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jDovernment 
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SESSIONAL PAPERS 






VOLUME D 



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FIFTH SESSION OF THE TWELFTH PARLIAMENT 



OF THE 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



SESSION 1915 






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VOJ^UME L. 




i;:^2T60T 



5 George V. 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1015 



ALPHABETICAL LSfDEX 



TO TDE 



SESSIONAL PAPERS 



OF THE 



PARLIAMENT OF CANADA 



FIFTH SESSION, TWELFTH PARLIAMENT, 1015. 



Abercorn, Quebec — re number, salaries of 

employees at Customs port of in 1911.. 180 

Agriculture — Report of the Minister of 
for year ended March 31, 1914 15 

Agricultural Instruction Act — Report on 

for 1913-14 93 

Agricultural Instruction Act — Return re 
arrangements between Government and 
Provinces 93a 

Agricultural Instruction Act — Correspon- 
dence between Dr. C. C. James, J. C. 
Chapais and Provinces re 93 L 

American citizen — re killing of, and shoot- 
ing 'another by Militia in Lake Erie, 
etc 143 

Antigonish Harbour — re dredging at since 

1912, etc 164 

Armoury at Amher.st, N.S. — re construc- 
tion of, etc 89 

Archives — Report of work of for year 

1913 29i> 

Astronomer Chief — Report of for year 

ending March 31 25(1 

Atlantic Ocean Freight Rates — Documents 
re from Nova Scotia to Dept. of Trade 
and Commerce, since August, 1914.. 267 

Auditor General's Report 3 Vols. — I't.s. 

A to L. ; M to V ; V to Z 1 



Baker Lake, N.B. — re correspondence be- 
tween Dept. of Marine and Fishery 
Overseer at 297 

Barracks Property, Shelburne, N.S. — re 

purchase of by Government 273 

Bannatyne, R. — re copies of documents 
respecting cancellation of entry for N. 
W. } section of land in section 24, 
township 35, range 18, west of 2nd 
meridian 104 

79240—1 



B 

Belanger, Theophile — Correspondence re 
claims made by the detention of bag- 
gage, etc 254 

Belgium — Communication from Consul 
General of re protest of against German 
Chancery, etc 233 

Bluff Head, Yarmouth Co., N.S. — re re- 
pairs and extension of breakwater at. 186 

Bonds and Securities — Detailed state- 
ment of since January 21, 1914 102 

Boots — Report of Board of Officers on, 
as supplied to Canadian force 91 

Boots, ankle — Showing how many firms 
ordered from, number of, etc 117 

Bow River Power and Storage Investi- 
gation, seasons of 1911-12-13 25e 

Brownlee, T. A. — re medical supplies pur- 
chased from by Government since July 
1, 1914 261 

Bicycles — re number of firms and persons 
from whom Government ordered since 
July 1, 1914 225 

C 

Canadian Pacific Railway: — 

Average cost per mile from inception 
to date, etc., also average rental, etc. 46 

Copy of agreement between Govern- 
ment and re special grant respecting 
irrigation system in Albirta 98 

Re lands sold by during year ended 

September 30, 1914 106 

Re Copies of O. in C. re required under 
Resolution passed in 1882, since last 

return 115 

Canadian Northern Railway Co. : — 

Return showing total bond issue of, 
and affiliated companies, cost to date 
of construction of lines composing 
system, etc 79 

Copies of Reports of Committee of 
Privy Council re advances made to, 
and also G.T.P. Ry. Co., &tc 190 



5 George V. 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1915 



Canada Cycle and Motor Co. — Relating 

to tires purchased by Government from 180 

Canadian Car and Foundry Co. of Am- 
herst, N.S. — re cost of preparing for 
military purposes, etc 155 

Capitally convicted persons in Canada — 

Statistics from 1867 to Feb. 1914.. .. 53 

Caraquet and Tracadie — re tenders re- 
ceived for mail service between.. .. 191 

Carslake Hotel — re purchase of for Post 

OfRce purposes 218 

Census of Canada, 1911— Agriculture, 

Volume IV B 

Chance Harbour and Trenton, Pictou Co. 

N.S. — re mail contract 16'i 

Churchill and Port Nelson, Ports of — re 

plans, reports, and soundings of . . . . 70 

Civil Service List of Canada, for year, 

1914 30 

Civil Service Commission — Annual Re- 
port of for year ended August 31, 1914. 31 

Coal imported into Alberta, Saskatche- 
wan and Manitoba from U. S. in 1914 
— duties, etc 96 

"Coasting Voyages" — respecting such 
as defined in Canada Shipping Act 
since 1SS6 214 

Commander Lieut. — Lieutenant Comman- 
der Engineer, and Lieutenant Com- 
mander, R.C.N.V.R.. Navj' 43a 

Conciliation and Investigation — Report 
of Registrar of Board of, year ended 
March 31, 1914 36a 

Cotton Shirts — re names of firms or per- 
sons from whom purchased by Govt, 
since July 1, 1914 260o 

Criminal Statistics for year 1913 17 

Customs — Report of Department of for 
year ended March 31, 1914 11 



Dairy and Cold Storage Commissioner — 
Report of for year ended March 31, 
1914 15a 

Dartmouth and Dean's, P. O. Branch of 
I.e. Ry. — Names of persons from whom 
lands have been bought, etc 251 

Demarcation of Meridian of 141st Degree 
West Longitude — Report of Commis- 
sioners, »-c 97 

Destructive Insect and Pest Act — Regu- 
lations under 92 

Dismissals : — 

Avard, Fredk.. of I.C.R 82 

Arbuckle, Isaac, foreman carpenter on 

I.C.R. at Pictou. N.S 244 

Blais, Alex., L^vis, Que. — Customs offi- 
cer at Bradore Bay 240 

Bruce, Wiswell — Sectionman at Stel- 

larton, N.S. on I.C.R 198 

Brennan, Jas., fireman, I.C.R. at Stel- 

larton, N.S 112 

Bonnyman, Alfred H. — Postmaster at 

Mattatal Lake, N.S 204 

Case, W. A. — Govt. Quarantine Service 

Halifax, N.S 80 

Carter, Warren, of I.C.R 82 

Cyr, Emile, Postmaster at St. Hermas, 

Co. of Two Mountains 275 

Day, Jos., of Little Bras D'Or, N.S... 292 
Dion, Ulric, Lightkeeper at St. Clias. 

de Caplan, Quebec 58 

Employees — dismissed, resigned, desert- 
ed to date, etc., from Oct. 10, 1911... 85 



Dismissals — Continued. 
Employees — dismissed, resigned, desert- 
ed to date, etc., from Oct. 10, 1911.. 85a 
Employees^dismissed, resigned, desert- 
ed to date, etc., from Oct 10, 1911.. 85b 
Employees — dismissed, resigned, desert- 
ed to date, etc., from Oct. 11, 1911.. 85c 
Employees — dismissed, resigned, desert- 
ed to date, etc., from Oct. 10, 1911.. 85d 
Eniplovees- — dismissed and appointed 

in P.E.L since Oct. 10, 1911, to date. 86 
Humphries, A. E.. Inspector of Immi- 
grations, Lethbridge, Alta 132 

Hutchinson, Leonard, Chief Keeper, 

Dorchester Penitentiary 181 

Hurlbert, T. P., Postmaster, Springdale, 

Yarmouth Co., N.S 208 

Higginbotham, Ed.wd. N., Postmaster, 

Lethbridge, Alta 274 

Ingraham, H. W., Asst. Registrar of 

alien enemies, Sydney, C.B 157 

Lariviere, Mr. — Dominion Lands Agent 

at Girouard 100 

Mallet. Mr. — Captain of lifeboat station 

at Cheticpjmp, N.S 159 

Marshall, Chas. H. — Postmaster at 

Nanton, Alta 211 

Medicine Hat, and McLeod — dismissals 

and appts. in present constituencies 

of from 1896 to present date 296 

McGibbon, A. R. — Customs Service, 

Lethbridge, Alta 108 

McKenzie, Dr. John — M. D. to Indians 

of Pictou Co., N.S 160 

Postmaster at Johnstown, Richmond 

Co., N.S 62 

Postmaster at St. Romuald, Que. . . . 105 
Pipes, Brown — Customs service Leth- 
bridge, Alta.. .; 108 

Shelburne Co., N.S. : — 

J. V. Smith of (Wood Harbour) ; 
John H. Lyons, Barrington Pas- 
sage ; Wm. L. Smith, Baccaro ; E. 
D. Smith. Shag Harbour ; J. A. 
Orechia, Woods Harbour 139 

J. C. Morrison, Shelburne ; Albert 
Mahaney, Churchover ; W. L. Smith, 
Baccaro, N.S. ; J. A. Arechia. 
Lower Wood Harbour, and J. C. 

Morrison, Shelburne, N.S 139o 

Thomas, John, Postmaster at Ham- 

monds Plain, N.S 205-205o 

Thomson, W. M., Postmaster at Fort 

Qu'Appelle, Sask 244 

Dominion Police Force — Statement relat- 
ing to for year 1914 69 

Dominion Trust Company— documents re 
incorporation of, etc 121 

Dominion Trust Company respecting cer- 
tain Act passed by Legislature of B.C., 
relating to 12ro 

Dominion Lands Survey Act, O. in C. 
from Dec. 13, to January 15, relating 
to 128 

Dominion Lands Survey Act, O. in C. 

from January 1914 to February 1915. 128o 

Dominion Lands within 40 mile Ry. Belt 

in B.C.— O. in C. in 1914 re 12Sb 

Dominion Lands — 40 mile Ry. Belt B.C. — 
O. in C. re between Dec. 1913, and Jan. 
15, 1915 128c 

Drill Shed or armoury at Inverness, In- 
verness Co., N.S. — Correspondence re . . 125 

Duck Mountain Timber Reserve — docu- 
ments re placing of settlers on home- 
steads of, etc 259 



5 George V. 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1915 



E 

Estimates required for service of Domin- 
ion, year ending March 31, 1916.. 3 

Estimates Supplementary for service of 
Dominion, year ending March 31, 1915. 4 

Estimates Further Supplementary for 
service of Dominion, year ending March 
31, 1915 5 

Estimates Further Supplementary for 
service of Dominion, year ending March 
31, 1916 5a 

Edmundston, N. B. — Clair N.B., and 
Green River, N.B., re customs money 
collected at for last five years . . . . 137 

Elections — By, held during year 1914.. 18 

Empress of Ireland — Report of Royal 

Commission, and evidence relating to. 21b 

Engineer Officers — Regulations re classi- 
fication of 43b 

" Eurelva," Str. — names of sailors em- 
ployed on, years 1910, 1911. 1912, 1913. 78 

European War — Memo, respecting work 
of Dept. of Militia and Defence re 
1914-15 75 

Exchequer Court of Canada — Rules, or- 
ders, etc., made in Feb. 1915 54a 

Exchequer Court of Canada — Rules, or- 
ders, etc 54 

Experimental Farm — Report of Director 
of, etc., for year ending March 31, 
1914.. 16 

Express Companies — agreements entered 
into between Depts. of Fisheries and 
Railway, etc 59 

Express Statistics of the Dominion of 

Canada, year ended June 30, 1914.. 20e 

Experimental Farms, Report of Director 
of, for year ending March 31, 1914, 
Vol. II 16 

External Affairs — Report of Secy, of 
State for, for year ended March 31, 
1S14 29a 

F 

Farrington, J. F. — B. H. Smith, and H. 

C. Dash — re moneys paid to, etc. ... 56 

Ferguson, Thos. R. — Report of re Blood 

Indian Reserve, etc 266 

Ferguson, Thos. R. — Return re Riding 

Forest Reserve, etc 268 

Ferguson, Thos. R. — Copies O. in C. — P. C. 
1109 and P. C. 1589 — re appointment 
of as commissioner 291 

Ferguson, Thos. R. — Report of re " Cra- 
ven Dam," Walter »Scott, Dieut. Gov- 
ernor Brown, and J. G. Turriff 290 

Ferguson, Thos. R. — Report of Grazing 
Ranch No. 2422, J. G. Turriff, A. J. 
Adamson and J. D. McGregor 289 

Ferguson, Thos. R. — Timber Berths 107 
and llOS, W. H. Nolan, A. W. Eraser, 
and J. G. Turriff 288 

Ferguson, Thos. R. — Aylwin Irrigation 
Tract. E. A. Robert and J. B. Mc- 
Gregor 287 

Re Bulletin Co., Hon. F. Oliver and G. T. 

P. Railway Co 286 

Ferguson, Thos. R. — Southern Alta. Land 
Co., Ltd., Grand Forks Cattle Co., J. D. 
McGregor, Arthur Hitchcock, etc.... 285 

Ferguson. Thos. R. — Blood Indian Reserve 

and Frank Pedley 284 

Fergu.son, Thos. R.— Kananaskis Coal Co. 
Ltd.. Howard Douglas, Geo. E. Hunter, 
Walter Garrett, etc 283 

Ferguson. Thos. R. — Timber Berths SSOJ 
and 528, H. Douglas, R. E. A. Leach, 
D. J. McDonald, etc 282 

79240— li 



Ferguson, Thos. R. — re (o) Dominion 
Lands; re (b) Timber and Mineral 
Lands, etc. ; ?-e (c) Water Power and 
rights; id) Indian Lands and Indian 

Reserves 281 

Report of to investigate all matters re 
Dominion Lands, Indian Lands, Re- 
serves, Water Powers, etc., since July. 
1S96, etc 281 

Foster, Wm. Gore, of Dartmouth, N.S., re 
appointment of as Inspector of Indian 
Reserves 176 

Fenian Raid Volunteer Bounty — re 
names, addresses, etc., to whom paid 
in Co. of Yarmouth. N.S 145 

Fenian Raid Volunteer Bounty — re 
names, addresses, etc., to whom paid 
in Co. of Guysborough, N.S 146 

Fenian Raid Volunteer Bounty — re 
names, addresses, etc., to whom paid 
in Co. of Antigonish. N.S 150 

Fenian Raid Volunteer Bounty — re 
names, addresses, etc., to whom paid 
in Co. of Pictou, N.S 162 

Fenian Raid Volunteer Bounty — re 
names, addresses, etc., to whom paid 
in Co. of Pictou, N.S 162a 

Fenian Raid Volunteer Bounty — re 
names, addresses, etc., to whom paid 
in Co. of Inverness, N.S 226 

Ferguson, G. Howard — re Investigations 
held by ; also fees paid to since Oct., 
1911 83 

Ferry service, between Halifax and Dart- 
mouth, N.S. — re establishment of. . . . 215 

Ferguson, Thos. R. — Report of re Indian 
Lands. Jas. A. Smart, F. Pedley and 
W. T. WTiite 266 

Fisher, Ward, Shelburne, N.S. — Fishery 
Inspector — re amounts of money paid 
to years 1912. 1913 144 

Fisheries in tidal waters — re proposed 
transfer of from Provincial to Federal 
control 228 

Fisheries in Quebec Province — re control 
of — also List of licenses granted by 
either Govts, for present year 230 

Flannel shirt.s — re number of firms or 
persons from whom Govt, purchased 
same since July 1, 1914 260 

Flynn, Wm. — re Instructions sent to re- 
garding investigations re employees of 
Marine and Fisheries in Bonaventure 
Co., Que., etc 57 

Food-stuffs — exportations to foreign coun- 
tries other than United Kingdom.. .. 120 

Forest Reserves and Park Act — Orders 
in Council re (between Dec. 1913 and 
Jan. 14) 127 

Forest Reserves and Park Act — Orders 
in Council re between May, 1914 and 
July,' 1914 127a 

Forage Caps — re number of firms, eto.. 
from whom Govt, ordered same since 

July 1. 1914 237 

Freight rates charged years 1912-13 on 
wheat by C.P. Ry.'s, lines, Allan lines, 
and Canadian Northern Ry.'s lines 
from Canadian Ports to those of Unit- 
ed Kingdom 81 

Fresh Fish re transportation of between 

ports in N.S. and United States.. .. 153 

3 



5 George V. 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1915 



G 

Geographic Board Report of for year 1914 25(1 

Georgian Bay Canal — respecting peti- 
tions, documents, etc., re construction 
of from Sept. 21, 1911 72o 

Geological Survey — Report of for year 

1913 26 

Georgian Bay Canal — Return re propos- 
als to Government for construction of, 
etc '2 

Gingras, J. E., re appointment of as post- 
master St. Romuald, Que 209 

Governor General's Warrants, etc., issued 
since last session of Parliament, 1914- 
1915 64 

Goverimient offices — re answer in Han- 
sard page 161, respecting furnishing of 
same 193 

Grain — re results of all grain per grade 
in terminal elevators in Port Arthur 
and Fort William in 1912, 1913, 1914.. 235 

Grand Etang — re conduct of Postmaster 

at since appointment at to date.. .. 210 

Green Harbour and vicinity — re regula- 
tion of fish traps in 213 

Gutelius, F. P. — re naturalization of, etc. 141 

H 

Heard, David, and Sons — re . mail con- 
tract with between Whitby and G. T. 
Ry. Station 189 

Highwater, Que. — re number of, salaries, 

etc., employees at customs port of.. 179 

Homestead lands in Saskatchewan — re 

fractional areas of sold in 1914 192 

Hopper, Newton — re suspension of as 

Conductor on I.C.R., etc 197 

Horses — Valcartier Camp — re names of 
parties purchasing same — prices paid, 
etc 272 

Hudson Bay or James Bay — re number 
of ships chartered by Goa^. to go there 
since Oct. 1911 148 

Hudson Bay or James Bay — re number 
of ships employed by Railway Dept., 
amt. expended, etc 148a 

Hydrographic Survey — British Columbia. 

Report of for year 1913 25/ 



Intercolonial Railway : — 

Tenders re purchase of cars for in 

years 1912-1913 45 

Documents re purchase of cars for in 

years since July 1, 1914.. 45o 

Freight revenue for certain stations on 

for years 1913-1914 47 

Names of Staff in several Depts. at 

Moncton — Salaries, etc 48 

Return asking if official statement re 
wages to be paid to officials absent 
on active service, etc 113 

Return re the supplying of ice for same 
at Port Mulgrave, N.S 118 

Return re sale of hay on lands belong- 
ing to in Parish of Bic, Rimcuski 
Co 196 

Return re Inward tonnage freight, and 
outward do, January, 1915 199 



Imperial Conference — Correspondence 
since January 1, 1915 as to calling of 
re Naval Defence 149 

Indian Affairs — Report of Department of 
for year ending March 31, 1914.. .. 27 

Indian Reserve, Restigouche, Que. — Docu- 
ments, etc., re 77 

Insurance — Report of Superintendent of 
for year 1914 8 

Insurance — Abstract of statement of for 
year ended December 31, 1914 9 

Inverness Co., N.S., re amounts expended 
by Dept. of Public Works in, from 1896 
to 1915.. 187 

Inland Revenues : — 

Reports, Returns and Statistics of for 
year ended March 31, 1915. 

Parti. — Excise 12 

Part II. — Inspection of Weights and 

Measures, Gas and Electricity.. .. 13 
Part III. — Adulteration of Food.. .. 14 

International Purity Congress^ — Report of 
Government Delegates attending. . . . 142 

Interior — Annual Report of Department 
of year ending March 31, 1914, Vol. I. 25 

Interior, re appointments to Dept. of, in 
Constituencies of Medicine Hat and 
McLeod — names of, etc 241 

Irrigation Act — O. in C. passed between 
Dec. 1913, and January, 1915, re. .. 129 

Isle Perrot — re Construction of bridge to 
connect with mainland at Vaudreuil.. 1S2 

Island of Montreal — re Construction of 
bridge between and mainland at Vau- 
dreuil lS2o 



J 

Jordan Breakwater, Shelburne Co., N.S. 

— re repairs, etc., to same 185 

Judges — re appointment of since Febru- 
ary, 1913 51 

Justice — Report of Minister of re Peni- 
tentiaries, etc 34 



K 

Kit-bags, re purcliase of by Govt, since 

July 31, 1914 262 



Labour, Report of Department of for 
year ended March 31, 1914 36 

Lakes of Two Mountains. St. Francis and 
St. Louis — re rescinding of prohibition 
of net fishing in, 1915 231 

Lethbridge — re supplies, etc., for field 

batterj' being trained at, etc 163 

Librarians of Parliament — Joint Report 

of 40 

Liquors spirituous. c'gTrs. cis.Trelt€s and 
tobacco — quantity of taken out of bo)id 
in Aug., 1914 at Ports in Dominion.. 236 



5 George V. 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1915 



I. 

List of Shipping for Canada up to De- 
cember 31, 1914 22 

Loans — re correspondence on subject of 
— from Imperial Govt, to Canadian 
Govt 156 

Lobsters — re licenses to pack issued by 
Govt., issued between Jan. 1, 1912, 
and Jan. 2. 1913 280 

Lower Burlington, N.S. — re construction 
of wharf at 184 

Lower Wood Harbour, N.S. — re proposed 

wharf at 220 

Lumber Supply to Militia Dept. re train- 
ing Camps at Medicine Hat and Cal- 
gary 270 

Lynch, Margaret — re expropriation of 
lands belonging to in Fredericton, N. 
B., by I.C.R 200 



M 

Mails : — 

Carrying of between Grand River Falls 
and Grand River, N.S 61 

Relating to contract between Armagh 

Station and Mailloux, Bellechasse Co. 133 

Relating to documents connected with 
tenders for service between Low 

Point and Creignish Station, 1913-14. 134 

Relating to contract between New Ross 
and Vaughan's P.O., Water\-ille, N.S. 135 

Relating to contract between Mabou 

and Whycocomagh, N.S 136 

Relating to contract between Chance 

Harbour and Trenton, N.S 167 

Relating to contract awarding of at 
Maria Capes, Bonaventure Co., in 
1914 168 

Relating to contract for rural delivery 
in Township of Dundee, Huntingdon, 
Que 169 

Relating to proposed service between 
Lower South River and South Side 
Harbour, N.S 170 

Relating to carriage of between Canso 
and Guysborough, docuiiients re 
since 1914 171 

Relating to route, proposed change in 
from Inverness Ry. Station to Mar- 
garee Harbour, N.S 173 

Relating to rural route from River 
John to Hedgeville, I'ictou Co., N.S. 232 

Relating to contract for the carry- 
ing of between Guysborough and 
Erinville, N.S 243 

Relating to contract for the Antig- 

onish-Sherbrooke mail .service, etc. . 245 

Relating tc> proposed rural delivery be- 
tween Pictou and Saltsprings, N.S.. 246 

Relating to proposed rural service from 
Bridgetown to Granville Ferry, An- 
napolis Co., N.S 247 

Relating to names, etc., of rural car- 
riers in Counties of Chicoutimi and 
Saguenay and carriers, etc., for St. 
Prime and St. Louis de Metabet- 
chouan 276 

Marine and Fisheries — Annual Report of 

for 1913-1914 — Marine 21 



M 

Marine and Fisheries — Annual Report of 
for 1913-1914 — Fisheries 39 

Marine Biology — 1911-1914 — Part I.. .. 39b 

Marine and Fisheries — Supplement to for 
year 1913-1914, "Steamboat Inspec- 
tion Report" 23 

Margaree Lobster Hatchery — correspond- 
ence re collecting of spawn for, etc.. 95 

Massonville, Que., re number of, salary, 

names of officials at Customs port of. 178 

Mate in R.C. Na^T — establishment of 
rank in 43 

Marois, G. A. — re appointment of to Cus- 
toms office at Quebec 209 

Medicine Hat, City of — re money spent 
for Government relief — to whom given, 
etc 138 

Militia Council, Report of for vear ended 

March 31, 1914 ' 35 

Militia General Orders promulgated to 
period between Nov. 25, 1913, and Dec. 
24, 1914 73 

Medical Supplies purchased from T. A. 

Brownlee, Ottawa City 261 

Mines Branch — Report of for calendar 

year 1913 2Ga 

Miscellaneous Unforeseen Expenses — 
Statement of from August, 1914, to 
February, 1915 65 

Moncton, N.B. — re names, salaries, etc., 
of employees at — also names of those 
superannuated, etc 250 

Montgomery, Geo. A., late — re value, etc., 
of estate of, etc 5? 

iVIotor-trucks — re number sent with first 
contingent — from Avhom purchased, etc. 119 

Motor Cycles — number of firms or per- 
sons from whom Gox-t. has ordered 
same, since July 1, 1914 227 



Mc 

MoKeown, A. H. — re appointment of to 
Immigration service at Lethl)ridge, 
Alta 131 

McDonald, \V. B. — re medical supplies, 
and other goods purchased from by 
Govt, since Aug. 1, 1914 265 



N 



Naval Service — Report of Department of 
for year ending March 31, 1914 38 

Naval Service — Orders in Council re 
Rates of pay, separation anoyances, 
etc 44 

New Brunswick and P. E. I. Railway — 
Correspondence re purchase of 202 

Newspapers in Canada — List of in which 
advertisements have been inserted by 
the Govt, between Oct. 10, 1911, and 
present date 84 

Newspapers in Canada — List of in which 
advcrtisemf nts have been inserted by 
Govt, between Oct. 10, 1906, up to Oct. 
1911 g4a 



5 George V. 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1915 



N 

Nickel — Correspondence re control of ex- 
portation of, etc 74 

North Sydney — Port of — re names, ton- 
nage, registry, etc., of all foreign fish- 
ing vessels, in 1913 50 



DflHcers commissioned to 17th N. S. Regt. 
at Valcartier before sailing for Eng- 
land 151 

Oliver equipment — Number of firms and 
individuals ordered from since July 1, 
1914 175 

Ottawa Improvement Commission — Re- 
ceipts and expenditures of to March 31, 
1914 67 

Overseas Contingents — purchase respect- 
ing — also Army contracts under O. in 
C, re 123 



Parry Island re advertisements and docu- 
ments connected with purchasing, etc. 99 

Paradis, Telesphore, of L6vis, correspon- 
dence, etc., re claim of against I.C.R. . 277 

Pensionary Assistance — re providing of 
for disabled officers and men on active 
service 206 

Pelletier, Hon. and W. B. Nantel, Hon. 

letters of resignation of, etc 90 

Pictou-Mulgrave-Cheticamp Steamship 

route — Correspondence, etc., re 76 

Phinney's Cove and Young's Cove, An- 
napolis Co., N.S., re breakwater at.. 219 

Port Daniel West — re Lobster hatchery 
at season of 1914 212 

Portneuf, Que. — re amount of money ex- 
pended by Govt, from July, 1896 to 
1911 140 

Post Offices: — 

Relating to site of at St. Lazare Vil- 
lage, Co. of BcUechasse, Que.. .. 63 
Post Offices in Nova Scotia re amount 
of money sent through in past five 
years, etc 107 

Post Offices in Counties of N.S. — re rent 
• allowances, etc 60 

Postmaster General — Report of for year 

ended March 31, 1914 24 

Post Offices — Total number, salaries, etc., 
of employees at — Montreal, Toronto, 
Winnipeg, Halifax, Quebec, St. John, 
N.B., and Vancouver 172 

Port Hawkesbury — re purchase of a site 

for public building at 222 

Prince Edward Island Ry. — Names, posi- 
tions, and salaries of appointees to, 
from 1912 to 1914 49 

Prince Edward Island Ry. — Names, ad- 
dre.sses, etc., salaries of appointees 
from 1911, to present date 49(i 

Prisoners of War in Canada — Number of 
since war, names of places of deten- 
tion, etc Ill 



Prisoners of War in Canada — Number of, 

cost of each detention camp, etc.. .. Ilia 

Prospect, Halifax Co., N.S. — re construc- 
tion of extension to breakwater at. . . . iii. 

Public Accounts for year ended March 

31, 1914 2 

Public Works — Report of Minister of for 
year ended March 31, 1914 19 

Public Printing and Stationery — Report 

of for year ended March 31, 1914 32 



Quebec Board of Trade — Copies of ah 
papers between, and Dept. of Rys. and 
Canals re trains in section of N.T. Ry., 
between Cochrane and Quebec City. . 114 

Quebec Oriental Ry. and Atlantic, Quebec 
and Western Ry. — re tariff on flour 
shipments 203 



R 

Radiotelegraph Regulation 106, etc.. .. 42 

Radiotelegraph Regulation amendment to 

Nos. 103 and 104 42 

Regiment 17th of N.S. — alleged ill treat- 
bent of at Salisbury Plain 154 

Refund — statement of re Customs Duties, 

for year ended March 31, 1914.. .. 126 

Remount Commissioners — re appointment 

of — general instructions, etc 116 

Regina City of — re properties acquired 
by Govt, in since Sept. 21, 1911.. .. 183 

Regina City — re properties acquired by 

Govt, since Sept. 21, 1911 217 

Royal Northwest Mounted Police — Re- 
port of for year 1914 28 

Royal Society of Canada — Statement of 
affairs of up to April 30, 1914 63 

Railways and Canals — Report of Dept. 
of for period from April 1, 1913, to 
March 31, 1914 20 

Railways, Canal Statistics, for season of 

1914 20a 

Railways Statistics of Canada, year end- 
ed June 30, 1914 206 

Railway Commissioners — ^With Report of 
Board of, for year ending March 31, 
1914 20c 

Railways and Canals — re tenders for ice 
for I.C.R. at Port Mulgrave, N.S 118 

Railways proposed line of from Orange- 
dale to Cheticamp, N.S 248 

Railway Offices at Moncton, N.B. — re 
names of, and salaries paid to em- 
ployees at 250 

Railways — relating to construction of in 
Co. of Guysborough, N.S 253 



S 



St. Lawrence River — Report of Commis- 
sioners to investigate water levels of, 
etc IM 



5 George V. 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1915 



S 

St. John Valley Railway — Correspond- 
ence re operation of by I.C.R. since 
July, 1914 257 

Stream Measurements for calendar year, 

1914 25c 

Sackville, N.B — re roadway to Public 
wharf at, and spur line from I.C.R. 
lO said wharf 258 

Saddles — re number of ordered — names 
of firms, individuals furnishing same.. 207 

Sandford, Yarmouth Co. — re breakwater 
at and work on same during 1914. . . . 188 

Salmon Hatchery — North Margaree — op- 
eration of, etc 88 

Salmon Pond — re removal of from " Flat 

Lands" to New Mills. N.B 279 

Schroder , Udo F. — re application for 
grazing lease township 40-41, R. 7, 
West of 3rd Meridian, Sask 161 

Scoles, C. R., New Carlisle, Que. — re pay- 
ment of balance of subsidy to 201 

Seager, Chas. — Commissioner investigat- 
ing charges against public officials — 
reports of, etc 87 

Secretary of State — Report of the, for 
year ended March 31, 1914 29 

Seed Grain distribution — re applications 

from Prairie Provinces tor same. . . . 147 

Separation allowances re soldiers of first 

contingent, etc 124 

Separation allowances re soldiers asking 
for permission to marry and placing of 
wives on list 124n 

Service shirts — re number of firms or 
persons from whom 00%^;. bought same 
since July 1, 1914 260b 

Shareholders in chartered banks — List of 

as on December 31, 1914 6 

Shellfish Fisher>' Commission of 1913 — 
Correspondence of between Dept. of 
Marine and Fisheries 94 

Ships, British — Copy of O. in C. restrict- 
ing transfer of, etc 165 

Shippegan Gully, Co. of Gloucester, N. 
B. — -re pay sheet in connection with re- 
pairs to same, Oct. 1914 : .. 224 

Shovels — re reports respecting purchase 
of 25,000, per O. in C. P. 2302, Sept. 4, 
also further purchases of same. . . . 271 

Smith, B. F. — re cutting of lumber by on 
Tobique Indian Reserve, since March 
12, 1914 177 

Southampton Railway Co. — Report of 
Royal Commission re, etc 41 

Stevenson, S. J. and Waverley Pharmacy 
— re medical supplies purchased from 
by Govt, since Aug. 1, 1914 263 

Steamers John L. Cann and Westport III. 

re rewards to officers and crews of, etc. 239 

Storm Signals at Shippegan, N.B. — re 
transfer of, etc 152 

Submarines — re purchase of by Canadian 
Govt, by O. in C. dated August 7, 1914, 
etc 158 

Submarines Supplementary purchase of 
by Canadian Govt, by O. in C. dated 
August 7, 1914, etc 158a 



S 

Submarines— Further purchase of by 
Canadian Go\-t. by O. in C. dated Aug. 
7, 1914, etc 158b 

Superannuation and Retiring Allowances 
— Year ended 31st December, 1914.. 66 

Subsidies, Railway, paid in Co. of Inver- 
ness, N.S. to date 194 

Sweetman, J. Herbert, Customs officer. 
Port Daniel, Que., re charges against 
etc 242 



lelephonc Statistics for year ended June 

30, 1914 

Telegraph Statistics for year ended June 

30, 1914 

Three Rivers ; — 

Number of employees and salaries paid 
to at Post Office on Sept. 21, 1911 ; 
number of employees and salaries 
paid to at Post Offive a tpresent date ; 
Customs Dept. at, number of em- 
ployees on Sept. 21, 1911, and at pre- 
sent date ; Inland Revenue Dept. at 
employees on Sept. 21, 1911, and at 
present date ; Public Works on the 
St Maurice, Co. of Champlain, number 
of employees on in 1911-12 ; Public 
Works on the St. Maurice, Co. of 
Champlain, number of employees in 
since that date ; Employees on such 
work dismissed in Nov. 1914, and 
Jan. 1915 — Wild6 LavallS, Pierre 
Thi\-ierge, Joseph Paquin, sr., Jos. 
Paquin, jr., and Athanase Gelinas. 
Clerks, etc 

Titles, numbers, and cost of all books and 
pamphlets issued by King's Printer to 
March 31, 1914 

Topographical Surveys Branch for year 
1912-13 

Transcontinental Railway — Report of 
Commissioners of for year ended March 

31, 1914 

Transcontinental Railway — Interim Re- 
port of Commissioners of for nine 
months ended Dec. 31, 1914 

Transcontinental Railway — re freight 
rates of N. B. portion of, and removal 
of Y at Wapski, Victoria, N.B 



20d 
20/ 



Trade and Commerce : — 

Part I — Canadian Trade (Imports and 
Exports) 

Part II — Canadian Trade — 1 

France 

Germany (. 

United States j 

United Kingdom J 

Part III — Canadian Trade, except — 

France 

Germany 

United Kingdom 

United States 

Part IV — Miscellaneous Information.. 

Part V — Report of Board of Grain 
Cominis-sioners for Canada 



278 

71 
25l» 

37 

37a 

256 

10 
10a 

10ft 

10c 
lOd 



5 George V. 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1915 



Trade and Commerce — Continued. 
Part VI — Subsidized Steamships Ser- 
vice lOe 

Part VII — Trade of Foreign Countries 

— Treaties and Conventions 10/ 

Trade Unions — Annual Return respect- 
ing 101 

Trawlers, Steam — re clearing of from 

Ports on Atlantic Seaboard of Canada. 269 

Transports hired conveyances of troops 
and material to England — names, own- 
ers, etc 109 

Transport Wagons purchased for second 
and third contingents — number and 
from whom, etc 110 

Trois Pistoles, Pulp and Lumber Co. — re 

burning of buildings of, on I.C.R 249 

Trust Companies— re names of complying 
with Trust Companies Act of 1914.... 293 



U 



Unclaimed Balances ; Dividends unpaid, 

etc., prior to Dec. 31, 1913.. 7 

Underwear — re number of suits of — 
names and members of firms or per- 
sons from whom purchased by Govt, 
since July 1, 1914 264 

Uniforms, Soldiers — re number of firms, 
individuals ordered from since July 1, 
1914 174 



Vale Railway in Co. of Pictou, N.S. — re 

purchase or lease of since 1911.. .. 195 

Valcartier Camp — re lands taken pos- 
session of by Govt., etc 295 



Valcartier Camp — Horses at — names of 
parties purchasing same and prices 
paid, etc 272 

Veterinary Director General — Report of 

for year ended March 31, 1914.. .. 15b 



"W 



War Appropriation Act — Correspondence 
between Auditor General and Govt. — 
re expenditures under 122 

War Appropriation Act — Correspondence 
between Auditor General and Govt. — 
re expenditures under 122o 

Wakeham, Dr. Wm. — re report of re- 
specting losses in storms in Bale Cha- 
leur, etc., June, 1914 238 

Winter Shirts — re number of firms, per- 
sons from whom Govt, bought same 
since July 1, 1914 260o 

Wisewell, Bruce — re dismissal of, etc. . 198 

Wharves in Co. of Shelburne, N.S. — East 

Green Harbour and Gunning Cove. . . . 216 

Wheat — re copies of documents respect- 
ing removal of customs duties on, en- 
tering Canada, etc 103 

Wlieat, oats and barley — re quantity pur- 
chased by Govt, in 1914, for seed dis- 
tribution in West 234 

Windsor Branch, I.C.R. — re leasing or 

transfer of to C.P.R 252 

Wright, Pontiac and Labelle, Counties — 
of — re amounts of money expended 
since 1911 223 



Yukon Territory — Ordinances of for vear 

1914 55 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to S^essir.nal Pnpers. A. 1P15 



See also Alphabetical List, Page 1. 

LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS 

Arranged in Numerical Order, v:ith their titles at full length; the dates when Ordered 
and ivhen presented to the Houses of Parliament; fm name of ike Senator or 
Member who moved for each Sessional Paper, and whether it is ordered to he 
Printed or Not Printed. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME D. 

Fifth Census of Canada, 1911, — Agriculture, Volume IV. Presented by Hon. Mr. Foster, 
February 8, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessioyial papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 1. 

(This volume is bound in three parts). 

1. Report of the Auditor Generil for the year ended 31st March, 1914, Volume I, Parts A, B 

and A to L ; Volume II, Parts M to U ; Volume III, Parts V to Z. Presented by Hon. 
Mr. White, February 9, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2. 

2. The Public Accounts of Canada, for the fiscal year ended 31st March, 1914. Presented by 

Hon. Mr. White, February 9, 1915 Printed for distribution arid sessional papers. 

3. Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion for the year ending on 31st 

March, 1916. Presented by Hon. Mr. White, February 8. 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

4. Supplementary Estimates of sums reciuired for the service of the Dominion for the year end- 

ing on the 31st March, 1915. Presented by Hon. Mr. White, March 9, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

5. Further Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion for the 

year ending on the 31st March, 1915. Presented by Hon. Mr. White, March 27, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

5o. Further Supplementary Estimates for year ending 31st March, 1916. Presented by Hon. 
Mr. White, March 31, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 3. 

6. List of Shareholders in the Chartered Banks of the Dominion of Canada as on 31st Decem- 

ber, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. White. February 9, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 4. 

7. Report on certified cheques, dividends, unclaimed balances and drafts or bills of exchange 

remaining unpaid in Chartered Banks of the Dominion of Canada, forfi ve years and 
upwards prior to 31st December, 1913. Presented by Hon. Mr. White, April 10, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5. 

(This volume is bound in two parts). 

8. Report of Superintendent of Insurance for year 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Whito, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and iicssional papers. 

9. Abstract of Statement of Insurance Companies in Canada for year ended 31st December, 

1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Whrie, 1914. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

9 



George V. Alpliabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 6. 

10. Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce for the fiscal year ended 31st March. 

1914 : Part I. — Canadian Trade. Presented by Sir George Foster, 8th February, 191.5. 

Printed for distribution and sessioyial papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 7. 

lOa. Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce for the fiscal year ended 31st March, 
1914: Part II. — Canadian Trade with (1) France, (2) Germany, (3) United King- 
dom, and (4) United States. Presented by Sir George Foster, 8th February, 1915. 

Printed for distHbjition and sessional papers. 

10b. Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce for the fiscal year ended 31st March, 
1914: Part III. — Canadian Trade with foreign countries (except France, Germany, 
the United Kingdom, and United States.) Presented by Sir George Foster, 8th 
February, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessioyial papers. 

10c. Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce, for the fiscal year ended 31st March, 
1914, (Part IV, Miscellaneous Information.) Presented by Sir George Foster, March 
27, 1915 Pririted for disti'ibution and sessional papers. 

lOd. Report of the Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada. Presented by Sir Georgo 
Foster, 1914 Pri^ited for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 8. 

lOe. Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce for the fiscal year ending 31st March. 
1914. Part VI. — Subsidized Steamship Services, with statistics showing steamship 
traffic to 31st December, 1914, and Estimates for the fiscal year 1915-16. Presented by 
Sir George Foster, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

lOf. Report of Trade and Commerce for fiscal year ended 31st March, 1914. (Part VII. — 
Trade of Foreign Countries, Treaties and Conventions.) Presented by Sir George 
Foster, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9. 

11. Report of the Department of Customs for the year ended 3l3t March, 1914. Presented by 

Hon. Mr. Reid, February 11, 1915.. .. Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 10. 

12. 13, 14. Reports, Retui-ns and Statistics of the Inland Revenues of the Dominion of 

Canada, for the year ended 31st March, 1914 (Part I. — Excise). (Part II. — Inspec- 
tion of Weights and Measures. Gas and Electricity). (Part III. — Adulteration of 
Food). Presented by Hon. Mr. Blondin, March 1, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

15. Report of the Minister of Agriculture for the Dominion of Canada, for the year ended 31st 

March, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Burrell, February 8, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 11. 

(This volume is bound in two parts). 

15a. Report of the Dairy and Cold Storage Commissioner for the fiscal year ended 31st March, 
1014. (Dairying, Fruit, Extension of Markets and Cold Storage). Presented by Hon. 
Mr. Burrell, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

15b. Report of the Veterinary Director General for the year ending 31st March, 1915. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Burrell, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessioiial papers. 

16. Report of the Director and Officers of the Experimental Farms for the years ending 31st 

March, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Burrell, March 1, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 12. 

17. Criminal Statistics for the year ended 30th September, 1913. (Appendix to the Report 

of the Minister of Trade and Commerce for the year 1913.) Presented by Sir Georg* 
Foster, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

18. Return of By-elections for the House of Commons of Canada, held during the year 1914 

Presented by Hon. Mr. Speaker, March 12, 1915. 

Printed for dialribution and sessional papers. 

10 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 13. 

19. Report of the Minister of Public Works on the worlcs under his control for the fiscal year 

ended 31st March, 1914, Volume I. Presented by Hon. Mr. Rogers, February 8, 1915. 

Printed for distribution atid sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OP VOLUME 14. 

20. Annual Report of the Department of Railways and Canals, for the fiscal period from 1st 

April, 191.3, to 31st March, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, March 12. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers^ 

20a. Canal Statistics for the season of navigation, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, 9th 
April, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

20&. Railway Statistics of the Dominion of Canada, for the year ended 30th June, 1914. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, March 12, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 15. 

20c. Ninth Report of the Board of Railway Commissioners for Canada, for the year ending 
31st March, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, February 8, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

20d. Telephone Statistics of the Dominion of Canada, for the year ended 30th June, 1914. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, March 17, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessio7ial papers. 

20''. Express Statistics of the Dominion of Canada for year ended 30th June, 1914. Presented 
by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, 1915 Printed for distribution nad sessional papers. 

20/. Telegraph Statistics of the Dominion of Canada, for the year ended 30th Jurfe, 1914. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, March 17, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 16. 

21. Forty-seventh Annual Report of the Department of Marine and Fisheries, for the. year 

1913-1914 — Marine. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, February 8, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

21b. Report and evidence in connection with the Royal Commission appointed to investigate 
the disaster of the E)npress of Ireland. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, 1914. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUI/EE 17. 

22. List of Shipping issued by the Department of Marine and Fisheries, being a list of vessels 

on the registry books of the Dominion of Canada on 31st December, 1914. Presented 
by Hon. Mr. Hazen, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

23. Supplement to the Forty-seventh Annual Report of the Department of Marine and Fish- 

eries for the fiscal year 1913-14 — Steamboat Inspection Report. Presented by Hon. 
Mr. Hazen, March 3, 1915 Printed for distribution and scssio7ial papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 18. 

24. Report of the Postmaster General for the year ended 31st March, 1914. Presented by Hon. 

Mr. Casgrain, February 8, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 19. 

(This volume is bound in two parts). 

25. Annual Report of the Department of the Interior, for the fiscal year ending 31st March, 

1914. — Volume I. Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, March 8, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sesstmal papers. 
11 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 20. 

25o. Report of Chief Astronomer. Department of the Interior for year ending: 31st March, 1911. 
Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

25». Annual Report of the Topographical Surveys Branch of the Department of the Interipr. 
1912-13. Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, 1914. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

25c. Report of progress of stream measurements for calendar year of 1914. Presented by Hon. 
Mr. Roche, 1914 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 21. 

25d. Thirteenth Report of the Geographic Board of Canada for the year ending 30th June, 
1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

25e. Report on Bow River Water Power and Storage Investigations, seasons 1911-1912-1913. 
Presented by Hon. Mr. Burrell, 1915.. ..Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

25/. Report of the British Columbia Hydrographic Survey for the calendar year 1913. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Burrell, 1915 Printed for distribiUion and sessio7ial papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 1^2. 

26. Summary Report of the Geological Survey, Department of Mines, for the calendar year 

1913. Presented, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

26a. Summary Report of the Mines Branch for the calendar year 1913. Presented. 1914. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 23. 

27. Report of the Department of Indian Affairs for the year ended Slst March, 1914. Pre- 

sented by Hon. Mr. Roche, 11th February, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessioiial papers. 

28. Report of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police, 1914. Presented by Hon. Sir Robert 

Borden, 8th February, 1915 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 24. 

29. Report of the Secretary of Stztte of Canada for the year ended Slst March, 1914. >'re- 

sented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 9th February, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

29b- Report of the work of tlie Public Archives for the year 1913. Presented, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

30. The Civil Service List of Canada, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 9th February, 

1915 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 26. 

31. Sixth Annual Report of the Civil Service Commission of Canada for the year ended Slst 

August, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 19th March, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

32. Annual Report of the Department of Public Printing and Stationery for the year ended 

31st March, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre. 6th April, iniij 

Pri7Ued for distribution and sessional papers. 

33. Report of the Secretary of State for External Affairs for the year ended Slst March, 1914. 

Presented by Sir Robert Borden, 18th February, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessiouil peepers. 

34. Report of the Minister of Justice as to Penetentiaries or Canada, for the fiscal year ended 

Slst March, 1914. Presented, 1915 Princed for distribution and sessional papers. 

35. Report of the Militia Council for the Dominion of Canada, for the fiscal year ending Slst 

March, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hughes, 10th February, igi."-). 

Printed for distribution and sessional papera 

12 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Secsioiial Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 26. 

36. Report of the Department of Labour for the fiscal year ending 31st March, 1914. Pre- 

sented by Hon. Mr. Crothers, 8th February, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

36a. Seventh Report of the Registrar of Boards of Conciliation and Investigation of the pro- 
ceedings under "The Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907," for the fiscal year 
ending 31st March, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Crothers, Sth February, 1915. 

Printed for distribution arid sessional papers. 

37. Tenth Annual Report of the Commissioners of the Transcontinental Railway, for the year 

ended 31st March, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, 8th February, 1915. 

Printed for distribiUion and sessional papers. 

37". Interim Report of the Commissioners of the Transcontinental Railway, for the nine 
months ended 31st December, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, 15th February, 
1915 Not printed. 

38. Report of the Department of the Naval Service, for the fiscal year ending 31st March, 1914, 

Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, Sth February, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 27. 

39. Forty-seventh Annual Report of the Department of Marine and Fisheries, 1913-14 — Fish- 

eries. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, 8th February, 191."). 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

39". Fisheries Investigations in Hudson's and James Bays. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, 
li'15 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

39b- Supplement to the 47th Annual Report of the Department of Marine and Fisheries (Fish- 
eries Branch), — Contributions to Canadian Biology, 1911-14, Part I — Marine Biology 
Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, 16th February, 1915. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 28. 

40. The Report of the Joint Librarians of Parliament. Presented by Hon. Mr. Speaker, -Ith 

February, 1914 Not printed. 

41. Report of R. A. Pringle, K.C., Commissioner appointed to investigate into the payment of 

subsidies to the Southampton Railway Company, together witli the evidence, etc., 
taken before the Commissioner. Presented by Hon. Mr. Cochrane, 8th February,' 1915. 

Not printed. 

42. Radiotelegraph Regulation 106 concerning the wave length for use by Canadian licensed 

ship stations during the period of hostilities, and 

Amendment to the Radiotelegraph Regulations, Nos. 103 (Ship Stations in Terri- 
torial Waters) and 104 (Ship Stations in Harbours). Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, 
8th February, 1915 j^ot printed. 

43. No. P. C. 260, dated 3rd February, 1915, re Establishment of Rank of Mate in the Royal 

Canadian Navy. Presented by Hon. Mr Hazen, 8th February, 1915 Not printed. 

43a. Copy of Order in Council No. P.C. 304, dated 18th February, 1915. — Establishment of 
ranks of Lieutenant-Commander, Engineer Lieutenant-Commander and Lieutenant- 
Commander R.C.N.V.R., in the Royal Canadian Navy. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, 
11th March, 1915 Not printed. 

43b- Copy of Order in Council No. P.C. 476, dated 6th March, 1915, — Regulations concerning 
the classification of engineer officers. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, 15th March, 1915. 

Not printed. 

44. Copies of Orders in Council re Naval Service. 

No. P.C. 2175, dated 21st August, 1914, re Extra Rates of Pay for Service in Sub- 
marine Vessels. 

No. P.C. 2251, re P^tes of Pay and Allowances for Petty Officers and Men Volun- 
teering for War Service. 

No. P.C. 2960, re Scheme of Separation Allowance for the Dependents of those 
serving in H.M.C. ships. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen. &th February, 1915. 

Not printed. 
13 



George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 19]!5 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

45. Return to an Order of the House of the 20th April, 1914, for a copy of all letters, papers, 

tenders and other documents in regard to the purchase of any cars for the Intercolonial 
Railway during the years 1912 and 1913. Presented 9th February, 1915. — il/r. Mac- 
donald Not printed. 

45a. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th February, 1915, for a copy of all letters, 
' telegrams, contracts, and other documents relating to the purchase of cars by the Inter- 
colonial Railway since 1st July, 1914. Presented 9th April, 1915. — Mr. Macdonald. 

Not printed. 

46. Return to an Order of the. House of the 26th February, 1914, for a return showing: — 1. 

The average cost per mile of construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway from its 
inception to date. 2. The average cost per mile in the last ten years. 3. The average 
rental per mile of lines leased by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and the 
names of such leased lines. 4. The rental paid by the Canadian Pacific Railway for 
the Toronto. Grey and Bruce Railway from Toronto to Owen Sound. Presented 9th 
February, 1915.— J/r. il/tdd/eljro Not printed. 

47. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st June, 1914, for a return showing the revenue 

derived from freight received at and forwarded from the following stations on the 
Intercolonial Railway during the fiscal years 1913 and 1914, giving separately the 
amount for each of said stations, viz. : Drummondville, Rimouslti, Ste. Flavie, Mata- 
pedia, Campbellton and Bathurst. Presented 9th February, 1915. — Mr. Boulay. 

Not printed. 

48. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st June, 1914, for a return showing the names of 

the staff employed in the several departments of the general offices of the Intercolonial 
Railway at Moncton, together with their salaries respectively as of 1st April, 1914. 
Presented 9th February, 1915. — Mr. Emmerson Not printed. 

49. Return to an Order of the House of the 18th May, 1914, for a return showing the names 

of the men who have been appointed to positions in the Prince Edward Railway Ser- 
vice from the 1st January, 1912, to the 1st May, 1914; the positions held by such 
appointees and the salary or wages attached to each position. Presented 9th Februarv. 
1915. — Mr. Hughes (Kings, P.E.I.) Not printed. 

49«. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915, for a return giving the names 
and post office addresses of all persons appointed to positions on the Prince Edward 
Island Railway from the 1st of October, 1911, to the present time; with a description of 
tlie position to which each person was so appointed. Presented 22nd March, 1915. — Mr. 
Hughes (Kings, P.E.I.) Not printed. 

50. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th February, 1914, for a return showing the 

names, tonnage, port of registry and destination of all foreign vessels engaged in fish- 
ing, both sail and steam, that entered and cleared from the port of North Sydney dur- 
ing the year ending 31st December, 1913. Presented 9th February, 1915. — Mr. Sin- 
clair Not pri7ited. 

51. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st June,. 1914, for a copy of all correspondence 

between the Department of Justice and the Attorney General of Quebec, with regard 
to the appointment of judges, since the 1st of February, 1913. Presented 9th February, 
1915. — Sir Wilfrid Laurier Not printed. 

52. Return to an Order of the House of the 30th March, 1914, for a return showing: — 1. Par- 

ticulars of the inventories and value of the estate of the late George A. Montgomery, 
Registrar at Regina, whose estate escheated to the Crown. 2. The amount realized at 
Regina or elsewhere, on the conversion of said estate into money. 3. The costs paid 
or allowed with names and amounts paid or allowed before the residue was paid over 
to the Crown. 4. The amount paid over and actually received by the Crown. 5. The 
disposition of the fund and the names of the persons to whom any sum has been paid, 
and the respective amounts thereof so paid over or allowed since the Crown received 
the same. 6. A statement showing the difference between the reports of the present 
and the late Minister of Justice as to disposition of the fund, and a copy of such corre- 
spondence and representations as led up to any change. 7. The actual balance now on 
hand and the intended disposition thereof. Presented 9th February, 1915. — Mr. 
Graham Not printed. 

53. Return to an Order of the House of the 16th March, 1914. for a return showing all persons, 

male or female, who have been capitally convicted in Canada,, and each province, for 
each year, from the 1st of July, 1867, to the 2nd of February, 1914, specifying the 
offences and whether and how the sentences were carried into effect by execution, or 
otherwise, with the name of convicts; dates'of conviction; crime of which committed; 
sentences passed ; judges by whom sentenced ; and how dealt with. 2. For a return 
showing all convicts, male and female, who have been reprieved from the execution of 
capital sentences passed upon them during the above mentioned period, with the nwne 

u 



5 George V. Alpliabetieal Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1315 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S—Co)itinued. 

of convicts ; dates of conviction ; crime of which convicted ; sentences passed ; by whom 
sentenced; sentences commuted, and if so, to what. 3. 'For a return showing all 
persons in Canada, and each province, convicted during the above mentioned period of 
murder whose senteitces have been mitigated, or who have received a free pardon, 
together with a statement of the offences of which they were severally convicted, witli 
the name of convicts ; dates of conviction ; nature of offence ; sentences ; and extent of 
mitigation of sentences and dates. 4. For a return of in-stances, during the above 
mentioned period, in which appeal has been made on behalf of the persons convicted 
of capital offences to His Excellency, the Governor in Council, for the exercise of the 
Royal Prerogative of pardon, or mitigation of sentences, with the name of convicts ; 
dates of conviction and place ; crime of which convicted ; sentences ; dates of appeal ; 
and the result. Presented 9th February, 1915. — Mr. Wilson (_Laval) . . . .Not printed. 

54. General Rules and Orders of the Excheauer Court of Canada made, respectively, on the 

23rd September, 1914, and the 18th June, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 9th 
February, 1915 Not printed. 

54a. General Rules and Orders of the Exchequer Court of Canada made on the 15th February, 
1915. Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 16th March, 1915 Not printed. 

55. Ordinances of the Yukon Territory passed by the Yukon Council in the year 1914. Pre- 

sented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 9th February, 1915 Not printed. 

56. Return to an Order of the House of the 18th May, 1914, for a return showing the details 

of moneys paid to J. F. Farrington, $248.25 ; B. H. Smith, $469.50, and H. C. Dash, 
$182.40, as set forth in Hansard of this session, page 3071. Presented 9th February, 
1915. — Mr. McLean (Halifax) Not printed. 

57. Return to an Order of frhe House of the 16th March, 1914, for a copy of instruction sent 

to Mr. Wm. Flynn, advocate, to hold investigations into charges made against employees 
of the Department of Marine ancl Fisheries in Bonaventure County, and reports made 
by him in such investigations. Presented 9th February, 1915. — Mr. Marcil (Bonaven- 
ture) Not printed. 

58. Return to an Order of the House of the 27th April, 1914, for a,copy of all documents bear- 

ing upon the application made to the Department of Marine and Fisheries for the dis- 
missal of Ulric Dion, lightkeeper at St. Charles de Caplan, Quebec, and the appoint- 
ment of Omer Arsenault in his place, and on the action taken by the Department in 
that connection. Presented 9th February, 1915. — Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure). 

Not printed. 

59. Return to an Order of the House of the 9th February, 1914, for a copy of all agreements 

made and entered into between the Department of Marine and Fisheries or the Govern- 
ment and Railway and Express Companies, including the Intercolonial Railway, relat- 
ing to the transportation of fresh fish by fast freight or express, since the year 1906; 
also a copy of all guarantees given to railway and express companies by the Govern- 
ment or any Department thereof, relating to such transportation, together with a state- 
ment of all disbursements made by the Department of Marine and Fisheries each year 
under the terms of such agreements or guarantees, di.stinguishing between disburse- 
ments made on account of fast freight and disbursements made on account of express 
shipments ; also the number of refrigerator cars, subject to guarantee, by Department 
of Marine and Fisheries, forwarded by fast freight from Mulgrave or Halifax to Mont- 
real, each calendar year since 1906, and the number of tons of freight carried by such 
cars each year. Also the number of refrigerator express cars forwarded from said 
points, Mulgrave and Halifax to Montreal, up to December 31, 1913, under the te#m3 
of an agreement made since 1911, between tlie Department of Marine and Fisheries 
and the railway or express companies or both. Also the number of tons of fresh fish 
carried by express companies, prior to December 31, 1913, under the last mentioned 
agreement; and the amount paid up to December 31, 1913, by the Department of 
Marine and Fisheries, under the last mentioned agreement. Also the number of tons 
of fresh fish carried by express companies from Mulgrave and Halifax to points west 
since 1906, on which the Government paid one-third, but not under the terms of tlie 
said agreement made as aforesaid, since 1911. Presented 9th February, 1915. — Mr. 
Sinclair Not printed. 

60. Return to an Order of the House of the 20th April, 1914. for a return showing all the post 

offices in the several counties in the province of Nova Scotia for which a rent allow- 
ance, or a fuel fund, and light allowance Is made, specifying the amount of such allow- 
ance in each case. Presented 9th February, 1914. — Mr. Chisholm (Antigonish). 

Not printed. 

61. Return to an Order of the House of the 16th March, 1914, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, letters, telegrams, etc., in the year 1913, relating to tiie carrying of the maii.<« 
between Grand River Falls and Grand Riyer, county of Ricbmond, and the awarding of 
the contract to Malcolm McCuspic. Presented 9th February, 1915. — Mr. Kyte. 

. . . .Not printed. 
15 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 28— Co uti7iued. 

62. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th May, 1914, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, correspondence and memorials since the 1st day of November. 1911, relating 
to the post office at Johnstown, Richmond County, N.S., and to complaints against the 
present postmaster and recommendations for his dismissal. Presented 9th February, 
1915. — Mr. Kyte ' Not printed. 

63. Return to an Order of the House of the 20th April, 1914, for a copy of all papers, petitions, 

letters and telegrams concerning the change of site of the post office at St. Lazare 
Village, county of Bellechasse, Quebec. Presented 9th February, 1915. — Mr. Lrmienx. 

. . . .Not printed. 

64. Statement of Governor General's Warrants issued since the last Session of Parliament on 

account of 1914-15. Presented by Hon. Mr. White, 9th February, 1915. 

Not printed. 

65. Statement of expenditure on account of " Miscellaneous Unforeseen Expenses," from the 

18th August, 1914, to the 4th February, 1915, in accordance with the Appropriation 
Act of 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. White, 9th February, 1915 Not printed. 

66. Statement of Superannuation and Retiring Allowances in the Civil Service during the year 

ending 31st December, 1914, showing name, rank, salary, service, allowance and cause 
of retirement of each person superannuated or retired, also whether vacancy is filled 
by promotion or by appointment, and salary of any new appointee. Presented by Hon. 
Mr. White, 9'th February, 1915 Not printed. 

67. Statement of receipts and expenditures of the Ottawa Improvement Commission to 31st 

March, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. White, 9th February, 1915 Not printed. 

68. Statement of the affairs of the Royal Society "of Canada, for the year ended 30th April, 

1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. White, 9th February, 1915 Not prinhd. 

69. Account of the average number of men employed on the Dominion Police Force duiing 

each month of the year 19J_4, and of their pay and travelling expenses, pursuant to 
Chapter 92, Section 6, Subsection 2, of the Revised Statutes of Canada. Presented by 
Hon. Mr. Doherty, 10th February, 1915 Not printed. 

70. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated the 16th January, 1913, calling for copy of the 

plans, reports, soundings, and other germane information respecting the ports of 
Churchill and Fort Nelson, so far as the Department of Railways and Canals is con- 
cerned. — (Senate) Not piintrd. 

71. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated the 29th April, 1914, showing: — -1. Titles of all 

books, pamphlets and other printed papers issued by tlie King's Printer during the 
year ending on the 31st of March, 1914. 2. The number of each of such books, 
pamphlets and papers printed during such year, and the number distributed, with the 
dates of distribution. 3. The number of pages in each. 4. The cost of each. 5. The 
authority for the printing and issuing of each of such books, pamphlets and papers. — 
(Senate) Not printed. 

72. Return to an Order of the Senate dated the 30th April, 1914, for the production of all pro- 

posals submitted to the Government for the construction of the Montreal, Ottawa and 
Georgian Bay Canal and all the correspondence relating thereto. — (Senate). 

Not printed. 

72a- Return to an Order of the House of the 11th February, 1915, for a copy of all petitions 
and memoranda from commercial bodies or other parties in relation to the immediate 
construction of the Georgian Bay Canal, and of all correspondence in connection with 
the same since 21st September, 1911. Presented 4th March, 1915. — Sir Wilfrid Laurirr. 

JVot printi d. 

73. Copies of general orders promulgated to the militia for the period between 25th November, 

1913, and 24th December, 1914. — (Senate) Not printed. 

74. Copy of correspondence respecting the conti'ol of the exportation of nickel. Presented by 

Sir Robert Borden, 11th February, 1915 Not p7inted. 

75. Memorandum respecting work of the Department of Militia and Defence — European War, 

1914-15. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hughes, 11th February, 1915 Not printed. 

76. Return to an Order of the House of the 6th April, 1914, for a copy of all correspondence, 

letters, telegrams, complaints and documents of all kinds received by the Department of 
Trade and Commerce during the years 1913-14, with respect to the Pictou-Mulgrave- 
Cheticamp steamship route. Presented 11th Febi-uary, 1915. — Mr. Cliisholm (Jnver- 
•ness) Not printed. 

16 



(-ieurge V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTEl^TS OF VOLUME 2S—Co>,tinurc]. 

77. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth June, 1914, for a copy of all documents bear- 

ing on an application or applications made to the Superintendent General of Indian 
Affairs or the Depaitment, on an amendment to the Indian Act to facilitate the sale 
of the Indian Reserve of Restigouche, Que., or on the acquiring otherwise of any por- 
tion or the whole of the said reserve for industrial or other purposes, and anyansweis 
given thereto. Presented llth February, 1915. — Mr. Marcil iBondvinturc). 

Not printed. 

78. Return to an Order of the House of the 2nd February, 1914, for a return showing the 

names of the sailors who have been employed on the Eureka during the years 1910, 
1911. 1912 and 1913. Presented 12th February, 1915.— -Uc. Boalay Not printed. 

79. Return to an Order of the House of the 13th April. 1914, for a return showing the total 

bond issue of the Canadian Northern Railway Company and its affiliated companies; 
and the total cost to date of the construction of the lines of railways comprising the 
Canadian Northern Railway system, including terminals, sidings, etc. Presented 12th 
February, 1915. — Mr. Murphy Not printed. 

80. Return to an Order of the. House of the ISth May, 1914, for a copy of all papers, docu- 

ments, reports and evidence relative to the dismissal or proposed dismissal of W. A. 
Case of the Government Quarantine Service at Halifax, N.S. Presented 12th February, 
1915. — Mr. McLean (Halifax) Not printed. 

81. Return to an Order of the House of the 26th February, 1914. for a return showing: — 1. 

The freight rates charged during the years 1912 and 1913, on wheat from Canadian 
ports to ports in the United Kingdom by the Canadian Pacific tlailway Company's 
Steamship Lines, the Allan Steamship Line and the Canadian Northern Railway Com- 
pany's Steamship Lines. 2. The profits made by the freight boats of the said seve; al 
lines which carried wheat alone or with other freight. Presented 12tli Februaiy, 191.". 
— l<ir James Aiki)is Not printei.. 

82. Return to an Order of the House of the IGth February, 1914, for a copy of all reports, 

reciuests, petitions, memorials, letters, telegrams and other correspondence and docu- 
ments relating to the removal, suspension or dismissal, by the management of the 
Intercolonial Railway, of Warren Carter and Frederick Avard, employees in the freight 
department of the Intercolonial Railway at Sackville, N.B. ; and of all letters, tele- 
grams and other corresj^ondence in the Department of Railways and Canals, or in the 
railway offices at 31oncton, or in any Department of Government, addressed to the 
Minister of Railways and Canals, or to any other member of the Government, or to 
any official of the Department of Railways and Canals, or of the Intercolonial Railway, 
by any person or persons in the county of Westmoiland, N.B., in an^ manner relating 
to said employees and to the dispensing with their services, pai-ticularly of any letteis 
sent to F. P. Brady, General Superintendent of the Intercolonial, by any party or 
parties in Sackville, N.B., or elsewhere, and of all replies to any such letters, corre- 
spondence or documents. Presented 12th February, 1915. — Mr. Evimerson. 

Not printed. 

83. Return to an Order of the House of the 23rd March, 1914, for a return showing: — 1. What 

investigations and other work have been entrusted by the Government, or any Depart- 
ment thereof, to G. Howard Ferguson, member for the electoral division of the county 
of Grenville in the Legislative Assembly of the province of Ontario. 2. How much the 
said G. Howard Ferguson has been paid by the Government, or any Department there- 
of, for fees and disbursements since the 21st of September, 1911, and how much is still 
due and owing to him. 3. How much has been paid to the said G. Howard Ferguson 
by the Government or any Department thereof, since the 21st September, 1911, in 
connection with any other matter whatever. Presented 12th February, 1915. — Mr. 
Proulx Not printed. 

84. Further Supplementary Return to an Order of the House of the 28th April, 1913, for a 

return showing a list of all the newspapers in Canada in which advertisements havf 
been inserted by the Government, or any minister, officer or department thereof, between 
10th October, 1911, and the present date, together with a statement of the gro.ss amount 
paid therefor between the above dates to each of said newspapers or to the proprietors 
of the same. Presented 12th February, 1915. — Mr. Sinclair Not printed. 

84". Further Supplementary Return to an Order of the House of the 30th Apiil, 1913, for a 
return showing" a list of all the newspapers in Canada in which advertisements have 
been insfrted by the Government, or any minister, officer or dcpa'tment tlioreof, between 
the 10th day of October, 1906, and 10th October, 1907, and between said dates in each 
of the years following up to the 10th October, 1911, togt-tlier witli a statement of llie 
gross amount paid therefor for the years mentioned, to each of the said newspapers or 
the proprietors of the same. Presented 12th February, 1915.— -l/r. Thornton. 

Not printed. 

79240—2 17 



George V. Alpliabetieal Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

85. Partial Return to an Order of the House of the 4th March, 1914, for a return showing: — 
1. How many employees of the Federal Government of Canada, including all services 
and all departments, have been dismissed from 10th October, 1911, to the present 
date. 2. How many have resigned. 3. How many have deserted the service. 4. 
How many deserters have been punished. 5. How many new employees have been 
engaged or appointed by the present Government during the same period. Presented 
12th February, 1915. — Mr. Boivin Not printed. 

85i'. Return to an Order of the House of the 4th March, 1914, for a return showing: — 
1. How many employees of the Federal Government of Canada, including all services 
and all departments, have been dismis-sed from 10th October, 1911, to the present 
date. 2. How many have resigned. 3. How many have deserted the service. 4. 
How many deserters have been punished. 5. How many new employees have boen 
engaged or appointed by the present Government during the same period. Presented 
4th March, 1915. — Mr. Boivin -r Not printed. 

ii5l>. Further Supplementary Return to an Order of the House of the 4th March, 1914, for a return 
showing: — 1. How many employees of the Federal Government of Canada, including 
all services and all departments, have been dismissed from 10th October, 1911, to the 
I^resent date. 2. How many have resigned. 3. How many have deserted the service. 
4. How many deserters have been punished. 5. How many new employees have been 
engaged or appointed by the present Government during the same period. Presented 
5th March, 1915. — Mr. Boivin Not printed. 

85c. Further Supplementary Return to an Order of the House of the 4th March, 1914, for a return 
showing: — 1. How many employees of the Federal Government of Canada, including 
all services and all departments, have been dismissed from 10th October. 1911, to the 
present date. 2. How many have resigned. 3. How many have deserted the service. 
4. How many deserters have been punished. 5. How many new employees have been 
engaged or appointed by the present Government during the same period. Presented 
12th March, 1915. — Mr. Boivin Not printed. 

85d. Further Supplementary Return to an Order of the House of the 4th March, 1914, for a return 
showing : — 1. How many employees of the Federal Government of Canada, including 
all services and all departments, have been dismissed fi'om 10th October, 1911, to the 
present date. 2. How many have resigned. 3. How many have deserted the service. 
4. How many deserters have been punished. 5. How many new employees have been 
engaged or appointed by the present Government during the same period. Presented 
7th April, 1915. — Mr. Boivin Not printed. 

86. Further Supplementary Return to an Order of the House of the 18th February, 1914, for 

a copy of all charges, complaints, memorials, correspondence and telegrams, not 
alieady i)roduced, relating to officials in any department of the Government since 10th 
October, 1911, the number of officials dismissed, reports of investigations held in 
respect of such charges, items of ex])enditure and costs of each investigation, the names 
of persons appointed to ofHce in the place of dismissed officials, and of all recom- 
mendations received in behalf of persons so appointed in the province of Prince Edward 
Island. Presented 12th February, 1915. — Mr. Hughes (Kings, P.E.I.) 

Not printed. 

87. Partial Return to an Order of the House of the ISth May, 1914, for a return showing in 

all cases in which Charles Seager, of Goderich, acted as Government Commissioner in 
the investigation of officials charged with partizanship, or other offences, from and 
including the year 1896 to the year 1900; and the names of all officials dismissed by 
reason of the reports of the said Charles Seager, the positions held by such officials, 
and when such dismissals took place; with a copy of the evidence taken in all such 
cases, together with the commissioners reports thereon, and also showing what fees 
were paid to the said Charles Seager for conducting such investigations. Presented 
12th February, 1915. — Mr. Clark (Bruce) Not printed. 

88. Return to an Order of the House of the 16th March, 1914, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, letters, telegrams, complaints and of all other documents in any way referring 
to the operation of the salmon hatchery at North lOast Margaree, and the fish pond at 
Margaree Harbour from 1311 to date. Presented 15th February, 1915. — Mr. Chisholm 
{Inverness) Not printed. 

89. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General of the 11th May, 1914, 

for a copy of all letters, telegrams. Orders in Council, contracts, tenders, papers and 
other documents in possession of the Department of Public Works, and of the Depart- 
mefit of Militia and Defence, relating to the construction of an armoury at Amherst, 
N.S. Presented 15th February, 1915. — Mr. Sinclair Not printed. 

90. Letters of the Honourable I.ouis P. Pelletier, M.P., and the Honourable Wilfrid B. Nantol, 

M.P., resigning their po.sitions as Postmaster General and Minister of Inland Revenue, 
respectively, and letters of the Prime Minister in acknowledgment thereof. Presented 
by Sir Robert Borden, 15th February, 1915 Not printd. 

18 



.") George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Piipcrs. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

91. Reyort of Board of OiTicers on boots supplied to the Canadian Expeditionary Force. Pre- 

sented by Hon. Mr. Hughes, 15th February, 1915 Not printed. 

92. Regulations under " The Destructive Ins<»ct and Pe-st Act." Presented by Hon. Mr. 

Burrell, 16th February, 1915 Not printed. 

93. Report on "The Agricultural Instruction Act," 1913-14, pursuant to Section S of the above 

named Act. Presented by Hon. Mr. Burrell, 16th February, 1915. 

Printed for sessioiial papers only. 

93(' Supplementary Return to an Address to His Royal Highne.s.s the Governor General of the 
9th February. 1914, for a copy of all arrangements made between the Government and 
the various provinces under the Agricultural Instruction Act. Presented I9th February. 
1915. — Sir Wilfrid Laurier Not printed. 

93&. Return to an Order of the House of *the 20th April, 1914, for a copy of all documents, 
correspondence, letters, petitions, reports, etc., exchanged between Dr. C. C. James, Mr. 
J. C. Chapais and each of the Provincial Ministers of Agriculture, in connection with 
the distribution and the administration of the federal subsidy- granted to the provinces 
for agricultural purposes since the granting of same. Presented 23rd February, 1915. 
— Mr. Lapointe (Kamouraska) Not printed. 

94. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th P'ebruary. 1914, for a copy of all telegrams, 

correspondence, instructions, re^-ommendations, and other documents that passed 
between the Shellfish Fishery Commission of 1913, and the Department of Marine and 
Fisheries, from the date of the appointment of said Commission to 31st December, 
1913, excluding such documents as have been printed in the published report of said 
Commission. Presented 16th February, 1915. — Mr. Sinclair Not printed. 

95. Return to an Order of the House of the 16th March, 1914, for a copy of all correspondence, 

tenders, telegrams, complaints and of all other documents in any way referring to the 
collecting of spawn for the Margaree Lobster Hatcherv during the years 1911-12, 
1912-13 and 1913-14. Presented I6th February, 1915. — .Vir. Chishohn (Inverness). 

Not printed- 

96. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th February, 1915, for a return showing the 

amount of coal imported into' Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, respectively, from 
the United States duj-ing the year 1914; also the amount of duty collected in each of 
the said provinces during the same year. Presented 16th February, 1915. — Mr. 
Buchanan Not printed. 

97. Copy of the Eighth Joint Report of the Commissioners for the Demarcation of the Meri- 

dian of the 141st Degree of West Lngitude. Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, 18th 
February, 1915 Not printed. 

98. P.eturn to an Order of the House of the- 20th April, 1914, for a copy of the agreement 

between the Government of Canada and the Canadian Pacific Railway Company at the 
time the special land grant was made whereby the Canadian Pacific Railway Company 
were enabled to get^their land grant in one block for the purpose of establishing their 
present irrigation system east of Ca!g:ary, province of Alberta. Presented 18th 
February, 1915. — Mr. Bnrnham Not printed. 

99. Return to an Order of the House of the 23rd March, 1914, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams and other documents in connection with the sale of any timber on Parry Island, 
Parry Sound District, and of advertisements, agreements for purchase and any other 
documents connected with su'.'h sale oi- grant of timber to any person or persons. Pre- 
sented ISth February, 1915. — .1/r. Arthurs A'ot ipinted. 

100. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th February, 1914, for a return showing 

reasons for the dismissal of Mr. LariviSre, Dominion Lands Agent at Girouard ; the 
date of his appointment and of dismissal and salary at time of dismissal ; also the 
name of agent appointed in his place, with date of appointment and salary. Presented 
ISth February, 1915. — Mr. Oliver ..Not printed. 

101. Annual Return respecting Trade Unions under Chapter 125, R.S.C., 1906. Presented bv 

Hon. Mr. Coderre, ISth February, 1915 Not printed. 

102. A detailed statement of all bonds or securities registered in the Department of the Secre- 

tary of State of Canada, since last return (21st January, 1914) submitted to the Par- 
liament of Canada under Section 32 of Chapter 19, of the Revised Statutes of Canada, 
1906. Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 18th February, 1915 Not printed. 

79240— 2i 19 



George V. AlphabetiLal Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

103. Return to an Order of the House of the !tth February, 1914, for a copy of all petitions, 

memorials, letters, telegrams, papers, and documents received by any department of 
the Government of Canada, or any Minister of the Crown from any company, corpor- 
ation, person or persons, requesting the removal of any customs duties upon wheat or 
wheat products entering Canada, or protesting against any diminution or removal of 
such custom's duties, and any replies thereto. Presented 18th February. 1915. — Mr. 
MucJcun (HoUfax) Xot printid. 

104. Return to an Order of the House of the 20th April, 19H, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, letters, documents or other papers relating to the cancellation of the entry of 
R. Bannatyne for the northwest i of section 24, township 35, range 18, west of the 
2nd meridian. Presented .19th February, 1915. — Mr. Ncely Not printed. 

105. Return to an Order of the House of the Ifith February, 1914, for a return showing the 

name of the postmaster of the Parish of St. Romuald, county of Levis, who, it is said, 
was dismissed from office since September, 1911, the reasons for such dismissal, the 
nature of the complaints made against him, the names of the parties who made those 
complaints, together with a copy of all correspondence and telegrams relating thereto, 
the name of the inquiring commissioner, and report of investigation, if any, and of all 
evidence taken at the investigation, the names of those who recommended the successor, 
names of the parties by whom the Government was represented at such investigation, 
with a detailed statement of all the accounts paid or to be paid by any department in 
connection with the aforesaid dismissal and investigation, the names of the parties who 
received any money or filed their accounts in connection with said investigation, and 
the amount awarded to or claimed by each of them. Presented 19th February, 1915. — 
Mr. Bourassa Not printed. 

106. Return showing lands sold by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company during the year 

which ended on the 30th September, 1914. Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, 19th Feb- 
ruary, 1915 Not printed. 

107. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th June, 1914, for a return showing: — 1. The 

amount of money sent through the post offices in the past five years outside Canada 
from the following Cape Breton post offices : Glace Bay, Caledonia Mines, Dominion No. 
4. New Aberdeen, Bridgeford, Old Bridgeford, Reserve Mines, Sydney, Whitney Pier, 
Ashby, North Sydney, Sydney Mines, Florence, Dominion No. 6, and Port Marrien. 2. 
What countries was such money transmitted to. Presented 22nd February, 1915. — 
Mr. Carroll Xot printed. 

108. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th February, 1915, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, telegrams and other documents in connection with the removal from the customs 
service at Lethbridge, Alberta, of Brown Pipes and A. R. Gibbons. Presented 23rd 
February, 1915. — Mr. Buchanan Xot printed. 

109. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th February, 1915, for a return giving the 

names of all the transports hired since 1st August, 1914, for the conveyance of troops^ 
horses, stores and material to England, the name of each vessel owner, broker or other 
person through whom the vessel was chartered, the tonnage of each vessel, speed, rate 
l)aid per ton per week or month, minimum time for which engaged, date of agreement, 
date at which pay commenced, date at which pay ceased, and the total sum paid by 
the Government for hire and other charges. Piesented 23rd February, 1915. — Mr. 
Mnrphy Xot printed. 

110. Return to an Order of the House of the loth February, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. 

How many transport wagons were purchased for the Second and Third Contingents? 
2. From whom they were purchased, and the name of each person or firm? 3. How 
many were purchased from each? 4. What was the price paid per wagon? 5. If any 
tenders were asked? 6. If any tenders were received that were not accepted? 7. If 
so, what was the price tendered at? Presented 23rd February, 1915. — Mr. Xcsbitt. 

Xot piinted. 

111. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th February, 1915, for a return showing: — 

1. How m'any persons have been made prisoners of war since the declaration of war 
between the Allies, Germany and Austria? 2. Where they have been kept captive? 3. 
What is the name of each place of detention, and the name of the officer in charge 
of such place of detention? I'resented 23rd February, 1915. — Mr. ll'i/soJi (Laval). 

Xot printed 

Ilia. Return to an Order of the House of the 19tli February, 1915. for a statement in detail 
of: Tl»e number of prisoners of war in this country; the number under parole; the 
nvmiber held in detention camps ; the number of detention camps, where situated, how 
accessible, and the number of prisoners in each. The amount of cost to Canada in 
each of these camps, respectively, for subsistence, pay. clothing, transportation and 
supervision ; the natuie of work done by prisoners, and the total value of same to date. 
Presented 1st April, 1915. — Mr. Clark (Red Deer) Not printed. 

20 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 28— Continued. 

112. Return to aji Order of the House of the 15th February. 1915. for a copy of all letters, 

telegrrams, minutes of investig^ation and other documents relating: to the dismissal of 
James Brennan. fireman Intercolonial Railway at Stellarton. Presented 25th February, 
1915. — Mr. Macdonald Not printed. 

113. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th February. 1915. for return showing if any 

official statement was given on behalf of the management of the Intercolonial Railway 
to the effect that wages would be paid in their absence to the employees of the railway 
who volunteered for active service. If so. when and by whom? If any order has bfen 
made by the Railway Department providing for such payment, and if so, when the said 
order was made. Presented 23rd February, 1915. — Mr. Macdonald Not printed. 

114. Return to an order of the House of the 9th February, 1915, for a copy of all papers, 

petitions, letters and telegrams exchanged between the Quebec Board of Trade and the 
Department of Railways and Canals concerning the circulation of trains on that section 
of the National Transcontinental Railway between Cochrane and Quebec City. Pre- 
sented 23rd February, 1915. — Mr. Lemieux Not printed. 

115. Return (in so far as the. Department of the Interior is concerned) of copies of all Orders 

in Council, plans, papers and correspondence relating to the Canadian Pacific Railway, 
which are required to bo presented to the House of Commons, under a resolution passed 
gn 20th February, 1SS2, since the date of the_ last return, under such resolution. Pre- 
sented by Hon. Mr. Roche, 24th February, "l915 Not printed. 

116. Return showing: — 1. Who the Remount Commissioners are for "VN'estern and Eastern 

Canada respectively? 2. When and by whom they were appointed, and what their 
general instructions were? 3. "Why were the mobilization orders 1913, which provide 
for the purchase of remounts, ignored and civilians put in charge of the purchase of 
remounts? 4. The names of the purchasers and inspecting veterinary officers ajipointed 
by the Remount Commissioner for Eastern Canada, in the various remount divisions? 
5. If any of the purchasers and inspecting veterinary officers have been stopped buy- 
ing. If so, what their names are, and the reasons given b.v the Remount Commissioner 
for his action? 6. How . ;any horses have been purchased between 1st December and 
31st January, in each remount division in Eastern* Canada, and the average price paid 
per horse? 7. What the average cost per horse is in each remount division to cover 
the expenses, including pay or allowances and all travelling and other expenses, 
between the said dates. Presented 24th February, 1915. — Mr. Lemieux. .Not printed. 

117. Return showing: — 1. From how many firms the Government have ordered ankle boots 

for the various contingents now being eciuipped for service? 2. The names of these 
firms? 3. How many ankle boots have been ordered from each firm? 4. How many 
ankle boots each firm have delivered up to date? 5. How many ankle boots each firnt 
have yet to deliver? 6. The price that each firm is receiving for these ankle boots. 
Presented 24th February, 1915. — Mr. Lemieux Not printed. 

118. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, recommendations, tenders and other papers on file in the office of the Department 
of Railways and Canals relating to supi»lyin.g ice for the Intercolonial Railway at Mu!- 
grave for the year 1915. Presentetl 25th February, 1915. — Mr. Sinclair. 

Not printed. 

119. Return to an Order of the House of the ISth February, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. 

How many motor trucks were sent with the first contingent to England? 2. From 
whom they were purchased, and by whom they were manufactured? 3. What tlieir 
capacity was? 4. What price was paid for them? 5. If any expert was emplo.ved by 
the Government in connection with their purchase. If so, who? 6. If any commis- 
sion was paid by the Government to any one in connection with their purchase? 7. 
If the trucks have given satisfaction in service. If not, what defects were exhibited? 
8. If a committee was appointed by the Militia Department or the Government in 
resard to the purchase of motor trucks for the second and further contingents. If so, 
who comprised it, and what were their special qualifications? 9. If one, Mr. McQuariie, 
was a member of this committee. If so, is it true he was, and is still, an employee at 
the Russell Motor Car Company of Toronto? 10. If one, Owens Thomas, was employed 
as expert on the said Committee? If so, what he was paid, or what he is to be paid 
fer his services, and how long his services were utilizctl? 11. If Mi. Thomas received 
any commission in connection with the purchases of motor trucks either fiom the 
Government or the manufacturers? 12. What recommendations were made by the 
said committee to the Militia Department or the Government in connection with pur- 
chases of motor trucks? 13. If the trucks have been purchased. If so, how many, 
from whom, and at what price? 14. If it is true that these trucks were purchased 
from the Kelly Company. Springfield, Ohio. If so. could not efficient and suitable 
trucks have been procured from Canadian manufacturers? 15. If it is true that the 
Government has decided to go into the motor tiuck business by placing orders with 
Canadian manufacturers for parts, and supplying such parts to assemblers in Canada. 
If so, is it true that orders have been, or are being placed with the Russell Motor Car 
Company, to manufacture engines? 16. Who recommended Mr. Thomas to the Minister 
of the Militia or the Government? Presented 25th February, 1915. — Mr. Copp. 

Not printed. 
21 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S—Co7itlnued. 

120. Return to an Order of the House of the l-jth February, 1915, for a return showing 

whether any exportations of food-stuffs have been made since 1st August last, to Euro- 
pean countries, other than the United Kingdom, France and Belgium, and if so, their 
nature and what countries. Presented 25th February, 1913. — Mr. Coclshiitt. 

A'ot print etU 

121. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th February, 1915, for a copy of the patit.on, 

papers, documents and letters in connection with the incorporation of the Dominion 
Trust Company, incorporated by Special Act of the Parliament of Canada in 1912, being 
Chapter 89 of 2 George V. Presented 25th February, 1913. — Mr. Protdx. 

yot printed. 

121a- Return to an Order of the House of the 11th February, 1915, for a copy of all the 
correspondence exchanged between the Department of Justice and the Government of 
the province of British Columbia, or any of its members, with regard to a certain Aci 
passed by the Legislature of the said province in 1913, being Chapter 89 of 2 George 
v., entitled: "An Act respecting the Dominion Trust Company." Presented 4th March, 
1915. — Mr. Proulx Not prmt'ci. 

122. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th February, 1915, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence which has passed between the Auditor General and the Militia Department or any 
other department of the Government service in regard to the expenditure under the War 
Appropriation Act. Presented 25th February, 1915. — Mr. Maclean (Halifax). 

Printed for disliibution and sessional papers. 

122n- Memorandum of the Accountant and Paymaster-General and the Director of Contracts of 
the Department of Militia and Defence, in res.pect to correspondence between the 
Auditor General and Militia Department, relating to expenditure under the War Appro 
priation Act. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hughes, 11th March, 1915 Not printed. 

123. Copy of all correspondence between the Minister of Finance and the Auditor General from 

ISth August to date, respecting purchases for overseas contingents, army contracts, or 
other purchases for military purposes, or under the operation of the Naval Service Act 
of 1910, or under Orders in Council relating to military matters. Presented by Hon. 
Mr. White, 25th February, 1915 Not rpinted. 

124. Certified copy of a report of the Committee of the Privy Council approved by His Royal 

Highness the Governor General on the 2.3rd January, 1915, on the subject of separ- 
ation allowance to dependents of soldiers of the First Overseas Contingent. Presented 
by Hon. Mr. Rogers, 26th February, 1915 Not printed 

124m- Certified copy of a report of the Committee of the Privy Council approved by His Royal 
Highness the Governor General on the 28th January, 1915, in respect to application* 
from men who have enlisted in the corps raised for overseas service, to be allowed to 
mi»rry and to have their wives placed on the separation allowance list. Presented by 
Hon. Mr. Rogers, 26th February, 1915 Not printed. 

125. Return to an Order of the Hou.se of the iGth February, 1914, for a copy of all telegrams, 

correspondence, petitions and docvunents of all kinds in any way referring to a drill 
shed or armoury to be built at the town of Inverness, Inverness county. Nova Scotia. 
Presented 26th February, 1915. — Mr. Chisholm (Inverness) Not printed. 

126. Detailed statement of revenue of custom duties and refund thereof under Section 92 Con- 

solidated Revenue and Audit Act, through the Department of Commerce for the fiscal 
year ended 31st March, 1914.— (SeiiaiP) Not printed. 

127 Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette betewen the 1st 

December, 1913, and 11th January, 1915, in accordance with the provisions of Section 
19, Chapter 10. 1-2 George V. "The Forest Reserves and Park Act." — (Senate). 

Not printed. 

127" Return of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette, between 
the 16th May, 1914. and 25th July, 1914, in accordance with the provisions of 'The 
Forest Reserves and Park Act," Section 19, of Chapter 10. 1-2 George V. Presented 
by Hon. Mr. Roche, 12th March, 1915 Not printed. 

128 Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette between 1st Decem- 

ber, 1913, and 15th January. 1915, in accordance with the provisions of Section 5, of 
Chapter 21, 7-8 Fdward VIT. "The Dominion Lands Survey Act." — (ffenate). 

Not printed. 

128a Return of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette, between 

■ 24th January, 1914, and 6th February, 1915, in accordance with the provisions of 

Section 77 of " The Dominion Lands Act," Chapter 20 of the Statutes of Canada, 1908. 

Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, 12th March, 1915 Not printed. 

22 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Paper3. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

laS?*- Return of Orders in Council whiih have been published in the Canada Gazette and in 
the British Columbia Gazette, between 11th April. 1914, and 10th December, 1914, in 
accordance with provisions of Subsection (d) of Section 38 of the regulations for the 
survey, administration, disposal and management of Dominion Lands within the 40- 
mile railway belt in the province of British Columbia. Presented by Hon. Mr. Roche, 
12th March, 1915 Not printed. 

128<?- Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette and in the British 
Columhia Gazette, betv/een 1st December, 1913, and the l5th January, 1915, in accord- 
ance with the provisions of Subsection (eZ) of Section 38 of the Regulations for the 
Survey, administration, disposal and management of Dominion Lands within the 40- 
mile railway belt in the province of British Columbia. — (Senate) Not printed. 

129. Orders in. Council passed between 1st December, 1913 and 15th .Tanuary, 1915, approving 

of regulations and forms prescribed in accordance with the provisions of Soot'on 57 of 
the Irrigation Act, Chapter 61, Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906, as unr-nded by 
Chapter 38, 7-8 Edward VII. — {Senate) Not printed. 

130. Return to an Order of the House of the 25th February, 1915, for a return sliowiiig 

whether the Government purchased from the Canada Cycle and Motor Company tires 
for motor trucks for the first Canadian Contingent and, if so, the price paid per set 
and the number purchased ; also whether the Government have obtained prices for 
tires for motor trucks for the second contingent and, if so, the prices per set so 
obtained. Presented 3rd March, 1915. — Mr. Gauvreau Not printed. 

131. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th February, 1915, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, telegrams and other documents in connection with the appointment of A. H. 
McKeown to the immigration service at Lethbridge, Alberta. Presented 3rd March, 
1915. — Mr. Buchanan Not printed. 

132. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th February. 1915, for a c:opy of all corre- 

spondence, telegrams and ot-her documents in connection with the removal from office 
of A. E. Humphries, Inspector of Immigration at Lethbridge, Alberta. Presented 3rd 
March, 1915. — Mr. Bu<-hanan Not printed. 

133. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd June, 1914, for a return showing: — 1. Who 

secured the mail contract between Armagh Station and Mailloux, county of Bellechasse, 
Que.? 2. How many tenders were received? 3. The names of the tenderers, and the 
amount of each tender? Presented 3rd March, 1915. — Mr. Letnieux Not printed. 

134. Return to an Order of the House of the 6th April. 1914, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, co: respondence, complaints, and documents of all kinds in any way connected 
with the asking for tenders for the mail route between Low Point and Creignish Station 
during the years 1913-14. Presented 3rd March, 1915. — Mr. Chi.'iholm il7ii;erness) . 

Not printed. 

135. lieturn to an Order of the House of the 6th April, 1914, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams and other documents relative to the mail contract between New Ross and 
Vaughans post office, Waterville. province of Nova Scotia. Presented 3i-d March. 1913. 
— Mr. Macdonald : Not printed. 

136. Return to an Order of the House of the 18th May, 1914, for a copy of all correspondence, 

telegrams, letters and documents of all kinds in possession of the Post Office Depart- 
ment received since 1913, up to the present date in any way referring to the mail con- 
tract from Mabou to Wycocomagh. Presented 3rd March, 1915, — Mr. Chisholm 
(Inverness) ., Not printed 

137. Return to an Order of the House of the 25th February, 1915, for a return showing: — -1. 

The amount of money collected by sub-collectors of customs at Edmundston, N.B., at 
Clair V^«.i<-. at St. Leonards. N.B.. and at Green River, N.B., each and every year for 
the last five fiscal years. 2. The salaries paid in connectian with each of said porta 
each year. Presented 3rd March, 1915. — Mr. Michaud Not printed. 

138. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th February, 1915, for a return showing how 

much money has been spent amongst the merchants of the city of Medicine Hat for 
fJovernment relief, to whom the payments were made and the total amount in each case. 
Presented 4th March. 1915. — Mr. Buchanan Not printed. 

139. Return to an Order of the House of the 2nd February, 1914, for a copy of all letters, 

correspondence, papers and documents relating to the dismissal of the following persons 
from the below mentioned offices in Shelburne County, N.S. : — J. V. Smith, sub-collector 
of customs at Ijower Woods Harbour; John H. Lyons, keeper of lightship, Birrington 
Passage: William L. Smith, lightkeeijer, Baccaro ; E. D. Smith, fishery ovei'sjer, Shag 
Harbour ; J. A. Orechia, hai hour master. Woods Harbour : J. C. Morrison, harbour 
master. Shelburne ; and Albert Mahaney, postmaster at Churchover. Presented 4th 
March, 1915. — Mr. Maclean (Halifax) Not ^rinleiL 

23 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

139a. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th February, 1915, for a copy of all letters, 
papers and documents relating to the dismissal of the following officers in Shelburne 
County, N.S. : Wm. L. Smith, lightkeeper, Baccaro, N.S. ; J. A. Arechia, harbour master, 
Lower Wood Harbour, and J. C. Morrison, harbour master, Shelburne, X.S. Presented 
16th March, 1915. — Mr. Law Xot printed. 

140. Return to an Order of the House of the 9th March, 1914, for a return showing: — 1. The 

amounts of money expended by this Government in the county of Portneuf from the 
1st of July, 1S96, to the 21st September, 1911. 2. The nature of the work done in each 
parish. 3. In what year such work was executed, and what amount was expended in 
each case. Presented 4th March, 1915. — Mr. Sevigny Xot printed. 

141. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915, for a copy of all papers, 

petitions, declarations, affidavits, sworn statements, requests, certificates and all other 
documents in connection with the naturalization of F. P. Gutelius, General Manager of 
the Intercolonial Railway. Presented 4th March, 1915. — Mr. Gauvreau.. . .Not printed. 

142. Report of the delegates appointed to represent the Government of Canada at the Eighth 

International Purity Congress, held under the auspices of the World's Purity League, 
at Kansas City, Mo., November 5th-9th, 1914. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, 4th. 
March, 1915. Xot printed. 

143. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General of the 22nd February, 

1915, for a copy of all complaints to the Government of the killing of one American 
citizen and the shooting of another, by militia men, in the waters of Lake Erie, and of 
all correspondence with regard to the same with the British Embassy and American 
authorities. Presented 5th March, 1915. — Sir Wilfrid Lanrier Not printed. 

144. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th February, 1915, for a return showing tire 

amounts in detail paid to Ward Fisher, of Shelburne, N.S., fishery inspector, for the 
years 1912 and 1913, for salary, office expenses, travelling expenses, and all other 
expenses. Presented 5th March, 1915. — ^[r. Law Not printed. 

145. Return to an Order of the House of the loth February, 1915, for a return showing the 

names and addresses of all persons in Yarmouth County to whom the bounty under the 
Fenian Raid Volunteer Bounty Act has been paid ; the names and addresses of all 
persons from said county whose applications have been rejected, and a list giving 
names and addresses of all applicants from said county whose applications have not 
yet been disposed of. Presented 5th March, 1915. — Mr. Law Not printed. 

146. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th February, 1915, for a return showing, the 

names and post office addresses of all persons in Guysborough County, N.S., to whom 
the bounty under the Fenian Raid Volunteer Bounty Act has been paid ; the names and 
post office addresses of all persons whose applications have been rejected, and the 
reason for such rejections ; also the names and post office addresses of all poisons 
whose applications have been received but have not yet been paid, distinguishing 
between those who have been dealt with and sillowed, and such applications as havp 
been received but not yet considered, if any. Presented 5th March, 1915. — Mr. Sinclair. 

Not printed. 

147. Return to an Order of the House, of the 12th February, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. 

How many applications for seed grain have been received from residents of the three 
prairie provinces since June, 1914? 2. How many bushels of grain were include<l in 
the applications? 3. How many acres of land were to be seeded by the grain applied 
for? 4. How many bushels of wheat, oats and barley, respectively, the Government 
has on hand with which to meet t)ic applications? 5. If arrangements have been made 
under which the several Provincial Governments will assist in meeting the needs of thp 
settlers for seed grain? l^resented Sth March, 1915. — Mr. MiCruney . . ..Not printed. 



148. 



Return to an Order of the House, of the 2nd February, 1914, for a return Showing the 
number of ships chai'tcred by the (^Jovernment or any department thereof since Octobt-r, 
1911, to go to Hudson's Bay or James Bay; the name of each anS the tonnage; the 
name and residence of each commanding officer ; what cargo each carried, and what 
portion was landed, and where, what was lost and where, and what returned ; with the 
values in each case. Presented Sth March, 1915. — Mr. Graham Not print<d. 

148'(- Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd March, 1915, for a return showing the 
number of ships employed by the Railway Department, the number of men hired on 
vessels and on shore, and the amount expended for supplies, men and transportation 
from 31st Mari'h, 1914, to 31st December. 1914, in connection with the Hudson Bay 
Railway expenditures. Presented 22nd March, 1915. — Mr. Maedonald. .Not printed. 

149. Retuin to an Addiess to His Royal Highness the Governor General, of the 9th February, 
1914, for a co!>y of all correspondence since the 1st Janua:-y last with regard to the 
Ciilling of an Imperial Conference on the subject of naval defence. Presented Sth 
March, 1915. — Sir Wilfrid Laurier - Not printed. 

24 



Geoi-ge V. Alrhabeticiil Iii*Vx to ?e<-i' nal Papers. A. IMIf) 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 28— Contiimed. 

150. Hetuiii to an Order of the House, of the 11th February, 1!U5, for a return showing tlie 

names and addresses of all persons In Antigonish County to whom the bounty under 
the Fenian Raid Volunteer Bounty Act has been paid ; the names and addresses of 
all persons from said county whose applications have been rejected, and a list givins 
names and addresses of all applications from said county whose applications have not 
yet been disposed of. Presented Sth March, 1915. — Mr. Chifshohn ( Aniiyonisli) . 

yot piinl'd. 

151. Return to an Order of the House, of the 3rd March. 1915, for a return showing: — 1. Who 

were the different officers commissioned to the 17th Nova Scotia Regiment at Valcarticr 
before they sailed for Kngland? 2. Who are now the commissioned officers of said re;-;-- 
ment. Presented Sth March, 1915. — Mr. Mucdonald Not iirinUd. 

152. Return to an Order of the House, of the 9th February, 1915, for a copy 'of all accounts 

of the transfer of the storm signal at Shippigan, N.B., from its former position on 
land to the public wharf, showing the total cost of said transfer during the months of 
October and November in 1911. Presented 8th March, 1915.— Af?:. Turyeon. 

Not printed. 

153. Return to an Order of the House, of the 4th May, 1914, for a copy of all correspondence, 

telegrams, petitions, including the signatures of such petitions, and all other documents 
and papers in the possession of the Der-artment of Trade and Commerce, Or the minister 
of said department, or in the possession of the Prime Minister, relating to any apjili- 
cation made between 1st November. 1913. and date hereof by parties in Nova Scotia 
asking Lor Government assistance towards the transportation of fresh fish between pons 
in Nova Scotia and the United States. Presented 9th March, 1915. — Mr. Hmcla:r. 

Not priul(d. 

154. Statement of Mr. H. C. Crowell, staff correspondent of the Halifax Chronicle, and corre- 

spondence in connection with statements appearing in the press referring to alleged ill- 
treatment of the 17th Regiment of Nova Scotia, at Salisbury Plains. Presented by 
Sir Robert Borden, 9th March, 1915 Not printed. 

155. Return to an Order of the House, of the 3rd March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. Tlie 

estimated cost of fitting up the works of the Canadian Car and Foundry ("ompany. 
Limited, at Amherst. N.S., for military purposes. 2. The rent or other remuneration 
being paid, or will be paid, this company for the use of its buildings. 3. Who are to 
supply the military provisions, including food for men. coal for heating and cooking, 
and food and other supplies for horses quartered on these premises, and at what prices. 
4. Whether it is true that forms for tendering for such military supplies could only be 
obtained from the office of the sitting member for Cumberland Cc'jnty, and in several 
cases forms of tender were refused to applicants. 5. Whether the Government is 
aware that in the case of the supplying of hay, as alleged, not only Liberals were not 
allowed to tender for same, but supporters of the Government were informed they 
would not secure any part of the contract, if any of the hay to be supplied was to be 
purchased from a Liberal. Presented 11th March, 1915. — Mr. Copp Not printed. 

156. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General, of the 1st March, 

1915, for a copy of all correspondence of the Imperial authorities on the sub.iect of 
loans from the Imperial Treasury to the Canadian Government. Presented 11th March, 
1915. — Mr. Maclean (Halifax) Not privlrd. 

157. Return to an Order of the House of tbe 3rd March, 1915, for a copy of all correspondence, 

recommendations, letters and telegrams relating to the appointment of H. W. Ingraham 
as Assistant Registrar of Alien Enemies at Sdyney, N.S., and to his dismissal from the 
said office. Presented 12th March, 1915. — Mr. Kyle Not printed. 

158. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General of the 11th February, 

1915, for a copy of all correspondence relating to the purchase of, and payment by the 
(Jovernment for two submarines authorized by Order in Council dated the 7th August, 
1914, and of any other Order or Orders in Council relating thereto: and also of all 
reports received by the Government or any department thereof referring to said sub- 
marines. Presented 12th March, 1915. — Mr. Pugsley . . . .Printed for distHbutioii onli/. 

158«- Supplementary Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General, of 
the 11th February, 1915, for a copy of all correspondence relating to the purchase of, 
and payment by the Government for two submarines authorized by Order ir. Council 
dated the 7th August, 1914, and of any other Order or Orders in Council relating 
thereto; and also of all reports received by the Government or any department thereof 
referring to said submarines. I'i'esented 15th March, 191">. — Mr. Puyslei/. 

PHutcd for distril'ution only. 

25 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Se~ssional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

158&. Further Supplementary Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor 
General, of the 11th February, 1915, for a copy of all correspondence relating to the 
purchase of, and payment by the Government for two submarines authorized by Order 
in Council dated the 7th August, 1914, and of any other Order or Orders in Council 
relating thereto ; and also of all reports received by the Government, or any depart- 
ment thereof, referring to said submarines. Presented 24th March. 1915. — Mr. Pugsley. 

Printed for distribution only. 

159. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th February, 1915, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, telegrams, petitions, letters and all other documents in any way referring to the 
dismissal of Mr. Mallet, captain of the life-boat in the life-saving station at Cheticamr>, 
and the appointment of his successor. Presented 12th March, 1915. — Mr. Chisholm 
(A7itiffoyiish) Not printed. 

160. Return to an Order of the House of the .3rd March, 1915, for a copy of all letters, papers 

and other documents relating to the discharge of Dr. John McKenzie as medical doctor 
to the Indians of Pictou County, and to the appointment of Dr. Keith as his successor. 
Presented 12th March, 1915. — Mr. Macdonald Not printed. 

161. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th February, 1915, for a copy of all corre- 

spondence, letters, telegrams, instructions, reports and other documents relating to ao 
application by Udo F. Schrader for a grazing lease in townships 40 and 41, range 7, 
west of the 3rd meridian, province of Saskatchewan. Presented 12th March, 1915. — 
Mr. McCraney Not printed. 

162. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd March, 1915, for a return showing the names 

of all applicants for Fenian Raid Bounty in the county of Pictou who have not yet 
been paid their bounty. Presented 15th March, 1915. — Mr. Macdonald.. ..Not pri^itcd. 

• 
162a. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th February, 1915, for a return showing the 
names and addresses of all persons in the county of I'lccou who have been paid the 
Fenian Raid Bounty, and of all persons in said county who have made application for 
said bounty, and who have not yet received it. Presented 15th March, 1915. — Mr. 
Macdonald Not printed. 

163. Return to an Order of the House- of the 4th March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. 

From whom food for men and horses, and all other supplies and equipment for the 
Field Battery now being trained at Lethbridge. is bought? 2. If by tender^ the date 
tenders were called for? 3. When tenders were opened and contracts awarded? 4. 
The names and post office addresses of all parties who submitted tenders? 5. The 
successful tenderers, and the price in each case. Presented 15th March, 1915. — Mr. 
Buchanan Not printed. 

164. Return to an Order of the House, of the Isl March, 1915, for a copy of all petitions, 

reports, recommendations, letters, telegrams and correspondence relating to the dredg- 
ing of Antigonish Harbour and the opening or improving of the entrance thereto, 
received by the Government, or any depai-tment thereof, since the 1st January, 1912, 
and not already included in the return presented the ."^Oth of April, 1914, in obedience 
to the Order of the House passed the 16th March, previously. Presented 15th March, 
1915. — Mr. Chisholm {Antigonish) Not printed. 

165. Copy of Order in Council dated 9th March, 1915, restricting the transfer of British ships. 

Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, ItJth March, 1915 Not printed. 

166. Report of the Commissioners appointed to investigate and report upon the water levels 

of the River St. Lawrence at and below Montreal, together with a brief summary pre- 
pared by the Chief Hydrographer of the Suivey. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, 16th 
March, 1915 Not printed. 

167. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd March, 1915, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, papers and other documents relating to the mail contract between Chance Har- 
bour and Trenton, Pictou County, in regard to the existing contract. Presented 18th 
March, 1915.— A/r. Macdonald Not printed. 

168. lieturn to an Order of the House of the 19th February, 1915. for a copy of all corre- 

spondence and other documents relating to the awarding of the mail contract at Maria 
Capes, Bonaventure County, in 1914. Presented 18th March, 1915. — Mr. Marcil 

Not printed. 

169. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th February, 1915. for a copy of all tenders 

letters and telegrams, including first and second call for tenders, for rural mail delivery 
in the township of Dundee, county of Huntingdon. Presented 18th March. 1915. — Mr. 
Robb Not printed. 

20 



5 George V. Alphabetical Iu<1ex to Sessioaal Papers. A. 191 f> 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

170. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th February, 1915. for a copy of all petitions. 

letters, telesrrams and correspondence regarding a proposed daily mail service between 
Lower South River and South Side Harbour, Antigonish County, and improved postal 
accommodation for the residents of the last-named district. Presented ITth Marcii, 
1915. — Mr. Chishohn iAntigo}iish) Nort printed. 

171. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915, for a copy of all letters, docu- 

ments, telegrams, recommendations, petitions and other papers received by the Post 
Office Department since 1st January, 1914, relating to the contract for carrying tlie 
mails between Guysborough and Canso, N.S. Presented ISth March, 1915. — Mr. Sin- 
clair Not prinicd. 

172. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915. for a return showing:!. 

The total number of employees, both permanent and temporary, at the following post 
offices: Montreal. Toronto. Winnipeg. Halifax, Quebec, St. John, X.B., and Vancouver. 
2. The total amount of salaries paid in each case. 3. The total number of employees, 
and the amount of salaries paid in the above offices on tlie 1st of October, 1911. Pre- 
sented ISth March, 1915. — Mr. Leinieux Not printed. 

173. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th Februaiy, 1915, for a copy of all corre- 

spondence, telegrams, letters, petitions and documents of all kinds in any way referring 
to a proposed change in the mail route from Inverness railway station to ^Margarce 
Harbour. Presented ISth March, 1915. — Mr. ChisJiohn (Inverness).. ..Not printed. 

174. Return to an Order -of the House of the 8th March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. From 

how many firms or individuals the Government, or any department tliereof, has ordered 
soldiers uniforms since the 1st of July, 1914. 2. The names of the.sa firms. 3. How 
many Oliver equipments have been ordered from each firm. 4. How many of tlie.se 
uniforms each firm has delivered up to date. 5. How many each firm has yet to 
deliver. 6. The price each firm is receiving for these uniforms. Presented 18th March, 
1915. — Mr. Murphy Not printed. 

175. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. From 

how many firms or individuals the Government, or any department thereof, has ordered 
Oliver equipments since the 1st of July, 1914? 2. The names of these firms? 3. How 
inany Oliver equipments have been ordered from eacit firm? 4. How many each firm 
has delivered up to date? 5. How many each firm has yet to deliver? 6. The price 
each firm is receiving for these Oliver equipments? Presented ISth :\[arch, 1915. — Mr. 
Murphy Not printed. 

176. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th March, 1915, for a copy of all letters, corre- 

spondence, etc.. relating to the api)ointifient of William Gore Foster, of Dartmouth, 
N.S , to the position of Inspector of Indian Reserves. I'l-esented ISth March, 1915. — Mr. 
Carroll •. Not printed. 

177. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th February. 1915, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams, correspondence, leases, and otiier documents relating to the cutting of lumber 
by Mr. B. F. Smith, and others, from the so-called Tobique Indian Reserve in tha 
province of New Brunswick since the twelfth day of March, A.D. 1914, and also of all 
agreements, offers and promises made either by the said B. F. Smith or the Depart- 
ment of Indian Affairs, with reference to the sale or disposal of any of the said Tobique 
Indian Reserve since the said date, or any logs or lumber cut thereon. 2. Also a 
statement of all lumber cut by the said B. F. Smith from the said reserve, the rates 
of stumpage charged, and the amounts actually paid thereon from the first day of 
January, 1912, down to the date hereof. Presented ISth Mai-cli, 19.15.— .^[r. C'arvell. 

• Not printed. 

178. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. The 

number of customs officers employed at the customs poi-t of Masonville. Quebec, on 
20th September, 1911. 2. The names of these officeis. 3. Tlie salary each one received. 
4. The total amount of salaries paid the ofiicers at this port. 5. The number of customs 
officers employed at the port of Masonville at the pre.sent time. 6. The names of 
these ofiicers. 7. The salary each one receives. 8. Th<j total amount of salaries paid 
to the officers at this iiort. Presented 18th March, 1915. — .Mr. Kay Not printed. 

179. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915. for a return showing: — 1. The 

numVjer of customs officers employed at the customs port of Highwater, Quebec, on 
20th September, 1911. 2. The names of these officers. 3. The salary each one received. 
4. The total amount of salaries paid the officers at this port. 5. The number of customs 
officers employed at the port of Highwater at the iire.sent time. 6. The names of 
these officers. 7. The salary each one receives. 8. Th« total amount of salaries paid 
to the officers at this port. Presented 18th March, 1915. — .Mr. Kay Not printed. 

27 , 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers, A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

180. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. The 

number of customs officers employed at the customs port of Abercorn, Quebec, on 
20th September, 1911. 2. The names of these officers. 3. The salary each one received. 
4. The total amount of salaries paid the officers at this port. 5. The number of customs 
officers employed at the port of Abercorn at the present time. 6. The names of 
these officers. 7. The salary each one receives. 8. The total amount of salaries paid 
to the officers at this port. " Presented 18th March, 1915. — Mr. Kay... ..Not printed. 

181. Return to an Order of the House, of the 1st March, 1915, for a copy of all petitions, 

letters, communications and other documents relating to or bearing upon the dismissal 
of Leonard Hutchinson, chief keeper at Dorchester penintentiary. Presented 18th 
March, 1915. — Mr. Copp Not. prirUed. 

182. Retuin to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams and papers generally concerning the proposed construcfon of a bridge to 
coifnect Isle Perrot with the mainland at Vaudreuil. Presented 18th March. 1915.— 
Mr. Boytr ^'ot printed. 

182a. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915, for a copy of all letters, 
telegrams and papers generally concerning the proposed construction of a bridge 
between the Island of Montreal and the Mainland at Vaudreuil. Presented 18th March, 
1915'. — Mr. Boycr Not printed. 

183. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February,. 1915, for a return showing: — 

1. What properties have been acquired by the Government in the City of Regina since 
21st September, 1911? 2. The descriptions of such properties by metes and bounds? 
3. For what purposes such properties were acquired? 4. From whom such properties 
were purchased? 5. The total price and the price per foot paid for each property? 
6. If any such property was acquired by expropriation, what tribunal determined the 
price to be paid for any property so expropriated? 7. The dates on which any such 
properties were acquired? Presented 18th March, 1915. — Mr. Martin (Regina). 

184. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th February, 1915, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams, memoranda, pay-lists, recommendations and any other documents whatso- 
ever in any wise appertaining to the construction of a wharf at Lower Burlington, in 
the County of Hants. Presented 18th March, 1915. — Mr. Chisholni (Invei^icss) . 

Not printed. 

185. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th February, 1915, for a copy of pay-rolls and 

all correspondence and vouchers in connection with the repairs to Jordan breakwater, 
■Shelburne county, for which Leander McKenzie was contractor of works or foreman. 
Presented 18th March, 1915. — Mr. Law Not printed. 

186. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th February, 1915, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams, corresjiondence and pay-rolls in connection with repairs and extension of 
breakwater at Bluff Head, Yarmouth county, N.S., during year 1914. Presented 18th 
March, 1915. — Mr. Law _ Not printed. 

187. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915, for a return showing the 

amounts expended by the Public Works Department in the County of Inverness each 
year from 1896 down to 1915. Presented 18th March, 1915. — Mr. Chishohn (Inver- 
ness) Not printed. 

188. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th February, 1915, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams, correspondence and pay-sheets in connection with the repairsand other work 
on tlie breakwater at Sandford, Yarmouth County, N.S., during the year 1914. Pre- 
.sented 18th March, 1915. — Mr. Law Not printed. 

189. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915, for a copy of all papers, letters, 

petitions and other documents relating to a mail contract with David D. Heard & Sons, 
betwc-Mi Whitby and Grand Trunk Railway station, or with one John Gimblet. Whitby. 
P)-esented 19th March, 1915. — Mr. Pardee Not printed. 

190. Copies of Reports of the Committee of the Privy Council, approved by His Royal High- 

ness the Governor General, relating to certain advances made to the Canadian Northern 
Railway Company and the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company, respeciively, 
together with copies of agreements made between the said companies and His Majesty. 
I^resented by Hon. Mr. White, 19th March, 1915 Not printed. 

191. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th February, 1915, for a copy of all tenders 

received by the Post Office Department for the mail service between Caraquet and 
Tracadie, Gloucester ro\inty, N.B., on the 15th day ofjr^r.r.ary last, with the names of 
the tenderers, the respective amounts of the tenders, and the name of the new con- 
tractor. Presented 19th March, 1915. — Mr. Turgcon .Not printed, 

28 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. lOin 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S—Co»iinuc(l 

192. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915, for a return showing: — i. The 

fractional areas of homestead lands or otherwise in the province of Saskatchewan sold 
in the year 1914. 2. The name of the purchaser, and the price paid in each case. 
Presented 22nd March, 1915. — Mr. Martin (Regina) Not printed. 

193. Return to an Order of the House of the 25th February, 1915, for a return showing, in 

reference to the answer to question No. 6 of 9th Febi'uary, and answered 15th Feb- 
ruary as per page 161 unrevised Ha^isard, the cost of furnishing the Government ofRces 
in each of the said buildings. Presented 22nd March, 1915. — Mr. Turriff. 

Mot printed. 

194. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915, for a return showing the amount 

of railway subsidies paid in the county of Inverness since 1896, to date, and the dates 
on which such subsidies were paid. Presented 22nd March, 1915. — Mr. Cliishoha 
Inverness) Not printi d. 

195. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915, for a copy of all letters, papers, 

telegrams and other documents relating to the purchase or lease of the railway from 
New Glasgow to Thorburn, in the county of Pictou, known as the Vale Railway, from 
the Acadia Coal Company, since January, 1911, to date. Presented 22nd March, 1915. 
. — Mr. Macdonuld Not printed. 

196. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915, for a copy of all papers, 

letters, telegrams, correspondence, contracts, etc., in connection with the sale of the 
hay grown or the lease of certain tracts of land belonging to the Intercolonial Railway, 
upon which hay is grown, and which are contiguous to the properties of Charles Lavoie, 
Cl^ophas Leclerc and Joseph Parent of the Parish of Bic, county of Rimouski. Pre- 
sented .22nd March, 1915. — Mr. Lapoiute iKamouraska) Not printed. 

197. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd March, 1915, for a copy of all letters, papers, 

telegrams, evidence taken at investigations, reports and all other documents relating to 
the suspension or other action in regard to the charge of drunkeness against Newton 
Hopper, conductor on the Intercolonial Railway, and to his subsequent reinstatement. 
Presented 22nd March, 1915. — Mr. Macdonuld Not printed. 

198. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams and other papers relating to the dismissal of Bruce Wiswell, as sectionman on 
the Intercolonial Railway at SteJlarton, Nova Scotia. Presented 22nd March, 1915. — 
Mr. Macdonuld Not printed. 

199. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915, for a return showing: — 

1. The inward tonnage freight, and also the outward tonnage freight respectively, at 
Loggieville station of the Intercolonial Railway for each month of 1911, and also for 
the month of January, 1915. 2. The inward tonnage freight, and the outward tonnage 
freight at Chatham station, on the Intercolonial Railway for each month of 1914, and 
also for the month of January, 1915. 3. The inward tonnage freight, and the out- 
ward tonnage freight at Newcastle station on the Intercolonial Railway for each 
month of 1914, and also for the month of January, 1915. 4. The local and through 
passenger traffic to and through each of the above stations, lespectively, during each 
of the months above mentioned. Presented 22nd March, 1915. — Mr. Loygie. 

Not printed. 

200. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th February, 1915, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams and corre.spondence had by Margaret Lynch, or any person representing her' 
with reference to the expropriation of certain land beolnging to the said Margaret 
Lynch in the city of Fredericton, province of New Brunswick, by the Intercolonial Rail- 
way, and also of all letters, telegrams and correspondence had with P'. P. Gutelius or 
any other official of the intercolonial Railway with reference thereto. Presented 22nd 
March, 1915. — Mr. Carvell Xot printed. 

201. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd March, 191,5, for a copy of all docunu iits 

bearing on the payment made to C. R. Scoles, New Carlisle, Quebec, in July, 1914, of 
balance of subsidy voted to the Atlantic and Lake Superior lUiilway on the recom- 
mendation of the Financial Comptroller. Presented 22nd Maich, 1915. — Mr. Mareil. 

Not printed. 

202. Return to an Order of the House of the Ist March, 1915, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, correspondence and reports relating to the purchase of the New Brunswick and 
Prince Edward Ibland Railway, extending from Sackville to Cape Tormentine, county 
of V^esimorland. Presented 22nd March, 1915. — Mr. Copp Not' printed. 

203. Return to an Order of the House of the Ist March, 1915, .for a cony of the tariff on flour 

shipments now in force on the Quebec, Oriental Railway and tlie Atlantic, Quebec and 
Western Railway. Presented 22iid March, 1U15. — Mr. Mured Not printed. 

29 



George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

204. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915, for a copy of all petitions,' 

corresponcTence, complaints, reports and other documents relating to the dismissal of 
Alfred H. Bonnyman, postmaster of Mattatall Lake, in the county of Colchester, N.S. 
Presented 24th March, 1915.— il/?-. SiHcZair Xot printed. 

205. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General, of the 1st March, 

1915, for a copy of all correspondence, documents, charges, evidence, findings and 
Orders in Council in reference to the dismissal of John Thomas, postmaster at Ham- 
mond's Plain, Halifax County, N.S. Presented 24th March, 1915. — Mr. Maclean {Hali- 
fax) A'^ot printed. 

205a- Supplementary Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General, of 
the 1st March, 1915, for -a copy of all correspondence, documents, charges, evidence, 
findings and Orders in Council in reference to the dismissal of John Thomas, postmaster 
at Hammond's Plain, Halifax County, N.S. Presented 8th April, 1915. — Mr. Maclean 
(Halifax) .. .' Not printed. 

206. Certified copy of a Report of the Committee ofthe Privy Council, a;;proved by His Royal 

Highness the Governor General, v;ith reference to the quoction of providing adequate pen- 
sionary assistance for officers and men disabled or partially disabled on active service 
or for the dependents of such officers and men should they be killed on active service. 
Presented by Sir Robert Borden, 24th March, 1915 Xot printed. 

207. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March. 1915, for a return showing: — 1. From 

how many firms or private individuals the Government, or any department of the 
Government has ordered saddles since the 1st of July, 1914? 2. The names of these 
firms? 3. How many saddles have been ordered from each firm? 4. How many saddles 
each firm has delivered up to date? 5. How many saddles each firm has yet to deliver? 
6. The price each firm is receiving for these saddles? Presented 26th March, 1915. — 
Mr. Murphy Xot printed. 

208. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915. for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, letters, telegrams and other documents relating to the dismissal of Mr. P. B. 
Hurlbert, postmaster at Springdale, Yarmouth County, N.S., and the removal of the 
office. Presented 30th March, 1915. — Mr. Laiv Xot printed. 

209 Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915, for a copy of all letters, peti- 
tions, telegrams and correspondence between the Hon. L. P. PcUeticr, ex-Postmaster 
General and any person or persons of the county of Levis, which during the month of 
April, 1912, had any connection with the appointment of G. A. Marois to a position in 
the customs office at Quebec, and the appointment of J. E. Gingras as postmaster of 
St. Romuald and Ktchemin. Presented 30th March, 1915. — Mr. Bourassa. 

Xot printed. 

210. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams, petitions and documents of all kinds in possession of the Post Office Depart- 
ment, referring in any way to the conduct of •he postmaster at Grand Btang since his 
appointment until the present date. Presenfed 0th March, 1915. — Mr. Chishohn (Inver- 
ness) Xot printed. 

211. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915, for a copy of all telegrams, 

letters, papers, documents, evidence and reports, in connection with the dismissal of 
Charles H. Marshall as postmaster at Nanton, Alberta. Presented 30th March, 1915. — 
Mr. Warwick Xot printed. 

212. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1-915, for a copy of tlie report of the 

officer in charge of the lobster hatchery at Port Daniel West, and of the report of 
the inspection thereof for the season 1914. Presented 31st March, 1915. — .Mr. Marcil. 

Xot printed. 

213. Return to an Order of the House of the 24tli February, 1915, for a copy of all corre- 

spondence, petitions, documents, etc., in connection with a petition of Donald Williams 
and others in respect to the regulation offish traps in Green Harbour and vicinity. Pre- 
sented 31st March, 1915. — Mr. Law Xot printed. 

214. Return to an Order of the House of the 9th February, 1915, for a coi)y of all correspond- 

ence, petitions, departmental recommendations and other pajfers an<l documents in the 
Department of Marine and Fisheries relating to the definition of a "coasting voyage," 
as defined in the Canada Shipping Act since the revision of the statutes in 1S86. Pre- 
sented 1st April, 1915. — Mr. Sinclair Not pHntcd. 

215. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915. for a copy of all advertisemenls. 

tenders, contracts, vouchers, letters, documents, etc.. relating to the establishment of 
the ferry service between the City of Halifax and Dartmouth, N'.S.. for the employees 
of the Marine and Fisheries Department at Halifax, N.S. Presented 1st April. 1915. — 
Mr. Maclean (Hulifax) Xot printed. 

80 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S—Uo7itmned. 

216. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th February, 101 r,. for a copy of all pay-rolls, 

vouchers in detail, correspondence and all other doci>;nents in conneotlon' with the fol- 
lowing public wharves in Shelburne ; breakwater or wharf at East Green Harbour ; shed 
on public wharf at Shelburne, and repairs to Gunning Cove wharf. Presented 1st 
April, 1915. — Mr. Law Kot printed. 

217. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. 

What properties have been acquired by the Government in the city of Regina since 
21st September, 1911? 2. The descriptions of such properties by metes and bounds? 
3. For what purposes such properties were acquired? 4. From whom such properties 
were purchased? 5. The total price and the price per foot paid for each property. 0. 
If any such property was acquired by exinopriation. what tribunal determined the price 
to be paid for any property so expropriated. 7. The dates on which any such prop- 
erties were acquired. Presented 1st April, 1915. — Mr. Martin (Regina) . .Kof printed. 

218. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th February, 1915, for a copy of all papers, 

letters, telegrams, etc., concerning the purchase of the property known as the Cai-slake 
Hotel, in Montreal, for post office purposes. Presented 1st April, 1915. — Mr. Lcinieux. 

Sot printed. 

219. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General, of the 1st March, 

1915, for a copy of all letters, telegrams, reports, recommendations, Ordei-s in Council, 
pay-rolls, list of expenditures, names of foremen and superintendents, and all other 
documents whatsoever relating to or in anywise appertaining to the erection and main- 
taining of breakwaters at Phinney's Cove and Young's Cove, county of Annapolis. Pre- 
sented 1st April, 1915. — Mr. Macdonald yot printed. 

220. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th February, 1915, for a copy of all corre- 

spondence, petitions and documents since the 31st of October, 1912, relating in any way 
whatever to the proposed public wharf at Lower Wood Harbour. Presented 1st April, 
1915. — Mr. Laxo Not pHnted. 

221. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915, for a copy of all advertisements, 

tenders, accounts, vouchers, letters, documents and correspondence relating to the con- 
struction of an extension to the breakwater at Prospect, Halifax County, N.S. Pre- 
sented 1st April, 1915. — Mr. Maclean (Halifax) Not printed. 

222. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915, for a copy of all telegrams, 

letters, petitions, reports, recommendations and documents of all kinds in any way 
referring to the purchase of a site for a public building at Port Hawkesbury, and also 
referring in any way to the erection of a public building thereon. Presented 1st April, 
1915. — Mr. Chisholm (Inv-eniess) Not printed. 

223. Return to an Order of the House of the 8th March, 1915, for a return showing all 

amounts of money expended upon public works in the counties of Wright, Pontiac and 
Labelle from October, 1911, to date. Presented 1st April, 1915. — Mr. Devlin. 

iVo< printed. 

224. Return to an Order of the House of the 17th March, 1915, for a copy of the pay-sheet 

for the month of October, 1914, in connection with repairs to the breakwater at Ship- 
pigan Gully, Gloucester County, N.B. Presented 1st April, 1915. — Mr. Turgeon. 

Not printed. 

825. Return to an Order of the House of the 8th March, 1915. for a return showing: — l. From 
hoy; nvany firms or private individuals the Government, or an.v department of the 
Government, has ordered bicycles since the 1st of July, 1914? 2. The names of those 
firuis? 3. How many bicycles have been ordered from each firm? 4. How many 
ea..h firm has delivered up to date? 5. How many each firm has yet to deliver? 6. 
Tn? price each firm is receiving for these bicycles. Presented 1st April, 1915. — Mir. 
^y'e Not printed. 

226. Return So an Order of the House of the 22nd Feljruary, 1915, for a return showing the 

names and addresses of all Fenian Raid Veterans in the county of Inverness who. have 
been paid the Fenian Raid Bounty, the names and addresses of those wiio have not 
been paid, and the names and addresses of those whose applications have b<;en refused. 
Presented 1st April, 1915. — Mr. Chisholm (Inverness) Not printed. 

227. Return to an Order of the Hou.se of the 8th March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. From 

how many firms or private individuals the (Jovernment, or any department of the Gov- 
ernment, lias ordered motor cycles since the 1st of July, 1914? 2. The names of these 
firms? 3. How many motor cycles have been ordered from each firm? 4. How many 
each firm has delivered up to date? 5. How many each firm has yet to deliver? 6. 
The price each firm is receiving for these motor cycles? I'resented 1st April, 1915. 
Mr. Chisholm (Antigonish) Not printed. 

31 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLITME 2S— Continued. 

228. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General of the 19th February, 

1915, for a copy of all Orders in Council, letters and telegrams exchanged between the 
Dominion Government and the several provinces, concerning the proposed transfer of 
fisheries in tidal waters from the Provincial to the Federal control. Presented 1st 
April, 1915. — Mr. Lemieux Xot printed. 

229. Return to an Order of the House of the 4th March, 1915, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence exchanged between the Govennnent of Canada, or any minister or official thereof, 
in regard to the control of fisheries in Quebec province, as well as of all documents 
bearing on that question, together with a list of licenses granted by either Governments 
for the present year. Presented 1st April, 1915. — Mr. Marcil Sot printed. 

230. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th February, 1915, for a copy of all corre- 

spondence, letters, telegrams and petitions relating to the appointment of Alfred Bi.shop 
as farm foreman, or in any other capacity at the experimental station at Kentville, 
Nova Scotia. Presented 1st April, 1915. -^il/r. Kytc Xot printed. 

231. Return to an Address of the 10th March, 1915, showing copies of all correspondence, tele- 

grams and documents exchanged between the Department of Marine and Fisheries and 
the Minister of tlie Naval Service and the Department of Colonization, Mines and Fish- 
eries of the province of Quebec, relating to the rescinding of the prohibition of net 
fisliing in the waters of the Lakes of Two Mountains, St. Francis and St. Louis, as per 
Order in Council (197) passed in Ottawa, Thursday, 28th day of January, 1915. — 
Senate) Xot printed. 

232. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915, for a copy of all papers, letters, 

petitions and other documents relating to the establishment of a rural mail route from 
River John to Hedgeville, county of Pictou. Presented 3rd April, 1915.- — Mr. Macdonatd. 

Xot printed. 

233. A communication from the Consul General of Belgium in Canada, respecting the protest 

of the Belgium Goveinment against the contention of the German Chancery that as 
far back as in 1906, Belgium had broken her own neutrality by the conclusion of an 
agreement with Great Britain. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, 5th April, 1915. 

Printed for srssionul papers. 

7CIS4:. Return to an Address of the Senate dated 11th March, 1915, showing: — 1. How much 
wheat, oats and barley has the Dominion (government purcliased in 1914 for seed to be 
distributed in the West, giving the amount of each kind? 2. Where is said grain 
stored, and what rate of storage is the Government paying on same? 3. How much 
did the Government pay per bushel for oats, barley and wheat, purchased for said 
provinces, and when was said grain purchased? 4. Have they given a contract for 
cleaning said grain, and to whom, and at what price? — (Senate) Xot printed. 

235. Return to an Order of the Senate dated the 18th March, 1915, that an Order of the 

Senate do issue for : — 1. A return showing the results per grade of all grain in each 
of the terminal elevators at Fort William and Port Arthur at the annual weigh-up for 
each of the years 1912, 1913 and 1914. 2. A return showing the balances whether 
overages or shortages in each grade in each elevator for each of the said years. 3. A 
return showing the net result of the three years operations of each of said elevators 
in overages or shortages in each grade. — (Senate) Xot printed. 

236. Return to an Order of the House of the 8th March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. The 

quantity of spirituous liquors, proof gallons, including ale, wines and beers, taken out 
of bond between 6th August and 21st August, 1914, at each port of the Domnion. 2. 
The quantity of cigars, cigarettes and tobacco taken out of bond between the above 
mentioned dates at each port of the Dominion. Presented 7th April, 1915. — Mr. 
Hughes ( Kint/s, P. E.I.) Xot printed. 

237. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. From 

how many firms or private individuals the Government, or any department of the Gov- 
ernment, has ordered forage caps since the 1st of July. 1914? 2. The names of these 
firms? 3. How many forage caps have been ordered from each firm? 4. How many 
each firm has delivered to date? 5. How many each firm has yet to deliver? 6. The 
price each firm is receiving for these forage caps? Presented 7th April. 1915. — Mr. 
Murphy Xot printed. 

238. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th March, 1915, for a copy of the report of 

Dr. Wm. Wakeham, on the extent of the losses sustained in the Baie des Chaleurs and 
Gulf of St. Lawrence in the storm of Sth June, 1914, togother with a statement show- 
ing the number of claims received and those entertained, with names of claimants and 
their residence, and the amounts paid to each, together with a copy of other documents 
bearing on this question. Presented 7th April, 1915. — Mr. Marcil Xot printed. 

S2 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1015 



CONTJiNTS OF VOLUME 2S—Con{inued. 

239. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General, of the 23rd Feb- 

ruary, 1915, for a copy of all letters, telegrams, reports, recommendations, Orders in 
Council and all other documents and papers in connection with rewards to the officers 
and crews of steamers John L. Cann and Westport III, for their heroic efforts in sav- 
ing the passengers and crews of ss. Cobequid, wrecked on Trinity Lodge, 13th January, 

1914. Presented 7th April, 1915. — Mr. Law Not printed. 

240. Return to an Order of the House of the 29th March, 1915, for a copy of all documents, 

letters, telegrams, reports, etc., relating to the dismissal of Alexandre Blais, of the city 
of L6vis, from the position of customs officer at Bradore Bay, and the appointment of 
his successor or succe.ssors. Presented 7th April, 1915. — Mr. Bourassa . . ..Not printed. 

241. A Return to an Address of the Senate dated 18th March, 1915, for: — 1. A return showing 

all appointments to the Civil Service, Department of the Interior, in that area con- 
tained ii; the present constituencies of Medicine Hat and Macleod, giving names, date 
of appointment, how appointed, and salaries from the year 1896 to the present date. 
2. Also, all vacainJes by death, resignation or dismissal, giving name, date, length of 
service and cause of dismissal in the same area and during the same period. — (Senate). 

Not printed. 

242. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915, for a copy of charges made 

against J. Herbert Sweetman, customs officer at Port Daniel Centre, Quebec, which 
brought about his dismissal ; and also of charges against Velson Horie, lighthouse 
keeper at Port Daniel West, Quebec, which brought about his dismissal. Presented 
Sth April, 1915. — Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure) Not printed. 

243- Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915, for a copy of all corre- 
spondence, recommendations, petitions, contracts, tenders and other papers and docu- 
ments in any way connected with the letting of the contract for carrying the mails 
between Guysborough and Erinville, N.S. Presented Sth April, 1915. — Mr. Sinclair. 

Not printed. 

244. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th March, 1915, for a copy of all reports, peti- 

tions, letters, telegrams and other documents in connection with the dismissal of W. M. 
Thomson from the postmastership at Fort Qu'Appelle, and of any petition or petitions 
for his reinstatement, and of all correspondence in connection therewith. Presented 
Sth April, 1915.- — Mr. Thomson (Qu'Appelle) Not printed. 

245. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd INIarch, 1915, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, correspondence and petitions received in the Post Office Department, in any 
way referring to the calling of tenders for the Antigonish-Sherbrooke mail service, 
which tenders were opened or due at the Post Office Department on the 11th December 
last ; and of all representations or requests, recommending or suggesting that new 
tenders should be invited as was done early in February last. Presented Sth April, 1915. 
— Mr. Chlshohn (Inverness) ■; xot printed. 

246. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd March, 1915, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, papers and other documents in regard to a proposed rural mail delivery service 
between Pictou and Saltsprings, Pictou coujity, and as to the arrangements for the 
existing service between those points. Presented Sth April, 1915. — Mr. Macdonald. 

Not printed. 

247. Return to an Address of His Royal Highness the Governor General, of the 1st March, 

1915, for a copy of all letters, telegrams, reports, recommendations, Orders in Council', 
and all other documents and papers whatsoever relating to or in any wise connected 
with the establishment of rural mail routes and deliveries from Bridgetown to Gran- 
ville Ferry, county of Annapolis, and especially of all letters, telegrams, reports, recom- 
mendations and documents relating to the closing of the post offices at Belleisle, Upper 
Granville, and the establishment of the post office at Granville Centre, all in the county 
of Annapolis. Presented Sth April, 1915. — Mr. Macdonald Not printed. 

248. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915, for a copy of all telegrams, 

letters, reports, petitions and all other documents in any way referring to the proposed 

line of railway from Orangedale to Cheticamp. Presented 9th April, 1915. Mr Chis- 

hohn (Inverness) >o( printed. 

249. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th Maroh, 1915, for a copy of all documents, 

investigations, reports, correspondence, etc., relating to the burning of certain buildings 
belonging to the Trois Pistoles Pulp and Lumber Company and to Andr4 Leblond, near 
Tobin station, on the Intercolonial Railway. Presented 9th April, 1915. — Mr. Lapointe 
(Kamov.raska) jy-ot printed. 

250. Return to an Order of the House of the ISth March, 1915, for a return showing the 

names of all officials,- assistants and clerks, employed in the railway offices at Moncton, 
N.B., and the salary paid to each ; also the namss of officials formerly employed in said 
offices who have been retired on superannuation allowance, and the amount of retiring 
allowance beii.g paid to each. Presented 9th April, 1915. — Mr. Copp . . ..Not printed. 

T9240— 3 33 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

251. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th March, 1915, for a return showing the names 

of all persons from whom lands have been purchased, the quantity of land so acquired, 
and the amount paid therefor, in connection with the Dartmouth and Dean's Post Office 
Branch of the Intercolonial Railway since the date of return numbered 12S made to 
Parliament at the last regular session thereof. Presented 9th April, 1915. — Mr. Maclean 
{Halifax) Not printed. 

252. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General of the 17th March, 

1915, for a copy of all correspondence, letters. Orders in Council, agreements, etc., in 
reference to the leasing or transfer of the Windsor Branch of the Intercolonial Railway 
to the Canadian Pacific Railway. Presented 9th April, 1915. — Mr. Maclean (Halifax). 

Not printed. 

253. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915, for a copy of all petitions, 

correspondence, reports of engineers or other persons in the possession of the Depart- 
ment of Railways and Canals relating to the construction of a railway in the county 
of Guysborough, N.S. Presented 9th April, 1915.^ — Mr. Sinclair Not printed. 

254. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th March, 1915, for a copy of all letters and 

correspondence, between D. McDonald, superintendent of the Intercolonial, at L§vi.s, 
P. Brady, general superintendent at Moncton, or any other official of the said Inter- 
colonial Railway and Theophile Belanger, commercial traveller of the city of Mont- 
real, concerning certain claims made by the said Theophile Belanger for delay of 
baggage in transportation between Drummondville and Matapedia, in May, 1913, also 
all reports made bearing upon such claims against the said Intercolonial Railway. Pre- 
sented 9th April, 1915. — Mr. Ethier Not printed. 

255. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th February, 1915, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams, minutes of investigation and other documents relating to the dismissal of 
Isaac Arbuckle, foreman carpenter Intercolonial Railway at Pictou, and of appointment 
of Alex. Talbot to the vacancy. Presented 9th April, 1915.— il/r. Macdonald. 

Not printed. 

256. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th February, 1915, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence letters, telegrams, by any and all persons whomsoever, had with the Department 
of Railways and Canals, or F. P. Gutelius, general manager of the Intrcolonial Rail- 
way, or any other official thereof, with reference to freight rates over that portion of 
the Transcontinental Railway, province of New Brunswick, and also with reference to 
the removal of the Y connection at "Wapski, county of Victoria, between the said 
Transcontinental Railway and the Canadian Pacific Railway at that point. Presented 
9th April, 1915. — Mr. Carvell .. ., Not printed. 

257. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th February, 1915, for a copj' of all letters, 

telegrams, correspondence, contracts, and other documents relating to the operation of 
the St. John Valley Railway, so called, by the Intercolonial Railway, since the first day 
of July last past, and of all letters, correspondence, etc., had either with the Department 
of Railways and Canals, or with F. P. Gutelius, or any other official of the Intercolonial 
Railway. Presented 9th April, 1915. — Mr. Carvell Not printed. 

258. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915, for a copy of all petitions, 

memorials, letters, telegrams, communications and reports regarding the construction 
of a roadway to the new public wharf at Sackville, N.B., and also In regard to thp 
building of a spur line or siding from the Intercolonial Railway at Sackville to said 
wharf. Presented 9th April, 1915. — Mr. Copp Not printed. 

259. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th March, 1915, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence passing between any department of the Government and any official of the Gov- 
ernment, or any other p«rson, with respect to the placing of settlers on homesteads in 
the Duck Mountains Timber Reserve, and also of the evidence taken by Inspector 
Cuttle, of the Department of the Interior, in an investigation held by the said inspector 
with respect to the granting of entries for homesteads on the said timber reserve. Pre- 
sented 9th April, 1915. — Mr. Martin {Reginu) j^ot printed. 

260. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. From 

how many firms or private individuals the Government, or any depai-tment of the Gov- 
ernment, has ordered flannel shirts since the 1st of July, 1914? 2. The names of these 
firms? 3. How many flannel shirts have been ordered from each firm? 4. How many 
each firm has delivered up to date? 5. How many each firm has yet to deliver? 6. 

The price each firm is receiving for these flannel shirts? Presented 9th April, 1915. 

Mr. Carroll A^o/ printed. 

260a. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915, for a return showing: 1. 

From how many firms or private individuals the Government, or any department of the 
Government, has ordered cotton shirts since the 1st of July, 1914? 2. The names of 
ifliese firms? 3. How many cotton shirts have been ordered from each firm? 4. How 
many each firm has delivered up to date? 5. How many each firm has yet to deliver? 
6. The price each firm is receiving for these cotton shirts? Presented 9th April, 1915. 
— Mr. Chisliolm (Antigonish) Not printed 

34 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sej^siontil Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

2606. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. 
From how many firms or private individuals the Government or any department of the 
Government, has ordered service shirts since tlie 1st of July, 1914? 2 The names of 
these firms? 3. How many service shirts have been ordered from each firm? 4. How 
many each firm has delivered up to date? 5. How many each flim has yet to deliver? 
6. The price each firm is receiving for these service shirts? Presented 10th April, 
1915. — Mr. Carroll Not printed. 

260c. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. 
From liow many firms or private individuals the Government or any department of the 
Government, has ordered winter shirts since the 1st of July, 1914? 2. The names of 
these firms? 3. How many winter shirts have been ordered from each firm? 4. How 
many each firm has delivered up to date? 5. How many each firm has yet to deliver? 
6. The price each firm is receiving for these winter shirts? Presented 12th April, 1915. 
Mr. McKenzie Kot printed. 

261. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. 

What medical supplies or other materials have been purchased since 1st A gust, 1914, 
by the Government, or any department of the Government, from Mr. T. A. Brownlee, 
of Ottawa? 2. The quantities of goods purchased from him and the prices paid? 3. 
Whether the Government, or any? department of the Government, prejiared a schedule 
of rates tos how what constitutes a fair and reasonable price for such goods purchased? 
4. If so, if a careful check was made Xo see that a fair and reasonable price was 
charged? 5. The total value of the goods delivered up to date? 6. The total value 
of the goods which have been ordered from IMr. T. A. Brownlee, but which to this date 
have not been delivered? Presented 9th April, 1915. — Mr. Kyte Not printed. 

262. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. From 

how many firms or private individuals the Government, or any department of the Gov- 
ernment, has ordered kit bags since the 31st of July, 1914? 2. The names of these 
firms? 3. How many kit bags have been ordered from each firm? 4. How many each 
fii-m has delivered up to date? 5. How many each firm has yet to deliver? 6. The 
price each firm is receiving for these kit bags? Presented 9th April, 1915. — Mr. Kyte. 

Not printed. 

263. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. 

What medical supplies or other materials have been purchased since 1st August, 1914, 
by the Government, or any department of the Government, from Mr. -S. J, Stevenson, 
or the Waverley Pharmacy? 2. The quantities of goods purchased from him and the 
prices paid? 3. Whether the Government, or any department of the Government, pre- 
pared a schedule of rates to show what constitutes a fair and reasonable price for such 
goods purchased? 4. If so, if a careful check was made to see that a fair and reason- 
able price was charged? 5. The total value of the goods delivered by Mr Stevenson, 
or Waverley Pharmacy, up to date? 6. The total value of the goods which have been 
ordered from Mr. S. J. Stevenson, or Waverley Pharmacj% but which to this date have 
not been delivered? Presented 9th April, 1915. — Mr. Chisholm {Antigonlsh) . 

Not printed. 

264. Return to an Order of the House of the Sth March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. From 

how many firms or private individuals the Government, or any department of the Gov- 
ernment, has ordered suits of underwear since the 1st July, 1914? 2. The names of these 
firms? 3. How many suits of underwear have been ordered from each firm? 4. How 
many each firm has delivered up to date? 5. How many each firm has yet to deliver? 
6. The price each firm is receiving for these suits of underwear? Presented 9th April, 
1915. — Mr. Law Not printed. 

265. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th March, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. 

What medical supplies or other materials have been purchased since 1st August, 1914, 
by-the Government, or any department of the Government, from Mr. W. B. McDonald, 
of Ottawa? 2. The quantities of goods purchased from him and the prices paid? 3. 
Whether the Government, or any department of the Government, prepared a schedule 
of rates to show what constitutes a fair and reasonable price for such goods purchased? 
4. If so, if a careful check was made to see that a fair and reasonable price was 
charged? 5. The total value of the goods delivered by Mr. McDonald up to date? 6. 
The tt)tal value of the goods which have been ordered from Mr. McDonald, but which 
to this date have not been delivered? Presented 9th April, 1915. — Mr. Carroll. 

Not printed. 

266. Report of Thomas R. Ferguson, commissioner appointed to investigate matters pertaining 

to the Blood Indian Reserve and the acquisition of certain Indian lands by Messrs. 
James A. Smart, Frank Pedley and William J. White, together with the evidence taken 
in the said investigation. Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 10th April, 1915. 

Not printed. 

35 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

267. Return to an Order of the House of the 17th March, 1915, for a copy of all petitions, 
letters, documents, etc., between persons in the province of Nova Scotia and the Depart- 
ment of Trade and Commerce since 1st August last, with regard to Atlantic ocean 
freight rates on subsidized steamers or otherwise. Presented 10th April, 1915. — Mr. 
Maclean (Halifax) Not printed. 

258. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd February, 1915, for a copy of the report 

of investigation held about 1st June, 1914, by T. R. Ferguson, as special commissioner, 
into the allotment of homesteads on the area cut out of the Riding Mountain Forest 
Reserve in the year 1908 or about that time. Presented 10th April, 1915.— Mr. Cruise. 

I^ot printed. 

259. Copy of Order in Council dated 6th April, 1915. — Regulations in respect to steam trawlers 

clearing from ports on the Atlantic seaboard of Canada. Presented by Hon. Mr. Hazen, 
10th April, 1915 Not printed. 

270." Return to an Order of the House of the 15th February, 1915, for a copy of all tenders in 
connection with the supply of lumber to the Department of Militia for the training 
camps at Medicine Hat and Calgary, and of the invoices for the material supplied. 
Presented 12th April, 1915. — Mr. Buchanan Not printed. 

271. Return to an Order of the House of the 17th March, 1915, for a copy of all correspond- 
ence and reports relating to the purchase of 25,000 shovels of special pattern, men- 
tioned in Order in Council P.C. 2302, dated 4.th September, 1914, on page 38 of memo- 
randa respecting work of the Department of Militia and Defence, and also relating to 
any further purchases of such shovels. Presented 12th April, 1915. — Mr. Hughes 
(Kings, P.E.I.) Not printed. 

212,. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th March, 1915, for a return showing tho 
names of the persons who bought the horses which were sold by auction at Valcartier 
camp, giving the price paid for each horse. Presented 12th April, 1915. — Mr. Kay. 

Not printed. 

273. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th February, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. 

If the Government ever leased any land at or near Shelburne, Nova Scotia, known as 
the Barracks property, to the town of Shelburne? 2. If, so, at what rental, and for 
how long? 3. If said lease is now in force? 4. If the Government has sold any of 
the standing timber on this property? 5. If so, when, to whom, and at what price? 
6. How long the purchaser has to remove it? 7. What is the minimum size at the 
stump sold? 8. If the Government has ever had the property cruised by competent 
timber cruiser? 9. K so, by whom, and when? 10. If the timber on said property 
was advertised for sale, and if tenders were asked for, or any opportunity afforded to 
other prospective buyers to bid for this timber? 11- If any other offers were received? 
12. If the town of Shelburne was notified before the sale took place. If so, on what 
date? 13. How much timber the Government estimates to be on this property? 14. 
What steps the Government intends to take to compute the quantity of timber cut from 
this property? 15. If the Government is aware that timber is now being cut from this 
property by a person or firm who are cutting tirpber from private property adjoining 
said Barracks property? 16. What steps are being taken by the Government to be 
sure that in this case the logs are kept separate from those coming from the adjoining 
lot, for the purpose of having accurate count and scale? 17. If the Government will 
bring down a copy of all correspondence, cruisers reports and contracts in relation to 
the sale of this timber? Presented 12th April, 1915.— il/r. Law Not printed. 

274. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General, of the 11th February, 

1915, for a copy of all correspondence, telegrams. Orders in Council, petitions and any 
other documents in connection with the removal of Edward N. Higinbotham from the 
position of postmaster at Lethbridge, Alberta. Presented 13th April, 1915. — Mr. 
Buchanan Not pr'mted. 

275. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th March, 1915, for a copy of all petitions, 

correspondence and other documents in connection with the dismissal of Emile Cyr, 
postmaster at St. Hermas, county of Two Xountains. Presented 13th April, 1915. — 
Mr. Ethier Not printed. 

276. Return to an Order of the House of the 7th April, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. Who 

the mail carriers are for the rural mail in the counties of Chicoutimi and Saguenay? 
2. The salai-y of each such mail carrier, and the trip that each lias to make? 3. Who 
the mail carriers are for the rural mails in the parishes of St. Prime and St. I^ouis de 
Metabetchouan, and their respective salaries? Presented 13th April, 1915. — Mr. 
Lapointe (Kamo%ii-aska) Not prtnted. 

277. Return to an Order of the House of the 29th March, 1915, for a copy of all documents, 

letters, telegrams, testimonials, repoits. etc., relating to the claim of T^lesphore Paradis, 
of the city of L$vis, arising from the bui-ning of his wharf and mills which were set 
on Are by a locomotive of the Intercolonial Railway. Presented 13th Apr;i, 1915. — 
Mr. Bourossa Not printed. 

nr. 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2S— Continued. 

278. Return to an Order of the House of the Slh April, 1915, for a return showing: — 1. The 

number of employees connected witli the administration of the Three Rivers post office 
on the 21st September, 1911, and the annual amount paid in salaries at that date for 
such service. 2. The number of employees connected with the administration of the 
Three Rivers post office at the present date, and the amount of the annual salaries paid 
for such service. 3. The number of employees in the Customs Department for Three 
Rivers on the 21st September, 1911, and the t^mount of the annual salaries paid for 
such service. 4. The number of employees in the Customs Department for Three Riveis 
at the present date, and the annual amount of the salaries paid for such service. 5. 
The number of employees in the Inland Revenue Department for the district of Three 
Rivers on the 21st September, 1911, and the annual amount of salaries paid for such 
service. 6. The number of employees at the present, dato in the Inland Revenuf 
Department for the district of Three Rivers, and the amount of the annual salaries 
paid for such service. 7. The number of employees, and the amount paid in salaries 
for the works on the St. Maurice, in the county of Champlain, during the year 1911-12. 
8. The number of employees, and the amount of salaries paid per year for the works 
on the St. Mauiice, in the county of Champlain, since 1911-12. 9. If the employees 
whose names follow, were dismissed on the 26th and 27th Novembe;-, 1914, and the 
4th and 5th January, 1915 ; Wilde Lavalee, Pierre Thicierge, Joseph Paquin, sr., 
Joseph Paquin, jr., Athanase G61inas, clerks. 10. If so, at whose request, and for what 
reasons. 11. If those days were taken off the salaries of such employees. Pi-esented 
13th April, 1915. — Mr. Bxtreau Not printed. 

279. Return to an Order of the House of the 4th March, 1915, for a copy of all documents 

bearing on the removal of the salmon retaining pond from Flat Lands to New Mills, 
N.B., and of all reports on the operations thereof, with a detailed statement of outlay 
and cost of removal, installation and operation. Presente<l 13th April, 1915. — Mr. 
Marcil Xot printed. 

289. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General of the 3rd February, 
1913, for a copy of all Orders in Council, letters, telegrams, reports, petitions and other 
papers and documents in the possession of the Department of Marine and Fisheries, or 
any department of the Government, relating to the granting of licenses to pack lobsters, 
and bearing date between 1st January, 1912, and 25th January, 1913. Presented 13th 
April, 1915. — Mr. Sinclair :^^ot 2}rintcd. 

281. Report of Thomas R. Ferguson, K.C., commissioner appointed to investigate into all 

matters relating to, or connected with, the application for (although such application 
may not have been granted, or may still bo pending) the sale, lease, grant, exchange, 
or other disposition by any means whatsoever, since the first day of July, 1S96, of: — 
(a) Dominion Lands ; (b) Timber and mineral lands and mining rights and privilege.^, 
including coal, petroleum, and gas lands and rights and irrigation tracts or lands, and 
the cutting of timber upon Government lands; (c) Water-power and rights; (d) 
Indian Lands and Indian Reserves : under authority or purporting to be under tha 
authority of the Dominion Lands Acts, and Irrigation Act, or other statutes of the 
Parliament of Canada, and the acts or proceedings of any person or corporation in 
relation to the matters foresaid. Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 13th April, 1915. 

Not printed. 

282. Report and evidence upon the matter known as: "Timber Berths 550i and 52S, Howard 

Douglas, R. E. A. Leech, D. J. McDonald, and others." Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 
13th April, 1915 Not printed. 

283. Report and evidence upon the matter known as : " The Kananaskis Coal Company, 

Limited, Howard Douglas, George E. Hunter, Walter Garrett, and others." Presented 
by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 13th April, 1915 ' 'tfot printed. 

284. Report and evidence upon the matter known as : " Blood Indian Reserve and Frank 

Pedley." Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 13th April, 1915 Not printed. 

285. Report and evidence upon the matter known as: "Southern Alberta Land Company, 

Limited, and Grand Forks Cattle Company, J. D. McGregor, Arthur Hitchcock, and 
others." Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 13th April, 1915 Not printed. 

286. Report and evidence upon the matter known as : " The Bulletin Company, Limited, the 

Honourable Frank Oliver, and the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company." I'resented 
by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 13th April, 1915 • Not printed. 

287. Report and evidence upon the matter known as: " Aylwin Irrigation Tract, E. A. Robert 

and J. D. McGregor." Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 13th April, 1915. ..2Vo< printed. 

288. Report and evidence upon the matter known as: "Timber Borths 1107 and 1108, W. H. 

Nolan, A. W. Fraser, and J. G. Turiff." Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 13th April_ 
1S15 A'ot printed. 

37 



5 George V. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1915 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 28— Continued. 

» 

289. Report and evidence upon the matter known as: "Grazing Ranch No. 2422, J. G. Turriff, 

A. J. Adamson, and J. D. McGregor." Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 13th April, 
1915 Not printed. 

290. Report and evidence upon the matter known as : " Craven Dam, Walter Scott, Lieutenant- 

Governor Brown, and J. G. Turriff." Presented by Hon. Mr. Coderre, 13th April, 1915. 

Not printed. 

291. Certified copies of Reports of the Committee of the Privy Council No. P.C. 1109 and No. 

P.C. 1589, approved by His Excellency the Administrator on the 10th May, 1913, and 
27th June, 1913, respectively, in respect to the appointment of Thomas R. Ferguson, 
K.C., as commissioner to investigate and report upon all matters connected with the 
disposition by any means whatsoever, since the first day of July, 1896, of: — (a) 
Dominion Lands ; (b) Timber and mineral lands and mining rights and privileges, 
including coal, petroleum, and gas lands and rights and irrigation tracts or lands, and 
the cutting of timber upon Government lands; (c) Water-power and rights, (d) 
Indian Lands and Indian Reserves. Presented by Sir Robert Borden, 13th April, 191.">. 

Not printed. 

292. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th March, 1915, for a copy of all charges, 

correspondence, letters, telegrams and other documents relative to the dismissal of 
Joseph Day, at Little Bras D'Or, in the riding of North Cape Breton and \nctoria, and 
of the evidence taken and reports of the investigation held by H. B. Duchemin, in 
regard to same, with a detailed statement of expenses of such investigation. Presented 
14th April, 1915. — Mr. McKenzie Not pHnted. 

293. A Return to an Order of the Senate, dated 30th March, 1915, for a return giving tho 

names of the trust companies up to the present date who have complied with the 
requirements of Clause 69 of the Trust Companies Act, 1914, and any correspondence 
connected therewith. — (Senate) Not printed, 

294. Report of R. A. Pringle, K.C., commissioner appointed to investigate into charges of 

corruption and fi-aud in relation to contracts for the building of certain drill halls in 
the province of Ontario, together with the evidence taken at the said inquiry. Pre- 
sented by Sir Robert Borden, 14th April, 1915 Not printed. 

295. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st March, 1915: — 1. For a full statement and 

description of all lands taken possession of by the Government for the camp at Val- 
cartier. 2. For copies of all titles of the Government to the same, whether by expro- 
priation, purchase or otherwise. 3. For a specified statement of all amounts claimed 
and stiil unpaid whether for land or damages. 4. For a specified account of all 
amounts paid up to date either for land or damages. Presented 15th April, 1915. — 
Sir Wilfrid Laurier Not printed. 

296. A return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General : — 1. A return 

showing all appointments to the customs in that area contained in the present con- 
.stituencies of Medicine Hat and Macleod, giving names, date of appointment, how 
appointed and salaries, from the year 1S96 to the present date. 2. Also, all vacancies 
by death, resignation or dismissal, giving name, date, length of service and cause of 
dismissal in the same area and during the same period. — (Senate) Not printed. 

3697. Return to an Address to His Royal Highness the Governor General ; praying that His 
Royal Highness will cause to be laid before the Senate copies of all letters between 
the Minister of Marine and Fisheries or his department and the fishery overseer at 
Baker Lake, in the province of New Brunswick ; and also copies of all claims made by 
the said fishery overseer and the payments made thereon. — (Senate) . . .. Not printed. 



88 



FIFTH CENSUS 



OF CANADA 1911 



AGRICULTURE 



VOLUME IV 




OTTAWA 

PRINTKD IJY ,1. DE L. TACHlt, PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST 

EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1914 



CONTENTS. 

Introduction. 

PAGE. 

FORnWORD V 

Farm Lands — 

Total land areas occupied and estimated areas possible of occupation as farm lands, in Canada, at date 

of the Census, June, 1911 vii 

Total land area and land in farms by provinces 1911 and 1901 \'iii 

Population, farms, farm lands and farm property of Canada, 1911 and 1901 ix 

Farm holdings, 1S91-1911 x 

Per cent distribution of farm holdings, 1S9 1-1911 xi 

Tenure of farm lands, 1891-1911 xii 

Comparative areas of farm lands by provinces in 1911 and 1901, together with increases made in ten 

years xiv 

Per cent distribution of farm lands by pro\'inces, 1911 and 1901 xv 

Average size of farms and average acreage of improved land per farm 1911 and 1901 xvi 

Farm Property — 

Value of farm property, by provinces, 1911 and 1901 xviii 

Average value of farm property per farm holding by provinces, 1911 and 1901 xix 

Per cent proportion of the value of farm property belonging to each province, 1911 and 1901 xx 

Per cent distribution of the value of farm property according to classes by provinces, 1911 and 1901. . . xxi 

Orchards and Gardens — 

Orchard and Garden areas for all Canada, 1S91-1911 xxi 

Land in orchards, small fruits and vegetables compared by provinces, 1891-1911 xxii 

Fruit trees bearing and non-bearing together with average number per farm and per 100 acres of im- 
proved land, 1911 and 1901 xxiii 

Fruit production for all Csmada together with the average production per farm and per 100 acres of 

improved land, 1890-1910 xxiv 

Orchard trees in 1901 and 1911 and fruit in 1890, 1900 and 1910 compared by pro\-inces xxv 

Value of fruits and vet;etabla3 separately in 1910 and compared by totals in 1910 and 1900, together 

with the per cent of increase in ten years xxvi 

Per cent proportion which the value of orchard fruits, of small fruits and of vegetables forms of the 

aggregate value of fruit and vegetables, by provinces in 1910 xxvii 

•■ Quantity and value of fruit exported for the years ended June 30, 1891, 1901 and 1911 xxviii 

Quantity and value of fruit imported for the years ended June 30, 1891, 1901 and 1911 xxviii 

Field crops — 

Comparative area of field crops, by provinces 1890, 1900, 1910 and 1911 '. xxix 

Vacant farms in eastern Canada, Census 1911 xxx 

Per cent distribution of a;'reage under field crops by provinces 1890, 1900 and 1910 xxx 

Comparative statement showing increases or decreases in the acreage of field crops for all Canada from 

1890 to 1900 and from 1900 to 1910 , xxxi 

Comparative statistics of areas of field crops by provinces, 1890, 1900, 1910 and 1911 xxxiv-xxxvii 

Average acres of specific 1 field crops per farm holding in 1910 and 1900 xxxix 

Average acres of specified field crops per 100 acres improved land by provinces, 1911 and 1901 xl 

Percentage which the area under specified crops forms of the total area of improved land and also the 

percentage of the total acreage under field crops possessed by each crop, by d -cades xli xliii 

Comparative statement of yields of grain crops, 1880-1910 xlv 

Comparative statement of yields of hay, potatoes, root and other crops, 1880-1910 xlviii 

Area and production of field crops for all Canada, 1890, 1900 and 1910 xlix 

Average production of field crops per acre under such crops for aU Canada, 1890-1910 1 

Comparative statistics of yields per acre of grain crops, by provinces, 1890-1910 1 

Average production per farm of principal crops, by provinces, 1910 and 1900 li 

Total value of field crops together with their average value per farm, by provinces, in 1910 and 190tl. . Hi 

Value of field crops by specified kinds, 1910 liii 

Per cent proportion of the total value of all field crops represented by specified crop groups, 1910 liv 

Unit value of field crops by provinces in 1910 Iv 

Per cent distribution of the value of field crops, together with their average value per acre of land under 

such crops, 1910 and 1900 Iv 

Principal crops classified according to value of production, by provinces, 1910 Ivi 

Quantity and value of field crops exported in 1891, 1901 and 1911 being the production of the census 

years 1890, 1900 and 1910 Ivii 

Rent and Labour — 

Rent of agricultural lands by provinces in 1911 and 1901 Iviii 

Farm labour and wages by provinces, 1911 and 1901 1\ 

Live Stock on farms — 

Summary of the number and value of live stock in Canada as a whole, 1911 and 1 101 Ixi 

Numljer of horses, all ages, by provinces, 1911 and 1901 Ixii 

Per cent distribution of horses, by provinces and average number per 100 acres improved land, 1911 

and 1901 Ixii 

Value of horse.= by provinces, 191 1 and 1901 Ixiii 

Average value per head of horses together with the average number per farm by provinces, 1911 and 

1901 Ixiii 

Number of milch cows by provinces, 1911 and 1901 Ixiv 

Value of milch cows by provinces, 1911 and 1901 Ixv 

Average value per head of milch cows, together with the average number per farm by provinces in 1911 

and 1901 Ixvi 

Per cent distribution of milch cows and average numlaer per 100 acres of improved land, by provinces, 

1911 and 1901 Ixvi 

Number of horned cattle, other than milch cows, by provinces, 1911 and 1901 Ixvii 

Value of horned cattle, other than milch cows, by provinces, 1911 and 1901 Ixviii 

Average value per head of horned cattle, other than milch cows, together with the average number per 

farm, 1911 and 1901 . . Ixviii 

Per cent distribution of horned cattle, other than milch cows, and the average number per 100 acres of 

improved land, by provinces, 1911 and 1901 Ixix 

Number of sheep by provinces, 1011 anrl 1901 kx 

Value of sheep by provinces, 1911 and 1901 Ixx 

Average value of sheep, together with the average number per farm bv provinces, 1911 and 1001 Ixxi 

15506— a| 



PAGE. 

Per cent distribution of sheep and the average number per lUU acres of improved land, by provinces, in 

1911 and 1901 Ixxi 

Number of swine in Canada, by provinces, 1911 and 1901 Ixxu 

Value of swine by provinces, 1911 and 1901 ■ lx\n 

.•V\craKe value per head of swine, together with the average number per farm, by provinces, 1911 and 

19U1 : 'x^iii 

Per cent distribution of swine and the average number per 100 acres of improved land, by provmces, 

1911 and 1901 Lxxiv 

i^umber of poultry by provinces, 1911 and 1901 Ixxiv 

Poultry according to kinds by provinces, 1911 and 1901 Ixxv 

Per cent distribution of poultry and the average number per 100 acres of improved land, by provinces, 

1911 and 1901 jxxvi 

Value of poultry by provinces, 1911 and 1901 Ixxvi 

Average value per head of poultry, together with the average number per farm, by pro-vinces, 1911 and 

1901 Ixxvii 

Exports of domestic animals by decades 1881-1910, and separately for the years 1909 and 1910 Ixxviii 

Pure-bred animals on farms by provinces, 1911 and 1901 Ixxix 

Average value per head of animals on farms, June 1911, and of animals sold in 1910 compared Ixxx 

Live stock sold — 

Horses sold in 1910. Proportion which they form of horses on farms, together with the per cent chstri- 

bution of sales by provinces '"■'■ Ixxxi 

Cattle, all kinds, sold in 1910. Proportion which they form of cattle on farms, together with the per cent 

distribution of sales by provinces Ixxxii 

Milch cows sold in 1910. Proportion which thej' form of milch cows on farm, together with the per 

cent distribution of sales, by provinces . Ixxxiii 

Sheep sold in 1910. Proportion which they form of sheep on farms, together with the per cent distri- 
bution of sales by provinces Ixxxiii 

Swine sold in 1910. Proportion which they form of all swine on farms, together with the per cent distri- 
bution of sales, by provinces Ixxxiv 

Revenue from poultry, by provinces in 1910 Ixxxv 

ComparativL statement of the aggregate value of all domestic animals, sold or slaughtered, 1910 and 

1900 Ixxxv 

Exports and Imports of Animal products — 

Production, exports, imports and consumption of Eggs, 1910 and 1900 lxxy\-i 

Quantity and value of animal products exported, 1891, 1901 and 1911 Ixxxvii 

Dairyings . . 

Comparative statistics of the Dairy Industrj' showing production, export?, imports and consumption, 

for all Canada, in the census years 1911 and 1901 lixxviii 

Comparative statement of Butter and Cheese production in Canada, 1910 and 1900 Ixsxix 

Dairy production, by provinces, in 1910 xo 

Value of Dairy products by provinces together with the average value of product per cow, 1910 and 

1900 sci 

General summary — 

Comparative statement of the total value of all farm property, of land products, of animals sold or 

slaughtered and of animal products in 1910 and 1900 together with the increase made in the decade xcii-iciii 

Non-productive areas in the Northwest provinces in the harvest year 1910 xcvi 

Per cent return on investment in farm property which the gross value of land products, animals sold 

and animal products represent by pro\inces, 1910 and 1900 xcv 

DUGRAMS ILLUSTRATING THE PRODUCTION OF GRAINS BY DECADES facing xliv 

General Tables. 

Table I. Farm Holdings 2-45 

Table II. Land occupied according to Tenure and Condition 46-133 

Table III. Grain crops, 1910 134-221 

Table IV. Hay, Potatoes. Roots, etc., 1910 222-309 

Table V. Fruit trees and fruit 310-327 

Table VI. Field crops. Harvest Year 1911 328-337 

Table VII. Live Stock on farms, 191 1 338-347 

Table VIII. Live Stock sold and Animal products, 1910 348-3.57 

Table IX. Values of Lauds, Buildings, Implements and Grain crops 358-3C7 

Table X. Values of fruit, fodders, hoed crops and labour on farms, 1910 368-377 

Table XI. Values of Dairv products, wool and eggs, 1910 378-381 

Table XII. Values of Live Stock in 1911 and of Animals sold or slaughtered in 1010 382-389 

Table XIII. Summary of Land occupied according to Tenure and Condition 390-391 

Table XIV. Summary of Grain Crops, 1910 390-391 

Table XV. Summary of Hay, Potatoes, Roots, etc., 1910 392-393 

Table XVI. Summary of Fruit trees and Fruit 392-395 

Table XVII. Summary of Field Crops, Harvest Year, 1911 394-395 

Table XVIII. Summary of Live Stock on Farms, 1911 396-397 

Table XIX. Summary of Live Stock sold and Animal products, 1910 306-397 

Table XX. Summary of values of Lands, Buildings, Implements and Grain Crops 398-399 

Table XXI. Summary of values of Fruit, Fodders, Hoed Crops and Labour on farms, 1910 398-399 

Table XXII. Summary of values of Live Stock in 1911 and Animals sold or slaughtered in 1910 400-401 

Table XXIII. Summary of values of Dairy Products, Wool and Eggs, 1910 400-401 

Table XXIV. Sunmiary of Farm Holdings 401 

Table XXV. Field Crops by Areas, Products and Averages, 1910, 1900 402-407 

Table XXVI. Comparative Statement of Areas in principal Field Crops, 1890-1910 408 

Table XXVII. Comparative Statement of yields of principal Grain Crops, 1880-1910 409 

Table XXVIII. Number of Farm Animals, 1891-1911 410 

Table XXLX. Average number of Farm Animals per farm holding, 1891-1911 411 

Table XXX. Number of Live Stock per 100 acres improved land 1911, 1901 412 

Table XXXI. Per cent distribution of Live Stock by Provinces, 1891-1901 413 

Table XXXII. Value of Live Stock 1911, 1901 414 

Table XXXIII. Average value per head of Live Stock on farm.s and elsewhere 1911, 1901 415 

Table XXXIV. Comparative Statement of Animal products 1890-1910 416 

Table XXXV. Pure-bred animals by classes 417-418 

Appendix. General provisions for enumeration of agricultural statistics and copies of schedules used in 

Fifth Census 419-428 



FIFTH CENSUS OF CANADA 1911. 

INTRODUCTION. 
Volume IV. 

This volume of the Fifth Census of Canada deals with the statistics of 
the agricultural industries of the Dominion. These statistics relate to areas 
of farms, production of field crops, fruits, animals and animal products, labour 
and wages. Separate bulletins were issued, as soon as the results were tabulated, 
giving the agricultural statistics of each province. These bulletins contained 
all the principal information relative to the agricultural industry in each 
province and afforded sufficient data to mark the progress made in farming 
during the ten years, 1901 to 1911. 

The records of area and production of field crops for Ontario, Quebec, New 
Brunswick and Prince Edward Island are given by townships and parishes. For 
the other provinces they are, for various reasons, given only by electoral districts. 
In Nova Scotia, excepting in a few instances, the whole county forms one 
municipality, there being no townships or parishes legally so defined. In 
Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the geographical toAvnship containing, 
usually 23,040 acres, is too small a unit for which to publish, in detail, the 
various tables of statistics of agriculture. 

Statistics of farm property, farm holdings, land owned, land leased or 
rented, land improved and unimproved refer to the date of the Census, June 1, 
1911. Those pertaining to jdeld of crops and animal production refer to the 
year 1910. According to the Manual of Instructions (see appendix pages 
419-428) the enumerators were to take account only of such lands as were 
used for the production of crops and the feeding of animals. "Improved 
land" was defined as "land which has been brought under cultivation and 
has been cropped and is fitted for producing crops." In previous censuses 
no clear definition was given of the term "improved land" and the result 
was, that under this heading were included non-tillable areas used as past- 
ure. In this census the acreages of arable lands only were enumerated 
as improved land. 0-\ving to this restriction in definition the records of 
this census, for the older provinces particularly, are not strictly comparable 
with those of previous censuses. 

The Census of 1911 was taken as of the date of June 1 whereas previous 
censuses were taken as of the date March 31. This change of date enabled 
the Census Office to collect statistics of areas, under the various field crops 
for the harvest year 1911, at a time when the results of recently finished farming 
operations were fresh in the minds of the farmers. It is therefore believed 



vi CENSUSOFCANADA1911 

that the statistics relating to the number of farms, tenure, condition, area of 
improved and unimproved land, the acres planted in the spring of 1911 and all 
other statistics which pertain to the status of the agricultural industry at the 
date of the census, June 1, 1911, are as nearly accurate, as it is possible to 
procure such data. The same accuracy cannot be claimed for the statistics 
of agriculture for the year 1910 which were collected in June of 1911, as can be 
for the statistics which pertain to the date of the census, because the longer 
the time intervening between the performance of the act and the making of a 
record thereof, the more liable are mental lapses to plaj' a part. 

The statistics of area and production of the principal crops in 1910 are 
no doubt reasonably accurate, as the preparation of the data for 1911, whicli 
were for recent operations, would aid the farmer in giving a very close figure 
of the acreage and production of the crops of the previous year. 

The statistics relating to most of the minor crops, such as fruits, vegetables 
and seed^, and of animal products, such as meats and dairj' products are doubtless 
much lower than the actual figures would show. Farmers, generally speaking, 
do not keep books and have no definite system of accounts and as a conse- 
quence are apt either to ignore altogether or greatly underestimate the 
quantities of vegetables, fruit, milk, cream, butter, cheese, eggs and honey 
consumed on the farm during the seasons when these are produced in greatest 
abundance. 

As regards the census of live stock, it is believed a truer report on the 
standing of this industry, has been procured by making the enumeration in 
the month of June, when animals were at their maximum, as regards condition 
and numbers, than at the end of March when such is not the case. However, 
in comparing the numbers and values of live stock for the census years 1911 
and 1901, it should be borne in mind that a greater number of young animals 
are included in the returns of the last census than there were in the previous 
one, and that consequently the average price per head in 1911 is thereby lowered. 

While the hindrances in the way of procuring absolutely accurate records of 
agriculture, which have been referred to in the previous paragraphs, can be to 
a great extent overcome and the inaccuracies which would result from a lack 
of appreciation of these factors prevented, yet there remains to be overcome 
the evident lack of appreciation on the part, nob only of some of the pt^rsons 
from whom the information is to be obtained, but too often on the part of 
some of the enumerators themselves, of the importance of an accurate census. 
Thej' fail to realize that the figures of the census are the only means of accurately 
determining the relative and comparative importance of any industry and its 
economic value in the national fabric. 

In the text discussion and Tables of the Introduction, wherever possible, 
the statistics of the Census of 1911 are presented in comparison with those of 
former censuses. In this way, it is hoped to convey a clearer idea (1) of the 
increases in farm land areas, crops, animals and animal products from one 
decade to another, (2) to forecast the trend and momentum of future agricultural 
operations and (3) to properly comprehend the westward movement in agri- 
cultural production from census year \ to census year. For example Table 25 
shows how the per cent proportion of the distribution of crop areas has steadily 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



decreased in eastern Canada and increased correspondingly in the western 
provinces. Similar westward movement in the proportion of the number 
of farm animals and animal products is exhibited by Tables VII and VIII. 
It is not intended that the text should be an exhaustive analysis of the 
various agricultural industries. 

The total land area of the Dominion is placed at 2, .306, 502, 15.3 acres, of 
which, at the date of the census, the nine provinces occupied 977,585,513 acres. 
The remaining area (1911) consists of the Yukon (132,113,360 acres) and the 
Northwest territories (1,196,803,280 acres). The areas of the Yukon and the 
Northwest territories are not taken into account in the calculations of the tables 
in this volume, because no appreciable extent of land in them is likely to be devot- 
ed to agriculture', before all the land within the provinces has been occupied. 

According to calculations made by the Census and Statistics Office in 
1909 and revised recently, the foMowing table shows, for 1911, the areas 
occupied and an estimate of areas possible of occupation as farm lands in the 
Dominion. The estimates of land capable of future occupation are based 
partly upon the amount of farm land occupied at the date of the census, 1911, 
and partly upon a percentage of the total area, fixed arbitrarily, but having 
reference to the more or less definitely ascertained facts, as to the character 
of the lands in each province and the increases both in land occupied as farms 
and of the area of improved land. 

TABLE 1. TOTAL LAND AREAS OCCUPIED, AND ESTIMATED AREAS POSSIBLE OF 
OCCUPATION, AS FARM LANDS, IN CANADA AT THE DATE OF THE CENSUS, JUNE , 
1911. 



Provinces 



Total land 



Occupied as farm land 



Estimate of possible 
farm land 



British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 

Totals... 



acres 

226,186,370 

161,872,000 

155,764,100 

41,169,098 

141,125,330 

218,723.687 

17,863,266 

13,483,671 

1,397,991 



540,011 
751,899 
642,985 
228,233 
171.785 
613,267 
537,999 
260,455 
202,354 



977,585,51.3 109,948,988 



per cent 
of total 

112 
10-97 
18-39 
29-70 
15-71 

7-14 
25-40 
.39 01 
86 01 



22,618,000 
97,123,000 
93,458,000 
24,700,000 
56,4.50,000 
43,745,000 
10,718,000 
8,092,000 
1,258,190 



11 25 



3.W,162.1M 



per cent 
of total 

10 
60 
60 
60 
40 
20 
60 
60 
90 



36 



According to the figures of the foregoing table, the total land area of the 
nine provinces was 977,585,513 acres of which 109,948,988 acres or 11-25 
per cent was occupied as farm lands. The estimate of possible farm land 
within the provinces, as constituted at the date of the census, was 358,162,190 
acres or 30 per cent of the total land area, contained within provincial boundaries. 

The land area of the nine provinces of the Dominion was increased from 
977,585,513 acres to 1,401,316,413 acres as a result of the Extension of Bound- 
aries Acts, 1912, which detached from the Northwest territories 423,730,900 
acres, of which 223,429,600 acres were added to Quebec, 93,037,700 acres to 
Ontario and 107,263,600 acres to Manitoba. 



viii CENSUSOFCANADA1911 

Of the total land area of the nine provinces 63,422,338 acres or 6-49 per 
cent were occupied as farm lands in 1901, as against 109,948,988 acres or 11-25 
per cent in 1911; this is an increase for the Dominion of 73-36 per cent or 
46,526,650 acres in ten years. From 1901 to 1911, Saskatchewan increased 
its area of occupied farm land by 24,809,551 acres or 647-18 per cent. Alberta 
by 15,016,269 acres or 548-91 per cent, British Columbia by 1,042,592 acres or 
69-63 per cent, Manitoba by 3,384,886 acres or 38-28 per cent. Of the Eastern 
provinces Quebec made the greatest gain, having increased its occupied farm 
land area by 1,169,092 acres, or 8-09 per cent, Ontario showed an increase 
of 822,261 acres or 3-85 per cent. Nova Scotia of 179,554 acres or 3-53 per cent, 
New Brunswick of 94,599 acres or 2-13 per cent and Prince Edward Island of 
7,846 acres or about three-fifths of 1 per cent. 



TABLE 2. TOTAL LAND AREA AND LAND IN FARMS, BY PROVINCES 1911 AND 1901. 


Provinces 


Total land area 


Land in farms 


Increase, in 

OF FARM 


10 YEARS, 
LANDS 




1911 


1901 


Amount 


Per cent 




acres 

226,186,370 

161,872,000 

155,764,100 

41,169,098 

141,125,330 

218,723,687 

17,863,266 

13,483,671 

1,397,991 


acres 

2,540,011 

17,751,899 

28,642,985 

12,228,233 

22,171,785 

15,613,267 

4,537,999 

5,260,455 

1,202,354 


acres 

1,497,419 
2,735,630 
3,833,434 
8,843,347 
21,349,524 
14,444,175 
4,443,400 
5,080,901 
1,194,508 


acres 

1.042,592 

15,016,269 

24,809,551 

3,384,886 

822,261 

1,169,092 

94,599 

179,554 

7,846 


p.c. 
69-63 




548-91 




647-18 




38-28 


Ontario 


3-85 




8 09 




213 


Nova Scotia 


3-53 


Prince Edward Island 


0-65 






Total, Provinces 


977,585,513 

132,113,360 

1,196,803,280 


109,948,988 


63,422,338 


46,526,650 

1 


73-36 




_ 






Total, Canada 


2,3«6,592,153 


109,918,988 

1 


63,432,338 


46,526,650 


73 36 



Table 3 summarizes for the Dominion the principal facts with regard to 
urban and rural population, farms, farm lands and farm property for the years 
1901 (March 31) and 1911 (June 1). 

From 1901 to 1911 the rural population increased by 17-20 per cent and 
the urban by 62 • 29 per cent, making a net increase for the Dominion of 34-17 per 
cent during the decade. In 1901, 62 persons in every 100 of the total popula- 
tion lived on the land, as against 54 persons in ever}' 100 in 1911. It is a 
significant fact, that the per cent increase in the number of farms from -1901 
to 1911 very nearly kept pace with the. ratio of increase in population during 
the same period, faUing only 2-97 per cent behind. While the increase per 
cent in the number of farms did not quite equal that of population, yet the 
increase per cent in area of farm lands and in the acreage under all crops are 
greater than the proportion of increase in the total population. The growth 
in the acreage of farm lands was 73 - 36 per cent and of land under all crop.s 
78-41 per cent. In 1911 there was an average of 6-76 acres of improved land 
for every person in Canada, as against 5-61 acres in 1901. The average number 
of acres per person, of land under all croiDS, rose from 3-68 acres in 1901 to 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 ix 

4 • 89 acres in 1911. In other words, it means that the increase in acreage devoted 
to the production of crops in 1911 over 1901, enhanced the purchasing power of 
the whole community by nearly 33 per cent. 

The farm holdings of the Dominion in 1911 numbered 714,646 and 
contained 109,948,988 acres, of which 48,733,823 acres were improved and of 
the remaining 61,215,165 acres, 17,477,526 acres were in natural forest, 
4,174,270 acres in marsh and waste land and the balance in unbroken prairie 
or land cut over and being prepared for the plough. 



TABLE 3. POPULATION, lARMt 



FARM LANDS AND FARM PROPERTY OF CANADA 
1911 AND 1901. 



Schedule 



1911 
(June 1) 



1901 
(March 31) 



Population no. 

Urban xo.} 

Rural NO.' 



Number of all farms. 



.NO.; 



Land in farms — 

Total AC 

Improved ac 

Unimproved ac 

Owned At • . ! 

Rented ac. ! 

Under crops, all kind.-; \c.' 

A\crage acres per farm — | 

Total AC. 

Improved .\c. 

Unimproved ac. 

Lender crops, all kinds ac. 

Xalu e of farm property $i 

I^and owned $1 

Buildin^^s $| 

Implements $; 

Live stock on farms $ 

Average value per farm — 

All Farm property $| 

J^and owned ?; 

Buildings Si 

Implements Sj 

Live stock on hand §! 

I 
Average value per acre of improved land — 

Buildings ......$ 

Iinplelnents $ 

Live stock on farms $ 



7,2»6,f>4,? 

3,281,141 
3, 925, ,502 

714,646 



109,948,988 

48,733.823 
61,21.5.165 
98,866,067 
11,082,921 
35,261,338 



153 85 

68-19 
85-66 
49-34 

4,231,840,636 

2,519,777,901 
823.951,767 
257,007,548 
631,103,420 



6,921 57 

3.525-91 

1,1.52-95 

359-63 

883-10 



16-90 
5-27 
12-95 



5,371,315 

2,021, 7;)9 
3,349,516 

544,688 



63,422,.3;J8 

30,166,033 
33, 256,. 305 
57,522,441 
5,899,897 
19,763,740 



116 44 

55-38 
61-04 
36-28 

1,787,102,639 

1,007,4.54,358 
395,815,143 
108,665,502 

275,167,627 



3,280 97 

1,849-61 
726-68 
199-50 
505-18 



13-12 
3-60 
9-12 



Increase 



Amount 



1,835,328 

1,259,342 
575,986 

169,958 



46,526,650 

18,567,790 
27,958,800 
41,343,626 
5,183,024 
15,497,598 



37 41 

12-81 
24-62 
13-06 

2,444,738,006 

1,512,323,543 
428,136,624 
148,342.046 
355,935,793 



2,619 69 

1,076-30 
426-27 
160-13 
377-92 



3-78 
1-67 
3-83 



Per cent 



34 17 

62-29 
17-20 

31 28 



73 36 

61 -,55 
84-07 
71-87 
87-85 
78-41 



32 13 

23 - 13 
40-29 
36 00 

136 79 

1.50- 12 
108-17 
136-51 
129-35 



80-48 
90-63 
58-66 
80-27 
74-81 



28-81 
46-39 
42 00 



The total value of all farm property (land owned, buildings, implements 
and live stock) reached the enormous figure of $4,231,840,636 in 1911. Of 
this vast total, the value of land represented $2,519,777,901 or 59-55 per cent, 
of buildings .$823,951,767 or 19-47 per cent, of farm implements $257,007,548 
or 6-07 per cent and of live stock $631,103,420 or 14-91 per cent. In 1901 the 
total value of all farm property was $1,787,102,630, of which the value of land 
was 56-36 per cent, of buildings 22-15 per cent, of implements 6-08 per cent 
and of live stock 15-41 per cent. 

The value of all classes of farm property more than doubled from 1901 to 
1911. The ratio of increase in the value of land during the decade was 150-12 
per cent, of buildings 108-17 per cent, of implements 136-51 per cent, and of 



X . CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 

live stock 129-35 per cent, with an aggregate for all farm property of 136 '79 
per cent. Of the total increase of $2,444,738,006 during the decade, in the 
value of farm property, land contributed 61-86 per cent, buildings 17-51 per 
cent, implements 6-07 per cent and live stock 14-56 per cent. 

The average value per holding of farm property increased from 1901 to 
1911 by 80-48 per cent. The gain in the value of land was 90-63 per cent, of 
buildings 58-66 per cent, of implements 80-27 per cent and of live stock 74-81 
per cent. The average value per acre of improved land in 1911 was $16.90 for 
buildings, $5.27 for implements and $12.95 for live stock, as compared with 
$13.12 for buildings, $3.60 for implements and $9.12 for Uve stock in 1901. 
These gains in the value of farm property, while no doubt in some measure due to 
greater cost of production and of materials, have been fairly well justified by the 
increase in the average size per farm from 116-44 acres in 1901 to 153-85 acres 
in 1911. For details by provinces see Table 10, page xviii. 

In Table 4 the number of occupiers of farm holdings in 1891, 1901 and 
1911 are classified according to the number of acres in each farm, that is to 

TABLE 4. FARM HOLDINGS, 1891-1911. 









Occupiers of 






Province.s 


Under 
1 acre 


1 to under 
5 acres 


5 to 10 
acres 


11 to 50 
acres 


1 
51 to 100 101 to 200 

acres acres 


201 acres 
and over 


Canada— 
1911 


NO. 

30,141 
33,615 

1,509 
238 

500 

7 

317 

167 

1,278 
243 

14.693 
20,073 

9,990 
10,489 

455 
577 

1,143 
1,555 

256 
206 


NO. 

44,180 
39,240 

2,888 
563 

643 

50 

246 
61 

1,761 
440 

18.827 
18.639 

11,221 
9,952 

1,761 
1,955 

6,227 
6,981 

606 
599 


NO. 

24.666 

18,331 

191,612 

2,754 

545 

2,811 

384 

41 

226 

215 

54 

225 

773 

2.57 

1.447 

8,944 

7,474 

108,724 

4,751 

3,708 

51,057 

1,658 
1,403 
6,774 

4,765 

4.400 

18,428 

422 

389 

1.920 


NO. 

89,829 
81,243 

87.879 

3.849 
740 
685 

449 
70 
55 

729 
33 
45 

1,552 
703 
599 

36,249 
34,912 
38,283 

22,209 
20,047 
22.296 

8.291 
7.722 

7,8SS 

12.052 
13.247 
13,857 

3.849 
3.769 
4.171 


NO. 

164,662 
156,778 
157,748 

1,754 
813 
528 

942 

154 

52 

941 
72 
45 

2,054 

1,254 

990 

78,335 
76,164 
75,307 

49,043 
45.813 
46.118 

12,820 
12,894 
13,791 

13,278 
14,234 
15.324 

5,495 
5,380 
5,. 593 


NO. 

228,237 
150.826 
130,271 

3.743 
2.186 
2.169 

34,. 555 
6,577 
1.205 

48,366 
8.041 
3.460 

17.758 
14,394 
10,834 

54,908 
52,534 
49,3.58 

46.106 
44,216 
40,309 

8.857 
8,775 
8,425 

10,717 
11,073 
11,034 

3,227 
3,0.30 

2,877 


NO. 

132,931 


1901 


64,655 


1891 


52,976 


British Columbia — 

1911 


1,970 


1901 


1,654 


1891 


1,258 


Albeita— 

1911 


24,023 


1901 


2,587 


1891 


1,039 


Saskatchewan — 

1911 


45,558 


1901 


5.184 


1891 


2,892 


Manitoba — 

1911 


20,430 


1901 


15,204 


1891 


8,701 


Ontario — 

1911 


14,845 


1901 


14.331 


1891 


13.936 


Quebec— 

1911 


16,371 


1901 


16,374 


1891 


15,216 


Kew Biunswick — 

1911 


4,368 


1901 


4,257 


1891 


3,958 


Neva Scotia — 

1911 


4.8.52 


1901 


4,483 


1891 


5,400 


Prince Edward I-sland — 

1!)11 


514 


JOOl 


581 


1S91 


576 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



say farm holdings of certain sizes are grouped together and considered under 
a general head. For example, all farms having 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, or 10 acres are 
classified as "5 to 10 acres" and similarly for the other groups. In the Census 
of 1891 all holdings of 10 acres and under were grouped together. 

From 1901 to 1911, in the eastern provinces, there was a total decrease 
of 6,423 in the number of lots of less than one acre and in the western provinces 
a total increase of 2,949, Anth a net decrease for Canada as a whole of 3,474 
in the number of farm holdings of less than one acre. Generally speaking fewer 
small areas were recorded in 1911 than in 1901, as in the last census enumerators 
were only paid for the enumeration of a small area when it produced a crop 
worth at least $50. The growth of urban centres and the consequent absorption 
of suburlian communities within city or town limits have also contributed to 
the falling off in the number of farm holdings of this size in eastern Canada. 
The increase in the number of small holdings in the western provinces has no 
particular significance as the cities and towns of the West were in many 
instances not staked in 1901. 

Table 5 gives for all Canada and for each of the provinces the per cent 



TABLE 5. PER CENT DISTRIBUTION OF FARM HOLDINGS, 1891-1911. 



Provinces 



Per Cent of Total Farm Holdings 



Under 
1 acre 



1 to under 


5 to 10 


5 acres 


acres 


p. c. 


p. c. 


6 18 


3 45 


7 2» 


3 37 


- 


30-88 


15-64 


14-91 


8-35 


8-09 


- 


37-73 


105 


-63 


•53 


-43 


- 


8-77 


•26 


-22 


•45 


-40 


- 


3-38 


3-86 


1-70 


1-35 


-79 


- 


6-41 


8-31 


3-94 


8-32 


3-33 


- 


38-07 


7-03 


2-98 


6-61 


2-46 


- 


29-19 


4-61 


4-34 


5-20 


3-73 


- 


16-59 


11-61 


8 -88 


12-46 


7-96 


- 


28-50 


4-22 


2-94 


4-27 


2-78 


- 


12-68 



11 to 50 
acres 



51 to 100 1 101 to 200 
acres i acres 



201 acres 
and over 



Canada — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

British Columbia — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Alberta — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Saskatchewan — 

1911 

1!)01 

1891 

Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Ontario — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Quebec— 

1911 

1901 

1891 

New Brunswick — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Nova Scotia — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Prince Edward Island 

1911 

1901 

1891 



p. c. 



4 22 
6 17 



8-17 
3-53 



-81 
-07 



•33 
1-23 



2-80 



6-48 



6-20 
6-97 



1-19 
1-53 



2-13 
2-78 



1-78 
1-90 



p. c. 

12 57 
14 92 
14 16 

20-84 

10-98 

919 

•73 

•74 

213 

•76 
•24 
-67 

3-40 
2-16 
2-65 

15-98 
15-58 
13-40 

13-91 
13-31 
12-74 

21-70 
20-55 
19-32 

23-59 
23 -64 
21-44 

20-78 
26-89 
27-55 



p. c. 

23 04 

28-78 
25 42 

9-50 
12-0(i 
7-09 

1-53 
1-63 
202 

•98 
•53 
-67 

4-50 
3-8(i 
4-39 

34-54 
33-98 
26-37 

30-70 
30-42 
20-3.-) 

33-55 
34-31 
33-77 

24-76 
25-40 
23-71 

38-24 
38-39 
30-95 



p. c. 

31 94 
27-69 
21 00 

20-27 
32-44 
29-11 

56-19 
69-33 
46-76 

50-18 
59-07 
51-90 

38-94 
44-30 
48-00 

24-21 
23-44 
17-28 

28-87 
29-36 
23-03 

23-18 
23-35 
20-63 

19-98 
19-76 
18-00 

22-46 
21-62 
1901 



p. c. 

18 60 
11 87 

8-54 

10-67 
24-55 
16-88 

39-06 
27-27 
40-32 

47-27 
38-08 
43-38 

44-80 
46-79 
38-55 

6-54 
6-39 
488 

10-25 
10-87 
8-69 

11-43 

11-33 

9-69 

9 05 
8-00 
8-35 

3-58 
4-15 
3-81 



xii CENSUSOFCANADA1911 

distribution of farm holdings by classes. The table gives the per cent number 
of farms in each size group in 1891, 1901 and 1911. As previously noted, the 
records for holdings of 10 acres and under were not presented separately in 
1891, therefore no comparisons can be made in the group ''5 to 10 acres" between 
the records of 1891 and those of subsequent censuses. For all Canada, in the 
two groups of farms "101 to 200 acres" and "201 acres and over," there has 
been a steady increase in the relative standing. In 1891 about 85 farms in 
every 1,000 had an acreage of over 200 acres, as compared with 119 in 1901 
and 186 in 1911. In the Maritime provinces, Quebec and Ontario the relative 
proportion of the size of farm holdings as between each census period presents no 
great changes. In 1911, 44-80 per cent of all farm holdings in Manitoba, 47-27 
per cent in Saskatchewan and 39-06 per cent in Alberta contained more than 
200 acres each. Farms of from 101 to 200 acres predominate in the western 
provinces while those of from 51 to 100 acres hold first place in Ontario, Quebec 
and the Maritime provinces. 

Table 6 gives comparative statistics concerning the tenure under which 



TABLE 6. TENURE OF FARM LANDS, 1891-1911. 



Provinces 


Total 
Occupiers 


Number of Occupiers being 


Per cent of 
total occupiers 
being owners 


Owners 


Tenants 


Owners 
and tenants 


Canada — 

1911 


NO. 

714,646 
544,688 
620,486 

18,467 
6,739 
7,451 

61,496 
9,486 
2,577 

96,372 

13,612 

6,667 

45,606 
32,495 
22,571 

226,801 
224,127 
285,608 

159,691 
150,599 
174,996 

38,210 
37,583 
40,836 

53,634 
56,033 
64,643 

14,369 
11.014 
15,137 


NO. 

633, 172 
474,441 
524,806 

15,846 
5,412 
5,456 

56,605 
9,083 
2,333 

87,448 

13,088 

6,298 

38,221 
28,893 
20,241 

186,696 
179,791 
224,034 

147,370 
135,625 
154,227 

36,128 
35,397 
37,853 

51,132 
53,953 
60,069 

13,726 
13,199 
14,295 


NO. 

57,129 
47,744 
95,689 

2,077 
1,031 
1,995 

2,341 
211 
244 

3,517 
215 
369 

4,675 
1,627 
2,330 

81,201 
82,360 
61,574 

9,287 

9,284 

20,769 

1,508 
1,255 
2,983 

2,106 
1,370 
4,574 

417 
391 

842 


NO. 

24,345 
22,503 

544 
296 

2,550 
192 

5,407 
309 

2,710 
1,975 

8,904 
11,976 

3,034 
5,690 

574 
931 

396 
710 

226 
424 

- 


p. c. 
88-60 


1901 


87 10 


1891 


84-58 


British Columbia — 

1911 


85-81 


1901 


80-30 


1891 


73-23 


Alberta— 

1911 


92 05 


1901 


95-75 


1891 


90-53 


Saskatchewan— 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Ontario — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Quebec — 

1911 

1901 

1891 


90-74 
9611 
94-47 

83-81 
88-92 
89-68 

82-32 
80-22 
78-44 

92-28 
90 06 
88-13 


New Brunswick — 

1911 


94-55 


1901 


94-18 


1891 


92-70 


Nova Scotia — 

1911 


95-34 


1901 


98 07 


1891 


92-78 


Prince Edward Island— 

1911 


95-53 


1901 


94- 18 


1891 


94-44 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 xiii 

farms are occupied, that i.s to say, whether the occupier is owner, tenant, or 
whether he owns part and rents part of the land occupied by him. 

The increase in the total number of occupiers in the ten years was 169,958. 
Of this large increase, the new provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan contributed 
134,770 or more than 79 per cent and if the figures for Manitoba and British 
Columbia be included, it will be seen that 94 per cent of the total increase is 
accounted for west of the Great Lakes. Of the eastern provinces, Nova Scotia 
is the only one which shows a decrease in the total number of occupiers and 
has occurred mainly in the case of owners. In 1891 the total number of 
occupiers reported for Nova Scotia was 64,643, in 1901 the number had fallen 
to 56,033 and in 1911 to 53,634. The statistics of the number of vacant farms 
in Table 24 page xxx explain to some extent the decrease in the number of 
farm holdings in Nova Scotia and the small increases in the other eastern 
provinces. 

For all Canada, owners constituted 84-58 per cent of all occupiers in 1891, 
87-10 per cent in 1901 and 88-60 per cent in 1911. In Prince Edward 
Island and Nova Scotia more than 95 per cent of all farms were operated by 
owners, 94-55 per cent in New Brunswick, 92-28 per cent in Quebec, 92-05 
per cent in Alberta, 90-74 per cent in Saskatchewan, 85-81 per cent in British 
Columbia and less than 85 per cent in Ontario and Manitoba were occupied by 
owners in the last census. The increase in the number of the class of 
occupiers designated as "owners and tenants," in the Northwest province-, is 
indicative of a growth in the class of annual tenants or croppers, or as \.^ / 
are sometimes termed "share farmers." 

Table 7 gives the total acreage of farm land occupied for agricultural 
purposes in the Dominion, as a whole, and in each of the provinces in 1901 
and 1911 and the quantity of it owned, leased or rented, improved or unimproved, 
in forest, marsh or waste land, together with the increase made in the decade 
in each class. For all Canada, the acreage of "improved land" has not kept 
pace with the increase in the quantity of land alienated for agricultural purposes. 
The increase made from 1901 to 1911 in the area of farm lands, was 2| times 
greater than that made in the acreage of improved land. In 1911, 44-32 per 
cent of all land occupied was improved as compared with 47-56 per cent in 1901. 

Of the total of 46,526,650 acres added to the area of "occupied farm land," 
during the decade, the western provinces contributed 44,253,298 acres or more 
than 95 per cent of the total, Saskatchewan, alone, accounted for over 53 per 
cent of the increase or with its sister province of Alberta 39,825,820 acres or 
85| per cent. In Saskatchewan and Alberta the average annual increase 
in the area of occupied farm land was 3,982,582 acres, this means, that if each 
occupier was allowed only a quarter section of land (160 acres) and the yearly 
additions level, that the average annual increase of occupiers would have been 
24,981 or a total for the ten years of 248,912; whereas in fact, the total increase 
in the number of occupiers in the two provinces from 1901 to 1911 aggregated 
only 134,770, and the average size per holding of lands, alienated whether by 
homesteading or purchase, was 293 acres. A reference to Table 4, page x, 
will show that holdings of over 200 acres were twelve times as numerous in 
Alberta and nine times in Saskatchewan in 1911 as they were in 1901. The 
number of farms of over 200 acres increased, in the Dominion, from 1901 to 



xiv CENSUSOFCANADA1911 

1911 by 68,276, of which all but 1,240 were in the Prairie provinces. The 
tendency, in the west, to occupy large areas is due, no doubt, principally to the 
almost exclusive devotion of the land to grain-growing and the demand for 
large returns to meet the necessarily, heavy initial expenses. 

TABLE 7. COMPARATIVE AREAS OF FARM LANDS BY PROVINCES IN 1911 AND 1901 
TOGETHER WITH INCREASES MADE IN TEN YEARS. 



Provinces 



Canada — 

1911 

1901 

Total Increase . . . 
Increase per cent 

British Columbia — 

1911 

1901 

Total increase 

Increase per cent. 

Alberta — 

1911 

1901 

Total increase. . . . 
Increase per cent. 

Saskatchewan — 

1911 

1901 

Total increase .... 
Increase per cent. 

Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

Total increase .... 
Increase per cent. 

Ontario — 

1911 

1901 

Total increase — . . 
Increase per cent. 

Quebec — 

1911 

1901 

Total increase. . . . 
Increase per cent. 

New Brunswick — 

1911 

I 1901 

' Total increase 

Increase per cent. 

Nova Scotia — 

1911 

1901 

Total increase. . . . 
Increase per cent. 

Prince Edward Island — 

1911 

1901 

Total increase 

Increase per cent. 



Total area 

of farm 

lands 

occupied 



acres 

109,948,988 

63,422,338 

46,526,650 

73 36 



2,540,011 

1,497,419 

1,042,592 

69-63 



17,751,899 

2.735,630 

15,016,269 

548-91 



28,642,985 

3,833,434 

24,809,551 

647-19 



12,228,233 

8,843,347 

3,384,886 

38-27 



22,171,785 

21,349,524 

822,261 

3-85 



15,613,267 

14,444,175 

1,169,092 

8-09 



4,537,999 

4,443,400 

94,599 

2-12 



5,260,455 

5,080.901 

179.554 

3-53 



1,202,, 354 

1,194.508 

7,846 

•65 



acres acres acres 1 acres 

98,866.067 11,082,921 48,733,823 61,215,16.11 



57,522,441 
41,313,626 

71-87 



Land Occupikd — 



Owned 



Leased 
or rented 



Im- 
proved 



Unim- 
proved 



2,071,527 

1,288,241 

783,286 

60-80 



15,707,349 

2,442,204 

13,265,145 

543-16 



26,101,033 

3,681,261 

22,419,772 

609-02 



10,334,467 

8,073,894 

2,260,573 

27-99 



19,192,707 

18,173,877 

1,018,8.30 

5-60 



14,836,325 

13,457,-540 

1,378,785 

10-24 



4,368,824 

4,269.606 

99.218 

2-32 



5,093.658 

4.974.559 

119.099 

2-39 



1.160,177 

1,161,259 

-1,082 

-09 



5, 899, 897 30, 166, 033 S3, 256, 305 
5 , 183 , 024 18 , 567 , 790 27 , 958 , 860 
87 85 6155 84 07 



468,484 

209,178 

259,306 

123-96 



2, 044, ,550 

293,426 

1,751,124 

596-78 



2,541,952 

1.52, 173 

2,389,779 

1,570-44 



1,893,766 

769,453 

1,124,313 

146-12 



2,979,078 

3,175,647 

-186,. 569 

-6-17 



776,942 
986,635 
-209,093 
—21-25 



169,175 

173,794 

-4,619 

-2-66 



166.797 

106,342 

60,455 

56-85 



42, 177 

33.249 

8,928 

26-85 



477,590 

473,683 

3,907 

-82 



2,062.421 

1,023,736 

1,038,685 

101-46 



4,351,698 1.'!, 400, 201 

474,694 2,260,936 

3,877,004 11,139.265 

816-73 492-24 



11,871,907 

1,122,602 

10.749,305 

957-53 



6,746,169 

3,995,305 

2,750,864 

68-83 



13,0.53,216 
13,266,335 
3C6,881 
2-91 



8,162,087 

7,439,941 

722, 146 

9-70 



1,444,-567 

1,409,720 

34,847 

2-47 



1,257.449 

1,257,468 

-19 



769,140 

726.285 

42,8.55 

5-90 



Forest 



acres 
17, 477.. 520 
16,791,885 

685.641 
4 08 



1,544,029 

391,100 

1,152,923 

294-79 



420,8-57 
66, 1-38 

3-54,719 
536-33 



16,771,0781 304,039 

2,710.8321 53,212 

14,060,246 250,827 

518-67 471-37 



5,482,064 497,547 

4,848,042: 258,729 

a34,022 238.818 

13 07: 92-30 



8.518.569 

8,083,189 

435,380 

5-38 



7,451,180 

7,004,2.34 

436,946 

6-23 



3,093,432 

3,0-33,680 

59,752 

1-97 



4.0a3,006 

3.823.4-33 

179,573 

4-43 



4-^'?.214 

468.223 

-35,009 

-7-47 



3,935,982 

4,823.140 

—887,1-58 

-18-39 



5,099,286 

5,442,322 

—343,036 

—6-30 



2,453.779 

2,561.494 

-107.715 

-4-20 



2,914.033 

2,845.384 

68,649 

2-41 



307,974 

350.366 

-42.-392 

-12 so 



Marsh or 
waste 
land 



acres 
4. 174, 270 



78.684 



240,854 



583,887 



445,625 



1.843.803 



.5-50.263 



152,317 



258,623 



20.214 



Note. — The minus sign ( — ) denotes a decrease. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 xv 

From 1901 to 1911 the percentage of increase in the acreage of lands rented 
was much greater than the increase in the acreage of lands owned. In British 
Columbia, there was a ten year gain in the former of 60-80 per cent and in the 
latter of 123-96 per cent, in Saskatchewan of 609-02 per cent and 1,570-44 per 
cent and in INIanitoba of 27-99 per cent for the former and 146-12 per cent 
for the latter. In Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick the acreage of land 
operated by tenants was less in 1911 than in 1901. Nova Scotia and Prince 
Edward Island show increases in areas of rented farms. 

The wood lots on farms in Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Prince 
Edward Island are given a smaller area in 1911 than in 1901. The increases 
showTi for Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta are in the northern sections. 

Table 8 gives a comparative statement of the per cent distribution of 
farm lands by provinces in 1901 and 1911. In 1901, of the total land area of 
the nine provinces, 6-49 per cent was occupied as farm land, as compared with 
11-25 per cent of the same aggregate area in 1911. The proportion per cent 
of improved land, for reasons already given on page v, has fallen from 47-56 
per cent of the total area in 1901 to 44-32 per cent in 1911. 

TABLES. PER CENT DISTRIBUTION OF FARM LANDS BY PROVINCES 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



Percent of 

occupied 

land formed 

of total 

land 



Per Cent of Land Occupied- 



Owned 



Leased or; 
rented ' 



Im- 
proved 



Unim- 
proved 



Natural 
forest 



Marsh 

or waste 

land 



Canada — 

1911 

1901 

British Columbia — 

1911 

1901 

Alberta — 

1911 

1901 

Saskatchewan — 

1911 

1901 

Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

Ontario — 

1911 

1901 

Quebec — 

1911 

1901 

New Brunswick — 

1911 

1901 

Nova Scotia — 

1911 

1901 

Prince Edward Island 

1911 

1901 



11 25 
6 49 



112 
■66 



10-97 
1-69 



18-39 
2-46 



29-70 
21-48 



l.i-71 
1.5 13 



714 
660 



25-40 
24-87 



39 01 
37-68 



8601 
85-44 



89 92 
99 79 



81-56 
86-03 



88-48 
89-27 



9113 
96-03 



84-51 
91-30 



86-56 
85-13 



95 02 
93-17 



96-27 
96 09 



96-83 
97-91 



96-49 
97-22 



p.c. 


p. c. 


10 08 
9 39 


44 32 
47 56 


18-45 
13-97 


18-80 
31-63 


11-52 
10-73 


24-51 
17-35 


8-87 
3-97 


41-45 
29-28 


15-49 
8-70 


.55- 17 
45- 18 


13-44 
14-87 


61-57 
62-14 


4-98 
6-83 


52-28 
51-51 


3-73 
3-91 


31-83 
31-73 


3-17 
209 


23-90 
24-75 


3-51 
2-78 


63-97 
60-81 



p.c. 



55 68 
52 44 



81-20 
08-37 



75-49 
82-65 



58-55 
70-72 



44-83 
54-82 



38-43 
37-86 



47-72 
48-49 



68-17 
68-27 



70-10 
75-25 



36 03 
3919 



p. c. 



15-89 
26 48 



60-79 
26- 12 



2-37 
2-42 



106 
1-38 



4-07 
2-92 



17-75 
22-59 



32-65 
37-68 



54 07 
57-65 



55-40 
56-00 



25-61 
29-33 



p. c. 
S 81 

3-10 

1-36 

204 

3-64 

8-32 

3-52 

3-36 

510 

1-68 



In Prince Edward Island 86-01 per cent of its total land area was occupied 
as farms, in Nova Scotia 39-01 per cent, in Manitoba 29-70 per cent, in New 
Brunswick 25-40 per cent, in Saskatchewan 18-39 per cent, in Ontario 15-71 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



per cent, in Alberta 10 • 97 per cent, in Quebec 7 • 14 per cent and in British 
Columbia 1-12 per cent of the total land area was occupied for agricultural 
purposes. 

The per cent proportion of natural forest on farms is less in 1911, than it 
v.'as in 1901 for all provinces except Manitoba and British Columbia, but as 
the areas of marsh and waste land were not enumerated separately in 1901, 
it msiy account for the decrease in the proportion per cent of the extent of the 
farm wood-lot. 

The average size of farms and the average acreage of improved land per 
farm in 1911 and 1901 are given in Table 9. For all Canada, the average size 
per farm rose during the decade from 116-44 acres to 153-85 acres, being an 

TABLE 9. AVERAGE SIZE OF FARMS AND AVERAGE ACREAGE OF IMPROVED LAND 

PER FARM 1911 AND 1901. 





Average size per farm in 


ACRES Average 


ACREAGE IMPROVED 


LAND PER 














FARM 




Provmcea 






Increase^ 






Increase^ 




1911 


1901 






1911 


1901 






~ 










- 






Amount 


Per cent 






Amount 


Per cent 




acres 


acres 


acres 


p.c. 


acres 


acres 


acres 


p.c. 


Canada 


153 85 


116 44 


37 41 


32 13 


S8 19 


55 38 


12 81 


23 31 


British Columbia. 


137-54 


222-20 


-84-66 


-38-10 


25-86 


70-28 


-44-42 


-63-20 


Alberta 


288-66 


288-39 


•27 


-09 


70-76 


50 04 


20-72 


41-41 


Saskatchewan 


297-21 


281-62 


15-59 


5-53 


123-19 


82-47 


40-72 


49-38 




26813 
97-76 
97-77 

118-76 


272-14 
95-26 
95-91 

118-23 


-401 

2-50 

1-86 

-53 


-1-47 
2-62 
1-94 

•45 


147-92 
60-20 
51-11 
37-81 


122-95 
59- 19 
49 40 
37-51 


24-97 

1-01 

1-71 

-30 


20-31 


Ontario 


1-71 


Quebec 


3-46 


New Brunswick. . . 


•80 


Nova Scotia 


98-08 


90-68 


7-40 


8-16 


23-44 


22-44 


1-00 


4-46 


P. E. Island 


83-68 


85-24 


-^56 


-1-83 


53-53 


51-83 


1-70 


3-8Z 



Note — The minus sign ( — ) denotes a decrease. 

increase of 37-41 acres in the ten years. The average size of farms is smaller 
in eastern Canada than in the western provinces. The high averages for the 
Prairie provinces are due to the fact that most of the farms were acquired 
under the homestead laws, which permitted to each adult male settler 160 acres 
at least; in this way, often several quarter-sections were held in the same family. 
Of the eastern provinces. New Brunswick has the largest average sized farms 
(118-76 acres). The smallest farms are in Prince Edward Island, where they 
average 83-68 acres. While the average size of farms in the country as a whole 
increased by 37-41 acres or 32- 13 per cent between 1901 and 1911, the provinces 
of Prince Edward Island, Manitoba and British Columbia show decreases. 
In Prince Edward Island the average size of farms fell from 85-24 acres to 
83-68 acres; in Manitoba from 272-14 acres to 268-13 acres; in Briti.-h 
Columbia from 222 - 20 acres to 137 • 54 acres during the decade. The explana- 
tion for this heavy decrease in British Columbia, may be found in the increase 
in the numljer of small holdings from 1901 to 1911, and in the development of 
the fruit industry and market gardening. In 1911 nearly 60 per cent of all 



CEN£US OF CANADA 1911 xvii 

farm holdings in British Columbia contained less than 51 acres — 38-72 per cent 
of all farms being of 10 acres or less. In 1901 only 31 per cent of all holdings 
contained less than 51 acres — 20 per cent of all farms having 10 acres or less. 

The average acreage of improved land per farm, furnishes a better basis 
for comparisons of the true size of a farm than the average acreage of occupied 
land. As to the acreage of improved land the Prairie provinces again lead, 
Manitoba coming first with 147-92 acres, followed by Saskatchewan with 123 • 19 
acres and Alberta with 70-76 acres brought under cultivation. The smallest 
average acreages of improved land were in Nova Scotia (23-44 acres) and 
New BrunsMdck (37-81 acres). The largest absolute and per cent increase in the 
decade was made in Saskatchewan with 40 - 72 acres per farm or 49 • 38 per cent, 
British Columbia shows a decrease of 44-42 acres per farm or 63-20 per cent. 
For Canada as a whole the average acreage of improved land per farm increased 
from 55-38 acres in 1901 to 68-19 acres in 1911. 

Table 10 gives the value of all farm property, by provinces, in 1911 and 
1901, together with the total and per cent increase in the ten years. The 
greatest advance, in the value of all farm property during the decade, was made 
by the province of Saskatchewan with a gain for the ten years of 1,773-14 
per cent, followed by Alberta with a gain of 1,319-71 per cent, British Columbia 
with 463-23 per cent and Manitoba with 206-06 per cent. In the eastern 
provinces, the ratio of increase ranged from 31 per cent in Ontario to 81 per 
cent in Quebec. Saskatchewan also shows the greatest proportion of increase 
from 1901 to 1911 in the value of buildings, implements and live stock, and in 
the value of land is surpassed only by Alberta. Quebec, of the older provinces, 
shows the greatest percentage of increase in the value of all classes of farm 
property during the decade. 

The abnormal increase in the value of all classes of farm property from 
1901 to 1911, in the western provinces as compared with the eastern, is due 
in a large measure to the increase of 159,609 new homesteads. Every new 
homestead established, means extensive initial outlay for buildings, implements 
and animals, and as regards the increase in the value of land occupied for 
agricultural purposes, some of it, no doubt, is the result of improvement and 
development, but by far the greater proportion represents the value of lands 
procured free of cost from the state. In other words the value only became 
active and tabulatable when the land was assigned in plots to particular persons. 
Tiie rapidit}' with which the alienation of land has proceeded in the western 
provinces is shown by the fact, that in the Census of 1901 Alberta had 640 
occupied townships and Saskatchewan 855 as against 2,056 for the former and 
2,874 for the latter in 1911. Table 7 shows that over 95 per cent of the increase 
in the acreage of farm lands from 1901 to 1911 occurred in the West. 

The improvement shown in the value of all classes of farm property in 
( >ntario, Quebec and the Maritime provinces is but slightly affected by newly 
occupied farm lands or by first outlays for buildings, farm implements or live 
stock. It is therefore safe to assume, that for eastern Canada, these increases 
are due principally to higher prices of building materials, implements and farm 
animals and do not represent as largely as they do for the AVest, correspondingly 
great additions to physical property. 

1550G -B 



xviii CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 

TABLE 10. VALUE OF FARM PROPERTY, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



All farm 
property 



Land 



Buildings 



Implements 



Live stock 



Canada— 

1911 

1901 

Increase total.. . . 
Increase per cent 

British Columbia — 

191] 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
Alberta — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
Saskatchewan — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
Ontario — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
Quebec — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
New Brunswick — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
Nova Scotia — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
Prince Edward Island — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 



4,2S1,840,636 

1,787,102,630 

2,444,738,006 

136 79 



188,635,724 

33,491,978 

155,143,746 

463-23 

492,636,008 

34,699,781 

457,936,227 

1,319-71 

832,812,560 

44,460,874 

788,351,686 

1,773-14 

463,243,591 

151,355,081 

311,888,510 

206 06 

1,223,701,549 

932,488,069 

291,213,480 

31-23 

787,754,494 

436,076,916 

351,677,578 

80-65 

84,895,906 

51,338,311 

33,557,595 

65-37 

115,974,892 

72,504,907 

43,409,985 

59-82 

42,185,912 

30,626,713 

11,559,199 

37-74 



2,519,777,901 

1,007,454,358 

1,512,323,543 

150 12 



141,421,477 

21,087,372 

120,334,105 

570-65 

344,759,704 

13,156,755 

331,602,949 

2,520-40 

583,401,337 

22,879,822 

560,521,515 

2,449-85 

309,960,153 

93,233,535 

216,726,618 

232-45 

611,756,794 

536,755,663 

75,001,131 

13-97 

423,964,516 

248,236,361 

175,728,155 

70-79 

32,989,546 

22,329,482 

10,660,064 

47-73 

52,106,903 

34,589,159 

17,517,744 

50-93 

19,417,471 

15,186,209 

4,231,262 

27-86 



823,951,767 

395,815,143 

428,136,624 

108 17 



29,479,522 

5,002,417 

24,477,105 

489-30 

40,642,348 

3,588,657 

37,053,691 

1,032-52 

76,156,050 

5, 178, 127 

70,977,923 

1,377-26 

62,607,036 

20,049,726 

42,557,310 

212-25 

314,377,168 
211,206,905 
103,170,263 

48-85 

214,245,173 

102,313,893 

111,931,280 

109-39 

31.476.427 

16,. 379, 4.56 

15,096,971 

92-17 

43,275,505 

24,163,225 

19,112,280 

79-90 

11,692,538 

7,9.32,7.37 

3,759,801 

47-39 



257,007,548 

108,665,502 

148,342,046 

136 51 



3,548,656 

1,197,876 

2,-350,780 

196-24 

24,009,659 

2,179,617 

21,8.30,042 

1,001-55 

57,538,712 

3,882,029 

53,656,683 

1,382-18 

27,956,212 

12,169,619 

15,786,593 

129-72 

77,734,449 

52,697,739 

25,036,710 

47-51 

51.954,520 

27,038,205 

24,916,315 

92-15 

6,106,826 

3,662,731 

2,444,095 

66-72 

4,578,658 

3,208,899 

1,369,7.59 

42-68 

3,579,856 

2,628,787 

951,069 

3617 



631,103,420 

275.167,627 

355,935,793 

129 35 



14,186,069 
6,204,313 

7,981,756 
128-64 

83,224,297 

15,774,752 

67,449,545 

427-57 

115,716,461 

12,520,896 

103,195,565 

824-19 

62,720,190 

25,902.201 

36,817,989 

142-14 

219,8.33,1.38 

131,827.762 

88, 005,. 376 

-66-75 

97,590,285 

58.488,457 

39,101,828 

66-85 

14,323,107 

8,966,042 

5.356,465 

59-73 

16,013,826 

10,603,624 

5,410.202 

51-02 

7,496.047 

4,878.980 

2,617,067 

53-63 



The value of all farm property per holding, according to Table 11, rose 
from $3,280-97 to $5,921-57 from 1901 to 1911, being a gain per farm of over 
80 per cent. The average value per farm of each class of farm property 
made marked increases during the decade. The value of land increased from 
$1,849.61 per farm in 1901 to $3,525.91 in 1911, of buildings from $726.68 
per farm to $1,152.95, of implements from $199.50 to $359.63 and of live 
stock from $505.19 per farm to $883.10. 

The increase per cent in the value of land and buildings per farm from 1901 
to 1911, for reasons which have been already referred to, was greater in the 
western provinces than in the eastern. British Columbia, Ontario, Manitoba 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



and Quebec, in the order named, have the greatest average value per farm of 
buildings in 1911. In the value of farm implements in the last census, the 
first place is captured by Manitoba with an average value per farm of $612 . 99, 



TABLE 11. 



AVERAGE VALUE OF FARM PROPERTY PER FARM HOLDINGS BY 
PROVINCES. 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



Canada— 

1911 

1901 

lutri'ase total 

Increase per cent 

British Columbia — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
Alberta — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent . 
Sacik at chewan — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
Ontario— 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
Quebec — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
New Brunswick — 

1911 

I'JOl 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
Nova Scotia — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 
Princo Edward Island — 

1911 

1901 

Increase total 

Increase per cent. 



AVER.\GE V.\LUE PER F.^RM OF — 



All farm 
property 



5,921.57 
3,280 97 

2,649.00 

80-48 



,214.75 

,969.87 
,244.88 
105-53 

,010.86 

,658.00 

,352.86 

119-00 

,641.64 
,206.30 
,375.34 
164 -.57 

,1.57 51 
,657.80 

,499.71 
118 08 

,395.49 

,160.53 

,234.96 

29-68 

,932.99 

,895.62 

,037.37 

70-36 

,221.82 

,366.00 

855.82 

62-65 

,162.34 

,295.04 

867.30 

66-98 

,935.90 

,185.44 

750.46 

34-34 



Land Buildings Implements Live stock 



3,525 91 

1,849 61 

1,676 30 

90 63 



7,658.06 

3,129.15 

4,. 528. 91 

144-73 

5,000.21 

1,386.97 

4,219.24 

304-21 

6,0,53.64 

1,680.86 

4,. 372. 78 

260-15 

6.796.48 

2,869.17 

3,927.31 

136-88 

2, 697.. 33 

2,394.87 

302.46 

12-63 

2,654.91 

1,648.33 

1,006.58 

61-07 

863. 37 

594 . 14 

269 . 23 

45-31 

971.53 

617.. 30 

354.23 

57-38 

1,351.35 

1,083.65 

267.70 

24-70 



1,152 95 

726 68 

428 27 

.58 66 



1,596.34 
742.31 

8.54.03 
115-05 

660.89 

.378.31 

282.58 

74-70 

790.23 
380.41 
409.82 
107-73 

1,. 372. 78 
617.01 
755.77 
122-49 

1,. 386. 14 

942.. 35 

443 . 79 

47-09 

1,. 341. 62 

679.38 

662.24 

97-48 

823.78 

435.82 

387.96 

89-02 

806.87 

431.23 

375.04 

87-11 

813.73 

566.06 

247.67 

43-75 



359 63 

199 50 

160 13 

80 27 



192.16 

177.75 
14.41 
8-01 

390.43 

229.77 

160.66 

69-92 

597.04 
285.19 
311.85 
109-35 

612.99 

374.51 

238.48 

63-68 

342.74 

2.35.13 

107.61 

45-77 

325.34 
179.54 
145.80 
81-21 

159.82 
97.46 
62.36 
63-99 

85.. 37 
57.27 
28.10 
49-07 

249.14 
187.58 
61.56 
32-82 



883 10 

505 19 

377 91 

74 81 



768.19 

920.66 

-152.47 

- 16-56 

1,353.33 
1,662.95 
-309.62 

- 18-62 

1,200.73 

919.84 

280.89 

30-54 

1,375.26 

797.11 

578.15 

72-53 

969.28 

588.18 

381.10 

64-79 

611.12 

388.37 

222.75 

57-36 

374.85 

238.58 

136.27 

57-12 

298.57 
189.24 
109.33 
57-77 

521.68 

348.15 

173.53 

49-84 



Note— The minu.s sign ( — ) denotes a decrease. 

followed by Saskatchewan with an average of S597.04 per farm. Nova Scotia 
and New Brunswick give the lowest values, per farm, of implements being $85 . 37 
for the former and $159.82 for the latter. Alberta and British Columbia show 

15506— B J 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



decreases in the average value per farm of live stock; in both provinces the 
numbers of animals are greater and the price per animal higher in 1911 than in 
1901, therefore what has occurred is, that the numbers of holdings (see Table 4 
page x) have grown faster than the increase in live stock. The passing of 
the ranch also has had a deterrent influence on stock raising. 

Table 12 needs little explanation. The figures in each column are to be 
read vertically. The total value, for all Canada, of each class of farm property- 
is represented by 100. The proportion of the total, which each province gave, 
is indicated by the percentages, the totals of which add up to 100. For example, 
of the total value of land in 1911, British Columbia provided 5-61 per cent, 
Alberta 13-68 per cent, Saskatchewan 23-15 per cent, Manitoba 12-30 per 
cent, Ontario 24-28 per cent, Quebec 16-83 per cent, New Brunswick 1-31 per 
cent. Nova Scotia 2-07 per cent and Prince Edward Island -77 per cent of the 
total value of farm land. The figures for the other items are to be similarly read. 

The increase in the per cent proportion of the value of all farm property in the 
western provinces has been one of the most striking features in the material devel- 
opment of the country during the decade, the per cent ratio of all farm property 
having increased from 14 • 77 per cent to 46 • 73 per cent. The proportion of land 
values advanced from 15 • 92 per cent to 54 • 74 per cent; of buildings from 8 • 54 
per cent to 25 - 33 per cent; of implements from 17 • 87 per cent to 43 • 98 per cent ; 
of live stock from 21 • 95 per cent to 43 • 72 per cent of the total value. 



TABLE 12. 



PER CENT PROPORTION OF THE VALUE OF FARM PROPERTY BELONGING 
TO EACH PROVINCE 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



All farm 
property 



1911 



1901 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island . 



p.c. p.c. 

i 

100 00100 00 



4-46 

11-64 

19-68 

10-95 

28-91 

18-61 

201 

2-74 

100 



1-87 
1-94 
2-49 
8-47 
52-18 
24-40 
2-87 
406 
1-72 



Land 



1911 I 1901 



Buildings 



1911 1901 



p.c. I p.c. p.c 

100 00 100 00 loa 00 



3-57 
4-9. 
9-2 

7-5; 
38- It 
26 Ot 
3-82 
5-25 
1-42 



5-61, 


209 


13-68' 


1-31 


23-15 


2-27 


12-30 


9-25 


24-28 


53-27 


16-83 


24-64 


1-31 


2-22 


2-07 


3-43 


•77 


1-52 



Implements 



1911 1901 



p.c. p.c. p.c. 
IGO 00 100 00 100 00 



1-10 

200 

3-57 

11-20 

48-50 

24-88 

3-37 

2-96 

2-4 



1-26 


1-38 


-90 


9-34 


1-31 


22-39 


5-07 


10-87 


53-37 


30-25 


25-85 


20-21 


414 


2-38 


6-10 


1-79 


2-00 


1-39 



Live stock 



1911 1901 



p.c. p.c. 
100 00 100 0« 



2-25 
13- 19 
18-34 

9-94 
34-83 
15-46 

2-27 

2-54 

lis 



2-25 
5-73 
4-55 
9-42 
47-91 
21-26 
3-26 
3-85 
1-77 



The statistics in Table 13, which give for 1911 and 1901 a comparative 
statement of the per cent distribution of the value of farm property, by provinces, 
according to classes, are to be read horizontally^ the sums of them constituting 
the share per cent of each province in the total value of all farm property in 
Canada. Table 12 gives the share per cent of the total value of farm property 
which each province contributed, while Table 13 gives in detail the ratio which 
the separate values of land, buildings, implements or live stock bear to the 
total. For example, British Columbia's share per cent in the total value 
of all farm property in 1911 (Table 12, 4-46 per cent) was divided among the 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



different classes of farm property, as follows, land 3- 34 per cent, buildings "70 
per cent, implements -08 per cent and live stock -34 per cent. Similarly for the 
other provinces, the totals of the different classes of farm property', constitute 
the share per cent of each province in the total value. 



TABLE 13. 



PER CENT DISTRIBUTION OF THE VALUE OF FARM PROPERTY 
ACCORDING TO CLASSES BY PROVINCES 1911 AND 1901. 





Per cent of 


V^ALUE OF 


ALL FARM PROPERTY REPRESENTED 


BY — 


Provinces 


Land 


Buildings 


Implements 


Live 


stock 




1911 


1901 


1911 


1901 


1911 


1901 


1911 


1901 


Canada 


p.c. 

59 55 

3-34 

8-14 

13-79 

7-33 

14-45 

10-01 

•79 

1-24 

•46 


p.c. 

56 36 

1-18 

-74 

1-28 

5-22 

30 03 

13-89 

1-25 

1-93 

•84 


p.c. 
19 47 

•70 

•96 
1-80 
1-48 
7-43 
5-06 

-74 
102 

•28 


p.c. 

22 15 

•28 
•20 
•29 

112 
11-82 

5-73 
■92 

1^35 
•44 


p.c. 

6-07 

•08 

■57 

1^36 

•66 

1-84 

123 

•14 

•11 

•09 


p.c. 

6 03 

•06 
•12 
•22 
•68 
295 
1-51 
•20 
•18 
•16 


p.c. 

14 91 

■34 

1-97 

2-73 

1-48 

519 

2^31 

•34 

•37 

•18 


p.c. 
15 41 

•35 


Alberta 


•88 


Saskatchewan 


•70 


Manitoba 


1-45 


Ontario 


7-38 




3-27 




•50 


Nova Scotia 


•60 


Prince Edward Island 


•28 







ORCHARDS AND GARDENS 

Table 14 presents comparative statistics, for all Canada, of areas devoted 
to the production of fruits and vegetables in 1891, 1901 and 1911. From 1891 
to 1901 there was a decrease of 25,2G5 acres in the area of orchards and nurseries, 
whereas during the next decade there was an increase of 47,490 acres. Vine- 
yards had an area of 9,836 acres in 1911 as against 5,600 acres in 1901, being an 



TABLE 14. ORCHARD AND GARDEN AREAS, FOR ALL CANADA, 1891-1911. 



Classes 



1891 



1901 



1911 



Per cent op total 



1891 



1901 



1911 



Total. 



acres ] acres 
464,462 ! 478,223 



Orchards 

Vineyards. . . 
Small fruits. 
Vegetables. . 



381,-371 

5,951 

13,411 

63,729 



356, lOG 
5,600 
(') 
116,517 



acres 

636,938 

403,596 

9,836 

17,495 

200,011 



p.c. 
100 00 



■10 
•28 

2-88 
13-74 



1- 



p.c. 
100 09 

74-45 
1-17 
(') 

24-38 



p.c. 
109 O'J 



03-:'!7 
1-54 



32 •34 



(') Included with vegetables. 

increase of 4,236 acres in the ten years. The combined area of small fruits 
and vegetables in 1901 was 116,517 acres as compared with an acreage in 1911 
of 223,506 acres, of which 17,495 acres were in fruit and 206,011 acres under 
vegetables. The total area under orchards and gardens increased by a little loss 
than three per cent in the ten years 1891-1901, while the increase from 1901 to 
1911 was better than 33 per cent. 



xxfl 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



The land under orchards in 1891 comprised 82-10 per cent of the total area 
in orchards and gardens, as compared with 74-45 per cent in 1901 and 63-37 per 
cent in 1911. The acreage in vegetables is more than three times as much 
as it was in 1891. The land in vegetables alone is 89,434 acres greater than the 
total acreage in small fruits and vegetables in 1901. 

In 1891 the census records showed that 1-34 acres of every 100 acres of 
improved land were under orchards as compared with 1 • 18 acres in 1901 and 
•83 acres in 1911. The ratio per 100 acres of the combined areas of orchards and 
gardens was 1-63 acres in 1891, 1-58 acres in 1901 and 1-31 acres in 1911. 

Table 15 gives the comparative statistics of the area of orchards and nurseries, 
vineyards, small fruits and vegetables in 1891, 1901 and 1911. In 1901 Ontario 
possessed 5,440 acres or 97 per cent of the total area as compared with 8,542 
acres in 1911 or 87 per cent. In every province there has been a marked increase 

TABLE 15. LAND IN ORCHARDS, SMALL FRUITS AND VEGETABLES COMPARED 

BY PROVINCES, 1891—1911. 



Provinces 



Acres of Land in- 



Orchards and 
nurseries 



Vine\'ards 



Small fruits 



Vegetables 



Canada— 
1911... 
1901 . . . . 
1891 . . . . 

British Columbia — 

1911.... 

1901.... 

1891.... 
Alberta — 

1911.... 

1901.... 

1891.... 
Saskatchewan — 

1911.... 

1901.... 

1891.... 
Manitoba — 

1911..., 



Ontario — 



1901. 
1891. 

1911. 
1901. 
1891. 



Quebec — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

New Brunswick — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Nova Scotia — 

1911 

1901 

1S91 

Prince Edward Island- 

1911 

1901 

1891 



403,596 
35S, 106 
381,371 

33,618 
7,502 
6,541 

340 
46 



817 
88 



1,933 

652 

3,538 

279,011 
267,112 
290,727 

34,077 
34,289 
42.013 

8,976 
8,934 
9,342 

40,474 
34,277 
25,283 

4,350 
3,216 
3.197 



9,836 
5,6Cd 
5.951 

309 

18 
30 

20 
2 



134 
2 
2 

8,542 
5,440 
4,956 

611 
119 
688 

68 

7 
28 

125 
10 

173 

6 
1 

72 



17,495 
13,411 

1,336 

104 

66 

185 

(') 

125 



12.973 

0) 
8,249 

1,803 

0) 

3,011 

425 

213 

466 

(') 
1.579 

116 
(') 
102 



206.011 
116,517 
63,729' 

9.222 
2,840 
1,080 

13,202 
957 



14,228 
1,584 



18,259 
4,549 
2,043 

63,810 
65,303 
26,116 

58,269 
28,809 
27.915 

10,284 
4,380 
1,896 

17,541 
7,581 
3,001 



198 
514 
474 



1 Small fruits included with vegetables. * Includes totals for Alberta and Saskatchewan. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



from 1901 to 1911 in the acreage devoted to grape production. From 1901 to 
1911 the acreage in orchards and nurseries in British Columbia increased from 
7,502 acres to 33,618 acres, being an increase of 26,116 acres or 348 per cent 
in the decade. Encouraging increases have been made in the planting of 
orchards in all the prairie provinces during the decade — the acreage in all fruits 
having increased from 791 acres to 3,641 acres. Quebec shows a steady decline 
in the acreage under orchards, but increases in other fruits and vegetables. In 
the setting out of new orchards, British Columbia takes first place, with Ontario 
in second position and Nova Scotia a good third. 

Table 16 gives for the Dominion, as a whole, the comparative number of 
trees bearing and non-bearing, according to classes, together with the average 
number of trees per farm and per 100 acres of improved land in 1901 and 
1911. With the exception of peaches there have been decreases in the numbers 
of all fruit-bearing trees during the decade. On the other hand there are large 
increases in the numbers of all kinds of young trees, except plums. The 
number of apple trees per farm dropped from 27-64 to 22-70 and the total 
number of all orchard trees per farm from 38-92 to 31-23. 

T.\BLE 16. FRUIT TREES, BEARING AND NON-BEARING, TOGETHER WITH AVER- 
AGE NUMBER PER FARM AND PER 100 ACRES OF IMPROVED LAND, 1911 AND 1901. 



Kinds 


Trees, bearixg 


Trees, non-be.\rixg 


Trees, per f..rm ^,^JZ^'J^^ }^^ *''• 

IMPROVED L.\ND 




1911 


1901 


1911 


1901 


1911 


1901 


1911 


1901 


Fruit trees — 
Apple 


NO. 

10,617,372 
839,288 
581,704 


NO. 

11,025,789 
819,985 
617.293 


no. 

5,599,804 

1,056,359 

385,538 

637, 220 


NO. 

4,028,086 
481,790 
344,808 
OR.-? 45'fi 


NO. 

22-70 
2-65 
1-35 
2-40 
1-73 
•40 


NO. 

27-64 
2-39 
1-76 
4-44 
2-36 
•33 


NO. 

33-28 
3-89 
1-98 
3-51 
2-54 
•59 


NO. 

49-93 




4-31 


Pear 


3-19 


Plum 


1 
1,075,130 1,452.269 

741,992 903.140 


8-01 


Cherry 


495,082' 385,228 
141,233 37,555 


4-25 


Other 


146.659 


141,870 


•59 


Totals '. .. 


14,063,145 


14,960,346 


8,315,236 6,240,893 


31 23 


.38 93 


45 79 


70 28 



The production of apples in the Dominion decreased from 1900 to 1910 
by 8,007,520 bushels. The correctness of the census figures are fairly well 
established by the Trade and Navigation Returns which show that in 1901 
Canada exported of the apple crop of the previous year 2,035,953 bushels as 
against an exportation of 1,570,974 bushels in 1911 of the 1910 crop, a falling 
off in exports of 464,979 bushels. In 1900-1901 we imported 78,189 bushels 
of apples as against 452,783 bushels in the fiscal year 1910-1911, which cor- 
responds closely to the census year, being an increase of 374,594 bushels over 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



the previous decennial year. The decrease in exports and thj increase iu 
imports both indicate a shortage in the home prod i and incidentally corroborate 
the statistics of the census. 

The records of the production of small fruits, other than grapes, for 1891 
are not available and for 1901 are grouped together and given in quarts. In 
the last census, there being a legal standard box adopted, the quantities are 
given in boxes and quarts in order to conform to common usage. Reducing 
the boxes to quarts for the sake of comparability there was an increase in the 
production of small fruits (grapes excepted) of over 2f million quarts. The 
production of grapes increased by 8,595,804 lb. during the decade. Table 17 
gives the fruit pioduction for all Canada, together with the average production 
per farm and per 100 acres of improved land in 1890, 1900 and 1910. 

TABLE 17. FRUIT PRODUCTION FOR ALL CANADA, TOGETHER WITH THE AVERAGE 
PRODUCTION PER FARM AND PER 100 ACRES OF IMPROVED LAND, 1890-1910. 



Kinds 



Total productiox 



Average PRODrcTioN 



1890 



1900 



1910 



Per farm 



Per 100 acres 
improved land 



1890 



1900 



1910 



1890 1900 1910 

i I 



Orchard fruits — 

Apples bu . 

Peaches " 

Pears " 

Plums " 

Cherries " 

All other " 

Total " 

Small fruits — 

Grapes lb. 

Strawberries boxes 

Currants and gooseberries qts. 
All other boxes 



7,563,894 
43,690 
229,283 
269,631 
197,090 
324,789 



18,626,186 
545,415 
531,837 
557,875 
336,751 
70,396 



8,628,377 



12,252,331 



10,618,666 
646, 8S6 
504,171 
508,994 
238,974 
47,789 



1219 
•07 
•37 
•43 
•32 
•52 



20,668,460 12,565,420 



24,302,634j32,898,438 
- 18,686,662 



13 90 



19-74 



21,707,791 



3,830,609 
9,000,208 



14-87 
-90 
•70 
•71 
•33 
•07 



37-95 



44-62 



39 85 



17-58 

46- 03 

26-15 

5-36 

12-60 



1105 

•06 
■34 
•39 
•29 

•48 



1261 



42 -.93 



61 -75! 21-79 

1-81 1 33 

I 
1-76 103 



1-85 

Ml 

•23 



6851 



80 56 



71-96 



105 
•49 
•09 



25-78 

67 50 

38 35 

786 

1847 



In Table 18 the number of bearing and non-bearing fruit trees by principal 
kinds are given by provinces for 1901 and 1911 and the production of fruit in 
1890, 1900 and 1910. Statistics of the number of trees are not available for 
1891. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 

TABLE 18. OllCHARD TREES IN 1901 AND 1911 AND FRUIT IN 1S90, 1900 AND 1910, 

COMPARED BY PROVINCES. 



Kinds 



Tkees, bearing 



1901 



1911 



Trees, xox-bearing; 



Productiox of fruit 



1901 



1911 



1890 



1900 



1910 



Canada — 

Apples 

Peaches 

Pears 

Plums 

Cherries 

Other 

British Columbia — 

Apples 

Peaches 

Pears 

Plums 

Cherries 

Other 

Alberta — 

Apples 

Peaches 

Pears 

Plums 

Cherries 

Other 

Saskatchewan' — 

Apples 

Peaches 

Pears 

Plums 

Cherries 

Other 

Manitoba — 

Apples 

Peaches 

Pears 

Plums 

Cherries 

Other 

Ontario — 

Apples 

Peaches 

Pears 

Plums 

Cherries 

Other 

Quebec — 

Apples 

Peaches 

Pears 

Plums 

Cherries 

Other 

Xew Brunswick — 

Apples 

Peaches 

Pears 

Plums 

Cherries.^ 

Other 

Nova Scotia — 

Apples 

Peaches 

Pears 

Plums , 

Cherries 

Other 

Prince Edward Isl'd- 

Apples 

Peaches 

Pears 

Plums 

Cherries 

Other 



NO. 

11,02.5,789 
819,985 
617,293 
1,452,269 
903, 140 
141,870 

220, 684 

3,552 

24,948 

59,7 

17,322 

5,132 

400 



300 



192 

47 



1,091 



24,094 
8,102 



7,551,636 
811,725 
564.798 
999,091 
446,556 
38,517 

1,476,727 

68 

5,191 

245,370 

317,762 

23,711 

456, 115 

86 

721 

10,900 

21,2.39 

12,326 

1,203,745 
4,482 
21,014 
93,790 
43,1.53 
14,806 

115,091 

72 

621 

13,001 

48,917 

47,378 



NO. 

10, en, 372 
839,288 
5S 1,704 
1,075,130 
741,992 
146, 659 

510,763 
39,522 
32, 908 
73,067 
32,697 
22,913 

333 

6 

12 

132 

195 

5,969 

1,449 

1 

8 

716 

237 

4,816 

4,292 

31 

14 

5,183 

9,776 

22,151 

6,710,033 
794, 192 
505,368 
784, 036 
506,868 
48,121 

1,252,835 

1,734 

4,014 

136,270 

112,056 

33,411 

393,874 

667 

811 

11,445 

11,425 

1,839 

1,596,0.56 

2,926 

37,154 

52,764 

31,056 

2,852 

147,737 

209 

1,415 

11,517 

37,682 

4,587 



NO. 

,028,086 
481,790 
344, f 
963,426 
385,228 
37,555 

170,960 

4,401 

19,795 

26,663 

9,477 

5,068 



831 



3,681 

2,280 

70 

7,241 



17,569' 
5,540 



1,989,983 
470, 772 
280, 175 
686,626 
237, 792 
10, 263 



780,025 

264 

6, 632 

118,910 

76,328 

4,817 

219,249 

247 

1,779 

16,371 

13,331 

3,470 

771,8.30 

6,015 

35,086 

78,655 

18,883 

3,321 

87,009 
91 
1,341 
14,479 
21,514 
10,. 546 



NO. 

5,599,804' 
1,056,3591 
385,538 
637, 220; 
495,082 
141,233 

1,465,6621 
162,507] 
116,487| 
96,144 
73,090 
50,649 



958 


4,448 


- 


20 


- 


26 


470 


536 


83 


285 


- 


6,163 



bush. 
7,563,894 
43,690 
229,283 
269,631 
197,090 
324,789 

76, 856 

1,494 

12, 156 

19,775 

4,227 

7,612 



5,434 
12 
92 

2,209 
924 

4,960 

17,801 
47 
59 
8,801 
2,371 
5,836 



713 

44 

212 

166 

2,443 



2,073,576 5,043,612 
890,4551 40,626 



237,769 

345,991 

327,894 

54,296 

859,812 

688 

3,812 

126, 1.56 

53,778 

9,538 

229,828 

251 

1,1.37 

10,541 

7,6.56 

3,014 

884,984 

2, 0.38 

25, 132 

37, 734 

13,672 

1,141 

58,2.59 

341 

1,024 

9,108 

15,412 
5,636 



208,887 
171,. 335 
106,658 
208,415 

1,078,120 

980 

887 

63,794 

72,931 

64,. 325 

259,615 

35 

96 

3,784 

1,243 

7,602 

1,051,592 

534 

7,115 

9,246 

7,482 
31,561 

52,01?: 

IP 

7] 

1,47! 

4,20: 

2,47. 



bush. 
18,626.186 
545,415 
531,837 
557,875 
336,751 
70,396 

240,012 

2,553 

25,364 

58,221 

14,445 

2,938 

500 



987 



571 



2,006 
673 



13,631,264 
539,482 
487,759 
337, 108 
132, 177 
40, 108 

2,025,113 

17 

3,275 

122,648 

1.50,690 

21,. 386 

503,214 

87 

279 

4,637 

4,2.33 

1,096 

2,065,104 

3,231 

14,881 

28,931 

16,669 

2,229 

159,421 

45 

279 

4,265 

17,8:;8 

2,639 



bush. 
10,618,666 
646,826 
504, 171 
508,994 
238,974 
47, 789 

575,377 
44,0.32 
51,000 
80,444 
27,417 
11.469 

189 



4 
1 

59 

90 



17 

6 

213 



1,528 
18 
13 

1,645 
547 

2,427 

6,459,151 
600, 187 
423,568 
346,944 
146,440 
20,465 

1,482,095 

1,484 

4,8S6 

53,947 

45, 744 

9,796 

272,884 

49 

423 

3,778 

1,680 

301 

1,666,977 

1,043 

23,506 

16,984 

10,004 

1,580 

160,375 

13 

773 

5,231 

7, 1.35 

1,479 



' Quantity of fruit produced in 1890 included with totals for Canada. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Table 19 gives the values of orchard fruits, small fruits and vegetables 
separately for the year 1910, the aggregate value for 1900 and 1910, together 
with the percentage of increase during the decade. For all Canada, in 1910, 
orchard fruits gave a value of $9,728,533, small fruits of $3,052,592, and vegetables 
of $18,806,544, making an aggregate for fruits and vegetables of $31,587,669, 
as compared with $12,994,900 in 1900, being a gain of $18,592,769 or 143-08 
per cent, in ten years. The average worth per farm of fruits and vegetables 
was $44 in 1910 as comjDared with $24 in the previous census. As the value 
of fruits, all kinds, and vegetables were combined in the census of 1901, it is 
therefore not possible to determine the proportion of the increase in value 
during the decade which belongs to each class but it is safe to assume, that 
the value of vegetables was an even greater proportion of the total value in 
1900 than it was in 1910. From 1900 to 1910 every province shows an increase, 
in the value of fruits and vegetables, ranging from 64-38 per cent in Prince 
Edward Island to 3,443-73 per cent in Alberta. 

TABLE 19. VALUE OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES SEPARATELY IN 1910 AND COM- 
PARED BY TOTALS FOR 1910 AND 1900, TOGETHER WITH THE PER CENT OF 
INCREASE IN TEN YEARS. 



Provinces 



Value in 1910 of — 



Orchard 
fruits 



Small 
fruits 



Vegetables 



Value of fruits and 
vegetables in — 



1910 



1900 



Increase 

per cent 

in ten 

years 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



9,728,533 

1,022.576 

401 

327 

7,146 

5,564, l:!3 

1,186,479 

267,993 

1,547,245 

132, 233 



$ 

3,052,593 

312,528 

6,469 

3,828 

14,690 

2,254,913 

284,633 

62,806 

87,161 

25,564 



18,806,544 

1,023,263 
1,129,922 
1.047,082 
1.428,402 
6,043,617 
5,797,606 
873.861 
1,392,039 
70,692 



31,587,669 

2,358,367 
1,136,792 
1,051,237 
1.450.238 
13.862,663 
7,268,778 
1,204,660 
3,026,445 
228,489 



12.9»4,900 

435,794 

32,079 

48,474 

163,958 

7,809,084 

2.564,801 

394,337 

1,407.369 

139,004 



p.c. 
143 08 

44117 

3,443-73 

2,068-66 

784-52 

77-58 

183-41 

205-49 

115 04 

64-38 



In the last census year Ontario obtained 57-20 per cent of the total value 
of all orchard fruits raised in Canada, Nova Scotia 15-90 per cent, Quebec 12-20 
per cent, British Columbia 10-51 per cent. New Brunswick 2-75 per cent. Prince 
Edward Island 1-35 per cent and the Prairie provinces -09 per cent; of small 
fruits, Ontario obtained 73-86 per cent of the total value, British Columbia 
10-24 per cent, Quebec 9-32 per cent. Nova Scotia 2-85 per cent, New Brunswick 
2 - 05 per cent, Prince Edward Island • 84 per cent and the Prairie provinces • 84 
per cent. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 xxvii 

Table 20 gives the per cent distribution of the value of orchard fruits, 
small fruits and vegetables in 1910. For all Canada the aggregate value of 
fruits and vegetables was $31,587,669 of which the value of orchard fruits 
(S9,728,533) was 30-80 per cent, of small fruits (S3,052,592) 9-66 per cent and 
of vegetables ($18,806,544) 59-54 per cent. The table is to be similarly inter- 
preted for the provinces. In 1910 vegetables obtained 99-39 per cent of the 
total value of fruits and vegetables in Alberta, 99-60 per cent in Saskatchewan, 
98-49 per cent in Manitoba, 79-76 per cent in Quebec, 72-54 per cent in New 
Brunswick, 46 per cent in Nova Scotia and less than 45 per cent in the remaining 
provinces. 

TABLE 20. PER CENT PROPORTION WHICH THE VALUE OF ORCHARD FRUITS, OF 
SMALL FRUITS AND OF VEGETABLES FORMS OF THE AGGREGATE VALUE OF 
FRUIT AND VEGETABLES, BY PROVINCES, IN 1910. 



Provinces 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



Per cent of the aggregate value of 
fruits an"d vegetables obtained 

BY — 



Orchard 
fruits 



p.c. 
30 80 

43-36 

•04 

•04 

•49 

40- 14 

1632 

22-25 

51-13 

57-87 



Small 
fruits 



p.c. 
9 66 

13-25 

-57 

•36 

1-02 

16-27 

3-92 

5-21 

2-88 

1119 



Vegetables 



p.c. 
59 54 

43-39 
99-39 
99-60 
98^49 
43 59 
79 76 
72 54 
*46 00 
30-94 



Aggregate 



P.O. 

100 00 

100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100-00 
100-00 
100 00 
100-00 
100 00 
100-00 



The total value of fruits of all kinds exported and imported by decades, 
ended June 30, since 1891 were as follows — in 1891 exports $1,487,336, 
imports $261,382; in 1901 exports $1,033,604, imports $337,674; in 1911 
exports $1,975,982, imports $1,. 531,077. 

From 1891 to 1901 the value of exports increased by 9-83 per cent and of 
imports by 29-18 per cent, while from 1901 to 1911 exports increased by 20-95 
per cent and imports by 353 • 42 per cent. Of the total value of all fruits exported, 
apples obtained 93-43 per cent in 1891, 90-77 per cent in 1901 and 88-91 per cent 
in 1911. The value of apples imported in 1891 represented 21-08 per cent of 
the total value of all fruits imported as compared with 21-97 per cent in 1901 
and 31-84 per cent in 1911. Table 21 gives the quantity and value of fruit 
exported for the years ended June 30, 1891, 1901 and 1911, and Table 22 
the quantity and value of fruit imports for the same years. 



xxviii CENSUSOFCANADA1911 

TABLE 21. QUANTITY AND VALUE OF FRUIT EXPORTED FOR THE YEARS ENDED 

JUNE 30, 1891, 1901 AND 1911. 





Exports of fruit 


Fruit 


1891 


1901 


1911 




Quantity 


"N'alue 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Apples 


bush. 
1,352,508 

(■) 
(') 


$ 
1,389,714 
64,849 
32,773 


bush. 
2,035,953 
(') 

0) 


1,482,927 
112,441 
38,236 


bush. 
1,570,974 

(') 

0) 


1,756,884 


Berries 


82,921 


All others 


136,177 






Total value 


- 


1,487,336 


- 


1,633,604 


- 


1,975,982 



(') Quantities not given. 



TABLE 22. QUANTITY AND VALUE OF FRUIT IMPORTED FOR THE YEARS ENDED 

JUNE 30, 1891, 1901 AND 1911. 









Imports 


of FRriT 






Fruit 


1891 


1901 


1911 




Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 




bush. 

48,303 

395,748 

5,013 

8,924 

lb. . 

334,871 

65,212 

1,081,792 


$ 

55,118 
32,039 
21,219 
26,905 

34,280 
12,369 
79,452 


bush. 

78,189 

2,093,157 

36,465 

13,570 

lb. 

1.079,274 
105,297 
978,199 


$ 

74,191 
52,001 
36,291 
26, 199 

80,310 

9,517 

.59, 165 


bush. 

452,783 

8,1.37,846 

89,808 

40, 022 

lb. 

3,272,6.36 

345,9.32 

3,934,25a 


487,516 




218,564 




127,604 


Cranberries 


103,118 




318.223 




44.744 




231,.;08 






Total value 


- 


261,382 


- 


337,674 


- 


1,531,077 



The average production of apples per head, of the population two years of 
age and over, in 1891 was 1-68 bushels as compared with 3-73 busiieis in 1901, 
and 1-59 bushels in 1911. If to the quantity retained for home consumption 
in each decade be added the quantity of apples imported, we find that the 
average consumption for the population two years of age and over at each 
census period was 1-39, 3-34 and 1-42 l)ushcls respectively. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



FIELD CROPS. 

The s.tatistics of the area, production and value of field crops are given in 
detail in Tables I to IV, VI, IX and X, and by summaries for provinces in 
Tables XIV to XVII, and by comparative statements in Tables XXV to 
XXVII. ' In Tables I to IV the statistics are given by townships or parishes 
wherever municipal arrangements lent themselves to the project. 

Acreage. 

In Table 23, which follows, the total acreage in field crops is given by 
provinces for the years 1890, 1900, 1910 and 1911. The statistics for the year 
1911, not being for a census year, cannot be compared with the figures of the 
previous censuses, but are given to illustrate the steadilj'' forward movement in 
agriculture. Table 27 (pp. xxxiv-xxxviii) gives the statistics for these years by 
individual crops and will afford an opjjortunity to study the fluctuations in the 
acreage devoted to each crop by census periods. 



TABLE 23. 



COMPARATIVE AREA OF FIELD CROPS, BY PROVINCES, 1890, 1900, 1910 

AND 1911. 



Provinces 


Field crops in — 


IXCRE.\SE PER CENT 


1890 


1900 


1910 


1911 


1900 
over 
1890 


1910 
over 
1900 


1911 
over 
1910 


Canada 

British Columbia 


acres 
15,662,811 

115,184 
38,371 

151,987 
1,229,041 
8,166,499 
4,064,716 

763,248 

723,825 


acres 

19,763,740 

171,447 

188,476 

655, 537 

2,756,106 

9,212,478 

4,704,396 

897,417 

730, 146 


acres 

39,556,168 

213,437 
2,067,589 

6,871,858 

4,668,250 

9,321,933 

5,265,738 

958,868 

710,966 

477,529 


acres 

35,261,338 

239,649 

3,378,365 

9,136,868 

5,161,858 

9,683,307 

5,480,673 

978,876 

717,468 

484,274 


PC. 

26 2 

48-8 

391-2 

331-3 

124-2 

12-- 8 

15-7 

17-6 

-9 

9-2 


PC. 

54 6 

24-5 

997 

948-3 

69-4 

1-1 

11-9 

6-9 

-2-6 

6-7 


p.c. 
15 4 
12-3 


Alberta 


63-4 


Saskatchewan 


330 


Manitoba 

Ontario : 


10-6 
3-9 


Quebec 

New Brunswick 


4-1 
2-1 


Nova Scotia 


•9 


Prince Edward Island 


409,940 


447,737 


1-4 



Note — The minus sign ( — ) shows a decrease. 

The total area, for all Canada, in field crops in 1890 was 15,662,811 acres, 
in 1900 it was 19,763,740 acres, in 1910 it was 30,556,168 acres and in 1911 it 
reached 35,261,338 acres. From 1890 to 1900 the increase per cent was 26-2, 
from 1900 to 1910, 54-6 per cent and for the year 1911 over the preceding year 
it was 15-4 per cent. Of the Prairie provinces, Manitoba alone shows a lesser 
increase in the second decade than in the first. All the eastern provinces show 
smaller increases in the acreage of field crops in the decade ending 1910 than 
they did for the decade ending 1900. From 1900 to 1910 the area under 
field crops in Nova Scotia shows a decrease of 2-6 per cent. It is the only 
province in which an increase was not made in the acreage in field crops during 
the decade. 

The relatively small gain per cent shown in crop acreage from 1900 to 1910 
in Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime provinces is due to the scarcity of efficient 
farm help and to migration to the western provinces. The last census showed 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



that of the total population west of the Great Lakes 352,735 were born in 
Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime provinces. Table 24, which gives the 
number of vacant farms in the eastern provinces, June 1, 1911, also speaks of 
movement of population and incidentally supplies a reason for the small gains 
made in crop area during the decade. 



TABLE 24. VACANT FARMS IN EASTERN CANADA, CENSUS 1911. 



Provinces 


Number of vacant farms HA\aNG — 


Total 

number 

of vacant 

farms 


Total 
number 
of acres 




5 to 10 
acres 


11 to 50 
acres 


51 to 100 
acres 


101 to 200 
acres 


201 acres 
and over 


in vacant 
farms 


Ontario 


NO. 

522 

84 

146 

219 

5 


NO. 

1,903 

236 

279 

418 

73 


NO. 

1,554 

215 

234 

218 

47 


NO. 

581 
93 
66 

104 
10 


NO. 

199 

37 

14 

32 

2 


NO. 

4,759 
665 
739 
991 
137 


acres 
398,637 




56.342 




48,754 


Nova Scotia 


63.967 


Prince Edward Island 


9.002 


Total 


976 


2,9«9 


2,268 


854 


284 


7,291 


576,702 







The percentages in Table 25 are computed from the figures given in Table 23. 
Of the total area in field crops in 1890, Ontario contributed 52 • 14 per cent as 
compared with 46-61 per cent in 1900 and 30-50 per cent in 1910. Quebec 
gave 25-95 per cent of the total area in 1890 as against 23-80 in 1900 and 17-24 
per cent in 1910. The Maritime provinces possessed 12-11 per cent of the crop 
acreage in 1890, as against 10-50 per cent in 1900 and 7-02 per cent in 1910. 
The share per cent of the total crop acreage given by the Prairie provinces in 
1890 was 9-06 per cent, in 1900 it had increased to 18-22 per cent while in 
1910 it made nearly 45 per cent of the total acreage of the Dominion under crops. 

TABLE 25. PER CENT DISTRIBUTION OF ACREAGE UNDER FIELD CROPS BY 

PROVINCES 1890, 1900 AND 1910. 



Provinces 



Percentage which crop acreage or 

EACH province FORMS OF TOTAL 



1890 



1900 



1910 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



p.c. 

100 00 

•74 

•21 

■97 

7^85 

52- 14 

25 95 

4^88 

4^62 

2-61 



p.c. 

100 00 

•87 

•95 

332 

13-95 

46-61 

23-80 

4-55 

3-69 

226 



p.c. 

100 •• 

•70 

6-77 

22-49 

15-28 

30-50 

17-24 

3-13 

2-33 

1-56 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



XXXl 



Table 26 shows in parallel columns for all Canada the increases or decreases 
made in acreage devoted to the various specified crops (1) for 1900 over 1890 
and (2) for 1910 over 1900. The areas of fall and spring wheat were not 
enumerated separately in the Census of 1891. In the Census of 1911 for the 
first time separate areas for turnips, mangolds and sugar beets find a place. 

The Census of 1901 showed increases cl ing the decade for wheat of 
1,523,329 acres or 56-39 per cent, for oats of 1,406,299 acres or 35-50 per cent, 
for corn for husking of 165,657 acres or 84-90 per cent, buckwheat and peas 
showed decreases of 31,581 acres or 12-06 per cent for the former and 255,055 
acres or 27-56 per cent for the latter; but for all grains, the net 
increase in acreage for 1900 over 1890 was 3,143,589 acres or 34-5 per cent. 
Potatoes and hops also showed decreased areas. The census records of 
1910 gave ten j'ears increases for wheat of 4,639,972 acres or 109-83 per 
cent; for oats of 3,288,524 acres or 61-26 per cent; for barley of 411,294 
acres or 47-17 per cent; for buckwheat of 95,787 acres or 36-59 per cent; for 
flax of 559,099 acres or 2,421-80 per cent. Practically the whole of this large 
increase in flax production took place in Saskatchewan and Alberta. In 
mixed grains the increase was 153,467 acres or 56- 11 per cent. Hay, clover 
and alfalfa show a ten year increase of 1,800,788 acres or 27-5 per cent. 
Forage crops increased by 275,835 acres or nearly 100 per cent. Decreases 
are shown for roots and hops, but in grains alone there was an increase of 
8,460,286 acres or 73-3 per cent in the decade. The combined area in forage 
crops (hay, clover, alfalfa, etc.) was 5,931,548 acres in 1890 as compared with 
6,819,773 acres in 1900 and 8,896,396 acres in 1910, being an increase at the end 
of the first decade of 15 per cent and of 30-45 percent at the end of the second. 

TABLE 26. COMPARATIVE STATEMENT SHOWING INCREASES OR DECREASES IN 
THE ACREAGE OF FIELD CROPS FOR ALL CANADA FROM 1890 TO 1900 AND 
FROM 1900 TO 1910, 



Crops 



Variation in ten years 

1890-1900 
Increase(+) decrease(— ) 



Variation in ten years 

1900-1910 
Increase(+) decrease(— ) 



Amount 



Per cent 



Amount 



Per cent 



Wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Rye 

Com for husking 

Buckwheat 

Peas 

Beans 

Mixed grains 

Flax 

Potatoes 

Field roots 

Hay, clover and alfalfa 

Other forage crops 

Tobacco 

Hops 



acres 

1,523,329 

3,336 

1,406,299 

54,577 

165,657 

31,581 

255,0.55 

3,537 

0) 

6. 850 

1,447 

57,017 

611.875 

(') 

7,141 
446 



p.c. 

56 -.39 
0-38 
35-50 
44-69 
84-90 
12 06 
27-56 
8-20 
(') 

42- 19 
0-30 
38-49 
10-31 
(») 
149-86 
23-30 



4,639, 

411, 

3,288, 

61, 

06, 

95, 

315, 

153, 

559, 

15, 

10, 

1,800, 

275, 

7, 



972 
294 
524 
951 
807 
787 
129 
335 
467 
099 
761 
595 
788 
835 
022 
304 



p.c. 



109-83 

47-17 

61-26 

35 06 

18-51 

36-59 

47-01 

0-72 

56-11 

,421-80 

3-51 

5-16 

27-50 

99-81 

68-98 

20-84 



(*) Not reported in the Census of 1801. 



xxxii CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 

Table 27 gives the area of all field crops for the Dominion, as a whole, and 
for each of the provinces together with the percentage of variation from one 
decade to another. The areas sown to the various crops in the spring of 1911 
(not a census year) are given to show the continuous and rapid advancement 
being made in agriculture in Canada in recent years. In discussing agricultural 
conditions in British Columbia in 1901, the following statement appears in the 
''Introduction to Volume II, Census 1901": "British Columbia is not primarily 
an agricultural province. The minerals of the mountains have hitherto been 
the chief attraction for men of adventure and capital; but no doubt in time, 
with the development of mining, agriculture will become an established industry." 
The statistics of the last census indicate that the fertile valleys of British 
Columbia are being devoted to fruit and vegetable culture rather than to the 
production of grain. The area under grain in British Columbia increased from 
1891 to 1901 by 12,199 acres, while from 1901 to 1911 there was a decrease of 
9,562 acres or 16-78 per cent. On the other hand during the last decade the 
acreage under hay and clover increased from 102,752 acres to 132,668 acres, 
under forage crops from 1,208 to 15,519 acres, and alfalfa, not enumerated in 
1900, is given an acreage of 3,741 acres in 1910, potatoes increased by 2,666 acres 
or 32-48 per cent. The net increase in the acreage of all field crops in British 
Columbia, during the last decade, was 41,990 acres or 24-49 per cent. As 
previously stated, the development of orchard and market gardens has been 
the notable agricultural feature of the Pacific province in recent years. From 
1900 to 1910 orchard and market gardens have increased from 10,360 acres to 
34,485 acres being an increase of 24,125 acres or 233 per cent in the decade. 

The number of farm holdings in Alberta in 1901 was 9,486 of which 9,429 
were holdings of five acres and over as compared with 60,353 holdings of five 
acres and over in 1911 and 1,143 of less than five acres. The area in wheat, 
oats and barley grew from 171,862 acres in 1900 to 1,784,265 acres in 1910, 
being an increase of 1,612,403 acres or 938 per cent. The minor grains increased 
from 1,254 acres to 8,954 acres in the ten years. Flax, of which there was only 
100 acres in 1900 increased to 30,885 acres in 1910. Hay, clover and alfalfa, 
which were not recorded in the Census of 1901, had an area of 152,424 acres in 
1910. The potato acreage grew from 3,792 acres to 20,086 acres. 

In 1900, on 13,384 holdings of five acres and over Saskatchewan had an 
acreage under wheat, barley and oats of 640,861 acres as against 6,246,202 
acres on 95,809 holdings in 1910, being an increase of 5,605,341 acres in ten 
years. Of this increase, wheat obtained 3,741,010 acres, barley 117,779 acres 
and oats 1,746,552 acres. Flax, which had an area of only 227 acres in 1900 
grew to 506,425 acres in 1910. The area in potatoes and roots rose from 6,756 
acres to 25,085 acres in the ten years. 

In 1900, on 31,812 farm holdings of five acres and over, Manitoba grow 
1,965,200 acres wheat, 139,672 acres barley and 573,858 acres oats as compareil 
with 2,759,445 acres wheat, 416,015 acres barley and 1,209,173 acres oats on 
42,567 holdings of similar sizes in 1910. Forage crops grew from 43,667 acres 
in 1900 to 216,618 acres in 1910 being an increase of 172,951 acres or 396 per 
ce^jt in the decade. 

The total area of all field crops in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta 
increased from 3,600,119 acres in 1900 to 13,607,607 acres in 1910 being an 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 xxxi.i 

increase of 10,007,578 acres or 278 per cent in the decade (of this increase the 
province of Saskatchewan provided more than 60 per cent). The area of 
Avheat, alone, increased from 2,495,474 acres to 7,867,423 acres, being a gain 
of 5,371,949 acres or 215-25 per cent in the ten years, and the area under the 
three principal crops grew from 3,491,453 acres in 1900 to 12,415,100 acres in 
1910, being an increase of 8,923,647 acres or 255-6 per cent. 

The importance of grain growing to the Prairie provinces is strikingly illus- 
trated by the fact, that in 1900, 96-98 per cent of their whole area under field 
crops was devoted to the growing of wheat, oats and barle}' and 91-24 per cent 
in 1910. The decrease in proportion of these crops, in the decade, is due to the 
more general attention which has been given in recent yesas to the growing of 
vegetables, grasses and forage crops; the area in potatoes having increased from 
25,967 acres to 70,342 acres, in roots from 2,183 acres to 5,550 acres and in 
forage crops from 60,505 acres in 1900 to 530,010 acres in 1910. 

In the five older provinces, the area of all field crops in the harvest year 
1900 was 15,992,174 acres and in the season of 1910 it was 16,735,034 acres 
being an increase of 742,860 acres or 4-65 per cent, as against an increase of 
1,863,946 acres or 13-2 per cent during the previous decade. From 1900 to 
1910, the area of field crops increased in Ontario bj- 109,455 acres or 1-18 per 
cent, in Quebec by 561,342 acres or 11-93 per cent, in New Brunswick by 61,451 
acres or 6-85 per cent, in Prince Edward Island by 29,792 acres or 6-65 per 
cent, in Nova Scotia during the same period, there was a decrease of 19 180 
acres or 2-62 per cent. In the Census of 1901 Ontario showed an increase of 
12-8 per cent in field crops, Quebec 15-7 per cent, New Brunswick 17-6 per 
cent. Prince Edward Island 9-2 per cent and Nova Scotia about one per cent. 

The area in grain crops, in 1910, of Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime 
provinces was 7,921,229 acres as compared Avith 8,699,923 acres in the harvest 
year 1900, being a decrease of 778,694 acres or 22-45 per cent. Each of the 
provinces contributed to the decrease excepting Prince E(hvard Island, where 
the area in grain increased by 2,835 acres or 1-28 per cent in the decade* in 
Ontario the decrease amounted to 617,875 acres or 79-33 per cent of the total 
in Quebec to 142,127 acres or 18-25 per cent, in New Brunswick to 19,032 acres 
or 2-44 per cent and in Nova Scotia to 2,495 acres or three-tenths of one per 
cent of the total decrease in the live provinces from 1900 to 1910. 

The area of wheat, in eastern Canada, fell from 1,713,101 acres in 1900 to 
987,599 acres in 1910, being a drop of 725,502 acres" or 42-35 per cent during 
the decade; in Ontario the decrease amounted to 617,279 acres or 41-49 per 
cent, in Quebec to 76,944 acres or 55 03 per cent, in New Brunswick to 13,506 
acres or 50-26 per cent, in Nova Scotia to 4,136 acres or 25-32 per cent and in 
Prince Edward Island to 13,577 acres or 32-08 per cent. In contrast, with the 
decreases shown in grain growing, the area in fodder production shows marked 
increases in all the eastern provinces, except Nova Scotia. The net increase 
amounted to 1,559,144 acres or 23-4 per cent over the figures of the previous 
census. The area in fodders, in Ontario, increased from 2,772,866 acres to 
3,533,288 acres being an increase of 760,422 acres or 27 -4 per cent, in Quebec from 
2,588,190 acres to 3,288,835 acres, being an increase of 700,645 acres or 27-1 
per cent over the figure of 1900. A smaller acreage in potatoes is noticeable 

15506 — c 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



in all the eastern provinces except New Brunswick where practically the same 
acreage obtained in 1910 as in 1900. 

Rye crop acreage is diminishing in all the eastern provinces; in Ontario 
the decrease amounted to 59,185 acres, being 86-42 per cent of the total decrease 
of 68,485 acres in the five provinces. 

The area in husking corn was reduced from 1900 to 1910 in Ontario by 
56,795 acres or 17-12 per cent, in Quebec by 9,981 acres or 35-01 per cent; 
in the Maritime provinces the production of this crop, never of serious dimensions, 
is fast approaching the vanishing point. There have been increases in the 
area in each of the Northwest provinces, but here also the acreage devoted to 
it is relatively small. In 1900 the acreage for all Canada totalled 360,758 acres 
as compared with 293,951 acres in 1910, being a falling off in the ten years of 
66,827 acres or 18-52 per cent. 

TABLE 27. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF AREAS OF FIELD CROPS BY PROVINCES, 

1890, 1900, 1910, AND 1911. 



Crops by Provinces 



1890 



1900 



1910 



1911 



Increase per cent 



1900 
over 
1890 



1910 
over 
1900 



1911 
over 
1910 



p. c. 



CANADA 

Fall wheat 

Spring wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Rye 

Corn for Imsking. . . 

Buckwheat 

Beans 

Peas 

Flax 

Mixed grains 

Hav and clover 

Alfalfa 

Corn for forage .... 
Other forage crops. 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

Other field roots. . . 

Tobacco 

Hops 

British Columbia. . 

I'all wheat 

Spring wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Rye 

■ Corn for husking. . . 

Buckwheat 

Beans 

I'cas 

Flax 

Mixed grains 

Hay and clover 

Alfalfa 

Corn for forage .... 
Other forage crops. 

Potatoes 

Turnins 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

Other field roots... 



15,662,811 

>2, 701, 213 

868,464 

3, 961,. 356 

122, 102 

195, 101 

293,307 

43,097 

925,. 375 

16,236 

5,931,548 



450, 190 
148,143 



19,763,740 30,555,165 



35,261,338 



/1, 120,984 

\3, 103, 5.58 

871,800 

5,367,655 

176.679 

360,758 

261,726 

46,6.34 

670,320 

23,086 

273,490 

6,543,423 

276,350 
448,743 

205, 160 



4,765 
1,9141 



11,906! 

1,46^!; 



977,015 
886,899 
2N3,094 
656, 179 
114,728 
293,951 
357,513 

46,299 
3.55, 191 
582, 185 
426,957 
289,407 

54,804 
294,347 
257,838 
464,. 504 
112,.3C5 

56,729 

17,710 
7,821 

18.»2« 
1,16 



1,162, 

9,933, 

1,522, 

9,641, 

132, 

324, 

373, 

53, 

294, 

1,351, 

525, 

8,090, 

94, 

295, 

136, 

480, 

122, 

57, 

21, 

17, 

25, 

1, 



26 2 

56-4 

■4 
S5-5 



44 

84 

-10 

8 

27-5 
421 



115,184 171,4471 213, 43i 



15,156/ 



2,22«i 

24! 148 i 

358 

86 

8 

1.53 

2,640 

91 

64,611 



4,213 
1 , 443 



3,903 

12,064 

2,232 

34^366 

730 

51 

55 

564 

2,949 

1 

570 

102,752 

1,208; 
8,207: 



1,980; 



4.369 

5, 12;; 
1,85: 

33,22; 

376 

1! 

1 

.347 

1,572 

2 

525 

1.32,068 

3,741 

355 

15,16-1 

10, 873 

1,008 

478 

74 

754 



239,649 

6,599 

7,108 

2.784 

45,. 301 

1,.370 

107 

18 

390 

1 , 489 

51 

2,248 

1.36, 1.34 

5.642 

429 

10,8.32 

14,798 

1,350 

537 

134 

1,50S 



10-3 



- -3 

38-5 



149-8 
-23-3 



4g-S 

5-4 

•9 
•3 



54 C 

-12-8 

1.54- 1 

47-2 

61-3 

-351 

-18-5 

.36-6 

- -7 
-47-0 

2,421-8 
56-1 
27-5 

99-8 
3-5 

- 5-2 

.59 
-20-8 

24 5 

11-9 
-.57-5 
-170 



p. c. 



42 
103 
-40 
587-50 
-63-4 
11-7 
-98-9 



59-0 



- 3-3 
-48-5 
-62-7 
-98-2 

519-6 

-12-8 

1000 

- 7-9 
29-1 



I 1,184-7 
94-8 32-5 



37-2; 



16-9 



15 4 

18-9 
25-9 
18-7 
11-4 
15-9 
10-3 
4-5 
15-1 
-170 
1.32- 1 
23- 1 
4-8 
73 
■4 
-46- 9 
3-5 
9- 
2- 
23- 
123- 
36- 
17 



12 3 

51-1 

38-7 

50-2 

.36-3 

264-7 

463-2 

,700-0 

12-4 

- 5-3 

,4.50-0 

328-2 

2-6 

50-8 

20-8 

-28-6 

36- 1 

33-9 

12-3 

811 

100 



Notb:— The minus sign (— ) denotes a decrease.. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



TABLE 27. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF AREAS OF FIELD CROPS, BY PROVINCES 
1890, 1900, 1910, AND 1911.— Continued. 



Crops by Provinces 



1S90 



1900 



1910 



1911 



Inxrease per cent 



1900 
over 
1890 



1910 
over 
1900 



1911 
over 
1910 



British rolunibia- 



Tobacco. 
Hops 



Alberta. 



Fall wheat 

Spring wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Rye 

Corn for husking. . . 

Buckwheat 

Beans 

Peas 

Flax 

Mixed grains 

Hay and clover. . . . 

Alfalfa 

Corn for forage .... 
Other forage crops. 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

Other field roots... 

Tobacco 

Hops 



Saskatchewan. 



Fall wheat 

Spring wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Rye 

Corn for husking. . . 

Buckwheat 

Beans 

Peas 

Flax 

Mixed grains 

Hay and clov'er 

Alfalfa 

Corn for forage .... 
Other forage crops. 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

Other field roots... 

Tobacco 

Hops 



Manitoba. 



Fall wheat 

Spring wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Rye 

Corn for hu.-^king. 

Buckwheat 

Beans 

Peas 

Flax 

Mixed grains 



1 

48 

35,799 



6,233 

3,418 

24, 180 

18 

2 

10 

107 
70 



1,391 



370 



154,559 



107,575 



,049 
,457, 

97 

501 

91 

4 

225 

83 



,500 
,507 



2 
1 

1,229,041 

> 896,622 

56,505 

256,211 

951 

96 

8 

23 

626 

6,089 



61 
202 

188,476 

521 

42, 541 

11,055 

117,745 

1,043 

23 

18 

1 

69 

100 

100 



10,877 
3,792 

582 

9 

655.537 

306 

486,906 

11,842 

141,807 

1,296 

2 

1 

1 

46 

227 

384 

5,961 
6,133 

623 

2 

2,756,106 



81 
825 

2,067,588 



205, 
674, 
121, 
783, 
6, 



30, 

1, 

149, 

2, 

1, 

67, 

20, 



{., 



120 

965,080 

139,672 

573,858 

937 

62 

56 

38 

406 

14,404 

769 



8. 

1,07; 

441 



6,871,858 

1,2,30 

4,226,992 

129,621 

1,888,359 

754 

94 

6 

- 8 

236 

500,425 

632 

37,694 

182 

f 675 

[ 53,863 

24,046 

f 651 

I 93 

1 49 

[ 246 

2 



4,668,250 

4,627 

2,754,818 

416,015 

1,209,173 

2,738 

233 

201 

91 

263 

34,684 

473 



48 
772 

3,378,365 



305 
1,334 

164 

1,221 

14 



107, 

2, 

162, 

7, 

25, 

23, 

1, 

1, 

2, 



.788 
186 
132 
217 
443 
437 
206 
70 
493 
273 
,789 
411 
890 
739 
,802 
,863 
.904 
298 
795 
,626 
3 



9,136,868 

2,638 

5,253,276 

273,988 

2,332,802 

2,271 

276 

90 

60 

.389 

1,153,861 

1,876 

47,720 

1,168 

1,357 

31,271 

30,076 

1,434 

237 

113 

1,9.59, 

I 

I 

5,161,858 

13,301' 
3,081,272 
448, 105 ■ 
1,307,4.34 
4,725 

937; 

321' 

113; 

414l 

79,765 

1,541 1 



p. c. 



445-8 
426 5 



590-9 

4 


4 





223 

.387- 

5,694 

1,050 

80 

-35 
42 



172- 
57- 



321 1 

452-9 

1.34-5 
278-6 
'GO 
-;i6-0 
-88-9 
-750 
-79-6 
173-5 



145-3 
-58-7 



124 2 



219-2 ( 
il 

147-2 

124-0 
- 1-5 
-.35-4 

600-0 

65-2 

-.351 

136-6 



p. c. 

32-8 
214-9 

997 

/ 39,264-9 

\ 1,485-9 

998-5 

565-1 

539-7 

221-7 

716-7 

1,100-0 

263-8 

30,785-0 

1,698-0 



I -530-3/ 
429-7 



-314-4 



-66-7: 



948 3 

.302-0 

708-1 

994-6 

1,231-6 

-41-8 

4,600 

.500-0 

700-0 

413-0 

222,994-7 

64-6 



814-9 
292-1 



66- 



69 4 

3,755-8 
40-2 
197-9 
110-7 
192-2 
275-8 
258-9 
139-5 

-35-2 
140-8 

-38-5 



p. c. 



-40-7 
- 6-4 



63 

49 
97 
35 
56 

116 

490 
40 

483 
96 

247 

54 

8 

205 

-41 

-61 

18 

136 

250 
66 

494 



32 9 

113-8 

24-3 
111-4 

23-5 

201-2 

193-6 

,400-0 

650-0 

64-8 
127-8 
186-8 

26-6 

541-8 

1011 

-41-9 

25-1 
120-3 
154-8 
1.30-6 
696-3 



10 6 

187-5 

11-9 

7-7 

8-1 

72-6 

302-2 
59-7 
24-2 
57-4 

130-0 

225-8 



15506 — c J 



Note: — The miniis sign (— ) denotes a decrease. 



xxxvi CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 

TABLE 27. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF AREAS OF FIELD CROPS, BY PROVINCES, 

1890, 1900, 1910, AND 1911.— Continued. 



Crops by Provinces 



1890 



1900 



1910 



1911 



Increase per cent 



1900 
over 
1890 



1910 
over 
1000 



Man toba — c 

Hay and clover. . . 

Alfalfa 

Corn for forage . . . . 
Other forage crops 

Potatoes. 

• Turnips 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

Other held roots. . 

Tobacco 

Hops 

Ontario 

Fall wheat 

Spring wheat 

Barley 

Qf +>- 

Ky"B 

Corn for husking . . 

Buckwheat 

Beans 

Peas 

Flax 

Mixed grains 

Hay and clover. . . . 

Alfalfa 

Corn for forage . . . . 
Other forage crops 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

Other field roots. . 

Tobacco 

Hops 

Quebec 

Fall wheat 

Spring wheat 

Barley 

Oats ■. . . 

Rye 

Corn for husking.. 

Buckwheat 

Beans 

Peas 

Flax 

Mixed grains 

Hav and clover. . . 

Alfalfa 

Corn for forage . . . . 
Other forage crops 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

Other field roots.. 

Tobacco 

Hops 

New Brunswick... 

Fall wheat 

Spring wheat 



9,791 

> 2, 102 

3 
14 

8,166,499 



43,667 
16,042 



978 



10 

7 

9,213,478 



430, 

681, 
053, 

92, 
176, 
101, 

36, 

763, 

6, 



532 1^' 

073 
105 
663 
2J5 
625 
473 
491 
775 



2,528,894 



179, 
114, 

1, 



281 
340 



4,064,716 



\ 168,929 

94,464 

1,161,038 

25,939 

17,586 

117,739 

3,929 

155,004 

2,878 

2,178,044 



122,254 

12, 103 

4,473 
330 

763,248 

17, 306' 



115,156 

372,477 

586,010 

2,707,357 

151,916 

331,641 

73,038 

42,080 

586,857 

6, 

117,020 
2,006,316 

166,550 
176,170 

169,387 

3, 144 
965 

4,704,396 

f 482 

[ 139,344 

104, 135 

1,350,031 

19,546 

28,506 

102, 673 

2,886 

77,982 

1.881 

143,729 

2,548,450 

39,740 
127.205 

9,029 

8,661 
116 

897.417 

f 336 

[ 26, 654 



137,671 

539 

4,603 

73,805 

26,210 

892 

211 

91 

905 

7 



9,321,933 

759,916 

110,438 

503,159 

2,871,288 

92,731 

274,846 

167,315 

40,585 

321,990 

8,780 

323,409 

3,216,139 

45,626 

r 245,267 

, 26,256 

158,305 

' 76, 485 

53.753 

15,970 

2,284 

7!oi7 

30S 

5,265,738 

2,295 

60,587 

98,164 

1,392,139 

11,0 

18.525 

119,466 

4,235 

30,295 

1,382 

90,404 

3,229,448 

2,036 

41,201 

16,150 

123,054 

9,8^3 

1.227 

310 

2,053 

11,818 

29 

958,8(8 

37 
13.387 



154, 

1, 

9, 

26, 

26, 

1, 



9,683,307 



832. 

129, 

519. 

2.806, 

96, 
298. 
178. 

45, 

258, 

8. 

389. 

3,445. 

74, 
243, 

27, 
156, 

81. 

53, 

18, 
4, 

13, 



760 ;\ 



5,480,673 

1,428 

69,573 

100, 701 

1.439.964 

12,833 

23,900 

114,780 

6,085 

32, 595 

1 , 428 

114,572 

3,356,692 

2,980 

38,375 

12,073 

125,995 

9,483 

1,584 

451 

2,875 

12,134 

172 

978,876 

38 
13,972 



p. c. 



63-8 

-53-5 

233-3 
-50-0 

12 8 

3-9 

-140 
31-9 
63-9 
g"8-l 

-23-1 
15-4 

-23- 1 

- 5-7 

31 



1-9 



32-5 

1, 018-9 
-28-0 

15 7 

-17-2| 

10-2 
16-3 
-24-6 
62-1 
-12-8 
-26-5 
-49-7' 
-34-6 

170 



40 
-25-3 



93-6 
-65 4 



17-6 



55-9 



p. c. 



79-6 
60-4J 

114-6 

-30-0 
-7000 

12 

-31-9 
-70-4 
-14-3 
6-1 
-39-0 
-171 
129-1 

- 3-6 
-45- 1 

360 

176-4 

23-4 

63-0 
-101 

-12-3 

123-2 
-68-3 

11 9 

376- 1 
-56-5 

- 5-7 
31 

-43-3 

-350 

16-4 

46-7 

-61-2 

-26-5 

-37-1 

26-7 

44-3 

- 3-2 

48-8 

36-5 
-750 

6 9 

-89-0 
-49-8 



Note: — ^ftie minus sren (— ) denotes a 4«creaa«. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 xxxvii 

TABLE 27. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF AREAS OF FIELD CROPS, BY PROVINCES, 

1890, 1900, 1910, AND 1911 —Concluded. 



Crops by Provinfes 



New Brunswick — con. 

Barley 

Oats 

Rye. 

Corn for hu.skins 

Buckwhrat 

Beans. ^ , 

Peas 

Flax 

Mixed grains 

Hay and clover 

Alfalfa 

Corn for forage 

Other forage crops 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

Other field roots 

Tobacco 

Hops 

Nova Scotia 

I'all wheat 

Spring wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Rye 

Corn for husking 

Buckwheat 

Beans 

Peas 

Flax 

Mixed grains 

Hay and clover 

Alfalfa 

( "orn for forage 

Other forage crops 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

Other field roots 

Tobacco 

Hops 

Prince Edward Island 

I'all wheat 

Spring wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Rye 

Corn for husking 

Buckwheat 

Beans 

Peas 

Flax 

Mixed grains 

Hay and clover 

Alfalfa 

( 'orn for forage 

Other forage crops 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

Other field roots 

Tobacco 

Hops 



1890 



6,141 

157, 170 

376 

501 

00, 0:5S 

1,060 

1,842 



470,834 

42, 703 
5,075 



101 
723,825 

14, 157 

11,902 

94,117 

1,088 

411 

8,783 

1,290 

1,184 

83 

539,057 



44,154 



6,843 

1 
66 

409,940 

44,703 

7,594 

153,924 

12 

74 

5,088 

165 

256 

75 

1.50, 108 



43,521 



4.411 



1900 



1910 



4,581 

186,932 

188 

259 

73,521 

709 

1,707 

57 

1,2.30 

549,538 

4,138 
40,330 

7,119 



116 

739, 14S 

160 

16,174 

7,710 

91,087 

I.OIS 

177 

9,371 

824 

156 

2,900 
554,371 



2,182 
37,459 

6,557 



447,737 

42,318 

4,563 

164,472 

5 

37 

2,993 

33 

148 

28 

6,788 

181,996 



2,027 
33,405 

8,905 

17 
2 



1911 



acres 

2,611 

201,147 

24 

66 

58,398 

254 

433 

5 

728 

630, 305 

81 

237 

2,103 

40,4,33 

7,898 

124 

34 

563 



710,960 

37 

12,161 

5,-354 

90,309 

350 

66 

9,541 

735 

109 

2, 4201 

540,589 

131 

560; 

2,273 

30,827 

8,394 

605 

90 

532 

1 

477,529 

13 

28,728 

4,882 

181,461 

6 

28 

2,438 

32 

36 

22 

6,568 

215,0.53 

2 

193 

920 

30,610 

6,. 328 

1.53 

13 

42 



iNCRE.iSE PER CENT 



1900 

over 
1890 



2,727 

207,618 

43 

77 

65,094 

358 

701 

13 

1,117 

635, 163 

118 

213 

746 

41,021 

8,405 

429 

146 

876 

J[ 

717,4SS| 

70^ 
13,228 ; 
5, 5511 
100, 2.56! 
466' 
137: 
11,810 
948 1 
210: 
6l 
4,3611 
5.35, 31S| 
32j 
645 \ 
1,703/ 
30.8391 
9,601il 
1,02411 
149 f 
l,114iJ 



484,274 

31,100:/ 

4,620 

180,584 

20 

80 

2,798 

147 

87 

15 

7,093 

217,189 

35 

289 

8.50 

30,780 

7,641 

228 

33 

67 

1 



p. c. 

25-4 

18-9 

-500 

-48-3 

22-5 

-33-1 

- 7-3 
-361 

16-7 

- 5-5 

40-2 

-.33-3 
14-8 

•8 

15-3 

-35-7 

- 3-2 
-39-6 
-56-9 

0-7 
-30- 1 
-80-8 



-151 
-41 



9 2 

- 5-3 

39-9 

6 
-.58-3 
-50 
-411 
-80-0 
-42 
-62-6 



1910 
o\ er 
1900 



21-2 

-23-2 

101-9 

1,6000 
-750 



p. c. 
-43 

-S7 
-74 
-20 
-04 
-74 
-91 
-40 
14 



1911 

over 
1910 



-43-5 
0-3 

211 

-1000 
-1000 

— 2 6 

-76-9 
-24-8 
-30-6 

5-7 
-65-6 
-62-7 

1-8 

-10-8 

30- 1 

-100 

- 2-5 

29-8 

-17-7 

40-7 



6 7 

70( 

10-3| 

20 

-24-3 

-18-5 

- 30 

-75-71 
-21-4 

- 3-21 
18-21 



-45-1' 

- 8-4! 



-26-6 



p. c. 

4-4 

3-2 

79-2 

16-7 

11-5 

40-1 

61-9 

100-0 

.53-4 

0-8 

45-7 

-10-1 

—04-5 

1-5 

6-4 

240-0 

.329-4 

55-0 



9 

89-2 

8-8 

3-7 

4 1 

33-1 

107-6 

23-8 

29-0 

92-7 

80-2 

- 1-0 
140-2 

15-2 
-25-1 

- 0-1 
14-4 
09-3 
05-6 

109-4 



14 



-SO-Oi 



-61 
8 

- 5 

- 
333 
185 

14 

359 

141 

-31 

17 

1 

1,650 

49 

- 7 


20 

49 

153 

59 

-100 



Note: — The miDus sign (— ) denotes a decrease. 



xxxviii CENSUSOFCANADA1911 

Buckwheat has more than doubled its area in Ontario, having increased 
from 73,038 acres in 1900 to 167,315 acres in 1910. There was an increase of 
16,793 acres i Quebec, and also a small increase in Nova Scotia. But New 
Brunswick, which showed an increase of 13,483 acres in 1900, gives for this 
census a decrease of 15,123 acres. For the five older provinces there was a 
net increase of 95,562 acres or 36-5 per cent in the decade and for all Canada of 
95,787 acres or 36 • 6 per cent. The acreage devoted to it in the western provinces, 
although increasing, is too small to affect general results. 

The cultivation of peas in eastern Canada has fallen off from 666,850 
acres in 1900 to 352,869 acres in 1910, which is a decrease of 313,981 acres or 
88-91 per cent in ten years; in Ontario, the area is less by 264,861 acres, in 
Quebec, by 47,687 acres and in New Brunswick, by 1,273 acres. In Nova 
Scotia and Prince Edward Island there are no large areas devoted to the 
growing of peas, the total acreage and production reported at each census 
being made up of small plots, therefore the variation between the figures of the 
various census 3'ears is of small moment. The total area in beans, in the five 
provinces, in 1900 was 46,538 acres as compared with 45,841 acres in 1910. 
There were decreases in all the provinces, except Quebec where the area 
increased from 2,886 acres to 4,235 acres. In Ontario, where beans are princi- 
pally grown, the area fell from 42,086 acres in 1900 to 40,585 acres in 1910. 

The area under flax, for the Dominion as a whole, in 1910, was 582,185 
acres, of which Saskatchewan possessed 506,425 acres, Alanitoba 34,684 acres, 
Alberta 30,885 acres — a total for the three provinces of 571,994 acres or 98-2 
per cent of the total acreage. In 1900 the total acreage sown was 23,086 acres 
of which Manitoba had 14,404 acres and Ontario 6,388 acres. The increase, 
for all Canada, during the decade was 559,099 acres or 2,421 -8 per cent. This 
crop receives but little attention in the Maritime provinces and is grown to a 
limited extent only in Ontario and Quebec. 

In all Canada, there were 18,928 acres of tobacco grown in 1910 as com- 
pared with 11,906 acres in the harvest year 1900, being an increase of 7,022 acres 
or 58-98 per cent. Nearly all the tobacco is grown in the provinces of Ontario 
and Quebec. The acreage in these two provinces constituted 99 per cent of 
the total area under tobacco in the Dominion in 1900 and 99^ per cent in 1910. 
In Ontario the crop increased from 3,144 acres in 1900 to 7,017 acres in 1910, 
and in Quebec from 8,661 acres in 1900 to 11,818 acres in 1910. British Columbia 
had 61 acres in 1900 and 81 acres in 1910. In all the other provinces the area 
is so small as to render the crop of little importance. 

The sowing of mixtures of various grains such as oats and peas, barley, 
oats and peas, or barley and oats seems to be growing in favour in Ontario, 
where the area grew from 117,020 acres in 1900 to 323,409 acres in 1910, an 
increase of 206,389 acres or 176-37 per cent in the decade. There was a decrease 
in Quebec of 53,325 acres or 37 -10 per cent, in New Brunswick of 502 acres or 
40-81 per cent, in Nova Scotia of 480 acres or 16-55 per cent, in Prince Edward 
Island of 220 acres or 3-24 per cent in the ten years. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 19 11 



Table 28 gives for the years 1910 and 1900 the average acreage per farm, 
of the principal field crops, for Canada and for each of the provinces. 

For all Canada, there are increases in the acreages per farm, of wheat, 
oats, barley, buckwheat, mixed grains and forage ci-ops (comprising fodder 
corn and grains sown for green feeding) and decreases in average acreages per 
farm of corn for husking, peas and beans, potatoes,roots and hay. 

For almost all kinds of field crops British Columbia shows a reduced average 
acreage per farm, attributable to the increase in the number of small holdings, 
which are given over almost exclusively to horticulture. 

According to the census records, Ontario possessed 53 per cent of the 
total wheat acreage in 1890 as compared with 35 per cent in 1900 and less than 

TABLE 28. AVERAGE ACRES OF SPECIFIED FIELD CROPS PER FARM HOLDING 

IN 1910 AND 1900. 



Provinces 



Wheat 



Oats 



Bar- Rye 

ley 



Buck 
wheat 



Corn I 
in Mixed 
ear grains 



Peas 

and 

Beans 



Pota- 
toes 



Roots 



Hay 



Other 
forage 
crops 



Canada — 

1910 

19S0 

British Columbia — 

1910 

1900 

Alberta — 

1910 

1900 

Saskatchewan — 

1910 

1900 

Manitoba — 

1910 

1900 

Ontario — 

1910 

1900 

Quebec — 

1910 

1900 

New Brunswick — 

1910 

1900 

Nova Scotia — 

1910 

1900 

Prince Edward Island- 

1910 

1900 



12 40 

7 76 



•51 

2-37 



14-30 
4-54 



43-87 
35-79 



60-51 
60-48 



3 -84 
6-64 



-35 
•72' 



•23 
•29 



12 11 

9-85 



1-80 
5-10 



12-73 
12-41 



19-59 
10-42 



26-51 
17-66 



12-66 
12 08 



8-97 



5-26 
4-97 



1-80 
1-63 



200| 1263 
320! 11.74 



1 79 
1 60 



•10 
-33 



1-97 
1-17 



1-35 



9-12 
4-30 



2^22 
2-61 



•11 
•11 



•41 



(0 



•01 






•02 



(') 



(0 

(') 

(') 
(') 

(0 



1-53 
1-95 



(0 
•01 

(0 
(0 

(') 
(') 

(■) 

1-21 

1-48 

•11 
•19 

(■) 
•01 

(') 
(') 

(0 
(>) 



56 
1 32 



•10 

•45 



(0 
(') 



L60 
2^81 



•531 



•02' 
•06: 



(') 



•01 



11 60 

12 01 

7-18 
15-25 

244 

•39 

302 

14^18 
11 62 

20^22 
1693 

16 50 
14 62 

10 79 
9^89 

14^97 
1299 



•85 
50 



104 

-18 



116 
115 



•57 
•44 



173 
1.34 



140 
•74 



•37 
•26 



•06 
-11 



-05 
•04 



14 



(') Less than one-hundredth of one acre. 

10 per cent in 1910. On the other hand the area under wheat in the prairie 
provinces which was 37 per cent of the total in 1890 increased to 59 per cent 
in 1900 and to more than 88 per cent of the total in 1910. 

In Table 29 the average acreage of each crop, spocifirHl in tlie table, is given 
in relationship to every 100 acres of improved farm land. From 1900 to 1910, 
for Canada as a whole, the area under wheat per 100 acres of imi)roved land 
increased from 14 acres to 22-77 acres, oats from 17-79 acres to 19-78 acres, 
barley from 2-89 acres to 3-12 acres, mixed grains and forage crops have also 



xl 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1511 



t^ a small extent advanced their position; hay shows a decrease from 2i-69 
acres to 17-83 acres, potatoes from 1-49 acres to -99 acres per 100 acres of 
improved land. 

TABLE 29. AVERAGE ACRES OF SPECIFIED FI-ELD CROPS PER 100 ACRES 
IMPROVED LAND BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 


Wheat 


Oats 


Bar- 
ley 


1 
Rye 


Buck- 
wheat 


Corn 
in 
ear 


Mixed 
grains 


Peas 

and 

Beans 


Pota- 
toes 


Roots 


Hay , 


Other 
forage 
crops 


Canada— 
1911 


acres 

22 77 
14 00 

2-87 
3-37 

37-69 


acres 

19 78 
17 79 

9-49 
7-26 

2S-0fi 


acres 

3 12 

2-89 

•58 
•47 

3-77 
2^33 

2-31 
1-05 

6-64 
3-50 

3-81 

4-42 

1-23 
140 

•19 
•32 

■44 
•63 

•60 
•63 


acres 

27 
59 

•29 
•15 

•33 
•22 

•12 

-07 
•02 

-71 
1-14 

•16 
•26 

{') 
•01 

•04 
•08 

(0 
(0 


acres 

-77 
•87 

•01 

(0 
(0 

(') 
(') 

(') 

1-31 
•55 

1-41 
138 

4-51 
5-22 

•94 
•74 

•36 
•41 


acres 

67 
1 19 

-02 
-01 

-01 
(0 

(0 

(0 

-01 

{') 

2-18 
2-50 

•29 
•38 

(') 
•01 

-01 
•01 

(■) 


acres 
1 08 

-47 
-12 

-06 
-02 

-02 
-03 

-02 
-02 

2-85 

-88 

1-40 
1-93 

•08 
•09 

•35 
•23 

101 
•93 


acres 

71 
2 38 

•39 
•63 

-01 
-01 

(') 
(') 

(') 
•01 

2-23 

4-74 

-47 
1-09 

-07 
1-71 

•09 
•08 

-03 

1 -02 


acres 

99 
1 49 

310 
1-73 

•55 
•80 

-25 
-55 

•39 
•40 

115 
1^33 

154 
1-71 

2^84 
2-86 

2-45 
2-98 

4-00 
4-60 


acres 
45 


acres 
17 83 


acres 
1 OS 


1901 


68' 21 69 


92 


British Columbia — 
1911 


-74 
-42 

-15 
•12 

■03 
•06 

•07 


28-50 
21-69 

3-73 

-40 

2-29 


3-54 


1901 


•26 


Alberta — 

1911 


•78 


KOI 

Saskatchewan — 

1911 


907 24-81 
44-27 19-65 


2-29 
■2S 


1901 


43-40 

45-87 
49-19 

705 
11-21 

•87 
1-88 

•97 
1-91 

1-06 
1-29 

404 
5-83 


12-63 

19-38 
14-36 

20-55 
20-41 

17-64 
18-15 

14-37 
13-26 

7-97 
7-24 

23-48 
22-65 


•53 


Manitoba — 

1911 


•57 


1901 


•02 

M5 25-24 
1-28 19-65 

•18 41-13 
•12 34-25 

•68 43-97 
•50; 38-98 

i ^95 42-57 
1 -52, 44-09 

1 1-04: 28-24 
1-23 2506 


109 


Ontario — 

1911 


2-53 


1901 


1-26 


Quebec — 

1911 


-65 


1901 


-53 


New Brunswick — 

1911 . ... 


•07 


1901 


•29 


Nova Scotia — 
1911 


[ -19 


1901 


•17 


Prince Edward Island — 
1911 


-15 


1901 . 


•28 




I 


) 





(1) Less than one-hundredth of one per cent. 

Table 30 shows for all Canada and for each of the provinces, (1) the pro- 
portion which the acreage devoted to each crop specified forms of the total area of 
improved land in 1901 and 1911, and (2) the per cent proportion which the 
acreage occupied by each crop forms of the total acreage of field crops harvested 
in 1890, 1900 and 1910. 

In 1911, for all Canada, field crops occupied 72 -So per cent of the total 
acreage of improved land as compared with 65 -52 per cent in 1901. The areas 
of flax, peas, beans, rye, corn for husking and mixed grains being relatively 
small and unimportant are grouped as "various" and classified under "cereals." 
The records of the census show, for the Dominion, that 51-94 per cent of 
improved land was devoted to grain growing in 1911, as compared with 40-70 per 
cent in 1901. The combined area in grains, seeds and fodders occupy more 
than seven-tenths of all land brought under cultivation. 

Of the crops harvested in 1890, wheat constituted 17 25 per cent, barley 
5-54 per cent, oats 25-29 per cent and haj'' 37-87 per cent. In the harvest 
of the year 1900, wheat occupied 21-38 per cent, barley 4-41 per cent, oats 27-16 
per cent and hay 33-11 per cent. In 1910 the ratio of wheat and oats increased 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1 9 1 jr 



xli 



to 29-01 per cent and 28-33 per cent respectively, Avhile the proportion of barley 
tiecreased to 4 • 20 per cent and of hay to 27 • 13 per cent of the total area harvested 
in that year. Fodder crops, other than hay which were not reported in the 
census of 1890, show a considerable increase for 1910 over 1900. In the last 
census, of every 100 acres under field crops nearly two acres were devoted to 
fodder production as compared with 1-4 acres in the previous census. 

TABLE 30.— PERCENTAGE WHICH THE AREA UNDER SPECIFIED CROPS FORMS 
OF THE TOTAL AREA OF IMPROVED LAND, AND ALSO THE PERCENTAGE 
OF THE TOTAL ACREAGE UNDER FIELD CROPS POSSESSED BY EACH 
CROP, BY DECADES. 



Field Crops 



Per cent of laxd 
improved under 
specified crops 



1901 



1911 



Per cent of total area in field 
CRors WHICH IS occi:pied by 

EACH crop 



1S90 



1900 



1910 



CANADA 



All crops. 



Cereals 

Wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Various 

1 'cfjetahies 

I^otatocs 

Field roots 

Forage crops 

Hay 

Variou.s 

Tobacco and hops 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 
All crops 



('(reals 

Wheat 

liarlev 

Oats 

^'a^ious 

I 'egctahles 

Potatoes 

Field roots 

Forage crops 

Hay 

^'a^ious 

Tobacco and hops. 



ALBERTA 



.411 crops. 



' I reals 

Wheat. 

Barley 

Oats 

Various 

VcgelMcs 

Potatoes 

Field roots.. .. 
Forage crops 

Hay 

Various 

Tobacco and hops 



65 52 



36 19 



12 



39 71 



12 Z5 

51 -H 

22-77 

.3- 12 

19-78 

6-27 

1-U 

-99 

•4.5 

18-92 

17-84 

1-08 

-06 



50 18 

U-13 
2-87 
■58 
9-49 
1-19 
S-8If 

;mo 

-74 

32-04 

28-50 

.3-54 

•17 



77 63 



56-50 


72- 41 


9-07 


.37^69 


2 -.33 


3^77 


24-81 


28 06 


-29 


2^89 


■92 


■70 


•80 


-55 


•12 


•15 


2-29 


4-52 


(=) 


3-74 


2-29 


-78 


(2) 


(') 



p. c. 

108 08 

58-27 

17-25 

5 -.54 

25-29 

10- 19 

10-82 

2-87 

•95 

37-87 

37-87 

{') 

-04 



100 09 

38-96 

13-16 

1-93 

20-97 

2-90 

4-91 

3 66 

1-25 

56-09 

56 09 

(') 

•04 



100 00 



p. c. 

109 00 

62-12 

21 •.38 

4-41 

27-16 

9- 17 

3-31 

227 

104 

34-51 

3311 

1-40 

•06 



100 00 

33-23 
9-31 
1-.30 

20 04 
2-, 58 
5-95 
i-79 
116 

60-63 

.59-93 
•70 
•19 



100 00 



95-22 


91-91 


15 74 


22^85 


10 -.33 


5-87 


6915 


62^47 


(2) 


•72 


4-78 


2 -32 


3^66 


201 


1-12 


•31 


(') 


5-77 


(=) 


(=) 


(^) 


5^77 


(=) 


(') 



p. c. 

100 00 

68-66 

29 01 

4-20 

28-33 

7^12 

2-16 

152 

•64 

29-12 

27 13 

U99 

•06 



100 00 

22 - 22 

4 45 

•87 

15 .57 
1-33 
6-17 
.5 09 
1-08 

71-18 

62- 16 

902 

•43 



100 00 



42 -.53 
5-88 

37^88 

193 

1-09 

•97 

•12 

10-69 
7-25 
3-44 
(=) 



(•) Less than one-hundredth of one per cent. (=•) Not reported. 



;li 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



TABLE 30— PERCENTAGE WHICH THE AREA UNDER SPECIFIED CROPS FORMS 
OF THE TOTAL AREA OF IMPROVED LAND, AND ALSO THE PERCENTAGE 
OF THE TOTAL ACREAGE UNDER FIELD CROPS POSSESSED BY EACH 
CROP, BY DECADES— Con 



Field Crops 



Per cent of land 
improved under 
specified crops 



1901 



1911 



Per CENT OF total area in field 
CROPS which is occupied by 
each crop 



1890 



1900 



1910 



SASKATCHEWAN 
All crops 



Cereals 

Wheat 

J Parley 

Oats 

Various 

Vegetables , 

Potatoes , 

Field roots 

Forage crops , 

Hay 

\'arious 

Tobacco and hops 



MANITOBA 



All crops. 



Cereals 

Wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Various , 

Vegetables 

Potatoes 

Field roots 

Forage crops 

Hay 

Various 

Tobacco and hops . 



ONTARIO 



All crops. 



Cereals 

Wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Various 

Vegetables 

Potatoes 

Field roots 

Forage crops 

Hay 

Various 

Tobacco and hops , 



QUEBEC 



AH crops. 



Cereals 

Wheat 

Barley 

Oat-s 

Various 

Vegetables 

Potatoc.i. . . 

Field roots. 



p. c. 


58 39 


67-25 


43-40 


105 


12-63 


•17 


■61 


•55 


•06 


■5S 


(=) 


•53 


{') 



68-98 

67-1^7 

49-19 

3-50 

14-36 

•42 

■42 

•40 

-02 

109 

V-) 

1-09 



S9 44 

45-91 

11-21 

4-42 

20-41 

9-87 

2-60 

1-33 

1-27 

SO -90 

19-64 

1-26 

•03 



63 23 

S6-50 
1-88 
1-40 

IS- 15 

5 07 

1-85 

1-71 

•12 



p. c. 



76 96 

75-99 

44-27 

2-31 

19-05 

9-76 

■28 

•25 

•03 

•69 

•40 

•29 

(0 



76 52 

7S-20 

45-87 

6-05 

19-38 

1-.30 

■46 

-39 

-07 

2-86 

2-29 

-57 

(') 



70 92 

40-75 
7-05 
3-81 

20-55 
9-34 
2 -SO 
1-15 
1-15 

27-77 

25-24 

2-53 

•10 



67 15 

2S-50 

•87 

1-23 

17-64 

3-75 

1-7B 

1-54 

•18 



p. c. 

100 00 

97 -SS 

68-70 

3-25 

24 •89 

-43 

2-67 

1-71 

•96 

{') 

(^) 

{') 

i}) 



100 00 

99 OS 

72-95 

4-(i0 

20-85 

•63 

-97 

•SO 

•17 

(') 



109 00 

65-42 

17-52 

S-.S4 

25-14 

14-42 

S-60 

2-20 

1-40 

SO -96 

30-96 

(=) 

•02 



100 00 



42 


99 


4 


16 


2 


32 


28 


56 


t 


95 


S 


St 


3 


01 




30 



p. c. 

100 00 

98-06 

74-32 

1-81 

21-63 

•30 



/• 



•94 

•09 
•91 

C-) 
•91 



100 00 

97-79 

71-30 

5-07 

20-82 

•60 

■63 

•59 

•04 

1^58 

(') 

1^58 



100 00 

66^11 

16-15 

6-36 

29-39 

14-21 

5-75 

1-91 

1-84 

SO- 10 

28-29 

1-81 

•04 



100 00 

41-91 
2-97 
2-22 

2,8-70 

8-02 

2-S9 

2-70 

•19 



p. c. 

100 00 

98-29 

61^53 

1-89 

27-48 

7-39 

■S6 

•35 

•01 

1-35 

•55 

•80 

(^) 



lOOOO 

94^76 

59^ 11 

8-91 

25-91 

•83 

■60 

•56 

04 

64 

95 

69 



4 
2 
1 



100 00 

S8-7S 

9-34 

5-40 

30-80 

1319 

3-29 

170 

1-59 

S7^90 

34-50 

3-40 

•08 



100 00 

S4-72 
119 
1-86 

26-44 

5-23 

2-60 

2-34 

•26 



(') Less than onc-hundrc<lt1i of one per cent. (=) Not reported. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



xliii 



TABLE 30. PERCENTAGE WHICH THE AREA UNDER SPECIFIED CROPS FORMS OF 
THE TOTAL AREA OF IMPROVED LANO, AND ALSO THE PERCENTAGE OF THE 
TOTAL ACREAGE UNDER FIELD CROPS POSSESSED BY EACH CROP, BY 
DECADES — Conclndcd. 



Field crops 



Per cent of land 

improved under 

specified crops 



1900 



1910 



Per CENT OF total area in field 

CROPS WHICH IS occupied BY 
EACH CROP 



1890 



1900 



QUEBEC— Con. 

Forage crops 

Hay 

Various 

Tobacco and hops 



NEW BRUNSWICK 
All crops 

Cereals 

Wheat 

Barlov 

Oats 

Various 

Vegetables 

Potatoes 

Field roots 

Forage crops 

Hay 

Various 

Tobacco and hops 



NOVA SCOTIA 
All crops 

Cereals ". 

Wheat 

Barley 

Oat.s 

Various 

Vegelahles 

Potatoes 

Field roots 

Forage crops 

Hay 

Various 

Tobacco and hops 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 

All crops 

Cereals 

Wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

^^■^rious 

Vtg'tahles 

Potatoes 

Field roots 

Forage crops 

Hay 

Various 

Tobacco and Hops 



S4-78 

34-25 

•53 

■12 



63 66 

2S-0S 

1-92 

•33 

13-26 

5-51 

S-S6 

2-86 

-50 

S9-27 

38-98 

•29 

•01 



58 06 

10-30 

1-30 

■61 

7-24 

115 

S-50 

2-98 

•52 

U-26 

44 09 

•17 

(') 



61 65 

S0-Jt8 

5^83 

•63 

22-64 
1-38 
5-8S 
4-60 
123 

25-3/, 

25 06 
•28 



p. c. 



jlfl-78 

4M3 

■05 

•15 



67 76 



■98 

■18 

14 -.37 

4-67 

3-52 

2-84 

•68 

U<H 

43-97 

•07 

(') 



57 08 

10 -SO 

1-06 

-44 

7-97 

1-43 

3-/fl 

2-45 

•95 

42-76 

42 57 

•19 

(') 



62 96 

29-53 

404 

•60 

23^48 

141 

6-0 It 

4-00 

1-04 

28-30 

28^24 

■15 

(') 



p. c. 



53-58 

53 58 

{') 

•12 



100 09 

32-03 

2^27 

•80 

20-59 

8-37 

6-27 

. 5-60 

•67 

61-69 

61-69 

C-) 

-01 



100 00 

18-48 
1^96 
166 

13 00 

rS6 

7-04 

610 

•94 

74-47 

74 47 

•01 



100 00 

61-68 
10-90 

1-85 
37 -.55 

1-38 
11-70 
10-62 

108 

36-62 

36-62 

{') 



p. c. 



65-01 
54-17 

-84 
-19 



100 00 

33-01 

301 

•51 

20-83 

8-66 

5-28 

4-49 

•79 

61-70 

6b 24 

•46 

•01 



100 00 



17 


76 


2 


24 


1 


06 


12 


48 


1 


98 


6 


02 


5 


13 




89 


76 


22 


75 


93 




29 




i') 



100 00 

49-44 
9-45 
102 

36-73 
2-24 
9-45 
7^46 
199 

41-11 

40-66 
-45 
(') 



0) Less than one-hundredth of one per cent. (*) Net reported. 



xhv CENSUSOFCANADA1911 

Production. 

Table 31 gives the yields of the principal grain crops by totals for Canada 
and each of the provinces in 1880, 1890, 1900 and 1910 and Table 32, a com- 
panion table, presents similar statistics of the quantities of hay, potatoes, roots, 
hops, tobacco, grass and clover seed and maple sugar produced in same years. 

Wheat. The production of wheat, which stood at 32,350,269 bushels 
in 1880, increased to 132,077,547 bushels in 1910, being an increase of 99,727,278 
bushels in 30 years or more than 308 per cent. In 1890, the farms of Canada 
produced 42,223,372 bushels, in 1900 55,572,368 bushels. The increase, from 
1880 to 1890 was 9,873,103 bushels or 30-5 per cent, from 1890 to 1900 13,348,996 
bushels or 31-6 per cent and from 1900 to 1910 the increase was 76,505,179 
bushels or 137-7 per cent. The total production of wheat, in all Canada in 
1910, was nearly two million bushels more than the aggregate production of the 
three previous census periods, 1880, 1890 and 1900. This large increase, in 
wheat production, is altogether attributable to the western provinces. In 
1880 Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta produced 1,153,328 bushels, in 1890 
17,884,629 bushels, in 1900 the quantity reported was 23,456,985 bushels as 
against a production of 110,166,704 bushels in 1910. In previous censuses, the 
quantity of wheat reported for Alberta and SaskatcheAvan was comparatively 
small, amounting to a little more than five million bushels in 1900, whereas 
Saskatchewan alone, in 1910, produced nearly IH million bushels more wheat, 
than was produced in all Canada in 1900. 

In each of the harvest years 1880, 1890 and 1900 the province of Ontario 
raised more than one-half of all the wheat produced in the Dominion in those 
years. In 1910 this position was captured by Saskatchewan which raised nearly 
07 millions of the 132 million bushels produced in that j-ear. Quebec, New 
Brunswick and Nova Scotia produced more wheat in the yea.r 1880 than they 
have in any subsequent census year. In 1880 they raised 3,070,211 bushels 
as compared with 1,360,114 bushels in 1910 being a decrease of 55-70 per cent 
in thirty years. Prince Edward Island showed a steady increase in the pro- 
duction of wheat from 1880 to 1900 — the quantity raised in 1880 was 546,986 
bushels as compared with 613,364 bushels in 1890 and 738,679 bushels in 1900, 
in 1910 the production fell to 501,553 bushels, a decrease of 237,146 bushels 
from the preceding census and 45,453 bushels less than in 1880. 

From September 1910 to August 1911, Canada exported 52,098,694 bushels 
of wheat. The remaining 79,978,853 bushels, of the production of the 
harvest year 1910, comprised stock in stores and quantity used for home con- 
sumption, seed, etc. In Table 43 the statistics of exports are given for the 
years ended June 30, 1891, 1901 and 1911. 

Barley. In 1910, Canada produced 28,848,310 l)ushels of barley, as 
compared with 22,224,366 bushels in 1900, 17,222,795 busliels in 1890 and 
1(), 844,868 bushels in 1880. Of the total production in 1880, Ontario provided 
85 per cent, in 1890 her share was 77 per cent, in 1900 it was 72 per cent and in 
1910 it fell to 48 per cent of the total yield of the Dominion. The yield of 
l)arley in the Prairie provinces was 12,057.806 busliels in 1010 as compared with 
3,141,357 bushels in 1900, being a gain of 8,916,449 bu.^hels or 283-8 per cciit 
in the decade. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



PER CENT PROPORTION OF WHEAT PRODUCTION OF CANADA WHICH WAS 
GROWN IN THE SEVERAL PROVINCES IN 1880, 1890, 1900 AND 1910. 



Cf/VSL/S /\ND St/ITI5TICS> 



l&SO 



J89_o 




7900 



1920 




In order to tshow the relative standing of the provinces to the total production of wheat in 
each Census, the areas of the circles are similar. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



PER CENT PROPORTION OF BARLEY PRODUCTION, OF CANADA. WHICH 
WAS GROWN IN THE SEVERAL PROVINCES IN 1880, 1890, 1900 AND 1910. 



Ce/^sus AND Sr^nsT/cs 



I&&0 



1890 




1900 




In order to .sliow tlie relative standing of the provincc.-i to the tot d production of l<arley in 
each Census, the areas of the oin'les .-in- >iiiiil ir. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



PER CENT PROPORTION OF OATS PRODUCTION, OF CANADA, WHICH WAS 
GROWN IN THE SEVERAL PROVINCES IN ISSO, IS90, 1900 AND 1910. 



Cc/ysos AND Statistics 



1880 



IMD 




1900 



l^IO. Brit.CduTnhia. 

'^ 0-7 P.C. 

Alberta 




In order to show the relative standing of the provinres to the total production of oats in 
each Census, the areas of the circles are similar. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



PER CENT PROPORTION OF MINOR GRMNS PRODUCTION OF CANADA, 
WHICH WAS GROWN IN THE SEVERAL PROVINCES IN 1880. 1890. 1900 AND 1910. 




In order to show the relative standins of the provinces to the total production of minor 
grains in each Census, the areas of the circles are similar. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



PRODUCTION OF PRINCIPAL GRMNS AND THE PER CENT PROPORTION 
WHICH THE QUANTITY OF EACH KIND FORMS OF THE TOTAL, IN 
THE YEARS 1880, 1890, 1900 AND ]910. 



CLftSui AitC S^ytTHriCi 



J910 




jsm 




I9Q_Q. 




The area of each circle represent:- the total production of grain in each Ccn^Ui year. 



lo'OO — D 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



xlv 



Oats. This cereal holds the premier place in grain production in the 
Dominion. It ranks first in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, Quebec and the 
]\Iaritime provinces, but is exceeded by wheat in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. 
The total yield for all Canada, in 1910, was 245,393,425 bushels as 
against 151,497,407 bushels in 1900, being an increase of 93,896,018 bushels 



TABLE 31. 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF YIELDS OF GRAIN 
CROPS, 1880-1910. 



Provinces 


Wheat 


Barley 


Oats 


Rye 


Peas 


Buck- 
wheat 


Beans 


Corn for 
Husking 




bush. 


bush. 


bush. 


bush. 


bush. 


bush. 


bush. 


bush. 


Canada — 


















1910 


133,077.547 


28,848,310 


245,393,425 


1,542,219 4,788.916 

1 


7,102,853 


826,281 


14,417,599 


1900 .. 


55, 572,. 368 


22,224,366 


151,497,407 


2,316,793 12,348,943 


4,547,159 


861,327 


25,875,919 


1890 .. 


42,223.372 


17.222,795 


83,428.202 


1,341,325 


14,823,764 


4,994,871 


800,015 


10,711,380 


1880.... 


.32,330.269 


16,844,868 


70.493,131 


2,097.180 


13,749,662 


4,901,147 


(') 


9,025,142 


British 


















Columbia — 


















1910.... 


206,570 


51,509 


1.764.533 


5,658 


43,979 


55 


5,341 


781 


1900... 


359.419 


73,790 


1.442,566 


17.328 


60,074 


1,899 


1,780 


1,849 


1890.... 


388,. 300 


79,024 


943.088 


6.141 


85,774 


276 


4.888 


3,938 


1880.... 


173.6.53 


79, 140 


253,911 


482 


50,542 


59 


(') 


1,433 


Alberta — 


















1910... 


9,060,210 


2,480,165 


16,893,840 
3,787,046 


109,006 


2,892 


968 


115 


863 


1900.... 


797, 161 


286, 937 


17,499 


939 


264 


15 


1.300 


1890.... 


94.929 


89.417 


571,427 


230 


1,729 


57 


2 


90 


1880... 


.50, 648 


24,624 


.33,705 


(-) 


766 


{') 


(') 


200 


Siiskat- 


















chewan — 


















1910.... 


66,978,996 


3,061,007 


58,922.791 


11,639 


2,612 


29 


59 


2.041 


1900.... 


4,306,811 


187,617 


2,274,616 


12,633 


5.58 


36 


38 


100 


1890.... 


1,697,480 


126,043 


1,056,917 


1,299 


3,972 


243 


117 


1,445 


1880... 


69,007 


23,821 


26,247 


240 


525 


50 


(') 


1,748 


Manitoba — 


















1910.... 


.34,127,498 


6.516,634 


30,346,879 


29,045 


4.863 


2,919 


904 


3,161 


1900.... 


18,353,013 


2,666,803 


10,592,660 


7,085 


4,950 


1,294 


710 


1,944 


1890.... 


16,092,220 


1.452,433 


8,370,212 


12,952 


10,872 


178 


434 


3,429 


1880.... 


l,OJ3,673 


253,604 


1,270,268 


1,203 


8,991 


320 


(') 


2.516 


Ontario — 


















1910... 


19,842,626 


14, 085,. 327 


89,936,041 


1,232,493 


4,311,113 


3,333,216 


726.925 


13.830.703 


1900... 


28,418,907 


16,087,862 


88,1.38,974 


2, 0.32,. 385 


11.351,646 


1,056,998 


767, 255 


24,463,694 


1890... 


21, 314, .582 


13, 4 19,. 354 


47,160.246 


1,064,-345 


12,760,331 


1,470,511 


664,541 


9,8.35,737 


1880.... 


27,406,091 


14,279,841 


40, 209, 929 


1,. 598, 871 


9,434,872 


841,649 


(') 


8,096,782 


Quebec — 


















1910... 


932,459 


2, .340,. 364 


33,804,291 


148,621 


414,367 


2, 365, 5.39 


76, 150 


575,249 


1900... 


l,968,2a3 


2.. 5.35,. 597 


33,536,677 


211,287 


908,656 


1,849,596 


61,376 


1,384,331 


1890... 


1,646,882 


1,580,197 


17,818,589 


226.316 


1,912,463 


2,118,197 


82,501 


826, 179 


1880... 
New 
Brunswick — 


2,019,004 


1.751,5.39 


19,990,205 


430, 242 


4,170,456 


2,041,670 


(') 


888, 169 


















1910... 


204, 125 


56,659 


5,538.005 


3.33 


6,584 


1,1.50,522 


4,517 


1,616 


1900... 


381.699 


99,050 


4,816,173 


2,809 


16.808 


1,390,885 


13,573 


12,509 


1890... 


209,809 


100,917 


3.025.329 


6,321 


24,352 


1,136,528 


20,137 


21,021 


1880 ... 


521,956 


84,183 


3,297,534 


18.268 


43.121 


1.587,223 


(') 


18. 159 


Nova Scotia — 


















1910 ... 


223,5.30 


142,224 


2,973,857 


5,356 


1.858 


206,005 


11.802 


2,684 


1900... 


248,476' 


181,085 


2,347,598 


15,702 


3.067 


190.498 


10,084 


9,358 


1890... 


165,806 


227, 530 


1,559,842 


23,500 


19,. 536 


184,421 


24,9.50 


16,890 


1880... 


.529, 251 i 


228,748 


1,873,113 


47,567 


.37,220 


3.39,718 


(') 


13,532 


Prince 


















Edward Is.- 


















1910 ... 


501.. 5.33 


114,421 


5, 212,. 588 


68 


648 


43,600 


468 


501 


1900... 


7.38,679 


105, 625 


4,561,097 


65, 


2.245 


49.689 


496 


834 


1890... 


613,. 364 


147.880 


2, 922,. 5.52 


221 


4,735 


84.400 


2,445 


2,651 


1880... 


.546,986 


119,. 368 


3,5.38,219 


307 


3,169 


90,458 


(') 


2.603 



(') Included with peas. 
15506— Dj 



(*) Not reported. 



xlvi CENSUSOFCANADA1911 

or nearly 62 per cent. The eastern provinces, in 1910, yielded 137,465,382 
bushels or 57 per cent of the total, the balance 107,928,043 bushels or 43 per 
cent being produced west of the Great Lakes. 

Corn for Husking. Owiiig to climatic conditions, corn for husking is 
grown successfully only in Ontario. Of a total production of 25,875,919 bushels 
in 1900, Ontario produced 24,463,694 bushels or 94 per cent, and in 1910 obtained 
13,830,703 bushels or 96 per cent out of a total of 14,417,599 bushels. 

Other Cereals. Of the minor cereals, buckwheat alone shows an increase 
in production, during the decade. In 1910, it yielded 7,102,853 bushels as 
compared with 4,547,159 bushels in 1900, being an increase of 2,555,694 
bushels, for which Ontario and Quebec are almost wholly responsible. Peas 
fell off from 12,348,943 bushels in 1900 to 4,788,916 bushels in 1910. This 
decrease in pea production was general, every province, excepting Alberta and 
Saskatchewan where the quantity produced is negligible, contributed to a 
result which was the product of many causes, the principal of which were insect 
pests. Beans in 1910 yielded 820,281 bushels as compared with 861,327 bushels 
in 1900 and 800,015 bushels in 1890. In 1880, beans and peas were grouped 
together and gave a total production of 13,749,662 buf^hels. In Ontario, which 
in the last census produced nearly 88 per cent of the whole Canadian bean crop, 
the yield dropped from 767,255 bushels in 1900 to 726,925 bushels in 1910; in 
Quebec the yield was greater in 1910 than in 1900 by 14,774 bushels; in the 
Maritime provinces the production was less for every province in the last census 
than in the previous one. The production of rye, which totalled 2,097,180 
bushels in 1880, declined in 1890 to 1,341,325 bushels; in 1900 it rose again, 
reaching 2,316,793 bushels to again drop back in 1910 to 1,542,219 bushels. 
Quebec and the Maritime provinces show a constant decrease from decade to 
decade. In 1880 Ontario produced 76-2 per cent of all the rye grain raised 
in the Dominion, 79-3 per cent in 1890, 87-7 per cent in 1900 and 79-9 per 
cent in 1910. 

Hay. 'In the year 1880 Canada grew 5,053,008 tons of haj'- made from 
timothy and clover, in 1890 the production was 7,693,733 tons as compared 
with 7,852,731 tons in 1900 and 10,406,367 tons in 1910. The prairie provinces 
show a decrease of 614,054 tons in the yield of hay in 1910 as compared with 
1900. This decrease is more apparent than real, as in 1900 and in previous 
censuses the hay reported was cut on the unbroken prairie, while the product of 
cultivated meadows only was enumerated in the records of the Fifth Census. 
From 1900 to 1910 the production of hay increased in Ontario by 1,574,971 
tons, in Quebec by 1,244,698 tons, in New Brunswick by 156,015 tons, in Nova 
Scotia b>" 65,962 tons, in Prince Edward Island by 87,672 tons and in British 
Columbia by 38,372 tons. In addition, to the products of timothy grass and 
clovers in 1910, there was also obtained from alfalfa or lucerne 115,189 tons of 
fodder, from corn 2,705,103 tons for summer feeding or for ensilage and 343,228 
tons from grain cut green and made into hay for winter u^e. 

Potatoes. The total production of potatoes for all Canada, amounted 
in 1910 to 55,461,473 bushels as against 55,362,635 bushels in 1900, being a net 
gain of onl}' 98,838 l)ushels or less than one-fifth of one per cent. Tiie provinces 
which gave increases for 1910 over 1900 were British Columbia, All)erta, 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 xlvii 

Saskatchewan, Manitoba and New Brunswick, while those showing decreases 
were Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Ishmd. The yield 
in the western provinces rose from 4,154,533 bushels in 1900 to 9,756,290 bushels 
in 1910, being a gain of 5,601,757 bushels or 134-8 per cent, and in New Bruns- 
wick from 4,649,059 bushels to 5,219,025 bushels, being a gain of 569,966 
bushels or 12-25 per cent. The drop in Ontario amounted to 2,741,467 bushels 
or 13-67 per cent, in Quebec to 1,684,200 bushels or 9-83 per cent and in Nova 
Scotia and Prince Edward Island to 1,647,218 bushels or 17-55 per cent. 

Turnips and Other Roots. The total quantity (86,659,034 bushels) 
in all Canada, reported under this head in 1910, comprised 47,371,434 bushels 
turnips, 30,353,132 bushels mangolds, 6,498,101 bushels sugar beets and 
2,436,367 bushels various kinds (carrots, table beets, parsnips, etc.). The 
details by provinces will be found in Table XXV. Of the total production, 
in 1910, Ontario contributed 70,418,599 bushels, Quebec 4,869,699 bushels and 
the Maritime provinces 9,224,299 bushels, the Prairie provinces 1,147,356 
bushels, and British Columbia 999,081 bushels. From 1900 to 1910 the pro- 
duction increased in Ontario by 7,050,136 bushels, in Nova Scotia by 1,466,005 
bushels, in Quebec by 1,343,512 bushels, in New Brunswick by 615,619 bushels, 
in British Columbia by 363,093 bushels, in Manitoba by 290,531 bushels, in 
Alberta by 257,314 bushels, in Saskatchewan by 132,390 bushels and a decrease 
of 935,208 bushels in Prince Edward Island, with a net increase for the Domir/... i 
of 10,583,392 bushels during the decade. 

Hops. There were 1,208,450 pounds of hops raised in 1910 as compared 
with 1,004,216 pounds in 1900. Of the total production in 1910, British 
Columbia produced 1,013,400 pounds. It is the only province which has made 
a success of hop growing. Each succeeding census since 1880 shows a decreasing 
production in the other provinces. 

Tobacco. Tobacco is grown principally in the provinces of Ontario and 
Quebec. Of the total production, in 1910 (17,632,342 lb.) Ontario possessed 
7,498,506 lb. and Quebec 10,115,016 lb., as compared with a total production in 
1900 of 11,266,732 lb. of which Ontario supplied 3,503,739 lb. and Quebec 
7,655,975 lb. The total quantity produced in all the other provinces fell from 
107,018 lb. in 1900 to 19,820 lb. in 1910. 

Flax. In 1900 there were 172,222 bushels of flax raised in the Dominion; 
but with the opening up of the Prairie provinces where flax has been sown to 
good advantage on new breaking, the production in 1910 reached 4,244,935 
bushels. Of this amount, Saskatchewan produced 3,893,160 bushels or 91-71 
per cent. Ontario, Manitoba and Alberta also showed increases during the 
decade. 

Grass and Clover Seed. In 1910 Canada had a yield of 26,960,765 lb. 
grass and clover seed. In 1900 the production was 15,499,140 lb. Ontario 
produced 23,883,223 lb. in 1910 as against 11,880,912 lb. in 1900. From 1890 
to 1900 Ontario showed only an increase of 39,962 lb. 



xlviii CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 

TABLE 32. COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF YIELDS OF HAY. 
POTATOES, ROOT AND OTHER CROPS, 1880-1910. 



Provinces 



Canada— 
1910 . 

1900 .. 

1890 . 

1880 . 

British 

Columbia- 
1910... 
1900... 
1890... 
1880. . . 

Alberta — 

1910... 
1900... 
1890... 
1880... 

Saskatchewan 
1910.. 
1900.. 
1890.. 
1880.. 

Manitoba — 
1910.. 
1900.. 
1890.. 
1880.. 

Ontario — 

1910.. 

1900.. 
1890.. 
1880.. 

Quebec — 

1910.. 
1900.. 
1890.. 
1880.. 

New 
Brunswick — 
1910. 
1900 
1890. 
1880. 

Nova Scotia — 
1910... 
1900... 
1890... 
1880... 

PrinceEdward 
Island — 
1910 
1900. 
1S90 . 
1880. 



Hay 



tons. 



Potatoes 



bush. 



10,406,367 55, 4S1, 473 
7,852,73l!55,362,635 

7,693,733 53,490,857 

i 
5,053,008 55,368,790 



208,559 
170, 187 
102, 146 

4.3,898 



124,8791 

183,702 

45,523 

4,113 



1,633,210 
955,946 
685,802 
473,831 



2,339,901 

587,461 

187.000 

32, 263 



45,129' 2,917,340 

247,455 690,-332 

110,. 347 351.126 

13,387 57,063 



124,9541 
477,859 
485,2.30 
185,279 



2,865,8.39 

1,920,794 

1,757,231 

556. 193 



4,427,436 17,300,791 
2,852,465,20.042,258 
3,465,6.33 17,6.35,151 
2,038,659 18,994,559 



3,826,52l!l5.451,5.39 
2, 581, 823117,1.35,739 
2,243,435 15.861,797 
1.612.104 14,873,287 



668,599 
5 12.. 584 
476,069 
414.016 



724.292 
658,330 
632,391 
597,731 



2.55.998 
168.326 
132.959 
143,791 



Turnips 

and other 

roots 



5,219,025 
4,649,059 
4,827,830 
6,961,016 



3,531,293 
4,394,413 
5,113.612 
7,378,387 



4,202,535 
4,986,633 
7,071,308 
6,042,191 



bush. 

86,659,834 
76,075,612 
49,679,636 
48,251,414 



999,081 
635,988 
516,242 
352,7 



432.045 

125.. 328 

70.040 

9.618 



192.537 

109,550 

.3.59.537 

8.366 



522, 774 
232.243 
547.5.59 
198. 121 



70.418.599 
63.368.463 
41,200,779 
40,3.35,943 



4,869.699 
3,526,187 
2, 656,. 587 
3,623,380 



2,686,105 

2.070,486 

974,363 

1,149,379 



3,540.811 
2.074,806 
1.349.076 
1,332.854 



2.997.383 
3. 932.. 591 
2.005,453 
1,240,979 



Hops 



lb. 

1,208,450 

1,004,216 

1,126,230 

905,207 



1,013,400 
299,717 

55,288 
24,899 



Tobacco 



lb. 

17,632,342 

11,266,732 

4,277.936 

2.527,962 



9,688 

61,830 

343 

96 



80 

8 

333 



122 

650 

1,022 

1,835 



Flax 



205 
5, 533 



1,678; 

1,149' 
1.2381 



7,072i 
6,. 365 
1,807 
2,037: 



176,131 7,408,506 

603,075 3.503.7.391 

837.647 314,086 

615,967 160,251 



17,165 10,115.016 

62.9.30 7,655.975 

180,297, 3.958,737 

218,542 2.356,581 



258 
31.775 
27.791 
15.006 



1.096 
4.571 
18. 192 
18,677 



198 

1,425 

5.6.37 

10.209 



15 
58 
702 
6.414 



110 

560 

228 

1,216 



52 

.30.994 

795 

1,367 



Grass and 

Clover 

seed 



bush. 

4,244,935 
172,222 
138,844 
108,694 



50 

4 

364 

34 



78,480 
693 
753 



3,893,160 

2,420 

700 



176.675 
81,898 
34, 588 



lb. 



Maple 
sugar 



lb. 



26, 980, 765^22, 205, 116 

15,499,140^17,804,825 

17,032,500 25,088,274 

324,317 20,556,049 



1,780 

3i,3as 

82,900 
41,1.36 



20,476 
13,632 
11,000 



75,932 

74,328 

3,750 



116,031 
14,436 
42,450 
14,544 



31 

320 

9 



553 
5 



690 

228 



476 
5,137 
3.987 
2,79« 



82.901'23.883,2231 5.232,278 

67,276 11,880,912 3.912,640 

71,339 11,840,9.50 5,665,796 

38,2081 8,160,9.50 4,169.706 



13, .375 2,105.222 16,543,622 

19, .309 2,813,976 13, .564. 819 

29,476 4,077,400 18,875,231 

65,995 5,965,300,15,687,835 



.32 90,489, 269.944 

283! 157.248 207,450 

4.59 247, .350! 340,781 

1,745 391,8781 453,124 



37.691 1.58,121 

58 26,724 112,496 

410 105,850, 194,232 

1.793' 438,912 217,481 



262i 

281 
7461 
9191 



629,921' 
486.516; 
620,850; 
823.338 



681 

1.009 

7.094 

25,098 



0) Prairie hay not included. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



xlix 



In Table 33 the aggregates of area and production for each kind of crop 
are given for all Canada in 1890, 1900 and 1910. 

TABLE 33. AREA AND PRODUCTION OF FIELD CROPS FOR ALL CANADA, 

1890, 1900 AND 1910. 



Crops 



Area and Production 



1890 


1900 - 


1910 


acres 


bush. 


acres 


bush. 


acres 


bush. 


2,701,213 


42,223,372 


4,224,542 


55.572,368 


8,864,514 


132,077.547 


- 


- 


1,120,984 


22,005,00.; 


977,615 


20,408,360 


- 


- 


3,103.558 


33,567,365 


7,886,899 


111,669.187 


868,464 


17,222,795 


871.800 


22,224.365 


1,283,0:)4 


28,848.310 


3,961,356 


83,428,202 


5,367.655 


151,497,407 


8,656,179 


245,393,425 


122,102 


1,341,325 


176.679 


2,316,793 


114,728 


1,542,219 


195.101 


10.711,380 


360.758 


25,875,91* 


293,951 


14,417,599 


293,307 


4.994,871 


261.726 


4.547,15) 


357,513 


7,102,853 


925,375 


14,823,764 


670.320 


12.34S.y43 


355,191 


4,788,916 


43,097 


800.015 


46.634 


86 1,. 327 


46,299 


826.281 


- 


- 


273.490 


7,267.621 


426,957 


13,086,400 


16.236 


138,814 


23.086 


172.222 


582,185 


4,244,935 


: 


346,036 


: 


149,780 
138.495 


- 


141,085 
336,445 


450. 190 


53,490,857 


448,743 


55.362.635 


464.504 
1 112,305 


5), 461, 473 
47.371.434 


148, 143 

i 


49,679,636 


205.160 


76,075.642 


1 .56.729 
1 17,710 
[ 7,821 


30.3)3.1.32 
6,498,101 
2,436,367 




ton.s. 




t^ns. 




tons. 


5.931.518 


7.693,733 


6,543.423 


7.852,731 


8.289,407 


10,40.5.367 


- 


- 


- 


- 


54,804 


115,189 


_ 


_ 


} 276,350 


1,251,327 


) 2y4,347 
\ 257,838 


2,705.103 
343.228 




lb. 




lb 




lb. 


4,765 


4, 277, 936 


11.906 


11,266,732 


18,928 


17.612,342 


1,914 


1,126,230 


1,468 


1,004,216 


1,164 


1,208,450 



Wheat, all 

Wheat, fall.... 

Wheat, spring. 

Barley 

Oats 

Rye 

Corn for husking. . 

Buckwheat -. . . 

Peas 

Beans 

Mi.TecI grains 

Flax 

Grass seed 

Clover seed 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

Other field roots. . 

Hav and clover . . . 

Alfalfa 

Corn for forage.. . . 
Other forage crops 

Tobacco 

Hops 



Table 34 gives for Canada the average production of field crops per acre 
in 1890, 1900 and 1910 for every crop for which acreage and yield were given 
on the census schedules. The average jdelds per acre of wheat, oats, rj^e, 
buckwheat and mixed grains were greater in 1910 than in 1900; the average 
jaeld of barley was smaller in the last census year than in the previous one. The 
average production per acre of all field roots increased from 335-35 bushels 
per acre in 1890 to 370-81 bushels in 1900 and to 477-61 bushels in 1910. As 
prcniously stated neither the acreage sown nor the quantity produced of the 
various kinds of field roots were separately enumerated previous to the last 
census. The fact that alfalfa produced on the average nearly twice as much 
fodder as did timothy grass and clover seems to indicate the desirability of 
its cultivation in districts where conditions are favourable. It is well to bear 
in mind, that the average production per acre obtained at decennial censuses 
is often, as has been the case in this country in 1890, 1900 and 1910, for j^ears 
when, owing to adverse seasonal conditions, the crops in many sections were 
comparatively a failure. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



TABLE 84. AVERAGE PRODUCTION OF FIELD CROPS PER ACRE 
UNDER SUCH CROPS, FOR ALL CANADA, 1890-1910. 



Crops 



Average Yield per Acre 



1890 



1900 



1910 



Wheat, all 

Wheat, fall.... 

Wheat, spring. 

Barley 

Oats 

Rye 

Corn for husking. . 

Buckwheat 

Peas 

Beans 

Mixed grains 

Flax seed 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

OtKer field roots. . 

Hay and clover. . . 

Alfalfa 

Corn for forage.. . . 
Other forage crops 

Tobacco 

Hops 



bush. 

15-63 

19-84 
21-05 
10-98 
54-90 
17 03 
16-02 
18-56 

8-55 
118-82 

335-35 

tons. 
1-29 



lb. 
897-78 
588-41 



bush. 
13 15 
19-63 
10-82 
25-49 
28-22 
13-11 
71-73 
17-37 
18-42 
18-47 
26-57 
7-46 
123-37 

370-81 

tons. 
1-20 



lb. 
946-31 
684 07 



bush. 



14 


90 


20 


87 


14 


15 


22 


48 


28 


35 


13 


44 


49 


05 


19 


86 


13 


48 


17 


85 


30 


65 


7 


29 


119 


40 


421 


81 


535 


05 


366 


92 


311 


52 


tons. 


1 


25 


2 


12 


6 


86 


1 


33 


lb 




934 


19 


.039 


97 - 



Table 35 gives the average yield per acre of the principal grain crops, by 
provinces, in 1890, 1900 and 1910. In the Census of 1880, excepting for a 

. TABLE 35. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF YIELDS PER ACRE OF 
GRAIN CROPS, BY PROVINCES, 1890-1910. 



Provinces 



Wheat 



British Columbia- 

1910 

1900 

1890 

Alborta — 

1910 

1900 

1890 

Saskatchewan — 

1910 

1900 

1890 

Manitoba — 

1910 

1900 

1890 

Ontario — 

1910 

1900 

1890 

Quebec — 

1910 

1900 

1890 

Now Brunswick — 

1910 

1900 

1890. 

Nova Scotia — 

1910 

1900 

1890 

Prince Edward Is. 

1910 

1900 

1890 



bush. 
21-76 
22-51 
25-62 

10-29 
18-51 
15-23 

15-84 
23-01 
15-78 

12-36 

9-34 

17-95 

22-79 
19-10 
14-90 

14-83 

14 07 

9-75 

15-21 
1414 
12-12 

18-33 
15-21 
11-71 

17-45 
17-46 
13-72 



Barley 



bush. 
27-80 
33-06 
35-47 

20-42 
25-95 
26-16 

23-02 
15-84 
24-96 

15-66 
19-09 
25-70 

27-99 
27-45 
19-40 

23-84 
24-35 
16-73 

21-70 
21-62 
16-43 

26-56 
23-49 
18-97 

23-44 
23- 15 
19-47 



Oats 



bus! 
53 
41 
39 

21 
32 
26 

31 
16 

28 

25 
18 
32 

31 
32 



Rye 



bush. 
15 
23 
17 



Peas 



bush. 
27 
20 
32 



Buck- 
wheat 



bush. 
55 00 
34-53 
34-50 

6-58 

14-67 

5-70 

4-83 
3600 
27-00 

14-52 
23-11 
22-25 

19-92 
14-47 
14-47 

19-80 
18-01 
17-99 

19-70 
18-92 
IS -93 

21-59 
20-97 
20-99 

17-88 
16-60 
16-60 



Beans 



bush. 
15-39 
31-78 
31-94 

9-58 
15-00 



7-38 
38-00 
29-25 

9-93 
18-68 
18-87 

17-91 
18-23 
18-22 

17-98 
21-27 
21-00 

17-78 
19-14 
19 00 

1005 
19-52 
19-34 

14-62 
15 03 
14-82 



Corn for 
husking 



bu.sh. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



feu- crops, prod' ' t ion, but not area, was recorded. In the Census of 1910 
Ontario obtained ilie nighest average yield per acre for wlieat, (2o-09 bushels), 
barley, (27-99 bushels), beans, (17-91 bushels) and corn for husking (50-32 
bushels); British Columbia for oats (53-10 bushels) and buckAvheat (55 bushels); 
Alberta for rye (16-33 bushels) and Manitoba for peas (18-49 bushels). As 
onh^ comparatively small areas are devoted to oats and buckwheat in British 
Columbia, to rye in Alberta, and to peas in Manitoba, the average yields recorded 
have not the same significance as have average yields obtained on large areas, 
extending over a wide region. The same remark applies to the yield per acre 
of wheat, oats and barley in Ontario, Quebec and the ^Maritime provinces as 
compared with that possessed bj' the prairie provinces. 

Table 36 gives for 1910 and 1900 the average production per farm holding 
of the principal grains, potatoes, roots and forage crops. There have been, 
during the decade, increases in the production, per farm, of wheat, oats and 
forage crops and decreases in the average quantities of barlej^, potatoes and 
roots. In 1910, ^Manitoba ranked first in the production per farm of wheat 

TABLE 36. AVERAGE PRODUCTION PER FARM OF PRINCIPAL 
CROPS, BY PROVINCES, 1910 AND 1900. 



Provinces 


Wheat 


Barley 


Oats 


Potatoes 


Turnips 

and other 

roots 


Hay 

and 
forage 


Canada— 

1910 


bush. 

184-82 
102 02 

1119 
53-33 

147-33 
84-03 

695 00 
316-40 

748-31 
564-79 

87-49 
126-80 

5-84 
13-07 

5-34 
10-16 

417 
4-43 

34-90 
52-71 


bush. 

40 37 

40 SO 

2-79 
10-94 

40-43 
30-25 

31-76 
13-78 

142-89 
82 07 

02-10 
71-78 

14-66 
16-84 

1-48 
2-64 

2-G5 
3-23 

7-96 
, 7-54 


bush. 

343 38 
278 14 

95 55 
214-06 

274-71 
399-22 

611-41 
167-10 

665-41 
325-98 

396-54 
393-25 

211-69 
222-69 

144-95 
128-15 

55-45 
41-90 

366-77 
325-47 


bush. 

77 61 
101 64 

88-44 
141-85 

38-05 
61-93 

30-27 
50-71 

62-84 
59- 11 

70-28 
89-42 

96-76 
113-78 

136-59 
123-70 

65 -S4 
78-43 

292-47 
•355-83 


bush. 

121 27 
139 67 

54-10 
94-37 

7-03 

18-42 

2-00 
4-42 

11-46 
7-15 

310-49 
282-73 

30-49 
23-41 

70-55 
55-09 

66 02 
37 03 

208-60 
280-62 


bush. 
18 99 


1900 


16 71 


British Columbia — 

1910 


13-06 


1900 


25-74 


Alberta — 

1910 


3-50 


1900 


22-28 


Saskatchewan — 

' 1910 


1-14 


1900 


18-92 


Manitoba — 

1910 


4-79 


1900 


16-34 


Ontario — 

1910 


30-33 


1900 


16-92 


Quebec — 

1910 


26-54 


1900 


18-48 


New Brunswick — 

1910 


17-66 


1900 


13-84 


Nova Scotia — 

1910 


13-69 


1900 


11-85 


Prince Edward Ic'and — 

1910 


18-08 


1900 


12-28 







(748-31 oushels), barley (142-89 bushels) and oats (665-41 bushels). Prince 
p]dward Island in potatoes (292-47 bushels), Ontario in turnips and other 
roots (310-49 bushels) and Quebec in hay and forage crops (26-54 tons). The 
production of wheat, per farm, increased from 1900 to 1910 in Alberta, Saskat- 
chewan and Manitoba; of barley in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and 
Prince Edward Island; of oats in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and the 



Hi 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



INIaritime provinces; of potatoes in Manitoba and New Brunswick; of roots 
in Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia; of hay and 
forage in the eastern provinces generally. 

The quantity of wheat produced in the eastern provinces, per farm, has 
greatly decreased in the ten years; the production per farm in 1910 and 1900 in 
Ontario was 87-49 bushels, and 126-80 bushels, in Quebec 5-84 bushels and 
13-07 bushels, in New Brunswick 5-34 bushels and 10-16 bushels, in Nova 
Scotia 4-17 bushels and 4-43 bushels, in Prince Edward Island 34-90 bushels 
and 52-71 bushels respectively. In the production of oats, Quebec, Alberta 
and British Columbia had a greater production per farm in 1910 than in 1900, 
the other provinces a lesser yield. 

Values of Crops. 

Table 37 gives the total value of field crops for Canada and the provinces 
in 1910 and 1900 as well as the average value per farm of such crops. Their 
value increased in the ten years by $189,560,375 or 97-23 per cent. Every 
province shows enormous aggregate increases for the last census over the previous 
one. The average value per farm, for all Canada, was $538-06 in 1910 as 
compared mth S357-92 in 1900. British Columbia shows a decrease in the aver- 
age value per farm of field crops in 1910 as compared with 1900. The increase 
in the number of holdings of 5 acres and under in the western provinces has had 
a tendency to reduce the average value per farm holding. 

TABLE 37. TOTAL VALUE OF FIELD CROPS TOGETHER WITH THEIR AVERAGE 
VALUE PER FARM, BY PROVINCES, 1910 AND 1900. 



Provinces 


Total value of 
field crops 


Average value, per 
farm, of field crops 




1910 


1900 


1910 ( 1900 


Canada 


$ 

384,513,755 

7,240,018 
17,015,329 
79,754,903 
45,-509,520 
140,780,055 
65,353,528 
11,030,237 
11,005,033 
6,013,172 


i 

194,953,4>0 

3,100,577 
2,618,420 
4,608,172 

10,669,321 
102,138,819 

44,851,108 
7,740,100 
8,584,956 
4,641,947 


% $ 

538 06 357 92 




392-35 460-09 




276-68 
829-65 
997-88 
620-74 
409-37 
288-67 
205-18 
460-23 


276- 03 




338-54 




512-98 




455-72 




297-82 




205-94 




153-21 


Prince Edward Island 


331-23 







Table 38 gives the value of field crops by specified kinds, in 1910, for 
Canada and the provinces. In the previous census the total value only was 
enumerated, consequently it is not possible to determine how much of the 
gross increase in the value of field crops during the decade was due to a larger 
acreage or how much, if any, to a higher valuation per unit of yield. In this 
connection it is well to bear in mind the important part which adequate means 
of transportation have upon tiie question of net profits to the farmer from his 
year's operations. At present, there are no reliable statistics which give the 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Uii 



lo io to the farmer from having to dehver his goods to the nearest market, over 
I)oor trackage. Nevertheless the fact must not be lost sight of, that the 
enormous railway extension from 1901 to 1911 has carried markets to many- 
places which were without such facilities ten years ago and that the consequence 
of such improved conditions has been to stimulate variety in production and to 
procure higher net returns for the products of the soil. 

The per cent proportion which the value of certain specified groups of 

TABLE 38. VALUE OF FIELD CROPS BY SPECIFIED KINDS, 1910. 



Crops 



Canada 



British 
Columbia 



Alberta Saskatchewan 



Manitoba 



Wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Rye 

Corn for husking 

Buckwheat 

Peas 

Beans 

Flax 

Mixed grains 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

Other field roots 

Hav and clover 

Alfalfa 

Corn for forage 

Other forage crops .... 
Grass and clover seed . 

Tobacco 

Hops 



104,816,825 

14,653,697 

86,796,130 

1,0.37,899 

5,774,0.39 

4,0.53,3.35 

4.195,500 

1,274,315 

8,870,483 

6,307,984 

27,426,765 

5,704,691 

3,332,094 

957,480 

693,303 

90,115,531 

1,173.800 

8,775,428 

2,736,966 

3,135,591 

2,422,379 

2.59,560 



223,724 

42,931 

1,004,796 

6,107 

883 

88 

43 , 565 

13,. 340 

120 

10,803 

1,148.613 

117,936 

49,294 

8.6.58 

94,773 

3,828.020 

134,515 

17,662 

274,607 

235 

1,082 

224,260 



$ 

6,676,318 

1.975,348 

5.74«,773 

59,4.35 

773 

808 

3,749 

222 

162,529 

17,155 

1,191,485 

44,800 

3,557 

31,160 

41.905 

1,238,982 

81,8.30 

18,019 

615,846 

2,. 580 



50,213,376 

1,299,768 

17,624,162 

6,120 

1,2.35 

32 

3.322 

'l08 

8.159.500 

4,747 

1,696,962 

35,072 

5,168 

4,877 

17,647 

319,248 

2,696 

6,191 

548,416 

5,928 

314 

14 



28,584,199 

2,924,609 

9,902,553 

20,469 

2,943 

2,313 

6,112 

1,474 

387.080 

3,847 

1,690,100 

62,844 

15,387 

6,660 

77,743 

1,012,971 

7.454 

93,957 

696,450 

9.660 

655 

40 



Crops 



Ontario 



Quebec 



Wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Rye 

Corn for husking 

Buckwheat 

Peas 

Beans 

Flax 

Mixed grains 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mangolds , 

Sugar beets 

Other field roots 

Hav and clover 

Alfalfa 

Corn for forage 

Other forage crops. . . . 
Grass and clover seed 

Tobacco 

Hops 



17,090,128 

7.414,210 

31,622.936 

806,892 
5,283,028 
1,692,482 
3,655,483 
1,067,684 

1.35,. 593 
4,889,031 
8,693,243 
3,318,711 
3,091,967 

86S,480 

1.50,950 
.38,607,211 

918,9.59 
7,108,625 

.345,897 

2,795,960 

1,197,739 

30,846 



$ 

1,076 

1 , 673 

15,151 

133 

480 

1,598 

472, 

150, 

24, 

1,215, 

7,671. 

695, 

97. 

23. 

218, 

31.512. 

27. 

1,494, 

178, 

232. 

1,222, 

3. 



,.342 
.237 
,059 
,414 
,805 
,484 
,197 
,318 
,916 
,689 
,015 
,145 
959 
649 
407 
060 
104 
136 
344 
951 
498 
799 



New Bruns- 
wick 



Nova Scotia 



P. E. Island 



$ 

218.009 

41,9.38 

2,331.870 

233 

1,543 

612,496 

7,627 

10,462 

62 

12,481 

2,167,444 

483,274 

10,512 

3,231 

44,099 

5,0.35,420 

958 

9,275 

26,974 

12,234 

95 



I 

229,802 

113,-563 

1,466,492 

5, 162 

2,266 

120,481 

2,694 

29,6.32 

74 

48,805 

1,7.39,. 376 

552,610 

45,519 

9,258 

43,710 

6,532,815 

244 

21,021 

36,245 

4,788 

25 

451 



% 

504,927 

68,093 

1,943,489 

67 

563 

26,151 

751 

1,075 

609 

105,420 

1,428,527 

394,299 

12,731 

1,507 

4,069 

2,028,804 

40 

6,542 

14,187 

71,255 

11 

55 



IlV 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



crops, formed of the total value of all crops, in 1910, is given in Table 39. For all 
Canada, the value of wheat, oats and barley formed 53 • 64 per cent of the value of 
all field crops, other grains 8-20 per cent, making a total for grains of 61-84 
per cent; potatoes and roots obtained 9-91 per cent; hay and forage 26-73 
per cent and various minor crops 1-52 per cent. In Manitoba, wheat, oats 
and barley obtained 90 ■ 99 per ceat of the gross value of the field crops of the 
province, in Saskatchewan 86-47 per cent, in Alberta 79-34 per cent, in Ontario 
39-87 per cent, in Prince Edward Island 38-05 per cent, and less than 30 per 



TABLE 39. 



PER CENT PROPORTION OF THE TOTAL VALUE OF ALL FIELD CROPS 
REPRESENTED BY SPECIFIED CROP GROUPS, 1910. 



Provinces 


Percentage 


WHICH V.\LUE OF EACH GROUP FORMS OF TOTAL VALUE 
OF ALL FIELD CROPS » 


Wheat, 

oats and 

barley 


Other 
grains 


Potatoes 
and 
roots 


Hay and 

forage 
crops 


Various 
crops 


Canada 


p. c. 

53 64 

17-55 
79 -.34 
SG-47 
90-99 
39-87 
27-40 
23-50 
16-45 
38-05 


p. c. 

8-20 

1-03 
1-43 

10-22 
-93 

12-45 
6-23 
5-85 
1-80 
2-03 


p. c. 
9 91 

19-59 

7-72 
2-20 
4-07 
11-45 
13-32 
24-55 
21-73 
27-84 


p. c. 

26 73 

58-71 
11-48 
1-10 
3-98 
33 -.37 
50-82 
45-99 
59-88 
30-99 


p. c. 
1 52 

312 




-03 




•01 




-03 




2-86 




2-23 




•11 




•05 


Prince Edward Island 


1-09 







cent in Quebec, British Columbia and Nova Scotia. Hay and forage crops 
gave more than one-half the total value in Nova Scotia, British Columbia and 
Quebec being 59-88 per cent, 58-71 per cent and 50-82 per cent respectively. 
Potatoes and roots show the smallest proportion of value in Saskatchewan and 
Manitoba and highest in Prince Edward Island and Nevv^ Brunswick. Ontario 
and Quebec present the best distribution of the aggregate value of crops as 
between the different groups. 

In Table 40, the average price per bushel, per ton or per pound, as the 
case may be, of field crops for the harvest year 1910, is given. In 1910, wheat 
was priced at over one dollar per bushel in British Columbia, Quebec and the 
Maritime provinces. The lowest and highest values respectively were obtained 
in Alberta with 74 cents per bushel and in Quebec with SI . 15 per bushel. The 
average price per bushel on the farm for all Canada was 79 cents. In British 
Columbia, Quebec and the ]\Iaritime provinces, the prices of grain generally 
obtained a higher range, than in Ontario and the prairie provinces. Peas, 
beans, flax and potatoes maintain a fairly level price in all the provinces, except 
Ontario where they are con.siderably lower. But in comparing the prices per 
unit obtained for farm products, as between provinces, the quantity produced 
must always be considered. Where only small quantities, insufficient even 
for local needs, of any farin product are produced, the unit value is generally 
higher, the cost of the imported article having been taken as the basis of valua- 
tion. For example, the price of wheat, barley and oats is higher in Quebec 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Iv 



and the Maritime provinces than in Ontario and the Northwest provinces. 
Peas, beans and roots are produced in larger quantities in Ontario than else- 
where in Canada and also obtain a smaller price per bushel. 

TABLE 49. UNIT VALUE OF FIELD CROPS. BY PROVINCES, 1910. 



Crops 



Wheat 

Barlej- 

Oats 

Rye 

Corn for husking. . . . 

Buckwheat 

Peas 

Beans 

Flax 

Mixed grains 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mangolds 

Sugar beets 

Other field roots. . . . 

Hay and clover 

Alfalfa 

Corn for forage 

Other forage crops... 

Tobacco 

Hops 



Unit 

of 
Mea- 



bu. 



tons 



lb. 



British 
Colum- 
bia 



Al- 
berta 



•74 
•43 
•34 
•55 
•90 
•83 
•.30 
•93 
•07 
•47 
•51 
•34 
•23 
•16 
•46 
•92 
•94 
•53 
•43 
•27 



Sas- 
katch- 
ewan 



•75 
•42 
•30 
•53 
■61 
•10 
•27 
•83 
•10 
•53 
•58 
•30 
•20 
•29 
•54 
•07 
•55 
■34 
■69 
•10 
•18 



Mani- 
toba 



$ 

•83 

•45 

•33 

•70 

•93 

•79 

1-26 

163 

219 

•44 

•59 

•26 

•17 

•26 

•48 

811 

12^87 

6-64 

8-82 

•O'J 

•33 



On- 
tario 



Quebec 



$ 


$ 


$ 


•86 


115 


!•( 


•53 


•71 




•35 


•45 




•65 


•90 




•38 


•84 


•< 


•51 


•68 


. 


•84 


114 


!• 


■47 


1^97 


2-: 


•64 


1^86 


!•< 


•46 


•58 


•( 


•50 


•50 


..: 


•10 


•21 




•11 


•17 




•14 


•21 




•20 


•25 




(•72 


8^24 


7-. 


•66 


6^60 


9- 


•09 


3^95 


4- 


)^86 


6-16 


7-( 


•16 


•12 




•18 


•22 





New 
Bruns- 
wick 



[•07 
•74 
•42 
•70 
•95 
•53 
[•16 
!32 
[•94 
•61 
•42 
•20 
•21 
•27 
•27 

r-53 

)^58 
[■01 

ro4 

■37 



Nova i P. E. 
Scotia i Island 



103 
■80 
•49 
•96 
•84 
•58 
145 
2-51 

•62 

•49 

•18 

•20 

•26 

•28 

902 

9-38 

403 

7-85 

•23 

•41 



Can- 
ada 



$ 

•79 

•51 

•35 

•67 

•40 

•57 

•88 

1-54 

209 

•48 

•49 

•12 

•11 

•15 

•28 

8^66 

10- 19 

3-24 

7^97 

■14 

•21 



Table 41 shows the per cent proportion of the total value of all field crops 
possessed by each province in 1900 and 1910, and also the average value per acre, 
of producing land, of such crops. 

Ontario contributed 36-61 per cent of the total value of the crop production 
of Canada in 1910, as compared with 52-39 per cent in 1900. In the provinces 
west of the Great Lakes the ratio of value increased from 13-84 per cent of the 
total in 1900, to 38-95 per cent in 1910, while in the Maritime provinces it 
dropped from 10-76 per cent to 7-44 per cent. The average value per acre 
of crop producing land was for the census years 1900 and 1910 highest in British 
Columbia. The lowest value per acre in 1900 was obtained by Manitoba 
($6.05) and in 1910 by Alberta ($8.22). 



TABLE 41. PER CETMT DISTRIBUTION OF THE VALUE OF FIELD CROPS. TOGETHER 
WITH THEIR AVERAGE VALUE PER ACRE OF LAND UNDER SUCH CROP, 19io 
AND 1900. 



Provinces 



Per cent distribution 

of the v.\lue of field 

crops by provinces 



1910 



1900 



Average v.\lue of field 

crops per acre of l.\nd 

under such crops 



1910 



1900 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



p. c. 
IM 00 

188 

443 

20-80 

11-84 

.30-61 

17-00 

2 -87 

2 -SO 

171 



p. c. 

100 00 

1-59 
134 
2-36 
8-55 
■52-39 
23^01 
3-97 
4-40 
2-39 



12 58 

33 90 
8-22 
11-64 
9-75 
15 10 
12-41 
11-50 
15-48 
13-85 



$ 

9 86 

18-08 

13-89 

7-03 

6-05 

11-09 

9-53 

8-02 

11-76 

10-36 



Ivi 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Table 42 gives percentages indicating the relative importance of the prin- 
cipal crops in 1910 according to the values assigned to them by the producers 
themselves. For all Canada wheat ranks first with 25-19 per cent, with hay 
and forage second and oats third. Wheat also leads in the Prairie provinces, 
giving more than 60 per cent of the total value of all field crops in Manitoba and 
Saskatchewan and nearly 37 per cent in Alberta; hay and forage crops rank 
first in British Columbia and the eastern provinces; oats holds second place in 
all provinces, excepting British Columbia and Nova Scotia where fruits and 
vegetables are in second place. Potatoes come third in British Columbia, 
Saskatchewan, Quebec and the Maritime provinces. Wheat takes third position 
in Ontario, barley in Manitoba, and hay and forage crops in Alberta. The table 
also shows, inter alia, the adherence to well defined crop groups in the several 

TABLE 42. PRINCIPAL CROPS CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO VALUE 
OF PRODUCTION, BY PROVINCES, 1910. 





Crop ranking First 
IN Value and per cent- 
age, WHICH IT FORMS OF 

value of all Field 
Crops 


Crop ranking Second 
IN Value and per cent- 
age WHICH IT FORMS OF 
VALUE OF ALL FlELD 

Crops 


Crop ranking Third 
IN Value and per cent- 
age WHICH IT FORMS OF 
VALUE or ALL FlELD 

Crops 


Provinces 


Kind 


Per cent 

of value 

of all 

Field 
Crops 


Kind 


Per cent 

of value 

of all 

Field 

Crops 


Kind 


Per cent 

of value 

of all 

Field 

Crops 


Canada.. 


Wheat 


25 19 

44-30 

36-78 

61-98 
60-87 
30-38 

45-73 


Hay and Forage 

Fruits and Vege- 
tables. 

Oats 


24 71 

24-56 

31-67 
21-75 


Oats 


2«-8« 


British Columbia 


Hay and Forage 
crops. 

Wheat 


Potatoes 

Hay and Forage 


11-96 




10-77 




Wheat. 


Oats 


crops. 1 
Potatoes 2-09 




Wheat 


Oats 


21-09 


Barley 


6-23 




Hay and Forage 

crops. 
Hay and Forage 

crops. 
Hay and Forage 

crops . 
Hay and Forage 

crops. 

Hay and Forage 
crops . 


Oats 


20-45 
20-86 
19-06 
21-57 

28-41 


Wheat 


11-05 




Oats 


Potatoes 

Potatoes 

Potatoes 

Potatoes 


10-58 




41-46 


Oats 


17-72 


Nova Scotia 


46-97 
29-96 


Fruits and Vege- 
tables. 

Oats 


12-40 




20 88 









provinces. For example, of the gross cash returns to the farmers from the 
land, the three principal crops constituted 88-19 per cent in Manitoba, 85-82 
per cent in Saskatchewan, 80-94 per cent in Nova Scotia, 80-82 per cent 
in British Columbia, 79-25 per cent, in Prince Edward Island, 79-24 per cent, 
in New Brunswick, 79-22 per cent in Alberta, 77-15 per cent in Quebec, and 
62-88 per cent in Ontario; for the Dominion as a whole the value of wheat, 
forage crops, including hay and oats, obtained 70 ■ 76 per cent of the total cash 
value represented by the harvest of the year 1910. \\'heat and oats obtained 
83-73 per cent of the value of all field crops in Saskatchewan and 81-97 per 
cent in Manitoba. The greater the proportion possessed by anj' three princi- 
pal crops in a province the smaller must be the extent of the other crops produced. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Ivii 



Table 43 shows the quantity and value of field crops exported for the 
years ended June 30, 1891. 1901 and 1911. 

For the year ended June 30, 1891. Canada o-r)arted 10,760,110 bushels 
of cereals and flax, valued at $7,435,285; in 1901 the exports totalled 25,579,071 
bushels, valued at $14,235,132; in 1911 the total exports of cereals pnd flax 
reached 58,919,147 bushels valued at $56,542,862. In 1891, barley, peas and 
wheat ranked first in quantity exported. In 1901, the first three positions were 
taken by wheat, peas and oats while in 1911 wheat, oats and flax led in the 
order named. The exports of wheat, which totalled 2,108,216 bushels in 1891, 
were 9,739,758 bushels in 1901, and 48,523,222 bushels in 1911. The exports of 

TABLE 43. QUANTITY AND VALUE OF FIELD CROPS EXPORTED 
IN THE YEARS ENDED 1891, 1901 AND 1911, BEING THE PRODUCTION OF THE 
CENSUS YEARS 1890, 1900 AND 1910. 



Kind 



Year ended 
June 30, 1891 



Field Crops — 

BjiTley 

Beans 

Buckwheat 

Oats 

Peas 

Rye 

Wheat 

Grain, other 

Flax seed 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Vegetables, all other. . 

Hav 



Totals. 



bush. 



4,892,-32 
323,729 

260,569 

2,754,285 

3.39,964 

2,108,216 

80,928 

92 

3,668,725 



tons 
65,082 



2,929,873 
495, 76S 

129,917 

2,032,601 

226,470 

1,-583,084 

37,222 

350 

1,693,671 

102,754 

559,489 



9,791,199 



Year ended 
June 30, 1901 



bush. 



2,386,371 
310,416 
429,-334 

8,155.063 

3,864,927 
687,0.59 

9,739,7.58 

5,190 

953 

887,409' 

916,290 

tons I 
252,9771 



Year ended 
June 30, 1911 



1,123,055 

418,161 

227,717 

2, 490,. 521 

2,674,712 

424,877 

6,871,93!) 

2,657 

1,493 

364,387 

96,462 

97,374 

2,097,882 



16,891,337 



bush. 



1,276,775 

27.. 591 

406.021 

5,944.430 

460, 580 

82,301 

48,523,222 

22,044 

2,197,072 

690,21-2 

1,503,120 

tons 
453,625 



676,727 

48 608 

207,118 

2,420,339 

670,868 

52,011 

47,293,027 

15,5.54 

5,158,610 

468,405 

212.543 

271,990 

3,576,250 



61,072,050 



oats were reduced l\y 2,210,633 bu.shels from 1901 to 1911. In the census years 
1891 and 1901 the quantity of flax exported was so small as not to merit attention 
but in 1911 it ranks third with an export of 2,197,072 bushels, valued at $5,158,- 
610. The value of the hay exported in 1901 was $2,097,882, as compared with 
$3,576,250 in 1911, being a gain of $1,478,368 or 70-4 per cent. Canada, in 1901 
ex];orted 887,409 bushels of potatoes with a total value of $364,387, and an 
average value of 41 cents per bushel, as compared with a total export of 
690,212 bushels with a total value of $468,405, and an average value of 67 cents 
per bushel in 1911, 

In addition to the quantities of field crops exported in natural form, the 
Dominion, in 1911, exported flour to the value of $13,854,790, oatmeal, bran and 
other cereal products to the value of $4,212,573, as again.st $4,015,226 worth of 
flour, and $742,821 worth of oatmeal, bran and other cereal products in 1901. 
The values of the exports of grain products for the years ended June 30, 1891, 
1901 and 1911 are given on the next page. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 





Value or exports of Grain Produce, for Year ended 
June 30 


Kinds 


1891 


1901 


1911 


Flour of wheat 


$ 

1,388,578 

45, 195 

162,324 

13,943 


$ 

4,015,226 

467,807 

242,245 

32,763 


$ 
13,854,790 


Oatmeal 


518,032 


Bran 


1,850,219 


All others 


1,844,322 






Total 


1,610,040 


4,758,047 


18,067,363 







The total value of the exports of all field products raw and manufactured, 
increased from $21,649,284 in 1901 to $79,139,413 in 1911. 

RENT AND WAGES. 

Rent. Table 44 gives by provinces the number of farms rented together 
with area of rented farms, the value of rent and the average value of rent per 
acre. 

The census of leased or rented lands was furnished by the tenants them- 
selves. In the whole Dominion, there were 57,129 rented farms in 1911, as 

TABLE 44. RENT OF AGRICULTURAL LANDS BY PROVINCES. 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



Lands leased or rented 



Farms 
rented 



Area in 
rented farms 



Value 
of rent 



Rent 
per acre 



Canada— 

1911 

1991 

British Columbia — 

1911 

1901 

Alberta — 

1911 

1901 

Saskatchewan — 

1911 

1901 

Manitoba — 

1911 

190.1 

Ontario — 

1911 

1901 

Quebec — 

1911 

1901 .... 

New Brunswick — 

1911 

1901 

Nova Scotia — 

1911 

1901 

Prince Edward Island — 

1911 

1901 



, 1^9 i 
,744 

,077 
,031 

,341 
211 

,517 
215 

,675 
,627 

,201 
,360 

,287 
.284 

.508 
,255 

,106 
,370 

417 
391 



,082,9:21 

,899,897 

468,484 
209, 178 

044,550 
293,426 

541,952 
152. 173 

893,766 
769,453 

,979,078 
,175,647 

776,942 
986,635 

169. 175 
173,794 

166,797 
100,342 

42, 177 
33,249 



13,593.351 
7,355.3J3 

617,265 
215,007 

1,175,907 
43,802 

2,126,600 
113,090 

1,839,414 
516,383 

5,709,505 
5,228,042 

1,641,061 
1,039,212 

184,222 
87.799 

2.58,134 
79,539 

43.240 
32,449 



1 22 
1 25 



1-32 
103 



0-57 
015 



0-83 
0-74 



0-97 
0-67 



1-92 
1-64 



211 
105 



109 
0-50 



1-54 
0-75 



0-99 
0-97 



CENSUSOFCANADA1911 lix 

compared with 47,744 in 1901, and the area increased from 5,899,897 acres in 
1901 to 11,082,921 acres in 1911. Tlie rent paid in 1901 was $7,355,323, being 
at the rate of SI. 25 per acre as compared with $1.22 per acre and a total of 
§13,595,351 in 1911. The large increases in the area of rented farm land in 
Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, at a low rate per acre, has had the 
effect of reducing the general average rent per acre for all Canada in the last 
census. In the Fifth Census, the highest rent per acre was obtained in Quebec 
with S2. 11 per acre, and in the previous census in Ontario with $1.64 per acre. 
In Nova Scotia the rate per acre increased from 75 cents to SI . 54, in New 
Brunswick from 50 cents per acre to SI. 09, in Quebec from $1.05 to $2.11 per 
acre, and in Ontario from $1 . 64 to $1 . 92 per acre. In the prairie provinces the 
rent value per acre of farm lands in 1910 ranged from 57 cents in Alberta to 97 
cents in Manitoba; in 1900 it ranged from 15 cents per acre in Alberta to 74 
cents per acre in Saskatchewan. 

A recent inquiry conducted by the Census and Statistics Office into the ques- 
tion of the cost of grain production in Canada in 1911 estimated the profit per 
acre of land under each crop to be, [Manitoba, spring wheat $5.20, oats $4,78, 
barley $5.98; Saskatchewan, spring wheat, $1.42, oats $1.23, barley $3.08; 
Alberta, spring wheat $1.47, oats $2.58, barley $3.76. Table 41 page Iv also 
shows the gross value of the yield per acre of land under such crops in 1910 to 
have been for Manitoba $9.75, for Saskatchewan $11.64, and for Alberta $8.22. 

Labour and Wages. The statistics of Farm Labour and Wages given in 
Table 45 show for the census years 1900 and 1910 the number of weeks of 
hired labour on the farm, total wages paid, average wages paid per week, per 
farm and per 100 acres of improved land. The table also shows the ratio of wages 
to total investment as represented by value of farm property, and to the total 
value of return on investment as represented by the value of farm products. 

In all the western provinces there were increases in the total wages paid, 
while in all the eastern provinces there wei-e decreases. The average wage per 
week on farms, including board, for all Canada, was $8.33 in 1911 as against 
$5.42 in 1901, being an increase of 53-69 per cent. The highest wages, in 1911, 
Avere paid in British Columbia, with an average of $12.35 per week for time 
employed, in Alberta the average was $10 . 79 per week, in Saskatchewan $10 . 47 
per week, in Manitoba $9.01 per week. In eastern Canada, the highest wages 
were paid in New Brunswick and the lowest in Prince Edward Island. For 
all Canada the average wage per farm in 1911 was $48.62 as compared with 
$44.48 in 1901, Computed on the area of improved land the tax for labour 
was less per 100 acres in 1911 than in 1901 by 6-96 per cent. The ratio of the 
value of wages to the value of all farm property and to the value of farm products 
decreased for all Canada and for each of the provinces from 1911 to 1901. In 
1911 wages were -82 per cent of the total value of all property as compared 
with 1-35 per cent in 1901. The records of the census show it required 4-81 
per cent of the total production to pay the cost of wages in 191 1, as compared with 
6-67 per cent in 1901. Every province shows a reduction in the ratio of wages 
to value of production. This result is no doubt due to the more general in- 
troduction of improved labour saving appliances which permit of more extensive 
agricultural operations without a corresponding increase in the number of 
hired l.elpeis. 

1».0G— E 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE 45. FARM LABOUR AND WAGES, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



Weeks of 
hired 
labor 



Wages 
paid 



Average Wages Paid 



Per week 



Per farm' 



Per 100 

acres 

improved 

land 



Per cent which thb 

value of labour 
form3 of the total 

VALUE OF — 



Farm 
property 



Farm 
product.s 



Canada — 

1911 , 

1901 

Increase 

British Columbia — 

1911 

1901 

Increase 

Alberta— 

1911 

1901 

Increase 

Saskutchcwan — 

1911 

1901 

Increase 

Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

Increase 

Ontario — 

1911 

1901 

Increase 

Quebec^ 

1911 

1901 

Increase 

New Brunswick — 

1911 

1901 

Increase 

Nova Scotia — 

1911 

1901 

Increase 

Prince Edward Island — 

1911 

1901 

Increase 



NO. 

4,171,236 
4,473,769 
-302,543i 



174, .580; 
1135, 507] 
38,983 

207,980 
86,705 

121,275 

.564,4171 
143,701 
420,710 
1 
000,89lj 
419,248 
181,643 

1,688,0171 
2,-359,632 
-671,615 

681,038 

894,534 

-213,496 

102,694 

158,348 

-55,654 

107, 152 

182,209 

-75,057 

44,457 

93,795 

-49,338 



34.745,813 
24,228,515 
10,517,298 



2,1.55,902 

1,223,2.30 

9.32,672 

2,245,039 

695,. 545 

1,549,494 

5,909,663 

880,319 

5,029,344 

5,411,916 
2,615,111 
2,796,805 

12,056,765 

12,152,915 

-96,150 

5,075,018 

4,512,674 

.562,344 

818.254 
842,253 
-23,999 

815,246 

960.227 

-144,981 

258.010 
346,241 
-88,231 



8-33 
5 42 
2 91 



10 



48 62 

44 48 

4 14 



116-74 
' 181-51 
-64-77 

36-50 
73-32 

-.36 -821 

61-32 
64-671 
-3-35J 

118- r--' 
8(-41 
38--,, 

53 -IG 
54-22 
-l-06i 

31-781 

29 ^ej 

1-82^ 

! 
21-41! 
22-39( 
--98 

15-20 
17- 13 

-1-93! 

17-96' 
24-70' 
-6-741 



73 35 

80 31 
-6 96 



451 

2.58 
193 

51 

146 

—94 

49 

78 
-28 

80 
65 
14 



91 
-3 

62 

60 

1 

56 
59 
-3 

64 

76 

-11 

33 

47 

-14 



P.O. 



•82 

1 35 

53 



p.c. 



4 81 

6 67 
1 86 



12-69 

18 -.35 

-5-66 

4-60 

11-98 

-7-32 

5-58 

11-60 

-6-02 

7-93 
10-69 

-2-76 

4-08 

617 

-2-09 

3-85 

5-30 

-1-45 

4 03 

6 -.54 

-2-51 

3-38 

5-89 

-2-51 



'Tlie average wages per farm are computed on the total number of farms and not on the number of 
farms employing labor. 

-The minus sign (— ) denotes a decrease. 

LIVE STOCK OX FARMS. 



In comparing the stati.'^tics of tlip number and value of domestic animals 
as reported in the censuses of 1911 and 1901, due consideration must be given 
to the fact that the census of 1911 was taken as of the date June 1, whilst 
that of 1901 was taken as of the date March 31. Had the census of 1911 
been taken as of March 31 the number of animals of all kinds, but especially 
of cattle, slieep and swine would have been materially smaller, both as regards 
total number and average number per farm, for the reason that from April 1 
to June 1 a very great number of all domestic animals are born. As the 
value of j'oung animals, added from April 1 to June 1, would be relatively low, 
the total increase in value would not be affected to nearly the same degree as 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



would the total numbers of each kind; in other words, the average value per 
head would have been lower for figures based on an enumeration of June 1 
than they would be on statistics collected as for April 1. A summary of the 
number and value of live stock for the Dominion as a whole is given in Table 46. 



TABLE 4«. 



SUMMARY OF THE NUMBER AND VALUE OF LIVE STOCK IN CANADA 
AS A WHOLE, 1911 AND 1901 



Schedule 



Horses 



Milch cows 



Other 

horned 

cattle 



Sheep 



Swine 



Poultry 



Number — , 

1911 NO. 2,598,958 2,595,255 

1901 NO.! 1,577,493 2,408,677 

Increase, total.... NO. 1,021,465 186,578 

Increase per cent p. c. 64 •75' 7-75 

Value — 

1911 $' 381,915,505 109,575.526 

1901 $; 118,279,419 69,237,970 

Increase, total $ 263,636,086 40,337,556 

Increase per cent. p. c! 222-89 58-23 

Average value per head — 

1911 ? 146-95! 42-22 

1901 $ 74-98 28-75 

Increase, total $ 71-97| 13-47 

Increase per cent. p. c.j 95-98 46-85 



3,930,828 

3,167,774 

763.054 

24-09 



86,278,490 

54, 197.. 341 

32,081,149 

59-19 



21-95 

17-11 

4-84 

28-29 



2,174,300 

2,. 510, 239 

335,9.39 

13-38 



3,6:54,778 

2,353,828 

1,280,950 

.54-42 



10,701,6911 26,986,621 

10,490,5941 16,445,702 

211,097] 10, .540. 919 

2-01 64-49 



4-92' 

4-18 

•74 

17-70 

I 



7-42 

6-99 

•43 

6-15 



31,793,261 

17,922.658 

13.870.603 

77-39 



14,653,773 

5.723.890 

8.929.8.83 

1.56 01 



•46 

•32 

•14 

43 75 



The foregoing table, notwitlistanding the inclusion of young animals of 
relatively low value per head, shows for the Dominion as a whole that from 
1901 to 1911 the average value per head of horses had increased by 95-98 per 
cent, of milch cows by 46-85 per cent, of other horned cattle by 28-29 per cent, 
of sheep by 17-70 per cent, of swhie by 6-15 per cent and of poultry by 43-75 
per cent. The total value of domestic animals, poultry and bees, in 1911, was 
§631,103,420 as compared with $275,167,627 in 1901 being an increase of 129-35 
per cent in the decade. Of the total value of all farm animals, in 1911, horses 
contributed 60-51 per cent, cattle 31-03 per cent, sheep 1-69 per cent, swine 
4-28 i^ier cent and poultr}' 2-32 per cent; in 1901 the proportion was, horses 
42-98 per cent, cattle 44-75 per cent, sheep 3-81 per cent, swine 5-97 per cent 
ar.d poultry 2-08 per cent. For both census years, the ratio of the value of 
bees to the total value was less than one-half of one per cent. 

Horses. 

In 1901, there were 1,577,493 horses in the Dominion, as against 2,598,958 
in 1911, being a gain of 1,021,465 or 64-75 per cent in the decade. Every pro- 
vince, excepting Nova Scotia where there was a decrease of 1,088 animals or 
le.^s than two per cent, participated in this increase. In 19L1 of the total num- 
ber of horses in Canada 48-19 per cent were west of the Great Lakes, 31-25 per 
cent in Ontario, 14-30 per cent in Quebec and 6-26 per cent in the Maritime 
provinces. For the ratio which the number in each province bears to the 
total, see Table 48. It is to be noted, that of the total net gain of 1,021,465 
in the number of horses during the decade, the provinces of Manitoba, Saskat- 
chewan and All)erta provided 854,666 or 83-67 per cent, in Saskatchewan 
15506— E J 



Ixii 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



they increased by 423;667 or 505-56 per cent, in Alberta by 314,492 or 339-40 
per cent, in Manitoba by 116,507 or 71 -10 per cent. iVs was previously stated, 
owing to the change in the date of the taking of the census, the figures for 1911 
as compared with those of 1901, have the advantage of the inclusion of young 
animals, born between April 1 and June 1. The number of horses bj^ provinces 
is given in the following table. 

lABLE 47. NUMBER OF HORSES, ALL AGES, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 


Horses, 


ALL AGES 


Increase (+) obdecrease(— ) 


1911 


1901 


Amount 


Per cent 


Canada 

British Columbia 


NO. 

2,598,958 

57,414 

407,153 

507,468 

280,374 

812,214 

371,571 

65,409 

61,420 

35,935 


NO. 

1,577,493 

37,325 

92,661 

83,801 

163,867 

721,138 

320,673 

61,789 

62,508 

33,731 


NO. 

+1,021,465 

+ 20,080 
+ 314,102 
+ 423,667 
+ 116,507 
+ 91,076 
+ 50,898 
+ 3,620 
- 1 , 088 
+ 2,204 


p. c. 
+ 64 75 

+ 53-82 


Alberta 


+339-40 


Saskatchewan 


+505-56 


Manitoba 


+ 7110 


Ontario 


+ 12-63 


Quebec 


+ 15-87 




+ 5-86 


Nova Scotia 


- 1-74 


Prince Edward Island 


+ 6-53 







Table 48 gives the percentage which the number of horses in each province 
forms of the total number of horses in Canada at the date of March 31, 1901, 
and June 1, 1911, and also the average number of horses per 100 acres of im- 
proved land. The decrease in the average number of horses per 100 acres of 
improved land in Alberta and Saskatchewan is not due to a decrease in the 
actual number of animals (as a matter of fact horses increased by over 300 
per cent from 1901 to 1911 in each of the provinces) but is due (1) to the passing 
of the ranch, (2) to the fact that the yearly increase in land under crops was 
brought about without necessitating a corresponding increase in horses to 
work it and (3) the employment of traction engines for extensive operations. 

TABLE 48. PER CENT DISTRIBUTION OF HORSES, BY PROVINCES, AND AVERAGE 
NUMBER PER 100 ACRES IMPROVED LAND, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 


Per cent of total horses in 

E.\CH province 


Number of horses per 100 

ACRES improved LAND 


1911 


1901 


Increase (+) 
Decrease (— ) 


1911 


1901 


Increase (+) 
Decrease (— ) 


Canada 

Brit it'll Columbia 


p. c. 

100 00 

2-21 

15-07 

19-52 

10-79 

31-25 

14 -.30 

2-52 

2-36 

1-38 


p. c. 

100 00 

2-37 

5-87 

5-31 

10-39 

45-71 

20-33 

3-92 

3-96 

2-14 


p. c. 

- -16 
+ 9-80 
+ 14-21 
+ -40 
-14-46 

- 603 

- 1-40 

- 1-60 

- -76 


NO. 

5 33 

12 02 
9-36 
4-27 
4-16 
5-95 
4-55 
4-53 
488 
4-67 


NO. 

5 23 

7-88 
19-52 
7-46 
410 
5-44 
4-31 
4-38 
4-97 
4-64 


NO. 

+ •!• 

+ 4-14 


Alberta 


- 10-16 

- 3-19 




+ -06 


Ontario 


+ -51 




+ -24 




+ -15 




- -09 




+ 03 







CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Ixiii 



The total value of all horses in 1911 was $381,915, 505, as compared with 
$118,279,419 m 1901 being a gain of $263,636,086, or 222-89 per cent. Although 
Nova Scotia had over 1,000 fewer horses in 1911 than she had in 1901, yet she 
shows an increase in value of $3,256,564, or 84-49 per cent. In Ontario and 
Quebec, the value of horses more than doubled in 10 years. Table 49 gives for 
all Canada, and by provinces, the value of horses in 1911 and 1901 and the 
incrervse made in the decade. 

TABLE id. VALUE OF HORSES BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 


Horses, total value 


Increase (+) or decrease(— ) 


1911 


1901 


Amount 


Per cent 


Canada 

British Columbia 


$ 

381,915,505 

7,833,769 

56,439,741 

88,759,211 

47,189,063 

113,540,859 

48,713,535 

8,087,425 

7,110,946 

4,240,956 


$ 

118,279,419 

2,094,528 

4,609,332 

6,406,665 

15,763,463 

54,926,679 

24,164,149 

4,312,286 

3,854,382 

2,147,935 


$ 

+263,636,086 

+ 5,739,241 
+ 51,830,409 
+ 82,352,546 
+ 31,425,600 
+ 58,614,180 


p. c. 
+ 222-89 

+ 274 01 


Alberta 


+1,124-47 
+1,285-42 


Saskatchewan 


Manitoba 


+ 199-36 


Ontario 


4- infi.71 


Quebec 


+ 24,549,386 + 101-59 


New Brunswick 


+ 3,775,139 + 87-54 




+ 3,256,504 + 84-49 
+ 2,093,021 4- 97-44 


Prince E J ward Island 






. 



Table 50 gives the average value per head of horses (all ages), together 
with the average number kept per farm in 1911 and 1901. In spite of the 
evident enumeration of more foals in the census of 1911 than in the previous 
census, the value per head of horses shov/s increases ranging from 74 per cent 

TABLE 50. AVERAGE VALUE PER HEAD OF HORSES, TOGETHER WITH THE 
AVERAGE NUMBER PER FARM, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



Vall'E of horses per head 



1911 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



146 95 

136-44 
1.38-62 
174-91 
168-31 
1.39-79 
131-10 
123-64 
115-78 
118-02 



1901 



Increase (+) or 
Decrease (— ) 



Amount Per cent 



% 

74 98 

56-12 
49-74 
70-45 
96-20 
76-17 
75-35 
69-79 
61-66 
63-68 



$ 

+71 97 

+80-32 
+88-88 
+98-46 
+72-11 
+63-62 
+55-75 
+ 53-85 
+.54-12 
+54-.34 



Nt.MBER OF HORSES PER FARM 



1911 



p. c. 


NO. 


+ 95 98 


3 6 


+14312 


31 


+178-69 


6-6 


+126-79 


5-2 


+ 74-95 


6-1 


+ 83-52 


3-5 


+ 74-00 


2-3 


+ 77-16 


1-7 


+ 87-77 


11 


+ 85-35 


2-5 



1901 



NO. 

2 9 

5-5 
9-8 
6-2 
5-0 
3-2 
2-1 
1-6 
11 
2-4 



Increase (+) 

or 
Decrease (— ) 



+ 9 7 

- 2-4 

- 3-2 

- 10 
+ M 
+ 0-3 
+ 0-2 
+ 0-1 

0-0 
+ 0-1 



IXIT 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



in Quebec to 178-69 per cent in Alberta, or an average increase for all Canada 
of 95-98 per cent. For all Canada, the average value per head of horses, all 
ages, in 1911, was $146.95, as against $74.98 in 1901, being an increase of 
$71.97. In British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan the average value has 
more than doubled during the decade. In 1901, the highest average value 
($96.20) was given by Manitoba and the lowest average value ($49.74) by 
Alberta. In 1911 the highest average value ($174.91) was provided by 
Saskatchewan and the lowest ($115.78) by Nova Scotia. 

The average number of horses per farm increased from 2-9 in 1901 to 3 • 6 
in 1911. In other words, in the la.st census, every 100 farms possessed 360 
horses as compared with 290 horses in the previous one. British Columbia, 
Alberta and Saskatchewan show decreases during the decade, in the average 
number of horses kept per farm. Nova Scotia is the only province in which 
the average number per farm remains level for the two censuses. 

Cattle. 

The statistics of farm cattle are presented under two main heads (1) milch 
cows and (2) other horned cattle — the former, as the name implies, includes milk 
producers onl}', while the latter includes bulls, oxen and young cattle generally. 
The total number of cattle was 6,520,083 in 1911, 5,576,451 in 1901, and 4,120,- 
586 in 1891. 

Milch Cows. In the census of 1891, milch cows were 45-06 per cent of 
the total number of all cattle, 43-19 per cent in 1901 and 39-76 per cent in 1911. 
In Ontario, milch cows were 45-15 per cent of all cattle in 1891, 42-84 per cent 
in 1901 and 41-29 per cent in 1911. In Quebec, for the censuses of 1891, 1901 
and 1911, milch cows were more than one-half of all cattle, being 56-69 per cent, 
56-22 per cent and 51-89 per cent respectively. In the Maritime provinces, the 
falling off in the ratio of milch cows has been smaller than elsewhere in Canada, 
being less than one per cent in each decade; in 1891 thej^ were 47-37 per cent of 
all cattle, 46-68 per cent in 1901 and 46-52 per cent in 1911. In the western 
I)rovinces the proportion has been on the increase, milch cows were 23 - 27 per 
cent in 1891 of all cattle, 25-19 per cent in 1901, and 26-59 per cent in 1911. 
The number of milch cows in the Dominion by provinces in 1901 and 1911 is given 
in Table 51, together with the increases and decreases made in the decade. 
Further statistics will be found in Tables 52, 53, and 54. 

TABLE 51. NUMBER OF MILCH COWS, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



Milch cows 



1911 



1901 



lNCRfe.\SE (4-) OR 

Decrease (— ) 



Amount 



Per cent 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



NO, 

2,595,255 

P.3,9.'>4 
147,649 
181,108 
l,l.j,328 
l,0:{2.i)06 
7.')4,220 
108,.-K)7 
129,274 
52,109 



NO. 

2,408,677 

24,535 

46,101 

.')6,034 

141,481 

1,00.0.763 

767,825 

111,084 

138,817 

56.437 



NO. 

+ 186,578 



p. c. 
+ 7-75 



9,419 


+ .38-39 


101,548 


+220-27 


124,. 534 


+219-89 


13,847 


+ 9-78 


.32,767 


- 3 07 


13,605 


- 1-77 


2,. 527 


— 2-27 


9.543 


- 687 


4.328 


- 7-66 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Ixv 



From the foregoing table it will be seen that there was a gain of 249,348 
in the number of milch cows from 1901 to 1911 in the western provinces and a 
decrease of 62,770 in Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime provinces, with a net 
iiicrease for the whole Dominion of 186,578 or 7-75 per cent. The largest 
absolute increase, in the decade, was nrade by Saskatchewan with 124,534 
followed by Alberta with 101,548. For each of these provinces the ratio of 
ijicr?asc in 1911 over 1901 was about 220 per cent. Milch cows in Ontario de- 
creased bj' 32,767 or 3-07 per cent during the decade. The decrease in Ontario 
constituted more than 52 per cent of the total falling off in the eastern provinces 
during the decade. Que])ec decreased its milch cows by 13,605 or 1-77 per 
cent, New Brunswick by 2,527 or 2-27 per cent. Nova Scotia by 9.543 or 6-87 
per cent and Prince Edward Island b}' 4,328 or 7-66 per cent during the last 
decade. 

The value of milch cows is presented for Canada as a whole and for each 
of the provinces in Table 52. In 1911 the value was $109,575,526 as compared 
with $69,237,970 in 1901, ])eing an increase of $40,337,556 or 58-26 per cent. 
Not^vithstanding a shortage of 63,170 in the number of milch cows in Ontario, 
Quebec and the Maritime provinces during the decade, the gross value showed 
a betterment of $27,275,759. In the western proviiices gains in numbers 
contributed to the increase in value sho\vii, for 1911 over 1901. 

TABLE 5'i. VALUE OF MII-CH COWS BY PROVINCES, 1911 and 1901. 



Provinces 



(anuda 

British Coluiiil>i:i 

Alborta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



1911 



$ 

109,575,526 



002,491 

368,r)46 

83,5,820 

246,p0.3 

708,, --wo 

377, S 10 

292,165 

199,92 

543,309 



1901 



Increase (+) or 
decrease ( — ) 



Amount 



69,237,970 



1,000, 
1,7.34, 
1,841, 
4,754, 
.32,, 5.36, 
20,7.57, 
2,317, 
2,990, 
1,244, 



Per cent 



+40, 337,556 

941,884 
633.604; 
994,380j 
491,929 
172,458 
620,199 
975,116 
,208,968 
299,018 



+ 

+ 4 
-r 5 
+ 1 
+ 10 
+ 8 
+ 



9-59 + 1 
291 + 



p. c. 

+ .?8 2G 

+ 88-80 
+267-08 
+325-52 
+ 31-37 
+ 49-76 
.+ 41,, 52 
+ 42-08 
+ 40-42 
+ 24-03 



Talkie 53 gives the average value per head of milch cows in 1901 and 1911- 
In order to show the average wealth of each farm, based on the numljer of cows 
kept, the average number per farm is also given. In 1911, for all Canada, the 
average value per cow was $42.22 as compared with $28.75 in 1901, being again 
of $13.47 per animal or 46-85 per cent. In Ontario there was a gain in average 
value per head of 54-49 per cent, in Nova Scotia of' 50 -76 per cent, in New 
Brunswick of 45-39 per cent and in Quebec of 4 1-09 per cent. The province 
of Alberta has the smallest percentage of increase with 14-61 per cent, followed 
by ^ilanitoba with 19-60 per cent. The higliCsL priced milch cows, in the last 



Lxvi 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



census, were reported for British Columbia ($58.98) and the lowest priced in 
Prince Edward Island ($29 . 62) . Every province shows a decrease in the number 
of milch cows possessed by each farm holding. This decrease per farm, in 
eastern Canada, is due to a decrease in numbers of animals, whereas in the 
western provinces it is due to the fact that homesteading, whether by purchase 
or otherwise, had progressed so rapidly, during the decade, as to preclude the 
pos£,ibility of providing an adequate number of animals per farm. 

TABLE 53. AVERAGE VALUE PER HEAD OF MILCH COWS, TOGETHER WITH THE 
. AVERAGE NUMBER PER FARM, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 





Value milch cows per head 


Number 


MILCH COWS PER FARM 


Provinces 


1911 


1901 


Increase (+) or 
Decrease (— ) 


1911 


1901 


Increase ( + ) 
or 




Amount 


Per cent 


Decrease (— ) 


Canada 


$ 

42 22 

58-98 
43-13 
43-25 
40-22 
47-15 
38-95 
30-33 
32-49 
29-62 


28-75 

43-23 
37-63 
32-53 
33-61 
30-52 
27-03 
20-86 
21-55 
22-05 


S 

+13 47 

+ 15-75 
+ 5-50 
+ 10-72 
+ 6-61 
+ 16-63 
+ 11-92 
+ 9-47 
+ 10-94 
+ 7-57 


p. c. 

+46-85 

+36-43 
+ 14-61 
+32-95 
+ 19-66 
+54-49 
+44-09 
+45-39 
+50-76 
+34-33 


NO. 

3 6 

1-8 
2-4 
1-9 
3-4 
4-5 
4-7 
2-8 
2-4 
3-6 


NO. 

4 4 

3-6 
4-9 
4-2 
4-4 
4-8 
5-1 
3-0 
2-5 
4-1 


NO. 

- 8 

- 1-8 




- 2-5 




- 2-3 




- 10 




- 0-3 




- 0-4 


New Brunswick 


- 0-2 




- 0-1 


Prince Edward Island 


- 0-5 



The per cent distribution of milch cows and average number per 100 acres 
of improved land in 1901 and 1911 is shown in Table 54. In 1901, Ontario 

TABLE 54. PER CENT DISTRIBUTION OF MILCH COWS AND AVERAGE NUMBER 
PER 100 ACRES IMPROVED LAND, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



Per cent of total milch cows 

IN EACH province 



1911 



1901 



Increase (+) 
Decrease (— ) 



Number milch cows per 100 acres 

IMPROVED land 



1911 



1901 



I Increase (+) 
Decrease (— ) 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



p. c. 

100 00 

1-31 
5-69 
6-98 
5-99 
39-80 
29 06 
4-18 
4-98 
2-01 



p. c. 

100 00 

103 
1-91 
2-35 
5-87 
44-25 
31-88 
4-01 
5-76 
2-34 



+ -28 

+ 3-78 

+ 4-63 

+ -12 

- 4-45 

- 2-82 

- -43 

- -78 

- -33 



no. 

5 33 

7-11 
3-39 
1-53 
2-30 
7-52 
9-24 
7-51 
10-28 
6-77 



7 98 

518 
9-71 
5 04 
3-54 
8-03 

10-32 
7-8S 

11-04 
7-77 



- 2 65 

+ 1-93 

- 6-.32 

- 3-51 

- 1-24 

- -51 

- 108 

- -37 

- -76 

- 1-00 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Ixvii 



put^sessed 44-25 per cent of all milch cows in Canada. In 1911, although her 
ratio had declined to 39-80 per cent, she still retained first place; for both census 
3'cars Quebec occupied second place with a ratio of 31-88 per cent in 1901 and 
29-06 per cent in 1911. In 1901, onlj^ 6-16 per cent of the milch cows of the 
Dominion were west of the Great Lakes, in 1911 the proportion had increased 
to 19 -97 per cent. 

The number of milch cows per 100 acres of improved land in Canada had 
fallen from 7-98 in 1901 to 5-33 in 1911. In the eastern provinces this decline 
has been due to the decrease in the actual number of milch cows, while in the 
Avcst it is due, not to a decrease in numbers, but to other factors, which have 
been already stated. 

Oxen, Young Cattle, etc. In the text to Tables 55, 56, 57, 58 and else- 
v.here the term ''other horned cattle" will signify all cattle, except milch cows. 

The number of ''other horned cattle" in Canada in 1911 was 3,930,828, 
as compared with 3,167,774 in 1901, being an increase of 763,054, or 24-09 per 
cent. All the provinces, excepting Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, contributed 
to this betterment. Nova Scotia showed a decrease of 19,139 or 10 • 79 per cent and 
New Brunswick 2,441 or 2-10 per cent in ten years. In eastern Canada the 
greatest increase was registered for Quebec, and in the western provinces, for 
Alberta. Table 55 gives the numbers at each census period by provinces to- 
gether, with the amount and ratio of variation. 



TABLE 55. 



NUMBER OF HORNED CATTLE, OTHER THAN MILCH COWS, BY 
PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



Other horned 

CATTLE. 



1911 
June 1 



1901 
March 31 



IXCREASE (+) OR 
DECREASE ( — ) 



Amount 



Per cent 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saiikatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



3,9.30,828 

10.5,230 
592,076 
452,470 
280,240 
1,468,540 
099,049 
113,071 
158,218 
61,334 



3,167,774 

100,467 
276,859 
212,145 
208,405 
1,422,043 
598,044 
116,112 
177,357 
56,342 



+763,054 

+ 4,763 
+315,217 
+240,-325 
+ 71,8.35 
+ 46,497 
+ 101,005 

- 2,441 

- 19,139 
+ 4,992 



p. c. 

+ 24 09 

+ 4-74 
+ 113-85 
+113-28 
+ 34-47 
+ 3-27 
+ 16-89 

- 2-10 

- 10-79 
+ 8-86 



The total value of "other horned cattle" in 1911 and 1901 is shown ia 
Table 56. For Canada, as a whole, the value of this cla.s.s of cattle iiicreased from 
$54,197,341 in 1901 to S86,278,490 in 1911, which is an increase in the decade of 
.$32,081,149 or 59-19 per cent. The greatest absolute increase as well as the 
greate.st percentage of increase in value is crcdit»od to the province of Sask- 
katcliewan, Ontario comes second in the amount of increase and Alberta third, 
■"i'hc advance in the price of "other horned cattle" during the decade, cannot 
perhaps be better illustrated than by a reference to the figures of their numbers 



Ixviii 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



and values in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, where in spite of an actual 
decrease in numbers, there were large increases in aggregate values for 1901 
over 1911. 

TABLE 56. VALUE OF HORNED CATTLE, OTHER THAN MILCH COWS, BY PROV- 
INCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



1911 



1901 



Increa.se (+) OK 
Decre.\se (— ) 



Amount 



Per cent 



Canada. 



British Co!uinl)ia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Islantl. 



86,278,490 

3,009,894 

16,302,340 

13,997,475 

6.311,318 

32,776,254 

8,725,031 

1,391,675 

3,036,444 

728,059 



54,197,341 

2,391,426 
8,730,895 
3,699,187 
3,944,406 
24,641,545 
6,629,784 
1,170,327 
2,390,865 
598,906 



+32,081,149 

+ 018,468 
4- 7,571,445 
+ 10,298.288 
+ 2,366,912 
+ 8,134,709 
+ 2, OX). 247 
+ 221,348 
+ 045,579 
+ 129, 153 



p. c. 
+ 5S19 

+ 25-80 
+ 80-72 
+278-39 
+ 00-01 
+ 33 01 
+ 31-60 
+ 18-91 
+ 2700 
+ 21-56 



Tlie average value per head of all cattle, exclusive of milch cows, for Canada 
as a whole, was $21-95 in 1911, as compared Avith S17-11 in 1901, being again 
per head of S4-84 or 28 -29 per cent. In comparing the average values per head 
and average numbers per farm, either with one another or with current market 
prices obtaining at March 31, 1901, and June 1, 1911, consideration must be 
given to the fact that a greater number of calves are included in the last census 
than there were in the previous and that therefore a strict comparison is not 
possible. Notwithstanding this evident inclusion of young animals, ever3' 
province, except Alberta, shows a marked increase in the price per head quoted 
on the farm. For causes already stated, the western provinces show decreases 
in the number of ''other horned cattle" per farm. Ontario, Quebec and Prince 
Edward Island show increases. In Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, although 
both the aggregate number and the average number per farm are smaller in 1911 
than in 1901, j-et the total value is greater in the last census tlian in the previous 
one. Table 57 gives the average value per head of horned cattle, other than 
milch cows, together with the average number per fnnii hi 1911 and 1901. 

TABLE 57. AVERAGE VALUE PER HEAD OF HORNED CATTLE, OTHER THAN 
MILCH COWS, TOGETHER WITH THE AVERAGE NUMBER PER FARM, 1911 AND 
1901. 





V.\LUE "other horned f.VTTLE' 


PER HEAD 


Number "other horned 
caitle" per farm 


Provinces 


1911 


1901 


Increase (+) or 
Decrease (— ) 


1911 


1901 


Increase (+) or 
Decrease (— ) 




Amount 


Ratio 


Canada 


$ 

21 95 

28-60 
27 ,53 
30 04 
22 -.52 
2'^ • 32 
12-48 
12-24 
19 19 
11-87 


$ 

17 11 

23-80 
31-54 
17-44 
18-93 
17 -.33 
11-09 
10 08 
13-48 
10 03 


S 

+ 4-84 

+ 4-80 
- 4-01 
+ 1.3-.50 
+ 3-59 
+ 4-99 
+ 1-39 
+ 2-16 
+ 5-71 
+ 1-24 


p. c. 
+28-29 

+20- 17 
-12-71 
+77-41 
+ 18-96 
+28-79 
+ 12-53 
+21-43 
+42-30 
+ 11-07 


NO. 

5 5 

5-7 
9-6 
4-7 
61 
6-5 
4-4 
30 
3-0 
4-3 


NO. 

5-8 

14-9 
29-2 
15-6 
6-4 
6-3 
40 
3-1 
3-2 
4-0 


NO. 

- 3 

— 9-2 


Alberta 


-19-6 




— 10-9 


Manitoba 


- 0-3 




+ 0-2 




+ 0-4 


New Brun.swick 


- 0-1 




- 0-2 


Prince Edward Island 


+ 0-3 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Ixix 



Table 58 gives the per cent proportion which the number of "other horned 
cattle" in each province constituted of the total for all Canada. From 1901 to 
1911 the proportion of the total number in the Dominion, possessed by Ontario 
fell from 44-89 per cent to 37-36 per cent, by Quebec from 18-88 per cent to 
17-78 per cent, by the Maritime provhices from 11-05 per cent to 8-48 per 
cent, by British Columbia from 3-17 per cent to 2-68 per cent; during the same 
period the proportion possessed by the prairie provinces increased from 21 -i)? 
per cent to 33-70 per cent. The number of animals per 100 acres of improved 
land, for Canada as a whole, fell from 10-50 in 1901 to 8-07 in 1911. Ontario, 
Quebec, Prince Edward Island and British Columbia re])orted an increase in the 
number kept per 100 acres of improved land during the decade and the other 
provinces a lesser number. 

TABLE 58. PER CENT DISTRIBUTION OF HORNED CATTLE, OTHER THAN MILCH 

COW.=^, AND THE AVERAGE NUMBER PER 100 ACRES OF IMPROVED LAND, BY 

PROVINCES 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



Canada 

British Columbia 

AUierta 

Saskatohowan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quobof 

New Brunswick 

Nova Srotia 

Prince Edward Island 



Per cent of total "other 

HORNED cattle" IN 
EACH PROVINCE 



Number "other horned 

cattle" per 100 acres 

of improved land 





In- 






In- 


1911 


1901 ,"easc(+) 
! or De- 


1911 


1901 crease ( + ) 
or De- 




crease ( — ) 




crease (— ) 


p.c. 


p.c. p.c. 


no. 


no. 


NO. 


199 00 


10000: 


8 07 


19 50, 


- 2 43 


2-68 


1 
317! - -49 


22-03 


21-21 


+ -82 


1.5 06 


8-73 


-^-6•33 


13-61 


58-32' 


-44-71 


11 51 


6-70 


+4-81 


3-81 


18-90! 


-15 09 


7-13 


6o8 


+ -.i.i 


4- 1.5 


5-22| 


- 107 


37-36 


44-89 


—7-53 


10-76 


10-721 


+ -04 


17-78 


18-88 


-1-10 


8 -.56 


804! 


+ -.52 


2-89 


3-67 


- -78 


7-87 


8-24i 


— ■•)! 


403 


.5-60 -1-57 


12 -.58 


1410 


- 1-.52 


1 ■ .')() 


1-78 


- -22 


7-97 


7-76 


+ -21 



Sheep. 

According to TaVjle 59 there wer<^ increases in the number of sheep froml901 
to 1911 in all the western provinces and decreases in all the eastern provinces. 
The increases aggregated 108,436 and the decreases 444,375 with a net decrease 
for Canada of 335,939 or 13-38 per cent. In Ontario alone, there was an actual 
decrease' of 304,268, Avhich was more than 90 per cent of the net decrease or 68 • 5 
per C(;nt of the gross decrease. The falling off in the Maritime provinces amount- 
ed to 122, 092. The smallest proportion of decrease (2-66 per cent) was given 
by Quebec and the largest by Ontario (29-08 per cent). The Inggest gain was 
rf cor<led for Saskatchewan (72-93 per cent) followed by Alberta (53-37 per cent), 
jNIanitoba (26-67 per cent), and British Columbia (17-76 per cent). It is pro- 
bable, owing to the fact that almost the whole increment in flocks, from young 
iambs, was at its maximum in June, that the falling off in the number of sheep is 
more serious than the figures of the table show. This heavy decrease was not 
because of lack of demand for mutton and lamb, a.s in recent years the imports 
of this commodity have exceeded five million pounds annually. 



Ixx CENSUSOFCANADA1911 

TABLE 59. NUMBER OF SHEEP, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND l&Ol. 



Provinces 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



Sheep 



1911 
June 1 



2,174,300 

39,272 
133,592 
114,216 

37,322 
742,188 
637,088 
158,316 
221,074 

91,232 



1901 
March 31 



Increase (+) or Decrease (— ) 



Amount 



I 

t 

2,510,239 

33,350 

87,104 

66,048 

29,464 

1,046,456 

654,503 

182,524 

285,244 

125,546 



-335,939 

+ 5,922 

+ 46,488 

+ 48, 168 

+ 7,858 
-304,268 

- 17,415 

- 24,208 

- 64,170 

- 34,314 



Per cent 



p.c. 



-13 38 

+17-76 
.+53-37 
+72-93 
+26-67 
-29-08 
- 2-66 
-13-26 
-22-50 
-27-33 



Table 60 gives the total value of sheep by provinces in 1901 and 1911 and 
Table 61 the average value per head together wth the average number per 
farm in the two census years. It will be seen, notwithstanding the heavy 
decrease in numbers, that the value of the animals on foot was greater for 
the last census than for the previous one. Had there been no decrease in numbers, 
the increase in value computed on prices obtained in the census year would 
have been nearly ten times the figure given in the table. The decrease in sheep 
caused a shrinkage of agricultural capital in Ontario of $1,090,838, in Prince 
Edward Island of $16,754 and in New Brunswick, of $5,524. 



TABLE 60. VALUE OF SHEEP, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 







Increase (+) or Decrease (— ) 




1901 








Amount 


Per cent. 


i 


$ 


S 


p.c. 


10,701,691 


10,490,591 


+ 211,097 


+ 2 01 


263,097 


164,679 


+ 98,418 


+ 59-76 


758,154 


333,210 


+ 424,944 


+127-53 


621,409 


273,063 


+ 348,346 


+ 127-57 


224,214 


144,018 


+ 80,196 


+ 55-68 


4,427,565 


5,518,403 


- 1,090,838 


- 19-77 


2,710,285 


2,376,471 


+ 333,814 


+ 14-05 


533.158 


538,682 


- 5,524 


- 1-03 


795.773 


757,278 


+ 38,495 


+ 5-08 


368,036 


384,790 


- 16,754 


- 4-35 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island . 



The average value per head of sheep, lambs included, for the Dominion, 
June 1, 1911, was $4.92 as compared with $4.18 March 31, 1901, when very few 
lambs could have been included. For both censuses, the lowest prices were 
recorded for Quebec and the Maritime provinces. In 1901 the highest average 
price per head ($5.27) and the lowest ($2.65) were obtained in Ontario and 
Nova Scotia. In 1911 British Columbia gave the highest average value ($6 .70) 
and Nova Scotia the lowest ($3.37). In the western provinces, the increase in 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



L\xi 



the valuation of sheep on the farm, during the decade, ranged from $1.12 in 
Manitoba to SI. 85 in Alberta. In eastern Canada the increase ranged from 
42 cents in New Brunswick to 97 cents in Prince Edward Island. 

The average number of sheep per farm in 1911, is in every province less 
than in 1901. The diminution in the western provinces of the number per farm 
is not -iue to decrease in animals, but to the extraordinary expansion in agri- 
culture between 1901 and 1911, the new farms confining themselves almost 
wholly to grain growing as yielding the largest quick return on investment — 
a matter of vital importance to new farmers of limited capital. 

TABLE 61. AVERAGE VALHE PER HEAD OF SHEEP, TOGETHER WITH THE 
AVERAGE NUMBER PER FARM, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



Value of Sheep per Head 



1911 



j Increase (+) or 
1901 Decrease (-) 



Amount I Per cent 



Number of Sheep per Farm 



1911 



1901 



Increase (-y 

or 
Decrease (— ) 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario ? 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island. 



4 92 

6.7o' 
5.68! 
5.44' 
6.011 
5.971 
4.25' 
3.37 
3.60 
4-03 



$ 


$ 


4 18 


74 


4.94 


1.76 


3.83 


1.85 


4,13 


1.31 


4.89 


1.12 


5.27 


0.70 


3.63 


0.62 


2.95 


0.42 


2.65 


0.95 


306 


0-97 



p.c. 

17 70 

35-63 
48-30 
31-72 
22-90 
13-28 
17.08 
14-24 
.35-85 
31-70 



NO. 

3 

2-1 
2-2 
1-2 
0-8 
3.3 
40 
41 
41 
6-3 



4 6 

5-0 
9-2 
4-9 
0-9 



9-0 



-16 

-2-9 
-7-0 
-3-7 
-0-1 
-1-4 
-0-4 
-0-8 
-10 
-2-7 



The proportion of the total number of sheep in Canada possessed by each 
province in 1901 and 1911 is given in Table 62. In both census years Ontario 
obtained the highest proportion with 41-69 per cent in the former and 34-13 
per cent in the latter. Quebec possessed 29 • 30 per cent of all sheep in the country 
in 1911, the Maritime provinces 21-65 per cent, leaving less than 15 per cent 
for the Avestern provinces. Although the capacity of Canada to produce more 
sheep in 1911 than in 1901 had greatly increased, yet the number of sheep kept 
on every 100 acres of improved land had fallen from 8-32 to 4-46. 

TABLE 6'?. PER CENT DISTRIBUTION OF SHEEP AND THE AVERAGE NUMBER 

PER 100 ACRES OF IMPROVED LAND, BY PROVINCES, 

1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 


Per cent of total sheep in 
each province 


Number of sheep per 100 
acres of improved land 


1911 


1 Increase (+) 
1901 1 or 

'Decrease (— ) 


1911 


1901 


Increase (+) 

or 
Decrease ( — ) 


Canada 

British Columbia 


p.c. 

100 00 

1-81 
614 
5-25 

1-72 
34-13 
29 -.30 

7-28 
1017 

4-20 


p.c. 1 p.c. 

100 00 

1:33 + -48 

3-47' + 2-67 

2-63 + 2-62 

M8 + -54 

41-69 - 7-.56 

20-07 + 3-23 

7-271 + 01 

11-36 . - 119 

500; - -80 


NO. 

4 46 

8-22 

.^-07 

-90 

■55 

5-44 

7-81 

10-96 

17-58 

11-86 


NO. 

8 32 

7-04 
18-35 


NO. 

- 3 86 

+ 1-18 


Alberta 


-15-28 




5-88 - 4-92 




-74! - -19 




7-89 - 2-45 




880 - -99 




12-95, - 1-99 




22-68: - 5-10 


Prince Edward Island 


17-29 - 5-43 



Ixxii 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Swine. 

The popularity of the hog is evidenced by the general increase recorded 
during the decade in numbers for every province, excepting British Columbia 
where there was a decrease of 7,815 or 18-87 per cent. The greatest numerical 
increpses for 1911 over 1901 were shown by Quebec with 390,188 and by Ontario 
with 324,755, while the highest percentages of increase were given by Saskatche- 
wan with 928 • 10 per cent followed by Alberta with 415 • 55 per cent. The follow- 
ing table gives the number of swine in Canada by provinces in 1911 and 1901. 
TABLE 68. NUMBER OF SWINE IN CANADA, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provincf^s 


Swine 


Increase (-|-) or 
Decre.^se ( — ) 


1911 
June 1 


1901 
March 31 


Amount 


Per cent 




NO. 

3,634,778 

33,604- 

237,511 

286,295 

188,416 

1,887,451 

794,351 

87,. 393 

63,-380 

56.377 


NO. 

2,-353,828 

41,419 
46,069 
27,847 

126,459 
1,. 562, 696 

404, 163 
51,763 
45,405 
48.007 


no. 

-1-1,280,950 

7,815 
-1- 191,442 
+ 258,448 
+ 61.957 
-h 324.7.55 
+ 390,188 
+ 35,630 
+ 17,975 
+ 8,370 


p. c. 
-(- 54 42 




- 18-87 




-i-415-55 




+928 10 




-1- 48, 9§ 




+ 20-78 




-!- 96-54 




-1- 68-83 




+ 39-58 




+ 17-43 







The total value of swine, in Canada, increased from -$16,445,702 in 1901 to 
^26,986,621 in 1911, being a gain of $10,540,919 or 64-09 per cent in the decade. 
In Ontario, the gain was $3,002,071 or 28-39 per cent, in Quebec $2,256,608 or 
71-80 per cent, in Saskatchewan $2,328,733 or 1,266-94 per cent, in Alberta 
$1,739,869 or 680-83 per cent. Prince Edward Island gave a decrease in aggre- 
gate value of $13,838 or 3-89 per cent during the decade. In Table 64 the total 
value of swine on farms by provinces in 1911 and 1901 is given. 
TABLE 64. VALUE OF SWINE, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



X rovinccs 




Increase (-|-) or 
Decrease ( — ) 



Amount 



Per cent 



Canada. 



British Columbia. 
Alborta. 



Saskutohewaii ' 2 



Manitoba. 
Ontii 



1 
13 

Quoljoc ' 5 

Now Brun.s\vi(-k 

Nova Scotia 

I'rincc Edward Island , 



361,985 
995,421 
512,540 
604,277 
577.817 
-399.5-33 
l).54,704 
,538,809 
341,-535 



■> ' p. c. 

16,415,702 I -1-10.540,919 , + 64 OS 



271, 
2-55, 
183, 
871, 
10.575, 
3,142, 
401, 
.387, 
355, 



327 
552 
807 
627 
746 
925 
905 
380 
373 



90,6-58 

1.7-39.809 

2,32S,733 

732.6.50 

3,002,071 

2,256,608 

2.52,739 

151,429 

13,838 



+ 
+ 
+ 1, 

+ 
+ 
-f 
-I- 
+ 



33-41 

680-83 

266-94 

84-06 

28 ?9 

71-80 

62-88 

39-09 

3-89 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 * Ixxiii 

According to Table 65, the average value per head of swine and the average 
number per farm for all Canada, have but slightly increased from 1901 to 1911, 
but as previously stated the changing of the date of taking the census from 
March 31, to June 1, has, to a certain extent detracted from the comparability 
of the statistics of live stock for the two censuses. 

According to the Trade and Navigation Returns, the oxpoi-t price per head 
of Vwe hogs in 1901 was S8.79 and in 1911 it was $14.84, being an increase 
of S().05 or 68-8 per cent over the figures of the previous census year. These 
traiie figures, apparently, show two things, (1) that the values recorded by 
the enumerators are rather under, than over the actual prices and (2) that the 
percentage of increase in value per head was more than ton times greater than 
that recorded in the census tables. It is therefore safe to assume that the 
decreases shown in average prices from 1901 to 1911 in Quebec and the Mari- 
time provinces are due to the smaller number of mature hogs kept over from one 
season to another and to the enumeration of spring litters in the last census. 
The same causes have tended to keep down the average price per head, in the 
other provinces. 

TABLE 65. AVERAGE VALUE PER HEAD OF SWINE, TOGETHER V/ITH THE AVER- 
AGE NUMBER PER FARM, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 





V.\LUE OF Swine per 


HEAD 


Number of Swine per f.\rm 


Provinces 


1911 


1901 


IncRE.\SE ( + ) OR 

Decre.^se (— ) 


1911 


1901 


Increa.se (+) 

or 
Decrease (— ) 


Amount 


Per cent 


Canada 


7 42 

10-77 
8-40 
8-78 
8-51 
719 
6-80 
7-49 
8 -.50 
606 


$ 

6 99 

6-55 
5-55 
0-60 
6-89 
6-77 
7-78 
7-77 
8-53 
7-40 


+ 43 

+4-22 
+2-85 
+2-18- 
+ 1-62 
+ -42 

- -98 

- -28 

- -03 
-1-34 


p. c. 

+ 6 15 

+64-43 
+51-.35 
+33 03 
+23-51 
+ 6-20 
-12-. 59 

- 3-60 

- -.35 
-18-10 


NO. 

5 1 

1-8 
3-9 
3-0 
4-1 
8-3 
50 
2-3 
1-2 
3-9 


NO. 

4 3 

6-2 
4-9 
2-1 
3-9 
7-0 
2-7 
1-4 
0-8 
3-4 


NO. 

+ 0-8 

- 4-4 


Albfrta 


- 10 


Saskatchewan 


+ 0-9 




+ 0-2 


Ontario 


+ 1-3 


Quebec' 


+ 2-3 


New Brun.swick 


+ 0-9 
+ 0-4 


Prince Edward Island 


+ 0-5 







In 1901 Ontario took first rank among tlie provinces in the matter of hog 
raising, having produced 66-39 per cent of all hogs in Canada. In 1911 it still 
retained its lead but with a ratio fallen to 51 -93 per cent of the total production. 
Quebec and New Brunswick alone of the eastern provinces improved their 
per cent ratios from 1901 to 1911, and Alberta and Saskatchewan of the western 
provinces. Table 66 gives the per cent (listril)ution of swine and the average 
number per 100 a^res of improved land for the Fourth and Fifth Censuses of 
Canada. 



Ixxiv 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



T\BLE «« PER CENT DISTRIBUTION OF SWINE AND THE AVERAGE NUMBER 
PER 100 ACRES OF IMPROVED LAND, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 





Per cent of total Swine 
in each province 


Number of Swine per 100 

ACRES OF improved LAND 


Provinces 


1911 


1901 


Increase (+) 
Decrease ( — ) 


1911 


1901 


Increase (+) 
Decrease ( — ) 




p. c. 

100 00 

■93 
6-53 
7-88 
5-18 
51-93 
21-85 
2-41 
1-74 
1-55 


p. c. 

100 00 

1-76 
1-96 
1-18 
5-37 
66-39 
17-17 
2-20 
1-93 
204 


p. c. 

- -83 
+ 4-57 
+ 6-70 

- -19 
-14-46 
+ 4-08 
+ -21 

- -19 

- -49 


NO. 

7 46 

7-04 
5-46 
2-41 
2-79 
13-82 
9-73 
605 
5-04 


NO. 

7 80 

8-74 
9-70 
2-48 
3-17 
11-78 
5-43 
3-67 
3-61 


NO. 

- 34 




-1-70 




-4-14 




- -07 




- -38 




+2-04 




+4-30 




+2-38 




+1-43 




7-33 6-61 


+ -72 







Poultry. 

The statistics of poultry are given in Tables 67, 68, 69, 70 and 71 b}^ provinces 
for 1901 and 1911, together with total and per cent increases. 

Table 67 gives the total number of poultry by provinces in 1911 and 1901. 
In 1901, Ontario possessed 58-38 per cent of all poultry in the Dominion as 
against 44-19 per cent in 1911. The greatest numerical gains were made by 
Ontario (4,024,429), Saskatchewan (3,096,059), Alberta (2,201,318) and Quebec 
(1,878,151), while the greatest percentage of increase is given by Saskatchewan 
(1,041-24 per cent). Alberta (874-24 per cent), British Columbia (178-56 per 
cent), Manitoba (121-42 per cent), Quebec (57-20 per cent); in each of the 
other provinces the increase made in the decade was less than 40 per cent. 

The number of all poultry rose from 17,922,658 with a total value of 
$5,723,890 to 31,793,261 with a total value of $14,653,773. There was, therefore, 
a gain from 1901 to 1911 in numbers of 13,870,603 or 77-39 per cent and in value 
of $8,929,883 or 156 per cent. Attention is again called to the fact that the 
change in the date of taking the census has, to some extent, militated against 
the comparability of the figures of 1901 and 1911. 

TABLE 67. NUMBER OF POULTRY, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901.. 



Provinces 



Poultry 



1911 
(June 1) 



1901 
(March 31) 



Increase (+) or 
decrease ( — ) 



Amount 



Per cent 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



NO. 

31,7»3,2«1 

1,012,220 

2,453,117 

3,. 393. 403 

2,585,903 

14,488,980 

5,101,794 

982.251 

9.54,251 

760,939 



NO. 

17,922,658 

363,379 

251 , 799 

297.344 

1.167,876 

10,464,551 

3.283,643 

714,131 

798.145 

.581.790 



NO. 

+ 13,870,603 

+ 648,841 
+ 2,201,318 
+ 3,096,059 
+ 1,418.027 
+ 4.024,429 
+ 1,878.151 
+ 26S.523 
+ 1.56.106 
+ 179,149 



p. c. 
+ 77 39 



+ 

+ 

+ 1 

+ 

+ 

+ 

+ 

+ 

+ 



178-56 

874-24 

,041 24 

121-42 

38-46 

57-20 

37-60 

19-56 

30-79 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Ixxv 



The census records of March 31, 1901, show that the totals of poultry for 
that census comprised 584,569 turkeys, 395,997 geese, 290,755 ducks 
and 16,651,337 hens and chickens. In the Census of June 1, 1911, turkeys 
numbered 863,182, geese 629,524, ducks 527,098, hens and chickens 29,773,457. 
Although the increases in numbers shown for 1911 are, no doubt to an apprec- 
iable extent, affected by spring hatchings, yet, that there has been a steady 
advancement made in poultr}' raising is sho"\ATi by the fact that the quantity 
of eggs produced has increased from 84,132,802 dozens in 1901 to 123,071,034 
dozens in 1911, being an increase of 38,938,232 dozens or 46 per cent in ten years. 

In Table 68 the number of poultry, according to specified kinds, is given by 
provinces for 1901 and 1911. Turkeys show a decrease in all, the Maritime pro- 
vinces, geese in Nova Scotia, and ducks in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. 
The increase in the numbers of hens and chickens extends to all provinces. 

TABLE 68. POULTRY ACCORDING TO KINDS, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 


Turkeys 


Geese 


Ducks 


Hens and 
chickens 


- ■ ■ 

Canada — 

1911 . . 


NO. 

863,182 
584,569 

8,926 
2,790 

67,151 
6,369 

72,616 
7,155 

79,639 
28,450 

416,705 
389,431 

166,173 
80,769 

30, 175 
30,532 

11,945 
23,564 

9,852 
15,509 


NO. 

629,524 
395,997 

6,808 
3,786 

19,6.53 
1,590 

22,999 
3,023 

28,472 
10,297 

364,295 
234.415 

102,462 
62,679 

23,283 
21,192 

18,800 
22,189 

42,752 
36,826 


NO. 

527,098 
290,755 

27,898 
9,551 

18,880 
4,147 

54,968 
8,181 

35,411 
24,381 

293,662 
178,215 

60, 146 
28,080 

14,196 
11,963 

10,897 
12,801 

11,040 
13,436 


NO. 

29,778,457 


1901 


16,651,S37 


British Columbia — 

1911 


968,588 


1901 


347,252 


Alberta— 

1911 


2,347,433 


1901 


239,693 


Saskatchewan — 

1911 


3,242,820 


1901 


278,985 


Manitoba— 

1911 


2,442,381 


1901 

Ontario — 

1911 


1,104,748 
13,414,318 


1901 


9,662,490 


Quebec- 

1911 


4,833,013 


1901 


3,112,115 


Now Brunswick — 

1911 


915,000 


1901 


650,444 


Nova Scotia — 

1911 


912,609 


1901 


739,591 


Prince Edward Island— 

1911 


697,295 


1901 


516,019 







In 1901 Ontario possessed 58-39 per cent of all poultry in Canada as com- 
])ared with 45-57 per cent in 1911. The per cent ratio of Ontario, Quebec and 
the Maritime provinces has decreased from 1901 to 1911, while that of the 
western provinces has increased. The number of fowl kept per 100 acres of 
improved land, for all Canada, rose from 59-41 in 1901 to 65-24 in 1911. In 
the last census for every 100 acres of improved land British Columbia possessed 
212 fowl of various kinds, Ontario 106, Prince Edward Island 99, Nova Scotia 
76, New Brunswick 68, Quebec 63, Alberta 56, Manitoba 38 and Saskatchewan 

15506— F 



Ixxvi CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 

29. The greatest numerical increases during the decade were made in British 
Columbia (135-23) and Ontario (27-24). Table 69 gives the proportion which 
the number of poultry in each province forms of the total number in the Dom- 
inion and also the average number per 100 acres of improved land for Canada 
as a whole and for each of the provinces. 

TABLE 69. PER CENT DISTRIBUTION OF POULTRY AND THE AVERAGE 
NUMBER PER 100 ACRES OF IMPROVED LAND, BY PROVINCES, 

1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 


Per cent of total Poultry 
in each province 


Number of Poultry per 100 
acres of improved land 


1911 


1901 


Increase (+) 

or 
Decrease ( — ) 


1911 


1901 


Increase (+) 

or 
Decrease ( — ) 


Canada 


p.c. 

100 00 

3-18 

7-72 

10-67 

8-13 

45-57 

16-24 

3-09 

3-01 

2-39 


p.c. 

100 00 

2-03 
1-40 
1-66 
6-52 
58-39 
18-32 
3-98 
4-45 


p.c. 

+ 1-15 
+ 6-32 
+ 901 
+ 1-61 
-12-82 

- 208 

- -89 

- 1-44 


NO. 

65 24 

211-94 
56-37 
28-58 
38-33 

106-12 
63-24 
68-02 
75-89 
98-93 


NO. 

59 41 

76-71 
53-04 
26-49 
29-23 
78-88 
44-14 
50-66 
63-47 
80-10 


NO. 

+ 5-83 

+ 
+135-23 




+ 3-33 


Saskatchewan 


+ 2-09 




+ 9-10 




+ 27-24 


Quebec .. 


+ 19- 10 


New Brunswick 


+ 17-36 




+ 12-42 




3-25 - -86 


+ 18-83 











Table 70 gives the value of all poultry by provinces in 1911 and 1901 together 
with the amount and proportion of increase made during the decade. From 1901 
to 1911 the average value, per family, of poultry on hand increased for all Canada 
from S5.34 to $9.84; for Ontario from S6.86 to $11 .25, for Quebec from $3.79 
to $6.53, for the Maritime provinces from $3.32 to $5.16, for the Prairie provinces 
from $7.44 to $14.51, and for British Columbia from $5.46 per family in 1901 to 
$8.59 per family in 1911. 



TABLE 70. VALUE OF POULTRY, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Provinces 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



1911 



1901 



14,653,773 

685.613 

1,357.183 

1,988,0811 

1,121,772 

6,128.401 

2,422.508 

3.50,853 

320.1.30 

273,172 



5,72.3,890 

209,747 
109.794 
110.582 
417.586 
3.125.166 
1,166.314 
213.319 
218.223 
147.159 



Incre.\sk (+) 
or decrease ( — ) 



Amount Per cent 



$ 

+8.929,883 

+ 475.866 
+1,247,. 389 
+1,871.499 
+ 704,186 
+3,003.235 
+1,256,254 
+ 1.37,. 5.34 
+ 107.907 
+ 126.013 



p.c. 

+ 156 01 

+ 226-88 
+1.136-12 
+ 1.605-31 



168-63 
96-10 

107-71 
64-47 
49-45 
85-63 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Lxxvii 



For Canada as a Avliole the average value of all poultry rose from 32 cents 
each in 1901 to 46 cents in 1911 and the average number per farm from 32-9 to 
44-5. For both census years Ontario had the largest average number of poultry 
of all kinds per farm being 40- 7 in 1901 as compared with 63-9 in 1911 and Nova 
Scctia the smallest, being 14-2 m 1901 and 17-8 in 1911. Table 71 gives the 
average value per bird, together with the average nunil)er per farm in 1911 and 
1001. 



TABLE 71. AVERAGE VALUE PER HEAD OF POULTRY, TOGETHER WITH 
THE AVERAGE NUMBER PER FARM, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 





V\LCE OF POULTRY PER HEAD 


NlMBER OF POULTRY PER FARM 


Piovinr'es 


1911 


1901 


Increase (+) 

OR 

Decrease (— ) 


1911 


Inoreasie (+) 

1901 T-. "'" .X 
Decrease ( — ) 






Amount Per cent 





Canada 

British Coluinhia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



•46: 

■68i 
•55 
•59l 
■4.3' 
■42 
■47 
■36 
■34 
■.36 



-32 

•58 
•44 
•39 
•36 
•30 
■36 
•30 
•27 
•25 



U 

+ •10 

+■11 

+ •20 
+ ■07 
+ •12 
+ •11 
+ •06 
+ •07 
+ ■11 



p.C. NO. 

43 75 44 5 



+17^24 
+25 00 
+51^28 
+ 19-44 
+40 00 
+30-55 
+20 00 
+25 93 
+44 00 



54-8 
39-9 
352. 

03 9 
323 



178 
.52-9 



xo. 

33 9 

539 
265 
218 
359i 
467, 
21-8 
190 
14^2 
4U5 



11 6 

+ 09 
+ 13-4 
+13^4 
+208 
+17^2 
+10-5 
+ G-7 
+ 3-() 
+114 



EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AXHIALS. 

Horses. The figures of Table 72, extracted from Trade and Navigation 
Pieturns, give the exports of domestic animals for the decades 1881-1890, 1891- 
1900, 1901-1910 and for the single years 1909 and 1910. 

During the first ten years, the number of horses exported to all countries was 
33,474 more than in the second; and while the United States took 106,353 
horses less in the latter than in the former period the United Kingdom took 
67,376 more. The exportation of horses in the third decade was 94,852 less than 
in the sec(uid decade and 128,326 less than in the first. In the ten years 1901- 
1910 the exj^ortation of horses to the United Kindgom dropped to less than -~ 
of what it was in the previous decade; to the United States to less than ^, while 
to other countries there was an increase of more than 50 ])er cent. The yearly 
average exportation from 1881-1890 was 16,952, from 1891-1900 it fell to 13,605, 
from 1901-1910 it made a further decline to 4,120. The annual export for the 
last two years of the decade was 2,028 for 1909 and 2.762 for 1910. 

A study of the previous tables \vill show that the falling off in the export 
of horses during the decade has been due, not to decreased production or small- 
ness of prices obtainable, but to an im])roved home market consequent upon 
material progress everywhere in Canada, anrl more particularly because of the 
heavy demand for work horses created by the extension of settlement in the 
western provinces. 

15o06— fJ 



Ixxviii 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Cattle. The increase in the exports of horned cattle to the United Kingdom 
for the ten years, 1901-1910 over 1891-1900 was 39-49 per cent. To the United 
States for the same period there was a decrease of 48-26 per cent. The total 
exports of cattle in 1910 were generally less than in the preceding year. 

Sheep. During the year 1910 our total export of sheep and lambs was 
111,107 of which 104,349 or 93-91 per cent were shipped to the United States. 
In 1909 our export of sheep and lambs to the United Kingdom was 19,793 as 
compared with 1,828 in 1910. 

Swine. The export trade in live hogs is insignificant showing only a total 
of 390 in 1910 and 366 in the previous year. 



TABLE 72. 



EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC ANIMALS BY DECADES 1881-1910 AND 
SEPARATELY FOR THE YEARS 1909 AND 1910. 



Animals 


To all 
Countries 


To 

United 
Kingdom 


To 

United 
States 


To 

Other 

Countries 


Horses — 

1881-1890 


NO. 

169,. 523 

136,049 

41,197 

2,028 

2,762 

916,305 

1,408,224 

1,664,546 

162,945 

157,386 

3,487,782 

3,436,350 

2,7.52,804 

118,896 

111,107 

23,461 

22,315 

37,800 

366 

390 


NO. 

1,333 

68,709 

10,130 

174 

584 

557,614 

1,045,1.56 

1,457,960 

143,661 

140,424 

616,692 

755,415 

667,183 

19,793 

1,828 

711 
1,882 

216 

_ 

J 


NO. 

165,316 

58,963 

18,184 

1,504 

1,906 

301,218 

310,226 

160,494 

16,130 

12,210 

2,783,822 

2,594,632 

2,022,521 

94,461 

104,349 

20,161 
I 15,936 

34,578 
132 
205 


NO. 

2,874 


1891-1900 


8,377 


1901-1910 


12,883 


1909 


350 


1910 


272 


Horned Cattle — 

1881-1890 


57,473 


1891-1900 


52,842 


1901-1910 


46,092 


1909 


3,1.54 


1910 


4,752 


Sheep and Lambs — 

1881-1890 


87,268 


1891-1900 


86,303 


1901-1910 


63,160 


1909 ■• 


4,642 


1910 


4,930 


Swine — 

1881-1890 


2,589 


1891-1900 


4,497 


1901-1910 


3,006 


1909 


234 


1910 


185 







PURE-BRED ANIMALS. 

The records of the number of pure-bred animals by totals for Canada and 
each of the provinces are given in Table 73. The details of the various breeds 
which constitute each class of pure-bred animals are given in Table XXXV. 

For all Canada, pure-bred horses show an increase from 1901 to 1911 of 
22,393 or 208-19 per cent, cattle of 47,398 or 61-95 per cent, sheep of 8,299 
or 18-31 per cent, SA\dne of 15,628 or 38-27 per cent. The ratios of pure-bred 
animals to the total number of each class on farms were, in 1901, horses -68 
per cent, cattle 1-37 per cent, sheep 1-85 per cent, swine 1-72 per cent; in 1911 
pure-bred horses were 1-27 per cent, cattle 1-89, per cent, sheep 2-46 per cent 
and swine 1-55 per cent, respectively of the total number of each kind on 
fai'ms at the date of the census. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Ixxix 



Among pure-bred horses, Clydesdales lead with 19,911 out of a total of 
33,149. In cattle. Shorthorns come first with 5G,614 of which 36,307 are iu 
Ontario, next come Holsteins with 23,292 of which 17,119 are in Ontario, 
Ayrshires aggregate 17,257 of which 8,695 are in Quebec. Among sheep the 
Shropshires lead with 17,678 followed by Oxford-downs wHh 9,127, Leicesters 
with 8,919 and Cotswolds with 8,539. The Yorkshires among SAvine come 
first with 27,730, followed by the Berkshires with 13,889. 

TABLE ;3. PURE BRED ANIMALS ON FARMS, BY PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 



Horses 



Cattle 



Sheep 



Swine 



Canada- 



Number, 1911 

1901 

Increase, total 

per cent 

British Columbia — 

Number, 1911 

1901 

Increase, total 

" per cent.. 



Alberta — 

Number, 1911 

1901 

Increase, total 

" per cent. 

Saskatchewan — 

Number, 1911 

1901 

Increase, total 

" per cent. 



Manitoba — 

Number, 1911 

1901 

Increase, total 

" per cent. 



Ontario — 

Number, 1911 

1901 

Increase, total 

" percent... 
Quebec — 

Number, 1911 

1901 

Increase, total 

" percent... 
New Brunswick — 

Number, 1911 

1901 

Increase, total 

" per cent. . . 
Nova Scotia — 

Number, 1911 

1901 

Increase, total 

" per cent... 
Prince Edward Island — 

Number, 1911 

1901 

Increase, total 

" percent... 



33,149 
19,756 
22,393 
208 19 



9.51 

439 

512 

116-62 



4,613 

4,054 
725-22 



4,432 

393 

4.039 

1,027-73 



4,0.34 

887 

3,147 

,354-79 



14,483 
5,417 
9,0G6 

167-30 

3,563 
2,294 
1,269 
55-31 

461 

268 

193 

72-01 

359 

333 

26 

7-80 

253 

166 

87 

.52-40 



123,899 

76,. 501 

47,398 

61 95 



3,278 
1,978 
1 , 300 
65-72 



9,741 
5,024 
4,717 
93-88 



5,286 
3,034 
2,252 
74-22 



10,848 
7,857 
2,991 
38 06 



70,472 

41,937 

28,. 535 

68-04 

18,163 

11,578 

6,5S5 

56-87 

2,769 

1,965 

804 

40-92 

2,315 

2,022 

293 

14-49 

1,027 
1,106 

- 79 

- 7-14 



53,616 

45,317 

8,299 

18 31 



1,181 

550 

631 

114 72 



1..372 
776 
596 

76-80 



.586 
392 
194 

49-48 



1,.322 

1,314 

8 

•60 



40,983 

33,590 

7,393 

22-01 

6,122 

6,060 

62 

102 

653 

618 

35 

5-66 

862 
1,044 

- 182 
-17-43 

535 
973 

- 438 
-45 02 



56,457 

40,829 

15,628 

38-27 



1,167 

1,058 

109 

10 -.30 



4,594 

613 

3,981 

649-42 



2,877 

927 

1,950 

210 -.35 



5,5.37 

4,822 

715 

14-82 



30,853 

26,273 

4,580 

17-43 

8,293 
4,765 
3,528 
74 04 

1,465 
914 
551 

60-28 

662 

524 

1.38 

26 -.33 

1,009 

933 

76 

8-14 



Note— The minua sign ( — ) denotes a decrease. 



l\xx 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



ANIMALS SOLD. 



In Tables 74 to 81 the records of animals sold in 1910 are given. In 

a study of these figures, it should not be overlooked that all sales, reported by 
the census, were not necessarily of animals for export and that the same animals 
may have been sold more than once during the year; for example, cattle, swine 
and poultry, especially, are bought for feeding purposes and later on, sold 
for home consumption or exportation. These phases of the subject will be 
further referred to, when the statistics of the various kinds of domestic animals 
sold are being dealt with. 

The statistics of the sales of cattle, sheep, swine and poultry for the two 
censuses are not comparable. In the Census of 1901 the enumerator was re- 
quired to obtain the number of these animals killed or sold for slaughter or 
export, whereas in the Census of 1911 the enumerator was instructed to make 
record of the number and value of horses, cattle, sheep, swine and poultry sold 
in the calendar year, and of the value only of animals slaughtered on the farm 
in 1910. In calling attention to and in explanation of the evident discrepancy 
in the figures relating to animals killed or sold in 1901, it is stated in the in- 
troduction to Volume II Agriculture, Fourth Census, page XXIX that "the 
question referring to the number of animals killed or sold for slaughter or ex- 
port was not clearly understood by enumerators, and that in many cases 
the animals killed at home were left out of the coant." 

Table 74 presents a comparative statement of the average valuation per 
head of each kind of domestic animals on farms in the last census and the 
average price per head obtained for animals sold. The figures show that, 
generally, the provinces which gave high values for any class of animals on 
the farm, also gave high values for animals sold, in 1910. The statistics 
would therefore seem to indicate that the farmer based his estimates of the 
value of stock on the farm, at the date of the census, on figures obtained in 
sales made during the year, and should therefore be a fairly reliable indication 
of the wealth of Canada in all classes of animals, as well as being an accurate indi- 
cation of the importance of the animal industry to the country. 



TABLE 74. 



AVERAGE VALUE PER HEAD OF ANIMALS ON FARMS, JUNE 1911, AND 
OF ANIMALS SOLD IN 1910 COMPARED. 



Provinces 



Canada 

British Columbia.. 

Alberta 

Saskatchewali 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Is'd 



Horses 



On farm 
June 1911 



% 

146 95 

1 30- 4-1 
l.SH-62 
174-91 
168-31 
139-79 
131 10 
123-64 
115-78 
118-02 



Sold 
1910 



$ 

146 72 

158-56 
144-24 
174-13 
170-40 
147-23 
117-79 
116-04 
115-95 
121-17 



Cattle 



On far: , 
June 1911 



30 ei 

3601 
30-64 
34-46 
28-83 
32-57 
26-21 
21-07 
25-18 
20-02 



Sold 
1910 



Sheep 



Swine 



On farm 
June 1911 



Sold 
1910 



On farm 
Juno 1911 



34-48 

37-29 
35-24 
.36-01 
30-07 
38-57 
26-06 
24-39 
30-52 
24-88 



$ 

4 92 

6-70 

5-68 

5 44 
6-01 
5-97 
4-25 
3-37 
3-60 
4-03 



$ 

4 97 

7-08 
5-82 
5-31 
6-44 
5-81 
4-36 
3-46 
3-46 
403 



% 

7 43 

10-77 
8-40 
8-78 
8-51 
7-19 
6-80 
7-49 
8-50 
6-06 



Sold 
1910 



$ 

11 99 

11-55 

12-54 

11-39 

12-03 

12-30 

1219 

6-59 

606 

6-09 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Ixxxi 



Horses. In the Census of 1901, the number of horses sold in the census 

year v.-ere not recorded and the values were included with the values of other 
domestic animals sold in' the year under the general term ' ' Live stock sold in 
the year". It is therefore not possible to make comparisons either as to num- 
bors or values of horses sold for both census years. In 1911 the number of horses 
sold, in all Canada, totalled 319,042 with a value of $46,810,659 and an average 
value of $146.72. For the Dominion, the average value of horses sold and of 
horses on hand bear a striking relationship, the former being $140.72 and the 
latter $146 . 95. Three provinces — Saskatchewan, Quebec and New Brunswick — 
record smaller average prices for horses sold, than for horses on the farm. The 
price per head obtained for horses sold was greater than the farmers' valuation 
in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Nova Scotia and Prince 
Edward Island. (Table 74.) 

Table 75 gives a summary of the number and value of horses sold in 1910, 
the ratio they form of horses on farms and the per cent distribution of sale*^ 
by provinces. The proportion of horses sold to the number reported on farms 
at the date of the census was, for all Canada, 12-28 per cent. Ontario and 
Prince Edward Island made the heaviest demand on their permanent resources, 
the sales in the former representing 15-23 per cent and in the latter 14-66 per 
cent of the total number on hand. The lowest proportion of sales was made in 
Saskatchewan, where they represented only 8-36 per cent of the stock on hand. 
In the other provinces the sales made represented a figure close to the average 
for the Dominion. As previously stated, only a small percentage of the sales of 
horses reported, in the census, were for export — the census gives 319,042 as 
the number of horses which changed hands in 1910, while the Trade Returns 
show that of this number only 2,764 or less than one per cent were sent out of 
the country. Of the total number of sales made Ontario obtained 38-74 per cent, 
Quebec 14-43 per cent, the Maritime provinces 5-82 per cent, the Prairie 
provinces 38-80 per cent and British Colum])ia 2-21 per cent. 

TABLE 75. HORSES SOLD IX 1910. PROPORTION WHICH THEY FORM OF H0RSE3 
Ox\ FARMS, TOGETHER WITH THE PER CENT DISTRIBUTION OF SALES, BY 
PROVINCES. 



Provinces 



H()u< 



Number 



Value 



V alue 
per head 



Per cent 

wliicli 

horses 

sold forms 

of horses 

on farms 



Per cent 
distribu- 
tion of 
honses 
sold 



Canada 

British Columbia 

-Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



NO. 

319,043 

7,040 

52,146 

42,42.5 

20,20.5 

123,026 

46.0:J0 

0,757 

0,540 

5,267 



46,810,659 

1,116,272 

7,521,611 

7,387,515 

4,970.413 

18,201,602 

5,422,582 

788,149 

7.58,307 

638,208 



158-56 
144-24 
174- 13 
170-40 
147-23 
117-79 
11604 
115 -Do 
121 17 



12 28 

12-26 
12 81 
8-36 
10-42 
15-23 
12-39 
10 -.33 
10-65 
14-06 



p. c. 

100 00 

2-21 

16-35 

13-30 

9-15 

38-74 

14-43 

2-12 

2-05 

1-65 



Ixxxii 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Cattle all Kinds. Table 76 which combines the statistics of all kinds 
of farm cattle — milcli cows, bulls, oxen, heifers and calves — gives the number 
and value of all such animals sold in 1910. A very considerable number 
of cattle sold during the year 1910 were .animals that had been purchased 
by the farmers previously in the year. The practice of buying animals, for 
fattening, is common in all parts of the Dominion, consequently the gross 
sales of cattle include some duplication. 

The total number of cattle sold in all Canada, in 1910 was 1,752,792 
with a total value of $60,438,593 and an average value of $34.48. The 
average price per head was highest in Ontario with $38.57 and lowest in 
New Brunswick, with $24.39. The ratio of number of sales to the number 
of cattle on farms, was highest in Alberta with 34-72 per cent, followed by 
Ontario with 32-14 per cent, Manitoba with 30-43 per cent, British Columbia 
with 28-90 per cent and Quebec with 21-33 per cent. In all the other provinces, 
the sales represented less than 20 per cent of all cattle on farms at June 1, 1911. 
Of the total sales reported in the census, Ontario obtained 45-87 per cent, 
Quebec 16-26 per cent, Alberta 14-65 per cent, Manitoba 7-56 per cent, Saskat- 
chewan 6 - 89 per cent, the Maritime provinces 6 - 47 per cent and British Columbia 
2-30 per cent. 

TABLE 76. CATTLE, ALL KINDS, SOLD IN 1910. PROPORTION WHICH THEY FORM 
OF CATTLE ON FARMS, TOGETHER WITH THE PER CENT DISTRIBUTION OF 
SALES BY PROVINCES. 



CATTLE SOLD 



Provinces 



Number 



Canada 1,752,792 



British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island . 



40, 

256, 

120, 

132, 

804, 

28.3, 

37, 

54, 

21, 



230 
840 
802 
538 
029 
024 
3S1 
938 
010 



Value 



6«,43S,593 



,500,086 
,052,045 
,350,06; 
,984,980 
,013,066 
,427,231 

911,598 
,676,845 

522,675 



Value 
per head 



Per cent 
which 

cattle 

sold forms 

of cattle 

on farms 



$ 

34-48 

37-29 
35-24 
36-01 
30-07 
38-57 
26-06 
24-39 
30-52 
24-88 



28-90 
34-72 
19-06 
30-43 
32-14 
21-33 
13-74 
14-48 
18-52 



Per c nt 
distribu- 
tion of 
cattle 
sold 



p. c. p. c. 

I 
28 86 100 00 



2-30 

14-65 

6-89 

7-56 

45-87 

16-26 

213 

3-14 

1-20 



Milch Cows. Table 77 gives the statistics of milch cows sold in 1010, 
the figures of which are included in the previous table. The sales of milch' 
cows represented 21 per cent of the number of all cattle sold and 23-45 per 
cent of the total value obtained. The average value for all Canada was $38 .51. 
The price paid per head in British Columbia was $52.29, in Ontario $42.32, 
in Saskatchewan $41.43, in Alberta $39.14, in Manitoba $37.75. In Quel)ec 
and the Maritime provinces the average price ranged from $24.49 in Prince 
Edward Island to $34 . 17 in Quebec. The sales of milch cows in Ontario, Quebec 
and Saskatchewan represented less than 14 per cent of the total number on 
farms, in the Maritime provinces, it was about 11 percent, in Manitoba it was 
18 • 43 per cent, in Alberta 19-78 per cent and in British Columbia 20-11 per cent. 



CENSUS-OF CANADA 1911 



Ixxxiii 



TABLE 77. MILCH COWS SOLD IX 1910. PROPORTION WHICH THElt FORM OF 
MILCH COWS ON FARMS, TOGETHER WITH THE PER CENT DISTRIBUTION 
OF SALES. BY PROVINCES. 



Provinces 



Milch cows sold 



Number 



Value 



Value 
per head 



Per cent 
which milch 

cows sold 
formsofcows 

on farms 



Per cent 
distribu- 
tion of 
milch 
cows sold 



Canada 

Uritibh Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



NO. 

368,155 

6,829 

29,209 

24,817 

28,631 

143,790 

103,180 

11,767 

13,775 

6,157 



14,177,527 

357, 120 

1,143,104 

1,028,204 

1,080,745 

6,085,102 

3,526,036 

345,356 

461,080 

150.780 



38 51 

52-29 
39-14 
41-43 
37-75 
42-32 
34-17 
29-34 
.33-47 
24-49 



p. c. 

14 19 

2011 
19-78 
13-70 
18-43 
13-92 
13-68 
10-84 
10-66 
11-82 



p. c. 

100 00 

1-85 
7-93 
6-74 
7-78 
39-06 
28-03 
3-20 
3-74 
1-67 



Sheep. The number of sheep sold m 1910 w^as 949,039 with a total valut> 
of $4,720,014 and an average value of $4 . 97. The value of the sheep slaughtered 
on the farm in the same year was $735,343 and applying the average price 
obtained for sheep sold, it would give a total of 1,096,996 sheep sold or slaughtered 
in 1910 as compared with a total of 1,342,288 in the census year ended March 
31, 1901. The sales of sheep do not contain the same amount of duplication 
as do that of cattle or swine, therefore the record is a fair representation of 
the trade in sheep for that year. Of the total number of sheep sold, Ontario 
contributed 41-79 per cent, Quebec 28-95 per cent, the Maritime provinces 
19-48 per cent and the western provinces 9-78 per cent. For Canada as a 
whole, the number sold formed 43-65 per cent of the total number on hand, 
in Ontario it represented 53-43 per cent of the number on farms, in Quebec 
43-12 per cent, in Prince Edward Island 43-04 per cent, in British Columbia 
41-10 per cent, in Xova Scotia, New Brunswdck and Manitoba from 38-17 
to 38-94 per cent, in Alberta and Saskatchewan less than 30 per cent. 



TABLE 78. SHEEP SOLD IN 1910. PROPORTION WHICH THEY FORM OF SHEEP 
ON FARMS, TOGETHER WITH THE PER CENT DISTRIBUTION 
OF SALES, BY PROVINCES. 



Provinces 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



Sheep Sold 



Number 



Value 



Value 

per 

head 



NO. 

949,039 

16,1.39 
37,0.59 
25,154 
14,. 5.34 
.396,571 
274,7.56 
01,187 
84,373 
39,266 



4,720,014 

114,317 

215,524 

133,628 

93.638 

2,. 303, 745 

1,196,892 

211,890 

292,122 

1^8,2.58 



4 97 

7-08 
5-82 
5-31 
6-44 
5-81 
4-36 
3-46 
3-46 
4-03 



Per cent 
wliich 
sheep sold 
forms of 
sheep on 
farms 



p.c. 

43 65 

4110 
27-74 
22-02 
38-94 
53-43 
4312 
.38-65 
38 17 
43-04 



Per cent 

distribution 

of sheep 

sold 



p.c. 

100 00 

1-70 

3-90 

2-65 

1-.53 

41-79 

28-95 

' 6-45 

8-89 

4-14 



Ixxxiv 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Swine. The gross returns to the farmers of Canada, in the year 1910, 
from the hog industry were $51,344,366. This large amount was obtained from 
swnne sold, ($33,229,063) and from swine slaughtered on the farm ($18,115,303). 

If we apply the average price obtained for hogs sold to the value of hogs 
slaughtered on the farms, it gives a total number of 4,282,623 swine sold or 
slaughtered in the year 1910, as compared with 2,555,413 in the previous decade, 
being a gain of 1,727,210 or 67-59 per cent from 1901 to 1911. The ratio of swine 
sold or slaughtered to swine on farms in 1901 was 108-56 per cent as compared 
with 116-82 per cent in 1911. In other words for 1,000 living hogs in 
1901 there was disposed of, either by sale or slaughter 1,085, in 1911 the number 
sold or slaughtered represented 1,178 hogs for every 1,000 live hogs. But as 
the figures of the last census, taken as of June 1, include young litters the ratio 
of hogs sold or slaughtered to li\dng hogs for the Census of 1911 is thereby 
adversely affected. The number of hogs slaughtered on the farm not having been 
recorded on the schedules, the statistics in Table 79 have reference only to 
swine sold. 

TABLE 79. SWINE SOLD IN 1910. PROPORTION WHICH THEY FORM OF ALL 

SWINE ON FARMS, TOGETHER WITH THE PER CENT DISTRIBUTION 

OF SALES, BY PROVINCES. 



Provinces 



Swine Sold 



Nuint)or 



Value 



Value 
per 
head 



Por cent 

which 

swine sold 

forms of 

swine on 

farms 



Per cent 
distribu- 
tion of 
swine 
sold 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 



NO. 

2,771,755 

30,433 

158.667 

102,442 

132,330 

1,811,078 

414,805 

42,074 

48,493 

31,433 



;i3.228,«G3 

351,374 

1,989,004 

1,166,895 

1,51,1,857 

22,282,644 

5,056,376 

277,243 

294,018 

219,652 



11 »9 

11-55 

12-54 

11-39 

12-03 

12-30 

12-19 

6-59 

606 

6-99 



p.c. 
76 3fi 

90-56 
66 SO 
35-78 
70-23 
95-95 
52-22 
48- 14 
76-51 
55-76 



p.c. 
100 M 

1-10 
5-72 
3-70 
4-77 
65-34 
14-97 
1-52 
1-75 
1-13 



Poultry. In the year 1910 the returns from poultry to the farmers 
of Canada aggregated $31,262,414, of which poultry- sold, su])plied $4,819,423, 
poultry slaughtered on the farm $3,172,228 and eggs $23,270,763. It will 
thus be seen that if the value of live poultry on the farm at the date of the 
census be accepted as the capital invested in this branch of animal industry, 
that the total receipts gave a gross return on investment of 213-34 per cent. 
Table 80 gives the revenue derived from the poultry industry according to 
classes and by provinces. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 Ixxxv 

TABLE 89. REVENUE FROM POULTRY, BY PROVINCES IN 1910. 



Provinces 



Canada 



British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island. 



Valuk of Poultry 



Sold 



j Slaughtered! 
on farm I 



Value 

of 
Eggs 



4,819,433 



207, 

252, 

153, 

286, 

,689, 

,026. 

86, 



42. 



S 



3,172,228, 23.270,763 31,262,414 



Total 
revenue 

from 
poultry 



56.091 

170,67.3 

227.718; 

2.55,113 

,453,901' 

662,343; 

166.770 

91.075 

88,544 



1.032, 

1,515, 

2.248, 

1.763. 

10.725, 

3,812, 

677, 

931, 

563, 



263: 
866 
998 
322 
733 
838 
205 
112 
426 



14 



296,. 306 
939.476 
629.879 
305.288 
869.431 
502,077 
930,890 
094,923 
6>4,144 



Summary of Value of Animals Sold or Slaughtered. Table 81 
gives a comparative statement of the value of all domestic animals sold or 
slaughtered in the last census period and in the i)recediug one. The figures 
for the Census of 1911 are for the calendar year 1910, whilst those of the Census 
of 1901 are for the census year ended March 31, 1901. Excepting for this 
difference, the statistics of values for each census were taken on a similar basis. 
In 1901 the values were given as totals (1) for animals sold and (2) for animals 
slaughtered on the farm. In 1911 the values of each kind of animal sold or 
slaughtered were given in detail. The total value of all animals sold or 
slaughtered in 1911 was $177,635,587 as compared with $75,706,902 in 1901, 
being a gain of $101,928,685 or 134-64 per cent. Ontario shows the greatest 
amount of increase during the decade, with $40,892,663. The highest percentages 
of increase are shown by the western provinces. Alberta 750 per cent, Saskat- 
chewan 669-15 per cent, Manitoba 205-40 per cent, British Columbia 144-99 
per cent. The lowest proportion of increase occurred in Xova Scotia (65-02 
per cent). 



TABLE 81. COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE AGGREGATE VALUE OF ALL 
DOMESTIC ANIMALS, SOLD OR SLAUGHTERED. 1910 AND 1900. 



Provinces 



Canada 



British Columbia 3,099,375 

Alberta 20.4.59. 669 

Saskatchewan 15. .394. 6.53 

Manitoba 12,809. 637 

Ontario 85,965. 148 

Quebec 28. 739,921 




Increase 



Per cent or total 

VALUE FOR ALL CAN- 
ADA GIVEN BY EACH 
PROVINCE 



Total 



Per cent 



1910 



$ 



177. 635, .587 75.706.9«2 ldl.928.685 



New Brunswick. 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island. 



3,711,345 
4,414..5S7 
2,441,252 



1,510,004 
2,406,899 
2, 001,. 505' 
4,194.3941 
45,072.4851 
14.656.8141 
1,948.758 
2.675,135 
1,240,908 



189,371 
052.770 
393,148 
615,243 
892,603 
083.107 
762.587 
739.452 
200,344 



p.c. 

134 64 

144-99' 

750 00; 

669- 151 

205-401 

90-73 

9609; 

90 -45 1 

05 02 1 

96-73i 



1900 



p.c. 

li'O CO 

2 0S' 

11-521 

8-66 

7-21 

48-40 

16-181 

2 09 

2-49' 

1-37 



p.c. 

103 00 

1-99 
3-18 
2-65 
5-54 
.59-54 
19-36 
2-57 
3-53 
1-64 



Ixxxvi- 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



WOOL AND EGGS. 

Wool. The wool clip of 1911 amounted to 6,933,955 lb. valued at 
$1,602,044 being an average price per lb. of 23-1 cents. The clip of 1900 ag- 
gregated 10,657,597 lb. with a total value of $1,887,064 and an average value 
per lb. of 17-7 cents. 

Eg^s. In 1910, Canada produced 123,071,034 dozen eggs with a total 
valiT: of $23,270,763 and an average value per dozen on the farm of 18 '9 cents, 
as compared with a production of 84,132,802 dozen in 1900 with a total value 
of $10,286,828 and an average value per dozen of 12-2 cents. 

For the year ended June 30, 1901, Canada exported 11,363,064 dozen 
eggs worth $1,691,640 and imported 951,745 dozen valued at $194,188 as compar- 
ed wnth an export in the year ended June 30, 1911, of 87,420 dozen valued 
at $23,752 and an importation of 2,926,856 dozen valued at $531,864. The price 
per dozen received for eggs exported in 1901 was 14-9 cents as against 27-2 
cents in 1911. Imported eggs brought 18-2 cents per dozen in 1911 and 20-4 
cents in 1901. 

The following table gives in tabulated form the statistics relative to pro- 
duction, exports, imports and consumption of eggs in 1911 and 1901. It il- 
lustrates the possibilities for profitable extension of the industry, for had there 
been neither exportation nor importation of eggs in 1910, the home product 
would have fallen short by 2,839,436 dozen of supplying the local demand. 



TABLE 82. PRODUCTION, EXPORTS, IMPORTS AND CONSUMPTION OF 

1910 AND 1900. 



EGGS. 



Schedule 



1910 



1900 



Increase (+) or Decrease (— ) 



Total 



Per cent 



Eggs- 
Home production 

Exports 

Imports 

Consumption, total 

" per family 

" per capita 

Total value of — 

Home production 

Exports 

Imports 

Price per dozen — 

On farms 

Exports 

Imports 



dozen 



123,071,034 

87,420 

2,926,856 

125,910,470 

84-6 

17-4 



23,270,763 

23,752 

531,864 

cents 
18-9 
27-2 
18-2 



dozen 



84,132,802 

11,363,064 

951,745 

73,721,483 

68-8 

13-7 



10,286,828 

1,691,610 

194,188, 

cents I 
12-2 
14-9| 
20-4 



dozen 



+38,938,232 
-11,275,644 
+ 1,975,111 
+52,188,987 
+ 15-8 

+ 3-7 

$ 

+12,983,9351 
- 1,667,888 
+ 337,676 



cents 
6-7 
12-3 
2-2 



p.c. 



+ 46-28 

- 99-23 
+207-53 
+ 70-79 
+ 22-96 
+ 27-00 

p.c. 
+ 126-22 

- 93-28 
+ 173-88 

p.c. 
+ 54-92 
+ 82-55 

- 10-78 



Note. Exports and imports are for the twelve months ended June 30, 1901 and 1911. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Ixxxvii 



EXPORTS OF ANIMAL PRODUCTS. 

The quant it}- and value of animal products exported in the years ended 
June 30, 1891, 1901 and 1911 are given in Table 83. From 1891 to 1901 the ex- 
l)orts of meats of all kinds show very heavy increases, whereas from 1901 to 1911 
the exports of beef and hams only have advanced. These decreases in the 
exports of animal products in the last decade have occurred, in spite of the fact 
that In 1901 the average export value per pound of bacon was 11-2 cents, of 
beef 8-4 cents, of canned meats 11-3 cents, of hams 11-3 cents, of mutton 7-4 
cents, of pork (3-9 cents, as compared Avith an export unit value in 1911 of bacon 
13-7 cents, of beef 9-3 cents, of canned meats 13-4 cents, of hams 13-3 cents, 
of mutton 8-8 cents, of pork 11-2 cents. Previous tables having shown that 
there has been an increase in the number of flesh producing animals in 1911 
as compared with 1901, therefore the decreased exportation during the decade, 
must be attributed to increased home consumption, due partly to increased 
population ;md partly to greater purchasing power of the people as a whole, 
and a consequent higher standard of living. 



TABLE 83. 



(n'ANTITY AND VALUE OF ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXPORTED, 
1891, 1901 AND. 1911. 



Kindt 



Exports year ended 
JuxE 30, 1891 . 



Exports year ended 
June 30, 1901 



Quantitj' 



Value 



Quantity 



Value 



Exports year ended 
June 30, 1911 



Quantity 



Value 



lb. 
Animal products 

Bacon 7, 150, 756 

Beef 309,791! 

Canned meats 2 , 7G7 , 080 

Hams 403,481 

Mutton 291,991 

Pork ! 67,687 

Butter ' 3,768,101 

Cheese ! 106, 202. 140 

I doz. 

Eggs 8,022,935 

lb. 

Wool 1,108,286 



■s 

590,852 

16,051 

271,184 

37,617 

23,993 

4,089 

602,175 

9,508,800 

1,160,359 

245,5031 



lb. 

103,020, 

9,710. 

3,726, 

2,528, 

76, 

742, 

16,335, 

195,926, 

doz. 

11,303, 

lb. 

1,043, 



661 
458 
997 
844 
875 
122 
528! 
3971 

0641 

673 



,493,868 
813,343 
419,959 
284,578 
5,712 
51,374 
,295,663 
,696,951 

,691,640 

186,510 



lb. 

64,184, 

1,113, 

390, 

4,023, 

51, 

398, 

3,514, 

178,465, 

doz. 

87, 

lb. 

1,076, 



966 
141 
307 
798 
605] 
6981 
174 
902 

420| 

I 

963 i 



20 



,790,5.37 

103,646 

52,297 

536,588 

4,562 

44,621 

824,155 

,395,616 

23,752 

217,969 



DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

In the Census of 1901 the statistics of the Dairy industry on farms were 
comprised under two heads, total value of dairy product and quantity of home- 
made butter produced in the census year. In the last census the quantity and 
value of home-made butter were recorded separately. The total quantity 
and value of milk produced on farms were also enumerated and this value was 
taken as representing the total value of dairy products to the farmer, that is 
to say, the value of milk production with the least possible enhancement from 
labour. 

The following table, in which tlie exports, imports and consumption of 
butter, cheese, cream, ice-cream, condensed milk, etc., have all been converted 



Ixxxviii 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



to their milk equivalents, gives an interesting comparison of the status of the 
dairy industry in Canada in 1911 and 1901. 

TABLE 84. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF THE DAIRY INDUSTRY, SHOWING 
PRODUCTION, EXPORTS, IMPORTS AND CONSUMPTION FOR ALL CANADA, 
IX THE CENSUS YEARS 1911 AND 1901. 




9,806,741,348 


6,866,834,000 


+2,939,907,348 


+ 42-81 


2,236,663,687 


2,514,596,967 


- 


277,932,280 


- 11-05 


39,871,207 


34,886,346 


+ 


4,984,861 


+ 14-28 


7,609,948,868 


4,387,123,379 


+3,222,825,489 


+ 73-38 


1055-96 


816-76 


+ 


239-20 


+ 29-28 


2,595,255 


2,408,677 


+ 


186,578 


+ 7-74 


3,779 


2,850 


+ 


929 


+ 32-59 



Tot:ii production of milk lb. 

Exports of dairy produce as milk " 

Imports of dairy produce as milk " 

Total consumption as milk " 

Per capita consumption as milk " 

Milch cows in Canada xo. 

Pounds of milk per cow lb. 



Note — The figures giving exports and imports of dairy produce, in terms of milk, are taken from 
"Dairy Production in Canada," by Mr. ,T. A. Ruddick, Dairy Commissioner. 

According to the foregoing table, the total production of milk increased 
by nearlj^ three billion pounds or 42 • 81 per cent from 1901 to 1911. For the same 
period our exports of dairy products, expressed in terms of milk, decreased by 
11-05 per cent and our imports similarly expressed, increased by 14-28 per cent. 
The consumption of dairy products, as milk for all Canada gives an aggregate 
increase of 3,222,825,489 lb. or 73-38 per cent and the per capita consumption 
gives an increase of 239-20 lb. or 29-28 per cent. The actual average pro- 
duction of milk per cow for all Canada, in 1911 was 3,779 lb. as against an 
estimated average of 2,850 lb. in 1901. The highest yield per cow, in the last 
census was recorded in British Columbia with 4,372 lb. followed by Ontario 
with 4,158 lb. and Quebec with 3,582 lb. The Maritime provinces all show 
low average production — Nova Scotia 3,296 lb., New Brun.swick 3,177 lb. 
and Prince Edward Island 3,010 lb. The production in the Prairie provinces 
was strikingly level, being 3,565 lb. in Alberta, 3,501 lb. in Manitoba and 3,654 
lb. per cow in Saskatchewan. 

In Table 85 is given a comparative statement of the quantity of butter, 
home and factory made, produced in Canada in 1900 and 1910, together with 
the average production per farm in the last census year. The total quantity 
of butter produced in Canada in 1910 was 201,599,598 lb. of which 137,110.200 
lb. was home-made and 04,489,398 lb. factory-made, as compared witli an 
aggregate production in 1900 of 141,409,815 lb. of which 105,343,076 lb. was 
liome-made and 36,066,739 lb. factory-made. The increase in butter, home- 
made, was 31,707,124 lb. or 30-15 per cent, in factory-made 28,422,559 lb. or 
78-80 per cent, being an aggregate increase of 60,189,783 lb. or 42-56 per cent 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



Ixxxix 



in the ten j^ears. The average i^roduction per farm of home-made butter which 
in 1900 was 193-4 lb. fell in 1910 to 191-8 lb. The average quantity of 
facton'-made butter per farm increased from 66-2 lb. in 1900 to 90-2 lb. in 
1910. 

In 1901, as previously- stated, no record was made of home-made cheese 
and 'A is probable that the quantity, then made on farms, was not appreciable. 
In 1911, not^A-ithstanding that factory cheese shows a decrease in the decade of 
nearly 21 million pounds, home-made cheese does not amount to more than 
7-10 of one per cent of the total cheese production. 



TABLE 85. COMPARATIVE 


STATEMENT OF BUTTER AND CHEESE 
IN CANADA, 1910 AND 1900. 


PRODUCTION 




1910 


1900 


IXCREASE- 


PRODUCTIO^f PER 
FARM 




Total 


Per cent 


1910 


1900 


Butter- 
Home-made 

Factory-made 


lb. lb. 

137.110,200 105,. 343. 076 
64,489,398] 36,066,739 


lb. 

31,767,124 
28,422,659 


p. c. 

30-15 
78-80 


lb. 

191-8 
90-2 


lb. 

193-4 
66-2 




Total 


201,.-)99,.598: 141,409,815 

1.371,092! (1) 
199,904,205: 220,8-33,269 


60,189,783 
-20,929,064 


42-56 
-42-56 


282-0 

1-9 
279-7 


259-8 

405-4 


Cheese — 

Home-made 

Factory-made 




Total 


201,275, 297j 220,8.33,269 


- 


- 


281-6 


- 



(•) Not reported. ^]\€t minus sign ( — ) shows a decrease. 



Of the total production of butter in 1910<201, 599,598 lb.) there was ex])orted 
3,(i73,702 lb. leaving 197,925,896 lb. for home use, which with the imports 
of 746,102 lb. gives an aggregate of 198,671,998 pounds of butter consumed in 
Canada in 1910, which is at the rate of 27-56 lb. per head of population. 

The exports of cheese amounted to 186,665,789 lb. or 92-6 per cent of the 
t(jtal production. The product of 1910 not exported (14,609,508 lb.) together with 
862,862 lb. imported, provided a per capita consumption of 2-14 lb. 

Table 86 gives by provinces a summary of the dairy production in 1910 
and shoAvs that Quebec produced 64-79 per cent of all factory butter made in 
Canada in 1910 and 30-44 per cent of all butter. It is the only province in 
which the home-made product did not exceed the factory-made. British 
Columbia produced no factory cheese and but a small quantity of cheese of any 
kind. The Prairie provinces have given greater attention to the production 
of butter than of cheese, the three provinces produced 36,428,801 lb. butter 
in 1910 and only 1,411,781 lb. cheese. Ontario leads in cheese making, 
having produced more than 68 per cent of the total Canadian product, Quebec 
comes-second with about 29 i)('r cent and Prince Edward Island third with 1-6 
per cent of the total producti(;n. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE 86. DAIRY PRODUCTION, BY PROVINCES, IN 1910. 



Provinces 



Total milk 
produced 



Butter produced 



Home 
made 



Factory 
made 



Total 



Cheese produced 



Home 
made 



Factory 
made 



Total 



Canada 

BritishColumbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan. . 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

New Brunswick 
Nova Scotia — 
P. E. Island.... 



lb. 
9,808,741, 

148,467, 
526,472, 
662,092, 
543,889, 
4,295,977, 
2,701,971, 
344,888, 
426,118 
156,864 



348 

451i 
140 
62l| 
750 
547 
618 
058 
151 
012 



lb. 
137,110,200 

1,248,282 

7,689,432 
12,053,201 
10,937,864 
63,253,444 
19,585,981 

9,053,394 
10,978,911 

2,309,691 



lb. lb. 
64,489,398 201,599,598 



1,206,202 
2,149,121 
1,548,696 
2,0.50,487 
13,876,888 
41,782,678 
849,633 
354,785 
670, 908 



2,454,484 

9,838,553 
13,601,897 
12,988.351 
77,130,332 
61,368,659 

9,903,027 
11,333,696 

2,980,599 



lb. 
1,371,093 

7,483 
141,604 
27,730 
327,525 
295,886 
358,625 

3,567 
199,250 

9,422 



lb. 
199,904,205 

193,479 

26,730 

694,713 

136,093,951 

58,171,091 

1,166,243 

264,243 

3,293,755 



lb. 
201,275,297 

7,483 

335,083 

54,460 

1,022,238 

136,389,837 

58,529,716 

1,169,810 

463,493 

3,303,177 



Table 87 furnishes a comparative statement of the value of dairy products 
in 1900 and 1910. For all Canada, the value of dairy produce aggregated 
$103,381,854 in 1910 as against $66,470,953 in 1900, being a gain of $36,910,901 
or 55-53 per cent in the decade. In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, 
the value of dairy products increased from $4,068,656 in 1900 to $21,861,450 
in 1910 or 437-30 per cent in the ten years. Ontario gave an increase of 
$8,524,714 or 24-51 per cent, Quebec $5,570,283 or 27-56 per cent, the Maritime 
provinces $3,562,144 or 56-92 per cent. The value of product per milch cow 
worked out at $39.83 in the last census as compared with $27.60 in the 
previous one, an increase of $12.23 or 44-31 per cent per animal. Much of this 
increase is no doubt due to higher market values but the figures of Table 84 
show that an appreciable portion of it is due to increased milk production, 
per animal, in 1910 over 1900. For both censuses the highest value per cow 
was in British Columbia— $47 . 28 in 1901 and $77.19 in 1911. In the last census 
the cash return per cow is less than the average in Quebec and the Maritime 
provinces and over the average in Ontario and the West. 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 

TABLE 87. VALUE OF DAIRY PRODUCTS BY PROVINCES, TOGETHER WITH 
VALUE OF PRODUCT PER COW, 1910 AND 1900. 



Provinces 



1910 



1900 



Increase 



Value of product 

PER MILCH cow 



Amount 



Per cent 


1910 


p. c. 


S 


55 53 


39 83 


125 -95 


77-19 


1 ;].5 ■ 55 


53-87 


893-18 


40-00 


138 -55 


42-89 


24-61 


41-92 


27-56 


34-18 


57-85 


32-87 


59-83 


35-68 


47-49 


31-46 



1900 



Canada 

British Columbia 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba , 

Ontario 

Quebec , 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Islanu 



103,381,854 

2,620,959 
7,953,847 
7,245,950 
6,661,653 
43,301,044 
25,778,109 
3,568,221 
4,612,596 
1,6-39,475 



e6,17»,953 

1,159,993 

546,i76 

729,574 

2,792,606 

34,776,330 

20,207,826 

2,260,537 

2,885,997 

1,111,614 



36,910,901 

1,460,960 
7,407,371 
6,516,376 
3,869,047 
8,524,714 
5,570,283 
1,307,684 
1,726,599 
527,861 



27-60 

47-28 
11-85 
12-88 
19-74 
32-63 
26-32 
20-35 
20-79 
19-70 



Table 88 gives a general summary of the total amount of investment in 
farm property (comprising land, buildings, implements and living animals) 
and the gross returns on this investment, as represented by the values of field 
crops, fruits and vegetables, animals sold, animals slaughtered on the farm, 
dairy products, wool, eggs and butter in the Fourth and Fifth Censuses. 

The value of all farm property increased by $2,444,738,006 or 136-79 per 
cent during the decade, and the gross value of all agricultural products by 
$360,057,079 or 99-28 per cent. From 1900 to 1910 the per cent ratio of the 
value of "Land products" and of "Animals and animal products" show but 
little variation. In the last census, land products gave a gross return on 
agricultural investment of 57-57 per cent as compared with 57-34 per cent 
in the previous one. Of land products, fruits and vegetables show a greater 
increase in the ten years than do field crops, the former, having increased by 
143 08 per cent and the latter by 97-24 per cent. Animals sold and animal 
products gave a total increase in the decade of $151,894,935 or 98-18 per cent. 
The largest increase in this class was made by "Animals sold" Avith $97,262,377 
or 184-36 per cent; dairy products increased by $36,910,901 or 55-53 per cent, 
and wool, eggs and honey combined gave a total increase of $13,055,349 or 104-19 
per cent. 



16506 — Q 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



TABLE 88. COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE TOTAL VALUE OF ALL FARM 
PROPERTY, OF LAND PRODUCTS, OF ANIMALS SOLD OR SLAUGHTERED, 
AND OF ANIMAL PRODUCTS IN 1910 AND 1900, TOGETHER WITH THE INCREASE 
MADE IN THE DECADE. 



Schedule 



Canada— 

1910 

1900 

Increase total 

" per cent.. 

British Columbia — 

1910 

1900 

Increase total 

" per cent... 



Alberta — 
1910.. 
1900. 



Value of all 
farm 
property - 



Increase total 

" per cent. 

Saskatchewan — 

1910 

1900 

Increase total 

" per cent. 



Manitoba- 
1910.. 
1900.. 



Increase total 

" percent... 



Ontario — 
1910.. 
1900. 



Increase total 

" per cent. 



Quebec — 
1910.. 
1900.. 



Increase total 

" per cent.. . 

N( w Brunswick — 

1910 

1900 

Increase total 

" per cent... 

Nova Scotia — 

1910 

1900 

Increase total 

" percent... 

Prince Edward Island — 

1910 

1900 

Increase total 

" percent... 



4,231,840,636 

1,787,102,630 

2,444.738,006 

136 79 



188,635,724 

33,491,978 

155,143,746 

463-23 



492,636,008 

34,699,781 

457,936,227 

1,319-70 



832,812,560 

44,460,874 

788.351.686 

1,773-14 



463,243,591 

151,355,081 

311,888,510 

206-06 



1,223,701,549 

932,488,069 

291,213,480 

31-23 



787,754,494 

436,076.916 

351,677,578 

80-65 



84,895.906 

51,338.311 

33,557,-595 

65-37 



115.974.892 

72.564.907 

43.409.985 

59-82 



42,185,912 

30,626.713 

11,559.199 

37-74 



Value of 

total 
products 



Values of Land Products 



722,713,962 

362,656.883 

360.057,079 

99 28 



16,982.193 

6, 646, 225 

10,335,968 

155-52 



48,124,564 

5,803,009 

42,321,555 

729-30 



105,964,883 

7,585,587 

98,379.30: 

1,296-92 



68,218.308 

24,443.558 

43,774,750 

179-08 



295,764,315 

196,588,732 

99,175,583 

50-45 



131,631.592 

84.970.277 

46.661.315 

54-91 



20.322,373 

12,866,955 

7,455,418 

57-94 



24,152.045 

16.285.849 

7.866.196 

48-30 



11.-553,683 

7,466,691 

4,086,992 

54-74 



Total 



416,110.464 

207.918.320 

208.162,144 

100-10 



9,604,385 

3,536,371 

6,068,014 

171-59 



18,152,121 

2,650,499 

15,501,622 

584-86 



81,015,140 

4,656,646 

76.-358,494 

1,639-77 



46,959,758 

16,833,279 

30.126.479 

178-97 



154.648,718 

109,947.903 

44,700,815 

40-65 



72,622.306, 

47,415,909 

25,206.397 

53-16 



12,234,897 

8,134,437 

4,100.460 

50-40 



14.031.478 

9,992,325 

4,039,153 

40-42 



6,841.661: 

4.780.9511 

2.060,710 

43-10 



Field crops 



Fruits and 
vegetables 



384.522.795 

194.953.420 

189,569.375 

97 24 



7,246,018 

3,100.-577 

4.145.441 

133-70 



17,015,329 

2,618,420 

14,396,909 

549-83 



79,963,903 

4,608,172 

75,355.731 

1,635-26 



45.509.520 

16.669.321 

28.840.199 

173-01 



140,786,055 

102,138.809 

38.647,236 

37-84 



65,353,528 

44,851,108 

20,502,420 

45-71 



11,030,237 

7,740,100 

3.290,137 

42-51 



11.005.03' 

8,584.9.')6 

2.420.077 

28- 19 



6.613,172 

4.641.947 

1,971.225 

42-47 



31.587.669 

12.994,900 

18,592,769 

143 08 



2,358.367 

435.794 

1.922,573 

441-17 



1,136,792 

32,079 

1,104,713 

3,443-73 



1.051.237 

48.474 

1.002.763 

2.068-66 



1.4-50.238 

163,958 

1.286,280 

784-52 



13.862.663 

7,809.084 

6.053.579 

77-53 



7.268,778 

2,564,801 

4,703,977 

183-41 



1,204,660 

394,337 

810.323 

205-49 



3,026.445 

1.407,369 

1.019.076 

11504 



228.489 

139.004 

89.485 

64-38 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 xciii 

TABLE 88. COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE TOTAL VALUE OF ALL FARM 
PROPERTY, OF LAND PRODUCTS, OF ANIMALS SOLD OR SLAUGHTERED, 
AND OF ANIMAL PRODUCTS IN 1910 AND 1900, TOGETHER WITH THE INCREASE 
MADE IN THE DECADE. 



Values of Animals and their Products 



Total 


Animals sold 


Animals 
slaughtered on farm 


Dairy products 


Wool, eggs and 
honey 


$ 


S 


$ 


$ 


S 


:;06.6{>3,4!)8 
l>4,708.5;>3 
151,891.935 

98 18 


150.017.752 

52,755,375 

97.262.377 

184 36 


27,617,835 

22,9-1,527 

4,866,308 

20 33 


103.381,854 

66,470,953 

36,910.901 

55 53 


25,586,057 

12,530,708 

13,055.349 

104 19 


7,377,808 

3,109,854 

4,267,954 

137-24 


3,290,001 

1,202,607 

2,087,394 

173-57 


409,374 

307.397 

101,977 

33-17 


2,620,959 

1,159,993 

1,460,966 

125-95 


1,057,474 

439.857 

617,617 

140-41 


29.972,443 

3,152,510 

26,819,933 

850-75 


19,031,121 

2,127,386 

16,903,735 

794-58 


1,428,548 

279,513 

1,149,035 

411-08 


7,953,847 

M6,476 

7,407,371 

1,355-48 


1,558,927 

199,135 

1,359,792 

682-85 


24,949.749 

2,928,941 

22,020,808 

751-84 


13,191,262 

1,626,446 

11,564,816 

711-05 


2,203.391 

375,059 

1,828,-332 

487-48 


7,245,950 

729,574 

6,516,376 

893-18 


2,309,146 

197,862 

2,111,284 

1,067-05 


21,258,550 

7,610,279 

13,648,271 

179-34 


10,933,747 

2,869.105 

8,064,642 

281 09 


1,875,890 

1,325,289 

550,601 

41-55 


6,661,6.53 

2,792,606 

3,869,047 

138-55 


1,787,260 

623,279 

1,163,981 

186-75 


141,115.597 

86,6-10,829 

54,474,768 

62-87 


76,490,854 

35,385,376 

41,105,478 

116-17 


9,474,294 

9,687,109 

212,815 

2-20 


43,301,044 

34,776,330 

8,524,714 

24-51 


11.849.405 

6,792,014 

5,0-57,391 

74-46 


59,009,286 

37,554,368 

21,4.54,918 

.57-13 


20,129.977 

6,650,486 

13,479.491 

202-68 


8,609,944 

8, 006.. 328 

603,616 

7-54 


25,778,109 

20,207,826 

5,570,283 

27-56 


4,491,256 

2,689,728 

1,801,528 

66-98 


8,087,476 

4,732,518 

3,354,9.58 

70-89 


2,275,795 

787,975 

1,487,820 

188-82 


1,435, .550 
1,160.783 

274,767 
23-67 


3,568,221 

2,260,-537 

1,307,684 

.57-85 


807,910 

-523,223 

284,687 

54-41 


10,120,567 

6,293,524 

3,827,043 

60-81 


3,094,028 

1,427,777 

1,666,251 

116-70 


1,320, .5.59 

1,247,3.58 

73,201 

5-87 


4,612,-596 

2,885,997 

1,726,-599 

.59-83 


1,093,384 

7-32,392 

360,992 

49-29 


4,712,022 

2,085,740 

2,026,282 

75-45 


1,580,967 

678,217 

902,750 

1.33-10 


860,285 

562,691 

297,594 

52-89 


1,639,475 

1,111,614 

527,861 

47-49 


631,295 

-3-33,218 

298,077 

89-45 



1.5506- 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



In the foregoing table and elsewhere in this volume, the statistics of the 
value of farm property, viz. value of land, buildings, implements and live stock 
on farms are for June 1, 1911, while the records of land products, animals sold 
iind animal products are for the year 1910. The Census of 1901 being taken 
r.s for March 31, the records refer almost entirely to the operations of the year 
1900. 

The values of land products, in the western provinces, were adversely affected 
by the unfavourable seasonal conditions prevailing during the summer and 
autumn of 1910. In Alberta 265,699 acres, or 12-85 per cent, in Saskatchewan 
159,456 acres or 2-32 per cent, in Manitoba 77,546 acres or 1-66 per cent of the 
area planted for the harvest year 1910 did not produce a crop. It is probable 
that, because the enumerators were not specifically required to obtain the record 
of non-productive areas, the acreage which failed to produce a harvest is not 
fully accounted for in Table 89. 

TABLE 89. NON-PRODUCTIVE AREAS IN THE PRAIRIE 
PROVINCES IN THE HARVEST YEAR 1910. 



Crops 



Non-productive areas, harvest year 1910 



Alberta 



Saskatchewan 



Manitoba 



Wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Flax 

Other grains 

Forage crops 

Potatoes and roots 

Total non-productive acreage 



acres 

133,842 

9,843 

109,961 

8,945 

1,0S4 

623 

1,401 



acres 

64,387 

2,948 

58,981 

32,310 

270 

273 

287 



acres 

12,918 

17,948 

44,247 

1,448 

304 

302 

379 



265,699 



159,456 



77,546 



The success of all agricultural operations are inter-dependent. Whether 
the returns from the farm are small or great depends primarily upon 
(1) the suitability of the "land occupied" for farming, (2) the number 
and character of the live stock kept, (3) the effectiveness of the implements 
employed and (4) the means taken to insure proper housing of the fruits of the 
field, of live stock and of implements and machincr}-. The earnings on invest- 
ment of the various agricultural products are therefore presented in Table 90 
as percentages of the value of all farm property, that is to say, the value of 
field crops, of animals sold, and of animal products are not given as percentages 
of the investment in land or animals, as the case may be, but as percentages 
of the aggregate value of all farm property at the date of the census. For 
example, in the figures for 1910, for all Canada, the aggregate value of field 
crops, fruits and vegetables represented a per cent return of 9-83 per cent, 
not on the value of lands only, but on the total value of all farm property (land, 
buildings, implements and live stock on farms). 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 



xcv 



TABLE 90. PER CENT RETURN ON INVESTMENT IN FARM PROPERTY, WHICH THE 
GROSS VALUE OF LAND PRODUCTS, ANIMALS SOLD, AND ANIMAL 
PRODUCTS REPRESENT BY PROVINCES, 1910 AND 1900. 







Per cent return on V.a.lue of Farm Property given bt 






All 
Pro- 
ducts 


Land Products 


Animals sold and Animal Products 


Provinces 


Total 


Field 
Crops 


Fruits 
and 
Vege- 
tables 


Total 


Ani- 
mals 
sold 


Ani- 
mals 
slaught- 
ered 
on 
farm 


Dairy 
Pro- 
ducts 


Wool, 

Eggs, 

and 

Honey 


Canada 
1910 


p.c. 

17 08 
20-29 

900 
19-84 

9-77 
16-72 

12-73 
17-06 

14-73 
1614 

2416 
21-08 

16-72 
19-48 

23-94 
25-06 

20-82 
22-44 

27-38 
24-37 


p.c. 

9 84 
11 62 

5-09 
10-55 

3-68 
7-63 

9-73 
10-47 

1014 
1112 

12-64 
11-79 

9-22 
10-87 

14-41 
15-85 

12-09 
13-77 

16-21 
15-61 


p.c. 

9 10 
10 90 

3-84 
9-25 

3-45 
7-54 

9-60 
10-36 

9-83 
1101 

11-51 
10-95 

8-30 
10-28 

12-99 
15-08 

9-48 
11-83 

15-67 
15-16 


p.c. 

0-74 
72 

1-25 
1-30 

0-23 
009 

0-13 
0-11 

0-31 
0-11 

M3 
0-84 

0-92 
0-59 

1-42 
0-77 

2-61 
1-94 

0-54 
0-45 


p.c. 

7 24 

8-67 

3-91 
9-29 

ii-09 
9-09 

300 
6-59 

4-59 
5-02 

11-52 
9-29 

7-50 
8-61 

9-53 
9-21 

8-73 
8-67 

1117 
8-77 


p.c. 

3 55 
2 95 

1-75 
3-59 

3-87 
6-13 

1-58 
3-66 

2-36 
1-88 

6-25 
3-79 

2-56 
1-52 

2-68 
1-53 

2-66 
1-97 

3-75 
2-21 


p.c. 

65 

1 29 

0-21 
0-92 

0-29 
0-81 

■ 0-27 
0-84 

0-41 

0-88 

0-77 
1-04 

MO 
1-84 

1-69 
2-26 

114 
1-72 

2-03 
1-84 


p.c. 

2 44 

3 72 

1-39 
3-46 

1-61 
1-57 

0-87 
1-64 

1-44 
1-85 

3-53 
3-73 

3-27 
4-63 

4-20 
4-41 

3-97 
3-98 

3-89 
3-63 


p.c. 
60 


1900 


71 


British Columbia — 

1910 


0-56 


1900 


1-32 


Alberta— 

1910 


0-32 


1900 


0-58 


Saskatchewan — 

1910 


0-28 


1900 


0-45 


Manitoba — 

1910 


0-38 


1900 


0-41 


Ontario — 

1910 


0-97 


1900 


0-73 


Quebec — 

1910 


0-57 


1900 


0-62 


New Brunswick — 

1910 


0-96 


1900 


101 


Nova Scotia — 

1910 


0-48 


1900 


1-00 


Prince Edward Island — 
1910 


1-50 


1900 


1-09 







By provinces the best percentage of return in 1910 is shown by Prince 
Edward Island, with 27-38 per cent for all products, being 16-21 per cent for 
land products, 11-17 per cent for animals sold and animal products, Ontario 
comes next with a total gross return on investment of 24-16 per cent, 12-64 
per cent being for field crops and 11-52 per cent for animals sold and animal 
products. These are the only provinces which show increased gross earnings 
on agricultural investment in 1910 as compared with 1900. In the western 
provinces, OA\'ing to rapid development and the consequent heavy outlay in 
recent years for buildings, implements and live stock, the gross return on in- 
vestment is less in 1910 than it was in 1900. 



E. s. M. 



CINQUIEME RECENSEMENT 



DU CANADA 1911 



AGRICULTURE 



VOLUME IV 




OTTAWA 

IMPRIMfi PAR J. »• L. TACHli, IMPRIMEUU DE SA TRftS EXCELLENTE 

MAJESTI!; LE ROl 
1914 



TABLES DES MATIERES. 



IxTRODrrxiox. 



Remarques pr£liminaires. 



PAGE. 

vii 



Tcrres en culture — 

Superficie totale des terres occupies et superficies consid6r6es susceptibles de culture au Canada k la 

date du recensement, juin 1911. 

Superficie totale des terres a culture, par provinces, 1911 et 1901 .[ 

Population, terros, superficies en terres et valeur des terres du Canada, 1911 et 1910 

Terres occupees, 1S91 . 1911 

Pour-cent de la distribution des terres occupies, 1S91-1911 

Te»ure des terres en culture, 1S91-1911 ..'..'..* 

Etat comparatif de la superficie des terres en culture par pro\-inces en 1911 et 1901, ainsi que I'augmen- 

tation faite en dix ans 

Pour-cent de la distribution des terres en culture par provinces, 1911 et 1901 .', 

Moyenne de la superficie totale des fermes, moyenne de la superficie am^lior6e des fermes, 1911 et 1901.. 



xiu 
xiv 



xvii 

xviii 

xix 



Valeur de la propriete agricole — 

Valeur de la propriete agriccle par provinces, 1911 et 1901 sx 

Valeur moyenne de la propriete agricole par ferme occupee, par provinces, 1911 et 1901 xxii 

Proportion pour cent de la valeur de la propriete agricole revenant a chaque province, 1911 et 1901. . ' xxiii 
Pour-cent de la di.slribution de la valeur de la propriete agricole telle que classifile par provinces, 1911 

et 1901 xxiv 

Vergers et jardins — 

Superficies des terres en vergers et en jardins pour le Canada, 1S91-1911 xxiv 

Tcrres en vergers, en petits fruits et en legumes, compar^es par provinces, 1891, 1901 et 1911 xxv 

Arbres fruitiers, en rapport et non en rapport, ainsi que leur nombre moyen par ferme et par 100 acres de 

terre amelioree, 191 1 et 1901 xsvi 

Produits fruitiers pour le Canada, ainsi que la production moyenne par ferme et par 100 acres de terre 

amelioree, 1S9!)-1910 xxvii 

Arbres fruitiers en 1901 et 1911, et fruits en 1890, 1900 et 1910, compares par provinces xxviii 

Valeur des fruits et des legumes en 1910 et totaux comparatifs pour 1910 et 1900, ainsi que I'augmenta- 

tion pour cent en dix ans xxix 

Proportion pour cent de la valeur totale des fruits de vergers, des petits fruits et des 16giuiies par provinces 

en 1910 XXX 

Quantit6 et valeur des fruits exportcs pour les ann^es se terminant le 30 juin, 1901 et 1911 xxxi 

<2uantit6 et valour des fruits import^s pour les ann6ee se terminant le 30 juin 1891, 1901 ot 1911 xxxi 

Recoltes des champs — 

Etat comparatif de la superficie en rficoltes des champs par provinces, 1890, 1900, 1910 et 1911 xxxii 

Torres vacantes dans Test du Canada, recensement de 1911 xxxiii 

Distribution pour cent des acres en recoltes par provinces, 1890, 1900 et 1910 xxxiii 

Etat comparatif montrant I'augmentation ou la diminution de r6tendue en rdcoltes des champs de 

1890 a 1900 et de 1900 a 1910 pour le Canada xxxiv 

Statistiques comparatives de la superficie en rScoltes des champs par provinces, 1890, 1900, 1910, 1911 xxxviii-xlii 
Moyenne de la superficie des principales recoltes des champs par 100 acres de terre amflioree par pro- 
vinces, 1911 et 1901 xliv 

Pour-cent que constitue I'^tendue en recoltes mentionn^es par rapport k la superficie totale des terres 
amelior6es et pour-cent de I'^tendue totale en r6coltes des champs revenant k chaque rScolte par 

dficades xlv 

Etat comparatif du rendement des rficoltes de grains 1880-1910 xlix 

Etat comparatif du rendement du foin, dea plantes-racines et des autres r6colte.<;, 1890-1910 lii 

Superficie et production des recoltes des champs au Canada, 1890, 1900 et 1910 liii 

Moyenne de la production des recoltes des champs par acre consacre A chactuc recolte 1890-1910 liv 

Statistiques comparatives du rendement des recoltes des champs k I'acro'par provinces, 1890-1910 Iv 

Production moyenne par ferme des principales rficoltes par provinces, 1910-1900 hi 

Valeur totale des rficoltes des champs, ainsi que lour valeur moyenne par ferme, pour chque province 

en 1910 et 1900 Ivii 

Valeur des r6coltes des champs pour chaque sorte de recolte, 1910 Ivii-lviii 

Proportion pour cent de la valeur totale des rfcoltes des champs representee par groupes, 1910 lix 

Valeur unitaire des recoltes des champs en 1910 lix 

Pour-cent de la distribution dc la valeur des rficoltes des champs, ainsi que leur moyenne par acre de 

terre con.sacre a ces cultures, 1910 et 1900 Ix 

Princip.iles r6coltcs clas-sifiSes selon la valeur de leur production, par provinces, 1910 Ixi 

Quantity et valeur des recoltes dea champs exportfies en 1891, 1901 et 191 1 pour les ann6es de recensement 

de 1890, 1900 et 1910 Ixii 



Loyer et gages^ 

Loycr de la terre consacrfe k ragriculturc, 1901-1911. 
Travail et gages par provinces, 1911 et 1901 



Ixiv 
Ixv 



Animaux de la ferme — 

•Sommairc du nombre et de la valeur du bfitail au Canada, 1911 et 1901 Ixvi 

Nombre dc chevaux de tout age par provinces, 1911 et 1901 Ixvii 

Pour-cent de la distribution dea chevaux par provinces et nombre moyen par 100 acrca dc terre am6lior6e, 

1911 et 1901 Ixviii 

Valour des chevaux par provinces, 1911 et 1901 Ixviii 

Valeur moyenne par tfite, ainsi que le nombre moyen de chevaux par ferme, par provinces. 1911 at 1901. Ixix 



PAGES. 

Nombre de vaches laitiferes par provinces, 1911 et 1901 Ixx 

Valeur des vaches laitiferes par provinces, 1911 et 1901 Ixxi 

Valeur moyenne des vaches laiti^ros par t6te, ainsi que leur nombre par ferme, par provinces, 1911 et 

1901 Ixri 

Pour-cent de la distribution des vaches laiti^res et nombre moyen par 100 acres de terro am61ior6e, par 

provinces, 1911 et 1901 Ixxii 

Nombre de b^tes a comes autres que les vaches laitiferes par provinces, 1911 et 1901 Ixxiii 

Valeur des bfites A comes, autres que les vaches laitiferes, par provinces, 1911 et 1901 Ixxiii 

Valeur moyenne des b^tes ii comes, autres que les vaches laitiferes, par t§te, ainsi que le nombre moyen, 

par ferme, 1911 et 1901 Ixxiv 

Pour-cent do la distribution des bStes a comes, autres que les vaches laitiferes, et le nombre moyen par 100 

acres de terre amfilior^e par provinces en 1911 et 1901 Ixxv 

Nombre des moutons, par pro\'inces, 1911 et 1901 Ixxvi 

Valeur des mautons, par provinces, 1911 et 1901 Ixxvi 

Valeur moyenne des moutons par tSte, ainsi que le nomibre moyen par ferme par provinces, 1911 et 1901 Ixxvii 
Pour-cent de la distribution des moutons et leur nombre moyen, par 100 acres de terra amSliorge par pro- 
vinces en 1911 et 1901 Ixxvii 

Nombre de p»rcs au Canada par provinces, 1911 et 1901 Ixxviii 

Valeur des pores par provinces, 1911 et 1901 Ixxix 

Valeur moyenne des pores par t^te, ainsi que leur nombre moyen par ferme, par pro\'inces, 1911 et 1901 Ixxix 
Pour-cent de la distribution des pores et le nombre moyen par 100 acres de terre am61ior6e par provinces 

en 1911 et 1901 Ixxx 

Nombre de volailles, par provinces, 1911 et 1901 Ixxxi 

Volailles par esp^ces, par provinces, en 1911 et 1901 Ixxxii 

Pour-cent de la distribution des volailles et le nombre moyen par 100 acrees de terre am6Ilor6e par 

provinces, 191 1 et 1901 Ixxxii 

Valeur des volailles par provinces, 1911 et 1901 _ Ixxxiii 

Valeur moyenne des volailles par t6te, ainsi que leur nombre moyen par ferme, par provinces, 1911 et 

1901 Ixxxiii 

Exportations d'animaiix de ferme par decades, 1881-1910. Les anndes 1909 et 1910 sent donn^es 

s^par^meut Ixxxiv 

Animaux de race sur les fermes, par provinces, 1911 et 1901 Ixxxv 

Animaux vendus — 

Valeur moyenne des animaux sur les fermes, juin 1911, et des animaux vendus en 1910, par tfite Ixxxvii 

Chevaux vendus en 1910. Proportion qu'ils forment des chevaux sur les fermes, ainsi que la distribution 
pour cent des ventes, par provinces Ixxxviii 

Bfites k cornes de toutes sortes vendues en 1910. Proportion qu'elles forment du total sur les fermes, ainsi 

que le pour-cent de la distribution des ventes par provinces ._ Ixxxix 

Vaches laiti^res vendues en 1910. Proportion qu'elles forment du total sur les fermes, ainsi que le pour- 
cent de la distribution des ventex, par provinces Ixxxix 

Moutons vendus en 1910. Proportion qu'ils forment du total sur les fermes, ainsi que le pour-cent de la 

distribution des ventes, par provinces xo 

Pores vendus en 1910. Proportion qu'ils forment du total sur les fermes, ainsi que le pour-cent de la 

distribution des ventes par provinces xci 

Eevenu des volailles par provinces en 1910 xcii 

Valeur totale de tous les animaux de ferme vendus ou tu^s en 1910 et ISOO xcii 

Exportations et importations de produits animaux — 

Production, exportations, importations et consommation des oeufs, 1910 et 1900 xciii 

Quantity et valeur des produits des animaux export^s en 1891, 1901 et 1911 xciv 

Produits laitiers — 

Statistiques comparatives de I'industrie laitifere montrant la production, I'exportation, rimportation, 

et la consoiumation, pour tout le Canada, pour les annfies de recenaement 1911-1901 xcv 

Etat comparatif de la production du beurre et du fromage au Canada, 1910 et 1900 xcvi 

Produits laitiers par provinces en 1910 xc^^i 

Valeur des produits laitiers par provinces, ainsi que la valeur de la production par vache laiti4re en 1910 

et 1900 xcvii 

Sommaire f>en6ral — 

Etat comparatif de la valeur totale des propri6t6s agricoles, des produits des chamgs, des animaux vendus 

ou abattus et des produits des animaux en 1900 et 1910, ainsi q\io I'augmontation durant la d6cade. xcviii-xcix 

Superficie iniproductive dans les provinces du Nord-ouest durant l'ann6e 1910 o 

Proportion pour cent des placements en propri6t6 agricole que constitue la valeur brute des produits 

des champs, des animaux vendus et des produits des animaux, par provinces, 1910 et 1900 ci 

DiAGRAMME MON'TUANT LA PRODUCTION DU GRAIN PAR DBCADE3, en /(ICe de /a po^e xHv 

Tableau.x G^NERAUX. 

tableaux. 

I. Terres occup<>es 2-45 

II. Terres occupies selon la tenure et la condition 46-133 

III. R6coltes de crains, 1910 134-221 

IV. Foin, pommo de terre, racines, etc., 1910 222-309 

V. Arbres f ruitiors et fruits 310-327 

VI. IW-coltes des champs, pour la saison de 1911 328-337 

VII. Bctail sur les formes, 1911 338-347 

VIII. B^^tail vendu et produits des animaux, 1910 34,8-367 

IX. Valeurs des terres, bAtimcnts, des machines agricolos et des r6colte3 de grains 358-367 

X. Valeurs des fruits, des plantes fourragJires, des plantes 3arcl6e3 ct des travaux sur les fermes, 

1910 368-377 

XI. Valeurs des produits de la laitoric, de la laine et des oeufs, 1910 378-381 

XII. Valeurs du b6tail en 1911 et des animaux vendus ou abattus en 1910 382-389 

XIII. Sommaire dea terres occupies selon la tenure et la condition 390-391 



TABLEAUX. PAGES. 

XIV. Sommaire des rftcoltes de grains, 1910 390-3!)l 

XV. Sommaire du loin, pommea de terre, racines, etc., 1910 392-393 

XVI. Sommaire de.s arbrcs fruitiers et leurs fruits 392-393 

XVII. Sommaire des recoltes des champs, saison de 1911 394-393 

XVIII. Sommaire du b^tail sur les fermes, 1911 396-397 

XIX. Sommaire du betail vendu et produits des animaux, 1910 390-397 

XX. Sommaire des valeurs des terres, des batimeuts, des machines agriooles et des rficoltes de 

grains 398-399 

XXI. Sommaire des valeurs des fruits, des r^coltes fourrag^rea, des rScoltes sarclSes et des travaux 

sur les fermes, 1910 39S-399 

XXII. Sommaire des valeurs du b6tail en 19911 et des animaux vendus et abattus en 1910 400-401 

XXIII. Somm.aire des valeurs des produits de la laiterie, de la laine et des oeufs, 1910 400 

XXIV. Sommaire des terres occupees 401 

XXV. Rec'oltes des champs par superficies, produits et moyennes, 1910, 1900 ..'. 402-407 

XXVI. Tableau comparatif de la superficie des principales rScoltes des champs, 1S90-1910 408 

XXVII. Tableau comparatif du rendement des principales rScoltes des champs, 1880-1910 409 

XXr\'^III. Nombre d'.animaux de la ferme, 1891-1911 410 

XXIX. Moyenne des animaux de la ferme par terre occup6e, 1891-1911 .,', 4n 

XXX. Nombre du b6tail par 100 acres do terre am^lior^e, 1911, 1901 . 412 

XXXI. Pour-cent de la distribution du b6tail par provinces, 1891-1901 41j 

XXXII. Valeur du betail, 1911-1901 .'.'." 41.4 

XXXIII. Valeur moyenne par t6te d'animaux de la ferme sur les terres et ailleurs, 1911, 1901 415 

XXXIV. Tableau comparatif des produits des animaux, 1890-1910 .' 415 

XXXV. Animaux de race, avec le nom de chaque race 417-418 

Appendice. Provisions g6n6rales pour I'^numeration dea statistiqucs agricoles, et copies des listes en 

usage dans le cinquifeme recensement 4 19-403 



CINQUIEME RECENSEMENT DU CANADA. 

INTRODUCTION. 
Volume IV. 

Ce volume du cinquieme recensement du Canada traite do la statistique 
des industries agricoles du Dominion. Cette statistique se rapporte aux super- 
ficies des terres, a la production des recoltes des champs, aux fruits, aux animaux 
et leurs produits, au travail et aux gages. Des bulletins separes furent publics 
aussitot que les resultats de la compilation furent connus donnant les statistiques 
agricoles de chaque province. Ces bulletins contenaient les principaux rcnsei- 
gnements touchant I'industrie agricole dans chaque province, avec des donnees 
indiquant le progres fait dans cette Industrie durant les dix annees, 1901 a 1911. 

Les chiffres de la superficie et de la production des recoltes des champs 
pour Ontario, Quebec, le Nouveau-Brunswick et I'lle du Prince-Edouard sont 
donnes par cantons et paroisses. Dans les autres provinces, pour differentes 
raisons, les chifi'res sont donnes par districts electoraux. Dans la Nouvelle- 
Ecosse, ou ni le canton ou la paroisse ne sont regulierement etablis, Ic comte 
entier dans presque tons les cas forme une municipalite. Dans les provinces 
du Manitoba, de la Saskatchewan et de I'Alberta, le canton geographique, 
contenant ordinairement 23,040 acres, est une unite trop petite pour permettre 
de donner dans les differents tableaux de la statistique agricole les details 
pour chacun de ces cantons. 

Les statistiques des proprietes agricoles, des terres occupccs en propricto 
ou louees, des terres ameliorecs et non ameliorees, se rapportent a la date du pre- 
mier juin 1911. Les statistiques concernant le rcndement des recoltes et la pro- 
duction des animaux se rapportent a Tannee 1910. 

D'apres le manuel d'instructions, voir appendice pages 419-428, les recenseurs 
devaient inscrire seulement les terres consacrees a la production des recoltes et a 
la nourriture des animaux. Le terme ((terre amcliorec )) etait defini comme ((terrc 
qui a ete mise en culture et qui a produit une recolte et qui pent produire des 
recoltes)). Dans les recensements precedents, aucune definition precise n'ayant 
ete donnee du terme ((terre amelioree)), le resuitat a etc que sous cet en-tcte 
on a compris les superficies des terrains impropres a la culture mais employes 
comme paturages; dans le present recensement les superficies des terres arables 
seulement ont ^te comptees comme terres ameliorees. Vu cette restriction dans 
la definition, les superficies de terres amdlior^es, telles que donn(5es dans le present 
recensement, ne peuvent etre strictement comparees avec celles des recensements 
precedents. 

La date fixee pour la prise du recensement de 1911 etait le premier juin, 
tandis que pour les recensements ])rec6dents la date etait le 31 mars. Ce chan- 
gement de date a permis au bureau du recensement de recueillir la statistique 
des superficies ensemencees, ou en autre ^tat, pour rannee 1911, au moment 

vii 



viii RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

ou les result ats des operations agricoies etaient encore fraiches a la m^moire des 
cultivateurs. On pent done croire que les statistiques se rapportant aux terres, 
a la tenure, a la condition, a la superficie amelioree et non amelioree, k la super- 
ficie ensemencee au printemps de 1911, ainsi que les autres statistiques tou- 
chant I'industrie agricole a la date du premier juin 1911, sont aussi exactes 
qu'il soit possible de les obtenir. On ne pent pas garantir le meme montant 
("exactitude quant aux statistiques agricoies pour I'annee 1910 qui ont 616 
recueillies en juin 1911, qu'on pent le faire pour les statistiques plus proches de 
la date du recensement, vu que la memoire pent faire defaut lorsqu'il s'est 
ecoule un espace de temps assez considerable entre la date des faits k recueillir et 
la date du recueillement de ces faits. 

Les statistiques de I'etendue et de la production des principales recoltes des 
champs en 1910 sont sans doute aussi exactes que possible, en vue du fait que la 
preparation des donnees pour 1911, representant des operations plus receates, 
a dH aider le cultivateur a fournir avec plus d'exactitude les chiffres se rap- 
portant a I'etendue et a la production des recoltes de I'annee precedente. 

Leis chiffres ayant rapport aux recoltes secondaires, telles que les fruits, 
les legumes et aux produits des animaux, tels que les viandes et les produits 
laitiers, sont sans doute beaucoup moins 61ev6s qu'ils ne devraient I'etre. Les 
cultivateurs en general ne tiennent pas de livres et n'ont aucun sj^steme defini 
de comptabilite, et sont consequemment portes a ignorer ou a rester en dec; a 
dans leurs estimations des quantites pour les legumes, les fruits, le lait, la ereme, 
le beurre, le fromage, les ceufs et le miel consommes sur la ferme durant les 
saisons au cours desquelles ces produits sont en plus grande abondance. 

Quant au recensement du betail il est raisonnable de croire qu'un rapport 
plus juste de cette Industrie a et4 obtenu en fixant I'inscription pour le mois de 
juin, alors que les animaux par la condition et le nombre sont a leur maximum, 
que si I'inscription eut ete fixee pour la fin de mars. On devra se rappeler, 
cependant, en comparant le nombre et la valeur du betail d'apres les recensements 
de 1911 et 1901, qu'un plus grand nombre de jeunes animaux se trouvent compris 
dans le recensement de 1911 que dans celui de 1911, et que le prix moyen par tete 
en 1911 se trouve ainsi reduit. 

Tandis qu'il est possible de surmonter les obstacles rencontres dans le 
recueillement des statistiques agricoies dont il est question dans le paragraphe 
precedent, il n'en reste pas moins vrai qu'un autre obstacle reside dans le manque 
d' appreciation d'un tel travail, non seulement chez les personnes appelees k 
fournir les renseignements, mais souvent aussi chez les recenseurs eux-memes 
qui ne comprennent pas bien toute I'importance d'un recensement bien fait, 
lis ne realisent pas que les chiffres d'un recensement sont le seul moyen de 
comparer au point de vue economique le progr^s accompli par un pays dans 
ses differentes industries. 

Dans le texte et les tableaux de I'introduction, la ou la chose est possible, 
les statistiques du recensement de 1911 sont presentees sous forme de compa- 
raisons avec les recensements precedents. De cette maniere une idee plus 
claire est donnee (1) des augmentations dans les superficies, les recoltes, les 
animaux et leurs produits, d'lme decade a I'autre, (2) de prevoir le progres 
des futures operations agricoies et (3) de bien comprendre le mouvement qu 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 ix 

se fait vers I'Ouest dans la production agricole d'un recensement a I'autre. 
Par exemple le tableau 25 indique comment la proportion des superficies distri- 
buoes en recoltes a graduellement diminu^ dans les provinces de I'Est, tandis 
qu'elle a augmente d'une maniere correspondante dans celles de I'Ouest. De 
meme pour la proportion des animaux et lours produits dans les tableaux vii et 
viii. II n'entre pas da)\s le plan de cette introduction de faire une longue analj'se 
des differentes industries agricoles. 

La superficie totale du Canada est donnee comme etant de 2,306,502,153 
acres, dont les neuf provinces occupaient 977,585,513 acres a la date du recen- 
sement, juin 1911. Le reste de la superficie totale appartient au Yukon 
(132,113,360 acres) et aux Territoires du Nord-Ouest (1,196,803,280 acres). 
On a tenu aucun compte des superficies du Yukon et des Territoires du Nord- 
Ouest dans les calculs des tableaux de ce volume, vu qu'il n'est pas probable 
qu'une etendue appreciable de leur territoire soit consacree a 1 'agriculture 
avant que les terres dans les autres provinces aient ete occupees. 

D'apres les calculs faits au bureau du recensement en 1909 et revises recem- 
ment, le tableau qui suit indique, pour 1911, les superficies occupees, avec 
estimations des superficies possibles en terres occupees comme fermes en exploi- 
tations agricoles dans le Dominion. Les estimations des terres capables d'etre 
occupees sont basees en partie sur les chiffres des terres a culture occupees 
a la date du recensement de 1911, et en partie sur les chififres proportionnels de 
la superficie totale fixee approximativement, mais se rapportant aux faits plus 
ou moins determines, quant au caractere des terres dans chaque province et aux 
augmentations dans les superficies des terres occupees et ameliorees. 

TABLEAU 1. SUPERFICIE TOTALE DES TERRES OCCUPIES ET SUPERFICIES COX- 
SID^lRfiES SUSCEPTIBLES DE CULTURE AU CANADA A LA DATE DU RECENSE- 
MENT, JUIN 1911. 



Provinces 



Total 
des terres 



Occupees comme terms 
en culture 



Estimees comme 
terres su.s<!eptible3 de 
culture 



Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick.. . 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

11'- du Prince-Edouard 

Totaux . . . 



226,186.370 

161,872,000 

155,764,100 

41,Hi(),0<)8 

141,125,330 

218,723,687 

17,863,266 

13,483,671 

1,397,991 



540,011 
751,899 
642,985 
228,233 
171,785 
613,267 
537,999 
260,455 
202,354 



977.5^5,513 



1§9,918,988 



pour-cent 
du total 

112 
10-97 
18-39 
29-70 
15-71 

7-14 
25-40 
3901 
86-01 



22,618,000 
97,123,000 
93,458,000 
24,700,000 
56,450,000 
43,745,000 
10,718,000 
8,092.000 
1,258,190 



11 25 



358,163,199 



pour-eon t 
du total 

10 
60 
60 
60 
40 
20 
60 
60 
90 



3fi 



D'apres les chilBFres du tableau precedent la superficie totale des terres des 
neuf provinces 6tait de 977,585,513 acres, dont 109,948,988 acres ou 11-25 
pour cent etaient occup^s comme terres k culture. L'estimation des terres 
susceptibles de culture, situees dans les provinces telles que constituees a la date 
du recensement, ^tait de 358,162,190 acres ou 36 pour cent de la superficie 
totale contenue dans les limites provinciales. La superficie des terres des 



X RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

neuf provinces du Canada a augmente de 977,585,513 acres a 1,401,316,413 
acres par I'application de la loi d'Extension de 1912 qui detachait des Territoires 
du Nord-Ouest 423,730,900 acres, dont 223,429,600 acres ont ete ajoutes a 
Quebec, 93,037,700 acres a Ontario et 107,263,600 acres au IManitoba. 

De I'etendue totale des terres des neuf provinces, 63,422,338 acres ou 6-48 
pour cent etaient occupees comme terres a culture en 1901, comparativement. 
a 109,948,988 acres ou 11-25 pour cent en 1911, formant une augmentation, 
pour le Canada, de 73-36 pour cent ou 46,526,650 acres en dix ans. De 1901 
a 1911 la Saskatchewan a accru son etendue en terres a culture occupees de 
24,809,551 acres ou 647-18 pour cent; I'Alberta, de 15,016,269 acres ou 548-91 
pour cent; la Colombie-Britannique de 1,042,592 acres ou 69-63 pour cent; le 
Manitoba de 3,384,886 acres ou 38 • 28 pour cent. Parmi les provinces de I'Est, 
Quebec est celle qui montre le gain le plus eleve, ayant augmente son etendue en 
terres a culture occupees de 1,169,092 acres ou 8 -09 pour cent; Ontario indique 
une augmentation de 822,261 acres ou 3-85 pour cent; la Nouvelle-Ecosse, de 
179,554 acres ou 3-53 pour cent; le Nouveau-Brunswack, de 94,599 acres ou 
2-13 pour cent, et I'lle dii Prince-Edouard, de 7,846 acres ou environ trois 
cinquiemes de un pour cent. 



TABLEAU 2. SUPERFICIE TOTALE DES TERRES ET TERRE A CULTURE, PAR PRO- 
VINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 


Superficie totale 
des terres 


Terres a culture 


Augmentation des 
terres a culture 
en dix ans 


1911 


1901 


numerique. 


pour 
cent 


Colombie-Britannique 


acres 

220,186.370 

101,872.000 

155,764,100 

41,169,098 

141,125.330 

218,723.687 

17,863,266 

13.483,671 

1,397,991 


acres 

2.540.011 

17,751.899 

28,642,985 

12,228.233 

22.171.785 

15,613,267 

4,537,999 

5,260,455 

1,202,354 


acres 

1,497,419 
2,735,630 
3,833,434 
8,843,347 
21,349,524 
14.444,175 
4.443,400 
5,080.901 
1,194,508 


acres 

1,042,592 

15.016,269 

24,809,551 

3,384,886 

822,261 

1.160,092 

94.599 

179,554 

7.846 


P.O. 

69-63 
548-91 




647-18 




38-28 




3-85 




809 




213 




3-53 


lie du Prince-Edouard 


^65 








977.585,513 

13211, 3, n60 

1,196,803,280 


109,948,988 


63.422.338 


46,526,650 


73-36 


Yukon 


- 




- 






Total, Canada 


2,30«.502.153 


119,948,988 


63,422,338 


46,52«,650 


73 36 







Le tableau 3 donne sous forme de sommaire les principaux faits se rap- 
portant a la population urbaine et rurale du Dominion, aux formes, aux terres 
a culture et propri^t^s agricoles pour les ann^es 1901 (ler mars) et 1911 (ler 
juin). 

De 1901 a 1911 la population rurale a augment^ de 17-20 pour cent et la 
population urbaine de 62-29 pour cent, formant une augmentation gen^rale 
pour le Canada de 34-17 pour cent durant la decade. En 1901, 62 personnes 
sur chaque 100 de la population totale vivaient sur des terres contre 54 sur 
chaque 100 en 1911. Un fait at>soz rcmarquable c'est que 1' augmentation 



RECENSEMENTDUCANADA1911 xi 

pour cent du noinbre de fermes, de 1901 k 1911, a 6t6 dans la meme proportion 
d' augmentation que celle de la population durant la meme p^riode, tombant 
seulement de 2-97 pour cent. Tandis que I'augmentation pour cent dans le 
nombre de fermes n'a pas egale celui de la population totale, I'augmeutation 
pour cent dans I'etendue en terres a culture et en terres en recoltes a ete plus 
grande que I'augmentation proportionnelle de la population. L'accroissement 
da^-S I'etendue des terres a culture etait de 73-36 pour cent, et de78-.41 pour 
cent dans Tetendue des terres en recoltes de toutes sortes. En 1911 il y avait 
une moyenne de 6 • 76 acres de terres ameliorees pour chaque personne au Canada, 
contre 5-61 a,cres en 1901. Le nombre moyen d'acres en recoltes par personne 
s'est eleve de 3-68 acres en 1901 a 4-89 acres en 1911. End'autres termes, cela 
veut dire que I'augmentation en terres consacrees a la production des recoltes 
en 1911 sur 1901, a fait monter lacapacite d'acheter de 33 potir cent a pen pres. 
Les terres occupees dans le Canada en 1911 etaient au nombre de 714,646 
et contenaient 109,948,988 acres, dont 48,733,823 acres etaient ameliorees; 
des 61,215,165 acres restant non ameliorees, 17,477,526 acres etaient en foret 
naturelle, 4,174,270 acres en terrains marecageux, et la balance en prairie 
vierge et abattis en voie de preparation pour la charrue. 

TABLEAU 3. POPULATION, TERRES, SUPERFICIES EN TERRES ET VALEUR DES 
TERRES DU CANADA, 1911 ET 1910. 



Liste 



1911 

(ler juin) 



1901 
(31 mars) 



Augmentation pendant 
la decade 



numerique 



propor- 
tionnelle 



Population xo. 

L'rbaine no. 

Rurale 

Nombre de toutes les fermes no. 

Terre.s a culture — 

Total AC. 

Ameliorees ac. 

Non-ameliorees ac. 

En propriete ac. 

Louees ac . 

En recoltes de toutes sortes ac. 

Movenne d'acres par ferme — 

Total AC. 

Aiiieliores ac. 

Xon-amelior^s ac. 

Kn recoltes de toutes sortes ac. 

Valeur de la propriety agricole S 

Terres en propriete $ 

Batiments S 

Instruments aratoires $ 

Betail sur les ferraes I 

^'aIellr moyenne par ferme — 

I*r«pri6t<^$ de tout«s sortes $ 

Terre.s en propriete $ 

Batiments $ 

Instruments aratoires $ 

Betail sur les fermes $ 

Valour moyenne par acre de terream^lioree 

Bdtiments $ 

Instruments aratoires $ 

Betail sur les formes .? 



15505— H 



7,306,643 

3,281,141 
3,925,502 

714,616 



109,948,988 

48,733,823 
61,215,165 
98,866,007 
11,082,921 
35,261,338 



15$ 85 

08-19 
85-66 
49-34 

4,231,840,6m 

2,519,777,901 
823,951,707 
2.57,007,548 
031,103,420 



5,921 57 

3,525-91 

1,1.52-95 

3.59-63 

883-10 



16-90 
5-27 
12-95 



5,371,315 

2,021,799 
3,349,516 

544,688 



63,422,3.38 

30,166,033 
33,256,305 
57,522,441 
5,899,897 
19.763,740 



116 44 

55 -.38 
61-04 
30-28 

1,787,102,630 

1,007, 454,. 3.58 
.395,815,143 
108, 065,. 502 
275,167,627 



3,280 97 

1,849-61 
726-68 
199 -.50 
.505-18 



13-12 
3-60 
9-12 



1,8.35,. 328 

1,2.59,342 
575,986 

169,958 



46,526,650 

18,567,790 
27,958,860 
41,343,626 
5,183,024 
15, 497,. 598 



37 41 

12-81 
24-62 
13-06 

2,441,738,086 

1,5 12, 323,. 543 
42,S,136,624 
14-^,342,046 
355,935,793 



2,640 60 

1,076-30 
420-27 
160- 13 
.377-92 



3-78 
1-67 
3 83 



34 17 

62,29 
17-20 

31 20 



73 36 

01 -.55 
84-07 
71-87 

87-85 
78-41 



32 13 

23-13 
40-29 
36 00 

1.36 79 

1.50-12 
l()S-]7 
136-51 
129 -.35 



80-48 
90-63 
.58 06 
80-27 
74-81 



28-81 
40 -.39 
42-00 



xii RECENSEMEI«T DU CANADA 1911 

La valeur totale des propriet^s agricoles, (terres en propri^te, batiments, 
instruments aratoires et betail) s'est elevee au chiffre 6norme de $4,231,840,636 
en 1911. De ce vaste total la valeur des terres representait $2,519,777,901 
ou 59-55 pour cent, la valeur des batiments $823,951,767 ou 19-47 pour cent, 
celle des instruments aratoires $257,007,548 ou 6-07 pour cent, et celle du 
betail $631,103,420 ou 14-91 pour cent. En 1901 la valeur des proprietes 
agricoles etait de $1,787,102,030, dont la valeur des terres representait 56.36 
pour cent, des batiments 22-15 pour cent, des instruments aratoires 6 -08 pour 
cent et du betail 15-41 pour cent. La valeur de toutes les classes de propriete 
agricole a plus que doublee de 1901 a 1911. L'augmentation proportionnelle 
dans la valeur des terres durant la decade etait de 150 - 12 pour cent, des batiments 
de 108-17 pour cent, des instruments aratoires de 136-51 pour cent et du betail 
de 129-35 pour cent, formant un total de 136-79 pour cent pour les differentes 
classes reunies. De l'augmentation totale de $2,444,738,006 durant la decade, 
dans la valeur des proprietes agricoles, les terres ont contribue 61-86 pour cent, 
les batiments 17-51 pour cent, les instruments aratoires 6-07 pour cent et le 
betail 14-56 pour cent. 

La valeur moyenne de la propriete agricole a augmente de 80-48 pour 
cent par ferme de 1901 a 1911, le gain dans la valeur des terres etait de 90-63 
pour cent, des batiments de 58-66 pour cent, des instruments aratoires de80-27 
pour cent et du betail de 74-81 pour cent. La valeur moyenne par acre de 
terre am61ioree en 1911 etait de $16.90 pour les batiments, de $5.27 pour les 
instruments aratoires, et de $12.95 pour le betail, comparativement a $13.12 
pour les batiments, k $3.60 pour les instruments aratoires -et a $9.12 pour le 
betail en 1901. Ces gains dans la valeur de la propriete agricole, bien qu'ils 
peuvent etre attribues dans une certaine mesure au cout eleve de la produc- 
tion et des materiaux, s'expliquent assez justement par l'augmentation dans 
r^tendue moyenne par ferme de 116-44 acres en 1901 a 153-85 acres en 1911. 
Voir les details par provinces au tableau 10, page xviii. 

Dans le tableau 4 les occupants de terres en 1891, 1901 et 1911 sont clas- 
sifies selon le nombre d'acres par ferme, c'est-a-dire que les ferme* d'une cer- 
taine etendue sont groupees ensemble et mises sous un meme en-tete. Par 
exemple, les fermes ayant 5,6,7,8, 9 ou 10 acres sont classifi^es comme"5 k 
10 acres" et ainsi de suite pour les autres groupcs. Dans le recensement de 
1891 toutes les fermes de 10 acres et au-dcssous etaient groupees ensemble. 

De 1901 a 1911 il y a eu dans les provinces de I'Est une diminution de 6,423 
d:uis le nombre de lots ou lopins de terre de moins d'un acre en etendue, et dans 
1(S provinces de I'Ouest une augmentation totale de 2,949, avec une augmen- 
t:ition dans I'ensemble pour le Canada, de 3,474. En general il y a eu moins de 
petites etendues inscrites en 1911 qu'en 1901, vu qu'au dernier recensement 
les reconscurs, selon le tarif de remuneration, n'etaient paves que pour les 
entries de terrains ayant produit une recolte ^valuee a pas moins de $50. 
L'accroissement des centres urbains et I'absorption des faubourgs par les villes 
ont aussi contribu6 a reduire le nombre de lots h culture de cette etendue 
dans I'Est du Canada. L'augmentation dans le nombre des lopins de terre 
dans les provinces de I'Ouest n'a aucune signification particulidre, vu que 
les cites et villes de ces provinces, dans bien des cas, n'etaient pas encore 
fondees en 1901. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU 4. TERRES OCCUPIES. 1891-1911. 



Provinces 



Canada^ 

1911 

1901 

1891 

C'olombie-Britannique — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

.Uberta— 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Sa:skatchc'nan^ 

1911 ■.... 

1901 

1891 

Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

C)ntario — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Qu.'bec — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Xouveau-Brunswick — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Xouvellp-Efosse — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

lie (hi Prinno-Edouard — 

1911 

1901 

1891 



-^ 



OCX:UPANTS DE 



Au-des 
sous d'un 
acre 



30,141 
33,615 



1,509 
238 



500 

7 



317 
167 



1,278 
243 



14,693 
20,073 



9,990 
10,489 



455 
577 



1,143 
1 . 555 



256 
266 



1 a au- 

dessous de 

5 acres 



44,180 

39,249 



2,888 
563 



643 
50 



246 
61 



1,761 
440 



18,827~ 
18,639 



11,221 
9,952 



1,761 
1 , 955 



0,227 
0,981 



606 
599 



5 a 10 
acres 



24,668 

18,331 

191,612 

2,754 
545 

2,811 

384 

41 

226 

215 

54 

225 

773 

257 

1,447 

8,944 

7,474 
108,724 

4,751 

3,708 

51,057 

1 , 658 
1,403 
6,774 

4,765 
4,460 

18.428 

422 

389 

1,920 



11 a 50 
acres 



89.829 
81,243 

87,879 

3,849 
740 
685 

449 
70 
55 

729 
33 
45 

1 , 552 
703 
599 

36,249 
34,912 
38,283 

22,209 
20,047 
22,290 

8,291 
7,722 

7! 888 

12,6.52 
13,217 
13,857 

3,840 
3,769 
4,171 



51 a 100 
acres 



164. 662 
156,778 
157,748 

1,754 
813 
528 

942 

154 



941 
72 
45 

2,0.54 

1,2.54 

990 

78,3.35 
76,164 
75,. 307 

49.043 
45,813 
46,118 

12,820 
12,894 
13,791 

13,278 
14.2.34 
15.. 324 

5.495 
5,3S0 
5,593 



101 k 200 
acres 



NO. 

228.237 
159,826. 
130,271 

3,743 
2,186 
2.169 

34, 555 
6,577 
1,205 

48,366 
8,041 
3,460 

17,758 
14,. 394 
10,834 

54,908 
52,, 5.34 
49,358 

46,106 
44,216 
40,309 

8,8.57 
8,775 
8,425 

10,717 
11,073 
11,634 

3,227 
3,030 

2,877 



201 acres 
et au- 
dessus 



132.931 
61,655 
52,976 

1,970 
1,654 
1,258 

24,023 

2,. 587 
1,039 

45,558 
5,184 
2,892 

20,430 
15,204 
8,701 

14,, 845 
14,331 
13,9.36 

16,371 
16,374 
15,216 

4,368 
4,2.57 
3,958 

4,852 
4,483 
5,400 

5!4 

.581 
576 



Le tfil)leau 5 indique, pour le Canada et chacune de.s provinces, la dis- 
tribution pour cent des fermes par classes, donnant la proportion pour cent 
des fermes dans chaque groupe en 1891, 1901 et 1911. Tel que dej^ mentionnd 
le chiffre des fermes de 10 acres et moins n'a pas ete donne se])arementen 1891, 
et par consequent aucune comparaison du f2;roupe de "5 a 10 acres" ne pent 
ctre faite avec les chiffres des recensements precedents. Dans les deux 
groupes de fermes de 101 a 200 acres et de 200 acres et plus, pour tout le Canada, 
il y a eu une augmentation constante dans les chiffres respectifs. En 1891, 
fnviron 85 fermes sur 1,000 avaient une etendue de 200 acres comparative- 
inent a 119 en 1901 et a 186 en 1911. 

Dans les Provinces maritimes, dans Quebec et dans Ontario la proportion 
relative de I'etendue des terres entre chaque recensement n'offre aucun chan- 
gement important. En 1911, il y avait 44-80 pour cent de toutes les terres 
du Manitoba, 47-27 pour cent de celles de la Saskatchewan et 39-06 pour cent 
de celles de I'Alberta (lui contenaient au-dessus de 200 acres chacune. Les 
15.506— H I 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



fermes de 101 a 200 acres predominent dans les provinces de 1' Quest, et celles 
de 51 a 100 acres dans Ontario, Quebec et les Provinces Maritimes, 

TABLEAU 5. POUR-CENT DE LA DISTRIBUTIOX DES TERRES OCCUPIES, 

1891-1911. 



Provinces 



PoUB-CENT DU TOTAL DES TERRES OCCUPEE3 



Audes- 

sous d'un 

acre 



1 a, au- 

dessous de 

5 acres 



5 a 10 
acres 



11 a 50 
acres 



51 a 100 

acres 



101 a 200 
acres 



201 acres 
et au- 
dessus 



Canada- 
Mil 

1*11 

1891. 

Colombie-Britannique 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Alberta — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Saskatchewan — 

9111 

1901 

1891 

Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Ontario — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Quebec — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Nouveau-Brunswick — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Nouvelle-Ecosse — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

He du Prince-Edouard- 

1911 

1901 

1891 



p.c. 



4 22 
6 17 



8-17 
3-53 



•33 
1-23 



2-80 
•75 



6^48 
8 96 



6^26 
6-97 



M9 
U53 



2 13 

2-78 



L78 
1^90 



p.c. 



6 18 

7 20 



15-64 
835 



105 
•53 



3-86 
1-35 



8-31 
8^32 



703 
661 



4-61 
5^20 



1L61 
12-46 



422 

4-27 



p.c. 



3 
30 



14^ 

8- 
37^ 



p.c. 



3^ 
3^ 

38 • 



29- 

4- 
3^ 
16^ 

8^ 

7- 

28 • 



12^ 



45 


12 


37 


14 


•88 


14 


•91 


20 • 


■09 


10^ 


•73 


9^ 


■63 




•43 




•7/ 


2- 


•22 




•40 




•38' 


. 


■70 


3^ 


•79 


9. 


•41 


2. 


•94 


15^ 


•33 


15- 


•07 


13 • 


•98 


13^ 


•46 


13 • 


19 


12^ 


34 


2L 


73 


20 • 


59 


19^ 


88 


23 • 


96 


23 • 


50 


21^ 


94 


26 • 


78 


26 • 


68 


27 • 



p.c. 

23 94 

28^78 
25 42 

9-50 

12^06 

709 

1-53 
163 
2^02 

•98 
•53 
•67 

4-50 
3-86 
4^39 

34-54 
33 98 

26^37 

30^70 
30^42 
26-35 

33 •.-)5 
34^31 
33^77 

24 76 

25 40 
23^71 

38^24 
38^39 
36^«5 



p.c. 

31 94 

27 99 

21 00 

20^27 
32^44 
29^ 11 

56^ 19 
G9 33 
46^76 

50 18 
59^07 
51-90 

38-94 
44-30 
48 00 

24-21 
23-44 
17-28 

28-87 
29-36 
23-03 

23-18 
23-35 
20-63 

19-98 
19 76 
18 00 

22 46 
21 62 
1901 



p.c 



Le tableau 6 donne les chiffres comparatifs concernant la tenure des terres 
occupees, c'est-a-dire si I'occupant est proprietaire ou locataire, ou dans certains 
cas s'il est proprietaire et locataire a la fois de la tcrre exploitec par lui. 

L'augmentation dans le nombrc total d'occupants de terres durant les dix 
annees est de 169,958. Les nouvelles provinces de la Saskatchewan et de 
TAlberta ont contribue 134,770, ou plus de 79 pour cent de cette augmentation, 
etsi on ajoutc aux chiffres de ces deux provinces ccux du Manitol^a et de la 
Colorpbie-Britannique, on trouve que 94 pour cent de raugmentation totale 
appartient au tcrritoire situe a I'oucst des Grands lacs. Des provinces de Test, 
la Nouvelle-Ecosse est la seulc qui inontre une diminution dans le nombre 
d'occupants de terres, et ccci en grande partie dans le cas des proprietaircs. 
En 1891 le nombrfe d'occupants do terres rapport{!^s pour la Nouvelle-Ecosse 
dtait de 64,643 en 1901, ce chiffre ctait tombe a 56,033 et en 1911 a 53,634. 



RECENSEMENTDUCANADA1911 xv 

Les statLstiques du nombre de fermes vacantes, au tableau 24, page xxxiii, expli- 
quent jusqu'a un certain point la diminution dans le nombre de terres occupees 
dans la Nouvelle-Ecosse et les faibles augmentations dans les autres provinces 
de Test. 

TABLEAU 6. TENURE DE3 TERRES EN CULTURE. 1891-1911. 



Provinces 



Total des 
occupants 



Nombre des occupants etant 



Proprietaircs 



Locataires 



Propri^taires 

et 

locataires 



Pour-cent 
du total dc3 
occupants 
etant pro- 
prietaires 



Canada— 

1»11 

lioi 

1891 

Colombie-Britannique — 

1911 

1901 

1891 .^ . 

Alberta — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Saskatchewan — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Ontario— 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Quebec — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Nouveau-Brunswick — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Nouvelle-Ecosse . — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

lie du Prince-Edou.'ird — 

1911 

1901 

1891 



714,646 

544,688 
620,486 


633,172 
474,441 

524,806 


18,467 
6,739 
7,451 


15,846 
5,412 
5,456 


61,496 
9,486 
2,577 


56,605 
9,083 
2,333 


96,372 

13,612 

6,667 


87,448 

13,088 

6,298 


45,606 
32,495 
22,571 


38,221 
28,893 
20,241 


226,801 
224,127 
285,608 


186,696 
179,791 
224,034 


159,691 
150,599 
174,996 


147,370 
135,625 
154^227 


38,210 
37,583 
40,836 


36, 128 
35,397 
37,853 


53,634 
56,033 
64,643 


51 , 132 
53,953 
60, 069 


14,369 
14,014 
15,137 


13,726 
13,199 
14,295 



NO. 

57,129 
47,744 

95,680 

2,077 
1,031 
1,995 

2,341 
211 
244 

3,517 
215 
309 

4,675 
1,627 
2,330 

31,201 
32,360 
61,574 

9,287 

9,284 

20,769 

1 , SOS 
1,255 
2,983 

2,106 
1,370 
4,574 

417 
391 

842 



24,345 
22,503 



544 
296 



2,550 
192 



5,407 
309 



2,710 
1,975 



8,904 
11,976 



3.034 
5,690 



574 
931 



396 
710 



226 
424 



88,60 
87 10 

84-58 

85-81 
80-30 
73-23 

92-05 
95-75 
90-53 

90-74 
96-11 
97-47 

83,81 
88-92 
89-68 

82-32 
80-22 

78-44 

92,28 
90-06 
88- 13 

94-55 
94-18 
92-70 

95,34 
98-07 
92-78 

95-53 
94-18 
94-44 



Pour tout le Canada, les proprietaires constituaient 84 • 58 pour cent de la 
totalite des occupants de terres en 1891, 87-10 pour cent en 1901 et 88-60 
pour cent en 1911. Dans Tile du Prince-Edouard et la Nouvelle-Ecossc, au dela 
de 95 pour cent de toutes les fermes ctaient exploitees par des proprietaires, 
94-55 pour cent dans le Nouveau-Brunswick, 92-28 pour cent dans Quebec, 
92-05 pour cent dans 1' Alberta, 90-74 pour cent dans la Saskatchewan, 85-81 
pour cent dans la Colomljie-Britannique, et moins de 85 pour cent des fermes 
dans Ontario et Manitoba etaient occupees par des proprietaires au dernier 
recensement. 



xvi RECENSEMENTDUCANADA1911 

L'augmentation dans la classe des occupants designes comme « proprietaires 
et locataires)), dans les provinces de I'ouest, correspond a I'accroissement de cette 
classe de locataires anniiels ((croppers)), ou comme ils sont souvent designes 
((share farmers. )) 

Le tableau 7 donne I'etendue totale des terres occupees pour des fins agri- 
roles, pour le Canada et les provinces en 1901 et 1911, et la quantity de ces terres 
en propriete ou en location, ameliorees ou non ameliorees, en forets ou marecages, 
ainsi que l'augmentation dans chaque classe durant la decade. Pour tout le 
Canada, I'etendue en terres ameliorees n'a pas augmente dans les memes pro- 
portions que I'etendue totale des terres consacrees aux fins agricoles. L'aug- 
mentation faite depuis 1901 a 1911 dans I'etendue des terres k culture, est 
une proportion de 2| fois plus grande que celle faite dans I'etendue des terres 
ameliorees. En 1911, 44-32 pour cent detoutes les terres occupees 4tait donnee 
comme "ameliorees", comparativement a 47-56 pour cent en 1901. 

Des 46,526,650 acres ajoutes a I'etendut^ des terres occupees durant la decade, 
les provinces de I'ouest ont contribue 44,253,298 acres, ou plus de 95 pour cent 
du total, la Saskatchewan seule comptant audela de 53 pour cent et I'Alberta 
39,825,820 acres ou 85| pour cent. Dans la Saskatchewan et I'Alberta, l'aug- 
mentation annuelle moyenne dans I'etendue des terres occupees s'elevait a 
3,982,582 acres, ce qui veut dire que si chaque occupant de terre recevait seule- 
ment un quart de section de terre (160 acres) et les additions annuelles, l'augmen- 
tation annuelle moyenne des occupants de terres s'^leverait k 24,981, ou un total 
de 248,912 pour les dix annees, tandis que, de fait, l'augmentation totale dans 
la nombre d'occupants de terres dans les deux provinces ne s'est elevee qu'a 
134,770 de 1901 a 1911, et I'etendue moyenne des terres occupees, en vertu 
soit d'un achat ou d'une preemption, etait de 293 acres. On voit par le tableau 
4, page xiii que les fermes de plus de 200 acres etaient douze fois plus nombreuses 
dans I'Alberta et neuf fois dans la Saskatchewan en 1911 qu'en 1901. Le 
nombre de fermes de plus de 200 acres pour tout le Dominion a augmente de 
68,276 do 1901 a 1911, et de ce chiffre, seulement 1,240 etaient en dehors des 
provinces des prairies. 

La tendance a occuper de grandes etendues de terres dans I'Ouest est due 
sans doute au fait que la terre est consacree presqu'exclusivement a la recolte 
du grain, avec des rendements necessairement proportionnes aux frais 
d'exploitation. 

De 1901 a 1911 la proportion pour cent de I'etendue des terres en location 
^tait plus elevee que celle des terres en propirete. Dans la Colombie-Britannique 
durant la decade il y a eu un gain de 60 - 80 pour cent dans les terres en loca- 
tion et de 123-96 pour cent dans les terres en propriete; dans la Saskatchewan, 
un gain de 609-02 et 1,570.44 pour cent, et dans la Manitoba un gain de 27-99 
et 146-12 pour cent. Dans Ontario, Quebec et le Nouveau-Brunswick I'etendue 
des terres en location etait moindre en 1911 qu'en 1901, tandis que dans la Nou- 
velle-Ecosse et I'lle du Prince Edouard il y a eu une faible augmentation dans 
le nombre de fermes loupes. L'dtendue en terres a bois dans Ontario, Quebec et 
le Nouveau-Brunswick est moindre en 1911 qu'en 1901, et les augmentations 
indiqu^es pour le Manitoba, la Saskatchewan et I'Alberta se trouvent dans 
le nord de ces provinces. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 xvii 

TABLEAU 7.— ETAT COMPARATIF DE LA SUPERFICIE DES TERRES EN CULTURE 
PAR PROVINCES EN 1911 ET 1901, AINSI QUE L'AUGMENTATION FAITE EN DIX ANS. 



Provinces 



Superficie 

totale 
des terres 
occupees 



Terres occupees 



En 
propriet6 



En 

location 

ou a 

ioycr 



Amelio- 
rees 



Non- 
amelio- 

rees 



En foret 



En ter- 
rains ma^ 
recageux 

ou 
incultea 



Canada — 

1911 

19»1 

Augmentation totale. . . 
Augment ition pour cent 

Colombie-Britannique 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent. 
Alberta — 

1911 

1901. 

Augmentation totale.... 
Augmentation pour cent 
Saskatchewan — ■ 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent. 
Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent. . 
Ontario — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent. . 
Quebec — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent. 
Nouveau-Brun.swi ck — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent.. 
Nouvelle-Ecosse — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent., 
lie du Prince-Edouard — 

1911 

1901.. 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent.. 



199,948,988 

63,432,338 

46,536,659 

73 36 

2,540,011 

1,497,419 

1,042,592 

69-63 

17,751,899 

2,735,630 

15,016,269 

548-91 

28,642,985 

3,833,434 

24,809,551 

647-19 

12,228,233 

8,843,347 

3,. 384, 886 

38-27 

22,171,785 

21,349,524 

822.261 

3-85 



98.866.96 
57, 523. 441 
41,343,636 

71-87 

2,071,527 

1,288,241 

783,286 

60-80 

15,707,349 

2,442,204 

13,265,145 

543-16 

26,101,033 

3,681,261 

22,419,772 

609-02 

10,334,467 

8,073,894 

2,200,573 

27-99 

19,192,707 

18,173,877 

1,018,830 

5-60 



11,983,931 

5,899.897 
5,183,024 

87-85 



48, 733, 833 51, 315, 165 17, 477, 536 

38.16G,033|33,356,395 16,791,885 

18,567,790127,958,860 685,641 

61 55 84 07 4 08 



468,484 477,590 

209,178 473,633 

259,. 306 3, 

123-96 



15,613,267 14,836,325 



14,444,175 

1,169,092 

8-09 

4,537,999 

4,443,400 

94,599 

2-12 

5,260,455 

5,080,901 

179,5.54 

3-53 

1,202.354 

1,194,508 

7,846 

-65 



13,457,540 

1,-378,785 

10-24 

4,368,824 

4,269,606 

99,218 

2-32 

5,093,658 

4,974,5.'59 

119,099 

2-39 

1.160,177 

1.161,2.59 

-1,082 

-•09 



2,044,5.50 

293,426 

1,751,124 

596-78 

2,541,952 

152, 173 

2,389,779 

1,570-44 

1,893,766 

769,453 

1,124,313 

146-12 

2,979,078 

3,175,647 

-196,569 

-6-17 

776,942 

986,635 

-209,693 

-21-25 

169,175 

173,794 

-4,619 

-2-66 

166,797 

106,. 342 

60,455 

56-85 

42,177 

33,249 

8,928 

26-85 



4,351,698 

474,694 

3,877,004 

816-73 



2,002,421 

1,023,736 

1,0.38,685 

101-46 

13,400,201 

2,260,936 

11,139,265 

492-24 



11,871,907 16,771,078 

1,122,602 2,710,832 

10,749,305 14,060,246 

957-53 518-67 



6.746.169 

3.995,305 

2.750,864 

68-83 

13,653,216 

13,266,335 

386,881 

2-91 

8,162,087 

7,4.39,941 

722,146 

9-70 

1,444,567 

1,409,720 

34,847 

2-47 

1,257,449 

1,257,468 

-19 



769, 140 

726,285 

42,8.55 

5-90 



5,482,064 

4,848,042 

6.34,022 

13-07 

8,518,569 

8,083,189 

435,380 

5-38 

7,451,180 

7,004,234 

436,946 

6-23 

3,093,432 

3,033,680 

59,752 

1-97 

4,003,006 

3,823,433 

179,573 

4-43 

433,214 

468,223 

-35,009 

-7-47 



1,544,029 

391,100 

1,152,923 

294-79 

420,857 
66, 138 

354,719 
536-33 

304,039 
53,212 

250,827 
471-37 

497,547 

258,729 

238,818 

92-30 

3,935,982 

4,823,140 

—887,158 

—18-39 

5,099,286 

5,442,322 

-343,036 

-6-30 

2.453,779 

2.561,494 

-107,715 

-4-20 

2.914,033 

2.845,384 

68,649 

2-41 

307,974 

350,. 366 

-42,392 

-12-09 



acres 
4,174,370 

78,684 

240,854 

583,887 

445,625 

1,843,803 

550,263 

152,317 

258.623 

20.214 



Nota: — Lc signe ( — ) indique une diminution. 



Le tableau 8 donne un dtat comparatif de la distribution dcs terres h. culture 
par provinces en 1901 et 1911. En 1901, sur la superficie totale des terres dcs 
neuf provinces, 6-49 pour cent etait occupce comme terres a culture, conpara- 
tivement a 11 -25 pour cent en 1911. La proportion des terres amelior^es, pour 
les raisons deja donnees k la page vii, est tombee de 47-56 pour cent de la 
superficie totale en 1901 a 44-32 pour cent en 1911. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Dans V-lle du Prince-Edouard les fermes ou exploitations agricoles repr^sen- 
taient 86-01 pour cent de la superficie totale de la province, dans la Nouvelle- 
Ecosse 39-01 pour cent, dans le Manitoba 29-70 pour cent, dans le Nouveau- 
Brunswick 25-40 pour cent, dans la Saskatchewan 18-39 pour cent, dans Ontario 
15-71 pour cent, dans I'Alberta 10 - 97 pour cent, dans Quebec 7-14 pour cent et 
dans la Colombie-Britannique 1 • 12 pour cent. 

La proportion en foret naturelle sur les fermes est moindre en 1911 qu'en 
1901 pour toutes les provinces excepte le Manitoba et la Colombie-Britannique, 
mais comme les etendues en terrains marecageux et incultes n'ont pas ete prises 
en 1901 ceci explique la diminution dans la proportion des terres a bois sur les 
fermes. 



TABLEAU 8. 



POUR-CENT DE LA DISTRIBUTION DES TERRES EN CULTURE PAR 
PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 





Pour-cent 
des terre 
occupees 
provenant 

de la 

superficie 

totale 


POUR-CEXT DES TERRES OCXIUPEES — 


Provinces 


En 

pro- 

priete 


En loca- 
tion ou a 
loyers 


Aine- 
liorees 


Non- 
ame- 
Iior6e3 


Foret 
natu- 
relle 


Terrains 
mareca- 
geux ou 
incultes 


Canada — 
1911 


p.c. 

11 25 
6 49 

1-12 
•66 

10-97 
1-69 

18-39 
2-46 

29-70 
21-48 

15-71 
15-13 

7-14 
6-60 

25-40 

24-87 

39-01 
37-68 

86-01 
85-44 


p.c. 

89 92 

90 70 

81-56 
86-03 

88-48 
89-27 

91-13 
96-03 

84-51 
91-30 

86-56 
85-13 

95-02 
93-17 

96-27 
96-09 

96-8S 
97-9; 

96-49 
97-22 


p.c. 

10 68 
9 30 

18-45 
13-97 

11-52 
10-73 

8-87 
3-97 

15-49 
S-70 

13-44 
14-87 

4-98 
6-83 

3-73 
3-91 

3-17 
2 09 

* 3-.V 

2-78 


p. c. 

44 32 
47 56 

18-80 
31-63 

24-51 
17-35 

41-45 
29-28 

55-17 

45 18 

Gl-57 
62-14 

52-28 
51-51 

31-83 
31-73 

23-90 
24-75 

63-97 
60-81 


p. c. 

55 68 
52 44 

81-20 
68-37 

75-49 
82-65 

58-55 
70-72 

44-83 
54-82 

38-43 
37-86 

47-72 
48-49 

68-17 
68-27 

76-10 
75-25 

36-03 
39 19 


p. c. 

15-89 
26-48 

60-79 
2612 

2-37 
2-42 

1-06 
1-38 

4 07 
2-92 

17-75 
22-59 

32-65 
37-68 

54 07 
57-65 

55-40 
56 00 

25 01 
29-33 


p. c. 
3 81 


1901 




Colombie-Britannique — 

1911 


3-10 


1901 




Alberta— 

1911 


1-36 


1901 




Saskatchewan — 

1911 


2 04 


1901 




Manitoba— 

1911 


3-64 


1901 




Ontario — 

1911 


8-32 


1901 


_ 


Quebec— 

1911 


3 -.52 


1901 




Nouveau-Brunswick — 

1911 


3-36 


1901 




Nou\ e'.le-Ecosse — 

1911 


510 


1901 




lie du Prince-Edouard— 

1911 


1-68 


1901 









L'^tendue moyenne des fermes et le nonibre {('ucres ameliores par ferine 
sont donnes au tableau 9 pour 1911 et 1901. Pour toiit le Canada I'etendue 
moyenne des fermes durant la d6cade s'est elevce de 116-44 acres a 153-85 
acres, soit une augmentation de 37-41 acres. L'6tendue moyenne des fermes 
est moindre dans les provinces de Test que dans ceDes de I'ouest. La moyenne 
61evee pour les provinces des prairies est due au fait que la plupart des fermes 
ont et^ acquises en vertu de la loi des « homestead » qui permettait a chaque adulte 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



TABLEAU 9. MOYEXXE DE LA SUPERFICIE TOTALE DES FERMES, MOYENNE DE 
LA SUPERFICIE AM^LIOR^E DES FERMES, 1911 ET 1901. 





MOYENXE DE L.\ SUPERFICIE TOT.^LE 
DES FERMES 


MoVEXXE DE LA SUPERFiaE .\MEUOREE 
DES FERMES 


Provinces 


1911 


1901 


Augmentation' 


. 1911 


1901 


Augmentation' 




Moj"enne 


Pour- 
cent 


Moycnne 


Pour- 
cent 


Canada 

Colombie-Britan. . 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 


ac. 

153 85 

137-54 

288-66 

297-21 

268-13 

97-76 

97-77 

118-76 

98 -OS 

83-68 


ac. 

116 44 

222 - 20 

288-39 

281-62 

272-14 

95-26 

95-91 

118-23 

90-68 

85-24 


ac. 

37 41 

-84-66 

■27 

15-59 

-4-01 

2-50 

1-80 

•53 

7-40 

-1-.56 


p. c. 

32 13 

-38-10 

-09 

5-53 

-1-47 

2-62 

1-94 

-45 

8-16 

-1-83 


ac. 

68 19 

25-86 
70-76 
123-19 
147-92 
60-20 
51-11 
37-81 
23-44 
53-53 


ac. 

55 38 

70-28 
50-04 
82-47 
122-95 
59 19 
49-40 
37-51 
22-44 
51-83 


ac. 

12 81 

-44-42 

20-72 

40-72 

24-97 

1-01 

1-71 

-.30 

100 

1-70 


p. c. 

23 13 

-63-20 
41-41 
49-38 
20-31 


Ontario 


1-71 


(Juebec 

Xouv.-Bruns«-ixk. 
Xouvelle-Ecos.se. . 
lie duPr.-Edouard 


3-46 

-80 

4-46 

3-28 



^Le signe (— ) indiciue une diminution. 

male de devenir acquereur de 160 acres au moins; de cette maniere dans bieii des 
cas plusieurs quarts de sections furent retenus dans la meme famille. Pour les 
provinces de Test, la moyenne des fermes de plus grande etendue appartient 
au Nouveau-Brunswick (118-76 acres). Les plus petites fermes sont dans I'llc 
du Prince-Edouard ou la moyenne est de 83-68 acres. Tandis que les fermes 
dans tout le pays ont augmente, en etendue, de 37-41 acres a 32-13 pour cent en- 
tre 1901 et 1911, les provinces de I'ile du Prince-Edouard, du Manitoba et de la 
Colombie-Britannique indiquent des diminutions. Dans Tile du Prince-Edouard 
la moyenne est tombee de 85-24 a 83-68 acres; dans le Manitoba, de 272-14 
a 268-13 acres; dans la Colombie-Britannique, de 222-20 a 137-54 acres durant 
la decade. Cette enorme difference dans les chiffres de la Colombie-Britannique 
s'explique par I'augmentation dans le nombre de petties fermes durant la decade 
et dans le developpement de I'industrie fruiticre et des jardins maraichers. 
Environ 60 pour cent de la totalite des fermes de la Colombie-Britannique, 
en 1911, contenaient moins de 51 acres — 38-72 pour cent de toutes les fermes 
etant de 10 acres ou moins. Seulement 31 pour cent' des fermes en 1901 conte- 
naient moins de 51 acres — 20 pour cent de la totalite des fermes ayant 10 acres 
rt moins chacune. 

L'etendue moj^enne des tcrrcs ameliorees par ferme offre une meilleurc 
l)ase pour des fins de comparaison, quant a l'etendue moyenne d'une ferme, 
que ne le fait le chiffre des terres occupees. Quant a l'etendue des terres ame- 
liorees, les provinces des prairies occupent encore le premier rang, Manitoba 
vcnant la premiere avec la moyenne de 147-92 acres, suivie de la Saskatchewan 
avec 123-19 acres et de 1' Alberta avec 70-76 acres propres a la culture. Les 
plus petites moyennes en terres ameliorees se trouvent dans la Nouvelle-Ecosse 
(23-44 acres) ct dans le Nouveau-Brunswick (37-81 acres). Les augmen- 
tations absolues et proportionnelles les plus elevees durant la decade, sont 
dans la Saskatchewan avec 40-72 acres par ferme ou 49-38 pour cent. La 



XX RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

Colombie-Britannique indique une diminution de 44 •42 acres par ferme ou 
63 • 20 pour cent. Pour Tensemble du Canada la moyenne des terres am61ior6es 
par ferme a augments de 55-38 acres en 1901 k 68-19 acres en 1911. 

Le tableau 10 donne la valeur de toute propriety agricole par provinces 
en 1911 et 1901. Le plus grand progres dans la valeur de la propriety agricole 
durant la decade a ete fait par la province de la Saskatchewan, qui montre 
un gain de 1,773-14 pour cent, suivie de I'Alberta avec un gain de 1,319-71 
pour cent, de la Colombie-Britannique avec 463 - 23 pour cent et du Manitoba 
avec 206-06 pour cent. Dans les provinces de Test I'augmentation proportion- 

TABLEAU 10. VALEUR DE LA PROPRU^T^IE AGRICOLE PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



Valeur 

totale de 

la propriet6 

agricole 



Terres 



B5timent3 



Instruments 
aratoires 



Bdtail 



Canada— 

1911 

1951 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent 

Colombie-Britannique — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale. . . . 
Augmentation pour cent. 
Alberta — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale. . . . 
Augmentation pour cent. 
Saskatchewan — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent. 
Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale. . . . 
Augmentation pour cent. 
Ontario— 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent. 
Quebec — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale. . . . 
Augmentation pour cent. 
Nouveau-Brunswick — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent. 
Nouvclle-Ecosse — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale .... 
Augmentation pour cent. 
He du Prinee-Edouard — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent. 



4,2.31,840,6.'{6 

1,787,102,030 

2,411,738,086 

136 79 



188,635,724 

33,491,978 

155,143,746 

463-23 

492,636,008 

34,699,781 

457,936,227 

1,319-71 

832,812,560 

44,400,874 

788,351,686 

1,773-14 

463,243,591 

151,3.^)5,081 

311,888,510 

206-06 

1,223, 701,. 549 

932,488,069 

291,213,480 

31-23 

787,754,494 

436,076,916 

351,677,578 

80-65 

84,895,906 

51,338,311 

33,557,595 

65-37 

115,974,892 

72,504,907 

43,409,985 

59-82 

42,185,912 

30,620,713 

11,559,199 

37-74 



2,519,777,901 

1,007,454,358 

1,512,323,543 

150 12 



141,421,477 

21,087,372 

120,334,105 

570-65 

344,759,704 

13,150,755 

331,602,949 

2,520-40 

583,401,337 

22,879,822 

560.521,515 

2, 449, -85 

309.960,153 

93,233,535 

216,726,618 

232-45 

611,756,794 

536,755,663 

75,001,131 

13-97 

423,964,516 

248,236,361 

175,728,155 

70-79 

32,989,546 

22,329,482 

10,660,004 

47-73 

52,106,903 

34,589,159 

17,517,744 

50-93 

19,417.471 

15,186,209 

4,231,262 

27-86 



823,951,767 

395,815,143 

428,1,36,624 

108 17 



29,479,522 

5,002,417 

24,477.105 

489-30 

40,642,348 

3,588,657 

37,053,691 

1,032-52 

76,156,050 

5,178,127 

70,977,923 

1,. 377 -26 

62,607,036 

20,049,726 

42,557,310 

212-25 

314.377,168 
211,206,905 
103,170,263 

48-85 

214,245,173 

102,313,893 

111,931,280 

109-39 

31,470,-127 

10,379.456 

15,090,971 

92-17 

43,275,505 

24,163,225 

19,112,280 

79-90 

11,092.538 

7,932,737 

3,759,801 

•17-39 



2,57,007,548 

10S,«)65,502 

148,342,948 

136 51 



3,548,656 

1,197,876 

2,350,780 

196-24 

24,009 659 

2,179,617 

21,830,042 

1,001-55 

57,538,712 

3,882,029 

53,656,683 

1,382-18 

27,956,212 

12,169,619 

15,786,593 

129-72 

77,734.449 

52,697,739 

25,036,710 

47-51 

51,954,520 

27,038,205 

24,916,315 

92-15 

6,106.826 

3,662,731 

2,444,095 

66-72 

4,578,658 

3,208,899 

1,369,759 

42-68 

3,579.856 

2,628.787 

951,009 

36-17 



631,103,420 

275,167,627 

355,935,793 

129 35 



14,186,069 

6,204,313 

7,981.756 

128-64 

83,224,297 

15,774,752 

67,449 545 

427-57 

115,716,461 

12,520,896 

103,195,565 

824-19 

62,720,190 

25,902,201 

36,817.989 

142-14 

219,833,138 

13 1.827', 762 

88,005,376 

66-75 

97.590 285 

58,488.457 

39,101.828 

66-85 

14,323.107 

8,966.642 

5,356,465 

59-73 

16,013,826 

10,603,624 

5,410,202 

51 02 

7,496,047 

4,878,980 

2,617,067 

63-63 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 xxi 

nolle a varie de 31 pour cent dans TOntario a 81 pour cent dans Quebec. La 
Saskatchewan montre aussi la plus forte augmentation proportionnelle, de 
1901 a 1911, dans la valeur des batiments, des instruments aratoires et du b^tail, 
n'etant surpassee dans la valeur des terres que par I'Alberta. Des anciennes 
provinces, Quebec offre la plus forte augmentation proportionnelle dans la valuer 
de toutes les classes de propriete agricole durant la decade. L'augmentatiou 
extraordinaire dans la valeur de toutes les classes de propriete agricole dans 
les provinces de I'ouest de 1901 a 1911, comparativemont aux provinces de Test, 
est due en grande partie a Taugmentation de 159,609 nouveaux homestead. 
L'etablissement de chaque homestead nouveau represente un montant consi- 
derable pour les batiments, les instruments aratoires et le betail, et quant a 
I'augmentation dans la valeur des terres occupees pour des fins agricoles, elie 
resulte en partie des ameliorations et du developpement qu'elles ont revues, 
mais de beaucoup la plus forte proportion represente la valeur des terres obtenues 
gratis de I'Etat. En d'autres termes la valeur n'est devenue active et suscep- 
tible d'etre comptee qu'apres I'alienation des terres de la couronne aux injlividus. 
La rapidite avec laquelle Talienation des terres s'est faite dans les provinces de 
I'ouest est indiquee par le fait que dans le recensement de 1901 I'Alberta comptait 
640 cantons occupes et la Saskatchewan 855, centre 2,056 et 2,874 respectivement 
en 1911. Le tableau 7 indique qu'une augmentation d'au-dela de 95 pour cent 
dans I'etendue des terres a culture, de 1901 a 1911, a eu lieu dans I'ouest. 

Le progres represente dans la valeur de toutes les classes de propriete agricole 
dans Ontario, Quebec et les provinces maritimes n'est que legerement affects 
par les terres a culture nouvellement occupees, ou par les fonds debourses pour 
batiments, instruments aratoires ou betail. On pent done assumer que, pour les 
provinces do Test, ces augmentations sont dues principalement au cout cleve 
des materiaux de construction, des instruments et des animaux de la ferme, 
et ne representent pas a un aussi haut degre que pour I'ouest les fortes additions 
correspondantes a la propriete physique. 

La valeur totale de la propriety agricole par ferme, selon le tableau 11, 
s'est accrue de $3,280.97 k $5,921.57, de 1901 a 1911, soit un pain par ferme 
de plus de 80 pour cent. La valeur moyenne de chaque classe de propriete 
agricole, par ferme, a augmente considcrablemcnt durant la decade. La valeur 
des terres a augmente de $1,849.61 par ferme en 1901 a $3,525.91 en 1911; 
celle ces batiments, de $726.68 par ferme a $1,152.95; celle des instruments 
aratoires, de $199.50 a .$359.63 et celle du betail, de $505. 19a $883.10 par ferme. 

La proportion d'augmentation dans la valeur des terres et des batiments par 
ferme, de 1901 h 1911, pour desraisons dej4 donnees, est plus elevee dans les pro- 
vinces de I'ouest que dans celles de Test. Les plus hautcs valeurs moycnnes des 
batiments par ferme, en 1911, se trouvent dans la Colombie-Britannique, Ontario, 
Manitoba et Quebec, dans I'ordre nommd. Pour les instruments aratoires la 
plus haute valeur moyenne revient k la province de Manitoba avec $612.99 
par ferme, suivie de la Saskatchewan avec une moyenne de $597 .04 par ferme; les 
plus basses moyennes pour les instruments aratoires se trouvent dans la Nou- 
velle-Ecosse et le Nouveau-Brunswick avec $85.37 dans la premiere et $159.82 
dans la derniere de ces provinces. L'Alberta et la Colombie-Britannique indi- 
quent des diminutions dans la valeur moyenne du betail par ferme; dans ces 
deux provinces le nombre d'aniraaux est plus grand et le prix par animal plus 



xii RECENSEMENTDUCANADA1911 

TABLEAU 11. VALEUR MOYENNE DE LA PROPRI^T^ AGRICOLE PAR FERME 
OCCUPf:E, PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901 



Provinces 



VaLEUH MOYENNE PAR FEKilB 



Valeur 

totale de la 

propriete 

agricole 



Terres 



Batiments 



Instruments 
aratoires 



Betail 



Canada- 
Mil 

1991 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent 
Colombie-Britannique — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent — 
Alberta — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent. . . , 
Saskatchewan — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent. . . . 
Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent 

Ontario — 

1911 

1901.... 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent.. . , 
Qu6bec — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent 

Nouveau-Brunswick — 

1911 

1901.... 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent. . . 
Nouvelle-Ecosse — ■ 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent.. . 
lie du Prince-Edouard — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

Augmentation pour cent.. . 



921.57 
280.97 
640.60 

80 '48 

214.75 
969.87 
,244.88 
105-53 

,010.86 
,658.00 
,352.86 
11900 

641 . 64 
,266.30 
375.34 
164-57 

,157-51 
,657.80 
,499.71 
11808 

,395.49 

,160. 53 

,234.96 

29-68 

,9.32.99 

,895.62 

,037,37 

70-36 

,221.82 

366.00 

855-82 

62-65 

,162.. 34 

,295.04 

867.30 

66-98 

,935.90 

,185.44 

750.40 

34-34 



3,525.91 

1,849.61 

1,676.30 

90-63 

7,658.06 

3,129.15 

4,528.91 

144-73 

5,606.21 

1,386.97 

4,219.24 

304-21 

6,053.64- 

1,680.86 

4,. 372. 78 

260-15 

6,796.48 

2,869.17 

3,927.31 

136-88 

2,697.33 

2,394.87 

302.46 

12-63 

2,654.91 

1,648.33 

1,006.58 

61-07 

863.37 

594.14 

269-23 

45-31 

971.53 

617.30 

354.23 

57-38 

1,351.35 

1,083.65 

267.70 

24-70 



1,152.95 

726.68 

426.27 

58-66 

1,596.34 
742.31 
854.03 
115-05 

660.89 

378.31 

282.58 

74-70 

790.23 
380.41 
409-82 
107-73 

1,372.78 
617.01 
755.77 
122-49 

1,386.14 

942.35 

443.79 

47-09 

1,341.62 

679.38 

662.24 

97-48 

823.78 

435.82 

387-96 

89-02 

806.87 

431.23 

375.64 

87-11 

813.73 

566.06 

247.67 

43-75 



359 . 63 

199.50 

160.13 

80-27 

192.16 

177.75 

14.41 

8-01 

390.43 

229.77 

160.66 

69-92 

597.04 
285.19 
311.85 
109-35 

612.99 

374.51 

238.48 

63-68 

342.74 

235.13 

107.01 

45-77 

325.34 

179.54 

145.80 

81-21 

159.82 
97.40 
62-36 
63-99 

85.37 
57.27 
28.10 
49 07 

249.14 
187.58 
61.. 56 
32-82 



883.10 

505.19 

377.91 

74-81 

768.19 

920.66 

-152.47 

-16-56 

1,353.33 

1,662.95 

-309.62 

-18-62 

1,200.73 

919.84 

280.89 

30-54 

1,375.26 

797.11 

578.15 

72-53 

969.28 

588.18 

381.10 

64-79 

611.12 

388.37 

222.75 

57-36 

374.85 

238.58 

136-27 

57-12 

298.57 

189.24 

109.33 

57-77 

521.68 

348.15 

173.53 

49-84 



NoTA. — Le signe (- ) indique une diminution. 

61cve en 1911 qu'en 1901, mais la diminution s'cxplique par le fait que Ic nombre 
des fermes a augmcnte en plus grande proportion que celui du bdtail (voir tableau 
4, pagexiii). Ladisparition du ranch a aussi affecte considerablement I'^levage. 
Le tableau 12 dcmande pcu d'expiication. La valeur totale de chaque 
classe de propriete agricole pour tout le Canada est representee par le chiffre 
100. La proportion que donne. chaque provmce, par rapport au total, est 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 xxiii 

indiquee par les chiffres pour cent dont raddition pour les different es provinces 
forme 100. Par exemple, de la valeur totale des terres en 1911, la Colombie- 
Britannique a fourni 5-61 pour cent, TAlberta 13-68 pour cent, la Saskatchewan 
23-15 pour cent, le Manitoba 12-30 pour cent, Ontario 24 -28 pour cent, Quebec 
16-83 pour cent, le Nouveau-Brunswick 1-31 pour cent, la Nouvelle-Ecosse 
2 - 07 pour cent et Tile du Prince-Edouard • 77 pour cent de la valeur totale 
des terres a culture. Les chiffres, quant aux autres classes, se lisent de la meme 
maniere. 

L'augmentation dans la valeur des differentes classes de propriete agri- 
cole dans les provinces de I'Ouest est une des choses les plus remarquables que 
nous offre le developpement materiel du pays dur^nt la decade, le chiffre propor- 
tionnel de toutes les proprietes agricoles y ayant augmente de 14-77 a 46 • 73 
pour cent; la valeur des terres a avance de 15 -92 a 54-74 pour cent, la valeur 
des batiments, de 8 -54 a 25-33 pour cent; la valeur des instruments aratoires, 
de 17-87 a 43-98 pour cent, et la valeur du betail, de 21-95 a 43-72 pour cent 
de la valeur totale. 



TABLEAU 12. PROPORTION POUR CENT DE LA VALEUR DE LA PROPRlfiT^ AGRI- 
COLE REVENANT A CHAQUE PROVINCE, 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



Valeur 

totale de la 

propriete 

agricole 



1911 1901 



Terres 



1911 1 1901 



Batiments 



Instrumente 
aratoires 



1911 ! 1901 1911 1901 



B6tail 



1911 1901 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick... 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

lie du Prince-Edouard 



p.c. 

100 09 

4-46 

11-64 

19-68 

10-95 

28-91 

18-61 

2-01 

2-74 

1-00 



p.c. p.c. p.c. 
IM 00 MM 09 1*0 



1-87 

1-94 

2-49 

8--^7 

52-18 

24-40 

'2-87 

4-06 

1-72 



p.c. j p.c. I p.c. p.c. p.c. p.c. 
IM 90 1<H) 90 100 (K) 100 00 100 09 1«0 



2 

1' 

2 

9 

53-27, 38' 
24 

2- 

3 

1 



-64 



-43 



57( 1 
931 

24 1 
591 5 

18 53 

00, 25 

821 4 

25 6 
42 2 



1-3S 

9-34 

22-39 

10-87 

30-25 

20-21 

2 -.38 

1-79 

1-39 



110' 
2-00| 

3-57 

11-20 

48 -.50 

24-881 

3-37' 

2-96: 

2-42! 



2i>. 2-2a 
19 5-73 
34' 4-55 
94j 9-42 
83' 47-91 
40 21-26 
27i 3-26 
54! 3-85 
18 1-77 



Les chiffres du tableau 13 donnant pour 1911 et 1901 un etat comparatif 
de la distribution proportionnelle des valeurs agricoles par provinces, selon 
les classes, devront se lire horizontalemcnt; ccs chiffres rcpresentent la propor- 
tion pour cent de chaque province dans la valeur totale des proprietds agri- 
coles du Canada. 

Le tableau 12 donne la part pour cent de la valeur totale contribuee par 
chaque province, tandis que le tableau 13 donne en detail la proportion des 
valeurs separees des terres, des batiments, des instruments aratoires et du 
betail, par rapport au total. Par exemple, la part pour cent de la Coloinbi(>- 
Britannique dans la valeur totale des proprietes agricoles en 1911 (Tableau 
12- 4-46 pour cent) 6tait divisee entre les differentes classes de propriete agri- 
cole de la maniere suivante: terres 3-34 pour cent, batiments -70 pour cent, 
in.struments aratoires -08 pour cent, et betail 0-34 pour cent. Et ainsi pour 



REi 



NSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



les autres provinces, les totaux des differentes classes de propriete agricole 
constituent la part pour cent de chaque province dans la valeur totale. 

TABLEAU 13. POUR-CENT DE LA DISTRIBUTION DE LA VALEUR DE LA PRO- 
PRIETE AGRICOLE TELLE QUE CLASSIFIEE PAR PROVINCES, 1911 AND 1901. 





Pour-cent de la valetjr du total de la prophiete agricole 
representee par — 


Provinces 


Torres 


Bitiments 


Instruments 
aratoires 


Betail 




1911 


1901 


1911 


1901 


1911 


1901 


1911 


1901 


Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 


p.c. 

59 55 

3-34 

8-14 

13-79 

7-33 

14-45 

10-01 

-79 

1-24 

•46 


p.c. 

56 36 

1-18 

-74 

1-28 

5-22 

30^03 

13-89 

1-25 

1-93 

•84 


p.c. 
19 47 

•70 

•96 
1-80 
1^48 
7-43 
508 

•74 
102 

•28 


p.c. 

22 15 

•28 
•20 
•29 

1^12 
11-82 

5-73 
•92 

1-35 
•44 


p.c. 

6-07 

•08 

•57 

136 

•66 

1-84 

1-23 

•14 

•11 

•OS 


p.c. 

6 08 

•08 
•12 
•22 
•68 
2-95 
1-51 
•20 
•18 
•10 


p.c. 

14 91 

•34 

1-97 

2-73 

1-48 

5-19 

2-31 

•34 

•37 

•18 


p.c. 
15 41 

■35 




•88 


Saskatchewan 


•70 




145 


Ontario 


7^38 




3-27 




•50 


Nouvello-Ecosse 


•60 
•28 







VERGERS ET JARDINS. 



Le tableau 14 donne, pour tout le Canada, les chiffres comparatifs des 
superficies consacrees k la production des fruits et des legumes en 1891, 1901 et 
1911. De 1891 h 1901 il y a eu une diminution de 25,265 acres, dans I'etendue 
des terres en vergers et pepinieres, tandis que durant la decade suivante il y a 



TABLEAU 14. 



SUPERFICIES DES TERRES EN VERGERS ET EN JARDINS POUR LE 
CANADA, 1891-1911. 



Classes 



1891 


1901 


acres 


acres 


464.462 


478,223 


381,371 


358, 106 


5,951 


5,600 


13.411 


(1) 


63,729 


116,517 



Pour-cent dti tot.\i, 



1911 




1901 



1911 



Total. 



Vergers 

Vignobles... 
Petits fruits. 
Legumes — 



acres 

636,938 

403,. 598 

9,830 

17,495 

206,011 



p.c. 

100 M 

74-45 
M7 
(1) 
24 38 



p.c. 
100 00 

63-37 
1-54 
2-75 

32-34 



(1) Compris avec les legumes. 

cu line augmentation de 47,490 acres. Les vignobles avaicnt une etendue 
de 9,836 acres en 1911, contre 5,600 acres en 1901, soit une augmentation de 
4,236 acres dans les dix ans. Les superficies en fruits et en legumes reunies 
en 1901 s'elevaient a 116,517 acres, comparativement 5, 223,506 acres en 1911, 
dont 17,495 acres etaient en fruits et 206,011 acres en legumes. La super- 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 xxv 

ficie totale en vergers et jardins a augments d'un peu moins de 3 pour 
cent dans les dix annees 1891-1901, tandis que, de 1901 a 1911, elle a augments 
de plus de 33 pour cent. En 1891 les tcrres en vergers representaient 82-10 pour 
cent de la superficie totale en vergers et jardins. comparativement h 74-45 
pour cent en 1901 et a 63-37 pour cent en 1911. L'etendue de terre en legumes 
est au-dela de trois fois plus elevee qu'elle ne I'etait en 1891. Les terres en legu- 
mes seules comptent 89,434 acres de plus que les superficies en petits fruits et 
legumes en 1901. 

D'apres le recensement de 1891 il y avait 1-34 acre en verger pour chaque 
100 acres de terre amelioree, comparativement a 1-18 acre en 1901 et a .83 
acre en 1911. La proportion par 100 acres des superficies en vergers et jardins 
reunics, etait de 1-63 acre en 1891, de 1-58 acre en 1901 et de 1-31 acre en 1911. 

Le tableau 15 domie les chiffres comparatifs des etendues de terre en 
vergers et pepinieres, en vignobles, en petits fruits et en legumes pour les annees 

TABLEAU 15. TERRES EN VERGERS, EN PETITS FRUITS ET EN LEGUMES, COMPA- 
REES PAR PROVINCES, 1891, 1901 ET 1911. 



Provinces 



Acres de terre en — 



Vergers 

et 

p6pini-Jres 



Vignobles 



Petits fruits Legumes 



Canada — 

1911 

1981 

1891. _. 

Colombie-Britannique — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Alberta — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Saskatchewan — 

1911 



1901 

1891 

Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Ontario — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Quebec — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

N )U voau-Brunswick — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Nouvelle-Ecosse — 

1911 

1901 

1891 

Ilf du Prinoe-Edouard — 

1911 

1901 

1891 



in, 

356, 
381, 

.3.3, 
7, 
6, 



.3, 

279. 
267, 
290, 

•34, 
34, 
42, 



40. 
34, 



598 
166 
371 

618 
502 
541 

340 
46 



817 
88 



,933 
652 
538 

Oil 
112 
727 

077 
289 
013 

,976 
,924 
,342 

474 
277 
283 

3.50 
216 
197 



9,836 
5,600 
5,951 

309 
18 
30 

20 

2 



1.34 



8,. 542 
5,440 
4,956 

611 
119 

688 

68 

7 



125 

10 



17,495 

(1) " 
13,411 


206,011 

116,517 

63.729 


1..336 

(') 
104 


9,222 
2,840 
1,080 


66 


13,202 
957 


185 

_ 


14,226 
1,584 


125 

(■) 
89 


18,259 
4,. 549 
2,043 


12,973 

(') 
8,249 


63,810 
65,303 
26,116 


1,803 

(') 

3.011 


58,269 
28.809 
27,915 


425 
(') 
213 


10.284 
4,380 
1,896 


466 

(') 

1,.579 


17.541 

7.581 
3,001 


. 116 

(') 
102 


1,198 
514 
474 



i Les petits fruits ont etc ooinpris avcc les legumes. 
I Comprend Alberta et Saskatchewan. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



1891, 1901 et 1911. En 1901 Ontario comptait 5,440 acres ou 97 pour cent 
de I'etendue totale, comparativement a 8,542 acres en 1911 ou 87 pour cent. 
II y a eu une augmentation considerable dans chaque province, de 1901 a 1911 
dans I'etendue de terre consacree a la production du raisin. De 1901 a 1911 
I'etendue en vergers et pepinieres, dans la Colombie-Brit.annique, a augmente 
de 7,502 a 33,618 acres, soit une augmentation de 26,116 acres ou 348 pour 
cent dans la decade. Des progres encourageants ont ete faits dans la plan- 
tation des vergers dans toutes les provinces des prairies durant la decade, 
I'etendue en fruits de toutes sortes y ayant augmente de 791 a 3,641 acres. 
Quebec indique une diminution constante dans I'etendue de terre en vergers, 
mais une augmentation dans les terres en autres fruits et en legumes. La 
Colombie-Britannique detient la premiere place dans I'etablissement de 
nouveaux vergers, Ontario venant ensuite avec la Nouvelle-Ecosse bonne 
troisieme. 

Le tableau 16 donne, pour tout le Dominion, le nombre comparatif des 
arbres en rapport et non en rapport selon les classes, ainsi que la moyenne des 
arbres par ferme et par 100 acres de terre amelioree en 1901 et 1911. En 
exceptant les peches il y a eu des diminutions dans le nomljre d'arbres frui- 
tiers en rapport durant la decade. D'un autre c6te il y a de fortes augmenta- 
tions dans le nombre de jeunes arbres fruitiers de toutes sortes, excepte les 
prunes. Le nombre de pommiers par ferme est tombe de 27-64 a 22-70, et 
le nombre total des arbres de verger par ferme, de 38-92 a 31-23. 

TABLEAU 16. ARBRES FRUITIERS, EN RAPPORT ET NON EN RAPPORT, AINSI QUE 
LEUR NOMBRE MOYEN PAR FERME ET PAR 100 ACRES DE TERRE AM^LIORfiE, 
1911 ET 1901 



Sortes 


Arbres en 

RAPPORT 


Arbres non 
en rapport 


Arbres par 

FERME 


Arbres par 100 
acres de tebre 
amelioree 


1911 1901 

1 


1911 


1901 


1911 


1901 


1911 


190 1 


Arbres fruitiers — 


NO. NO. 

10,017,372 11,025,789 
839,288 819,985 
.581,704 617,293 
1,075,130 1,452,209 
741,992; 903,140 
146,659 141,870 


NO. 

5,599,804 


NO. 

4,028,086 


NO. 

22-70 

2-65 

1-35 

! 2-40 

1-73 

-40 


NO. 

27-64 

2-39 

1-76 

4-44 

' 2-36 

•33 


NO. 

33-28 
3-89 
1-98 
3-51 
2-54 
-59 


NO. 

49-93 


Pechps 


1,0.56,359 


481,790 


4-31 


Poires 


385,538: 344,808 

637,220 963,420 

1 495,082 385,228 

141,233 37,555 


3-19 


Prunes 

Cerises 

Autres fruits. .. .- 


8-01 

4-25 

-59 


Totaux 


14,0»2,145 14,96«,34fi 


8,3i5,33«| 6,240,S93 


31 23 


38 92 

1 


45 79 


70-28 



La production des pommes dans le Dominion, de 1900 a 1910, a diminue 
de 8,007,520 boisseaux. L'exactitude des chiffres du recensement se trouve 
appuyce par le « Rapport du Commerce)) qui indique qu'en 1901 le Canada 
a exporte 2,035,953 boisseaux de pommes r^coltees I'ann^e precedente, contre 
une exportation de 1,570,974 boisseaux en 1911, de la rdcolte de 1910, ou une 
difference de 404,979 boisseaux en moins. En 1900-1901 il a etc importe au 
Canada 78,189 boisseaux de pommes, contre 452,783 boisseaux dans I'annee 
fiscale 1910-1911, qui correspond presque avec I'annee de recensement, soit 
une augmentation de 374,594 boisseaux sur Tannee decennale precedente. La 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 xxvii 

diminution dans la quantite exportee et raugmentation dans la quantite importee 
iudiquent' ensemble la lacune dans la production domestique et corroborent 
incidemment I'exactitude des chiffres du recensement. 

Les chiffres concernant la production des petits fruits, autres que le raisin, 
lie sont pas donnes pour I'annee 1891, et pour 1901 ils sont groupes ensemble 
et donnes en pintes. Dans le dernier recensement une boite etalon ayant ete 
adoptee, les quantites sont donnees en boites ou en pintes conformcment a 
I'usage commun. En reduisant les boites en pintes pour les rendre comparables, 
11 y a eu une augmentation de plus de 2f millions de pintes dans la production 
des petits fruits (le raisin excepte). La production du raisin a augmente de 
8,595,804 livres durant la decade. 

Le tableau 17 donne la production fruitiere pour tout le Canada, ainsi que 
la production moycnne par ferme et par 100 acres de terre amelioree en 1890, 
1900 et 1910. 



TABLEAU 17. PRODUITS FRUITIERS POUR LE CANADA, AINSI QUE LA PRODUCTION 
MOYENNE PAR FERME ET PAR 100 ACRES DE TERRE AMELIOREE, 1890-1910 



Production totale 



Production moyexne 



Sortes 



1890 



Fruits de vergers — 

Pommes boiss. 

Peches " 

Poires " 

Prunes " 

Cerises " 

Autres fruits " 

Total " 

Petits fruits — 

Raisins lb. 

Fraises boites 

Gadelles et groseilles. . .pintes 
Autres fruits boites 



7,563,894 
43,690 
229,283 
269,631 
197,090 
324,789 



1900 



Par ferme 
1910 



18,626,186 10,618,666 



545,415 
531,837 
557,875 
336,751 
70,396 



646,826 
504, 171 
508,994 
238,974 
47,789 



8,628,377 20,668,460 12,565,420 



12,2.52,331 



24,302,634 32,898,4.38 



21,707,791 



18,686,662 
3,830,609 
9,000,208 



1890 



12 19 
•07 
•37 

' ^43 
•32 
•52 



13-90 



1900 I 1910 



34-23 14-87 



1-00 
•96 

1-02 
•61 
•13 



37-95 



19-74' 44-62 



39-85 



17-58 

46-03 

2615 

5^36 

12-60 



Par 100 acres de 
terre amelioree 



1890 ; 1900 1910 



1105^ 61-75 21^79 
■06 1-81 1-33 



•34 



1-76 103 



•39 1-85 105 



•29 Mli 

I 



•48; 



•23 



•49 
-09 



12-61 68-51 25-78 



42-96 3 80-5J 67-50 

- I 38-35 

71-96 7-86 

18-47 



Le nombre d'arbres fruitiors, en rapport ou non, par espcccs principales, 
est donn^ par provinces pour 1901 et 1911, et la production fruitiere pour 1890, 
1900 et 1910. Le nombre d'arbres n'a pas ete obtenu pour 1891. 

15506—1 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



TABLEAU 18.— Arbres fruitiers en 1901 et 1911, et fruits en 1890, 1900 et 1910, 

compares par provinces. 



Sortes 


Arbres en rapport 


Arbres non en 

RAPPORT 


Production des 


FRUITS 


1901 


1911 


1901 


1911 


1890 


1900 


1910 


Caaada — 

Poninics 

Pcc'.hes 


no. 

11,025,789 
819,985 
617,293 
1,4.52,269 
903,140 
141,870 

220,684 
3,552 

24,948 

.59.780 

17.322 

5, 132 

400 

51 
42 

300 

192 
47 

1,091 

24,094 
8,102 

7.551,636 
.. 811,725 


no. 

10,617,-372 
839,288 
581,704 
1,075,130 
741,992 
146, 659 

.510,763 
39,. 522 
32,908 
73,067 
32,697 
22,913 

333 

6 

12 

132 

195 

5,969 

1,449 

1 

8 

716 

237 

4,816 

4,292 

31 

14 

5, 183 

9,776 

22,151 

6.710,033 
794,192 
505.368 
784,036 
506.868 
48,121 

1,252.835 

1,734 

4,014 

136,270 

112,056 

33,411 

393,874 

667 

811 

11,445 

11,425 

1,839 

1,. 596. 0.56 

2,926 

.37,154 

52,764 

31,056 

2,852 

147,7.37 

209 

1,415 

11.517 

37,682 

4,587 


no. 

4,028,086 
481,790 
.344,808 
963,426 
385,228 
.37,. 5.55 

170,960 

4,401 

19,795 

26,663 

9,477 

5,068 

958 

470 
83 

831 

3,681 

2,280 

70 

7,241 

17,569 
5,540 

1,989,983 
470,772 
280,175 
686.626 
2.37.792 
10,263 

780,025 

204 

6,632 

118.910 

76,328 

4,817 

219,249 

247 

1,779 

16,371 

13,. 331 

3,470 

771,830 

6,015 

35,086 

78,6.55 

18.883 

3,. 321 

87,009 
91 
1,341 
14,479 
21,514 
10,546 


no. 

5,599,804 
1,0,56,3.59 
385,. 538 
637,220 
495,082 
141,2.33 

1,465,662 

162,507 

116,487 

96, 144 

73,090 

.50,649 

4,448 

20 

26 

536 

285 

6,163 

5,434 

12 

92 

2,209 

924 

4,960 

17,801 

47 

59 

8,801 

2,371 

5,836 

2, 073,. 576 
890,455 
237,769 
345,991 
327,894 
54,296 

859,812 

688 

3,812 

126,156 

.53,778 

9,538 

229,828 

251 

1,137 

10,541 

7,656 

3,014 

884,984 

2,038 

25, 132 

.37,734 

13,672 

1,141 

.58.2,59 

341 

1.024 

9. lOS 

15.412 
5.636 


boi.ss. 

7,563,894 
43,690 
229.283 
269.631 
197.090 
.324,789 

76,856 

1,494 

12,156 

19,775 

4,227 

7,612 

713 

44 

212 

166 

2,443 

5,043,612 
40,626 
208,887 
171,. 335 
106,6.58 
208,415 

1,078.120 

980 

887 

03.794 

72,931 

64,325 

2.59,615 

35 

96 

3,784 

1 , 243 

7,602 

1,051,592 

534 

7,115 

9,246 

7,482 

31.. 561 

.'52.018 

19 

71 

1,479 

4,265 

2.473 


boiss. 

18,626,186 
545,415 
.531,837 
.557,875 
.3.36,751 
70,396 

240,012 

2,553 

25,364 

58.221 

14,445 

2,938 

500 

38 
13 

987 

21 
13 

571 

2,006 
673 

13,631,264 
539,482 
487,7.59 
3.37,108 
132,177 
40,108 

2,025,113 

17 

3,275 

122,648 

150.690 

21,386 

503,214 

87 

279 

4,637 

4.233 

1,096 

2,065,104 

3,231 

14,881 

28,931 

16,669 

2,229 

1.59,421 

45 

279 

4,265 

17.838 

2. 639 


boiss. 

10,618,666 
646,826 


Poires 


.504.171 


Prunes 


508.994 




2.38,974 




47,789 


C'olombie-Britan. — 
Pommcs 


575,377 


Peches 


44,032 


Poires 


51.000 




80.444 


Ct'rises. 


27.417 


Autres 


11,469 


Alberta 1— 

Pomnies 


189 


Peches 




Poires 




Prunes 


4 


Cerises 

Autres 


1 
59 


e'askatchewiin — ' 
Pommes.. . 


90 


Peches 






2 


Prunes... 


17 


Cerises 

Autres... . 


6 

213 


Manitoba — 
Pommes 


1,528 




18 


Poire.s 


13 


Prunes 


1,645 


Cerises 


547 


Autres 


2,427 


Ontario — 

Pommes 


6,4.59,151 


Poires 


600, 187 


Peches 


564,798 

999,091 

446,556 

38,517 

1,476,727 

68 

5,191 

245,370 

317,762 

23,711 

456,115 

86 

721 

16,900 

21,2.39 

12,326 

1,203,745 
4,482 
21,014 
93,790 
43, 153 
14,806 

115,091 

72 

621 

13,001 

48,917 

47,378 


423.568 


Prunes 


346.944 




146.440 


Autres 


20,465 


Quebec — 


1,482,095 


Peches 


1,484 


Poires 


4,886 


Prunes 


53,947 


Cerises 


45,744 


Autres 


9,796 


Nouv'.-Brunsw ic'v— 
Pommes 


272,884 


Peches 


49 


Poires 


423 




3,778 


Cerises 


1,680 


Autres 


301 


Nouvelle-Ecossc — 
Pommes 


1,666.977 




1.043 


Poires 


23.. 506 


Prunes 


16,984 




10.004 




1,580 


He du Pr.-Edouard— 


160.375 


Poches 


13 


Poires 


773 


Prunes 


5.231 


Cerises 


7, 1.35 


Autres 


1.479 



>La production des fruits en 1890 est comprise dans les totaux pour le Canada. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Le tableau 19 donne les valeurs des fruits de vergers, des petits fruits et des 
legumes separ^ment pour I'annee 1910, la valeur totale pour 1900 et 1910, ainsi 
q\ie raugmeiitation ])roportionnelle durant la decade. Les fruits de vergers 
]H)ur tout le Canada, en 1910, representent ime valeur de $9,728,533; les petits 
fruits, une valeur de S3,052,592, ef les legumes, une valeur de $18,806,544, 
forniant un total, pour les fruits et les legumes, de -So 1,587, 669, comparativement 
a $12,994,900 en 1900, soit un gain de $18,592,769, ou 143-08 pour cent dans 
les dix annees. La valeur moyenne des fruits et des legumes par ferme etait 
de .?44 en 1910, comparativement a $24 dans le recensement precedent. Comme 
la valeur des fruits de toutes especes et ceile des legumes etaient comptees 
ensemble dans le recensement de 1901, il n'est pas possible de det<srrainer la pro- 
portion de Taugmentaticm dans la valeur durant la decade pour chaque classe, 
mais on pent justement supposer que la valeur des legumes formait une plus forte 
proportion du total en 1910 qu'en 1900. De 1900 a 1910 toutes les provinces 
indiquent une augmentation dans la valeur des fruits et des legumes, variant 
de 64-38 pour cent dans I'lle du Prince-Edouard a 3,443.73 pour cent dans 
LAlberta. 

TABLEAU 19. VALEUR DES FRUITS ET DES LEGUMES EN 1910 ET TOTAUX COM- 
PARATIFS POUR 1910 ET 1900, AINSI QUE L'AUMENTATION POUR CENT EX 
DIX ANS. 



Provinces 


Valeur ex 1910 


DES — 


Valeur des fruits et 

DES LEGirMES 


Augmen- 
tation 
pour cent 

on 

dix 

auM 


Fruits de 
vergers 


Petits 
fruits 


Legumes 


1910 


1900 


Canada 

Colouibie-Britanniquc 

Alberta 

Siiskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 


$ 

9,7?8,53$ 

1,022,576 

401 

327 

7,140 

5,. 564, 133 

1,186,479 

267,993 

1,547,245 

132,233 


$ 

3,05^,592 

312,528 

6,469 

3,828 

14,690 

2,2.54,913 

284,633 

62,806 

87, 161 

25,. 564 


$ 

18,806,344 

1,023,263 
1,129,922 
1,047,082 
1,428,402 
6,043,617 
5,797,060 
873,861 
1,392,0.39 
70,692 


$ 

31..iS7,669 

2,.35S,.367 
1,136,792 
1,051,2.37 
1,450,238 
13,862,663 
7,268,778 
1,204,660 
3,026,445 
228,489 


$ 

1?,994,900 

435,794 

32,079 

48,474 

163,9.58 

7,809,084 

2,. 564, 801 

394,337 

1,407,. 369 

139,004 


p. c. 
143 08 

441 17 
3,443-73 
2,068-66 

784-52 
77-52 




183-41 


Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nouvelle-Ecossc 

He du Prince-Edouard 


205-49 

11504 

64-38 



D'apres le dernier recensement la province d'Ontario comptait 57-20 pour 
cent de la valeur totak; de tons les fruits de vergers recoltes au Canada, la Nou- 
velle-Ecosse 15-90 pour cent, Quebec 12-20 pour cent, la Colombie-Britannique 
10-51 pour cent, le Xouveau-Brunswick 2-75 pour cent, I'lle du Prince-Edouard 
1 -35 pour cent et les provinces des prairies -09 pour cent; pour les petits fruits, 
Ontario comptait 73-86 pour cent de la valeur totale, la Colombie-Britannique 
10-24 pour cent, Quebec 9-32 pour cent, la Nouvelle-Ecosse 2-85 pour cent, 
K' Xouveau-Brunswick 2-05 pour cent, I'llc du Prince-Edouard -84 pour cent 
et les provinces des prairies -84 pour cent. 

Le tableau 20 donne la distril)ution pour cent de la valeur des fruits dc 
vergers, des petits fruits et des legumes en 1910. La valeur totale des fruits 
et des legumes pour tout le Canada etait de $31,587,669, dont la valeur des fruits 
1550G— li 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



de vergers ($9,728,533) ^tait de 30-80 pour cent, celle des petits fruits ($3,052, 
592) de 9-66 pour cent et celle des legumes ($18,806,544) de 59-54 pour cent. 
Le tableau doit etre interprete de la meme maniere pour chacune des provinces. 
En 1910, les legumes representaient 99-39 pour cent de la valeur totale des 
fruits et des legumes dans I'Alberta, 99-60 pour cent dans la Saskatchewan, 
98-49 pour cent dans le Manitoba, 79 • 76 pour cent dans Quebec, 72 • 54 pour cent 
dans le Nouveau-Brunswick, 46 pour cent dans la Nouvelle-Ecosse, et moins 
de 45 pour cent dans le reste des autres provinces. 

TABLEAU 20. PROPORTION POUR CENT DE LA VALEUR TOTALE DES FRUITS 
DE VERGERS, DES PETITS FRUITS ET DES LEGUMES PAR PROVINCES, EN 1910. 



Provinces 


Pour-cent de la valeur totale des 

FRUITS et des legumes REVENANT 
AUX — 


Totuux 




Fruits de 
vergers 


Petits 
fruits 


Legumes 


■ 


Canada 

Coloinbie-Britannique 


p. c. 
SO 80 

43-36 

•04 

•04 

•49 

40^14 

16^32 

22-25 

51-13 

57-87 


p. c. 

9 66 

13-25 

•57 

•36 

1-02 

lG-27 

3-92 

. 5-21 

2-88 

11-19 


p. r-. 
59 54 

43-39 
99-39 
99-60 
98-49 
43-59 
79-76 
72-54 
46-00 
30-94 


p. c. 
100 09 

100-00 


Alberta 


100-00 


Saskatchewan 


100-00 


Manitoba 


100 00 


Ontario 


100-00 


Quebec 


100-00 


Nouveau-Brunswick 


100 • 00 


Nouvelle-Ecosse 


100 00 


lie du Prince-Edouard 


10003 







La valeur totale des fruits de toutes sortes exportes ou import^s, pour 
les decades expirees le 30 juin depuis 1891, est representee dans les chiffres 
qui suivent: en 1891, exportations $1,487,336, importations $261,382; en 
1901, exportations $1,633,604, importations $337,674; en 1911, exportations 
$1,975,982, importations $1,531,077. 

De 1891a 1901, la valeur des exportations a augments de 9-83 pour cent 
et celle des importations de 29- 18 pour cent, tandis que de 1901 a 1911 les expor- 
tations ont augmente de 20 - 95 pour cent et les importations de 353 - 42 pour cent. 
De la valeur totale de tons les fruits exportes, les pommes comptaient 93 - 43 pour 
cent en 1891, 90-77 pour cent en 1901 et 88-91 pour cent en 1911. La valeur 
des pommes import^es en 1891 representait 21-08 pour cent de la valeur totale 
de tous les fruits importes, comparativement a 21-97 pour cent en 1901 et a 
31-84 pour cent en en 1911. Le tableau 21 donne la quantite et la valeur des 
fruits exportes pour les dix annees se terminant le 30 juin 1891, 1901 et 1911, 
et le tableau 22 donne la quantite et la valeur des fruits importes pour les 
memes amines. 



RE CENSE ME NT DU CANADA 1911 xxxi 

TABLEAU 21. QUANTITY; ET VALEUR DES FRUITS EXP0RT£;S POUR LES ANN^IES 
SE TERMIXANT LE 30 JUIX 1S91, 1901 ET 1911. 









ExPORTATIOXS DE FRUITS 






Fruits 


1891 1901 


1911 




Quantity 


Valeur Quantite 


Valeur 


Quantite 


Valeur 


Pommcs 


boiss. 
1,352,508 
(') 
(') 


S 

1,389,714 
64,849 
32,773 


boiss. 
2,0.35,953 

(') 
(■) 


S 
1,482,927 
112,441 
38,236 


boiss. 
1,570,974 
(•) 
(M 


S 

1,756,884 


Baies 


82,921 




136, 177 






Valeur totale 


- 


1,487,336 


- 


1,633,601 


- 


1,9:5,982 



(') Quantite non-donnee. 



TABLEAU 21. QUANTITY ET VALEUR DES FRUITS IMPORTES POUR LES ANNEES 
SE TERMINANT LE 30 JUIN 1891, 1901 ET 1911 



ImPORT.ITIONS DE FRUITS 



Fruits 


1891 


1901 


1911 




Quantite 


Valeur Quantite 


Valeur 


Quantite 


Valeur 


Ponimcs 


boiss. 

48,. 303 

395,748 

5,013 

8,924 

lb. 

334,871 
65,212 


S 

. 55,118 
32,039 
21,219 
26,905 

.34,280 
12,369 
79,452 


boiss. 

78,189 

2,093,157 

36,465 

13,570 

lb. 

1,079,274 
105,297 
978,199 


$ 

74,191 
52.001 
36,291 
26, 199 

80,310 
9,517 
59, 165 


boiss. 

452,783 

8,137,846 

89,808 

40,022 

lb. 

3,272,6.36 

345,932 

3,934,255 


$ 
487.516 




218,564 




127,604 


Airelles (Atokas) 


103,118 


Baies 


318,223 
44,744 


Raisin.s 


1,081,792 


231,308 


Valeur totale 


- 


'261,382 


- 


337,674 


- 


1,531,077 





La quantite moj^enne de pommcs rccoltees par tetc de la population au-dessus 
do deux ans, etait de 1-68 boisseau en 1891, comparativement a 3-73 boisseaux 
en 1901 et a 1-59 boisseau en 1911. Si, a la quantite retenue pour consomma- 
tion domestique dans ehaquc decade, on ajoute la quantite de ])ommes impor- 
tee, on trouve que la consommation moyenne pour la population au-dessup 
de deux ans, a chaque pericde de recensement, <'^tait de 1-39, 3-34 etl-42 
boisseaux respectivement. 



xxxii RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

RECOLTES DES CHAMPS 

I^a statistique concernant la superficie, la production et la valeur des 
rccoltes des champs est donnee en detail bans les tableaux I a VI, IX et X, 
par sommaires pour les provinces dans les tableaux XIV a XVII, et par etats 
comparatifs des tableaux XXV a XXVII. Dans les tableaux I a IV la statis- 
ticjue est donnee par cantons et par paroisses ou la. chose est pratical)le. 

SUPERFICIE. 

Dans le tal)leau 23, qui suit, la superficie totale en recolte des champs 
est donnee par provinces pour les annees 1890, 1900, 1910 et 1911. Les chiffres 
pour I'annee 1911 n'etant pas pour une annee de recensement, ne peuvent 
etre compares avec ceiix des recensements precedents, mais lis sont donnes 
pour illustrer le mouvement progressif constant en agriculture. 

Le tableau 27 (p.p. xxxviii-xlii) donne les statistiques pour ces annees par 
recoltes individuelles, et permettra d'etudier les fluctuations dans les etendues 
de terre consacrees a chaque recolte par periodes de recensement. 



TABLEAU 23. 



ETAT COMFARATIF DE LA SUPERFICIE EN RECOLTES DES CHAMPS, 
PAR PROVINCES, 1890, 1900, 1910 ET 1911 





Recoltes en 


Augmentation' 

CENT 


POUR 


Provinces 


1890 


1900 


1910 


1911 


1900 

sur 
1890 


1910 
sur 
1900 


1911 
sur 
1910 


Canada 

C'olombie-Britannique 


acres 

l.S,662,811 

115,184 

38,371 

151,987 

1,229,041 

8,166,499 

4,064,716 

763,248 

723,825 

409,940 


acres 

19,763,740 

171,447 

188,476 

6.55,5.37 

2,756,106 

9,212,478 

4,704,396 

897,417 

7.30,146 

447,7.37 


acres 

30,5.56,168 

213,437 

2, 067,. 589 

6,871,858 

4,068,2.50 

9,321,933 

5,265,738 

9.58,868 

710,966 

477,. 529 


acres 

35,261,3.38 

239,649 

3,378,365 

9,136,868 

5,161,8.58 

9,683,307 

5,480,673 

978,876 

717.468 

484.274 


p.c. 

26 2 

48-8 

391-2 

331 3 

124-2 

12-8 

15-7 

17-6 

•9 

j 9-2 


p.c. 

54 6 

24-5 

997-0 

948-3 

69-4 

11 

11-9 

6-9 

1 —2-6 

i '■' 


p.c. 

15 4 

12-3 
63-4 


Sa.skatchewan 


33-0 




10-6 


O n tario 


3-9 


Qti^^bec 


4-1 


Nouvcau-Brunswick 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 


2-1 
-9 


He du Prince-Edouard 


14 



Nota: — Le signe (— ) indique une diminution. 

La superficie totale en recoltes des champs pour tout le Canada 4tait de 
15,662,811 acres en 1890, de 19,763,740 acres en 1900, de 30,.^.56,168 acres 
en 1910 et de 35,261,338 acres en 1911. De 1890 a 1900 raugmentation pour 
cent etait de 26-2; de 1900 a 1910 de 54-6, et pour I'annee 1911 sur I'annee 
precedente, de 15-4. 

Des provinces des prairies, le Manitoba seul indicpie une plus faible aug- 
mentation dans la seconde decade que dans Ui premiere. Toutes les pre v.nces de 
Test indiquent de plus faibles augmentations dans I'^tendue de terre en re- 
coltes des champs durant la decade se terminant en 1910 que durant la decade 
precedente. De 1900 a 1910 I'etendue de terre en recoltes des champs dans 
la I^ouvellc-Ecosse accuse une diminution de 2-6 pour cent; c'est la seule 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



province qui montre une diminution dans le nombre d'acres en recoltes dcs 
cliamps durant la decade. 

Les gains relativement faibles en acres en culture de 1900 a 1910 dans 
Ontario, Quebec et les Provinces ]\Iaritimes out pour cause la rarete des bras 
agricoles et la migration vers les Provinces de I'Ouest. Le dernier recense- 
ment a demontre que sur le chiffre de la population totale situee a I'ouest des 
Grands Lacs, 352,735 etaient natifs d'Ontario, de Quebec et des Provinces 
Maritimes. Le tableau 24 qui donne le nombre de fermes vacantes dans les 
provinces de Test, le ler juin 1911, indique le mouvement de la population 
et explique les faibles gains faits dans les superficies en recoltes durant la decade. 
TABLEAU 24. TERRES VACANTES DANS L'EST DU CANADA, RECENSEMENT DE 1911 





Nombre des terres vacantes ayant — 


Total 

des 

terres 

vacantes 


Total 

d'acres 

des terres 

vacantes 


Provinces 


5 a 10 

acres 


11 a 50 

acres 


51 a 100 
acres 


101 £l 200 
acres 


201 acres 

et audes- 

sus 


O.'itorio 


NO. 

522 

84 

146 

219 

5 


NO. 

1,903 

236 

279 

418 

73 


NO. 

1,554 
215 
234 

218 
47 


NO. 

.581 
93 
66 

104 
10 


NO. 

199 

37 

14 

32 

2 


WO. 

4,759 
665 
739 
991 
1.37 


acres 
.398,63 




56.342 


Nouveau-Bi"unswipk 


48,754 


Nouvelle-Ecos.se 


63,967 


lie du Prince-Edouard 


9,002 


Total 


976 


2,909 


2,268 


854 


284 


7,291 


576,702 







Les proportions pour cent dans le tableau 25 sont basees sur les chift'res 
donne.s au tableau 23. De la superficie totale en recoltes des champs en 1890, 
Ontario comptait 52^14 pour cent, comparativement a 46-61 pour cent en 1900 
et a 30-50 pour cent en 1910; Quebec comptait 25-95 pour cent de la super- 
ficie totale en 1890, contre 23-80 pour cent en 1900 et 17-24 pour cent en 1910; 
les provinces marithnes comptaient 12-11 pour cent en 1890, contre 10-50 
pour cent en 1900 et 7-02 pour cent en 1910. La part de la superficie totale 
en recoltes, donnce pour Ics provinces des prairies, etait de 9-06 pour cent 
en 1890, et de 18-22 pour cent en 1900, tandis qu'elle est montee a pres de 
45 pour cent en 1910. 

TABLEAU 25. DISTRIBUTION POUR CENT DES ACRES EN RECOLTES PAR 
PROVINCES, 1890, 1900 ET 1910 



1_ — . — _ 

Provinces 


PoUR<ENT DE.'« ACUE.S EN RECOI.TE.S 


1890 1 1900 [ 1910 


Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 


p.c. 

100 00 

•74 

•24 

•97 

7^85 

.52^14 

25-95 

4-88 

4 62 

2-61 


p.c. 

100 0« 

•87 

•95 

3-32 

13^95 

4601 

23 80 

4-55 

3-69 

226 


p.c. 
100 00 

-70 


Alborta 


6-77 


Saskatchewan 


22-49 


Manitoba 


15-28 


Ontario 


30-i50 




17-24 


Nouveau-Brunswick 


3-13 


Nouvelie-Ecosse 


2 -.33 


lie du Prince-Edouard 


1-58 


N 





RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Le tableau 26 donne en eolonnes paralleles pour tout le Canada I'aug- 
meiitation ou la diminution faite en acres conaacres aux differentes recoltes 
(1) pour 1900 sur 1890 et (2) pour 1910 sur 1900. 

Les superficies en ble de printemps et en ble d'automne n'ont pas ete 
prises separement dans le recensement de 1891. Dans le recensement de 1911, 
pour la premiere fois, les superficies ont ete prises pour les navets, les betteraves 
fourrageres et les betteraves a sucre. 

Le recensement de 1901 indique des augmentations, durant la decade, de 
1,52.3,329 acres pour le ble, ou 56-39 pour-cent; pour I'avoine, de 1,406,299 
acres ou 35-50 pour cent; pour le ble d'Inde a grain, de 165,657 acres, ou 84-90 
pour cent; le sarrasin et les pois indiquent une diminution de 31,581 acres ou 
12-06 pour cent dans les premiers et de 255,055 acres ou 27-56 pour cent dans 
les derniers; mais, pour tons les grains, I'augmentation totale de 1900 sur 1890 
est de 3,143,589 acres ou 34-5 pour cent. Les pommes de terre et le houblon 
indiquent aussi des diminutions. Le recensement de 1910 donne les augmen- 
tations decennales suivantes: ble 4,639,972 acres ou 109-83 pour cent; avoine 
3,288,524 acres ou 61-26 pour cent; orge 411,294 acres ou 47-17 pour cent; 
sarrasin 95,787 acres ou 36-59 pour cent; lin 559,099 acres ou 2,421,80 pour 
cent. La presque totalite de cette augmentation dans la superficie en lin, 
se trouve dans la Saskatchewan et I'Alberta. En grains melanges I'augmen- 
tation etait de 153,467 acres ou 56-11 pour cent. Le foin, le trefle et I'alfalfa 
ou luzerne indiquent une augmentation de 1,800,788 acres ou 27-5 pour cent. 

TABLEAU 28. ETAT COMPARATIF MONTRANT L'AUGMEXTATION OU LA DIMINU- 
TION DE L'E'l'ENDUE EN RECOLTES DES CHAMPS, DE 1890 a 1900 ET DE 1900 k 1910, 
POUR LE CANADA 



Recoltes 



VaRI.\TION ex 10 ANS 

1890-1900 
Augmentation (+) 
Diminution (— ) 



VaRUTION en 10 ANS 

1900-1910 

Augmentation (+) 

Diminution (— ) 



N ombre 



Propor- 
tion 



Nombre 



Propor- 
tion 



Ble + 

Orge + 

Avoine i + 

Seigle + 

Ble d'Inde a grain \ + 

Sarrasin 

Pois 

Feves 

Grains melangds ^ 

Lin 

Pommes de terres 

Raeines des champs 

Foin, trefle et alfalfa 

Autrcs recoltes fourrageres ' 4- 

Tabac.^ ; + 

Houblon I — 



1,523, 

3, 

1,406, 

54, 

165, 

31, 

255, 

3, 

6, 

1, 

57 

611 



329 
336 
299 
,577 
,657 
,581 
,055 
,537 
(') 
,850 
,447 
,017 
,875 
(') 
,141 
446 



p.c. 

56-39 

0-38 

35-50 

44-69 

84-90 

12 06 

27-56 

8-20 

(') 

42-19 

0-30 

38-49 

10-31 

(') 

149-86 

23-30 



+ 



4,639, 

411 

3,288 

61 

66 

95 

315 

153 

559 

15 

10 

1,800 



,972 
,294 
,524 
,951 
,807 
,787 
,129 

335 
,467 
,099 
.761 
,595 
,788 
.8.35 
.022 

304 



+ 



p.c. 

109 

47 

61 

35 

18 

36 

47 



56 

2,421 

3 

5 



•83 
•17 
•26 
•06 
-51 
■59 
•01 
•72 
11 
•80 
•51 
•16 
•50 
•81 
•98 
•84 



(1) Non mentionn6 dans le recensement de 1891. 

L'etendue en recoltes fourrageres a augmente de 275,835 acres ou pres de 100 
pour cent. II y a des diminutions dans les raeines et le houblon, mais dans 
les grains seuls il y a une augmentation de 8, 460,286 acres ou 73-3 pour cent 
durant la decade. Les superficies reunies en rdcoltes fourrageres (foin, trefle, 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 xxxv 

alfalfa, etc.) formaieui un total de 5,931,548 acres en 1890;- comparativement 
a 6,819,773 acres en 1900 et a 8,896,396 acres en 1910, soit une augmentation 
de 15 pour cent a la fin de la premiere decade, et de 30-45 pour cent k la fin 
de la seconde. 

Le tableau 27 donne les superficies de toutes les recoltes pour le Dominion 
ft pour chacune des provinces, ainsi que le pour-cent de variation d'une decade 
a Tautre. L'et endue ensemencee en differentes recoltes au printemps de 1911 
(qui n'est pas une annee de recensement) est donnee afin de montrer I'avan- 
cemcnt rapide et continu fait en agriculture au Canada en ces dernieres annees. 
Relativement aux conditions agricoles de la Colombic-Britannique, le passage 
suivant se trouve dans I'introduction au rapport du volume II, recensement de 
1901: « La Colombie-Britanniquc n'a pas cor^me ressource principale I'agricul- 
ture. Les mineraux des montagnes y out eie jusqu'a ce jour la principale 
attraction des homines qui aiment I'aveuture et la fortune; cependant si I'in- 
dustrie miniere devient a augmenter, I'industrie agricoie augmentera certaine- 
ment et deviendra aussi une Industrie necessaire)). Les statistiques du dernier 
recensement indiquent que les vallees fertiles de la Colombie-Britanniquc 
s'ouvrent plutot a la culture des fruits et des legumes qu'a la production des 
grains. L'etendue en grains dans la Colombie-Britannique a augmente de 
12,199 acres entre 1891 et 1901, tandis que de 1901 a 1911 il 3^ a eu une diminution 
de 9,562 acres ou 16-78 pour cent. D'un autre cote le nombre d'acres en foin 
et en trefle y a augmente de 102,752 a 132,668 acres durant la decade; le nombre 
d'acres en recoltes fourrageres, de 1,208 a 15",519 acres, et I'alfalfa, non donnee en 
1900, compte 3,741 acres en 1910, les pommes de terre ont augmente de 2,666 
acres ou 32-48 pour cent. La superficie totale en toutes recoltes dans la Colom- 
bie-Britannique pour la derniere decade etait de 41,990 acres ou 24-49 pour 
cent. Comme on I'a dit deja, I'etablissement do vergers et de jardins marai- 
chers dans la province du Pacifique est un des faits les plus remarquables dans 
le developpement agricoie de cette province. De 1900 a 1910 les vergers et les 
jardins maraichers ont augmente en etendue de 10,360 a 34,485 acres, soit une 
augmentation de 24,125 acres ou 233 pour cent dans la decade. 

Le nombre de -fermes dans I'Alberta en 1901 etait de 9,486, dont 9,429 
ayant une etendue de cinq acres et au-dessus, comparativement a 60,353 fermes 
de cinq acres et au-dessus en 1911 et a 1,143 de moins de cinq ; crcs. La super- 
ficie en ble, en avoine et en orge s'est accrue de 171,862 acres en 1900 a 1,784,265 
acres en 1910, soit une augmentation de 1,612,403 acres ou 938 pour cent. Les 
autrcs grains ont augmente de 1,254 a 8,954 acres dans les dix annees. Lo 
lin dont il n'y avait que 100 acres en 1900 a augmente a 30,885 acres en 1910. 
Le foin, le trefle et I'alfalfa qui n'ont pas ete donnes dans le recensement de 1901, 
avaient une etendue de 152,424 acres en 1910. L'etendue en pommes de terre 
s'est accrue de 3,792 a 20,086 acres. 

Sur 13,384 fermes do cinq acres et au-dessus en 1900, la Saskatchewan 
avait une superficie en ble, en orge et en avoine de 640,861 acres, contre 6,246,202 
acres sur 95,809 fermes en 1901, soit une augmentation de 5,605,341 acres dans 
.les dix annees. De cette augmentation le ble a obtenu 3,741,010 acres, I'orge 
117,779 acres et I'avoine 1,746,552 acres. Le lin qui avait une etendue de 227 
acres seulement en 1900 s'est accru a 506,425 acres en 1910. L'etendue en pommes 



xxxvi RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

de terre et en racines s'est elevee cle 6,756 a 25,085 acres dans les dix amines. 
Sur 31,812 fermes de cinq acres et au-dessus en 1900, le Manitoba avait 1,965,200 
acres en ble, 139,672 acres en orge et 573,858 acres en avoine, comparativement 
a 2,759,445 acres en ble, 416,015 acres en orge et 1,209,173 acres en avoine 
sur 42,567 fermes de meme etendue en 1910. Les recoltes fourrageres se sont 
accrues de 43,667 acres en 1900 a 216,618 acres ^n 1910, soit une augmentation 
de 172,951 acres ou 396 pour cent dans la decade. 

La superficie totale en toutes recoltes des champs dans le Manitoba, la Sas- 
kachewan et TAlberta a augmente de 3,600,119 acres en 1900 a 13,607,697 
acres en 1910, soit mie augmentation de 10,007,578 acres ou 278 pour cent 
dans la decade. De cette augmentation, au dela de 60 pour cent revenait 
a la Saskatchewan. La superficie en ble seulement a augments de 2,495,474 
acres a 7,867,423 acres, soit un gain de 5,371,949 acres ou 215.25 pour cent 
dans les dix ans, et la superficie sous les trois principales recoltes s'est accrue 
de 3,491,453 acres en 1900 h 12,415,100 acres en 1910, soit> une augmentation 
de 8,923,647 acres ou 255-6 pour cent. 

L'Jmportance donnee a la recolte des grains dans les provinces des prairies 
est illustree d'une maniere frappante par le fait que 96-98 pour cent de la 
superficie totale en recoltes des champs etait en ble, en avoine et en orge en 
1900, et 91-24 pour cent en 1910. La diminution proportionnelle de ces grains 
dans la decade est due a ce que plus d' attention a et6 donnee dans ces dernieres 
annees aux recoltes des 16gumes et aux recoltes fourrageres ; la superficie en pom- 
mes de terre ayant augmente de 25,967 a 70,342 acres, en racines de 2,183 a 
5,550 acres et en recoltes fourrageres de 60,505 acres en 1900 a 530,016 acres en 
1910. Dans les cinq plus vieilles provinces, la superficie en toutes recoltes des 
champs, pour la moisson de 1900, etait de 15,992,174 acres et pour la moisson 
de 1910 de 16,735,034 acres, soit une augmentation de 742,860 acres ou 4-65 
pour cent, centre une augmentation de 1,863,946 acres ou 13-2 pour cent durant 
la decade precedente. 

De 1900 a 1910 la superficif en recoltes a augmente de 109,455 acres ou 
1 • 18 pour cent dans Ontario, de 561,342 acres ou 11-93 pour cent dans Quebec, 
de 61,451 acres ou 6-85 pour cent dans le Nouveau-Brunswick, de 29,792 acres 
ou 6-65 pour cfent dans I'lle du Prince-Edouard. Dans la Nouvelle-ficosse, 
durant la meme p6riode, il y a eu une diminution de 19,180 acres ou 2-62 pour 
cent. Dans le recensement de 1901, Ontario indiquait une augmentation de 
12-8 pour cent dans les recoltes; Quebec, 15-7 pour cent; le Nouveau-Brunswick, 
17-6 pour cent, I'lle du Prince-Edouard 9-2 pour cent et la Nouvelle-Ecosse 
environ 1 pour cent. La superficie en recoltes de grains dans Ontario, Quebac 
et les Provinces Maritimes, en 1910, etait de 7,921,229 acres, contre 8,699,923 
acres en 1900, soit une diminution de 778,694 acres ou 22 • 45 pour cent. Chacune 
des provinces a contribue dans la diminution, except(5 I'lle du Prince-Edouard 
ou la su])erficie en grains a augmente de 2,835 acres ou 1-28 pour cent dans la 
decade. Dans Ontario la diminution s'eleve a 617,875 acres ou 79-33 pour cent 
du total; dans Quebec a 142,127 acres ou 18-25 pour cent; dans le Nouveau- 
lirunswick a 19,032 acres ou 2-44 pour cent, et dans la Nouvelle-Ecosse a 
2,495 acres ou trois dixiemos de 1 pour cent de la diminution totale dans les 
cinq provinces de 1900 a 1900. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 xxxvii 

La siiperficie en ble, dans les pro\'inces de I'Est, est tombee de 1,713,101 
acres en 1900 a 987,599 acres en 1910, soit line diminution de 725,502 acres ou 
42 • 35 pour cent durant la decade. Dans Ontario la diminution s'elevait a 61 7.279 
acres ou 41-49 pour cent; dans Quebec a 70,944 acres ou 55-03 pour cent; dans 
le Nouve.iu-Brunswick a 13,566 acres ou 50-26 pour cent; dans la Nouvelle- 
Ecosse a 4,136 acres ou 25-32 pour cent et dans I'lle du Prince-Edouard a 13,577 
acres ou 32 ■ 08 pour cent. En contraste avec les diminutions dans les recoltes de 
grains, la superficie en production fourragere indique mie aujinientation remar- 
quable dans toutes les provinces de Test, excepte la Nouvelle-P.cossc. L'augmen- 
tation totale s'elevait a 1,559,144 acres ou 23 -4 pour cent sur les cbiffres du recen- 
sement ])recedent. lia superficie en recoltes fourrageres dans Ontario a augmente 
de 2,772,866 a 3,533,288 acres, soit une augmentation de 760,422 acres ou 27-4 
pour cent; dans Que])ec de 2,588,190 t\ 3,288,835 acres, soit une augmentation 
de 700,645 acres ou27-l pour cent sur les chifCres de 1900. Une plus petite 
su]>erficie en p'ommes de terre se rencontre dans toutes les provinces de T Est, 
excepte le Nouveau-Brunswick on les cbiffres sont a pcni ])res les memes en 1910 
qu'en 1900. 

Ea superficie en seigle diminue dans toutes les provinces de I'Est: dans 
Ontario la diminution se monte a 59,185 acres, soit 86-42 pour cent de la dimi- 
nution totale de 68,485 acres dans les cinq provinces. 

La superficie en ble d'Inde a grain dans Ontario, de 1900 a 1910, a ete reduite 
de 5t3,795 acres ou 17-12 pour cent, dans Quebec de 9,981 acres ou 35-01 pour 
cent, et dans les Provinces Maritimes, ou la production de ce grain n'a jamais 
ete forte, elle est en voie de disparaitre tout a fait. II y a eu des augmentations 
dans les su])erficies de cette recolte pour cbacune des provinces du Nord-Ouest, 
mais ici encore I'etendue consacree a ce. grain est relativement petite. En 
1900 la superficie pour tout le Canada etait de 360,758 acres, comparativement 
a 293,951 acres en 1910, soit une reduction de 66,827 acres ou 18-52 pour cent 
dans la decade. 

La superficie en sarrasin a plus que double dans Ontario, ayant augments 
de 73,038 acres en 1900 a 167,315 acres en 1910. II y a eu une augmentation 
de 16,793 acres dans Quebec, et aussi une faible augmentation dans la Nouvelle- 
Ecosse, mais le Nouveau-Brunswnck qui indiquait une augmentation de 13,483 
acres en 1900 donne pour ce recensement une diminution de 15,123 acres. Pour 
les cinq vieilles provinces il y a eu une augmentation d(^ 95.562 acres ou 36-5 
pour cent dans la decade, et pour tout le Canada une augmentation de 95,787 
acres ou 36-6 pour cent. La superficie consacree au sarrasin dans les provinces 
de rOuest, bien qu'elleaille en augmentant, est trop petite pour affect er les resul- 
tats generaux. 

La culture des pois, dans les' province* de I'Est, est tombee de 666,850 
acres en 1900 a 352,869 acres en 1910, soit une diminution de 313,981 acres 
ou 88-91 pour cent dans les dix ans; dans Ontario la superficie en pois est 
moindre de 264,867 acres; dans Quebec de 47,687 acres et dan's le Nouveau- 
Brunswick, de 1,273 acres; dans la Nouvelle-ficosse et I'lle du Prince-Edouard, 
ou cette culture se fait sur une petite 6chelle, la superficie totale et la 
production pour chaque recensement, ne rcpresentant que de faibles etendues, 
la variation entre les cbiffres des differents recensements ne sont que de peu 



xxxviii RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

d'importance. La superficie totale en feves dans les cinq provinces, en 1900, 
etait de 46,538 acres, comparativement a 45,841 acres en 1910. II y a eu des 
diminutions dans .toutes les provinces, excepte dans Quebec ou la superficie en 
feves a augments de 2,886 a 4,235 acres, et dans Ontario, ou elles sont pro- 
duites en plus grande quantite, la superficie en est tombee de 42,086 acres en 
1900 a 40,585 acres en 1910. 

TABLEAU 27. STATISTIQUES COMPARATIVES DE LA SUPERFICIE EN R^ICOLTES 
DES CHAMPS, PAR PROVINCES, 1890, 1900, 1910, 1911. 



R6coltes par provinces 



1890 



1900 



1910 



1911 



Augmentation pour cent 



1900 
Bur 
1890 



1910 
sur 
1900 



1911 
sur 
1910 



CANADA 

Ble d'automne 

Ble de printemps 

Orge 

Avoine 

Soigle 

Ble d'Inde a grain 

Sarrasin 

Feves 

Pols 

Lin 

Grains melanges 

Foin et trefle 

Luzerne 

Ble d'Inde fourrager 

Autres recoltes fourrageres. 

Pommes de terre 

Navets 

Bctteraves fourrageres 

Betteraves a sucre 

Autres racines 

Tabac 

Houblon 

Colombie -Britannique 

Ble d'automne 

Ble de printemps 

Orgo 

Avoine 

Seigle 

Ble d'Inde d, grain 

Sarrasin 

Feves 

Pois 

Lin 

Grains melanges 

Foin et trelle 

Luzerne 

Ble d'Inde fourrager 

Autres recoltes fourrageres. 

Pommes de terre 

Navets ~ . . . 

Betteraves fourrageres 

Betteraves a sucre 

Autres racines 

Tabac 

Houblon 



15,662,811 

|2,';01,213 

868,464 

3,961,356 

122,102 

195,101 

293,307 

43,097 

925,375 

16,236 

5,931,548 



19,763,710 30,536,168 



450, 190 

148,143 

4,765 
1,914 

115,184 

I 15, 156 ( 

2 228 1 ^ 
24! 148 1 
358! 
861 

8 

153 

2,640! 

91 i 

_ r 

64,611 



4,213 
1,443 

1 

48 



1,120,984 

3,103,558 
871,800 

5,36/, 655 
176,679 
360,758 
261,726 
46,634 
670,320 
23,086 
273,490 

6,543,423 

276,350 
448,743 

205, 160 

11,906 
1,468 



977,615 

7 ,886,899 

1,283,094 

8,656,179 

1U,728 

293,951 

357,513 

46,299 

355,191 

582, 185 

426,957 

8,289,407 

54,804 

' 294,347 

, 257,838 

464,504 

112,305 

56,729 

17,710 

7,821 

18,928 

1,164 



171,4471 213,437 



3,903 

12,064 

2,232 

34,366 

730 

51 

55 

56 

2,949 

1 

570 

102,752 

1,208 

8,207' 

i 
1,980 

61 

262 



4,369 

5,123 

1,853 

33,229 

376 

19 

1 

347 

1,572 

2 

525 

132,668 

3,741 

355 

15,164 

10,873 

1,008 

478 

74 

754 

81 

825 



p. c. 



35,261,338 



1,162, 

9,933, 

1,522, 

9,641, 

132, 

324, 

373, 

53, 

294, 

1,351, 

525, 

8,690, 

94, 

295, 

136, 

480, 

122, 

57, 

21, 

17, 

25, 

1 



657 
223 
534 
240 
928 
141 
730 
284 
802 
105 
517 
963 
828 
457 
950 
842 
612 
903 
937 
499 
,826 
,360 



239,649 

6,599 

7, 108 

2,784 

45,301 

1,370 

107 

IS 

390 

1,489 

51 

2,248 

136, 134 

5,642 

429 

10,832 

14,798 

1,350 

537 

• 134 

1,508 

48 

772 



26 2 

56-4 

•4 
35-5 
44-7 
84-9 
-10-8 
8-3 
27-5 
42- 1 

10-3 



-•3 

38-5 

14-98 
-23-3 

48-S 

5-4 

•9 

42-3 

103-9 

-40-6 

587-50 

-63-4 

11-7 

-98-9 

59-0 



94-8 
37-2 

445-8 



p. c. 



54-6 



-12- 
154- 

47- 

61- 

-35- 

-18- 

36- 

-47- 

2,421- 

56- 

27- 

99- 
3 



-5-2 



59- 
-20- 



24 5 



11 
-57 
-17 

-3 
-48 
-62 
-98- 

519- 
-12- 

100- 

-7- 
29- 

1,184- 
32- 

16-9 



32 
214 



p. c. 
15 4 



18 
25 
18 
11 
15 
10 

4 

15 

-17 

132 

23 

4 
73 

-46 

3 

9 

2 

23 

123 

36 

17 

12 

51 

38 

50 

36 

264 

463 

1,700 

12 

-5 

2,450 

328 

2 

50 

-20 

-28 

36 

33 

12 

81 

100 

-40 

-6 



Nota: — Le signe ( — ) indique unc diminution. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



TABLEAU 27. STATISTIQUES COMPARATIVES DE LA SUPERFICIE EN RfiCOLTES 
DES CHAMPS, PAR PROVINCES, TS90, 1900, 1910, 1911— Suite. 



Reooltcs par provinces 



Alberta 

Ble d'automne 

Ble de printemps 

Orge 

Avoine 

Seigle 

Ble d'Inde a grain 

Sarrasin 

Fevcs 

Pois 

Lin 

Grains melanges 

Foin ct trefle 

Luzerne 

Ble d'Inde fourrager 

Autres recoltcs fourrageres 

Pommes de terre 

Navets 

Betteraves fourrageres 

Be( toraves a sucre 

Autrcri rac-incs 

Tabac 

Houblon 

Saskatchewan 

B16 d'automne 

Ble de printemps 

Orge 

Avoine 

Seigle 

Ble d'Inde k grain 

Sarrasin 

Feves 

Pois 

Lin ; 

Grains melanges 

Foin et trefle 

Luzerne 

Ble d'Inde fourrager 

Autres recoltes fourrageres 

Pommes de terre 

Navets 

Betteraves fourrag5res 

Betteraves a sucre 

Autres racines , 

Tabac 

Houblon 

Manitoba 

Ble d'automne 

Ble de printemps 

Orge 

Avoine 

Seit^le 

Ble d'Inde k grain 

Sarrasin 

Feves 

Pois 

Lin 



1890. 



acres 
35,799 

6,233 

3,418 

24,180 

18 

2 

10 

107 

70 



1,391 



1900 



370 



154,559 



107,575 

5,049 

37,457 

97 

50 

9 

4 

225 

83 



2,500 

i 1.507 

2 
1 

1,229, Ml 

> 896,622 

56.505 

256,211 

951 

96 

8 

23 

626 

6,089 



acres 

18S,476 

521 

42,541 

11,0,55 

117,745 

1,043 

23 

18 

1 

69 

100 

100 

10,877 I 
3,792 

582 



1910 



acres 
2,067,589 



655,537 

306 

486,906 

11,842 

141,807 

1,296 

2 

1 

1 

46 

227 

384 



5,961 
6,133 

623 

2 



2,756,106 

120 

1,965,080 

139,672 

573,858 

937 

62 

56 

38 

406 

14.404 



205, 
674, 
121, 

783, 



30 

1 

149 

2, 

1 

67, 

20 



Augmentation pour cent 



1911 



1900 


1910 


1911 


sur 


sur 


sur 


1890 


1900 


1910 



6,871,858 

1,230 

4,226,992 

129,621 

1,888,359 

754 

94 

•6 

8 

236 

506,425 

632 

37,694 

182 

675 

53,863 

24,046 

651 

93 

49 

246 

2 



4,668,259 

4,627 

2,7.54,818 

416,015 

1,209,173 

2,7.38 

233 

201 

91 

263 

34,684 



acres 

3,378,365 

305,788 
1,334,186 
164,1.32 
1,221,217 
14,443 
437 
206 
70 
493 
107,273 
2,789 
162,411 
7,890 
739 , 
25,802;/ 
23,863 1 
l,904il 
298! I 
1,795 ( 
2,626 
3 



9,136,868 

2,6.38'\ 
5,253,276/ 

273,9881 
2,332,802 
2,271 
276 
90 
60 
389: 
1,153,861' 
1,876' 
47,720^ 
1,168 
1,357 \ 
31,271/ 
30,076^ 
1,434 f 
237( 
113i) 



■1,959 
2 
4 

5,161,858 

13,301 

3,081,272 

448. 105 

1,307,434 

4,725 

037 

."^21 

1131 

414 

79,765; 



p. c. 
426 s! 

590-9 

223-4 

387 

5,694-4 

1,050-0 

800 



p. c. 

997 

39,264-9 
1,485-9 



-35-5 
42-9 



172-6 
57-3 



324 1 



452-9 

134-5 

278-6 

1,236-0 

-96-0 

-88-9 

-75 

-79-6 

173 



145-3 
-58-7 

124 2 

219-2 

147-2 
124-0 
-1-5 

-35-4 

6000 

65-2 

-35- 1 
136-6 



998 

565-1 

539-7 

221-7 

716-7 

1,1000 

263-8 

30, 785 

1,6980 



-530-3 

429-7 

-314-4 
-66-7 

948 3 

L 302-0 

[ 768-1 

994-6 

1,231-6 

-41-8 

4,6000 

500-0 

700 

413-0 

222,994-7 

64-6 

814-9 
292-lj 

66-8 



69 4 

3.755-8 
40-2 
197-9 
110-7 
192-2 
275-8 
2.18 -9 
139-5 
-.35-2 
140-8 



p. c. 

63 4 

49- 1 
97-8 
.35-2 
500 

110-5 

4ii0o 
40-1 

483-3 
96-4 

247-3 

54-6 

8-3 

205-3 

-41-2 

-61-7 

IS -8 

136-2 

250-6 
66-4 

494-1 



32 9 

113-8 

24-3 

111-4 

23-5 

201-2 

193-6 

1,4000 

650 

64-8 

127-8 

186-8 

26-6 

541-8 

101 1 

41-9 

25-1 

120-3 

154-8 

130-6 

696-3 



10 6 

187-5 

11-9 

7-7 

8-1 

72-6 

302-2 
59-7 
24-2 
57-4 

1.30 



Nota: — Le signe ( — ) indique une diminution. 



xl 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



TABLEAU 37. STATISTIQUES COMPARATIVES DE LA SUPERFICIE EX RT^.COLTES 
DES CHAMPS, PAR PROVINCES, 1890. 1900, 1910, 1911— .Sut^e. 



Reeoltps par provinces 



1890 



1900 



Augmentation pour cent 



1910 



1911 



1900 
sur 
1890 



1910 
sur 
1900 



Manitoba— ^Fiii. 



Grains melanges 

Foin et trefle 

Luzerne 

Ble d'Inde fourrager 

Autres recoltes fourragores. 

Pommes de tcrre 

Navets 

Betteraves fourragercs 

Betteraves a sucre 

Autres racines 

Tabac 

Houblon 



Ontario. 



Ble d'automne 

Ble de printcrnps 

Orge 

Avoine 

Seigle 

Ble d'Inde fourrager 

Sarrasin 

Feves 

Pois 

Lin 

Grains melanges 

Foin et trefle 

Ijuzerne 

Ble d'Inde fourrager 

Autres recoltes fourrageres. 

Pommes de teire 

Navets 

Betteraves fourrageres 

Betteraves a sucre 

Autres racines 

Tabac 

Houblon 



9,791 

1 

[> 2, 102 

3 
14 

8.1fi«,499 

1,430,532 

681,073 

2,053,105 

92,663 

176,295 

101.625 

.36.473 

763.491 

6,775 

2.528.894 



179, 663 

114,289 

281 
1 . 340 



43,667 
16.042 

978 



10 

7 

9,312,478 



Quebec ; 4,064.716 



Bk^ d'automne 

BIc de printemps 

< )rge 

Avoine 

Seigle 

Ble d'Inde a grain 

Sarrasin 

Feves 

Pois 

Lin 

CJrains melanges 

Foin et tn'^fle 

Luzerne 

Ble d'Intle fourrager 

Autres recoltes fourragores. 

Pommes de tcrre 

Navets 

lietteraves fourragercs 

Betteraves u sucre 

Autres racines 

Tabac 

Houblon 



168,929 

94.464 

1,161.038 

25.939 

17.,58C 

117.739 

3,929 

155,004 

2,878 

2.178,044 



122,254 

12,103 

4,473 
336 



1,115,156 

, 372.477 

586.010 

2,707,-357 

151,916 

331,641 

73,038 

42.086 

586,857 

6,388 

117,020 

2,606,310 

106,550 
176,170 

169,387 

3,144 
965 

4.704,396 

482 

139,344 

104,1.35 

1,3.50.031 

19,546 

28 506 

102 , 673 

2,886 

77.982 

l.SSJ 

143.729 

2.. 548. 4.50 

39.740 
127,205 

9,029 

8,661 
116 



473 

1.37,671 

539 

4,603 

73,805 

26,210 

892 

211 

91 

905 

7 



I . 



9,331,93S 

759,916 

110,438 

503,159 

2,871,288 

92,731 

274,846 

167.315 

40,. 585 

321,996 

8,780 

323,409 

3,216,139 

45,626 

245,267 

26.256 

158,365 

76,485 

53,753 

15,970 

2,284 

7,017 



5,265,738 

2,295 

00,587 

98, 164 

1,392,139 

11,077 

18.525 

119,466 

4,2.35 

30.295 

1 . 382 

90.404 

3,229,448 

2,036 

f 41,201 

I 16,150 

123.054 

f 9.843 

I 1.227 

1 310 

I 2.053 

11,818 

29 



1 

154 

1 

9 
26 
26 

1 



541 
632 
965 
919 
477 
488 
477 
402 
235 
288 
46 
1 



9,683,307 



832, 

129, 

519, 

2,806, 

96, 
298, 
178, 

45, 

258, 

8, 

389, 

3,445, 

74, 
243, 

27, 
1.56, 

81, 

53, 

18, 
4, 

13. 



5,480,673 



1, 

69, 

100, 

1,439, 

12, 

23, 

114, 

6, 

32 

1, 

114, 

3.. 3.56. 

2 

38! 

12, 

125, 

9 

1 



12 



428 
573 
701 
964 
833 
900 
780 
085 
.595 
428 
572 
692 
980 
375 
073 
995 
4S3 
584 
451 
875 
1.34 
172 



p. c. 



63-J 
-53-5 



233-3 
-.500 



12 8 



3-9 

-140 
31-9 
63-9 
88-1 

-28-1 
15-4 

-23-1 
-5-7 

31 



-1-9 

32-5 

1.018-9 
-28-0 

15 7 

-17-2 

10-2 
16-3 
-24-6 
62- 1 
-12-8 
-26-5 
-49-7 
-34-0 

170 



4-0 
-25-3 



93-6 
-65-4 



-38-5 



79-6 
60-4 

114-6 

-.30-0 
-7000 

12 

-31-9 

-70-4 

-14-3 

61 

-39 

-171 

129-1 

-3-6 

-451 

.36-0 

176-4 

23-4 

03-0 
-101 

-12-3 

123-2 
-68-3 

11 9 

376-1 

—56-5 

-5-7 

31 

-43-3i 

-35-0| 

16-41 

46-71 

-61-2' 

-26-5: 

-37-11 

26-7 

44-3 
-3-2 

48-8 

.36-5 
-750 



Nota: — Le signe ( — ) indique une diminution. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



xli 



TABLEAU 27. STATISTIQUES COMPARATIVES DE LA SUPERFICIE EN RfiCOLTES 
DES CHAMPS, PAR PROVINCES, 1890, 1900, 1910, 1911— Suite. 



Recolt<?s par provinces 



Nouveaii-Bnins wick . 



Ble d'automne 

Ble de prinf'einps 

Oige 

Avoine 

Soigle 

B16 (ITndc a, grain 

Sarrasin 

Feves 

Puis 

Lin 

Crains raolangef? 

loin et treflc 

I>uzorne 

Bit' d'lnde fourrager 

Autres recoltes fourragores 

Poiumes de terre 

Navets 

Betteravcs fourrageres 

Betteravcs a sut-re 

Autres racines 

Tabac 

Houblon 



Noiivclle-Ecosse. 



Ble d'automne 

Ble de piinternps. . 

Orge 

Avoine 

Seigle 

Ble d'lndc ii, grain 

Sarrasin 

I-'eve 

I'ois 

Lin 



Ci rains melanges 

Foin et trefle 

Luzerne 

Ble d'lnde fourrager 

Autres recoltes fourrageres, 

Pommes de terre 

Navets 

Betteraves fourrageres 

l^etteraves k sucre 

Autres racines ^ 

Tabac 

Houblon 



ne dii Priiico-Edouard. 



Ble d'automne 

Ble de printemps. . 

Orge 

Avoine 

Seigle 

Ble d'lnde a grain 

Sarrasin 

Feves 

Pois 

Lin 



1890 



763,248 



17,306 

6,141 

157,176 

376 

501 

60, 038 

1,060 

1 842 

92 

470,834 



42. 703 

5,075 

3 
101 

723,825 

14,157 

11.992 

94,117 

1.1 

411 

8,782 

1,290 

1,184 

83 

539,057 



44.1.54 
6,843 



409,940 



44,703 

7,594 

153,924 

12 

74 

5,088 

165 

256 

75 



1900 



1910 



897,417 

336 

26,654 

4.581 

186,932 

188 

259 

73,521 

709 

1,707 

57' 

1 , 2.30! 

549 , 538 

4, 1.38 
40,. 330 

7,119 



116 

730,146 

160 

16,174 

7,710 

91,087 

1,018 

177 

9,371 

824 

156 

2,900 
554,371 



2,182i 

37,459| 

6,.557' 



447,737 



42,318 

4,. 563 

164,472 

5 

37 

2,993 

33 

148 

28 



938,868 



13 
2 

201 



58 



030 



37 
387 
611 
147 

24 

66 
398 
254 
4.33 
5 
728 
305 

81 
237 
103 
433 
898 
124 

34 
563 



710.966 

37 

12,161 

5,3.54 

96,309 

350 

66 

9,541 

735 

109 

2.420 

540,589 

13 

560 

2,273 

30,827 

8,-394 

605 

90 

532 

1 

477,529 



28 

4 

181 



1011 



13 

728 

882 

461 

6 

28 

4.38 

32 

36| 



978,876' 

I 
38 1 
13,972!/ 
2,727i 
207,618 
43' 
77 
65, 094 
358 
701 
13 
1,117 
635, 163 
118 
213 
746 
41,0211 
8,405;^ 
429 H 
146 f 
S76jJ 
1 



717,468 

70i 

13,228 

5.5511 

100,2.56 

4661 

1.371 

11,810' 

948j 

210! 

6! 

4,361i 

5.35,318; 

32! 

04.5 ■ 

1 . 703 

30.8.39 

9,601; 

l,024i 

149 

1,114 



484,274 

5 

31,100 

4.626 

180,584 

26 

80 

2.798 

147 

87 

15 



Augmentation pour- cent 



1900 
.sur 
1890 



p. c. 
17 6 

55 •91 

25-4' 
18-9' 

-50-0' 

-48-3 
22-5, 

-33- ll 
-7-3 

-36- 1 

16-7 



40-2; 



— 33 • 3 j 

14-8 

•8 

15.3|{ 

-35-7j 
-3-2! 
-39-6! 
-.56-9 
6-7 
-36 1 
--86-8 



2-9 



-151 
-41 



9 2 



-5-3' 

.39-9 
6S 
-,')S-3 
-.WO 
-411 
-800 
-421 
-62-6 



1910 



1900 



6 9 

-890 
-49-8 
-430 

7-7 
-87-2 
-74-5 
-20-6 
-64-2 
-74-6! 
-91-2 
-40Sl 
14-7J 

-43-5 
0-3j 

2M 

-1000! 
-1000! 



-769 
-24-8i 
-.30-6! 

5-7| 
-65-6 
-62-7 

1-8 

-10-8' 

30lj 

-16-6| 
-2-5 

29 

-17-7 

46-7 



6 7 



-321 

70 
10-3 
200 
-24-3 
-18-5 
-30 
-75-7 
-21-4 



1911 
.'iur 
1910 



p. c. 



2 1 



4 
4 

79 

16 

11 

40 

61 

160 

53 

-0 

45 

-10 

-64 

1 

6 

246 

329 

55 



89-2 



3 
4 

33 
107 



7 
1 
1 
6 

23-8 
2t)0 
92-7 

80-2 

-10 

146-2 

15-2 

-251 

-01 

14-4 

69-3 

65-6 

109-4 



14 

-61-5 
8-3 
-5-3 
-0-5 
3.33-3 
185-7 
14-8 
359-4 
141-7 

-31-8 



Nota: — Le signe ( — ) indique une diminution. 



x!ii RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

TABLEAU 37. STATISTIQUES COMPARATIVES DE LA SUPERFICIE EN RfiCOLTES 
DES CHAMPS, PAR PROVINCES, 1890, 1900, 1910, 1911.— Fir. 



Recoltes par provinces 



1890 


1900 


acres 


acres 


_ 


6,788 


150, 108 


181,996 


, - 


2,027 


43,521 


33,405 


4,411 


8,905 


1 


17 


8 


2 



1910 



1911 



AUGMENT.^TION POUR CENT 



1900 

sur 
1890 



1910 

sur 

1900 



1911 
sur 
1910 



Iledu Prlnce-Edouard-Fin 



Grains melanges 

Fein et trefle 

Luzerne 

Ble d'lnde fourrager 

Autres recoltes fourrageres.j 

Pommes de terre I 

Navets |1 

Betteraves fourrageres. . . 

Betteraves a sucre 

Autres racines 

Tabac 

Houblon 



p. c. 



6,568 

215,053 

2 

193 

920 

30,610 

6,328 

153 

13 

42 



7,693 

217,189 

35 

289 

850 

30,780 

7,641 

228 

33 

67 

1 



21-2 



-23-2 
101-9 



1,6000 
-75-0 



-3-2 
18-2 



-45- 1 
-8-4 



-26-6 



-500 



p. c. 

17- 1 

10 

1,6500 

49-7 

-7-6 

0-7 

20-8 

490 

153-9 

59-5 

-1000 



NoT.v: — Le signe ( — ) indique unc diminution. 

La superficie en lin, pour tout le Canada, etait cle 582,185 acres en 1910 
dont 506,425 acres pour la Saskatchewan, 34,684 acres pour le Manitoba et 30,885 
acres pour I'Alberta, soit un total;- pour les trois provinces, de 571,994 acres ou 
98 • 2 pour cent de la superficie totale en lin. En 1900 1'etendue totale ensemencee 
etait de 23,086 acres dont 14,404 au Manitoba et 6,388 a Ontario. L'augmen- 
tation pour tout le Canada, durant la decade, est de 559,099 acres ou 2,421-8 
pour cent. La culture du lin n'est pas beaucoup connue dans les Provinces Mari- 
times et n'est pratiquee jusqu'a un point assez limite dans les provinces de TEst, 
que dans Ontario et Quebec. 

II y avait 18,928 acres en tabac dans tout le Canada en 1910, comparative- 
ment a 11,906 acres en 1900, soit une augmentation de 7,022 acres ou 58-98 
pour cent. Le tabac est recolte presqu'entierement dans Ontario et Quebec. 
Le nombre d'acres sous culture dans ces deux provinces represente 99 pour 
cent de la superficie totale du Canada en 1900, et99| pour cent en 1910. Dans 
Ontario le nombre d'acres en tabac a augmente de.3,144 en 1900 a 7,017 acres 
en 1910, et dans Quebec, de 8,661 acres en 1900 k 11,818 acres en 1910. Dans la 
Colombie-Britannique il y avait 61 acres en tabac en 1900 et 81 acres en 1910, 
et dans toutes les autres provinces Tetendue en est si minime que la r<?colte 
n'a aucune importance. 

Les semences de melanges de differents grains, tels que avoine et pois; 
orge, avoine et pois, ou orge et avoine, semblent favorables dans Ontario ou 
Tetendue ensemencee s'est accrue de 117,020 acres en 1900 a 323,409 acres en 
1910, une augmentation de 206,389 acres ou 176-37 pour cent dans la decade. 
II y a eu une diminution de 53,325 acres dans Quebec, ou 37-10 pour cent; dans 
le Nouveau-Brunswick, de 502 acres ou 40-81 pour cent; dans la Nouvelle-ficosse, 
de 480 acres ou 16-55 pour cent; dans I'llc du Prince-Edouard, de 220 acres ou 
3-24 pour cent dans les dix ans. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



xliii 



Le tableau 28 doiine la siiperficie moyenne des principales r^coltes par 
ferme, pour le Canada et chacune des provinces. 

II y a eu des augmentations, pour tout le Canada, dans le nombre d'acrcs 
par ferme, pour le ble, I'avoine, I'orge, le sarrasin, les grains melanges et les 
recoltes fourrageres (comprenant le ble d'Inde et autres grains fourragers coup6s 
verts), et des diminutions pour le ble d'Inde a grain, les pois et les feves, les 
pommes de terre, les racines et le foin. 

Pour presque toutes les differentes especes de recoltes, la Colombie-Britan- 
nique indique une reduction dans la moyenne d'acres par ferme, reduction 
attribuee a I'accroissement du nombre de petites fermes consacrees presqu'exclu- 
sivement a I'horticulture. D'apres les rapports des differents recensements, 
Ontario comptait 53 pour cent de la superficie totale en ble, en 1890, compara- 
tivement a 35 pour cent en 1900 et a moins de 10 pour cent en 1910. D'un autre 
cote la superficie en ble dans les provinces des prairies, qui etait de 37 pour cent 
du total en 1890, avait atteint 59 pour cent en 1900 et au-dela de 88 pour cent 
du total en 1910. 

TABLEAU 28. MOYENNE DE LA SUPERFICIE DES PRINCIPALES RfiCOLTES DES 
CHAMPS PAR FERME OCCUP:fiE EN 1910 ET 1900 



Provinces 



BI6 



Avoi- 
ne 



Orge 



Sei- 
gle 



Sar- 
rasin 



Ble 
d'In- 
de a 
gr'n 



Grain 
me- 
langes 



Pom- 
Pois mes 
et de 
feves terre 



Ra- 
cines 



Foitt 



Au- 
tres 

re- 
coltes 
four- 
rage 

res 



Canada — 

191« 

19W 

Colombie-Britannique— 

1910 

1900 

Alberta — 

1910 

1900 

Saskatchewan — 

1910 

1900 

Manitoba — 

1910 

1900 

Ontario — 

1910 

1900 

Quebec — 

1910 

1900 

Nouveau-Brunswick — 

1910 

1900 

Nouvelle-Ecosse — 

1910 

1900 

He du Prince-Edouard — 

1910 

1900 



acres acres acres 



acres 'acres 



12 4« 

7-7« 



•51 

2-37I 



14-30; 

4-54 



12 11 

9 85 



1-80 
510 



12-73 
12-41 



43-8 
35-7 



719-59 
910-42 



60-51 
60-4S: 



3-841 
6-64i 



•39 
•931 



•351 

■721 



•23 

•29 



200 
3-20: 



26-51 
17-66 



12-66 
1208 



8^72 
897 



5-26 
497 



1-80 
163 



12 63 
11-74 



-41 



0) 
0) 



•02 



0) 



(') 



•01 

0) 

(') 
(») 

(') 

-74 
•33 

•75 

-68, 

1-53 1 
1,95 



acres i acres i acres 



acres acres 



•01 

0) 
0) 

(') 
(>) 

(') 

0) 

1-21 
1-48 

-11 
•19 

(') 
•01 



•181 (•) 

•171 (') 



•16 
•21 



(0 

0) 



50 



•56| 
1 32 

•45 

0) 

(') 

(') 
(') 

•01 
-01 

1-60 
2-81' 

-22! 
■53 1 

•02 
•06 



•02 
•02 

(') 
•01 



•S5 

•82 




■59 
1-22 




•33 
•40 




•25 

•45 




-57 
-49 




-70 

-79 




■77 
-84 




106 
1-07 




•57 
-67 




2- 13 
2-38 





11 m' 

12 •! 

7-18 
15-25 

2-44 

•39 

3 02 



14-18 
11-62 

20-22 
16-93 

16-50 
14-62 

10-79 
9-89 

14-97 
12-99 



-85 
50 

104 

-18 

1-16 
115 

•57 
•■44 

1-73 
1-34 

1-40 

-74 

•37 
•26 

•06 
11 

05 
■04 

•03 
•14 



(') Moins d'un centi^me d'acre. 

La superficie moyenne de chaque r^colte specifiee est donnee d; ns le tableau 
29, en rapport avec chaque (ent acres do terre amelioree. De 19 /i; a 1910, pour 
tout lo Canada, la superficie en ble par cent acres de terre ainelio:('o a augmcnte 
looOG— J 



xliv 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



de 14 k 22-77 acres; en avoine, de 17-79 a 19-78 acres; en orge de 2-89 a 3-12 
acres. Les grains melanges et les recoltes fourrageres ont aussi fait quelque 
progres; le foin indique une diminution de 21-69 a 17-83 acres; les pommes de 
terre de 1-49 a -99 acre par cent acres de terre amelioree. 

TABLEAU 29. MOYENNE DES ACRES DES PRINCIPALES RfiCOLTES DES CHAMPS 
PAR 100 ACRES DE TERRE AM]6lIOR6e PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901, 



Provinces 



Ble 


Avoi- 
ne 


acres 


acres 


22 77 
14 00 


19 78 
17 79 


2-87 
3-37 


9-49 
7-26 


37-69 
907 


28 06 
24-8'l 


44-27 
43-40 


19-65 
12-63 


45-87 
49-19 


19-38 
14-36 


7-05 
11-21 


20-55 
20-41 


•87 
1-88 


17-64 
18-15 


-97 
1-91 


14-37 
13-26 


106 
1-29 


7-97 
7-24 


4-04 
5-83 


23-48 
22-65 

1 



Orge 



Sei- 
gle 



Sar- 
rasin 



Ble 
d'ln- 
de k 
gr'n 



Gr'ns 
me- 
langes 



Pois 

et 
feves 



Pom- 






mes 


Ra- 




de 


cines 


Foin 


terre 






acres 


acres 


acres 


99 


45 


17 83 


1 49 


■68 


21 69 


3-10 


-74 


28 •SO 


1-73 


-42 


21-69 


-55 


-15 


3-73 


•80 


-12 


- 


-25 


■03 


•40 


■55 


•06 


- 


-39 


•07 


229 


•40 


■02 


- 


1-15 


1-15 


25-24 


1-33 


1-28 


19-65 


1-54 


■18 


41 13 


1-71 


■12 


34-25 


2-84 


■68 


43-97 


2-86 


-50 


38-98 


2-45 


•95 


42-57 


298 


•52 


44-00 


400 


104 


28-24 


4-60 


123 


25-06 



Au- 
tres 

re- 
coltes 
four- 
rag^ 

res 



Canada — 

1911....... 

1901. 

Colombie-Britaniiique— 

1911 

1901 

Alberta '. 

1911 

1901 

Saskatchewan — 

1911 

1901 

Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

Ontario — 

1911 

1901 

Quebec — 

1911 

1901 

Nouveau-Brunswiok — 

1911 

1901 

Nouvelle-Ecosse — 

1911 

1901 

He du Prince-Edouard 

1911 

1901 



3 12 

2-89 



3-77 
233 



6-64 
3 •SO 



381 
4^42 



1^23 
1-40 



•19 
•321 



•60, 
•63 



•27 
59 

•29 
•15 

•33 
•22 

•02 
•12 

•07 
•02 

•71 
1-14 

■16 
•26 

0) 
•01 

•04 






•01 

(0 
{') 

0) 

(') 

(') 
(') 

131 

•55 

141 
138 

4-51 
522 

•94 
•74 

•36 
•41 



acres 


acr 


67 
1 19 


1 


-02 
-01 




•01 

0) 








•01 




2-18 
2-50 


2- 


•29 

•38 


1- 
1^ 


•01 




•01 
•01 




0) 


1 



•85 



09 



71 

2 38 

•39 
•63 

•01 
•01 

(») 
(') 

{') 
•01 

2^23 
4 -,74 

•47 
109 

■07 
171 

•091 
•081 

03 
•02 



1 08 
•92 



354 
-26 



•78 
2-29 



-28 
•53 



-57 
1 09 



2-53 

1-26 



-65 
-53 



-07 
-29 



■15 
-28 



(1) Moins d'un centieme de un pour cent. 

Le tableau 30 indique, pour tout le Canada et pour chacune des provinces* 
(1) la proportion que porte le nombre d'acres consacres a chaque recolte sp6- 
cifiee, a la supcrficie totale des terres ameliorecs en 1901 et 1911 (2) la propor- 
tion que porte le nombre d'acres en chaque recolte, au nombre total d'acres 
en recoltes des champs en 1890, 1900 et 1910. 

En 1911, pour tout le Canada, les recoltes des champs occupaient 72-35 
pour cent de la superficie totale en terres am^liorees, comparativement k 65-52 
pour cent en 1901. Les superficies en lin, en pois, en feves, en seigle, en bl6 
d'Inde a grain et en grains melanges, 6tant relativement basses et de pen d'im- 
portance, ont 6t4 groupees comme "diverses" et classifi(5es sous I'en-tete de 
"c^r6ales". Les rapports du recensement indiquent que 51-94 pour cent 
des terres ameliorees etait consacre a la culture du grain en 1911, compara- 
tivement k 40-70 pour cent en 1901. Le nombre d'acres en grains de toutes 
espcces et en recoltes fourrageres occupe plus des sept-dixiemes de toutes les 
terres propres k la culture. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



xlv 



Des r^coltes moissonnees en 1890, le ble representait 17-25 pour cent, 
I'orge 5-54 pour cent, Tavoine 25-29 pour cent et le foin 37-87 pour cent, et 
en 1900 le ble representait 21-38 pour cent, I'orge 4-41 pour cent, Tavoine 
27-16 pour cent et le foin 33-11 pour cent. En 1910 la proportion du ble et 
de Tavoine a augmente a 29-01 et 28-33 pour cent respectivement, tandis 
que la proportion de I'orge a diminue a 4-20 pour cent et celle du foin a 27-13 
pour cent de la superficie totale moissonnee dans cette annee. Les recoltes 
fourrageres, autres que le foin, non rapportees dans le recensement de 1890, 
montrent une augmentation considerable de 1900 a 1910. Dans le dernier 
recensement, sur chaque cent acres de terre en culture, pres de deux acres etaient 
consacres aux recoltes fourrageres, contre 1'4 acre dans le recensement pre- 
cedent. 

TABLEAU 30. POUR-CENT QUE CONSTITUE L'l^TENDUE EN RECOLTES MENTION- 
NtES PAR RAPPORT A LA SUPERFICIE TOTALE DES TERRES AMfiLIOR^ES ET 
LE POUR-CENT DE L'^TENDUE TOTALE EN RECOLTES DES CHAMPS REVENANT 
A CHAQUE RlilCOLTE, PAR DECADES. 



Recoltes 


Pour-cent DE l.\ terre 

AMEI.IORKF. PAR RK- 
COLTE SPECIFIEE 


PoUR-CENT DU TOTAL DE LA SUPERFiriE 
EN RECOLTE.S DES CHAMPS POCR 
CHAQUE RECOLTE 




1901 


1911 


1890 


1900 


1910 


C A X A D A 

Totalite des moltes 


p.c. 

65 52 

40-70 

14-01 

2-89 

17-79 

6-01 

2-17 

1-49 

-68 

22-61 

21-69 

-92 

•04 

36 IS 


p.c. 

72 35 

51-94 

22-77 

3-12 

19-78 

6-27 

1-44 

-99 

-45 

18-92 

17-84 

108 

•06 

50 18 

14-13 

2-87 

-58 

9-49 

119 

S-84 

3-10 

•74 

33-04 

28-50 

3-54 

-17 

77 63 

72-41 
37^69 

3-77 
28^06 

2 •SO 


p.c. 

100 00 

58-37 

17 25 

5 54 

25-29 

10-19 

10-82 

2^87 

•95 

37-87 

37 87 

(-) 

•01 

100 00 

SS-06 

1S16 

193 

20-97 

2-90 

4-91 

3-66 

1-25 

56-09 

56-09 

(=) 

-04 

100 00 

95-22 
15 74 
10-33 
09-15 

('■) 


p.c. 

100 00 

62-12 

21-38 

4-41 

27- 16 

917 

S-Sl 

227 

104 

S4-5t 

3311 

1-40 

-06 

100 00 

33-23 
9-31 
1-30 

20 04 
2^58 
5-95 
479 
116 

60-63 

59-93 
-70 
-19 

100 000 

91-91 

22-85 

5-87 

02-47 

-72 


p.c. 
100 00 




68-66 


Ble 


29-01 


Orge 


4-20 


Avoine 


28-33 




7 12 


Legumes. 


316 


Pommcs dc terre.. 


1-52 




•64 


Kicoltes fourrageres ... 


29 -IS 


P^oin 


27 13 


Diverses 


199 


Tabac et houblon 


•06 


COLOMBIE-BRITANNIQUE 
Totality des recoltes 


100 00 


Cereales 


12 
3 

7 

2 
1 

21 
21 


OS 
37 
47 
26 
93 
15 
73 
42 
94 
69 
25 
07 


32 -2» 


Ble 


4-45 


Orge 


•87 


Avoine 


15 57 


Diver.ses 


1-33 


Lfgumes 


6-17 


Pom mes de terro 


5-09 


Racines des champs 


1-08 


Recoltes fourrageres 


71 18 


P^oin 


62-16 


Diverses 


9-02 


Tabac et houblon 


-43 


albp:rta 

Totalite des recoltes 


39 71 

36-50 
907 
2 33 

24-81 
■29 


100 00 


Cereales 


88-22 


Ble 


42-53 


Orge 


5-88 


.\voine 


37-88 


Diverses 


1-93 



(') Moins d'un centiemc de un pour cent. 
f") Non donne. 
15.")05— ji 



xlvi 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



tableau 30. pour-cent que constitue l':fitendue en r^coltes mention. 
n£es par rapport a la superficie totale des terres am1i:lior6es 

ET pour-cent DE L'fiTENDUE TOTALE EN RfiCOLTES DES CH.lilPS REVE- 
NANT a CHAQUE RfiCOLTE, PAR DECADES. 



R6coltes 



ALBERTA— Fin. 

Legumes 

Pommes de terre 

Racines des champs 

Rccoltes fourrageres 

Foin 

Diverses 

Tabac et houblon 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Totality des rccoltes 

Cereales 

Ble 

Orge 

A voine 

Diverses 

Legumes 

Pommes de terre 

Racines des champs 

Ri'coltes fourrageres 

Foin 

Diverses 

Tabac et houblon 

MANITOBA 

Totality des i ^coltes 

Ccr'ales 

Ble 

Orge 

Avoine 

Diverses 

L6guines 

Pommes de terre 

Racines des champs 

RecoUes fourrageres /. 

Foin 

Diverses 

Tabac et houblon . 

ONTARIO 

Totality des r^oltes 

Ceriales 

B16 

Orge 

Avoine 

Diverses 

Lfgumes 

Pommes de terre 

Racines des champs 

Ricoltcs fourrageres 

Foin 

Diverses 

Tabac et houblon 



POUR-CEXT DE LA TERRE 

AMELIOREE PAR RE- 

COLTE SPECIFIEE 



Pour-cent du total de la terre en 
recoltes des champs occtjpee 
par chaque recolte 



1901 



•92 
•80 
•12 

2-S9 
{') 

2^29 



58 39 

67 -35 

43^40 

1^05 

12^63 

•17 

■61 

•55 

•06 

■63 

{') 

•53 



68-98 

67-47 

49 19 

350 

14-36 

•42 

■42 

•40 

•02 

1-09 

•109 



69 44 

45-91 

1121 

442 

20 41 

987 

g-60 

133 

1^27 

SO -90 

19-M 

1-26 

-03 



1911 



1890 



1900 



p.c. 



-70 
•55 
•15 
'r62 
574 
■78 



76 96 

75-99 

44-27 

2-31 

19-65 

9-76 

■28 

•25 

•03 

■69 

•40 

•29 

(') 



76 52 

73-20 

45-87 

6-65 

19-38 

130 

■46 

•39 

•07 

S-86 

2-29 

-57 

(') 



70 92 

40^75 
705 
381 

20-55 
934 
2-SO 
115 
115 

S7 -77 

25 24 

253 

•10 



3^66 
112 

{') 



leo 00 

97-33 

68-76 

3-25 

24-89 

•43 

2-67 

171 

•96 

(}) 

i}) 

(^) 

(') 



100 00 

99-03 

72-95 

4-60 

20 -S5 

•63 

■97 

•80 

•17 

(') 

(') 

(') 

(^) 



100 00 

65-42 

17 52 

8^34 

25^ 14 

14-42 

3-60 

2-20 

1-40 

30-96 

30-96 

{■") 

-02 



p.c. 



2-32 

2-01 

•31 

5-77 

5-77 



100 00 

98-06 

74-32 

1-81 

21-63 

•30 

1-03 

•94 

•09 

■91 

(') 

•91 



100 00 

97^79 

71 30 

507 

20 82 

•60 

•63 

•59 

•04 

1-58 

(=) 

1^58 

(=) 



100 00 

66^11 

1615 

6-36 

29-39 

1421 

3-75 

191 

184 

30-10 

28 29 

181 

•04 



(') Moins d'un centierae de un pour cent. 
C) Non donn6. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



xlvii 



TABLEAU 3d. POUR-CENT QUE CONSTITUE L'£;TENDUE EN RfiCOLTES MENTION- 
N£:ES par rapport a la SUPERFICIE TOTALE DES TERRES AMfiLIORfiES ET 
POUR-CENT DE L'fiTENDUE TOTALE EN R^ICOLTES DES CHAMPS REVENANT A 
CHAQUE RECOLTE, PAR DfiCADES. 



Recoltes 



Pour-cent de la terre 
amelioree par re- 
colte specifiee 



1901 



1911 



Pour-cent du total de la superficie 

EN recoltes DES CHAMPS POUR 
CHAQUE RECOLTE 



1890 



1900 



1910 



QUEBEC 
Totality des recoltes. . 



Cereales 

Ble 

Orge 

Avoine 

Di verses , 

Legumes 

Pommes de terre — 

Racines des champs. 
Recoltes fourrageres . . . . 

Foin 

Diverses 

Tabac et houblon 



NOUVEAU-BRUNSWICK 
Totalite des recoltes 



Cereales 

Ble 

Orge 

Avoine 

Diverses 

Legumes 

Pommes de terre 

Racines des champs. 
Recoltes fourrageres 

Foin 

Diverses 

Tabac et houblon 



NO UVELLE-fiCOSSE 
Totalite des recoltes 



Cereales 

Ble 

Orge 

Avoine 

Diverses 

Legumes 

Pommes de terre — 

Racines des champs. 
Recoltes fourragens 

Foin 

Diverses 

Tabac et houblon 



ILE DU PRINCE-EDO LAUD 
Totality des recoltes 



Cereales 

Ble 

Orge 

Avoine 

Diverses 

Legumes 

Pommes de terre 

Recoltes des champs. 
Recoltes fuurragires 

Foin 

Diverses 

Tabac et houblon. 



(') Moins d'un centieme de un pour cent. 
(,-) Non donn6. 



p.c. 

63 23 

26-50 

1-88 

1-40 

18-15 

507 

1-83 

1-71 

•12 

S4-7S 

34-25 

•53 

•12 



63 66 

S8-02 

1-92 

•33 

13-26 

5-51 

S-S6 

2-86 

-50 

S9-27 

38-98 

-29 

-01 



58 06 

10-30 

1-30 

-61 

7-24 

1-15 

S-50 

2-98 

-52 

U-26 

44-09 

•17 

(^) 



61 66 

SO -48 

5-83 

-63 

22-64 
1-38 
6-8S 
4-60 
1-23 

26-34 

25 06 
-28 

(=) 



p.c. 

67 15 

23-30 

-87 

1-23 

17-64 

3-75 

1-72 

1-54 

•18 

41-78 

41 - 13 

-65 

-15 



67-76 

SO -20 

•98 

•18 

14 -.37 

4-67 

S-52 

2-84 

•68 

U-04 

43-97 

-07 

(0 



57 06 

10-90 

1-06 

-44 

7-97 

1-43 

3-40 

2-45 

-95 

42-76 

42 57 

■19 

(') 



62 96 

29-53 

404 

•60 

23-48 

1 41 

B-04 

400 

1-04 

28-39 

28-24 

•15 

(') 



p.c. 

100 00 

42-99 

4^16 

2-32 

28-56 

7-95 

S-31 

3^01 

•30 

63-58 

53 58 

(') 

•12 



100 00 

32-03 

2-27 

•80 

20 59 

8^37 

6-27 

5-60 

•67 

61-69 

61 69 

(^) 

•01 



100 00 

18-48 

1-96 

1-66 

13-00 

1-86 

7-04 

6-10 

•94 

74-47 

74-47 

(') 

-01 



100 00 

51-68 
10-90 

1-85 
37-56 

1-.38 
11-70 
10-62 

1-OS 

36-62 

30-62 

(=) 



p.c. 

100 00 

41-91 

2-97 

2-22 

28-70 

8-02 

2-89 

2-70 

•19 

55-01 

54- 17 

•84 

•19 



100 00 

33-01 

3-01 

-51 

20-83 

8-66 

6-28 

4-49 

•79 

61-70 

61^24 

•46 

•01 



100 00 

17-76 
2-24 
1-06 

12-48 

1-98 

6-02 

5- 13 

•89 

76-22 

75-93 
-29 



100 00 

49-44 
9-45 
1-02 

.36-73 
2-24 
9-4 J 
7-46 
1-99 

41-11 

40-66 
•45 
(^) 



xiviii RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

PRODUCTION. 

Le tableau 31 donne le rendement des principales recoltes de grains par 
totaux pour le Canada et les provinces, en 1880, 1890, 1900 et 1910, et le tableau 
32 faisant pendant au tableau precedent donne aussi les statistiques concernant 
la production du foin, des pommes de terre, des racines, du houblon, du tabac, 
de la graine d'herbe et de trefle, ainsi que du sucre d'erable produit durant ces 
annees. 

Ble. La production du ble qui etait de 32,350,269 boisseaux en 1880, 
a augmente a 132,077,547 boisseaux en 1910, soit une augmentation de 
99,727,278 boisseaux en trente ans ou plus que 308 pour cent. En 1890 les 
terres du Canada ont produit 42,223,372 boisseaux, et en 1900, 55,572,368 bois- 
seaux. L'augmentation de 1880 a 1890 etait de 9,873,103 boisseaux ou 30-5 
pour cent; de 1890 a 1900 elle etait de 13,348,996 boisseaux ou 31-6 pour cent, 
et de 1900 k 1910 Taugmentation etait de 76,505,179 boisseaux ou 137-7 pour 
cent. La production totale du ble dans tout le Canada en 1910 etait pres de 
deux millions de boisseaux plus elevee que la production totale des trois periodes 
de recensement 1880, 1890 et 1900. Cette grande augmentation dans la pro- 
duction du ble est due entierement aux provinces de I'Ouest. En 1880 le 
Manitoba, la Saskatchewan et 1' Alberta produissaient 1,153,328 boisseaux de 
ble; en 1890, 17,884,629 boisseaux; en 1900 la quantite s'elevait a 23,456,985 
boisseaux, contre une production de 110,166,704 boisseaux en 1910. La 
quantite de ble dont il est fait rapport dans les recensements precedents, 
pour I'Alberta et la Saskatchewan, etait relativement faible, s'elevant k un peu 
plus de cinq millions de boisseaux en 1900, tandis qu'en 1910 la Saskatchewan 
seule a produit pres de 11| millions de boisseaux de plus qu'il n'a ete produit 
dans tout le Canada en 190;). 

Dans chacune des moissons de 1880, 1890 et 1900 la province d'Ontario a 
recolte plus que la moitie de tout le ble produit dans le Dominion en ces annees. 
En 1910 cette position a ete conquise par la Saskatchewan qui a recolte pres 
de 67 millions des 132 millions de boisseaux produits dans cette ann^e. 
Quebec, le Nouveau-Brunswick et la Nouvelle-Ecosse ont produit plus de 
ble dans Tannee 1880 que dans aucune annee de recensement subsequente. 
En 1880 ces provinces ont recolte 3,070,211 boisseaux, comparativement a 
1,360,114 boisseaux en 1910, soit une diminution de 55-70 pour cent en trente 
ans. L'lle du Prince-Edouard indique une augmentation constante dans la 
production du ble de 1880 a 1900. La quantite recoltee en 1880 6tait de 546,986 
boisseaux, contre 613,364 boisseaux eu 1890 et 738,679 boisseaux en 1900; 
en 1910 la production est tombee de 501,553 boisseaux, soit une diminution 
de 237,146 boisseaux sur le recensement precedent et de 45,453 boisseaux 
de moins qu'en 1880. 

De septembre 1910 k aout 1911 le Canada a exporte 52,098,694 boisseaux 
de bl^. La balance de la production de I'ann^e 1910, 70,978,853 boisseaux, 
comprend la quantite emmagasinee et la quantity destinee a la consommation 
domestique, aux semences, etc. Les statistiques des exportations sont don- 
nees au tableau 43, pour les annees se terminant le 30 juin 1891, 1901 et 1911. 

Orge. En 1910 le Canada a produit 28,848,310 boisseaux d'orge, com- 
parativement a 22,224,366 boisseaux en 1900, a 17,222,795 boisseaux en 1890 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



PROPORTION POUR CE>7T DE LA PRODUCTION DU BLfi R^COLTfi D\N3 LRS 
DIVERSE© PROVINCES DU CANADA EN 1880, 1890. 1900 ET 1910. 



RECEr^SEMEtiT £7 5TAT/5T1QUE5 



J3m^ 



J890 





Afin de d6rnontrer la position relative des prorinccs p^r nwport k la production totile du bI6. dans 
chaque aniwe de reccnseTnent. I'^tendue dea cerclea est la mSme dans chaque cas. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



PROPORTION POUR CENT DE LA PRODUCTION DE L'ORGE R]6C0LT£E DANS 
LES DIVERSES PROVINCES DU CANADA EN 1880, 1890, 1900 ET 1910. 



RtaNSEMENT ET StaTISTIQUES 



Jd&O 



J3JA 




1900 



J9JO 




Afin de d^montrer la position relative des provinces par rapport k la production totale de I'oige dans 
chaque ann6e de recensement, I'^tcnduc des cf roles est la mfimc dans chaque cas. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



PROPORTION POUR CENT DE LA PRODUCTION DE L'AVOINE RfiC0LT]6E DANS 
LES DIVERSES PROVINCES DU CANADA EN 1880, 1890, 1900, ET 1910. 




Afin dc deinontrer la, position relative das provinces p .r rrpport a l;i production tot ilc dc I'uvoine 
dans chaquc annee de recensement, I'etendue des cercles est la iiieme dans chuquc cas. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



PROPORTION POUR CENT DE LA PRODUCTION DE3 GRAINS SECONDAIRES 

RECOLTfiS DANS LES DIVERSES PROVINCES DU CANADA 

EN 1880, 1890, 1900 ET 1910. 



Re.cems£meht etSta vstiques. 



AutresProv. 



QJjPG 



Au iresProv . 
0-5P.C. 




.^900 



I9J0 



'AulretPm'. 

^■ S EC. 




Afin de denaontrer la position relative des provinces par rapport a 1* productioa totiile des grains 
sccondcurea dans chaque recensemeat, I'etendue des ccrcles est la mfeme dans chaque cas. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



PRODUCTION' DES PRINCIPAUX GRAINS ET PROPORTION POUR CENT DE 

CHACUN PAR RAPPORT AU TOTAL POUR LES ANNEES 

1880, 1S90. 1900 ET 1910. 




L'etendue de chaque cercle rcpifisente la produi.iion toUle du gr.ua pour (.huquc ;um6e 

de recenijenicnt. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



xlix 



et a 16,844,868 boisseaux en 1880. De la production totale en 1880, Ontario 
a fourni 85 pour cent; sa part en 1890 etait de 77 pour cent, en 1900 de 72 
pour cent ct en 1910 de 48 pour cent de la production totale du Doniinion. 
Le rendement de I'orge dans les provinces des prairies ^ait de 12,057,806 
boisseaux en 1910, comparativement a 3,141,357 boisseaux en 1900, soit un 
gain de 8,916,449 boisseaux ou 283-8 pour cent dans la decade. 

TABLEAU $1. tTAT COMPARATIF DU RENDEMENT DES RfiCOLTES DE GRAINS 

1880-1910. 



Provinces 



Canada- 



Blc. 



boi^s. 



191» 132, 
IMO 55, 
18»0 i'i, 
1880 32, 

Colombie- ' 
Britannique — : 
19101 
1900 
1890s 
1880! 
Alberta — I 

1910, 9, 
1900l 
1890 
1880 
Saskat- ! 

chewan — 

1910 66 
1900 
1890 
1880 
Manitoba — 

1910 
1900 
1890 
1880 
Ontario — 

1910 
1900 
1890 
1880 
Quebec — 

1910 

19001 

18'J0i 

1880 

Nouveau- 

Brunswick — 

1910, 

1900 

1890, 

1880, 

NouvoUe- 

I-Zcosse — 
19101 
1900, 
1890, 
1880, 
He (lu Prince- ] 
li^douard — 
1910 
1900 
1890 
1880 



Orge 



boiss. 



077,547 28,848,310 
572,368 22,224,366 
223,372 17,222,795 
350,26916,844,868 



Avoine 



boiss. 



Seigle 



boiss. 



206, 570 
359,419 
388,300 
173,653 

060.210 

797,161 

94,929 

50,648 



,978,996 

,306,811 

,697,480 

69,007 

,127,498 
,.353,013 
,092,220 
,033,673 



,842,626 
,418,90 



51,509 
73,790 
79,024 
79,140 

2,480,165 

286,937 

89,417 

24,624 



3,061,007 

187,617 

120.043 

23.821 

6,516.634 

2,666,803 

1,452,433 

253,604 



14,085,327 
16,087,862 
314, 582]l3, 419, 3.54 
406,091114,279,841 



932,459 
,968,203 
,646,882 
,019,004 



204,125 
.381 , 699 
209,809 
521,956 



223,530 
248,476 
165,806 
529,251 



.501,5.33 
738,679 
613,364 
546,986 



2.340,364 
2,535,597 
1,580,197 
1,751.539 



245,393,425 1 

151,497,407 2 

83,428,202; 1 

70,493,131 2 



1,764,-533 

1,442,566 

943,088 

253-, 911 

16,893,840 

3,787,046 

571,427 

33,705 



58,922,791 

2,274,616 

1,056,917 

26,247 

30,346,879 

10,. 592, 660 

8,370,212 

1,270,268 



89.9.36,041 1 

88.138,974 2 

47,160,246' 1 

40,209,929! 1 



33,804,291 
33,536,677 
17, 818,. 589 
19,990,205 



Pois 



boiss. 



542,219 4,788,916 
316,793 12,348,943 
341,325 14,823,764 
097,18013,749,662 



Sarrasin 



56,6.59 

99,0.50 

100.917 

84,183 



142,224 
181,085 
227,5.30 
228,748 



114,421 
105,625 
147,880 
119,368 



5,658 

17,328 

6,141 

482 

109,006 

17,499 

230 

(=) 



11.639 

12,633 

1,299 

240 

29,045 
7,085 

12,952 
1,203 



43,979 
60,074 
85,774 
50,542 

2,892 
939 

1.729 
766 



2,612 
558 

3,972 
525 

4.863 
4,950 
10,872 
8,991 



,2.32,493 4,311,113 
,032,385 11,351,646 
,064,345 12.760,331 
,598, 871 t 9,434,872 



148,621 
211,287 



boiss 



7,102,853 
4,547,159 
4,994,871 
4,901,147 



55 

1.899 

276 

59 

968 

264 

57 



29 

36 

243 

50 

2,919 

1,294 

178 

320 

3.3.33.216 

1,056,998 

1,470,511 

841,649 



Fevcs 



boiss. 



Ble 
d'lnde 
a grain 



boiss. 



826,2Sl'l4,417.5ft9 

861,327,25,875,919 

808,015 10, 711, 3S0 

(1) 9,025,142 



5,341 
1,780 
4,888 
(') 



115 
15 



0) 



59 
38 
117 



908,656 
226,316 1,912,463 
403,242 4.170,456 



414,367 2,365,539 



5,538,605 
4,816,173 
3,025,329 
3,297,534 



2,973,8.57 
2,347,598 
1,. 5.59, 842 
1,873,113 



5, 212,. 588 
4,. 561, 097 
2.922,552 
3,538,219 



333 

2,809 

6,321 

18,268 



5,. 3.56 
15,702 
23,500 
47,567 



65 
221 
.307 



6,584 
10,808 
24,352 
43,121 



1,8.58 

3,067 

19,536 

37,220 



648 
2,245 
4,735 
3, 169 



1,849,596 
2,118,197 
2,041,670 



1,1.50,522 
1,390,885 
1,136,528 
1,587,223 



(■) 

904 
710 
434 
(') 

726,925 

767,255 

664,541 

0) 

76,150 
61,. 376 
82,501 

(') 



781 
1,849 
3.938 
1.433 

863 

1,300 

90 

200 



2,041 

100 

1,445 

1,748 

3,161 
1,944 
3,429 
2.516 

13.830,703 

24,463,694 

9,835,737 

8,096,782 

575,249 

1,384,. 331 

826, 179 

888,169 



4,517 
13,. 573 
20, 137 



206,005 


11,802 


196,498 


16,084 


184 


421 


24,950 


339 


718 


(•) 


43 


600 


408 


49 


089 


496 


84 


460 


2,445 


90,4,58 


(') 



1,616 
12,. 509 
21,021 
18,1.59 



2,684 
9.3.58 
16.890 
13,532 



501 

834 

2.651 

2,003 



(') Compris avec les poifl. 
(') Non donnd. 



I RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

Avoine. L'avoine occupe la premiere place dans la production du 
grain au Canada. EUe est au premier rang dans la Colombie-Britannique, 
I'Alberta, Ontario, Quebec et les Provinces maritimes, mais elle cede la place 
au ble dans le Manitoba et la Saskatchewan. Le rendement total, pour le 
Canada, en 1910, 6tsdt de 245,393,425 boisseaux, contre 151,497,407 boisseaux 
en 1900, soit une augmentation de 93,896,018 boisseaux ou pres de 62 pour 
cent. Les provinces de Test en 1910 donnaient un rendement de 137,465,382 
boisseaux ou 57 pour cent du total; la balance, 107,928,043 boisseaux, ou 43 
pour cent ayant ete recoltee a I'ouest des Grands Lacs. 

Ble d'Inde a grain. Vu les conditions de climat le bled 'Inde 
a grain ne peut etre cultive avec succes que dans Ontario. Sur une produc- 
tion totale de 25,875,919 boisseaux en 1900, Ontario en a produit 24,463,694 
boisseaux ou 94 pour cent, et en 1910 la meme province a produit 13,830,703 
boisseaux ou 96 pour cent d'un total de 14,417,599 boisseaux. 

Autres cereales Des autres grains de moindre importance, le sarrasin 
seul indique une augmentation de production durant la decade. En 1910 
le rendement de ce grain etait de 7,102,853 ])oisseaux, comparativement 
a 4,547,159 boisseaux en 1900, soit une augmentation de 2,555,694 boisseaux 
revenant presqu'entierement a Ontario et Quebec. La production des pois 
est tombee de 12,348,943 boisseaux en 1900 a 4,788,916 boisseaux en 1910. 
Ce decroissement dans la production des pois a ete general, ayant eu lieu pour 
differentes causes, dont la principale provient des insectes dans toutes les pro- 
vinces, excepte la Saskatchewan et I'Alberta. 

Les feves en 1910 ont obtenu un rendement de 826,281 boisseaux, compara- 
tivement a 861,327 boisseaux en 1900 et a 800,015 en 1890. Les pois et les f^ves 
groupes ensemble en 1880, ont donne une production totale de 13,749,662 
boisseaux. Dans Ontario ou la production des feves au dernier recensement 
6tait pres de 88 pour cent de la production totale du Canada, le rendement 
est tombe de 767,255 boisseaux en 1900 a 726,925 boisseaux en 1910; 
dans Quebec le rendement ^tait de 14,774 boisseaux plus elev6 en 
1910 qu'en 1900; dans les Provinces maritimes la production 6tait moindre 
pour chaque province au dernier recensement qu'a aucun recensement 
precedent. La production du seigle qui s'elevait a 2,097,180 boisseaux en 1880, 
a decru en 1890 a 1,341,325 boisseaux; en 1890 elle s'est accrue encore, attei- 
gnant 2,316,793 boisseaux pour tomber encore en 1910 a 1,542,219 boisseaux. 
Quebec et les Provinces maritimes indiquent un decroissement constant de 
decade en d6cade. En 1880 Ontario a produit 76-2 pour cent de la produc- 
tion totale du seigle recolte dans tout le Canada, 79-3 pour cent en 1890, 87-7 
pour cent en 1900 et 79-9 pour cent en 1910. 

Foin. En 1880 le Canada a recolte 5,053,008 tonnes de foin provenant 
du mil et du trefle, en 1890 la production etait de 7,693,733 tonnes, compara- 
tivement a 7,852,731 en 1900 et k 10,406,367 tonnes en 1910. Les provinces 
des prairies indiquent une diminution de 614,054 tonnes dans le rendement 
du foin en 1910, comparativement a 1900, mais cette diminution est plus appa- 
rente que reelle, vu qu'en 1900 et dans les recensements precedents le foin dont 

II est fait rapport avait ete coupe sur la priarie vierge, tandis qu'il n'a et^ fait 
rapport que du foin cultiv^ au dernier recensement. De 1900 a 1910 la produc- 



RECENSEMENTDU CANADA 1911 li 

tion du foin dans Ontario a augmente de 1,574,971 tonnes; dans Quebec, de 

1.244.698 tonnes; dans le Nouveau-Brunswick, de 156,015 tonnes; dans la 
Xouvelle-ficosse, de 65,962 tonnes; dans Pile du Prince-Edouard, de 87,672 
tonnes et dans la Colombie-Britannique, de 38,372 tonnes. En plus des produits 
du mil et du trefle en 1910, il y a eu aussi 115,189 tonnes de recoltes fourra- 
geres provenant de I'alfalfa ou luzerne et 2,705,103 tonnes de ble d'Inde fourragcr 
pour nourriture d'ete ou pour 'ensilage", et 343,228 tonnes de grain coupe vert 
etconverti en fourrage pour I'hiver. 

Ponimes de terre. La production totale des pommes de terre pour tout 
le Canada s'elevait a 55,461,473 boisseaux eii 1910, contre 55,362,635 boisseaux 
en 1900 soit un gain de 98,838 boisseaux seulement ou moins de i de un pour 
cent. Les provinces montrant des augmentations, pour 1910 sur 1900, sont la 
Colombie-Britannique, I'Alberta, la Saskatchewan, le Manitoba et le Nouveau- 
BrunsTvack, tandis que celles qui indiquent des diminutions sont Ontario, Quebec, 
la Nouvelle-Ecosse et I'lle du Prince-Edouard. Le rendement dans les provinces 
de rOuest s'est accru de 4,154,533 boisseaux en 1900 a 9,756,290 boisseaux en 
1910, soit un gain de 5,601,757 boisseaux ou 134-8 pour cent; dans le Nouveau- 
Brunswick de 4,649,059 boisseaux a 5,219,025 boisseaux, soit un gain de 569,966 
boisseaux ou 12-25 pour cent. La diminution dans Ontario est de 2,741,467 
boisseaux ou 13 • 67 pour cent; dans Quebec de 1,684,200 boisseaux ou 9 • 83 pour 
cent et dans la Nouvelle-Ecosse et I'lle du Prince-Edouard de 1,647,218 boisseaux 
ou 17-55 pour cent. 

Navets et autres racines. La quantite totale rapportee sous cet en-tete 
(86,659,034 boisseaux) pour tout le Canada, comprpnait 47,371,434 boisseaux 
de navets, 30,353,132 boisseaux de betteraves fourrageres, 6,498,101 boisseaux de 
betteraves a sucre et 2,436,367 boisseaux de diverses especes (carottes, betteraves 
a table, panais, etc.), dont les details par provinces se trouvent au tableau XXV. 
De la production totale en 1910, Ontario comptait 70,418,599 boisseaux, Quebec 

4.869.699 boisseaux, les Provinces maritimes 9,224,299 boisseaux, les provinces 
des prairies 1,147,356 boisseaux et la Colombie-Britannique 999,081 boisseaux. 
De 1900 a 1910 la production a augmente dans Ontario de 7,050,136 boisseaux; 
dans la Nouvelle-Ecosse, de 1,466,005 boisseaux; dans Quebec, de 1,343,512 
boisseaux; dans le Nouveau-Brunswick, de 615,619 boisseaux; dans la Colombie- 
Britannique, de 363,093 boisseaux; dans le Manitoba, de 290,531 boisseaux; 
dans I'Alberta, de 257,314 boisseaux; dims la Saskatchewan, de 132,390 boisseaux, 
tandis qu'il y a une diminution de 935,208 boisseaux dans Tile du Prince Edouard, 
formant une augmentation totale pour le Dominion de 10,583,392 boisseaux 
durant la decade. 

Houblon. II y a eu 1,208,450 livres de houblon r^colt^ en 1910, compa- 
rativemcnt a 1,004,216 livres en 1900. De la production totale en 1910, la 
Colombie-Britannique en compte 1,013,400 livres, et c'est la seule province 
qui ait fait un succes de la culture du houblon. Les autres provinces indiquent 
des decroissements dans cette culture dans chacun des rccensements depuis 
1880. 

Tabac. La culture du tabac se fait principalement dans les provinces 
d'Ontario et Quebec. De la production totale en 1910 (17,632,342 livres), 
Ontario en poss^dait 7,498,506 et Quebec 10,115,016 livres, comparativement 
k une production totale de 11,266,732 livres en 1900, dont Ontario comptait 



lii 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



3,503,739, et Quebec 7,655,975 livres. La production du tabac dans les autres 
provinces est tombee de 107,018 livres en 1900 a 19,820 livres en 1910. 

TABLEAU 32. :fiTAT COMPARATIF DU RENDEMENT DU FOIN, DES PLANTES- 
RACINES ET DES AUTRES RfiCOLTES, 1880-1910. 



Provinces 



Canada — 
1910... 
1900 .. 
1890... 

1880... 
Coloinbie- 
Britannique — 

1910... 

1900... 

1890.... 

1880... 
Alberta — 

1910.... 

1900.... 

1890.... 

1880.... 
Saskat- 
chewan 

1910... 

1900. . . . 

1890... 

1880.... 
Manitoba — 

1910.... 

1900... 

1890... 

1880. . . . 
Ontario — 

1910.... 

1900.... 

1890.... 

1880.... 
Quebec — 

1910 

1900 

1890 

1880 

Nouveau- 
Brunswick — 

1910 

1900 

1890 

1880 

Nouvolle 

Ecosse — 

1910 

1900 

1890 

1880...... 

He du Prince- 
Edouard — 

1910 

1900 

1890 

1880 



Fein 



tonnes 



Pommes 

de 

terre 



boiss. 



10,406,367;55,461,47.3 
7,852,7.3155,362,635 
7,693,733 53,499,857 
5,053,008 55,368,790 



Navets 
et autres 
racines 



208,559 

170, 187 

102,146 

43,898 

124,879! 

183,702 

45,523 

4,113 



45, 129 

247,455 

110,347 

13,387 

124,9541 
477,859 
485,230 
185,279 



1,633,210 

. 955,946 

685,802 

473,831 

2,339,901 

587,461 

187,000 

32,263 



2, 917,, 340 

690,3.32 

351,126 

57.063 

2,865,839 

1,920,794 

1,757,231 

556, 193 



4,427,436 17,300,791 
2,852,465 20,042,258 
3,465,633 17,635,151 
2, 038, 659j 18, 994, 559 

3,826,52lll5,451,539 
2,581,823:17,135,7.39 
2,243,435 15,861,797 
1,612,104 14,873,287 



668,599 
512,584 
476,069 
414,046 



724,292 
658,330 
632,391 
597,731 



255,998 
168,326 
132,959 
143,791 



5,219,025 
4,649,05ai 
4,827,830 
6,961,016 



3,531,293 
4,394,413 
5,113,612 
7,378,387 



4,202,535 
4,986,633 
7,071,308 
6,042,191 



boiss. 



Houblon 



lb. 



Tabac 



lb. 



86 , 659 , 034 1 , 208 , 450 17 , 632 , 342 

76,075,642 1,094,216 11,266,7,32 

49,679,636 1,128,2.30 4,277,936 

48,251,414 905,207 2,527,962 



999,081 
6.35,988 
516,242 
352,774 

432,045 

125,328 

70,040 

9,618 



192,537 

109,5.50 

350,537 

8,366 

522,774 
232,243 
547,559 
198,121 

70,418,599 
63,368,463 
41,200,779- 
40,335,943 

4,869,699 
3,526,187 
2,656,587 
3.623,380 



2,686,105 

2,070,486 

974,363 

1,149,379 

3,540,811 
2,074,806 
1,349,076 
1,332,854 



2,997,383 
3,9.32,591 
2,005,453 
1.240,979 



1,013,400 

299,717 

55,288 

24,899 



80 

8 

333 



122 

650 

1,022 

1,835 



9,688 

61,8.30 

343 

96 

205 
5,533 



1,678 
1,149 
1,238 



7,072 
6,. 365 
1,807 
2,037 



176,131 7,498,506 

603,075 3,. 503, 739 
837, 647 i 314.086 

615,967 160,251 

17,165 10,115,016 

62,930 7,655,975 

180,297 3,9,58,7.37 

218,542 2,356,581 



Lin 



258 
31,775 
27,791 
15,006 



l,09»i 

4,5f1^ 

18,192 

18,677 



198 

1,425 

5,637 

10,209 



15 

587 

702 

6,414 



110 
560 

i,2:§i 
Si; 

30,994 

795 

1,367 



boiss. 



Graine 
d'herbe et 
de trefle 



lb. 



Sucre 
d'erable 



lb. 



4,244,9.35 26,960,765 22.205,116 
172,222 15,499,149 17.804,825 
138, 844 17, 032, 500 25, 088, 274 
108,694 324,317 20,556,049 



50 

4 

364 

34 

78.480 
603 
753 



3,893,160 

2,420 

709 



176,675 
81,898 
34,588 



1,780' 
31,368| 
82,900 
41,136j 

20,476' 
13,6.32' 
11,000 



I 

75,932' 

74,328; 

3,750: 



116,0311 
14,4.36 
42,450 
14.544' 



31 

320 

9 



553 
5 



690 

228 



470 
5. 137 
3,987 
2,796 



82,90123,883,223 5,2,32.278 
67,276 11,880,912 3,912,640 
71,3.39 11.840,950, 5,665,796 
38,208 8,160,950 4,169,706 



13,375 
19.309 
29.476 
65,995 



32 

283 

459 

1,745 



58 

410 

1.793 



262 
2.V) 
7^6; 
919i 



2,105,222 16,543,622 
2,813,976 13,564,819 
4,077,400 18,875,231 
5.965.300 15,687,835 



90,489 
157,248 
247,350 
391,878 



37,691 

26,724 

105,850 

438,912 



629,921 
486,516 
620,850 
S2a.338 



269,944 

207, 450 

340, 781 

"453.124 



158.121 
112,496 
194,232 
217,481 



681 

1,009 

7,694 

25.098 



'Le foin de praiiie non compris. 

Lin. En 1900 il a ^te recolt^ 172,222 boisseaux de lin dans tout k Dominion; 
mais depuis Tetablissement des provinces dcs prairies oil le lin est avantageuse- 
ment cultive sur les terres nouvellement remu^es, la produotion de 1910 s'est 
41ev6e a 4,244,935 boisseaux. De ce chiffre la Saskatclie\s'an a produit 3,893,100 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



liii 



boisseaux ou 91-71 pour cent. Ontario, le Manitoba et I'Alberta ont aiissi 
fourni des augmentations durant la decade. 

Graine d'herbe et trefle rouge. Le rendemeiit de ce produit en 1910 
etait de 26,960,765 livres, comparativement a 15,499,140 livres en 1900. De 
ces chiffres Ontario comptait 23,883,223 livres en 1910 contre 11,880,912 livres 
en 1900. De 1890 a 1900 Ontario indique une augmentation de 39,962 livres 
seulement. 

Le tableau 33 donne la superficie et la production de chaque espece de 
recolte pour tout le Canada, en 1890, 1900 et 1910. 



TABLEAU 33. 



SUPERFICIE ET PRODUCTION DES RECOLTES DES CHAMPS AU 
CANADA, 1890, 1900 ET 1910. 



Recoltes 



Ble, total 

Ble d'automne 

Ble de printemps 

Orge 

A voine 

Seigle 

Ble d'lnde a grain 

Sarrasin 

Pois 

Feves 

Grains melanges 

Lin 

Graine d'herbe 

Graine de trefle 

Pommes de terre 

Navets 

Bettoraves fourragerea . . 

Betteraves a aucre 

Autres racines 



Superficie et production 



1890 



Foin et trefle 

T>uzerne 

Ble d'lnde fourrager 

Autres recoltes fourrageres.. 



Tabao. . . 
Houblon. 



2,701,213 



868.464 
3,961,356 
122,102 
195,101 
293,307 
925,;575 
43,097 

16,236 



450, 190 
148,143 

5,931,548 



4,765 
1,914 



boiss. 
42,223,372 



17,222,795 
83,428,202 

1,341,325 
10,711,380 

4,994,871 

14,823,764 

800,015 

138,844 

346,036 
53,490,857 

49,679,636 



tonnes 
7,693,733 



liv. 
4,277,936 
1,126,230 



1900 



4,224,542 

1,120,984 

3,103,538 

871,800 

5,367,655 

176,679 

360, 758 

261,726 

670,320 

46,634 

273,490 

23,086 



448,74 3 
205 , 160 

,543,423 

276,350 



11,906 
1,468 



boiss. 

55,. 572, .368 

22,005,003 

33,567,365 

22,224,366 

151,497,407 

2,316,793 

25,875,919 

4,547,159 

12,348,943 

861,327 

7,267,621 

172,222 

149,780 

138,495 

55,362,635 

76,075,642 



tonnes 
7,8.52,731 

1,251,327 

liv. 
11,266,7.32 
1,004,216 



1910 



8,864,514 

977,615 

7,886,899 

1,283,094 

8,656,179 

114,728 

293,951 

357,513 

355,191 

46,299 

426,957 

582,185 



464,504 

112,305 

56,729 

17,710 

7,821 

,289,407 

54,804 

294,347 

257,838 

18,928 
1,164 



boiss. 

132,077,547 

20,408,360 

111,669,187 

28,848,310 

245,393,425 

1,542,219 

14,417,599 

7,102,8.53 

4,788,916 

826,281 

13,086,400 

4,244,935 

141,085 

336,445 

55,461,473 

47,371,434 

30,. 353, 1.32 

6,498,101 

2 ,436,367 

tonnes 

10,406,367 

115,189 

2,705,103 

.343,228 

liv. 

17,632,342 

1,208,450 



Le tableau 34 donne, pour tout le Canada, la production moyennc des 
recoltes par acre en 1890, 1900 et 1910, pour chaque recolte dont la superficie 
ct le rendement ont etc donnes dans les listes de recensement. Les rendements 
moyens du bl6, de I'avoine, du seigle, flu sarrasin et des grains m(51anges par 
acre, etaient plus eleves en 1910 qu'en 1900; le rendement moj'en de I'orge 
etait moins eleve au dernier qu'au precedent recensement. La production 
moyenne des racines par acre a augmente de 335-35 boisseaux en 1890 a 370-81 
Ijoisse'aux en 1900 et a 477-61 boisseaux en 1910. Comme on I'a deja dit, ni 
la superficie ni la production des differentes recoltes de racines n'avaient <5te prises 
S'^parement avant le dernier recensement. Le fait que I'alfalfa rapporte on 
moyenne environ deux fois plus de fourrage que le mil et le trefle, semble cncou- 
15.50(>— K 



liv 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



rager cette culture dans les districts ou les conditions sont favorables. II 
est bon de se rappeler que la production moyenne par acre, determinee par les 
recensements decennaux, represente souvent, comme il est arriv6 dans ce pays 
en 1890, 1900 et 1910, des annees ou, a cause des mauvaises saisons, les recoltes 
ont manque dans bien des endroits. 

TABLEAU 34. MOYENNE DE LA PRODUCTION DES RfiCOLTES DES CHAMPS PAR 
ACRE CONSACRfi A CHAQUE RECOLTE, 1890-1910. 



Recoltes 



Rendement moyex par acre 



1890 



1900 



1910 



B16, total 

Ble d'automne 

Ble de printemps 

Oige 

Avoine : 

Seigle 

Ble d'Inde k grain 

Sarrasin 

Pois 

Feves 

Grains melanges 

Graine de lin 

Pommes de terre 

Navets 

Betterave* fourrageres. . . . 

Betteraves a sucre 

Autres racines 

Foin et trefle 

Luzerne 

Ble d'Inde fourrager 

Autres recoltes fourrageres 

Tabac 

Houbion 



boiss. 



boiss. 







13-15 


15-63 


19-63 




10 82 


19-84 


25-49 


21 05 


28-22 


10-98 


13-11 


54>90 


71-73 


17 0.3 


17-37 


1602 


18-42 


18-56 


18-47 


- 


26-57 


8 -.55 


7-46 


118-82 


123-37 




^ 


335 -35 


\ 370-81 


tonnes 


tonnes 


1-29 


1-20 


- 




4-52 


liv. 


^ liv. 


897-78 


946-31 


588-41 




684-07 



boiss. 

14-90 

20-87 

14-15 

22-48 

28-35 

13-44 

49-05 

19-86 

13-48 

17-85 

.30-65 

7-29 

119-40 

421-81 

5.35-05 

366-92 

311-55 

tonnes 

l-' 

2-12 

6-86 

1-33 

liv. 

934-19 

1,0.39-97 



Le tableau 35 donne le rendement moyen par acre des principales recoltes 
de grain par provinces en 1890, 1900 et 1910. Dans le recensement de 1880, 
certaines recoltes exceptees, la production est donnee mais non la superficie, 
Dans le recensement de 1910 Ontario avait la plus haute moyenne de rendement 
par acre pour le ble, 25-09 boisseaux; pour I'orge, 27-99 boisseaux; pour les 
feves, 17-91 boisseaux et pour le bl6 d'Inde a grain, 50-32 boisseaux. La 
Colombie-Britannique avait la plus haute moyenne pour I'avoine, 53-10 bois- 
seaux, et pour les arrasin, 55 boisseaux. L' Alberta avait la plus haute moyenne 
pour le seigle, 16-33 boisseaux, et le Manitoba pour les pois, 18-49 boisseaux. 
Comme les superficies en avoine et en sarrasin sont relativement pen ^levees 
dans la Colombie-Britannique, ainsi que pour le seigle dans I'Alberta et les 
pois dans le Manitoba, les rcndements moyens n'ont pas la meme signification 
dans ces provinces que dans celles oil les superficies en ces produits sont d'une 
plus grande ^tendue. Ceci s'aplique au rendement par acre du ble, de I'avoine 
et de Forge dans Ontario, Quebec et les Provinces Maritimes, compart au ren- 
dement dans les provinces des prairies. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



TABLEAU 35. STATISTIQUES COMPARATIVES DU RENDEMENT DES RECOLTES DES 
CHAMPS A L'ACRE PAR PRC?V'INCES, 1890-1910. 



Provinces 


Ble 


Orge 


Avoine 


Seigle 


Poia 


Sarrasin 


Fevea 


B16 
d'lnde 
a grain 


Colonibie- 
Britannique — 
1910 


boiss. 

21-76 
22-51 
25-62 

10-29 
18-51 
15-23 

15-84 
23-01 
15-78 

12 -.36 
9-34 
17-95 

22-79 
19-10 
14-90 

14-83 
14-07 
9-75 

15-21 
14-14 
12- 12 

18-33 
15-21 
11-71 

17-45 
17-46 
13-72 


boiss. 

27-80 
33-06 
35-47 

20-42 
25-95 
26-16 

23-62 
15-84 
24-96 

15-66 
19-09 
25-70 

27-99 
27-45 
19-40 

23-84 
24 -.35 
16-73 

21-70 
21-62 
16-43 

26-56 
23-49 
18-97 

23-44 
23-15 
19-47 


boiss. 

53 10 
41-98 
39-05 

21-57 
32-94 
26-33 

31-20 
16 04 
28-22 

2509 
18-46 
32-67 

31 -.32 
.32-56 
22-97 

24-28 
24-84 
15-35 

_ 

27-53 
25-76 
19-25 

30-87 
25-77 
16-57 

28-73 
27-73 
18-99 


boiss. 

15-05 
23-73 
17-15 

16-33 
16-77 
12-77 

15-43 

9-74 

13-39 

10-60 

7-56 

13-61 

13-29 
13-37 
11-48 

13-41 
10-81 
8-72 

13-75 
14-94 
17-07 

15-30 
15-42 
13-33 

11-33 
13-00 
18-42 


boiss. 

27-98 
20-37 
32-49 

11-52 
13-61 
16-16 

11-06 
12-13 
17- ()5 

18-49 
12-19 
17-37 

13-39 
19 -.33 
16-71 

13-67 
11-65 
12-34 

15-20 

9-85 

• J3-22 

17 05 
19-60 
16-50 

18-00 
16-52 
18-50 


boiss. 

55-00 
34-. 53 
34-50 

6-58 

14-67 

5-70 

4-83 
.36 00 
27-00 

14-52 
23-11 
22-25 

19-92 
14-47 
14-47 

19-80 
18 01 
17-99 

19-70 
18-92 
18-93 

21-59 
20-97 
20-99 

17-88 
16-60 
16-60 


boiss. 

15 -.39 
31-78 
31-94 

9-58 
15-00 

7-38 
38-00 
29-25 

9-93 
18-68 
18-87 

17-91 
18-23 
18-22 

17-98 
21-27 
21-00 

17-78 
19-14 
19-00 

10-05 
19-52 
19 -.34 

14-62 
15-03 
14-82 


boiss. 
4:-ll 


1900 


36 - 25 


1890 


4.) - 79 


.•\lberta— 

1910 


11 06 


1900 




1890 


45-00 


Saskatchewan — 
1910 


21-71 


1900 


50-00 


1S90 


28-90 


Manitoba — 

1910 


13-57 


IfiOO 

1890 


31-35 
35-72 


Ontario — 

1910 


50-32 


1900 


73-77 


1890 


55-79 


Quc'bec — 

1910 


31-05 


1900 


48-56 


1890 


46-98 


Nouveau- 
Brunswick — 

1910 

1900 . . . . 


24-48 
48-30 


1890 


41-95 


Nouvelle-Ecosse — 
1910 . 


40-67 


1900 


52-87 


1890 

lie du Prince- 
Edouard — 

1910 

1900 


ni-09 

17-89 
22-54 


1890 


35-82 







Le tableau 36 donne, pour les annees 1910 et 1900, la production moyenne 
par fcrnie des principaux j^rains, des pommes de tcrre, des racines et des recoltes 
fourrageres. II y a eu durant la decade des augmentations dans la production, 
par ferme, du ble, de I'avoine et des recoltes fourrageres, et des diminutions 
dans la production moyenne de I'orge, des pommes de tcrre et des racines. 
En 1910 Ic jNIanitoba etait en tete des provinces pour la production du bl6 
par ferme, 748-31 boisseaux; de Torge, 142 • 89 boisseaux, et de I'avoine, 665-41 
boisseaux; I'lle du Prince-Edouard en tete pour les pommes de terre, 292-47 
boisseaux; Ontario pour les navets et les racines, 310-49 boisseaux; Quebec 
pour le foin et les recoltes fourrageres, 26-54 tonnes. La production du bl6 
par ferme a augmente durant la decade dans I'Alberta, la Saskatchewan et 
le' Manitoba; de I'orge, dans I'Alberta, la Saskatchewan, le Manitoba et I'lle 
du Prince-Edouard; de I'avoine, dans la Saskatchewan, le Manitoba, Ontario 
et les Provinces Maritimes; des pommes de tcrre, dans le Manitoba et le Nou- 
veau-Brunswick; des racines, dans le Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, le Nouveau- 
Brunswick et la Nouvelle-Ecosse; du foin et des recoltes fourrageres, dans les 
provinces de I'Est en general. 
15506— K 5 



Ivi 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



La production du bl^ a beaucoup d^cru dans les provinces de I'Est durant 
la decade. La quantite par ferme en 1910 et 1900 dans Ontario, etait de 87-49 
et 126-80 boisseaux respectivement; dans Quebec, de 5-84 et 13-07 boisseaux; 
dans le Nouveau-Brunswick, de 5-34 et 10-16 boisseaux; dans la Nouvelle- 
Ecosse, de 4-17 et 4-43 boisseaux, et dans I'lle du Prince-Edouard, de 34-90 
et 52-71 boisseaux, respectivement. Dans la production de I'avoine, Quebec, 
I'Alberta et la Colombie-Britannique avaient une plus grande quantite par 
ferme en 1910 qu'en 1900, et les autres. provinces un rendement moindre. 

TABLEAU 3S. PRODUCTION MOYENNE PAR FERME DES PRINCIPALES R^COLTES 

PAR PROVINCES, 1910 ET 1900. 



Provinces 


B16 


Orge 


Avoine 


Pommes 

de 

terre 


Navets 
et autres 
racines 


Foin 

et' 

fourrage 


Canada— 

1910 


boiss. 

184-82 
102 02 

1119 
53-33 

147-33 
84 03 

695 00 
316-40 

748-31 
564-79 

87-49 
126-80 

5-84 
13 07 

5-34 
10-16 

4-17 
4-43 

34-90 
52-71 


boiss. 

40 37 
40 80 

2-79 
10-94 

40-43 
30-25 

31-76 
13-78 

142-89 
82-07 

62-10 
71-78 

14-66 
16-84 

1-48 
2-64 

2-65 
3-23 

7-96 
7-54 


boiss. 

343 38 
278 14 

95-55 
214-06 

274-71 
399-22 

611-41 
167-10 

665-41 
325-98 

396-54 
393-25 

211-69 
222-69 

144-95 
128-15 

55-45 
41-90 

366-77 
325-47 


boiss. 

77 «1 
101 S4 

88-44 
141-85 

38-05 
61-93 

30-27 
50-71 

62-84 
59-11 

76-28 
89-42 

96-76 
113-78 

136-59 
123-70 

65-84 
78-43 

292-47 
355-83 


boiss. 

121 27 
139 «7 

54-10 
94-37 

7-03 
18-42 

2-00 
4-42 

11-46 
7-15 

310-49 
282-73 

30-49 
23-41 

70-55 
55-09 

66-02 
37 03 

208-60 
2S0-62 


tonnes 
18 99 


iwo 


16-71 


Colombie-Britannique — 

1910.. 


13-06 


1900 


25-74 


Alberta — 

1910 


3-50 


1900 


22-28 


Saskatchewan — 

1910 


114 


1900 .. 


18-92 


Manitoba — 

1910 


4-79 


1900 


16-34 


Ontario — 

1910 


30-33 


1900 


16-92 


Qu6bec — 

1910 


26-54 


1900 


18-48 


Nouveau-Brunswick — 

1910 


17-66 


1900 


13-84 


Nouvelle-Ecosse — 

1910 


13-69 


1900 


11-85 


lie du Prince-Edouard— 

1910 


18-08 


1900 


12-28 







Le tableau 37 donne la valeur totale des recoltcs, pour le Canada et les 
provinces, en 1910 et 1900, ainsi que la valeur moyenne par ferme de ces re- 
coltes. Leur valeur a augmente de §189,500,375 ou 97-23 pour cent dans les 
dix ans. II y a eu d'enormes augmentations dans chaque province au dernier 
recensement compar(^ avec le recensement precedent. La valeur moj'erme 
par ferme, pour tout le Canada, 6tait de S538-0G en 1910, comparativement 
a $357-92 en 1900. La Colombie-Britannique indique une diminution dans 
la vp,leur moyenne des recoltes par ferme, comparee avec 1900. L'augmen- 
tation du nombre de fermes ayant 5 acres et moins, dans les provinces de I'Ouest, 
a eu pour effet de r^duire la valeur moyenne par ferme. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



ivii 



TABLEAU 37. VALEUR TOTALE DES Rl&COLTES DES CHAMPS AINSI QUE LEUR VA- 
LEUR MOYENNE PAR FERME, POUR CHAQUE PROVINCE EN 1910 ET 1900. 



Provinces 



VaLEUR TOTALE DES RE- 
COLTES DES CHAMPS 



VaLEUR MOYENNE DES 

HECOLTES DES CHAMPS 

PAR FERME 



1910 



1900 



1910 



1900 



Canada. 



Colouibie-Britannique . 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick . . . 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

lie du Prince-Edouard . 



S -5 

384,513,795 194,953,420 



7,246.018 
17,015,329 
79,954,903 
45,509,520 
I 140,7>6,055 
65,353,528 
11, 050,337 
11,005,033 

6,613,172 



3,100,577, 

2,618,420 

4,608,172 

16,669,321 

102,138,819 

44,851,108 

7,740,100 

8, .584, 956 

4,641,947| 



53S 06 

392-35 
276-68 
829-65 
997-88 
620-74 
490-37 
288-67 
205 18 
460-23 



$ 

357 93 

460-09 
276-03 
338-54 
512-98 
455-72 
297-82 
205-94 
152-21 
331-23 



Le tableau 38 donne la valeur des recoltes specifiees en 1910 pour le Canada 
et les provinces. Dans le recensement precedent la valeur totale ay ant ete 
donnee en bloc, il n'est pas possible par consequent de determiner quelle frac- 
tion de Taugmentation totale dans la valeur des recoltes, durant la decade, 
est due a un accroissement de superficie cultivee, et quelle fraction a la valeur 
elevee des differents rendements. A cet effct il est bon de se rappeler que 
les moyens de transport determinent jusqu'a un certain point, le plus ou le 
moins de profits que pent faire le cultivateur dans ses operations de Tannee. 
II n'y a pas de donnee sur laquelle on puisse s'appuyer, indiquant au cultivateur 
les pertes provenant pour lui d'avoir a transporter ses produits au march^ 

TABLEAU 38. VALEUR DES RECOLTES DES CHAMPS POUR CHAQUE SORTE DE Rfi- 

COLTE, 1910. 



Recoltes 



Canada 



Colombie- 
Britannique 



Alberta 



Saskatchewan 



Manoitoba 



Ble 

Orge 

Avoine 

Seigle 

Ble d'Inde 4 grain 

Sarrasin 

Pois 

F6ves 

Lin 

Grains melanges 

Porniiies de terre 

Navets 

Betteravcs fourrageres 

Betteraves a sucre 

Autrcs racines 

Foin et treflc 

Luzerne 

Ble d'Inde fourrager 

Autres recoltes fourrageres., 
Graine d'herbe et do trefle 

Tabac 

Houblon 



104 

14 

86 

1 

5 

4 

4 

1 

8 

6 

27 

5 

3 



$ 

816,825 
6.53,697 
7"J6,130 
037,899 
774,039 
053,. 335 
195,500 
274,315 
870,483 
307,984 
,426,765 
.704,691 
,332,094 
957,480" 
693,. 303 
,115, .531 
,173,800 
,775,428 
,7.36,966 
,1.35.. 591 
,422,379 
2.59,560 



$ 

223,724 

42,931 

1,004,796 

6,107 

883 

88 

43,565 

13,340 

120 

10,809 

1,148,613 

117,936 

49,294 

8,658 

94,773 

3,828,020 

1.34,515 

17,662 

274.607 

235 

1 , 082 

224,260 



i 

6,676,318 

1,0/ 5,. 348 

5,748,773 

59,435 

773 

808 

3,749 

222 

162,. 529 

17, 1.55 

1,191,485 

44,800 

3,557 

31,160 

41,905 

1,2.38,982 

81,8.30 

18,019 

615,846 

2,. 580 



50,213,376 

1.299,768 

17,624,162 

6,120 

1,235 

32 

3,322 

108 

8,159,500 

4,747 

1,696,%2 

35,072 

5, 168 

4,877 

17,617 

319,248 

2,096 

0,191 

548,410 

5,928 

314 



28,584,199 

2,924,609 

9, 902.. 553 

20,469 

2,943 

2,313 

6, 112 

1,474 

387,080 

3,847 

1.690,100 

62,844 

15,387 

6,660 

77,743 

1,012,971 

7,4.54 

93,957 

696,450 

9,660 

655 

40 



Iviii 



RE CENSE ME NT DU CANADA 1911 



TABLEAU 38. VALEUR DES R^COLTES DES CHAMPS POUR CHAQUE SORTE DE 

RECOLTE, 1910— Suite. 



Recoltes 


Ontario 


Quebec 


Nouveau- 
Brunswick 


Nouvelle- 
Ecosse 


He du 

Prince- 

Edouard 


Ble 


$ 

17,090,128 

7,414,210 

31,622,936 

806,892 

5,283,028 

1,692,482 

3,655,483 

1,067,684 

135,593 

4,889,031 

8,693,243 

3,318,711 

3,091,967 

868,480 

150,950 

38,607,211 

918,9.59 

7,108,625 

345,897 

2,795,960 

1.197,7.39 

30,846 


S 

1,076,342 

1,673,237 

15,151,059 

133,414 

480.805 

1,598,484 

472,197 

150,318 

24,916 

1,215,689 

7,671,015 

695, 145 

97,959 

23,649 

218,407 

31,512,060 

27,104 

1,494,136 

178,344 

232,951 

1,222,498 

3,799 


$ 

218,009 

41.9o8 

2,331,870 

233 

1,543 

612,496 

7,627 

10,462 

62 

12,481 

2,167,444 

483,274 

10.512 

3.231 

44,099 

5,035,420 

958 

9,275 

26,974 

12,234 

95 


$ 

229,802 

11 3.. 563 

1,466.492 

5,102 

2.266 

l.''0.4Sl 

2,694 

29,632 

74 

48,805 

1,739,376 

552, 610 

45,519 

9,258 

43,710 

6,532,815 

244 

21,021 

36,245 

4,788 

25 

451 


504,927 

68,093 

1,943,489 

67 


Orgc 


Avoine 


Seigle 


Ble d'Inde a grain 


503 


Sarrasin 


og J51 


Pois 


751 
1 075 


Feves 


Lin 


609 


Grains melanges 


105,420 
1 4''8 5''7 


Pommes de terre 


Navets 


394 ''99 


Betteraves fourrageres 

Betteraves A. sucre 


12, 731 
1 507 




4.069 

2,028,804 

40 


Foin et trefie 


Luzerne 




6 54'' 


Autres r6coltes fourrageres 

Tabac 


14,187 

71,2.55 

11 

55 







et plus rapprocli^ par de mauvais chemins. Neanmoins on ne doit pas oublier 
que les developpements apportes dans I'extension des chemins de fer, de 1901 
a 1911, a fait naitre en bien des endroits des marches la ou il n'en existait pas 
il y a dix ans passes, et que consequemment ces conditions meilleures ont eu 
pour effet d'introduire la variete dans la production agricole et de procurer 
ainsi des prix plus eleves pour les produits du sol. 

Le tableau 39 indique la proportion pour cent de la valeur totale des 
recoltes des champs representee par groupes de recoltes en 1910. La valeur 
du ble, de I'avoine et de I'orge, pour tout le Canada, repr6sentait 53-64 pour 
cent de la valeur de toutes les recoltes, les autres grains 8-20 pour cent, for- 
mant un total pour tons les grains, de 61-84 pour cent; les pommes de terre 
representaient 9-91 -pour cent; le foin et les recoltes fourrageres, 26-73 pour 
cent, et les recoltes diverses, 1-52 pour cent. Dans le Manitoba, le bl-e, 
I'avoine et I'orge representaient 90-99 pour cent de toutes les recoltes de la 
province ;dans la Saskatchewan, 86-47 pour cent; dans 1' Alberta 79-34 pour 
cent; dans Ontario, 39-87 pour cent; dans I'lle du Prince-Edouard, 38-05 
pour cent, et moins de 30 pour cent dans Quebec, la Colombie-Britannique, 
la Nouvelle-Ecosse et le Nouveau-Brunswick. Le foin et les recoltes fourra- 
geres reprdsentent plus de la moitie de la valeur totale de touios les recoltes 
dans la Nouvelle-Ecosse, la Colombie-Britannique et Quebec, soit 59-80, 58-71 
et 50-82 pour cent respoctivement. Les pommes de terre et les racines 
offrent la plus petite proportion de valeur dans la Sa.skatchewan et le Manitoba 
et la plus haute dans I'lle du Prince-Edouard et le Nouveau-Brunswick. 
Ontario et Quebec offrent la meilleure distribution de valeur entre les diffe- 
rents groupes. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



lix 



TABLEAU 39. PROPORTIOX POUR CENT DE LA VALEUR TOTALE DE3 RECOLTES DES 
CHAMPS REPRfiSENTfiE PAR GROUPES, 1910. 



Provinces 



Pour-cent de chaqtje groupe par rapport a la valeur 

TOTALE 



Ble, 

avoine et 

orge 



Autres 
grains 



Pommes 

de terre 

et racines 



Foin et 

recoltes 

fourrageres 



Recoltes 
diverses 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick. . . 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

He du Prince-Edouard 



p.c. 

53 64 

17- 55 
79-34 
86-47 
90-99 
39-87 
27-40 
23-50 
16-45 
38-05 



S 20 

1-03 
1-43 

10-22 
•93 

12-45 
6-23 
5-85 
1-89 
2-03 



9 91 

19-59 

7-72 

2-20 

4-07 

11-45 

13-32 

24-55 

21-73 

27-84 



p.c. 

26 73 

58-71 
11-48 
1-10 
3-98 
33-37 
50-82 
45-99 
59-88 
30-99 



p.c. 



1 52 

3-12 
•03 
-01 
-03 

2-86 

2-23 
•11 
•05 

109 



Le prix moyen par boisseau, par tonne ou par livre, selon le cas, est donn^ 
dans le tableau 40 pour les recoltes de I'annee 1910. Le ble en 1910 etait evalu^ 
a au dela d'un dollar par boisseau dans la Colombie-Britannique, dans 
Quebec et dans les Provinces IVIaritimes. Les plus basses etles plus hautes valeurs 
ont ete obtenues dans I'Alberta avec 74 cents par boisseau, et dans Quebec 
avec $1.15 par boisseau. Le prix moyen par boisseau sur la ferme, pour tout 
le Canada, etait de 79 cents. Le prix des grains est generalement plus elev6 
dans la Colombie-Britannique, Quebec et les Provinces Maritimes que dans les 
provinces des prairies. Les pois, les feves, le lin et les pommes de terre se 

TABLEAU 40. VALEUR UNITAIRE DES RECOLTES DES CHAMPS EN 1910. 



Recoltes 





Co- 
















He 








Unit6 


lom- 




Sas- 








Nou- 


Nou- 


du 




de la 


bie- 


Al- 


kat- 


Mani- 


Onta- 


Que- 


veau 


velle- 


Prin- 


Cana- 


me- 


Bri- 


berta 


che- 


toba 


rio 


bec 


Brun- 


Ecos- 


ce-E- 


da 


sure 


tanni- 
que 




wan 








swick 


se 


douard 






$ 


$ 


S 


S 


S 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


3 


boiss. 


1^08 


•74 


•75 


•83 


■86 


1-15 


1-07 


103 


101 


•79 


" 


•83 


•43 


•42 


•45 


•53 


•71 


•74 


•80 




60 




51 


" 


•57 


•34 


•30 


•33 


•35 


•45 


•42 


•49 




37 




35 


" 


108 


•55 


•53 


•70 


•65 


•90 


•70 


•96 




99 




67 


" 


113 


-90 


•61 


•93 


-.38 


•84 


-95 


•84 


1 


12 




40 


" 


1-60 


■83 


110 


•79 


•51 


•68 


-53 


•58 




60 




57 


(< 


•99 


1-30 


127 


1-26 


-84 


114 


1-16 


145 


1 


16 




88 


" 


2-50 


1-93 


183 


1-63 


1-47 


197 


2-32 


251 


2 


30 


1 


54 


" 


240 


2-07 


210 


2-19 


1-64 


1^86 


194 


- 


2 


32 


2 


09 


" 


•80 


•47 


•53 


•44 


•46 


•58 


•61 


•62 




40 




48 


" 


•70 


•51 


•58 


•59 


•50 


•50 


•42 


•49 




34 




49 


I: 


•30 


•.34 


•30 


•26 


•10 


•21 


•20 


•18 




13 




12 


•14 


•23 


•20 


•17 


-11 


•17 


•21 


•20 




14 




11 


II 


•28 


•16 


•29 


•26 


•14 


•21 


•27 


•26 




24 




]5 


tonnes 


•44 


•46 


•54 


•48 


•20 


•25 


•27 


. ^28 




27 




28 


" 


18 .35 


992 


707 


8-11 


8^72 


8^24 


7 53 


902 


7 


93 


8 


60 


" 


13^58 


15-94 


13 55 


12-87 


966 


6-61 


958 


9-38 


10 


00 


10 


19 


" 


646 


7-53 


634 


6-64 


3-09 


3-95 


4-01 


4-03 


3 


71 


3 


24 


« 


13 79 


7-43 


8^69 


8-82 


5-86 


6-16 


7-04 


7-85 


7 


15 


7 


97 


liv. 


•11 


•27 


•19 


•09 


•16 


-12 


- 


•23 




21 




14 




•22 


- 


•18 


•33 


•18 


•22 


-.37 


•41 




28 




21 



Bid 

Orge 

Avoine 

Ble d'Inde k grain.. 

Sarrasin 

Pois 

Feves 

Lin 

Grains melanges 

Pommes de terre... 

Navets 

Betteraves fourrage- 
res 

Betteraves k sucre... 

Autres racines 

Foin et tr&fle 

Luzerne 

Ble d'Inde fourrager. 

Autres recoltes four- 
rageres 

Tal>ac 

Houblon 



Ix 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



maintiennent a un prix r6gulier dans toutes les provinces, excepte Ontario ou 
le prix est de beaucoup moins eleve. Mais en comparant les prix obtenus 
pour chaque produit entre les differentes provinces, on ne doit pas oublier de 
considerer la quantite produite par chacune. La ou les quantites sont petites 
et meme insuffisantes pour les besoins locaux, les produits de la ferme obtiennent 
une valeur plus elevee, le cout de I'article importe ayant ete pris comme base 
d'^valuation. Par exemple, le prix du ble, de I'orge et de I'avoine est plus eleve 
dans Quebec et les Provinces Maritimes que dans Ontario et les provinces du 
Nord-Ouest. Les pois, les feves et les racines sont produits en plus grandes quan- 
tites dans Ontario que partout ailleurs au Canada, et obtiennent aussi un prix 
moins eleve par boisseau. 

Le tableau 41 indique la proportion pour cent de la valeur totale de toutes 
les recoltes appartenant a chaque province en 1900 et 1910, et aussi la valeur 
moyenne par acre de terre produisant ces recoltes. 

Ontario a fourni 36-61 pour cent de la valeur totale des recoltes du Canada 
en 1910, comparativement a 52- 39 pour cent en 1900. Dans les provinces situees 
k I'ouest des Grands Lacs, la proportion de valeur s'est accrue de 13-84 pour 
cent du total en 1900, a 38-95 pour cent en 1910, tandis que la proportion dans 
les Provinces Maritimes est tombee de 10-76 a 7-44 pour cent. La valeur 
moyenne par acre de terre productive etait plus elevee qu'ailleurs dans la Colom- 
bie-Britannique aux recensements de 1900 et 1910. La plus basse valeur 
par acre donnee en 1900 revenait au Manitoba ($6.05), en et 1910 a I'Alberta 
($8 22). 

TABLEAU 41. POUR-CENT DE LA DISTRIBUTION DE LA VALEUR DES RECOLTES 
DES CHAMPS, AINSI QUE LEUR VALEUR MOYENNE PAR ACRE DE TERRE 
CONSACRfi A CES CULTURES, 1910 ET 1900. 



Provinces 


Pour-cent de la distri- 
bution DE LA VALEUR 
DES RECOLTES DES 
CHAMPS PAR PRO\^NCES 


Valeur motenne des 

RECOLTES des CHAMPS 
PAR ACRE DE terre 
CONSACRE a CES CULTU- 
RES 




1910 


1900 


1910 


1900 


Canada 


p. C. 

100 00 

1-S8 

4-43 

20-80 

11-84 

36-61 

17-00 

2-87 

2-86 

1-71 


p. c. 

100 00 

1-59 
1-34 
2-36 
8-55 
52-3!) 
23-01 
3-97 
4-40 
2-39 


$ 

13 58 

33-90 
8-22 
11-64 
9-75 
15- 10 
12-41 
11 50 
15-48 
13 85 


S 

9 86 

18 08 




13-89 




7-05 




6-05 




11-09 




9-53 




8-62 




11-76 




10-36 







Le tableau 42 donne les chiffres proportionnels indiquant I'importance 
relative des principales recoltes en 1910, selon les valeurs qui Icur sont assignees 
par les producteurs eux-memes. Pour tout le Canada la l)le occupc la premiere 
place avec 25-19 pour cent; le foin et autres recoltes fourrageres la soconde, 
et I'avoine la troisieme place. Le ble est aussi au premier rang dans les provinces 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 19 11 



Ixi 



des prairies, doiiuanc plus que 60 pour cent delavaleur totale des recoltes dans 
le ^Manitoba et la Saskatchewan, et pres de 37 pour cent dans 1' Alberta; le foiu 
et autres recoltes fourrageres occupent la premiere place dans la Colombie- 
Britannique et les provinces de Test; Tavoine tient la seconde place dans toutes 
les provinces, excepte la Colombie-Britannique et la Nouvelle-Ecosse oil les 
fruits et les legumes occupent cette place. Les pommes de terre viennent en 
troisieme place dans la Colombie-Britannique, la Saskatchewan, Quebec et les 
Provinces ]Matirimcs. Le ble est au troisieme rang dans Ontario, Forge au memo 
rang dans le Manitoba et de meme pour le foin et autres recoltes fourrageres 
dans I'Alberta. Le tableau indiquc aussi une certaine cohesion entre les 
groupes des recoltes bien definis dans les differentes provinces. Par exemple, 

TABLEAU «. PRINCIPALES RECOLTES CLASSIFIEES SELON LA VALEUR DE 
LEUR PRODUCTION, PAR PROVINCES 1910. 



Provinces 



Recoltes rangees com- 

ME premieres en VA- 
LEUR ET POUR-CEXT 

qc'elles forment de 
la valeur totale 



Espec^s 



Pour- 
cent de 
la va- 
leur de 
toutes 

les 
recoltes 

des 
champs 



Recoltes rangees com- Recoltes rangees com- 
me secondes en va- me troisiemes en va- 
leur et pour-centj leur et pour-cent 

QU'eLLES FORMENT DE QU'eLLES FORMENT FE 
LA VALEUR TOTALE LA VALEUR TOTALE 



Especes 



Pour- 
cent de 
la va- 
leur de 
toutes 

les 
recoltes 

des 
champs 



Especes 



Pour- 
cent do 
la va- 
leur de 
toutes 

les 
recoltes 

des 
champs 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique. 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick. . . 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

lie du Prince-Edouard 



BI€ 

Foin et recoltes 
fourrageres. 

B16 

Ble 

Ble 

Foin et recoltes 

fourrageres. 
Foin et recoltes 

fourrageres. 

Foin et recoltes 
fourrageres. 

Foin et recoltes 
fourrageres. 

Foin et recoltes 
fourrageres. 



p. c. 
25 19 



Foin et recoltes 
fourrageres... 



44 -.30 Fruits et legu- 
mes. 



36-78 
61-98 



60-87 
30-38 



45-73 



41-46 



46-97 



29-96 



Avoine. 
Avoine. 



p. c. 

24 71 

24-56 

31-67 
21-75 



Avoine . 



20 83 



Pommes dotcrre' 11-96 



Avoine. 
Avoine. 



Avoine. 



Avoine. 



Fruits et legu- 
mes. 



Avoine. 



21-09 
20-45 

20-86 
19 06 
21-57 
28-41 



Foin et recoltes 
fourrageres. 

Pommes de ter- 
re. 

Orge 



20 -45 Ble 

Pommes de ter-' 
re. I 

Pommes de ter-' 
re. 

Pommes de ter-! 
re. 

Pommes de ter-i 



09 



56 



40 



du montant total rapporte par la terre au cultivateur, les trois principales recoltes 
representaicnt 88 • 19 pour cent dans le INIanitoba, 85 • 82 pour cent dans la Saskat- 
chewan, 80-94 pour cent dans la Nouvelle-Ecosse, 80-82 ])our cent dans la 
Colombie-Britannique, 79-25 pour cent dans Tile du Prince Edouard, 79-24 
pour cent dans le Nouveau-Brunswick, 79-22 pour cent dans I'Alberta, 77-15 
pour cent dans Quebec et 62-88 pour cent dans Ontario; pour tout le Canada, 
la valeur du ble, des recoltes fourrageres (y compris Ic foin) ct de ravoino 



Ixii 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



constitue 70 • 76 pour cent de la valeur monetaire totale representee par la recolte 
de I'ann^e 1910. Le ble et I'avoine constituent 83-73 pour cent de la valeur 
totale de toutes les recoltes dans la Saskatchewan, et 81-97 pour cent dans 
le Manitoba. Plus la protection attribuee aux trois principales recoltes d'une 
province est elevee, plus la proportion des autres recoltes se trouvent reduite. 

Le tableau 43 indique la quantite et la valeur des recoltes exportees, 
pour les annees se terminant le 30 juin 1891, 1901 et 1911. 

Pour I'annee expiree le 30 juin 1891, le Canada a exporte 10,760,110 boisseaux 
de cereales et de lin evalues a $7,435,285; en 1901 les exportations se montaient 
a 25,579,071 boisseaux evalues a $14,235,132, et en 1911 les exportations de 
cereales et de lin avaient atteint 58,919,147 boisseaux d'une valeur de $56,542,862. 
En 1891 I'orge, les pois et le ble etaient au premier rang quant aux quantites 
exportees. En 1901 les trois premieres positions etaient prises par le ble, les 
pois et I'avoine, tandis qu'en 1911 le ble, I'avoine et le lin Etaient en tete dans 
I'ordre nomme. Les exportations du ble qui s'elevaient a 2,108,216 boisseaux 
en 1891 6taient de 9,739,758 boisseaux en 1901 et de 48,523,222 boisseaux en 
1911. Les exportations de I'avoine ont decru de 2,210,633 boisseaux entre 

TABLEAU 43. QUANTITY ET VALEUR DES RECOLTES DES CHAMPS EXPORTEES 
EN 1891, 1901 ET 1911 POUR LES ANNIES DE RECENSEMENT DE 1890, 1900 ET 1910/ 



Especes 



Annee fiscale terminee 
le 30 juin 1891 



Annee fiscale terminee 
le 30 juin 1900 



Annee fiscale terminee 
le 30 juin 1911 



Recoltes des champs- 

Orge 

Feves 

Sarrasin 

Avoine 

Pois 

Seigle 

Ble 

Grains, autres.. . . 

Graine de lin 

Pommes de terre 

Navets 

Legumes, autres.. 

Foin 

Totaux 



boiss. 

4,892,-327 
323,729 

260,569 

2,754,285 

339,964 

2,108,216 

80,928 

92 

3,668,725 



tonnes 
65,082 



2,929,873 
495,768 

129,917 

2,032,601 

226,470 

1,583,084 

37,222 

350 

1,693,671 

102,754 

559,489 



boiss. 

2,386,371 
310,416 
429,334 

8,155,063 

3,864,927 
687,059 

9,739,758 

5,190 

953 

887,409 

916,290 

tonnes 
252,977 



9,791,199 



1,123,055 

418,161 

227,717 

2,490,521 

2,674,712 

424,877 

6,871,939 

2,657 

1,493 

364,387 

96,462 

97,37^ 

2,097,882 



boiss. 

1,276,775 

27,591 

406,021 

5,944,430 

460,580 

82,301 

48,523,222 

22, 044 

2,197,072 

690,212 

1,503,120 

tonnes 
453,625 



16,891,237 



676, 727 

48,608 

207,118 

2,420,339 

670,868 

52,011 

47,293.027 

15,554 

5,158,610 

408,405 

212,543 

271.990 

3,576,250 



61,092,059 



1901 et 1911. La quantite de lin export^e dans les annees d^cennales 1891 
et 1901 fut si petite qu'elle ne m^rite aucune attention, mais en 1911 elle vient 
en troisieme avec une exportation de 2,197,072 boisseaux d'une valeur de 
$5,158,610. La valeur du foin exporte en 1901 ctait de $2,097,882, compar^e 
a $3,576,250* en 1911, soit un gain de $1,478,368 ou 70-4 pour cent. Le Canada 
en 1901 a exporte 887,409 boisseaux de pommes de terre d'une valeur totale 
de $364,387 et d'un valeur moyenne de 41 cents par boisseau, comparatrv^e- 
ment a une exportation totale de 690,212 boisseaux d'une valeur totale de 
$468,405 et d'une valeur moyenne de 67 cents i)ar boisseau en 1911. 

En plus des quantites de recoltes exportees k I'ctat naturel en 1911, le 
Canada a exports de la farine de ble pour une valeur de $13,854,790, de la 
farine d'avoine, du son et d'autres grains moulus pour une valeur de $4,212,573, 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Ixiii 



cuntre une valeur de §4,015,226 pour la farine de bl4 et de $742,821 pour la farine 
d'avoine, le son et autres grains nioulus en 1901. La valeur des exportations 
pour les produits du grain est donnee dans le tableau qui suit, pour les annees 
se terminant le 30 juin 1891, 1901 et 1911; 



Especes 



Valeur des exportatioxs des prodcits du grain pour les annees 

SE TEKMIXAXT le 30 JUIN 





1891 


1901 


1911 


Farine de ble 


S 

1,388,578 

45,195 

162,324 

13,943 


4,015,226 

407,807 

212,245 

32,709 


13,854,790 
518,032 


Son 

Autres 


1,850,219 
1,844,322 


Exportations totales 


1,610,040 


4,758,047 


18,087,363 



La valeur totale des exportations de tous les produits des champs, bruts et 
manufactures, a augmente de $21,649,284 en 1901 a $79,139,413 en 1911. 

LOYER ET GAGES. 

Loyer. Le tableau 44 donne le nombre de fermes en location ou a 
loyer, ainsi que la superficie des fermes louees, la valeur totale du loyer 
et la valeur moyenne du ioye^" par acre. Les faits se rapportant au recensement 
des terres en location ou a loyer ont ete fournis par les locataires eux-memes. 
II y avait 57,129 fermes louees dans tout le Canada en 1911, comparativement a 
47,744 en 1901, dont la superficie a augmente de 5,899,897 acres en 1901 a 11,082-, 
921 acres en 1911. Le loyer paye en 1901 etait de $7,355,363, soit au taux de 
SI. 25 par acre, comparativement a $1.22 par acre et a un total de $lJi,595,351 
en 1911. Les fortes augmentations dans la superficie des terres louees dans le 
Manitoba, la Saskatchewan et I'Alberta, a un taux minime par acre, a eu pour 
effet de reduire la moyenne g^nerale du loyer par acre pour tout le Canada 
au dernier ''recensement. En 1911 le loyer le plus elcve par acre a ete obtenu 
dans Quebec avec $2.11 et en 1901 dans Ontario avec $1.64. Dans la Nouvelle- 
Ecosse le taux par acre a augments de 75 cents a $1.54; dans le Nouveau-Bruns- 
wick, de 50 cents a $1.09; dans Quebec, de $1.05 a $2.11, et dans Ontario, de 
$1.64 a $1.92 par acre. Dans les provinces des prairies en 1910 la valeur des 
loyers par acre de terre k culture, variait de 57 cents en Alberta a 97 cents au 
Mtmitoba; en 1900 la valeur variait de 15 cents par acre en Alberta a 74 cents 
en Saskatchewan. 

Une enquete recemment institute par le Bureau du recensement et des 
statitsique^> touchant la question du cout de la producton du grain au Canada 
en 1911, a estime le profit pa^* acre de terre sous chaque recolte comnie etant: — ■ 
Manitoba, \)\6 de printemps $5.20, avoine $4.78, orge $5.98; Saskatchewan, 
ble de i)rintemps $1.42, avoine $1.23, orge $3.08; Alberta, ble de printemps, 
$1.47, avoine $2.58, orge $3.76. Le tableau 41 page Ix indique aussi que la 
valeur totale du rendement par acre de terre sous recolte, en 1910, 6tait de 
S9.75 pour le Manitoba, de $11.64 pour la Saskatchewan et de $8.22 pour 
I'Alberta. 



Ixiv RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

TABLEAU 44. LOYER DE LA TERRE CONSACRfiE A L'AGRICULTURE, 1911 ET 1901. 



Pre 



TeRRE ex location OU a LOYER 



Feriiies 
louees 



Acres 

en fernics 

louees 



Valeur du 
loyer 



Loyer 
par acre 



Canada— 

1911 

1991 

Colonibie-Biitannique — 

1911 

1901 

Alberta — 

1911 

1901 

Saskatchewan — 

1911 

1901 

Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

Ontario — 

1911 

1901 

Quebec — 

1911 

1901 

Nouveau-Brunswick — 

1911 

1901 

Nouvelle-Ecosse — 

1911 

1901 

lie du Prince-Edouard — 

1911 

1901 



57,129 
47,744 

2,077 
1,031 

2,341 
211 

3,517 
215 

4,675 
1,627 

31,201 
32,360 

9,287 
9,284 

1 , 508 
1,255 

2,106 
1,370 

417 
391 



11,083, 
5,899, 

468, 
209, 

2,044, 
293, 

2,541, 
152, 

1,893, 
769, 

2,979, 
3,175, 

776, 
986, 

169, 
173, 

166, 
106, 

42. 
33, 



9211 

8971 



484 
178, 



13,595,351 
7,355,323 

617,265! 
215,007 

1,175,907 

43,8021 

i 

2,126,600i 

113,0901 

1,839,414 
516,383 

5,709,505 
5,228,042 

1,641,064 
1,039,212 

184,222 
87,799 

258, 134 
79,539 

43,240 
32,449 



54 



Travail et gages. Les statistiques du travail et des gages sur la fcrmo, 
donnees au tableau 45, indiquent, pour les annees de recensement 1901 efc 1911, 
le nombre de semaines de travail a gages sur la ferme, le montant total des 
gages payes, la moyenne des gages par semaine, par ferme et par 100 acres de 
tcrre amclioree. Le tableau indique aussi la proportion des gages par rapport 
a la valour totalc de la propriete agricole, et la proportion par rapport a la valeur 
des produits de la ferme. 

II y a eu des augmentations pour toutes les provinces de Touest dans le 
montant total des gages payds, tandis que les provinces de Test indiquent des 
diminutions. La moyenne des gages sur la ferme par semaine, y compris la 
pension, etait dc $8.33 pour tout le Canada en 1911, contre $5.42 en 1901, soit 
une augmentation de 53-69 pour cent. Les gages les plus 61cves en 1911 ont 
ete pay6s dans la Colombie-Britannique, avec une moyenne de $12.35 par semaine 
pour le temps donne; dans I'Alberta la moyenne etait de S10.79 ])ar semaine;, 
dans la Saskatchewan de $10.47 par semaine; dans le Manitoba, de $9.01 par 
semaine. Dans Test du Canada, les gages les plus elev^s ont ete pay^s au 
Nouveau-Brunswick, et les moins Aleves dans I'llc du Prince-Edouard. Pour 
tout le Canada la moyenne des gages par forme etait do $48.62 par mois en 1911, 
contre $44.48 en 1901. Calcul6 sur la superficie des torres ameliorees, le cout 
du travail etait moindro do 6-96 i)onr cout i)ar 100 acres on 1911 qu'on 1901. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Ixv 



La proportion de la valeur des gages par rapport a la valeur de toute la propriete 
agricole et a la valeur des produits de la ferme, a dirainue dans toutes les provinces 
de 1901 a 1911. En 1911 les gages etaient 1-82 pour cent de la valeur totale 
de la propriete, comparativement a 1-35 pour cent en 1901. Les rapports du 
recensement indiqucnt qu'il fallait 4-81 pour cent de la production totale 
pour paj^er le coiit des gages en 1911, comparativement a 6-67 pour cent en 
1901. Chaque province indique une reduction dans la proportion des gages 
relativement a la valeur de la production. Ce resultat est dii sans doute a 
I'introduction generale du travail mecanique qui permet d'augmentcr les opera- 
tions agricoles sans augmentations correspondantes dans le nombfe d'aides a 
gages. 

TABLEAU 45. TRAVAIL ET GAGES PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



Seniaines 

de la main- 

d'oeuvre 

employee 



Gages 
payes 



MOYENXE DES GAGES PAYES 



Par 

semaine 



Par 

ferme' 



Par 100 

acres de 

terre amc- 

lioree 



Pour-cent fobme 
de la valeur des 
travaux par rap- 
port a la valeur 

TOTALE DES FER- 
MES 



Pro- 
priete 



Pro- 
duit 



Canada— 

1911 

19«1 

Augmentation 

Colombie-Britannique — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation. . 
Alberta — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation. . 
Saskatchewan— 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation. . 
Manitoba — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation. . 
Ontario — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation. . 
Qurbec — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentaticwi. . 
Nouveau-Brunswick — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation , . 
Nouvelle-Ecosse — 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation. . 
He du Prince-Edouard. . 

1911 

1901 

Augmentation. . 



4,171,226 
4,473,769 
-302,543 

174,580 

135,597, 

38.983! 

207,980 
86,705 
121,275 

564,417 
143,701 
420,716 

600,891 
419,248 
181,643 

1,688,017 
2, 35'}, 6.32 
-671,615 

681,0.38 

894,. 534 

-213,496 

102,694 

158,348 

-55,654 

107, 152 

182,209 
-75,057 

44,457 

93,795 

-49,338 



34,745,813 
24,3rS,»lS 
10,517,2«8 

2,155,902 

1,223,230 

932,672 

2,245,0.39 

695,545 

1,549,494 

5,909,663 

880,319 

5,029,344 

5,411,916 
2,615,111 
2,796,805 

12,056,765 

12,152,915 

-96, 150 

5,075,018 

4,512,674 

562,344 

818,254 
842,253 
-23,999 

815,246 

960,227 

-144,981 

2.58,010 
346,241 
-88,231 



8,33 
5,42 
2,91 

12-35 
902 
3-33 

10-79 
8-02 
2-77 

10-47 
6-13 
4,34 

901 
6-24 

2-77 

7-14 
515 
1-99 

7-45 
504 
2-41 



5-80 
3-69 
2-11 



48 

41 

4 

116 

181 

-64 

36 

73 

-36 

61 
64 
-3 

118 
SO 
38 

53 
54 
-1 

31 

29 

1 

21 
22 



15 

17 

-1 

17 
24 
-6 



p.c. 



73 35 

80 31 
-6,96 

451-41 
258-24 
193-17 

51-58 

146-52 

-94-94 

49-78 

78-41 

-28-63 

80-22 
65-45 
14-77 

88-31 
91-61 
-3-30 

62-18 

60-66 

1-52 

56-64 
59-74 
-3-10 

64-75 

76-36 

-11-61 

33-55 

47-67 

-1412 



p.c. 



4 81 
-6,67 
-1,86 



12 

18 

-5 

4 
11 

-7 



11 
-6 

7 

10 

— 2 

4 

6 

_2 

3 

5 

-1 

4 

6 

_9 



4 

_9 



NoTA — ' La moycnne des gages par ferme est tiree du total des formes et non du uombro dc fermea 
employant la main-d'oeuvre. 

NoTA — ^ Le signe (— ) indique unc diminution. 



Ixvi 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



ANIMAUX DE LA FERME. 

En comparant le nombre et la valeur des animaux de la ferme tels que 
rapportes dans les recensements de 1911 et 1901, il est absolument necessaire 
de considerer que le recensement de 1911 a ete pris comme se rapportant a la 
date du premier juin, tand.s que le recensement de 1901 s'est fait comme a 
la date du 31 mars. Si le recensement de 1911 avait ete pris comme se rappor- 
tant au 31 mars, le nombre d'animaux de toutes sortes, mais particulidrement 
le b^tail, les moutons et les pores eut ete considerablement plus bas dans les totaux 
comme dans les moyennes par ferme, pour la bonne raison qu'un tres grand 
nombre d'animaux naissent sur chaque ferme entre le premier avril et le premier 
juin. Comme la valeur des jeunes animaux ajoutes du ler avril au ler juin, 
serait relativement basse, I'augmentation totale dans la valeur ne serait pas 
affect^e au meme point que ne le serait le nombre de chaque sorte. En d'autres 
termes la valeur moyenne par tete aurait ete plus basse pour les chiffres bases 
sur le recensement pris le ler juin que sur les chiffres se rapportant au ler avril. 
Un sommaire du nombre et de la valeur du betail au Canada est donne au tableau 
46. 

TABLEAU 46. SOMMAIRE DU NOMBRE ET DE LA VALEUR DU BETAIL AU CANADA. 

1911 ET 1901. 



Liste 


Chevaux 


Vaches 
laitieres 


Autre.s betes 
h comes 


Moutons 


Pores 


Volaiiles 


Nombre — 

1911.. NO. 

1901 NO. 

Augmentation totale no. 
Pour cent p.c. 

Valeur — 

1911 S 

1901. . $ 


2.598.958 

1,577,493 

1,021,465 

64-75 

381.915.505 

118.279.419 

263,636,086 

222-89 

146-95 
74-98 
71-97 
95-98 


2,595,255 

2.408,677 

186,578 

7-75 

109,575,526 

69,237,970 

40,337,556 

58-23 

42-22 
28-75 
13-47 
46-85 


3.930.828 

3.167,774 

763,054 

24 09 

86,278,490 

54.197.341 

32,081,149 

59 19 

21-95 
17-11 

4-84 
28-29 


2.174.300 

2.510.239 

335.939 

13-38 

10.701.691 

10,490,594 

211,097 

201 

4-92 

4- 18 

-74 

17-70 


3,634,778 

2,353,828 

1,280,950 

54-42 

26,986,621 

16,445.702 

10,540,919 

64-49 

7-42 

6-99 

•43 

6-15 


31.793,261 

17,922,658 

13,870,603 

77-39 

14.653,773 
5,723,890 


Augmentation totale $ 
Pour cent p.c. 

Valeur moyenne par tete — 

1911 $ 

1901 $ 

Augmentation totale $ 
Pour cent p.c. 


8,920,883 
156- 01 

•46 

•32 

•14 

43-75 



Le tableau precedent, malgre I'addition des jeunes animaux 'd'un valeur 
relativement basse par ttte, indique pour tout le Canada, que la valeur moyenne 
des chevaux par tete, de 1901 a 1911, a augmente de 95-98 pour cent; des 
vaches-laitieres, de 46-85 pour cent; des autres betes a comes, de 28-29 pour 
cent; des moutons, de 17-70 pour cent; des pores, de 6-15 pour cent, et des 
volaiiles, de 43-75 pour cent. La valour totale des animaux de la forme, des 
volaiiles et des abeilles, en 1911. etait de $631,103,420, comi):irativoment h 
$275,167,627 en 1901, soit une augmentation de 129-35 pour cent dans la 
decade. De la valour totale de tous les animaux de la ferme on 1911, les 
chevaux comptaient 60-51 pour cent, le betail 31-03 pour cent, les moutons 
1-69 pour cent, les pores 4-28 pour cent et les volaiiles 2-32 pour cent; en 1901 
la proportion des chevaux etait de 42 - 98 pour cent, du b6tail 44 • 75 pour cent, des 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Lwii 



moutons 3-81 pour ceiit, des pores 5-97 pour cent et des volailles 2-08 pour cent. 
Dans les deux recensements la proportion de la valeur des abeilles par rapport 
a la valeur totale etait moins de la moitie de un pour cent. 

Chevaux 

En 1901 le nombre de chevaux pour tout le Canada, etait de 1,577,493, 
contre 2,598,958 en 1911, soit un gain de 1,021,465 ou 64-75 pour cent dans 
la decade. Chaque province, excepte la Nouvelle-Ecosse qui indique une 
diminution de 1,088, a contribue a cette augmentation. En 1911 du nombre 
total de chevaux au Canada, 48- 19 pour cent etaient a I'ouest des Grands Lacs, 
31-25 pour cent dans Ontario, 14-30 pour cent dans Quebec et 6-25 pour 
cent dans les Provinces Maritimes. Pour les proportions de chaque province 
par rapport au total, voir le tableau 48. On remarquera que sur raugmenta- 
tion de 1,021,465 dans le nombre de chevaux durant la decade, les provinces 
du Manitoba, de la Saskatchewan et de I'Alberta ont fourni 854,666 ou 83-67 
pour cent; dans la Saskatchewan ils ont agumente de 423,667 ou 505-56 pour 
cent; dans I'Alberta de 314,492 ou 339-40 pour cent; dans le Manitoba de 
116,507 ou 71-10 pour cent. Comme on I'a deja dit, vu le changement de date 
dans la prise du recensement, les chiffres pour 1911, compares a ceux de 1901, 
ont I'avantage du nombre d'animaux qui sont nes entre le ler avril et le ler 
juin. Le nombre de chevaux par provinces est donne dans le tableau suivant. 

TABLEAU 47. NOMBRE DE CHEVAUX DE TOUT AGE PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



Chevaux, tous ages 



1911 



1901 



augmextation ( + ) ou 
Diminution ( — ) 



numerique 



proportion- 
nelle 



Canada 



Colombie-Britannique. 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Qu6bec 

Nouveau-Brunswick. . . 

Nouvellc-Ecosso 

lie du Prince-Edouard . 



2,598,958 

57,414 

407,153 

507,468 

280,374 

812,214 

371,571 

65,409 

61,420 

.35,935 



1,577,493 



+ 1, on, 465 



37, 

92, 

83, 

163, 

721, 

320, 

61, 

62, 

33, 



325 
661 
801 
867 
138 
673 
789 
508 
731 



20,089 

314,402 

423,667 

116,507 

91,076 

50,898 

3,620 

1,088 

2,204 



p.c. 

+ 64 75 

+ 53-82 
+339-40 
+505-56 
+ 71-10 
+ 12-63 
+ 15-87 
+ 5-86 
- 1-74 
+ 6-53 



Le tableau 48 donne le pour-cent que forme le nombre de chevaux dans cha- 
que province, par rapport au total du nombre de chevaux dans tout le Canada, 
k la date du 31 mars 1901 et du ler juin 1911, ainsi que le nombre moj^en 
des chevaux par 100 acres de terre amelioree. La diminution dans le nombre 
moyen de chevaux par 100 acres de terre amelioree dans I'Alberta ct la Sas- 
katchewan, n'est pas due k une diminution dans le nombre r6el des animaux 
(puisque les chevaux ont augmente de plus de 300 pour cent de 1901 a 1911 
dans chacune de ces provinces) mais (1) k la disparition du ranch, (2) au fait 
que I'augmentation annuelle dans les terres sous culture a eu lieu sans une 
augmentation correspondante du nombre de chevaux pour les cultiver et (3) 
^ I'emploi des machines 5, traction pour les oxjilnifations d'unc vaste etendue. 



Ixviii 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



TABLEAU 48. POUR-CENT DE LA DISTRIBUTION DES CHEVAUX PAR PROVINCES ET 
NOMBRE MOYEN PAR 100 ACRES DE TERRE AMELIOREE, 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



Pour-cent du total des chevaux 
dans chaque province 



1911 



1901 



Augmentation 
(-f) Diminu- 
tion ( — ) 



NoMBRE DES CHEVATJX PAR 100 ACRE S DE 
TERRE AMELIOREE 



1911 



1901 



Augmentation 
(-|-) Diminu- 
tion (— ) 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Qu6bec 

Nouveau-Brunswick.. . 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

He du Prince-Edouard 



p.c. 

100 00 

2-21 

15-67 

19-52 

10-79 

31-25 

14-30 

2-52 

2-36 

1-38 



p.c. 

100 00 

2-37 

5-87 

5-31 

10-39 

45-71 

20-33 

3-92 

3-96 

2- 14 



- -16 
+ 9-80 
+ 14-21 
+ -40 
-14-46 

- 6 03 

- 1-40 

- 1-60 

- -76 



5 33 

12-02 
9-36 
4-27 



5 23 



7-88 
19-52 



+ 10 



+ 


4 


•14 




10 


•16 


— 


3 


-19 


+ 




•06 


+ 




•51 


+ 




•24 


+ 




•15 


+ 




•09 
•03 



La valeur totale de tous les chevaux . ^tait de $381,915,505 en 1911, 
comparativement a $118,279,419 en 1901, soit un gain de $263, 636^086 ou 
222-89 pour cent. Bien que la Nouvelle-Ecosse en 1911 ait au dela de 1,000 
chevaux en moins qu'en 1901, elle indique cependant une augmentation de 
$3,256,564 ou 84-49 pour cent dans la valeur. Dans Ontario et Quebec la 
valeur des chevaux a plus que double en dix ans. Le tableau 49 donne, pour 
tout le Canada et par provinces, la valeur des chevaux en 1911 et 1901 et I'aug- 
mentation faite dans la decade. 

TABLEAU 49. VALEUR DES CHEVAUX PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



Valeur totale des chevaux 



1911 



1901 



Augmentation (-}-) 
Diminution (— ) 



numerique 



proper tion- 
nelle 



Canada 

Colombie-Britanni(}ue 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario , 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nouvelle-Rcosse 

He du Prince-Edouard. . . . 



381,915,505 

7,833,769 

56,439,741 

88.759,211 

47,189,063 

113,540,859 

48,713,535 

8,087,425 

7,110,946 

4,240,956 



118,279,419 



094,528 
609.332 
406,665 
763,463 
926,679 
164,149 
312,286 
854,382 
147,935 



-1-263,636,086 

-f 5,739,241 
+ 51,8.30,409 
+ 82,352.5-16 
+ 31,425,600 
-f 5.S,614,180 
-t- 24,549.386 
+ 3,775.1.39 
+ 3,256.564 
-f- 2.093,021 



p.c. 

+ 222-89 

-t- 27401 
-fl, 124-47 
+ 1,285-42 



199-36 
106-71 
101-59 
87-54 
84,49 
97-44 



Le tableau 50 donne la valeur moyenne par tete des chevaux de tout 
age, ainsi que le nombre moycn par ferme en 1911 et 1901. Malgr6 
qu'un plus grand nombre de poulains aient ete comptcs en 1911 qu'en 1901, 
la valeur des chevaux par tete, indique des augmentations proportionnelles 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Lxix 



variant de 74 pour cent dans Quebec a 178-69 pour cent dans 1' Alberta, ou 
une moyenne d' augmentation pour tout le Canada de 95-98 pour cent. La 
valeur moyenne des chevaux par tete, pour tout le Canada, en 1911, ^tait de 
$146-95, contre S74-98 en 1901, soit une augmentation de S71-97 par cheval. 
Dans la Colombie-Britannique, I'Alberta et la Saskatchewan la valeur moj-emie 
a plus cjue double durant la decade. En 1901 la plus haute valeur moyenne 
(S96-20) rcvenait au jManitoba, et la plus basse (S49-74) a I'Alberta. En 
1911 la plus haute valeur moyenne ($174-91) a ete fournie par la Saskatchewan 
et la plus basse ($115-78) par la Nouvelle-Ecosse. 

Le nombre moyen de chevaux par ferme a augmente de 2-9 en 1901 a 
3-6 en 1911. En d'autres termes, au dernier recensement chaque cent fermes 
possedaient 360 chevaux, contre 290 au recensement precedent. La Colombie- 
Britannique, I'Alberta et la Saskatchewan indiquent des diminutions dans 
le nombre de chevaux par ferme durant la decade. La Nouvelle-Ecosse est 
la seule province dans laquelle le nombre moyen par ferme demeure le meme 
pour les deux recensements. 

TABLEAU 50. VALEUR MOYENNE PAR TETE AINSI QUE LE NOMBRE MOYEN DE 
CHEVAUX PAR FERME PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



Valeur des chevaux par tete 



1911 



1901 



Augmentation (+) 
ou Diminution ( — ) 



nume- 
rique 



pro- 
por- 
tion- 
nelle 



Nombre des chevaux par ferme 



1911 



1901 



Augmenta- 
tion (+) ou 

Diminution 
(-) 



Canada 

Colombie-B ri tannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick. . 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

He du Prince-Edouard 



146 95 

136-44 
138-62 
174-91 
168-31 
139-79 
13110 
123-04 
115-78 
118-02 



74 98 

56-12 
49-74 
76-45 
96-20 
76- 17 
75-35 
69-79 
61-66 
63-68 



$ 

+1191 

-F80-32 
-1-88-88 
+98-46 
4-72-11 
-1-63-62 
-f-55-75 
-1-53-85 
-f54-12 
+54-34 



p.c. 

+ 95-98 

+ 143-12 

+ 178-69 

+ 126-79 

+ 74-95 

+ 83-52 

+ 7400 

+ 77-16 

+ 87-77 

+ 85-35 



NO. 

3 6 

3-1 
6-6 
5-2 
6-1 
3-5 
2-3 
1-7 
1-1 
2-5 



NO. 

2 9 

5-5 



2-4 



+ 0-7 

- 2-4 

- 3-2 

- 1-0 
+ M 
+ 0-3 
+ 0-2 
+ 0-1 

0-0 
+ 0-4 



Betail. 

Les statistiques concernant le betail sur la ferme sont presentees sous 
deux en-tetes principaux (1) vaches laitieres et (2) autres betes a cornes, cc 
dernier comprenant les taureaux, les boeufs et le jeune betail en general. Le 
nombre total de betail etait de 6,526,083 en 1911, de 5,576,451 en 1901 ct do 
4,120,580 on 1891. 

Vaches laitieres. Dans le recensement de 1891 les vaches laitieres 

formaicnt 45-06 pour cent du chiffre total do tout le betail, comparativement 

a 43-19 pour cor.t on 1901 et a 39-76 pour cent en 1911. Dans Ontario les 

vaches laitieres formaient 45-15 pour, cent de tout le Ix'tail en 1891, 42-84 

15606— L ~~^ 



Ixx 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



pour cent en 1901 et 41-29 pour cent en 1911. Dans Quebec pour les recen- 
sements de 1891, 1901 et 1911, les vaches laitieres representaient plus que la 
moitie de tout le betail, soit 56-69 pour cent, 56-22 pour cent et 51-89 pour 
cent respectivement. Dans les provinces maritimes le decroissement dans la 
proportion des vaches laitieres a ete plus faible que partout ailleurs au Canada, 
soit moins de un pour cent dans chaque decade; en 1891 elles representaient 
47 '37 pour cent de tout le betail, 46-68 pour cent en 1901 et 46-52 pour cent 
en 1911. Dans les provinces de I'ouest oh. la proportion est allee en augmentant, 
les vaches laitieres comptaient 23-37 pour cent de tout le betail en 1891, 25-19 
pour cent en 1901 et 26-59 pour cent en 1911. Le nombre de vaches laitieres 
dans tout le Canada, par provinces, en 1901, est donne dans le tableau 51, ainsi 
que les augmentations et diminutions de chaque decade. D'autres statistiques 
concernant les vaches laitieres se trouvent dans les tableaux 52, 53 et 54. 

TABLEAU 51. NOMBRE DE VACHES LAITIERES PAR PROVINCES. 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



Vaches laitieres 



Augmentation (+) otr 

DIinNUTION ( — ) 



1911 



1901 



num6- 
rique 



propor- 
tion- 
nelle 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

He du Prince-Edouard 



2,595,255 

3.3,954 
147,049 
181,1681 
155,328: 
1,032,996 
754,220 
108,557 
129,274 

52,109 



2,408,677 

24,535 

46,101 

56, 634 

141,481 

1,065,763 

767,825 

111,084 

138,817 

56,437 



+186,578 

+ 9,419 
+101,548 
+124,534 
+ 13,847 

- 32,767 

- 13,605 

- 2,527 

- 9,543 

- 4,328 



+ 7-75 

+38 39 
+220-27 
+219-89 
9-78 
3-07 
1-77 
2-27 
6-87 
7-66 



+ 



On voit par le tableau precedent qu'il y a eu un gain de 249,348 dans le 
nombre de vaches laitieres entre 1901 et 1911 dans les provinces de I'ouest, 
et une diminution de 62,770 dans Ontario, Quebec et les provinces maritimes, 
avec une agumcntation nette, pour tout le Canada, de 186,578 ou 7-75 pour 
cent. La plus haute augmentation numerique dans la decade revient a la 
Saskatchewan avec 124,534, suivie de 1' Alberta avec 101,548; pour chacune 
de ces deux provinces la proportion d'augmentation en 1911 sur 1901 etait 
de 220 pour cent. Le nombre de vaches laitieres dans Ontario a diminue de 
32,767 ou 3-07 pour cent durant la decade, et cette diminution a constitu6 
plus de 52 pour cent du decroissement total dans les provinces de Test; dans 
Qu6bec le nombre a decru de 13,605 ou 1-77 pour cent; dans le Nouveau-Bruns- 
wick, de 2,527 ou 2-27 pour cent; dans la Nouvellc-Ecosse, de 9,543 ou 6-87 
pour cent, et dans I'llc du Prince-Edouard, de 4,328 ou 7-66 pour cent durant la 
decade. 

La valeur des vaches laitieres est dounee, pour tout le Canada et pour 
chaque province, dans le tableau 52. En 1911 la valeur etait de §100,575,526, 
comparativement k $69,237,970 e-n 1901, soit une augmentation de $40,337,556 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



kxi 



ou 58-26 pour cent. Malgr4 le decroissement de 63,170 dans le nombre de 
vaches laitieres dans Ontario, Quebec et les provinces maritimes, dura.nt la 
decade, la valeur totale indique une a^ugmentation de S27,275,759. Les gains 
numeriques dans les provinces de I'ouest ont contribue a 1' augmentation dans 
la valeur indiquee pour 1911 et 1901. 

TABLEAU 52. VALEUR DES VACHES LAITlJiRES PAR PROVINCES. 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



1911 



1901 



Augmentation (+) ou 

DIMINUTION ( — ) 



nurri3- 
rique 



proportion- 
nelle 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

He du Prince-Edouard 



109,575,526 

2,002.491 
6,368,546 
7,835,820 
6,246,903 
48,708,555 
29,377,810 
3,292,165 
4,199,927 
1,543,309 



69,237,970 



+40,337,556 



060, 607 
734,942 
841,440 
754,974 
536,097 
757,611 
317,049 
990,959 
244,291 



+ 

+ 4, 
+ 5. 
+ 1, 
+ 16, 
+ 8, 
+ 

+ 1, 
+ 



941,884 
633,604 
994,380 
491,929 
172,458 
620, 199 
975,116 
208,968 
299,018 



p. c. 

+ 58-26 

+ 88-80 
+267-08 
+325-52 
+ 31-37 
+ 49-76 
+ 41-52 
+ 42-08 
+ 40-42 
+ 2403 



Le tableau 53 donne la valeur moyenne par tete de vaches laitieres en 
1901 et 1911. Afin de montrer la richesse moyenne de chaque ferme, basee 
sur le nombre de vaches laitieres tenues, le chiffre moyen par ferme est aussi 
donne. En 1911, pour tout le Canada, la valeur moyenne par vache ^tait de 
S42.22, comparativement a $28.75 en 1901, soit un gain de $13.47 par vache 
ou 46-85 pour cent. Dans Ontario il y a eu un gain de 54-49 pour cent dans la 

TABLEAU 53. VALEUR MOYENNE DES VACHES LAITIERES PAR T^TE, AINSI 
QUE LEUR NOMBRE PAR FERME, PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 





Valeur des vaches laitieres par tete 


NOMBRB 


DE VACHES LAITliRES 
PAR FEHMK 


Provinces 


1911 


1901 


Augmentation (+) 

ou 

diminution ( — ) 


1911 


1901 


Augmenta- 
tion (+) ou 
Diminution 
.(-) 




nuiiie- 
rique 


propor- 
tionnelle 


Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 


$ 

42 22 

58-98 
43- 13 
43-25 
40-22 
47-15 
38-95 
30-33 
32-49 
29-62 


$ 

28-75 

43-23 
37-63 
32-53 
33-61 
30-52 
27 03 
20-86 
21-55 
22-05 


$ 

+13 47 

+ 15-75 
+ 5-50 
+ 10-72 
+ 6-61 
+ 16-63 
+ 11-92 
+ 9-47 
+ 10-94 
+ 7-57 


p. c. 

+46-85 

+36-43 
+ 14-61 
+32-95 
+ 19-66 
+54-49 
+44-09 
+45-39 
+50-76 
+34-33 


NO. 

3 6 

1-8 
2-4 
1-9 
3-4 
4-5 
4-7 
2-8 
2-4 
3-6 


NO. 

4 4 

3-6 
4-9 
4-2 
4-4 
4-8 
5-1 
30 
2-5 
41 


NO. 

- 8 

- 1-8 

- 2-5 


Saskatchewan 


- 2-3 


Manit^jVja 


- 10 


Ontario 


- 3 


Quebec 


- 0-4 


Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

He du Prince-Edouard 


- 0-2 

- 01 

- 0-5 



15506-^Li 



Ixxii 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



valeur moyenne par tete; dans la Nouvelle-Ecosse, de 50-76 pour cent; dans le 
Nouveau-Brunswick, de 45-39 pour cent, et dans Quebec, de 44-09 pour cent. 
La province de I'Alberta a la plus faible proportion d'augmentation avec 14-61 
pour cent, suivie du Manitoba avec 19-66 pour cent. Les vaches laitieres 
de plus hauts prix au dernier recensement etaient dans la Colombie-Britannique 
($58.98) et celles de plus bas prix dans I'lle du Prince-Edouard ($29.62). Cha- 
cune des provinces indique une diminution dans le nombre de vaches laitieres 
en possession de chaque ferme. Cette diminution par ferme dans les provinces 
de Test est due au decroissement du nombre d'animaux, tandis que dans les 
provinces de I'ouest elle est due au fait que la prise de possession des terres 
comme homestead, ou autrement alienees, a fait des progres si rapides durant la 
decade qu'il a ete impossible d'augmenter dans une meme proportion le nombre 
d'animaux. 

La distribution proportionnelle des vaches laitieres et le nombre moyen 
par 100 acres de terre amelioree, sont donnas dans le tableau 54 pour les annecs 
1901 et 1911. En 1901 Ontario possedait 44-25 pour cent de toutes les vaches 
laitieres du Canada, et en 1911, bien que sa proportion soit tombee a 39-80 
pour cent, elle occupait encore la premiere place; Quebec occupait la seconde place 
pour les deux recens^ements avec une proportion de 31-88 pour cent en 1901 
et de 29-06 pour cent en 1911. En 1901, seulement 6- 16 pour cent des vaches 
laitieres du Canada etaient a I'ouest des Grands Lacs, et en 1911 la proportion 
avait atteint 19-97 pour cent. 

TABLEAU 54. POUR-CENT DE LA DISTRIBUTION DES VACHES LAITIERES ET 
NOMBRE MOYEN PAR 100 ACRES DE TERRE AM6lIOR6e, PAR PROVINCES, 

1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



Pour-cent du total des vaches 

laitieres dans chaque 

province 



Nombre de vaches laitieres par 

100 ACRES DE terre AMELIOREE 



1911 



1901 



Augmenta- 
tion (+) 
Diniinu- 
tion ( — ) 



1911 


1901 


NO. 


NO. 


5 33 


7 98 


711 


5- IS 


3-39 


9-71 


1-53 


504 


2 -.30 


3-54 


7-52 


803 


9-24 


10-32 


7-51 


7-88 


10-28 


11 04 


6-77 


7-77 



Augmenta- 
tion {+) 
Diminu- 
tion (— ) 



Canada 

Colombie-Bri'tannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouvcau-Hrunswick. . . 

Nouvclle-fieosse 

lie du Princc-Edouard 



p. c. 

100 «0 

1-31 
5-69 
6-98 
5-99 
39-80 
29 06 
4-18 
4-98 
201 



p. c. 

100 00 

1-03 
1-91 
2-35 
5-87 
44-25 
31-88 
4-61 
5-76 
2-34 



p. c. 



+ -28 
+ 3-78 
-f 4-63 



+ 



12 

4-45 

2-82 

•43 

•78 

•33 



- 2 65 

-f 193 

- 6-32 

- 3-51 

- 1-24 

- 51 

- 108 

- -37 

- -76 

- 1-00 



Le nombre de vaches laitieres par 100 acres de terre amelior(^e au Canada 
est tomb6 de 7-98 en 1901 a 5-33 en 1911. Dans les provinces de Test la dimi- 
nution proportionnelle est due au decroissement du nombre de vaches, tandis 
que dans I'ouest elle est due, non pas au decroissement' du nombre mais aux 
causes d^ja donn(5es plus haut. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



IxxLi 



BOEUFS, JEUNE BETAIL, ETC. Dans le texte prec(5clant les ta- 
bleaux 55, 56, 57, 58 et ailleurs, le terme "autres betes a cornes" signifie tout 
le betail, excepte les vaches laitieres. 

Le nombre d''autres betes a cornes, pour tout le Canada, ^tait de 3,930,828 
en 1911, comparativement a 3,167,774 en 1901, soit une augmentation de 
763,054 ou 24-09 pour cent. Toutes les provinces, excepte la Nouvelle-Ecosse 
et le Nouveau-Bruns"udck, ont contribue a cette augmentation. La. Nouvelle- 
Ecosse indique une diminution de 19,139 ou 10-79 pour cent, et le Nouveau- 
Brunswdck de 2,441 ou 2- 10 pour cent dans les dix ans. La plus haute augmen- 
tation dans les provinces de I'Est revient a Quebec, et dans les provinces de 
rOuest, a I'Alberta. Le tableau 55 donne les chiffres pour chaque periode de 
recensement par provinces, ainsi que le montant et la proportion de variation. 

TABLEAU 55. NOMBRE DE Bf:TES A CORNES (AUTRES QUE LES VACHES LAI- 
TIERES) PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



ler juin 
1911 



31 mars 
1901 



Augmentation (+) ou 

DIMINUTION ( — ) 



nuiiierique 



propor- 
tionnelle 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

He du Prince-Edouard 



3,93«,828 

105,230 
592,076 
452,470 
2,S0,240 
1,468,540 
699,049 
113,671 
158,218 
61,334 



3,167,774 

100,467 
276,859 
212,145 
208.405 
1,422,043 
598,044 
116,112 
177,357 
56,342 



+ 763, •« 

+ 4,763 
+315,217 
+240.. 325 
+ 71,S35 
+ 46,407 
+ 101,005 

- 2,441 

- 19,139 
+ 4,992 



p. c. 

+ 24,09 

+ 4-74 
+ 113-85 
+ 113-28 
+ 34-47 
+ 3-27 
+ 16-89 

- 210 

- 10-79 
+ 8-86 



La valeur totale des "autres betes a cornes" en 1911 et 1901 est indiquee 
au tableau 56. La valeur de cette classe, pour tout le Canada, a augments 
de $54,197,341 en 1901 a S86,278,490 en 1911, soit une augmentation de 
$32,081,149 ou 59-19 pour cent dans la decade. Les plus fortes augmentations 

TABLEAU 56. VALEUR DES B^TES A CORNES, AUTRES QUE LES VACHES LAI- 
TIERES, PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



Pro\ inces 



1911 



1901 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alljerta 

Saskatchewan • 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Qut'bec 

Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

He du Prince-Edouard 



86,278,490 

3,009,894 

16,302,340 

13,997,475 

6,311,318 

32,776,2.M 

8,725,031 

1,. 39 1,675 

3,0.36,444 

728,059 



54,197,341 

2,. 391. 426 
8,7.30,895 
3,699,187 
3,944.406 
24, 641.. 545 
6,629.784 
1,170.. 327 
2,390,865 
598,906 



Augmentation (+) ou 

DIMINUTION ( — ) 



propor- 
num6riquo tionnclle 



+32,081,149 



61S,468 

7,, 57 1,445 

10.2*8,288 

2, .366. 912 

8.134,709 

2,095,247 

221,348 

64 5,. 579 

129,153 



p. c. 

+ 59,19 

+ 25 86 

+ 86-72 
+278-39 

+ 6001 

+ 33-01 

+ 31-60 

+ 18-91 

+ 27-00 

+ 21-56 



Ixxiv 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



numerique et proportionnelle dans la valeur se trouvent dans la province de 
la Saskatchewan, Ontario venant en deuxieme place et I'Alberta en troisieme. 
Le haussement du prix des "autres betes a comes", durant la decade, ne pent 
etre mieux illustr^ qu'il ne I'estpar les chiffres du Nouveau-Brunswick et de 
la Nouvelle-Ecosse ou, en depit d'une diminution dans le nombre de tetes, une 
forte augmentation dans la valeur totale est indiquee pour 1911 sur 1901. 

La valeur moyenne par tete de tout betail, les vaches laitieres exceptees, 
^tait de $21.95 en 1911, pour tout le Canada, comparativement a $17.11 en 
1901, soit un gain par tete de $4.84 ou 28-29 pour cent. En comparant 
les valeurs moyennes par tete et le nombre de tetes par ferme, soit I'une avec 
r autre ou avec les prix courants le 31 mars 1901 et le ler juin 1911, il ne faut 
pas oublier qu'un plus grand nombre de veaux est inclus dans les chiffres de 
1911 que dans ceux de 1901, et que par consequent les comparaisons ne sont 
pas possibles. Malgre que les jeunes ariimaux soient compris dans les chiffres 
de 1911, toutes les provinces, excepte I'Alberta, indiquent une augmentation 
remarquable dans le prix par tete cote sur la ferme. Pour les raisons deja 
donn^es, les provinces de I'Ouest indiquent une diminution dans le nombre 
d'"autres betes a cornes" par ferme. Ontario, Quebec et Tile du Prince-Edouard 
montrent des augmentations. Dans le Nouvelle-Ecosse et le Nouveau-Bruns- 
wick, ou encore le nombre par ferme est moins eleve en 1911 qu'en 1901, la 
valeur totale est plus grande au dernier qu'au precedent recensement. Le 
tableau 57 donne la valeur moyenne par tete de betes a cornes, autres que 
les vaches laitieres, ainsi que le nombre moyen par ferme en 1911 et 1901. 

TABLEAU 57. VALEUR MOYENNE DES B^TES A CORNES, AUTRES QUE LES VACHES 
LAITIERES, PAR t£TE, AINSI QUE LE NOMBRE MOYEN, PAR FERME, 

1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



Valeur des autres betes a cornes 
PAR tete 



Nombre des autres betes A 

CORNES PAR FERME 



1911 



1901 



Augment.\tion (+) 
ou diminution (— ) 



numeri- 


que 


? 


+ 4-84 


+ 4-80 


- 401 


+ 13-50 


+ 3-59 


+ 4-99 


+ 1-39 


+ 2-16 


+ 5-71 


+ 1-24 



pro- 
portion- 
nelle 



1911 



1901 



Augmenta- 
tion (-I-) ou 
Diminution ( — 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick. . 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

He du Prince-]6douard 



31 95 

28-60 
27-53 
30-94 
22-52 
22-32 
12-48 
12-24 
1919 
11-87 



17 11 

23-80 
31-54 
17-44 
18-93 
17-33 
1109 
10-08 
13-48 
10-63 



p.c. 

+28-29 

+20-17 
-12-71 
+77-41 
+ 18-96 
+28-79 
+ 12-53 
+21-43 
+42-36 
+ 11-67 



5 5 

5-7 
9-6 
4-7 
6-1 
6-5 
4-4 
3-0 
3-0 
4-3 



5-8 

14-9 
29-2 
15-6 
6-4 
6-3 
40 
3-1 
3-2 
4-0 



- O-S 

- 9-2 
-19-6 
-10-9 

- 0-3 
+ 0-2 
+ 0-4 

- 0-1 

- 0-2 
+ 0-3 



Le tableau 58 donne la proportion que formait Ic nombre d'autres betes 
k cornes dans chaque province par rapport au chiffre total du Canada. De 
1901 a 1911 la proportion revenant k Ontario est tombee de 44-89 pour cent 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Ixxv 



a 37-36 pour cent; k Quebec, de 18-88 pour cent a 17-78 pour cent; aux Pro- 
vinces maritimes, de 11-05 pour cent a 8-48 pour cent; a la Colombie-Bri- 
tannique, de 3-17 pour cent a 2-68 pour cent; et durant la meme p6rode la 
proportion revenant aux provinces des prairies est mont^e de 21-97 pour cent 
a 33*70 pour cent. Le nombre d'animaux par 100 acres de terre am^lioree, 
pour tout le Canada, est tombe de 10-50 en 1901 k 8-07 en 1911, Ontario, 
Quebec, rile du Prince-Edouard et la Colombie-Britannique indiquant dea 
augmentations et les autres provinces des diminutions. 

TABLEAU 58. POUR-CENT DE LA DISTRIBUTION DES B^TES A CORNES. AUTRES QUE 
LES VACHES LAITlfcRES, ET LE NOMBRE MO YEN PAR 100 ACRES DE TERRE AM6- 
LIORfiE PAR PROVINCES EN 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 


POXJR-CENT DU T0T.\L DES AUTRES 
BETE3A CORNES DANS CH.\QUE 
PROVINCE 


NoMBRE DES AUTRES BETES A COR- 
NES PAR 100 ACRES DE TERRE 
AMELIOREE 


1911 


1901 


Augmentation 
{+) ou Di- 
minution (— ) 


1911 


1901 


Augmentation 

(-I-) ou Di- 
minution (— ) 


Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 


p.c. 

100 00 

2-68 

15,06 

11-51 

7-13 

37-36 

17-78 

2-89 

4-03 

1-56 


p.c. 

100 00 

317 
8-73 
6-70 
6-58 
44-89 
18-88 
3-67 
5-60 
1-78 


p.c. 

- -49 
-1- 6-33 
+ 4-Sl 
+ -55 

- 7-53 

- MO 

- -78 

- 1-57 

- -22 


NO. 

8 07 

22 03 

13-61 
3-81 
4-15 

10-76 
8-56 
7-87 

12-58 
7-97 


NO. 

10 50 

21-21 
58 -.32 
18-90 

5-22 
10-72 

8-04 

8-24 
14-10 

7-76 


NO. 

- 2 43 

+ -82 


Alberta 


- 44-71 




- 1509 


Manitoba 


- 1-07 


Ontario 


+ -04 




+ -52 




- -37 




- 1-52 


lole du Prince-Edouard 


+ 21 



MOTJTONS 



Commc I'indique le tableau 59, il y a eu des augmentations dans le nombre 
de moutons, de 1901 a 1911, dans toutes les provinces de I'Ouest, et des diminu- 
tions dans toutes les provinces de I'Est. Les augmentations s'elevent k 108- 
436 et les diminutions a 444,375, soit une diminution nette de 335,939 ou 13-38 
pour cent. Dans Ontario seulement il y a une diminution de 304,268, soit 
plus de 90 pour cent de la diminution nette ou 68 • 5 pour cent de la diminution 
totale. Le decroissement dans les Provinces maritimes se montait k 122,692. 
La plus faible proportion de diminution (2-66 pour cent) revient k Quebec, 
et la plus forte k Ontario (29-08 pour cent). Le plus gros gain revient k la 
Saskatchewan (72-93 pour cent) suivie par 1' Alberta (53-37 pour cent), le 
Manitoba (26-67 pour cent) et la Colombie-Britannique (17-76 pour cent). 
Les troupeaux etant a leur plus haut degre de dcveloppement, pour le nombre 
de jeunes agneaux, en juin, il est probable que la cause de se decroissement 
est plus serieuse que ne I'indiquent les chiffres de ce tableau. Cette forte 
diminution n'est pas due au manque de demandc pour les viamles de mouton 
ou d'agneau, puisqu'en ces derniercs annecs les importations de ces viandes 
ont depass6 cinq millions de livres par annee. 



kxvi RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

TABLEAU 59. NOMBRE DES MOUTONS, PAR PROVINCES. 1911 ET 1901. 




Le tableau 60 donne la valeur totale des moutons par provinces en 1901 
et 1911, et le tableau 61 la valeur moyenne par tete, ainsi que le nombre moyen 
par ferme dans les deux annees de recensement. On remarquera, malgre la 
forte diminution numerique, que la valeur des animaux sur pied etait plus 
elevee au dernier recensement qu'au recensement precedent. S'il n'y avait 
pas eu de diminution dans le nombre, Taugmentation dans la valeur, calculec 
d'apres les prix obtenus dans I'annee de recensement, eut ete dix fois a peu 
pres plus elevee que ne I'indiquent les chiffres du tableau. Le decroissement 
des moutons a fait baisser le capital agricole dans Ontario de $1,090,838, 
dans rile du Prince-Edouard de $16,754 et dans le Nouvcau-Brunswick de 
$5,524. 

TABLEAU 60. VALEUR DES MOUTONS, PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 




Canada 

Coloinbie-Britunniquc 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontaiio 

Quebec 

Nouvcau-Brunswick. . . 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

He du Prince-Edouard 



263,097 
7.58,154 
621,409, 
224,2141 
4,427,565: 
2,710,285 
533,158} 
795,773 
368,036 



164,679 
333,210 
273,0631 
144,018 
5,518,403 
2,376,471: 
538,685. 
757,278, 
384,790 



+ 98,418 
+ 424,944 
+ 34X,346 
4- 80, 1B6 
-1,0»«,83S 
+ 333.814 

- 5.524 
+ 38,495 

- 16,754 



+ .59-76 
+ 127-53 
+ 127-57 
+ 55-68 

- 19-77 
+ 1405 

- 1-03 
+ 5-08 

- 4-35 



La valeur moyenne des moutons par tete, pour tout Ic Canada, k la date 
du ler juin 1911, 4tait de $4.92, les agneaux compris, comparativement a $4.18 
le 31 mars 1910, quand peu d'agneaux pouvaient alors etre comptes. Pour les deux 
recensements, Quebec et les Provinces Maritimos indiquent les prix les plus bas. 
En 1901, le plus haut prix moyen par tete ($5.27) et le plus bas ($2.65) ont H6 
obtenus X)ar Ontario et la Nouvellc-Ecossc rcspcctivcment. En 1911, la Colom- 
bie-Britanniquc a donne la plus haute valeur moyenne ($6.70), et la KouvcUe- 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Ixxvii 



Ecosse la plus basse $(3.37). Dans les provinces de I'Ouest raugmentation 
dans revaluation des moutons sur la ferme, durant la decade, a varie de $1.12 
au IManitoba a $1.85 en Alberta. Dans les provinces de Test raugmentation 
a varie de 42 cents au Nouveau-Brunswick a 97 cents dans I'ile du Prinoe- 
Edouard. 

Le nombre de moutons par ferine, dans toutes les provinces, etait moindre 
en 1911 qu'en 1901. La diminution du nombre par ferme dans les provinces 
de rOuest n'est pas due au decroissement des animaux, mais au developpemcnt 
extraordinaire des terres agricoles entre 1901 et 1911, les nouvelles fermes 
etant presque toutes consacrees a la culture du ble, en vue de meilleurs rende- 
ments. 

TABLEAU 61. VALEUR MOYENXE DES MOUTOXS PAR T:&TE, AIXSI QUE LE NOMBRE 
MOYEX PAR FERME PAR PROVIXCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



VaLEUR des MOUTOXS PAR 
TETE 



Provinces 



1911 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannieque 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Biunswick. . . 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

lie du Prince-Edouard 



$ 

4 93 I 



1901 



403 



$ 

4 18 

4-94 
3-83 
4-13 
4-89 
5-27 
3-63 
2-95 
2-65 
306 



Augmentation (+) 
ou Diminution ( — ) 



numeri- 
que 



propor- 
tion- 

nello 



Nombre des moutons par 

FERME 



1911 



I 

+ -74 

+ 1-76 

+ 1-85 

+ 1-31 

+ M2 



p.c. 

17 70 

+35-63 
+48-30 
+31-72 
+22-90 
+ 13-28 
+ 17-08 
+ 14-24 
+35-85 
+31-70 



NO. 

3 



2-1 
2-2 
1-2 
0-8 
3-3 
4-0 
4-1 
4-1 
6-3 



1901 



NO. 

4 6 

5-0 
9-2 
4-9 
0-9 
4-7 
4-4 
4-9 
5-1 
9-0 



Augmenta- 
tion ( + ) ou 
Dimiinution 

(-) 



- 16 

- 2-9 

- 70 

- 3-7 

- 01 

- 1-4 

- 0-4 

- 0-8 

- 10 

- 2-7 



La proportion de chaque province par rapport au nombre total de moutong 

au Canada est donnee dans le tableau 62 pour les annees 1901 et 1911. Dan 

s 

TABLEAU 63. POUR-CEXT DE LA DISTRIBUTION DES MOUTONS ET LEUR NOMBRE 
MOYEX PAR 100 ACRES DE TERRE AM^LIOR^E, PAR PROVINCES. EN 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



PoUR-CENT DU TOTAL DES MOUTONS 
DANS CHAQUE PROVINCE 



1911 



1901 



Augmenta- 
tion (+) ou 
Diminution 
(-) 



Nombre des moutons par 100 

ACRES de TERRE AME- 
LIOREE 



1911 



1901 



Augmenta- 
tion (+) ou 
Diminution 
(-) 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

OnJario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick. . . 

Xouvelle-Eco.sse 

lie du Prince-Edouard 



p.c. p.c. 

100 00 100 N 



p.c. 



1-81 

6-14 

5-25 

1-72 

34-13 

29-30 

7-28 

10-17 

4-20 



1-33 

3-47 

2-63 

118 

41-69 

26-07 

7-27 

11 -.36 

500 



+ -48 
+2-671 
+2-62 
+ -541 
-7-56 
+3-23' 
+ -01; 
-1-19 
- -801 



4 46 

8-22 

3-07 

-96 

•55 

5-44 

7-81 

10-96 

17-58 

11-86 



8-33 

7-04 
18-35 

5-88 
-74 

7-89 

8-80 
12-95 
22-68 
17-29 



-3-86 

+ 1-18 

-15-28 

-4-92 

- -19 
-2-45 

- -99 
-1-99 
-5 10 
-5 -IS 



Ixx 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



les deux recensementSS Ontario .. obtenu la plus haute proportion avec 41 '69 
pour cent en 1901 et 34-13 pour cent en 1911. Quebec comptait 29-30 pour 
cent de tous les moutons des differentes provinces en 1911, les provinces mari- 
times 21-65 pour cent, laissant moins de 15 pour cent aux pro\nnces de I'Ouest. 
Bien que la capacite de produire plus de moutons au Canada fut plus grande 
en 1911 qu'en 1901, le nombre domie pour chaque 100 acres de terre amelior^e 
est tombe de 8-32^ 4-46. 



PORCS. 



L'activit6 dans I'elevage des pores s'cst manifestde dans toutes les provinces 
excepte dans la Colombie-Britannique ou il y a eu une diminution de 7,815 ou 
18-87 pour cent durant la decade. La plus forte augmentation numerique 
pour 1911 sur 1901 se trouve dans Quebec avec 390,188 et dans Ontario avec 
324,755, tandis que les plus fortes augmentations proportionnelles se trouvent 
dans la Saskatchewan avec 928-10 pour cent, et dans I'Alberta avec 415-55 
pour cent. Le tableau suivant donne le nombre de pores au Canada par provin- 
ces en 1911 et 1901. 

TABLEAU 63. NOMBRE DE PORCS AU CANADA PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



1911 
Icr juin 



1901 
31 mars 



Augmentation (+) ou 
Diminution ( — ) 



numeri- 
que 



proportion- 
nelle 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 1 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nouvelle-Eco.sse 

lie du Princc-Edouard 



3,634.778 

ss.eO"! 

237,511 

286,295 

188,416 

1,887,451 

794,351 

87,393 

63,380 

56,377 



2,353,828 

41,419 

46,069 

27,847 

126,459 

1,562,696 

404,163 

51,763 

45,405 

48,007 



+1,280,956 

- 7,815 
+ 191,442 
+258,448 
+ 61,957 
+324,755 
+390, 188 
+ 35,630 
+ 17,975 
+ 8,370 



p. c. 



+54,42 

+ 18-87 
+415-55 
+928-10 
+ 38-99 
+ 20-78 
+ 96-54 
+ 68-83 
+ 39-58 
+ 17-43 



La valeur totalc des pores au Canada a augmente de $16,445,702 en 1901 
a $26,986,621 en 1911, soit un gain de $10,540,919 ou 64.-09 pour cent dans la 
decade. Dans Ontario le gain est de $3,002,071 ou 28-39 pour cent; dans 
Quebec, de $2,256,608 ou 71-80 pour cent; dans la Saskatchewan, de $2,328,733, 
ou 1,266.94 pour cent; dans I'Alberta, de $1,739,869 ou 680.83 pour cent. L'ile 
du Prince-Edouard indique une diminution de $13,838 ou 3-89 pour cent durant 
la decade. Le tableau 64 donne la valeur des pores par provinces en 1911 et 
1901. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU 64. VALEUR DES PORCS, PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



Ixxix 



Provinces 



1911 



1901 



Augmentation (+) ou 
DIMINUTION ( — ) 



niime- 
rique 



proportion- 
nclle 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-B runs wick 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

lie du Prince-Edouard 



26,9S6,S21 



361, 

1,995, 

2,512, 

1,604, 

13,577, 

5,399, 

654, 

538, 

341, 



985 
421 
540 
277 
817 
533 
704 
809 
535 



$ I S 
10,445,702 +1»,540,919 



271,327 
255 ,'552 
183,807 
871,627 
10,575,746 
3,142,925 
401,965 
387,380 
355,373 



+ 90, 658 
+ 1,739,869 
+ 2,328,733 
+ 732,650 
+ 3,002,071 
+ 2,256,608 
+ 252,7.39 
+ 151,429 
- 13,838 



p. c. 

+ 64 03 

+ 33-41 
+ 6S0-R3 
+ 1,266- 94 



94-06 
28-39 
71 -SO 
62-88 
.39-09 
3-89 



Comme I'mdique le tableau 65, pour tout le Canada, la valeur moyenne 
par pore et le nombre moyen par ferme ont faiblement augmente de 1901 a 
1911, mais le changement de date, du 31 mars au ler juin, affecte jusqu'a un 
certain point les statistiques comparatives du betail pour les deux recensements. 

D'apres les rapports du Commerce le prix d'exportation par pore, en 1901, 
6tait de S8.79 et en 1911 de $14.84, soit une augmentation de $6.05 ou 68-8 
pour cent sur les chiffres de I'annee de recensement prececente. Ces chiffres 
du Commerce demontrent deux choses (1) que les valeurs inscrites par les recen- 
seurs etaient plutot au-dessous qu'au-dessus du prix reel et (2) que la proportion 
d'augmentation dans la valeur par pore, etait au dela de dix fois plus 61evee que 
celle fournie par les recenseurs. De la on peut conclure que les augmentations 

VALEUR MOYENNE DES PORCS PAR T^TE AINSI QUE LEUR NOMBRE 
MOYEN PAR FERME, PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



TABLEAU 65. 





Valeur des porcs par tete 


NO.MBRE 


DES PORCS PAR FERMI 


Provinces 


1911 


1901 


Augmentation (+) 
ou diminution ( — ) 


1911 


1901 


Augiuonta- 
tion ou 
Diminu- 
tion (-) 




num6- 
rique 


propor- 
tion 
nolle 


Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 


$ 

7 42 

10-77 
8-40 

8-78 
8-51 
719 
6-80 
7-49 
8-.50 
6-06 


S 

6 99 

6-55 
5-55 
6-60 
6-89 
0-77 
7-78 
7-77 
8-53 
7-40 


+ -43 

+ 4-22 
+ 2-85 
+ 2-18 
+ 1-62 
+ -42 

- -98 

- -28 

- -03 

- 1-34 


p. c. 

+ 6 15 

+64-43 
+51-35 
+33-03 
+23-51 
+ 6-20 
-12 -.59 

- 3-60 

- -.35 
-1810 


NO. 

5 1 

1-8 
3-9 
3-0 
4-1 
8-3 
5-0 
2-3 
1-2 
3-9 


no; 

4 3 

6-2 
4-9 
2-1 
3-9 
7-0 
2-7 
1-4 
•8 
3-4 


NO. 

+ 0-8 

— 4-4 


Alberta ... 


— 1-0 


Saskatchewan 


+ 0-9 


Manitoba 


+ 0-2 
+ 1-3 
+ 2-3 
+ 0-9 
-1- 0-4 


Oiitario 


Qu6bcc 


Nouveau-Brunswick 


Nouvclle-Ecosse 


He du Prince-Edouard 


+ 0-5 





Ixxx 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



indiqu^es dans les prix moyens de 1901 k 1911, pour Quebec et les provinces 
maritimes, sont dues au petit nombre de pores de grosseur ordinaire gardes d'une 
saison a I'autre, ainsi qu'au nombre de jeunes pores comptes dans le dernier 
recensement. Les memes causes ont contribue a r^duire le prix moyen par tete 
dans les autres provinces. 

En 1901 la province d'Ontario occupait le premier rang dans I'elevage 
des pores, avec une production de 6G • 39 pour cent des pores de tout le Canada. 
En 1911 elle tenait encore le meme rang mais avec une proportion reduite a 
61-93 pour cent de la production totale du Canada. Quebec et le Nouveau- 
Brunswick seules des provinces de I'Est, indiquent une augmentation propor- 
tionnelle de 1901 a 1911, ainsi que I'Alberta et la Saskatchewan dans I'ouest. 
Le tableau 66 donne la proportion que forme le nombre de pores dans chaque 
province par rapport au chiffre total pour le Canada, ainsi que le nombre moyen 
de pores sur chaque 100 acres de terre am^lioree eh 1911 et 1901. 

TABLEAU 68. POUR-CENT DE LA DISTRIBUTION DES PORCS ET LE NOMBRE MOYEN 
PAR 100 ACRES DE TERRE AM£lI0R6e PAR PROVINCES, EN 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 


PoUR-CENT DU TOTAL'DES PORCS 
DANS CHAQUE PROVINCE 


Nombre des porcs par 100 

ACRES de TERKE AMELIOREE 


1911 


1901 


Augmenta- 
tion (+) 
Diminu- 
tion (— ) 


1911 


1901 


Augmenta- 
tion (4-) 
Diminu- 
tion (— ) 


Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 


p. C. 

100 00 

-93 
6-53 
7-88 
5-18 
51-93 
21-85 
2-41 
1-74 
1-55 


p. 0. 

100 00 

1-76 
1-96 
1-18 
5-37 ■ 
66-39 
17-17 
2»20 
1-93 
2-04 


p. c. 

- -83 
+ 4-57 
+ 6-70 

- -19 

- 14-46 
+ 408 
+ -21 

- -19 

- -49 


NO. 

7 46 

7-04 
5-46 
2-41 
2-79 
13-82 
9-73 
605 
5-04 
7-33 


NO. 

7 80 

8-74 
9-70 
2-48 
317 
11-78 
5-43 
3-67 
3-61 
6-61 


NO. 

- -34 

— 1-70 


Alberta 


— 4-14 


Saskatchewan 


— -07 


Manitoba 


— -38 


Ontario 


+ 2-04 


Quebec 


+ 4-30 


Nouveau-Brunswick 


4- 2-38 


Nouvelle-Ecosse 


+ 1-43 


lie du Prince-Edouard 


+ -72 







VOLAILLES 

La statistique des volaillcs est donn^e dans les tableaux 67, 68, 69, 70 et71 
par provinces, pour 1901 et 1911, en chiffrcs num^riques et proportionnels. 

Le tableau 67 donne le nombre de volailles par provinces en 1911 et 1901. 
En cette derniere annee Ontario possedait 58-38 pour cent de la totalite des 
volailles du Dominion, contre 44-19 pour cent en 1911. Les gains numeriques 
les plus Aleves se trouvent dans Ontario avec 4,024,429, dans la Saskatchewan 
avec 3,096,059, dans I'Alberta avec 2,201,318 et dans Quebec avec 1,878,151, 
tandis que les augmentations proportionnelles les plus elevees se trouvent 
daiis la Saskatchewan avec 1,041.24 pour cent; dans I'Alberta avec 874-24 
pour cent; dans la Colombie-Britannique avec 178-56 pour cent; daas le 
Manitoba avec 121-42 pour cent et dans Quebec avec. 57 • 20 pour cent. Dans 
chacune des autres provinces I'augmentation proportionnelle durant la decade 
6tait au-dessous de 40 pour cent. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Lxx.x 



Le nombre de toutes les volailles est mont6 de 17,922,658 avec une valeur 
de S5,723,890 en 1901, a 31,793,261 avec une valeur de $14,653,773 en 1911, 
soit ungain en nombre de 13,870,603 ou 77-39 pour cent, et en valeur de 
88,929,883 ou 156 pour cent. On devra se rappeler encore que le changement 
de date du dernier recensement rend les comparaisons quelque peu difl&ciles 
entre les chiffres pour 1901 et 1911. 

TABLEAU 67. NOMBRE DE VOLAILLES, PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 


1911 
ler juin 


1901 
31 mars 


Augmentation (+) ou 

DIMINUTION ( — ) 


nume- 
rique 


proportion- 
nelle 


Canada 


NO. 

31,793,261 

1,012,220 

2,4.53,117 

3,393,403 

2,585,903 

14,488,980 

5,161,794 

982,251 

954,251 

760, 939 


NO. 

17,922,658 

363,. 379 
251 , 799 
297,34-1 

1,167.876 
10,464,551 

3,283,043 
714,131 
798,145 
581,790 


NO. 

+13,87«,««3 

+ 648,841 
+ 2,201,318 
+ 3,096,059 
+ 1,418,027 
+ 4,024,429 
+ 1,878,151 
+ 268,523 
+ 156,106 
+ 179,149 


p. c. 
+ 7;-39 


Colombie-Britannique 


+ 178-56 


Alberta 


+ 874-24 


Saskatchewan 


+ 1,041-24 


Manitoba 


+ 121-42 


Ontario 


4- 38-46 


Quebec 


+ 57-20 


Nouveau-Brunswick 


+ 37-60 


Nouvelle-Ec'osse 


+ 19-56 


He du Prince-Edouard 


+ 30-79 







D'apres le recensement de 1901, se rapportant a la date du 31 mars, il y 
avait, pour tout le Canada, 584,569 dindons, 395,997 oies, 290,775 canards 
et 16,651,337 poules et poulets; d'apres le recensement de 1911, se rapportant 
a la date du ler juin, les dindons etaient au nombre de 863,182, les oies de 
629,524, les canards de 527,098, les poules et poulets de 29,773,457. Bien que 
les chiffres indiques pour 1911 aient ete considerablement affectes pour les 
eclosions entre le 31 mars et le ler juin, le progres constant fait dans I'elc- 
vage des volailles est confirmc par le fait que la quantite d'oeufs a augment e 
de 84,132,802 douzaines en 1901 a 123,071,034 douzaines en 1911, soit une 
augmentation de 38,938,232 douzaines ou 46 pour cent en dix ans. 

Le tableau 68 donnc le nombre de volailles selon les differentes especes, 
par provinces pour 1901 et 1911. Les dindons indiquent des diminutions 
dans toutes les provinces maritimes, les oies ont diminue dans la Nouvoilc- 
Ecosse, et les canards dans le Nouvelle-Ecosse et I'lle du Prince-Edouard. 
L'augmentation quant au nombre de poules et poulets s'etend a toutes Ics 
provinces. 

En 1901 Ontario possedait 58-39 pour cent de toutes les volailles du 
Canada, comparativement a 45-57 pour cent en 1911. Les chiffres proportion- 
nels d'Ontario, de Quebec et des provinces maritimes ont diminue de 1901 
a 1911, tandis que ceux des provinces de I'ouest ont augmente. Le noiubrc 
de volailles par 100 acres de terre ameliorce, pour tout le Canada, a monte 
de 59-41 en 1901 k 65-24 en 1911. Pour chaque 100 acres de terre amelioree, 
au dernier recensement, la Colombie-Britannique possedait 212 volailles de 
differentes especes, Ontario 106, I'llc du Prince-Edouard 99, la Nouvelle- 



Ixxxii RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

TABLEAU 68. VOLAILLES PAR ESPfeCES, PAR PROVINCES, EN 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 


Dindons 


Dies 


Canards 


Poules et 
poulets 


Canada— 

1911 


NO. 

863,182 
584,569 

8,926 
2,790 

67,151 
6,369 

72,616 
7, 155 

79,639 
28,450 

416,705 
389,431 

166, 173 
80, 769 

30, 175 
30,532 

11,945 
23,564 

9,852 
15,509 


NO. 

629,524 
395,997 

6,808 
3,786 

19,653 
1,590 

22,999 
3,023 

28,472 
10,297 

364,295 
234,415 

102,462 
62,679 

23,283 
21,192 

18,800 
22,189 

42,752 
36,826 


NO. 

527,098 
290,755 

27,898 
9,551 

18,880 
4,147 

54,968 
8,181 

35,411 
24,381 

293.662 
178,215 

60, 146 

28,080 

14,196 
11,963 

10,897 
12,801 

11,040 
13,436 


NO. 

29,773,457 


1901 


16,651,337 


Colombie-Britamiique — 

1911 " 


968.588 


1901 


347.252 


Alberta — 

1911 


2,347,433 


1901 


239,693 


Saskatchewan — 

1911 


3,242,820 


1901 


278,985 


Manitoba — 

1911 


2.442,381 


1901 


1,104,748 


Ontario — 

1911 


13,414,318 


1901 


9.662.490 


Quebec — 


4,833,013 


1901 


3,112,115 


1911 


915,000 


1901 


650,444 


Nouvelle-Ecosse — 


912,609 


1901 


739,591 


1911 


697,295 


1901 


516,019 







Ecosse 76, le Nouveau-Brunswick 68, Quebec 63, I'Alberta 56, le Manitoba 
38 et la Saskatchewan 29. Les plus fortes augmentations numeriques par 100 
acres durant la decade se trouvent dans la Colombie-Britannique avec 135-23 
et dans Ontario avec 27-24, Le tableau 69 donne la proportion que forme 
le nombre de volailles dans chaque province pas rapport au nombre total 
dans le Dominion, ainsi que la moyenne par 100 acres de tcrre amelior^e pour le 
Canada et chacune des provinces. 

TABLEAU 69. POUR-CENT DE LA DISTRIBUTION DES VOLAILLES ET LE NOMBRE 
MOYEN PAR 100 ACRES DE TERRE AM^LIOR^E PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 





PoUR-CENT DU TOTAL DES VOLAILLES 
DANS CHAQUE PROVINCE 


NOMBRB DES VOLAILLES PAR 100 
ACRES DE TERRE AMELIOREE 


Provinces 


1911 


1901 


Augmenta- 
tion (+) OU 
Diminu- 
tion ( — ) 


1911 


1901 


Augmenta- 
tion ( + ) OU 
Diminu- 
tion ( — ) 


Canada 


p. C. 

100 00 

318 

7-72 

10-67 

8-13 

45-57 

16 24 

309 

3-01 

2-39 


p. c. 

100 00 

2-03 
1-40 
1-66 
6-52 
58-39 
18-32 
3-98 
4-45 
3-25 


p. c. 

+ 1-15 
-1- 6-32 
+ 9-01 
+ 1-61 

- 12-82 

- 2-08 

- -89 

- 1-44 

- -86 


NO. 

65 21 

211-94 
56-37 
28-58 
38-33 

106-12 
63-24 
68-02 
75-89 
98-93 


NO. 

59 11 

76-71 
53-04 
26-49 
29-23 
78-88 
44-14 
50-66 
63-47 
80-10 


NO. 

+ 5-83 
+ 135-23 




+ 3-33 




+ 209 




+ 9-10 




+ 27-24 




-f 19-10 




+ 17-36 




+ 12-42 




+ 18-83 







RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Ixxxiii 



Le tableau 70 donne la valeur de toutes les volailles par province en 1911 
et 1901, ainsi que le montant et la proportion d' augmentation durant la decade 
De 1901 a 1911 la valeur moyenne des volailles par famille, pour tout le 
Canada, a augmente de So -3-1 a S9-84, par provinces dans I'ordre qui suit: — 
Ontario de S6-86 a Sll-25, Quebec de $3-79 a $0-53, les provinces maritimes 
dc S3 -32 a S5-16, les provinces des prairies de $7-44 a S14-51 et la Colom- 
bie-Britannique de S5-46 a S8-59. 

TABLEAU 70. VALEUR DES VOLAILLES PAR PROVINCES. 1911 ET 1901. 



Provinces 



1911 



1901 



Augmentation (+) otj 
diminution (— ) 



num6- 
rique 



proportion- 
nelle 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

lie du Prince-Edouard 



14,6a3,773 

685,613 

1,357,183 

1,988,081 

1,121,772 

6,128,401 

2,422,568 

350,853 

326, 130 

273,172 



$ 

5, 723, 890 

209,747 
109,794 
116,582 
417,586 
3,125,166 
1,166,314 
213,319 
218.223 
147, 159 



8,929,883 

475,866 

1.247,38'J 

1,871.499 

704. 186 

3,003.235 

1,256,254 

137,534 

107,907 

126,013 



p. c. 

15«,01 

+ 226-88 
+ 1.13612 
+1.605-31 



168-63 
96- 10 

107-71 
64-47 
49-45 
85-63 



La valeur moyenne de chaque volaille, pour tout le Canada, a monte de 
32 cents en 1901 a 46 cents en 1911, et le nombre moyen par ferme de 32-9 k 
44-5. Dans les deux recensements, Ontario avait la plus haute moyenne de 
volailles de toutes especes par ferme, soit 46-7 en 1901 et 63-9 en 1911, et la 
Nouvelle-Ecosse la plus basse, soit 14-2 en 1901 et 17-8 en 1911. Le tableau 
71 donne la valeur moyenne par volaille, ainsi que le nombre moyen par ferme 
en 1911 et 1901. 

TABLEAU 71. VALEUR MOYENNE DES VOLAILLES PAR t£;TE. AINSI QUE LEUR 
NOMBRE MOYEN PAR FERME PAR PROVINCES. 1911 ET 1901. 





Valeur des volailles par tetb 


Nombre des volailles par fermh 


Provinces 


1911 


1901 


Augmentation (+) 
ou Diminution ( — ) 


1911 


1901 


Augmenta- 
tion ( + ) ou 
Diminu- 
tion (-) 


numeri- 
que 


propor- 
tion 
nelle 


Canada 

Colombie-Britannique. . . 
Alberta 7 


$ 


46 

68 
55 
59 
43 
42 
47 
36 
34 


$ 

•32 

•58 
•44 
•39 
•36 
•30 
•36 
-.30 
•27 


$ 

14 

+ -10 
+ -11 
+ -20 
+ -07 
+ -12 
+ -11 
+ 06 
+ 07 
+ -11 


p. c. 

+ 4.3-75 

+ 17-24 
+ 25-00 
+ 51-28 
+ 19-44 
+ 40-00 
+ 30-55 
+ 20-00 
+ 25-93 
+ 44-00 


NO. 

44 5 

54-8 
39-9 
35-2 
56-7 
63-9 
32-3 
25-7 
17-8 
52-9 


NO. 

.32 9 

53-9 
26-5 
21-8 
35-9 
46-7 
21-8 
19-0 
14-2 
41-5 


NO. 

+ 11 6 

+ 0-9 
+ 3-4 
+ 13-4 
+ 120-8 
+ 17-2 
+ 10-5 
+ 6-7 
+ 3-6 
+ 11-4 


Saskatchewan 


Manitoba 


Ontario 


Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 


He du Prince-Edouard.. . 


36 


-25 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



EXPORTATIONS D'ANIMAUX DE FERME. 

Chevaux. Les chiffres du tableau 72, tires des rapports du Commerce, 
donnent les exportations des animaux de ferme pour les decades 1881-1890, 
1891-1900, 1901-1910, et pour les annees 1909 et 1910 separement. 

Pour les dix premieres annees, le nombre de chevaux exportes a tous 
les pays etait de 33,474 plus eleve que durant la deuxieme decade; et quoique 
les Etats-Unis aient pris 106,353 chevaux de moins dans la derniere decade 
que dans la premiere, le Royaume-Uni en a pris 67,376 de plus. Les exportations 
de chevaux dans la troisieme decade etaient de 94,852 de moins que dans la 
seconde et 128,326 de moins que dans la premiere. Dans les dix annees 1901- 
1910 les exportations de chevaux au Royaume-Uni sont tombees a moins de 
6 de ce qu'elles etaient dans la decade precedente et aux Etats-Unis a moins 
de I, tandis qu'elles out augmente au dela de 50 pour cent aux autres pays. 
L'exportation moyenne par annee, de 1881-1890, etait de 16,952, de 1891-1900 
elle est tombee a 13,605, et de 1901-1910 elle a encore decru jusqu'a 4,120. Le 
rapport annuel pour les deux dernieres annees de la decade etait de 2,028 pour 
1906, et de 2,762 pour 1910. 

Une etude des tableaux precedents demontre que le decroissement dans 
l'exportation des chevaux durant la decade est dii non pas a une diminution 
dans la production ou a I'inferiorite des prix obtenus, mais a des conditions 
meilleures sur le marche domestique occasionnees par le progres general du pays, 
et plus particulierement encore a cause de la grande demande pour les chevaux 
de travail creee par les nombreux ^tablissements agricoles dans les provinces de 
I'ouest. 

TABLEAU n. EXPORTATIONS D'ANIMAUX DE FERME PAR DlfiCADES, 1881-1910. 
LES ANNIES 1909 ET 1910 SONT DONNEES SfiPARl^MENT. 



Animaux 



Chevaux — 

1881-1890.... 
1891-1900..., 
1901-1910... 

1909... 

1910... 

Betes k cornes — 

1881-1890... 

1891-1900... 

1901-1910... 

1909... 

1910... 
Moutons — 

18S 1-1890... 
1891-19(K)... 
1901-1910... 

1919... 

1910... 
Pores — 

1881-1890... 
1891-1900... 
1901-1910... 

1909... 

1910... 



A tous 


Au 


Aux 


Aux 


les 


Royaume- 


Etats-Unis 


autres 


pays 


Uni 




pays 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


169,52.3 


1,333 


165,316 


2,874 


136,049 


68,709 


58,963 


8,377 


41,197 


10,130 


18,184 


12,883 


2,028 


174 


1,504 


350 


2,762 


584 


1,906 


272 


916,305 


557,614 


301,218 


57,473 


1,408,224 


1,015,156 


310,226 


52.842 


1,064,546 


1,457,960 


160, 494 


46,092 


162,945 


143,661 


16,130 


3.154 


157,386 


140,424 


12,210 


4.752 


3,487,782 


616,692 


2,783,822 


87.268 


3, 436,. 350 


7.55,415 


2,594,632 


86,303 


2,752,864 


667,183 


2,022,521 


63,160 


118,896 


19,793 


94,461 


4,&12 


111.107 


1,828 


104,349 


4,930 


23.461 


711 


20,161 


2,589 


22,315 


1,882 


15,9»6 


4,497 


37,80( 


216 


34,578 


3,006 


366 


- 


1.32 


234 


39C 


- 


20S 


185 



BetaiL L'accroissenjent dans les exportations du bctail au Royaume-Uni, 
pour les dix annees 1901-1910 sur la periode de 1891-1900, est de 39-49 pour 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



h 



cent; dans les exportations aux Etats-Unis diirant la meme p^riode il y a eu une 
diminution de 48-26 pour cent. Les exportations totales du betail en 1910 
sont moindres qu'en 1900. 

Moutons. Les exportations totales de nioutons et d'agneaux, durant 
I'annge 1900, etaientde 111,107 dont 104,349 ou 93-91 pour cent aux Etats-Unis. 
En 1909 les exportations de moutons et d'agneaux au Royaume-Uni 6taient 
de 19,793, contre 1,828 en 1910. 

Pores. Le commerce d'exportation dans les pores vivants est presque 
nul,-seulement 390 en 1910 et 36G Tannee precedente. 

ANIMAUX DE RACE. 

Le nombrc d'animaux de race, pour tout le Canada et pour chacune des 
provinces, est donne dans le tableau 73, ainsi que les d(5tails des differentes races 
dont se compose chaque classe. 

TABLEAU 73. ANIMAUX DE RACE SUR LES FERMES, PAR PROVINCES, 1911 ET 1901. 



Liste. 



Chevaux 



B^tes k 
comes 



Moutons 



Pores 



Canada— 

Nombre 1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale.. . . 
" pour-cent. 

Colombie-Britannique— 

Nombre 1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

" pour-cent.. 

Alberta — 

Nombre 1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

" pour-cent.. 

Saskatchewan — 

Nombre 1911 

1901..... 

Augmentation totale 

" pour-cent.. 

Manitoba — 

Nombre 1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

" pour-cent. . , 

Ontario — 

Nombrc 1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

" pour-cent. . , 

Qu6bec — 

Nombre 1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

" pour-cent... 

Nouveau-Brunswick — 

Nombre 1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

" pour-cent. . . 

Nouvelle-Ecosse — 

Nombre 1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

" pour-cent. . . 

lie du Prince-Edouarrl — 

Nombre 1911 

1901 

Augmentation totale 

" pour-cent. . . 



33, 149 
10,756 
22,393 
208 19 

951 

439 

512 

116-62 

4,613 

559 

4,054 

725-22 

4,432 

393 

4,039 

1,027-73 

4,034 

887 

3,147 

354-79 

14,483 
5,417 
9,066 

167-36 

3,563 
2,294 
1,269 
55-31 

461 

268 

193 

72 01 

359 

333 

26 

7-80 

253 

166 

87 

52-40 



123,899 

76,501 

47,398 

61 95 

3,278 
1,978 
1.300 
65-72 

9,741 
5,024 
4,717 
93-88 

5,286 
3,034 
2,252 
74-22 

10,848 
7,857 
2,991 
38-06 

70,472 
41,937 
28,535 
68-04 ' 

18,163 I 

11,578 

6,585 

56-87 

2.769 I 
1.965 I 

804 
40-92 

2,315 

2,022 

29.3 

14-49 

1,027 
1,106 

- 79 

- 7-14 



53,616 

45,317 

8,299 

18-31 

1,181 

550 

631 

114-72 

1,372 
776 
596 

76-80 

586 

392 

194 

49-48 

1,322 

1.314 

8 

-60 

40,983 

33,590 

7,393 

22-01 

6,122 

6,060 

62 

1-02 

653 

618 

35 

5-66 

862 
1,044 

- 182 
-17-43 

535 
973 

- 4.38 
-45-02 



56,457 

40,829 

15,628 

38 27 

1,167 

1,058 

109 

10-30 

4,594 

«13 

3,981 

649-42 

2,877 

927 

1,950 

210-35 

5,537 

4,822 

715 

14-82 

30,853 

26,273 

4,580 

17-43 

8,293 
4,765 
3,528 
74-04 

1.465 
914 
651 

60-28 

662 

524 

138 

36-33 

l.OOg 
933 

76 
8I4 



NoTA — Le signe (— ) indique une diminution. 
1550&— M 



Ixxxvi RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

Pour tout le Canada, de 1901 a 1911, les chevaux de race indiquent une 
augmentation de 22,393 ou 208-19 pour cent; le betail de 47,398 ou 61-95 
pour cent; les moutons, de 8,299 ou 18-31 pour cent; les pores, de 15,628 ou 
38-27 pour cent. La proportion des animaux de race par rapport au chiffr§ 
total de chaque classe sur la ferme en 1901, etait de -68 pour cent pour les 
chevaux; de 1-37 pour cent pour le betail; de 1-85 pour cent pour les 
moutons, et de 1 - 72 pour cent pour les pores. En 1911 la porportion des chevaux 
etait de 1-27 pour cent; du betail de 1-89 pour cent; des moutons, de 2-46 
pour cent et des pores de 1-55 pour cent. 

Les Clydesdales sont en tete des chevaux de race avec 19,911 sur un total 
de 33,149. Pour le betail la race des Shorthorn vient en premier ra,ng avec 
56,614 dont 36,307 dans Ontario, suivi de la race des Holstein avec 23,292 
dont 17,119 dans Ontario. La race des Aj^rshire compte 17,257 dont 8,695 
dans Quebec. Pour les moutons les Shropshire viemient les premiers avec 
17,678, suivis des Oxforddowns avec 9,127, des Leicesters avec 8,919 et des 
Cotswolds avec 8,539. Pour les pores les Yorkshire sont en tete avec 27,730, 
suivis des Berkshire avec 13,889. 

ANIMAUX VENDUS. 

Les tableaux 74 a 81 contiennent les statistiques des animaux vendus 
sur la ferme en 1910. On ne devra pas oublier, dans I'etude de ces chiffres, 
que toutes les ventes d'animaux inscrites sur les listes du recensement ne sont 
pas n^cessairement que pour I'exportation, et que les memes animaux peuvent 
avoir ete vendus plus d'une fois durant I'annee; par exemple, le betail, les pores 
et les volailles, particulierement, sont achetes pour etre^ engraisses et vendus 
ensuite pour la consommation domestique ou I'exportation. On reviendra 
plus tard sur ce sujet lorsque les statistiques des diff^rentes cspeces d'animaux 
vendus seront consid^rees. 

Les chiffres des ventes de betail, de moutons, de pores et de volailles, tels 
que donnes dans les deux recensements, ne sont pas comparables. Dans le 
recensement de 1901 les recenseurs devaient obtenir le nombre d'animaux tuSs 
ou vendus pour I' abattoir ou V exportation, tandis qu'en 1911 ils devaient inscrire 
le nombre et la valeur des chevaux, du betail, des moutons, des pores et des 
volailles vendus durant d'ann^e de calendrier, et la valeur seulement des animaux 
tues sur la ferme en 1910. Afin d'expliquer la difference apparcnte des 
chiffres concernant les animaux tues ou vendus en 1900, il est dit dans T intro- 
duction du volume II du recensement de 1901, page XXX, «que la question 
relative au nombre des animaux tues ou vendus pour la boucherie ou I'expor- 
tation n'ait pas 6t6 clairement comprise par les enum^rateurs et que dans bien 
des cas les animaux tues sur la ferme n'aient pas ete compt^s. » 

Le tableau 74 est un etat comparatif des Evaluations par tete de chaque 
espece d'animaux sur la ferme dans le dernier recensement, et le prix moj-en par 
tete obtenu pour les animaux vendus. Les chiffres demontrcnt que, genera- 
lement, les provinces qui donnent des valeurs elevees pour une classe quelconquc 
d'animaux sur la ferme, donnent aussi des valeurs elev<5es pour les animaux 
vendus en 1910. Les statistiques semblent indiquer par 1^ que les cultivateurs 
out bas6 Icurs estimations de la valeur des animaux sur la ferme, a la dale du 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Ixxxvii 



recensement, sur les chiffres obtenus des ventes faites durant Fannee, et sent 
en meme temps une indication de la richesse du Canada dans toutes les classes 
(i'animaux, ainsi qu'une preuve de I'importancc de Tindustrie animale au 
pays. 

TABLEAU li. VALEUR MOYENNE DES ANIMAUX SUR LES FER.MES, JUIN 1911, ET 
DES ANIMAUX VEXDU3 EN 1910, PAR TETE. 





Che\'aux 


BetE!? a 


CORNES 


Mou 


roNs 


PORCS 


Provinces 




















Sur les 




Sur les 




Sur les 




Sur les 


Ven- 




ferraes 


Vendus 


fermes 


Vendues 


fermes 


Vendues 


fermes 


(lus- 




(juin 1911)1 

i 


(1910) 


(juin 1911); 


(1910) 


(juin 1911) 


(1910) 


(juin 1911) 


(191i) 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


§ 


$ 


1 


$ 


Canada 


146-93 


146 72 


3G 01 


34 48 


4 92 


4 97 


7 42 


11 99 


Colombie- 


















Britannique 


136-44 


158-56 


3601 


37-29 


6-70 


7-08 


10-77 


11-55 


Alberta 


138-62 


144-24 


30-64 


35-24 


5 -68 


5-82 


8-40 


12-54 


Saskatchewan 


174-91 


174-13 


34-46 


36-01 


5-44 


5-31 


8-78 


11-39 


Manitoba 


168-31 


170-40 


28-83 


30 07 


0-01 


0-44 


8-51 


12-03 


Ontario 


139-79 


147-23 


32-57 


38-57 


5-97 


5-81 


7-19 


12-30 


t,)uebcc 


131-10 


117-79 


26-21 


26-06 


4-25 


4-36 


6-80 


12.19 


Xouveau-Brunswick 


123-64 


116-64 


21-07 


24-39 


3-37 


3-46 


7-49 


6-59 


Xouvellc-Ecosse. . . . 


115-78 


115-95 


25-18 


30-52 


3-60 


3-46 


8-50 


8-06 


He du Prince- 


















Edouard 


118 02 


12117 


20- 02 


24-88 


403 


403 


6- 06 


6-99 



Chevaux. Dans le recensement de 1901 le nombre de chevaux vendus 
durant I'ann^e n'a pas ete inscrit, et les valeurs en ont ete comprises avec celles 
des autres animaux vendus durant I'annee sous I'en-tete general "Animaux 
vendus durant Tannee". II n'est done pas possible de faire, entre les deux 
recensements, des comparaisons quant au nombre ou a la valcur des chevaux 
vendus. En 1911 le nombre de chevaux vendus, pour tout le Canada, s'^levait 
a 319,042 avec une valeur de $46,810,659 et une valeur moyenne de $146-72 jxir 
tete. La valeur moyenne des chevaux vendus et celle des chevaux gardes sur 
la ferme sont presque semblables, la premiere etant de $146-72 et la derniere de 
S146-95. Les trois provinces de la Saskatchewan, de Quebec et du Nouveau- 
Brunswick indiquent des plus petites moyennes quant aux prix des chevaux 
vendus que pour ceux des chevaux gardes sur la ferme. Le prix par tete obtenu 
pour les chevaux vendus etait plus 61eve que celui des chevaux gardes sur la 
ferme dans la Colombie-Britanniquc, I'Alberta, le Manitoba, Ontario, la Nouvelle- 
Ecosse et I'lle du Prince-Edouard, tableau 74. 

Le tableau 75 donne un sommaire du nombre et de la valeur des chevaux 
vendus en 1910, la proportion qu'ils forment par rapport aux chevaux sur la 
ferme et. la distribution proportionnelle des ventes par provinces. La propor- 
tion des chevaux vendus par rapport au nombre gard<5 sur la ferme i\ la date 
du recensement etait, pour tout le Canada, de 12-28 pour cent. Ontario et 
rile du Prince-Edouard offrent les chiffres les plus eleves, les ventes dans la 
premiere representant 15-23 pour cent et dans la derniere 14-60 pour cent du 
chiffre total sur la ferme. La plus basse proportion des ventes se trouve dans 
la Saskatchewan ou elle repr^sente seulement 8-36 pour cent du total sur la 



Ixxxviii 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



ferme. Dans les autres provinces les chiffres se rapprochent de la moyenne 
g^n^rale pour le Dominion. Comme on I'a dej^ mentionne, une petite pro- 
portion seulement des ventes de chevaux inscrites dans le recensement 6tait 
pour I'exportation. Les chiffres du recensement indiquent que 319,032 che- 
vaux ont change de mains en 1910, tandis que les rapports du Commerce mon- 
trent que sur ce nombre 2,764, ou moins de un pour cent, ont ete exp6di6s en 
dehors du pays. Du nombre de ventes faites, Ontario a obtenu 38-74 pour 
cent, Quebec 14-43 pour cent, les provinces maritimes 5-82 pour cent, les 
provinces des prairies 38-80 pour cent et la Colombie-Britannique 2-21 pour 
cent. 

TABLEAU 75. CHEVAUX VENDUS EN 1910, PROPORTION QU'ILS TORMENT DES 
CHEVAUX SUR LES FERMES, AINSI QUE LA DISTRIBUTION POUR CENT DES 
VENTES. PAR PROVINCES. 





Chevaux 


VENDU.S 


Valcur 
par 
t^te 


Proportion, 
des 
chevaux 
vendus 
du total 
sur les 
fermes 


Pour- 
cent de la 
distri- 
bution 

des 
chevaux 
vendus 


Provinces 


Nombre < 


Valour 


Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 


NO. 

319,642 , 

7,010 
52,146 1 
42,425 ; 
29,205 ' 
123,626 
46,036 
6,757 
6.540 
5,267 \ 
1 


$ 

4G, 810, 659 

1,116,272 

7,521,611 

7,387,515 

4,976,413 

18,201,602 

5,422,582 

788,149 

758,307 

638.208 


$ 

146 72 

158-56 
144-24 
174-13 
170-40 
147-23 
117-79 
116-64 
115-95 
121-17 


p. c 

12 28 

12-26 
12-81 
8-36 
10-42 
15-23 
12-39 
10-33 
10-65 
14-66 


p. c. 

100 e« 

2-21 
16-35 
13-30 


Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 


9-15 

38-74 

14-43 

2- 12 

205 




1-6* 







Be tail de tOUte espece. Le tableau 76 contient la statistique 
(les differentes especes de betail — ^vaches laitieres, taureaux, boeufs, taures 
ct veaux — et donne le nombre ct la valeur do to us ces animaux vendus en 
1910. Un tr^s grand nombre do bestiaux vendus durant Tannic etaient des 
animaux qui avaient deja 6t6 achetes par les cultivateurs durant la meme 
ann6e. La coutume d'acheter des animaux pour les mettre a I'engrais est com- 
mune a toutes les parties du pays, et consequemment les ventes collectives 
du betail comprennent n^cessairement quelques cas de duplication. Le nombre 
total du betail vendu pour tout le Canada, en 1910, ^tait de 1,752,792 tetes, 
avec une valeur totale de $60,438,593 et une valeur moyenne de $34-48 par tete. 

Le prix moyen le plus 61ev6 par tete revenait k Ontario avec $38-57, et 
le moins 6\e\€ au Nouveau-Brunswick avec $24-39. 

La proportion du nombre de ventes par rapport au nombre de bestiaux 
sur la ferme 6tait plus 61ev6e dans I'Alberta avec 34 • 72 pour cent, suivie d'On- 
tario avec 32 - 14 pour cent, du Manitoba avec 30 - 43 pour cent, de la Colombie- 
Britannique avec 28-90 pour cent, et de Quebec avec 21-33 pour cent. Dans 
toutes les autres provinces les ventes repr^sentaic nt au-dessous de 20 pour cent 
d( tous les bestiaux sur la ferme Ic ler juin 1911. De toutes les ventes ins- 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Ixxxix 



crites dans les listes du recensement, Ontario comptait 45 • 87 pour cent, Quebec 
16-26 pour cent, 1' Alberta 14-65 pour cent, le Manitoba 7-56 pour cent, la 
Saskatchewan 6-89 pour cent, les provinces maritimes 6-47 pour cent, et la 
Colombie-Britannique 2-30 pour cent. 

TABLEAU 76 BETES A CORNES DE TOUTES SORTES VENDUES EN 1910, PROPORTION 
QU'ELLES FORMENT DU TOTAL SUR LES FERMES, AINSI QUE LE POUR-CENT 
DE LA DISTRIBUTION DES VENTES PARPROVIM 1> 



Provinces 



Betes a cornes vendues 



Nonibre ^'aleul• Valeur 

; par tete 



Proportion, 

des betes 

a cornes 

vendues du 

total sur 

les fermes 



Pour-cent 
de la distri- 
bution dca 
betes a 
cornes 
vendues 



Canada 

Coloni bie-Hritanniquc 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick. . . 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

He du Prince-Edouard 



1,753,793 i 60,438,593 



34,48 



26 86 



40,230 


1,500,086 


37-29 


28-90 


256,840 


9,052,045 


35-24 


34-72 


120,802 


4,350,061 


36-01 


19-06 


132, 538 


3,984,986 


30-07 


30-43 


804,029 


31,013,066 


38-57 


32-14 


285,024 


7,427,231 


26-06 


21-33 


37,381 


911.598 


24-39 


13-74 


54,938 


1,676,845 


30-52 


14-48 


21,010 


522,675 


24-88 


18-52 



P.O. 

100 09 

2-30 

14-65 

6-89 

7-50 

45-87 

16-26 

2-13 

3-14 

1-20 



Vaches laitieres. Le tableau 77 donne la statistique des vaches 
laitieres vendues en 1910, et dont les chiffres sont aussi compris dans le tableau 
precedent. Les ventes de vaches laitieres representaient 21 pour cent du 
nombre total de betes a cornes vendues et 23-45 pour cent de la valeur totale 
obtenue. La valeur moyenne pour tout le Canada dtait de S38-51 par tete. 
Le prix paj^e par tete etait de $52-29 dans la Colombie-Britannique, de $42-32 

TABLEAU 77. VACHES LAITIERES VENDUES EN 1910, PROPORTION QU'ELLES FOR- 
MENT DU TOTAL SUR LES FERMES. AINSI QUE LE POUR-CENT DE LA DISTRI- 
BUTION DES VENTES, PAR PROVINCES. 



Vaches laitieres vendues 



Provinces 



Nombre 



Valeur 



Valeur 
par tSte 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick. . . 

Xouvelle-Ecosse 

Ilo du Prince-Edouard. 



NO. ; $ 

368,165 I 14,177,527 



0,829 

29,209 ' 

24,817 I 

28,631 I 

143,790 1 

103,180 

11,767 I 

13,775 I 

6,157 ' 



357, 120 

1,143,104 

1,028,204 

1,080,745 

6,085,102 

3,526,036 

345,356 

461,080 

150,780 



$ 

38 51 

52-29 
39-14 
41-43 
37-75 
42-32 
.34-17 
29-34 
33-47 
24-49 



Proportion 
dos vaches 

laitieres 
vendues du 

total sur 
les fermes 



p.c. 

14 19 

20-11 
19-78 
13-70 
18-43 
13-92 
13-68 
10-84 
10-66 
11-82 



Pour-cent 
de la distri- 
bution doH 
vaches 
laiti^re.s 
vendues 



p.c. 

100 09 

1-85 

• 7-93 

6-74 

7-78 

39-Ort 

28-03 

3-20 

3-74 

1-67 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



dans Ontario, de $41-43 dans la Saskatchewan, de $39-14 dans 1' Alberta, et 
de $37-75 dans le Manitoba. Dans Quebec et les provinces maritimes le prix 
moyen variait de $24-49 dans I'lle du Princ'e-Edouard a $34-17 dans Quebec. 
Les ventes de vaches laitieres dans Ontario, Quebec et la Saskatchewan re- 
pr^sentaient moins de 14 pour cent du total sur les fermes; dans les provinces 
maritimes la proportion 6tait environ de 11 pour cent; dans le. Manitoba, de 
18-43 pour cent; dans I'Alberta, de 19-78 pour cent, et dans la Colombie- 
Britannique, de 20-11 pour cent. 

Moutons. Le nombre de moutons vendus en 9110 etait de 949,039 avcc 
une valeur totale de $4,720,014 et une valeur moyenne de $4.97 par tete. La 
valeur des moutons tues sur la ferme dans la meme ann6e etait de $735,343, 
et en appliquant le prix moyen obtenu pour les moutons vendus ce!a donnerait 
un total de 1,096,996 moutons vendus ou tues en 1910, comparativement a _un 
total de 1,342,288 dans Tannic de recensement se terminant le 31 mars 1901. 
Comme les ventes de moutons ne comptent pas autant de cas de duplication 
que celles du betail ou des pores, les chiffres representent passablement bien le 
commerce dans les moutons pour cette annee-la. Du chiffre total de moutons 
vendus, Ontario comptait 41-79 pour cent, Qu6bec 28-95 pour cent, les pro- 
vinces maritimes 19-48 pour cent et les provinces de I'ouest 9-78 pour cent. 

Le nombre des moutons vendus, pour tout le Canada, formait 43-65 pour 
cent du nombre total sur les fermes, par provinces dans I'ordre suivant: Ontario 
53*43 pour cent, Quebec 43-12 pour cent, I'lle du Prince-Edouard 43-04 pour 
cent, la Colombie-Britannique 41 - 10 pour cent, la Nouvelle-Ecosse, le Nouveau- 
Brunswick et le- Manitoba de 38- 17 a 38-94 pour cent, et I'Alberta et la Saskat- 
chewan, moins de 30 pour cent 



TABLEAU 78. MOUTONS VENDUS EN 1910, PROPORTION QU'ILS FORMENT DU 
TOTAL SUR LES FERMES, AINSI QUE LE POUR-CENT DE LA DISTRIBUTION 
DES VENTES, PAR PROVINCES. 



Provinces 



Moutons vend is 



Nombre 



Vuleur 



Valeur 
par t6te 



Proportion ; 
desmou- ! Pour-cent 

tons vendus^ de la distri- 
du total : bution df- 
sur les ! moutons 
fermes i vendus 



4,97 



I NO. $ 

(aiiadu 919,039 4,720,014 

Coloiubie-Britanniquc 16, 139 

Alberta | .37, 059 

Saskatchewan 25, 154 

Manitoba 14,534 

Ontario 396,571 

Quebec 274,756 

Nouveau-Brunswick 61 , 187 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 84,373 

lie du Prince-Edouard 39, 266 



P.O. 

43 65 



p.c. 
100 00 



114,317 


7-08 


4110 


1-70 


215,524 


5-82 


27-74 


3-90 


133,628 


5-31 


22 02 


205 


93,638 


6-44 


38-94 


1-53 


2,303,745 


5-81 


53-43 


41-7!i 


1,196,892 


4-36 


4312 


28-95 


211,890 


3-46 


38-65 


6-45 


292.122 


3-46 


38-17 


8-89 


158.258 ! 


403 


43 04 


414 



Fores. Le montant total qui revient aux cultivateurs tin Canada en iUlU 
de la vente des pores, est de $51,344,300. Ce montant considerable a ete obtenu 
(1) des pores vendus $33,229,063 et (2) des pores tues sur la ferme $18,115,303. 



RECENSEMENTDU CANADA 1911 xci 

Si Ton applique le prix moyen obtenu pour les pores vendus k la valeur des 
pores tues sur la ferme, cela doime un total de 4,282,623 pores vendus ou tues 
dans I'amiee 1910, eomparativement a 2,555,413 dans la deeade pr^c^dente, 
soit un gain de 1,727,210 ou 67-59 pour cent de 1901 a 1911. 

L;l proportion des pores vendus ou tues par rapport aux pores gardes sur 
la iVrme en 1901, etait dc 108-50 pour cent, eontre 116-82 pour cent en 1911. 
En d'autres termes pour chaque 1,000 pores vivants en 1900 on en avait vendu 
ou tue. 1,085, et en 1911 le nombre de pores vendus ou tues ^tait de 1,178 pour 
chaque 1,000 pores vivants. Mais comme les ehiffres du dernier reeensement, 
pris le ler juin, eomprenneht les jeunes pores, la proportion des pores vendus 
ou tues par rapport au total des pores vivants en 1911 se trouve ainsi eontrai- 
renient afl'eetee. Le nombre de pores tues sur la ferme n'ayant pas ete entre 
sur les listes, la statistique du tableau 79 ne se rapporte qu'aux pores vendus. 



TARI.AEAU 79. PORCS VENDUS EN 1910, PROPORTION QU'ILS FORMENT DU TOTAL 
SUR LES FERME?, AINSI QUE LE POUR-CENT DE LA DISTRIBUTION DES VENTES 
PAR PROVINCES. 



I'n.vii, 




Proportion, 

des pores 

vendus 

du 

total 
sur les 

fermes 



Pour-cent 
do la distri- 
bution dos 
porc.-^ 
vendus 



xo. 

Canuda I 2,771,755 

Coloniljie-Britannique | 30,433 

Alberta 158 , 667 

Saskatchewan 102,442 

Manitoba 132,330 

Ontario 1,811,078 

Quebec 414,805 

Nouveau-Brun.swiek 42,074 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 48,493 

He du Prince-Edouard 31 , 433 



1, 
1, 
1, 

22, 
5, 



351,374 
989,004 
166,895 
591,857 
282,644 
056,376 
277,243 
294,018 
219,652 



11-55 

12-54 

11-39 

12 03 

12-30 

12-19 

6-59 

6 06 

6-99 



p.p. 

76,26 

90-56 
66-80 
35-78 
70-23 
95-95 
52-22 
48-14 
76-51 
55-76 



p.c. 

10«,0« 

11 
5-72 
3-70 
4-77 
65-34 
14-97 
1-52 
1-75 
113 



Volailles. En 1910 le montant qui revenait aux cultivateurs du produit 
des volailles, pour tout le Canada, s'elevait k $31,262,414 dont $4,819,423 
pour volailles vendues, $3,172,228 pour volailles tu6es et $23,270,763 pour les 
ceufs. On voit par \k que si la valeur des volailles vivantes sur la ferme a la 
date du reeensement, pent etre acceptive comme eonstituant le capital plae6 
dans eette branche de I'industrie animale, les revenus provenant de cette source 
se montcnt a 213-34 pour cent. 

Le tal^lcau 80 donne les ehift'res du revenu provenant dc I'industrie dc la 
vohiille, par classes et par provinces. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU 8«. REVENU DES VOLAILLES PAR PROVINCES EN 1910. 



YaLEUR DES VOLAILLES 



Provinces 



Vendues 



Canada 4,819,433 

Colombie-Britannique 207, 952 

Alberta 252,937 

Saskatchewan 153, 163 

Manitoba 286,853 

Ontario 2, 689,797 

Quebec 1,026,896 

Nouveau-Brunswick 86, 915 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 72, 736 

He du Prince-Edouard 42, 174 



Tuees 
sur la 
ferme 



Valeur 

des 
oeufs 



Revenu 

total 

des volailles 



S $ I $ 

3,172.228 23,270,763 31,262,414 



56,091 


1,032,263 


1,296,306 


170.673 


1,515,866 


1,939,476 


227,718 


2,248,998 


2,629,879 


255,113 


1,763,322 


2,305,288 


1,453,901 


10,725,733 


14,869,431 


662,343 


3,812,838 


5,502,077 


166,770 


677,205 


930,890 


91,075 


931,112 


1,094,923 


88,544 


563,426 


694,144 



Le tableau 81 constitue un etat comparatif de la valeur des animaux de 
ferme vendus ou tues au dernier recensement et au recensement precedent. 
Les chiffres pour le recensement de 1911 se rapportent a I'annee de calendrier 
1910, tandis que ceux du recensement precedent sont pour I'annee se tcrminant 
le 31 mars 1901. Cette difference de date exceptee, les statistiques des valeurs 
dans chaque recensement reposent sur les memes bases. En 1901 les valeurs 
^talent donnees totalement (1) pour les animaux vendus et (2) pour les animaux 
tu^s sur la ferme. En 1911 les valeurs de chaque espece d'animaux vendus 
ou tues ont ete donnees en detail. La valeur totale de tous les animaux vendus 
ou tues, en 1911, etait de §177,635,587, contre §75,706,902 en 1901, soit un gain 
de $101,928,685 ou 134-64 pour cent. Le plus haut montant d'augmentation 
durant la decade se trouve dans Ontario avec §40,892,663, et les plus fortes 
proportions dans les provinces de I'ouest, a savoir: 1' Alberta 750 pour cent, 
la Saskarchewan 669 • 15 pour cent, le Manitoba 205 • 40 pour cent et la Colombie- 
Britannique 144-99 pour cent. La plus faible proportion est dans la Nouvelle- 
Ecosse (65-02 pour cent). 

TABLEAU 81. VALEUR TOTALE DE TOUS LES ANIMAUX DE FERME VENDUS OU 

TUES EN 1910 ET 1900. 



Pre 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau-Brunswick. . . 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

He du Prince-Edouard 




A U G M E NT ATIO N 



1900 



propor- 
num6riquj tionnelle 



177,635,587 

3,699,375 

20,459,669 

15,394,653 

12,809,637 

85,965.148 

28.739,921 

3,711,345 

4,414,587 

2,441,252 



S S 

75,706,902 101,928,685 



1,510,004 
2,406,899 
2,001,505 
4,194,394 
45.072,485 
14,656,814 
1,948,758 
2,675,135 
1,240,908 



Pour-cent de la va- 
leur TOTALE POUR 
TOUT LE CANADA 



1910 



1900 



p.c. : p.c. p.c. 
134 64 160 00 lOO 00 



2,189,371 

18,052,770; 

13,393, 148 1 

8,615,243 

40,892,663 

14,083,1071 

1,762.587, 

1,739,4521 

1,200,344 



144-99 


2-08 


1-99 


750 00 


11-52 


3-18 


669 151 


8-66, 


2-65 


205-40; 


7-21 


5 -.54 


90-73 


48 -40! 


59-54 


96-09 


16-18 


19-36 


90-45 


209 


2-57 


65-02; 


2-49 


3-53 


96-73 


1-37 


1-64 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Laine. La tonte de 1911 etait de 6,933,955 livres evaluce a $1,602,044, 
soit une valeur moyenne de 23-1 cents la livre. La tonte de 1901 s'clevait a 
10,657,597 livres valant $1,887,004 ou une valeur moyenne de 17-7 cents la 
livre. 

Oeufs. En 1910 le Canada a produit 123,071,034 douzaines d'oeufs ayant 
une valeur totale de $23,270,763 et une valeur vmoyenne de 18 • 9 cents la douzaine 
sur la ferme, comparativmeent a une production de 84,132,802 douzaines en 
1900 ayant une valeur totale de $10,286,828 et une valeur moyenne de 12-2 
cents la douzaine. 

Durant I'annee se termiiiant le 30 juin 1901 le Canada a exporte 11,363,064 
douzaines d'oeufs valant $1,691,640, et importe 951,745 douzaines valant 
$194,188, contre une exportation durant I'annee se tcrminant a la meme date 
en 1911, de 87,420 douzaines valant $23,752 et une importation de 2,926,856 
douzaines valant $531,864. Le prix par douzaine re^u pour les oeufs exportes 
en 1901 etait de 14-9 cents contre 27-2 cents en 1911. Les ceufs importcs out 
rapporte 18-2 cents par douzaine en 1911 et 20-4 cents en 1901. 

Le tableau suivant contient les statistiques de la production, dcs cxporta- 
tions, des importations et de la consommation des oeufs en 1911 et 1901. Les 
chiffres de ce tableau demontrent qu'il est possible d'agrandir avantagcusement 
la sphere do cette Industrie, car s'il n'y avait eu ni exportation ni importation 
d'oeufs en 1910, la production domecstique serait restee en dec a de 2,839,436 
douzaines de la demainde du marche canadien. 



TABLEAU 82. 



PRODUCTION, EXP0RTATI0N3, IMPORTATIONS ET CONSOMMATION 
DES CEUFS, 1910 ET 1900. 



Liste 



Augmentation (+) ou 

DIXITNUTION ( — ) 



1910 



1900 



(Eufs— 
Consommation domestique. 

Exportations 

Importations 

Consommation totale 

" parfamille.. 

" par tetc 



Valeur totale de — 
Production domestique. 

Exportations 

Importations 



Prix la douzaine- 
Sur les fermes. 
Exportations. . 
Importations. . 



123,071,034 

87,420 

2,926,856 

125,910,470 

84-6 

17-4 



23,270,763 

23,752 

531,864 



cents 



18-9 
27-2 
18-2 



douz. 

84,132,802 

11,363,064 

951,745 

73,721,483 

68-8 

13-7 



10,286,828 

1,691,640 

194, 188 



cents 



12-2 
14-9 
20-4 



numerique 



douz. 

+38,938,232 

-11,275,644 

+ 1,975,111 

+52,188,987 

+ 15-8 

+3-7 



+ 12,983,935 

-1,667,888 

+337,676 

cents 

+6-7 

+ 12-3 

-2-2 



proportionnelle 



p.c. 

+46-28 
-99-23 
+207-53 
+70-79 
+22-96 
+27-00 

p. c. •< 

+ 126-22 

-93-28 

+ 173-88 

p. c. 'A 
+54-92 
+82-55 
-10-78 



Nota: — Les chiffres de I'exportation et de rimportation sont pour les douze mois expirant le 30 juin 
1901 et 1911. 



EXPORTATIONS DES PRODUITS ANIMAUX. 



La quantite et la valeur dcs produits animaux exportes durant les annees 
se terminant le 30 juin 1891, 1901 et 1911 sont donn^es dans le tableau 83. De 
1891 k 1901 les exportations de viandes de toutes sortes indiquent de fortes 



xciv RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

augmentations, tandis que de 1901 a 1911 les exportations du boeuf et du jamhon 
seulement ont avance. Ces diminutions dans les exportations des produits 
animaux durant la derniere decade se sont produites en depit du fait qu'en 
1901 la valeur moyenne par livre des exportations du bacon etait de 11 -2 cents; 
du boeuf de 8 • 4 cents; des viandes en boites de 11-3 cents; des jambons dc 11-3 
«ents; du mouton de 7-4 cents; du pore de 6-9 cents, comparativemcnt aux 
«hiffres suivants pour 1911 : bacon, 13 • 7 cents, boeuf, 9 • 3 cents, viandes en boites, 
13-4 cents, jambons, 13-3 cents, mouton, 8-8 cents, pore, 11-2 cents. Les ta- 
bleaux precedents ayant demontre qu'il y a eu une augmentation da,ns le nombre 
d'animaux en 1911, comparativemcnt a 1901, la diminution dans les exportations 
durant la decade doit etre attribuee a une plus grande consommation domcstique, 
due en partie a I'augmentation de la population et aussi a une population plus 
en moyen d'acheter conformement a un ton de vie plus eleve. 

TABLEAU 83. QUANTITE ET VALEUR DES PRODUITS DES ANIMAUX EXPORTEri EN 

1891, 1901 ET 1911. 



Especes 



Produits des animaux- 

Saindou 

Boeuf 

Viandes en conf^orvcs. 

Jambons 

Mouton 

Pore 

Beurre 

From age 

Oeufs. . . 

Laino , . 



Exportations durant ' 


Ex PORTATIO NS D U R A XT 


Exportation^! durant 


l'annee ecoulee le 30 


l'annee ecoulee le 30 


l'annee ecoulee le .30 


JUIN 


1891 1 


JOTN 1901 


JUIN 


1911 


Quantite 


Valeur 


Quantite 


\ iili'ur 


Quantite 


\ al<>ur 


lb 


.§ 


11) 


> 


lb 


S 


7,150,756 


590,852 


103,020,661 


ll,49;i,868 


()4, 1,S4,9(J() 


■S, 790, 537 


.309,791 


16,051 


9,710,458 


813,343 


1.113,141 


103,646 


2,767,080 


271,184 


3,726,997 


419,959 


390, 307 


. .52,297 


403,481 


.37,617 


2,528,844 


284,578 


4,023,798 


.-):J6,588 


291,991 


23,993 


76,875 


5,712 


51,60.i 


4,562 


67,687 


4,089 


742, 122 


51,. 374 


398.698 


44,621 


:],768,101 


602,175 


16,335,528 


3,295,663 


3,514,174 


824, 155 


100,202,140 


9,508,800 


195,926,397 


20,696,951 


178.465,902 


20,395,610 


douz. 




douz. 




douz. 




8,022,935 


1,160,359 


11,363,064 


1,691,640 


87,420 


23,752 


lb 




lb 




lb 




1.108,286 


245,503 


1,043,673 


186,540 


1,076.963 


217, 90! » 



PRODUITS LAITIERS. 



Dans le recensement de 1901 la statistique de I'industrie laitiere sur la 
ferme etait representee sous deux en-tetes (1) la valeur totale des produits 
laitiers et (2) la quantite de beurre fait durant l'annee. Dans le dernier recen- 
sement la quantite et la valeur du beurre de manage ont ete inscrites separement . 
La quantity totale et la valeur du lait produit sur la ferme ont aussi 6t6 inscrites 
et cette valeur a 6ie prise comme repr^sentant la valeur totale des produits 
laitiers revenant au cultivatoiir. c'est-i-dire la valeur du lait sans le rench^ris- 
sement du travail. 

Le tableau suivant, — dans lequol les exportations, les importations et 
la consommation du beurre, du fromage, de la creme, du lait condens(5, etc., 
ont ete convertis a leurs Equivalents en lait — donne une comparaison int^ressante 
de la condition de I'industrie laitiere au Canada en 1901 et 1911. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



TABLEAU Si. STATISTIQUES COMPARATIVES DE LTNDUSTRIE LAITI^RE MOX- 
TRANT LA PRODUCTION, L'EXPORTATION, L'IMPORTATION, ET LA CONSOMMA- 
TION, POUR TOUT LE CANADA, POUR LES ANNEES DE RECENSEMENT 1911 ET 1901. 



Liste 



1911 



AuG.MEXTATtOX 
DIMIXUTIOX 



litOl 



(-I-) ou 

(-) 



iiuinenque 



propor- 
tionnelle 



Production totale du lait lb. i 9,806,741,348 6,866,834,000 



+2,939,907,348 +42-81 



Exportations des produits de la laiterie, 
comme lait " 

Importations des produits de la laiterie, 
comme lait " 

Consommation totale comme lait " 

Consommation par tete comme lait " 

Vaches laitiercs en Canada no. 

Livres de lait par vaches lb. 



2,236,663,687| 2,514,596,967 - 277,932,280 -llOo 

39,871,207 34, 886,. 346' + 4,984,861 +14 -28 

7,609,948,868; 4,387,123,3791 +3,222,825,489 +73-:;8 

1,055-96 816-76; + 239-20 +29-28 
I 

■ 2,595,255! 2,408,077; + 186,578 + 7-74 

3,779 2,850 + 929 +-32-59 



NoTA. — Les chiffres donnant I'exportation et I'importation des produits de la laiterie, sous le terme 
"iait" sont tires dulivre intitule "Production laitiere au Canada" par M. J. A. Ruddick, commissaire de 
r Industrie laiti&re. 

On voit par le tableau precedent que la production totale du lait a augmentc 
de pres de trois billions de livres ou 42-81 pour cent de 1901 a 1911. Durant 
cette meme periode nos exportations de produits laitiers convertis a leurs equi- 
valents en lait, ont augmcnte de 11-05 pour cent ct nos importations converties 
de la meme maniere ont augmente de 14-28 pour cent. La consommation 
de produits laitiers, en lait, pour tout le Canada donne une augmentation totale 
de 3,222,825,489 livres ou 73 - 38 pour cent, et la consommation par tete de la 
population donne une augmentation de 239-20 livres ou 29-28 pour cent. La 
production moyenne de lait par vache, pour tout le Canada, 6tait de 3,779 livres 
en 1911, contre 2,850 livres en 1901. Lc plus haut rendement par vache au 
dernier recensement sc trouve dans la Colombic-Britannique avec 4,372 livres, 
suivie d'Ontario avec 4,158 et de Quebec avec 3,582 livres. Les Provinces 
Maritimes indiquent toutes une faible moyenne de production, la Nouvelle- 
Ecosse 3,296 livres, le Nouveau-Brunswick 3,177 livres et I'lle du Prince-Edouard 
3,010 livres. La production laitiere dans les provinces des prairies est remarqua- 
blement egale, soit de 3,565 livres dans I'ATberta, de 3,501 livres dans le Manitoba 
et de 3,654 livres dans la Saskatchewan. 

Dans le tableau 85 se trouve un 6tat comparatif de la quantity de beurre, 
de menage et de fabrique, produite au Canada en 1900 et 1910, ainsi que la pro- 
duction moyenne par ferme dans chaque annee. La quantite totale de beurre 
produite au Canada en 1910 6tait de 201,599,598 livres, dont 137,110,200 livres 
de menage et 64,489,398 livres de beurre de fabrique, contre une production 
totale de 141, 409,815 livres en 1900, dont 105,343,076 livres de beurre de 
manage et 36,066,739 livres de beurre de fabrique. L'augmentation dans le 
beurre de manage etait de 31,767,124 livres ou 30-15 pour cent, et dans le 
beurre de fabrique, de 28,422,559 livres ou 78-80 pour cent, formant une 
augmentation totale de 60,189,783 livres ou 42-56 pour cent. La production 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



moyenne du beurre de manage par ferme qui dtait de 193-4 livres en 1900 est 
tombee a 191-8 livres en 1910, et la quantite moyenne de beurre de fabrique par 
ferme a augmente de 66-2 livres en 1900 a 90-2 livres en 1910. 

En 1901, comme il est d6ja mentionne, on n'a pas tenu compte du fromage 
de menage, et il est probable que le quantite alors etait de peu d'importance; 
en 1911, bien que le fromage de fabrique indique une diminution de pr^s de 21 
millions de livres, le fromage de menage ne s'eleve pas a plus des f,, de un pour 
cent de la production totale du fromage. 

TABLEAU 85, ETAT COMPARATIF DE LA PRODUCTION D U BEURRE ET DU FROMAGE 

AU CANADA. 1910 ET 1900. 



Liste 


1910 


1900 


Augmentation* 


Production 
par ferme 


nume- 
lique 


pro- 

portion- 

nelle 


1910 


1900 


Beurre — 

De menage 

Fabrique 


lb. 

137,110,200 
64,489,398 


lb. 

105,343,076 
30,065,739 


lb. 

31,767,124 
28,422,659 


p.c. 

30- 15 

78,80 


lb. 

191-8 
90-2 


lb. 

193-4 
66-2 


Total 

Fromage — 

De menage 

P abriqu6 


201,599,598 

1,371,092 
199,904,205 


141,409,815 

0) 
220,833,269 


60,189,783 
-20,929,064 


42-56 
-42-56 


282-0 

1-9 
279-7 


259-6 
405-4 






Total 


201,275,297 


220,833,269 


_ 


- 


281-6 


_ 







.(') Non mentionne. (2) Lc signe ( — ) indique une diminution. 

Sur la production totale du beurre en 1910 (201,599,598 livres) 3,673,702 
livres ont ete exportees, laissant 197,925,890 livres pour la consommation 
domestique, qui, avec les 746,102 livres importees, donnent un total de 198,- 
671,998 livres de beurre consommees au Canada en 1910, soit une moyenne de 
27-56 livres par tete de la population. 

Les exportations du fromage se montaient a 186,665,789 livres ou 92-6 
pour cent de la production totale. Le produit de 1910 non exports (14,609,508 
livres) avec les 862,862 livres importees forment une consommation moyenne 
de 2- 14 livres par tete de la population. 

Le tableau 86 donne un sommaire de la production laitiere en 1910 par 
provinces. La province de Quebec a produit 64 • 79 pour cent de tout le beurre 
de fabrique fait au Canada en 1910, et 30-44 pour cent de tout le beurre. C'est 
la seule province oil la production domestique n'a pas depasse la production 
des fabriques. La Colombie-Britannique n'a pas produit de fromage de fabrique 
et seulement une petite quantite de fromage d'aucune sortc. Les provinces des 
prairies ont donne plus d'attention k la production du beurre qu'a celle du 
fromage; les trois provinces ont produit 36,428,801 livres de beurre en 1910 
et seulement 1,411,781 livres do fromage. La province d'Ontario occupe la 
premiere place dans la fabrication du fromage, aj'ant produit plus de 68 pour 
cent de la production totale du Canada, Quebec vient ensuite avec environ 
29 pour cent et I'lle du Prince-Edouard en troisieme avec 1-6 pour cent. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU 86. PRODUITS LAITIERS PAR PROVINCES EN 1910. 



Provinces 



Production du beurre 



Totalite 

de la 

production 

du lait 



Canada 

Colombie- 

Britaiinique — 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan.. 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Nouveau- 

Brunswick ; 

Nouvelle-Ecosse. | 
lie du Prince- I 

Edouard ! 



lb. 



Production du fromagk 



de de | d( 

menage fabrique lotale j menage 



lb. 



lb. 



lb. 



lb. 



fabrique toial<. 



lb. 



9, 806, Ul, 348! 137,110,200 64,489,398 201,599,598; 1,371,092 199,904,205 



148,467,451 
526,472,140 
662,092,621 
543,889,750 
4,295,977,547 
2,701,971,618 

344,888,058 
426,118,151 



1,248,282 1,206,202 
7,689,4.32' 2,149,121 
12,053,201 1,548,696 
10,937,864; 2,050,487 
63,253,444:13,876,888 
19,585,98141,782,678 



9,053,394 
10,978,911 



156,864,012! 2,309,691 



2,454,484 
9,838,553 
13,601,897; 
12,988,351' 
77,130,3.32', 
61,368,6591 



849,633 9,903,027 
354,785 11,333,696 

670,908] 2,980,599 



7,4S3 
141,604' 
27,730 
327,525' 
295,886' 
358,625 
I 

3,567 
199,250 



193,479 

26,730 

694,713 

136,093,951 

58,171,091j 

1,166,243 
264,243 



9,422 3,293,755 



lb. 
201,275,297 



7,483 

335,083 

54,460 

1,022,238 

136,389,837 

58,529,716 

1,169,810 
463,493 

3,303,177 



Le tableau 87 fournit un etat comparatif de la valeur des produits laitiers 
en 1900 et 1910. Pour tout le Canada, la valeur des produits laitiers s'elevait 
k $103,381,854 en 1910; contre $66,470,953 en 1900, soit un gain de $36,910,901, 
ou 55-53 pour cent dans la decade. Dans le Manitoba, la Saskatchewan et 
I'Alberta la valeur des produits laitiers a augmente de $4,068,656 en 1900 k 
§21,861,450 en 1910, ou 437-30 pour cent dans la decade. Ontario a donne 
une augmentation de $8,524,714 ou 24-51 pour cent; Quebec une amgmentation 
de $5, 570,283, ou 27-56 pour cent, et les Provinces Maritimes une augmenta- 
tation de $3,562,144, ou 56-92 pour cent. La valeur de la production par 
vache k lait au dernier recensement etait de $39-83, comparativement a $27-60 
au recensement precedent, soit une augmentation de $12-23 ou 44-31 pour 

TABLEAU 87. VALEUR DES PRODUITS LAITIERS PAR PROVINCES, AINSI QUE LA 
VALEUR DE LA PRODUCTION PAR VACHE LAITlfilRE EN 1910 ET 1900. 



Provinces 



1910 



1900 



Augmentation 



num6- 
rique 



pro- 

portion- 

nelle 



Valeur de la pro- 
duction PAR va- 
che LAITIERE 



1910 



Canada 

Colombie-Britannique 

Alberta 

fiaekatchewan 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

■Quebec 

Nouvcau-Brunswick. . . 

Nouvcllc-Ecosse 

lie du Princc-Edouard 



103,381,854 

2,620,9.59 
7,953,847 
7,245,9.50 
6,661,653 
43,. 30 1, 044 
25,778,109 
3.. 568, 221 
4.612,596 
1,639,475 



66,470,953 

1,1,59,993 

546,476 

729,574 

2,792,606 

34. 776,. 3.30 

20,207,826 

2, 260, .537 

2,885,997 

1,111,614 



s 


p.c. [ 


.36.910,901 


55 53 


1,460,966 


125-95 ■ 


7,407,371 


135-55 


6,516,376 


893-18 


3,869,047 


138-55 


8.. 524. 714 


24-51 


5.570,283 


27-56 


1,. 307, 684 


57-85 


1,726,. 599 


59-83 


527.861 


47-49 



$ 

39 83 

7719 
53-87 

40 00 
42-89 
41-92 
34-18 
32-87 
35-68 
31-46 



1900 



$ 

27 CO 

47-28 
11-85 
12-88 
19-74 
32-63 
26-32 
20 -3» 
20-79 
10-70 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



cent par vache. Une grande partie de cette augme»tation est sans doute 
due aux cotes plus ^levees du march^, mais les chiffres du tableau 85 demon- 
trent qu'une bonne partie en est due a raugmentation de la production de 
lait par vache en 1910 sur 1900. Pour les deux recensements la plus grande 
valeur par vache revenait a la Colombie-Britannique, S47-28 en 1901 et S77-19 
en 1911. 

TABLEAU 88. ]&TAT COMPARATIF DE LA VALEUR TOTALE DES PROPRI^T^S 
AGRICOLES, DES PRODUITS DES CHAMPS, DES ANIMAUX VENDUS OU ABAT- 
TUS ET DES PRODUITS DES ANIMAUX EN 1900 ET 1910. AINSI QUE L'AUGMEN- 
TATION DURANT LA DECADE. ^ 



PrODUITS DES CHAMPS 



Li^^te 



Valeur dos 
proprietes 
agricolcs 



Total 

des 

produits 



Total 



Recoltes des 
champs 



Fruits et 
l^umes 



Canada — 

1910 

1900 

Aiignienlatiou totalc... 
" poiir cent. 

Colombie-Britannique — 

1910 

1900 

Augmentation tot-ale. . . . 
■' pour cent. 

A Iberta^ 

1910 

1900 

Augmentation totale 

" pour cent.. 

Saskatchewan — 

1910 

1900 

Augmentation totale 

" pour cent. 

Manitoba— 

1910 

1900 

Augmentation totale. . . . 
" pour cent. 

Ontario — 

1910 

1900 

Augmentation totale 

" pour cent. 

Qu6bec — 

1910... 

1900 

Augmentation totale. . . . 
" pour cent. 

Nouveau-Brunswick — 

1910 

1900 

Augmentation totale 

" pour cent. 

Nouvelle-Ecosse — 

1910 

1900 .- 

Augmentation totale 

" pour cent. 

He du Prince-Edouard — 

1910 

1900 

Augmentation totale 

" pour cent. 



4,231,84»,636i 

1,787, 102, 630| 

2,444,738,0061 

136 79 

188,635,724 

33,491,978 

155,143,746 

463-23 

492,636,008 

34,699,781 

457,936,227 

1,319-70 

832,812,560 

44,460,874 

788,351,686 

1,773-14 

463,243,591 
151,355,081 
311,888,510 

206 -oej 

1,223,701,5491 

932,488,0691 

291,213,480[ 

31-23 

787,754,494, 

436,076,916 

351,677,578 

80-65 

84,895,906 

51,338,311 

33,557,595 

65-37 

115,974,892 

72,564,907! 

43,409,985 

59-821 

I 

42,185,912! 

30,626,713- 

11,559,199, 

37-741 



722,713,962 

362,656,883 

360,057,079 

99 28 

16,982,193 

6,646,225 

10,335,968 

155-52 

48,124,564 

5,803,009 

42,321,555 

729-30 

105,964,889 

7,585,587 

98,379,302 

1,296-92 

68,218,308 

24,443,558 

43,774,750 

179-08 

295,764,315 

196,588,7.32 

99,175,583 

50-45 

131,631,592 

84,970,277 

46,661,315 

54-91 

20,322,373 

12,866.955! 

7,455,418] 

57-94| 

I 

24,152,0451 

16,285,849' 

7,866.196! 

48-301 

11,553,683! 

7,466, 691 1 

4,086,992 

54-741 



416,110,4641 

207,948,320 

208,162,144 

100 10 

9,604,385 

3,5.36,371 

6,068,014 

171-59 

18,1.52,121' 

2,650,4991 

15,501,622 

584-86, 

81,015,140' 

4,656,646; 

70,. 358, 494' 

1,639-97 

46,959,758 

16.833.279 

30,126.479; 

178-97 

154,648.718 

109,947,903 

44,700,815 

40-65 

I 

72, 622, 306 I 

47,415,909 

25,206,397 

53-16 

12,234,897 

8,134.437 

4,100.460 

50-40! 

14,031,478 

9,992,325, 

4,039,153 

40-42, 

6,841,661 

4.780.951 

2,000.710 

43 10, 



384,522,795 

194.953,420 

189,569,3751 

97 24| 

7,246,0181 

3,100,577i 

4,145,441! 

133-70^ 

17,015,329 

2,618,420 

14,396,9091 

549-83' 

i 

79,963,903 

4,608,172 

75,355,731 

1,635-26 

45,509,520 
16,669,321 
28,840,199 

173-01: 

140,786,055 

102,138,809 

38,647,236 

37-84 

65,353,528! 

44,851,108 

20,502,420, 

45-71' 

11,030,237' 

7,740,100 

3,290,137 

42-51 

11,005,033 

8,-584,956 

2,420,077 

28-19 

6,613,172 

4,641,947 

1,971,225 

42-47 



31.587,669 

12,994,900 

18,592,769 

143 08 

2,358,367 

435,794 

1,922,573 

44117 

1,136,793 

32, 079 

1.104.713 

.'i, 443- 73 

1, 051,237 

48,474 

1 , 002, 763 

2,068-66 

1 . 450, 238 

163,958 

1,286,280 

784-52 

13.S62,663 

7,809,084 

ti. 053. 579 

77-53 

7,268,778 

2,564,801 

4,703.977 

183-41 

1,204,660 

.394,337 

810,323 

205-49 

3,026.445 

1,407.309 

1,619,076 

115 04 

228.489 

139,004 

89,486 

64-35i 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



D'apres le dernier recensement le rapport en argent par vache est au- 
dessous de la moyenne dans Quebec et les provinces maritimes, et au-dcssus 
dans Ontario et les provinces de I'ouest. 

Le tableau 88 contient un sommaire general du montant total place en 
proprietes agricoles (comprenant la terre, les batiments, les instruments ara- 
toires et les bestiaux) et les revenus collectifs de ces placements, tels que repre- 

TABLEAU SS. tTAT COMPARATIF DE LA VALEUR TOTALE DE3 PROPRlfeTl^ 
AGRICOLES, DES PRODUITS DES CHAMPS, DES ANIMAUX VENDUS OUiABAT- 
TUS ET DES PDODUITS DES ANIMAUX EN 1900 ET 1910, AINSI QUE L'AUGMEX- 
TATIOF DURANT LA DfiCADE. 



Animaux et leurs pkoduits 



1 

Total 


Aniinaux 

vondus 


Aniniaux 
abattus ou 
vendus 


Produits 
laitier.s 


Lainc, 

anifs pt 
iiiiel 


§■ 


S 


§ 


S 


•? 


306,603,498 
154,708,563 
151,894,935 

98-18 


150,017,752 

52,755,375 

97,262,377 

184-36 


27,617,835 

22,951,527 

4,666,308 

20 33 


103,381,851 

66,470.9.>3 

36,910,901 

55 53 


25.586,057 

12,530,708 

13,055,31!) 

104 19 


7,377,808 

3,109,854 

4,267,954 

137-24 


3,290,001 

1.202,607 

2,087,394 

173-57 


409,374 

307,397 

101,977 

33-17 


2,620,959 

1,159,993 

1,460,966 

125-95 


1,057,474 

439,857 

617,617 

140-41 


29,972,443 

3,152,510 

26,819,933 

850-75 


19,031,121 

2,127,386 

16,903.735 

794-58 


1,428,548 

279,513 

1.149,035 

41108 


7,953,847 

546,476 

7,407,371 

1,355-48 


1,558,927 

199, 135 

1.359,792 

682-85 


24,949,749 

2,928,941 

22,020,808 

751-84 


13,191,262 

1,626,446 

11,564,810 

711-05 


2,203,391 

375,059 

1,828,332 

487-48 


7,245,950 

729,574 

6,516,376 

893-18 


2,309,146 

197,862 

2,111,284 

1,067-05 


21,258,550 

7,610,279 

13,648,271 

179-34 


10,933,747 

2,869,105 

8,064,042 

281-09 


1.875,890 

1,325,289 

550.601 

41-55 


6,061,653 

. 2,792,606 

3,869,047 

138-55 


1,787,260 

623,279 

1,163,981 

186-75 


141,115,597 

86,640,829 

54,474,768 

62-87 


76,490,854 

35,385,376 

41,105,478 

116-17 


9,474,294 

9,687,109 

212,815 

2-20 


43,301,044 

34,776,330 

8,524,714 

24-51 


11,849,405 

6,792,014 

5,057,391 

74-46 


59,009,286 

37,554,368 

21,454,918 

57-13 


20,129,977 

6,650,486 

13,479,491 

202-68 


8,609,944 

8,006,328 

603,616 

7-54 


25,778,109 

20,207,826 

5,570,283 

27-56 


4,491,256 

2,689,728 

1,801,528 

66-98 


8,087,476 

4,732,518 

3,354,958 

70-89 


2,275,795 

787,975 

1,487,820 

188-82 


1,435,550 

1,160,783 

274,767 

2 J- 67 


3,568,221 

2,260,537 

1,307,684 

57-85 


807,910 

523,223 

284, 687 

54-41 


10,120,567 

6,293,524 

3,827.043 

60-81 


3,094,028 

1,427,777 

1,666,251 

116 70 


1,320,559 

1,247,358 

73.201 

5-87 


4,612,596 

2,885,997 

1,726,599 

59-83 


1,093,384 

732,392 

360,992 

49-29 


4,712,022 

2,685,740 

2,026,282 

75-45 


1,580,907 

678,217 

902,750 

133-10 


860,285 

562,691 

297.594 

52-89 


1,639,475 

1,111,614 

527.861 

47-49 


631,295 

333,218 

298,077 

89-45 



C RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 

sentes par les valeurs des recoltes des champs, des fruits et legumes, des ani- 
maux vendus, des animaux tues sur la ferme, des produits laitiers, de la laine, 
des oeufs et du beurre dans les quatrieme et cinquieme recensements. 

La valeur de toutes les proprietes agricoles a augments de $2,444,738,006 
ou 136-79 pour cent durant la decade, et la valeur collective des produits agri- 
coles de 8360,057,097 ou 99-28 pour cent. De 1900 a 1910 la proportion pour 
cent de la valeur des "produits de la terre" et" des animaux et leurs produits", 
n'indique qu'une faible variation. Dans le dernier recensement les produits 
de la terrc out donne un revenu collectif sur les placements agricoles de 57-57 
pour cent, comparativement a 57-34 pour cent dans le recensement precedent. 
Des produits de la terre, les fruits et legumes indiquent une plus forte aug- 
mentation dans les dix ans .que les recoltes des champs, les premiers ayant 
augmente de 143 • 08 pour cent et les demieres de 97 • 24 pour cent. Les animaux 
vendus et les produits animaux ont donn6 une augmentation totale 
de $151,894,935 ou 98-18 pour cent dans la decade. La plus forte augmen- 
tation dans cette classe a ete faite par les animaux vendus, avec $97,262,377 
ou 184-36 pour cent; les produits laitiers ont augmente de $36,910,901, ou 
55-53 pour cent, et la laine, les oeufs et le miel reunis ont donne une augmen- 
tation totale de $13,055,349 ou 104-19 pour cent. 

Dans le tableau precedent, et ailleurs dans ce volume, les statistiques de 
la valeur des proprietes agricoles, a savoir: la valeur des terres, des batiments, 
des instruments aratoires et du betail sur la ferme, se rapporte a la date du 
ler juin 1911, tandis que les chiffres relatifs aux produits de la terre, aux 
animaux vendus et aux produits animaux sont pour I'annee 1910. Le recen- 
sement de 1901 se rapportant a la date du 31 mars, les chiffres se rapportent 
de meme presque entierement aux operations de I'annee 1900. Les valeurs 
des produits de la terre dans les provinces de I'ouest ont ^te desavantageu- 
sement affect^es par les conditions defavorables qui ont prevalu durant I'^t^ 
et I'automne de 1910. Dans I'Alberta 265,699 acres ou 12-85 poiir cent, 
dans la Saskatchewan 159,456 acres ou 2-32 pour cent, dans le ^Manitoba 
77,546 acres ou 1-66 pour cent des superficies ensemencees pour la recolte de 
1910, n'ont rapporte aucune recolte. Vu que les recenseurs n'^taient pas tenus 
de faire des entrees pour les superficies non productives, le tableau 89 nc tient 
pas compte des etendues de terre ensemencees qui n'ont produit aucune 
recolte. 



TABLEAU 89. 



SUPERFICIE IMPRODUCTIVE DANS LES PROVINCES DES PR.\1RIES 
DURANT' L'ANNfiE 1910. 



R6colte3 



B16 

Orge 

Avoine 

Lin 

Autros grains 

Recoltes fourrageres 

Pommcs de terre et racines 

Total de la superficie improductive 



Superficies improductives, annee 1910 



Alberta 



133,842 
9,843 

109.961 

8,945 

1,084 

623 

1,401 



265,699 



Saskatchewan 


Manitoba 


acres 


acres 


64,387 


12,918 


2,948 


17.948 


58,981 


44.247 


32,310 


1.448 


270 


304 


273 


302 


2S7 


379 


159.456 


77,540 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 



Le succes des operations agricoles depend de ce qu'elles sont liees les unes aux 
autres. Les revenus de la terre, faibles ou eleves, reposent principalemcnt : 
(1) sur la condition de la "terre occupee" pour fins agricoles, (2) sur le nombre 
et la sorte de betail garde, (3) sur l.'efficacite des instruments aratoires, et (4) 
sur les moj'ens pris pour assurer Tengrangement convenable des recoltes des 
champs et I'abris necessaire au betail et aux instruments. Les revenus sur 
les placements des differents produits agricoles sont donnes dans le tableau 
90 comme proportions de la valeur de toutes les proprietes agricoles, c'est-a-diro 
que les valeurs des recoltes des champs, des animaux vendus et des produits 
animaux ne sont pas donnees comme proportions du placement en terres ou 
en animaux, selon le cas, mais comme proportions de la valeur totale de toutes 
les proprietes agricoles a la date du recensement. Par exemple, dans les chif- 
fres de 1910, pour tout le Canada, la valeur totale des recoltes des champs, des 
fruits et legumes donne un revenu de 9-83 pour-cent, non pas sur la valeur des 
terres seulement, mais sur la valeur totale de toutes les proprietes agricoles 
(terres, bailments, instruments et betail sur la ferme). 

TABLEAU 90. PROPORTION POUR CENT DES PLACEMENTS EN PROPRlfiT^l AGRI- 
COLE QUE CONSTITUE LA VALEUR BRUTE DES PRODUITS DES CHAMPS, DES 
ANIMAUX VENDUS ET DES PRODUITS DES ANIMAUX, PAR PROVINCES, 1910 
ET 1900. 







Poor-cent de l.\ valeur de la propei 


£TE AGRICOLE 




Provinces 


Tous 
les pro- 
duits 


Produits de la terre 


Animaux vendus et Icurs produits 


Total 


Recol- 
tes des 
champs 


Fruits 
et legu- 
mes 


Total 


Ani- 
maux 
vendus 


Anim. 

tues 
sur la 

ferme 


Pro- 
duits 
lai- 
tiers 


Laine, 

oeufs et 

mi el 


Canada— 

1910 


p. c. 

17 08 

20 29 

9-00 
19-84 

9-77 
16-72 

12-73 
17-06 

14-73 
16-14 

24-16 

21 08 

16-72 
19-48 

23-94 
25-06 

20-82 
22-44 

27-38 
24-37 


p. c. 

9 84 
11 62 

5-09 
10-55 

3-68 
7-63 

9-73 
10-47 

10-14 
11-12 

12-64 
11-79 

9-22 
10-87 

14-41 
15-85 

12-09 
13-77 

16-21 
15-61 


p. c. 

9 10 
10 90 

3-84 
9-25 

3-45 

7-54 

9-60 
10-36 

9-83 
11-01 

11-51 
10-95 

8-30 
10-28 

12-99 
15-08 

9-48 
11-83 

15-67 
15-16 


p. c. 

74 
72 

1-25 
1-30 

-23 
•09 

-13 
•11 

•31 
■11 

113 
-84 

-92 
•59 

1-42 

•77 

2-61 
1-94 

-54 
-45 


p. c. 

7 24 

8 67 

3-91 
9-29 

6-09 
9-09 

3-00 
6-59 

4-59 
5-02 

11-52 
9-29 

7-50 
8-61 

9-53 
9-21 

8-73 
8-67 

11-17 

8-77 


p. c. 

3 55 
2 95 

1-75 
3-59 

3-87 
6-13 

1-58 
3-66 

2-36 
1-88 

6-25 
3-79 

2-56 
1-52 

2-68 
1-53 

2-66 
1-97 

3-75 
2-21 


p. c. 

65 
1 29 

-21 
-92 

-29 
■81 

•27 

•84 

•41 
•88 

-77 
1-04 

1-10 
1-84 

1-69 
2^26 

M4 
1-72 

2^03 
r84 


p. c. 

2 44 

3 72 

1.39 
3-46 

1-61 
1-57 

-87 
l-Gl 

1-44 
1-85 

3-53 
3-73 

3^27 

4 63 

4-20 
4-41 

3-97 
3-98 

3-89 
3-63 


p. c. 
-60 


1900 


•71 


Colombic-Iiritannique — 
1910 


-56 


1900 


1-32 


Alberta — 

1910 


-32 


1900 


•58 


Saskatchewan — 

1910 


-28 


1900 


•45 


Manitoba — 

1910 


•38 


1900 


•41 


Ontario — 

1910 


•97 


1900 


•73 


Quebec — 

1910 


•57 


1900 


•62 


Nouveau-B runs wick — 

1910 


•96 


1900 


101 


Nouvelle-Ecossc — 

1910 


-96 


1900 


1-00 


He du Princc-I^douard— 
1910 


1-50 


1900... 


1-09 







15506— N 



cii RECENSEMENTDUCANADA1911 

Les plus fortes proportions de revenus par provinces en 1910 se trouvent 
premierement dans I'lle du Prince-Edouard, avec 27-38 pour-cent pour tons 
les produits, soit 16-21 pour-cent pour les produits de la terre et 11-17 pour-cent 
pour les animaux vendus et les produits animaux, et ensuite dans Ontario 
avec 24- 16 pour-cent pour tons les produits ou 12-64 pour-cent pour les produits 
de la terre et 11-52 pour cent pour les animaux vendus et les produits animaux. 
Seules ces deux provinces indiquent une augmentation de revenus collectifs 
sur les placements agricoles en 1910 comparativement a 1900. Dans les 
provinces de I'Ouest, ou le developpement rapide de nouvelles terres ainsi que 
I'achat d 'instruments et de betail a entraine des sommes considerables, les 
revenues collectifs sur les placements sont moindres en 1910 qu'en 1900. 

E. s. M. 



STATISTICS OF AGRICULTURE 



STATISTIQUE AGRICOLE 



Vol. IV— 1550G— 1 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 





Districts 






OCCUPIERF 


OF — Occupants de 




No. 


UI-DER 
1 


1 TO 
UNDER 


5 TO 10 


11 TO 50 


51 TO 100 


101 TO 2C0 


201 ACRES 






ACRE 


5 ACRES 


ACRES 


ACRES 


ACRES 


ACr.ES 


\ND OVER 






AU- 


DE 1 A 5 


DE 5 A 10 


DE 11 A 50^ 


DE 51 A 


DE 101 A 


201 ACRES 






DEssors 


ACRES 


ACRES 


ACRES 


100 ACRE^- 


200 ACRE: 


ET AU- 






d'cn acee 












DESSUS 






NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 




CANADA. 


30, Ul 


44,186 


24,666 


89,829 


164, G62 


228,237 


132,931 




Alberta 


500 


643 


384 


449 


942 


U,5SS 


24,023 


1 


CALGARY 


5 

34 


20 
126 


53 

83 


39 
160 


58 
72 


897 
3,757 


1,272 


?, 


EDMONTON 


874 


s 


MACLEOD 


41 


21 

267 


14 

79 


26 
79 


102 
272 


2,405 

4,. 382 


2,777 


4 


MEDICINE HAT 


9,285 


5 


RED DEER 


49 

257 


52 
104 


47 
82 


59 

59 


246 

88 


9.912 
6,258 


5,895 


6 


STRATHCONA 


2, £04 


7 


VICTORIA 


114 


53 


26 


27 


104 


6,944 


1.016 




British Columbia 


1,509 


2,888 


2,754 


3,849 


1,754 


3,743 


1.970 


8 


COMOX-ATLIN 


53 


187 


89 


194 


21Q 


731 


228 


1 


Alberni 


1 
8 

10 
1 

36 

202 

5 

9 
46 
26 
34 

82 

569 

2 
40 

326 

200 

1 

200 


14 
14 
39 

1 
119 

308 

10 
12 
14 
56 

85 

22 

109 

556 

61 
59 
80 
280 
76 

576 


20 

8 

28 
15 
18 

' 480 

6 
28 
11 
48 
36 
101 
250 

471 

77 
49 
84 
220 
41 

904 


51 

35 

61 

42 

5 

615 

3 
16 
12 
65 
32 
91 
396 

554 

157 
62 
59 

208 
68 

1,216 


74 
45 
68 

'I 

210 

14 

16 

4 

29 
29 
31 
87 

284 

101 
33 
24 
66 
60 

597 


166 

327 

201 

31 

6 

361 

72 
44 
26 
26 
39 
68 
86 

352 

77 
71 
66 
34 
104 

702 


62 


2 


Atlin 


92 


3 


Comox 


63 


4 
5 


Richmond pt 


8 
3 


9 


KOOTENAY 


267 


1 


Columbia 


44 


2 


Cranbrook 


7b 


3 


Fcrnie 


18 


4 


Kaslo 


n 


5 


Revelstoke 


17 


6 


Slocan 


23 


7 


Ymir 


78 


10 


NANAIMO 


193 


1 


Cowichan 


4C 


2 


Esquimau 


4C 


3 


Newcastle 


11 


4 


Saanich 


1" 


5 


The Islands 


84 


11 


NEW WESTMINSTER 


187 


I 


Chilliwack 


23 

29 

120 

28 


119 
100 
175 
181 
1 


115 
231 
398 
160 


385 
276 
425 
123 
7 


220 

212 

101 

63 

1 


228 

267 

164 

1 " 39 

4 


57 


2 


Delta 


6f 


3 


Dewdnov 


47 


4 


Richmond pt 


If 


5 




] 


12 


VANCOUVER 


39 

206 


82 
57 


1 

45 

17 


28 


1 & 


4 
1 




13 


VICTORIA C 


1 
11 2 


• 



Note — Wherever possible, the agricultural sl s, if an^-, of urban centres have been ii.cluded with 

the records of the township or parish in which the city, town or village is located. 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



OcClPiERS OF — OcrUP.VNTS DE 



^lo. 


Districts 


UNDER 

1 


1 TO 

UNDER 


5 TO 10 


11 TO 50 


51 TO 100 


1 

101 TO 200 201 ACRE.-* 






.\CRE 


5 .\CRE3 


ACRES 


.\CRES 


ACRES 


ACRES 


AND OVER 






AU- 


DE 1 .A. 5 


DE 5 .\ 10 


DE 11 .\ 50 


DE 51 .\ 


DE 101 .1 


201 ACRES 






DEssors 


.ACRES 


ACRES 


.\CRES 


100 .\CRES 


200 ACRES 


ET AU- 






d'un acre 












DESSUS 


British Columbia-Con. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


14 


YALE & CARIBOO.. 


2.37 


1,022 


74S 


1,231 


445 


1,592 


1,002 


1 


Cariboo 


4 

7 
2 
61 
25 
85 
34 
19 


16 

31 

3 

284 

17 
460 

81 
130 


15 
23 
10 

118 
15 

410 
43 

114 


16 
60 

11 

22-3 

166 

569 

92 

91 


11 

21 

100 
39 

1.59 
73 
35 


191 
39 
31 
570 
120 
366 
169 
106 


117 


? 


Grand Forks 


28 


3 


Greenwood 


56 


4 

5 


Kamloops 


188 
118 


6 

7 


Okanagan 


267 
233 


8 


Yale pt 


85 




Manitoba 


1.278 


1,761 


773 


1,552 


2,054 


17,758 


20.430 


IS 


BRAXDON 


65 
154 

97 
251 


64 
143 
117 
341 


36 

39 

41 

126 


52 

65 

60 

162 


59 
250 
142 
133 


439 
5,537 

957 
1,308 


2,859 


u 


DAUPHIX 


1,737 


17 


LISGAR 


1,952 


18 


MACDONALD 


2,582 


19 MARQUETTE 


127 


109 


34 


55 


110 


2,762 


3,187 


2* jPORTAGE LA PRAIRIE 


216 


227 


134 


248 


109 


998 


2,100 


21 PROVENCHER 


69 


344 


115 


192 


423 


2,344 


1,492 


23 SELKIRK 


118 


293 


218 


693 


811 


2,690 


772 


?.s 


SOURIS 


165 
16 

4.)9 


114 
9 

1,761 


24 
6 

1,658 


23 
2 

8,29! 


17 
J2,820 


722 

1 

8,857 


3,749 


?4 


WINNIPEG €...: 






New Brunswick 


4,368 


25 


CARLETON 


50 

3 
3 

5 

9 
1 

22 

"7 

4 


104 

1 
6 

12 
2 
5 
6 
1 

16 
7 

38 

10 

206 


70 

1 

8 
7 

12 
3 

7 

5 

1 

11 

15 

248 


303 

5 
41 
60 
16 
44 
12 

25 
22 
26 
52 

651 


1,023 

95 

149 

186 

46 

69 

94 

20 

75 

113 

84 

92 

641 


1,083 

68 
100 
124 

49 

59 
135 

50 
146 
129 
124 

99 

484 


467 


1 


Aberdeen 


47 


?. 


Brighton 


54 


3 


Kent 


34 


4 


Northampton 


47 


5 


Pee! 


27 


fi 


Richmond 


67 


7 


Simond.s 


21 


8 


Wakefield 


49 


.9 


Wieklow 


41 


in 


Wilmot 


41 


11 


Woodstock 


39 


26 


CHARLOTTE 


262 


1 
?. 


Campobello 

Clarendon 


1 
1 


39 

5 

1 

62 

11 

9 

1 


33 

6 
5 

72 

3 

24 

1 


26 

22 
12 
94 
34 
52 
20 
10 


4 
13 
49 

42 
4 

50 
18 
29 


4 

5 
45 
29 

3 
38 

6 
31 


5 


3 


Dufforin 


- 


4 
5 
6 


Dumbarton 

Grand Manan 

Lepreau 


27 
17 
3 


7 
8 
9 


Penfield 

St. Andrews 

St. Croix 


12 

8 

20 



Nota — Les statistiqucs agricolcs de.s centres urbains la ou il on ete fait rapport 
chiffrcs donnes pour Ic^ cantons ou paroisses, dans le.^quels se trouvent situ 6s les vi' 

Vol. IV— 15.506— li 



, ont 6te ajoutcts aux 
llages, villes ou cit63- 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 





Districts 






Occupiers 


OF — Occupants de 




No. 


UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 
DESSOUS 
D'UN.'iCRE 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 


5 TO 10 

ACRES 

DE 5 A 10 
ACRES 


11 TO 50 

acres 

de 11 a 50 

acres 


51 TO 100 101 TO 200 
acres acres 

DE 51 A de 101 A 

100 acres 200 acres 


201 ACRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 


10 


New Brunswkk— con. 

CHARLOTTE-con. 
St. David 


NO. 

2 

3 
3 

28 

17 
5 

2 

102 

23 

1 
9 

1 

2 
5 
1 

4 

79 
3 
1 

10 
8 

12 

45 


NO. 

3 

41 

3 

1 

6 
24 

160 

22 

17 

54 

3 

4 

1 

25 

34 

77 

3 

7 
7 
2 
31 
3 
5 
2 
2 
7 
8 

304 

138 
4 
2 
5 

30 
19 
1 
13 
18 

8 

14 

12 

3 

8 

1 

166 

9 

6 

19 

19 

64 

69 


NO. 

4 

47 
4 

1 

30 

18 

336 

36 
29 
85 
3 
14 
13 

47 
109 

82 

15 

11 

5 

11 

7 

4 

1 

10 

15 

3 

202 

118 
1 

8 

21 

4 

3 

14 

14 

3 

10 

7 

21 

6 

2 

4 

84 
4 
7 
7 
17 
28 
21 


NO. 

41 
102 
53 
13 
81 
91 

1,933 

151 
295 
368 
174 
175 
122 
73 
298 
277 

939 

56 
63 

188 
33 
76 
55 
78 
50 
80 

191 
69 

576 

323 

3 
19 

8 
36 
18 

2 
45 
17 
35 
20 
28 
37 
13 

3 
39 
£63 
21 
38 
29 
35 
73 
57 


NO. 

82 
82 
163 
34 
51 
20 

1,388 

195 
242 
161 
165 
129 
110 
123 
136 
127 

1,347 

121 

74 
171 

69 
125 

81 
154 

51 
237 
201 

63 

1,395 

970 
26 
45 
31 
45 

109 
30 

111 
73 

102 

114 
85 
59 
35 
26 
79 

426 
50 
79 

102 
53 
86 
55 


NO. 

80 
61 
97 
52 
22 
11 

470 

81 
56 
37 
64 
87 
29 
26 
37 
53 

720 

36 
31 
77 
32 

sr 

49 
101 

55 
151 

73 

34 

1,451 

1,122 

33 

37 

28 

59 

125 

42 

97 

75 

38 

172 

130 

103 

79 

47 

57 

329 

13 

67 

92 

68 

69 

40 


NO. 

33 


11 


St . Georj'e 


38 


12 




42 


13 


Rt Patrick 


50 


14 


St. Stephen 


5 


15 




2 


27 

1 


GLOUCESTER 


93 
26 


9 


Beiesford 


23 


3 




5 


4 




5 






15 


6 




4 


7 


St. Isidore 


1 


8 




5 


9 


Shippig an 


9 


?8 


KENT 


216 


1 




7 


2 


Carleton 


5 


3 


Dunda;^ 


9 


4 


Harcourt 


14 


5 


Riciiibucto 


24 


6 




21 


7 


St. Marv 


29 


8 


St. Paul 


23 


9 


Weldford 


66 


10 


Wellington 


14 


11 


St. Charles 


4 


29 


KINGS & ALBERT.. 

Kings . ... 


938 
680 


1 


Card well 


69 


2 




22 


3 
4 
5 


Hammond 

Hampton 

Havclock 


20 
32 
50 


6 


Kars 


17 


7 


Kingston 


23 


8 


Norton 


50 


9 


Rothesay 


11 


10 




111 


11 


Springfield 


Tl 


12 
13 


Sussex 

Upham 


86 
47 


14 


Watorford 


V7 


15 


Westfield 


^1 




Albert 


9'ifi 


16 


Alma 


7 


17 


Coverdale 


ex\ 


18 


Elgin 


72 


19 




4^ 


20 
21 


Hillsborough 

Hopewell 


40 
SI 









RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 





Districts 


Occupiers of — Occupants de 


No. 


UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 

DESSOUS 

d' UN ACRE 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 .\CRES 

DE 1 .1 5 
ACRES 


5 TO 10 

ACRES 

DE 5 .\ 10 

ACRES 


11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 

ACRES 


51 TO 100 

ACRES 

DE 51 A 

100 ACRES 


[ 

101 TO 200 201 ACRES 
ACRES AND OVER 

DE 101 A 201 ACRES 
200 ACRES] ET AU- 
1 DESSUS 


30 

1 


New Brunswick— con. 

NORTHUMBERLAND. . 
Alnwick 


NO. 

1 

1 

2 
1 
1 

1 

1 

10 
7 

4 
2 

1 
S 

1 
1 

1 

25 
10 

1 


NO. 

97 

26 
8 

1 

13 
8 
3 
4 
3 
3 

13 
6 
2 
7 

52 

7 
4 
7 

10 
23 

1 

62 

17 
18 
15 
12 

128 

4i 

4 

14 

12 

4 

1 

1 

5 

87 

4 
4 

25 
21 
4 
8 
9 
9 
3 

110 

39 
3 
8 


NO. 

154 

32 

14 

1 

23 

9 

6 

15 

5 

8 

16 

19 

2 

4 

26 

1 

1 

3 

6 

12 

3 

76 

33 
13 
13 
17 

88 

57 
1 

12 
9 
1 
3 
2 
9 

61 

6 
8 
6 
7 
8 
4 
4 
5 
3 

49 

SS 
1 
3 


NO. 

973 

216 
83 
22 
92 
43 
41 
82 
25 
69 
71 
74 
96 
59 

295 

48 
62 
23 
58 
102 

2 

280 

90 

23 

59 

108 

256 

1S9 

6 

42 

21 

8 

4 

21 

27 

127 

• 2 

11 

19 

27 

8 

14 

14 

7 

18 

7 

431 

52 
93 


NO. 

1,256 

204 

147 
40 
69 
37 

126 
62 
66 
84 
90 
94 

167 
70 

493 

69 
94 
49 
93 
122 

66 

211 

47 
17 
58 
89 

885 

SIO 
52 
60 
56 
30 
4 
74 
34 

675 
13 
46 
49 
82 
26 
53 

111 
93 
78 
24 

1,485 

815 

83 

308 


NO. 

585 

72 
57 
24 
40 
IS 
74 
36 
39 
49 
41 
47 
52 
36 

195 

20 
31 

28 
52 
48 

16 

169 

35 
15 
83 
86 

863 

197 
37 
47 
29 
30 
12 
14 
28 

666 
19 
83 
36 
66 
36 
63 

104 

135 
79 
45 

976 

387 
60 
88 


NO. 

216 
31 


? 


Black ville 


27 


3 


Bli.ssfield 


23 


4 


Chatham 


10 


5 


Derby 


4 


n 


Glenelg 


19 


7 


Hardwicke 


14 


8 


Ludlow 


11 


q 


Nelson 


14 


10 


Newcastle 


10 


11 


North Esk 


23 


}? 


RQgersville 


14 


13 


South Esk 


16 


31 

1 


RESTIGOUCHE 

Addington 


65 
10 


•> 


Balmoral 


2 


3 


Colborne 


12 


4 


Dalhousie 


19 


5 


Durham 


17 


6 


Eldon & Restigouche 
River 


5 


32 

1 


ST. JOHN CITY & 
CO-CITfi & CO.. 

Lancaster 


106 
16 


2 
3 


Musqua.sh 

St. Martin 


9 
23 


4 


Simonds 


58 


33 


SUNBURY & QUEENS 
Sunbury 


617 
228 


1 


Blissville 


35 


9 


Burton 


35 


s 


Gladstone 


20 


4 


I,incoln 


47 


«) 


Maugervillc 


53 


6 


Northfield 


6 


7 


Sheffield 


32 




Queens 


S89 


8 


Brunswick 


16 


9 


Cambridge 


31 


10 


Canning 


.21 


11 


Chipman 


42 


1*? 


Gage town 


40 


IS 


Hampstead 


51 


14 


.Johnston 


55 


15 


Petersville 


67 


16 


\Vaterh)oro 


27 


17 


Wickham 


30 


34 


VICTORIA & MADA- 
WASKA 


402 




Victoria 


125 


1 


Andover 


18 


2 


Drummond 


31 









CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 



Districts 

i 


Occupiers of — Occlpants de 


UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 

DESSOUS 

d'uN ACRE 


1 TO 

UNDER 

-5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 


5 TO 10 

ACRES 

DE 5 A 10 
ACRES 


11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 

.\CRES 


1 
51 TO 100 1 

ACRES 

DE 51 A 
100 ACRES 


1 

101 TO 200 201 ACRES 
ACRES AND OVER 

DE 101 A 201 ACRES 
200 ACRES ET AU- 
DESSUS 


New Brunswick — con. 

VICTORIA & 
MADAWASKA— con. 

Gordon 

Grand Falls 

Lome 

Perth 

Madawaska 


NO. 

9 

15 
3 

2 

7 

185 

16 
59 

2 

75 

1 

44 

18 
15 

~1 

3 

. 4 
'3 

1,143 

36 
22 

22 

11 
It 

' 47 

18 


NO. 

9 
2 

17 

71\ 

'fl 

7 
4 
1 
1 
6 
6 
21 
1 
2 
6 

327 

In 
65 
75 
67 
11 
80 
13 

134 

3 
19 
22 

2 

20 
6 
3 
3 
7 
3 

23 
15 

8 

6,227 

447 
91 

124 

44 
80 

245 

152 


NO. 

3 
5 

11 

26 
6 
1 

4 
1 

1 
S 

1 
2 

2 
5 

210 

24 
36 
2t 
4.- 
13 
39 
24 

117 

11 
3 
10 

li 

2 

i 

5 

6 
5 

27 
2 

3.3 
4,765 

246 
104 

140 

58 
82 

197 

190 


NO. 

20 

36 
6 

22 

9 
3 
11 
43 
37 
15 
22 
2 
11 
37 
11 

1,222 

171 

273 
160 
196 

44 
299 

79 

429 

38 

51 

52 

9 

35 

3 

8 

24 
25 
15 
21 
40 
47 
61 

12,652 

535 
441 

588 

SIO 

278 

434 
511 


NO. 

100 

171 

58 
95 

670 
23 
28 
21 
48 

105 
83 
59 
72 
25 

116 

88 

2 

1,359 

200 
202 
274 
148 
171 
269 
95 

1,337 

84 

183 

111 

39 

43 

5 

92 

51 

41 

60 

52 

119 

195 

262 

13,278 

785 
854 

964 

555 
611 

596 

771 


NO. 

47 
68 
30 
94 

589 
30 
33 
7 
49 
55 
62 

132 
65 
70 
43 
43 

944 

201 
87 
196 
104 
145 
126 
85 

917 

93 
84 
117 
21 
55 
3 
93 
21 
30 
45 
91 
75 
93 
96 

10,717 

751 
605 

711 

130 
681 

387 

935 


NO. 

14 
10 
17 
35 

277 


Clair 

Lake Baker 

Ledges 

Madawaska 

St. Andre 


15 

5 

2 

48 

10 


St. Anns 


14 


St. Bazile 

St. Francis 


73 
20 


St. Hilaire 


54 




15 


St. Leonard 

Indian Reserve 

WESTMORLAND 

Botsf ord 


21 

374 
64 


Dorchester 


35 


Moncton 


84 


Sackville 


.^0 


Salisbury 


77 


Shediac 


41 




23 


YORK 


612 


Brisjht 


40 




22 


Douglas 


87 


Dumfries 


22 


Kingsclear 


75 




2 


Manners Sutton 

New Maryland 

North Lake 


49 
26 
12 


Prince William 


30 
96 


St. Marys 


68 


Southampton 


65 


Stanley 


18 


Nova Scotia 

ANNAPOLIS 


4,852 

424 


ANTIGONISH 

CAPE BRETON N <fe 
VICTORIA 

Cape Breton N 

Victoria 


159 

146 

19 

187 


CAPE BRETON S.... 
COLCHESTER 


S7 
571 



RECENSEME/^T DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. 5[^rres occupees 



iVo. 



Districts 



53 



3i 



24 



Nova Scotia — con. 

CUMBERLAND 

DIGBY 

GUYSBOROUGH.... 
HALIFAX ( ITY & 

co-cit£; & CO.. 

HANT.S 

INVERNESS 

KINGS 

LUNENBURG 

PICTOU 

RICHMOND 

SHELBURNE & 
QUEENS 

Shelburne 

Queens 

YARMOUTH 

Ontario 

.\LGOM A E 

Aird Island & Shed 
den 

Allan 

Assisiinack 

Baldwin & Merritt.. . . 

Balfour & "Morgan 

Barric Tslan<l 

]?id\voll 

Billintrs 

Brij^ht <t Day 

I^iirpcp 

Campbell 

Cyarnarvon 

Cartier, Ermatinger, 
etc 

Chapleau district 

Cobden 

Cockbum 

Collins Inlet 

( 'rail; 

Crcighton, Snider & 
Waters 

Dawson 

Denison, Drury, Gra- 
ham & Trill 

DowlinK 

Duck Island, Robin.son 

Dunlop, Fleck, Gough 
& Shakespeare 



OcCUPIER.S OF — 0CCUP.\NT.S DB 



U*rDER 

1 

.\CRE 

.\U- 

DESSOUS 

O'UX .\CRi 



14 



17 

s; 
G: 

67 
3 

S 
191^ 

4(_ 

6: 

64 
84 

17 

693 

142 



17 



1 TO 
UNDER 
■5 .\CRES 


.5 TO 10 

.\CRE3 


11 TO 50 

.\CRES 


51 TO 100 

.\CRES 


! 1 

101 TO 200 201 ACRBi 
ACRES |aND OVER 


UE 1 A 5 
.\CREi? 


DE 5 k 10 

.\CRES 


DE 11 .\ 50 

.\CHES 


DE 51 .\ 
109 .\CRE.-. 


DE 101 k 

200 ACRES 


201 .\CR3S 

ET AU- 
D ESS US 


iVO. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


.34C 


25cS 


744 


967 


772 


523 


312 


312 


869 


781 


452 


213 


419 


17.5 


438 


585 


505 


269 


738 


513 


1,113 


660 


580 


440 


40fi 


267 


541 


509 


672 


487 


219 


148 


761 


1,251 


1,061 


259 


425 


305 


874 


911 


730 


215 


61fi 


500 


1,5.56 


927 


6.89 


308 


21S 


1-59 


590 


1,299 


916 


251 


426 


320 


584 


496 


385 


94 


713 


478 


935 


429 


337 


280 


459 

25,4 


S46 
13S 


622 
313 


205 
224 


101 
236 


130 
160 


327 


4.53 


1,1.38 


493 


229 


98 


1],8,27 


8,914 


36,249 


78,33,5 


54,908 


14,845 


22.5 


1.35 


267 


6.18 


1,179 


709 


5 

3 

1.5 

1 

3 

1 


1 

1 

1 
2 

3 

1 


4 

5 

4 
3 

2 
4 

2 

5 

1 


1 
13 
18 

5 
32 

9 
19 
27 
20 
11 
42 
37 


20 
16 
27 
49 
46 
15 
34 
26 
31 
22 
37 
36 


3 
12 

a 

1 
22 
17 
26 
42 
19 
12 
30 
32 


11 


J 


1 
3 


1 

12 


1 

10 
12 


3 
11 


- 


- 


2 


6 

7 


30 
5 


7 
13 


: 


1 


3 


6 
5 
10 


11 
2!) 
16 


6 

4 

14 


1 


- 


2 


1 


12 


5 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 





Districts 






Occupiers 


OF — Occupants de 




^o. 


UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 
DESSOUS 

d'un .\cre 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACHES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 


5 TO 10 

ACRES 
DE 5 A. 10 

acres 


11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 
ACRES 


51 TO 100 

ACRES 

DE 51 A 
100 ACRES 


101 TO 200 

ACRES 

DE 101 A 
200 ACHES 


201 ACRES 
AND OYER 

201 ACHES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 


25 
26 

71 


Ontario — con. 

ALGOMA E.— con. 

Esten & Spragge 

Foster, Lome, Louise 

& Nairn 

Gull)raith 


NO. 

11 

15 

1 

10 

1 
1 

1 

29 

3 

2 

19 
20 

IS 
1 


NO. 

3 
11 

4 

24 

3 
5 

5 
2 
4 
3 
19 
1 
6 

15 
50 
29 

1 

80 

5 

1 

3 

4 
2 

2 

1 -' 


NO. 

1 

13 

1 

2 
2 

2 

5 

1 
1 

7 
- 
1 

33 

49 

5 

42 
1 

2 

1 
7 

1 

: 


NO. 

1 
• 1 

1 

7 

1 

2 
9 
2 

5 

10 

1 

5 
2 
4 
3 
13 
1 
1 

56 

98 

3 

155 

1 
2 

1 

1 


NO. 

2 

6 
1 
5 

28 

4 

1 

22 

31 

32 

16 

3 

65 

13 
6 

1 

3 
11 

5 
18 
25 

2 
11 

2 

41 

1 

1 

446 

1 

4 

9 
1 

2 
22 


NO. 

21 

18 
35 
25 

16 
30 
38 
102 
34 

42 

8 
41 

6 
15 

20 

7 
5 
22 
14 
32 
64 
29 
32 

21 

1 
13 

3 

447 

14 

8 

12 

2 
29 
39 
26 

41 
3G 

25 

13 

1 


NO. 

9 
25 


28 
29 
30 

31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 


Gladstone 

Gordon 

Gould, Haughton & 

Wells 

Grasett & Parkinson. . 

Hallam 

Hariow, May & Salter 

Howland 

John Island 

Kirkwood & Lefroy... 
Lewis 


15 
27 

IS 
16 

18 
41 
22 

25 


38 
39 

4n 


Long & Striker 

Liiiiisden & Rayside. . 
Mackinnop.. . 


5 

28 


41 


Mills 


14 


4!^ 


New Post 




4.3 


Patto*.... . 


9 


44 
45 


Picnic Island 

Porcupine North & 
South 




46 


Ro.se 


6 


47 


Rutherford 


2 


48 


Hand field.. . 


18 


49 


Sheguiandah 


26 


•iO 


Tehkummah 


25 


"^1 


Thessalon... 


10 


'>? 


Thompson 


10 


53 


Victoria 


10 


54 


Other parts-autres par- 
ties 




55 
50 
57 
58 
59 


Chapieau I R 

Gore Bay I R 

Manitowaning I R 

Tlussalon I R 

Whitefish River 
Mouth I R.. 


7 
3 


5S 

1 


ALGOMA W-0 

Aweres 


202 


^ 


Aberdeen 


22 


3 


Deroche 


1 


4 
5 


English River 

Fenwick. 


9 


6 

7 


Fisher 

Gargantua 


3 


8 


Haviland 


_ 


9 


HiltDn 


13 


in 


Johnson 


ll 39 


23 


11 


Jocolvn 


5 

36 
3 

4 

1 


24 

1 

64 

37 

54 

7 

1 


19 


I'' 


Kar.s 




n 


Korah 


14 


14 


Laird 


24 


15 


Lev 


2 


16 


Macdonald 


12 


17 


Meredith 


7 


18 
19 


Michipicoten Harbour 


1 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 





Districts 


Occupiers of — 0ccup.\xr.s de 


No. 


UNDER 

1 

.\CRE 

AU- 

DESSOUS 

D'uN ACRE 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 .\CRES 

DE 1 A 5 

"ACRES 


5 TO 10 

ACRES 

DE 5 .A 10 

.ACRES 


11 TO 50 

ACRE.S 

DE 11 A 50 
ACRES 


51 TO 100 

ACRES 

DE 51 A 
100 .ACRES 


101 TO 200 

.ACRES 

DE 101 .A 
200 .ACRES 


201 ACRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 


?0 


Ontario — con. 
ALGOMAW-0 — con. 
Plummer 


NO. 

16 
1 

22S 

31 

139 

52 

2 

4 

24 

5 
19 

57 

25 

18 
14 

93 

4 

21 

11 

9 

5 

31 

12 

507 

115 

59 

71 

234 

14 

5 

9 


NO. 

2 
1 

16 
4 

1 
38 

311 

112 
116 

48 
6 

32 

120 

17 
103 

131 

59 

46 
26 

222 

1 

40 

29 

8 

16 

75 

1 

1 

51 

297 

60 
47 
45 
78 
25 
22 
20 


NO. 

2 

2 

1 
7 
1 

1 

16 

1.59 

55 
41 
IS 
4 
41 

60 

8 
52 

91 

54 
19 
18 

145 

8 

21 

14 

6 

3 

33 

60 

163 

24 
25 
12 
46 
13 
15 
2S 


NO. 

6 
4 

28 

3 

34 

25 

731 

121 

247 

56 

34 

273 

143 

36 
107 

229 

' 6 
55 
38 

584 

86 

138 

73 

66 

11 

1.35 

3 

4 

68 

526 

125 
71 
54 
60 
67 
63 
86 


NO. 

33 
10 

86 

20 

23 

1 

6 

1 

863 

144 
314 
130 
116 
159 

241 

59 
1S2 

4 63 

274 

116 

73 

1,467 

97 

189 
263 
302 
111 
297 
56 
6 
140 

1 , 630 

285 
2.53 
222 
ill 
200 
25S 
168 


NO. 

73 
21 

57 
26 
14 

9 

1 

533 

101 
159 
170 
63 
40 

144 

20 
124 

470 

215 
163 
92 

812 

78 

127 
115 
140 
73 
141 
24 
15 
99 

1 , 076 

198 
177 
182 
116 
159 
150 
94 


NO. 

14 


?1 


Prince 


g 


99 


Ryan. . 




23 
24 
25 


St. Joseph Island 

Tarbutt 

Taren torus & St Mary. 
Tupper.. 


12 
10 
5 


?7 


Vankou^hnet 


5 


28 

29 
30 
31 
32 

'»6 


Other parts — autres 

parties 

Batchawana I R 

.Goulais Bay I R 

Garden River I R 

Michipicoten I R 

BRAXT.... 


73 


1 

9 


Brantford E 

Burford 


7 
20 


3 


Diiinfrics S 


26 


4 


Onondaga 


6 


^ 




14 


57 

1 


BRANTFORD 

Oakland. . 


12 
3 


2 

58 

1 
2 
3 

59 


Brantford W-0 

BROCKVJLLE 

Elizabeth town 

Yonge & Escott front. 
Yonge & Escott rear. . 

bruce: n. 


9 

1.36 

59 
59 

18 

285 


1 
2 
3 


Albemarle & Caoc 
Croker I R '. . 

Amabel & Saugeen I 
R 

Arran 


53 

52 

28 


4 


Bruce 


22 


5 


East nor 


34 


6 


Kincardine.. . . 


21 


7 

8 


Lind.'^ay 

St. Edmunds 


42 
12 


9 


Saugeen 


21 


60 


BRUCE S 


192 


1 


Brant 


22 


2 
3 


( 'arrick 

( 'ulro.'^s 


25 
27 


4 


Elderslie 


37 


5 




30 


6 




26 


7 


Kinloss 


25 









10 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 





Districts 


Occupiers of — Occupants de 


No. 


UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 

DESSOU8 

d'uN ACRE 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 

.\CRES 


5 TO 10 

ACRES 

DE 5 A 10 

ACRES 


11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 

ACRES 


51 TO 100 

.\CRES 

DE 51 A 

100 .'VCRES 


101 TO 200 

.\CRES 

DE 101 -i 
200 ACRES 


201 ACRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSU.S 


61 


Ontario— con. 

CARLETON 


NO. 

81 

7 
45 
12 

1 

3 
11 

2 

86 

6 
6 

34 

22 
13 

416 

61 

63 

60 

2.32 

41.- 

8 

95 

85 

14^ 

16 

135 

10 

7k. 
45 

5^ 

3f 

IC 

7e 

2 

42 
27 

5 

1 


NO. 

149 

17 
52 
19 

6 
14 

4 
34 

3 

136 

9 

43 
11 
28 
29 
16 

271 

59 

27 
107 

78 

484 

22 

66 

111 

123 

124 

38 

366 

69 

14 

138 

145 

124 

40 
25 
53 

154 

8 
21 
6.8 

7 
50 

27.? 

11 

30 
23 


NO. 

73 

7 
20 
6 
4 
4 
1 
30 
1 

39 

2 
14 
8 
6 
5 
4 

80 

21 
16 
28 
15 

176 

4 
25 
34 
65 
36 
12 

195 

38 

4 

69 

84 

85 

34 
25 
26 

172 

6 
14 
52 

2 

98 

208 

13 
24 

24I 


NO. 

423 

66 
81 
52 
30 
15 
47 
98 
34 

233 

23 
29 
28 
73 
32 
48 

584 

180 
124 
128 
152 

451 

20 
55 
100 
152 
86 
38 

682 

162 

76 

219 

225 

653 

334 
175 
144 

807 

200 
•126 
117 
138 
226 

1,784 

173 
183 
146i 


NO. 

1,176 

159 
229 
196 
108 

56 
123 
232 

73 

1,359 

215 
130 
119 
303 
315 
277 

1,108 

329 
221 

274 
284 

1,250 

127 
223 
248 
252 
205 
195 

1,051 

238 
175 
320 
318 

923 

347 
265 
311 

661 

202 
150 
80 
113 
116 

1.385 

124 
135 
162] 


NO. 

770 

132 
144 

66 
117 

52 

81 
133 

45 

869 

162 
113 
103 
164 
165 
162 

607 

157 
142 
171 
137 

1,079 

107 
167 
184 
235 
190 
196 

537 

139 

72 

161 

165 

491 

141 
151 
199 

285 

95 

71 
33 
52 
34 

472 

34 
47 
69 


NO. 

284 


I 


Fitzroy 


47 


2 




39 


3 


Gower N 


5 


4 


Huntlev. 


58 


5 


March 


~~~ 32 


6 

7 


Marlborough 

Nepean. 


48 
33 


8 




22 


62 


DUFFERIN 


187 


1 


Amaranth 


43 
30 


3 


Luther E 


22 


4 


Melancthon. 


39 


5 


Mono 


23 


6 


Mulmur 


31 


6^ 


DUNDAS 


78 


1 


Matilda 


21 


2 
3 

4 

61 


Mountain 

Williamsburg 

Winchester 

DURHAM 


13 
25 
14 

208 


1 
2 


Cartwright 

Cavan 


21 
35 


3 
4 
5 
6 


Clarke 

Darlington 

Hope 

Manvers 


47 
33 
30 

42 


65 

1 


ELGIN E 


84 


Bayham 


34 


2 
3 


Dorchester S 

Malahide 


8 
17 


4 

66 

1 
2 
3 

67 


Yarmouth 

ELGIN W-0 

Aldborough 

Dunwich 

Southwold 

ES&EX N, 


25 

80 

18 
3S 
30 

46 


1 


Maidstone 


13 


2 
3 
4 
5 

63 

1 
2 

3 


Rochester 

Sandwich E 

Sandwich S 

Sandwich W-0.. 

ESSEX S 

Anderdon 

Colchester N 

Colchester S 


16 
7 
4 
6 

62 

7 

7 

11 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



11 





Districts 


Occupiers of— Occup.\xts de 


No. 


UNDER 

1 

.\CRE 

AU- 
DE3SOUS 

d'ux.\cre 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 


5 TO 10 

.\CRE3 

DE 5 A 10 

ACRES 


11 TO 50 

.^CRES 

DE 11 .; .50 

.\CRES 


51 TO 100 

.\CRE5 

DE 51 A 

100 .\CRES 


101 TO 200 201 ACRES 
.\CRES AND OVER 

DE 101 -A '201 ..^CRES 
200 ACRE3I ET AU- 
D ESS US 


4 


Ontario— con. 

ESSEX S. -con. 
Gosfield X... 


NO. 

3 

23 

2 

28 

5 
10 

95 

10 

3 
6 
1 
4 
26 
10 
1 

1 

19 

13 

1 

330 

110 
64 
95 
61 

180 

64 
20 

60 
36 

153 

27 
62 
2 
12 
27 
23 

186 

' t 

13| 

5 

159, 


NO. 

10 

45 
40 
75 

7 
27 

5 

231 

14 

~4 

6 

13 

2 

9 

61 

26 

10 

15 

5 

6 

18 

36 

6 

223 

60 
33 
76 

54 

180 

54 
61 
6 
43 
16 

266 

61 
110 
14 
19 
15 
47 

167 

13 
22 
64 
12 
56 


NO. 

8 

31 
15 
67 

6 
17 

3 

85 

5 

'l 
2 
1 
2 
8 

17 
8 

3 

14 

8 
9 

7 

64 

13 
17 
20 
14 

89 

29 
38 

3 
11 

8 

87 

14 
43 
10 
11 
3 
6 

151 

16 
7 

60 
25 
43 


NO. 

230 
230 
112 
345 

79 
178 
108 

350 

5 

15 
1 

3 

9 

6 

33 

76 

31 

7 

8 

37 
57 
24 

38 

295 

41 
93 
76 

85 

483 

. 152 

167 

26 

96 

42 

349 

69 
101 
75 
51 

27 
26 

371 

SO 
61 
103 
33 
94 


NO. 

151 
136 
126 
260 
43 
140 

m 

981 

V 43 

42 

8 
26 
37 
22 
57 

153 

84 

16 

20 

6 

126 

130 
SO 

131 

1,2.54 

309 
314 
274 
357 

990 

257 
313 
80 
226 
114 

1,523 

229 
274 
30.1 
175 
217 
325 

842 

127 
162 
275 
38 
240 


NO. 

26 
- 53 
3; 
102 
25 
46 
33 

1,274 

23 

88 

9 

25 

46 

86 

28 

64 

179 

100 

80 

62 

13 

151 

112 

124 

84 

732 

245 
193 
1.50 
144 

702 

201 
174 
63 
147 
117 

1,033 

162 
157 
161 
183 
182 
188 

647 

111 
169 
142 
25 
200 


NO. 

_ 


5 


Gosfield S 


6 


r> 


Maiden 


5 


7 


Mersea.. 


11 


8 



Pelee Island... 

Tilbury N 


4 
7 


10 
69 


Tilbury W-O 

FRONTEX.AC : 


4 

727 


1 


Barrie 


15 


?. 


Bedford 


93 


3 


Canonto N 


20 


4 




93 


5 
6 

7 


Clarendon & Miller.... 

Pinchinbrooke 

Howe Island 


72 

80 

6 


S 


Kennebec 


42 


q 


Kingston 


34 


10 4 

11 


Loughborough 

Olden 


44 

72 


1? 


Oso 


52 


n 


Palmor.ston 


13 


14 


Pitt.sburg 


40 


15 


Portland 


54 


15 


Storrin'^ton 


58 


17 


Wolfe I.sland 


10 


70 

1 
•> 


GLENGARRY 

Charlottenburg 

Kenyon 


138 

45 
40 


^ 


Ijanca.ster 


•>■> 


4 


Lochiel 


31 


71 


GRENVILLE 


161 


1 


Augu.sta 


52 


? 


Edward.sburg 


31 


S 


Gower S 


10 


4 


Oxford 


31 


5 


Wolford 


37 


7? 


GREY E 


245 


1 


Artemesia 


46 


? 


Collinj.''wood 


29 


■^ 


Euphrasia 


28 


4 


Holland 


54 


5 


Osprey 


46 


r> 


Proton 


42 


73 


GREY N 


178 


1 


Derby 


19 


•> 




78 


3 


St. Vinf"ent 


25 


4 




8 


5 




43 









12 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 





Districts 


Occupiers of — Occupants de 


No. 


UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 

DESSOUS 

d' UN ACRE 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 
ACRES 


5 TO 10 

ACRES 

DE 5 A 10 
ACRES 


11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 
ACRES 


51 TO 100 

ACRES 

DE 51 A 
100 ACRES 


101 TO 200 

ACRES 

DE 101 A 
200 ACRES 


201 ACRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 


74 


Ontario— con. 

GREY S 


NO. 

224 

18.5 
16 

7 
16 

92 

2 
6 

1 
10 

5 

5 

63 

74 

26 
9 
3 

36 

227 
3 

33 

29 
3 

88 

1 
55 

5 
10 

108 

1 

2 
33 

5 
12 
46 

9 

242 

79 
70 
44 


NO. 

146 
57 

27 
10 

24 

28 

142 

6 
26 

8 

2 
33 
13 

9 
17 

8 
20 

220 

58 
22 
43 
97 

5 

306 

3 

1 

5 

12 

51 
5 

69 
8 

10 

93 
6 

43 

235 

4 

1 

4 

48 

24 

37 

109 

8 

220 

52 
71 
23 


NO. 

62 

18 
4 
6 

25 
9 

122 

7 
23 

7 

3 
21 
13 
10 
10 

1 
27 

138 

31 

8 
53 
46 

3 

135 

1 
5 
4 

31 

2 

20 

48 

24 

104 

2 
9 
7 
21 
63 
2 

75 

20 

24 

4 


NO. 

374 

91 

44 

77 

103 

59 

802 

42 

60 

26 

35 

189 

117 

117 

44 

18 

154 

293 

38 

38 

104 

113 

1 

385 

3 

1 

7 

14 

68 

52 

5 

81 

2 

152 

335 

2 

10 

5 

42 

27 

114 

129 

. 6 

398 

103 

112 

53 


NO. 

1,364 

299 
292 
203 
290 
280 

1,506 

111 

149 

89 

97 

140 

151 

168 

188 

29 

384 

928 

249 
171 
184 
324 

1,118 

23 
11 
33 
66 
1 

184 
19 

100 
14 
70 

229 
40 

328 

963 

51 

34 

63 

144 

89 

261 

284 

37 

1,380 

325 
333 
310 


NO. 

926 

185 
211 

178 
175 
177 

739 

68 
92 
37 
36 
49 

138 
54 

105 
14 

146 

585 

175 
109 
130 
171 

1,046 

37 
15 
53 
46 
1 

193 
24 

141 
44 

108 

130 
34 

220 

816 

48 

65 

85 

124 

95 

159 

189 

51 

599 

127 
175 
127 


NO. 

180 


1 


Bentinck 

Egremont 


41 
26 


3 


Glenelg 


42 


4 


Normanby 


34 


5 

71 


Sullivan 

HALDIMAND 


37 
80 


1 


Canboro 


6 


2 


Cayuea N 


13 


s 


Cayuga S 


2 


4 


Dunn 


3 


5 


Moulton 


2 


g 


Oneida 


17 


7 


Rainham 


1 


8 


Sencpa 


19 


9 


Slierbrooke 




in 


Walpole 


17 


76 


HALTON 


90 


1 


Esquesing 


36 


2 
3 


Nassagaweya 

Nelson 


22 
12 


4 


Trafalgar 


20 


771 
78/ 

79 


HAMILTON C 

HASTINGS E 


512 


1 


Carlow 


40 


2 


(^ashel 


8 


3 


Dungannon 


41 


4 


Elzevir 


56 


5 
6 


Grimstliorpe 

Hungorford 


87 


7 


Ijiinerick 


24 


8 


Madoc 


75 


9 


Mavo 


23 


10 
11 


Monteaglc 

Thurlow 


41 
29 


12 


Tudor 


39 


13 


Tyendinaga 


49 


SO 

1 

2 
3 
4 


HASTINGS WO 

Bangor & Wicklow 

Faraday 

Hersohcll & McClure.. 
Huntingdon 


262 

10 
36 
24 
44 


5 
6 


Marmora & Lake 

Rawdon 


46 
40 


7 
8 

81 
1 




27 


WoUaston 

HURON E 


35 
71 




24 


2 




14 


3 




10 









RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



13 







Districts 






Occupiers of — Occt 


• PA NTS DE 




Xo. 


rXDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 
DESSOUS 

d'un acre 


i TO 
UI>n)ER 
5 .\CRES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 


5 TO 10 

ACHES 

DE 5 A 10 

ACRES 


i 11 TO 50 

1 ACRES 

DE 11 .\ 50 

.\CEES 


51 TO 100 
ACRES 

DE 51 A 

100 .\CEES 


101 TO 200,201 .\CRES 

ACRES AND OVER 

DE 101 A 201 ACRES 
200 ACRES ET AU- 

j D ESS US 


4 


Ontario— con. 

HURON E.— con. 
Turnbcrr J' 


NO. 

44 
5 

283 

130 
6 
24 
57 
40 
26 

107 

1 
4 

51 
- 15 

36 

199 

25 
126 

36 
7 
5 

46 

1 

18 
16 

11 

3 

79 

19 

12 

34 

9 

5 

30 

3 

3 

8 

16 

114 
12 


NO. 

61 

13 

269 

92 
21 
31 
50 
54 
21 

121 

14 
22 
37 
12 
36 

218 

73 
46 
73 
13 
13 

177 

16 

77 

47 

9 

28 

19 

206 

60 
20 
56 
20 
50 

149 

6 
32 
35 
55 
21 

67 

5 

5 


NO. 

24 
3 

106 

24 
4 
17 
39 
15 
7 

68 

13 
19 
18 
4 
14 

138 

39 
37 
32 
18 
12 

134 

20 

54 

42 

3 

15 

5 

94 

31 
13 
27 
5 
18 

110 

2 
18 
20 
33 
37 

10 

2 
1 


NO. 

74 

56 

488 

110 
77 
54 

132 
59 
56 

257 

78 
48 
43 
58 
30 

1,010 

245 
429 
152 
109 
75 

1,055 

279 

247 
242 
134 
153 

8 

680 

119 
144 
172 
108 
137 

885 

263 
113 
120 
1.52 
237 

48 

2 
1 

7 


NO. 

177 
235 

1,397 

262 
214 
196 

248 
248 
229 

900 

271 
113 
144 
199 
173 

1,109 

203 
401 
267 
205 
93 

1,332 

268 

404 
312 
121 

227 

1 

1,398 

222 
350 
341 
200 
285 

1,418 

303 
275 
331 
208 
301 

359 

49 
11 
52 

7 

1 


NO. 

88 

82 

687 

119 
143 
111 
142 
73 
99 

661 

160 
83 
180 
148 
90 

581 

85 
148 
147 
152 

49 

608 

104 

208 
142 
41 
113 

678 

129 
154 
172 

77 
146 

677 

99 
172 
173 

94 
139 

472 

94 

31 

104 

20 


NO. 

g 


S 




14 


8"^ 


HURON S.. 


88 


1 


Hav 


11 


?. 


McKillop 


21 


3 


Stanley 


17 


4 


Stephen 


22 


5 


Tuckcrsmith 


6 


fi 


Usborne 


11 


8.^ 


HURON W-0 


150 


1 


Ashfield 


31 


7. 


Col borne 


28 


3 


Goderieh 


42 


4 
5 


Hullett 

Wawanosh W-0 

KENT E 


25 
24 

100 


1 


Camden 


10 


? 


Chatham 


22 


3 


Houard 


34 


4 


Orford 


24 


5 


Zone 


10 


85 


KENT W-O... 


108 


1 
2 
3 


Dover E \ 

Dover W-0 / 

Harwich 


24 
23 


4 


Raleiffh 


37 


5 


Romncy 


4 


6 


Tilbury E 


20 


86 


KINGSTON 




87 


LAMBTON E 


153 


1 


Bo«anquet 


40 


9 


Brooke 


32 


3 


Enniskillen 


29 


4 


Eupheinia 


13 


5 


Warwick 


39 


88 
1 


LAMBTON W-O 

Dawn 


115 
13 


9 


Moore 


40 


3 


Plympton 


33 


4 


Sarnia 


9 


5 

89 


Sombra <fe Walpole Is.. 
LAN.ARK N 


20 
405 


1 


; 

Dalhousie 


74 




Darling 


55 


3 


Lanark 


103 


4 


Lavant 


17 









14 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Parm Holdings 



No. 



Districts 



Ontario^con. 

LANARK N.— con 

Pakenham 

Ramsay 

Sherbrooke N 



90 



91 



92 



LANARK S. 



Bat hurst 

Beckwith 

Burgess N 

Drummond.. . 
Elmsley N.... 

Montague 

Sherbrooke S. 

LEEDS 



Occupiers of^Occupants de 



UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 

DESSOUS 

d'un acre 



Bastard & Burgess S 

Crosby N 

Crosbys 

Elmslcy S 

Kitlcy 

Leeds & Lansdowne 

front 

Leeds & Lansdowne 

rear 



LENNOX & ADD 
INGTON 



Lennox 

Adolphustown. ... 
Amherst Island.. . 

Erncstown 

Fredericksburg N. 
Fredericksburg S.. 

Richmond 

Addington 

Abinger, Ashby & 

Denbigh 

Anglesea, Effingham 

& Kaladar 

Camden E 

Sheffield 



LINCOLN. 



Caistor 

Clinton 

Gainsborough, 
(iranthani. . . . 
Grimsby N... 

Grimsby S 

Louth 

Niagara 



94 LONDON C 

85 MIDDLESEX E. 



1 I Dorchester N . 

2 London 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 



5 TO 10 
ACRES 



11 TO 50 
ACRES 



51 TO 100 101 TO 200 201 acres 

ACRES .ACRES |AND OVER 



DE 1 A 5 |dE 5 A 10 DS 11 A 50 DE 51 A 
ACRES ACRES ACRES 100 .\CRES 



101 



227 

75 
7 

62 
4 

23 

11 
45 



134 



27 



10 



5 

81 

2 

173 

2 

39 
21 
46 
26 
5 
14 
20 



157 

62, 
3li 



6 

50 

1 

110 

32 
10 

4 
32 

9 
15 



249 

78 
24 
30 
11 
28 

36 

42 



266 

15S 

7 

2 

83 

29 

4 

28 

lis 



10 
80 
17 

406 

14 
76 
23 
90 
76 
24 
32 
71. 

13 

315 

I 

66, 

145] 



47 



72 



19 



107 

79 
2 
1 

22 

19 
9 

26 



21 
6 

286 



262 

isi 

160| 



DE 101 A 1 201 .ACRES 
200 ACRES ET AU- 
I DESSUS 



16 

21! 

1 

126 

29 

8 

5 

26 

19 

35 

4 

246 

43 
28 
31 
7 
39 

62 

36 



339 



15 
59 
20 

1,090 

82 
159 
158 
170 
142 

75 
157 
147 



161' 
346. 



81 

145 

14 

573 

159 
70 
43 

122 
70 
94 
15 

768 

131 
56 
82 
53 

124 

192 
130 



1,090 

698 
37 
42 

229 

113 
96 

181 



28 

41 

240 

83 

1,020 

156 

162 

221 

92 

81 

117 

90 

101 



1334 



242 
508 



78 

125 

20 



136 
113 

60 
145 

77 
114 

51 

847 

158 
86 
87 
63 

149 

187 
117 



971 



37 

38 

203 

67 

61 

136 

4S9 

62 

53 

225 
89 

372 



581 



122 
198 



72 
59 



383 

53 

74 
43 
57 
23 
75 
58 

318 

67 
54 

42 
17 
50 

40 

48 



394 



10 
29 
43 
7 
10 
27 
S68 

57 

52 

76 
83 

52 

5 
2 

25 
3 
1 

G 
10 



43 

10 
16 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



15 



Ncj. 



97 



98 



DlSTMCTS 



Occupiers of — Occipants de 



UNDER 

1 

ACRE 



AU- DE 1 A 5 

dessous acres 
d'ux acre 



1 TO 
UNT)ER 
5 ACRES 



Ontario — con. 

MIDDLESEX E.— con 

Nissouri W-0 

Westminster 



MIDDLESEX X. 



Adelaide 

Biddulph 

Loho 

McCillivray.. 

Williams E 

Williams W-0. 



MIDDLESEX W-0. 



Caradcc. . 
Delaware. 
Ekfrid.... 
Metcalfe. . 
Mesa 



MUSKOKA. 



Baxter, Freeman 

Gibson 

Brunei 

Card well 

CliafTcy 

Draper 

Franklin & Sinclair.. 

Macaulay 

McLean & Ridout.... 

Medora & Wood 

Mo-ck 

Morrison 

Muskoka 

Oakley 

Ryde 

Stephenson 

Stisted 

Watt 



NI PISSING. 



.Airy 

.\n<2;Iin, Deacon & Li- 
ster 

.\ppleby & Hawley.... 

.\rmstrong, Beau- 
champ & Bryce 

.\wrey, Dryden & 
Hagar 

Bastedo, Gibbons & 
Crcrar 

Benoit, Maisonville & 
Otto 

Bonfieid 

Bonis &. Bowyer 

Boulti-r 

fi'iwni D 

Brethnur 



9 
55 



55 



183 



6.3 



22.3 



38 



5 TO 10 
.acres 



11 TO .50 
.acres 



DE 5 -A 10 DE 11 .\ 50 
.\CRES i .ACRES 



191 

85 



146 



51 
26 
15 
14 

325 

179 
56 
50 
15 
25 

139 



7 

6 

5 

33 

26 

22 

12 

2 

3 

2 
3 

207 

11 



19 



7' 
77! 



84' 



^^1 

175 



68! 
12 

4! 
141 

42 



3 
1 

72 
1 



51 TO 100 101 TO 200 201 .\cres 

ACRES I ACRES AND OVER 

DE 51 .\ DE 101 .A 201 .ACRES 
100 .ACRES 200 .ACRES* ET AXI- 
DESSITS 



152 

230 

520 

69 

65 

113 

152 

77 
44 

819 

357 

134 

98 

97 

133 

133 



1.- 

183 
3 



281 
303! 

1,«07| 

241 
214 
240 
308 
165 
139 

1,108 

355 

113: 

251 i 
180 
209! 

7341 



22 
77 
7 
52 
59 
21 
52 
30 
47 
47! 
77 
32 
11 
42, 
76 
30 
52 

1,075 

13 

1 
3 



5 
5 

115 



90: 
1711 

572 

99 
78 
102 
124 
90 
79 

519 

137 
71 

135 
64 

112 

746 



28 
34 
25 
64 
57 
53 
38 
41 
80 
59 
36 
34 
32 
29 
43 
37 
56j 

2,591 

19 

38 

136 

36 

62 

2 
49 



16 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 



Districts 



Occupiers op — Occupants de 



UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 
DESSOUS 
>'UN ACRE 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 
ACRES 



5 TO 10 

ACRES 



11 TO 50 

ACRES 



DE 5 A 10, DE 11 A 50 

ACRES ACRES 



101 TO 200 201 ACRES 
ACRES AND OVER 



51 TO 100 
ACRES 

DE 51 A DE 101 A 

100 ACRS3 200 ACRES 



201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 



& 



Ontario — eon. 

NIPISSING-con. 

Broder 

Brower 

Bucke 

Caldwe'l 

Calvert, Sherring 
M rtimer 

Calvin 

Cameron 

Canisbay 

CapreoL Norman & 
Rathbun 

Carman, Langmuir & 
Thomas 

Carr 

Casey & Harris 

Casimir, Hendrie & 
Jennings 

Chamberlain & Mar- 
ter 

Charlton & Dack 

Chisholm 

Clara & M^ria 

Cleland, Davis, Fal- 
conbridge & McCar- 
thy 

Clergue, Walker & 
Taylor 

Coleman 

Cosbv & Mason 

Dill& Secord 

Dundonald, Evelyn, 
German & Matheson 

Dunnet & Ratter 

Dymond 

Evanturel 

Ferris 

Field, Grant & Bad- 
gerow 

Firstbrook & Barr. . . . 

Garson & Neelon 

Glackmeyer 

Gooderham & Os- 
borne _. ._ _. . 

Gowganda Mining Dis- 
trict 

Hanmer & Blezard — 

Harley 

Haultain, Knight, Mo- 
rel, Rankin, Tyriell 

& Van Hise 

Head 

Honwood & Kerns 

Hilliard 

Hislop, Munro, Play- 
fair & Guibord 

Hudson 

Hugel 

Hunter 

Hutton & Creelman... 
Ingram & Pense 



36 



24 



13 

24 

5 

104 

19 
3 

29 
1 



36 



29 



13 

77 

50 

55 

73 

107 

3 



35 



57 



10 

107 

59 

14 
46 
56 



32 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



17 



Districts 



Ontario — con. 

NIFISSING— con. 

James 

Kirkpatrick 

T auder 

j.cbel 

Lorrain & South 1 or- 

rain 

Lyell.Murehison, Cross 

Lake, Dickson, 

Preston & Clancy.. 

McKim 

Macpherson & Loudon 

Martland 

Mat ta wan 

Milner 

Pacaud 

Papineau 

Peck 

Phelps 

Poitras 

Rohillard, Savard & 

Sharpe 

Sabine 

Scollard 

Springer 

Stewart & Mulock. . . . 

Wliite 

Widdifield 

Larder Lake Mining 

Division 

Temagami, French 

River & Nipissing 

IR 



NORFOLK. 



Charlotteville.. 

Houghton 

Middleton 

Towiisend 

Walsingham N. 
WaL-jingharn S.. 

Windham 

Wood house. . . . 



NORTHUMBER- 
LAND E 



Brighton. 
Cramatie. 
Murray. . . 

Percy 

Seymour. 



NORTHUMBER- 
LAND WO... 



Alnwick. . . . 
Haldimand. 
Hamilton... 



Occupiers of — Occrp.\XTS de 



UXUER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 

DESSOUS 

d'un .\CRE 



10 
156 



161 

14 

4 

6 

41 

3 

30 

22 

41 



231 

52 
38 
17 
54 
70 



126 

7 
32 

87 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 



5 TO 10 
ACRES 



11 TO 50 

ACRES 



51 TO 100 101 TO 200 

ACRES ACRES 



DE 1 A 5 DE 5 A IOJdE 11 A 50 DE 51 A DE 101 A 
ACRES ACRES , ACRES 100 ACRES 200 ACRES 



1 
2 
1 
1 

23 

30 
1 

39 

411 

44 
21 
51 
88 
16 
65 
60 
66 

393 

lOG 
101 
55 
64 
67 

219 

14 
73 
132 



1 
1 
2 

11 
5 

16 

224 

29 
11 
10 
60 
5 
16 
52 
41 

154 

35 
42 
29 
17 
31 



33 



1,467 

204 
153 
174 
236 
158 
97 
292 
153 



523 

138 

128 

129 

55 

73 



261 

51 

90 
120 



46 



1,818 

239 
157 
199 
350 
197 
156 
322 
198 



1,119 

207 
200 
227 
233 
252 



499 

56 

226 
217 



37 



781 

107 
54 

108 

162 
80 
75 

127 
68 



637 

130 
114 
105 
122 
166 



491 

64 
218 
209 



201 ACRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 

DESSUS 



Vol. IV— 15506— 2 



18 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 



Districts 



Ontario — con. 



ONTARIO N. 



Brock. . . . 

Mara 

llama. . . . 

Scott 

Thorah . . . 
Uxbridge. 



ONTARIO S. 



Pickering. 

Reach 

Scugog.... 
Whitby.... 
Whitby E. 



OTTAWA C. 
OXFORD N. 



Blandford . . 
Blenheim. . . 
Nissouri E., 

Zorra E 

Zorra W-O . 

OXFORD S. 



Dereham 

Norwich N.. 
Norwich S... 

Oxford E 

Oxford N... 
Oxford W-O. 



PARRY SOUND. 



Armour 

Bethune & Proudfoot. 
Burpee & Hagernian. . 
Burton, Harrison & 

Mackenzie 

Carling, Ferguson & 

Shawar.aga 

Chapman 

Christie 

Conger & Cowpor 

Croft 

Ferric & Lount 

Foley 

Gurd 

Hardy, McConkey & 

Patterson 

Him sworth 

Humphrey 

Joly & Lauricr 

Machar 

Mills, Pringle& Wilson 

McDougall 

McKellar 

McMurrich 



Occupiers of — Occupants de 



UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 
DESSOUS 
)'UN ACRE 



277 

111 

21 

5 

23 

89 
28 

554 

116 

201 

2 

165 

70 



165 

1 

13 

17 

126 



581 

294 
41 
47 
23 
15 

161 

149 

31 

G 



15 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 



231 

70 
39 
4 
22 
61 
35 

463 

119 

97 

5 

158 



228 

20 
48 
20 
85 
55 

533 

159 
77 
63 
40 
36 

158 

166 

25 
1 
5 



5 TO 10 

ACRES 



11 TO 50 
ACRES 



DE 5 A lOiDE 11 A 50 
ACRES ACRES 



22 


66 


3 


69 


4 


48 


5 


22 


19 


39 


15 


74 


86 


428 


45 


137 


40 


^ 108 


6 


19 


31 


66 



12 
9 
13 
29 
15 

152 

24 
31 
10 
25 
12 
50 



318 



520 

45 
122 
122 
118 
113 

5.38 

132 
115 

75 
79 
56 
81 

85 

11 
2 
1 

1 



51 TO 100 jlOl TO 200 

ACRES I ACRES 

DE 51 A I DE 101 -V 
100 ACRES200 ACRES 



921 

235 

179 

73 

149 

88 
197 

834 

299 
256 
36 
123 
120 



1,186 

125 

253 
237 
293 

278 

1,015 

297 
173 
161 
159 
106 
119 

545 

78 
9 
7 



201 ACRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AV- 
DESSU3 



712 

173 
135 

48 
126 

92 
138 

580 

190 

156 

28 

93 

113 



620 

73 
177 
103 

138 
129 

579 

177 
86 
97 
86 
54 
79 

1,158 

61 
33 
37 

28 

30 

4 

33 

14 

23 

30 

36 

47 

39 
128 
28 
66 
52 
71 
28 
41 
45 



R E C E N S E M E N T D U CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



19 



Districts 



Occupiers of — Occupants de 



UNTJBR 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 
DESSOUS 

d'un acre 



Ontario— con. 

PARRY SOUND— con. 

Monteith 

Mowat 

Nipissing 

Perry 

Ryerson 

Spence 

Strono; 

Wallbridge 

DokisI R 

BTenvey Inlet & Lower 

French I R 

Maganatawan I R 



PEEL. 



Albion 

Caledon 

Chinguacousy. 

Toronto 

Toronto Gore. 



PERTH N. 



Easthope N. 

Ellice 

Elma 

Momington. . 
Wallace 



PERTH S. 



Blanchard.. 

Downie 

Easthope S. 
Fullarton. . . 
Hihbcrt. . . . 
Logan 



PETERBOROUGH E. 

Anstruthcr & Burleigh 

Asphodel 

Belmont & Methuen. . 

Chandos 

Doiiro 

Duinmcr 

Otonabee 



PETERBOROUGH W 
-O 



Cavendish 

Ennismore 

Galway 

Harvey 

Monaghan N. 
Monaghan S. . 
Smith 



34 



ISl 

46 
32 
44 
57 
2 



52 
27 
49 
36 
13 

373 

7! 

100 
10 
14 

16T 

100 

1 
67 
12 

1 

2 

17 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 .\CRES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACEES 



5 TO 10 

ACRES 



11 TO 50 
ACRES 



51 TO 100 ; 101 TO 200^201 .\cre.s 

ACRES i ACHES lAND OVER 



DE 5 -A 10 DE 11 A 50 DE 51 -A | DE 101 .A ;201 ACRES 
j ACRES .ACRES , 100 .ACRES'200 .ACRES ET AU- 

I DESSUS 



321 



107 
12 



218 

58 
31 
63 
46 
20 

223 

78 
20' 
29 
16 
14 
66 

360 

7 

78 
34 

4 

179 

20 

38 



143 



25 
26 



155 

21 
22| 
18 
92 
2 



110 

45 
16 
22 
17 
10 

90 

23 
7 
9 
9 
7 

35 

90 



Vol. IV— 1558G— 2J 



419 

61 
48 
80 
215 
15 

368 

51 
107 
86 
53 
71 



62 
71 
24 
52 
69 
99 

195 

4 
17 
33 

5 

69 
23 
44 



152 



1,273 

237 
266 
343 
330 
97 



1 , 339 

171 
251 
349 
262 
306 

1,343 

260 
254 
163 
200 
229 
237 

768 

28 
107 
132 

46 
140 
116 
199 



372 

4 
51 
24 
38 
42 
64 
149 



760 

1.59 
189 
213 
147 
52 



654 

141 
1.32 
153 
137 
91 

649 

134 
137 

45 
103' 

90 
140 

684 

42 
93 
114 
63 
78 
110 
184 



420 



57 
54 
55 
37 
48 
161 



22 

28 
20 
47 
32 
38 



92 

21 
23 
31 
13 
4 



56 

11 
12 
15 
12 
6 

62 



9 

4 

11 

13 

17 

269 

28 
31 
45 
49 
25 
48 
43 



162 

3 

12 
22 
65 
8 
15 
37 



20 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 



Districts 



OcCUPIERg OF — Ocx::UPANTS DE 



UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 

DESSOUS 
d' UN ACRE 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 
ACRES 



5 TO 10 

ACRES 



DE 5 A 10 

ACRES 



11 TO 50 

ACRES 



DE 11 A 50 

ACRES 



51 TO 100 

ACRES 



DE 51 A 



101 TO 200 
ACRES 



DE 101 A 



100 ACRES 200 ACRES 



201 ACRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 



Ontario — con. 

PRESCOTT 

Alfred 

Caledonia 

Hawkesbury E , 

Hawkesbury W-0 

Longueuil 

Plantagenet N 

Plantagenet S 

PRINCE EDWARD.. 



Ameliasburg. . 

Athol 

Hallowell 

Hiliier 

Marysburg N. 
Marysburg S . . 
Sophiasburg. . 



RENFREW N. 



Algona N. & Wilber- 

f orce 

Algona S 

Alice & Fraser 

Bromley 

Buchanan, Rolph & 

Wylie 

McKay & Petawawa 

Pembroke 

Ross 

Stafford 

Westmeath 



RENFREW S. 



Admaston 

Bagot & Blithfield. 

Brougham 

Brudenell 

Burns, Jones & Sher- 
wood 

Gnxttan 

GrilKth & Matawat- 
chan 

Hagarty & Richards. 

Horton 

Lynedoch 

McNab 

Radcliffe & Raglan.. 

Sebastopol 



RUSSELL. 



Cambridge.. 

Clarence 

Cumberland. 
Gloucester.. . 

Osgoode 

Russell 



304 

57 
13 
43 
68 
62 
43 
18 



251 

25 

28 
87 
87 

4 
13 

7 

166 



13 



41 



46 
178 



3 
1 

1 

6 

96 

62 
3 
1 

334 

58 
60 
26 
20 
70 
100 



238 

22 
12 
41 
35 
69 
28 
31 



416 

72 
38 
141 
84 
16 
44 
21 

131 



21 



21 



166 



4 
3 

9 
3 

3 
15 
34 

1 
79 

3 

3 

329 

20 
47 
45 
139 
41 
37 



107 

27 
4 
40 
13 
5 
9 
9 

45 



37 



153 

16 
10 

6 
99 

9 
13 



602 

110 

111 

70 

46 

32 

117 

116 



348 

79 
22 
95 
37 
32 
31 
52 

142 



1,496 

211 
311 
148 
350 
184 
292 



1,221 

195 
173 
230 
98 
115 
210 
200 



900 

177 
94 

201 

116 
86 
80 

146 

944 



111 
37 
96 

109 

43 

38 
30 

184 
79 

217 

565 

108 

34 

7 

21 

30 
74 

15 
38 
61 
5 
134 
20 
18 

1,908 

243 
305 
280 
374 
481 
225 



762 

114 
70 

168 
89 
73 

134 

114 



719 

144 
63 

129 

108 
64 
68 

143 

928 



166 
82 
148 
108 

52 
40 
19 

lis 

55 
149 

1,136 

159 
53 
37 
44 

108 
101 

51 
169 

83 

27 
141 
119 

44 

760 

84 
121 
150 
153 

187 
65 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



21 



No. 



Districts 



Occupiers op — Occupants de 



UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 
DESSOUS 
a' UN ACRE 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 



5 TO 10 

ACRES 



DE 5 A 10 
ACRES 



11 TO 50 
ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 
ACRES 



51 TO 100 101 TO 200 201 acres 

ACRES ACRES |aND OVER 

DE 51 A DE 101 A 201 ACRES 
100 ACRES 200 ACRES ET AU- 
I DESSUS 



119 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 

no 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 

121 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 



Ontario— con. 



SIMCOE E. 



Matchedash 

Medonte 

Orillia 

Tay 

Tinyi 



SIMCOE N. 



Flos 

Nottawasaga. 

Oro.. 

Sunnidale 

Vespra 



SIMCOE S. 



Adjala 

Essa 

Gwillimbury W-O 

Innisfil 

Tecumseth 

Tosorontio 



122 STORMONT. 



1 
2 
3 
4 

123 



Cornwall 

Finch 

Osnabruck. .. 
Roxborough . 



THUNDER BAY & 
RAINY RIVER. 

At wood, Curran, 
Aubrey & Haycock.. 

Langton, Mutrie, Sand- 
ford & Temple 

Aylesworth, Lash & 
Eno V (not inc.) 

Barwick, Dobic & 
Mather 

Bigsby Island, Dewart 
Morson & Tovell.. . . 

Blake, Neebing, Par- 
dee & Scobic 

Blue & Worthington. . 

Britton, Rugby & 
Wainwright 

Burriss 

Carpenter, Dance & 
Kingsford 

Conmee & Pearson... 

Crozier 

Devlin & Woodyatt.. 

Dilke & NcUcs 

Dorion, McGregor, Mc- 
Tavish & Pearl 

P2ton &Van Home — 

Fleming, Potts & 
Richardson 



151 



55 
27 
32 
37 

228 

5 

170 

39 

4 
10 

193 

7 
40 
70 
37 
38 

1 



665 
6 

98 
19 



51 



209 

1 

63 
69 
44 
32 

275 

35 
151 

42 
18 
29 

232 

19 
32 
62 
66 
45 



413 

239 
24 
102 

48 



94 

1 

16 
42 
12 
23 

126 

12 

72 

19 

3 

20 

83 



12 



523 

5 
132 
123 
95 
168 

461 

93 
1.55 
67 
49 
97 

312 

17 

40 
50 
108 
76 
21 

465 

109 
116 
134 
106 



873 

31 

248 
208 
1'4 

2-i2 

1,382 

249 
469 
283 
180 
201 

1,249 

142 
249 
214 
228 
293 
123 

1,173 

281 
288 
319 
285 



239 

5 
3 



493 

24 
123 
122 

77 
147 

694 

125 
183 
164 
115 
107 

760 

117 
152 
103 
145 
165 
78 

569 

154 
91 
161 
163 



1,453 

14 

35 

51 

OS 

54 

24 
53 

18 
57 

68 
44 
56 
100 
40 

40 
21 

10 



1 Includes Cliristian Island I R. 



22 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 





Districts 






Occupier 


s OF — Occupants de 






No. 


UNDER 
1 

ACRE 

Atr- 

DESSOUS 

d'un .\cre 


1 TO 

UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 
ACRES 


5 TO 10 

ACRES 

DE 5 A 10 

.\CRES 


11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 

ACRES 


51 TO 100 

ACRES 

DE 51 A 
100 ACRES 


101 TO 200 

ACRES 

DE 101 A 

200 ACRES 


201 .\CRE3 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 


18 


Ontario — con. 

THUNDER BAY & 
RAINY RIVER— con 
Gillies, Lybster & 
Marks 


NO. 

2 
5 

C 

IG 
387 


NO. 

4 
9 

2 

2 

1 

2 
1 

1 

11 
318 


NO. 

1 

5 

6 
1 

1 

1 

2 

1 
3 

7 
109 


NO. 

3 
5 

17 
4 

1 

3 

1 
3 

1 

1 

1 
1 

11 

3 
398 


NO. 

1 

23 

23 

8 

2 

4 

~ 

2 

13 

87 

9 

2 

2 

4 
3 

1,843 


NO. 

106 
46 

44 
9 

56 

1 

2 

17 

69 

60 
82 
44 
31 
12 

65 

4 

12 

19 
3 

8 

3 

1 

1,527 


NO. 

26 


19 


Gorham, Mclntyre & 
Ware . 


29 


20 


Grassy Narrows, -Swan 
Lake & White Dog 
Post 




21 


Heron Bay, Michipico- 
ten Island & Port 
Coldwell 




22 

23 
24 
•^5 


Jack Fish Island, Nipi- 
gon House Post, 
Tamarack Lake, 
Wabinosh Bay & 
Smooth Rock Lake 

Jaffray & Melick 

Lake of tli^ Woods 

Lake Savant 


14 


26 
27 


Long Lake Post 

McCrosson, Pratt & 
Spohn 


33 


?.H 


Mclrvine 




'1^ 


Melgund 


1 


:^o 


Miscampbell 


3 


31 
3'^ 


Morley & PattuUo.... 
Nipigon 


29 


33 


O'Connor 


9 


34 


Oliver 


31 


35 


Paipoonge 


7 


36 


Pellatt 


6 


37 


Roddick 


4 


38 


Rosebery, Shonstone 
& Tait 


29 


39 


RossDort 




40 
41 


RowcU & Wabigoon... 
Schreiber & C.P.R. 

line Schreiber to 

Jack Fish.. 




42 
43 

44 


Sifton to Sutherland. . 

Stanley to Windigo on 
C. N. R., Silver Is- 
let, High Island & 
Thunder Bay points 

Strange 


6 
9 


45 
4fi 


Sturgeon Lake Dis- 
trict G.T.P 

Watten 




47 


Zealand 


6 


48 

49 
50 


Along C.P.R. between 
English & Kaiiiin- 
istiivwia rivers 

Indian Reserve 

Unorganized 


2 
1 


1281 
1^9 


TORONTO C 




VICTORIA 


6G6 









RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



23 



No 



14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 

130 

1 

2 
3 

131 

1 



132 



133 



Districts 



Occupiers op — Occupants de 



UNDER 

1 
acre 



AU- DE 1 A ; 

DESSOUS ACRES 

UN ACRE 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 



5 TO 10 I 11 TO 50 51 TO 100 
ACRES I ACRES ACRES 

DE 5 A 10 DE 11 A 50 DE 51 A 
ACRES ACRES 100 ACRES 



Ontario— Con. 

aCTORIA— con. 

Anson & Hindon. . . 

Bexlcy 

Bruton, Dudley, Har- 
burn & Harcourt 

Garden 

Cardiff 

Dalton 

Digby & Lax ton 

Dysart& Guilford.... 

Eldon 

Emily 

Fenelon 

Glamorgan 

Lawrence, Lij'ingstone. 
McCIintcck, Night- 
ingale & Sherborne 

Lutterworth 

Mariposa 

Minden 

Monmouth 

Ops 

Snowdon 

Scrnervillo 

Stanhope 

Verulam 



WATERLOO N. 



Waterloo N. 

Wcllcsley... 
Woolwich. . . 



WATERLOO S. 



Dumfrie.s N . 
Waterloo S . . 
Wilmot 



WELLAND. 



Bertie 

Crow land 

Hum hers tone. 

Pelham 

Stamford 

Thorold 

Wainflcet 

Willoughby. . . 



134 



WELLINGTON N. 



Arthur 

Garafraxa W-0. 
Luther W-O.... 
Maryborough... 

Minto 

Peel 



WELLINGTON S. 



Eramosa. 



120 
110 



1.391 

08 i 
52 
19 

163 

22 
3 
8 

45 

46 
3 
6 

30 

186 

48 
4 

51 
68 
15 

210 

12 



- 2 
36 
16 
10 
67 

3 
11 

1 
22 

309 

179 
77 
53 

204 

68 
86 
50 

375 

50 

14 
39 
108 
92 
42 
16 
14 

224 

64 

23 

4 

31 

69 
33 

298 

28 



1 
1 

7 
6 

32 

6 

12 

143 

82 
25 
36 

95 

16 
37 
42 

237 

29 
18 
16 
72 
41 
38 
17 
6 

100 

34 
9 

7 
36 
1 

116 



9 

1 

13 

6 

4 

39 

79 

39 

3 



3 
1 

93 
9 

2 

43 
3 

13 
7 

24 

267 

1.37 
61 
69 

214 

37 
97 
SO 

1,114 

149 
83 
142 
234 
122 
1 

179 
73 

.300 

50 
45 
20 
49 
73 
69 

247 

27| 



13 
23 

13 

28 

34 

23 

30 

01 

184 

249 

188 

35 



14 
28 

316 
47 
36 

208 
32 

■79 
34 

168 

652 

110 
367 
175 

485 

104 
142 
239 

1,064 

152 

86 
163 
144 

76 
107 
219 

87 

1,616 

281 
201 
231 
294 
283 
350 

1,0.30 

185 



101 TO 200 201 ACRES 
.\CRES AND OVER 



DE 101 .\ 

200 .\CRES 



201 ACRES 

ET AU- 
DESSUS 



39 

52 

35 

34 

53 

123 

141 

117 

27 



12 
31 

201 
74 
61 

152 
50 
82 
44 

148 

576 

180 
161 
235 

535 

157 
167 
211 

495 

82 
51 
66 
48 
49 
41 
113 
45 

917 

176 
130 
104 
1.30 
191 
183 

830 

125 



24 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 



Districts 



Ontario — con. 

WELLINGTON S — 

Erin 

Guelph 

Nichol 

Piltcington 

Puslinch 



WENTWORTH. 



Ancaster 

Barton 

Beverley 

Binbrook 

Flamborough E 

Flamboroughi W-0. 

Glanford 

Saltfeet 



Occupiers of — Occupants de 



UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 

DESSOUS 

d'uN ACRE 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 



5 TO 10 
ACRES 



11 TO 50 

ACRES 



51 TO 100 
ACRES 



DE 1 A 5 i DE 5 A 10 jDE 11 A 50| DE 51 
ACRES ACRES ACRES 1 100 ACRES 



YORK CENTRE. 



Etobicoke. . . 

Markham 

Scarborough. 
Vaughan 



YORK N. 



ueorgina 

Gwillirobury E. 
Gwillimbury N. 

King 

Whitchurch 



YORK S. 



York 

Prince Edward Island 



KINGS. 



Township 38 

Township 39 

Township 40 

Township 41 

Township 42 

Township 43 

Township 44 

Township 45 

Township 46 

Township 47.. 

Township 51 

Township 52 

Township 53 

Township 54 

Township 55 

Township 56 

Town.ship 59 

Township 61 

Townsliip 63 

Township 64 

Township 66 

Georgetown Royalty, 



40 

38 

102 

8 

10 

142 

44 
10 
24 

8 
16 
24 

4 
12 

344 

75 

145 

56 



394 

85 
75 
53 
56 
125 

154 

154 

256 

114 

4 
1 

4 



29 
104 
98 
16 
23 

491 

96 
78 
44 
11 
62 
95 
28 
77 



112 
146 
107 
121 

439 

78 
102 

3S 
109 
112 

199 

199 

606 

173 



14 

58 

23 

7 

6 

368 

61 
79 
27 
16 

46| 

4l! 

9 

89 

311 

144 
61 
67 
391 

157 

27| 
29l 
27! 
28 i 
46 

151 

151 

422 

115 

3 
9 
4 
1 
1 
3 
3 

21 
1 

11 
1 
4 
5 
3 
2 
5 
6 
1 



11 



54 
65 
27 
31 
43 

1,014 

161 
114 
130 

47 
160 
141 

54 
207 

482 

153 

128 
117 
84 

426 

61 
93 
46 
84 
142 

145 

145 

3,849 

1,348 

45 
53 
36 
67 
23 
71 
81 
70 
63 
39 
41 
63 
58 
60 
68 
37 
71 
137 
108 
113 
7 
371 



101 TO 200 201 ACRES 
.\CRES AND OVER 



DE 101 A 

200 ACRES 



300 

134 

62 

116 

239 

1,325 

272 
44 
296 
129 
153 
153 
135 
143 

1,045 

127 
370 
238 
310 

1,061 

95 
213 

85 
363 
305 

199 

199 

5,495 

1,554 



201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 



192 

122 

127| 
105 
159 

629 

97 
18 
181 
77 
84 
64 
55 
53 

500 

52 

163 

97 

188 

663 

72 
152 

86: 
2261 

127| 

108j 
1081 

3,227J 
8651 



31 

17 

18 

7 

22 

84 

11 
2 

34 
5 

11 
5 



52 

3 
16 

8 
25 

144 

27 
33 
28 
39 
17 

19 

19 

514 

139 



74 


46 


9 


72 


54 


11 


60 


55 


9 


73 


51 


2 


34 


38 


8 


68 


31 


4 


44 


38 


11 


68 


38 


6 


76 


42 


4 


84 


47 


10 


89 


50 


3 


88 


44 


8 


76 


32 


9 


71 


32 


7 


84 


47 


10 


63 


43 


7 


71 


48 


8 


90 


36 


2 


108 


39 


8 


116 


33 


2 


30 


18 


1 


15 


3 


- 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



25 



Districts 



OcruPiERs OF — Occupants de 



VXDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 

DESSODS 
d' UN ACRE 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 



5 TO 10 

ACRES 



DE 5 A 10 
ACRES 



11 TO 50 

ACRES 



51 TO 100 
ACRES 



DE 11 A 501 DE 51 A 

ACRES 100 ACRES 



101 TO 200 201 ACRES 
ACRES AND OVER 



DE 101 A 

200 ACRES 



201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 



Prince Edward Island 

— con. 
PRINCE 

Township 1 

Township 2 

Township 3 

Township 4 

Township 5 

Township 6 

Township 7 

Township 8 

Township 9 

Township 10 

Township 11 

Township 12 

Township 13 

Township 14 

Township 15 

Township 16 

Township 17 

Townsliip IS 

Township 19 

Township 25 

Township 26 

Township 27 

Township 28 

QUEENS 

Township 20 1 

Township 21 

Township 22 

Township 23 

Township 24 

Township 29 

Township 30 

Township 31 

Township 32 

Township 33 

Township 34 

Township 35 

Township 36 

Township 37 

Township 48 

Township 49 

Township 50 

Township 57 

Township 58 

Township 60 

Township 62 

Township 65 

TownsJiip 67 

Charloftetown City 
and Royalty 

Quebec 

A.RGENTEUIL 

Arundel 

Cluitham 

Gore 

Cronville 

Harrington 



1 
3 
8 
4 
4 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 

2 

9,990 

57 

1 
3 

I 
1 



202 

8 
9 
4 

29 
9 
6 
1 
6 
2 

1 

6 

11 

4 

10 

6 

26 

13 

11 

5 

5 

12 

18 

231 

10 

39 

8 

16 

19 

12 

2 

15 

9 

5 

9 

11 

2 

6 

3 

13 

7 

11 

9 

3 
4 
5 

13 

11,221 

138 

3 
31 

2 
23 

1 



157 

15 

10 

3 

4 

5 



3 
4 

1 

9 

3 

7 

7 

2 

20 

15 

6 

6 

9 

8 

14 

150 

5 

12 

1 

9 

15 

12 

5 

3 

4 

2 

7 

5 

1 

13 
6 
3 
14 
4 
2 
3 
5 
10 



,751 

39 

3 
4 



1,238 

128 
159 
46 
90 
49 
52 
19 
20 
27 
17 
28 
41 
32 
58 
138 
45 
75 
52 
38 
13 
25 
46 
40 

1,263 

24 
59 
43 
76 
105 
76 
62 
67 
37 
33 
35 
49 
68 
24 
46 
52 
60 
84 
43 
14 
43 
83 
32 

4S 

22,209 

160 

7 
45 

2 
53 

2 



1,821 



I.IOS 



106 


59 


10 


64 


38 


6 


88 


51 


10 


101 


53 


13 


93 


31 


7 


91 


39 


8 


49 


53 


20 


60 


51 


11 


69 


24 


8 


40 


29 


11 


41 


37 


11 


48 


40 


13 


87 


46 


13 


105 


48 


4 


100 


46 


10 


83 


40 


11 


101 


42 


9 


112 


63 


9 


81 


65 


9 


46 


72 


10 


69 


65 


14 


89 


52 


10 


98 


64 


8 


2,120 


1,254 


140 


49 


39 


5 


110 


73 


4 


71 


65 


6 


92 


58 


2 


110 


58 


3 


110 


45 


7 


87 


53 


5 


123 


56 


7 


88 


51 


4 


97 


56 


9 


96 


79 


6 


74 


62 


4 


88 


42 


2 


60 


54 


11 


103 


46 


5 


83 


61 


7 


94 


56 


4 


127 


39 


3 


71 


58 


5 


72 


52 


5 


60 


45 


13 


120 


29 


5 


105 


63 


13 


30 


14 


5 


49,043 


46, lOS 


i6,3;i 


458 


634 


350 


37 


53 


38 


107 


137 


51 


22 


38 


16 


72 


74 


65 


17 


44 


36 



235 



26 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 



Districts 



Occupiers of — Occupants de 



UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU I 

DESSOUS j 

d'un acre! 



1 TO 

UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 



5 TO 10 
ACRES 



DE 5 A 10 

ACRES 



11 TO 50 

ACRES 



51 TO 100 

ACRES 



DE 11 A 50 DE 51 A DE 101 A 
ACRES 1 100 ACREs!200 ACRES 



101 TO 200 201 ACRES 
ACRES AND OVER 



201 ACRES 

ET AU- 
DESSU3 



Qii?he€ — con. 

ARGENTEUIL — 

Montcalm 

Howard 

Mille Isles 

Morin 

St. Andrew.? 

St. Jerusalem 

Wentworth 



BAGOT. 



St. Andre d' Acton. . 

vSte. Christine 

St. Dominique 

St. Ephrem d' Upton 

Ste. Hel^ne 

St. Hugues de Ramsay 

St. Liboire 

St. Nazaire d'Acton 

St. Pie 

Ste. Rosalie 

St. Simon de Ramsay 
St. Theodore d'Acton. 

BEAUCE 



Ditchfield 

L'Enfant Jesus 

Saints Anges 

St. Benoit-Labre... 

St. Come de Kennebec 

St. Elzear 

St. Ephrem de Tring. 

St. Evariste de For 
syth 

St. Francois 

St. Frederic 

St. Gedeon de Marlow 

St. Georges 

St. Hilaire Dorset.... 

St. Honore 

St. Hubert de Spald 
ing 

St. Joseph 

St. Ludger 

Ste. Marie 

St. Martin 

Ste. Martine de Cour- 
celles 

St. Maxiiuc do Scott. . 

St. Methode d 'Ad- 
stock 

St. Pierre de Brough- 
ton 

Ste. Rufine 

St. Samuel de Gay- 
hurst 

St. Scbastien d'Ayl- 
mer 

St. Severin 

St. Theophile 

St. Victor de Tring.. . 



155 



584 

3 
3 
24 
13 
14 
29 

65 

8 

22 

32 

31 

4 
129 

1 
42 
42 



32 

26 

3 

232 

4 
3 

10 

13 

13 

47 

83 

11 

38 

1 

5 

4 

351 

6 
3 
7 
3 
8 
11 
32 

15 
57 

3 
12 
30 

2 
25 

4 
25 

6 
16 
13 

4 
1 

2 

4 



10 



95 



3 
4 
4 

14 
9 

10 

267 

9 
28 
20 
28 
31 
24 
31 
17 
22 

9 
20 
28 

560 

21 
8 
4 

15 

36 
9 

59 

15 
47 
18 
14 
40 

14 

5 
25 

3 
11 
23 

12 
3 

18 



16 
33 
13 
24 
53 
29 
35 

933 

46 
53 
74 
73 
84 
86 
85 
44 

142! 
81 

104 
61 

2,098 

91 
4 
31 
71 
87 
25 
112 

60 
154 

48 

80 
156 

19 
119 

52 

47 

147 

43 

85 

42 
7 

82 

44 
20 

72 

46 

14 

45 

125 



19 
31 
48 
22 
61 
84 
23 

838 

84 
31 
86 
51 
84 
78 
69 
52 
106 
60 
64 
73 

2,227 

22 
23 
62 
66 
55 
89 
119 



197 
87 
35 

180 
19 
89 

28 
120 
28 
94 
60 

48 
30 

70 

43 
16 

55 

64 

49 

20 

105 



RECENSEMENT DU CAIMADA 191. 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



27 





Districts 


Occupiers of — Occup.\nts de 


No. 


UXDER 

1 

.\CRE 

AU- 
DESSOUS 

d'un.'vcre 


1 TO 
irXDER 

5 .\cres 

DE 1 .\ 5 

ACRES 


5 TO 10 

.\CRES 

DE 5 .A. 10 
ACRES 


11 TO 50 

.\CRES 

DE 11 A 50 
ACRES 


51 TO 100 

.\CRES 

DE 51 A 

100 .\CRES 


101 TO 200 

.\CRE6 

DE 101 .\ 
200 ACRES 


201 .\CRE3 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 


30 
31 
32 

143 

1 

9, 


Quebec— con. 

BEAUCE— con. 
St. Vital de Lambton. 
Sacre-Coeur de Jesus . 
Woburn and Louise. . . 

BEAUHARXOIS 

Ste. Cecile 

St. Clement 


NO. 

9 
44 

59 

3 

8 

29 

10 
9 

376 

10 
22 
28 

25 

1 
1 

10 
100 

1 

24 

139 

12 

1 
2 

166 

9 

14 
13 
41 
14 
18 

9 
26 

5 

3 

14 

25 


NO. 

6 

17 

4 

108 

45 

11 

5 

18 

10 
19 

207 

10 

6 

22 

9 

21 

21 

6 

3 

29 
43 

2 
8 

190 

13 
20 
22 
29 
22 
12 
13 
27 
10 
19 

3 

209 

3 

3 

20 
6 


NO. 

1 
3 

26 

6 
4 

7 

2 

7 

57 

1 
3 

2 

6 
12 
8 

4 
8 

1 

10 

1 

1 

86 

8 

7 

4 

17 

19 

5 

16 

2 

5 

1 
2 

235 

10 
21 
12 


NO. 

8 

23 

1 

138 

21 
20 
19 

27 

21 
30 

254 

8 
15 
11 

15 

6 

26 
18 

26 

7 

12 

38 
41 
2 
11 
11 
- 7 

363 

35 

20 

20 

103 

56 

14 

46 

32 

4 

23 

4 

6 

1,340 

6 

34 

36 

236 

230 


NO. 

5.S 
83 
29 

4G1 

67 
70 
54 
117 

71 

82 

871 

68 
113 
40 

45 

28 
60 
29 

72 
45 
43 

89 
79 
50 
50 
32 
28 

6.S7 

66 
43 
27 
98 

121 
32 

100 
17 
61 
60 
57 
5 

1.163 

IS 

25 

12 

173 

84 


NO. 

98 

147 

11 

353 

43 
79 
37 
89 

45 

60 

1,109 

59 
96 

88 

58 

51 
1.38 
91 

74 
58 

84 

49 
100 
50 
39 
28 
37 

750 

87 
76 
49 

108 
96 
54 

109 
19 
40 
65 
32 
15 

845 

50 
25 
14 
61 
42 


NO. 

55 
35 

52 

7 
11 


3 
4 
5 

6 

146 

1 

2 
3 
4 


St. Etienne 

St. Louis de Gonzague 
St. Stanislas de Kost- 

ka 

St. Timothee 

BELLECHASSE 

Notre-Dame de Buck- 
land 

St. Cajetan d 'Armagh 

St. Charles Borromee. 

St. Damien de Buck- 
land 


3 
13 

3 

15 

252 

15 
23 

19 

23 


5 


St. Etienne de Beau- 
mont 


11 


R 


St. Gcrvais 


14 


7 


St. Lazare 


32 


8 
P 


St. Magloire, (Rioux 
Bellechasse, Daa- 
quam) 

St. Michel 


27 
3 


in 


St. Xeree 


17 


11 


S t e. Philomfene de 
Mailloux 


18 


1'' 


St. Raphael 


20 


13 


St. Valier 


1 


14 


St. Camille 


15 


15 


Ste. Sabine 


10 


16 
147 


St. Gabriel Archange. 
BERTHIER 


4 

272 


1 


Berthier 


22 


*> 


Lanoraie 


25 


■>, 


Laval trie 


32 


4 
5 


St. Barthelciny 

St. Cuthbert 


10 
31 


6 


St. Damien 


43 


7 
8 
9 
10 


St. Gabriel de Brandon 
St. Ignace de Loyola. 
St. Michel des Saints. 
St. Norbert 


23 
14 


11 


St. Zenon 


12 


12 
148 

1 


Visitation (Isle Dupas) 

BONAVENTURE 

Carleton 


9 

249 

4 


9 


Gascons E 


3 


3 


Gasco.^s W-0 


3 


4 


Hamilton 


■ 12 


5 


Hope 


3 









28 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 



Occupiers of — Occupants de 



Districts 


UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 
DESSOUS 

d'un acre 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 .\CRES 

DE 1'a 5 

ACRES 


5 TO 10 

ACRES 

DE 5 A 10 
ACRES 


11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 
ACRES 


51 TO 100 

ACRES 

DE 51 A 
100 ACRES 


101 TO 200 

ACRES 

DE 101 A 
200 ACRES 


201 ACRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 


QU3bec — con. 

BONAVENTURE — con. 
Mann & Indian Res- 
erve 


NO. 

2 

3 
4 

10 
3 

2 

1 

292 

52 
3 

74 

11 

8 

144 

189 

hb 

25 

4 

10 

- 6 

m 

26 

2 

30 

18 

19 

5 

38 

6 

431 

56 

46 

1 

24 

8 

8 
15 


NO. 

27 

9 

4 

18 

26 

7 

52 

14 

1 

2 

1 

2 

3 

4 
6 

1 

267 

43 
4 
112 
39 
20 
49 

280 

166 
4 
49 
91 
8 
5 
9 

m 

18 
13 
14 
18 
8 
9 
21 
13 

283 

42 

21 

8 
34 
14 

IC 


NO. 

22 

12 

2 

12 

16 

2 

92 

19 

6 

1 

3 
5 

88 

15 
1 
26 
12 
10 
24 

82 

2 

26 

2 

4 

10 

98 
3 
6 
3 
4 
4 
2 

15 
1 

74 

3 

11 

4 
12 

10 
4 


NO. 

18 
57 
65 
45 

147 
41 

131 
52 
47 
15 
17 
97 

8 
21 
36 

1 

293 

41 
15 
85 
62 
45 
45 

240 

86 
10 
19 
19 

7 
27 

4 
/54 
17 
22 
22 
44 
11 

5 
16 
17 

510 

2 

26 

12 
18 
23 

21 
3i 


NO. 

23 

131 

92 

40 

122 

102 

25 

15 

34 

48 

48 

80 

33 
24 
31 

3 

508 

81 
45 
118 
89 
76 
99 

612 

181 
42 
36 
33 
28 
23 
19 

J^l 
50 
65 

101 
55 
26 
26 
70 
38 

1,390 

42 

16 

61 

122 

50 

22 
53 


NO. 

16 

108 
45 
37 
60 

131 
10 
12 
43 
47 
14 
63 

20 
20 
25 

2 

680 

99 
64 

172 
94 
97 

154 

866 

SS4 
82 
91 
46 
38 
28 
49 

632 
58 
58 
82 
'54 
64 
41 
91 
84 

1,137 

41 

70 

105 

41 

104 

36 
68 


NO. 

9 


Maria 


28 


Matapedia 


16 


New Carlisle 


6 


New Richmond 

Nouvelle & Shoolbred 

Paspebiac 

Port Daniel E 

Port Daniel W-0 .... 

Restigouche 

St. Alphonse de Caplan 
St. Charles de Caplan . 
St. Laurent de Mata- 
pedia 

St. Omer 

Shigawake 


24 

44 

5 

7 
41 

6 
14 

16 
5 
3 


Other parts-autres 
parties 


_ 


BROME 


316 


Bolton E 


47 


Bolton W-0 


27 


Brome 


76 


Farnham E 

Potton 


27 
75 


Sutton. . 


64 


CHAMBLY & VER- 
CH^RES 


232 




118 


Boucherville 

Chamblv 


15 
33 




12 


St. Bazile le Grand 
St. Bruno 


14 
9 


St. Hubert 


35 




m 


Bela?il pr 


23 


Contrecoeur pf 

St Antoine 


9 


Stc. Julie 


17 


St. Marc 


24 


Sto. Theodosie 


1 
22 




18 


CHAMPLAIN 


347 


Cap de la Magdcleine 
La Visitation de 


•1 

19 


Notre-Dame du Mont 


37 


St "Vdelphe 


1€ 


Ste. Anne de la P6radc 
St. Francois - Xavici 


2S 


Ste. Genevieve 


32 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I Terres occupees 



29 





DisTRicra 


Occupiers or — Occupants de 


No. 


UNDER 

1 

acre 

\v- 

DESSOUS 

d'un acre 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACHES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 


5 TO 10 

ACRES 

DE 5 A 10 
ACRES 


11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 
ACRES 


51 TO 100 

ACRES 

DE 51 A 
100 ACRES 


101 TO 200 

ACRES 

DE 101 A 
200 .^CRES 


201 ACRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 


8 

9 

10 

11 


Quebec— con. 

CHAMPLAIN — con. 

St. Jacques dcs Piles.. 

St. Jean des Piles 

St. Louis de France. . . 
St. Luc 


NO. 

1 

1 

34 
31 

48 
98 
24 
26 

7 

37 

2 
1 
5 
3 

2 

3 
2 
8 
6 
5 

1.37 

7 

5 

24 

15 
32 
21 
23 
10 

184 
9 

2 

1 
1 


NO. 

10 

7 

6 

19 

11 

1 

5 

22 

19 

8 

29 
14 

152 

49 
12 
22 
15 

2 

9 
2 

15 
16 
10 

168 

2 
6 

10 
40 

29 
13 
14 
17 
37 

288 
72 

10 

3 
4 

9 

8 


NO. 

1 

1 

3 
2 
1 
1 
5 
3 
1 
2 
10 

39 

16 
2 
2 
5 

2 
1 

1 
4 
2 
4 

49 

2 
12 
10 

11 
3 
2 
2 
7 

75 
SO 

2 
2 

6 


NO. 

2 

8 
10 
21 
11 
74 
34 

4 
40 
22 
15 
42 

9 
83 

150 

30 
28 
19 
24 

11 
15 
3 
3 
6 
4 
7 

269 

9 
33 
62 
41 

49 
7 
25 
23 
20 

527 

72 

5 

6 

12 

5 

2 
2 


NO. 

5 
24 
39 
40 
91 

108 
43 
11 
76 
85 

128 

120 
69 

185 

333 

42 
32 
27 
54 

15 
46 
42 
17 
15 
25 
18 

669 

35 
63 
84 
56 

125 
75 
56 
55 

120 

1 , 5.58 

297 

22 
12 
43 

8 
2 

17 

8 


NO. 

14 

38 
36 
39 
82 
67 
66 
25 
47 
79 
53 
10 
60 
56 

679 

115 

24 
98 
104 

29 
104 
43 
53 
44 
30 
35 

497 

28 
39 
62 
38 

106 
54 
41 

47 
82 

1,577 

m 

35 
32 

87 

36 

5 

30 
34 


NO. 

12 

13 
16 
12 


1'^ 


St. Maurice 


26 


13 


St. Narcisse 


5 


14 


St. Prosper 


33 


15 
16 


St. Roch Makinac 

St. Severin 


17 
11 


17 

18 


St. Stanislas 

Ste. Thfecle 


27 
12 


iq 


St. Timothee 


1 


20 

''I 


St. Theophile 

St. Tite 


8 
8 


22 


Other parts-autres 
' parties 




152 

1 
2 
3 
4 


CHARLEVOIX 

Baie St. Paul 

He aux Coudres 

Les Eboulements 

JIall)aie 


577 

116 

4 

65 

70 


5 


Petite Riviere St. 
Francois 


43 


fi 


Ste. Agn^s 


81 


7 


St. Fiddle 


35 


8 


St. Hilarion 


46 


q 


St. Irenee 


34 


in 


St. Simeon 


34 


11 


St. Urbain 


49 


153 

1 


CHATEAUGUAY 

St. Antoine Abb6 

Ste. Clothilde 


96 

5 
12 


3 

4 


St. Jean-Chrysostome. 
St. Joachim 


11 
8 


5 


St. Malachie d'Orms- 
town 


15 


6 


Ste. Martine 


15 


7 
8 
9 

151 


Ste. Philomcne 

St. Urbain Premier... 
Tr^s St. Sacrenient.... 

CHICOUTLMI & 

SAG LENA Y 

Chicoutimi 


12 

11 

7 

1,012 
S96 


1 


Anse St. Jean pr. & 
Dumas tp 


34 


2 
3 

4 


Bagotvillc pr 

Chicoutimi pr 

Grande B:iie pr. & 

Boilcau & Ferland 

tps 


35 
54 

36 


5 


Kenogami unorg-non 
org 


8 


6 


Laterrifere pr. & 
Simon tp 


38 


•7 


St. Ambroise pr 


19 



3a 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 



Districts 



Occupiers of — Occupants de 



UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU I 

DESSOUS 
O'UN ACRE 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 



5 TO 10 

ACRES 



DE 1 A 5 Ide 5 a 10 

ACRES ACRES 



11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 

ACRES 



51 TO 100 101 TO 200 201 acres 

ACRES I ACRES AND OVER 



DE 51 A I DE 101 A 
100 ACRES 200 ACRES 



201 ACRES 
ET AU 
DESSUS 



Quebec— con. 

CHICOUTIMI & 

SAGUENAY— con. 

Ste. Anne pr 

St. Cyriac pr 

St. Dominique dp 

Jonquieres pr 

St. Felix d' Otis 

Mopigny 

St. Fulgence pr 

St. Honore pr 

St. Louis Nazairepr 

Lac St. Jean 

Albanel pr 

Girard unorg-non- 

org 

Hfebertville pr 

Indian Reserve-R. 

Indienne 

La Dore pr 

Normandin pr 

, Roberval pr 

St. Amedee de Peri 

bonka pr 

St. Andre pr 

St. Bruno pr 

St. Charles pr 

St. Edouard de Peri- 

bonka pr 

Ste . Edwidge pr . 
St. Felicien pr.. . 
St. Francois de Sales 

St. Gedeon pr 

St. Henri de Taillon 

pr ' 

St. Joseph d'Almapr 
St. Jerome pr . . . . 
St. Louis de Metab- 

etchouan pr 

St. Methode pr 

St. Michel dcMistas- 

sini pr 

St. Prime pr 

St. Thomas d'Aquin 

pr 

Sacre-Coeur de 

Marie pr 

Saguenay 

Bergeronnes pr 

Bersimis 

Escoumains pr 

Harrington mun 

He d'Anticosti 

Magpie from Moisie 

to Mingan 

Mille V'aches pr., 

Natashquan 

N o t re - D a m e de 
Blanc Sablon mun 

Piastre Baie 

Pointo aux Esqui- 
maux 

Pointe de Monts. . . 



171 
1 



20 

1 



186 
1 



26 



18 



5 
11 

5 

416 
16 

1 
27 

18 
34 
26 

28 



1 
2 

42 
55 
19 

10 

11 

5 

13 
1 

6 
42 

14 

21! 

4 



11 



44 



11 

20 
12 
31 

1,130 



13 
74 

9 

43 

124 

61 

34 
32 
41 
10 

13 

24 

78 
58 
49 

32 
35 
50 

33 
32 

36 
95 

34 

63 

131 

13 

3 

16 

1 



42 
18 

56 

15 
30 
30 
18 
957 
30 



941 



23! 
63' 

621 

251 
311 
45' 

9; 

1 

19| 
26l 
591 
151 
391 

i 
33! 
68 
63 

36 
39 

26' 

45! 

30 

I 
69 

15S\ 

221 
8 



10 



56 
12 

40 

12 

30 

17 

5 

547 
14 

4 

74 



9 
31 

32 

17 
12 
29 
26 

9 

7 
30 

2 

16 

22 
35 
34 

19 
28 

23 

25 

15 

34 

69 

24 

5 

5 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



31 



No. 



Occupiers of — Occupants de 



Districts 



Quebec — con. 

CHICOUTIMI & 
SAGUENAY— con 
Saguenay — con. 
Ste. Anne de Port 

neuf mun 

St. Firmin mun & 
-■ Saguenay tp.-canton 
Sacre-Cceur pr. & La 

brosse tp 

Tadoussac pr 



COMPTON. 



Auckland 

Bury 

Chesham 

Clifton E & W-0 

Compton 

Eaton 

Emberton 

Hampden 

Hereford 

La Patrie (Ditton).. . . 

Lingwick 

Marston & Piopolis 

Newport 

St. Alphonse 

Ste. Cecile de Whitton 
St. Leon de Marston. . . 

Ste. Edwidge 

Westbury 

Whitton 

Winslow & St. Remain 

deux-montagnes 



L'Annonoiation. . . 

St. Augustin 

St. Benoit 

St. Canut 

St. Colomban 

St. Eustacbe 

St. Hermas 

St. Joseph 

Ste. Moniquc 

St. Placide 

Ste. Scholastique. 



UNDER 

1 

.\CRE 

AU- 
DESSOUS 

d'un.\cre 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 .1 5 

ACRES 



5 TO 10 
ACRES 



11 TO 50 51 TO 100 101 TO 200 201 .\cres 

.\CRES ACRES j .ACRES IaND OVER 



DE 5 k 10|dB 11 A 50, DE 51 A DE 101 A 201 ACRES 
ACRES I .\CRES I 100 ACRES 200 -ACRES* ET AVz 
I I DESSUS 



DORCHESTER. 



St. Anselmc 

Ste. Aurelie 

St. Benjamin 

St. Bernard 

Ste. Claire 

St. Edouard de Fram 

pton 

Ste. Germaine d'Et- 

chemin 

Ste. Henedine 

St. Isidore 

Ste. Justine , 



128 

1 

13 

6 

12 

8 
7 

7 
7 
6 
2 
2 

> 18 

1 

22 

16 

ISl 

57 
6 

20 
9 

4 

23 
5 
1 

52 
4 

214 



217 

4 

18 

1 

4 

59 

32 



16 



217 

40 

20 

27 

4 

1 

26 

21 

16 

7 

7 

48 

130 

14 

2 

2 

12 

17 

14 

3 

6 

9 

11 



2 
3 

141 

4 
9 
1 
3 
32 
27 
7 



5 

4 

5 
3 

771 

24 
32 
15 
19 
78 
92 
46 
20 
50 
28 
14 

8 
39 

9 
36 

4 

56 

33 

37 

131 

199 

40 
15 
10 
28 

2 
45 

5 
25 

6 
17 



342 

21 
8 
14 
13 
12 

11 

21 

8 

15 

13 



22 

15 

44 
11 

1.514 

55 
91 

120 
39 

138 

114 
70 
36 
66 
77 
62 
63 
70 
22 
86 
74 
71 
41 
84 

135 

606! 

41 
60 
57 
48 
7 
85 
63 
56 
68 
49 
72 

1,331 

02 
31 
49 
78 
67 

80 

116 
38 
95 
57 



23 

20 

39 
22 

1,437 

63 

100 

33 

70 

148 

157 

60 

34 

111 

143 

57 

83 

77 

9 

50 

23 

29 

55 

68 

67 

557 

35 
73 
68 
11 
10 
109 
44 
38 
49 
30 
90 

1,411 

113 
23 
39 

87 
109 



130 

i:'.3 
(■)',) 

110 

74 



32 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 





Districts 


Occupiers of — Occupants de 


No. 


UNDER 

1 

acre 

AU- 
DESSOUS 

d'un acre 


1 TO 

UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 
ACRES 


5 TO 10 

ACRES 

DE 5 A 10 
ACRES 


11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 59 
ACRES 


51 TO 100 

ACRES 

DE 51 A 

100 ACRES 


101 TO 200 

ACRES 

DE 101 A 
200 ACRES 


201 ACRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 

ET AU- 
DESSUS 


11 
12 
13 


Quebec— con. 

DORCHESTER— con. 

St. Leon de Standon . . 
St. Louis de Gonzague 
St. Malachie 


NO. 

6 

34 

3 

11 
12 

8 

270 

109 
1 
4 
17 

15 
2 

12 

29 

5 
11 

13 

161 

6 

10 

2 
11 

2 

16 
3 

4 
14 

41 

23 

4 

25 


NO. 

7 

19 

4 

5 
3 

2 

291 

127 

9 

21 

15 

5 

6 

11 

3 

6 

20 
2 

7 
6 
2 

14 
164 

11 

4 

5 

8 

4 
9 

22 

3 

9 
5 

7 
4 

11 
33 
12 

17 


NO. 

2 

2 
1 

1 

2 

1 

80 

S8 
1 
3 
2 
4 
1 
1 

14 

3 
2 

5 

2 

J,2 
2 

8 

3 

1 
1 

1 

2 

6 

4 

7 
3 

4 


NO. 

30 

1 

22 
12 

7 

74 
30 
11 

19 

713 

S2J, 
9 

32 
21 
28 
11 
32 
11 

11 

66 
5 

18 
47 

^\ 

S89 
38 

8 
5 

22 
3 

6 
6 

18 

15 

5 
11 

15 

46 

51 
44 
38 
14 
44 


NO. 

93 

10 
62 
37 
26 

162 
121 

58 

83 

2,140 

932 
13 
67 
63 
63 
35 
78 
82 

89 

95 
45 

35 
163 
31 
73 
1,208 
81 

69 
50 

96 
23 

82 
77 
20 

57 

46 

26 
30 

48 
43 

133 
93 

107 
28 
99 


NO. 

89 

10 
90 

87 
26 

52 
65 
50 

55 

1,667 

- 713 
33 
69 
36 
70 
33 
75 
66 

59 

77 
15 

21 
70 
30 
59 
954 
79 

82 
43 

85 
15 

49 
51 

38 

74 

17 

29 
36 

68 
37 

36 
53 
70 
50 
42 


NO. 

- 31 

7 

19 


14 
15 


Ste. Marguerite 


25 
11 


16 


St. Odilon de Gran- 
bourne 


9 


17 

18 
19 


St. Pro.sper ( M is&itJ'n) . . 

Ste. Rose de Watford . 

St. Zaeharie de Met- 

germette 


26 
18 

35 


158 
1 


DRUMMOND & AR- 
THABASKA 

Drummond 


510 
209 


2 


Durham 


13 


3 




27 


4 


Grantham 


10 


5 


Kingsey 


30 


6 

7 


Kingsey Falls 

L' Avenir. . . . 


8 
21 


8 
9 


N.-D.duBonConseil 
St. Eugfene de Gran- 
tham 


15 
3 


10 
11 


St. Germain de 

Grantham 

St. Lucien 


11 

8 


12 

13 
14 


St. Majorique de 

Grantham 

Wendover & Simpson 
Wickham 


4 

9 

23 


15 
16 


Wickham W-0 

Arthabaska 


27 

sot 


17 


Chenier. . . 


21 


18 


Chester E (Ste. 
Hclene) 


13 


19 


Chester N 


4 


20 


Chester W-0. (St. 
Paul) 


22 


21 


Haddington 


6 


22 


St. Albert de War- 
wick ... . 


12 


23 
24 
25 

26 


Ste. Annedu Sault... 

St. Christophe 

Ste. Clothilde 

d'Horton 

Ste. Elizabeth de 

Warwick 


10 

48 

32 
8 


27 


St. Louis de Bland- 
ford 


21 


28 


St. Norbert 


10 


29 


St. Remi de Ting- 
wick 


9 


30 
31 


St. Rosaire 

St. Val^re de Bul- 
strode 


18 
5 


32 
33 


Ste. Victoire 

Stanfold 


11 
18 


34 




14 


35 




19 









RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



33 



No. 



Districts 



Occupiers of — Occupants de 



UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 
DESSOUS 
d'uN ACRE 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 
ACHES 



5 TO 10 

ACRES 



11 TO 50 
ACRES 



51 TO 100 jlOl TO 200 201 acres 

ACRES ACRES AND OVER 



DE 5 A. 10 DE 11 A 50| DE 51 A | DE 101 A 
ACRES ACRES llOO ACRES.200 ACRES 



201 ACRES 

ET AU- 
DESSUS 



159 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 



160 

161 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 


162 

163 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 



Quebec — con. 
GASPfi 



Cap Chat 

Cap Rosier 

Coffin Island 

Douglastown 

Douglas W-0 

Etang du Nord 

Fox River & 

Sydenham N 

Gaspe Bay N & 

Sydenham S 

Gaspe Bay S 

Grande Vallee des 

Monts.' , 

Grande Riviere 

Grand Etang 

Grosse He, 

Havre Aubert 

Havre aux Maisons... 
L'Anse au Griffon... . 

L'Anse du Cap 

Malbaie 

Mont Louis & 

Riviere Magdeleine 

Newport 

Pabos 

Perce 

Petite Magdeleine 

Ste. Anne des Monts.. 

York 

Other parts — autres 

parties 



HOCHELAGA. 



HUNTINGDON. 



Dundee 

Elgin 

Franklin 

Godmanchester. 

Havelork 

Heiniiiingford. . . 
Hinchinbrook. . . 

St. Anicet 

Ste. Barbe 



JACQUES-CARTIER 
JOLIETTE 



St. Alphonse 

St. Ambroise 

Ste. Beatrice 

St. Charles Borromde 

St. Cleophas 

St. Come 

Ste. Elizabeth 

Ste. Emilie 

St. Felix dc Valois 

St. .lean de Matha 



108 

28 

26 
5 
3 
11 
14 
21 

57 
204 



217 



207 

34 
4 
17 
19 
12 
24 
38 
57 
2 

123 

172 

16 

19 

4 

15 

2 

3 

20 

11 

24 

20 



571 



12 

4 

31 

6 

115 

13 

1 

10 

1 

77 
5 
12 
90 
57 
4 
19 
18 

6 
17 
43 
19 



2,967 

9 
185 

28 
149 

67 
274 
198 

82 



14 

176 

61 

18 

175 

111 

83 

312 

247 

22 

176 

232 

156 

13 

39 

53 



272 

70 
14 
21 
24 
22 
29 
35 
54 
3 

219 

216 

2 
27 

4 
40 
11 

1 
17 

7 
32 
13 



NO. 

1,030 

55 
57 
10 
34 
10 
11 
66 

60 

47 

27 
18 
36 



44 
71 
90 

35 
30 
56 
81 
30 
126 
21 



671 

55 
48 
48 

110 
59 
99 

142 
85 
25 

370 

715 

33 
95 
34 
57 
18 



48 
97 
61 



519 

50 
18 
1 
9 
5 
1 
42 

37 

14 

3 

1 

19 

6 



677 

48 
56 
60 
108 
58 
116 
109 
88 
34 

170 

993 

48 
80 
67 
42 
13 
96 

152 
66 
70' 

107 



141 

37 
1 
1 
1 
1 

10 



2 

5 

7 

5 
6 
9 
32 
4 



162 

18 
9 
14 
14 
11 
41 
17 
25 
13 

32 

254 

33 

23 

20 

4 

2 

42 

20 

27 

8 

24 



Vol. IV— 15506-3 



34 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I, Farm Holdings 



No. 



Districts 



Occupiers of — Occupants de 



UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 

DESSOUS 

d'uN ACRE 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DB 1 A 5 

ACRES 



5 TO 10 

ACRES 



11 TO 50 

ACRES 



DE 5 A 10 pE 11 A 50 
ACRES ACRES 



51 TO 100 101 TO 200 

ACRES I ACRES 



DE 51 A 
100 ACRES 



DE 101 A 
200 ACRES 



201 ACRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 



Quebec — con. 

JOLIETTE — con. 

Ste. Melanie 

St. Paul 

St. Thomas 



164 KAMOURASKA. 



9 
10 
11 

12 
13 
14 
15 

166 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



Mont Carmel 

Riviere Quelle 

St. Alexandre 

St. Andre & Notre- 
Dame du Portage 
Pt 

Ste. Anne de la Poca- 
tiere 

St. Bruno & Wood- 
bridge 

St. Denis 

St. Eleuth^re & un- 
org. ter.-ter.non-org. 

St. Germain 

Ste. Helene 

St. Louis de Kamour- 
aska 

St. Oijesime 

St. Pacome 

St. Pascal 

St. Phillipe de Ned. . . 



LABELLE. 



Addington 

Amherst 

Bigelow 

Blake... 

Bouthillier 

Bowman 

Boyer 

Buckingham 

Campbell 

Clyde 

Derry 

Dudley 

Gravel 

Hartwell 

Joly 

Kiamika 

Labellc 

L'Ange-Gardien. . 

La Minerve 

Lathbury 

Lesiige & Gagnon. 
Lochabcr & Gore. 

Lorangcr 

Major 

Marchand 

McGill 

Montigny 

Moreau 

Mulgrave 

Notre- Dame de 
Bonsecoura 



20 



1 

3 

18 

144 



137 

2 
20 
12 



25 



12 
33 
10 

218 



6 

12 

1 
3 

2 
4 

4 

1 

11 
5 

2 

65 



4 
18 
40 

266 

19 
40 
11 



7 

40 

15 
9. 

16 
16 
10 

11 
12 
23 
18 
19 

387 

1 
3 
1 
3 
5 
3 

36 
2 

27 
1 

1 

30 

5 



18 



51 
2 
1 

8 

1 
1 

7 



40 
73 
67 

584 

33 

49 
38 



15 

72 

32 
29 

44 
14 
43 

31 
25 

92i 

3Si 
29i 

1,900 

19 

45 

7 

6 

22 

17 

4 

108 

57 

26 

2 

3 

50 

129 

32 

26 

1 

51 

36 



161 
35 

98 
12 
11 



72 
91 
89 

725 

55 
43 
81 



46 

58 

54 
31 

46 
29 
65 

23 
38 
48 
77 
31 

1,459 

15 
30 

7 
21 
38 
27 
23 
92 
49 
16 
12 

2 
39 
54 
29 
36 

6 
36 
19 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



35 





Districts 


Occupiers of — Occupants de 


No. 


UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 
DESSOUS 

d'un acre 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 
.\CRE3 


5 TO 10 

.\CRES 

DE 5 A 10 
.\CRES 


11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 
.\CRES 


51 TO 100 

ACRES 

DE 51 .i 
100 .\CRE.S 


101 TO 200 

.\CRES 

DE 101 A 

200 .\CRES 


201 .\CRE3 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 


31 


Quebec— con. 

LABELLE— con. 
Notre- Dame de la 
Pais 


NO. 

6 
1 

16 
2 

1 

3 
2 
2 

296 

185 
36 
88 
9 
25 
14 
13 

tu 

78 

10 

2 

18 
3 

43 

3 

1 
1 

10 
3 
8 

16 
1 

240 

55 

9 


NO. 

4 
2 
2 
1 

12 
2 

10 

4 
5 

1 
5 
2 
4 
1 
1 

270 

187 
49 
48 
13 
30 
27 
20 
8S 
45 
8 
11 

5 
14 

130 

3 

16 
4 
5 

12 
12 
26 
35 
10 

278 

124 

1 
17 


NO. 

1 

4 

1 
1 
2 
1 

1 

1 
1 

3 

1 
3 

1 

105 

64 
9 

34 
4 
5 
5 
7 

U 

21 
3 
6 

1 
10 

42 

2 
2 
3 

1 
1 

9 
5 

1 

15 
3 

75 

35 

1 
3 


NO. 

20 
5 
2 

1 

8 

4 

32 

14 
8 
2 

25 

7 

- 12 

13 
2 
1 

417 

218 
39 

120 

9 

14 

21 

15 

199 
30 
42 
55 

39 
33 

227 

17 
17 
34 

8 

1 

35 
49 

5 
58 

3 

258 
178 

9 
9 


NO. 

72 
31 
36 
29 
79 
24 

124 

44 

2 

102 
46 
10 

120 

33 

28 

5 

5 

39 

716 

Sll 
54 
36 
65 
51 
58 
47 

53 
54 
98 

112 

88 

724 

25 
49 
71 
36 
10 

102 
160 

24 
215 

32 

551 
471 

3 
9 
11 


NO. 

27 

18 

51 

10 

53 

10 

55 

38 

6 

1.34 

63 

20 

67 

21 

24 

8 

7 

17 

710 

S77 
83 
24 
83 
57 
52 
78 

sss 

92 
38 
51 

74 
78 

580 

44 
73 
60 
25 
34 

108 
98 
46 
51 
41 

283 

484 

1 
10 


NO. 

10 


:^'> 


Plaisance 


6 


3? 


Ponsonby 


27 


34 


Pope 


13 


35 


Portland 


38 


Ifi 


Preston 


7 


37 


Ripon 


16 


38 
39 


Robertson 

Roehon 


15 

10 


40 
41 
4? 


St. Andre-Avellin 

Ste. Angelique 

St. Malachie 


30 
22 
26 


43 


Suffolk 


31 


44 


Turgeon 


8 


45 


Villeneuve 


8 


46 


Wabasee 


6 


47 


Wells 


9 


48 


Wurtele 


6 


166 

1 


LA PRAIRIE & NA- 
PIERVILLE 

Laprairie 


211 

121 


?^ 


Laprairie 


36 


3 

4 


Sault St. Louis 

St. Constant 

St. Isidore 


4 
16 
12 


6 

7 


St. Jacques le M incur 
St. Phillipe 


15 
38 


8 


Napierville . 


90 


9 


St. Cyprien 


38 


10 
11 
12 


St. Edouard 

St. Michel Archange 
St. Patrice de Sher- 
rington 


1.1 

8 

15 


13 


St. Remi 


16 


167 

1 


L'ASSOMPTION 

Lachenaie 


78 
8 


? 


L'Assomption 


9 


3 


L'Epiphanie 


- 


4 
5 
6 


Repentigny 

St. Gerard Majella.... 
St. Henri de Mas- 
couclie 


4 
12 

24 


7 


St. Lin 


10 


8 

9 

10 


St. Paul I'Ermite 

St. Roch de I'Achigan 
St. Suipice 


5 
2 
4 


168 


LAVAL 


34 


169 


l6vis 


1.52 


i 


Notre- Dame de la 




2 
3 


Notre- Dame du Per- 
petuel Secours 

St. David de I'Aube- 
rivi^re 


3 



Vol. IV— 15506— 31 



36 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 



No. 



Districts 



OccTJPiEHS OF — Occupants de 



UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 

DESSOUS 

d'uN ACRE 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 



DE 5 A 10 DE 11 A 50 



5 TO 10 

ACRES 



11 TO 50 

ACRES 



ACHES 



ACRES 



51 TO 100 
ACRES 



DE 51 A 



101 TO 200 201 ACRES 
ACRES AND OVER 



DE 101 A 
100 ACRESi200 ACRES 



201 ACRES 
ET AU- 

DESSUS 



10 
11 
12 
13 

170 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 



9 
10 
11 

171 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 

173 

173 

1 

2 
3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 



Quebec — con. 

L:fiVIS — con. 

St. Etienne de Lauzon 

St. Henri de Lauzon 

Ste. Helene de 
Breakeyville 

St. Jean-Chrysostome 

St. Joseph de Levis. . 

St. Lambert de Lau- 
zon 

St. Louis de Pintendre 

St. Nicholas 

St. Romuald 

St. Telesphore 



L'ISLET. 



L'Islet 

St. Aubert 

St. CyriUe 

St. Damase (Ashford) 

St. Eugene 

St. Jean Port Joli. . 

Ste. Louise 

St. Marcel 

St. Pamphile 

Ste. Pcrpetue 

St. Roch des Aulnaies 

LOTBINI^RE 



St. Agapit 

Ste. Agathe 

St. Antoine de Tilly. . 

St. ApoUinaire 

Ste. Croix 

St. Edouard 

Ste. Emilie 

St. Flavien 

St. Giles 

St. Jacques de Paris- 

ville , 

St. Jean Deschaillons, 

St. Louis 

St. Narcisse 

St. Patrice 

Ste. Philornene 

St. Sylvestre 

Sacr6-Cu.'ur 



MAISONNEUVE. 
MASKINONG^.. 



Huntcrstown 

Louiseville 

St. Alexis des Monts. . 
St. Charles de Mande- 

ville 

St. Didace 

St. Joseph de Maski- 

• nonge 

St. Justin 

St. L6on 



139 

68 

10 

6 

10 

17 

9 



19 
290 



143 
14 



25 
1 

20 
4 
1 

264 

65 

43 

13 

4 

13 

59 

13 

3 

2 

19 
30 

187 



199 

2 

86 

3 

2 
16 

19 
18 
28 



9 

5 

4 
2 
2 

106 

19 

10 

6 

3 

19 

29 

9 



313 

34 
21 
27 
19 
36 
41 
32 
6 
40 
25 
32 

327 



247 



61 
54 

19 
50 

27 

107 

38 

79 

12 

1 

593 



29 
96 
42 
57 
53 
22 
24 
121 
43 
22 

1,017 

59 
16 
44 
75 
74' 
71 
55 
61 
33 

62 
61 
45 
60 
59 
134 
53 
55 

10 

557 

14 
53 
46 

18 
66 

67 

77 
47 



35 
131 

4 
58 
33 

64 

53 

83 

5 

7 

625 

74 
55 
47 
50 
33 
80 
53 
22 
79 
63 
69 

1,048 

52 
64 
71 

101 
63 
93 
40 

108 
48 

11 
35 

87 
48 
6 

10 < 



624 

14 
59 
73 

26 
86 

64 
42 
85 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



37 





Districts 


Occupiers of— -Occupants de 


No. 


UNDER 

1 
acre 

AU- 
DESSOUS 

d'un.^cre 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 .\CRES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 


5 TO 10 
acres 

de5a 10 

acres 


11 TO 50 
acres 

de 11 a 50 
acres 


51 TO 100 

ACRES 

DE 51 A 
100 ACRES 


101 TO 200 

ACRES 

DE 101 A 

200 ACRES 


201 ACRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 

ET AU- 
DESSUS 


q 


Quebec— con. 

MASKINONGfi — con. 

St. Paulin.. 


NO. 

2 

29 

214 

18 

51 

2 

4 

2 

1 

14 

9 

9 
37 
66 

1 

191 

27 
115 

1 

23 

1 

6 
2 

16 

67 

2 
3 

1 
7 
3 
6 

40 
5 


NO. 

3 
22 

111 

8 
12 
7 
5 
1 
13 
6 

3 
1 

7 

2 

1 
16 
23 

6 

274 

74 
82 

28 

2 

12 
35 

5 

15 
3 
4 

14 

193 

o 
24 

10 

4 

12 

8 

22 

14 

14 

7 

69 

7 


NO. 

4 

37 

2 
6 
2 

2 

7 
1 

1 
2 

1 

3 
1 

4 
2 
3 

119 

36 
16 

24 

1 
9 
5 
6 

7 
1 

7 
7 

77 

1 
21 

2 

11 
19 
7 
6 
3 
2 

4 

1 


NO. 

27 
30 

1 

305 

10 

9 

30 

28 

15 

10 

2 

2 

11 
26 
30 

29 
7 
11 
18 
44 
23 

389 

78 
56 

70 

18 
20 
22 
20 

42 
12 
22 
29 

270 

52 
5 
5 

1 
47 
75 
25 
16 
19 
10 

13 

2 


NO. 

62 

90 

17 

1,089 

43 
70 
121 
100 
85 
125 
49 
27 

41 
87 
73 

51 
15 
41 
50 
64 
47 

589 

128 
75 

63 

17 
40 
47 
41 

79 
46 
27 
26 

775 

36 

68 
28 
36 
41 
86 
149 
55 
78 
47 
27 

97 

27 


NO. 

42 
104 

29 

1,014 

80 

110 

107 

59 

49 

118 

60 

33 

34 
44 
58 

27 
9 
51 
71 
89 
15 

664 

162 
70 

63 

17 
72 
56 
60 

41 
42 
44 
37 

476 

33 
35 
41 
27 
6 
21 
43 
47 
54 
23 
72 

57 

17 


NO. 

12 


10 


Ste. Ursule 


17 


11 


Other parts — autres 


11 


174 

1 


MEGANTIC 

Halifax N 


300 
17 





Halifax S 


34 


3 


Inverness 


38 


4 


Ireland N 


14 


5 


Ireland S 


20 


6 


Leeds 


20 


7 
8 


Leeds E 


14 




9 


9 


Notre-Dame de Lour- 
des 


15 


10 
11 
12 


Sacre-Cceur de Marie. 

Ste. Anastasie 

St. Antoine de Pont- 


15 
11 

5 


13 
14 
15 


St. Joseph de Coleraine 
St. Pierre Baptiste.. . . 
Somerset N 


5 

24 
30 


16 
17 


Somerset S 

Thetford S 


25 
4 


175 


MISSISQUOI 


216 


1 


Dunham 


56 


2 
3 


Farnham W-O 

Notre-Dame de Stan- 
bridge 


18 
16 


4 

5 
6 
7 


Notre-Dame des Anges 

de Stanbridge 

St. Armand E 

St. Armand W-O 

St. George. . . 


4 

36 
25 
28 


8 


St. Ignace de Stan- 
bridge 


11 


9 


St. Thomas 


6 


10 
11 

176 


Stanbridge Station 

Stanbridge 

MONTCALM 


4 

12 

192 


1 
2 


Ascension 


16 


St. Alexis 


3 


3 


St. Calixte 


60 


4 
5 
6 


St. Donat & Chilton... 
St. Emile& Wexford.. 
St. Esprit 


29 
3 
1 


7 


St. Jacques 


2 


s 


Ste. Julienne 


10 


g 


St. Liguori 


3 


10 
11 
12 


Ste. Marie Salomee. . . 

St. Patrice de Rawdon 

St.Thdodore de Cherts 

sey 


46 
17 


13 


Other parts — autres 
parties 


2 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 





DlSTRICT3 






Occupiers of — Occupants de 






No. 


UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

\V- 
DE.SSOUS 

d'un.4.cre 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 


5 TO 10 

ACRES 

DE 5 A 10 

ACRES 


11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 
ACRES 


51 TO 100 

ACRES 

DE 51 A 
100 .\CRES 


101 TO 200 

ACRES 

DE 101 A 
200 ACRES 


201 .\CRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 


177 

1 
2 


Quebec — con. 

MONTMAGNY 

Cap St. Ignace 

L'Assomption de Ber- 
thier 


NO. 

63 

18 

9 

1 

2 
2 
2 
8 
15 

6 

181 

16 
83 

21 
5 

22 
9 
4 
4 

17 

279 

11 
33 

11 

1 

40 

20 

1 

16 
13 
16 
35 

8 

2 
11 

1 
28 

2 
30 


NO. 

163 

69 
13 

1 

10 
2 
3 

17 
9 
4 

35 

196 

6 
IS 
21 

1 
15 

6 

4 
54 
13 
23 
22 
13 

2 

239 

21 

18 

22 

3 
29 

5 
10 

5 
25 

6 
12 

■ 1 

5 
21 

1 
30 

7 
18 


NO. 

45 

26 

4 

1 

1 
1 
2 
3 

7 

78 

22 

14 

9 

1 

2 

1 
5 
3 
4 
4 
6 
7 

83 

11 

17 
2 
1 

3 
1 

8 

3 
8 
2 

19 
2 
6 


NO. 

414 

97 

15 

9 

5 

11 

16 
37 
20 
136 
13 
55 

105 

11 

13 

11 

5 

6 

7 

10 

2 

16 

2 

8 

14 

361 

35 
62 

10 

3 

9 

3 

15 

4 

21 

22 

21 

3 

15 
12 
55 

9 
34 

3 
22 


NO. 

891 

105 
35 

88 

41 

12 
169 
93 
77 
177 
24 
70 

221 

5 

5 

S 

31 

5 

41 

16 

4 

20 

3 

15 
68 

1,648 

57 

140 

39 

36 

35 

32 

50 

117 

84 

117 

84 

83 

38 

66 
102 
1.33 

34 
146 

73 
182 


NO. 

499 

65 

23 

41 

35 

13 
43 
2 
59 
34 
68 
116 

440 

21 
28 
12 
33 
41 
55 
41 
55 
21 
32 
48 
53 

1 , 349 

73 
95 
14 
80 
48 
26 
75 
82 
82 
106 
98 
82 

37 

i 86 
56 

i ^^ 
43 

48 

85 

1 62 


NO. 

128 

15 
2 


3- 


Rolette, Panet & Ta- 


10 


4 


Notie-Dame du Ro- 
saire 


9 


5 


'St. Antoine He aux 
Grues 


5 


fi 


Ste. ApoUine 


8 


7 
8 


Ste. Euphemie 

St. Francois.. 


13 


9 
10 


St. Paul de Montminy 
St. Pierre. 


24 


11 


St. Thomas 


42 


178 

1 
2 
3 


MONTMORENCY.... 

Chateau Richer 

Sto. Anne de Beaupre. 

L'Angc-Gardien 

Ste. Brigitte 


317 

75 
42 
38 
34 


5 


Ste. Famille 


19 


6 


St. Fereol 


33 


7 


St. Francois... 


3 


g 


St. Jean 


20 


9 


St. Joachim.. 


16 


in 


St. Laurent 


16 


11 


St. Pierre 


6 


12 

1791 

t(s i- 
183J 

184 

1 


St. TitedesCaps 

MONTREAL C 

NICOLET 


15 
301 


Becancour 


14 


o 


Gentilly 


11 


3 


Manceau 


6 


4 


Nicolct 


39 


5 
6 

7 
g 


Precieux Sang 

Ste. Angtile de Laval.. 
Ste. Brigitte des Saults 
St. Celestin.. . 


4 
5 


9 


Ste. Eulalie 


24 


10 
11 


Ste. Gertrude.. . 


17 


St. Gregoire 


20 


12 


St. Leonard 


23 


13 


Ste. Marie de Bland- 
ford 


10 


14 


Ste. Monique 


26 


15 


Ste. Pcrpetuc 


15 


16 
17 
18 
19 


St. Pierre Ics Bccquets 
St. Samuel de Horton. 
Ste. Sophie de L6vrard 
St. Sylv^re 


8 

7 

10 

24 


20 


St. Wenceslas 


7 









RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



39 



No. 



Districts 



Occupiers of — OauPA>rTs ds 



1 

ACRE 



AU- 

DESSOUS 

Id'uN ACRE] 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 



DK 1 A i 

ACRES 



5 TO 10 11 TO .50 I 51 TO 100 101 to 200 201 .\cre9 

ACRES ACRES j ACRES ACRES :A?n> OVER 



DE 5 A 10 DE 11 A 50' DE 51 A 
ACRES I ACRES 100 ACRE? 



DE 101 A 201 ACRES 
200 ACRESi ET AU- 



Quebec — con. 

POXTIAC 122 

Aberdeen & Malakoff, 

Sheen & Esher 2 

Aldfield 1 

Allumette Island... . 
Alleyn & Cawood.. . 

Bii.stol 

Calumet Island 

Chichester 8 

Clarendon 9 

Dorion 

Fabre 5 

DuhamelE& W-0.... • 17 

Guigues 1 

Laverlochfere & Raby 
Leslie, Clapham & 

Huddersfield .3 

Litchfield 2.3 

Mansfield & Pontefract 29 

Nedelec 3 

Onslow N 1 

Onslow 8 8 

Thome 3 

Waltham & Bryson. . . 6 
Unorg. ter.-ter.non-org 

PORTNEUF 446 

Canton Bois (Riviere 

a Pierre) 25 

Cap Sante 34 

Deschaiiibault 46 

Ecureuils 6 

Grondinos 19 

Lac aux Sables., 1 

Neuville 6 

Notre - Dame des 

Anges 6 

Portncuf 5 

St. Alban.. 39 

St. Augustin 1 

St. Bazile 4i 

St. Casimir. 105j 

Ste. Catherine - \ 

Ste. Christine i ?! 

St. Gilbert 21 

Ste .Joanne de Neuville 1 ; 

St. Leonard 7\ 

St. Marc 48i 

St. Ravmond-Nonnat. 52 

St. Tluiribe 6 

St. Ubalde 26 

QUEBEC C 5 

QUEBEC COUNTY— 

COMTfi 71 

Ancienne Lorette 1 



195 



19 



20 
12 
13 
17 

2 

16 

4 

2 

9 

18 

22 

4 

1 

17 

4 

1 

6 

246 



5' 
8i 
31 
51 
26| 

al 

31 

111 

10 

16 

5 

2 



136 
17 



84 



15 



78 



18 



318 



11 
11 
28 
10 
9 

29 
8 
2 
9 

440 



32 



581 
75 



NO. 

1,603 



26 

39 

93 

3 

140 

54 

29 

158 

22 

78 

126 

193 

129 

75 
102 
73 
34 
42 
86 
35 
13 
53 

1,258 



9 
43 
54 

18 
58 
31 
25 

49 
37 
41 
42 
87 

141 
33 
34 
64 
471 
44 
34 

191 
81 
95 



23 



.587 
131 



NO. [ 

1,195 



30 
43 
79 
19 

109 
55 
40 

178 
32 
41 
59 
70 
50 

54 
62 
55 
14 
43 
41 
73 
20 
28 

1,154 



11 

58 
54 
20 
47 
28 
72 

45 
42 
68 
93 
70 
44 
61 
37 
15 
80 
33 
12 
174 
7 
83 



16 



3.57 
50 



40 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 





Districts 


Occupiers of — Occupants de 


No. 


UNDER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 
DESSOUS 

d'un.^cre 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 

ACRES 


5 TO 10 

ACRES 

DE 5 A 10 

ACRES 


11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 
ACRES 


51 TO 100 

ACRES 

DE 51 A 
100 ACRES 


101 TO 200 

ACRES 

DE 101 A 
200 ACRES 


201 ACRES 
AND OVER 

201 ACRES 
ET AU- 

DESSUS 


<> 


Quebec— con. 

QUEBEC COUNTY— 
COMTfi — con. 
Beauport 


NO. 

47 

10 

4 
4 

4 
1 

116 

36 
1 

2 

1 
1 
2 

14 
59 

235 

6S 

1 
16 

8 
3 

12 
12 

4 

7 

17S 

13 

4 

2 
9 

1 


NO. 

60 
21 

5 
15 

2 
5 

1 

10 

171 

7 
29 
17 

34 

6 

15 

38 
25 

183 

9S 
1 
3 

24 

19 
12 

11 

8 
5 

10 

90 

2 

7 

9 

10 

9 
1 
1 


NO. 

14 
14 

10 

16 
5 

3 
4 

2 

6 
1 

1 

143 

25 
38 

8 

3 
1 

10 
12 
32 
12 
2 

99 

66 
3 
5 

10 

14 

7 

19 

8 
55 

13 
4 
2 

1 
1 
1 


NO. 

64 
134 

70 

118 

10 

8 

5 

38 

2 

1 
41 

14 

1 

716 

102 
81 
64 

88 
60 

28 
24 
179 
32 
58 

877 

509 
19 
70 
33 

35 
68 

77 
58 
89 
60 
S68 
23 
73 
38 
15 

7 

6 

38 


NO. 

71 
66 

41 

74 
3 

15 

4 

45 

14 

4 

64 

54 

1 

894 

120 
46 
51 

100 
122 
105 

34 
168 

41 
107 

1,784 

856 
20 
75 
77 

105 

88 

153 
128 

74 
136 
9S8 

57 
117 

55 

72 

26 
60 
69 


NO. 

50 
19 

26 

33 

1 

14 

2 

14 

38 
25 

37 

47 

1 

262 

42 
16 
9 

12 
16 
64 
14 
8 
22 
59 

1,342 

597 

7 

34 

98 

131 
44 

82 
107 
45 
49 
745 
39 
59 
25 
79 

33 
64 
45 


NO. 

11 


3 


Charlesbourg 




4 


Notre-Dame des Lau- 
rentides 


• 4 


5 




3 


6 

7 


St. Colomb de Sillerj' 
St. Dunstan Lac 


_ 
10 


8 
9 


St. Felix du CapRouge 
Ste. Foye 


1 
3 


10 


St. Gabriel de Val- 
cartier 


38 


11 

12 


St. Gabriel W—0 

St. Gregoire de Mont- 
morency 


45 


13 
14 


St. Gerard de Magella 
Stoneham & Tewkes- 
bury 


7 
35 


15 


Other parts — autres 
parties 


3 


191 


RICHELIEU 


28 


1 


St. Aime 




2 
3 
4 


Ste. Anne de Sorel 

St. Joseph de Sorel 

St. Louis de Bonse- 
cours 


1 

1 


a 


St. Marcel 


1 


6 


St. Ours 


7 


7 
8 


St. Pierre de Sorel 

St. Robert 


2 


q 


St. Roch 


7 


in 


Ste. Victoire 


9 


192 


RICHMOND & 

WOLFE 


332 




Richmond 


121 


1 


Ascot Corner 

Brompton 


3 
3 


3 


Cleveland 


29 


4 

5 
6 


Melbourne & 
Brompton Gore.. . 

St. Francois- Xavier. 

St. George de Wind- 
sor 


32 
1 

4 


7 


Shipton 


34 


8 


Stoke 


9 


ft 


Windsor 


6 




Wolfe 


SU 


10 


D'Israeli 


12 


11 


Dudswell 


24 


1? 


Garthby 


6 


13 

14 

15 
16 


Ham N 

Notre-Dame de 

Lourdes de Ham.. 
St. .^drien de Ham. 
St. Camille 


21 

13 
10 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



41 





Districts 


OcCrPIERS OF — 0CCUP.\NTS DE 


No. 


UNDER 

1 

.-iCRE 

.\U- 
DESSOUS 

d'un.\cre 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 .4CRES 

DZ 1 A 

.^CRES 


: 5 TO 10 

ACRES 

DE 5 A 10 
.\CRES 


11 TO 50 

.^CRES 

DE 11 .A. 50 
ACRES 


1 

51 TO 100 

1 .\CRES 

DE 51 A 
!100 .\CREi- 


I 

101 TO 200 201 ACRES 
ACRES AND OVER 

DE 101 A ! 201 .ACRES 
200 .\CRESi ET AU- 
1 DESSUS 


17 

18 
19 


Quebec — con. 

RICHMOND & 
WOLFE— con. 
Wolfe — co.T. 
St. Fortunat de 

Wolfestown 

St. Jacques 

St. Joseph de Ham 
S... 


NO. 

1 

5 
79 

8 
50 

103 

~2 
15 

6 

11 

2 

1 

1 
1 

16 

1 

16 
4 

14 

4 
1 

249 
17 
31 


NO. 

7 

2 

5 

24 

5 

8 

120 

1 

1 

16 

1 

30 

1 
2 

2 

6 
6 
1 

3 

16 
4 

3 

1 

10 
1 

3 

1 
3 
5 
3 

219 
17 
13 


NO 

4 

1 

3 
3 

42 

1 
1 

1 

3 

5 
2 
1 

1 
2 

1 

7 
3 

2 
2 

1 

4 
1 

1 
3 

77 
3 
4 


NO. 

18 

14 

13 
36 
42 
9 
36 

543 

8 
4 
8 

14 

5 
6 
8 
5 
15 

17 
19 

9 
19 

2 

15 

10 

153 

8 

2 

26 
51 

9 
13 
17 

7 

12 
18 

6 
11 
10 
15 

5 
12 

4 

197 
6 

10 


NO. 

73 
25 

43 
57 

111 
46 

117 

1,450 

79 
20 
41 

65 

11 
7 
69 
26 
60 

139 
54 
44 
44 
26 

25 
36 
118 
24 
17 

60 
52 
51 
27 
20 
20 
34 
78 
8 

70 
46 
14 
16 
21 
28 

578 
84 
21 


NO. 

33 
22 

54 
38 
82 
77 
95 

1,597 

57 

29 
33 

95 

36 
6 
55 
66 
80 

143 
52 
71 

47 
28 

19 
79 
5 
53 
25 

60 

84 

26 
35 
74 
44 
32 
51 
71 
7 
36 
52 
46 

618 

103 

27 


NO. 

14 
10 

19 


90 


Stratford 


13 


21 
22 
23 


Weedon 

Wolfestown 

Wotton 

RIMOUSKI 


19 
21 
29 

1,097 


1 


Cedar Hal!. 


22 


?, 


Kempt 


11 


3 

4 


Lac au Sauinon 

Notre-Dame de Mac- 
nider 


16 
35 


5 


Notre-Dame du Sacre- 
Cceur 


23 


6 


Price 


3 


7 


Rimouski 


20 


8 


St. Anaclet 


61 


9 
10 

11 
12 
13 


Ste. Ang^le de Merrici 

St. Benoit-Labre & 

St. Leon le Grand. . 

Ste. Blandine 

Ste. Cecile du Bio. . . . 
St. Damasc 


60 

66 
28 
26 
31 


14 


St. Donat 


60 


15 


St. Edouard des Me- 
chins 


1 


10 


St. Fabien 


86 


17 


Ste. Felicite 


- 


IS 


Ste. Flavie 


33 


10 


Ste. Florence 


17 


20 


St. Gabriel & St. 
Marccllin. . . 


43 


21 
22 
23 
?4 


St. Jacques le Majeur. 
St. Jerome de Matane. 
St. Joscpli de Lepage.. 
St. Leandre 


54 

82 

9 

9 


25 

'>e> 


St. Luc (Tessier) 

Ste. Luce 


16 
46 


27 
?8 


Ste. Marie de Sayabec 
St. Mathieu 


27 
46 


?9 


St. Moise 


21 


30 
31 

^9 


St. Octave de Metis. . 
St. Paul des Capucins. 
St. Simon 


47 

1 

31 


?S 


St. Ulric 


31 


34 


St. Valerien 


35 


35 


Other parts — autres 
parties 


_ 


I*)! 


ROUVILLE 


111 


1 
2 


L' Ange-Gardien 

Notre-Dame de Bon- 
secours 


17 
14 



42 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 





Districts 


- 




Occupiers of — Occupants de 






No. 


U^JT)ER 

1 

ACRE 

AU- 
DESS0U3 

d'un acre 


1 TO 
UNDER 
5 ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 

.\CRE3 


5 TO 10 

acres 

DE 5 A 10 
ACRES 


11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 

.\CRES 


51 TO 100 

ACRES 

DE 51 A 

100 ACRES 


101 TO 200 201 ACRES 
ACRES AND OVER 

DE 101 A 201 ACRES 
200 ACRES ET AU- 
DESSU.S 


3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

195 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 


Quebec — Con. 

ROUVILLE— con. 
Ste. Anf^le 


NO. 

38 

8 

4 

30 

90 

13 

13 

5 

308 

7 

58 
10 

3 
16 
46 
54 

51 

61 

1 

1 

124 

79 
50 

4 

7 

8 

10 

4S 

14 

3 

5 

1 
10 

5 
5 
2 

251 

3 

46 
59 

8 
14 

1 
44 
17 
44 
13 

2 


NO. 

18 
12 

32 
21 
54 
21 
14 
17 

196 

3 

19 

8 

1 

7 

11 

81 

37 

18 

4 

7 

199 

101 

43 

20 

8 

7 

15 

8 

98 
5 

7 

9 

4 

17 

23 

29 

4 

255 

35 
3 

28 
55 

5 
12 

6 
19 
13 
66 
12 

1 


NO. 

3 

4 

19 

15 

12 

4 

7 

6 

52 

3 
5 
3 
1 
2 
4 
13 

10 

7 

2 
2 

78 

45 

8 

24 

2 

2 
4 
5 
55 
3 
8 

1 
4 
6 

2 
6 
3 

120 

14 

1 

. 13 

25 

1 
3 
7 
7 
6 
20 
12 
11 


NO. 

17 

23 
40 
17 
29 
9 
21 
25 

160 

9 
5 
7 
3 
9 

20 
55 

25 
9 
6 

12 

164 

88 

43 

16 

5 

5 
11 

8 
76 
20 

9 

10 

5 

19 

3 
6 

4 

535 

57 
22 

78 
71 

8 
62 
44 
34 
22 
66 
51 
20 


NO. 

41 
97 
34 
67 
86 
16 
53 
79 

711 

46 
55 
45 
20 
32 
92 
158 

71 
52 
53 

87 

619 

S3S 
90 
35 
27 

29 
20 
31 
S87 
60 
32 

42 
54 
104 

18 
49 

28 

968 

109 

69 

101 

111 

18 
69 
83 
44 

101 
88 

129 
46 


NO. 

57 
80 
37 
80 
72 
48 
38 
76 

634 

80 
30 
68 
47 
67 
81 
70 

23 

74 
47 
47 

979 

S79 

156 

37 

50 

55 
42 
39 
600 
98 
66 

32 

81 
SO 

68 
97 

78 

964 

96 
89 
125 
89 

33 
52 

86 
80 
90 
97 
77 
50 


NO. 

5 


St. Cesaire 


11 


St. Hilaire 


6 


St. Jean Baptiste 

Ste. Marie de Monnoir 
St. Mathias 


17 
13 
13 


St. Michel 

St. Paul d'Abbotsford 

ST. HYACINTHE... 

La Presentation 

Notre-Dame 

St. Barnabe 


3 
12 

125 

37 

6 

13 


St. Bernard 


15 


St. Charles 


15 


St. Damase 


12 


St. Denis 


1 


St. Hyacinthe le Con- 
fesseur. . . . 


3 


9 

10 
11 

196 


St. Jude 


5 


Ste. Marie-Magdeleine 
St. Thomas d'Aquin. . 

ST. JEAN & IBERVILLE 

St. Jean 


12 
6 

283 

118 


1 
2 
3 
4 


St.Bernard de Lacolle 
St. Jeanl'EvanKeliste 
St. Luc 


30 
16 
21 


Ste. Marguerite de 
Blairfindie 


33 


5 


St. Paul 


3 


6 


St. Valentin 


9 




Iberville 


171 


7 
8 
9 


St. Alexandre 

St. Athanasc 

Ste. Anne de Sabre- 
vois 


18 
17 

17 


10 


St. Blai.se 


19 


11 


Ste. Brigide 


17 


12 


St. George d'Henri- 
ville 


30 


12 
14 

197 


St.Gregoire le Grand 
St. Sebastien 

SHEFFORD 


24 
29 

200 


1 


Ely S 


11 


2 


Ely N 


25 


3 


Granby 


45 


4 


Roxton 


33 


5 


St. Alphonse de 
Granby 


11 


6 

7 

8 

9 

10 


Ste. Cecile de Milton.. 


12 

18 


Ste. Prudentienne 

St Valerien 


21 
21 


Shoff ord 


30 


n 


Stukelv N 


8 


19 


Stukely S 


25 









R E C E N S E M E N T D U CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



43 



No, 



198 



Districts 



Occupiers of — Occupa>jt3 de 



UNUBK 

1 

ACRE 



1 TO 

UNDER 
5 ACRES 



5 TO 10 
ACRES 



AU- j DE 1 A. 5 'DE 5 A 10 
DESSOU3 I ACRES I ACRES 
d'uNACRE! 



Quebec — con. 
SHERBROOKE... 



1 Ascot 

2 I Orford 

3 I St. Elie d'Orford. 

199 jSOULANGES 



1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

200 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



201 



St. Clet 

St. Ignace 

St. Joseph de Sou- 

langes 

St. Polycarpe 

St. Telesphore 

St. Zotique 



STANSTEAD. 



10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 

16 
17 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 

202 

1 
2 



Barford 

Bamston 

Hatley 

Magog 

Stanstesd 

Ste. Catherine de Hat- 
ley 

St. Hermenegilde.. 

TEMISCOUATA... 

Cabano, Packington & 
unorg. ter. — ter. non- 
org 

Cacouna 

He Verte 

Notre- Dame des Sept 
Douleurs 

Not re- Dame du Lac. 

Notre-Dame du For 
tage (pt.) 

Riviere du Loup ^ 

St. Antonin ■> 

St. Arsene 

St. Clement 

St. Cypricn 

St. Eloi 

St. Epiphane 

Ste. Fran^oise 

St. Frangois-Xavier & 
St. Hubert 

St. Honore 

St. Jean de Dieu, Ran- 

dot. Robitai11e& Begon 

St. Louis du Ha-Ha.. 

St. Modeste 

St. Paul de la Croix... 

Ste. Rose du D6gel6. 

Trois- Pistoles 



TERREBONNE. 



Breboeuf.. . 
Ste. Adfele. 



102 



100 
2 



HI 



14 
12 
35 

294 

3 

81 

33 

18 

153 



158 



19 

1 
10 

251 

13 
2 
9 



419 



3(5i 



192 

10 

58 

16 
39 
10 
59 

345 



94 

51 

63 

117 

4 
9 

225 



299 



11 TO 50 

.\CRES 



51 TO 100 101 TO 200 201 acres 



.\CRES 



DE 11 A. 50| DE 51 k ! DE 101 A 
.ACRES i 100 .ACRES 200 ACRES 



AND OVER 



201 ACRES 
ET A'J- 



S81 



5 

7 
1 
6 

121 



22 



289, 

177 
53 
59 

115 



30i 

ul 

29 

io| 

27] 
386 

34 
54 
61 

65| 

lOlj 

27' 
43 

265 



4 
13 
23 

3 

7 
15 

8 

111 

"I 

17 

51 
10 



186 



3071 

179 
80 
48 

444! 

421 
77I 

1 

79l 

mi 

681 

67i 

498 

73 

106 

65 

63 

102 

57i 
32 

990 



119 
34 
39 

28 
64 

10 
34 
41 

18 
44 
56 
20 
34 
41| 

71 
42 

100 
51 

18 
32 
72 
22 

845 

13 

28 



201 

127 
48 
26 

383 



44 

76 
95 
75 
38 

077 

70 

168 

90 

81 
188 

57 
23 

1,275 



82 
40 
82 

7 
92 

28 
52 
67 
59 
55 
37 
39 
80 
45 

99 
40 

85 
68 
39 
52 
70 
57 

1,071 

11 
1021 



49 

40 

8 
1 



17 
4 
5 
6 

280 

16 
80 
19 
31 
115 

15 
4 

633 



38 
16 
60 



30 

9 

23 
24 
39 
24 
11 
28 
38 
26 

45 
22 

24 
47 
35 
20 
14 
65 

390 

8 
54 



44 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE I. Farm Holdings 



No. 



3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

11 

12 
13 
14 
15 

203 



204 

1 
2 



Districts 



205 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
12 
15 
15 



Quebec — con. 

TERREBONNE— con. 

Ste. Agathc 

Ste. Anne des Plaines. 

St. Faustin 

St. Hy polite 

St. Janvier 

St. Jerome 

St. Jovite 

St. Louis de Terre- 
bonne 

Ste. Lucie 

Ste. Marguerite 

St. Sauvour 

Ste. Sophie 

Ste. Ther^se 



TROIS-RIVlfeRES 
ST. MAURICE... 



BanlieueTrois- Rivieres 

Pointe du Lac 

St. Barnabe 

St. Boniface (Shawini 

gan) 

St. Elie de Caxton. . . 
St. Etienne des Gr^s. 

Ste. Flore 

St. Mathieu 

St. Severe 

Yamachiche 

Unorg. parts-parties 

non-org 



VAUDREUIL. 



Occupiers of — Occupants de 



Ul^TJER 

1 

.iCRE 

.\U- 
DESSOUS 
)'UN ACRE 



Rigaud 

Ste. Jeanne de I' He 
Perrot 

Ste. Justine de New- 
ton 

St. I^azare 

Ste. Marthe 

Tr^.s St. Redempteur 

Vaudreuil 



WRIGHT. 



Aumond 

Aylwin 

Baskatong. . 
Bouchette. . 
Cameron — 
Dcnholm . . . 

Eardley 

Egan 

Hincks 

Hull 

Kensington. 

Low 

Ly tton 

Maniwaki.. 
Masham — 



196 
16 



14S 



281 



84 



60 



1 TO 
UNDER 
ACRES 

DE 1 A 5 
ACRES 



5 TO 10 

ACRES 



DE 5 A 10 

ACRES 



53 

13 

23 

1 

123 
3 

20 
2 

14 
14 
23 



196 

1 

4 

-14 

14 

37 
20 
30 
15 
12 
49 



130 

14 

20 

19 

37 

8 

6 

26 

202 



28 
4 

16 
1 
2 

22 

11 
1 

40 
2 
8 
7 
7 

25 



11 TO 50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 

ACRES 



64 



324 

18 
36 
43 

21 

28 
42 
34 
29 
14 
58 

1 

128 

12 

17 

31 

39 

5 

4 

20 

284 



51 TO 100 

ACRES 



DE 51 A 
100 ACRES 



132 

37 
70 
74 
62 
101 
66 

43 
15 
10 

48 
76 
70 



764 

35 

49 
124 

51 
44 
120 
124 
41 
49 
87 

40 

371 

54 

17 

64 
83 
66 
20 
67 

1,165 

53 
29 
9 
83 
31 
43 
86 
85 
24 

163 
31 
41 
15 
38 

100 



101 TO 200 201 ACRES 
ACRES AND OVEB 



DE 101 A 

200 ACRES 



71 

103 
70 
27 
49 

131 
51 

70 
74 
34 
101 
82 
95 



659 

49 
75 
80 

41 
38 
95 
85 
24 
37 
97 

3S 

397 

87 

37 

61 
34 
79 
21 

78 

972 

38 
49 

62 
20 
39 
70 
53 
36 
136 
25 
85 
13 
39 
77 



201 ACRES 
ET AU- 
DESSUS 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU I. Terres occupees 



45 



No. 



206 

1 

2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 



20? 
208 



Districts 



Occupiers of — Occupants db 



UNDER 

i 

ACRE 

AU- 

DESSOUS 

d'uN ACRE 



Quebec — con. 

WRIGHT— con. 

Northfield 

Sicotte 

Templeton 

Wakefield 

Wright 

Other parts-autres 
parties 



YAMASKA. 



La Baie du Febvre.. . . 

La Visitation 

Notre-Daine de Pierre- 
ville 

St. Bonaventure d' Up- 
ton 

St. David 

St. Elph^ge 

St. Francois 

St. Gerard de Magella 

St. Guillaume d' Upton 

St.Joachim de Courval 

St. Michel 

St. Pie de Guire 

St. Thomas 

St. Zephirin 



Saskatchewan 

ASSINIBOLA. 

BATTLEFORD... 



209 HUMBOLDT. 



210 
211 
212 
213 
213 
215 
216 



MACKENZIE.. 

MOOSEJAW 

PRINCE ALBERT... 

QU'APPELLE 

REGINA 

SALTCOATS 

SASKATOON 



163 

2 
12 

2 

34 

11 

22 

13 

29 

1 
37 

317 

41 

3 

2 

1 

3 

6 

210 

17 

34 



1 TO 
UNDER 
5 .\CRES 

DE 1 A 5 
ACRES 



182 



7 
1 

4 

55 

1 

14 
4 

41 
4 
1 

13 

246 

29 



5 TO 10 

ACRES 



DE 5 A 10 

ACRES 



95 



2 
2 

215 

14 
7 
21 
11 
10 
50 
37 
13 
17 
35 



11 TO .50 

ACRES 

DE 11 A 50 
ACRES 



426 

14 

18 

24 

36 
28 

6 
64 

7 
162 

8 
11 
16 
19 
13 

729 

33 
86 
80 

lOG 
24 

152 
93 
51 
41 
63 



51 TO 100 


101 TO 200 


201 


ACRES 


ACRES 


ACRES 


AND 


OVER 


DE 51 A 


DE 101 A 


201 


.\CRES 


100 ACRES 


200 ACRES 


ET AU- 






DESSUS 


NO. 


NO. 




NO. 


2(-, 


28 




25 


9 


4 




3 


198 


102 




29 


36 


38 




27 


65 


58 




33 


729 


759 




234 


17 


78 




47 


18 


37 




12 


26 


23 




4 


86 


59 




12 


70 


82 




22 


10 


40 




15 


82 


53 




7 


31 


25 




4 


165 


99 




16 


34 


36 




13 


64 


75 




12 


63 


42 




10 


41 


46 




15 


22 


64 




45 


941 


48,366 




45,558 


35 


2,402 




4,871 


300 


8,048 




4,795 


91 


9,815 




3,192 


221 


6,097 




1,312 


26 


7,791 




15,427 


88 


4,220 




1,368 


33 


1,324 




3,699 


22 


2,856 




4,729 


31 


2,290 




2,. 301 


94 


3,523 




3,864 



43 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE II. Land occupied according to Tenure and Condition 







Number of occupiers of land 


Acres of land 






NOMBRE d'oCCUPANTS DE 


TBRRES 


Acres de terre 








BEING 










No. 


Districts 




BEING 


OWNERS 
AND 


TOTAL 






LEASED 






BEING 


TEN- 


TEN- 


OCCU- 






OR 






owners 


ANTS 


ANTS 


PIERS 


OCCUPIED 


OWNED 


RENTED 






ETA NT 


ETA NT 


ETA NT 


TOTAL 


OCCUPES 


EN PRO- 


EN LOCA- 






propri- 


LOCA- 


PROPRI- 


DES 




PR IETE 


TION OU A. 






ETAIRES 


TAIRES 


ET.AIRES 
ET LOCA- 
TAIRES 


OCCU- 
PANTS 






LOYER 






NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


NO. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 




CANADA 


633,172 


57,129 


24,345 


714,646 


109,948,988 


98,866,067 


11.082,921 




Alberta 


56,603 


2,341 


2,550 


61,496 


17,751,893 


15,707,349 


2,044,550 


1 


CALGARY 


1,933 
4,722 
4,600 
13,610 
14,969 
8,916 
7,855 

15,816 


236 
270 
227 
381 
663 
369 
195 

2,077 


175 
114 
518 
414 
628 
467 
234 

544 


2,344 
5,106 
5,345 
14,405 
16,260 
9,752 
8,284 

18,467 


1,060,849 
969,184 
2,366.628 
5,721,859 
3,929,411 
2,189,298 
1,514,670 

2,540,011 


914,037 
898,523 
1,916,485 
4,952,918 
3,626,937 
1,964,556 
1,433,893 

2,071,527 


146,812 


2 


EDMONTON 


70,661 


3 


MACLEOD 


. 450, 143 


4 


MEDICINE HAT 


768,941 


5 


RED DEER 


302,474 


« 


STRATHCONA. 


224,742 


7 


VICTORIA 


80,777 




British Columbia 


468,484 


8 


COMOX-ATLIN 


1,455 

361 
396 
408 
106 
184 

2,250 

130 
164 

82 

264 

240 

347 

1,023 

2,497 

461 
300 
535 
828 
373 

3,583 


133 

25 
34 

58 

12 

4 

168 

19 
27 
11 
14 
20 
22 
55 

456 

43 

53 

115 

185 

60 

652 


107 

2 
99 
4 
1 
1 

25 

5 

1 
1 
3 
4 
1 
10 

26 

11 

1 

13 
1 

147 


1,695 

388 
529 
470 
119 
189 

2,443 

154 
192 
94 
281 
264 
370 
1,088 

2,979 

515 
354 
650 
1,026 
434 

4,382 


240,273 

65,489 
98,580 
61,451 
12,131 
2,622 

239,012 

35,972 
46,619 
13,327 
12,434 
18, 708 
24. 750 
87, 202 

179,853 

40,253 
35. 176 
18,478 
26,022 
59,924 

276.003 


219,658 

61.155 
92,901 
52, 525 
10,781 
2,296 

211,651 

28, 135 
40,363 
12,931 
11,935 
16,240 
24,209 
77,8.38 

151,987 

35,951 
28,358 
16,457 
21,016 
50,205 

211,257 


20,615 


1 


Alberni 


4,334 


? 


Atlin 


5,679 


3 


Coinox 


8,926 


4 


Richmond pt 


1,350 


S 


Skeena 


326 


ft 


KOOTENAY 


27.361 


1 


Columbia 


7,837 


? 


Cranbrook 


6,256 


3 


Fernie 


396 


4 


Kaslo 


499 


5 


Revelstoke 


2,468 


6 


Slocan 


541 


7 


Ymir 


9,364 


10 


NANAIMO 


27.866 


1 
? 


Cowiohan 

Esquimalt 


4,302 
6,818 


3 


Newcastle 


2.021 


4 


Saanich 


5.006 


6 


The Islands 


9.719 


11 


NEW WESTMINSTER 


64.746 


1 


Chiiliwack 


939 

923 

1,307 

404 

10 

168 

369 


158 
214 
IM 
172 
4 

39 

25 


50 
44 
19 
34 


1,147 

1,181 

1,430 

610 

14 

207 

394 


87,608 
98,378 
68,046 
20,765 
1,206 

3,269 

949 


70, 128 
74.680 
54.796 
10,787 
866 

2,691 

884 


17.480 


2 


Delta 


23,698 


3 


Dewdncy 


13,250 


4 




9,978 


5 


Yale pt 


340 


12 


VANCOUVER 


578 


1» 


VICTORIA C 


65 



RECENSSIMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU II. Terre occu^ee selon la tenure et la condition 



47 



ackk9 of land 

Acres de terre 



IMPROVED 



48.733,823 
4,351,698 

291,722 
211,268 
924, 173 
1,094,019 
895,284 
612,078 
323, 154 

477,590 

26,510 

6,516 
10,905 

7,895 
573 
621 

31,817 

4,295 
5,680 
1,820 
2,006 
2,367 
2,422 
13,227 

41,904 

8,347 

6,072 

4,753 

11,152 

11,580 

113,103 

30,940 
42,979 
21,197 

17,887! 
IQO 

1,497! 

778' 



UN- 
IMPROVED 



NON- 
AMELIORES 



NATURAL 
FOREST 

FORET 
NATU- 
RELLE 



MARSH 

OR 
WASTE 
LAND 



FALLOW 



TERRAINS JA- 

MA REC A- I CHERE 
GEUX OU I 1910 
INCl"LTrs 



81,215.165 17,477,526 4,174,270 

13,400,2011 420,857 

769,1271 15,256 

757,916 123,626| 27,812 

1,442,455 1,567! 31,190 

4,627,840 185 50,871 

3,034,127 106,424 63,200 

1,577,220 112,691 39,567 

1,191,516 61,1081 20,887 



2,062,421 

213,763 

58,973 
87,675 
53,556 
11,558 
2,001 

207,195 

31,677 
40,939 
11,507 
10,428 
16,341 
22,328 
73,975 

137,949 

31,096 
29, 104 
13,725 
14,870 
48,344 

162,900 

56,668 

55,399 

46,849 

2.878 

1,106 

1,772 

i7r 



55,745 
64,222 
45, 630 
10,809 
2,004 



130,588 

23,859 
11,877 
10,008 
6,676 
11,072 
15,309 
51,787 

109,575 

18,970 
24,812 
12,203 
13,312 
40, 278 

116,839 

46,801 

32,549 

35,831 

638 

1,020 

211 



AC. AC. 

2.538,900 35,2fil,33£ 
240,8541 250,808J 3,378,365 

7, 3271 26,783| 227,129 



FIELD 
CROPS 

RE- 
COLTES 

DES 
CHAMPS 



ORCHARD 

AND 
NURSERY i 



PEPI- 
NIERES 



VEGE- 
TABLES 



1,544,0291 78,684 

178,410 6,772 



757 
1,024 
4,991 



13,791 157,278 



772,490 
800, 654 
711,452| 
22,728J 441,087 
12,557 268,275 



88,602 
62,521 
23,826 



5,356 

246 

203 

8 

24 

11 



9,416 


509| 


1,133 


261 


2,485 


52 


290 


62 


1,480 


13 


342 


12 


384 


27 


3,302 


82 


5,486 


196 


1,250 


73 


2,697 


28 


93 


27 


1,148 


46 


298 


22 


6,724 


251 


996 


54 


1,637 


54 


4,028 


92 


58 


51 


5 


- 


1 


4 


- 


1 



239,649 

10,834 

1,608 
4,501 



.AC. 

403.. i»G 
340 

10 
30 
10 
149 
73 
66 
2 

33,618 

720 

269 
62 



4,687 


235 


- 


112 


38 


42 


13,. 364 


6,051 


2,8.50 


177 


2,979 


110 


814 


48 


648 


861 


837 


268 


837 


789 


4,. 399 


3,798 


17,265 


2,881 


4,595 


397 


1,859 


.3041 


2,099 


301 


5,853 


1,224 


2,859, 


655 


68,245 


4,400 


20,442 


1,4.37 


28,806 


901 


6,958 


1,085 


11,963 


363 


76 


14 


47 


132 


1 


l.y.i 



AC. 

206.011 
13,202 

704 
1,925 

941 
2,697 
2,474 
1,744 
2,717 

9,222 

566 

22S 

106 

146 

75 

11 



1,492 

10 
218 
91 
73 
225 
165 
613 

1,034 

1.37 
226 
229 
403 
39 

1,863 

282 
372 
.544 
664 
1 

2S0 

233 



VINE- 
YARDS 



VIGNO- 
BLES 



A.C. 

9,836 
20 



369 

31 
31 



1 

3 

1 

208 
12 

2 

192 
2 

28 

1 
15 

7 
5 



SMALL 
FRUITS 



PETITS 
FRUITS 



No. 



AC. 

17,495 
66 

3 
1 

16 
24 
7 
9 
6 

1,336 

44 

12 
9 

17 
5 
1 



320 

10 

29 

1 

27 

27 
35 
191 

2o; 

18 

2 

6 

174 

7 

552 

43 

23 

402 

84 



15 



10' 13 



48 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE II. Land occupied according to Tenure and Condition 



Districts 



Number of occupiers of land 

NOMBRE d'oCCUPANTS DE TERRES 



BEING BEING 
OWNERS TEN- 
ANTS 



ETA NT 
PROPRI- 
ETAIRES 



ETA NT 
LOCA- 
TAIRES 



BEING 

OWNERS 

AND 

TEN- 
ANTS 

ETA NT 
PROPRI- 
ETAIRES 
ET LOCA- 

TAIRES 



TOTAL 
OCCU- 
PIERS 

TOTAL 

DES 
OCCU- 
PA NTS 



Acres of land 
Acres de terre 



^N PRO- 
PRIETE 



LEASED 

OR 
RENTED 

EN LOCA- 
TION OU A 
LOYER 



British Columbia — con. 



YALE & CARIBOO. 



Cariboo 

Grand Forks. 
Greenwood. . . 
Kamloops. . . . 

Lillooet 

Okanagan 

Similkameen. 
Yale pt 



Manitoba 



BRANDON. 



DAUPHIN... 

LISGAR 

MACDONALD 

MARQUETTE 

PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE. 

PROVENCHER 

SELKIRK 

SOURIS 

WINNIPEG C 

New Brunswick 
CARLETON 



Aberdeen 

Brigiiton 

Kent 

Northampton. 

Peel 

Richmond 

Simonds 

Wakefield 

Wicklow 

Wiimot 

Woodstock 



CHARLOTTE. 



Campobcllo... 
Clarendon .... 

Dufferin 

Dumbarton. . . 
Grand Manan. 

Lepreau 

Penfield 

St. Andrews. . 



NO. 

5,524 

327 
183 
108 

1,297 
430 

1,966 
673 
540 

38,221 

2,795 

7,222 

2,431 

3,759 

5,510 

3,301 

4,517 

5,072 

3,587 

27 

36,12$ 

2,934 

207 
338 
417 
152 
213 
303 
98 
300 
295 
324 
287 

2,361 

73 

13 

41 

136 

309 

52 

186 



604 

31 

14 

9 

220 
44 

216 
43 
27 

4,675 

507 

382 

531 

734 

517 

434 

306 

416 

842 

6 

1,508 

116 

4 

15 

4 

2 

8 

9 

1 

25 

7 

14 

27 

103 



239 

12 
12 

3 

30 

26 

134 

9 
13 

2,710 

272 

321 

404 

410 

357 

297 

156 

107 

385 

1 

574 

50 

6 
8 
5 
6 



12 

8 

32 

16 

2 
1 
1 



NO. 

6,367 

370 
209 
120 

1,547 
500 

2,316 
725 
580 

45,606 

3,574 

7,925 

3,360 

4,903 

6,384 

4,032 

4,979 

5,595 

4,814 

34 

38,210 

3,100 

217 
361 
426 
160 
221 
317 
99 
325 
314 
346 
314 

2,496 

98 

13 

51 

139 

317 

58 

192 

47 



1,600,652 

135,406 
24,310 
31,. 398 
509,770 
270,185 
247,811 
192,660 
189,112 

12,228,233 

1,472,621 
1,623,4.38 

987,003 
1,350,781 
1,895,264 
1,128,052 
1,014,927 

797,421 

1,958,460 

266 

4,537,999 

434,308 

38,231 
51,067 
51,785 
30,589 
25,979 
51,691 
16,362 
45,165 
43,417 
40,128 
39,894 

265, 184 

10,301 
3,060 
2,6S1 

21,010 

17,753 
2,595 

20,414 
4,256 



1,273,399 

126,450 
22,735 
30, 157 
414,4.30 
171,190 
228,004 
172,402 
108,025 

10,334,467 

1,199,926 

1,478,700 

785,175 

1,083,660 



1,650,854 
956,846 
934,748 
730,035 

1,514,280 
243 

4,368,824 

418,243 

30,931 
48,171 
51,030 
29,239 
25,378 
50,011 
16,162 
42,658 
42,395 
39,609 
36,659 

257,571 

9,9,39 
2,740 
2,211 
20,725 
17,637 
2,485 
19,907 
3,260 



AC 

327,253 

8,956 
1,575 
1,241 
95,. 334 
98,995 
19,807 
20,258 
81,087 

1,893,766 

272,695 

144,738 

201,828 

267,121 

244,410 

171,206 

80,179 

67,386 

444. ISO 

23 

169, 175 

16,065 

1,300 
2,896 

755 
1,350 

601 
1,680 

200 
2,507 
1,022 

519 
3,235 

7,613 

362 
320 
470 
285 
116 
110 
447 
996 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU II. Terre occupee selon la tenure et la condition 



49 









Acres of 


LAND 


















Acres de 


TEREE 


















MARSH 




















NATURAL 


OR 






ORCHARD 








No. 




vs- 


FOREST 


WASTE 




FIELD 


AND 


\t:ge- 


VINE- 


SMALL 




IMPROVED 


IMPROVED 




LAND 


FALLOW 


CROPS 


NURSERY 


TABLES 


YARDS 


FRUITS 




AMELIORES 


NON- 


FORET 


TERRAINS 


JA- 


RE- 


\t;rgers 


LEGUMES 


VIG NO- 


PETITS 






AMELI0R2S 


NATU- 
RELLE 


M \ nECA- 
GEIX OU 
INCULTES 


CHERE 
1910 


COLTES 

DE3 
CHAMPS 


ET 
PE PI- 
NT E RES 




BLES 


FRUITS 




AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 




261,981 


1,. 338, 671 


1,008,406 


50, 285 


4, 149 


129,894 


19,301 


3,754 


31 


188 


14 


24,677 


110,729 


79,. 305 


1,959 


772 


14,703 


19 


95 






1 


6,347 


17,963 


13,660 


2,607 


277 


3,012 


1,685 


114 


3 


16 


2 


3,783 


27,615 


20, 955 


270 


128 


2,344 


607 


215 




8 


3 


61,182 


448,588 


413,300 


5,. 368 


82-; 


38,761 


2,194 


370 


2 


59 


4 


37,956 


232,229 


125,935 


9,919 


152 


18,.5S7 


148 


1.59 


3 


3 


5 


74.944 


172,867 


153,595 


3,314 


1,244 


22,658 


12,262 


1,884 


9 


84 


6 


27,045 


165,615 


105,977 


21,049 


587 


17, 19S 


1,719 


408 


4 


8 


7 


26,047 


163,065 


95,679 


5,799 


165 


12,631 


667 


509 


10 


10 


8 


6,746,169 


5,482,061 


497,547 


445,625 


938,788'5,161,858 

i 


1,933 


18,259 


134 


125 




1,050,074 


422,547 


11,702 


,54,009 


194,904 


738,711 


194 


1,071 


2 


18 


15 


458,617 


1,164,821 


146,643 


67,559 


29,057 


393,067 


378 


2,605 


40 


33 


16 


699,187 


287,816 


14,629 


27,987 


74,656 


575,285 


361 


2,302 


1 


12 


17 


832,929 


517,852 


59,040 


34,681 


87, 163 


654,707 


402 


2,156 


6 


9 


18 


854,296 


1,040,968 


17,742 


136,601 


113,531 


678,407 


51 


1,001 


78 


13 


19 


744,625 


383,427 


11,833 


19,738 


101,9.31 


566,965 


60 


1,685 


1 


15 


20 


488,669 


526,258 


37,995 


23,957 


63,422 


376,880 


343 


3,108 


3 


8 


21 


189,884 


607,537 


190,881 


41,944 


22,368 


144,465 


71 


3,301 


- 


9 


22 


1,427,804 


530,656 


7,082 


39,089 


251,696 


1,033,335 


61 


994 


, 3 


8 


23 


84 


182 


- 


- 


- 


36 


12 


36 


- 


- 


24 


1,444,567 


3,093,4.32 


2,453,779 


152,317 


650 


978,876 


8,976 


10,284 


68 


425 




228,516 


205,792 


IV- v,;| 


8,981 


87 


180,722 


1,765 


1,229 


3 


45 


25 


14,067 


24,161 




175 




10,241 


76 


2 






1 


24,324 


26,743 


Z\,'7'.i<.) 


265 


8 


18,. 398 


ISO 


307 


- 1 


26 


2 


29,764 


22,021 


17,775 


1,373 


13 


22,303 


124 


3.59 




14 


3 


11,535 


19,0.54 


17,041 


142 


1 


9,715 


141 


13 


_ 


2 


4 


13,592 


12,387 


12,337 


- 


- 


10, 8o:; 


82 


19 


_ 




5 


26,290 


25,401 


25, 154 


603 


6 


21,392 


237 


394 


_ 


_ 


6 


9,750 


6,612 


6,079 


- 


2 


7,420 


SO 


27 


_ 


_ 


7 


2S,65S 


16,. 507 


15,931 


135 


- 


24,220 


222 


20 


_ 


_ 


8 


30,357 


13,000 


12,141 


475 


- 


25,9.55 


201 


14 


_ 


_ 


9 


23,973 


16,155 


12,122 


4,078 


57 


18,407 


135 


40 


2 


_ 


10 


16,206 


23,688 


18,409 


1,735 


- 


11,808 


287 


28 




3 


11 


.54,411 


210, 773 


156,175 


13,229 


76 


34,161 


530 


973 


8 


115 


26 


656 


9,645 


6,006 


200 


_ 


409 


9 


26 


_ 


1 


1 


500 


2,500 


3.5S5 


200 


- 


• 365 


3 


3 


_ 




2 


1 , 243 


1 , 438 


8.53 


10 


- 


549 


24 


22 


_ 


8 


3 


3,819 


17,191 


16,330' 


55 


2 


2,350 


40 


35 


_ 




4 


2,161 


15,. 592 


10,674 


3,936 


2 


1,586 


3 


18 


_ 


_ 


5 


606 


1,989 


1,989 


- 


- 


331 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


6 


3,122 


17,292 


993 


423 


27 


2,069 


28 


6 


_ 


_ 


7 


2,641 


1,615; 


1,055 


210 


40 


948 


8 


56 


- 


2 


8 


Vol. ] 


V— 1550G 


-^ 



















50 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE II. Land occupied according to Tenure and Condition 



No. 



Districts 



New Brunswick — con. 
CHARLOTTE— con. 



28 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 



29 



St. Croix 

St. David.. 
St. George.. 
St. James. . . 
St. Patrick . 
St. Stephen. 
West Isles... 



GLOUCESTER. 



Bathurst 

Beresford 

Caraquet 

Inkerman 

New Bandon. 
Paquetville. . 

St. Isidore 

Saumarez 

Shippigan 



KENT. 



Acadieville. 

Carleton 

Dundas 

Harcourt. . . 
Richibucto. 

St. Louis 

St. Mary..., 
St. Paul.... 
Weldford... 
Wellington,. 
St. Charles. 



KINGS & ALBERT. 



Kings 

Cardwell. . 

Greenwich. 

Hammond. 

Hampton.. 

Havelock.. 

Kars 

Kingston. .. 

Norton. . . . 

Rothofiay . . 

Studholm. . 

Springfield. 

Sussex 

Upham 

Waterford . . 

Wcstfield . . 
Albert 

Alma 



Number of occupiers of land 

NOMBRE d'oCCUPANTS DE TERRES 



BEING 
OWNERS 



ETA NT 
PROPRI 
ETAIRE3 



BEING 

TEN- 
ANTS 

ETA NT 
LOCA- 



BEING 

OWNERS 

AND 

TEN- 
ANTS 

ETA NT 
PROPRI- 
ETAIRES 
ET LOCA- 
TAIRES 



83 

233 
316 
351 
143 
227 
160 



4,261 

508 
648 
697 
413 
401 
267 
222 
541 
564 



3,191 

222 
170 
445 
134 
336 
201 
353 
156 
511 
482 
181 



4,536 

3,145 
121 
132 

72 
203 
324 

90 
294 
231 
188 
400 
322 
299 
164 
111 
194 
1,S91 

96 



127 

1 
25 
11 
11 
20 
11 
8 
6 
21 
13 



333 

180 

12 

1 

15 

17 

9 

4 

9 

15 

1 

30 

19 

10 

11 

15 

12 

15S 



34 



TOTAL 
OCCU- 
PIERS 

TOTAL 

DES 
OCCU- 
PANTS 



91 



91 



Acres of land 
Acres de terrb 



OCCUPIED 



91 
243 
336 
362 
151 
232 
166 



4,383 

514 
662 
710 
414 
424 
279 
223 
548 
609 



3,409 

223 
196 
464 
156 
365 
217 
376 
182 
546 
503 
181 



4,968 

S,S74 
136 
133 
92 
224 
334 
95 
304 
247 
189 
437 
344 
318 
183 
127 
211 

1,594 
107 



EN PRO- 
PRIETE 



leased 

OR 
RENTED 

EN LOCA- 
TION OU } 
LOYER 



15,950 

.30,. 570 
36,760 
45,750 
31,910 
15, 652 
6,522 



288,115 

46,397 
47,052 
30,917 
30, 554 
37, 103 
18,587 
18,719 
28.143 
30,643 



344,7.36 

21.451 
16,293 
38,977 
18,659 
33,374; 
26, 390 j 
40, 652 j 
23,0761 
72,513 
39,807 
13,544 



725, 107 

527, 606 
38,^57 
19.327 
14,985 
24, 288 
50, 485 
14.. 587 
35,661 
36,395 
22,915 
78,. 530 
54,173 
51,342 
31,674 
23,319 
31.368 

197,501 
9,638 



15,5.39 

29,768 
35,787 
44,643 
31,147 
15,526 
6,197 



283,200 

46,217 
46,124 
30,609 
30,528 
,36,432 
18,241 
18,679 
27,876 
28,494 



331,. 334 

21,376 
14,412 
38,123 
17.226 
32.459 
25.392 
39.573 
21,196 
69,096 
38,937 
13.544 



682.583 

500,095 
35,0.52i 
19.257 
12,650 
22,754 
49.729 
13,797 
34,129 
35,161 
22,815 
73.480 
51,785 
49,341 
29,241 
21.414 
29,490 

18S,488 
9,011 



411 
802 
973 
1,107 
763 
126 
325 



4.915 

180 

928 

308 

26 

671 

346 

40 

267 

2,149 



13,402 

75 
1,881 

854 
1,433 

915 

998 
1.079 
1.880 
3.417 

870 



42,. 524 

S7,51l 

3.505 

70 

2. -335 

1,534 

756 

790 
1,532 
1.234 

100 
5.050 
2,388 
2,001 
2.433 
1.905 
1.878 
15.01S 

027 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU II. Terre occupee selon la tenure et la condition 



51 



Acres of land 
Acres de terre 



IMPROVED 



AMEI.IORES 



UN- 
IMPROVED 



NON- 
AMELIORES 



4,498 

11,075 
5.736 
9,375 
3,618 
4,153 
1,148 



.161 

,707 
.408 
, 125j 
.503 
404! 
540; 
495 
286 
693 



112,258 

4,838 

2,971 
15,622 

3,463 
11,136 

9,190 
14,113 

6,471 
21,571 
18,002 

4,881 



256, 163 

198,035 

12,20.) 

3,006: 

6,673] 

9,810 

25,7,32; 

3,561 

7,041i 

12,646' 

8,660 

35,881' 

22,21l| 

23,826| 

10.883. 

11,447 

4,453; 

58, 128 

3,743' 



11,452 
19,4!)5 
31,024 
36,375 
28,292 
11,499 
5,374 



211,954 

32, 690 
31,644 
22, 792 
23,051 
28.699 
15,047 
13,224 
20,857 
23,950 



232,478 

16,613 
13,322 
23,3.55 
15,196 
22,238 
'17,200 
26,. 539 
16,605 
50.942 
21,805 
8,663 



468,944 

829, 571 
20,352 
16,321 
8,312 
14,478 
24,7,53: 
11.026 
28,620 
23,749 
14,2.55 
42,649 
31,962 
27,516 
20,791 
11,872 
26,915 

139, 373 
5,895 



NATURAL 
FOREST 



FORET 
NATU- 
RELLE 



9.979 

17,065 
22,815 
32,457 
24,944 
5,874 
1,556 



184,101 

18,. 389 
33,842 
18,744 
20,545 
25,589 
15,550 
13,878 
16,712 
20,852 



206,226 

16,381 
12,132 
lG,424i 
12,087 
21,. 546 
13,997 
23,946 
13,574 
48.934 
18,611 
8,594 



373,001 

256, 189 

22,210 

14,225 

6,518 

11,172 

15,377 

4,8.32 

23,231 

22,933 

2,865 

39,397 

31,572 

17,466 

14,889 

11,113 

18,. 389 

116,812] 

4,3961 



MARSH • 

OR I 

WASTE I 

LAND I FALLOW 

TERRAINS J\- 

MARECA- j CHERE 
GEUX OV 1 1910 
INCULTES 



105 

,206 

10 

,896 

906 

72 



12,442 

133 
3,418 
1,896 

148 
2,722 

521 

1,627 
1,977 



10,472 

90 

889 

38 

1 , 574 

1,885 

2,679 

1,434 

848 

537 

497 



24, 105 

17,3.58 

1,210| 

17i 

65 

5351 

14: 

4051 

57' 

217i 

181| 

212I 

"201 

6871 

4,198 

872 

8,568 

6,847 

736 



FIELD 
CROPS 



RE- 
COLTES 

DES 
CHAMPS 



29 



ORCHARD 

AND 
NURSERY 

VERGER.* 

ET 

PEPI- 

NIERES 



VEGE- 
TABLES 



2,262 
4,799 
3,959 
6,818 
3,348 
3,530 
838 



59,482 

9,766 
9,762 
6.044 
6,861 
6,633 
3,479 
4,48l! 
6, 153 
6,. 303 



36 80,353 



4.. 306 
2,171 

12,185 
2,506 
7,003 
6,869 

11,2.55 
4,612 

14.545 

11,617 
3,284 



140, 501 



42 
111 
34 
119 
38 
27 
44 



124 

69 
33 

8 



2 

4 

423 

26 
6 
98 
19 
19 
58 
61 
29 
61 
23 
23 



1,603 



tos, 745 


940 


4,995 


36 


2,374 


66 


3,169 


16 


4,266 


32 


13,270 


90 


2,669 


24 


6.259 


120 


5,900 


46 


5,735 


57 


18.701 


109 


11.158 


143 


11.357 


69 


5,392 


23 


4,450 


35 


3.0501 


74 


87,756 


668 


1,224 


13 



44 
229 
53 
338 
20 
91 
32 



198 

141 
23 
10 



16 



324 



2,541 

2,026 

175 

125 

83 

23 

313 

97 

206 

176 

258, 

3591 

52 1 

87 

59 

9 

4 

515 



VINE- 
YARDS 



VIG NO- 
BLES 



SMALL 
FRUITS 



PETITS 
FR UITS 



1 

101 



108 

105 



10 



- 



Xo. 



9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 



•Hi 



- 


3 


3 


4 


- 


5 


19 


6 


38 


7 





8 


10 


9 


7 


10 


3 


11 


1 


1? 




13 


1 


14 


8 


15 


3 


16 


- 


17 



Vol. IV— 15506— 4i 



52 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE II. Land occupied according to Tenure and Condition 



No. 



32 



Districts 



New BFunswick— con. 

KINGS & ALBERT— cor 
Albert — con. 

Coverdale 

Elgin 

Harvey 

Hillsborough 

Hopewell 



NORTHUMBERLAND. 



Alnwick. . . . 
Black ville. . 
Blis.sfield... 
Chatham... 

Derby 

Glenelg 

Hardwicke. 

Ludlow 

Nelson 

Newcastle. . 
North Esk., 
Rogersville. 
South Esk. . 



RESTIGOUCHE. 



Number of occupiers of land 

NOMBRE d'oCCUPANTS DE TERRES 



BEIKG 
OWNERS 

ETA NT 
PROPRI- 
ETAIRES 



Addington 

Balmoral 

Colborne 

Dalhousie 

Durham 

Eldon & Restigouche River. 

ST. JOHN CITY & COUNTY 
CIT^. ET COMTfi 



Lancaster. . 
Musquash. 
St. Martin. 
Simonds... 



SUNBURY & QUEENS. 



Sunbury 

Blissville. . . 

Burton 

Gladstone. . 

Lincoln 

Maugei ville. 

North field.. 

Sheffield.... 
Queens 

Brunswick. . 

Cambridge. 

Canning 

Chipman. . . 

Gagetown.. . 

Hampstead. 

Johnston. . . . 



245 
290 
197 
318 
245 

3,209 

562 
335 
111 
239 
118 
260 
212 
140 
225 
230 
262 
327 



1,100 

148 
191 
122 
233 
317 
89 



BEING 
.TEX- 
ANIS 

ETA NT 
LOCA- 
TAIRES 



BEING j 
OWNERS 

AND TOTAL 

TEN- OCCU- 

ANTS PIERS 



ETA NT 
PROPHl- 
ETAIRES 
ET LOCA- 
TAIRES 



771 


113 


21 


181 


50 


7 


85 


10 


- 


183 


14 


4 


322 


39 


10 


2,690 


108 


49 


885 


4S 


SI 


134 


1 


- 


196 


9 


5 


146 


3 


2 


122 




_ 


58 


11 


8 


114 


4 


_ 


115 


15 


6 


1,805 


65 


28 


47 


, 3 


- 


170 


8 


3 


135 


2 


_ 


235 


8 


6 


138 


9 


1 


173 


9 


11 


288 


9 


- 



TOTAL 

DES 
OCCU- 
PANTS 



Acres of land 
Acres de terre 



258 
331 
238 
352 
308 

3,282 

581 
337 
111 
247 
119 
269 
213 
149 
227 
241 
263 
333 
192 

1,128 

155 
194 
123 
239 
324 
93 



905 

238 

95 

201 

371 

2,847 

9A9 
135 
210 
151 
122 

77 

118 

136 

1,898 

50 
181 
137 
249 
148 
193 
297 



EN PRO- 
PHIETE 



leased 

OR 
HENTED 

EN LOCA- 
TION OU A 
LOYER 



40,488 

53,063 
31,875 
39,239 
23,198 

333,481 

49,820 
39,595 
15,806 
18,85.-) 
9,447 
34,596 
19,352! 
17, 648 i 
23,]90j 
23,499 
26,024| 
34,543 
21,046, 

f 

114,297 

16,431 
17,635 
14,042 
26,055 
29,081 
11,053 



106,696 

21,393 
10,962 
26,069 

48,272 

490,572 

164. sm 

25,226' 
29, 481 : 
17,790' 
24,473 
33,7.'?0 
11,6601 
21,9F0 
SS6, 2S2 
12,555; 
30,395 
18,900 
35,302 
29,408 
33,584 
46,848 



37,962 
50,770 
28,129 
35,697 
20,919 

328,576 

49,062 
39,395 
15,866 
18,679 
9,397 
33,623 
19,306 
16,738 
22,945 
22,962 
25,999 
34,216 
20,388 

112,649 

16,029 
17,435 
13,762 
25,934 
28,851 
10,638 



94,886 

16,656 
10,820 
24,844 
42,506 

467,707 

154, S7Q 
24,676 
29,260 
17.3.35 
24,473 
29,7.32 
11,375 
17,419 

S1S,4S7 
12,0.55 
29,294 
18.590 
33,5.34 
28,067 
29.766 
44,988 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU II. Terre occupee selon la tenure et la condition 



53 









Acres op 
Acres de 


LAND 

TERRE 


















MARSH 






















OB 






ORCHARD 












UN- 


NATURAL 


WASTE 




FIELD 


AND 


VEGE- 


\aNE- 


SMALL 


No. 


IMPROVED 


IMPROVED 


FOREST 


LAND 


FALLOW 


CROPS 


NURSERY 


TABLES 


TARDS 


FRUITS 




— 








— 


— • 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




AMELIORES 


NON- 


FORET 


TERRAINS 


JA- 


RE- 


VERGERS 


LEGUMBS 


VIGNO- 


PETIT3 






AMEUORES 


N.\TU- 
BELLE 


MARECA- 
GEUX OU 

INCULTES 


CHERE 
1910 


COLTE3 

DES 
CHAMPS 


ET 

P£PI- 

NIERES 




BLES 


FRUITS 




AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 


AC. 




10,794 


29,694 


26,529 


2,668 




7,564 


161 


66 




3 


17 


17,637 


35,426 


22,738 


1,403 


- 


11,840 


160 


113 


1 




18 


7,722 


24, 153 


20,291 


629 




5,733 


47 


36 


- 


_ 


19 


11,006 


28,233 


26,073 


382 


- 


7,046 


199 


162 


2 


_ 


20 


7,226 


15.972 


16,785 


1,029 


- 


4,-349 


83 


138 




- 


21 


64,353 


269, 128 


183,340 


5,737 


11 


47,760 


162 


540 


12 


5 


30 


9,357 


40,463 


36,840 


2,222 


4 


7,503 


35 


136 


12 




1 


7,384 


32,211 


29,564 


- 


- 


4,791 


4 


26 


- 


1 


2 


2,482 


13,384 


13,672 


- 


- 


1,974 


8 


7 


- 


_ 


3 


5,722 


13,133 


7,184 


105 


2 


4,352 


7 


40 


_ 


_ 


4 


2,504 


6,943 


293 


50 


- 


1,901 


1 


- 




1 


5 


5,724 


28,872 


30,090 


2,360 


- 


4,128 


12 


145 


_ 




6 


3,400 


15,952 


6,710 


891 


- 


2,410 


9 


155 


- 


_ 


7 


2,463 


15,185 


15,404 


- 


- 


1,749 


7 


- 


- 


_ 


8 


4,078 


19,112 


10,730 


- 


- 


2,970 


5 


5 


- 


_ 


9 


5,578 


17,921 


2,545 


80 


- 


3,596 


19 


9 


- 


_ 


10 


4,903 


21,121 


7,319 


- 


- 


4,119 


14 


5 




3 


11 


7.285 


27,258 


13,389 


- 


- 


5,401 


20 


3 


- 


_ 


12 


3,473 


17,573 


9,600 


29 


5 


2,868 


21 


9 


- 


- 


13 


27,318 


86,979 


53,268 


3,333 


- 


18,049 


• 69 


127 


2 


5 


31 


3,248 


13,183 


6,313 


880 


_ 


1,841 


2 


89 


_ 


2 


1 


5,170 


12,465 


11,536 


235 


- 


3,3.33 


3 


- 


_ 


- 


2 


3,841 


10,201 


5,502 


1,643 


- 


2,392 


13 


- 


1 


- 


3 


6,275 


19,780 


454 


17 


- 


4,244 


22 


18 


- 


1 


4 


7,559 


21,522 


19,726 


558 


- 


5,243 


29 


20 


1 


2 


5 


1,225 


9,828 


9,737 


- 


- 


996 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


20,427 


86,269 


62,124 


14,730 


38 


14,983 


23 


278 


1 


7 


33 


5,514 


15.879 


12,794 


315 


37 


3,656 


5 


81 


_ 


5 


1 


716 


10,246 


7,039 


3,188 


- 


608 


7 


28 


- 


- 


2 


4,045 


22,024 


17,6.39 


238 


- 


3,791 


4 


109 


- 


2 


3 


10,152 


38,120 


24,652 


10,989 


1 


6,928 


7 


60 


1 


- 


4 


123,953 


366,619 


323,899 


14,488 


113 


74,82.-j 


1,538 


1,241 


9 


65 


33 


S2,2S7 


132,113 


106.322 


9,748 


9 


21,H69 


631 


718 


_ 


3 




5,159 


20,067 


17,634 


695 


- 


4,077 


33 


10 


- 


1 


1 


5,577 


23,904 


19,267 


1,350 


1 


3,3.56 


143 


129 


- 


- 


2 


4,589 


13,201 


11,688 


574 


- 


2,728 


218 


73 


- 


- 


3 


4,866 


19,607 


14,604 


456 


- 


2,914 


39 


250 


- 


- 


4 


4,326 


29, 404 


22,358 


462 


- 


3, 108 


57 


54 


- 


- 


5 


3,411 


8,249 


4,127 


2,123 


- 


2,640 


38 


101 


- 


- 


6 


4,299 


17,681 


16,644 


4, OSS 


8 


3,046 


103 


101 


- 


2 


7 


91,726 


234,506 


217,577 


4,740 


104 


62,956 


907 


523 


9 


62 




3,292 


9,263 


8,680 


143 


- 


1,701 


- 


3 


- 


- 


8 


10, 176 


20,219 


19,489 


25 


5 


4,884 


137 


38 


2 


- 


9 


3,784 


15,116 


14,769 


170 


2 


3,545 


47 


11 


- 


- 


10 


9,718 


25,584 


21,297 


600 


- 


4,833 


15 


53 


- 


- 


11 


7,177 


22,231 


19,0-14 


494 


16 


3,339 


126 


333 


5 


20 


12 


13,078 


20,506 


20,022 


714 


28 


7,6.58 


214 


10 


- 


5 


13 


11,564 


35,284 


37,292 


17a 


5 


6,560 


105 


29 


- 


17 


14 



54 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE II. Land occupied according to Tenure and Condition 





Districts 


Number of occupiers of land 

NOMBRB d'oCCUPANTS DE TERRES 


Acres of land 
Acres de terre 


No. 


BEING 
OWNERS 

ETA NT 

PROPra- 

ETAIRES 


being 

TEN- 
ANTS 

ETA NT 
LOCA- 
TAIRES 


BEING 
OWNERS 
AND 
TEN- 
ANTS 

ETA NT 
PROPRI- 
ETAIRES 
ET LOCA- 
TAIRE3 


TOTAL 
OCCU- 
PIERS 

TOTAL 

DES 
OCCU- 
PANTS 


occupied 

OCCUPES 


owned 

EN PRO- 
PRIETE 


leased 

OR 
RENTED 

EN LOCA- 
TION OU A 
LOYER 


TS 


New Brunswick — con. 

SUNBURY & QUEENS — con. 
Queens— con. 

Petersville 


NO. 

302 
211 
106 

3,345 

1,554 

213 

495 

188 

285 

111 

262 

1,791 

94 

64 

43 

160 

212 

195 

268 

178 

171 

186 

193 

27 

4,281 

625 
671 
822 
602 
424 
835 
302 

3.449 

2,->9 
371 
397 

84 
217 

19 
236 
124 
115 
153 
255 
342 
402 
475 


NO. 

11 

2 
4 

95 

56 

3 

29 

10 

3 

11 

39 

2 

8 

4 
3 
2 
6 
6 
2 
2 

4 

224 

31 
25 
42 
27 
17 
70 
12 

108 

6 

8 

7 

9 

19 

2 

9 

6 

1 

6 

5 

10 

17 

3 


NO. 

2 
3 

2 

41 

18 
1 
8 
4 
4 

1 
23 

5 

1 

14 

2 

1 

116 

20 
18 
10 
16 
22 
24 
6 

33 

4 
1 

10 
2 
3 

1 

2 

5 
4 

1 


NO. 

315 
216 
112 

3.481 

1,628 

217 

532 

202 

292 

111 

274 

1,853 

96 

77 

43 

161 

215 

198 

288 

186 

174 

183 

193 

31 

4,621 

676 
714 
874 
645 
463 
929 
320 

3,590 

269 
3S0 
414 

95 
239 

21 
246 
130 
118 
159 
265 
356 
420 
478 


AC. 

58,936 
31,090 
29,214 

450, 225 

194,637 
25,465 
58,271 
23,381 
31,494 
16,659 
39,367 

355,588 
11,212 
14,4.30 
3,673 
28,045 
23.977 
22.212 
50,000 
22, 139 
29,905 
24,948 
23.879 
567 

463,611 

80,623 
63,544 
92,683 
58,916 
71,251 
65,813 
30,778 

521,667 

35,808 
41,112 
64.275 
15.394 
44.959 
1.712 
40. 820 
18.296 
12,892 
24,179 
53,922 
56,149 
62,3.33 
49.816 


AC. 

58,232 
30,416 
28,495 

439,043 

188,921 
25,062 
55,4.32 
22.465 
30,964 
16,659 
38,339 

250,122 
11,206 
12,671 
3,673 
27,703 
23,695 
22, 1.32 
48,657 
21,578 
29,706 
24,778 
23,779 
544 

444,748 

77,002 
61,034 
88.698 
58, 151 
66,019 
63,460 
30,304 

508,284 

35,457 
39,995 
63,363 
13, 765 
43,074 
1,710 
39,588 
17,631 
12,267 
23.041 
52,715 
54,538 
60,782 
49,758 


AC. 

704 


16 


Waterboro 


674 


17 




719 


34 

1 


VICTORIA & MADAWASKA . 
Victoria 


11.182 

5,716 


1 




403 


? 




2,839 






916 


4 


Grand Falls 


530 


5 


Lome 




6 


Perth 


1,028 




Madawaska.. . . 


5.466 
6 




Clair 


8 


Lake Baker 


1 . 759 


q 


Lcdces 




10 


Madawaska 


342 


11 


St. Andre 


282 


V> 


St. Anns 


80 


13 




1,943 


14 


St. Francis 


561 


15 


St. Hilaire 


200 


16 




170 


17 


St. Leonard 


100 


18 


Indian Reserve 


23 


35 


WESTMORLAND 


18,863 


1 


Botsf ord 


3,621 


•> 


Dorchester 


2,460 


3 


Monctou . .■ 


3,985 


4 


Sackville 


765 


5 


Salisbury 


5,205 


6 


Shediac 


2.353 


7 


Westmorland 


474 


36 


YORK 


13.383 


1 


Bright 


351 


9 


Canterbury. 


1.117 


3 




912 


4 




1.629 


5 

6 


Kin^'sclear 

Mc.\dain 


1,885 
2 




Manners Sutton . . 


1,232* 


8 
9 
10 


New Maryland 

North Lake 

Prince William 


665 
625 
538 


11 




1,207 


12 


St. Marvs 


1,611 


13 


Southampton 


1,551 


14 


Stanley 


58 






I 



RECENSEMENT DU CANADA 1911 
TABLEAU II. Terre occupee selon la tenure et la condition 



Acres of land 
Acres de terre 



IMPROVED 



AMELIORES 



UN- 
IMPROVED 



,NON- 
AMELIORES 



NATURAL 
FOREST 

FOR&T 
NATU- 
RELLB 



MAR3H 

OR 
WASTE 
LAND 

TERRAINS 
MARECA- 
GEUX OU 
INCULTES 



CHERE 
1910 



FIELD 
CROPS 

RE- 

COLTES 

DE3 
CHAMPS 



ORCHARD 

AND 
NURSERY 

VERGERS 
ET PEPI- 
NIERE3 



VEGE- 
TABLES 



VINE- 
YARDS 



VI G NO- 
BLES 



SMALL 
FRUITS 



PETTTS 
FRUITS 



16,587 
8,583 
7.767 



155.827 

66, 786 
10,941 
22.756i 

5,657' 
12, 296 

3,694 
11.442| 
89,04l\ 

3,758i 

6,229! 

1,4261 

8,850' 
12,306' 

7,534 
15, 232 I 

5,6311 
10,606| 

8.001, 

9,0.34 
434 



170,471 

29, 177 
27.068 
29.017 
16,696 
27,097 
27,973 
13,443 



154,709 

ll,850i 

13, 193 i 

17,4091 

4.945! 

12,071' 

3.50: 

13, 762 1 

3, 565 I 

4,996 

8, 2.50 

17,. 32.5 

9.299 

19,9231 

17.771 



42,349 
22,507 
21,447 



294,. 398 

127,851 
14,524 
35,515i 
17,724' 
19,198 
12,965 
27,925 

166,547] 

7,4.54 

8,201' 

2,2471 

19,195! 

11,671 

14,678 

35,368: 

16,. 508 

19.300 

16,947 

14,845 

1.33 



293,140 

51,446 
36,4761 
63,666] 
42,220 
44, 1571 
37,8401 
17.. 3351 



366,958 

23,958 
27,919 
46,866 
10,449 
32,888 

1,362 
27,058 
14,731 

7.896 
15,929 
.36,597 
46,8.50 
42,410: 
32,04.51 



37,809 
21,666 
17,509 



238,826 

99,970\ 

280! 

30,813; 

16,219i 

18,332! 

12,340 

21,986 

138, 856] 

5,78li 

6,668' 

1,0981 

19,0901 

10,0661 

10,0S6l 

33,547| 

8,638i 

18,314 

14,. 547 

11,021 



210,5.53 

33,5.32 
26,. 387 
50,345 
25,4421 
31,0491 
33,211 
10,587 



276,402 
i 
16,2421 
26,004 
16.878| 
10,498: 
27.605 

l,.348l 
14,6731 
13, 1.36i 

5,654 
12,0141 
33, 251 1 
33.6881 
.33,8171 
31.594 



250 

35! 

2, 1361 



7, 118i 

3,339 

1,726 

10 

470 



1.33 

4,779 

532 

663 

317 

5 

327 

1,376 

714 

755 

40 

40 

10 



14,294 

2,356 
1,797 

699 
4,570 

855 
2,188 
1,829 



23,388 

3,071 

1,5.50 

290 

5 

1,765 

1,223 

379 

1,.50.S 

373 

1 , 676 

8.21.31 

3,:, 051 

30 



134 

lU 



109 



SO 



20 



18 
110 



12 



11,524 
4,794 
4.118 



115,091 

48,919 
8,377j 

16,439 
3,S9l! 
9,360! 
3,1171 
7, 735i 

66, 17 2\ 
2,912' 
4.940 
947 
6,828 
6,830 
6,475 

11,569 
4,3.37 
7,519 
5,969 
7,654 
192 



132! 110,494 



17,. 352 
14,368 
22, 126 
13.677: 
17,775' 
18,679| 
6,517 



102,455 

7,594 
8,909: 

11,1431 
3, 106 
6,716 
245 
8, 183 
2,7321 
3,700! 
4, 779; 

10, .389| 
7,811 

13.912 

13.236 



S3 

30 

150 



294 



1,104 

89 
173 
242 

76 
141 
352 

31 



1..341 



516 

411 

343 

23 

5 

151 

25 

105 

23 

3 

16 

171 

10; 

3 

3 

13 

17 



1.495 

363 
178! 
371; 
2.57 
163 
137j 
26 



822 



97 


1 


118 


30 


146 


25 


43 


151 


180 


23 


7 


7 


92 


274 


46 


2 


70 


4 


53 


14 


149 


68 


16 


41 


187 


178 


137 


4 



20 



50 



18 



56 



CENSUS OF CANADA 1911 
TABLE II. Land occupied according to Tenure and Condition 



No. 



Districts 



Nova Scotia 

ANNAPOLIS 

ANTIGONISH 



CAPE BRETON N & 
' VICTORIA 



Ca-pe Breton N . 
Victoria 



CAPE BRETON S 

COLCHESTER 

CUMBERLAND 

DIGBY 

G UYSBO ROUGH 

HALIFAX CITY & CO.... 

HANTS 

INVERNESS 

KINGS.... : 

LUNENBURG 

PICTOU 

RICHMOND 

SHELBURNE & QUEENS 



Shelburne . 
Queens 



YARMOUTH 

Ontario 

ALGOMA E 



Number of occupiers of land 

NOMBRE d'OCCUPANTS DE TERRES 





BEING 


BEING 


TEN- 


OWNERS 


ANTS 


ETA NT 


ETA NT 


PKOPRI- 


LOCA- 


EIAIRES 


TAIRES 



BEING I 
OWNEnSi 
AND 
TEN- 
ANTS 

lETANT 
PROPRI- 
ET.URES 
ET LOCA- 
TAIRES 



Aird Island & Shedden. 

Allan 

Assiginack 

Baldwin & Merritt 

Balfour & Morgan 

Barric Island 

Bidwell 

Billings 

Bright & Day 

Burpee 

Campbell 

Carnarvon 



NO. 

51,133 

3,094 
2,223 

2,609 

90S 
1J06 

1,922 

3,023 

3,541 

2.915 

2,394 

3,915 

2,65G 

3,604 

3,358 

4,535 

3,342 

2,315 

3,069 

1,849 
1,220 

2,617 

186.696 

2.SG0' 

.■; ! 

90 
59 
100 
34 
72 
81 
71 
40 
89 
85 



NO. 

2,106 

126 
50 

63 



69 

96 

208 

89 

51 

191 

254 

87 

181 

216 

119 

45 

140 

67 
73 

121 

31,201 



TOTAL 
OCCU- 
PIERS 

TOTAL 

DES 
OCCU- 
PANTS 



Acres of land 
Acres de terre 



LEASED 
OR 

rented 



EN PRO- ! EN LOC.\- 
PRIETE TION OU A 
; LOYER 



39S 

4 
3 

23 

2 
21 

2 
29 
35 
18 

8 

14 

39 

42 

39 

42 

18 

12 

51 

/ 
BO 

17 

8.901 



NO. 

53,631 

3,224 
2,276 

2,695 

925 
1,770 



309 


126 


6 


_ 


5 


6 


15 


8 


1 


- 


3 


3 


1 


6 


5 


4 


8 


13 


2 


1 


- 


7 


13 


12 


12 


10 



1,993! 

i 
3,1481 

I 
3,7S4l 

i 
3.022J 

2,453! 

4,120l 

2,949 

3,733 

3,578 

4,793 

3,479 

2,372 

3,260 

1,917 
1,SJ,S 

2,755 

22s, 801 

3,295 

40 
44 

113 
60 

106 
41 
81 

102 
74 
47 

114 

107 



AC. 

5,230,455 

369,389 
231,498 

283,508 

70,258 
213, 250 

166, 222 j 

476,902! 

529,632! 

I 

264,304 

248,350 

370,277i 

I 

370,717! 

409,055 

305,383 

340,170 

364,957 

139,453 

242,776 

115,935 
126,841 

147,862 

22,171,785 

511,708 

3,926 

8, 3.54 
21,217 

8,715 
17,591 
11,171 
16,239 
25,396 
12,401 

9,459 
20,927i 
20,448 



,093,658 

3.58,7461 

i 

226,5.321 



19 



275, 155 

68, 946 
206, 209 

162,782 

462,944 

500,328 

259,558 

244,7091 

3