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Natomas Arena Reuse 
Planned Unit Development 



Draft 

October 2019 


AECOM 




























Table of Contents 


1. Introduction.1 

1.1 LOCATION AND CONTEXT.2 

1.2 PROJECT GOALS.3 

1.3 PURPOSE AND INTENT.4 

2. Plan Overview and Principles.7 

2.1 DESIGN PRINCIPLES.9 

2.2 DESIGN FRAMEWORK.10 

3. Land Use Development Standards.17 

3.1 CONCEPT AND LAND USES.18 

3.2 ADJACENCIES.19 

3.3 RESIDENTIAL.20 

3.4 EMPLOYMENT.21 

3.5 COMMERCIAL.22 

3.6 PARK AND OPEN SPACE.23 

4. Site-Specific Design Guidelines.25 

4.1 RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT.26 

4.2 COMMERCIAL AND EMPLOYMENT DEVELOPMENT.29 

5. Circulation and Parking.33 

5.1 CONNECTION TO BASELINE ROADWAY NETWORK.34 

5.2 SITE ACCESS FROM ROADWAYS.35 

5.3 CONNECTOR ROADWAYS.36 

5.4 LOCAL ROADWAYS.40 
























NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


5.5 PUBLIC TRANSIT.41 

5.6 BIKE AND PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION.43 

5.7 PARKING.45 

6. Public Realm.49 

6.1 ROADWAYS.51 

6.2 COMMUNITY PARK.53 

6.3 NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS.53 

6.4 LINEAR PARKS.54 

6.5 PRIVATE PLAZAS.54 

6.6 DRAINAGE BASINS.55 

7. Lighting.57 

7.1 GENERAL GUIDELINES.58 

7.2 ROADWAY AND WALKWAY LIGHTING.58 

7.3 BUILDING LIGHTING (EXTERIOR).59 

7.4 PARKING LIGHTING.59 

7.5 LANDSCAPE LIGHTING.59 

8. Signage and Graphics.61 

8.1 GENERAL SIGNAGE DESIGN REQUIREMENTS.62 

8.2 DIRECTIONAL SIGNAGE.62 

8.3 FREESTANDING SIGNAGE.63 

8.4 TENANT SIGNAGE.63 























List of Figures 


Figure 1: Project Location.2 

Figure 2: Design Framework.11 

Figure 3: Proposed Zoning Plan.18 

Figure 4: Surrounding Land Uses.19 

Figure 5: Town Center District and Core Area Map.22 

Figure 6: Baseline Roadway Network.34 

Figure 7: Site Access.35 

Figure 8: Collector Roadways Cross Section Map.36 

Figure 9: Innovator Drive Cross Section.37 

Figure 10: Sports Parkway North Cross Section.37 

Figure 11: Minor Collector Cross Section.38 

Figure 12: Sports Parkway with One Side Parking Cross Section.38 

Figure 13: Major Collector with Parking on Both Sides Cross Section.39 

Figure 14: Collector Gateway Cross Section.39 

Figure 15: Collector Gateway North Cross Section.40 

Figure 16: Potential Light Rail Route and Stations Map.41 

Figure 17: Bus Route and Stations Map.42 

Figure 18: Bike Network Map.44 

Figure 19: Sidewalk Zones.51 






















NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


List of Tables 

Table 1: Minimum Setback Requirements.26 

Table 2: Building Height Limit Related to Adjacent Land Use.27 

Table 3: City of Sacramento Parking Requirement.31 









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1.1 LOCATION AND CONTEXT 


The Natomas Arena Reuse Plan Area ("Plan Area”) 
covers approximately 183 acres that includes 
the former Sleep Train Arena site in the City of 
Sacramento. The Plan Area is an infill redevelopment 
site located in North Natomas and is bounded by the 
semi-curvilinear ring of Sports Parkway. It is roughly 
bisected by Terracina Drive from the east and by an 
extension of Innovator Drive from the southeast. 

The environs immediately surrounding the site are 
composed of mixed-use commercial, multi-family 
residential, and vacant land uses, and are bounded by 
Del Paso Road to the north, Truxel Road to the east, 
Arena Boulevard to the south, and East Commerce 
Way to the west. 


The Plan Area is also located close to the crossing 
of Interstate 80 and Interstate 5, between the 
Sacramento International Airport and downtown 
Sacramento. The size of the site, along with its 
freeway visibility and location provide a unique 
redevelopment opportunity to attract residents, 
employers and visitors to the area. 



Toward^ 

Sacramer 

Airport 


N Park Dr 


N Bend Dr 


Del Paso Rd 


Del Paso Rd 


Bon fair Ave 


Plan Area 


Windsong St 


Water 


Road Functional Classifications 


Existing Roads 


Freeway 


Arena Blvd 


Minor Collector 


^Towards 

Sacramentj 

Downtownl 


Figure 1: Project Location (Existing Conditions) 


































































































































NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


1.2 PROJECT GOALS 


Redevelopment of the Plan Area is envisioned as a 
vibrant, livable, transit-oriented, mixed-product and 
mixed-density infill district, set in a predominantly 
built-out portion of North Natomas. The overarching 
goal of this project is to ensure the orderly and logical 
reuse of the Plan Area supported by the following 
sub-goals: 

• To redevelop the property with mixed residential 
and employment uses consistent with the overall 
vision of a dynamic and desirable neighborhood 
and widely appealing commercial center. 

• To make efficient reuse of a key infill opportunity 
site in North Natomas. 

• To provide policy and design guidance for the 
future layout and mix of uses that promotes transit 
use, biking, and walking and would result in a 
sustainable and healthy place. 

• To thoughtfully integrate public parks and open 
space areas in a manner that provides recreational 
opportunities and contributes to the area's overall 
character. 

• To capitalize on the site's proximity to transit, 
existing employment centers, and neighborhoods 
by creating an attractive, well-defined, and 
integrated place to live, work and play. 

• To promote a multi-modal transportation 
network by providing transit ready rights-of- 
way, lower parking ratios, car sharing and low 
emission vehicles, as well as bike parking for both 
individuals and the bike share program. 



A dynamic mixed-use district 



Promote transit opportunities 



Integrated open space system 

























1.3 PURPOSE AND INTENT 


The purpose of this document is to define the 
project vision and to guide development in the Plan 
Area. This document establishes development 
requirements and guidelines unique to the area 
that should be applied to all project development. 
These guidelines should be used in the planning and 
design of all projects within the Plan Area boundaries 
and would follow all relevant and applicable City 
codes, standards, and reviews. The Planned Unit 
Development ("PUD") is intended to present the 
desired planning and design characteristics that, 
when implemented, would help to ensure the 
realization of the vision of the Plan Area. These 
include: 


• Development Guidelines describing 
recommended development attributes and 
elements unique to the Plan Area; 

• Development Standards that include required 
development design attributes; and 

• Development Objectives that are recognized and 
defined as goals for the area, and which strive to 
achieve the spirit of the vision for development in 
the Plan Area. 






NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


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The PUD is intended to serve as flexible road map 
leading to the establishment of a diverse, vibrant, 
and attractive destination at the geographic heart 
of the largely developed southern portion of 
North Natomas. The Plan Area is located between 
Downtown Sacramento and Sacramento International 
Airport, near the intersection of two interstate 
highways (1-5 and 1-80). The Plan Area thus has the 
potential to serve as both a community and regional 
hub. 

The project provides the opportunity to fulfill an 
exciting vision for urban infill development that 
could include housing, employment, a variety of 
goods and services, and other destination-oriented 
uses. This opportunity is complemented by the 
well-established surrounding uses, transportation 
network, anticipated future connection to light rail, 
and City policies that identify it as an urban core. The 
Plan Area is intended to accommodate distinctive 
residential neighborhoods of many different 
housing types and densities, commercial uses that 
could include mixed-use, major employers, or a 
combination thereof. 


The public realm would serve as the framework from 
which various development projects would emanate. 
Safe, inviting, and efficient tree-lined streets would 
both connect the community and provide an 
attractive and memorable network for pedestrians, 
bicyclists, and motorists to conveniently move 
about, with key arrivals and destinations enhanced 
by urban open spaces. An important attribute of 
this framework would be context sensitivity, or the 
intentional design awareness of the end user, and the 
recognition of the differences between places—be 
it a safe and inviting neighborhood, or a vibrant and 
bustling mixed-use employment district. Each can 
be accommodated in the Plan Area, and both warrant 
design solutions that best meet the needs of their 
users. 

Redevelopment of the Plan Area would be realized 
overtime, resulting in a community composed of 
interesting places that complement one another 
and reflect the most current thinking and market 
conditions. 








NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


2.1 DESIGN PRINCIPLES 


The project is focused on the variety of opportunities 
that could come from reusing this important infill 
redevelopment site. Because the site is large, it offers 
the potential for a diverse collection of development 
scenarios. Being largely bounded by existing uses in 


the heart of a thriving district, it must be designed to 
function as a responsible addition to the community. 
To achieve this balance of diversity and compatibility, 
the following design principles serve as the 
foundation for the Planned Unit Development: 



Create guidelines 
that allow flexibility 
and respect the 
development and 
market context 



Provide guidance to 
allow for predictable 
decisions which may 
be implemented over 
an extended period 
of time 



Create walkable 
neighborhoods and 
districts 


Establish a transit- 
ready environment 



Allow for a horizontal 
and vertical mix of 
land uses 


Accommodate a 
variety of housing 
types and densities 


Support opportunities 
for employment and 
other commercial uses 


Foster the creation of 
an infill development 
that is composed of 
distinctive and 
attractive districts 
with a strong sense of 
place 


I 9 













2.2 DESIGN FRAMEWORK 


The design framework is closely tied to the strength 
of the public realm, which would serve as the Plan 
Area's primary organizational element. This is 
enhanced by the careful allocation of thoughtfully 
designed open space areas that are complemented 
by building placement and massing, which could 
serve to create memorable, well-defined, and 
human-scaled places. This fundamental concept is 
considered applicable no matter the land use being 
proposed, be it a peaceful and attractive residential 
neighborhood, a vibrant mixed-use core area, or a 
significant employment center. Each area could be 
defined by inviting, pedestrian-friendly, tree-lined 
streets, enhanced by the buildings and open space 
areas that define the neighborhood or district. 


The Plan Area can be organized in various ways 
as shown in Figure 2. Each conceptual design 
framework has different approaches to the primary 
organizational elements such as cores and centers, 
circulation, and open spaces. The three baseline 
framework strategies represent examples of distinct 
organizing concepts. 

Among these three conceptual frameworks, the 
Central Core concept is the scenario that the current 
traffic study is built upon. The other two concepts will 
need additional traffic studies. 






NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 





Central Core 

• The core area would be centrally located in the 
heart of the Plan Area and would have direct and 
easy access from all directions by car and transit. 

• A loop road would connect all surrounding 
neighborhoods in the Plan Area. 

• A mix of various uses with the highest 
development density and building height would be 
concentrated in the central core area. 

• The central core area would have a central park 
or plaza that is connected with surrounding 
neighborhood parks. 


Linear Central Corridor 

• The project could have a linear central corridor as 
a core area, which would serve as the most vibrant 
mixed-use district in the project. 

• The central corridor is organized around the major 
street, which trends north-south. The street is 
carefully designed with urban streetscape and 

is fronted by active ground-floor uses such as 
shops, cafes, and restaurants. 

• The central corridor is easily accessible by users 
in and out of the project through interconnected 
roads and transit networks. 

• High-quality urban plazas or parks are provided 
within the corridor for recreational activities. These 
public spaces are connected with neighborhood 
open spaces through streets and linear parks. 


Multi-Core 

• Instead of the single core described in previous 
framework concepts, this concept provides 
multiple cores connected by an internal loop road. 

• The cores are strategically located to be best 
accessed by major roads or transit. 

• Each core has a distinct character, mix of uses, 
and density and locally serves its respective 
neighborhood. 

• Each core has its own park, connected by 
sidewalks or linear parks. 


Development Center 


] Future Light Rail Station 


1/4 miles to station 


| 11 


Figure 2: Design Framework 




















2.2.1 Land Use Concept 


The land use concept is multifaceted, primarily 
supporting mixed development, followed by creating 
a pedestrian-friendly, transit-ready environment 
to address a variety of program and market 
influences. This forward-looking concept includes 
the opportunity to accommodate a variety of housing 
types and densities and thriving mixed-use core 


areas based on rapidly changing demands on the 
contemporary workplace. Guidance for the land uses 
anticipated for the site is provided, and is organized 
with the goal of creating an attractive and market- 
supported project, while being aware of the uses 
surrounding the Plan Area. 



Mixed-use development 



Office campus 


Retail center 
















NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


2.2.2 Circulation Plan 


The circulation network is the area's foremost 
organizational element, as well as being the method 
for safe, efficient, and attractive movement in the 
Plan Area, accommodating the needs of pedestrians, 
bicyclists, and motorists. To realize these important 
responsibilities, the roadway network is hierarchical 
and interconnected; areas intended to have vibrant 
and bustling streets have appropriately scaled and 


designed streets and public areas, whereas areas 
that are intentionally planned to be more calm and 
tranquil have appropriately calibrated streets and 
public spaces. This approach is used so that the 
overall vision for the community may be efficiently 
and attractively implemented overtime, while 
accommodating flexibility in land use types and 
locations. 



Light rail transit center 



Bus transit center 


Bicycle and pedestrian path network 



















































2.2.3 Open Space, Parks, and Recreation Concept 




The public realm is envisioned as the thread weaving 
together the fabric of the Plan Area—be it in the form 
of attractive tree-lined streets, neighborhood parks, 
mixed-use district plazas, or connections to regional 
recreational amenities. The area's tree-lined streets 
would be designed in keeping with their setting— 
broad and accommodating in core areas, and more 
supportive of shade and strolling in residential 
districts. The same applies to parks and plazas, with 


Public plaza 


Neighborhood park 


the parks in neighborhoods designed in part to meet 
area resident's recreational needs, and also to offer a 
peaceful place to rest. Similarly, some urban plazas 
would accommodate active, open events, such as 
small farmer's markets or fairs, while others would 
be more in keeping with a goal of providing local 
employees a pleasant place to rest or have lunch. 
Although different experiences, both are foreseen to 
contribute to the area's vitality and character. 


Attractive street 


Recreational trail 
















NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


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This section provides the land use framework and 
development standards for the Plan Area to ensure 
realization of the project's vision, while allowing for 
flexibility and innovative design. These standards are 
built on existing policies, regulations, and guidelines 
of the Sacramento 2035 General Plan and the 
Sacramento City Code. 


3.1 CONCEPT AND LAND USES 

The Plan Area was used as a sports arena and training 
facility for the Sacramento Kings, and has been 
vacant since 2016. Because the project's surrounding 
area has been rapidly developed over the last 15 
years, it is an ideal location for new development 
opportunities. 

The Plan Area is centrally located in the North 
Natomas Community and borders the North Natomas 
Town Center to the north. The Town Center includes 
intense employment and commercial centers, and 
high density residential, civic, and regional park 
uses 1 . Additionally, the project would be served by 
a proposed light rail line, with easy access to three 


1 North Natomas Community Plan, Page 3-NN-4 


light rail stations planned along Truxel Road and 
north of Del Paso Road 2 . The Plan Area is generally 
surrounded by a low-density employment center, with 
suburban commercial and suburban residential uses 
to the east, south and west. These conditions offer 
the project a unique opportunity to become a mixed- 
use community with transitional intensity. The project 
is envisioned to provide a balance of uses such as 
office, commercial, mixed-use, residential, open 
spaces and community amenities with appropriate 
density that is lower than the adjacent Town 
Center, but higher in central areas than a suburban 
community, similar to its surrounding context. Such 
mix of uses would help create a compact—yet lower- 
density—urban feel center in the growing city of 
Sacramento, enabling employees and residents in 
and near the Plan Area to enjoy a vibrant, convenient, 
and sustainable urban lifestyle. 

To ensure the project's vision as a low-density 
urban center, development standards for the 
Plan Area should incorporate C-2 zone policies 
under Sacramento City Code, as well as guidance 
and regulations of Urban Center Low under the 
Sacramento 2035 General Plan. 


2 Sacramento 2035 General Plan, Mobility, Figure M2, Light Rail 
Facilities 



Del Paso Rd 


Towards 

Sacramento 

Airport 


Sports Pkwy 


Towards 

Sacramento 

Downtown 


Arena Blvd 


North Natomas 

Proposed Zoning Designation 

(Site Scale) 

KEY 

□ Plan Area 


- Roads 


Proposed Zoning 


C-2-SPD: 

General Commercial 




250 500 FEET 


Figure 3: Proposed Zoning Plan 














NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


3.2 ADJACENCIES 

The Plan Area is bounded by Sports Parkway as a 
perimeter road on three sides, and the northern side 
of the site shares a boundary with Town Center. 

Land uses in the Town Center include a mix of office, 
commercial, residential, educational, civic uses, 
and open space. Other adjacent uses are generally 
low-density, low-rise development with suburban 
character. East of the Plan Area across Sports 
Parkway are various commercial uses, including retail. 


office, restaurant, educational, and institutional uses. 
South of the Plan Area across Sports Parkway are 
commercial and residential uses, including multi¬ 
family residential, office, educational, and medical 
uses. Across Sports Parkway to the west, adjacent 
parcels are used as multi-family residential, retail, 
commercial, restaurant, and a religious facility. To the 
north of the Plan Area are commercial uses in the 
Town Center, including retail, office, educational, and 
restaurant. 



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and Natomas 
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(350,300 sq.ft) 


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Figure 4: Surrounding Land Uses 



















































3.3 RESIDENTIAL 


The project could accommodate a variety of 
residential products to meet the needs of a variety 
of users. With its low-density urban center character, 
permitted residential uses under C-2 zone includes 
single-family residential, duplex, townhouse, and 
multi-family residential 3 . 

Urban center residential should be strategically 
located near other land uses to promote walkability 
and reduce automobile trips where feasible. 
Residential units should have easy access to 
commercial uses and open spaces through streets, 
pedestrian paths, or bikeways. 4 

Residential lots should generally be small and narrow. 
Residential density in the Plan Area should typically 
be between 20 units per net acre to 150 units per net 
acre, 5 although may vary. 



Small-lot single family residential 



Townhouse 


3 Sacramento City Code, 17.216710 C-2 Zone-Permitted Uses 

4 North Natomas Community Plan, Residential, Page 3-NN-5 

5 Sacramento 2035 General Plan, Land Use and Urban Design, 
Urban Center Low, Page 2-74 



Multi-family residential 


20 | 




















NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


3.4 EMPLOYMENT 


As a new urban center, the Plan Area would include 
employment use as one of the primary functions. 
Employment use would create more jobs for the 
city, and is an important mechanism to promote 
economic development. Employment use also 
provides complementary residential and commercial 
opportunities. Employment use development 
intensity in the Plan Area should correlate to the 
distance to the Town Center and transit centers. 

Employment uses should be intensified within 1/8 
mile of the light rail stations where feasible. 



Higher employment use development intensity around transit center 


I 21 




































3.5 COMMERCIAL 

The project should ensure sufficient commercial 
space to provide a variety of commercial activities to 
meet the daily and weekly needs of various users in 
the Plan Area and surrounding communities. 

In the Town Center north of the Plan Area, there are 
two commercial centers on the eastern and western 
sides of the Town Center core area: the one to the 
east is a community commercial center, which serves 
daily retail needs of the residents, workers and 
visitors. The one to the west is a transit commercial 
center that serves retail needs of the transit riders. 6 

Commercial uses in the Plan Area would continue this 
commercial pattern, and provide both community 
commercial uses and transit commercial uses. The 
community commercial uses should be located 
along active areas such as the main street, gateway 
areas, or along major roadways or community parks 
or plazas. Transit commercial uses should be within 
walking distance to the proposed light rail stations. 

The C-2 zoning is intended to accommodate a 
wide variety of land uses by definition or following 
requirements associated with conditional use 
permit. These uses range from a broad collection 
of sales and repair to a diverse indoor and outdoor 
destination uses such as amusement park and movie 
theaters. 


6 North Natomas Neighborhood Plan, NN.LU 1.38, Page 3-NN-24 


Permitted commercial uses in the C-2 zone include 
the following: entertainment businesses, indoor 
amusement centers, museum, athletic clubs/fitness 
studios, bed-and-breakfast inns, childcare centers, 
cinemas, commercial services, community markets, 
hotels and motels, self-service laundromats, non¬ 
profit organizations, plant nurseries, restaurants, 
retail stores, schools of dance, music, art, and martial 
arts, vocational schools, theaters, veterinary clinics 
or hospitals, and wholesale stores. 7 

Some conditional destination uses allowed in C-2 
include outdoor amusement center, cinema (outside 
arts and entertainment district), drive-in theater, golf 
course, driving range and outdoor market. 


7 Sacramento City Code, 17.216710 C-2 Zone-Permitted Uses 




LEGEND 

>>S>>>^ Town Center Core 

Town Center District 


Figure 5: Town Center District and Core Area Map 




























NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


3.6 PARK/OPEN SPACE 


The Plan Area as an urban center should provide a 
variety of public spaces to support an urban lifestyle 
and the needs of residents, workers, and visitors. 

For example, community and neighborhood parks 
would be used by residents to play and relax; urban 
plazas and courtyards are areas for workers to have 
lunch and rest; and civic spaces and other gathering 
places can be enjoyed by visitors and residents for 
gatherings and celebrations. 

To encourage public health and safety, public space 
in the Plan Area should be connected to nearby 
parks, open space areas, and recreational facilities 
to create a complete open space network. Open 
space networks can be realized by connecting parks 
and open space through various types of links, 
such as trails, sidewalks, bike paths, medians, and 
bridges. These links are important components of the 
project’s circulation system, and would encourage 
alternative modes of transportation. 8 

To provide adequate open space amenities for 
residents in the Plan Area, open space should 
be provided within Vi mile of all residents 9 . The 
requirement for every 1,000 residents is 5 acres 
of neighborhood and community parks and other 
recreational facilities. 10 


8 Sacramento 2035 General Plan, Education, Recreation and 
Culture, ERC 2.1.2, Page 2-260 

9 Ibid., ERC 2.2.3, Page 2-261 

10 Ibid., ERC 2.2.4, Page 2-261 







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Urban park for gathering and interaction 



Neighborhood park with play structures 



Interconnected bike paths can encourage the use 
of alternative transportation mode 


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The following design guidelines are intended to 
be used in conjunction with Section 3, "Land Use 
Development Standards." Together, these guidelines 
and standards would promote the high-quality 
site and building designs in the Plan Area. These 
guidelines are also consistent with the Sacramento 
2025 General Plan and the Sacramento City Code. 


4.1 RESIDENTIAL 
DEVELOPMENT 

4.1.1 Residential Building 
Placement and Orientation 

• Lower-density residential buildings, such as 
single-family and duplexes, should be arranged to 
front on public streets, or parks and open space. 

• Higher-density residential buildings, such as 
townhouses and multi-family residential, should 
define the street edge along public streets with 
building walls and landscaping. 

• Main fagades and pedestrian entrances of all 
residential buildings should be located along 
public streets, or parks and open space. 

• All residential buildings should be placed to take 
maximum advantage of views to nearby amenities 
and natural features such as iconic buildings, 
structures, parks, and open space. 

• Higher-density residential buildings should be 
situated on street corners that bound the parcel. 



Residential buildings front on public street 


• Parking and service entries of higher-density 
residential buildings should be located away 
from the main pedestrian entries and should be 
accessed from the side or back of the building. 

• Where feasible, ground floor or other parking 
structures should generally be located towards 
the center of the parcel, away from sidewalks or 
highly visible areas. 

4.1.2 Residential Building Setback 
Standards 

There is no building setback requirement due to 
the project's urban center character. There is no 
minimum rear-yard setback, unless the rear yard of a 
lot is adjacent to an R-zoned (residential) or OB-zoned 
(Office Business Mixed Use) lot and is not separated 
by an alley, in which case the minimum rear-yard 
setback is 15 feet. There is no minimum interior side 
yard setback, unless the interior side yard of a lot 
is adjacent to an R-zoned (residential) or OB-zoned 
(Office Business Mixed Use) lot, and is not separated 
by an alley: the minimum interior side-yard setback is 
5 feet. 1 


Front 

Rear 

Interior 

Side 

Street Side 

No 

Requirement 

0* 

0** 

No 

Requirement 


Table 1: Minimum Setback Requirements 


1 City of Sacramento 2013-2021 Housing Element Table H 8-2, 
Page H 8-9 



Parking located at the back of the building 


















NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


4.1.3 Residential Building Height 4.1.4 Residential Architecture 


• Residential building heights in the Plan Area 
generally range from two to seven stories, 2 with 
some potential for one story. 

• The maximum building height in the Plan Area is 65 
feet. However, building height limits also depend 
on distances of a building from an R-1 (Single 
Unit Dwelling Zone), R-1 B (Single Unit or Duplex 
Dwelling Zone), and R-2 zones (Duplex Dwelling 
Zone). 3 Detailed height limits influenced by such 
distances are shown in table below. 4 


Zones 

Distance to R-1, R-1 B and 

Height Limits 


R-2 Zones (feet) 

(feet) 

R-1 

0 to 39 

45 

R-1 B 

40 to 79 

55 

R-2 

80 + 

65 


Residential buildings should be designed with 
consistent design integrity. Harmonious architectural 
elements such as massing, articulation, and building 
materials would promote quality and Plan Area unity. 

4.1.4.1 Massing and Scale 

• Bulky volumes that detract from pedestrian scale 
should be avoided. 

• Building elements such as porches, bay windows, 
and balconies are encouraged for visual interest 
and to help break down building scale and mass. 

• The upper story of a building should exhibit a 
lighter character than the base. 

• Special massing treatment, such as step-back or 
extrusion is encouraged at the corners, entrances, 
or at feature areas. 


Table 2: Building Height Limit Related to Adjacent Land Use. 


• To avoid monotonous building forms, residential 
products with various building height should be 
encouraged. Residential buildings also need to 
provide appropriate transitions in building height. 

• Buildings should be stepped down to no more than 
one story higher than permitted in the adjacent 
neighborhood unless separated by a roadway or 
other setback or buffer. 5 

• Buildings near major public gathering places, such 
as the main street, plaza, and central park, can also 
have higher building heights. 


Special architectural treatment at corner 


2 Sacramento 2035 General Plan, Land Use and Urban Design, 
Urban Center Low, Page 2-74 

3 City of Sacramento 2013-2021 Housing Element, Table H 8-2, 
Page H 8-9 

4 Sacramento City Code, 17.216.720 C-2 zone—Height, density, 
lot coverage, and floor area ratios 

5 Sacramento 2035 General Plan, Land Use and Urban Design, 
Urban Center Low, Page 2-74 




Upper story of the building exhibit a lighter 
character 





























4.1.4.2 Facade and Articulation 

• Level of details and articulation should be 
consistent to all residential buildings with various 
densities. 

• Add architectural features to emphasize front and 
corner facades. 

• The ground level of higher-density residential 
building should be carefully designed to anchor 
the building, which can be accomplished with 
unique architectural design, materials, or color 
change. 

• Roof treatment should include a cornice, eave 
parapet, cap, or distinctive roofline to provide 
visual interest in harmony with overall style. 

4.1.4.3 Colors and Materials 

• Materials used in all residential buildings should be 
high quality, and such materials should be used on 
all visible facades. 



Architectural features help emphasize front and 
corner facades 



Pedestrian-oriented residential street 


• Color variety is encouraged. However, a limited 
number of colors should be used to maintain 
coherence of materials and color. 

• Material changes should occur at intersecting 
planes, preferably at the inside corners of 
changing wall planes or where architectural 
elements intersect. 

• Heavier materials should be used on lower 
elevations to define the building's base. 

4.1.5 Circulation and Parking 

4.1.5.1 Circulation 

• All residential development in the Plan Area should 
have interconnected street networks that link 
internal and external streets. 

• Residential streets should be designed as 
pedestrian-oriented, and emphasize walking and 
biking. 6 

• All residential development should provide 
interconnected pedestrian networks that link to 
sidewalks, parks, open spaces, and other public 
areas. 

• Bike lanes and trails are encouraged in residential 
development, and should be connected with city¬ 
wide bike routes. 

• If possible, all circulation systems, including 
roadways, pedestrian paths, biking, and bus routes 
should provide connections to transit centers to 
create an integrated, multi-modal transportation 
network. 

4.1.5.2 Parking Requirements 

• The minimum parking requirement for lower- 
density residential uses such as single-family, 
duplexes, and townhouses is 1 parking space per 
dwelling unit. 7 

• The minimum parking requirement for multi-family 
residential is 0.5 space per dwelling unit. 8 

• An extra 300 parking spaces may be required at 
the Arena Station for use as Park n-Ride spaces. 9 


6 Sacramento 2035 General Plan, Mobility, Page 2-199 

7 City of Sacramento 2013-2021 Housing Element, Table H 8-5, 
Page H 8-17 

8 City of Sacramento 2013-2021 Housing Element, Table H 8-5, 
Page H 8-17 

9 North Natomas Neighborhood Plan, NN.M 1.9, Page 3-NN-30 


28 | 











NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


4.1.6 Garages 

• To create a pleasant and pedestrian-friendly urban 
form, single-family residential garage widths 
should not exceed 50 percent of the total front 
facade width. 

• Townhouse garage doors should not face public 
streets, if possible. When a townhouse garage 
is accessed from an alley or a private street, the 
garage door width should not exceed 70 percent 
of the facade width. 

• Multi-family residential garages or carports should 
be clustered throughout the site. Garages may 

be placed in an interior parking court with access 
from a shared driveway. 

• To minimize obstruction to pedestrian traffic, 
multi-family parking structures should be 
designed so that the entry and exit ramps are 
oriented towards service areas, rather than facing 
primary pedestrian streets. 


4.2 COMMERCIAL AND 
EMPLOYMENT 
DEVELOPMENT 

The project is envisioned as a lower-density urban 
center with ample opportunities for commercial and 
employment development. The development density 
of commercial and employment buildings would have 
an FAR ranging between 0.4 and 4.O. 10 

The following design guidelines for commercial and 
employment buildings would result in high-quality 
development projects consistent with the needs of 
the community. 

4.2.1 Commercial and Employment 
Building Setbacks and 
Orientation 


• There is no specific setback requirement for all 
commercial and employment buildings in the Plan 
Area. 

• Buildings should be generally located along and 
oriented towards public streets wherever possible. 
Buildings should also be situated on street corners 
that bound the parcel. 

• Buildings should have their visual and main 
functional activities facing the main street and/or 
public amenities. 

• Building placement that creates opportunities for 
plazas, courtyards, or outdoor dining is strongly 
encouraged. 

• It is encouraged to situate service and loading 
areas on secondary streets or at the back of the 
building. 


10 Sacramento 2035 General Plan, Land Use and Urban Design, 
Urban Center Low, Page 2-74 



Townhouse garages accessed from an alley 


Commercial buildings located along public streets 
and have main functional activities facing streets 


I 29 







4.2.2 Commercial and Employment 
Building Height 

• The maximum building height in the Plan Area is 65 
feet. However, building height limits also depend 
on distances to the R-1, R-1B, and R-2 zones. 

• To avoid monotonous building appearances, 
various building heights should be encouraged. 

• To create a transit-oriented community and 
promote transit ridership, taller buildings should 
be encouraged but not required within walking 
distance to the transit centers. 

• Buildings near major public gathering places, such 
as the main street, plaza, and central park, can also 
have higher building heights. 

• Building heights should step down to not more 
than one story higher at the property line than 
permitted in the adjacent neighborhood unless 
separated by a roadway, rail corridor, or other 
setback or buffer. 11 

4.2.3 Commercial and Employment 
Architecture 


• Building facades facing primary streets should be 
predominantly glazed or contribute positively to 
the streetscape. Continuous blank walls are highly 
discouraged. 

• Pedestrian-friendly elements, such as awnings 
and eaves, are encouraged along ground-floor 
frontages. 

• Treat all facades of the building, including parking 
structure if applicable, with equal architectural 
rigor, level of detail, and articulation. 

• Building walls should be articulated through the 
use of texture, color, and material changes. 

4.2.3.3 Colors and Materials 

• All surface treatments or materials should be 
designed to appear as an integral part of the 
design. 

• The use of environmentally friendly and climate- 
responsive materials is encouraged. 

• High-quality, attractive, and durable materials, and 
stronger, more distinguishable color tones, should 
be used for all buildings. Special attention should 


4.2.3.1 Massing and Scale 

• Building massing should be modulated and 
articulated using varying planes and horizontal 
and vertical elements to stimulate visual interest 
and variety. 

• Special massing treatment, such as step backs 
or extrusions, is encouraged at the major street 
corners or public areas such as parks, plazas, and 
the transit center. 

• Building facades should include vertical elements 
to break up largely horizontal massing. 

• Stepbacks are allowed above the ground floor, and 
are encouraged above the third floor. 

4.2.3.2 Articulation and Facade 

• Active and attractive ground floor frontages, 
including but not limited to lobbies, shops, and 
cafes, are encouraged along primary streets. 
Parking and service structures should be 
located away from primary streets and should 
be accessed from secondary streets whenever 
possible. 


11 Sacramento 2035 General Plan, Land Use and Urban Design, 
Urban Center Low, Page 2-74 



Higher building height at the main entry 



Pedestrian-friendly elements such as eaves and 
glazed ground-floor frontages are encouraged 


30 | 




















NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


be given to the lower building levels to enhance 
the pedestrian experience. 

• Buildings should be designed to incorporate 
daylighting. This includes the use of high-quality, 
energy-efficient glazing to reduce interior heat 
gain. 

• Vivid accent colors may be permitted to highlight 
certain components of the building such as 
entrances or primary building corners. 

4.2.4 Circulation and Parking 

4.2.4.1 Circulation 

• All commercial streets in the Plan Area should be 
designed as interconnected street networks that 
link internal and external streets. 

• Commercial streets that serve as a commercial 
corridor or destination should provide attractive 
streetscape elements such as wide sidewalks, 
furnishings, and on-street parking to promote 
walking, biking, and transit. 

• Secondary commercial streets that serve as 
vehicular and parking access can have narrower 
sidewalk and fewer pedestrian amenities. 


4.2.4.2 Parking Requirements 

• Parking requirements for commercial and 
employment uses vary. The table below shows 
a selected range of parking requirements, as 
defined in the Sacramento City Code. 12 



Commercial street with attractive streetscape 
elements to promote walkability 


12 Sacramento City Code, 17.608.030, Table 17.608.030B Vehicle 
Parking Requirements by Parking Districts 


Land Use 

Parking Requirement 

Office; medical clinic or office 

Minimum 1 space per 2,000 gross square feet of building; maximum 1 
space per 250 gross square feet of building 

Restaurant 

Minimum 1 space per 2,000 square feet of building 

Retail store 

Minimum 1 space per 2,000 square feet of building 

Warehouse retail 

Minimum 1 space per 2,000 square feet of building 

Bed-and-breakfast inn 

Minimum 1 for resident owner, manager 

Commercial services 

Minimum 1 space per 2,000 gross square feet of building 

Hotel 

No minimum requirements 

Motel 

Minimum 1 for resident owner, manager 

Athletic club; fitness studio 

Minimum 1 space per 333 gross square feet of building 

Hospital 

Minimum 1 space per patient bed 

Assembly—cultural, religious, 
social; theater; night club 

Minimum 1 space per 6 occupants 

Childcare center 

Minimum 1 space per 12 children 

School—dance; music; art; 
martial arts; vocational; and 
tutoring center 

Minimum 1 space per 2,000 square feet of building 


Table 3: City of Sacramento Parking Requirement 

Note: An extra 300 parking spaces may be required at the Arena Station for Park-n-Ride spaces. 




































































































The Plan Area is in the center of the North Natomas 
neighborhood, within close proximity to North 
Natomas Town Center and Arco Arena light rail 
station. The Plan Area would be served by an 
integrated and multi-modal circulation system that 
would enhance connectivity of all transportation 
modes, including roadways, pedestrian ways, bike 
paths, light rail, and bus. 

This section provides standards for various 
circulation elements and parking facilities. These 
standards would contribute to the creation of a 
pedestrian-friendly environment and urban center 
character. 


5.1 CONNECTION TO BASELINE 
ROADWAY NETWORK 

The Plan Area consists of a hierarchy of 
interconnected streets. Major connector (Sports 
Parkway, Innovator Drive, and Collector Gateways) 
and minor collectors serve as the framework from 
which the local roadway network is tiered. The local 
streets provide the internal circulation network. 

The major roads carry large volumes of traffic 
without compromising pedestrian-friendly features 
and attractive appearances. The local streets are 
narrower and provide a direct connection to the local 
community. 



Toward^ 

Sacramei 

Airport 


N Park Dr 


Del Paso Rd 


Del Paso Rd 


Sports Pkwy N 


BonfairAve 


Windsong St 


Water 


Roads 


Arena 


Planned (Off-Site) or 
Proposed (On-Site)Roads 




Arena Blvd 


N Bend Dr 


Road Fun 

Existing / P 


Towards 

Sacrament 

Downtownl 


Figure 6: Baseline Roadway Network 


34 | 



















































































































NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


5.2 SITE ACCESS FROM 
ROADWAYS 

The Plan Area is bounded by Sports Parkway, and is 
connected to four surrounding arterial roads through 
six access roads. 

Del Paso Road is the arterial road to the north, 
separating the Town Center Core Area and the Plan 
Area. It is connected to the Sports Parkway through 
Town Center Drive and Five Star Way. Town Center 
Drive provides a direct connection to the Town 
Center Core Area. Truxel Road is the arterial road to 
the east, and Arco Arena East Entry Drive serves as 
the eastern connection between Truxel Road and 
Sports Parkway. South Entrance Road is the southern 
entryway that links Arena Boulevard to the Plan 
Area. West Entrance Road and Main Entrance Road 
connect E. Commerce Way, and serve as the project's 
western entryways. 



Gateway intersection 



Towards 

Airport 


KEY 

□ Plan Area 
Parks 
Water 
- Roads 

Road Functional Classifications 

Existing / Planned (Off-Site) or 

Proposed (On-Site)Roads 

Freeway 

Arterial 

mu Major Collector 

■■■■■ Minor Collector 

Local Road 

I_| 

_ Gateway Roads 

Gateways 


Arena 


Blvd 


Towards 

Sacramento 

Downtown 


Figure 7: Site Access 


I 35 














5.3 COLLECTOR ROADWAYS 


There are seven types of collector roadways in the 
Plan Area that provide linkage between the Plan Area 
and adjacent development. Six of them are major 
collectors and one is a minor connector. Details of 
these collector roads are described in the following 
section. 



Figure 8: Collector Roadways Cross Section Map 










NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


5.3.1 Innovator Drive 

Innovator Drive is the major north-south thoroughfare 
that connects the Plan Area to the Town Center 
and southern neighborhoods. The right-of-way of 
Innovator Drive is 107 feet, providing four travel 
lanes, two in each direction; a 12-foot median, and 
6-foot bike lane and on-street parking on both sides. 
Innovator Drive also provides 12.5 feet of sidewalk 
zone on each side; the sidewalk zone includes a 6.5- 
foot landscape zone and a 6-foot pedestrian zone for 
pedestrian circulation and commercial activities. 


5.3.2 Sports Parkway North 

Sports Parkway North is the northern section of 
Sports Parkway that has an existing SMUD easement 
and future light rail on its northern side. The right- 
of-way of Sports Parkway North is 76 feet, which 
includes two travel lanes, one in each direction; a 
12-foot median, and 6-foot bike lanes on both sides. 
Sports Parkway North also provides 12.5 feet of 
sidewalk zone on each side; the sidewalk zone is 
made up of a 6.5-foot landscape zone and a 6-foot 
pedestrian zone. 




11.00' I 11.00' I 6.00' l 7.00' 6.50' I 6.00' 

1 ’travel lane' I 'travel lane' I ’ bike r i Marking 'parkwayim 

I I \ I 

I I III 


35.00' 


-f 


Figure 9: Innovator Drive Cross Section 



Figure 10: Sports Parkway North Cross Section 


EXISTING 

SMUD 

EASEMENT 


76.00' 

















































5.3.3 Minor Collector 

The Minor Collector road links Main Entrance Road to 
Innovator Drive. 

The 71 -foot right-of-way in the Minor Collector 
provides space for two travel lanes, 6-foot bike 
lanes, and on-street parking in both directions; also 
provided on both sides of the Minor Collector is an 
11.5-foot sidewalk zone, which includes a 6.5-foot 
landscape zone and a 5-foot pedestrian zone. 


5.3.4 Sports Parkway with One Side 
Parking 

Sports Parkway with one side parking is the condition 
of the eastern and western sections of the Sports 
Parkway. The total right-of-way is 76 feet, including 
two travel lanes, a 12-foot median, 6-foot bike lanes 
in both directions, on-street parking on the inner side 
to serve internal development parcels, and 11.5-foot 
sidewalk zones on both sides. 



71.00 1 


Figure 11: Minor Collector Cross Section 




5.00-1 i 6.50- 

6.00- i 11.00- ( 12.00’ I i 11.00- i 6.00- ( 7.00 1 ! 6.50’ i 

5.00- 

SIDEWALK 1 IPARKWAY 

1 fa 

1 

LANE 1 TRAVEL LANE 1 MEDIAN ' 1 TRAVEL LANE 1 LANE 1 PARKING 

17.00 - 24.00- 

PARKWAYI 

RB 

CE 

SIDEWALK 

RB 2 50 ’ .1 U- CU 

CE 950- | ^ FA 

1 

1 


Figure 12: Sports Parkway with One Side Parking Cross Section 


38 | 




















































NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


5.3.5 Major Collector with Parking 
on Both Sides 

There are three Major Collectors with parking on 
both sides in the Plan Area, two of them provide 
connections from West Entrance Road and Arco 
Arena East Entry Drive to Innovator Drive; the other 
one is the southern section of the Sports Parkway. 
On-street parking is provided on both sides of these 
roads to serve development parcels on both sides. 

The right-of-way of this type of collector is 83 
feet, including two travel lanes, a 12-foot median, 
6-foot bike lanes, on-street parking, and all .5-foot 
sidewalk zone in both directions. 


5.3.6 Collector Gateways 

Collector Gateways are West Entrance Road and 
Main Entrance Road, two western access roads from 
E Commerce Way, as well as Arco Arena East Entry 
Drive, the eastern access road from Turxel Road. 

The right-of-way of Collector Gateway is 120 feet, 
which includes four travel lanes, two lanes each 
direction, and a 25-foot median or center turn lane. 

A 6-foot bike lane, on-street parking and a 12.5-foot 
pedestrian zone are provided on both sides of the 
road. 




R/W 


r;w 


5.00' 1 

.7% 

i 6.50' ! 7.00' i 

2.0% 

6.00' i 11.00' i 

1 1 1 

1 

12.CO' 

2.0% 1-7% 

l 11.00' 1 6.00' i 7.00' ! 6.50' I 

5.00' 

SIDEWALK 1 

1 

PARKWAY 1 PARKING | 

1 

BIKE e | TRAVEL UNE j 

MEDIAN 

| 

1 TRAVEL LANE 1 BIKE I PARKING |PARKWAV| 

1 SIDEWALK 

1 

1 

1 

1 1 
24.00' 

6.00' 6.00' 

24.00' 

1 


i ■ 

CURB 



' 1 

CURB 


1 

1 

1 

FACE 


1 

1 

1 

FACE 

. 

1 

1 

L 


H.50' 

1 

41.50' 



Figure 13: Major Collector with Parking on Both Sides Cross Section 






6.00’ i 6.50' 7.00’ i 6.00’ 


[WALNPARKWAYj >ARKING r | BIKE | TRAVEL LANE I TRAVEL LANE f MEDIAN /TURN LANES *1I TRAVEL LANE I TRAVEL LANE I BIKE | >ARKING |PARKWAY$IDEWALll 


Figure 14: Collector Gateway Cross Section 


I 39 




























































5.3.7 Collector Gateway North 


Collector Gateway North are the two northern access 
roads from Del Paso Road, Town Center Drive and 
Five Star Way. The right-of-way of Collector Gateway 


North is 60 feet and provides space for two travel 
lanes, a 12-foot median, a 6-foot bike lane and a 
6-foot sidewalk in each direction. 




(60.000 EXISTING PARCEL WIDTH 


Figure 15: Collector Gateway North Cross Section 


5.4 LOCAL ROADWAYS 

Local roadways are lower-traffic-volume streets that 
serve the interior of a neighborhood. Typical right- 
of-way of local roads is 40 to 60 feet, which could 



Minor collector road with parallel parking and bike 
lane 


accommodate two travel lanes, bike lanes, on-street 
parking, and a sidewalk zone. 1 


1 Sacramento 2035 General Plan, Mobility, M 4.4.1, Page 2-198 



Local road serves the interior of a neighborhood 


40 | 







































NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


5.5 PUBLIC TRANSIT 

The Plan Area is centrally located in the North 
Natomas neighborhood, and is easily accessible by 
light rail and bus. Transit would become a catalyst 
for the creation of an urban environment that would 
encourage people to walk and bike. 


5.5.1 Light Rail Route and Stations 

The proposed light rail extension would give the 
Plan Area direct connections to the Sacramento 
International Airport and Downtown Sacramento. A 
proposed light rail station would provide direct transit 
service to and from the Plan Area. 

The proposed light rail route runs along at the 
western side of Truxel Road up to East Entrance 
Drive, and enters the Plan Area by turning west along 


East Entrance Drive. The route continues along the 
northern side of Sports Parkway, and extends to meet 
E Commerce Way, continuing along E Commerce Way 
to the north. 

At the center of north Sports Parkway is a proposed 
light rail station. The station would provide a vital 
transportation resource and connection for residents, 
employees, and visitors. Additional nearby stations 
include Arena Boulevard station, less than 0.5 mile to 
the south and North Natomas Town Center Station, 
less than 1 mile to the northwest. 

The area within 0.25 mile of the Arco Arena light rail 
station would become transit-oriented development 
(TOD) area. Within the TOD area, residential, 
commercial, and employment uses would surround 
the station, making the TOD area a truly urban core 
that is highly walkable and transit-accessible. 



Toward^ 

Sacramer 

Airport 


N Park Dr 


Water 


Existing / Planned (Off-Site) or 

Proposed (On-Site) Roads 


NBend Dr 




RT Station 


Del Paso Rd 


Minor Collector 


Sports Pkwy N 


BonfairAve 


Windsong St 


Arena 


N Market Blvd 


Arena Blvd 


N Freeway Blvd 


^Towards 

Sacramentj 

Downtownl 


Figure 16: Potential Light Rail Route and Stations Map 


































































































5.5.2 Bus Transit Centers 

The Plan Area is currently served by the #11 bus 
route, running between downtown Sacramento and 
Club Center Drive in North Natomas. 


5.5.3 Bus/Shuttle Bus Stops 

The #11 bus runs along Truxel Road, and there are 
three bus stops near the Plan Area. Truxel Road and 
Arena Boulevard is the southernmost stop that could 
serve the southern part of the project. This stop is 
less than 0.25 mile to the Arena Boulevard light rail 
station and South Entrance Road. The Truxel Road 
and Terracina Drive stop is at the project's East 
Entrance Road. It is within walking distance to the 
project’s eastern area, and is the closest stop to the 
Plan Area. The Truxel Road and Del Paso Road stop is 
the northernmost stop that could serve the northern 


area of the project, and it is less than 0.25 mile to 
Five Star Way, the northeastern access road to the 
project, and less than 0.5 mile to the Arco Arena light 
rail station. 



A bus entering a bus station 



Toward^ 

Sacramer 

Airport 


N Park Dr 


Plan Area 


Sports Pkwy N 


Arena 


Arena Blvd 


N Freeway Blvd 


^Towards 

Sacramentj 

Downtownl 


Dei Paso Rd 


BonfairAve 


Windsong St 


N Market Blvd 


N Bend Dr 




Parks 
■I Water 
- Roads 

Road Functional Classifications 

Existing / Planned (Off-Site) or 

Proposed (On-Site) Roads 

Arterial 

■■■■i RT Alignment 
RT Station 
Bus Route 
Bus Station 

■ ■■■l Major Collector 
■■■■i Minor Collector 


Figure 17: Bus Route and Stations Map 


42 | 





















































































NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


5.6 BIKE AND PEDESTRIAN 
CIRCULATION DESIGN 
FRAMEWORK 


The bike and pedestrian network is an important 
component of a completed multi-modal 
transportation system. The project should provide 
safe and continuous biking and walking paths that 
would be located in public rights-of-way or dedicated 
trails. 


5.6.1 Pedestrian Circulation 

Pedestrian circulation facilities in the Plan Area will 
include sidewalks, and pedestrian paths. All streets 
in the Plan Area would have carefully designed 
sidewalks. Sidewalks should consist of three zones: 
frontage, pedestrian through and landscape. The 
landscape zone should be planned between the 
pedestrian through zone and vehicular circulation 
zone to provide maximum safety for pedestrians. 
Pedestrian zones in the Plan Area should have 
minimum width of 5 feet to allow two people walk side 
by side. 

Pedestrian crossings should be provided in every 
street intersection. In areas with heavy pedestrian 
traffic, mid-block pedestrian crossings may be 
needed. Every pedestrian crossing should provide 
pedestrian signals, push bottom or pedestrian signs. 

Other pedestrian paths will be provided in various 
parks and open space. Some paths will be used by 
pedestrians only, while some paths can be shared 
by pedestrians and cyclists. Sidewalks, crosswalks, 
and walking paths should all be consistent with The 
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations, 
and they should be seamlessly connected to create a 
continuous pedestrian network. 



Carefully designed sidewalks will provide 
maximum safety for pedestrians 



Mid-block crossing should provide pedestrian 
signs 



Pedestrian path in a public park 


I 43 











5.6.2 Bike Circulation 

Bike circulation facilities in the Plan Area will be 
mainly bike paths located within street rights-of-way. 
Bike paths are encouraged on all streets within the 
Plan Area if possible. When street width allows, on¬ 
street bike paths should have their own dedicated 
lanes in both directions, with a minimum width of 
4 feet. On-street bike paths should be located at 
the edge of pavement between the sidewalk and 
vehicular circulation zone. When on-street parking is 
available, bike lanes should be located between the 
parking zone and vehicular circulation zone. When 
the street is too narrow to have dedicated bike lanes, 
travel lanes can be wider to share space with bike 
circulation. Such conditions will require bike symbols 
marked on street pavement. Bike lanes can also be 
designed as a raised lane that is adjacent to sidewalk 
at the same level. In this condition, special paving 
materials should be used on bike lane and pedestrian 
path to avoid conflict of each other and clearly define 
their dedicated circulation zones. 


Like pedestrian crosswalks, bike crosswalks are 
also encouraged at intersections to create safe and 
continuous biking experience. Special paving and 
markings for bike crosswalks to help avoid conflicts 
with pedestrian crosswalks at intersections. 

Bikes can also travel on off-street shared use paths 
that are typically provided within parks or open space. 
Such shared paths are recommended to be at least 
10 feet wide for two-way bike travel. 

All bike paths in the Plan Area should be 
interconnected and linked to the citywide biking 
network. Other bike support facilities, such as 
bike parking, lockers, and showers, should also be 
considered in the Plan Area, especially near the light 
rail transit center. 



Figure 18: Bike Network Map 


44 | 










NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


5.7 PARKING 


5.7.1 Vehicular Parking 

Vehicular parking in the Plan Area is made up of 
surface parking areas, parking structures, and 
on-street parking spaces. Together, these parking 
facilities would provide sufficient and efficient 
parking for all users. The Plan Area will be served by 
interconnected streets, pedestrian and bike paths, 
and public transit including bus and light rail. The 
interconnected multi-modal transportation system 
will allow people to explore anywhere in the Plan Area 
by foot, bike or transit. 

The project’s mix of uses, connectivity, and transit 
options could create opportunities for reduced 
parking requirement. Shared parking may also be 
considered, for instance, commercial and commuter 
parking can be shared with residential parking. Such 
shared parking can reduce parking demand and 
maximize parking utilization. 

Meanwhile, with today's advanced technology in 
shared ridership services such as Uber and Lyft, as 
well as emerging autonomous vehicles, the parking 
demand in the Plan Area may be further reduced 
compared to traditional neighborhoods. Another 
method for reducing reliance on drive alone trips 
and the need for cars and parking can be the use 
of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) 
strategies that provide policies and incentives to 
use alternative transportation modes, also reduce 
the need for excess parking. With these strategies, 
lower parking ratios can be effectively achieved, and 
creates more opportunities for development and 
open space. Lower parking ratio could also help 
form a more pedestrian oriented urban environment 
that will encourage more people to use alternative 
transportation, reduce vehicular trips and create 
fewer carbon emissions. 

Surface parking in the Plan Area should provide an 
attractive landscape treatment around and within 
the parking lotto provide shading and break down 
surface parking scale. Parking lots should also be 
designed to include adequate drainage, and should 
consider permeable pavement. Landscape medians 
between parking rows are recommended, as they 
can provide space for stormwater management and 
pedestrian paths. Pedestrian paths within parking 
lots should be aligned and connected to sidewalks. 
Landscape islands are also encouraged every 20 
linear spaces, and at the end of each parking aisle. 



Uber/Lyft car share program will significantly 
reduce parking demand 



Landscape islands will be located at the end of 
every parking aisle 



Landscape medians between parking can be 
designed as bioswales 


I 45 














Structure parking in the plan area can be standalone, 
integrated podium or integrated structure attached to 
commercial or residential uses. Standalone parking 
structures should be screened by vertical plantings 
or architectural elements to create appealing exterior 
walls. Integrated parking structures with commercial 
or residential uses should be designed as attractive 
elements of the primary buildings, and not be isolated 
or uncomplimentary. 

Dedicated parking spaces for electric vehicles 
(EV) should be incorporated on surface parking 
lots and parking structures. EV charging poles and 
parking spaces should be located at designated 
areas with clear signs. Adjacent to transit center, 
carpool parking should be also provided in dedicated 
locations. Carpool and EV parking spaces should 
also be given priority by arranging them at primary 
locations to support low emission vehicles. 



Parking structure designed with appealing facade 



Designated EV parking with charging stations 



Dedicated parking for carpool vehicles 


46 | 































NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 





5.7.2 Bike Parking 


Bike parking in the Plan Area falls into two categories; 
short-term and long-term. Short-term bike parking 
is designed for users for up to 2 hours. Short-term 
bike parking facilities include sidewalk bike racks and 
on-street bike corrals. Sidewalk bike racks should be 
located within the landscape zone of the sidewalk 
and should avoid creating conflict with pedestrian 
circulation. On-street bike parking should be located 
in the on-street parking lane. Short-term bike parking 
should be placed in higher density development 
areas and higher bike ridership areas, such as 
commercial districts and transit centers. 


Long-term bike parking facilities include bike lockers, 
bike rooms and bike stations. Compared to short¬ 
term bike parking, long-term bike parking is a more 
secure way to park bikes. Bike lockers can typically 
secure one bicycle each, the user would need a 
key or access code to gain access. Bike rooms are 
indoor bike parking facilities that can be located in a 
building's ground floor or in parking garages. If space 
is limited, vertical bike racks and double decker racks 
in addition to floor racks can be installed. Users would 
need a key or a passcode to use the facility. Bike 
stations provide secure indoor parking for bikers like 
bike rooms, but can also provide other bike services 
such as bike repairs, sales, rentals, and showers. 


The Plan Area will provide both short-term and 
long-term bike parking facilities and will offer a 
combination of the various facilities described in 
appropriate locations depending on user demand and 
space available. 


The Plan Area also encourages bike share programs. 
Bike share is a short-term bike rental system that 
provides an easy and affordable transportation 
option. All shared bikes and shared low-speed 
electric bikes, such as scooters, should be parked in 
dedicated bike share stations or instructed parking 
areas located in landscape zones of the sidewalks or 
on-street bike parking zones. All bike share stations 
need to be installed and maintained by bike share 
operators. 


On-street bike corrals in the parking lane 


Bike lockers can lock one bike and accessories 
using a key or a passcode 


Dedicated bike share station for shared bikes 

























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A high-quality public realm that includes streets, 
parks, plazas, and other public spaces would greatly 
contribute to the project's character and urban life. 
The public realm would help weave together the 
various districts and neighborhoods by providing 
attractive and inviting gathering spaces where 
residents, workers, and visitors would spend time and 
interact with one another, and use the destinations, 
shops, and services found within. 

The overarching goal of the public realm is to provide 
a multitude of benefits that would not only make the 
community memorable and enjoyable, but also one 
that positively contributes to creating a healthier 
environment for the city and the region. 


The public realm in the Plan Area is to be made up 
of five types of spaces that are interconnected into 
a completed network. These typologies respond 
to their context, adjacent land use, and anticipated 
use. This section provides overall direction on the 
recommended character for each of these distinct 
open space typologies. 



50 | 


















NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


6.1 ROADWAYS 

Because the project is to be developed as an urban 
center, the major and minor roadways in the Plan Area 
would become important connectors to tie various 
uses and districts; meanwhile, they are also important 
components of the project’s public realm. Roadways 
would be used by vehicles, bikes, and pedestrians to 
circulate in and out of the Plan Area; they would also 
serve as public space with shops, cafes, or housing 
facing these streets, and would be used for strolling, 
interaction, and experience. 

The sidewalk zone in the roadway is a dedicated zone 
for pedestrian circulation and various pedestrian 
amenities. Sidewalk zones of any roadway in the Plan 
Area would have three sub-zones: a frontage zone, 
pedestrian through-zone, and landscape zone. 


6.1.1 Frontage Zone 

Frontage zone is the area along the building fagade 
that faces street. This zone is encouraged to be 
occupied by building entries, or tables, seating, 
and merchandise displays of ground floor shops 
and cafes. Pedestrian and commercial activities in 
frontage zones would help create a vibrant and safe 
public realm. 


Some architectural elements may encroach into 
the frontage zone, such as signage, awnings, and 
canopies. These elements should be designed 
harmoniously with the overall architecture and ground 
floor fagade, and elevate the visual interest of the 
streetscape. 

The widths of frontage zones vary by width of the 
total sidewalk zone and level of commercial activities 
along the roadway. Frontage zone width should be 
reasonable to accommodate commercial activities, 
but not take over space needed for pedestrian 
circulation. 


6.1.2 Pedestrian Through-Zone 

A pedestrian through-zone is an unobstructed area 
for pedestrian circulation. The pedestrian through- 
zone should be paved with concrete and concrete 
unit pavers to provide a safe walking surface. The 
pedestrian through-zone design should also meet 
Americans with Disabilities Act requirements. 



Landscape Zone 


Pedestrian Through-Zone 


Frontage Zone 


Figure 19: Sidewalk Zones 









6.1.3 Landscape Zone 

The landscape zone is the outer area of the sidewalk 
zone. It provides space for street trees, lighting, and 
furnishing; and acts as a buffer between vehicular 
and pedestrian circulation. 

One of the key elements in the landscape zone is 
street tree. Street trees should be mid-size drought- 
tolerant trees that have minimal obstruction of the 
ground floor commercial uses. Tree canopy should 
be at least 8 feet in height over sidewalks and 14 feet 
over the street 1 . Street trees should be planted in tree 
wells at a regular interval to provide shade and create 
a visual rhythm for the street. 

Lighting and street furnishings such as benches, 
meters, newspaper corrals, trash receptacles, and 
bike racks should be all placed within the landscape 
zone. 

Stormwater management is encouraged to be 
considered in roadway design to detain and treat 
runoff biologically. Stormwater management 
infrastructure in the Plan Area can be a combination 
of bio-swales, flow-through planters, pervious 
strips—which can be typically accommodated in the 
landscape zone, or pervious payment that can be 
used in the sidewalk zone or the entire roadway. 


6.1.4 Transit Stops 

Transit stops should be located in the landscape 
zone or median depending on transit lane location. 

If the transit stop is located in the landscape zone, 
additional space may be required to accommodate 
the transit stop. Such circumstances would require 
the landscape zone to be extended into the on-street 
parking or vehicular circulation area. 

If transit uses the center lane or dedicated lanes, the 
transit stop can also be located in median islands or 
on a dedicated platform. 


6.1.5 Median and Refuge Island 

Some roadways would have a median in the middle to 
separate traffic in each direction. The median should 
be planted with native trees to provide a continuous 
structure; it should also have a native grass 
understory to provide color and seasonal interest. 


When major throughways run through the Plan Area, 
such as Innovator Drive, design of medians should 
emphasize continuity even if the roadway runs 
through various land uses, scales, and intensity. 

A refuge island is a safety area for pedestrians to 
cross a wider street. It is typically designed within 
the median to create a two-stage crossing. Refuge 
islands should be at least 6 feet wide and should 
be clearly visible to drivers. All refuge islands at 
intersections should be extended past the pedestrian 
crossing. 



Bio-swales can be used in the landscape zone for 
stormwater management 



Refuge islands provide safety for pedestrian 
crossing 


1 City of Sacramento Street Design Standards, 15.12.3, Page 20 







NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


6.2 COMMUNITY PARK 

The community park is a major destination that is 
centrally located in the Plan Area. It would be the 
primary public gathering place within the community, 
intended to serve its residents, workers, and visitors. 

It is envisioned as a large gathering area, with flexible 
outdoor programs, and easily visible and accessible 
by the public. 

The main feature of the community park should be 
a multi-use area that accentuates the space's civic 
potential. The community park should be designed as 
a highly inviting and attractive urban park. 

The design of the community park would be a 
combination of hardscape and planted areas, 
all of which would support and complement the 
surrounding mixed-use, office, retail, and civic uses. 

It would allow for both casual and organized events, 
and serve as a destination in and of itself. The park 
would provide seating and gathering areas, public art, 
sculptural elements, a playground, and possibly water 
features. A comfortable, welcoming environment 
would be achieved by providing ample seating, 
shaded areas, and easily accessible routes entering 
the community park from all sides. It would be visually 
open and well-lit at night, imparting a feeling of safety 
for use at any time of day. 


6.3 NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS 

There would be multiple neighborhood parks 
throughout the Plan Area. The neighborhood parks 
would be within walking distance of all residents, and 
are intended to serve the recreational needs of every 
neighborhood. These parks would have a more casual 
and natural character and would support more active 
programming such as sports fields and playgrounds. 

Neighborhood parks should be designed to 
be visually open from adjacent roadways from 
surrounding areas to increase safety. When possible, 
buildings should be oriented to front onto the 
neighborhood parks to provide visual access to 
the parks. Sidewalks and formal entrances would 
be placed at key locations along park boundaries 
to facilitate access. Neighborhood parks should 
be landscaped with larger trees to create a shade 
canopy in key gathering areas. For example, both 
seating areas and playgrounds would benefit from 
being shaded during hot summer months to increase 
user comfort. In all areas of the park, native and 
drought-tolerant plant species should be used 
whenever possible to reduce water usage. 



Community park is a multi-purpose gathering 
area 



Community park can provide both hardscape and 
softscape spaces for various activities 



Neighborhood park with playground 


I 53 




6.4 LINEAR PARKS 

Linear parks are a series of green corridors that 
connect the major open space and parks in and 
around the Plan Area. They contain paths and 
bikeways for transportation, as well as other activities 
such as recreational or civic uses. 

Depending on their location in the Plan Area and their 
surrounding land uses, linear parks can have various 
characters and programs. When surrounded by 
retail and commercial uses, linear parks can provide 
activities such as jogging or biking paths, and small 
gathering pockets. Design of such active linear 
parks can have more urban elements such as paving, 
seating, gridded trees, and water features. When 
adjacent to neighborhoods, linear parks can also 
have passive uses, and can have linking paths as their 
main function, with less gathering. 



Urban linear park with ample seating and a formal 
pedestrian path 



Neighborhood linear park with a jogging path 


6.5 PRIVATE PLAZAS 

Privately owned plazas are encouraged to add further 
amenities and enhancement to the public realm. 
Additional plazas can be used along major pedestrian 
routes to provide informal gathering areas. Plazas 
should be designed to incorporate elements like 
seating, public art, decorative landscaping, and 
unique paving treatment, among other design 
techniques, to enliven the public space. Due to the 
large proportion of paved areas, plazas serve as ideal 
areas for markets, events, and festivals. 



Plazas provide space for special events 



Plaza designed with public art and water features 


54 | 






NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 





Drainage basin used as a play area with seating at 
the edge of the basin 


_ Drainage basin designed as a amphitheater 

2 North Natomas Neighborhood Plan, Drainage System, Page 
3-NN-9 


6.6 DRAINAGE BASINS 


Drainage basins are topographically depressed from 
the surrounding landscape to collect and detain 
surface runoff on the land before releasing it to the 
Sacramento River. 2 The depression creates sufficient 
area to meet the required stormwater capacity in a 
large rain event. 


The programming and design of drainage basins 
should be based on adjacent land uses, and the area 
tailored to meet the needs of those specific users. 

In addition to stormwater management, drainage 
basins can also be used as multi-functional passive 
or active recreational areas, such as sports fields, 
amphitheaters, or aesthetic amenities. 


Integration of soft and hard edges along drainage 
basins creates flexible seating and gathering areas 
along the edges. The edges of drainage basins 
should be landscaped with native plants, and 
connected to other parks and open spaces in the 
Plan Area through paths that lead to the basins. 


Drainage basins can be used as sports fields 


I 55 































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Lighting is an important component to create a 24/7 
community that allows for safe activities at night. 
Appropriate lighting should be used to provide 
illumination for the security and safety of roadways, 
pathways, and parking, as well as parks and plazas. 
High-quality lighting and efficient use of energy 
should be applied to all development in the Plan Area 
to create a cohesive appearance, and also to avoid 
negative aspects from light pollution, glare, or light 
trespass. 

The lighting guidelines in this chapter give general 
guidelines for the Plan Area, and more specific 
guidelines for special areas. 


7.1 GENERAL GUIDELINES 

• Level of illumination should be appropriate to 
create safe and secure places. 

• Site lighting shall be architecturally compatible 
and consistent in design between sites. 

• Street address numbers and building numbers 
should be illuminated at night. Lighting should be 
placed and designed to avoid light trespass, light 
glare, and skyglow. 

• Integrate solar-powered lighting to increase 
energy efficiency. 

7.2 ROADWAY AND WALKWAY 
LIGHTING 

• Roadway lighting should be installed within the 
sidewalk landscape zone, and should be linearly 
placed with even intervals. 

• Light fixtures should be installed to avoid being 
blocked by street trees. Therefore, the location 
of light fixtures and height of light poles should 
consider street tree locations and height. 

• Lighting should be provided at the minimum level 
to accommodate safe pedestrian and vehicle 
movements without causing any off-site glare. 

• Sidewalk lighting should be pedestrian-scale, 
and should provide for safe use of pathways and 
pedestrian areas. Pedestrian pole lighting should 
be no more than 14 feet in height, pedestrian 
bollard lighting should be no more than 3 feet in 
height. 1 



Light fixtures are architecturally compatible and 
consistent in design 



Sidewalk lighting is pedestrian-scale and 
provides appropriate level of illumination 



Pedestrian bollard lighting along a pathway 


58 | 


1 Citywide Commercial Design Guidelines, Design Guidelines 18- 
3, P38 




























NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


7.3 BUILDING LIGHTING 
(EXTERIOR) 

• Lighting should be provided at building entries for 
safety and directional purpose. 

• Light fixtures should be designed to be 
architecturally compatible with the architectural 
design of the Plan Area. If different architectural 
styles are designed for various districts, lighting 
in each district should also be consistent with the 
specific style. 

• The level of illumination should be appropriate 
for the buildings' use. Mixed-use buildings would 
require a higher level of illumination for active uses 
throughout day and night. Office buildings would 
require less illumination due to limited users during 
the night. 

• Flashing and neon lighting are not allowed. 

• Roof should not be illuminated; canopies and 
awnings should also not be internally illuminated. 

• Outdoor decorative lighting can only be used to 
highlight significant architectural features. 

7.4 PARKING LIGHTING 

• Lighting in all parking areas should have adequate 
illumination levels to create a safe driving 
environment. Glare from direct lighting resource is 
dangerous and should not be allowed. 

• Light fixtures in the parking lot should be in scale 
with the lighting pole height. Light fixtures and 
poles should be consistent with adjacent building 
styles. Pole mounted lighting should be no taller 
than 16 feet for energy efficiency. 2 

• Parking garage interior lighting levels should be 
consistent with adjacent street lighting to avoid 
being too dark or too bright in the context. 

7.5 LANDSCAPE LIGHTING 

• Landscape lighting should be subtle. Light 
resources should be shielded to prevent light 
trespass. 

• Light fixtures should be harmonious with 
softscape and hardscape designs. 

• Walkways in the landscaped area should be lighted 
for pedestrian safety, especially in dangerous 
areas such as stairways, ramps, and intersections. 


2 Citywide Multi Unit Dwelling Design Guidelines, Design 
Guidelines 11-2, P22 



Exterior building lighting is used to highlight 
architectural features 



Solar-powered light fixtures used in the parking 
lot are mounted at appropriate height 



Landscape lighting fixtures are harmonious with 
softscape and hardscape designs 


I 59 


















































































SIGNAGE AND 
GRAPHICS 


'i - 














































































This chapter provides general guidelines for all 
signage and specific guidance on various types of 
signage. 

Signage and graphics on buildings and in the public 
realm should be consistent with the overall project 
design, but should not detract from architectural 
and landscape elements. Each building or 
group of buildings should have a consistent and 
comprehensive signage program. Placement, scale, 
and readability should be considered in signage 
design. 


8.1 GENERAL SIGNAGE DESIGN 
REQUIREMENTS 


• Signage should be located so as to be visible from 
streets and paths without conflicting with safe 
vehicular movement and visibility. 

• The size of signs should be modest, and afford 
businesses sufficient visibility and identification 
without dominating or obscuring the architectural 
elements of a building. 

• Design and construct signs of durable, high- 
quality weatherproof materials. 

• Limit the total number of colors used in any one 
sign. Small accents of several colors make a sign 
unique and attractive, but many different colors 
reduce readability. 

• Limit text on signs to convey the business name or 
logo. Eliminate words that do not contribute to the 
basic message of the sign. 

• Illuminate signs only to the minimum level required 
for nighttime readability. 




Signage is illuminated to the minimum level for 
nighttime readability 


8.2 DIRECTIONAL SIGNAGE 


• Directional signage is used for wayfinding, and 
should be placed near the site entry. 

• Signage placement should avoid creating conflict 
with vehicular or pedestrian circulation. 

• Directional signage should be designed 
harmoniously with architectural style and color. 

• Signage should be appropriately illuminated at 
nighttime for visual clarity. 


Directional signage placed at the edge of an entry¬ 
way to avoid conflict with pedestrian circulation 



62 | 











NATOMAS ARENA REUSE PUD 


8.3 FREESTANDING SIGNAGE 

• Freestanding signage should be placed at major 
entryways and should be designed with landscape 
features. 

• Massing and placement of the freestanding 
signage should be appropriate to provide clear 
line of sight at entryways, and be harmonious with 
adjacent development. 

• Materials and colors used on freestanding signage 
should be harmonious with adjacent architectural 
materials and colors. 

8.4 TENANT SIGNAGE 


• Tenant signage can be wall-mounted, projected 
perpendicular to the exterior wall, or can be 
affixed to awnings. All tenant signage should have 
consistent color with its affiliated building. 

• Wall-mounted signs should be placed in the center 
of a blank wall, or in locations that are compatible 
with the architectural components and details. 
When multiple signs are needed, wall signs should 
complement each other in shape and color. 

• Projected signage should be installed 
perpendicular to the exterior wall, and ground- 
level tenant signage should be designed at 
pedestrian scale. 

• Awning signs are typically imprinted on awning 
fabrics. Such signage should be simple; and have 
limited color, text, or logo. 



Freestanding signage placed at major entry 



Projected signage are installed perpendicular to 
the exterior wall and designed at pedestrian scale 



Simple awning signs are imprinted on awning 


I 63 


















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