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Desormeaux breaks 
McCarron's record 


Maryland Horse 

r -i nnn / CA M TU ^ f/, /) 4 f//itifir f'/irrinn 


January 1990 / $3.50 f ? 


The Thoroughbred magazine for the Mid-Atlantic region 










* V 

, p *s 


We get you to the races... 



because we know what it takes to get there 


If you are new to the racing game, we can take you to the winner's circle, either 
through the partnership route or through individual ownership. 

If success in the breeding business is your goal, we stand four of the most promising 
young stallions in the East: CARNIVALAY (by Northern Dancer); ALLEN'S PROSPECT 
(by Mr. Prospector); CORRIDOR KEY (by Danzig); and ASSAULT LANDING (by 
Buckfinder). 

If you are looking for a year-round home for your mares and foals, 
we offer a top facility staffed by veteran horsemen. 

Whatever route you choose, Country Life will get you to the 
races. We've been going there since 1933. 


ESTABLISHED 193 3 

MARYLAND'S OLDEST FAMILY-OWNED BREEDING FARM 
Josh Pons/Attorney-at-Law or Michael Pons/MBA 
1*0. Box 107, Bel Air, Maryland 21014 ■ (301) 879-1952 or 877-7422 













Tills Is The Place. 


Fasig-Tipton Midlantic, in the heart of 
the largest racing community in the 
world — is the place to buy and sell 
Thoroughbreds. Throughout the year 


our consignors offer quality stock includ¬ 
ing broodmares, yearlings, weanlings, 
stallions, two-year-olds in training and 
horses of racing age. 



1990 Sales Calendar All Sales held at Timonium Sales Pavilion 


Saratoga 

Finger Lakes 

Belmont 

Aqueduct 

Meadowtands 

Monmouth Park 

Garden State 

Atlantic City 

Philadelphia Park 

Penn National 

Delaware Park 

Pimlico 

Laurel 

Mountaineer Park 

Charlestown 


Winter Mixed • Sunday, February 11 Entries Close Dec. 11 

Selected TWo-Year-Olds In training • Sunday, May 20 Nominations Close Feb. 12 

Open IWo-Year-Olds In Training • Monday, May 21 Entries Close Mar. 19 

Selected Yearlings • Sunday September 23 Free Nominations Close Mar. 12/Nominations Close Apr. 16 

Open Yleariings • Monday, September 24 Entries Close July 30 

December Mixed • Sunday/Monday, December 2 & 3 Entries Close Oct. 1 


l ; asi£Ti|)lon Midlantic 

120 South Broad Street Kennett Square, Pa 19348 (215) 444-9000 (301) 252-5860 Fax (215) 444-9003 
Susan Small Jones, Vice-President/Operations 
















WE’VE IMPROVED OUR 
BLOODLINES! 

FAPPAVALLEY, the multiple stakes 
winner ($125,804) by FAPPLANO has joined the stallion 
roster at SUNSET HILL FARM. He will be the only stakes 
winner by FAPPIANO to stand in Maryland in 1990. 
(FAPPAVALLEY’s 1990 fee: Private treaty) 
FAPPAVALLEY is out of Seven Valleys, a graded stakes- 
placed winner and stakes producer with 
6 winners from 6 runners. 

Also standing at SUNSET HILL FARM 


DANCING AGAIN 

(NIJINSKY II - Dancealot by 
ROUND TABLE) 

Sire of 8 individual winners in 1989 with 56% 
of his starters that year finishing in the money, 
including stakes winner BUSINESSMATE. 

(1990 fee: $2500) 

NORTH POLE 

(NORTHERN DANCER - Canalu by 
CANADIAN CHAMP) 

A leading active sire lifetime in Maryland and 
leading active 2-year-old sire lifetime. 

(1990 fee: $3500) 

TATIBAH 

(HABITAT - Three Tees by TIM TAM) 

Champion 3-year old colt in France. 100% 
conception rate in 1989. (1990 fee $1,000.) 

^SunsetHillFarm^ 

P.O. Box 125, Woodbine, Md. 21797 
Inquiries To: Edmond Hogan, Gen. Manager, (301) 442-2919/2025 


ALL SUNSET HILL FARM STALLIONS ARE BREEDERS'CUP AND 
MARYLAND MILLION ELIGIBLE 




Maryland Horse Breeders 
Association 

The purposes of the Maryland Horse 
Breeders Association, a corporation 
chartered in 1929, are to encourage, pro¬ 
mote, protect and improve the horse 
breeding industry in Maryland. 

In addition to representing the Mary¬ 
land horse industry on legislative and 
regulatory matters, the MHBA functions 
as an informational resource for Thor¬ 
oughbred breeders and owners, for the 
media, for national, community and gov¬ 
ernmental organizations, and for the 
general public. 

Officers 

PRESIDENT 
King T. Leatherbury 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
C. Frank Hopkins Sr. 
SECRETARY-TREASURER 
Betty Shea Miller 
EXECUTIVE VICE-PRESIDENT 
Richard W. Wilcke 

Directors 

J. William Boniface, William K. Boniface, Thomas 
Bowman, Kimball C. Firestone, Ann M. Heffner, 
C. Frank Hopkins, King T. Leatherbury, Donald P. 
Litz Jr., Robert T. Manfuso, J.W.Y. Martin Jr., James 
McManus, Betty Shea Miller, Frederick B. Peterson, 
Joseph P. Pons, Jr., Barclay Tagg 

DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL EVENTS 

Cricket Goodall 

DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATION 

Suzanne Long 
DIRECTOR OF PUBLICATIONS 
Barrie B. Reightler 
ADMINISTRATOR, MARYLAND FUND 

Georgia L. Dovell 
Donna Powell, assistant 

Maryland Million Ltd. 

Maryland Million Ltd. is a member¬ 
ship association chartered in 1985 and 
dedicated to the improvement and pro¬ 
motion of Thoroughbred racing and 
breeding in Maryland. Its main event is 
Maryland Million Day, the richest state 
stallion stakes program in America, al¬ 
ternating between Laurel and Pimlico, 
and featuring nine title-sponsored races 
for Maryland-conceived Thorough¬ 
breds. Maryland Million Day is the cul¬ 
mination of official "Thoroughbred Week 
in Maryland." 

Executive Committee 

CHAIRMAN 

James McManus (Jim McKay) 

PRESIDENT 

Geoffrey A. Huguely 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
J. William Boniface 
SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Katharine M. Voss 

David Hayden, King T. Leatherbury, Robert T. 

Manfuso, J.W.Y. Martin Jr., R. Richards Rolapp 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

Richard W. Wilcke 

ASSISTANT Dl RECTOR 

Cricket Goodall 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLICITY 

Joseph B. Kelly 

ADVISORY BOARD 

Lawrence J. Abbundi, Howard M. Bender, Ernest J. 
Colvin, Joseph A. De Francis, Kimball C. Firestone, 

C. Oliver Goldsmith, Richard J. Hoffberger, C. 
Frank Hopkins, Robert P. Levy, John A. Manfuso 

Jr., Betty Shea Miller, Howard M. Mosner Jr., 
Lynda J. O'Dea, Michael Pons, Wayne W. Wright 


2 


Maryland Horse 













January, 1990 


Maryland Horse serves 
Thoroughbred breeders, trainers, 
owners and enthusiasts in a six-state 
region: Maryland, Delaware, 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Virginia and 
West Virginia. The magazine's primary 
purpose is to promote the 
Thoroughbred racing and breeding 
industry in Maryland along with its 
vital secondary markets— 
steeplechasing, eventing, hunting, 

showing, polo, etc. 

EDITOR 

Richard W. Wilcke 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLICATIONS 

Barrie B. Reightler 

MANAGING EDITOR 

Lucy Acton 

SENIOR EDITOR 

Marge Dance 

PRODUCTION 

Betty Fairbank 

ADVERTISING 

Brenda Brown 

CIRCULATION 

Anne M. Warner 

RESEARCH 

Cindy Deubler 

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 

Margaret Worrall 

STAFF WRITER 

Joseph B. Kelly 

CONTRIBUTOR 

Marty McGee 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Neena Ewing 

Cappy Jackson 

Maryland Horse (ISSN 0025-4274) is 
published 12 times a year by the Mary¬ 
land Horse Breeders Association, 201 
West Padonia Road, Lutherville- 
Timonium, Md. 21093. (301) 252-2100. 
Subscription rate $30 per year, which in¬ 
cludes annual stallion issue. Foreign sub¬ 
scription rate $39 per year (surface mail), 
payable by U.S. money order or by bank 
draft payable in U.S. funds. Subscription 
price included in annual membership 
dues to the Maryland Horse Breeders 
Association. 

Second-class postage paid at Luther- 
ville-Timonium, Md. 21093 and addi¬ 
tional mailing offices. 

POSTMASTER: Send address changes 
to Maryland Horse, P.O. Box 427, 
Timonium, Md. 21093. 

Single Copies: $3.50, special Stallion 
Register $15, back issues past six months 
$5.00. 

Maryland Horse Shows Association, Inc.: 
Maryland Horse has been designated 
the official publication of the Maryland 
Horse Shows Association, Streett E. 
Moore, President; Rebecca Foster, Secre¬ 
tary. 

Acknowledgements: Statistics and re¬ 
sults of North American racing, as given 
in Maryland Horse, are based upon the 
copyrighted charts and tabulations of 
Bloodstock Research, Inc., Daily Racing 
Form and American Racing Manual, pub¬ 
lished by Daily Racing Form, Inc. Special 
line drawings by Paul Brown. 

Printed by WAVERLY PRESS, INC., Easton, Md. 

'fiiCopy right 1989 

Maryland Horse Breeders Association, Inc. 


Maryland Horse 

The Thoroughbred magazine for the Mid-Atlantic region 


Volume 56, Number 1 


Table of Contents 

24 Going for the big prizes 

Go for Wand, bred and owned by Jane Lunger, was among area 
horses who earned distinction in the Breeders 7 Cup. 

32 Trainer has traveled a long way 

Thirty-seven year-old Jerry Robb reached the pinnacle of the 
sport last fall, with two Breeders 7 Cup contenders. 

68 Four stand together 

Clinton Pitts, Jean Chalk, John Heisler and Bill Passmore mark five- 
year anniversary this month. 

72 New Bolton Center to open new unit 

Intensive care and neonatal services to be greatly expanded 
through custom-designed facility. 

78 Picking up the pieces after tragic fall 

Exercise girl Cecil Daugherty, near death three years ago, adapts 
to life in a rehabilitation center in York, Pa. 


Departments 

12 Personal Perspective 
36 What's New in Maryland 
59 Maryland-Bred Stakes Winners 
92 Mid-Atlantic Report 
108 Sales results 


Cover —Tremendous attention was focused on Maryland last fall, when 
Kent Desormeaux rode his 547th winner of 1989. Desormeaux's 
achievement eclipsed a record set in 1974 (for number of winning 
rides in one year) by then-Maryland-based jockey Chris McCar- 
ron. His record-breaking victory came November 30, in the fifth 
race at Laurel, aboard a 2-year-old maiden claiming filly, Gilten, 
trained by Charles H. Hadry. (Photograph by Neena Ewing) 


January 1990 


3 















Manor Race Weekend 

Two Night Package Includes: 

Two Nights Lodging 
Two Full Country Breakfasts 
Tickets for Two to the 
Ladew Gardens Reception 
Preferred Parking Pass 
Tailgate Picnic for Two 

Limited Availability 


For reservations call 

1 - 800 - 552-3965 

1 - 301 - 557-7321 

2425 Pocock Road, Fallston, MD 


WMLSOIM 


Horse 

Transportation 

Middleburg, VA 


HORSE TRANSPORTATION 
AT ITS BEST 


(703) 253-5262 
Outside of Virginia 
1 (800) 325-0119 


Sporting Calendar 



Maryland Tracks 

Laurel— Jan. 1 to March 14 
Pimlico—March 15 to June 13 


Out-of-State Tracks 

Aqueduct—Jan. 1 to May 7 
Calder—May 28 to Jan. 14 
Charles Town—Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 
Fair Grounds—Nov. 17 to April 2 
Gulfstream Park—Jan. 16 to May 4 
Hialeah—Nov. 18 to May 20 
Mountaineer Park—Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 
Oaklawn Park—Feb. 2 to April 21 
Penn National—Jan. 3 to Dec. 31 
Philadelphia Park—Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 
Rockingham—Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 
Suffolk Downs—Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 
Tampa Bay Downs—Dec. 8 to April 8 


Maryland Auctions 

Maryland Mixed, Equivest, Timonium 
Sales Pavilion. (800) 666-4677. Jan. 
14. 

Winter Mixed, Fasig-Tipton Midlantic, 
Timonium Sales Pavilion. (215) 
444-9000. Feb. 11. 

Spring Classic Mixed, Equivest, 
Timonium Sales Pavilion. (800) 
666-4677. March 25. 

Chesapeake Two-Year-Olds, Equivest, 
Timonium Sales Pavilion. (800) 
666-4677. May 6. 

Selected Two-Year-Olds in Training, 
Fasig-Tipton Midlantic, Timonium 
Sales Pavilion. (215) 444-9000. May 
20 . 

Open Two-Year-Olds in Training, 
Fasig-Tipton Midlantic, Timonium 
Sales Pavilion. (215) 444-9000. May 
21 . 

International Steeplechase and Hunt, 
Equivest, Fair Hill. (800) 666-4677. 
May 27. 

Selected Yearlings, Fasig-Tipton Mid¬ 
lantic, Timonium Sales Pavilion. 
(215) 444-9000. Sept. 23. 

Open Yearlings, Fasig-Tipton Midlan¬ 
tic, Timonium Sales Pavilion. (215) 
444-9000. Sept. 24. 

December Mixed, Fasig-Tipton Midlan¬ 
tic, Timonium Sales Pavilion. (215) 
444-9000. Dec. 2, 3. 


Out of State Sales 

Winter Mixed, Fasig-Tipton Kentucky, 
Lexington, Ky. (606) 255-1555. Jan. 
5-7. 

Horses of All Ages, Keeneland, Lex¬ 
ington, Ky. (800) 456-3412. Jan. 8-11. 

Winter Mixed, Ocala Breeders' Sales, 
Ocala, Fla. (904) 237-2154. Jan. 
22-24. 

Selected Florida-bred Two-Year-Olds in 
Training, Ocala Breeders' Sales, 
Ocala, Fla. (904) 237-2154. Feb. 5. 

Selected Two-Year-Olds in Training, 
Fasig-Tipton Florida, Calder Race 
Course, Miami, Fla. (516) 328-1800. 
Feb. 26-28, March 1. 

Open Selected Two-Year-Olds in Train¬ 
ing, Ocala Breeders' Sales, Ocala, 
Fla. (904) 237-2154. March 12, 13. 

Spring Sale of Two-Year-Olds in Train¬ 
ing, Ocala Breeders' Sales, Ocala, 
Fla. (904) 237-2154. April 23-26. 


Courses/Lectures 


All Breeds Equine Appraiser Courses, 
Equine Appraisal Institute Interna¬ 
tional, Lexington, Ky. (800) 
234-6773. Jan. 4-7. 

Equine Reproductive Management and 
Artificial Insemination, Colorado 
State University, Fort Collins, Colo. 
(303) 491-8373. Jan. 10-13. 

Pasture Management for Horse Own¬ 
ers, University of Maryland Coop¬ 
erative Extension Service, Carroll 
Co. Ag. Center, Westminster, Md. 
(301) 992-2030. Jan. 20. 

Breeding Management Shortcourse, 
Ohio State University, Columbus, 
Ohio. (614) 292-6661. Jan. 26-28. 


Shows, Trials, etc. 

Commonwealth Park Hunter School¬ 
ing, Culpeper, Va. (703) 825-0600. 
Jan. 20, Feb. 17, March 3, March 18. 
Commonwealth Park Jumper School¬ 
ing, Culpeper, Va. (703) 825-0600. 
Jan. 21, Feb. 18, March 4, March 19. 

Shows in capital letters are members of the 
Maryland Horse Shows Association. The 
Sporting Calendar lists show dates and in¬ 
formation free of charge. Telephone (30V 
252-2100. 


4 


Maryland Horse 






























EQUIVEST 


Building a tradition of excellence 
thanks to our consignors and buyers. 



<4 ARCTIC FLING 
(Northern Dancer—Running 
Around), our six-figure 
Timonium November Sale 
topper purchased by Michael 
Cavey, DVM. 


▼ LANDAURA, Maryland 
juvenile champion to be sold 
in foal to CONQUISTADOR 
CIELO at our January 14 
Mixed Sale at Timonium. Also 
selling multiple SW 
TULINDAS ($174,448) in 
foal to WAQUOIT. 


Continued higher price averages, lower fees, faster payment 
equal more money in your pocket. 


Winter Mixed 
January 14 
Timonium 


UPCOMING SALES INCLUDE: 


Two-Year-Olds in Training 
May 6 
Timonium 
Closes March 15 


Steeplechase & Hunt 
May 27 
Fair Hill 
Closes April 15 


EQUIVEST 

BREEDERS SALES COMPANY 


Chesapeake Yearlings 
September 
Timonium 
Closes July 15 


1919 Greenspring Drive •Timonium, MD 21093 


1 -800-666-467 7 



























Letters to the Editor 




Approves of changes 

Sir: 

I just finished reading your November regional is¬ 
sue and wanted to let you know that I think your maga¬ 
zine fills a real need. After all, local is not just Mary¬ 
land but Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, etc., as 
well. 

The Red Revelle story was especially interesting; it 
proves that your magazine has not only expanded its 
geographical coverage but expanded its depth as well. 
Congratulations on a job well done. 

Sincerely, 
J. Gordon 
Bethesda, Md. 

4H appreciates support 

Sir: 

Thank you very much for the support the Maryland 
Horse Breeders Association has given to the Maryland 
4H Horse Program. Without such support we simply 
could not offer the program we are developing and we 
especially could not offer the kids a chance to compete 
nationally. Placing in the top ten was terrific! 

Sincerely, 
Shirley Geis 
Clarksville, Md. 

Further explanation re bucked shins 

Sir: 

This past August's issue of the Maryland Horse 
gave a summary of the early findings of research on 
bucked shins conducted at Fair Hill. This quoted Dr. 
David Nunamaker as saying "The important thing is 
not to stop, once the horse starts training." 

Would it be possible to receive some further expla¬ 
nation on this particular? The point is of interest be¬ 
cause it appears considerably opposed to the conclu¬ 
sions of several writers on the subject—Drs. O.R. 
Adams, James R. Rooney, and the USDA—who ex¬ 
plain a necessity to ease off on a horse's training when 
the painful symptons of bucked shins become appar¬ 
ent. 

Does the research at Fair Hill indicate that the train¬ 
ing should continue but with a local anesthetic applied 


to the shins so that the addition of new bone to the 
shins will not be interrupted? 

Sincerely, 
Milton R. Daniels 
Baltimore 


Dr. Nunamaker's reply: 

The quotation Mr. Daniels refers to in Lucy Acton's 
article in the August issue of the Maryland Horse, 
"The important thing is not to stop, once the horse 
starts training," is related to the initial training of the 
horse and not to the time when the animal becomes 
sore and bucks his shins during training. 

Many trainers will purchase their yearlings in the 
late summer and break them to saddle and start some 
conditioning. After that period of time these animals 
are stopped, usually for a month or so, and then 
brought back with the new year. 

This is the time which I was talking about. The inter¬ 
ruption of training in the early phase will allow the 
bone to go into a remodeling phase. This first phase of 
bone remodeling is bone resorption and has the effect 
of increasing the porosity of the bone, hence weaken¬ 
ing it. 

The entire process of resorbing the bone and replac¬ 
ing the bone (bone remodeling) may take three to six 
months in the horse. If the animal begins training 
when the bone is more porous, it will be weaker and 
may hasten the onset of bucked shins. Therefore the 
quotation was directed at early training and not at the 
time the animal begins to have problems. 

Some of the animals that do have pain associated 
with the onset of bucked shins can be continued in 
training by modifying the training regime after the 
initial pain goes away. This can be accomplished in 
some animals after evaluation of the animal both clini¬ 
cally and radiographically. 

Sincerely, 

David M. Nunamaker, V.M.D. 

Jacques Jenny Professor of 
Orthopaedic Surgery 
University of Pennsylvania 
New Bolton Center 


6 


Maryland Horse 














UNDER OATH wins 


the Grade HI Honey Bee Handicap. 



Deputed Testamony’s 

talented 3-year-old daughter proved her merit 
on November 25 when she soundly defeated 
a veteran field of fillies that included multiple 
New York stakes winner DREAMY MIMI. 
The victory brought UNDER OATH’s 
earnings to $275,200. 


$5,000 Live Foal 

Payable Sept. 1 of year bred 

Traffic Cop—Proof Requested, by Prove It 

Nominated to Breeders’ Cup and Maryland Million 



the 


j^ S 8pha2 uat 

n' PSyGlrl 0 

a-ss $5""" iisJJJTttp*,. 

' ‘ i $ * £ z i «&' 

. ,ce!: 

> . „„„ •*-«*. ss. 

0rn 0 *>*fr 
9 0l ' n d out 


P.O. Box 366, 3745 Harmony Church Rd., Darlington 


Also Standing: EL RAGGAAS, JOHN ALDEN, PARFAITEMENT 
MD 21034 0 J. William Boniface, William K. Boniface (301) 734-6906 or 879-5324 


















Retirement program needed 

Sir: 

I was saddened to read that Rocket Guitar broke 
down on the track in a $6,500 claiming race, and had to 
be destroyed. Under the patient care of trainer Barclay 
Tagg, Rocket blossomed from a Charles Town sprinter 
to a stakes winner who could go long or short, on the 



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T\ S 

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DELUXE HORSE VANS 

Outride the competition 
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Hew 4-6-8-9-liorse Vans 
15-Horse 48 ft. Stainless Trailers 
Also a large selection of used vans & trailers. 
Complete service and restoration specialist. 

FRANK DIBELLA 
P.O. Box 142, Malvern, PA 19355 
(215) 296-5943 or (215) 696-4957 
Fax (215) 696-8760 

Call or write for brochure. 


dirt or turf. He always sped to the front, challenging all 
comers, gamely fighting to the finish. He completed 
the race in which he broke down—a fighter to the end. 

I was saddened not just at the loss of this gallant 
9-year-old, but at the attitude of his former owners 
who allowed this winner of over $300,000 to descend 
into the bottom claimers. He deserved to be retired. 
The usual excuse we hear in such a case is that the 
horse didn't want to retire—he was bucking and 
squealing to run, etc. But it is people that make the 
decisions, not the horses (we're the smart ones, 
right?). Besides turn-out to a paddock, there are useful 
retirements for a classy old horse. With his blazing 
speed Rocket might have made a fine outrider's pony. 1 
read that when Dave's Friend was too old to race, Jack 
Van Berg used him to escort and school babies. 

There should be an organization in Maryland to co¬ 
ordinate the retirement of old stakes-winning geld¬ 
ings. I recall that there is such a group in New York. I 
hope that there is an individual in the racing commu¬ 
nity who cares enough to start such an organization in 
Maryland. 

Sincerely, 
Jay T. Ryan 
Alexandria, Va. 

Suggestions for retirement project 

Sir: 

Allaire duPont's recent Personal Perspective article 
was interesting and it hit home with my wife and my¬ 
self. We too feel that horses who can no longer race or 
contribute to the industry deserve a decent retirement. 

I believe that within our state we have everything 
that is needed for a program similar to the one in New 
York. Not far from our farm the Maryland Correctional 
Institution is located. The grounds include several va¬ 
cant dairy barns and other outbuildings. The complex 
also has acres upon acres of pasture and farm land that 
is not in production. Needless to say there is a prison 
population with nothing to do! 

In my opinion the site is ready and waiting for good 
use and with the ever growing problem of labor short¬ 
ages in the horse industry what better way could be 
used to rehabilitate these inmates with meaningful 
training that can put them into a job when they leave 
the penitentiary. Psychologically it would probably be 
the best thing for some inmates to work with horses 
because of the special rewards you get from caring for 
animals. 

This is an idea and I hope some good may come of it 
from people who could sell Governor Schaefer the 
package. What a great public relations move for the 
upcoming election! 

Sincerely, 
L.B. Miller 
Boonsboro, Md. 


8 


Maryland Horse 






















BIG OPPORTUNITY IN MARYLAND 
FOR “CLASS-CONSCIOUS” BREEDERS! 


Roo Art, multiple Grade I winning 
Millionaire beat the best on both 
coasts while achieving one of 
racing's highest honors, New York 
Handicap Champion in '86. 

Roo Art now gives breeders even 
two more reasons for booking 
their mares in 1990: 

(1) CONSISTENTLY CORRECT 
FOALS Roo Art stamps his foals 
... the looked-for consistency that 
marks the successful stallion. 


(2) OUTSTANDING BREEDING 
STATISTICS 

• 92.45% mares reported in foal. 

• 1.87% covers per mare average. 

• 53 mares covered in 1989. 

Roo Art—his family traces to 
Ribot— that distinguished 
broodmare sire's TOP EARNER. 

Roo Art. Bay H. 1982. Buckaroo-New Art, 
by Ribot. 

$5,000 Live Foal, or $3,500, guaranteed 
in foal Sept. 1, non-refundable. 

Property of Barbara and Bert Hoileran. 


Be part of the Maryland Million, a pro¬ 
gram of particular interest to Out-of-Staters 
who also share in its benefits. All progeny 
sired by its nominees become eligible for 
the program regardless of foaling location. 


Nominated 
tottie 
Breeders' 
I Cup Series. 




GREEN WILLOW FARMS. 956 OAK TREE ROAD. WESTMINSTER MO 21157 


Inquiries to Carolyn Green (301) 795-3438 


BIG APPLE HANDICAP CHAMPION... 


























Personal Perspective 


By Jim Ryan 


Last year my wife Linda and I managed to give 
away $1 million to help set up drug and alcohol coun¬ 
seling programs for backstretch workers. But it wasn't 
easy. 

When we decided to make a million dollars avail¬ 
able—in the form of matching grants—we did so with¬ 
out knowing how big the need was . . . without under¬ 
standing the degree of indifference among many of the 
industry leaders. 

This past year of giving has been one of the high 
points in my almost 20 years in horse racing. To know 
that we are doing something needed and worthwhile, 
and making good use of our money and talents, gives 
us a good feeling. But sometimes, Linda says, we feel 
like we're trying to eat an elephant one bite at a time. 

The program got off the ground in January, 1989, 
with 15 race tracks signing up in one month. (Our goal 
was to have 50 tracks participate, with us providing 
$20,000 grants, to be matched in equal amount by the 
race track.) We waited until April to get three more. 
And for awhile it looked like we would fall far short of 
our goal. 

Finally, in June, we hired a professional counselor, 
John Mayton, formerly the director of the Winners 
Foundation in California. John started visiting race 
tracks all over the country—showing them how to lo¬ 
cate and hire counselors, helping them with their bud¬ 
gets. 

We found a number of race tracks were interested— 
they only needed to be shown that they could, in fact, 
make it work. By August the number of participants 
rose to 34. 

Then, last fall, Churchill Downs and the Norton 
Foundation hosted a five-day conference in Louisville 
to address the problem of drug and alcohol abuse on 
the race track. A lot of good things came out of the 
conference, which was organized and moderated by 
Dr. Curtis Barrett, of the University of Louisville. Four¬ 
teen more tracks accepted grants after that, and in No¬ 
vember there was a race for the last two. 

Maryland's racing industry is relatively enlight¬ 
ened. Here the grant was matched three times: by Lau¬ 
rel and Pimlico, the Maryland Thoroughbred Horse¬ 
men's Association and the Horsemen's Assistance 
Fund. 

Bob Babes, from the University of Maryland, has 
done a very good job with the program. Arlington 
International race track is another model. They were 


already providing a number of health and welfare ben¬ 
efits for backstretch workers, and a day care program 
for the children, even before we approached them with 
our match. 

Throughout the year, Linda and I made more than a 
dozen trips tied to the backstretch program. What we 
saw was sometimes shocking; often disheartening. It's 
like opening a can of worms. No one really wants to 
look inside. More and more, we are realizing that alco¬ 
hol and drug abuse are really symptoms of other— 
deeper seated—problems. 

Horse racing is an industry whose existence is 
based on thousands of people who are paid below 
minimum wage and living in conditions that are often 
worse than a homeless shelter. We're talking about 
people who sleep on two bales of straw pushed togeth¬ 
er ... I can't imagine the Health Department permit¬ 
ting a homeless shelter to smell as bad as the rooms 
and bathrooms at our race tracks. 

The net effect is that we have built a building that is 
many stories high, with the top floors, the trustees' 
rooms, as fine as the most luxurious penthouse. But 
the foundation is built on . . . straw (I was thinking of 
using a stronger word). 

A criminal investigator from the Department of Jus¬ 
tice, Anthony Valenti, speaking at a seminar for securi¬ 
ty personnel at the TRPB meeting in Minneapolis in 
October, stated that in four years of studying the racing 
industry, he found the business to be corrupt at all 
levels, "top to bottom." He stated that the horse racing 
industry is "corrupt on an institutionalized basis." 

This statement was made to security people, whose 
job it is to deal with the issue of honest and safe racing. 
In the discussion that followed, many of these people 
pointed out that the quality of life is so low among 
workers on the backstretch—the hours are so long, the 
pay is so poor, the boredom is so great—that security 
must constantly struggle to barely keep the lid on a 
very volatile situation. 

I'm aware that there are tracks which are closing 
down due to low mutuel handles and maybe increased 
competition. And even the tracks that are managing to 
survive don't have the kind of income to finance wide¬ 
spread renovations in the stable area. But the issue 
needs to be dealt with—it's pay me now or pay me 
later. 

What we hope to get across to industry leaders is 
that this is not just a humanitarian cause—it's an issue 


10 


Maryland Horse 










WOLLASTON 

‘‘Wollaston had a world of class 
and ability. But for a series of 
hard luck circumstances and a 
stable fire in which he suffered 
severe injuries , his record might 
have been comparable to the best 
during his racing career. His 
courage and heart should pay off 
in the quality of Jus anticipated 
foals. ” JOE CANTEY, TRAINER 

Heart* Ability* Racing luck* 

These are the elements that determine the success of 
a horse’s racing career. Each played a major role for 
WOLLASTON. 

He was bred to be a top race horse. By the highly 
successful LORD GAYLORD, sire of champion 
LORD AVIE and representative of a remarkable sire- 
producing line, WOLLASTON is out of a daughter 
of leading broodmare sire *LE FABULEUX. His 
great granddam is foundation mare *HIGH 
STEPPER. 

Brought along carefully by Joe Cantey, who also 
trained Cox’s Ridge and Temperence Hill, 

WOLLASTON was developing into a top turf 
performer. Then a near-fatal stable fire caused a six- 
month delay in his career. Courageously, he returned 
to the races and embarked upon an outstanding 
4-year-old campaign, which included a resounding 
off-the-pace victory (above) over turf star 
EQUALIZE and earned him an invitation to the 
Washington D.C. International. He later suffered a 
career-ending injury in the Grade II Canadian Turf 
H. All told, he won seven races, six of them on the 
turf, placed second in the Grade III Appleton H, 
and earned $156,445. 



1982, LORE) GAYLORD—NORA HARVEY, by *Le Fabuleux 



Private fee at GREEN WILLOW FARMS, Westminster , MD. Property of Jilerlane Stable. Nominated to 
Breeders' Cup and Maryland Million. Inquiries to Carolyn or Ronald Green , 301-795-3438. 












Don’t 
let our 
* 200,000 
races 
pass 
you by. 

Thursday, March 1 is the 
last day for nominations. 


<T(?e S 




$200,000 GRADE II 

For 2-year olds—both sexes. 
To be run Aug. 11,1990. 

(foals of 1988) 6 furlongs. 


3%e Soto tily 

$200,000 GRADE III 


For fillies, 2 years old. To be run Aug. 4,1990. 
(foals of 1988) 6 furlongs. 


Minimum Gross Value Guaranteed 

Nominations to be accompanied by payment of $150 each. 
Send breeding, check and address today. 

Robert J. Kulina 
Director of Racing 
& Racing Secretary. 

MONMOUTHPARK 



Write, wire or phone 
(201)222-5100 


RO. Box MR 
Oceanport, NJ 07757 


From New York, Pennsylvania and Maryland 
800-631-2103 — From New Jersey 800-822-9756 


that affects their business. Some 35 percent of workers 
on the backstretch are believed to have some form of 
addiction. That's three times higher than the national 
average. No other business in the world routinely al¬ 
lows valuable commodities to be placed in the hands of 
drug addicts and alcoholics. 

At the conference in Louisville, one of the speakers. 
Dr. Joe Ciarrocchi, made the statement that 18 percent 
of addicted individuals regularly steal from their em¬ 
ployers to support their addictions. How do people on 
the backstretch steal from their employers? There's 
only one way they can do it—and that way has an 
impact on everyone who is the least bit involved in 
racing. 

Concern over this grave situation led to my resigna¬ 
tion from The Jockey Club this past August. It's crazy 
to spend $7.4 million a year on drug testing for horses, 
without ever addressing the drugged condition of the 
people who are handling the horses. 

As a member of The Jockey Club Foundation, I had 
sent a letter to Dinny Phipps requesting that the mem¬ 
bership be allowed to vote on whether or not to give 
away more than five percent, the legal minimum the 
IRS allows, of the $7 million in the Foundation trust. 
Dinny called me in and asked me to resign from The 
Jockey Club Foundation Committee. I told him I didn't 
want to; I'd like to stay and disburse the funds. I said: 
"You put me on the committee, and you can take me 
off." With a frown, he said he would have to remove 
me, because 1 was out of sync with the other members 
of the committee and himself. 

Since retiring from Ryland Homes seven years ago. 
I've spent most of my time working on charitable ef¬ 
forts, through the Ryan Family Foundation, which 
presently helps support approximately 25 different 
agencies. My thought was that if I couldn't contribute 
some of that expertise to The Jockey Club, where could 
I contribute? I didn't want to belong to the organization 
just to go out to dinners. 

The next day I stood up in front of the general mem¬ 
bership and told them of the huge need to improve the 
quality of life at the race tracks. Then I announced my 
resignation. There were no comments; none at all. I felt 
very alone at the time. Now I feel good about my deci¬ 
sion to leave; it was the right one to make. 

Many people insulate themselves from the needs of 
the world. The chairman of the Foundation Committee 
made the comment at the last meeting that they were 
"saving the money for a rainy day." My reply should 
have been—although I didn't think of it right away— 
"If you'll get out of your office on Madison Avenue and 
the Trustees Room and visit the rooms where the back¬ 
stretch people live, you'll see it's pouring out there." □ 


Jim Ryan owns and operates Ryehill Farm in Mt. Airy 
(Md.). 


12 


Maryland Horse 


















A stakes winner from a female line famous 
for the race horses and sires it produces. 



Dover Ridge 

♦ Stakes winner of 11 races, $155,355. 

♦ By world record-setting champion RIVA RIDGE, classic winner of $1,111,497. 

♦ Half-brother to PRIVATE TERMS, multiple graded stakes winner of $1,243,947, entering 
stud in 1990 for $15,000. 

♦ Half-brother to BLUE ENSIGN, graded stakes winner of $243,065; a successful sire with an 
average earnings index of 2.00 and a live foal fee of $20,000. 

♦ Half-brother to graded stakes winner LIGHT SPIRITS ($198,690) and multiple stakes winner 

STEEL MAIDEN ($119,030). 

♦ Out of LAUGHTER, half-sister to successful sires ICECAPADE (graded stakes winner of 
$256,468; average earnings index of 2.45) and BUCKFINDER (graded stakes winner of $230,513; 
average earnings index of 2.52) and to the great race mare RUFFIAN. 

Booked full 1989, his first season 
$1,500 live foal; Due September 1 of year bred 
Nominated to Maryland Million and Breeders' Cup 



FARM INC. 


Box 39, Libertytown, Maryland 21 762 
Jerry Calhoun (301) 775-0015 



















Clever Secret 


“IT WAS THE GREATEST 
PERFORMANCE BY A RACEHORSE 
IN THIS CENTURY.” 

WHITNEY TOWER, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED 


Anyone who witnessed Secretariats com¬ 
manding victory in the 1973 Belmont Stakes, 
which made him the first Triple Crown 
winner in 25 years, will never forget it. 

The splendid chestnut captured the 
hearts of America, making 
fans of the general public. 

Universal sadness followed 
news of Secretariat’s death 
last fall. He will be remem¬ 
bered now through his sons 
and daughters. 

Corbett Farm is proud V '-A 
to add Clever Secret, one of Secretariat’s best 
racing sons, to our 1990 stallion roster. A graded 



Bold Ruler 

Secretariat 

Chestnut, 1970 

Somethingroyal 


Pia Star 

Small Loaf 

Dk.B. or Br., 1968 

Swoon Bread 


‘Nasrullah 

Nearco (E) 
Mumtaz Begum 

Miss Disco 

Discovery 

Outdone 

‘Princequillo 

Prince Rose 
‘Cosquilla 

Imperatrice 

Caruso 

Cinquepace 

Olympia 

‘Heliopolis 

Miss Dolphin 

Inquisitive 

‘Mahmoud 

Swistar 

Swoon’s Son 

The Doge 
Swoon 

Lawdy Claudy 

Woodchuck 
Rhinestone (2) 


stakes winner of over $400,000, Clever Secret is 
made in the image of his magnificent sire. Clev¬ 
er Secret’s grandsire, Bold Ruler, was the most 
consistently brilliant sire of fast, early-maturing 


horses in the world. Clever Secret won at 2, 3 
and 4, competing against the top horses in the 
country—Bet Twice, Alysheba, Lost 
Code, etc. He won or placed in 12 stakes, 
eight of them graded, including the 
G1 Haskell Invitational, G2 
Lamplighter Handicap, G3 Aqueduct 
Handicap, G3 Hawthorne Derby, 
G3 Choice Handicap, etc. 

Clever Secret is a 
half-brother to Small 
Raja, a G1 stakes winner 
with victories in the 
important Monmouth Oaks (Gl), Black-Eyed 
Susan (G2) and Test Stakes (G3), and Rising 
Raja, a stakes winner and sire. 

Secretariat sired 42 stakes winners in his 
lifetime, including Horse of the Year Lady’s Se¬ 
cret, champions Risen Star and Medaille d’Or, 
and General Assembly. 

Bcx)k now to this promising young stal¬ 
lion—perpetuate the magic of Secretariat. Syn¬ 
dicate shares are available. $2,500 live foal; 
nominated to Breeders’ Cup and Maryland Mil¬ 
lion. Contact Bill Albright. 

fSbett 

FARM 

Monkton, Md. 21111 • (301) 472-2501 

















. 












Interview/on parasite control 


with Dr. Fred Peterson 


Question: Is parasite control really a concern in this day 
and age? If your horses are wormed on a regular basis , isn't 
that all there is to it? 

Answer: Parasites are still a real problem on a lot of 
farms—even in places where they worm every four to 
six weeks. 

We can eliminate some parasites relatively easily, 
but others present a much more complicated picture. 

Large strongyles—the ones that cause colic and in¬ 
testinal aneurysms—are dangerous, but they can be 
controlled by regular interval worming and rotation of 
chemicals used. 

It's the small strongyles that are more of a problem 
than we think. Signs can include unthriftiness, weight 
loss, maybe some diarrhea. Small strongyle larvae can 
live in a horse's intestinal wall for up to two years be¬ 
fore maturing and laying eggs, which makes them es¬ 
pecially hard to control. Also, they're very adaptable 
when it comes to developing resistance to worming 
chemicals. 

Roundworms are a big problem in foals, weanlings 
and yearlings. After that age horses usually build up 
resistance. Part of the roundworm's life cycle is spent 
in the lungs and liver, causing respiratory disease in 
the foal; foals can become so impacted with this type of 
parasite that they die. But roundworms are easily con¬ 
trolled by beginning worming at four to eight weeks of 
age. 

Tapeworms are another parasite we often see doing 
damage. Part of their life cycle is within the orbatid 
mite. The mites live just under the surface of the soil— 
they'll die if you bury them, or expose them to the 
surface. You can destroy the mites by deep plowing the 
field, or by cross-grazing with cattle. The cattle ingest 
the mites and also the eggs, breaking the life cycle. 

Botworms are easily controlled by worming twice a 
year with a specific agent. 

Lungworms have a low incidence in horses, except 
on farms which also keep donkeys. Donkeys are natu¬ 
ral carriers of these, and will cross-infect with horses. 
This is easy to take care of, when it happens. 

Q: So it's the small strongyles that you're especially 
alarmed about. What do you recommend that horse owners 
do? 


A: There are a couple of different approaches you 
can take to worming. The usual way is to go through 
and worm everything at six to eight week intervals. 
You use a different chemical every time, or every other 
time you worm—so that the parasites don't have a 
chance to build up resistance to any one kind. That's 
what we've been doing routinely in our practice. And 
now we're seeing a lot of resistance. In fact, we now 
believe that this method may promote resistance. 
Small strongyles are becoming resistant to the whole 
class of benzimidazoles. 

The new theory is called strategic control. Using this 
method, you begin in the spring and attack with chem¬ 
icals every 30 days (four wormings). Then you wait 
until fall and give two more wormings. 

The so-called strategic program is aimed at totally 
killing off the adult parasites, before they can lay eggs 
(which are passed in the horse's manure and re-enter 
the horse's body when the horse grazes in the field). 
There's less contamination of pastures. You can use 
any of a number of chemicals, but one larvicidal agent 
should be included in the spring and fall, and the fall 
treatment should include a boticide. 

According to the new theory, which has been tested 
extensively in England—and has been proven to 
work—you don't want to rotate chemicals all the time. 
The recommendation is slow rotation. You use the 
same wormer for a year or two, and then switch to a 
totally different chemical. 

Constantly rotating chemicals may actually create 
resistance. You use a particular worming agent once, 
and then turn to something else for the next treatment. 
Meanwhile, the strongyles that survived that first 
treatment, because they are less susceptible to killing 
by that particular wormer, multiply like crazy. The or¬ 
ganism has adapted. So the next time they're bom¬ 
barded with the same chemical, many more of them 
survive. The same thing can happen with each brand, 
and soon the small strongyle population explodes. So 
you have actually accomplished the reverse of what 
you set out to do. 

In theory, if you keep hitting away with one chemi¬ 
cal that the parasites are susceptible to, and use it to 
totally kill all of the adult parasites, resistance may not 
develop. 


16 


Maryland Horse 











Corbett Farm Stallions 

Meeting Maryland's Every Need 



Sire of 13% stakes, horses 



4—Qhare$ noco available. Contact 
&H/ Shea Miller (doi) 592 - 615/ 




<■ 


BELIEVE THE QUEEN 

1980, Believe it—Raise a Queen, by Raise a Native ^ 

Grade 1-Winning Son of a Leading Sire 

Winner of 8 races, $452,338, BELIEVE THE QUEEN captured the Monmouth H-Gl, Tom Ftx.l S-G2, True North H-G3 and placed 
2nd in Bold Ruler S-G3,3rd in Roseben 1 1-G3 and Jaipur S-L. From a solid family, BELIEVE THE QUEEN has sired 15 winners from 
24 starters in his first 2 crops, including stakes horses Wise Woman ($146,276), Spicy Monarch and Burning Oak (at 2, 1989). 
Fee: $3,500 live foal; Payable Sept. 1 of year bred; Nominated to Breeders' Cup and Maryland Million 

CLEVER SECRET 

1984, Secretariat—Small Loaf, by Pia Star 

_ Graded Stakes-Winning Son of the Great Secretariat 

CLEVER SECRET, a $406,355 winner racing for the stable of Eugene Klein, enters stud for 1990. He won 8 races including the 
Lamplighter H-G2, Aqueduct H-G3, Atherton S-L, and placed in 10 additional added-monev events. He is half-brother to Grade 1 
winner SMALL RAJA ($234,688) and RISING RAJA ( $137,497). 

Fee: $2,500 live foal; Payable Sept. 1 of year bred; Nominated to Breeders' Cup and Maryland Million 

EXCLUSIVE ONE 

1979, Exclusive Native—La Jalouse, by Nijinsky II 

Stakes Winner from the Influential Raise a Native Line 

Earner of $163,266. EXCLUSIVE ONE won the Palisades H and three allowances at Belmont, including a 1 '/i 6 -mi. victory in 1:4l 'A. 
He placed 2nd in the Paterson H-G2, 3rd in the Pegasus H. Half-brother to three stakes horses, EXCLUSIVE ONE has sired 26 
winners, including Exclusive Star ($50,762). 

Fee: $1,000 live foal; Payable Sept. 1 of year bred; Nominated to Breeders' Cup and Maryland Million 

HARRIMAN 

1984, Lord Gaylord—Averell, by Restless Native 

Stakes Winner of 9 Races, $366,835 in 33 Starts 

HARRIMAN represents the same nick that produced champion LORD AVIE (by LORD GAYLORD out of the dam of Averell). He 
comes from a female line that boasts hard-knocking runners and successful sires and is by a highly regarded son of SIR GAYLORD 
HARRIMAN won or placed in 12 stakes races, including the Garden State S-G3, Cherry Hill Mile S-L, Goss L. Strvker S-L and Duck 
Dance H-L. He enters stud for 1990. 

Fee: $1,500 live foal; Payable Sept. 1 of year bred; Nominated to Breeders’ Cup and Maryland Million 

ISELLA 

1975, Peace Corps—Gallamar, by Royal Dorimar 

_ Sire of 73% Winners From Starters 

From a few small crops, ISELLA has sired KADE PLUME (12 wins, $146,784), Blue Bella, Ambassador of Love etc ISELLA is a 
stakes winner of 10 races, $191,862 and half-brother to SPECTACULAR LOVE, STAGE DOOR CANTEEN Shipping Magnate 
Dutch Luck. * 

Fee: $500 live foal; Payable Sept. 1 of year bred; Nominated to Breeders’ Cup and Maryland Million 

JANE’S DILEMMA 

1981, Master Derby—Zippy Do, by Hilarious 

Multiple Graded Stakes Winner of $546,756 

JANE’S DILEMMA won the Gallant Fox H-G2 (IV* mi., by IOV 2 lengths). Display H-G3 (2V, mi ), Walter Haight H-L (l'/» mi in 
1:50, 4 A off track record), etc. He is a half-brother to Grade 1 winners VILZAK ($603,859), SOME ROMANCE ($545 355 ) and 
graded stakes-placed MINT COOLER. JANE’S DILEMMA is by classic winner MASTER DERBY 1 $698 625) out of graded stakes 
winner ZIPPY DO. 

Fee: $1,000; Payable Sept. 1 of year bred; Nominated to Breeders’ Cup and Mary land Million 

WHATEVER FOR 

1982, Caro (Ire)—What’s the Reason, by Hail to Reason 

Two-Time Course Record-Setter from a Classic Family 

WHATEVER FOR won 6 races and $108,881, setting a new course record for 1'A mi. on the turf in the Hessian H-L (1-46'A taking 
2 Vs off the former record) and a new course record at Philidelphia Park for 1 V .6 mi. on the grass (1:40 2 A, taking 2 3 A off the former 
record^ He also placed 2nd in Pennsylvania Governors Cup-G3 and 3rd in Cedar Key H-O. He is bv champion and leading sire 

CARO (Ire), from the family of champion LATE BLOOMER, ENDS WELL, LATE ACT, FRED ASTAIRE, etc 
Fee: $1,500 live foal; Payable Sept. 1 of year bred; Nominated to Maryland Million 

Lehr Jackson 

CORBETT FARM 

Direct Inquiries to William Albright, General Manager (301) 472-2501 
2314 Corbett Road, Monkton, Maryland 21111 


•A bo {hr Wo/ 
















Stallions/1990 

AI^HIgE 

AL HATTAB—BEAT THE CHIEF, BY CHIEFTAIN 

Stakes-placed at two in England and stakes-placed 
in North America, earning $137,238. His youngsters 
are unusually impressive looking. 

$1.000 Live Foal 

JEVPSO 

RAISE A NATIVE—LA JALOUSE, BY NIJINSKY II 

This $650,000 Saratoga sale yearling is a winning 
half-brother to EXCLUSIVE ONE (Grade 2 placed), 
OHSOMELLOW (Grade 2 placed), and London 
Lady (Grade 3 placed). Jayeff B. Stable offers a 
$15,000 award to the breeder of the first stakes 
winner of $25,000. 

$1,000 Five Foal 

LOO§E 

BAILJUMPER—MISS BUFFUM, BY MISTY FLIGHT 

New York graded stakes-placed winner; placed in 
the Japan Racing Association H. beating course 
record by 4/5 second. Half-brother to Grade III 
winner CASTELETS ($582,491), FED FUNDS 
($268,428), and BALLET BUFF. 

$1,000 Five Foal 

PAR FIVE 

ICECAPADE—TEE TO GREEN, BY VERTEX 

26 stakes winners lead the family, from the first four 
dams, to this winner; 4 starters, 3 winners, 1 placed 
in 1989. 

$1,000 Five Foal 

FULL OUT—VICTORIAN QUEEN, BY VICTORIA PARK 

Half brother to JUDGE ANGELUCCI $1,582,535, 
WAR $377,217 and PEACE $341,950. 
Fimite«l book offered 1090 
by Private Contract. 

VERIFICATION 

EXCELLER—THE CUDDLER, BY BUCKPASSER 
VERIFICATION is a stakes winner/graded stakes- 
placed earner of $289,400; out of a full sister to 
NUMBERED ACCOUNT, the dam of PRIVATE 
ACCOUNT, DANCE NUMBER, and 2 other stakes 
winners. A $10,000 award is offered the breeder of 
his first winner of a stakes valued at $25,000 or 
more. (Does not apply to mares bred prior to 1989). 
$2,000 Five Foal 

ALL STALLIONS ARE SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT 
AND ELIGIBLE FOR THE WEST VIRGINIA 
BREEDERS CLASSICS 

Inquiries to Rene K. Moore 

NATLEE FARM 

P.O. Box 346, Summit Point, WV 25446 

(301) 363-6631 or (703) 955-3038 


The only way to make sure you're killing the small 
strongyles is to have a veterinarian do fecal examina¬ 
tions, to look for the eggs. 

Strategic worming hasn't gotten the full endorse¬ 
ment of our practice yet, because it's still a new idea in 
the U.S. But we'll be using it this spring on a few farms 
that have especially bad parasite problems. 

Q: Do you have any recommendations on paste worming 
versus tube worming? 

A: It's really an open choice. I'd recommend inter¬ 
spersing the two; using them in combination. Tube 
worming offers you a few more chemicals to choose 
from, and assures that the horse gets the entire dose. 
It's actually not much more expensive than paste 
worming. In our practice, we totally paste worm foals 
up until they're weaned, because we believe in keeping 
the stress on a foal to a minimum. 

Whatever program you use, the important thing is 
to follow it up with routine fecals. 


Dr. Peterson, a well-respected equine practitioner and found¬ 
ing partner in the Maryland Equine Center, in Cockeysville 
(Md.), spoke on herd health practices at the November meet¬ 
ing of the Maryland Professional Farm Managers. 


A Sound Tradition 

Providing expert medical and surgical care to 
horses and small animals since 1943. And now 
offering diagnostic ultrasound for equine lame¬ 
ness, reproduction work, cardiac and abdominal 
disorders and umbilical problems in foals. 

Monday-Friday 7:00am-8:00pm 
Saturday 8:00am-5:00pm 
Sunday 8:00am-2:00pm 
24 Hour Emergency Service 

Equine: Drs. Wendell Loomis, Cooper Williams 
Small Animals: Drs. Bill Benson, Mark Liberto, 
Barbara Eidel 



Reisterstown Veterinary Center 

13030 Hanover Road (Off 1-795) • (301) 833-0660 














SIR GAYLORD - MISS GLAMOUR GAL, by AMBIORIX 


When Lord Gaylord first went to stud in 1975, he was equipped mostly 
with an attractive “sire” pedigree, having raced only six times before 
being retired. 

Now, fourteen years later, he has earned his way onto any list of the 
Mid-Atlantic region’s top sires, and has gained prominence far beyond 
the area. His first big hitter was Lord Avie, champion North American 
two-year-old male of 1980 and earner of $705,977, with wins in such 
prestige events as the Florida Derby and Champagne Stakes. 

That was only the beginning. He has sired 26 stakes winners, 45 
black-type earners and winners of over $9-million. Almost 80% of his 
progeny get to the races, and more than three-fourths of those visit the 
winner’s circle. There are few stallions any¬ 
where with better numbers, and the story 
gets better. 


Worthington 

Farms 


His average starter earns $45,814. In addition to Lord Avie (who’s 
becoming a fine stallion himself), other good Lord Gaylords include the 
classy mare Lady Dean, winner of $361,328,1 Am The Game, who won 
$369,051 while taking on the best of his generation, 1 Rejoice, winner 
of the Grade III Kelso Handicap in New York and earner of $436,296, 
Notches Trace, who was on the board in 24 of 38 career starts which 
included multiple stakes wins and $360,562 in earnings, and the crack 
miler Harriman, winner of six stakes and $366,835. 

A son of leading sire Sir Gaylord out of a blue-hen female family. 
Lord Gaylord long ago certified his place among the best sires of his day. 
His tradition continues. 

1990 Fee: Private Contract. 

Nominated to the Breeders' Cup Series 
and The Maryland Million. 


J.W.Y. MARTIN, OWNER (301) 833-1167 ■ BILL MAGNESS, FARM MANAGER (301) 833-4104 




LORD GAYLORD - WEQUETONSING, by BE SOMEBODY 


When Lord Gaylord entered stud in 1975 after a brief racing career, 
he was the prototype of a sire who would have to make his own oppor¬ 
tunities by proving himself early and often, and so he did. 

Lord Gaylord is now firmly established as one of the premier sires in 
the Mid-Atlantic region, and is widely sought by breeders throughout the 
area. And, if the success of his outstanding son Lord Avie is a barometer, 
he might well become a sire of sires. But, you don’t have to ship to 
Kentucky to get to a quality son of Lord Gaylord. 

Gaylord’s Carousel is your passport to the types of tough, willing, and 
capable horses typical of the Lord Gaylord line, horses able to earn checks 
in any sort of company. Gaylord’s Carousel 
was a winner on the race track, taking four 


of his ten career starts and placing second in the Marlboro Nursery Stakes. 

From two small crops of racing age, Gaylord’s Carousel has sired three 
winners from four starters, including the hard-hitting three-year-old filly 
Maggie Go Round, who has earned $70,700 in two seasons of racing, 
and the 1989 two-year-old winner Harbor Point View. 

In a state where breeders are known for their eye for value, it’s harder 
to find more promise, or better value, than in Gaylord’s Carousel. He’ll 
give you a run for your money. 

1990 Fee: $1,000 Live Foal . 

Payable September 1, 1990. 

Nominated to the Breeders’ Cup Series 
and the Maryland Million. 


Worthington 

Farms 


J.W.Y. MARTIN, OWNER (301) 833-1167 ■ BILL MAGNESS, FARM MANAGER (301) 833-4104 











RAJA BABA - NORTH OF VENUS, by NORTHERN DANCER 


Northern Raja only made one start (he finished third) before suffering 
a career-ending injury, but his pedigree was of such quality that he earned 
a chance at stud. 

For starters, he is by Raja Baba, a regally bred son of the great racehorse 
and sire Bold Ruler (eight-time leading North American sire), who was 
himself a good racehorse and even better sire. Raja Baba led the North 
American general sire list in 1980, and was consistently among the top 
stallions of the 1980s. Raja Baba has more than 40 sons at stud, including 
the successful young sire Well Decorated, and promises to be a sire of 
sires as well as a top broodmare sire. 

Northern Raja’s female family matches 
that of his male side, his dam being the 
classy Northern Dancer filly North of Venus, 
a multiple stakes winner and stakes producer 


who comes from a family of black-type specialists. 

With that pedigree background, it’s no surprise that Northern Raja, 
with only five relatively small crops of racing age has amply demonstrated 
his ability to get horses who bring home the bacon. Two-thirds of his 
starters are winners, among them Ringing, winner of the Ryland Group 
Maryland Turf Stakes and $156,460 in career earnings, and Seventh 
Venus, winner of the Suebee Handicap and the Bryan Field Stakes. 
Northern Raja, with only limited opportunity, has sired the winners of 
more than $800,000, with average earnings per starter of almost $20,000. 
The Northern Rajas pay the bills, and sometimes much more. 

1990 Fee: $2,500 Live Foal. 

Payable September l, 1990. 

Nominated to the Breeders' Cup Series 
and the Maryland Million. 


Worthington 

Farms 


J.W.Y. MARTIN, OWNER (301) 833-1167 ■ BILL MAGNESS, FARM MANAGER (301) 833-4104 






Why the buyers seek us out. 

With a well-bred horse brought to peak condition for a 
sale, exposure to serious buyers is the final important selling 
factor. Representation by a leading sales agent can insure 
that this essential step in the marketing process is achieved. 

Buyers invariably come to see the Litz consignment, and 
with good reason. Over the years Litz Bloodstock has 
established itself as one of the leading East Coast sales 
agents and recently has expanded into the national market. 
Not only will buyers find Litz consignments in Maryland, but 
in Kentucky and Florida as well. Litz Bloodstock offers 
quality individuals presented in impeccable, professional 
style. Our agency consistently ranks among leading 
consignors, attaining high sales averages. It's no wonder 
both buyers and sellers seek us out. 

Put your horses in the best of company and assure yourself 
of a successful sale. Join our consignments at the major 
1990 auctions. 


Litz Bloodstock 

AGENCY, INC. Butler, Maryland 21023 (301) 526-6254 . 


c°VV 


V 












Where 
’feu Live... 

has a great deal to 
do with the way 
you live. 



^ Timber Ridge Farm 

Classic stone colonial built circa 1832 with 3 subsequent 
additions. Features original glass in deep-set windows, original 
hardwood floors, beamed ceilings, 2 bedrooms, 1 '/2 baths. 
Situated on 85 private acres with 2 streams and riding trails. 
Barn for 6 horses, kennels. Call Mary Harris 337-0705. 



▲ ARARE PRIVILEGE... 

just a stone’s throw from the Maryland Hunt Cupcourse sits an amazing 
combination of custom Contemporary home in the elegantly T raditional 
Worthington Valley ... Magnificent wooded private site for the house and 
swimming pool, lush fenced pastureland for the stable and arena... 
Perfect location for the family who needs it all... For private tour of this 
wonderful property, call 

Stephen Edelen 527-1600 or Betsy Merz 821-1700... 


Addressing 

Your 

Lifestyle 

-- 



Butler Farm 

Colonial farmhouse built in 1787 
5 bedrooms ^ </2 baths 5 
fireplaces, staff quarters - master 
suite w/spa facilities, tenant 
house new 9 stall barn 2nd 
bam circa 1747 - kennels • 
dressage arena and more. 

Situated on 135 acres ± in the 
heart of Maryland Horse 
Country. Now’ being offered in 
its entirety or as 3 separate 
parcels - 1) Main house with 85 
acres ± 3 stall barn tenant 
house and garage 2) 29 acre ± 
hillside building site with pond 
3)21 acre ± building site with 
9 stall bam & caretakers 
residence. 

Call Mary Michel 363-6092. 


Whether you are interested in 
buying or selling a secluded 
Country Cottage, a spectacu¬ 
lar Hunt Country estate, or a 
shoreline retreat, Sotheby’s 
International Realty and 
O’Conor, Piper & Flynn 
offer distinctive homes 
that suit your style of 
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way you love to live. 


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REALTORS* 


Exclusive Local Af f iliate 

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INTERNATIONAL REALTY 


And, to discover the world¬ 
wide marketing Sotheby’s 
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provide for your property, 
please call Richard M. 
Price at O’Conor, Piper & 
Flynn, at (301) 561-8800. 


January 1990 


23 
























Jim Raftery-Turfotos 


Go for Wand makes magic 
for Jane duPont Lunger 

By Lucy Acton 


W hen my husband and I approached Jack Heal¬ 
ey about becoming our trainer (back in 1940), he inter¬ 
viewed us,” Jane duPont Lunger recalls, her eyes twin¬ 
kling the way they do when she tells one of her favorite 
stories. "I'll never forget what he told us: He said, 'If I 
do train for you, I expect you to do two things—win as 
though you're accustomed to winning, and lose as 
though you like it.' 

"I've never had any problems with the second part. I 
can sit there and take loser after loser. But it's hard for 
me to control my enthusiasm when we win!" 

Enthusiastic hardly begins to describe her reaction 
last fall after Go for Wand, a homebred who races in 
the yellow and purple colors of Mrs. Lunger's Chris¬ 

Jane duPont Lunger, who founded Christiana Stables 
with her late husband Harry in 1937, reached new heights 
when her homebred Go for Wand, by Deputy Minister 
out of Obeah, captured the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies. 


tiana Stables, won the $1,000,000 Breeders' Cup Juve¬ 
nile Fillies event on Breeders' Cup day at Gulfstream 
Park. "I'm not sure how I felt," she says. "Numb, may¬ 
be . . ." 

Go for Wand is the latest of 35 stakes winners— 
including 24 homebreds—who have campaigned in 
the name of Christiana Stables, founded in 1937 by 
Mrs. Lunger and her late husband Harry Lunger, who 
died in 1976. 

Plates and trophies take up every inch of space on 
one of the walls in the sunroom of her home near 
Wilmington (Del.) where Mrs. Lunger sits, reminisc¬ 
ing. She talks of many things: her superstitions, her 
paradoxical allergy to horses. But always the conversa¬ 
tion comes back to the pleasure that the horse business 
has given her over the last 50-plus years. 

"My husband was the one who laid the foundation 
for all this," she confides. "Years ago, when Mr. Lung- 



24 


Maryland Horse 
















January 1990 


25 







er was not well—but his mind was clear—I would be 
going to the races, and he would say we had too many 
horses. I agreed with him. Then I'd go watch one of the 



,L..\ __ 


nr n- 

tfllj >4* *** > 




horses run, and come back and tell him how well it did, 
and he would say we didn't have enough horses. He 
was the brains behind it all." 

An attorney and stockbroker, Mr. Lunger was a 
graduate of Princeton and Harvard Law School. In his 
legal work for the Delaware state legislature, he was 
instrumental in bringing pari-mutuel wagering to the 
state. When Delaware Park opened in 1937, he imme¬ 
diately jumped in with the purchase of the couple's 
first race horse. "He was always terribly enthusiastic 
about racing," Mrs. Lunger says. "And he had almost 
a sixth sense when it came to bloodlines." 

The Lungers called their stable Christiana because 
their home is located in a part of Delaware known as 
the Christiana Hundred. When Delaware was origi¬ 
nally settled, the land was divided into parcels which 
were restricted to 100 families each. Many of Dela¬ 
ware's earliest residents came over from Sweden; the 
Christiana Hundred was named after Queen Chris¬ 
tina of Sweden. 



26 


Maryland Horse 


Skip Ball 





















Christiana's breeding operation was launched in 
1938, with the purchase of a yearling filly by *Bull Dog. 
The filly, named Miss Ferdinand, cost $7,000—a huge 
price at the time. But she was worth every penny. The 
next year Miss Ferdinand won the Matron Stakes, and 
in 1943 she produced Christiana's first homebred 
stakes winner. Sea Snack. 

Miss Ferdinand and her half-sister Camargo, whom 
the Lungers purchased soon after that, became Chris¬ 
tiana's foundation broodmares. Both are out of Mis¬ 
leading (by Sweep). Camargo produced Thinking 
Cap, who won the 1955 Travers Stakes for the Lungers. 
("The Travers—the 'mid-summer Derby'—has always 
been one of my favorite races," says Mrs. Lunger.) 

Today her bloodline is carried on in Maryland by the 
popular young stallion Oh Say, who stands at 
Sagamore Farm. Sire of Grade 1 winner Sham Say, and 
six other stakes winners, Oh Say (by Hoist the Flag) is 
out of Christiana's outstanding homebred race mare 
Light Hearted (who won the Delaware Oaks and other 
major stakes). Light Hearted (by Cyane) was a great- 
granddaughter of Camargo. 

Mrs. Lunger and her family still own 17 of the 40 
shares in the Oh Say syndicate. 

In 1960, Mr. Lunger made the purchase that would 
lead to victory—almost 30 years later—in the Breeders' 
Cup. At Saratoga that year he paid $34,000 for a son of 
*Turn-to—Your Game by *Beau Pere. Named Cyane, 
the colt won the 1961 Futurity Stakes and the 1962 
Dwyer Handicap, plus four other races, and earned 
$176,367 before retiring to stud. (Cyane stood at vari¬ 
ous farms in Maryland and Virginia during his long 
and successful career at stud. Among his most famous 
offspring was Smarten, a major stakes winner who 
ranked as Maryland's leading sire in 1989. Smarten 
stands at the Northview Stallion Station in Chesapeake 
City.) 

Cyane was one of many top runners developed for 
the Lungers by Maryland-based trainer Henry Clark. 
Their first trainer was Selby Burch, brother of Hall of 
Fame trainer Preston Burch. He was succeeded upon 
his death in 1940 by Jack Healey, who died in 1947. 

Mr. Clark took over at that time, and today, at 83, 
continues to train a few horses for Christiana. A mem¬ 
ber of racing's Hall of Fame, Mr. Clark does not travel 
far from his home in Glyndon these days. The more 
active divisions of the Christiana Stables are handled 
by Jimmy Murphy (in Maryland) and Bill Badgett (in 
New York and Florida). Badgett has six—including Go 
for Wand and another 1989 stakes winner. To the Light¬ 
house. 

Cyane (top left) raced with distinction for Christiana 
before being retired. His first offspring sold at auction 
was Obeah (left), who was purchased by Mr. Lunger. 

The $387,299 winner, shown with trainer Henry Clark and 
assistant Penny Wilson in 1972, was carrying her first 
foal, stakes winner Black Powder, by Northern Dancer. 


"Henry deserves so much of the credit," says Mrs. 
Lunger. "I said that in Florida, on national television, 
and it's true. He's not only been our trainer, but a dear 
friend to my husband and me." 

Friendship aside, Henry Clark was caught off guard 
when Mr. Lunger made up his mind to buy a yearling 
filly by Cyane at the 1966 Saratoga auction. The first 
son or daughter of Cyane ever to go through a sales 
ring, the filly—whom the Lungers were to name Ob¬ 
eah—cost $15,000. "Henry was upset because he 
hadn't had a chance to look at her first. But Mr. Lunger 
was determined; he said we had to support our stal¬ 
lion," remarks Mrs. Lunger. 

Mr. Clark was able to make the best of the situation. 
He sent Obeah out to win five major stakes (to the 
Lungers' especial delight she won the prestigious Del¬ 
aware Handicap at their home track twice) and earn 
$387,299. 

Bred to Northern Dancer, Obeah produced graded 
stakes winners Dance Spell ($326,090) and Discorama 
($181,569) and stakes winner Black Powder ($126,190). 

The enormous expense of sending a mare to North¬ 
ern Dancer year after year (Obeah was bred to him five 
times, getting five foals, three of whom won stakes) 
was a carefully considered judgment. "We never had a 
share in Northern Dancer. We insured the mating first 
and then, after the mare was pronounced in foal, the 
fetus," says Mrs. Lunger. Was such insurance costly? 
"Proportionately, it wasn't expensive. But we never 
lost one," she replies. 

Obeah's final foal by Northern Dancer was Carni- 
valay, who is now making a success at stud at Country 
Life Farm in Bel Air (Md.). (See accompanying article.) 

The next-to-last foal she produced (at 25, she is now 
a pensioner) was Go for Wand. Foaled in nearby Penn¬ 
sylvania at Russell Jones' Walnut Green farm, Go for 
Wand is by Northern Dancer's grandson Deputy Min¬ 
ister, who stood at Windfields Farm in Chesapeake 
City until the farm's closing in 1988. 

"We shipped Obeah down there for one cover, and 
she came back in foal (carrying Go for Wand)," Mrs. 
Lunger states proudly. "That's impressive for a mare 
who was 21 years old at the time." 

Mrs. Lunger's fascination with superstition, and 
her penchant for clever names, came together with 
Obeah, and now Go for Wand. "An Obeah is a curse," 
explains Mrs. Lunger. "In Jamaica, where we have a 
winter home, they talk about the obeah man, and the 
obeah woman. If the obeah is around, you go for a 
wand to protect yourself." 

But Go for Wand's success on Breeders' Cup day 
proved that superstition is not always borne out. "I 
hadn't seen either of Go for Wand's winning races be¬ 
fore that day, and I was worried (about jinxing her)," 
admits Mrs. Lunger. 


January 1990 


27 








"The first time she ran my daughter and I were 
going to New York to watch when we were caught in a 
vast accident on the bridge. A crane had fallen; there 
was no way we could make it there on time. She won by 
five lengths. 

"The second time she ran I was away, accompanying 
my grandson to the University of St. Andrews in Scot¬ 
land; we were on a vessel crossing the Atlantic. She 
won by 18 lengths. 

"Our whole family went to New York to see her run 
against Stella Madrid (in the Frizette Stakes-Gl on Oc¬ 
tober 14)." In that race, the only defeat in her brief 
career. Go for Wand lost by a half-length to Stella Mad¬ 
rid. 

On Breeders' Cup day, even worse omens appeared. 
A short time before the race, "Three big men came up 
and stood next to our box. They said: 'We're here to 
escort you down to the winner's circle if you win!' " 
says Mrs. Lunger, with an amused laugh. 

"Well, you know, that's the kiss of death to talk like 
that. 

"I said okay. Then the men were standing there, and 
they were so big they were blocking my view. I said: 
'You'll have to make yourselves smaller, or I won't be 
able to see the race.' " 

Go for Wand, of course, won easily, by two and 
three-quarter lengths, with Selima Stakes-G2 winner 
Sweet Roberta finishing second and Stella Madrid 
third. 

"I don't really like to run my 2-year-olds much," 
Mrs. Lunger says, somewhat quixotically. 

She enjoys watching her horses grow to maturity: "I 
like to get to know them." But Mrs. Lunger is not a 
hands-on horseperson. "My husband loved to go on 
riding trips out West, and he used to insist that I go 
too," she recalls. "I hated it. As soon as we started out, 
I'd get a headache. I didn't even like to go to the race 
track, because I felt so awful there. Then, after years 
went by, it was discovered that I was allergic. I have to 
be very careful—even going to visit the horses in the 
stable, which I like to do. When I go into the winner's 
circle, I push the horse aside." 

There are no horses on Mrs. Lunger's Delaware es¬ 
tate. "We tried it once, a long time ago, but we didn't 
have the facilities to do it right," she explains. "Al¬ 
exis—the only horse we ever ran in the Kentucky Der¬ 
by (in 1945)—was one of the few horses we ever kept 
here. Some deer hunters were shooting, and a bullet 
ricocheted and went through one of his legs. We de¬ 
cided this wasn't the right place for our horses." 

Alexis was named after Mrs. Lunger's great-grand¬ 
father Alexis duPont, the last member of her branch of 
the family to be connected with the chemical company 
that bears the duPont name. Mrs. Lunger is a sixth- 
generation descendant of the original duPont who 
came over from France in 1800, and whose son started 
the company. 


Mid-Atlantic area 
well represented 
in Breeders' Cup 


Many breeders and owners in the Mid-At¬ 
lantic region had their fortunes boosted by the 
1989 Breeders' Cup. 

The star performer from the Mid-Atlantic re¬ 
gion was Christiana Stables' Go for Wand, who 
became a leading contender for an Eclipse award 
after her impressive, two and three-quarter 
length victory in the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fil¬ 
lies. (See accompanying story.) 

Although not a Maryland-bred — she was 
foaled at Russell Jones' Walnut Green farm in 
West Grove, Pa. — Go for Wand has close ties to 
Maryland. Her sire Deputy Minister stood at 
Windfields Farm in Chesapeake City at the time 
of her conception. And her half-brother Carni- 
valay stands at Country Life Farm near Bel Air 
(Md.). 

"November 4 was a dream day for us," com¬ 
ments Country Life business manager Mike 
Pons. (Earlier that same afternoon two of Carni- 
valay's daughters, Valay Maid and Lucky Lady 
Lauren, finished one-two in the What a Summer 
Stakes at Laurel.) Carnivalay's first crop of 2-year- 
olds came to the races in 1989 and as of late No¬ 
vember the 9-year-old son of Northern Dancer — 
Obeah ranked as Maryland's leading freshman 
sire. 

Maryland was represented by the brilliant 
Safely Kept, who gave the best performance a 
Maryland-bred has ever given in the six-year his- 


28 


Maryland Horse 












tory of the Breeders' Cup, leading all the way in 
the Breeders' Cup Sprint (against males) before 
being nipped at the wire by Dancing Spree. A 
daughter of Maryland stallion Horatius, Safely 
Kept (dispatched at odds of nearly 7-1) registered 
her only loss of the year, and was still in conten¬ 
tion for an Eclipse award as the nation's top 
sprinter of 1989. 

Safely Kept was sold as a 2-year-old by her 
breeders, David and Jo Ann Hayden of Upperco 
(Md.), but her dam Safely Home remains a 
prized member of the Haydens broodmare band. 
The week after the Breeders' Cup, the Haydens 
sold Safely Kept's weanling half-brother by Dou¬ 
ble Zeus at Keeneland for $115,000. 

Another from this area who figured promi¬ 
nently was Mr. and Mrs. Bertram Firestone's Vir¬ 
ginia-bred Sweet Roberta, who returned from a 
victory in Laurel's Selima Stakes-G2 to finish sec¬ 
ond to Go for Wand in the Juvenile Fillies. 

Of the 80 horses who competed in the Breed¬ 
ers' Cup, nine were foaled in the Mid-Atlantic 
region. Four of them placed first, second or 
third—giving Mid-Atlantic breeders an enviable 
percentage. 

The third-placed runner was Open Mind (also 
a daughter of former Maryland sire Deputy Min¬ 
ister), who rallied behind Bayakoa and Gorgeous 
in the Distaff. 

Having a horse good enough to run in the 
Breeders' Cup is, in itself, an achievement worth 


Running against colts in the Breeders' Cup Sprint, 
the Maryland-bred filly Safely Kept was edged 
by Dancing Spree after leading throughout the race. 


noting. Contenders from this region also includ¬ 
ed New Jersey-bred Sewickley, who started as 
favorite in the Sprint and finished sixth; next be¬ 
hind him in the Sprint was Flourescent Gem, also 
bred in New Jersey; Wonders Delight (Pennsylva¬ 
nia), last in the Distaff; and Virginia-breds Sim¬ 
ply Majestic (a close-up fifth in the Mile) and 
Pleasant Tap (sixth in the Juvenile). 

Little Bold John, the only Maryland-bred be¬ 
sides Safely Kept, showed early speed before fad¬ 
ing to be next-to-last in the Mile. 

The Maryland-connected entry of Dispersal 
(owned by locals Harry and Tom Meyerhoff and 
trained by Bud Delp) gave an excellent account of 
himself in the Sprint, getting up for third, beaten 
two necks. Philadelphia Park hero Mr. Nicker¬ 
son, trained by Mark Reid, did not fare as well, 
ending up last among the 12 finishers. 

Maryland-based trainer Barclay Tagg saddled 
Bonner Farm's Highland Springs to register sev¬ 
enth in the Mile (in the tightly-bunched finish he 
was beaten less than two lengths by the winner, 
Steinlen). 

Robert P. Levy, who owns Muirfield East Farm 
in Chesapeake City, was represented by 
Trumpet's Blare, sixth in the Juvenile Fillies. □ 


January 1990 


29 













» 






. 


Go for Wand's half-brother Carnivalay, who is a son 
of Northern Dancer and thus a full brother to Dance Spell, 
Discorama and Black Powder, stands at Country Life. 

She lives on part of an old dairy farm that has been 
her home since she and her husband were married in 
1944. Originally their land included 100 acres, and 
their house was a stone mansion designed by a French 
architect, in the style of a French country chateau. Af¬ 
ter Mr. Lunger's death, Mrs. Lunger donated the 
house and 60 acres of land to the Episcopal Diocese of 
Delaware, and moved into a smaller—though still 
grand—contemporary-styled house that overlooks the 
rolling hillsides. 

Mrs. Lunger has five children: Philip, a cattle 
rancher in New Mexico; Ann, who is married to attor¬ 
ney and bloodstock agent Richard Jones (Richard's 
brother Russell Jones is president of the Thoroughbred 
Owners and Breeders Association and owns the farm 
where Go for Wand was foaled); Brett, a former Formu- 

30 


'■ _ 1 * _ —iv - _ 


Neena Ewing 

la One racing car driver; David, a stockbroker; and 
Mary Davis. She has 19 grandchildren, and two great¬ 
grandchildren. 

So that her family may have an opportunity to carry 
on Christiana Stables after she is gone, Mrs. Lunger 
has set up the Christiana Nursery Trust. Ten of the 
approximately 15 broodmares in the stable are owned 
by the Trust; race horses are leased back to run in the 
Christiana Stables name. Most of the broodmares are 
boarded year-round at Claiborne Farm in Kentucky. 

Mrs. Lunger has had a policy for many years of sell¬ 
ing colts and retaining fillies. Among her rising crop of 
2-year-olds are a filly by Mr. Prospector—Discorama, 
and the last foal out of Obeah: a bay filly by Topsider. 

"Horses are a business, and they always have been 
for us," remarks Mrs. Lunger. "And we have been 
fortunate, very fortunate." □ 

Maryland Horse 














¥ ”■) 



PERFORMANCE AND PEDIGREE 




Private Terms 



■,.A 


m 


% 


1985 PRIVATE ACCOUNT — LAUGHTER, by BOLD RULER 


$1,243,947 in career earnings - $73,000 per start. 
Nine stakes victories. Set a new stakes record (1:47 Vs) 
in the Grade I Wood Memorial. 

Defeated Seeking the Gold in the Grade II Gotham 
Stakes, running a mile in l:34 4 /5. 

Set a track record at Pimlico, nine furlongs in 1:47 Vs. 


• His dam, Laughter, has produced five stakes 
winners that have each earned over $100,000. 
His second dam is the incomparable broodmare 
Shenanigans. All six of her foals raced and won, 
including Ruffian. Her sons, Icecapade and Buckfinder 
have sired over 70 stakes winners. 




1990 Fee: $15,500 LIVE FOAL. PAYABLE SEPTEMBER 1, 1990. 


Also standing at Northview: 

CAVEAT 1990 Fee: $7,500 SMARTEN 1990 Fee: $12,500 

TWO PUNCH 1990 Fee: $5,000 WAQUOIT 1990 Fee. $15,000 

All stud fees payable September 1, 1990. 

All Northview stallions nominated to Breeders' Cup Series and The Maryland Million. 





y^orthwew Q&tallim Qsbtatum 


RO.BOX 89 ■ CHESAPEAKE CITY, MARYIAND2I915 ilNQUIRlESTO: TOM BOWMAN, DVM(30l) 778-04 39 ■ LINDA BENCH (301) 885-2855 ■FAX:(30I) 885-5985 


'it' 







Robb sees Breeders' Cup 
as Super Bowl of racing 

By Bill Tanton 


It is early on a cold November morning at Bowie. In 
barn 12, all the way in the back of the stable area, a 
solitary man sits alone in a small, Spartan office, doing 
paper work. 

On his head is a white cap that says Super Bowl XII. 
In his case, the cap turns out to be significant. 

Outside the door to his office a steady parade of 
Thoroughbreds is being walked. An exercise girl, 19- 
year-old Tracy Wessner, is getting ready to take a horse 
to the track, the eighth she will have gotten on that 
morning. The man in the Super Bowl cap is oblivious 
to the activity around him. He is absorbed in the book 
work. 

"Is that Jerry Robb in there, the man who trained 
the Breeders' Cup horses?" a visitor asks someone who 
is making coffee in the tiny room next door. 

"Yes, sir," says the man. "I'm his assistant. My 
name's Rick Sillaman." 

"How is Jerry to work for, pretty demanding?" the 
visitor asks Sillaman, himself the son of a former train¬ 
er. 

"Very demanding," says Sillaman, "but he's a good 
boss. He works very hard. But he can act up, too. I 
remember one time he stuck a hose right in an agent's 
van. Got water all over the place. Must have ruined the 
upholstery." 

Now it is the hour at which Robb has agreed to be 
interviewed by the visitor, whom he welcomes with a 
handshake and the offer of a seat on a crate. Robb is 
only 37 years old, young to have reached the pinnacle 
of his business, which the Breeders' Cup is. He looks 
older. 

"They say horses age you quick," he says with a 
slight smile. 

It makes you wonder about the trainers who labor 
all their lives in the vineyards of racing and never get 
close to a Breeders' Cup or a Kentucky Derby. How old 
must they look? Most of the nation's trainers are in that 
category: 

When Robb went to Gulfstream Park for the Breed¬ 
ers' Cup this fall with Little Bold John and Robyn 

32 


Dancer he joined the elite of his sport. He thinks of it as 
racing's Super Bowl. 

"All my life I've loved football," he says. "I like to 
handicap the pro games just like I handicap the horses. 
The Redskins are my team. One year I went to Califor¬ 
nia to see them in the Super Bowl. That was the year 
Denver was supposed to beat the Redskins but the 
Redskins won. That's where I got this cap. 

"Well, to me, going to the Breeders' Cup was like 
being at the Super Bowl. All the people, all the excite¬ 
ment, all the best in the sport gathered in one place. 
I've been down there (to Florida) before and run better 
(Little Bold John won the Grade 2 Donn Handicap at 
Gulfstream Park in 1987), but this was different. You're 
surrounded by good horses and top horsemen. I've 
been training since 1974 and that sure was the high¬ 
light of my career." 

Robb is right, of course, when he says he has run 
better. So has Little Bold John, who has won more 
stakes races than any Maryland-bred flat horse in his¬ 
tory. Little Bold John, who turns 8 this month, ran out 
of the money in the Breeders' Cup Mile. So did Robyn 
Dancer (in the Juvenile event). Neither result surprised 
Robb. 

"John will not run on a soft turf course," Robb says. 
"He just won't. Maybe that's why he's still around at 
his age, because he knows what he can and cannot do. 

I had him entered in two different races but I waited on 
the weather. I took a shot it wouldn't be wet and en¬ 
tered him in the mile race, but I lost my gamble. The 
morning of the race we had a three-hour downpour 
and that was that." 

One understandable disappointment has by no 
means diminished Robb's high regard for Little Bold 
John, who, on Robb's advice, was purchased (from one 
of Robb's other clients, Hal C. B. Clagett) as a 2-year-old 
for $30,000 by John E. (Jack) Owens. 

"There'll never be another like Little Bold John 
around here," Robb says. 

Never? 

Maryland Horse 




"Well, how long they been racing in Maryland?" he 
asks with just a trace of impatience. "A lot of horses 
run in claiming races. Some of 'em win stakes races for 
a couple years. But John, he's won 25 stakes races. He's 
been doing it for five straight years. 

"He hurt himself on the way back from Florida in 
the van. Nothing serious. Just enough to take care of it 
now. But he'll be back in February or March." 

Robyn Dancer is another story. In the week leading 
up to the Breeders' Cup, the 2-year-old was sold. A son 
of Crafty Prospector, Robyn Dancer had been pur¬ 
chased at auction in Florida by Owens earlier in the 
year for $22,000. He had won three stakes—the World's 


Playground, Jet Pilot and Vanlandingham—and 
earned $127,228 before the Breeders' Cup. His price 
last fall was reported to have been $600,000. 

Jerry Robb was at Gulfstream Park from October 25 
until November 7, and if he has a lasting memory of his 
trip to the Breeders' Cup it is the time he spent on the 
telephone on that transaction. The deal was consum¬ 
mated November 1, three days before the Breeders' 
Cup. 

"The biggest thing," he says, "was the sale of that 
horse. I was on the phone for a week, talking to blood¬ 
stock agents in New York and California. The two men 
who bought him, one was from Hawaii and one was 


January 1990 


33 


Neeirn Ewing 







from California. With people in all those different time 
zones I felt like I spent the whole time on the tele¬ 
phone. The only time I got out to any parties or any¬ 
thing was one night I went to the press hospitality 
room and talked to Dale Austin and Jack Mann." 

The new owners, Robb says, did not expect Robyn 
Dancer to win. Like them, Robb thought the horse 
would "bounce"—run a poor race coming back after a 
good one. (On October 21, Robyn Dancer had run an 
excellent race to be second to Go and Go-Ire in the 
Laurel Futurity-G2.) "If we thought he was going to 
win," Jerry says, "we'd-a never sold him." 

That is typical of the common sense Robb employs 
in handling one of this state's most competitive stables. 

"I train light compared to most trainers," he says, 
"but I'm kind of in the middle. Some trainers work all 
their horses the same. Some of them give their horses 
no break at all. I think you have to treat each horse 
different, find out how they were brought up." 

Robb says he has worked this way "all my training 
life." He started out with a shoestring operation, and 
got-his first major break in 1976, when he was hired to 
train some horses for Hal C.B. Clagett, the Upper 
Marlboro breeder and lawyer. Clagett is the principal 
shareholder in syndicate-owned John Alden. As John 
Alden rose to prominence in the mid-1980s, with 
stakes winners Little Bold John and Alden's Ambition 
($326,820, Geisha H, Alma North H, Jameela H, etc.), 
so did Robb. Today it's a moot question whether Jerry 
Robb has been responsible for the success of John Al¬ 
den (who ranks as Maryland's leading active sire on 
the average-earnings index)—or the other way 
around. Five of John Alden's eight stakes winners have 
been developed by Jerry. 

Clagett turned Little Bold John over to Robb at the 
start of his career. The gelding broke his maiden his 
second time out in the fall of 1984. He has since won 
$1,852,267. All this is pretty heady stuff for someone 
like Jerry Robb, who was raised in Deale, Md., the son 
of a Washington, D.C., meat cutter. 

"I never had anything to do with horses as a kid," 
Jerry says, "except going to the races with my dad 
when I was a teenager. He went every Saturday and he 
took me with him. We went to double headers. If we 
won in the afternoon, we'd go off to a night track to try 
to win some more. And if we lost in the afternoon, 
we'd go at night to try to win it back. Some days he 
didn't want to take me with him and I'd hide in the 
back of the car. I wouldn't come up until he was too 
close to the track to turn back." 

"You must have found the race track exciting," the 
visitor tells Robb. 

"I still do/' he says. 

Robb long ago grew tired of betting every race. Now 
he bets on his own horses. Is that, he was asked, to 
show the owner he has confidence in the horse? 


"To show myself," he says. "If he doesn't have a 
shot to win he shouldn't be in there." 

Owens and Clagett are not Robb's biggest clients (in 
sheer number). That status is held by sports figure 
Arnold Heft, who has ten horses in Robb's care. Over 
the past two years, Robb has saddled two horses— 
Baldski's Choice and Pulverizing—to win stakes for 
Heft and his wife Sylvia. Altogether, Jerry's stable con¬ 
sists of 40 horses, whom he trains for 20 different own¬ 
ers. "Most of my owners have only one horse," he 
explains. 

Robb arrives at Bowie at 7:30 each morning. He does 
not get home to his wife Robin and their three children 
at their 15-acre farm in Edgewater, five miles south of 
Annapolis, until 7:30 in the evening. He takes off 
Wednesdays when there is no racing. If the weather is 
good, he indulges in another favorite activity—one 
that reveals the fun side of him, the action side. He flies 
a plane. 

"I already wrecked one airplane in the Chesapeake 
Bay a year ago," he says. "The instructor forgot to put 
the fuel in before we went up. When we ran out of gas, 
we were over Annapolis. It was too populated to put it 
down there so we turned back and put it in the Bay. 
When we landed, I was bruised from the harness. The 
instructor had a broken nose." 

"I'll bet that instructor checks the fuel before he 
goes up now," observes the visitor to Robb's barn. 

"So do I," Jerry says. 

Robb is getting ready to buy his own plane, a Cher¬ 
okee 140. He likes the excitement of flying. 

"The horse business is bad for a family man," Jerry 
admits. "You're never home." 

Rick Sillaman, the assistant, recalls none too fondly 
the four consecutive Saturdays last summer when they 
raced at the Meadowlands in New Jersey, within view 
of the New York skyline. After racing at night, they'd 
need a little time to cool the horse, then van back to 
Bowie—arriving at 6 a.m., in time for another day's 
work. But then most veteran horsemen have had simi¬ 
lar experiences. 

The Robbs have two daughters, Wendy, 17, and The¬ 
resa, 12, and a 12-year-old son, Donald. Interestingly, 
Donald loves to go to the races with his dad. Donald 
likes to gamble. Jerry understands. 

These days Robb is occupied with the cycle of his 
business, the beginning part. 

"It's time to clean out the barn and get a new crop of 
babies," he says. "You're always looking for that good 
horse. I want to get back to the Breeders' Cup. I'm not 
the kind of trainer who dreams of being in a Kentucky 
Derby, although I did run a horse in the Derby Prep 
and in the Preakness. But to me the Breeders' Cup is as 
big as the Derby. Not any one race, but the whole day 
is." □ 


34 


Maryland Horse 




IRON RULER — ALOMA, by NATIVE CHARGER 


ALOMJTS RULER 


THE HORSEMEN’S CHOICE 


Here’s all you need to know about ALOMA’S RULER: 

• He won seven of 13 career starts, was off the board only 
once, and earned $498,883. 

• He won five stakes, including the Preakness, Withers, 
and Jersey Derby. 


• His sire line (Never Bend) is one of the world’s best 
sources of classic performance. 

1 He sires winners. 

1 His first few crops have seen more than 70% of his foals 
that race get to the winner’s circle. 


1989 Fee: $3,500 Live Foal Payable September 1 st • Nominated to: The Breeder’s Cup Series and The Maryland Million 


Tom Bowman, DVM • Syndicate Manager • (301)778-0439 • Jim Steele • Farm Manager • (301)795-0723 








What's New in Maryland fi /| 

)W H ' 


Maryland Million sponsor 

USAir has agreed to be one of the 
major sponsors of the fifth Mary¬ 
land Million Day, scheduled Sun¬ 
day, September 9 at Pimlico. 

Maryland's leading airline, US- 
Air joins Anheuser-Busch, the First 
National Bank of Maryland, 
USF&G, Crown Central Petroleum, 
the State of Maryland and the Ken- 
nard Warfield Jr. Group as race-title 
sponsors for the ESPN televised 
event. 

Arabian racing halted 

Laurel's controversial experi¬ 
ment with Arabian racing lasted 
only one month last fall before be¬ 
ing discontinued in mid-Novem¬ 
ber. 

Low mutuel handle on the races 
for Arabians was apparently the 
major reason Laurel president Joe 
De Francis called a halt to the pro¬ 
motion, which his father, the late 


Frank De Francis, had fought hard 
to implement. 

After being turned down by the 
Maryland Racing Commission, 
Frank De Francis gained approval 
through the state legislature in 1989 
to conduct Arabian racing on a trial 
basis. Race track management 
hoped to use Arabian racing as a 
promotional tool to expand its fan 
base. But the innovation was op¬ 
posed by many of the state's horse¬ 
men, who saw it as unfair competi¬ 
tion. 

Laurel would have been the only 
major race track in the country to 
conduct pari-mutuel races for Ara¬ 
bians. 

Beginning October 14, Arabian 
races were carded as the first event 
on the program on Fridays, Satur¬ 
days and Sundays. Thirteen were 
run, generating an average mutuel 
handle of $49,687. By contrast, the 
lowest mutuel handle on a Thor¬ 


oughbred race on any of those days 
was $78,010. 

Problems with identifying some 
of the horses who were entered to 
run, and certifying the eligibility of 
others, further clouded the experi¬ 
ment. 

Spokesmen for the Arabian Jock¬ 
ey Club expressed dismay over the 
track's decision to discontinue Ara¬ 
bian racing, and indicated that 
some legal action may be forthcom¬ 
ing. 

Hurricane relief effort 

Some horses in rural areas of 
South Carolina are facing starva¬ 
tion, or severe malnutrition, due to 
the effects of last fall's Hurricane 
Hugo. 

"At first, we didn't worry too 
much about the horses," said John 
Freed, organizer of the Animal Re¬ 
lief Fund for the South Carolina So¬ 
ciety for the Prevention of Cruelty 



Maryland Horse 












to Animals (SPCA). "Their imme¬ 
diate need was not as great, be¬ 
cause they could still eat grass. 

"Now, with the onset of winter, 
horses are suffering from the ef¬ 
fects of damaged hay and feed sup¬ 
plies. The situation is getting worse 
and worse." 

Freed noted that most large 
farms are managing to cope. "It's 
the small places, with a trailer out 
back and one or two horses on three 
or four acres—those are the ones 
who are struggling. And there are a 
lot of them." 

Donations may be sent to S.C. 
SPCA, P.O. Box 4296, Greenville, 
S.C. 29608. Freed's phone number 
is (803) 242-3626. 

Top-priced broodmares 

Some of the highest prices ever 
paid for Maryland-bred brood¬ 
mares were recorded at the recent 
Keeneland November sale. 

Doubles Partner, from the Ralph 
C. Wilson/Oxford Stable dispersal, 
who sold for $2,750,000 (on a bid by 
Skara Glen Stable), became the sec¬ 
ond-highest priced Maryland-bred 
broodmare ever sold at public auc¬ 
tion. The all-time record was set by 
Avum, who brought $3,200,000 (in 
foal to Spectacular Bid) at Keene¬ 
land in 1983. 

Foaled at Windfields Farm in 
1984, Doubles Partner is by Damas¬ 
cus—Fabuleux Jane by *Le Fabu- 
leux. A major client of the now-de- 
funct Windfields, Wilson, from 
Detroit (Mich.), campaigned Dou- 

A major character in Josh Pons' 
Country Life Diary, a monthly series 
in The Blood-Horse last year, is the 
contracted-tendon foal Rollaids, who 
survived a difficult birth to become 
the mascot of the farm's 1989 crop. 


bles Partner to win the Anne Ar¬ 
undel Handicap-G3, and Sweet 
Tooth and Pearl Necklace Stakes 
and earn $180,869. Doubles Partner 
produced a Nureyev filly in 1989, 
and was sold in foal to Mr. Prospec¬ 
tor. 

Wilson's Keeneland consign¬ 
ment also included two other 
Maryland-bred mares who sold for 
well over $1 million. Farewell Part¬ 
ner (Northern Dancer—Native 
Partner by Raise a Native) was pur¬ 
chased for $1,700,000 by Bruce 
Hundley, agent; Danseur Fabuleux 
(Northern Dancer—Fabuleux Jane 
by *Le Fabuleux), $1,400,000, Dar- 
ley Stud Management. Those two 
mares rank as the third and fourth 
highest-priced Mary land-bred 
broodmares to be sold at auction. 

All three mares are descendants 
of major stakes winner Native Part¬ 
ner ($138,636, Woodhaven H, 
Maskette H, etc.). Native Partner is 
also the dam of European champi¬ 
on Ajdal, champion Maryland- 
bred 3-year-old colt and turf runner 
in 1987. 

Ten Maryland-bred mares have 
sold at public auction for $1 million 
or more. The others are Sulemeif, 
$1,250,000 (1986); Equanimity, 
$1,200,000 (1980); A Realgirl, 
$1,200,000 (1983); Pearl Necklace, 
$1,150,000 (1982); Hardly, $1,000,000 
(1985) and Alma North, $1,000,000 
(1981). 

Handicapped riding award 

Jean Tebay of Sparks (Md.), one 
of the leaders of the riding therapy 
movement in this country and 
abroad, has been selected as the 
first recipient of the James Brady 
Professional Achievement award, 
to be given annually by North 



"The Helper," a bronze by Jo-Anne 
Hill-Saunders, has been presented to 
Jean Tebay of Sparks (Md.) for her 
work in the riding therapy movement. 

American Riding for the Hand¬ 
icapped, Inc. 

Commemorating the award is a 
bronze poured at the New Arts 
Foundry in Baltimore, and de¬ 
signed by Marylander Jo-Anne Hill 
Saunders. "I am truly moved by the 
expression of joy and satisfaction 
on a rider's face when feeling the 
confidence of being one with a 
horse," comments the artist, who 
named the statue "The Helper." 
Adds Ms. Saunders: "The figures 
are deliberately abstract to symbol¬ 
ize all those sharing in this special 
event. This is a fantasy because re¬ 
ality is often quite harsh in the 
handicapped riding experience." 

News from Sagamore 

William Lewis (Buddy) Keeton, 
25, formerly employed by Nelson 
Bunker Hunt's Bluegrass Farm in 
Kentucky, has been hired to run the 
broodmare division at Sagamore 
Farm. 


January 1990 


37 









Standing his second season at stud 

MR. NAPTON 

Chestnut, 1984 

* Forii—Medal of Valor, by Damascus 

Top bloodlines 

TORLI—Sire of three-time Horse of the Year FOREGO (34 wins, 
$1,938,957). 

MEDAL OF VALOR—Turf specialist at Belmont and Saratoga (2 wins, 
$20,470); dam of graded stakes winner CAPADES (8 wins, $717,366), 
including the 1988 Selima S-Gl at Laurel. 

DAMASCUS—Horse of the Year at 3, champion handicap horse (21 wins, 
$1,176,781, Preakness S, Belmont S, etc.). 

MR. NAPTON—2 wins in 6 starts at Laurel and Pimlico at 3 and 4. Retired 
from racing due to injury. 

YOUR MARE MA Y BE THE KEY TO THE NEXT CHAMPION! 


Standing at: Kingdom Farm, 

Upper Marlboro,MD • (301) 249-6231 
Fee: $500; $250 booking fee; 

$250 payable Sept. 1 of year bred 
SPECIAL RA TE TO APPROVED MARES 


For a free computer printout of 
Mr. Napton’s family (3 generations) 
and their lifetime earnings, please 
contact Caroline Stallings at 
(301) 888-1587, evenings, 8-11 p.m. 


Facts About Your Farm 
are Seeds for Big 
Decisions... 



Help yourself and your 
farm friends. Complete the 
Census of Agriculture 
report and help build an 
accurate record of the 
nation's farms. The census . 

— it's confidential_by 

law. 


U.S. Department 
of Commerce mP 

BUREAU OF 
THE CENSUS 


’ 51 


'. 


38 


Jockey Lang honored 

Chick Lang, father of present- 
day racing entrepreneur Chick 
Lang, and grandfather of Oaklawn 
Park administrative director Chick 
Lang, will be inducted into the Ca¬ 
nadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame 
next month. 

A native of Hamilton, Ontario, 
but a longtime resident of Bal¬ 
timore (Md.), the elder Lang rode 
Reigh Count to victory in the 1928 
Kentucky Derby and was the North 
American jockey champion in races 
won in 1921. 

Returns to Sunset Hill 

Multiple stakes winner Fap- 
pavalley has been retired and will 
stand at Jerold C. Hoffberger's Sun¬ 
set Hill Farm for 1990. The Mary¬ 
land-bred son of Fappiano—Seven 
Valleys by Road At Sea campaigned 
three seasons for Sunset Hill, car¬ 
rying its colors to victory in the Star 
de Naskra and Northern Dancer 
Stakes and earning $125,804. 

Fappavalley is one of four stakes 
horses out of Seven Valleys. A 
stakes-placed earner of $144,744, 
the mare has produced additional 
stakes winners Regal Valley 
($211,624) and Silver Valley 
($105,731) and stakes-placed Valley 
Prospector. She is also the grand- 
dam of stakes winner Silver Depu¬ 
ty 

New at Green Willow 

Foligno, a graded stakes winner 
of $503,787, has been moved to 
Green Willow Farms for 1990. En¬ 
tering his second season at stud, 
the syndicated son of Foolish Plea¬ 
sure and stakes-placed Zerelda, by 
In Reality, will stand for $2,500 live 
foal, or $1,700 no guarantee, pay¬ 
able September 1 of year bred. The 
8-year-old roan horse previously 
stood at Hickory Tree Farm in Vir¬ 
ginia. 

During a racing career which 
spanned five years, Foligno re¬ 
corded 16 victories from 63 starts 
and won or placed in 20 stakes 

Maryland Horse 





















A sire of brilliant runners THIRTY EIGHT GO GO ($800,000) 
and JET STREAM (winner of five of seven starts from 3 / 4 -mile 
in near record time to a stakes win at lVs miiles). 


♦Horses with 40 or more starters. 


$5,000 live foal; Syndicate; Nominated to Breeders’ Cup, Maryland Million 


SHAMROCK FARMS 


4926 Woodbine Road, Woodbine. Maryland 21797 
Inquiries to Jim Steele, Farm Manager (301) 795-0723 
or James V. Stewart. DVM, (301) 442-2471 


Thirty Eight Paces 

NODOUBLE—THIRTY PACES by DANCING COUNT 


A great racehorse, now a proven stallion with 
brilliance and consistency in his offspring. 

Fourth ranking active sire in Maryland 
in percentage of winners from starters—63.4.* 

Fourth ranking active sire in Maryland 
in average earnings per start—$1,844. 









races. His most successful season 
was at the age of 5, when he ac¬ 
counted for the Cliff Hanger Hand- 
icap-G3 and Birmingham Park's 
Red Mountain Handicap and Ca- 
haba Stakes, setting new track rec¬ 
ords for a mile and one and one- 
eighth miles. Foligno placed in 
three additional graded races that 
year, finishing second in the Pater¬ 
son Handicap-G2, and third in the 
Riggs Handicap-G3 and the Penn¬ 



sylvania Governors Cup Handicap- 
G3. 

Moved to Whitehackle 

Melodisk has been moved to Mr. 
and Mrs. Jervis Marshall's White¬ 
hackle Farm in Upperco for the up¬ 
coming breeding season. The 
9-year-old son of Alydar stood his 
first season at Blue Ridge Farm in 
Virginia last year. 


Ask us how 
to tell the world!! 
Call 301-974-3085. 


cf An I.C.C. Carrier 

o* Breeding Farms 

cf Race and Returns 

ef Short or Long Distance 


JACK _ 

McKEE _ 

HORSE TRANSPORTATION 


( 215 ) 357-1210 



WHY SETTLE FOR LESS? 

Professional Service 
Diversified Products 


LIVESTOCK MORTALITY 

SURGICAL 

FARM OWNERS 

CARE CUSTODY & CONTROL 

LIABILITY 

(703) 347-3552 Local 
(800) 347-3552 Watts 


Chris Norden 
E. Sue Smith 
Martha A. Hall 
Ernest M. Oare 

70 Main St., Suite 23 
P.O. Box 837 
Warrenton, VA 22186 


Winner of six races, with earn¬ 
ings of nearly $140,000, Melodisk 
placed second in the Hallandale 
Handicap, the Handicapper Cham¬ 
pionship and the Sycamore Stakes. 
He finished fourth in the Grade 2 
Bougainvillea Handicap. 

Melodisk is a half-brother to 
stakes winners Jubilous and 
Robertina, out of the One for All 
mare Bring Out the Band, winner 
of the Acorn Stakes-Gl and three 
other graded races. The chestnut 
horse will stand for $1,500 live foal 
as property of a syndicate, in which 
shares are still available. 

Son of John Alden 

John E. Owens Ill's Alden's Ace 
has been retired and will stand the 
1990 breeding season at Liberty 
Run Farm in Sykesville for $1,000 
live foal. 

The 7-year-old son of John Alden 
and the Bold Ambition mare Ambi¬ 
tious Ace, victorious in the Carry 
Back Handicap and the Charles 
Staats Memorial last year, amassed 
career earnings of $170,862. The 
first John Alden son to retire to 
stud, Alden's Ace is a full brother to 
stakes winners Alden's Ambition 
($326,820) and Ambitious John 
($117,520). 

First for S.S. Hot Sauce 

Honey Acres Farm's freshman 
sire S.S. Hot Sauce was represented 
by his first winner when the 2-year- 
old filly Came Clear broke her 
maiden at Charles Town on Octo¬ 
ber 27. Bred in Maryland by Reuel 
E. Warriner Jr. and owned by Her¬ 
bert M. Payne, Came Clear led 
throughout the four and one-half 
furlong maiden special, scoring by 
one and one-quarter lengths at first 
asking. 

S.S. Hot Sauce, a $165,500 earn¬ 
er, won the Maryland Juvenile 
Championship at 2 and the Bowie 
and Prince George's Stakes at 3. 
The 9-year-old son of Sauce Boat 
and the *Le Fabuleux mare Electric 
Blanket stands for $2,000 live foal. 


40 


Maryland Horse 



























The good news is that, 
with his first Maryland 
foal crop (foals of 
1987), Baederwood is 
Maryland's leading sire 
of two-year-old winners. 
Among his eleven 
winners are Forest 
Fealty who broke her 
maiden at Hollywood 
Park and followed with 
a 2nd in the $50,000 
Corte Madera Stakes 
at Golden Gate; 
and Maryland's own 
Wooden Injun, who 
placed in the $100,000 
All Maryland Nursery at 
Pimlico. Then there's 
Frugal Doc who placed 
in the Warren County 
Stakes at the 



Meadowlands, plus 
there's Dans Les Bois 

who recently placed 
in the $150,000 
Maryland Juvenile Filly 
Championship at Laurel. 
The Baederwoods are 
off and winning! Ason of 
the outstanding race 
horse and sire TENTAM 
(from the Man OWar 
sire line) out of the 
NORTHERN DANCER 
mare ROYAL STATUTE, 
whose family is rich 
in quality black type, 
Baederwood was born 
to be a stallion, and so 
he is. He had full books 
in 1987,1988 and 1989, 
and you a bet he will 
again next year. 


Sagamore Farm 

DAVID HAYDEN - Syndicate Manager (301) 239-7075 • TOM BOWMAN, DVM - Stallion Manager (301) 778-0439 





Around the Farms 



Muirfield East 

There is a lot going on at Robert 
R Levy's new farm in Chesapeake 
City. This fall at Keeneland Muir¬ 
field purchased one of the star at¬ 
tractions—a weanling filly by Aly- 
dar out of horse of the year Lady's 
Secret. The fourth-highest priced 
weanling in the sale at $950,000, the 
filly is a "real flashy chestnut," with 
three white feet and a blaze, ac¬ 
cording to farm manager Wendy 
Moon. 

"Ask me if I'm nervous!" says 
Moon, who will prep the filly, and 
five other just-turned yearlings, for 
the Muirfield consignment at Sar¬ 
atoga next August. 

Muirfield now boasts Mary¬ 
land's first Equitrack training gal¬ 
lop, completed in December. The 
five-eighth mile, J-shaped track is 
one of five of the all-weather sur¬ 
faces in use by a Thoroughbred fa¬ 
cility in the U.S., the best known of 
which is Remington Park's race 
track. 

Other construction projects at 
the farm include an annex to the 
main office, which was finished in 
November, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Levy's house. Ground was broken 
on the house in late November. 
Once completed, the residence will 
be used by the family on farm vis¬ 
its. 

So far, Mr. Levy's investment is 
paying off. Of the ten yearlings bro¬ 
ken at Muirfield in 1988, three won 
stakes at 2 last year. Trumpet's Blare 
(purchased at Keeneland for 
$175,000) captured the Grade 1 Ar¬ 
lington Lassie Stakes. Homebreds 
Habar (Fair Star S) and Housebus- 
ter (Morven Breeders' Cup S) also 
did the farm proud. 

Future hopes include 19 just- 
turned 2-year-olds, who got their 


early lessons at Muirfield last fall. 
Among the group was a Secretariat 
filly out of Grade 1 stakes winner 
Bundler and a Fappiano filly 
bought at the Keeneland Septem¬ 
ber Yearling sale for $390,000. The 
Fappiano filly is the final foal from 
the stakes-winning and stakes-pro- 
ducing mare Square Generation (by 
Olden Times), bred and raced by 
the Levys back in the early 1970s. 

The first foal by Levy's syndi¬ 
cated classic winner Bet Twice is 
scheduled to arrive at Muirfield at 
the end of this month. The Secre¬ 
tariat mare Wife Mistress, dam of 
the stakes-winning filly Crafty 
Wife, is the first mare due to deliver 
to Bet Twice. Most of the 11 other 
mares owned by Muirfield, in foal 
to such stallions as Risen Star and 
Waquoit, also have early foaling 
dates. 


Buckingham 

The Find Handicap on Novem¬ 
ber 5 marked the end of a glorious 
era for Eddie and Binnie Houghton. 
Their 11-year-old gelding Castelets 
was retired after the race, in which 
he finished out of the money. 

A favorite of Maryland racing 
fans over the past several seasons, 
the officially roan (now white) son 
of King's Bishop will not be joining 
other retirees at the Houghtons' 
Buckingham Farm on the Eastern 
Shore, however. "Castelets (named 
after a kind of small country castle 
found in France) is completely 
sound, and our intentions are to 
make him into a working hunter 
and show prospect," relates Mrs. 
Houghton. "After he's let down, 
he'll be sent to Louise Serio in Ken- 
nett Square (Pa.), who will train 
him and show him." 


Maryland's champion turf horse 
in 1986, Castelets raced over fences 
early in his career. Returned to the 
flat as a 5-year-old, he won ten 
stakes over a six-year span and 
amassed earnings of $614,486. 

Edmarve 

Edmarve Farm in Ijamsville has 
a hot young sire in Clever Champ, 
last year's leading freshman sire in 
Maryland in number of winners. 

Clever Champ's seven winners 
scored at seven different tracks 
throughout the country, and in¬ 
cluded stakes-placed Stickers n 
Scuffs, who was third in the Jet Pi¬ 
lot Stakes at Pimlico. 

Syndicate manager Robert Siegel 
notes that the stallion's progeny 
were also successful in the show 
ring, two of his daughters placing 
first and second in the filly foals 
class at the Maryland State Fair 
Thoroughbred Show last Septem¬ 
ber. Robin Armstrong Townsend's 
Clever Champ—Estrapade Gal filly 
was named reserve junior champi¬ 
on of the show. 

Clever Champ has a bumper 
crop of 54 2-year-olds who will 
come of racing age this year, ac¬ 
cording to Siegel. This spring he is 
expected to cover about 60 mares. 
Bookings include stakes winner Eta 
Carinae and stakes winner/pro¬ 
ducer War Exchange. 

Clever Champ (Clever Trick— 
Here's Inez by Venetian Court) won 
the Hoist the Flag, Play the Palace 
and Primer Stakes as a 2-year-old in 
1984. He returned the following 
year to annex the Best Turn Stakes 
and finish second in the Swift 
Stakes-G3, and retired with earn¬ 
ings of $165,762. His 1990 stud fee 
is $3,500 live foal. 


42 


Maryland Horse 










We do one thing. 

And we do it very well. 



Two-year-olds prepped for Timonium sales 

We turn babies into race horses. 

Ideal facilities and single-mindedness of purpose—the breaking and 
training of young race horses. That’s Church Mouse Meadows. Year after year, 
horses we send off to sales agents and trainers more than meet expectations. 
Horsemen and owners who have received horses prepped hy us in recent years 
include Jim Simpson, Toughy Hacker, Meadowcreek Stable, Fourbros Stable, 

K.T. Leatherbury, Carlos Garcia, Ronnie Cartwright, Richard Delp, Hap 
Ravich, Nancy Alberts, J.B. Secor, Dennis Logan, Chuck Stancer, Donald 
Campbell, Greg Bowman, Alec Bullock, Sonny Hines, Ferris Allen, J. Willliam 
Boniface, John Hicks and many more. 




















BRILLIANT PROTEGE 

SECRETARIAT—IRRADIATE, by ‘RIBOT 



Average earnings per starter $24,305 


Brilliant Protege’s runners go to the races trying, as evidenced 
by the Standard Starts Index on such horses as stakes winners 
BAGETELLE (6.54) and BRILLIANT STEPPER (4.37), 
twice stakes-placed Edgar’s Girl (3.53), Hatta Pro (2.33), 
1989 stakes horse Brilano (2.34) and hard-knocking runner 
Temple Light ($120,270, 4.28). 

Brilliant Protege is represented by 8 stakes horses and 1989 
2-year-old winners Flying Feet ($20,131) and Harvest’s Pro. 


By horse of the century SECRETARIAT, Brilliant Protege 
is half-brother to MAJESTIC LIGHT, FLUORESCENT 
LIGHT and CELESTIAL LIGHTS from the family of cham¬ 
pions HIGH VOLTAGE and IMPRESSIVE. 


$2,500 Live Foal 

Nominated to Breeders’ Cup and Maryland Million 
Property of a Syndicate 


AE Verdi III 
(301) 865-5429 5213 


EdjiakvE 

FARM 


3029 Prices Distillery Road 
Ijamsville. Maryland 21754 









Average earnings per starter $24,509 


At the Keeneland Fall Sale in November, a DOUBLE ZEUS 
weanling out of Safely Home sold for SI 15,000. Quite a return 
on the original investment. 

DOUBLE ZEUS is the sire of 12 stakes horses, including 
CAPP IT OFF ($213,803), MIKE CANTWELL ($94,560), 
DOUBLE SUEZ ($80,161), DEVILISH ZEUS, Doubirubv 
($139,790), Miss Cee Gee ($120,231), Safe At the Plate 


($114,923), in addition to tough runners Safe On Second 
($189,485), Mystic Wars ($122,715), etc. 

A multiple stakes winner of $403,867, DOUBLE ZEUS is 
full brother to KIT’S DOUBLE (multiple stakes producer) and 
half-brother to KITS EVE. 

Private Contract 

Nominated to Maryland Million; Property of a Syndicate 


AE. Verdi III 
(301) 865-5429 / 5213 


EdmakvE 

FARM 


3029 Prices Distillery Road 
Ijamsville, Maryland 21754 















Breed for the Maryland Million 


Stormin’ Again 


Vice Regent—Soft Horizon, by Cyane 


NEW FOR 1990! 

By a son of NORTHERN DANCER, 
out of a CYANE mare. Half-brother to 
stakes-placed Sir Rufus. Out of a sister to 
VEILED LOOK ($184,052), SILKEN 
DELIGHT ($107,973), Oriental Splendor 
($84,938). Family of LIGHT HEARTED. 

By VICE REGENT, sire of 64 stakes 
winners, 9 champions, including REGAL 
CLASSIC, BESSARABIAN, REGAL 
INTENTION, RULING ANGEL, 
DEPUTY MINISTER, FRAUD SQUAD, 
BOUNDING AWAY, CHRISTY’S 
MOUNT, DECEIT DANCER. 

$1,000 live foal 

Property of Joseph Piccioni 
Nominated to Maryland Million 



C. Frank Hopkins, C. Frank Hopkins Jr., Amy P Hopkins 
(301) 836-3900 














Breed for the Maryland Million 


Seniority 

Exclusive Native—Lifelong Friend, by Stevward 


JUST ARRIVED FOR 1990! 

California allowance-winning son of EXCLUSIVE NATIVE, 
sire of 68 black-type winners, including champions AFFIRMED, 
OUTSTANDINGLY, GENUINE RISK and PRODIGO. 

Half-brother to graded stakes winner GRATEFUL FRIEND 
($250,391), Huge Success ($149,892, graded stakes-placed), 
Companionship ($123,882, multiple graded stakes-placed and dam 
of ONLY COMPANION), Endurance (multiple graded stakes- 
placed) and to the dam of graded stakes winner TARA TOWER. 
This is the family of current graded stakes winner INGOT’S 
RULER ($442,658), CRUDE WAYS, etc. 

$1,000 live foal 

Property of a Syndicate 
Nominated to Maryland Million 



ELBERTON HILL FARM 

837 Darlington Road, Darlington, MD 21034 
C. Frank Hopkins, C. Frank Hopkins Jr., Amy P. Hopkins 
(301) 836-3900 







Breed for the Maryland Million 


Clint Maroon 



Foolish Pleasure—Saratoga Trunk, by Raise a Native 


Sire of 64% winners from starters, 
including $55,860-earner Gray Maroon 
(SSI 3.37), $45,185-earner Until 
September, After the Fact ($21,594) and 
1989 juvenile winner Fleas Begone. 

By FOOLISH PLEASURE, champion 
at 2, classic winner of $1,216,705 and 
leading sire of 30 stakes winners, three 
champions. 

Out of Saratoga Trunk, a winning 
half-sister to G1-winner WHITE STAR 
LINE, FAIRWAY FUN (dam of FAIRWAY 
FLYER, TORSION, FUN FOREVER, 
FAIRWAY FABLE), FILIBERTO and to 
the dams of champion NORTHERN 
TRICK, ON THE SLY, SWEET SLEW, 
MAGAZINE, etc. 



$1,000 live foal 

Property of a Syndicate 
Nominated to Maryland Million 


ELBERTOIM HILL FARM 

837 Darlington Rd., Darlington, MD 21034 

C. Frank Hopkins, C. Frank Hopkins Jr., Amy P Hopkins 

(301) 836-3900 







Breed for the Maryland Million 


Double Edge Sword 


Sword Dancer—-Jeanelou, by Discovery 

Reliable and durable best describe the 
progeny of DOUBLE EDGE SWORD. As 
a young horse entering stud a decade ago, 
he offered breeders the qualities that spark 
serious attention—a graded stakes winner 
of $327,929 with 17 victories, including 
the mile Westchester H-G2 in l:33 2 /5, 
just a tick away from the track record and, 
at that time, the second fastest mile in 
history over an Eastern track. DOUBLE 
EDGE SWORD has since established a 
respectable record: total progeny earnings 
over $3.8 million, 87% starters from foals 
that race an average of 3.16 years, average 
earnings per starter over 26 TIMES HIS 
STUD FEE. He has sired graded stakes 
winner ASPRO ($416,587), NAVAL 
CUTTER ($172,025), Sanguine Sword 
($140,781, twice graded stakes-placed), 
and five additional black-type earners. 

$1,000 live foal 

Property of Aisquith Stables 
Nominated to Maryland Million 


ELBERTON HILL FARM 

837 Darlington Road, Darlington, MD 21034 

C. Frank Hopkins, C. Frank Hopkins Jr., Amy R Hopkins 

(301) 836-3900 










Breed for the Maryland Million 


\ 


i 


Jolly Johu 


Resdess Native—Avie, by * Gallant Man 

A winning 2-year-old, a classic-placed 
3-year-old and a solid handicapper as an 
older horse, JOLLY JOHU earned 
$366,840. 

He has established himself as a sire of 
hard-knocking, long-lasting, consistent 
runners. His average earnings per starter 
are $29,016, with 17% hlacktype earners 
from starters and 72% winners. 

Half-brother to champion LORD 
AVIE, from a grand family of top runners, 
JOLLY JOHU also offers the NATIVE 
DANCER sire line. 

$1,000 live foal 

Property of a Syndicate 
Nominated to Maryland Million 




ELBERTON HILL FARM 

837 Darlington Road, Darlington, MD 21034 

C. Frank Hopkins, C. Frank Hopkins Jr., Amy R Hopkins 

(301) 836-3900 










Breed for the Maryland Million 


Lord Lister 



Sir Lister — Negation, by Mongo 


Sire of multiple stakes winner and 
graded stakes-placed LADY LISTER 
($140,813; SSI 6.23), Noble Jaunt (4 
wins, $39,760), Lister Miss (4 wins) and 
Lister County (2 wins) in his first crop. 

Maryland’s champion older male in 
1983, LORD LISTER was a multiple stakes 
winner of $277,333. He won or placed in 
22 of 28 starts from 2 to 4, largely in new 
York, including seven stakes wins or 
placings. He set a new track record of 
1:42 3 /5 in the 17i6-mile Congressional H 
and equaled the track record of 1:4975 in 
the 178-mile Walter Haight H. 

By New York graded stakes winner 
SIR LISTER, grandson of BOLD RULER, 
out of Negation, winning half-sister to four 
stakes winners, from the family of 
champion miler NOALCOHOLIC and 
champion 2-year-old ALEA. 



$1,000 live foal 

Property of Mrs. Harold P. Whitmore 
Nominated to Maryland Million 


ELBERTON HILL FARM 


837 Darlington Road, Darlington, MD 21034 

C. Frank Hopkins, C. Frank Hopkins Jr., Amy P Hopkins 

(301) 836-3900 









TO! 

'-j-L. - 



Maryland Stallion Rankings 


Maryland's Leading Active Sires in 1989 

(Statistics compiled by Bloodstock Research Information Services. They include racing of Dec. 5.) 






Races 


% Winners / 

Avg.l 

Avg.l 


Runners 

Starts 

Winners 

Won 

Earnings 

Starters 

Start 

Runner 

Smarten. 

. 96 

867 

64 

136 

$1,998,450 

66.7 

$2,305 

$20,817 

Horatius. 

. 96 

838 

48 

115 

1,670,190 

50.0 

1,993 

17,398 

Caveat. 

. 81 

612 

41 

76 

1,440,220 

50.6 

2,353 

17,780 

Shelter Half. 

. 71 

627 

43 

79 

1,170,790 

60.6 

1,867 

16,490 

Oh Say. 

. 74 

638 

49 

88 

1,148,920 

66.2 

1,801 

15,526 

Lord Gaylord. 

. 83 

650 

46 

79 

1,014,570 

55.4 

1,561 

12,224 

Rollicking. 

. 86 

852 

53 

103 

990,629 

61.6 

1,163 

11,519 

Dancing Count. 

. 78 

643 

45 

81 

959,148 

57.7 

1,492 

12,297 

John Alden. 

. 50 

447 

24 

57 

832,346 

48.0 

1,862 

16,647 

Double Zeus. 

. 77 

730 

44 

85 

766,066 

57.1 

1,049 

9,949 

Aloma's Ruler.,. 

. 74 

609 

46 

84 

763,724 

62.2 

1,254 

10,321 

Hail Emperor. 

. 59 

515 

31 

64 

738,982 

52.5 

1,435 

12,525 

Deputed Testamony. 

. 39 

307 

18 

46 

737,672 

46.2 

2,403 

18,915 

Thirty Eight Paces. 

. 46 

382 

26 

50 

706,653 

56.5 

1,850 

15,362 

Salutely. 

. 44 

465 

31 

74 

692,090 

70.5 

1,488 

15,729 

Sir Ivor Again. 

. 22 

183 

9 

27 

690,579 

40.9 

3,774 

31,390 

Masked Dancer. 

. 87 

843 

48 

87 

690,056 

55.2 

819 

7,932 

Full Intent. 

. 31 

306 

19 

48 

560,442 

61.3 

1,832 

18,079 

Silver Badge. 

. 55 

489 

24 

52 

489,341 

43.6 

1,001 

8,897 

North Tower. 

. 61 

502 

38 

74 

473,476 

62.3 

943 

7,762 

Travelling Music. 

. 55 

421 

26 

54 

471,925 

47.3 

1,121 

8,580 

Bear Hunt. 

. 40 

319 

24 

58 

396,025 

60.0 

1,241 

9,901 

Northern Raja. 

. 29 

288 

16 

36 

388,519 

55.2 

1,349 

13,397 

Parfaitement. 

. 47 

346 

24 

40 

387,370 

51.1 

1,120 

8,242 

Fuzzbuster. 

. 45 

428 

27 

59 

382,918 

60.0 

895 

8,509 

Believe the Queen. 

. 23 

167 

14 

25 

379,929 

60.9 

2,275 

16,519 

Baederwood. 

. 44 

293 

24 

37 

377,798 

54.5 

1,289 

8,586 

Hasty Spring. 

. 39 

406 

18 

30 

307,325 

46.2 

757 

7,880 

Assault Landing. 

. 43 

284 

21 

28 

301,377 

48.8 

1,061 

7,009 

Exclusive One. 

. 37 

339 

24 

37 

288,497 

64.9 

851 

7,797 

Christopher R. 

. 48 

410 

25 

53 

276,310 

52.1 

674 

5,756 

Providential (Ire). 

. 37 

256 

16 

26 

270,259 

43.2 

1,056 

7,304 

Jolly Johu. 

. 22 

186 

10 

19 

228,114 

45.5 

1,226 

10,369 

Brilliant Protege. 

. 36 

237 

12 

22 

221,890 

33.3 

936 

6,164 

Double Edge Sword. 

. 26 

276 

15 

30 

216,480 

57.7 

784 

8,326 

Dancing Master (Fr). 

. 19 

192 

9 

22 

215,198 

47.4 

1,121 

11,326 

North Pole. 

_ 36 

245 

16 

32 

207,808 

44.4 

848 

5,772 

Blues Parade. 

. 28 

269 

16 

24 

200,655 

57.1 

746 

7,166 

Anticipating. 

.... 28 

266 

14 

33 

195,682 

50.0 

736 

6,989 

Century Prince. 

.... 29 

270 

17 

36 

185,465 

58.6 

687 

6,395 

Mokhieba. 

.... 30 

252 

12 

28 

169,417 

40.0 

672 

5,647 

Rio Carmelo (Fr). 

.... 38 

251 

14 

26 

162,261 

36.8 

646 

4,270 

Buck Hill. 

.... 20 

160 

8 

16 

159,865 

40.0 

999 

7,993 

Friend's Choice. 

.... 23 

205 

11 

26 

154,004 

47.8 

751 

6,696 

tCarnivalay. 

14 

55 

4 

6 

147,386 

28.6 

2,680 

10,528 

Never Down Hill. 

.... 35 

337 

12 

19 

144,237 

34.3 

428 

4,121 

Gasp. 

.... 21 

163 

10 

20 

116,560 

47.6 

715 

5,550 

Isella. 

.... 21 

144 

11 

23 

114,562 

52.4 

796 

5,455 

Royal Hierarchy . 

.... 21 

126 

10 

14 

110,410 

47.6 

558 

5,258 

Dancing Again. 

18 

126 

8 

14 

109,490 

44.4 

869 

6,083 


t Indicates stallion's first crop to race. 


52 


Maryland Horse 


























































No Robbery—Clear Road, by Hasty Road 


This graded stakes- 
winning juvenile has gone 
on to prove himself as a 
sire: 

The statistics above 
indicate FUZZBUSTER's 
success in siring runners. 
What they don't show is the 
correct conformation he 
passes on to his progeny, a 
trait demonstrated at the 
1989 MHBA Yearling 


Show—a Fuzzbuster colt 
was pinned reserve 
champion, out of 159 
entries, by respected 
horseman Shug 
McGaughey. 

From six crops to race, 
FUZZBUSTER h as sired 
multiple SW FUZZY 
JACK ($167,038), SW and 
graded SP LAFITTE (Mex), 
SP horses World Peace 


($90,603), Master Fuzz, 
Mark N Brett, Bust Out 

and hard-knocking 
runners such as Radar 
Mark ($181,055), Sherry B. 
($102,030), Electronic Age 
($81,835), etc. 

$1,500 live foal; syndicate 

Payable Sept. 1 of year bred 
Nominated to Breeders' Cup and 
Maryland Million 


Michael J. Harrison, DVM 


15630 Falls Road, Butler, Maryland 21023 


(301) 771-4095 



Maryland's Leading Active Sires Lifetime 

(Statistics compiled by Bloodstock Research Information Services. They include racing of Dec. 5.) 






Races 


% Winners / 

Avg.l 

Avg.l 


Runners 

Starts 

Winners 

Won 

Earnings 

Starters 

Start 

Runner 

Rollicking. 

. 291 

9,170 

247 

1,403 

$13,745,400 

84.9 

$1,499 

$47,235 

Lord Gaylord. 

. 203 

3,822 

160 

644 

9,140,130 

78.8 

2,391 

45,025 

Rambunctious. 

. 304 

10,397 

261 

1,357 

8,873,400 

85.9 

853 

29,189 

Dancing Count. 

. 276 

6,612 

219 

939 

8,762,790 

79.3 

1,325 

31,749 

Smarten. 

. 179 

3,318 

132 

506 

7,812,980 

73.7 

2,355 

43,648 

Friend's Choice. 

. 154 

5,053 

123 

676 

4,984,860 

79.9 

987 

32,369 

Horatius. 

. 174 

3,560 

130 

454 

4,855,180 

74.7 

1,364 

27,903 

Masked Dancer. 

. 200 

4,319 

143 

491 

4,513,630 

71.5 

1,045 

22,568 

Anticipating. 

. 128 

3,882 

89 

515 

4,475,340 

69.5 

1,153 

34,964 

Shelter Half. 

. 106 

2,415 

87 

343 

4,473,200 

82.1 

1,852 

42,200 

Christopher R. 

. 177 

4,405 

131 

614 

4,349,620 

74.0 

987 

24,574 

John Alden. 

. 83 

1,940 

57 

247 

4,192,450 

68.7 

2,161 

50,511 

Double Edge Sword. 

. 146 

4,814 

109 

484 

3,829,330 

74.7 

795 

26,228 

Aristocratic. 

. 164 

6,595 

134 

814 

3,769,240 

81.7 

572 

22,983 

Silver Badge. 

. 170 

4,329 

116 

400 

3,246,570 

68.2 

750 

19,097 

Run Fool Run. 

. 114 

3,977 

88 

473 

3,189,440 

77.2 

802 

27,978 

Double Zeus. 

. 127 

2,770 

92 

323 

3,087,590 

72.4 

1,115 

24,312 

Caveat. 

. 98 

1,070 

54 

119 

2,944,170 

55.1 

2,752 

30,043 

Oh Say. 

. 92 

1,124 

68 

161 

2,734,460 

73.9 

2,433 

29,722 

Never Down Hill. 

. 138 

3,862 

84 

370 

2,696,330 

60.9 

698 

19,539 

Jolly Johu. 

. 89 

2,486 

64 

298 

2,571,250 

71.9 

1,034 

28,890 

Fuzzbuster. 

. 94 

2,317 

74 

310 

2,163,480 

78.7 

934 

23,016 

Brilliant-Protege. 

. 84 

1,969 

57 

226 

2,061,290 

67.9 

1,047 

24,539 

Full Intent. 

. 59 

1,361 

47 

228 

1,976,460 

79.7 

1,452 

33,499 

Baederwood. 

. 70 

1,175 

46 

150 

1,794,940 

65.7 

1,528 

25,642 

Aloma's Ruler. 

. 102 

1,429 

76 

178 

1,767,060 

74.5 

1,237 

17,324 

Salutely. 

. 52 

1,050 

40 

152 

1,766,390 

76.9 

1,682 

33,969 

Sir Ivor Again. 

. 43 

873 

29 

124 

1,645,370 

67.4 

1,885 

38,264 

North Tower. 

. 114 

1,954 

84 

253 

1,591,990 

73.7 

815 

13,965 

Thirty Eight Paces. 

. 48 

569 

30 

80 

1,523,250 

62.5 

2,677 

31,734 

Eager Native. 

. 64 

1,373 

42 

181 

1,412,890 

65.6 

1,029 

22,076 

Rose Argent. 

. 67 

2,162 

54 

276 

1,375,040 

80.6 

636 

20,523 

Gallant Native. 

. 60 

2,030 

52 

279 

1,353,260 

86.7 

667 

22,554 

Hail Emperor. 

. 66 

1,009 

42 

125 

1,302,840 

63.6 

1,291 

19,740 

Travelling Music. 

. 71 

1,134 

50 

153 

1,282,890 

70.4 

1,131 

18,069 

Disc. 

. 88 

2,308 

58 

231 

1,276,120 

65.9 

553 

14,501 

Buck Hill. 

. 92 

1,658 

60 

153 

1,237,560 

65.2 

746 

13,452 

North Pole. 

. 59 

952 

38 

142 

1,235,760 

64.4 

1,298 

20,945 

Quartermaster. 

. 75 

1,533 

60 

221 

1,190,090 

80.0 

776 

15,868 

Providential (Ire). 

. 72 

798 

43 

100 

1,119,080 

59.7 

1,402 

15,543 

Rio Carmelo (Fr). 

. 78 

1,130 

41 

121 

1,052,740 

52.6 

932 

13,497 


Maryland's Leading Active 2-Year-Old Sires in 1989 

(Statistics compiled by Bloodstock Research Information Services. They include racing of Dec. 5.) 






Races 


% Winnersl 

Avg.l 

Avg.l 


Runners 

Starts 

Winners 

Won 

Earnings 

Starters 

Start 

Runner 

Smarten. 

. 13 

43 

5 

9 

$208,250 

38.5 

$4,843 

$16,019 

Baederwood. 

. 20 

75 

11 

16 

207,856 

55.0 

2,771 

10,393 

tCarnivalay. 

. 14 

55 

4 

6 

147,386 

28.6 

2,680 

10,528 

Oh Say. 

. 10 

37 

3 

4 

134,074 

30.0 

3,624 

13,407 

Aloma's Ruler. 

. 14 

59 

8 

8 

121,278 

57.1 

2,056 

8,663 

Caveat. 

. 22 

77 

6 

8 

105,212 

27.3 

1,366 

4,782 

tMarine Brass. 

. 6 

19 

4 

6 

94,870 

66.7 

4,993 

15,812 

tClever Champ. 

. 15 

58 

7 

10 

84,596 

46.7 

1,459 

5,640 

tlsland Champ. 

. 1 

5 

1 

2 

78,150 

100.0 

15,630 

78,150 

Shelter Half. 

. 6 

27 

4 

6 

63,545 

66.7 

2,354 

10,591 

Deputed Testamony. 

. 13 

39 

1 

1 

58,736 

7.7 

1,506 

4,518 

Parfaitement . 

. 11 

49 

5 

6 

55,182 

45.5 

1,126 

5,017 

John Alden. 

. 7 

24 

2 

3 

52,689 

28.6 

2,195 

7,527 

Pilot Ship. 

. 6 

19 

1 

2 

49,545 

16.7 

2,608 

8,258 


t Indicates stallion's first crop to race. 


54 


Maryland Horse 































































Sire of Two Maryland Million Winners 
Plus Three Stakes-Placed Winners 


B., 1978 , Hoist the Flag—Politely, by Amerigo 


including Hew York allowance winner A 
Wink and A Hod ($116,215), Lovely 
Crystle ($78,627), Born to Salute ($67,292) 
and Flag Pole Gal ($59,775), recent 
winner of 2 races in Hew York. 

A stakes-winning son of champion 

HOIST THE FLAG, SALUTELY is out of 

the phenomenal racemare POLITELY (21 
wins, $552,972). 

1990 Fee: $2,500 Live Foal 

Nominated to Breeders' Cup and Maryland Million 


SALCITELY is the sire of 10% stakes 
horses from starters, including Maryland 
Million winners FIRST PATRIOT 
($297,745) and SEAN’S FERRARI 
($82,085), as well as 1989 graded stakes- 
placed Salute the Crew (12 wins, 
$180,899), and Battle Man ($56,172), 
plus stakes-placed 2-year-old 
Hlbealongintime (3 wins, 2nd Budweiser 
Breeders Classic, 3rd West Virginia 
Futurity). 

SALCITELY has sired 75% winners from 
starters with nearly one-third of his 
winners earning over $50,000 each, f 


3501 Belmont Ave., Glyndon, Maryland 21071 ♦ (301) 833-3737 
Inquiries to Snowden Carter, Syndicate Manager ♦ (301) 363-1481 










Waiting for a promising stallion to conic along? Well now lies here 


ALONG CAME JONES, a multiple stakes and 

graded stakes placed winner of $264,826, had 

9 wins, 9 seconds and 11 thirds in 54 career starts 

from 2 to 6, and will stand his first season in 1989. 

ALONG CAME JONES, a 

proven star on the track, 

won the Militia 

Handicap, defeating the 

graded stakes winner 

DO IT AGAIN DAN and H I Mi V 


SPARROWVON. He also won the Camden 
Handicap and the Cedar Key Handicap, 
defeating LAND OF BELIEVE, TRI FOR SIZE, 
CASTELETS and WHATEVER FOR. 
1990 Fee: $2,000 Live Foal 
Payable September 1. 
Nominated to Md. Million 
Property of a Syndicate 
Shares Available 

















Races 


% Winners! 

AvgJ 

AvgJ 


Runners 

Starts 

Winners 

Won 

Earnings 

Starters 

Start 

Runner 

Hail Emperor. 

. 10 

34 

4 

4 

48,570 

40.0 

1,429 

4,857 

Masked Dancer. 

8 

29 

4 

6 

48,531 

50.0 

1,673 

6,066 

Assault Landing. 

.. 17 

51 

4 

4 

42,930 

23.5 

842 

2,525 

Salutely. 

5 

22 

4 

6 

37,501 

80.0 

1,705 

7,500 

tlron. 

. 11 

49 

5 

5 

37,423 

45.5 

764 

3,402 

Lord Gaylord. 

8 

18 

2 

2 

36,738 

25.0 

2,041 

4,592 

Bear Hunt. 

. 13 

48 

3 

3 

35,799 

23.1 

746 

2,754 

Rollicking. 

6 

22 

2 

2 

32,556 

33.3 

1,480 

5,426 

Providential (Ire). 

3 

6 

1 

1 

29,437 

33.3 

4,906 

9,812 

Command Control. 

2 

8 

2 

2 

29,367 

100.0 

3,671 

14,684 

tUno Roberto. 

6 

27 

4 

5 

29,076 

66.7 

1,077 

4,846 

Dancing Count. 

5 

17 

2 

2 

27,066 

40.0 

1,592 

5,413 

Run Fool Run. 

2 

11 

2 

4 

22,239 

100.0 

2,022 

11,120 

Double Zeus. 

7 

25 

3 

3 

21,890 

42.9 

876 

3,127 

Maryland's 

Leading 

Active 2-Year-Old 

Sires Lifetime 


(Statistics 

compiled by l 

bloodstock Research Information Services. They include racing of Dec. 5.) 







Races 


% Winners! 

Avg.f 

AvgJ 


Runners 

Starts 

Winners 

Won 

Earnings 

Starters 

Start 

Runner 

Rollicking. 

. 192 

949 

100 

186 

$2,681,360 

52.1 

$2,825 

$13,965 

Smarten. 

. 120 

492 

47 

70 

1,709,740 

39.2 

3,475 

14,248 

Rambunctious. 

. 191 

1,158 

109 

192 

1,200,200 

57.1 

1,036 

6,284 

Lord Gaylord. 

71 

242 

36 

57 

1,002,140 

50.7 

4,141 

14,115 

Shelter Half. 

62 

276 

35 

60 

775,501 

56.5 

2,810 

12,508 

Baederwood. 

40 

176 

20 

38 

618,630 

50.0 

3,515 

15,466 

Dancing Count. 

112 

466 

53 

66 

612,440 

47.3 

1,314 

5,468 

Oh Say. 

41 

152 

15 

23 

592,254 

36.6 

3,896 

14,445 

Caveat. 

66 

271 

18 

23 

576,414 

27.3 

2,127 

8,734 

Masked Dancer. 

. 101 

455 

39 

53 

497,886 

38.6 

1,094 

4,930 

Christopher R. 

91 

383 

40 

54 

485,986 

44.0 

1,269 

5,341 

Aloma's Ruler. 

55 

221 

25 

31 

453,885 

45.5 

2,054 

8,252 

Horatius. 

94 

342 

33 

46 

437,227 

35.1 

1,278 

4,651 

Thirty Eight Paces. 

22 

76 

5 

9 

424,897 

22.7 

5,591 

19,314 

Silver Badge. 

97 

400 

25 

36 

393,787 

25.8 

984 

4,060 

North Pole. 

38 

167 

15 

21 

374,391 

39.5 

2,242 

9,852 

Run Fool Run. 

56 

320 

33 

48 

322,633 

58.9 

1,008 

5,761 

Aristocratic. 

98 

552 

39 

57 

307,471 

39.8 

557 

3,137 

Anticipating. 

63 

240 

17 

25 

282,038 

27.0 

1,175 

4,477 

John Alden. 

51 

211 

17 

22 

279,468 

33.3 

1,324 

5,480 

Double Zeus. 

63 

246 

24 

31 

262,838 

38.1 

1,068 

4,172 

Double Edge Sword. 

84 

369 

26 

30 

255,865 

31.0 

693 

3,046 

Never Down Hill. 

66 

337 

23 

31 

227,499 

34.8 

675 

3,447 

Friend's Choice. 

69 

304 

19 

22 

223,578 

27.5 

735 

3,240 

Fuzzbuster... 

53 

271 

22 

26 

222,084 

41.5 

819 

4,190 

Jolly Johu. 

41 

191 

16 

25 

215,354 

39.0 

1,128 

5,253 

Pilot Ship.... . 

15 

70 

5 

9 

212,821 

33.3 

3,040 

14,188 

Hail Emperor. 

42 

180 

14 

19 

209,138 

33.3 

1,162 

4,979 

Salutely. 

27 

88 

8 

12 

204,922 

29.6 

2,329 

7,590 

North Tower. 

47 

180 

21 

26 

201,278 

44.7 

1,118 

4,283 

Providential (Ire). 

36 

128 

13 

16 

201,139 

36.1 

1,571 

5,587 

Assault Landing. 

33 

119 

11 

15 

195,182 

33.3 

1,640 

5,915 

Travelling Music. 

35 

133 

18 

21 

187,203 

51.4 

1,408 

5,349 

Quartermaster. 

35 

151 

13 

19 

168,493 

37.1 

1,116 

4,814 

Century Prince. 

26 

92 

6 

11 

167,036 

23.1 

1,816 

6,424 

Brilliant Protege. 

42 

174 

14 

22 

165,921 

33.3 

954 

3,951 

Buck Hill. 

40 

151 

12 

15 

149,247 

30.0 

988 

3,731 

tCarnivalay. 

14 

55 

4 

6 

147,386 

28.6 

2,680 

10,528 

Rose Argent. 

40 

142 

10 

16 

138,928 

25.0 

978 

3,473 

Lord Lister. 

4 

19 

2 

4 

136,110 

50.0 

7,164 

34,028 

Coppabarb. 

28 

122 

15 

20 

132,802 

53.6 

1,089 

4,743 

Authenticity. 

17 

94 

11 

22 

124,672 

64.7 

1,326 

7,334 

Deputed Testamony. 

32 

116 

5 

7 

124,378 

15.6 

1,072 

3,887 

Parfaitement. 

30 

106 

12 

14 

124,263 

40.0 

1,172 

4,142 


t Indicates stallion's first crop to race. 


January 1990 


57 






























































Ten Keys and Misty Ivor 
spotlight Sir Ivor Again 

By Cindy Deubler 


Sires, like race horses, can beat the odds. Such is 
the case with Sir Ivor Again. 

A 14-year-old son of champion Sir Ivor, Sir Ivor 
Again has had 54 named foals—an average of less than 
ten a year—in his six crops of racing age. But he sired 
two of the most accomplished Maryland-bred runners 
of 1989. 

Ten Keys, whose victories last season included the 
$100,000 Laurel Turf Cup Handicap-G3 and the Cliff 
Hanger Handicap-G3 at Meadowlands, is almost cer¬ 
tain to be voted best Maryland-bred turf horse. 

Misty Ivor won or placed in nine stakes, earning 
$279,575, and was the second leading Maryland-bred 
money earner among 3-year-old fillies in 1989 (behind 
Safely Kept). 

Both Ten Keys, a now-6-year-old horse, and Misty 
Ivor launched their careers in claiming company. Their 
earnings, combined, are now approaching the million 
dollar mark—not bad for a sire whose 1989 stud fee 
was $1,000 live foal. 

As a race horse, Sir Ivor Again had class. Coming to 
hand relatively early for a son of Sir Ivor, he captured 
the seven-furlong Ashley T. Cole Stakes as a 2-year-old 
for owner Mrs. Tilyou Christopher, who had pur¬ 
chased him at Saratoga for $37,000. Campaigned by 
Mrs. Christopher and trainer Leroy Jolley throughout 
his career, he won the Everglades Stakes early in his 



3-year-old season. A third to Spectacular Bid in the 
Flamingo Stakes-Gl soon after that sent the colt on an 
ambitious path to the Kentucky Derby, in which he 
finished seventh. 

He succeeded in winning the final two starts of his 
career, taking the restricted Dewitt Clinton Stakes, for 
3-year-old New York-breds, and a mile handicap at Bel¬ 
mont in his only outing at 4. He earned a total of 
$168,715 and when he finished racing in 1980 he 
ranked as Sir Ivor's second leading money-winning 
son. 

Helen Polinger, of Olney (Md.), enjoying consider¬ 
able success at the time with her millionaire filly The 
Very One, spotted Sir Ivor Again at a 1980 Belmont 
Horses of Racing Age sale. "Based on his bloodlines, 
and his athletic ability, he looked like he had a good 
chance of being successful at stud," comments Mrs. 
Polinger. His selling price was $165,000. 

Sir Ivor Again is out of the Fleet Nasrullah mare 
Miss Fleet Ardan, a daughter of Canadian Oaks win¬ 
ner Miss Ardan. 

Mrs. Polinger retains a majority interest in the Sir 
Ivor Again syndicate, which includes 11 other share¬ 
holders. From 1981 through 1985, the stallion stood at 
Mrs. Polinger's farm in Maryland. In 1986, he spent a 
year at a farm in New Jersey. Returned to Polinger Farm 
for 1987, he was transferred to Red Oak Farms in Dar¬ 
lington (Md.) for 1988, and to Murmur Farm, also in 
Darlington, for 1989. 

Thanks to the achievements of Ten Keys, Sir Ivor 
Again had his most popular season ever at Mr. and 
Mrs. E. Allen Murray's Murmur Farm last year, cover¬ 
ing 29 mares. 

Also the sire of stakes winner Ivory Mist, a Cana¬ 
dian-based earner of $84,407, and stakes-placed Warm 
Season ($116,319, 2nd Maryland City H, etc.) and Paco 
Tio (who was third in the Copa San Juan-Gl in Puerto 
Rico), Sir Ivor Again has sired 69 percent winners from 
starters and 51 percent winners from foals. 

His location for 1990 was still undecided at the time 
this article was written. □ 

Sir Ivor Again 


58 


Maryland Horse 









1989 Maryland-Bred Stakes Winners 

Profiles by Lucy Acton 


ALDEN'S ACE 

April, p. 66 
July, p. 54 

ALDEN'S WARRIOR 

Jan., p. 61 

BEN REATTA 

Jan., p. 60 

BEWARE OF THE CAT 

Nov., p. 60 

BIG UPHEAVEL 

Nov., p. 62 

CALL LOUIS 

July, p. 61 

CASTELETS 

July, p. 58 

CROWNED 

Jan., p. 64 

D. GUILFORD 

July, p. 60 
Nov., p. 58 

DIAMOND DONNIE 

April, p. 65 

DOUBLE BUNCTIOUS 

Oct., p. 48 

EAST COAST 

March, p. 69 

EESEE'S TAW 

March, p. 70 

ENCODER 

March, p. 72 

ENDLESS SURPRISE 

May, p. 55 

ETA CARINAE 
Aug., p. 55 
HARRIMAN 
Oct., p. 50 
HOMEBUILDER 
Sept., p. 42 
HOUSTON 
May, p. 48 
July, p. 58 
Oct., p. 53 

INTENSIVE COMMAND 

June, p. 44 

IN THE CURL 

June, p. 46 
Jan., p. 61 


INTOWN FOR THE DAY 

March, p. 74 

JET STREAM 

Jan., p. 62 

KATHLEEN THE QUEEN 

Oct., p. 53 
Nov., p. 63 
Dec., p. 64 

KING'S NEST 
July, p. 54 

LITTLE BOLD JOHN 

April, p. 63 
May, p. 52 
June, p. 48 
Dec., p. 60 

LOCAL THRILLER 

Oct., p. 49 
Nov., p. 58 

MASTER SPEAKER 

Nov., p. 62 
Jan., p. 64 

MISS GAYBEDDARD 

Aug., p. 56 

MISTY IVOR 

April, p. 66 
May, p. 51 
Dec., p. 63 

MY FRENCHMAN 

Aug., p. 57 

NEW SOVEREIGN 

Nov., p. 58 

NOBLEST HEART 

July, p. 59 

NORTHERN WOLF 

May, p. 55 
June, p. 46 

QUEEN'S RECKONING 

Oct., p. 48 

REAL TOUGH 

Oct., p. 50 
Nov., p. 60 

RESTLESS CON 

Jan., p. 66 

RINGERMAN 

Sept., p. 43 


SAFELY KEPT 

June, p. 45 
July, p. 54 
Aug., p. 56 
Sept., p. 44 
Nov., p. 59 
Dec., p. 62 

SALOHCIN 

Dec., p. 60 

SHE'S A CHAMP 

Oct., p. 51 
Nov., p. 60 

SILANO 

March, p. 73 
Sept., p. 44 
Jan., p. 63 

SMART 'NUFF 

March, p. 71 
Sept., p. 43 

SUPER CHOLO 

Jan., p. 64 

TEN KEYS 

Aug., p. 54 
Dec., p. 61 
Jan., p. 62 

THIRTY EIGHT GO GO 

May, p. 50 
July, p. 56 

TIMELY WARNING 

Oct., p. 49 
Nov., p. 62 

TURN TO TEDDY 

Dec., p. 62 

T. V. WIZARD 

March, p. 70 

TWO TIMING 

Sept., p. 44 

UNCLE MERLIN 

July, p. 57 

UNDER OATH 

Oct., p. 52 
Jan., p. 66 

VALAY MAID 

Jan., p. 60 

WAGGLEY 

March, p. 73 
May, p. 54 


January 1990 


59 







VALAY MAID 

b.f., 1987 

1989 

$75,000-guaranteed What a Summer Stakes, 7 fur., regis¬ 
tered Maryland-bred 2-year-old fillies. Laurel, Nov. 4. 
Bred by Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Hamilton 
Owned by Mrs. Frank P. Wright; trained by Carlos A. 

Garcia 

Foaled at Huntingfields, Hampstead, Md. 

Nearctic 
Natalma 
Cyane 

Book of Verse 
*Sensitivo 
Dandy Princess 
First Landing 
Wee Nip 

3rd earnings 

0 $54,000 

(through Nov. 4) 

Freshman sire Carnivalay sired the first two finishers 
in the What a Summer Stakes. Valay Maid and Lucky 
Lady Lauren—both trained by Carlos Garcia—crossed 
the wire a length and three-quarters apart, helping to 
make November 4 a dream day for Country Life Farm. 

That same day Carnivalay's half-sister Go for Wand 
(by Deputy Minister) captured the $1-million Breeders' 
Cup juvenile filly race at Gulfstream Park. 

Carnivalay, who stands at the Pons family's Country 
Life Farm near Bel Air, has been one of Maryland's best- 
supported young stallions. And his first crop is living up 
to promise. Valay Maid, out of a mare who sold at auction 


in 1983 for $2,000, is his second stakes winner. His first 
was the New Jersey-bred Groscar, who won the Open 
Mind Stakes at Monmouth in August. Carnivalay had 37 
registered foals in 1987. 

The product of supreme bloodlines, Carnivalay (him¬ 
self a foal of 1981) is by Northern Dancer out of the 
outstanding race mare and producer Obeah (by Cyane). 
Obeah is also the dam of stakes winners Dance Spell, 
Discorama and Black Powder. 

Valay Maid was bred by Joe Hamilton, manager of 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Wright's Huntingfields Farm near 
Hampstead, and his wife Betty. The Hamiltons consigned 
the filly to a Timonium auction as a weanling, and the 
Wrights bought her for $5,200. 

The first stakes winner ever owned by the Wrights— 
or bred by the Hamiltons—Valay Maid is out of the West 
Coast Scout mare Nancy's Scout, whom the Hamiltons 
purchased at an auction at Laurel. 



Northern Dancer 

Carnivalay 

Obeah 

West Coast Scout 

Nancy's Scout 

Wee Landing 

starts 1st 2nd 
1989 (SW) 2 2 0 


BEN REATTA 

dk.b. or br.c., 1987 

1989 

$15,000 Tri-State Futurity (2nd div.), 7 fur., 2-year-olds 
foaled in Maryland, Virginia or West Virginia. Charles 
Town, Nov. 4. 

Bred by Dewey C. Wright 

Owned by PA. DiSario; trained by E. Kevin Palmer 
Foaled at Glenstone Farm, Middletown, Md. 

Sword Dancer 
Kerala 
Nashua 
Levee 

Bold Favorite 
lie Emeraude 
Jig Time 
Queen Lask 

3rd earnings 

1 $28,184 

(through Nov. 4) 

Nominating a horse for the Tri-State Futurity is a little 
bit like selecting a college before your child is born. It's 
destined to work out for only a lucky few. 

When nominations closed for the 1989 Tri-State Futu¬ 
rity—on December 31, 1986—154 unborn foals had been 
made eligible. Twelve of them started in the Charles Town 
event, contested in two divisions on the first Saturday in 
November. 


Posting a mild upset in the second division was the 
Benefice colt Ben Reatta, an 8-1 shot who charged up at 
the wire to claim victory, by a head, over the favorite Flash 
Number One. Remarkably, Ben Reatta is the second horse 
Dewey Wright, an automobile dealer in Manassas, Va., 
has bred to win the Tri-State Futurity in the past four 
years. Sold by Wright privately as a weanling to current 
owner PA. DiSario, the colt is closely related to Win for 
Dewey, a Century Prince filly who won the race in 
Wright's colors in 1986. 

Ben Reatta, by the former Glenstone Farm stallion 
Benefice, is out of Wright's homebred mare Sweet Little 
Mindy (by Favorite Isle). Both Sweet Little Mindy and 
Win for Dewey's dam Cut Out are daughters of the Jig 
Time mare Princess Jale, whom Wright claimed at Charles 
Town in 1973 for $2,000. 

Wright keeps four broodmares at his farm in 
Nokesville (Va.), and currently has three in training with 
Henry Mercer at Charles Town. His approach to the busi¬ 
ness is low-key. He sold Ben Reatta (the first part of the 
colt's name is derived from his sire. Benefice; the second 
from a model of Buick that Wright sells) because this was 
the only foal he had that year and he "didn't want to be 
bothered with just one." 

But winning the Tri-State Futurity is a relatively lofty 
achievement. Because of the volume of nominations, it is 
much richer than a typical $15,000-added race. Winner's 
jackpot was $24,074, and Wright got a breeder's award of 
$1,250. 


Benefice 


Sweet Little Mindy 


Damascus 
Shuvee 
Favorite Isle 


Princess Jale 


1989 (SW) 


starts 

5 


1st 

2 


2nd 

0 


60 


Maryland Horse 













ALDEN'S WARRIOR 

dk.b. or br.c., 1987 

1989 

$15,000 Tri-State Futurity (1st div.), 7 fur., 2-year-olds 
foaled in Maryland, Virginia or West Virginia. Charles 
Town, Nov. 4. 

Bred by John J. Robb 

Owned by John J. Robb; trained by John J. Robb 
Foaled at Hidden Hill Farm, Edgewater, Md. 


John Alden 


Ambitious Apache 


Speak John 
Nicoma 


Bold Ambition 


Apache Legend 


1989 (SW) 


starts 

6 


1st 

2 


2nd 

1 


Prince John 
*Nuit de Folies 
Nashua 
Hasty Flirt 
Bold Ruler 
Be Ambitious 
On the Warpath 
Apache Penny 

3rd earnings 

1 $36,794 

(through Nov. 18) 


Hal Clagett's practice of mating John Alden with Bold 
Ambition mares has produced stellar performers Little 
Bold John and Alden's Ambition, and stakes winners Am¬ 
bitious John and Alden's Ace. Cut from the same mold is 
Alden's Warrior, bred and owned by Clagett's trainer Jerry 


Robb. Alden's Warrior (by John Alden) is out of the Bold 
Ambition mare Ambitious Apache, whom Robb pur¬ 
chased from Clagett as a yearling at a Timonium sale for 
$1,800. 

Scoring in a time (1:27 3 /s) that was almost three sec¬ 
onds faster than his counterpart in the second division, 
Alden's Warrior defeated odds-on favorite Bardland by a 
half-length in the first division of the Tri-State Futurity, 
while conceding nine pounds to the runner-up. 

It was a hard-charging victory that turned out even 
better than Little Bold John's performance in the 1984 Tri- 
State Futurity. (LBJ, who now has 25 stakes wins and 
earnings of $1,852,267, won, but was disqualified.) Al¬ 
though he does not believe Alden's Warrior has the poten¬ 
tial to be another Little Bold John, Robb is more than 
pleased with his efforts so far. "Alden's Warrior is not a 
real good horse," says Robb. "But he could develop into 
one. There will never be another Little Bold John." 

Alden's Warrior is the first foal from his dam, who 
also has a 2-year-old John Alden filly. Not bred for 1989, 
she is due February 1 to the cover of John Alden. "We're 
still chasing after that nick," Robb comments. 

Alden's Warrior broke his maiden while running for a 
$16,000 tag at Pimlico in September; he was third in an 
allowance race at Marlboro in his last outing before the Tri- 
State Futurity, and he came back two weeks later to be 
second in a $25,000 claiming race at Laurel. 


IN THE CURL 

b.m., 1984 

1987 

$40,000 Lochearn Handicap, 6 fur., fillies and mares, 3 & 
up. Pimlico, Oct. 11. 

$35,000 Heirloom Stakes, 6 fur., 3-year-old fillies. Phila¬ 
delphia Park, Nov. 14. 

1989 

$50,000 Primonetta Handicap, 6 fur., fillies and mares, 3 
& up. Pimlico, April 15. 

$30,000 Hydrangea Stakes, 6 fur., fillies and mares, 3 & 
up. Meadowlands, Nov. 10. 

Bred by Dark Hollow Number One Partnership 
Owned by N.E. Rinaldi; trained by Dale Capuano 
Foaled at Carol Hill Farm, Upperco, Md. 


Shelter Half 


Ocean Girl 


Tentam 
Gay Matelda 
Rollicking 
Pennsylvania Girl 


Intentionally 

Tamerett 

Sir Gaylord 

Hasty Matelda 

Rambunctious 

Martinetta 

Tumiga 

Bank Book Sadye 


1986 

starts 

8 

1st 

0 

2nd 

5 

3rd 

0 

earnings 
$ 37,142 

1987 (SW) 

13 

6 

1 

2 

105,145 

1988 

13 

4 

4 

2 

113,212 

1989 (SW) 

16_ 

5 

7 

2 

182,424 

50 

15 

17 

6 $437,923 

(through Nov. 10 


In the Curl is a feather in the cap of trainer Dale 
Capuano. Claimed by Capuano, on behalf of owner Nick 
Rinaldi, for $75,000 at Pimlico last March, she has since 
annexed two stakes, and earned $155,372. 

In her latest outing, Meadowlands' Hydrangea 
Stakes, the Maryland-bred mare easily defeated a field of 
seven rivals, pulling away to a one and one-half length 
score over favored Valid Line. The 122-pound highweight. 
In the Curl was giving nine pounds to the second-place 
finisher. 

It was her second victory in a row. On International 
Day (October 22) at Laurel, In the Curl won an overnight 
handicap worth $21,000 to the winner. 

In the Curl was bred by Stewart Greenebaum, of 
Pikesville (Md.), in partnership with Upperco (Md.) resi¬ 
dents Carol and Donald Wenderoth. She was consigned 
to a Timonium auction as a weanling, and purchased 
there by Penny Chenery (of Secretariat fame) for $14,000. 

Mrs. Chenery raced In the Curl for three seasons, 
with relatively good success, winning two stakes and 
placing in eight others. In the fall of 1988, Mrs. Chenery 
consigned her to the Keeneland Fall sale. Greenebaum 
(and several partners) bought In the Curl at that sale for 
$70,000. They planned to continue racing her for awhile, 
and then have her as a broodmare. 

Losing In the Curl in the claiming race last spring was 
a major blow to Greenebaum. Compounding his misfor¬ 
tune, In the Curl's dam Ocean Girl (whom Greenebaum 
still owned) died of foaling complications in April. 

But the claim was obviously a savvy one on the part of 
Capuano, who sent In the Curl out to be second to Safely 
Kept on Maryland Million Day. 


January 1990 


61 











TEN KEYS 

dk.b. or br.h., 1984 

1987 

$15,000 Nick Shuk Memorial Stakes, 1 mi., turf, 3-year- 
olds. Delaware Park, May 10. 

$50,000 Humphrey S. Finney Stakes, lVi6 mi., turf, reg¬ 
istered Maryland-bred 3-year-olds. Laurel, June 6. 

$50,000 Timely Writer Handicap, 1 mi. 70 yds., turf, 
3-year-olds. Suffolk Downs, Sept. 5. 

$50,000 Japan Racing Association Handicap, l'/ib mi., 
turf, 3-year-olds. Pimlico, Oct. 10. 

$50,000 Palisades Handicap (plus $25,000 Breeders' Cup 
premium awards), lVi6 mi., turf, 3-year-olds. Mead- 
owlands, Oct. 31. 

1988 

$75,000-guaranteed Find Handicap, IVh mi., turf, 
registered Maryland-breds, 3 & up. Laurel, Nov. 5. 

1989 

$60,000 Chieftain Handicap, l‘/i6 mi., turf, 3 & up. 
Pimlico, June 17. 

$75,000 Cliff Hanger Handicap-G3, 1 Vie. mi., turf, 3 & 
up. Meadowlands, Sept. 30. 

$75,000-guaranteed Find Handicap, IVh mi., turf, regis¬ 
tered Maryland-breds, 3 & up. Laurel, Nov. 5. 

$100,000-guaranteed Laurel Turf Cup Handicap-G3, IV 2 
mi., turf, 3 & up. Laurel, Nov. 12. 



Bred by Richard Bendit 

Owned by Charles Linhoss; trained by Michael V. Pino 
Foaled at Polinger Farm, Olney, Md. 

Sir Gaylord 
Attica 

Fleet Nasrullah 
Miss Ardan 
Third Brother 
Exceed 
*Beau Gem 
Rising Temper 

3rd earnings 

0 $ 180 
1 201,179 

1 120,914 

J_ 310,795 

3 $633,068 

(through Nov. 12) 

Ten Keys, the wondrous ex-$14,500 claimer, reached 
new heights last fall. 

His most recent achievements consist of a creditable 
fifth in the Budweiser International-Gl, and back-to-back 
victories in the Find Handicap and Laurel Turf Cup-G3. In 
the Find, which Ten Keys annexed for the second year in a 
row, Charles Linhoss's runner was dispatched as odas-on 
favorite against eight Maryland-bred rivals. He drew off 
in the final stages and held a one and three-quarter- 
length margin over J.B. Merryman's Rebuff at the wire. 
Timely Warning was another half-length back, followed 
by Due North, Kitchener's Reward, Eagle Watch, Caste- 
lets, Pacific Spy and Change for Better. 

Only one week later. Ten Keys gave an even more 
impressive performance in the Laurel Turf Cup. Employ¬ 
ing his usual come-from-behind style, he charged home 
two and a half lengths in front of runner-up Coosaragga, 
to whom he was giving six pounds. He was next-highest 
weighted at 121 pounds (one less than favored Coeur de 
Lion, who had a rough trip, and returned lame). 

Together, the two stakes enriched Ten Keys' bankroll 
by $105,000, and made him a virtual certainty to become 
Maryland-bred turf horse of the year. 


Sir Ivor Again 


Mabs a Babs 


Sir Ivor 

Miss Fleet Ardan 
Exceedingly 
Temper Temper 


1986 

starts 

2 

1st 

0 

2nd 

0 

1987 (SW) 

16 

7 

3 

1988 (SW) 

11 

3 

1 

1989 (SW) 

14 

5 

4 

43 

15 

8 


JET STREAM 

dk.b. or br.g., 1986 

1989 

$60,000 Annapolis Handicap, IVh mi., 3-year-olds. Lau¬ 
rel, Nov. 18. 


62 


Bred by Gretchen B. Mobberley 
Owned by Gretchen B. Mobberley; trained by John C. 
Mobberley 

Foaled at Summer Hill Farm, West Friendship, Md. 


Thirty Eight Paces 


Celtic Sarre 


Nodouble 
Thirty Paces 
Cornish Prince 
Sarre Green 
1st 2nd 

5 1 


*Noholme II 
Abla-Jay 
Dancing Count 
Bank Book Sadye 
Bold Ruler 
Teleran 
Clem Pac 
Saree 

3rd earnings 

0 $103,500 

(through Nov. 18) 


starts 

1988 unraced 

1989 (SW) 7 


Gretchen and Jack Mobberley have trained and 
owned and bred a lot of good horses over the last 20 years. 
But—surprising as it may seem—Jet Stream is their first 
homebred stakes winner. 



Maryland Horse 

















SILANO 

b.g., 1984 

1986 

$40,000 Playpen Stakes, 5 x h fur., 2-year-olds. Laurel, 
July 11. 

$35,000 Rollicking Stakes, 6 fur., registered Maryland- 
bred 2-year-olds. Pimlico, Aug. 9. 

1988 

$50,000 Capitol Handicap, 1 mi., 3 & up. Laurel, Feb. 21. 
$50,000 Explorer Handicap, 6 fur., 3 & up. Laurel, Oct. 10. 

1989 

$50,000 Presidential Handicap, 6V2 fur., 3 & up. Laurel, 
Jan. 21. 

$50,000 Duck Dance Handicap, 6 fur., 3 & up. Laurel, July 

1. 

$60,000-guaranteed Challedon Handicap, 7 fur., regis¬ 
tered Maryland-breds, 3 & up. Laurel, Nov. 24. 

Bred by Phillip Capuano 

Owned by Constance A. Capuano; trained by Dale 
Capuano 

Foaled at Capuano Farm, Upper Marlboro, Md. 


Silver Badge 


Poker 


Round Table 
Glamour 


Silver True 


Hail to Reason 
Silver Fog 

Yemen's Mite 


Yemen 


Bryan G. 
Imperatrice 

George Case 

Pats Anne 



Indictment 



starts 1st 

2nd 

3rd 

earnings 

1986 (SW) 

5 

3 

1 

1 

$ 71,978 

1987 

12 

2 

1 

3 

49,215 

1988 (SW) 

16 

4 

5 

3 

166,656 

1989 (SW) 

14 

5 

4 

2 

195,900 


47 

14 

11 

9 

$483,749 


(through Nov. 24) 

The 120-pound highweight and even-money favor¬ 
ite, Silano set every fraction and captured the Challedon 
Handicap by a head over Turn to Dancin. Behind those 



two came Maryland-breds Muddy Rudder, Due North 
and Timely Warning. 

A model of consistency, Silano finished in the money 
in 11 out of 14 starts throughout the first 11 months of 
1989, and earned $195,900. He continues to be a mainstay 
of trainer Dale Capuano's stable, whose other stars last 
year included Maryland-breds Double Bunctious and In 
the Curl. 

Silano, owned and bred by Dale Capuano's parents, 
Phil and Connie Capuano, is out of a mare who was pur¬ 
chased by Mr. Capuano as a yearling in 1966 for $800. 
Remarkably, Yemen's Mite produced three stakes horses 
before her death in 1987. 

Gary's Friend (by Friend's Choice) won the 1982 Play¬ 
pen Stakes and $94,530; then came Silano. Her most re¬ 
cent is Brilano, a foal of 1986 by Brilliant Protege, whom 
Dale Capuano's brother Gary trains. Last year Brilano fin¬ 
ished second in the Ambler Stakes and third in the Gover¬ 
nor's Cup and Japan Racing Association Handicap, earn¬ 
ing $71,107. 

The last foal out of Yemen's Mite is a just-turned 
3-year-old filly who is so far unraced. Her name is Ye¬ 
men's Last. 


"To the best of my recollection, he's the first one 
we've ever bred and raised," says Jack Mobberley, who in 
recent years saddled William Backer's Scotch Heather to 
win multiple stakes and earn over $370,000. "That's the 
way it is. They don't come along all that often." 

Jet Stream is out of the Cornish Prince mare Celtic 
Sarre. And Celtic Sarre is a daughter of the good race 
mare Sarre Green. Claimed by the Mobberleys as a 3-year- 
old, Sarre Green (a foal of 1968) developed into one of this 
area's top handicap mares, winning the Gallorette, 
Whitemarsh and Haddonfield Handicaps and placing in 
six others. 

Celtic Sarre, a foal of 1980, showed a lot of talent in 
her early training. But she bowed a tendon before she had 
an opportunity to prove it. Her first foal, a 1985 filly by 
Barrera, never raced at all—the Mobberleys made her into 
a show horse. Then came Jet Stream. 

Unraced as a 2-year-old ("There was no particular 
reason, except that we never push our 2-year-olds," says 
Mobberley), Jet Stream won going away, by six lengths, in 
his debut in a $45,000 maiden claiming race at Laurel last 


July. He came back to win three more in a row, in allow¬ 
ance company. Next he gave a good account of himself in 
Laurel's Northern Dancer Stakes, finishing third behind 
Turn to Teddy and Flaming Emperor (he was moved up to 
second upon Flaming Emperor's disqualification). 

Although he has finished out of the money only once 
in seven career starts—the Japan Racing Association 
Handicap on October 29, in which he was fifth, beaten 
two lengths by the victorious Dixie Dancer—Jet Stream 
was not regarded as a huge threat in the Annapolis Hand¬ 
icap. His odds were more than 8-1. But he won by a wide 
open five-length margin, over the accomplished New 
York-bred Packett's Landing. 

Jet Stream is the third earner of $100,000 or more to 
represent his young sire Thirty Eight Paces, who stands at 
Shamrock Farm in Woodbine. Celtic Sarre has an unraced 
3-year-old filly by Dancing Count, a 2-year-old filly by 
Eminency and a yearling filly by Acallade; all are still 
owned by the Mobberleys. Not bred for 1990, she is book¬ 
ed back to Thirty Eight Paces. 


January 1990 


63 














MASTER SPEAKER 

b.h., 1985 

1988 

$60,000-guaranteed Humphrey S. Finney Stakes, IV 16 
mi., turf, registered Maryland-bred 3-year-olds. 
Pimlico, June 18. 

$100,000-guaranteed Ryehill-Windfields Maryland Turf, 
l'/i6 mi., turf, 3-year-olds sired by Maryland stallions. 
Laurel, Sept. 18. 

$40,000 Mercer County Stakes, lVi6 mi., turf, 3-year- 
olds. Meadowlands, Oct. 27. 

1989 

$200,000-guaranteed Budweiser Maryland Classic, VU 
mi., 3 & up, sired by Maryland stallions. Pimlico, Sept. 
10 . 

$100,000 Paterson Handicap-G2, lVs mi., 3 & up. Mead¬ 
owlands, Nov. 18. 

Bred by Anderson Fowler 

Owned by Anderson Fowler; trained by Virgil W. 
Raines 

Foaled at Buckingham Farm, Chestertown, Md. 


Master Willie (GB) 


Speak Up Now 


High Line 
Fair Winter 
Speak John 


High Hat 
Time Call 
Set Fair 
Winter Gleam 
Prince John 
*Nuit de Folies 
Bold Lad 



Step On It 


Clear Road 


starts 1st 

2nd 

3rd 

earnings 

1987 

8 2 

0 

1 

$ 22,631 

1988 (SW) 

10 4 

0 

2 

152,631 

1989 (SW) 

12 _2_ 

J_ 

3 

273,800 


30 8 

3 

6 

$449,062 


(through Nov. 18) 

Master Speaker concluded his 1989 fall campaign in 
masterful style, winning the $100,000 Paterson Handicap- 
G2. It was his first graded stakes win. 

After the race, the now-5-year-old horse was shipped 
to trainer Buddy Raines' winter headquarters in Aiken, 
S.C., where he will have a rest. "We'll keep him in light 
training and bring him back in the spring," Raines prom¬ 
ises. 

Master Speaker, who races for his breeder Anderson 
Fowler, of Gladstone, N.J., charged into the limelight last 
fall when he won the $200,000 Budweiser Maryland Clas¬ 
sic on Maryland Million Day. He continued to be a force, 
finishing second by three-quarters of a length to Little 
Bold John in the Polynesian Handicap on September 30, 
and dead-heating for third with Slew City Slew in the 
Meadowlands Cup-Gl won by Mi Selecto on October 13. 

Then, in the Paterson Handicap, he gave a virtual 
repeat of his Maryland Million performance. Set down by 
jockey Julie Krone near the three-eighths pole. Master 
Speaker responded with a powerful run. He circled the 
leaders , took command in the stretch, and held off a chal¬ 
lenge by Congeleur to win by a length and a quarter. 
Master Speaker paid $6.20 as favorite. 

In his last four outings, he earned $242,500. 


SUPER CHOLO 

dk.b. or br.c., 1987 

1989 

$75,000-guaranteed Devil's Bag Stakes, 7 fur., registered 
Maryland-bred 2-year-olds. Laurel, Nov. 19. 

Bred by Solstice 

Owned by Vi-Ga-Ma Stable; trained by Carlos A. Gar¬ 
cia 

Foaled at Solstice, Cockeysville, Md. 

Hail to Reason 
Bra ma lea 


Darby Creek Road 


Luck Too 


Roberto 
On the Trail 
What Luck 
Counterflight 


1989 (SW) 


Olympia 
Golden Trail 
Bold Ruler 
Irish Jay 
Count of Honor 
Sinister 

3rd earnings 

3 $99,393 

(through Nov. 19) 


Super Cholo was the ranking Maryland-bred juve¬ 
nile colt, as of late November. Trained by Carlos Garcia, 
whose record with 2-year-olds last season was sensational 
(his successes included Valay Maid and Lucky Lady Lau¬ 
ren, who finished one-two in the What a Summer Stakes), 
Super Cholo had three stakes placings to his credit before 
his determined length victory in the Devil's Bag Stakes. 

He was third (although more than ten lengths behind 
the victorious Go and Go) in the Laurel Futurity-G2, and 


CROWNED 

ch.f., 1987 

1989 

$50,000 Pocahontas Stakes, 1 mi., 2-year-old fillies. 
Churchill Downs, Oct. 29. 

$150,000 Maryland Juvenile Filly Championship, lVi6 
mi., registered Maryland-bred 2-year-old fillies. Lau¬ 
rel, Nov. 25. 

Bred by Mrs. Richard C. duPont and Woodstock Enter¬ 
prises 

Owned by Bohemia Stable; trained by William I. Mott 
Foaled at Woodstock Farm, Chesapeake City, Md. 


Chief's Crown 


Fair Rosalind 


Danzig 
Six Crowns 


Exclusive Native 


Thirty Years 


1989 (SW) 


Northern Dancer 
Pas de Nom 
Secretariat 
Chris Evert 
Raise a Native 
Exclusive 
Bold Hour 
Battle of Roses 

3rd earnings 

0 $148,910 

(through Nov. 25) 


Crowned is likely to be crowned Maryland's best 
2-year-old filly of 1989 after her smashing, 11-length victo¬ 
ry in the Maryland Juvenile Filly Championship at Laurel. 

Owned and bred by Mrs. Richard C. duPont, the filly 
had been based in the Midwest with trainer Bill Mott and 
was shipped in to Laurel specifically for the race. Odds-on 
favorite, she completely dominated the field of eight 


64 






Maryland Horse 












also third in Laurel's Vanlandingham Stakes and Primer 
Breeders' Cup—both in unrestricted company, on the 
turf. In the Devil's Bag, Super Cholo defeated fellow 
Maryland-breds Eagle Mill, Worthington Winner, 
Gretchen's Lou, Real Estate, A Top Brandy and Real 
Tough. 

Owned by Enrique Villa Garcia, who is with the Per¬ 
uvian Embassy in Washington, D.C., and is no relation to 
the trainer. Super Cholo was bred by Cockeysville (Md.) 
veterinarian Fred Peterson and his wife Wildie. Carlos 
Garcia purchased him at the 1988 Fasig-Tipton Select 
Yearling sale at Timonium for $8,700. 

Carlos Garcia explains that Cholo is the Peruvian 
equivalent of "Yankee." Super Cholo means Super Peru¬ 
vian. 

The Petersons purchased Super Cholo's dam Luck 
Too (by What Luck) privately for $17,000 after she failed to 
meet her reserve at a Florida auction in 1986. She was 
carrying the current 3-year-old (by Darby Creek Road) at 
the time. 

"It's really a funny story how we came to get her," 
says Dr. Peterson. "I had always been an admirer of Mer- 
ryman breeding (John and Kitty Merryman have had re¬ 
markable results with bargain broodmares at their Ore- 
banks farm in Sparks). When my wife and I decided to 
buy our first mare, back in the late 1970s, I asked John's 
advice, and he recommended Anchor and Hope (a mare 
whom the Merrymans bred but no longer owned, by their 
home stallion Up All Hands)." 

The first foal Anchor and Hope produced for the Pe¬ 
tersons was Engadine, a Rock Talk gelding who finished 


second in the Bowie Juvenile Stakes and earned almost 
$100,000. The Petersons sold him as a yearling to Sally M. 
Gibson. 

Unfortunately, Anchor and Hope produced only one 
more foal before dying of colic. The Petersons started 
looking for another Merryman-bred, and found Luck 
Too. "I had taken care of her as a foal," says Dr. Peterson. 
"She'd been claimed from the Merrymans, and somehow 
ended up in Florida." Luck Too is a half-sister to the dam 
of the good Merryman homebred Smart 'n Quick. The 
mare has a 2-year-old filly by John Alden who is so far 
following in Super Cholo's footsteps—she was purchased 
at last year's select sale by Carlos Garcia for $10,000. Bar¬ 
ren for 1989, Luck Too is due to foal this spring to Caveat. 



Maryland-bred fillies. She's a Champ, considered the best 
juvenile filly in the state after her triumph in the USF&G 
Maryland Lassie on Maryland Million Day, trailed in last. 
Her poor showing was attributed to bleeding. 

Runner-up in the Juvenile Filly Championship, con¬ 
tested in exceptionally slow time of 1:47, was Ryehill 
Farm's Run Smartly, who held a four and one-half length 
margin over Dans les Bois. Then came Follies Jumper, 
Golden Triad, Only Keren, Bonne Coeur and She's a 
Champ. 

Crowned had placed second to the good Woody Ste¬ 
phens-trained filly De la Devil in the Grade 3 Golden Rod 
Stakes at Churchill Downs only one week before the race 
at Laurel. Before that, she was undefeated in three starts, 
one of which was Churchill Downs' Pocahontas Stakes. 
Heavily backed by fans for the Pocahontas, the opening 
day feature at Churchill Downs' fall meeting, she scored 
by one and one-half lengths. 

From the first crop of champion Chief's Crown, Mrs. 
duPont's homebred has a regal background. Her second 
dam, Thirty Years by Bold Hour, was purchased as a foal 
by Mrs. duPont from breeder William G. Helis Jr. Thirty 
Years went on to win graded stakes in Mrs. duPont's Bo¬ 
hemia Stable colors ($49,786, Little Silver H-G3, etc.). 

As a producer she has been even more outstanding. 
Her best runner is Thirty Flags, a 1980 Hoist the Flag filly 
who won the Beaugay and Little Silver Handicaps, placed 
in six graded races, including the Acorn Stakes-Gl, and 
earned $275,243. Her next-best. Fair Rosalind by Exclu¬ 
sive Native, placed second in the 1980 Leonia Stakes, 
earning $45,770. Fair Rosalind is the dam of Crowned. 


January 1990 



Interestingly, almost all of the good horses on the 
distaff side of Crowned's family are females who have 
built their reputations on the turf. Following in that tradi¬ 
tion, Crowned's 5-year-old half-sister Betty Lobelia (by 
Assert-Ire) has won two graded stakes on the grass—the 
Miss Grillo and Nijana, both Grade 3—and earned 
$331,549. 

Betty Lobelia was Fair Rosalind's second foal. Her 
first, a gelding named Doubt It (by Believe It), was a non¬ 
descript winner who has found his niche as a three-day 
event horse. He is being trained for Olympic competition 
by Mrs. duPont's granddaughter Beale Wright. 

Fair Rosalind's 1986 foal, a filly named Fabula Dancer 
by Northern Dancer, sold at Keeneland for $575,000 and 
went to West Germany, where she reportedly has not 
raced. In 1988 and 1989, the mare produced colts by Storm 
Bird. Not bred for 1990, the 12-year-old mare may go to 
Chief's Crown this spring, according to Mrs. duPont. 















UNDER OATH 

b.f., 1986 
1989 

$75,000-guaranteed Twixt Stakes, lVs mi., registered 
Maryland-bred 3-year-old fillies. Laurel, Aug. 25. 
$75,000 Honey Bee Handicap-G3, lVi6 mi., 3-year-old 
fillies. Meadowlands, Nov. 25. 

Bred by Andrew G.P. Hobbs 

Owned by Yvonne Stoner; trained by Francis P. Cam- 
pitelli 

Foaled at Windfields Farm, Chesapeake City, Md. 


Traffic Cop 

Deputed Testamony 

Traffic Judge 

Flight Bird 

Prove It 

Come On 


Proof Requested 

China Bound 

Salem 

Cyane 

Witching Hour 

Family Gallery 

Due de Fer 
*Fair Edwine 



starts 1st 2nd 

3rd earnings 

1988 

2 0 0 

0 $ 0 

1989 (SW) 

\2 _S_ _3_ 

0 224,200 


14 8 3 

0 $224,200 


(through Nov. 25) 


Deputed Testamony got his first graded stakes win¬ 
ner when Under Oath captured the Honey Bee Handicap- 
G3 by a flourishing two and one-quarter length margin. 


A game runner-up to Royal Plume in the Long Look 
Handicap-G2 at Meadowlands in her last previous outing. 
Under Oath performed sensationally last season, finish¬ 
ing first or second in 11 of her 12 starts (through the end of 
November). With victories in two stakes, and seconds in 
three others (including the Kennard Warfield Jr. Group 
Maryland Oaks on Maryland Million Day), she earned 
$224,200. 

Under Oath, from Deputed Testamony's first crop, 
has given a significant boost to her sire, who stands at 
Bonita Farm in Darlington (Md.) for $5,000 live foal. And 
she has been a bonanza for Jim and Yvonne Stoner, who 
claimed her on June 2, in her second start of the season, 
for $20,000. The Stoners have been the recipients of nearly 
all her earnings—$208,600. 

Relatively new to racing, Mr. and Mrs. Stoner main¬ 
tain one of Maryland's most active claiming stables, with 
trainer Francis Campitelli. "We had no idea what we were 
getting when we claimed her," says Jim Stoner, with glee. 
"We were hoping for a good allowance filly." Earlier in 
1989, the Stoners campaigned another stakes-winning 
3-year-old filly, Eesee's Taw, whom they also claimed. But 
Under Oath is by far the best horse they have had. 

Under Oath was bred by Wilmington (Del.) horse¬ 
man Andrew G.P. Hobbs, who also bred and raced her 
dam China Bound (by Salem). China Bound, a foal of 
1976, won the Bristol and Whitemarsh Handicaps and 
earned $155,563. Her only other foal to race is a now-5- 
year-old filly named Open Door, who is a modest winner. 


RESTLESS CON 

ro.c., 1987 
1989 

$50,000 Leland Stanford Stakes, l l /i6 mi., 2-year-olds. 
Bay Meadows, Nov. 25. 

Bred by Geri C. Hughes 

Owned by Chambers, Offield, Rago, et al; trained by 
Duane Offield 

Foaled at Sagamore Farm, Glyndon, Md. 


Restless Native 


Filouette 


Native Dancer 
Next Move 
Wallet Lifter 
Paris Picnic 


Polynesian 
Geisha 
Bull Lea 
Now What 
*Khaled 
Lismore Liz 
County Delight 
*Judith Paris 


starts 1st 2nd 3rd earnings 
1989 (SW) 4 3 0 0 $48,600 

(through Nov. 25) 


Jane Chambers, 27, "fell in love" with Restless Con 
two years ago, when the colt was a yearling. Now she is 
"ruined for life," says her mother, Geri Hughes. 

Mrs. Hughes lives in Hillsborough, Calif., but has 
been a longtime client of Sagamore Farm. She brought her 
daughter East with her, to see her yearlings, in the spring 
of 1988, and "this colt just walked right up to Jane," Mrs. 


Hughes recalls. "He had this funny look that reminded 
her of a Smurf—she's always called him that. I said, 'Well, 
I'm sorry, I sell all of my young horses; we won't be keep¬ 
ing him.' Jane decided to try to buy him. She got up a 
partnership with the trainer Duane Offield and another 
friend." 

That September, at Keeneland, the Restless Native 
colt was purchased by the partnership for $17,000. And 
the rest is history. 

Restless Con—from one of the last crops of the illus¬ 
trious Sagamore Farm stallion Restless Native, who died 
in July, 1988—won convincingly in his first start as a 
2-year-old. "It was the first 2-year-old race of the season in 
Northern California (at Golden Gate, on May 5)," relates 
Mrs. Hughes. "That (kind of precociousness) is practically 
unheard of for offspring of Restless Native." 

Although he didn't live up to hopes in his next 
start—the $100,000 Hollywood Juvenile Championship- 
G2, in July—he was discovered to be coming down with 
an illness. Given a rest, he came back to register in an 
allowance race at Bay Meadows in late October. Then, a 
month after that, he captured Bay Meadows' Leland Stan¬ 
ford Stakes. 

"Imagine, a stakes winner in your very first try!" says 
Mrs. Hughes, who adds that her daughter is also a new 
mother. 

Mrs. Hughes reports that she still owns Restless 
Con's dam, Filouette (by Wallet Lifter). One of several 
broodmares whom Mrs. Hughes boards at trainer Henry 
Clark's farm in Glyndon, Filouette is also the dam of 
Frenchman's Honor (a 1983 colt by Rollicking) who is a 
hard-hitting winner of $100,362 on the Maryland circuit. 


66 


Maryland Horse 












Zannetta Farm — 


when finding the right stallion is not 
the only thing you’re concerned with. 


We offer three impeccably- 
bred young stallions by 
leading sires and two 
proven sires of hard- 
knocking runners ... we 
also offer our special brand 
of Zannetta care, where 
the horse always comes 
first. a 



211 Widens Rd., Elkton, MD 21921 
Ron and Kaye Gibellino 
(301) 398-5910/5911 



ALLY RUNNER 
Alydar—Running Juliet 

By the sire of 35 SWs, 6 multi-millionaires, 
including EASY GOER and ALYSHEBA, 
Ally Runner comes from the sterling family of 
JULIETS NURSE. Half-brother to FULL 
OUT ($357,660), Running Around, Full 
Partner, Karelina. First foals are yearlings in 
1 990. $2,000 LIVE FOAL; special considera¬ 
tion to approved mares. Nominated to Breed¬ 
ers’ Cup, Maryland Million. 



NORTHERN CLASSIC 
Danzig—Summer Classic 


By the sire of millionaires CHIEF’S CROWN, 
STEPHAN’S ODYSSEY, POLISH NAVY 
and DANZIG CONNECTION, Northern 
Classic is an allowance-winning half-brother to 
champion WHAT A SUMMER. He is from the 
family of DANZIG CONNECTION and 
PINE CIRCLE. First foals are yearlings in 1990. 
$3,000 LIVE FOAL; special consideration to 
approved mares. Nominated to Breeders’ Cup, 
Maryland Million. 



SENTIMENTAL SLEW 
Seattle Slew—Savage Bunny 


By the sire of champions SLEW O’ GOLD, 
SWALE, CAPOTE and LANDALUCE, Sen¬ 
timental Slew is half-brother to RASCAL RAS¬ 
CAL and FLEUR DE PRINTEMPS. From the 
distinguished family of WELL DECORATED, 
TUDOR JET, etc. First foals are 2-year-olds in 
1990. $2,500 LIVE FOAL for first two mares, 
special fee on single bix>kings. Nominated to 
Breedens’ Cup, Maryland Million. 



NEVER DOWN HILL 
Never Bend—Imperial Hill 

Progeny earnings of over $2.6 million, with such 
consistent runners as CHOCOLATE 
DANCER ($254,222), HILL BILLY 
DANCER ($214,420), etc. From the great sire- 
pRxlucing family of foundation mare IMPER- 
ATRICE, his second dam. $1,000 LIVE 
FOAL; special consideration to approved mares. 
Nominated to Maryland Million. 



SILVER BADGE 
Poker—Silver True 


A stakes winner of $152,486 and graded stakes- 
placed, SILVER BADGE is sire of $498,748- 
eamer SILANO, TARNISH ($190,724), etc. 
Half-brother to SILVER BUCK ($421,906), 
Pvt. Smiles, Bid to Fame and to the dams of 
WAYNE’S CRANE ($339,378), Silver Stark 
and Riverstreak. Second dam is the top producer 
SILVER FOG. $2,500 LIVE FOAL; special 
consideration to approved mares. Nominated to 
Maryland Million. 




























Maryland stewards mark 
five-year anniversary 

Story by Marty McGee 
Photographs by Neena Ewing 



68 


Maryland 









Jean Chalk, as usual, is on the move. He's about 
two-thirds of the way through jogging some three 
miles, and he can't figure out why he's struggling to 
keep up with a companion on this chilly Friday morn¬ 
ing in November. 

"I ran Monday," Chalk says. "I lifted (weights) and 
played basketball on Tuesday. Then I ran and played 
wallyball (volleyball on a racquetball court) on 
Wednesday. But last night I just relaxed at dinner with 
some friends. Maybe that's why I'm so tired." 

Right. Try keeping up with the schedule 55-year-old 
Chalk maintains, and you, too, might have an occa¬ 
sional off day. Cynical fans or horsemen—ones vic¬ 
timized a time or two by a disqualification or unfavor¬ 
able ruling—might say that Chalk, as one of the four 
Maryland stewards, has more than his share of "off 
days," but then, that's the nature of the racing game. 

After showering. Chalk will leave his Columbia 
townhouse for another day in the stand at Laurel. On 
race days, one steward must be at the track early in the 
morning to attend to late program changes and other 
details. Two, sometimes three, of the others will join 
him around 10 a.m. That's when Chalk arrives on this 
day. 



Bill Passmore comes in late, too, and will join John 
Heisler, who has been at the track since early morning. 
Passmore gets out of his Mercedes after driving in 
from his Annapolis townhouse. He surveys the weath¬ 
er, which was supposed to be overcast and unseason¬ 
ably cold. 

"I think it might be all right today," Passmore says. 
The man says it as if he knows what is "all right." And 
he does. Winner of 3,533 races before becoming a stew¬ 
ard, Passmore rode on plenty of downright nasty win¬ 
ter days. This one, he has quickly concluded, won't be 
one of those. 

Six days later, Clinton Pitts Jr. will return to the 
stand after a two-week absence. It is Thanksgiving 
Day, and he has been away for over two weeks attend¬ 
ing a seminar for stewards in Louisville, Ky., reviewing 
procedures and laws and comparing notes with offi¬ 
cials from across the country. 

"I got quite a lot out of it," he says. "Sometimes you 
don't get much done at those things, but this one was 
really good." 

Pitts has a reputation as a hard-liner, a back-break¬ 
ing disciplinarian. Although he is the youngest (48) of 
the four, he is chief steward and has the most seniority. 

Heisler is asked his plans for Thanksgiving dinner. 
Typically, he will low-key it with his wife, Cathy, and 
his son. "We used to travel on Thanksgiving," he says, 
"but not anymore. It's murder." Of the four stewards, 
Heisler is the most reserved. 

This month marks the five-year anniversary of this 
four-man unit. Passmore, the last to come on, began in 
January 1985. 

They have not spent those five years without draw¬ 
ing criticism from fans and horsemen. Stewards, like 
umpires or referees, acknowledge that they are doing 
their jobs best when no one notices them. Easy calls 
are easy calls, but tough calls, well . . . someone is 
usually left very unhappy. 

"Everyone has an opinion," they all say. 

Heisler, at 61 the oldest of the group, made his way 
through the ranks before finally being awarded a stew¬ 
ard's job in September 1983. He grew up in Phila¬ 
delphia, served two years in the Navy, then went to 
Delaware Park "around 1948. I was a hot walker, then 
an exercise boy and, in about 1950,1 took out my train¬ 
er's license." 

He trained horses on his own until 1959, when he 
joined the powerful Bowes Bond stable as his assistant. 
He worked with some excellent runners during his ten 
years with Bond, including Ahoy, Rambunctious, 
Spring Double, Rock Talk and Process Shot. 

A native of Ohio, Jean Chalk (opposite) was a jockey, 
then a trainer before becoming an official. Chief steward 
Clinton Pitts Jr. (left), who grew up around horses in 
Monkton (Md.), is junior in age but senior in experience. 

69 








In 1969, at Timonium, he became an official, and has 
served as one ever since. 

"I like being a steward because it's challenging," he 
said. "When I began as an official, becoming a steward 
was something I set as a goal. People are always going 
to be critical of stewards, no matter which way you go, 
but that's the way this game is." 

Heisler spends his time away from the track quietly 
with Cathy, his wife of 36 years. Cathy works as a din¬ 
ing room hostess at the tracks. They live in Laurel and 
have one adult son. 

Chalk also came up through the ranks. He is from a 
poor family in Sharonville, a small Southern Ohio 
town, where his father worked for the WPA during the 
Depression. 

He eked out a living as a jockey in the '50s and '60s, 
then as a trainer, working at places such as Hazel Park 
and Latonia and Beulah Park. Never acclaimed as a star 
rider or horseman. Chalk did train some decent 
horses, including Get the Axe (fourth in the Kentucky 
Derby in 1977) in the colt's 2-year-old year. Eventually, 
he turned to officiating when he grew frustrated with 
training. 

In March 1984, Chalk moved to Maryland from 
Kentucky after he applied for, and got, a steward's 
position when one became open. He describes himself 
as a man who has made it to the top of his profession 
through "hard work, being conscientious, and having 
a few breaks." 

Chalk's only brother, his twin, is a Methodist minis¬ 
ter, and he himself is very active in his church in 
Clarksville. "I used to have a hard time dealing with 
my religion and being in racing," he said. "But one 
time my brother said some people in his congregation 
asked him about his brother being into horse racing. 
He said, 'I think if he does like he should, then he 
testifies to more people than I do.' Of course, we all fail 
sometimes, but it's important to me to set an example 
in the way I conduct myself and deal with these people 
on the race track." 

Chalk and his wife, also named Jean, have two chil¬ 
dren. Ted, a son, is a trainer on the Kentucky circuit. 

Passmore, not long ago the darling of Maryland 
fans when he dominated the jockey colony, still likes to 
reminisce about those glory days. "I thought after five 
years, I would certainly be adjusted to not riding," he 
said, "but I still miss it." He ends with a longing, al¬ 
most wistful tone. "I think that's because I did it so 
long, and I really enjoyed riding." 

"I don't get depressed, but I do get kind of bored. 
The toughest thing is when I went to (working) five 


A former assistant to trainer Bowes Bond, John Heisler 
began officiating in 1969 at Timonium. Most familiar 
to fans of all the stewards. Bill Passmore (opposite) was 
for many years a leading jockey on the local circuit. 


days a week," he said. "When I rode. I'd always work 
six, sometimes seven days. Everyone said, 'You'll real¬ 
ly welcome the two days off.' But I said, 'What am I 
going to do with myself? During the summer, I could 
work outside in the yard. But in the winter, when there 
isn't anything to do outside ... I found it tough.' " 

In April, Passmore and his wife Charlene moved to 
Annapolis. For most of their adult lives, they lived in 
Laurel, where they raised seven children, all of them 
now grown. 

"The toughest thing about raising the kids when I 
was so busy riding was the things I missed that they 
were involved in," he said. "The ball games, the func¬ 
tions, my girls twirling batons. I think they might not 
have understood at first, but now they all accept what I 
was doing. You have to give so much credit to my wife 
because she almost raised the children when I wasn't 
there that much." 

Passmore, 56, grew up in Delaware, on Bayard 
Sharp's farm. "I rode my first winner for him and 
number 2,999 for him. Then number 3,000 was for 
King (Leatherbury)." 

Now that he's no longer riding, Passmore enjoys 
being a steward if for no other reason than "you're still 
around racing." 



70 


Maryland Horse 








Pitts has never been especially well-known to racing 
fans, let alone as famous as Passmore. Yet, in their 
"second careers," some people believe Pitts is the dom¬ 
inant figure. 

"They say I'm a one-man stand, that I control the 
other three," Pitts acknowledged. "They said it about 
(former chief steward) Fred Colwill, too. But if you 
know these other guys well enough, you know they're 
going to say exactly what they think." 

Pitts, who was believed to be the youngest person to 
become a steward (in 1978, at 37) and chief steward (in 
1984, at 43) on a major racing circuit when named to 
those respective positions, has been around racing his 
entire life. 

He was raised in northern Baltimore County, where 
he attended private schools. He showed horses and 
would eventually ride steeplechasers professionally 
from 1963 to 1968. 

Prior to his racing career, Pitts was in the Marine 
Corps, and then entered law school, but dropped out 
after about two and one-half years. His background in 
law and the military, he believes, has fostered his strict 
attitude. He wants younger people in the horse indus¬ 
try to realize the importance of discipline and educa¬ 
tion. And he also believes he is fair in his dealings. 


"I'd like to think I've got a little bit of compassion 
about me," he said. "After a while, you develop a cer¬ 
tain ability to see through the con artists to the guy 
who's down on his luck or in need of some help." 

Pitts describes himself as "a loner, so some of the 
things that come with this job don't bother me too 
much. But there have been some strains in friendships 
that weren't there before. There are some things you 
just can't do when you're in a position like I am." 

Pitts still rides competitively on occasion, and he 
has a pilot's license. He lives in Monkton with his two 
children and wife Poppett, a retired show rider. She 
showed world champion Duke of Paeonian in the late 
'50s and early '60s. 

Barring unforeseen circumstances, this group of 
stewards should continue to function as a unit for at 
least, say, another five years. "As long as we have our 
health," Heisler said. 

To some, that may be a sobering revelation. To oth¬ 
ers, it doesn't make much difference. As for the stew¬ 
ards, Chalk will stick to his running, Passmore will 
probably continue to miss riding . . . and the four of 
them will just keep to the daily grind. 

"We have a job to do, just like anyone else on the 
race track," Pitts said. □ 



January 1990 


71 




Neonatal intensive care unit 
nears completion at New Bolton 

Story by Margaret Worrall 
Photographs by Neena Ewing 


The sturdy bay filly wheeled and kicked out with 
all the exuberance and cockiness of the typical adoles¬ 
cent. Yet for her, trotting eagerly to the fence to be 
petted, all that activity was not so ordinary. 

Born with severe flexor tendon laxity, Gracie, as she 
came to be known, moved at birth with her fetlocks 
touching the ground. She could barely stand when she 
was brought, only three days old, to the New Bolton 
Center (NBC) division of the University of Pennsylva¬ 
nia's School of Veterinary Medicine. 

"We'd never had one this bad," says Wendy E. 
Vaala, VMD, lecturer in medicine for NBC's neonatal 
department. "She was put in braces made especially 
for her by our farrier, Rob Sigafoos, who is an artist in 
this field. A lot of therapy followed, and almost con¬ 
stant care and attention were necessary. 

"Gracie was out of a stakes-winning mare who had 
produced several other perfectly normal foals which 
had raced successfully. The most that the owners were 
hoping for was to save this filly for breeding. 

"Now, at seven months," Vaala states with obvious 
satisfaction, "she's coming along so well that we're en¬ 
couraging them to put her in training when they start 
the others her age." 

This filly is but one of over 1,000 critically ill 
horses—and another 5,000 or so general large animal 
caS es—who come to New Bolton each year for treat¬ 
ment. 

Next month, the $2.25-million Connelly Intensive 
Care Unit and the Graham French Neonatal Section for 
horses will open at New Bolton. 

Custom-designed by Bohlin Powell Larkin Cywin- 
ski architects, the facility, the first of its kind in the 
world, covers 11,200 square feet. 

72 


"It's 25 times larger than what we have," says Eileen 
Rule, who, with Anne Brumbaugh and Colleen Settle, 
runs the neonatal nursing component. "Right now, al¬ 
though we function amazingly well, we do get in each 
other's way." 

The new building is divided into two units, with the 
nursing station and laboratory as the hub: surgical/ 
medical intensive care (SMICU) for adult horses on one 
side, and neonatal intensive care (NICU) for newborn 
foals on the other. There are six stalls in SMICU and 
five in NICU, these to be converted to adult use once 
the foaling season is completed. 

Special features include an electric monorail system 
designed to transport the horse overhead by sling to 
the recovery pool where it can emerge safely from an¬ 
esthesia while supported by a large raft. Then the ani¬ 
mal is carried to the ICU, and later back to the pool for 
therapy as required. 

There is oxygen and compressed air available in 
each stall plus special air-handling systems planned to 
control temperature according to the individual ani¬ 
mal's needs, as well as state-of-the-art machinery for 
electronic monitoring of heart rate, pulse and blood 
pressure. 

Elevators transfer feed, bedding and medical sup¬ 
plies to each unit, and a special containerized manure 
waste disposal system has been developed. 

Airlock entry to the SMICU and NICU, plus limited 
access to the building and a high pressure water clean¬ 
ing system in all areas reduce the danger of introduc¬ 
ing infectious agents into the facility. 

Finally, as in a human hospital, equine patients in 
SMICU and NICU receive round-the-clock nursing 
care with closed circuit television to every patient. 

Maryland Horse 




"We've always seen sick foals here," remarks Jon¬ 
athan Palmer, VMD, who heads up this NBC division 
along with Dr. Vaala, "but in 1984 we organized a sepa¬ 
rate unit for treating just the babies." 

"We've been inhibited over the years by working on 
critical cases in whatever makeshift corner we could fix 
up ourselves," adds Dr. Vaala. 

"Then, in the '80s, we saw a number of foals—some 
of them very valuable—with an acute liver disease. 
This crisis focused our attention on the need for an area 
devoted to the neonates." 

Principal funding for the intensive care unit came 
from the Connelly Foundation, a family of New Jersey 
horsemen who have been longstanding clients at New 
Bolton. Particular heed to the newborns was the pet 
project of Mrs. Anne French Thorington, a dedicated 
Pennsylvania horse breeder, who named the unit in 
memory of her father, Graham French. The J. Maxwell 
Moran family was also very important in financial sup¬ 
port of the new facility. 

"The need for a unit like this is evidenced by the 
success rate we've had," explains Dr. Palmer. "One of 
the most common cases we get is neonatal maladjust¬ 
ment—dummy foal syndrome—which usually results 
from some chronic lack of oxygen. The foal may forget 
how to nurse, stand in the corner and not move, forget 
the mare, make strange noises. The brain is affected 
and there are numerous neurological problems. The 


Twin foals were full term but the filly had contracted 
tendons and the colt suffered kidney failure after exhibiting 
the dummy foal syndrome, the result of a chronic lack 
of oxygen. Treated at New Bolton, both are thriving now. 


good news is that we have learned to save 80 percent of 
these cases if we get them soon enough." 

In "dummy foal" situations, the signs become ap¬ 
parent within the first 24 hours, according to Drs. Pal¬ 
mer and Vaala. Because the foal does not nurse, it does 
not get the antibodies from the mare's colostrum and is 
susceptible to bacterial infections. 

In the past, many of these foals died from secondary 
complications because adequate care could not be giv¬ 
en on the farm," continues Dr. Palmer. "Here we can 
provide oxygen, transfusions, antibiotics, intravenous 
feeding, the works." 

"It's important to understand," interjects Dr. Vaala, 
"that we're not into saving foals that won't have a hap¬ 
py outcome. However, we can save the foals that bene¬ 
fit from human intervention, foals that can be perfectly 
normal and useful with proper post-partum care." 

Other cases treated in the New Bolton NICU include 
premature and immature foals requiring oxygen, spe¬ 
cialized feeding and temperature-controlled environ¬ 
ments. The staff also deals with foals whose bones 


Penn's veterinary school 

Founded in 1884, the University of Pennsylva¬ 
nia's School of Veterinary Medicine is a private 
institution boasting world renowned clinical, di¬ 
agnostic and research facilities in all aspects of 
the treatment of animals, exotic as well as domes¬ 
tic. 

Although much of the school's curriculum is 
taught on the urban campus in Philadelphia, the 
large animal program is concentrated at New Bo¬ 
lton Center, 1,000 acres of rolling Pennsylvania 
farmland 32 miles southwest of the city in Chest¬ 
er County, near Unionville. 

The property for the rural campus was pur¬ 
chased in 1952 and now incorporates more than 
70 buildings, including the modern teaching hos¬ 
pital named for George D. Widener and the C. 
Mahlon Kline Orthopedic and Rehabilitation 
center. 

More than 300 people staff NBC: 80 veter¬ 
inarians, a rotating unit of 40 students in their 
final year of veterinary training, nurses specializ¬ 
ing in equine practice, and individuals interested 
in veterinary technology and nursing, the partic¬ 
ipants in a cooperative program between the Uni¬ 
versity of Pennsylvania and Harcum Junior Col- 
lege. 


January 1990 


73 










74 


Maryland Horse 







have not developed enough to support them because 
of a lack of sufficient calcium, and foals which are sep¬ 
ticemic from overwhelming bacterial infections. There 
are also those with musculoskeletal problems such as 
contracted tendons which necessitate intensive care. 

"One of our greatest assets is that we are able to 
draw from the vast resources of all the departments of 
the veterinary school," says Dr. Vaala. "The foal comes 
to this unit for our expertise with neonates, but then 
we may call on the anesthesiologist, the surgeon, the 
reproduction people, the radiology department—and 
our neonatal nurses who are the world experts in their 
field. We could never have a unit like this without all 
the sections of the hospital working together." 

As the facility becomes a reality, Drs. Palmer and 
Vaala and their support staff are looking ahead to an 
opportunity to prevent many of the problems that 
newborn foals and their dams may experience. 

"This is our new commitment," says Dr. Vaala em¬ 
phatically. "Can we take a mare with a history of prob¬ 
lem births and prevent those problems? Or, if we can't 
prevent them, if we pick up the difficulty within the 
first few minutes of life, maybe we can do something 
immediately and be successful. 

"Our hope is that we may save the owner money as 
well as the foal," she continues. "It costs much more to 
care for a critically ill foal that's been sick for three or 
four days, and they have a far smaller success rate." 


Potential beneficiaries of a program of this type in¬ 
clude mares with a background of dummy or prema¬ 
ture foals, those whose pregnancies show a tendency 
toward dystocia (foals getting stuck in the birth canal), 
and those who may have trouble foaling because of a 
musculoskeletal injury. 

These high-risk mares would come to New Bolton in 
the last month of their term and foal there under opti¬ 
mum supervision. 

"We're also trying to get smart enough to know 
when a C-section (Caesarean section, where the foal is 
removed surgically) is called for," says Dr. Palmer. 
"We're not pushing to do them because it is a major 
operation. We don't do a lot of them, either, but there 
are cases where the C-section is essential. 

"One of the primary problems is that heavy labor 
lasts only a half-hour with a mare. Once the foal is in 
the birth canal," he goes on, "it's only a matter of min¬ 
utes before it's born or it dies. If we're to be truly effec¬ 
tive, we must have the luxury of an elective C-section, 
with everything and everyone set up and prepared." 

Born with severe flexor tendon laxity (far left, below). 
Grade was fitted with braces (bottom right, opposite) made 
especially for her by farrier Rob Sigafoos (top opposite). 
After seven months (lower left). Grade's ankles appear to 
be normal. Foal in sling (below) was premature and has 
a lack of bone density caused by the deficiency of calcium. 



January 1990 


75 











New Bolton Center's neonatal intensive care division 
is headed by Doctors Jonathan Palmer and Wendy Vaala, 
both graduates of Penn's veterinary school. Supplying 
tender loving care are (from the left) Eileen Rule, Colleen 
Settle and Anne Brumbaugh, who run the nursing staff. 


Furthermore, Drs. Palmer and Vaala point out that 
every foal born by C-section is severely stressed. If 
proper care can be given within the initial 24 hours, the 
foal may be totally normal. 

"We're trying these belts, the type used by pregnant 
women, that detect the earliest contractions," adds Dr. 
Vaala. "In fact, most of our research is based on, and in 
conjunction with, what's been done for humans. 

"We're also collecting amniotic fluid from the womb 
and trying to learn more, trying to decide if we can 
predict some of these problems in time to cope with 
them in the best manner possible." 

Another new method under investigation is deter¬ 
mining blood flow to the fetus via the Doppler tech¬ 
nique, a non-invasive procedure which the NBC staff 
has learned from similar approaches used with hu¬ 
mans at Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

Drs. Vaala and Palmer indicate that New Bolton is 
basically a clinical, teaching facility, not one dedicated 
to research and experimentation. 

76 


"We take what comes in; we don't own a group of 
horses which we use for tests," says Dr. Palmer. "Each 
case is different. We learn from every one and each 
case builds on what went before." 

Another reality that the New Bolton staff faces is the 
limitation that must be placed on an equine practice. 

"We are always weighing the situation," observes 
Dr. Palmer. "There's a wide range of outcomes in 
equine medicine, and there's also the motivation of the 
owner to be considered. It may vary from person to 
person. Some may only want a horse that will be able to 
race; others care only that the animal be pasture sound 
and comfortable." 

"We don't encourage going as far as human medi¬ 
cine," says Dr. Vaala. "There is an economic factor 
here. Although it is sometimes disappointing to us 
when monetary conditions warrant euthanasia and we 
feel that we might be able to save the animal and have a 
happy outcome over the long term." □ 

Maryland Horse 















WHAT MARYLAND STALLION offers a direct 
link to MR. PROSPECTOR, RAISE A NATIVE, 
NATIVE DANCER, NASHUA, SIR GAYLORD, 
NORTHERN DANCER . . . and champions 
FANFRELUCHE, L’ENJOLEUR, LA VOYAGEUSE, 
MEDAILLE D OR, along with D’ACCORD, 
BARACHOIS, COCO LA TERREUR? 


WHAT MARYLAND STALLION has two new 

stakes horses under his first dam in 1989? 



WHAT MARYLAND STALLION has 11 

championships under his second dam? 



ACALLADE 

Mr. Prospector—Grand Luxe 

$1,000 Live Foal 

Nominated to Breeders’ Cup, Maryland Million 


LONGWOOD FARM 

Route 97, Glenwood, Maryland 21738 

C. Oliver Goldsmith (301) 442-2121 or Robert H. Goldsmith, Farm Manager 







Former exercise girl 
faces life after tragedy 

By Lucy Acton 


September 29, 1986: No one who was on the back- 
stretch at Laurel has forgotten what happened to Cecil 
Daugherty that morning. 

"It's the kind of thing that comes back to haunt you 
in the middle of the night," says an exercise rider who 
prefers not to be named. "You can't help seeing your¬ 
self in that person's place. You imagine what it would 
be like, and you can't—really." 

One of the worst training accidents that has ever 
taken place in Maryland happened on a clear day, over 
dry race track, on a sound horse, for no obvious rea¬ 
son. 

Cecil (short for Cecilia), then 32, a "frustrated jock¬ 
ey," had earned her living on the race track for a dozen 
years. Fun-loving and free-spirited, with beautiful, 
long hair that grew a vibrant shade of red, she was 
known as one of the best exercise girls around. 

But luck wasn't with her that morning. One who 
remembers Cecil's accident all too well is trainer Katy 
Voss: "It was amazing how suddenly the horse went 
down," says Voss. 

Cecil, an employee of trainer John Hicks, was on a 
2-year-old filly named Masked Hillo, who was work¬ 
ing three-quarters of a mile. Past the half-mile pole, 
one of the filly's legs came out from under her "Wham! 
Like you're coming down the stairs and you miss the 
bottom step," in Voss's words. "Everybody just stood 
around in shock afterwards. The horse got up fine. But 
we all knew Cecil was very severely injured." 


What became of Cecil? Her life, like life on the back- 
stretch, goes on. Only in a totally different way. Her 
saddest regret is that she'll never go back. 

"I don't have it in my blood to hate those animals," 
says Cecil, sitting in her motorized wheelchair next to 
a bulletin board filled with pictures of herself on horse¬ 
back. 


Other people have tried to explain what made the 
filly fall—her front legs got crossed while she was 


changing leads; her knee got caught in the yoke. Cecil 
has her own theory: "The devil made it happen. My 
brain was gone for a year, a whole year,” her voice rises 
incredulously. "And God brought me back." 

For most of the last two years, Cecil has lived in a 
small, private rehabilitation center named Transitions, 
in York, Pa. She is not paralyzed, but her arms and legs 
have limited movement, especially on the right side. 
Her eyes focus poorly. She has trouble remembering 
things. 

This is a miraculous improvement from the months 
just after the accident, when she lay in a coma. Cecil 
didn't break any bones in the fall, and her helmet 
stayed on her head, totally intact. The damage was 
done inside her skull, when her brain was jostled from 
the impact. 

"Cecil always was out to be a winner," says her 
mother Ethel Daugherty. "If anybody could fight it, 
she could." Mrs. Daugherty, a stolid woman in her 
mid-60s, recalls being out in the yard of her home in 
Dividing Creek, N.J., at 8:30 in the morning, and hear¬ 
ing the phone ring. "It was Cecil's boss, John. He was 
very calm. He told me if I'd come down to her apart¬ 
ment he'd have somebody meet me there. 

"The trip took three hours; I had to concentrate on 
the driving. John Fortinski, a jockey agent, was at Ce¬ 
cil's apartment when I got there, and he drove me to 
the hospital. Cecil was really a terrible sight." 

Although Cecil could not appreciate it at the time, 
her mother is deeply grateful for the support she got 
from race track people, especially John Hicks. "John 
came to see her every day for three months," says Mrs. 
Daugherty. "It got to the point where I felt bad about 
the time he was taking away from his own family. He 
just felt so bad about Cecil—although we certainly 
don't blame him. 

"The waiting room was filled with race track people 
every day And none of them were allowed in to see 
Cecil. They were there to support the family." 


78 


Maryland Horse 





Former exercise girl 
faces life after tragedy 

By Lucy Acton 


September 29, 1986: No one who was on the back- 
stretch at Laurel has forgotten what happened to Cecil 
Daugherty that morning. 

"It's the kind of thing that comes back to haunt you 
in the middle of the night/' says an exercise rider who 
prefers not to be named. "You can't help seeing your¬ 
self in that person's place. You imagine what it would 
be like, and you can't—really." 

One of the worst training accidents that has ever 
taken place in Maryland happened on a clear day, over 
dry race track, on a sound horse, for no obvious rea¬ 
son. 

Cecil (short for Cecilia), then 32, a "frustrated jock¬ 
ey," had earned her living on the race track for a dozen 
years. Fun-loving and free-spirited, with beautiful, 
long hair that grew a vibrant shade of red, she was 
known as one of the best exercise girls around. 

But luck wasn't with her that morning. One who 
remembers Cecil's accident all too well is trainer Katy 
Voss: "It was amazing how suddenly the horse went 
down," says Voss. 

Cecil, an employee of trainer John Hicks, was on a 
2-year-old filly named Masked Hillo, who was work¬ 
ing three-quarters of a mile. Past the half-mile pole, 
one of the filly's legs came out from under her "Wham! 
Like you're coming down the stairs and you miss the 
bottom step," in Voss's words. "Everybody just stood 
around in shock afterwards. The horse got up fine. But 
we all knew Cecil was very severely injured." 


What became of Cecil? Her life, like life on the back- 
stretch, goes on. Only in a totally different way. Her 
saddest regret is that she'll never go back. 

"I don't have it in my blood to hate those animals," 
says Cecil, sitting in her motorized wheelchair next to 
a bulletin board filled with pictures of herself on horse¬ 
back. 


Other people have tried to explain what made the 
filly fall—her front legs got crossed while she was 


changing leads; her knee got caught in the yoke. Cecil 
has her own theory: "The devil made it happen. My 
brain was gone for a year, a whole year/' her voice rises 
incredulously. "And God brought me back." 

For most of the last two years, Cecil has lived in a 
small, private rehabilitation center named Transitions, 
in York, Pa. She is not paralyzed, but her arms and legs 
have limited movement, especially on the right side. 
Her eyes focus poorly. She has trouble remembering 
things. 

This is a miraculous improvement from the months 
just after the accident, when she lay in a coma. Cecil 
didn't break any bones in the fall, and her helmet 
stayed on her head, totally intact. The damage was 
done inside her skull, when her brain was jostled from 
the impact. 

"Cecil always was out to be a winner," says her 
mother Ethel Daugherty. "If anybody could fight it, 
she could." Mrs. Daugherty, a stolid woman in her 
mid-60s, recalls being out in the yard of her home in 
Dividing Creek, N.J., at 8:30 in the morning, and hear¬ 
ing the phone ring. "It was Cecil's boss, John. He was 
very calm. He told me if I'd come down to her apart¬ 
ment he'd have somebody meet me there. 

"The trip took three hours; I had to concentrate on 
the driving. John Fortinski, a jockey agent, was at Ce¬ 
cil's apartment when I got there, and he drove me to 
the hospital. Cecil was really a terrible sight." 

Although Cecil could not appreciate it at the time, 
her mother is deeply grateful for the support she got 
from race track people, especially John Hicks. "John 
came to see her every day for three months," says Mrs. 
Daugherty. "It got to the point where I felt bad about 
the time he was taking away from his own family. He 
just felt so bad about Cecil—although we certainly 
don't blame him. 

"The waiting room was filled with race track people 
every day. And none of them were allowed in to see 
Cecil. They were there to support the family." 


78 


Maryland Horse 


Adds Mrs. Daugherty: "I never liked being around 
horses too much myself, but there's nothing in the 
world that's more beautiful." 

When she was a teenager Cecil won an Arabian 
mare in a 4-H contest. "You had to write an essay on 
why you wanted to win one. And my essay won," she 
says. Her grandfather built a small stable for Cecil's 
mare, and the following spring Cecil helped deliver 
her first foal. "I sat on the floor crying when that foal 
was born," Cecil recalls. "I'd never seen anything like 
it." 

The foal grew up to be her riding horse, and Cecil 
still technically owns it, although it's kept at someone 
else's farm. 

Cecil also took formal lessons at Fox Hollow riding 
school, near Philadelphia. She got her first race track 
job with the late Donald Bradley at Bowie in 1974, and 
over the years she worked for a number of other train¬ 
ers, including Charlie Sniffen and Toughy Hacker. "I 
adored it all to death," says Cecil, repeating one of her 
favorite expressions. 


Today she spends much of her free time writing 
letters—painstakingly typed with her left hand. She 
writes to old friends from the race track, and to people 
she has never met: Bill Shoemaker, Elton John, Walter 
Farley (before the author's death). Sometimes she gets 
replies. Claiborne Farm sent treasures: a piece of Da¬ 
mascus's mane, and one of his shoes. 

Her boyfriend ("We lived together for seven years 
and were engaged for two," says Cecil) gave his sup¬ 
port for a long time. Cecil and her mother were neither 
surprised, nor bitter, when he announced about a year 
ago that he had found someone else. He still calls Cecil 
occasionally to see how she's doing. 

A friend, Barbara Foose, takes her on regular out¬ 
ings—once or twice to Penn National race track. 

She has had a volunteer job for a few hours a week in 
the public library. 

"I'm here and that's all I can say," says Cecil. "It's 
been rough. I can't say it hasn't." □ 


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80 


Maryland Horse 

































Or just getting out of the gate? 


For the past eighteen years, owners, breeders, consignors, buyers, trainers, and bloodstock agents, alike have 
relied on Bloodstock Research to give them the winning edge. Ask any of our users. They'll tell you it's made the 
competitive difference between those who make it to the finish line - and those who bring up the rear. 


A phone call to any one of our divisions is a way to ensure that you'll finish several lengths ahead of the 
competition. 


Bloodstock Research Information Services, Inc. 

On-line Computer Database For The Thoroughbred Industry 
Contact: Michael Henderson or Wendy Slusher 


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Bloodstock Services & Matings 
Contact: John Mayer 

The Handicapper's Data Base 

On-line Computer Database Devoted To Handicapping 
North American Runners 
Contact: Happy Broadbent 

Call: 

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Contact: Sonya Cox 



P.O. Box 4097 
Lexington, KY 40544 
















Corbett Farm adds 
four new stallions 


Corbett Farm in Monkton will be one of the busiest 
breeding farms in Maryland this spring, thanks to the 
efforts of new owner Lehr Jackson. 

Four stallions have been added to Corbett's roster 
for 1990—bringing the total to seven. The most recent 
acquisition is Clever Secret, a multiple graded stakes 
winner of $406,355, who enters stud this year. By Sec¬ 
retariat—Small Loaf by Pia Star, Clever Secret was pur¬ 
chased by Jackson from the recent Eugene V. Klein 
dispersal at Keeneland, and is in the process of being 
syndicated. His stud fee is $2,500 live foal. 

Also new to Corbett in 1990 are Believe the Queen, 
who previously stood at Sagamore Farm; and recently 
retired runners Harriman and Jane's Dilemma. 

Believe the Queen (Believe It—Raise a Queen by 
Raise a Native) has had two crops come to the races, 
and is the sire of stakes-placed Spicy Monarch and 
Burning Oak. Maryland's champion handicap horse in 
1984, Believe the Queen won the Monmouth Hand- 
icap-Gl, Tom Fool Stakes-G2 and True North Hand¬ 

Corbett owner Lehr Jackson holds Believe the Queen, 
who was transferred to the farm late last fall. Entering 
stud at Corbett this year are the good stakes winners 
Clever Secret (lower right), Harriman (top opposite) and 
Jane's Dilemma, being led to pasture by Jeff Canoles. 



icap-G3 and placed in two other graded races, amass¬ 
ing $452,335. From the family of champion Needles, he 
combines the influential sire lines of In Reality (on the 
top) and Raise a Native (on the bottom). 

Harriman, by Lord Gaylord—Averell by Restless 
Native, is a three-quarter brother to 1980 2-year-old 
champion Lord Avie. Winner of six stakes (including 
the Cherry Hill Mile, Goss L. Stryker Stakes and Duck 
Dance Handicap) throughout a career that spanned 
four seasons, Harriman earned $366,835 for his owner/ 
breeder Bayard Sharp. The 6-year-old son of leading 
Maryland sire Lord Gaylord will stand for $1,500 live 
foal. 

Jane's Dilemma (Master Derby—Zippy Do by Hilar¬ 
ious) retired last season at the age of 8. Excelling at long 
distances, he captured the Gallant Fox Handicap-G2 
(at a mile and five-eighths) and the Display Handicap- 
G3 (at two and one-quarter miles) in New York, and the 
local Walter Haight Handicap, earning $546,756. He is 
a half-brother to Some Romance ($545,355, Frizette 
S-Gl, Matron S-Gl, etc.) and Mint Cooler ($122,104, 
Primrose S, 2nd Coaching Club American Oaks-Gl). 
Jane's Dilemma's stud fee is $1,000 live foal. 

Also standing at Corbett are Whatever For ($1,500 
live foal). Exclusive One ($1,000 live foal) and Isella 
($500 live foal). 



82 


Maryland Horse 















"We're delighted by the interest our stallions have 
received so far," reports Jackson, who expects about 
200 mares to be bred at Corbett this spring. 

A new stallion manager, Kieran McDermott, a na¬ 
tive Irishman who got his early experience at the Irish 
National Stud, has been hired to assist Corbett's long¬ 
time manager Bill Albright. McDermott's wife, Car¬ 
oline, also an accomplished horseperson, will help out 
with the foalings. 

Jackson's own wife Julie has resigned from an execu¬ 
tive post with the National Endowment for the Arts in 
Washington, D.C., and is Corbett's new administrative 
farm manager. □ 




Neena Ewing (4) 



Farm Credit has 
Horse Sense 


Thoroughbred, standardbred, 
saddlebred, 5th wheel trailers, 
yearling sales, standing at stud . . . 
it’s the language of horse breeding, 
and we’ve got to speak it to succeed 
in this area. 


We make all kinds of short and 
long-term loans to horse owners for 
breeding stock, operating expenses, 
whatever you need for your horse 
breeding operation. 

Call or come by today. 

Central Maryland Farm Credit 


Frederick 

925 East St. 
Frederick, 21701 
301/663-4192 


Bel Air 

730 Belair Rd. 
Bel Air, 21014 
301/879-2550 


Hereford 
16938 York Rd. 
Monkton, 21111 
301/329-2179 


FftBMCREDTPfc 

Nobody knows the field better. 


January 1990 


83 











Maryland Fund Report 


o 


Statistics for Pimlico's 
Maryland Fund Program 

September 7 through October 10, 1989 



Total 

Handle 


$35,063,227 


Maryland Fund 
Share of Handle 

$384,256.62 


Distribution other than purses: 

Yearling show. 

Breeder awards. 

Stallion awards. 

Owner awards. 

Maryland Million purses. 

Service charge to MHBA. 

Total. 


Simulcast Interest Surplus from 

Breakage Fees Earned Previous Meeting Distributed 

$7,132.20 $4,373.39 $9,173.25 $335,491.89 $264,011.04 

Fund Expenditures: 

Purses in Maryland Fund races: 

. $ 5,000.00 

. 119,819.27 

. 42,396.30 

. 66,087.16 


11,148.88 Available for purses. $132,176.80 

19,559.43 Surplus from previous meeting. 335,491.89 

$264,011.04 Surplus to be carried over for purses. $467,668.69 


Breeder Bonuses 

Harold A. Allen—GALEN'S RULER: 

Oct. 7, 11th race, $419.19. 

Ayres Fountain Spring Farm—KATH¬ 
LEEN THE QUEEN: Oct. 8,10th race, 
$1,219.86. 

Bernard R. Babbitt—ELLI ETTE: Sept. 
19, 10th race, $346; Sept. 29, 3rd race, 
$346.($692) 

Jorgene Z. Barton—REASON TO 
ROLLICK: Sept. 17, 5th race, $379.26. 
Bassford, Leatherbury and Wayson— 
BAGED: Sept. 23, 12th race, $565.57. 
Harold Bausum—BARA BEAR: Sept. 

21, 5th race, $379.26. 

Mrs. Robert L. Beall—FRIENDLY IN¬ 
TENT: Sept. 19, 8th race, $1,463.83. 
Benray Farm—JAN R.'S BABY: Sept. 

17, 6th race, $931.53. 

Black Gates Nursery Trust—SHOW 
SUM RESPECT: Sept. 28, 2nd race, 
$731.91. 

J. Wayne Braglio —CRISSY'S AMBI¬ 
TION: Sept. 30, 5th race, $379.26. 
Herman M. Braude—TWO STEP 
DANCER: Sept. 30, 10th race, 
$665.38. 


Daniel B. Brewster—ROLLICKING 
SEA: Sept. 9, 5th race, $665.38. ROLL¬ 
ING CART: Sept. 9, 4th race, 
$1,530.36. ($2,195.74) 

Brookwood Farms—BOLD AND 
LUCK: Sept. 23, 10th race, $1,164.41. 
William R. Buehler—LOLLYPOP LIL: 

Sept. 21, 9th race, $2,528.43. 

Phillip L. Capuano—SILANO: Oct. 9, 
9th race, $652.62. 

Joseph W. Carter—NATAHALA: Sept. 

9, 3rd race, $379.26. 

Hal C.B. Clagett—AMBITIOUS JOHN: 
Sept. 21,2nd race, $1,330.75. BULLET 
ASSAULT: Oct. 1, 6th race, $1,330.75. 
LITTLE BOLD JOHN: Sept. 30, 10th 
race, $6,653.76. RUN LYLLOS RUN: 
Sept. 8, 10th race, $665.38. ($9,980.64) 
Mrs. Henry S. Clark—BOZA: Sept. 8, 
1st race, $532.30; Sept. 29, 10th race, 
$532.30; Oct. 10, 10th race, $632.11. 
KAY'S MILL: Sept. 16, 7th race, 
$1,197.68. MONROVIA: Sept. 21, 8th 
race, $1,463.83; Oct. 1, 4th race, 
$1,330.75. ($5,688.97) 

Mrs. Ben Cohen—FOLLIES JUMPER: 
Sept. 24, 4th race, $1,164.41. VER¬ 


SATILE KEYS: Sept. 26, 10th race, 
$379.26; Oct. 6, 10th race, $632.11. 
($2,175.78) 

Albert H. and Randy L. Cohen—MIS¬ 
TY CLOVER: Sept. 7, 2nd race, 
$632.11. 

Julie Bassford Collison—SECOND 
LIEUTENANT: Sept. 16, 8th race, 
$1,197.68. 

A.H. Cunningham—CLEVER MARY: 
Oct. 7, 1st race, $931.53. MARY HAD 
A LOT: Oct. 8, 11th race, $346. 
($1,277.53) 

Dark Hollow Farm—FLEETWOOD 
DOUBLE: Oct. 3, 4th race, $1,064.60. 
Donelson Christmas Stables—BACA 
D'OR: Sept. 12, 9th race, $1,463.83. 
Annette Eubanks—DANCING GOLD: 

Oct. 6, 8th race, $1,330.75. 

Falls Ridge Stable—MY FRENCH¬ 
MAN: Oct. 6, 9th race, $2,195.74. 
Frank F. Favazza Jr.—GRATI TUDE: 

Oct. 9, 5th race, $379.26. 

Anderson Fowler—MASTER SPEAK¬ 
ER: Sept. 30, 10th race, $2,217.92. 
Peter Fuller—TIME BEING: Sept. 17, 
11th race, $445.80. 


84 


Maryland Horse 
































[ Maryland Fund Report 


o 


Statistics for Pimlico's 
Maryland Fund Program 

September 7 through October 10, 1989 



Total 

Handle 


$35,063,227 


Maryland Fund 
Share of Handle 

$384,256.62 


Distribution other than purses: 

Yearling show. 

Breeder awards. 

Stallion awards. 

Owner awards. 

Maryland Million purses. 

Service charge to MHBA. 

Total. 


Simulcast Interest Surplus from 

Breakage Fees Earned Previous Meeting Distributed 

$7,132.20 $4,373.39 $9,173.25 $335,491.89 $264,011.04 

Fund Expenditures: 

Purses in Maryland Fund races: 

. $ 5,000.00 

. 119,819.27 

. 42,396.30 

. 66,087.16 


11,148.88 Available for purses. $132,176.80 

19,559.43 Surplus from previous meeting. 335,491.89 

$264,011.04 Surplus to be carried over for purses. $467,668.69 


Breeder Bonuses 

Harold A. Allen—GALEN'S RULER: 

Oct. 7, 11th race, $419.19. 

Ayres Fountain Spring Farm—KATH¬ 
LEEN THE QUEEN: Oct. 8,10th race, 
$1,219.86. 

Bernard R. Babbitt—ELLI ETTE: Sept. 
19, 10th race, $346; Sept. 29, 3rd race, 
$346. ($692) 

Jorgene Z. Barton—REASON TO 
ROLLICK: Sept. 17, 5th race, $379.26. 
Bassford, Leatherbury and Wayson— 
BAGED: Sept. 23, 12th race, $565.57. 
Harold Bausum—BARA BEAR: Sept. 

21, 5th race, $379.26. 

Mrs. Robert L. Beall—FRIENDLY IN¬ 
TENT: Sept. 19, 8th race, $1,463.83. 
Benray Farm—JAN R.'S BABY: Sept. 

17, 6th race, $931.53. 

Black Gates Nursery Trust—SHOW 
SUM RESPECT: Sept. 28, 2nd race, 
$731.91. 

J. Wayne Braglio —CRJSSY'S AMBI¬ 
TION: Sept. 30, 5th race, $379.26. 
Herman M. Braude—TWO STEP 
DANCER: Sept. 30, 10th race, 
$665.38. 


84 


Daniel B. Brewster—ROLLICKING 
SEA: Sept. 9, 5th race, $665.38. ROLL¬ 
ING CART: Sept. 9, 4th race, 
$1,530.36. ($2,195.74) 

Brookwood Farms—BOLD AND 
LUCK: Sept. 23, 10th race, $1,164.41. 
William R. Buehler—LOLLYPOP LIL: 

Sept. 21, 9th race, $2,528.43. 

Phillip L. Capuano—SILANO: Oct. 9, 
9th race, $652.62. 

Joseph W. Carter—NATAHALA: Sept. 

9, 3rd race, $379.26. 

Hal C.B. Clagett— AMBITIOUS JOHN: 
Sept. 21, 2nd race, $1,330.75. BULLET 
ASSAULT: Oct. 1, 6th race, $1,330.75. 
LITTLE BOLD JOHN: Sept. 30, 10th 
race, $6,653.76. RUN LYLLOS RUN: 
Sept. 8,10th race, $665.38. ($9,980.64) 
Mrs. Henry S. Clark—BOZA: Sept. 8, 
1st race, $532.30; Sept. 29, 10th race, 
$532.30; Oct. 10, 10th race, $632.11. 
KAY'S MILL: Sept. 16, 7th race, 
$1,197.68. MONROVIA: Sept. 21, 8th 
race, $1,463.83; Oct. 1, 4th race, 
$1,330.75. ($5,688.97) 

Mrs. Ben Cohen—FOLLIES JUMPER: 
Sept. 24, 4th race, $1,164.41. VER¬ 


SATILE KEYS: Sept. 26, 10th race, 
$379.26; Oct. 6, 10th race, $632.11. 
($2,175.78) 

Albert H. and Randy L. Cohen—MIS¬ 
TY CLOVER: Sept. 7, 2nd race, 
$632.11. 

Julie Bassford Collison—SECOND 
LIEUTENANT: Sept. 16, 8th race, 
$1,197.68. 

A.H. Cunningham—CLEVER MARY: 
Oct. 7, 1st race, $931.53. MARY HAD 
A LOT: Oct. 8, 11th race, $346. 
($1,277.53) 

Dark Hollow Farm—FLEETWOOD 
DOUBLE: Oct. 3, 4th race, $1,064.60. 
Donelson Christmas Stables—BACA 
D'OR: Sept. 12, 9th race, $1,463.83. 
Annette Eubanks—DANCING GOLD: 

Oct. 6, 8th race, $1,330.75. 

Falls Ridge Stable—MY FRENCH¬ 
MAN: Oct. 6, 9th race, $2,195.74. 
Frank F. Favazza Jr.—GRATI TUDE: 

Oct. 9, 5th race, $379.26. 

Anderson Fowler—MASTER SPEAK¬ 
ER: Sept. 30, 10th race, $2,217.92. 
Peter Fuller—TIME BEING: Sept. 17, 
11th race, $445.80. 


Maryland Horse 













Maryland Fund Report 


Glade Valley Farms, Inc.—BOLD ES¬ 
TATE: Sept. 28, 10th race, $864.99; 
Oct. 6, 6th race, $864.99. RIGHT 
AGAIN: Sept. 28, 7th race, $565.57. 
($2,295.55) 

David P. Reynolds and Glenn Stable— 
MINT FRAPPE: Oct. 2, 2nd race, 
$931.53. NORTH LORD: Sept. 15, 1st 
race, $565.57. ($1,497.10) 

C. Oliver Goldsmith—CUT ICE: Sept. 
30, 8th race, $2,262.28. WHATAWAR: 
Sept. 28, 8th race, $1,197.68. 
($3,459.96) 

Green Willow Farms and Bradley Cor¬ 
nell—MASKED MIA: Sept. 17, 8th 
race, $1,863.05. 

Charles H. Hadry—GILDED CON¬ 
NECTION: Sept. 8, 7th race, 
$1,197.68; Sept. 28, 6th race, 
$1,330.75. ($2,528.43) 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Joseph Hamilton— 
VALAY MAID: Sept. 19, 4th race, 
$998.06. 

William R. Harris—PO PETE: Sept. 8, 
6th race, $731.91. 

Harwood Enterprises—ANGEL'S SAY: 

Sept. 9, 1st race, $798.45. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Hayden—SAFELY 
KEPT: Oct. 8, 10th race, $6,653.76. 
Marshele E. Bassford Heffron—BRIL¬ 
LIANT BRASS: Sept. 24, 5th race, 
$864.99. 

Jerold C. Hoffberger—DUE IT 
SMOOTHLY: Oct. 3, 1st race, 
$465.76. 

H-O-G Stables—JUDGE HOWELL: 

Oct. 3, 9th race, $1,164.41. 

Geoffrey A. Huguely—MRS. WALES: 

Sept. 7, 1st race, $465.76. 

Marian Jones—SAVAGE STAR: Sept. 
15, 2nd race, $665.38; Oct. 1, 7th race, 
$798.45. ($1,463.83) 

Jamie M. Rauck Kimmell—MIKE 
HAWTHORN: Sept. 19, 9th race, 
$1,330.75. 

Alan S. Kline and Floyd R. Oliver— 
DAD'S ACT OF LOVE: Oct. 10, 1st 
race, $379.26. 

Mrs. Elizabeth C. Koepsell—MASKED 
H1LLO: Oct. 9, 1st race, $565.57. 

Dr. Herman J. Kossow—LUCKY LADY 
LAUREN: Oct. 9, 2nd race, $998.06. 
ONLY KEREN: Sept. 9, 9th race, 
$332.69; Oct. 1, 10th race, $499.03. 
($1,829.78) 

K. T. Leatherbury Assoc., Inc.—TOLL: 

Oct. 3, 7th race, $864.99. 

William L.S. Landes III—PAR HALO: 

Oct. 2, 8th race, $1,164.41. 

David C. Lentz Jr.—CHRIS FARRELL: 
Oct. 8, 2nd race, $632.11. 


86 


Robert A. and Nancy Leonard—CAR¬ 
LA'S EXPRESS: Sept. 23, 5th race, 
$379.26. 

Dr. Fred T. Lewis—DR. FRED T.: Oct. 
7, 5th race, $379.26. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Noel Magee—DARN 
DEM SOCKS: Oct. 1, 3rd race, 
$379.26. 

D.V. Maiorca and C. Robert Brewer— 
RACKETEER GIRL: Sept. 29, 5th race, 
$465.76. 

Robert T. Manfuso—CITY HALL: Sept. 

28, 5th race, $379.26. 

J.A. Manfuso—A MAGIC EMPEROR: 
Sept. 26, 7th race, $1,197.68. A TOP 
BRANDY: Sept. 15, 7th race, $864.99. 
($2,062.67) 

John P. McDaniel—PRINCESS LIGHT: 

Sept. 28, 3rd race, $445.80. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. McGinnes— 
STILL OF THE NIGHT: Sept. 21, 4th 
race, $864.99. 

Meeting House Farm—QUIET 

PRINCE: Oct. 10, 7th race, $1,097.87. 
Robert E. Meyerhoff—EARLY DECI¬ 
SION: Sept. 23, 6th race, $1,397.29. 
PRIDE: Sept. 24, 1st race, $964.80. 
RACING THOUGHTS: Sept. 30, 11th 
race, $445.80. ($2,807.89) 

Gretchen B. Mobberley—JET 
STREAM: Sept. 8, 8th race, $1,330.75; 
Sept. 26, 8th race, $1,596.90. 
($2,927.65) 

Dr. Frederick E. Musser—INTENDED 
RULLAH: Oct. 6, 2nd race, $1,197.68. 
Pentimento Farm—NORTH ENVOY: 
Sept. 12, 10th race, $931.53; Oct. 1, 
9th race, $1,197.68. ($2,129.21) 

John Polek—COOL JUSTIN: Sept. 26, 
4th race, $998.06. MR. J. W. P: Oct. 9, 
4th race, $665.38. ($1,663.44) 

Kevin M. Potts—NOTHING UP¬ 
STAIRS: Oct. 10, 6th race, $864.99. 
Quail Ridge Stable—HASTYLEA RE¬ 
GINA: Sept. 17, 2nd race, $931.53. 
David P. Reynolds—BRICK RIDER: 

Sept. 7, 7th race, $1,197.68. 

Deane G. Riddle—INSTRUMENT 
FLIGHT: Sept. 16, 1st race, $698.64; 
Oct. 1, 11th race, $798.45. ($1,497.09) 
John J. Robb—ALDEN'S WARRIOR: 

Sept. 7, 3rd race, $698.64. 

R. Richards Rolapp—FLAMING EM¬ 
PEROR: Sept. 23, 11th race, $665.38. 
Ross Valley Farm—ETAGE D'OR: Oct. 

5, 2nd race, $964.80. 

Ryehill Farm—HILLIAN: Sept. 21, 1st 
race, $1,164.41; Sept. 29, 4th race, 
$1,463.83. ($2,628.24) 

Ingrid C. Saunders—SON OF A NO¬ 
BLE: Sept. 7, 10th race, $419.19. 

Dr. and Mrs. Roger I. Scullin—SPRING 
DEBUT: Sept. 30, 1st race, $465.76. 


Robert S. Siegel, L. Millman, et al— 
CLEVER ANSWER: Oct. 6, 5th race, 
$465.76. 

Douglas R. Small—R. B. STRUT: Sept. 

17, 3rd race, $565.57. 

Solstice—SUPER CHOLO: Oct. 1, 8th 
race, $914.89. 

James and Brenda Stewart—TURN TO 
DANCIN: Sept. 26, 9th race, 
$2,129.20; Oct. 9, 9th race, $355.98. 
($2,485.18) 

Stoneworth Farm—JUSTA SHELTER: 

Sept. 15, 3rd race, $698.64. 

Robert and E. Hill Summers and Ham¬ 
ilton A. Smith—DIAGONAL QUAR¬ 
TERS: Oct. 2, 5th race, $346. 

Temar Stables—GRETCHEN'S LOU: 

Sept. 15, 8th race, $1,197.68. 
Thornmar Farm—MICKEY'S MONEY: 

Sept. 21, 6th race, $864.99. 

P.J. Torsney Jr.—AT THE BRIDGE: 
Sept. 16, 4th race, $798.45; Sept. 29, 
7th race, $931.53. ($1,729.98) 

William F. Walker and William R. Al¬ 
bright—WILLIE'S GIRL: Sept. 17, 4th 
race, $1,197.68. 

Janet L. Wayson—RACING SPLEN¬ 
DOR: Sept. 9, 6th race, $1,197.68. 
Vincent P. Weber—DANCING SPACE: 

Oct. 7, 3rd race, $698.64. 

Dan D. Westland—DOUBLE BUNC- 
TIOUS: Oct. 7, 10th race, $1,663.44. 
Windfields Farm Limited—GLENCOE 
SWAN: Sept. 8, 9th race, $1,463.83. 

Owner Bonuses 

Elaine L. Bassford—BRILLIANT 
BRASS: Sept. 24, 5th race, $943.07. 
SECOND LIEUTENANT: Sept. 16, 
8th race, $1,305.78. ($2,248.85) 

BBB Stable—NORTH ENVOY: Oct. 1, 
9th race, $1,305.78. 

Daniel B. Brewster—ROLLING CART: 

Sept. 9, 4th race, $1,668.50. 
Brightwood Stables—STILL OF THE 
NIGHT: Sept. 21, 4th race, $943.07. 
William R. Buehler—LOLLYPOP LIL: 

Sept. 21, 9th race, $2,756.66. 
Constance A. Capuano—GRETCH¬ 
EN'S LOU: Sept. 15, 8th race, 
$1,305.78. 

Hal C.B. Clagett—AMBITIOUS JOHN: 
Sept. 21, 2nd race, $1,450.87. BULLET 
ASSAULT: Oct. 1, 6th race, $1,450.87. 
($2,901.74) 

Mrs. Henry S. Clark—KAY'S MILL: 

Sept. 16, 7th race, $1,305.78. 

Cross Creek Farm—INTENDED 
RULLAH: Oct. 6, 2nd race, $1,305.78. 
Dark Hollow Farm—FLEETWOOD 
DOUBLE: Oct. 3, 4th race, $1,160.70. 
Do-Right Stable—EARLY DECISION: 
Sept. 23, 6th race, $1,523.42. 


Maryland Horse 









Royal Hierarchy 

Stakes winner of $325,138, graded stakes-placed 


1990 Fee—$1,000 
Payable Sept. 1 
of year bred 

Nominated to Breeders’ Cup 
and Maryland Million 
Property of a partnership 


1977, NATIVE ROYALTY- 
HIGH HAIL, BY HAIL TO ALL 


^ ROYAL HIERARCHY represents the influential RAISE A NATIVE line through his sire 
Native Royalty. 

^ ROYAL HIERARCHY is a half-brother to DISTAFF LEADER ($105,958) and Savage 
Call, dam of LADY JOVE ($104,588), granddam of CAROS LOVE ($199,486). 

^ ROYAL HIERARCHY won or placed in 11 stakes, including the Carter H-G2, Roamer 
H-G2, Discovery H-G3, Governor’s Cup H, etc. 

^ ROYAL HIERARCHY is the sire of 11 winners, including King Trumpeter, allowance 
winner of $42,022, and Wingate Arch, New York allowance winner of $33,376. 


MEADOW RUN FARM 1800 Cape Horn Road, Hampstead, Md. 21074 

Arthur J. Ward (301) 239-3641 



















Maryland Fund Report 


S. Greenhoot Fischer—GLENCOE 
SWAN: Sept. 8, 9th race, $1,595.96. 
Eugene F. Ford Sr.—FRIENDLY IN¬ 
TENT: Sept. 19, 8th race, $1,595.96. 
Glenn Stable—MINT FRAPPE: Oct. 2, 
2nd race, $1,015.61. 

C. Oliver Goldsmith—CUT ICE: Sept. 
30, 8th race, $2,466.48. WHATAWAR: 
Sept. 28, 8th race, $1,305.78. 
($3,772.26) 

Charles H. Hadry—GILDED CON¬ 
NECTION: Sept. 8, 7th race, 
$1,305.78; Sept. 28, 6th race, 
$1,450.87. ($2,756.65) 

Arnold A. Heft—HILLIAN: Sept. 21, 
1st race, $1,269.51; Sept. 29, 4th race, 
$1,595.96. ($2,865.47) 

Sylvia E. Heft—PAR HALO: Oct. 2, 8th 
race, $1,269.51. 

H-O-G Stables—JUDGE HOWELL: 

Oct. 3, 9th race, $1,269.51. 

Dr. Herman J. Kossow—LUCKY LADY 
LAUREN: Oct. 9, 2nd race, $1,088.15. 
J.A. Manfuso—A MAGIC EMPEROR: 
Sept. 26, 7th race, $1,305.78. A TOP 
BRANDY: Sept. 15, 7th race, $943.07. 
($2,248.85) 

F. Lawrence McGinnis—FOLLIES 
JUMPER: Sept. 24, 4th race, 
$1,269.51. 

Meeting House Farm—QUIET 

PRINCE: Oct. 10, 7th race, $1,196.97. 
Gretchen B. Mobberley—JET 
STREAM: Sept. 8, 8th race, $1,450.87; 
Sept. 26, 8th race, $1,741.05. 
($3,191.92) 

Terence A. Mowers—BOLD AND 
LUCK: Sept. 23, 10th race, $1,269.51. 
Quail Ridge Stable—HASTYLEA RE¬ 
GINA: Sept. 17, 2nd race, $1,015.61. 
Quality Hill Stable—TURN TO 
DANCIN: Sept. 26, 9th race, 
$2,321.40. 

David P. Reynolds—BRICK RIDER: 

Sept. 7, 7th race, $1,305.78. 

Ronald W. Rogers—MASKED MIA: 

Sept. 17, 8th race, $2,031.22. 

Corinne C. Sullivan—BACA D'OR: 

Sept. 12, 9th race, $1,595.96. 

The Jim Stable—TOLL: Oct. 3, 7th race, 
$943.07. 

The Jon and Bill Stable—MONROVIA: 
Sept. 21, 8th race, $1,595.96; Oct. 1, 
4th race, $1,450.87. ($3,046.83) 

P.J. Torsney Jr.—MY FRENCHMAN: 

Oct. 6, 9th race, $2,393.94. 

V Penny Farm—DANCING GOLD: 

Oct. 6, 8th race, $1,450.87. 

William F. Walker III—WILLIE'S GIRL: 

Sept. 17, 4th race, $1,305.78. 

Janet L. Wayson—MIKE HAWTHORN. 
Sept. 19, 9th race, $1,450.87. RACING 


88 


SPLENDOR: Sept. 9, 6th race, 
$1,305.78. ($2,756.65) 

Mrs. Frank P. Wright—VALAY MAID: 
Sept. 19, 4th race, $1,088.15. 


Stallion Bonuses 

AFFILIATE (Dr. Fred T.: Oct. 7, 5th 
race, $189.63): Affiliate Syndicate. 
ASSAULT LANDING (Bullet Assault: 
Oct. 1, 6th race, $665.38): Assault 
Landing Syndicate. 

BAEDERWOOD (Fleetwood Double: 
Oct. 3, 4th race, $532.30): Baeder- 
wood Syndicate. 

BEAR HUNT (Mickey's Money: Sept. 
21, 6th race, $432.49): Bear Hunt Syn¬ 
dicate. 

BLUES PARADE (R. B. Strut: Sept. 17, 
3rd race, $282.78): Blues Parade Syn¬ 
dicate. 

BUCK HILL (Elli Ette: Sept. 19, 10th 
race, $173; Sept. 29, 3rd race, $173): 
Buck Hill Syndicate—$346. 
CARLISLE CHIEF (Darn Dem Socks: 
Oct. 1, 3rd race, $189.63): J. Noel Ma- 
gee. 

CARNIVALAY (Lucky Lady Lauren: 
Oct. 9, 2nd race, $499.03. Valay Maid: 
Sept. 19,4th race, $499.03): Carnivalay 
Sy n d ica te—$998.06. 

CENTURY PRINCE (Reason to Rollick: 
Sept. 17, 5th race, $189.63): Century 
Prince Syndicate. 

CHRISTOPHER R. (Crissy's Ambition: 
Sept. 30, 5th race, $189.63): Shamrock 
Farms. 

CLEVER CHAMP (Clever Answer: 
Oct. 6, 5th race, $232.88. Clever Mary: 
Oct. 7, 1st race, $465.76): Clever 
Champ Syndicate—$698.64. 

COUNT BROOK (Boza: Sept. 8, 1st 
race, $266.15; Sept. 29, 10th race, 
$266.15; Oct. 10, 10th race, $316.05): 
Spring Valley Farm, Inc.—$848.35. 
DANCING AGAIN (Dancing Space: 
Oct. 7, 3rd race, $349.32): Dancing 
Again Partnership. 

DANCING COUNT (Dancing Gold: 
Oct. 6, 8th race, $665.38. Turn to 
Dancin: Sept. 26, 9th race, $1,064.60; 
Oct. 9, 9th race, $177.99): Dancing 
Count Syndicate—$1,907.97. 
DEPUTED TESTAMONY (Grati Tude; 
Oct. 9, 5th race, $189.63): Deputed 
Testamony Syndicate. 

DOUBLE ZEUS (Chris Farrell: Oct. 8, 
2nd race, $316.05. Mary Had a Lot: 
Oct. 8, 11th race, $173. Spring Debut: 
Sept. 30, 1st race, $232.88. Still of the 
Night: Sept. 21, 4th race, $432.49): 
Double Zeus Syndicate—$1,154.42. 


FULL INTENT (Friendly Intent: Sept. 
19, 8th race, $731.91. Intended Rullah: 
Oct. 6, 2nd race, $598.84. Savage Star: 
Sept. 15, 2nd race, $332.69; Oct. 1, 7th 
race, $399.23): Mrs. Robert Beall— 
$2,062.67. 

HAIL EMPEROR (A Magic Emperor: 
Sept. 26, 7th race, $598.84. A Top 
Brandy: Sept. 15, 7th race, $432.49. 
Carla's Express: Sept. 23, 5th race, 
$189.63. City Hall: Sept. 28, 5th race, 
$189.63. Flaming Emperor: Sept. 23, 
11th race, $332.69. Mrs. Wales: Sept. 
7, 1st race, $232.88): Hail Emperor 
Syndicate—$1,976.16. 

HASTY SPRING (Hastylea Regina: 
Sept. 17, 2nd race, $465.76): Hasty 
Spring Syndicate. 

HORATIUS (At the Bridge: Sept. 16, 
4th race, $399.23; Sept. 29, 7th race, 
$465.76. Judge Howell: Oct. 3, 9th 
race, $582.20. Lollypop Lil: Sept. 21, 
9th race, $1,264.21. Nothing Upstairs: 
Oct. 10, 6th race, $432.49. Safely Kept: 
Oct. 8, 10th race, $3,326.88): Horatius 
Syndicate—$6,470.77. 

JOHN ALDEN (Alden's Warrior: Sept. 
7, 3rd race, $349.32. Ambitious John: 
Sept. 21, 2nd race, $665.38. Bara Bear: 
Sept. 21, 5th race, $189.63. Little Bold 
John: Sept. 30, 10th race, $3,326.88. 
Mike Hawthorn: Sept. 19, 9th race, 
$665.38): John Alden Syndicate— 
$5,196.59. 

LANNGAR (Ire) (Jan R.'s Baby: Sept. 
17, 6th race, $465.76): Lanngar (Ire) 
Syndicate. 

LORD GAYLORD (Early Decision: 
Sept. 23, 6th race, $698.64. Mint 
Frappe: Oct. 2, 2nd race, $465.76. 
North Lord: Sept. 15, 1st race, 
$282.78): Lord Gaylord Syndicate— 
$1,447.18. 

LYLLOS (Fr) (Run Lyllos Run: Sept. 8, 
10th race, $332.69): Lyllos (Fr) Syndi¬ 
cate. 

MARINE BRASS (Brilliant Brass: Sept. 
24, 5th race, $432.49. Toll: Oct. 3, 7th 
race, $432.49): K.T. Leatherbury and 
Murmur Farm—$864.98. 

MASKED DANCER (Masked Hillo: 
Oct. 9, 1st race, $282.78. Masked Mia: 
Sept. 17, 8th race, $931.53): Masked 
Dancer Syndicate—$1,214.31. 
MEDAILLE D'OR (Baca d'Or: Sept. 12, 
9th race, $731.91. Etage d'Or: Oct. 5, 
2nd race, $482.40): Medaille d'Or Syn¬ 
dicate— $1,214.31. 

NORTHERN RAJA (Brick Rider: Sept. 
7, 7th race, $598.84. Monrovia: Sept. 
21, 8th race, $731.91; Oct. 1, 4th race, 
$665.38): Northern Raja Partner¬ 
ship—$1,996.13. 

Maryland Horse 










NIJINSKY U-STREET DANCER, by NATIVE DANCER 



$H!P 




By sire of sires NIJINSKY II, classic winner, 
champion and horse of the year, who represents 
the preeminent NEARCTIC-NORTHERN DANC¬ 
ER line. 

Out of STREET DANCER, $2-million sales 
broodmare, two-time track record setter, stakes 
winner of $224,019 and multiple stakes producer 
of STREET BALLET and La Nijinska (both by Ni¬ 
jinsky II). Second dam is the blue hen mare * Bea¬ 
ver Street. 

Sire of 14 winners, including Nicky's Prince 
($46,986), Pleasure Avenue ($26,094), Prince of 
Night ($26,027), Brady Street ($20,614), Princess 
Bandi ($18,490). 

Private Contract 




BOX 39, LIBERTYTOWN, MARYLAND 21762 


Inquiries to Elliott Kessler, Syndicate Manager (301) 829-2929 or Jerry Calhoun, Farm owner/manager (301) 77S-001 S 



Maryland Fund Report —d 


NORTH SEA (Rollicking Sea: Sept. 9, 
5th race, $332.69): Alfred G. Vander¬ 
bilt. 

NORTH TOWER (North Envoy: Sept. 
12, 10th race, $465.76; Oct. 1, 9th race, 
$598.84): North Tower Syndicate— 
$1,064.60. 

OH SAY (Angel's Say: Sept. 9, 1st race, 
$399.23. Galen's Ruler: Oct. 7, 11th 
race, $209.59. Kay's Mill: Sept. 16, 7th 
race, $598.84): Oh Say Syndicate— 
$1,207.66. 

PARFAITEMENT (Diagonal Quarters: 
Oct. 2, 5th race, $173. Par Halo: Oct. 
2, 8th race, $582.20): Parfaitement 
Sy n d icate—$755.20. 


PEACE FOR PEACE (Dad's Act of Love: 
Oct. 10, 1st race, $189.63): Peace for 
Peace Syndicate. 

RUN THE GANTLET (Racketeer Girl: 
Sept. 29, 5th race, $232.88): Run the 
Gantlet Syndicate. 

SHELTER HALF (Justa Shelter: Sept. 
15, 3rd race, $349.32): Shelter Half 
Syndicate. 

SILVER BADGE (Silano: Oct. 9, 9th 
race, $326.31): Silver Badge Syndi¬ 
cate. 

SON EXCELLENCE (Son of a Noble: 
Sept. 7, 10th race, $209.59): Son Excel¬ 
lence Syndicate. 


SPRING DOUBLE (Double Bunctious: 
Oct. 7, 10th race, $831.72): Spring 
Double Syndicate. 

THIRTY EIGHT PACES (Baged: Sept. 
23, 12th race, $282.78. Jet Stream: 
Sept. 8, 8th race, $665.38; Sept. 26, 8th 
race, $798.45. Racing Splendor: Sept. 
9, 6th race, $598.84. Second Lieuten¬ 
ant: Sept. 16, 8th race, $598.84): Dou¬ 
ble Paces Stable—$2,944.29. 

TRAFFIC COP (Mr. J. W. P: Oct. 9, 4th 
race, $332.69): Traffic Cop Syndicate. 
TRAVELLING MUSIC (Instrument 
Flight: Sept. 16,1st race, $349.32; Oct. 
1,11th race, $399.23): Travelling Music 
Syndicate—$748.55. 


WFVEGOTTM! 

S.E.I. APPROVED 
HELMETS 

GUARANTEED 
TO MEET 
NEW SAFETY 
EQUIPMENT 
INSTITUTE, 

AMERICAN 
SOCIETY 
FOR 

TESTING & 

MATERIALS, & 

PONY CLUB 
STANDARDS. 



MARYLAND 

SADDLERY 

10811 NORTH REISTERSTOWN ROAD 
(NEXT DOOR TO RICHARDSON S FLORIST) 
OWINGS MILLS, MD 21117 



581*0800 

OPEN TUESDAY - SATURDAY: 
10 AM-6 PM 

THURSDAYS: OPEN TILL 9 PM 

MAJOR CREDIT 
CARDS ACCEPTED 


90 


Maryland Horse 



























Entering stud for 1990: 


ALDEN'S ACE 



Stakes-winning son of John Alden 

Won 11 races, $ 170,862, including the Carry Back Handicap (above, within 
two seconds of the track record) and the Charles Staats Memorial. 

From one of Maryland's hottest families, ALDEN'S ACE is 
full brother to ALDEN'S AMBITION ($326,820) 
and AMBITIOUS JOHN ($117,520). 


_ 52,500 to the owner of the first winner by 

Alden's Ace. 

■ 510,000 to the owner of the first stakes winner 

by Alden's Ace. 



$ 1,000 live foal 

Payable when foal stands and nurses 

Liberty Run Farm 1000 W. Liberty Road, Sykesville, MD 21784 

David Sipe, Stallion Manager (301) 261-9769 or Frank Shamer, Farm Manager (301) 795-4033 
























The Mid-Atlantic Report 


The 1989 Keeneland November 
Breeding Stock Sale was a real up¬ 
per by almost everyone's stan¬ 
dards—including those of Mid-At¬ 
lantic breeders. As we must all 
know by now, the sales topper of 
the Eugene Klein dispersal on No¬ 
vember 6 at Keeneland was the 
3-year-old New Jersey-bred filly 
Open Mind, by Deputy Minister— 
Stage Luck. 

Open Mind, the champion 2- 
year-old filly of 1988, was pur¬ 
chased from Klein by Japanese 
bloodstock agent Kazuo Nakamura 
for $4.6 million, the highest price 
ever paid at Keeneland for a horse 
in training. Nakamura indicated 
that he would leave Open Mind in 
trainer D. Wayne Lukas' barn, and 
race her as a 4-year-old. 

But Open Mind was just the ic¬ 
ing on the cake. "I don't think any¬ 
one expected it (Keeneland) to be 
so good," says Russell Jones of 
Pennsylvania, who with his broth¬ 
er Richard trades as Walnut Green, 
Agent. 

"On a horse-by-horse basis," 
Jones continued, "we outsold what 
we anticipated. The funny thing is 
that no one can explain why this 
sale was so good." 

In the Walnut Green consign¬ 
ment was the 4-year-old bay mare 
Assertaine, by Assert (Ire) out of 
Obeah and thus a half-sister to 
Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies win¬ 
ner Go for Wand. Believed to be in 
foal to Hickory Tree (Va.) stallion 
Hagley, Assertaine sold for 
$375,000 to David Minton Blood¬ 
stock. Jones believes this to be the 

92 


highest price ever paid for a mare in 
foal to Hagley. 

In the thick of the bidding at 
Keeneland was Joseph Allbritton's 
Lazy Lane Farm (Va.), the under¬ 
bidder on the second-highest 
priced offering, Kentucky Derby 
victress Winning Colors, who went 
for $4.1 million. 

Pennsylvania-based Brushwood 
Stables took home So She Sleeps, 
by Seattle Slew—Shy Dawn and be¬ 
lieved in foal to Lyphard, for 
$1,050,000. Robert Smith's Heron- 
wood Farm (Va.) purchased the Sir 
Ivor broodmare Ivor's Image for $1 
million, and Edward Evans of 
Spring Hill Farm (Va.) bought the 
Mr. Prospector mare Prospector's 
Fire for $800,000. The 3-year-old 
Fappiano filly Some Romance (a 
half-sister to Jane's Dilemma, who 
enters stud this year at Corbett 
Farm in Maryland) was purchased 
by Stanley Gumberg of Pittsburgh's 
Skara Glen Stables for $1.15 mil¬ 
lion, and Pam and Martin Wygood 
of River Edge Farm in New Jersey 
bought One of a Klein, a 4-year-old 
daughter of Danzig in foal to Al- 
ydar, for $1.35 million. 

Muirfield East, Robert Levy's 
Chesapeake City farm, was also 
well represented, purchasing an 
Alydar—Lady's Secret weanling fil¬ 
ly ($950,000) and a 5-year-old mare 
named Homemade Cookie, by Our 
Native out of Double Axle 
($140,000). 

The weanling market was ex¬ 
tremely strong, producing an aver¬ 
age price of $42,455 for the total of 
755 weanlings. 


Some 51 youngsters were listed 
as foaled in Maryland, Pennsylva¬ 
nia, Virginia or New Jersey. Of that 
group, a half-dozen were not sold. 
Among the remaining 44, the star 
attraction at $115,000 was Mr. and 
Mrs. David Hayden's Maryland- 
bred Double Zeus—Safely Home 
colt, a full brother to stakes-placed 
Safe At the Plate and half-brother 
to super-filly Safely Kept. 

Second highest priced Mid-At¬ 
lantic weanling was a New Jersey- 
bred Tank's Prospect colt out of the 
stakes winner Margaret's Number, 
sold in the Klein dispersal to Flying 
Zee Stable for $62,000. 

The median price for the entire 
weanling sales—$16,000 —equal¬ 
led the median for the Mid-Atlantic 
weanlings sold. 

Delaware 

In 1989, the historic track's 52nd 
season of racing, Delaware Park ex¬ 
tended its meeting by 21 days over 
1988 to 121. Tentative plans call for 
even more days, possibly 150, in 
1990. 

Local jockey Sean Jones of Bear 
(Del.) was leading Delaware Park 
jockey, with 110 victories during 
the 1989 season. John Luzzi of 
Wilmington tied for second with 
Chad Murphy, each notching 66 
wins. 

Sam Cronk, who lives in North 
East, Md., was the leading trainer, 
enjoying 39 trips to the winner's 
circle last year. 

Most exciting news from this 
state, of course, was the thrilling 

Maryland Horse 













victory of Mrs. Harry Lunger's 
homebred Go for Wand in the 1989 
Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies. For 
the whole story, read the article on 
page 24. 

Greenwood Racing, Inc., a Dela¬ 
ware corporation owned by Bob 
Green, former chairman of the Brit¬ 
ish William Hill-Mecca bookmak¬ 
ing firm, has purchased Phila¬ 
delphia Park. 

New Jersey 

Two progeny of Glade Valley 
(Md.) stallion Shelter Half recently 
won stakes on the same day at 
Meadowlands. The Hydrangea 
Stakes went to Maryland-bred In 
the Curl, and Born to Shop, a 
5-year-old horse by Shelter Half out 
of Farrago, won the Chief Pen- 
nekeck Handicap. Bred in New Jer¬ 
sey by Richard and William Sinkler, 
Born to Shop is owned by Joe-Dan 
Farm and has won three other 
stakes. 

Tukwila, a 3-year-old Coastal fil¬ 
ly who campaigns for Vintage Rac¬ 
ing One, a partnership of several 
Mid-Atlantic show horse enthusi¬ 
asts including Mr. and Mrs. F. Eu¬ 
gene Dixon Jr. (Pa.) and Mr. and 
Mrs. Don Cush (N.J. and Md.), 
captured the Union County Stakes 
and Middlesex County Stakes 
within a two-week span. 

The New Jersey Racing Commis¬ 
sion has granted 344 days for 1990 
to its four race tracks. News is that 
Garden State Park officials have au¬ 
thorized a feasibility study on de¬ 
veloping all or part of their 285 

January 1990 


acres for residential and/or com¬ 
mercial use. 

Due to go into effect January 1 is 
a State Worker's Compensation In¬ 
surance Plan developed by the 
HBPA, covering jockeys, exercise 
riders, grooms, hot walkers, driv¬ 
ers and all other persons employed 
by owners or trainers at licensed 
New Jersey tracks. Premiums will 
be determined by an audit of each 
employer's payroll records. 

New Jersey has adopted new 
pre-race standards, effective this 
month, for phenylbutazone. As in 
New York, not more than two mi¬ 
crograms per milliliter are permit¬ 
ted. 

Pennsylvania 

In a wire-to-wire romp over four 
and one-half furlongs at Charles 
Town in West Virginia, the 2-year- 
old Pennsylvania-bred filly Taps- 
ville became the first winner in the 
first crop of Pennsylvania sire Rol¬ 
licking's Image. 

Out of Incommicado by Gozo, 
Tapsville was bred by Marc Bowen, 
who stands Rollicking's Image at 
Reigle Heir Farm in Grantville. 
Tapsville is now owned by Helene 
Rynn and trained by Gerald Bast Jr. 

Pennsylvanians overwhelmed 
the jump race circuit as the 1989 
NSHA season came to a close in 
November. Trainer Jonathan Shep¬ 
pard virtually clinched another 
Eclipse award, winning both the 
$250,000 Breeders' Cup Stee¬ 
plechase, held this year in Far Hills, 
N.J., and the prestigious Marion 


duPont Scott Colonial Cup in Cam¬ 
den, S.C., with Mr. and Mrs. Jesse 
Henley's Highland Bud. 

On the Colonial Cup card, Lan¬ 
caster resident Beverly R. Steinman 
captured the Sharp Electronic Cup 
with her French import The Town 
Bridge. In Georgia that same Sun¬ 
day Oxford (Pa.) trainer Janet Elliot 
sent out Delaware owner William 
C. Lickle's Victorian Hill to win the 
Delta Airlines Supreme Novice 
Hurdle. 

At the Royal Chase in Nashville, 
Tenn., on November 3, George 
Strawbridge's Augustin Stable won 
three of the four races carded, in¬ 
cluding the $100,000-guaranteed 
Queen Mother Supreme Hurdle 
with Jamaica Bay, ridden by 20- 
year-old Pennsylvanian Blythe Mil¬ 
ler and trained by Sheppard. 

Ironically, in the only local race 
over fences, the Pennsylvania Hunt 
Cup, the winner was an all-Mary¬ 
land team: 7-year-old Von Csadek, 
owned by Herb Sheppard of Bal¬ 
timore and his niece Margaret Wor- 
rall, trained by Doug Worrall and 
ridden by Patrick Worrall. Von 
Csadek won the four-mile race over 
timber by 20 lengths over another 
Maryland representative, Local 
Kid, owned by W. Wallace Lanahan 
and ridden/trained by Charlie Fen¬ 
wick. It was Von Csadek's second 
consecutive victory in the Pennsyl¬ 
vania Hunt Cup. 

And Pennsylvanians shone on 
Hunt Night at the Washington In¬ 
ternational Horse Show in Land- 
over, Md. A hunt team of Mia Mor- 
ano on The Last Hurrah, Joy 

93 




Carrier on Fighting Falcon and Jack 
Trainor on Amadeus won its class, 
contributing to Mr. Stewart's 
Cheshire Foxhounds' champion¬ 
ship performance. 

The Pennsylvania State Horse 
Racing Commission has granted 
439 racing dates for 1990 to Phila¬ 


delphia Park (199) and Penn Na¬ 
tional (240). 

Virginia 

On consecutive days at Aque¬ 
duct, November 18 and 19, Virgin¬ 
ia-bred fillies rolled over their 
stakes rivals. 


Longshot Rootentootenwooten, 
by Diesis (GB)—Bold Flora, edged 
her head in front to take the De¬ 
moiselle Stakes-Gl. Bred by Bur¬ 
dette Associates (Robert H. Smith 
and Richard Kristin), Rooten¬ 
tootenwooten was sold to agent 
B.G. Hughes at the 1988 Saratoga 
yearling sale for $220,000. The 
2-year-old filly broke her maiden at 
Belmont in October in the silks of 
Lexington, Ky., owner Alex G. 
Campbell. At nine furlongs, the 
Demoiselle is the longest graded 
stakes on the dirt in America for 
2-year-old fillies. 

The final Grade 1 race in New 
York in 1989, the $200,000-added 
Ladies Handicap, was won handily 
by Dance Teacher, a 4-year-old filly 
by Smarten, who stands at North- 
view Stallion Station in Chesapeake 
City (Md.). Out of the Tentam mare 
Intentional Move, Dance Teacher is 
owned by her breeder, Edward P. 
Evans, and was foaled at his Spring 
Hill Farm near Casanova. Evans 



Breaking ♦ Training 
Leg-Ups ♦ Layups 
Schooling for Flat and Steeplechase 

Jennifer R. Small 

P.O. Box 462, Monkton, MD 21111 
(301) 472-4564 home ♦ (301) 785-0241 barn 


As its primary fund raiser, The Virginia Thoroughbred Association annually sells donated stallion 
seasons. The following seasons are currently for sale privately: 

CONTARE 
CURE THE BLUES 
DANCE WITH DAN 
FIT TO FIGHT 
GAYLORD S CAROUSEL 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
GILDED AGE 
HARRIMAN 
IRISH SWORDS 

TO THE QUICK 

We are still accepting donations. For information on how to donate or to purchase a season, please 
call: Peter Pegg (703) 687-6331 or Glenn Petty (703) 347-4313. 



Virginia Thoroughbred Association, 38 Garrett Street, Warrenton, VA 22186 • (703) 347-4313 


JUNGLE BLADE 
LORD GAYLORD 
MAJESTY’S PRINCE 
NORTHERN RAJA 
PURPLE COMET 
QUADRATIC 
ROO ART 
SILENT CAL 
TAYLOR’S SPECIAL 


94 


Maryland Horse 

















The Only Graded Stakes-Placed 
Son of Alydar—sire of EASY GOER 
and ALYSHEBA 


in Maryland 


MELODISK 


ALYDAR—BRING OUT THE BAND, by One for All 


Multiple stakes-placed winner of $139,933 
Half-brother to $212,896-winner JUBILOUS and ROBERTINA ($107,670) 

Out of multiple graded stakes winner BRING OUT THE BAND 

(6 wins, $152,328, Acorn S-G1, Demoiselle S-G2, Comely S-G3, Golden Rod S-G3) 

$1,500 Live Foal 

Property of a Syndicate; Special Consideration to Approved Mares 
Nominated to Breeders' Cup and Maryland Million 


WHITEHACKLE FARM 


3531 Mt. Zion Rd„ Upperco, MD 21 155 ■ Mr. and Mrs. Jervis S. Marshall ■ (301) 329-8187, FAX (301) 374-9493 





has produced six homebred stakes 
winners including a half-sister to 
Dance Teacher by Sharpen Up (GB) 
named Lunar Mover, who is cur¬ 
rently racing successfully in Eng¬ 
land. 

Farther afield, Alwuhush, a 4- 
year-old colt by Nureyev—Beam¬ 
ing Bride (Ire), won the $200,000- 
added Carleton F. Burke Handicap- 
G1 at Oak Tree for owner Frank 
Stronach after taking the Gran Pre- 
mio di Milano-Gl in mid-June. 

Alwuhush was bred by Peggy 
Augustus' Keswick Stable (near 
Charlottesville) out of a King Em¬ 
peror mare purchased privately for 
$4,000. Beaming Bride (Ire) has also 
produced the multiple graded 
stakes winner Simply Majestic, by 
Majestic Light, for Augustus. 

In Europe, Virginia-bred Heart 
of Groom, by Blushing Groom 
(Fr)—Polar Bear, won the Premio 
Roma Vecchia-G3 in Rome by two 
and one-half lengths on November 


12. Purchased by BBA Italia for 
$50,000 as a weanling at the 1986 
Keeneland November Breeding 
Stock Sale, the 3-year-old colt was 
bred by Richard Stokes of Shen- 
stone Farm. 

The Middleburg Agricultural 
Experiment Station, through a sub¬ 


stantial gift from Virginia horse¬ 
man Paul Mellon, is being convert¬ 
ed from a beef cattle operation to an 
equine facility. 

In conjunction with Virginia 
Tech, the station is beginning its 
equine program with a research 
project studying the influence of 



YVIDA 

NA VI DA 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 

A PROFESSIONAL CORPORATION 

Carole K. Boyd 

Attorney at Law 

Specializing in equine law. 

Contracts, syndication, litigation, 
and tax consultation. A certified 
equine appraiser. 

9 Main Street • Flemington, New Jersey • 08822 
(201) 782-1801 



1989 Pennsylvania-Bred 
Eclipse Award Candidates 

GO FOR WAND 

First Pennsylvania-bred Breeders’ Cup winner. 

YANKEE AFFAIR 

Three-time Grade One winner in 1989. 

JAMAICA BAY 

Won the $100,000 Queen Mother Supreme Hurdle on Nov. 3. 

Pennsylvania Horse Breeders Association 

203 North Union Street, Kennett Square, PA 19348 ■ (215) 444-1050 


96 


Maryland Horse 




















Like father . . . like son. 


RAJA BABA - DUMTADUMTADUM, BY GREY DAWN II 



> K * 


P'A'f 


At the Fasig-Tipton New Sire Showcase Sale this July in Lexington, 
two outstanding yearlings were sold - one at $50,000, the other 
at $45,000. A phenomenal start in the sales ring for this promising 
young multiple stakes winning son of RAJA BABA who stands 
for $3,500 ... a generous return on the stud fee. 



N EPAL is by a sire of sires - 

RAJA BABA - a leading 
sire of 59 stakes winners 
including champions SACAHUISTA 
and SUMMER MOOD plus Horse 
of the Year in Mexico GRAN ZAR 
and Breeders’ Cup Juvenile winner 
ISITTRUE. RAJABABA’s sons at 
stud that are doing well include - 

WELL DECORATED, ROYAL SKI, 
FAR OUT EAST, GRAN ZAR, 
EL BABA and AYMAN. 


N epal is out of grey 

DAWN IPs (Champion 
two-year-old) stakes 
winning and multiple 
stakes producing daughter 
DUMTADUMTADUM, dam 
of the graded stakes winner 
DUMDEDUMDEDUM 
($262,344) and ALLEGEDUM 
($101,502) and from the family 
of WAR CENSOR and 
IMP SOCIETY. 


N EPALs stud fee is $3,500 live 
foal and is due September 1st 
of year bred. Nominated to 
the Breeders’ Cup Series. 

Property of a syndicate. 


u 


r \ 


plana ' j priny 

♦ A ♦ R 

P.O. Box 108 


F ♦ A ♦ R ♦ M 

Unionville, Pennsylvania 19374 


Diana B. Donaldson (215) 347-2197 

Russell B. Jones, Jr. (215) 444-5228 

Fax (215) 444-9273 






nutrition on reproductive perfor¬ 
mance in Thoroughbred mares, 
and on the growth and skeletal 
soundness of their progeny. The in¬ 
vestigators include Drs. George 
Morrow, Tom Meacham, Jim 
Brown, and David Kronfeld, who is 
the Paul Mellon Professor and 
comes to VPI from New Bolton 
Center in Pennsylvania. 

A band of 40 representative 
mares is being assembled for the 
study. Owners interested in donat¬ 
ing mares should contact the study 
team at (703) 687-3521 or (703) 
231-4740. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bertram Firestone 
have sold their 2,000-acre Catoctin 
Stud in Loudon County to a group 
of 50 Japanese investors. According 
to the local newspaper, Leesburg To¬ 
day , the Firestones, who also have 
farms in Kentucky and Ireland, re¬ 
tain an option to remain on the 
property for 20 years. Thoroughly 


engrossed in the horse world, the 
family not only owns and breeds 
Thoroughbred race horses, but has 
steeplechase, show and three-day 
event competitors as well. 

In special referenda on Novem¬ 
ber 7 ballots in Virginia, five coun¬ 
ties supported the building of a race 
track in their areas. They are 
Brunswick, Greensville, Mecklen¬ 
burg, Isle of Wight and Prince 
William Counties. Gloucester 
County voted against the measure. 

C. Fred Kohler, who headed the 
Virginians for Racing drive, noted 
that Prince William County in 
northern Virginia near Washing¬ 
ton, D.C., and New Kent County 
between Richmond and Williams¬ 
burg (New Kent passed a similiar 
referendum in a special election 
last June) are the most likely sites 
for a track because they are the sec¬ 
tions with the greatest population 
concentration. 


The next step is for parties inter¬ 
ested in building a race track to 
make application to the Virginia 
Racing Commission. The Commis¬ 
sion has drafted regulations and 
criteria for application which must 
then be approved through legisla¬ 
tive process. Formal acceptance of 
applications by the Commission is 
not expected before mid-spring 
1990 at the earliest. 

West Virginia 

On November 5 West Virginia- 
bred Gauntlett Boy won the 
$100,000-guaranteed Remington 
Green Handicap on the turf at Rem¬ 
ington Park. The 3-year-old geld¬ 
ing, by the late Maryland-based 
stallion Run the Gantlet out of 
Juanita's Girl by Jungle Cove, was 
bred by Mrs. Blair Major in the 
name of H.W. Dick Company and 
foaled at Mrs. Major's farm near 
Charles Town. 


The WEST VIRGINIA THOROUGHBRED BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 

It’s worth your while to take a closer 
look at our breeders’ program: 

$2-Million Thoroughbred Development Fund 
$250,000 West Virginia Breeders’ Classic 
West Virginia Breeders’ Futurity 
Stallions by the Nation’s Top Sires 

For further information, contact: The West Virginia Development Fund Program (304) 725-7001 ext. 318 

The WEST VIRGINIA THOROUGHBRED BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 


98 


Maryland Horse 



















I 



* 



Island Champ 



Graded stakes winner of $293,694 

Sire of multiple juvenile stakes winner 
SHE S A CHAMP from his first crop 

1980, Dancing Champ—Island Search by Search for (.old 
SI,000 Live Foal; Property of John C. Heil 
Nominated to Breeders' Cup, Maryland Million 

GREEN WILLOW FARMS 

Inquiries to Carolyn Green (301) 7 95-3438 



Gauntlett Boy was subsequently 
sold as a yearling for $19,000 and 
purchased by his present owners, a 
group of South Carolina, Georgia 
and Texas businessmen racing as 
Tri-State Racing Stable, for $40,000 
as a 2-year-old in training. 

The Remington Green is Gaunt¬ 
lett Boy's fourth stakes win and his 
lifetime earnings now exceed 
$250,000. □ 



WE SALUTE THE 
233,459 4-H MEMBERS 
IN THE HORSE PROGRAM 


Contact Your County Extension Office 


Thoroughbred 
Breeders’ 
Association of 
New Jersey 

Stanley Panco, Executive Director 
231 Crosswicks Road, Suite 11, Bordentown, NJ 08505 

(609) 298-6401 

too 


Blanket Your Horse 
With Research 



Dollars for Research 

Equine research monies have fallen well below an acceptable level. Research must 
continue in many danger areas to assure the horse the very best in medical care. There 
are over ten million horses in the United States...many are lost unnecessarily to diseases 
that could be cured. We suggest each horse owner send one dollar per horse owned to 
the Morris Foundation for research. 

Send to: 

Blanket Your Horse 

Morris Animal Foundation 

45 Inverness Drive East 
Englewood, Co. 80112 

or Call: Carole Williams (303) 790-2345 to discuss your contribution. 

(A USEMA Project) 



Maryland Horse 





















UNO ROBERTO 



ROBERTO—MISS SECRETARIAT, by Secretariat 


Four winners from six starters 


His first crop includes Laurel winner Truly Outrageous, who placed 
second her first time out and won her second start, and Boogie With 
Bobbi, who won her first two starts by a total of 8V2 lengths. 

UNO ROBERTO is a stakes-winning son of now-deceased ROBERTO, champi¬ 
on and leading sire of 68 stakes winners He won the TETERBORO STAKES in 
near track-record time as a juvenile and went on to win or place in six 
additional added-money events earning $158,267. Out of a daughter of the 
great SECRETARIAT, from the family of champions ONE COUNT, MRS. PENNY 
MUCH RAIN, etc. 

$1,500 Live Foal 

Payable Sept. 1 of year bred 

Nominated to Breeders’ Cup and Maryland Million 


C W/E§THELD 

2506 Monkton Rd., Monkton, MD 21111 ■ Michael Buck (301) 472-4538/9003 















Mid-Atlantic Region 
Leading Active Sires in 1989 

Stallions standing in Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia 

(Statistics compiled by Bloodstock Research Information Services. They include racing of Dec. 5.) 

Races %Wnrs/ Avg.t 



Foals 

Runners 

Starts 

Winners 

Won 

Smarten (Md). 

234 

96 

863 

64 

136 

Horatius (Md). 

228 

96 

834 

48 

115 

Quadratic (Va). 

290 

125 

1,210 

67 

138 

Caveat (Md). 

124 

81 

609 

40 

75 

Shelter Half (Md). 

155 

71 

624 

43 

79 

Oh Say (Md). 

142 

74 

635 

48 

86 

Val de I'Orne (Fr) (Va) . .. 

325 

64 

592 

35 

60 

Lord Gaylord (Md). 

252 

83 

649 

45 

78 

Rollicking (Md). 

326 

86 

849 

53 

102 

The Cool Virginian (Va).. 

144 

74 

838 

50 

119 

Dancing Count (Md) .... 

360 

78 

639 

45 

81 

John Alden (Md). 

121 

49 

444 

24 

57 

Double Zeus (Md). 

170 

77 

727 

44 

85 

Aloma's Ruler (Md). 

143 

74 

609 

46 

84 

Hail Emperor (Md). 

93 

59 

511 

31 

64 

Deputed Testamony (Md) 

63 

38 

305 

18 

46 

Thirty Eight Paces (Md) 

74 

46 

381 

26 

50 

Salutely (Md). 

71 

44 

464 

31 

74 

Sir Ivor Again (Md). 

57 

22 

183 

9 

27 

Masked Dancer (Md).. .. 

264 

87 

838 

48 

87 

To the Quick (Va). 

303 

78 

596 

38 

81 

Pappa Riccio (NJ). 

43 

35 

364 

23 

58 

Great Prospector (NJ) . .. 

105 

56 

466 

29 

69 

Two Davids (NJ). 

65 

42 

367 

30 

52 

Full Intent fMd). 

66 

31 

306 

19 

48 

Hagley (Va). 

316 

68 

473 

32 

57 

Silver Badge (Md). 

218 

55 

489 

24 

52 

North Tower (Md). 

165 

61 

499 

38 

74 

Travelling Music (Md) . .. 

112 

55 

419 

26 

54 

Bold Josh (NJ). 

64 

37 

367 

20 

40 

Contare (Va). 

106 

50 

525 

33 

72 

Five Star Flight (NJ). 

122 

41 

386 

24 

61 

*Slady Castle (NJ). 

240 

39 

358 

24 

37 

Pas Seul (Va). 

124 

45 

324 

21 

46 

Dancing Czar (Va). 

28 

21 

169 

14 

32 

Bear Hunt (Md). 

61 

40 

318 

24 

58 

Silent Cal (Va). 

138 

51 

495 

32 

59 

Northern Raja (Md). 

60 

29 

288 

16 

36 

Parfaitement (Md). 

88 

47 

346 

24 

40 

Miteas Well Laff (NJ).... 

120 

44 

438 

21 

47 

Fuzzbuster (Md). 

120 

45 

426 

27 

58 

Believe the Queen (Md) 

59 

23 

166 

14 

25 

Baederwood (Md). 

116 

44 

290 

24 

37 

Hello Gorgeous (NJ) .... 

236 

56 

273 

15 

20 

Ga Hai (Pa). 

174 

45 

415 

23 

40 

Hasty Spring (Md). 

69 

39 

403 

18 

30 

Assault Landing (Md). . . 

65 

43 

283 

21 

28 

Sir Jinsky (NJ). 

126 

50 

419 

26 

44 

Exclusive One (Md). 

75 

37 

338 

24 

37 

Better Arbitor (NJ). 

114 

31 

275 

18 

32 

McCann (Pa). 

34 

15 

139 

10 

19 

Christopher R. (Md) .... 

224 

48 

410 

25 

53 

Providential (Ire) (Md). . . 

118 

37 

255 

16 

26 

Gentleman Gene (NJ) ... 

46 

14 

129 

10 

24 

Klassy Flight (NJ). 

65 

26 

272 

15 

33 

Vittorioso (NJ). 

44 

30 

270 

16 

24 

Honest Bullet (NJ). 

75 

23 

255 

15 

27 

Jolly Johu (Md). 

132 

22 

184 

10 

19 

Brilliant Protege (Md) . . . 

118 

36 

236 

12 

22 

Khatango (Va). 

87 

47 

435 

28 

43 

Double Edge Sword (Md) 

167 

26 

275 

15 

30 

O. K. By You (NJ). 

63 

29 

272 

17 

23 

Dancing Master (Fr) (Md) 

50 

19 

191 

9 

22 

Bedford (Pa). 

68 

37 

372 

19 

38 

Lobsang (Ire) (NJ). 

35 

21 

238 

15 

28 

North Pole (Md). 

86 

36 

245 

16 

32 

Gilded Age (Va). 

69 

32 

162 

19 

23 

Blues Parade (Md). 

102 

63 

28 

268 

16 

24 


Leading Earner 

Earnings 

Starters 

Runner 

Dance Teacher ($306,821) 

$1,998,260 

67.0 

$20,815 

Safely Kept ($696,270) 

1,668,872 

50.0 

17,384 

Speed ratic ($329,720) 

1,663,921 

54.0 

13,311 

Princess Caveat ($172,949) 

1,436,195 

49.0 

17,731 

In the Curl ($188,424) 

1,169,600 

61.0 

16,473 

Real Tough ($103,023) 

1,133,015 

65.0 

15,311 

Pay the Butler ($272,742) 

1,084,623 

55.0 

16,947 

I Rejoice ($149,500) 

1,013,190 

54.0 

12,207 

King's Nest ($113,160) 

986,780 

62.0 

11,474 

Fancy Equipment ($88,251) 

971,293 

68.0 

13,126 

Turn to Dancin ($131,878) 

953,688 

58.0 

12,227 

Little Bold John ($382,451) 

829,772 

49.0 

16,934 

Muddy Rudder ($58,600) 

765,466 

57.0 

9,941 

Bakers Beach ($70,450) 

763,724 

62.0 

10,321 

Flaming Emperor ($112,966) 

738,472 

53.0 

12,516 

Under Oath ($224,200) 

737,012 

47.0 

19,395 

Thirty Eight Go Go ($201,861) 

706,599 

57.0 

15,361 

Salute the Crew ($98,380) 

692,090 

70.0 

15,729 

Ten Keys ($310,795) 

690,579 

41.0 

31,390 

Mask Appeal ($58,880) 

684,056 

55.0 

7,863 

Double Quick ($235,625) 

654,006 

49.0 

8,385 

Kechi ($172,238) 

634,535 

66.0 

18,130 

Great Pass ($80,845) 

590,477 

52.0 

10,544 

Nasty Too ($87,489) 

587,570 

71.0 

13,990 

Endless Surprise ($108,509) 

560,442 

61.0 

18,079 

Waggley ($62,548) 

560,091 

47.0 

8,237 

Silano ($195,900) 

489,341 

44.0 

8,897 

Crooked Tower ($72,171) 

471,892 

62.0 

7,736 

Make Music ($64,188) 

470,725 

47.0 

8,559 

Ira's Cat ($89,805) 

466,097 

54.0 

12,597 

Laura Jones ($76,680) 

458,117 

66.0 

9,162 

Astro ($74,883) 

445,877 

59.0 

10,875 

Castle Park ($55,237) 

402,403 

62.0 

10,318 

Learned Jake ($83,166) 

399,543 

47.0 

8,879 

Sharp Dance ($192,544) 

396,283 

67.0 

18,871 

Bear On ($64,155) 

396,025 

60.0 

9,901 

Lummox ($69,351) 

395,377 

63.0 

7,752 

Bloomin Bell ($80,951) 

388,519 

55.0 

13,397 

Perfectible ($53,760) 

387,370 

51.0 

8,242 

Love Old Dad ($69,184) 

385,701 

48.0 

8,766 

O. K. Buster ($38,180) 

380,630 

60.0 

8,458 

Wise Woman ($130,056) 

379,229 

61.0 

16,488 

Frugal Doc ($41,670) 

377,300 

55.0 

8,575 

Hello Calder ($91,288) 

328,022 

27.0 

5,858 

Hai Plateau ($42,391) 

304,983 

51.0 

6,777 

Big UpheaveI ($83,260) 

301,585 

46.0 

7,733 

Bullet Assault ($55,570) 

301,377 

49.0 

7,009 

Oh How We Danced ($57,540) 

300,938 

52.0 

6,019 

Upgrading ($46,965) 

288,417 

65.0 

7,795 

Eleven Spurs ($47,851) 

279,607 

58.0 

9,020 

Ligature ($166,225) 

277,768 

67.0 

18,518 

Chris' Holiday ($65,134) 

276,310 

52.0 

5,756 

Princess Elaine ($43,356) 

270,259 

43.0 

7,304 

Natala ($91,572) 

268,796 

71.0 

19,200 

Maluke ($65,848) 

244,406 

58.0 

9,400 

Forlioso ($41,827) 

239,090 

53.0 

7,970 

Honest Uzi ($50,959) 

234,934 

65.0 

10,215 

Pour Moi ($50,170) 

227,514 

45.0 

10,342 

Brilano ($71,107) 

221,844 

33.0 

6,162 

Dance the Tango ($21,462) 

219,994 

60.0 

4,681 

Naval Cutter ($50,136) 

216,480 

58.0 

8,326 

O. K. At Cards ($32,248) 

215,540 

59.0 

7,432 

Two Step Dancer ($115,335) 

215,198 

47.0 

11,326 

Grey Bed ($30,148) 

209,166 

51.0 

5,653 

Ten Be Six ($39,605) 

208,472 

71.0 

9,927 

Deansgate ($49,132) 

207,808 

44.0 

5,772 

Sir Riddle ($34,120) 

206,050 

59.0 

6,439 

Eesee's Taw ($71,190) 

200,285 

57.0 

7,153 


Maryland Horse 





















































John 
Alden 

Two Maryland-bred champions: little bold john, 1988 

SPARROWVON, 1986 

LITTLE BOLD JOHN: winner of $1.8 million— 
an all-time record for Maryland-sired 
Maryland-breds; winner of 25 stakes—an 
all-time record for Maryland-bred flat 
runners 

SPARROWVON: winner of $357,989, voted 
champion older Maryland-bred male of 
1986 

ALDEN’S AMBITION: winner of $32682Q 
equaled Pimlico’s 6-furlong track record of 
1:09 

ETA CARINAE: winner of $282573. 

ALDEN’S ACE: winner of $170862 

LIKELY PASSAGE: winner of $121,936 

AMBITIOUS JOHN: winner of $114070 

ALDEN’S WARRIOR: winner of $35544 at 2 
1989. 


$5,000 live foal, due Sept. 1, 1990 

Nominated to Breeders’ Cup and Maryland Million 

Inquiries to Snowden Carter, Syndicate Manager (301) 363-1481 or 



Eight stakes winners 
from 80 starters— 
10% stakes winners 

Average Earnings 
Index of 2.60 (when 
bred to other stallions; 
his mares had a 
Comparable Index of 
0.91) 












DANCING COUNT 

$5,000 live foal 

Unbeaten son of NORTHERN DANCER from a Grade 1-producing dam. 

Sire of 42 stakes horses. 


The facts (opposite) show NO stallion 
in Maryland at a comparable fee has 
done as much. 





s 

\ 

V 

> 


s 




♦ Four NEW 1989 stakes horses. 

♦ Over $1 million in 1989 
earnings. 

♦ Fourth leading sire in lifetime 
earnings among active Maryland 
stallions. 

♦ Third leading sire in lifetime wins 
among active Maryland stallions. 

♦ Third leading sire in lifetime 
winners among active Maryland 
stallions. 


$5,000 live foal 

Nominated to Breeders' Cup and Maryland Million 
Northern Dancer—*Snovv Court, by King's Bench 
Property of a Syndicate 


SHAMROCK FARMS 

4926 Woodbine Road. Woodbine. Maryland 21 /97 
Jim Steele. Farm Manager (301) 795-0723 or 
Tom Bowman. DVM. Syndicate Manager (301) 778-0439 



TIMONIUM 

The complete 
dispersal of 
Thornmar Farm 

PHASE 1 

JANUARY 14,1990 
Breeding Stock 
34 Mares 

Including (as agent) $191,096 SW 
LANDAURA, in foal to 
CONQUISTADOR CIELO 

PHASE 2 

SEPTEMBER, 1990 
Yearlings 

FOR CATALOGS AND INFORMATION 
CONTACT 

EOUIVEST 

BREEDERS SALES COMPANY 

1-800 666 4677 



WHICH STALLION 

sired Maryland’s only G-l 

winner, leading money- 

earner and undisputed 

horse of the year in 1989? 



WHICH STALLION 

sired the only Maryland- 

bred to ever finish 

on the board in the 

Breeders’ Cup? 



WHICH STALLION 

sired four graded stakes 

horses and the winners 

of more than $1,700,000 

in 1989? 


















THIS STALLION 


HORATIUS 


Sire of Leading Contender For 
Eclipse Award Sprinter 


1990 Fee: 

$2,400 Live Foal 

$100 Booking Fee, Non-Refundable 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. McGinnes 

THORNMAR 

CHESTERTOWN. MARYLAND 21620 • (3Q1) 778-1116 

Bear Hunt • Horatius 









:WM . T' 


North Tower 


Rio Carmelo (Fr) 






$100,000 Northern Dancer 
mare tops Equivest sale 


The 5-year-old Northern Danc¬ 
er mare Arctic Fling recorded one of 
the highest prices ever for a brood¬ 
mare at auction in Maryland when 
she sold for $100,000 at the Equivest 
Breeders' Sales Company's Fall 
Mixed sale at Timonium on Novem¬ 
ber 19. 

Arctic Fling's dam Running 
Around (by What a Pleasure) is a 
stakes-placed half sister to Grade 1 
winner Full Out and stakes runners 
Full Partner and Karelina. 

Consigned to the Equivest auc¬ 
tion by L. Bett, Arctic Fling was 
sold (in foal to Val de l'Orne-Fr) on a 
bid by Michael Cavey, agent. The 
mare had been purchased by Bett at 
the Woodbine Autumn Mixed sale 
only one month earlier (on October 
3) for $70,000. 

Equivest's first fall mixed sale in 
Maryland grossed $488,800 for 129 
horses. An additional 22 were 
RNAs. The average was $3,789. 

Results follow: 

1— Barmaid Lady; Pam Winseman; 
RNA; $800. 

2— Bloomin Robbery; Green Willow 
Farms, Agt.; RNA; $1,300. 

3— Blue Motel; Derby Hill Farm, 
Agt.; Cherry Lane Farm; $1,500. 

4— Bright Motel; Green Willow 
Farms, Agt.; Birt Burbol; $1,500. 

5— Casarette (Ire); Douglas R. Small; 
Mike Spielmann; $6,000. 

6— b.f. Blues Parade—Casarette 
(Ire); Douglas R. Small; Francis 
DiAmario and Paul Burns; 
$1,500. 

7— Cat's Pajamas; L. Bett; RNA; 
$1,800. 

8— b.c. Deputed Testamony—Clos¬ 
in' Time; Thornmar, Agt. for 
Rookwood Farm; William H. 
Leachman; $1,500. 


9—Foudroyant; Schoenborn Broth¬ 
ers Farm, Agt.; Out. 

10— Dancing Betts; Honey Acres 
Farm, Agt.; RNA; $3,000. 

11— Dandy Mallory; Hide A Way 
Farms; Kathy Vickers-Smith; 
$800. 

12— Dia De Suerta; Pineal G. Farm; 
RNA; $2,500. 

13— Jola; Thomas J. Gallo, Agt.; No 
bid. 

14— Dynamism; Thomas J. Gallo, 
Agt.; No bid. 

15— Ellen's Serenade; Litz Bloodstock 
Service, Agt. for Gordon E. Little; 
Katy Kohn; $600. 

16— February's Fool; Hide A Way 
Farms; Out. 

17— Feeling No Pain; Derby Hill Farm, 
Agt.; Herbert R. Creel; $500. 

18— Flippity Doo Dah; Charlotte Ford 
Spillane; Centaur Farms; $800. 

19— Flutterfly; Thomas J. Gallo, Agt.; 
No bid. 

20— Gala Glace; Hide A Way Farms; 
Daniel E. Lucas; $1,600. 

21— Gillis; Derby Hill Farm, Agt.; Ed 
Price; $700. 

22— Fair Jeanine; Schoenborn Broth¬ 
ers Farm, Agt.; Out. 

23— dk.b./br.f. Stone Manor—Glitter¬ 
ing Array; L. Bett; Mary C. Corn- 
well; $700. 

24— Glorissa's Way; Thomas J. Gallo, 
Agt.; William M. Leachman; 
$900. 

25— Grande Finis; Green Willow 
Farms, Agt.; Rebecca Burk¬ 
holder; $8,000. 

26— Greensboro; L. Bett; Chanceland 
Farm, Inc.; $24,000. 

27— Gussie Way; Hillbrook Farm, 
Agt.; Henry Caroles; $2,800. 

28— Hasten On; Hillbrook Farm, Agt.; 
No bid. 

29— Hatina; Honey Acres Farm, Agt.; 
RNA; $4,200. 

30— Holiday Regent; L. Bett; Stud Aire 
Farms; $16,000. 

31— Homily; Brookwood Farm; RNA; 
$15,000. 


32— If Summer Comes; Thomas J. Gal¬ 
lo, Agt.; Ann McAlpin Cain; 
$1,900. 

33— b.f. Canadian Slew—If Summer 
Comes; Thomas J. Gallo, Agt.; 
Ann McAlpin Cain; $600. 

34— Withdrawn. 

35— Illusive Vision; Green Willow 
Farms, Agt.; Ron Kohn Jr.; $800. 

36— I've Gotta Run; Stuart L. Graves; 
Wynn Laske; $700. 

37— Joanie's Princess; Green Willow 
Farms, Agt.; Dark Hollow Farm; 
$15,500. 

38— Joan's Double; Hillbrook Farm, 
Agt.; RNA; $18,500. 

39— Jobasoff (GB); Eastern Thorough¬ 
bred Services, Agt.; Ann Mc¬ 
Alpin Cain; $500. 

40— Just a Friend; Eastern Thorough¬ 
bred Services, Agt.; Out. 

41— Withdrawn. 

42— b.c. Rich Cream—Just a Friend; 
Eastern Thoroughbred Services, 
Agt.; Out. 

43— Khoshamad; Derby Hill Farm, 
Agt.; Mike Wheeler; $700. 

44— Kiack; Hillbrook Farm, Agt.; 
William M. Leachman; $3,600. 

45— Killarney Lass; Thornmar, Agt. 
for Rookwood Farm; Edward H. 
Price; $1,600. 

46— Last Batch; Derby Hill Farm, Agt.; 
No bid. 

47— ch.c. Princely Heir—La Ventura; 
Marathon Manor Farm, Agt.; Ka¬ 
ren Ward; $700. 

48— Le Fragil; Honey Acres Farm, 
Agt.; J. Robin Berol; $700. 

49— Louise's Love; Thomas J. Gallo, 
Agt.; No bid. 

50— Lovely Pirate; Green Willow 
Farms, Agt.; Ed Price; $600. 

51— Lt. Lady; Thomas J. Gallo, Agt.; 
William J. Surbe; $2,500. 

52— Makin Money; Winners Choice 
Farm, Agt.; Ernest M. Haynes; 
$2,600. 

53— Romantic Interlude (GB); Thomas 
J. Gallo, Agt.; J. Robin Berol; 
$500. 


108 


Maryland Horse 



THEY LOVE THE 
SORT BABIES! 

55,725 average sale price for 
his first weanlings to sell 

At the recent Fasig-Tipton Midlantic December Mixed Sale, 
two weanlings sold for $6,500 and two others for $3,900 and $6,000. 

At the Fasig-Tipton Midlantic Select Yearling Sale in September, 
a yearling from his first crop sold for $9,500. 


SORT 

NIJINSKY II—SPECIAL 

■ Full brother to NUMBER, dam of recent Group I 

winner JADE ROBBERY (at 2, 1989 in France). 

■ Full brother to BOUND ($339,744). 

■ Half-brother to leading sire NUREYEV (champion by 

NORTHERN DANCER). 

■ Half-brother to champion FAIRY BRIDGE, dam of 

champion SADLER'S WELLS, FAIRY GOLD, TATE 
GALLERY, PUPPET DANCE, etc. 

52,500 live foal 

Nominated to Breeders' Cup and Maryland Million 
Property of a Syndicate 

WHITEHACKLE FARM 

3531 Mt. Zion Road, Upperco, MD 21155 
Mr. and Mrs. Jervis Marshall (301) 239-8187 ■ FAX (301) 374-9493 


January 1990 


109 





KID COLIN 

Ranked in Top 20 of ALL 
Maryland Stallions by SSI 
FEE: $1,500 
(301) 329-6053 


54— Marion's Madel; Alvin Ackman; 
Daniel E. Lucas; $3,000. 

55— Miss Beaux Blue; Lowen Hankin; 
No bid. 

56— Miss Brownwood; Green Willow 
Farms, Agt.; R.N. Miller; $500. 

57— b.c. Wollaston—Miss Brown- 
wood; Green Willow Farms, 
Agt.; Marion DiAngelo; $500. 

58— Miss Iptay; Mill Creek Farm, 
Agt.; Joyce Ainsworth; $1,200. 

59— Miss Lyphard (Fr); Hillbrook 
Farm, Agt.; RNA; $23,000. 

60— Miss Marcey B.; Brookwood 
Farm, Agt.; J. Robin Berol; $700. 

61— b.f. Northern Classic—Miss Mar¬ 
cey B.; Brookwood Farm, Agt.; J. 
Robin Berol; $1,000. 

62— Miss Nauset; Thomas J. Gallo, 
Agt.; No bid. 

63— Ms. Anthropologist; Maple Hill 
Farm; Out. 

64— ch.f. Mulberry (Fr)—Ms. Anthro¬ 
pologist; Maple Hill Farm; No 
bid. 


65— Ms. Belladonna; Green Willow 
Farms, Agt.; Out. 

66— dk.b./br.c. Advocator—My Gal¬ 
lant Gypsy; L. Bett; Greenbriar 
Farm; $5,000. 

67— Withdrawn. 

68— dk.b./br.f. Shifty Sheik—My Har¬ 
vest; Sylvan Run Farm; Mel Cain; 
$500. ' 

69— No Blues; Sedgefield Farm, Agt.; 
Stephen R. Matz; $15,500. 

70— Oh So Vain; Foxcroft Farm; Cen¬ 
taur Farms; $1,000. 

71— Pirate Den; Thornmar, Agt. for 
Rookwood Farm; Irish Acres 
Farm; $11,700. 

72— Princess Porter; Hillbrook Farm, 
Agt.; No bid. 

73— Proud Green; L. Bett; Hart Farm; 
$2,500. 

74— Pyramid Power; L. Bett; RNA; 

$ 120 , 000 . 

75— Withdrawn. 

76— Quick Marty; Donna M. Evans; 
No bid. 

77— Keyrayzee Friend; Country Life 
Farm, Agt.; Out. 

78— Ready and Royal; Walnut Farm, 
Agt.; Roili-Dot Manor Farm; 
$700. 


79— Regal Promise; Maple Hill Farm; 
No bid. 

80— Regency Period; Eastern Thor¬ 
oughbred Services, Agt.; No bid. 

81— Rich and Righteous; Walnut 
Farm, Agt.; Daniel E. Lucas; 
$1,400. 

82— Robitony; Maple Hill Farm; Janet 
Cribb; $700. 

83— Rosebery Rambler; L. Bett; Henry 
Carole; $2,500. 

84— Market Girl; Thomas J. Gallo, 
Agt.; No bid. 

85— Royal Itch; Eastern Thorough¬ 
bred Services, Agt.; Kathy 
Broyles; $500. 

86— Saequal; Maple Hill Farm; No bid. 

87— Short Thrills; Litz Bloodstock Ser¬ 
vice, Agt. for Gordon E. Little; 
Joy Moore; $1,500. 

88— Spinning Reel; Green Willow 
Farms, Agt.; Vincent Portora; 
$4,000. 

89— Star Amber; Litz Bloodstock Ser¬ 
vice, Agt. for Gordon E. Little; J. 
Robin Berol; $2,800. 

90— Stewardess; Green Willow 
Farms, Agt.; Centaur Farms; 
$600. 


What’s the Biggest 



Health Problem 


Affecting Your Horse? 


Lack of 
Money 


Donate NOW to fund studies of 
lameness, colic, Potomac horse fever, 
reproductive problems. 


MORRIS ANIMAL FOUNDATION 45 Inverness Drive East, Englewood, CO 80112-5480 • (303)790-2345 


110 


Maryland Horse 











The epitome of a hard- 
knocking race horse. 


The Willard Scott 



oy 

i »«|® n v 




, TO OM^i-i" „ pu vo«"? 

jcoj^JSSS^^S^ 

. a sW d ’ n ° vimo, ' s ° vn !;,«d tee 


mare ca^ r — ^ 


•Births, 

-te v SK , ? T %.o"!t' ne 

i‘r n ‘ a S r a 

n °t the NBr^, 0Ugllt >red of V,,,ar d 
Hor4 ® CTv weai£* C0Ur se, 
^ear^^'s 

a, 

2 On the track 1 ^^ ^ ^ 

»Xm%L°? "eg™*"' »•>„ 

tentber a „i . ,ast r ac e wf c arne <J 

?si3&-** m £s 
ftssr&stgg'* 

W'hen the r h,ngt0t > radio „ Jard 

f^miission rayson s asked c at,0n - 

“»• «/£&,"?* a SSfS* 

I v e had o u ,a * ^eathprrv. ^ a ^er 

^£ta? to *2!3K 

«'«*■i£te> '■“-i ” ' nM 

^the/atest. 


A multiple stakes winner of $458,808. 
■ Won 24 races by a total of over 84 
lengths. ■ Set two new track records. 
In fact, 16 of his 24 wins (66%) were 
within two seconds of track record 
time. ■ Won under all track 
conditions, going distances of 5 
furlongs (in 57.2) to 17i6 miles (in 
1:41.4), running off the pace or 
winning wire-to-wire. ■ At 2, won 
five of eight starts, including his first 
start by 6 lengths (in 1:05.2) and three 
added-money events—Royal Ski S (by 
14 lengths). Kindergarten S, Virginia 
Stallion S. ■ At 3, set a new track 
record for 672 furlongs at Timonium, 
running in 1:15.2. ■ At 4, won five 
races, including Maryland City H 
(over Roo Art, Pat’s Addition, Little 
Bold John), and placed in two stakes. 
Set a new track record for 17i6 miles 
at Laurel, a mark of 1:41.4 which still 
holds today. ■ At 5, won five races, 
including J. Edgar Hoover H, 2nd 
Maryland City H, 4th in Grade 3 
Salvator Mile H. ■ At 6, won four 
races, including Protagonist H (1 mile 
in 1:35.1, only 4 ticks off the track 
record). ■ At 7, won four races and 
placed 4th in the Grade 3 Riggs H. 


1981, ROANOKE ISLAND—SHENANDOAH VALLEY 
by QUADRANGLE 

|U|| IDMI ID CADim 1334 stafford Rd., Darlington, MD 21034 

IVlUIllvlUn I fADIwl Mr. and Mrs. E. Allen Murray Jr., (301) 836-3491 


$1,000 LIVE FOAL 

$750 for second mare ; $500 for third mare 
NOMINATED TO BREEDERS' CUP AND 
MARYLAND MILLION 















REMEMBER THIS CHARLES ATLAS AD? 












When my horse runs in a race, 

The others kick dirt in his face. 

So to breed one with speed and class, 
I’m sending my mare to MARINE BRASS. 


MasUm Qn&bi 

Gr., 1979, FIFTH MARINE—MOON GLITTER by IN REALITY 

$1,500 Live Foal 




Mr. and Mrs. E. Allen Murray Jr. 
(301) 836-3491 


MURMUR FARM 

Thoroughbred Nursery 


1334 Stafford Road 
Darlington, Maryland 21034 












91— Tammy's Vantage; Francis P. 
Snarski, Agt.; A. Perry Hall; 
$700. 

92— Ten Thousand; Anchor and Hope 
Farm; Raul Grandos; $3,100. 

93— Withdrawn. 

94— Texas Lark; Hillbrook Farm, Agt.; 
No bid. 

95— One season to Told; Thomas J. 
Gallo, Agt.; Bid not published. 

96— One share in Travelling Music; 
Hide A Way Farms; Bid not pub¬ 
lished. 

97— Twilight Bells; Derby Hill Farm, 
Agt.; No bid. 

98— Unbridled Pleasure; Green Wil¬ 
low Farms, Agt.; RNA; $19,500. 

99— Unlimited Prospect; Stuart L. 
Graves; Centaur Farms; $500. 

100— Vajinsky; Maple Hill Farm; No 
bid. 

101— dk.b./br.c. Quack—Vera Barb; 
Thomas J. Gallo, Agt.; Robert J. 
Snyder; $600. 

102— Viaraja; L. Bett; Out. 

103— Waiting Room; Brookwood Farm; 
L. Bett; $12,700. 

104— Withdrawn. 

105— b.c. Taylor's Special—Westmin¬ 
ster Seven; Thornmar, Agt. for 
Rookwood Farm; Douglas C. 
Smith; $4,200. 

106— What a Cherie; Litz Bloodstock 
Service, Agt. for Gordon E. Little; 
Wayne Paul; $700. 

107— Whata Disaster; Derby Hill Farm, 
Agt.; Pavel Blaho; $1,700. 

108— What a Pannie; Brookwood Farm; 
P.G. Melbourne III; $1,000. 

109— ch.c. Mulberry (Fr)—You Won't 
Be Sorry; Maple Hill Farm; No 
bid. 

110— Zandig; L. Bett; Out. 


111— One share in Ack Drone; Clark 
Barnaby; Bid not published. 

112— Patton's Flower (Ire); Due Process 
Stable, Agt.; J. Robin Berol; 
$1,500. 

113— Advance Funding; Derby Hill 
Farm, Agt.; No bid. 

114— Air Maid; Hillbrook Farm, Agt.; 
Chesapeake City Group; $600. 

115— Alata Girl (Ire); Green Willow 
Farms, Agt.; Pray Hard Stable; 
$4,200. 

116— Alcool (Fr); Honey Acres, Agt.; 
No bid. 

117— Withdrawn. 

118— b.f. Peace for Peace—Alcool; Hon¬ 
ey Acres, Agt.; Holly Run Farm, 
Inc.; $900. 

119— All for Scarlet; Douglas R. Small; 
Mike Spielmann; $7,700. 

120— b.c. Jolly Johu—All for Scarlet; 
Douglas R. Small; Emil Spadone; 
$4,500. 

121— Amazoniana; Thomas J. Gallo, 
Agt.; Out. 

122— Apalachee Pride; Honey Acres 
Farm, Agt.; Centaur Farms; 
$4,100. 

123— Nod Yes; Schoenborn Brothers 
Farm, Agt.; Raul Granados; 
$1,900. 

124— b.c. Tyrant—Apalachee Pride; 
Honey Acres Farm, Agt.; RNA; 
$4,400. 

125— Arctic Fling; L. Bett; D.W. Cavey, 
Agt.; $100,000. 

126— A Reason for Kari; Honey Acres 
Farm, Agt.; No bid. 

127— Aurilla; Harry L. Landry, Agt.; 
Out. 

128— Azure Coast; Hide A Way Farms; 
No bid. 

129— Mr. Cornerstone; Derby Hill 
Farm, Agt.; No bid. 


130— Toms River Sailor; Charlotte Ford 
Spillane; No bid. 

131— dk.b./br.f. Winged T.—Barby 
Blue; K. Warren; RNA; $1,000. 

132— Cassis; Pam Winseman; No bid. 

133— ch.c. Princely Heir—Bright Art; 
Marathon Manor Farm, Agt.; 
Donald E. Skaggs; $1,000. 

134— gr.f. Blues Parade—Cool Kisses; 
Jennifer R. Small, Agt.; Stud Aire 
Farm; $1,500. 

135— b.f. Chumming—Foudroyant; 
Schoenborn Brothers Farm, Agt.; 
Out. 

136— Bold Breezin'; Northbrook Farm, 
Agt.; Robert Murphy; $5,500. 

137— dk.b./br.f. Silver Supreme—Dou¬ 
ble Strategy; Andrew Simoff; 
John Alecci; $1,900. 

138— Fools Never Differ; Just Resting 
Farm; Rolf J. Bauersachs; $600. 

139— Johnny Flash; Northbrook Farm, 
Agt.; Robert Murphy; $4,500. 

140— Top to Toe; Thomas J. Gallo, Agt.; 
Marie Buetti; $3,200. 

141— Hasty Bull; Bull Run Thorough¬ 
bred Farm; Clint Bratton; $500. 

142— Goodboy's Secret; Just Resting 
Farm; No bid. 

143— Withdrawn. 

144— Nosrovi; Holly Run Farm; No bid. 

145— Slewsosis; Just Resting Farm; 
Bonnie Thomas; $1,000. 

146— Red Lief; Stephen C. White; Out. 

147— b.f. Believe the Queen—Lunar 
Halo; Sylvan Run Farm; J. Robin 
Berol; $700. 

148— Be a Bomber; Thomas J. Gallo, 
Agt.; No bid. 

149— Shady Sabre; Thomas J. Gallo, 
Agt.; No bid. 

150— ch.c. Fuzzbuster—My Money 
Machine; Flambards Farm, Agt.; 
John G. Aulisio; $3,000. 


Competitive rates and 29 years experience combined with an A + 
Superior financial rating are the substance of which better values 


arn ma/i/i 


For the best value in horse mortality insurance 


3 


look to 

kohler 

for quality 


Agency Affiliation for over 29 years with 
American Live Stock Insurance Company 


Kohler Bloodstock Co. • Middleburg, VA 22117 
Phone: 800-225-0098, (Va. Residents: 800-468-1424) 


January 1990 


113 










151— Withdrawn. 

152— Dice Toss; Thomas J. Gallo, Agt.; 
No bid. 

153— Hunts Devilry; Northbrook 
Farm, Agt.; Don Jacobs; $1,400. 

154— His Tallness; Zimmerman Sta¬ 
bles; RNA; $1,000. 

155— b.f. Full Out—Pronouncer; Win¬ 
ners Choice Farm, Agt.; Christo¬ 
pher North; $5,500. 

156— Regal J Suitress; Just Resting 
Farm; Out. 

157— dk.b./br.c. Impatient Fool—Sae- 
qual; Maple Hill Farm; Rolli-Dott 
Manor Farm; $600. 

158— Only Standing Room; Just Rest¬ 
ing Farm; Robert Murphy; 
$ 2 , 000 . 

159— Nil Fios Agam; Just Resting Farm; 
C. Kelly Smith; $3,600. 

160— Silks Finale; Northbrook Farm, 
Agt.; Herbert R. Creel; $800. 

161— b.c. Marine Patrol—Vajinsky; Ma¬ 
ple Hill Farm; RNA; $500. 

162— Withdrawn. 


MR. DREAMER 

Only Stakes Son of 
Mr. Leader in Maryland 
FEE: $500 
(301) 329-6053 


PHONE: (301) 725-0220 


C. MILLS, 
Inc. 


Horse Transportation 


Operating under regulations of 
Interstate Commerce Commission 


Box 124 

Laurel, Md. 20707 


163— Becca's Dream; K. Warren; RNA; 
$500. 

164— Waltzing Slew; Just Resting Farm; 
Ann McAlpin Cain; $1,400. 

165— b.f. Baederwood—Agenda Ball 
(Arg); Chanceland Farm, Inc., 
Agt.; RNA; $2,000. 

166— b.f. I Am the Game—All for Scar¬ 
let; Jennifer R. Small, Agt.; J. 
Richard Await; $7,000. 

167— Withdrawn. 

168— Night Surf; Thomas J. Gallo, Agt.; 
Out. 

169— Madison Darling; Winners 
Choice Farm, Agt.; No bid. 

170— Blue Willow; Jennifer Small, Agt.; 
Ann McAlpin Cain; $800. 

171— Bold Angel; Chanceland Farm, 
Inc., Agt.; Russell Carrier; $20,000. 

172— Breeze 'n Sing; Thomas J. Gallo, 
Agt.; Harry L. Thompson; 
$2,400. 

173— Withdrawn. 

174— Cann Be Brave; Pennfield Farms, 
Inc., Agt. (to dissolve a partner¬ 
ship); Ernest M. Haynes; $6,000. 

175— Captain Cann; Pennfield Farms, 
Inc., Agt. (to dissolve a partner¬ 
ship); Joseph O. Crane; $2,400. 

176— Chasethebluesaway; Thomas J. 
Gallo, Agt.; RNA; $5,200. 

177— Withdrawn. 

178— Christaly; Gerald Flynn Sr., Agt.; 
Lee H. Vosters, Agt.; $1,000. 

179— Cold Quiche; Green Willow 
Farms, Agt.; Wynn Laske; 
$1,500. 

180— Courting; John B. Merryman; 
William L. Ward; $3,200. 

181— Creme de Naskra; Thomas J. Gal¬ 
lo, Agt.; Herbert R. Creel; $1,100. 

182— Hasty Sandhill; Thomas J. Gallo, 
Agt.; Out. 

183— D'youville Nurse; Honey Acres 
Farm, Agt.; Crown Point Enter¬ 
prises; $30,000. 

184— End a Nasty Affair; Derby Hill 
Farm, Agt.; J. Robin Berol; $500. 

185— Erintalksalot; Good Choice Farm, 
Agt.; Centaur Farms; $1,000. 

186— Forever Be Bold; Loreb Farm; Out. 

187— Her Majesty Carrie; Joel Zawitz; 
Out. 

188— b.f. Blues Parade—Hoity Toity; 
Jennifer R. Small, Agt.; Ann 
McAlpin Cain; $3,500. 

189— If This Is Peace; Honey Acres 
Farm, Agt.; RNA; $4,000. 

190— Jets Do Fly; Mill Creek Farm, 
Agt.; Out. 

191— Johnny Fuller; Eastern Thorough¬ 
bred Services, Agt.; Out. 

192— J.'s Epic Pride; Tim F. Ritchey, 
Agt.; J. Robin Berol; $900. 

193— Linda's Red Head; Joel Zawitz; 
Out. 


194— Secret Escape; Mary Eppler, Agt.; 
Ann McAlpin Cain; $10,000. 

195— Majestic Triade; Barbara Brown, 
Agt.; C. Allen Johnson; $900. 

196— Maybe She Cann; Pennfield 
Farms, Inc., Agt. (to dissolve a 
partnership); J. Robin Berol; 
$1,900. 

197— Midwood; Jean Walter, Agt.; J. 
Robin Berol; $700. 

198— Mt. Airy Hobo; Derby Hill Farm, 
Agt.; Charles T. Balmer; $900. 

199— Mt. Airy Spring; Derby Hill Farm, 
Agt.; Bruce E. Barshay and Ralph 
D. Blood; $2,100. 

200— b.f. Believe the Queen—Quiet 
Moments; Thomas J. Gallo, Agt.; 
Preferred Stock Farm; $3,900. 

201— Quite Eloquent; Eastern Thor¬ 
oughbred Services, Agt.; Out. 

202— Raised on Prunes; Winners 
Choice Farm, Agt.; Ronald G. 
Smith; $3,000. 

203— Reasonably Prompt; Pennfield 
Farms, Inc., Agt. (to dissolve a 
partnership); Harold F. Burton; 
$1,700. 

204— Regal Point; Eastern Thorough¬ 
bred Services, Agt.; Fred E. Fox; 
$800. 

205— Ron's Gal Shal; Ronald Emery; 
Centaur Farms; $500. 

206— Another Prom; Chanceland 
Farm, Inc., Agt.; Ann McAlpin 
Cain; $900. 

207— Shot Tower; John B. Merryman; 
George R. Walter; $2,400. 

208— Sing Me Away; Deep Meadows 
Farm; Out. 

209— Skull and Bones; Jennifer R. 
Small, Agt.; RNA; $2,700. 

210— Speedo; Deep Meadows Farm; 
Nelson Crews; $1,200. 

211— Splash Regia; Thomas J. Gallo, 
Agt.; Wilma Winter; $2,500. 

212— Spring Kick; Holly Run Farm, 
Agt.; Justine M. Hughes; $900. 

213— Sunset Flight; Robert Bates; 
William L. Ward; $1,000. 

214— Time to Go Home; Good Choice 
Farm, Agt.; Centaur Farms; $700. 

215— Token of Value; Vel Maike; C. Al¬ 
len Johnson; $900. 

216— Verbal Option; Thomas J. Gallo, 
Agt.; Out. 

217— Wings Cann Fly; Pennfield 
Farms, Inc., Agt. (to dissolve a 
partnership); Jerry Vitalo; $2,000. 

218— Shameful Pride; Mary Eppler, 
Agt.; RNA; $15,000. 

219— Agile Expression; Honey Acres 
Farm, Agt.; R & A Racing Stable; 
$ 600 . 

220— All Atwitter; Chanceland Farm, 
Inc., Agt.; John V. Betts; $500. 


114 


Maryland Horse 











'Ttk « / 



Prince 

HIS MAJESTY-PIED PRINCESS 

A rguably the soundest and 
most consistent classics- 
distance star of the ’ 80 s. 

Never sick or injured through a distinguished career, 
Majesty’s Prince won or placed in 12 Grade 1 events, earned 
$2,075,200 and was the only horse in any category to be 
weighted among the top five on The Boood-Horse Free Hand¬ 
icap every year from 1982 through 1984. 

Virtually without peer at the classic distances and particularly 
on turf, his first foals raced at three in 1989 and, like their 
sire, are demonstrating increasing promise as the distances 
lengthen. These are the very sort of individuals, fresh, sound 
and exceedingly talented, likely to excel in major international 
competition. His DUKE’S CUP, for example, a 2-year-old of 
1989, won the Continental Mile Stakes in his first career start, 
then ran a strong second in Aqueduct’s Gr. 11 Pilgrim Stakes. 

The 15 auction yearlings in 1989 by Majesty’s Prince averaged 
$36,533 - nearly five times his current fee. 

$7,500 - LIVE FOAL 

NOMINATED TO THE BREEDER’S CUP 


Inquiries: 

Spendthrift Farm 

P.O. Box 3131 
Lexington, KY 40596 
Ph. (606) 299-5271 
Fax (606) 299-4755 


Mrs. Hazel B. Marsh 

,P.O. Box 624 
Berryville, VA 22611 
Ph. (703) 837-1016 


_ John Schilling 

M P.O. Box 22168 

Spendthrift Farm 














A Pony Rider's Diary. Nina 
Duran. Prentice Hall, N.Y. 1989. 96 
pp., illus. $14.95, hardcover. 

A Pony Rider's Diary is sheer sim¬ 
plicity. Filled with the watercolors 
of New York artist and horse show 
competitor Nina Duran, the small 
book tries no less nor more than to 
charm. 

Trading on that special feeling 
that grows between children and 
their ponies, A Pony Rider's Diary is 
designed for the child to write his 
or her own story. 

Beside each wonderful picture is 
a place for entries about the pony 
itself, what it eats, the name and 
phone number of the veterinarian 
and the blacksmith, training sched¬ 
ules for animal and rider, horse 
show checklist, and many empty 
pages for horse show results. 

As with her previous book, A 
Rider's Diary, the appeal of Duran's 


paintings is sufficient to entice any 
adult to make the purchase. 

For the child who loves horses, A 
Pony Rider's Diary could provide the 
chance to create a personal account 
which he or she will treasure forev¬ 
er. 

And don't think that the child 
must actually possess a horse or 
pony. Long before I had my own 
animal, I had a collection of horse 
show and race programs with the 
actual riders' names crossed out 
and mine penciled in. The fantasy 
was a wonderful part of my child¬ 
hood . . . only I didn't have Duran's 
lovely scenes to help my imagina¬ 
tion along. 

Grooming for Ginny. Elaine 
Pickworth. Half Halt Press, Mid¬ 
dletown, Md. 1989. 144 pp., illus. 
$21.95, hardcover. 


Grooming for Ginny is a thorough¬ 
ly charming tale about British 
three-day event rider Virginia Hol- 
gate Leng, told from the "groom's 
eye view" by Leng's head stable 
manager, Elaine Pickworth. 

Pickworth carries the readers 
along from her first interview with 
Leng as a 16-year-old working stu¬ 
dent through the traumas and ec¬ 
stasy of Leng's triumphs as world 
champion and Olympic silver and 
bronze medalist. 

Anyone with an interest in com¬ 
bined training will enjoy Pick- 
worth's story. Everyone with 
horses to care for will envy the Brit¬ 
ish working student system. 

Whereas our helpers most often 
come in by the day, but live else¬ 
where, it is commonplace in Eng¬ 
land for young people who want to 
learn about horses to live, often 
tucked away in the attic or sharing a 
sparse room with others, and work 
as part of the competition team. 
These dedicated youngsters vie for 
the opportunity to be on the job 
from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.—and even 
pay for the privilege—considering 
it a fair tradeoff for the chance to 
learn with the experts. 

Pickworth sold her horse for the 
funds to go to Ginny Leng's yard. 

"The money I received for my 
youngster paid for my first year at 
Ivygleaze," writes Pickworth 
proudly. And later: "At Ivygleaze 
everyone lives at very close quar¬ 
ters, which means you get to know 
one another pretty well—for better 
or worse." 

In addition to shedding light on 
the running of a top-flight three- 
day yard, Pickworth also attempts 
to impart some practical hints on 
care, grooming, organization and 
even horse training which she 



Maryland Horse 















picked up from her experience with 
Leng. 

The amount of work and disci¬ 
pline demanded of Pickworth in 
her position seems phenomenal, 
but the story is always upbeat, cul¬ 
minating in the final chapter: 
"Seoul—An Olympic Dream." 
Pickworth gives her version of Gin- 
ny Leng and her horse Master 
Craftsman in Korea in 1988. 

"Being part of an Olympic team, 
though in a minor role, had been an 
incredible experience. It is the stuff 
of which dreams are made, and I 
shall never forget it." 

Ginny Leng on her part does not 
see Pickworth's role as minor. "Not 
only," writes Leng in the introduc¬ 
tion, "has she been invaluable as a 
groom but also as a dear friend." 

Nutrition for the Equine 
Athlete. William E. Jones, DVM, 
PhD, editor. Published by Equine 
Sportsmedicine News, P.O. Box 
1209, Wildomar, Calif. 92395. 97 
pp., softcover. No price available. 

William E. Jones, DVM, PhD, is 
the editor of Equine Sportsmedicine 
News , a newsletter-format publica¬ 
tion which is most interesting be¬ 
cause it takes a forward-looking ap¬ 
proach. Jones' philosophy presup¬ 
poses that there is a lot more that 
needs to be known about horse 
care, horse health and horse per¬ 
formance. 

In his new paperback. Nutrition 
for the Equine Athlete, Jones takes up 
that theme once again. 

"A major goal of this small book 
is to chronicle the development of 
specialized nutrition, reporting 
fact, anecdote, and hearsay. Regret¬ 
tably, most of the information avail¬ 
able is of the latter two types. Even 
legitimate research in this area is 
not much better than anecdotal be¬ 
cause such a few horses are nor¬ 
mally used in the studies." 

Nutrition for the Equine Athlete is 
meant, therefore, to be a catalyst— 
something to get those of us inter¬ 
ested in improving the breed or the 

January 1990 


competition thinking about the 
part that nutrition plays. 

As with Jones' newsletter, I find 
the book intriguing. However, the 
chapters, which range over such 
topics as hair analysis, DMG, 
DMSO, MSM, mineral imbalance, 
etc., appear to be articles taken di¬ 
rectly from Equine Sportsmedicine 
News. Jones makes no attempt to 
coordinate the material, and there 
is lots of repetition, especially on 
the current trend stressing the im¬ 
portance of feeding fat to the per¬ 
formance animal. 

The format too seems to be taken 
from varying sources as some para¬ 
graphs are indented, some not, and 
there are misspelled words and ty¬ 
pographical errors throughout. 
Strong editing would have made 
the text more readable. 

Finally, the book is sponsored by 
a variety of equine health product 
and feed companies. The result is 
that the information is often mixed 


COLD BACK 
HIP LAMENESS 
SHOULDER LAMENESS 

keeping you out of the winners circle? 

MUSCLE SPASM 

• causes pain & weakness 

• hampers movement 

• increases tension on 
tendons & joints 

• impedes circulation 

• wastes energy 

• diminishes performance 

MYOTHERAPY 

is a form of trigger point therapy which 
releases spasm. If your equine athlete 
is in pain, or is unable to perform to 
expectations, call your Vet first, then 
call your Myotherapist to treat the 
muscular aspect of the problem. 

JAMES J. JUDGE 

Certified Bonnie Prudden Myotherapist 
Specializing in Equine Myotherapy 

P.O. Box 1754. Westminster. MD 21157 
Tel. 301-857-4504 


with what seems very close to ad¬ 
vertisement. 

Unfortunately, Jones also uses 
the 1978 Research Council Nutrient 
Requirements for Horses study as the 
foundation for his remarks. This 
study was just updated in 1989 af¬ 
ter ten years of further research. 

Nutrition for the Equine Athlete is 
worth reading, but I also agree with 
what Jones himself says about the 
material. “In this book, we try to 
tell it all. We have not held informa¬ 
tion because it has not been proven 
beyond a shadow of a doubt. Take 
what you read here with a grain of 
salt, and use it as if you were exper¬ 
imenting." 


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301-329-3924 

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117 

















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Highlands Fanu 
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Farm: (606) 846-4386 
Home: (606) 846-5055 

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Obituaries 



Joseph Mergler 

Joseph William (Joe) Mergler, a 
longtime trainer who campaigned 
the brilliant race mare Tosmah to 
earn national handicap honors in 
1964, died November 14 at Harford 
Memorial Hospital. He was 80. 

Mr. Mergler, who made his 
home in Havre de Grace, was re¬ 
tired from a long career that includ¬ 
ed a 20-year stint as trainer for Mrs. 
R.H. Heighe's Prospect Hill Farm. 
For 16 years he trained for Anthony 
Imbesi's Briardale Farm in New Jer¬ 
sey, his greatest achievements com¬ 
ing with Tosmah, whose nine 1964 
stakes victories included the Ar¬ 
lington Classic, Matron Handicap 
and Beldame Stakes. Tosmah was 


voted best 3-year-old filly in the 
country in 1964, as well as champi¬ 
on handicap mare. She had been 
the 2-year-old filly champion the 
previous year. Throughout her ca¬ 
reer she won 16 stakes and earned 
$612,588 in 1960s dollars. 

Born and raised in Baltimore 
city, Mr. Mergler worked around 
horses from the time he was 10 
years old, and rode as a jockey for 
three or four years in his youth. 

Survivors include his wife, Mary 
E. Mergler, two sons, Joseph W. 
Mergler Jr. and Robert A. Mergler, 
both of Havre de Grace, and four 
grandchildren. 

Denise Williams 

Denise Warfield Williams, 38, 
wife of noted former Maryland 
horseman John Williams, died No¬ 
vember 25. 

Mrs. Williams, born in Mt. Airy 
(Md.), was the daughter of Dana 
Roudell and Patricia Dante War- 
field, who still live in Mt. Airy. 

Her husband managed Edgar 
M. Lucas' Helmore Farm in Mary¬ 
land before being hired away by 
Spendthrift Farm in Kentucky in 
the mid-1970s. Williams managed 
the vast Spendthrift operation for 
several years before joining Lee Eat¬ 
on in business as a bloodstock 
agent. The Eaton-Williams Agency 
is one of the most prominent sales 
agencies in the country. Mr. 
Williams also owns Ballindaggin 
Farm near Lexington. 

In addition to her husband and 
parents, Mrs. Williams is survived 
by a son, Richard Martin Williams 
of Lexington, and a brother, James 
Warfield, of Norfolk, Va. 


118 


Maryland Horse 
























Fourth 
Annual < 


Mainland Horsemen’s 

w m 

^*£9 3 

and 

Blue Ribbon Auction 


Party 


m 



Saturday, February 17, 1990, 7 p.m. 
Sports Palace, Laurel Race Course 

Oldies music, dancing, food, drink 
Tickets $25 

Sponsored by the MHBA for the benefit of the 
Sallie Robertson 4-H Horse Endowment 
Frank B. Russo Jr. Auctioneers, Inc. 


RESPOND BY FEBRUARY 10, 1990 

MARYLAND HORSEMEN’S PARTY (Laurel Sports Palace, February 17, 1990) 
Name_ 


Address 


City/State/Zip 


TICKETS: $25 PER PERSON 

Number of persons __ 

Check for $__ 


For donation information 
MHBA (301) 252-2100 


Payable to: Maryland 4-H Club Foundation 
Mail to: MHBA 

P.O. Box 427, Timonium, MD 21093 






















Show, 3-Phase News Items 


Round-up in Louisville 

The first Saturday in November 
was a big day for participants in the 
4H Horse and Pony program. Sev¬ 
enteen Maryland teenagers at¬ 
tended the Eastern National 4H 
Horse Round-Up in Louisville, Ky., 
a friendly competition based on 
knowledge and communication 
skills. Each state may send a single 
demonstration, a team demonstra¬ 
tion, a public speaker, a judging 
team, a horse bowl (quiz) team and 
a hippology team. Hippology, the 
study of horses, incorporates all of 
the other skills in a written exam, 
judging, feed and equipment iden¬ 
tification, and a team problem. 

Amy and Lee Schnappinger, of 
Centreville, Queen Anne's County, 
were reserve champions with their 
team demonstration, "Home, 
Sweet Home," which discussed 
factors to consider in building a 
barn. Cindy Cinnamond, of 
Charles County, gained tenth place 
in demonstration with her video 
tape and explanation of "Training 
the Young Horse." 

The horse bowl team, from 
Charles County, placed eighth, and 
Trish Marsh was second highest in¬ 
dividual in that competition. The 
judging team ranked eighth in 
placing performance classes. 

The hippology team finished 
second overall, and Adrianne 
Buschling, from Clarksville, How¬ 
ard County, was reserve champion 
individual. The team placed sec¬ 
ond in the written phase, with 
Mark Llewellyn, from Cumber¬ 
land, Allegany County, second and 
Adrianne seventh. The team tied 
for first in judging, with Adrianne 
first individual, Beverly McCredy, 


Wheaton (but Howard County 4H) 
fifth, and Vanessa Lee, of Mt. Airy, 
Carroll County, ninth. In the identi¬ 
fication phase, the team was 
fourth, and Adrianne was the 
fourth individual. The team placed 
third in the team problems. As in¬ 
dividuals, Adrianne Buschling 
ranked second, Mark Llewellyn 
eighth, Vanessa Lee 12th, and Bev¬ 
erly McCredy 16th. 

Volunteer coaches were: com¬ 
munications—Gary and Ann 
Schnappinger and Mrs. Eleanor 
Cinnamond; horse bowl—Mrs. 
Betty Ann Hyssong, Charles Coun¬ 
ty; judging—Bob Shirley, Carroll 
County; and hippology—Mrs. 
Shirley Geis, Howard County. 

Even when the 4H members 
weren't in competition, they were 
learning. Early Friday morning 
they had a private tour of the back- 
stretch of Churchill Downs, which 
was arranged by former Mary¬ 
lander Norm Luba. After a warm¬ 
up snack in the track kitchen, they 
went to the Kentucky Derby Muse¬ 
um. In the afternoon, some went to 
the Kentucky Horse Park in Lex¬ 
ington, while the horse bowl and 
hippology teams visited Carriage 
Lane American Saddlebred Farm. 
Saturday evening, after the compe¬ 
tition, there was a party. The 
awards breakfast took place Sun¬ 
day morning. 

The competition, party and 
awards are sponsored by breed as¬ 
sociations, feed companies, tack 
manufacturers, insurance compa¬ 
nies and all sorts of businesses re¬ 
lated to horse ownership. The 
Maryland delegates, who are se¬ 
lected by state competitions, have 
their transportation, hotel and 


meals paid through The Maryland 
4H Foundation, which raises the 
money from donors. The Maryland 
Horse Breeders Association spon¬ 
sors an annual "Horsemen's Party" 
and auction to raise funds and an 
endowment fund in memory of 
Sallie Robertson also helps make 
these 4H horse activities possible. 

New USPC director 

The United States Pony Clubs, 
Inc. has appointed Michael C. 
Kromer as executive director. 

Mr. Kromer comes to the organi¬ 
zation from Richmond, Va., where 
he served as executive director of a 
national trade association since 
1981. Previously, he was a member 
of the national staff of the American 
Camping Association. He holds de¬ 
grees in recreation education and 
recreation administration, and has 
earned the distinction of Certified 
Association Executive for the 
American Society of Association 
Executives. 

MHSA Final Standings for 1989 

MHSA high score standings for 1989. Please 
contact the MHSA office (472-2293) should 
there be any discrepancy. Exhibitors are 
urged to keep their own point records. 
Number following division/section indicates 
recorded ponies/horses competing who 
have won ribbons. In performance shows, 
number following name indicates shows 
where points were won. In breeding shows, 
number following name indicates sessions 
where points were won. 

Small Pony Hunter (12) 

1- Glenmore Sally, Alexandra Listrani (22) 1,060 

2- Glennant Prelude, Elizabeth Hackman (22) 834 


3- Beaujolais, Michael Hagan (32) 827 

4- Pippins Storybook, Mrs. Wyatt Stewart (23) 579 

5- Longacre Spun Son, Emily Rohrbach (19) 331 

6- Ponykins, Elizabeth Hackman (8) 244 

Small Pony Hunter 
Maryland Resident (7) 

1- Longacre Spun Son, Emily Rohrbach (8) 144 

2- Glenmore Sally, Alexandra Listrani (3) 88 

Medium Pony Hunter (23) 
1-Glenmore Twilight, Amy Boyle (25) 1,205 


120 


Maryland Horse 




2- Lucky Charm, Alexandra Listrani (25) 852 

3- Farnley Cotillion, Laura Deeley (11) 299 

4- Day Dreams, Judith Grewell (14) 248 

5- Patent Pending, Melanie Francis (8) 204 

6- Rainbeau Connection, S. Williams (10) 176 

Medium Pony Hunter 
Maryland Resident (16) 

1- Glenmore Twilight, Amy Boyle (7) 564 

2- Farnley Cotillion, Laura Deeley (9) 269 

3- Lucky Charm, Alexandra Listrani (6) 148 

4- Day Dreams, Judith Grewell (6) 128 

Large Pony Hunter (16) 

1- Footlights, Katie Huber (26) 1,038 

2- Strike It Rich, The Barracks (18) 678 

3- Equus Travel Time (17) 390 

4- Jasmine Classic, Kim Lloyd (11) 308 


5- Glenmore Teddy Bear, Allison Grewell (5) 241 

6- Olney Copper Collection, Louise Strunck (9) 201 

Large Pony Hunter 
Maryland Resident (10) 

1- Glenmore Teddy Bear, Allison Grewell (3) 221 

2- Olney Copper Collection, Louise Strunck (5) 163 

Small/Medium Green Pony Hunter (10) 


1- Shining Moment, Laurel Mullen (24) 1,074 

2- Snausages, Nancy Tomlinson (21) 998 

3- Willoughby, Allison Grewell (25) 808 

4- Famous Moment, Matthew Groff (13) 571 

5- Beaujolais, Michael Hagen (15) 542 

6- Samaritan, Hillcrest Farm (7) 272 

Small/Medium Green Pony Hunter 
Maryland Resident (7) 

1- Shining Moment, Laurel Mullen (8) 480 

2- Snausages, Nancy Tomlinson (8) 336 


Large Green Pony Hunter (8) 

1-Glenmore Teddy Bear, Allison Grewell (30) 1,729 


2- Fox Hollow Movie Star, H. Scarcia (26) 1,012 

3- She's Got Dots, Julianna Falk (17) 996 

4- Orient Express, Kristina Lyhus (16) 848 

5- Straight A's, Anne Burbach (19) 662 

6- Short Circuit, Jennifer Elder (8) 536 

Large Green Pony Hunter 
Maryland Resident (7) 

1- Glenmore Teddy Bear, Allison Grewell (9) 659 

2- Fox Hollow Movie Star, H. Scarcia (10) 426 

Children's Hunter (26) 

1- Pay the Fiddler, Alexandra Gelber (26) 1,532 

2- Acres of Diamonds, JoAnne Wessells (27) 1,433 

3- Limited Edition, Julie Cole (17) 584 

4- Uptown, Deneane Clementi (9) 244 

5- Dropcloth, Elissa Beddow (11) 228 

6- Barely Blue, Jennifer Furman (13) 209 

Children's Hunter 
Maryland Resident (16) 

1- Acres of Diamonds, JoAnne Wessells (10) 611 

2- Pay the Fiddler, Alexandra Gelber (9) 472 

3- Limited Edition, Julie Cole (7) 175 

4- Just One More Time, Jennifer Sharpe (7) 120 

Small Junior Hunter (11) 

1- Private Collection (20) 1,952 

2- Harbor Bay, Kim Lloyd (28) 1,742 

3- Patterdale, Kristina Lyhus (24) 1,504 

4- Reveille, Sally Smith (19) 342 

5- Playing for Keeps, Mrs. Frederick 

Peterson (9) 194 

6- Even Tempo, Jack Stedding (6) 188 

Small Junior Hunter 
Maryland Resident (6) 

1- Patterdale, Kristina Lyhus (6) 556 

2- Playing for Keeps, Mrs. Frederick 

Peterson (4) 158 


Large Junior Hunter (17) 


1- Lark's Impression, Kristina Lyhus (24) 1,684 

2- Boardwalk, Madeline Garnett (24) 646 

3- Scandal, Beth O'Connor & 

Greenore Farm (5) 476 

4- Incentive, Sally Smith (6) 452 

5- Etched in Granite, Amber Philler (12) 336 

6- Amarette, Lolly Clark & 

Wood's Hill Farm (5) 280 

Large Junior Hunter 
Maryland Resident (12) 

1- Lark's Impression, Kristina Lyhus (7) 536 

2- Etched In Granite, Amber Philler (5) 216 

Adult Amateur Hunter (33) 

1- All At Once, Christa Bartel (21) 552 

2- Another Star, Karen Poynter (12) 476 

3- Steel Cinder, Ruth Brooke (7) 412 

4- Shetan, Sharon Wolfe (11) 342 

5- Finer Things, Lolly Clark (5) 280 

6- The Other Shoe, Joan A. Wilson (5) 262 

Adult Amateur Hunter 
Maryland Resident (23) 

1- Another Star, Karen Poynter (5) 292 

2- Winter Affair, Carol Moore (6) 142 

3- Shetan, Sharon Wolfe (4) 120 

4- Pay the Fiddler, A. Gelber (1) 100 

Small Hunter (17) 

1- Baileys Irish Cream, Karolyn Rohr (12) 1,072 

2- Wishes, Kara Ellis (6) 430 

3- Ambrosia, M. Treptow & 

Newstead Farm (4) 190 

4- Wintarra Ring, Mary Lisa Nicholson & 

Rolling Acres Farm (1) 108 

5- Scandal Sheet, Suzanne Clark (3) 92 

6- Chase the Clouds, Claire Prouty (2) 80 



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January 1990 


121 




































Small Hunter 
Maryland Resident (11) 

1- Baileys Irish Cream, Karolyn Rohr (5) 504 

2- Wishes, Kara Ellis (3) 200 

Younger Amateur-Owner Hunter (15) 

1- Wintarra Ring, Rolling Acres Farm & 

Mary Lisa Nicholson (33) 3,358 

2- Savoy, Peter Foley (24) 891 

3- Split Decision, Linda Bayley (12) 764 

4- Rugby Road, Rolling Acres Farm & 

Kevin Foster (22) 740 

5- Batman, Fantasy Farm (17) 554 

6- Riverdale, Fantasy Farm (10) 290 

Younger Amateur-Owner Hunter 
Maryland Resident (10) 

1- Wintarra Ring, Rolling Acres Farm & 

Mary Lisa Nicholson (9) 732 

2- Split Decision, Linda Bayley (3) 272 

Older Amateur-Owner Hunter (9) 

1- To the Max, Diane Monroe (22) 1,057 

2- Reveille, Sally Smith (16) 804 

3- Cruisin' the Coast, Bay Landing Farm & 

Patricia Schindler (20) 748 

4- Incentive, Sally Smith (8) 708 

5- After Goody's, Bay Landing Farm & 

Patricia Schindler (21) 604 

6- Vested Interest, Susan Steiding (14) 336 

Older Amateur-Owner Hunter 
Maryland Resident (4) 

1-Cruisin' the Coast, Bay Landing Farm & 

Patricia Schindler (5) 244 


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2-After Goody's, Bay Landing Farm & 

Patricia Schindler (5) 176 

Green Working Hunter (14) 

1- Cruisin' the Coast, Bay Landing Farm & 

Patricia Schindler (18) 1,192 

2- Turn the Card, Joan A. Wilson (6) 431 

3- Sand Shower, Laura Danowski (7) 328 

4- Playing for Keeps, Mrs. Frederick 

Peterson (4) 100 

5- Assured, Erin Kennedy (3) 68 

6- Ambrosia, Mary Lea Treptow (2) 48 

Green Working Hunter 
Maryland Resident (10) 

1- Cruisin' the Coast, Bay Landing Farm & 

Patricia Schindler (6) 464 

2- Turn the Card, Joan A. Wilson (5) 327 

Green Conformation Hunter (11) 

1- Nuttin Shy Bout Me, Sheila Heider (13) 387 

2- Amarette, Lolly Clark & 

Woods Hill Farm (5) 374 

3- C.M. Panache, Cool Meadows Farm (5) 310 

4- Turn the Card, Joan A. Wilson (5) 252 

5- Reveille, Sally Smith (1) 76 

6- Baileys Irish Cream, Karolyn Rohr (4) 54 

Green Conformation Hunter 
Maryland Resident (5) 

1- C.M. Panache, Cool Meadows Farm (4) 180 

2- Turn the Card, Joan A. Wilson (2) 68 

Regular Hunter (10) 

1- Harbor Bay, Kim Lloyd (13) 1,372 

2- Gentlemen Jim, Jaye Younkers (4) 164 

3- Incentive, Sally Smith (3) 148 

4- Vested Interest, Susan Steiding (1) 92 

5- Barely Blue, Jennifer Furman (1) 81 

6- Ancient Line, Amanda Burt (1) 80 

Regular Hunter 
Maryland Resident (6) 

1- Barely Blue, Jennifer Furman (1) 81 

2- Ancient Line, Amanda Burt (1) 80 

Pleasure Pony (8) 

1- Country Charmer, 

Country Comfort Farm (8) 207 

2- Don't Pass Me By, Holly Latham (5) 184 

3- Wrap It Up, Rachel Sensi (1) 46 

4- Shenandoah's Almosta Alf, 

A. Prettyman (5) 22 

5- Cullowhee Lilly, Holly Bounds (2) 19 

6- Aspiring Height's Zipper, J. Robertson (2) 15 



HORSE TRANSPORTATION 

(301) 879-1378, 876-5554 

Serving all your equine travel needs local and long distance 


Pleasure Pony 
Maryland Resident (8) 


1- Country Charmer, 

Country Comfort Farm (8) 207 

2- Don't Pass Me By, Holly Latham (5) 184 

Pleasure Horse (8) 

1- Schrandy Chiquita, Daryl Insley (11) 230 

2- Golden Pawnee, Kathy Titus (8) 228 

3- Decision Eighty, Kelly Spencer (5) 97 

4- Nowata King Bee, Anita Lyvers (3) 74 

5- Magnolia, Mary C. Pearl (5) 68 

6- Tuff Cookie, Nicole Benchoff (6) 48 

Pleasure Horse 
Maryland Resident (8) 

1- Schrandy Chiquita, Daryl Insley (11) 230 

2- Golden Pawnee, Kathy Titus (8) 228 

Junior Amateur Jumper (8) 

1- News Break, Rolling Acres Farm & 

Mary Lisa Nicholson (15) 624 

2- Dr. Bruno, Beth Newman & 

Allen Shreve (8) 228 

3- Bar Brat, Oak Knoll Farm (9) 172 

4- Daniel, Zoellen Speelman (4) 168 

5- Destiny, Nicole Del Toro (4) 128 

6- Pensato, John T. Bartko (4) 45 

Junior Amateur Jumper 
Maryland Resident (6) 

1- News Break, Rolling Acres Farm & 

Mary Lisa Nicholson (7) 288 

2- Daniel, Zoellen Speelman (3) 160 

Combined Jumper (3) 

1- Sportin Jack, Edna Lytle (6) 55 

2- Remy Martin, Mill Haven Farm (3) 16 

3- Gemse, Robert Pras (3) 13 

Ladies' Side-Saddle (3) 

1- Gentlemen Jim, Jaye Younkers (8) 43 

2- Bearily Evil, Barbara Stevens (7) 32 

3- Bye Dawn, Barbara Kohr (2) 4 

Eastern Shore - Junior 

1- Farnley Cotillion, Laura Deeley 161 

2- Country Charmer, Country Comfort Farm 144 

3- Don't Pass Me By, Holly Latham 117 

4- Just One Moe Time, Jennifer Sharpe 92 

5- Toots, Dawn Vileno 43 

6- Simply Irresistible, Connie Ewing 37 

Eastern Shore 

1- Schrandy Chiquita, Daryl Insley 200 

2- Golden Pawnee, Pam Titus 168 

3- Doublemint, Ranlyn Pines 59 

4- Decision Eighty, Kelly Spencer 53 

5- Tuff Cookie, Nicole Benchoff 29 

6- Tiroth, Daryl Insley 19 

Thoroughbred Broodmare (3) 

1- Think Blue, Mrs. Frederick Peterson (2) 6 

2- Hunter Princess, E. Edmunds (1) 5 

3- Questionable Return, Clarice Kendrick (2) 4 

Thoroughbred Foal (2) 

1-Colt, Joan Fox Miller (2) 4 

1-Filly, Joan Fox Miller (1) 4 

Thoroughbred Yearling (5) 

1- Light Up the Sky, Virginia Olmstead (12) 36 

2- Class Secret, Mede Cahaba 

Stable & Stud (6) 14 

3- Complete Color, Mede Cahaba 

Stable & Stud (6) 9 

4- Complete Cheer, Mede Cahaba 

Stable & Stud (1) 2 

5- Aerial Maneuvers, Dawn 

Edwards-Callahan (1) 1 

Thoroughbred 2-Year-Old (6) 

1- Tug O' War, Virginia Olmstead (21) 50 

2- Joyful, Nancy Tomlinson (3) 7 

3- Spellbound, E.J. Fisher (3) 6 


122 


Maryland Horse 












4- Do It My Way, Holly House Farm (2) 5 

5- CIavier Note, Mede Cahaba Stable & Stud (2) 3 

5-Amelia-Claire, Equine Services (2) 3 

Thoroughbred 3-Year-Old (3) 

1- Singing Street, Jennifer Walsmith (6) 9 

2- Clavier Calling, Mede Cahaba 

Stable & Stud (2) 5 

3- Clavier Intent, Mede Cahaba 

Stable & Stud (4) 4 

Non-Thoroughbred Broodmare (2) 

1- Idle Chatter, Nicole duPont (4) 7 

2- Quintessence, Clarice Kendrick (2) 2 

Non-Thoroughbred Foal (1) 

1-Filly, Nicole duPont (4) 6 

Non-Thoroughbred Yearling (2) 

1- Fetch a Pail, Daryl Insley (2) 4 

2- Returning to Camelot (2) 2 



United Way 

Thanks to you, it works. 
For all oF us. 

A Public Service of This Magaiine & The Advertising Council 


Non-Thoroughbred 2-Year-Old (2) 

1- Wap Spotted, Cheri Moats (7) 14 

2- Enrico, Melanie Mecca (1) 4 

Non-Thoroughbred 3-Year-Old (2) 

1- Emberez, Melanie Mecca ( 6 ) 16 

2- Windjammer, Mary Brighoff (2) 8 

Pony Broodmare (2) 

1- Fashion Plate, Beverly Hubbard (10) 22 

2- Broadaxe Chablis, Richard Strauss (3) 13 

Pony Foal (4) 

1- Huntfield's First Edition, 

Beverly Hubbard (9) 22 

2- Severn Sweet Sensation, Tiz Benedict (4) 12 

3- Strawberry Hill, Richard Strauss (2) 8 

4- Heritage Superflash, Beverly Hubbard (3) 4 

Pony Yearling (5) 

1- Mine Run, Louise O'Brien (16) 51 

2- Heritage Fancy Too, Beverly Hubbard ( 8 ) 29 

3- Knicker Bocker, Louise O'Brien (7) 20 

4- Kid You Not, Cynthia Spears (10) 13 

5- Secret Affair, W. Gary Baker (3) 

6 - Katie's Cloud, Peri Ann Fitzpatrick (1) 2 

Pony 2-Year-Old (8) 

1- Charlie Chaplin, Robert Pras (15) 48 

2- Sizzlin' Socks, Louise O'Brien (17) 30 

3- Land's End Spring Special, 

W. Gary Baker (7) 22 

4- Beaugart, Pam Simoneau (4) 9 

5- North Light Josephine, P. Renzuli (2) 5 

5-Cabernay, Richard Strauss (2) 5 

5-Sedgefield's Easter Sunday, E. Edmonds (2) 5 

5- Liseter Ladyship, Elizabeth Sponseller ( 2 ) 5 

6 - High Spirits, Peri A. Fitzpatrick (1) 4 

Pony 3-Year-Old (1) 

1-Krystal, Virginia Williams ( 8 ) 13 


MHSA Lead Line (11) 

1- Hilary Gibbons-Neff 18 

2- Chelsea Lynn Faulkner 17 

3- Cari Strunck 15 

4- Jennifer Trovato \\ 

4- Cara Chester ll 

5- Jennifer Corson 10 

5-Courtney Somers 10 

5-Bonnie Wilt 10 

MHSA Short Stirrup (25) 

1- Kathleen Danielewicz 104 

2- Ryan Wilcoxon 80 

3- Marielle Bolicki 72 

4- Cara Chester 62 

5- Ami Prettyman 46 

6 - Courtney Somers 45 

7- Miranda Regan Langrell 43 

7- Megan Trovato 43 

8 - Tracy Lynn Nepert 38 

9- Nicole Frigon 30 

9-Hilary Gibbons-Neff 30 

Adult Amateur Hunter Seat 

1- Joan A. Wilson 7 

2- Emily Biscoe 6 

3- Wendy Bartko 5 

3-Laura Danowski 5 

3-Leslie Jones 5 

3-Claire Prouty 5 

3- Lynn Richards 5 

4- Carol Moore 4 

Children's Hunter Seat 

1- Joanne Wessells 13 

2- Allyson Dausy 8 

3- Daniela Meyer 5 

3-Laurel Mullen 5 

3-Erika Starnes 5 

3- Danielle Vilenos 5 

4- Connie Ewing 4 



Great. 

Even when you’re 
just horsing around. 

\x>u may not want to wade through water deep 
enough for a boat. 

Or climb slopes that justify a fear of heights. 

Or travel over terrifying terrain. 

But the fact is the Range Rover can do all these 
things. So it certainly excels in ordinary driving 
situations. Like rain, sleet or the hazards of a 
snowstorm. 

So do come in for a test drive. 

And find out how much excitement you can 
endure. 


GRANGE ROVER 


Distinguished Prices. Impeccable Service. 

FRANKEL 


201 RI ISTI RSTOXVN ROAD 


£3 RANGE ROVER 


R.S.V.P. 484-8800 


January 1990 


123 













LOOKING BACK... 


50 Years Ago... 

■ ^Challenger II became the first 
Maryland sire ever to top the 
national stallion rankings. A 
photograph of William L. Brann's 
prepotent son of Swynford— 
Sword Play by Great Sport, in his 
stud paddock at Glade Valley 
Farm in Walkersville, appeared on 
the cover of the Maryland 
Horse. 

■ Humphrey Finney reported on 
a day spent at William 
Woodward's Belair Stud in Prince 
George's County. The 3,500-acre 
farm was the home to top class 
Thoroughbreds, Clydesdales, 
Shorthorn cattle and Shropshire 
sheep, and Finney noted there 
were "excellent specimens of each 
breed in considerable quantity, to 
boot." The fields were full of 
Thoroughbred weanlings and 
yearlings by leading sires * Sir 
Gallahad III, ’"Blenheim II, Gallant 
Fox and Omaha, all of which 
impressed the author 
tremendously. 

In the course of his travels, 
Finney, who served as the 
MHBA's field secretary, stopped 
at Ernest Hackney's Elberton Hill 
Farm in Darlington (Harford 
County). The farm, described by 
Finney as "an excellently 
appointed breeding farm of some 
150 acres of good Deer Creek 
Valley land," was home to seven 
broodmares and eight yearlings 
and 2-year-olds. The young 
horses were said to be "sound, 
well turned and giving the 
impression of being the sort of 
stock that is well worth training." 

■ "Maryland assumes a very 
forward position in the 
Thoroughbred world today. 
Besides tradition and background. 


practical advancement has gained 
momentum and improvements 
originated or popularized in 
Maryland have spread to other 
centers and benefited racing 
throughout the other racing 
states," remarked Raleigh 
Burroughs in regard to Maryland 
racing's innovative ideas, such as 
the Puett gate, Totalisator, finish 
line camera and electrical timing 
devices. Burroughs continued, ". . . 
the people who give us racing in 
Maryland are a strangely 
progressive lot . . . " 

■ Walter P Chrysler Jr., son of 
the well-known automobile 
manufacturer, was actively 
acquiring Thoroughbred breeding 
stock and yearlings, with the idea 
of perhaps purchasing a farm in 
Maryland. Chrysler attracted 
attention as one of the partners in 
the purchase of the new Holly 
Beach Farm stallion *Quatre Bras 
II. Most of Chrysler's small band 
of mares, which were boarded at 
Stadacona Farm in the 
Worthington Valley, were booked 
to that stallion. 


30 Years Ago... 

■ Maryland mourned the passing 
of Merryland Farm owner Danny 
Shea, who died suddenly at the 
age of 62. Renowned as a show 
ring rider. Shea captured titles at 
Madison Square Garden for three 
consecutive years before turning 
to Thoroughbred training in 1936. 
Three years later, he purchased 
the 250-acre Merryland Farm 
property and turned it into the 
largest commercial breeding and 
training establishment in 
Maryland. Future plans for the 
farm were under the direction of 


Shea's widow Betty, who 
announced that "business will 
continue at Merryland Farm. I'm 
sure that's the way Danny would 
have wanted it." 

■ The Jennings Handicap for 
Maryland-breds was dropped to 
overnight status, thus denying 
Yes You Will a much-deserved 
first stakes victory. The 3-year-old 
colt by Rough'n Tumble had been 
a model of consistency during the 
year, winning eight of fourteen 
starts, and finishing second, by a 
nose, in the Ventnor Turf 
Handicap. Yes You Will drew off 
to a commanding lead in the 
Jennings, then held off a stern 
challenge by Madok to win by a 
length and a quarter. The finish 
of the Jennings was shown on the 
cover of the Maryland Horse. 

■ Improvements underway at 
Bowie were expected to be 
completed in time for the 
February opening. The new 
glass-enclosed clubhouse and 
grandstand, the only one of its 
kind in the East, was designed to 
provide the best possible 
protection from the elements 
while affording an unobstructed 
view of the track. In addition, a 
new two-acre "preferred parking" 
area was cleared. Previously the 
land had been used for the race 
train from Washington, but with 
the decline of rail travel, the 
"Washington Special" was 
canceled, paving the way for the 
new parking lot. 

■ The 1960 Maryland stallion 
roster listed 93 Thoroughbreds, 
nine more than the previous 
season. New additions for the 
year included Mrs. Anderson 
Fowler's stakes winner 
Assemblyman, who had been 
retired to Daniel B. Brewster's 
Worthington Farm. 


124 


Maryland Horse 










■ Trainer J. Bowes Bond led the 
Maryland trainer standings in 
wins (42) at the mile tracks, 
exceeding his brother Bernie's 
total by two. In the jockey 
rankings, Howard Grant's 133 
wins outdistanced his closest 
pursuer, Arthur Chambers (with 
83), while William Clark topped 
jockeys at the minor tracks with 
51 wins. 

The leading money-winning 
race horse in Maryland for 1959 
was Preakness victor Royal Orbit, 
who earned $136,200 for his effort 
in Maryland's richest race. 


10 Years Ago... 

■ Eddie Blind and his nephew 
Eric, Maryland's newly appointed 
head starter, were featured on the 
cover of the MARYLAND HORSE. 
Eddie Blind, the head starter in 
Maryland since 1947, had decided 
it was "time to rack it up" and 
announced his retirement late in 
1979. The 73-year-old racing 
official reflected on his long 
career—and the hard work and 
dangers of the demanding job—in 
an article written by Snowden 
Carter. Commented Carter on 
Eddie's having "handed over the 
starting button" to Eric: "It 
proved the faith and trust which 
race track operators have in this 
man. You see it was Blind, 
himself, who chose his successor 
by personally grooming him for 
the job a number of years ago." 

■ Maryland's share of Eclipse 
honors grew with news that 
media awards were to be 
presented to Skip Ball of the 
Maryland Horse, for his 
photograph of Spectacular Bid 
winning the Kentucky Derby 


(best color photograph), and Dick 
Woolley, public address 
announcer for Maryland's tracks, 
for the weekly radio show 
"Showcase of Racing," which he 
conceived, hosted and produced 
for Baltimore radio station WITH 
(best radio program on horse 
racing). 

Other Marylanders to receive 
Eclipses were Mr. and Mrs. James 
P. Ryan, owners and breeders of 
champion 2-year-old filly Smart 
Angle; Carlyle J. Lancaster, who 
raced homebred champion 
sprinter Star de Naskra; and the 
Meyerhoffs (Harry, Tom and 
Teresa), owners of 3-year-old 
champion Spectacular Bid. 

■ Jerry Hoffberger plunged into 
the commercial horse business 
with the purchase of 129-acre 
Helmore Farm from Edgar M. 
Lucas. The Howard County 
property was renamed Sunset 
Hill by the former owner of the 
Baltimore Orioles, whose 
intention, with the help of farm 
manager Sonny Sims, was to 
establish a commercial breeding 
operation and stand two or three 
stallions. Due Diligence, a stakes 
winner of nearly $275,000, was 
the first stallion advertised. 

No stranger to horse racing, 
Hoffberger had previously 
operated Bel Air race track and 
Baltimore Raceway. During the 15 
years he had owned race horses, 
he campaigned stakes horses 
Jerali, Piute and Silk or Satin. 

■ Dr. Edgar Berman, surgeon, 
author and Thoroughbred owner, 
was asked in a Snowden Carter 
interview to reveal his secrets on 
breeding a good race horse. 
"Grinning elfishly," Dr. Berman 
replied without hesitation: "It's 85 
percent heredity and 15 percent 
environment." Berman was the 


breeder of Phoebe's Donkey, a 
stakes winner and Maryland 
champion despite her 
unfashionable pedigree, whom he 
had just sold for $300,000. 

The doctor also offered his 
views on horse racing: 

"It's a funny thing, but nothing, 
and I mean nothing, I have ever 
been involved in is as nerve- 
racking as a horse race. Breeding 
horses is a rather placid existence. 
But racing a horse is more exciting 
than the most difficult surgery ..." 

■ Maryland-bred 2-year-old filly 
Weber City Miss notched her first 
stakes win, capturing the Cameo 
Stakes at Laurel in late December. 
The daughter of Berkley Prince 
had three wins and three seconds 
in seven starts for the year. 

Three-year-old filly Jameela 
ended the year with victories in 
the Idle Miss and Anne Arundel 
Handicaps, raising her record to 
nine wins in 13 starts, with three 
seconds and a third, for earnings 
close to $200,000. 

Follow-up report: Weber City 
Miss and Jameela both went on to 
even more distinguished racing 
careers, and each produced her 
first foal in 1984. Those foals are 
millionaires Slew City Slew 
(Weber City Miss) and champion 
Gulch (Jameela). 

■ The Commission on Racing 

Reform, created by Governor 
Harry Hughes early in 1979, was 
instructed to review thoroughly 
all facets of Maryland's racing 
industry. The first report was 
released in December, 1979. In the 
first of two installments to run in 
the Maryland Horse, the 
commission reported on the 
problems confronting racing: 
inflation, attendance and handle, 
quality of Maryland 
Thoroughbred circuit, promotion 
and facilities. □ 


January 1990 


125 










Fine Country Properties 


Harford County 


96-acre estate with many lovely 
improvements including—fine 
stone and frame 5-BR home Circa 
1700, spacious master BR suite, 
five baths, lovely den, formal I)R, 
a very gracious home, also 
excellent modern horse bam, two 
other horse bams, one with 
apartment over it, 2-BR stone 
tenant cottage, swimming pool, 
board fencing, g900,000. 

Harry Hopkins C ompany 

Churchville, Maryland 21028 
801-734-6288 or 301-836-2689 



199-Acre Horse-AgH. Farm in York County, PA 


This estate is minutes from 1-83, 
near York, FA, with easy access to 
Route 30 bypass. Present use is 
dairy and agricultural. However, 
there are creek and hard road 
frontage, corrals, 2 barns, 3 
shelters and a new 10-stall horse 
barn and excellent level pastures. 

2 older homes and a 9-year-old 
cedar contemporary home are 
included in sale. Words here do 
not fully describe this offering 
at $975,000. 

Call Kick Smith. Realtor 

for additional information 
or an appointment. 

Cold well Banker, Bob Yost, Inc. 

2525 Eastern Boulevard, York, PA 

(717) 757-7S11 



COLDUieU. 

BANKeRB 


BOB YOST, INC. 

An Independently Owned and Operated Member 
of Coldvell Banker Residential Affiliates. Inc. 


126 


Maryland Horse 

































Real Estate 


SOUTHERN YORK CO. 80-A. FARM: 60 A. tillable. 
2-story frame house, bank barn & large cement 
block gar. Pasture w/stream fed from spring on 
prop. This prop, adjacent to 1-83 midway between 
Exit 2 & 3 w/frontage on both sides of paid state 
maint. road. Call (717) 244-4168. 

HORSE FARM FOR SALE: 170 acres in Bedford 
Co., PA. River borders part of property & pond on 
property. 100 x40’ bank barn in very good condi¬ 
tion w/14 box stalls. 4 separate feed lots under 
roof, machine sheds and other outbuildings. 
About 35 acres wooded. Balanced, tillable & 
fenced pasture. Remodeled main house w/3-BR, 
1.5 BA, LR, DR, kitchen & office. Mobile trailer & 
tenant house (presently rented) also included in 
sale. 3 wells supply ample water to barn & homes. 
Asking $275,000. Call (814) 733-4363._ 

FOR RENT: Near Harrisburg, min. from turnpike & 
routes 15 & 83. 14 new box stalls, sliding doors, 


clay floors, plus 4-board fenced paddocks for turn 
outs. Rent it all for $900 mo. Call Gary D. Reihart, 
(717) 432-3148. 

FOR RENT: New indoor heated swimming facility 
for horses. Excellent design for safety of horses. 
Infra-red heat, 4 new box stalls included with pool. 
14 more available. Monthly rental $1,200. Call 
Gary D. Reihart, (717) 432-3148. 

HORSE FARM FOR SALE: Professional Maryland 
horse farm with excellent access to state and re¬ 
gional tracks offers outstanding opportunity to 
buyer. Approximately 50 stalls, breeding facilities, 
all amenities, including main house. Offered at 
$3,000,000. For confidential inquiries please con¬ 
tact: Nellie Arrington, REALTOR, Long & Foster 
Real Estate, Inc., (301) 465-7946 or (301) 
730-3456, (301) 982-1031 Washington area, 
10724 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia, Mary¬ 
land 21044. 


Independence Farm for Sale 

Conveniently located off of Route 301 near Chestertown, Maryland, 
is this exciting 28-acre show/breeding/layup operation, consisting of 
19 stalls, 3 turn-out sheds, lovely main residence and separate 
apartment. 



Independence Farm is both well-designed and maintained, and lends 

itself well for various types of 
operations. Realistically priced 
at only $450,000, 
Independence is one of few 
well-maintained, affordable 
horse farms on the Eastern 
Shore. 

For further information contact: 
Land and Farm Division 


fa Patterson 
k) Schwartz 

estate 

1-800-336-LAND 


Dick Woolley 

REALTOR 


From start to 
finish, your best bet 
in real estate. 


Specializing in horse farms, 
residential real estate and prime 
building lots. 

A previous horse farm owner 
knowledgeable in the design and 
development of horse farms. 

Serving Baltimore, Howard, 
Frederick, Carroll, Prince Georges, 
Montgomery and Anne Arundel 
counties. 


Whether buying or selling 
contact me at home ( 301 ) 
461-3130 or the office: 

American Properties, Inc. 

8307 Main Street, Ellicott City, MI) 
21043 • (301) 461-7100 or 
(301)596 1967 (D C.) 



People read 
ads in our 
Real Estate 
Section. 



January 1990 


127 


























PREVIOUSLY 
WINDFIELDS FARMS 


FARMS 

FOR 

SALE 

Chesapeake City, Maryland 


321 ± Acres 

• 2 block (asphalt center aisle) bams 
totalling 50 stalls 

• 5 residences (4 brick constructed) 

• Separate farm office building 

• 50'x 100’ covered yearling 
walking ring 

• 36’x 140’ block, run-in shed 

• Some woods, mostly open 

• Lovely rolling fields 

• Extensive interior, asphalt roads 

• Situated adjacent to major training 
facility and near Northview 
Stallion Station 

• Restrictions apply 

$1,550,000 


113± Acres 

• 2 block (asphalt center aisle) bams 
totalling 48 stalls 

• 2 brick, 3-bedroom residences 

• Beautifully maintained double- 
fenced pastures with automatic 
waterers in largerfields 

• Small pine woods 

• Pond frontage 

• Adjacent to former Windfields Farm 
Stallion Division 

• Restrictions apply 

$775,000 


These farms are located at the 
northern end of the Chesapeake Bay, 
midway between Baltimore and 
Philadelphia (one hour to each). 
Summit Aviation, with a 4500’ 
strobe-lighted runway, is situated 
four miles away. There are also 
several marinas nearby. 


© 

Patterson 

Schwartz 


REAL 


ESTATE 


Call for a detailed information package. 
A. John Price 
Land ©> Farm Division 
1-800-336-LAND 


















1990 Maryland Fund 
Stakes Schedule 

Offering $2 million in purse money 
for registered Maryland-breds. 


2-YEAR-OLDS I 

August 

Rollicking Stakes 

$ 50,000-guaranteed, 

6 fur. 

November 

Devil’s Bag Stakes 

$75,000-guaranteed, 

7 fur. 

December 

Md. Juvenile Championship 

$ 150,000-guaranteed, 

l'/u. mi. 

2-YEAR-OLD FILLIES 

August 

Smart Angle Stakes 

$50,000-guaranteed, 
6 fur. 

November 

What a Summer Stakes 

$75,000-guaranteed, 
7 fur. 

November 

Md. Juvenile Filly Championship 

$ 1 50,000-guaranteed, 

I'/ui mi. 

December 

Heavenly Cause Stakes 

$60,000-guaranteed, 

6 '/_* fur. 

3-YEAR-OLDS 

January 1 3 

Star de Naskra Stakes 

$60,000-guaranteed, 

7 fur. 

February 3 

Goss L. Stryker Stakes 

$7 5,000-guaranteed, 

l'/i* mi. 

March 

Mister Diz Stakes 

$60,000-guaranteed, 
6 fur. 

April 

Deputed Testamony Stakes 

$75,000-guaranteed, 

P/s mi. 

July 

Humphrey S. Finney Stakes 

$7 5,000-guaranteed, 
P/w> mi., turf 

October 

Northern Dancer Stakes 

$100,000-guaranteed, 

1 ‘/.n mi. 


Another $2 million will be distributed in bonus awards for breeders, own 
ers and stallion owners of registered Maryland-breds. 


For more information, contact Maryland Horse Breeders Assc 


3-YEAR-OLD FILLIES 

February 24 Jameela Stakes 

$75,000-guaranteed, 

l'/u. mi. 

April 

Politely Stakes 

$60,000-guaranteed, 

6 fur. 

April 

Caesar’s Wish Stakes 

$ 7 5,000-guaranteed, 
P/h, mi. 

July 

Pearl Necklace Stakes 

$75,000-guar; i nteed, 
l'/ic mi., furt 

August 

Twixt Stakes 

$ 100,000-guaranteed, 

P/s mi. 

3 & UP 

March 

Jennings Handicap 

$ 100,000-guaranteed, 
P/s mi. 

June 

Challedon Handicap 

$60,000-guaranteed, 
7 fur. 

November 

Find Stakes 

$75,000-guaranteed, 
P/s mi., turf 

3 & UP, FILLIES & MARES 

March 10 

Conniver Stakes 

$60,000-guaranteed, 
7 fur. 

May 

Geisha Stakes 

$ 100,000-guaranteed, 

1 Vi«. mi., dirt or turf 

September 

Alma North Stakes 

$40,000-added, 
P/ii. mi., Timonium 

Fall 

All Brandy Handicap 

$75,000-guaranteed, 
1 '/s mi., dirt or turl 


An additional $50,000 in stakes funds may also be paid for split races, 
enhanced purses or allowance races. 

iation, BO. Box 427, Timonium, MO 21093, (301) 252-2100. 





































Classified Advertisements 


$12 minimum, $4 per line. Estimated at 50 char¬ 


acters per line. $2.50 additional per insertion if 
name withheld and a drawer number used with 
the Maryland Horse address. Minimum pay¬ 
ment required with placement. Classified ads are 
not subject to any commissions or discounts. Due 
5th of month preceding month of publication. 

Stallions 


EXTRA STALLION SEASONS: Arts and Letters, 
Native Charger, San Feliou (Fr), Horatius, Gold 
Stage, Baederwood. Too many seasons, not 
enough mares! Very reasonable. (703) 364-2922. 

TEASER WANTED: For large TB farm. Call (301) 
898-9027. 

DOUBLE IMAGE: By Spring Double. Standing first 
season. Free to approved mares. Call (301) 
821-6844, (301) 255-4200. 


FOR SALE: 

ONE SHARE IN IRON 

By Mr. Prospector. Five 2-y-o winners 
in his first crop. Owner dispersing all 
equine interests. Sale subject to 
syndicate approval, 7 days to match. 

_ ( 301 ) 239-8187 _ 


Horses, Ponies 


READY TO BE TRAINED: 5 PA-bred 2-yr.-olds lead¬ 
ing and ready to be trained (3 geldings, 2 fillies) by 
Peddler’s Pass, Right Judex and King Reasonable. 
Priced from $1,000 to $2,500. Also '87 gelding by 
Hasty Spring. $2,500. Call (814) 733-4363. 

1988 BEAR HUNT COLT: Out of a winning HOLD 
YOUR PEACE mare. Registered Maryland-bred. 
Fully nominated to Breeders’ Cup and Maryland 
Million. SEA JAY FARM (703) 594-3430. 

Boarding, Training, Lessons 

SOME DAY SOON FARM: In Mt. Airy. Boarding 
broodmares, yearlings, weanlings & sales prep. 
New barns & fencing. Professional top quality 
care. Standing T. Brooke, Class Chief, Next Fron¬ 
tier & Conqueror Too. (301) 831-5070. 

STONEWORTH FARM: Boarding broodmares and 
weanlings. New barn and fencing. Excellent pas¬ 
tures. Quiet environment. Foaling services by 
manager with over 25 years experience. Call Skee- 
ter Figgins at (301) 833-6549. 

FOALING MARES: Experienced attendant, 24- 
hour watch. Cameras, 12 x 20 stalls. Turnout. 
Hauling available. (301) 442-2259. 

RED WOOD KNOLL FARM: All new facilities in 
Northern Harford Co. Boarding, broodmares, 
sales prep, layups and foaling services. Breaking 
and training at reasonable rates by experienced 
professionals. Licensed trainer available. (301) 
879-4021. 


Trailers, Vans 


CLASSIC ALUMINUM TRAILERS: NOW AVAILABLE 
FROM OCTOBER FARM * CLASSIC, Box 209A, RR 2, 
Titusville, NJ 08560. (609) 737-9645. 

1984 HARTMAN: Thoroughbred horse trailer, 
newly painted, new floor, in excellent condition. 
Priced right at $3,400. Call Gary D. Reihart, (717) 
432-3148. 


Horse Transportation 


AVL INC.: The standard of quality in horse transporta¬ 
tion. 48-state authority. Weekly service. Inside KY 
800-633-0905, outside KY 800-235-5735. 


Help Wanted, Available 

NIGHT WATCH PERSON: Needed for TB horse 
farm. Frederick area. Mid-January through mid- 
June 1990. Must have foaling experience. Sorry, 
no housing. Call (301) 898-9027, 7:30 a.m.-4 
p.m. (Mon.-Fri.). 


Miscellaneous 


FENCE SPRAYING: DISTINCTIVE DECORATORS. Inte¬ 
rior & exterior painting, wall coverings. All home & 
business services, farm repairs. (301) 592-3828. 

HORSE MANURE REMOVAL: Prompt, regular 
pickup. Year-round service. Frezzo Bros., Box44, 
Avondale, PA 19311. (215) 268-8258. 

EQUINE DENTISTRY: Michael J. Dougherty, West 
Chester, PA (215) 431-3184 or Centreville, MD 
(301) 758-2749. 

WILL DESIGN & BUILD: Custom horse barns to 
your needs at competitive costs. (301) 833-1840. 

FENCES: Built and painted. Barns repaired and 
painted. Trees trimmed, hedgerows cleared. (301) 
848-0637. 


FARRIER: Professional services for farms. Md - 
state licensed. Bobby Burns (717) 382-4906. 

BLACKTOP, TAR & CHIP: Driveways, parking lots, 
barns. STREAKER CONSTRUCTION AND AS¬ 
PHALT. (301) 442-2409. 


HORSE MANURE REMOVAL: PROMPT REGULAR 
PICK-UP. YEAR-ROUND SERVICE. HUDSON 
FARMS, AVONDALE, PA. (215) 869-2408. 

PAINTING & CONSTRUCTION: Andy R Sadler— 
fence and barn painting. (301) 857-4391. 

RWK CONTRACTING CO.: Custom Equestrian Fa¬ 
cilities and Pole Buildings to accommodate your 
equine needs. Guaranteed to beat any written esti¬ 
mate by 15%. (301) 879-4021. 

EQUINE PORTRAITS: Commissions in oil or water- 
color invited. Barbara Oelke, 3334 Jarrettsville 
Pike, Monkton, MD 21111. (301) 692-6088. 
Member, American Academy of Equine Art. 


We're Essential to 
Your Horse Business 



You surround your horses with 
professionals because you care 
about them. Whether you're in¬ 
volved for business or pleasure, 
the welfare of your horses 
comes first. The American Horse 
Council is a vital part of your 
professional team, working to 
inform Congress, the federal 
agencies and the media about 
your horse industry. AHC is the 
Washington D.C. trade associa¬ 
tion representing all horse 
interests. 


A* 

Z3 /4MERIG4N 
MM HORSE COUNCIL 

1700 K Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20006 
Telephone 202/296-4031 


Please send me AHC membership 
information: 

Name_ 

Address_ 

City_ 

State_ Zip 


130 


Maryland Horse 






















































Index to Advertisers 


STALLIONS 


Acallade. 

Alchise. 

Alden's Ace. 

Ally Runner. 

Aloma's Ruler. 

Along Came Jones.. 

Baederwood. 

Believe the Queen . . 
Brilliant Protege 

Caveat. 

Clever Secret. 

Clint Maroon. 

Dancing Again. 

Dancing Count. 

Deputed Testamony 
Dom Menotti (Fr).. . 
Double Edge Sword. 

Double Zeus. 

Dover Ridge. 

Exclusive One. 

Fappavalley. 

Fuzzbuster. 

Gaylord's Carousel . 

Harriman. 

Horatius. 

Isella. 

Island Champ. 

Jane's Dilemma. 

Jeloso. 

John Alden. 

Jolly Johu. 

Kid Colin. 

Loose. 

Lord Gaylord. 

Lord Lister. 

Majesty's Prince 

Marine Brass. 

Melodisk. 

Mr. Dreamer. 

Mr. Napton. 

Nepal. 

Never Down Hill ... 
Northern Classic .. . 

Northern Raja. 

North Pole. 

Oh Say. 

Par Five. 

Prince Street. 

Rambler Red. 

Roo Art. 

Royal Hierarchy 

Salutely. 

Seniority. 

Sentimental Slew .. . 

Silver Badge. 

Smarten. 

Sort. 

Stormin' Again. 

Tatibah (Ire). 

Thirty Eight Paces . . 

Two Punch. 

Uno Roberto. 


. 77 

. 18 

. 91 

. 67 

. 35 

. 56 

. 41 

. 17 

. 44 

. 31 

.14, 15, 17 

. 48 

. 2 

.104, 105 

. 7 

. 85 

. 49 

. 45 

. 13 

. 17 

. 2 

. 53 

. 20 

. 17 

.106,107 

. 17 

. 99 

. 17 

. 18 

. 103 

. 50 

. 110 

. 18 

. 19 

. 51 

. 115 

. 112 

. 95 

. 114 

. 38 

. 97 

. 67 

. 67 

. 21 

. 2 

Inside back cover 

. 18 

. 89 

. 85 

. 9 

. 87 

. 55 

. 47 

. 67 

. 67 

. 31 

. 109 

. 46 

. 2 

. 39 

. 31 

. 101 


Van Go. 18 

Verification. 18 

Waquoit. 31 

Whatever For. 17 

Willard Scott. Ill 

Wollaston. 11 

Stallion shares/seasons 

Dancing Count. 8 

Iron. 130 


OTHER ADVERTISERS 


Anderson Feed Co. 132 

Bloodstock Research. 81 

Carole K. Boyd, Attorney. 96 

Broom Hall. 4 

Bruce Carter, Attorney. 118 

Church Mouse Meadows. 43 

Corbett Farm . 17 

Country Life Farm.Inside front cover 

Creative Classic Construction. 122 

DeGarmo Constructors & Assoc. 121 

DiBella Vans. 8 

Equivest Sales. 5 

Fair Play Horse Supplies. 117 

Farm Credit System. 83 

Fasig-Tipton Midlantic. 1 

Frankel Range Rover. 123 

Highlands Farm. 118 

Horse Transportation: 

Amos Fenstermacher. 117 

Jack McKee. 40 

C. Mills, Inc. 114 

Tamberino. 122 

Wilson. 4 

Insurance: 

EMO Insurance. 40 

Kohler Bloodstock. 113 

Larking Hill Training Center. Back cover 

Litz Blood stock. 22 

Maryland Fund. 129 

Maryland Saddlery. 90 

Monmouth Park. 12 

Myotherapy. 117 

New Jersey Breeders' Association. 100 

Northview Stallion Station. 31 

Pennsylvania Horse Breeders Association. 96 

Real Estate: 

Coldwell Banker. 126 

O'Conor Piper & Flynn. 23 

Harry Hopkins Co. 126 

Patterson Schwartz.127, 128 

Dick Woolley, Realtor. 127 

Reisterstown Veterinary Center. 18 

Jennifer R. Small. 94 

Springtime Feed Co.!. 80 

Stitches by Chloe. 8 

Sunset Hill Farm. 2 

Thorn mar. 106 

Virginia Thoroughbred Association. 94 

West Virginia Thoroughbred Breeders Association. 98 

White Hall Feed Co. 132 


January 1990 


131 
























































































































Editorial 


White Hall 
Feed Co. 


17106 York Road 
Hereford, MD S (301) 329-2171 



Anderson 
Feed Co. 


423-425 South Main St. 
Shrewsbury, PA S (717) 235-4485 

♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


Full Line of Horse Feeds 

PURINA 

WAYNE 

TIZWHIZ 

and our own special mixes: 
WHITE HALL FEED 
HUNT COUNTRY FEED 

Feeding Consultations 
Complete Line of Horse 
Supplies, Treatments 
and Supplements 

Hay, Straw and Shavings 

Pet Foods and Pet 
Supplies 

Delivery Available 


Horses, preservation and development 


1 ublic concern about growth was revealed in a recent poll 
showing that residents of some Maryland counties consider devel¬ 
opment to be their most important problem, causing them more 
anxiety even than schools or drugs. As a result, growth is expected 
to be a major political issue in the 1990 elections. 

What most Marylanders would understandably prefer are sin¬ 
gle-family dwellings in scenic suburban or rural settings, but with 
stores, restaurants and offices only a brief uncongested drive away. 
Because many of them are willing to work hard to try to achieve these 
ends, development occurs, which is nothing more sinister than the 
market supplying their demands. 

What horses have to offer the problem is an economic use for 
agricultural open space that is compatible with suburban living. A 
reason why open space continues to diminish is that farmland pre¬ 
servation programs aren't effective unless suburban neighbors are 
willing to allow preserved "farmland" to be farmed. 

In Maryland, the feeling of "horse country" is precisely what 
makes some areas so attractive for development, proven by the 
horse-related names often chosen for subdivisions. A strong horse 
breeding industry driven by a strong horse racing industry will only 
enhance and broaden these positive connotations. 

Because it will end up being all but impossible for Maryland to 
prevent or manage growth in a way that serves equally both its long¬ 
term economic and life-style goals, it should be stressed repeatedly 
that horse breeding is one industry that is capable of bridging preser¬ 
vation and development of the state. 

/Richard W. Wilcke 


132 


Maryland Horse 






























' ?* #i m 

> ■ , l 

WmHM m >> " 




I 

|k;«*w . , „ 


Living up to expectations. 

During OH SAY's racing career. Hall of Fame trainer Henry Clark 
(pictured above with OH SAY and Sagamore Farm trainer Joe Crowley) 
touted this stakes-winning son of HOIST THE FLAG as "one of the very best 
... I ever trained." 

And in the breeding shed, OH SAY has not disappointed his 
supporters. His four crops to race have generated ten stakes horses. 
Among them are the $2-million filly SHAM SAY, a Grade 1 stakes winner of 
$517,138 with a SSI of 37.88, multiple stakes winner BANNER HIT 
($159,415) and 1989 juvenile sensation REAL TOUGH, who in five starts 
has captured two added-money events. 

$7,500 Live Foal 

Payable Sept. 1 of year bred; Property of a Syndicate 
Nominated to Breeders' Cup and Maryland Million 


3501 Belmont Ave., Glyndon, Maryland 21071 ■ Donald P. Litz, Jt ■ (301) 833-3737 










DON’T 


YOU 


TAKE ENOUGH RISKS? 




mmm 


lot can go wrong along the way to the starting gate. Take away the 
expected 33% attrition rate from conception to the 2-year-old year and 
there are still many factors remaining. But you can avoid many misfor¬ 
tunes with a properly prepared race horse. Larking Hill Training Center has 
the facilities and the expertise to give a young Thoroughbred an education 
that will prevent foreseeable problems which may obstruct his path to the 
races. Since breaking and preparing race horses is our specialty, the odds 
are your horse will wind up in the winner's circle. 

Harwood, Maryland U Christy Clagetz, owner!manager ■ (301) 867-2052 or 798-1294