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(0 Ontario 

Ontario 
School Board 
Reduction 
Task Force 

Final Report 



2831 
. S93 


c . 1 

tor mai 1 


1996 







Final Report 


Ontario 
School Board 
Reduction 
Task Force 

February 1996 





Copies of this report are available for a charge from: 

Publications Ontario 
880 Bay Street 
Toronto, Ontario 

Access Ontario 
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Ottawa, Ontario 

Mail order customers may contact: 

Publications Ontario 
50 Grosvenor Street 
Toronto, Ontario M7A 1N3 
Telephone (416) 326-5300 
Toll-free in Ontario 1-800-668-9938 
Fax (416) 326-5317 

Anyone wishing access to the submissions to and records of the Ontario 
School Board Reduction Task Force should contact the Records 
Management Unit or the Freedom of Information and Privacy Office of the 
Ministry of Education and Training. The records will be retained there for 
three years and then permanently stored at the Archives of Ontario. 

Ce document est egalement offert en frangais sous le titre suivant: 
Groupe d’etude sur la reduction du nombre de conseils scolaires 
en Ontario - Rapport final. 


Contents 


Letter of Transmittal 
Order in Council 

Preface . 

1. Mandate of the Task Force . 

Background . 

Mandate and Terms of Reference . . . 

2. School Board Governance and Funding 

in Ontario . 

The Present Governance System . . . . 
The Present Funding System. 

3. Context of Reform: Changing Economic 

and Social Environments . 

The Changing Economic Environment 
The Changing Social Environment . . 
The Challenge for Education 
Governance . 

4. Other Education Reforms . 

Education Finance Reform . 

Limits on Trustee Compensation . . . . 
A Requirement to Share Services . . . 

School Councils . 

Curriculum Development . 

Testing and Reporting on Student 

Achievement . 

Teacher Education . 

5. Task Force Criteria for Amalgamation and 

New School Board Boundaries . 

Respect for Constitutional Rights . . . 

Coterminality and Contiguity . 

Size of Student Population . 

Reasonable Distance . 


Existing Traffic Patterns . 22 

Natural Barriers . 22 

Similar Interests and Natural Affinities . . 22 

Joint Ventures with Social Services . 22 

Impact Studies . 22 

Deliberations of the Greater Toronto 

Area Task Force . 22 

6. Interim Report and Public Response . 23 

Interim Report, September 1995 . 23 

Public Response . 23 

7. Issues Before the Task Force . 25 

Funding of School Boards . 25 

Amalgamation and New Boundaries .... 28 

New School Board Boundaries . 28 

Creation of French-Language 

School Boards . 35 

Section 68 Boards . 40 

Metropolitan Toronto School Board ... 41 
Penetanguishene Protestant Separate 

School Board. 42 

Boundary Expansion for Northern 

Boards . 42 

Extension of Boards from Elementary 

Only to Elementary-Secondary . 43 

Trustees and School Boards . 43 

Trustee Representation . 43 

Trustee Remuneration . 45 

Effective Functioning of School 

Boards . 46 

Native Education . 47 

Administrative Costs . 48 

Collective Agreements . 61 

Collective Bargaining . 61 

Retirement Gratuities . 63 

Surplus Administrative Staff . 63 

Transition and Implementation . 64 

Interim Governance Structures . 64 

Vacancies on a Board . 65 

Disposition of Assets and Liabilities . . 65 

Distribution of Property Tax . 66 

Overseer for Transition Period . 66 


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Contents 


8. Financial Implications of New School Board 

Boundaries . 67 

Will Amalgamation Produce Savings That 
Can Be Redirected to the Classroom? ... 67 
Lower Levels of Administrative 

Staffing . 67 

Reduced Need for Central-Office 

Facilities .. 70 

Enhanced Collaboration Between 

Boards . 70 

Financial Impact of Task Force 
Recommendations on Amalgamated 
Boards . 71 

9. Conclusion . 78 

10. List of Recommendations . 79 

Appendices 

A List of Maps, Tables, and Figures . 83 

B Letters from the Minister and 
Deputy Minister of Education and 
Training to School Board Chairs and 
Directors of Education . 85 

C Summary of Public Responses . 88 

D 1994 Assessment Wealth and Over/ 

Under-Ceiling Expenditures, by Board . . 93 

E Changes to Amalgamation Proposals 

Contained in the Interim Report .100 

F Education Expenditures in the Three New 
Categories, by Board.110 

G Retirement Gratuity Liabilities by Board .115 

H Sample Analysis, Central-Office Staffing: 

Supervisory Officers .117 

Task Force Members .118 


Final Report 1996 


















Ontario School Board 

Reduction 

Task Force 

13th Floor 
101 BloorSt W 
Toronto ON M5S 1P7 
Telephone (416) 325-2133 


Groupe d'etude sur 
la reduction du nombre de 
conseils scolalres en Ontario 

13 e 6tage 
101 rue Bloor O 
Toronto ON M5S 1P7 
T6l6phone (416) 325-2133 


® Ontario 


February 1996 


The Honourable John Snobelen 
Minister of Education and Training 


Mr. Minister, 

We herewith respectfully submit the Final Report of the Ontario School Board Reduction 
Task Force. 


Sincerely, 



John Sweeney, 
Chair 



Dorothy Wight, 
Member 



Duncan Green, 
Member 



Jean-Louis Bourdeau, 
Member 



Member 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2018 with funding from 
Ontario Ministry of Finance 


https://archive.org/details/ontarioschoolboaOOswee 


Order in Council 
D6cret 



Ontario 


Executive Council 
Conseil dee miniatree 


On the recommendation of the undersigned, the 
Lieutenant Governor, by and with the advice and 
concurrence of the Executive Council, orders that: 


Sur la recommandation du soussign$, le 
lieutenant-gouverneur, sur I’avis et avec le con- 
sentement du Conseil des ministres, d6cr$te ce 
qui suit: 


WHEREAS the efficient operation of the education system requires a review of existing 
school board boundaries and of the number of school trustees, and 

WHEREAS it is expedient and desirable to establish a task force to advise the Minister in 
respect of these matters, and 

WHEREAS it is expedient and desirable to appoint a Chair and members to the task force; 

NOW THEREFORE on the recommendation of the Minister of Education and Training, 
pursuant to Clause 10(a) of the Education Act . R.S.O. 1990, Chapter E.2, there is hereby 
established an advisory task force to be known as the Ontario School Board Reduction Task 
Force consisting of four members, one of whom shall be appointed as Chair, who are 
appointed for a term expiring the 31st day of December 1997: 

• John Sweeney as Chair 

• Duncan Green 

• Jean-Louis Bourdeau 

• Dorothy Wight, 

AND FURTHER that the Task Force shall advise the Minister and provide recommendations 
on, 

a. new school board boundaries which will result in a reduction in the current 
number of school boards; 

b. dissolution of school boards; 

c. streamlining the delivery of French-language education while at the same time 
ensuring that constitutional obligations continue to be met; 

d. financial implications arising out of the proposed boundaries, including: 

i. impact on assessment and mill rate 

ii. impact on provincial grants; 

...12 


O.C./D6cret 3 9 0/9 5 




- 2 - 


e. human resources and labour relations matters arising during the transition and 
implementation, including: 

i. employment security 

ii. orderly and timely integration of collective agreements and other 
employment relationships including cost containment measures 

iii. transitional measures to facilitate a fully integrated operation by the 
date set for the establishment of the new boards; 

f. formula for trustee representation and distribution, including issues related to 
ensuring appropriate Native representation; 

g. whatever ancillary matters related to the above the Task Force considers 
necessary; 

The Task Force shall further: 

a. review all pertinent materials and data on the boundaries of each and every 
school board in the Province of Ontario, including those governed by the 
Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto Act . R.S.O. 1990, Chapter M.62 to 
ensure that all regions of the Province are considered; 

b. consult on any aspect of its mandate with any interested ministry, employee 
group and appropriate stakeholder associations; 

c. take into consideration: 

i. school boards which share common characteristics, 

ii. school boards where there is a history of established relationships, 

iii. voluntary proposals by school boards, 

iv. existing boundaries of school boards, 

v. existing regional boundaries, 

vi. merits of extension of school board boundaries in northern Ontario, 

vii. rural/urban issues, 

viii. the disparities in wealth between school boards; 

d. release for public consultation a proposed boundaries map for the new school 
board boundaries and receive comments and advice thereon at public hearings 
in each region of the province; 

e. review recommendations in light of public consultation and modify proposals 
as the Task Force considers appropriate; 

f. consult with school boards, employee groups and appropriate stakeholder 
associations in the implementation of the new school boards, particularly in 
respect of the above elements; 


...13 



The Task Force shall further work within the following parameters: 

a. school boards will continue to be the basic governance structure for elementary 
and secondary education; 

b. in accordance with constitutional obligations, there will continue to be school 
governance structures for Roman Catholic education; 

c. in accordance with Charter obligations, there will continue to be school 
governance structures for section 23 rightholders; 

d. changes in governance structures will be for the purposes of ensuring 
effectiveness and efficiencies and will take into account existing provincial 
policies and priorities for elementary and secondary education. 


The Task Force may request the assistance of officials of the Ministry of Education and 
Training for the purposes of the Task Force. 

The Task Force shall report to the Minister of Education and Training on new school board 
boundaries as soon as practicable but not later than December 31, 1995. Following 
submission of its report, the Task Force shall submit additional recommendations on matters 
identified by the Minister, or as deemed appropriate by the Chair, that may assist in the 
implementation of the new school board boundaries. 


This Task Force is dissolved effective December 31, 1997. 


Recommended 



Minister of Education 
and Training 


FEB 2 2 1995 


Concurr 



Approved and Ordered 


Date 


Lfeu 


t 


mo 


























































Preface 


The Ontario School Board Reduction Task Force 
was established on February 22, 1995, to advise 
the Minister of Education and Training on how to 
reduce the number of school boards and trustees 
in Ontario. Following six months of deliberations 
and meetings with representatives of stakeholder 
groups and people who had been involved in 
restructuring in the education sector and else¬ 
where, on September 6, 1995, we released an 
Interim Report for public consultation. It con¬ 
tained our recommendations for amalgamations 
of existing school boards and the creation of 
French-language school boards, for a reduction in 
the number of boards in Ontario by 50 per cent. 
Maps were included to show our proposed new 
boundaries for each board. 

When the task force was set up, part of its mandate 
was to hold public hearings on the Interim Report 
throughout the province. By the time of the report's 
release, however, the government had changed and 
the new government had announced an increased 
level of fiscal constraint. We were asked by the 
new Minister of Education and Training to forego 
public hearings, but to encourage the widest possi¬ 
ble public response. In addition to asking people for 
written submissions by mail, fax, and e-mail, we set 
up a telephone hotline. 

Although many stakeholders and members of the 
public were disappointed that the public hearings 
were cancelled, we received over 19,000 responses 
to our Interim Report from individuals and orga¬ 
nizations across Ontario. We would like to thank 
all those who took the time to write to us or to 
call the hotline. Your comments and submissions 
were most helpful in our deliberations for this 
final report. 


Public response to the Interim Report supported 
the need for change in the way education is gov¬ 
erned in Ontario. Of all the issues covered by the 
report, education finance reform received the 
highest approval rating from those who respond¬ 
ed. There was also a high level of support for 
reducing the administrative bureaucracy of school 
boards. There was less support, however, for spe¬ 
cific amalgamation proposals. 

The task force agrees that education finance 
reform is vital; indeed, we maintain here, as we 
did in our Interim Report, that reform of educa¬ 
tion governance cannot take place without reform 
of education finance. We also believe there is a 
need to reduce the administrative bureaucracy of 
some boards. There are clear cost savings 
attached to reducing the number of trustees and 
supervisory staff, and the administrative struc¬ 
tures supporting them. There are also identifiable 
savings from cooperatives and consortia between 
neighbouring school boards. The province has 
seen little willingness, though, on the part of most 
boards to capitalize on these opportunities for sav¬ 
ings. We have therefore concluded that the struc¬ 
tural changes associated with amalgamation are 
necessary to realize savings in school board gover¬ 
nance and administration. 

A major force behind the establishment of this 
task force and the design of its mandate was the 
need, in view of the province's fiscal circum¬ 
stances, to redirect scarce education dollars from 
non-classroom activities to classrooms. 
Amalgamation will help achieve that goal if it 
occurs in conjunction with other reforms, includ¬ 
ing changes recommended in this report. 

One of the criticisms levelled at our Interim 
Report was that we dealt with issues well beyond 
our amalgamation mandate. However, the Order 
in Council that established our task force, which 
is reproduced on the preceding pages, required us 
to examine the financial, human resources, and 
labour implications of our proposals. Many of our 
recommendations derive from this part of the 
mandate and address the issue of how amalgama¬ 
tion can be accomplished in such a way as to 
redirect savings to classrooms. In addition to 


Final Report 1996 




Preface 


responding to our mandate, we have tried to 
respond to the changes in public finance that have 
taken place in Ontario over the past year. Fiscal 
constraints are tighter than when we began our 
task, and our recommendations had to consider 
the impact of these constraints on amalgamation 
and the continued ability of school boards to sus¬ 
tain present levels of classroom activities. 

The task force's mandate contained specific para¬ 
meters: the school board was to continue to be 
the basic structure for education governance and 
the constitutional and Charter rights of Roman 
Catholics and franco-Ontarians related to educa¬ 
tion governance were to be honoured. A number 
of the public responses to our Interim Report 
expressed dissatisfaction with these restrictions 
on the task force's mandate, and some advocated 
changes in governance structures far beyond our 
proposals for amalgamation. These suggestions 
are addressed elsewhere in this report. We wish, 
however, to draw the Minister's attention to this 
public dissatisfaction and to the governance alter¬ 
natives proposed. 

Our work in producing this report could not have 
been done as well as it has been without the assis¬ 
tance of several highly capable people, whom we 
wish to recognize and thank. 

• John Samuel was assigned by the Ministry of 
Education and Training as staffperson and liai¬ 
son to the task force. John's friendly 
demeanour and competence kept us on track 
and on time. We came to rely on his insights 
and abilities, especially when difficult decisions 
needed to be made. 

• Peggy McCormick was assigned from the min¬ 
istry's western regional office to assist us in 
analyzing the financial implications of our rec¬ 
ommendations. Her spark and wit helped us 
negotiate the financial minefields. 


• Pat Tolmie, our writer-editor, took the humble 
writing efforts of task force members and con¬ 
verted them into the readable prose of this 
report. Pat cajoled us into thinking clearly, logi¬ 
cally, and with some semblance of order. 

• A small team of analysts from the ministry and 
regional offices joined us for two weeks in 
November to help us process and interpret the 
19,000-plus responses to our Interim Report. It 
would have been physically impossible to com¬ 
plete the task without them. 

• A very small staff in the ministry's school 
board operating grants section, in addition to 
all their regular duties, always found time to 
collect, collate, and organize the financial data 
we requested. 

As chair, I wish to extend a special thanks to my 
task force colleagues. You have been professional 
in every sense of the word, and you have become 
friends in ways I can't begin to count. Thank you. 

John Sweeney 


Final Report 1996 




11 


1. Mandate of the Task Force 


Background 

The Ontario School Board Reduction Task Force 
was established as part of a series of interrelated 
reforms initiated by the former provincial govern¬ 
ment in response to public demands for improve¬ 
ments in the quality of education at a time of 
severe fiscal constraints. The overriding goal of 
these initiatives was to focus the province's limit¬ 
ed financial resources for education on the class¬ 
room - to support the student and the teacher. 

The litany of public complaints about education is 
familiar. Parents fear their children are not 
receiving the quality of education that will enable 
them to compete effectively in the new global 
economy. Francophones maintain that their chil¬ 
dren are not receiving an equivalent education to 
that received by students in the English-language 
system. Parents want more input into the way 
schools operate. Taxpayers maintain that they are 
not getting value for their education dollar and 
that there is massive waste in the system: too 
much government, too much bureaucracy, and 
too much money being spent for too little return. 

Specific concerns about school boards revolve 
around the number of boards in the province, the 
number of trustees, and, in some parts of the 
province, the remuneration received by trustees. 

In recent years, governments at all levels have 
heard the public's message, and real progress has 
been made in strengthening standards and reduc¬ 
ing waste. At the provincial level, the former gov¬ 
ernment established a Royal Commission on 


Learning to conduct a wide-ranging review of 
education in Ontario and to present the govern¬ 
ment with "a vision and action plan'' 1 for reform. 
Following a review of the commission's report, 
the government announced the series of inter¬ 
related reforms of which this task force is a part 
(see chapter 4 of this report). 

Reforms have also been initiated at the school 
board level, including several cooperative ven¬ 
tures and consortia among boards to reduce dupli¬ 
cation and streamline services. Public perceptions 
notwithstanding, members of this task force have 
been impressed with the dedication shown by 
trustees and school board administrators to pro¬ 
viding a high quality of education and value for 
money. In the 1994 municipal elections, school 
boards across the province voluntarily reduced the 
number of trustees by five per cent. But voluntary 
changes have barely scratched the surface of the 
need for reform, and much remains to be done. 

It is obvious to even the most casual observer that 
the climate in which education operates in 
Ontario has changed dramatically. The economic 
and social forces driving the reform of education 
governance - the reform of all aspects of educa¬ 
tion - are described in detail in chapter 3 of this 
report. 

Mandate and Terms of Reference 

Our mandate was set out in an Order in Council 
dated February 22, 1995, which is reproduced at 
the beginning of this report. Further direction was 
provided by the then Minister of Education and 
Training in detailed terms of reference that 
expanded upon and clarified the mandate. In brief, 
we were asked to make recommendations on: 

• new school board boundaries that would 
reduce the number of boards by 40 to 
50 per cent 

• a reduction in the number of trustees that 
make up each board and a new formula for 
trustee representation 


1. Royal Commission on Learning, For the Love of Learning, 
Report of the Royal Commission on Learning: A Short Version 
(Toronto: Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1994), p. viii. 


Final Report 1996 





1. Mandate of the Task Force 


• a streamlining of the delivery of French- 
language education through the creation of 
15 French-language school boards from the 
78 existing French-language boards, sections, 
and advisory committees 

• the implications of our proposals for finances 
and human resources 

The Order in Council also defined the parameters 
within which we were to work: 

• We were to continue to regard school boards as 
the basic governance structure for education in 
Ontario. 

• Our recommendations were to honour the con¬ 
stitutional rights of Roman Catholics to their 
own education governance structures. 

• Similarly, our recommendations were to hon¬ 
our the rights, outlined in the Charter of Rights 
and Freedoms, of franco-Ontarians to their own 
education governance structures. 

• Our recommendations were to be made for the 
purpose of ensuring effectiveness and efficiency 
and were to take account of provincial educa¬ 
tion policies. 

We were also asked to prepare maps showing our 
proposals for school board boundary changes, 
release them for public consultation, and consider 
public response to our proposals before making 
our final recommendations. 


Final Report 1996 




I 13 


2. School Board Governance and 
Funding in Ontario 


The Present Governance System 

School boards are the oldest form of publicly 
elected government in Ontario. Ontario boards 
generally fall into one of four categories: English- 
language public school boards, English-language 
Roman Catholic separate school boards, French- 
language public school boards, and French-lan¬ 
guage Roman Catholic separate school boards. 

Section 93 of the Canadian Constitution guaran¬ 
tees Roman Catholics the right to govern their 
own education. Since 1985, most Roman Catholic 
separate school boards in Ontario have been 
"extended" - that is, they govern both the elemen¬ 
tary and secondary education of their students. 

Section 23 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms 
provides a similar guarantee to franco-Ontarians, 
but at present there are only four French-language 
school boards in Ontario: Conseil des ecoles 
publiques de langue frangaise d'Ottawa-Carleton; 
Conseil des ecoles catholiques de langue frangaise 
de la region d'Ottawa-Carleton; Conseil des ecoles 
separees catholiques de langue frangaise de 
Prescott & Russell; Conseil des ecoles frangaises 
de la communaute urbaine de Toronto. French- 
language education in other areas of the province 
is governed by French-language "sections" and 
"advisory committees" attached to English- 
language boards. 

Today there are 168 school boards in Ontario, 
including the four French-language boards and 
74 French-language sections and advisory com¬ 
mittees that also act as governance structures. 


School boards establish policy, providing a focus 
and framework for the delivery of education 
within their own jurisdictions. Board policy must 
be consistent with the conditions outlined by the 
Education Act and its regulations, and with any 
other applicable provincial and federal legislation. 
In effect, boards adapt provincial education policy 
to local situations. 

School boards elect their own chairs and employ 
directors of education to serve as their chief exec¬ 
utive officers. 

School boards also bear the fiscal responsibility 
for the education of their students, including the 
provision and maintenance of an adequate teach¬ 
ing and support staff and appropriate facilities. 
They must account for the way they spend their 
revenue to both their electors and the province, 
and are required by the Education Act to establish 
and maintain balanced budgets. Boards set the 
amount of the education tax requisitions within 
their jurisdictions, and in unorganized territories 
(territories without municipal government) they 
also collect education taxes. As employers, boards 
also have contractual obligations related to, and 
responsibilities for, all their staff. 

School boards consist of locally elected trustees, 
whose exact number is established by the 
Education Act according to a formula based on the 
number of electors in each board's jurisdiction. 
Trustees fulfil the democratic principle of repre¬ 
sentation for taxation: they represent the local 
community, providing liaison between electors 
and their designated education system. A trustee 
has no power or authority as an individual, only 
as a voting member of a school board or in a posi¬ 
tion delegated to him or her by a board. In recent 
years, individual trustees have expanded their role 
beyond the legal requirements of the Education Act 
to include aspects of the day-to-day operations of 
schools. While these trustees have been motivated 
by an understandable desire to respond to the con- 


Final Report 1 996 




2. School Board Governance and Funding in Ontario 


14 [ 


cerns of their electors, many people feel that the 
primary roles and responsibilities of trustees have 
suffered with this shift of focus. 

Historically in Ontario there has been tension 
between the need to govern education at the 
local, community level, where elected representa¬ 
tives who are familiar with local conditions can 
ensure that local needs are met, and the need to 
spend both local and provincial public funds in an 
efficient and equitable manner. As a result of this 
tension, local school boards have continued to be 
the basic governance structure for education, but 
the school-board unit has been enlarged through 
successive amalgamations. 

The current system of school-board boundaries 
was established in 1968, when the government 
reduced by amalgamation the 1,446 school boards 
then existing to numbers close to the 168 that 
exist today. With the exception of a few boards 
established in the larger urban centres, the boards 
set up in 1968 were given administrative areas 
that - at least for southern Ontario - coincided 
with county, district, or regional boundaries. 
Introducing legislation that would establish the 
new boards, the Honourable William Davis, then 
Minister of Education, said: "The major goal of 
the reorganization is to create educational juris¬ 
dictions capable of extending equal educational 
opportunity to the boys and girls of Ontario. 1 ' 2 

The goal of equal educational opportunity contin¬ 
ues to be a driving force behind education 
reforms, but it has been joined by a new demand 
for effectiveness and efficiency. The economic 
climate of the mid-1990s is a far cry from the 
halcyon days of the late 1960s. In 1968, Ontario 
was, by today's standards, flush with money for 
education. The motive behind the 1968 amalga¬ 
mation was not to save money; rather, it was to 
create larger, more efficient structures that could 
offer more and better programs and services. 

Even though the number of school boards was 
being reduced, education programs and services 
were expanding. 


The Present Funding System 

Education in Ontario is funded through a combi¬ 
nation of local property taxes and grants from the 
provincial government, called General Legislative 
Grants. School boards establish their budgets 
based on their own assessment of local education 
needs. Local need, or perceived need, depends on 
a variety of local circumstances, and some boards 
spend much more per pupil than others. 

The Ministry of Education and Training provides 
school boards with a uniform, provincially estab- 
lished mill rate to use in raising the local share of 
education costs from property taxes. This mill 
rate is based on the principle that all ratepayers in 
the province should make the same tax "effort" 
toward the basic cost of education. Some school 
boards, because they have a higher level of 
assessment wealth, can raise more revenue from 
the provincially established mill rate than others. 
In recognition of this discrepancy, the ministry 
provides boards with "equalization" grants that 
supplement local revenue sources. The grants are 
the ministry's attempt to ensure that each student 
has an equal educational opportunity, no matter 
where he or she lives. The grants, however, are 
limited to a ministry-determined "ceiling" or max¬ 
imum "recognized ordinary expenditure" level per 
pupil. Almost all boards in the province feel they 
must spend beyond the provincially established 
levels to meet their local education needs. 

When the present funding formula was developed 
many years ago, the grant ceilings were thought 
to be a realistic estimate of the basic cost of edu¬ 
cation per pupil. Community expectations for 
education have broadened considerably, how¬ 
ever, and boards have tried to meet these expecta¬ 
tions. The provincial government has also 
responded to changes in society's expectations by 
requiring boards to provide certain programs and 
services, like educating children with special 
needs and integrating these children into regular 
classrooms. The salaries and improvements in 
working conditions achieved by teachers through 
collective bargaining have expanded as well. 


2. Ontario, Legislature of Ontario Debates, 15 March 1968, 
p. 833. 


Final Report 1996 





2. School Board Governance and Funding in Ontario 


1 15 


As a result, the understanding of "basic" costs has 
changed. Ministry officials and successive govern¬ 
ments have tried, through incremental changes in 
the funding formula, to ensure that the amount in 
the grant ceilings continued to cover basic costs, 
but they have not attempted to identify the pro¬ 
grams and services the ceilings are meant to 
cover. To be fair, defining the basic cost of educa¬ 
tion is a complex and subjective undertaking: 
what one observer considers basic or adequate, 
another may consider inadequate - or excessive. 
But without a definition of basic costs no one 
knows whether the ceilings are realistic. The pre¬ 
vailing opinion among educators and others famil¬ 
iar with Ontario's education system is that they 
are unrealistic. 

Boards that choose to spend beyond the level of 
recognized expenditure - and almost all boards in 
the province do - must raise the additional fund¬ 
ing from their local property tax base. Having 
determined the amount of revenue available from 
the combination of the provincially established 
mill rate and grants, boards then assess the 
amount of additional revenue, if any, they wish to 
raise and establish their local tax rates accordingly. 

The amount of additional revenue a board is able 
to raise depends primarily on the wealth of its 
commercial-industrial assessment base. Because 
the wealth of this assessment base in Ontario 
communities varies widely, the ability of Ontario 
school boards to raise funds above the grant ceil¬ 
ings also varies widely. To put it simply: If a 
board has a high proportion of commercial-indus¬ 
trial assessment (that is, more businesses paying 
property tax than homeowners), it can raise sig¬ 
nificant amounts of money by making only a 
small increase in the local tax rate. 3 If another 
school board with little commercial-industrial 
assessment wants to spend as much per pupil as 
the assessment-rich board, it must make greater 
demands on its residential ratepayers. If the 


3. This is a general rule. We are aware that some boards, par¬ 
ticularly the Metropolitan Toronto School Board, have been 
unable recently to collect the revenue they had anticipated 
when they set their tax rates. A large number of businesses in 
Metro have successfully appealed their property tax assess¬ 
ments and had them reduced. 


assessment-poor board's ratepayers cannot afford 
tax rate increases, it will not be able to spend as 
much per pupil as the assessment-rich board. 

In recent years, for example, both the 
Metropolitan Toronto School Board and the 
Ottawa Board of Education have had such 
wealthy assessment bases (relative to other parts 
of the province) that, for a time, they were able to 
raise enough money from their tax bases alone to 
provide for their perceived education needs. 

Their property tax bases were so strong that they 
were ineligible for provincial equalization grants 
and were, in fact, in a position of "negative 
grant." 

Over the last 25 years, many groups and studies 
have advocated reform of Ontario's system of 
funding education. While minor changes have 
been made to respond to criticisms and changing 
circumstances, no fundamental reform has been 
undertaken. In recent years, the clamour for 
reform has grown: both the Fair Tax Commission, 
which reported in December 1993, and the Royal 
Commission on Learning, which reported in 
December 1994, recommended education finance 
reform. 

The Royal Commission on Learning recommend¬ 
ed that the Ministry of Education and Training 
develop a realistic basis for determining the cost 
per student of an adequate educational program, 
taking into account regional and social 
disparities. 4 It also noted the inequity in school 
boards' ability to spend above the grant ceilings 
and recommended that the province ensure there 
is equal per-pupil funding across Ontario. 5 

In response to the recommendations of the royal 
commission and others, in March 1995 the 
Ministry of Education and Training established a 
Working Group on Education Finance Reform. 

We discuss its mandate in chapter 4, Other 
Education Reforms. 


4. For the Love of Learning: A Short Version, p. 79 (recommen¬ 
dation 162). 

5. For the Love of Learning: A Short Version, p. 79 (recommen¬ 
dation 159). 


Final Report 1996 






16 


3. Context of Reform: Changing 
Economic and Social Environments 


The Changing Economic Environment 

For the past three years fiscal constraints have 
prevented the province from increasing the 
amount of its transfer payments to school boards. 
In its economic statement of November 29, 1995, 
the government substantially reduced those pay¬ 
ments - by $400 million - and warned of further 
reductions to come. These drastic steps reflect the 
government's commitment to eliminating the 
provincial deficit and make it very unlikely that 
new money will be available for several years. 

Most of the transfer-payment money is allocated 
to school boards on the basis of the funding for¬ 
mula referred to in chapter 2. Since the amount of 
the transfer payments determines both the mill 
rate set by the Ministry of Education and Training 
and the grant ceiling, a reduction in the total 
amount of transfer-payment money could result 
in either a higher provincially established mill 
rate or a lower grant ceiling, or both. The min¬ 
istry determines the final formula. The effect, 
however, will be that all school boards in Ontario 
that receive grants from the province will receive 
less money. 

Many boards will be tempted to recoup the loss of 
provincial funds from local property taxes. In his 
economic statement of November 29, 1995, the 
Minister of Finance said that "the government 
fully expects school boards to meet [the] reduc¬ 
tion by cutting costs outside the classroom, and 
without increasing the tax burden on local 
ratepayers." 6 Boards that ignore the government's 


expectations may well encounter taxpayer resis¬ 
tance. Taxpayers have made it clear, particularly 
during municipal and provincial election cam¬ 
paigns, that they cannot bear and will not tolerate 
tax increases. Responses to our Interim Report 
also contained strong opposition to tax increases. 
It seems clear that, difficult as it will be, boards 
will simply have to adjust to reduced expenditure 
levels. 


The Changing Social Environment 

At the same time as we are experiencing these 
unprecedented fiscal constraints (at least unprece¬ 
dented in recent memory), we are also facing pro¬ 
found social change in every aspect of life, from 
personal, family, and community levels right up 
to the new, fiercely competitive global economy. 

Economic and social pressures similar to those 
affecting Ontario are being experienced by many 
other jurisdictions in Canada and abroad. One 
measure being used by other jurisdictions to 
respond to these pressures is reform of the educa¬ 
tion system, including the restructuring of educa¬ 
tion governance. Before issuing our Interim 
Report, we reviewed the literature on education 
restructuring initiatives in Alberta, New 
Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, 
Michigan, Chicago, Great Britain, and New 
Zealand, and spoke with some of the people who 
had been involved in them. 

Restructuring, of course, is not limited to the edu¬ 
cation sector. Many institutions and organizations, 
in both the public and private sectors, have 
changed their structures as an impetus to chang¬ 
ing people's behaviour. Before issuing our Interim 
Report, we also consulted people who participated 
in restructuring programs in hospitals and univer¬ 
sities, in municipal, provincial, and federal gov¬ 
ernments, and at IBM Canada. 

Among the most significant changes in our social 
environment are the revolutionary changes 
brought about by advances in technology. It's 


6. Ontario, Official Report of Debates (Hansard), 29 November 
1995, p. 1114. 


Final Report 1996 





3. Context of Reform: Changing Economic and Social Environments 


1 


hard - and expensive - to keep up with these 
advances, but the consequences of falling behind 
are troubling to contemplate. To some extent, the 
restructuring programs we examined originated in 
response to technological advances; what particu¬ 
larly impressed us, however, was the extent to 
which these advances make it possible to change 
the way an organization does business. 

The capacity of Ontario school boards to use 
advances in technology varies widely. Some 
boards lack the financial resources to keep pace, 
both in the classroom and in the conduct of their 
own business. It is precisely these boards, how¬ 
ever, that could benefit most from the enhance¬ 
ment of classroom and administrative procedures 
that technology offers. In the classroom, technolo¬ 
gy can be a tool to enhance traditional practices, 
or even to augment the number of teachers. It can 
change the way teachers teach and students learn, 
speeding up certain processes and shortcutting 
others. In board offices, it can produce significant 
efficiencies in administrative procedures and 
reduce costs. 

Some boards in northern Ontario face another 
impediment to the use of technology: they lack 
the infrastructure that allows it to function - 
cable, power lines, satellites, fibre optics. Yet in 
areas like northern Ontario, with its small, isolat¬ 
ed communities, modern technology could play a 
pivotal role in education. Remote communities 
could be linked to one another and to the rest of 
the world by computer or telecommunications 
networks. They could share lessons and other 
learning experiences, and take advantage of more 
opportunities for self-directed or independent 
learning. They could also benefit from the admin¬ 
istrative efficiencies offered by technology. To 
offer just one example, trustees could meet by 
video- or teleconference. Technology could pro¬ 
vide similar benefits to francophones throughout 
Ontario, many of whom live in remote communi¬ 
ties or form small groups in communities that are 
largely anglophone. 


In our examination of issues related to education 
governance, we were struck by the potential ben¬ 
efits of technology to school boards, but disturbed 
by the prospect of Ontario boards being unable to 
realize them. 

The Challenge for Education Governance 

The only thing that hasn't changed is the need to 
educate our children to participate fully and suc¬ 
cessfully in life. If Canada is to be an effective 
player on the world stage, it is essential that our 
children be able to communicate, compute, 
research, be creative and productive, work 
together, and strive for excellence. But competing 
with the essential educational needs of our chil¬ 
dren is a complex set of other social and financial 
expectations that we want fulfilled at the same 
time, expectations related to "rights," wages, ben¬ 
efits, and working conditions. Ontarians, mem¬ 
bers of this task force included, have become 
accustomed to standards that we may no longer 
be able to afford. 

The challenge today - and there is no choice but 
to take it up - is to sustain the essential elements 
of education. The limited financial resources 
available must be focused on the classroom, on 
providing adequate resources for students to learn 
and teachers to teach. Everyone involved in edu¬ 
cation will have to adapt. 

The need to adapt is a lesson that the education 
community in Ontario is learning somewhat late 
in the game, but learn it we must. Reform of edu¬ 
cation governance is necessary to ensure that 
administrative costs are reduced and cooperation 
improved, that there is less duplication of effort 
and more sharing of services, and that trustees 
and administrators are seen by parents and tax¬ 
payers to be accountable for the way they educate 
our children and spend our tax dollars. 


Final Report 1996 





3. Context of Reform: Changing Economic and Social Environments 


The circumstances that led other jurisdictions and 
sectors to restructure, and their experiences with 
restructuring, do not all apply to Ontario. Each 
situation is unique. Changes in the governance 
structures of school boards must take into 
account the particular circumstances surrounding 
education in this province, including people's 
expectations. Members of the task force, how¬ 
ever, did learn a great deal from the experiences 
of others that is applicable in Ontario. For exam¬ 
ple, in many of the new structures policy-making 
remains a "head office" responsibility, but man¬ 
agement is local or "site-based." Our recommen¬ 
dations will suggest a similar structure for school 
boards and their schools. Those we consulted 
were almost unanimous in observing that, in their 
experience, new structures compelled people to 
change their behaviour and devise fresh solutions 
to their problems. 

Since its election in June 1995, and particularly in 
its economic statement of November 29, 1995, the 
government has served notice of a level of fiscal 
constraint that few Ontarians could have predict¬ 
ed. This level of constraint, along with the need 
to respond to public complaints and perceptions 
about education, changing social pressures, and 
technological advances, demands a fundamental 
change in the way school boards operate. It also 
requires a substantial change to the way educa¬ 
tion is funded in Ontario. 

The current economic and social climate rein¬ 
forces our opinion, expressed in our Interim 
Report, that: "The level of education programs 
and services we have been enjoying cannot be 
maintained under our present governance and 
funding systems. If we don't change both these 
systems, our ability to educate our children will 
be threatened." 


Final Report 1996 




1 19 


4. Other Education Reforms 


Reducing the number of school boards is only one 
of several interrelated education reforms the gov¬ 
ernment is pursuing. Many of these initiatives, if 
implemented, would relieve school boards of 
some of their present responsibilities. They there¬ 
fore complement and assist the reform of gover¬ 
nance that we are recommending. 

We outlined these initiatives in our Interim 
Report and present them again here, updated 
where appropriate. 

Education Finance Reform 

As we noted in chapter 2, in March 1995 the 
Ministry of Education and Training established a 
Working Group on Education Finance Reform. 
The working group, a partnership between the 
ministry and stakeholder groups, was expected to 
report to the minister by the end of January 1996. 

The working group has been asked to advise the 
minister on the changes that need to be made to 
the current funding model, including changes 
needed to share assessment revenue more equi¬ 
tably, and the best way to ensure fiscal account¬ 
ability on the parts of both the province and 
school boards. The group is working on the 
assumption that the provincial contribution to 
education will not increase and that money now 
spent on administration will be limited so that 
more resources can be directed to the classroom. 

We believe that reform of Ontario's education 
finance system is essential. In fact, we maintain 
that the governance changes requested by our 


mandate and recommended in this report are 
impossible without the prior or simultaneous 
reform of education finance. 

Limits on Trustee Compensation 

The former Minister of Education and Training, 
in announcing the establishment of our task 
force, stated that he would introduce legislation to 
limit the compensation trustees receive to an all- 
inclusive maximum of $20,000 a year. 

A Requirement to Share Services 

The former Minister of Education and Training 
also announced that he would introduce legisla¬ 
tion to require boards to save money by sharing 
services. Under the proposed legislation, boards 
would be required to report annually to the min¬ 
ister and the public on the extent of their savings 
and shared services. 

School Councils 

By the end of the 1995-96 school year, all schools 
will be required to have school councils. These 
influential advisory groups will be composed pri¬ 
marily of parents, but will include school princi¬ 
pals, teacher and community representatives, and 
student representatives (optional at the elemen¬ 
tary level). We describe school councils and their 
role more fully in chapter 7, when we discuss the 
accountability of trustees and school boards. 

Curriculum Development 

School boards now develop curriculum for their 
schools based on guidelines from the Ministry of 
Education and Training. To provide boards with 
better direction and establish province-wide stan¬ 
dards, the ministry will be assuming greater 
responsibility for curriculum development. 


Final Report 1996 




4. Other Education Reforms 


20 [ 


Testing and Reporting on Student 
Achievement 

The Ministry of Education and Training has initi¬ 
ated a comprehensive testing program to assess 
whether elementary and secondary students are 
meeting provincial education standards. The min¬ 
ister announced in November 1995 that the pro¬ 
gram will begin in the fall of 1996 with the testing 
of Grade 3 students. Testing of students in certain 
other grades will begin in future years. 

The government has also introduced legislation to 
establish an independent agency, the Education 
Quality and Accountability Office, to implement 
the testing program, report on the quality of edu¬ 
cation in Ontario, recommend improvements, and 
promote best practices. 


The college, like similar self-governing profes¬ 
sions (the Law Society of Upper Canada, the 
Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons), will 
license, govern, and regulate teachers in Ontario, 
develop new standards of practice for teachers, 
and investigate complaints of professional mis¬ 
conduct involving teachers. It will also accredit 
all teacher-education programs in the province 
and monitor career-long professional develop¬ 
ment for teachers. 


Teacher Education 

The Royal Commission on Learning recommend¬ 
ed that a professional college of teachers be estab¬ 
lished to regulate the teaching profession, includ¬ 
ing the certification of teachers. In response, the 
Ministry of Education and Training set up the 
Ontario College of Teachers Implementation 
Committee to recommend the structure and terms 
of reference for such a college. The minister has 
received and reviewed the implementation com¬ 
mittee's report, and the government has intro¬ 
duced legislation to establish a College of 
Teachers. 


Final Report 1996 




5. Task Force Criteria for Amalgamation 
and New School Board Boundaries 


In the first six months of our mandate, we con¬ 
sulted with education stakeholders from a variety 
of organizations, including school boards, as well 
as government officials and the office of the 
Attorney General. We also consulted many peo¬ 
ple in both the public and private sectors, in 
Canada and elsewhere, who have been involved 
in restructuring systems and organizations. In 
addition, we reviewed earlier reports that had 
considered education governance issues, and we 
received and considered over 300 submissions on 
the subject of our deliberations. 7 

Our mandate clearly stated that we were to 
reduce the number of school boards by 40 to 50 
per cent and also create French-language boards. 
We began by establishing certain criteria for 
amalgamating boards and drawing new board 
boundaries, as follows: 

Respect for Constitutional Rights 

Our overriding criterion was respect for 
constitutional rights. The Canadian Constitution 
and the Charter of Rights guarantee Roman 
Catholics and franco-Ontarians the right to govern 
their own education - that is, to administer their 
own school boards. In our recommendations, 
therefore, public school boards have been joined 
only with other public school boards; Roman 
Catholic separate school boards only with other 
Roman Catholic separate school boards; and 
French-language public and separate school 
boards only with their counterparts. 


7. These submissions, together with other records of the task 
force, are available to the public. See the copyright page of 
this report for information on how to gain access to them. 


Coterminality and Contiguity 

"Coterminality" exists where two or more boards 
share a common set of geographical borders. For 
example, a common border may contain an 
English-language public school board, an English- 
language Roman Catholic separate school board, a 
French-language public school board, and a 
French-language Roman Catholic separate school 
board. We attempted to preserve existing cotermi¬ 
nality wherever possible. 

"Contiguity" exists where two boards are neigh¬ 
bours. We applied the contiguity criterion more 
than any other. Boards that now exist side by side 
are likely to have constituents with similar needs 
and may already share some services. 

Some of the responses to our Interim Report pro¬ 
posed better ways of applying this criterion to 
individual situations than we had originally seen. 
We were grateful for these suggestions and, in 
some cases, adjusted boundaries accordingly. 

Size of Student Population 

In amalgamating boards, we followed a general 
rule that the smallest board should not have 
fewer than 5,000 students and the largest not 
more than 55,000 students. The geography of the 
province and the distribution of population, how¬ 
ever, required exceptions. Some newly created 
boards have fewer than 5,000 students. A number 
of existing boards already have student popula¬ 
tions over 60,000, and we made no attempt to 
reduce them. 

In establishing our criteria, we were aware that 
many people believe large school boards, by their 
very nature, cannot be cost-efficient. At our 
request, staff of the Ministry of Education and 
Training did a literature search for research on 
the best size for a school board. They found the 
research on this subject to be sparse and inconclu¬ 
sive. It seems so many factors must be taken into 
account that a simple conclusion cannot be 
drawn. The ministry also looked at the size of 
Ontario school boards' central-office administrative 
staff in relation to the size of the boards' student 


Final Report 1996 





5. Task Force Criteria for Amalgamation and New School Board Boundaries 


22 [ 


populations. This review indicated that, once the 
student population exceeds 30,000, the number of 
central-office administrative staff "flatlines" - that 
is, it does not increase as the student population 
increases. We concluded that, at least in Ontario, 
the size of a board's student population alone 
does not determine its cost efficiency. 


amalgamated. In the year since the task force was 
established, other boards have initiated consortia 
and cooperative agreements with nearby boards. 
We tried to respect all such initiatives in making 
our decisions and are grateful to those boards 
who assisted our task by suggesting their own 
amalgamation. 


Reasonable Distance 

We tried to ensure that there was a reasonable 
distance between a board and the communities 
whose schools it administers, but this was not 
always possible, especially in the north and with 
French-language boards in both the north and 
south of the province. Where we have recom¬ 
mended boundaries that cover a particularly large 
territory, we have made other recommendations 
to help these boards function efficiently. For 
example, we have suggested that new information 
technology could facilitate communications and 
management and reduce travel time and costs, 
and that greater delegation of responsibility for 
day-to-day management to schools and school 
councils will reduce the need for trustees and 
administrators to be on site. We acknowledge, 
however, that new technology and school coun¬ 
cils will not resolve all the problems of boards 
that cover a large geographical area. 

Existing Traffic Patterns 

The flow of traffic is a logical organizing principle. 
Existing highway connections and shopping pat¬ 
terns influenced some of our decisions. 

Natural Barriers 

In setting new boundaries, we also considered the 
existence of major transportation corridors, water¬ 
ways, and other geographic features. 

Similar Interests and Natural Affinities 

Before our task force was established, some 
boards had already begun to discuss amalgama¬ 
tion and several boards presented joint submis¬ 
sions to the task force suggesting that they be 


Joint Ventures with Social Services 

We considered how easy or difficult it would be 
for the new boards to coordinate their activities 
with other social services, such as those delivered 
to students, families, and schools by the 
Ministries of Health and Community and Social 
Services, the Children's Aid Society, and others. 

Impact Studies 

As our Interim Report noted, we asked the 
Ministry of Education and Training to study the 
financial impacts of our proposals on boards, tax¬ 
payers, and students. Our conclusion, represented 
by recommendation 1, is that many of the prob¬ 
lems presented by amalgamation on its own can 
only be resolved by education finance reform or 
by legislation. With education finance reform, 
negative impacts are reduced considerably. 

In most cases, new board boundaries respect 
existing municipal boundaries. To do otherwise 
would have risked confusion in the establishment 
of local mill rates and the disruption of many 
existing agreements. 

Deliberations of the Greater Toronto Area 
Task Force 

Our terms of reference require us to consider the 
deliberations of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) 
Task Force "with respect to assessment and 
municipal boundaries." The GTA Task Force is 
expected to report to the provincial government at 
approximately the same time we do, early in 
1996. At the time of writing this report, we 
believe our recommendations will not conflict 
with theirs, but if they do, our recommendations 
and theirs may need to be reconciled. 


Final Report 1996 




1 23 


6. Interim Report and Public Response 


Interim Report, September 1995 

On September 6, 1995, we issued our Interim 
Report in the form of a tabloid-style newspaper. 
The Interim Report: 

• provided background information on our 
mandate 

• outlined the need for, and benefits of, the 
changes we were recommending 

• recommended that the government reform edu¬ 
cation finance before implementing our amalga¬ 
mation recommendations 

• outlined, with the help of maps, our specific 
amalgamation recommendations 

• discussed other issues related to amalgamation 
and offered options for dealing with them 

It addressed all of the issues in our mandate with 
the exception of administrative costs. In our delib¬ 
erations prior to issuing our Interim Report, we 
found that school boards did not agree on what 
constitutes administrative costs. The Ministry of 
Education and Training, although most helpful in 
other areas of education finance, had also been 
unable to provide us with consistent statistical 
data on school board administrative costs. Since 
issuing our Interim Report, however, we have 
received reliable information, and so we address 
administrative costs in this report. 

In an effort to reach as many members of the 
public as possible, we printed 2.3 million English 
copies and 135,000 French copies of the Interim 
Report and made them available through local 
schools, school boards, Ministry of Education and 
Training regional offices, and public libraries. 


The Minister of Education and Training sent a let¬ 
ter to each school board chair, and the Deputy 
Minister a letter to each school board director of 
education, requesting the boards' cooperation in 
the distribution of the Interim Report. The letters, 
which are reproduced in Appendix B, asked 
boards to give each child in their schools a copy 
to take home, and to make the remaining copies 
available in the schools and board offices so that 
ratepayers who did not have children in school 
could pick up a copy if they so desired. 

Regrettably, not all boards acceded to these 
requests. Some boards simply advised parents 
that copies of the Interim Report were available 
at the school and could be picked up. Others sent 
a letter along with the Interim Report, asking par¬ 
ents to respond negatively to the amalgamation 
recommendation. Many parents and ratepayers 
who had not received a copy of the Interim 
Report from their local board contacted the task 
force's office to request a copy. 

Public Response 

In establishing the task force, the former Minister 
of Education and Training had intended that we 
would hold public hearings on our Interim 
Report. The government changed, however, a few 
months before that report was issued. The new 
Minister of Education and Training reviewed our 
mandate, process, and timelines and instructed us 
to proceed as planned, with the exception of the 
public hearings. He had decided that the signifi¬ 
cant expense of public hearings could not be justi¬ 
fied, given the state of the province's finances. 

As an alternative to public hearings, we invited 
the public and stakeholder organizations to send 
in written responses by mail, fax, or e-mail, and 
we set up a telephone hotline (a 1-800 number). 

We heard many expressions of resentment at the 
cancellation of public hearings. While people 
acknowledged the high cost of hearings, they 
regretted missing the opportunity to hear first¬ 
hand what others had to say about our interim 
recommendations. They noted that having 
responses filtered through the task force's final 
report was not the same as hearing them for 


Final Report 1996 




6. Interim Report and Public Response 


24 [ 


themselves. 8 Some stakeholders had not respond¬ 
ed to our requests for submissions prior to our 
interim recommendations because they thought 
there would be hearings later. People who shared 
our concern about the recommendations receiving 
the widest possible public airing felt that hearings 
would have stimulated more local press coverage 
of the Interim Report and the issues it discussed. 

In spite of the restrictions, however, we received 
19,031 responses via the hotline and in letters and 
briefs. 9 Public response was of two types, which 
we have labelled "self-directed" and "campaign- 
directed." Self-directed responses (4,516 of the 
total 19,031 responses) came from individuals or 
groups, including school boards, who clearly were 
responding on their own initiative. Campaign- 
directed responses (14,515 of the total) clearly 
were part of an orchestrated response. 10 

Self-directed responses were characterized by: 

• a wide range of media used (1,951 by telephone, 
1,714 by mail, 851 by fax and e-mail) 

• both positive and negative responses to issues 
raised in the Interim Report 

• responses to many or all of the issues raised in 
the Interim Report 

Of the 4,516 self-directed responses, 2,057 opposed 
amalgamation in general or as it affected their local 
area, and 1,378 supported it. (The remainder did 
not offer a clear opinion either way.) 

While there were some exceptions, most of the cam¬ 
paign-directed responses were characterized by: 

• wording that was identical or nearly identical 

• printed petitions containing signatures only 
(rather than individual responses) 11 


8. See the copyright page of this report for information on how 
to gain access to the task force's records, including responses 
to the Interim Report. 

9. The response, while substantial, represents less than 
one per cent of the total number of copies of the report 
distributed. 

10. We acknowledge that those responding as part of a cam¬ 
paign were also responding “on their own initiative." The 
labels are for classification purposes only; they are not meant 
to impute motives. 

11. Each signature was counted as one response. 


• almost exclusive opposition to the amalgama¬ 
tion recommendation that affected the area of 
the province in which the responder lived, and 
very few responses to other issues raised in the 
Interim Report 

Most, but not all, of the campaigns were clearly 
directed by local organizations representing 12 
public school boards and 7 separate school boards 
(see Appendix C, Table Cl). Campaign-directed 
responses from these 19 boards, representing 15 
per cent of all the boards in the province, 
accounted for 90 per cent of the total responses 
we received. While many people supported these 
campaigns by signing the petitions or submitting 
the requested response, the task force did receive 
letters from parents who expressed resentment at 
the attempt to influence their response and who 
stated that they supported amalgamation recom¬ 
mendations affecting their local area. 

We reviewed all responses to our Interim Report 
with great attention. Because there had been no 
opportunity for public hearings, we were most 
concerned that people who wished to comment 
be heard and their comments noted. The respons¬ 
es were analyzed carefully (see Appendix C, 
Tables C2 and C3). They indicated overwhelming 
support for our recommendation for education 
finance reform, substantial support for reducing 
the administrative bureaucracy of school boards, 
and considerably less support for specific amalga¬ 
mation proposals. As was to be expected, the 
responses to amalgamation included a sizeable 
not-in-my-backyard component. That is, certain 
boards and their supporters saw some wisdom in 
amalgamation, but felt that there was no need for 
it in their particular situation. 

Responses to the Interim Report did influence the 
recommendations we offer in this Final Report - 
particularly specific amalgamation recommenda¬ 
tions, where we changed about half of our interim 
proposals. 

We discuss the substance of the public responses 
in more detail in chapter 7, which follows, relat¬ 
ing them to each issue before the task force. 


Final Report 1996 





1 « 


7. Issues Before the Task Force 


Funding of School Boards 

We have described the present funding system 
and discussed why it is considered inadequate for 
Ontario today. We also noted that the Ministry of 
Education and Training has established a 
Working Group on Education Finance Reform to 
recommend changes to the present system, and 
that it will be reporting to the Minister early in 
1996. However, our mandate requires us to report 
on the financial implications of our proposals, and 
to fulfil it we had to undertake our own investiga¬ 
tion of the education finance system. 

In investigating it and in making specific recom¬ 
mendations about its reform, we kept two key 
objectives in mind: 

• the need for greater equality of treatment for 
all students 

• the need for greater efficiency in the expendi¬ 
ture of severely constrained financial resources 
in order to sustain classroom activities 

We concluded, as have so many investigators 
before us, that reform is essential. Indeed, we 
concluded that reform of education finance is 
even more essential than reform of education gov¬ 
ernance, and that governance reform cannot and 
should not proceed without finance reform. 

Before offering our recommendations on funding, 
we wish to deal with an issue brought to our 
attention by many interested parties, both before 
and after the publication of our Interim Report. 
Earlier studies on the amalgamation of school 
boards in the Windsor-Essex and Ottawa-Carleton 
areas concluded that amalgamation would result 
in an increase, not a reduction, in the cost of 


education in the boards concerned. 12 These stud¬ 
ies assumed that the system of funding education 
would remain the same. Given this and other 
assumptions their authors made, 13 it is not sur¬ 
prising that they concluded amalgamation would 
increase costs. We believe that different assump¬ 
tions would have led to different conclusions. 

The following tables compare school boards' 1994 
spending levels. 

The figures in Table 1 show the variance in net 
expenditure per pupil (total expenditure minus 
miscellaneous revenue) between the lowest and 
highest levels of board spending. 


Table 1: Net Expenditure Per Pupil, 1994* 
(figures are $) 


Expenditure 

Elementary 

Secondary 

Level 

Panel 

Panel 

Low 

5 044 

3 600 

High 

11 441 

30 830 

Gap 

6 397 

27 230 


* Includes capital costs 

Source: School Boards' 1994 Financial Statements to the Ministry of 
Education and Training 

School boards do not usually compare net expen¬ 
ditures, but rather expenditures based on "cost of 
operating." This cost is the amount a board would 
charge in tuition fees for students who do not 
reside within its boundaries but whom the board 
is educating. Table 2 compares board expenditure 
based on the current (1994) cost of operating per 
pupil. 


12. Thomas L. Wells, Amalgamation? A Fact Finder's 
Conclusions about School Governance in the Windsor-Essex Area 
(Toronto: Ministry of Education and Training, 1993) and Brian 
Bourns, School Board Structure in Ottawa-Carleton: Final Report 
of the Fact Finder for the Minister of Education and Training of 
the Province of Ontario (Toronto: Ministry of Education and 
Training, 1993). 

13. They assumed that amalgamated boards would absorb the 
savings achieved through amalgamation into their operating 
costs to harmonize collective agreements and mill rates. We 
deal with these other assumptions later in this report. 


Final Report 1996 









7. Issues Before the Task Force 


26 


Table 2: Current Cost of Operating Per Pupil, 1994* 
(figures are $) 


Expenditure 

Elementary 

Secondary 

Level 

Panel 

Panel 

Low 

4 278 

5 192 

High 

10 160 

11 454 

Gap 

5 882 

6 262 


* Does not include capital costs 

Source: School Boards' 1994 Financial Statements to the Ministry of 
Education and Training 

The most telling comparison, however, is how 
much boards spend over or under the maximum 
"recognized ordinary expenditure" level estab¬ 
lished by the province. (This spending level is 
also the ministry's grant ceiling). In 1994, the 
basic per-pupil grant ceiling for elementary edu¬ 
cation was $4,134, and for secondary education it 
was $5,066. The province augments these basic 
amounts with board-specific grants that reflect 
particular circumstances, such as small schools 
and small French-language sections. Table 3 com¬ 
pares the amount boards spend over or under 
ceiling per pupil, from the lowest to the highest. 
Bracketed numbers are under ceiling. 


Table 3: Over/Under-Ceiling Expenditure Per Pupil, 
1994* (figures are $) 


Expenditure 

Elementary 

Secondary 

Level 

Panel 

Panel 

Low 

(370) 

(3 068) 

High 

2 376 

3 551 

Gap 

2 746 

6 619 


* Does not include capital costs 

Source: School Boards' 1994 Financial Statements to the Ministry of 
Education and Training 

In 1994, almost all school boards in the province 
spent over ceiling; only four elementary panels 
and nine secondary panels spent under ceiling. 
(See Appendix D. Figures Dl and D2 are graphs 
that show the great range in 1994 expenditure per 
pupil among boards across the province. Table Dl 
shows 1994 assessment wealth and 1994 over- 
and under-ceiling expenditures by board.) 

As we explained in chapter 2, boards' ability to 


spend above the grant ceilings is determined by 
the wealth of their assessment bases, particularly 
their commercial and industrial assessment bases. 
The goals of education finance reform should 
include ensuring that school boards across the 
province have an equitable amount of classroom 
expenditure per pupil and that their ratepayers 
make a similar tax "effort" to achieve this level of 
spending. As we recommended in our Interim 
Report, the wide variation in the ability of boards 
to raise money locally could be diminished by 
pooling all the commercial and industrial assess¬ 
ment in the province and redistributing it equi¬ 
tably to all boards. 

Under our proposal, residential ratepayers would 
continue to direct their property taxes to the 
school board of their choice. The education tax 
paid by commercial and industrial ratepayers, 
however, would be determined by a provincially 
established mill rate and would be forwarded by 
local municipalities to an independent provincial 
agency. The agency would put this money into a 
common fund or "pool" and redistribute it to 
school boards so that they all have access to an 
equitable amount of direct classroom expenditure 
per pupil. 

We asked the Ministry of Education and Training 
to simulate the financial impact of some of our 
major recommendations. For our pooling proposal, 
the ministry established a standard mill rate for 
commercial and industrial assessment that would 
raise the same amount of revenue, approximately 
$3 billion, as is raised from this assessment at 
present. In the simulation, a board's recognized 
expenditures were met by a combination of local 
residential and farm taxes, provincial grants, and 
the redistributed revenue from pooled commer¬ 
cial and industrial assessment. 14 As we had antici¬ 
pated, the ratepayers of boards that at present are 
assessment-poor experienced the most benefits 
from pooling. 


14. The simulation assumed that boards were amalgamated 
according to our recommendations. 


Final Report 1996 













7. Issues Before the Task Force 


The main reason for, and the main benefit of, 
pooling the revenue from commercial and indus¬ 
trial assessment is a more equitable redistribution 
of the revenue from this assessment. In particu¬ 
lar, pooling would provide newly created French- 
language boards with an equitable financial base 
relative to other boards in the province. These 
boards must have sufficient funding to provide 
their students with an education that is of the 
same standard as that available to other Ontario 
students. 

If province-wide pooling of the revenue from 
commercial and industrial assessment were 
implemented as in the ministry's simulation and 
if the revenue were redistributed on an equitable 
basis by an independent provincial agency, there 
would be other benefits. 

• Pooling would reduce the amount of unrecog¬ 
nized or over-ceiling expenditure by boards, 
which is now funded entirely from local 
property taxes. 

• The Ministry of Education and Training could 
make use of the pooled assessment funds in its 
funding formula: by adding the total assess¬ 
ment pool to the total transfer-payment pool, 
the ministry would have more fiscal room to 
establish a realistic level of recognized ordinary 
expenditure per pupil. It would, of course, be 
essential that the government not consider the 
pooled assessment a windfall and an excuse for 
decreasing the amount of transfer payments to 
elementary and secondary education. 

• Pooling could also reduce the need for a costly 
practice now engaged in by many coterminous 
public and separate boards. At present, the 
commercial and industrial assessment from 
publicly traded companies is pooled between 
coterminous public and separate school boards. 
To ensure that they get as much of the revenue 
from the unpooled assessment as possible, 
coterminous boards now employ assessment 


I 27 

officers whose job it is to ensure that, wherever 
possible, ratepayers direct their property taxes 
to the board that is employing the assessment 
officers. 15 If province-wide pooling of all com¬ 
mercial-industrial assessment were implement¬ 
ed, overall distribution of assessment revenue 
would be more equitable, and unpooled assess¬ 
ment would be limited to that from residences 
and farms. In this situation, boards would 
probably require fewer assessment officers to 
track unpooled assessment. 

Of all of the issues described in our Interim 
Report, the need for the reform of Ontario's sys¬ 
tem of funding elementary and secondary educa¬ 
tion received by far the greatest support. The 
Interim Report presented four options for changes 
to the present system: 

1. provincial pooling of all commercial and indus¬ 
trial assessment 

2. elimination of the education component of the 
residential property tax 

3. the Alberta model (where the province collects 
all local property taxes and redistributes the 
revenue) 

4. the New Brunswick model (where the province 
funds education from income and sales taxes) 

Only the first two options received much com¬ 
ment from the public, and of these two pooling 
received more support. While many people would 
like to see the education component of residential 
property tax eliminated, this option was consid¬ 
ered impractical. Most responders felt that cur¬ 
rent provincial revenues are insufficient to cover 
the full funding of education. 

Opposition to province-wide pooling came, of 
course, from those jurisdictions that would lose 
their sole access to sizeable amounts of commer¬ 
cial and industrial assessment. Support came from 
those that have a more limited assessment base. 


15. The "default" system for property tax is explained in the 
section of this chapter entitled "Creation of French-Language 
School Boards." 


Final Report 1996 





7. Issues Before the Task Force 


28 | 

The task force recommends that: 

1. the government reform the present system of 
funding education in Ontario before it pro¬ 
ceeds with the amalgamation of school 
boards recommended in this report 

2. in proceeding with recommendation 1 above, 
the government undertake province-wide 
pooling of commercial and industrial assess¬ 
ment, using the following process: 

a) establish a standard mill rate for commer¬ 
cial-industrial assessment 

b) require municipalities to forward the rev¬ 
enue raised from the application of the mill 
rate in 2(a) to an independent provincial 
agency to be established for the purpose of 
supervising the collection and redistribu¬ 
tion of this revenue 

c) require the independent agency to ensure 
this revenue is redistributed so that all 
boards have an equitable amount of direct 
classroom expenditure per pupil 

and further that: 

d) this process of redistribution be phased in 
over a period of five years 

e) during this five-year period, the province 
not reduce the total amount of grant 
money it provides to school boards 

3. simultaneously with the process described in 
recommendation 2, the province establish a 
new, realistic level of recognized ordinary 
expenditure per pupil 

4. the government make use of the pooled 
assessment funds that result from the process 
described in recommendation 2 to establish 
the realistic level of expenditure per pupil 
described in recommendation 3, but not at 
the expense of a continued fair and adequate 
allocation of money from the consolidated 
revenue fund for transfer payments to all 
school boards 


Amalgamation and New Boundaries 

New School Board Boundaries 

The most significant parts of our terms of refer¬ 
ence were those that required us to: 

• recommend new school board boundaries that 
would reduce the number of boards by 40 to 50 
per cent, and 

• streamline the delivery of French-language edu¬ 
cation through the creation of 15 French-lan¬ 
guage school boards from the 78 existing 
French-language boards, sections, and advisory 
committees 

In fulfilling these terms of reference, we were 
required to honour the rights of Roman Catholics 
and franco-Ontarians - rights protected by the 
Canadian Constitution and Charter of Rights and 
Freedoms - to their own education governance 
structures. 

Earlier in this report, we established the basis of 
our argument that amalgamation of school boards 
is necessary. To reiterate briefly: 

• To maintain the quality of education in the cur¬ 
rent environment of severe fiscal constraints, 
school boards must operate in a new, more 
cost-effective way. 

• The limited financial resources available for 
education must be focused on the classroom, 
on providing adequate resources for students to 
learn and teachers to teach. 

• School boards' governance and administrative 
costs must be reduced and cooperation 
between and among boards, and between and 
among boards and other agencies and institu¬ 
tions, must be improved so that there is less 
duplication of effort and more sharing of ser¬ 
vices. 

• Trustees and administrators must be seen by 
parents and taxpayers to be accountable for the 
way they educate our children and spend our 
tax dollars. 


Final Report 1996 





7. Issues Before the Task Force 


• Too few school boards have willingly cooperat¬ 
ed with one another and local service providers 
to reduce duplication, enhance efficiency, and 
save money. 16 

In accordance with our mandate and terms of ref¬ 
erence, and as a result of our careful deliberations 
on the above points and on the responses to our 
Interim Report, we are recommending amalgama¬ 
tion and boundary changes that will reduce the 
number of school boards in Ontario by slightly 
less than 50 per cent, to a total of 87 boards. All of 
the boards we are recommending are autonomous; 
that is, each one represents one of the four sys¬ 
tems - English-language public, English-language 
Roman Catholic separate, French-language public, 
and French-language Roman Catholic separate. 

Of the 87 boards, 15 are French-language - 
5 French-language public and 10 French-language 
Roman Catholic separate. 

These recommendations fulfil our mandate and 
honour constitutional and Charter rights. As 
noted in the Preface, however, we received a 
number of complaints from school boards, other 
education stakeholders, and members of the pub¬ 
lic that our mandate was wrong. 

Most of those who felt our mandate was wrong 
suggested that greater savings would come from 
amalgamating all coterminous boards (that is, the 
English, French, public, and separate systems 
within a geographic area) into one unified board. 
Such unified boards are usually referred to as 
"confederated" boards. Supporters of confederat¬ 
ed boards believe that by having one administra¬ 
tive structure - one support system for the busi¬ 
ness, transportation, and maintenance needs of all 
the coterminous boards - substantial savings 
would be achieved, existing facilities would be 
better managed, and scarce resources would be 
distributed more equitably. They also believe that 
the rights of Roman Catholics and franco- 
Ontarians can be guaranteed at the local level by 
providing them with their own schools, or by 


| 29 

providing them with their own subsections of the 
confederated board. 

Among those who responded to our Interim 
Report, there was a significant degree of support 
for confederated boards. Of the 1,296 responders 
who suggested alternatives to our amalgamation 
proposals, fewer than 200 suggested alternatives 
that fell within the parameters of our mandate. 

The others supported a form of confederated 
board. 

The degree of disagreement with our mandate 
was so substantial that we sought advice on the 
concept of confederated boards from the Ontario 
Ministry of the Attorney General. The advice we 
received was that we not recommend confederat¬ 
ed boards because "such boards would violate the 
constitutional rights of Ontario's Roman Catholics 
and French-speaking persons." The Ministry of 
the Attorney General advised, however, that "the 
constitutional restraints do not prevent rational¬ 
ization of services on a cooperative basis that 
respects the constitutional status of Roman 
Catholic separate and French-language boards." 

We are not recommending confederated boards. 

The amalgamations that we are recommending, 
however, will result in more consolidated admin¬ 
istrative structures - one of the goals sought by 
supporters of confederated boards. Under amalga¬ 
mation, there will be one support system for the 
business, transportation, and maintenance needs 
of the amalgamated boards, more efficient man¬ 
agement of existing facilities, and more equitable 
distribution of scarce resources. Amalgamation 
will also allow all partners in the merger to bene¬ 
fit from the expertise of other partners. 

Cooperation between amalgamated coterminous 
boards would enhance the benefits achieved by 
amalgamation. The Ministry of the Attorney 
General's advice, that "rationalization of services 
on a cooperative basis" is quite acceptable, should 
encourage coterminous boards to look for addition¬ 
al savings by cooperating with one another after 
amalgamation. Later in this report, we recommend 
that this kind of collaboration be required. 


16. It has been pointed out to us that the task force's existence 
and mandate have stimulated additional cooperative activities 
and consortia. 


Final Report 1996 





7. Issues Before the Task Force 


30 f 

We recognize that there will be challenges in 
adjusting to the changes and in reconciling philo¬ 
sophical differences. But we also recognize that 
trustees and administrators have as their top pri¬ 
ority the best interests of their students. We are 
confident that, even with a reduction in the num¬ 
ber of trustees and administrators, the amalgama¬ 
tion of two or more similar boards will not only 
result in savings but will meet the needs of stu¬ 
dents more efficiently. 

The criteria we used in establishing new school 
board boundaries, both for the Interim Report 
and for this report, were outlined in chapter 5. 
Most of those who responded to our Interim 
Report acknowledged these criteria to be sound, 
but many felt that our application of the criteria 
was not always appropriate. We are grateful for 
the constructive suggestions we received in what 
must be a very difficult exercise for school 
boards. As a result, we changed half of our initial 
boundary proposals. Many of those changes 
incorporate a number of the suggestions we 
received. 

We paid particular attention to suggestions like 
the following: 

• A stronger community of interest existed in a 
different alignment of boards than we had sug¬ 
gested in our interim recommendation. 

• A greater potential for cooperation between 
coterminous public and separate boards existed 
in a different alignment. 

• The borders being contemplated by the Greater 
Toronto Area Task Force were different from 
those contemplated by our interim recommen¬ 
dations, and the external borders recommended 
by each of us needed to match. 

• Other workable alternatives to our proposals 
were offered. 

• Additional information was available concern¬ 
ing section 68 boards and the Penetanguishene 
Protestant Separate School Board. 


For the benefit of those who commented on the 
amalgamation proposals in our Interim Report 
and offered alternative solutions, Appendix E lists 
the changes we made to arrive at the final recom¬ 
mendations in this report. 

The task force recommends that: 

5. a) English-language school boards be amalga¬ 
mated and school board boundaries be 
adjusted according to Maps 1, 2, 3, and 4 

b) trustees for the new boards recommended 
in 5(a) be elected in November 1997, the 
new boards establish themselves in 
December 1997, and full implementation 
of the new boards be effective January 1, 
1998 

c) where amalgamation as recommended in 
5(a) occurs, existing English-language 
boards and sections be dissolved 17 


17. We make specific recommendations about section 68 
boards, the Metropolitan Toronto School Board, and the 
Penetanguishene Protestant Separate School Board later in 
this report. 


Final Report 1996 






Map 1 Northern Ontario English-Language Public School Boards 


7. Issues Before the Task Force 


31 



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Final Report 1996 




































Map 2 Southern Ontario English-Language 
Public School Boards 


7. Issues Before the Task Force 


32 


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Final Report 1996 











Map 3 Northern Ontario English-Language Roman Catholic Separate School Boards 


7. Issues Before the Task Force 


33 



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Final Report 1 996 





























Map 4 Southern Ontario English-Language 

Roman Catholic Separate School Boards 


7. Issues Before the Task Force 


34 


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Final Report 1996 









7. Issues Before the Task Force 


| 35 


Creation of French-Language School 
Boards 

Governance of French-language education is a 
longstanding issue in Ontario. Franco-Ontarians 
have long argued that section 23 of the Canadian 
Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which establish¬ 
es their rights to govern their own education, enti¬ 
tles them to their own school boards. 
Recommendations about the formation of French- 
language school boards were contained in the 
1991 report of the French-Language Education 
Governance Advisory Group (the Cousineau 
report) and the 1994 report of the Royal 
Commission on Learning. 

In its response to our Interim Report, the Franco- 
Ontarian community expressed support for the 
amalgamation of 78 French-language boards, sec¬ 
tions, and advisory committees into 15 French- 
language school boards. Many people expressed 
concern, however, about the "default" system cur¬ 
rently in place in Ontario, whereby ratepayers' 
support defaults to the local public school board 
unless: 

a) ratepayers who are Roman Catholic designate 
their support to their local Roman Catholic sep¬ 
arate school board, and 

b) ratepayers who are entitled to section 23 rights 
(rights under section 23 of the Canadian 
Charter of Rights and Freedoms) designate 
their support to their local French-language 
public school board, or in the case of section 23 
right-holders who are Roman Catholics, to their 
local French-language Roman Catholic separate 
school board. 

Several responders suggested that, when voters 
are enumerated before the election of trustees for 
the new boards, they be made aware of their right 
to designate their support as described above. 

In establishing the boundaries of the new French- 
language boards, we took into consideration the 
criteria described in chapter 5 - in particular, 
coterminality and contiguity, the size of the stu¬ 
dent population (present and potential), similar 
interests and natural affinities, and existing coop¬ 
erative arrangements and joint ventures. 


As we did with the English-language boards, we 
made several changes to our proposals for 
French-language boards as a result of constructive 
suggestions we received in response to the 
Interim Report. One aspect that we were not able 
to alter to everyone's satisfaction is the large terri¬ 
tory covered by some of the new French-language 
boards. Many responders expressed concern 
about the size of these boards. Certainly these 
and other large boards resulting from amalgama¬ 
tion will have special communications and man¬ 
agement needs. Later in this report, we make sug¬ 
gestions and recommendations related to these 
special needs. 

Again, for the benefit of those who commented 
on the proposals for French-language boards in 
our Interim Report and offered alternative solu¬ 
tions, Appendix E lists the changes we made to 
arrive at the final recommendations in this report. 

The task force recommends that: 

6. a) two French-language public school boards 
be created in northern Ontario with 
boundaries as shown in Map 5 

b) three French-language public school 
boards be created in southern Ontario with 
boundaries as shown in Map 6 

c) five French-language Roman Catholic sepa¬ 
rate school boards be created in northern 
Ontario with boundaries as shown in Map 7 

d) five French-language Roman Catholic sepa¬ 
rate school boards be created in southern 
Ontario with boundaries as shown in Map 8 

e) trustees for the new boards recommended 
in 6(a), 6(b), 6(c), and 6(d) be elected in 
November 1997, the new boards establish 
themselves in December 1997, and full 
implementation of the new boards be 
effective January 1, 1998 

f) the 78 existing French-language boards, 
sections, and advisory committees be 
dissolved 


Final Report 1996 





Map 5 Northern Ontario French-Language Public School Boards 


36 


7. Issues Before the Task Force 



Final Report 1996 




























Map 6 Southern Ontario French-Language 
Public School Boards 


7. Issues Before the Task Force 


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Final Report 1996 





Map 7 Northern Ontario French-Language Roman Catholic Separate School Boards 


7. Issues Before the Task Force 


38 



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Final Report 1996 


























Map 8 Southern Ontario French-Language 

Roman Catholic Separate School Boards 


7. Issues Before the Task Force 



Final Report 1996 






7. Issues Before the Task Force 


40 [ 


Section 68 Boards 

"Section 68 boards" were created under section 68 
of the Education Act to provide educational ser¬ 
vices for students who have long-term physical or 
health-care needs that cannot be met within the 
jurisdiction of their local school board. Section 68 
boards operate schools, situated on tax-exempt 
land, in affiliation with medical treatment centres. 
Students who attend these schools require lengthy 
medical treatment and attend the schools for 
varying periods of time. The schools, especially 
the Hugh MacMillan Centre in North York, 
which is a residential facility, receive students 
from well beyond their local area. 

There are six section 68 boards: 

- Essex County Children's Rehabilitation Centre 

- Hugh MacMillan Centre (North York) 

- Campbell Children's School (Oshawa) 

- Niagara Peninsula Crippled Children's Centre 

- Waterloo North Children's Centre 

- Ottawa Children's Treatment Centre 

Section 68 boards receive 80 per cent of their 
funding from the province, and the balance in the 
form of fees that they charge the boards of which 
their students are resident pupils. Trustees of sec¬ 
tion 68 boards are appointed by the Minister of 
Education and Training and serve without 
remuneration. 

In our Interim Report we recommended that 
"pending further investigation, section 68 boards 
remain as is." 

We received very little response to this recom¬ 
mendation, but what we did receive was divided 
between support for the interim recommendation 
and support for the dissolution of these boards 
and the transfer of their programs to the jurisdic¬ 
tion of the public school board in which the med¬ 
ical treatment centre is located. Those who sup¬ 
ported the transfer of programs for section 68 
students to the host public board cited the advan¬ 
tages of integration with the regular school sys¬ 
tem, greater opportunities for teaching staff to 
acquire a variety of experience, and the greater 


accountability afforded by having an elected body 
responsible for the programs. They advocated 
incorporating the section 68 programs into the 
programs of the local board by means of agree¬ 
ments between the medical institution and the 
host board similar to the agreements under which 
section 27 schools operate. (Section 27 of the 
annual General Legislative Grants Regulation - a 
regulation under the Education Act that governs 
the province's transfer payments to boards - pro¬ 
vides for the operation by local school boards of 
schools in hospitals, women's shelters, homes for 
unwed mothers, and similar agencies and institu¬ 
tions. The local board is reimbursed for the cost 
of these programs by the province because many 
of the students are involuntary nonresidents of 
the board providing the service.) 

In their original submission to us, the section 68 
boards indicated a strong preference to be left as 
they are. They did volunteer three alternatives, 
however, for their operation: 

• unite them under the jurisdiction of one section 
68 board, with a trustee from each existing 
jurisdiction appointed by the Minister of 
Education and Training 

• amalgamate them with local school boards 
under special agreements that would contain 
provisions similar to the existing provisions for 
section 68 boards 

• absorb their programs into local school boards 
with the proviso that these programs operate 
under agreements similar to those under which 
section 27 schools operate 

After reviewing these options, as well as those 
submitted in response to the recommendation in 
our Interim Report, and consulting with several 
boards whose students use the services provided 
by section 68 boards, we reached the following 
conclusions: 

• Board structure would have little impact on 
student access to education programs. 

• There is no evidence of financial advantage 
regardless of the board structure. 


Final Report 199G 




7. Issues Before the Task Force 


1 41 


• The potential for mobility of teachers is greater 
if the section 68 school is operated by a school 
board. 

• Greater transparency of and accountability for 
costs would occur if the section 68 school were 
operated by an elected school board. 

The task force recommends that: 

7. a) existing section 68 school boards be 
dissolved and their responsibilities be 
undertaken by the public school boards in 
whose jurisdictions the section 68 schools 
are located 

b) the responsibilities under 7(a) be undertak¬ 
en under agreements similar to those that 
apply to schools under section 27 of the 
annual General Legislative Grants 
Regulation, but without the requirement 
for annual renewal 

c) there be no change in the present funding 
arrangements for agreements under section 
27 of the annual General Legislative 
Grants Regulation, so that the host boards 
described in 7(a) are not penalized finan¬ 
cially for undertaking this responsibility 

Metropolitan Toronto School Board 

The Metropolitan Toronto School Board is a coor¬ 
dinating body for the six public school boards in 
Metro Toronto, the only board of its type in the 
province. It no longer operates any schools - all 
schools in Metro Toronto are operated by the 
Metro board's constituent boards - but it does 
have certain other functions. It operates as a kind 
of bank for its constituent boards, managing their 
revenue, pooling it, and redistributing it accord¬ 
ing to an agreed-upon formula. It also sets a 
Metro-wide tax rate, beyond which individual 
boards can set a limited discretionary tax rate to 
cover local spending decisions. It conducts Metro¬ 
wide bargaining with teacher federations and 
other employee groups on behalf of its constituent 
boards. It coordinates the scheduling of school 
capital programs in Metro and the self-insurance 
programs and special education activities of its 
boards, and it has also coordinated the develop¬ 
ment of curriculum within Metro Toronto. 


Our Interim Report recommended that the 
Metropolitan Toronto School Board be dissolved 
because the new configuration of boards that we 
are recommending for Metropolitan Toronto will 
be able to cooperate with one another without the 
umbrella structure now provided by the Metro 
board. Even without our recommendations, much 
of Metro's coordinating function is disappearing 
with the recent initiation by the constituent 
boards of a cooperative venture to implement cost 
savings. 

If, as we are recommending, education finance is 
reformed before the amalgamation of school 
boards, and if, as we are also recommending, the 
revenue from commercial-industrial assessment is 
pooled on a province-wide basis, the banking 
functions of the Metro board will be taken over 
by the province. If, as we are also recommending 
(see recommendation 21), province-wide bargain¬ 
ing with teachers is implemented, the negotiating 
function of the Metro board will also disappear. 

We also believe that the new configuration of 
boards we are recommending for Metro will 
allow the Metro-area boards to accommodate 
themselves to any revised design that might be 
required as a result of the recommendations of 
the Greater Toronto Area Task Force. We are not 
privy to the task force's recommendations, 
expected early in 1996, and our recommendation 
about the Metro-area boards may have to be 
reconciled with its proposals. 

Little comment was received in response to our 
interim recommendation for dissolution of the 
Metropolitan Toronto School Board. Most of the 
responses opposed dissolution of the board, but 
not all of the constituent boards submitted argu¬ 
ments in favour of its retention. 

The task force recommends that: 

8. the Metropolitan Toronto School Board be 
dissolved 


Final Report 1996 







7. Issues Before the Task Force 


42 [ 


Penetanguishene Protestant Separate 
School Board 

The Penetanguishene Protestant Separate School 
Board is the only Protestant separate school board 
remaining in Ontario. Part V of the Education Act 
permits the creation of a Protestant separate 
school board "where the teacher or teachers in 
the public school or schools in the municipality 
are Roman Catholics." 18 The Penetanguishene 
board was created under these conditions in the 
nineteenth century, but they no longer exist. If 
the Penetanguishene Protestant Separate School 
Board were dissolved, it is unlikely that it could 
be reestablished. In fact, it is unlikely that the 
conditions permitting the creation of Protestant 
separate school boards will exist anywhere in 
Ontario in the foreseeable future. 

In our Interim Report, we recommended that "if 
it is determined that the rationale for the 
Penetanguishene board no longer exists, it be 
amalgamated with the Simcoe County and 
Muskoka boards of education." (As recommenda¬ 
tion 5(a) indicates, we are no longer recommend¬ 
ing that Simcoe County and Muskoka be com¬ 
bined, but that Muskoka be added to Nipissing, 
East and West Parry Sound.) 

We requested legal advice on this matter from the 
Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General. The 
advice we have received is that: 

a) the right to establish a Protestant separate 
school board, though more limited than the 
right enjoyed by Roman Catholics in respect of 
separate schools, is nonetheless a separate- 
school right for purposes of the Constitution 
Act, 1867; and 

b) because the Penetanguishene Protestant 
Separate School Board no longer meets the con¬ 
ditions for the establishment of a Protestant 
separate school board, the better opinion is that 
it could be abolished. 


The task force recommends that: 

9. the Penetanguishene Protestant Separate 
School Board be dissolved and its duties and 
powers be transferred to the Simcoe County 
Board of Education 

Boundary Expansion for Northern Boards 

From time to time, school boards in northern 
Ontario request expansion of their boundaries 
into what is now unorganized territory - that is, 
territory that has no municipal government struc¬ 
ture - to provide education to children who live 
in the unorganized territory, and to levy taxes for 
education purposes on the homes and other struc¬ 
tures in the territory. Several such requests were 
made in northwestern Ontario just before the 
appointment of our task force, and we were asked 
to consider them. 

Many of the unorganized territories in question 
are not only without municipal government, they 
have not even been surveyed or assessed. Taxes 
cannot be levied on land that has not been sur¬ 
veyed and assessed. While we recognize that 
some school-age children live in these areas, and 
that homes and businesses in these areas could be 
contributing to the cost of education, we believe 
that the cost of surveying the territories, assessing 
the structures, and providing education is such 
that the boards requesting expansion may gain no 
benefit by expanding. The school-age children in 
unorganized territories are educated in any case. 
They usually attend the schools of a convenient 
board, where they are considered nonresident 
pupils, and the province pays the board they 
attend tuition fees for educating them. 


18. Education Act, RSO 1990, c. E.2, 158(3). 


Final Report 1996 






7. Issues Before the Task Force 


The task force recommends that: 

10. where a board seeks to expand into unorga¬ 
nized territory, it be allowed to expand its 
boundaries in accordance with the guide¬ 
lines established by the Ministry of 
Education and Training and in accordance 
with the school board boundaries proposed 
in recommendations 5 and 6, with the stipu¬ 
lation that the board seeking to expand be 
responsible for the cost of surveying and 
assessing the territory into which it wishes 
to expand 

Extension of Boards from Elementary 
Only to Elementary-Secondary 

Some school boards with very small student pop¬ 
ulations, particularly in northern Ontario, now 
operate only at the elementary level. Older stu¬ 
dents in these boards are offered secondary 
school programs by the nearest public school 
board. When these small elementary-only boards 
are amalgamated into larger boards, the larger 
board's responsibilities may include secondary 
education. 

It is customary for school boards to want to 
accommodate their students in their own schools. 
In our Interim Report, we recommended that 
these "extended" boards "purchase services for 
their secondary students, or pursue other cooper¬ 
ative arrangements, rather than build new sec¬ 
ondary schools." Those who responded to this 
recommendation did not support this restriction 
on new construction. Pupil spaces are available 
under the current arrangements, however, and 
we continue to believe that the severe constraints 
on funding available for education rule out unnec¬ 
essary capital expenses. 


I 43 

The task force recommends that: 

11. a) boards that have been extended through 
amalgamation from elementary only to 
elementary-secondary and that do not 
have secondary facilities for students be 
required to purchase services for their 
secondary students from other boards 
or share existing facilities, rather than 
construct new facilities, until such time 
as pupil spaces are no longer available in 
the area and the extended boards can 
make a case for new construction 

b) the province make it clear to boards that 
have been extended through amalgama¬ 
tion that funding is not available for new 
capital projects where existing facilities 
are adequate to accommodate all area 
students 

Trustees and School Boards 

Trustee Representation 

Under our recommendations, Ontario's school 
boards, together with the Ministry of Education 
and Training's Independent Learning Centre and 
provincial schools, 19 will be able to serve the 
needs of all elementary and secondary students in 
the province. School boards will continue to be 
responsible for providing pupil spaces, instruc¬ 
tion, and the supplies and services required for 
the delivery of education. Each board will be 
composed of locally elected trustees, chosen by 
electors who define themselves as public or 
Roman Catholic and English- or French-language. 

In these important aspects, we are not changing 
the governance structure for education. 


19. "Provincial schools," including "demonstration schools," 
provide special education services to students who are blind, 
deaf, deaf-blind, and learning disabled. Since school boards 
now provide services to many children with special needs, 
provincial schools usually provide services to those with 
severe or multiple disabilities. 


Final Report 1996 






7. Issues Before the Task Force 


44 [ 


Under our recommendations, however, ratepay¬ 
ers who are francophone rightholders under the 
Charter of Rights and Freedoms, as well as those 
who are Roman Catholic, will be able to elect 
their own trustees, designate their education taxes 
to the system of their choice, and send their chil¬ 
dren to the system of their choice. 

Amalgamation of school boards will intensify the 
need for good trustees. As in the past, locally 
elected citizens with a strong faith in the future, a 
willingness to venture into difficult decision mak¬ 
ing, and a sense of public responsibility will be 
needed to guide education in this province. We 
believe, however, that the interrelated reform ini¬ 
tiatives of which amalgamation is a part will 
serve to focus the attention of trustees on those 
areas of responsibility that the Education Act 
intended they focus on - policy, budgets, and the 
provision of staff and facilities. 

As our society has become more complex and as 
schools have been asked to do more, to become 
involved in activities and services once consid¬ 
ered well beyond their purview, many people - 
not just trustees - have expressed the desire to 
monitor and become more involved in the day-to- 
day operation of schools. Chief among them, of 
course, are parents. As we observed earlier, the 
previous government responded to this desire for 
community involvement by establishing school 
councils, and the present government is proceed¬ 
ing with the initiative. 

School councils, which must be in place in all 
Ontario schools by June 1996, will be made up of 
parents, community representatives, school staff, 
and students. 20 The councils will be influential 
advisory bodies, providing advice to the principal 
and, where appropriate, the board on such mat¬ 
ters as the code of student behaviour, program 
goals, the selection of principals, school budget 
priorities, school communications strategies, and 
school-based community services. No honorarium 
will be paid to members of school councils. 


School councils, along with other education 
reforms outlined earlier in this report - ministry 
development of curriculum, new measures for 
testing and reporting on student achievement, 
and changes in teacher education and the regula¬ 
tion of the teaching profession - will relieve 
trustees of many of the additional responsibilities 
they have assumed in recent years. These reforms 
will also permit a reduction in the present num¬ 
ber of trustees on each school board. 

The number of trustees on each board should be 
adequate for appropriate decision making, but 
not too many to be cumbersome or financially 
burdensome. Throughout the history of school 
boards in Ontario, different criteria have been 
used to establish the appropriate number of 
trustees for each board. At present, the number 
is determined by the number of electors. We 
believe that, since in Ontario the number of 
pupils enrolled in a board forms the basis for 
education funding as well as for the number of 
teachers, the number of classrooms, and other 
aspects of education, the number of pupils is also 
an appropriate basis for determining trustee rep¬ 
resentation. We also believe that there should be 
an odd number of trustees so that a tie-breaking 
vote is available. 

In our Interim Report, we recommended that the 
number of trustees elected to each board be a 
minimum of five and a maximum of 13. While we 
received a great deal of support for our recom¬ 
mendations about reducing school boards' admin¬ 
istrative costs, the response to our recommenda¬ 
tion on reducing trustee representation was 
negative. Responders clearly felt the numbers we 
proposed were insufficient, both to allow electors 
access to their trustees and to allow trustees to be 
accountable to their electors. 


20. Student members will be mandatory in secondary schools, 
but at the discretion of the principal in elementary schools. All 
the information set out here on school councils is from the 
Ministry of Education and Training's Policy/Program 
Memorandum No. 122, April 12, 1995. 


Final Report 1996 





7. Issues Before the Task Force 


1 45 


In response to the public input we received on 
this recommendation, and also to the significant 
degree of concern expressed about the large geo¬ 
graphic areas covered by some of the amalgamat¬ 
ed boards, we have revised our recommendation. 

The task force recommends that: 

12. effective as of the November 1997 munici¬ 
pal elections, trustee representation be 
based on the number of pupils enrolled in a 
school board as reported by the board to the 
Ministry of Education and Training in its 
full-time enrolment report for the previous 


January, as follows: 

up to 30,000 students . 7 trustees 

up to 60,000 students . 9 trustees 

up to 90,000 students .11 trustees 

over 90,000 students.13 trustees 


and, further, that the process for distribu¬ 
tion of these numbers be worked out in time 
for the 1997 municipal election campaigns 

Some English-language boards in northern 
Ontario, and some French-language boards in 
both northern and southern Ontario, will cover 
an extremely large geographic area and have a 
small, widely dispersed student population. The 
formula for trustee representation set out in rec¬ 
ommendation 12 may be inadequate for these 
boards, although new technology, if available, 
and the introduction of school councils may pro¬ 
vide these boards with the assistance they require 
to adhere to the formula. 


Trustee Remuneration 

As we noted in chapter 4, the previous Minister 
of Education and Training had intended to intro¬ 
duce legislation limiting the amount of compensa¬ 
tion received by a trustee to an all-inclusive 
maximum of $20,000 annually, as part of his edu¬ 
cation reform initiatives. At the time of writing 
this report, the present minister had made no 
announcement on this issue. 

In light of the severity of fiscal constraints and the 
overriding need to reduce administrative costs 
and sustain classroom expenditure, we believe 
trustees' remuneration should be limited as 
follows. 

The task force recommends that: 

14. the Education Act be amended to establish: 

a) the honorarium for trustees at a mini¬ 
mum of $5,000 and a maximum of 
$15,000 annually 

b) the additional honorarium to recognize 
the extra responsibilities of the chair and 
vice-chair of a school board at no more 
than $5,000 additional for the chair and 
no more than $2,500 additional for the 
vice-chair 

and further 

c) that school boards have the authority to 
establish policies regarding the appropri¬ 
ate compensation of legitimate travel and 
other expenses incurred by trustees 


The task force recommends that: 

13. the individual needs of boards that cover a 
very large geographic area and have a small, 
widely dispersed student population be con¬ 
sidered on a case-by-case basis during the 
period of transition to full implementation 
and, if it is decided that they need more 
trustees than permitted by the formula in 
recommendation 12, the total number of 
trustees representing each of these boards 
be increased, but that it not exceed 11 


Final Report 1996 











7. Issues Before the Task Force 


46 [ 


Effective Functioning of School Boards 

Amalgamation and the reduction in the number 
of trustees will require that school boards func¬ 
tion with a high degree of efficiency. Both the 
provincial government and school boards will 
have to consider the needs of boards to conduct 
their business in new and innovative ways. We 
are particularly concerned with the needs of the 
geographically large northern boards. 

Northern Ontario, with its small populations scat¬ 
tered in widely separated communities, provided 
us with our greatest challenges in devising work¬ 
able amalgamations. The amalgamation recom¬ 
mendations contained in our Interim Report were 
based on the information available to us at the 
time. Responses to that report included specific 
proposals dealing with isolated school boards and 
schools. We are grateful for these considered 
suggestions and certain new information, and we 
have revised some of our recommendations in 
response. We were unable, however, to accom¬ 
modate all requests. 

In spite of their isolation and lack of access to 
conveniences enjoyed by southern Ontario 
boards, small district area boards have managed 
to function effectively to date. Hornepayne and 
Chapleau, while not the smallest northern com¬ 
munities, are particularly isolated because they 
are distant from the two major transportation cor¬ 
ridors of Highways 11 and 17. The boards in 
these jurisdictions drew our attention to the coop¬ 
erative ventures they have established among 
themselves and suggested to us that they be pro¬ 
vided with an alternative form of governance that 
would maximize their resources and reduce the 
disadvantages of distance and winter-weather 
conditions. They proposed that a joint or coopera¬ 
tive structure, similar to the confederated board 
structure discussed earlier, be established involv¬ 
ing all of the local boards - public, Roman 
Catholic and French-language. 


Although we have not taken up their suggestion, 
we are recommending amalgamations that we 
believe will allow these boards to continue the 
cooperative ventures they have in place. 21 We 
suggest that the functioning of these boards be 
monitored during the transition period to full 
implementation of our recommendations. Should 
the proposed amalgamations prove to be stum¬ 
bling blocks to the continuation of existing coop¬ 
erative ventures, the alignments of these boards 
should be reexamined. 

We also believe the amalgamations we are recom¬ 
mending for these boards will not require addi¬ 
tional schools. There are sufficient places in exist¬ 
ing schools for all the students in the area. 

One way for boards that have schools in remote 
and isolated communities to cope with their large 
territories may be to delegate more authority to 
those schools. We noted earlier that organizations 
that have restructured are making use of site- 
based management - that is, policy is formulated 
at head office but day-to-day decisions are made 
locally. We feel this is a useful model for geo¬ 
graphically large boards; many boards already use 
it extensively. At the very least, cooperation 
between geographically large boards and their 
school councils will go far towards helping them 
to function effectively. 

All boards will wish to take advantage of new 
technology to enhance their effectiveness and effi¬ 
ciency. In the north, the innovative use of tech¬ 
nology can assist boards in providing their stu¬ 
dents with an education as close to home as 
possible. New communications technology could 
also provide cost-effective alternatives for board 
and committee meetings. At present, however, 
the Education Act contains a number of require¬ 
ments that inhibit full use of technology. For 
example, the act requires that board meetings be 


21. The recommended amalgamation for each board in these 
jurisdictions is shown earlier in this chapter in Maps 1, 3, 5, 
and 7. 


Final Report 1996 





7. Issues Before the Task Force 


I 47 


held regularly, that they be publicly advertised, 
and that voting be conducted in person only. 
Regular in-person meetings could prove difficult 
for geographically large northern boards because 
of the vagaries of winter weather. Meetings con¬ 
ducted by teleconference or, preferably, video- 
conference, however, would allow for public 
attendance and discussion of issues without 
expensive and hazardous travel. Other electronic 
technology could be used, with appropriate safe¬ 
guards, to handle confidential materials and 
votes. 

The task force recommends that: 

15. the Education Act be amended to allow 
school boards to use electronic technology 
to conduct board and committee meetings, 
including votes 

Some areas of northern Ontario lack the infra¬ 
structure necessary to use new electronic technol¬ 
ogy. Installation is costly and utility companies 
fear the cost would never be recovered through 
usage, since these areas are sparsely populated. 
Where the infrastructure is available, it is inter¬ 
mittent, and there are some areas of the north 
where single-line service for telephone, fax, and 
e-mail transmissions is not available at all. The 
unavailability of such services will make it 
extremely difficult for certain of the new northern 
boards to function effectively. 

The task force recommends that: 

16. the availability of electronic technology in the 
areas covered by northern Ontario school 
boards be monitored carefully during the 
transition period to the new board structures 
and that the structure of northern boards be 
altered as necessary prior to full implementa¬ 
tion to permit them to operate effectively 


Native Education 

Native bands have three options for using the 
funds provided them by the federal government 
for the education of native children: 

• operating their own schools on their reserves 

• purchasing education from provincially funded 
public or separate school boards 

• combining the above two options - for exam¬ 
ple, offering elementary education on reserves 
and purchasing secondary education from a 
school board 

When a band purchases education from a school 
board, two elements are involved: tuition agree¬ 
ments and trustee representation. Tuition agree¬ 
ments spell out the services that will be provided. 
Generally, the more services negotiated, the high¬ 
er the tuition per student. 

The level of trustee representation is defined by 
section 188 of the Education Act : 

• If there are fewer native students than the less¬ 
er of 10 per cent of the board's enrolment and 
100, the board "may" add one position for a 
native trustee. 

• If the number of native students exceeds the 
above threshold, the board "shall" add one posi¬ 
tion for a native trustee. 

• If the number of native students exceeds 25 per 
cent of the board's enrolment, the board "shall" 
add two positions for native trustees. 

As the language indicates, the native trustee posi¬ 
tions are in addition to the board's complement of 
trustees. Their remuneration is included in tuition 
agreements. 


Final Report 1996 






7. Issues Before the Task Force 



Some boards have tuition agreements with more 
than one band, and we were asked by representa¬ 
tives of several bands to recommend that each 
band be permitted a trustee on each board with 
which it has an agreement. We cannot support 
this request because it would result in a dispro¬ 
portionate number of native trustees on boards 
that, if our other recommendations are followed, 
will be experiencing a significant reduction in 
number of trustees. 


At the time we wrote our Interim Report, we had 


source of information was a costing framework 
developed by the Working Group on Education 
Finance Reform. While the working group estab¬ 
lished the framework, the figures in the report 
were provided by boards themselves and repre¬ 
sent their 1994 expenditures. The costing frame¬ 
work is reproduced in Table 4. 


not yet developed a definition of administrative 
costs, but we are recommending one in this 


report. To arrive at our definition we looked at 
how school boards are spending their money. Our 


The task force recommends that: 


17. the level of native trustee representation as 
defined at present in the Education Act be 
maintained 

Administrative Costs 

Perhaps the biggest conundrum we faced as we 
began to examine how money is spent on educa¬ 
tion was the remarkable gap between those who 
believe that far too much money is spent on 
administration, and not enough in the classroom, 
and those who believe that administration expen¬ 
ditures are being kept to a minimum. 

Public perception that too much money is spent 
on bureaucracy is widespread. Many members of 
the public, including parents and teachers, who 
wrote or called us expressed the opinion that 
school boards employ too many people who are 
engaged in activities that appear unrelated to the 
classroom. But almost all school boards, in their 
submissions to us both before and after the 
release of our Interim Report, maintained that 
less than five per cent of their budget is spent on 
administration - in many cases, less than four per 
cent. The problem arises from a difference in the 
meaning that each group attaches to 
"administration." 


Final Report 1996 





7. Issues Before the Task Force 

I 49 


Table 4: School Board Expenditures, 1994 


Expenditure Item 

No. of 
Staff' 

$ 

Average 

Salary 

$ 

Total 

Expenditure 

%of 

Category 

%of 

Total 

1 

1.1 

1.1.01 

1.1.01.1 

Resources for General Education 

Resources for Elementary Schools 

Regular Classroom Program 

Classroom Teachers (1 per class) 

49 128.2 

53 382 

2 622 538 240 

60.1% 

18.4% 

1.1.01.2 

Preparation Time-classroom teachers 

5 831.0 

52 127 

303 952 841 

7.0% 

2.1% 

1.1.01.3 

On-Call Time-classroom teachers 

23.8 

53 406 

1 271 063 

0.0% 

0.0% 

1 1.01.4 

Other 

1 185.8 

47 985 

56 899 522 

1.3% 

0.4% 

1.1.02 

1.1.02.1 

Special Education and Remedial 

Self-Contained 

4 008.3 

54 100 

216 848 911 

5.0% 

1.5% 

1.1.02.2 

Resource Withdrawal 

3 442.1 

53 166 

183 000 261 

4.2% 

1.3% 

1.1.02.3 

Services in Lieu for Blind and Deaf 

143.2 

55 238 

7 907 312 

0.2% 

0.1% 

1.1.02.4 

Care, Treatment and Corr Fac 

483.4 

54 469 

26 332 142 

0.6% 

0.2% 

1.1.02.5 

Remedial and Speech Language 

946.2 

53 471 

50 595 500 

1.2% 

0.4% 

1.1.03 

FSL/Anglais/NSL 

1 210.4 

52 208 

63 192 179 

1.4% 

0.4% 

1.1.04 

Compensatory Education 

690.1 

72 122 

49 770 263 

1.1% 

0.3% 

1.1.05 

English-as-a-Second-Language/ALF/PDF 

1 447.5 

53 835 

77 922 923 

1.8% 

0.5% 

1.1.06 

Teacher Librarian 

1 819.5 

54 144 

98 516 362 

2.3% 

0.7% 

1.1.07 

Guidance Teachers 

337.7 

55 020 

18 580 684 

0.4% 

0.1% 

1.1.08 

Sub-Total 

70 697.1 

53 430 

3 777 328 203 

86.5% 

26.5% 

1.1.09 

Teachers-on-Leave 

713.2 

40 891 

29 162 909 

0.7% 

0.2% 

1.1.10 

Sub-Total 

71 410.3 

53 305 

3 806 491 112 

87.2% 

26.7% 

1.1.11 

Benefits for the above groups 

71 410.3 

0 

440 565 433 

10.1% 

3.1% 

1.1.12.1 

Supply Teachers 

0.0 

0 

118 698 214 

2.7% 

0.8% 

1.1.12.2 

Total 

71 410.3 

0 

4 365 754 759 

100.0% 

30.6% 

1.1.13 

1.1.13.1 

Education Assistants (Elementary Schools) 

Teacher Assistants (mostly for JK/K) 

1 758.9 

24 648 

43 353 646 

18.0% 

0.3% 

1.1.13.2 

Compensatory Education Assistants 

558.1 

22 789 

12 718 292 

5.3% 

0.1% 

1.1.13.3 

Programmes-in-Lieu Assistants 

119.2 

23 531 

2 804 626 

1.2% 

0.0% 

1.1.13.4 

Care, Treatment and Corr Fac Assistants 

74.7 

24 361 

1 819 531 

0.8% 

0.0% 

1.1.13.5 

Other Special Education Assistants 

5 303.0 

24 784 

131 428 278 

54.7% 

0.9% 

1.1.13.6 

Health Related Assistants 

718.2 

22 059 

15 843 001 

6.6% 

0.1% 

1.1.13.7 

Sub-Total 

8 532.1 

0 

207 967 375 

86.5% 

1.5% 

1.1.13.8 

Benefits for the above groups 

8 532.1 

0 

32 395 957 

13.5% 

0.2% 

1.1.13.9 

Total 

8 532.1 

0 

240 363 332 

100 0% 

1.7% 

1.1.14 

1.1.14.01 

Other Instructional Supports (Elementary Schools) 

Psychologists 176.2 

68 603 

12 088 476 

8.1% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.02 

Psychometrists 

187.9 

59 213 

11 126 630 

7.4% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.03 

Psychiatrists 

7.4 

53 074 

392 749 

0.3% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.04 

Speech Language 

291.0 

50 249 

14 620 836 

9.8% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.05 

Audiologists 

5.0 

50 258 

251 288 

0.2% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.06 

Occupational Therapists 

8.2 

49 214 

403 557 

0.3% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.07 

Physiotherapists 

11.8 

53 783 

634 638 

0.4% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.08 

Childcare Workers 

299.7 

32 489 

9 737 627 

6.5% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.09 

Social Workers 

229.2 

50 573 

11 591 308 

7.7% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.10 

Attendance Counsellors 

97.5 

42 827 

4 173 698 

2.8% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.11 

Guidance Counsellors 

19.3 

47 907 

923 169 

0.6% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.12 

Other Professional Staff 

181.6 

40 954 

7 435 951 

5.0% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.13 

Para-Professional Staff 

636.0 

25 736 

16 369 030 

10.9% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.14 

Technicians (including Librarians) 

598.4 

29 854 

17 865 375 

11.9% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.15 

Lunchroom Supervision 

1 303.0 

0 

21 031 024 

14.1% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.16 

Total 

4 052.2 

31 747 

128 645 356 

86.0% 

0.9% 

1.1.14.17 

Benefits for the above groups 

4 052.2 

0 

18 021 100 

12.0% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.18 

Professional Development 

2.5 

0 

2 933 819 

2.0% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.19 

Total 

4 054.7 

0 

149 600 275 

100.0% 

1.0% 


Final Report 1996 









7. Issues Before the Task Force 


50 


Expenditure Item 

No. of 
Staff’ 

$ 

Average 

Salary 

$ 

Total 

Expenditure 

%of 

Category 

%of 

Total 

1.1.15 

1.1.15.1 

Supplies Ser & Pupil Transportation (Elementary Schools) 

Instructional Supplies and Services 0.0 0 

202 067 896 

31.1% 

1.4% 

1.1.15.2 

Computer Technology-GEMS HW/SW 

3.3 

0 

21 976 271 

3.4% 

0.2% 

1.1.15.3 

- Teacher Training 

2.8 

0 

1 046 289 

0.2% 

0.0% 

1.1.15.4 

- Administration 

66.9 

0 

5 821 931 

0.9% 

0.0% 

1.1.15.5 

- Cabling 

1.9 

0 

641 476 

0.1% 

0.0% 

1.1.15.6 

Pupil Transportation 

262.6 

0 

409 875 133 

63.1% 

2.9% 

1.1.15.7 

Other Student Supports (Comp Ed) 

1.4 

0 

7 731 541 

1.2% 

0.1% 

1.1.15.8 

Total 

338.8 

0 

649 160 537 

100.0% 

4.5% 

1.1.16 

1.1.16.1 

Custodial and Maintenance (Elementary Schools) 

Salaries and Wages 10 602.4 

33 931 

359 754 637 

46.9% 

2.5% 

1.1.16.2 

Benefits 

10 602.4 

0 

77 148 756 

10.1% 

0.5% 

1.1.16.3 

1.1.16.4 

Supplies and Services 
- Utilities 

0.0 

0 

152 315 969 

19.9% 

1.1% 

1.1.16.5 

- Other 

0.0 

0 

114 879 825 

15.0% 

0.8% 

1.1.16.6 

Fees and Contractual Services 

0.0 

0 

62 763 679 

8.2% 

0.4% 

1.1.16.7 

Total 

10 602.4 

0 

766 862 865 

100.0% 

5.4% 

1.1.17 

1.1.17.01 

School Administration (Elementary Schools) 

Principal 

3 761.8 

77 734 

292 418 856 

46.8% 

2.0% 

1.1.17.02 

1.1.17.03 

Additional Instructional Leaders 

Vice-Principals 

0.0 

1 562.6 

69 819 

109 102 863 

17.4% 

0.8% 

1.1.17.04 

Department Heads - Release Time 

7.7 

0 

497 216 

0.1% 

0.0% 

1.1.17.05 

Department Heads - Allowance 

252.1 

0 

21 125 644 

3.4% 

0.1% 

1.1.17.06 

Benefits for the above groups 

5 332.1 

0 

41 271 051 

6.6% 

0.3% 

1.1.17.07 

Clerical/Secretarial Staff 

4 888.1 

27 925 

136 499 928 

21.8% 

1.0% 

1.1.17.08 

Benefits for the above groups 

4 888.1 

0 

22 826 960 

3.6% 

0.2% 

1.1.17.09 

Professional Development 

51.4 

0 

1 690 735 

0.3% 

0.0% 

1.1.17.10 

Total 

10 271.7 

0 

625 433 253 

100.0% 

4.4% 

1.1.18 

1.1.18.1 

Capital (School-Based) - (Elementary School 

Provision of Pupil Places 

s) 

0.0 

0 

235 725 418 

44.7% 

1.7% 

1.1.18.2 

Renovation and Renewal 

0.0 

0 

121 779 025 

23.1% 

0.9% 

1.1.18.3 

Retrofitting for Computer Networks 

0.0 

0 

3 119 187 

0.6% 

0.0% 

1.1.18.4 

Other Capital Costs 

0.0 

0 

64 702 225 

12.3% 

0.5% 

1.1.18.5 

Capital Expenditure - MET placeholder 

0.0 

0 

102 201 265 

19.4% 

0.7% 

1.1.18.6 

Total 

0.0 

0 

527 527 121 

100.0% 

3.7% 

1.2 

1.2.01 

1.2.01.1 

Resources for Secondary Schools 

Regular Classroom Program: 

Classroom Teachers (1 per class) 

28 023.5 

57 430 

1 609 404 687 

55.8% 

11,3% 

1.2.01.2 

Preparation Time-classroom teachers 

5 190.3 

57 064 

296 177 848 

10.3% 

2.1% 

1.2.01.3 

On-Call Time-classroom teachers 

3 370.2 

56 786 

191 380 074 

6.6% 

1.3% 

1.2.01.4 

Other 

306.0 

56 548 

17 302 257 

0.6% 

0.1% 

1.2.02 

1.2.02.1 

Special Education and Remedial 

Self-Contained 

0.0 

659.0 

57 817 

38 103 850 

1.3% 

0.3% 

1.2.02.2 

Resource Withdrawal 

1 269.5 

57 991 

73 621 638 

2.6% 

0.5% 

1.2.02.3 

Services in Lieu for Blind and Deaf 

30.2 

54 951 

1 659 532 

0.1% 

0.0% 

1.2.02.4 

Care, Treatment and Corr Fac 

447.8 

61 748 

27 653 617 

1.0% 

0.2% 

1.2.02.5 

Remedial and Speech Language 

168.2 

55 506 

9 336 028 

0.3% 

0.1% 

1.2.03 

FSL/Anglais/NSL 

128.1 

59 538 

7 627 950 

0.3% 

0.1% 

1.2.04 

Compensatory Education 

131.6 

114 775 

15 105 909 

0.5% 

0.1% 

1.2.05 

English-as-a-Second-Language/ALF/PDF 

824.8 

57 352 

47 301 888 

1.6% 

0.3% 

1.2.06 

Teacher Librarian 

898.8 

58 002 

52 129 430 

1.8% 

0.4% 

1.2.07 

Guidance Teachers 

2 257.7 

58 019 

130 986 703 

4.5% 

0.9% 

1.2.08 

Sub-Total 

43 705.7 

57 608 

2 517 791 411 

87.4% 

17.6% 

1.2.09 

Teachers-on-Leave 

492.9 

49 276 

24 285 454 

0.8% 

0.2% 

1.2.10 

Total 

44 198.5 

57 515 

2 542 076 865 

88.2% 

17.8% 

1.2.11 

Benefits for the above groups 

44 198.5 

0 

284 755 456 

9.9% 

2.0% 

1.2.12.1 

Supply Teachers 

0.0 

0 

55 292 152 

1.9% 

0.4% 

1.2.12.2 

Total 

44 198.5 

0 

2 882 124 474 

100.0% 

20.2% 


Final Report 1996 

















7. Issues Before the Task Force 


51 


Expenditure Item 

No. of 
Staff' 

$ 

Average 

Salary 

$ 

Total 

Expenditure 

%of 

Category 

%of 

Total 

1.2.13 

Education Assistants (Secondary Schools) 






1.2.13.1 

Teacher Assistants (mostly for JK/K) 

251.9 

27 060 

6 816 445 

12.0% 

0.0% 

1.2.13.2 

Compensatory Education Assistants 

127.9 

23 408 

2 993 938 

5.3% 

0.0% 

1.2.13.3 

Programmes-in-lieu Assistants 

45.1 

21 437 

967 430 

1.7% 

0.0% 

1.2.13.4 

Care Treatment and Corr Fac Assistants 

35.3 

25 152 

888 864 

1.6% 

0.0% 

1.2.13.5 

Other Special Education Assistants 

1 424.2 

23 579 

33 582 058 

59.2% 

0.2% 

1.2.13.6 

Health Related Assistants 

182.2 

20 807 

3 791 241 

6.7% 

0.0% 

1.2.13.7 

Sub-Total 

2 066.7 

0 

49 039 975 

86.5% 

0.3% 

1.2.13.8 

Benefits for the above groups 

2 066.7 

0 

7 654 493 

13.5% 

0.1% 

1.2.13.9 

Total 

2 066.7 

0 

56 694 468 

100.0% 

0.4% 

1.2.14 

Other Instructional Supports (Secondary Schools) 





1.2.14.01 

Psychologists 

103.4 

69 673 

7 203 227 

9.8% 

0.1% 

1.2.14.02 

Psychometrists 

76.5 

55 061 

4 211 620 

5.7% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.03 

Psychiatrists 

2.4 

109 888 

263 730 

0.4% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.04 

Speech Language 

62.6 

58 991 

3 693 751 

5.0% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.05 

Audiologists 

0.2 

43 905 

8 781 

0.0% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.06 

Occupational Therapists 

3.0 

44 165 

132 494 

0.2% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.07 

Physiotherapists 

4.5 

58 496 

263 232 

0.4% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.08 

Childcare Workers 

113.6 

32 555 

3 697 281 

5.0% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.09 

Social Workers 

130.8 

51 256 

6 704 816 

9.1% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.10 

Attendance Counsellors 

100.2 

46 964 

4 706 056 

6.4% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.11 

Guidance Counsellors 

17.6 

55 232 

973 732 

1.3% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.12 

Other Professional Staff 

129.9 

38 525 

5 003 105 

6.8% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.13 

Para-Professional Staff 

217.0 

28 557 

6 196 071 

8.4% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.14 

Technicians 

546.7 

34 123 

18 655 517 

25.4% 

0.1% 

1.2.14.15 

Lunchroom Supervision 

49.0 

0 

758 846 

1.0% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.16 

Total 

1 557.1 

40 120 

62 472 260 

85.0% 

0.4% 

1.2.14.17 

Benefits for the above groups 

1 557.1 

0 

8 992 868 

12.2% 

0.1% 

1.2.14.18 

Professional Development 

1.2 

0 

2 030 910 

2.8% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.19 

Total 

1 558.3 

0 

73 496 038 

100.0% 

0.5% 

1.2.15 

Supplies Ser & Pupil Transportation (Secondary Schools) 




1.2.15.1 

Instructional Supplies and Services 

0.0 

0 

185 592 602 

44.9% 

1.3% 

1.2.15.2 

Computer Technology-GEMS HW/SW 

3.3 

0 

15 330 847 

3.7% 

0.1% 

1.2.15.3 

- Teacher Training 

1.2 

0 

282 798 

0.1% 

0.0% 

1.2.15.4 

- Administration 

56.3 

0 

5 066 316 

1.2% 

0.0% 

1.2.15.5 

- Cabling Costs 

0.6 

0 

442 297 

0.1% 

0.0% 

1.2.15.6 

Pupil Transportation 

69.6 

0 

200 638 912 

48.6% 

1.4% 

1.2.15.7 

Other Student Supports (Comp Ed) 

1.4 

0 

5 677 813 

1.4% 

0.0% 

1.2.15.8 

Total 

132.5 

0 

413 031 586 

100.0% 

2.9% 

1.2.16 

Custodial and Maintenance (Secondary Schools) 





1.2.16.1 

Salaries and Wages 

7 310.5 

36 056 

263 584 415 

46.7% 

1.8% 

1.2.16.2 

Benefits 

7 310.5 

0 

59 132 612 

10.5% 

0.4% 

1.2.16.3 

Supplies and Services 

0.0 





1.2.16.4 

- Utilities 

0.0 

0 

117 875 564 

20.9% 

0.8% 

1.2.16.5 

- Other 

0.0 

0 

78 933 360 

14.0% 

0.6% 

1.2.16.6 

Fees and Contractual Services 

0.0 

0 

44 293 438 

7.9% 

0.3% 

1.2.16.7 

Total 

7 310.5 

0 

563 819 389 

100.0% 

3.9% 

1.2.17 

School Administration (Secondary Schools) 






1.2.17.01 

Principal 

810.7 

82 818 

67 137 405 

15.1% 

0.5% 

1.2.17.02 

Additional Instructional Leaders 






1.2.17.03 

Vice-Principals 

1 121.1 

73 586 

82 498 270 

18.6% 

0.6% 

1.2.17.04 

Department Heads - Release Time 

1 392.2 

0 

80 074 775 

18.1% 

0.6% 

1.2.17.05 

Department Heads - Allowance 

7 120.2 

0 

41 352 544 

9.3% 

0.3% 

1.2.17.06 

Benefits for the above groups 

3 324.0 

0 

23 342 035 

5.3% 

0.2% 

1.2.17.07 

Clerical/Secretarial Staff 

4 085.7 

30 887 

126 196 894 

28.5% 

0.9% 

1.2.17.08 

Benefits for the above groups 

4 085.7 

0 

21 200 069 

4.8% 

0.1% 

1.2.17.09 

Professional Development 

0.0 

0 

1 416 378 

0.3% 

0.0% 

1.2.17.10 

Total 

7 409.7 

0 

443 218 370 

100.0% 

3.1% 


Final Report 1996 













7. Issues Before the Task Force 


52 





$ 

$ 





No. of 

Average 

Total 

% of 

%of 

Expenditure Item 

Staff’ 

Salary 

Expenditure 

Category 

Total 

1.2.18 

Capital (School-Based) - (Secondary Schools) 





1.2.18.1 

Provision of Pupil Places 

0.0 

0 

214 617 604 

45.3% 

1.5% 

1.2.18.2 

Renovation and Renewal 

0.0 

0 

104 347 103 

22.0% 

0.7% 

1.2.18.3 

Retrofitting for Computer Networks 

0.0 

0 

2 505 804 

0.5% 

0.0% 

1.2.18.4 

Other Capital Costs 

0.6 

0 

74 049 345 

15.6% 

0.5% 

1.2.18.5 

Capital Expenditure - MET placeholder 

0.0 

0 

78 244 501 

16.5% 

0.5% 

1.2.18.6 

Total 

0.6 

0 

473 764 357 

100.0% 

3.3% 

2 

Instructional Supervision/Support Ser 






2.1 

Supervisory Officers 

416.2 

99 278 

41 317 573 

12.5% 

0.3% 

2.2 

Educator Program Support Staff 

2 178.6 

64 521 

140 562 450 

42.5% 

1.0% 

2.2.1 

Benefits of above group 

2 594.6 

0 

21 803 626 

6.6% 

0.2% 

2.3 

Clerical/Secretarial Support 

1 907.6 

32 304 

61 622 360 

18.6% 

0.4% 

2.3.1 

Benefits of above group 

1 907.6 

0 

8 330 634 

2.5% 

0.1% 

2.4 

Supplies and Services 

1.7 

0 

53 664 113 

16.2% 

0.4% 

2.5 

Professional Development 

3.5 

0 

3 810 983 

1.2% 

0.0% 

2.6 

Total 

4 502.2 

0 

331 111 739 

100.0% 

2.3% 

3 

Administration and Governance 






3.1 

Governance Costs 






3.1.1 

Board of Trustees 

1 875.0 

10 498 

19 682 996 

3.5% 

0.1% 

3.1.2 

Trustee Clerical/Secretarial Support 

33.7 

41 359 

1 395 056 

0.2% 

0.0% 

3.1.3 

Trustee Supplies and Services 

0.0 

0 

4 083 946 

0.7% 

0.0% 

3.2 

Board Administration 

0.0 





3.2.01 

Director or Supervisory/CEO 

120.0 

115 769 

13 886 489 

2.5% 

0.1% 

3.2.02 

Senior Supervisory Officers 

260.2 

99 723 

25 942 856 

4.6% 

0.2% 

3.2.03 

Central Office Administration 

2 288.9 

49 800 

113 989 039 

20.3% 

0.8% 

3.2.04 

Clerical/Secretarial Support 

2 753.5 

33 879 

93 284 674 

16.6% 

0.7% 

3.2.05 

Supplies and Services-lnterest 

0.0 

0 

38 310 004 

6.8% 

0.3% 

32.06 

- Insurance 

0.0 

0 

19 682 659 

3.5% 

0.1% 

3.2.07 

- Other 

0.0 

0 

93 136 770 

16.6% 

0.7% 

3.2.08 

Food Services 

235.7 

0 

8 418 327 

1.5% 

0.1% 

3.2.09 

Other 

705.3 

0 

32 873 493 

5.9% 

0.2% 

3.2.10 

Benefits for the above groups 

8 272.2 

0 

52 232 500 

9.3% 

0.4% 

3.2.11 

Professional Development 

86.3 

0 

3 642 353 

0.7% 

0.0% 

3.3 

Capital (Central Office) 

0.0 

0 

0 

0.0% 

0.0% 

3.3.1 

Capital Costs 

0.0 

0 

24 110 809 

4.3% 

0.2% 

3.3.2 

Renovations and Renewals 

0.0 

0 

15 645 806 

2.8% 

0.1% 

3.3.3 

Total 

8 272.2 

0 

560 317 778 

100.0% 

3.9% 

Continuing Education 2 






4.1 

Adult Basic Education 






4.01.1 

Adult Basic Literacy & Numeracy 

5 691.6 

0 

12 766 257 

5.8% 

0.1% 

4.01.2 

Adult Citizenship & Language 

676.1 

0 

2 015 367 

0.9% 

0.0% 

4.01.3 

Adult English-as-a-Second-Language 

18 587.9 

0 

37 808 697 

17.2% 

0.3% 

4.01.4 

Adult Native-as-a-Second-Language 

0.8 

0 

51 237 

0.0% 

0.0% 

4.02 

Correspondence/Self-study Courses 

1 734.7 

0 

5 339 350 

2.4% 

0.0% 

4.03 

Credit for Diploma 

12 459.8 

0 

39 573 741 

18.0% 

0.3% 

4.04 

International (Heritage) Languages 

5 349.8 

0 

20 085 793 

9.1% 

0.1% 

4.05 

Non-Credit/General Interest Courses 

34 747.8 

0 

16 301 409 

7.4% 

0,1% 

4.06 

Summer School 

6 245.0 

0 

27 497 881 

12.5% 

0.2% 

4.07 

Training Programs 

0.0 





4.07.1 

JobsOntario Training 

9.0 

0 

4 476 239 

2.0% 

0.0% 

4.07.2 

Federal LINC Programs 

670.0 

0 

18 342 153 

8.3% 

0.1% 

4.07.3 

Human Resources Canada 

72.0 

0 

4 349 252 

2.0% 

0.0% 

4.07.4 

0TAB 

1 312.0 

0 

2 417 798 

1.1% 

0.0% 

4.08 

Driver Education (non-credit) 

355.8 

0 

1 705 961 

0.8% 

0.0% 

4.09 

Estimated admin/plant overhead 

61.2 

0 

27 176 730 

12.4% 

0.2% 

Total 


87 973.5 

0 

219 907 863 

100.0% 

1.5% 


Final Report 1996 













7. Issues Before the Task Force 


| 53 


Expenditure Item 

No. of 
Staff 1 

$ 

Average 

Salary 

$ 

Total 

Expenditure 

%of 

Category 

%of 

Total 

5 

Other Commitments 






5.1 

Tuition fees 

0.0 

0 

555 095 385 

61.2% 

3.9% 

5.2 

Municipal Charge-backsttax write-offs) 

0.0 

0 

205 238 858 

22.6% 

1.4% 

5.3 

Contributions to Reserves 

0.0 





5.3.1 

Working Funds 

0.0 

0 

73 045 496 

8.1% 

0.5% 

5.3.2 

Refund of Taxes 

0.0 

0 

539 838 

0.1% 

0.0% 

5.3.3 

Ministry Equity Capital Reserve 

0.0 

0 

2 604 057 

0.3% 

0.0% 

5.3.4 

Board Equity Capital Reserve 

0.0 

0 

16 438 660 

1.8% 

0.1% 

5.3.5 

Other Reserves 

0.0 

0 

53 916 994 

5.9% 

0.4% 

5.3.6 

Total 

0.0 

0 

906 879 289 

100.0% 

6.4% 

6 

Miscellaneous 






6.1 

Catch-All Category 

(310.7) 

0 

26 615 737 

0.2% 

0.2% 

7 

Total 

170 345.9 

0 

14 275 683 228 

100.0% 

100.0% 

8 

Reconciliation 






8.1 

Total Expenditure-revised estimates 






8.2 

Total Expenditure-costing framework 






8.3 

Variance 






9 

Teacher pensions 3 


571 879 727 



Source: Costing framework developed by Working Group on Education Finance Reform. Numbers from school boards' 1994 
Financial Statements to the Ministry of Education and Training, as updated by boards in fall 1995. This table includes only updates 
received by the ministry as of December 4,1995. It does not include isolate boards or section 68 boards. 


Notes: 

1 Staff numbers are full-time equivalent. Some staff work part-time. 

2 For category 4, Continuing Education, only, the No. of Staff column contains No. of Students in the programs, not staff. Funding 
for continuing education programs is based on the number of students taking courses, and so number of staff in this category 
is not relevant to total expenditure. 

3 Category 9, Teacher Pensions, is not a board expenditure. The province, which acts as the teachers' employer for the purpose 
of teachers' pensions only, pays the employer’s share of teachers' pension contributions to the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan 
on behalf of school boards. 

Acronyms and Abbreviations: 

ALF actualisation linguistique en franqais 

CEO chief executive officer 

Comp Ed compensatory education 

Corr Fac correctional facilities 

FSL French as a second language 

GEMS HW/SW grant-eligible microcomputer systems, hardware/software 

JK/K junior kindergarten/kindergarten 

LINC language instruction for newcomers to Canada 

MET Ministry of Education and Training 

NSL native as a second language 

OTAB Ontario Training and Adjustment Board 

PDF perfectionnement du frangais 

Ser services 


Final Report 1996 












7. Issues Before the Task Force 


54 | 


We examined the material in Table 4 line by line. 
As in our investigation and recommendations 
about education finance reform, we kept two key 
objectives in mind: 

• the need for greater equality of treatment for 
all students 

• the need for greater efficiency in the expendi¬ 
ture of severely constrained financial resources 
in order to sustain classroom activities 

Table 4 is divided into six major categories: 

1. Resources for General Education 

2. Instructional Supervision/Support Services 

3. Administration and Governance 

4. Continuing Education 

5. Other Commitments 

6. Miscellaneous 22 

Category 3, Administration and Governance, con¬ 
tains the amount attributed to administrative 
expenditures. Few boards spend more than five 
per cent of their total budget on these expendi¬ 
tures. Province-wide, these expenditures repre¬ 
sent only 3.9 per cent of total school board expen¬ 
ditures. But these expenditures represent only the 
costs of central board administration - the salaries 
and benefits of trustees and board administrative 
staff, central-office supplies and services, and cen¬ 
tral-office capital costs. They do not include the 
costs associated with school administration or 
instructional supervision and support, which are 
listed in Table 4 under the following headings: 


1.1.17 School Administration (Elementary Schools) 4% 

1.2.17 School Administration (Secondary Schools) 3% 

2 Instructional Supervision/Support Services 3% 

Total 10% 


The total of these costs - 10 per cent of overall 
board costs - is similar to an estimate of school 
administration costs reported by the Ontario 
Public School Boards' Association. In its Statement 
on School Board Administration Costs, dated 
November 1995, the association estimated total 
school administration costs to range from 6.5 per 
cent to 9.5 per cent of a board's budget. 

We believe that most reasonable observers would 
consider that the costs associated with school 
administration and instructional support belong in 
the Administration and Governance category. 

To attempt to define school board administrative 
costs is to walk through a minefield. Because 
none of the expenditure items listed in Table 4 is 
expendable, arguments about the category to 
which an expense rightly belongs will probably 
never be resolved. But administrative activities 
must be clearly defined - and limited - to ensure 
that scarce financial resources are used to sustain 
classroom activities and programs. 

It seemed to us, as we examined the board expen¬ 
ditures in Table 4, that they fell into one of three 
categories: 

I. Direct Classroom Expenditures - costs direct¬ 
ly related to the classroom, including the 
salaries and benefits of the people (teachers, 
educational assistants, specialists) who work 
directly in the classroom or with students, 
and the costs of supplies and equipment for 
learning purposes 

II. Operational Support - costs which, while not 
directly related to classroom instruction, are 
unavoidable, including student transportation, 
utilities, and the cleaning and maintenance of 
school facilities 

III. Administrative Support - costs related to the 
management and organization of schools and 
school systems 


22. The last item in Table 4, category 9, Teacher Pensions, is 
not a board expenditure. The province, which acts as the 
teachers' employer for the purpose of teachers' pensions only, 
pays the employer's share of teachers' pension contributions 
to the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan on behalf of school 
boards. 


Final Report 1996 






7. Issues Before the Task Force 


In allocating the expenditure items in Table 4 
among our three categories, we considered many 
factors, including the relationship of the activity 
to the classroom and the cost of the activity with¬ 
in the board's budget. We also acknowledged and 
took into account the strong support in responses 
to our Interim Report for a reduction in adminis¬ 
tration costs. 

Among school boards' most significant costs are 
those associated with hiring sufficient teachers to 
ensure that classes are being taught while other 
teachers' preparation time and department heads' 
release time is honoured. In recent years, prepa¬ 
ration time has formed a part of teachers' collec¬ 
tive agreements with boards. It provides teachers 
with time, outside classroom time, to prepare 
lessons. Many secondary school department 
heads receive lesson preparation time plus release 
time for the administrative duties related to man¬ 
aging their departments. 

Boards consider preparation time to be part of 
their "regular classroom program" expenditures 
(see items 1.1.01.2 and 1.2.01.2 in Table 4). While 
lesson preparation is obviously related to class¬ 
room activity, we believe that most reasonable 
observers would not consider it a Direct 
Classroom Expenditure. We therefore allocated it 
to Administrative Support. We feel it is an area 
where savings can be achieved. 

Because our focus was on sustaining elementary 
and secondary programs and reducing all other 
costs, we did not include continuing education 
programs in our Direct Classroom Expenditures 
category. Although some continuing education 
programs are provided for children, most are for 
adults. As such, these programs receive funding 
from a variety of sources, including the federal 
government and municipal social service agen¬ 
cies. Continuing education is clearly not an 
Administrative Support expenditure either. We 
therefore allocated it to Operating Support. 

Our reorganization of the expenditure items in 
Table 4 to fit into our three categories of Direct 
Classroom Expenditures, Operational Support, 
and Administrative Support is shown in Table 5. 


1 55 

The task force recommends that: 

18. school board expenditures be identified and 
categorized as shown in Table 5, under the 
three categories: 

I. Direct Classroom Expenditures 

II. Operational Support 

III. Administrative Support 

At present, according to the information provided 
by boards (Table 4), school board expenditures in 
the three categories that we have defined are as 
follows (see Figure 1, page 61): 

Direct Classroom Expenditures 53 % 

Operational Support 28.69% 

Administrative Support 18.31% 

The amalgamation of boards that we are recom¬ 
mending will result in a consolidation and 
restructuring of many board activities, particular¬ 
ly in the administrative, governance, and instruc¬ 
tional supervision items in our Administrative 
Support category. While the savings achieved in 
these items through amalgamation will be signifi¬ 
cant, they will not be enough, given current fiscal 
constraints, to enable boards to sustain their 
present level of classroom activities. 

If boards are to preserve Direct Classroom 
Expenditures from any serious reduction, they 
will have to achieve savings in the other two 
categories - Operational Support and 
Administrative Support. 

At present, as Figure 1 shows, school board 
expenditures in the two categories of Operational 
Support and Administrative Support as we have 
defined them are 47 per cent of total board expen¬ 
ditures. We believe that boards should be restrict¬ 
ed in the percentage of their budgets that they 
can spend on these two categories. 


Final Report 1996 





7. Issues Before the Task Force 


56 


Table 5: School Board Expenditures, 1994, as Reorganized by Task Force 


Expenditure Item 

No. of 
Staff 

$ 

Average 

Salary 

$ 

Total 

Expenditure 

%of 

Category 

%of 

Total 

1 . 

1.1 

1.1.01 

1.1.01.1 

DIRECT CLASSROOM - ELEMENTARY 

Resources for Elementary Schools 

Regular Classroom Program 

Classroom Teachers (1 per class) 

49 128.2 

53 382 

2 622 538 240 

64.6% 

18.4% 

1.1.01.3 

On-Call Time-classroom teachers 

23.8 

53 406 

1 271 063 

0.0% 

0.0% 

1.1.01.4 

Other 

1 185.8 

47 985 

56 899 522 

1.4% 

0.4% 

1.1.02 

1.1.02.1 

Special Education and Remedial 
Self-Contained 

4 008.3 

54 100 

216 848 911 

5.3% 

1.5% 

1.1.02.2 

Resource Withdrawal 

3 442.1 

53 166 

183 000 261 

4.5% 

1.3% 

1.1.02.3 

Services in Lieu for Blind and Deaf 

143.2 

55 238 

7 907 312 

0.2% 

0.1% 

1.1.02.4 

Care, Treatment and Corr Fac 

483.4 

54 469 

26 332 142 

0.6% 

0.2% 

1.1.02.5 

Remedial and Speech Language 

946.2 

53 471 

50 595 500 

1.2% 

0.4% 

1.1.03 

FSL/Anglais/NSL 

1 210.4 

52 208 

63 192 179 

1.6% 

0.4% 

1.1.04 

Compensatory Education 

690.1 

72 122 

49 770 263 

1.2% 

0.3% 

1.1.05 

English-as-a-Second-Language/ALF/PDF 

1 447.5 

53 835 

77 922 923 

1.9% 

0.5% 

1.1.06 

Teacher Librarian 

1 819.5 

54 144 

98 516 362 

2.4% 

0.7% 

1.1.07 

Guidance Teachers 

337.7 

55 020 

18 580 684 

0.5% 

0.1% 

1.1.08 

Sub-Total 

64 866.1 

53 547 

3 473 375 362 

85.5% 

24.3% 

1.1.09 

Teachers-on-Leave 

713.2 

40 891 

29 162 909 

0.7% 

0.2% 

1.1.10 

Sub-Total 

65 579.3 

53 409 

3 502 538 271 

86.2% 

24 5% 

1.1.11 

Benefits for the above groups 

65 579.3 

6718 

440 565 433 

10.8% 

3.1% 

1.1.12.1 

Supply Teachers 

0.0 

0 

118 698 214 

2.9% 

0.8% 

1.1.12.2 

Total 

65 579.3 

0 

4 061 801 918 

100.0% 

28.5% 

1.1.13 

1.1.13.1 

Education Assistants (Elementary Schools) 

Teacher Assistants (mostly for JK/K) 

1 758.9 

24 648 

43 353 646 

18.0% 

0.3% 

1.1.13.2 

Compensatory Education Assistants 

558.1 

22 789 

12 718 292 

5.3% 

0.1% 

1.1.13.3 

Programmes-in-Lieu Assistants 

119.2 

23 531 

2 804 626 

1.2% 

0.0% 

1.1.13.4 

Care, Treatment and Corr Fac Assistants 

74.7 

24 361 

1 819 531 

0.8% 

0.0% 

1.1.13.5 

Other Special Education Assistants 

5 303.0 

24 784 

131 428 278 

54.7% 

0.9% 

1.1.13.6 

Health Related Assistants 

718.2 

22 059 

15 843 001 

6.6% 

0.1% 

1.1.13.7 

Sub-Total 

8 532.1 

0 

207 967 375 

86.5% 

1.5% 

1.1.13.8 

Benefits for the above groups 

8 532.1 

0 

32 395 957 

13.5% 

0.2% 

1.1.13.9 

Total 

8 532.1 

0 

240 363 332 

100.0% 

1.7% 

1.1.14 

1.1.14.01 

Other Instructional Supports (Elementary Schools) 

Psychologists 176.2 

68 603 

12 088 476 

8.1% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.02 

Psychometrists 

187.9 

59 213 

11 126 630 

7.4% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.03 

Psychiatrists 

7.4 

53 074 

392 749 

0.3% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.04 

Speech Language 

291.0 

50 249 

14 620 836 

9.8% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.05 

Audiologists 

5.0 

50 258 

251 288 

0.2% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.06 

Occupational Therapists 

8.2 

49 214 

403 557 

0.3% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.07 

Physiotherapists 

11.8 

53 783 

634 638 

0.4% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.08 

Childcare Workers 

299.7 

32 489 

9 737 627 

6.5% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.09 

Social Workers 

229.2 

50 573 

11 591 308 

7.7% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.10 

Attendance Counsellors 

97.5 

42 827 

4 173 698 

2.8% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.11 

Guidance Counsellors 

19.3 

47 907 

923 169 

0.6% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.12 

Other Professional Staff 

181.6 

40 954 

7 435 951 

5.0% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.13 

Para-Professional Staff 

636.0 

25 736 

16 369 030 

10.9% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.14 

Technicians (including Librarians) 

598.4 

29 854 

17 865 375 

11.9% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.15 

Lunchroom Supervision 

1 303.0 

0 

21 031 024 

14.1% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.16 

Total 

4 052.2 

31 747 

128 645 356 

86.0% 

0.9% 

1.1.14.17 

Benefits for the above groups 

4 052.2 

4 447 

18 021 100 

12.0% 

0.1% 

1.1.14.18 

Professional Development 

2.5 

0 

2 933 819 

2.0% 

0.0% 

1.1.14.19 

Total 

4 054.7 

0 

149 600 275 

100.0% 

1.0% 

1.1.15 

1.1.15.1 

Supplies & Services (Elementary Schools) 

Instructional Supplies and Services 

0.0 

0 

202 067 896 

84.4% 

1.4% 

1.1.15.2 

Computer Technology-GEMS HW/SW 

3.3 

0 

21 976 271 

9.2% 

0.2% 

1.1.15.3 

- Teacher Training 

2.8 

0 

1 046 289 

0.4% 

0.0% 

1.1.15.4 

- Administration 

66.9 

0 

5 821 931 

2.4% 

0.0% 

1.1.15.5 

- Cabling 

1.9 

0 

641 476 

0.3% 

0.0% 

1.1.15.7 

Other Student Supports (Comp Ed) 

1.4 

0 

7 731 541 

3.2% 

0.1% 

1.1.15.8 

Total 

76.2 

0 

239 285 404 

100.0% 

1.7% 


Final Report 1996 












7. issues Before the Task Force 


57 


Expenditure Item 

No. of 
Staff 1 

$ 

Average 

Salary 

$ 

Total 

Expenditure 

%of 

Category 

%of 

Total 

1 . 

1.2 

1.2.01 

1.2.01.1 

DIRECT CLASSROOM - SECONDARY 

Resources for Secondary Schools 

Regular Classroom Program: 

Classroom Teachers (1 per class) 

28 023.5 

57 430 

1 609 404 687 

62.2% 

11.3% 

1.2.01.3 

On-Call Time-classroom teachers 

3 370.2 

56 786 

191 380 074 

7.4% 

1.3% 

1.2.01.4 

Other 

306.0 

56 548 

17 302 257 

0.7% 

0.1% 

1.2.02 

1.2.02.1 

Special Education and Remedial 
Self-Contained 

659.0 

57817 

38 103 850 

1.5% 

0.3% 

1.2.02.2 

Resource Withdrawal 

1 269.5 

57 991 

73 621 638 

2.8% 

0.5% 

1.2.02.3 

Services in Lieu for Blind and Deaf 

30.2 

54 951 

1 659 532 

0.1% 

0.0% 

1.2.02.4 

Care, Treatment and Corr Fac 

447.8 

61 748 

27 653 617 

1.1% 

0.2% 

1.2.02.5 

Remedial and Speech Language 

168.2 

55 506 

9 336 028 

0.4% 

0.1% 

1.2.03 

FSL/Anglais/NSL 

128.1 

59 538 

7 627 950 

0.3% 

0.1% 

1.2.04 

Compensatory Education 

131.6 

114 775 

15 105 909 

0.6% 

0.1% 

1.2.05 

English-as-a-Second-Language/ALF/PDF 

824.8 

57 352 

47 301 888 

1.8% 

0.3% 

1.2.06 

Teacher Librarian 

898.8 

58 002 

52 129 430 

2.0% 

0.4% 

1.2.07 

Guidance Teachers 

2 257.7 

58 019 

130 986 703 

5.1% 

0.9% 

1.2.08 

Sub-Total 

38 515.4 

57 681 

2 221 613 563 

85.9% 

15.6% 

1.2.09 

Teachers-on-Leave 

492.9 

49 276 

24 285 454 

0.9% 

0.2% 

1.2.10 

Total 

39 008.3 

57 575 

2 245 899 017 

86.9% 

15.7% 

1.2.11 

Benefits for the above groups 

39 008.3 

7 300 

284 755 456 

11.0% 

2.0% 

1.2.12.1 

Supply Teachers 

0.0 

0 

55 292 152 

2.1% 

0.4% 

1.2.12.2 

Total 

39 008.3 

0 

2 585 946 625 

100.0% 

18.1% 

1.2.13 

1.2.13.1 

Education Assistants (Secondary Schools) 

Teacher Assistants (mostly for JK/K) 

251.9 

27 060 

6 816 445 

12.0% 

0.0% 

1.2.13.2 

Compensatory Education Assistants 

127.9 

23 408 

2 993 938 

5.3% 

0.0% 

1.2.13.3 

Programmes-in-Lieu Assistants 

45.1 

21 437 

967 430 

1.7% 

0.0% 

1.2.13.4 

Care, Treatment and Corr Fac Assist. 

35.3 

25 152 

888 864 

1.6% 

0.0% 

1.2.13.5 

Other Special Education Assistants 

1 424.2 

23 579 

33 582 058 

59.2% 

0.2% 

1.2.13.6 

Health Related Assistants 

182.2 

20 807 

3 791 241 

6.7% 

0.0% 

1.2.13.7 

Sub-Total 

2 066.7 

23 728 

49 039 975 

86.5% 

0.3% 

1.2.13.8 

Benefits for the above groups 

2 066.7 

0 

7 654 493 

13.5% 

0.1% 

1.2.13.9 

Total 

2 066.7 

0 

56 694 468 

100.0% 

0.4% 

1.2.14 

1.2.14.01 

Other Instructional Supports (Secondary Schools) 

Psychologists 103.4 

69 673 

7 203 227 

9.8% 

0.1% 

1.2.14.02 

Psychometrists 

76.5 

55 061 

4 211 620 

5.7% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.03 

Psychiatrists 

2.4 

109 888 

263 730 

0.4% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.04 

Speech Language 

62.6 

58 991 

3 693 751 

5.0% 

0.0% 

1.2.14 05 

Audiologists 

0.2 

43 905 

8 781 

0.0% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.06 

Occupational Therapists 

3.0 

44 165 

132 494 

0.2% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.07 

Physiotherapists 

4.5 

58 496 

263 232 

0.4% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.08 

Childcare Workers 

113.6 

32 555 

3 697 281 

5.0% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.09 

Social Workers 

130.8 

51 256 

6 704 816 

9.1% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.10 

Attendance Counsellors 

100.2 

46 964 

4 706 056 

6.4% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.11 

Guidance Counsellors 

17.6 

55 232 

973 732 

1.3% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.12 

Other Professional Staff 

129.9 

38 525 

5 003 105 

6.8% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.13 

Para-Professional Staff 

217.0 

28 557 

6 196 071 

8.4% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.14 

Technicians 

546.7 

34 123 

18 655 517 

25.4% 

0.1% 

1.2.14.15 

Lunchroom Supervision 

49.0 

15 496 

758 846 

1.0% 

0.0% 

1 2.14.16 

Total 

1 557.3 

40 115 

62 472 260 

85.0% 

0.4% 

1.2.14.17 

Benefits for the above groups 

1 557.1 

5 775 

8 992 868 

12.2% 

0.1% 

1.2.14.18 

Professional Development 

1.2 

0 

2 030 910 

2.8% 

0.0% 

1.2.14.19 

Total 

1 558.3 

0 

73 496 038 

100.0% 

0.5% 

1.2.15 

1.2.15.1 

Supplies & Services (Secondary Schools) 

Instructional Supplies and Services 

0.0 

0 

185 592 602 

87.4% 

1.3% 

1.2.15.2 

Computer Technology-GEMS HW/SW 

3.3 

0 

15 330 847 

7.2% 

0.1% 

1.2.15.3 

-TeacherTraining 

1.2 

0 

282 798 

0.1% 

0.0% 

1.2.15.4 

- Administration 

56.3 

0 

5 066 316 

2.4% 

0.0% 

1.2.15.5 

- Cabling Costs 

0.6 

0 

442 297 

0.2% 

0.0% 

1.2.15.7 

Other Student Supports (Comp Ed) 

1.4 

0 

5 677 813 

2.7% 

0.0% 

1.2.15.8 

Total 

62.9 

0 

212 392 674 

100.0% 

1.5% 


Final Report 1996 













7. Issues Before the Task Force 


58 | 


Expenditure Item 

No. of 
Staff 1 

$ 

Average 

Salary 

$ 

Total 

Expenditure 

%of 

Category 

%of 

Total 

II. 

1.1.15.6 

OPERATIONAL SUPPORT 

Pupil Transportation (Elementary Schools) 

262.6 

0 

409 875 133 

67.1% 

2.9% 

1.2.15.6 

Pupil Transportation (Secondary Schools) 

69.6 

0 

200 638 912 

32.9% 

1.4% 

1.2.15.6 

Total 

332.2 


610 514 045 

100.0% 

4.3% 

1.1.16 

1.1.16.1 

Custodial and Maintenance (Elementary Schools) 

Salaries and Wages 10 602.4 

33 931 

359 754 637 

46.9% 

2.5% 

1.1.16.2 

Benefits 

10 602.4 

0 

77 148 756 

10.1% 

0.5% 

1.1.16.3 

1.1.16.4 

Supplies and Services 
- Utilities 

0.0 

0 

152 315 969 

19.9% 

1.1% 

1.1.16.5 

- Other 

0.0 

0 

114 879 825 

15.0% 

0.8% 

1.1.16.6 

Fees and Contractural Services 

0.0 

0 

62 763 679 

8.2% 

0.4% 

1.1.16.7 

Total 

10 602.4 

0 

766 862 865 

100.0% 

5.4% 

1.2.16 

1.2.16.1 

Custodial and Maintenance (Secondary Schools) 

Salaries and Wages 7 310.5 

36 056 

263 584 415 

46.7% 

1.8% 

1.2.16.2 

Benefits 

7 310.5 

0 

59 132 612 

10.5% 

0.4% 

1.2.16.3 

1.2.16.4 

Supplies and Services 
- Utilities 

0.0 

0 

117 875 564 

20.9% 

0.8% 

1.2.16.5 

- Other 

0.0 

0 

78 933 360 

14.0% 

0.6% 

1.2.16.6 

Fees and Contractural Services 

0.0 

0 

44 293 438 

7.9% 

0.3% 

1.2.16.7 

Total 

7 310.5 

0 

563 819 389 

100.0% 

3.9% 

1.1.18 

1.1.18.1 

Capital (School-Based) - (Elementary Schools) 

Provision of Pupil Places 0.0 

0 

235 725 418 

44.7% 

1.7% 

1.1.18.2 

Renovation and Renewal 

0.0 

0 

121 779 025 

23.1% 

0.9% 

1.1.18.3 

Retrofitting for Computer Networks 

0.0 

0 

3 119 187 

0.6% 

0.0% 

1.1.18.4 

Other Capital Costs 

0.0 

0 

64 702 225 

12.3% 

0.5% 

1.1.18.5 

Capital Expenditure - MET placeholder 

0.0 

0 

102 201 265 

19.4% 

0.7% 

1.1.18.6 

Total 

0.0 

0 

527 527 121 

100.0% 

3.7% 

1.2.18 

1.2.18.1 

Capital (School-Based) - Secondary Schools 

Provision of Pupil Places 

0.0 

0 

214 617 604 

45.3% 

1.5% 

1.2.18.2 

Renovation and Renewal 

0.0 

0 

104 347 103 

22.0% 

0.7% 

1.2.18.3 

Retrofitting for Computer Networks 

0.0 

0 

2 505 804 

0.5% 

0.0% 

1.2.18.4 

Other Capital Costs 

0.6 

0 

74 049 345 

15.6% 

0.5% 

1.2.18.5 

Capital Expenditure - MET placeholder 

0.0 

0 

78 244 501 

16.5% 

0.5% 

1.2.18.6 

Total 

0.6 

0 

473 764 357 

100.0% 

3.3% 

4 

4.01.1 

4.01.1 

Continuing Education 2 

Adult Basic Education 

Adult Basic Literacy & Numeracy 

5 691.6 

0 

12 766 257 

5.8% 

0.1% 

4.01.2 

Adult Citizenship & Language 

676.1 

0 

2 015 367 

0.9% 

0.0% 

4.01.3 

Adult English-as-a-Second-Language 

18 587.9 

0 

37 808 697 

17.2% 

0.3% 

4.01.4 

Adult Native-as-a-Second-Language 

0.8 

0 

51 237 

0.0% 

0.0% 

402 

Correspondence/Self-study Courses 

1 734.7 

0 

5 339 350 

2.4% 

0.0% 

4.03 

Credit for Diploma 

12 459.8 

0 

39 573 741 

18.0% 

0.3% 

4.04 

International (Heritage) Languages 

5 349.8 

0 

20 085 793 

9.1% 

0.1% 

4.05 

Non-Credit/General Interest Courses 

34 747.8 

0 

16 301 409 

7.4% 

0.1% 

4.06 

Summer School 

6 245.0 

0 

27 497 881 

12.5% 

0.2% 

4.07 

4.07.1 

Training Programs 

JobsOntario Training 

9.0 

0 

4 476 239 

2.0% 

0.0% 

4.07.2 

Federal LINC Programs 

670.0 

0 

18 342 153 

8.3% 

0.1% 

4.07.3 

Human Resources Canada 

72.0 

0 

4 349 252 

2.0% 

0.0% 

4.07.4 

0TAB 

1 312.0 

0 

2 417 798 

1.1% 

0.0% 

4.08 

Driver Education (non-credit) 

355.8 

0 

1 705 961 

0.8% 

0.0% 

4.09 

Estimated admin/plant overhead 

61.2 

0 

27 176 730 

12.4% 

0.2% 

4.1 

Total 

87 912.3 

0 

219 907 863 

100.0% 

1.5% 


Final Report 1996 
















7. Issues Before the Task Force 


59 


Expenditure Item 

No. of 
Staff 1 

$ 

Average 

Salary 

$ 

Total 

Expenditure 

%of 

Category 

%of 

Total 

5 

5.1 

Other Commitments 3 

Tuition fees 

0.0 

0 

555 095 385 

61.2% 

3.9% 

5.2 

Municipal Charge-backs(tax write-offs) 

0.0 

0 

205 238 858 

22.6% 

1.4% 

5.3 

5.3.1 

Contributions to Reserves 

Working Funds 

0.0 

0 

73 045 496 

8.1% 

0.5% 

5.3.2 

Refund of Taxes 

0.0 

0 

539 838 

0.1% 

0.0% 

5.3.3 

Ministry Equity Capital Reserve 

0.0 

0 

2 604 057 

0.3% 

0.0% 

5.3.4 

Board Equity Capital Reserve 

0.0 

0 

16 438 660 

1.8% 

0.1% 

5.3.5 

Other Reserves 

0.0 

0 

53 916 994 

5.9% 

0.4% 

5.3.6 

Total 

0.0 

0 

906 879 289 

100.0% 

6.4% 

III. 

1.1.17 

1.1.17.01 

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT 

School Administration (Elementary Schools 

Principal 

) 

3 761.8 

77 734 

292 418 856 

46.8% 

2.0% 

1.1.17.02 

1.1.17.03 

Additional Instructional Leaders 
Vice-Principals 

1 562.6 

69 819 

109 102 863 

17.4% 

0.8% 

1.1.17.04 

Department Heads - Release Time 

7.7 

0 

497 216 

0.1% 

0.0% 

1.1.17.05 

Department Heads - Allowance 

252.1 

0 

21 125 644 

3.4% 

0.1% 

1.1.17.06 

Benefits for the above groups 

5 332.1 

0 

41 271 051 

6.6% 

0.3% 

1.1.17.07 

Clerical/Secretarial Staff 

4 888.1 

27 925 

136 499 928 

21.8% 

1.0% 

1.1.17.08 

Benefits for the above groups 

4 888.1 

0 

22 826 960 

3.6% 

0.2% 

1.1.17.09 

Professional Development 

51.4 

0 

1 690 735 

0.3% 

0.0% 

1.1.17.10 

Total 

20 744.0 

0 

625 433 253 

100.0% 

4.4% 

1.1.01.2 

Preparation Time-classroom teachers 

5 831.0 

52 127 

303 952 841 

100.0% 

2.1% 

1.2.17 

1.2.17.01 

School Administration (Secondary Schools) 

Principal 

810.7 

82 818 

67 137 405 

15.1% 

0.5% 

1.2.17.02 

1.2.17.03 

Additional Instructional Leaders 
Vice-Principals 

1 121.1 

73 586 

82 498 270 

18.6% 

0.6% 

1.2.17.04 

Department Heads - Release Time 

1 392.2 

0 

80 074 775 

18.1% 

0.6% 

1.2.17.05 

Department Heads - Allowance 

7 120.2 

0 

41 352 544 

9.3% 

0.3% 

1.2.17.06 

Benefits for the above groups 

0.0 

0 

23 342 035 

5.3% 

0.2% 

1.2.17.07 

Clerical/Secretarial Staff 

4 085.7 

30 887 

126 196 894 

28.5% 

0.9% 

1.2.17.08 

Benefits for the above groups 

0.0 

0 

21 200 069 

4.8% 

0.1% 

1.2.17.09 

Professional Development 

0.0 

0 

1 416 378 

0.3% 

0.0% 

1.2.17.10 

Total 

7 409.7 

0 

443 218 370 

100.0% 

3.1% 

1.2.01.2 

Preparation Time-classroom teachers 

5 190.3 

57 064 

296 177 848 

100.0% 

2.1% 

2 

2.1 

Instructional Supervision/Support Ser 

Supervisory Officers 

416.2 

99 278 

41 317 573 

12.5% 

0.3% 

2.2 

Educator Program Support Staff 

2 178.6 

64 521 

140 562 450 

42.5% 

1.0% 

2.2.1 

Benefits of above group 

2 594.6 

8 403 

21 803 626 

6.6% 

0.2% 

2.3 

Clerical/Secretarial Support 

1 907.6 

32 304 

61 622 360 

18.6% 

0.4% 

2.3.1 

Benefits of above group 

1 907.6 

4 367 

8 330 634 

2.5% 

0.1% 

2.4 

Supplies and Services 

1.7 

0 

53 664 113 

16.2% 

0.4% 

2.5 

Professional Development 

3.5 

0 

3 810 983 

1.2% 

0.0% 

2.6 

Total 

4 502.2 

0 

331 111 739 

100.0% 

2.3% 


Final Report 1996 

















7. Issues Before the Task Force 


60 





$ 

$ 





No. of 

Average 

Total 

% of 

%of 

Expenditure Item 

Staff 1 

Salary 

Expenditure 

Category 

Total 

3 

Administration and Governance 






3.1 

Governance Costs 






3.1.1 

Board ofTrustees 

1 875.0 

10 498 

19 682 996 

3.5% 

0.1% 

3.1.2 

Trustee Clerical/Secretarial Support 

33.7 

41 359 

1 395 056 

0.2% 

0.0% 

3.1.3 

Trustee Supplies and Services 

0.0 

0 

4 083 946 

0.7% 

0.0% 

3.2 

Board Administration 

0.0 





3.2.01 

Director or Supervisory/CEO 

120.0 

115 769 

13 886 489 

2.5% 

0.1% 

3.2.02 

Senior Supervisory Officers 

260.2 

99 723 

25 942 856 

4.6% 

0.2% 

3.2.03 

Central Office Administration 

2 288.9 

49 800 

113 989 039 

20.3% 

0.8% 

3.2.04 

Clerical/Secretarial Support 

2 753.5 

33 879 

93 284 674 

16.6% 

0.7% 

3.2.05 

Supplies and Services-lnterest 

0.0 

0 

38 310 004 

6.8% 

0.3% 

3.2.06 

- Insurance 

0.0 

0 

19 682 659 

3.5% 

0.1% 

3.2.07 

- Other 

0.0 

0 

93 136 770 

16.6% 

0.7% 

3.2.08 

Food Services 

235.7 

0 

8 418 327 

1.5% 

0.1% 

3.2.09 

Other 

705.3 

0 

32 873 493 

5.9% 

0.2% 

3.2.10 

Benefits for the above groups 

8 272.2 

0 

52 232 500 

9.3% 

0.4% 

3.2.11 

Professional Development 

86.3 

0 

3 642 353 

0.7% 

0.0% 

3.3 

Capital (Central Office) 






3.3.1 

Capital Costs 

0.0 

0 

24 110 809 

4.3% 

0.2% 

3.3.2 

Renovations and Renewals 

0.0 

0 

15 645 806 

2.8% 

0.1% 

3.3.3 

Total 

8 272.2 

0 

560 317 778 

100.0% 

3.9% 

MISCELLANEOUS (NOT INCLUDED IN TASK FORCE’S THREE CATEGORIES) 




6 

Miscellaneous 






6.1 

Catch-All Category 

(310.7) 

0 

26 615 737 

0.2% 

0.2% 

7 

Total 

170 345.9 

0 

14 275 683 229 

100.0% 

100.0% 

8 

Reconciliation 






8.1 

Total Expenditure-revised estimates 






8.2 

Total Expenditure-costing framework 






8.3 

Variance 






9 

Teacher pensions 4 



571 879 727 




Source: Costing framework developed by Working Group on Education Finance Reform. Numbers from school boards' 1994 Financial 

Statements to the Ministry of Education and Training, as updated by boards in fall 1995. This table includes only updates received 

by the ministry as of December 4,1995. It does not include isolate boards or section 68 boards. 

Notes: 

1 Staff numbers are full-time equivalent. Some staff work part-time. 

2 For category 4, Continuing Education, only, the No. of Staff column contains No. of Students in the programs, not staff. Funding 
for continuing education programs is based on the number of students taking courses, and so number of staff in this category 
is not relevant to total expenditure. 

3 See p. 61, following recommendation 19, for comments about the inclusion of Other Commitments expenditure items under the 
Operational Support category. 

4 Category 9, Teacher Pensions, is not a board expenditure. The province, which acts as the teachers’ employer for the purpose of 
teachers’ pensions only, pays the employer's share of teachers’ pension contributions to the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan on 
behalf of school boards. 

Acronyms and Abbreviations: 


ALF 

actualisation linguistique en frangais 

LINC 

language instruction for newcomers to 

CEO 

chief executive officer 


Canada 

Comp Ed 

compensatory education 

MET 

Ministry of Education and Training 

Corr Fac 

correctional facilities 

NSL 

native as a second language 

FSL 

French as a second language 

0TAB 

Ontario Training and Adjustment Board 

GEMS HW/SW 

grant-eligible microcomputer systems, hard¬ 

PDF 

perfectionnement du frangais 


ware/software 

Ser 

services 

JK/K 

junior kindergarten/kindergarten 




Final Report 1996 














7. Issues Before the Task Force 


I 61 


Figure 1: Proportion of School Board Expenditures, 1994 


Operations 

28.69% 


Administration 

18.31% 



Direct 

Classroom 

53% 


Source: Task force reorganization of information in costing framework 
developed by Working Group on Education Finance Reform. Numbers from 
school boards' 1994 Financial Statements to the Ministry of Education and 
Training, as updated by boards in fall 1995 (only updates received by the 
ministry as of December 4, 1995). 

Figure 1 represents expenditures in the three categories by all boards. 
Appendix F contains a list of expenditures in the three categories by 

individual boards 


The task force recommends that: 

19. school board expenditures on items in the 
combined categories Operational Support 
and Administrative Support, as defined in 
recommendation 18, be limited to less than 
40 per cent of their total budgets 


We recognize that the expenditure items under 
Other Commitments, which we have allocated to 
Operational Support, are expenditures over which 
boards have little or no control. Where these 
expenditure items prove to be a major obstacle to 
a board's ability to meet the target for combined 
Operational and Administrative Support expendi¬ 
tures, we suggest that the ministry review the 
board's situation annually and assess a fair pro¬ 
portioning of expenditures in keeping with the 
spirit of recommendation 19. 

Several items in the Operational Support and 
Administrative Support categories involve con¬ 
tracts (for example, Pupil Transportation) or 
collective agreements (for example, Custodial and 
Maintenance and Preparation Time). To achieve 
savings in these items, boards will have to renegoti¬ 
ate several of the clauses in their current contracts 
and collective agreements with staff. Many boards 
have told us that the present negotiating process, 
which is established by legislation, does not give 
them sufficient strength to negotiate the changes 
required to effect savings in the items noted above. 
We address their concern later in this report. 


Our Interim Report raised the issue of the "man¬ 
dated" costs school boards face that are associated 
with statutory and regulatory requirements 
imposed by the province. Mandated costs, for 
which boards are not reimbursed, are substantial. 
Past and present examples include the employer 
health tax, health and safety regulations (includ¬ 
ing staff training), fire codes, changing environ¬ 
mental regulations, employment equity, pay equi¬ 
ty, and extensive public consultation associated 
with curriculum changes. In their submissions to 
us, school boards emphasized the difficulty of cut¬ 
ting administrative costs while at the same time 
meeting statutory and regulatory requirements. 
They also suggested that some of these require¬ 
ments should not be applied to schools and 
boards. They want the government to reimburse 
them for the costs associated with these require¬ 
ments or excuse them from observing and imple¬ 
menting them. 

In our Interim Report, we agreed with the boards, 
and we have not changed our minds. Without 
relief from mandated costs, it would be difficult 
for boards to limit their Operational and 
Administrative Support costs to less than 
40 per cent of their total budgets, as per 
recommendation 19. 


The task force recommends that: 

20. in limiting school boards' administrative 
budgets, the province acknowledge the bur¬ 
den of and accept responsibility for the costs 
it imposes on boards through statutory and 
regulatory requirements 


Collective Agreements 

Collective Bargaining 

The most significant cost involved in education is 
salaries. Each school board has collective agree¬ 
ments or contracts with both its teaching and 
non-teaching staff. Under present legislation, col¬ 
lective agreements with all staff are negotiated by 
individual school boards, not by the provincial 
government. 


Final Report 1996 










7. Issues Before the Task Force 


62 [ 


Amalgamation will require new negotiations to 
harmonize all the different collective agreements 
that existed previously. Pay scales and terms and 
conditions of employment will vary. More than 
one teachers' federation may be involved, and dif¬ 
ferent unions may represent groups such as custo¬ 
dial staff. A staff group may be represented by a 
union in some but not all of the amalgamating 
boards. 

The easiest way to harmonize collective agree¬ 
ments - and the route often chosen in the past - 
has been to allow all members of the new staff 
group to rise, gradually or instantly, to the level 
of the highest pay scale and the most generous 
terms and conditions of employment that existed 
before the reorganization. As other groups who 
have studied amalgamation have discovered, this 
method of harmonization could consume the 
entire savings achieved through amalgamation, as 
well as substantial additional funds. 

In March 1996, public service employees of this 
province, including school board employees, will 
emerge from the Social Contract, the fiscal- 
restraint policy they negotiated with the former 
government. One of its terms was that there 
would be no wage increases during its three-year 
period. Because of the nature of teachers' wage 
scale, teachers in the early years of their careers, 
who receive annual increments to recognize gains 
in experience, were penalized much more severe¬ 
ly by the Social Contract than those at maximum 
salary, who receive across-the-board increases 
only. The end of the Social Contract will see 
strong efforts by public service employees, 
including school board employees, to restore lost 
wages and improve other working conditions. 

Thus (assuming our recommendations are accept¬ 
ed), during the period of transition to full imple¬ 
mentation of their new structures, newly amalga¬ 
mated school boards will face: 

• reduced transfer payments from the province 

• requirements to reduce spending on opera¬ 
tional and administrative items that are not 
directly related to classroom activities 

• the need to harmonize a number of collective 
agreements 


• pressure from employees who have just been 
released from the Social Contract, including 
teachers, who are represented by strong federa¬ 
tions, to improve their wages and other work¬ 
ing conditions 

• legislation governing collective agreements 
with teachers - the School Boards and Teachers 
Collective Negotiations Act - that allows pro¬ 
tracted negotiations 

• fewer trustees with experience in, and solid 
understanding of, contract negotiations 

• the prospect of hiring professional negotiators 
at great cost 

Our Interim Report proposed the following three 
options for the negotiation of collective agree¬ 
ments between amalgamated school boards and 
their employees: 

1. Renegotiate the collective agreements within 
the new board boundaries and limit the nego¬ 
tiable amount for each employee group to the 
total pool of money in all that group's existing 
contracts. 

2. Change the legislation to require bargaining 
within defined regions and limit the negotiable 
amount for each employee group to the total 
pool of money in all that group's existing 
regional contracts. 

3. Change the legislation to require province-wide 
bargaining. 

Although many of our responders did not address 
this issue, those who did expressed significant 
support for restricting the negotiable amount. The 
option most frequently supported was the legisla¬ 
tion of province-wide bargaining. As might be 
expected, teachers and other board staff who 
would be affected by the restrictions implied by 
our three options, and who responded to our 
Interim Report, did not support limitations. 

We recognize that school board employees have 
the right to bargain collectively, and we also rec¬ 
ognize that collective bargaining has been restrict¬ 
ed by the Social Contract. Our mandate and terms 
of reference require us, however, to address the 
implications of our amalgamation proposals on 


Final Report 1996 




7. Issues Before the Task Force 

~~| 63 


finances and human resources and to make rec¬ 
ommendations that will ensure effectiveness and 
efficiency in education governance (see chapter 
1). Many boards have indicated to us that they do 
not feel the present negotiating process provides 
them with sufficient strength to negotiate the 
changes required to effect the level of operational 
and administrative savings we are recommending. 
We agree with them. 

The task force recommends that: 

21. a) the School Boards and Teachers Collective 
Negotiations Act be reviewed within the 
context of the Labour Relations Act, 23 and 
amended or revoked as necessary to per¬ 
mit province-wide negotiation of teachers' 
salaries, benefits, and working conditions 

b) that newly amalgamated school boards be 
empowered to negotiate and/or renegoti¬ 
ate contracts with non-teaching staff 
under terms and conditions that limit the 
negotiable amount for each employee 
group to the total pool of money in all 
that group's existing contracts with the 
pre-amalgamation boards 

Retirement Gratuities 

An issue of particular concern related to collective 
bargaining is the largely unfunded liability certain 
school boards carry for the retirement gratuities 
for sick-leave credits that teachers and some other 
employees are entitled to receive. For the most 
part, this benefit applies to those who hold a 
teaching certificate. It was negotiated some years 
ago at a time when teachers' pension provisions 
were less generous. Where it has been negotiated, 
it entitles retiring teachers and others to a lump¬ 
sum payment for sick days not taken. 

The costs associated with these retirement gratu¬ 
ities are substantial. The amount of money boards 
owe under retirement-gratuity provisions is esti¬ 
mated to be $914,113,341, yet they have only 

23. The Labour Relations Act contains provisions that may be 
sufficient to cover the collective negotiations of boards and 
teachers, given the changes we are recommending, or it may 
be capable of being amended to cover these negotiations so 
that there is no need for a separate statute. 


$93,946,192 in reserve to cover them. (See 
Appendix G for a list of retirement gratuity liabili¬ 
ties by board.) 

Today teachers have an excellent pension plan, 
with the employer's contribution funded by the 
province, which acts as employer for the purpos¬ 
es of teachers' pensions. Some of the responses to 
our Interim Report indicated surprise that such 
gratuities exist, and expressed the view that they 
have the effect of rewarding teachers for good 
health. We understand that existing contracts 
must be respected, but the successful negotiation 
of this kind of retirement gratuity in future con¬ 
tracts would undermine board efforts to focus 
every possible financial resource on the classroom 

The task force recommends that: 

22. a) those school board employees who at pre¬ 
sent are entitled to receive a retirement 
gratuity based on accumulated unused 
sick days retain that right, and that the 
amount paid be no greater than one half 
their 1995-96 salary 

b) new contracts no longer contain a benefit 
such as that described in 22(a) 

Surplus Administrative Staff 

The amalgamation of school boards recommend¬ 
ed in this report will result in a surplus of admin¬ 
istrative staff, particularly at the senior level. 
When the task force was established, the then 
Minister of Education and Training directed 
school boards not to enter into new contracts or 
personnel agreements that extend beyond 
December 31, 1997. Boards must also make provi 
sions, however, to address the entitlements of 
surplus administrative staff. Most of these staff 
are salaried or contract employees eligible for sev¬ 
erance payments or packages that involve certain 
costs and legal obligations. 


Final Report 1996 







7. Issues Before the Task Force 


64 [ 


Within the next three years, almost half the acad¬ 
emic supervisory officers 24 now employed by 
school boards will have attained the "90 factor," a 
combination of age and years of service that totals 
90. These employees will therefore be eligible for 
retirement with no loss of pension benefits. 

The recommendation providing for surplus staff 
that was contained in our Interim Report was 
substantially the same as the recommendation we 
are making in this report (see below). Public 
response generally indicated support for the rec¬ 
ommendation, with less support for the part that 
would permit surplus supervisory officers to 
return to teaching or school-principal positions. 

As one would expect, opposition to this part of 
the recommendation came particularly from 
teachers. 

The task force recommends that: 

23. for a three-year period only, school boards 

offer surplus staff the following opportunities: 

a) those staff who are three or fewer years 
short of qualifying for an unreduced pen¬ 
sion be deemed to qualify for an unre¬ 
duced pension 

b) the negotiations necessary to make possi¬ 
ble the pension qualification described in 
23(a) be undertaken with the Ontario 
Teachers' Pension Plan for educational 
staff and with the Ontario Municipal 
Employees' Retirement System for noil- 
educational staff 

c) those academic supervisory officers who 
wish to do so be permitted to return to 
positions such as principal, consultant, or 
teacher, with no loss of seniority 

d) a provincial pool of surplus supervisory 
officers, both academic and business, be 
created from which all school boards be 
required to draw new supervisory officers 


24. Academic supervisory officers are senior-level board 
employees who hold a valid teaching certificate and a supervi¬ 
sory officer's certificate from the Ministry of Education and 
Training. They have backgrounds in teaching, and many are 
former school principals. 


Transition and Implementation 

Interim Governance Structures 

When school boards were amalgamated in 1968, 
Interim School Organization Committees were 
established to effect the transition to the new 
structures. If our recommendations are accepted, 
similar interim governance structures will need to 
be established for all boards being amalgamated 
to ensure a smooth transition to full implementa¬ 
tion. Interim structures are particularly important 
for the new French-language school boards, 
which will have to negotiate the redistribution of 
assets with the English-language boards of which 
they are now sections or advisory committees, 
and also for new English-language boards created 
from former English-language minority sections, 
for the same reason. 

A smooth and orderly transition will require plan¬ 
ning, cooperation, goodwill, and determination. 
While the interim structures should have the 
power to make binding decisions, in some cases 
third-party intervention or arbitration may be 
necessary. 

Vital issues to be dealt with before the date of 
effective implementation of the newly amalga¬ 
mated boards - January 1, 1998 - are: 

• distribution of trustees for new boards 

• identification of a director of education for the 
new board 

• the transfer and redistribution of assets 
between and among existing boards and their 
successor boards 

Other important issues include: 

• harmonization and reconciliation of collective 
agreements, tuition agreements, and so on (in 
conjunction with the parties affected) 

• reconciliation of board policies 

• continuation and extension of existing coopera¬ 
tive activities 

• implementation of other recommendations of 
this report that the government approves 


Final Report 1996 






7. Issues Before the Task Force 


The task force recommends that: 

24. a) an interim governance structure, to be 
called an Interim Board Organization 
Committee, be established for each new 
board created under recommendations 5 
and 6, with the authority to make final, 
binding decisions on behalf of each new 
board for the smooth and orderly transi¬ 
tion to full implementation of amalgama¬ 
tion 

b) in the case of each new English-language 
board, each Interim Board Organization 
Committee consist of at least one trustee, 
selected by his or her peers, from the 
English-language component of each 
existing board being amalgamated into 
the geographical boundaries of the pro¬ 
posed new English-language board 

c) in the case of each new French-language 
board, each Interim Board Organization 
Committee consist of at least one trustee, 
selected by his or her peers, from each 
French-language component, including 
advisory committees, being amalgamated 
into the geographical boundaries of the 
proposed new French-language board 

d) each Interim Board Organization 
Committee have the power to establish 
subcommittees and/or consultative com¬ 
mittees, composed of other trustees, offi¬ 
cials, teachers, and/or parents, to perform 
specified tasks and provide advice as 
required 

e) where an Interim Board Organization 
Committee cannot reach agreement on 
the distribution of assets, the Ministry of 
Education and Training make available to 
it an independent facilitator or arbitrator 
to help it reach agreement 

Vacancies on a Board 

The Education Act requires school boards to 
replace trustees who leave office before the end 
of their term. In view of our recommendations to 
reduce the number of trustees, during the transi¬ 
tion period school boards should not be required 


~~| 65 

to replace trustees. In situations where a board 
feels it is necessary to replace a trustee, the mat¬ 
ter should be decided locally. 

The task force recommends that: 

25. during the period of transition to amalgama¬ 
tion, school boards not be required to 
replace trustees who leave office before the 
end of their term 

Disposition of Assets and Liabilities 

Among the important issues that the interim 
structures proposed in recommendation 24 will 
have to decide is the disposition of existing 
boards' operating surpluses, reserves, deficits, or 
liabilities. 25 

School boards are required by the Education Act 
to establish balanced budgets, but in recent years 
several boards have carried operating deficits in 
defiance of the Act. These boards have main¬ 
tained that a deficit was required to ensure their 
students received a quality of education equiva¬ 
lent to that received by students in coterminous 
boards. The Ministry of Education and Training 
has worked with these boards in a variety of 
ways, including supplementing their revenue, to 
try to bring them into a state of compliance. A 
small number of boards, however, still carry 
operating deficits. 

Newly amalgamated boards and their ratepayers 
will naturally be unwilling to take responsibility 
for operating deficits. In our Interim Report, we 
recommended that an existing school board's 
assets and liabilities remain the benefit or 
responsibility of that existing board's ratepayers, 
even after amalgamation. Response to this rec¬ 
ommendation was fairly evenly divided between 
support and opposition, perhaps reflecting local 
conditions. 26 


25. We assume that capital surpluses, reserves, deficits, or lia¬ 
bilities will be negotiated smoothly by the interim structures. 

26. Because many of the responses to our Interim Report 
came via our telephone hotline, we made no attempt to chart 
the location of responders. 


Final Report 1996 







7. Issues Before the Task Force 


66 | 


We continue to believe that our interim recom¬ 
mendation was fair. The ratepayers of a school 
board with an operating deficit will likely object 
to having to pay higher taxes after amalgamation 
than their fellow ratepayers in the newly amalga¬ 
mated board, in order to dispose of their old 
board's deficit. We strongly urge boards that have 
such deficits to reduce them to zero in their 1996 
and 1997 budgets. 

The task force recommends that: 

26. a) operational surpluses accrued by an exist¬ 
ing school board and brought into amal¬ 
gamation continue to accrue to the 
ratepayers of the existing school board 

b) operational deficits incurred by an exist¬ 
ing school board and brought into amal¬ 
gamation continue to accrue to the 
ratepayers of the existing school board 
through higher property taxes until the 
deficit is eliminated 

Distribution of Property Tax 

Amalgamation will result in an equitable sharing, 
throughout the amalgamated area, of the educa¬ 
tion revenue from property taxes. It will also 
result in an equitable redistribution of property 
taxes among ratepayers in the amalgamated area. 
Inevitably, property taxes will increase for some 
people and decrease for others - even when the 
total amount of tax collected by the amalgamated 
board remains the same as that collected by the 
pre-amalgamation boards. If our recommendation 
on province-wide pooling of commercial-industri¬ 
al assessment is implemented, it will moderate 
the tax increases and decreases experienced by 
ratepayers, but not eliminate them entirely. 

In our Interim Report, we recommended that 
property tax increases and decreases of up to 20 
per cent be phased in over five years, and that 
any increase over 20 per cent be phased in and 
subsidized by provincial grants for five years. Not 
surprisingly, any possibility of tax increases was 
strongly resisted by responders. 


The task force recommends that: 

27. a) property tax increases and decreases of 

up to 20 per cent that result from the 
redistribution of taxes under amalgama¬ 
tion be phased in over five years 

b) property tax increases of more than 20 
per cent that result from the redistribu¬ 
tion of taxes under amalgamation be 
phased in over five years and subsidized, 
during that period, by provincial grants 

c) the province introduce greater equity into 
the provincial equalization factors upon 
which local tax apportionment is based 
and update these factors regularly 

Overseer for Transition Period 

The terms of reference provided us by the former 
Minister of Education and Training covered imple¬ 
mentation of the recommendations of the task 
force after they had been accepted by the govern¬ 
ment. We were expected to oversee the transition 
to new school board boundaries, which was envis¬ 
aged to take two years, through 1996 and 1997. 
This overseeing role required that we "consult 
with school boards, employee groups, and appro¬ 
priate stakeholder associations in the implementa¬ 
tion of the new school boards...." Our terms of ref¬ 
erence also included the following, that: 
"Following submission of its report, the task force 
shall submit additional recommendations on mat¬ 
ters identified by the minister or as deemed appro¬ 
priate by the chair, that may assist in the imple¬ 
mentation of the new school board boundaries." 

We recognize that the present government and 
Minister of Education and Training will wish to 
make their own decisions about our recommenda¬ 
tions and their implementation. We do, however, 
suggest that the overseer function is important. 

The task force recommends that: 

28. the Minister of Education and Training 
appoint a person or persons to oversee the 
transition to full implementation of the rec¬ 
ommendations in this report 


Final Report 1996 







8. Financial Implications of New School 
Board Boundaries 


Will Amalgamation Produce Savings That 
Can Be Redirected to the Classroom? 

This question was frequently asked in responses 
to our Interim Report. The redirection of savings 
to the classroom was, of course, a primary reason 
for the establishment of our task force. 

We have identified three areas where amalgama¬ 
tion will clearly produce savings without having a 
negative impact on the classroom: 

• lower levels of administrative staffing 

• reduced need for central-office facilities 

• enhanced collaboration between boards 

In each case, savings can - and in the current fis¬ 
cal climate probably will - be achieved by boards 
whether or not they are required to amalgamate. 
We believe, however, based on our studies of the 
last year, that these potential savings will be 
enhanced and increased by amalgamation. And as 
we have noted before, boards - and other mem¬ 
bers of the education community - have shown a 
reluctance to acknowledge the necessity for sub¬ 
stantial change in the status quo. 

Some have argued that the savings achieved by 
amalgamation are not significant enough to justify 
it. We argue that any savings redirected to the 
classroom will help sustain educational programs 
that would otherwise face severe cuts. We have 
also been told that previous amalgamation studies 
have demonstrated that any savings would be 
used up in the harmonization of collective 


agreements. As we have made clear elsewhere in 
this report, harmonization cannot take the form of 
raising all staff members to the highest level of 
the pay scale. 

Lower Levels of Administrative Staffing 

To assist us in evaluating potential savings from 
staffing changes, we asked the Ministry of 
Education and Training to analyze the current 
staffing levels of school boards' central offices. 

(See Appendix H for a sample chart from the min¬ 
istry's analysis.) Guided by this analysis, we 
developed a recommendation for post-amalgama¬ 
tion staffing levels for boards' central offices (see 
Table 6). If this new staffing formula is applied, it 
will result in savings for many boards but it will 
have maximum impact on amalgamated boards. 
Some boards are already below the new formula 
in some categories, and for these boards there 
will be fewer savings. 


Table 6: Proposed Staffing Formula for School Boards' 
Central Offices After Amalgamation 


Trustees/Staff 

Formula 

Trustees 

As per the formula in recommendation 
12 of this report; that is, 

up to 30,000 students _ 7 trustees 

up to 60,000 students .... 9 trustees 

up to 90,000 students ... 11 trustees 

over 90,000 students .... 13 trustees 

Supervisory officers 

Pupil enrolment 

to the power (0.572) x 0.0227 1 

Consultants and other 
teachers attached to 
central offices 

0.9 persons per 1,000 pupils 

Professional support 
staff 

0.25 persons + 0.9 persons 
per 1,000 pupils 

Clerical/secretarial 
in central offices 

0.5 persons + 1.9 persons 
per 1,000 pupils 

Central-office 

administration 

0.25 persons + 0.9 persons per 

1,000 pupils 


1 The mathematical formula is X 0572 x 0.0 2 2 7, 
where X is the number of pupils enrolled. 


Final Report 1996 










8. Financial Implications of New School Board Boundaries 


68 


Table 7: Projected Savings from the Application of the Proposed Staffing Formula 
to Amalgamated Boards 1 

English-Language Boards: 


No. of Trustees/Staff $ 

Amalgamated Boards Existing Projected 2 Savings 3 


No. of Trustees/Staff $ 

Amalgamated Boards Existing Projected 2 Savings 3 

275.8 258.6 1 299 620 


1 Kapuskasing-Smooth Rock 

Falls B of E 
Hearst B of E 
Cochrane et al B of E 
Hornepayne B of E 

2 Kirkland Lake B of E 
Timiskaming B of E 

5 ChapleauBofE 
Michipicoten B of E 

8 Central Algoma B of E 
North Shore B of E 
Espanola B of E 
Manitoulin B of E 

9 Nipissing B of E 

East Parry Sound B of E 
West Parry Sound B of E 
Muskoka B of E 

10a Red Lake B of E 
Dryden B of E 

11 Atikokan B of E 

Fort Frances-Rainy River B of E 

12 Geraldton B of E 
Nipigon-Red Rock B of E 

14 LakeheadBofE 

16 Bruce B of E 
Grey B of E 

17 Huron B of E 
Perth B of E 

18 Windsor B of E 
Essex B of E 

19 Kent B of E 
Lambton B of E 

20 London B of E 
Middlesex B of E 

21 Elgin B of E 
Oxford B of E 

25 Toronto B of E 
York B of E 
East York B of E 

26 Northumberland part of 

Northumberland-Clarington B of E 
Peterborough B of E 

26a Victoria B of E 
Haliburton B of E 

27 Durham B of E 
Clarington part of 

Northumberland-Clarington B of E 

31 Wellington B of E 
Dufferin B of E 

34 Hamilton B of E 
Wentworth B of E 


57.6 26.6 500 012 


54.5 

37.1 

446 955 

22.5 

14.3 

89 305 

93.8 

56.1 

853 112 

176.5 

134.8 

1 324 452 

57.4 

37.1 

555 119 

54.2 

29.8 

666 808 

30.1 

17.1 

209 057 

145.4 

90.7 

2 766 285 

119.3 

133.4 

542 904 

107.7 

117.3 

626 078 

300.3 

192.0 

4 434 736 

188.4 

179.6 

790 452 

299.2 

292.5 

1 363 120 

134.2 

157.6 

373 290 

149.0 

497.8 

33 945 717 

207.4 

161.9 

1 719 920 

89.8 

78.9 

512 067 

380.0 

341.4 

3 559 440 

211.0 

169.2 

1 626 170 

331.2 

289.3 

1 652 834 


35 Lincoln B of E 
Niagara South B of E 

36 Haldimand B of E 
Norfolk B of E 
Brant B of E 

38 Ottawa B of E 
Carleton B of E 

39 LanarkB ofE 

Leeds & Grenville B of E 

40 Lennox & Addington B of E 
Frontenac B of E 

42 Prescott & Russell B of E 
Stormont Dundas & Glengarry B of E 

43 Prince Edward B of E 
Hastings B of E 

44 Hearst RCSSB 
Cochrane et al RCSSB 
Timmins RCSSB 
Kapuskasing RCSSB 

Kirkland Lake-Timiskaming RCSSB 

46a Nipissing RCSSB 
District of Muskoka 

47 Sault Ste Marie RCSSB 
Chapleau RCSSB 
Michipicoten RCSSB 
North Shore RCSSB 

48 Fort Frances-Rainy River RCSSB 
Dryden RCSSB 

49 Geraldton RCSSB 
North of Superior RCSSB 

50 Kenora RCSSB 

53 Windsor RCSSB 
Essex RCSSB 

54 London & Middlesex RCSSB 
Elgin RCSSB 

Oxford RCSSB 

55 Kent RCSSB 
Lambton RCSSB 

57 Peterborough Victoria 
Northumberland part of 
Peterborough et al RCSSB 

61 Durham RCSSB 
Clarington part of 
Peterborough et al RCSSB 

63 Wellington RCSSB 

Dufferin part of Dufferin-Peel RCSSB 

64 Lincoln RCSSB 
Welland RCSSB 
Haldimand-Norfolk RCSSB 
Brant RCSSB 

65 Lanark Leeds & Grenville RCSSB 
Prescott & Russell RCSSB 
Stormont Dundas & Glengarry RCSSB 


194.6 

183.9 

1 899 462 

601.5 

397.3 

8 170 271 

142.8 

127.8 

837 365 

253.3 

140.2 

5 748 222 

137.2 

90.8 

1 349 908 

131.7 

123.5 

334 384 

35.2 

24.2 

238 527 

27.9 

33.3 

102 307 

87.0 

48.9 

1 008 154 

30.9 

16.2 

489 014 

24.1 

15.1 

199 766 

15.7 

15.6 

111 689 

168.7 

138.9 

1 974 327 

149.3 

113.2 

1 031 396 

109.7 

77.5 

1 431 240 

59.1 

50.7 

546 136 

147.2 

130.9 

905 700 

56.7 

48.8 

341 564 

203.6 

166.1 

1 255 198 


113.8 67.7 1 858 112 


Final Report 1996 










8. Financial Implications of New School Board Boundaries 


69 


French-Language Boards: 


Amalgamated Boards 

No. of Trustees/Staff 
Existing Projected 2 

$ 

Savings 3 

66 Ottawa RCSSB 

Carleton RCSSB 

270.2 

172.5 

4 314 730 

67 Hastings-Prince Edward RCSSB 
Frontenac-Lennox & 

Addington RCSSB 

110.1 

71.8 

1 197 439 

68 Kapuskasing-Smooth Rock 

19.2 

16.6 

44 384 


Falls B of E 


Cochrane et al B of E 

Kirkland Lake B of E 

Timmins B of E 

Nipissing B of E 

Geraldton B of E 




69 ChapleauBofE 

Michipicoten B of E 

Sudbury B of E 

North Shore B of E 

Espanola B of E 

Lake Superior B of E 

30.5 

23.9 

284 916 

70 LambtonBofE 

London B of E 

Hamilton B of E 

Niagara South B of E 

28.0 

21.2 

354 675 

70a Toronto (Conseil) 

Simcoe B of E 

59.8 

22.1 

2 116310 

71 Ottawa-Carleton Cslf(p) 

Frontenac B of E 

Prescott &Russell B of E 

Stormont Dundas & Glengarry 

85.0 

48.6 

1 354 807 


Bof E 

blastings B of E 


72 Sudbury RCSSB 

77.2 

77.7 

558 640 

Nipissing RCSSB 




73 Timmins RCSSB 

54.4 

44.3 

326 082 

Kirkland Lake-Timiskaming RCSSB 
Chapleau RCSSB 




74 Hearst District RCSSB 

51.3 

36.4 

436 501 


Cochrane et al RCSSB 
Kapuskasing RCSSB 



No. of Trustees/Staff 

$ 

Amalgamated Boards 

Existing 

Projected: 

! Savings 3 

75 Michipicoten RCSSB 

Sault Ste Marie RCSSB 

North Shore RCSSB 

21.8 

17.2 

147 745 

76 Fort Frances Rainy-River RCSSB 
Geraldton RCSSB 

North of Superior RCSSB 

Kenora RCSSB 

Dryden RCSSB 

Lakehead RCSSB 

11.4 

11.6 

54 584 

77 Windsor RCSSB 

Essex RCSSB 

London & Middlesex RCSSB 

Oxford RCSSB 

Kent RCSSB 

Lambton RCSSB 

65.1 

44.5 

977 764 

78 Halton RCSSB 

Hamilton-Wentworth RCSSB 

Waterloo RCSSB 

Lincoln RCSSB 

Welland RCSSB 

Haldimand-Norfolk RCSSB 

Brant RCSSB 

Wellington RCSSB 

Dufferin-Peel RCSSB 

77.2 

35.2 

1 647 556 

79 Metropolitan Separate 

York Region RCSSB 

Simcoe RCSSB 

Durham RCSSB 

56.7 

329 

1 252 408 

81 Prescott & Russell Cesc 

Stormont Dundas & 

Glengarry RCSSB 

95.4 

92.6 

644 200 

82 Ottawa-Carleton French Cslf(c) 
Lanark Leeds & Grenville RCSSB 
Renfrew RCSSB 

Hastings-Prince Edward RCSSB 
Frontenac-Lennox & 

Addington RCSSB 

126.3 

87.5 

1 904 122 

Total Savings 



107 307 058 


Source: School boards' September Reports for 1994 to the Ministry of Education and Training, plus application of formula in Table 6, 

1 This table includes all boards for which data were available or could be projected. It does not include boards that would be untouched by our amalgamation 
recommendations, nor does it include section 68 boards or isolate boards (in either their pre- or post-amalgamation configurations). 

2 Where there is little change in the number of existing trustees/staff and projected trustees/staff (i.e , projected after amalgamation and the application of the new 
formula), the savings are related to the reduced number of trustees and supervisory officers attached to the new central office. In these cases, the level of other 
staff is already close to that recommended by the new formula. 

3 Savings reflect only cost reductions. In some boards, application of the formula results in the potential for staff increases, but the simulation assumes present staff 
levels will hold. 


Final Report 1996 












8. Financial Implications of New School Board Boundaries 


70 | 


Using the actual 1994 salaries paid by the boards 
and applying the formula in Table 6, the ministry 
was able to project the savings that would result 
if the new staffing formula were implemented 
along with the amalgamations recommended in 
this report. These savings are shown in Table 7. 
As Table 7 shows, some boards now operate at 
staffing numbers below those in the formula. We 
assume that these boards have been operating 
efficiently at their present staffing levels and that, 
if the formula is implemented, they will not 
increase their numbers to rise to it. 

The task force recommends that: 

29. the staffing formula shown in Table 6 apply 
to all school boards 

Reduced Need for Central-Office Facilities 

Amalgamation will reduce the need for adminis¬ 
trative space. For example, at present each of the 
following public boards operates out of one cen¬ 
tral office: Hamilton, Wentworth County, 

London, Middlesex County, Bruce County, and 
Grey County. When they are amalgamated - 
Hamilton with Wentworth County, London with 
Middlesex County, and Bruce County with Grey 
County, they will resemble their separate-school- 
board counterparts, each of which operates out of 
a single central office: the Hamilton-Wentworth, 
London & Middlesex County, and Bruce-Grey 
County Roman Catholic separate boards. After 
amalgamation, the public boards should also be 
able to operate out of one central office. Even 
where it is felt that one office is insufficient, extra 
space in the second existing office could be leased 
to produce income for the board. 

While we cannot attach a dollar figure to the sav¬ 
ings resulting from the reduction in the number 
of central board offices, because each amalga¬ 
mated board will make its own space decisions, it 
is obvious that there will be savings. Additional 
savings will be achieved in some amalgamated 
boards through the consolidation of maintenance 
facilities and equipment. 


Enhanced Collaboration Between Boards 

Many of those who opposed our proposals sug¬ 
gested that, if saving money was our goal, collab¬ 
oration between boards offered a better solution 
than amalgamation. We have noted that to date 
most boards have shown little willingness to col¬ 
laborate. A 1994 joint report by the school-board 
associations and the Ministry of Education and 
Training called Restructuring: New Realities, New 
Beginnings 27 revealed that, while many boards 
were in the planning or consultation stages of col¬ 
laboration, fewer than 25 per cent were actually 
participating in cooperative arrangements that 
produced savings. 

An October 1995 study by the Ontario Institute 
for Studies in Education entitled Ontario School 
Board Collaboration identified the greatest barrier 
to boards' willingness to collaborate as the threat 
they perceived it would pose to their autonomy. 28 
The study also noted that amalgamation and col¬ 
laboration could be viewed as "competitors," but 
found that "both have the potential to yield 
increased efficiencies." 29 

Savings achieved by collaborations between coter¬ 
minous and adjoining boards would be a welcome 
addition to those achieved by amalgamation. 
Response to our Interim Report indicated strong 
support for such cooperation. Where boards are 
engaged in cooperative activities with other boards 
and with community agencies and organizations, 
the results are encouraging. Existing ventures 


27. Ontario Public School Boards' Association, Ontario 
Separate School Trustees' Association, Association franq:aise 
des conseils scolaires de l'Ontario, Association franco-ontari- 
enne des conseils d'ecoles catholiques, and the Ontario 
Ministry of Education and Training, Restructuring: New 
Realities, New Beginnings (Toronto: Ontario school board asso¬ 
ciations, 1994). This report is also known as the TAF report, 
from the "transition assistance fund" established by the min¬ 
istry in 1993 to encourage cooperative and other restructuring 
activities between boards. 

28. Mark Ryall, Joyce Scane, and Stephen Lawton, Ontario 
School Board Collaboration: Etiology, Barriers, General Forms 
and Implications (Toronto: Ontario Institute for Studies in 
Education, 1995), p. 17. The report notes that "the threat to 
organizational autonomy is...probably the most potential 
generic inhibitor to collaboration." 

29. Ryall, Scane, and Lawton, Ontario School Board 
Collaboration, p. 8. 


Final Report 1996 






8. Financial Implications of New School Board Boundaries 


range from consortia for banking purposes to 
multi-board collaborations for curriculum writing 
and shared use of education facilities with munic¬ 
ipal groups. In northern Ontario, some public and 
separate boards share everything except class¬ 
rooms, and in some cases they share classrooms 
too. In Toronto, the Toronto Board of Education 
and the Metropolitan Separate School Board have 
shared six elementary school buildings for 20 
years. In Hearst, the English-language public 
board and the French-language separate board 
share offices; business administration, bookkeep¬ 
ing, and payroll services; transportation; tax col¬ 
lection for unorganized territories; and a sec¬ 
ondary school building. The possibilities for 
sharing appear to be limited only by the partici¬ 
pants' vision and flexibility. 

As with the savings resulting from reduced needs 
for central-office facilities, we are unable to attach 
dollar figures to the savings that will result from 
enhanced collaboration between boards. Each 
board will have to make its own decisions about 
collaboration based on what is economically 
reasonable in its area. The public and separate 
boards in both Kent and Wellington counties 
pointed out to us that their successful collabora¬ 
tions with their coterminous boards, and in the 
case of Kent with other local agencies as well, 
generate significant savings. And a 1993 report on 
School Board Structure in Ottawa-Carleton esti¬ 
mated that a consortium among boards in that 
area could save $26.4 million. 30 

As we noted in chapter 4, the former Minister of 
Education and Training had intended to introduce 
legislation to require boards to save money by 
sharing services. If this requirement were imple¬ 
mented, it would enhance the savings achieved 
by amalgamation and voluntary collaboration. 


I 71 

The task force recommends that: 

30. a) school boards be required to save money 
by forming consortia with other school 
boards and/or with agencies and institu¬ 
tions for the purpose of managing ser¬ 
vices that do not contravene the 
Constitution- and Charter-protected edu¬ 
cation rights of Roman Catholics and 
francophones, including negotiations with 
non-teaching staff involved in providing 
the services managed by the consortia 

b) school boards be required to report annu¬ 
ally to the Minister of Education and 
Training and the public on the extent of 
their shared services and the savings 
resulting from those shared services 

Financial Impact of Task Force 
Recommendations on Amalgamated Boards 

We asked the staff of the Ministry of Education 
and Training to simulate the overall financial 
impact of four of our major recommendations: 
amalgamation, province-wide pooling of commer¬ 
cial-industrial assessment, the post-amalgamation 
staffing formula for boards' central offices, and 
new levels of recognized ordinary expenditure per 
pupil. The simulation was based on school 
boards' 1994 Financial Statements - that is, the 
same numbers we have used throughout this 
report. 

For the purposes of the simulation, new levels of 
recognized expenditure were established as fol¬ 
lows. The ministry determined the median points 
of school boards' 1994 elementary and secondary 
expenditures per pupil above the grant ceilings 
(recognized ordinary expenditure per pupil) to be 
$605 for the elementary level and $942 for the 


30. Bourns, School Board Structure in Ottawa-Carleton, p. 13. 


Final Report 1996 







8. Financial Implications of New School Board Boundaries 


secondary level. These median figures were 
added to the 1994 recognized expenditure levels 
of $4,134 per elementary pupil and $5,066 per 
secondary pupil to establish new recognized lev¬ 
els of $4,739 per elementary pupil and $6,008 per 
secondary pupil. 

Table 8 shows the results of the ministry's simu¬ 
lation. Boards were grouped according to our 
amalgamation recommendations. Calculations 
were applied to existing boards' numbers as well 
as to the totals for the new, amalgamated boards. 

Table 8 shows the 1994 numbers first: (reading 
across the columns) total board expenditure; the 
portion of total expenditure covered by the 
province through its General Legislative Grants; 
the portion covered by taxes from commercial- 
industrial assessment; the portion covered by 
taxes from local residential and farm assessment; 
and the equalized mill rate for residential/farm 
assessment. 

It then shows what the numbers would look like 
if the four major recommendations referred to 
above were implemented: (again, reading across 
the columns) total board expenditure at the new 
levels of recognized ordinary expenditure per 
pupil defined above; the portion of total expen¬ 
diture covered by the province through both the 
independent distribution of pooled commer¬ 
cial-industrial assessment and the General 
Legislative Grants; the portion covered by taxes 
from local residential/farm assessment, and the 
new equalized mill rate for residential/farm 
assessment for ratepayers of the amalgamated 
boards. 


Final Report 1996 




8. Financial Implications of New School Board Boundaries 


73 


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CP 

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CD 

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09 

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CD 


CD 


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3 

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CD 



CD 



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CO 



r— 

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CM 

ND 




ID 





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1 — 



s — 



■'— 



’— 



CM 



CM 



CM 

CM 



CM 



CM 

CM 

ND 

ND 



ND 

ND 

ND 



ND 




Final Report 1996 































Actual 1994 Figures__Recommendations Implemented 2 


8. Financial Implications of New School Board Boundaries 


I 75 


E 


tm 

p 


(/) 

P 

cc 


E 

L. 

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& 


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p 


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p 


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3 


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3 

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3 


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CD 

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d- 



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CD 



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NO 






CD 

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LO 

CD 



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■^d- 



LO 

CD 



UO 



I s — 






CD 

T— 

CD 





CM 



CD 




CD 

CM 



LO 



CD 




CD 



CM 



NO 






CM 

1- 

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UO 



y — 




CD 




f>— 






LO 

CM 



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O 

CM 

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■'d' 



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NO 

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r— 



1— 



NO 

CD 



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LO 






I s — 

CD 

CO 





CD 



I s — 




CO 

CO 



CO 



CD 



CD 

CD 



I s — 



CD 






CD 

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CD 





UO 



NO 

LO 

NO 

-d - 

CM 



CD 


o 



CD 

CO 


•^d" 

CD 

uo 

^d- 

O 

CM 

CM 

NO 

uo 

LO 

to 


r— 


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CD 

to 

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OO 

OO 

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CD 

CO 

O 

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LO 

CM 


NO 

d- 

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CD 

CO 


CD 

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1— 

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s ^- 

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CD 

to 

to 

04 

CD 

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CO 

o 

LO 

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to 

CO 

LO 


■>— 

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CD 

LO 

CM 

r— 

O 

CM 

CM 

CD 

NO 

CD 

o 

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CO 

•'d - 

CD 

NO 

NO 

CM 

CD 

CM 

CD 

CD 

CO 

,— 

OO 

CO 

— 

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CO 

d" 

CO 

CD 

LO 

CD 

LO 

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CM 

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CD 

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CD 

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NO 

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CD 

o 


O 

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o 

CO 

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CO 


CD 

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r— 

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o 

to 

I s — 


y — 

CM 


CO 

LO 

NO 

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LO 

NO 

CD 

CD 

CD 

oo 

NO 

CD 

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LO 

s ^- 

O 

CD 

CD 


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1 — 

to 

to 

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— 

to 

,— 

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r— 

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CO 

OO 

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LO 

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CO 

i— 


1— 

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LO 

CM 

NO 

CD 



T- 

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CD 




OJ 



LO 

CD 

CO 

CD 

00 


CM 

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NO 






CM 

CM 


to 







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LO 

to 

to 


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NO 

LO 

CO 

NO 

CO 


CD 

LO 


CD 

O 

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NO 

to 


CO 

I s — 

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o 


NO 

CD 

r— 

to 

CD 

CD 

CD 

CO 

CD 

I s — 

NO 

o 

CD 

CD 

CD 

CD 

NO 

to 

T- 

CO 

OO 

CD 

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r—• 

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CM 

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t— 

CD 

to 

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O 

CM 

CD 

CO 

LO 

d- 

CD 

LO 

CD 

CD 

r— 

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CD 

CD 

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r— 

-,; d- 

NO 

r— 

co 

o 

CM 

CT3 

O 

1 — 

NO 

CD 

CM 

CD 

y — 

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I s — 

r— 

r— 

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LO 

CD 

NO 

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CD 

CD 

CD 

d - 

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CD 

s «3- 

CD 

,— 

CM 

to 

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to 

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o 

CM 

CD 

CD 

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I— 

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UO 

CM 

CD 

CD 

CO 

uo 

CD 

LO 

CD 

CM 

r— 

CO 

■*d" 

CD 

I s — 

CD 

NO 

NO 

CD 


CD 



CD 



NO 

r— 

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CM 

to 

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CM 


LO 

CO 

LO 

NO 

CD 

CO 

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xd 

NO 

uo 

CD 

cn 

CO 

O 

CO 

CD 

CO 

CD 

CO 

CM 

O 

NO 

CD 


NO 

CD 

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r— 

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CM 

CM 

LO 

UO 

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■'d- 

CD 

CD 

■^d- 

NO 

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LO 

CD 

CD 

CD 

CD 

uo 

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r—- 

CO 

CD 

LO 

I s — 

NO 

CM 

CO 

CO 

,— 

CD 

CM 

CD 

CM 

^— 

NO 

CM 

LO 

UO 

NO 

oo 

CM 

CD 

CD 

CM 

i — 

CD 

LO 

CD 

CM 

CM 

i— 

CD 

NO 

NO 

NO 

r— 

co 

CM 

NO 

to 

CD 

r— 

OO 

UO 

to 

LO 

OO 

I s — 

CM 

CD 

LO 

CM 

LO 

r— 

1— 

T- 

CO 

■>— 

i— 

i— 

CM 

NO 

CD 

CD 




y — 

NO 

UO 








CM 



CM 






























CD 

CD 

r—• 

to 

CD 

•d- 

LO 

CD 

NO 

CD 

CM 

CM 

to 

LO 

NO 

CD 

I s — 

CD 

CM 

CD 

CM 

CO 

I s — 

NO 

CD 

^d- 

CO 

CD 

^d- 

■'d- 

LO 

NO 

CD 


•^d - 

CD 

to 

CO 

CD 

T- 

CD 


CD 

d" 

NO 

CD 

CD 

O 

OO 

1— 

CD 

i— 

NO 

CD 

to 

UO 

CD 

T- 

CD 

CD 

CD 

CD 

CO 


CD 

s, d- 

■^d- 

O 

T- 

LO 

CM 

■d" 

■'d- 

CD 

CD 

CD 

LO 

CO 

CD 

to 

to 

I s — 

I s — 

CD 

CO 

■»— 

CD 

y — 

to 

LO 

CD 

LO 

•^d - 

UO 

o 

CO 


CM 

CD 

CM 

CO 

y — 

O 

1 — 

NO 

LO 

CD 

CD 

CD 

ro 

to 

CO 

I s — 

r— 

,— 

CD 

r— 

CD 

NO 

CM 

CD 

,— 

LO 

CM 

I s — 

CO 

CD 

NO 

CD 

NO 

-^d- 

CO 

I s - 

O 

,— 

,— 

OO 

CD 

CM 

I s — 

NO 

CD 

LO 

O 

CD 

CD 

CD 

LO 

•'d- 

CD 

o 

CO 


CD 

CM 

CM 

LO 

CO 


r— 

UO 

CM 

CO 

•'3- 

NO 

CO 

■^d - 

ro 

r— 

r— 

CD 

CM 

■*d- 

I s — 

O 

CM 

CD 

LO 

y— 

CM 

I s — 

LO 

CD 

o 

1— 

r— 

CD 

CO 

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y — 

CD 

I s - 

CO 

d* 

CM 

r— 

I s - 

CD 

I s — 

CD 

LO 

y — 

CD 

CD 

y — 

o 

CO 

*'d' 

y— 

CD 


CD 

y — 

NO 

CD 

I s — 

CM 

LO 

y — 

NO 

CD 

CM 

''d' 

CD 

CM 

I s — 

CM 

1— 

I s — 

OO 

d" 

CD 

NO 

CD 

CD 

CD 

CD 

CO 

CD 

I s — 

■^d- 

CM 

I s — 

to 

T- 

i— 

LO 

I s — 

CD 

CD 

r— 

CM 

CM 

CM 

•^d- 

CM 

•^d- 

to 

CO 

CD 

NO 

LO 

CO 

CD 

CO 

r— 

NO 

LO 

r— 

NO 

o 

NO 

■^d- 

I s — 

CM 

CD 

CD 

CD 

CM 

CM 

i— 

1— 

CM 

CM 

NO 

CD 

CM 

LO 



y — 

■^d- 

CD 








NO 

CM 


d - 






























O 


CD 

o 

CD 

CO 

to 

CM 

I s - 

o 

CD 

CD 

UO 

CD 

CD 



CD 

CO 

CD 

LO 

I s — 

CO 

NO 

I s — 

UO 

LO 

CO 

•^d- 

UO 

CD 

NO 


CD 

to 

CM 

NO 

CD 

CD 

LO 

T- 

CD 

oo 

CO 

CD 

1— 

LO 

i— 

to 

T- 

CD 

OO 

CD 


CD 

CD 

CM 

CD 

LO 

r— 

CD 

to 

NO 

O 

UO 

LO 

CO 

to 

CD 

oo 

s *d- 

CD 

CD 

I s — 

1— 

T- 

CO 

to 

to 

t— 

d - 

OO 

CO 

I s — 

CD 

CD 

CM 

CO 

LO 

LO 

O 


O 

CD 

CD 

I s — 

CD 

UO 

CO 

CD 

CD 

LO 

CD 

CM 

CD 

CD 

to 

CM 

i— 

NO 

CD 

CD 

r— 

CO 

lO 

LO 

LO 

T- 

LO 

CM 

r— 

CD 

NO 

■'3’ 

LO 

i— 

CD 

o 

i— 

LO 

CO 

I s — 

^d - 

o 

to 

uo 

•*d- 

CD 

LO 

r— 

■*d- 

"d- 

to 

■^d- 

uo 

1— 

i— 

LO 

LO 

i— 


CD 

y — 

CD 

CD 

d; 

CO 

■*3- 

CD 

CD 

r— 

CD 

CO 

CM 

CD 

CD 

CD 

I s — 

I s — 

y — 

uo 

UO 

CO 

•^d; 

CD 

Tt; 

uo 

’— 

CM 

CD 

CM 

I s — 

CM 

CO 

CD 

r—■ 

CO 

OO 

I s — 

OO 

CD 

CD 

CD 

r— 

CD 

CD 

CO 

CO 

OO 

CD 

CD 

CO 

CD 

CO 

CD 

I s - 

LO 

CD 

CD 

oo 

I s — 

f— 

CO 

I s — 

NO 


CD 

CO 

I s — 

NO 

■'d- 

NO 


CD 

NO 

NO 

■d - 

LO 

LO 

O 

o 

CM 

CM 

CO 

r— 

LO 

r— 


oo 

CM 

LO 

OO 

to 

UO 


CD 

CM 

CO 

UO 

LO 

CD 

^d" 

uo 

I s — 

CO 

■^d- 

CD 

CD 

CO 

CD 

to 

CD 

CD 

^d" 

CD 

CM 

NO 



CO 

CO 

CO 

r— 

CD 

CD 

■^d- 

-3- 

O 

NO 

■'d- 

•^d- 

CM 

OO 

i— 

CD 

to 

I s — 

CM 

uo 

i— 

O 

to 

i— 

CM 

UO 

CO 

CO 

CO 

CO 

y — 

CD 

CM 

OO 

CD 

— 

CD 

O 

r— 

y— 

CD 

CM 

CM 

O 

to 

CD 

I s — 

CD 

CD 

CD 

CO 

LO 

CD 

CM 

CD 

CO 

CM 

CM 

CD 

OO 

CM 

CO 

CD 

"d" 

LO 

LO 

OO 

CD 

CD 

I s — 

CO 

CD 

I s — 

CD 

r— 

i— 

CO 

CD 

UO 

CD 

r— 

CD 

CD 

o 

o 

CO 

■'d- 

CM 

CD 

i— 

LO 

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•^d- 




Final Report 1996 


49 Geraldton RCSSB 2 713 047 2 384 063 163 119 165 865 4.69942 2 845 330 2 725 427 119 903 

North of Superior RCSSB 5 996 845 4 805 255 723 807 467 783 3.47707 6 423 356 5 895 120 528 236 

New Board Total 8 709 892 7 189 318 886 926 633 648 3.73110 9 268 686 8 620 547 648 139 3.81643 

























8. Financial Implications of New School Board Boundaries 

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Final Report 1996 






































Actual 1994 Figures_^_Recommendations Implemented 2 


8. Financial Implications of New School Board Boundaries 


1 77 


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Final Report 1996 














78 


9. Conclusion 


As we submit this report, we are aware that the 
government is also receiving reports from other 
groups whose work is related to ours, and that it 
will be considering our recommendations in light 
of these reports. We conferred with members of 
these groups during our deliberations to coordi¬ 
nate our work as much as possible, and we wish 
to express our gratitude for their cooperation. 

The Order in Council that established our task 
force required us to make recommendations on 
reducing the number of school boards and 
trustees in Ontario and on creating new French- 
language school boards. It also required us to 
make recommendations on the financial implica¬ 
tions of our proposals, including the impact on 
assessment, mill rates, and provincial grants; the 
human-resource and labour-relations implications 
of our proposals, including "cost containment 
measures"; and "whatever ancillary matters...the 
Task Force considers necessary." 

In carrying out our task, we have tried to keep 
firmly in mind that the main purpose of our work 
was to identify opportunities for savings, so that 
more education dollars could be directed to the 
classroom. We found, as others have before us, 
that amalgamation alone would not generate sav¬ 
ings. Reforms were needed elsewhere, primarily 
in the way education is funded but also in the 
management and containment of administrative 
costs. 


We are well aware that our recommendations will 
not be universally popular. Changes on the scale 
we are proposing will be difficult, even painful, 
for many to accept. And implementation of these 
changes will be a complex exercise, requiring 
great care and sensitivity to ensure that the 
results are fair. We urge the government, educa¬ 
tors at all levels, parents, and ratepayers to take a 
broad and long-term view. 

Money to support the quality of education is 
scarcer now than it was when we began our work 
less than a year ago. We believe that the people of 
Ontario want the classroom to be the focus of our 
efforts to educate; that everything else - the 
boards, the administration, the buildings - exists 
to support teachers working with pupils. Our rec¬ 
ommendations on amalgamation, combined with 
the "roadmap" of our other recommendations, 
which show how amalgamation can work, will 
enable Ontario's school boards to continue to 
function effectively and, at the same time, pro¬ 
duce savings that can be used to sustain the pro¬ 
grams and services we now offer our young peo¬ 
ple in the classroom. 


Final Report 1996 




10 . 


List of Recommendations 


The task force recommends that: 

1. the government reform the present system of 
funding education in Ontario before it pro¬ 
ceeds with the amalgamation of school boards 
recommended in this report 

2. in proceeding with recommendation 1 above, 
the government undertake province-wide 
pooling of commercial and industrial assess¬ 
ment, using the following process: 

a) establish a standard mill rate for commer¬ 
cial-industrial assessment 

b) require municipalities to forward the rev¬ 
enue raised from the application of the mill 
rate in 2(a) to an independent provincial 
agency to be established for the purpose of 
supervising the collection and redistribu¬ 
tion of this revenue 

c) require the independent agency to ensure 
this revenue is redistributed so that all 
boards have an equitable amount of direct 
classroom expenditure per pupil 

and further that: 

d) this process of redistribution be phased in 
over a period of five years 

e) during this five-year period, the province 
not reduce the total amount of grant money 
it provides to school boards 

3. simultaneously with the process described in 
recommendation 2, the province establish a 
new, realistic level of recognized ordinary 
expenditure per pupil 


I 79 

4. the government make use of the pooled 
assessment funds that result from the process 
described in recommendation 2 to establish 
the realistic level of expenditure per pupil 
described in recommendation 3, but not at the 
expense of a continued fair and adequate allo¬ 
cation of money from the consolidated rev¬ 
enue fund for transfer payments to all school 
boards 

5. a) English-language school boards be amalga¬ 

mated and school board boundaries be 
adjusted according to Maps 1, 2, 3, and 4 

b) trustees for the new boards recommended 
in 5(a) be elected in November 1997, the 
new boards establish themselves in 
December 1997, and full implementation of 
the new boards be effective January 1, 1998 

c) where amalgamation as recommended in 
5(a) occurs, existing English-language 
boards and sections be dissolved 

6. a) two French-language public school boards 

be created in northern Ontario with bound¬ 
aries as shown in Map 5 

b) three French-language public school boards 
be created in southern Ontario with bound¬ 
aries as shown in Map 6 

c) five French-language Roman Catholic sepa¬ 
rate school boards be created in northern 
Ontario with boundaries as shown in 
Map 7 

d) five French-language Roman Catholic sepa¬ 
rate school boards be created in southern 
Ontario with boundaries as shown in 
Map 8 

e) trustees for the new boards recommended 
in 6(a), 6(b), 6(c), and 6(d) be elected in 
November 1997, the new boards establish 
themselves in December 1997, and full 
implementation of the new boards be effec¬ 
tive January 1, 1998 

f) the 78 existing French-language boards, 
sections, and advisory committees be dis¬ 
solved 


Final Report 1996 





10. List of Recommendations 


80 [ 


7. a) existing section 68 school boards be dis¬ 

solved and their responsibilities be under¬ 
taken by the public school boards in whose 
jurisdictions the section 68 schools are 
located 

b) the responsibilities under 7(a) be undertak¬ 
en under agreements similar to those that 
apply to schools under section 27 of the 
annual General Legislative Grants 
Regulation, but without the requirement 
for annual renewal 

c) there be no change in the present funding 
arrangements for agreements under section 
27 of the annual General Legislative Grants 
Regulation, so that the host boards 
described in 7(a) are not penalized finan¬ 
cially for undertaking this responsibility 

8. the Metropolitan Toronto School Board be 
dissolved 

9. the Penetanguishene Protestant Separate 
School Board be dissolved and its duties and 
powers be transferred to the Simcoe County 
Board of Education 

10. where a board seeks to expand into unorga¬ 
nized territory, it be allowed to expand its 
boundaries in accordance with the guidelines 
established by the Ministry of Education and 
Training and in accordance with the school 
board boundaries proposed in recommenda¬ 
tions 5 and 6, with the stipulation that the 
board seeking to expand be responsible for the 
cost of surveying and assessing the territory 
into which it wishes to expand 

11. a) boards that have been extended through 

amalgamation from elementary only to ele¬ 
mentary-secondary and that do not have 
secondary facilities for students be required 
to purchase services for their secondary 
students from other boards or share exist¬ 
ing facilities, rather than construct new 
facilities, until such time as pupil spaces 
are no longer available in the area and the 
extended boards can make a case for new 
construction 


b) the province make it clear to boards that 
have been extended through amalgamation 
that funding is not available for new capital 
projects where existing facilities are ade¬ 
quate to accommodate all area students 

12. effective as of the November 1997 municipal 
elections, trustee representation be based on 
the number of pupils enrolled in a school 
board as reported by the board to the Ministry 
of Education and Training in its full-time 
enrolment report for the previous January, as 


follows: 

up to 30,000 students . 7 trustees 

up to 60,000 students . 9 trustees 

up to 90,000 students .11 trustees 

over 90,000 students .13 trustees 


and, further, that the process for distribution 
of these numbers be worked out in time for 
the 1997 municipal election campaigns 

13. the individual needs of boards that cover a 
very large geographic area and have a small, 
widely dispersed student population be con¬ 
sidered on a case-by-case basis during the 
period of transition to full implementation 
and, if it is decided that they need more 
trustees than permitted by the formula in rec¬ 
ommendation 12, the total number of trustees 
representing each of these boards be 
increased, but that it not exceed 11 

14. the Education Act be amended to establish: 

a) the honorarium for trustees at a minimum 
of $5,000 and a maximum of $15,000 
annually 

b) the additional honorarium to recognize the 
extra responsibilities of the chair and vice¬ 
chair of a school board at no more than 
$5,000 additional for the chair and no more 
than $2,500 additional for the vice-chair 

and further 

c) that school boards have the authority to 
establish policies regarding the appropriate 
compensation of legitimate travel and other 
expenses incurred by trustees 


Final Report 1996 








10. List of Recommendations 


I 81 


15. the Education Act be amended to allow school 
boards to use electronic technology to conduct 
board and committee meetings, including 
votes 

16. the availability of electronic technology in the 
areas covered by northern Ontario school 
boards be monitored carefully during the tran¬ 
sition period to the new board structures and 
that the structure of northern boards be 
altered as necessary prior to full implementa¬ 
tion to permit them to operate effectively 

17. the level of native trustee representation as 
defined at present in the Education Act be 
maintained 

18. school board expenditures be identified and 
categorized as shown in Table 5, under the 
three categories: 

I. Direct Classroom Expenditures 

II. Operational Support 

III. Administrative Support 

19. school board expenditures on items in the 
combined categories Operational Support and 
Administrative Support, as defined in recom¬ 
mendation 18, be limited to less than 40 per 
cent of their total budgets 

20. in limiting school boards' administrative 
budgets, the province acknowledge the 
burden of and accept responsibility for the 
costs it imposes on boards through statutory 
and regulatory requirements 

21. a) the School Boards and Teachers Collective 

Negotiations Act be reviewed within the 
context of the Labour Relations Act, and 
amended or revoked as necessary to permit 
province-wide negotiation of teachers' 
salaries, benefits, and working conditions 

b) that newly amalgamated school boards be 
empowered to negotiate and/or renegotiate 
contracts with non-teaching staff under 
terms and conditions that limit the nego¬ 
tiable amount for each employee group to 
the total pool of money in all that group's 
existing contracts with the pre-amalgama¬ 
tion boards 


22. a) those school board employees who at pre¬ 

sent are entitled to receive a retirement gra¬ 
tuity based on accumulated unused sick 
days retain that right, and that the amount 
paid be no greater than one half their 1995- 
96 salary 

b) new contracts no longer contain a benefit 
such as that described in 22(a) 

23. for a three-year period only, school boards 

offer surplus staff the following opportunities: 

a) those staff who are three or fewer years 
short of qualifying for an unreduced pen¬ 
sion be deemed to qualify for an unreduced 
pension 

b) the negotiations necessary to make possible 
the pension qualification described in 23(a) 
be undertaken with the Ontario Teachers' 
Pension Plan for educational staff and with 
the Ontario Municipal Employees' 
Retirement System for non-educational 
staff 

c) those academic supervisory officers who 
wish to do so be permitted to return to 
positions such as principal, consultant, or 
teacher, with no loss of seniority 

d) a provincial pool of surplus supervisory 
officers, both academic and business, be 
created from which all school boards be 
required to draw new supervisory officers 

24. a) an interim governance structure, to be 

called an Interim Board Organization 
Committee, be established for each new 
boaid created under recommendations 5 
and 6, with the authority to make final, 
binding decisions on behalf of each new 
board for the smooth and orderly transition 
to full implementation of amalgamation 

b) in the case of each new English-language 
board, each Interim Board Organization 
Committee consist of at least one trustee, 
selected by his or her peers, from the 
English-language component of each exist¬ 
ing board being amalgamated into the geo¬ 
graphical boundaries of the proposed new 
English-language board 


Final Report 1 996 





10. List of Recommendations 


82 [ 

c) in the case of each new French-language 
board, each Interim Board Organization 
Committee consist of at least one trustee, 
selected by his or her peers, from each 
French-language component, including 
advisory committees, being amalgamated 
into the geographical boundaries of the pro¬ 
posed new French-language board 

d) each Interim Board Organization 
Committee have the power to establish 
subcommittees and/or consultative commit¬ 
tees, composed of other trustees, officials, 
teachers, and/or parents, to perform speci¬ 
fied tasks and provide advice as required 

e) where an Interim Board Organization 
Committee cannot reach agreement on the 
distribution of assets, the Ministry of 
Education and Training make available to it 
an independent facilitator or arbitrator to 
help it reach agreement 

25. during the period of transition to amalgama¬ 
tion, school boards not be required to replace 
trustees who leave office before the end of 
their term 

26. a) operational surpluses accrued by an exist¬ 

ing school board and brought into amalga¬ 
mation continue to accrue to the ratepayers 
of the existing school board 

b) operational deficits incurred by an existing 
school board and brought into amalgama¬ 
tion continue to accrue to the ratepayers of 
the existing school board through higher 
property taxes until the deficit is eliminated 

27. a) property tax increases of up to 20 per cent 

that result from the redistribution of taxes 
under amalgamation be phased in over five 
years 

b) property tax increases of more than 

20 per cent that result from the redistribu¬ 
tion of taxes under amalgamation be 
phased in over five years and subsidized, 
during that period, by provincial grants 


c) the province introduce greater equity into 
the provincial equalization factors upon 
which local tax apportionment is based and 
update these factors regularly 

28. the Minister of Education and Training 
appoint a person or persons to oversee the 
transition to full implementation of the recom¬ 
mendations in this report 

29. the staffing formula shown in Table 6 apply to 
all school boards 

30. a) school boards be required to save money 

by forming consortia with other school 
boards and/or with agencies and institu¬ 
tions for the purpose of managing services 
that do not contravene the Constitution- 
and Charter-protected education rights of 
Roman Catholics and francophones, includ¬ 
ing negotiations with non-teaching staff 
involved in providing the services managed 
by the consortia 

b) school boards be required to report annual¬ 
ly to the Minister of Education and 
Training and the public on the extent of 
their shared services and the savings result¬ 
ing from those shared services 


Final Report 1996 




Appendix A: 


Maps 

Map 1 

Map 2 
Map 3 

Map 4 

Map 5 
Map 6 
Map 7 

Map 8 

Map El 

Map E2 

Map E3 

Map E4 


83 


List of Maps, Tables, and 
Figures 


Northern Ontario English-Language 
Public School Boards . 31 

Southern Ontario English-Language 
Public School Boards . 32 

Northern Ontario English-Language 

Roman Catholic Separate 

School Boards. 33 

Southern Ontario English-Language 

Roman Catholic Separate 

School Boards. 34 

Northern Ontario French-Language 
Public School Boards . 36 

Southern Ontario French-Language 
Public School Boards . 37 

Northern Ontario French-Language 
Roman Catholic Separate School 
Boards . 38 

Southern Ontario French-Language 
Roman Catholic Separate School 
Boards . 39 

Interim Report Map: Northern 

Ontario English-Language 

Public School Boards .102 

Interim Report Map: Southern 
Ontario English-Language Public 
School Boards.103 

Interim Report Map: Northern 
Ontario English-Language Roman 
Catholic Separate School Boards . . 104 

Interim Report Map: Southern 
Ontario English-Language Roman 
Catholic Separate School Boards . . 105 


Map E5 Interim Report Map: Northern 
Ontario French-Language Public 
School Boards.106 

Map E6 Interim Report Map: Southern 
Ontario French-Language Public 
School Boards.107 

Map E7 Interim Report Map: Northern 

Ontario French-Language Roman 
Catholic Separate School Boards . . 108 

Map E8 Interim Report Map: Southern 

Ontario French-Language Roman 
Catholic Separate School Boards . . 109 


Tables 

Table 1 
Table 2 

Table 3 

Table 4 
Table 5 

Table 6 

Table 7 

Table 8 

Table Cl 

Table C2 

Table C3 

Table D1 


Net Expenditure Per Pupil, 1994 . . 25 

Current Cost of Operating 

Per Pupil, 1994 . 26 

Over/Under-Ceiling Expenditure 
Per Pupil, 1994 . 26 

School Board Expenditures, 1994 . . 49 

School Board Expenditures, 1994, 
as Reorganized by Task Force .... 56 

Proposed Staffing Formula for 
School Boards' Central Offices 
After Amalgamation. 67 


Projected Savings from the Application 
of the Proposed Staffing Formula to 
Amalgamated Boards . 68 

Financial Impact of Implementing 
Four Task Force 

Recommendations . 73 

Campaign-Directed Responses to 
Interim Report. 88 

Reactions to Amalgamation 
Proposals in Interim R.eport . 89 

Response to All Issues in 
Interim Report by Category of 
Responder . 90 

1994 Assessment Wealth and 
Over/Under-Ceiling Expenditures 
by Board, in Descending Order by 
Commercial-Industrial Equalized 
Assessment Per Pupil. 94 


Final Report 1996 


























Appendix A: List of Maps, Tables, and Figures 


84 [ 


Table Fl 1994 Expenditures by Board, 

Organized by the Task Force's Three 


New Categories .110 

Table Gl Retirement Gratuity Liabilities by 

Board.115 


Figures 

Figure 1 Proportion of School Board 

Expenditures, 1994 . 61 

Figure Dl 1994 Range in Expenditure Per 
Pupil Among Ontario School 
Boards - Elementary . 93 

Figure D2 1994 Range in Expenditure Per 
Pupil Among Ontario School 
Boards - Secondary . 93 


Figure HI Sample Analysis, Central-Office 

Staffing: Supervisory Officers .... 117 


' 


Final Report 1996 









Appendix B: Letters from the Minister 
and Deputy Minister of 
Education and Training to 
School Board Chairs and 
Directors of Education 


Final Report 1996 




Appendix B: Letters from the Minister and Deputy Minister of Education and Training to School Board Chairs and Directors of Education 


86 [ 



Ministry 
of Education 
and Training 


Ministere 
de l'Education 
et de la Formation 


Mowat Block 
Queen's Park 
Toronto, Ontario 
M7A 1L2 

Telephone (416)325-2600 
Facsimile (416)325-2608 


Edifice Mowat 
Queen's Park 
Toronto (Ontario) 

M7A 1L2 

Telephone (416) 325-2SG0 
T6l6copieur (416) 325-2608 


Minister Ministre 


MEMORANDUM TO: Chairs of School Boards and 

Chairs of Minority Language Sections of 
School Boards 

FROM: John C. Snobelen 


DATE: August 21, 1995 

SUBJECT: Interim Report of the Ontario School 

Board Reduction Task Force 


As you are aware, the Ontario School Board Reduction Task Force is 
a team appointed by an Order in Council. 

A part of its mandate it was to develop an interim report for release to 
the public in September, 1995. 

The Task Force has now completed this part of its mandate. 
Therefore, during the first week of September, I will be sending to each 
director of education, and to all principals, copies of the Interim Report 
and ask that they be distributed to all parents, trustees and school 
board staff. In addition copies should be made available for ratepayers 
and community groups at the central board office and the local schools. 

Thank you in advance for facilitating this distribution process at what 
I know is a very demanding time of the year. 



Final Report 1996 


















Appendix B: Letters from the Minister and Deputy Minister of Education and Training to School Board Chairs and Directors of Education 


1 87 



Ministry 
of Education 
and Training 


Ministere 
de I’Education 
et de ia Formation 


Deputy Minister Sous-ministre 


Mowat Block 
Queen's Park 
Toronto, Ontario 
M7A 1L2 

Telephone (416)325-2180 
Facsimile (416)327-9063 


Edifice Mowat 
Queen's Park 
Toronto (Ontario) 

M7A 1L2 

Telephone (416) 325-2180 
T6l6copieur (416) 327-9063 


MEMORANDUM TO: 
FROM: 

DATE: 

SUBJECT: 


Directors of School Boards 
Richard DiCerni 
August 21, 1995 

Interim Report of the Ontario School 
Board Reduction Task Force 


As you know the Minister of Education and Training has contacted 
Chairs of school boards and minority language sections of school boards 
to request their support in the distribution of the Interim Report of the 
Ontario School Board Reduction Task Force during the first week of 
September, 1995. 

He has asked that copies be made available to all parents, trustees and 
school board staff. As well, he has requested that additional copies be 
made available to ratepayers and community groups at the central 
board office and at the local schools. 

I know that this request comes at one of the busiest times in the school 
year and want to thank you in advance for your co-operation in this 
distribution process. 



W'/ Richard DiCerni 
< \ v r' Deputy Minister 


c.c.: Regional Directors of Education 


Final Report 1996 

















88 I” 

Appendix C: Summary of Public 
Responses 


Table Cl outlines the responses received from 
people within the jurisdictions of the 12 public 
school boards and 7 Roman Catholic separate 
school boards where response campaigns were 
organized. The left column names the board. The 
middle column indicates the number of negative 


responses received related to the amalgamation 
proposal for each board. The right column indi¬ 
cates the total number of responses received that 
were related to each board. Most of the responses 
indicated in the middle column were clearly part 
of campaigns. 


Table Cl: Campaign-Directed Responses to Interim Report 


Board Name 

Negative Responses to 
Specific Amalgamation Proposals 
(chiefly associated with campaigns) 

Total Responses 

Related to Each Board 

Carleton B of E 

156 

221 

Carleton RCSSB 

609 

669 

Central Algoma B of E 

525 

580 

Haliburton B of E 

146 

159 

Hornepayne B of E 

896 

905 

Huron-Perth RCSSB 

1 343 

1 347 

Kenora B of E 

156 

161 

Kirkland Lake-Timiskaming RCSSB 

375 

380 

Lambton B of E 

120 

127 

Lambton RCSSB 

132 

319 

Metropolitan Toronto School Board 

552 

589 

Middlesex B of E 

329 

342 

Northumberland-Clarington B of E 

248 

249 

Ottawa RCSSB 

121 

137 

Peterborough B of E 

140 

157 

Prescott & Russell RCSSB 

345 

353 

Renfrew RCSSB 

7 129 

7 176 

Victoria B of E 

432 

461 

Wellington B of E 

615 

669 

Subtotal 

14 515 

14 999 1 

Self-directed responses, all other boards 


4 032 

Total responses 


19 031 


Source: Ministry of Education and Training analysis of responses to the task force’s Interim Report. 


Note: 

1 Of the 14,999 responses received from the boards named above, 484 are clearly seif-directed. If these 484 are added to the 4,032 self-directed responses 
from all other boards, the total number of self-directed responses is 4,516. 


Final Report 1996 










Appendix C: Summary of Public Responses 


| 89 


Table C2 is a breakdown of reactions to the amal¬ 
gamation proposals. 

If the campaign-directed responses are included, 
the breakdown of reactions is 87% opposed, 

7% supportive, and 6% unknown and/or 
noncommittal. 

If the self-directed responses only are included, 
the breakdown of reactions is 45% opposed, 31% 
supportive, 24% unknown and/or noncommittal. 


Table C2: Reactions to Amalgamation Proposals in 
Interim Report 


Reaction 

Number 

Negative 

10915 

Negative with suggestions 

5 657 

Noncommittal 1 

682 

Positive 

950 

Positive with comments 

428 

Unknown 

399 

Total Responses 

19 031 


Source: Ministry of Education and Training analysis of responses to the 
taskforce's Interim Report. 


Note: 

1 A reaction was considered "noncommittal" when it discussed the issue 
but expressed no discernible opinion one way or another. It was con¬ 
sidered "unknown" when it did not address the issue. Many of the 
responders in these two groups just seemed to wish to express anger 
at the whole education system. 

Table C3 shows a breakdown of public response 
to key issues outlined in the Interim Report. Each 
of the 19,031 responders is counted in three 
ways: 

1. as an individual (e.g., parent, ratepayer) 

2. as affiliated with an organization (e.g., board, 
municipal government) 

3. as affiliated with a particular sector of education 
(e.g., public, separate, French) 

For example, a public elementary school teacher 
who responded is counted in the responder cate¬ 
gory Individual as "teacher," in the responder cat¬ 
egory Organizations as "elementary," and in the 
responder category Education Sector as "public." 

Groups 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, and 10 produced a large 


positive response, with group 10, Education 
Finance Reform, yielding the highest approval 
rating of all issues. 

Groups 1, 6, and 7 yielded a strong negative 
response. 


Final Report 1996 








Table C3: Responses to All Issues in Interim Report by Category of Responder 


Appendix C: Summary of Public Responses 


90 


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Final Report 1 996 


Key: - Negative; -(S) Negative with suggestions; NC Noncommittal; + Positive; +(C) Positive with comments; UNK Unknown; N Neutral; S Supportive; NR No response 
























































































(6) (7) (8) (9) (10) 

Trustee Representation School Councils: Limitation on Definition of Need for Education 

Responder Formula Enhanced Parent Role Administrative Costs Administrative Costs Finance Reform 


Appendix C: Summary of Public Responses 


1 91 


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Final Report 1996 

























































Appendix C: Summary of Public Responses 


92 


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Final Report 1996 




| 93 

Appendix D: 1994 Assessment Wealth 
and Over/Under-Ceiling 
Expenditures, by Board 


Figure Dl: 1994 Range in Expenditure Per Pupil Among Ontario School Boards - Elementary 



1 ROE - Recognized ordinary expenditure (grant ceiling) 

Source: School Board's 1994 Financial Statements to the Ministry of Education and Training 



◄- Per-Pupil Expenditures, All Ontario Boards - Lowest to Highest-► 


1 ROE - Recognized ordinary expenditure (grant ceiling) 

Source: School Board's 1994 Financial Statements to the Ministry of Education and Training 


Final Report 1 996 































Appendix D: 1 994 Assessment Wealth and Over/Under-Ceiling Expenditures, by Board 


94 


Table D1: 1994 Assessment Wealth and Over/Under-Ceiling Expenditures by Board, in Descending Order 
by Commercial-Industrial Equalized Assessment Per Pupil 1 


Elementary Panel: 

Board Name 

($) 

Residential 
Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

($) 

Cl 

; Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

($) 

Total 

Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

Residential 

Wealth 

Index 

Cl 

Wealth 

Index 

Total 

Wealth 

Index 

($) 

Spending 

Over 

ROE 

Metropolitan Toronto 

447 537 

436 660 

884 197 

1.7054 

2.7765 

2.1068 

2 549 

Kapuskasing - 
Smooth Rock Falls B of E 

210 992 

358 491 

569 483 

0.8040 

2.2795 

1.3569 

2 396 

Ottawa B of E 

454 525 

336 598 

791 123 

1.7320 

2.1403 

1.8850 

2 104 

Michipicoten B of E 

142 086 

312 718 

454 804 

0.5414 

1.9884 

1.0837 

434 

Hearst B of E 

171 337 

311 019 

482 356 

0.6529 

1.9776 

1.1493 

196 

Peel B of E 

358 987 

236 539 

595 526 

1.3680 

1.5040 

1.4190 

1 330 

Nipigon-Red Rock B of E 

113 802 

236 302 

350 104 

0.4337 

1.5025 

0.8342 

1 187 

Dryden B of E 

133 554 

209 543 

343 097 

0.5089 

1.3324 

0.8175 

817 

York Region B of E 

413 269 

209 461 

622 729 

1.5748 

1.3319 

1.4838 

1 052 

Lake Superior B of E 

91 364 

204 704 

296 068 

0.3482 

1.3016 

0.7054 

912 

Windsor B of E 

228 828 

197 718 

426 545 

0.8720 

1.2572 

1.0163 

1 035 

Kenora B of E 

252 462 

192 810 

445 272 

0.9620 

1.2260 

1.0610 

771 

Hamilton B of E 

208 893 

186 726 

395 619 

0.7960 

1.1873 

0.9426 

1 774 

Geraldton B of E 

114 082 

181 836 

295 918 

0.4347 

1.1562 

0.7051 

370 

Lakehead B of E 

204 951 

177 513 

382 464 

0.7810 

1.1287 

0.9113 

1 039 

Halton B of E 

377 106 

168 329 

545 435 

1.4370 

1.0703 

1.2996 

1 004 

Cochrane et al B of E 

103 279 

165 915 

269 194 

0.3936 

1.0550 

0.6414 

1 362 

Timiskaming B of E 

154 361 

161 054 

315415 

0.5882 

1.0241 

0.7515 

790 

Sault Ste Marie B of E 

176 931 

154 586 

331 517 

0.6742 

0.9829 

0.7899 

765 

Timmins B of E 

154 441 

151 492 

305 933 

0.5885 

0.9633 

0.7289 

554 

Waterloo B of E 

233 159 

148 301 

381 460 

0.8885 

0.9430 

0.9089 

944 

Ottawa RCSSB 

309 660 

147 891 

457 552 

1.1800 

0.9404 

1.0902 

820 

Metropolitan Separate 

286 519 

146 699 

433 218 

1.0918 

0.9328 

1.0322 

972 

Lambton B of E 

221 243 

144 913 

366 157 

0.8431 

0.9214 

0.8724 

944 

Niagara South B of E 

212 966 

143 553 

356 519 

0.8115 

0.9128 

0.8495 

708 

Espanola B of E 

130 191 

141 782 

271 972 

0.4961 

0.9015 

0.6480 

1 282 

Sudbury B of E 

179 827 

140 106 

319 933 

0.6853 

0.8909 

0.7623 

703 

North of Superior RCSSB 

91 592 

137 780 

229 372 

0.3490 

0.8761 

0.5465 

804 

London B of E 

245 642 

137 029 

382 670 

0.9361 

0.8713 

0.9118 

814 

Oxford B of E 

203 867 

133 521 

337 388 

0.7769 

0.8490 

0.8039 

711 

Atikokan B of E 

125 594 

131 164 

256 758 

0.4786 

0.8340 

0.6118 

1 573 

Haldimand B of E 

209 303 

127 936 

337 239 

0.7976 

0.8135 

0.8035 

888 

Leeds & Grenville B of E 

216 346 

126 538 

342 884 

0.8244 

0.8046 

0.8170 

672 

Kirkland Lake B of E 

110 355 

124 128 

234 482 

0.4205 

0.7893 

0.5587 

604 

Wellington B of E 

246 291 

120 423 

366 714 

0.9385 

0.7657 

0.8738 

666 

Fort Frances-Rainy River B of E 

177 929 

119 300 

297 229 

0.6780 

0.7586 

0.7082 

634 

Chapleau B of E 

150 976 

116 139 

267 115 

0.5753 

0.7385 

0.6365 

750 

Stormont Dundas & 

Glengarry B of E 

176 070 

116 039 

292 109 

0.6709 

0.7378 

0.6960 

870 

Lincoln B of E 

250 466 

116 000 

366 466 

0.9544 

0.7376 

0.8732 

757 

Brant B of E 

195 370 

114 609 

309 978 

0.7445 

0.7287 

0.7386 

594 

Michipicoten RCSSB 

73 471 

113215 

186 686 

0.2800 

0.7199 

0.4448 

338 

Perth B of E 

212 986 

112 859 

325 845 

0.8116 

0.7176 

0.7764 

365 

Durham B of E 

241 990 

110 927 

352 917 

0.9221 

0.7053 

0.8409 

802 

Kapuskasing RCSSB 

92 498 

110 396 

202 895 

0.3525 

0.7020 

0.4834 

265 

Peterborough B of E 

281 880 

109 652 

391 532 

1.0741 

0.6972 

0.9329 

649 


Final Report 1996 





















































































95 


Appendix D: 1 994 Assessment Wealth and 0 ve r/U n d e r-C e i I i n g Expenditures, by Board 


Elementary Panel: 

Board Name 

($) 

Residential 
Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

($) 

C-l 

Equal Assess 

Per Pupil 

($) 

Total 

Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

Residential 

Wealth 

Index 

C-l 

Wealth 

Index 

Total 

Wealth 

Index 

($) 

Spending 

Over 

ROE 

Muskoka B of E 

544 230 

108 585 

652 815 

2.0739 

0.6904 

1.5555 

1 370 

Kent B of E 

199 266 

108 040 

307 306 

0.7593 

0.6870 

0.7322 

668 

Nipissing B of E 

152 711 

107 517 

260 228 

0.5819 

0.6837 

0.6200 

724 

Frontenac B of E 

279 075 

107 274 

386 350 

1.0635 

0.6821 

0.9206 

994 

Red Lake B of E 

120 865 

106 652 

227 517 

0.4606 

0.6781 

0.5421 

511 

Simcoe B of E 

278 023 

103 404 

381 427 

1.0595 

0.6575 

0.9088 

650 

Hastings B of E 

193 879 

101 400 

295 279 

0.7388 

0.6448 

0.7036 

763 

Essex B of E 

232 020 

100 738 

332 758 

0.8841 

0.6405 

0.7929 

696 

Timmins RCSSB 

127 663 

99 564 

227 227 

0.4865 

0.6331 

0.5414 

352 

Wentworth B of E 

283 881 

99 064 

382 945 

1.0818 

0.6299 

0.9124 

653 

Dryden RCSSB 

74 279 

98 236 

172 515 

0.2831 

0.6246 

0.4111 

(104) 

Lakehead RCSSB 

132 056 

97 968 

230 024 

0.5032 

0.6229 

0.5481 

641 

Carleton B of E 

257 361 

94 764 

352 125 

0.9807 

0.6026 

0.8390 

1 288 

Middlesex B of E 

233 502 

92 049 

325 551 

0.8898 

0.5853 

0.7757 

595 

Sault Ste Marie RCSSB 

143 780 

91 986 

235 765 

0.5479 

0.5849 

0.5618 

454 

Cochrane et al RCSSB 

78 548 

91 743 

170 291 

0.2993 

0.5834 

0.4058 

193 

Renfrew B of E 

178 717 

90 741 

269 458 

0.6810 

0.5770 

0.6420 

448 

Elgin B of E 

176 340 

90 423 

266 762 

0.6720 

0.5750 

0.6356 

201 

Hearst RCSSB 

93 237 

89 805 

183 042 

0.3553 

0.5710 

0.4361 

35 

York Region RCSSB 

247 745 

81 505 

329 250 

0.9441 

0.5183 

0.7845 

440 

Windsor RCSSB 

153 499 

81 082 

234 581 

0.5849 

0.5156 

0.5589 

484 

Grey B of E 

250 014 

80 678 

330 692 

0.9527 

0.5130 

0.7879 

645 

Haliburton B of E 

516 580 

77 735 

594 315 

1.9685 

0.4943 

1.4161 

1 059 

North Shore B of E 

176 834 

77 053 

253 887 

0.6739 

0.4899 

0.6049 

1 303 

Northumberland-Clarington 

B of E 

216 946 

75 798 

292 744 

0.8267 

0.4820 

0.6975 

701 

Hamilton-Wentworth RCSSB 

177 275 

75 253 

252 528 

0.6755 

0.4785 

0.6017 

657 

Lennox & Addington B of E 

176 880 

75 212 

252 093 

0.6740 

0.4782 

0.6007 

898 

Welland RCSSB 

142 108 

74 695 

216 803 

0.5415 

0.4750 

0.5166 

342 

Hornepayne B of E 

129 317 

74 688 

204 005 

0.4928 

0.4749 

04861 

233 

West Parry Sound B of E 

492 535 

74 064 

566 599 

1.8769 

0.4709 

1.3500 

581 

Lanark B of E 

194 979 

72 406 

267 385 

0.7430 

0.4604 

0.6371 

782 

Wellington RCSSB 

170 681 

70 121 

240 802 

0.6504 

0.4459 

0.5738 

480 

Sudbury RCSSB 

138 437 

69 720 

208 157 

0.5275 

0.4433 

0.4960 

542 

Lambton RCSSB 

132 821 

65 724 

198 544 

0.5061 

0.4179 

0.4731 

637 

Dufferin-Peel RCSSB 

180 710 

64 230 

244 940 

0.6886 

0.4084 

0.5836 

350 

Geraldton RCSSB 

62 612 

63 051 

125 663 

0.2386 

0.4009 

0.2994 

114 

Norfolk B of E 

201 102 

62 504 

263 606 

0.7663 

0.3974 

0.6281 

866 

Halton RCSSB 

204 725 

61 371 

266 096 

0.7801 

0.3902 

0.6340 

650 

Kenora RCSSB 

85 647 

59 686 

145 333 

0.3264 

0.3795 

0.3463 

101 

Oxford RCSSB 

127 654 

59 232 

186 886 

0.4864 

0.3766 

0.4453 

151 

Fort Frances-Rainy River RCSSB 

74 668 

59 048 

133 717 

0.2845 

0.3755 

0.3186 

571 

Huron B of E 

236 554 

58 617 

295 171 

0.9014 

0.3727 

0.7033 

379 

Waterloo RCSSB 

150 391 

58 509 

208 900 

0.5731 

0.3720 

0.4977 

358 

Victoria B of E 

273 881 

56 748 

330 629 

1.0437 

0.3608 

0.7878 

823 

Dufferin B of E 

234 432 

54 510 

288 941 

0.8933 

0.3466 

0.6885 

740 

Nipissing RCSSB 

129 341 

54 200 

183 541 

0.4929 

0.3446 

0.4373 

266 

Ottawa-Carleton Cslf(c) 

192 764 

53 303 

246 067 

0.7346 

0.3389 

0.5863 

967 

Frontenac-Lennox & Addington 
RCSSB 

170 611 

52 288 

222 899 

0.6501 

0.3325 

0.5311 

922 


Final Report 1996 
























































































Appendix D: 1 994 Assessment Wealth and 0 v e r/U n d e r-C e i I i n g Expenditures, by Board 



Elementary Panel: 

Board Name 

($) 

Residential 
Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

(S) 

C-l 

Equal Assess 

Per Pupil 

($) 

Total 

Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

Residential 

Wealth 

Index 

C-l 

Wealth 

index 

Total 

Wealth 

Index 

(S) 

Spending 

Over 

ROE 

Lincoln RCS SB 

173 045 

51 377 

224 422 

0.6594 

0.3267 

0.5347 

450 

London & Middlesex RCSSB 

168 733 

51 359 

220 092 

0.6430 

0.3266 

0.5244 

348 

North Shore RCSSB 

101 009 

49 986 

150 995 

0.3849 

0.3178 

0.3598 

728 

Ottawa-Carleton Cslf(p) 

196 201 

49 864 

246 065 

0.7477 

0.3171 

0.5863 

1 392 

Manitoulin B of E 

280 168 

49 635 

329 802 

1.0676 

0.3156 

0.7858 

0 

Stormont Dundas & 

Glengarry RCSSB 

112 246 

49 429 

161 674 

0.4277 

0.3143 

0.3852 

574 

Kirkland Lake-Timiskaming 

RCSSB 

76 833 

46 584 

123 418 

0.2928 

0.2962 

0.2941 

526 

Durham RCSSB 

150 130 

46 433 

196 562 

0.5721 

0.2952 

0.4684 

288 

Elgin RCSSB 

149 902 

46 215 

196117 

0.5712 

0.2939 

0.4673 

174 

East Parry Sound B of E 

241 118 

45 061 

286 179 

0.9188 

0.2865 

0.6819 

1 014 

Prescott & Russell B of E 

144 221 

44 030 

188 251 

0.5496 

0.2800 

0.4485 

573 

Hastings-Prince Edward 

RCSSB 

131 574 

43 279 

174 853 

0.5014 

0.2752 

0.4166 

318 

Kent RCSSB 

132 155 

41 785 

173 940 

0.5036 

0.2657 

0.4144 

269 

Bruce B of E 

237 698 

41 539 

279 237 

0.9058 

0.2641 

0.6653 

876 

Renfrew RCSSB 

120 565 

41 477 

162 042 

0.4594 

0.2637 

0.3861 

614 

Prince Edward B of E 

261 818 

38 957 

300 775 

0.9977 

0.2477 

0.7167 

280 

Essex RCSSB 

152 275 

38 575 

190 850 

0.5803 

0.2453 

0.4547 

314 

Lanark Leeds & Grenville 

RCSSB 

109 368 

37 385 

146 752 

0.4168 

0.2377 

0.3497 

133 

Carleton RCSSB 

156 400 

36 379 

192 780 

0.5960 

0.2313 

0.4593 

606 

Brant RCSSB 

127 398 

36 142 

163 540 

0.4855 

0.2298 

0.3897 

628 

Prescott & Russell Cesc 

132 093 

34 604 

166 697 

0.5034 

0.2200 

0.3972 

284 

Haldimand-Norfolk RCSSB 

171 977 

33 010 

204 987 

0.6553 

0.2099 

0.4884 

557 

Chapleau RCSSB 

68 959 

32 429 

101 388 

0.2628 

0.2062 

0.2416 

(347) 

Simcoe RCSSB 

148 912 

31 146 

180 058 

0.5675 

0.1980 

0.4290 

164 

Central Algoma B of E 

184 691 

30 914 

215 606 

0.7038 

0.1966 

0.5137 

673 

Huron-Perth RCSSB 

143 247 

30 250 

173 497 

0.5459 

0.1923 

0.4134 

155 

Prescott & Russell RCSSB 

112 508 

29 783 

142 291 

0.4287 

0.1894 

0.3390 

124 

Peterborough et al RCSSB 

133 440 

27 350 

160 790 

0.5085 

0.1739 

0.3831 

74 

Bruce-Grey RCSSB 

136 890 

23 713 

160 603 

0.5216 

0.1508 

0.3827 

251 

Provincial Average - 
Elementary 

262 422 

157 269 

419 691 

1.0000 

1.0000 

1.0000 

1 006 


Final Report 1996 
























































Appendix D: 1 994 Assessment Wealth and 0 v e r / U n d e r-C e i I i n g Expenditures, by Board 


I 97 


Secondary Panel: 

Board Name 

($) 

Residential 
Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

($) 

C-l 

Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

($) 

Total 

Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

Residential 

Wealth 

Index 

Cl 

Wealth 

Index 

Total 

Wealth 

Index 

<$) 

Spending 

Over 

ROE 

Metropolitan Toronto 

666 323 

650 205 

1 316 528 

1.3974 

2.2737 

1.7259 

3 174 

Ottawa B of E 

816 650 

606 251 

1 422 901 

1.7127 

2.1200 

1.8654 

2 838 

Hearst B of E 

296 919 

538 308 

835 227 

0.6227 

1.8824 

1.0950 

619 

Michipicoten B of E 

242 128 

456 024 

698 151 

0.5078 

1.5947 

0.9153 

918 

Peel B of E 

634 512 

419 380 

1 053 892 

1.3307 

1.4665 

1.3816 

1 785 

Nipigon-Red Rock B of E 

201 390 

403 712 

605 103 

0.4224 

1.4117 

0.7933 

2013 

Lake Superior B of E 

193 295 

390 475 

583 770 

0.4054 

1.3655 

0.7653 

1 216 

Hamilton B of E 

432 591 

386 691 

819 282 

0.9072 

1.3522 

1.0741 

1 857 

Dryden B of E 

248 811 

380 387 

629 198 

0.5218 

1.3302 

0.8249 

1 100 

York Region B of E 

736 132 

372 632 

1 108 764 

1.5438 

1.3031 

1.4536 

1 506 

Kapuskasing- 
Smooth Rock Falls B of E 

212 823 

363 655 

576 478 

0.4463 

1.2717 

0.7557 

2 805 

Windsor B of E 

387 047 

333 017 

720 064 

0.8117 

1.1645 

0.9440 

2 745 

Lakehead B of E 

367 023 

318 555 

685 578 

0.7697 

1.1140 

0.8988 

1 717 

Cochrane et al B of E 

188 150 

302 810 

490 960 

0.3946 

1.0589 

0.6436 

1 788 

Kenora B ofE 

383 980 

294 653 

678 633 

0.8053 

1.0304 

0.8897 

661 

Ottawa RCSSB 

615 960 

292 701 

908 661 

1.2918 

1.0235 

1.1912 

1 711 

Kenora RCSSB 

413 257 

288 803 

702 060 

0.8667 

1.0099 

0.9204 

(147) 

Halton B of E 

623 838 

278 404 

902 242 

1.3083 

0.9736 

1.1828 

1 710 

Waterloo B of E 

425 222 

272 800 

698 021 

0.8918 

0.9540 

0.9151 

1 431 

Timmins B of E 

274 363 

266 963 

541 326 

05754 

0.9335 

0.7097 

1 231 

Lambton B of E 

394 321 

257 947 

652 268 

0.8270 

0.9020 

0.8551 

1 392 

Oxford B of E 

393 391 

257 863 

651 254 

0.8250 

0.9017 

0.8538 

1 171 

Sault Ste Marie B of E 

295 166 

257 810 

552 976 

0.6190 

0.9015 

0.7249 

1 076 

Metropolitan Separate 

501 147 

257 035 

758 182 

1.0510 

0.8988 

0.9940 

1 298 

Geraldton B of E 

184 298 

256 318 

440 617 

0.3865 

0.8963 

0.5776 

2 071 

Espanola B of E 

229 379 

256 160 

485 539 

0.4811 

0.8958 

0.6365 

1 260 

Haldimand B of E 

392 341 

239 819 

632 160 

0.8228 

0.8386 

0.8287 

1 191 

Wellington B of E 

487 968 

239 808 

727 776 

1.0234 

0.8386 

0.9541 

1 558 

Timiskaming B of E 

229 099 

239 219 

468 319 

0.4805 

0.8365 

0.6140 

1 011 

London B of E 

420 647 

233 521 

654 168 

0.8822 

0.8166 

0.8576 

1 666 

Leeds & Grenville B of E 

395 286 

231 026 

626 312 

0.8290 

0.8079 

0.8211 

1 234 

Niagara South B of E 

340 564 

229 525 

570 088 

0.7142 

0.8026 

0.7474 

1 450 

Kapuskasing RCSSB 

191 222 

227 545 

418 767 

0.4010 

0.7957 

0.5490 

1 262 

Durham B of E 

464 529 

212 984 

677 513 

0.9742 

0.7448 

0.8882 

1 370 

Perth B of E 

399 209 

210 675 

609 884 

0.8372 

0.7367 

0.7995 

985 

Lakehead RCSSB 

283 685 

210 374 

494 059 

0.5949 

0.7357 

0.6477 

408 

Sudbury B of E 

267 558 

209 398 

476 957 

0.5611 

0.7322 

0 6253 

1 215 

Stormont Dundas & 

Glengarry B of E 

318 675 

207 624 

526 299 

0.6683 

0.7260 

0.6900 

1 455 

Brant B of E 

351 204 

206 566 

557 770 

0.7365 

0.7223 

0.7312 

904 

Peterborough B of E 

520 401 

202 786 

723 187 

1.0914 

0.7091 

0.9481 

1 143 

Timmins RCSSB 

256 501 

200 506 

457 007 

0.5379 

0.7011 

0.5991 

458 

Kent B of E 

369 843 

199 022 

568 865 

0.7756 

0.6960 

0.7458 

926 

Kirkland Lake B of E 

176 778 

198 856 

375 634 

0.3707 

0.6954 

0.4924 

1 118 

Hastings B of E 

379 262 

197 642 

576 904 

0.7954 

0.6911 

0.7563 

1 382 

Nipissing B of E 

276 667 

194 899 

471 566 

0.5802 

0.6815 

0.6182 

1 250 

Lincoln B of E 

422 927 

194 791 

617 717 

0.8870 

0.6812 

0.8098 

1 644 

Fort Frances-Rainy River B of E 

277 033 

190 575 

467 609 

0.5810 

0.6664 

0.6130 

679 

Simcoe B of E 

510 231 

188 560 

698 792 

1.0701 

0.6594 

0.9161 

1 045 


Final Report 1996 

















































































Appendix D: 1 994 Assessment Wealth and 0 v e r/U n d e r-C e i I i n g Expenditures, by Board 


98 


Secondary Panel: 

Board Name 

(S) 

Residential 
Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

($) 

C-l 

Equal Assess 

Per Pupil 

($) 

Total 

Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

Residential 

Wealth 

Index 

C-l 

Wealth 

Index 

Total 

Wealth 

Index 

($> 

Spending 

Over 

ROE 

Red Lake B of E 

225 625 

186 998 

412 623 

0.4732 

0.6539 

0.5409 

20 

Muskoka B of E 

947 518 

186 889 

1 134 407 

1.9871 

0.6535 

1.4872 

1 564 

Carleton B of E 

504 471 

186 650 

691 121 

1.0580 

0.6527 

0.9060 

1 420 

Middlesex B of E 

457 905 

180 690 

638 595 

0.9603 

0.6319 

0.8372 

1 623 

Cochrane et al RCSSB 

155 153 

180 672 

335 825 

0.3254 

0.6318 

0.4403 

21 

Hearst RCSSB 

186 071 

179 568 

365 640 

0.3902 

0.6279 

0.4793 

188 

Wentworth B of E 

507 648 

177 306 

684 954 

1.0646 

0.6200 

0.8980 

1 216 

Essex B of E 

406 177 

176 299 

582 476 

0.8518 

0.6165 

0.7636 

1 159 

Haliburton B of E 

1 165 548 

174 675 

1 340 223 

2.4444 

0.6108 

1.7570 

1 099 

Renfrew B of E 

335 239 

172 793 

508 032 

0.7031 

0.6042 

0.6660 

1 037 

Elgin B of E 

331 822 

168 943 

500 765 

0.6959 

0.5908 

0.6565 

575 

Sault Ste Marie RCSSB 

262 811 

168 321 

431 132 

0.5512 

0.5886 

0.5652 

305 

York Region RCSSB 

511 316 

167 810 

679 126 

1.0723 

0.5868 

0.8903 

1 260 

Frontenac B of E 

408 561 

159 926 

568 487 

0.8568 

0.5592 

0.7453 

1 781 

Wellington RCSSB 

372 350 

153 243 

525 593 

0.7809 

0.5359 

0.6890 

860 

Welland RCSSB 

285 195 

149 967 

435 163 

0.5981 

0.5244 

0.5705 

702 

Northumberland- 
Clarington B of E 

429 924 

149 623 

579 547 

0.9016 

0.5232 

0.7598 

1 281 

Hamilton-Wentworth RCSSB 

352 243 

149 330 

501 573 

0.7387 

0.5222 

0.6575 

1 189 

Atikokan B of E 

155 999 

148 529 

304 529 

0.3272 

0.5194 

0.3992 

546 

Oxford RCSSB 

315 586 

146 605 

462 191 

0.6618 

0.5127 

0.6059 

253 

Windsor RCSSB 

273 069 

144 677 

417 746 

05727 

0.5059 

0.5477 

1 178 

West Parry Sound B of E 

944 968 

143 365 

1 088 333 

1.9818 

0.5013 

1.4268 

910 

Grey B of E 

445 813 

142 545 

588 359 

0.9350 

0.4985 

0.7713 

1 108 

Lanark B of E 

380 824 

141 306 

522 130 

0.7987 

0.4941 

0.6845 

1 180 

Chapleau B of E 

219 844 

140 976 

360 819 

0.4611 

0.4930 

0.4730 

48 

Lambton RCSSB 

279 965 

138 690 

418 655 

0.5871 

0.4850 

0.5488 

135 

Lennox & Addington B of E 

323 790 

137 681 

461 470 

0.6791 

0.4815 

0.6050 

1 976 

Hornepayne B of E 

246 242 

132 624 

378 866 

0.5164 

0.4638 

0.4967 

(1 804) 

Halton RCSSB 

441 613 

132 211 

573 823 

0.9262 

0.4623 

0.7523 

1 197 

Ottawa-Carleton Cslf(c) 

450 953 

126 574 

577 528 

0.9457 

0.4426 

0.7571 

647 

Dufferin-Peel RCSSB 

352 566 

125 311 

477 877 

0.7394 

0.4382 

0.6265 

545 

Waterloo RCSSB 

314 709 

123 204 

437 913 

0.6600 

0.4308 

0.5741 

8 

Norfolk B of E 

374 660 

116 448 

491 107 

0.7857 

0.4072 

0.6438 

1 007 

Sudbury RCSSB 

226 693 

115 402 

342 095 

0.4754 

0.4035 

0.4485 

582 

Manitoulin B of E 

630 859 

111 251 

742 110 

1.3230 

0.3890 

0.9729 

1 308 

Victoria B of E 

542 193 

111 139 

653 332 

1.1371 

0.3886 

0.8565 

1 040 

Durham RCSSB 

355 873 

110 553 

466 425 

0.7463 

0.3866 

0.6115 

292 

Lanark Leeds & Grenville RCSSB 

319 654 

109 257 

428 910 

0.6704 

0.3821 

0.5623 

(216) 

Huron B of E 

427 980 

106 216 

534 196 

0.8976 

0.3714 

0.7003 

764 

Stormont Dundas & 

Glengarry RCSSB 

234 974 

105 522 

340 495 

0.4928 

0.3690 

0.4464 

520 

Dufferin B of E 

448 756 

104 343 

553 099 

0.9411 

0.3649 

0.7251 

1 347 

Kent RCSSB 

317 606 

101 095 

418 702 

0.6661 

0.3535 

0.5489 

(24) 

Kirkland Lake-Timiskaming 

RCSSB 

164 114 

99 755 

263 869 

0.3442 

0.3488 

0.3459 

873 

London & Middlesex RCSSB 

320 306 

97 019 

417 326 

0.6717 

0.3393 

0.5471 

1 086 

Nipissing RCSSB 

233 230 

96 951 

330 181 

0.4891 

0.3390 

0.4329 

602 

Lincoln RCSSB 

323 477 

95 394 

418 871 

0.6784 

0.3336 

0.5491 

473 

Elgin RCSSB 

303 537 

94 204 

397 741 

0.6366 

0.3294 

0.5214 

910 


Final Report 1996 














































































Appendix D: 1 994 Assessment Wealth and 0 v e r/U n d e r-C e i I i n g Expenditures, by Board 


99 


Secondary Panel: 

Board Name 

($) 

Residential 
Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

($) 

C-l 

Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

($) 

Total 

Equal Assess 
Per Pupil 

Residential 

Wealth 

Index 

C-l 

Wealth 

Index 

Total 

Wealth 

Index 

($) 

Spending 

Over 

ROE 

Renfrew RCSSB 

264 381 

93 062 

357 443 

0.5545 

0.3254 

0.4686 

452 

Frontenac-Lennox & Addington 
RCSSB 

293 202 

93 039 

386 241 

0.6149 

0.3253 

0.5064 

316 

Hastings-Prince Edward RCSSB 

280 553 

92 421 

372 974 

0.5884 

0.3232 

0.4890 

382 

Prescott & Russell B of E 

293 135 

91 331 

384 466 

0.6148 

0.3194 

0.5040 

1 106 

North Shore B of E 

220 080 

84 732 

304 812 

0.4616 

0.2963 

0.3996 

432 

Brant RCSSB 

279 324 

79 241 

358 566 

0.5858 

0.2771 

0.4701 

775 

Essex RCSSB 

313 193 

78 486 

391 679 

0.6568 

0.2745 

0.5135 

1 138 

East Parry Sound B of E 

424 699 

78 459 

503 158 

0.8907 

0.2744 

0.6596 

693 

Carleton RCSSB 

335 952 

78 296 

414 248 

0.7046 

0.2738 

0.5431 

696 

Prince Edward B of E 

513 500 

76 530 

590 030 

1.0769 

0.2676 

0.7735 

784 

Simcoe RCSSB 

360 243 

75 813 

436 057 

0.7555 

0.2651 

0.5717 

(2) 

Ottawa-Carleton Cslf(p) 

292 801 

75 209 

368 009 

0.6141 

0.2630 

0.4824 

3 343 

Bruce B ofE 

430 269 

74 292 

504 560 

0.9024 

0.2598 

0.6615 

1 033 

Peterborough et al RCSSB 

363 652 

74 087 

437 739 

0.7627 

0.2591 

0.5739 

975 

Fluron-Perth RCSSB 

354 314 

74 002 

428 316 

0.7431 

0.2588 

0.5615 

160 

Prescott & Russell Cesc 

274 988 

71 853 

346 841 

0.5767 

0.2513 

0.4547 

764 

Haldimand-Norfolk RCSSB 

358 963 

68 664 

427 627 

0.7528 

0.2401 

0.5606 

0 

Prescott & Russell RCSSB 

248 591 

65 601 

314 192 

0.5213 

0.2294 

0.4119 

838 

Bruce-Grey RCSSB 

328 286 

59 594 

387 879 

0.6885 

0.2084 

0.5085 

77 

Central Algoma B of E 

278 914 

46 821 

325 735 

0.5849 

0.1637 

0.4270 

119 

Provincial Average - 
Secondary 

476 825 

285 968 

762 795 

1.0000 

1.0000 

1.0000 

1 606 


Source: 1994 assessment rolls (Ontario Ministry of Finance) and school boards' 1994 revised estimates submitted to the Ministry of Education and 
Training. Indices generated by Ministry of Education and Training. 


Note: 

1 Table D1 does not include isolate boards, section 68 boards, the Penetanguishene Protestant Separate board, or the individual public boards in 
Metropolitan Toronto (the umbrella Metropolitan Toronto School Board is included). 

Boards are listed in descending order by commercial-industrial equalized assessment per pupil. If a different category of wealth were used, the wealth 
ranking of boards would change. For example, if boards were listed in descending order by residential equalized assessment per pupil, the Muskoka 
B of E would be ranked wealthiest for the elementary panel, and the Haliburton County B of E for the secondary panel 

Acronym: 

C-l commercial-industrial 

Equal Assess equalized assessment 

ROE recognized ordinary expenditure 


Final Report 1996 







































Appendix E: Changes to Amalgamation 
Proposals Contained in the 
Interim Report 


Maps El through E8 in this appendix are repro¬ 
ductions of the maps in the Interim Report, and 
are presented for the information of those who 
wish to compare our final recommendations in 
this report (Maps 1 through 8 in chapter 7) with 
those in the Interim Report. 

The numbers applied to new boards have not 
changed from the Interim Report to this Final 
Report. Where a new amalgamation was created 
that was not part of the interim recommenda¬ 
tions, the number of the new amalgamation has 
been rendered with an "a," as in board 10a. 

Changes to Interim Report Map (Map El) 
for Northern Ontario English-Language 
Public School Boards 

9. Muskoka added to Nipissing, East Parry- 
Sound, and West Parry Sound 

10. Kenora alone; Red Lake and Dryden moved 
to board 10a 

10a. Red Lake and Dryden combined 

Changes to Interim Report Map (Map E2) 
for Southern Ontario English-Language 
Public School Boards 

18. Essex County Children's Rehabilitation 
Centre added to Windsor and Essex 

22. Hugh MacMillan Centre added to North York 


26. Northumberland part of Northumberland- 
Clarington combined with Peterborough; 
Clarington (Newcastle) part of 
Northumberland-Clarington moved to 
board 27; Victoria and Haliburton moved to 
board 26a 

26a. Victoria and Haliburton combined 

27. Clarington (Newcastle) part of 
Northumberland-Clarington and Campbell 
Children's School added to Durham 

29. Penetanguishene Protestant dissolved 

30. Simcoe, including students from the dis¬ 
solved Penetanguishene Protestant; Muskoka 
moved to board 9 

35. Niagara Peninsula Crippled Children's 

Centre added to Lincoln and Niagara South 

37. Waterloo North Children's Centre added to 
Waterloo 

38. Ottawa Children's Treatment Centre added 
to Ottawa and Carleton 

Changes to Interim Report Map (Map E3) 

for Northern Ontario English-Language 

Roman Catholic Separate School Boards 

44. Kirkland Lake-Timiskaming added to Hearst, 
Cochrane Iroquois Falls/Black River 
Matheson, Timmins, Moosonee, 

Kapuskasing, and Hornepayne 

45. Proposed amalgamation deleted 

46. Sudbury alone; Nipissing and Parry Sound 
moved to board 46a 

46a. Nipissing, Parry Sound, and District of 
Muskoka 

47. Chapleau, Michipicoten, North Shore, Foleyet, 
and Gogama added to Sault Ste. Marie 

48. Dryden and Ignace added to Atikokan and 
Fort Frances-Rainy River 

50. Red Lake and Kenora; Dryden and Ignace 
moved to board 48 


Final Report 1996 




Appendix E: Changes to Amalgamation Proposals Contained in the Interim Report 

~| 101 


Changes to Interim Report Map (Map E4) 
for Southern Ontario English-Language 
Roman Catholic Separate School Boards 

52. Bruce-Grey alone; Huron-Perth moved to 
board 52a 

52a. Huron-Perth alone 

57. Clarington (Newcastle) part of Peterborough 
Victoria Northumberland & Newcastle 
moved to board 61; remainder of 
Peterborough Victoria Northumberland & 
Newcastle stays with Cardiff-Bicroft and the 
District of Haliburton 

59. Peel part of Dufferin-Peel alone; Dufferin 
part of Dufferin-Peel moved to board 63 

60. Simcoe alone; District of Muskoka moved to 
board 46a 

61. Clarington (Newcastle) part of Peterborough 
Victoria Northumberland & Newcastle added 
to Durham 

62. Halton alone; Hamilton-Wentworth moved 
to board 62a 

62a. Hamilton-Wentworth alone 

63. Dufferin part of Dufferin-Peel added to 
Wellington; Waterloo moved to board 63a 

63a. Waterloo alone 

66. Ottawa and Carleton; Renfrew moved to 66a 
66a. Renfrew alone 

Changes to Interim Report Map (Map E5) 
for Northern Ontario French-Language 
Public School Boards 

68. Muskoka added to boards listed 

Changes to Interim Report Map (Map E6) 
for Southern Ontario French-Language 
Public School Boards 

70. Bruce, Grey, Huron, Perth, Windsor, Essex, 
Kent, Lambton, London, Middlesex, Elgin, 
Oxford, Dufferin, Peel, Halton, Hamilton, 
Wentworth, Lincoln, Niagara South, 
Haldimand, Norfolk, Brant, Waterloo, and 
Wellington; Muskoka moved to board 68 


70a. North York, Scarborough, Etobicoke, 

Toronto, Conseil des ecoles frangaises de la 
communaute urbaine de Toronto, York, East 
York, Northumberland-Clarington, 
Peterborough, Victoria, Haliburton, Durham, 
York Region, and Simcoe, including students 
from the dissolved Penetanguishene 
Protestant 

Changes to Interim Report Map (Map E7) 

for Northern Ontario French-Language 

Roman Catholic Separate School Boards 

72. District of Muskoka added to Sudbury, 
Nipissing, and Parry Sound 

73. Chapleau added to Timmins, Moosonee, 
Foleyet, Gogama, and Kirkland Lake- 
Timiskaming 

75. Hornepayne, Michipicoten, Sault Ste. Marie, 
North Shore, and Dubreuilville; Chapleau 
moved to board 73 

Changes to Interim Report Map (Map E8) 

for Southern Ontario French-Language 

Roman Catholic Separate School Boards 

78. Dufferin-Peel added to Halton, Hamilton- 
Wentworth, Wellington, Waterloo, Lincoln, 
Welland, Haldimand-Norfolk, and Brant 

79. Metropolitan Separate, Peterborough Victoria 
Northumberland & Newcastle, Cardiff- 
Bicroft, York Region, Simcoe, Durham, and 
the District of Haliburton; Dufferin-Peel 
moved to board 78; District of Muskoka 
moved to board 72 

80. Proposed amalgamation deleted 

81. Stormont Dundas & Glengarry added to 
Conseil des ecoles separees catholiques de 
langue frangaise de Prescott et Russell 

82. Lanark Leeds and Grenville, Renfrew, 
Hastings-Prince Edward, Frontenac-Lennox 
& Addington - all added to Conseil des 
ecoles catholiques de langue frangaise de la 
region d'Ottawa-Carleton 


Final Report 1996 




Map El Interim Report Map: Northern Ontario English-Language Public School Boards 


Appendix E: Changes to Amalgamation Proposals Contained in the Interim Report 

102 | 



Final Report 1996 


































Map E2 Interim Report Map: Southern Ontario English-Language Public School Boards 


Appendix E: Changes to Amalgamation Proposals Contained in the Interim Report 


103 


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Final Report 1996 










Map E3 Interim Report Map: Northern Ontario English-Language Roman Catholic Separate School Boards 


Appendix E: Changes to Amalgamation Proposals Contained in the Interim Report 


104 [ 



Final Report 1996 































Map E4 Interim Report Map: Southern Ontario English-Language Roman Catholic Separate School Boards 


Appendix E: Changes to Amalgamation Proposals Contained in the Interim Report 


| 105 


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Map E5 Interim Report Map: Northern Ontario French-Language Public School Boards 


Appendix E: Changes to Amalgamation Proposals Contained in the Interim Report 


106 | 



Final Report 1996 





























Map E6 Interim Report Map: Southern Ontario French-Language Public School Boards 


Appendix E: Changes to Amalgamation Proposals Contained in the Interim Report 


107 



Final Report 1996 


1 





Map E7 Interim Report Map: Northern Ontario French-Language Roman Catholic Separate School Boards 


108 


Appendix E: Changes to Amalgamation Proposals Contained in the Interim Report 


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Final Report 1996 



























Map E8 Interim Report Map: Southern Ontario French-Language Roman Catholic Separate School Boards 



Final Report 1996 






Appendix F: Education Expenditures in the 
Three New Categories, by Board 


110 



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Final Report 1996 







































































































































$ % $ - English Boards/Sections $ - French Boards/Sections 

Direct Operational Administrative Direct Operational Administrative Direct Operational Administrative Direct Operational Administrative 
Board Name 1 Classroom Support Support Classroom Support Support Classroom Support Support Classroom Support Support 


Appendix F: Education Expenditures in the Three New Categories, by Board 


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Final Report 1996 















































































$ % $ - English Boards/Sections $ - French Boards/Sections 

Direct Operational Administrative Direct Operational Administrative Direct Operational Administrative Direct Operational Administrative 
Board Name 1 Classroom Support Support Classroom Support Support Classroom Support Support Classroom Support Support 


Appendix F: Education Expenditures in the Three New Categories, by Board 


112 








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Final Report 1996 


Northumberland- 

Clarington B of E 84 816 123 47 460 813 28 834 542 52.6% 29.5% 17.9% 84 816 123 47 460 813 28 834 542 





















































$ % $ - English Boards/Sections $ - French Boards/Sections 

Direct Operational Administrative Direct Operational Administrative Direct Operational Administrative Direct Operational Administrative 
Board Name’ Classroom Support Support Classroom Support Support Classroom Support Support Classroom Support Support 


Appendix F: Education Expenditures in the Three New Categories, by Board 


| 113 




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Peterborough B of E 

Prescott & Russell B of E 

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Peterborough et al RCSSB 

Red Lake B of E 

Renfrew B of E 

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Sault Ste Marie B of E 

Sault Ste Marie RCSSB 

Simcoe B of E 

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Stormont Dundas & 

Glengarry B of E 

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Sudbury B of E 

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Timiskaming B of E 

Timmins B of E 

Timmins RCSSB 

Victoria B of E 

Waterloo B of E 

Waterloo RCSSB 

Welland RCSSB 

Wellington B of E 


Final Report 1996 


































































































$ % $ - English Boards/Sections $ - French Boards/Sections 

Direct Operational Administrative Direct Operational Administrative Direct Operational Administrative Direct Operational Administrative 
Board Name' Classroom Support Support Classroom Support Support Classroom Support Support Classroom Support Support 


Appendix F: Education Expenditures in the Three New Categories, by Board 


114 


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Final Report 1996 































115 


Appendix G - Retirement Gratuity 

Liabilities by Board 



Total Estimated 

Reserve 


Total Estimated 

Reserve 

Board Name 1 

Liability 

Funds 

Board Name 

Liability 

Funds 

Atikokan B of E 

1 194 586 

0 

Hearst B of E 

797 573 

35 680 

Brant B of E 

5 204 634 

4 342 220 

Hearst RCSSB 

1 647 304 

151 812 

Brant RCSSB 

896 000 

895 596 

Flornepayne B of E 

193 113 

127 420 

Bruce B of E 

7 498 575 

1 13 792 

Fluron B of E 

13 009 588 

737 886 

Bruce-Grey RCSSB 

0 

0 

Huron-Perth RCSSB 

387 852 

0 

Carleton B of E 

58 714 406 

0 

Kapuskasing-Smooth Rock Falls B of E 

2 090 000 

0 

Carleton RCSSB 

277 700 

0 

Kapuskasing RCSSB 

0 

629 330 

Central Algoma B of E 

1 841 805 

0 

Kenora B of E 

721 307 

634 439 

Chapleau B of E 

485 325 

185 978 

Kenora RCSSB 

90 486 

0 

Chapleau RCSSB 

270 245 

194 767 

Kent B of E 

22 362 000 

66 948 

Cochrane et al B of E 

2 456 527 

1 458 094 

Kent RCSSB 

231 887 

289 581 

Cochrane et a! RCSSB 

1 121 325 

0 

Kirkland Lake B of E 

0 

460 327 

Dryden B of E 

447 339 

257 605 

Kirkland Lake-Timiskaming RCSSB 

3 600 000 

316 067 

Dryden RCSSB 

208 632 

0 

Lake Superior B of E 

0 

1 013 954 

Dufferin B of E 

7 340 318 

1 000 000 

Lakehead B of E 

15 218 000 

1 344 548 

Dufferin-Peel RCSSB 

35 000 000 

1 565 000 

Lakehead RCSSB 

4 720 438 

2 511 595 

Durham B of E 

10 862 086 

10 862 086 

Lambton B of E 

25 513 731 

489 631 

Durham RCSSB 

25 846 980 

3 497 420 

Lambton RCSSB 

0 

0 

East Parry Sound B of E 

0 

487 809 

Lanark B of E 

2 389 683 

271 975 

Elgin B of E 

1 215 896 

345 085 

Lanark Leeds & Grenville RCSSB 

261 186 

564 443 

Elgin RCSSB 

1 857 605 

0 

Leeds & Grenville B of E 

2 062 356 

3 836 686 

Espanola B of E 

2 190 000 

522 979 

Lennox & Addington B of E 

8 509 154 

0 

Essex B of E 

2 604 465 

0 

Lincoln B of E 

31 746 074 

7 845 425 

Essex RCSSB 

0 

0 

Lincoln RCSSB 

8 141 828 

0 

Fort Frances-Rainy River RCSSB 

0 

0 

London B of E 

41 378 000 

0 

Fort Frances-Rainy River B of E 

261 806 

0 

London & Middlesex RCSSB 

1 670 395 

0 

Frontenac-Lennox & Addington RCSSB 

10 483 780 

288 225 

Manitoulin B of E 

1 392 785 

0 

Frontenac B of E 

5 890 000 

0 

Metropolitan Separate 

14 152 912 

0 

Geraldton B of E 

1 233 230 

236 894 

Metropolitan Toronto 

157 228 726 

200 000 

Geraldton RCSSB 

208 632 

0 

Michipicoten B of E 

970 055 

0 

Grey B of E 

2 131 703 

1 007 855 

Michipicoten RCSSB 

598 703 

0 

Haldimand B of E 

6 591 956 

106 154 

Middlesex B of E 

614 166 

0 

Haldimand-Norfolk RCSSB 

2 691 856 

607 038 

Muskoka B of E 

7 602 000 

335 135 

Haliburton B of E 

2 668 000 

0 

Niagara South B of E 

31 268 312 

2 383 047 

Halton B of E 

6 276 201 

0 

Nipigon-Red Rock B of E 

1 207 366 

686 916 

Halton RCSSB 

0 

0 

Nipissing B of E 

14 998 691 

0 

Hamilton B of E 

35 336 998 

4 853 121 

Nipissing RCSSB 

805 641 

0 

Hamilton-Wentworth RCSSB 

4 649 300 

0 

Norfolk B of E 

2 245 480 

0 

Hastings B of E 

22 074 472 

845 484 

North of Superior RCSSB 

490 603 

15 000 

Hastings-Prince Edward RCSSB 

3 402 000 

0 

North Shore B of E 

6 030 930 

1 151 678 


Final Report 1996 












Appendix G - Retirement Gratuity Liabilities by Board 


116 


Board Name 

Total Estimated 
Liability 

Reserve 

Funds 

Board Name 

Total Estimated 
Liability 

Reserve 

Funds 

North Shore RCSSB 

1 971 240 

287 001 

Simcoe RCSSB 

0 

0 

Northumberland-Clarington B of E 

16 850 000 

1 181 381 

Stormont Dundas & Glengarry B of E 

15 595 913 

2 250 000 

Ottawa B of E 

43 140 515 

0 

Stormont Dundas & Glengarry RCSSB 

1 106 936 

0 

Ottawa RCSSB 

9 984 000 

0 

Sudbury B of E 

3 050 563 

4 084 439 

Ottawa-Carleton Cslf(c) 

0 

0 

Sudbury RCSSB 

1 113 000 

0 

Ottawa-Carleton Cslf(p) 

168 090 

0 

Timiskaming B of E 

4 163 600 

0 

Oxford B of E 

2 087 040 

0 

Timmins B of E 

606 953 

1 055 781 

Oxford RCSSB 

605 400 

0 

Timmins RCSSB 

2 500 000 

0 

Peel B of E 

19 000 000 

0 

Victoria B of E 

713 040 

0 

Perth B of E 

1 453 692 

0 

Waterloo B of E 

0 

13 112 795 

Peterborough B of E 

0 

2 384 163 

Waterloo RCSSB 

0 

0 

Peterborough et al RCSSB 

507 138 

507 138 

Welland RCSSB 

15 217 229 

989 286 

Prescott & Russell B of E 

1 945 619 

283 213 

Wellington B of E 

0 

0 

Prescott & Russell Cesc 

10 685 861 

0 

Wellington RCSSB 

0 

0 

Prescott & Russell RCSSB 

13 102 

55 000 

Wentworth B of E 

2 583 084 

2 657 100 

Prince Edward B of E 

719 107 

0 

West Parry Sound B of E 

0 

223 747 

Red Lake B of E 

0 

0 

Windsor B of E 

0 

0 

Renfrew B of E 

2 496 354 

2 160 182 

Windsor RCSSB 

26 011 000 

0 

Renfrew RCSSB 

392 487 

0 

York Region B of E 

0 

0 

Sault Ste Marie B of E 

Sault Ste Marie RCSSB 

17 705 551 

258 340 

2 942 241 

0 

York Region RCSSB 

13 429 000 

0 

Simcoe B of E 

256 779 

0 

Provincial Total 

914 113 341 

93 946 192 


Source: School boards' 1994 Financial Statements to Ministry of Education and Training 
Note: 

1 This table does not include isolate boards, section 68 boards, the Penetanguishene Protestant Separate board, or individual public school boards in Metropolitan 
Toronto (the umbrella Metropolitan Toronto School Board is included). 


Final Report 1996 












Appendix H: Sample Analysis, Central-Office 
Staffing: Supervisory Officers 

The following chart is a sample from the ministry's analysis that indicates current staffing levels for supervisory officers 
per 1,000 enrolment. The regression line indicates the provincial mean. 


117 



Final Report 1996 































118 [ 

Task Force Members 


John Sweeney (Chair) 

John Sweeney, from Kitchener, is chancellor of 
the University of St. Jerome's College. A former 
MPP, Mr. Sweeney served in the Ontario Cabinet 
as Minister of Municipal Affairs, Minister of 
Housing, and Minister of Community and Social 
Services. Before being elected as an MPP, he was 
the director of the Waterloo Region Roman 
Catholic Separate School Board. 

Duncan Green 

Duncan Green, who lives in Toronto, is an inde¬ 
pendent education consultant. He is a former 
director of the Toronto Board of Education and a 
former assistant deputy minister in the Ontario 
Ministry of Education. 

Dorothy M. Wight 

Dorothy Wight, a sheep farmer in Belle Vallee in 
the district of Timiskaming, has been a school 
board trustee in both southwestern Ontario with 
the Lambton County Board of Education, and in 
northeastern Ontario with the Timiskaming Board 
of Education. She is also a former director of the 
Ontario Public School Boards' Association, 
Northeastern Ontario region. Mrs. Wight is the 
1995 co-recipient of the Bernadine Yachman 
Award for contributions to education in Ontario. 


Jean-Louis Bourdeau 

Jean-Louis Bourdeau lives in North Bay. A former 
school business official, he also served as presi¬ 
dent of l'Association canadienne-frangaise de 
l'Ontario and executive director of l'Association 
frangaise des conseils scolaires de l'Ontario. Mr. 
Bourdeau chaired the Advisory Commission on 
French-Language Colleges, Northern Ontario and 
South/Central Ontario. Mr. Bourdeau resigned 
from the task force in the summer of 1995, for 
health reasons. 

Francine Morissette 

Francine Morissette replaced Mr. Bourdeau on 
the task force. Ms. Morissette is a former Ontario 
teacher, principal and school-board superinten¬ 
dent. She has also been a professor at the 
University of Ottawa faculty of education, an 
education officer with the Ontario Ministry of 
Education, and head of education outreach at 
TVOntario. In 1995, in recognition of meritorious 
service to education and international coopera¬ 
tion, Ms. Morissette was inducted as Knight in 
the Order of Academic Palms by the government 
of France. 


Final Report 1996 




LB/2831/.S93 
Sweeney, John 
Ontario school board 
reduction task eudb 

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MAR 1 2 1996 

FEB 26 1998 







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