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NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


January 2* 195ft 

MEMORANDUM* 

TO % BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF NAEB AND MEMBERS OF THE NETWORK 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE . 

FROM s DICK RIDER 

The attached is a Preliminary Report on the use of network 
Packages end #2 by usaidber s tat lone 0 

Under the present system of reporting on useage* the stations fill 
in a preliminary report as accurately as possible at the tin© the pro» 
grains are offered? After the third week's program are broadcast a roor® 
detailed and accurate report is submittedo At the conclusion of a 
package a final report is made® These report© are filed at headquarter® 
and a permanent record is mads after the final reports are receivedo 
While Package #3 aid are well started many stations are just 
getting started with Package #1 and #2o This results in an Inc ample to 
report at ths tiraao Also* some stations omit part of the information 
called for* or are late in returning the reports 0 These we ©orrect by 
writing and asking for the specific informationo 

The present report represents the most conplet^ information v& 
have at this timso 

Richard L 0 Rider 
Manager* Tape Network 



NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 
Pcko #1 Series 51-7 Title MU SIC FOR THE 
Distributed to 66 stations* 
Used by 6k stations 


Percentage of Use 97 <* 


STATION BROADCAST DATE ANY DEVIATIONS 


KBPS 

KCVN 

OF FIRST PROGRAM 

oct. ia, 1951 


KFJM 

KFKU 

Kmiw 



KOAC 

Bov. 3, 1951 


KSAC 



KSLH 

KUOM 

Dec. ll», 1951 


know 

KUSC 

KTJSD' 

Oct. 13, 1951 


KVOF 

KWAR 

KWAX 



KWGS 

kwlc 

Oct. 21, 1951 


KWSC 

Setp 18, 1951 

£ 12 omitted 

WABE 

Bov. 20, 1951 


WAER 

Oct. 3, 1951 


WBAA 

• Sept. 18, 1951 


WBEZ 

WBOO 

WBGU 

WBJC 

Oct. 15, 1951 


WBKY 

WBOE 

WBUR 

Oct. k, 1951 


V/CAL 

Nov. 17, 1951 


VJDTR 

WDUQ 

Oct. 31, 1951 


WEPS 

WEVC 

WFIU 

WFPL 

WOBH 

WOPS 

WGRE 



WHA 

Sept. 18, 1951 


WHAZ 

WILL 

Oct. 1, 1951 



DUBBED 


les 


Yes 


January 2, 1952 


CONNOISSEUR 13 Programs 
1 hour 


COMMENTS 


Too early for report 


Skipped first 2 progi, 


Too early fter report 
Too early for report 


Too early for report 


Skipped first 2 prog® 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


STATION BROADCAST DATE ANY DEVIATION DUBBED 

OF FIRST PROGRAM 

WKAR Oct. 21, 1991 

WLSU Sept. 19, 1991 

WMCR Oct. 2, 1991 

WfWI Oct. ii, 1991 

WNAD Yes 

WNAS 

WNOV 

WNUR 

VINYC 

WOI Oct. 17, 1991 

WOStI 

WSAJ 

WSOU Oct. 1)4, 1991 

WSUI Oct. 9, 1991 

WTD3 
WTHS 

WUOA Oct. Ih, 1991 

WUOM Oct. 29, 1951 

WUOT Nov. 16, 1991 

WUSV Oct 29, 1991 

WWHI 


COMMENTS 


Too early for report 


NAEB TAPS NETWORK 


?cko #1 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 
Series 51-8 Title BBC WORLD THEATRE 


STATION 

KBPS 

BROADCAST DATS 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 

KCVN 

KFJM 

KFKU 

KMJW 

oot. m, i?<a 

KOAC 

KSLH 

Nov. 2, 1951 

KUOM 

KUOW 

KUSC 

KVOF 

KWAR 

KWAX 

KWGS 

Nov. 28, 1951 

KWSC 

Sept. 19, 1951 

WABE 

Nov. 15, 1951 

WAKE 

Sept. 30, 1951 

WBAA 

WBEZ 

WBGO 

Sept. 19, 1951 

WBQU 


WBJC 

WBOE 

Oot. 19, 1951 

WBUR 

Oot. 7, 1951 

WCAL 

WDTR 

Nov. 17, 1951 

WDUQ 

WEPS 

WEVC 

WFIU 

WFPL 

WFUV 

WGBH 

WOPS 

WORE 

WHA 

WIIAZ 

WHCU 

Oot. 28, 1951 

WILL 

Oct. 7, 1951 

WKAR 

Oct. 20, 1951 

WLSU 

Sept. 17, 1951 


Distributed to 
Used by 

Percentage of U3® 
ANY DEVIATIONS 


66 stations* 
62 stations* 
9k 

DUBBED 


#12 Omitted 
#6 Omitted 


¥es 


Yes 


January 2, 19 £2 


13 Programs 1 Hour 


COMMENTS 


Too early for report 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


Too early for report 


Skipped f forst 2 programs 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 



DUBBED 


COMMENTS 


STATION BROADCAST DATE ANY DEVI ’ATIONS 

OF FIRST PROGRAM 

WM3R Oct® 3, 195)1 

Wffl Oct® 9, 1950. 

WMUB Nov« 15;, 1951 

WNAD 

WNAS 

WNOV 

WNTJR 

WOI Oct. 20, 1991 

WOSU 

WSAJ 

WSOlf Oct. 20, 1991 

WSUI Oct. 2, 1991 

NTDS 
WTHS 

WUOA Oct® lh , 1991 

WIJOM Nov. 2, 1991 

MJOT Nov. 19, 1991 

WIJSV Nov, 1, 1991 

WV5H Nov. llj, 1991 

WWHI 


IQS 


Too carl;/ for report 



NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


J anuary 2, 1?£2 

REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

Pck. #1 Series £L ~9 Title THE PEOPLE. ACT 13 Programs l/2 Hoar 

Distributed to 66 stations. 

Used by 62 stations. 

Percentage of us© 9b° 


STATION 

KBPS 

BROADCAST DATE 
OK FIRST PROGRAi' 

KCVN 

KFKU 

kmuw 

Oct, 16, 1951 

KOAC 

KSAC 

KSLH 

Oct. 31, 1951 

KUOP 

kuow 

KUSC 

KVGF 

KWAR 

KWAX 

KWGS 

Kov. 29, 1951 

KSLC 

Nov. 3, 1951 

KWSC 

Sept 19, 1951 

WABS 

Nov. 12, 1951 

WAiSR 

Oct. 7, 1951 

WBAA 

wbez 

WBGG 

Sept 18, 1951 

WBGU 


WBJC 

WBKY 

WBOE 

Oct. 16, 1951 

WDUR 

Oct. 3, 1951 

WCAL 

WDTR 

Nov. 15, 1951 

WDUO 

WEPS 

WEVG 

WFIU 

WFPL 

WFUV 

WGBH 

WGPS 

WGRE 

' Oct. 31, 1951 

WHA 

WHAZ 

WHCU 

Sept. 28, 1951 


ANY DEVIATIONS DUBBED 


#12 Omitted 

#10, 11, 12 omitted 


COMMENTS 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


Too early for report 


skipped first 2 programs 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


ANY DEVIATIONS 


DUBBED 


COMMENTS 


STATION 

BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 

WKAR 

Oct. 2li, 1951 

WLSTJ 

Sept. 20, 1951 

WMCH 

Oct. h, 1951 

WMMI 

Oct. 8, 1951 

WMUB 

WNAS 

WNOV 

WNUR 

WNYC 

December 17, 19' 

WOI 

wosu 

Oct. 16, 1951 

wsou 

Oct 15, 1951 

WSUI 

WTDS 

WTKS 

Oct. i», 1951 

WUOA 

Bet. 19, 1951 

WUQM 

Nov. 2, 1951 

WIJOT 

Hov, 15, 1951 

WUSV 

Oct. 29, 1951 

WSK 

WKL 

Nov. 12, 1951 


Too early for report 




NAEB tape network 


January 2, 1952 

* 

REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

Pcko #1 Series 51-10 Title STORIES N STUFF 13 Programs 1/2 Hour 
Distributed to 66 s tat ions o 

Used by $9 stations® 

Percentage of use 89 * 


STATION BROADCAST DATE ANY DEVIATIONS 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 


DUBBED COMMENTS 


KBPS 
KCVN 
KFKU 

mjw 

KOAC 
KSAC 
KSLH 
KUOW 
KJSC 
KVOF 
KWAR 
KWAX 
KWGS 
MLC 

t KWSC 
WABE 
VJAER 
WBAA 
WBEZ 
WBGO 
WBGU 
WBJC 
WBKY 
WBOE 

mm 

WCAL 

WDTR 

WDUQ 

WEPS 

WEVC 

V/FIU 

WFPL 

WFUV 

WGBH 

WOPS 


Oct. 18, 1951 
Nov 3, 1951 


Nov. 3y 1951 
Sept. 22, 1951 
Nov. 16, 1951 
Oct. 6, 1951 
Sept. 22, 1951 



Too early for report 
Too early for report 


Too early for report 


Too early f or report 
Too early for report 


ANY DEVIATIONS 


DUBBED 


COMMENTS 


STATION 

BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 

WILL 

WKAR 

Oct. 20, 1951 

WLSU 

Sept. 17, 1951 

WMC R 

Oct. 2, 1951 

Hillli 

Oct. 3, 1951 

wsou 

Oct. 15, 1951 

WSUI 

wtds 

wths 

Oct. 6, 1951 

WUOA 

Oct 19, 1951 

WUOM 

Nov. 2, 1951 

WUOT 

Nov. 12, 1951 

WVSH 

WWHI 

Nov. 16, 1951 


Yes 


Originating station.' ; 


Too early £ or report 



NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 
Pck a #1 Series £L«11 A> itle FESTIVAL CO?\ :ERTS 13 

Distributed to 66 stationso 
Used by 5? stations® 

Percentage of use 66, 


STATIONS 

KBPS 

BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 

KCVN 

KFKU 

KMUW 

Oct. 17, 1951 

KOAC 

KSLH 

KNOW 

KUSC 

KVOF 

KWAR 

KWAX 

Nov. 3, 1951 

KWGS 


KWLG 

Oct. 29, 1951 

KWSC 

Setp. 22, 195.1 

WABE 

Nov. 16, 1951 

WAF.R 

Oct. U, 1951 

WBAA 

WBEZ 

WBGO 

WBGU 

Sept. 20, 1951 

WBJC 

WBKY 

WBOE 

WCAL 

WDTR 

Oct. 17, 1951 

IIIHIliiilS 

Oct. 28, 1951 


ANY DEVIATIONS DUBBED 


i'12 Omitted 


Yes 


January 2, X9£l 

Programs 1 Hour 

GOmENTS 


Too early for report 
Too early for export 


Too early for report 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


Originating station 


STATION 

BROADCAST DATE 

ANY DEVIATION 

DUBBED COMMENTS 


OF FIRST PROGRAM 



WLSU 

Sept, 20, 1951 



WMJR 

Oct. 3, 1951 



WMUB 

Nov. 13, 1951 



WNAD 



Yes 

WNAS 




WNOV 




wnur 




WOI 

Oct. 20, 1951 



WOSTJ 




WSAJ 




wsou 

Oct. 19, 1951 



WSUI 

Oct. 1, 1951 



WTDS 

WTHS 



Too early for report 

WUQA 

Oct. 19, 1951 



WUOM 



Yes 

WOT 

Nov. 13, 1951 



wusv 

Nov. 13, 1951 



WWHI 





January 2, 19 & 


NASB TAPE NET.vGR‘; 


REPORT OH PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

Pck. #1 Series £L-12 Title INTERNATIONAL VISITOR 
Distributed to 66 stations,, 

Used by £3 stations* 

Percentage of use 80o 

ANY DEVIATIONS DUBBED 


13 


STATION 

BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 

KBPS 


KFKU 


kmjw 


KOAC 

Oct. 31, 19?1 

KSAC 


KSU1 


KUOW 


KUSC 


KVOF 


KWAR 


KWAX 


KWGS 


KWLC 

Nov. 2ii, 1951 

KWSC 

Sept. 17, 1951 

WABE 

Nov. 16, 195& 

WAER 

WBEZ 

WBGO 

WBGU 

Oct. 6, 1961 

WBKY 

WBOE 


WCAL 

WDTR 

Nov. 11, 1951 

WDUQ 

WEPS 

Nov. U, 1951 

WEVC 

WFIU 

WFPL 

WFUV 

WGBH 

WBPS 

WORE 

WHAZ 

WHGU 

WILL 

Oot. 2, 1951 

WKAR 

WLSU 

Sept. 17, 1951 

WMDR 

Oot. 2, 1951 


#9, #12 Omitted 


Programs 1/2 Hour 


COMMENTS 


Too early for report 
TOO early f or report 


Too early for report 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


STATION BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 


ANY DEVIATIONS 


DUBBED 


COMMENTS 


mm 

wnad 

WAS 

WNOV 

WNUR 

WOI 

wosu 

WSAJ 

wsou 

WSUI 

WTDS 

WUOA 


Oct. 8, 1951 


Oct. 15, 1951 


Oct. 18, 1951 
Oot. 2, 1951 


Xos 


Originating station 


Too early for report 


Oot. 18, 1951 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


January 2, 1951 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

Pck. #1 Series 51-13 Tibi© MASTERWGRKS STORY 13 Programs X5~Minutes 


Distributed to 

66 

stations 

^sed by 

53 

stations 

Percentage of use 

80a 



STATION 

BROADCAST DATE 

ANY DEVIATIONS D!JBBED COMMENTS 


OF FIRST PROGRAM 


KBPS 



KCW 

Goto 17, 1951 


KFKU 



KMIW 



KOAC 

Oct. 31, 19Si 


KSLH 



KITOW 



K1TSC 



KVOF 



KWAR 


Too early for report 

kwax 


Too early for report 

KWGS 



KWLC 

Oot. 28, 1951 


WABE 

Mov. 11*, 1951 


WAER 

Oot. 7, 1951 


WBAA 

Sept. 18, 1951 

if 10, 11, 12 Omitted 

WBEZ 


Too early for report 

WBGO 



WBGU 



WBJC 

Oot. 16, 1951 


WBKY 



WBOE 



WDTR 



WDUQ 

Oot. 28, 1951 


WPS 


Too early for report 

WEVC 


Too early for report 

WFlU 



WFPL 



WFUV 



WGBH 



WOK 



WORE 



WHA 

Sept. 16, 1951 


V/HCU 



WLSU 

Sept. 17, 1951 


WMCR 

Oct. 2, 1951 


wmi 

Oot. 5, 1951 


WMUB 

Nov. 16, 1951 





STATION 

BROADCAST DATE 

OF FIRST ’’ROGRAM 

ANY DEVIATIONS 

D T JBBED 

lllllll 

Oct. IS, 1951 


Yes 

WSUI 

WTDS 

Oct. li, 1951 



WUOA 

Oct. 18, 1951 



WTHS 

WUOT 

Hov. ia, 1951 



Wl&V 

WWHI 

Hov. 3, 1951 




WCAL 


COMMENTS 


Too early 


Originating station 


mm TAPE NETWORK 


January 2, TP£2 

REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

Pck* #1 Series 5l~lli Title AMERICA AND THE WORLD 13 Programs 1/2 Hour 

Distributed to 66 stations a 
56 stations 

Used by 

Percentage of use 85a 


STATIONS 

BROADCAST CASE 

ANY DEIVATION 

KBPS 

KCVN 

OF FIRST PROGRAM 

Oct* 19, 1951 


KFKU 

KMUW 

KDAC 

KSAC 

KSLH 

KUOW 

KUSC 

KVOF 

KHAR 



KM AX 

KWGS 

KWSC 

Sept* 18, 1951 

^12 Omitted 

WABE 

Nov* 1U, 1951 


WAER 

Oct* 1, 1951 


WBAA 

Sept* 17, 1951 

#1, 2 Omitted 

WBEZ 

WBGO 

WBOU 

WBJC 

W13KY 

WBOE 

WCAL 

Nov* 16, 1951, 


WDTR 

WDUQ 

Nov. 5, 1951 


WEPS 

WE VC 

WFIU 

WFPL 

WFUV 

WGBH 

WGPS 

WCRE 

WIIA 

Oct 2, 1951 


WHAZ 

WILL 

Nov. 6, 1951 



DUBBED COMMENTS 


Too early for report 
Too early f or report 


Too early for report 


Yes 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 





STATION 

BROADCAST date 


Of FIRST PROGRAM 

WKAR 

Oct. 2U, 1951 

WLSU 

Sept. 21, 1951 

WMCR 

Oct. 2, 1951 

WMUB 

Nov. 17, 1951 

WAD 


WN AS 


WNOV 


HNUR 


WOI 

Oct. 18, 1951 

WOSU 


WSOU 

Oct. 19, 1951 

WSUI 

Oct. U, 1951 

WTDS 


WTHS 


WTIOA 

Oct. 15, 1951 

WIIOT 

Nov. 12, 1951 

WUSV 

Oct. 31, 1951 

WVSH 

Nov. 12, 1951 

WWHI 



ANY DEVIATIONS 


DUBBED COMMENTS 


Yes 


Too early for report 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 
Pck. #2 Series £l~l£ Title BDIGH OF THE BOUNTY 
Distributed to 66 stations 
. Used by £7 stations 

Percentage of use 86 0 


January 2* 

6 Program s 1/2 Hour 


STATIONS 

BROADCAST DATE 

Of FIRST PROGRAM 

ANY DEVIATIONS 

Dubbed 

COMMENTS 

KCVN 

KBPS 

Oot. 19, 1951 




KFKU 

KMUW 





KOAC 

Nov. 2, 1951 




KSLH 





KUOM 

KUOW 

Oct. 18, 1951 



Too early for report 

KUSC 




KUSD 

Oct. 23, 1951 




K?OF 





KWOS 





KWLC 





msc 

Nov. 17, 1951 




WABE 

Oct. 17, 1951 




WAER 

WBAA 

WBEZ 

WBGO 

Oct. 22, 1951 



Too early for report 

WBQU 

wbjc 

Nov. 16, 1951 




WBKY 

Oct. 16, 1951 




WBOE 

WCAL 

WDTR 

Nov. 12, 1951 




WDUQ 

WEPS 

Oct. U, 1951 



Too early for report 

WEVG 

WFIU 




Too early for report 

WFPL 

WFUV 

WGBH 

WGPS 

WORE 

Sspt. 2h, 1951 



Too early for report 

WHAZ 

Sept. 16, 1951 




WILL 

Nov. 5, 1951 







STATION 


BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST BRQGRAM 


ANY DEVIATION 


DUBBED 


COMMENTS 


WKAR 

Oct. 28, 1951 

wr.su 

Sept. 19, 1951 

wmcp. 

wmi 

Bov. 12, 1951 

WMUB 

WNAS 

WNOV 

WNUR 

Oct. 22, 1951 

WOI 

Bov. 29, 1951 

WOSU 

Sept. 30, 1951 

WSAJ 

W50U 

WSUI 

WTDS 

WTBS 

Sept. 25, 1951 

WIIOA 

Oct. 17, 1951 

WUOM 

Nov. 1, 1951 

WUOT 

Sept. 25, 1951 

wusv 

Oct. 10,J951 

WVSH 

WWHI 

Nov. 1, 1951 


NASH TAPE NETWORK 


January 2, 19%2 

REPORT ON PRO CHAM UTILIZATION 

? ck. #2 Series ^1-16 x itle U.S. ARMY BAND CONCERTS 9 Programs 1 Hour 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SYMPHONIC BAND .U PROG, L Hour 

Distributed to 66 stations 

Used by £7 stations. 

Percentage of Use 86 , 


STATION 

BROADCAST DATE 

OF FIRST PRQGRAK 

ANY DEVIATION 

DUBBED 

COMMENTS 

KANW 

KBPS 

KCVN 

KFJM 

KFKU 

KMUW 

KOAC 

KSLH 

Sept. 2k, 1951 

Oct. 19, 1951 




KUOW 

KUSC 




Too early for report 

KUSD 

KVOF 

KWGS 

KVJLC 

KWSC 

WA3E 

WAER 

WBAA 

VJBEZ 

WBGO 

Hov. 13, 1951 

Oct. 15, 1951 

Oct. 26, 1951 


Yes 

Too early for report 

WBGU 

WBJC 

WBKY 

WBOE 

WCAL 

WDTR 

WDUQ 

WEPS 

WEVC 

WFIU 

Not. 12 , 1951 

Oct. 19, 1951 

Oct. h, 1951 


Yes 

Too early for report 

Too early for report 

WFPL 

WFUV 

WGBH 





WGPS 

WGRE 

WHAZ 

WILL 

WKAR 

WLSU 

WMCR 

Sept. 16, 1951 

Oct. 3, 1951 

Oct. 27, 1951 

Nov. 20, 1951 



Too early for report 

Used Hindemith and Mich. 




STATION BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 


ANY DEVIATION 


DUBBED 


COMMENTS 


mm 

WNAD 
WNAS 
WNOV 
WNUR 
WO I 

wosu 

WSAJ 

WSOU 

WSUI 

WTDS 

wths 

VIUOA 

X^UOM 

W'TOT 

W1JSV 

WVSH 


Oct« 6, 19$1 
Sept a 27 
Oct® 20, 1951 


Oct. 19, 19*1 
Oct. 29, 19*1 
Sept 2*, 19*1 
Oct. 10, 19*1 
Oct. 29, 19*1 


Irregularly 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


January 2, 1952 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

Pek. #2 Series 5l-C Title AMERICAN TV SOCIETY SPEAKERS 2 Programs* | hour 

Distributed to 66 stations 
Used by 12 stations 

Percentage 18* 


STATION BROADCAST DATE ANY DEVIATION DUBBED * COMMENTS 

OF FIRST PROGRAM 


KUOM 

KUSD YES 

WABE Oct. 22, 1951 Yes 

WCAL Yes 

WDUQ Oct. h, 1951 

WMuR Nov. 12, 1951 

WMUB Yes 

WOSU Oct. k, 19<1 

WUOA Oct. 18, 1951 


WUOT Sept. 2h, 1951 
¥USV Oct. 13, 1951 
WVSH Oct. 30, 1951 


MASS TAPE NETWORK 


January 2 S 19$Z 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

Pcko #2 Series £l~D Title GROSSING ON THE TROOP SHIP "GENERAL PATCH*" 
L Progss^o 1/2 horn* 

Distributed to 66 stations 


Used by 


XI stationso 


Percentage 17© 


STATION BROADCAST DATS ANY DEVIATIONS DUBBED COMMENTS 

OP FIRST PROGRAM 


KTJSI) 



WARE 

Octo 

IS, 19 SI 

WCAL 

Nov 0 

30, 1951 

WDUQ 

Octo 

U, 1951 

WMCK 

Novo 

12, 1951 

WMUB 



WOI 



WUQA 

Octo 

23, 1951 

W1J0T 

Octo 

8, 1951 

WUS? 

Oct© 

27, 1951 

WVSH 

Octo 

31, 1951 


yes 


Yes 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 



•f 


January 

REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 


SPECIAL MUSIC FOR THE CONNOISSEUR CHRISTMAS PROGRAM 1 




Distributed to 

63 stationso 



Usad by* 

58 stationso 



Percentage of use 

92 © 

STATION 

BATE BROADCAST 

STATION 

DATE BROADCAST 

WAER 


KUSD 


WSOU 


KFJM 


WBOO 


KSAC 


WDUQ 

Dec. 25, 1951 

KFKU 


WSHS 


raw 


WBuR 


KWOS 

Dec* 21, 1951 

WHAZ 

Dec. 10, 1951 

WNAD 


WFU¥ 


KWSG 

EtoCo It, I95X 

wusv 

Dot. 21*, 1951 

KUOW 


WBJC 

Doc. 10, 1951 

KOAC 


WGBH 

Dec. 2l», 1951 

KBPS 


WBAA 

Dec. It, 1951 

KCVN 


WFIU 

Dubbed 

KUSG 


WFPL 


KVOP 


WOSU 


WBEZ 


VTBGU 


WEPS 


vims 


KSLH 


WISH 

Dec. 5, 1951 

WNAS 

DoCo 21, 1951 

WHKC 


UWHI 


WBRY 


WSH 


WOUT 


WILL 

Deco 2$ and Dec, 

wuoa 




WARE 

Dec. 10, 1951 



WOPS 




WDTR 




WKAR 

Dec. 2It, 1951 



WMDR 


• 


WNUR 




WIJOM 

DEc„ 10, 1951 



WORE 




WHA 




KWLC 




WCAL 




ran 

Dec. 19, 1951 



WOI 




KWAR 




MUOM 

Del,, 21, 1951 




!, 1958 

Prog. X Hour* 


2U, 1951 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


January 2, 1952 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 
BBC«S "THE MEANING OF CHRISTMAS" 1 Program 
Distributed to 25 stationso 

Used by 22 stations 0 

Percentage of use 88 <, 


STATION DATE OF BROADCAST 


WNYC 

WDUQ 

WBUR 

WUS? 

WBAA 

WBKI 

WKAR 

WUOM 

WUOA 

WSUI 

WOI 

KUSD 

MX 

KW3C 

KOAC 

KCVN 

WNAD 

KWGS 

me 

KFKU 

WABE 

WILL 


Dec* 2h ff 1951 
Deco 23, 1951 

Deco 2h 9 1951 

D®c 0 20, 1951 
Deco 2k$ 1951 
Deco 2h s 1951 


Deco 21, 1951 


PRELIMINARY REPORT 



TO: Jim Miles 

FROM: Bob Johnston 

SUBJECT: NAEB Tape Network Engineering Group meeting, January 3 and h, 19$2 
DATE: January 11, 1952 


GENERAL: 

The Group meeting was quite successful, in fact, more successful than 
we who organized it had originally expected. Much good was derived from the mere 
exchange of information, and closer cooperation in the future is, I believe, 
guaranteed. It was gratifying to observe the willingness on everyone # s part to 
spend some concerted time and effort in order to insure that the formulation of 
standards for the Network will be the best possible standards which can be de¬ 
vised. Although practically everything that was proposed was agreed upon, many 
more facets began to glow than were originally observed, and for this reason, a 
complete solution is not at hand. For instance, the area of electrical standards 
is very difficult to define practically, therefore there is still work to be done 
on this point. On the other hand, the more simple basic standards were agreed 
upon in fullo Many good recommendations came out of this conference and we can 
begin work to carry these out. I believe everyone left the meetings much wiser 
than he entered them, and for this reason alone, the entire effort can be justified. 

RECOMMENDATIONS: 

Equipment : The equipment owned and the equipment on order for the NAEB 
Tape Network came under discussiono It was generally agreed that the quality of 
Magnecord tape recorders was not high enough to be used universally at the Network 
Headquarters. It was thought that they were of good enough quality to be used 
in stations in the Network for playing back the Network tapes and in the Network 
Headquarters for the more simple tasks. Therefore the continued use of Magnecord 
tape recorders for the duplication of masters and copies for the Network is 
definitely not recommended except where it can be justified as a delaying action 
or as a matter of expediency until some better equipment is available. Along 
this same line of reasoning it was agreed that the use of Magnecorders for the 
master duplicating should be discontinued as soon as possible and better quality 
equipment be acquired. It was felt that this equipment be purchased even before 
the acquisition of some permanent duplicating equipment, for the quality of master 
duplicating would have to be improved sometime and should be made immediately. 

It was agreed that this equipment for master duplicating be the very finest avail¬ 
able at this time fcr the following reasons: 

I. This is the first step in the process of making duplicates 
of a program submitted to the Network. 



2 . 



2. Since it is during this process that the speed is reduced 
from 1$ to ?i, this will be the greatest single loss of 
quality in the entire operation* It is, therefore, reasoned 
that the very finest equipment be obtained to minimize this 
loss as much as possible • 

3* Since the masters sent to the Network are made on many dif¬ 
ferent types of machines, it IS highly desirable to duplicate 
these masters on equipment that can be adjusted easily to 
agree with the equipmef.it making the original* 

Ji. Since the determining quality is established by the primary 
standards, it is essential that Network headquarters have 
equipment capable of performing at this level* This equip¬ 
ment, properly maintained and tested, will in a practical 
sense be the first link in the process of establishing 
standards* 

The Group specifically recommended the Amp ex 300 tape recorder for this 
application* It is recommended that two of these be purchased immediately to re¬ 
place all other equipment which is now used to duplicate master tapes* The ap¬ 
proximate cost of two Ampex 300 tape recorders is $3,600.00 

The purchase of to Hewlett-Packard test equipment was endorsed by 
everyone in the Group. 

Head Alignment s The Group agreed that the problem of head alignment 
was mainly one of fully - informing everyone of the proper technique to use. It was 
suggested that a tape recorded program be circulated around the Network which 
fully explains the correct procedure to follow in aligning the recording heads* 
Several practical tips were offered as means in which this could most effectively 
be carried out* 

Basic Standards: The first seven basic standards were agreed to in 
full. The eighth basic standard, “Electrical Characteristics", is not complete 
at this tin® and much more work has to be done before I would recommend issuing 
it* The basic standards are grouped into two catagorles, primary standard and 
secondary standard* The primary standard are the highest attainable today using 
the finest equipment and a speed of 1$ ips* The secondary standards are accept¬ 
able standards for use in playback. 

• The basic standards which are most conflate at this time are: 

1* Type of tape: 

A« Plastic back—red oxide. 

2. Type of wind: 

A* Tape wound with oxide in—('’A' 1 - wind). 

3o Reel size: 

A. Primary standard—lO^’* (NARXB) 

B. Secondary standard—7” • 




3 . 


1*. Tape length: 

A. Primary standard—2^00 ft. plus $ 0 minus 0 

Bo Secondary standard—=>1200 ft. plus 25> minus 0. 

5. Erasing and recording width: 

A. Entire width of tape (full track) 

6. Tape speed: 

A. Primary standard—1£ inches per second 

B. Secondary standard—inches per second. 

7* Tape alignment: 

A. Recording and reproducing heads shall be aligned 
perpendicular to travel of tape. 

The above standards are basic to the entire industry and should not 
cause any conflict with any kind of equipment generally used in the broadcast stations. 

In the three areas of standardization the proposal was generally agreed 
to. It was believed necessary that the standards for tape duplication be the very 
highest attainable today* The standards in the area of tape acceptance bears 
emphasis for they involve a change from our nornal routine in the past® It is 
recommended that the standards of tape acceptance be the primary standard. This 
means that tapes offered to the Network for acceptance be recorded at l£ inches 
per second and be of very good quality® Either size reel may be accepted however. 

The philosophy followed in making this decision is as follows: It is absolutely 
necessary, if we are to distribute good quality tapes, that the master sent to 
the Network be of the very highest attainable with the equipment the stations 
possess. It is, therefore, believed that requiring the masters to be made at 15 
ips. will go farther in insuring this requirement than will 7j ips. It may appear 
ridiculous on first thought to require l£ ips. masters when we turn right around 
and duplicate them at ips. However, it is believed the requirement of masters 
at l£ ips. will have an uplifting effect on all programs sent to the Network. If 
it does this, then it is entirely justified for it requires little additional cost. 
Furthermore, it is suggested that it bo a requirement that, whenever possible, 
these masters be original recordings on pre-erased tapes. 

It is belie ved that full attainment of these standards will require a 
good distribution program accompanied with complete written instructions® Our 
procedure for adopting officially these standards Is as follows: the immediate 
two weeks are being spent on a little study on the electrical standards® I will 
then send out a revised form of standards to the members of the Group. They will 
then answer with sny other suggestions® Their answer will constitute an official 
recommendation to the NAEB Board of Directors for adoption. We will then send 
copies of these standards to all the chief engineers of stations in the Network. 

It is possible that the electrical standards may take more time than two or three 
weeks. If so, the standards as much as are complete can be circulated® It is 
believed that with continued effort and cooperation the Tape Network can operate 
with standards more complete and workable than any other set of standards existing 
in the country today. 


RHJ :WC 


Robert H. Johnston 
Recording Engineer 


FIRST N1EB TAPE NETWORK ENGINEERING CONFERENCE 



PURPOSE t 

To discuss and formulate the technical standards and procedure for 
the operation of the NAEB Tape Network* 


PUCE* 


10:00 aoino January 3 at Illinois Alumni Association Headquarters, 20th 
Floor of the LaSalle Hotel, Chicago, Illinois 0 

ATTENDANCE: 


Members of the Board: 


John H* Stiehl, ^hief Engineer WKA, Madison, Wisconsin* 

Norris,E„ Grover, Chief Engineer WKA-R, East Lansing, Michigan c 
Andy mres en. Chief Engineer WBEZ, Chicago, Illinoiso 
Ralph Townsley, Chief Engineer YJBAA, Lafayette, Indiana* 

Berton A* Holnberg, Chief Engineer KUOM, Minneapolis, Minnesota* 
Robert H. Johnston, Recording Engineer, NAEB Tape Network* 

Industry Representatives: 




Robert Von Behrens, Minnesota Inning and Manufacturing Conpnny 

- Hines, Magnacord Inco 

L.S. Toogood, L»S« Toogood Recording Company 


NAEB Tape Network Officials: 

Jim Miles, Executive Director 
Richard L® Rider, Manager 




AGENDA: 


Jane 3 in Chicago 


10:00 am 

Meeting opens 

RoH, 

Johnston 

10*15 

Kellogg Foundation Fund 




Explanation 

Jim Miles 

10*30 

Talk on tape, tape recording. 




and tape duplicating 

Robert Von Behrens 

11:30 

Discussion, questions, and 




answers 



12*00 n 

Lunch 



1:00 pm 

Trip to Magnecord Factory- 


Hines 

3*00 

Trip to L.S* Toogood Recording 




Company 

LoS* 

Toogood 

5:00 

Train to Champaign 



Jan<> h in Champaign 



9:00 am 

Meeting opens 

RoH. 

Johnston 

9:15 

Explanation of operation of 




tape network 

R,L. 

Rider 

9:30 

Inspection trip of network 




facilities 



10*30 

Proposal and explanation of 




standards 

Roll* 

Johnston 

12:00 n 

Lunch 



1:30 poino 

Discussion of standards 



h:00 

Ajoura 



5:10 

Train to Chicago 




PROPOSED STANDARDS FOR NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


BASIC STANDARDS: 


lo Type of tape: 

A* Plastic backed 


2® Ttype of wind: 

A® Tape wound with oxide in* 


3o Reel size : 

A* 7 inch reel 0 


Uo Tape length: 

Ao 1200 feet plus £0 minus 0 feet* 


£<> Erasing and recording width: 

A* Entire width of tape (full track) 

8 6 0 Tape speed: 

A« Primary standard—~l£ inches per second 
Bo Secondary standard<=>*«7i inches per second 


7o Tape alignment 

Ao Recording and reproducing heads shall be aligned perpendicular 
to travel of tape* This shall be accomplished by using 
L.S. Toogood Alignment Tape* 


8o Electrical characteristics: 


Frequency Response 

Total Harmonic Distortion 
Total Wosr and Flutter 
Average Speed Variation 
Signal to Noise Ratio 


Primary Standard 

£0-15,000 c/s 
1 dbo 

3 % RMS 

0o2 % 

0o3 % 

60 dbo down 


Secondary Standard 

70-7000 c/& 

3 dbo 

Less than £ % RMS 
Less than 0 o £ % 

Less than 0«£ % 

Less than l*£ dbo down c 



PROPOSED STANDARDS CONTINUED, 


GROUP I TAPS ACCEPTANCE 

It shall be standard that all tape recorded programs accepted by 
the NAEB Tape Network for distribution, conform to the following 
standards® 

lo All of the "Basic Standard" 

2o Tape speed---primary standard—1£ inches per second 
3o Electrical characteristic—-primary standard® 
ho Where at all times it is possible, these recordings be 
original recordings, i^e® not duplicates® 


GROUP II TAPE DUPLICATION 

It shall be standard that, all tape recorded programs to be distributed 
by the NAEB Tape Network, be duplicated according to the following 
standards® 

lo All of the "Basic Standards” 

2® Tape speed-secondary standard—7^ inches per second 
3® Electrical characteristics—secondary standard 


GROUP in TAPE USAGE 

It shall be standard that, all tape recorded programs distributed 
by the NAEB Tape Network, be reproduced (Broadcast) on/with 
equipment which conforms to the following standards® 

I® All of the "Basic Standards” 

2o Tape speed—secondary standard—7f inches per second 
3® Electrical characteristics—secondary standard® 





MSB TAPE NETWORK EQUIPMENT INVENTORY 


3 * Magnecord PT6«A Recording Mechanisms ^ 

1 - Magnecord PT6«P Recording Amplifier (3 channel) ) / 

1 « Magnecord PT6-J Recording Amplifier (1 channel) J 

1 - Magnecord PT6-D3 Duplicating Amplifier 3 

ApproxinAtely 6000 reels Scotch 111~A* 1200 foot recordi ng^tape^ 


ON ORDER 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 


Presto RC/lO«2U Recording Jfechanisn _ 
Presto P01-A1 Recording Arolifier / 

Standard Speech Racks _____ 

Hewlett Packard 206 a Audio Oscillator 
Hewlett Packard 3303 Distortion Meter 


y o o 

) V oo 

?co 


v6 CO- 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS REOORDING SERVICE EQUIPMENT PRESENTLY 
USED FOR NAEB TAPE NETWORK. 

3 - Magnecord PT6-A Recording Mechanisms 

1 - Magnecord PT6~P Recording Amplifier (3 channel) 

1 «* Magnecord PT6«J Recording Amplifier (1 channel) 

1 - Magnecord PT6-R Recording Amplifier (Rack) 

1 » Magnecord PT6«M Recording Mechanism (10” Reel) 

2 - Presto 8N Recording Tables 

1 - Presto 6Iu\ Transcription turntable 

Miscellaneous amplifiers* tools* microphones* studio* remote 
equipment* speech racks* patches* etco 


19 

</4> & 

if©-©--© 






OPERATION "CLARITY 1 


Foreword-- 

Let me admit that Operation "Clarity" grew out of my own confusion 
as to just what NAEB had grown to be. The time spent in Board Meetings 
in briefing, "up dating" and explaining organizational relationships 
leads me to believe that I*m not alone in this state of confusion. The 
Board of Directors, which is presumably "in the know", is confused. 

How much more confusing our present organization must be to the general 
membership! 

Let me admit now that the proposed NAEB "Structure" (Schematic B) 
may actually be closer to the real structure than that shown in Schema¬ 
tic A, as I have based it on the present commitments, committees, and 
the regional structure. Schematic A is merely my idea of the structure 
of the present organization, ahd its apparent disjointodness may be due 
to my own confusion. 

Let me also say that both Schematics probably contain omissions 
and inaccuracies that came from my own bias. 

The proposal is merely a suggestion for your consideration to use 
as a basis of departure. I hold no particular brief for it. 

Whatever you do, however, I would like to emphasize a strong per¬ 
sonal feeling: We desperately need a clear , structually sound organi- 
2atlon tha t every member can understand and that will provide : (1) a 
chain of command ; (2) a. free unmixed flow of in formation to all members ? 
(3) clear policies ; and (4) more democratic procedures to accomplish 
our objectives . 

COMMITMENTS: 

Any structure that we as an organization assume must take into 
consideration our: 

1- Needs of members, 

2- Absent Regional §et»Up* 




























- 2 * 


3- Relationship and cbmmitments to foundations,. 

These can be spelled out in greater detail as follows; 

1~ Membership Needs 

a® Information on NAEB policy and progress* 
b« Program assistance (NETWORK) 

c« Program production (PORT) FOUNDATION OR OTHER PROGRAMS) 
do Up-grading station personnel, 
e. Etc- 

2- Regional Structure of NAEB 

a„ Offers several difficulties, per se 
lo Geographic dispersion 

2 0 Liasion between Director and individual members is weak 
3 0 Communication upward from member to Director Is bad, not to 
mention flow downward which is somewhat compensated for by 
’’Newsletter'' etc® 

b. But there are compensating advantages to regional set-up 

lo With regular yearly Regional Meetings the geographic liabi 
lity can be turned into an asset* 

2* If the Regional Director could be turned into an interprete: 
of NAEB policy to the individual members, the communications 
flow up and down might be materially increased* I frankly 
don ! t know if there is a standard method of doing this-- 
better, that is, than the Newsletter does now* 

3- Foundations 

a® Committee of Five’s contact with Ford Foundation 
b*« Lowell Institute as fiscal agent and repository 
c* Project Director—Harley 
d® Productions as a ’’going concern” 
e® NAEB Board as Kellogg Board 


- 3 - 


f, Kellogg Project Director as Executive Director of NAEB 
go Headquarters and Net as “going concerns" 
h* University of Illinois as fiscal, housing, etc a agent 
i a JCET as a "going concern" 
j« W0I*-TV project as a "going concern" 

Present NAEB "Structure" (See "Schematic A") 

Although "Schematic A" may seem to be unfair, it roughly parallel: 
that of the growth of the organization 0 

There exists, to my way of thinking, two great areas of weakness 
and, eventually, danger: 

1. There are too many policy making groups 0 We have committees 
"to the right of us", committees "to the left of us" et cetera, all 
busy grinding out policies. Some of these decisions are on a high 
policy level and are presented to the NAEB as fait accomple* The Boa 
then wrangles and finally approves for fear of offending someone, or 
undoing some important project already "in progress". In consequence 
the Board fritters its time away in discussing whether to approve or 
disapprove. 

This is not to suggest forbidding policy decisions by other com-* 
mittees or the Executive Director, but policy decisions should be made 
on .ly within the framework of broad or specific policy laid down by the 
NAEB Board. 

At the present rate it might come eventually to the point of "Who ? 
running NAEB?" I submit that the NAEB Board has no more authority to 
abdicate it’s policy-making function than it has to authorize the ex¬ 
penditure of the Federal budget. We are the only control the general 
membership has over the organization other than a yearly vote "in con¬ 
vention assembled". Let’s not forget that this organization is owned 
soul and body by the membership, and it is in their interest that we 


- 4 - 


labori 

NOTES There is no personal .reference in this at all e The dangers are 

due solely to method by which we have grown. It was often neces¬ 
sary for individuals to speak in our name under the pressure of 
time and necessity. Jll credit to them for the resultsi It wil 
be to the benefit of foundations if our organizational structure 
is streamlined to meet the burden their gifts have imposed. 

2 0 The second great area of weakness is in the Regions themselves 
There is a big gap, communication wise, between the Regional Directors 
and the member stations. John Dunn put his finger on this weak spot in 
his recent circular. Regular regional meetings (at least yearly) are 
the partial answer here, I believe, in addition to the particular 
genius of the Director in keeping in touch with the membership. There 
is also an apathy in the membership (they are busy in tljieir own opera¬ 
tions*). Confession being, * tis said, good for the soul, let me per¬ 
sonally admit to object failure to do a job in this regard in Region I. 

OPERATION "CLARITY" (See Schematic B) 

There are three main elements to Operation "Clarity"; 

1- NAEB Board (also read Foundation Board) 

2- Headquarters (add Executive Director) 

3- Regional Meetings 

In more detail; 

A. The Board becomes the high-level policy making organ of the 
National Association of Educational Broadcasters. In reference to the 
Executive Director and Headquarters this should take the form of num¬ 
bered and dated policy directives. These policy directives may be as 
broad or as specific as the situation calls for. In a case where too 
minute a directive would hamper operations a broad directive with cer¬ 
tain definite limits would do. Within the framework of the limits. 


- 5 - 


Exeoutive Director sets the policies he thinks will produce the best re. 
suits. Policies may originate with the Executive Director for approval 
by the Board, but not after a structure of action or procedure has al¬ 
ready been built on the policy—no ex post facto policies. The Execu 
tive Director should be present at the formulation of all policies—he 
will be the nerve center of the organization. 

The policies laid down for the Production Director and Committee 

of Five should be of a broader character perhaps—their judgment would 
be best on this 0 

This is the direction in which we have been moving during the last 

year, but what we need now is recognition of the fact and operating on 
it from now on, 

B. Headquarters (and appendages) becomes the operating arm of the 
NAEB. This whole question needs a "skull busting" session on it alone. 
My thoughts are neasonalbly clear from the Schematic. Prom the policy 
directives of the Board, the Executive Director controls and guides ti: 
policies and operations of the Publications Editor, the Research Dire 
tor, Network Manager and sets up the facilities of meeting, seminars, 
etc. It is also his function to keep the Board members and officers 
informed in writing of the progress of the above operations and that c ,: 
Foundations projects* 

There should be certain committees working with and for the Execu¬ 
tive Director (Program Acceptance, Headquarters Policy Planning Group 
(See Miles proposal P.4, etc*), but such committees shall be kept to 
the necessary minimum and shall go out of existance upon completion of 
work. The policies of such committees, where policies are formulated 
and where such policies lie outside the limits of existing Board polic; 
directives, shall be submitted to the Board for discussion and approval 
Any suc)a committees shall be set up only under a directive of the Board 



■ 6 - 


Membership on such committees shall not include Board members except 
where the qualifications of the Board member warrant his membership„ 
The President of NAEB shall be an ex officio member of all committees. 
The Executive Director shall be an ex-officio member of all such Head¬ 
quarters committees c, 

The Secretary and Treasurer shall be considered as Headquarters 
officers for operational purposes. 

C* The Regions shall hold yearly meetings and funds shall be made 
available to support such meetings. Why not hold the regional meeting 
each year before the NAEB Convention? It could be spotted geographi¬ 
cally between the majority location of the regional stations and the 
location of the convention. The Director could thus use the Regional 
Meeting to get the "grass roots" feeling and opinion of the membership, 
The Board meeting that follows will then reflect the feeling and wishc 
of the whole membership. In connection with this, would it not be 
possible for the Executive Director (upon order from the President) to 
furnish Regional Directors with an agenda early enough before each 
Board meeting to allow the Directors to contact the membership on vita, 
questions to be discussed? This would allow the membership a direct 
and continuing expression of opinion on policy matters, 

CONCLUSION: 

That’s the blueprint, born out of general concern for the welfare 
of the NAEB. Many people have contributed to my thinking, but should 
not bear any responsibility for its inadequacies. Sy Siegel*s driving 
power has set us far along the road that Dick Hull, George Probst, Par¬ 
ser Wheatley, Allen Miller, and many others have dreamed and nurtured. 
There’s a lot of Graydon’s concern here and much of Jim Miles’ keen 
analysis. Discussions with many of the members have contributed much. 
John Dunn lit the match that fired the whole thing. The blame is mine 


- 7 - 


for fuzzy thinking and long windedness; any good that may come from 
this can be credited to all those who have wished NAEB well and worked 
for it 0 

One last clinche: M It*s later than you think®“ 

Yours for NAEB 


Alvin M* Gaines 
Director Region II 


NAEB TAPE NE2W0RK 


January 2, 19 

MEMORANDUM t 

TO 5 BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF NAEB AND MEMBERS OF THE NETWORK 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE® 

FROM s DICK RIDER 

Tha attached is a Preliminary Report on the use of network 
Packages #1 and #2 by nsaa&er stationso 

Under the present system of reporting on useage, the stations fill 
in a preliminary report as accurately as possible at the time the pro® 
grains are offered® After the third week*a progress are broadcast a more 
detailed and accurate report is submitted® At the conclusion of a 
package a final report is mads® These report® are filed at headquarter® 
and a permanent record is mad© after the final reports are received® 
While Package #3 and #Ij. are well started mny stations are just 
getting started with Package #1 and #2® This results in an inccisplat© 
report at the tine® Also, some stations omit part of the information 
called for, or are late in returning the reports® These we ©orrect by 
writing and asking for the specific information® 

The present report represents the most cor^pleta information we 
have at this tinrn 0 

Richard L® Rider 
Manager, Tap© Network 



NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 
Pcko Series 51-7 Title MU :SIC FOR THE 


Distributed to 66 stations a 
Used by 61* stations 

Percentage of Use 97* 


STATION 

KBPS 

BROADCAST DATE 

OF FIRST PROGRAM 

ANY DEVIATIONS 

KCVN 

KFJM 

KFKU 

Oct. 18, 1951 


KMJW 



KOAC 

K5AC 

KSLH 

Hov. 3, 1951 


KUOM 

KUQW 

KUSC 

Dec. Hi, 1951 


KUSD" 

KVOF 

KWAR 

Oct. 13, 1951 


KWAX 



KWGS 



KWLC 

Oct. 21, 1951 


. KWSC 

Setp 18, 1951 

& 12 omitted 

WABE 

Nov. 20, 1951 


WAER 

Oct. 3, 1951 


WBAA 

WBEZ 

WBOO 

WBGU 

> Sept. 18, 1951 


WBJC 

WBKY 

WBOE 

Oct. 15, 1951 


WBUR 

Oct. li, 1951 


WCAL 

WDTR 

Nov. 17, 1951 


WDfJQ 

WEPS 

WEVC 

WFIU 

WFPL 

WGBH 

WGPS 

WGRE 

Oct. 31, 1951 


WHA 

WHAZ 

Sept. 18, 1951 


WILL 

Oct. 1, 1951 



DUBBED 


les 


Yes 


January 2, 1952 


CONNOISSEUR 13 Programs 
1 hour 


COMMENTS 


Too early for report 


Skipped first 2 progv 


Too early iter report 
Too early for report 


Too early for report 


Skipped first 2 prog* 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 



STATION 

BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 

WKAR 

oot. n, 1951 

WLSU 

Sept. 19, 1951 

WfCR 

Oct. 2, 195. 

WJWI 

WNAD 

WNAS 

mov 

mm 

WYC 

Oct. li, 1951 

WOI 

wosu 

W5AJ 

Oct. 1?, 195 

WSOU 

oct. lit, 1951 

WSUI 

WTDS 

WTHS 

Oct. 5, 195. 

WUOA 

Cct. 1I», 1951 

WUOM 

Cct. 29, 1951 

wuar 

Nov. 16, 1951 

wusv 

WWHI 

Oct 29, 1951 


ANY DEVIATION DUBBED COMMENTS 


Yes 


Too early for report 




* 


HAEB TAPS NETWORK 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 
Pcko #1 Series £1-8 Title BBC WORLD THEATRE 

Distributed to 66 stations® 

Used by 62 stations© 

Percentage of use 9h 


STATION 

KBPS 

BROADCAST DATE 

OF FIRST PROGRAM 

ANY DEVIATIONS 

KC7N 

KFJM 

KFKU 

kmjw 

Oct. l)i, 1951 


KOAC 

KSLH 

Nov. 2, 1951 


KUOM 

KNOW 

KUSC 

KVOF 

KWAR 

KWAX 

KWGS 

Nov. 28, 1951 


KWSC 

Sopt. 19, 1951 

#12 Omitted 

WABE 

Nov. 15, 1951 


mm 

Sopt. 30, 1951 


WBAA 

WBEZ 

WBGC 

WI3GU 

Sapt. 19, 1951 

#6 Omitted 

WBJC 

WBOtE 

Oct. 19, 1951 


WBUR 

Oct. 7, 1951 


WCAL 

WDTR 

Nov. 17, 1951 


WDUQ 

WEPS 

WEVC 

WFIU 

WFPL 

WFUV 

WGBH 

WGPS 

WGRE 

WHA 

WHAZ 

WHCU 

Oct. 28, 1951 


WILL 

Oct. 7, 1951 


WKAR • 

Oct. 20, 1951 


WLSU 

Sopt. 17, 1951 



DUBBED 




Yes 


January 2, 19£2 


13 Programs 1 Hour 


COMMENTS 


Too early for report 


Too ©arly for report 
Too ©arly for report 


Too early for report 


Skipped filirst 2 programs 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


STATION BROADCAST DATE ANY DEVI ATIONS 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 

WiCR Oct. 3» 190 

mm Oct. 9, 19Q. 

mm nov. i?, 190 

WNAD 

WNAS 

WNOV 

WNUR 

WOI Octo 20, 190 

wosu 

WSAJ 

WSOU Oct. 20, 190 

WSUI Oct. 2, 190 

WTDS 
WTHS 

WUOA Oct. 1 ) 4 , 1951 

WUOM Nov. 2, 190 

WUOT. Nov. 15, 190 

WTJSV Nov. 1, 190 

WVSH Nov. Hi, 190 

WWHI 


DUBBED COMMENTS 


Yes 


Too early for report 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


J anuary 2, 19$2 

REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

Poke. #1 Series $1-9 Title THE PEOPLE ACT 13 Programs 1/2 Hour 
Distributed to 66 stations. 

Used by 62 stations. 

Percentage of use 9U. 


STATION 

KBPS 

BROADCAST BATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 

KCVN 

KFKU 

KlfJW 

Oct. 16, 1951 

KOAC 

KSAC 

KSLH 

Oct. 31, 1951 

iiiiili 

Nov. 29, 1951 

KSLC 

Nov. 3, 1951 

KWSC 

Sept 19, 1951 

WABE 

Nov. 12, 1951 

WAER 

Oct. 7, 1951 

WBAA 

WBEZ 

WBGO 

WBGU 

Sept 18, 1951 

WI3JC 

WBKY 

WBOE 

Oct. 16, 1951 

WBUR 

Oct. 3, 1951 

WCAL 

WDTR 

Nov. 15, 1951 

WDIJQ 

WEPS 

WEVC 

WFIU 

WFPL 

WFUV 

WGBH 

WGPS 

Oct. 31, 1951 

WGRE 


WHA 

WHAZ 

WHCU 

Sept. 29, 1951 

WILL 

Oct. li, 1951 


ANY DEVIATIONS DUBBED 


#12 Omitted 

#10, 11, 12 omitted 


COMMENTS 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


Too early for report 


skipped first 2 pro grains 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


STATION 

BROADCAST DATE 

OF FIRST PROGRAM 

WKAR 

Oot. 21*, 1951 

WLSTJ 

S«pt. 20, 1951 

WMCR 

Oct. 1*, 1951 

WMMI 

Oct. 8, 1951 

WMIJB 

WNAS 

WNOV 

WNUR 

WNIC 

Decenfcer 17, 1951 

WOI 

wosu 

Oct. 16, 1951 

wsou 

Oct 15, 1951 

WSUI 

WTDS 

WTKS 

Oct. U» 1951 

WUOA 

Bet. 19, 1951 

WUQM 

Nov. 2, 1951 

WUOT 

Nov. 15, 1951 

WUSV 

Oct. 29, 1951 

WVSH 

WWHI 

Nov. 12, 1951 


ANY DEVIATIONS 


DUBBED COMMENTS 


Too early for report 


NAER TAPE NETWORK 


January 2, 1952 


REPORT OK PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

Pcko #1 Series 51-10 Title STORIES N STUFF 13 Programs 1/2 Hour 
Distributed to 66 stations© 

Used by 59 stations. 

Percentage of use 89o 


STATION 

KBPS 

BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 

KGVN 

KFKU 

KHtJVT 

Oct. 18, 1951 

KOAC 

KSAC 

KSLH 

KUOW 

ElISC 

KVOF 

KWAR 

KWAX 

KWGS 

Nov 3, 1951 

KWLC 

Nov. 3, 1951 

KWSC 

Sept. 22, 1951 

WABE 

Nov. 16, 1951 

WAER 

Oct. 6, 1951 

WBAA 

W13EZ 

WBGO 

WBGU 

Sept. 22, 1951 

WBJC 

WBKY 

WBOE 

Oct. 18, 1951 

WBUR 

WCAL 

WDTR 

Oct. 6, 1961 

WDUQ 

WEPS 

WEVC 

WFXU 

WFPL 

WFUV 

WGBK 

WGPS 

WGRE 

Nov. 2, 1951 

WHA 

WHAZ 

WHCU 

Sept. 5* 1951 


ANY DEVIATIONS 


DUBBED COMMENTS 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


Too early for report 


Yes 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


ANY DEVIATIONS 


DUBBED 


COMMENTS 


STATION 

BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 

WILL 

WKAR 

Oct. 20, 1951 

WLSU 

Sept. 17, 1951 

mm 

Oot. 2, 1951 

WMMI 

WNAD 

WAS 

WNOV 

WNUR 

WNYC 

wosu 

Oot. 3, 1951 

wsou 

Oot. 15, 1951 

WSUI 

WTDS 

wths 

Oot. 6, 1951 

WUOA 

Oct 19, 1951 

WUOM 

Nov. 2, 1951 

WUOT 

Nov. 12, 1951 

WVSH 

WWHI 

Nov. 16, 1951 


Yes 


Originating station;' 


Too early £ or r eport 


NAEB TAPS NETWORK 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 
Pck« #1 Series £U11 FESTIVAL CGPOSRTS 13 

Distributed to 66 stations« 

Used by £7 stations« 

Percentage of use 86, 


STATIONS 

KBPS 

BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 

KCVN 

KFKU 

mm 

Oct. 1?, 1951 

KOAC 

KSLH 

KITOV/ 

KUSC 

KVOF 

KWAR 

KWAX 

KWGS 

Bov. 3, 1951 

KWLC 

Oct. 29, 1951 

KWSC 

Setp. 22, 1951 

WABE 

Nov. 16, 1951 

WAER 

Oct. h, 1951 

WBAA 

WBEZ 

WBGO 

WBGU 

Sept. 20, 1951 

WBJC 

WBKT 

WBOE 

WCAL 

WDTR 

.Oct. 17, 1951 

WDUQ 

WEPS 

WEVC 

win 

WFPL 

WFUV 

WGBH 

WGPS 

WORE 

WHAZ 

WliGU 

WILL 

Oct. 28, 1951 


ANT DEVIATIONS DUBBED 


/ L2 Omitted 


Yes 


January 2 fi 19 £L 


Programs 1 Hour 


COMIERTS 


Too early for report 
Too early £ or report 


Too early for report 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


Originating station 


STATION BROADCAST DATE ANY DEVIATION DUBBED COMMENTS 

OF FIRST PROGRAM 

WLSU Septo 20, 1951 

WMCR Oct. 3, 19*>1 

WMUB Nov. 13, 1951 

WAD leg 

WNAS 

WNOV 

VNUR 

WOI Oct. 20, 1951 

WOSU 

WSAJ 

WSOU Oct. 19, 1951 

WSUI Oct. 1, 19ft 

WTDS Too early for report 

WTHS 

WUOA Oct. 19, 1951 

WUQM yes 

WOT Nov. 13, 1951 

WIJSV Nov. 13, 1951 

vjwhi 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


January 2* 19$2 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

Pck. #1 Series 51-12 Title INTERNATIONAL VISITOR 13 'Program 1/2 Hour 


Distributed to 66 stations* 


Used by 


53 stationso 


Percentage of use 80 0 


STATION 

KBPS 

KFKU 

KMJW 

BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 

KOAC 

KSAC 

KSUI 

KUOW 

kusc 

KVOF 

KWAR 

KWAX 

KWGS 

Oct* 31, 1951 

KWLG 

Nov. 2h, 1951 

KWSC 

Sept* 17, 1951 

WABE 

Nov. 16, 195a 

WAER 

WBE7. 

WBGO 

WBGU 

WBKY 

WBOE 

Oct. 6, 1961 

WCAL 

WDTR 

Nov. 11, 1951 

WDUQ 

WEPS 

WEVG 

WFIU 

WFPL 

WFUV 

Nov. li s 1951 

WGBH 


WBPS 


WGRE 

WHAZ 

WHCU 


WILL 

WKAR 

Oct. 2, 1951 

WLSU 

Sept. 17, 1951 

WM3R 

Oct. 2, 1951 


ANY DEVIATIONS 


#9, #12 Omitted 


DUBBED COMMENTS 


Too early for report 
TOO early f or report 


Too early for report 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


STATION 


BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 


ANY DEVIATIONS 


DTJBBED 


COMMENTS 


WMMI 

Oct. 8, 1951 


wnad 


Yes 

WNAS 



WNOV 



WNUR 



WOI 

Oct. 15, 1951 


WOSTJ 


Originating station 

WSAJ 



wsou 

Oct. 10, 1951 


WSUI 

Oct. 2, 1951 


WTDS 


Too early Tor report 

WUOA 

Oct. 18, 1951 


WUSV 

Nov. 3, 1951 


WWHI 




NASH TAPE NETWORK 


January 2 S 1951 




REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 


Pck. #1 


Series 51-13 Title MASTEEWORKS STORY 13 Programs l5«Minutes 

Distributed to 66 stations» 
u sed by 53 stations® 

Percentage of use 80 o 


STATION 

BROADCAST DATS 

ANY DEVIATIONS DUBBED COMMENTS 


OF FIRST PROGRAM 


KBPS 



KCVN 

Oct. 17, 1951 


KFKU 



KMUW 



KOAC 

Oct. 31, 1951 


KSLH 



KUOW 



KUSC 



K70F 



KWAR 


Too early for report 

KWAX 


Too early for report 

KWGS 



KWLC 

Oct. 28, 1951 


WABE 

Nov. lit, 1951 


WAER 

Oct. 7, 1951 


WBAA 

Sept. 18, 1951 

#10, 11, 12 Omitted 

WBEZ 


Too early for report 

WBGO 



WBGU 



WBJC 

Oct. 16, 1951 


WBKY 



WBOE 


■ 

WDTR 



WDUQ 

Oct. 28, 1951 


HEPS 


Too early for report 

WEVC 


Too early for report 

WFIU 



WFPL 



WFUV 



WGBH 



WOPS 



WORE 



WHA 

Sept. 16, 1951 


WHCU 



WLSIJ 

Sept. 17, 1951 


WMCR 

Oct. 2, 1951 


WMMI 

Oct. 5, 1951 


WMUB 

Nov. 16, 1951 



STATION 


BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 


ANY DEVIATIONS 


D r !BBED 


COMMENTS 


WNAD 

WNAS" 

WNOV 

VJNUR 

¥OSU 

WSAJ 

W50TJ 

waii 

WTDS 

WUOA 

WTHS 

WUOT 

WU&V 

WWHI 

1CAL 


Oct. IS, 19^1 
Oct. h, 19£l 

Oct. 18, 19^1 


Nov. Ik, 19ft 
Nov. 3, 19ft 


Yes 


Too early 


Originating station 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


January 2, 1952 

REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

Pck* fil Series 51-1I* Title AMERICA AND THE WORLD 13 Programs 1/2 Hour 

Distributed to 66 stations© 

56 stations 

Used by 

Percentage of use 85 o 


STATIONS 

KBPS 

BROADCAST DATE 

OF FIRST PROGRAM 

ANY DEIVATION 

KCVN 

KFKU 

Oct. 19, 1951 


KMJW 

KDAC 

KSAC 

KSLH 

KUOW 

KUSC 

KVOF 

KWAR 

KWAX 

KWGS 



KWSC 

Sept. 18, 1951 

#12 Omitted 

VfABE 

Nov. 11*, 1951 


WAER 

Oct. 1, 1951 


WBAA 

WBEZ 

WBGO 

WBGU 

WBJC 

WBKY 

WBOE 

Sept. 17, 1951 

//l, 2 Omitted 

WCAL 

WDTR 

Nov. 16, 1951 


WDUQ 

WEPS 

WEVC 

WFIU 

WFPL 

WFUV 

WGBH 

WGPS 

WGRE 

Nov. 5, 1951 


WIIA 

mm 

Oct 2, 1951 


WILL 

Nov. 6, 1951 



DUBBED COMMENTS 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


Too early for report 


Yes 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


STATION 

BROADCAST DATE 
Of FIRST PROGRAM 

WKAR 

Oct. 21*, 1951 

WLSU 

Sept. 21, 1951 

WMCR 

Oct. 2, 1951 

WMJB 

WNAD 

WNAS 

WN07 

HNUR 

Nov. 17, 1951 

WOI 

WOSU 

Oct. 18, 1951 

WSOU 

Oct. 19, 1951 

WSUI 

WTDS 

WTHS 

Oct. !*, 1951 

WUOA 

Oct. 15, 1951 

WUOT 

Nov. 12, 1951 

WUSV 

Oct. 31, 1951 

WVSH 

WWHI 

Nov. 12, 1951 


MY DEVIATIONS 


DUBBED COMMENTS 


Yes 


Too early for report 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 
Pck. #2 Series £L-l5 Title BDIGH OP HIE BOUNTY 
Distributed to 66 stations 

Used by 57 stations 

Percentage of use 86® 


January 2 S 19$2 

8 Program a 1/2 Hour 


STATIONS 

BROADCAST DATE 
Of FIRST PROGRAM 

KCVN 

KBPS 

KFKU 

KMUW 

Oct. 19, 1951 

KOAC 

K5LH 

Nov. 2, 1951 

KUOM 

KUOW 

KUSC 

Oct. 18, 1951 

KUSD 

KYOF 

KWGS 

KWLC 

Oct. 23, 1951 

WSC 

Nov. 17, 1951 

WABE 

Oct. 17, 1951 

WAER 

WBAA 

WBEZ 

WBQO 

WBGU 

Oct. 22, 1951 

WBJC 

Nov. 16, 1951 

WBKY 

WBOE 

Oct. 16, 1951 

WCAL 

WDTR 

Nov. 12, 1951 

WDUQ 

WE PS 

WEVC 

WFIU 

WFPL 

WFUV 

WGBH 

WGPS 

Oct. It, 1951 

WORE 

Sent. 2 ) 4 , 1951 

WHAZ 

Sept. 16, 1951 

WILL 

Nov. 5, 1951 


ANY DEVIATIONS 


Dubbed COMMENTS 


Too early for report 


Too early for report 


Too early for report 
Too early for report 


Too early for report 


STATION BROADCAST DATE ANT DEVIATION 
OF FIRST 8RQQRAM 


DUBBED 


WKAR Oct. 28, 1951 

WLSU Sept. 19, 1951 

WMCR Nov. 12, 1951 

WfMI 

WMUB Oct. 22, 1951 

WNAS 

wnov 

WNUR 

WOI Nov. 29, 1951 

WOSU Sept. 30, 1951 

WSAJ Sept. 25, 1951 

W50U 

WSUI 

WTDS 

WTHS 

WUOA Oct. 17, 1951 

WUOM Nov. 1, 1951 

WUOT Sept. 25, 1951 

WUSV Oct. 10,1951 

WVSH Nov. 1, 1951 

WWHI 


COMMENTS 




NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


January 2, 19f?2 

REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

Pck. 02 Series 51-16 A ‘itle U*S. ARMY BAND CONCERTS 9 Programs 1 Hour 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SYMPHONIC BAND k PROGo L Hour 

Distributed to 66 stations 

> 

Used by 57 stations* 

Percentage of Use 86 0 


STATION 

BROADCAST DATE 

OF FIRST PROGRAM 

ANY DEVIATION 

DUBBED 

COMMENTS 

KANW 

Sept. 2h, 1951 




KBPS 





KCVN 

Oct. 19, 1951 




KFJM 





KFKU 





KMUW 





KOAC 





KSLH 





KUQW 




Too early for report 

KUSC 





KUSD 

KVOF 



Yes 


KWGS 





KWLC 





KWSC 

Nov. 13, 1951 




WABE 

Oct. 15, 1951 




WAER 

WBAA 

WBEZ 

WBGO 

WJ3GU 

Oct. 26, 1951 



Too early for report 

WBJC 

Not. 12, 1951 




V/BKY 

WBOE 

Oct. 19, 1951 




WCAL 

WDTR 

VJDUQ 

WEPS 

Oct. i», 1951 


Yes 

Too early for report 

WEVC 

WFIU 

WFPL 

WIN 

WGBH 




Too early for report 

WGPS 




Too early for report 

WGRE 




Used Hindemith and Mich* 

WHAZ 

Sept. 16, 1951 




WILL 

Oct. 3, 1951 




WKAR 

Oct. 27, 1951 




WLSU 





WMCR 

Nov. 20, 1951 





STATION BROADCAST DATS 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 


ANY DEVIATION 


DUBBED 


COMMENTS 


WMMI 

WNAD 

WNAS 

WNOV 

mm 

WQI 

wosu 


Oct* 6, 19^1 


WSAJ 

Sept, 

. 27 


WSOU 

Oct. 

20, 

19?1 

WSUI 




WTDS 




WTHS 




WUOA 

Oct. 

19, 

19? 1 

WUOM 

Oct. 

29, 

19?1 

WITOT 

Sept 

25, 

19?1 

WTJSV 

Oct. 

10, 

19?1 

WVSH 

Oct. 

29, 

1951 


Irregularly 


MEB TAPE NETWORK 


January 2 S 1952 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 


Pck„ 

#2 Series 51-G 

Title AMERICAN TV SOCIETY SPEAKERS 

£ Programs* ^ hour 



Distributed to 66 stations 




Used by 12 stations 

Percentage 18* 


STATION 

BROADCAST DATE 
OF FIRST PROGRAM 

ANY DEVIATION DUBBED 

COMMENTS 


KUOM 



KUSD 


YES 

¥ABE 

Oct. 22, 1951 

Yes 

WCAL 


Yes 

WDUQ 

Oct. U, 1951 


WICR 

Not. 12, 1951 


¥MUB 


Yes 

WOSU 

Oct. U, 1951 


WUOA 

Oct. 18, 1951 


WUOT 

Sept. 2h, 1951 


WUSV 

Oct. 13, 1951 


¥VSH 

Oct. 30, 1951 



fiAEB TAPS NETWORK 


January 2* 1992. 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

Pck* #2 Series 91«D Title CROSSING ON THE TROOP SHIP "GENERAL PATCH." 
L Progwun. 1/2 hour 

Distributed to 66 stations 

Used by 11 stationso 

Percentage 17o 

STATION BROADCAST DATE ANY DEVIATIONS DUBBED COMMENTS 

OF FIRST PROGRAM 

KTJSD yes 

WARE Oct© 1% 1951 

WCAL Nov© 30* X99X 

WDUQ Oct© h, 1991 

WMCR Nov© X2 S 1991 

WMUB Y^is 

WOI 

WUOA Oct© 23* 1991 

WUOT Oct© 8* 1991 

WUS? Octo 27* 1991, 

WVSH Oct© 31# 1991 



NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


January 2* 195$ 

REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 

SPECIAL MUSIC FOR THE CONNOISSEUR CHRISTMAS PROGRAM 1 Prog* 1 Hour* 
Distributed to 63 stations 0 

Used by $8 stations 0 

Percentage of us© 92 « 


STATION 

DAK BROADCAST 

STATION 

WAER 


KU5D 

W30U 


KFJM 

WBQO 

Dec. 25, 1951 

KSAC 

WDUQ 

KFKU 

WSHS 


mm 

WBUR 

Dec. 10, 1951 

mas 

WHAZ 

WNAB 

WF0¥ 


KWSC 

WUSV 

Dsr. 2U, 1951 

mm 

WBJC 

Dec. 10, 1951 

XCAC 

WQBH 

Dec. 2Ji» 1951 

KBPS 

WBAA 

Dec. 1*, 1951 

KGVN 

WIU 

Dubbed 

KUSC 

WFPL 


moF 

W0ST3 


WBEZ 

WBGU 


WEPS 

WTDS 


KSLH 

msu 

Dec. 5, 1951 

MAS 

WMMI 


WWHI 

WBKI 


WVSH 

WOUT 


WILL 

WUOA 

WABE 

Dec. 10, 1951 


WOPS 

WDTR 



WKAR 

Dec. 2li, 1951 


WMCR 

MUR 

WHOM 

DEc. 10, 1951 


WOKE 

WBA 

XWLC 

WCAL 

WSUI 

Dec. 19, 1951 


WOI 

KWAR 

KUOM 

Dei. 21, 1951 



DATS BROADCAST 


Dae* 21* i?51 
Deco k» X9£X 


Deco 21# 19£L 

J3@Oa 2$ md Bee* 2h» 195'1 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


Jannaiy 2, 1952 


REPORT ON PROGRAM UTILIZATION 
BBC'S "THE MEANING OF CHRISTMAS" 1 Program 
Distributed to 25 stationso 

Used by 22 stations«? 

Percentage of use 86o 


STATION DATE OF BROADCAST 


WNYC 

WDUQ 

WBUR 

¥US? 

WBAA 

WBKX 

WKAR 

WUOM 

WUOA 

WSUI 

WOI 

KUSD 

KWEX 

KWSC 

KOAC 

KCVN 

WNAD 

EWGS 

©AC 

KFKU 

WABE 

WILL 


Decc 2h 9 1951 
Deco 23* 1951 

Deco 2U 5 .195l 

Deco 20* 1951 
Deco 2k 9 1951 
Dec* 2k» 1951 


Deco 21* 1951 


NAEB Tape Network 


January l£, 1952 


Summary of Poll of Stations on Distribution Methods 


A rough poll was taken to determine the sentiment of stations on 
the previous individual program distribution and the present package 
method. The following summary includes all questionnaires returned to 


date. 

Number of stations returning questionnaire---——** 38 

Those favoring old method-—---*-— 2 

Those favoring Package method-—-—-——-———-31* 

Neutral---———--—-—— 2 


As indicated in the note from Audrey June Booth at KUOM, there are 
drawbacks to the package system. This can not be dm led. However, it 
is to be noted that some of the difficulties she mentions would be worse 
under the old method. Actually the one she reco?m»nds is impossible at 
this time; although it is the method planned for the future. 

It was also interesting to find a nunfoer of stations that feel 
the package system should be retained permanently for programs which are 
not limited in time of use. This should be supplemented by direct two- 
way, headquarters-station distribution for timely shows. 

Jim Miles has the copies of the returned questionnaires. 

It is hoped this explains, at least in part, why the package sys¬ 
tem is being used! 


Richard L. Rider 
Manager, Tape Network 






MSB TAPS NETWORK 




February 20, 1952 


ME&)RANDUM 


TO: ALL NETWORK STATIONS 

FROM: DICK RIDER 

RE:::::::: USE OF TAPE NETWORK PROGRAMS 


Tills memorandum is intended to clarify present practices in the use of pro-* 
grans received through the NAEB Tape Network*, These practices apply generally to all 
network programs* EXCEPT FOR CERTAIN SPECIFIED SERIES. One such exception is the mater¬ 
ial supplied by the BBC., All stations should have received a copy of the BBC restric¬ 
tions as published by them. If not* please let us 'mow and we will supply one. Another 
exception is THE NEW WORLD OF ATOMIC ENERGY which was given limited clearance by AFRA. 

In the future the attached form will be used to obtain pertinent information 
from the originating source,, This information will accompany program offerings. 

It is essential that all stations rigidly adhere to all restrictions imposed 
on the use of pro grains supplied to us* In case of doubt please check with headquarters 
before subjecting NAEB tapes to unusual uses. 


1. Dubbing programs for delayed use* or far re-use. Except where specific¬ 
ally prohibited the dubbing of tapes for delayed use or for later re-use is permitted* 

2o Dubbing programs for non-broadcast use. Except where specifically pro¬ 
hibited the dubbing of tapes for classroom* library* or other legitimate educational 
non-broadcast use is permitted * 

3o Network programs will not be supplied for use by stations not partici¬ 
pating members of the network,. There are certain exceptions to this* but the right of 
exception rests 'with the Board of Directors of NAEB and not with the individual station. 

bo Under no circumstances may a member station provide network programs 
for coimrercial stations. This area provides our greatest risk* Special care is re¬ 
quested to insure that this policy is followed» 

5. Network programs may not be used over wired wireless* gas-pipe, or 
other non-licensed campus stations. 


These areas seem to have j>°sed the majority of problems* lour complete co¬ 
operation is requested. 


DR:¥G 

Enc. 


Dick Rider 




NAEB TAPE NETWORK 
119 Gregory Hall- 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 


MEMORANDUM 

TO: ORGANIZATIONS SUPPLYING PROGRAMS FOR USE BY STATIONS OF THE MSB TAPE 

NETWORK 


The purpose of this memorandum is to inform you about the basic distribu¬ 
tion practices of the NAEB Tape Network, and to obtain from you instructions regarding 
any restrictions you desire to impose on the use of your programs® We would appreciate 
it if you would answer the . questions on one copy of this form and return it to us so 
we my inform our stations of your desires* 


STANDARD PRACTICES 


1 Programs are distributed only to non-commercial educational stations 
which are participating membei’s of Hie NAEB Tape Network* 

2o Under no circumstances will network programs be supplied for use by 
commercial stations* 

3o Programs are available to licensed broadcast stations only, and are not 
available to so-called, "wired wireless'’, ’'gas-pipe”, or other non-licensed campus sta¬ 
tions o 

lie The National Association of Educational Broadcasters will exercise every 
possible precaution to insu that programs are used in accordance with any restrictions 
imposed by the originating source* 


QUESTIONS 

While the NAEB Tape Network distributes programs primarily for broadcast 
purposes, certain copying and non-broadcast uses are desirable in many cases,, Please 
indicate your reactions to this kind of use by answering the following questions® 

lo Will you permit NAEB stations to dub copies of your programs for de¬ 
layed use, and/or for re-use at a later date? 

2o Will you permit NAEB stations to dub copies of your programs for non¬ 
broadcast use? (This Includes classroom us© in schools, library files, use by repu¬ 
table agencies conducting educational programs, and similar uses*) 




3° please describe below any other restrictions or conditions which you 
desire the NA.EB Tape Network to enforce in connection with the use of your programs» 


February 13* 19>2 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK • 


MEMORANDUM! 
TO j 

RE i 

FROM ) 


% ALL NETWORK STATIONS* 

i new program offerings. 

t Dick Rider 


The offering of the next group of programs* scheduled to begin 
on the first stations the week of March 16th requires some addition^ 
al explanation© 

First of all* you will note that the enclosed material indicates 
the programs to be included together with a brief description® How¬ 
ever, detailed descriptions and program lists are not included® 

The make up of these packages has been somewhat slowed while wait« 
ing for a meeting of the new program committee© That committee 
has now met® Thus, the program announcement is being made, and 
program lists and detailed descriptions will follow as soon as 
possibleo 

For Packages //£ and #6, schedules will follow those in 
effect for Packages #3 and tfk<j to enable stations to maintain 
continuity of programs 0 


IN^CHOOL PROGRAMS 


We are pleased to announce that In«School programs are now 
a part of the NAEB Tape Network service© Information on three 
of the in-school series is enclosed© The fourth program will be 
selected very soon, and detailed information sent out as soon as 
possible © 

Full information on in«school program plans, as well as 
considerable information pertinent to network programming in 
general will be distributed soon© i'he committee meetings were 
most successful© The executive committee of the Board of Direct 
tors is meeting this week«ena 9 and as scon as they have approved 
the recommendations of the program committees this information 
will be distributed© Meanwhile, the following is included so 
that we can begin distribution of school programs© 

AVAILABLE CHOICES AND COSTS 

The following plan is being submitted to the board for 
approval© It is important to note that if this plan is not 
accepted, or is modified, something comparable will take its 
place® SO js s: sPLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING WITH CARE® 





Page 2— 


The Network normally will offer eight packages of programs 
per year© Even after individual distribution becomes passible 
some similar offering period will prevailo These eight packages 
constitute the normal services obtained by payment of the annual 
service assessment fee* It is not practical to materially increase 
this service without increasing the costso Therefore* the in-school 
programs are not being offered in addition to the regular service 
but in lieu of a portion of it© 

Two packages of in«school programs will be offered each year© 
This makes a total of ten packages e A station may select a maximum 
of eight packages for any one year© If a station desires all ten 
packages it will have to pay an additional fee to ©over costs of 
recording* handling, etc© 

One possibility being submitted to the board is that the 
extra two packages will cost a station one-fourth of its annual 
assessment© This, it seems probable, would be the maximum cost© 
CAUTIONx: tThis, I repeat is not final© The only thing certain at 
this time is, that if a station desires all programs, it will have 
to pay a small extra fee© 

On the other hand, a school station can get six regular 
packages, enough to cover the school year««Sept© through May— 
and both school packages at no increase over its regular assess** 
ment fee© 

DISTRIBUTION OF IN-SCHOOL PROGRAMS 


The in«school committee asked me to assure me to assure you 
first of all that the msthod of distribution outlined below is 
temporary© It will be perfected and refined as facilities in 
network headquarters are improved© Furthermore, it should be 
pointed out that the in^school programs are not available to 
stations which are not members of the network© This is an 
integral part of the basic network service, the overhead for 
which will be carried by the station assessment fees© Thus, 
non«eubscribering stations will not be allowed to purchase this 
service alone© 

The presently offered in^school package is intended for 
use during the first semester of the 19!>2«£3 school year© The 
first program series will begin circulating by March 1, and all 
four series will be in circulation by April 1©' Programs for 
use during the second semester of the 19£2«£3 school year will be 
selected by the committee during the Ohio State Institute in 
April and will be available to the stations prior to the close 
of the current school year© This, in general, will be the pattern 
for scheduling of in-school programs© 

The programs will be circulated in sc hip merits containing an 
entire series of fourteen programs© Our plan is to make six copies 
of each series© These will be started at each end of the school 
station legs© After the tapes have completed this circuit, they 
will be available to college and university stations electing to 
use them© 




page 3— 


The programs will be circulated in shipments containing an 
entire series of fourteen programs*. Our plan is to make six 
copies of each series* These will be started at each end of the 
school station legs* After the tapes have conpleted this circuit, 
they / will be available to college and university stations electing 
to use them,, 


ALL STATIONS MUST ARRANGE TO MAKE THEIR OWN COPIES OF SCHOOL 
PROGRAM IN THE SHORTEST POSSIBLE TIME* 


Unfortunately, we could not determine any satisfactory means 
for providing audition copses prior to distribution© It is the 
committee’s plan to arrange for school program auditioning at 
both the Ohio State Institute and the annual NAEB Convention* 
Meanwhile you mst accept the programs on faith, and make your 
final decision after they are in your hands© 


All stations selecting the school program package will be 
pro’rided immediately with the manual for each series prepared by 
the originating station© From this copy of the manual, it is 
expected that /ill using stations will prepare their own supple¬ 
mentary materi als/ 

In all cases, both in the supplementary materials and on the 
tapes, the originating station should be given appropriate 
creditso 


If there are any questions concerning the above, please 
feel free to write*. It will be considerably more clear when you 
receive tee materials growing out of the program committee 
meetings * 


PLEASE INDICATE ON THE ENCLOSED CARD 10UR CHOICE OF 
PACKAGES© RETURN THE CARDS PROMPTLY* 


With best regards. 


Dick Rider 


mSK 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


March h, 1952 


REPORT: 

TO : NAEfc BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

FROM : DICK RIDER 

RE : NETWORK STATIONS ADD ASSESSMENT FEES 


There are currently 61 participating stations using the network service® 
These break down into 16 Class "A" stations, 15 Class tt B% and 30 Class n C tt o 
A list of active network stations by classification is attached® 

The following figures are based on the 1952-1953 network service assess- 
ment rates as established by the membership at the Biloxi meeting® These were: 
Class "A" $200 5 Class "B" $125j and Class "C" $75* 


For the present six months period, January 1, 19£2, to June 30, 1952, the 
following revenues will be obtained: 


From Class 
From Class 
From Class 


"A" Stations 
"B" Stations 
"C" Stations 


$1,600*00 

937*50 

1,125*00 


Total $3,662*50 


For the fiscal year July 1, 1952, to June 30, 1953* the following revenues 
are anticipated: 


From Class 
From Class 
From Class 


"A” Stations 
»B» Stations 
"C" Stations 


$3,200*00 

1,875*00 

2*250*00 


Total $7,325*00 


It has been recommended by the Executive Committee of the Board that the 
next installment of the Kellogg Grant be paid to coincide with the normal July- 
June fiscal year* The anount allocated to network operation in the Kellogg 
budget for fiscal year 1952-53 is $16,500® This, added to the $7,325 antici¬ 
pated as receipts from stations, gives a total potential budget for the network 
of $23,825 for July 1, 1952-June 30, 1953* 

Since the purpose of this memorandum is partly to assist you in thinking 
about network assessments to be considered and approved at the Minneapolis 
convention, I might mention that the proposed Kellogg budget figure for network 
operation for fiscal year July 1, 1953-June 30, 19 $b is $11,500® To achieve 




our hoped for &2*>,000 budget we will obviously need $13,500 from assessment 
fees. This is slightly less than double the anticipated 1952-53 receipts* 

For the 19$h°19$5 fiscal year the Kellogg budget provides $6,500 o After 
July 1, 1955, we are on our own c 

Obviously there will be some fluctuation in the number of stations and 
thus in the revenues receivedo This is submitted to inform you of the situation 
as it now is and to begin the projection of dollar figures for future years 0 

Cordially, 


Dick Hider 


CIASS “A" STATIONS 


WGBH — Lowell Institute Cooperative Broadcasting Council 

WBAA — Purdue University 

WFIU — Indiana University 

WOSU — Ohio State University 

WILL — University of Illinois 

WKAR — Michigan State 

WUOM — University of Michigan 

WHA — University of Wisconsin 

WSUI — University of Iowa 

WOl Iowa State College 

KUQM — University of Minnesota 

WCAL — Sto Olaf College 

KWSC — State College of Washington 

KSAC — Kansas State College 

KFKU — University of Kansas 

KOAC — Oregon State College 


CLASS "B" STATIONS 

WBKY — University of Kentucky 

WLSU «- Louisiana State University 

WUOA «»- University of Alabaiia 

WOT — University of Tennessee 

WSVC — Evansville College 

KFJM — University of North Dakota 

KCVN -- College of the Pacific 

KUOW — University of Washington 

WABE Atlanta Board of Education 

KBPS — Des Moines Public Schools 

WBEZ Chicago Board of Education 

WBGQ — Board of Education, Newark, New Jersey 

WDTIt Detroit Public Schools 

KSLH — Board of Education, St B Louis 

WAD — University of Oklahoma 

CLASS "C" STATIONS 


WAER -- Syracuse University KHUW 

WSOU — Seaton Hall College WGPS 

WDUQ Duquesne University 
WSAJ -- Grove City College 
WBUR — Boston University 
WUSV -- University of Scranton 
WKSU -« Kent State University 
WGRE De Fauw University 
WFPL -- Louisville Public Library 
WMCR — Western Michigan College 
WNUR — Northwestern University 
WMUB Miami University 
WMMI — Municipal Jr. College, 

KWLC — Luther College, Decorah, Iowa 
KWAR — Wartburg College, Waverly, Iowa 
KUSD — University of South Dakota 
KUSC — University of Southern California 
KBPS — Portland Public Schools 
KWGS — University of Tulsa 


— University of Wichita 

— Greensboro Public School 

— Dade County Board of EduCo, Mi am 
—. New Albany, Indiana, City Schools 
■=>- Wilson Jr 0 High School, Muncie, Indo 

— School-City of Huntington, Indo 

— Board of Education, Elgin, Illo 

— Sewanhaka High School, Floral Fko,NX 
<=* Toledo Public Schools, Toledo, Ohio 
«« Bowling Green State University 

University of Oregon 


WTHS 

WAS 

WWHI 

WVSH 

WEPS 

WSHS 

WTDS 

WBGU 

KWAX 


Meridian, Mississippi 


To: Seymour Siegel 111'' Date: Jan. 7, 1952 

Prom: Alvin Gaines, WABE, Atlanta, Ga. Subject: Network & NAEB 

I hope John Dunn won't mind if I adopt his form in order to join 
the fracas now in progress concerning the Network in particular and 
NAEB in general 0 Parenthei/tically, I'm glad to see this whole commo¬ 
tion as I believe it is a sign of the fermentation indicative of NAEB : l 
growth and coming-of-age. 

Here are some comments on John’s blast—both pro and con: 

To begin with, I don’t believe that the Network is being run to 
the satisfaction or for the benefit of any individual or group of in¬ 
dividuals. The point to remember about the Network is that its growth 
has been weed-like and in its short life it nearly wrecked one station 
(WNYC) in giving it birth, its paternity was changed before it could 
walk, and now it is expected to perform like an adult at age 2 when it 
still lacks a heart (the mass duplicator)£ Not to belabor to above im¬ 
age, I think that the Network will have to do without its adolescence, 
but let’s be realistic: a wire net won’t operate without wires, and 
tape net won’t operate with maximum flexibility without a mass dupli¬ 
cator; This is not a defense of Network faults, but a statement of 
facts. The present package system is but a stop gap measure which 
offers the greatest flexibility under present circumstances . It was 
never envisioned as the final method of distribution. This final 
method has been spelled out repeatedly. Criticism should be directed 
toward this method, not the package method—it’s a waste of time to 
kill a dying man! 

Now to John’s numbered paragraphs— 

1. I am in general agreement as to the importance of the Network 
and its relation to NAEB. It _is one of the principal things the Associ ¬ 
ation has to offer, but I think we can get so close to the importance 
of the Network that we will not see that the NAEB can and must offer 











-2- 


F ^ 

other very important servicess audience surveys, up dating station 
staff personnel, clearing house functions in various fields, and, final 
1 7 9 and I think this is important, the Headquarters function (more on 
this later under item 10)* The Network is but a service of NAEB* 

2* The idea of offering one year free network service to new 
member stations is excellent* After all, the old stations have had 
the equivalent of one year’s free Network service* » 

The matter of NAEB membership carrying with it a sliding scale of 
free programs must be balanced against two facts; (a) The NAEB must 
assume the full load of Network operation within five years and an in¬ 
creasing load each succeeding year before the full load* This, the 
NAEB obligated itself to when it accepted the Kellogg Grant. If the 
sliding scale will allow the acceptance of the terms of the Grant then 
it deserves consideration* (b) But now we come to the matter of largo 
station carrying the small station de facto--and they have to live with 
their administrators 12 months a year too* It’s a matter of each sta¬ 
tion carrying its own share of the burden, if the ability to carry is 
small then the share must be small* None of us is so rich that he can 
afford to carry someone else share of the burden* 

NAEB membership must offer other services to justify membership_ 

so I think we had better examine the sliding scale with great care and 
in the light of the above facts. 

3, 4, and 5* We have a similar trouble in programming Network 
shows as to local needs. But let’s face it; no national network can 
ever meet a strictly local program need! And if you’ll tell me what 
a "grass-roots" TYPE of program is I’ll buy it. But lets assume you’vo 
found a "grass-roots" TYPE, John; it is per se and by definition a mid 
western "grass-roots" TYPE, not southern, and certainly not a New York 
TYPE. I think the Network is going "grass-roots" in that it is now dis- 


- 3 - 


tributing more programs of nearly universal appeal from local NAEB sta¬ 
tions (that is non-New York and foreign), viz, Polio series, Aging Suc¬ 
cessfully, Station 60, Masterworks Story (WCAL), Bach Memorial Concert s 
(WHA), etc, etco 

The Network is seeking programs constantly, and, in talking with 
Jim and Dick, I never hear them say they had been overcome with program 
offerings from member stations. If we want "grass-roots’ 1 programs it 
seems to me that the "grass-roots" stations had better bear some respon 
sibility in offering programs® This, of course, doesn’t relieve Head¬ 
quarters or the Network of the responsibility to beat the bushes for 
programs 0 

6. Agreement—the value of the Tape Network is that stations can 
broadcast when program would be of maximum value in local situation, 
but cost and work of a delayed broadcast should be up to individual 
station, because in getting away from simultaneity we are likely to go 
too far in opposite direction, which kills much of timeliness value of 
radio. I’m dead set against any fixed catalogue—library type or opera 
tion because of its two great dangers: (a) it violates a fundamental 
characteristic of the medium of flexibility, timeliness—it just isn’t 
RADIO. (b) the costs go up as the "mass" handling of programs goes 
down—also, the library is soon full of deadwood. How are changes for 
such service going to be made, and how figure the income to meet our 
increasing Kellogg obligations? As for the availability of past series 
the Network keeps copies that could be duplicated to meet a small de¬ 
mand of this type. 

7. No comment. 

8. Agreement. 

9. The answer here is NOl if you mean what I think you do. 

Several small regional operations will end up costing more than one 









- 4 - 


national Headquarters Net operation,. This is what Headquarters and Net 
are for—to centralize and save. As for WABE, we want none of this — 
we *ve "already had some• n 

10. I T m not against more emphasis on regions, but I’m for a 
strong Headquarters manned by someone devoting his full time to the 
Job which is more than any regional director—overloaded already with 
his local operations—can hope to do 0 The regional director can do 
more than most of us do—but it usually means working on our own time 
or snitching it from station time. If we 1 re going to be practical 
we»ll have to admit that fact first of all. Let’s not forget that it’s 
The NATIONAL Association of Educational Broadcasters. 

This item you’re reading comes out of WAB3 Time. 

In conclusion, John, thanks—your effort has not been wastedj 


TO 


DATE 


s Seymour Siegel 

FROM s John W. Dunn* WNAD, 



: January 3, 1952 


SUBJECT : MAEB Tape Network & NAEB 


On several occasions of late, I have voiced opinions and suggestions regarding our 
NAEB Tape Network. Both Jim and Dick have met these opinions and suggestions with 
answers which perhaps in their judgment were valid but not entirely satisfactory 
to us. 

To begin with, I think it should be emphasized over and over again that the NAEB 
Tape Network belongs to no one individual or group of individuals, but the ENTIRE 
association; that it should not be run for the satisfaction of any one individual 
or group of individuals, but it must be operated for the benefit of the association 
as a WHOLE and according to the wishes of the majority. 

1, I am not so sure but what the NAEB Tape Network is tied directly to and actually 
centers in this thing which we call THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL 
BROADCASTERS. Certainly, all of us can recall in those days before the actual 
vitalization of the network how we felt regarding this project of the future— 
that it would be THE thing which would save NAEB from going under and that it 
would be the heart of NAEB operations. There was, at that time, a feeling that 
NAEB had very little to offer member stations scattered all over the nation in 
the way of material assistance. We took their money in the form of dues and let 
it go at that. The tape network vjw the best answer to this pressing problem. 

In my estimation it has certainly been one of the greatest factors in preserv¬ 
ing NAEB and pushing it ahead. And to look at the whole thing realistically, 

it still is one of the principal things the association has to offer member 
stations. 

2. Furthermore, I am not so sure that we can always divorce membership in NAEB from 
participation in the NAEB Network. Most certainly, active membership in the 
association is required for service from the network, and I do think it is the 
best LURE v/e can offer educational radio stations to become members of NAEB. 

You will recall that I have made several suggestions along this line: 

(1) That we offer FREE network service for one year to NEW stations joining 
NAEB. With not too many new possibilities, such a move couldn’t hurt us 
financially. This offer would certainly introduce them to the advantages 
of the network AND would make them feel that v/e are vitally interested in 
them. Most of the new stations will have a hard enough time as it is— 
starting off on limited budgets and facing operational difficulties. Our 
help in PROGRAMMING would be REAL help. 

(2) That membership in NAEB would automatically carry with it a number of FREE 
hours of NAEB Tape Network service on a SLIDING scale. For the larger 
stations there would be fewer hours than for the smaller ones. Many of us 
would find that membership dues in NAEB—small as they may seem to some— 
would be justified in the eyes of administrators with whom we have to live 
12 months out of the year. 






3» We are under the impression that vie are being asked to gear our operations to 
the network without the network finding out how we operate. Now I know it’s 
true that the network can’t satisfy everybody, • But surely there must be a 
common basis of approach to the solution of our problem. To begin with, I 
don’t recall that there has ever been even a simple study made as to just how 
member stations do program-program periods, length of program periods, etc. 
Furthermore, there is a wide difference between the small operation which is 
on the air only 20 to 30 hours a week (and which depends on the network for 
probably 50fo of their programs as is the case with the University of Tennessee, 
WUOT-FM) and the stations which program and broadcast 60 to 100 hours a week. 
Certainly, we here at WNAD are not going to abandon a scheme of programming 
which has built a tremendous listening audience for us over a period of years 
(and I can hear voices shouting now, "we don’t expect you to do so"), 

4, Let me illustrate what I have been saying: we program three times a year with 
each program period lasting four months and roughly paralleling the semesters 

of the academic year. We’ve found ice had to do this in order to accommodate our 
talent. We have seen no reason why we should be bound to the old traditional 
13 week idea of commercial radio. Then, too, each program period sees some 20 
to 30 NEW and CHALLENGING series offered to our listeners. They like itJ 

Furthermore, we PLAN our programs for each period some three months ahead of 
the actual starting date of that period. This enables our talent to organize 
their program and be ready when the time comes to work with us* They are all 
busy people and our thoughtful attitude has really paid off with faculty and 
staff cooperation. Then, too, we program tightly, leaving few or no gaps with 
the exception of several quarter hours which may be used for emergencies or 
spot programs. 

Now, after this has been done and we 1 re all set for a program periodoo 00 along 
comes th® NAE3 Tape Network with an offer of a wide array of program series for 
which we have no room on our schedule at all. This means that we must either 
dub them for future use (tying up hundreds of tapes) or ship them on to the 
next station in the leg. 

It seems to us that we should know FAR ENOUGH ahead of time what programs will 
be available so that we can program accordingly. We simply can’t throw out a 
local series which we have worked long and hard to get to accommodate the NAEB 
Network, Our responsibility is FIRST to the local groups 5 second to the network. 

We are planning NOW for our in-3chool broadcasts for the school year of 1952-53* 
In this we work very closely with the State Department of Education, If the NAEB 
Tape Network should offer the finest in-school programs in the world AFTER we 
have set up our programming for the entire year of 1952-53, we simply would have 
to pass them by, 

5, Next, there has been no real effort made to find out what the "grass roots" need 
in TYPES of programs. It appears that programming of the network too often has 
been a catch-as-catch-can affair. We have the feeling that things are offered 
us that we do not need and that do not fit in so easily with program plans. In 
other words, network programming has been from the top rather than the bottom. 




Music programs should be really distinctive—things which are not available on 
records or ET’s. We need more short dramatic shows (such as Cavalcade, of Amer¬ 
ica) , BBC offerings are fine, but they are so terribly long that all but the 
most enthusiastic "draymuhtist" get a wee bit tired. We would like to see more 
programs dealing with literature in all of its various aspects and science programs 
that are off the beaten track. Next to good music, we have found these have tre¬ 
mendous appeal. Discussion programs are fine, We’ve found rural and small town 
audiences eat ’em up. But for goodness sake, keep them within half-hour limits, 
Chicago Roundtable and London Forum do a bang-up good job in half-hour limits. 

Personally, I think we need more SHORT programs—quarter hour especially. 

Whether we like it or not, people—our listeners, bless them—have been brought 
up on short quarter programs for daytime listening. That’s one of the reasons 
why soap operas, etc,, have such an appeal to the daytime listeners. Since so 
many of us are daytime operations, we*re* faced with the problem of programming 
for daytime listening when people for the most part are busy, A good deal of our 
success as an educational station has been due to the use of short program forms. 
Our network has improved greatly in this respect these last several months but 
we need to do more, 

6, While I know it sounds good to say that a program is being broadcast simultaneously 
by umpteen NAEB stations, I’m not so hepped on that idea. To do so may satisfy 
someone 9 3 ego but actually the listener in Bov/legs, Oklahoma, doesn’t give a whoop 
whether or not he hears it at the same time it’s being done in Pullman, Washington, 
And to expect member stations to always hew the line is again being no better 
than our commercial networks (and even they are getting away from the idea). 
Certainly, I think it should be left to the judgment of the member stations as 

to when and how they can best air network programs—something which our package 
idea doesn’t allow. 

Again, I propose that master copies of programs which are not dated, be kept at 
Tape Network headquarters for a limited period of time—say six months or one 
year. Periodically, a mimeographed catalog of these program offerings might be 
made available to member stations. Then those of us who’ve had to pass up a 
program series might pick it up for use, 

7, We here at WNAD are NOT afraid of controversial issues provided they are handled 
in the RIGHT way. Just because we do not offer facilities to political candidates 
is no criterion to judge by. We pass up the politicos because here in Oklahoma 
politics is a rough and tumble game and our judgment simply dictates we should 
leave it alone. As a matter of fact, we have handled some of the hottest local 
issues with very good results, 

8, I agree with Si that we should cooperate with governmental agencies when those 
agencies have a message for the people of the United States that’s worthwhile. 

All of us have been doing it and I see no reason why we should suddenly assume 
a holy attitude about the matter. Certainly government agency offerings should 
not conflict with basic program policies of the station (I’m thinking here of 
OPS which sometimes uses hillbilly programs as vehicles for their messages), 

9, With a little financial assistance, regional headquarters would be in a position 
to dub programs and dispatch to members with that region more cheaply and quickly 
than otherwise, I agree that something should be done in this respect. 


- 4 - 


10o Finally, I look with deep concern on the growing tendency of our association 
to be top-heavy. 

Some years ago, when I made recommendations for dividing tho country into regions 
with regional headquarters to be set up in each region, I had in mind that 
regional organization would really amount to something. Actually, our regional 
set-ups are nothing more than a farce„ 

Regional, directors should be,and I believe in most cases are, in a better posi¬ 
tion to know more about educational broadcasting in their part of the country 
than Si in New York or Jim in Urbana. Actually, the President of NAEB should 
be the guide, pointing the way; the Executive Director should be the coordinator 
and the President’s right-hand man. The Regional Directors of the organization 
should be the wheel horses pulling the load, each in his own region. In ny 
opinion, if NAEB is to grow strong with each local educational station and each 
region maintaining its own stamp of identity, it must start with STRONG REGIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS. 

While I’m for Jim getting out over the country, still I think we must be realistic 
about the whole matter. More good would come from allowing funds for regional 
director's to make junkets over their region. 

I’m for REGIONAL CONFERENCES, preferably in the spring of the year. These confer¬ 
ences might be two-day affairs where educational radio people might get together 
and let their hair down. PRACTICAL would be the keynote of these get-togethers. 

I noticed at Biloxi, Region V had only four out of ten active members represented 
and no associate members. I believe other regions were worse off than we were. 

By keeping in close contact with regional members, I know that regional directors 
can really pour a wealth of information into the President’s and Executive Direc¬ 
tor’s offices that will mean something. 

Furthermore, I think the National Headquarters and the President’s Office should 
utilize regional offices more in association business. In short, let’s VITALIZE 
the regional set-up and make it count for something. Let’s get our feet on the 
ground and our head out of the cloudsJ Let’s climb down out of our nice pink 
ivory towers and get our ears to the ground! Let’s bypass the lures of the 
academic and the glib talking idealists! 

We’re BROADCASTERS first, last and always, filling a decided need in the 
American scene. Let’s run NAEB on a hard-headed, practical, businesslike 
basis 2 



* 


■'HQ?*-' 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


February 3.8, 19$ 2 


TO; NAEB BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

TAPE NETWORK ACCEPTANCE COMMITTEE 
IN-SCHOOL PROGRAM COMMITTEE 
MEMBER STATIONS 

SUBJECT; Summary of proceedings and recommendations of the NAEB Tape Network Com¬ 
mittee and the In-School Program Committee, as approved by the Executive 
Committee of th© Board of Directors 


The committees met jointly on February 7, 8, and 9 in Memorial Union of 
Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana* Meetings were held the afternoon and 
evening of February ?, morning, afternoon, and evening of February 8, and the 
morning of February 9 * 

Present at the meetings were; 

Tape Network Acceptance Committee ; Burton Paulu, Chairman, KUOMj 
Bernard Buck, WNTC; NorWrop 1 'Dawson, Jr,, KUOM; Homer Salley, 

WFPL: Ray J« Stanley, Jr*, WHA. 

In-School Pro gram Committee : Alvin Gaines, Chairman, WABEj 
MargueriicTFleming, KSLH| M. ?&Cabe Day, WVSH; John Henderson, 
WBAAj James MacAndrew, WNYE. 

From NAEB H e adquarters ; James Miles, Executive Director; Richard 
ftider, Network Onager 

The principle findings and reeoimaendations are included in the foll.oid.ng 
attached materials; 

Statement of Purpose of NAEB Tape Network (jointly compiled) 

Statement of Program Acceptance Standards (jointly compiled) 

Additional In-School Standards (addendum to above by In-School 
Committee) 

Recommendations of In-School Committee on Distribution of In- 
School Programs 

Recommendations for Program Selection Procedures (both committees) 

Miscellaneous Recommendations 





2 


STATEMENT OF PURPOSE OF NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


The NAEB Tape Network is a cooperative organization devoted to the 
dissemination of outstanding radio programs * It is operated by the National 
Association of Educational Broadcasters for its member stations, which are owned 
by educational institutions, municipalities, and public service agencies<> It 
provides for the interchange of the best programs of its member stations, and 
procures and distributes programs from other sources 0 

The NAEB Tape Network Acceptance Committee and the In-School Program 
Committee have drawn up the following statement of purposes and objectives of the 
Networko Subject to such directives as the Board of Directors may lay down, and 
in accordance with whatever conditions may be imposed by the originating sources, 
copyright holders, or unions involved, the Tape Network shall provide for:-/ 

1. The interchange among member stations of programs they themselves 
producer This is dor© to provide a wider range of program material, 
to stimulate the upgrading of local program standards, and to en¬ 
courage the production of broadcasts in needed subject areas * 
Programs thus circulated will include: 

a* Outstanding programs in all subject areas. 

be Programs from, member stations utilising special local resources 
or staff skills* 

c. Special events recorded by the station to which the events are 
most accessible geographically* 

2« The distribution to members of programs produced under NAEB auspices 
for Tape Network use* 

3* The distribution to members of programs from non-NAEB sources«» 

In addition the Tape Network may distribute educational programs to non- 
member stations, both commercial and non-commercial, and make available such pro¬ 
grams for non-broadcast use* 


17 Last sentence added by Executive Committee. 



3 


STATEMENT OF PROGRAM ACCEPTANCE STANDARDS 


The following statement is intended as a guide in the selection of pro¬ 
grams for use by the Tape Network. Obviously few programs can meet all the 
standards listed below; some programs excellently suited for the Tape Network may 
meet only a few of them. 

The Network as now constituted is to. a large extent an outgrowth of the 
first Allerton House Radio Seminar of 19U9; therefore, it is fitting that the 
committees should accept the basic educational programming principles determined 
at that meeting. As phrased by Robert B. Hudson, "The Allerton seminar asserted 
that the aims of educational broadcasting are the broad aims of education: 

"...education in a democracy has the responsibility of lifting the 
level of understanding and appreciation of the people, of giving 
the individual a knowledge of himself and his society, and of the 
tensions and perplexities in each; 

"...in a free society it is essential that the individual have a 
continuing sense of belonging and participating, of keeping up 
with a complex and fast-moving world; 

"...it is the responsibility of education to foster and further that 
feeling of belonging and counting."1/ 

The committees further agree that programs chosen for the Tape Network 
should meet certain minimum standards as to: (1) network suitability; (2) 
engineering standards; (3) audience appeal; (k) subject matter; and (5) presen¬ 
tation o 


1. Network Suitability. The programs distributed should be of wide¬ 
spread interest and should be selected to supplement the program 
resources of individual stations. 

2. Engineering Standards. The engineering s tandards of the programs 
distributed shall conform to the standard ) drawn up by the NAEB 
Taps Network Engineering Advisory Committee. 

3. Audience Appeal. The programs should ax.tract and hold their 
intended audiences. 

lu Subject Matter. The programs « again in Hudson 1 s words - should be 
"distinguished by...high concern for integrity in the selection... 
of materials, and by...consistent dedication to social purpose." 
Subject matter chosen should have the effect of: 

"(1) infoming, 

"(2) stimulating the individual to organize and give meaning to 
information, 

17 Sohert B. Hudson, "Allerton House 1949, 195>0% Hollywoo d Quarterly , Voi. V, 

~ No. 3, p. 239. 




Uo 


"(3) contributing to the understandings that make for better human 
relations and adjustment, 

"(k) broadening participation in the culture of our society, 

"(5) acting as an outlet for the varied expressions of the community 
which the station serves, and acting as a force within the com¬ 
munity to help it solve its problems, and 

”(6) leading the way, by e^eriment, towards new forms and activities 
of broadcasting»” 

In choosing subject matter it should also be recognized ’’that people 
cannot come to like what they have never experienced,” for which, 
reason we “must provide a variety of experience which .permits and 
encourages the development of tastes and interests • '*£/ 

Presentation, Programs should meet high standards of presentation 
in writing, performance and direction. 

a. Writings 

- - should be well organized, 

- - should be stimulating and challenging, 

- should fulfill the requirements of an effective oral style 
(simplicity, clarity, brevity), 

- - should be free of superficiality, self-consciousness, 

and stereotyped situations and characterisations, 

-should be suitable in style to subject matter and intended 

audience. 

bo Performance? 

- « should be understandable and intelligible, with suitable 

speech patterns, 

- ~ should be, in the case of dramatic and documentary material, 

plausible and consistent, 

- - should be free of stereotyped characterizations, 

- - should maintain a hi^i level of performance skills. 

Co Direction? 

- « should reflect a mature, intelligent grasp of the objectives 

of the program, 

- should demonstrate an effective command of the principles of 
timing, pace, perspective, and effective integration of 
music and sound effects. 


V lbldTT ~PP. 239-ho 



ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR 
IN-SCHOOL PROGRAMS 


The In-School Program Cozmnittee recommends the following additional 
standards for evaluating school programso Such programs should; 

1* Enrich instruction in a given subject area, 

2o Be geared for fairly specific school levels, 

3o Stress simplicity in both writing and presentation, 
io Be paced for group listening, 

£• Utilize vocabulary on an acceptable level, 

6« Be accompanied ty all available teacher material . 


6 


RECOMMENDATIONS OF IN-SCHOOL PROGRAM COMMITTEE ON CHARGES FOR 
AND DISTRIBUTION OF IN-SCHOOL PROGRAMS BY NETWORK 


lo COSTS 

The In-School Program Committee recommends that: 

a. School programs be offered to member stations in the form of semi-annual 
packages. 

b. The network offering of a certain number of packages during the year include 
the two school packages. Any subscribing station may elect to include the 
in-school offerings in lieu of a comparable number of non-school programs 
for the basic annual service assessment fee. 

c* If a subscribing station elects to take the in-school offerings in addition 
to the full amount of non-school offerings, there will be levied an addit¬ 
ional assessment fee, the amount to be determined by the Executive Com¬ 
mittee. 

ADDENDUM: 

On the present basis, eight packages per year will be considered a year’s ser¬ 
vice paid for by the regular assessment fee. Adding the two school packages 
will make a total of ten. Each station is entitled to eight packages per year. 
If all ten are desired, it seems warranted to add a fee equal to one fourth 
of the annual assessment. 

This method will require modifications when individual distribution is possible, 
but some similar basis can undoubtedly be arranged. 

2. DISTRIBUTION 

The In-School Program Committee recommends that: 

a. The present package-lag method of distribution be used for school programs. 

b. Each SHIPMENT of school programs contain one complete tern series (ll* 
programs)* 

c. Teacher aid materials be sent directly to the member station as soon as that 
station indicates its choice of the series. 

d. It be made clear that this method of distribution is strictly temporary, 
pending future operational and equipment developments at Headquarters. 
Moreover, that the stations be informed that this is a temporary distribu¬ 
tion method. 




RECOMMENDATIONS OP THE NAEB NETWORK ACCEPTANCE COMMITTEE AND THE IN-SCHOOL 
PROGRAM COMMITTEE ON SPECIFIC METHODS OF IMPLEMENTING BASIC RECOMMENDATIONS 
ON PURPOSES AND PROGRAM ACCEPTANCE STANDARDS 


7 


lo Methods of determining programming needs. 

a. Polling of member stations* (Recommended that this be done*) 
b« Recommendations of committee members. 

c. Securing the recommendations of subject matter exports* 
do Recommendations of NAEB officers and headquarters staff* 

2. Specific methods of selecting programs for network offering* 

a* General programs. 

(1) The NAEB Network Acceptance Committee will meet at the call of the 
chairman in consultation with the headquarters staff. The headquarters 
office can request a meeting of the committee • Apart from such meetings 
as may be called the committee will continue to be a consultative body 
for the headquarters staff. 

(2) Network headquarters will eonpose offering schedules in accord with the 
following: 

(a) Headquarters will normally select the programs to be distributed. 

(b) It will refer to the members of the committee all programs of a 
doubtful nature, or which involve points of network policy, or for 
which it desires the weight of committee support for its decisions* 

(c) It will inform the committee members in advance what programs it 
intends to offer. 

(d) Committee members reserve the right to request an opportunity to 
audition any program. 

(e) Committee members will continue to make whatever recommendations 
they desire to the network staff. 

(f) Network headquarters will endeavor to make arrangements which will 
enable it to offer the bulk of network programs at least three 
months in advance* This is not intended to exclude such programs 
as must be handled on a more immediate basis* 

b. In-School programs. 

(1) It is the recommendation of the in-school committee that it meet semi¬ 
annually o These meetings to take place the two days preceding the Ohio 
State Institute and the two days preceding the annual NAEB Convention. 

(2) All in-school programs will be selected by the in-school committee at 
the meetings delineated in (1). 


8. 


(3) Between meetings of the in-school committee* school programs will be 
given a preliminary screening, so that the remaining programs can be 
given a careful evaluation at the meeting. 

3* Specific program recommendations 0 (These suggested needed areas of programming 

are listed in the order given, and do not imply any kind of priority *) 

ao Social Sciences^-areas such as mental health, child development* family 
relations, etc. 

b« International understanding,. To include background material on crucial 
geographical areas of the world* 

c. Artistic and cultural programs of uniqueness and high quality* 

d. Historical perspective on current world affairs• Interpretation of current 
affairs in the light of historical parallels* 

e. School programs—more programs designed for elementary grades. Less 
emphasis on programs in area of social studies. 

f. School—natural sciences and nature study. 

g. School—-rhythmics. (BBC program, MUSIC AND MOVEMENT, with Ann Driver sug¬ 
gested as excellent prototype. It was suggested that we check with BBC 

on whether this program might be made available. 

ho Commonly useful areas of assorted information. Programs designed for the 
lay-listener in legal problems, house buying and building, budget for a 
family, and similar areas. 

i. School—physical sciences for high school levels 

National problems* Mare detailed elaboration of these and international 
problems * 

k. Polk music. 

l. Music. Confined to unique programs not available from usual recording 
sources• 

ro. Dramatized history. (Such as YOU ARE THERE.) 

n„ Make greater use of one shot, or non-series programs. It was felt that a 
considerable number of programs not part of organised series could be 
utilized by the stations. 

0 . General health programs. 

p. School—development of social attitudes at upper elementary level* 


9 


RECOMMENDATION OF PROGRAM ACCEPTANCE COMMITTEE ON 
AUDITIONING OF PROGRAMS BT NETWORK HEADQUARTERS 


The NAEB Program Acceptance Committee recommends that: 

1, Before a series is accepted by network headquarters, as wide a sample of indi¬ 
vidual programs as possible should be carefully auditioned« 

The above is not intended to preclude the offering of occasional timely series 
without previous auditioning# 

2. Every effort should be made to carefully audition all individual programs before 
they are distributed to member stations » Such auditions will be conducted by a 
responsible person* 

3o Based on the auditions indicated in 2, the Network Manager will: 

a. Withdraw any undesirable pro grams • 

b. Notify stations well in advance of any material that may raise questions 
of taste, obscenity, ethics, and similar problems <> 

c. Notify stations in all cases where individual programs have not been so 
screened• 

U. Network headquarters will solicit, secure, and distribute available scripts 
and other descriptive materials about series and individual programs# This 
should include all materials useful in the promotion of NAEB programs. 

The above measures will apply within the limits of time and personnel# 

6c None of the above is designed to relieve station managers of any responsibilityo 
The network cannot guarantee that all programs will conform to individual sta¬ 
tion policy or to the strictest rules and regulations in all cases# Both 
legally and morally the broadcast licensee assumes full responsibility for 
everything broadcast by its transmittero This is intended to be assurance that 
network headquarters will do all it can to make the editing job as easy as 
possible. 


10, 


MISCELLANEOUS CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 


1® General purpose of network® The network should devote its major 
effort to the distribution of well-planned and executed programs of significant 
educational and. cultural purpose* It should offer a distinctive service of sub¬ 
stantive programs having relatively long-tern value® 

This does not exclude programs of a timely nature * which require 
special handling, but such programs should, in view of present facilities^, consti¬ 
tute a minor portion of the service® 

2» ''Propaganda'* programs® A lengthy discussion was held on the in¬ 
herent "propaganda" nature of programs originated by governmental agencies* foreign 
governments* and similar organizations® It was felt that no general policy of 
excluding such programs could be justified* Rather* each series should be judged 
on its individual merits® 

The committees do not object to programs originated by governmental 
agencies, international organizations* and foreign governments® It does feel that 
the network should not be used for indiscriminate promotion of such organizations® 
Series originated by such organizations should be judged on the same basis as other 
programs ® 


3c Salley recommended that networks and other organizations producing 
programs be approached regarding the release to the tape network of such outstand¬ 
ing series in their archives as, CBC's YOU ARE THERE, and NBC * s dramatizations of 
great novels* 

U- Music programs* The committees generally agreed that music offerings 
by the network should consist of programs of a distinctly unique character® The 
network should not waste its time, money, and facilities distributing music per¬ 
formed by artists and consisting of compositions normally available on commercial 
transcriptions, or recordings® 

There is sore? doubt as to the desirability of distributing more or 
less traditional music performed by the best college and university groups® This 
would bear further examination® In fact, some study needs to be made before a 
final policy on musical programs can be delineated® 

£* The in-school committee recommended that a questionnaire study be 
conducted to determine deadlines, and scheduling problems for in-school programs® 

6* The Network Acceptance Committee recommended that network headquarters 
issue a memorandum on the followings 

a.o Dubbing of network programs for re-use. 
b„ Dubbing of network programs for non-broadcast use® 
c» Policy against supplying non-member stations with network programs, 
d® Policy against use of network programs by campus wired-wireless 
stations* 


11, 


It further recommended that such information as is applicable be obtained from the 
originating source and distributed to the member stations, 

7« Both committees spent some time auditioning programs• 

With the in-"school committee this resulted in the selection of three of 
the desired four programs to be included in the first school package• The fourth 
program is to be selected at the earliest possible date by mailing audition copies 
to committee members« 

For the Network Acceptance Committee the group auditioning proved 
to be an excellent opportunity to apply the general standards which had been estab¬ 
lished * This was of considerable value to committee members and to the headquarters 
staff. Such occasions enable the committee members and the network staff to reach 
a higher degree of understanding on scheduling programs on the network® 

8, There was general agreement that the package method of distribution 
was not satisfactory, but that it should be continued as the most workable method 
pending the installation of a mass duplicator• 


TO: MEMBERS OP THE IN-SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 
Dear Miss P. and Gentlemen: 


Assume that the attached memorandum is self-explanatory and 
satisfactory* If you have any suggestions on further communications, or 
actions that should be done, prior to the Columbus meeting let me know 
and we will do our best. 

May I be so bold as to suggest that you, the committee, not 
depend entirely on this notice. lou know the school stations and the 
people involved far better than I, so if you think of someone who might 
have some good series available vhy not do a little personal prodding by 
mail? Our experience thus far indicates much enthusiasm for these ideas, 
especially at meetings, but when people get back to the daily grind of 
the job they gradually lose this enthusiasm. I think it is only natural 
that this should be the case, but—we still want sane cracking good 
school programs. Perhaps a prod here and there from committee members 
individually would do far more good than a general dittoed memo. It is 
possible, also, that if we get enough programs submitted you can begin 
to think about next year as well as the current need* 

*• - 

In any event we stand ready to do all we can. Let us have 
all suggestions. 

Warmest regards. 


Dick Rider 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


March 11, 1952 


MEMORANDUM* 

TO* * ALL NAEB STATIONS AND MEMBERS OF IN-SCHOOL PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

FROM I DICK RIDER 

RE itsxsst IN-SCHOOL PROGRAMS FOR POSSIBIE NETWORK USE. 

Having now begun—at long last—the distribution of in-school pro grams, 
it is necessary to conduct an intensive search for outstanding series to be 
used as future offerings* Our immediate concern is for programs to be used 
during the second semester of the 1952-53 school year* These programs are 
to be selected by the in-school committee at their meeting which coincides 
with the Institute For Education by Radio-Television in Columbus* The plan 
is to have these programs distributed before the close of the current school 
year* It is also planned to maintain an NAEB audition room at the Institute 
—so there is a double incentive to have as many programs as possible for 
all interested to hear while in Columbus* 

THEREFORE— I strongly urge you to consider all of your in-school 
program series for offering to the network* In this regard I call your 
attention to the report issued by the Network Acceptance Committee and the 
In-School Program Committee which most of you have received, and which is 
also reproduced in the current NEWS-LETTER* I particularly invite attention 
to the list of suggested areas, a copy of which page is attached for your 
convenience* 

The following are the major procedural points: 

1. Send all possible series to network headquarters* We will catalogue 
them and have them all ready for the committee to audition* 

2* The committee prefers to have available a whole series, which has 
been standardized at 1L programs* (Exceptions can be made, of course*) If 
this isn*t possible, send a good representative sample of programs—this 
would mean more than the best single show in a seriesi 

3* Send at least one copy of the appropriate teacher*s manual or other 
supplementary material. 

It* These are for audition purposes only. Individual arrangements will 
be made for those series to be used® You will get back soon after the Colum¬ 
bus meeting all tapes which you send in* 

5>o Time is short—so, please consider this problem soon, and get your 
tapes off to us at the earliest possible date* 


In the event that one of your series is selected for distribution, you 
will be asked to do the followings 

1* Supply headquarters with master tapes for the entire series* We 
much prefer original recordings* We can take them off discs if necessary* 

(In either stage indicated above there is no objection at all to having two 
fifteen minute programs on a 7” reel of tape.) 

2* Supply one copy of supplementary material for each station using the 
series* 

3* Agree to permit NAEB Tape Network stations to use the series within 
whatever restrictions you care to impose* 


If you have any suggestions or comments about our in-school program 
operation, please communicate these ideas to a member of the committee so 
that they can be considered at the next meeting* The committee is* 

Alvin Gaines, WABE, Atlanta, Georgia (Chairman) 

Marguerite Fleming, KSLH, St* Louis, Mo* 

John Henderson, WBAA, Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind* 

James Macandrew, VOTE, New York, New York 
MaCabe Day, WVSH, Huntington, Ind* 

William Levenson, WBOE, Cleveland, 0* 

We are negotiating with several outside sources for in-school programs* 
Uhtil these begin to materialize we are 100% dependent on member stations fcr 
our program offerings* The committee is most anxious to select really out¬ 
standing series* This means that they need a wide field from which to choose 0 


WHAT DO YOU HAVE? SEND THEM AIONGIIU SOON, PLEASEUI 

Best regards. 


Dick Rider 


3. Specific program recommendations- (These suggested needed areas of 

programming are listed in the order given* and do net imply any kind 

of priority.) 

( 1) Social sciences—areas such as mental health* child development* 
family relations, etc. 

(2) International understanding. To include background material on 
crucial geographical areas of the world. 

( 3) Artistic and cultural programs of uniqueness and high quality., 

( U) Historical perspective on current world affairs. Interpretation 
of current affairs in the light of historical parallels. 

( £) School programs*—more programs designed for elementary grades. 

Less emphasis on programs in area of racial studies. 

( 6) School—natural sciences and nature study. 

( 7) School—rhythmics. (BBC program, MUSIC AND M0V5MSNT, with Ann 
Driver suggested as excellent prototype. It was suggested that 
we check with BBC on whether this program might be made avail¬ 
able. 

(8) Commonly useful areas of assorted information. Programs designed 
for the lay-listener in legal problems, house buying and build¬ 
ing, budget for a family, and similar areas. 

(9) School—physical sciences for High School level. 

(10) National problems, More detailed elaboration of these and inter¬ 
national problems. 

(11) Folk music. 

(12) Music. Confined to unique programs not available from usual re¬ 
cording sources. 

(13) Dramatized histciy. (Such as YOU ARE THERE.) 

(lii) Make greater use of one-shot, or non-series programs. It was 

felt that a considerable number of programs not part of organized 
series could be utilized by the stations. 

(l£) General health programs. 

(16) School—development of social attitudes at upper elementary level. 


NAEE TAPE NETWORK 


March 11, 1952 


MEMORANDUM 

TO: ALL NAEB STATIONS 

FROM: Dick Rider 

RE::::::: Submitting programs for network use. 


The time has come to remind you once again that we are on the trail of 
programs. We should like to announce the summer schedule as soon as possible. 

We are also thinking about the first offerings for next fall. Thus, we need some 
programs to think about. 

In this regard I invite your attention to the report of the two program 
committees issued following the Purdue meeting, which most of you have received 
and which is reproduced in the current NEWS-LETTER. Especially consider the sug¬ 
gested list of program needs, a copy of which is attached. 

Please consider your program schedule and see if you have anything that 
will meet the network*s needs. If you see a possibility let us know about it. 

In submitting a program send us a brief prospectus on the series which covers talent, 
purpose, format, etc. and a list of the individual programs. Of course, send along 
a few sample programs. 

We have not yet published our document on technical standards, however 
there are certain basic points which should be mentioned in the event that one of 
your series is used. We require original recordings wherever possible to use as 
our masters. We hope that as time goes by more of you will make these originals 
at 15 ips, especially for musical programs. At the moment, however 7& is satis¬ 
factory. Wo prefer that the station originating a program send us a complete 
show, including opening and dosing credits, all continuity, etc. If this isn*t 
practical, we can finish them here. In no case do you lose ary tapes on this 
deal. Any that you send in are returned to you. If we know ahead of time we 
can supply you tapes on which to record our masters. 

If some of you who have submitted programs are wondering what has hap¬ 
pened to them let me say that you will hear from us shortly. Sometimes it is a 
clow process, for us to listen to them here, some of them go to the program com¬ 
mittee, sometimes we wait to see what develops for the next offering, etc. How¬ 
ever, we do consider them all, and eventually I will write to you and you will 
even get your tapes back l In any cases where speed is essential, we can arrange 
to do it in a hurry. 


May X remind you that for the most part the network lives on your blood. 
So, check carefully and see if you haven 1 1 a series or two that will interest 
other stations. Send them in-——-——we need *em. 

Best regards. 


Dick Eider 



February 13 » 1952 


To: Members of the NAEB Board of Directors 
Tape Network Committee 
In-School Broadcast Committee 


From: Burton Paulu 

Subject: Summary of Meeting of Tape Network and In-School Broadcast 
Committees-, Lafayette* February 7» 8 and 9 f 1952 

Attached is a summary of the high points of our meeting, 
together with a revised copy of the Statement of Purpose and’outline 
of Program Acceptance Standards which we drew up* 

Present at the sessions were: 

From the Tape Network Program Committee: Bernard Buck, Y.NYC; 
Northrop Dawson, Jr,, KUOMJ Homer Salley, •*FPL; Hay Stanley, Y.HA; 

Burton Paulu, KUOM (Chairman)* From the In-School Program Committee: 

M* McCabe Day, WSH; Marguerite Fleming, KSLH; John Henderson, WBAA; 
James Mac Andrew, WNYEj Alvin Gaines* Y'ABE (Chairman)* Also James 
Miles, NAEB Executive Director and Richard Rider, Tape Network 
Manager* 

Meetings were held the afternoon and evening of February 7 s morning, 
afternoon and evening of February 8, and the morning of February 9* 

The results are covered in part by the attached materials: 

Statement of Purpose of NAEB Tape Network (drawn up uointly by 

both committees) 

Statement of Program Acceptance Standards (drawn up jointly by 

both committees) 

Statement of In-School Standards (addendum to above by the 

In-School Committee) 

Report of In-School Committee 

Recommendations For Program Selection Procedures (both committees) 


STATEMENT OF PURPOSE OF NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


The NAEB Tap© Network is a cooperative organization devoted to 
the dissemination of outstanding radio programs* It is operated by 
the National Association of Educational Broadcasters for its member 
stations, which are owned by educational institutions, municipalities, 
and public service agencies* It provides for the interchange of the 
best programs of its member stations, and procures and istributes 
programs from other sources* 

The NAEB Tape Network Acceptance and In-School Program Committees 
have drawn up the following statement of the purposes and objectives 
of the network: 

1* The inter««change among member stations of programs they 
themselves produceo This is done to provide a wider 
range of program material, to stimulate the upgrading of 
local program standards, and to encourage the production 
of broadcasts in needed subject areas• Programs thus 
circulated will include: 

a* Outstanding programs in all subject areas* 

b* Programs from member stations utilizing special 
local resources or staff skills* 

c e Special events recorded by the station to which 
^ the events are most accessible geographically* 

2o The distribution to members of programs produced under 
NAEB auspices for Tape Network use* 

3* The distribution to members of programs from non-NAEB 
sources * 

In addition the Tape Network may distribute educational programs 
to non-member stations, both commercial and non-commercial, and make 
available such programs for non-broadcast use* 




=1 


STATEMENT OF PROGRAM ACCEPTANCE STANDARDS 


The following statement is Intended as a guide In the selection 
of programs for use by the Tape Network* Obviously few programs can 
meet all the standards listed below; some programs excellently suited 
for the Tape Network may meet only a few of them* 

The Network as now constituted is to a large extent an outgrowth 
of the first Allerton House Radio Seminar of 195.9; therefore it is 
fitting that the committees should accept the basic educational 
programming principles determined at that meeting. As phrased by 
Robert B © Hudson* "The Allerton seminar asserted that the aims of 
educational broadcasting are the broad alms of education: 

"•• e education in a democracy has the responsibility of 
lifting the level of understanding and appreciation of 
the people* of giving the individual a knowledge of him~ 
self and his society, and of the tensions and perplexities 
in each; 

”o*.In a free society it is essential that the Individual 
have a continuing sense of belonging and participating* of 
keeping up with a complex and fast-moving world; 

"®®*it is the responsibility of education to foster and 
further that feeling of belonging and counting®"A/ 

The committees further agree that programs chosen for the Tape 
Network should meet certain minimum standards as to: (1) network 
suitability; ( 2 ) engineering standards; ( 3 ) audience appeal; 

(I 4 .) subject matter; and ( 5 ) presentation* 

1. Network Suitability• The programs distributed should 
be of widespread interest and should be selected to 
supplement the program resources of individual stations * 

2® Engineering Standards** The engineering standards of the 
programs distributed shall conform to the standards 
drawn up by the NAEB Tape Network Engineering Advisory 
Committee® 

3® Audience Appeal® The programs should attract and hold 
their Intended audiences® 

Subject Matter. The programs - again in Hudson’s words - 
should be t! distinguished by.® .high concern for integrity 
In the selection®..of materials* and by®•.consistent 
dedication to social purpose." Subject matter chosen 
should have the effect of: 

"( 1 ) informing* 

"( 2 ) stimulating the individual to organize and give 
meaning to Information* 

I T Robert B. Hudson, "Allerton House 1949, 1950", Hollywood Quarterly. 

Vol. V, No, 3, p. 239o ~ - 





"(3) contributing to the understandings that make 
for better human relations and adjustment 9 

"(4) broadening participation in the culture of 
our society* 

"(5) acting as an outlet for the varied expressions 
of the community which the station serves, and 
acting as a force within the community to help 
it solve its problems, and 

w (6) leading the way, by experiment, towards new 
forms and activities of broadcasting 

In choosing subject matter it should also be recognized 
n that people cannot come to like what they have never 
experienced,” for which reason we "must provide a variety 
of experience which permits, and encourages the development 
of tastes and interests.”2/ 

5® Presentation. Programs should meet high standards of 
presentation in writing, performance and direction. 

a. Writing: 

- * should be well organized, 

- « should be stimulating and challenging, 

- - should fulfill the requirements of an effective 

oral style (simplicity, clarity, brevity), 

- - should be free of superficiality, self-consciousness, 

and stereotyped situations and characterizations, 

- should be suitable in style to subject matter and 

intended audience© 

b« Performance: 

- - should be understandable and Intelligible, with 

suitable speech patterns, 

- ** should be, in the case of dramatic and documentary 

material, plausible and consistent, 

• * should be free of stereotyped characterizations, 

• - should maintain a high level of performance skills. 

c. Direction: 

- - should reflect a mature, intelligent grasp of the 

objectives of the program** 

- - should demonstrate an effective comman of the 

principles of timing, pace, perspective, and 
effective integration of music and sound effects. 



IN-SCHOOL STANDARDS ADDENDUM TO THE ABOVE 


The In-School Program Coircnitte© drew up the following 
relative to Network selections for in-school use, to point 
In addition to the above standards, programs chosen for in* 
broadcasting should: 

lo Enrich instruction In given subject area. 

2. Be geared for fairly specific school levels. 

3® Stress simplicity in both writing and presentation, 
k* Be paced for group listening* 

5>* Utilize vocabulary on acceptable level. 

6. Be accompanied by all available teacher material® 


-t- 


addendum 
out that, 
■school 


REPORT OF THE IN-SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


COST 

1* It is the recommendation of the In-School Committee: 

a 0 that school programs be presented to the membership in the 
form of two semi-annual packages« 
b 0 that the network offering of a certain number of packages 
during the year Include the two semi-annual school packages® 

Any subscribing station may elect to include the in-school 
offering in lieu of a comparable number of non-school 
offerings for the basic program service assessment fee the 
amount to be determined by the Executive Committee® 

DISTRIBUTION 

lo The present package-leg method of distribution will be used* 

each shipment to contain one complete term-series (II 4 . programs)* 
a* Teacher aid material will be sent directly to t he member station 
as soon as the station signs for the series 0 

2 * It is the recommendation of this committee that this distribution 
method be considered only as a temporary arrangement* pending 
further operational developments at headquarters 0 



RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PROGRAM SELECTION PROCEDURES 

Both committees agreed that areas of program need should be deter¬ 
mined through: polling network members; recommendations from the 
wo selection committees; suggestions from subject matter experts 
Vinthe various fields involved; and ideas from the headquarters 
secretariate 

Suggestions made by the committee members as to areas for program 
selection included the following; 


Social sciences—family life* mental health*, child develop¬ 
ment, community problems 

International Understanding*-background programs on world 
trouble areas 

Backgrounding of National Events 

Significant Cultural Offerings--drama, music, art 

Nontechnical Practical Presentations of General Information 

in such fields as law, and medicine as spplied to the 
average family,, 

General Health 

Dramatic Recreation of Historical Events 
Outstanding One-Time Programs—talksspecial events 
In-School Program Areas--nature study, physical science 

at the high school level, a&tural science® 
development of social attitudes 

The school program committee plans to meet twice yearly in 
connection with the annual Columbus and NAEB conventions in order to 
>nitor and select programs for network use* This committee is chosing 
Vts fall 1952 programs at the present meeting, and hopes to select 
winter 1952-53 programs at the November 1952 NAEB nenvention in 
Minneapolis* It was agreed by the headquarters stiff and the school 
committee'that all decisions as to in-school progrim offerings would 
be made by the committee, and that the headquarters would only imple¬ 
ment the committee*s decision* 

The selection of non-school programs, on the ether hand, will 
be done mostly by the headquarters staff, following the general 
policies laid down at this meeting in the statement of purpose and 
outline of program standardso 

The Network Manager will keep in close contact with the committee, 
however, will send them advance lists of the programs he intends to 
circulate, and will send them sample tapes for individual monitoring 
if requested* He will also refer to them for guidance in matters 
involving difficult policy or program quality choices© 

It was agreed by members of the Tape Network Acceptance Committee 
that the Committee should meet from time to time in the future upon 
call of the chairman if requests from committee members or headquarters 
staff made evident the need for such a meeting* 


OTHER BUSINESS TRANSACTED 


It was the reeling of the entire 
concentrate on programs of "timeless” 
and that it should circulate programs 
quality set them apart from what most 
for theraselveso 


group that the network should 
rather than ”immediate” interest* 
only if their subject matter and 
of the members could produce 


Salley recommended that networks and other program producing 
organizations be approached as for the release to the Tape Network 
of outstanding programs in their archives, such as n You Were There”, 
and the NBC series dramatizing great novels® 


A number of programs were monitored* Careful attention was given 
to the Federal Security Agency series being produced for Network use® 
After extended discussion it was decided to send the following telegram 
to President Seymour Siegels 

"Tape Network Committee after monitoring three FSA tapes unanimously 
recommends these not be offered to network reason poor audience 
appeal and mediocre presentation® Miles will suggest to Bemstien 
Monday no point FSA producing more programs for NAEB unless further 
consulation as to program quality leads to upgrading of output®” 

Rider drew up a resolution relative to headquarters pre^monitoring 
•of all programs sent to the network! he will supply the final version 
of the resolution to the committee members© 


Rider will also circulate to the entire network a codification 
of operating standards in regard to such things as the copying of 
programs and their use over commercial stations© 


NAEB TAPE NETWORK 




February 18, ±952 


TO: NAEB BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

TAPE NETWORK ACCEPTANCE COMMITTEE 
IN-SCHOOL PROGRAM CO!«T?EE 
MEMBER STATIONS 

SUBJECT: Summary of proceedings and re commendations of the NAEB Tap© Network Com¬ 
mittee and the In-School Program Committee., as approved by the Executive 
Committee of the Board of Directors 


The committees met jointly on February ?, 8, and 9 in Memorial Union of 
Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana* Meetings were held the afternoon and 
evening of February 7, morning, afternoon, and evening of February 8, and the 
morning of February 9® 

Present at the rn.eetings were: 

Tape Network Acceptance Committee : Buxton Paulu, Chairman, KUOM; 
Bernard Biick7WNXC7^Northrop Dawson, Jr,, K'UOM; Homer Salley, 

WFPL; Ray J* Stanley, Jr*, WHA. 

In-School Program Committee : Alvin Gaines, Chairman, WABE; 
~Maxgueriie Fleming, KSLH; M* McCabe Day, WSH| John Henderson, 
WBAA; James MacAndrow, WNYE. 

Fro m NAEB He adquarters : James Miles, Executive Director; Richard 
’ Rider, Network Manager 

The principle findings and recommendations are included in the following 

attached materials: 

Statement of Purpose of NAEB Tape Network (jointly compiled) 
Statemart of Program Acceptance Standards (jointly compiled) 
Additions^ In-School Standards (addendum to above by In-School 
Committee) 

Recommendations of In-School Committee on Distribution of In- 
School Programs 

Recommendations for Program Selection Procedures (both committees) 
Miscellaneous Recommendations 





2 


STATEMENT OF PURPOSE OF NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


The NAEB Tape Network is a cooperative organ!zation devoted to the 
dissemination of outstanding radio programs« It is operated by the National 
Association of Educational Broadcasters for its member stations« which are owned 
by educational institutions, municipalities, and public service agencies* It 
provides for the interchange of the best programs of its member stations, and 
procures and distributes programs from other sources* 

The NAEB Tape Network Acceptance Committee and the In-School Program 
Committee have drawn up the following statement of purposes and objectives of the 
Network* Subject to such directives as the Board of Directors may lay down, and 
in accordance with whatever conditions may be imposed by the originating sources, 
copyright holders, or unions involved, the Tape Network shall provide for:3/ 

1* The interchange among member stations of programs they themselves 
produce* This is done to provide a wider range of program material, 
to stimulate the upgrading of local program standards, and to en¬ 
courage the production of broadcasts in needed subject areas* 
Programs thus circulated will include: 

a* Outstanding programs in all subject areas. 

be Programs from member stations utilizing special local resources 
or staff skills. 

c. Special events recorded by the station to which the events are 
most accessible geographically* 

2. The distribution to members of programs produced under NAEB auspices 
for Tape Netwcrk use* 

3. The distribution to members of programs from non-HASH sources. 

In addition the Tape Network may distribute educational programs to non- 
member stations, both commercial and non-commercial, and make available such pro¬ 
grams for non-broadcast use* 


17' last sentence added by Executive Committee. 



3 


STATEMENT OP PROGRAM ACCEPTANCE STANDARDS 


The following statement is intended as a guide in the selection of pro¬ 
grams for use by the Tape Network* Obviously few programs can meet all the 
standards listed below? some programs excellently suited for the Tape Network may 
meet only a few of them* 

The Network as now constituted is to a large extent an outgrowth of the 
first A lie rt on House Radio Seminar of 1 9h9} therefore, it is fitting that the 
committees should accept the basic educational programming principles determined 
at that meetingc As phrased by Robert B. Hudson, "The Allerton seminar asserted 
that the aims of educational broadcasting are the broad aims of education: 

"...education in a democracy has the responsibility of lifting the 
level of imderstanding and appreciation of the people, of giving 
the individual a knowledge of himself and his society, and of the 
tensions and perplexities in each; 

"...in a free society it is essential that the individual have a 
continuing sense of belonging and participating, of keeping up 
with a complex and fast-moving world; 

"..ait is the responsibility of education to foster and further that 
feeling of belonging and counting."2/ 

The committees further agree that programs chosen for the Tape Network 
should meet certain minimum standards as to: (1) network suitability? (2) 
engineering standards? (3) audience appeal? (U) subject matter? and (5) presen¬ 
tation r. 


1. Network Suitability * The pro grams distributed should be of wide¬ 
spread interest and should be selected to supplement the program 
resources of individual stations. 

2. Engineering Standards* The engineering l' andards of the programs 
distributed shall oonfo m to the standard; drawn up by the NA'EB 
Tape Network Engineering Advisory Committee. 

3* Audience Appeal. The programs should attract and hold their 
intended audiences. 

ho Subject Matter. The programs - again in Hudson 3 s words - should be 
"distinguished by*..high concern for integrity in the selection... 
of materials, and by...consistent dedication to social purpose." 
Subject matter chosen should have the effect of: 

"(1) informing, 

"(2) stimulating the individual to organise and give meaning to 
information, 

I/ Robert B 0 Hudson, "Allerton House 19U9, 1950", Hollywoo d Quarterly , Vol. V, 

~ No. 3> p. 239. 





"(3) contributing to the understandings that snake for better human 
relations and adjustment* 

"(k) broadening participation in the culture of our society* 

"(5>) acting as an outlet for the varied expressions of the community 
which the station serves* and acting as a force \ii thin the com¬ 
munity to help it solve its problems* and 

”(6) leading the way* by experiment* towards new forms and activities 
of broadcasting * •* 

In choosing subject matter it should also be recognized "that people 
cannot come to like what they have never experienced,” for wftich 
reason we "must provide a variety of expe lience which ^permits and 
encourages the development of tastes and interests«"2r 

5>. Presentation, Programs should meet high standards of presentation 
in writing* performance and direction. 

a* Writing: 

• « should be well organized, 

- - should be stimulating and challenging, 

« - should fulfill the requirements of an effective oral style 
(simplicity, clarity, brevity), 

- - should be free of superficiality, self-consciousness, 

and stereotyped situations and characterisations * 

- - should be suitable in style to subject matter and intended 

audience* 

b. Performance: 

- - should be understandable and intelligible, with suitable 

speed patterns, 

- - should be, in the case of dramatic and documentary material, 

plausible and consistent, 

- should be free of stereotyped characterizations, 

-should maintain a high level of performance skills. 

c„ Direction: 

- - should reflect a mature, intelligent grasp of the objectives 

of tho program, 

-should demonstrate an effective command of the principles of 

timing, pace, perspective, and effective integration of 
music and sound effects. 



ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR 
IN-SCHOOL PROGRAMS 


The In-School Program Committee recommends the following additional 
standards for evaluating school programs* Such programs should: 

1* Enrich instruction in a given subject area, 

2. Be geared for fairly specific school levels, 

3o Stress simplicity in both writing and presentation. 

Be paced for group listening. 

Utilize vocabulary on an acceptable level, 

6« Be accompanied by all available teacher material. 


It further recommended that such information as is applicable be obtained from the 
originating source and distributed to the member stations• 

7 • Both committees spent some time auditioning programs» 

With the in-school committee this resulted in the selection of three of 
the desired four programs to be included in the first school package. The fourth 
program is to be selected at the earliest possible date by mailing audition copies 
to committee members» 

For the Network Acceptance Committee the group auditioning proved 
to be an excellent opportunity to apply the general standards which had been estab¬ 
lished* This was of considerable value to committee members and to the headquarters 
staff. Such occasions enable the committee members and the network staff to reach 
a higher degree of understanding on scheduling programs on the networko 

8, There was general agreement that the package method of distribution 
was not satisfactory* but that it should be continued as the most workable method 
pending the installation of a mass duplicator. 


N&EB TAPE NETWORK 


March 2T & . 1952 

BREAKDOWN OP 

PACKAGE #5 & #6 & # S~I ACCEPTANCE 

Packages #5 and #6 are the regular packages bicycled on the 
twelve network legs* Package # $*I is the in-school program 
packageo 


Number of Stations Taking Package §$ and #6 3? 

Number of Stations Taking Pckage #5 and # S~I 9 

Number of Stations Taking Only Poke # S«I X 

(Due to summer hiatus) 

Number of Stations Taking All Three Packages _ Ik 

Total “~5T 


STATIONS ACCEPTING AIL THREE PACKAGES 

KMUW University of Wichita., Wichita, Kansas 

KSIH Board of Education, Sto Louis, Missouri 

KWSC State College of Washington, ^Pullman , Washington 

WABE Board of Education, Atlanta, Georgia 

MBAA Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana 

I®00 Board of Education, Newark, New Jersey 

WBUR Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 

WEPS Board of Education, Elgin, Illinois 

WFPL Louisville Free Public Library, Louisville, Kentucky 

WGPS Greensboro Public Schools, Greensboro, North Carolina 

WMCR Western Michigan College, Kalamazoo, Michigan 

WSHS Sew&nhaka Hi$i School, Floral Park, New York 

WSUI State University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 

WTHS Division of Vocational, Education, Miami, Florida 



2- 





FIRST YEAR 

EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING PROJECT 


A Report 



from 


NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 

to 


W. K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION 


.history was made in educational broadcasting.” 

These were the words John Dunn, Director of NAEB Region V, used 
to describe the first regional conference in NAEB history. This 
conference was a long dreamed of high point of the past year for 
NAEB. It was finally possible this year under terms of the grant 
from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. 

Region V of NAEB is composed of the s tates of Missouri, 
Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Texas, and Louisi¬ 
ana. This land of wide open spaces was also a land of great dis¬ 
tances between educational broadcasters. Jfeny of the people who 
found it possible to attend this conference with Foundation help 
had in the past literally never talked to another person engaged in 
educational broadcasting. Who then could better counsel these people 
than practical educational broadcasters? It was therefore logical 
that the national officers of NAEB, all practical educational broad¬ 
casters, be chosen as the consultants for this meeting. 

The results will be felt for a long time. Immediately 

they can best be summed up by quoting two paragraphs from the report 

of John Dunn, who originally fathered the idea of regional divisions 

of NAEB and who sparkplugged this meeting. 

”REGIONALLY , I believe that Region V, for the first time, 
has a deeper respect for and understanding of the National 
Association of Educational Broadcasters than even before; 
regional members know their national officers and are 
greatly impressed with their ability; regional members 
know each other in a truly personal way, regional members 
realize that others have problems sometimes greater than 
their own; regional members are willing to help others so 
far as it is in their ability in the solution of problems; 
regional members are truly inspired to do bigger and better 
things in educational broadcasting. 



"NATIONALLY , I think the national officers got a real in¬ 
sight into the problems of small operations; they know 
what educational broadcasting is doing at the »grass 
roots ' level. We proved to ourselves that we could 
operate a conference in a helpful way without any so- 
cal3ed 'big shots'." 

In the natter of regional meetings, as with everything 
else it attempted this past year, the educational broadcasting pro¬ 
ject was experimental. It was a shake-down year. To get a true 
perspective on the problems faced and solved by this activity, it 
is perhaps wise to turn briefly to history. 

The idea of educational broadcasting was bom at the same 
time the technical problems of broadcasting were solved. Early in 
the 1920's people began talking about the great potentialities for 
mass education via radio. Some who thought of radio as a panacea 
to all educational problems soon lost some of their enthusiasm 
when broadcasting didn't fall into the accustomed and time-tested 
educational patterns. 

A group of the stouter-hearted individuals who realized 
that radio would be important in its long term aspect continued 
to broadcast and to talk about the present accomplishments and 
even greater potentialities of the new medium. 

This organization of the 20»s, feeling the need for a 
stronger association, formed and activated NAEB in 193lw During 
the years prior to the advent of FM, NAEB continued to serve as 
the focal point for the exchange of information among those 
interested in educational broadcasting. The end of the war and 
the opening of the FM band with its allocation of 20 percent of 
the FM channels for educational purposes — largely at the insti¬ 
gation of NAEB — meant that the possibilities for the growth of 
educational broadcasting were now increased many fold. 



NAEB aid its members rightly decided that this was the 
time to strengthen the organization from within* The first thing 
attempted was a strengthened publication* NAEB had long issued 
a monthly News-Letter varying from four to ten pages and contain¬ 
ing information of and for members* This was now expanded to 
thirty to forty pages monthly with an attempt to secure all news 
bearing on educational broadcasting* From the original News- 
Letter circulation of less than fifty, there are now nearly four 
hundred News-Letters distributed each month* 

Other members felt the need for group determination of 
educational broadcasting's "aims and responsibilities*" These were 
spelled out during the summer of 1 9h9 at the first Allerton Seminar 
on educational broadcasting* There was a subsequent seminar in 
1950 which concerned itself with the problems of interpreting 
educational material via radio* These seminars gave form to the 
idea of the NAEB Tape Network* which was quickly implemented and 
which has continued to grow to it present position of importance* 

When it appeared that education's stake in the television 
picture was about to be determined, the NAEB President called a 
special meeting with these seminar attendees as the nucleus* 

This meeting led to the formation of the Joint Committee on 
Educational Television, which has been the guiding force in 
securing a reservation of 2h2 T.V. channels for education* 

It had been felt that if NAEB were to progress as speed¬ 
ily as the occasion seemed to demand, it would have to have 
immediate outside support. It was at this point that the proposal 
which began the Kellogg Foundation Educational Broadcasting Pro¬ 
ject was presented to the Foundation. At this same time other 
approaches were being made to other foundations for money in 






different areas* At about the same time the Kellogg Foundation 
made its grant, the Fund for Adult Education made a grant for the 
production of several series of distinguished radio programs, and 
another grant for the conducting of T.V. monitoring projects. At 
the same time money was made available to two other areas of edu¬ 
cational broadcasting — The Joint Committee on Educational Tele¬ 
vision and WOI-TV, the only television station in the country owned 
by an educational institution* 

It was readily apparent that the headquarters office of 
NAEB would have a large size job in merely keeping people informed 
of what the various NAEB members and NAEB projects were doing* 

This important job is being done. NAEB policy persons are today 
better informed about the many programs of NAEB than ever before 
in its history. Lines of communication and forms of procedure 
are being worked out rapidly. 

To the NAEB member, headquarters provides that all- 
important service which has been sorely lacking in years past — 
namely, a needed pool of information about educational broadcast¬ 
ing which is readily available. While the members have been call¬ 
ing upon headquarters for specific-information for some time, it is 
only relatively recently that they have been provided with unsolicited 
helps in the fields of promotion, programming, television, and many 
others. Many members have expressed their appreciation for these 
helps, and they will be expanded in the future. 

NAEB has for a long time had a number of committees. These 
functioned in the past mainly through correspondence. Meetings 
involving the stimulating face-to-face exchange of ideas were rarely 
possible. In recent years the NAEB Board has been the only group 
to meet regularly — usually twice a year. This past year the 


NAEB Board has been able to meet four times) the Executive Commit¬ 
tee has met five times 5 the Adult Education Committee four tines 5 
the Tape Network In-School Program Committee twice; the Tape Net¬ 
work Acceptance Committee and the Tape Network Engineering Com¬ 
mittee, once each* The headquarters office has prepared the major¬ 
ity of background material used at the above meetings* This has 
greatly expanded the possible items for consideration by the com¬ 
mittees* 

Personal visitations were realized as an integral part in 
strengthening individual operations. The Executive Director visited 
eighteen member institutions during the past year. In addition, 

NAEB was represented by headquarters personnel at eight meetings 
of other organizations. 

The Kellogg Foundation has provided much more than money 
for this project. The advice and consultation of Mr. Hugh Masters 
and Mr. Robert VanDuyn has been sought and gladly given upon several 
occasions. Their stories of hoi* other organizations handled similar 
problems have often provided th§ key to the solution of some of our 
problems. At the same time, they have made scrupulously sure the 
ideas eventually carried out were those of NAEB. 

This has been a year of super activity on the part of 
those charged with the responsibility of determining the policies 
for educational broadcasting. It has been a year strengthened by 
the many new groups entering the educational broadcasting field. 

It has been a year made even more glowing by the unfulfilled prom¬ 
ise of educational television. Measured by the past, this has been 
a year of tremendous growth. If the potentialities for the future 
come anywhere near true, it will eventually seem that we have 


moved at a snail f s pace. This has been a necessary year. Neces¬ 
sary steps have been taken toward our ultimate goal: sound educa¬ 
tional broadcasting. 

In summary, the educational broadcasting project this past 
year has meant; 

(1) That the first real headquarters for educational 
broadcasting has been established. This means that not only do 
educational broadcasters have a place to turn to seek information, 
but that those not now directly connected with educational broad¬ 
casting know there is a centrality of thought and action in this 
area. 

(2) That there has been a chance for educational broad¬ 
casters to get together, sharing in ideas and solving problems in 
face-to-face situations. 

(3) That there was held the first regional meeting in 
the history of educational broadcasting ; that the first real help 
has gotten to the educational broadcasters who are far from the cen¬ 
ters of educational broadcasting and who have been unable to attend 
the major meetings. 

(U) That the first provisions of central service have now 
been established so that educational broadcasters are securing the 
best information available on promotion, engineering, production, 
ideas, and management. 

(5) That the tape network is now on a sound footing, 
able to supply eight to ten hours weekly of high quality programs 
to supplement and strengthen the individual station offerings. 

This brings us to a discussion of the NAEB Tape Network 


to which we now turn, 


THE NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


June, 1952 


INTRODUCTION 

The NAEB Tape Network came into being in January of 
1950 when the series WE HUMAN BEINGS was offered to 19 stations. 

In January of 1951 the headquarters of the tape network operation 
was moved from WNYC in New York to the University of Illinois. 

There it was operated under the guidance of the Division of Communi¬ 
cations. In June of 1951 the network began operations under the 
grant from the Kellogg Foundation. To indicate fully the progress 
made by the tape network, this report summarizes its activities 
from the beginning in January, 1950. 

STATION PARTICIPATION AND PROGRAM DISTRIBUTION 
When the network operation was moved to the University of 
Illinois in January of 1951* there were 1*1 stations participating in 
the service. One copy of each program was circulated among a selected 
number of these stations. Because of the limited facilities, it was 
not possible to offer all programs to all stations. At this time 
the average monthly production of tapes was 17 reels, and the 
average monthly air time was 118 hours.* 

Shortly after January, 1951* an effort was made to in¬ 
crease the network’s output. Four "legs” or groups of stations were 

^Throughout this report “air time” indicates the following conputa- 
tion: Total running time of all programs distributed multiplied by 
the number of stations using the programs. Includes only regular 
series. Does not include extra programs or in-school programs. 








established* It was intended that four copies of all programs 
would be made and a copy circulated on each of the four ‘'legs' 1 * 

This increased the average monthly production of tapes to 53 reels , 
and the average monthly air time to 167 hours# This also made it 
possible to offer all programs to all stations# Such was the net¬ 
work on June 1, 1951* the starting date of the grant from the 
W, K# Kellogg Foundation. 

The first steps taken under the grant were the purchasing 
of recording equipment and tape, and the hiring of additional per¬ 
sonnel. The equipment purchased was so selected that it could 
serve in the duplicating process while the search for a large 
duplicating machine was conducted. The number of M legs ,, or groups 
of stations was increased to 8. The number of stations participat¬ 
ing increased to 52. Four months after the start of the grant the 
average monthly air time increased to 1,082 hours. These figures 
represent a significant improvement in the service. M°re programs 
were being distributed to more stations in less time. 

Within a few months the number of stations increased to 
70. The annual NAEB convention was held in Biloxi, Mississippi, 
in November, 1951* At this meeting the NAEB Board of Directors 
took up the problem of levying a fee on stations using the network* 
It was deemed wise to put to the test the willingness of stations 
to support the network operation. A schedule of assessment fees 
was devised and the matter was put to the menbership for a vote. 
(See Appendix "C".) The membership approved the plan. Thus, prior 
to the need for income from the stations to augment the annually 
decreasing funds from the Kellogg grant, the member stations agreed 
to pay a substantial annual assessment fee. The results of this 


action have been highly encouraging. 8 stations felt they could 
not afford to continue the s ervice on a paying basis. This left 
a total of 62 stations. Since then soit© have returned to the net¬ 
work, and a few new stations have joined. The present total of 
paying stations is 65. Three additional stations have asked for 
the service indicating that with the next assessment period, begin¬ 
ning July 1, 1952, there will be 68 paying participants in the 
network. 

By January of 1952 the network achieved its present opera¬ 
tional level. The average monthly tape production increased to 
l,06l reels. There were now 12 "legs 1 '. Average monthly air time 
increased to 1,231 hours. This indicates the scope of the opera¬ 
tion at the time of this report. 

PROGRAMS AND THEIR UTILIZATION 
The tape network has offered 73 regular series of programs 
plus 12 extra series or individual prograirs, totalling 90U individual 
programs. This represents 12,797 hours and 30 minutes of air tine.* 
The programs have been obtained from a wide variety of 
sources including: member stations $ the British Broadcasting Corpora¬ 
tion j the Cooper Unions the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation; the 
University of Berne, Switzerland; the Federal Security Agency; the 
Mutual Security Agency; the Armed Forces of the United States; the 
United Nations; UNESCO; commercial stations and networks; private 
foundations; and other public service agencies. The programs have 
been c oncerned with many important subject areas and were presented 
in numerous formats. 

The percent of stations using regular program series has 


# See Appendix n B 





run from a low of 20$ to a high of 100$ with an average percent¬ 
age of use of 66$, This is an encouragingly high percentage in 
view of the fact that use is entirely optional on the part of 
the station. No effort is made to increase the usage of programs 
except to select programs of continually higher quality. This 
use of the network service has also been achieved with a distribu¬ 
tion system that cannot guarantee a regular delivery of tapes on a 
sufficiently safe basis to insure complete regularity of schedul¬ 
ing. This bodes well for the network’s future. 

TOWARD A SOLUTION OF SOME PROBLEMS 

Two important steps were taken during the past year to 
help solve some of the network’s most pressing problems. 

In January there met in Urbana a group of engineers and 
invited electronics specialists. This group was concerned with the 
technical problems of tape recording and the mass reproduction of 
tapes. Tape recording is such a new process that the extant techni¬ 
cal standards are incomplete. Thus it became obvious that techni¬ 
cal standards would have to be devised by our own members. A pre¬ 
liminary report was submitted. The standards are now being revised 
and will soon be published as a technical guide for the entire net¬ 
work operation. 

In February there met in Lafayette, Indiana, the Tape 
Network Program Acceptance Committee and the In-School Programs 
Committee. These committees were confronted with the problem of 
establishing policies and evaluative criteria for programming the 
network. A greatly increased mutuality of thinking on the subject 
of programs resulted. A report of these findings was published 
for the information of all member stations. The In-School Programs 





Committee took further action in implementing an active distribution 
of programs designed for classroom use in elementary and secondary 
schools. This distribution is now a successful reality* 

THE OPERATION 

At this writing the network is still required to operate 
on a '’bicycle’* basis. The equipment, tapes, and personnel made 
possible by the Kellogg grant have permitted expanding this opera¬ 
tion to a maximum degree. However, optimum service is not possible 
under a ”leg-bicycle” system. There are too many possibilities of 
shipping errors, delays in the mail, and actual losses of tapes. 
Experience indicates that the most effective operation is a direct 
two-way service wherein each station is supplied directly from head¬ 
quarters with its own copies of all programs. This is possible only 
with a machine capable of duplicating tapes in mass volume. Such 
a machine is now contracted for and will be installed no later 
than July 1, 1952. Starting with the programs to be issued in 
September, 1952, each station will receive its own copy of all 
programs, and the network will achieve the operating efficiency 
toward which it has been striving* 

The network has acquired approximately 5*200 reels of 
recording tape. This quantity has made possible the continually 
expanding service. Tape supply has been one of the major chronic 
problems. This situation has not changed. With the advent of 
direct headquarters-station service the need for tapes will be in¬ 
creased. The only alternative to an increased tape s upply is a re¬ 
duction in the volume of programming distributed. At this time it 
is anticipated that approximately 10,000 reels of tape will be 
needed to keep the network operating at peak efficiency* 



CONCLUSIONS 


The NAE3 Tape Network has achieved a position of eminence 
in the field of educational broadcasting# It is now enjoying a 
national, and even an international, reputation# It is supplying 
a significant program service to the vast majority of non-commercial 
educational stations in the United States# It is providing the 
residents of the major population centers with a truly alternative 
radio service# It is clear that this has been possible because of 
the grant from the Kellogg Foundation* It would not have been 
possible to weather the early days of the operation without this 
help# It is equally clear that continuing support by the using 
stations will be accomplished to a degree in excess of the most 
generous estimates# 

This much has been achieved before the network reached 
its maximum efficiency# The full potential of this idea will not be 
realized until the mass duplicator is installed. The keen enthusiasm 
expressed by member stations has been developed while operating 
under a system that precludes regular, dependable, and timely service# 
This will be altered during the summer of 19^2# 

Program resources are maturing and developing at a most 
encouraging rate# National organizations, governmental agencies, 
foreign governments, international organizations, and private pub¬ 
lic service groups are now exercising the initiative in providing 
programs for the network. In the fall of 19^2 the network will 
begin the distribution of programs produced under a grant from the 
Fund for Adult Education# This project was predicated on the exist¬ 
ence and efficient operation of a tape network service. Plans are 
developing for extensive cooperative program production by member 
stations * 



In view of all of this, it is inpossible to look upon the 
future of the tape network with anything but enthusiastic optimism* 


SECOND 


YEAR 


EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING PROJECT 


A Proposal 


from 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 


to 


W. K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION 


PLANS FOR 1952-53 


Plans for utilization of the money outlined in the at¬ 
tached budget statement can again be divided into three general 
areas t 

(1) Network operation 

(2) Seminars, meetings, etc. 

(3) Central office functions 

The NAEB Tape Network has been seriously hampered this 
past year by the lack of the key piece of equipment, the mass dupli¬ 
cator. With its arrival now seemingly only a matter of days away, 
we are making many plans not only to adequately use this piece of 
equipment but to change the operation of the network so that it can 
more speedily and more surely distribute the many fine programs which 
are available to it. The major hope is that we can dispense entirely 
with the system of legs and start a system of direct distribution to 
each member station. We are also looking forward to handling some 
exceptional program material, especially the Adult Education Project*s 
series. 

The arrival of the duplicator rreans not only a change of 
methods but also a change of personnel and their duties. These 
plans are again well under way. One new rrBiriber will be added to 
our staff in June and another perhaps in the fall as the details of 
the operation are developed. The tape duplicator will also solve, 
we hope, another knotty problem, that of quality reproduction. The 
engineering group is still working on tape reproduction standards 
and is making progress toward the ultimate goal of top quality 
masters, top quality duplicates, and top quality reproduction by 


the local stations 


By a financial twist the seminar portion of the operation 
gets off to a real start even before the fiscal year begins. At 
this writing, twenty-one public school broadcasters will meet in 
Allerton House, June 15-25* This seminar will be under the guidance 
of H. B. McCarty, Director, Station WHA, University of Wisconsin; 

I. Keith tyler. Director, Office of Radio Education, Ohio State 
University; Alvin Gaines, Program Director, Station WABE, Atlanta 
(Georgia) Board of Education; and Jim Macandrew, Director, New 
York City Board of Education, It will have as consultants; Harold 
Hand, Professor of Education, University of Illinois; Wilbur Schramm, 
Dean of the Division of Communications, University of Illinois; 
William E. Levenson, Asst, Supt, of Schools, Cleveland, Ohio; Ben¬ 
jamin Bloom, Examiner's Office, University of Chicago; Martha Gable, 
TV Co-ordinator, Philadelphia Public Schools; and Gordon Hullfish, 
Professor of Education, Ohio State University, 

These people should solve not only some of their operational prob¬ 
lems but should also provide a good answer to the ever asked question, 
"Where does broadcasting fit into the operation of a public school 
system?" 

Plans are rapidly being completed for the television work¬ 
shop at Iowa State College this summer. This is to be a cooperative 
venture with Iowa State College and perhaps the Joint Committee on 
Educational Television. It should bring toegther those people most 
actively engaged in preparing for the operation of educational tele¬ 
vision stations or production centers. 

It is the plan w ith all seminars to make the irrportant item 
the amount and kind of information the attendee can take home and 
apply. The Norman, Oklahoma, regional meeting was this type of 



meeting. It is a pattern which will be followed in at least 
two other regions this year* Regions II and VI have already 
submitted preliminary plans for such a meeting in their area. 

No Board action has been taken at this time, but it is the feel¬ 
ing that these meetings will not be held until late fall or winter** 

The NAEB Convention in Minneapolis in early November will, 
of course, receive much consideration from headquarters* Should it 
become necessary to support this convention by bringing in outstand¬ 
ing speakers or in other ways, the budget is flexible enough to 
handle it* 

The NAEB Board when meeting to consider the attached 
budget held lengthy discussions on the portion allocated to seminars* 
There was a general realization that there were more jobs which 
needed doing this year than there was money available to do them* 

The Executive Director was authorized to proceed along the lines 
approved but to continue to explore the possibilities in other 
areas and, if possible, to make some concrete plans for such work. 

The Board then wished to reconsider and possibly petition the 
Kellogg Foundation for additional money for work in this area dur- 
int this current fiscal year. 

In the central office area, main effort will be given 
over to the integration and coordination of the many NAEB projects 
such as the TV monitoring project, the Adult Education Project, and 
others* It is hoped that not only can the liaison function be 
strengthened but that many of the projects not now operating 
directly from the central office will be able to gear their opera¬ 
tions to it in a more concrete way. Of course, the normal function 
of the distribution of literature, of maintaining the files, of 


doing as much of the secretariat work as is possible for the officers 
will be maintained* 

Summing up the meaning of the attached budget in terms of 
NAEB plans for 1952-53, this means that: 

(1) We will have for the first time a really effective 
tape network able to furnish a copy of every program direct to 
every station. This allows for greater flexibility and does 
away with the impossible situations involved in the “bicycle" 
method. 

(2) We will hold the first seminar devoted to considera¬ 
tion of the role of broadcasting by the public schools* 

(3) We will hold two more regional conferences* This 
enables us to take the most advanced knowledge on educational 
broadcasting directly to the small broadcasters and school systems. 

(b) We will have a more effective central office in a 
better position to serve educational broadcasters generally and to 
focus and unify the exciting activities now under way. 

(5) We will have the opportunity for work groups and 
NAEB committees to meet occasionally and restudy the problemsbe- 
fore educational broadcasters and the proper functioning of the 
national organization and its programs. Certain plans for this 
type of stu$r are now under way. NAEB officers will undoubtedly 
wish to talk to the Foundation in more detail about this later. 


BUDGET FOR NASB HEADQUARTERS AND THE NAEB TAPE NETWORK 
July 1, 1952, to June 30, 1953 


OVERALL BUDGET 

SALARIES AND WAGES 
SEMINARS, ETC. 
SUPPLIES AND EXPENSES 
OVERHEAD 
TOTAL 


$27,600©00 
17,700.00 
10,000.00 
2 , 525*00 


BREAKDOWNS 


SALARIES AND WAGES 

Rate Only 

Executive Director 

$10,000,00 

Secretary 

2,900.00 

Assistant Network Manager 

3,900.00 

Traffic Manager 

2,900.00 

Shipping Manager 

2,900.00 

Duplicator Operator 

3,500.00 

Extra Labor 

1,500.00 

TOTAL S & W 


SUPPLIES AND EXPENSES 


SEMINARS, ETC. 


Seminar 

$ 5,ooo«oo 

Regional Meetings 

k,000.00 

Executive Committee Meetings 

2,000.00 

Research - internal 

1,000.00 

Research - external 

2,000.00 

NAEB Committees 

1 , 500.00 

Office travel 

2,200*00 

TOTAL SEMINARS 


TOTAL 


INTERNAL BUDGETS 


PROJECT AREA 


Salaries and Wages 

$12,900.00 

Seminars, etc. 

16,700.00 

Overhead 

1,700.00 

Supplies and Expenses 

2,700.00 

TOTAL PROJECT AREA 


TAPE NETWORK AREA 


Salaries and Wages 

flil, 700.00 

Travel 

1,000.00 

Overhead 

825.00 

Supplies and Expenses 

7,300.00 

TOTAL TAPE NETWORK AREA 


TOTAL 


INCONE 


PROJECT AREA 


from Kellogg Foundation 

$3U,ooo.oo 


$27,600.00 

$10,000.00 


$17,700.00 


$31*, 000.00 


$23,825.00 


$3U,000.00 


TAPE NETWORK AREA 

from Kellogg Foundation 
from member assessment fees 

TOTAL 


$16,500.00 

7,325.00 


$23,825.00 


$57,825.00 


$57,825.00 


$ 57 , 825.00 


$57,825.00 













APPENDIX "A 1 


HISTORICAL SUMMARY OF THE NUMBER OF STATIONS 
PARTICIPATING IN THE NAEB TAPE NETWORK 


February, 1950-The first series to be distributed by WNYC, 

originator of the NAEB Tape Network, was 
WE HUMAN BEINGS. 

This series was distributed to.19 stations. 

December, 1950---The tenth series, IDEAS AND THEIR COMMUN¬ 
ICATION, was the last series to be distributed 
by WNYC. The Headquarters was moved to the 
University of Illinois in January, 1951- 

IDEAS AND THEIR COMMUNICATION was distributed to 4l stations 

May, 1951-In the NAEB Tape Network Progress Report #2 

Network manager, Dick Rider, reported that 
the number of stations now being served by 
the NAEB Tape Network was.43 stations. 

June, 1952-The number of stations increased to .46 stations. 

July, 1951 -Of the 69 active members of NAEB, the number 

receiving network service was. 52 stations. 

November, 1951---With the start of the package method of dis¬ 
tribution, the network was servicing. 70 stations 

December, 1951—A service assessment fee was levied for the 
NAEB Tape Network service. 

January, 1952-Of the 79 active members, those receiving 

network service were. 62 stations. 

May, 1952-The number of stations now being serviced 

by the NAEB Tape Network totalled. 65 stations. 

July, 1952-With the addition of three new stations, it 

is estimated that the number of stations to be 

serviced by the network will be.....68 stations 















LIST OF STATIONS CURRENTLY PARTICIPATING 
IN THE NAE3 TAPE NETWORK 


KBPS (AM) 
KCVN (FM) 
KDPS (FM) 
KFJM (AM) 
KFKU (AM) 
KANU (FM) 
KMUW (FM) 
KOAC (AM) 
KSAC (AM) 
KBPS (FM) 
KSLH (FM) 
KUOM (AM) 
KUOW (FM) 
KUSC (FM) 
KUSD (AM) 
KWAR (fm) 
KWAX (FM) 
KWGS (FM) 
KWLC (AM) 
KWSC (AM) 
WABE (AM) 
WAER (FM) 
WBAA (AM) 
WBEZ (FM) 
WBGO (FM) 
WBGU (FM) 
WBKY (FM) 
WBUR (FM) 
WCAL (AM) 
WDTR (FM) 
WDUQ (FM) 
WEPS (FM) 
WE VC (FM) 
WFTU (FM) 
WFPL (FM) 
WGBH (FM) 
WGPS (FM) 
WGRE (FM) 
WHA (AM) 
WILL (AM) 
WIUC (FM) 
WKAR (AM) 
WKAR (FM) 
WKSU (FM) 
WESU (FM) 
WMCR (FM) 
WMMI (FM) 
WMUB (FM) 
WNAD (AM) 
WEAD (FM) 
WNAS (FM) 
WNUR (FM) 


Benson Polytechnic Institute 
College of the Pacific 
Des Mpine§ Public Schools 
University of North Dakota 
University of Kansas 

it tt ti 

University of Wichita 

Oregon State College 

Kansas State College 

San Diego City Schools 

Board of Education 

University of Minnesota 

University of Washington 

University of Southern California 

University of South Dakota 

Wartburg College 

University of Oregon 

University of Tulsa 

Luther College 

State College of Washington 

Board of Education 

Syracuse University 

Purdue University 

Board of Education 

Board of Education 

Bowling Green State University 

University of Kentucky 

Boston University 

St Olaf College 

Board of Education 

Duquesne University 

Board of Education 

Evansville College ’ 

Indiana University 
Free Public Library 

Lowell Instit. Co-op B/dcasting Council 
Greensboro Public Schools 
DePauw University 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Illinois 

IT If Tt 

Michigan State College 

If M ft 

Kent State University 
Louisiana State University 
Western Michigan College 
Municipal Junior College 
Miami University 
University of Oklahoma 

»i it n 

New Albany City Schools 
Northwestern University 


Portland, Ore. 
Stockton, Calif. 
Des'Moines, Iowa 
Grand Forks, N.D. 
Lawrence, Kan. 

ti ii 

Wichita, Kans. 
Corvallis, Ore. 
Manhattan, Kan. 

San Diego, Calif. 
St. Louis, Mo 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Seattle, Wash. 

Los Angeles, Calif 
Vermillion, S.D. 
Waverly, Iowa 
Eugene, Ore. 

Tulsa, Okla. 
Decorah, Iowa 
Pullman, Wash. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Syracuse, N.Y. 
Lafayette, Ind. 
Chicago, Ill. 
Newark, N.J. 

Bowling Green, Ohio 
Lexington, Ky. 
Boston, Mass. 
Northfield, Minn. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Elgin, Ill. 
Evansville, Ind. 
Bloomington, Ind. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Boston, Mass. 
Greensboro, N.C. 
Greencastle, Ind. 
Madison, Wis. 
Urbana,Ill. 

East Lansing, Mich. 

t! T? If 

Kent, Ohio 
Baton Rouge, La. 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Meridian, Miss. 
Oxford, Ohio 
Norman, Okla. 

ii ii 

New Albany, Ind. 
Evanston, Ill. 


WNYC (AM) 
WNYC (FM) 
WNYE (FM) 
WOI (AM) 
WOI (FM) 
WOSU (AM) 
WOSU (FM) 
WOUI (FM) 
WSAJ (AM) 
WSHS (FM) 
WSOU (FM) 
WSUI (AM) 
KSUI (FM) 
WTDS (FM) 
WTHS (FM) 
WUOA (FM) 
WOT (FM) 
WSV (FM) 
WVSH (FM) 
WWHI (FM) 


Municipal Broadcasting System 

IT II II 

Board of Education 
Iowa State College 

it it it 

Ohio State University 

ti it ii 

Ohio University 
Grove City College 
Board of Education 
Seton Eall College 
State University of Iowa 

Board of Education 
Lindsay Hopkins Vocational School 
University of Alabama 
University of Tennessee 
University of Scranton 
School City of Huntington 
Wilson Junior High School 


Possible additions to the network as of July 1, 1952. 

KANW (FM) Board of Education 

WDET (FM) Wayne University 

WUNC (FM) University of North Carolina 


New York, N.Y. 

it ii ii 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Ames, Iowa 

ti ii 

Columbus, Ohio 

ti ti 

Athens, Ohio 
Grove City, Pa. 
Floral Park. 

South Orange, N.J. 
Iowa City, Iowa 

it ii h 

Toledo, Ohio 
Miami, Fla. 
University, Ala. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
Scranton, Pa. 

Huntington, Ind. 
Muncie, Ind. 


Albuquerque, N.M. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Chapel Hill, N.C. 


SERIES DISTRIBUTED BY NAEB TAPE NETWORK AND THEIR UTILIZATION 


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Air 

Time x 

o o o o 

O O O m 

O) 4 w on 

oj cvj la on 

m h 


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O VO \£) o 

(A Jfr VO - 3 - 'Jv- 

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No. of 
Stations 
Using 

on c— co .d - 
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Total Air 
Time of 

Each Series 

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Length of 
Each 

Prog.(Min) 

60:00 

60:00 

30:00 

15:00 

jstations ir 

60:00 

60:00 

30:00 

30:00 

60:00 

15:00 

15:00 

30:00 

30:00 

60:00 

p 

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No. of 
Programs 

on oj co h 

rH rH rH 

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HI 


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BBC 

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CO 

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xi 

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WNYC 

BBC 

20 th Century 
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WILL 

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wosu 

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Denver U. & 
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BBC 

WNYC &Fed. 

Pec. Comm. 

& WU 0 M 

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| 


Series & Title 

51-3 Music for the Connoisseur 

51-4 Women 

51-5 The Nature of the Universe 

51-6 The New World of Atomic Energy 

p 

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51-7 Music for the Connoisseur 

51-8 BBC World Theatre 

51-9 The People Act 

51-10 Stories *n Stuff 

51-11 Festival Concerts 

51-12 International Visitor 

51-13 Masterworks Story 

51-14 America and the World 

51-15 Bligh of the Bounty 

51-16 U.S. Army Band Concerts & 

U. of Michigan Symphonic Band 

p 

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51-17 Music for the Connoisseur 



() Stations not reporting their use of the series, plus the originating station. 

























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APPENDIX «C" 


TAPE NETWORK INCOME FROM SERVICE ASSESSMENT ?EES 


Network Service Assessment Fees are levied on the same basis as stations are 
charged for regular NAEB annual dues. The stations are divided into three classes 
according to transmitter power. 

Class u A n £kw. or more 

Class "B" lkw. to iu9 kw. 

Class "C" Less than lkw. 


The membership voted at the annual convention at Biloxi, Mississippi, in 
November, 1951, to levy an annual service assessment fee for the network service. 
The rates established for the fiscal year July 1, 1952, to June 30, 1953 were: 
Class "A" $200.00 

Class "B" 125.00 

Class «C" 75.00 

The membership further voted to assess fees for the six-month period January 1, 
1952, to June 30, 1952, at half the rate for the first full fiscal year. 


These charges break down as follows: 
Period-January 1, 1952, to June 30, 1952 


Number of stations in each classification 
Class "A” 16 

Class «B M 15 

Class "C“ 30 

Total 6l 

Plus WNYC 
carried fre e 1 

61 Stations participating in Network 
(Jan. 1952)* 


Rates 


Revenue 


Class 

"A” 

$ 100.00 

Class 

f»B« 

62.50 

Class 

«C H 

37.50 

Class 

•’A" 

$1,600.00 

Class 

»B" 

937.50 

Class 

MC M 

1 , 125.00 

Total 

13,662.50 


Period-—July 1, 1952, to June 30, 1953 


Number of stations in each classification 
Class "A" 20 

Class "B n 16 

Class «C" 32 

Total 


* Stations KSDS, WNXE, & WOUI were added late in this period and are not counted 
in the number of stations nor revenue received. They will not be billed until 
fiscal year 1952-1953« 






Rates 


l* 


Class "A" $200.00 
Class "B" 125.00 
Class ”C" 75.00 


Revenue (Estimated) 

Class "A" 
Class "B" 
Class "C" 


Total 


$4,000.00 

2,000.00 

2,400.00 

$8,400.00 


> 



NAEB HEADQUARTJ 


TO: NAEB Board 

FROM* Jim Miles 

Gentlemen: 

In late August when we were readying the fall offerings on the tape network, there 
was considerable talk about MUSIC FOR THE CONNOISSEUR*, All reactions we had received 
here at headquarters indicated that it was far and away the most successful program 
ever put on the network* 

Mr. Randolphs position with WNYC is somewhat different from that of most of those 
who appear on our stations for the love of it® He does not have a full-time, basic 
university salary upon which to draw* Thus, any time devoted to the preparation and 
airing of this program must be taken away from some of his income producing effortso 
Dave and Sy Siegel talked about this at soira length and finally suggested that the 
network pay $1.00 per program per station for the show. They then wrote me about it® 
I did not like the idea because of the extra bookkeeping involved and the precedent 
thereby set for shows on the network® X felt that Randolph was valuable to us and 
that we should in some way retain him. We had discussed many t in»s employing network 
n consultants” and so it was rry idea that Randolph be retained as a consultant® 

Specifically, my deal was that I would propose and recongnend to the board for con- 
sideration at the Minneapolis meeting that we'”pay Randolph'$1,000 for the fiscal 
year 1952-^3, during which time he would prepare at least three MUSIC FOR THE 
CONNOISSEUR series of thirteen programs each® Second, he would be on the lookout 
for additional musical material in the New fork area available for network use® 

Third, he would be available for specific consultation work from time to time, but 
if we called on him tp do this, we would pay his traveling expenses® 

Randolph agreed to this proposal and submitted immediately the first series of 
programs of MUSIC FOR THE CONNOISSEUR. It is currently on the tape network and 
has been accepted by fifty stations® 

He has secured for us the rights to the Little Orchestra public dress rehearsal 
broadcast, a nd we will offer these programs in the spring® 

He has agreed to come to the NAEB Convention at Minneapolis, and I have agreed to 
cover his expenses to that convention® Burton has him scheduled to appear Saturday 
raoning, November 8, on one of the general sessions® 

This is the entire story® I heartily recommend that you approve this proposal® 

There is sufficient money in the tape network budget to handle it, and I do not 
believe it will be setting a precedent which we do not care to follow® I would 
like to further recommend that this be made a matter for the agenda at the 
Minneapolis board meeting® 






Scanned from the National Association of Educational Broadcasters Records 
at the Wisconsin Historical Society as part of 
"Unlocking the Airwaves: Revitalizing an Early Public and Educational Radio Collection." 


'oiTu> c KTwe 
\\KWAVEs 


A collaboration among the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, 
University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Communication Arts, 
and Wisconsin Historical Society. 

Supported by a Humanities Collections and Reference Resources grant from 
the National Endowment for the Humanities 


I I T I—I MARYLAND INSTITUTE for 

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UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND 



WISCONSIN 

HISTORICAL 

SOCIETY 





WISCONSIN 




NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE 


Humanities 


views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication/collection do not necessarily reflect those of the 

National Endowment for the Humanities.