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FINAL IDP REVIEW 2018/19 


• • 



PORT ST JOHNS 

• MUNICIPALITY • 

OUR HERITAGE, OUR PEOPLE 


PORT ST. JOHNS LM 
FINAL IDP 
2018/19 


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FINAL IDP REVIEW 2018/19 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

GLOSSARY OF TERMS v 

FOREWORD BY THE MAYOR 1 

FOREWORD BY ACTING MUNICIPAL MANAGER 3 

1 INTRODUCTION 7 

1.1 THE MUNICIPALITY AT GLANCE 9 

1.2 PSJ LM LOCALITY PLAN 10 

1.2.1 The Environment 10 

1.2.2 Population 11 

1.3 BASIS FOR THE IDP DEVELOPMENT 11 

1.3.1 IDP Assessment 12 

1.3.2 The Process Plan 13 

1.3.3 IDP Institutional Arrangements 13 

1.3.4 Roles And Responsibilities Of Stakeholders 15 

1.3.5 Public Participation 17 

1.4 THE IDP STRATEGIC APPROACH 17 

1.4.1 IDP Key Issues 18 

1.5 PORT ST. JOHNS STRATEGIC AGENDA 18 

1.5.1 Background Introduction 18 

1.5.2 Projects matrix 19 

1.5.3 Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP) 19 

1.5.4 Monitoring of the IDP through the Performance Management System20 

1.6 IMPLEMENTATION OF THE IDP 21 

1.6.1 Catalytic Projects 21 

1.7 SUMMARY OF BUDGET ALLOCATIONS FOR 2018/19 - 2020/21 26 

1.8 KEY MUNICIPAL REPORTS 27 

1.8.1 Annual Report 27 

1.8.2 Auditor General’s Report 27 

2.1 INTRODUCTION 30 

2.2 POLICY FRAMEWORK 30 

2.2.1 The Municipal Systems Act (32 of 2000) 30 

2.2.2 Sustanaible Development Goals 31 

2.2.3 The National Development Plan (VISION 2030) 32 

2.2.4 Government Outcomes 1 -14 33 

2.2.5 The National Infrastructure Plan 34 

2.2.6 National Spatial Development Framework 36 


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2.2.7 Regional industrial Development Strategy 37 

2.2.8 National Priorities (State of the Nation Address 2018) 37 

2.2.9 The Back To Basics Approach 40 

2.2.10 Integrated service delivery model: operation Masiphathisane and the 

establishment of War Rooms 42 

2.2.11 The Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act 46 

2.2.12 Provincial Priorities (State of the Province Address 201 8 ) 46 

2.2.13 Provincial Development Plan (PDP) (Vision 2030) 49 

2.2.14 Eastern Cape Provincial Economic Development Strategy (PEDS) Strategic 

Framework 51 

2.2.15 District Municipal IDP Framework 52 

3.1 DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE 55 

3.1.1 Population Distribution 55 

3.1.5 HIV and AIDS 58 

3.2 SPATIAL PLANNING 60 

3.2.1 Background 60 

3.2.2 Status Quo 60 

3.2.3 Spatial Planning And Land Use Management Act (SPLUMA) 62 

3.2.4 Human Settlements 64 

3.3 BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY 67 

3.3.1 Infrastructure Service Profile 67 

3.3.2 Infrastructure status quo 67 

3.3.3 Infrastructure Asset & Investment Plan 67 

3.3.5 Access To Water 72 

3.3.6 Access To Sanitation 77 

3.3.7 Access To Electricity And Energy Supply Sources 79 

3.3.8 Access To Telecommunication 81 

3.3.9 Roads & Storm Water 82 

3.3.10 Transportation 83 

3.3.11 Community Services 84 

3.3.12 Environmental Management Profile 94 

3.4.1 Overview Of Municipal Financial Viability 99 

3.4.2 Capability To Execute Capital Projects 99 

3.4.3 Free Basic Services Cost To The Municipality 101 

3.4.4 Financial Management By-Laws & Policies 102 

3.4.5 Financial Recovery Plan 105 

3.4.6 Supply Chain Management 105 

3.4.7 Infrastructure Assets 106 

3.4.8 Tariff schedule for 2018/2019 108 

3.4.9 Revenue Management 109 

3.4.10 Audit Outcomes, Audit Committee and Internal Audit 110 

3.4.11 Valuation Roll 111 

3.4.12 Budget Alignment 111 

3.4.13 Expenditure Management 111 


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3.4.14 Municipal Standard Charts Of Accounts (MSCOA) 112 

3.5.1 Economic Development Profile 115 

3.5.2 Policy & Planning Informants 115 

Key Focal Areas 119 

Overcoming constraints - moving forward 119 

3.5.4 Key Economic Sectors 146 

3.5.6 Natural capital 152 

3.6.1 Overview of Good Governance Issues 163 

3.6.2 Intergovernmental Relations 163 

3.6.3 Structures Created Within The Municipality 164 

3.6.4 Risk Management 170 

3.6.5 Fraud & Corruption Prevention Plan 172 

3.6.6 Communication Public Participation, Customer Care And Special Programmes 
172 

3.6.7 Petitions And Complaints Management 173 

3.6.8 General Good Governance 173 

3.7.1 Institutional Synopsis 175 

3.7.2 Functions And Powers 175 

3.7.4 Municipal Overview 176 

3.7.5 Organisational Structure/ Organogram 177 

3.7.6 Municipal Institutional Capacity And Status Of Critical Posts 179 

3.7.7 Pluman Resource Development 180 

3.7.8 Municipal Policies 181 

4.1 PLANNING THE FUTURE 186 

4.1.1 Introduction 186 

4.1.2 The Main KPAs 186 

4.1.3 Municipal Key Issues 186 

4.1.4 Municipal Vision 188 

4.1.5. Values 188 

4.1.6 Batho Pele Principles 189 

4.2 KPAs, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES 190 

4.2.1 Municipal Planning and Co-operative government 190 

4.2.2 Goals and Strategic objectives linked to National, Provincial outcomes191 

4.3 INSTITUTIONAL SCORECARD 197 

4.4 O.R. TAMBO DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY 225 

4.5 PROVINCIAL AND NATIONAL PROJECTS FROM OTHER SECTORS 227 

4.6 Municipal Needs Analysis-Unfunded projects 241 

5.1 INTRODUCTION 263 

5.1.2 Operating Budget 263 

5.1.3 Cash Flow Statement 265 

5.1.4 Alignment Of The Municipal Budget With The Municipal Goals And Objectives 
266 


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5.2 BUDGET IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 268 

6.1 SECTOR PLANS 299 

6.1.1 Introduction 299 

6.2 Spatial Development Framework 299 

6.3 PORT ST JOHN’S MASTER PLAN 303 

6.4 HOUSING SECTOR PLAN (HSP) 305 

6.5 LED STRATEGY 309 

6.6 PORT ST JOHN’S ENVIRONMENTAL PLAN 320 

ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE 332 

7.1 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK 337 

7.1.1 Overview 337 

Performance Management, IDP Monitoring and Evaluation 339 

7.1.2 MS Policies And Legislative Imperatives 340 

7.1.3 Nature of PMS 341 

Key Performance Area Model 343 

7.2 THE SERVICE DELIVERY AND BUDGET IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (SDBIP)343 

7.2.1 Introduction 343 

7.2.2 REPORTING ON THE SDBIP 345 

IDP APPROVAL 347 


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GLOSSARY OF TERMS 


AIDS Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 
ASGISA Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for 
South Africa 

AG Auditor General 

CBO Community Based Organization 

CPF Community Policing Forum 

CSIR Council for Scientific and Industrial Research 

DBSA Development Bank of South Africa 

DEAT Department of Tourism, Environment and 
Economic Affairs 

DFA Development Facilitation Act No 67 of 1995 
DRDLA Department of Rural Development & Land 
Affairs 

DEIS Department of Fluman Settlements 

DME Department of Mineral and Energy 

DoA Department of Agriculture & Agrarian 
Transformation 

DoE Department of Education 

DoH Department of Health 

DoSD Department of Social Development 

DoT Department of Transport 

COGTA Department of Cooperative Government & 
Traditional Affairs 

DPWRT Department of Public Works, Roads and 
Transport 

DSRAC Department of Sport, Recreation, Arts & 
Culture 

DWA Department of Water Affairs 

ECA Environmental Conservation Act 

EIA Environmental Impact Assessment 

ES Equitable Share (grant) 

FBS Free Basic Services 

ECDC Eastern Cape Development Corporation 
ECPGDS Eastern Cape Provincial Growth & 
Development Strategy 
EXCO Executive Committee 

GP Gross Geographic Product 

GIS Geographical Information System 

GVA Gross Value Added 


GAR Gravel Access Road 

HDI Fluman Development Index 

IDC Independent Development Corporation 

IDP Integrated Development Plan 

IDT Independent Development Trust 

IT Information Technology 

ITP Integrated Transportation Plan 

IWMP Integrated Waste Management Plan 

LDO Land Development Objectives 

LED Local Economic Development 

MEC Member of the Executive Committee 

MDG Millennium Development Goals 

MIG Municipal Infrastructure Grant 

MFMA Municipal Finance Management Act 

MM Municipal Manager 

MSIG Municipal Support & Institutional Grant 

MSA Municipal Systems Act, 2000 

MSA Municipal Structures Act, 1998 

NDC National Development Corporation 

NEMA National Environmental Management Act 

NER National Electrification Regulator 

NGO Non-Governmental Organizations 

NSS National Sanitation Strategy 

ORTRTO OR Tambo Regional Tourism Organisation 

ORTDM OR Tambo District Municipality 

PATA Promotion of Administrative Justice Act 

PMS Performance Management System 

PPP Public Private Partnership 

RDP Reconstruction and Development Programme 

REDs Regional Electricity Distributors 

RTP Responsible Tourism Planning 

SMME Small Medium and Micron Enterprises 

SOE State Owned Enterprises 

SADC Southern African Development Community 

SALGA South African Local Government Association 

SANDF South African National Defense Force 

SAPS South African Police Service 

SGB School Governing Body 

SMME Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises 


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VIP Ventilated Improved Pit (dry sanitation facility) 
WSDP Water Services Development Plan 
VAT Value Added Tax 


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FOREWORD BY THE MAYOR 


f The President of the Republic of South Africa has announced 2018 as the Nelson Mandela 
Centenary. In his announcement he highlighted all the important values that Nelson Mandela 
represented, encouraging each and every one of us to align with these values. The 2017/2018 
financial year has been quite a challenging year for the Municipality. As we accept the call by 
the President to honour and celebrate the legacy of Nelson Mandela, it becomes important, on behalf of the leadership 
and as the representatives of the masses that voted for us to be their voices, to acknowledge our flaws, applaud our 
achievements and commit to a better and more improved Port St. Johns. 


It is my privilege and pleasure to introduce our 2018/2019 Integrated Development Plan (IDP) Review. The Municipal 
Council would like to take this opportunity to thank our residents and stakeholders for their continued support and 
contribution, as we passionately work towards our vision of uplifting the people out of poverty through economic 
emancipation. In the past term Port St. Johns Municipality has worked tirelessly to maintain a credible IDP, that serves 
as a positive baseline in the development of the 2018/2019 IDP Review. It is our hope that the Municipality will 
continue putting more effort in maintaining this positive status which is ideal for all our stakeholders. IDP is a process 
that has become central to local government in driving delivery of basic services for Port St Johns communities. The 
IDP sets out core principles, mechanisms and processes that give meaning to developmental local government. It sets 
our progressive move towards social and economic upliftment of Port St Johns. 


The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Act 108 of 1996), Chapter 3 [section 40 (1)], stipulates that 
the three spheres of government (national, provincial and local spheres) are distinct, interdependent and interrelated. 
The IDP thus ensures that our municipal programs are well coordinated, aligned and integrated across the three 
spheres of government. Arising from the five-year IDP 2017/18 - 2021/2022, the municipality has undertaken a 
review of its strategic goals and objectives to guide the implementation of municipal programmes. These programmes 
are informed by the needs of communities gathered through public participation engagements. 


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Our Council has undertaken to review the IDP so that it reflects on the plans for the previous year and adapt to the 
prevailing conditions. The Municipality has developed a set of long term goals and five-year development objectives 
and priorities that will form the basis of its annual strategic planning and budgeting, implemented by the Municipality 
on an ongoing basis. With this first review, we want to adequately respond to our community dynamics, needs and 
aspirations through active engagements, accountability and reporting. 

In focusing on the service delivery priorities of the national governments i.e. reducing poverty, creation of decent work 
and sustainable livelihood; sustainable use and development of natural resources, education; health; fighting crime 
and corruption; and rural development, we have ensured that our IDP aligns with these national priorities, with special 
emphasis on the priorities that directly affect Port St Johns Municipality. As in our previous IDPs, we are again proud to 
announce that our IDP remains the strategic driver of both our budget and our performance management system. In 
this way, our strategy drives real development and civil society can measure us against targets that are based on 
strategic programmes for service delivery and infrastructure development as set out in this IDP. 

Having laid a solid platform for deepening community participation in our IDP, we are hopeful that, henceforth, our 
ward based planning process becomes the vehicle for entrenching participation in the IDP, in order to maximize co¬ 
ordination and synergy between priorities and Municipal programs. In addition, we wish to continue and extend our 
sectoral engagement with various departments such as health, education, social security and agriculture in the next 
four years. 

I encourage each and every resident of Port St Johns Municipality, business, community and non-governmental 
organization to take this opportunity to engage with us and provide feedback to us on our IDP and its implementation. 
For it is only with your commitment to working together with us that we can achieve our Municipal vision and bring 
about a Municipality that is efficient and meets all your expectations. 


Cllr. N. Mlombile-Cingo 
Mayor 


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_FINAL IDP REVIEW 2018/19_ 

FOREWORD BY ACTING MUNICIPAL MANAGER 

In compliance with the provisions of the Local Government Municipal Systems Act, the Municipality had successfully 
undertaken the review of the Integrated Development Plan for 2018/19 financial year. The review emanates from the 
adoption of the five-year IDP 2017/22. Being the fourth generation IDP, IDP 2017/22 laid a solid foundation aimed at 
improving internal controls, systems and procedures that will deliver the municipality to a clean administration by 
2022. The municipality continues making strides in terms of building a capable and capacitated municipality, seen from 
a shift from a disclaimer in 2014/15 to a qualification in 2015/16 and 2016/17. 

The 2018/2019 IDP Review is a culmination of the activities as contained in the IDP/ Budget/PMS Process Plan that 
was approved by the Council in August 2017. These activities include, amongst others, public participation in the 
planning process of the Municipality. The public participation process, as mandated by Chapter 4 of the Municipal 
Systems Act, is an integral part of the IDP development. Accordingly, a series of consultative sessions in a form of IGR 
Forums, IDP/Budget/PMS Representative Forums were held in which all stakeholders were invited to contribute to the 
development of the IDP. Over and above the above highlighted activities, the Draft IDP after it was approved by the 
Council was taken to the people to input on the document through a series of roadshows. 

We wish to acknowledge the support we have received from Eastern Cape Socio-Economic Consultative Council 
(ECSECC) in the development of this IDP and other institutions such as Stats SA and SALGA that have provided us with 
training and reliable information to ensure that we maintain a credible IDP. It is also important to note the strides that 
have been done by the municipality to ensure the credibility of information. In 2016/17 the municipality conducted a 
community survey, giving effect to the research component in the development of the IDP. This information has 
served as a reliable baseline during the situation analysis phase along the statistics received from Statistics South 
Africa. 

With the above in mind, the Municipality aligns to national and provincial policies. Chapter 2 of this document 
demonstrates how the Municipality aligns to the various policy initiatives. The IDP follows the prescribed template 
developed by Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) and the chapters are set as 
required by the IDP guidelines. The Municipality has also ensured that the Back to Basics policy is incorporated into the 

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IDP and also forms a part of the monthly report by the relevant managers and the leadership. The war rooms have 
also found an expression in the new IDP with a clear detail on the formation of the structure and the responsibilities. 

Having followed a very rigorous programme of consultation, both internally and externally, the 2018/19 IDP review is 
one which the community, politicians and staff of the Municipality can take ownership of and work together in ensuring 
that the vision, objectives, strategies and plans are implemented to the best of our ability as we move forward to 
ensure that indeed Port St. Johns Municipality is the destination of Choice. 


B. Mase 

Acting Municipal Manager 


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FINAL IDP REVIEW 2018/19 


MUNICIPAL LEADERSHIP 

In the second year of the current term of the current term of local government the following three office 
bearers have assumed leadership, this made us our municipality to be the second of the two only 
municipalities that these offices are led by females. 




Hon.Speaker 


Hon. Chief Whip 


Cllr. B. Nokhanda 


Cllr. C.S. Mazuza 


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FINAL IDP REVIEW 2018/19 


CHAPTER 1 

PORT ST. JOHNS AT A GLANCE 


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1 INTRODUCTION 

The Port St Johns Local Municipality (Area: 1291km 2 ) is a Category B municipality situated within the OR Tambo 
District on the coast of the Indian Ocean in the largely rural province of the Eastern Cape. It is bounded by Ingquza LM 
in the north-West and Nyandeni LM South-West. It is the smallest of the five municipalities in the district, making up 
11% of its geographical area. It comprises coastal and inland areas that fall under the jurisdiction of the former 
Transkei. The seat of the municipality is in the main town of Port St Johns, which is known for its beautiful beaches 
and mountainous terrain, with hills, cliffs and sandy dunes. The municipality's beautiful scenery, its natural vegetation 
and the pristine beaches referred to above are the main attractions for tourism. It has land for commercial use and an 
environmentally-friendly residential area. There are 1 053 types of plants and 164 plant families found around Port St 
Johns. This unique vegetation harbours rare bird species, providing evidence of the rich biodiversity in Port St Johns. 

The main City or Town in Port St Johns Local Municipality is Port St Johns and the main economic sectors are Tourism 
and agriculture. The Port St Johns Local Municipality is well known nationally for its beautiful scenary, natural 
vegetation and pristine beaches which are the main attraction for tourism. The figure 1.1 below shows the locality of 
PSJ LM within the OR Tambo District municipal. 


Figure 1.1: PSJ Geographic Location within the OR Tambo District Municipality. 



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FINAL IDP REVIEW 2018/19 


This document represents a 2018/19 IDP review for Port St Johns Municipality. It has been produced in fulfilment of 
the requirements of the Local Government Municipal Systems Act, 2000 (Act 32 of 2000). This IDP document covers a 
range of issues and programmes under the following titles: 

1. The Executive Summary 

2. Planning and development principles and Government policies and imperatives 

3. Situation Analysis 

a. Demographic Profile 

b. Spatial Planning 

c. Basic Service Delivery 

d. Financial Viability and Management 

e. Local Economic Development 

f. Good Governance and Public Participation 

g. Municipal Transformation and Institutional Development 

4. Planning for the Future 

a. Vision, Mission, Values 

b. Strategies and Objectives 

c. Project Priorities 

5. Municipal Budget 

6. Integration and Alignment 

a. Sector Plans 

b. Institutional Arrangements 

c. Performance Management Framework 

d. Service Delivery Budget and Implementation Plan (SDBIP) Framework 

7. Approval 


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1.1 THE MUNICIPALITY AT GLANCE 

The following table summarizes key municipal statistics, and a further detail is given on the situation analysis chapter 
under the demographic profile: 

Table 1.1 : Community survey 2016 and IHS Market Regional Explorer version 1156 


Total population 

168 000 

Number of households 

33 951 

Population growth rate 

1.3% 

Household size (average) 

4.9% 

Male Population 

46.2% 

Female Population 

53.8% 

Unemployment 

50.3 

Flush toilets connected to sewerage 

2.1% 

Weekly refuse removal (once a week) 

0.5% 

Piped water inside dwelling 

18.7% 

Energy for lighting (Electricity 

82.7% 


Source, ECSECC, 2016 

Figure 1.2: The figure below shows wards within our boundaries: 



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_FINAL IDP REVIEW 2018/19_ 

1.2 PSJ LM LOCALITY PLAN 

According to its environmental profile, PSJ municipality has a strong tourism industry, which is well-supported by a 
variety of hills, dunes, rivers, and the mountainous terrain that meet its picturesque beaches as highlighted above. In 
terms of settlement pattern, the municipal area is characterized by a predominantly scattered rural settlement pattern 
with approximately 130 communities/villages distributed over the municipal area of 1 301 km 2 at an average density 
of 126 persons/ km 2 . Nearly 90% of all the dwellings in the municipality are located in traditional tribal settlements. 
The municipality is by and large a rural municipality with 20 wards spreading all over approximately 130 rural villages 
which are supported by a Small Urban Centre of Port St Johns (ward 6). 

1.2.1 The Environment 

Port St Johns Local Municipality (PSJLM) is located in the north-eastern portion of the Eastern Cape Province, in the 
former homeland of Transkei. The western and north-western boundary is formed partly by the Mzintlava River and 
Ingquza Hill Municipality, whilst Indian Ocean is to the south and south-eastern. The Mnenu River and Nyandeni 
Municipality area make up the western boundary. It has one town on the mouth of Umzimvubu River, Port St Johns, 
which is approximately 90km from Mthatha. Port St. Johns is known for its rich cultural resource base and its green 
natural environment. This requires the leadership to come up with innovative strategies to sustain this natural wealth 
of this region taking into consideration the social and environmental health of the residents. Another emerging factor 
that has caught the attention of the leadership is the climate change. With this emergence, there is a consensus to 
focus strategies on climate change, paying particular attention to mitigation factors as well as looking at adaptation 
strategies. This will reduce communities' susceptibility to climate change. 


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1.2.2 Population 

A review of the anticipated growth rates for the next 5 years, 2017 - 2021 is provided below. The basis of these 
projections is derived from the historical growth rates experienced in the municipality between the 2001 and 2011 
Census. When looking at the population projection of Port St Johns Local Municipality shows an estimated average 
annual growth rate of 1.1% between 2016 and 2021. The average annual growth rate in the population over the 
projection period for O.R.Tambo District Municipality, Eastern Cape Province and South Africa is 1.1%, 1.0% and 1.4% 
respectively. The Eastern Cape Province is estimated to have an average growth rate of 1.0% which is very similar 
than that of the Port St Johns Local Municipality. South Africa as a whole is estimated to have an average annual 
growth rate of 1.4% which is very similar than that of Port St Johns' projected growth rate. 


Table 1.2: Population Projections 


Year 

Port St 

Johns 

O.R.Tambo 

Eastern 

Cape 

National 

Total 

Port St Johns as 

% of district 

municipality 

Port St 

Johns as % 

of province 

Port St 

Johns as % 

of national 

2016 

168,000 

1,470,000 

7,010,000 

55,700,000 

11.4% 

2.4% 

0.30% 

2017 

170,000 

1,490,000 

7,080,000 

56,500,000 

11.4% 

2.4% 

0.30% 

2018 

172,000 

1,510,000 

7,160,000 

57,400,000 

11.4% 

2.4% 

0.30% 

2019 

173,000 

1,520,000 

7,240,000 

58,100,000 

11.4% 

2.4% 

0.30% 

2020 

175,000 

1,540,000 

7,310,000 

58,900,000 

11.4% 

2.4% 

0.30% 

2021 

177,000 

1,550,000 

7,380,000 

59,600,000 

11.4% 

2.4% 

0.30% 

Average Annual growth 

2016-2021 

1 . 05 % 

1 . 08 % 

1 . 05 % 

1 . 37 % 





Source: IHS Market Regional Explorer version 1156 

1.3 BASIS FOR THE IDP DEVELOPMENT 


In 2016 the municipality took a decision to develop a new IDP for its new term, that being necessitated by a number of 
circumstances that warrant the changes and inclusion in the IDP. The development of the IDP was a response to the 
legal requirement in particular the Local Government Municipal Systems Act 32 of 2000 Section 25 under "Adoption of 
Integrated Development Plans". For 2018/19 the Municipality had undertaken a review as guided by the provisions of 
the same Act. 


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1.3.1 IDP Assessment 

After the adoption of IDP 2017/18, a copy was submitted to the Department of COGTA for assessment. The 
assessment was conducted in 2017 by MEC's panel, assessing each Key Performance Area. The municipality obtained 
an overall high rating, which indicates the credibility of the IDP, with each Key Performance Area rated high. 


Table 1.3: MEC's Comments 


No. 

KEY 

PERFORMANCE 

AREA 

MEC's COMMENTS 

PROGRESS TO DATE 

1 

Spatial Planning 

SDF not developed according 

to the SDF guidelines 

The Municipality will be undertaking the review of 

the SDF in 2018/19 and that project forms part of 

the 2018/19 IDP review. 

The master plan must be 

incorporated in the SDF 

The incorporation of Master plan will be done 

during the SDF review, which will start in July 

2018. 

The draft land audit report 

should be taken to Council for 

adoption 

The Municipality is working towards the adoption 

of the Land Audit Report within 2018/19. 

2 

Basic Services 

Delivery and 

Infrastructure 

PRAMS is not reflected on the 

IDP 

This has been incorporated during the 2018/19 

IDP review 

Municipality did not reflect on 

planned and budgeted for 

non-motorized facilities 

This will be undertaken during 2018/19. 

The Municipality has not 

reflected on the IWMP 

A Reflection has been made on Chapter 6 of the 

IDP under sector plan 

No indication of waste related 

by-laws 

This will be undertaken during 2018/19. 

No indication of existence of 

Trade effluent Policy, 

Integrated Community Plan 

This will be finalised before the end of 2019/20. 

Sources of alternative energy 

not reflected or explored 

This will be finalised before the end of 2019/20. 

The Municipality does not 

have a Disaster Management 

Plan 

This will be finalised before the end of 2019/20. 

3 

Financial viability and 

Management 

The municipality must reflect 

on the valuation roll in the IDP 

This will be undertaken during 2018/19. 


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MUNICIPALITY 

KPA2 BSD 

KPA 3 FVM 

KPA 4 LED 

KPA 5 GG&PP 

KPA 6MTID 

OVERAL RATING 

PORT ST. JOHNS 

HIGH 

HIGH 

HIGH 

HIGH 

HIGH 

HIGH 


Source, MEC, EC COGTA (2017). 

1.3.2 The Process Plan 


Port St. Johns Municipality prepared and adopted a Process Plan for the development of IDP 2018/19 on the 30 August 
2017 in terms of Section 28 (1) of the Municipal Systems Act (2000) which aligns the IDP, Performance Management 
System (PMS), and the budget preparation process. However the due to the delays encountered during 
implementation of the approved plan, the Council in its special meeting of the 28 February 2018 adopted a revised 
schedule. The process plan ensures alignment between the preparation processes for the budget, the IDP, and the 
Performance Management System (PMS). One of the main achievements of this IDP development is the greater 
alignment between the budget, the IDP, and the PMS. It also aims to guide the planning process and the entire 
development of the IDP, which will include the following: 

• A programme specifying timeframes for the different planning phases; 

• Appropriate mechanisms, processes and procedures for consultation with local communities, organs of state, 
traditional authorities, and other stakeholders in the IDP process; and 

• The identification of all plans and planning requirements binding on the Municipality in terms of provincial and 
national legislation 


1.3.3 IDP Institutional Arrangements 

The table below shows the IDP structural arrangements: 


Table 1.4: IDP Structures 


Structure 

Members of the structure 

Terms of Reference 

IDP/PMS and 

Budget 

technical 

Steering 

Committee 

Chair: Municipal Manager 

Secretariat: Secretaries to the 

MM and the Chief Financial 

Officer 

Composition: Top 

Management and Strategic 

Manager 

Provide ToR for the various planning activities 

Commission research studies 

Considers and comments on : 

Inputs from sub-committees, study teams and service 

providers/advisors 

Inputs from provincial sector departments and support providers 

Processes, summaries and documents output 


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Structure 

Members of the structure 

Terms of Reference 


Adhoc representation: 

Makes content change recommendations 


Executive Committee 

members 

Prepares, facilitates and documents meetings 

IDP/PMS and 

Chair: Mayor 

Considers and comments on : 

Budget 

Secretariat: Secretary to the 

Inputs from the Technical committee 

Political 

Mayor or Council 

Makes recommendations to the Council 

Steering 

Composition: Troika, Executive 


Committee 

Committee, Top Management 


Finance Sub- 

Chair: Chief Financial Officer 

Prepares an action plan linked to the IDP process plan for the 

committee 

Secretariat: Chief Accountant 

development of the annual budget 


Composition : Top 

Reviews the previous and current year budget and sets basis for 


Management 

the next budget 


Adhoc representation- 

Ensures that the budget is aligned to the IDP 


Members of the Financial 

Reviews the revenues sources of the municipality and proposes 


Services Standing Committee 

options for financing of the budget 

Responsible for allocating self-generated revenues to the 

municipal departments based on a predetermined formula. 

IDP and 

Chair: Mayor 

The IDP Representative Forum shall: 

Budget 

Secretariat: Secretaries to the 

Represent the interests of their constituents in the IDP processes 

Representative 

Mayor and Council 

Provide an organizational mechanism for discussion, negotiation 

Forum 

Composition: 

and decision making between the stakeholders including the 


Government: 

municipal government 


Executive Committee 

Ensure communication between all stakeholder representatives 


All councilors 

including the municipal government 


Ward Committees and CDWs 

Monitor the performance of the planning and implementation 


Top Management 

processes. 


Regional / District Managers 

Participate in the process of setting up and monitoring "key 


provincial 

performance indicators" in line with the Performance Management 


Public: 

Stakeholder Representatives of 

organized groups 

Community Representatives 

(based on advert) 

Advocates for unorganized 

groups 

Manual. 


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Structure 

Members of the structure 

Terms of Reference 

Manager 


Responsible for the preparation of the Process Plan in line with the 

IDP/Strategic 


District Framework Plan. 

Manager 


Responsible for the day to day management of the planning 

process under consideration of time, resources and people, 

ensuring: 

Involvement of all different role players, especially officials, 

That the timeframes are being adhered to , 

That the planning process is horizontally and vertically aligned and 

complies with national and provincial requirements. 

That outcome is being documented. 

Secretariat to Steering Committee and Representative Forum and 

Management of service providers 

Chief Financial 


Convenes the finance sub committee 

Officer 


Responsible for the day to day management of the budgeting 

process 

Responsible for researching for grants/donations earmarked for 

the Port St. Johns Municipality to sensitize HODs to develop 

business plans 

Ensure that timeframes relating to the budgeting process are 

being met 


1.3.4 Roles And Responsibilities Of Stakeholders 

The IDP planning process includes a wide range of role-players. The following table drawn from our adopted process 
plan identifies key role players and their envisaged responsibilities. 


Table 1.5: IDP Roles and responsibilities 


Actors 

Roles and Responsibilities 

Executive Committee 

• Recommend the Process Plan to Council 

• Overall management, coordination and monitoring of process and drafting of IDP 

• Approve nominated persons to be in charge of the different roles, activities and 

responsibilities 

• Overall management and coordination of planning process 

• Public participation 

• Ensure the annual business plan, budget and land use management decision are 

linked to and based on the IDP 

Municipal Council 

• Political decision making body 

• Consider, adopt and approve process plan and IDP 

• Ensure the annual business plans, budget and use management decision are linked to 


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Actors 

Roles and Responsibilities 


and based on the IDP. Adjust in accordance with the comments of the MEC for Local 

Government. 

O.R. Tambo DM 

• Prepare a framework plan 

Ward Councilors, 

Ward Committees, 

Traditional Leaders 

and CDWs 

• Major link between municipality, government and residents 

• Link the planning process to their wards or constituencies 

• Organizing public consultation and participation 

• Participation of the ward committees in the IDP Representative Forum 

Municipal Manager/ 

IDP Manager 

• Prepare the Process Plan 

• Undertake the overall management and co-ordination of the planning process 

• Ensure that all relevant actors are appropriately involved 

• Nominate persons in charge of different roles 

• Be responsible for the day-to-day management of the drafting process 

• Ensure that the planning process is participatory, strategic and implementation 

orientated and is aligned with and satisfies sector planning requirements 

• Respond to comments on the draft IDP from the public, horizontal alignment and 

other spheres of government to the satisfaction of the municipal council. 

• Ensure proper documentation of the results of the planning of the IDP document, and 

• Adjust the IDP in accordance with the MEC for local Government's proposals 

• The Municipal Manager may delegate some of these functions to an IDP Manager 

Municipal and 

Government Officials 

• Provide relevant technical, sector and financial information for analysis for 

determining priority issues 

• Contribute technical expertise in the consideration and finalization of strategies and 

identification of projects 

• Provide departmental operational and capital budgetary information 

• Be responsible for the preparation of project proposals, the integration of projects 

and sector programmes, and 

• Be responsible for preparing amendments to the draft IDP for submission to the 

municipal council for approval and the MEC for Local Government for alignment 

• Charged with the responsibility of preparing business plan for different programmes 

and projects 

Community at Large 

• Represent interests, contribute knowledge and ideas (Representative forum) 

• Inform interests groups, communities and organizations. 

• Analyze issues, determine priorities, negotiate and reach consensus 

• Participate in designing project proposals 

• Discuss and comment on the draft IDP 

• Monitor performance in implementation 

• Conduct meetings with groups, communities etc. to prepare for the follow-up on 

relevant planning activities. 


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1.3.5 Public Participation 

Various forms of public engagements have been held in this financial year to ensure public involvement in the 
development of the IDP. This process has further been bolstered by the District Municipality, sector departments as 
well as the NGOs and private sectors. In terms of the Municipal Systems Act the Plan is further advertised for public 
comment before the final submission in May this year. 

Below are some of public participation mechanisms that have been used and that will be used by Port St. Johns 
Municipality in adhering to the provisions of the Municipal System Act: 

• Use of IDP Representative Forum to verify data & add additional data 

• Use of Councilors and Traditional leaders to call meetings to keep communities informed on the IDP progress 
(including CDWs and Ward Committees) 

• Published annual reports on municipal progress 

• Newspaper advertisement to inform communities of the progress 

• Making the IDP document available for public comments 

• Outreaches by Port St. Johns Municipality to communities and stakeholders 

1.4 THE IDP STRATEGIC APPROACH 

This IDP development sees a fundamental shift from the previous information- laden and cumbersomely formatted 
IDPs, to a more user-friendly and strategic document. Detailed information is, however, available to users of this IDP. 

The IDP strategies have been aligned to the following National, Provincial, and District Level initiatives: 

(i) SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS 

(ii) NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN (VISION 2030) 

(iii) GOVERNMENT OUTCOMES 

(iv) NATIONAL PRIORITIES (STATE OF THE NATION ADDRESS 2018) 

(v) BACK TO BASICS 

(vi) PROVINCIAL PRIORITIES (STATE OF THE PROVINCE ADDRESS 2018) 


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(vii) PROVINCIAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 
(viii) PROVINCIAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

1.4.1 IDP Key Issues 

The following highlights the main KPAs: 

• Spatial planning 

• Basic Service Delivery 

• Financial Viability and Management 

• Local Economic Development 

• Good Governance and Public Participation 

• Municipal Transformation and Institutional Development 


1.5 PORT ST. JOHNS STRATEGIC AGENDA 
1.5.1 Background Introduction 

The PSJ municipality at its review of IDP 2016/2017 and development of IDP 2017/22 evolved a multi-prong approach 
that lays foundation for launching a multi-year strategy that asserts PSJ to become the New Eastern Cape's Tourism 
Epicenter. The same approach has been used during the review of IDP 2018/19. Methodically this approach is 
premised on identifying strategy leader projects that gears PSJ to being a "Destination of Choice". These Strategy 
Leader Projects are in either new productive investment, addressing basic needs, being remedial replacement 
investments and or crisis responsive. The success of these Strategy Leader Projects is based on them being supported 
by Strategy Supporter Projects, meeting operational requirements, and rigorously addressing community needs. 


The PSJ development agenda is heightened and given momentum by the entire national and provincial government 
mega investments projects within the OR Tambo District namely: 

• N2 Wild Coast 

• Umzimvubu 

• Wild Coast SEZ 

• Agri-Parks & Hubs 

• Oceans Economy 
o Aquaculture 

o Marine / Coastal Tourism 


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o Maritime economy 

• ICT Broadband 

Further, the PSJ Strategic Agenda will be conducted within the context of development of long term vision for the 
entire region of OR Tambo, PSJ and the Integrated Wild Coast Development work, in which PSJ seeks to be a key 
anchor of a couple of development niches that stupa tourism in the eastern part of the Eastern Cape. The long term 
vision and plan for both PSJ and OR Tambo District shall seek to integrate the national, provincial and all sector 
programmes and projects within its space including allowing its Spatial Development Framework to be influenced by 
these mega investment projects. 

1.5.2 Projects matrix 

The matrix below summarizes the various projects from the five clusters of the municipality viz. Basic services; 
Institutional development and transformation; Good Governance; Financial Viability; and Local Economic Development; 
and places them in accordance to their relative relevant quadrants. The following catalytic projects were endorsed by 
Port. St. Johns Council and will feature in Port St. Johns' IDP until their implementation. These projects include: 

• Small Flarbour 

• Waterfront 

• Shopping complex 

• Office precinct 

• Golf Course development 

1.5.3 Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP) 

The SDBIP has been operational for several years. Previously through its implementation, the Auditor General noted 
the following concerns: 

• The alignment between budget, the IDP, and the SDBIP has been problematic; 

• Key performance indicators are not Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Time- based (SMART); 

• The reported actual performance does not always match the targets set; and 

• Inadequate evidence submitted by officials to justify reported performance. 


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Taking cognizance of the above, the Office of the Municipal Manager has embarked upon a project to ensure that the 
content of the SDBIP is 'SMART', and that better alignment exists between the IDP, Budget, and SDBIP. Major strides 
are being made towards improvement in this regard. With the approval of the Performance Management System 
(PMS) in 2014, Council has embarked upon the process of cascading performance managements from the Municipal 
Manager and Senior Managers to recently the middle managers. With the signing of the performance agreement, it 
becomes mandatory to keep a Portfolio of Evidence, so as to enhance performance reporting at all levels. The plan is 
to cascade Performance Management to the lowest level by 2022 and accordingly an introductory workshop was held 
for all levels including the Council in 2016 and 2017. 


1.5.4 Monitoring of the IDP through the Performance Management System 

Port St. Johns Municipality has an approved Performance Management policy, which serve as the guideline document 
for the implementation of the Performance Management System (PMS) within the Municipality. The implementation of 
performance management is guided by various legislative prescripts and requirements. The PMS Policy is inclusive of 
the following interrelated processes: 

(i) Planning; 

(ii) Implementation; 

(iii) Monitoring; 

(iv) Evaluation 

Port St. Johns Municipality's PMS is the primary mechanism to monitor, review and improve the implementation of its 
IDP and to gauge the progress made in achieving the objectives set out in the IDP. In addition, the Municipality's PMS 
facilitates increased accountability, learning, improvement, as well as providing early warning signals to facilitate 
decision-making. The PMS monitors actual performance against set targets and contractual obligations. Effective 
service delivery relies upon the IDP, efficient utilization of all resources and the PMS being closely integrated across all 
functions at an organizational and individual level. The most valuable reason for measuring performance is that what 
gets measured gets done. Once performance planning and the IDP have been completed and departmental SDBIP's 
are in place, they need to be implemented by executing the work in accordance with these plans. As the work is 


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executed, it needs to be continuously monitored and periodically measured and reported on. Reporting requires that 
the Municipality takes the priorities of the organization, its performance objectives, indicators, targets, measurements, 
and analysis, and present this information in a simple and accessible format, relevant and useful to the specific target 
group, whilst meeting the legal prescripts for reporting. 

1.6 IMPLEMENTATION OF THE IDP 
1.6.1 Catalytic Projects 

A catalyst is described as something that 'precipitates an event' or something that causes change. Catalytic projects 
speed-up realization of the municipal strategies leading to community needs being met, and facilitates speedier 
realization of the Vision. The Municipality has identified a number of projects that seek to stimulate change and 
development in the Municipality. It must, however, be noted that these projects are being implemented by delivery 
agents other than the Municipality. In this regard, the Municipality will be playing facilitation and enabling role. 


The following catalytic projects that are aimed at revitalizing the economy and growth trajectory for the Port St. Johns 
Municipality: 

Table 1.6: Catalytic Projects 


PROJECT 

DESCRIPTION 

PARTNERS 

PROGRESS 

PSJ Sewer Project 

Medium term development 

aimed at improving sanitation 

in the Municipal area 

Port St. Johns 

Municipality 

O.R. Tambo District 

Municipality 

A council resolution was taken 

and a series of consultation has 

been held on the matter. 

Environmental authorization has 

been issued, which specifies a site 

N2 Wild Coast 

Medium to long term 

development aimed at 

upgrading the roads 

infrastructure for major 

anticipated economic spin offs 

Port St. Johns 

Municipality 

SANRAL 

The development is on tender 

awarding stage 


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PROJECT 

DESCRIPTION 

PARTNERS 

PROGRESS 

Shopping Mall 

Medium term development 

aimed at developing the town 


Consultation stage to source a 

funder. Public engagements have 

been initiated to negotiate for the 

closure of the public facility. 

Office Precinct 

This is a medium term 

Port St. Johns 

Engagements have been made 


development which will see the 

development of offices to cater 

for the government institutions 

in Port St Johns 

Public Works 

with Public Works and further 

consultations are being made to 

solicit an investor 

Waterfront 

This is a medium term 

Department of 

Engagements, planning and more 

Development 

development which will see the 

Environmental Affairs 

consultations continue to unfold. 


development of the first beach 

Port St. Johns 

Feasibility study has been done 


as one of tourist attractions 

Municipality 

and completed. 

Airstrip upgrade 

This is a medium- term project 

Port St. Johns 

The proposal was submitted to 


that will see the upgrade of the 

Municipality 

the municipality and was 


existing 

Department of 

welcomed. 


Runway and terminal aviation 

Transport 

Engagements are underway; this 


facilities. This will allow for 

airplanes to make use of the 

airstrip, when diverting from 

Mthatha 

Caguba Community 

includes a visit of the Airstrip for 

proper planning. More 

engagements are still to unfold 

Draft MOU in place, Budget 

consultations are underway 

Fruit cluster 

development 

This is a short tern 

PSJ DA 

Land has been identified and the 


development aimed at 

DRDAR 

Feasibility study has been 


unleashing Port St. Johns 

DEDEAT 

completed 


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PROJECT 

DESCRIPTION 

PARTNERS 

PROGRESS 


agricultural potential, investing 




in fruit production 



Oceans Economy 

Maritime resource centre 

DOT 

Concept Document has been 

Development: 

• Maritime 

Medium to Long term 


presented and 

Resource 

development responding to the 


Potential sites have identified 

centre 

• Fish Factory 

oceans economy agenda 



• Harbour 

Fish Factory 

DPW, DAFF, Troyan 

A private partner has been 

• Aquaculture 

development 

Medium to Long term 

Foods, CPA 

identified, engagements are 


development responding to the 


underway 


oceans economy agenda 




Harbour 

Port St. Johns 

Feasibility study is underway 


Long term development 

Municipality 



responding to the oceans 

Public Works, PUBLIC 



economy agenda 

WORKS, DOT, SAMSA 



Aquaculture development 

DAFF, DEDEAT,NMMU, 

Feasibility study is underway 


Medium to Long term 

ECDC 



development responding to the 




oceans economy agenda 



ICT Broadband 

This is a medium term 

Port St. Johns 

Business case for Phase 1 


development for improving the 

Municipality 

developed and approved to 


connection and network 

O.R. Tambo District 

connect 5803 sites. 


systems in the entire Port St. 

Municipality 



Johns region 

Department of 

During SONA 2016, the President 



Telecommunications 

confirmed that funding to the 




tune of R740m over a three-year 




period has been allocated. EC 




Provincial Broadband coordinating 


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PROJECT 

DESCRIPTION 

PARTNERS 

PROGRESS 




structures have been established. 

Feasibility study will be 

undertaken following a series of 

consultations at Port. St. Johns 

Street and High 

mast Project 

This is a medium term 

development aimed at 

improving the face of the town 

whilst contributing towards 

crime reduction 

Port St. Johns 

Municipality 

DEDEAT 

DEDEAT has committed in 

funding the project. 

Marble/Travertine 

Mining 

Mining of the stone is a short to 

medium term development 

aimed at organizing and 

maximizing the mining 

potential of stone in the region 

The Development 

Agency is still looking 

for a funder 

Partnership is still being discussed 

with ECDC for prospecting 

Small Town 

Short to a long term 

Port St. Johns 

• Roadshows introducing the 

Revitalization 

development aimed at 

infrastructure economic 

transformation 

Municipality 

Office of the Premier 

Programme to the Local 

Beneficiary Municipalities 

have been concluded. 

• Business Plans, Cessions, 

MoA's and PSC ToR are 

signed 

• PSC's and LSC's have been 

established and are meeting 

regularly 

• Gazetted funds for the 2017 

MTEF has been 

communicated to the 

Municipality 

• Business plans have been 

developed and submitted 

• Appointments have been 

done 


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PROJECT 

DESCRIPTION 

PARTNERS 

PROGRESS 

Agri Parks 

Agri-Parks are aimed at 

DRDAR 

• Port St. Johns identified as an 


creating an enabling 

DRDLR 

FPSU Site 


environment for economic 

PSJLM 



development and job creation, 

ORTDM 



with a focus on value chains for 




dominant products in a short to 




medium term 




Source: PSJ Municipality 


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1.7 SUMMARY OF BUDGET ALLOCATIONS FOR 2018/19 - 2020/21 


The table below summarizes the MTREF: 

Table 1.7: 2018/19 - 2020/21 Medium Term Revenue & Expenditure Framework 


FINAL ANNUAL BUDGET 2018/19 - 2020/21 MEDIUM TERM REVENUE & EXPENDITURE FRAMEWORK 


2018/19 

2019/20 

2020/21 

Revenue per Department 




MUNICIPAL COUNCIL 

12,455,746.26 

13,725,098.29 

14,783,197.55 

MAYOR'S OFFICE 

3,120,951.15 

3,439,004.01 

3,704,124.70 

OFFICE OF THE SPEAKER 

6,514,931.57 

7,178,861.41 

7,732,296.27 

MUNICIPAL MANAGER'S OFFICE 

9,744,878.59 

10,737,968.94 

11,565,783.56 

BUDGET AND TREASURY OFFICE 

47,794,319.43 

51,242,293.23 

54,544,731.29 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 

13,313,325.09 

14,391,082.60 

15,459,358.67 

CORPORATE SERVICES 

6,039,018.89 

6,654,448.97 

7,167,455.68 

LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

8,849,169.93 

9,750,979.55 

10,502,704.89 

INFRASTRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 

153,624,899.10 

153,022,791.48 

147,642,975.34 


Total Revenue 

261,457,240.00 

270,142,528.48 

273,102,627.96 


Operating Expenditure per Department 




MUNICIPAL COUNCIL 

16,787,747.48 

17,947,934.91 

19,189,591.81 

MAYOR'S OFFICE 

5,647,584.31 

5,970,490.62 

6,312,091.44 

OFFICE OF THE SPEAKER 

12,528,753.66 

12,905,925.08 

17,121,454.55 

MUNICIPAL MANAGER'S OFFICE 

22,296,776.94 

23,598,991.33 

24,979,429.61 

BUDGET AND TREASURY OFFICE 

24,940,205.52 

26,291,696.21 

31,817,706.32 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 

24,826,382.34 

26,359,034.40 

28,194,809.64 

CORPORATE SERVICES 

14,210,851.12 

15,132,134.23 

16,114,717.44 

LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

18,061,704.91 

19,135,856.39 

20,275,795.54 

INFRASTRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 

28,422,781.71 

30,194,699.80 

34,232,917.84 





Total Operating Expenditure 

167,722,788.00 

177,536,762.97 

198,238,514.19 


SURPLUS/ (DEFICIT) 


8,614,762.00 

1,651,678.08 

TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE 

93,734,452.00 

83,991,003.50 

73,212,435.69 


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1.8 KEY MUNICIPAL REPORTS 

1.8.1 Annual Report 

Every municipality and municipal entity must prepare an annual report for each financial year, in accordance with the 
Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA). The purpose of the annual report is: 

• To provide a record of the activities of the municipality or entity; 

• To provide a report on performance in service delivery and budget implementation; and 

• To promote accountability to the local community. 

In the past, annual reports have often been used solely to promote the positive image of municipalities, with little focus 
on comparing actual with promised performance. The MFMA now requires the Municipality to report on all aspects of 
performance, providing a true, honest, and accurate account of the goals set by council and the success or otherwise 
in achieving these goals. The annual report is a key performance report to the community and other stakeholders, and, 
once approved by the council, must be placed on the municipal website, with copies sent to various authorities and 
made available to the wider community. Port St Johns Municipality has prepared an Annual Report which complies with 
the MFMA requirements. The Annual Report has been submitted to the MPAC and has been noted by this committee 
for consideration of Council's next sitting. 

1.8.2 Auditor General's Report 

The report of the Auditor-General dated 19 December 2017 on the Audit of the Accounts of the Council for the financial 
year ended 30 June 2017, has been received. The Auditor-General performed an audit and issued a report on the 
following: 

• Fair presentation and absence of material misstatements in the financial statements (i.e. all transactions or 
event have been dealt with in accordance with accounting and financial reporting disciplines); 

• Reliable, usefulness and credible performance information for purposes of reporting on predetermined 
performance objectives; and 


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• Compliance with key legislation governing financial and performance matters 
The Auditor-General has expressed a qualified opinion on the Annual Financial Statement for year ending 30 June 2017 
and Performance Information. The basis for the qualified opinion has been accounted to Irregular and unauthorized 
expenditure. The municipality is working tirelessly on the above matters which formed basis of the qualified opinion. 
An Action plan has been drawn and will be monitored on a monthly basis by the structures of Council to deal with the 
findings at a detail. It must however, be mentioned that there are still weaknesses as highlighted in the management 
report issued by Auditor General which are being worked on tirelessly in order to obtain an unqualified audit opinion. 
Issues raised by Auditor General to rescue the situation have been accepted and we will work in conjunction with AG to 
improve the situation. 


Table 1.8: Audit Outcome 


Financial year 

2012/13 

2013/14 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

OUTCOME 

Qualified 

Qualified 

Disclaimer 

Qualified 

Qualified 


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CHAPTER 2 
PLANNING AND 
DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES, 
GOVERNMENT POLICIES 
AND IMPERATIVES 


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2.1 INTRODUCTION 

This section identifies key Planning and Development Principles that guide the IDP and planning decision-making in the 
Municipality. Also included in this section is a summary of the applicable government priorities and policies guiding 
organs of state and Port St. Johns Municipality. 

2.2 POLICY FRAMEWORK 

2.2.1 The Municipal Systems Act (32 of 2000) 

The Municipal Systems Act (MSA) is the key piece of legislation guiding the preparation of IDPs. Section 26 of the act 
compels all municipalities to prepare IDPs as their primary and overriding management tool. Section 26 also lists key 
components that an IDP must reflect which are summarized as follows: 

• The Council's Vision for the long-term development of the Municipality; 

• An assessment of the existing level of development within the Municipality, including the identification of 
communities without access to basic municipal services; 

• Council's development priorities and objectives, inclusive of its local economic development aims, as well as the 
internal transformation needs; 

• Council's development strategies, which must be aligned with any national or provincial plans and planning 
requirements binding on the Municipality in terms of legislation; 

• A municipal Spatial Development Framework (SDF), which must include the provision of basic guidelines for the 
Land Use Management System (LUMS) of the Municipality; and 

• Key Performance Indicators and targets determined through an organizational performance system, based on the 
priorities identified in the IDP 

The development of this IDP document has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the MSA as well as 
with the Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations (R796 of 2001). 


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2.2.2 Sustanaible Development Goals 

At the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit on 25th September 2015, world leaders adopted the 2030 
Agenda for Sustainable Development, which includes a set of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to end 
poverty, fight inequality and injustice, and tackle climate change by 2030. The Sustainable Development Goals 
therefore, build on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); eight anti-poverty targets that the world committed to 
achieving by 2015. The MDGs, adopted in 2000, aimed at an array of issues that included slashing poverty, hunger, 
disease, gender inequality, and access to water and sanitation. Enormous progress has been made on the MDGs, 
showing the value of a unifying agenda underpinned by goals and targets. Despite this success, the indignity of poverty 
has not been ended for all. The new SDGs, and the broader sustainability agenda, go much further than the MDGs, 
addressing the root causes of poverty and the universal need for development that works for all people. The 
Sustainable Development Goals are summarized as follows: 

Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere. 

Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture. 

Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages. 

Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. 

Goal 5 Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls. 

Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all. 

Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. 

Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent 
work for all. 

Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation. 

Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries. 

Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable. 

Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns. 

Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts. 

Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development. 


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Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat 
desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss. 

Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and 
build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. 

Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development. 

Figure 2.1: Alignment between SDF Principles and SDG's 



2.2.3 The National Development Plan (VISION 2030) 

The National Development Plan (NDP) was prepared by the National Planning Commission (NPC), a structure that was 
appointed by President Jacob Zuma in May 2010. The NDP aims to eliminate poverty and reduce inequality by 2030. It 
indicates that South Africa can realize these goals by drawing on the energies of its people, growing an inclusive 
economy, building capabilities, enhancing the capacity of the state, and promoting leadership and partnerships 
throughout society. In addressing the concerns that underlay the development of NDP, the document sets out six 
interlinked priorities, namely: 

Uniting all South Africans around a common programme to achieve prosperity and equity; 

Promoting active citizenry to strengthen development, democracy, and accountability; 

• Bringing about faster economic growth, higher investment, and greater labour absorption; 


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• Focusing on key capabilities of people and the state; 

• Building a capable and developmental state; and 

• Encouraging strong leadership throughout society to work together to solve problems. 

The NDP is a plan for all South Africans, which provides a framework to guide key choices and actions of both civil 
society and the state. Amongst other things, the NDP depends on municipal IDPs to unpack and operationalize these 
priorities, something which this IDP strives to do through its objectives and strategies. 

2.2.4 Government Outcomes 1-14 

The Government's outcome-based approach arose out of a realization by government that change was not happening 
as rapidly and effectively as required. It noted that progress was being made in many areas, and that greater access to 
services was being provided to many communities. However, government was not achieving the outcomes to ensure a 
"better life for all" and many communities were rightly impatient with the quality, relevance, and adequacy of 
government service delivery. Out of this backdrop the outcomes approach was developed ensuring that government is 
focused on achieving the expected real improvements in the lives of South Africans. The approach clarifies what is 
expected to be achieved, how it will be done, and where it will take place. It insists that the different spheres of 
government improve the lives of citizens rather than just carrying out their functions. 

The fourteen outcomes are summarized below: 

1. Improved quality of basic education; 

2. A long and healthy life for all South Africans; 

3. All people in South Africa are and feel safe; 

4. Decent employment through inclusive economic growth; 

5. A skilled and capable workforce to support an inclusive growth path; 

6. An efficient, competitive, and responsive economic infrastructure network; 

7. Vibrant, equitable, and sustainable rural communities, with food security for all; 

8. Sustainable human settlements and improved quality of household life; 

9. A responsive, accountable, effective, and efficient local government system; 


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10. Environmental assets and natural resources that are well protected and continually enhanced; 

11. Creation of a better South Africa, and contributing to a better and safer Africa and World; 

12. An efficient, effective, and development oriented public service and an empowered, fair, and inclusive citizenship 

13. A comprehensive, responsive and sustainable social protection system. 

14. A diverse, socially cohesive society with a common national identity 

These outcomes provide strategic focus and do not cover the whole of government's work and activities. This IDP 
document seeks to address each of these outcomes and our objectives and strategies have been designed and aligned 
accordingly. 

2.2.5 The National Infrastructure Plan 

The National Infrastructure Plan is based on a spatial analysis of the country and identifies 18 Strategic Integrated 
Projects (SIPs) therein. The SIPs cover a range of projects earmarked to expand the economic and social 
infrastructure platform of the country throughout its nine provinces. 

The Presidential Infrastructure Coordination Commission (PICC) was established to: 

• Coordinate, integrate, and accelerate implementation; 

• Develop a single common National Infrastructure Plan that will be monitored and centrally driven; 

• Identify who is responsible and hold them to account; 

• Develop a 20 year planning framework beyond one administration to avoid a stop-start pattern to infrastructure 
roll out. 

Under this guidance, the PICC has identified Strategic Integrated Projects (SIPs). Some of the SIPs talk indirectly to 
Port St Johns Municipality, but the following four have direct bearing on the Municipality, hence the IDP has been 
aligned to them: 


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Table 2.2: National Infrastructure Plan' relevance to PSJ 


SIP No. 

DESCRIPTION/PROJECT 

RELEVANCE TO PSJ 

SIP 3 

South-Eastern node & 

corridor development 

This development includes the N2-Wild Coast Highway which is aimed at 

improving access into KwaZulu-Natal and national supply chains 

SIP 6 

Integrated municipal 

infrastructure project 

Develop national capacity to assist the 23 least resourced districts (19 million 

people) to address all the maintenance backlogs and upgrades required in 

water, electricity and sanitation bulk infrastructure. 

The road maintenance programme will enhance service delivery capacity 

thereby impacting positively on the population. 

SIP 10 

Electricity transmission and 

distribution for all 

Expand the transmission and distribution network to address historical 

imbalances, provide access to electricity for all and support economic 

development. Align the 10-year transmission plan, the services backlog, the 

national broadband roll-out and the freight rail line development to leverage off 

regulatory approvals, supply chain and project development capacity. 

SIP 11 

Agri-logistics and rural 

infrastructure 

Improve investment in agricultural and rural infrastructure that supports 

expansion of production and employment, small-scale farming and rural 

development, including facilities for storage (silos, fresh-produce facilities, 

packing houses); transport links to main networks (rural roads, branch train¬ 
line, ports), fencing of farms, irrigation schemes to poor areas, improved R&D 

on rural issues (including expansion of agricultural colleges), processing facilities 

(abattoirs, dairy infrastructure), aquaculture incubation schemes and rural 

tourism infrastructure. 

SIP 15 

Expanding access to 

communication technology 

Intends to provide 100% broadband coverage to all households by 2020 

through establishing core Points of Presence (POPs) in district municipalities, 

extend new Infraco fibre networks across provinces linking districts, establish 

POP's and fibre connectivity at local level, and further penetrate the network 

into deep rural areas. The project has been launched at the district and is 

being rolled out to the locals including PSJ. 


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SIP 18 


Water and Sanitation 


This SIP focuses on developing a 10 year plan to address the estimated backlog 
of adequate water supply to 1.4 million households and basic sanitation to 2.1 
million households whilst also layering favourable conditions for economic 
growth through the provision of water and sanitation infrastructure. Projects 
will include a focus on a new infrastructure, rehabilitation, upgrading and the 
improvement of water infrastructure management. 


2.2.6 National Spatial Development Framework 

The NSDP is a spatial development perspective that aims to provide a clearer picture of the current spatial patterns in 
the country and provides guidelines (perspectives) on spatial planning. The following are the key principles outlined in 
the NSDP that have been taken into account in the formulation of this review. 

► Principle 1: Rapid, sustainable and inclusive economic growth is the foremost priority for the country. It is a 
pre-requisite for the achievement of other policy objectives; 

► Principle 2: Government must meet constitutional obligations to provide basic services to all citizens 
everywhere in the country. But beyond this, spending on fixed investment should be focused mainly on areas 
of existing strong economic growth or future potential; 

► Principle 3: In areas that do not demonstrate future economic potential, efforts to address development 
challenges must ‘focus on people, not place'. This means investing in social support, human resource 
development and labour market intelligence, instead of unsustainable infrastructure. These social investments 
will empower people with knowledge and choice so that they can move to areas with greater opportunities if 
they wish to; and 

► Principle 4: To address the spatial distortions of apartheid, settlement development should be steered into a 
configuration of nodes linked to main growth centers through creative exploitation of activity corridors and 
movement patterns. 

It is important therefore that the municipality builds internal planning capacity that will enable it to respond to these 
emerging NSDP concepts. Accordingly, Spatial Planning is one of the priorities of the term. This on the main includes 
the review of the Spatial Development Framework and the development of a Localized Spatial Development 
Framework. 


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2.2.7 Regional industrial Development Strategy 

The RIDS Strategic Intent is outlined as follows: 

• To enable all areas in the SA economy to attain their optimal economic potential by facilitating local development 
embedded in a regional/district through linkages within existing and latent industrial and economic base. 

• To stimulate investments that will promote sustained high growth in a local community 

• To focus on a region's potential and identify what local stakeholders can and need to do to ensure their local 
community reaches its potential 

• To assess a community's comparative advantage, identify new or existing market opportunities for businesses, 
and reduce obstacles to business expansion and creation 

• To have an impact on the economic viability districts 

• To create new jobs, help communities retain existing jobs, help businesses access capital. 

• To contribute to a broader national framework with a spatial dimension, in order to increase each region's global 
competitiveness. 

We subscribe to this strategic intent and have systematically designed a programme that will enable us to respond 
effectively to the challenges of our own economy. As such, we have improved integration of the LED programme with 
ruling IDP and SDF in order to achieve better spatial economic integration and sustainability in our interventions. In 
undertaking this, the strategy takes into account our contributions to regional economy. 

2.2.8 National Priorities (State of the Nation Address 2018) 

The President of the Republic delivered his latest State of the Nation Address (SONA 2018) of the current 
administration on 16 February 2018. The Honourable President of the republic announced 2018 as the year of 
centenary of Nelson Mandela and that the country shouldn't just honour the past but also build the future on the same 
values of Nelson Mandela. 

The president highlighted that a resilient and fast growing economy is at the heart of our radical economic 
transformation agenda and our National Development Plan. In an effort to achieve radical socio-economic 
transformation, legislation, regulations, licensing, budget and procurement as well as Broad-based Black Economic 
Empowerment charters are expected to influence the behaviour of the private sector and drive transformation. 


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Table 2.3: SONA, 2018 


NO. 

ACTIONS 

SUMMARY OF ACTIONS 

MUNICIPALITY'S RESPONSE TO THE SONA 

1 

Transformation 

Support black industrialists - 

To build a new generation of 

black and women producers 

that are able to build 

enterprises of significant scale 

and capability. 

Use competition to open 

markets to new black entrants. 

Invest in the developments of 

rural enterprises 

This term the municipality will be looking at potential 

areas for agri-processing and small scale mineral 

resources through its Local Economic Development 

department, which had already committed some of 

its funds towards these initiatives. Working with 

other sectors the municipality will ensure all 

initiatives of this nature are supported and are 

benefiting to government programmes on 

industrialization. 

2 

Infrastructure 

Assemble teams to speed up 

implementation of new 

projects, particularly water 

projects, health facilities and 

road maintenance. 

The Municipality has prioritized and set aside funds 

for road maintanance 

3 

Mining 

Intensifying engagements with 

all stakeholders on the Mining 

charter. 

The Municipality has agreed to engage the relevant 

sectors to pursue sand mining in the region. 

Currently the municipality has been subject to a lot 

of illegal sand mining which prompted the 

municipality into finding workable ways to conduct 

this business for the benefit of local communities. 

4 

Small business, co-ops, 

township enterprises 

Honour 30% of procurement 

allocation to these enterprises. 

Invest in SME incubation. 

Welcome SME Fund initiative 

This term the municipality will be looking at potential 

areas for agri-processing and small scale mineral 

resources through its Local Economic Development 

department, which had already committed some of 


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NO. 

ACTIONS 

SUMMARY OF ACTIONS 

MUNICIPALITY'S RESPONSE TO THE SONA 



by corporate sector 

its funds towards these initiatives. Working with 

other sectors the municipality will ensure all 

initiatives of this nature are supported and are 

benefiting to government programmes on 

industrialization. 

5 

Land and agriculture 

Accelerate land redistribution 

programme and make more 

land available 

Land expropriation without 

compensation 

Over and above the provision of electricity by Eskom, 

the Municipality has welcomed a three-year 

intervention from the department of energy to 

address the backlog in terms of electricity 

distribution. The project has been initiated in 

2016/17 and will continue until 2018/19. 

7 

Health and NHI 

Scale up testing and treating 

campaign 

Implementation of NHI 

The Municipality has established a Local Labour 

Forum which sits on a quarterly basis. Over and 

above this the municipality continues giving priority 

on labour issues and convenes meetings whenever 

need arises to deal with labour matters. 

8 

Education 

Free higher education to first 

year students 

The municipality has endorsed a strategic approach 

of attracting private investment. A number of 

developments have been identified which came with 

the municipality's vision of turning the Town into a 

City. On the other side the Municipality has 

welcomed a Small Town Revitalization Programme 

aimed at improving the economic infrastructure in 

the Municipal area. These developments are also 

anticipated to attract a lot of private investment. 

9 

Social grants 

Compliance with directives of 

The Municipality facilitates IDP Representatives 


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NO. 

ACTIONS 

SUMMARY OF ACTIONS 

MUNICIPALITY'S RESPONSE TO THE SONA 



the Constitutional Court 

Forum, IGR Forums and other forms of engagements 

which are used as platforms to resolve any 

bottlenecks from the side of the Municipality. Oceans 

Economy has been endorsed as one of the catalytic 

projects for the Municipality through which a fish 

factory development has been endorsed. 

10 

Social sector/Civil 

Society 

Convene a social sector 

summit 

Municipality will send representation 

11 

State/governance 

Review the finding models of 

SOEs and othe measures 

Change the appointment of 

Boards 

The PSJ municipality at its review of IDP 2018/22 

evolved a multi-prong approach that lays foundation 

for launching a multi-year strategy that asserts PSJ 

to become the New Eastern Cape's Tourism 

Epicentre. Methodically this approach is premised on 

identifying strategy leader projects that gears PSJ to 

being a "Destination of Choice". 

12 

Corruption/state capture 

Uproot corruption in work 

environment 

Municipality will review its anti-fraud and anti¬ 
corruption plan 


2.2.9 The Back To Basics Approach 

Port St. Johns municipality is one of the Municipalities that adopted the Back to Basics Program and is reporting on the 
programme on a monthly basis. The Council adopted a Back to Basics Action Plan and appointed a Back to Basics 
Champion to ensure successful implementation of the Action Plan. The municipality has aligned some of its 
programmes and projects to the five pillars of Back to Basics and continues to ensure its adherence to the B2B 
framework 


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Below are the five pillars as stated on the back to basics policy and how the municipality is responding to each: 

Table 2.4: Back to Basics (B2B) 


No. 

PILLAR 

ACTION 

1 

Putting people first 

Monthly monitoring and hosting of ward committee meetings and community 

meetings, outreach programmes and IDP roadshows 

2 

Delivering basic 

The implementation and facilitation of operational and maintenance plans of 


services 

different service department: roads, electricity, water, sanitation and 

community services 

3 

Good governance 

Council structures are in place and monthly and quarterly meetings are held 

to play the oversight role. 

4 

Sound financial 

• The municipality is working towards improving its internal controls 


management 

• Generating expenditure reports on a monthly basis, 

• Is reviewing its finance policies according to legislation 

• Is in a process of developing a revenue enhancement strategy and 

will be undertaken a comprehensive debt collection project in the 

2017/18 which continues to the next financial year 

5 

Building capabilities 

The municipality has a Workplace skills plan in place and it is implemented 

accordingly. 


The municipality has further integrated these into the municipal strategic framework and into the SDBIP. The 
scorecards of the relevant senior managers will reflect indicators and targets that respond to the Back to basic 
approach. 


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2.2.10 Integrated service delivery model: operation Masiphathisane and the 
establishment of War Rooms 

2.2.10.1 Purpose 

The province is embarking on a coordinated approach, the Integrated Service Delivery Model (ISDM), dubbed 
Operation Masiphathisane, to provide comprehensive, integrated and transversal sen/ices to communities through 
effective and efficient multi-sectoral partnerships. This calls for: 

• A shared understanding of the model; 

• The reconfiguration of structures to support the roll-out of the Operation Masiphathisane; and 

• The establishment of War Rooms 

2.2.10.2 Objectives 

Create a shared understanding of the model 

Present a reconfiguration of structures to support the roll-out of the ISDM 
Present an update on progress in the rollout. 

Share some challenges experienced in the rollout 

2.2.10.3 Integrated Service Delivery Model (ISDM) Rationale 

• Misalignment between IGR structures and other policy implementation platforms resulting into their under 
utilization 

• No vertical and horizontal linkages 

• Often very low participation of sector departments at local level 

• Current IGR platforms do not create enough space for integrated planning and reporting thus weakening the 
impact of government work 

• Siloistic service delivery resulting into unfulfilled objectives, duplication of efforts and pressure on limited resources 

• Lack of community ownership of services rendered hence persistent social unrest 

• Lack of proper monitoring and evaluation to track impact of service delivery on the citizens of the Province 


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2.2.10.4 What is Operation Masiphathisane? 

• A coordinated and integrated service delivery model of action to address the empowerment of Youth and Women, 
Social Ills of the communities 

• Communities participating in governance, Bringing Government to the people 

• A Ward-based initiative targeting disease management in the wards with special emphasis on HIV, TB and poverty 
a developmental approach to disease prevention, child and maternal health, infancy mortality rate, orphan and 
vulnerable childcare 

• A model where an aggressive behavior change will be vigorously implemented using the existing cadres to focus 
their efforts on: crime, adolescent health, sexual behaviour, substance abuse, road accidents, abuse (gender-based 
and children), etc. 

2.2.10.5 Institutionalization and Governance Structure (Roles & 
responsibilities) 

District Task Team 
Chairperson: 

• Executive Mayor 

Secretariat: 

• Municipal Manager 
Selected Roles & Responsibilities: 

• Household profiles and socio-—economic data 

• Review local level reports to monitor interventions 

• A point where bottom-up community needs and technical analytical top-down possibilities meet 

• A point of decision making for issues that need Provincial intervention 

• The aggregated District needs are met by Provincial Departments and other stakeholders resource allocations 

• Produce an aggregated District Task Team report 


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Local War Room 
Chairperson: Local Mayor 
Secretariat: Municipal Manager 

Selected Roles & Responsibilities: 

• Ensure the establishment of Ward War Rooms 

• Facilitate training, coaching and mentoring support to the War Room in terms of interventions and referrals 

• Provide support to War Rooms in terms of interventions and referrals 

• Technical analysis of the needs from the people relative to the profiles 

• Collate and categorize the needs and allocate to appropriate sector and level 

• Prepare and carry out implementation through War Rooms and report back 

• Provide feedback to District and Ward War Rooms 

• Produce an integrated Local War Room Report 

Ward War Room 
Chairperson: Ward Councillor 

Secretariat: Community Development Worker (CDW) 

Members: Ward Committee, All Heads of Community Structures in the Ward, Civil Society Organizations, Faith-Based 
Organizations, Private Sector, Local Business, Traditional Leaders, Key sectors (health, Safety and security, education, 
social development, municipal services etc.) 

Roles & Responsibilities: 

• Ward level coordination and planning 

• Conduct household and ward profiles 

• Mobilize communities and hold community dialogues 

• Collate and categorize the needs and refer to appropriate sector and level 

• Use the multitude of field workers available in different sectors including non—-government sector to identify 
household and community needs 

• Provide feedback to respective communities 


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2.2.10.6 Difference between Ward Committees and War Rooms 

Table 2.5: Ward Committees and War Rooms 


WARD COMMITTEE 

WAR ROOM 

Is a Legal entity (as per section 73 of the Municipal 

Is a Model to improve access to service delivery by 

Structures Act, 117 of 1998) established to link 

households and communities. .It links all spheres of 

communities with their Local Council for service delivery 

government with the people at ward level and the model is 

championed by Presidency 

Participation is restricted to 10 community members 

Participation is open to all community based organizations, 

representing specific portfolios 

private sector and Provincial/National sector departments 

Plays an advisory role in all matters of the ward 

Coordinates identification and provision of services to 

identified households /community and ensures cooperative 

governance for better & more fast tracked service delivery 

Term of ward committees linked to council, in terms of 

Permanent structure- only changes Chairperson if he/she is 

section 24 of the Municipal structures Act 

as a Councillor as per the Municipality term of office 

Focuses more on identification of community needs 

Needs identification process covers household 

rather than household needs 

And community. Household walk-ins also submit their 

needs at War Room 


2.2.10.7 Municipality's Response to the Operation 

In O.R. Tambo District Municipality, all Councilors in the district and six Troikas from the District and Local 
municipalities have been trained on the model. The War Rooms have been launched at a municipal level along the 
District Municipality in the presence of the Councillors Ward Committee and CDW's in 2017. The municipality has 
successfully cascaded the war rooms to all wards out of 20 Wards in its jurisdiction. 


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2.2.11 The Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act 

The Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act (SPLUMA), 2013 was assented to by the President of the Republic 
of South Africa on 5 August 2013. It came into operation on the 1st of July 2015. It is a framework act for all spatial 
planning and land use management legislation in South Africa. It seeks to promote consistency and uniformity in 
procedures and decision-making in this field. The other objects include addressing historical spatial imbalances and the 
integration of the principles of sustainable development into land use and planning regulatory tools and legislative 
instruments. SPLUMA has become the official overarching legislation for development planning in the country and has 
repealed the following legislations previously used for various development planning purposes: 

• Removal of Restrictions Act, 1967 (Act No. 84 of 1967) 

• Physical Planning Act, 1967 (Act No. 88 of 1967) 

• Less Formal Township Establishment Act, 1991 (Act No. 133 of 1991) 

• Physical Planning Act, 1991 (Act No. 125 of 1991) 

• Development Facilitation Act, 1995 (Act No. 67 of 1995) 

• More detail on the implementation of this Act is dealt with in the next chapter, which is the Situation Analysis, 
under Spatial Planning. 


2.2.12 


Provincial Priorities (State of the Province Address 2018/ 


Table 2.6: The Premier on Friday, 23 February 2018 delivered the State of the Province Address 


NO. 9 POINT PLAN 


MUNICIPALITY RESPONSE TO THE PROVINCE PRIORITIES 


The municipality along the Department of Education and the 
Provincial Government has celebrated the schools who did well in 
their matric results. The municipality continues visiting schools 
throughout the municipal area to understand their needs and to 
intervene when possible. A back to school programme was 
endorsed by Council as a quick win towards encouraging children 
to go to school. Through this programme the municipality 
continues to provide school uniform to the most destitute learners 


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NO. 9 POINT PLAN MUNICIPALITY RESPONSE TO THE PROVINCE PRIORITIES 

2 

3 

4 


NO. 9 POINT PLAN 

and sometimes working tools. 

The municipality has received a district plan that details all the 

strategic goals and objectives that will be pursued by the 

department which include improving the schools infrastructure. 

Promoting better healthcare for all 

Through IGR Forums the Department has submitted their 

our people 

commitments to improve health facilities in the municipal area. 

This includes renovations, electrification and improving access 

roads. The Department of health has also committed to conduct 

more campaigns to raise health awareness. 

Stimulating rural development, land 

In 2016/17 financial year farmers were enrolled in a capacitation 

reform and food security 

programme to improve their skills and to expand their knowledge. 

The municipality continues to partner with sectors such as DRDAR 

to give this a priority as it has a potential of improving our rural 

communities in terms of socio-economic transformation. The LED 

Department has programmes responding to this. The municipality 

has also welcomed the agri-parks programme as announced by 

the president as a way of improving agriculture further making 

commitments of implementation. 

Transformation of the economy to 

EPWP, CWP are part of the programmes that will be coordinated 

create jobs and sustainable livelihood 

by the municipality to improve the employment rate in the 

municipal area. More support will be given to SMMEs so that they 

are able to sustain themselves. This includes a close monitoring of 

policies that talk to the implementation of SMME support such as 

the adherence to the 30 day payment circle. Port St. Johns 

acknowledges the commitment by the Premier of sourcing atleast 

50% of goods and services locally. 


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NO. 9 POINT PLAN MUNICIPALITY RESPONSE TO THE PROVINCE PRIORITIES 

5 

6 


NO. 9 POINT PLAN 

MUNICIPALITY RESPONSE TO THE PROVINCE PRIORITIES 

Roads infrastructure 

Through our collaboration with SANRAL, roads continue to 

improve. Upgrading initiatives include R61 from N6, near 

Queenstown, to Ndwalane near Port St John's through Ngcobo 

and Mthatha. As a catalyst for regional and economic 

development. 

The N2 Wild Coast Highway project will unlock the tourism and 

agriculture potential of the entire wild coast region. The detailed 

design for the two mega bridges is now complete, with 

construction planned to start in November 2016. Construction in 

the uncontested part from Mthatha to Ndwalane, near Port St 

John's, is progressing well. Upgrading of strategic roads, including 

the R61 from Umtamvuna to Mbizana and Nomlacu, as well as 

Nkantolo Road, is progressing well. The DRPW in collaboration 

with SANDF will also work on the critical bridges to connect 

inaccessible villages, schools and health institutions. 

Over and above these interventions the municipality through its 

MIG will be improving some of the roads in the in the municipal 

area. 

Strengthening the developmental 

The municipality adopted the B2B Programme and the War 

state and good governance 

Rooms have been established down to a ward level. Reports on 

the B2B programme are generated on a monthly basis and 

submitted to COGTA 

Intensifying fight against crime 

The municipality continues to run crime awareness campaigns in 

partnership with law enforcement agencies. Police forums are 

held in which the municipality is part of. The municipality 

welcomes the plea by the Premier to establish Community Safety 


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NO. 

9 POINT PLAN 

MUNICIPALITY RESPONSE TO THE PROVINCE PRIORITIES 



Forums in our municipal area in collaboration with Department of 

Safety & Liaison and SAPS. 

9 

Building of cohesive communities and 

In a region dominated by high unemployment and poverty the 


Nation building 

municipality continues working hand in hand with SASSA to 

ensure that all those deserving grants are benefiting from this 

government initiative. The municipality continues to partner with 

the department through outreach programmes and other 

municipal gatherings to ensure that services are communicated to 

the people. 


2.2.13 Provincial Development Plan (PDP) (Vision 2030) 

Based on the National Development Plan (NDP), the Provincial Development Plan (PDP) seeks to outline a 
development path for the province. Vision 2030 sets the development agenda and priorities for the next 15 years 
(2015-2030), building on the Provincial Growth and Development Plan (PGDP) of 2004-2014. The plan proposes key 
programmes and projects for implementation up to 2030 and suggests arrangements for implementation of the plan, 
tracking and accountability. The provincial plan starts from the premise that key structural features hobble the 
provincial economy and social progress. The plan therefore strives for social and economic justice. It places 
particular emphasis on transforming the apartheid spatial geography. The plan promotes cultural development, 
inclusion and respect for diversity. It further encourages citizen participation and co-responsibility for development. It 
promotes ethical, integrated multi-agent action predicated on relative strengths of institutional partners. This is not a 
plan for government alone, but for the entire province. 

The E Cape PDP has 5 goals, which are: 

Goal 1: A growing, inclusive and equitable economy 

The PDP aims to develop a growing, inclusive and equitable economy. This includes a larger and more efficient 
provincial economy that optimally exploits the competitive advantages of the Eastern Cape, increased employment and 
reduced inequalities of income and wealth. 


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Goal 2: An educated, empowered and innovative citizenry 

The PDP seeks to ensure that people define their identity, sustain their livelihoods, live healthy lives and raise healthy 
families, develop a just society and economy, and play an effective role in the development of their communities, as 
well as the politics and governance of the state at all levels. 

Goal 3: A healthy population 

The PDP seeks to ensure that all citizens of the Eastern Cape live longer and healthy lives. This will mainly be achieved 
by providing quality healthcare to people in need. The health system must value patients, care for communities, 
provide reliable service and value partnerships. In addition, the system should rest on a good primary healthcare 
platform and be integrated across primary, secondary and tertiary levels of healthcare. 

Goal 4: Vibrant, equitably enabled communities 

The PDP seeks to ensure that by 2030, the Eastern Cape is characterized by vibrant communities in which people can 
responsibly exercise their growing freedoms. The plan aims to address spatial disparities across the province, and 
seeks to guide the development and use of instruments to achieve this. These instruments include legislation and 
policy, spatial targeting of infrastructure and other investments, and planning itself. Where and how people live and 
work is the most visible manifestation of spatial equity. 

Goal 5: Capable, conscientious and accountable institutions 

The PDP seeks to build capable, conscientious and accountable institutions that engender and sustain development 
partnerships across the public, civic and private sectors. It aims to construct and mobilize multi-agency partnerships 
for development, encouraging the emergence of a strong, capable, independent and responsible civil society 
committed to the province's development. The province will build the necessary capabilities to anchor these multi¬ 
agency partnerships and empower people to meaningfully participate in their own development. 

Given that over 70% of the population is rural, the fortunes of the province are inherently bound up with the 
future of its rural areas. While urbanisation is an undeniable trend, we estimate that the majority of the 
population will still be outside of the metropolitan areas in 2030. The Eastern Cape is set to remain a rural 
province for the foreseeable future and this situation demands appropriate development and support measures. 
Therefore rural development is a key priority and has been integrated into all the goal areas. 


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In its development of strategic goals, objectives and strategies for its new five-year term. Port St. Johns Municipality 
has aligned itself to these Provincial Goals as contained in the Provincial Development Plan. This is detailed in chapter 4 
of this IDP. 


2.2.14 Eastern Cape Provincial Economic Development Strategy (PEDS) 
Strategic Framework 

The diagram below synthesises neatly the framework for the strategy. The Economic Goal and Objectives of the 
PEDS is built upon the growth pillars of six 'high-potential sectors' and eight 'economic enablers'. All of these 
hinge critically upon institutional capacity - this is elaborated on below in "making the strategy work. 


m 

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The PEDs has been taken into consideration when formulating this review. As a municipality located within OR Tambo 
DM and EC Province we are bound by the commitments made in the above mentioned economic development 
framework. 


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2.2.15 District Municipal IDP Framework 

The DM provides a framework for managing and facilitating uniform and coherent planning in the region. This is 
coordinated through its IDP framework which is developed in terms of the requirements of the Municipal Systems Act 
2000. Such a framework also informs this IDP review. Port St. Johns Municipality is part of district IDP representative 
forum and therefore are informed and able to influence its development. 


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The figure below presents a summary of integrated developmental planning, which is detailed in section 2.1 below. 


Figure 2.1: Integrated Development Planning 


Global-Continental 



Provincial 




development 


Goals 


Agenda 2063 


National 


Development 


Plan 


Strategic 


Framework 


Provincial 

Development 


Plan 


Provincial 


Strategic 


Framework 


and POA 


Integrated 


Development 


Plan 



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CHAPTER 3 

SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS 
DEMOGRAPHICS 


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3.1 DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE 


3.1.1 Population Distribution 


In this section, an overview is provided of the demography of the Port St Johns Local Municipality and all its 
neighboring regions, and South Africa as a whole. In an attempt to improve and update statistical planning information 
various sources have been used and referenced to inform the analysis in this section. The chart below shows the 
Population of the O.R. Tambo District Municipality: 

Chat 3.1: Distribution of the population by municipality 



Ngquza Hill Port St Johns Nyandeni Mhlontlo ■ King Sabata Dalindyebo 


When compared to other regions, Port St Johns Local Municipality accounts for a total population of 168,000, or 11.4% 
of the total population in O.R.Tambo District Municipality ranking as the most populous local municipality in 2016. The 
ranking in terms of the size of Port St Johns compared to the other regions remained the same between 2006 and 
2016. In terms of its share Port St Johns Local Municipality was slightly larger in 2016 (11.4%) compared to what it 
was in 2006 (11.2%). When looking at the average annual growth rate, it is noted that Port St Johns ranked third 
(relative to its peers in terms of growth) with an average annual growth rate of 1.1% between 2006 and 2016. 


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Chart: 3.2: Population structure 



Source: Ihs Mark it Regional Explorer Version 1156 

Comparing the 2006 with the 2016 population pyramid for Port St Johns Local Municipality, interesting differences are 
visible: 

• In 2006, there were a significant smaller share of young working age people - aged 20 to 34 (20.0%) compared 
to 2016 (24.7%). 

• Fertility in 2006 was significantly higher compared to that of 2016. 

• The share of children between the ages of 0 to 14 years is significantly larger in 2006 (44.2%) compared to 
2016 (41.1%). 

• Life expectancy is increasing. 


In 2016, the female population for the 20 to 34 years age group amounted to 11.1% of the total female population 
while the male population group for the same age amounted to 8.9% of the total male population. In 2006 the male 
working age population at 11.6% did not exceed that of the female population working age population at 13.1%. 

This growth in population requires the municipality to strengthen its provision of services to the community to ensure 
that everyone has equal access, in particular to basic services. The provision of basic services is one of the focus areas 
for this review prompted by the statistical backlogs. 


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Percentage (%) 


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Chart 3.3 Dependency Ration 

EC154 : PORT ST JOHNS DEPENDENCY RATIO 



2011 2016 



2011 

2016 


% 

EC154 : Port St Johns 

92.9 

90.1 


Source: Statistics South Africa (2011 Census and 2016 Community Survey) 


3.3 Levels of Poverty in the District 


Source: Statistics South Africa Community Survey 2016 

Chart 3.4: Violent and Property Crime Index in the District 


DR Tamhn ?00S/?00fi-?01 S/201 fi 



^™»OverallCrime Index ^—-Violent Crime Index Property Crime Index 

Source: HIS 2015 


Poverty Head 
Count 



2016 2011 


Poverty Intensity 

44 



Crime index is a composite, weighted index which measures crime. The higher the index number, the higher the level 
of crime for that specific year in a particular region. 


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3.1.5 HIV and AIDS 

According to 2011 estimates, 5.38 million people in South Africa are living with HIV; an estimated 16% of the adult 
population aged 15-49 years is HIV-positive. The percentage of deaths caused by AIDS nationally is showing a slight 
year-on-year decrease. It fell from 49.2% in 2008 to 44.3% in 2010 (Statistics South Africa, 2011). 

According to 2009 Antenatal Care Statistics, the HIV/AIDS prevalence of antenatal woman in the Eastern Cape average 
is 28.1%. A significant number of people in the PSJM are treated with Anti-retroviral Therapy each year, which results 
in a large volume of medical waste being produced (Department of Health, 2009) 


Table: 3.1 District Statistic 


2011 


2013 


Number of new cases of HIV/AIDS 

139,401 

Number of new cases of HIV/AIDS 

145,861 

Number of AIDS related deaths 

15,174 

Number of AIDS related deaths 

15,761 

Ratio of AIDS related deaths to total 

deaths 

53.70 

Ratio of AIDS related deaths to total 

deaths 

59.75 


Source: ECSECC 2014 


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KEY PERFOMANCE AREA #1 
SPATIAL PLANNING (SP) 



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3.2 SPATIAL PLANNING 

3.2.1 Background 

In terms of Section 26(e) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, No. 32 of 2000 (the "MSA") requires all 
municipalities to compile Spatial Development Frameworks (the "SDF") as a core component of Integrated 
Development Plans (the "IDP"). SDFs enable Council, communities, industries, service providers, and government 
agencies to plan, budget, and develop with confidence and certainty. 

3.2.2 Status Quo 

A Spatial Development Framework was developed by Port St. Johns Municipality and was adopted by council in 2010. 
After a thorough consideration on the validity of the framework and the spatial complexity of issues, the municipality 
has agreed to review its Spatial Development Framework, taking into consideration the advent of the Spatial Planning 
and Land Use Management Act that came into effect in 1 st July 2015. The reviewal of the framework was supposed to 
be in 2017/18 but was delayed by the labour unrest will which continued to over seven Months and so the project will 
now commence in 2018/19 financial year. 

A copy of the approved SDF is appended to this document for perusal. The main aim of the Spatial Development 
Framework is to formulate spatially based policy guidelines whereby changes, needs and growth in the region can be 
managed to the benefit of the whole community. The Spatial Development Framework further guides and informs all 
decisions of the Municipality relating to use, development and planning of land. This will have to be balanced with the 
need to provide adequately for the social and economic needs of the growing population. In particular, it will identify 
opportunities for future development and conservation and make recommendations as to where and how development 
or conservation should take place. In doing so, the framework will not make detailed proposals for specific land 
portions, but will rather provide broad spatial guidelines to assist decision making with regard to land use/spatial 
planning. The Spatial Development Framework (reviewed 2010) for the Port St Johns indicates and informs the 
following: 

• Status quo analysis of the Port St John's area 

• Vision and objectives for desired spatial form 


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• Policies and guidelines with respect to land use management 

• Desired spatial form 

The need for the preparation of a Spatial Development Framework for the Port St Johns was identified as a result of a 
number of imperatives: 

The Spatial Development Framework forms a legally binding component of the Port St Johns Integrated 
Development Plan 

This Spatial Development Framework is a refinement of the broad spatial framework guidelines as contained in the Port 
St Johns IDP. 

The need to formulate and implement spatial planning guidelines and policies 

Proper land use planning guidelines and policies in the Port St Johns are lacking and in some cases outdated. The 
absence of proper planning guidelines therefore necessitates the preparation of a detailed Spatial Development 
Framework for the area to manage future land use. 

Legislative requirements 

The Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 (Act 32 of 2000) and its Regulations require all Local Authorities 
to prepare Spatial Development Frameworks. 

Increasing pressure for development 

Demand for development in the Port St John's and rural areas are putting pressure on existing scarce resources and 
sustainability of the region and the environment. Specific reference is made to the valuable agricultural land of the area 
as well as the unique unspoiled coastal region. 

The imperative to implement and maintain sustainability 
Sustainability of the natural and man-made environment is of critical importance for long term land use management 
and effective development. 


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3.2.3 Spatial Planning And Land Use Management Act (SPLUMA) 

3.2.3.1 Background 

• Pre-1994 Planning was designed to serve a different political idea - segregation, differentiation, and privilege; 

• Multiple laws, multiple institutions and parallel processes instituted by the pre-1994 pieces of legislation; 

• Planning laws were fragmented across the old boundaries of the then four (4) provincial administrations, 
homelands, and Self-Governing Territories (SGT); 

• In 1994, South Africa inherited complex and disjointed planning systems which manifest in unequal, incoherent 
and inefficient settlement patterns; 

• The Development Facilitation Act, 1995 (Act No. 67 of 1995) ("the DFA") was promulgated as an interim 
measure to deal with this legacy. 

• SPLUMA emerged through the Green Paper (1999) and White Paper (2001) processes to replace the DFA as the 
legislative instrument to regulate spatial planning and land use management in the country. 

The Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act 16 of 2013 (SPLUMA) is a national law that was passed by 
Parliament in 2013. The final version of these Regulations (Regulations in terms of SPLUMA GG 38594 GN R239) was 
published on 23 March 2015. The law came into effect on 1 July 2015, while a commencement date for the 
Regulations are yet to be published. 

3.2.3.2 Purpose 

SPLUMA aims to develop a new framework to govern planning permissions and approvals, sets parameters for new 
developments and provides for different lawful land uses in South Africa. SPLUMA is a framework law, which means 
that the law provides broad principles for a set of provincial laws that will regulate planning. SPLUMA also provides 
clarity on how planning law interacts with other laws and policies. The law is important because the repeal of many 
apartheid era laws has left our planning laws fragmented, complicated and inconsistent. For this reason, section 3 of 
SPLUMA says that the law tries to develop a 'uniform, effective and comprehensive system' of planning that 'promotes 
social and economic inclusion'. 


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3.2.3.3 SPLUMA Regulations 

The powers of traditional councils in relation to planning and land use are governed by regulation 19(1) and (2) of the 
SPLUMA Regulations, which read: 

19 (1) "A traditional council may conclude a service level agreement with the municipality in whose municipal area that 
traditional council is located, subject to the provisions of relevant national or provincial legislation, in terms of which 
the traditional council may perform such functions as agreed to in the service level agreement, provided that the 
traditional council may not make a land development or land use decision. 

(2) If a traditional council does not conclude a service level agreement with the municipality ■■■ that traditional council 
is responsible for providing proof of allocation of land in terms of the customary law applicable in the traditional area to 
the applicant of a land development and land use application in order for the applicant to submit it in accordance with 
the provisions of the Regulations." 

These provisions provide that a municipality can conclude an agreement with a traditional council which would allow a 
traditional council to take over some of the land planning and land use powers and functions that are vested in the 
municipality (as long as the traditional council is not empowered to make a decision in relation to land planning and 
land use). In cases where the municipality does not conclude this type of agreement with a traditional council, the 
traditional council would be required to provide proof of land allocation in terms of customary law. 


3.2.3.4 SPLUMA Principles 



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3.2.3.5 SPLUMA Implementation 

Port St. Johns Council adopted delegations to give effect to the SPLUMA and also the categories of development 
applications into category 1 & 2. The Municipality resolved for a Joint Municipal Planning Tribunal with Ingquza Hill 
Local Municipality. Subsequently, a call for nomination was issued in terms of section 35 of SPLUMA. 

• The shortlisting for tribunal members was undertaken and subsequently their appointment. 

• Terms and conditions of service for MPT members was formulated 

• By-laws adopted and gazette published (assisted by CoGTA-EC) 

• Council resolved to be the Appeal authority 

• Seating allowance for tribunal members was adopted by council 

• Training and induction of tribunal members was done 

• Tariffs have been adopted 

3.2.4 Human Settlements 

Our role in housing is only limited to facilitation and administration of beneficiary registrations and monitoring. We 
depend on the department of human settlements for funding of housing programmes. Its role is to develop sustainable 
human settlements for needy South African Citizens through the delivery of the following key programs. 

• Upgrading of Informal Settlements 

• Rural settlement development 

• Affordable Rental Housing (project at Feasibility stage ) 

• Access to basic services (informal Settlement upgrading project) 

• Rectification of defective houses 

• Release of state land for human settlements development 

• Housing Assistance for Destitute and Vulnerable People (Homeless women, elderly persons, people with 
disabilities. Child-headed households for the whole of OR TAMBO) 

• Housing Assistance for Military Veterans 


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Chart 3.5: Housing Statistics 


EC154 : PORT ST JOHNS DWELLING TYPE % 


2016 1 
2011 I 


3 - a ” 

c 4 2011 9 

2016 


P flj I 


£■£ 2011 


;B_~ 2016 


T3 2 (U CO 
2 * 2011 





/ 

0 

20 40 

60 

80 

Traditional 

Formal 

Informal 

Other 

dwelling 

dwelling 

dwelling 

2011 2016 

2011 2016 

2011 2016 

2011 2016 

■ EC154 : Port St Johns 74 62.2 

24.6 36.9 

1 0.7 

0.3 0.1 






26,000 

25,000 

24,000 

23,000 

22,000 

21,000 


Formal dwelling backlog 

Port St Johns, 2006-2016 


— 









2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 
- - i-ormal dwelling backlog 


SOURCE: IHS Market Regional Explorer Version 1156 



When looking at the formal dwelling unit backlog (number of households not living in a formal dwelling) over time, it 
can be seen that in 2006 the number of households not living in a formal dwelling were 23 300 within Port St Johns 
Local Municipality. From 2006 this number decreased annually at -0.17% to 22 900 in 2016. 


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KEY PERFORMANCE AREA #2 
BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY 


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3.3 BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY 

3.3.1 Infrastructure Service Profile 

Understanding the extent to which households as well as businesses are provided and have access to infrastructure 
services is central to delivering the mandate of a developmental local government. 

3.3.2 Infrastructure status quo 

Our analysis of service delivery gaps and challenges points to the following high level summary of issues which have 
been dealt with in detail in the sections that follows: 

• Backlogs for basic services (water, sanitation, refuse collection) remain unacceptably high in most of our areas 

• Visual road index shows a poor and decaying infrastructure network characterised by potholes and unmaintained 
gravel roads 

• Some villages still do not have access to electricity 

• Poor Public transport infrastructure 

• Community amenities and social facilities are insufficient to service our growing demand from especially young 
people 

• Despite our proven popularity for tourism, our investment resources are severely limited and fail to make 
sufficient dent to our infrastructure backlogs resulting in potential loss of investment revenue. 

• The purchasing of more machinery has assisted the municipality in dealing with service deliver/ backlogs in both 
capital projects and maintenance programme. 

3.3.3 Infrastructure Asset & Investment Plan 

PSJ has developed a three year capital and infrastructure asset investment plan based on its medium term expenditure 
framework. This plan is largely influenced by our approved MIG programme and is currently being updated with 
additional capital infrastructure projects budgeted for implementation by our partners including sector departments. 
However, the fact that the plan is not derived from a longitudinal master plan makes it difficult to forecast and quantify 
the required levels of capital investments in order to strategically reverse our backlogs and ensure sustainable 
provision for the required maintenance programs. It is our intention to set up such a plan and build it within our long 


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term strategic plan so that we can begin to lobby for the relevant resources and lead our organizations development 
trajectory towards the desired future as envisaged in our IDP vision. The Municipality has also improved in its grant 
expenditure reaching 100% over the past three years. 


Chart 3.6: OR Tambo Dwelling Types 

% O. R. TAMBO DWELLING TYPES 


80.0 / 



2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 

Traditional dwelling Formal dwelling Informal dwelling Other 

■ DC 15: O.R.Tambo ■ EC153 : Ngquza Hill ■ EC154 : Port St Johns 

■ EC155 : Nyandeni ■ EC156 : Mhlontlo ■ EC157 : King Sabata Dalindyebo 


Table 3.1: OR Tambo Dwelling Types 



Traditional dwelling 

Formal dwelling 

Informal dwelling 

Other 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

% 

DC 15: O.R.Tambo 

54.3 

54.2 

43.4 

43.6 

1.5 

1.3 

0.8 

0.9 

EC153 

Ngquza Hill 

58.0 

57.0 

40.5 

40.0 

1.0 

1.2 

0.6 

1.8 

EC 154 

Port St Johns 

74.0 

62.2 

24.6 

36.9 

1.0 

0.7 

0.3 

0.1 

EC155 

Nyandeni 

64.6 

62.1 

33.8 

36.8 

0.6 

0.4 

1.0 

0.6 

EC 156 

Mhlontlo 

62.7 

54.7 

34.3 

41.5 

2.3 

2.9 

0.7 

0.8 

EC 157 

KSD 

36.7 

45.9 

60.2 

51.8 

2.0 

1.3 

1.1 

1.0 


Source: Stats SA (Census 2011Community Survey 2016) 


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Chart 3.7: Dwelling type per Ward 


Dwelling type per ward 



■ Unspecified «Caravan/tent 

■ Flat or apartment in a block of flats - Unspecified ■ block of flats 

■ Traditional dwelling ■ House or brick structure 

Source: Stats SA (Census 2011) 


The chart above indicates the dwelling type of the municipality. According to Stats SA, the majority of households in 
PSJ municipality reside in traditional dwellings. There is a need for the Municipality to develop a comprehensive 
housing sector plan that would take into consideration the growth of our rural settlements. The Department of Human 
Settlement has planned to implement a number of projects in PSJ LM. The Department is the developer in all the 
projects under PSJ Municipality. 


In planning for the provision of housing, the Municipality has identified priority areas for implementation of human 
settlement projects. Housing demand in the municipality has increased from 11 000 beneficiaries in 2002 to an 
estimated 22 000 beneficiaries to date. Demand for low cost housing in the urban area is estimated to be 1600 units. 
There seems to be little control over beneficiary registration within the municipality as there is no formal demand 
register yet developed. Data collection has been done for most of the wards. Middle to high income demand is 
estimated to be in the order of 800 units for middle income and 500 units for high income, but no official waiting lists 
are available to substantiate these figures. 


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3.3.4.2 Challenges to Housing Delivery 


Table 3.2: Regional Backlog 


DISTRICT 

LOCAL MUNICIPALITY 

BACKLOG 


Ingquza Hill 

33 502 

I- 



u 

1—1 

3 
\— 

(/) 
i—i 
□ 

King Sabata Dalindyebo 

22 000 

Mhlontlo 

38 749 

o 



CO 

Z 

2 

Nyandeni 

41 892 

d 

Port St Johns 

22 000 

6 




GRAND TOTAL 

158 143 


Challenges identified as potential risks for effective implementation of human settlements programs in the region are 
summarized in the table below. 

Table 3.3: Challenges and Interventions 


Challenges 

Interventions 

Inadequate project management 

Enhance capacity through Accreditation Grant for municipalities and 

improve contract and programme management. 

Poor contractor performance 

Strict construction management including enforcement of contract terms 

Enhanced performance management and streamlined responsibilities 

between the Province, municipalities and contractors 

Supply chain management delays 

Enhance institutional capacity and monitor developer procurement 

processes 

Bulk infrastructure inadequacy 

Lobby for additional fund and restructure grant funding 


South African cities and towns have experienced rapid urbanization over the past few years. Migration has made it 
difficult to address housing backlog. As a result, a huge demand exists for diverse forms housing. When decent 
housing is provided, it creates an opportunity for sustainable economic growth and social development. This rapid 
migration has resulted in four informal settlements being formed in Port St Johns (Greens Farm, Zwelitsha, Mpantu 
and Nonyevu). A complex land identification process, inadequate infrastructure and spatial anomalies have also 


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contributed to the slow progress on housing deliver/. Port St Johns Municipality is also hindered by an uneven terrain 
and distorted settlement patterns. 

Over the past few years, there has been a significant shift in the legislative and policy environment that have a huge 
bearing on spatial planning and also on the socio-economic environment. It is therefore essential for the municipality to 
have a housing sector plan that will address our fragmented settlements and ensure that there is maximum benefit for 
our communities that is derived from government investment. The Municipality should develop a new housing sector 
plan; which at its core be aimed at enhancing existing housing delivery mechanisms and move towards effective 
delivery taking into consideration both infrastructure and economic development. Among other things, focus must be 
given to accelerating housing provision whilst improving skills levels, SMME's and providing social amenities. Key 
among other strategies that should be taken into consideration is bridging-finance to ensure that all income levels have 
access to housing. 

The municipality is not an accredited by the Department of Human Settlements; therefore it does not enjoy a 
developer status. There are capacity constraints that are being experienced in the public sector in general, especially 
around the issues of project management. Consideration should be made by both the municipality and the provincial 
department to make a provision out of the capital budget for operational expenses for planning, engineering, project 
management and social facilitation to ensure efficient delivery in the short term. 


3.3.4.3 Current Housing Projects 

• Ntafufu 350 

• Mdlankala 200 

• Tombo 200 

• Chaguba 300 

• PSJ 256 (OR TAMBO 730) 

• PSJ 362 (OR TAMBO 2016) 

• PSJ 50 

• PSJ 321 

• PSJ 259 

• PSJ 806 


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• BOLANI 97 

• Tombo26 

• Lutshaya 300 

3.3.5 Access To Water 

3.3.5.1 Service Level Agreement with OR Tambo DM 

OR Tambo District Municipality is the Water Services Authority & provider for all areas under the jurisdiction of PSJ 
Municipality. As such an authority, the DM is responsible for planning and governance functions, which include: 

• Development of Water services policies and by-laws; 

• Local Regulatory function; 

• Water Services Planning; 

• Tariff Determination; 

• Water Quality Monitoring and Environmental Safety; 

• Revenue Management; 

• Communication and Customer Relation; 

• Free Basic Services; and 

• Drought relief. 

The following functions are included under water services planning: 

• Water Conservation and Water Demand Management; 

• Water Services Master Plans; 

• Water Services Development Plan (WSDP); 

• Asset Management Plan; and 

• Water Safety Plans. 

The current status of the Water Services Policies and By-Laws is as follows: 

• Water Services By-Law: Approved by Council; 

• Indigent Policy: Approved by Council; 

• Tariff Policy: Approved by Council; 


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• Free Basic Policy: Approved by Council; 

• Credit Control/Debt Collection Policy: Approved by Council; 

• Occupational Health and Safety Specification: Approved by Council; and 

• Procurement Policy: Approved by Council. 

3.3.5.2 Water sources 

The two primary sources for water supply in PSJ are Bulolo dam with 90% reliability and yield of 1 M Q. /day and Mngazi 
river system with 100% reliability and yield of >2Mf?/day. Port St Johns receives its raw water from the Bulolo River 
via the upper Bulolo dam which has a catchment area of 3,2 km2 and an estimated capacity of 30000 m3, the Bulolo 
main dam with a catchment area of 6,8 km2 and a capacity of 255000 m3. The supply is supplemented by raw water 
pumped from an off-channel storage dam of 600000 m 3 capacity located adjacent to the Mngazi River and accessible 
from the access road to the Mngazi River Bungalows. 

3.3.5.3 Water quality 

The Bulolo stream provides a source of high quality water (acidic) to Port St Johns. The water quality from the Mngazi 
River was good at the time of construction. 

3.3.5.4 Water infrastructure 

Transfer from the Upper Bulolo Dam to the Main Dam is effected during spilling and via. A low level outlet in the 
concrete weir. Raw water is gravitated from the main dam to a 2 M0/day treatment works situated below the dam. 
Raw water from the Mngazi Off-Channel dam is pumped to a raw water storage balancing dam situated above the 
treatment works. Following treatment the clear water is gravitated via. a 250 mm dia. GMS pipeline to a 1.5 M 
reservoir situated adjacent to the off-take to Mt. Thesigner and from there distributed via a continuation of the 250 
mm pipeline to the various suburbs in Port St Johns via the bulk supply and reticulation network. 

The existing reticulation in the town consists of: 

• 2,1 km x 160 mm dia. mPVC gravity pipeline to the town centre 


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• 3,6 km x 110 mm dia. mPVC gravity pipeline to Tiger Flats 

• 0,5 km x 140 mm dia. mPVC rising main to the 120 m 3 reservoir supplying Mtumbane 

• 0,7 km x 160 mm dia. mPVC gravity main to Mtumbane 

• 1,4 km x 75 mm dia. AC pipeline to the 465 m 3 Second Beach reservoir. 

3.3.5.5 Water Source sufficiency and alternatives 

The MAR at the Bulolo dam site is l,26m 3 /a and the assured yield (1:50 year return period) of the dam has been 
assessed as 0,35M m 3 /a or approximately 960m 3 /day. This source is to be augmented by off-channel storage of 
"surplus" river flows in the Mngazi River. An application for a water use license has been issued by the Dept, of Water 
Affairs and Forestry for abstraction of 365000 m 3 /p.a from the Bulolo system and 700000m 3 /p.a from the Mngazi River 
respectively. 

3.3.5.6 Infrastructure for Urban Areas 

a) CBD/First Beach Areas 

These areas are presently served with water however some of the pipelines are old and require upgrading. The bulk 
supply to the area is adequate. 

b) Mtumbane 

This area is adequately served with water. 

c) Naval Base 

The water supply will have to be upgraded to this area to ensure that the required demand flows can be met. It may 
be necessary to increase storage capacity. 

d) Mpantu 

The present water supply to this area is from rain water harvesting. When this area is developed a supply main will 
have to be brought in along the river bank from the CBD area. The costs of this will be high due to the length of the 
main and having to meet the minimum flow demands for firefighting purposes. 


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e) Agate Terrace/Ferry Point 

This area gets its water from rain harvesting and springs against the mountain. This system should be retained as it 
would be too costly to service with a conventional reticulated supply. 

f) Military Base 

The present supply to the area will require upgrading to meet the future demands. Additional storage will be required 
at a suitable elevation to ensure that the minimum pressures are maintained. 

According to OR Tambo district IDP the Port St John's LM Regional Water Supply under the Port St Johns LM, which 
supplies rural village will be integrated into the proposed regional scheme. Thus far, approximately R90million has 
been allocated for the development of this particular scheme since its inception. Phase 2 of the bulk services is under 
construction and Phase 2b is on tender, with implementation scheduled for mid-2012. A business plan with an 
approximate amount of R25million has been submitted to the DWA for Dam construction. 

3.3.5.7 Household Access to water Supply 

The O.R Tambo DM was declared a Water Services Authority (WSA) in terms of Local Government Municipal Structures 
Act 117 of 1998. This gave the district powers and functions for the planning and provision of water services in its area 
of jurisdiction which includes PSJLM. Water provision has therefore not been devolved to the municipality and this has 
a negative effect on the local municipality as there is limited control and involvement in the provision of water. There is 
no proper channel of communication between the LM and the DM and there is no service level agreement in place to 
regulate water provision. 

The four most rural municipalities in the OR Tambo District (IHLM, PSJ LM, Mhlontlo LM and Nyandeni) have a backlog 
that is over 90% in terms access safe and clean drinking water. Water cleaning is a challenge in Port St Johns because 
of the lack water treatment works and challenges of water demand management. This problem is exacerbated by our 
scared rural settlement and terrain which make it very expensive to provide basic services. 

The figure below shows the extent of access to water supply in PSJ and other municipalities in the District. 


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Chart 3.8: Access to Water 


ACCESS TO WATER: O. R. TAMBO 


100.0 

80.0 

60.0 

40.0 

20.0 

0.0 



DC 15: EC153 : Ngquza EC154 : Port St EC155 : Nyandeni EC156 : Mhlontlo EC157 : King 

O.R.Tambo Hill Johns Sabata 

Dalindyebo 


Access to piped water ■ Access to piped water ■ No access to piped water ■ No access to piped water 


Table 3.4: Access to Water 



Access to piped water 

No access to piped water 

% 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

DC 15: O.R.Tambo 

49.3 

38.9 

50.7 

61.1 

EC153 : Ngquza Hill 

31.0 

18.3 

69.0 

81.7 

EC154 : Port St Johns 

35.0 

18.7 

65.0 

81.3 

EC155 : Nyandeni 

44.5 

29.2 

55.5 

70.8 

EC 156 : Mhlontlo 

61.8 

48.7 

38.2 

51.3 

EC157 : King Sabata Dalindyebo 

61.2 

57.2 

38.8 

42.8 


Source: Stats SA (census 2011 and Community Survey 2016) 


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Chart 3.9: Access to Water Per Ward 


Access to Water per Ward 

10000 
8000 
6000 
4000 
2000 
0 — 

ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ward 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

8 

■ Access to water ■ no access 

Source: Stats SA 2011 



As a result of the problem highlighted above, the number of households that have access to water from a tap inside a 
yard or dwelling is still very low. Most of our households do not have access to reliable water supply. Water 
provisioning backlogs are apparent in the majority of the wards. In many wards, for example Tyityana (Ward 9) and 
Sandluluba (Ward 12) there are animals and humans using the same water source. This is coupled with a prevalence 
of diseases such as diarrhoea and cholera in those wards which have evidence of lack of access to potable water. 
There are also a number of schools that do not have a supply of clean drinking water. 


3.3.6 Access To Sanitation 

3.3.6.1 Household Access to Sanitation 

PSJ has the highest backlog for sanitation in the district. According to the figure below which uses data sourced from 
the WSA, our sanitation backlog remains as high as 67% by 2011. 


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Chart 3.10: Access to Sanitation 

EC154 : PORT ST JOHNS ACCESS TO SANITATION 

3.4 (= 2.1 



■ Flush toilet 2011 ■ Flush toilet 2016 ■ Chemical toilet 2011 ■ Chemical toilet 2016 

■ Pit latrine 2011 • Pit latrine 2016 Bucket 2011 -Bucket 2016 


Table 3.5: Access to Sanitation 



Flush toilet 

Chemical toilet 

Pit latrine 

Bucket 

None 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

% 

EC154 : Port St Johns 

3.4 

2.1 

10.6 

36.4 

56.8 

38.4 

1.0 

2.0 

28.3 

19.7 


Source: Stats SA (census 2011 and Community Survey 2016 ) 


Sanitation is a proxy for human dignity and development. If access is limited or non-existent the dignity of our citizens 
is impaired. It is accepted now that our municipality will not meet the MDG target for water and sanitation. However, 
our leadership will work hard at lobbying the relevant authorities to rectify the situation in this term. 

In an attempt to understand the root causes of our failure to meet MDGs the WSA acknowledged that its ability to 
deliver water and sanitation services is hampered by the following challenges: 

• Huge Backlogs: Negligence of the area during the apartheid era. Topography of the area which makes it 
expensive for some areas to be services. 

• Old Infrastructure: Lack of refurbishment, and as result the infrastructure is being operated though it has 
far reached its design life span. 

• Infrastructure Capacity: Demand is in excess of available infrastructure due to rapid and unplanned growth 
and as such the infrastructure is over-strained which result in reduction of its lifespan 


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• Non Functional on Schemes especially standalones: Water resource scarcity and reliability. Drought as a 
result of climate change. 

• Pollution in environment: Sewer effluent discharged is not of acceptable standard due to lack of resources 
to upgrade of infrastructure 

• Lack of energy supply: Has an effect on the capacity of the infrastructure to be provided as the dependency 
is on diesel which are limiting on type of infrastructure that should be provided. 

• High Level of Vandalism and theft: High unemployment. 

• Shortage of skilled personnel: High Level of illiteracy, and unable to attract skilled personnel from other 
area due to financial constraints. 

• Poor Maintenance of existing infrastructure: Low revenue-generation, as many of the District's 
inhabitants are unemployed, and as such there is dependence on grants, which are very small. 

• Lack of funds for infrastructure investment planning: Due to the rural nature of the District, funds for 
infrastructure development are only provided through Grant funding. 


3.3.7 Access To Electricity And Energy Supply Sources 
3.3.7.1 Electricity Statistics 

Eskom is a sole provider of bulk electricity services in our jurisdictional areas while the municipality only purchases and 
resells to households few other users. 

Chart 3.11: Access to Energy 


100.0 



2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 2011 2016 


Electricity Other Electricity Other 

Lighting Cooking 

■ DC 15: O.R.Tambo ■ EC153 : Ngquza Hill ■ EC154 : Port St Johns 

BEC155 : Nyandeni bEC 156 : Mhlontlo ■ EC157 : King Sabata Dalindyebo 


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Table 3.6: Access to Energy 



Lighting 

Cooking 

Electricity 

Other 

Electricity 

Other 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

% 

DC 15: O.R.Tambo 


84.0 


16.0 


67.2 


32.8 

EC153 : Ngquza Hill 


84.9 


15.1 


57.9 


42.1 

EC154 : Port St Johns 


82.7 


17.3 


50.2 


49.8 

EC155 : Nyandeni 


81.9 


18.1 


63.8 


36.2 

EC156 : Mhlontlo 


84.3 


15.7 


71.4 


28.6 

EC157 : King Sabata Dalindyebo 


85.0 


15.0 


77.3 


22.7 


Source: Stats SA (Community Survey 2016) 


The table below tabulates the different forms of energy used in Port St Johns for lighting per ward. 


Chart 3.12: Energy per Ward 


10000 
o nnn 

annn 



7000 

6000 

5000 

4000 

3000 

2000 

1000 


















































































• 




■ 




■ 


















1 


L 















i . 

. i 



i . 

u 

ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward ward 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

■ Electricity ■ Candles ■ Solar HParafin aGas ■ Other 


Source: Stats SA (census 2011) 


Trends show significant improvement in household access to electricity for lighting purposes. This is largely attributable 
to massive capital investment in rural electrification during the last decade. The recent national statistics report shows 
that PSJ recorded a huge improvement on electricity connections which rose from 17% to about 66% by 2011 and 
82% in 2016. 17.3% of the population uses other forms of energy for lighting. Eskom has budgeted to spend between 
R7 and R15million over the next three years to fund projects in PSJ within its integrated national electrification 
programme. 


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3.3.7.1 Project Status on DOE Intervention 

Other forms of energy provision have been explored by the Municipality and accordingly, the municipality has received 
an Intervention from the Department of energy. With an amount of 65 million the project has been staggered in a 
three-year period, starting in 2016/17 financial year. An amount of 20 Million was allocated for 2016/17 but later 
reduced to 13million which that had impacted the original plan and the implementation of the project. Accordingly, 
adjustments have been made to accommodate this reduction. 

3.3.8 Access To Telecommunication 

Telkom has established telecommunication infrastructure in Port St Johns. In outlying rural areas, Digital Enhanced 
Cordless Telephone System (DECT) provides infrastructure for communication. Cellular telephones also provide 
coverage for up to 70% of the municipality. Despite this there remain significant backlogs especially in rural areas. 
Expansion of telecommunication technology and installation of conventional land lines is hampered by theft and 
vandalism of infrastructure. The major constraint in PSJ is the topography of the area. The mountainous terrain makes 
it very expensive to provide telecommunication infrastructure resulting in some areas not being provided for and 
certain instances having no cellular telephone coverage. Another factor is the rejection of high-masts by Environmental 
Affairs as they are not regarded as environmentally friendly in terms of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). 

Chart 3.13: Households Access to Telecommunication 

100 
80 
60 
40 
20 

0 - -- 

Access to telephone lines 



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Table 3.7: Households Access to Telecommunication 



2011 

2016 

Number 

Percent 

Number 

Percent 

Access to telephone lines 

793 

2.3 

357 

1.0 

Access to cellular phones 

25911 

76 

30337 

91 

Access to Internet 

5342 

16 

543 

1.6 


Source: Stats SA (census 2011 and Community Survey 2016 


Approximately 91% of households depend on cellular phones for telecommunication according to the table above. 


Technological development of the area is very slow and the situtation has not changed from previous IDP reports. This 
situation has a negative impact on the efficiency of local businesses, emergency institutions, SAPS as well as general 
communication by communities and tourists. In the midst of the stagnant technological development, in 2016 we 
welcomed the national intervention of the Broadband Project as it was tabled in the State of the Nation address in 
2015 to be delivered by the Department of Telecommunication and Postal Services. O. R. Tambo is one of the areas 
that have been prioritised to benefit in this project with its locals. Business case for Phase 1 has been developed and 
approved to connect 5803 sites. During SONA 2016, the President confirmed that funding to the tune of R740m over a 
three-year period has been allocated. Furthermore, the Minister of Finance announce an increase in the allocation for 
broadband to R1.6 billion over the MTEF. EC Provincial Broadband coordinating structures have been established. 


3.3.9 Roads & Storm Water 
3.3.9.1 Overview 

The municipality is responsible for the construction, maintenance and upgrading of local access roads and storm water 
infrastructure. Other roads are a responsibility of the District, Province and National department of Transport. The road 
.backlog is estimated at over 1400km of access roads and the municipality is not able to adequately address this 
backlog due to resources at its disposal. There are generally low levels of investments in road and related 
infrastructures and this has resulted in compounding backlogs. Participants at the representative forum workshops 
raised numerous concerns over lack of service delivery and infrastructure maintenance in many of our areas and also 
decried the wastage in terms of incomplete or poor workmanship experienced in certain projects. However, the 

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municipality had now prioritised investments in roads, bridges and storm water infrastructure. The municipality has 
budgeted to spend between R24 and R35 million on roads, pavements, bridges and storm water infrastructure 
development over the next 3 years. 

To ensure that services are delivered, coordinated according to the set development priorities and also have an 
integrated Municipal approach to issues, the Municipality has established a full Project Management Unit which include 
technicians, project accountant, data capturer and ISD officer. The Municipality has also adopted an EPWP policy to 
mainstream and better manage the work opportunities created through municipal projects and initiatives. 

3.3.10 Transportation 
3.3.10.1 Status Quo 

The OR Tambo District Municipality has developed an Integrated Transport Plan and has committed in assisting the LM 
with its own ITP. The Municipality is currently using the District ITP for transport planning and management. The 
proposed N2 toll road holds significant potential for the nodal development in three specific areas -Tombo, Ntafufu and 
the Port St John's urban node. Based on desktop research these are the three main areas that will be affected mainly 
due to increased traffic volumes as a result of transportation routes and tourism options. This in itself opens up a 
number of direct and indirect investment opportunities and a number of direct and indirect opportunities for 
entrepreneurial activity, including possible development in areas along the coastal node to the north and south of the 
Port St John's urban area. 

A need for a by-pass through Port St John's town, as a safety measure has been a big concern, particularly in view of 
floods and traffic congestion during holiday months. With regard to other areas, the impact of the N2 toll road will be 
minimal based on their geographic location and distance from the road itself. The only significant benefit for areas that 
are distant from the R61 would be easier access to Mthatha and Port St John's via the toll road, on the contrary, it is 
anticipated that taxi fares in this area will increase as a result of the tolling of this stretch of road and this could have a 
negative economic effect on the communities of Bambisana, Isilimela and other areas who need to access services in 
Mthatha and Port St Johns. 


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Through upgrades to the existing R61 road, the municipality has benefited through the construction of alternative 
roads and sidewalks (pedestrian and bicycle paths). The municipality has also managed to maintain and upgrade the 
taxi rank in town and in the process of engaging SANRAL for the formal establishment of the second Taxi Rank in 
Tombo. The two taxi ranks are operated by one taxi association. In a bid to improve revenue collection, the 
Municipality has commissioned and completed a traffic licensing and testing centre. The municipality has received a 
license from the Department of Transport. 


3.3.11 Community Services 

3.3.11.1 Mandate 

The Sector seeks to be responsive to the needs of the communities utilizing available resources effectively to improve 
community livelihoods 

3.3.11.2 Waste Management & Refuse Removal 

PSJ municipality is responsible for providing refuse removal service to its areas of jurisdiction. In the rural areas there 
is no formal refuse disposal system. This function is still restricted in town and its surrounding areas, mostly tourism 
nodes, due to limited resources. In expanding this service, Tombo Business area is identified and refuse collection is 
undertaken once a week. The collected refused is transported to the landfill site which is licensed. 


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Chart 3.14: Access to Refuse Removal 

... . O.R TAMBO ACCESS TO REFUSE REMOVAL 

100.0 

80.0 
60.0 
40.0 
20.0 
0.0 













ill 

I.J 

1 

1 

1 

r __ i 


lllli llih_ 


2011 2016 

2011 2016 

2011 2016 

2011 2016 

2011 2016 

2011 2016 

Removed by local 
authority at least 

Removed by local 
authority less often 

Communal refuse 
dump 

Own refuse dump 

No rubbish disposal 

Other 

awis&mbc 

l 

■ EC153 : Ngquza Hi 

ll 

■ EC154 : Port St 

Johns 


■ EC155 : Nyandeni 

Table 3.8: Access to Refuse Removal 


i EC156 : Mhlontlo 


■ EC157 : King Sabata Dalindyebo 




Removed by local 

authority at least 

once a week 

Removed by 

local authority 

less often 

Communal 

refuse 

dump 

Own refuse 

dump 

No rubbish 

disposal 

Other 



2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 

2011 

2016 



% 

DC 15: 

O .R. Tambo 

10.8 

9.0 

0.9 

0.7 

1.2 

3.8 

65.1 

75.7 

19.5 

10.4 

2.4 

0.6 

EC 153 

: Ngquza Hill 

3.3 

2.9 

0.6 

1.5 

1.4 

1.8 

74.0 

80.8 

18.4 

13.0 

2.3 

0.1 

EC 154 

: Port St Johns 

3.2 

0.5 

0.4 

0.2 

1.1 

2.4 

65.1 

75.6 

27.6 

19.2 

2.6 

2.2 

EC155 

: Nyandeni 

1.8 

1.0 

0.4 

0.7 

0.7 

2.2 

68.4 

86.8 

25.4 

9.0 

3.3 

0.3 

EC 156 

: Mhlontlo 

4.6 

1.8 

1.1 

0.2 

2.2 

4.3 

60.5 

82.4 

27.9 

10.2 

3.6 

1.1 

EC157 : King Sabata 

Dalindyebo 

25.0 

21.5 

1.6 

0.6 

0.9 

5.8 

60.4 

64.7 

10.7 

7.2 

1.5 

0.3 


Source: Stats SA (census 2011 and Community Survey 2016) 


According to the community survey report 2016 there has been a huge decline on waste removal from 3.2% to 0.5%. 
Annually, Port St Johns embarks on annual awareness cleaning campaign as a means of educating people about waste 
management and its impact on the environment. The Integrated Waste Management Plan (IWMP) was completed and 
was adopted by the council and MEC endorsed it. It is now implemented. The municipality has a community recycling 
project (Vukayibambe recyclers) taking place in the landfill site. The project was funded by the O R Tambo District 
municipality. They make sorting of material and sell it for their own profit. The illegal dumping is prohibited through 
the enforcement of municipal by-laws which were gazzeted in 2007. 


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Solid Waste Disposal 

Port St. Johns municipality landfill site is a licensed facility that is managed by the Municipality. The site gets 
rehabilitated on a quarterly basis with the assistance of the Engineering department. The department of Community 
Services has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the department of Engineering to give effect to this 
rehabilitation. 


3.3.11.3 Education Trends 


Chart 3.15: Level of Education 20+ 


30000 

25000 

20000 

15000 

10000 

5000 

0 



No schooling Some primary Completed Some Grade Higher Other 

primary secondary 12/Matric 


■ 2011 ■ 2016 


% LEVEL OF EDUCATION 20 + 

40 



No schooling Some primary Completed Some Grade Higher Other 

primary secondary 12/Matric 

■ 2011 ■ 2016 


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Table 3.9: Level of Education 20+ 



2011 

2016 

Number 

% 

Number 

% 

No schooling 

15696.8 

23.5 

11687.56 

16.1 

Some primary 

17077.7 

25.6 

15306.66 

21.1 

Completed primary 

3886.1 

5.8 

4273.55 

5.9 

Some secondary 

19400.8 

29.1 

27296.78 

37.7 

Grade 12/Matric 

8004.1 

12 

11344.32 

15.7 

Higher 

2501 

3.7 

2135.49 

2.9 

Other 

155.1 

0.2 

412.64 

0.6 


Provision of education and its programmes is the responsibility of the Department of Education as well as erection of 
early childhood learning facilities like creches. The municipality plays a facilitating role. In particular the municipality 
needs to communicate information to relevant authorities in terms of key priority areas needing education 
infrastructure and services. 

The municipality also has direct interest in the monitoring of education and functional literacy levels among its 
economically active population so as to ensure adequate supply of critical skills needed for growing the local economy. 

A number of schools are reportedly to be overpopulated with a shortage of classrooms and space while others are 
under populated and are undergoing a process of rationalization. Some schools do not have fencing thereby posing a 
threat to the safety of pupils and educators respectively. In addition to this, the maintenance of schools and 
equipment is still a problem. 

In summary, the conditions and challenges that need to be addressed to improve the standard of education is 
summarized as follows:- 

• Some schools are still mud structures and more new schools need to be built. 

• Limited classrooms result in overcrowding of children in schools as such there is a need for additional 
classrooms. 

• On the contrary, the small numbers of children in some schools have led to the need to rationalize existing 
schools. 


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• Some schools do not have access to clean water and sanitation putting children at risk of diseases such as 
cholera, diarrhoea etc. 

• A number of schools need fencing to ensure the safety of children. 

• Bad roads to some schools make it difficult to access such schools. 

• Some schools have access to scholar transport programme whilst others do not have. 

• Schools infrastructure needs to be improved, particularly access to libraries and science laboratories. 

There is also a shortage of high schools, which results in many children having to travel long distances to get to school. 
This problem is compounded by a lack of scholar transport. There are few ABET centres. There are shortages of 
teachers, books, computers and lack of maintenance programmes. The Department of Education has started initiative 
of reducing mud schools. Newly constructed schools are suitable even for the physically challenged. 

Generally, PSJ has low levels of literacy than any other municipality in the district. According to the figure below it 
currently records a functional literacy rate (being the average number of adult population with 20 years and above who 
have the ability to read, write and spell equivalent to a grade 07 learner). This situation is hoped to reduce steadily 
over the next few years owing to improved enrolment levels among our primary schools. According to statistics 
StatsSA 2011, PSJ has recorded some improvements in terms of school enrolments among peoples aged 6-13 years 
of age. The same report further claims that approximately 16% of the population has no schooling while another 
15.7% managed to attain a matriculation level by 2016. Only 2.9% of the adult population aged 20 years and above 
managed to attain education qualifications beyond matriculation, which is a decline from the 3.7% of 2011. 

This situation is viewed as a concern because it further compounds our development challenge. Our economy needs a 
skilled local labour force to be able to deal with required infrastructure development and improve chances of absorption 
of the unemployed into our active labour market. Port St Johns has no higher education centres such as colleges / 
FETs nor SETAs. This has resulted in a number of school-leaving populations migrating out of Port St Johns to search 
for tertiary institutions in other regions. This has an impact in level of skills the municipality is able to retain. 


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3.3.11.4 Health 

Primary health is a competence of the Provincial Department of Health. OR Tambo DM is responsible for municipal 
health. There are mainly four parties that provide health facilities in the study area namely, Department of health, OR 
Tambo District Municipality, PSJ municipality and Private institutions. 

Health facilities and services 

Port St John's municipality is composed of the following health facilities: 

■ Two Hospitals, that is, Isilimela and Bambisana 

■ Two Health Centres, that is, PSJ and Tombo 

■ One Community Based Service, in Bambisana 

■ Nineteen Clinics 

The Municipality and the Department of Health are committed to ensuring that local communities have access to 
efficient health facilities. There are a number of challenges that hinder the effective provision of this service. These 
include limited staff and equipment as well as lack of sufficient staff accommodation in these areas. There are no 
mobile points in the municipality, which are supposed to circulate once or twice a month depending on the demand of 
a particular area. Health visits are ideally supposed to be done every week in each mobile point but this is not done 
due to inadequacy of staff. Clinic services are generally not available at night or over weekends. 

The hospital in Isilimela sometimes has problems with its sewerage system while Ntafufu experiences problems with its 
telecommunication system. In addition to this, bad and poorly maintained roads result in the limited access to these 
facilities. HIV/AIDS is a serious threat to Port St Johns Municipality and has a negative impact on developmental 
aspects. It seems that the number of people infected constantly increases. Awareness campaigns and treatment 
centres are crucial. 


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3.3.11.5 Safety and Security 

Traffic Services 

The Unit helps to ensure a safe environment, and improves quality of life through effective traffic policing combined 
with efficient use of security officers. Traffic services include: 

• Control and regulate all forms of traffic, promote education and training in road and traffic safety; 

• Attend scenes of motor vehicle collisions and assist with traffic control, removal of injured persons, and 
removal of vehicles so that traffic may flow freely again; and 

• Eliminate points of congestion, obstruction, hindrance, interference, or danger to vehicles and pedestrians. 

Other areas of service provision currently requiring attention include by-law enforcement and crime prevention. 

The Municipality is currently recruiting Traffic Officers so as to balance the work that needs to be executed. 

Security Services 

• The internal Security Services Section's responsibilities include: 

• Protection of municipal assets; 

• Access control to municipal buildings; 

• The Municipality is embarking on a safe and lawful initiative. Key objective of this initiative is to provide camera 
surveillance of certain areas within the Municipality, so as to encourage a crime-free environment for the benefit 
of Port St. Johns communities, and to attract investors and promote development, tourism and job creation. 

In its commitment to fight against crime, Port S. Johns works closely with partners such as SAPS, Department of 
Justice and other safety and security agencies in a bid to prevent and reduce the negative effect of crime to our 
communities. Port St Johns as a municipality has a shortage of staff whose service is to fight crime or law enforcement 
officers. Only few traffic officers and security personnel who currently work with external stakeholders to combat 
crime. 


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The SAPS has a number of members whose function is to fight crime in our area. These include members who are part 
of crime prevention, community service centre (CSC), crime investigation, court, and support service members. An 
area of approximately 1 300 square kilometres in PSJ is currently policed. The ratio of functional police officials per 
community is reported to be 1:2377 whereas the recommended ratio is 1:500. That implies that there is still a 
shortage of workforce in the field of SAPS. The most common incidents are the following:- 

• Attacks on tourists 

• Faction fights 

• Theft 

• Robbery 

• Domestic related crime 

• Disasters (road accidents and drowning) etc. 

The station, among its priority, is focussed on addressing rape, murders, armed robbery, house breaking and assault 
with grievous bodily harm. Their main objective, however, is to make the community safe and secure for all its 
members. These crimes are commonly believed to be result of a lack of or limited street lights in certain areas, liquor 
abuse, deserted informal houses, shebeens as well as incautious movements of tourists. Community awareness 
programmes are constantly held by the police and the relevant stakeholders such as municipal law enforcement 
officers. This is most likely to reduce the crime rate in Port St John's Local municipality. 


3.3.11.6 Disaster Management 

a) Introduction 

The Disaster Management Act (57 of 2002) clearly outlines initiatives that must be undertaken to make sure that 
organs of state comply with the Act and policy framework on disaster management. Port St. Johns Municipality is 
prone to different types of disasters, both natural and human made. It is therefore important to understand that 
natural disasters cannot be prevented, but that the least the Municipality can do is to develop strategies to mitigate the 


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effectiveness of such natural disasters. In addition, it is important to note that human disasters can be prevented by 
making sure that continuous sharing of information takes place with the community at all times. 

Disaster management is a direct responsibility of the District Municipality but the PSJ municipality works closely with 
the DM to ensure functional systems and processes for responding to local disasters such as fire and other 
emergencies. The municipality does not have a localised response plan which provides for setting up of policy and 
institutional arrangements for dealing with disasters and liaising with the District. Port St. Johns has a satellite disaster 
management centre managed by the OR Tambo DM. The centre is not well resourced to cope with disasters that occur 
in Port St Johns. 

The well-equipped centre is located in Mthatha. Port St Johns municipality currently does not have budget to be utilized 
as an immediate relief in the event of a disaster in Port St Johns communities. 

The following are the common types of disaster risks: 

• Shark Attacks - slaughtering of animals for ritual sacrifices could be the contributing factor to the increase of 
sharks on the coastline. 

• Accidents linked to boat crossing in Umzimvubu, Mngazi and Noqhekwana Rivers. 

• Veld fires and communicable waterborne diseases 

• Seasonal overcrowding at Second Beach as a result of lack of access to other beaches. 

• Drowning in certain areas like Second Beach, Noqhekwana, Umzimvubu River and others. 


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b) Risk Assessment 

The following classification of hazards has been developed for the Municipality: 

Table 3.10: Risk Assessment 


DISASTER RISK PRIORITY 

RISK TYPE 

1 

Flooding 

2 

Drownings 

3 

Shark Attacks 

4 

Fires 

5 

Severe Weather conditions 

6 

Lighting incidents 

7 

Building collapse 

8 

Transportation incidents 

9 

Hazardous material 


c) Risk Reduction and Prevention 

Prevention and mitigation strategies identified in the District Disaster Management Plan include: 

• The development of an early warning system for natural disasters such as floods, hailstorms, and droughts; 

• Prevent forest fires by having fire breaks; 

• Upgrade and maintenance of infrastructure; 

• Develop protocols for specific risks; 

• Public awareness campaigns; 

• Replacement of old vehicles and machinery; 

• Establish rehabilitation centres; 

• Implementation of regular patrols. 

3.3.11.7 Community Facilities (Public Amenities) 

PSJ owns and manages a number of community facilities. In the last few years the municipality has developed and 
operated a number of community multipurpose halls. Due to lack of resources there is generally very little maintenance 
happening in most amenities especially sports fields, cemeteries, public parks and coastal or beach related facilities. 
Port has two cemetery sites, one is at Mthumbane Township and the other is in town. Of these two only one 
operational - the one in town although is about to be full and be closed. That one at Mthumbane was fully utilized and 


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was closed years ago. The identification of a new cemetery is vital, as the lack of burial space in the existing 
cemeteries will seriously impact on service delivery in the near future. 


Table 3.11: Public Amenities 


Facility 

Number 

Community Halls 

9 

Sports facilities 

5 

Cemeteries 

2 

Beach facilities 

12 

Library 

4 

Heritage Sites 

2 

Parks 

2 


3.3.12 Environmental Management Profile 

3.3.12.1 State of Environment Overview 

Port St Johns is charged with the responsibility to take care of the environment such as beaches, air quality, noise 
pollution, health and hygiene. The municipality has not managed to develop adequate capacity for responding to this 
mandate. For instance, there are no environmental specialists to deal with day to day environmental management 
responsibilities. Port St Johns is an important and strategic national and regional environmental space. It falls within 
the Wild Coast SDI gently undulating coastline, rocky outcrops and sandy beaches inhabit unique ecosystem that needs 
protection. In this current term, the Municipality takes priority of this and is currently recruiting an environmental 
specialist to attend to these environmental issues. One of the urgent priorities of the Council is the development of an 
Environmental Policy and other relevant and crucial strategic plan that will guide the environment management. 

3.3.12.2 Physical Environment 

a) Geography & Topography, Vegetation & Biodiversity, Nature & Conservation, Rivers & Drainage 

Port St Johns has a unique geography, topography and vegetation. It is mainly characterized by mountainous terrain 
with hills, cliffs, beaches and sandy dunes. The area is so steep such that it makes development very expensive. 


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The areas in close proximity to the ocean and rivers have a lesser gradient and are susceptible to flooding. Natural 
vegetation plays a vital role in the economic performance of the area as it is one of the main attractions for tourists. 
Unlike most regions in the country, much of the natural vegetation in Port St Johns has not been touched. It is 
therefore imperative that communities are encouraged to conserve it and use it in a sustainable manner. Following are 
the types of vegetation that are found in the region: 

• Coastal Forest Thornveld - found along coastal area. 

• Coastal Bushveld Savannah mostly found in central part of the region. 

• Eastern Valley Bushveld on the north western side. 

• Afromontane Forest in the small pockets, mostly concentrated in the central eastern side of the region. 

• Scarp Forest along the coast. 

• Ngongoni Veld on the western parts of the municipality. 

• Lantana - found almost in all the wards 

Most of the natural vegetation within the municipality (73.5%) is undisturbed (Biodiversity GIS, 2007). The only formal 
land-based protected area in PSJM is the Silaka Wildlife Reserve. This is a provincial nature reserve that covers 262.6 
ha (0.2%) of the Municipality. The only Marine Protected Area in the PSJM is the Pondoland offshore Controlled Zone. 
The biomes of the PSJM include Savanna (52.41% of the Municipality), the Indian Ocean Coastal Belt (47.14% of the 
Municipality) and Grassland (0.13% of the Municipality). There are twelve different vegetation types that cover 128 
712.9 ha of the 129 120 ha of the Municipality (Biodiversity GIS, 2007). These vegetation types include Ngongoni Veld 
(26.77% of the Municipality), Eastern Valley Bushveld (23.96% of the Municipality), and Scarp Forest (9.58% of the 
Municipality) (Biodiversity GIS, 2007). The endangered terrestrial ecosystems include the Mount Thesiger forest 
complex (3.9% of the Municipality) and the mangrove forest (0.1% of the Municipality), while the vulnerable 
ecosystems include the Ngongoni Veld (15.49% of the Municipality), Transkei coastal forest (6.49% of the 
Municipality) and Midlands Mistbelt Grassland (0.01% of the Municipality). This means that 26% of the terrestrial 
ecosystems within the PSJM are threatened. The Ngongoni Veld is clearly very important, since it is a prominent 
vegetation type and threatened ecosystem within the PSJM. The Ngongoni Veld is so named since it is dominated by 
the Ngongoni grass (Aristida junciformis). 


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There are five rivers within the Municipality, the largest of which being the Umzimvubu River. There are also 88 
wetlands and 13 estuaries (Biodiversity GIS, 2007). Three main rivers flow from the north to the Indian Ocean in the 
south and separate PSJM into three catchments. The largest of these rivers is the Umzimvubu River. Some ward 
boundaries are delineated by these rivers. There is inadequate infrastructure (boats and bridges) to cross the rivers, 
which impacts on both the mobility and safety of the community. Many communities have cited frequent drownings as 
a result. Drainage depends on river levels, storm conditions and tides, and is generally poor. Ecotourism plays an 
important role in the economy of the PSJM. It is therefore important to continue to protect the natural resources of the 
PSJM. Poor waste management practices can negatively affect and/or destroy such resources, giving further impetus 
for the practicing of sound waste management practices within the Municipality. 

There are 1 053 types of plants and 164 plant families found around Port St Johns. This unique vegetation harbours 
rare bird species, providing evidence of the rich biodiversity in Port St Johns. 

b) Geology and Soils 

Port St Johns is dominated by sandstones of the Beaufort Group (Karoo Supergroup). Sediments of the Ecca Group are 
deposited around the Horst of the Table Mountain Group in the northern coastal region of Port St Johns. These 
sedimentary rocks are relatively resistant. Along the areas coastline are sediments of the Dwyka and Ecca Groups 
containing many intrusions. Although the soils are suitable for intensive cultivation and vegetable gardening, they are 
generally highly erodible. The riparian areas and veld are poorly managed, which could result in the formation of 
erosion dongas and gullies. 

c) Climate 

Port St Johns is a subtropical coastal area with a moderate, humid climate. Summer temperatures range between an 
average of 20°C and 25°C. Winters are mild with temperatures that range between an average of 8°C and 21°C. 
Annual rainfall is between 1 100 and 1 400 mm, and falls predominantly between October and March. While climatic 
extremes and local variations do occur, Port St Johns enjoys relatively good weather. 


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d) Open Space (Parks and Recreation) 

The need for public recreational parks in Port St Johns cannot be overemphasized. A small park at the entrance of the 
town has been developed by the PSJ Development Agency. Recreational facilities are limited to sports fields which are 
located in different wards. These facilities are currently maintained by municipality in terms of grass cutting using the 
tractor. Those sports fields are very few to meet the requirements and the needs of the Port St Johns clubs. 

3.3.12.3 Climate Change 

One of the priorities of the current term is to address the issues of climate change. The first stop towards achieving 
this is the development of a Climate Change Policy. One key objective of the Policy will be to ensure that all Municipal 
Business Units are compelled to take environmental impacts of their activities / plans into consideration and ensure 
that there are suitable strategies in place which enable cooperative and coordinated environmental management 
throughout Municipal structures and activities. 

Secondly the Policy will ensure that Port St. Johns is able to adapt to climate change related impacts and ensure that 
there are options available when decisions need to be made regarding adaptation and mitigation. The relevance, 
effectiveness and implementation of this policy will be managed through on-going monitoring, evaluation and review to 
ensure it reflects the most recent developments in climate change science and technology, and delivers on the 
Municipality's statutory responsibilities. 


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KEY PERFOMANCE AREA #3 
FINANCIAL VIABILITY & 
MANAGEMENT 


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3.4.1 Overview Of Municipal Financial Viability 

PSJ remains financially viable despite known challenges of: 

• Lack of skills capacity in certain critical areas 

• Low levels of revenue base coupled with poor rate of payment 

• Consistent reliance on grant funding as the main source of our budget 

• Limited systems and shortfalls in some aspects of our internal controls 

• Limited revenue resources to cater for all our infrastructure needs 

• Skewed budget with higher rate of operational expenditure compared to operational capital expenditure 

3.4.2 Capability To Execute Capital Projects 

This section summarizes key elements from the municipal budget. The municipality has capacity to spend its capital 
budget with the reflection of the previous financial years. 


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.EC154 Port St Johns - Table A5 Budgeted Capital Expenditure by vote, functional classification and funding 


EC154 Port St Johns ■ Table A5 Budgeted Capital Expenditure by vote, functional classification and funding 


Vote Description 

Ref 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 


Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Pre-audit 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 


Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

outcome 

2018/19 

+1 2019/20 

+2 2020/21 

Capital expenditure - Vote 

Multi-vear expenditure to be appropriated 

2 











Vote 1 - Executive and council 


166 

1,252 

1,010 

2,070 

2,008 

2,008 

2,008 

1,568 

371 

390 

Vote 2 - Budget and treasury Office 


554 

604 

460 

1,300 

160 

160 

160 

100 

105 

111 

Vote 3 - Community services 


1,802 

218 

1,546 

1,952 

456 

456 

456 

2,422 

2,548 

2,680 

Vote 4 - Corporate services 


377 

343 

262 

- 

- 

- 

- 

50 

53 

55 

Vote 5 - Planning and development 


19 

96 

59 

900 

- 

- 

- 

450 

53 

55 

Vote 6 - Enginnering services 


40,489 

28,642 

48,856 

63,822 

63,265 

63,265 

63,265 

89,145 

80,978 

70,042 

Vote 7 - [NAME OF VOTE 7] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 8 - [NAME OF VOTE 8] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 9 - [NAME OF VOTE 9] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 10 - [NAME OF VOTE 10] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 11 - [NAME OF VOTE 11] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 12 - [NAME OF VOTE 12] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 13 - [NAME OF VOTE 13] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 14 - [NAME OF VOTE 14] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 15 - [NAME OF VOTE 15] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Capital multi-year expenditure sub-total 

7 

43,406 

31,155 

52,192 

70,044 

65,889 

65,889 

65,889 

93,734 

84,107 

73,334 

Sinale-vear expenditure to be appropriated 

2 











Vote 1 - Executive and council 


- 

- 

- 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 2 - Budget and treasury Office 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 3 - Community services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 4 - Corporate services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 5 - Planning and development 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 6 - Enginnering services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 7 - [NAME OF VOTE 7] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 8 - [NAME OF VOTE 8] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 9 - [NAME OF VOTE 9] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 10 - [NAME OF VOTE 10] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 11-[NAME OF VOTE 11] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 12 - [NAME OF VOTE 12] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 13 - [NAME OF VOTE 13] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 14 - [NAME OF VOTE 14] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 15-[NAME OF VOTE 15] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Capital single-year expenditure sub-total 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total Capital Expenditure - Vote 


43,406 

31,155 

52,192 

70,044 

65,889 

65,889 

65,889 

93,734 

84,107 

73,334 

Capital Expenditure - Functional 












Governance and administration 


720 

1,856 

1,469 

3,370 

2,168 

2,168 

2,168 

1,718 

413 

434 

Executive and council 


166 

1,252 

1,010 

2,070 

2,008 

2,008 

2,008 

1,568 

255 

268 

Finance and administration 

Internal audit 


554 

604 

460 

1,300 

160 

160 

160 

150 

158 

166 

Community and public safety 


1,802 

218 

1,546 

1,952 

456 

456 

456 

2,422 

2,548 

2,680 

Community and social services 

Sport and recreation 

Public safety 

Housing 

Health 


1,802 

218 

1,546 

1,952 

456 

456 

456 

2,422 

2,548 

2,680 

Economic and environmental services 


40,508 

28,738 

48,915 

64,722 

63,265 

63,265 

63,265 

89,595 

81,030 

70,098 

Planning and development 


19 

96 

59 

900 

- 

- 

- 

450 

53 

55 

Road transport 

Environmental protection 


40,489 

28,642 

48,856 

63,822 

63,265 

63,265 

63,265 

89,145 

80,978 

70,042 

Trading services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Energy sources 

Water management 

Waste water management 

Waste management 












Other 












Total Capital Expenditure - Functional 

3 

43,029 

30,812 

51,931 

70,044 

65,889 

65,889 

65,889 

93,734 

83,991 

73,212 

Funded by: 























National Government 


40,302 

28,248 

45,081 

60,339 

52,897 

52,897 

52,897 

59,645 

47,145 

48,916 

Provincial Government 

District Municipality 

Other transfers and grants 






7,442 

7,442 

7,442 

26,775 

33,780 

21,071 

Transfers recognised - capital 

4 

40,302 

28,248 

45,081 

60,339 

60,339 

60,339 

60,339 

86,420 

80,925 

69,987 

Public contributions & donations 

5 











Borrowing 

Internally generated funds 

6 

2,728 

2,564 

6,850 

9,705 

5,550 

5,550 

5,550 

7,314 

3,066 

3,225 

Total Capital Funding 

7 

43,029 

30,812 

51,931 

70,044 

65,889 

65,889 

65,889 

93,734 

83,991 

73,212 


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3.4.3 Free Basic Services Cost To The Municipality 

The municipality has an indigent register and annually people are invited to register as per the adopted policy. The 
indigent policy is reviewed annually as required by the Legislation. The Council Adopted the Indigent Policy for 
implementation in 2017/18 financial year. The purpose of the policy is to make provision for basic services to the 
community in a sustainable manner within the financial and administrative capacity of the Council. Whilst indigents 
refer to people who are lacking the necessities of life such as sufficient water, basic sanitation, refuse removal, 
environmental health, and basic energy. Council receives Equitable Share to subsidize those who cannot afford to pay 
for the minimum needs. The objective in calculating the amount to be subsidized, must be to prevent an increasing 
balance on the account of an indigent as it will be difficult to recover the debt in a humanly way. 

According to the Municipal Systems Act 2000, Section 74(3) and 75(2) stipulates, "A tariff policy may differentiate 
between different categories of users/debtors.'' 

Criteria for Approval: 

1. That the gross household income for qualification as a registered Indigent be determined each year by Council in 
terms of the tariff register. 

2. That the prescribed application forms be completed annually 


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EC154 Port St Johns - Table A10 Basic service delivery measurement 


EC154 Port St Johns ■ Table A10 Basic service delivery measurement 


Description 

Ref 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Original 

Budget 

Adjusted 

Budget 

Full Year 

Forecast 

Budget Year 

2018/19 

Budget Year 

+1 2019/20 

Budget Year 

+2 2020/21 

Household service tarqets 

1 










Water: 











Piped water inside dwelling 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Piped water inside yard (but not in dwelling) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Using public tap (at least min.service level) 

2 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

Other water supply (at least min.service level) 

4 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Minimum Service Level and Above sub-total 


23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

Using public tap (< min.service level) 

3 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other water supply (< min.service level) 

4 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

No water supply 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Below Minimum Sen/ice Level sub-total 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total number of households 

5 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

23,732 

Electricity (< min.service level) 


2,000,000 

3,500,000 

3,500,000 

3,000,000 

3,000,000 

3,000,000 

4,208,000 

4,426,816 

4,657,010 

Electricity - prepaid (< min. service level) 


- 

- 

- 

2,000,000 

2,230,000 

2,230,000 

1,293,360 

1,360,615 

1,431,367 

Other energy sources 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Below Minimum Service Level sub-total 


2,000,000 

3,500,000 

3,500,000 

5,000,000 

5,230,000 

5,230,000 

5,501,360 

5,787,431 

6,088,377 

Total number of households 

5 

2,000,000 

3,500,000 

3,500,000 

5,000,000 

5,230,000 

5,230,000 

5,501,360 

5,787,431 

6,088,377 

Refuse: 











Removed at least once a week 


425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

Minimum Service Level and Above sub-total 


425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

Removed less frequently than once a week 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Using communal refuse dump 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Using own refuse dump 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other rubbish disposal 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

No rubbish disposal 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Below Minimum Service Level sub-total 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

- 

- 

Total number of households 

5 

425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

425 

Households receivinq Free Basic Service 

7 










Water (6 kilolitres per household per month) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Sanitation (free minimum level service) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Electricity/other energy (50kwh per household per month) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Refuse (removed at least once a week) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Cost of Free Basic Services provided - Formal Settlements (R’000) 

8 










Water (6 kilolitres per indigent household per month) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Sanitation (free sanitation service to indigent households) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Electricity/other energy (50kwh per indigent household per month) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Refuse (removed once a week for indigent households) 


- 

- 

- 


- 

- 

- 


- 

Revenue cost of subsidised services provided (R'000) 

9 










Property rates (tariff adjustment) (impermissable values per section 17 of MPRA) 
Property rates exemptions, reductions and rebates and impermissable values in 
excess of section 17 of MPRA) 








2,104 

2,213 

3,364 

Water (in excess of 6 kilolitres per indigent household per month) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Sanitation (in excess of free sanitation service to indigent households) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Electricity/other energy (in excess of 50 kwh per indigent household per month) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Refuse (in excess of one removal a week for indigent households) 

Municipal Housing - rental rebates 

Housing - top structure subsidies 

Other 

6 










Total revenue cost of subsidised services provided 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

2,104 

2,213 

3,364 


3.4.4 Financial Management By-Laws & Policies 

Port St Johns Municipality has adopted the following financial management policies which guide the development of the 
annual budget: 


• Credit Control and Debt collection Policy 

The Policy responds to S96 of the Systems Act, which compels a municipality to: 

• Collect all money that is due and payable to it subject to this Act and any other applicable legislation; 
and 


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• For this purpose, must adopt, maintain and implement a credit control and debt collection policy, which 
is consistent with rates and tariff policies and complies with the provisions of this Act. 

• Supply Chain Management Policy 

The Purpose of the SCM policy is to ensure that the Municipality procures goods and services in an efficient, timely and 
cost-effective manner, ensures customer satisfaction, pursues socio-economic objectives through a preference system 
and demonstrates compliance with the constitution and all relevant legislation. 

• Rates Policy 

The Policy is developed in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government: Municipal Property Rates Act, (Act 
6 of 2004) to ensure that property rating in Port St Johns Municipality is carried out in a fair, consistent, considerate 
and controlled manner. 

• Indigent Policy 

The purpose of the policy is to make provision for basic services to the community in a sustainable manner within the 
financial and administrative capacity of the Council. 

• Asset Management Policy 

The policy for the management of property, plant and equipment (PPE/ Capital Asset) has been developed to assist the 
Municipality with the following: 

Description of management procedures for PPE. 

It also should assist with the capacity to differentiate between activities, which are acceptable in terms of 
general authorization, supervisory responsibilities and limits of authority to the management of PPE and 
functions of the organisation. 

Provides certainty with respect to the handling of PPE management procedures undertaken within the 
organisation and will ensure that management and employees understand their respective responsibilities and 
duties. 

This policy replaces all fixed asset management procedures/instructions and memoranda that have been 
previously issued. 


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• Funding and Reserves Policy 

This policy aims to set standards and guidelines towards ensuring financial viability over both the short and long term 
and includes funding as well as reserves requirements. 

• Cash and Investment Management Policy 

The objective of the Policy is to gain the highest possible return without unnecessary risks during periods when excess 
funds are not being used. 

• Budget and Virement Policy 

The Budget and Virement Policy aims to empower Senior Managers with an efficient financial and budgetary 
amendment and control system to ensure optimum service delivery within the legislative framework of the MFMA and 
the Municipality's system of delegations. 

The Budget and Virement Policy will be approved by the council during the financial year. 

• Tariff Schedules 

The Municipality's tariff policies provide a broad framework within which the Council can determine fair, transparent 
and affordable charges that also promote sustainable service delivery. The policies have been reviewed and a 
consolidated tariff policy is envisaged to be compiled for ease of administration and implementation of the next two 
years. 

• Fleet Policy 

The policy is meant to ensure an effective and efficient control, utilization, safeguarding, and managing of municipal 
vehicles and equipment. 

• Borrowing Policy 

The policy seeks to establish a framework and guidelines for the borrowing of funds. 


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• Long term Financial Planning 

The policy on long term financial planning is aimed at ensuring that Port St John's Municipality has sufficient and cost- 
effective funding in order to achieve its long term objectives through the implementation of the medium term 
operating and capital budgets. 

Over and above the listed policies the municipality will be embarking on a journey of developing some of financial 
management policies which will be promulgated by relevant by-laws, such policies will be reviewed on annual basis like 
the rest of other policies. The Credit Control and Debt Collection by-law, Rates by-laws and Immovable Assets by-laws 
by have been gazetted and are reviewed annually. 

3.4.5 Financial Recovery Plan 


In 2016/17 the Municipality along Provincial Treasury undertook a financial recovery project as means of addressing or 
mitigating the financial and cash flow challenges the municipality is currently experiencing. The project was completed 
in December 2016. 


3.4.6 Supply Chain Management 


The municipality has a supply chain management unit. The Unit is a support function for all business units within the 
Council, to ensure provision of efficient, transparent, fair, equitable, and cost effective procurement services, assisting 
them to implement their service delivery priorities. In terms of the Municipal Finance Management Act's SCM 
regulations, the SCM unit is established to implement the SCM policy adopted by Council. It operates under the direct 
supervision of the Chief Financial Officer (CFO). Core functions include procurement services, disposal management, 
SCM risk management, and contract management and Fleet management. The SCM Policy is reviewed on an annual 
basis. The three Bid Committees have been established and are fully functional. The procurement turnover rate is 
three months and the municipality is striving to improve this rate. The municipality does not have a separate contract 
management unit it utilises SCM Senior Accountant and Legal Advisor to draft contracts. 


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3.4.7 Infrastructure Assets 

The asset register has been updated with all movable and immovable assets, including investment property, and is 
GRAP and MSCOA compliant. The verification, conditional assessment, and revaluation of infrastructure assets have 
been done and updated in the asset register in compliance with MSCOA. Movable assets are verified on an annual 
basis. The asset register is updated, on a monthly basis, with asset acquisitions (movable and immovable), disposals, 
and movements. 


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EC154 Port St Johns - Table A9 Asset Management 


Description 

Ref 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 


Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 


Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

2018/19 

+1 2019/20 

+2 2020/21 

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE 











Total New Assets 

1 

43,029 

30,812 

51,931 

70,044 

65,889 

65,889 

93,734 

83,991 

73,212 

Roads Infrastructure 


40,302 

28,248 

45,081 

36,380 

36,380 

36,380 

36,705 

34,345 

36,116 

Storm water Infrastructure 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

23,775 

33,780 

21,071 

Electrical Infrastructure 


- 

- 

- 

18,000 

18,000 

18,000 

25,940 

12,800 

12,800 

Infrastructure 


40,302 

28,248 

45,081 

54,380 

54,380 

54,380 

86,420 

80,925 

69,987 

Community Facilities 


- 

- 

133 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Sport and Recreation Facilities 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Community Assets 


- 

- 

133 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Heritage Assets 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Revenue Generating 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Non-revenue Generating 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Investment properties 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Operational Buildings 


341 

322 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1,900 

421 

443 

Housing 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other Assets 


341 

322 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1,900 

421 

443 

Biological or Cultivated Assets 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Servitudes 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Licences and Rights 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Intangible Assets 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Computer Equipment 


- 

- 

- 

20 

375 

375 

273 

287 

302 

Furniture and Office Equipment 


662 

805 

1,010 

2,602 

308 

308 

305 

295 

310 

Machinery and Equipment 


1,724 

1,437 

5,708 

13,042 

10,825 

10,825 

4,837 

2,064 

2,171 

Total Capital Expenditure 

4 










Roads Infrastructure 


40,302 

28,248 

45,081 

36,380 

36,380 

36,380 

36,705 

34,345 

36,116 

Storm water Infrastructure 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

23,775 

33,780 

21,071 

Electrical Infrastructure 


- 

- 

- 

18,000 

18,000 

18,000 

25,940 

12,800 

12,800 

Infrastructure 


40,302 

28,248 

45,081 

54,380 

54,380 

54,380 

86,420 

80,925 

69,987 

Community Facilities 


- 

- 

133 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Sport and Recreation Facilities 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Community Assets 


- 

- 

133 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Operational Buildings 


341 

322 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1,900 

421 

443 

Housing 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other Assets 


341 

322 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1,900 

421 

443 

Computer Equipment 


- 

- 

- 

20 

375 

375 

273 

287 

302 

Furniture and Office Equipment 


662 

805 

1,010 

2,602 

308 

308 

305 

295 

310 

Machinery and Equipment 


1,724 

1,437 

5,708 

13,042 

10,825 

10,825 

4,837 

2,064 

2,171 

Transport Assets 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Libraries 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Zoo's, Marine and Non-biological Animals 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE - Asset class 


43,029 

30,812 

51,931 

70,044 

65,889 

65,889 

93,734 

83,991 

73,212 

ASSET REGISTER SUMMARY - PPE (WDV) 

5 










Roads Infrastructure 

Storm water Infrastructure 


249,050 

264,199 

286,852 

436,531 

429,089 

429,089 

451,402 

474,875 

499,568 

Electrical Infrastructure 





18,000 

18,000 

18,000 

25,940 

12,800 

12,800 

Information and Communication Infrastructure 





1,501 

8,943 

8,943 

9,408 

9,897 

10,412 

Infrastructure 


249,050 

264,199 

286,852 

456,032 

456,032 

456,032 

486,750 

497,572 

522,780 

Community Facilities 

Sport and Recreation Facilities 


10,210 

9,803 

9,449 







Community Assets 

Heritage Assets 


10,210 

9,803 

9,449 

- 



~ 

- 


Revenue Generating 

Non-revenue Generating 


11,461 

11,461 

11,461 







Investment properties 


11,461 

11,461 

11,461 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Operational Buildings 

Housing 


97,840 

96,873 

98,993 

8,222 

8,422 

8,422 

8,859 

9,320 

9,805 

Other Assets 


97,840 

96,873 

98,993 

8,222 

8,422 

8,422 

8,859 

9,320 

9,805 

TOTAL ASSET REGISTER SUMMARY - PPE (WDV) 

5 

368,561 

382,336 

406,755 

464,254 

464,454 

464,454 

495,609 

506,892 

532,585 

EXPENDITURE OTHER ITEMS 











Depreciation 

7 

- 

(28,821) 

(26,383) 

39,290 

39,290 

39,290 

39,290 

41,712 

43,881 

Repairs and Maintenance bv Asset Class 

3 

2,320 

2,160 

3,373 

5,841 

5,841 

5,841 

9,613 

10,112 

9,812 





684 

4,250 

4,250 

4,250 

6,423 

6,757 

5,453 

Storm water Infrastructure 


- 

- 








Electrical Infrastructure 


- 

- 

19 

- 

- 

- 

200 

210 

320 

Infrastructure 


- 

- 

704 

4,250 

4,250 

4,250 

6,623 

6,967 

5,772 

Operational Buildings 


670 

2,160 

1,382 

- 

- 

- 

896 

942 

991 

Housing 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other Assets 


670 

2,160 

1,382 

- 

- 

- 

896 

942 

991 

Computer Equipment 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

80 

84 

97 

Furniture and Office Equipment 


35 

- 

105 

60 

60 

60 

42 

44 

51 

Machinery and Equipment 


1,615 

~ 

1,183 

1,531 

1,531 

1,531 

1,972 

2,075 

2,901 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE OTHER ITEMS 


2,320 

(26,661) 

(23,010) 

45,131 

45,131 

45,131 

48,903 

51,824 

53,693 


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3.4.8 Tariff schedule for 2018/2019 

Tariff Schedule 2018/19 



2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

REFUSE REMOVAL fDer month for one removal Der weekf 

Tariff 

Tariff 

Tariff 

Domestic Consumers xl 

89.89 

95.28 

100.99 

SME'S Commercial Consumers x7 

626.97 

664.59 

704.46 

Large Commercial Consumers x7 

1,253.24 

1,328.44 

1,408.15 

Government/Hospitals//Hostels/Schools/Flats x5 

447.63 

474.49 

502.95 

Bed & Breakfast 

179.02 

189.76 

201.15 

Holiday resorts 

358.07 

379.55 

402.32 

Rubble per load 

334.71 

354.79 

376.07 

Garden Refuse Removal per load 

200.81 

212.86 

225.63 

The tariff is based on 85L Bin/bag Iper week 









RATES 


1. Unless indicated otherwise the following tariffs are applicable throughout the Port St Johns Municipal area. 

2. Interest at the Standard Interest Rate would be charged on all late payments. 

2016/2017 2017/2018 2018/2019 


DIFFERENT CATEGORY OF PROPERTIES 

Tariff 

Tariff 

Tariff 

Per Rand on Valuation of all Residential Properties 

0.007 

0.007 

0.007 

Per Rand on Valuation of all Business Properties 

0.012 

0.013 

0.013 

Per Rand on Valuation of all Industrial Properties 

0.013 

0.014 

0.014 

Per Rand on Valuation of all Government Properties 

0.040 

0.013 

0.013 

Per Rand on Valuation of all vacant land (erven) according their zc 

0.013 

0.014 

0.014 

Per Rand on Valuation of all Farms used for Agricultural purposes 

0.013 

0.014 

0.014 

Per Rand on Valuation of all Farms used for eco-tourism/converst 

0.013 

0.014 

0.014 

Per Rand on Valuation of all Farms used for trading in/ hunting of 

0.013 

0.014 

0.014 

Per Rand on Valuation of all Public Service Infrustracture 

0.013 

0.014 

0.014 

Per Rand on Valuation of all Public Benefif Organisations 

- 

- 

- 

Per Rand on Valuation of all Multiple use Properties - Dorminant use shall be deemed for determination of rate/tariff 


REBATES ON RATABLE PROPERTIES 





2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

Public service infrastruture 

30% 

30% 

30% 

Senior Citizens 

50% 

50% 

50% 

Indigents 

100% 

100% 

100% 

Newly Rateble Properties (phase-in over 3 years) 75%,50%,25% 

50% 

100% 

100% 


All other Rebates,Exemptions and Discounts will be effected according to Municipal Rates Policy 


_ STANDARD INTEREST 

15% per annum 


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3.4.9 Revenue Management 

a) Core Business 

• Billing of customers-this is done every month end and billing statements are printed and distributed. 

• Debt management-Handing over of debtors to debt collectors 

• Credit control-contacting debtors and encouraging payment arrangements to be made. 

• Customer care-attending of debtors queries and correspondence 

• Revenue collection-receiving, receipting and daily banking of cash received 

• Performing monthly debt by type report, debtors reconciliations, rates and services reconciliations. 

• Monthly monitoring of grant income. 

b) Revenue Profile 

The municipality has a limited revenue base. Its major sources of revenue are property rates; refuse removal, rental of 
facilities, license and permits. PSJLM is grant depend as own revenue accounts for only 6% of the total revenue. The 
municipality is determined to increase revenue collection to 70% in the 2016/17 financial year and an annual 
increment of 10%. The municipality has a revenue enhancement strategy and is currently being reviewed. 

The municipality has 1300 accounts in total including government properties. A high percentage of the municipality's 
population is unemployed and therefore unable to pay rates or for services. 

Port St Johns municipality has performed as follows on capital expenditure for the past three financial years: 
Table 3.12: 


2013/2014 

2014/2015 

2015/2016 

2016/17 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 


The municipality has fully spent MIG in the past three financial years. 


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3.4.10 Audit Outcomes, Audit Committee and Internal Audit 


PSJLM has an agreement with ORTDM to provide internal auditing functions. The agreement is renewed after every 3 
years. Both Internal auditing charter and Audit committee charter are in place and signed by the chairperson of the 
Audit Committee. 

• There is an existing Audit Committee as per requirements of the MFMA. 

• Over the past three financial years, PSJLM received qualified audit opinion. Improvements have been made on 

the number of matter of emphasis issued. 

• The municipality has developed and adopted the audit action plan in order to address AG's finding and 
eliminate any recurring findings. 

• The municipality has developed an Annual Financial Statement process as the municipality compiles AFS in 
house supported by an appropriate audit file. 

• The AFS process plan has been submitted to the Audit Committee. 

• PSJ Municipality ensures that there is adequate internal control through credible financial system, systematic 

filling system and procedure manuals. 

Table 3.13: Audit opinions for the last four financial years are as follows 


Financial year 

2012/13 

2013/14 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

OUTCOME 

Qualified 

Qualified 

Disclaimer 

Qualified 

Qualified 


Notwithstanding certain challenges, the municipality is committed to the goal of achieving a clean audit by 2020. 

This Audit Action Plan will comprise a key part of the contracting arrangements between the municipality and the CFO 
moving forward. 

The plan includes a number of improvements and introductions into the systems of accounting and reporting such as: 

• Regular management reporting on their AG concerns 


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• New controls to manage and curb poor documentation trail for expenditure 

• Training and capacity building for all managers on financial management 

• Mechanisms for definition and registration of new assets especially from the technical services division 

• Lack of integration of the IDP objectives and municipal performance management plans etc. 


3.4.11 Valuation Roll 

The old valuation roll with its supplements has been used as the basis for the new valuation roll. In an effort to 
improve municipal billing, a service provider was appointed to undertake a data cleansing exercise on the billing 
system. 


3.4.12 Budget Alignment 


The IDP and budget has been adequately aligned, SDBIP has been aligned to the budget. The following documents will 
be submitted with the budget: 

. SDBIP 

• Procurement Plans 

• Tariff structure 

• Budget related policies 


3.4.13 Expenditure Management 

The unit operates under the supervision of the CFO and is responsible for: 

• Receiving invoices from various departments. 

• Making sure that all supporting documents are attached to the invoice 

• Listing & capturing of invoice on arrival to the system 

• Payment of all outstanding invoices within 30 days as per MFMA 

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• Processing of salaries & Payment of third parties before 07 of every month 

• Capturing & updating of vouchers on PROMUNE 

• Prepare monthly bank reconciliation 

• Prepare monthly payroll reconciliations 

• Prepare monthly cash flow projections 

• Listing of fruitless & wasteful expenditure 

3.4.14 Municipal Standard Charts Of Accounts (MSCOA) 

National Treasury issued Government Gazette No 37577, Municipal Regulations on Standard Chart of Accounts, which 
is effective 01 July 2017. The objective is to have a National Standard for uniform recording and classification of 
municipal budget and financial information at a transactional level by providing a Standardized Chart of Accounts which 
is: 

• aligned to budget formats and accounting standards; 

• enable uniform information sets across the whole of government to better inform national policy coordination 
and reporting, benchmarking and performance measurement. 

MSCOA is not a system change it is a business process/reform change! There are Seven (7) segments that are to be 
complied with on a transaction (posting) level and no further breakdown is needed subsequent to transaction posting. 
The seven segments are: 

• Project 

• Function 

• Item segment: Assets, Liabilities and Net assets; Expenditure; Revenue; Gains and Losses 

• Fund 

• Regional Indicator 

• Costing 

• Municipal Standard Classification - No standardization 


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Project segment is linked to the IDP is indicates how the projects should be reflected in the IDP it distinguishes projects 
according to the nature of expense in terms of capital or operational expense. It into capital, operational or default 
transactions (non-project related Items). Table number 7 on the IDP will have projects classified as per the MSCOA 
requirements. 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


KEY PERFORMANCE AREA #4 

LOCAL ECONOMIC 
DEVELOPMENT 


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3.5.1 Economic Development Profile 

This chapter provides an assessment of the current (multifaceted) developmental environment. A high level description of the 
Port St Johns Municipality is provided in terms of aspects that have a bearing on LED. The Situation Analysis provides a critical 
informational base required for the LED strategic framework to be properly contextualised and sets the scene for development in 
the region by discussing salient socio-economic features, providing an economic overview, exploring institutional dimensions and 
inserting an infrastructural vignette. The importance of this chapter is not found explicitly in the numbers, figures and amounts 
contained, but rather the implicit structures, trends, relationships and patterns of development they point to. 

Where possible, information which pertains to the district, provincial and national levels is presented. This is in order to draw 
comparisons of how the status quo in Port St Johns is when compared to other units of analysis. Similarly, where possible, 
information is presented for over one time period, in order to draw-out dynamic trends and shifts. 

3.5.2 Policy & Planning Informants 

In the process of reviewing an LED Strategy, a number of key legislative and policy documents need to be considered. 
Furthermore, this review is necessary to ensure appropriate alignment with national, provincial and district policies. There has 
been an evolution in the nature and focus of the strategic planning environment and this section acknowledges the importance of 
various policies to the Port St Johns economy. The LED review process must be informed by and aligned with national, provincial, 
district and local level priorities. 

3.5.2.1 National Development Plan (NDP) 

The National Planning Commission (NPC) developed the NDP vision for 2030 for South Africa which is classified as a long term 
strategic framework for the country to work towards collectively. A Diagnostic Report was released in June 2011 and sets outs 
South Africa's achievements and shortcomings since 1994. 

Challenges identified include 

• Too few people work; 

• Corruption is widespread; 

• The standard of education for most black learners is of poor quality; 

• A widespread disease burden is compounded by a failing public health system; 


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• Infrastructure is poorly located, under-maintained and insufficient to foster higher growth; Public services are uneven and 
often of poor quality; 

• Spatial patterns exclude the poor from the fruits of development; 

• The economy is overly and unsustainably resource intensive 

In reaction to these fundamental challenges, the NDP 2030 plan spells out the key strategic development areas which require 
focus over the next 20 years. These are: 

• Employment and economy; 

• Economic infrastructure; 

• Environmental sustainability; 

• An integrated and inclusive rural economy; 

• Positioning South Africa in the world; 

• Transforming human settlements; 

• Improving education, training and innovation; 

• Promoting health; 

• Social protection; 

• Building safer communities; 

• Building a capable and developmental state 

• Fighting corruption; 

• Transforming society and uniting the country. 

Whilst the above strategic areas are broad, the three priorities that are highlighted include; raising employment through faster 
economic growth, improving the quality of education, skills development and innovation and building the capability of the state to 
play a developmental, transformative role. These are seen as essential to achieving higher rates of investment and 
competitiveness, and expanding production and exports. 


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3.5.2.2 New Growth Path (NGP) 

The new growth path is a broad framework that sets out a vision and identifies key areas where jobs can be created within the 
South African National Economy. The new growth path is intended to address unemployment, inequality and poverty in a 
strategy that is principally reliant on creating a significant increase in the number of new jobs in the economy, mainly in the 
private sector. The new growth path sets a target of creating five million jobs by 2020. This target is projected to reduce 
unemployment from 25% to 15%. Critically, this employment target can only be achieved if the social partners and government 
work together to address key structural challenges in the economy. The new growth path seeks to place the economy on a 
production-led trajectory with growth targeted in ten 'jobs drivers'. As a first step, government will focus on unlocking the 
employment potential in six key sectors and activities. 

These include: 

Infrastructure, through the massive expansion of transport, energy, water, communications capacity and housing, 
underpinned by a strong focus on domestic industry to supply the components for the build-programmes; 

• The agricultural value chain, with a focus on expanding farm-output and employment and increasing the agri-processing 
sector; 

• The green economy, with programmes in green energy, component manufacture and services; 

• Manufacturing sectors in IPAP2 and; 

• Tourism and certain high-level services. 

The New Growth Path indicates that current investment and savings is below the levels required for sustainable growth which is 
seen as an imbalance in the economy. The NGP therefore sees the need for government to 'encourage stronger investment by 
the private and public sectors to grow employment-creating activities rapidly while maintaining and incrementally improving 
South Africa's core. 

3.5.2.3 National Framework For LED 

The National Framework for LED in SA aims to support the development of "sustainable, robust and inclusive local economies 
exploiting local opportunities, real potential and competitive advantages, addressing local needs and contributing to national 
development objectives". 


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It views LED as the outcome of actions and interventions resulting from local good governance and the improved integration and 
coordination between national, provincial and local government programmes and projects. Locally owned appropriate solutions 
and strategies must emerge for local areas to promote sustainable development and sustainable human settlements. Local 
initiative, energy, creativity, assertive leadership and skills will ultimately unlock the latent potential in local economies. 

The National Framework for LED in South Africa seeks to mobilise local people and resources, within the framework of the PGDP 
and NSDP, to become competitive in the economic marketplace, both domestically and internationally. Strategies to implement 
these outcomes include: 

• Improving good governance, service delivery, public and market confidence in municipalities through an alignment of 
national, provincial and local programmes - as a critical first step in attracting investment . 

• Identifying and exploiting competitive advantage as a better understanding of the opportunities and constraints in local 
economies should inform a more balanced development path. 

• Instituting Sustainable Developmental Community Investment Programming, building community and thus using a 
powerful cultural dynamic as the main vehicle and partner for LED together with the resourcing of organised communities 
to become important productive units. 

• Intensify enterprise support- the Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA) should be the key vehicle for localised 
enterprise support. 

3.5.2.4 Industrial Policy Action Plan 2017/18 -2019/20 

The Industrial Policy Action Plan (IPAP) is firmly entrenched in Government's overall policy and plans to address the key 
challenges of economic and industrial growth and race based poverty, inequality and unemployment. It is a key component of the 
President's Nine Point Plan and is aligned to the policy perspective of Radical Economic Transformation. It is guided by the vision 
of the National Development Plan. IPAP 2017 is aligned to the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) as well as the 
Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF). The IPAP is a product of the Economic Sectors, Employment and Infrastructure 
Development (ESEID) cluster. The responsibility for its implementation lies with Government as a whole and a wide range of 
entities, including SOCs. 


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Key Focal Areas 

• The need to raise aggregate domestic demand 

• The national Buy Back SA campaign must be energetically implemented, with the full support of the public sector, led by 
Proudly SA, the SOCs and the private sector 

• The need to ensure a much stronger on-going focus on labour intensity across the value chains 

• A stepped-up export effort - because of the strong economic and employment multipliers which result - with a focus on 
key existing exporters, emerging and export-ready firms and supporting new black-owned entrants 

• Continuing efforts to achieve a well-regulated, integrated, development-friendly investment framework to raise levels of 
productive (non-portfolio) capital inflows into the economy 

• " Strengthening of on-going efforts to build a less concentrated, more competitive economic and manufacturing structure 
in which barriers to entry for new entrants are lowered across key sectors of the economy 

• An understanding that the Fourth Industrial Revolution and disruptive technologies do constitute a clear and present 
threat to the competitiveness of South African industry and employment; and, therefore, that a concerted, integrated 
government approach to the issue is imperative 

Overcoming constraints - moving forward 

IPAP 2017/18 - 2019/20 will be reinstating its efforts to overcome persistent structural hurdles to development and 

industrialisation, focussing on: 

• enhancing the contribution of manufacturing to a more inclusive economy both by promoting black industrialists and small 
business; 

• support large, lead and dynamic firms, greater attention will be paid to providing holistic support to emerging enterprises 
and to concrete measures to maximise the indirect employment benefits of industrialisation; 

• diversifying away from commodity dependence by take advantage of the end of the metal's price boom to promote new 
industries and activities that are more sustainable, promote higher value add and encourage employment creation; 

• developing integrated regional value chains to open opportunities for industrialisation across the region, including South 
Africa, and reduce the cost of logistics (including regulatory delays and fees) while at the same time ramping up transport 
and communications infrastructure; 


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• responding proactively to the massive shifts in technology - the fourth industrial revolution - indicated by digitisation, the 
internet of things and big data capabilities and 

• drawing on all possible state levers based on clear priorities, consistency, and strong alignment across the state. 

3.5.2.5 Provincial Policy Initiatives 

Provincial documents give an indication of the forms of support availed to regions and localities, with the following initiatives 
discussed below: 

a) Eastern Cape Provincial Spatial Development Plan 

b) Eastern Cape Rural Development Strategy 

c) Strategy and Programme for Cooperative Development and Support in the Eastern Cape 

d) Integrated Strategy for Promotion of Entrepreneurship and Small Business in the Eastern Cape 

e) Eastern Cape Provincial Local and Regional Economic Development Strategy 

f) Eastern Cape Provincial Industrial Development Strategy 

g) Eastern Cape Sustainable Energy Strategy 

a) Eastern Cape Provincial Spatial Development Plan (ECPSDP) 

This plan gives guidance on the principles that should underpin the strategic approach to spatial development and management 
in the province. To this end, a targeted and phased approach to development is recommended based on: 

Settlement hierarchy: This involves focusing investment strategically at three levels of support. The plan promotes 
identification of nodes and corridors with opportunity and targets development initiatives which promote consolidation of 
settlements to facilitate cost effective development. 

• Flexible zoning: allowing for flexibility for special kinds of investment. 

• Resources sustainability: Monitoring of the use of resources to ensure sustainability and minimization of environmental 
impacts in all land developments. 

• Restricted development zone: identification of environmentally sensitive areas and ensuring that developments do not 
occur, for example wetlands, state forest, dune systems, river estuaries, game and nature reserves and heritage sites. 


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• Spatial Integration: promotion of integrated development with maximum spatial benefits, integrating communities and the 
spatial economy. 

b) Eastern Cape Rural Development Strategy 

The Eastern Cape Rural Development Strategy is a sustained and long-term programmatic intervention in response to endemic 
poverty in the province. It is premised on the belief that through self-organisation of communities, government, the private 
sector and other actors in the developmental arena, inroads can be made in the fight against chronic poverty in the province. The 
rationale for a Rural Development Strategy that caters to the specific needs of the province can be found in the status of: 

• Structural factors that lead to marginalisation of societies and inequality of opportunities. 

• The historical political economy, whose legacy in rural hinterlands is experienced through low levels of economic 
integration. 

• Land and agrarian relations, which give rise to a skewed distribution of natural resources. 

• Settlement and migration patterns that lead to a divide between rural and urban areas. 

• A marked need for improved food security, based on agrarian transformation linked to indigenous ways of life. 

• Past initiatives, that have had mixed fortunes in their ability to deliver a lasting impact on rural development. 

In order to achieve the dual goals of transformed rural areas that are socially and economically developed, and a conducive 
institutional environment for rural development, the following pillars will give effective articulation to the Rural Development 
Strategy: 

• Land reform 

• Agrarian transformation 

• Non-farm rural economy 

• Infrastructure development 

• Social and human development 

• Enabling environment 

c) Strategy and Programme For Cooperative Development and Support in The Eastern Cape 


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The strategy document outlines the rationale, methodology and agreed approach to cooperative development in the Eastern 
Cape. The vision of this strategy is to see a vibrant, independent cooperative sector in the Eastern Cape with cooperatives 
becoming a significant component of the province's economic structure. The cooperative vision is not only economic, but also 
developmental with cooperatives playing a major role in the social and cultural development of all communities in the province. 

Towards realising this vision the strategy has set itself seven objectives: 

1. To ensure the efficient & effective establishment of the institutional framework to support cooperatives & other similar 
collective enterprises from the local to the provincial level; 

2. To pool the resources of government and other partners to catalyse and support the growth of community and socially owned 
capital; 

3. To ensure that adequate and tailor made cooperatives support programmes are in place to ensure sustainability and growth of 
cooperatives in the Eastern Cape; 

4. To ensure that the growth of the cooperative movement in the Eastern Cape is autonomous and independent of government 
and is aligned to the cooperatives sectors and types identified in the Cooperatives Act Nol4 of 2005; 

5. To ensure that there is continuous availability of best practice through research, database & knowledge management, 
networking amongst cooperatives and the creation of linkages both locally and internationally; 

6. To clarify the role of stakeholders, agencies, government departments, communities and cooperatives themselves in the 
development of cooperatives in the Eastern Cape; 

7. Create proper alignment in terms of cooperatives strategy with all other provincial government support programmes and also 
with municipalities; 

These objectives are then supported by several pillars: 

• Institutional capacity for supporting cooperatives in the Eastern Cape 

• Support infrastructure for cooperatives development 

• Building an independent cooperative movement 

• Research, 

• Knowledge 

• database management and 

• statistics 

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d) An Integrated Strategy For Promotion Of Entrepreneurship And Small Enterprises In The Eastern Cape 

The vision of the SMME Strategy is to mainstream Small and Medium Enterprises into the economy of the province in order to 
enhance entrepreneurship and self-employment. In order to achieve the vision, the following strategic pillars and projects are 
proposed for implementation: 

Strategy Pillar One: SMME Institutional Framework 

• Develop Capacity within DEDEA 

• Establish a forum for development finance institutions 

• Establish a Provincial SMME Working Group 

• Establish an Enterprise Development Agency in the Eastern Cape 

• Establish an Innovation Hub to enhance product development and manufacturing in the Province 

Strategy Pillar Two: SMME Programme Design and Support 

• Increase supply of financial services 

• Increase supply of non-financial services 

• Access to markets through government procurement 

• Enhance access to markets to industry opportunities for SMMEs 

• Increase access to franchise opportunities in the Eastern Cape 

• Skills enhancement of SMME owners 

• Support to the informal sector and hawkers 

• Access to SMME Information 

Strategy Pillar Three: SMME Regulatory Functions and Services 

• Reduce small business regulatory constraints and awareness 

• Capacity building of municipality officials on regulations affecting SMMEs and how to manage them 


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Strategy Pillar Four: Monitoring and Evaluation 

• Conducting ongoing research about SMMEs in the province 

• Align and integrate all the District and Metro SMME Strategies with the Provincial Strategy Framework 

• Developing knowledge and information about SMMEs to inform policy and programmes in the province 

• hosting annual conferences, seminars and summits on SMME Development in the province 

• Monitoring and evaluation of the implementation of the provincial SMME Strategy 

e) Eastern Cape Provincial Local And Regional Economic Development Strategy (LREDS) 

The Local and Regional Economic Development Strategy (LREDS) were developed by the Eastern Cape provincial Department of 
Economic Development and Environmental Affairs (DEDEA). It aims to address some of the identified bottlenecks in local 
economic development and the lack of capacity to deliver at local level. 

LRED is an ongoing process by which key stakeholders and institutions from all spheres of society, the public and private sector 
as well as civil society work jointly to create a unique advantage for the locality and its firms, tackle market failures, remove 
bureaucratic obstacles for local businesses and strengthen the competitiveness of local firms. 

The LREDS provides a more structured and comprehensive approach to local economic development than before through a 
framework within which "top-down" policy programme managers interact with "bottom-up" beneficiary and target groups. It was 
identified that top-down-bottom-up planning can suffer from weaknesses at both levels, with top-down on its own suffering from 
knowledge deficit at policy level and bottom-up on its own suffers from capacity deficit and populism. 

The LREDS approach aims to build the capacity of locally based institutions, interest groups and communities to enable them to 
act as effective partners by: 

• Understanding the local economy; 

• Identifying and communicating needs; 

• Developing appropriate responses/opportunities; 

• Managing integrated regional plans; 

• Managing local action plans; and 


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• Monitoring progress - learning from experience 

The approach is to build structures, systems and skills for policy direction from the centre and to mobilize the public investment 
needed to build that capacity as a prerequisite for balanced growth and development. 

f) EASTERN CAPE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 

The Eastern Cape Industrial Strategy (ECIS) is a strategy that was developed to guide industrial development in the province. It 
is based on the national and provincial policy strategies that deal with regional growth, industrial development, the 
manufacturing sector, inclusive community development and other such strategies. In this light, the provincial strategy is in fact 
a means of articulating the national and provincial developmental policy framework. This framework is constituted of documents 
such as the Accelerated Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (ASGISA), Provincial Growth and Development Plan (PGDP), 
Integrated Sustainable Rural Development Strategy (IRSDS) and Regional Industrial Development Strategy (RIDS). 

As a practical manifestation of the policy framework it provides guidelines for intervention, based on economic analyses. From a 
broad perspective, the strategy will contribute towards achievement of the ASGISA's and PGDP's targets of 6% growth and 
halving unemployment by 2014. The strategy then effectively becomes a 'landing strip' for policy initiatives. 

The Provincial Industrial Development Strategy has linkages to IPAP2 and its pillars are used as the basis for the Integrated Wild 
Coast Development Programme (specifically manufacturing, tourism and Renewable Energy), which in turn leads into the Wild 
Coast Special Economic Zone proposals. 

g) Eastern Cape Sustainable Energy Strategy 

The vision is to create an enabling environment for sustainable energy investment and implementation. Strategic goals are to 
alleviate energy poverty, improve industrial competitiveness, promote renewable energy (RE) production, manufacturing and 
technology development and reduce C02 emissions and pollution. Recommendations provided include lobbying ESKOM to 
expedite the strengthening of transmission capacity in the former Transkei, the development of a provincial locational perspective 
on RE and embarking on an intensive training programme. 


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Roles identified for local government in organising a response to the sustainable energy sector include: 

• Local content manufacture; 

• Enabling regulatory support / landuse applications; 

• Logistics; 

• Developing Capacity of local decision-makers; 

• Assistance to local beneficiary trusts 

• Political Support 

• Coordination of regional and local development initiatives 

• Power purchase 

• Match making with funding institutions 

• Pilot projects 

• Promotion of manufacturing sector, investment and coordination 


3.5.2.6 District Perspective 

The district planning perspective allows identification of key sectors, actions and interventions that characterise the O.R. Tambo 
District's approach to economic development. This follows on from priorities targeted by the province and reflects regional 
viewpoints and differences. 

Outcomes of district documents not summarised in this section but incorporated in this report include: 

i. ORTDM IDP 

ii. ORTDM Growth and Development Summit (GDS) 

iii. ORTDM Marketing Strategy 

iv. ORTDM Tourism Planning Framework 

v. ORTDM Integrated Waste Management Plan 

vi. ORTDM Land Availability Audit & Area Based Plan 

vii. ORTDM Regional Industrial Roadmap 

i. ORTDM Spatial Development Framework (SDF) 


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ORTDM's SDF recognises the presence of several constraints to aforementioned development within the district. These include: 

The vast amount of unresolved land claims in the district. This halts many prospective developments in their planning 

phase. 

• The lack of basic infrastructure in the district, compounded by the lack of funds to invest in an improvement in service 
levels. 

• The lack of clear land administration mechanisms. 

• The absence of a Land Use Management System (LUMS) for the district because of insufficient capacity with district and 
local municipalities. 

The main result of the Spatial Development Framework is the district's spatial development plan, which seeks to unlock economic 
growth by prioritising infrastructure investment. The Spatial Development Plan is a response to the challenges identified above, 
highlighting opportunities that exist within different localities. The opportunities are focused on the areas of tourism, mining, 
agriculture and environmental assets. 

The Spatial Development Plan also recommends the establishment of strategic transport links within the district. These links are 
to be internal (within the district's urban and rural areas) and external (between the district and surrounding areas). These links 
include tourism routes based on a conservation belt rich in biodiversity 

ii. ORTDM LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY REVIEW (LED) 

The main purpose of the 2010 O.R. Tambo District Municipality's Local Economic Development (LED) Strategy was to facilitate 
the review, update and development of the 2003 strategy. This was done to guide development interventions to improve the 
economy of the O.R. Tambo District and was developed in the context of a dynamic regional economic landscape that has been 
affected by macro- and micro level developments between 2003 and 2010. 

The following programmes are contained in the strategic framework: 

• Nodal rural development 

• Infrastructure provision & service delivery 

• Institutional strengthening & partnerships 

• Education, skills development and training 


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• Prioritised tourism support 

• Business support 

The LED Strategy's implementation plan discusses recommendations towards boosting of technical and administrative capacity 
and fostering of knowledge exchange centred around: 

Establishment of district support team: will serve as an effective means of addressing institutional misalignment and low 
levels of integration in planning and implementation. 

• Continuous organisational development in Ntinga to align with establishment of provincial Rural Development Agency: 
focusing on partnerships and strategic alliances, commercial development and project management as key performance 
levers to drive institutional capacity in district developmental partners. 

Establishment of one-stop investment shop: Identified as a means of promoting and attracting investment into the area in 
the Regional Industrial Roadmap through attracting internal and external investment into the area and providing 
information dissemination. 

Resuscitation of LED Forum, chaired by the District Municipality: despite challenges faced in the past, lessons must be 
learnt and applied as the ORTDM still stands to benefit immensely from having a functioning and well-constituted LED 
Forum 

3.5.2.7 Local Input 

Local level inputs are informed by ward based planning processes, and a review of these conforms with a bottom-up approach to 
development. 

a) Port St Johns 2016 Led Strategy 

The vision for the Port St Johns LED strategy is founded on that of the 2016 LED strategy, the municipal Integrated Development 
Plan (IDP) as well as the Master Plan. It also considers the visions contained in the Port St Johns Development Agency 
Regeneration of Port St Johns high level development strategy and the vision from the Port St johns Tourism Assessment 
exercise. The importance of these documents was discussed in section 2.1 of the situation analysis chapter and as a result, their 
input is critical in the PSJ LED strategy vision. Stakeholder input was also used as a means of acquiring consensus on the vision. 
Key elements that are consistently reflected in the planning documents above are presented 

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Based on these, the vision for the LED strategy is as follows: 


A Wild Coast gateway and destination that serves as an agro-processing and ecotourism hub, 
providing sustainable growth and development for all 


Its equally unique and pivotal role as a gateway into the Wild Coast is highlighted in the vision. This is a source of competitive 
advantage as it represents an attribute that cannot be matched by other localities. As such, it represents a core asset to be built- 
upon for the derivation of benefits for all. Also critical in the vision statement above is the element of all people being able to 
benefit from the growth and development. This transcends different economic sectors (i.e. performance of one sector does not 
prejudice or prove to be detrimental to the prospects of another), regions (access to services in both rural and urban areas as 
well as infrastructure provision to both coastal and inland regions) and economic actors (an enabling environment in which 
cooperatives, micro-enterprises and large entities can all thrive). The statements regarding the PSJLM becoming an agro¬ 
processing and ecotourism hub are aspirational, and indicate the desired end-state of stakeholders operating within the PSJLM 
space. The vision thus clearly sets out 'what we want to achieve', projecting an outlook for the future and indicating its key 
selling points. 


Goals & objectives 


Figure S.5: Key vision elements 

Goal- TARGETED SECTOR 
SUPPORT 


Objective-Objective- 

Acceleration of small-holder 

AGRICULTURAL VALUE-CAPTURING 

Objective- Brand & 
MARKET POSITIONING OF 
TOURISM SECTOR FROM 2015 I 
ONWARDS 


Goal- ENHANCEMENT OF 
RURAL LIVELIHOODS 


Objective- Provision of critical 

& CATALYTIC ECONOMIC 
INFRASTRUCTURE 


Objective- Establishment 
STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS WITH 
DEVELOPMENT PARTNERS 


Goal- ENTERPRISE 
CAPACITATION 


Objective- Credible extension of 

SUPPORT SERVICES TO AT LEAST 1 
ENTERPRISE PER WARD PER YEAR 


Objective- Business attraction 

BASED ON IMPLEMENTATION OF 
NODAL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 


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Goals unpack the vision into objectives that are Specific, Measureable, Action-oriented, Relevant and Time-based. They are more 
concrete and descriptive than the vision statement and assist the PSJLM in assessing its progress towards attainment of the 
vision. The goals encompass high-level ideas regarding the intended end-state, whilst objectives set-out detailed metrics of how 
such an end-state is to be realised. Both goals and objectives are thus seen as measuring progress that the PSJLM has made 
towards making its vision statement a reality. 

The goals of the PSJLM LED strategy are presented in Figure 3.5 and are based on the following: 

i. TARGETED SECTOR SUPPORT 

Targeted sector support recognises the fact that it is not possible to devote scarce resources to all the economic sectors. As such, 
it is prudent to focus energy on sectors that would yield the highest returns on investment (ROI) and are aligned with the 
region's competitive and comparative advantages. In PSJLM, these sectors are tourism and agriculture. 

Agriculture appeals to the rural nature of settlement throughout the municipality, whilst accounting for the biophysical 
endowments that support the up-scaling of this form of activity. The objective relating to agriculture recognises the fact that 
most agricultural activity in the locality is currently undertaken by small holders, and that commercial enterprise is currently 
bounded in its possibilities by the land tenure system. Value capture relates to the role of local farmers as actors in the value 
chain expanding their scope of activity from just being primary producers. 

Similarly tourism is an activity which can be considered a strength for the PSJLM, and must be built upon further. Given the 
highly competitive nature of tourism in South Africa, and its position as a growth market, it is important that Port St John's brand 
equity and identity in the market be positioned through coordinated action by all interested and affected parties. This is in line 
with the recommendations of the Eastern Cape Tourism Masterplan. This objective focuses on product development to maximise 
on visitor numbers and visitor spend in the area 


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ii. ENHANCEMENT OF RURAL LIVELIHOODS 

This goal recognises the fact that over 90% of the PSJLM's residents live in non-urban settings. As such, it is important that one 
of the strategic goals directly seek to uplift the quality of life experienced in rural areas. This is in accordance with principles 
contained in the Eastern Cape Rural Development Strategy (as discussed in the provincial policy initiatives section of the situation 
analysis chapter). Enhancement of rural livelihoods will help mitigate against the negative effects of outward and internal 
migration. The state of infrastructure provision and the leveraging power of partnerships are both central issues in enhancing 
rural livelihoods in Port St Johns . 

Critical infrastructure is that which is deemed to be a predeterminant for any forms of investment and thus development. Thus, 
it may be inferred that the absence of such forms of infrastructure effectively delays or defers investment into the locality's rural 
areas. 

Catalytic infrastructure has the capacity to create significant multiplier impacts (induced and indirect) on development in the 
area. An objective of the LED strategy will be to identify and highlight such forms of infrastructure that may provide secondary 
and tertiary positive externalities on the state of rural livelihoods in Port St Johns. 

The ability of the Port St Johns Local Municipality to deliver on the goal of enhanced rural livelihoods will be highly dependent on 
its capacity to utilise strategic partnerships with development partners. Institutions involved in the development arena may 
assist stakeholders in the PSJLM in the implementation of the LED strategy through access to expertise, funding and other forms 
of resources. As such, this is listed as an objective that will allow it to reach this goal. 


iii. ENTERPRISE CAPACITATION 

As a goal, enterprise capacitation is in alignment with key planning documents such as the Strategy and Programme for 
Cooperative Development and Support in the Eastern Cape, The Integrated Strategy for Promotion of Entrepreneurship and Small 
Enterprises in the Eastern Cape and the O.R. Tambo Regional Industrial Roadmap. It is understood that for LED to be 
sustainable, it must be predicated on the creation, attraction and retention of enterprise (large and small). This in turn leads to 
employment generation and household income growth and subsequently reduces incidences of poverty levels. Enterprise 
capacitation as a goal is thus multifaceted in its achievement of key developmental targets. 


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The Port St Johns Municipality has 20 wards, meaning that this objective seeks to ensure that at least 20 enterprises receive 
credible support services. The terminology of credible support refers to the nature of assistance being sustained over a period of 
at least one year, involving meaningful interaction and being based on the provision of quality services. These services will vary in 
the nature depending on the type of business. Such services may be rendered directly by the municipality or through its 
development partners. The benchmark of 20 enterprises per year is to be seen as a minimum performance standard, and thus 
more than 20 enterprises may be supported in a given year. 

Business attraction based on implementation of the nodal development strategy seeks to activate potential which has been 
spatially identified in prior research undertaken by the municipality. This objective aims to support the establishment and 
attraction of businesses away from Port St Johns town and towards the high-potential rural locations within the municipality 
which have been identified in the nodal development strategy. Such potential is identified as being high based on population 
levels, infrastructure linkages (present or prospective), household income levels (and thus expenditure patterns) and other such 
factors. 


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Municipal 

capacity 




Pillar : 

Agriculture 

prioritisation 


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b) Port St Johns Spatial Development Framework 

The purpose of the SDF is to formulate spatially based policy guidelines whereby changes, needs and growth in the municipal 
region can be managed to benefit the entire community. The plan identifies opportunities for future growth, development and 
conservation whilst simultaneously providing guidelines for spatial management and conservation. 

There is tremendous pressure on the Port St Johns Municipality to identify additional land for future residential development as a 
great demand exists for all economic sectors of residential housing. Furthermore, a strong demand exists for retail, industrial and 
tourism related developments. Future expansion directions are severely limited by the surrounding topography and state owned 
land. The difficulty of providing infrastructure to developable land pockets further places pressure on the Municipality to fast-track 
development in the Port St Johns urban area. 

Spatial Planning Principles contained in the SDF state intentions to: 

• Promote residential densification in the Port St Johns Central Business District (CBD); 

• Promote mixed land use development in new development areas; 

• Strengthen and develop the business node in the Port St Johns CBD; 

• Promote tourist accommodation and related activities in the Second Beach; 

• Promote mixed land use and maximise the opportunity for tourist related activities such as accommodation, recreation, 

arts and culture in the Mtumbane Settlement; 

• Maximise the land resources available in the former Naval Base for middle and high income residential development; 
Maximise the municipal resources such as infrastructure, land available within the Port St Johns CBD area for high income 
residential and tourist related development; 

• Promote and encourage commercial and administrative development as well as expansion within the Port St Johns area; 

• Develop and maintain a metropolitan open space system for the Port St Johns urban area; 

• Develop and maximise the potential of the former Military Base area for mixed land use development. This development 
must aim at creating a new urban area for Port St Johns; 

• Develop the former Military Base to its full potential catering for all forms of residential development, namely, low income, 
middle income and high income brackets. This area must be established into a harmonious residential cluster; 

• Maintain the Mpantu smallholding and retain it as a low density agriculture- produce generating area; 


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• Enforce stringent environmental conservation principles on all developments adjacent to the coastline along with all terms 
of the IEM legislation and policy; 

• Locate developments not dependant on coastal location elsewhere; 

• Minimise traffic flows and maximise pedestrian flows; 

• Ensure that tourism development and activities do not exceed the carrying capacity of the local and coastal environment; 

• Link a open space system rather than fragment into individual parks; 

• Cluster and connect both public and private sector developments relative to each other; 

• Consider existing built context of the design area when placing structures; 

• Consider the location of incompatible land uses, the location of major traffic generators along with an analysis of a site's 
characteristics and particular influence; 

• Provide separate vehicle and pedestrian circulation systems should be provided. 

c) Port St Johns Master Plan 

The PSJ SDF identified eight Development Nodes within the urban area as the core areas for further evaluation and formulation of 
the development framework of the Master Plan, namely: 

• Mpantu and River Frontage 

• Airport and Landing Strip 

• Ferry Point and Agate Terrace 

• Port St Johns CBD including Town Entrance 

• Former Naval Base 

• Mtumbane 

• Second Beach 

• Former Military Base 

The town of Port St Johns has potential for development in the Service industry, Tourism as well as Government Sectors over the 
next few years. Such growth would improve current issues around poverty and unemployment for the area. Currently there are 
number of tourist attractions in the town, benefiting from the scenic location and pristine natural environment, while the 


possibility for private land ownership further attracts interest in the area. In addition the town has maintained a positive image as 

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a main node for many years, while a number of developments and initiatives in the region, once realised will further improve 
tourist/investor attraction. 

At the same time however there are a number of issues that need to be first resolved in order for future development to take 
place. Infrastructure needs urgent planning, as well as upgrading in order to be able to deal with future growth and development. 
The focus therefore needs to be on these critical aspects in terms of planning, fund raising and implementation. Improvement of 
civil services, especially sewage and storm water; improvements to road infrastructure; finalisation of land transfers in order to 
complete the land restitution project and the compilation of an Environmental Management Plan in order to clarify environmental 
issues are all identified as critical actions with regards to the town's development. 

The following strategic projects are identified: 

• Mpantu / River Node 

• Second Beach Development 

• PSJ Entrance and Adventure Centre 

• Taxi Rank Upgrading 

• First Beach Marine Boulevard 

• Former Naval Base Development 

• Bulolo Dam and Former Military Base Development 

• First Beach Conference Facility 

• Golf Course Development 

• Sports Field Development 


d) Port St Johns Tourism Assessment 

The Tourism Strategy was adopted in 2016. Using information collected from various sources as a baseline the economic impact 
of tourism on the town of Port St Johns was calculated in the document below: 

Number of beds available in Port St Johns in 2008 = 1 241 

• 1 241 beds x 365 days = 452 965 bed nights 

• 452 965 bed nights x 30% bed occupancy = 135 890 bed nights sold 

• 135 890 bed nights x R350 average bed night sold = R48 million 


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• R48 million x 1.5 multiplier = R72 million 

• R72 million supports 514 jobs in the tourism sector 

Strategic actions identified at the Port St Johns LTO workshop included: 

• Positioning Port St Johns and its surroundings as a unique African coastal town 

• Provision of infrastructure, services and public transport 

• Safety and freedom from crime 

• Skills and tourism awareness 

• Effective marketing, promotion and information 

• A properly functioning, stakeholder driven, LTO 

e) Port St Johns Nodal Development Strategy 

According to the Nodal Development Strategy 

• There is distinct development potential for some nodes but not for others. Tombo, Bambisana and Ntafufu have key 
strategic opportunities that can be exploited within the overall context of rural development in the Port St Johns Municipal 
area and by virtue of the fact that these nodes already have existing infrastructure for investment and development - 
roads. However, significant development and investment opportunities in areas such as Silimela and along the coastal 
nodal belt both north and south of Port St Johns face challenges in that they do not have good road access. 

• Although Bambisana can be regarded as a relatively poorly developed area there is significant potential for agricultural 
activity given the existing agricultural focus. In addition the area lends itself to agro-processing activities for both primary 
and secondary agricultural industry. 

• As a service node Silimela has a hospital and a number of schools. The economic activity in the area is centred around 
subsistence farming with very little else in the way of economic and development initiatives. The planned upgrading of the 
road between Silimela and Tombo will boost the potential of this area significantly and, as per the research conducted, the 
Silimela area could become an agricultural service node to enhance development in this area. Coupled to this is also the 
potential of fishing and sea harvesting in the immediate area which could form the backbone of the supply potential to the 
coastal nodal areas. 


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• The proposed Ntafufu Nodal Development Zone is situated on the R61 and forms a key confluence point for the areas in 
and around this intersection. The catchment of people from Lusikisiki, Port St Johns and the rural hinterland has identified 
that this area has potential as both a transportation hub and a service center (given that a new clinic is currently being 
completed in the immediate area). 

• Tombo is the most developed of all the rural nodes and has been identified as having the potential of becoming the 
second-largest centre in the Port St Johns Municipality. The existing infrastructure and services on offer in the Tombo 
node play a crucial role in addressing the needs of the thousands of people who live in the immediate area and who rely 
on public transport to get to and from their destinations. Tombo's strategic location on the R61 and the amount of foot 
and vehicular traffic that passes through the node to Port St Johns, Mthatha, Silimela and the rural hinterland provides 
significant opportunity for development and investment. One key investment opportunity that has been identified during 
the study is a "filling station" like development along the R61 at the Tombo junction. This could service both incoming and 
outgoing traffic. In addition to this the node has also been identified as having the potential for light industry, agro¬ 
processing and becoming an agricultural "pick-up" point for fresh produce to markets in Mthatha and beyond. 

• The Port St Johns urban area and the coastal belt to the north and south of the Port St Johns town has been identified as 
having significant potential in terms of tourism and hospitality development.. The advantage of this approach is that there 
is existing infrastructure that can be utilised to market the Port St Johns urban area and coastal belt as a preferred holiday 
destination - 365 days of the year. 

f) Port St Johns Development Agency High Level Development Strategy : Regeneration Of Port St Johns 

High impact or catalytic projects to be implemented by the PSJDA are listed as: 

• Bulk services- water reticulation: with a vision of eradicating all septic tanks 

Majola tea factory: ensuring that a rescue plan is in place and canvassed amongst all critical stakeholders including 
Management of the Estate, Workers Trust, ECDRDAR, ECRDA, Majola Community and Traditional Leadership 

• Shopping mall: to expand the retail sector to accommodate and regulate growing potential and also to assist in providing 
offices for small business and other professional business entities; creating jobs and permanent work opportunities. 

• Human settlement development: zonal certificates have been secured, council resolution has been acquired and the 
Department of Human Settlements has approved the project. 


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• Craft development & training centre: a business plan has been competed to submitted for funding application. A site for 
the project has been identified. A database of crafter will be developed to assist in packaging capacity programmes 
(financial and technical) for accredited training modules 

• Tourism programme for beautification of Port St Johns town within the context of Small Town Revitalisation Programme. 
Cleaning and reconfiguration of the CBD in terms of planning and GIS support, with support from LGTA (through despatch 
of technical personnel for the LSDF) for expansion nodes and SALGA 

• Fruit cluster developments villages in 6 wards have been identified for piloting. Partners include Is'Baya Development 
Trust, Agricultural Research Council, the Department of Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism and 
the Department of Rural Development and Agrarian Reform. The project will involve manufacture of fruit juices, dried 
fruit, canned jam, etc. 

Marketing of Port St Johns as a prime Tourism destination: involves revitalisation and functioning of the Local Tourism 
Organisation, a marketing strategy to mitigate negative publicity and change the image of Port St Johns in an innovative 
and eye-catching manner. This also involves nurturing and developing tourism attractions including Sinuka sulphur 
springs, first beach lighthouse, Third Beach Silaka Nature reserve, The gap and blow hole and Mount Thesiger (airstrip 
and cable car) 

• Marine & industrialisation: this was identified by the O.R. Tambo mega strategic planning session and would involve 
establishing a harbour. Studies would be conducted on the viability and sustainability of ship docking and cruising. 


g) Implications For PSJ LED Strategy 

The National Development Plan is useful in its provision of SMART targets for LED practitioners within the Port St Johns Local 
Municipality, as well as those operating at the district and provincial level whose work impacts on local development. From the 
New Growth Path, the importance of focusing on agricultural value chains is brought out. This is of strategic importance given the 
location of the Kei Fresh Produce market in Mthatha. The LED Framework guides the development of this document in ensuring 
that it aligns with recognised standards. Finally, IPAP 2 highlights the importance of municipal procurement as a tool of 
advancing LED objectives in the area . 


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From the Eastern Cape Provincial Spatial Development Plan, the role of restricted development zones and flexible zoning stand 
out as prominent concepts to guide the future of Port St Johns town, when cognisance is taken of the environmental sensitivity of 
the area and the physical constraints to development in the region. Interventions targeting the non-farm economy are to be 
drawn upon from the Eastern Cape Rural Development Strategy *as Port St Johns town and the various nodes within the 
municipality will feature as catalytic locations in the near future. Micro-enterprise and other forms of small business are seen as 
key drivers of employment creation in the rural economy as posited by the Strategy and Programme for Cooperative 
Development and Support in the Eastern Cape and the Integrated Strategy for Promotion of Entrepreneurship and Small 
Enterprises in the Eastern Cape. The need for strong structures to govern coordination and alignment between programmes and 
projects at the local and district level is emphasised by the Local Regional Economic Development Strategy. 

The ORTDM SDF highlights the importance of robust knowledge management information systems as a powerful tool to assess 
and influence spatial development trends in the region. The ORTDM LED strategy sets out the need for congruence between the 
activities of Ntinga Development Agency with those of local level LED departments and agencies such as PSJDA. 

The 2005 Port St Johns LED Strategy served an important function of providing an informational baseline from which the 2014 
review has built upon until its adoption. This is supported by the tourism assessment which guides in providing strategic input. 
The nodal development strategy, master plan and SDF all play a critical role in spatially analysing the status quo and 
recommending possible alternate growth trajectories. 

3.5.3 The State of Economy 

3.5.3.1 Local output 

The Map below shows the GDP-R per capita of local municipalities within the Eastern Cape Province. GDP-R per capita attempts 
to equate the level of output associated with each area to its resident population. This measure is beneficial in its ability to allow 
comparison of economic welfare across regions (assuming homothetic distributions of income across the entire province). The 
comparison is further illustrated in the following Figure. From the Map it is evident that the PSJLM ranks among the lowest levels 
of output per capita in the province. PSJLM thus has an underdeveloped economy when consideration is made of its population. 
This points to the population having a low level of productivity (limited marginal product of labour, in economic terms), as a 


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result of the low employment levels and low skill levels. Economic output in the PSJLM can thus be attributed to a relatively small 
percentage of the total population. From the Figure below it emerges that the National Development Plan's goal is for per-capita 
GDP to be approximately R110 000 in 2030, whilst the PSJLM level is currently R7 552. Further comparison with the district, 
provincial and current national levels reveal how low local output is in real terms (not nominal terms). Although the low level of 
economic activity in the PSJLM is often attributed to its Transkei legacy, and the fact that it is situated along the Wild Coast, from 
Map and Figure below it emerges that the PSJLM's economy is significantly underdeveloped when compared to other similar 
localities. 


Figure 3.1: Map 



Source: Urban-Econ calculations based on Quantec, 2014 


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Figure 3.2: 


120000 


100000 


80000 


60000 


40000 


20000 


R 110,000 



Port St Johns O.R. Tambo Eastern Cape South Africa NDPgoal 


Source: Urban-Econ calculations based on Quantec, 2014 


The performance of the PSJLM economy is presented in Figures below with comparisons with the district, provincial and national 
growth rates also provided. It is encouraging to note that the PSJLM constantly outperformed the district, provincial and national 
averages. It is however important to note that the PSJLM's growth as shown in the figures below came off a very small initial 
base. This means that although the nominal change may seem positive, the real change was very low, especially when 
consideration is made of population changes and the low per capita level of GDP-R as discussed above. 

Figure 3.3: 

0.1 
0.08 
0.06 
0.04 
0.02 
0 

- 0.02 

-♦-GEAR/ASGISA/NDP goal-B-South Africa 
A Eastern Cape M O.R. Tambo 

M Port St Johns 

Source: Urban-Econ calculations based on Quantec, 2014 



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Figure 3.4: Port St John's Economic Performance Trends: GDP growth between 1995-2015 

7.0 



Eastern Cape O.R.Tambo Port St Johns 

Source: Urban-Econ calculations based on Quantec, 2014 

A growth of 6.1% has been recorded for 2006 and after that there was a huge decline of the economic growth taking Port St. 
Johns to 2.1% in 2009. The local economy grew sluggishly between 2009 and 2011 from 2.1% to 3.1%. In 2015 the local 
economy remains at 1.8%. 


3.5.3.2 Structure of the local economy 

Classification of economic activity in this report is based on the South African Standard Industrial Classification of all Economic 
Activities (SIC) approach. Under this approach, similar forms of economic activity are organised and distinguishable under the 
following nine major sectors: 

i. Agriculture, hunting, forestry and fishing 

ii. Mining and quarrying 

iii. Manufacturing 

iv. Electricity, gas and water supply 

v. Construction 

vi. Wholesale and retail trade 

vii. Transport, storage and communication 

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viii. Financial intermediation, insurance, real estate and business services 

ix. Government and Community services 

As it is evident, these sectors are made up of combinations of diverse forms of activity. Under the SIC approach, it is possible to 
disaggregate economic activity to a sub-sectoral level, as well as into lower levels of greater detail. 


3.5.3.3 Comparative & Competitive Advantage 

In order to see which economic sectors have considerable potential, there is a need to understand which sectors have 
comparative advantages over their regional counterparts. One commonly utilised method of determining comparative advantage 
is the location quotient (LQ). The location quotient is a technique used in economic geography and locational analysis to compare 
a local economy to a reference economy (provincial, national or even transnational). This allows quantification of how 
concentrated or specialised certain activities are within a locality, compared to the reference economy. 

The formula used when calculating the location quotient is as follows: 


Location Quotient= 


/ Local employment in given sector 
\Total local employment in given year/ 
Reference economy employment in given sector 1 
Total reference economy employment in given year! 


The LQ calculated above can then be interpreted by using the following conventions: 

• LQ<1: Local employment is less than that required to satisfy local demand of the good or service. This means the region 
is a net importer of that good and thus does not have a comparative advantage in its provision. 

• LQ= 1: Local employment is exactly sufficient to meet local demand for the given good or service. The region thus neither 
exports nor imports the good as it is self-sufficient in its provision, without excess supply. This means it produces the 
good at a level proportionate to its other economic contributions to the reference area. 

• LQ>1: local employment is greater than that needed to satisfy local demand. This means the region is a net exporter of 
that good and thus has a comparative advantage in its provision as it has a relatively high concentration of that good 
compared to the reference economy. 


The table below shows the LQs for PSJLM's ten major sectors of economic activity. The reference economy used was that of the 
district as a whole. From this, it can be seen which sectors in the PSJLM possess a comparative advantage over the district level. 


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As stated above, an LQ of above 1 indicates possession of a comparative advantage while an LQ of less than one indicates that 
the district cannot engage in production at a lower opportunity cost than the provincial average 


Table 3.14: Port St Johns Location quotient relative to Province, 2015 



O.R.Tambo 

Ingquza 

Hill 

Port 

St 

Johns 

Nyandeni 

Mhlontlo 

KSD 

Primary sector 

1,0 

1,6 

,8 

1,3 

2,5 

5 

Agriculture, forestry and fishing 

0,7 

1,0 

1,8 

0,4 

2,3 

3 

Mining and quarrying 

3,0 

4,9 

',4 

6,6 

3,3 

2 

Secondary sector 

0,5 

0,5 

1,5 

0,5 

0,5 

5 

Manufacturing 

0,3 

0,3 

1,2 

0,2 

0,4 

2 

Electricity, gas and water 

1,3 

0,8 

1,9 

1,7 

0,7 

5 

Construction 

1,0 

1,1 

,4 

1,2 

0,9 

9 

Tertiary sector 

1,1 

1,1 

,1 

1,1 

1,1 

1 

Wholesale and retail trade, catering and accommodation 

1,0 

1,0 

1,7 

0,9 

0,9 

0 

Transport, storage and communication 

0,8 

0,6 

1,8 

1,0 

0,7 

8 

Finance, insurance, real estate and business services 

0,9 

0,8 

1,6 

0,8 

0,6 

0 

General government 

1,6 

1,6 

.,9 

1,5 

1,7 

5 

Community, social and personal services 

1,3 

1,4 

.,6 

1,4 

1,6 

2 

Total 

1,0 

1,0 

,0 

1,0 

1,0 

0 


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Figure 3.5: Port St Johns Location quotient relative to ORT Districte, 2015 


65 

64 

63 

62 

61 

60 

59 

58 



^HO.R.Tambo 62.2 

62.4 

62.1 

61.2 

61.3 

61.6 

59.6 

60.5 

59.4 

59.1 

59.8 

59.1 

58.9 

59.3 

59.5 

59.9 

60 

59.8 

59.6 

59.5 

59.3 


Port St Johns 63.9 

63.7 

63.3 

62.5 

62.5 

63 

60.2 

61.7 

60.3 

59.7 

60 

59.2 

58.9 

59.8 

59.7 

60.4 

60.4 

60.2 

59.9 

59.7 

59.3 



1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 


Table 3.15: Concentration or Diversification of Port St. Johns: Tress Index over 10 Industries 



1995 

2000 

2005 

2010 

2015 

O.R.Tambo 

62,2 

61,6 

59,8 

59,9 

59,3 

Ngquza Hill 

61,5 

61,5 

59,5 

59,8 

59,2 

Port St Johns 

63,9 

63,0 

60,0 

60,4 

59,3 

Nyandeni 

60,9 

60,0 

57,6 

57,7 

56,7 

Mhiontlo 

61,6 

62,0 

59,9 

59,2 

57,0 

g Sabata Dalindyebo 

64,7 

63,3 

61,2 

61,2 

61,0 


3.5.4 Key Economic Sectors 

Another tool that is used to measure the economy is the Gross Value Added (GVA). GVA is a measure of the value of goods and 
services produced in an area. 


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Chart 3.16: Port St John's sectoral contribution to GVA and % share 



According to the figure and tables above the key economic drivers within the local municipality were: 

• Government at 42% 

• Trade at 15% 

• Community Services at 12% 

• Finance at 11% 

It can be seen that approximately a quarter of all activity in the PSJLM economy may be attributed to the government and 
community services sector. A high level of reliance of the public sector for economic activity may 'crowd out' private sector 
investment. Similarly, an economy that is heavily dependent on the public sector for stimulus is often underdeveloped as seen by 
the small contribution of private enterprise activity. Activities classified within this sector include public administration and 
defence activities, activities of government, government departments and agencies; education, public and private; health and 
social work; activities of membership organisations; recreational, cultural and sporting activities. It is anticipated that the Port St 
Johns Local Municipality would contribute the bulk of the government and community service sector's output. 


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The agriculture sector makes a negligible contribution to the economy. It is important to point out that the statistics presented in 
the Figure above only represent formal sector output. The figures thus do not reflect informal sector activity associated with 
agriculture. This is typical of subsistence agriculture as is found throughout the PSJLM. It is also noteworthy that the local 
economy features limited value addition of primary goods. This is a result of the low output from primary sectors (agriculture and 
mining). This then means that a disproportionate level of economic activity is found in tertiary sectors such as retail trade and 
finance and business service. 

The paragraphs below analyze four economic sectors that the municipality can invest on to change the economic state of the 
region: 

a) Manufacturing 

Due to the distance from large urban centres, there is no market for manufactured goods from the PSJM, and hence 
manufacturing is not undertaken on a large scale. Sewing and welding operations are undertaken by informal subsistence 
manufacturers. There are, however, several manufacturing opportunities in the area, including beadwork production and export, 
fish farming (including the harvesting and packaging of mussels), production of textiles, tropical fruit production and vegetable 
production and processing. Another reason that manufacturing is limited in the area is that there is a lack of pioneers who are 
willing to invest in this sector, a lack of individuals skilled in this sector, and a lack of reliable infrastructure (e.g. electricity and 
roads) to support it. Should the manufacturing sector be developed in this area, it would contribute to decreasing unemployment 
in the area. It is necessary for the PSJM to acquire funding from government for the development of this sector. 

b) Agriculture 

Due to the rural nature of the PSJM, agriculture is the main economic activity. Its practice is, however, still largely at a 
subsistence level. The climate and soil conditions of the municipality are favourable for the propagation of crops, grains, fruits 
and vegetables, but this is currently not being exploited to its full potential as a result of the subsistence nature of present 
agricultural practices within the PSJM. Subsistence farming in the PSJM comprises mainly maize, poultry and vegetables. The 
limited commercial agricultural activities focus on cabbage, green maize and spinach. A study conducted by the Agricultural 
Research Council concluded that the area would be most suited to crop and fruit production, but a land suitability analysis must 


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still be conducted to determine what types of crops and fruits will be most suitable. The PSJM has strong goat-farming potential 
owing to its mountainous terrain, but the area's levels of goats, sheep and cattle remain the lowest in the OR Tambo District 
Municipality (ORTDM). 

c) Mining 

There is potential for the mining of sand, stone and travertine (used in the manufacture of ornaments and wall tiles) in the PSJM. 
The Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) approved the mining of travertine in ward 7 and these mining rights confer 26% of 
the profits to the Tyityane Community. There are sand deposits along the Mngazi and Umzimvubu Rivers. An application for a 
mining permit has been submitted to the DMR to mine sand from the Umzimvubu River. There are several stone quarries in 
operation in wards 6 and 11. There are concerns that some of the operators of these quarries are not in possession of mining 
permits, nor are they aware of the need to acquire them. 

d) Tourism 

The PSJM has great potential for development within its tourism sector, but this is not fully exploited as a result of limited 
availability of sanitation and water in Port St Johns. The greatest tourism assets within the municipality are the ocean and Long 
Beach in Port St Johns itself. Other tourism assets include mountains and rivers. Port St Johns is also close to Mthatha and easily 
accessible via the R61, making it a coastal resort destination of choice. Port St Johns was identified under the Wild Coast Spatial 
Development Initiative as a primary tourism development node, and by the ORTDM"s Tourism Framework as an adventure 
tourism destination with great potential for the development of hiking and horse trails. Other types of tourism (e.g. ecotourism) 
and products should also be developed. 

A major dilemma that must be overcome for the effective development of the tourism sector in the PSJM is exploiting the area's 
tourism assets whilst still preserving them. A tourism strategy has been developed to ensure that tourism is harmonized in the 
area. An Environmental Management Plan needs to be developed for the area that includes measures and policies that conserve 
the area's tourism assets. 


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3.5.5 Levels of Employment 

I. Employment 

In its Diagnostic Overview released in 2011, the National Planning Commission (NPC) found that education and employment were 
two major problems affecting the South African economy - specifically a poor quality of education and low employment levels. 
These two aforementioned variables are interrelated in that a poor quality of education can lead to inability to find relevant 
employment, resulting in structural unemployment; the most prevalent type of unemployment in South Africa. Inherently, 
unemployment leads to loss of income by households. As household income decreases and becomes unable to meet all the needs 
of the household, that household is categorized as living in poverty. 


II. Total Employment by Informal and Formal, 2015 
Table 3.16: Total Employment by Informal and Formal 



O.R.Tambo 

Ingquza Hill 

Port St. 

Johns 

Nyandeni 

Mhlontlo 

King Sabata 

Dalindyebo 

Total Formal 

and informal 

- Total 

140 143 

21 818 

8 236 

21 754 

17 921 

70 414 

= ormal - Total 

93 545 

14 333 

5 733 

14 919 

12 360 

46 200 

-ormal - 

Skilled 

28 045 

4 183 

1 766 

4 020 

3 287 

14 789 

= ormal - Semi¬ 
skilled 

37 392 

5 046 

2 213 

6 063 

4 783 

19 287 

= ormal - Low 

skilled 

28 108 

5 104 

1 754 

4 836 

4 290 

12 124 

Informal - 

Total 

46 598 

7 485 

2 503 

6 835 

5 561 

24 214 


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III. Real Compensation Of Employees (R MILLION CONSTANT 2010 PRICES), 2015 
Table 3.17: Real Compensation of Employees 



O.R.Tambo 

Ngquza Hill 

Port St. 

Johns 

Nyandeni 

Mhlontlo 

King Sabata 

Dalindyebo 

Total Formal 

and informal - 

Total 

10 777 

1 512 

620 

1 512 

1 218 

5 914 

Formal - Total 

10 396 

1 452 

598 

1 460 

1 175 

5 711 

Formal - 

Skilled 

5 979 

859 

365 

767 

676 

3 312 

Formal - Semi¬ 
skilled 

3 326 

408 

163 

516 

342 

1 897 

Formal - Low 

skilled 

1 091 

185 

70 

177 

157 

502 


Chat 3.17: PSJ Sector Employment 



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Employment total (number) 

Table 3.18: Employment by Sector 



O.R.Tambo 

Ngquza 

Hill 

Port St 

Johns 

Nyandeni 

Mhlontlo 

King Sabata 

Dalindyebo 

Primary sector 

6023 

1589 

469 

627 

1956 

1382 

Agriculture, forestry and fishing 

5446 

1456 

392 

450 

1887 

1261 

Mining and quarrying 

577 

133 

77 

177 

69 

121 

Secondary sector 

15081 

2491 

993 

2561 

1927 

7109 

Manufacturing 

3768 

647 

185 

425 

737 

1774 

Electricity, gas and water 

494 

46 

24 

102 

34 

288 

Construction 

10819 

1798 

784 

2034 

1156 

5047 

Tertiary sector 

119039 

17738 

6774 

18566 

14038 

61923 

Wholesale and retail trade, 

catering and accommodation 

36171 

5647 

1704 

5367 

4040 

19413 

Transport, storage and 

communication 

4819 

558 

258 

838 

579 

2586 

Finance, insurance, real estate 

and business services 

14284 

1820 

621 

2076 

1316 

8451 

General government 

32729 

4964 

2304 

5146 

4004 

16311 

Community, social and personal 

services 

31036 

4749 

1887 

5139 

4099 

15162 


Employment statistics per sector are presented for the district as it shares common attributes with the PSJLM. A disjuncture 
between agricultural employment and output is apparent as the sector has a low level of output even though a high number of 
people are involved in it. This points to limited yields, low levels of technology adoption, high labour intensity and generally low 
output levels. 


3.5.6 Natural capital 

The Map below shows land cover for the PSJLM. It can be seen that a significant amount of land is used for agricultural purposes 
(dry land and irrigated cultivation, as well as forestry plantations. This is in line with the PSJLM having a natural environment that 
is conducive to various forms of agriculture. 


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Table Figure 3.6: Port St. Johns Local Municipality 



From the Map above it is clear that Port St Johns has an extensive coastal zone adjacent to the Ocean. This features notable 
marine and estuarine resources. This creates potential opportunities linked to the maritime economy in the tourism and 
agriculture (fishing, angling, mariculture) sectors and as such the municipality is pursuing such activities to enhance its economy. 

Strong links exist between conservation and tourism, based on the presence of biodiversity associated the Pondoland Centre of 
Endemism (PCE) as well as the Pondoland Marine reserve to the North of the Mzimvubu River and Silaka Nature Reserve. In 
addition, the PSJLM has a pristine environment that makes it suitable for various forms of nature based tourism. 

It is important to point out the level of environmentally sensitivity in the area as seen in the recent increase in shark attacks on 
tourists within the area. This highlights the need for sustainable development in the region that balances the needs of human 
development with those of preserving natural habitat and respecting ecological processes. 

The PSJLM receives an average of 1150mm of rain per year, with over two thirds of this precipitation experienced between the 
months of October and March. There is however no clearly defined dry season, which allows the cultivation of crops throughout 


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the year. This also supports livestock production, as it reduces the burden of animal feed in typically dryer months of the year. 
Generally warm temperatures also mean that frost is not a frequent occurrence, further positioning PSJLM as an area that is 
suitable for agriculture. 

Planning priorities relating to the area's natural capital that are identified in municipal documents include the eradication of exotic 
plants, protection of medicinal plants, reduction of pollution and protection of natural resources (i.e. fishing, fauna, flora, water 
sources and catchment areas). 

Given the links between tourism in the area and its natural endowment, it is critical that sustainability be engendered in 
environmental management. This is emphasised by threats from factors such as flooding, shark attacks, drought and climate 
change, all of which have affected PSJLM in the past. 


In 2014, the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries issued 1028 permits and collected 844 permits within the PSJLM 
for fishing activities. This once again underscores the role of the natural environment in the area's development. 

3.5.6.1 Access to services 
Table 3.19: Access to services 



PSJ LM 

Tambo District 

Eastern Cape 

National 



average 

average 

Average 

Rural population 

98% 

86% 

54% 

35% 

HDI 

0.35 

0.46 

0.51 

0.55 

No access to piped water 

65% 

51% 

22% 

9% 

River or stream as source of water 

60% 

45% 

18% 

5% 

No access to electricity for lighting 

32% 

29% 

25% 

16% 

Below national sanitation policy standard 

62% 

54% 

40% 

28% 


Source: Urban-Econ calculations based on Quantec, 2014 


The Figures in the Table above need to be contextualised by the fact that PSJLM is very rural, and as such, the provision of 
services to all households is often not technically or financially feasible. This means that comparisons must be tempered by the 
fact that the high percentage of rural dwellers means that most services cannot be provided by the PSJLM given the current 
settlement configuration. 


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Figure 3.7: Education vs Health Facilities 



A useful composite measure of household wellbeing is the human development index (HDI). The HDI examines relative 
community development through aggregated approximations of life expectancy, literacy and income. The HDI thus provides 
insight on the ability of community members to live full and prosperous lives, with decent access to certain services and 
amenities that influence their income-creation abilities. The low HDI for the PSJLM thus represents low educational levels, low 
incomes and the lower than average life expectancy of 45.9 years (compared to national average of 50.4). 

3.5.7 Institutional Configuration of LED 

This section briefly discusses the organisational environment from which LED in Port St Johns may be contextualised. The role of 
this section is to provide a status quo of some of the key role players directly involved in LED in the locality. The institutional 
configuration of LED impacts on its implementation, as will be discussed in the strategic framework. 


3.5.7.1 PSJLM LED Unit & PSJ Development Agency 

Traditionally, the best-practice role of a local municipality in LED is found in creating an enabling environment, promoting 
interdepartmental collaboration, facilitating Private Public Partnerships (PPPs), improving market and public confidence in the 
municipality and coordinating planning based on competitiveness. 

The role of the local municipality typically does not cover job creation, handing out business plans for potential entrepreneurs or 
running quasi-businesses. 


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The mandate of the PSJLM LED unit is as follows: 

To facilitate, coordinate and stimulate local economic development in the PSJ Municipal area thus ensuring sustainable job 
creation, poverty alleviation and increased investment levels. 

The scope of responsibility covers: 

• To formulate a long-term LED strategy and plan for the area 

• To develop appropriate LED policies and by-laws to advance economic development 

• To coordinate local economic development within the PSJLM area 

• To facilitate meaningful participation by local communities in PSJLM processes 

• To manage and monitor the implementation of the IDP and LED strategy 

• To advise Council on all LED related matters 

From viewing the organogram it can be seen that the unit is geared to service the agricultural sector as well as bring about 
enterprise development. There is also provision for officials responsible for tourism. The LED unit is a fully-fledged department 
within the top-level municipal organogram, with other key departments in the municipality being engineering, community, 
financial and corporate services. 

In addition to the LED unit, the PSJLM is served by the Port St Johns Development Agency (PSJDA) which is the development 
arm of the municipality. This is a unique entity among local municipalities in the O.R. Tambo district. The PSJDA has an 
independent board, with representation from the LED unit of the Local Municipality. The mandate of the PSJDA as per the 2005 
LED strategy is as follows: 

To implement the Port St Johns Municipality's LED Strategy and job creation programme in accordance with an agreed 
institutional legal framework. 

Based on the 2005 LED strategy its scope of responsibility covered: 

• Act as a municipal agent in implementing economic social and environmental projects 

• Act as a one-stop shop for investors, entrepreneurs and other parties 

• Acquire, own and manage land and buildings on behalf of PSJLM for purposes of leveraging investment and stimulating 
economic growth 

• Initiate and manage any financial assistance or incentive programme aimed at stimulating economic activity within the 
municipal area 

• Maintain donor relations and lobby for programme funding 

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• Packaging and marketing of investment and trade opportunities 

In the 2005 LED strategy, the PSJDA was conceptualized as being a section 21 organization. Since inception, some of the 
activities it has been involved with include: 

• Mangrove holiday camp 

• First beach campsite 

• Upgrade to the central business district 

• Enterprise development 

• Golf course residential development 

• Initiation of the PSJ Master plan 

• Tourism visitor information centre 

• Coastal care 

• Jazz festivals 

• Small scale fish-farming 

• Majola tea factory 

• Sand mining 

• Supporting the Local Tourism Office and development of a tourism master plan 

• Craft development training 

• Film bye-laws 

• Cultural precinct 

• Cable car & air strip development 

• Rural market access centre 

• Fruit cluster & nursery 

• Waterfront development 

• Flousing property development 

• Umzimvubu river rehabilitation technical assessment 

• Town branding strategy, with associated website 


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Information on these above activities is sourced directly from documents supplied by the Port St Johns Development 
Agency. Further information on such activities may thus be acquired directly from the Port St Johns Development 
Agency. Provincially, best-practice for development agencies sees them undertaking branding and area promotion, 
partnership facilitation, business start-ups and growth and human capital development as their key focal areas. 

3.5.7.2 Other Developmental Programmes 

It is recognized that the LED unit and the development agency do not operate in isolation from other partners that are 
involved in various developmental programmes. Several organizations are actively or passively involved in supporting 
LED in the PSJLM, and some of these are presented in Table below. 


3.5.7.3 Development Partners 

Table: 3. 20: Development Partners 


PARTNER 

ROLE 

Other units of the Port St Johns Local Municipality 

(including the Port St Johns Development Agency) 

Facilitation of implementation of initiatives 

Port St Johns Ratepayers Association 

Representation of community interests in development- 

oriented fora 

Local tourism organization 

Although not currently active, historically, this organisation 

represented sector interests. 

Eastern Cape Department of Local Government 

Monitoring of LED progress 

O.R. Tambo District 

Oversight 

Ntinga 

As the O.R. Tambo development agency, it implements 

projects within the Port St Johns jurisdiction 

Eastern Cape Rural Development Agency 

Agro-enterprise finance (as well as some of the activities 

previously undertaken by ASGISA-EC 

Eastern Cape Department of Rural Development 

and Agrarian Reform 

Specialized sector assistance 

NAFCOC 

Representation of business interested in development- 


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PARTNER 

ROLE 


oriented fora 

Extended Public Works Programme 

Infrastructure, environmental, and social sector projects 


The role of these development partners is recognized as essential in bringing about conditions through which Local Economic 
Development can occur. These partners make contributions to development in the region through their resource allocation, 
capacity assistance, local knowledge and other forms of support. Various forms of agreement (formal and informal) exist between 
the Port St Johns Local Municipality and some of these partners. As such, some of the listed partners feature in various Inter- 
Governmental-Relations (IGR) structures of the municipality. 


3.5.7.4 Consolidated potential assessment 

Table 3.21: Potential assessment 


SECTOR 

SOURCE 

PROJECT 

Agriculture 

Environmental scoping report 

Majola tea estate 


Environmental scoping report 

Rural market access centre 


Environmental scoping report 

Fruit cluster 


Environmental scoping report 

Mantusini dairy 


2013/14 IDP review 

Egg production inTombo 


2013/14 IDP review 

Cwebeni fishing 


2013/14 IDP review 

Irrigation schemes on Umzimvubu and Mngazi rivers 


2013/14 IDP review 

Majola essential oils 


Environmental scoping report 

Adluck and Masakhane poultry 

Mining 

Environmental scoping report 

Salt mining 


Environmental scoping report 

Sand mining 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Kaolin mining 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Travertine mining 

Manufacturing 

Environmental scoping report 

Craft development & training 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Agroprocessing- fish products 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Agroprocessing- honey 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Agro-processing- fresh produce 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Mineral beneficiation- kaolin 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Brickmaking 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Construction products linked to quarry 

Construction (Property) 

PSJ Master plan 

Mpantu river node 


PSJ Master plan 

Improvement of infrastructure services 


Environmental scoping report 

Housing developments 


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SECTOR 

SOURCE 

PROJECT 


Nodal Development Strategy 

Nodal developments: Bambisana, Silimela, Ntafufu, 



Tombo 


2010 SDF 

Majola service node 


2010 SDF 

Naval base, bulolo dam & airports nodes in PSJ town 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Rural and tourism nodes 

Transport 

PSJ Master plan 

Fencing of airstrip 


PSJ Master plan 

Repair of potholes 


PSJ Master plan 

Signage 


PSJ Master plan 

Redevelopment of taxi rank 

Business services 

2005 LED strategy 

Business service centre 


2005 LED strategy 

Rural trading stations 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Clean-up campaign 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Informal trader capacity building 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Municipal supplier development programme 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Review of municipal procurement policy 

Community & 

PSJ Master plan 

Urban renewal of CBD 

government services 

Environmental scoping report 

Caguba hall of remembrance 


2005 LED strategy 

Municipal LED forum 

Tourism 

Local Sectoral Potential Review 

Linkages with local nature reserves 


PSJ Master plan 

Development of marine boulevard 


PSJ Master plan 

Construction of adventure centre 


PSJ Master plan 

Construction of facilities at 2 nd beach 


Environmental scoping report 

Sinuka 


Environmental scoping report 

Cultural precinct 


Environmental scoping report 

Waterfront development 


Environmental scoping report 

Visitor information centre 


Environmental scoping report 

Cable car 


Environmental scoping report 

Hiking trails 


Environmental scoping report 

Coast care 


Environmental scoping report 

Beach management 


Environmental scoping report 

Cultural festivals 


Environmental scoping report 

Establishment of events committee 


2013/14 IDP review 

Mphande coastal resort rehabilitation 


2013/14 IDP review 

Lighthouse development 


2013/14 IDP review 

Conference facilities 


2013/14 IDP review 

Branding & Marketing strategy 


2013/14 IDP review 

Events and festival programme 


2013/14 IDP review 

Cultural dance competition 


2013/14 IDP review 

Tourism information & booking system 


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SECTOR 

SOURCE 

PROJECT 


2013/14 IDP review 

Tourism development plan 


Local Sectoral Potential Review 

LTO revitalisation 

Infrastructure 

2013/14 IDP review 

Upgrading of Port St Johns sewer system 


2013/14 IDP review 

Resurface DR08029 Isilimela Road 


2013/14 IDP review 

Pothole repairs R61 and DR008307 


2013/14 IDP review 

Regravel DR08191 


2013/14 IDP review 

9,7km pot hole repair in town and link roads 


2013/14 IDP review 

Street lighting 


2013/14 IDP review 

Storm-water channels cleaning 


2013/14 IDP review 

Development of an Integrated Waste Management Plan 


2013/14 IDP review 

Sustainable recycling project 


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KEY PERFOMANCE AREA #5 
GOOD GOVERNANCE & 
PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 


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3.6.1 Overview of Good Governance Issues 

Good governance remains key priority for the term. There are key areas that have been earmarked for attention in terms of 
improving good governance in the municipality including: 

• Stabilizing council and its administration with a view to improving its public image 

• Achieving a clean audit with the next two years 

• Responding to MEC assessment and assessment action plan 

• Automation and cascading of PMS to lower levels 

• Training and provision of administrative support to ward councillors and CDWs to improve effective public participation 

• Improving cooperative governance through revitalizing the IGR especially aimed at improving cooperation between the 
municipality and sector departments in the planning and delivery of development programmes 

• Promotion of public participation through setting up a dedicated desk and reaching out to traditional leaders and other 
strategic partners. 

• Fighting corruption 

• Improvement of intergovernmental relations and effectiveness through training and continuous engagement via IGF 

3.6.2 Intergovernmental Relations 

Port St Johns Municipality has established an IGR Forum in accordance with the Intergovernmental Relations Framework Act PSJ 
Mayor chairs our local IGR and IDP forum which meets regularly to discuss and evaluate progress on the implementation of plans 
that are committed in the IDP and departmental annual plans. The major challenges towards ensuring an effective IGR forum are 
the participation of government departments which do not attend nor submit reports. 


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Intergovernmental Structures 


Table 3.22: Intergovernmental structure 


SPHERE 

STRUCTURE 

Provincial 

The Mayor and Municipal Manager participate in the 

MUNIMEC Forums 

Municipal Entity 

The Municipality has one entity called the Development 

Agency 

District IGR 

This includes Municipal Managers Forum, District IGR Forum 

and other structured engagements the municipality has 

partnered with the District. 

Local IGR 

Local IGR Forum, Development Committee, Transport 

Forum 


3.6.3 Structures Created Within The Municipality 

3.6.3.1 Council 

Council is the highest decision making body in the municipality and seats every quarter unless a special council meeting is 
arranged by the Speaker. Councillors are elected by the local registered voters to serve a predetermined term of office on the 
local council as representatives of their respective constituencies. Port St. Johns Council has a total of 39 seats, with 20 of these 
seats being allocated to ward Councillors who are elected by the wards they represent, while 19 seats are allocated to political 
parties in proportion to the number of votes cast for them. There are nine members on EXCO including the Mayor. 


The Mayor is the head of the political and decision making structures. The Speaker chairs the council and controls compliance 
with rules of order of Council as adopted. All municipal councillors and ward committee were sworn in and given a copy of the 
code of conduct and the Speaker ensures that both parties (councillors and ward committees) observe and adhere to the code. 

3.6.3.2 Committees 

For purposes of administering political oversight the council is supported by the following standing committees which are each 
chaired by a nominated councillor. The following table reflects the committees of Council and their respective purposes, as well as 
the frequency of meetings during a financial year. 


Table 3.23: Committees 


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COMMITTEE NAME 

COMMITTEE TYPE 

FUNCTIONS 

NO. OF MEETINGS 

COUNCIL 

Council 

Political oversight 

4 Ordinary Council meetings. Special 

Councils depend on the Municipal 

business 

EXCO 

EXCO 

Deals with matters delegated to it by 

Council and legislation. 

4 ordinary EXCO, Special EXCO 

depend on the Municipal business 

BTO Standing 

Committee 

Section 80 

Financial Management Oversight 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing Committee 

are convened as per need arises 

LED Standing 

Committee 

Section 80 

All matters requiring attention arising from 

the provisions of the relevant legislation 

inline the departmental mandate and the 

Municipal Delegation Framework 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing Committee 

are convened as per need arises. 

Corporate 

Services 

Section 80 

All matters requiring attention arising from 

the provisions of the relevant legislation 

inline the departmental mandate and the 

Municipal Delegation Framework 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing Committee 

are convened as per need arises 

Community 

Services 

Standing 

Section 80 

All matters requiring attention arising from 

the provisions of the relevant legislation 

inline the departmental mandate and the 

Municipal Delegation Framework 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing Committee 

are convened as per need arises 

Engineering 

Standing 

Committee 

Section 80 

All matters requiring attention arising from 

the provisions of the relevant legislation 

inline the departmental mandate and the 

Municipal Delegation Framework 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing Committee 

are convened as per need arises 

Research 

Planning and 

IGR 

Section 80 

All matters requiring attention arising from 

the provisions of the relevant legislation 

inline the departmental mandate and the 

Municipal Delegation Framework 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing Committee 

are convened as per need arises 

Special 

Programmes 

Standing 

Committee 

Section 80 

All matters requiring attention arising from 

the provisions of the relevant legislation 

inline the departmental mandate and the 

Municipal Delegation Framework 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing Committee 

are convened on request. 

MPAC 

Section 79 

Deals with matters delegated to it by 

Council 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing Committee 

are convened as per need arises. 

Local 

Geographic 

names 

Section 79 

Deals with matters delegated to it by 

Council 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing 

Committees are convened as per need 

arises 


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COMMITTEE NAME 

COMMITTEE TYPE 

FUNCTIONS 

NO. OF MEETINGS 

Rules and 

ethics 

Section 79 

Deals with matters delegated to it by 

Council 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing 

Committees are convened as per need 

arises 

Members 

Interest 

Section 79 

Deals with matters delegated to it by 

Council 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing 

Committees are convened as per need 

arises 

Public 

Participation 

Section 79 

Deals with matters delegated to it by 

Council 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing 

Committees are convened as per need 

arises 

Remuneration 

Section 79 

Deals with matters delegated to it by 

Council 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing 

Committees are convened as per need 

arises 

Women's 

Caucus 

Section 79 

Deals with matters delegated to it by 

Council 

4 Ordinary standing Committee 

Meetings. Special Standing 

Committees are convened as per need 

arises. 

Audit 

Committee 


Deals with matters delegated to it by 

Council 

4 Ordinary Committee Meetings. 

Special Committee meetings are 

convened as per need arises 


3.6.3.3 IDP, Budget and PMS Representative Forum 

The Municipality every year establishes a Representative Forum and accordingly the same was done for the development of IDP 
2018/22. This information was highlighted on the first Chapter, under Executive Summary and again is brought into detail as part 
of the Good Governance Key Performance Area. The IDP Representative Forum consists of the following role-players with the 


listed functions: 

Table 3.24: IDP Representative Forum 


ROLE PLAYERS 

EXCO members; 


• Councillors; 


• Traditional leaders; 


• Ward Committee Chairpersons; 


• Senior Municipal Officials; 


• Stakeholder representatives of organized groups; 


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• Advocates of unorganized groups; 

• Resource persons; 

• Other community representatives; 

• National and Provincial Departments regional representatives; 

• NGO's; and 

• Parastatal organizations 

FUNCTIONS 

Represent the interest of the Municipality's constituency in the IDP process; 

• Provide an organizational mechanism for discussion, negotiation, and decision making 

between the stakeholders inclusive of municipal government; 

• Ensure communication between all the stakeholder representatives, inclusive of municipal 

government; and 

• Monitor the performance of the planning and implementation process. 

• To institutionalize participation in integrated development planning 

• Membership to ensure geographical and social representation 

• Members to have mandate to represent the interests of their constituents in the integrated 

development planning process 

• Provide an organizational mechanism for discussion, negotiation, and decision-making 

between the stakeholders and municipal government 

• Ensure communication between all stakeholders representatives and the Municipality 

• Monitor performance of the planning process 

• Represent interests and contribute knowledge and ideas in the planning process 

Participating in the IDP Rep Forum 

• Inform interest groups, communities, and organizations on relevant planning activities and 

outcomes 

• Analyze issues, determine priorities, negotiate, and reach consensus 

• Participate in designing project proposals and/or assess them 

• Discuss and comment on the draft Integrated Development Plan 

• Comment on and discuss alignment of annual business plans and budget with Integrated 

Development Plan 

• Conducting meetings/workshops with groups, communities, or organizations 


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IDP, BUDGET AND PMS STEERING COMMITTEE 

The IDP Steering Committee consists of the following role-players, with the listed functions: 

Table 3.25: Steering Committee 

ROLE PLAYERS The Mayor 
The Speaker 
The Chief Whip 

• The Executive Committee Members 

• Municipal Manager 

• Senior Managers (SEMs) 

• representatives from Union 
•IDP Manager 

FUNCTIONS Provide terms of reference for all reviewing and planning activities 

• Commission IDP planning studies, programs, and projects 

• Process, summarize, and document outputs from subcommittees, teams etc. 

• Recommend amendments to the contents of the IDP 

• Prepare, facilitate, and document meetings and workshops 

• Ensure alignment and participation in the determination and prioritization of plans and 
programs in the spirit of cooperative governance 


3.6.3.4 Ward Committees and CDWs 

Section 74 of the Municipal Structures Act, and regulation 5 of the Government Gazette No. 27699 Ward Committee, state that 

Ward Committees may have powers and functions delegated to them (which are essentially advisory in nature) in terms of S59 of 

the Municipal Systems Act. Among these powers and functions are: 

• To serve as an official specialized participator/ structure in Port St. Jon Municipality. 

• To create formal, unbiased communication channels, as well as a co-operative partnership between the community and 
the Council. 

• Advise and make recommendations to the Ward Councillor on matters of policy affecting the Ward. 

• Assisting the Ward Councillors in identifying the challenges and needs of residents. 

• Dissemination of information in the Ward concerning municipal affairs, such as the budget, integrated development 
planning, performance management systems, service delivery options, and municipal properties. 

• Receive queries and complaints from residents concerning municipal service delivery, communication with Council, and 
provide feedback to the community on Council's response. 

• Ensure constructive and harmonious interaction between the Municipality and community through the use and co¬ 
ordination of ward residents meetings and other community development forums, and 

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• Interact with other organizations and forums on matters affecting the ward. 

A ward committee may also make recommendations on any matter affecting its ward to the ward Councillor, or through the ward 
Councillor to the local council. Port St. Johns Municipality has 20 functional ward committees, established with the 
commencement of the new term. One meeting per month, per ward committee, is scheduled. 

Most wards are allocated a Community Development Workers who assists the ward committee with compilation and submission 
of reports on community development needs and progress. CDWs also assist with conducting basic research aimed at supporting 
the work of ward committees. It is common for each CDW to attend to 10 to 15 cases per month in each ward. CDWs form part 
of the municipal gatherings especially those involving IDPs and make a valuable contribution thereto. The office of the Speaker 
and ward councillors monitor and elevate issue emanating from the monthly ward committee meetings with constant feedback 
being provided to the ward committees off which CDW are part off. 


3.6.3.5 Traditional Leadership 

The Municipal Structures Act states that "Traditional Authorities that traditionally observe a system of Customary Law in the area 
of the Municipality may participate in the proceedings of Council of that Municipality, and those Traditional Leaders must be 
allowed to attend and participate in any meeting of Council". Accordingly, Traditional Leadership has a representation of 8 
members in the Council. With regards to the Traditional Leadership the following is being implemented: 

• Amakhosi are invited to all meetings of the Municipality and participate in discussions. 

• Amakhosi have been allocated to Council's Standing committees in order to be actively involved in the discussions 
happening in those meetings. 

• The provision of an office for Amakhosi 

• Providing financial support for programmes and projects. 

3.6.3.6 Internal Audit Unit 

PSJLM has an agreement with ORTDM to provide internal auditing functions. The agreement is renewed after every 3 years. 
Internal Audit is an independent, objective, assurance and consulting activity designed to add value and improve the 
municipality's operations. The unit assists the municipality in accomplishing its objectives through a systematic, disciplined 

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approach to evaluate and improving the effectiveness of risk management, system of internal control and governance processes. 
By its nature. Internal Audit Unit is a governance structure and not service delivery vehicle. Its role is critical in promoting and 
enhancing control environment through auditing and special reviews and recommending solutions to management. To solidify the 
internal audit institutional framework, an internal audit methodology has been developed and approved by the Audit Committee 
which guides execution and management of the internal audit activity. 

The unit has reviewed its Internal Audit charter in 2017/18 financial year. The Audit Committee's charter was also revised to 
encapsulate all the requirements of legislation. A positive change has been realized through internal audit effort by changing the 
approach of auditing. This improvement includes the initiation of the dashboard project which is aimed at better monitoring the 
internal systems and Controls. 

3.6.3.7 Audit & Risk Committee 

The Municipality has an established the Audit & Risk Committee, with four Council approved membership. Its responsibilities arise 
from section 166 of the Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003 (MFMA). The audit & Risk committee acts as an 
advisory body independent of management and internal and external audit, reporting to the Council on accountability, internal 
audit function, external audit, risk management, governance, performance management, financial management and reporting on 
municipal entities related matters. It provides assistance to the Council by: 

• Providing an independent review of Port St. Johns Municipal's reporting functions to ensure the integrity of the financial 
reports. 

• Ensuring all systems of internal control, governance and risk management functions are operating effectively and reliably. 

• Providing strong and effective oversight of Port St. Johns Municipal's internal and external audit functions. 

The Audit & risk Committee Charter was reviewed and adopted as required by law. 


3.6.4 Risk Management 

Section 62(1) (c)(i) of the Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 53 of 2003 requires the Accounting Officer to establish and 
maintain effective, efficient & transparent systems of risk management. Port St. Johns Municipality's risk management philosophy 
is informed by the constitutional imperatives. The preamble of our constitution and Chapter 2 of the Constitution deals 


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extensively with the Bill of Rights. The Constitution describes one of the values of founding provisions as; Human dignity, the 
achievement of quality and the advancement of human rights and freedoms. Section 3 of the Constitution further states that 
all citizens are equally entitled to the rights, privileges and benefits of citizenship. 

The values that are enshrined in the Constitution and the Bill of Right are relevant to risk management. Port St. Johns 
Municipality is aware that no organization is functioning in a risk-free environment and as a public institution it is susceptible to 
risks associated with the fulfilling of our constitutional mandate. 

Port St. Johns Municipality is committed to achieve its vision as set out in this IDP. It therefore considers risk management as an 
integral part of its strategy and operations and as a management tool to assist in achieving our service delivery objectives. To 
effectively manage risks to the achievement of the municipality's objectives provides managers with a systematic way to make 
responsible, coherent and informed decisions and enables them to achieve improved outputs and outcomes. A structured 
approach to the management of risks also enhances and encourages the identification of greater opportunities for continuous 
improvement through innovation. In most of the public sector organizations "risk management" is viewed as a stand-alone 
activity that requires special skills and resources and add to an already cumbersome workload. 

Risk Management Practices requires the Accounting Officer to manage the strategic and operational risks of the municipality. 
Accordingly, the Municipality has developed and adopted a Risk Management Policy, Strategy. Port St. Johns risk management 
system provides for mitigating strategies and control activities against the risks within the municipality from unacceptable 
likelihood and impact. The municipality's risk management system identifies strategic and operational risks and assigns 
responsibility to appropriate officials within the municipality. The Audit & Committee's role in relation to risk is to provide an 
oversight role and advise Council. The municipality has a Risk Management Committee in place that meets on quarterly basis and 
is made of Senior Managers and Risk Champions. The Risk Management Committee has its terms of reference in a form of a 
charter that was adopted in 16 December 2016. Risk register are updated on regular basis and as the municipality embarks on 
new initiatives and programmes any emerging risks that could have a negative impact on the municipality's ability to achieve its 
strategic objectives. 

The Council is ultimately responsible for risk management supremacy with EXCO and Audit & Risk Committee playing a very 
crucial oversight role as a function that is delegated to them and legislated. The status of strategic and operational risks are 

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reported and monitored on regular basis by Internal Audit Unit and Risk Management Committee who give feed back to the 
Accounting Officer and Audit & Committee. 


3.6.5 Fraud & Corruption Prevention Plan 

The municipality has developed and adopted a fraud and Corruption prevention plan, drawing its legal mandate from Chapter 2 of 
the Constitution which deals extensively with the Bill of Rights. On a quarterly basis the municipality conducts fraud assessments 
as part of implementing the plan, which came into effect on the 1 st July 2017. 

3.6.6 Communication Public Participation, Customer Care And Special 
Programmes 

The council promotes local democracy and community involvement in its affairs by facilitating capacity building and establishing 
operational mechanisms for ensuring public participation in planning, project implementation and general council affairs. The 
Municipality has a communication strategy that was adopted in 2011 and it is in the process of drafting a comprehensive 
communication and public participation strategy that among other things will inform the participation of traditional leaders not 
part of Council in governance matters and the general public. The Municipal Council resolved that the Mayor must hold at least 
one outreach per quarter rotated throughout the wards for the current term with reports submitted to council for consideration. 
These outreaches exclude the IDP and Budget roadshows, IDP representative forums and IGR forums. That resolution has been 
complied with since the start of the current term. In addition, we have a dedicated unit dealing with the promotion of special 
programmes reporting directly to a section 56 manager. This office works closely with our political offices and office of MM and 
serves as interface between our organization and stakeholders in the realization of programme objectives. 

The Municipality also has a well-established stakeholder's forum that sits every quarter. This forum evaluates and discusses the 
impact of municipal programmes. Recommendations from these meeting are then circulated to the relevant department where 
timeframes are also developed for each mater raised. 

SPECIAL GROUPS 

We have a dedicated SPU which is responsible for facilitating our interventions in social cohesion and support targeted at 
affirming special groups and mainstreams them for improved participation. The unit run key programmes that are dealing with 


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youth, women, children, elderly, disabled and HIV Aids programmes. It is hosted and reports to the office of the municipal 
manager. 

In the past financial year the unit has successfully completed the following: 

• Established the Port St Johns Youth Council which is represented by youth from different organisations (Political formation. 
Council of Churches, Community base organisations and Civic society). 

• Hosted women's summit and facilitated the establishment of the women's caucus 

• Elected two member to represent the PSJ Municipality in the District People with Disability forum 

• Annual mayoral cup 

• Tradition dance competition with representation from all tribal authorities. 

3.6.7 Petitions And Complaints Management 

In the past, there was no system in place for the management of the complaints and petitions in the municipality. The Municipal 
Council has developed a policy which seeks to regulate (1) the manner in which community members and stakeholders lodge 
their complaints/petitions, and (2) how the municipality handles such complaints/petitions. This policy also seeks to encourage 
community members and stakeholders to exercise their constitutional right as per Section 17 of our Constitution. This policy was 
adopted by council as a draft pending a Policy Workshop. 

3.6.8 General Good Governance 

■ The Budget and IDP process plan was developed and adopted by council in August 2016. 

■ The previous year IDP (2017/18) was assessed by COGTA and all the weaknesses were addressed in the current year IDP. 

■ Port St Johns municipality embarked on an extensive Public Participation in a form of IDP roadshows to present and agree 
on the programmes to be implemented by the Municipality in the current term, which is budgeted for. 


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KEY PERFOMANCE AREA #6 

MUNICIPAL 
TRANSFORMATION & 
INSTITUTIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT 


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3.7.1 Institutional Synopsis 

FOCUS AREAS 
Staff establishment: 

• Development and review of (organogram) staff establishment. 

• Job description writing, Job evaluation 

Attach remuneration and other conditions of service as may be determined in accordance with any relevant legislation. 

Human Resource (Training) & Development: 

• Develop and adopt appropriate system to ensure a fair, effective and transparent personnel administration including 
recruitment, service conditions, supervision of staff, transfer, promotion, demotion, investigation of allegations of 
misconduct and complaints against staff grievance procedure, disciplinary procedure etc. 

Capacity Building 

• Development of human resource capacity to ensure the Municipality performs its functions and exercise its powers in 
economic, efficient and accountable way 

Code of Conduct for Municipal Staff Members 

• Ensuring the purpose, contents and consequences of the code of conduct are explained to the staff. 

ICT 

• Provision of support in so far as Information and communication technology infrastructure requirements of the Municipality 
are concerned. 

Provisioning and Booking services 

• Coordinate provisioning and accommodation bookings for the institution. 

Registry and Customer services 

• Provision of document keeping and management, handling and complaints and customer care services. 

3.7.2 Functions And Powers 

The mandate for local government stems out of the constitutional duties provided for by section 152 and 156 read with the 
schedules 4b and 5b of the South African Constitution. In terms of the constitution, local government has the following 
responsibilities. From the powers and functions allocated to local government, the Municipality performs all the functions except 
for the ones highlighted bold in the table below. 


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Table 3.26: Functions and Powers 


Part B of Schedule 4 

Part B of Schedule 5 

1. Air pollution 

16. Beaches and amusement facilities 

2. Building regulations 

17. Billboards and display advertisement in public places 

3. Child care facilities 

18. Cemeteries, funeral parlors and crematoria 

4. Electricity and gas reticulation 

19. Cleansing 

5. Fire-fighting services 

20. Control of public nuisance 

6. Local tourism 

21. Control of undertakings that sell liquor to the public 

7. Municipal airport 

22. Facilities for the accommodation care and burial of 

8. Municipal planning 

animals 

9. Municipal health services 

23. Fencing and fences 

10. Municipal public transport 

24. Licensing and controlling of undertakings that sell food to 

11. Pontoons, fairies, settees, piers and 

the public 

harbours excluding the regulations of 

25. Local amenities 

international and national shipping 

26. Local sport facilities 

12. Municipal public works only in respect of 

27. Markets 

the needs of the municipalities 

28. Municipal abattoirs 

13. Storm water management system 

29. Municipal parks and recreation 

14. Trading regulations 

30. Municipal roads 

15. Water and sanitation services (limited to 

31. Noise pollution 

potable water supply system, domestic 

32. Pounds 

waste water and sewerage disposal 

33. Public places 

system) 

34. Refuse removals, refuse dumps and solid waste disposals 


35. Street trading 


36. Street lighting 


37. Traffic and parking 


3.7.4 Municipal Overview 

PSJ is a category "B" municipality in terms of Section 7 Municipal Structures Act 117 of 1998, with a collective executive system 
and a ward participatory system Section 9(b) with only one office centre located in the Port St Johns town and was established in 
December 2000 as a fully-fledged wall-to wall municipality. 

The Municipality is led by a Council and Mayor who works closely with elected ward Councillors. Its administration is headed by a 
Municipal Manager who is supported by other section 56 line functional managers. 


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3.7.5 Organisational Structure/ Organogram 

There are five Business Units in the Municipality, which mirror the committee portfolios and report to the Municipal Manager. The 
Municipal Manager is the principal Accounting Officer employed in terms of section 57 of the Municipal Systems Act -2000 as 
amended. He is supported by section 56 managers who are contracted for a five year term. These Business Units, each headed 
by a Senior Manager, ensure that services are delivered to the people of the Port St. Johns Municipality, and are structured as 
follows: 

• Engineering and Planning Services 

• Community Services 

• Local Economic Development 

• Financial Services 

• Corporate Services 

As required by law, all section 56 Managers have performance agreements signed and submitted to the Department of Local 
Government and Traditional Affairs in time. These contracts are reviewed annually. 

The Municipal Manager and his team of executive managers hold monthly meetings to discuss key strategic service deliverables, 
and to offer guidance on achieving IDP goals. 

To ensure that services are delivered, coordinated according to the set development priorities and also have an institutional 
approach to issues, departmental meetings are also held on a monthly basis. Reports from these meeting are elevated to Council 
when necessary. 

The administrative component is aligned with the five National Key Performance Areas: 

• Financial Viability and Management, 

• Local Economic Development, 

• Basic Service Delivery and Infrastructure Development, 

• Good Governance and Public Participation, 

• Institutional Development and Transformation, and 

• Spatial Planning 

The table below gives further details on the organizational arrangements at Port St. Johns Municipality 


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Table 3.27: Organisational Arrangements 


DEPARTMENT 

SECTIONS / UNITS 

MAJOR FUNCTIONS 

Engineering and 

Infrastructure Development 

1. Project Management 

Unit (PMU) 

2. Construction and 

maintenance 

3. Town Planning and 

Housing 

• Roads construction and maintenance 

• Housing infrastructure 

• Mechanical Workshop 

• Provision of recreation and social infrastructure 

• Building plans and inspections 

• Water and sanitation services 

• provide project management services 

• manage and control land usage 

• ensure spatial planning and development 

Community Services 

1. Sports, Arts and Culture 

2. Traffic Management 

3. Cleansing and Solid 

Waste 

4. Parks and Recreation 

> Provide community welfare support 

> Render social development services 

> Render community services 

> Render traffic services 

Finance Services 

1. Income and Expenditure 

2. Budget and Reporting 

3. Supply chain & 

inventory management 

■/ Provide income and credit control services. 

■/ Provide budgeting and expenditure services. 

■/ Administer Supply Chain Management Services. 

v' Asset Management 

Corporate Services 

1. Corporate 

Administration 

2. Human Resources 

■ Coordinate and manage all corporate services 

■ Manage human resources 

LED 

1. Enterprise Development 

2. PSJ Development 

Agency 

3. Tourism Development 

4. Agricultural 

Development 

o Tourism Development, Marketing and promotion 

o Arts trusts and cultural promotion 

o SMME Development and poverty alleviation 

o Policy and strategy formulation 

o Monitoring and evaluation of Municipal LED 

o Business development and investment promotion 

o Town and spatial developmental assessment and awareness 


In addition to these line functionaries the municipality also owns a subsidiary company responsible for dispensing its LED 
programmes called PSJ Development Agency. The agency is headed by a Chief Executive Officer who also reports directly to 
Municipal Manager. 


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3.7.6 Municipal Institutional Capacity And Status Of Critical Posts 

The organisational structure of the municipality was adopted in 2014 and is currently under review. The structure provides for 
252 approved posts of which 86 (34.1%) are vacant many of which are critical. 

Municipal Manager and Section 56 Posts 
Below is the status of the section 56 posts: 

• Municipal Manager - Vacant 

• Chief Financial Officer - Filled 

• Senior Manager: Engineering- Vacant 

• Senior Manager: Community Services- Vacant 

• Senior Manager: Local Economic Development - Filled 


• Senior Manager: Corporate Services -Vacant 

Table 3.28: PSJ Posts 


DEPARTMENT 

TOTAL NO. OF POSTS 

FILLED POSTS 

VACANT POSTS 

Office of the Mayor 

6 

4 

2 

Office of the Speaker 

7 

6 

1 

Office of the Municipal Manager 

11 

3 

8 

Engineering 

62 

49 

13 

Finance 

15 

6 

9 

Community Services 

89 

60 

29 

LED 

6 

5 

1 

Corporate Service 

56 

40 

16 


The organisational structure is currently under review, to align certain functions with the appropriate departments and council 
priorities as articulated in the IDP. There is also a need to align the organisational structure with the budget and to ensure that it 
is MSCOA compliant. All municipal employees have a job description which is given to each employee when they sign their 
employment contract. The Corporate Services Department also ensures that all municipal officials have the code of conduct and it 
is also responsible to monitor compliance and adherence. The above office also ensures compliance with the recruitment policy 
and that there is a budget for all advertised vacancies. 


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3.7.7 Human Resource Development 

3.7.7.1 Employment Equity 

In the past the staff components of the Municipality did not fully reflect the demographics of the municipal area, and the 
approved Equity Plan had to be activated to address the imbalances created by Apartheid employment policies. To date, the 
Municipality has complied with the required provisions of the Employment Equity Act. Employment equity reports are generated 
and submitted to the department of Labour on an annual basis. 

3.7.7.2 Workforce Capacity Development 

Section 68 (1) of the Municipal Service Act (2000) requires municipalities to develop their human resource capacity to a level that 
enables them to perform their functions and exercise their powers in an economical, effective, efficient, and accountable way. The 
Municipality, through the Human Resources Development Unit under the Corporate Services Department, is the custodian or 
champion for skills development on behalf of the Municipality. Various training interventions are conducted through different 
levels in the organization. There are training programmes that are intended to equip the employee in order to improve the quality 
and standard of service delivery. The Workplace Skills Plan is developed along the LGSETA guideline. The Municipality collects in 
full almost all of what is due to it in training rebates, on an annual basis. 

Whilst the Human Resources Development Unit is tasked to improve the competency of our employees, the unit is also 
responsible for working in partnership with various departments, training providers, and communities to improve the level of 
skills, knowledge, and behavior of our employees and citizens, enabling them to be active participants in the economic 
development and growth of the region. 

3.7.7.3 Labour Relations 

The Municipality has established a local labour forum (LLF). This forum is functional and in the past financial year it held four 
meetings aimed at addressing labour issues. 

3.7.7.4 Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) 

The WSP is an annual plan developed by Port St. Johns Municipality that describes the training and development strategy of the 
organization, and assists the organization to meet its overall objectives and targets. The WSP of the Municipality must relate to 
the key municipal Integrated Development Plan objectives, and to the priority training areas identified in the sector skills plan. 

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The process of compiling the Work Place Skills Plan started in July 2016, when all employees were approached and were 
requested to complete forms to identify their training needs. The training needs that are identified in these forms are used to 
compile the Work Place Skills Plan for 2018/2019. Organizations that have more than 50 employees must consult on the process 
of developing the Workplace Skills Plan in a Training and Development Committee. Where a workplace is unionized, trade union 
and management structures must be represented on this Committee, as their signature is required to verify that consultation on 
the development of the workplace skills plan has taken place. It is essential to obtain buy-in in the process, initially at Council 
Level, and then throughout the Organization. The same approach was followed by Port St. Johns Municipality. 

3.7.7.5 Retention Strategy 

The Municipality has developed and adopted a policy on Staff Retention to address the scarce skills phenomenon. It is the belief 
of the Municipality that through recruitment, the application of the employment Retention Policy will contribute towards assisting 
the Municipality to meet its objectives as expounded in the IDP. 


3.7.8 Municipal Policies 

The Municipality has adopted the following HR policies in order to address gaps on existing policies and to assist facilitation of 
operations of the municipality in achieving its objectives and IDP objectives. 

• Organizational design, approving and • 


changing of organizational structure 
Recruitment, selection, 

shortlisting and induction 
management 
Placement 

Employee leave management 
Skills development and training 
Employee assistance programme 
Employment equity plan 
Overtime management 


• Employment retention strategy 

• Bursary policy 

• Appointment in acting capacity 
policy 

Occupational health and safety 
Cellphone policy 
Travelling and subsistence 
Disciplinary procedure and code 
collective agreement 
Management of customer services 
Bereavement policy 


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• Exit policy and procedure • Pauper burial policy 

• Transport and operations policy 

• Management of performance in the 
municipality 


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3.7.8.1 Institutional SWOT Analysis 


Table 3.29: SWOT Analysis 


STRENGTHS 

WEAKNESSES 

• Availability and adherence to spatial planning policies 

• Lack of integration on spatial planning and development 

and By-laws 

• Lack of integrated infrastructure service delivery plan 

• Promotion of infrastructure service delivery 

• Lack of availability of Standard Operating Procedure 

• Availability and adherence to financial management 

Manuals 

policies and By-laws 

• Inadequate funding and infrastructure to implement LED 

• Availability of economic policies 

strategy 

• Geographic competitive advantage for local economic 

• Inadequate monitoring of resolutions by governance 

development supported by LED policies 

structures 

• Functional governance structures 

• Inadequate human development (trainings, workshops. 

• Availability of Human Resource Plan with specific 

seminars etc.) 

reference to human and organizational development 

• Aged ICT infrastructure that is unable to respond to 

• Adopted ICT policies to strengthen the functioning of 

modern needs of the municipality 

the municipality 

• Inadequate ICT capacity 

OPPORTUNITIES 

THREATS 

• Improved integration on spatial planning and 

• Uncoordinated Spatial Development 

development leading to clear roles and 

• Complete Eradication Of Infrastructure Service Delivery 

responsibilities amongst stakeholders 

Backlogs 

• Development and implementation of integrated 

• Non-Implementation Of Standard Operating Procedure 

infrastructure service delivery plan 

Manual 

• Development and implementation Standard 

• Inadequate private sector investment in local economic 

Operating Procedure Manual 

development 

• Properly funding of economic infrastructure would 

• Unwillingness to support and implement resolutions 

lead to efficient implementation of the LED strategy 

taken by governance structures 

• Capacitation of stakeholders in governance issues 

• Poor performance and outdated workforce skills 

• Implementation of Workplace Skills Plan 

• Inability to retain institutional information and ICT back- 


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Development of integrated ICT infrastructure system 
Conduct ICT capacity assessments 


ups 

Inadequate leadership support of ICT importance for the 
entire institution 


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CHAPTER 4 

PLANNING THE FUTURE 


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4.1 PLANNING THE FUTURE 

4.1.1 Introduction 

The Vision, Objectives, Strategies, and Projects of Port St. Municipality are underpinned by Strategic Planning and Policies at a 
National and Provincial level, which were summarized in Chapter 2 above. The objectives and components of these documents 
and policies have helped determine the direction towards which the Municipality is moving, as reflected in this IDP. 


4.1.2 The Main KPAs 

a) Spatial planning 

b) Basic service delivery 

c) Financial viability and Management 

d) Local economic development 

e) Good governance and public participation 

f) Municipal transformation and institutional development 


4.1.3 Municipal Key Issues 


Table 3.30: Municipal Key Issues 


KPA 

KEY ISSUES 

GOAL STATEMENT 

Spatial planning 

Spatial Equity 

To develop Port St. Johns as an integrated spatially equitable 

municipal area, maximizing the potential benefits of its 

environmental assets in a sustainable and prosperous manner 

for all its people 

Basic service 

delivery 

Infrastructure backlogs 

Inadequate provision of 

basic services 

Inadequate provision of 

community services 

To provide sustainable municipal infrastructure and social 

services, consistently maintaining and improving the needs of 

the people 

Financial viability 

and Management 

Debt collection 

Revenue generation 

Poor internal controls and 

systems 

To build financial sustainability for Port St. Johns Municipality 

through empowering staff to achieve Good Governance and a 

Clean Administration, promoting accuracy and transparency 

Local Economic 

Development 

Economic growth leading 

to the creation of decent 

jobs. 

Economic infrastructure 

To create and facilitate a conducive environment that builds 

inclusive local economies, sustainable decent employment and 

eradicates poverty 


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KPA 

KEY ISSUES 

GOAL STATEMENT 


development 


Good governance 

and public 

participation 

Innovative and effective 

public engagements 

To create an enabling environment for active public 

participation and an administrative culture characterized by 

accountability transparency and efficiency 

Municipal 

transformation 

and institutional 

development 

Institutional skills 

development and 

professionalization of the 

organization. 

Filling of strategic critical 

vacant posts. 

Institutional and 

individual performance 

management framework. 

To provide professional, efficient, people cantered human 

resources and administrative services to Port St. Johns 

Communities, staff and council for a transformed, equitable and 

efficient development local system 


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4.1.4 Municipal Vision 

VISION 

Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality. 

MISSION 

A municipality that is financially viable and committed to provide quality services through good governance in a manner that is 
equitable and responsive to community needs. 


4.1.5. Values 

In addition to the eight Batho Pele principles introduced by government on 1 October 1997, the municipality wishes, in the next 
five years to embrace an additional seven values of accountability, corruption-free, responsibility and social justice. Statements 
made below therefore constitute a service charter with residents of Port St John's Municipality who are the recipients of the 
goods and services of the municipality. 

MUNICIPAL VALUES: 

Effectiveness 

Honesty 

Accountability 

Ethics 

Transparency 

Efficiency 

Integrity 


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4.1.6 Batho Pele Principles 

The Batho Pele "People First" values were first introduced on 1 October, 1997 as a government initiative to stand for better 
than before delivery of goods and services. The Batho Pele initiative aims to enhance the quality of and accessibility to 
government services by improving efficiency and accountability to the recipients of public goods and services. As a local 
municipality which is a frontline of government and therefore the face of government for delivery of goods and services, and in 
keeping with the municipal mandate as elaborated under vision, Port St Johns Local Municipality embraces and will be guided 
by the eight Batho Pele principles in dealing with the residents of the municipality and in executing its mandate. The principles 
are elaborated in the table below. 


Table 3.31: Batho Pele Principles 


BATHO PELE 

PRINCIPLE 

PRINCIPLE STATEMENT 

APPLICATION 

Consultation 

Recipients of the service must be consulted about the 

level and quality of the public services they receive 

and, wherever possible, should be given a choice about 

the services that are offered. 

Residents should tell the municipality what 

they want from the municipality and 

government. 

Service 

standards 

You should be told what level and quality of the public 

services you will receive so that you are aware of what 

to expect. 

Residents must insist that promises are 

kept. 

Access 

You and all citizens should have equal access to the 

services to which you are entitled. 

One and all should get their fair share. 

Courtesy 

You should be treated with courtesy and consideration. 

Don't accept insensitive treatment. 

Information 

You should be given full, accurate information about 

the public services you are entitled to receive. 

You are entitled to full particulars. 

Openness and 

transparency 

You should be told how national and provincial 

departments are run, how much they cost, and who is 

in charge. 

Administration must be an open book. 


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BATHO PELE 

PRINCIPLE 

PRINCIPLE STATEMENT 

APPLICATION 

Redress 

If the promised standard of service is not delivered. 

Your complaints must spark positive 


you should be offered an apology, a full explanation 

and a speedy and effective remedy. When complaints 

are made, you should receive a sympathetic, positive 

response. 

action. 

Value for money 

Public services should be provided economically and 

efficiently in order to give you the best possible value 

for money. 

Your money should be employed wisely. 


4.2 KPAs, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES 

4.2.1 Municipal Planning and Co-operative government 

This section provides the background for the inter-governmental development planning framework that was considered during 
the development of the municipal strategies and illustrates the alignment of all these strategies as mandated by Section 25(1) 
of the Municipal Systems Act. Chapter 4 also details how the municipality organisational goals and strategic objectives will 
address priority issues through the tracking of performance indicators and targets, through the institutional scorecard. The 
alignment table below summarises the integration of the developmental frameworks into one strategy for the Port St Johns 
Municipality. 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


4.2.2 Goals and Strategic objectives linked to National, Provincial outcomes 


Table 3.32: Strategic Alignment 


KEY 

PERFOMANCE 

AREAS 

OUTCOME 9 

PDP 

BACK TO 

BASICS 

PILLARS/TEN- 

POINT PLAN 

STRATEGIC 

GOAL 

GOAL 

STATEMENT 

IDP 

REF 

STRATEGIC 

OBJECTIVES 

STRATEGIES 

Spatial 

Responsive, 

Vibrant, 

Spatial 

Effective and 

To develop an 

SP 

Effective and 

• 

Develop and implement land use 

planning 

accountable. 

equitably, 

regional 

efficient 

integrated 

1.1 

efficient 


management and spatial planning 


effective and 

enabled 

integration 

planning and 

spatially 


implementation 


system 


efficient 

Communities 

zones/spatial 

development- 

equitable 


of spatial 

• 

Coordinate the development of an 


developmental 


contract 

oriented 

municipal 


planning in a 


integrated plan for human 


Local 



municipality 

area, 


compliant 


settlement. 


Government 




maximizing 


manner 




System and 




the potential 






Traditional 




benefits of its 

SP 

To promote the 

• 

Coordinate and facilitate the 


Leadership 




environmental 

1.2 

protection and 


environmental related interventions 






assets in a 


enhancement 


aimed at protecting the municipal 






sustainable 


of municipal 


environmental and natural 






and 


environmental 


resources 






prosperous 


assets and 








manner 


natural 










resources 












Basic Service 

Responsive, 

Vibrant, 

Delivering 

Equitable and 

To provide 

BSD 

Adequate 

• 

Coordinate and facilitate the 

Delivery 

accountable, 

equitably, 

basic services 

sustainable 

sustainable 

2.1 

provision and 


implementation of INEP projects 


effective and 

enabled 


provision of 

municipal 


maintenance of 

• 

Facilitation of electrification projects 


efficient 

Communities 


municipal 

infrastructure 


basic 


through ESKOM 


developmental 



infrastructure 

and social 


infrastructure 

• 

Construction of Access Roads 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


KEY 

PERFOMANCE 

AREAS 


OUTCOME 9 

PDP 

Local 

An educated 

Government 

empowered 

System and 

and 

Traditional 

innovative 

Leadership 

citizenry 


A healthy 


population 


BACK TO 
BASICS 
PILLARS/TEN- 
POINT PLAN 


STRATEGIC 

GOAL 


GOAL 

STATEMENT 


IDP 

REF 


STRATEGIC 

OBJECTIVES 


STRATEGIES 


services, 
consistently 
maintaining 
and improving 
the needs of 
the people 


services 


Implementation of infrastructure 
maintenance plan 


BSD 

2.2 


Rapid provision • 
of social and 
community 
services • 


BSD 

2.3 


BSD 

2.4 


Provision and • 
maintenance of 
water and 
sanitation 
infrastructure 
services 

Coordinate and • 

facilitate 

economic 

infrastructure 

development 

through Public- 


Efficient and effective development 
and management of Public 
amenities 

Coordinate the implementation of 
Integrated Waste Management Plan 
Facilitate the removal of alien 
plants through partnerships 
Provision of Free Basic Services 
Facilitate the provision and 
maintenance of water and 
sanitation infrastructure services 


Facilitate the provision of economic 
infrastructure for shared growth 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


KEY 

PERFOMANCE 

AREAS 

OUTCOME 9 

PDP 

BACK TO 

BASICS 

PILLARS/TEN- 

POINT PLAN 

STRATEGIC 

GOAL 

GOAL 

STATEMENT 

IDP 

REF 

STRATEGIC 

OBJECTIVES 

STRATEGIES 








Private 

Partnerships 

(PPP) 











Financial 

Viability & 

Management 

Responsive, 

accountable, 

effective and 

efficient 

developmental 

Local 

Government 

System and 

Traditional 

Leadership 

Capable, 

conscientious 

and 

accountable 

institutions 

Sound 

financial 

management 

To create a 

financial 

viable 

environment 

in accordance 

with relevant 

Acts towards 

clean 

administration 

To promote 

financial 

sustainability 

through 

effective 

internal 

controls 

pertaining to 

Supply Chain, 

Asset, 

Revenue, 

Budget and 

expenditure 

management 

FVM 

3.1 

Create sound 

financial 

management, 

Supply Chain 

and Asset 

Management 

environment 

• Improvement of revenue 

generation 

• Compliance to MFMA provisions and 

prescripts with specific reference to 

budget and expenditure (including 

payroll) 

• Strengthen financial management 

internal controls 

• Regular, implementation, 

monitoring and reporting on Supply 

Chain management prescripts 

• Effective and efficient 

implementation of Asset 

Management Policy 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


KEY 

PERFOMANCE 

AREAS 

OUTCOME 9 

PDP 

BACK TO 

BASICS 

PILLARS/TEN- 

POINT PLAN 

STRATEGIC 

GOAL 

GOAL 

STATEMENT 

IDP 

REF 

STRATEGIC 

OBJECTIVES 

STRATEGIES 










Local 

Economic 

Development 

Implementation 

of Community 

works 

Programme 

and supported 

Cooperatives 

A growing, 

inclusive and 

equitable 

economy 

Spatial 

regional 

integration 

zones/spatial 

contract 

Viable, 

liveable and 

sustainable 

developmental 

municipality 

that promotes 

transformative 

economic 

livelihoods 

To create and 

facilitate a 

conducive 

environment 

that builds 

inclusive local 

economies, 

sustainable 

decent 

employment 

and 

eradicates 

poverty 

LED 

4.1 

Promote Local 

Economic 

development 

through 

agriculture, 

tourism and 

oceans 

economy 

• Promote rural economic 

development through formalised 

agricultural production 

• Enhance eco-tourism, oceans 

economy, heritage and sports 

tourism participation. 

• Improve service in tourism 

industry. 

LED 

4.2 

Creation of 

sustainable job 

opportunities 

through 

internal and 

external 

partnerships 

• Implementation of the LED 

Strategy 

• Coordinate partnerships for job 

creation (CDW, CWP, EPWP, etc.) 

• Building Inclusive Green 

Municipalities. 

• Coordinate and facilitate the 

development of the Film production 

By-Law. 










Good 

governance 

and Public 

Participation 

Deepen 

Democracy 

through a 

refines 

Capable, 

conscientious 

and 

accountable 

Good 

governance 

To improve 

public trust 

and credibility 

in local 

To create an 

enabling 

environment 

for active 

GGPP 

5.1 

To promote 

sound 

leadership, 

good 

• Implementation of compliance 

register 

• Implementation of the Batho Pele 

principles and Public participation 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


KEY 

PERFOMANCE 

AREAS 

OUTCOME 9 

PDP 

BACK TO 

BASICS 

PILLARS/TEN- 

POINT PLAN 

STRATEGIC 

GOAL 

GOAL 

STATEMENT 

IDP 

REF 

STRATEGIC 

OBJECTIVES 

STRATEGIES 


Ward 

Committee 

System 

institutions 


governance 

through public 

participation 

public 

participation 

and an 

administrative 

culture 

characterized 

by 

accountability, 

transparency 

and efficiency 


governance, 

public 

participation 

and enabling 

environment 

policy 

• Conduct awareness campaigns of 

government programmes 

• Promote accountability and 

transparency 

• Implementation of Communication 

strategy 

• Strengthen the functioning of SPU 

• Coordinate the implementation of 

SPU programmes 

• Development of a Traditional 

Leadership support Policy 










Municipal 

transformation 

and 

institutional 

development 

Implement 

a differential 

approach to 

Municipal 

Financing, 

planning and 

support 

Capable, 

conscientious 

and 

accountable 

institutions 

An educated, 

empowered 

and 

innovative 

citizenry 

Building 

capacity 

An enabling 

environment 

to enhance 

institutional 

capacity to 

promote 

governance 

and integrated 

support 

services. 

To provide 

professional, 

efficient, 

people 

cantered 

human 

resources and 

administrative 

services for a 

transformed, 

equitable and 

efficient 

development 

MTID 

6.1 

Create a 

conducive 

administrative 

environment 

and 

organizational 

development 

• Facilitate the Implementation of the 

HR Plan 

• Implementation of the Workplace 

Skills Plan. 

• Implementation of ICT Policy 

• Implementation of the PMS Policy 

• Develop, review and Implement HR 

Policies. 

• Effective records management 

system 

• Institutionalise and coordinate 

customer care services 

• Finalisation of organisational 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


KEY 

PERFOMANCE 

AREAS 

OUTCOME 9 

PDP 

BACK TO 

BASICS 

PILLARS/TEN- 

POINT PLAN 

STRATEGIC 

GOAL 

GOAL 

STATEMENT 

IDP 

REF 

STRATEGIC 

OBJECTIVES 

STRATEGIES 






local system 



structure review 

• 


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_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR_ 

4.3 INSTITUTIONAL SCORECARD 

The review of IDP 2018/19 has seen the alignment between the IDP strategic framework, the SDBIP, and the MTREF. A unique 
IDP number has been given to each strategic objective as recorded on the five year scorecard which will serve as an alignment 
tool between the IDP and SDBIP. The same objectives have been further translated into a year, to fit into the SDBIP which is 
an annual document. The table below summarizes a high level annual scorecard derived from the five year scorecard. 

In creating these linkages, it becomes far easier for oversights structures (e.g. Council, Internal Auditors, the Auditor General, 
etc.) to ensure that municipal expenditure is in terms of the municipal vision, the IDP and budget. 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


INSTITUTIONAL SCORECARD 2018/19 

KPA 

STRATEGIC 

GOAL 

STRATEGIC 

OBJECTIVE 

IDP REF. 

STRATEGIES 

KPI 

NO. 

KEY 

PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

PROJECT 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

BUDGET 

Spatial 

Planning 

Effective and 

efficient planning 

and 

development- 

oriented 

municipality 

Effective and efficient 

implementation of 

spatial planning in a 

compliant manner 

SP 1.1 

Develop and 

implement a land use 

and spatial planning 

system 

1.1 

No. of SDF 

developed and 

approved 

Development of 

Spatial 

development 

Framework 

2010 SDF 

1 SDF 

R368 200 

Spatial 

Planning 

Effective and 

efficient planning 

and 

development- 

oriented 

municipality 

Effective and efficient 

implementation of 

spatial planning in a 

compliant manner 

SP 1.1 

Develop and 

implement a land use 

and spatial planning 

system 

1.2 

No. of tribunal 

members trained 

on SPLUMA 

Training on 

SPLUMA 

Nil 

10 

R52 600 

Spatial 

Planning 

Effective and 

efficient planning 

and 

development- 

oriented 

municipality 

Effective and efficient 

implementation of 

spatial planning in a 

compliant manner 

SP 1.1 

Develop and 

implement a land use 

and spatial planning 

system 

1.3 

No. of tribunal 

hearings on 

SPLUMA 

conducted 

Implementation 

SPLUMA 

4 

4 

R52 600 

Spatial 

Planning 

Effective and 

efficient planning 

and 

development- 

Effective and efficient 

implementation of 

spatial planning in a 

compliant manner 

SP 1.1 

Develop and 

implement a land use 

and spatial planning 

system 

1.4 

% Progress on 

the development 

of Land Use 

Scheme 

Development of 

land use Scheme 

Nil 

40% 

R210 400 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



oriented 

municipality 





guidelines 





Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.1 

A comprehensive 

report on final 

completion of 

Zinyosini Access 

Road 

Construction of 

Zinyosini GAR 

(final completion 

phase) 

7.5 KM 

1 

R306 458 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.2 

No. of access 

road km 

constructed for 

Gabelana to 

Noqhekwana 

Construction of 

Gabelana to 

Noqhekwana 

GAR 

Nil 

12 km 

R399 661 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.3 

No. of access 

road km 

constructed for 

Butho Access 

Road 

Construction of 

Butho GAR 

Nil 

7km 

R4079 098 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.4 

No. of access 

road km 

constructed for 

Mzintlava Access 

Road 

Construction of 

Mzintlava GAR 

Nil 

9km 

R442 941 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.5 

No. of access 

road km 

constructed for 

Nonyevu Acess 

Road 

Construction of 

Nonyevu GAR 

Nil 

7km 

R306 377 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.6 

No. of access 

road km 

constructed for 

Lugasweni to 

Nkwilini Access 

Road 

Construction of 

Lugasweni to 

Nkwilini GAR 

Nil 

7km 

R396 141 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.7 

No. of access 

road km 

constructed for 

R61 to Mrhuleni 

Construction of 

R61 to Mrhuleni 

GAR 

Nil 

5.5km 

R260 284 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.8 

No. of gravel 

access road km 

constructed for 

Mkhuzaza 

Construction of 

Mkhuzaza GAR 

Nil 

6 kms 

R7 477 319 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.9 

No. of gravel 

access road km 

constructed for 

Ntlenga 

Construction of 

Ntlenga GAR 

Nil 

5.5 kms 

R4 664 088 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.10 

No. of gravel 

access road km 

constructed for 

Mjojeli - Jabavu 

Construction of 

Mjojeli - Jabavu 

GAR 

Nil 

5.5 kms 

R2 501 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.11 

No. of gravel 

access road km 

constructed for 

Luphaphasi 

Construction of 

Luphaphasi GAR 

Nil 

11 kms 

R6 566 622 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.12 

No. of gravel 

access road km 

constructed for 

Bele 

Construction of 

Bele GAR 

Nil 

7 kms 

R1 961 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.13 

No of design 

reports approved 

Construction of 

Magoba-Dedeni 

GAR 

Nil 

9 kms 

R436 190 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.14 

No of design 

reports approved 

Construction of 

Hotana GAR 

Nil 

6 kms 

R2 475 000 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Construction of 

Access Roads 

2.15 

No. of design 

reports approved 

Construction of 

fhontsini- 

Gangatha GAR 

Nil 

12 kms 

R3 363 570 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

2.16 

No. of kms of 

Gravel Access 

Roads maintained 

Maintenance of 

gravel access 

roads in all 20 

wards 

9 kms 

140 kms 

R6 422 760 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Coordinate and 

facilitate the 

implementation of 

[NEP projects 

2.17 

No. of households 

benefiting from 

the electrification 

programme 

Mfadaleni/Mahlat 

hin 

Nil 

106 

R2 120 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Coordinate and 

facilitate the 

implementation of 

[NEP projects 

2.18 

No. of households 

benefiting from 

the electrification 

programme 

Mpotshotsho 

Nil 

140 

R2 800 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Coordinate and 

facilitate the 

implementation of 

[NEP projects 

2.19 

No. of households 

benefiting from 

the electrification 

programme 

Buchele 

Nil 

140 

R2 800 000 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Coordinate and 

facilitate the 

implementation of 

[NEP projects 

2.20 

No. of households 

benefiting from 

the electrification 

programme 

Nonyevu/Zwelitsh 

Nil 

180 

R3 600 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Coordinate and 

facilitate the 

implementation of 

[NEP projects 

2.21 

No. of households 

benefiting from 

the electrification 

programme 

Tuweni/Maplotini 

Nil 

106 

R2 120 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Coordinate and 

facilitate the 

implementation of 

[NEP projects 

2.22 

No. of households 

benefiting from 

the electrification 

programme 

tambeni 

Nil 

313 

R6 260 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Coordinate and 

facilitate the 

implementation of 

[NEP projects 

2.23 

No. of households 

benefiting from 

the electrification 

programme 

Majola 

Nil 

106 

R2 120 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Coordinate and 

facilitate the 

implementation of 

[NEP projects 

2.24 

No. of households 

benefiting from 

the electrification 

programme 

Nomvalo 

Nil 

98 

R1 960 000 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Coordinate and 

facilitate the 

implementation of 

1NEP projects 

2.25 

No. of households 

benefiting from 

the electrification 

programme 

Lujazo 

Nil 

108 

R2 160 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

BSD 2.1 

Adequate provision 

and maintenance of 

basic infrastructure 

services 

2.26 

No of street lights 

maintained 

Maintenance of 

street lights 

220 

34 

R100 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Rapid provision of 

social and 

community services 

BSD 2.2 

Coordinate the 

implementation of 

integrated Waste 

Management Plan 

2.27 

No. of reports on 

land fill site 

rehabilitation 

compiled 

Rehabilitation of 

Land fill site 

4 

4 

R60 600 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Rapid provision of 

social and 

community services 

BSD 2.2 

Coordinate the 

implementation of 

integrated Waste 

Management Plan 

2.28 

No. cleaning 

campaigns 

conducted 

Cleaning 

campaign 

1 

1 

R266 862.40 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Rapid provision of 

social and 

community services 

BSD 2.2 

Efficient and effective 

development and 

management of Public 

amenities 

2.29 

No. of sport 

gymnasium 

facility 

constructed 

Construction of 

Outdoor 

Gymnasium 

Nil 

1 

R300 000 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Rapid provision of 

social and 

community services 

BSD 2.2 

Efficient and effective 

development and 

management of Public 

amenities 

2.30 

No. of animal 

pound facility 

constructed 

Construction of 

Animal pound 

Nil 

1 

R300 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Rapid provision of 

social and 

community services 

BSD 2.2 

Efficient and effective 

development and 

management of Public 

amenities 

2.31 

No. of reports on 

parks 

maintenance 

compiled 

Maintenance of 

parks 

4 

4 

R200 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Rapid provision of 

social and 

community services 

BSD 2.2 

Efficient and effective 

development and 

management of Public 

amenities 

2.32 

A comprehensive 

report on the 

construction of 

beach equipment 

shelter 

Construction of 

Shelter for beach 

equipment 

Nil 

1 

R50 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Rapid provision of 

social and 

community services 

BSD 2.2 

Provision of Free 

Basic Services 

2.33 

No. of households 

benefiting from 

the provision 

indigent services 

Provision of 

Indigent services 

7126 

household 

s 

7126 

R5 000 000 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Coordinate and 

facilitate economic 

infrastructure 

development through 

Public-Private 

Partnerships (PPP) 

BSD 2.4 

Facilitate the 

provision of economic 

infrastructure for 

shared growth 

2.34 

A report on the 

final completion 

of the 6-day 

adventure centre 

compiled 

Completion of 6 

day adventure 

centre 

Existing 3 

structures 

(Town, 

Mngazana 

& Mpande 

Finishings 

NDT Funding 


205 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




















FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Coordinate and 

facilitate economic 

infrastructure 

development through 

Public-Private 

Partnerships (PPP) 

BSD 2.4 

Facilitate the 

provision of economic 

infrastructure for 

shared growth 

2.35 

No. of hawker 

stalls constructed 

for Mpantu area 

Construction of 

Mpantu hawker 

stalls 

Nil 

5 

R318 200 

Basic 

Service 

delivery 

Equitable and 

sustainable 

provision of 

municipal 

infrastructure 

Coordinate and 

facilitate economic 

infrastructure 

development through 

Public-Private 

Partnerships (PPP) 

BSD 2.4 

Facilitate the 

provision of economic 

infrastructure for 

shared growth 

2.36 

Report on the 

completion of 

Isinuka Ablution 

Completion of 

Isinuka Ablution 

Nil 

1 

R150 000 

Financial 

Viability 

and 

Manageme 

nt 

To create a 

financial viable 

environment in 

accordance with 

relevant Acts 

towards clean 

administration 

Create sound 

financial 

management, Supply 

Chain and Asset 

Management 

environment 

FVM 3.1 

Improvement of 

revenue generation 

3.1 

% increase in 

revenue collection 

Revenue 

generation 

5% 

2 617 

441.26 

R1 000 000 

Financial 

Viability 

and 

Manageme 

nt 

To create a 

financial viable 

environment in 

accordance with 

relevant Acts 

towards clean 

administration 

Create sound 

financial 

management. Supply 

Chain and Asset 

Management 

environment 

FVM 3.1 

Improvement of 

revenue generation 

3.2 

A comprehensive 

report on 

property 

valuations 

conducted 

Conduct 

Valuation roll 

1 

2015/16 

Valuation 

roll 

1 000 000.00 


206 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



















FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Financial 

Viability 

and 

Manageme 

nt 

To create a 

financial viable 

environment in 

accordance with 

relevant Acts 

towards clean 

administration 

Create sound 

financial 

management, Supply 

Chain and Asset 

Management 

environment 

FVM 3.1 

Improvement of 

revenue generation 

3.3 

No. of revenue 

enhancement 

strategy 

developed 

Develop Revenue 

Enhancement 

Strategy 

Nil 

1 

1 000 000.00 

Financial 

Viability 

and 

Manageme 

nt 

To create a 

financial viable 

environment in 

accordance with 

relevant Acts 

towards clean 

administration 

Create sound 

financial 

management. Supply 

Chain and Asset 

Management 

environment 

FVM 3.1 

Compliance to MFMA 

provisions and 

prescripts with 

specific reference to 

budget and 

expenditure (including 

payroll) 

3.4 

No. of financial 

statutory 

document 

compiled 

Compilation of 

AFSs 

2016/17 

AFS 

1 

3 000 000.00 

Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

economic 

livelihoods 

Promote Local 

Economic 

development through 

agriculture, tourism 

and oceans economy 

LED 4.1 

Promote rural 

economic 

development through 

formalised agricultural 

production 

4.1 

No. of hectors of 

agricultural land 

fenced 

Fencing 10 

Electors of 

vegetable 

projects 

20 hectors 

10 hectors 

R498 600 

Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

Promote Local 

Economic 

development through 

agriculture, tourism 

and oceans economy 

LED 4.1 

Promote rural 

economic 

development through 

formalized agricultural 

production 

4.2 

No. of 

beneficiaries 

supported with 

agricultural inputs 

Provision of 

agricultural inputs 

to all wards with 

fruit and 

vegetable 

20 

Projects 

20 Projects 



207 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



















FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



transformative 

economic 

livelihoods 






projects 




Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

economic 

livelihoods 

Promote Local 

Economic 

development through 

agriculture, tourism 

and oceans economy 

LED 4.1 

Promote rural 

economic 

development through 

formalized agricultural 

production 

4.3 

No. of hectors of 

Qhaka FPSU site 

debushed 

Debushing of the 

Qhaka 

Nil 

5 hectors 


Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

economic 

livelihoods 

Promote Local 

Economic 

development through 

agriculture, tourism 

and oceans economy 

LED 4.1 

Promote rural 

economic 

development through 

formalized agricultural 

production 

4.4 

A comprehensive 

report on the 

development of 

feasibility study 

for farmers 

production unit 

Conduct 

Feasibility study 

for the Farmers 

Production 

Support Unit 

Nil 

1 


Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

Promote Local 

Economic 

development through 

agriculture, tourism 

and oceans economy 

LED 4.1 

Enhance eco-tourism, 

oceans economy, 

heritage and sports 

tourism participation 

4.5 

A report on 

Mayor's local 

development 

through sport 

programmes 

compiled 

Mayors Local 

Youth 

Development 

1 

1 

R500 000 


208 | 3 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



















FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



economic 

livelihoods 










Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

economic 

livelihoods 

Promote Local 

Economic 

development through 

agriculture, tourism 

and oceans economy 

LED 4.1 

Enhance eco-tourism, 

oceans economy, 

heritage and sports 

tourism participation 

4.6 

A report on river 

,mountain 

marathon and 

Golf tournament 

compiled 

River and 

Mountain 

Marathon and 

Golf tournament 

Nil 

1 

R265 600 

Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

economic 

livelihoods 

Promote Local 

Economic 

development through 

agriculture, tourism 

and oceans economy 

LED 4.1 

Enhance eco-tourism, 

oceans economy, 

heritage and sports 

tourism participation 

4.7 

A comprehensive 

report on the 

promotion of PSJ 

in tourism events 

compiled 

Participation in 

Tourism events 

(Tourism 

awareness, 

Tourism Indaba, 

Mangaung 

Cultural Festival) 

3 

3 

Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

Promote Local 

Economic 

development through 

agriculture, tourism 

and oceans economy 

LED 4.1 

Enhance eco-tourism, 

oceans economy, 

heritage and sports 

tourism participation 

4.8 

A comprehensive 

report on Isingqi 

Sethu cultural 

festival compiled 

Coordinate the 

hosting of Isingqi 

Sethu cultural 

festival 

1 

1 

R160 400 


209 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



















FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



economic 

livelihoods 










Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

economic 

livelihoods 

Promote Local 

Economic 

development through 

agriculture, tourism 

and oceans economy 

LED 4.1 

Enhance eco-tourism, 

oceans economy, 

heritage and sports 

tourism participation 

4.9 

A comprehensive 

report on 

Intsizwa cultural 

programme 

compiled 

Hosting Cultural 

celebration 

(traditional 

dances & games) 

Nil 

1 

R63 000 

Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

economic 

livelihoods 

Promote Local 

Economic 

development through 

agriculture, tourism 

and oceans economy 

LED 4.1 

Enhance eco-tourism, 

oceans economy, 

heritage and sports 

tourism participation 

4.10 

A comprehensive 

report on the 

development of 

Feasibility Study 

and business plan 

compiled 

Feasibility Study 

and business plan 

for Wild Coast 

Multi-Purpose 

Centre 

Nil 

1 

R320 800 

Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

Promote Local 

Economic 

development through 

agriculture, tourism 

and oceans economy 

LED 4.1 

Enhance eco-tourism, 

oceans economy, 

heritage and sports 

tourism participation 

4.11 

A comprehensive 

report on the 

development of 

feasibility study 

for Cwebeni 

Cultural Village 

Feasibility study 

of Cwebeni 

Cultural Village 

Nil 

1 



210 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



















FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



economic 

livelihoods 










Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

economic 

livelihoods 

Creation of 

sustainable job 

opportunities 

through internal and 

external partnerships 

LED 4.2 

Implementation of the 

LED Strategy 

4.12 

No. of Co-ops 

trained on sewing 

and fruit 

processing 

through TARDI 

Training of 20 

sewing and fruit 

processing Co-ops 

through TARDI 

4 co-ops 

20 people 

R110 000 

Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

economic 

livelihoods 

Creation of 

sustainable job 

opportunities 

through internal and 

external partnerships 

LED 4.2 

Implementation of the 

LED Strategy 

4.13 

No. of SMME 

beneficiaries in 

construction 

trained 

Training of 

SMMEs in 

Construction 

Nil 

20 


Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

Creation of 

sustainable job 

opportunities 

through internal and 

external partnerships 

LED 4.2 

Implementation of the 

LED Strategy 

4.14 

No. of SMME and 

Co-ops 

beneficiaries 

trained on 

business 

management 

Training of SMME 

& Co-ops on 

business 

management 

Nil 

20 



211 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



















FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



economic 

livelihoods 










Local 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Viable, liveable 

and sustainable 

developmental 

municipality that 

promotes 

transformative 

economic 

livelihoods 

Creation of 

sustainable job 

opportunities 

through internal and 

external partnerships 

LED 4.2 

Coordinate 

partnerships for job 

creation (CDW, CWP, 

EPWP, etc.) 

4.15 

A comprehensive 

report on 

implementation of 

community works 

program compiled 

Coordinate 

implementation of 

Community 

Works Programs 

1020 

1100 

COGTA Funding 

LED 4.2 

Building Inclusive 

Green Municipalities 

4.16 

No of awareness 

campaigns 

conducted 

Conduct 

awareness 

campaigns on 

BIGM programme 

Nil 

2 

R450 000 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Implementation of 

compliance register 

5.1 

No. of statutory 

MSCOA 

implementation 

reports compiled 

MSCOA 

implementation 

12 

12 

R500 000 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Implementation of the 

Batho Pele principles 

and Public 

participation policy 

5.2 

No. Mayoral 

outreach 

programmes 

conducted 

4 Mayoral 

outreach 

programmes 

2 

4 

R504 960 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Implementation of the 

Batho Pele principles 

and Public 

participation policy 

5.3 

No. of compliant 

strategic 

documents 

developed in 

terms MSA 

Compilation of 

IDP and SDBIP 

2017/18 

IDP and 

SDBIP 

2 

R1 070 000 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Implementation of the 

Batho Pele principles 

and Public 

participation policy 

5.4 

No. of public 

participation 

forums 

established 

through 

roadshow 

Public 

participation 

forums 

10 

10 

R533 798.95 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Implementation of the 

Batho Pele principles 

and Public 

participation policy 

5.5 

No. of public 

participation 

engagements 

conducted. 

Conduct public 

participation 

engagements 

Nil 

4 



213 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



















FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Implementation of the 

Batho Pele principles 

and Public 

participation policy 

5.6 

No. of Initiation 

Forum 

established. 

Establishment of 

Initiation Forum 

Nil 

1 


Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Implementation of the 

Batho Pele principles 

and Public 

participation policy 

5.7 

No. of Moral 

Regeneration 

Movement 

structure revived 

Revalitisation of 

moral 

regeneration 

movement 

structurer 

1 

1 


Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Implementation of the 

Batho Pele principles 

and Public 

participation policy 

5.8 

No of Council 

Standing Rules of 

Order Reviewed 

Review and 

implement 

Council Policies 

1 

1 

RNil 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Implementation of the 

Batho Pele principles 

and Public 

participation policy 

5.9 

No. of reports on 

the 

implementation of 

the Council 

Delegation 

Framework 

No of reports to 

be implemented 

Nil 

4 

R76 370 


214 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



















FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Implementation of the 

Batho Pele principles 

and Public 

participation policy 

5.10 

No. of policies on 

petitions 

developed. 

Development and 

implementation of 

Petitions Policy 

Nil 

1 


Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Implementation of the 

Batho Pele principles 

and Public 

participation policy 

5.11 

No. of reports on 

the 

implementation of 

Petition Policy. 

Review and 

implement 

Council Policies 

Nil 

2 


Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Conduct awareness 

campaigns of 

government 

programmes 

5.12 

No.of reports on 

community safety 

and crime 

awareness 

campaigns 

compiled 

Community safety 

and crime 

awareness 

campaign 

Nil 

4 


Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Conduct awareness 

campaigns of 

government 

programmes 

5.13 

No of IGR Forums 

convened 

Convene 4IGR 

Forums 

3 

4 

R100 000 


215 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



















FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Promote 

accountability and 

transparency 

5.14 

No. of IGR Policy 

approved 

Development of 

IGR Policy 

Nil 

1 


Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Promote 

accountability and 

transparency 

5.15 

No. of 

IDP/Budget/PMS 

Rep Forums 

convened 

Conduct 

IDP/Budget/PMS 

Rep Forums 

3 

4 

IDP/Budge 

t/PMS Rep 

Forums 

R150 000 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Promote 

accountability and 

transparency 

5.16 

No. of 

IDP/Budget/PMS 

Roadshows 

conducted 

Conduct 

IDP/Budget/PMS 

Roadshows 

4 

4 

R 500 000 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Promote 

accountability and 

transparency 

5.17 

No. of Strategic 

Planning Sessions 

Conducted 

Conduct Strategic 

Planning Session 

1 Strategic 

Planning 

Session for 

2018/19 

1 

R 1 230 0 00 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Promote 

accountability and 

transparency 

5.18 

No. of 

Performance 

Management 

Policy reviewed. 

Revision and 

Implementation 

of Performance 

Management 

Policy 

1 Current 

PMS policy 

1 PMS 

Policy 

RNil 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Promote 

accountability and 

transparency 

5.19 

No. of Open 

Council day 

conducted to 

promote 

accountability and 

transparency 

Open Council 

1 

1 

R450 000 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Promote 

accountability and 

transparency 

5.20 

No. of reports on 

the 

implementation of 

Risk Management 

Policy 

Implementation 

of Risk 

Management 

Policy 

4 

4 

RNil 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

GGPP 5.1 

Coordinate the 

implementation of 

SPU programmes 

5.21 

No. of SPU 

programmes 

implemented 

Support to Special 

groups 

6 

Programs 

9 

Programm 

es 

R570 200 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


n 

participation 

environment 

GGPP5.1 

Coordinate the 

implementation of 

SPU programmes 

Implementation of 

Communication 

strategy 

5.22 

No. of youth 

development plan 

Review of youth 

development plan 

Nil 

1 

RNil 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP5.1 

Coordinate the 

implementation of 

SPU programmes 

Implementation of 

Communication 

strategy 

5.23 

No of 

Communication 

Srategy Reviewed 

Review of the 

Communication 

Strategy 

Nil 

1 

Nil 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP5.1 

Implementation of 

Communication 

strategy 

5.24 

No of reports on 

the 

implementation of 

Communication 

strategy compiled 

Production of 

reports on the 

implementation of 

communication 

strategy 

Nil 

4 

R 840 000 

GGPP5.1 

Implementation of the 

Batho Pele principles 

and Public 

participation policy 

5.25 

No. of Community 

Participation and 

Roadshows 

conducted 

Community 

participation 

roadshows 

Nil 

4 

R428 598.95 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 





GGPP5.1 

Promote 

accountability and 

transparency 

5.26 

No of Audit 

Committee 

Meetings 

convened 

4 Ordinary Auti 

Committee 

Meetings 

convened 

3 

4 

R310 000 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Promote 

accountability and 

transparency 

5.27 

No. of Portfolio 

Commiittees Held 

per Portfolio 

4 Ordinary 

Sittings per 

Portfolio 

Committee 

4 

4 

R 218 200 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Promote 

accountability and 

transparency 

5.28 

No of Ordinary 

Council Meetings 

Held 

4 Ordinary 

Councils 

4 

4 

R41 040 

Good 

Governanc 

e and 

Public 

Participatio 

n 

To improve 

public trust and 

credibility in local 

governance 

through public 

participation 

To promote sound 

leadership, good 

governance, public 

participation and 

enabling 

environment 

GGPP 5.1 

Legal Matters 

5.29 

• Promote 

accountabilit 

y and 

transparency 

Reduce ligations 

4 

0 

R3 000 000 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Municipal 

Transforma 

tion and 

Institutiona 

1 

Developme 

nt 

Implement 

a differential 

approach to 

Capable, 

conscientious and 

accountable 

institutions 

An educated, 

empowered and 

innovative citizenry 

MTID 6.1 

Implementation of the 

Workplace Skills Plan 

6.1 

No of work skills 

developed 

Training 

interventions 

1 

1 

R2 277 905 

Municipal 

Financing, 

planning and 

support 

MTID 6.1 

Develop, review and 

Implement HR 

Policies. 

6.2 

No. of HR policies 

reviewed 

Facilitate the 

implementation of 

HR policies 

Nil 

23 

RNil 




MTID 6.1 

Develop, review and 

Implement HR 

Policies. 

6.3 

No. of HR policies 

developed 

Facilitate the 

implementation of 

HR policies 

23 

3 

RNil 

Municipal 

Transforma 

tion and 

Institutiona 

1 

Developme 

Implement 

a differential 

approach to 

Municipal 

Capable, 

conscientious and 

accountable 

institutions 

An educated, 

empowered and 

MTID 6.1 

Effective records 

management 

6.4 

No of reports on 

the functionality 

of the records 

management 

system 

Facilitate the 

development and 

implementation of 

effective records 

management 

system 

Nil 

4 

RNil 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


nt 

Financing, 

planning and 

support 

innovative citizenry 

MTID 6.1 

Functional, effective 

and efficient 

customer care 

services 

6.5 

Customer care 

plan developed 

Institutionalise 

and coordinate 

customer care 

services 

Nil 

1 

RNil 





Institutionalise and 

coordinate customer 

care services 

6.6 

A comprehensive 

report on the 

institutionalization 

and coordination 

of customer care 

services 

compiled. 

Report on 

institutionalized 

and coordination 

of customer care 

Nil 

1 

RNil 




MTID 6.1 

Finalisation of of 

organisational 

structure review 

6.7 

Approved 

organisational 

structure by the 

Council. 

Completion of a 

reviewed 

organisational 

structure. 

1 Current 

organisatio 

nal 

structure 

1 

R157 800 

Municipal 

Transforma 

tion and 

Institutiona 

1 

Developme 

nt 

Implement 

a differential 

approach to 

Municipal 

Financing, 

planning and 

Capable, 

conscientious and 

accountable 

institutions 

An educated, 

empowered and 

innovative citizenry 

MTD 6.1 

Implementation of 

ICT Policy 

6.8 

No. of server 

rooms upgraded 

Server room 

upgrade 

1 

1 Server 

room 

upgraded 

R215 600 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



support 










Municipal 

Transforma 

tion and 

Institutiona 

1 

Developme 

nt 

Implement 

a differential 

approach to 

Municipal 

Financing, 

planning and 

support 

Capable, 

conscientious and 

accountable 

institutions 

An educated, 

empowered and 

innovative citizenry 

MTD 6.1 

Implementation of 

ICT Policy 

6.9 

No of buildings 

provided with 

network & 

telephone system 

Network 

installation & 

telephone system 

5 

2 buildings 

provided 

with with 

network & 

telephone 

system 



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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


GRAVEL ACCESS ROADS MAINTAINANCE PLAN (Below is the list of prioritized and funded projects to be undertaken within the period 2018/19 & 2019/20). 

Table 3.33: Roads Maintainance Plan 


KPA: BASIC SERVIVE DELIVERY 

Strategic Goal : Equitable and sustainable provision of municipal infrastructure 

IDP OBJECTIVE: Adequate provision and maintenance of basic infrastructure services 

STRATEGY: Implementation of infrastructure maintenance plan 

VILLAGE 

WARD 

KM 

VILLAGE 

WARD 

KM 

Bulawu 

1 

4.5 

Nyakeni - Lutatweni 

1 

5 

Njela 

2 

5 

Mtalala - Nyikimeni 

2 

5 

Mfadaleni 

3 

6.5 

Kwa-Ntsila 

3 

8 

Islam-Mngazi 

4 

6 

Ntabeni- Nkonkxeni 

4 

4.5 

Sicambeni 

5 

5.5 

Makhombathini-Sjungqwini 

5 

4 

Mthumbane Ext. 

6 

5.5 

Zwelitsha 

6 

6 

Imvume 

7 

7 

Tankini 

7 

5.5 

Ziphondo 

8 

6 

Tshakude 

8 

6.5 

Qhaka Mboleni-Nyosana via Niniva 

9 

13 

Chabasa- Nqabeni 

9 

6 

Mswakazi-Dedeni 

10 

7 

Lupoko 

10 

3.5 

Ntlanjeni 

11 

6 

Lujazo 

11 

5.5 

Sandlulube 

12 

6 

Ntile-phesheya Komthatha 

12 

5 

Mbokazi 

13 

7.2 

Ndwalane 

13 

9 

Mbharhane 

14 

5 

Mzintlava B 

14 

4 

Luqoqweni - Komani 

15 

5 

Sandlulube - Mdlankala 

15 

7 

Tyityane 

16 

6 

Qhubuswayo 

16 

6 

Kwa-Ndayini 

17 

9.5 

Bhukuqweni 

17 

6 

Gugwini 

18 

5.5 

Ngqikiza 

18 

6 

Jambeni (b)- Mamvenyane 

19 

6 

Mabheleni-Selekulu 

19 

6 

Mthimde 

20 

5.7 

Luzuphu kwa Nyathi 

20 

4.5 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Table 3.34: Gravel Access Roads for Implementation in 2019/2020 


PROJECT 

WARD 

BUDGET SOURCE 

Ziphunzana - Njela Access Road 

2 

MIG 

Mbenengeni- Ngutyana Access Road 

3 

MIG 

Luqoqweni - Komane Access Road 

15 

MIG 

Xhaka Access Road 

11 

MIG 

PSJ Sports field 

6 

MIG 

Street Lights 

6 

MIG 


3.35: Gravel Access Roads for Implementation In 2020/21: Tabl 3.35 


PROJECT 

WARD 

BUDGET SOURCE 

Babheke Community Hall 

19 

MIG 

Buzongoma Access Road 

3 

MIG 

Phahlakazi- Masameni Access Road 

1 

MIG 

Gqweza Access Road 

18 

MIG 

Rhebu Access Road 

1 

MIG 

Sandlulube Access Road 

12 

MIG 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


4.4 O.R. TAMBO DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY 

Table 3.36: Mig Water Projects 


PROJECT NUMBER 

WATER/SANITATION 

PROJECT NAME 

TOTAL BUDGET FOR THE 2017/18 

FINANCIAL YEAR (RANDS) 

P138 

Water 

Dumasi Regional Water Supply - Study 

5 245 000.00 

P139 

Water 

PSJ RWS Phase 4 

1 000 000.00 


2018/19 FY WSIG & MIG PROJECT ALLOCATIONS: Table 3.37: 


PROJECT NUMBER 

WATER/SANITATION 

PROJECT NAME 

TOTAL BUDGET FOR THE 2017/18 

FINANCIAL YEAR (RANDS) 

P142 

Water 

KwaNyathi Regional Bulk Water Supply - Feasibility 

Study 

3 000 000 

1_17_9_P042 

Water 

Port St Johns Regional Water Supply Scheme Phase 5 

18 046 626 


Table 3.38: MIG Water Borne Sanitation 


PROJECT NUMBER 

WATER/SANITATION 

PROJECT NAME 

TOTAL BUDGET FOR THE 

2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 

(RANDS) 

P135 

Waterborne 

Sanitation 

Port St. Johns Town Sewer 

6 000 000 


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_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 

Table 3.39: WSIG PROJECTS 2018/19 


Services 

Project Name 

Ward No. 

Budget 

Water and Sanitation 

Gogogo Borehole 

Ward 1 

R5,927,151.18 

Water and Sanitation 

Kwandayini Borehole 

Ward 17 

R5,050,817.52 

Water and Sanitation 

Construction of VIP'S 

Caguba, Qhaka, and Sicambeni 

R 344.000.00 

Water and Sanitation 

KwaNyathi (PSJ INGQUZA LM) 

Regional Bulk Water Supply - 

Feasibility Study 

Ward s (13,17,18,19, 20 PSJ 

LM) & (1,3,21 Ngquza LM) 

R2,950.000.00 

Water and Sanitation 

Port St Johns Regional Water 

Supply Scheme Phase 5 

Ward 12 Gqubeni 

R31 994 054.81 

Water and Sanitation 

Port St Johns Town Sewer 

Reticulation Upgrade 

Ward 6 

R635. 000.00 


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_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR_ 

4.5 PROVINCIAL AND NATIONAL PROJECTS FROM OTHER SECTORS 


SECTOR: ESKOM 

Table 3.40: CONSOLIDATED ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAMME FOR 2017/18 


Municipality 

Project name 

Planned Capex 

Exc Vat 

Planned Con 

YTD Actual Capex 

( ) 

YTD Actual H/H 

(Dec) 

PSJ 

Kwa Nyathi 

R 5 830 000.00 

364 

R 

2500 


Kwa Nyathi Link line 

R 840 000.00 


R 



Lutshaya 

R 2 640 000.00 

165 

R 

20 


Lutshaya link line 

R 1 120 000.00 


R 



Mtambalala 

R 2 400 000.00 

220 

R 

0150 


Mtambalala link line 

R1 400 000.00 

874 

R 



PSJ Infill Type 1 

R 3 300 000.00 

206 

R 

524 


Tyeni 

R 1 040 000..00 


R 

65 


Tyeni link line 

R 840 000.00 


R 



PSJ ward Ext 

R2 720 000.00 


R 

170 

Total PSJ 







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_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 

SECTOR: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 


Table 3.41: Current Projects 


PROJECT NAME 

HOUSEHOLDS 

BUDGET 

BUDGET SOURCE 

Noqhekwane 

342 

R5.7m 


Bholani &shiyobo 101 

146 

R2.7 m 


Luqoqweni 

278 

6 950 000.00 

INEP 

Ntsimbini A/A Tankini 

101 

2 525 000.00 

INEP 

Mbenengeni 

69 

1 725 000.00 

INEP 

Cwebeni 

95 

2 375 000.00 

INEP 

Mbabalane 

39 

975 000.00 

INEP 

Buchele 

106 

1 802 000.00 

INEP 

Qandu 

97 

1 648 000.00 

INEP 

TOTAL 

785 

18 000 000.00 

INEP 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Table 3.41: Electrification -2018/19 


Project Name 

Ward 

Status 

Budget (R 000) 

Mfadaleni/Mahlathini 

106 

R 2,120,000.00 

R 2,120,000.00 

Mphotsotso 

140 

R 2,800,000.00 

R 2,800,000.00 

Buchele 

140 

R 2,800,000.00 

R 2,800,000.00 

Jam ben i A/A 

313 

R 6,260,000.00 

R 6,260,000.00 

Majola 

106 

R 2,120,000.00 

R 2,120,000.00 

Nomvalo 

98 

R 1,960,000.00 

R 1,960,000.00 

Lujazo 

108 

R 2,160,000.00 

R 2,160,000.00 

Tuweni/Maplotini 

106 

R 2,120,000.00 

R 2,120,000.00 

Nonyevu/Zwelitsa 

180 

R 3,600,000.00 

R 3,600,000.00 

TOTAL 

1297 

R 25,940,000.00 

R 25,940,000.00 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Table 3.42: Sector: Human Settlement 


PROJECT NAME 

PROJECT BUDGET 

PROJECT DELIVERABLES 

START AND 

COMPLETION 

DATE 

PLANNED IMPLEMENTATION 

PERIOD 

BUDGET 

EXPENDITURE 

PROJECT 

SCOPE 

UNITS 

COMPLETED 

PSJ 259 

20 438 126.00 

2 527 502.00 

259 

0 


18/19 FY 

PSJ 806 

147 413 015.40 

0 

806 

0 


18/19 FY 

Tombo 26 

4 478 293.94 

0 

26 

0 


18/19 FY 

Bolani 97 

10 646 699.56 

0 

97 

0 


19/20 FY 

Lutshaya 1200 


RO 

1200 

0 


20/21 (Presented for funding, 

councilors already submitted a 

revised list of 350 most 

destitute) as per our request. 

Mkhanzini 1200 


RO 

800 

0 


20/21 (Presented for funding, 

councilors already submitted a 

revised list of 350 most 

destitute) as per our request. 

Qandu 1200 


RO 

1200 

0 


21/22 (Pending beneficiary list) 

Mantusini 1200 


RO 

1200 

0 


21/22(Pending beneficiary list) 

Majola 1200 


R 0 

1200 

0 


21/22(Pending beneficiary list) 

Mtambalala 1200 


RO 

1200 

0 


21/22(Pending beneficiary list) 

Buchele 1200 


RO 

1200 

0 


21/22 (Pending beneficiary list) 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Nyazi 1200 


R 0 

1200 

0 


21/22(Pending beneficiary list) 

Mkhumbeni 1200 


R 0 

1200 

0 


21/22(Pending beneficiary list) 

Green Farm 1200 


R 0 

1200 

0 


21/22(Pending beneficiary list) 

Mngazana 1200 


RO 

1200 

0 


21/22 (Pending beneficiary list) 


Table 3.43: SECTOR: DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS 


MUNICIPALITY 

PROJECT NAME 

PROJECT DELIVERABLES 

BUDGET 

PROGRESS TO DATE 

PSJ LM 

WftC Manteku to Mthamvuna 

River 

Coastal Clean up 

12 m 

Project under implementation 

PSJ LM 

Manteku Camp 

Establishment of a nursery, admin 

block & ablution facility 

5 m 

Project on hold, pending the 

appointment of another service provider 

PSJ LM 

Tidal Pool Development 

Establishment of a tidal pool ( Pre¬ 
feasibility study complete) 


Project under planning 

PSJ LM 

Water quality monitoring 

Water testing 


Under planning 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Table 3.44: SECTOR: SANRAL 


PROJECT NAME 

PROECT SCOPE 

TYPE OF 

INFRUSTRUCTURE 

PROJECT DURATION 

BUDGET 

ALLOCATION 



START 

END 

R61 Libode (Mount 

Nicolas) to Mngazi 

(N2WCR) 

Construction of bridges: Umngazi River Bridge, Qiti Overpass 

Bridge, Qhaka Overpass Bridge. 

Construction of underpasses: Gangata Agricultural underpass, 

Kuleka Agricultural underpass, Tutor Ndamase Agricultural 

underpasses 1, 2, 3 & 4, Mnxabakazi Agricultural underpass, 

Umngazi Agricultural underpass. 

Widening of Intersections: 8x Intersections will be widened, 

6x Dangerous intersections will be closed. 

Community Development project: Local SMME will be used to 

construct community access roads which will be used to 

channel traffic towards the new formalized intersections. 

Relocation of services - ESKOM, Telkom, houses, etc. 


Sept 2016 

36 Months 

R450 MIL, 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Table 3.45: Sector: Social Development 


PROJECT NAME 

WARD 

BUDGET 

Imvuselelo PSJ Albinism 2.3 

All wards of Port St Johns 

R74.000 

Zanokhanyo HCBC 2.4 

Ward 02 - Mtalala 

R 522.434.00 

Dakane Household Food Garden - Sustainable 

Livelihood 

Ward 11 - Dakane 

R15 000.00 

Bholani Community Nutrition Development Centre- 

Sustainable Livelihood 

Ward 10 - Bholani 

R204 000.00 

Umngazi Dolphins Surf Life Saving Club-Youth 

Development programme 

Ward 6 - Mthumbane 

R20 000.00 

Phaphamani ECD 

Jambeni- ward 19 

R 124.425 

Masikhanye ECD 

Mzintlava -ward 14 

R117,315.00 

Mpophomeni ECD 

Mpophomeni- ward 12 

R120.870.00 

Sandlulube ECD 

SANDLULUBE-WARD 12 

R3.990.00 

Zwelitsha ECD 

Gemvale-ward 11 

R53.990.00 

Tsweleni ECD 

Gomolo-ward 01 

R33.990.00 


SECTOR: SASSA 

The following grants are offered By SASSA on a continuous basis to the deserving: 

• Social relief of Distress 

• Grants in aid 


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_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR_ 

• Child Support grant 

• Foster care grant 

• Care dependency grant 

• War veterans grant 

• Disability grant 

• Grants for older persons 

Food parcels are also issued by the sector on a continuous basis to the deserving targets. 


Table 3.46: Sector: Home Affairs 


IDP - KPI 

2017/18IDP 

Targets 

Projects to be 

implemented 

Budget 

Wards to be covered 

Budget source 

Civic Services 

Smart Cards - 

applications 

To realise the targets 

Baseline 

Budget 

All Wards in the Municipal area 

DHA Baseline 


Birth Registration 

Continued awareness in 

Hospitals& clinics 

Baseline 

All clinics and Hospitals covered in 

the distribution 

DHA Baseline 


Uncollected IDs in the 

offices throughout the 

municipal area 

ID distribution 

Baseline 

All wards 

DHA Baseline 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


SECTOR: DEPARTMENT OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND AGRARIAN REFORM 
Table 3.47: AGRICULTURAL PROJECTS FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


NAME OF PROJECT 

VILLAGE 

WARD 

ENTERPRISE 

NEED 

EXTENT 

Busi Co-op 

Genvale 

11 

Maize & veg 

Fencing 

5 ha 

Siyaphambili 

Mzintlava 

14 

Maize 

Fencing 

50 ha 

Luqhoqweni project 

Luqhoqweni 

15 

Maize 

Fencing 

30 ha 

Ntanjana project 

Majola 

16 

Maize 

Fencing and irrigation 

50 ha 

Siyalakha 

Luthengele 

16 

Maize 

Fencing 

10 ha 

Zanobom project 

Mtalala 

02 

Maize 

Irrigation 

10 ha 

Macadamia nuts project 

Port St Johns 


Macadamia 

Fencing 

900ha 

Majola Tea Estate 

Majola 

08 

Tea 

Factory Renovations 

500 

Xamana maize project 

Mtalala 

02 

Maize 

Fencing and irrigation 

50 ha 

Ngawu fruit project 

Mtambalala 

14 

Fruit 

Fencing and irrigation 

8 ha 

Imizamo wool growers 

Lutshaya 

18 

Wool 

Shearing shed 

lha 

Kwa Ndayeni maize 

Kwa Ndayini 

17 

Maize 

Fencing 

117ha 

Lutshaya maize producers 

Lutshaya 

18 

Maize 

Fencing 

289 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Table 3.48: DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 


PROJECT 

SITE OF OPERATIONS 

CURRENT STATUS 

COMMENTS 

• Electrification 

Ngcoya 

Mtambalala 

Lutshaya 

Using solar system 

Cables installation in progress 

• Renovations 

Bomvini 

Lutshaya 

Port St Johns Health centre 

Tombo 

Soil samples taken by DBSA for 

construction 

Awaiting for feedback from DBSA 

• Inaccessible roads 

Bolani 

Luphoko 

Bad and uneven gravel road 

Very remote area with poor access roads 

Difficulty to provide health services due to 

inaccessible roads 

Department cannot provide mobile health 

services due to poor access roads 

• Electrification 

• Renovations 

Qandu 

The clinic building dilapidated 

To be renovated in 17/18 

• Reengineering of Primary 

Health care 

Ward 1,2,4,5,7,8 &9 

House hold registration in progress 

Rendering primary health services at 

household level 

Conducting service points to unreachable 

arrears to promote access to primary 

health care services 

Rendering school health services to provide 

screening for early detection, treatment 

and referral. 

Programme is ongoing as these cadres are 

on contracts that is being renewed on a 

yearly bases 

• Measles campaign 

All wards 

Immunization of all children from 6months- 

12months 

It will commence from the 12- 30 June 2017 

• Central Chronic Medicine 

Dispensing & Distribution 

Program 

All clinics 

Enrollment of all eligible chronic patients is 

in progress to reduce the workload in our 

facilities 

Ongoing 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


PROJECT 

SITE OF OPERATIONS 

CURRENT STATUS 

COMMENTS 

• Establishment of 

Adherence clubs 

All wards 

All patients that are registered on CCMDD 

will be grouped according to their 

catchment arrears & treatment will be 

collected by a team leader appointed by the 

group from the pick- up point outside the 

facility close to their place of residence. 

It will commence in July 2017. 


Table 3.49: Service Delivery- Education Port St. JOHNS CMC 


AREA/CIRCUIT/SCHOOL 

SERVICE RENDERED 

STATUS 

COMPLETED/ NOT 

COMPLETED 

Taleni JSS 

Construction of permanent structure 

Not completed 

Toli SSS 

Construction of permanent structure 

Not completed 

Ntafufu SSS 

Construction of 10 classrooms 

Not completed 

Sobaba SSS, Vulindlela 

SSS and Ngubezulu SSS 

Appointment of mentors in 3 underperforming schools 


PSJ Schools 

(a) 32 Learner Support Agents (LSAs) to implement care 

and support for Teaching and Learning (CSTL) in 15 Senior 

Secondary Schools and 17 Junior Secondary Schools. 

(b) Establishment of homework clubs and study groups 

(co- curricular activities) 

(c) Peer education programme to reduce learner pregnancy, 

drug and alcohol abuse. 

(d) Social welfare services and Psycho-social support: 

referrals. 

(e) 01 Safe circumcision monitor responsible for the Port 

St. Johns Area. 



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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


AREA/CIRCUIT/SCHOOL 

SERVICE RENDERED 

STATUS 

COMPLETED/ NOT 

COMPLETED 


(f) 02 Social worker interns responsible for the District. 


Mqakama JSS 

Construction of permanent structure. 

Not completed 

PSJ Schools 

11 schools benefit in scholar transport 

In Progress 


Table 3.50: LED 


PROJECT NAME 

SECTOR 

ESTIMATED 

BUDGET 

SOURCE OF FUNDING / FUNDING AGENCY 

1. Cwebeni Fishing Project 

Manufacturing 

9,000,000 

DEA 

2. Irrigation Schemes Programme agreement on 

Agriculture 

2,500,000 

DRDAR 

Umzimvubu & Mngazi Rivers 




3. Zimisele stock dam and handling facilities 

Agriculture 

345,555 

DRDAR 

4. Mantusini Dairy Farm Revitalisation (Purchase of 

Agriculture 

6,900,000 

DRDAR/DRDLR 

fencing material, equipment and planting of pastures) 




5. Lutshaya Fencing of Arable Lands 

Agriculture 

102,817 

DRDAR 

6. Masakhane Fencing and Construction of Poultry Plouse 

Agriculture 

572,169 

DRDAR 

7. Delivery of Siyazondla Starter Packs 

Agriculture 

545,456 

DRDAR 

8. Implementation of Siyakhula Vegetable Production 

Agriculture 

3,272,727 

DRDAR 

9. Revival of Majola Tea Factory 

Agriculture 

5,000,000 



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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


PROJECT NAME 

SECTOR 

ESTIMATED 

BUDGET 

SOURCE OF FUNDING / FUNDING AGENCY 

10. Consumer Awareness Workshop 

Educate consumers on 

R60000 All LM's 

DEDEAT 


consumer rights 



11. Annual International Cooperatives Day Celebrations 

Exhibition of products 

All LM'S Allocation 

DEDEAT 


produced by 

determines 



cooperatives 



12. Removal of Allien Plants 

Agriculture 

R3 000 000 

DEDEAT 


Table 3.51: Community Development and Services 


PROJECT NAME 

SECTOR 

ESTIMATED BUDGET 

POSSIBLE SOURCE OF FUNDING 

1 . 

Construction of Ntafufu Multipurpose Centre in Ward 12 

Community Services 

TBD 

DHS 

2. 

Construction of Majola Multipurpose Centre in Ward 8 

Community Services 

TBD 

DHS 

3. 

Construction of Silimela Multipurpose Centre in Ward 2 

Community Services 

TBD 

DHS 

4. 

Construction of Bambisana Multipurpose Centre in Ward 13 

Community Services 

TBD 

DHS 

5. 

Construction of Chaguba Multipurpose Centre in Ward 5 

Community Services 

TBD 

DHS 

6. 

Construction of a Port St Johns Multipurpose centre in Ward 6 

Community Services 

TBD 

DHS 

7. 

Disaster Management (immediate intervention) 

Community Services 

100,000 

PSJLM/ORTDM 

8. 

Establishment of children's park in Port St Johns 

Community Park 

5,000,000 

DWCPWD 


239 | P a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



























FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


PROJECT NAME 

SECTOR 

ESTIMATED BUDGET 

POSSIBLE SOURCE OF FUNDING 

9. PSJ survivor centre 

Community Services 


ORTDM/Dept. of Social Delopment 


Table 3.52: Housing and Spatial Planning 


Project Name 

Sector 

Estimated 

budget 

Possible source of funding / funding 

agency 

1. 1 200 rural housing units per ward 

Housing and Spatial Planning 



2. Township establishment, layout plan, EIA, Design of 

engineering services, Survey 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

800,000 

PSJ LM, DLG&TA 

3. Rezoning Naval Base for residential 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

500,000 

DLG&TA 

4. Rezoning Erf 283, consolidate with erf 264 & erf 1 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

320,000 

DLG&TA 

5. Planning and Survey of rural nodes 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

6,600,000 

DLG&TA 

6. Review housing sector plan 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

1,400,000 

DHS 

7. Develop a new LSDF 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

2,000,000 

Rural Development 

8. Development Strategy for Majola 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

900,000 

DLG&TA 

9. Planning and Survey of coastal nodes 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

3,000,000 

DLG&TA 

10. Develop an SG Diagram for the Urban Node 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

1,400,000 

DLG&TA 

11. Develop a GIS system integrated with finance 

department 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

900,000 

Rural Development 

12. Develop a building plan system to scan, capture and 

store building plans. 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

500,000 

PSJ LM, DLG&TA 

13. Develop a system which will track and trace 

application, store application and update zoning map 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

300,000 

PSJ LM, 

14. review ward profiles and include area base plans 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

1,200,000 

DLG&TA 

15. Re-survey and plan Mtumbane 

Housing and Spatial Planning 

540,000 

PSJ LM, DLG&TA 


240 | P a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



























_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR_ 

4.6 Municipal Needs Analysis-Unfunded projects 

The following table provides a summary of the issues raised by community members during the IDP roadshows and Strategic Planning 2018 held in May 2018 
and some of the information has been extracted from the Ward Profiles that have been prepared by the Ward Councillors. 

Table 3.53: IDP Roadshows 2018 



241 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 













FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



• 

Maintenance of Noduva and Sitha Schools 

3 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

Maintenance of Ludalasi , T305 - Buzongoma - Maqebevu Roads 

Electrification of 398 units at KwaNtsila Village 

Maintenance and Electrification of Buzongoma Stadium 

Mahlathini Stadium is incomplete since 2009 

Taps were installed but not functional at Mfadaleni Village 

4 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

Maintenance of Roads ( including blading) and bridges 

Sanitation backlog in some areas 

Electricity backlog in some areas including streetlights electrification on R61 

Alcohol and drug abuse, teenage pregnancy, crime, dread disease and Unemployment 

Maintenance of Tombo Multi-purpose and Sports Ground 

5 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

Maintenance of all access roads 

Request for installation of electricity to extensions 

Maintenance of Sicambeni Access Road 

Incomplete disaster houses 

Incomplete project of installation of toilets 

6 

• 

• 

• 

• 

Maintenance of roads 

Water, sanitation and Houses 

Inadequate electricity supply and maintenance of streetlights and installation of High mast lights 

Recreational facilities including parks and sports facilities 


242 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 














FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR, 



Economic infrastructure, bulk infrastructure, capacitation of Co-ops high unemployment rate 
Land invasion 


No water at ward 07 as a whole 
Maintenance of access road to Mantusini Diary 
Maintenance of Mantusini Sports Ground 
Maintenance of Mvume Bridge 
No RDP Houses 

Incomplete installation of toilets 
Request for a clinic at Njiveni Village 
Request for removal of alien plant 
Request for mobile clinic 


Request for clinic 

Maintenance of access roads for the whole ward 
Rate of unemployed graduates is increasing 

Gcose - Cepheni -Lwandlana Access road was planned to be maintained in previous IDPs but it is no longer appearing whilst is 
not yet maintained 

Construction of Hotana to Lutataweni access road 
Contsruction of Gangatha to Tyeni 
Contsruction of Mdeni access road 
Construction of Tshakude to Mantusini 


243 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 










FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR, 



• Contsruction of Mabanjana to Wakeni 

9 

• 

No hall at Magombeni Trafitional Authority 


• 

Renovation of Zintonga J.S.S 


• 

Request for a clinic 


• 

Maintenance of Green - Swazini and Qhaka - Mbolenia access roads 


• 

Maintenance of Nkweni access road 


• 

Request for electricity at Nkweni Village 


• 

Unfinished disaster hoses 


• 

Maintenance of Dumasi Bridge 


• 

High rate of unemployed youth 

10 

• 

Maintainance of Mswakazi and Dedeni Access Road 


• 

Outstanding RDP House in Bholani 


• 

No progress to all issues raised during the 2017/18 IDP Roadshow 


• 

Venue for holding roadshows at ward 11 must revolve 


• 

Unemployment rate is high 

11 


Electrification that was meant for Lujazo Village was implemented at Madikazini Village 



No water at Xhaka Village and there was no indicated as when the issue would be addressed 



Lujazo Bridge is not complete 



Maintenance of Ntongwane - Matane Access Road 



No access roads leading to churches 


244 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 












FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR, 




There was a proposal that there should be ward base budget 

No Boreholes 

No Sports Grounds 

Maintenance of Matane Community Hall 

No water and sanitation 

12 

• 

Water and Sanitation 


• 

Housing 


• 

Access roads 


• 

Community Services ( Community halls, Sport fields, Clinics, Preliminary schools) 


• 

Electricity in some villages 


• 

Nomsenge access road 


• 

Qambatha access road 


• 

Nomvalo bus stop to Nomvalo School 


• 

Ngweni to Khanyisa 


• 

Luisibeni to Malize SPS 

13 

• 

Access roads 


• 

Electricity in some villages 


• 

Community services (Additional Schools, hospital, clinics, Sports grounds, Post Office services, community Library, Community 

Halls) 


• 

Water and Sanitation in some villages 


245 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 











FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR, 



• Housing 

14 

• 

Maintenance of Ntongwana and Sobaba Acess Roads 


• 

Request for pre - school at Sobaba Village 


• 

No water and sanitation in some villages 


• 

Community Hall 


• 

Mzintlava Sports Ground 


• 

Maintannance of Sobaba SSS and Maphindela School 


• 

Mbarhane Acces Road and 


• 

Dakane to Mahlontlweni 


• 

Ntongwana to Sabdlulube 


• 

Nqubela bridge 


• 

210 Infills at Sobaba 

15 


Access Roads 



RDP Houseslnadequate health facilities 



Inadequate sport facilities 



High unemployment rate and crime rates 



Construction of Luqhoqhweni 



Maintanance of access roads 

16 

• 

Request for taps at Ngxongweni and Qhoboshendlini villages 


• 

Maintenance of Ngxongweni and Luphaphasi - Bizana Access Roads 


246 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 












FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR, 



• 

Maintenance of Ngxongweni Sport Ground 


• 

No Community Hall at Ngxongweni Village 


• 

Shortage of clinic staff 


• 

EPWP programme to be made a permanent programme 

17 

• 

Maintainance of Kwanyathi and most of Access Road for the ward 


• 

No water and sanitation for the whole ward 


• 

Unemployment rate is high 

18 

• 

Construction of Mkhuzaza Access Road 


• 

Maintenance of Mbambeni Access Road 


• 

Maintenance of Mbotyi - Malangeni Access Road 


• 

No water in Dlelanga Village 

19 

• 

Maintenance Nltenga Access Road 


• 

Request for clinic 


• 

No Water and sanitation for the whole ward 


• 

Request for RDP Houses / temporal structures for needy people 


• 

Request for construction of sidewalks for the safety of students 


• 

Request for electricity to homes that are newly built 

20 

• 

Maintenance of Jabavu Access Road 


• 

Request for a clinic 


• 

Request for assistance with farming resources 


247 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 













FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



No Community Halls for the whole ward 
Request for RDP Houses 

Maintenance of Tshandatshe - Makhwaleni Access Road 


TABLE 3.54: Projects form the Strategic Planning 2018 (Gravel Access Roads) 



STRATEGIC PLANNING 2018 


LIST OF UNFUNDED PROJECTS 

Project 

Village 

Units/ 

km 

Ward 


Project 

Village 

Units/ 

km 

Ward 

Com Hall 

Lutatweni 


1 


Water 

Njela 


2 

Com Hall 

Magingqi 


1 


Water 

Noduva 


2 

Education 

Fencing Nkangala 

School 


1 


Water 

Matselu 


2 

Education 

Fencing Maggie 


1 


Water 

Mawotsheni 


2 


School 




Water 

Mvelelo 


2 

Education 

Fencing 

Lungisani SPS 


1 


Water 

Masameni 


2 

Education 

Fencing Diko JSS 


1 


Water Extensions 

Sihlanjeni 


2 

GAR 

Tsweleni 


1 


Water Extensions 

Ngcanda 


2 

GAR 

Qandu Store to 

Bulawu 


1 


Water Extensions 

Mtalala 


2 

GAR 

Magoqweni to 

Kwa 

Dubulinkanga 


1 


HS 

All villages 


2 


248 | P a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 








































FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


GAR 

Matandela JSS to 

Nocuze 


1 


Comm Hall 

Masameni 


2 

GAR 

Matandela JSS to 

Noduva 


1 

Comm Hall 

Sihlanjeni 


2 

Sports Field 

Horse Race Belt 


1 

Comm Hall 

Mtalala 


2 

Sports Field 

Bhalonini Sports 

Field 


1 

Sports Field 

Mvelelo 


2 

Water 

Lugongqozo 


1 

Sports Field 

Noduva 


2 

Water 

Phahlakazi 


1 

Sports Field 

Lugasweni 


2 

Water 

Nqutyana 


1 

Sports Field 

Nkwilini 


2 

Water 

Nocuze 


1 

Sanitation 

Infills new 

househols in all 

the wards 


2 

Water 

Nyakeni 


1 

Electricty Extensions 

Mtalala 


2 

Water 

Extensions 

Gogogo 


1 

Electricty Extensions 

Nkwilini 


2 

Electricty 

Gogogo infills 


1 

Electricty Extensions 

Madakeni 


2 

Electricty 

Lutatweni 


1 


Electricty Extensions 

Mawotsheni 


2 

Electricty 

Vithini and 

Nkonkoni 


1 

Electricty Extensions 

Magcakini 


2 

Electricty 

Mmangweni and 

Phahlakazi 


1 

Electricty Extensions 

Sihlanjeni 


2 

Electricty 

Rhebhu 


1 

Electricty Extensions 

Njela 


2 

GAR 

Sinangwana 


2 

Electricty Extensions 

Mvelelo 


2 

GAR 

Mpoma 


2 

Electricty Extensions 

Ngcanda 


2 

GAR 

Phepheni 


2 

Electricty Extensions 

Masameni 


2 


249 | 3 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


GAR 

Mhlezu 


2 


Electricty Extensions 

Noduva 


2 

GAR 

Mawotsheni 


2 


Electricty Extensions 

Lugasweni 


2 

Electricty 

Phelomoya 


2 

AR 

Kwantsila 


3 

Electricty 

Makaka 


2 

AR 

Mbenengeni 


3 

Electricty 

Masameni 

eTankini 


2 

AR 

Mfadaleni 


3 

Electricty 

Sitha 


2 


AR 

Gorha 


3 

Electricty 

Moyeni 


2 

AR 

Ludalasi 


3 

Electricty 

Mbange 


2 

AR 

Mtondela 


3 

Electricty 

Makhumbathini 


2 

AR 

Matsilela 


3 

Electricty 

Mfabantu 


2 

AR 

Butho 


3 

Electricty 

Mahlule 


2 

Bridge 

Butho 


3 

Electricty 

Masameni 


2 

Bridge 

Zwelibatshiyayo 


3 

Electricty 

Masameni to 

Qandu 


2 

Health 

Butho 


3 

Electricty 

Mthonjeni 


2 

Health 

Lujecweni 


3 

Electricty 

Magcakini 


2 

DEAET 

Isivivani Nature 

Reserve 


3 

Electricty 

Extension in 12 

Villages 


2 

AR 

Mabhulwini 

3 km 

4 

Water 

Mvelelo 


2 

AR 

Mngazana 

4 km 

4 

GAR 

Gade 

2,5 

km 

4 


Side walks 

Side walks to the 

Gap 


6 

GAR 

Mafusini 

3 km 

4 

Business 

Stall for Street 

Hawkers 


6 

GAR 

Nkonxeni 

4 km 

4 

GAR 

Nomnandi 

900 

7 


250 | 3 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 






FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


GAR 

Tombo Mission 

4 km 

4 


GAR 

Mvume 

5,5 

km 

7 

GAR 

Getto 

3 km 

4 

GAR 

Ntsimbini 

6 km 

7 

GAR 

Mgxabakazi 

3 km 

4 

GAR 

Tankini 

4 km 

7 

GAR 

Rhela 

3 km 

4 

GAR 

Dangwana 

3.5 

km 

7 

GAR 

Bholani 

2 km 

4 

GAR 

Makhovana 

900 

m 

7 

GAR 

Hlamvana 

2 km 

4 

GAR 

Mantusini 

400m 

7 

GAR 

Mtalala 

2 km 

4 

GAR 

Njiveni 

1 km 

7 

SANRAL 

R61 Street not 

working @ 

Tombo 


4 

Bridge 

Mvume 


7 

HS 

1200 units ????? 

1200 

4 

Electricty 

Machomsholo 

80 

7 

Renovations 

Tombo Thusong 

Centre 


4 

Electricty 

Mruleni 

60 

7 

Sports Field 

Construction 


4 

Electricty 

Mvume 

50 

7 

Water 

5 Taps 

Extensions in 12 

Village 

5 

4 


Electricty 

Mantusini 

30 

7 

Sanitation 

1192 


4 

Electricty 

Butulo 

40 

7 

Electricty 

176 infills 

176 

4 

Water 

Mantusini 


7 

Electricty 

180 New 

Extensions 

180 

4 


Ngqwalani 


7 

Electricty 

Infills 

Makhumbathini 


5 


Njiveni 


7 


251 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 





FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Electricty 

Infills 

Maplotini 


5 


Sanitation 

Ntsimbini 


7 

Water 

Vukandlule for 

the past 15 years 


5 


Dangwana 


7 

Sanitation 

Cwebeni 


5 


Tankini 


7 

HS 

Complition of 

unfinished house 

by Simple Do 


5 


Katini 


7 

HS 

Houses @ 

Cwebeni 


5 

HS 

No Houses in the 

whole ward 


7 

Com Hall 

Caguba 


5 

Education 

Lundini SPS 


8 

Com Hall 

Makhuzeni 


5 

Education 

Gobizizwe SPS 


8 

Sports 

Multi Purpose 

Center 


5 


Sanitation 

Mbanjana 


8 

GAR 



5 

Comm Hall 

Hall Mantainance 


8 

GAR 

Water Works 


6 

GAR 

Mdeni 

5 km 

8 

GAR 

Mpantu 

7 km 

6 

GAR 

Luzupu to 

Kwanyathi 


8 

GAR 

Riverside 

8 km 

6 

GAR 

Mbanjana to 

Wakeni 

8 km 

8 

GAR 

Zwelitsha 

5 km 

6 

GAR 

Tshakude to 

Mantusini 

12 km 

8 

GAR 

Ntlantsana Farm 

9 km 

6 

GAR 

Hotana to 

Lutaweni 

10 km 

8 

GAR 

Mthumbane 

4 km 

6 

GAR 

Gangatha to 

Tyeni 

7 km 

8 


252 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


GAR 

Old Military Camp 

2 km 

6 


GAR 

Tyeni Road 


8 

Health 

Mtumbane 


6 


Water 

Whole Ward 8 


8 

Com Hall 

Green Farm 


6 

GAR 

Hotana to 

Lutaweni 


8 

Storm 

Water 

Drainage 

Ward 6 


6 

Tared Road 

T 191 


8 

Bridge 

Water Works 


6 

Health 

Hospital 


8 

Security 

Surviallance 

Cameras Second 

Beach 


6 

GAR 

Mboleni to Kopi 


9 

Water 

Nonyevu 


6 

GAR 

Ndwalane to 

Drayini 


9 

Water 

Old Military Camp 


6 

GAR 

Bizana to 

Luphaphasi 


9 

Water 

Zwelitsha 


6 

GAR 

Mkhanzini to 

Ginya 


9 

Water 

Mpantu 


6 

Education 

Zintonga JSS 


9 

Santitation 

Nonyevu 


6 


Education 

Bhekabantu JSS 


9 

Santitation 

Old Military Camp 


6 

Grass Cutting 

Woods Com Hall 


9 

Testing 

Ground 

Facilitation of 

testing ground 


6 

Renovations 

Mkhanzini Youth 

Grave Yard 

(Memorial Year 

Event) 


9 

Municipal 

Offices 

Construction 

plans of Offices 

for 2019/20 

6 

Santitation 

Mpantu & 


6 



Ntafufu Camp 


11 


253 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 






FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



Zwelitsha 





Site 



SH 

????? 


9 


Com Hall 

Mthambalala 


11 

Health 

Mobile Clinic 


9 


Old Age Centres 


11 

Debushing 

Ward 9 


9 


Quary Project 


11 

Allien Plant 

Removal 

Ward 9 


9 


Aqua Culture 

Academy 


11 

Electricity 

Extensions 

Mkahanzini 

54 

9 


GAR 

Nomsenge 


12 

Com Hall 

Noqhekwana 


10 

GAR 

Qambatha 


12 

Com Hall 

Sizilo 


10 

GAR 

Ngweni to 

Khanyisa 


12 

GAR 

Mbiza 


10 

GAR 

Nomvalo Bus 

Stop to Nomvalo 

School 


12 

GAR 

Khaleni Magoba 


10 

GAR 

Lusibeni to 

Malize 


12 

GAR 

Gabelana to 

Mtambalala 


10 

GAR 

Nyazi to No 1 


13 

GAR 

Bolani to 

Noqhekwana 


10 

GR 

Mbokazi to No 3 


13 

GAR 

Qaq to 

Malongweni 


10 

GAR 

Ndwalane to No 

2 


13 

GAR 

Sizilo to Siyilo 


10 

GAR 

Mamaleni to No 

4 


13 

GAR 

Roads to Schools 

and Traditional 


10 

GAR 

Mzimvubu & 

Maweleni 


13 


254 | 3 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 






FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



Authorities 








Health 

Servicing Bolani, 

Noqhekwana, 

Dedeni, Shiyabo 


10 


Bridge 

Tyityane Bridge 


13 

Health 

Clinic @ 

Noqhekwana 


10 

Transport 

Maintanance of 

tarred road from 

Bambisana 

Hospital to 

KwaZweni SPS 


13 

Health 

Mobile Clinic @ 

Luphoko 


10 

Health 

Mamaleni Clinic 


13 

Health 

Clinic @ 

Mswakazi 


10 

Health 

Bambisana 

Hospital Phase 2 


13 

Health 

Training of 

learners on 

health related 

issues 


10 

Education 

Kwa Msikwa 

High Scool 


13 

Bridge 

Noqhekwana 


10 

Education 

Nyazi JSS 


13 

Bridge 

Balaw Bridge 


10 

Comm Hall 



13 

Bridge 

Luphako 


10 


Allien Plant Removal 

Ward 13 


13 

Bridge 

Gabelana to 

Mtambalala 


10 

Water 

Supply Clean 

Water 


13 

Bridge 

Nenga 


10 

Sport Field 



13 

DRDAR 

Fencing 

Fencing Khwela 

Kuwo Co-op 


10 

Electricty 

Infills 


13 

DRDAR 

Magoba Mealie 


10 

Electricty 

Extensions 


13 


255 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 





FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Fencing 

fields 








DRDAR 

Fencing 

Noqhekwana Co¬ 
op 


10 


Electricty 

250 Connections 

for the whole 

ward 


13 

DRDAR 

Fencing 

Tshobeni Co-op 


10 

Sanitation 



13 

DRDAR 

Fencing 

Maswakazi 


10 

GAR 

Ntongwana to 

Manteku 


14 

DRDAR 

Training 

Co-op on animal 

production 


10 

GAR 

Dakana to 

Mahlontlweni 


14 

LED 

Training of 

Hawkers on 

business 

management 


10 

GAR 

Ntongwana to 

Sandlulube 


14 

LED 

Training brick 

making and 

sewing 


10 

GAR 

Mcwabantsasa to 

Extension 


14 

LED 

Training of life 

guards at 

Noqhekwana and 

Luphoko 


10 

GAR 

Mbarhani 


14 

Education 

High School 


10 

Com Hall 



14 

Electricity 

Extension 

Khaleni 

198 

10 

Sports Field 

Mzintlava B 


14 

Electricity 

Mbiza 

178 

10 

Sports Field 

Sobaba 


14 

Electricity 

Mswakazi 

98 

10 


Sports Field 

Maphindela 


14 


256 | 3 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 





FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Extension 









Electricty 

Infills 

All wards 


10 


Bridge 

Nkqubela 


14 

GAR 

Buchele Clinic to 

Mthambalala 

Maintanance 

10 km 

11 

Electricty 

Infills 100 


14 

Bridge 

Buchele to Mbotyi 


11 

Electricty 

Extensions 210 

Sobaba 

210 

14 


R61 Pedestrian 

Crossing 


11 

Sanitation 

Extensions 200 

200 

14 

Health 

Xhaka Clinic 


11 

Water 

Sobaba 


14 

SANRAL 

Manteku to 

Ntongwana 

tarred road 

23 km 

11 

Water 

Maphindela 


14 


Sikhululweni to 

Lujazo tarred 

road 

20 km 

11 

HS 

Whole Ward - 

Sobaba 


14 

Water 

Construct Bore 

Vholes in 11 

villages 


11 

HS 

Maphindela 


14 

HS 

Desttitute Houses 

lost about 

150 

11 

HS 

Mzintlava A 


14 

DEAET 

EC Manteku 

Camp Site 

(Nursery) 


11 

HS 

M Fzintlava B 


14 

Comm Hall 

Sobaba 


14 


DRDAR 

Maize Project 


17 


257 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 





FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 








Ebhukuqwini 



Health 

Mobile @ Sobaba 


14 


GAR 

Mboziseni 


18 

Education 

Sobaba SSS 


14 

GAR 

Mlaza 


18 

Com Hall 

Dutch Comm Hall 


15 

GAR 

Bele 


18 

AR 

Gcobani to 

Mkhuma 


15 

GAR 

Ngcoya 


18 

AR 

Machibini to 

Tyiweni 


15 


GAR 

Mkhuzaza 


18 

Education 

Luqoqweni Pre 

School 


15 

GAR 

Gugwini 


18 

Health 

Dutch Clinic 


15 

GAR 

Dlelengani 


18 

Water 

Extension @ 

Thontsini 


15 

GAR 

Gqwesa 


18 

Water 

Mdlankala 


15 

GAR 

Ngqikiza 


18 

DRDAR 

Dipping Tank @ 

Lalu 


15 

GAR 

Mbambeni 


18 

Electricty 

Infills and 

Extensions the 

whole Ward 


15 

GAR 

Magangeni 


18 

HS 

Gangatha 

1200 

15 

GAR 

Tyeni 


18 

Bridge 

Mdlankomo 


15 

Multi Purpose Centre 

Lutshaya 


18 

Bridge 

Luqhoqweni 


15 

Health 

Health Centre 


18 

AR 

Lupapasi 


16 


Comm Hall 

Ngcoya 


18 

Comm Hall 

Ngxongweni 


16 

Education 

Ngcoya TVET 

College 


18 

Community 

LED to support 


16 

Comm Hall 

Dlelengani 


18 


258 | 3 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 






FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Projects 

and help 

establish new 

ones 








Sports 

Centre 

Construct Multi 

Purpose Sport 

Centre 


16 

Sports Field 

Lutshaya 


18 

EPWP 

Extension of 

EPWP& CWP 

programs across 

the ward 


16 

Sports Field 

Ngcoya 


18 

Water 

Resusitate spring 

waters in 8 

villages of the 

ward, 1 per 

village 


16 

Bridge 

Tyeni Bridge link 

Ward 8 Nyandeni 

Municipality 


18 

Water 

Tyityane Village 


16 

GAR 

Bomvini Clinic to 

Ntlenga 


19 

Health 

Increase Staff 


16 

Electricty 

Isihlitho 


19 

Health 

Mobile Clinic 


16 

Electricty 

Mazizini 


19 

HIV/ AIDS 

Campaign on 

HIV/ AIDS and 

drugs awareness 


16 

Electricty 

Mavenyane 


19 

Comm Hall 

Kwa Nyathi 


17 

Electricty 

Jambeni A 


19 

Bridge 

Between Ntlenga 

& Bhukuqweni 


17 

Electricty 

Jambeni B 


19 

GAR 

Kwandayini to 


17 

Toilets 

Isihlitho 


19 


259 | 3 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



Mtimde 








GAR 

Ward 17 to Ward 

20 


17 


Toilets 

Mazizini 


19 

GAR 

Mnqezu 

3 

17 

Toilets 

Mavenyane 


19 

GAR 

Mkhumbeni 

4 

17 

Toilets 

Jambeni A 


19 

GAR 

Makukhanye 

3 

17 

Toilets 

Jambeni B 


19 

GAR 

Dlokweni 

15 

17 


Water 

Mavenyane 


19 

GAR 

Kwandayini 

7 

17 

Water 

Jambeni A 


19 

GAR 

Sijungqwini 

5 

17 

Water 

Jambeni B 


19 

GAR 

Phephu 

4 

17 

Water 

Bomvini 


19 

GAR 

Bambisana to 

Mbotyi 

(Maintanance) 


17 

Water 

Ntlenga 


19 

Electricty 

Mnqezu 


17 

Fencing Melie Fields 



19 

Electricty 

Bhakaleni 


17 

Sports Field 



19 

Electricty 

Makukhanye 


17 

HS 

Houses 

1200 

19 

Electricty 

Kwandayini 


17 


Com Hall 

Mtimde 


20 

Electricty 

Diphini 


17 

Water 

Mthide 


20 

Electricty 

Bhukuqweni 


17 

Sanitation 

Mthimde 


20 

Health 

Clinic kwa Nyathi 


17 

Elextricty Ext. Infills 

Jabavu 


20 

Sport Field 

Construct Sports 

Field 


17 

Elextricty Ext. Infills 

Dumezweni 


20 

GAR 

Bambisana to 

Mbotyi 

(Maintanance) 


17 

Elextricty Ext. Infills 

Sunrise 


20 

GAR 

Mnqezu to 


17 

Elextricty Ext. Infills 

Luzapu 


20 


260 | J a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 






FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



Bukuqweni 








GAR 

Sijungqwini 

(Maintanance) 


17 


Elextricty Ext. Infills 

Jambeni 


20 


261 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


CHAPTER 5 

MUNICIPAL BUDGET 


262 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 

5.1 INTRODUCTION 


This section summarizes key elements from the municipal budget. The municipality has the capacity to spend its capital budget. 

5.1.2 Operating Budget 

The following table summarizes Port St. Johns' Operating Budget. 

Table 5.1: Budgeted Capital Expenditure by vote, functional classification and funding (A5) 


263 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


EC154 Port St Johns ■ Table A5 Budgeted Capital Expenditure by vote, functional classification and funding 


Vote Description 

Ref 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 


Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Pre-audit 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 


Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

outcome 

2018/19 

+1 2019/20 

+2 2020/21 

Capital expenditure - Vote 












Multi-vear expenditure to be appropriated 

2 











Vote 1 - Executive and council 


166 

1,252 

1,010 

2,070 

2,008 

2,008 

2,008 

1,568 

371 

390 

Vote 2 - Budget and treasury Office 


554 

604 

460 

1,300 

160 

160 

160 

100 

105 

111 

Vote 3 - Community services 


1,802 

218 

1,546 

1,952 

456 

456 

456 

2,422 

2,548 

2,680 

Vote 4 - Corporate services 


377 

343 

262 

- 

- 

- 

- 

50 

53 

55 

Vote 5 - Planning and development 


19 

96 

59 

900 

- 

- 

- 

450 

53 

55 

Vote 6 - Enginnering services 


40,489 

28,642 

48,856 

63,822 

63,265 

63,265 

63,265 

89,145 

80,978 

70,042 

Vote 7 - [NAME OF VOTE 7] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 8 - [NAME OF VOTE 8] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 9 - [NAME OF VOTE 9] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 10 - [NAME OF VOTE 10] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 11-[NAME OF VOTE 11] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 12 - [NAME OF VOTE 12] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 13 - [NAME OF VOTE 13] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 14 - [NAME OF VOTE 14] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 15 - [NAME OF VOTE 15] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Capital multi-year expenditure sub-total 

7 

43,406 

31,155 

52,192 

70,044 

65,889 

65,889 

65,889 

93,734 

84,107 

73,334 

Sinqle-vear expenditure to be appropriated 

2 











Vote 1 - Executive and council 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 2 - Budget and treasury Office 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 3 - Community services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 4 - Corporate services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 5 - Planning and development 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 6 - Enginnering services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 7 - [NAME OF VOTE 7] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 8 - [NAME OF VOTE 8] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 9 - [NAME OF VOTE 9] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 10 - [NAME OF VOTE 10] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 11 - [NAME OF VOTE 11] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 12 - [NAME OF VOTE 12] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 13 - [NAME OF VOTE 13] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 14 - [NAME OF VOTE 14] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 15 - [NAME OF VOTE 15] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Capital single-year expenditure sub-total 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total Capital Expenditure - Vote 


43,406 

31,155 

52,192 

70,044 

65,889 

65,889 

65,889 

93,734 

84,107 

73,334 

Capital Expenditure - Functional 












Governance and administration 


720 

1,856 

1,469 

3,370 

2,168 

2,168 

2,168 

1,718 

413 

434 

Executive and council 


166 

1,252 

1,010 

2,070 

2,008 

2,008 

2,008 

1,568 

255 

268 

Finance and administration 

Internal audit 


554 

604 

460 

1,300 

160 

160 

160 

150 

158 

166 

Community and public safety 


1,802 

218 

1,546 

1,952 

456 

456 

456 

2,422 

2,548 

2,680 

Community and social services 

Sport and recreation 

Public safety 

Housing 

Health 


1,802 

218 

1,546 

1,952 

456 

456 

456 

2,422 

2,548 

2,680 

Economic and environmental services 


40,508 

28,738 

48,915 

64,722 

63,265 

63,265 

63,265 

89,595 

81,030 

70,098 

Planning and development 


19 

96 

59 

900 

- 

- 

- 

450 

53 

55 

Road transport 

Environmental protection 


40,489 

28,642 

48,856 

63,822 

63,265 

63,265 

63,265 

89,145 

80,978 

70,042 

Trading services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Energy sources 

Water management 

Waste water management 

Waste management 












Other 












Total Capital Expenditure - Functional 

3 

43,029 

30,812 

51,931 

70,044 

65,889 

65,889 

65,889 

93,734 

83,991 

73,212 

Funded by: 












National Government 


40,302 

28,248 

45,081 

60,339 

52,897 

52,897 

52,897 

59,645 

47,145 

48,916 

Provincial Government 

District Municipality 

Other transfers and grants 






7,442 

7,442 

7,442 

26,775 

33,780 

21,071 

Transfers recognised - capital 

4 

40,302 

28,248 

45,081 

60,339 

60,339 

60,339 

60,339 

86,420 

80,925 

69,987 

Public contributions & donations 

5 











Borrowing 

Internally generated funds 

6 

2,728 

2,564 

6,850 

9,705 

5,550 

5,550 

5,550 

7,314 

3,066 

3,225 

Total Capital Funding 

7 

43,029 

30,812 

51,931 

70,044 

65,889 

65,889 

65,889 

93,734 

83,991 

73,212 


264 | P a § 6 Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 






































FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


5.1.3 Cash Flow Statement 

Table 5.2: Budgeted Cash Flows, (A7) 


EC154 Port St Johns ■ Table A7 Budgeted Cash Flows 


Description 

Ref 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 


Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Pre-audit 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 


Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

outcome 

2018/19 

+1 2019/20 

+2 2020/21 

CASH FLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES 
Receipts 












Property rates 


2,135 

5,113 

5,876 

11,700 

10,000 

10,000 


2,946 

3,099 

2,897 

Service charges 


317 

260 

430 

100 

600 

600 

29 

1,000 

1,052 

1,107 

Other revenue 


1,085 

23,367 

14,216 

26,928 

1,480 

1,480 

13,757 

22,595 

23,770 

26,042 

Government - operating 

1 

130,318 

149,933 

173,869 

130,627 

130,173 

130,173 

57,331 

142,974 

152,331 

164,311 

Government - capital 

1 




60,339 

60,339 

60,339 

16,049 

86,420 

80,925 

69,987 

Interest 


1,059 

1,784 

3,837 

4,700 

2,000 

2,000 

0 

3,052 

3,211 

3,378 

Dividends 

Payments 









- 

- 

- 

Suppliers and employees 


(86,895) 

(123,795) 

(127,991) 

(155,951) 

(211,615) 

(211,615) 

(37,805) 

(163,170) 

(172,747) 

(193,200) 

Finance charges 


(7,151) 

(i) 

(5) 

(350) 

(350) 

(350) 


(368) 

(387) 

(407) 

Transfers and Grants 

1 

(618) 



(8,050) 

(8,050) 

(8,050) 

(160) 

(8,469) 

(8,909) 

(9,372) 

NET CASH FR0M/(USED) OPERATING ACTIVITIES 

40,250 

56,662 

70,232 

70,043 

(15,423) 

(15,423) 

49,201 

86,980 

82,344 

64,742 

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES 
Receipts 












Proceeds on disposal of PPE 



466 






- 

- 

- 

Decrease (Increase) in non-current debtors 









2,738 

- 

- 

Decrease (increase) other non-current receivables 







1,594 

- 

- 

- 

Decrease (increase) in non-current investments 

Payments 








(60,349) 

- 

“ 

“ 

Capital assets 


(25,744) 

(20,331) 

(51,469) 

(70,043) 

(70,044) 

(70,044) 


(83,420) 

(80,925) 

(69,987) 

NET CASH FROM/(USED) INVESTING ACTIVITIES 

(25,744) 

(19,865) 

(51,469) 

(70,043) 

(70,044) 

(70,044) 

(58,755) 

(80,682) 

(80,925) 

(69,987) 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES 
Receipts 












Short term loans 









- 

- 

- 

Borrowing long term/refinancing 









- 

- 

- 

Increase (decrease) in consumer deposits 

Payments 









“ 

” 

" 

Repay ment of borrow ing 


(19,570) 

(9,150) 

(6,454) 





- 

- 

- 

NET CASH FROM/(USED) FINANCING ACTIVITIES 

(19,570) 

(9,150) 

(6,454) 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

NET INCREASE/ (DECREASE) IN CASH HELD 


(5,064) 

27,646 

12,309 

- 

(85,467) 

(85,467) 

(9,553) 

6,298 

1,419 

(5,245) 

Cash/cash equivalents at the year begin: 

2 

14,711 

9,647 

37,294 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,378 

50,000 

56,298 

57,717 

Cash/cash equivalents at the year end: 

2 

9,647 

37,294 

49,602 

5,000 

(80,467) 

(80,467) 

(4,175) 

56,298 

57,717 

52,472 


265 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




























_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR_ 

5.1.4 Alignment Of The Municipal Budget With The Municipal Goals And 
Objectives 

Table 5.3: Alignment with Operating Revenue Budget 

EC154 Port St Johns - Supporting Table SA4 Reconciliation of IDP strategic objectives and budget (revenue) 


EC154 Port St Johns - Supporting Table SA4 Reconciliation of IDP strategic objectives and budget (revenue) 


Strategic Objective 

Goal 

Goal 

Code 

Ref 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 




Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

R thousand 




Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

2018/19 

+1 2019/20 

+2 2020/21 

To promote a culture of 
participation, civic 
responsibility and good 
governance and active 
citizenry by June 2019 

Promote knowledge and 

awareness both internal and 







29,501 

20,471 

20,471 

22,092 

24,343 

26,220 

external by June 2019 

To have a fully compliant 
municipality by June 2019 








9,030 

9,030 

9,745 

10,738 

11,566 

To Ensure effective revenue 




108,933 

134,983 

144,301 

63,120 

27,222 

27,222 

47,794 

51,242 

54,545 

management by June 2022 

To ensure adherence to all 

Supply Chain and asset 
Management Prescripts by 

2019 

To have an Improved and 
adequate provision of Social 
and community development 
Services by June 2019 




936 

856 

804 

11,103 

11,603 

11,603 

13,313 

14,391 

15,459 

Reduced unemployment by 




1,333 

1,028 



5,596 

5,596 

6,039 

6,654 

7,167 

June 2019 

Ensure effective monitoring of 
compliance in relation to 
management of payroll, 
employee benefits and 
allowances by June 2019 

To promote and enhance 
development of productive 
sectors focusing on 
agriculture, tourism, ocean 
economy by June 2019 
Increased economic activity 
by June 2019 




3,650 


99 

8,200 

8,200 

8,200 

8,849 

9,751 

10,503 

To leverage public and private 

sector resources for economic 

infrastructure development by 

June 2019 

Facilitate provision of water 

services and reduction of 

sanitation backlog and provide 
decent sanitation by June 




38,117 

25,427 

49,781 

122,470 

122,470 

122,470 

153,625 

153,023 

147,643 

Allocations to other priorities 


2 










Total Revenue (excluding capital transfers and contributions) 


152,969 

162,294 

194,985 

234,394 

204,592 

204,592 

261,457 

270,143 

273,103 


266 | P 3 g 6 Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 
































_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR_ 

Table 5.4: Alignment with Operating Expenditure Budget 

EC154 Port St Johns - Supporting Table SA5 Reconciliation of IDP strategic objectives and budget (operating 
expenditure) 

Table 5.5: Alignment with Capital Expenditure Budget 

EC154 Port St Johns - Supporting Table SA6 Reconciliation of IDP strategic objectives 
and budget (capital expenditure) 


EC154 Port St Johns - Supporting Table SA5 Reconciliation of IDP strategic objectives and budget (operating expenditure) 


Strategic Objective 


Goal 

Goal 

Code 

Ref 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 





Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Budget Year j Budget Year 

Budget Year 

R thousand 





Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

2018/19 j +1 2019/20 

+2 2020/21 

To promote a culture of 
participation, civic 
responsibility and good 





26,563 

30,077 

38,288 

56,439 

34,425 

34,425 

35,280 1 37,156 

42,972 

Promote knowledge and 

awareness both internal and 

external by June 2019 

To have a fully compliant 
municipality by June 2019 











22,423 i 23,732 

25,119 

To ensure effective 

expenditure management by 

June 2018 

To ensure adherence to all 

Supply Chain and asset 
Management Prescripts by 





53,410 

55,282 

57,721 

58,940 

40,328 

40,328 

40,036 j 42,173 

i 

i 

55,957 

To have an Improved and 
adequate provision of Social 
and community development 





17,048 

11,162 

23,008 

28,511 

23,940 

23,940 

25,458 | 27,023 

28,893 

Reduced unemployment by 

June 2019 





19,052 

15,995 

12,694 


14,548 

14,548 

15,473 i 16,460 

i 

17,512 

Ensure effective monitoring of 
compliance in relation to 
management of pay roll, 

To promote and enhance 
development of productive 
sectors focusing on 

Increased economic activity 
by June 2019 





11,980 

15,615 

10,109 

18,565 

17,148 

17,148 

1 

i 

18,430 19,523 

i 

i 

i 

20,683 

To leverage public and private 

sector resources for economic 

infrastructure development by 

June 2019 

Facilitate provision of water 

services and reduction of 

sanitation backlog and provide 
decent sanitation by June 

2019 





12,221 

13,704 

12,307 

110,452 

137,304 

137,304 

i 

61,035 ] 64,503 

i 

i 

i 

i 

i 

i 

i 

86,381 

Allocations to other priorities 








| 


Total Expenditure 

1 

140,274 

141,835 

154,128 

272,906 

267,693 

267,693 

218,135 | 230,570 

277,518 


267 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 
























_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 

5.2 BUDGET IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 


The following tables summarises the capital Budget for 2018/19 and two outer years 

Table 5.6: FINAL ANNUAL BUDGET 2018/19 - 2020/21 MEDIUM TERM REVENUE & EXPENDITURE 
FRAMEWORK 


268 | 5 a § e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


FINAL ANNUAL BUDGET 2018/19 - 2020/21 MEDIUM TERM REVENUE & EXPENDITURE FRAMEWORK 


Department Costing Alloc 

Municipal ManagerAccounting Officer ORTambo intervention 
Infrastructural EngineeringRoads Storm Small Town Revitalization 
Executive CouncilMunicipal Council Grant Gov-NT:Equitable share 
Executive CouncilMayor Grant Gov-NT:Equitable Share 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office Grant Gov-NT:Equitable Share 
LEDAdministration Grant Gov- NT:Equitable Share 

Municipal ManagerAccounting Officer Grant Gov- NT:Equitable Share 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Grant Gov- NT:Equitable Share 
Corporate Services Administration Grant Gov- NT:Equitable Share 
Community Services Administration Grant Gov- NT:Equitable Share 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads Storm Grant Gov- NT:Equitable Share 
Community Services Administration Grant Gov- DSRAC Library 

Community Serv ices Waste Managemen Refuse Charges 
Community Serv ices Traffic Department Traffic Fines 
Community Serv ices Traffic Department Traffic Fines 
Community ServicesParks Cemetdes M Grave Sites 
Financial Services Administration Interest Received 

Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Assessment Rates 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Assessment Rates 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Assessment Rates 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Assessment Rates 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Assessment Rates 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Assessment Rates 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Assessment Rates 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Assessment Rates 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Assessment Rates 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Assessment Rates 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Plan Fees 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Plan Fees 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Trade Licences 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Lease Rental Income 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Rental - Halls 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Rental of Plant and equipment 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Grant Gov- NT:Mun Fin Man 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Interest received from Debtors 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Interest received from Debtors 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Interest received from Debtors 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Interest received from Debtors 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Interest received from Debtors 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Interest received from Debtors 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Sundry Income 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Sundry Income 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Sundry Income 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Sundry Income 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Sundry Income 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Sundry Income 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Sundry Income 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec VAT Refunds 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Financial Management support 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Traffic revenue 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Traffic revenue 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Traffic revenue 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Traffic revenue 
Financial ServicesRevenue Debt Collec Traffic revenue 
Financial Services Payroll Services Commission received 

Financial Services Payroll Services Tender Documents 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads Storm Electrification programme 
Infrastructural EngineeringRoads Storm EPWP Grant 
Infrastructural EngineeringRoads Storm Municipal Infrastructure Grant 


Costing 

Alloc 

Annual 

budget 

201819 

Annual 

budget 

201920 

Annual 

budget 

202021 

9 / 106 - 412-6515 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

9 / 118 - 434-8001 

- 23775000.00 

- 33780000.00 

- 21071000.00 

9 / 200 - 352-5785 

- 12455746.26 

- 13725098.29 

- 14783197.55 

9 / 202 - 352-5785 

- 3120951.15 

- 3439004.01 

- 3704124.70 

9 / 204 - 352-5785 

- 6514931.57 

- 7178861.41 

- 7732296.27 

9 / 206 - 352-5785 

- 8849169.93 

- 9750979.55 

- 10502704.89 

9 / 208 - 352-5785 

- 9744878.59 

- 10737968.94 

- 11565783.56 

9 / 238 - 352-5785 

- 12024079.43 

- 13249440.75 

- 14270870.48 

9 / 212 - 352-5785 

- 6039018.89 

- 6654448.97 

- 7167455.68 

9 / 220 - 352-5785 

- 11550325.09 

- 12727406.60 

- 13708591.52 

9 / 254 - 352-5785 

- 65429899.10 

- 72097791.48 

- 77655975.34 

9 / 220 - 350-5751 

- 500000.00 

- 335000.00 

- 353000.00 

9 / 226 - 326-5415 

- 1000000.00 

- 1052000.00 

- 1106704.00 

9 / 228 - 340-5701 

- 105200.00 

- 110670.40 

- 116425.26 

9 / 228 - 340-5703 

- 105200.00 

- 110670.40 

- 116425.26 

9 / 230 - 322-5413 

- 52600.00 

- 55335.20 

- 58212.63 

9 / 232 - 338-5651 

- 2000000.00 

- 2104000.00 

- 2213408.00 

9 / 238 - 320-5231 

- 867900.00 

- 913030.80 

- 960508.40 

9 / 238 - 320-5233 

- 1472800.00 

- 1549385.60 

- 1629953.65 

9 / 238 - 320-5235 

- 1472800.00 

- 1549385.60 

- 1629953.65 

9 / 238 - 320-5237 

- 867900.00 

- 913030.80 

- 960508.40 

9 / 238 - 320-5239 

- 867900.00 

- 913030.80 

- 960508.40 

9 / 238 - 320-5241 

- 1472800.00 

- 1549385.60 

- 1629953.65 

9 / 238 - 320-5243 

- 1472800.00 

- 1549385.60 

- 1629953.65 

9 / 238 - 320-5245 

- 867900.00 

- 913030.80 

- 960508.40 

9 / 238 - 320-5247 

- 736400.00 

- 774692.80 

- 814976.83 

9 / 238 - 320-5249 

- 420800.00 

- 442681.60 

- 465701.04 

9 / 238 - 324-5401 

- 26300.00 

- 27667.60 

- 29106.32 

9 / 238 - 324-5409 

- 26300.00 

- 27667.60 

- 29106.32 

9 / 238 - 328-5417 

- 100000.00 

- 105200.00 

- 110670.40 

9 / 238 - 332-5401 

- 50000.00 

- 52600.00 

- 55335.20 

9 / 238 - 334-5401 

- 21040.00 

- 22134.08 

- 23285.05 

9 / 238 - 336-5401 

- 500000.00 

- 526000.00 

- 553352.00 

9 / 238 - 354-5757 

- 1970000.00 

- 2435000.00 

- 2867000.00 

9 / 238 - 362-5953 

- 175333.33 

- 184450.67 

- 194042.10 

9 / 238 - 362-5961 

- 175333.33 

- 184450.67 

- 194042.10 

9 / 238 - 362-5963 

- 175333.33 

- 184450.67 

- 194042.10 

9 / 238 - 362-5971 

- 175333.33 

- 184450.67 

- 194042.10 

9 / 238 - 362-5975 

- 175333.33 

- 184450.67 

- 194042.10 

9 / 238 - 362-5977 

- 175333.33 

- 184450.67 

- 194042.10 

9 / 238 - 364-5951 

- 7514.29 

- 7905.03 

- 8316.09 

9 / 238 - 364-5955 

- 7514.29 

- 7905.03 

- 8316.09 

9 / 238 - 364-5959 

- 7514.29 

- 7905.03 

- 8316.09 

9 / 238 - 364-5965 

- 7514.29 

- 7905.03 

- 8316.09 

9 / 238 - 364-5969 

- 7514.29 

- 7905.03 

- 8316.09 

9 / 238 - 364-5973 

- 7514.29 

- 7905.03 

- 8316.09 

9 / 238 - 364-5981 

- 7514.29 

- 7905.03 

- 8316.09 

9 / 238 - 368-5979 

- 18000000.00 

- 18936000.00 

- 19920672.00 

9 / 240 - 346-5783 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

9 / 242 - 330-5403 

- 210400.00 

- 221340.80 

- 232850.52 

9 / 242 - 330-5405 

- 210400.00 

- 221340.80 

- 232850.52 

9 / 242 - 330-5407 

- 210400.00 

- 221340.80 

- 232850.52 

9 / 242 - 330-5411 

- 210400.00 

- 221340.80 

- 232850.52 

9 / 242 - 330-5419 

- 210400.00 

- 221340.80 

- 232850.52 

9 / 248 - 360-5957 

- 100000.00 

- 105200.00 

- 110670.40 

9 / 248 - 366-5967 

- 300000.00 

- 315600.00 

- 332011.20 

9 / 254 - 342-5777 

- 25940000.00 

- 12800000.00 

- 12800000.00 

9 / 254 - 344-5763 

9 / 254 - 356-5755 

- 4775000.00 

- 33705000.00 

- 34345000.00 

- 36116000.00 


269 | P a g e 


Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




270 | 


FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Department 

Costing Alloc 

Costing 

Alloc 

Annual 

budget 

201819 

Annual 

budget 

201920 

Annual budget 

202021 

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE 






Executive CouncilMayor 

Computers & accessories 

9/100-408- 

6511 

20000.00 

21040.00 

22134.08 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Motor Vehicles 

9/100-422- 

6509 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Furniture & Fittings 

9/102-414- 

6517 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Motor Vehicles 

9/102-422- 

6509 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Office Space 

9/102-426- 

6567 

300000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Furniture and Fittings 

9/102-427- 

6568 

10000.00 

10520.00 

11067.04 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Buildings and Installations 

9/102-428- 

6569 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Computer and accessories 

9/102-429- 

6510 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

LEDAdministration 

Computers and accessories 


50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

LEDAdministration 

Motor vehicle 

9/104-400- 

6251 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Office park homes 

9/104-404- 

6255 

400000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Computers & accessories 

9/106-408- 

6510 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Office park homes 

9/106-409- 

6512 

400000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Motor vehicle 

9/106-410- 

6513 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

PA System 


25000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Portable Backup Generator 


200000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Furniture and Fittings 

9/106-411- 

6514 

60000.00 

63120.00 

66402.24 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Motor vehicle 

9/108-400- 

6509 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Computers & accessories 

9/108-408- 

6511 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Cemetery Management System 

9/110-406- 

6503 

300000.00 

315600.00 

332011.20 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Computers accessories 

9/110-407- 

8003 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Pound 

9/110-409- 

8004 

300000.00 

315600.00 

332011.20 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility - Beach Eq 

9/110-416- 

6565 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility -Bush / brush 

Cutters 

9/110-418- 

6507 

56252.00 

59177.10 

62254.31 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Motor Vehicles 

9/110-422- 

6509 

500000.00 

526000.00 

553352.00 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Outdoor Gymnasium 

9/110-428- 

300000.00 

315600.00 

332011.20 


Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 




6505 




Community ServicesAdministration 

Parkhome 


400000.00 

420800.00 

442681.60 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Maintenance of Parks 


200000.00 

210400.00 

221340.80 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Shelter for beach equipment 

9/110-432- 

6565 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 

Community ServicesTraffic 

Department 

Security &Traffic Equipment 

9/112-402- 

6253 

165600.00 

174211.20 

183270.18 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Computers & accessories 

9/114-408- 

6511 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Furniture & Fittings 

9/114-414- 

6517 

50,000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Motor Vehicles 

9/116-422- 

6509 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP 

9/118-424- 

6521 

7477319.00 

3900000.00 

7925958.14 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP 

9/118-424- 

6523 

6069704.00 

2369495.70 

6433886.24 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP- Gabelana 

to noqhekwana 

9/118-424- 

6525 

3355000.00 

6885042.30 

3556300.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP 

9/118-424- 

6527 

6667959.00 

4300000.10 

5709756.54 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP 

9/118-424- 

6529 

2014000.00 

13577877.90 

2134840.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP 

9/118-424- 

6531 

2894288.00 

1512584.00 

3067945.28 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP-PMU 

9/118-424- 

6533 

2255000.00 

0.00 

2390300.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP 

9/118-424- 

6535 

617911.00 

0.00 

654985.66 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP 

9/118-424- 

6537 

360377.00 

0.00 

381999.62 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP 

9/118-424- 

6539 

409098.00 

0.00 

433643.88 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP 

9/118-424- 

6541 

442941.00 

0.00 

469517.46 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP 

9/118-424- 

6543 

260284.00 

0.00 

275901.04 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP 

9/118-424- 

6545 

306458.00 

0.00 

324845.48 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP- Zinyosini 

9/118-424- 

6547 

399661.00 

0.00 

423640.66 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Municipal Infrastructur Grant EXP - 

9/118-424- 

8002 

175000.00 

1800000.00 

1932480.00 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringStormwater Drainage 

EPWP grant expenditure 

9/120-412- 

6501 

4400000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringStormwater Drainage 

EPWP grant expenditure 

9/120-412- 

6563 

250000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringStormwater Drainage 

EPWP grant expenditure 

9/120-412- 

6564 

125000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringStormwater Drainage 

Plant & Vehicles 

9/120-430- 

6509 

500000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringStormwater Drainage 

Small town revitalization 

9/120-434- 

6519 

23775000.00 

33780000.00 

21071000.00 


271 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Infrastructural 

EngineeringStormwater Drainage 

Computer and accessories 

9/120-435- 

6511 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Electrification Programme - Mfadaleni/ 

Mahlathini 

9/122-410- 

6549 

2120000.00 

2247200.00 

2382032.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Electrification Programme- Mpotshotsho 

9/122-410- 

6551 

2800000.00 

2968000.00 

3146080.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Electrification Programme-Buchele 

9/122-410- 

6553 

2800000.00 

2968000.00 

3146080.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Electrification Programme-Nonyevu/ Zwelitsha 

3600000.00 

3816000.00 

3276960.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Electrification Programme-Tuweni/Maplotini 

2120000.00 

800800.00 

848848.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Electrification Programme-Jambeni 

9/122-410- 

6555 

6260000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Electrification Programme- Majola 

9/122-410- 

6557 

2120000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Electrification Programme- Nomvalo 

9/122-410- 

6559 

1960000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Electrification Programme-Lujazo 

9/122-410- 

6561 

2160000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Parkhome engineering 

9/122-411- 

8005 

400000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Parkhome Councillors 


400000.00 






93734452.00 

83991003.50 

73212435.69 







EXECUTIVE AND COUNCIL 






EMPLOYEE RELATED COSTS 






Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Allowances 

9/200-2-14 

493778.70 

530120.81 

569137.71 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Allowances 

9/200-2-38 

2053597.11 

2204741.86 

2367010.86 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Allowances 

9/200-2-40 

631632.16 

678120.29 

728029.94 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Allowances 

9/200-2-62 

190500.66 

204521.51 

219574.29 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Allowances 

9/200-2-64 

142875.76 

153391.42 

164681.03 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Allowances 

9/200-2-92 

617223.38 

662651.02 

711422.13 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Allowances 

9/200-2- 

102 

176802.80 

189815.48 

203785.90 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Allowances 

9/200-2- 

134 

618422.37 

663938.26 

712804.12 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Allowances 

9/200-2- 

152 

463804.86 

497940.90 

534589.35 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Allowances 

9/200-2- 

162 

914478.31 

981783.91 

1054043.21 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Allowances 

9/200-2- 

168 

5234123.15 

5619354.62 

6032939.12 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Allowances 

9/200-2- 

172 

1607793.30 

1726126.89 

1853169.82 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Allowances 

9/200-2- 

178 

152400.74 

163617.44 

175659.68 




13297433.31 

14276124.40 

15326847.15 

Repairs and maintenance 






Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Buildings & Installations 

9/200-44- 

3003 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Repairs & Maintanance Furniture & Fittin 

9/200-48- 

11151.20 

11731.06 

12341.08 


272 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 




3011 







11151.20 

11731.06 

12341.08 

Expenses 






Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Accomodation 

9/200-80- 

3531 

1000000.00 

1052000.00 

1106704.00 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Books & Publications 

9/200-88- 

3365 

20000.00 

21040.00 

22134.08 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Community Participation & Roadshows 

9/200-100- 

3565 

142866.32 

150295.36 

158110.72 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Community Participation & Roadshows 

9/200-100- 

3567 

142866.32 

150295.36 

158110.72 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Community Participation & Roadshows 

9/200-100- 

3569 

142866.32 

150295.36 

158110.72 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Consumables & Beverages 

9/200-110- 

3571 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Fuel & Oil 

9/200-132- 

3317 

157800.00 

166005.60 

174637.89 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Hire - External Transport 

9/200-180- 

3555 

33664.00 

35414.53 

37256.08 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Lease repayment 

9/200-204- 

5001 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Licence Fees 

9/200-214- 

3573 

5260.00 

5533.52 

5821.26 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Meals & Entertainment 

9/200-218- 

3515 

57800.00 

60805.60 

63967.49 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Membership fees 

9/200-224- 

3587 

894200.00 

940698.40 

989614.72 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Printing & Stationary 

9/200-236- 

3575 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Printing & Stationary 

9/200-236- 

3577 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Printing & Stationary 

9/200-236- 

3579 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Printing & Stationary 

9/200-236- 

3581 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Printing & Stationary 

9/200-236- 

3583 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/200-270- 

3341 

28571.00 

30056.69 

31619.64 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/200-270- 

3357 

8571.00 

9016.69 

9485.56 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/200-270- 

3395 

250000.00 

263000.00 

276676.00 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/200-270- 

3421 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/200-270- 

3531 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/200-270- 

3551 

28571.00 

30056.69 

31619.64 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/200-270- 

3559 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 

Executive 

CouncilMunicipal Council 

Support to Traditional Authorities 

9/200-280- 

3585 

108327.03 

113960.04 

119885.96 


273 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Climate change and asset management 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Telephone 

9/200-282- 

3589 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 

Executive CouncilMunicipal Council 

Training 

9/200-294- 

8006 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 










3479162.98 

3660079.45 

3850403.58 

TOTAL FOR EXECUTIVE AND COUNCIL 


16787747.48 

17947934.91 







MAYORS OFFICE 






EMPLOYEE RELATED COSTS 






Executive CouncilMayor 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/202-10- 

12 

8146.48 

8746.06 

9389.77 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/202-10- 

18 

8146.48 

8746.06 

9389.77 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/202-10- 

66 

8146.48 

8746.06 

9389.77 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/202-10- 

116 

83298.48 

89429.24 

96011.24 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/202-10- 

132 

8146.48 

8746.06 

9389.77 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/202-10- 

144 

8146.48 

8746.06 

9389.77 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/202-10- 

148 

8146.48 

8746.06 

9389.77 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Contributions - Pension Fund 

9/202-16- 

32 

343204.15 

368463.98 

395582.93 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Insurance - UIF 

9/202-24- 

108 

8498.62 

9124.12 

9795.65 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Levy - Bargaining Council 

9/202-28- 

120 

494.93 

531.36 

570.46 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Overtime Pay 

9/202-32- 

30 

22447.90 

24100.07 

25873.83 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Overtime Pay 

9/202-32- 

46 

975.90 

1047.73 

1124.84 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Overtime Pay 

9/202-32- 

98 

975.90 

1047.73 

1124.84 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Overtime Pay 

9/202-32- 

138 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Salaries 

9/202-40- 

24 

2280299.56 

2417117.53 

2562144.59 




2789074.31 

2963338.10 

3148566.99 

Repairs & Maintenance 






Executive CouncilMayor 

Repairs & Maintenance Furniture & Fittin 

9/202-60- 

3011 

20000.00 

21040.00 

22134.08 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Repairs & Maintenance Electricity 

9/202-246- 

3591 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Vehicles & Implements 

9/202-74- 

3019 

105200.00 

110670.40 

116425.26 




125200.00 

131710.40 

138559.34 

Expenses 






Executive CouncilMayor 

Accomodation 

9/202-80- 

165600.00 

174211.20 

183270.18 


274 | 5 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 




3531 




Executive CouncilMayor 

Advertising 

9/202-82- 

3455 

73640.00 

77469.28 

81497.68 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Advertising 

9/202-82- 

3499 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Advertising 

9/202-82- 

3511 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Advertising 

9/202-82- 

3521 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Communication & Media 

9/202-96- 

3441 

55200.00 

58070.40 

61090.06 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Consumables & Beverages 

9/202-110- 

3571 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Fuel & Oil 

9/202-132- 

3317 

126240.00 

132804.48 

139710.31 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Disable 

9/202-148- 

3437 

45000.00 

47340.00 

49801.68 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Disable 

9/202-148- 

3491 

10200.00 

10730.40 

11288.38 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Disable 

9/202-148- 

3515 

44800.00 

47129.60 

49580.34 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Elderly 

9/202-150- 

3491 

35,000.00 

36820.00 

38734.64 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Elderly 

9/202-150- 

3515 

50,000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Elderly 

20,000.00 

21040.00 

22134.08 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - HIV & A 

9/202-152- 

3413 

25000.00 

26300.00 

27667.60 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - HIV & A 

9/202-152- 

3491 

40000.00 

42080.00 

44268.16 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - HIV & A 

9/202-152- 

3515 

40000.00 

42080.00 

44268.16 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Local 

Mayors Youth Development 

9/202-156- 

3413 

6400.00 

6732.80 

7082.91 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Local 

Mayors Youth Development 

9/202-156- 

3437 

40000.00 

42080.00 

44268.16 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Local 

Mayors Youth Development 

9/202-156- 

3455 

15000.00 

15780.00 

16600.56 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Local 

Mayors Youth Development 

9/202-156- 

3475 

400400.00 

421220.80 

443124.28 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Local 

Mayors Youth Development 

9/202-156- 

3491 

19200.00 

20198.40 

21248.72 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Local 

Mayors Youth Development 

9/202-156- 

3515 

19000.00 

19988.00 

21027.38 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Outreac 

9/202-160- 

3325 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Outreac 

9/202-160- 

3413 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Outreac 

9/202-160- 

3491 

220920.00 

232407.84 

244493.05 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Outreac 

9/202-160- 

3515 

231440.00 

243474.88 

256135.57 

Executive CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Youth 

9/202-174- 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 


275 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 




3413 




Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Youth 

9/202-174- 

3491 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Youth 

9/202-174- 

3515 

35000.00 

36820.00 

38734.64 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Youth 

9/202-174- 

3531 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Youth 

30000.00 

31560.00 

33201.12 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Youth 

40000.00 

42080.00 

44268.16 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Lease repayment 

9/202-204- 

5001 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Licence Fees 

9/202-214- 

3573 

2630.00 

2766.76 

2910.63 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Meals and Entertainment 

9/202-220- 

3515 

20,000.00 

21040.00 

22134.08 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Printing & Stationary 

9/202-236- 

3575 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Printing & Stationary 

9/202-236- 

3577 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Printing & Stationary 

9/202-236- 

3579 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Printing & Stationary 

9/202-236- 

3581 

44160.00 

46456.32 

48872.05 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Printing & Stationary 

9/202-236- 

3583 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Rent - Equipment 

9/202-244- 

3599 

105200.00 

110670.40 

116425.26 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

SAMVA support 

9/202-252- 

3491 

15000.00 

15780.00 

16600.56 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

SAMVA support 

9/202-252- 

3515 

10000.00 

10520.00 

11067.04 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

SAMVA support 

9/202-252- 

3531 

25000.00 

26300.00 

27667.60 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Social Responsibility Programmes 

Women&Children 

9/202-260- 

3593 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Social Responsibility Programmes 

Women&Children 

9/202-260- 

3595 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/202-270- 

3341 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/202-270- 

3357 

10520.00 

11067.04 

11642.53 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/202-270- 

3395 

10520.00 

11067.04 

11642.53 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/202-270- 

3421 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/202-270- 

3531 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/202-270- 

3551 

31560.00 

33201.12 

34927.58 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/202-270- 

3559 

31560.00 

33201.12 

34927.58 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Telephone, Fax & Internet 

9/202-284- 

3449 

105200.00 

110670.40 

116425.26 


276 | '7 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Climate change and asset management 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Executive 

CouncilMayor 

Telephone 

9/202-286- 

3597 

210400.00 

221340.80 

232850.52 




2733310.00 

2875442.12 

3024965.11 

TOTAL FOR MAYORS OFFICE 



5647584.31 

5970490.62 

6312091.44 







SPEAKERS OFFICE 






Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Allowances 

9/204-2-56 

133586.02 

143417.95 

153973.51 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Annual Bonus 

9/204-6- 

174 

564786.77 

564786.77 

980469.83 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Contributions - Medical Aid 

9/204-14- 

116 

293283.31 

293283.31 

509139.83 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Contributions - Pension Fund 

9/204-16- 

112 

647738.06 

647738.06 

1124473.27 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Contributions- UIF 

9/204-20- 

108 

23514.12 

23514.12 

40820.51 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Levy - Bargaining Council 

9/204-28- 

122 

1439.14 

1439.14 

2498.35 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Overtime 

9/204-30- 

26 

8680.00 

0.00 

15068.48 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Overtime 

9/204-30- 

46 

8680.00 

8680.00 

15068.48 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Overtime 

9/204-30- 

98 

8680.00 

8680.00 

15068.48 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Overtime 

9/204-30- 

138 

8680.00 

8680.00 

15068.48 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Salaries 

9/204-40- 

24 

3598542.25 

3598542.25 

6247069.34 




5297609.66 

5298761.59 

9118718.56 

Repairs & Maintenance 






Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Repairs Maintenance Equipment 

9/102-415- 

8007 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Repairs & Maintenance - Motor Vehicles 

9/204-54- 

3019 

60000.00 

63120.00 

66402.24 




60000.00 

63120.00 

66402.24 

Expenses 






Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Accomodation 

9/204-80- 

3531 

150000.00 

157800.00 

166005.60 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Books & Publications 

9/204-88- 

3365 

30000.00 

31560.00 

33201.12 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Congress Fees 

9/204-102- 

3605 

15780.00 

16600.56 

17463.79 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Consumables & Beverages 

9/204-110- 

3571 

15780.00 

16600.56 

17463.79 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Council Chief Whip 

9/204-112- 

3567 

42080.00 

44268.16 

46570.10 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Council Chief Whip 

9/204-112- 

3577 

8416.00 

8853.63 

9314.02 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Council Chief Whip 

9/204-112- 

3581 

12624.00 

13280.45 

13971.03 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Council Chief Whip 

9/204-112- 

3601 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 


277 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Council Chief Whip 

9/204-112- 

3603 

42080.00 

44268.16 

46570.10 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Fuel & Oil 

9/204-132- 

3317 

157800.00 

166005.60 

174637.89 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Open Da 

9/204-158- 

3565 

120,000.00 

126240.00 

132804.48 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Open Da 

9/204-158- 

3567 

225,000.00 

236700.00 

249008.40 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Open Da 

9/204-158- 

3607 

105,000.00 

110460.00 

116203.92 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Lease repayment 

9/204-204- 

5001 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Licence Fees 

9/204-214- 

3573 

5260.00 

5533.52 

5821.26 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Meals and Entertainment 

9/204-220- 

3515 

25000.00 

26300.00 

27667.60 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Printing & Stationary 

9/204-236- 

3575 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Printing & Stationary 

9/204-236- 

3577 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Printing & Stationary 

9/204-236- 

3579 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Printing & Stationary 

9/204-236- 

3581 

42080.00 

44268.16 

46570.10 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Printing & Stationary 

9/204-236- 

3583 

0 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Public Participation 

9/204-238- 

3635 

31560.00 

33201.12 

34927.58 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Public Participation 

9/204-238- 

3639 

31560.00 

33201.12 

34927.58 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Public Participation 

9/204-238- 

3641 

42080.00 

44268.16 

46570.10 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Publications & Marketing materials 

9/204-240- 

3617 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Rent - Equipment 

9/204-244- 

3635 

63120.00 

66402.24 

69855.16 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Subsistence & Travelling Allowances 

9/204-272- 

3621 

105200.00 

110670.40 

116425.26 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Subsistence & Travelling Allowances 

9/204-272- 

3623 

10000 

10520.00 

11067.04 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Subsistence & Travelling Allowances 

9/204-272- 

3625 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Subsistence & Travelling Allowances 

9/204-272- 

3627 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Subsistence & Travelling Allowances 

9/204-272- 

3629 

5000.00 

5260.00 

5533.52 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Subsistence & Travelling Allowances 

9/204-272- 

3631 

59964.00 

63082.13 

66362.40 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Subsistence & Travelling Allowances 

9/204-272- 

3633 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Support to Council & Traditional Authori 

9/204-274- 

3609 

55200.00 

58070.40 

61090.06 

Executive 

CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Support to Council & Traditional Authori 

9/204-274- 

3611 

55200.00 

58070.40 

61090.06 


278 | 3 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Support to Council & Traditional Authori 

9/204-274- 

3613 

60400.00 

63540.80 

66844.92 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Support to S 79 Committees 

9/204-276- 

3437 

55200.00 

58070.40 

61090.06 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Support to S 79 Committees 

9/204-276- 

3461 

107800.00 

113405.60 

119302.69 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Support to S 79 Committees 

9/204-276- 

3467 

55200.00 

58070.40 

61090.06 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Telephone, Fax & Internet 

9/204-284- 

3615 

73640.00 

77469.28 

81497.68 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Telephones 

9/204-288- 

3489 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Training Costs Councillors 

9/204-294- 

3619 

592200.00 

622994.40 

655390.11 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Training Costs Councillors 

9/204-294- 

3621 

157800.00 

166005.60 

174637.89 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Training Ward Committees 

9/204-298- 

3437 

400000.00 

420800.00 

442681.60 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Climate change and asset management 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Executive CouncilSpeaker"s office 

Ward Commitees Stipend 

9/204-308- 

3637 

4000000.00 

4208000.00 

4426816.00 




7171144.00 

7544043.49 

7936333.75 

TOTAL FOR SPEAKERS OFFICE 



12528753.66 

12905925.08 

17121454.55 







LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 




EMPLOYEE RELATED COSTS 






LEDAdministration 

Allowances 

9/206-2-36 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Allowances 

9/206-2-48 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Allowances 

9/206-2-56 

159539.71 

171281.83 

183888.17 

LEDAdministration 

Allowances 

9/206-2-74 

29769.85 

31960.92 

34313.24 

LEDAdministration 

Allowances 

9/206-2-78 

29769.85 

31960.92 

34313.24 

LEDAdministration 

Allowances 

9/206-2-88 

29769.85 

31960.92 

34313.24 

LEDAdministration 

Allowances 

9/206-2- 

126 

29769.85 

31960.92 

34313.24 

LEDAdministration 

Allowances 

9/206-2- 

158 

29769.85 

31960.92 

34313.24 

LEDAdministration 

Allowances 

9/206-2- 

170 

29769.85 

31960.92 

34313.24 

LEDAdministration 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/206-10- 

60 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/206-10- 

112 

218844.78 

234951.75 

252244.20 

LEDAdministration 

Contributions - Pension Fund 

9/206-16- 

112 

525565.85 

564247.50 

605776.11 

LEDAdministration 

Contributions - Pension Fund 

9/206-16- 

166 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Insurance - UIF 

9/206-24- 

104 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Insurance - UIF 

9/206-24- 

108 

16999.38 

18250.54 

19593.78 

LEDAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/206-32- 

26 

32208.00 

34578.51 

37123.49 


279 | 5 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


LEDAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/206-32- 

46 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/206-32- 

98 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/206-32- 

138 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Peformance Bonus 

9/206-34- 

174 

150000.00 

161040.00 

172892.54 

LEDAdministration 

Salaries 

9/206-40- 

24 

3552093.64 

3813527.73 

4094203.37 

LEDAdministration 

Salaries 

9/206-40- 

70 

1413482.44 

1517514.74 

1629203.83 




6247352.91 

6707158.09 

7200804.92 

Repairs & Maintenance 






LEDAdministration 

Repairs & Maintenance - Motor 

9/206-52- 

3021 

31560.00 

33201.12 

34927.58 

LEDAdministration 

Repairs & Maintenance Equipmen 

9/206-56- 

3011 

10520.00 

11067.04 

11642.53 




42080.00 

44268.16 

46570.10 

Expenses 






LEDAdministration 

Accomodation 

9/206-80- 

3531 

276120.00 

290478.24 

305583.11 

LEDAdministration 

Fuel & Oil 

9/206-132- 

3317 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility - Business plan 

9/206-134- 

3567 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility - Business plan 

9/206-134- 

3659 

265600.00 

279411.20 

293940.58 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility - Business plan 

9/206-134- 

3661 

34160.00 

35936.32 

37805.01 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility - Small town 

revitalisation 

9/206-136- 

3575 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility - Small town 

revitalisation 

9/206-136- 

3661 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility - Small town 

revitalisation 

9/206-136- 

3663 

86760.00 

91271.52 

96017.64 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility - Small town 

revitalisation 

9/206-136- 

3665 

76240.00 

80204.48 

84375.11 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility Agri Park 

9/206-138- 

3581 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility Agri Park 

9/206-138- 

3657 

160400.00 

168740.80 

177515.32 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility -Isingqi s 

9/206-140- 

3565 

87400.00 

91944.80 

96725.93 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility -Isingqi s 

9/206-140- 

3567 

40000.00 

42080.00 

44268.16 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility -Isingqi s 

9/206-140- 

3581 

3000.00 

3156.00 

3320.11 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility -Isingqi s 

9/206-140- 

3655 

30000.00 

31560.00 

33201.12 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility -Support 

informal traders( MPATU) 

9/206-142- 

3565 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility -Support 

9/206-142- 

118200.00 

124346.40 

130812.41 


280 | 3 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 



informal traders( MPATU) 

3649 




LEDAdministration 

Grant & Social Responsibility -Support 

informal traders( MPATU) 

9/206-142- 

3667 

150000.00 

157800.00 

166005.60 

LEDAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Bylaws 

9/206-144- 

3567 

31560.00 

33201.12 

34927.58 

LEDAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Bylaws 

9/206-144- 

3575 

73640.00 

77469.28 

81497.68 

LEDAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Cultural 

Insizwa 

9/206-146- 

3565 

3000.00 

3156.00 

3320.11 

LEDAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Cultural 

Insizwa 

9/206-146- 

3567 

30000.00 

31560.00 

33201.12 

LEDAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Cultural 

Insizwa 

9/206-146- 

3645 

30000.00 

31560.00 

33201.12 

LEDAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Isinuka 

9/206-154- 

3649 

150000.00 

157800.00 

166005.60 

LEDAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Isinuka 

9/206-154- 

3651 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Tourism 

9/206-166- 

3565 

84160.00 

88536.32 

93140.21 

LEDAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Tourism 

9/206-166- 

3567 

73640.00 

77469.28 

81497.68 

LEDAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Tourism 

9/206-166- 

3647 

107800.00 

113405.60 

119302.69 

LEDAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Working 

9/206-172- 

3603 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Working 

9/206-172- 

3653 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Lease repayments 

9/206-206- 

5001 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

LED Programmes (PSJ Development 

Agency) 

9/206-208- 

3349 

8468600.00 

8908967.20 

9372233.49 

LEDAdministration 

Licence Fees 

9/206-214- 

3643 

1052.00 

1106.70 

1164.25 

LEDAdministration 

Meals and Entertainment 

9/206-220- 

3515 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

LEDAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/206-236- 

3575 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

LEDAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/206-236- 

3577 

5260.00 

5533.52 

5821.26 

LEDAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/206-236- 

3579 

1052.00 

1106.70 

1164.25 

LEDAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/206-236- 

3581 

35768.00 

37627.94 

39584.59 

LEDAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/206-236- 

3583 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Rent - Equipment 

9/206-244- 

3565 

105200.00 

110670.40 

116425.26 

LEDAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/206-270- 

3661 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

LEDAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/206-270- 

3669 

5260.00 

5533.52 

5821.26 

LEDAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/206-270- 

3671 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

LEDAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/206-270- 

2000.00 

2104.00 

2213.41 


281 | 3 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 




3673 




LEDAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/206-270- 

3675 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

LEDAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/206-270- 

3677 

84160.00 

88536.32 

93140.21 

LEDAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/206-270- 

3679 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

LEDAdministration 

Climate change and asset management 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

LEDAdministration 

Support to small scale farmers 

9/206-278- 

3329 

76240.00 

80204.48 

84375.11 

LEDAdministration 

Support to small scale farmers 

9/206-278- 

3437 

73640.00 

77469.28 

81497.68 

LEDAdministration 

Support to small scale farmers 

9/206-278- 

3445 

20000.00 

21040.00 

22134.08 

LEDAdministration 

Support to small scale farmers 

9/206-278- 

3475 

328720.00 

345813.44 

363795.74 

LEDAdministration 

Telephone 

9/206-282- 

3589 

57000.00 

59964.00 

63082.13 

LEDAdministration 

Training Costs 

9/206-292- 

3605 

105200.00 

110670.40 

116425.26 

LEDAdministration 

Training of SMME Cooperation 

9/206-296- 

3399 

40000.00 

42080.00 

44268.16 

LEDAdministration 

Training of SMME Cooperation 

9/206-296- 

3475 

40000.00 

42080.00 

44268.16 

LEDAdministration 

Training of SMME Cooperation 

9/206-296- 

3515 

30000.00 

31560.00 

33201.12 




11772272.00 

12384430.14 

13028420.51 

TOTAL FOR LED 



18061704.91 

19135856.39 

20275795.54 







MUNICIPAL MANAGERS OFFICE 






EMPLOYEE RELATED COSTS 






Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Allowances 

9/208-2-16 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Allowances 

9/208-2-24 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Allowances 

9/208-2-26 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Allowances 

9/208-2-56 

197225.69 

211741.50 

227325.67 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Allowances 

9/208-2-90 

78890.28 

84696.60 

90930.27 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Allowances 

9/208-2- 

124 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Allowances 

9/208-2- 

146 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Allowances 

9/208-2- 

156 

118335.41 

127044.90 

136395.40 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Allowances 

9/208-2- 

158 

78890.28 

84696.60 

90930.27 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/208-10- 

100 

150400.62 

161470.11 

173354.31 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/208-10- 

116 

150400.62 

161470.11 

173354.31 


282 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Contributions - Pension Fund 

9/208-16- 

112 

362876.80 

389584.53 

418257.95 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Contributions - Pension Fund 

9/208-16- 

164 

362876.80 

389584.53 

418257.95 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Insurance - UIF 

9/208-24-4 

6705.71 

7199.25 

7729.11 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Insurance - UIF 

9/208-24- 

108 

13411.41 

14398.49 

15458.22 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Overtime 

9/208-30- 

26 

17500.00 

18788.00 

20170.80 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Overtime 

9/208-30- 

46 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Overtime 

9/208-30- 

98 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Overtime 

9/208-30- 

138 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Performance Bonus 

9/208-38- 

174 

182000.00 

195395.20 

209776.29 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Salaries 

9/208-40- 

24 

4055781.66 

4354287.19 

4674762.73 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Salaries 

9/208-40- 

124 

834981.66 

896436.31 

962414.03 




6610276.94 

7096793.33 

7619117.32 

Repairs and Maintenance 






Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Buildings 

9/208-42- 

3003 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 




0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Expenses 






Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Audit Committee Fees 

9/208-76- 

3251 

160000.00 

168320.00 

177072.64 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Audit Committee Fees 

9/208-76- 

3253 

60000.00 

63120.00 

66402.24 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Audit Committee Fees 

9/208-76- 

3257 

20000.00 

21040.00 

22134.08 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Audit Committee Fees 

9/208-76- 

3259 

70000.00 

73640.00 

77469.28 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Audit Costs 

9/208-78- 

3255 

5260000.00 

5533520.00 

5821263.04 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Accomodation 

9/208-80- 

3531 

110400.00 

116140.80 

122180.12 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Advertising 

9/208-82- 

3323 

40000.00 

42080.00 

44268.16 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Advertising 

9/208-82- 

3353 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Advertising 

9/208-82- 

3455 

70000.00 

73640.00 

77469.28 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Advertising 

9/208-82- 

3521 

30000.00 

31560.00 

33201.12 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Books & Publications 

9/208-88- 

3365 

10000.00 

10520.00 

11067.04 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Communications 

9/208-98- 

3505 

110000.00 

115720.00 

121737.44 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Communications 

9/208-98- 

400000.00 

420800.00 

442681.60 


283 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Officer 


3509 




Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Communications 

9/208-98- 

3689 

80000.00 

84160.00 

88536.32 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Consultants & Proffesional Fees 

9/208-108- 

3507 

200000.00 

210400.00 

221340.80 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Consultants & Proffesional Fees 

9/208-108- 

3681 

450000.00 

473400.00 

498016.80 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Consultants & Proffesional Fees 

9/208-108- 

3683 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Consumables & Beverages 

9/208-110- 

3481 

15000.00 

15780.00 

16600.56 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

IDP Programme 

9/208-186- 

3399 

300000.00 

315600.00 

332011.20 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

IDP Programme 

9/208-186- 

3413 

200000.00 

210400.00 

221340.80 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

IDP Programme 

9/208-186- 

3515 

150000.00 

157800.00 

166005.60 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

IDP Programme 

9/208-186- 

3543 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Insurance - General 

9/208-190- 

3443 

1500000.00 

1578000.00 

1660056.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Legal Fees 

9/208-210- 

3327 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Legal Fees 

9/208-210- 

3347 

1000000.00 

1052000.00 

1106704.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Legal Fees 

9/208-210- 

3429 

2000000.00 

2104000.00 

2213408.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Meals and Entertainment 

9/208-220- 

3515 

10000.00 

10520.00 

11067.04 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Media Fees 

9/208-222- 

3575 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Media Fees 

9/208-222- 

3685 

150000.00 

157800.00 

166005.60 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Membership Fees 

9/208-224- 

3687 

3500.00 

3682.00 

3873.46 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Perfomance Management System 

9/208-230- 

3303 

1000000.00 

1052000.00 

1106704.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Perfomance Management System 

9/208-230- 

3413 

20000.00 

21040.00 

22134.08 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Perfomance Management System 

9/208-230- 

3515 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Printing & Stationary 

9/208-236- 

3365 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Printing & Stationary 

9/208-236- 

3379 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Printing & Stationary 

9/208-236- 

3405 

5000.00 

5260.00 

5533.52 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Printing & Stationary 

9/208-236- 

3475 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Printing & Stationary 

9/208-236- 

3487 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Rent - Equipment 

9/208-244- 

3413 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Subscriptions 

9/208-268- 

10000.00 

10520.00 

11067.04 


284 | 3 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Officer 


3687 




Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/208-270- 

3341 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/208-270- 

3357 

20000.00 

21040.00 

22134.08 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/208-270- 

3395 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/208-270- 

3421 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/208-270- 

3531 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/208-270- 

3551 

20000.00 

21040.00 

22134.08 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/208-270- 

3559 

30000.00 

31560.00 

33201.12 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Climate change and asset management 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Telephone 

9/208-282- 

3449 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 

Municipal ManagerAccounting 

Officer 

Training - External 

9/208-290- 

3437 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 

Municipal ManagerSpecial 

Programmes Unit 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Strat Plan 

9/210-164- 

3365 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 

Municipal ManagerSpecial 

Programmes Unit 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Strat Plan 

9/210-164- 

3413 

200000.00 

210400.00 

221340.80 

Municipal ManagerSpecial 

Programmes Unit 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Strat Plan 

9/210-164- 

3515 

130000.00 

136760.00 

143871.52 

Municipal ManagerSpecial 

Programmes Unit 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Strat Plan 

9/210-164- 

3531 

800000.00 

841600.00 

885363.20 

Municipal ManagerSpecial 

Programmes Unit 

Grants & Social Responsibility IGR 

9/210-176- 

3515 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 




15686500.00 

16502198.00 

17360312.30 







CORPORATE SERVICES 






Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Allowances (Housing) 

9/212-4-6 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Allowances (Housing) 

9/212-4-16 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Contribution Employer- Medical Aid 

9/212-12- 

24 

447093.20 

479999.26 

515327.21 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Contribution Employer- Medical Aid 

9/212-12- 

94 

232376.43 

246319.01 

261098.15 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Contributions Employer - Pension Fund 

9/212-18- 

72 

322080.00 

345785.09 

371234.87 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Contributions Employer - Pension Fund 

9/212-18- 

112 

728420.42 

782032.17 

839589.73 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Gross Salaries 

9/212-22- 

10 

1119540.42 

1201938.59 

1290401.27 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Gross Salaries 

9/212-22- 

24 

5413940.42 

5812406.43 

6240199.55 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Insurance UIF 

9/212-26- 

84 

33093.72 

35529.42 

38144.38 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Insurance UIF 

9/212-26- 

108 

33093.72 

35529.42 

38144.38 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/212-32- 

101992.00 

109498.61 

117557.71 


285 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 




26 




Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/212-32- 

46 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/212-32- 

98 

5368.00 

5763.08 

6187.25 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/212-32- 

138 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Perfomance Bonus 

9/212-36- 

174 

150000.00 

161040.00 

172892.54 




8586998.33 

9215841.09 

9890777.05 

Repairs and maintenance 






Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Repairs and maintenance Computers 

9/212-68- 

3019 

63751.20 

67066.26 

70553.71 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Infrastructure- Buildings and Installations 

9/216-46- 

3003 

895772.76 

942352.94 

991355.29 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Vehicles & Implements 

9/216-74- 

3019 

10520.00 

11067.04 

11642.53 




970043.96 

1020486.24 

1073551.53 

Expenses 






Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Accomodation 

9/212-80- 

3531 

107800.00 

113405.60 

119302.69 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Cleaning Material 

9/212-92- 

3475 

318200.00 

334746.40 

352153.21 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Consultants & Proffesional Fees 

9/212-108- 

3381 

105200.00 

110670.40 

116425.26 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Consultants & Proffesional Fees 

9/212-108- 

3429 

31560.00 

33201.12 

34927.58 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Consultants & Proffesional Fees 

9/212-108- 

3543 

73640.00 

77469.28 

81497.68 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Consumables & Beverages 

9/212-110- 

3481 

5260.00 

5533.52 

5821.26 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Climate change and asset management 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Fuel & Oil 

9/212-132- 

3317 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Lease repayments 

9/212-206- 

5001 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/212-236- 

3365 

15780.00 

16600.56 

17463.79 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/212-236- 

3379 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/212-236- 

3405 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/212-236- 

3475 

34160.00 

35936.32 

37805.01 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/212-236- 

3487 

5260.00 

5533.52 

5821.26 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/212-270- 

3341 

10520.00 

11067.04 

11642.53 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/212-270- 

3357 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/212-270- 

3395 

73640.00 

77469.28 

81497.68 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/212-270- 

10520.00 

11067.04 

11642.53 


286 | 5 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 




3421 




Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/212-270- 

3531 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/212-270- 

3551 

16560.00 

17421.12 

18327.02 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/212-270- 

3559 

31560.00 

33201.12 

34927.58 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Telephone 

9/212-282- 

3451 

157800.00 

166005.60 

174637.89 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Training Costs 

9/212-292- 

3437 

91357.24 

96107.82 

101105.42 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Training Costs 

9/212-292- 

3475 

16832.00 

17707.26 

18628.04 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Training Costs 

9/212-292- 

3515 

77848.00 

81896.10 

86154.69 

Corporate ServicesAdministration 

Electricity 

9/214-122- 

3433 

688071.60 

723851.32 

761491.59 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Advertising 

9/216-82- 

3521 

213000.00 

224076.00 

235727.95 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Fire Extinguishers 

9/216-130- 

3333 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Job Evaluation 

9/216-196- 

3381 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Levy - Skills Development [SETA] 

9/216-212- 

3503 

1052000.00 

1106704.00 

1164252.61 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Meals and Entertainment 

9/216-220- 

3517 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Organogramme 

9/216-228- 

3381 

157800.00 

166005.60 

174637.89 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Rent - Equipment 

9/216-244- 

3413 

105200.00 

110670.40 

116425.26 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Sports & Recreation & Wellness 

9/216-266- 

3413 

136760.00 

143871.52 

151352.84 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Sports & Recreation & Wellness 

9/216-266- 

3467 

42080.00 

44268.16 

46570.10 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Sports & Recreation & Wellness 

9/216-266- 

3469 

157800.00 

166005.60 

174637.89 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Sports & Recreation & Wellness 

9/216-266- 

3475 

105200.00 

110670.40 

116425.26 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Sports & Recreation & Wellness 

9/216-266- 

3515 

84160.00 

88536.32 

93140.21 

Corporate ServicesHuman Resources 

Uniforms & Protective Clothing 

9/216-300- 

3463 

157800.00 

166005.60 

174637.89 

Corporate ServicesAdmin Support 

Electricity & Water 

9/218-124- 

3547 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Corporate ServicesAdmin Support 

IT Systems,software and Maintainance 

9/218-194- 

3389 

107800.00 

113405.60 

119302.69 

Corporate ServicesAdmin Support 

IT Systems,software and Maintainance 

9/218-194- 

3523 

107800.00 

113405.60 

119302.69 

Corporate ServicesAdmin Support 

Telephone 

9/218-282- 

3449 

126000.00 

132552.00 

139444.70 




4653808.84 

4895806.90 

5150388.86 

TOTAL FOR CORPORATE SERVICES 


14210851.12 

15132134.23 


287 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 








COMMUNITY SERVICES 






EMPLOYEE RELATED COSTS 






Community ServicesAdministration 

Allowances 

9/220-2-56 

100000.00 

107360.00 

115261.70 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Casual Wages 

9/220-8-24 

271084.00 

291035.78 

312456.02 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/220-10- 

116 

1353207.31 

1452803.37 

1559729.70 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/220-10- 

154 

64887.31 

69663.02 

74790.21 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Contributions - Pension Fund 

9/220-16- 

112 

2147200.00 

2305233.92 

2474899.14 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Contributions - Pension Fund 

9/220-16- 

180 

927215.71 

995458.79 

1068724.56 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Insurance - UIF 

9/220-24- 

108 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Insurance - UIF 

9/220-24- 

128 

109084.20 

117112.80 

125732.30 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/220-32- 

26 

85888.00 

92209.36 

98995.97 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/220-32- 

46 

33070.10 

35504.06 

38117.16 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/220-32- 

98 

55404.20 

59481.95 

63859.82 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/220-32- 

138 

43806.10 

47030.23 

50491.65 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Perfomance Bonus 

9/220-36- 

174 

150000.00 

161040.00 

172892.54 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Salaries 

9/220-40- 

24 

13284289.44 

14262013.15 

15311697.32 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Salaries 

9/220-40- 

52 

1406353.73 

1509861.37 

1620987.16 




20031490.12 

21505807.79 

23088635.24 

Repairs & Maintenance 






Community ServicesAdministration 

Buildings & Installations 

9/220-44- 

3003 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Buildings & Installations 

9/220-44- 

3023 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Repairs & Maintenance Equipmen 

9/220-56- 

3011 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Repairs & Maintenance Equipmen 

9/220-56- 

3023 

10000.00 

10520.00 

11067.04 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Repairs and Maintanance Motor Vehicles 

9/220-64- 

3005 

30000.00 

31560.00 

33201.12 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Repairs and Maintanance Motor Vehicles 

9/220-64- 

3019 

106760.00 

112311.52 

118151.72 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Repairs and Maintanance Plant & Machiner 

9/220-66- 

3011 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 










296760.00 

312191.52 

328425.48 

Expenses 






Community ServicesAdministration 

Accomodation 

9/220-80- 

3531 

106044.76 

111559.08 

117360.16 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Books & Publications 

9/220-88- 

5344.16 

5622.06 

5914.40 


288 | 5 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 




3365 




Community ServicesAdministration 

Cleaning campaign 

9/220-90- 

3413 

27352.00 

28774.30 

30270.57 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Cleaning campaign 

9/220-90- 

3475 

160400.00 

168740.80 

177515.32 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Cleaning campaign 

9/220-90- 

3515 

79110.40 

83224.14 

87551.80 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Cleaning Materials - Material 

9/220-94- 

3475 

110544.16 

116292.46 

122339.66 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Consultants & Proffesional Fees 

9/220-108- 

3365 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Consultants & Proffesional Fees 

9/220-108- 

3495 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Consultants & Proffesional Fees 

9/220-108- 

3515 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Consultants & Proffesional Fees 

9/220-108- 

3527 

339240.00 

356880.48 

375438.26 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Climate change and asset management 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Consumables & Beverages 

9/220-110- 

3481 

10752.49 

11311.62 

11899.83 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Crime Awareness 

9/220-114- 

3413 

9468.00 

9960.34 

10478.27 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Crime Awareness 

9/220-114- 

3515 

66901.51 

70380.39 

74040.17 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Fuel & Oil 

9/220-132- 

3317 

368200.00 

387346.40 

407488.41 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Road si 

9/220-162- 

3475 

31560.00 

33201.12 

34927.58 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Road si 

9/220-162- 

5003 

106240.00 

111764.48 

117576.23 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Training 

Ifeguards 

9/220-168- 

3309 

159378.00 

167665.66 

176384.27 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Waste Site 

M 

9/220-170- 

3475 

105200.00 

110670.40 

116425.26 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility - Waste Site 

M 

9/220-170- 

5003 

23067.20 

24266.70 

25528.57 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Grants & Social Responsibility Stipend for 

life gaurds 

9/220-178- 

3309 

759035.20 

798505.03 

840027.29 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Landfill site rehabilitation 

9/220-200- 

3317 

60600.00 

63751.20 

67066.26 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Lease repayments 

9/220-206- 

5001 

0 

0 

0 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Licence Fees 

9/220-214- 

3389 

26722.90 

28112.50 

29574.34 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Meals & entertainment 

9/220-218- 

3515 

10857.69 

11422.29 

12016.25 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/220-236- 

3365 

11534.13 

12133.90 

12764.87 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/220-236- 

3379 

10520.00 

11067.04 

11642.53 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/220-236- 

3405 

10520.00 

11067.04 

11642.53 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/220-236- 

3475 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 


289 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Community ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/220-236- 

3487 

10520.00 

11067.04 

11642.53 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Rent - Equipment 

9/220-244- 

3413 

75667.20 

79601.90 

83741.20 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Social Responsibility Programmes 

9/220-258- 

3309 

60000.00 

63120.00 

66402.24 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Social Responsibility Programmes 

9/220-258- 

3325 

83000.00 

87316.00 

91856.43 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Social Responsibility Programmes 

9/220-258- 

3345 

60000.00 

63120.00 

66402.24 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Uniforms & Protective Clothing-lifeguards 

9/220-302- 

3463 

263000.00 

276676.00 

291063.15 

Community ServicesAdministration 

Uniforms & Protective Clothing 

9/220-304- 

3463 

250000.00 

263000.00 

276676.00 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5753 

41666.67 

27916.67 

29416.67 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5759 

41666.67 

27916.67 

29416.67 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5761 

41666.67 

27916.67 

29416.67 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5765 

41666.67 

27916.67 

29416.67 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5767 

41666.67 

27916.67 

29416.67 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5769 

41666.67 

27916.67 

29416.67 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5771 

41666.67 

27916.67 

29416.67 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5773 

41666.67 

27916.67 

29416.67 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5775 

41666.67 

27916.67 

29416.67 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5779 

41666.67 

27916.67 

29416.67 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5781 

41666.67 

27916.67 

29416.67 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5787 

41666.67 

27916.67 

29416.67 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5789 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5791 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5793 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5795 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5797 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Community ServicesLibrary Services 

Grant - Provincial DSRAC 

9/222-348- 

5799 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Community ServicesParks Cemetries 

Municipal Bu 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/224-270- 

3341 

8416.00 

8853.63 

9314.02 

Community ServicesParks Cemetries 

Municipal Bu 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/224-270- 

3357 

4208.00 

4426.82 

4657.01 


290 | 3 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Community ServicesParks Cemetries 

Municipal Bu 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/224-270- 

3395 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Community ServicesParks Cemetries 

Municipal Bu 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/224-270- 

3421 

8416.00 

8853.63 

9314.02 

Community ServicesParks Cemetries 

Municipal Bu 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/224-270- 

3531 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Community ServicesParks Cemetries 

Municipal Bu 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/224-270- 

3551 

5260.00 

5533.52 

5821.26 

Community ServicesParks Cemetries 

Municipal Bu 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/224-270- 

3559 

15780.00 

16600.56 

17463.79 

Community ServicesParks Cemetries 

Municipal Bu 

Telephone 

9/224-282- 

3449 

89360.00 

94006.72 

98895.07 

Community ServicesParks Cemetries 

Municipal Bu 

Training Costs 

9/224-292- 

3437 

106889.51 

112447.77 

118295.05 

Community ServicesWaste 

Management 

Sports & Recreation 

9/226-264- 

3413 

7364.00 

7746.93 

8149.77 

Community ServicesWaste 

Management 

Sports & Recreation 

9/226-264- 

3491 

10520.00 

11067.04 

11642.53 

Community ServicesWaste 

Management 

Sports & Recreation 

9/226-264- 

3515 

32535.20 

34227.03 

36006.84 

Community ServicesWaste 

Management 

Sports & Recreation 

9/226-264- 

5003 

4208.00 

4426.82 

4657.01 

Community ServicesTraffic 

Department 

Meals and Entertainment 

9/228-220- 

3515 

21377.69 

22489.33 

23658.78 

Community ServicesTraffic 

Department 

Refuse Bags & Bins 

9/228-242- 

3475 

159378.00 

167665.66 

176384.27 




4498132.22 

4541035.10 

4777748.92 

TOTAL FOR COMMUNITY SERVICES 


24826382.34 

26359034.40 







BUDGET AND TREASURY OFFICE 






EMPLOYEE RELATED COSTS 






Financial ServicesAdministration 

Maintenance of Buildings and Facilities 

9/232-339- 

8009 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Allowances 

9/234-2-34 

50000.00 

52600.00 

79952.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Allowances 

9/234-2-58 

200000.00 

210400.00 

319808.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/234-10- 

42 

225427.01 

237149.22 

360466.81 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/234-10- 

118 

504534.03 

530769.79 

806770.09 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Contributions - Pension Fund 

9/234-16- 

114 

810411.25 

852552.64 

1295880.01 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Contributions - Pension Fund 

9/234-16- 

140 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Insurance - UIF 

9/234-24- 

108 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Insurance - UIF 

9/234-24- 

110 

27241.53 

28658.09 

43560.29 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/234-32- 

26 

21472.00 

22588.54 

34334.59 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/234-32- 

46 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/234-32- 

98 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 


291 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Financial ServicesAdministration 

Overtime Pay 

9/234-32- 

138 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Peformance Bonus 

9/234-34- 

174 

150000.00 

157800.00 

239856.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Salaries 

9/234-40- 

22 

4001728.05 

4209817.91 

6398923.22 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Salaries 

9/234-40- 

96 

2391328.05 

2515677.11 

3823829.21 




8382141.92 

8818013.30 

13403380.22 

Repairs & Maintenance 






Financial ServicesRevenue Debt 

Collection 

Repairs & Maintenance Furniture & Fittin 

9/240-60- 

3007 

10520.00 

11067.04 

16821.90 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

Buildings & Installations 

9/244-44- 

3001 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

Repairs and Maintenance Equipment 

9/244-70- 

3009 

12600.00 

13255.20 

20147.90 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

Vehicles 

9/244-72- 

3017 

25600.00 

26931.20 

40935.42 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

Repairs and Maintanance computer & 

accessories 

9/244-248- 

5003 

16300.00 

17147.60 

26064.35 




65020.00 

68401.04 

103969.58 

Expenses 






Financial ServicesAdministration 

Accomodation 

9/234-80- 

3531 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Advertising 

9/234-82- 

3453 

15780.00 

16600.56 

17463.79 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Advertising 

9/234-82- 

3493 

36820.00 

38734.64 

40748.84 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Bank Charges 

9/234-86- 

3373 

263000.00 

276676.00 

291063.15 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Books & Publications 

9/234-88- 

3361 

31875.60 

33533.13 

35276.85 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Congress Fees 

9/234-104- 

3437 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Consultants & Proffesional Fees 

9/234-108- 

3305 

4000000.00 

4208000.00 

4426816.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Consultants & Proffesional Fees 

9/234-108- 

3427 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Consultants & Proffesional Fees 

9/234-108- 

3541 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Debt collection 

9/234-116- 

3501 

1000000.00 

1052000.00 

1106704.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Electricity FBE 

9/234-126- 

3537 

4000000.00 

4208000.00 

4426816.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Hire Charges - Vehicle 

9/234-184- 

3341 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Indigent Programme 

9/234-188- 

3537 

1000000.00 

1052000.00 

1106704.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Membership Fees 

9/234-224- 

3313 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Postage & Courier Costs 

9/234-234- 

3321 

31560.00 

33201.12 

34927.58 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/234-236- 

94680.00 

99603.36 

104782.73 


292 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 




3361 




Financial ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/234-236- 

3375 

10520.00 

11067.04 

11642.53 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/234-236- 

3401 

0 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/234-236- 

3471 

147280.00 

154938.56 

162995.37 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Printing & Stationary 

9/234-236- 

3483 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Revenue enhancement strategy 

9/234-250- 

3305 

1000000.00 

1052000.00 

1106704.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/234-270- 

3339 

10520.00 

11067.04 

11642.53 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/234-270- 

3355 

5260.00 

5533.52 

5821.26 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/234-270- 

3393 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/234-270- 

3419 

57860.00 

60868.72 

64033.89 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/234-270- 

3529 

0 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/234-270- 

3549 

5260.00 

5533.52 

5821.26 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/234-270- 

3557 

15780.00 

16600.56 

17463.79 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

Valuation Roll 

9/234-306- 

3331 

1000000.00 

1052000.00 

1106704.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

FMG-GRANT EXPENDITURE 

9/234-358- 

5901 

150000 

160000.00 

168320.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

FMG-GRANT EXPENDITURE 

9/234-358- 

5903 

450000 

500000.00 

526000.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

FMG-GRANT EXPENDITURE 

9/234-358- 

5905 

600000 

650000.00 

683800.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

FMG-GRANT EXPENDITURE 

9/234-358- 

5907 

250000 

270000.00 

284040.00 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

FMG-GRANT EXPENDITURE 

9/234-358- 

5909 

350000.00 

368200.00 

387346.40 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

FMG-GRANT EXPENDITURE 

9/234-358- 

5911 

100000.00 

105200.00 

110670.40 

Financial ServicesAdministration 

FMG-GRANT EXPENDITURE 

9/234-358- 

5913 

70000.00 

73640.00 

77469.28 

Financial ServicesSupply Chain 

Asset Managemen 

Licence Fees 

9/236-214- 

3307 

21040.00 

22134.08 

23285.05 

Financial ServicesSupply Chain 

Asset Managemen 

Licence Fees 

9/236-214- 

3387 

252480.00 

265608.96 

279420.63 

Financial ServicesSupply Chain 

Asset Managemen 

Training - External 

9/236-290- 

3435 

150000.00 

157800.00 

166005.60 

Financial ServicesRevenue Debt 

Collection 

Interest paid 

9/240-192- 

3301 

1052.00 

1106.70 

1164.25 

Financial ServicesRevenue Debt 

Collection 

Interest paid 

9/240-192- 

3337 

104148.00 

109563.70 

115261.01 

Financial ServicesRevenue Debt 

Collection 

Interest paid 

9/240-192- 

3351 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesRevenue Debt 

Interest paid 

9/240-192- 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 


293 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Collection 


3563 




Financial ServicesRevenue Debt 

Collection 

Telephone 

9/240-282- 

3447 

150000.00 

157800.00 

166005.60 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

Electricity & Water 

9/244-124- 

3545 

104148.00 

109563.70 

115261.01 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

Fuel & Oil 

9/244-132- 

3315 

31560.00 

33201.12 

34927.58 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

Hire Charges - Office Equipment 

9/244-182- 

3411 

73640.00 

77469.28 

81497.68 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

Lease instalment 

9/244-202- 

5001 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

Climate change and asset management 

50000.00 

52600.00 

55335.20 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

Local government Grant 

9/244-216- 

3383 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

Meals and Entertainment 

9/244-220- 

3513 

22080.00 

23228.16 

24436.02 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

Social Responsibility Programm (MSCOA) 

9/244-256- 

3305 

500000.00 

526000.00 

553352.00 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

Subscriptions 

9/244-268- 

3435 

52600.00 

55335.20 

58212.63 

Financial ServicesBudget 

Expenditure 

O.R Tambo Intervention 

9/244-319- 

5176 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Financial Serviceslnformation 

Technology 

Consumables & Beverages 

9/246-110- 

3477 

5260.00 

5533.52 

5821.26 




16493043.60 

17405281.87 

18310356.52 

TOTAL FOR BTO 



24940205.52 

26291696.21 

31817706.32 







INFRASTRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 






EMPLOYEE RELATED COSTS 






Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Insurance - UIF 

9/250-24- 

86 

0 

0 

0 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Insurance - UIF 

9/250-24- 

106 

77705.02 

83424.11 

89564.12 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Peformance Bonus 

9/250-34- 

176 

150000.00 

161040.00 

172892.54 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Salaries 

9/250-40-8 

2469280.00 

2651019.01 

2846134.01 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Salaries 

9/250-40- 

20 

6554052.08 

7036430.32 

7554311.59 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringSewerage 

Contributions - Pension Fund 

9/252-16- 

114 

1699061.11 

1824112.01 

1958366.65 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringSewerage 

Contributions - Pension Fund 

9/252-16- 

130 

410741.11 

440971.65 

473427.17 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Allowances 

9/254-2-2 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Allowances 

9/254-2-28 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Allowances 

9/254-2-50 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Allowances 

9/254-2-54 

215672.28 

231545.76 

248587.53 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Allowances 

9/254-2-58 

193134.03 

207348.69 

222609.56 


294 | 3 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Stormwater Drainage 






Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Allowances 

9/254-2-76 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Allowances 

9/254-2-80 

86269.13 

92618.54 

99435.26 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Allowances 

9/254-2-82 

86269.13 

92618.54 

99435.26 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Allowances 

9/254-2- 

142 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Allowances 

9/254-2- 

150 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Allowances 

9/254-2- 

160 

43134.03 

46308.69 

49717.01 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/254-10- 

68 

560393.43 

601638.39 

645918.98 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Contribution - Medical Aid 

9/254-10- 

118 

560393.43 

601638.39 

645918.98 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Overtime Pay 

9/254-32- 

26 

115412.00 

123906.32 

133025.83 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Overtime Pay 

9/254-32- 

44 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Overtime Pay 

9/254-32- 

98 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Overtime Pay 

9/254-32- 

136 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 




13221516.78 

14194620.42 

15239344.48 

Repairs & Maintanance 






Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Infrastructure Roads 

9/254-46- 

3013 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Infrastructure Roads 

9/254-46- 

3015 

212400.00 

223444.80 

339636.10 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Infrastructure Roads 

9/254-46- 

3027 

6105160.00 

6422628.32 

9762395.05 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Infrastructure Roads 

9/254-46- 

3029 

105200.00 

110670.40 

168219.01 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Infrastructure Roads 

9/254-46- 

3033 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Infrastructure Roads 

9/254-46- 

3035 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Repairs & Maintanance Street lights 

9/254-50- 

3025 

100000.00 

105200.00 

159904.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Repairs & Maintanance Street lights 

9/254-50- 

3031 

100000.00 

105200.00 

159904.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Repairs & Maintenance Equipment 

9/254-58- 

3011 

210400.00 

221340.80 

336438.02 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Repairs & Maintenance Equipment 

9/254-58- 

3031 

315600.00 

332011.20 

504657.02 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringMechanical Workshop 

Repairs & Maintenance Plant & Machinery 

9/256-62- 

3007 

893600.00 

940067.20 

1428902.14 




8042360.00 

8460562.72 

12860055.33 

Expenses 






Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Consultants & Proffesional Fee 

9/250-106- 

3425 

31560.00 

33201.12 

50465.70 


295 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Consultants & Proffesional Fee 

9/250-106- 

3525 

178840.00 

188139.68 

285972.31 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Consultants & Proffesional Fee 

9/250-106- 

3539 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Lease repayments 

9/250-206- 

3385 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/250-270- 

3343 

25000.00 

26300.00 

39976.00 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/250-270- 

3359 

20000.00 

21040.00 

31980.80 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/250-270- 

3397 

50514.44 

53141.19 

80774.60 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/250-270- 

3423 

50871.22 

53516.52 

81345.11 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/250-270- 

3533 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/250-270- 

3553 

30114.44 

31680.39 

48154.19 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringADMINISTRATION 

Subsistence & Travel 

9/250-270- 

3561 

1043584.84 

1106199.93 

1172571.92 

Infrastructural 

EngineeringSewerage 

Fuel & Oil 

9/252-132- 

3319 

3392400.00 

3568804.80 

5424583.30 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Accomodation 

9/254-80- 

3533 

107800.00 

113405.60 

172376.51 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Entertainment 

9/254-128- 

3479 

25000.00 

26300.00 

39976.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Licence Fees 

9/254-214- 

3391 

368200.00 

387346.40 

588766.53 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Printing & Stationary 

9/254-236- 

3363 

10520.00 

11067.04 

16821.90 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Printing & Stationary 

9/254-236- 

3377 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Printing & Stationary 

9/254-236- 

3403 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Printing & Stationary 

9/254-236- 

3473 

26300.00 

27667.60 

42054.75 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Printing & Stationary 

9/254-236- 

3485 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Rent - Equipment 

9/254-244- 

3415 

157800.00 

166005.60 

252328.51 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Telephone 

9/254-282- 

3449 

115000.00 

120980.00 

183889.60 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Training - External 

9/254-290- 

3439 

105200.00 

110670.40 

168219.01 

Infrastructural EngineeringRoads 

Stormwater Drainage 

Uniforms & Protective Clothing 

9/254-300- 

3465 

318200.00 

334746.40 

508814.53 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Autocad/Ally cad 

9/258-84- 

3407 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Development of Land Use Scheme 

9/258-118- 

3409 

210400.00 

221340.80 

336438.02 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

development of SDF 

9/258-120- 

3367 

21040.00 

22134.08 

33643.80 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

development of SDF 

9/258-120- 

3409 

305080.00 

320944.16 

487835.12 


296 | 5 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

development of SDF 

9/258-120- 

3459 

15780.00 

16600.56 

25232.85 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

development of SDF 

9/258-120- 

3519 

26300.00 

27667.60 

42054.75 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Land audit 

9/258-198- 

3311 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Land audit 

9/258-198- 

3431 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Land audit 

9/258-198- 

3497 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Municipal Planning Tribunal Members 

Allowance 

9/258-226- 

3335 

89420.00 

94069.84 

142986.16 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Municipal Planning Tribunal Members 

Allowance 

9/258-226- 

3369 

68380.00 

71935.76 

109342.36 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Planning Consultant Fees 

9/258-232- 

3311 

105200.00 

110670.40 

168219.01 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

Planning Consultant Fees 

9/258-232- 

3409 

105200.00 

110670.40 

168219.01 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

SLUMA Implementation 

9/258-254- 

3417 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

SLUMA Implementation 

9/258-254- 

3457 

42080.00 

44268.16 

67287.60 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

SLUMA Implementation 

9/258-254- 

3517 

10520.00 

11067.04 

16821.90 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

SLUMA Implementation 

9/258-254- 

3535 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

SPLUMA Training 

9/258-262- 

3371 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

SPLUMA Training 

9/258-262- 

3417 

21040.00 

22134.08 

33643.80 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

SPLUMA Training 

9/258-262- 

3517 

31560.00 

33201.12 

50465.70 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding 

Services 

SPLUMA Training 

9/258-262- 

3535 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Infrastructural EngineeringBuilding Services 

Climate change and asset 

management 

50000.00 

52600.00 




7158904.92 

7539516.66 

10951213.36 

TOTAL FOR ENGINEERING 



28422781.71 

30194699.80 

39050613.17 


297 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 




FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


CHAPTER 6 

INTEGRATION 

AND 

ALIGNMENT OF SECTOR 

PLANS 


298 | 5 a g e Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR_ 

6.1 SECTOR PLANS 

6.1.1 Introduction 

The ability of municipalities to coordinate and integrate programmes of other spheres and sectors operating in their 
space is of critical importance. This owing to the fact that all government programmes and services are delivered in 
municipal spaces and ensures that integration of programmes and maximum utilization of available resources. It is for 
this reason that the integrated development planning process becomes a vehicle to facilitate integrated development to 
ensure the attainment of local government outcomes. Legislation and policies required municipalities to develop sector 
specific plans to guide the rendering of certain services. These sector plans should are categorized into the following:- 

(a) Sector plans that should form of the IDP as required by the MSA and provide an overall developmental vision of the 
municipality: Spatial Development Framework (SDF); Local Economic Development Plan (LED Plan); Disaster 
Management Plan; and Financial Plan. 

(b) Sector plans provided for and regulated by sector specific legislation and policies, such as; Water Services 
Development Plan (WSDP), Integrated Waste Management Plan (IWMP), Integrated Transport Plan (ITP); 
Environmental Management Plan (EMP); Integrated Fluman Settlement Plan (IFHS) / Flousing Sector Plan (FHSP); 
Integrated Energy Plan (IEP), etc. 

The purpose of including these sector plans is to ensure that they are considered during planning and implementation 
of the IDP. They guide the institution and its departments on sector specific issues to ensure sustainable growth and 
development. 


6.2 Spatial Development Framework 

The Spatial Development Framework (SDF) for Port St John's Municipality was last revised in November, 2010. It 
forms part of the Port St John's Integrated Development Planning Process. The SDF as one of the operational 


299 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR_ 

strategies of the IDP, is closely linked and aligned, and functions with the other operational strategies of the 
municipality such as the district and provincial strategies, LED Strategy and the Nodal Development Strategy. The table 
below shows the SDF Spatial Development Plan for the entire Port St John's Municipality. 

Figure 6.1: PSJLM SDF 



Source: PSJLM SDF Review 2010 p.Ill 

The SDF further gives effect to Council's vision for development and Council's spatial development objectives and 
strategies with respect to Land Development and Land Use Management. The PSJM adopted the first SDF in 2005 as a 
first attempt to align development vision, goals, and national, provincial and local spatial development policies. The 
2005 SDF assisted in identification of strategic spatial planning initiatives such as the PSJ Master Plan and Regional 
Nodal Study. The need for the preparation and review of a Spatial Development Framework for the Port St John's was 
based on the following imperatives: 

1. The Spatial Development Framework forms a legally binding component of the Port St John's Integrated 
Development Plan: This Spatial Development Framework is a refinement of the broad spatial framework guidelines 
as contained in the Port St John's IDP; 

2. The need to formulate and implement spatial planning guidelines and policies: Proper land use planning guidelines 
and policies in the Port St Johns are lacking and in some cases outdated. The absence of proper planning 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


guidelines therefore necessitated the preparation of a detailed Spatial Development Framework for the area to 
manage future land uses; 

3. Legislative requirements: The Local Government: Municipal Systems Act: 2000 (Act 32: 2000) and its Regulations 
require all local authorities to prepare and implement Spatial Development Frameworks. 

4. Increasing pressure tor development: Demand for development in the Port St Johns and rural areas are putting 
pressure on existing scarce resources and sustainability of the region and the environment. Specific reference is 
made to the valuable agricultural land of the area as well as the unique unspoiled coastal region. 

5. The imperative to implement and maintain sustainability: Sustainability of the natural and man-made environment 
is of critical importance for long term land use management and effective development. 

The summarized framework presented below represents a very concise extract from the Port St Johns Spatial 
Development Framework 2010. 

(a) Spatial Vision 

The vision is seeking to transform and integrate the social-economic space of the PSJLM and elevate and promote Port 
St Johns into a regional economic node and driver for sustainable economic growth and development in relation to 
surrounding rural lands and The Wild Coast. The principles guiding the vision for spatial planning are: Efficient and 
Integrated Land Development; Sustainable Development; Protection and Enhancement of the Environment; 
Discouraging Illegal Land Use; Efficient Public Participation and Capacity Building; Facilitating Development Interaction 
with the PSJLM; Clear Guidance, Procedures and Administrative Practice; Speedy Land Development; No one Land Use 
is more Important than any other; Security of Tenure; Co-ordination of Land Development, and Promotion of Open 
Markets and Competition. 

(b) Objectives 

The PSJLM will pursue the following objectives to achieve the desired spatial form: 

Objective 1: To fulfill Council's mandate as outlined in the Municipal Systems Act, Municipal System Act Regulations 
and the Land Use Management Bill with respect to preparation and implementation of Spatial 
Development Frameworks. 

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_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR_ 

Objective 2: To spatially address shortfalls with respect to development with specific reference to Land Identification 
for urban expansion, tourism development and rural development. 

Objective 3: To apply the planning principles, development objectives and guidelines with respect to all developments 
within the study area as outlined in the Spatial Development Framework. 

Objective 4: To encourage and promote positive development within strict environmental guidelines and control. 

Objective 5: To support and promote infrastructure to serve the communities of the study area, and tourism industry. 

Objective 6: To promote integration and co-ordination of Spatial Development Framework initiatives on a regional 
level. 

Objective 7: To promote and ensure alignment and co-ordination of the Spatial Development Framework with the Port 
St Johns Integrated Development Plan and other sectoral plans and programmes. 

(c) Strategies 

The achievement of the Spatial Objectives revolves around the following seven strategies: 

Strategy A: Anticipate growth and plan ahead, both spatially and physically 

Strategy B: Concentrate municipal development in the identified development potential nodes. 

Strategy C: Determine utilization potential of all land and limit development to best usage through policy and/or 
statutory plan. This involves developing land suitability criteria, review, developing, implementing and 
managing procedures with respect to detailed land suitability studies, legislative approvals, land use 
management procedures and land acquisition. 

Strategy D: Developing and promoting the desired spatial form of the study area involving consolidating and promoting 
PSJ into an urban regional node servicing surrounding 130 satellite rural villages. 

Strategy E: Support economic growth opportunities created by the SDF by creating the spatial and infrastructural 
investment framework for economic and commercial and social opportunities. 

Strategy F: A strategic assessment of the environmental impact of the Spatial Development Framework involving 
carrying out Environmental Strategic Impact Assessment and implementation and management of 
standard and custom environmental policies and principles. 

Strategy G: Institute a formalization program to systematically formalize settlements and give secure tenure. 


302 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 



_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR_ 

6.3 PORT ST JOHN'S MASTER PLAN 

The Port St Johns Master Plan was prepared and adopted in 2009. The numerous initiatives unfolding along the Wild 
Coast have prompted the PSJLM, through the Port St Johns Development Agency, to prepare an integrated Master 
Plan. Several strategic issues and Eight Strategic Development Nodes within the urban area, defined by the PSJ SDF, 
were identified as the core areas for further evaluation and formulation of the development framework of the Master 
Plan. The strategic issues identified are as follow. 

(a) Strategic Issues 

• Positioning Port St Johns and its surroundings as a unique African coastal town; 

• Providing infrastructure, services and public transport; 

• Ensuring safety and freedom from crime; 

• Promoting skills and tourism awareness; 

• Ensuring effective marketing, promotion and information; 

• Providing a properly functioning, stakeholder driven, LTO. 

(b) Objectives of the Port St Johns Master Plan 

The following project principles constitute the strategic objectives to guide the town's master plan and urban node 
detailed planning and development: 

■s Promote access and supply of residential land and employment opportunities in close proximity and integrate 
with each other in urban development. 

■s Encourage environmentally sustainable and efficient land development practices and processes. 

■s Ensure that urban policy, administrative practice and town planning regulations are efficient and effective, 
v Promote sustainable development at the required scale and land development which is within the fiscal, 
institutional and administrative means of the PSJLM. 

■s Promote sustained protection of the environment. 

■s Ensure the safe utilization of land by taking into consideration factors such as geological formations and areas 
prone to flooding. 

■s Permitting development only that which does not at cause unacceptable visual damage, unacceptable 


pollution of air, water or land, or nuisance by way of smell, noise or light. 

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_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR_ 

(c) Urban Nodal Development Strategy 

The achievement of the Spatial Objectives revolves around promoting and developing eight (8) development nodes 

that need strategic development interventions. The nodes collectively making up the urban area of Port St Johns can 

be explained as follow: 

• Node l:Mpantu: plan and develop for mixed use and maximum use potential for middle and higher income 
residential housing. 

• Node 2: Airport and Landing Strip: development of airport terminal and aviation facilities 

• Node 3: Ferry Point and Agate Terrace: discouraging further coastal ribbon development by only permitting the 
subdivision or consolidation of existing residential properties to enhance the unique character of the coastal 
village. 

• Node 4: Port St Johns CBD: including town entrance: planning and redevelopment of CBD to achieve 
sustainable business, tourism, residential and recreational investment and activities and facilities. 

• Node 5: Former Naval Base; plan for subdivision of the land into self-sustaining urban residential neighborhood 
with urban facilities and services. 

• Node 6: Mtumbane Village: plan and develop its unique community heritage for cultural and eco-tourism by 
creating unique accommodation and recreation experience. 

• Node 7: Second Beach; re-planning, upgrading and development to its full potential to become "first choice 
beach" for locals and tourists visiting the Wild Coast. 

• Node 8: Former Military Base: creating a self-sustainable, independent urban neighborhood for Port St Johns 
town. 


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FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR 


Figure 6.2: PSJ Development Nodes 



NODE 1 

MPUNTU / THE BRIDGE 


STATE 
FORESTRY 
V AREA V 


SULLIVAN 


NODE 2 


STATE 
* FORESTS 


NODE 3 

FERRY POINT / 
AGATE TERRACE 


NODES 

FORMER 
MILITARY BASE 


STATE 

FORESTRY 

AREA 


NODE 5 

FORMER NAVAL BASE 


PORT ST. JOHNS DEVELOPMENT NODES 

\ /TO I > /' Lj \ 


NODE 4 

PORT ST. JOHNS CBD I 
INCLUDING TOWN ENTRANCE 


NODE 6 

MTU M BANE 


NODE 7 

SECOND BEACH 




-• 


Source: PSJLM SDF Review 2010 p. 8 


6.4 HOUSING SECTOR PLAN (HSP) 

a) Analysis 

Municipal housing objectives and targets are defined in the Housing Sector Plan. The Port St Johns Local Municipal 
Housing Sector Plan was prepared in 2007 in terms of Municipal Systems Act (MSA) 32 of 2000, and was reviewed in 
2012. The Housing Sector Plan 2012-2017 is one of the sector plans reflected on the 2018/19 IDP review. The housing 
sector plan guides and informs all future housing developments and informs management, budgeting and decision - 
making processes with regards to housing development. The Housing Sector Plan aims at ensuring, orientating and re¬ 
focusing the PSJLM's vision to fulfil its developmental mandate of housing delivery. 

The Housing Act (Act 107 of 1997) also guides and informs the preparation of Housing Sector Plans. The HSP therefore 
outlines the needs and demands for housing, respond to fundamental challenges with regards to provision of housing 
and make proposals for realistic strategic housing interventions. 

305 | Page Destination of choice that promotes inclusive economic growth for a sustainable and unified municipality 


















































_FINAL IDP FOR 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEAR_ 

The housing chapter is linked and aligned to give effect to and implement provisions of several pieces of legislation and 
policies such as the Bill of Rights contained in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. Article 26 entrenches 
basic rights of access to adequate housing for all citizens of South Africa and whose basic standards are defined in the 
RDP White Paper of November 1994: "as a minimum, all housing must provide protection from weather, a durable 
structure, and reasonable living space and privacy. A house must include sanitary facilities, storm water drainage, a 
household energy supply, and convenient access to clean water. Moreover, it must provide for secure tenure in a 
variety of forms." Along with other legislations and policies, the housing chapter also gives effect to and implements 
the requirements of the National Housing Code as set out in Section 4 of the Housing Act, 1997 (Act No. 107 of 1997) 
which provide administrative regulations to facilitate the effective implementation of the National Housing Policy. 

b) Strategic Housing Objective 

The main objective of developing a housing sector plan therefore is to provide for and ensure an efficient housing 
delivery process. The following are some of the operational objectives: - 

• Institutionalizing housing delivery in order to ensure meaningful, effective and efficient housing delivery through 
monitoring, evaluation and review of existing projects. 

• Enabling municipalities to align and direct their financial and institutional resources towards agreed policy 
objectives and programmes, based on the existing housing backlog and housing need. 

• To inform the multi-year subsidy allocation of the Provincial Department of Human Settlements. 

• To be able to develop an institutional framework and capacity for the required administration and effective 
implementation of housing programmes. 

• Ensuring alignment of housing delivery with the strategic development areas as identified by the Spatial 
Development Framework (SDF). 

• Ensuring proper administration and implementation of housing development. 

• Ensure integration between housing and service provision of physical, (for example roads), water, sanitation, 
safety and security. 


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c) Housing Strategy 

The PSJLM seeks to achieve the housing vision of "A PSJLM with adequate institutional capacity, to efficiently provide 
quality housing and able to guarantee development of sustainable settlements" through the following three turn around 
strategies and housing programmes: 

• Build Institutional and Financial Capacity: Review organogram to cater for required personnel; source funding 
for employment of new staff; training and capacity building workshops; develop a strategy for the monitoring of 
housing projects in all phases. 

• Invest in matching Infrastructure: Investigate further funding options such as MSIG, Neighborhood Grant; 
effect integrated housing infrastructure planning; OR Tambo as a water services and sanitation authority and 
provider to be involved during the planning, budgeting and implementation stages of sanitation projects. 

• Land, Housing and Planning: Identify suitable land for housing in advance; identify and follow up all land claims; 
identify ownership of farms suitable for housing development; appointment of housing staff and supporting 
contractors to register with the National Home Builders Registration Council; implementation of SDF and LUMS 
and enforcement, and education of housing consumers and community representatives. 

d) Formal Housing opportunities 

The section below reflects on the various areas earmarked for housing projects within the Port St Johns Local Municipal 
area to help provide an estimated 3 200 sites in mixed housing developments in the following areas: 

1. Former Military Base: proposed low, medium and high density residential developments. 

2. Second Beach: development of high density residential, tourism accommodation as well as town houses. 

3. Agate Terrace (Erf 756, 899 & 918): low density and tourism accommodation. 

4. Golf Course: low density and town houses. 

5. Farms: negotiations with the owners of farms, both private and state owned. 


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e) Housing Options and Housing Demand 

i. Subsidy Housing (Low Cost): Low cost development is a serious challenge in Port St Johns as a result 
of sprawling informal settlements which have to be relocated. The former Military Base has been 
earmarked for further high density housing development. 

ii. Affordable Housing (Middle Income/Medium Density): The Former Military Base is also reserved for 
medium density residential. This includes the middle class type housing for the middle income rank, like 
teachers, nurses and other government officials. There is adequate land for approximately 500 sites. 

iii. High Income Housing: Although the demand for high income housing is not clearly quantified, the 
following areas were proposed in the HSP and SDF: 

• Erf 1402 owned by DPW, the Former Naval Base - even though this land is still a subject of a land 
claim, the PSJLM has indicated that a process of resolving the land claims is underway. 

• Erf 500, the existing Golf Course - the plan is to relocate the existing golf course to make way for up 
market housing development. An alternative area is proposed for a new golf course around the old 
Military Base. 

• The Former Military Base, as part of the mixed use developments. 

• Agate Terrace (Erf 756, 899 & 918) - ownership of these properties would have to be fully 
investigated. 

iv. Rental Housing Stock: The second beach and Golf course have some areas suitable for town houses. 
These will be utilized for rental purposes in cases where the need for ownership is not great. The area 
around Mangrove is also suitable for rental housing development. 

v. Tourist Accommodation: A need for tourist accommodation is vital, particularly close to the beach. The 
second beach area will be suitable for additional tourism accommodation. Further to that, Agate Terrace 
(Erf 756, 899 & 918) can also be utilized for tourism accommodation. 

vi. Rural Housing: According to the SDF, 500 houses per ward are proposed for rural housing 
development. The main challenge is the pace at which applications are being approved by the 
Department of Human Settlements. 


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vii. Breaking New Ground: The PSJLM currently does not have any BNG project and would need assistance 

towards conceptulisation and identification of land for BNG purposes. 

f) Summary 

The analysis has confirmed that the PSJLM is still currently experiencing serious challenges which hinder the delivery of 
housing. The low affordability levels resulting from low educational qualifications, unemployment and very low income 
levels are some of the glaring challenges. This means that PSJLM is confronted with not only having to provide for 
housing but also to subsidize infrastructure like electricity and water. 

The close link between housing delivery and infrastructure provision puts the PSJLM under pressure to speed up the 
provision of basic services as well as upgrade existing facilities to ensure reliability. The low levels of accessibility to 
basic services and the low levels of education and employment both have serious negative implications on the PSJLM's 
revenue base. The PSJLM therefore has to develop strategies and programmes for job creation, which will decrease 
poverty levels as well as reduce the demand for subsidized housing and sen/ices. 

Another major challenge indicated in one of the workshops is the lack of human as well as financial capacity to deliver 
housing as expected by the constitutional mandate of developmental local government. More serious consideration 
would have to be taken with respect to building adequate capacity in order for the PSJLM to have the ability to deal 
with housing delivery. The objectives, strategies and projects are clearly focused on dealing with blocked projects as 
well as issues of lack of bulk infrastructure in some instances. Some already constructed houses have structural defects 
and these would have to be rectified through funding from Province. 

Again, the issue of shortage of land as a result of land claims is debatable as there are views that these have already 
been resolved. The PSJLM has to aggressively consider proactively dealing with planning and surveying of land in 
preparation for urbanization. 

6.5 LED STRATEGY 

The Port St Johns LED Strategy was prepared and adopted in 2016. The strategy covers an urban area of Port St Johns 
and the 130 surrounding rural areas/villages. Port St John's is part of the Wild Coast, an area of the Transkei stretching 
250 kms from the Kei Mouth to Port Edward. The area is largely in its undisturbed natural state due in large part to 

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difficulties in access both now and historically. Port St Johns known as the Jewel of the Wild is Coast located at the 
mouth of the Umzivubu River. As a regional service centre, it supplies the surrounding rural villages with commodities 
and services and is the administrative and government centre for the area. The LED Strategy identifies many 
strengths and opportunities for local economic development that is tourism, SMME and agriculture. A new LED strategy 
is being prepared for the Municipality. 

Table 6.4: LED SWOT analysis 


STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES 


■ Poor infrastructure - roads, 
electrification, telecommunication, dams 

• Underutilised factor endowments - 
agriculture, forestry, scenic beauty, good 
climatic conditions and coastal line. 

• Unbalanced GGP contribution - 
government a major GGP contributor and 
employer 

■ High level of dependence on social grants 

• Extremely high levels of poverty, 
inequality and unemployment. 

• Poorly integrated business and 
development support services 

■ Low levels of literacy, education and skills 

■ Poor land use planning in urban area 


■ Restrictive traditional land tenure 
arrangements 


Opportunities 

Threats 

• Potential for development in agriculture, tourism, 

❖ Continued high levels of HIV/AIDS 

mariculture and forestry 

❖ Rising unemployment levels 

• Potential for new irrigation systems 

❖ High levels of poverty 

• Massive public works programmes to improve roads and 

❖ Low income levels 

clean up environment 

❖ A low skills base 

• Value processing in agriculture and forestry 

❖ Poor co-ordination in project planning and 

• Information technology targeting rural communities 

implementation 

• Public private partnerships to improve market opportunities 

❖ Continued net migration to stronger 

and technical support to emerging rural based enterprises 

economic nodes (Port Elizabeth, Cape 

• Youth and women majority in the district 

Town, Gauteng) 

• Cultural and historical heritage 

❖ Continued dependency syndrome (social 

• Local jobs through procurement in all projects 

grants, pensions etc) 

• Donor willingness to invest and support areas of greatest 

❖ Unplanned developments along coast 


s Good climatic conditions for tourism and agriculture 
■s Abundant water resources still untapped 
v Small population 
■s Land - good, fertile with deep soils 
■s Long and unspoilt coastal line 

v Scenic beauty, historic heritage, natural heritage, unspoilt 
environment. 

v Strong tourism and agricultural sectors 
■s Organized youth (youth development plan) 


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poverty and unemployment 

(ribbon development) 

• Capacity and skills development in agriculture, business 

❖ Crime and Violence 

and tourism e.g. craft production 


• Development of tourism products (accommodation, trails, 


fishing etc) 


• Exploitation of fishing resources and development of a 


fishing industry 


• Marketing, branding and development of market centres 


• Investment policies based on the development of capacities 


and skills acquired in the execution government 


programmes 


• Development of necessary infrastructure for investment 


and job creation (supply led strategies) and associated job 


creation through local procurement 



Source: PSJLM LED Strategy, 2005 


a) Strategic Objective 

The strategic objectives of the LED Sector as in the municipal vision is creating a regional centre of Port St John's as a 
Gateway to the Wild Coast that generates economic development and employment opportunities through improving 
basic services in rural areas and by utilising the area's natural resources and tourism potential. The operational 
objectives are: 

• To grow the local economy and achieve an annual growth of between 3% - 5%. 

• To create sustainable jobs thereby reducing existing unemployment from 80% to 65%. 

• To reduce the number of households living in poverty from 80% to 65%. 

• To increase literacy rate from 60% to 70%. 


b) LED Strategy 

The PSJLM seeks to promote and achieve local economic development that is sustained through optimizing competitive 
and comparative advantages of the tourism resources through the three priorities and strategies as shown below 


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Table 6.5: LED Priorities, Objectives and Strategies 


Priority 

Objective 

Strategy 


• To stimulate the 

• Facilitate the construction of Cultural Villages in Rural Villages 


development of the 

• Provide training and business skills to communities 


tourism industry to 

• Provide essential services to new cultural villages 


generate 

• Support tourism initiatives 

+-» 

employment 

• Upgrade existing and construct new tourist accommodation and facilities 

c 

cu 

E 

Q. 

opportunities and 

• Inject capital into public tourism initiatives 

O 

CU 

> 

cu 

eradicate poverty 

• Create a coordinated database for available tourist attractions 

~G 

T3 

C 

CD 

■ To promote Tourism 

• Upgrade road linkages to various tourism nodes 

C 

o 

o 

through the 

• Tighten safety and security measures 

E 

o 

1 _ 

Q. 

construction of 

• Provide adequate infrastructure to support tourism facilities 

E 

w 

L 

Cultural Villages in 

• Explore all avenues for funding and support 

O 

H 

rural areas by the 

• Upgrade and market tourist facilities 


end of 2004 

• Lobby with the department of transport to provide signage to indicate the 



location of tourist facilities 



• Establish a specialist school for tourism 



• Market tourism in the Wild Coast through the Wild Coast Festival 


❖ Facilitate SMME 

V Review a database for potential LED funding sources 


development to 

v Provide relevant training and facilities to encourage the development of 


stimulate economic 

SMMES 


growth and 

V Lobby for Funding 


development so as 

V Review rural SMME support structures 


to reduce 

v Build local capacity on SMME development 

■M 

c 

cu 

unemployment by 

v Secure funding from potential sources 

E 

o. 

o 

10% over the next 

V Provide community assistance in the development of business plans 

> 

cu 

□ 

5 years 

V Review a database for packaged and marketable products 

z 

z 

Vi 


v Review the LED forum to oversee all LED related programmes 


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Priority 

Objective 

Strategy 


❖ To review the LED 


Review all LED related activities from various role - players within the 


plan 


PSJLM 




Exchange information with district PSJLM and other local municipalities 




Review the LED Plan including necessary feasibility studies 


o Improve and 

> 

Investigate production of cash crops with export potential 


stimulate 

> 

Liaise with Department of Agriculture regarding training and equipment 


agricultural growth 

> 

Establish an agricultural advice Centre 


in rural areas by 

> 

Provide essential supporting infrastructure i.e. irrigation schemes, 


2005 


equipment etc. 



> 

Provide skills development and business training for emerging farmers 


o To develop the 

> 

Investigate production of cash crops with export potential 


agricultural sector 

> 

Liaise with Department of Agriculture regarding training and equipment 

4-» 

c 

cd 

as a way of fighting 

> 

Establish an agricultural advice Centre 

E 

Q. 

O 

CD 

> 

CD 

□ 

poverty and 

> 

Provide essential supporting infrastructure i.e. irrigation schemes, 

creating economic 


equipment etc. 

3 

3 

opportunities for 

> 

Provide skills development and business training for emerging farmers 

u 

L 

O) 

< 

Port St Johns 




(d) LED Initiatives 

The section below reflects on the various intervention initiatives earmarked for local economic development promotion 
and development: 

Economic Infrastructure Development: by establishing an effective delivery system of non-financial and financial 
support services; establishing an up-to-date market intelligence on the local SMME and business market; improving the 
coordination of local, provincial and national government programmes; facilitating access to BEE exports, market and 
business linkages; providing suitable business accommodation, water, electricity and sanitation; strengthening 


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relationships between the PSJLM, local business and investors; establishing a one-stop business and investor service 
centre; market repositioning, branding and investment promotion; focusing on investor retention through aftercare 
support; increasing municipal procurement spending on SMME and local enterprises; and facilitate provision of support 
services to rural areas. 

Enterprise and Sector Development: by improve communication between PSJLM and business sectors; ensuring 
reliable regional road, rail and air based transportation linkages; improving the supply, cost and maintenance of 
electricity, water and sanitation; formulation of a spatial investment and incentives framework; formulating a Tourism 
Infrastructure Development Plan to address existing gaps; addressing land tenure, usage and ownership bottlenecks 
within the system; establishing an Infrastructure Development Task Team; local business preferential used to deliver 
IDP infrastructure projects; establishment of Private Public Partnerships for effective delivery, and formulating an 
Economic Infrastructure Development Plan. 

Skills Development and Labour Alignment: by creating a comprehensive database of existing skills base for the 
area; investigating the existing and future labour needs of the economy; prioritize skills development needs and 
linkage to major economic projects; promoting and facilitating basic adult educational programmes; strengthening 
partnerships with the government's learnership programmes, and establishing dedicated labour linkage centres or 
facilities. 

Informal Sector and Community Development: by formulating an informal trading [and poverty alleviation] policy ; 
strengthening dialogue between the PSJLM and the informal sector; improving the coordination of government poverty 
alleviation projects ; improving access to project and business advice, training and information; facilitating access to 
local and external informal markets; providing appropriate street-trading and hawkers facilities; facilitating women 
business development programmes; promoting youth entrepreneurship in local schools and communities; 
strengthening existing non-governmental organizations as key partners; addressing access to funding and financial 
assistance, and facilitating life-skills programmes for the unemployed, youth, disabled people and women. 

Institutional Development: Enhancing the economic policy planning and coordination capacity of the PSJM; 
consolidating the LED Forum to improve stakeholder participation and dialogue; strengthening the PSJ Development 

Agency as an economic delivery arm of PSJM; improving intergovernmental planning and programme implementation; 

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strengthening the non-governmental support system within the municipal area; improving communication between the 
PSJLM and the business sectors; establishing institutional support for sector-specific support; strengthening the 
participation of ward-level structures in LED activities; facilitating access to human and organizational support for local 
organizations, and entering into strategic partnerships with key agencies and donors. 

(e) Summary 

The analysis has confirmed that the PSJLM is still currently experiencing serious challenges which hinder the promotion 
and facilitation of LED projects. The PSJLM has to review the promotion and development of both public and private 
develop strategies and programmes and projects of the LED Strategy and refocus approaches, techniques and 
techniques. 

Nodal Development Strategy 

As part of implementation of the Municipal Spatial Development Framework, the Port St Johns Local Municipality 
prepared a Nodal Development Strategy. The preparation involved an intensive spatial assessment of development 
potential of regional significance. The idea was to identify existing and future development potential including 
competitive and comparative advantages and to align and implement the nodal development strategy with furtherance 
of all other municipal planning and policy documents such for IDP, LED, Master Plan, the Wild Coast SDI, OR Tambo 
Tourism Framework, and others. The strategy seeks to provide strategic and detailed guidelines for development of 
specific nodal areas and generates an investment strategy for the nodal points. Each of the nodes is provided with an 
investment strategy. A total of five (5) nodes were identified for focused planning and investment promotion and 
development. 

These five nodes are: 

• Ntafufu 

• Bambisana 

• Port St Johns and the adjacent coastal resort 

• Tombo 

• Isilemela 


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(a) Strategic Development Nodes 
Bambisana Node 

Bambisana developed around a hospital, surrounded by rural homesteads. It is located on along the District Road 
DR08029 from the R61 at Tombo. The Bambisana Node consists of a mission hospital and a small commercial centre. 
The area is relatively densely occupied by rural homesteads. The main competitive advantages are Bambisana 
Hospital; a fertile rural hinterland with lots of water, and successful local agricultural entrepreneurs (poultry and sugar 
cane). Other advantages relate to agricultural development such as fruit, poultry, forestry, maize, tea, sugar cane, 
goats and also quarry mining. Strategic Development opportunities include public infrastructure and services, housing 
development, agro-processing Park, and Retail Park. This node is supported economically by Lusikisiki (Inquza Hill 
Municipality). 

Isilimela Node 

Isimelela is relatively densely occupied by rural homesteads. The main competitive advantages are the potential to 
provide services to tourists visiting the coastal node/travelling on the Wild Coast Meander, and the potential to take 
advantage of fishing along the coast, public facilities for people visiting the hospital including a landscaped park with 
benches and table, facilities for the informal sector and tourism and fishing hub. As a way of ensuring that this node is 
functional, the municipality has constructed an access road linking Silimela to ward 1. This link provides easy access to 
Hluleka Nature Reserve and Ntlaza (Nyandeni LM). 

Ntafufu Node 

Ntafufu node is situated on a major transportation route, the R61 to Lusikisiki at the intersection with the district road 
to Mgugwana. The site consists of a commercial centre, some administration buildings, a school and a clinic. There is 
potential that the proposed new alignment of the R61 (the N2 toll road) will intersect at this node. Ntafufu is 
earmarked for administrative services in terms of the Municipal SDF. Ntafufu will form part of the new proposed N2 toll 
road from East London to KwaZulu Natal. 

The proposed route alignment would connect various economic centres, including Mthatha and Lusikisiki with Ntafufu 
falling within. A new interchange called Ntafufu Interchange is proposed. Key investments potential is in creating hubs 

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for residential, transportation, tourism and SMME development. This is consistent with the number of planning 
meetings between PSJ Municipality, Inquza Hill Municipality, SANRAL and other stakeholders where N2 beneficiation 
and advantages are being discussed. 

Tombo Node 

Tombo is situated on a major transportation route, the R61 at the intersection of the district road DR 08029 to 
Isilemela and the coastal nodes of Mngazana and Simangwana. The site is an important transportation hub, with small 
businesses and administrative services. Tombo and its surrounds are rural in character and the inhabitants have no 
security of tenure. The investment advantages are farm produce collection/distribution point and availability of an agri 
park/service centre, availability of vacant land, agricultural potential in the rural hinterland, manufacturing for dairy, 
furniture, leather and a housing shortage in the area development including light industrial park. The comparative 
advantages are: its strategic location on the R61, its significance as a transfer station, a variety of businesses, an array 
of community services, and the proposed upgrading of the road to Isilimela as part of the Wild Coast Meander. 

The Town of Port St Johns is located at the mouth of the Umzimvubu River and is accessed from Umtata, via the main 
R 61 route. It is the only formalised urban area within the municipal boundary. The town is the main economic and 
administrative base to the surrounding rural community. The town is primarily a tourist-oriented destination. Minimal 
industrial activity is generated in the Port St Johns urban area and surrounding periphery. 

The competitive and comparative advantages and investment opportunities of Port St Johns are as follow: 

❖ The beauty and character of the town 

❖ The climate 

❖ The availability of a variety of accommodation establishments 

❖ The administrative and business services 

❖ The development of fishing 

❖ The development of agriculture 

❖ The development of tourism 

❖ Residential development 

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The main policies / strategies for development of the Port St Johns Urban node area are to: 

• Reinforce the different identities of the various nodes 

• Promote densification of the various nodes 

• Maintain the small scale, informal character of the town 

• Improve the linkages between the various nodes 

• Maintain the lush, tropical vegetation 

The identified development nodes within the Port St Johns urban node include: 

■ Node 1: Mpantu suitable for development of mixed use and maximum use potential for middle and higher income 
residential housing. 

■ Node 2: Airport and Landing Strip for development of an airport terminal and aviation facilities. 

■ Node 3: Ferry Point and Agate Terrace useful in discouraging further coastal ribbon development by only permitting 
the subdivision or consolidation of existing residential properties to enhance the unique character of the coastal 
village. 

■ Node 4: Port St Johns CBD including town entrance for planning and redevelopment of the CBD to achieve 
sustainable business, tourist, residential and recreational activities and facilities. 

■ Node 5: Former Naval Base recommended for subdivision of the land into self-sustaining urban residential 
neighborhood with urban facilities and services. 

■ Node 6: Mtumbane Village with potential to develop its unique community heritage resource for cultural and eco- 
tourism by creating unique accommodation and recreation experience. 

■ Node 7: Second Beach for replanning, upgrading and development to its full potential to become a "first choice 
beach" for locals and tourists visiting the Wild Coast. 

■ Node 8: Former Military Base with potential to create a self-sustainable, independent urban neighbourhood for Port 
St Johns. 

■ Node 9: Port St Johsn Peri-Urban Node; creating economically productive subdivisions and maximizing density of 
land use. 


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Coastal Nodes 

The Wild Coast Tourism Development Policy, 2001 provides for a basic framework of development guidelines for the 
one kilometre coastal strip. Second order coastal nodes are regarded as a "family holiday" tourism and recreation 
destination provided by both the development and the environment involving cottage settlements, smaller cluster 
complexes and family hotels. These nodes include: Sinangwana, Mngazi, Mngazana, Ntafufu River Mouth - Eco- 
Tourism/Low-Impact Tourism Zone, and Manteku Eco-Tourism/Low-Impact Tourism Zone. The municipality has 
experienced a lot of development pressure on the coastal nodes. As a result in has established a committee 
coordinated by both DEDEAT and PSJ Municipality to better manage development along the sensitive coastline. There 
are also projects that are funded by DEA for the coast care. 

Nature reserves 

Port St Johns has a nature reserve which is an environmentally protected area in terms of the provincial legislation. 
The Silaka Nature Reserve also serves as a key tourism attraction point for the municipality 

Objectives of the Reserve 

• To ensure that the planning and expansion of the Silaka Nature reserve maintains and enhances the integrity of 
its ecological, cultural and scenic resources, promotes its financial sustainability, and is integrated and co¬ 
ordinated with the development and planning if the surrounding areas 

• To promote the long term conservation , rehabilitation and restoration of the biodiversity, scenic, and heritage 
futures of the reserve and minimise operational impacts on the environment 

• To establish a nature co-operative, collaborative and mutually beneficial relationships with stakeholders to ensure 
the long term sustainability of the Silaka Nature Reserve 

• To ensure the provision, utilisation, development and maintenance of adequate and appropriate reserve 
infrastructure and equipment that supports effective conservation management and provision of visitors facilities 
and services 


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Table 6.6: List the most important threats and pressures 


PRESSURES 

THREAT 

Invasion by alien plants 

Spread threatens biodiversity of coastal forest 

Poaching by surrounding community 

Reduced vertebrate diversity and impacts on 

ecological functioning of the systems in the reserves 

Crime, burglaries and theft from clients 

Reduced income from the reserve due to an absence 

of return business and poor publicity by word of 

mouth 

Uncontrolled access to the reserve 

Linked to both crime and poaching and in this 

instance also to the presence of dogs in the reserve 


(c) Strategic Investment Opportunities 

• Agriculture - cattle farming, goat farming, small-scale beneficiation of wool and mohair, nut farming, banana 
farming, citrus fruit farming, dairy farming and forestry; 

• Retail/trade - riverside commercial, trade and tourist related opportunities in and around the Port St John's urban 
node including a fresh produce market, shops and the upgrading of tourism facilities; 

• Scenic landscape for the film industry - both local, regional and international; and 

• An "adventure" centre. 

6.6 PORT ST JOHN'S ENVIRONMENTAL PLAN 

(a) Legislative requirements and EMP guiding policies 

The EMP draws mandate and legality primarily from the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (NEMA) which 
gives legislative effect to the principles of the Constitution and the White Paper on a National Environmental Policy. 
NEMA also creates the institutions and procedures needed for cooperative governance and integration between spheres 
of government for environmental management. The Act also imposes a number of duties on the various spheres of 
government in terms of environmental management, including local government. District Municipalities are mandated 
by NEMA to develop and implement EMP. Environmental Management Plan will be based primary on, but not restricted 


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to: The Constitution of South Africa, (Act 108 of 1996); Environmental Conservation Act (Act 73 of 1989); National 
Environmental Management Act (Act 107 of 1998); Amendment of Environment Impact Assessment Regulation of 
2006; Municipal Systems Act ; Municipal Structures Act ; Environmental Implementation Plan of Eastern Cape 
Province ; Integrated Development Plan of Port St John's Municipality; White Paper on Environmental Management ; 
White Paper on Integrated Pollution & Waste Management ; White Paper on Sustainable Coastal Development (2000); 
National Waste Management Strategy ; National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act (10 of 2004); National 
Environmental Management Air Quality Act (39 of 2004); National Water Act,36 of 1998; National Environmental 
Management of Protected Areas Act (31 of 2004); Waste Management Bill ; Intended Pondoland Marine Protected Area 
Act ; Marine Living Resources Act, 18 of 1998 and By-laws. 

The guiding policies for this Environmental Spatial Framework include the following: 

• Retaining and enhancing the environmental quality of the area. 

• Promoting development opportunities with due regard to possible impact on environmentally sensitive areas. 

• One of the goals of this Environmental Management Plan is to "identify areas of environmental sensitivity and 
take steps to ensure long term conservation and management of these areas". 

• To undertake a strategic environmental assessment to identify opportunities and constraints on development 
in Port St John's and propose projects that the Municipality can undertake. 

(b) Linking the SDF and the Provincial Spatial Development Framework (PSDF) or Provincial Spatial and 
Economic Strategy (PSEDS) 

Environmental issues at Port St John's are considered as one of the development challenges. Port St John's Municipal 
Council in preparing the Environmental Management Plan (EMP) intends to address all of its environmental objectives. 
To be most effective the EMP is to be integrated into the Integrated Development Plan 2012/13-2016/17. The EMP will 
address schedules, resources and responsibilities for achieving the council's environmental objectives and targets. Port 
St John's Local Municipality will need to comply with the EMP. Sensitive areas include rivers, estuaries, coastal areas, 
beach, indigenous and coastal forests. The O.R.Tambo District Environmental Management Unit is made aware of the 
activity to a consultative process. 

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(c) Provisions for basic guidelines for land use management system of the municipality 

This Environmental Management Plan will form part of the IDP and provide the following objectives and basic 
guidelines: 

• To provide Council with an environmental inventory which provides the basis for establishing an interlinking 
system of conservation reserves, good civil service master plan and public spaces, and which will assist 
council in the process of development management. 

• To minimize harmful developmental tendencies which may affect the environment? 

• To recommend environmental principles which will assist in the maintenance and improvement of the present 
urban and rural environment? 

• To designate boundary limitations of conservation areas in the area so as to enhance species survival in the 
long term. 

• To monitor and evaluate sustainable development using the Eastern Cape Biodiversity Conservation Plan 

(d) Ecosystems, ecological corridors and other special biodiversity features 

The Sensitive Development Zone (SDZ) is classified as the area of 1km, adjacent to the Indian Ocean coast line 
between the Mnenu River in the west and the Mzintlavu River in the north-east. The SDZ is characterized by open 
unspoiled coastline with raggedy cliffs, sheltered golden beaches, river estuaries and mangrove swamps. The 
Singwanana, Mngazana coastal villages and Mngazi River Resort and the built-up urban area of Port St John's abutts 
the Coastal Zone. The following development parameter should apply for the development applications within this 
zone: all developments should be subject to an environmental impact assessment procedure and be subject to 
approval and support from the Department of Economic Development and Environmental Affairs. 

(e) Climate, Topography, Geology and flora 

The environmental analysis provides a concise summary and background on the environmental aspects and 
management issues within the Port St John's Local Municipality. The purpose of this section is to summarize the 
background of the Municipal Environmental Management Plan. 


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Climate: The region has a temperate to warm and humid climate with a predominantly summer rainy season. It has 
bimodal rains with annual average rainfall varying from about 650mm to 1000mm. Rainfall is predominantly in the 
form of light showers. Thunderstorms occur frequently and are occasionally accompanied by hail and lightning in the 
interior. Average daily maximum temperatures are around 28°C in January and 21°C in July. Occasionally, mainly 
during late winter, dry and hot "berg winds" are experienced. In winter the sky is mostly clear when the region 
receives most sunshine. Frost occurs at night in interior valleys during July and August. 

Topography and Drainage: The ground is mainly undulating and mountain peaks with high and steep elevation 
gradually increasing from the coastline to a maximum of approximately 1 000m (measured at mountain tops) above 
mean sea level (msl) in the north. The topography of the coastal belt is typically flat, whereas the interior is typified by 
undulating mountainous with steep slopes and with valleys and gorges that have been extensively carved by the main 
rivers flowing through the area towards the sea. In terms of drainage, the Port St John's Local Municipality is bounded 
by the Mzintlava River in the north and the Mnenu River in the south and has the great Mzimvubu River passing 
through the central regions of the Municipality and discharging to the sea at Port St John's. 

Geology: Port St John's is located on an upstanding fault block or host of table-like mountain sandstone and ecca age 
sediments, mainly shale. This faulting or fracture took place during the breakup of Gondwanaland's about 130 million 
ago when the present coastline was formed, more or less as it is today. The more or less flat-lying mountain 
sandstones is resistant to erosion and forms the prominent flat topped features of Mt. Thesiger and Mt.Sullivian on 
either side of the Umzimvubu River. Fluctuations in the sea level and related climatic changes are also reflected in the 
sand dunes which are located in the valleys between the hills Southwards from Port St John's to second and third 
beaches, this sand has been blow up off the narrow continental shelf offshore. 

Flora: The ECBCP Cape Floristic region covers approximately 6% of the province. This hotspot is home to the greatest 
non-tropical concentration of higher plant species in the world. The region is the only hotspot that encompasses an 
entire floral kingdom, and holds five of South Africa's 12 endemic plant families and 160 endemic genera. The Eastern 
Cape is in need of a detailed appraisal of the conservation status of all plant and animal taxa. According to Pooley, E 

(2003), three great features of the area are its beautiful indigenous forest, excellent estuaries and its scenic 

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landscapes. Nowhere in South Africa are these features so well conserved as long this spectacular stretch of rugged 
coastline. The forests contain a great variety of interesting trees and shrubs. Typical trees of the forest biome include 
Giant Umzimbeet ( milletia sutherandii) umQunye (X); Forest Mahogany ( Tichlia dregeana) umkhuhlu (X), Forest iron 
plum ( Drypetes gerrendii) iDwesa (X); Forest Fever Berry ( Croton sylvaticus ) uMfeze (X) ,Forest Bush willow 
( Combretum kraulis) uMdubu- wehlathi (X) , 

Most of the forests are demarcated as 'state forests' and conserved for the benefit of local people and visitors alike. 
Fascinating hours and days can be experienced walking along the forest trials enjoying the sights and sounds of this 
great diversity of life. The estuaries provide a suitable habitat for mangroves (the only trees that tolerate sea water) 
and both Mngazana and Ntafufu estuaries harbour fine stands of black, white and red mangroves. These mangroves 
providean indispensable nursery area for many juvenile marine fish and crustaceans. Eventually these fish, prawns and 
crabs grow to provide food and recreational angling for both locals and visitors. The coastal grasslands and valley 
bushveld areas are another feature of this region of South Africa. Typical species include buffalo grass ( stenotaprum 
secunndatum), wire grass (aristida junciformis), giant terpentine grass ( cymbopogon validis), bitter alo e(aloe ferox ) 
sweet thorn ( acacia karoo), and the common umzimbeet ( milletia grandis), (Van Oudtshoorn, F.1992). In addition 
Cymbopon plurinoides and stenotaphrum secumdatum are blooming at Silaka Nature reserve. Indigenous shrubs offer 
a large variety of leaf shapes and textures, foliage and flower colours. The fruits, seeds and nectar of most of these 
plants will attract a wide variety of birds and this alone makes them worth growing. 

Invasive Alien Plants tor both inland and coastal areas of Port St John's: Alien plants spotted along the Port St John's 
second beach include Lantana caramara-ubutywala bentaka (x) Amaranthas hybridus (umtyutyu)(x),Cestrum 
laevigatum (inkberry) pteridium aquilinum (eaglefern), Caesalpinia decapetai, Solanum mautritainum (bugweed), 
Montanoe, hibiscifolia (Tree daisy), Chromoleana adorata (Triffid weed), Psidium guajava (guava), Agava sisalana 
(Sisal),Rubus cuneifolius (American Bramble), Ricinus communis (Castor oil plant), chromolaena odorata (Triffid weed) 
and Bammboo. Alien plants will be removed using the same methods used by Working for Water Project by 
Department of Water Affairs and Environment and Department of Forestry and Fisheries. The project protection must 
eradicate invasive plants as part of the repairs works and making part was for indigenous plants. 

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Socio- Economic Uses and Conservation: Forest trees are continually exploited for timber although specific species are 
usually selected. Likewise, other species are selected for traditional medicine and, in the more populated areas, for 
firewood. Afromontane Forest is well conserved in a number of areas, and many areas are safe from exploitation by 
being inaccessible and isolated in remote areas. Plantations of pine threaten the water supply to the indigenous forests 
in many regions. 

(f) Key Environmental Parameters 

In terms of economic land uses, the environment is supporting agriculture, especially for sugar, and exotic timber 
plantations. Wild forest timber harvesting has long since ceased to be economically viable, but extensive exotic 
plantations have been established. In terms of conservation, the coastal areas are well preserved compared to settled 
inland areas which are overgrazed, degraded and deforested. Flowever, the unique inland bushveld/grassland plains, 
which are high in endemic plant species, are poorly conserved. The coastal forests whose common species include 
Coast Red Milkwood, Natal Guarri and Cape Plane are well conserved as are scrubs and shrubs. It is heavily 
overgrazed in the Transkei region of Eastern Cape. 

Valley thicket is often confined to river valleys stretching from the coast towards inland. Valley mists in the drier 
regions provide moisture. This thicket is invasive into savanna and grassland. In the past its distribution was controlled 
by large browsers such as rhino and kudu, and it is now spreading into many other vegetation types in the Eastern 
Cape. It is economically important as the best area for Angora and Boer goat farming. A number of large reserves 
conserve this thicket type, but it is under threat where there is intensive, poorly managed farming with goats or 
ostriches. 

(g) Geology and Soils 

A detailed hydro and geotechnical survey of the study area has not been conducted for the purposes of the 
environment plan or Spatial Development Framework. A feasibility study was undertaken for the Port St John's 
Municipality undertaken by Stemele Bosch Africa and broadly described the geology as being dominated by the Ecca 
group. The Ecca and Beaufort Groups consist of sandstone, mudstone and shale in varying configurations. This Group 

along with the Beaufort and Dwyka Group, which occur in the area, form part of the Karoo Supergroup The Dwyka 

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Group consist of tillite. Also occurring is quarzititc sandstone of the Natal Group. Dolerite intrusions form massive 
sheets, dykes and ring-shaped intrusions in the geology. The Natal Group comprise predominantly quartz arenites. 
Also represented are conglomerates, coarse-grained sandstones, siltstone, mudstone and diamictite. The succession is 
between 900 and 1300m thick. The Group lies on the basement rocks of the Natal Metamorphic Province. The Balfour 
Formation of the Beaufort Group is relatively sandstone rich at its contact with the underlying Middleton Formation but 
mudrock predominates overall. The Formation is approximately 2000m thick. 

(h) Agriculture 

In the rural area located north of the coastline and Port St John's Town the environment allows primarily subsistence 
grazing and dry land alleviation (mainly maize) farming. Along the Umzimvubu River floodplain in close proximity to 
the peri-urban region of the Port St Johns Town intensive irrigation by private individuals is being developed on fairly 
large scale. 

(i) Forestry and vegetation 

The Port St John's area is rich in natural vegetation with indigenous forests spread sparely over a larger portion of the 
municipal area. The most easterly parts have indigenous forests. 

Several distinct vegetation zones are found in the Transkei. Much of the region is grasslands with the hardy alpine veld 
in the Drakensberg and high veld Sourveld over the central region. The larger river valleys are flanked with valley 
bushveld; acacias and europhobia dominate; and thornveld types; Ngogoni Veld and Eastern Province Thornveld; 
around the coastal strip. The grassland is damaged disturbed by the recent coastal storms; overgrazing hills but also 
by human movement at the beach and surrounding areas. The beach, river, forest entrance should be restricted to 
certain entrance points and avoiding vehicles and human damage to the natural resources. There are not signs that 
restrict any fires near the sand dunes and coastal forest. The random indigenous medicinal uses, fires and beach 
woods have had a negative impact to the ecosystem. Pondoland Coastal Plateau Sourveld occurs on the table-likde 
mountain sand stone in the North and is characterized by sour grasses; forestry and patches of the fynbos. 


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The wild coast has a comparatively high rainfall, with the coastal and mountain regions receiving about 1000mm per 
annum. Snow is not uncommon at high altitudes in winter, but the remainder of the municipality, like most parts of the 
country, is template with the high sub-tropical temperatures along the coast in summer. The high rainfall in the area 
results in frequent flooding and storms often coincide with high tides in the Umzimvubu River. The areas of concern 
include Mpantu (area proposed for the Regional Taxi Rank and Filling Station) by run-off from the Mountain; Greens 
Farms with informal settlement and Former Naval Base (area is proposed for residential development with a mix of 
supporting facilities). 

National -level ecosystem status classifications section 52 of the Biodiversity Act provides for the listing of threatened 
ecosystems at both national and provincial. NSBA Threatened ecosystem in the Eastern Cape state that the Pondoland- 
Natal Sandtone Coastal are vulnerable compared to Umtata Moist Grassland land which are endangered ( ECBCP 
Technical Report 2007) ECBCP Technical Report 2007 - The vegetation of centre is variable and is associated with the 
grassland, forest and savanna biomes of South Africa. Lamiaceae and Apocynaceae considered endemic or nearly 
endemic but most plant families have endemic (Anderson and Von Wyk 1999). The area is under serious threat from 
poor land -use practice. Cowling and Hilton Taylor (1994) cited 33 species with the Red Data status, although this may 
be much higher by now. 

(j) Environmental priorities 

The Port St John's local Municipality took the initiative to develop an Environmental Management Plan and enforce EIA 
at a project level so as to ensure that important natural resources are conserved by all stakeholders when promoting 
rural development, poverty alleviation, and service delivery. O. R.Tambo District Municipality IDP 2010/11 review 
identifies major concerns in the district which include environmental degradation, soil erosion. At the local municipal 
level the Ntabankulu area is the most affected at 35% degradation followed by Mbizana at 32% with Port St Johns only 
at 15%. 

(k) Use and protection of natural resources and heritage as its comparative and competitive advantages 

The Eastern Cape is globally recognized for its high biodiversity value and scenic beauty. It has the highest biome 
diversity of any province, with seven biomes. Port St John's biodiversity value and scenic beauty is made of the centre 

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of biological endemism: the Pondoland Centre. The Eastern Cape Biodiversity Conservation Plan further recognise the 
fact that irrespective of high biodiversity and biological endemism, the Eastern Cape Province has the highest level of 
rural poverty in the country with low employment rates and underdevelopment concurred by draft Port St John's 
Municipality IDP 2010/11 Review stating that poverty remains critical issues in the municipality. The Eastern Cape 
Province is currently facing unprecedented pressure from unplanned development, urban and agriculture expansion, 
mining, illegal holiday cottages, and over-harvesting of natural resources. The ECBCP further suggest that all these 
developments have potential to rapidly erode the natural resources. 

Port St John Town is characterized by a range of environments features such as subsistence agricultural farming areas. 
State and Indigenous forestry. Nature Conservation, coastal and rivers and areas with inherent economic opportunity 
such as the tourism area. A small proportion of the Port John Central Business Centre and around the core areas of 
Second Beach, Agate Terrace, Ferry Point, Mpantu, Mtubane and Airstrip have structures. Port St Johns Municipality 
Integrated Development Plan 2010/2011 review stated that the economic base of the municipality remains low. The 
municipality has identified the following resources and sectors which need to be used optimally to develop the 
economy of the municipality; mineral resources (travertine, sand and stone); forestry; heritage (arts and culture); 
tourism; manufacturing; agriculture; marine based economic activities and Small Medium and Micro Enterprise (SMME) 
Development. 

In summary the land use reflects the spatial distribution of economic activities. Informal sand mining and quarrying are 
distributed along the near river and coastal sources. Port St John's Municipality, Port St John's SMME, emerging 
contractors, supplier and communities (example Caguba) near CBD will form joint initiatives for mining rights and 
mining enterprises for sand, bricks and crash stone to address the lack of sand and quarry development within Port St 
John's CBD area. The joint initiative will promote sustainable and legal use of mineral resource within Port St John's 
balancing conservation of estuaries, rivers, mountains with socio economic development and increase municipal 
revenue. 


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(I) Projects / programs to address environmental challenges 
1. Recreation, Tourism and Conservation Initiatives 

Several eco-tourist related initiatives have been initiated especially for the coastal strip of Port St John's area. The 
European Union funded projects comprise of guided horse and hiking trails operating along the Wild Coast. Significant 
trails are the Mantku trail, the Ntafufu trail, Scambeni trail, Mngazana trail and Mpande trail. Local tourism initiatives 
being developed are the development of cultural villages, the Wild Coast Festival the craft production programmes and 
market place development programme. The Port St John's Local Economic Development Plan and Tourism 
Development Plan has details about the above projects. 

BUILDING INCLUSIVE GREEN MUNICIPALITIES 

Background: 

The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM), in partnership with the South African Local Government Association 
(SALGA), received a contribution from Global Affairs Canada (GAC) to implement "The Building Inclusive Green 
Municipalities (BIGM)" program for 51 months (4.3 years). The aim is to improve the capacity of South African 
municipal governments to support effective service delivery, inclusive of local green economic growth, and enhanced 
climate change mitigation and adaptation measures. The program will pilot local economic development initiatives to 
promote job creation, poverty reduction, and enhanced well-being, while empowering women, youth, and vulnerable 
groups, and ensuring their inclusion as decision makers and beneficiaries. The BIGM program will also improve 
municipal-level plans and policies targeting climate change adaptation and mitigation, including asset management 
policies and practices. 

Climate change is creating major challenges for municipalities worldwide. At the same time, municipal practitioners 
have a key role to play in implementing measures for climate change mitigation and adaptation at the local level. 
Partnership cooperation between municipalities is a form of long-term international cooperation between local self- 
governments consisting of regular meetings of municipal representatives and citizens. Usually, this cooperation is 
based on an official document (partnership agreement) or a resolution adopted by the legislative body of the 
municipality concerned. The municipal partnership movement is unique in that it integrates all groups of citizens - 
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from ordinary citizens, experts, businessmen and employees of different institutions, people of different ages, men and 
women, youth, economically active citizens, senior people, the handicapped, etc., to civic associations and various 
organizations. 

BIGM will build on the strengths of FCM and SALGA and of their respective members to deliver good, suitable local 
economic development and contribute to South Africa's national priority of reducing poverty and transitioning to a low 
carbon economy. BIGM project is initiating a bottom-up process that will take up the challenges posed by climate 
change by supporting strategic climate initiatives agreed on between the City of Fredericton and Port St. Johns 
municipality to transfer municipal expertise to share information, and generate new knowledge. 

The climate change and assets management component will be supported by one anchor metro municipality; Buffalo 
City Metropolitan Municipality. The ultimate outcome: will be to reduce poverty and improve climate change mitigation 
and adaptation within targeted municipalities in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. 

The programme is to improve the capacity of municipal staff in Port St. Johns in asset management, as well as climate 
change mitigation and adaptation, with a view to improving the quality of life of Port St. Johns residents, particularly 
for women, youth, and vulnerable groups. 

The City of Fredericton (Canadian partner) and the Port St. Johns Municipality (South African partner) were selected 
for the BIGM program through a competitive application process. The partners met for the first time during the week 
of September 18, 2017 in Port St. Johns, South Africa. During the week, there were discussions and workshops to 
identify a project for the two partners that would start in September, 2017 and run until November, 2020. The 
partners agreed that a collaboration to develop an asset management plan that would incorporate climate change 
mitigation/adaptation would be the most beneficial for Port St. Johns. The Municipality of Port St. Johns has already 
experienced some serious flooding, as well as localized road damage due to rains and will be more susceptible to 
flooding and road damage as weather events become more severe with climate change. Port St. Johns has an asset 
register but it is acknowledged that the register is not complete and it is not used for infrastructure program planning 

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or infrastructure strategic planning. It is also acknowledged that there are not sufficient principles and policies in place 
to guide the management of infrastructure assets in Port St. Johns. 

The aim of the mission is to facilitate a partnership between Port St. Johns Local Municipality and the City of 
Fredericton from Canada on Climate Change and Asset Management (Component 2000). 


PROJECT NAME: 


The Municipality has identified a project called: Bring back our greening - Uhlaza Lwethu 

Purpose: 

The main purpose of this project is to create a tourists friendly environment by introducing climate change campaigns, 
which seek to introduce a culture of cleanliness amongst residents, beautification of the town and also assist with the 
development of credible asset management plan. 

Impact 

The project will improve the quality of life for all residents of Port St. Johns, and in particular women and the 
vulnerable members of the community, by improving the capacity of municipal staff to understand and adapt to the 
likely impacts of climate change and to understand and manage the municipality's infrastructure assets. 

Mandate: Council 

Council took a resolution to support the programme and chose Climate change and asset management 

In summary, this project will be to develop an Asset Management Plan that takes in to account existing assets and 

planned assets, including assets for overcoming climate change vulnerability. 

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Expected Results: 

• Signing Ceremony (actual place to be decided between South Africa or Canada) 

• Broad-based stakeholder involvement in municipal development strategies. 

• Participatory problem-solving through inclusive processes and proper governance. 

• Mobilization of local resources and commitment for vulnerable groups & youth. 

• A framework for capacity development and support for institutions leading to better implementation. 

• Mainstreaming environmental concerns in local economic development. 

• Alignment with existing projects such as Greenest Municipality , Infrastructure Development Project funded by 
OTP that will create job opportunities 

• Gender Strategy Developed and mobilise funding for implementation 

• Asset Management Plan and Procedure Manual 

• Climate Change 

• Training of Staff, Councillors and Community 

• Stakeholder engagements 

ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE 

Many of the grasslands present in the area have been degraded by prolonged selective and over-grazing in the past. 
Bush encroachment of Acacia and indigenous Tonga Pondoland Centre of Endemism has been the result. Soil erosion 
and trampling in wetlands is also a large problem in the Port St Johns and the silk at the Umzimvubu River is as a 
result of poor livestock management and limit recreational water activities. 

Environmental Education and Conservation of both Flora and Fauna training is to be initiated by all stakeholders 
(Provincial Department of Environmental Affairs, National and Provincial Department of Education, National 
Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, National Department of Water Affairs, National Department of Rural 
Development and Land Reform, Development Bank of Southern Africa, Eastern Development Corporation, Department 
of Labour and various SETAs). 


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(n) Capital projects that will require environmental authorization to comply with an EIA process 

(i) A full environmental Impact assessment with specialists in biodiversity, water quality and a detailed Public 
Participation Process. The proposed Bulolo Golf Estate will have impact on the forest, water use and trigger 
NEMA, 1998 as a listed activity as amendment in the EIA regulation,2006. 

(ii) A Cable Way is a listed activity in Government Notice No. R. 386 and therefore must be authorized by the 
Department of Economic Development and Environmental Affairs (DEDEA) in terms of Section 24 of the National 
Environmental Management Act (Act No 107 of 1998). 

(iii) Port st. Johns is locad in a very sensitive area and the majority of our infrastructure projects require 
comprehensive environmental assessment prior to any construction especially in relation to roads, water, and 
electrification projects. 

(o) Air quality management plan as contemplated in section 15(2) of the NEMA: Air Quality Act 39 of 
2004 

In order to obtain more detailed information on the level and content of emissions within the region (from vehicles, 
businesses, homes, industries), mitigation measures for various development scenarios, the location of the problem 
and its potential impact on air quality in the identified areas of local concern (such as industrial emissions), a detailed 
specialist study would be required. This Specialist Study/Air Quality Report would be based on an analysis of monitored 
local gas emissions: Carbon Monoxide (CO) - motor vehicle emission indicator and Nitrogen Oxides (N0 2 ) - both 
industrial and motor vehicle emission indicator- "Criteria pollutants" - forming the basis for the compilation of an 
emissions inventory. Diesel utilised in South Africa contains a higher sulphur content than elsewhere in the world - 
(0.55%) and may be a contributory factor to sulphur dioxide (S0 2 ) levels (DMA Air Report, 1995). National Guideline 
Values - as a basis for establishing exceedances and World Health Organisation standards for more stringent control. 

(p) Integrated Waste Management Plan and or System 

Waste Disposal Strategies will depend on the scale and type of new development and need to be carefully assessed. It 
is therefore incumbent on the developing agencies to ensure that sustainable management practices are introduced at 
an early stage of policy-making for the area. Programmes and projects should be truly supportive of strategies to 
improve the quality of life of the prospective residents of the area without detriment to the natural river systems. 

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(q) Environmental Information Management Strategies 

To ensure biodiversity is sustainable, ten key strategies will underpin all development as guidelines: 

> Avoid land use that results in vegetation loss in critical biodiversity areas. 

> Maintain large intact natural patches - try to minimize habitat fragmentation in critical biodiversity areas. 

> Maintain landscape connections (ecological corridors) that connect critical biodiversity areas. 

> Maintain ecological processes at all scales, and avoid or compensate for any effects of land uses on ecological 
processes. 

> Plan for long-term change and unexpected events, in particular those predicted for global climate change. 

> Plan for cumulative impacts and knock-on effects. 

> Minimize the introduction and spread of alien species. 

> Minimize land-use types that reduce ecological resilience (ability to adapt to change), particularly at the level 
of water catchments. 

> Implement land use and land management practices that are compatible with the natural potential of the 
area. 

> Balance opportunity for human and economic development with the requirements for biodiversity persistence. 

INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN 

Scope 

This IWMP has been produced for the Port St Johns Municipality (PSJM) and is applicable geographically to all areas 
falling within the jurisdiction of the Municipality. As municipal plan, it is applicable to all directorates. 

Waste Service Provision 

The Constitution of South Africa and other legislation mandate refuse removal by municipalities in their areas of 
jurisdiction. The sub-function of Solid Waste Management includes refuse removal, solid waste disposal and landfill, 
street cleaning and recycling. 


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Waste Generation and Storage 

Waste produced within the PSJM is mostly general waste that is mostly produced in the urban centre of Port St Johns. 
In peri-urban and rural areas, waste is generally stored in pits and burned, however the municipality provides 85 litre 
plastics for the storage of waste to residents. 


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CHAPTER 7 

PERFOMANCE MANAGEMENT 

SYSTEM 


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7.1 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK 

7.1.1 Overview 

Port St. Johns Municipality has an approved Organizational Performance Management System (OPMS) Framework 
which is currently undergoing review. This document serves as a guideline document for the implementation of the 
Performance Management System (PMS) within the Municipality. The Municipality has further developed Performance 
Procedure Manual which was adopted by Council in December 2016. The implementation of performance management 
is guided by various legislative prescripts and requirements. The OPMS Framework is inclusive of the following 
interrelated processes: 

• Planning; 

• Implementation; 

• Monitoring; 

• Evaluation. 

The Municipality's PMS is the primary mechanism to monitor, review, and improves the implementation of its IDP and 
to gauge the progress made in achieving the objectives set out in the IDP. In addition, the Municipality's PMS facilitates 
increased accountability, learning, improvement, as well as providing early warning signals to facilitate decision¬ 
making. The PMS monitors actual performance against set targets and contractual obligations. Effective service 
delivery relies upon the IDP, efficient utilization of all resources and the PMS being closely integrated across all 
functions at an organizational and individual level. The most valuable reason for measuring performance is that what 
gets measured gets done. 

Once performance planning and the IDP have been completed and departmental SDBIP's are in place, they need to be 
implemented by executing the work in accordance with these plans. As the work is executed, it needs to be 
continuously monitored and periodically measured and reported on. Reporting requires that the Municipality takes the 
priorities of the organization, its performance objectives, indicators, targets, measurements, and analysis, and present 
this information in a simple and accessible format, relevant and useful to the specific target group, whilst meeting the 
legal prescripts for reporting. 

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Figure 7.1: The PMS Cycle can be illustrated 




Organization Key Performance Indicators Linked To Departmental Indicators 

Whilst the organizational key performance indicators are presented in the SDBIP at an annual and quarterly level, the 
departmental indicators are broken down into monthly indicators, which are monitored and reported on a monthly 
basis at meetings of the operational management committee. 

Departmental Indicators Linked To Outputs in the Performance Agreements 

According to the draft Individual Performance Management System policy, all Senior Managers including the Municipal 
Manager, must enter into a performance agreement annually. These performance agreements are directly linked to the 
approved SDBIP and departmental indicators, through the development of individual work plans. Indicators in the work 
plans also include indicators that are not necessarily included in the SDBIP and/or departmental indicators, but are 
relevant to the operational functionality of any particular post. The indicators contained within the work plan are 
agreed upon and signed off by both the supervisor and the incumbent. 


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IDP and Performance Management 

As already indicated earlier, the purpose of the IDP is to plan for what the municipality should do, when, where, what 
it will cost and who should be responsible. This has been done in Chapter Four. The IDP should also ensure that the 
available resources are directed and employed at achieving the set development objectives and priorities as set out in 
Chapter Three. Implementation of the IDP should therefore ensure that the development projects are implemented, 
the resources are used in a most effective and efficient manner and the pace at which projects are implemented is 
acceptable. To achieve this, it is necessary to monitor, evaluate, measure and review the performance of Municipalities 
against indicators and targets set in the IDPs. 

The performance management should therefore: 

• Be able to guide the planning, setting of objectives and use of resources; 

• Enable and facilitate identification of management and service delivery (development implementation) 
challenges; 

• Provide for mechanisms to timely identify management problems; 

• Provide for mechanisms and systems to solve problems and remove impediments; and 

• Provide for means to change or adjust resources deployed to achieve the municipality's development 
objectives. 


Performance Management, IDP Monitoring and Evaluation 

The Port St Johns IDP, like any plan that is prepared, needs to be monitored and evaluated. The monitoring needs to 
be done at two critical levels, implementation or operational level and impact or outcome level. Operational monitoring 
is the monitoring that needs to be done relating to how implementation is being done, measuring progress in relation 
to time lines and deadlines, operational challenges and bottlenecks, and any other factors that may hamper smooth 
implementation of strategic projects. Monitoring also needs to be done at impact level, i.e. the outcomes of 
interventions and projects implemented needs to be done to determine whether the intended positive impacts will be 
achieved. The performance management system as legislated and discussed below provides mechanisms for IDP 
monitoring and evaluation. 

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7.1.2 MS Policies And Legislative Imperatives 

There are several policies and pieces of legislation making provision for performance management and its review. The 
important ones are three which are discussed in detail: the Municipal Systems Act, (Act 32 of 2000), Municipal 
Planning and Performance Management Regulations 2001 (No 796, of 24 August 2001) and the Municipal Financial 
Management Act, 2003 (Act 66 of 2003). The other relevant policies and pieces of legislation are: 

• The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 ( Act 108 of 1996); 

• The White Paper on Batho Pele (1998); 

• The White Paper on Local Government (1998); 

• Regulations for Municipal Managers and Managers reporting directly to Municipal Managers (dated 1 August 
2006); and 

The Local Government: Municipal Structures Act, 1998 (Act 117 of 1998). 


The Municipal Systems Act, No. 32 of 2000 

As stated before in Chapter One, the Municipal Systems Act, 32 of 2000 (MSA) requires municipalities to prepare IDPs. 
The Act also requires a municipality to monitor and evaluate its performance. Section 34 of the MSA requires each 
municipality to annually review its IDP in accordance with its performance measurement (in terms of Section 41) to 
the extent that changing circumstances so demand and to amend the IDP in accordance with the prescribed process. 
Other provisions are that the municipality must: 

• Develop a Performance Management System. 

• Publish an Annual Report on performance for the Councillors, its employees, and other spheres of 
Government that are rendering support to the municipality. 

• Carry out an internal audit of performance and tabling the report before council and publicising the report. 

• Have its annual performance report audited by the Auditor-General (and cooperate with the exercise). 

• Involve the community in setting indicators and targets and reviewing municipal performance. 


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The Local Government: Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations, 2001 

The Local Government Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations were published on 24 August, 
2001 in accordance with the Municipal Systems Act of 2000. The regulations are for municipal planning (specifically 
integrated development planning) and performance monitoring. For integrated development planning, the regulations 
provide guidelines on contents of an IDP and process for amendment (Chapter Two of the regulations). Chapter three 
is dedicated to performance management. The following are the key contents of the regulations on performance 
management: 

• Nature and adoption of a performance management system (Sections 7 and 8) 

• Setting of and review of key performance indicators (Sections 9 and 11) 

• Setting of performance targets (Section 12) 

• Internal auditing of performance measurements (Section 14) 

• Monitoring, measurement and review of performance (Section 13) 

7.1.3 Nature of PMS 

Section 7 (2) of the regulations stipulate that the Municipality, in developing its Performance Management System, 
must ensure that the PMS: 

• Complies with all the requirements set out in the Municipal Systems Act; 

• Demonstrates how it is to operate and be managed from the planning stage up to the stages of performance 
review and reporting; 

• Clarifies the roles and responsibilities of each role player, including the local community, in the functioning of the 
system; 

• Clarifies the processes of implementing the system within the framework of the Integrated Development 
Planning process; 

• Determines the frequency of reporting and the lines of accountability for performance; 

• Relates to the Municipality's Employee Performance Management processes. 


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Salient Key Performance Indicators 

The key performance indicators of the municipality, authorized by the Minister in terms of Section 43 of MSA, should 
include the salient Key Performance Indicators. It also shows the relationship between the municipality's strategic 
development objectives as espoused in Chapter Three and the Key Performance Indicators for Port St Johns 
Municipality. 

Table 7.1: Key Performance Areas and Salient Key Performance Indicators 


Key Performance Area Salient Key Performance Indicators 


Good governance 

Job creation - The number of local jobs created through the Municipality's local, 

economic development initiatives, including capital projects. 

Institutional Development 

Employment Equity - the number of people from employment equity target groups 

and Transformation 

employed in the three highest levels of management in compliance with a 

Municipality's approved employment equity plan. 

Skills Development - the percentage of a Municipality's budget actually spent on 

implementing its workplace skills plan. 

Financial viability and 

Budget - the percentage of the Municipality's capital budget actually spent on capital 

sustainability 

projects in terms of the IDP. 

Financial viability with respect to debt coverage; outstanding debtors in relation to 

revenue and cost coverage. 

Infrastructure Planning and 

Access to basic services - the percentage of households with access to basic levels 

Development 

of water, sanitation, electricity and solid waste removal. 

Local economic development 

Income and access to free basic services - the percentage of households earning 

less than R1100-00 per month with access to free basic services. 


Institutionalizing the PMS 

In establishing the PMS, the Port St Johns Municipality goes beyond fulfilling the legislative requirements. The PMS is to 
serve as a primary tool used to monitor, review and improve the implementation of the Municipality's IDP so as to be 


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able to achieve its development objectives and targets till 2016/17 financial year. The PMS should be institutionalised 
and thereby fulfilling the following functions: 

• Promoting accountability by the municipality and facilitating public participation; 

• Be a useful tool for decision-making and resource allocation; 

• Guiding development of municipal capacity-building programmes; and 

• Provide for an early warning system. 

The Municipal Financial Management Act 

The Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA) also provides for municipal performance management most important 
of which is the requirement that municipalities should annually adopt a Service Delivery and Budget Implementation 
Plan (SDBIP). The SDBIP should contain service delivery targets and performance indicators. Whilst considering and 
approving the annual budget, the Municipality must also set measurable performance targets for each revenue source 
and vote. 


Key Performance Area Model 

There are several models available for measuring performance. Examples of such models are the Municipal Score Card, 
Balanced Score Card and Key Performance Area. Port St Johns Municipality has adopted a Key Performance Area 
Model. Like any other model for performance measurement, the KPA model has to fulfil its functions as stated before 
and should be used for evaluation, control, budgeting, motivation, celebration, promotion, improvement and learning. 
The Audit committee monitors and audits all performance reports that are submitted to council. 

7.2 THE SERVICE DELIVERY AND BUDGET IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (SDBIP) 

7.2.1 Introduction 

The SDBIP is a key management, implementation, and monitoring tool, which provides operational content to the end- 
of-year service delivery targets, set in the budget and IDP. It determines the Performance agreements for the 
municipal manager and all top managers, whose performance can then be monitored through section 71 monthly 


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reports, and evaluated through the annual report process. The biggest challenge is to develop meaningful non-financial 
service delivery targets and indicators, in addition to the budget indicators. However, this will remain a work in 
progress for the Municipality. 

The development of the Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plans (SDBIPs) is a requirement under the 
Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA) and gives effect to the Municipality's Integrated Development Plan (IDP) 
and annual budget. The SDBIP is an expression of the objectives of the Municipality, in quantifiable outcomes, that will 
be implemented by the administration for the municipal financial year. The SDBIP includes the service delivery targets 
and performance indicators for each quarter that should be linked to the performance agreements of senior 
management. 

These are integral to the implementation and entrenchment of our performance management system. The SDBIP 
facilitates accountability and transparency of municipal administration and managers to the Council, and of Councillors 
to the community. It also fosters the management, implementation, and monitoring of the budget, the performance of 
top management, and the achievement of the strategic objectives as laid out in the IDP. 

The SDBIP enables the Municipal Manager to monitor the performance of senior managers, the mayor to monitor the 
performance of the municipal manager, and for the community to monitor the performance of the Municipality, as each 
activity contains outputs, outcomes, and timeframes. The SDBIP is compiled on an annual basis, and is linked to the 5 
year and 1 year organizational scorecards that are contained in the approved SDBIP. The SDBIP is yet another step 
forward to increasing the principle of democratic and accountable government at local level. Development objectives 
are measured through key performance indicators at every level, and continuously monitored throughout the year. The 
SDBIP is in essence the management and implementation tool which sets in year information such as quarterly service 
delivery and monthly budget targets, and links each service delivery output to the budget of the Municipality. It further 
indicates the responsibilities and outputs for each of the senior managers and the top management team, the 
resources to be used, and the deadlines set for the relevant activities. 


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7.2.2 REPORTING ON THE SDBIP 

Various reporting requirements are outlined in the MFMA, and both the mayor and the accounting officer have clear 
roles to play in preparing and presenting these reports. The SDBIP provides an excellent basis for generating the 
reports which the MFMA requires. The report then allows the Council to monitor the implementation of service delivery 
programs and initiatives across the Municipality. 

(i) MONTHLY REPORTING 

Section 71 of the MFMA stipulates that reporting on actual revenue targets and spending against the budget should 
occur on a monthly basis. This reporting must be conducted by the accounting officer of a Municipality, no later than 
10 working days after the end of each month. Reporting must include the following: 

(i) Actual revenue, per source; 

(ii) Actual borrowings; 

(iii) Actual expenditure, per vote; 

(iv) Actual capital expenditure, per vote; 

(v) The amount of any allocations received. 

If necessary, explanation of the following must be included in the monthly reports: 

(a) Any material variances from the Municipality's projected revenue by source, and from the Municipality's 
expenditure projections per vote 

(b) Any material variances from the service delivery and budget implementation plan and; 

(c) Any remedial or corrective steps taken or to be taken to ensure that the projected revenue and expenditure 
remain within the municipality's approved budget 

(ii) QUARTERLY REPORTING 

Section 52 (d) of the MFMA compels the Mayor to submit a report to the Council on the implementation of the budget 
and the financial state of affairs of the Municipality, within 30 days of the end of each quarter. The quarterly 
performance projections captured in the SDBIP form the basis for the Mayor's quarterly report. 


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(iii) MID-YEAR REPORTING 

Section 72 (1) (a) of the MFMA outlines the requirements for mid-year reporting. The Accounting Officer is required, by 
the 25th January of each year, to assess the performance of the Municipality during the first half of the year, taking 
into account: 

(i) The monthly statements referred to in section 71 of the first half of the year 

(ii) The municipality's service delivery performance during the first half of the financial year, and the service delivery 
targets and performance indicators set in the service delivery and budget implementation plan; 

(iii) The past year's annual report, and progress on resolving problems identified in the annual report; 

(iv) The performance of every municipal entity under the sole or shared control of the Municipality, taking into account 
reports in terms of section 88 from any such entities. 

Based on the outcomes of the mid-year budget and performance assessment report, an adjusted budget may be 
tabled if actual revenue or expenditure amounts are materially different from the projections contained in the budget 
or the SDBIP. The SDBIP is also a living document, and may be modified based on the mid-year performance review. 
Thus the SDBIP remains a kind of contract that holds the Port St. Johns Municipality accountable to the community. 


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IDP APPROVAL 

Having given all stakeholders an opportunity to air their views and influence municipal decision making regarding this 
plan and the intended development programme for the term 2018 /2022, and the PSJ Municipal council being satisfied 
that all necessary planning activities as envisaged in the IDP process plan were carried out accordingly. Council 
therefore RESOLVED to adopt this document as its IDP 2018/19 -2022. 

DECLARATION OF ADOPTION 

COUNCIL RESOLUTION NUMBER FOR IDP ADOPTION: . 

SIGNATURES 


Mr. P.B. MASE DATE 

ACTING MUNICIPAL MANANGER 


CLLR N. MLOMBILE-CINGO DATE 

HONORABLE MAYOR 


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