Skip to main content

Full text of "Ontario Sessional Papers, 1920, No.13-18"

See other formats


SESSIONAL PAPERS 



VOL. LII. — PART IV 



SIXTH SESSION 



OF THE 



FIFTEENTH LEGISLATURE 



OF THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 






SESSION 1920 



TORONTO : 
Printed by CLARKSON W. JAMES, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1922 



rnnted by 
THE KYEKSON PRESS 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS 

Peesented to the House Durixg the Session. 



Title 



s^o. 


Rexl^rks 


4 


Printed. 


80 


Not Printed. 


32 


Printed. 


32 


li 


41 


(( 


29 


u 


90 


Not Printed. 


93 


a 


52 


Printed. 


54 


(t 


37 


Printed. 


20 


a 


72 


Printed. 


27 


Printed. 


92 


Not Printed. 


65 


Printed. 


82 


Not Printed. 


68 


Printed. 


73 


(( 


69 


Not Printed. 


35 


Printed. 


67 


Not Printed. 


38 


Printed. 


27 


(( 


85 


Not Printed. 


5 


Printed. 


17 


Printed. 


57 


Not Printed. 


51 


Printed. 


85 


Not Printed. 


36 


Printed. 


2 


i( 


24 


Printed. 


74 


11 


11 


<( 


44 


ii 


14 


Printed. 


26 


(( 


90 


Not Printed 


93 


« 



Accounts, Public 

Adding Machines, number of 

Agricultural College, Report 

Agricultural and Experimental Union, Report 

Agricultural Societies, Report 

Agriculture, Department of, Report 

Appointments to Office since Dec. 1, 1919 

Appointments to Office since Xov. 14, 1919 

Archivist, Report 

Auditor, Provincial. Report 

Bee-Keepers Association, Report 

Births. Marriages and Deaths, Report 

Carrick, J. J., correspondence 

Children, Dependent, Report 

Civil Servants dismissed 

Civil Service Commissioner, Report 

Civil Service Commissioner, re Public Service 

Clarkson's Report re Hydro Power Commission, etc. 
Clarkson's Report re Ontario Power Commission, etc 

Clarkson's Report re Racing Associations 

Corn Growers^ Association. Report 

Crown Timber, Order-in-Council 

Dairymen's Association. Report 

Dependent Children, Report 

Deputy Ministers. Clerks, leave of absence 

Division Courts, Report 

Education. Report 

Education. Orders-in-Council 

Elections, Returns from Records 

Employees, leave of absence 

Entomological Societv. Report 

Estimates, 1920-21 .' 

Feeble-Minded. Report 

Flax, acreage sown to 

Friendly Societies. Report 

Fruit Growers' Association, Report 

Game and Fisheries, Report 

Gaols, Prisons and Reformatories, Report 

Government Appointments since Dec. 1st, 1919 

Government Appointments since Nov. 14th, 1919. . . 



Title 



No. 



Remarks 



Hamilton Hospital Enquiry, Snider's Eeport 

Health, Eeport of Board of 

Health, Eegulatioas of Board 

Highways, Eeport 

Hodgins' Eeport on Mentally Defective 

Horticultural Societies, Eeport 

Hospitals and Charities, Eeport 

Hospitals and Charities, Orders-in-Council 

Housing, Eeport on 

Housing Act, Experts or persons employed under 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission, Clarkson's Eepbrts 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission, Eeport 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission, correspondence re meet 
ins: of Midland Association 



Idiots and Epileptics, Eeport 
Insane Hospitals, Eeport . . . . 
Insurance, Eeport 



Kapuskasing, Eeport of Commissioners 
Kapuskasing, basis of adjustment 



Labour, requests from organizations 

Labour, correspondence re hours of '• 

Lands, Forests and Mines. Eeport 

Legal Offices, Eeport 

Library, Eeport 

License Board, licenses issued by • • • • 

License Board, correspondence with holders of Export Ware 

house Licenses 

License Commissioners, Eeport on 0. T. A • 

Liquor Vendors, quantity of liquor passed through hands of, 

Live Stock Branch, Eeport 

Loan Corporations, Statements 

London Hospital, Macbeth's Eeport 



Macbeth, J.. Eeport on London Hospital 

Mentallv Defective, Hodgins' Eeport 

Meredith, Sir W., Eeport on 0. T. A 

Meredith, Sir AV., Eeport re Police Force 

Midland Municipal Association, correspondence re 

borough meeting 

Mines. Eeport 

Municipal Affairs, Bureau of, Eeport 

Municipal Auditor, Eeport 

^Muskoka Eoad, correspondence 



Peter 



87 
21 
71 
15 
56 
43 
25 
77 
47 
62 
68 
49 



Ontario Housing Act. persons appointed under 

Ontario Power Company of Niagara Falls, Clarkson's Eeport 

Ontario Eailway and Municipal Board, Eeport 

Ontario Temperance Act, Eeport of Commissioner Meredith 



Not Printed. 
Printed. 



Printed. 



Not Printed. 
Printed. 
Not Printed. 
Printed. 



83 \ Not Printed. 

23 Printed. 
22 

10 



61 
76 

79 
89 
3 
6 
53 
63 

91 
28 
64 
39 
12 



56 
66 
80 

83 
4 

47 
8 

75 

62 
73 
50 
66 



Printed. 
Not Printed. 

Printed. 
Not Printed. 

Printed. 

« 

Not Printed. 
Not Printed. 



Printed. 

Not Printed. 

Printed. 
« 

Not Printed. 

Not Printed. 
« 

Printed. 
Not Printed. 



Printed. 



Not Printed. 

Not Printed. 
Printed. 



Title 



Xo. 



Remarks 



Ontario Temperance Act, persons employed in enforcement of | 
Organization of Resources Committee, payments under....! 

Pic and Black Sturgeon River Timber Limits, correspondence 

Police Force, ^ilunicipal. Report 

Prisons and Reformatories, Report 

Provincial Archivist, Report 

Provincial Auditor, Report 

Provincial Municipal Auditor, Report 

Provincial Secretary's Department, etc., names of Deput\ 
Ministers and Clerks applying for leave of absence on 
medical certificates 

Public Accounts, 1919 

Public Service, classification 

Public Works, Report 



Queen Victoria Xiagara Falls Park, Report 



Racing Associations, Clarkson's Report 

Register-General, Report 

Registry Offices, Report 



Secretary and Registrar. Report . . . 
Sniders Report. Hamilton Hospital 
Soldiers' Aid Commission, expenses 
Stallion Enrolment Board, Report . 

Statistical Branch, Report 

Statute distribution 

Surrogate Court, Orders-in-Council 

Temiskaming and X. 0. R.. Report 

Toronto University. Report 

Trades and Labour, Report 



Vegetable Growers. Report 
Venereal Diseases. Report . 
Veterinary College, Report 
Vineland Station, Report . , 



70 Not Printed. 
86 

72 Printed. 

80 ' " 

26 j " 
52 

54 I " 



85 Sot Printed. 

1 Printed. 

60 'X at Printed. 

13 Printed. 



9 

69 

20 
7 

19 
87 
78 
33 
46 
58 
40 



Printed. 

Not Printed. 

Printed. 



Printed. 

Not Printed. 
« 

Printed, 
it 

Not Printed. 



48 \ Printed. 
18 i " 
16 ' « 



34 
81 
31 
45 



Printed. 



Warrants, Special 59 ■ Not Printed. 

Women's Institups. Report 41 Printed. 

Workman's Compensation Board i •55 '' 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS 

Arranged in Numerical Order with their Titles at full length; 

the dates when presented to the Legislature; the name 

of the Member who moved the same, and 

whether ordered to be Printed or not. 



10 



11 



13 



I CONTENTS OF PART I. 

Public Accoimts of the Province for the year ending 31st October, 1919. 
Presented to the Legislature, 19th March, 1920. Printed. 

Estimates — Supplementary for the service of the Province for the year 
ending 31st October. 1920. Presented to the Legislature, 13th 
April, 1920. Printed. Further Supplementary Estimates. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 13th May, 1920. Printed. Estimates 
for the year ending 31st October, 1921. Presented to the Legis- 
lature, 26th May, 1920. Printed. 

CONTENTS OF PART II. 

Keport of the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines for the year 1919. 
Presented to the Legislature. 28th May. 1920. Printed' 

Report of the Bureau of Mines, for the vear 1919. Presented to the 
Legislature, 19th April, 1920. Printed. 

CONTENTS OF PART III. 

Report of the Inspector of Division Courts, for the year 1919. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 30th April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Inspector of Legal Offices, for the vear 1919. Presented 
to the Legislature, 26th April. 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Inspector of Registrv Offices, for the vear 1919. Presented 
to the Legislature, 26th Apri'l, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Provincial Municipal Auditor, for the year 1919. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 4th May, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Commissioners for the Queen Victoria Niagara Falls Park, 
for the year 1919. Presented to the Legislature, 13th May, 1920. 
Printed. 

Report of the Inspector of Insurance, for the year 1919. Presented to 
the Legislature, 6th May, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Registrar of Friendly Societies. Transactions for the year 
1919. Presented to the Legislature, 6th May, 1920. Printed. 

Financial Statements made by Loan Corporations, Building Societie.s, 
Loaning Land Companies and Trust Companies, for the year 1910. 
Presented to the Legislature, 6th Mav, 1920. Printed. 



No. 13 
No. 14 
No. 15 
No. 16 
No. 17 
No. 18 



No. 


19 


No. 


20 


No. 


21 


No. 


22 


No. 


23 


No. 


24 


No. 


25 


No. 


26 


No. 


27 



No. 28 



CONTENTS OF PART IV. 

Report of the Minister of Public Works of the Province, for the year 
1919. Presented to the Legislature, 31st March, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Game and Fisheries Department, for the year 1919. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 16th April, 1920. Printed. 

Report on Highway Improvement in the Province, for the year 1919. 
Presented to the Legislature, 7th May, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Trades and Labour Branch, for the year 1919. Presented 
to the Legislature, 28th May, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Minister of Education, for the year 1919. Presented to 
the Legislature, 27th April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Board of Governors of the University of Toronto, for the 
year ending 30th June, 1919. Presented to the Legislature, 12th 
March, 1920. Printed. 

CONTENTS OF PART V. 

Report of the Secretary and Registrar of the Province, for the year 1919. 
Presented to the Legislature, 28th May, 1920. Printed. 

Report upon the Registration of Births, Marriages and Deaths, for the 
year 1919, Presented to the Legislature, 26th May, 1920. Printed. 

Iieport of the Provincial Board of Health, for the year 1919. Presented 
to the Legislature, 30th March, 1920. Printed. 

Report on the Hospitals for the Insane, for the year 1919. Presented to 
the Legislature, 28th May, 1920. Printed. 

Report on Idiots and Epileptics, for the year 1919. Presented to the 
Legislature, 28th May, 1930. Printed. 

Report on Hospital for Feeble-Minded, Orillia, for the year 1919, and 
Part II. on Feeble-Minded in Ontario. Presented to the Legis- 
lature, 28th May, 1920. Printed. 

Report upon the Hospitals and Charities for the year 1919. Presented 
to the Legislature, 28th May, 1920. Printed. 

Report upon the Prisons and Reformatories for the year 1919. Presented 
to the Legislature, 28th May, 1920. Printed. 

Report upon Neglected and Dependent Children, for the year 1919. 
presented to the Legislature, 26th May, 1920. No report. 

CONTENTS OF PART VI. 

Report upon the Operation of the Ontario Temperance Act, for the year 
1919. Presented to the Legislature, 6th April, 1920. Printed. 



No. 29 
No. 30 
No. 31 
No. 32 
No. 33 
No. 34 
No. 35 
No. 36 
No. 37 
No. 38 
No. 39 
No. 40 

No. 41 
No. 42 
No. 43 
No. 44 
No. 45 



Report of the Department of Agriculture, for 1919. Presented to the 
Legislature, 26th April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Agricultural College and Agricultural Farm, for the year 
1919. Presented to the Legislature, 27th April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Ontario A'eterinary College, for the year 1919. Presented 
to the Legislature, 27th April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Ontario Agricultural and Experimental Union, for the 
year 1919. Presented to the Legislature, 26th April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Stallion Enrolment Board, for the year 1919. Presented 
to the Legislature, 21st April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Ontario Yegetahle Growers' Association, for the year 1919. 
Presented to the Legislature, 26th April, 1920. Printed. ' 

Report of the Corn Growers' Association, for the vear 1919. Presented 
to the Legislature, 29th April, 1920. Not Printed. 

l?eport of the Entomological Society of Ontario, for the year 1919. 
Presented to the Legislature, 27th April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Ontario Bee-Keepers' Association, for the year 1919. 
Presented to the Legislature, 27th April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Dairymen's Association of Ontario, for the year 1919. 
Presented to the Legislature, 29th April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Live Stock Associations of Ontario, for the year 1919. 
Presented to the Legislature, 29th April, 1920. Printed. 

Copies of Orders-in-Council under section 78 of the Surrogate Courts 
Act, cap. 62, R.S.O., 1914. Presented to the Legislature, March 
19th and April 14th, 1920. Not printed. 

Report of the Women's Institutes of Ontario, for the year 1919. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 29th April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Agricultural Societies of Ontario, for the year 1919. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 6th March, 1920. Printed. 

Report on the Horticultural Societies of Ontario, for the year 1919. 
Presented to the Legislature, 21st April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Fruit Growers' Association of Ontario, for the year 1919. 
Presented to the Legislature, 27th April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Horticultural Experiment Station, Vineland Station, 
Ontario, for the year 1919. Presented to the Legislature, 27th 
April, 1920. 



CONTENTS OF PART VII. 

Report of the Statistics and Publications Branch of Department of Agri- 
culture, for the year 1919. Presented to the Legislature, S^th 
April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Bureau of Municipal Affairs, for the year 1919. Presented 
to the Legislature, 10th March, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Eailway, for the year 
1919. Presented to the Legislature, 28th May, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission, for the year 1919. 
Presented to the Legislature, 18th May, 1920. Printed. 

Iieport of the Ontario Eailway and Municipal Board, for the year 1919. 
Presented to the Legislature, 10th May, 1920. Printed. 

CONTENTS OF PART VIII. 

Returns from the Records of the Elections and By-Elections in 1919- 
20. Presented to the Legislature, 10th March, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Archivist of Ontario, for the year 1919. Presented to tlie 
Legislature, 28th May, 1920. Printed. 

Report on the State of the Legislative Library. Presented to the Legis- 
lature, 20th March, 1920. Not Printed. 

Statements of Provincial Auditor under Audit Acts. Presented to tlu; 
Legislature, 23rd April, 1920. Printed. 

Report of the Workmen's Compensation Board, up to 31st Deceni])er. 
1919. Presented to the Legislature, 28th April, 1920. Printed. 

I?eport of Mr. Justice Hodgins, on the Care and Control of the Mentally 
Defective. Presented to the Legislature, 12th March, 1920. Printed. 

Regulations and Orders-in-Council under the authority of the Depart- 
ment of Education Act or the Acts relating to Public, Separate or 
High Schools. Presented to the Legislature. 12th March, 6(;li 
April, 7th May, and 28th May, 1920. Not Printed. 

Report on the Distribution of the Statutes for 1918 and 1919. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 12th March, 1920. Not Printed. 

I?oturn to an Order of the House of the 12th day of March, 1920, for a 
Return of all Special Warrants issued from the 31st day of October, 

1919, to the 29th day of February, 1920, together with such details 
as will plainly set forth the purposes for which the money in eacli 
case was expended. Presented to the Legislature, 12th Marcli, 

1920. Mr. O'Neill. Not Printed. 

Report on the Classification of the Public Service. Presented to the 
Legislature, 18th March, 1920. Not Printed. 



Xo. 61 



No. 62 



Xo. 63 



Xo. 6i 



Xo. 65 



Xo. 66 



Xo. 67 



Xo. 68 



Iieport of Commissioners to enquire into and report upon the affairs of 
the Soldier Settlement Colony at Kapuskasincf, with the Evidence. 
Presented to the Legislature/l8th and 30th March, 1920. Printed 

"Return to an Order of the House of the 19th March. 1920, for a Eeturii 
showing: 1. How many experts or persons having technical or 
special knowledge, were appointed under The Ontario Housing Act, 
. 1919. 2. What are their names. 3. What salar\- or remuneration 
did each of said persons receive. What other officers, clerks and 
servants were appointed to carry out the provisions of said Act. 
5. What are their names. What salary or remuneration did each 
of said persons receive. 7. What is the total amount paid for 
salaries to all of such persons combined. 8. What is the total amount 
paid for remuneration other than salaries to all of such person.s 
combined. 9. What is the total amount paid for travelling expenses 
to all of such persons combined. 10. Wliat is the total amount to 
date expended in any way for salaries, remuneration, travelling 
expenses or otherwise in carrying out the provisions of said Act, as 
provided in section 24 thereof. Presented to the Legislature. 22nd 
March, 1920. Mr. Sinclair. Xot Printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the 19th March, 1920. for a Eetuni 
showing: 1. How many licenses were issued by the License Board 
under the now repealed " Liquor License Act " durino" the following 
years: (a) from 1905-1910: (h) from 1910-1916. 2rAATiat was the 
approximate yearly cost to the Province of the said License Board 
under the said Act. Presented to the Legislature, 21th March, 
1920. Mr. Pinard. Xot Printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the 19th March. 1920. for a 
Return showing the quantity of liquor that has passed through the 
hands of Government liquor vendors for each month, separately, 
during the period from the 1st September, 1919, to the 1st March, 
1920. Presented to the Legislature, 21th March, 1920. Mr. ToJmie. 
Xot Printed. 

Report of the Civil Service Commissioner for Ontario for the year 
ending 31st October. 1919. Presented to the Legislature. 24th 
March, 1920. Printed. 

Report of Sir William Ralph Meredith, Commissioner in the matter of 
certain charges as to the Administration of the Ontario Temperance 
Act. Presented to the Legislature, 24th March. l!>2n. Printed. 

(^py of an Order-in-Council approved by His Honour the Lieutenant- 
Governor in Council, dated the 19th day of March, 1920, relating 
to the preservation of Crown Timber. Presented to the Legislature, 
2oth March, 1920. Xot Printed. 

Report of F. C. Clarkson, f.c.a., respecting Hydro-Electric Power Com- 
mission of Ontario. Also, Audit and Report of G. T. Clarkson. 
F.C.A.^ upon the Accounts of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission 
of Ontario, for the year ending October 31st, 1919. Presented to 
the Legislature, 26th March and 6th April, 1920. Printed. 



No. 69 
Xo 70 

No. 71 

No. 72 



'"''™oTtantT're'LTt-'' S^^^^"' ^-^on and Dilworth, Chartered 
Accountant, le.pectmg Eacmg Associations in the Province of 
Ontario under terms of Order-in-Council, dated 30th Aprl 1917 
Presented to the Legislature, 26th March;i920 Not pZted 



Regulations of the Prorincial Board of Health 
Legislature, 30th March, 1920. Printed. 



Presented to the 



No. 73 



No. 74 



Return to an Order of the House of the 12th day of March, 192'0, for a 
Return of copies of:-(l) All correspondence or agreement' 
entered mto, between the Government of the Province of Ontario^ 
or any officer or official thereof (subsequent to the Return presented 
to the House during the Session of 1919, being S.P. No. 73) and 
J. J. Carrick, or anyone in his behalf, or any other person or 
persons, company or corporation, relative to the sale of the Pic 

?Zr 1. f 1^'^'°^ ^''''' ^''''^''' ^^^i^« i^ ^he District of 

rhunder Bay and the carrying out of the provisions of a certain 
agreement dated the 9th day of May, 1917, between the said Carrick 
and the Government of the Province of Ontario (as represented by 
the Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines), requiring as part of the 
consideration for the transfer of the said limits, the erection and 
operation of a pulp mill and a paper mill within a period of three 
years at an expenditure of not less than $2,000,000, which =aid 
agreement was rescinded by a subsequent agreement bearing date 
the 8th day of May, 1918, whereby the Government relieved the said 
Carrick from carrying out the terms of the first-mentioned agree- 
ment, by reason of the alleged absence of suitable water power to 
permit of the operation of the said pulp and paper mills or warrant 
their erection; (2) all correspondence (subsequent to the Return 
above mentioned) lietween the Government of the Province of 
Ontario and the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 
with reference to the supply of power for the operation of the said 
mills; (3) all correspondence (subsequent to the Return above 
mentioned) between the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of 
Ontario and the said Carrick, or any one in his behalf, with refer- 
ence to the supply of power for the operation of the said mills 
Iresenfced to the Legislature, 31st March. 1920. Mr. Dewarl 
Printed. 

Audit and report of G. T. Clarkson, f.c.a., upon the Ontario Power 
Company of Niagara Falls and the Ontario Transmission Companv 
Lmiited, for the year ending 31st October, 1919. Presented to the 
Legislature, 6th April, 1920. Printed. 

IJeturn to an Order of the House of the 7th April, 1920, for a Return 
shovying:— 1. The acreage sown to flax by the Department of 
Agriculture in 1918. 2. Number of bushels "of flax seed produced. 
3. To whom sold and price per bushel received. 4. Quantity flax 
fibre produced : to whom sold and price received. 5. Copies of all 



No. ?.r 



Xo. 76 



No. 77 



No. 78 



No. 79 



No. 80 



No. 81 



No. 82 



cables or other communications between the Government and tlic 
Agent-General in London regarding the growing of flax in Ontario 
during the year 1917. 6. Detailed cost of the experiment and not 
profit or loss to the Department. Presented to the Legislature, Stli 
April, 1920. Mr. Henry. Printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the 26th day of March, 1920, for a 
Eeturn of copies of correspondence, tenders, contracts, vouchers, 
and all other papers, letters or documents in connection with the 
construction of the road in the Municipality of Orillia Township 
in the Electoral Distict of Simcoe East, from the Severn Bridge to 
Orillia, known as the Muskoka Eoad and constructed under the 
Northern Development Branch of the Lands, Forests and Minos 
Department between the dates of the 1st of September, 1919, and 
the loth of November, 1919. Presented to the Legislature, ]2th 
April. 1920. Mr. Johnston [Simcoe.) Xot Printed. 

Uecommendations as a Basis of Adjustment of Difficulties which have 
arisen in the Kapuskasing Soldiers' Colony, with open letter with 
reference thereto addressed to the Soldiers of Kapuskasing. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 13th April. 1920. Xot Printed'.^ 

Copies of Orders-in-Council designation pursuant to section 14 of The 
Hospitals and Charitable Institutions Act, Hospitals, Eefuges. 
Orphanages and Infants to which aid mav be granted. Presented 
to the Legislature, 14th April. 1920. Xot Pri^ited. 

Pieturn to an Order of the House of the 7th April, 1920, for a Eeturn 
showing tlie whole amount of $88,853.30 (page 738, column 2, 
Public Accounts, 1918-19), expended in travelling, office and other 
expenses of the Soldiers' Aid Commission, and in what other manner 
this amount was expended. Presented to the Legislature, 14tli 
April, 1920. :s1t. Pinard. Xot Printed. 

Eeturn to an Order of tlie House of the 22nd March. 1920. for a Return 
shewing: — 1. All requests of memorials filed with the Minister of 
Public Works, or the Labour Department, during the years 191(5, 
1917, 1918, 1919 and 1920. to date, from Labour Organizations. 
Presented to the Legislature, loth April, 1920. Mr. Puinl'in. 
Printed. 

Eeport of Sir William Ealph Meredith and James Ounn, Esquire, Com- 
missioners under Commission dated January 21st, 1919, in the 
matter of the Administration of Municipal Police Force throughout 
the Province, the Constitution of Police Commissioners, etc. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature. 19th April, 1920. Xot Printed. 

Eegulations of the Provincial Board of Health respecting Venereal 
Diseases. Presented to the Legislature, 21st April, 1920. Printed 
for Distribution. 

Statement of the Civil Service Commissioner respecting the Public; 
Service of Ontario, 1920. Presented to the Legislature, 24th March, 
1920. Xot Printed. 



No. 83 



No. 84 



No. 85 



No. 86 



No. 87 



No. 88 



<'opies of correspondence between the Hydro-Electric Power Commission 
and others respecting meeting of Midland Municipal Association 
at Peterborough, April 28, 1920. Presented to the Legislature, 
30th April, 1920. Not Printed. 

Ifcturn to an Order of 7th May, 1920, for a Return shewing: — 1. How 
many adding machines have been purchased or ordered by the 
different departments of the Government and how they are allotted 
to the departments. 2. What is the date of such purchases. 
3. What is the cost of each machine and the name and place of 
business of the seller. Presented to the Legislature, 7th May, 1920. 
Mr. Evanturel. Not Printed. 

U'eturn to an Order of the House of the 31st March, 1920, for a Eeturn 
shewing: — 1. Names of all Deputy Ministers, Chief Clerks and 
Clerks who, during the calendar years 1916, 1917, 1918 and 1919, 
applied on medical certificates for leave of absence from their duties 
in respect of the following departments : (a) Provincial Secretary 
and Registrar's Department; (&) King's Printer Department. 
2. To wdiich of the parties so applying was leave granted. 3. From 
which of them was leave withheld. 4. Whether the monthly pay- 
ments of salary continued to the officials who were granted leaves of 
absence during such absence. Presented to the Legislature, 11th 
May, 1920. Mr. Cooper (Toronto). Not Printed. 

I'eturn to an Order of the House of the 19th May, 1920, for a Eeturn 
shewing in detail all payments and disbursements made under the 
heading of " Organization of Eesonrces Committee, Expenses of 
Patriotic Fund and Eed Cross Campaign. For expenses of the 
campaign to increase food production and for services and expenses 
of the Provincial Committee appointed under Organization of 
Eesources Act": — In the Public Accounts of 1916-17, page 653. 
Organization of Eesources Committee, accountable, $111,000: In 
the Public Accounts for 1917-18, page 618, Organization of 
Eesources Committee, accountable, $260,000 ; In the Public 
Accounts for 1918-19, page 736, Organization of Eesources Com- 
mittee, advance, $350,000 — for which the note in the Public 
Accounts shows that no audit has been made in any year by the 
Audit Office. And also for any other sums that have been paid 
since the end of the last fiscal year in addition to the amount of the 
last-named advance down to the 1st day of April, 1920, on the same 
account. And further for the authority under Order-in-Council or 
otherwise, under which the said bulk sums granted in each year by 
special warrant were distributed to the funds, committees, organiza- 
tions or individuals who received the same. Presented to the 
Legislature, 19th May, 1920. Mr. Dewart. Not printed. 

Report of Colin G. Snider, Commissioner in Enquiry respecting Ontario 
Hospital, Hamilton. Presented to the Legislature. 28th May, 1920. 
Not Printed. 

Report of Talbot Maclieth, Commissioner in Enquiry respecting the 
Ontario Hospital, London. Presented to the Legislature, 28th 
May, 1920. Not Printed. 



Xo. 89 



No. 90 



No. 91 



No. 93 



No. 93 



Tieturn to an Order of the House of the 19th March, 1920, for a Return 
of copies of all correspondence between the Minister of Justice of 
Canada or any other official of the Dominion Government on the 
one hand, and the late Premier of the Province of Ontario or any 
other Minister, officer of official of the Ontario Government, on the 
other hand, relating to the question of hours of labour being limited 
to eight hours per diem. Presented to the Legislature, 27th May, 
1920. Mr. McAlpine. Not Printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the 21st May, 1920, for a Return 
shewing : — Bow many appointments have been made iDy the Govern- 
ment since November 14th, 1919, as follows : (a) name and address 
of person appointed; (&) to what position; (c) date of appoint- 
ment; (d) salary paid or to be paid in each case; (e) is the 
appointment temporarv or permanent. Presented to the Legis- 
lature, 28th May, 1920. Mr. BucMand. Not Printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd March. 1920. for a Return 
shewing: — 1. Copies of all papers and correspondence between the 
present holders of export warehouse licenses and the License Board, 
or any member thereof. 2. Between such applicants and the Gov- 
ernment, or any member thereof. 3. Between the License Board, 
and any member thereof, and the Government, or any member 
thereof. 4. And bet«'een any Member of the House, and any Mem- 
ber of the Government, or any member of the License Board. 
Presented to the Legislature. 28th Ma}^ 1920. Mr. Hogarth. Not 
Printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the 26th March, 1920. for a Return 
shewing: 1. The names of all civil servants dismissed, retired, or 
resigned, or whose positions have become vacant from any other 
cause from the first day of January, 1914. 2. The date of such 
dismissals, retirements, or resignations respectively. 3. The reason 
for the occurrence of each vacancy. 4. The salary obtained by the 
official at the time of removal. 5. The present salary of the new occu- 
pant, if any. Presented to the Legislature, 28th May, 1920. Mr. 
Deivart. Not Printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the 29th March, 1920, for a Return 
shewing: — 1. How many appointments have been made to the fol- 
lowing Government Departments since December 1st, 1919: 
Attorney-General's Department; Provincial Secretary's Depart- 
ment: Provincial Treasurer's Department; Department of Lands 
and Forests; Department of Agriculture; Department of Public 
Works; Department of Labour; Department of Mines. 2. How 
many of these positions have gone to returned soldiers. 3. And 
what were the salaries they received. Presented to the Legislature, 
28th May, 1920. Mr. McNamara. Not Printed. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Public Works 



FOR THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



FOR THE 



TWELVE MONTHS ENDING 31st OCTOBER 



1919 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE'LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO : 
Printed and Published by A. T. WILGRESS, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 



Printed by 
THE RYERSON PRBS&. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Letter of Transmission 5 

Report of Deputy Minister ' 7 

Report of Architect 10 

Report of Engineer 19 

Statement of Accountant of Public Works 59 

Report of Secretary and Law Clerk 67 



[3] 



To His Honour, Lionel H. Claeke, Esq., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May it Please Your Honour: 

As required by law I submit for the information of Your Honour and the 
Legislative Assembly, the Annual Eeport on the works under the control of the 
Public Works Department, comprising the Eeports of the Deputy Minister, the 
Architect, the Engineers, the Accountant and Law Clerk, for the twelve months 
ending the 31st of October. 1919. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

F. C. Biggs, 
Minister of Public Worlcs and Highways. 

Department of Public Works, Ontario, 
March 29th. 1920. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

Deputy Minister of Public Works 

ToEOXTO, March 29tli, 1920. 

HONOUEABLE F. C. BiGGS.. 

Minister of Public Works and HigJivjays, Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to transmit the annual reports of the Provincial 
Architect, the Provincial Engineer, the statement of the Accountant and the report 
of the Secretary and Law Clerk of the Public ^Vorks Department for the fiscal 
jear ending October 31st, 1919. 

The Colonization Eoads Branch which was attached to the Department o£ 
•Crown Lauds from Confederation until the year 1900, when it was transferred to 
the Department of Public Works was returned to the Department of Lands and 
Forests by order-in-council dated the 28th day of February A.D., 1919. 

The expenditure on public buildings and public engineering works during 
the period of the war, was confined to those of the most urgent nature necessary 
for the safety of the public. An expenditure of $1,917,012.61 on public buildings 
in the year 1911: was reduced to the sum of $51: T, 41 1.64 in the year 1918. At the 
last session of the Legislature large appropriations were taken for public buildings^ 
to provide needed buildings and also to give employment to the returned soldiers, 
as it was anticipated that a large number of men would be returning to their pre- 
hear employment with probably a serious condition of unemployment; contrary to 
the expectation the building season was marked by great scarcity of workmen in 
all trades and from an appropriation of $2,159,803.08 for capital expenditure the 
sum of $737,726.55 only was expended. The expenditure for dams, bridges, 
ilrainage and other engineering works under the Provincial Engineer were generally 
■carried out as appropriated by the Legislature as the construction of the bridges 
■which had been deferred during the war period had to be renewed for the safety 
of the public. 

Of the building operations a few of the principal ones may be mentioned : — 
The Government office building at 46 Eichmond Street, Toronto, was com- 
pleted in February and occupied by the several sections in the Motion Picture 
activities of the Provincial Treasury Department; the Factory Inspectors and 
Steam Boiler Inspectors of the Trades and Labour Branch; and the Divisional 
Engineers of the Highways Department later occupied offices in the building. In 
addition to two fine projection rooms, forty-two well lighted offices are provided at 
a remarkably low square foot cost per annum. 

The Ontario Hospital for Feeble Minded. Orillia, the completion of the 
improvements, which have been proceeding for several years past, in the recon- 
struction of the Kitchen and Laundry, and improvements in the water supplv. 



KEPOET OF Xo. 13 



The Ontario Hospital, Whitby, the erection of farm buildings, the completion 
of cottages for patients and erection of houses for employees, and the planting of 
trees and shrubs to beautify the grounds. 

The Industrial Farm, Burwash, the completion of an addition to the camp with 
an Assembly Hall, the construction of a central heating plant, new laundry and 
storehouse, dormitory for guards and improvement in water supply. 

The Ontario Hospital, Brockville, new farm buildings, a new boat house and 
dock. 

The Normal and Model School, Ottawa, extensive alterations were made to 
this building by changing the interior partitions and putting in much larger win- 
dows, a very great improvement in the lighting and general arrangement of the 
class rooms was obtained. 

New Court House, Sault Ste. Marie. Early in the season a contract was 
awarded for taking down the old court house and gaol and the building of the 
foundation of the new court house on the site of the old. A further contract was 
awarded for the erection, of the new building in the month of August and good 
progress made during the balance of the fiscal year. 

Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph. A Students' residence to accommodate 
135 students has been in course of erection from the Federal grants to aid in 
Agriculture. 

Agricultural School and Farm, Kemptville. The construction of the main 
building including class rooms and students' residence was in course of erection 
also from the Federal grants, to aid in Agriculture. 

The engineering works constructed during the year comprise 118 new bridges, 
73 of timber, 39 reinforced concrete and 6 of steel. The more important were, 
the bridge over the Madawaska Eiver in the Township of Griffith, County of Een- 
frew, having a length of 398 feet 6 inches, a centre span of steel 70 feet, with a 
concrete floor four spans of reinforced concrete 30 feet each, the balance being stone 
filling; a bridge over the Sturgeon Eiver at Smokey Falls, in the Township of 
Field, 280 feet in length, with two spans of steel 70 feet each and one 60 feet, 
the balance being pile approach ; a bridge over the North Channel of the Tvaminis- 
tiquia Eiver at Stanley, the bridge as reconstructed is 184 feet long, three spans 
60 feet each, 90 feet of the old bridge was replaced by filling with stone. 

The expenditure for maintenance of locks, dams, bridges, dredging, etc., was 
abnormally high, the cost of labour and material being nearly double that of former 
years. Eepairs were made to 77 bridges, 3 locks and 5 dams. The dredge was 
operated at Peninsula Canal connecting Fairy and Peninsula Lakes, on the Hunts- 
ville section of navigation. 

The statement of the Accountant gives the expenditure under the different 
appropriations in the supply bill. The report of the Secretary and Law Clerk 
gives the several contracts entered into during the fiscal year. 

The Ontario Public Works Department and the Department of Public High- 
ways have expended since Confederation on Capital Account, to the 31st of October, 
1919, in the erection of public buildings, engineering works, colonization and 
mining roads (in Northern Ontario) good roads improved highways (in Older 
Ontario) and in the construction of railways and aid in the form of subsidies to 
railways, the sum of $54,941,838.8? as follows : 



1920 DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



(1) Public Buildixgs: — 

Parliament and Departmental Buildings and Government House. $4,655,590 15 

Hospitals for Mental Diseases and Feeble-Minded 10,311,89'1 57 

Penal Institutions 3,962,675 17 

Educational Institutions 3,314,147 53 

Agricultural Institutions 1,874,196 81 

Buildings for the Administration of Justice 1,533,280 77 

Miscellaneous expenditures 112,446 21 

$25,764,228 21 
<2) Public Exgixeerixg Works :^ — 

Improvement in inland navigation such as locks, dams, etc., 
at first for colonization purposes but which has now developed 
into most attractive and lucrative tourist resorts, in the noted 
Muskoka lakes. 

Improvement in transportation such as roads, bridges, etc.. 
drainage of lands and roads, in aid to municipalities in grants, 
advances, etc $4,267,552 19 

<3) Colonization and Mining Roads 9,361,305 05 

<4) Good Roads Highways Improvement (now under Dept. of Public 

Highways) 5,430,607 47 

<5) Aid to Railways 10,118.145 90 

The Department of Public Works of Ontario has an honourable record; since 
its inception at Confederation on July 1st, 1867, not a single dollar of the expendi- 
ture of $54,941,838.82 on Capital construction on public buildings and public works 
has ever been questioned as having been dishonestly expended. 

I have the honour to be, 

Sir, 

Your obedient servant, * 

R. P. Fairbaiex, 
Deputy Minister of Puhlic Worhs. 



P.AV 



10 EEPORT OF Xo. 13 

EEPORT OF ARCHITECT. 

Hox. F. C. Biggs, Minister of Public IforA*.? and Highivays. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my Annual Report for work done by this 
Branch of the Department of Public Works for year ending October 31st, 1919. 

Departmextal Buildings. 

Including the Parliament Buildings, Xo. 5 Queen's Park, (Ontario Provincial 
Laboratories in connection with the Provincial Board of Health and Department 
of Mines) ; Xo. 15 Queen's Park, occupied by the Trades and Labour Department, 
and Xo. 17 Queen's Park, occupied by the Forestry Branch of the Lands Depart- 
ment. Repairs to these buildings have received proper attention. A considerable 
amount of painting has been done to the Parliament Buildings, including the 
woodwork on the outside and walls and ceilings of corridors on the inside and a 
number of offices. 

Xo. 46 Richmond St. AY. The work in connection with the reconstruction of 
this building was completed and the building occupied early in the year. Furniture 
has been supplied and renewed in the buildings as found to be necessary from time 
to time. 

Government House. Xo new work was done to this building during the past 
year, repairs are being attended to. It was found necessary to paint the whole 
of the outside woodwork of the buildings to which nothing had been done since 
their erection. Buildings and grounds generally have been kept in a good state of 
repair. 

Osgoode Hall. The work in connection with this building during the past 
year consisted mostly of repairs, including a large amount of painting and decor- 
ating to Main Library, Chancery Division Court. High Court, Court of Appeal 
and some of the corridors. The work has been done, as in all cases of painting 
this year in the city, by men employed (mostly returned soldiers) by the Depart- 
ment under a capable foreman. Alterations have been made in the old west wing 
by removing the side stairs leading from first to upper floors and converting the 
space on the upper floor into an addition to the Judges' Library and on the lower 
floor into an additional office. Furniture has been supplied to the apartments of 
the Judges, Officials and others as required. Considerable renovating was done to 
the rooms occupied by the Assistant House-keepers, including papering, painting, 
etc., etc. Repairs have also been made to roofs, drains, etc. During the past year 
the Fess Fuel Oil Burning Equipment has been installed to three of the steam 
heating boilers to take the place of coal and it is anticipated a considerable saving 
will be made. The work was done under contract by the Fess Oil Burners of 
Canada Limited, and the apparatus will be tested out during the winter months. 

Ontario Hospitals. 

Including Hospitals for 'Insane, Brockville. Hamilton, Kingston, London, 
Mimico, Penetanguishene, Toronto, and for Feeble Minded at Orillia, and Hospital 
for Epileptics, "Woodstock. The work in connection with repairs and maintenance 
of these Institutions is now attended to by the Department of the Provincial Secre- 
tarv who has established a building branch with Architects, Draughtsman, and 



1920 DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 11 

Inspectors pretty much on the same lines as this Department. The new buildings, 
including additions and alterations are designed from sketches and data supplied 
by that Department, the construction of the buildings being carried out by this 
Department. 

Ontario Hospital, Brockville. Plans and specifications were prepared for an 
. addition to the Dairy Barn and a Milk House, tenders were advertised for and the 
contract awarded to the lowest tenderer, the Canadian Contractors and Builders 
Limited, of Brockville, the work is progressing satisfactorily and the building will 
be ready to receive the stock by the first of the month. The work is being carried 
on under the supervision of a local Architect. Mr. B. Dillon, who also prepared 
plans and specifications for a Boat House, for which tenders were called and con- 
tract for general trades awarded to G, A. Munroe. of Brockville, whose tender was 
the lowest, the work has been satisfactorily completed under ]\Ir. Dillon's super- 
vision. The new Barn and the old Barn have been wired and electrically lighted, 
a pole line having been erected by our electricians from the town limits to the 
Stag Farm. 

Ontario Hospital, Hamilton. Plans and specifications were prepared for a 
reservoir adjoining the present one to act in conjunction with it, to increase the 
water supply for fire protection. Tenders were called for in the press and the 
contract awarded to the lowest tenderer, that of Stuart and Sinclair of Hamilton, 
good progress is being made with the work. The reservoir is built of reinforced 
concrete, has a capacity of 262,000 gallons, giving in all, including the old reser- 
voir, 524,000 gallons for fire protection and domestic service. Plans and specifica- 
tions were made for a Mortuarv* Building, which will be built by the Hospital 
Authorities under the supervision of this Department. Repairs have been made 
to the electric lighting of the grounds, and wiring and electric lighting fixtures 
have been installed in the Superintendent's residence and in six employees' cottages. 

Ontario Hospital, Kingston. The alterations to the Industrial Building, con- 
verting same into dormitories for patients was completed early in the season. Plans 
and specifications were prepared for an addition to the Xurses' Home at this 
Institution and the contract awarded to the lowest tenderer, that of Messrs. Mc- 
Kelvey & Birch of Kingston, good progress is being made with the work and the 
building should be ready for occupation by May 1st next. Sketches were also made 
for an addition to the Infirmarv and are now under consideration. Some necessary 
improvements have been made to the barn at Xew Court. 

Ontario Hospital, London. Plans and specifications were prepared for a 
verandah 16 ft. wide extending to both floors of the east wing of the Main Building, 
the work is being done by men employed by the Asylum under the supervision of 
the Chief Carpenter of the Institution. Plans and specifications were made for 
a Fire Hall and Hose Tower with living apartments over same to house the men 
in charge of the apparatus. Tenders were called for and the contract for general 
trades awarded to Messrs. J. Hayman & Sons, of London, good progress is being 
made with the work. Plans and specifications were made for new lavatories in 
cottages A, B, and C. Tenders were called for the plumbing and the contract 
awarded to Messrs. Xoble & Rich, of London, the structural work is being done by 
Asylum Labour; up-to-date sanitan,^ appliances are being installed, including 
shower baths, which are now much in favour with attendants and patients. The 
work is progressing and should be completed by the beginning of the year, 

Ontario Hospital, Mimico. Plans and specifications were prepared for a new 
Fire Hall and Hose Tower, the building is completed, the work was done by day 



12 EEPOET OF No. 13 



work under the supervision of this Department. A system of underground cable 
with concrete lamp standards for lighting the grounds of the Institution was in- 
stalled during the season, the work being done by the staff of the Institution under 
the direction of the electrician of this Department, who has displayed excellent 
judgment in the placing of the lights. 

Ontario Hospital, Orillia. The work in connection with the erection of the 
store, bakery, cold storage, butcher shop, etc., was carried on throughout the winter 
and all completed, including the steam heating, plumbing and equipment of 
kitchen, and in full commission by the end of last July and is giving entire satis- 
faction. Owing to the difficulty in procuring labour and materials the work could 
not be carried on as speedily as could be desired. The 75,000 gallon water tank 
for fire protection, has been completed and all water mains connected therewith. 
An addition has been built to the pumping station to provide space for the new 
engines and pumps which have been installed, with the exception of a new pump 
which will have to be ordered to take the place of present domestic pump, which 
has been found to be too small to do the work required. The system has been 
working for about six months and for the first time in years this Institution is 
thoroughly safe guarded from fire. The floors of the connecting corridors leading 
to kitchen in the north and south sides which were of cement, have been taken 
up and re-laid with tile from the Government Plant at Mimico. A contract has 
been awarded for covering of steam mains and the work is now under way. Plans 
and specifications were prepared for a residence for the Medical Director and for 
a fire hall, the former is being erected on a very desirable site across the road 
from cottage A; steam heating pipes have been connected up with the mains in 
that building; the latter is being erected conveniently close to the boiler house, 
provision is made for sleeping apartments for men in charge of the fire fighting 
appliances on the upper floor of the building, who are employed in the boiler house 
during the day time. The work on both buildings is progressing satisfactorily. 
A small addition is being built to the Superintendent's verandah, necessitated by 
the decayed condition of that portion of the old verandah. An addition has been 
built to the Main Barn to provide accommodation for dairy cows with a milk 
room adjoining. The old cow barn is being converted into a horse stable using 
the materials, as far as possible, from the old horse stable, which has been taken 
down. A considerable amount of work has been done in re-wiring the main build- 
ing, which had not been renewed since the building was first wired, wiring the 
new stores and kitchen, the Doctor's residence and fire hall, setting up the motors 
operating the pumps in connection with the water service. This work was done 
by electricians of the Department under the supervision of Mr. Fred Stroud, 
Electrician of the Department. All other work was carried out under the super- 
vision of Mr. IT. S. Scott, Inspector of Works. 

Ontario Hospital, Penetanguishene. The only work done by your .Depart- 
ment during the past year was the installation of a pole line for electric lighting 
of fourteen employees' cottages, fixtures were supplied and installed. The laundry 
building was re-wired for electric light and apparatus, the old wiring having become 
unsafe, having outlived its lifetime. The work was also done by electricians in 
the employ of this Department, under the direction of our electrician. 

Ontario Hospital, Whitby. The various works in connection with this Insti- 
tution were continued throughout the year, including grading of grounds, laying 
out of flower beds, planting of shrubs etc. Some of this work was done under 
contract bv ^h\ P. Good, Landscape Gardener of Toronto, the remainder by the 



1920 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WOEKS. 13 

Department, including grading and grass seeding about three acres of lawn. The 
dairy barn commenced in March, is completed and occupied and is probably 
the largest and finest barn of its kind in the Province. It has accommodation for 
eighty milk cows, maternity pens and calf stalls and feed rooms. Two silos, 20 ft. 
in diameter and 40 ft. high, and root house are situated at the junction of the 
two wings, all the lumber for this building was purchased in the rough, the sash, 
frames, doors, sheeting, etc., were all manufactured in the Mill on the job. 
]\raterials for other farm buildings are also being manufactured at this mill. 
Separate buildings have been erected in connection with the barn, including 
milk house and bull pen. Foundations of concrete have been laid for the horse 
stable, 34 ft. wide by 109 ft. long and for implement shed, 24 ft. wide by 196 ft. 
long. The super-structure of both buildings is under way, materials taken from 
the old barn, which is being torn down, will be used as far as possible in the 
construction of these buildings. A piggery 28 ft. wide and 100 ft. long with 
foundation walls of concrete, has been erected and occupied with exterior runways 
in connection therewith. Two poultry buildings have been erected, located on the 
farm land leading to the piggery. A house for Farm Superintendent and two pairs 
of cottages for farm help and five pairs of cottages for mechanics and attendants 
of the Institution are under c-onstruction. All should be completed by the end of 
this year and some before that time. These houses are properly equipped with 
up-to-date plumbing and heating and electric lighting and generally speaking are 
very attractive buildings. The old Farm House known as the " Polly Smith 
House " has been remodelled, re-plastered on the inside and plastered in stucco on 
the outside, new floors have been laid and the house re-decorated and sanitary 
plumbing installed, and is now ready for occupancy. Septic tank, sewers and water 
mains have been laid to these buildings, a transmission line has been erected from 
the power house to the cottages and farm buildings. A 90 K.V.A. Generator in con- 
nection with the electric power plant has been installed, all steam and electric 
connections made and the whole, properly tested by the Expert Engineer and found 
to work satisfactorily. Other more or less important work, too numerous to men* 
tion, was also carried on during the year. It will be seen by the foregoing that 
a very large building programme has been carried on at this Institution. All of 
the work being carried out under the direction and supervision of Mr. S. J. Spall, 
Director of Works for this Department, who has fulfilled his multitudinous and 
arduous duties in a most creditable manner. All mechanics and labourers are 
hired by him and all quantities of materials are taken out by him and purchased 
on his requisitions by the Department. Patient Labour has been utilized as far 
as possible in the grading, etc., of grounds. All plans and specifications for the 
above buildings were iprepared by this Department from sketches and data 
furnished by the Provincial Secretary's Department. 

Andrew Mercer Eeformatory. The work done at this Institution by this 
Department included the moving forward and reconstruction of the Goal fence 
en the west side, the erection of brick piers to main entrance gates, the installation 
of a local automatic telephone system connecting the executive offices with the 
hospital, industrial building, wards and boiler room, has been completed, the work 
being done by our electricians under the supervision of the Electrician of this 
Department. 

Industrial Farm, Burwash. An extensive programme is being carried out at 
this Institution. During the year we have erected the following buildings, first 
and not the least important, the extensive addition to Camp Xo. 1 has been com- 



14 PtEPOET OF Xo. 13 

pleted, with the exception of the bowling alley, which it is intended to install 

during the winter months. The building is furnished and has been occupied for 

about three months. This addition will give accommodation for 100 prisoners and 

include an Amusement Hall and Bowling Alleys, is provided with up-to-date 

sanitary plumbing and bathing facilities. A Guards' Dormitory Building has been 

erected close to the above building, is fully furnished and has been occupied for 

some time. Plans and specifications were prepared for a central heating plant 

including a boiler house constructed of concrete with a brick chimney 80 ft. iu 

height, two 100 h.p. second hand steam boilers have been installed and will be 

sufficient for this winter, the intention being to install two similar boilers next 

season. Present boilers were purchased by tender from the Hagersville Crushed 

Stone Co., of Hagersville. Steam mains have been laid from the boilers to the 

various buildings through a tunnel 4 ft. x 5 ft. 180 ft. long extending firom the 

boiler house to main building and concrete trenches varying in dimensions from 

18 in. X 18 in. to 36 in. x 36 in. to the other buildings. The plant is now in 

operation and working satisfactorily, the cost of fuel is practically nil as wood 

is used exclusively for heating, which is procured on the land and cut by the 

prisoners. A water supply system for fire protection and domestic purposes has 

been installed, a well with a capacity of 100,000 gallons has been constructed by 

the river side with pump house adjoining, the water being purified by being 

filtered through the sand through which it passes into the well, is pumped from 

there to a 50,000 gallon steel tank supported on a tower 100 ft. high, from there 

it is distributed through service mains to the various buildings, the mains being 

run in the same trenches as the steam mains. The laying of the trench and tunnel 

was an extensive operation as a large proportion of it was through the rock and 

had to be blasted. The steel tank was erected under contract by the Canadiar. 

Des Moines Co., of Chatham. The chimney to boiler house was also erected under 

contract by the Canadian Custodius Chimney Co. A complete electric light system 

is being installed with generators and engine operated by oil in camp No. 1 ; in 

camp No. 2 electric wiring system is being installed in conduit; lighting the whole 

of the buildings in camp No. 2, including two generators and engines with main 

switch board located in the power house. This work has been installed by the 

electricians of the Department under the direction of the Chief Electrician and 

the Inspector of Works. 

The saw mill has been reconstructed and enlarged and new machinery pur- 
chased for same and has been installed, the logs are cut during the winter in 
the woods, brought to the mill ^nd cut into dimension — timber and lumber as 
may be required for joiner work is dried in the kiln. All frames, sashes, etc., 
required for the buildings to be erected in the future can now be made at this 
mill as it is equipped to permit of this being done on the premises and will be a 
great saving in the cost of the work, as formerly all frames and sashes had to 
be made on the outside. 

An up-to-date barn 33 ft. 6 in. x 151 ft. has been erected with silo complete 
giving accommodation for about 40 horses and 10 cows. Three double cottages to 
be occupied by the guards have been erected at Farmlands and a cottage for the 
Superintendent of works at Camp No. 2. A new administration building lias also 
been erected at this Camp, one storey in height with a high basement, the building 
is 42 ft. X 57 ft. Provision is made on the ground floor for a waiting room, 
!)oard room, SuperinteJident's office, general office and office of records with large 
A'aults off same. The basement is divided into office, storeroom and vaults. 



1920 DEPAETMEXT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 15 



All the above works have been carried out under the direction and supervision 
of Mr. J. M. Philip, Inspector of Works for this Department, who, by his un- 
remitting attention has carried an enormous amount of work to a successful issue 
with the hearty co-operation of the Superintendent of the Institution and the 
oflficials under him to whom great credit is due, as all work such as excavating, 
concrete work and all labouriDg work of every kind and some of the skilled labour 
was done by the prisoners under the supervision of the officials. 

Educational Buildings. 

Including the Normal and Model Schools, Toronto, and Ottp.wa, The Xormal 
Schools, Peterborough, Xorth Bay, Stratford, Hamilton and London, Ontario 
School for the Deaf, Belleville, Ontario School for the Blind, Brantford, the 
English and French School at Sandwich. Repairs and maintenance of these 
buildings are under the charge of this Department, inspections are made of the 
buildings at intervals by the Officials of the Department and repairs made as found 
to be necessary. 

Xormal School, Toronto, a large fireproof vault, three storeys in height, 
including the basement, is being erected on the west side of the Main Building 
in connection with the offices of the Compensation Board. The work is being 
done under contract by Messrs. Witchall & Sons. A large burglar proof safe has 
been purcliased by tlie Board and is being built in on the first floor of the vault. 
Considerable painting was done to the interior of this building, the gutters and 
conductor pipes to all of the buildings were repaired or renewed and painted, the 
woodwork on the outside of the buildings was also painted,' the work being done 
by our own men. A small addition was built to the garage which necessitated 
the building of a laundry under the Superintendent of Buildings' house to take 
the place of one torn down to give space for the garage. 

Xormal and Model Schools, Ottawa. Plans and specifications were prepared 
for remodelling these buildings the arrangements of which were out of date, the 
buildings being badly lighted and unsanitary. The work of construction (general 
trades) is being carried out under contract by Messrs. Taylor & Lackey, contractors, 
of Ottawa. The heating, ventilation and plumbing by Purdy Mansell Limited, ol: 
Toronto, to whom the contract was awarded when their tender was found to be 
the lowest. The heating and ventilation is being carried out from plans and speci- 
fications prepared by Mr. Melvern F. Thomas, Heating and Ventilating Engineer, 
who is supervising the work. The boiler house has been remodelled, the old 
chimney, which- was too small and blocked the light on that side from the library, 
has been taken down and a new chimney 85 ft. in height has been erected to tlie 
east of the boiler house. A coal vault has been built under the pavement of the 
yard and next to the boiler house. The coal formerly was stored under the building 
at some distance from .the boiler room, the storage was insufficient in area and 
inconvenient in every way. The interior of the buildings has been greatly im- 
proved, the old heavy woodwork and plaster in the corridors of the Model School 
have been removed and replaced by new plastering and light wood work and the 
corridors lighted by large Iwrrowed lights placed in the walls and by putting glass 
in the doors and large fanlights over them. The class rooms have been re-arranged 
and the lighting made as nearly perfect as possible, by removing all the old 
windows and replacing with large windows as called for in the Department oC 
Education's rules as to lighting of School Buildings. Adequate provision has been 



16 EEPOKT or No. 13 

made in both buildings for cloak rooms and lavatories for teachers and pupils. 
The library which was dark and gloom}-, located in the centre between the two 
schools, has been greatly improved by raising the floor to the level of the front 
building and increasing the window areas. The old passage way on the east side 
alongside the boiler house has been removed and a well lighted corridor placed 
on the north side for access to either building. Xew shelving and furniture for 
this room is being provided. Owing to the dilapidated condition of the ceilings 
of corridors and apartments in the Model School, it was necessary to cover them 
with embossed sheet steel. The ceilings of corridor in front building, the library 
and some of the class rooms have been treated in a similar manner. All the 
interior wood of the building has been painted, as also the new wood and iron 
work on the outside, the plastering will be painted during the summer vacation. 
The whole of the buildings have been wired in conduit and new lighting fixtures 
installed, the work was done by our electricians under the direction of the Chief 
Electrician. An asphalt pavement has been laid over the girls' play yard, same 
as laid in the boys' play yard last year. The work was done under contract by 
O'Leary Brothers, of Ottawa. The old wood fence on Lisgar Street was torn 
down and the iron fence erected to take its place for a length of 413 ft. this- 
work was also done under contract by the Canadian Ornamental Iron Works Co., 
of Toronto. The old wooden fence between the Federal Governments Military 
grounds and the school groi^ads on Cartier Square, which was decayed and falling 
dowu, has been removed and a new fence erected. The buildings generally are in 
good repair. 

Normal School, Lrondon. A slight alteration was made to the centre of the 
building by partitioning off a lavatory from the teacher's room on the ground 
floor and by placing a glass partition across the alcove in the tower in the upper 
iloor, to provide a room for teachers. 

Normal School, Hamilton. The iron fence has been continued on Lamoreaux 
Street enclosing the property adjoining the school grounds, which was purchased 
last year, the work being done under contract by the Olmstead Iron Works of 
Hamilton. 

The above are the only Normal Schools where new work of any importance 
was done. 

Ontario School for Deaf, Belleville. As the Main Building erected in 
1870 was designed to give accommodation for class rooms on the lower floors and 
dormitories on the upper floor and was considered to be unsafe from fire, two 
up-to-date dormitory buildings were erected in 1913 to take the place of the 
dormitories in the main building. It then became a matter of c'onsideration as 
to Avhat could be done in the way of altering the old building to meet the modern 
requirements of a school of this character. After a great deal of thought, it was 
found that even with a very large expenditure, owing to the plan of the old building 
not lending itself to the newer requirements and considering that owing to its being 
four storeys in height and the upper storeys would be practically useless, it was 
decided to abandon the idea of remodelling. Plans and specifications were pre- 
pared for a new building two storeys in height, planned in units corresponding 
with the most modern practice, as used in the later buildings in the United States. 
The foundation walls will be built of concrete, the exterior will be built of brick 
and stone work, tenders were called for the excavations and foundations and the 
contract let to Thos. Manley & Sons, Contractors, of Belleville. Plans and specifi- 
cations were prepared, tenders called for and contracts awarded for the erection 



1920 DEPAETMEXT OF PUBLIC WOEKS. 17 



of a cottage for the engineer and a double cottage for workmen, contract for 
general trades was awarded to Thos. Manley & Sons; heating and plumbing to 
J. Lewis Co.. of Belleville, and electric wiring and fixtures to E. Finkle, of Belle- 
ville. These buildings are being built with concrete foundations and brick super- 
structure, the bricks being supplied from the Government Clay Plant at Mimico. 
Owing to the diflficulty in procuring men. only fair progress is being made with 
the work. Xew grates to the ^lurphy Stokers were installed to the four steam 
heating boilers in the main boiler house, replacing those worn out. 

School for the Blind, Brantford. The remaining portion of the old main 
board walk leading up to the building for a distance of 550 ft. has been taken 
up and replaced with a concrete walk same as present walk. The work being 
done under contract by Jesse Bartle, of Brantford. 

A programme clock and inter-communicating telephone system has been 
installed by Automatic Telephone Co., and is giving satisfactors' results. The 
heating system in the Superintendent's residence has been remodelled and is now 
giving good service. 

Agricultural Buildings. 

Including the buildings in connection with the Ontario Agricultural College, 
Guelph. the Horticultural Experimental Station, Jordan Harbour, the Ontario 
Agricultural School. Kemptville, the Demonstration Farm, Monteith. the Demon- 
stration Farm. Xew Liskeard and the Ontario Yeterinar}- College, Toronto. 

Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph. Tenders were called for the erectioii 
of the Student's Dormitory Building for which plans and specifications were drawn 
last year, the contract was awarded to Messrs. Secord & Sons of Brantford, theirs 
being the lowest tender. Owing to labour conditions the work on this building- 
is not as rapid as it might be. Judging by present progress, the building will 
be finished in time for occupation by August. The building is designed in moderit 
Domestic Gothic, the foundations are of concrete and the super-structure of stone 
backed with brick, is three storeys in height, exclusive of basement. The works 
are being .supervised by Mr. C. B. Medley, Inspector of works. This building will 
accommodate 135 students and supervisors, ample accommodation for lavatories. 
clothes rooms, trunk rooms and a large general sitting or common room, will be 
steam heated from the central boiler plant and electrically lighted. 

Plans and specifications were prepared for an Apiary Building and the con- 
tracl awarded to P. H. Secord & Sons, of Brantford, their tender being the lowest 
in this case also. This building will be built with foundations of concrete and 
upper structure of bricks from the Government Clay Plant at Mimico, is three 
storeys in height including basement, the bee room, wax room, laboratory- and work 
room's are located in the basement; offices and laboratory are provided for on the 
ground floor. A lecture room is located on the upper floor and has a capacity for 
150 students: will be steam heated and electrically lighted from the central plant 
and should be completed by the spring. 

Plans and specifications were prepared for a piggery, which has been built 
by the college. 

Agricultural School, Kemptville. Plans and specifications were prepared for 
the main building and the contract for general trades awarded to Messrs. C. 
TTolbrook & Sons "of Ottawa, and for steam heating, ventilation and plumbing to 
Purdy Man.-ell Limited, their tenders being the lowest in both cases. Good pro- 
gress has been made with the work, considering the difficulty in obtaining materials 



18 EEPOET OF Xo. 13 

and labour. The building has a frontage of 120 ft. by a depth of TO ft., will be 
three storeys in height including the basement. The foundations are of concrete, 
the super-structure of brick from the Government Clay Plant at Mimico. The 
basement is divided into chemical laboratory class room, a dairy room and boiler 
room ; the first floor into physics laboratory, library and two class rooms, principal's 
room, stenographer's room, general office, and a room for the professors ; on the 
second floor a domestic science room, sewing room and class room. Ample pro- 
vision has been made for cloak rooms and lavatories. 

Ontario Veterinary College. A class room has been partitioned ofE the 
anatomical laboratory on the upper floor of the south east wing. Eepairs to the 
building have been made as required including painting of some of the class rooms. 

District Buildings. 

Including Court Houses, Gaols and Registry Offices in the Districts of 
Algoma, Kenora, Manitoulin, Muskoka, Xipissing, Parry Sound, Eainy Eiver, 
Sudbury, Temiskaming and Thunder Bay. The buildings in the districts are 
inspected by the officials of the Department and repairs made as found to be 
necessary and furniture renewed and supplied as required. N"o contracts have been 
awarded in the Districts with the exception of that for the Court House, Sault 
Ste. Marie. Plans and specifications were made for this building and tenders called 
for in 1916. Owing to war conditions at that time the Government did not think 
it advisable to proceed with the work and consequently, it was deferred until this 
year when tenders were again called for and the contract for excavations and 
concrete foundations awarded to Bumbaco Bros. & Thornton, of Sault Ste. Marie, 
who have completed their contract. While this work was under way tenders were 
called for the interior walls and super-structure and the contract awarded to 
Messrs. D. Jannison & Son, of Sault Ste. Marie. Good progress has been made 
with the work, it being the intention to carry on as far as the ground floor and 
cover it in and protect the work during the winter months. Tenders were also 
called for Heating, Plumbing and Ventilation and the contract awarded to Purdy 
Mansell Limited, of Toronto. The work is being carried on under the supervision 
of Mr. C. A. Findlay, Architect of Sault Ste. Marie. 

Plans and specifications were prepared for a Court House at Port Arthur and 
tenders called for the excavations and foundations. This work, I understand, has 
been deferred. Some work was done on the property making test pits before 
tenders were called for, at a small expense. 

Fish Hatchery, Port Arthur, Plans and specifications were made for a cottage 
for the Inspector of Fish Hatcheries at Port Arthur the work is being done under 
contract by Mr. P. Tonge of that place under the supervision of Mr. L. Lloyd 
Owens, Architect of Port Arthur. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

F E. Heakes, 

A rch Heel. 
Toronto, October 31st, 19 m. 



1920 DEPAETMEXT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 19 



REPOET OF EXGIXEER. 
Hon. F. C. Biggs, 

Minister of Public Works and Highways. 

SiE, — I have the honour to report on Public Works constructed and the general 
business of the Department for the fiscal year ending October 31st, 1919. 

Following the practice of former years the work was carried out by day labour 
under foremen regularly employed. Plans and specifications were prepared for 
«ach work, and Engineers of the Department visited the works under construction 
to see that directions were followed and that the work was being carried out to 
the best advantage. All supplies of steel and cement were purchased by tender, 
also all large supplies of timber. Small orders of timber, hardware, camp supplies, 
etc., were procured in the locality by the foreman in charge. Practically all of the 
works for which fulids had been provided were completed or were under way at 
the end of the fiscal year. Work was continued on the unfinished works and will 
continue while the weather is favourable. 

During the season 118 bridges were constructed: 73 of timber, 39 of reinforced 
concrete and 6 of steel. The most important of these were the Griffith Bridge over 
the Madawaska Eiver in Eenfrew, the Smoky Falls Bridge over the Sturgeon 
Eiver in the Sturgeon Falls District, and the Xorth Channel Bridge over the 
Kaministiquia Eiver in the Thunder Bay District. 

The expenditure for Maintenance of Public Works and Bridges was abnormally 
high, the high cost of labour and material nearly doubling the cost of work over 
the cost of former years. 

The necessary- dredging in the Muskoka Lakes having been completed the 
machinery- from the dredge was removed to Huntsville and installed in the old 
dredge hull. The hull was overhauled and lengthened 16 feet. Two new dump 
scows were constructed; a flat scow was also constructed and a boarding camp 
provided. During the season the dredge was operated in the Peninsula Canal 
between Peninsula and Fairj- Lake. The channel was deepened to 10 feet and 
widened to 60 feet. Work will continue on this canal next season. 

The next important expenditures from the fund provided for Maintenance of 
Locks, Dams, Bridges, etc., were as follows: — 

EECAPITULATIOX. 

MAINTENANCE EXPENDITURE. 

General. 

Tools, repairs to equipment, etc . $1,911 55 

Storehouse, freight, cartage, etc 100 21 

Superintendent's office, supplies: 

Travelling expenses 649 99 

Freight, wages, etc 582 64 

$3,244 39 

NA\^G.vnox. 

T)redge operation, wages, supplies, etc $7,719 39 

Clearing channels 396 67 

OuTlitting scows, etc 7,625 66 

$15,741 72 



20 



REPORT OF 



Xo. 13 



Magnetawan lock and swing bridge 

Huntsville lock 

Port Carling lock 

Swing iDridge, Huntsville 

Port Sandfield 

Ryerson 

Bala dam 

Huntsville dam 

Deer Lake Dam ". 

Magnetawan dam 

Norman dam 



Repaib and Renewal of Bridges 
Algoma: 

Finlay bridge 

Han'bury bridge 

Jeffrey bridge 

Laclocbe bridge 

McKay bridge 

Montgomery bridge 

Ophir bridge • ■ 

Shedden bridge 

Striker bridge 

Sault Ste. Marie: 

Bye bridge 

Goulais bridge 

Goulais Bay Road bridge 

Gully bridge 

People's Road bridge 

Wilding bridge 

Kenora: 

- Quibell bridge 

West Branch bridge (re-flooring) 

Manitoulin: 

Espanola bridge 

Wood Creek bridge, Gordon 

Sudbury: 

East Branch bridge, 8 and 9 Hagar 

Finn bridge, Waters 

Land bridge 

Sturgeon Falls: 

Begin bridge 

€asimir bridges 

Deer Creek bridge. Con. 2 

Deer Creek bridge, Con 1 

First Concession bridge, Appleby 

Martin bridge. Field 

North West Arm bridge 

" South Branch bridge 

Temagami bridge (grade) 

Temiskaming: 

ITilliardton bridge 

Moose Creek bridge 

Pearson bridge 

Tomstown bridge 

Wright Creek bridge 



$515 28 




151 97 




339 31 






$1,006 55 




$655 13 




210 70 




464 04 






$1,32^ 8T 




$470 39 




31 41 




10 00 




140 52 




717 65 






$1,370 oa 




-$685 51 




598 52 




125 00 




853 92 




655 50 




451 65 




543 01 




146 30 




380 80 






$4,440 21 




$531 20 




1,244 72 




454 37 




1,273 88 




776 89 




330 88 





$96 30 


394 


65 


$568 


64 


109 


41 



$968 79 
180 70 
126 00 



$376 88 


413 


07 


97 


75 


589 


92 


100 


10 


377 


70 


1.604 


08 


318 


59 


336 


00 


$8S 25 


183 


75 


118 


69 


88 


25 


123 


70 



1,611 94 



$490 95 



$678 OS 



$2,098 65- 



1,714 41 



$602 64 



1920 DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 21 



Nipissing: 

Calvin bridge $198 00 

Poverty Creek bridge 298 49 

Prince Creek bridge 535 71 

Sparks Creek bridge 668 15 

$1,700 35 



Public Works Drainage. 



$2,961 35 



Parry Sound: 

Ahmic Dam bridge $69 50 

Commanda Creek bridge. Gurd 281 05 

Croft bridge, Con. 12 , 448 88 

Distress bridge, Magnetawan 71 50 

Joly Laurier Townline bridge 95 25 

Loring Road bridge, Hardy 73 50 

Monteith Culvert 116 85 

Nipissing Road bridge, Commanda 38 50 

Restoule Road bridge. Pringle 81 75 

Ryerson bridge 45 25 

Seguln bridge, McDougall 67 45 

Shebeshikong bridge 573 35 

South River bridge. Strong T.L 724 05 

Squaw Lake bridge 234 95 

Wolf River bridge 42 52 

Muskoka: 

Beaver Creek bridge $152 70 

Big East bridge, Hoodstown Rd 352 65 

Brandy Creek bridge 242 02 

High bridge at Locks 26.6 60 

Long Lake bridge 76 25 

Sharps Creek, MacauUey 903 79 

Haliburton: 

Burnt River bridge, Cardiff $199 60 

Burnt River bridge, Torv Hill Rd 199 00 

$398 60 

Hastings : 

York Branch bridge $262 57 $262 57 

Renfrew: 

Bells Rapids bridge $179 40 

Black Bay bridge 100 50 

Byers Creek bridge 33 00 

Combermere bridge 78 75 

Ferguson Lake bridge 102 00 

Latchford bridge 1,420 60 

Lett bridge 82 92 

Mount St. Patrick Rd. bridge 200 40 

Schutt bridge 50 00 

T\Tiitefish bridge, Broughton 99 60 



$1,994 01 



?,347 17 



The money for Road Drainage in the Xorthern Districts was practically all 
expended. The labour cost was high, reaching $4.00 per day in some districts. 

LOCKMASTERS' REPORTS. 

The movement of boats at the different Locks was reported by the Tjock- 
masters as follows : — 

Huntsville Lock. — Steamboats, 153; small boats, 464; scows, 15; rafts, 92. 
Port Calling Lock.— Steamboats. 4,9-? 1 ; small boats, 330 ; scows, 470 : rafts, 38. 
Magnetawan Lock. — Steamboats, 652: small boats, 185; scows, 293; rafts, 259. 



22 EEPORT OF Xo. 13 

WORKS COXSTEUCTED UXDER SPECIAL APPEOPEIATIONS. 

Eaixy River District Bridges. 

Bunting Creek Bridge, Dilke Townllne. — Located over Bunting Creek at 
Section 31, on the west townline of' Dilke. A pile trestle bridge, 45 feet long, with 
pile bents driven at 15-foot centres ; caps 10 x 10 ; stringers, 5 lines 8 x 10 flatted ; 
cover 3-inch tamarac plank. Standard guard rail in place ; approaches well graded. 
Cost, $461.24. 

Cameron Creek Bridge, River Road, Morley. — Located at Lot 25 on the Eainy 
River Road. A pile trestle bridge 150 feet long. The deck is 12 feet above water 
level. Pile bents of 4 piles each are driven at lo-foot centres; caps 10 inches x 
10 inches; stringers, 5 lines, flatted; cover, 3-inch tamarac plank; standard guard 
rail in place; approaches graded. Cost, $1,407.65. 

Crozier-Lavalle Bridge, Trunk Road. — Located over the Lavalle River on the 
Trunk Road north of Section 19, Crozier. A pile trestle bridge 45 feet long. 
Cost, $713.73. 

Fifth Line Bridge, Burri^s. — Located over Lavalle River at Lot 8 on the road 
in front of Concession 5, Burriss. A pile trestle bridge 64 feet long, with a centre 
span 34 feet long. This span is supported by a king truss of 10 x 10 timber. 
The truss span rests on double pile bents. The flooring of 3-inch tamarac plank 
is supported by 5 lines of flatted stringers. The approaches are well graded. Cost, 
$890.12. 

Long Bridge, Front Road. — Located over a deep and wide ravine on the River 
Road, Lot 25, Lash. A pile trestle bridge 134 feet long with pile bents driven 
at 15-foot centres. The deck is 20 feet above bottom of ravine. Caps 10 x 10; 
5 lines of flatted stringers ; 3-inch tamarac plank floor ; standard railing approaches 
well graded and graveled. Cost, $1,283. 

Lavalle Bridge, Sections 4 and 9, Devlin. — Located between Sections 4 and 9,. 
Devlin. Total length, 100 feet; centre span, 40 feet, with two 16-foot spans at 
each end. Timber, all tamarac. Caps 10 x 10; 5 lines of stringers 8 x 10 with 
3-inch plank floor. Approaches well graded. Cost, $1,159.18. 

Pine River Bridge, North Road. — Located over Pine River on the North Road 
between Sections 34 and 35, Dilke. It is a pile trestle bridge 330 feet long. It 
has a centre truss span 36 feet long to allow the free passage of driftwood. The 
old piles were in fair condition, but for safety new piles were driven on the outside 
of each pile bent. An entirely new deck was furnished. Caps 10 x 10 ; stringers 
8 x 10, with a 3-inch plank floor. All first-class tamarac. A substantial guard rail 
was provided on each side of the bridge. After the big flood of July a heavy 
jam of driftwood was removed. Total cost, $2,690.00. 

Section 9 Bridge. Devlin. — ^Lo<'ated over Lavalle River on the road between 
Sections 8 and 9. It is a pile trestle bridge 70 feet long, with a centre truss span 
40 feet long. Apjiroaches avoII oraded. Cost, $749.63. 



1920 DEPAETMEXT OF PUBLIC WOEKS. 25 



Sturgeon Bridge, Dohis Townline.— Located over the west branch of Sturgeon 
Eiver at Lot 8 on the Dobie-Mather Townline. It is a pile trestle 45 feet long, 
with pile bents driven at 15-foot centres. All timber first-cla-s tamarac. Ap- 
proaches well graded. Cost, $772.16. 

Sturgeon Bridge, Sections 13 and 14, Shenstone.— Located, over the Sturgeon 
River, on the road between Sections 13 and 14, Shenstone. A pile trestle bridge 
66 feet long; centre truss span 36 feet, supported by double pile bents. Timber 
all first-class tamarac. Approaches well graded. Cost, $580.30. 

West Toiunline Bridge, Burriss.— Located over the Lavalle Eiver on the town- 
line between Burriss and Carpenter. It is a pile trestle bridge 62 feet long, with 
centre truss span 32 feet. Timber and lumber is all standard tamarac. Approaches 
well graded. Cost, $870.61. All the wo?k in this district was done under the 
direction of Frank Clement, Inspector Col. Eoad. 

Kenora District Bridges. 

Black Sturgeon Bridge, Mellicl: — Located over the Xarrows in Black Sturgeon 
Lake, Lot 5, Concession 1, Mellick. The work comprised placing a new plank 
floor, wheel guard, and railing on the bridge, which is 310 feet long. 

Current Creek Bridge. — Located over Current Creek on the West Eoad, Mel- 
lick, S. 484. A new bridge 52 feet long and 10 feet high. The old span was 
shortened 12 feet by a rock fill. Timber cribs built on rock support, 6 lines of 
flatted stringers 10 inches thick. The floor is 5-inch flatted tamarac. A sub- 
stantial guard rail was placed on each side of bridge. $638,53 was expended on 
these bridges. 

Dryden-Bichan Boad Bridge. — Located over a creek on the Dryden-Eichan 
Road, about 12 miles north of Dryden and one mile south from the Gull Eiver 
Bridge in the Township of Britton. The bridge is 52 feet ^ong— 31 feet shorter 
than the old bridge. The piers and abutments are timber cribs; stringers, 10-inch 
flatted tamarac; floor, 5-inch flatted tamarac. The hills were reduced on each 
side and the approaches well filled. $495.00 was expended on the work. 

Hutchinson Creek Bridge, Quih el. —Located over Hutchinson Creek about half 
a mile north of Quibel Station in the Township of Wabigoon. It is a pile trestle 
bridge, 297 feet long, with pile bents driven at 16-foot centres. The floor level 
is 19 feet above the water. The timber is Norway and jack pine; caps and 
stringers, 10-inch flatted: floor 5-inch flatted jack pine. A strong guard rait of 
sawn material is placed at each side of the bridge. The approaches are well graded. 
Total cost, $1,695.49. 

West Channel Bridge, Kenora.— This bridge, including approaches, is 387 
feet long. It was re-floored with first-class B.C. Fir in 1913, but the heavy traffic 
has worn away the plank at the wheel track. This season a new top deck of 3-inch 
plank, 19 feet long was placed over the old plank. A few defective stringers were 
replaced. The new floor plank was given a good coat of hot tar on both sides, 
and while the tar was hot a good coat of coarse sand was scattered over the tar. 



24 REPORT OF Xo. 13 



This coat of tar and sand appears to give excellent service, as after five months 
of heavy traffic it shows no signs of disintegration. The truss rods were all 
tightened up. Cost of repair, $907.87. 

All the work in the Kenora District was done under the direction of James 
Traser, Inspector of Colonization Roads. 

Thunder Bay District Bridges. 

Arnold Creeh Bridge, Conmee. — Located over Arnold Creek at north half 
Lot A, Concession 1, Conmee. A timber bridge 24 feet long, 14 feet wide, and 
5 feet 6 inches above water level. Abutments are framed bents resting on mud sills. 
The approaches are rock-filled and top dressed with gravel. A king truss of 10 x 10 
timbers supports the floor, five lines of 3 x 12 floor joist carry a 3-inch plank floor. 
A substantial guard rail is provided, and the whole structure painted with a carbon 
paint. Cost, $275. T2. 

Flint Bridge, O'Connor. — Located over the Whitefish River at Lot 5, Con- 
cession 1, O'Connor. A timber bridge 112 feet long. It has two truss spans 60 
feet and 31 feet long, resting on timber cribs. A new crib abutment was provided 
for the east end; the west abutment and centre pier were repaired; the deck was 
raised to give a clear height of 10 feet above low water level. The deck was 
entirely renewed. Truss members are 10 x 12 timbers; 7 lines of 3 x 12 floor 
joist; 3-inch tamarac plank floor; entire structure well painted and approaches 
w^ell graded. Cost, $1,105.55. 

Lyhster Whitefish Biidge. — Located over the Whitefish River at South half 
•of Lot 8, Concession 5, Lybster. A timber bridge 33 feet long; abutments, cedar 
pile bents. A king truss of 10 x 12 timber supports the floor; 7 lines of 3 x 32 
stringers carry a 3-inch tamarac plank floor; guard rails are provided and the 
structure well painted. Cost, $424.64. 

The bridge over the Whitefish at Lot 11, Concession 4, Lybster. was also 
Tebuilt at a cost of $289.00. 

Pearson Bndge, Lot 8, Concession 5. — Located over a creek in front of Lot 8, 
Concession 5, Pearson. A timber bridge 20 feet long; the abutments are timber 
cribs stone-filled ; 5 lines of 10-inch flatted stringers carry a floor of 3-inch tamarac 
plank ; wheel guards and railing in place. Approaches well graded ; creek bed 
cleared and straightened at site. Cost, $198.95. 

Second Concession Bridge, Maries. — Located over Pitch Creek on the road 
between Lots 6 and 7, Concession 2, Marks. A pile trestle 28 feet 6 inches long. 
Throe pile bents with 5 piles to each bent; 10 x 12 caps: 7 lines 3 x 12 floor 
joists; 3-inch tamarac plank floor; wheel guard and railing in place: approaches 
well graded ; structure well painted. Cost, $377.86. 

Stanley Bridge, North Channel. — The bridge over the South Channel of the 
Ivamanistiquia River was rebuilt in 1916. A steel deck on timber piers. This 
season the bridge over the ISTorth Channel was renewed. This bridge, as recon- 
structed, is 184 feet long. 90 feet of the old span was filled in, 42 feet at the north 
end and 48 feet at the south end of the bridge; three 60-foot steel spans provided 



1920 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WOEKS. 25 

with 6 lines of steel floor joist were placed: the old timber piers were rebuilt from 
the water line and the floor level was raised 2 feet to conform to the height of 
the bridge over the South Channel. At the abutments the rock fill is allowed 
to fall to a natural slope and is protected from scour by timber cribs sunk well 
below the bottom of the channel. These cribs are built up to low water leveL 
The steel spans rest on grillages of 2 lines of 12-inch I beams and are bolted to 
the cribs. The cribs are well drift bolted. The approaches are well graded and 
gravelled with a strong guard rail in place on each side. Total cost, $10,608.77 

All the work in the Thunder Bay District was done under the direction of 
John McXee, Inspector of Colonization Eoads. 

Sault Ste. Maeie District Bridges. 

Booth Bridge. — Located over a creek on the road between Sections 14 and 23, 
Korah. A concrete beam bridge 20 feet clear span, 14 feet clear roadway on 
concrete abutments 10 feet in height to floor level. Pour concrete beams 12 inches 
wide and 18 inches deep, reinforced with four 1-inch square twisted bars, support 
a 6-inch floor slab reinforcd with %-inch bars. The railing consists of a 9-inch 
top rail with moulded posts. The railing is supported with three main posts on 
each side 12 inches square reinforced wnth four ^-inch bars. Cost, $1,364.50. 

Bovington Bridge. — Located over a creek on the road between sections 28 and 
33, Korah, It is a concrete beam bridge of the same size and class as the Booth 
Bridge above described. The abutments rest on pile foundations. Cost, $1,377.13. 

Gully Bridge. — Locally known as " XefE's Bridge " — located over a large gully 
at the north-west corner of Section 33 on the 2nd Line, Korah, This bridge is 
100 feet long and from 12 to 15 feet in height. The structure is a steel trestle 
of four spans, the deck being supported on steel bents resting on concrete pedestals. 
The pedestals are sunk four feet below the ground level and rest on pile founda- 
tions. A hear}' fill was put in at the west end of the bridge, the fill being allowed 
to fall to a natural slope around the end supporting bent. The floor is a 6-incli 
slab of concrete reinforced with 3-9-20 floor mesh. The steel used was originally 
purchased for an overhead railway crossing on the Soo Branch of the C.P.E. The 
full cost of the bridge, including the transportation and alterations in steel, was 
$2,667.43. 

Ironside Bridge. — Located over a creek on the road between Sections 35 and 
36, Prince Township. A 20-foot concrete beam bridge supported by concrete pile 
abutments. Pour concrete piles 14 inches square at the butt end and 9 inches 
square at the top, 15 feet long, are driven at each end. The piles are reinforced 
with four %-inch square twisted bars. The bars are wound with ISTo. 7 annealed 
wire. The reinforcing rods project 12 inches above the head of piles. Caps of 
concrete 18 inches wide and 4 feet high are built up from the heads of piles. 
The caps are reinforced transversely. The beams are joined to caps with 18-inch 
knees. The 1-inch reinforcing bars of the beams extend through the caps. The 
fill at each end is of stone. Before placing the fill the bottom is excavated to 
allow the stone fill to extend below the bottom of the stream to guard against 
displacement of the fill by scour. The floor and railing are as before de^cribed^ 
Cost, $1,090.00. 



26 REPOET OF Xo. 13 

Marshall Bridge. — Located over a creek on the road between Sections 30 and 
31, Korah. It is a concrete beam bridge 20 feet long with concrete pile abutments. 
It follows the same plan as the Ironside Bridge, above described. A long fill was 
placed at each end. Total cost, $1,360.91. 

Silver Creek Bridge. — Located over Silver Creek on the road south-east of 
Section 15, Tarentorus. A 20-foot concrete beam bridge on concrete abutments. 
The abutments are 10 feet in height to the floor level. Construction follows the 
same lines as Booth Bridge, before described. Cost, $1,373.00. 

Silver Creeh Bridge, Garden River Road. — Located on the Rankin Location 
on the Garden River Road. A concrete beam bridge with a 20-foot clear span 
on concrete abutments 10 feet high. Construction on lines before described. Cost, 
$1,275.77. 

Thompson Bridge. — A concrete box culvert located between S. i/^ of sections 
26 and 35, Prince. A reinforced concrete culvert 6 feet wide and 4 feet high 
inside measurements, reinforced throughout with %-inch square twisted bars. The 
culvert is 35 feet long, provided with wing walls at each corner. The fill extends 

3 feet above top of floor. Cost, $992.00 

All the work in the Soo District was done under S. W. Butt, Public Works 
foreman. 

ALGOilA DiSTKICT BRIDGES. 

First Concession Bridge, Plummer. — Located over Black Creek at Lot 4, 
Concession 1, Plummer. A concrete beam bridge with a 20-foot clear span on 
concrete abutments. The abutments are 12 feet 6 inches in height to the floor 
level, and rest on pile foundations. Four concrete beams, 12 inches wide and 
18 inches deep, reinforced with four 1-inch square twisted steel bars support a 
floor slab 6 inches thick, reinforced with %-inch bars. The railing consists of 
a top rail 9 inches in width and 8 inches deep, reinforced with two %-inch rods. 
The intermediate posts are 7 inches square at the bottom and 5 inches square 
at the top, set in grooves in the floor and top rail. The rail is supported by three 
main posts on each side 12 inches square, reinforced with four %-inch bars. The 
approaches are well graded and gravelled and a strong guard rail placed on each 
side of the -filled approach. Total cost, $2,069.87. 

Frejd Bridge. — A concrete culvert located on Frejd Creek on the road south 
, of Bruce Mines, in Plummer Additional. A concrete culvert 6 feet in clear width ; 

4 feet 3 inches in height and 18 feet long, with wing walls at each comer. The 
side walls are sunk 3 feet below the creek bottom. The walls are 3 feet 3 inches 
wide at the base and 16 inches wide at the top. The top cover is a 12-inch concrete 
slab reinforced with %-inch square bars. There is a fill of 12 inches of gravel 
over the top of the fioor slab. A concrete railing supported by two 12 x 12 posts 
are provided on each side. Cost, $680.69. 

Gladstone Bridge. — Located over a creek on the Day Mills Road in Gladstone. 
A 15-foot clear span on concrete abutments. The abutments are 8 feet in height 
to the floor level. Standard concrete railing. Cost. $1,100.00. 



1920 DEPARTMEXT OE PUBLIC WORKS. 27 



Great Northern Road Bridge. — Located over a creek on the Great Northeru 
Eoad in the 4th Concession of Plummer. It is a concrete beam bridge with a 
20-foot clear span on concrete pile abutments. The concrete piles are 15 feet long. 
The bridge is located on a new road line necessitating extensive grading. Cost, 
$1,865.18. 

King Creek Bridge^ Lefroy. — Located over a creek on the Ansonia-Cloudslee 
Eoad, Section 15, Lefroy. A concrete beam bridge with a 20-foot clear span on 
concrete abutments. The abutments required to be sunk to an unusual depth 
to reach a firm foundation and are 15 feet in height to the floor level. Cost, 
$1,823.43. 

. The above described bridges were constructed under the direction of "Walter 
Eobinson, Public Works Foreman. 

Laird Bridge, Section 3. — Located over Black Creek on the road between 
Sections 3 and 4, Laird. A concrete beam bridge with a clear span of 17 feet; 
concrete abutments 11 feet 2 inches in height, resting on pile foundations. S. Cole, 
Foreman in charge. Cost, 1,498.88. 

Sixth Line Bridge. — Located over Anderson Creek at Lot 2. on the 6th Line 
in Tarbutt Additional. It is a concrete beam bridge with a 20-foot clear span 
on concrete abutments. The abutments are 12 feet in height to the bridge flo^r. 
Approaches are well graded. S. Cole was Foreman in charge. Cost, $1,417.42. 

Stohie Bridge, Johnston. — Located on Stobie Creek at Lot 3, Concession 6. 
Johnston. It is a concrete box culvert 6 feet wide and 4 feet high inside measure- 
ment. The walls, top and bottom, are reinforced with %-inch square twisted bars. 
A heavy fill was required to fill in the old channel. S. Cole, Foreman in charge. 
Cost, $1,023.92. 

Victoria Bridge, Section 3. — Located over a creek on the road between Sec- 
tions 26 and 27, Victoria. A timber bridge on pile abutments. It has a clear 
span of 16 feet. A small bridge adjoining this was removed and the channel 
filled. Walter Eobinson was Foreman in charge. Total cost, $414.81. 

Sudbury District Bridges. 

Chelmsford Bridge. — Located over Whitson Creek on the main road in the 
Village of Chelmsford. It is a concrete pile trestle 71 feet long. It has a centre 
span of 25 feet clear. The floor level is 15 feet above bottom of stream. The 
concrete piles are from 20 to 25 feet long as required. Each pile is reinforced 
with four %-inch square twisted bars wound with Xo. 7 annealed wire. The pile 
caps are reinforced with %-inch bars. The 25-foot beams are reinforced with 
five 1-inch square twisted bars and the 20-foot beams reinforced with four 1-inch 
square twisted bars. Four beams are in place for each span. The floor is a 6-inch 
concrete slab reinforced with %-inch bars. The railing consists of a top rail 9 
inches wide and 8 inches deep supported by 8 main posts 12 inches x 12 inches 
on each side of the bridge. The intermediate posts are moulded, 7-inch square 
set at 16-inch centres. A stone fill is placed at each end of the bridge and is 
allowed to fall to a natural slope around the end piles. The top of the fiU is 
covered with gravel. C. R. Dolmage was Foreman in charge. Total cost of bridge 
$3,824.32. 



28 



EEPOET OF 



\o. 13 



Second Line Bridge, Balfour. — Located over Whitson Creek at Lot 3, on the 
road between Concessions 1 and 2, Balfour, It is a timber pile trestle bridge 
75 feet long with pile bents driven at 15-foot centres: 10 x 10 caps, 3 x 12 stringers, 
with 3-inch plank floor. Wheel guards and railing in place on each side of bridge. 
Approaches well graded. C. E. Dolmage was Foreman in charge. Cost, $925,00. 

Fourth Concession Bridge, Waters. — Located over Kelly Creek in the 4th 
Concession of Waters. It is a pile trestle QQ feet long, with two spans of 14 feet, 
one of 20 feet and one of 18 feet; cedar piles; 10 x 10 caps: corbels 8 x 10; flatted 
cedar stringers and 3-inch plank floor. A good strong guard rail is placed at 
€ach side of the bridge. Approaches well graded. A. L. McDonald was Foreman 
in charge. Cost. $784.30. 



^ . 




Chelmsford Bridee. Whitson Creek. 



Maxitoulix District Bridges. 

Black Creel Bridge.— Located, over Black Creek at Lot 17 on the 4th Con- 
cession Eoad, Tehkummah. A timber deck bridge with a clear span of 17 feet. 
The abutments are rubble masonry set in cement mortar. The floor is of 4-inch 
sawn cedar. Guard rail -in place. The approaches are filled with 90 yards of 
stone and clay and top dressed with gravel. The Township supplied part of the 
timber. $259 was expended on the work. 



Blue Jay Creeh Bridge, Concession A. — Located over Blue Jay Creek at Lot 
27, Concession A, Tehkummah. A timber bridge with an 18-foot span on timber 
crib abutments; 7 lines of 10-inch flatted stringers: floor 6-inch flatted tamarac. 
50 yards of stone, clay and gravel were used in filling in approaches. $175.00 was 
expended on the work. 



1920 DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 39 

Croft Creek Bridge. — Located over Croft Creek at Lot 13, Concession T, 
Allan. A timber deck bridge on rubble masonry abutments. The bridge has a 
clear span of 18 feet; T lines of 10-inch tlatted cedar stringers and a 3-inch plank 
floor. Fifty yards of stone and gravel were used in approaches. Cost, $174.00. 

Emery Creek Bridge. — Located over Emery Creek at Lot 11:, Concession 7, 

Gordon. A timber deck bridge with an IS-foot span on concrete abutments: 7 

lines of 10-inch flatted cedar stringers: -l-inch sawn cedar floor. $175.00 was 
expended on the work. 

Graham Creek Bridge. — Located over Graham Creek at Lot 12, on the road 
between Concessions 12 and 13, Carnavon. It is a timber deck bridge with a clear 
.span of 18 feet on concrete abutments: flated cedar stringers; 4-inch cedar plank 
floor; guard rails in place. The road was straightened and a fill 110 feet long and 
10 feet deep put in. $291.57 was*expended on the work. 

Mindemoya River Bridge. — Located at Lot 2 on the road between Concessions 
10 and 11, Carnavon. A new timber deck was placed on the bridge and the ap- 
proaches properly graded. $113.25 was expended on the work. 

Pike Creek Bridge. — Located over Pike Creek at Lot 12, Concession 9, Bidwell. 
A timber deck bridge on rubble masonry abutments. The stone in abutments is 
set in cement mortar. The bridge has a clear span of 20 feet, supported by a king 
truss. Cedar plank floor. The approaches were filled with rock and gravel, 50 
cubic yards being used in the fill. Cost, $-124.27. 

Scott Creek Bridge. — Located on the 2-3 Side Road in the 7th Concession of 
Mills. A timber deck bridge with a clear span of 18 feet, on concrete abutments. 
$485.50 was expended on the work. 

All the work in the Manitoulin District was done under the direction of John 
McAnsh, Inspector Colonization Roads. 

Sturgeox Falls District Bridges. 

Casimir- Jennings Bridges, No. 1. — Located on the 8 and 9 Sideline in Ihe 
4th Concession, Casimir. A timber bridge with a 20-foot span on cedar crib 
abutments. Five lines of 10-inch flatted cedar stringers; floor, 5-inch flatted 
cedar; guard rail in place. Approaches well graded. $202.65 was expended 
on the work. 

No. 2. — Located on the 4th Concession road at Lot 10. A timber bridge with 
a clear span of 15 feet on cedar crib abutments. Cribs are rock-filled and ap- 
proaches well graded. $167.70 was expended on the work. 

No. 3. — Located at Lot 11, Concession 4, Casimir. A timber bridge with a 
clear span of 15 feet on cedar crib abutments. Approaches well graded. Cost, 
$341.72. 

No. 4. — Located at Lot 10, Concession 3, Casimir. Same description as No. 2. 
Cost. $199.5G. These bridges were all built by A. L. McDonald, Foreman Public 
Works. 



30 EEPOET OF Xo. 13 



Field Village Bridge. — Located over the Sturgeon Eiver in the A'illage of 
Field. This bridge was constructed in steel. It consists of two ?0-foot steel spans 
with a roadway 14 feet in clear width. Steel floor joists were furnished. The 
bridge is designed to carry a concrete floor and a live load of 100 lbs. per foot 
of floor surface. Xew tops were placed on the old timber piers; the steel spans 
rest on a grillage of two 12-inch I beams 6 feet long, which are bolted to the crib 
timbers. A 3-inch plank floor was placed on the bridge. The steel was well 
painted and the approaches properly graded. The steel was furnished by the 
Dominion Bridge Co., Toronto, at a cost of $4,215.00, f.o.b. Field. All the work, 
including the erection of the steel, was done under the direction of Amos Traiu, 
Foreman Public "Works. The total cost of bridge was $5,993.73. 

Smoky Falls Bridge. — Located over the Sturgeon Eiver at Smoky Falls in 
the Township of Field. The bridge is 280 feet long. It comprises two steel spans 
of 70 feet each, and one steel span of 60 feet. A pile trestle approach 45 feet 
long at the west end, and a pile trestle approach 30 feet long at the east end. 
The steel is supported on timber cribs. One of the piers was unsafe to use and 
a new crib was built. The other 3 cribs were rebuilt from the water line. The 
steel spans are furnished with 6 lines of steel joist. The roadway is 14 feet in 
clear width. A 3-inch plank floor was laid throughout the entire length of the 
bridge and the approaches were properly graded. The steel is designed to carry 
a live load of 100 lbs. per foot and a concrete floor 6 inches thick. The steel wa& 
furnished by the Dominion Bridge Co., Toronto, for $5,370.00, f.o.b. Smoky Falls. 
All the work, including the erection of the steel and the painting thereof, was 
done under the direction of C. E. Dolmage, Public Works Foreman. Total cost 
of bridge, $9,487.00. 

Veuve River Bridge, Caldwell. — Located over the Veuve Eiver on the road 
between Concessions 1 and 2, Caldwell. It is a new structure of steel and concrete. 
The bridge is 128 feet long over all. It comprises a centre steel span of 60 feet 
with approach spans of concrete at each end 30 feet long. The bottom is rock. 
The steel span rests on concrete piers 3^/2 feet wide on top and with bases 6 feet 
wide below the water line. The approaches consist of concrete beams resting on 
shore abutments and on the centre piers. Four beams, 12 inches wide and 30 
inches deep, reinforced with six 1-inch square twisted bars carry a 6-inch floor 
slab reinforced with %-inch bars. The railing consists of a top rail 9 inches wide 
and 8 inches deep, supported by four main posts on each side. The main posts 
are 12 inches square reinforced with four %-inch bars. The intermediate railing 
posts are 7 inches square at the bottom and 5 inches square at the top, are set 
in a groove in the top of the outside beam and built in with the top rail. The 
east shore abutment required to be sunk 8 feet to reach the rock foundation. 
Heavy fills were required at each end. The steel span was furnished by the 
Standard Steel Construction Company of Port Eobinson, at a cost of $2,313.00 
f.o.b. Verner. All the work, including the erection and painting of the steel, was 
done under the direction of C. E. Dolmage. The full cost of the bridge was 
$9,661.84. 

Temiskahhstg District Bridges. 

Moose CreeTc Bridge. — Located over Moose Creek at Lot 9 on the Casey-Harris 
Townline. A timber bridge 101 feet long on pile piers. It comprises a centre 
span 45 feet long supported by a queen truss of 10 x 12 timbers. The 



1920 



DEPAETMEXT OF PUBLIC WOEKS. 



31 




:i2 EEPOET OF Xo. 13 

truss is supported on double pile piers 6 feet wide, 13 piles in each pier. The 
end piers are 4 pile bents. The fill falls to a natural slope around the end piles. 
Five lines of 10-iiich flatted stringers carry a 3-inch tamarac plank floor. The 
approaches are well graded. Cost, $597.47. 

Moose CreeJc Bri^e, Harley-IIilliard T. L. — A timber bridge with a clear 
span of 22 feet; pile abutments; five lines of 10-inch flatted stringers; 3-inch 
tamarac plank floor; guard railings in place; approaches stone-filled and top 
dressed with gravel. D. H. Mcintosh Foreman in charge. Cost, $597.00. 

Walls Bridge, Firstbrooke T. L. — Located over the Wabis Eiver on the Bucke- 
Firstbrooke T. L, It is a timber bridge 75 feet long with a centre span of 28 feet. 
The piers are timber cribs stone-filled. The centre span is supported by a king 
truss. Approaches well graded. D. H, Mcintosh was foreman in charge. Co>t, 
$1,083.00. 

Jean Baptiste Bridge, Qth Line, Henwood. — Located over Jean Baptiste Crei k 
at Lots 10 and 11, Concession 6, Henwood. It is a timber bridge 60 feet long. 
It has a centre span of 28 feet supported by the king truss. D. H. ]\IcIntosh 
Foreman in charge. Cost, $650.00. 

Wright Creek Bridge, Concession 1, Brethour. — Located over Wright Creek 
at lot 8 on the Second Line of Brethour. A timber bridge 56 feet long on pile 
piers. The centre truss span of 24 feet is supported by double pile piers. Pile 
bents are also driven at each end. A heavy fill was required. D. H. Mcintosh 
was Foreman in charge. Cost, $930.00. 

The grading was completed at the following bridges. — Wabis Bridge, 6th Lino, 
Dymond; Bear Creek Bridge, Uno Park; Wabis Bridge, 4th Line, Kearns. 



NiPissiNG Bridges. 

Beckett Bridge. — Located over the Amable Du Fond Eiver at Lot 24, Con- 
cession 2, Calvin. It is a three span concrete beam bridge on concrete piers. 
The centre span is 30 feet clear and the end spans each 20 feet clear. Eoadway 
14 feet in clear width. The piers are 13 feet 6 inches in height to the bottom 
of the floor beams, and the abutments 11 feet in height to the floor level. Nose 
plates of steel angles are placed on the up-stream angles of centre piers to protect 
them from ice and logs. A 6-inch floor slab, reinforced with %-inch bars is 
supported by four concrete beams. Over the centre span the beams are 12 inches 
wide and 2 feet 6 inches deep, reinforced with five 1-inch square twisted bars. 
Over the outer spans the beams are 12 inches wide and 18 inches deep, reinforced 
with four 1-inch square twisted bars. The railing consists of a top rail 9 inclics 
wide and 8 inches deep reinforced with two %-inch bars. The rail is supported 
by eight main posts 12 inches square reinforced by four %-inch bars. The inter- 
mediate posts are moulded concrete 7 inches square at the bottom and 5 inches 
square at the top, set in grooves in the outside floor beams and the top rail. The 
approaches are well filled with stone and gravel. J. W. Davis was Foreman in 
charge. Cost, $3,603.77 

Larocque Bridge. — Located, on Gorman Creek, Lot 22, Concession C, Widdl- 
field. A long worn-out timber bridge was replaced with a 30-inch pipe culvert 



1920 DEPAirr.MEXT OF FVBUC WORKS. 33 

and fill. The fill is loO feet loug and 12 feet in height at tht- middle of the ravine. 
The hills were cut down for a distance of 93 feet on the east side and 132 on the 
west side to ease the grades. Substantial guard rails of cedar posts and cedar 
plank are ])laced at each side of the roadway across the ravines. $TS.j.<iO was 
expended on the work. 

Pupineau Townshijj Bridges: No. 1, Boom Creek, Concession 8. — A timber 
bridge 64 feet long. It has five spans, framed bents on mud sills, caps, stringers 
and floor flatted cedar. The timber was furnished by the township. Cost, $404.00. 

No. 2: Eighth Concession Bridge, Lot 5. — A timber deck bridge on rubble 
masonry abutments. Span, 13 feet. Abutments are 6^ feet high, stone laid in 
cement mortar. The deck, stringers, floor and railing are of cedar. Approaches 
well graded. Cost, $449.36. 

No. 3. — Located on a creek on the Pembroke-Mattawa Koad, Concession 15. 
A box culvert 4 feet square, inside measurement. Walls, rubble masonry, cement 
mortar, top, a concrete slab. The ravine, oO-foot wide, is filled with stone and 
clay. Guard rail in place. Cost, $241.25. 

No. 4, lOfh Concession Bridge, at Lot 14. — A timlier deck l)ridge on rubble 
masonry abutments. Span. 15 feet clear. Abutments 5 feet high; stone laid in 
cement mortar; deck, stringers, floor and railing, cedar. Approaches well graded. 
Cost, $403.23. The work on the Papineau and Larocque bridges was done under 
the direction of P. Rochefort, lioad Inspector. 

Seventh Concession Bridge, Graham Creel\ — Located over Graham Creek at 
Lot 12 on the 7th Concession Road, Chisholm. It is a concrete beam bridge with 
a 20-feet clear span on concrete abutments. The concrete floor slab, 6 inches 
thick, is supported on four beams 12 inches wide and 18 inches deep, reinforced 
with four 1-inch square twisted bars. Standard railing with moulded posts. 
Approaches graded. J. W. Davis, Foreman in charge. Total cost, $1,410.00. 

Siddine Bridge. — Located over Graham Creek on the Id and 11 Sideline 
in the 7th Concession of Chisholm. It is a concrete beam bridge on concrete pile 
abutments vnih a clear span of 20 feet. Each end is filled with stone which is 
allowed to fall to a natural sloj)e around the piles. The floor level is 6 feet above 
)>ottom of creek. J. W. Davis was Foreman in charge. Cost, $1,234.00. 

Sixth Concession ^Vassa Bridge. — Located over Wassa Creek on the road be- 
tween Concessions 6 and 7, Chisholm. A concrete beam bridge of the same size 
and similar in construction to the Sideline Bridge above descri])ed. J. W. Davis 
was Foreman in charge. Cost, $1,393.00 

Wassa. 17//( Concession Bridge. — Located over Wassa Creek at Lot 13, on tlu; 
1 7th Concession Road. Chisholm. It is a timber bridge 87 feet long on timber 
piers. It has a centre span of 29 feet with end spans of 15 and 16 feet. The 
centre span is supported by a king truss of 10 x 12 timbers. The timber cribs 
are 16 feet long, 6 feet 6 inches wide and 10 feet in height. The cribs were 
rebuilt from the water line up. Stringers, flatted cedar. 5 lines; floor, 3-inch 
tamarac plank 14 feet long. P. Rochefort, Road Inspector, had charge of the 
work. Cost, $993.41. 

3 p.w. 



34 EEPOET OF No. 13 



Parry Sound Bridges. 

BerridaJe Bridfje. — Located over the Magnetawan River at Lot 14 on the 15itli 
Concession Eoad, Armour. It is a concrete pile trestle bridge 95 feet in length. 
It has three spans of 30 feet clear; four bents of conciete piles support the deck; 
four piles are placed in each bent. In the end bents the piles are 20 feet long, 
and in the two middle bents the piles are 30 feet long. On the centre bents 
concrete caps 18 inches wide and G feet high, reinforced with %-inch bars are 
filaced over the heads of the j)iles. Four concrete beams carry a 6-inch floor slab, 
the beams are reinforced with five 1-inch square twisted l^ars and are connected 
with the caps and ])iles with knee braces of %-inch bars. The middle beams are 
12 inches wide and 2 feet 6 inches deep, and the two outside beams are 12 inches 
wide and 3 feet 6 inches deep. The railing consists of a top rail 9 inches wide 
and 8 inches thick, reinforced with two %-inch bars. The rail is supported by 
10 main posts on each side 12 inches square. These posts are reinforced with 
four %-inch bars. The intermediate posts are moulded concrete 7 inches square 
at the bottom and 5 inches square at the top. The posts are set in grooves in 
the outside beams and the top rail. A stone fill at each end is allowed to fall 
to a natural slope around the end piles. The bottom was excavated for the toe 
of the fill to guard against scour. T. J. Paget was Foreman in charge. Total 
cost, $3,548.10. The Township of Armour contributed $500.00 to the cost of the 
bridge. 

Eleventh Concession Bridge. — Located over a creek on the 11th Concession 
Road of Himsworth, at the intersection with the Muskoka Road. It is a concrete 
beam bridge with a clear span of 20 feet on concrete abutments. The abutments 
are 11 feet 6 inches in height to the floor level, and rest on pile foundations. The 
abutments are sunk 3 feet below the bottom of the creek, and much trouble and 
delay was caused by high water in the creek.* In order to straighten the creek 
a new site was adopted and the old site filled in. T. A. Scanlan was Foreman 
in charge. Cost complete, $1,918.55. 

Magnetawan Bridge, '^rd Line, Joly. — Located over the north branch of the 
Magnetawan River at Lot 1 on the 3rd Concession Road, Joly. It is a timber 
bridge on pile bents. It has a centre span of 30 feet and two outside spans of 
15 feet each. The centre span is supported by a king truss of 10 x 12 timbers; 
stringers 10-inch flatted cedar; floor 3-inch tamarac; standard guard rails in place: 
approaches well graded. T. J. Paget was Foreman in charge. Total cost, 
$1,197.00. 

Narroivs Bridge Christie. — Located over the Narrows of Maple Ijako at Lot 
20, Concession 8, Christie. It is a concrete beam bridge with a clear span of 
25 feot on concrete abutments. The abutments rest on solid rock and are 16 feet 
in height to the bridge floor. A very heavy fill was placed at each end of the 
bridge to fill the ravine. Four concrete beams 12 inches wide and 24 inches deep 
carry a 6-inch floor slab. The beams arc reinforced with five 1-inch square twisted 
bars. The bridge is provided with a standard moulded post railing. C. L. 
Falstrem was Foreman in charge. Total cost. $3,995. 

Byerson Swing Bridge.— Ij0caie(\ over the '\ragnetawan River on the 9th Con- 
cession Road of Ryerson. The old bridge was constructed in 1903. It consisted 
of a timber swing with equal arms 65 feet long, 14 feet in clear roadway. The 



1920 



DEPAETMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



35 



pivot pier consists of piles driven at 3-foot centres, surrounded by a crib of 12 x 
12 timbers. The up-stream face of the piers is provided with a cut water making 
a five faced structure. Just below the low water line the piles are capped with 
12 X 12 timbers with a top deck of crossed timbers above the caps. A concrete 
pier of the full size of substructure and 10 feet in height is built up from the 
submerged timber structure. The deck of the swing bridge rests on this 
concrete pier. The swing was in a dangerous condition and last spring could 
not be operated. It was decided to rebuild. The old pivot pier and part of the 
old approaches were utilized. A new steel swing span with equal arms of 60 feet 
each was provided, with a roadway 14 feet in clear width. The swing was provided 
with steel floor joist. As the new swing span was shorter than the old swing 
new rest piers had to be provided at each end. The new bridge furnishes a clear 
passage of 46 feet in width between the pivot piers and the rest pier on the 




Narrow's Bridge, Cliristie. 

cliannel side. TIic timber approaches were ovorluiiilod, new ]»ilos jdaced where 
necessary and a new deck provided. A length of :'>2 feet of the old approaches 
were filled in with earth. The present over-all length of the bridge is 226 feet. 
The steel swing was furnished by the Standard Steel Construction Company of 
Port Robinson at a cost of $5,790.00, f.o.b. Burks Falls. All the work, including 
the erection and painting of the steel, was done under the direction af T. J. Paget, 
Foreman Public Works, The total cost of the bridge was $10,516.00. 



MusKOKA Bridges. 

Avery CreeTc Bridge. — Located over Avery Creek on the Baysville Road at 
Lot 4, Concession 11, Ridout. It is a concrete beam bridge on concrete abutments. 
It has a clear span of 17 feet, with a roadway 14 feet in clear width. The abut- 
ments rest on pile foundations and arc 11 feet in height to the floor level. To 



36 EEPORT OF Xo. 13 

straighten the road and provide a better line for the creek the bridge site was 
moved to the south, necessitating a heavy fill at each end of the bridge. Cost, 
$1,672.00. 

Buck Bridge, Stisted. — Located over the river at the south end of Buck Lake, 
Lot 25, Concession 14, Stisted. A pile trestle timber bridge 102 feet long with 
a 14-foot roadway. The entire deck of the old bridge was rotten and had to be 
replaced. The piles were in good cojidition; new caps 10 x 12 were provided for 
the pile bents. Five lines of 4 x 12 pine stringers were placed to carry a new floor 
of 3-inch pine plank. A strong guard rail was placed on each side of the bridge. 
Part of the log-fill in the approaches was removed and both approaches were 
overhauled and well filled with gravel. Total cost of bridge, $1,020.00. 

Hoc Roc Bridge^ Concession 6. — Located over Hoc Koc Creek at Lot 16 on 
the 6th Concession Road, Muskoka Township. It is a concrete beam bridge with 
a clear span of 27 feet — 14-foot clear roadway; approaches well graded. Cost, 
$1,864.00. 

Little East Bridge. — Located over the Little East River at Lot 21, on the 
boundary between Chaffey and Perry, about half a mile east of Novar. It is a 
concrete beam bridge with a 20-foot clear span on concrete pile alnitments. Eacli 
end is filled with stone, which i'alls to a natural slope around the end piles. Cost, 
$1,560.00. 

Lot 8 Bridge, Musloka Road. — Located over a creek at Lot 8 on the Muskoka 
Road in the Township ol; Morrison. It is a concrete beam bridge with a 15-foot 
clear span on concrete abninieiits. The abutments are !) feet in height to the floor 
level. Cost, $998.76. 

Lowe Bridge, Ryde. — Located over a creek on tbe 15- Hi Side Road, Concession 
12, Ryde. It is a concrete beam bridge, with a clear span of 17 feet on concrete 
abutments. The abutments are 10 feet in heigbt to the floor level and rest on 
pile foundations. The approaches have been graded. Cost, $1,287.00. 

McDoruM's Creek Bridge.— hocnioxl over McDonald's Creek on the 25th Side- 
line in the 2nd C!oncession of Stephenson. A concrete beam bridge with a clear 
span of 20 feet on concrete abutments. Tbe abutments are 14 feet in height to 
the floor level, and rests on pile foundations. Very heavy fills were placed at 
each end of the bridge and ])rovide(l with standard gnard rails. Cost of liridge, 
$1,867.00. 

Silver Creek Bridge, Baysville Road. — Located over a small creek on the Bays- 
ville Road at Lot 28, Concession A, in the Township of Ridout. It is a concrete 
box culvert 6 feet wide and 4 feet high, inside dimensions. Length, 32 feet with 
wing walls at each end. Side walls are set on bases 3 feet 3 inches wide, sunk 
2 feet below creek bottom. The top slab is reinforced with %-inch bars. The 
present fill is 3 feet above top of culvert. Cost, $873.00. 

iL'cnih Concession Bridge, Stephenson. — Located (uer a creek on the 25th 
Sideline in the 10th Concession of Stephenson. It is a concrete beam bridge with 
a clear span of 25 feet on concrete abutments. The abutments are 11 feet in 
height to the floor level and rest on pile foundations. The bridge is provided with 
a standard moulded post railing. Cost, $1,261.00. All the work in the Muskoka 
District was done under the direction of Wm. Lowe. Public "Works Foreman. 



1920 



DEPAKTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



37 



SiMCOE County Bridges. 

Fifteen Sideline Bridge.— Located over the East Branch of North River on 
the Fifteen Sideline, Concession 6, Orillia. A concrete beam bridge with a 27' -foot 
clear span on concrete pile abutments. Roadway 14 feet in clear width; standard 
moulded post railing; approaches at each end filled with stone. Cost, $1,487.0(1. 

Fourth Concession Bridge, Matcliedash. — Located over Black River at Lot i;5 
on the 4th Concession Road, Matchedash. It is a concrete beam bridge with a 
clear span of 28 feet on concrete pile abutments. A very heavy stone fill is placed 
at each end of the bridge. Cost, $1,797.00. 




^ 



North River Bridge, 10 and 11 Sideline. Nortii Orillia. 



Hog Creek Bridge, Tag. — Located over a creek on the 10 Sideline in the 6th 
Concession of Tay. It is a concrete beam bridge with a 27-foot clear span on 
concrete abutments. The abutments are 11 feet in height to the floor level and 
rests on a Ivoulder gravel foundation. The bridge is built on a skew to conform 
to the line on the creek banks. An extensive fill was placed at each end of the 
bridge to provide proper approaches. Total cost, $1,975.00. 

Ten Sideline Bridge. — Located over Coldwater Greek on the 10 Sideline in 
the 8th Concession of Medonte. A concrete pile trestle bridge 55 feet 4 inches 
long. It has a centre span 25 feet clear with end spans of 14 feet 6 inches each. 
Ifoadway 14 feet in clear width. The piles supporting the centre span are 22 feet 
long and the piles in the outer bents are 15 feet long. The outer bents are in 
the bank clear of the stream. The fill at each end, which is very light, is of field 
stone. The whole structure is well reinforced. Standard moulded post railing. 
Total cost, $2,770.00. The Simcoe bridges were all built under the direction of 
Amos Train, Public Works Foreman. 



38 



EEPOET OF 



Xo. 13 



Grey County Bridges. 

Indian River Bridge, Sarawak. — Located over Indian River in the lT-18 Side- 
ruad in the 2nd Concession, Sarawak. A concrete beam bridge with two spans of 
27 feet each in clear width on concrete pier and abutments. The abutments are 
10 feet in height to the floor level and rest on hard pan gravel foundations. There 
is a double channel in the river at this point, with two bridges. The westerly 
channel has been filled and the easterly channel has been widened to safely carry 
all the water. The approaches to the bridge at each side have always been sub- 
merged in high water. It is proposed to raise both approaches above high water 
level and force all the water through the bridge. Cold weather prevented the 
completion of the grading. Amos Train was Foreman in charge. $2,671.00 was 
expended on the work. 











Indian River Bridge, Sarawak. 



Victoria and IFALiBuuTONr Biiiihii'^s. 

Beaver Creek Bridge. — Located over Beaver Creek on the Townline between 
Minden and Anson. The bridge has a timber deck on timber crib abutments, 
stone-filled. Five lines of 10-inch flatted stringers carry a 3-inch plank floor. 
A standard guard rail was placed on each side of the bridge. The bridge has a 
clear span of 18 feet and a roadway 14 feet in clear width. The approaches are 
well graded. Cost, $210.61. 

Black Creek Bridge. — Located over Black Crook in the road west of Gull Lake 
at Lot 2G, Concession 6, Lutterworth. It is a timlior ))ridge with a clear span of 
22 feet 8 inches, on crib abutments, stone filled; roadway 1-t feet in clear width; 
floor of 3-inch plank on 5 lines of 6 feet x 10-inch stringers, supported by a king 
truss. The old bridge was shortened, and the ravine at tlio west end filled with 



1920 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 39 

stone for a length of 50 feet with a height of 10 feet. The bridge was raised two 
feet and both approaches brought up to the new grade ; standard guard rails placed 
at each side of bridge and fill. Total cost, $877.84. 

Carley Bridge, Dalton. — Located over the Head Eiver on the Monck Road, 
Lot 28, Concession 3, Dalton. The river has two channels at this point 360 feet 
apart. Two new concrete beam bridges were erected. The bridge over the North 
channel has a clear span of 40 feet and a clear height of 5 feet 6 inches above 
normal water level. The bridge over the South channel has a clear span of 35 feet, 
3 feet wider than the old bridge. The floor level of each bridge was raised two 
feet above the old level. On both bridges 4 lines of standard reinforced beams carry 
a 6-inch floor slab. The approaches to each bridge are properly graded. Total 
cost of the two bridges $3,325.87. P. R. Switzer was Foreman in charge. 

Long Point Bridge. — Located over a creek at Lot 30. Concession 1, Fenelon. 
A reinforced cr>iicrete bridge with a clear span of 30 feet on concrete abutments. 
Roadway 14 feet in clear width. The bridge was con.structed by the Township of 
Fenelon at a cost of $3,215.00. It was examined by Wm. Kennedy. Superintendent 
Public Works, who reported the structure complete in a workmanlike manner. 
The grant of $600.00 which was voted 'by the Legislature to this bridge was paid 
to the Township of Fenelon. 

Hastings County Bridges. 

Deer River Bridge. — Located over Deer River at Lot 32, Concession J. Wol- 
laston. A timber bridge on timber crib piers. The bridge has three spans. A 
centre span 29 feet clear with 2 end spans of 19 feet clear width. Roadway 1 4 feet 
wide. The centre span is supported by a king truss. Five lines of 10-inch x 10- 
inch stringers support a 3-inch plank floor. Cost complete, $903.45. 

Gulch Bridge, Marmora. — Located over Beaver Creek at Lot 23 on the 4th 
Concession Road of Marmora. It is a timber trestle 65 feet long with timber bents 
set at 16 feet centres. The bents rest on mud sills and are well braced in both 
directions. Five lines of 6 x 10 stringers carry a 3-inch plank floor. The ap- 
proaches are well graded and a sul)stantial guanl rail extends over bridge and fill 
at each side. Cost, $796.00. 

Fra.ser Creek Bridge. — A timber bridge. 18-foot span, located over Fraser 
Creek between Lots 20 and 21, Concession 5, Carlow. Cost, $294.00. 

Mayo Bridges: No. 1. — Located on Lot 12, Concession 14. No. 2 — Located 
at Lot 14, Concession 13. and No. 3 — Located at Tx)t 15, Concession 15. The bridges 
are built on the same plan — 5 lines of flatted cedar stringers on cedar crib piers, 
stone filled. The floor is of 5-inch flatted cedar. Guard rail in p^ace. Approaches 
well filled Avith stone top dre.<sed with gravel. Total cost of the three bridges, 
$647.37. 

Paudash Bridge. — Located over a creek at east end of Paudash Lake, Lot 32, 
Concession 8. Faraday. It is a timber bridge 94 feet long built on timber piers 
eight feet wide. It has one span of 40 feet, with a queen truss and one of 30 feet 



40 EEPOlfT OF So. 13 

with a king truss. The truss timbers are 10 inches x 13 inches. The lower chords 
and needle beams are 10 x 12 timbers, stringers 10-^nch flatted cedar. Floor 3-inch 
tamarac plank; approaches stone filled and top dressed with gravel. Cost com- 
plete, $722.15. 

Fapineau Creeh Bridye. — Located over Papineau Creek on the Townline 
between Monteagle and Wicklow. A new deck was placed on the l)ritlge and the 
approaches rock-filled. $600.00 was expended on the work. 

Rmvdon Creek Bridge. — Located ()\('r liawdon Creek at Lot 4 on the Line 
between Concessions 2 and 3, Huntingdon. It is a timber bridge on timber piers. 
It has a clear span of 20 I'eet. The approaches are well fillerl with rock and gravel. 
Cost, $499.00. 

Tudor Cashel Bridges: Five Mile Creek Bridge. — Located at liot 16, (Jonces- 
sion 10, Tudor. It is a timber bridge on timber crib piers, with a clear span of 
15 feet; stringers and cover, flatted cedar; approaches well filled with stone top 
dressed with gravel. Cost, $250.00. 

Loveless Bridge. — Located at Lot 23. (Concession 2, Cashel. A timber deck 
bridge on stone abutments, with a clear span of 16 feet. Stringers and cover flatted 
cedar ; approaches well graded. Cost, $250.00. 

All the bridges in Hastings were constructed under the direction of Walter 
Wiggins, Eoad Inspector-. 

Addington Bkiuges. 

Blind Lake Bridge. — Located at Lot 28 in the 5th Concession of Palmerston. 
A timber deck on rubble masonry abutments. It has a clear span of 6 feet. A 
long timber bridge Avas removed and the ravine filled with stone, top dressed with 
gravel. $299.00 was expended on the work. 

Clear Creek Bridge. — Located over Clear Creek in the Village of Arden, Lot 
14, Concession 8, Kennebec. It is a concrete bridge with a clear span of 12 feet; 
roadway 18 feet wide with a (i-l'oot sidewalk on one side-, (huird rails are iron 
posts with galvanized pipe rails.. A long timber bridge was removed and the 
ravine filled with stone over a length of 121 feet. The fill is 24 feet wide, from 
3 to 8 feet high, and on top dressed with gravel. $1,343.00 was exj)ended on tlie 
work. 

Denbigh Bridge. — Located over a creek at Lot 21, Concession 8, 1\'nl)igh. 
south of the A'^illage of Denbigh on the Vennachar Eoad. A long dilapidated 
timber bridge was removed and the ravine filled with earth and stone. The fill 
is 190 feet long, 22 feet wide on top, witli an average height of 7 feet. The roadway 
has been gravelled and strong guard rails jdaced on each side across the ravine. 
The work was done by the Townshi]) of Denbigh at a cost of $70<i.ii(). The grant 
of $300.00 voted for the work was paid to the Tbwnsliip of Denbigh. 

Cole Creek Bridge. — Located over Cole Creek on the Frontenac Road. Lot 4, 
Concession 3, Hinchinbrooke. A timber deck bridge on rubble masonry abutments 



1920 DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC WOEKS. 41 

with a clear span of 10 feet. A long timber bridge was removed and the ravine 
filled with gravel. The fill is from 3 to 9 feet in height; strong guard rails are 
placed at each side of the fill. $199.00 was expended on the work. 

McLaren Creek Bridge. — Located over McLaren's Creek on the Snow Eoad 
in the Township of Palmerston. It is a timber bridge on timber crib abutments 
with a clear span of 21 feet. The abutments are 9 feet in height. The cover 
is 5-inch flatted cedar with a strong railing of sawn cedar. A long timber bridge 
was removed and the ravine filled with stone. The fill is 117 feet long and from 
3 to 6 feet in height. The roadway is gravelled. The work was done by the 
Township , of Palmerston, and the grant of $300.00 voted for this work was paid 
to the Township. 

Swamp Creek Bridge. — Located over Swamp Creek on the road from 
Plevna to Fernleigh at Lot 30. Concession 10, Clarendon. It is a timber bridge 
with a clear span of 15 feet on timber crib abutments 9^^ feet high. The timber 
in the bridge is all cedar. The hills on each side were cut down to ease the grades 
and the ravine for a length of 95 feet was filled to an average height of 6 feet. 
Strong guard rails were placed on each side of the bridge fill. The work was done 
by the Township of Clarendon at a cost of $600.00," and the grant of $350.00 
voted for the work was paid to the Township. All the work in Addington was 
done under the direction of W. W. Pringle, Eoad Inspector for the District. 

Renfrew Beidges. 

Eighth Concession Bridge. — Located over the Indian Eiver at Lot 17, Conces- 
sion 8, Alice. This is a timber bridge 90 feet long. A new pier was built at the 
west end ; 12 defective stringers were replaced by new ones. A new floor of 
flatted cedar was put on and new guard rails provided. The approaches were well 
graded and top dressed with gravel. Cost of work, $190.32. 

Finiicane Creek Bridge. — Located over Finucane Creek at Lot 27, Concession 
5, South Algoiia. A timber bridge 10 feet long on timber crib piers. The bridge 
was entirely renewed above the water line. The west approach. 80 feet long and 
the east approach. 100 feet long, were well graded and guard rails provided on 
each side of bridge and fill. Cost of work, $352.00. 

Griffith Bridge. — Located over the Madawaska Eiver at Lot 8, Concession 3, 
Griffith. It is a steel and concrete bridge 203 feet 6 inches long, with stone fills 
195 feet long, giving an all over length of 398 feet 6 inches. Over the main 
channel a steel span 70 feet clear has been placed on concrete abutments. On* a 
ridge in the middle of the channel a fill 56 feet long has been placed. Over the 
east channel a concrete beam trestle of four 30-foot clear spans has been placed 
on concrete piers. The abutments under the steel span are 13 feet in height to 
the floor level. They are provided with wing walls and rest on solid rock. The 
steel span is provided with a concrete floor. Over the 30-foot spans four lines of 
concrete beams support a 6-inch floor slab. The beams are 14 inches wide and 
30 inches in depth below the floor. The two middle beams are reinforced with 
si.x 1-inch square twisted bars. The two outside beams, which are 42 inches in 
depth, are reinforced with four 1-inch square twisted bars. The railing consists 

4 r.w. 



4? EEPOET OF Xo. 13 

of moulded posts set in grooves in the top of the Qutside beams and bedded in 
the top rail. The top rail is 9 inches wide and 8 inches deep, reinforced with two 
%-inch bars. The top rail on each span is supported by four main posts 12 inches 
X 12 inches, reinforced with %-inch bars connected with the main beam. The 
approaches, 95 feet on each end, are rock-filled and top dressed with gravel. Strong 
guard rails are provided on each. The steel span was provided by the Hamilton 
Bridge Works at a cost of $2,723.00. All the work in connection with this bridge, 
including erection and painting of steel, was in charge of P. E. Switzer, Public 
Works Foreman. The total cost of the bridge was $13,132.00. 

Hallidcuj Creek Bridge. — Located at Lot 19, Concession 5, Bagot. The work 
consisted of re-covering the bridge, which is 140 feet long. The new cover consists 
of 3-inch cedar plank. The Department contributed $100.00 to the cost of the 
work. 

Halliday Creek Bridge. — Located at Lot 5, Concession 12, Admaston. A new 
bridge on stone-filled timber cribs. The cribs are 10 feet high. The bridge is 
32 feet long, and is supported by a kiiig truss. Cost of bridge, $249.30. 

Hurds Creek Bridge. — Located over Hurds Creek at Lot 25, Concession 20, 
Grattan. on the Eganville-Cormac Eoad. The old bridge was 60 feet long — the 
new bridge is 27 feet long. The abutments are timber cribs. Five lines of flatted 
cedar stringers carry a 5-inch cedar plank floor. A king truss .supports the 
stringers. The approaches are well graded and railing provided. The Department 
contributed $200.00 to the work. 

McPherson Creek Bridge. — Located at Lot 15, Concession 8, Matawachan, A 
timber bridge 24 feet long on stone-filled timber piers. The approaches were im- 
proved by blasting away a rock ledge that o1)structed the road. The ap})roaches are 
well graded and guard rails have been erected. Cost, $200.00. 

Snake Creek Bridge. — Located over Snake Creek at Lot 33, Concession 1, 
Eflglan. The bridge is 110 feet long. The floor is supported by three stone-filled 
cribs m the creek bed and two shore piers. The approaches. 30 feet long, at each 
end of the bridge, wjere well graded; strong guard rails Avere placed on each side 
of the bridge and grade. Co.st of work, $447.60 All the work in Eenfrew was done 
under the direction of H. X. Moss, Eoad Inspector for the district. 



1920 DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC WOEKS. 43 



EEPAIPIXG AXD EECOXSTRUCTIOX OF BEIDGES AXD PUBLIC 
WORKS, FROM THE MAIXTEX'AXCE FUXD. 

Kexora Disteict. 

West Branch. Bridge. — A new floor of 3-mch Xorway pine and tamarac plank 
was placed on this bridge over the west channel outlet of the Lake of the Woods 
at Kenora. The plank was heavily coated with boiling tar. and while the tar 
was still hot coarse sand was applied to the tarred surface. After a few days, 
when the tar had properly hardened, the plank was placed on the bridge. The 
result was beyond our expectations. After months of heavy traffic no sign of 
abrasion was discernible. The bridge floor is 38T feet long and IS feet wide. Plank 
was secured at $38.50 per M. The work was done under the direction of James 
Eraser, Road Inspector, at a cost of $1,400.00. 

Sault Ste. Marie Di-teict. 

Goulais River Bridge, FenwicTc. — A new plank floor was placed on this bridge 
which is 309 feet long and 16 feet wide. The old floor was entirely removed and 
replaced with new 3 x 12 joist. A new floor of 3-iuch pine and tamarac plank 
was laid over the entire. length. The south-west corner of the bridge was jacked 
up; four new piles were driven: the old timber bridge seat was taken out and 
replaced with new timber, resting on the old seat and also on the new piles. Tlie 
bridge is now in a c-ondition to safely carry traffic for many years. Cost, $1,244.72. 

Gouluis Bay Road Bridge. — A new bridge was built on the Goulais Bay Road 
west of the big bridge in the Township of Fenwick at a cost of s4o4.3T. 

Bi/e Bridge. — A pile trestle bridge was built over a deep gully on the Bye Road 
in Fenwick. It consists of three spans of 10 feet each. The piles in the two centre 
bents are 40 feet long and in the two end bents 25 feet long. The caps and 
stringers are flatted cedar. For flooring, the best of the stringers removed from 
the Goulais bridge were used. Cost of bridsfe. 8531.20. 

People's Road Bridge. — A new concrete beam bridge was'iiuilt over a small 
stream, crossing the People's Road near the Algoma Central Ry. crossing. The 
bridge has a span of 15 feet. Four concrete beams carrying a 0-inch floor slab. 
The bridge has a standard concrete post railing. Total cost. $776.89. 

Algoma District. 

Findlaij Bridge. — A timber bridge over the Echo River at Section 9, ^lac- 
Donald. The bridge is 163 feet long. It had two truss spans 50 feet each, with 
two approach spans of 16 feet each at each end. One of the truss spans was 
removed and two pile bents put in place. Xew lo\\-er chords were provided for 
the other truss. All defective timbers were removed from the structure and re- 
placed with new timber. A new floor was laid throughout. Cost. $685.51. 

Hanhiinj Bridge, Aberdeen. — The old bridge was 66 feet long — it was short- 
ened to 60 feet. Three new pile bents of cedar were driven. Anew deck, floor 
and stringers, was provided. The approaches were only ten feet wide — 60 feet at 



44 EEPOET OF Xo. 13 



the north end and 20 feet at south end were widene^d out to 16 feet with earth and 
stone. A strong guard rail was placed on each side oyer bridge and fill. Cost, 
$598.52. 

Jeifreii Bridge. — Located over the Potomac River on the Patton-Gladstone 
Townline. Repairs consisted of putting on new braces, repairing abutments and 
widening and raising approaches. Cost, $125.00. 

LaCloche Bridge. — Located over LaCloche Creek, Lot 9, Concession 2, Hallam. 
The old bridge was 100 feet long. The new bridge is a pile trestle of four spans 
of 16 feet each; the remainder of the space occupied by the old bridge was filled 
with stone and a strong guard rail placed on each side of bridge and fill. Walter 
Robinson was Foreman in charge. Cost, $853.92. 

McKay Bridge. — Over a creek on the Aberdeen-Galbraith Townline, Conces- 
sion 2. It is a pile trestle 55 feet long, with pile bents at 18 feet centres; caps, 
=;trincrer> and floor, flatted cedar. The bridge is 10 feet shorter than the old one, 
and the 10-foot space was filled with stone. The approaches are well graded with 
stone and gravel. A strong guard rail was placed on each side of bridge and fill. 
Cost, $655.50. 

Opliir Bridge. — Located over a creek on the Leeburn-Ophir Road in Aberdeen. 
The bridge is a pile trestle 42 feet long, with pile bents at 14-foot centres. The 
old piles were cut down two feet and a new deck constructed, flatted cedar caps 
and stringers, with a 3-inch plank floor. The approaches to the bridge were built 
up of logs. The logs were removed and the approaches properh- built up of stone 
and clay, top dressed with 12 inches of gravel. Strong guard rails are provided 
on each side of bridge and fill. 

Shedden Bridge. — A small timber bridge over a creek, the outlet of Moose 
Lake, between Sections 2 and 3, Shedden. It has a clear span of 12 feet, crib 
abutments, flatted pine stringers; 3-inch pine plank floor; approaches well graded. 
The settlers supplied all the timber except the plank. Cost, $146.30. 

Striker Bridge. — The old bridge, 50 feet long, was destroyed by fire. It was 
replaced with a bridge with a clear span of 12 feet on cedar crib abutments, stone- 
filled. The stringers and floor are of flatted pine and cedar. The approaches 
were well graded : 126 yards of earth and stone being used in the fills. Cost, $380.80, 

Sudbury District. 

East Branch Bridge, 8 and 9, Ha gar. — Located over the East Branch of the 
Veuve River on the 8 and 9 Sideroad, Concession 5, Hagar. A timber bridge 54 
feet long: it has a truss span of 42 feet on timber piers 6 feet wide; stone-filled. 
The approaches are well graded and faced heavily with stone to prevent erosion 
by the stream. Total cost, $969.00. 

Land Bridge, Dryden. — A timber bridge to replace a bridge destroyed by fire 
at Lot 11, Concession 5, Drj-den. This bridge is 21 feet long, with a clear span 
of 11 feet. Timber crib abutments 5 feet wide. Cost, $126.00. 



1920 DEPAETMEXT OF PUBLIC WOEKS. 45 

Whitson CreeJc Bridges: Blezard. — Sixth Concession bridge at Lot '••. The 
repairs consisted of filling in a washout at the bridge. Cribs of cedar timber were 
placed at each end of the bridge on the road side. The north end crib is 28 feet 
long and the south end 15 feet. Ties run from the cribs into the road bed. The 
cribs are filled with stone to the high water level. The road-bed was then properly 
graded. 

The bridges over Whits<jn Creek on the 8 and 9 Sidelines, Concession 6. and on 
the 10 and 11 Sidelines, Concession 5, were thoroughly overhauled and placed in 
proper condition for travel. $823.16 was expended on the three bridges. 

Sturgeon' Falls Disteict. 

Begin Bridge. — Located at Lot 9, Concession 3, Field. A four bent pile trestle 
46 feet long, with a centre span of 18 feet, and end spans of 14 feet each. Flatted 
cedar stringers 6 lines, pine plank floor, guard rail in place. Cost, $376.88. 

Casimir Bridges: Xo. 1. — Between Lots 10 and 11. A timber bridge with a 
clear span of 15 feet on cedar crib abutments — 5 x 16 feet, and 5 feet high: stringers 
and floor, flatted cedar. 

So. 2. — Between Lots 8 and 9, Concession 4. A timber bridge with a 2iJ-foot 
clear span on cedar abutments stone-filled. Floor and stringers flatted cedar. 
$413.00 was expended on the two bridges. 

Deer Creel: Bridge, on the Warren-Hugel Road. — The bridge has a span of 
27 feet clear width: rubble masonry abutments; floor and stringers flatted pine and 
cedar ; approaches well graded : guard rails in place on bridge and fill. Cost, 
$590.00. 

Field Bridge, Lot 6, Concession 3. — A pile trestle bridge 44 feet long; centre 
span 18 feet; piles all cedar: caps and stringers flatted cedar. Floor, pine plank: 
approaches well graded. 

Field Bridge, Lot 5, Concession 3. — A pile trestle bridge of the same size and 
class as the Lot 6 bridge above described. The Municipality furnished the limber 
for the above bridges. Labor cost, $790.00. 

Xorth West Arm Bridge, situate at Xotre Dame DuLac. — On the Towiiline 
between McPherson and Caldwell. This bridge comprises a timber pile trestle 400 
feet long with fills at each end — 900 feet in all. The work of repair consisted in 
filling in two spans of the trestle. 33 feet in all. with stone, levelling up the floor 
by putting new caps over the old ones, and repairing all weak spots in the floor. 
$1,604.00 was expended on the work. 

XipissixG Bridges. 

Poverty Creeh Bridge, Avery. — A timber bridge with a clear span of 15 feet. 
Timber crib abutments, stone-filled : floor and stringers flatted cedar. A fill .49 
feet long placed at north end of bridge : strong guard rails are placed on each side 
of bridge and fill. Cost of bridsre, $331.00. 



46 EEPORT OF Xo. 13 



Prince Creek Bridge, Lyell. — Located over Prince Creek at Lot 31, Concession 
11, Lyell. A timber bridge with a clear span of 16 feet on timber crib abutments. 
The abutments are eleven feet in height and are 8 x 14 in size. The approaches, 
30 feet long at each end, are filled with stone. Guard rails on each side over bridge 
and fill. Total cost, $535.00. 

Sparks Creek Bridge. — Located over Sparks Creek, Concession 2, Bonfield. A 
timber bridge, with a clear span of 20 feet. The floor is supported by a king truss. 
Timber, flatted cedar : approaches stone-filled, 40 feet on east end and 50 feet on 
west end. Guard rails full length of bridge and fill. Total cost, $668.00. 



Parry Sound Bridges. 

Commanda Creek Bridge, Gurd. — Over Commanda Creek, Lot 3, Concession 
3, Gurd. The repairs consisted of a new deck, caps, stringers and floor. The old 
piles were all sound, but new bracing was put on. Cost, $281.00. 

Loring Bond Bridge, Hardy. — Repairs consisted of new stringers and floor of 
flatted cedar. The approaches were well graded. The settlers furnished the timber 
free of cost. Amount expended, $73.50. 

Har)iilton Bridge, Restoule Road. — Located over a creek at Lot 177, Concession 
B, Prindle. The bridge is 52 feet long. The repairs consisted of placing a new 
floor of hemlock plank. Cost, $81.75. " 

Shehesliekong Bridge. — Located over a creek on Concession 9, Carling. The 
bridge is 64 feet long. Three timber piers were constructed. The middle pier is 
16^ feet high. A bottom was put in four feet above the bottom of the timber 
sides. The pier was filled with stone and sunk 4 feet into the soft bottom. The 
piers are 8 feet wide and 16 feet long, built of hewn hemlock. The stringers and 
floor are of flatted tamarac and cedar. The bridge is well built, with the approaches 
properly graded. Cost of work, $573.00. 

Magnetaivan Bridge, Strong- Armour T. L. — Located over the south branch of 
the Magnetawan River at Lot 32, on the Townline between Strong and Armour. 
It is a timber ))ridge, with a clear span of 24 feet; timber crib abutments. Cost, 
$724.00 

Squaw Lake Bridge. — Located over a creek at the north end of Squaw Lake, 
Lot 17, Concession 14, McKellar. Repairs consisted of placing a new deck on the 
bridge, stringers, truss, floor and railing. The floor is of 6-inch flatted cedar. 
$235.00 was expended on the work. 

MusKOKA Bridges. 

Beaver Creek Bridge, Monck. — Located at Lot 2, Concession 2, Monck. Repair 
work consisted of five new stringers of flatted rock elm, with a 3-inch pine plank 
floor, A new railing was also placed and the approaches properly graded. $153.00 
was expended on the work. 



1920 



DEPAETMEXT OF PUBEIC WOEKS. 










m 



48 REPOET OF . Xo. 13 

Brandy Creek Bridge. — Located at Lot 5, Concession 13, Monck. The bridge 
lias two spans of 14 feet each on stone abutments. The repairs consisted of putting 
an entire new deck on the bridge — stringers, floor and railing. Cost, $142.00 

High Bridge, HuntsviUe Lock. — Eepairs consisted of putting on a new floor 
of hemlock plank and replacing a couple of decayed posts and stringers. $267.00 
was expended on the work. 

Sharp's Creek Bridge, Macaulay. — Located over Sharp's Creek at Lot 21 on 
the Third Concession Eoad, Macaulay. It is a new timber trestle 65 feet long 
of four spans of 16 feet each. Five lines of 10-inch flatted stringers carry a 3-inch 
pine plank floor. The approaches are well graded with earth and stone. $904.00 
was expended on the work. 

Haliburtox Bridges. 

Burnt Fiver Bridge, Cardij/f.— Located over Burnt Eiver at Lot 18. Concession 
A, Cardiff. A new timber bridge 52 feet long. It has one span of 14 feet. Three 
timber piers 6 feet x 14 feet support a deck of flatted cedar, floor and stringers. 
The Avest approach, 192 feet long, was built up of earth and stone. A strong guard 
rail was placed on each side of bridge and fill. $199.00 was expended on the work. 

Burnt River Bridge, South Monmo-uth. — Located over the South Branch of 
Burnt Eiver on the road from Tor}^ Hill to South Monmouth. A timber bridge 
70 feet long. It has two piers 8 feet x 14 feet — 12 feet high. The centre span is 
24 feet, supported by a king truss. The outside spans are 12 and 18 feet: stringers 
and floor flatted cedar. Cost, $199.00. 

Eenfeew District Bridges. 

Bells Rapids Bridge. — Located over the Madawaska Eiver. at Lot 10, Conces- 
sion 1, Township of Jones. It is an old timber bridge 300 feet long. The repairs 
consisted of replacing the defective section of the floor with sound flatted cedar, 
cutting down the hills at each end and grading the approaches. $179.40 was ex- 
pended on the work. 

Black Bay Bridge. — Situate over an arm of Calaliogie Lake, on Lot 20, Con- 
cession 1, Blithfield. The bridge is 130 feet long. Eeparis consisted of a new 
deck, stringers, floor and railing. $239.96 was expended on the Avork. 

Ferguson Lake Bridge. — Located over an arm of Ferguson Lake. Lot 26, 
Concession 3, Blithfield. Eepair work comprised filling in a long timber bridge 
and building a bridge 30 feet long. $102.00 was expended on the work. 

Latchford Bridge. — Located over the Madawaska Eiver at Lot 30, Concession 
13, Eaglan. It is a steel bridge on timber piers. It is 262 feet 4 inches in length. 
It comprises one span of 108 feet and two spans of 52 feet each. The repairs 
consisted of putting in new timber bridge seats, new floor stringers and putting 
on new flooring. The handrail was also repaired. $1,420.60 was expended on 
labor and material. 



1920 DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC WOEKS. 49 

Lett Bridge. — Located at Lot o, Concession 17, Matawatchan. The bridge is 
30 feet long. Repairs comprised raising the piers 2 feet, putting on a new deck 
and re-grading approaches. $82.9.2 was expended on the work. 

Schutt Bridge. — Lot 30, Concession 11, Raglan. Work consisted of grading 
approaches and placing strong guard rail on each side of bridge and till. Cost, 
$50.00. 

Mount St. Patricl- Bridge. — Located over Consta Creek at Mount St. Patrick, 
in the Township of Brougham. The bridge is 140 feet long. Repairs consisted 
of putting on a top cover 8 feet long, of 4-inch cedar plank, placing a new railing 
and properly grading the approaches. $200.00 was expended on the work, 

Whitefish Creek Bridge. — Located on the Black Donald Road in the Township 
of Brougham. A new deck was placed on the bridge and the approaches graded, 
$99.60 was expended on the work. All the work in the Renfrew District was done 
under the direction of H. N. Moss, Road Inspector for the District. 



PUBLIC WORKS FOR XAYIGATIOX. 

Continuing from Oct. 31st, 1918, the dredging at the mouth of the Muskoka 
River was completed. At the close of navigation the dredge was laid up at Graven- 
hurst; the machinery and tug were removed to the Huntsville water. The old 
dredge hull was remodelled and lengthened 16 feet. Two new dump scows and 
one flat scow were built. A floating boarding camp was also constructed. During 
the summer the dredge worked in the Peninsula Canal, enlarging the channel, 
which was widened to 60 feet and deepened to 10 feet throughout. A small amount 
of dredging has yet to be done just above the upper entrance to the canal. 

Buoys were placed as follows: Two in cut to lower entrance to Peninsula 
Canal : one on shoal at mouth of Fairv River. 



SWIXG BRIDGES. 

Manetmcan Swing Bridge. — A new floor was placed on this bridge, 

HiintsviUe Swing Bridge. — A new floor was placed on this bridge. 

Bala Dam. — A new deck of 3-ineh plank was placed on full length of this dam. 

Port Carling Locl\ — The work here was mainly on repairing the cover of the 
different docks. A few broken planks in the lining of the Lock Chamber were 
replaced. 

5 r.w. 



50 EEPOET OF Xo. 13 



DRAIXAGE WOEKS CONSTRUCTED BY THE PLBLIC WOEKS 

DEPARTMENT. 

RaIXY RiVEll DuAIXAGE. 

Crozier Drain, Sections 25 and 36. — This drain taps the road between Sections 
25 and 26. It runs east and north through Sections 25 and 36. emptying into 
Frog Creek. The drain is 160 rods long, 9-foot top and 5-foot bottom^ and 2^^ 
feet deep — right-of-waj^ cleared 20 feet wide. 

Burriss Drain, Lot 2, Concessions 1 and 2. — This drain drains a muskeg and 
pot holes on the road between Lots 2 and 3, Concession 1. Burriss. The drain on 
the road is 52 rods long. The outlet is to the east and north through Lot 2, in the 
1st and 2nd Concessions — 122 rods emptying into the Lavalle River. A tap drain 
of 80 rods was constructed in front of Lot 2, west from the Main Drain. 

Tait-Mather TownUne Drain. — A drain 100 rods long was constructed on the 
west side of the Tait-Mather T.L. in the 2nd and 3rd Concessions. An outlet T 8 
rods long was constructed to the east into a natural outlet. 

Shenston Drain, Section 36. — A drain 90 rods long was constructed from the 
road north of Section 36 in a south-westerly direction, connecting with the drain 
constructed on Section 22. 

Morley-PattuUo Townline Drain. — A drain 48 rods long was constructed on 
the Morley-Pattullo T.L. at Section 2. An outlet 100 rods long was also con- 
structed, discharging into a creek on Section 35, Morley. 

Nelles-Pattullo Townline Drain. — A drain 80 rods long was constructed on 
the Townline between Xelles and Pattullo, discharging into a creek on Section 12, 
Nelles. 

Blue Drain, Section Si. — An old outlet leading to the west from the Bergland 
Eoad, on Section 34. Blue was cleaned out and enlarged for a distance of 200 
rods. This drain discharges into a swamp. 

Worthington Drain ^ Sections 32 and 33. — A drain 160 rods long was con- 
structed on the road between Sections 32 and 33, Worthington. It discharges into 
a drain in front of Section 33, which was constructed last year. 

Curran Drain, Section 2. — A drain 240 rods long was constructed in the bed 
of Miller Creek from the south part of Section 2, north-westerly to tap a pot hole 
on the road west of Section 2. The drain must be extended next year to reach 
the objective point. 

Attivood Drain. — A brancli (»f Miller Creek was opened up for a distance of 
50 rods to drain a swamp on the road west of Section 36. 

The Eainy River drainage work was all done under the direction of Frank 
Clement, Eoad Inspector. $5,586.0<i was expended on the work. 



1920 DEPAETMEXT OF PUBLIC WUEKS. 51 

ALGOilA DeAIXAGE. 

Victoria Drain, Section 23. — A drain 50 rods long was opened np to drain 
the road north of Section 23. The drain empties into Bhiek Creek. 

C Line Drain, St. Joseph Ishnd. — A drain 320 rods long was opened up west 
and south along a creek bed to provide drainage for the road between Lots 10 and 
11. 

Laird Drain, E and F. — A drain ITO rods long was opened up on the road 
between Sections E and F east from Lake George. It provides an outlet for a 
swamp at the east part of these sections. 

Blach Creel:, Laird. — Black Creek, in Laird Township, cleared out and ditched 
for a distance of two miles east from Bar River, for a further distance of one mile 
the creek bed was cleaned out to provide a free passage of the water. This drain 
provides an outlet for three roads and affects a large area of land. 

Thessalon Drain. — x4. drain 240 rods long was constructed west and north 
from the road west of Lot 19 to provide an outlet for the drains on this road. 

Johnston Drain, Lot 6. — A drain ITO rods long was constructed south through 
Lot 6, Concession 4, to provide an outlet for a drain on the Trunk Eoad. 

Patton Drain, Concession 4. — A drain 180 rods long was constructed on the 
road between Lots 10 and 11, across the north half of Concession 4. to drain a 
swamp on this road. 

Thompson Drain, Section 21. — A drain 190 rods long was opened up on a 
creek bed on the south half of Section 21, to drain the road on the centre line of 
Sections 20-21-22. 

McDonald Drain, Section 20-. — A drain To rods long was opened up in a 
creek bed in the south-east part of Section 20 to drain the road west of Section 20. 
A. drain was also opened up on the road at the south-west part of Section 20, 
running west 43 rods and north 58 rods, discharging into a drain constructed last 
year. 

Thompson Drain, Section 6. — A drain 200 rods long was constructed on 
Section 6 to drain the roads at the north-west corner of Thompson. The drain 
discharges into the Mississagua Eiver. 

Gladstone Drain, Lot 4, Concession 1. — An outlet to drain a section of the 
Trunk Eoad was constructed for a distance of 160 rods through Lot 1, Concession 
4. The drain discharges into the Mississagua Eiver. 

SUDBUHY DraiXAGE. 

The following drains were opened up in the Sudbury District uiuh r the 
direction of Basile Ethier, Eoad Inspector : 

Balfour Township, on Lot 1, Concession 1, 80 rods. 

'• " on Lot 2, Concession 3, 160 rods. 

" •• on Lot 1, Concession 4, 80 rods. 

'• ■' on Lot 8, Concession 4, 100 rods. 

" " on Lot T, Concession 6, 80 rods. 



52 PiEPORT OF Xo. 13 

Balfour Township, on Lot i, Concession 6, 480 rods. 

" '• on Lot 11, Concession 6, 80 rods. 

" '■ on Lot 10, Concession 6, 80 rods. 

Blezard Township on Lot 7, Concession, 5, 80 rods. 

'' '' on Lot 8, Concession 5, 80 rods. 

'■ on Lots 8, 9 and 10, Concession 5, 220 rods. 

Broder " on Lot 3, Concession 5, 80 rods. 

Capreol " on Lot 1, Concession 1, 160 rods. 

" '' on Lot 3, Concession -1, 125 rods. 

Lumsden *• on Lot 1, Concession 5, 80 rods. 

Morgan " on Lot 7, Concession 1, 60 rods. 

Maxitoulin Drainage. 

The following drains were opened up in the Manitoulin District under the 
direction of John McAnsh, Eoad Inspector : 

Allen-Billings Townline, Concession 11, 52 rods. 

Assignac, on Lot 26, Concession 1, 66 rods. 

Baldwin, on Lot 4, Concession 11, 124 rods. 

Barrie Island, on Lots 11 and 12, Concession 4, 120 rods. 

Bidwell, on Lots 7 and 8, Concession 2, 114 rods. 

Billings, on Lots 4 and 5, Concession 8, 115 rods. 

" on Lots 14 and 15, Concession 10, 108 rods. 
Campbell, on Lot 23, Concession 9, 240 rods, 
Carnarvon, on Lots 12 and 13, Concession 7, 116 rods, 
on Lots 14 and 15, Concession 13, 92 rods. 
Gordon, on Lots 8 and 9 Sideroad, 32 rods. 
Howland, on Lots 16 and 17, Concession 11, 80 rods. 
Lome, on Lot 9, Concession 3, 70 rods. 
Sandfield, on Lot 11, Concession 11, 68 rods. 

Tehkummah, Blue Jay Creek, Lots 13 and 14, Concession 7, 132 rods. 
The total amount expended on Manitoulin drainage was $1,459.00. 

Stukgeox Falls Draixage. 

Casimir Township, Lots 10, 11 and 12, Concession 3, 480 rods. 
Cosby Township, I^ots 2 and 3, Concession 1, 75 rods. 

" " Lot 4, Concession 3, 121 rods. 

Hugel Township, Lot 3, Concession 1, 47 rods. 

" " Lots 2 and 3, Concession 4, 77 rods. 

Lot 3, Concession 3, 70 rods. 
Kirkpatriek Township, Lot 4, Concession 5, 67 rods. 
Macphersoii Township, Lot 7, Concession 5, 22 rods. 

" " Lot 5, Concessions 5 and 6, 88 rods. 

" " Lots 4 and 5, Concession 6, 165 rods. 

Martian d Township, Lot 11, Concession 1, 48 rods. 
" Lot 12, Concession 5, 39 rods. 

Springer Township, Lot 6, Concession 1, 160 rods. 
" Lot 1, Concession C, 80 rods. 

" ". Lot 6, Concession 1. 112 rods. 

" " Lot 1, Concession 2, 306 rods. 



1920 DEPARTMP:XT of public WuEKS. 53 

Springer Township, Lot 9, Concession 2, 84 rods. 
" Lot 9, Concession 3, 175 rods. 

Lot 10, Concession 3, 92 rods. 
$2,600 was expended on drainage in the Sturgeon Falls District, the work 
being done nnder the direction of A. L. McDonald. Public Works Foreman. 

Temiskamixg Drainage. 

The following drains were opened up in the Temiskaming District under the 
direction of W. E. Kerr, Eoad Inspector. $2,498.00 was expended on the work. 

In Hilliard Tou-nship. — Moose Creek was cleaned out across Lots 6 and T in 
the 2nd Concession, a distance of 285 rods, and was brushed out across Lots T and 
8 in the 1st Concession, a distance of 320 rods. This drain is intended to drain 
the -1 and 5 Sideroad and 3rd Concession Eoad. 

Casey ToirnsJiip. — A drain was opened up along the road between Lots 8 and 9 
in the 5th Concession. 110 rods. The right-of-way for the extension of the drain 
is cleared out for a width of 20 feet over a distance of 100 rods. 

The Qth Concession Drain in Hilliard was opened up along the 6th Concession 
Road. It extends east from the White Eiver l.TOO feet, to a wet swamp, for which 
it provides an outlet. 

In Hudson Tou-nship. — A ditch 20 rods long was opened up on the west side 
of the 4 and 5 Sideline in the 3rd Concession. The outlet extends west 78 rods, 
across Lot 5 on the 3rd Concession. 

In Harley Township. — Moose Creek was cleared out across -Lots 11 and 12, 
Concession 6, a distance of 400 rods. The creek bed was cleaned, and a width of 
12 feet on each side of the creek was cleared of logs and brush. This work will 
relieve "roads in Harley and Hilliard of flooding. 

XipissixG District Deaixage. 

In the District of Xipissing $760.32 was expended in improving the outlet 
of Wassa Lake, for the purpose of lowering the water level of Wass.a Lake and 
Wassa Creek south of the lake, and thus permit the drainage of swamp lands 
adjoining the lake and creek. In addition to this $2,525.00 was expended on small 
drains throughout the district. The work was all done under the direction of 
P. Eochefort, Eoad Inspector for the District. 

Parky Souxd Draixage. 

Xorth Ilimsworth. — The drain started three years ago was extended 80 rods 
on Lot 1, in Concessions 18 and 19, and the right-of-way chopped out and logged 
over a length of 320 rods. 

CarJing Township. — A rock cut was opened up on Lot 64, Concession 10. 
The cut is 38 feet long, 6 feet wide and 18 inches deep. 

Nipissing Township. — A drain 160 rods long was opened up on Lots 11 and 
12. Concession 7. This is known as the Christian Yallev Drain. 



5i EEPORT OF Xo. 13 



East Simcoe Deain^age. 

The following drains were opened up in East Simcoe under the direction of 
E, C. Hipwell, Eoad Inspector : 

Orillia Township, Lot 16, Concession 4, 140 rods. 
Medonte Township, Lots 54 and 55, Concession 1, 80 rods. 
Oro Township, Lot 15, Concession 11, 100 rods. 
Matchedash Township, Lots 10 and 11, Concession 2, 140 rods. 
" " Lots 5 and 6, Concession 4, 320 rods. 

Mara Township. — A drain one mile long was opened up through Lots 27, 28 
and 29, Concession 10. 

Bruce Couxty Deaixage. 

Spence Swamp Drain: Exteyision. — In 1917 the east end of this drain was 
opened up. This season the drain was extended west in to the Township of Arran. 
a distance of 475 rods, to Mud Lake. The drain will be extended next season to 
reach the objective point — the 30-31 Sideroad. 

Fourth Concession Drain, Amabel. — This drain opened up in 1918 to lower 
a small lake, was extended 30 rods to reach the objective point — the sink hole at 
Lot 12. on the road east of Concession C, in the Township of Amabel. 

Eastern Sivamp Drain, Eastnor. — In the south-east part of the Township of 
Eastnor. in Concessions 2, 3 and 4, lies a large cedar swamp. This swamp is fed 
by springs located at the south Townline in the 4th Concession; these springs 
keep the swamp full of water the year round. The proposed trunk road, known 
as the centre road, runs through this swamp, as does the townline between Eastnor 
and Amabel. "Without drainage these roads cannot be opened up. After a thorough 
examination of the SAvamp it was decided to open up a drain leading from the 
springs through the centre of the swamp north-west to the Judge Creek, on Lot 5, 
Concession 2, Eastnor. The drain has a fall of 15 feet 9 inches in a distance of 
9,000 feet. This season the work was commenced at Judge Creek and the right- 
of-way cut out over the whole length of the drain. The drain was opened up 
over a length of 5,500 feet. Owing to the scarcity of labor and the extreme diffi- 
culty of excavation from the mass of cedar stumps, a new method of construction 
was adopted. A foreman was secured with large experience in handling explosives : 
holes were driven 4 feet apart along the centre line, dynamite cartridges were 
inserted in the holes and connected up to a battery. About 50 feet of drain was 
covered in each blast. The explosion created a drain 12 feet wide, 3^ feet deep, 
with a bottom from 4 to 6 feet wide. Earth, logs, stumps and brush all disappeared. 
Projecting roots require to be trimmed to put the drain in proper working order. 
The experiment was an unqualified success. The swamp is rapidly drying up. 
About 2,000 acres of arable land will be drained. The centre road is now well 
drained and is being opened up to traffic. Xext season it is proposed to extend the 
drain 3.500 feet to reach the south townline. $1,500.00 was expended on the work. 



1920 DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 55 



^ORTH Hastings Draixage. 

Madoc Drain. — This drain is through a ridge on Lot 9, on the 9th Concession 
road of Madoc. The ridge cuts off the drainage of the road. To provide drainage 
for t-lie road to the south it was found that a cut 12 feet deep -would be required 
through the ridge. It was decided to put in a covered drain of 18-inch sewer pipe 
through the deep section. An open drain 300 feet long and from 3 to 6 feet deep 
leads up to the covered section. The covered section is also 300 feet long. $898.00 
was expended on the work. 

Monteagle Drain, Concession v. — On the road between Lots 10 and 11. Conces- 
sion T, Monteagle, two swamps were badly in need of drainage. Two short sections 
were constructed on the road, two culverts put in and two outlets opened up to the 
creek on Lot 11. $536.18 was expended on the work. 

Wollaston Drain, Concession 9. — In the Township of Wollaston, a drain 2,000 
feet long was opened up to drain a bad swamp at Lot IT, Concession 9. $593.97 
was expended on the work. 



DRAIXAGE AID. UXDER THE PROVIXCIAL AID TO DRAIXAGE ACT. 

Beaudette River Draix, Glengarry. 

This drain commences near the north-east angle of Lot- 9 in the 12th Conces- 
sion of Kenyon, and extends south and east along the Beaudette River to Lot 28 
in the 1st Concession of Kenyon. Thence on a course south-west, crossing into 
the Township of Charlottenburg, on Lot 29. Thence continuing south-west to Lot 
32 in the last named township. The total length of the drain, 41,380 feet, or 
nearly 8 miles. The drain varies in bottom width from 5 feet at the head to 12 
feet at the outlet. The estimated excavation amounted to G5,000 cubic yards, or 
about an average of 2(3 cubic yards per rod. The drainage area comprises 10,394 
acres. The estimated cost of the work was $27,200.00. ^vhich is assessed as follows: 

On Lands and Roads in Charlottenburg $3,307.10 

On Lands and Roads in Kenyon . . . .\ 23.892.60 

The individual assessments are very high for this cla.^s of work, reaching as 
high as $5.25 per acre on 150 acre farms. I have examined the drain and found 
the work completed in a workmanlike manner. 

On report, the grant of $2,500.00, voted to this drain, was paid to the Treas- 
urer of Kenyon, the initiating municipality. 

Curry Marsh Drain, South Essex. 

This drainage work is a pumping scheme on Pelee Island. The work, carried 
out under By-law Xo. 260, comprised repair of internal drains, the repair and en- 
largement of embankments and the installation of new equipment for pumping. 
The cost of the original scheme is not yet paid and the tax for the present work, 
running as high as 8<ic. per acre for 20 years, added to the original assessment, 
renders the burden on the land owners oppressive. I examined the work in 1918 



56 KEPOET OF X6. 13 

and found drain and pumping equipment completed in a workmanlike manner. 
The cost of the scheme was $8,500.00. 

On report, the grant of $1,500.00, voted to this drainage work, was paid to the 
Treasurer of the Township of Pelee. 

Flat Creek Draix, Perth. 

This drain commences at the line of Lots 1 and 2 in the Township of Hibbert, 
and runs south-east through the Township of Fullarton, terminating on Lot 9 in 
the 1st Concession of Blanshard. The total length of drain is 26,900 feet, or nearly 
5 miles. The work consisted of deepening, widening and straightening Flat Creek. 
The width of the drain varies from 8 feet at the head to 18 feet at the outlet. The 
excavation averaged about 45 cubic yards per rod. The drainage area comprised 
about 13,800 acres. The estimated cost of the work was $17,163.35, which was 
assessed as follows: 

On Lands and Eoads in Hibbert Township $5,470.40 

On Lands and Eoads in Fullarton Township .... 11,692.95 

The drain was examined by J. S. Leitch, an Engineer of this Department, who 
reported the work fully completed. On report, the grant of $1,500, voted to this 
drain, w^as paid to the Township of Fullarton. the initiating municipality. 

Otter Creek Draix, West Lambtox. 

This drain is a Trunk Outlet constructed to relieve lands in the Tovniships of 
Chatham and Sombra from water brought doAvn by natural streams and artiiicial 
drains from higher lands in Sombra and Dawn. The drain is about 14 miles long. 
It commences at the townline between Dawn and Sombra at the front of the 10th 
Concession of Sombra, and extends south-west in the valley of Otter Creek, dis- 
charging into the Sydenham Eiver, at the Town of Wallaceburg. Lateral drains 
extend into the Township of Dawn about 8 miles. The drain was constructed by 
floating dredges and Bay .City ditching machine. The total drainage area consisted 
of 33,000 acres. The cost of the work complete, was $42,882.00, which is assessed 
against the municipalities affected as follows: 

On Lands and Eoads in Chatham $11,596.00 

On Lands and Eoads in Dawn 11,288.00 

On Lands and Eoads in Sombra 2O/.)58.00 

I examined the drain in July and found the work eom])leted in a workmanlike 
manner. On report, the grant of $3,500.00. voted to this drain, was paid to the 
Township of Sombra, the initiating municipality. 

Phalex Creek Draix, Stormoxt. 

This drain is located in the Township of Osnabruck. It commences at the line 
between Lots 2 and 3 in the 7th Concession, and extends south-west 22.830 feet to 
Dixon Creek, which is reached at Lot 8, in the 5th Concession. The work also 
extends down Dixon Creek a distance of 3,727 feet. The work also embraces 
a branch known as '•' Hawns Drain," having a length of 1,650 feet. The 
total length of drain is 28,206 feet, or about 5^ miles. The drainage area com- 



1920 DEPAETMEXT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 57 

prises 9,207 acres, siti^ate in the Townships of Osnabruck, Cornwall and Eox- 
borough. The estimated cost of the work was $8,900.00, assessed as follows: 

On Lands and Eoads in Osnabruck $7,961.39 

On Lands and Eoads in Cornwall 2^8.53 

On Lands and Eoads in Eoxborough 690.08 

On report, the grant of $1,000.00, voted to this drain, was paid to the Town- 
ship of Osnabruck, the initiating municipality. 

SUTHERLAXD PuMPIXG SCHEME, KeXT. 

This work is a pumping scheme situate at the junction of the Sydenham 
Eiver with Lake St. Clair. The lands embraced are low lying and subject to 
Hooding during seasons of high water in Lake St. Clair. The scheme includes parts 
of Lots 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 in the 1st Concession of the Gore of Chatham, and also 
Lots 1, 2, 3 and 1, known as the Baldoon Farm, in the Township of Dover. The 
drainage area comprises 2.2<)0 acres, one-half of which is cultivated, the balance 
swamp or marsh. The work consists of dredge cuts and embankments along the 
low lying lands on the Sydenham Eiver and the Chenal Eearte. On the west, the 
east bank of the Arnold cut is used, and on the north, the south .bank, along 
Eunning Creek, is incorporated in the scheme. This embankment along Eunning 
Creek has been improved to a greater extent than was provided for in the original 
plan. A solid embankment has been constructed along the south side of Eunning 
Creek, from the east bank, at the 5-6 sideroad, easterly to the Pere Marquette 
Eailway grade. A series of internal drains provide for the complete drainage of 
the area. These drains are: the McDonald Drain, the McXaughton Drain, Arm- 
strong Drain, Sutherland Drain and the Card Drain. The total length of drain 
constructed was 2,164 rods. The excavation amounted to 106,189 cubic yards. The 
pumping plant comprised a farge dash wheel driven by an electric motor. The 
head works are constructed of concrete. The entire plant is operated efficiently 
and economically. The estimated cost of the drainage scheme was $18,551.73, 
which was assessed against lands and roads affected as follows : 

On Lands and Eoads in Gore of Chatham $9,338.73 

• On Lands and Eoads in Dover 0.213.00 

I examined the scheme in July of this year and found the entire work, as 
outlined in Engineer's report, completed in a workmanlike manner. On report, 
the grant of $2,500.00, voted to this work, was paid to the Township of Chatham, 
the initiating municipality. 

Young's Cheek Dkaix, South Hurox. 

This drain commences at the centre of Lot 18 in the 4th Concession of ^Yest 
Wawanosh, and runs south along Young's Creek, crossing into Colborne on Lot 10, 
in the 9th Concession, and continuing south along the creek to a sufficient outlet 
at Lot 6, in the 6th Concession of Colborne, a total length of 23,140 feet or about 
114 miles. The drain varies in bottom width from 5 feet at the head, to 8 feet 
at the outlet. The estimated excavation was 33,300 cubic yards, being an average 
of about 23 cubic yards per rod. The drainage basin comprises an area of 7,127 
acres. 



58 EEPOET OF No. 13 

The estimated cost of the work was $7,770.00, which was assessed as follows: 

On Lands and Eoads in West Wawanosh $7,277.20 

On Lands and Eoads in Colborne 492.80 

I examined the drain and found the work completed in a workmanlike manner. 
On report, the grant of $1,000.00, voted to this drain, was paid to the Township 
of West Wawanosh, the initiating municipality. 

Eespectfully submitting the above, 

I have the honour to be. 

Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

A. J. Halfoed, 
Engineer, Department of Public Worlcs. 



STATEMENTS 



OF THE 



ACCOUNTANT 



OF 



PUBLIC WORKS 



59 



Departmext of Public Works. Oxtario, 

ToROXTO, :Mareh ^oth, 1920 
Hox. F. C. Biggs, 

Minister of Public Worls and Highicays. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit detailed statements of Capital Expenditure 
on Provincial Public Buildings, Public Works, Colonization and Mining Eoads, 
Good Eoads, (Highway Improvement) Aid to Railways, etc., during the Fiscal 
Year which ended on the 31st of October, 1919. To these are added Statements, 
in a condensed form, of the Capital Expenditure thereon from the date of Con- 
federation to the 31st of October, 1918, the expenditure during the Fiscal Year 
1918-19, and the Grand Total Expenditure from the 1st July, 1S6T. to the 31st 
October, 1919. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant. 

M. C. O'DOXXELL, 

Accountant. Public ^^orls. 



61 



62 



EEPOET OF 



Xo. 13 



A statement of expenditure on Capital Account for Public Buildings, Public 
Works, Drainage. Colonization and Mining Pioads, Good Eoads, (Highways Im- 
provement Act) Aid to Eailways, etc., for the year ending October 31st, 1919. 



Name of Work. 



Amount. 



Public Buildings: 

Parliament Buildings: 



Alterations to provide additional ac- 
commodation and fire escapes . . 

Purchase, etc.. 44-46 Richmond St. 
West, Toronto, Special Warrant. . 

Repairs property, Peter and Welling- 
ton Streets, Special Warrant .... 

Soldiers' Aid Commission, Childrens' 
Home, Special Warrant 



Osgoode Hall : General repairs 

" " Electric wiring and fixtures 

" " Painting interior and exterior 

" '* Fittings for vaults and offices 

" Permanent lighting 

Installation of fuel oil burning equipment. 



Ontario Hospital. Brockville 

" " Hamilton 

" Kingston 

Purchase of additional property 



1,659 32 

92,120 10 

981 94 

10.609 65 



7,740 12 
9 81 
8,618 78 
4,225 00 
218 00 
2,830 35 



12.336 85 
7,474 40 



London 

" " Mimico 

Orillia 

Penetanguishene 

Toronto, Whitby Branch 

Woodstock 

Mercer Reformatory, Toronto 

Normal and Model Schools, Toronto 

Ottawa 

Normal School. London 

'* Hamilton 

Peterborough 

Stratford 

" North Bay 

English-French Training School, Sandwich 

Sturgeon Falls, Special 

Warrant 

Ontario School for the Deaf, Belleville 

Ontario School for the Blind, Brantford 

Ontario Agricultural College. Guelph 

Horticultural Experimental Station. Jordan Harbour 

" Cottages for Farm Help. 



Ontario Veterinary College 



4.533 46 

570 79 



Algoma District: 

Court House, Gaol and Registry Office, Sault Ste. Marie. . 
Lockup at Massey, grant 



44.174 29 
500 00 



Eenora District: 

Court House, Gaol and Registry Office 



Manitoulin District: 

Court House, Gaol, Registry OflSce, Lockup and Grounds.. 

Muskoka District: 

Court House, Gaol. Registry Office, grounds, etc 



105,371 01 



23.642 06 
23,183 58 
12.178 97 



19.811 25 

20,361 86 

3,727 85 

115,501 05 

3,454 87 

170,623 72 

746 43 

4,778 04 

22,806 97 

77,386 10 

2,605 11 

1,861 19 

2,894 84 

818 23 

931 64 

140 23 

1.360 97 

11.188 62 

4,251 94 

8,116 73 



5,104 25 
5,214 33 



44.674 29 
724 63 

293 45 

1,785 46 



1920 



DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



63 



Name of Work. 



Amouat. 



Public Buildings. — Continued. 
Nipissing District: 

Court House, Gaol, Registry Office, grounds, etc. 




Parry Soimd District: 

Court House, Gaol. Registry OflBce, Land Titles Office, Lockup, 
etc 



Rainy River District: 

Court House, Gaol, Registry Office, Land Titles Office, Lockup, 
etc * 



Sudbury District: 

Court House, Gaol, Registry Office 1 ,018 41 

Industrial Farm, Burwash Works, Buildings 120,507 72 



$ c. 
1,683 56 

2,160 60 

747 33 

121,526 13 
1,062 15 

1,375 90 

1,530 00 

1.277 73 

14.596 14 

Public Buildings 841 ,499 21 



Temiskaviing District: 

Court House, Registry Office, Land Titles Office. Lockups. 
Grounds, etc., 



Thunder Bay District: 

Court House, Gaol, Registry Office, Land Titles Office, 

Grounds, etc 

Industrial Farm, Fort William, Ont 

Miscellaneous: 

Fish Hatchery, Port Arthur, House for Superintendent 

Compensation for Workmen injured on Government Works. . 
Insurance 



635 78! 
740 12 



PuiiLic Works: 

Ahmic Bridge and Dam 

Arnold Creek Bridge, Comee 

Avery Creek Bridge, Ridout - 

Bastien Bridge, Cameron 

Beckett Bridge, Calvin 

Big Head River Bridge, Sydenham 

Beaver Creek Bridge, Minden Townline . . . 

Black Creek Bridge, Lutterworth 

Bovington Bridge, Korah 

Bunting Creek Bridge, D'obie Townline . . . 
Blind Lake Bridge, Palmerston, Grant . . . 
Black Creek Bridge, Garden River Road . . 

Buck Creek Bridge, Con. 14, Stisted 

Booth Bridge, Korah 

Berridale Bridge, Armour, Con. 13 

Cameron Creek Bridge, River Road Morley 

Clear River Bridge, Kennebec 

Carley Bridge. Dalton 

Crozier Lavellee Bridge, Trunk Road . . . . 
Cole Creek Bridge, Hinchinbrooke, Grant . 

Chelmsford Bridge 

Cassimer-Jennings Bridges 

Distress Bridge, Magnetawan 

Dana Bridge, Dog River 

Deer River Bridge, Con. 1, Wollastau .... 

Dembigh Bridge, Grant 

Deux Riviere Bridge 

Equipment, Instruments, etc 

Eighth Concession Bridge, Alice 

Eleventh Concession Bridge, Himsworth . 

First Concession Bridge, Plummer 

Flint Bridge, O'Connor 

Fourth Concession Bridge, Waters 

Fourth Concession Bridge, Matchedash ... 



1.392 78 
275 72 

1.354 30 
302 54 

3.256 72 

1.847 17 
210 61 
877 84 

1,377 13 
461 24 

299 00 
1.160 72 

597 30 

1,364 47 

2.099 30 

1,408 25 

1.343 19 

3.280 85 

713 73 

497 95 

2,428 02 

911 53 

2.381 15 

231 00 

894 51 

300 00 
339 94 

4,496 55 
490 32 
1.913 65 
2,079 87 
1.093 74 
784 30 
1,797 39 



64 



EEPORT OF 



No. 13 



Name of Work. 



Amount. 



Public Works. — Continued. 



Fifth Line Bridge, Burriss 

Finacune Creek Bridge, Algoma 

Fifteen Sideline Bridge, Medonte 

First Concession Bridge, Wicklow 

Field Village Bridge 

Fraser Creek Bridge, Carlow 

Frejd Bridge, Plummer 

Gladstone Bridge 

Griffiths Bridge 

Green Creek Bridge, Sinclair 

Gulch Bridge, Marmora 

Gully Bridge, 2nd Line, Korah 

Great Northern Road Bridge. Plummer 

Hog Creek Bridge, 5th Con., Tay 

Hoc Roc Bridge, Con. 6, Muskoka 

Halliday Creek Bridge 

Hurds Creek Bridge, Grattan 

Hollow Lake Dam 

Indian River Bridge, Sarawak 

Ironside Bridge, Prince 

King Creek Bridge, Lefroy 

Kenora District Bridges 

Kushog Lake Bridge, Snowdon • • • 

Keppel Bridge. Indian River 

Lang Bridge, Trout Road, Lash 

Laird Bridge, Section 3 ■ 

Larocque Bridge. Widdifleld 

LeClair Bridge. Black Donald Road 

Lavallee Bridge, Sections 4 and 9, Devlin 

Little East Bridge. Chaffey T. L 

Long Point Bridge, Fenelon, Grant 

Lowe Bridge, Ryde 

Lybster Bridges (2 ) 

Lot 8 Bridge, Muskoka Road 

Lockmasters, etc.. Salaries ♦ 

McDonald Creek Bridge. Stevenson 

McPherson Creek Bridge 

McLaren Bridge, Palmerston, Grant ■ . 

Maintenance locks, dams, etc 

Magnetawan Bridge, 3rd Con. Line, Joly 

Marshall Bridge, Korah 

Mayo Townline Bridges ". . 

Manitoulin Bridges 

Mausons Bridge, Limerick 

Narrows Bridge. Christie 

North Seguin Bridge, Nipissing Road 

Papineau Township Bridges 

Pearson Township Bridges 

Pine River Bridge, North Road 

Papineau Creek Bridge, Monteagle T.L 

Paudash Bridge, Faraday 

Ryerson Swing Bridge, rebuilding, Special Warrant 

Rawdon Creek Bridge, Con. 3, Huntingdon 

Rainy River Bridges, rebuilding and repairing, Special War 

rant 

Surveys and Inspections 

Silver Creek Bridge, 15 Tarentorus 

Silver Creek Bridge, Ridout 

Silver Creek Bridge, Garden Road , 

Section 9 Bridge, Devlin 

Snake Creek Bridge, Raglan 

Seguin Bridge, McDougall Road 

Serpent River Bridge 

Stanley Bridge . 



889 12 

352 00 

1,483 44 

415 24 

5,993 73 

294 50 

680 69 

1,099 22 

6,539 39 

28 00 

497 03 

1,392 55 

622 88 

1,975 83 

1,864 03 

349 80 

199 92 

125 00 

1,225 34 

1.089 81 

1.824 43 

3,640 37 

704 26 

563 05 

1,282 04 

1,358 03 

267 50 

299 00 
1,159 38 
1.363 06 

600 00 
1.287 62 

663 67 

958 61 
3,887 50 
1.869 07 

199 85 

300 00 
51,212 69 

1,187 43 
1,360 91 

647 37 
1,538 49 

300 00 
4.094 86 

560 31 
1,498 54 

198 95 
2,690 05 

600 00 

622 15 
8,454 01 

499 02 

9,863 47 

4,741 41 

861 02 

665 32 

1.277 77 

843 43 

447 60 

5,379 23 

4.345 75 

10.465 79 



1920 



DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



65 



Name of Work. 




Amount. 



Public Works. — Continued. 



Sixth Line Bridge, Tarbutt 

Seventeenth Con. Bridge, Graham Creek .... 

Second Concession Bridge, Marks 

Side Line Bridge, Con. 7, Cliisholm 

Sucker Creek Bridge, Humphrey 

Smoky Falls Bridge 

Second Line Bridge, Balfour 

Seventh Concession Bridge, Graham Creek . . . 
Sturgeon Bridge, Sections 13 and 14, Shenston 

Sturgeon Bridge. Dobie T.L 

Solmes Bridge. Monteagle 

Stobie Bridge, Johnston 

Southern Bridge, Sturgeon Falls, conditional 

Sfxth Concession Bridge, Chisholm 

Swamp Creek Bridge, Clarendon 

Superintendent Public Works, salary 

Ten Sideline Bridge, Orillia 

Tenth Concession Bridge, Stevenson 

Temiskaming Bridges 

Thompson Bridge, Prince 

Tudor Bridges 

Tudor-Cashel Bridges 

Victoria Bridge, Section 3 

Veuve Bridge. 2nd Con., Caldwell 

White Oak Creek Bridge, Humphrey 

Willow Creek Bridge, Con. 8, Vespra 

Wassa Bridge, Con. 17, Chisholm 

Widdifield Bridges 

West Sideline Bridge. Burruss 

Wages and expenses supervising foremen 

Workmen injured, etc.. Compensation for . . . . 



Public Works, Bridges, etc. 



DuAiNAGE Works: 

Algoma District Road Drainage 

East Simcoe District Road Drainage 

Eastern Swamp Drain, Eastnor 

Fourth Concession Drain, Amabel 

Horseshoe Lake Drain 

Manitoulin Road Drainage 

Mara Drain 

Muskoka Road Drainage 

Nipissing Road Drainage 

North Hastings Road Drainage 

Oak Flat Road Drainage 

Parry Sound Road Drainage 

Rainy River Road Drainage 

Spence Swamp, drain extension 

Sturgeon Falls Road Drainage 

Sudbury Road Drainage 

Temiskaming Road Drainage 

Beaudette River Drainage, Kenyon, Grant 

Curry Marsh Drain, Pelee Island, " 

Flat Creek Drain, FuUerton " 

Otter Creek Drain. Sombra " 

Phelan Creek Drain, Osnabruck " 

Salter Drain, May and Salter " 

Sutherland Pumping Scheme, Chatham, Grant . . . . 
Young Creek Drain, West Wawanosh " . . . . 

Renfrew District Road Drainage, Special Warrant 

Drainage Works 



1,583 17 


170 60 


377 


26 


857 


30 


1,844 


82 


9,297 


17 


491 


45 


1,017 


35 


580 30 


768 


18 


249 


50 


1.023 


92 


1.762 


13 


1.299 


63 


350 00 


1.400 00 


2,832 


10 


1.261 


20 


8,730 


39 


991 


95 


484 


29 


500 


00 


415 


31 


6.772 


19 


334 40 


1.236 


51 


992 


51 


1,062 


70 


870 


61 


3,348 


10 


125 


40 


260,994 40 


2.099 80 


1.218 23 


1.355 


33 


150 00 


290 62 


1,459 


00 


295 


51 


1,852 32 


3.299 


82 


2.028 


00 


95 


18 


1.205 


76 


5.713 


18 


600 


00 


2.599 


/o 


2.599 80 


2,247 


81 


2.500 00 


1,500 


00 


1,500 


00 


3,500 


00 


1.000 00 


800 


00 


2.500 


00 


1,000 


00 


498 99 


43,909 65 



66 



EEPOET OF 



No. 13 



Name of Work. 



Amount. 



SUilMARY: $ c! $ c. 

Public Buildings i 841 ,499 21 

Public Works, Bridges, etc 260,994 40| 

Public Works, Drainage 43.909 65 

304,904 05 

Total il, 146, 403 26 

Colonization and Mining Roads 390.621 54 

Good Roads (Highway Improvement) 2,259,719 65 

Aid to Railways 139,112 54 

Grand Total 3,935,856 99 



Addenda 


Expenditure 

1st July, 1867, to 

31st Oct., 1918 


Expenditure 

Fiscal Year ending 

31st Oct., 1919 


Total Expenditure 

to 31st Oct., 

1919 


Public Buildings 


$ c. 
24,756,388 90 

3,274,871 54 
684,024 28 
8,970 683 51 
3,376.096 42 
9,876,290 27 


$ c. 
841,499 21 

260,994 40 

43,909 65 

390.621 54 

2.259.719 65 

139,112 54 


$ c. 
25,597,888 11 


Public Works, Bridges, Locks, dams, 
etc 

Public Works, Drainage 

Colonization and Mining Roads 

Good Roads (highways improvement) 
Aid to Railways 


3,535,865 94 

727,933 93 

9.361,305 05 

5.635,816 07 

10,015,402 81 


NOTE :— 
Certiiicates issued 

to railways $10,515,892 45 

Cash paid direct to 

railways 2,337,982 42 

$12,853,874 87 
Certificates out- 
standing 2,838,472 06 

Actual cash expen- 
ded 31st Oct.,1919 10,015,402 81 




Totals 


50,938,354 92 


3,935,856 99 


54,874,211 91 






Recapitulation : — 

Total Public Buildings 


24,756,388 90 
3,958,895 82 

8,970,683 51 

3,376,096 42 
9,876,290 27 


841.499 21 
304.904 05 

390,621 54 

2,259,719 65 
139,112 54 


25,597,888 11 


' ' Public Works and Drainage 

' ' Colonization and Mining 
Roads 

' ' Good Roads (Highway Im- 
provement) 

' ' Aid to Railways 


4,263,799 87 

9,361,305 05 

5,635,816 07 
10,015,402 81 






Grand Totals 


50,938,354 92 


3,935,856 99 


54,874,211 91 







Department of Public Works, Ontario, 
Toronto, March, 1920. 



M. C. O'DONNELL, 

Accountant, Public Works. 



STATEMENT 



OF 



SECRETARY 



AND 



LAW CLERK 



67 



68 



EEPOET OF 



No. 13 



02 



6« 






M 


tn 


a^ 




iH 


-d 


o 


c 

0) 


^ 


U3 


« 



a) .Td 
^- 

•^ o 

^ o 

be o 

.S -J 



tn . 

H 
J? 

9 a 



«a5 








o 






C 




O 


C 




O 






- 


CTJ 


e 






c5® 


o 


o 


O 


O 


o 




i 


C<l 


o 




o 


ITi 


o 


O 


o 


IM 






C<l 


t- 




\a 


T-H 


CD 


t^ 


T— I 


CO 






CO 


05 




e/^«i 


e<i_ 


O 


CO 


o 


05 


o 




00 


05^ 


■^ 


CO 


•^ 


U5 


irt 


TJ>" 


CO 
1—1 




CO 


00 
CO 


s 














,3 








s 














« 








o 














^^ DO 








s 


. 


















ew ■-3 

o » 










< 


























CO 03 

'-3 

&- o3 

o 




































T-l 






























H-i 03 










og^ 


































o 
























•3 










s *J- 
























C ■►^ 










03 ^ 


sties. 






















039 
03 
































CO 










§^ 


Si 






















03 










o 


3 






























03 


W. ■ 
























































H 








fei 






( 


QJ 




1 






^2 


<« 03 


-iJ 






3 




6 


bC 


"3 


O 




o 






o 


\ 


y 




h5 


O 


^ 






a. 


ig 


1 
w 
<-> 
o 

u 
o 

a 




w^ 


: 


a> 


>> 


. -1^ 

03 •:; 


03 




bX 


o8 


•52 


o 
c . 

as 


o 

2 

PQ cs 


bC 

2 d 
m § 

o H 


-3 - 

£« Jn c3 


t- 03 

o 

O C 03 




03 

03 

o 
u 

pa 




1^ 


6 


.2£ 


13 


— 2 o 
-3 c c; 

o3 •;r o 




I- 03 

2 ^ 




> 

■u 







S 


m 


Q 


O 


pa 


b 




p: 


O 


o 
o 


c 
a> 

en 
cS 

bX) 

e 


3 
o 
ti 

03 


m 
G 

CO 


03 

ft 

m 
a) 


■3 

G 

o3 

-3 


O "* C3 
o 3 

T3 o3 
O ^"^ 

03 

ti-i "O 3 

o c 


"3 -3 O 
C £ *^ 

Oi C?* OJ 
— 03 c 
>- s- S 

oj 2 
:;^ c -^ 
g2£ 

C ^ 03 


bi) 
"3 


1= 

a 

£ 
c 

E 
a 


6 
S bi 

'' C -3 

'"3 "3 

^ 3.S 


o 

3 


3 


ft 

m 

a; 
-2 


o 


o 

>> 

a 
a 

3 




03 be 

05 03 ":: 

fl 3 2 

Pi 


a !=! - 


o 
o 

03 


c 

> 
e 


io §2 




S 


C» 


w 


m 


M 


CO 




^ 


3 cn 








Q> 


u 




.^_> 








• f— 1 




o 


3 




> 
o 






3 
o 








• 03 


Si 

o 
o 


o 
o 


>■ 

o 


bo cij 


be 


c 


3 


03 

OS 


o 

o 
.=: 
o 
CO 







o 

H bD 




^ 


!H, ^ 


'S 

00 


0! Ph 


^ 




a 




1 'c 


X 


s 


rt 


OC QJ 




a 




t-l 




c 


i 


3 

CO 

o 


a> 
-a 
o 

•a 

O 


73 > 


13 c 


03 

o 
O 


03 

CO a; 

03 

1 ilC 


o3 
O 




1 c 

1 ^ 


■£1 




22S 


05 Oq 


i • 


T-l 

CO 


00 

I— 1 




1-1 




« 
&■ 


5 O 
fl CO 


03 

Q 


OS 
1—1 


J 


I— 1 


e 

-5 




3 

-5 


. 


a3 

-3 


i 

I 


2 


?5 


a 
< 




( 
i 


2< a 

t) <1 



1920 



DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



69 



o 

bo o 
-a H 



,3^ 
o 

5 


13 


o 


w 






^ 




o 








W 








.X o 
X5pQ 






CO lO o o o o 

Tf c- w lo in o 

00 !>■ i-H rH 1-1 GO 



I— I --I 00 irq 00 



O 00 00 '■ l-l 









• •„ -g-g 


72 


33 


- c J? - " 5 


— — -- ^ c 


.2 


o •: =- o s ^ 


c3 c3 2 « S 


:S rt c3 


o o o -- r; 


c c -71 


O .. O QJ 




00"= 


Pea 

Mine 

Stove 

Nut 

Cann 

Hard 


Egg, 

Nut 

Soft 

Pine 

Mine 





o 



03 



>, 


fl 


;h 


ca 


c 


m 


(i> 




ffi 


>> 

-a 




•0 


03 








a 






33 . 



PQ 



<^ 




c 


a 






32 

-a 


C 













> 


U 


J3 




(1> 



u 






. o 

1-5 -a 



o 
to- » 



S -^ • 

d I- ~ 

o 



O *j 



P§ 



C/2 .Si* 



o o 



tf 



(- T3 



OS 

o S 

era > 



^ .2 - 

O '*j -a 

S^ '^ «- 

* 3 o 









s§« 



£i ffi 



opq 



D 5 



a; S 

CS o 

c o 



0, 



»» 



ra o 












1—1 


^^ 




CO 


s 


-*J eS 




t3 *^ 




§0 

"O - 


« 


3 


C ,- 


PQ 


(D t*. 




a c 




(1) oj 

'3 a 


a 


c 


^ 



ifl 



33 



.SX3 
c3 jS 



-3 3 

C CO 
3 

O ^ 



=« S s 

;_ O f5 

C '^ 
M=^ O 

•S M^ 

12 -^ !-V 



"3 .;- 

03 



g 3 



M 



QJ 



c3 



2 o ^ 



O 3 O 

""^ 32 r- 



« o « 

O) 3 

2 o ^ 

o =P^ 

S O 3 



o 



3 



> 











<u 






>i 






tf 








'3 




■3 
3 




3 







^ 


CC 




■I-) 


>- 


be 

C 


0) 
3 


t- 


^ 


cfl 


c;^ 


M 


^ 


Oh 







gra 
(5 



be 




< 













;_, 


<D 


« 


bf) 




a» 

























a. 


OS 


O) 


3 



be 


a; 


2 


3 



3 




m 


■<-> 

a 




<u 




S 


;^ 


3 


01 


s- 


0- 


<u 



m 



a 



? 3 



3 ;-; 

cS o; 



03 fl 
J= C 



>> 5 
02 



03 



=3 -J^ 





05 




*- '-' 









° 3 


C^) 







>> 32 


?s 


0.^ 


&1 


m 



"3 <U ^ 
C -O O 

Ǥ- 
b£ . 

32 -*-> 

15^> 

t. C r- 

3 X — 3J 

C O rt M 



tS o 



o 






ei3 
% 






70 



EEPOET OF 



Xo. 13 



.9 

a 
o 



o 



-Q 
o 
-1^ • 

<0 Pi 
Xi 0) 

o s 

a^ 

& o 

« 2 

■*^ fl 

^ o 
at o 



^ o 
CO 



-^ re 



PI 3 

o -5 



,^ 





C3 « 


C , 


^ 


3 




















o o 


c - 


- : o 


o - - 


- » * - 










*J o 




w 














"5 ■=> 


o o 


o o o 


la Oi Oi 


00 0> ID O 


o 


O 


O 




W '-'5 o 


o o 


O O o 


t- 00 05 


CO CO 00 O 


o 


O 


o 




t— i cp 


o o 


(M (fl t- 


to i-H i-H 


t- Ol 03 O 


o 


O 


(M 




1-1 


lH i-H 


r-l iH 


tH 1-1 


1—1 


t^ 


o 


iH 




ee- 










00 ^ 


OO 


CO 


-*-3 












«o 


lO 


t^ 


a 


, 
















s 


















o 


















s 
















^ 


-< 


o ^^ 
bC.5 


o o 
o o 

bC 3 


^ — ^ 

cti c^ c€ 
Sow 


"3 

o ~ — 

CJ CO 03 
O o 

- w £ 
00 HZ 


-^ ^ "=3 _ 

5? S g =* 
o c "^ o 

" " « « 

O CJO^ 3 
M H 05 !Z 
















^'d 


m 


a 


^ 
















' 








1 >> 


h4 5 




















o 




1-3 


> 


















EXi 


=<^ t" 


o8 .t: 


Vl ^ 


0) 


















Suretie 


c - 


S 

3 '^ 
3 
oi >3 

"a 

m 


q8 is 

^H O 

be ^ 

. xj 


-a 

3 
.ffi 


















<:«) 


Qa 


a 


•d 


3 
cS 


Cl-I 

o 


c 










-d 




o 


J 


1/3 


o 




CO 


*-> 
■3 J 


QJ -■-> 






m 


0) (0 


S-d 


3 
o 


o 


'^i 

^ 


sa 

3 cS 


"3 

3 


6 


2 
"3 


Sa 

»2 


O 54-1 

^3 


J2 


(-< 


*. 


>» 


.2 


3 




d 




C 
o 




3 ° 


03 
ffl 


CD S 


o 

O . 


3 


3 '^ 

O - 






nj !-< 


3 ° 


y cS 


3 OI 


f^ 


'- ci3 


a> ^ 






^^ 


§y 


Sa 


-3m 


o 


%o 


"S^ 


3 
o 


" 


Cl, 


Q 


iz; 


Q 


fc 


^ 


Z 






o 
O 


ro 3 

3 O 

CQ 
<V 


•53 n 

3 O 

CO 

a> 


•a 3 
3 o 


§1.2- 

ce M 
-l-J U} 

CO o; CO 
3^1 


o P 
N 3 


bt, c 

15 "^ 


o 

o 


C 2-1 . 


Oi 

'<^3 


P 

o ^ ■ 
J? 


T3M 

;-■ 

cS 

cS 


T3 W2 
cS 

CO 

oQ . 


o 

^ 3 CO 
->J ^ t- 

>. m 

ft— ^H 
2<-2 ^ 


5 T to 

d r: o 
S bc 


k 


^ ^ 


o 


o 


o 

C<1 




cS <D pQ 


Sul 


3 CO l-H 


>> EC 


" 3 1-1 
§"^1-1 


^ -tJ OS 

lis 


~ '^J T-l 

lis 


g-So a 


3. re ^ 

3 ^ 




CO 


CO 


M 


CC 


M 


cc 


(2 


m 




_J 




^ 


Oi 


OJ 




a 


• 




o 


Q 


o 


,3 












o 


O 


o 

,3 


+-> 


+J 


^ 


03 






J^ 


"u 


o 


;-i 


«H 


"S 


^ 






o 


cc 


M 


W 


o 

4-1 


o 


ffi 








c 


5 
S 


a 


a 


o 

o 


§ 


0) 
O 


"cS 

• r-H 

CO 


13 


u 


o 


si 


,3 


o 


3 




5 


o 


o 
3 


>> 




CJ 

■3 


be 

O 


3 


m 

o 


o 




o 

-l-J 


J3 


"^-s 


O -O 
■^ 3 


O 
3 


"co 
o3 


3 

o 




q;) 


f2 


t^ 


® p 


3 '.S 


O 


T3 




« 


rt 


o 


?« 


gPQ 


(h 

o 


^ 


3 
O 




CL, 


:r 


z 


CO 


m 


H 


m 


J 


c; 


CO 


00 


to 


CO 


c^ 


l-( 


^ 
•<*< 


00 




o:) 1—1 


1—1 


T— H 


1-1 


1—1 


tH 


l-H 


1—1 


"S 


1—1 
1-1 rt 


>> 


OS 


>> 
a 






0) 

3 

3 
•-5 




3 
3 

1-5 




0) 

3 





1920 



DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC WOEKS. 



71 



o o 
o oo 



o p 




= c 

El; 



c^ 



M CIS 
. w 



^" O 



^'1 



o O 



Q . . 

CO 



-a o 
a. 



cS 73 

O S 



;: 6 
o 

o 



-• :>. i 



■c C 

CL 






fcC 



SI 






CO 
o 

ct 



CQ 



> 



s 



i c o 
I re " 
^> 



""5 

=^ 5 

t. ct 

S 
O —I 

c 

CQ tt-i 



>. ^ 



a 

03 



bO 




a 
















cS 




-u 




CC 




C3 


hn 


'•^ 


C 






-c 


fl) 


d 


> 


c« 


o 


1 


O 


>> 


(U 


o. 


o, 


g-cu 


3 




m 





H 



Co gj 

5 



s It 
o 

i= > 
C* > 

C 

a c 
a—; 






X :S - 



c c < 

■~ Z: _ M 






^ c 
CO m 
c "^ 

O -k-> 

o «-. 

3 
O 



a*; 



CJ 




2 


<u 


^ 


•J-. 


•«-> 


3 


M 


o 


i o 


ffi 


i ^ 






4^ 




a 


'O 


o 


cS 






si-l 




O 


>> 




















_ 


*- 






«2 





5^ 



y ;j^ a; 



C U) 












2 c? 






02 



M 


cS 






c 


O. 


*"* 


o 


r' 


ffi 


-Jl 




cS 


03 


^ 




(^ 




3 


tH 


CQ 


o 



'C M) 

S fl 



•- s 






o3 

_; a 
c n 

XT. 



3 
CO 






if 



tx: 






CO 



EEPORT OF DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Xo. 13 



O <u 

*> a 

CO ci 

.al 

-a o 

to O 

as 

2^ 
=3 « 

& ° 

.a « 



W CO o 

■^ .2 * 

CO u 
M o 

o a 
a ^ 

— ' 03 



«.a 



3-^ -^^ 



M 






-a 
CO 















f 




1 


a 




1 










1 












o 








1 












-u 












o 


c> 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 




o 




o 


o 


o 


cq 


o 


o 


o 




o 




o 


o 


t- 


a> 


CO 


IC 


i.t 




o 




fw 




<y. 


C<1 


tH 


c- 


t- 




o 




c» 


t^ 


03 


00 




rH 


o_ 




o 


■4^ 


oi^ 


^ 


00 


US 




C^" 


(m' 




OO 





I-H 


CO 


M 






C^l 






eo 


s 




















O 




















a 




















< 


















o 














1 




















bO 
































bJD 
































K 




































1 














W c 


d 


^•« 


^i 




H 


K 




d 




si 


o8 C 


O Oi 

en u 


O M 




03' 
03 






o 


^ 




ce 


0) s_, 


QQ 




0) CQ 


^ 




05 E-. 


43 


c^ > 


t-i 


■5 O . 


' ^ 






O) 




02 


•SB 




S o 


01 V 

rQ CO 

-< ^ .« 




>> - 

■ ^ 
El, 


C3 ,—1 




3 — ' 

CO 

. C 

1-5 CS 










. "5 52 

. o '* 




«* o 

P 






S 


H 


d 


=:s 




§■ 


H 




fc 




a 

ffi. 


02 ^ 


h4 


-l-> 

9 

1 




03 

03 

PQ 


•3 




r 
-3 


03 
O 
« 



o 
O 




CO o ;2 

MH cn !-i 

a. o 


5 

% s 


03 

c 
a 03 

dS 
o 


> 

bj 

re 
0, 

bi 

1 
5 


CO 

o ^^ 
tt-c > 


6 

u 

03' 

'?> 
03 03 

m 

1-3 




CO 

^ 6 

3 

>.£ 

-3 O 

CL, 


2 






« .2 " 


6 ;^ CO 

3 r >. 

CO ^j 


c 

c 


6 S 


-3 03 
« S 

cd o 

bC t, 
3 O 


"3 
ft 

2 co" 


-3 

c . 
3 CO 


"^ 


O -kJ 


o >> ■ 


O *J . 


0-^3 

« a 
« o 

« S 
a§ ?-*§ 

Q, .^ C 03 

~ *J .PH JJ 




J 8^ 

3 03 

a< ft o 3 


•.^ «4.^ 


3 (jj 


■s >> 


o 
o 

3 


c h 

CO <l-i o 

o > 
ft o a> 


OS 

o 


-5 a 

e X 

'" O X 
0) 

a o 3 


c 


b£^ 

ll 


® b£ 

"SI'S 


.s 

bC« 

c ::: 

a « 


m 




az:.S 


-13?; 


£ 


1 ft-J CQ 
3 3 *^ ^ 


3 "3 


CO "3 


|> 




m 


m 


M 


M 


» 


2 CO 


E 




E 










-■-> 




0) 


<u 




.fcj 
















3 


"c 


= 5 


^ 




u 

3 
















O 


c 


3 






o 














P 





I a 


o 

<4-l 




d 


-« 
^ 


"3 
ft 


03 

o 

O 


ft 


.2 


t 

■s 


2 o 

- .3 


o 
o 




.2 

'u 

Hi 


o 


o 




o 




c 


5 5^ 


"3 






^ 


ffi 


bO 


K 


03* 


^ 


I ^ 


CO 




03* 




o 


< 


Q 


C6 OJ 




3 * 


,2 




-4^ 

CO oJ 




-!-> 


ft 




CO 


< 


2 -^'tS 


> rt 




03 

^ 3 




a 

C8 




bi; 


t^ o 




J 0) 0) 


03 (Jj 




— o 




"3 

3 




s^ 






iQ 




3 E^ 




a 


o 


5 


CO 





Q CQ 


oa 




C^ 




2^ 

^ ft 


t- 

ft 


CO 


t- 


c 


-J -4-> 


U5 
C^l 




OO 




0) 


0! 


tJ 


13 




J « 


43 




w 




c/ 


2 


u 


1 


C 


D 


o 


c 


o 


O 




O 



Z o <= 

< .- 



fa gt 
g 



Thirteenth Annual Report 



OF TrlE 



GAME AND FISHERIES 
DEPARTMENT 

1919 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO: 
Printed and Published by A. T. WILGRESS, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 



Printed by 
THE RYERSON PRESS 




^ ^ 



To His Honour Lionel HEKBEin I'laeke^ 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

.May it Please Your Honour: 

1 have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Thirteenth Annual Eeport of the Department 
of Game and Fisheries of this Province. 

I have the honour to be, 

A^our Honour'.s most obedient servant, 

F. C. Biggs, 

Minister of Public Works and Highivays^ 

Toronto, 2nd February, 1920. 



m 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Department of Game and Fisheries of 

Ontario 



To the Honourahle F. C. Biggs, 

Minister of Public Works and Higliicays. 

Sir, — I have the honour to place before you the Thirteenth Annual Eeport 
of the work of the Department of Game and Fisheries for the fiscal year ending 
October 31st, 1919. It is satisfactory that there continues to be a steady and very 
Toarked increase in the revenues without a corresponding increase in the expendi- 
tures for the year. The surplus over and above expenditure amounts to $160,- 
949.42. The total revenues reached $346,197.14, and the expenditures amount to 
$185,247.72. These figures are exclusive of the Sales Branch returns which show 
surplus of monies received over expenditures of $24,426.42 aside from assets of 
Book Accounts and stock of fish on hand, or a total surplus for the year of 
$185,375.84. A statement of the Sales Branch is shown elsewhere in this report. 

Compai-ative Statement of Revenue and Expediture — Department of Game and 
Fisheries,. 1910-1919, as Published in the Public Accounts. 



1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 

1919 















Relation of 














surplus to 


Revenue. 


Expenditure. 


Surplus. 


expenditure. 


S126.86G 


61 


1104.203 


87 


$22,662 


74 


21.74% 


130,267 


39 


114.517 


37 


15,750 


02 


13.75<7c 


133,354 


49 


123.197 


31 


10,157 


18 


8.24% 


138.364 


31 


127.594 


24 


10.770 


07 


8.44% 


154,836 


73 


134,629 


16 


20,207 


57 


15.% 


168.763 


47 


152,872 


41 


15,891 


06 


10 . 39% 


174.186 


71 


157,681 


94 


16.504 


1 1 


10 . 46% 


219,442 


94 


154.055 


17 


65,387 


1 1 


42.44% 


258.671 


62 


167,795 


22 


90.876 


40 


54.16% 


346.197 


14 


185.247 


72 


160.949 


42 


86.88% 




Sales Braxch. 










$357,741 


06 


$333,314 


64 


.?24.426 


42 


7 . % Gain. 



Statement showing the revenues received, from Game and also those received 
from Fish in the year 1910 as compared with the year 1919. 



Revenue from Game 
Revenue from Fish 



1910 
S38.904 89 


1919 
S193.939 68 
152.257 46 


Increase. 

$155,034 79 

64 ''95 74 


87,961 72 






$126,866 61 
[5] 


S346.197 14 


$219,-330 53 



THE EEPOET UPON No. 14 



You will note that the total revenues for 1919 of $346,197.1'! are nearly three 
times as great as the revenues for 1910, and the increase is largely responsible 
to the revenues received in the Game Department being almost five times as great 
for the same period, while the revenues from the Fisheries for 1919 are less than 
twice the amount received in 1910. 



Statistics. 

The statistics have been carefully prepared and furnish much interesting and 
valuable information. 

Fish. 

Commercial licenses were issued in 1918 for G, 605, 067 yards of gill nets, 
36,402 yards seines, l,0i69 pound nets, 1,332 hoop nets, 36 dip or roll nets, 269 
spears as well as 58,500 hooks. 

The occupation gave direct employment to 3,918 men with 125 tugs, 703 
gasoline boats and 1,176 sail or row boats, with an estimated capital of $2,694,- 
104.31 invested in the industry. The aggregate catch amounts to 46,004,1761/^ 
lbs. as compared with 42,836,179 lbs. in the previous year, an increase of 
3,167,996l/o lbs. 

The reports received from nearly every district show that angling for game 
iish in 1919 has been exceptionally good and no doubt the results are responsible 
to a large measure to the re-stocking programme carried on by this De])artment 
(luring the past few years. 

Game 

Moose and Deer are reported to be plentiful in several districts and C'aribou 
has appeared in sections where they have not been seen for some years. The 
number of non-resident licenses issued this year shows an increase of 172 over 
the ])revious years, the num])er of resident Deer licenses shows an increase of 3,341 
and the number of resident Moose licences shows an increase of 61 over the previous 
year. 

Partridge. — The benefit of the existing close season together with favourable 
weather conditions during the hatching period has been very beneficial to these 
game birds and there is reported to be a large increase in numbers in many parts 
of the province. 

Ducks. — The season for ducks may ho considered as normal and the number 
taken compares favourably with the ])revi()us year. 

Quail. — Has not shown any increase in the province. 

Pheasants. — Favourable reports have been received from parts of the province 
regarding the number of pheasants, i)articularly in the Niagara district. The 
Department has undertaken to assist in the propagation of these game birds by 
importing some new stock of English Ring-Neck pheasants and placing them at 
Eondeau Park, and a quantity of eggs were also imported during the spring 
months and the hatch therefrom has been very satisfactory. It is hoped that some 
satisfactory results will be obtained in the rearing of these birds in order that 
they may become more plentiful in those parts of the province suitable for their 
existence. 



1920 GAME AXD FISHERIES. 



Fdk. 

The prices paid for all classes of pelts during the past year have been ex- 
ceptionally high and have attracted many to trap, and there has been a great 
increase in the number of fur dealers. Therefore the revenue has increased not 
only from the sale of these licenses but from the royalties imposed on certain pelts. 

Beaver appear to be, quite plentiful and the number taken greatly exceeds any 
previous year. 

Otter are not obtained in any great numbers. 

Minh, Marten and Fisher show no increase and appear to l)e scarce. 

Mushrats have been taken in large numbers, but the high prices paid for 
these pelts tend to tempt the unscrupulous trapper to take them during the close 
season provided for their protection. 

Wolf. — Reports continue to reach the Department as to the destruction of 
deer and other game by these animals, and many are urging that the bounty be 
increased so that the trapper may have something substantial for the efforts put 
forth in his endeavour to capture this predatory animal. 

Game Saxctuary. 

I must once more strongly recommend and urge that one or more suitable 
areas of considerable extent be set aside by the Government for the establishment 
of a Game Sanctuary or Sanctuaries which, in my opinion, should be located some- 
where in the north or western jiart of the province where arrangements could be 
readily made for such purposes and which are suitable from natural conditions. 
Great inroads have been made upon fur-bearing animals, as well as the game and 
birds of the province during the past few years and more attention must be given 
by the Department to the existing conditions. 

Hatcheries. 

The progressive policy in regard to the propagation of lish by this Department 
during the past three years has been maintained and a modern and efficient hatchery 
is now under construction at Fort Frances. The building will have an artistic 
appearance in keeping with its location among other public buildings in that town, 
and will have a capacity of 100,000,000 pickerel and a further capacity for speckled 
trout, or lake trout can be installed later if conditions warrant same. A distri- 
bution of fry fingerling and parent fish was made this year, as shown elsewliere 
in this report, and while weather conditions were not favourable to the taking 
of spawn this fall yet it is lioped the distribution for 1920 will be larger than any 
other year of the Province's undertaking. The rapid growth in the hatchery policy 
of the Department made it imperative that an efficient and qualified Fish Cultnrist 
be obtained for its success, and I have secured, through the courtesy of the Federal 
Government, Mr. A. W. ilcLeod, formerly of the Thurlow Federal Hatchery, for 
ibis work. 



THE BEPORT UP OX Xo. 14 



SALES BRANCH. 

This branch has been in charge of the Superintendent of the Department 
since March 1st, and the following letter and statement will give you the details 
of the Sales Branch operations for the past fiscal year. 

D McDoN^ALD, Esq., 

Deputy Minister Game and Fisheries, 
Toronto, Ont. 

Deae Sir, — 1 have pleasure in handing you herewith a financial report of 
the Sales Branch for the fiscal year ending October 31st, 1919, by which you will 
note that there has been a surplus of cash received over expenditures amounting 
to $24,335.77, and by adding thereto the outstanding ledger accounts it shows a 
credit balance of $70,116.48. 

The total fish purchased for the year amounts to 3,155,90'2 lbs. as against 
2,728,159 lbs. of the previous year, and the municipalities supplied during the past 
year being 106 with 218 dealers against 152 municipalities and 303 dealers for 
the previous year. The shortage of ice in many municipalities this year together 
with the restrictions removed on the consumption of meat, I consider responsible 
for the decrease in the number of municipalities and dealers supplied. Yet, taking 
this into consideration, you will notice that there was an increase in the distribii- 
tion of 427,743 lbs. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Yours truly, 

Geo. H. Rapsey, 

Superintendent. 



1920 GAME AXD FISHEEIES 

Departmext of Game a>'d Fisheries. 

Sales Branch. 

Income and Expenditure for year ending October 31, 1919. 

I'scoyiE. 

Cash, paid treasurer $357,741 06 

Outstanding Accounts, Sales Ledger, Toronto 9.688 19 

Outstanding Accounts, Sales Ledger (Ontario, other than 

Toronto) 19,195 57 

Outstanding Accounts, fish in freezers 16,896 95 



$403,521 77 



Expenditure. 

Paid fishermen $194,364 02 

Express, freight and cartage 58,160 30 

Boxes and cases 11,671 25 

London and St. Thomas Warehouse, charges 6,448 37 

Toronto Warehouse, charges 15,947 22 

Wages, packing and shipping, Nipigon 9,255 63 

Salaries, Nipigon 2,100 00 

Salaries, Toronto Warehouse 4,219 15 

Salaries, Toronto Office 2,774 89 

Commission, Purchasing 1,768 40 

Travelling expenses 513 53 

Sundry expense, Nipigon 984 67 

Sundry expense, Toronto 41 75 

Ice 3,112 71 

Postage and stationery 611 44 

Office equipment, Toronto Office 16 50 

Buildings, docks, warehouse, etc., Nipigon 7,623 41 

Expense, docks, warehouse, etc., Nipigon 7,845 76 

Equipment and supplies, Nipigon 1,504 33 

Horses, motor and motor boat expense 1,540 08 

Telephone and telegraph 236 35 

Advertising 1,594 60 

Miscellaneous expense 980 28 

$333,314 64 

Balance, profit and loss 70,207 13 

$403,521 77 



10 THE BEPORT UPON No. 14 

Acknowledgments. 

I cannot close my report without publicly expressing my appreciation of the 
co-operation received from many outside sources and I have reference particularly 
to the Deputy Minister of Naval Service, Ottawa, and his officiak, the Trans- 
portation Companies, as well as to other Departments of the Provincial Govern- 
ment. During the year death claimed one of the Department's most valued and 
efficient members of the staff in the person of Mr. Jas. Pegg, who had been in 
the emplo}^ of this G-overnment for approximately twenty-four years, and in this 
particular Department since its inception. His work was always conscientiously 
performed and the Department has suffered a decided loss by his removal. In 
reporting any success that has been attained by the Department during the past 
year I must also bear tribute to the co-operation and willingness with which 
every member of the staff attributed his or her efforts to bring about the best 
possible results. 

All statistics mentioned as well as many others will be found in detail in 
statements published herein. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am. 
Your obedient servant, 

D. McDonald, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 
Toronto, Januarv 31st, 1920. 



4 




o 



1920 GAME AXD FISHERIES. 11 



Statement of Revenue received from Game and Fisheries during the year ended 

October 31st, 1919. 

Game. 

Rondeau Park $1,975 92 

Royalty Coupons (Beaver and Otter) 48,874 83 

Royalty on Muskrat, etc 7,679 16 

Trappers' Licenses 38.592 66 

Non-resident Hunting Licenses 7,693 00 

Resident Deer Licenses 39,141 35 

Resident Moose Licenses 11,266 00 

Fur Dealers" Licenses 17,673 96 

Tanning Licenses 50 00 

Game Dealers' Licenses 317 00 

Hotel and Restaurant Licenses 173 00 

Cold Storage Licenses 75 00 

Guides' Licenses 1,254 00 

Fines 12,160 40 

Sales ( Fur, etc. ) 7,013 40 

$193,939 68 



FiSHEBIES. 

Fishing Licenses $124,361 03 

Angling Permits 25,469 78 

Fines 1,808 85 

Sales (Fish, Twine, etc.) 617 80 



Sales Braxch. 
Sale of Fish, etc $357,741 06 



$152,257 46 



$357,741 06 



Total $703,938 20 



12 THE REPORT UPOX Xo. 14 

WATERS STOCKED. 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN EACH IN 1919. 

Blade Bass Fingerlings Distributed from Ponds at Mount Pleasant. 

Waters Stocked. County. Quantities. 

Oakland Ponds Brant 15,000 

Cedar Creek Oxford 15,000 

Victoria Lake Perth 15,000 

Pond Mills Middlesex 25,000 

Cache Lake Algonquin Park 20,000 

Lake Nipissing Nipissing 20,000 

Wood and Prospect Lakes Muskoka 6,000 

Sydenham River Lambton 30,000 

Waters vicinity of Waterloo Waterloo 25,000 

Toronto Exhibition Toronto 100 

Puslinch Lake Wellington 10,000 

Saugeen River Grey 5,000 

Clear Lake Renfrew 2,000 

Crow Lake Peterboro 3,000 

Mississippi Lake Carlton 1,500 

Trout Lake Frontenac 2,000 

Kurd's Lake Renfrew 2,500 



197,100 



Black Bass Fingerlings Distributed from Normandale. 

Waters Stocked. County. Quantities. 

Sand Lake Leeds 1,150 

Mississippi Lake Carlton 1,450 

Pond near St. Thomas Elgin 800 



3,400 

Parent Bass Distributed from Mount Pleasant Ponds. 

Waters Stocked. County. Quantities. 

Cache Lake Algonquin Park 200 

Waterworks Pond Toronto 24 

Toronto Exhibition Toronto 21 

Belmont Lake Peterboro 50 

iStoco Lake Peterboro 50 

Norway Lake Renfrew 25 

Stony and Clear Lakes Peterboro 178 



548 

LaJce Trout Fry Distributed from Thurlow Hatchery. 

Waters Stocked. County. Quantities. 

Sharbot Lake Frontenac 45,000 

Charleston Lake Leeds 50,000 

Sararas Lake Frontenac 20,000 

Rideau Lake Leeds and Lanark 75,000 

Eagle Lake Frontenac 60,000 

Cache Lake Algonquin Park 250,000 

500,000 



'.MsSB^.i 




1920 (.AMI-; AM* FISHEKIES. 13 



Lake Trout Fry Distributed from Mount Pleasant Hatchery. 

Waters Stocked. County. Quantities. 

Draper's Lake Frontenac 15.000 

Charleston Lake Leeds 35,000 

Lake Muskoka Muskoka 20.000 

Lake Joseph do 20,000 

Lake Rosseau do 25,000 

McKays Lake do 20,000 

Fairy Lake do 30.000 

Mary Lake do 30.000 

f'eninsular Lake do 30.000 

Lake of Bays do 65,000 

Oxtongue Lake do 20,000 

Lake Simcoe At Atherley Jt.. North Shore . . 210.000 

Toronto Exhibition Toronto 100 



520,100 
Brook Trout FingerUngs Distributed from Mount Pleasant HatcJiery. 

Waters Stocked. County. Quantities. 

Waters in vicinity of Simcoe Norfolk 2,000 

Spring Creek at Chatsworth Grey 2,000 

Toronto Exhibition Toronto 100 

Two Lakes. McKay Township Renfrew 6.000 

Creek at Normandale Norfolk 500 



Pickerel Fry Distributed from Port Cnrlinn Hatchery. 



10,600 



Waters Stocked. County. Quantities. 

Lake Josepn Muskoka District 750,000 

Lake Rosseau do 750,000 

Lake Muskoka do 750,000 

Mud Lake ne'ar Utterson do 150,000 

Silver Lake near Port Carling do 150,000 



2,550.000 



Frjf Distributed from Port Arthur Hatchery, in the Waters of Rainy River and 

Thunder Bay District. 

Whitefish Frv 4,500,000 

Lake Trout Fry 30.000 

Speckled Trout Fry ICi.OOO 



4,540.000 

Fry Disiribirted from Xormandulc Hatchery. 

Lake Erie. Whitefish 3,240,000 

Herring 10,800,000 



14,040.100 
Summary of Distrirttiox. 

Black Bass Fingerlings 200.500 

Parent Bass 54S 

Lake Trout Fry 1.050.100 

Brook Trout Fingerlings 10.600 

Speckled Trout Fry 10.000 

Pickerel Fry 2.550.000 

Whitefish Fry 7.740.000 

>Ierring Fry 10,800,000 



22.361,748 



Fingerlings 211,100 

Fry 23.150.100 

Parent Bass 548 

22.361.748 



14 



THE KEPOET UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

industry during the year 1918, in the Public 





District. 






Fiahine 


material. 










1 


Tubs. 


Oasoline Launches. 


Sail 


or Row Boats. 


Oill-Neta. 


No. 


Ton- 
HRee. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men, 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 


Kenora and 'Rainy River. 


2 


32 


$ 

4.500 


6 


39 

12 

3 

8 
1 

o 
o 

3 
23 

1 


$ 

14,415 

4.700 

600 

1,825 
300 

450 

605 

800 
11,075 

1.000 


66 

22 

6 

10 
2 

4 

3 

44 


30 
3 
1 

2 
1 

2 

2 
33 

5 

1 

1 


$ 

1,130 

80 

30 

55 
25 

125 

100 

104 
1,500 

200 

40 


22 
4 
2 

3 

1 

5 

2 

3 
23 

2 

1 


52,230 

19,000 

9,200 

13.200 
4,000 

4.700 

11.500 

8.000 
41,900 

5,000 

9.700 
2,400 


$ 

10,125 


2 


Obabicon, Orang Outang, Shoal 


3,150 


3 


Deer, Dryberry, Basket and Long 










1,.3?.0 


4 


Indian, Lawrence, Sturgeon and 










2,245 


"i 












465 


6 


Pelican, Big Sea. Lac Suel and 










696 


7 


Clay, Swan.Minnitakie and Rock- 










825 


8 


Big Vermillion, Sandy. One 
Man's and Kawaeogama Lakes. 










1,250 


H 


1 


4* 


450 


3 


6,845 


10 


Namaken. Tuttle and Pipestone 


350 


11 


Clearwater, Kaiarskon and Trout 


1 


14 


145 


2 


1,910 


1" 










450 




Totals 




















H 


38 


5.095 


11 


94 


35,770 


166 


83 


3,389 


70 


180,830 


29,641 













Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught during the 



c 

n 

^ 


District. 


T3 

1 

U 

a 


.a 
1 

a 

£ 

a 


i 

73 

S 


1 

<a 

S 


1 

"S 

o 

pi 


Trout, fresh. 


6 

Jt 

£ 


£ 

o 

a 

O 

£ 


1 


Kenora and Rainy River. 
Lake of the Woods 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs, 

261,328 
1.55.972 
34.274 

57,552 

S,657 

13.077 
13,150 

32.056 

82.873 

11,467 

8,0.50 
250 


lbs, 

229,800 


lbs. 

14.548 

2,600 

33.f60 

12 222 
.3 if 24 

300 

500 

17,754 
5.397 


lbs, 

341,493 

.37,037 

2,697 

8,897 
3,095 

4,565 

13,300 

3,691 
2:^9,705 

14,981 

3,900 
400 


lbs. 

348.966 


2 


Obabicon, Orang Outang, Shoal 








93,617 


3 


Deer, Dryberry, Basket and Long 










3,185 


4 


Inilian, Lawrence, Sturgeon and 






800 


22 977 


c, 








1,2.30 


6 


Pelican, Big Sea, Lac Suel and 










3.826 


7 


Clay, Swan, Minnitakieand Hock 










26,875 


8 
9 


Big Verniillioii, Sandy, One 
Man's and Kawaeogama Lakes,. 






100 
700 




1,520 
224,398 


10 


Namaken. Tvittle and Pipestone 






25,428 


11 


Clearwater, Kaiarskon and Trout 










3.000 
200 


1,148 


I"* 


White Otter and Six Mile Lakes. 
Totals 
























1,600 


677.706 


229,800 


94,205 


673,761 


753.370 















$ c. 


$ c. 

160 00 


$ c. 

67.770 60 


$ c. 

22.980 00 


$ c. 

9,420 .50 


$ C. 

53.900 88 


» c. 

"5.r37 00 













1920 



GAME AXD FISHERIES. 



15 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the fishing 
Waters of Kenora and Rainy River District. 













Pishing materia!. 










Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 


Seines. 


Pound nets. 


HOOP nets. ^^ip^-. 


Night lines. 


Spears. 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses. 


Piers and 
Wharves. 


No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


No. Value. 


No. Value. 


No. Value. 


Hooks.: V»»'»«-j No. 


Value. 


No.l Value. 

1 


No. Value. 






$ 


32 


$ 
i-j.-oo 


35 

6 


$ 

1.980 
360 


$ 




$ 




$ 


20 

3 

9 


$ 

7,425 

1.700 

225 

1.125 


25 
4 
4 
3 


$ 








1 










1 025 












[ 










240 














1 




250 


































i 






3 

6 

5 
"8 


200 

840 

760 
5.785 

650 


3 

17 
2 
















1 i 








220 






























29 


!».4()ll 

:! iHin 






:::::::::::: 




2 235 








1 i 1 






5 


100 










::: t:::T:::r:::::::::: 














::::::::.::: ;:;;i:;;;;;;; 


1 
































t • • • 










68 as. ion 41 


2.340 








86 


18,700 


63 


9 360 
























year 1918, in the Public Waters of Kenora and Rainy River District. 





2 












■a 






■a 


5 










a 


~ 




a 


_^ 




o 


- .a 
































o 


w 


ill 



Value. 



lbs. 
12,460 



4,525 
3,841 



lbs. 



lbs. 

Rl.tlfiii 

4.182 

.500 

5.931 
6.344 

1..^50 

1.500 

7.012 
131,224 



lbs. 

i;ir.:>2i 

10,00(1 



lbs, 

10.591 ' 
1.410 j 



lbs, 

91,287 
1.320 



lbs. 



No, 



3,t25 
1 .5.59 



3.7.50 
1.000 



.30 
250,539 



1 ,364 

600 



446 
269 



140,200 28 

29,326 98 

7,. 387 66 

10.618 97 
2.067 29 

2.961 50 

5.256 50 

6.985 25 
72.703 59 

5.954 .38 

1.600 00 
107 00 



24,291 



$ c. 

3,643 65 



$ C. 



12.001 



364.437 



12.815 



$ c. 

W, 1(1 



11.425 08 16.601 92 



% c. 

240 02 



f c. I $ 
823 00 ' 



I C. 

1.281 50 



285.169 10 



16 



THE EEPOET UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Retiiru of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1918, 





District 


Fishing Material. 


1 


Tugs. 


Gasoline Launches 


Sai 


or Row 


Boats. 


Gill-Nets. 


No. 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


"Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 


Lake Superior. 


6 

6 

3 


211 
72 

64 


$ 
28,000 
11.100 

9,000 


98 
20 

12 


3 
2 


$ 

1,800 

600 

1,050 

650 


1 

11 
2 


7 
5 

11 

4 

3 

5 

6 

2 
3 
3 
1 
o 

4 

1 




$ 
1,175 
550 

785 

750 

350 

575 
725 
535 

640 

200 
75 
150 
100 
100 
400 
200 

50 
100 


12 

7 

8 
6 
9 

4 

8 
6 
8 
3 

""3* 

1 
2 

7 
6 

2 



208,000 
120,. 325 

62,500 

23,450 

7,000 

132,600 

36,000 

41,125 

28,500 

13.250 
80,000 
89,800 
85,000 
34,000 
50,000 
14,600 

134,500 
3,000 


$ 
16,025 


., 




12,150 


3 


Black Bay, Whitefish Lake and 


8,325 


4 


Shaganash, Wilson, Lamb Islands 


2,000 


5 


Kashabowie, Sturgeon, North 












1.000 


6 


Port Arthur. Point Magnet, Fort 
William, _ Nipigon Bay and 


3 
1 
1 
1 


63 
15 
25 
13 


8,700 
2,500 
4,000 
1,000 


36 
3 
4 








8,240 


7 


Evelyn. Perley, Welcome Islands, 
Steel River and Terrace Bay ... 

Pine. McKellar. Stake, McLean's 
Points and Woodbine Harbour. 

Pine, Oiseau Bays. Thunder Cape 






2,950 


8 
9 




150 


■2 


. 4,525 
2,550 


10 


Gratto. Bignell, Isacoie Points, 




.300 
6,400 

450 
2,100 
1.650 
1,300 

800 

800 


25 
4 

5 
10 





1,350 


11 




3 
3 

1 


101 
63 
48 


18,700 
13,000 
5.000 


29 
20 
4 


5,685 


]'? 




14.775 


13 




10.100 


1 1 




2.280 


It 










3.210 


16 












1.300 


17 
18 


Gargantaii, Richardson's Harbour, 
East and West Agawa River... 


3 




86 


14.500 


23 


12,300 
250 


Totals 


30 


761 












115,500 


251 


36 


18,050 


81 


74 


7 . 160 


94 


1163,650 


109,015 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 



a " 



■Sjs 






"5^ 



Lake Superior. 

Thunder Bay 

Rossport 

Black Bav, Whitefish Lake and 

Port Coldwel) 

Shag^nash, Wilson, Lamb Islands 

and Jack fish 

Kashabowie, Sturgeon North and 

Baril Lakes 

Port Arthur, Point Magnet, Port 

William, Nipigon Bay and 

Carpenter's Beach. ..; 

Evelyn, Perley, Welcome Islands, 

Steele River and Terrace Bay . . 
Pine, McKellir's. Stake, McLean's 

Points and Woodbine Harbour. 
Pine, Oiseau Rays. Thunder Cape 

i and Pays Platte 

Oratto. Bignell. Isacore Points. 

North and South Twin Lakes , . 

Lake Nij) igon 

Michipicotii) 



lbs. 

45,000 
64.450 

2,850 



I lbs 
11,868,499 
461,051 



40.900 



.900 



,497 



97,380 
21,585 



2,000 



Mil 



Goulais Ba 
Oros Cai.' .. 



16 Ba 



Gargant.MU. Richardson's Harbmn-. 

East and West .Vgawa River ... 

. Locklash Lake and f)ba Lake 



•;,454 
11.00(1 



Values. 



_$ c. 
28,310 00 



lbs. 
10,000 



'2,200 



200 



lbs. I lbs. lbs. 

3.605 I 40,100 18.717 

9,238 1 191,360 



21,655 

2,435 

48,760 



40 



20 
850 

26 
100 

70 

19 
153 

113 
3 



800 185,775 
800 57,368 

300 29,377 



695 6,1011 112.640 

,744 300 107.743 

.611 43.389 

.400 , llio 36,358 

,387 1 47.130 

,041 1 401,109 

,.370 I .?9.700 217,608 

027 ! 2)0 94.229 

493 ' 718,381 

,850 ! 400 86,765 

900 '] 105,000 

,121 ' 1 .700 176,108 

,000 



lbs. 

'""129' 
7,923 

20 
5,097 

31 

35 

307 

2.711 

.365 

1,736 



3,681.609 12,400 1,517,395 



184.080 45 1,240 00 If 



90,800 2,659.057 



1.7.39 50 9.080 00 265,905 70 1.468 32 10.728 20 






lbs. 
110 
1 , 253 

53,770 

60 

22,284 

1,925 

55 

260 

7,455 

1,971 

16,394 

21 

58 
100 
100 

1,466 



107.282 



1920 



GAME AXD FISHERIES. 



17 



FISHERIES. 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake Superior 



Fishing Material. 


Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 


Seines 


Pound Nets. Hoop Nets. 


Dip or 
Roll Nets, 


Night Lines 


Spears. 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses, 


Piers and 
Wharves, 


No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


No. Value No. 


Value, 


No. 

1 


Value. 


No. 
Hoops. 


Value. 


No. Value. 


No. 


Value, 


No.l Value. 






S 




$ 


s 1 


S 




? 


$ 


$ 
3 19,600 


■2 


$ 
750 








6 
1 


1 , -200 
3,150 




















1 20 










I 


6 3,000 


5 


9.i0 






























































' 










2 : 1,600 
1 100 


1 

1 


GOO 








-1 


1,300 

500 

1,700 

3,500 
3,500 
3 500 


















nO 




























500 








6 












































4 4.000 
1 1,000 
3 2.. 300 
1 .300 


1 
1 



1 


500 








10 
6 




400 






2,000 


60 






200 
















1,700 


























600 














1 


























1 100 


1 


3011 












., ..1 


::::::::i:::: 










9 


9.000 
















7 5,000 


5 


2.200 










1 ! 




















' 
















1 38 


26.300 i 11 


420 


' 1 2,000 


60 


L. 


29 37,000 1 22 


8.3.-0 



during the year 1918, in the Public Waters of Lake Superior. 



a 

O 
a, 

Ef 

3 


H 


JS 

o 

(U 


1 

3 


'5 
O 


Carp. 


Mixed and 
coarse fish. 


Id 
O 


ll 




Value. 


lbs. 


lbs 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

.500 


lbs. 

,300 
6,805 

46.120 

1,200 

405 


lbs. 



No. 




$ c. 
105,203 15 








2,507 










50,183 64 


164 
















47,7.38 84 








15 












6,128 80 


















, 10,520 11 




















59,560 43 


117 






102 
333 




2(1 


2,9f)2 







21,9.35 62 


38 








17,624 53 


206 






5 

126 




300 


j 






9,308 31 


631 


■ 












7.267 89 


4 215 


1 








24,6.24 
541,255 








128,647 05 


632 


1 














55.766 33 




' 








40,715 








21,4K1 35 










79.015 90 










11,411 50 










25.900 00 






9(1, 110 








.33.745 00 




511(1 










330 00 














6,003 


500 




8.873 


820 


754,741 








691.768 45 














$ c. 

900 45 


S c. 
30 no 


$c. 


S c. 
532 .38 


$ c. 


S c. 
16 40 


$ C. 
1 .37.737 05 


$c. 


$ c. 


S c. 


$ c. 
691,768 45 



18 



THE EEPOET UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1918, in the 



District. 



Fishinc material. 



Tugs. 



Qasoline Launches 



No. Value. Men 



Sail or Row Boats. Gill-Nets. 



No. Value. 



Men. 



Yards. Value 



Lake Huron, North Channel. 

Thessalon 

Spanish, St. Joseph's. Cedar Is- 
lands and Spragge . . . 

Little Laloche. Gordon, Burrows, 
Rock and William Lakes 

Bruce Mines, Algoma Mills, Bus- 
well's Point and McKinnon. .. . 

Pakowkami Lake, Little Detroit, 
Turnbulland Bacon Islands.... 

Fitzwilliam, Squaw and Duck 
Islands 

South Bay, Kagowong and Little 
Current 

K i Harney 

Meldrum, Providence, Sheguin- 
dah, and Gore Bays ... . 

Wekwemikong, Mississauga 
Straits, Wabino Channel, Gron- 
dine Point 

Manitowaning Bay, Tamarack 
Cove, Manitoulin, Club and 
Berry Islands 

Centre, George, Hamilton and 
Rabbit Island 

Bedford, Heywood and Cockburn 
Islands 



55 11.000 



Totals 19 



192 



900 



8.000 



4.000 



$ 

2,500 

1,600 



1.850 

1.800 

1,550 

225 
2.925 



1,300 

3,150 
1,100 

1 , .-.oo 



20,400 



$ 

630 

855 
280 
310 
400 



700 
880 



.35,476 

30,. 300 

5,200 

8,200 

1.000 

288,000 

148,600 
48,300 



60.000 

11,000 
1.600 
10.800 



S 

2.505 

2,090 

825 

675 

170 

34.300 

14.460 
2,303 

22,750 

4,000 

1,500 
160 
800 



86.5.38 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught daring 



District. 



i 


S 




*^ 


bi 


bt 


a 




















W 


m 



Lake Huron, North Channel. 

1 Thessalon 

2 Spanish, St. Joseph's, Cedar Is- 
lands and Spragge 

3 Little Laloche, Gordon, Burrows, 
Rock and William Lakes 

4 Bruce Mines, Algoma Mills Bus- 
well's Point and McKinnon . .. . 

Pakowkami Lake, Little Detroit, 

TurnbuU and Bacon Islands ... 

Fitzwilliam, Squaw and Duck 

Islands 

South Bay, Kagowong, and Little 

Current 

SiKillarney 

9 Meldrum, Providence, Sheguin- 

dah and Gore Bays 

10 Wekwemikong Bay, Mississauga 
Straits, Wabino Channel, Gron- 

dine Point 

11 1 Manitowaning Bay, Tamarack 
Cove, Manitoulin Club and 

Berry Islands 

12 Centre, George. HamiltoTi and 

Rabbit Island 

1.3 Bedford, Heywood and Cockburn 
Islands 



lbs. 



1,180 
4.7!)3 



400 

700 

1,1(11) 



700 



lbs. 

48.702 
6.918 



5.18S 

21.528 

1.30.573 

37.1.19 
115.027 

lOfi.578 
63.359 



lbs. 



700 
4,900 



Total" '."00 

$ c. 
Values I'O 00 



$ c. 
323 6= 



26,53(1 
'100 118,000 
200 8,. "-50 



lbs. 

40,792 

9.750 

1.080 

20.384 

21.320 

793,261 

229,368 
30.339 

3C5,181 

18.228 

22.701 
18.349 
16.892 



4.200 688.121 



$ c. So. 

420 00 68,812 10 



$ c, 

S50 00 



lbs. 

7.450 

8,900 

2,375 

10,672 

2,048 

325 

2,318 
15,859 



2,432 

1,031 

3.230 

935 



59,869 



$ c. 

4,7S9 52 



lbs. 
3,261 
5.856 
1.900 
82,229 
11,846 



89 
17,856 

313 

41,826 

3,843 
18.648 
6.945 



194,612 



1920 



GAilE AXD FISHERIES. 



19 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
Public Waters of Lake Huron, North Channel. 













Fishing' material. 








Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 


Seines. 


Poand nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Dip or 
roll nets. 


Night lines. Spears. 


Freezers and Piers and 
Ice Houses. Wharves. 


No.! Yards.! Value. 

1 • 


No. Yalae. 


No. Value. 


No. Value. 


H^ks. V»"^«- ^°- '^^"^«- 


No. Value. No. Value. 






S 


6 
4 


$ 
1.500 

1,050 




$ 


S 


( 


$ 


$ 

3 1 350 
1 

4 j .325 


1 
2 


$ 

200 

150 













i 
























20 
21 
24 


5,600 
6,400 


5 


150 


i 






7 
6 
2 
2 


2,400 

1.800 

900 

600 


7 
4 

1 
2 


6,550 

4,800 

503 

300 


















17.000 














, 






5 
It 


4,000 
8,000 






1 


i 














2 

1 

1 
2 






1 


15 

16 
15 


8,200 










■ 




600 

600 
400 


1 200 

1 150 

2 3.200 






7,500 

8,000 

1.500 


































1 
( 




1 












1 








1.50 68.750 1 5 150 L... 


I...J 


31 1 8.925 25 19.950 



the year 1918, in the Public Waters of Lake Huron, North Channel. 



i 

CO 


1 


Perch . 


Tullibee. 

Catfish. 

Oarp. 


Mixed and Ooarso 
fish. 


> 


2 

« 

TJ 

el 

a 

c 
o 

t» 

3 


s 

3 


Value. 


lbs. 
151 


lbs. 


lbs. 

4,760 

1.115 


lbs. i lbs. lbs. 


lbs. 

41,530 


lbs. 


No. 




S c. 

12,2.38 65 

4.059 50 
1.262 00 

15,770 08 
8,126 89 

S4,497 00 

29,603 78 
17.831 31 

54.-3.56 97 

13.632 71 

7.129 09 
16.468 05 

4.608 05 


610 




i 
1 


16,257 
14 .300 












i 








4,2.34 




484 


1 


376 


64.595 
38 469 








2.868 


1 


fnn 












32.460 
18,904 












3.842 
119 


1 


16,608 
4,487 






37 




:::::::::::: 


227 








.353 




500 


1 


70 .966 

11.234 

14.366 
11.334 

25,170 








3.081 




3 






318 




229 


16.000 




43 




.355 












107 








! 






12,114 { 


11,049 


67,364 




646 


329,316 


103 


279.584 08 


$ c. $ c. 
1.817 10 ' 


$ c. 

5.V2 45 


$ c. i $ c. 
4.041 84 


$ r. 
12 92 


$ c. 

16.465 80 


$ c. 

103 00 


$ c. 


1 c. $ c. 
279.584 08 



20 



THE EEPOKT UPOX 



Xu. 14 



O.NTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

industry during the year 1918, 





District 


Fishing material. 


^ 


Tugs. 


Gasoline Launches. 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets. 


B 
s 
z 


No. 


Ton 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


Yards, i Value. 



Ceorginn Pnu 

Byng Inlet 2 

Parry Sound | -1 

Waubaushene ^ 

Ponetanguishene 



Collingwood 

Moaford (including Owen Sound 

Bay) 

Colpoy's Bay to Tobermoiy 



Totals 



$ 
11.000 
14,000 



18,000 



32,000 
4,000 



5.. 350 
2,900 



930 
1,520 



11,450 
S.StOO 



30,020 



48 18 
32 



$ 

20 
608 
395 
625 

50 

830 
610 



3,138 



1.32,000 

270,500 

5.700 

11,564 

258,000 

.300,925 

208.200 



$ 

12.900 

21,200 

825 

1 , 050 

16.000 

21.1.30 
9.870 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 







•d 




« 


A 








a> 














13 






C 
























ca 


i> 


w 


'- 














w 


(.H 


^ 


^ 


si 


OJ 




o 




District. 


lit 


tii 


<C 


tn 


M 


C-i 




« 








c 














c 




'^ 




.^ 


.■^ 


a 


:i 


o 


^ 
















J^ 


o 


y. 






K 


^ 


i 


tH 


H 


C 


Cn 




GeoryioH liaii. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


1 








4,400 

62,050 

200 

1,150 


144,039 
161,376 
2,837 
31,400 
12,259 


""62.'550' 


50,250 

205.703 

500 

48,2,92 
111,668 


21.688 
4.518 
12.496 

200 


48,547 


9 




25,000 

400 
900 


2J5 

2,021 

1.800 

37,688 


7.029 


3 




9.929 


4 




800 


1.000 








6 


Meaford (incliulinf; Owen Sound 














Bay ) 




4,380 


1.2.50 


4,210 


77,. 300 


386.854 


25 






Colpoy's B.'y to Tobci niory 

Total.'- 




29.510 


100 


6.026 


68.200 


325,047 






' 








26.300 


75,694 


69,150 


362.137 


208,850 


1,128.314 


38.927 


66,655 




$ c. 


? c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


S C. 


$ C. 


% c. 


f c. 




A'iiluo 


g3o 00 


3,784 70 


6,915 00 


•36,213 70 


20.885 00 


112,831 40 


3,114 16 


6.665 50 











1920 



GAME AXD FISHERIES. 



21 



FISHERIES. 

auantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures emploj'ed in the fishing 
in the Public Waters of the Georgian Bay. 



Fishin. materi..!. Other fixtu,^es used in 


Seines. 


Pound Nets. Hoop nets. 


Dip or 
Roll Nets. 


Night Lines. 


cr^oo,.= Freezers and Piers and 
*P®*" Ice Houses. 1 Wharves. 


No. 


Yards. Value. 


No. 


Value. No. 

1 


Value. 


No. Value. 


H^'ooks. V-'-- 


No. 


Value. 


NO. 


Value. No. 


Value. 






$ 


12 
5 


$ 
10,. 300 
2,508 


s ! : $ 


1 $ 


2 
4 
1 
2 


$ 
3,800 
1,700 
25 

100 


1 
6 
2 
1 


1,000 










1,300 125 




1,048 








12 235 







1,100 












:::::::::::::::: .;;. ;:;:;: 


25 




















1 


1 


12.300 
6.200 


1.455 

240 




. 


fiSO 9 


950 






5 2,000 








3 350 3 


375 











1 










22 14.S0« 


12 


2.35 




19,800 


1.820 




19 


6.625 


22 


4.498 


" 


! 













during the year 1918 in the Public Waters of the Georgian Bay. 





00 


















•a 






T3 


















a 


:;^ 
















o 


- 








a 


it 


^ 








cS 






O 


CO 


^ , 



Value. 



lbs. 
1 , 407 


! 
lbs. lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 
290 

4,050 


lbs. 
200 
15 
4,908 


lbs. 
14,000 
238 
14.742 


lbs. ' No. 

70 


$ c. 

27.466 89 




.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.' \"\,'hm' 




52,759 19 


205 




3,802 .34 


1,100 


9.560 20 


1 000 












14,427 10 






6.600 
69.159 






'.. 


47.577 40 












45.577 34 










' 


, 


2,612 


2,500 


75 759 


4,340 


5,123 


28,980 


1, 170 


201,170 46 






$ c. 

391 80 


$ c. 
125 00 


S c. 
4,. -,4.5 54 


$ c. 

347 20 


S c. 

102 46 


$ c. 

1,449 00 


$ C. 1 

1,170 ooj :.... 

1 


$ c. 

201.170 46 



23 



THE EEPORT UP OX 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of flshermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1918, 



District. 



Fishing material. 



Tugs. 



Gasoline Launches. 



No. 



Sail or Row Boats. Gill-Nets. 



Value. Men. iNo. Value. 1 Men. ! Yards. Value. 



Lake Huron (Proper). 



t Tobermory to Southampton 

2 Southampton to Pine Point 

3 County of Huron 

4:County of Lambton (including 

River St. Clair) 



Totals. 



150 
14 
10 



26.000 
4,000 
1.500 



31,500 



26 



56 



8,150 
1.900 
6.400 

9.480 



25,930 , 107 



28 



2,325 

50 

1.070 

973 



24 396,250 
2 ' 80,250 
90.009 



30 



4.418 108 566.509 



38.800 
11.315 
10.744 



60,859 



Returns of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 





















<u 










1 

"3 




•6 


M 




o 
Q 






















M 


District. 


a 


U 


■s 


ta 


a 


*^ 




"Z 






a 


B 




o 










a 










^ 


3 


3 




Jd 




h 


M 




JS 


O 




.X 




3 




W 


s 


^ 


^ 


H 


h* 


E 


Cti 



1 

2 


Lake Huron (Proper). 
Tobermory to Southampton 


lbs. 
8.400 


lbs. 

35.280 

5,164 

68,750 

140.906 


lbs. 
2,700 


lbs. 
22.703 


lbs. 
38,054 


lbs. 

586.504 
48,854 
77,997 

18,976 


lbs, 
899 


lbs. 
.372 


3 




5,300 
200 




7.010 
33,255 


300 
5,000 




14.600 


4 


County of Lambton (including 
River St. Clair) 


.550 


189.. 386 




Totals 






13,900 


250,100 


2,700 


62,968 


43,354 


732 331 


1.449 204,358 




Values 








$ c. 

1 390 00 


$ c. 

12 505 00 


$ c. 
270 00 


S c. 
6,296 80 


$ c. 

4,335 40 


% c. 
73,233 10 


$ C. 

115 92 


$ c. 

20,435 80 

















1920 



GAME AXD FISHEBIES. 



23 



FISHERIES. 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake Huron (Proper). 



Fishing material. 



Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 





Seines 




Pound nets. Hoop nets, i Roll^'Ne'ts. 


Night Lines. 


Spears. 


Freezers and Piers and 
Ice Houses. Wharves. 


No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


No. Value. No. 


Value. No. Value. 


Hooks. ^=^1-- 


No. Value. 


No. Value. No. Value. 




$ 


2 


$ 

900 


; s 1 $ 


$ 
3. mo 220 


$ 


$ 

7 3.300 

2 ! 900 
11 1 '50 

5 ; 1,175 


3 


$ 
650 












. • . • 




"io" 
50 


5,000 
26.600 


1 , ' * ' * 




2 


50(1 


4 


175 


187 


3 


225 1 7 69 


600 65 














175 


187 


62 32,500 


3 


2-25 7 69 


4,500 285 




25 6.325 i 5 

1 


1,150 









during the year 1918, in the Public Waters of Lake Huron (Proper). 



to I H I 0- H 

lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. 

4.378 173,746 

47.670 

5,280 54.361 10,442 

13,503 4 5,272 

18,783 4 64,014 231, S5S 

$ c. $ c. $ c. ' $ c. 

2.817 45 24 3.200 70 113,911 48 



lbs 



lbs. 



lbs. 
8.677 

82,428 



lbs. 



No. 



100 
767i 



49 

















o 




























































o 


r 








=! 


u 


-li 


> 






e« 




«" 


o 


DO 


ft. 1 



Value. 



78.786 73 
8,003 80 
20.840 72 

39.202 83 



$ c. 
40 00 



$ c. 

164 24 



144,021 



$ c. $ c, 

7.201 05 I 887 50 



49 146,834 08 



$ c. $ c. 

29 40 , 146,834 08 



24 



THE REPORT UP OX 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1918, 





District. 


Fishing material. 


1 


Tugs. Gasoline Launches. 


i^ail 


or Row 


Boats. 


Gill-Nets. 


c 
a 


No. 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. No. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 


Lake St. Clair. 
Kent County (including River 








31 

17 
•2 


$ 

11.200 

4.700 

700 


54 
36 
13 


44 

46 

as 


$ 

3.120 

1.625 

525 


56 
79 
50 




$ 

















3 




■ 
















1 1 








1 




50 16.600 ! 103 Ills 


5.270 


185 























Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 











^ 




































•a 






03 








o 






a 




sj 


£ 


T3 


. 




Q 






























































B 


District. 


a 


ill 


0; 


X 


3 


3 


9 








fc. 




Si 


J^ 




O 


^ 


u 


'4. 




a 


K 


^ 


^ 


^ 


H 


a, 


Oi 


Lake St. Clair. 


brls. 


lbs. 


brls. 


lbs. 


brls. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


J Kent County (including River 


















2 
















46,074 
11,171 
4,785 


20.046 






950 




17.580 
11,430 






19.575 












1.250 
















950 




■:!9,010 






62.030 


40.871 


















$ C. 


1 


$ c. 






$ c. 


$ c. 








47 50 




2,901 00 






4,962 40 


4.087 10 















1920 



GAME AXD FISHEEIES. 



25 



FISHERIES. 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake St. Clair, etc. 











Fishing material. 




Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 


Seines. 


Ponnd nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Dip or 
Roll Nets. 


NiB^ht liups 1 <;npflrs Freezers and Piers and 
xMght Lines. 1 fcpears. j^^ Houses.^ Wharves. 


1 
Xo.; Yards. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


( 
No.; Value. 


No. Value. 


H^s.- Value. No. 


Value. jNo.| Value, j No. Value. 



24 


4.239 
5.750 
3.108 


$ 

2.935 
2.175 
2.195 




« 


102 
70 


$ 

10,400 ... 
6.900 ... 


5 


900 
1,800 


$ 
14 .... 


« 


. 25 
. 14 


5 

7.500 
3.350 


12 


$ 
1 650 


•>o 


8 


3,000 


90 .... 






2o 


2 


315 






















72 


13.0P7 


7.305 


S 


3.000 


172 


17,300 ... 




2.700 


1.4 .... 




.' 39 


10,850 


14 


1.965 



during the year 1918, in the Public Waters of Lake St. Clair, etc. 















o 




£ 


















t. 




o 


^^ 






































o 






















u 




« 


^ 






































































c 




. 


J 


^ 




s 


o 


o 


~ 






, 




• « 


X 




£ I 


tS 


u 


'- 


^ 
























X 


:5 


£ 


c 


i 


,=; 


1 


a 


z^ 


> 



lbs. 


lb=. 


lbs. 
84,640 . 

61,311 ;. 

1,530 . 


lbs. 
i 


lbs. 1 

1 

40.698 ! 

21.220 

375 ' 


lbs. 

98,965 
63.400 
62.0f0 


lbs. 

260.413 

124.658 

12.070 


Ib^. 
""451" 


No. 
550 


$ c. 
28 257 31 


14,700 




19,576 73 










3,602 60 














14.700 




147 481 '. 




62.593 


224,455 


397,141 


451 


550 


51,436 64 










$ c. 

2,205 66 


$ C. 


$ c. 
7.374 05 . 


$ -c. : 


$ c. 

5,007 44 : 


$ c. 

4.489 10 


$ c. 

19,857 05 


S c. 
451 00 


$ c. 

55 00 


$ c. 
51.436 64 











26 



THE EEPORT UP OX 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

fishing industry during the year 1918, 



Liistrict. 



Fishing material. 



Tubs 



Oasoline Launches, 



No. 



Ton- 
nage. 



Value Men. No. Value Men 



Sail or Row Boats. | 



Gill-Nets. 



No.' Value. Men. Yards. Value. 



Lake Erie. 



1 Pelee Island 

2i Essex County.. 

3 Kent County, VS'^est 

4 Kent County, East 

5 Elgin County. West 

6 Elein County, East t. ... 

TlNorfolk County 

8 Haldimand County (to and in- 

cludinK the Grand River) 

9|Port Maitland to Port Col borne 
10 Port Colborne to Niagara Falls 



138 



12,000 

ioiooo 



66 
696 
299 



19,000 
148,000 
109,500 

31,500 



Totals 44 1,.391 339,000 274 168 104.1.30 



12 
124 



28 



7,500 
25.990 
19,450 
12,250 
8,000 
8,200 
12.450 

9,290 
1,000 



920 
1,140 
1,335 
6,285 
440 
100 
2,215 

560 



882 



53,260 
18,400 I 
120,000 1 
5,000 1 
273,780 
729.200 
246,500 I 

136,800 



18 



4,800 



11,525 
1,875 
14,000 
1,300 
11,310 
94,000 
29.800 

13.955 

""eoo 



186 1,. 587,7401 178 ,.365 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 



District. 



Lake Brit. 



Pelee Isbnd 

Essex County 

Kent County, West 

Kent County, East 

Elgin County, West 

Elgin County, East 

Norfolk County 

Haldimand County (to and in- 
cluding the Grand River) 

Port Maitland to Port Colborne.. . 
Port Colborne to Niagara Falls.. . 



Totals 13.531,993 



lbs. 



lbs. 



532, 

604, 
1,616, 
1,100, 
1,225, 



4,570, 
2,362, 



1,480, 
I 38, 

; 1, 



$ c. 
Values 676.599,65 



lbs. 



lbs. 

128,745 
270,775 
74,437 
44.890 
46,928 
150,483 
196,589 

213,612 
1,797 



lbs. 



lbs. 



1,128.256 



$ c. 



; 112,825 60 



106 
1,329 



1.011 



lbs. 



70 
,190 



2.446 



I c. 



$ c. 

244 60 



1,38,591 

1,668 

12,868 

71,251 

1,241 

52 

1,200 



229.131 



$ c. 

18,330 48 



lbs. 

16,919 
62.122 
36,876 
18,668 
21,228 
8,932 
15,210 

4,189 
235 



$ c. 

18,437 90 



1920 



GAME AXD FISHERIES. 



37 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake Erie. 



Fishing material. 



Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 



Seines. 


Pound Nets. 


Hoop Nets, 


Dip or 
Roll Nets. 


Night Lines. 


Spears. 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses. 


Piers and 
Wharves. 

. 


No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 
Hooks. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 1 Value. 

1 


8 


600 
2.100 

150 
2,400 


$ 

500 

965 

.300 

1,200 


24 
177 
130 
92 
87 
46 
64 

63 
6 


$ 

11,000 
117,810 
90,400 
63,700 
53,800 
36 750 




« 


f 


$ $ 


$ 
4 6.850 


1 
7 
12 
13 
7 
6 
14 

6 


$ 

900 


7 


3 


50 






n 


18,950 
36.300 


1,050 


a 






27 


4,825 


a 








28 16,850 
15 13,100 
10 13,650 
17 17,250 

13 4.350 
2 300 


2,700 










8,700 






'"'677' 


5 ^•'' 


5,650 86 




3,450 


31 

<> 


12,280 
825 


7,600 
670 


36,000 

28,150 
2,500 


29 


9 


71 




3,300 
950 








1 


50 


18 






3,350 66 






















59 


18.405 


11.253 


689 


,440,110 


32 


727 


14 1 11 ?■ 


y 000 i->2 




1.39 127.600 


66 25.875 























during the year 1918, in the Public Waters of Lake Erie. 

















































































a 












































o 




^ 


a 


























it 






Zi 






5 


9 


So 


% 






xs 


J3 


.2 


.; 


■^ _£ 


3 


u i 


^ 


3 


X 


o 


i. 


^ 


^ 


a 
O 


.2 3 


5 


- 3 




> 



lbs. 



lbs. 



8,959 
9,337 




1.840 




909 




964 
i,052 




6.738 




16.158 




1.286 




4.685 








51 ,928 








$ c. 

7,789 20 









lbs. 

113.808 
230.785 
431,814 
283,515 
306 ,645 
443.201 
194,965 

49,051 

830 

1,600 



2.056.214 



lbs. 



$ c. , $ c. 
102,810 70 



lbs. 

2,414 
3.859 



1,190 

230 

14.482 

25,201 

24 



lbs. 

63,990 

107,298 

14,566 

67,060 

207 

198 

345,512 

111.301 

i.sei' 



lbs. 

52,014 
333,076 
93.670 
42,098 
19.156 
19,260 
149,622 



lbs. 

424 
292 
99 
341 
.30 
28 
203 



41,971 368 

1.000 I 30 

14.655 i 3111 



766,522 ' 1,820 



$ C. $ 

.792 00 14.229 86 



$ c. I $ c. 
3S,.326 10 1,820 00 



No. 



$ C, 



10.5-30 
290,-325 
2.35,733 



85,366 
67,864 
18,498 

64.624 

813 

11,200 



53,763 77 
125,083 78 
142,474 27 
90.-331 58 
93.251 08 
276,760 81 
174,338 25 

112,0-33 57 
2.544 06 
3.127 42 



784,953 '1,073,708 59 



$ c. $ c. 

,495 .30 1,073,708 59 



28 



THE EEPOET UP OX 



Xn. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1918 





District. 


Fishing material. 


tH 


Tugs. 


Gasoline Launches. 


Sail 


or Row 


Boats. 


Gill- 


Nets. 


B 
2; 


No. 


^oL 1 Value. Men. 
nage. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 


Lake Ontario. 
Lincoln County 


1 


17 


$ 
4,000 


6 27 


12,600 


52 


7 


$ 
840 


16 


129,550 


$ 

11,219 


■^ 












11 
22 
4 

8 

I 
14 
58 
11 

8 
14 


4,650 
7,545 
2,000 
2,450 
3,250 
1.000 
4,725 
15,770 
1,525 
1,855 
3,500 


24 
44 

4 
16 
17 

4 
28 
105 
15 
14 
23 


10 
2 



12 
4 


460 
125 
50 
550 
260 


14 
4 
3 

14 

8 


64,000 
118,000 
18,000 
27,800 
39,900 
34,000 
67,412 
3.34,661 
82,600 
62,400 
37,000 


4,700 


4 












7,250 


•^ 












1,900 


fi 












2.530 


7 












4,015 


g 


Durham County 




20 


5.000 


4 


2,650 


q 


32 
121 
130 
21 
42 


1,315 
4,863 
8,903 
965 
1,512 


52 
190 
245 
27 
61 


6,135 


10 












23,091 


11 


Bay of Quinte (Proper) 










9,177 


t9 


Bay of Quinte (Eastern Channel). 










4,785 


ts 










2 .520 




Totals 














2 


37 


9,000 


10 


187 


60,870 


346 


383 


19,843 


634 


1015323 


79,972 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 











•a 


ja 






















































73 


a, 


t 


>S 


■a 


.c 




Q 








£ 






^ 






e 




District. 


















01 




















J3 




a 


a 














e 






tm 


.t; 




s 


d 






a 






fe 




!S 


o 


o 


.:< 




;z; 




a 


w 


^ 


i^ 


H 


H 


Sh 


O, 




Lake Ontario. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


1 


Lincoln County 





423,936 




106,641 




6,750 




2,075 


o 


Welland County 






33 
2 690 




3 






33,100 




65,971 




3,436 




4 
5 

6 

8 
9 
10 
11 


Halton County 




253,900 

5,480 

781 

4,050 

7,300 

94,476 

277,244 

653,985 

,36,700 




60,250 
2,880 
.37,038 
98,992 
51.884 
119,058 
433 078 
213,920 
68,050 




34,050 
16,610 
4,603 
5,343 
4,509 
69,910 
176,212 






Peel County 












York County 




















280 




Durham County 


400 
3, 150 


2,000 






Northumberland County 


39,734 

30,078 

109,360 

4,140 




Prince Edward County 


1,800 
200 
700 


60.100 
350 
200 


250 


78 


Bav of Ouinte (Prniior) 


9,386 


12 Bay of Quinte (Eastern Channel). 


200 


34,275 


2,350 


13 Wolfe Island and Vicinity 


21)0 


4,100 


350 


15,739 


1,400 


29,903 


26,485 


1,252 




Totals 


6,450 


1.795,052 


63,000 


1,273,501 


1.8.i0 


.385,601 


212,800 


15,141 








$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ C. 


$ c. 


$ C. 


$ c. 


% C. 






645 00 


89.752 60 


6,300 00 


127,350 10 


185 00 


38,560 10 


17,024 00 


1 514 10 







1920 



GAME AXD FISHEEIES. 



29 



FISHERIES. 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake Ontario. 



Fishing material. '^^^^' «''l°'^^ ''^^ '" 

fishiDK. 


Seines. Ponnd Xets. Hoop Xeis. 


Dip or Roll Xight Lines. Spears. Freezers and [ Piers and 
Nets. Ice Houses. | Wbarres. 


No. Yards Value. Ko. Value. Xo. Value. 


No. Value, g^^g I Value. iNo.i Value. No. Value. iNo.] Value. 


s 

3 ' 949 -290 


5 


4 


*1 
2 


s 

50 00 
17 70 
20 00 


$ 
100 5 00 .... 


17 


$ 
4. SOD 


.... 


$ 










3 6511 4511 






148 


222 , tl50 
oi 


2,676 

2,200 

350 


1 


500 










■2 115 55 






' 


..' 2 


•••• 




T t;<'5 475 










. • ... - 


2 -MO 150 




















.... 1 


100 

325 

2.485 








74 2,188 






5 545 -2411 




152 4,548 




1.650 1 190 00 .. .. . . 26 




" "iin' 






365 S.f-SO 1 5 00 


2,900 ' 29 00 ....!.! 3 




1 T 1" 




13 250 

100 3.470 


1..350 1 41 50 




T 59 IMi 




1,800 1 55 00 


:"« .; 525 


-So i.D-ln l>o" 


:"i iCl iSr! 


9 9-2 7h 7.S00 320 5m ll"" -l-l-i 2>5 


14. '-3<; 17 i,4-:;5 









* One machine used in Niagara River. 

+ 148 of these are spearing houses, value $1,776. 



during the year 1918. in the Public Waters of Lake Ontario. 



lbs. 
1.600 



lbs. 



lbs. 



lbs. 
450 

4,035 



8.110 
20,297 
78,714 

4,031 
23.9.36 



9.1.50 . 

14.761 ! 

53.033 '. 

4.100 . 

21.925 . 



350 



1.600 1.36,428 i 108,469 



98 
2,000 
47.033 
.33.. 363 
118.895 
2.000 
27,920 



lbs. 
18.000 
6 
3,185 
2,000 



31,030 
1.515 

ioo' 
72,186 
12.6-36 



lbs. 
26.106 
1.37 
89.470 



3.000 |. 

7.237 i. 

15.199 (. 

20, IM I. 

79. .381 . 

175.195 

250.. 585 . 

8.2.50 . 

35.065 . 



lbs. 



2-35,796 142.. 378 709.806 



$ c. $ c.l t c. 

240 00 8.185 68 5.423 45 



$ c. $ c. $ c. $ c. 

21 00 18.863 68 2.847 56 .35.490 30, 





^ c. 


35 


935 40 




9 77 


14 


225 90 


22 


207 00 


•) 


373 00 


5 


186 00 


11 


456 49 


7 


413 35 


35 


793 91 


98 


569 62 


94 


701 71 


13 


763 06 


13 


761 46 


355 


.396 67 



5 c. $ c. $ c. $ c. 

300 00 1.200 OOi 1.494 10 355.396 67 



30 



THE EEPOET UP OX 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1918, 















Fishing material. 










i 


District. 


Tugs. jGasoline Launches. 


Sail 


or Row Boats. 


Gill Nets. 


i 


No. ^°": Value. Men. No. 


Value. Men. No. 


Value. 


Men. 


Yards. Value. 


1 

2 
3 

4 

5 

6 


Ivlani Watera. 






$ 




.8 

11 

3 

4 

1 
8 


1 

625 
3,325 

600 

2.. 300 

600 

4,950 

3,500 

7,450 


3 
19 

6 

5 

1 
21 
15 

.36 


26 
55 

21 

23 
2 
13 


$ 

634 

1..870 

.380 

285 
45 
174 


23 

80 




$c. 
















Grenville, Dundas. Storraont and 










•^4 


600 


38 


Russell, Carleton and Victoria 










22 
8 
8 


2.200 
1,000 
7,400 


105 










200 










712 48 










7 




Nipissin^r and TJmiskamin<? Dis- 










16 


18 


665 


18 


23,950 


3.622 




















16 


23.350 


106 


158 


3,553 


183 


.35.150 


4,672 48 













Return of the kinds, ciaantities and values of fish caught 



District. 



/ nland Waters. 



lbs. 



lbs. 



Prontenac County 

Lanark an'i Leeds Counties 

Grenville, Uuiidas. Stormont and 
Prescott Counties ... 

Russell, Carleton and Victoria 
Counties 

Muskoka and Simcoe Counties. . . 

Lake Si mcoe 

Lake Ni pissing, 

Nipissin? and Timlskamin? Dis- 
tricts. 



315 

1.148 

•27.740 

13,012 



Totals 



Values 



$ c. 

10 00 



42,215 



$ c. 

2,110 75 



lbs. 



12,600 



$ 

1.260 00 



lbs. 



lbs. 



15.395 
48.266 



24,508 



88,419 



$ c. 

.841 90 



.30,000 



3.000 00 



lbs. 



48,821 
12,680 



61,501 



$ c. 

,150 10 



lbs. 

15.446 

16,698 

1.839 

2,500 



13,239 

40.775 



$ C. 

7.239 76 



lbs. 
20 ' 

595 
715 



4,849 
f.8,559 



88,829 



90,4^7 153,667 



$ c. 

15,366 70 



1920 



GAME AXD FISHEEIES. 



31 



FISHERIES. 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Inland Waters. 



Fishjntr material. 



Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 



Pound nets. Hoop nets, ^'^^^etf"" 



Night Lines. 



Spears. 



Freezers and Piers and 
Ice Houses. Wharves. 



Xo. 



No. Yards. Value. No. Value. 'No. Value. No. Value, gj^^ Value. [No.' Value. No. Value. No. Value 







1 




$ 


70 
•244 

23 


$ 

•2.340 
6.480 

675 




$ 




$ 




$ 




$ 




$ 




•20 


40 
3 










1.500 
3.000 
4,200 


100 

162 

63 






3 


600 


■• * * 










3 
2 


12 00 
3 75 
















1 
5 1 1.30 






2 


400 








178 
•2.000 


59 
1.6.50 














• • • • 






"u 


"7. ".360' 
3.200 


5 


100 


1 


4 00 


4.000 


68 


121 


636 50 


3 
6 

13 


1.1^ 
2.600 

2,975 


2 
5 

7 


800 
900 

505 








18 


16 


:;is 




























14 


2/205 


1.752 


32 


10.500 


36S 


10,043 j 6 


19 75 


12.700 


■393 j 121 


636 50 


27 


7,700 


14 


2.205 



during the year 1918, in the Public Waters of Inland Waters. 



lbs. 



4.550 

1.375 



;i8,5i)7 
870 



107,11s 



$ c. 

16.067 70 



lbs. 
6.398 



1.816 14.. 379 



1.950 
1.^200 



lbs. 
4.8^25 



12,752 



1.800 
•2,050 



lbs. 



1,972 



183 



$ c. 

1,446 60 



1.91: 



•24.110 31. -205 



6.300 



lbs. 
30.416 



3.175 



lbs. 
300 

18.103 

•25 
250 



84 .452 



8. •27^2 



112,354 



103,130 



$ c. f c. 

1.560 25 496 .32 



S c. 

.988 .32 



t c. 

.062 60 



lbs. lbs. No. ] lbs. $ c. 

31,740 5,887 09 

6t.341 1-2.546 49 

23.948 1 ri 2.830 02 

11,385 1.505 50 

4.350 -233 -25 

18.565 9,850 18 

13,445 3.717 32.^293 92 

61..585 ! -24.895 .50 

•2.34.359 i 3.7-23 90.04195 

$ c. I $ c. $ c. $ c. j $ c. 

11 .717 95 "3.723 00 90.041 95 



THE EEPORT UPOX 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 



Recapitulation of the number of fishermeD, tonnagf 



and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 
industry during 





District. 


Fishing material. 




Tugs. 


Gasoline Launches. Sail or Row Boats. 


Gill-NeU. 




xr^ Ton- 
N^-inage. 


Value. 


Men. Xo. 

1 


Value. 


Men. No. 


Value. 


Men. 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 




Kenora & Rainy River Dists. 


3 
30 
19 
17 
10 


1 

38 
761 
462 
3.35 

17.4| 


$ 

5,095 
115.500 
81.400 
69,000 
.31,500 


11 
251 
90 

87 
51 


94 

36 
37 

59 
56 
50 
168, 
187 
16 


$ 

35.770 
18.050 
20,400 
30,020 
25,930 
16,600 
104,130 
60.870 
23,350 


166 
81 
76 
113 
107 
103 
466 
346 
106 


83 

74 

55 

54 

68 

115 

186 

383 

158 


$ 

3.. 389 
7.460 
4.. 390 
3.1.38 
4.418 
5.270 
13.877 
19.843 
3.553 


70 

94 

63 

57 

108 

185 

186 

6.34 

183 


180.830 
1,163,650 

868,976 
1.186.889 

566.509 

i.ssfiiio 

1,015,323 
35.150 


$ 

29.641 00 
109,016 00 


3 


Lake Huron (North Channel) 


86,538 00 
82.975 00 


5 
6 


Lake Huron (Proper) 

Lake St. Clair, etc 


60.859 00 






44 
2 


1,391 
37 


3.39,000 
9.000 


274 
10 


178,. 365 66 


8 
q 


Lake Ontario 


79.972 00 
4.672 4S 




Totals 














125 


3,198 


650,495 


774 


703 


3.35,120 


1.564 


1176 


65,. 3.38 


1.580 6.605.06716.32,037 48 



Recapitulation of the kinds, quantities and values 



lbs. 



lbs. 



1 Kenora and Rainy River Districts 

2 Lake Superior , 283,100 3,681 

3 Lake Huron (North Channel)....! 1.700. 6 

4 Georgian Bay I 26.3001 75 

5 Lake Huron (Proper) 13.900' 250 

6 Lake St. Clair, etc I 

7 Lake Erie 13,531 

8JLake Ontario 6,450i 1,795 

9; Inland Waters 100 42 



.609 
.473 
,694 
,100 
f50 
,993 
,052 
,215 



Totals i .331 ,550 19.384,086 



$ c. $ c. 

Values 133,155 00,96!, 204 30 



lbs. 



lbs. 



1.6001 677,706 229,800 



lbs. 



12,400' 1,517, .395 
4.200! 688.121 



90,800 
8.500 



69.150, 362,137: 208.850 1.128. .314 



.700 



62.968! 

29,010 

I 1,128.256 

63,000! 1,273 501 
12.600 88.419 



43. .354 



lbs. 



2.658,0.57 
1.617,645 



lbs. 



94.205 673.761 



732,331! 



1.850 
.30.000 



165.6501 5.827.513| 613,154 



$ c.| $ c. $ c. 

16,565 00 582.751 30 61.315 40 



2.446 
385.601 
61.501 



18.354 

59,869 

38,927 

1.449 

02,030 
229.131 

212,800 
90.4117 



6.681.100 1.386,818 



lbs. 



194.612 
66,655 

204.. 358 
48.871 

184.379 
15.141 

153.667 



$ c. $ 
668.110 00 110.^45 44|l72.0.33 50 



1920 



GAME AXD FISHERIES. 



33 



FISHERIES. 

the qaaatity aad value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the fishing 
the year 1918. 



Fishing material. 



Other fixtures nsed in 
fishing. 



Seines. 



Poand Nets. 



Hoop Nets. 



No. Yards Value. No. 



Value. ; No. 



Vali;. 



38 
150 



4 175 
7-2 13,097 
.59 18.405 
30 2,520 
14 2,205 



187 
7.305 
11.253 
1,850 
1.752 



$ c. 

25,100 00 

26,300 00 

68,750 00 

22 14,808 00 

62 32.500 00 

8 3,000 00 

689 440.110 00 

"32 10 ,'506 '06' 



Dip or Roll 



$ c. 



Night Lines. 



Freezers and 
Ice Houses. 



Piers and 
Wharves. 



Hooks. ^'''•''<'- N'o.jValae No Value. Xo.i Value. 



2,340 00:...' 86 

1 2,000 60 00 29 

150 00 ...I • 31 

235 00...! 19.800 1.820 00 19 



12 

3 225 00 
172 17.300 00 

32 727 00 
704 19 436 00 
.363 10,043 00 



7\ 69 00 


4.500 


..i 


2,700 


14 113 00 


9.000 


9 92 70 


7.800 


6 1.975 00 


12.700, 



285 00 25 

104 00 39 

152 00 139 

320 ,50 148 222 OO 236 

S3S 00 121 636 50 27 



1S.7IP0 

37.000 
8,925 
6,625 
6.325 

10.8.50 
l->7,600 

14.836 
7.700 



Ll79 36.4021 22,347 1.069 621,068 00 1.33250,456 OOj 36 2.349 70 



*14S of these are spearing houses, value $1,776. 



of fish caught during the year 1918. 



9,360 
8.350 

19,950 
4,498 
1.150 
1 ,965 

25,875 
1.425 
2.205 



58,5003.134 50 269:858 50 631 238.561 ^48 74.778 



x a £< H 

lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. 

24,2S1 7,268 240.418 

6.003: oOOJ 8.873 

12,114 1 1 11,049 67,364 

2,612 1 2,500 75.759 

18.783 4 64.014' 2.31,858 

14.700 , 147,481 

51,928 ' 2,056,214 

1,600 136.428. 108.469 350 

107.118 24,110 31,205 8,272 

239,140 161,042| 2,428,2001 632,894 

$ c. I $ c. $ c] $ c. 
35,872 35 9.662 521 121.410 00l37,973 64 



lbs. 



lbs. 



■* O X i, > 

lbs. lbs. No. $ c. 

364.437 823 12.815 285.169 40 

754,741 691.768 45 

329.316 103 279 584 08 

28,980 1,170 201170 46 

144.021 887i 4I< 146,834 08 

397,141 451 5511 51.436 64 

766.522 1.820 12 784.95J 1.073.708 59 

709.806 300 2.000 14,941 355,396 67 

234,359 3,723 90,04195 

670,507 1,208,258: 3,729.323 9.277i 2.061 Sl3.25!l 3.175,110 32 

$ c.| S c. $ c' $ c. $ c. I c. $ c. 

53.640 56| 24. 165 16 186.466 15 9,277 50 1.236 60 81.325 90 3.175.110 32 



207,524 


12.001 


1 


820 


1 


646 


4.340 


5.123 


500 


8.212 


62,593 


224.455 


47,400 


711,4M3 


2.35,796 


142.378 


112.354 


103 . 130 



34 



THE REPORT UP OX 



Xo. 14 



Comparative Statement of yield for 1917-18, according to Districts. 




Kenora and Rainy River Districts 

Herring. Salted lbs 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish, Salted " 

Whitefish, Fresh '' 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike " 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon " 

Eels 'I 

Perch 

Tullibee " 

Catfish I' 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse Fish " 

Caviare 

Sturgeon Bladders No 

Pickerel (Blue* lbs. 



s: 








1()7.^20 




167,920 


2.300 


1,600 
677,706 
229,800 

94.205 
(573.761 
753.370 

24.291 




70(t 


(580.717 

250 

111.804 

787.859 

961 . 653 


"'"229',55(V 


3,011 

i7',599" 

113,598 
208,283 


20.460 


3,831 









679 

174.445 

8.000 

173 
592.(538 

790 

677 



7,268 

240.418 

207,524 

12,001 

3(54.437 

823 



12.815 



6.589 

(55.973 

199.524 

11,828 

33* 

'i2",8i.5' 



228,201 
677* 



Lake Superior: 

Herrins, Salted lbs 2(55 . 500 283 , 100 

Herring. Fresh " .... 2.443.201 3,681,(509 

Whitefish, Salted " ^-600 12,400 

Whitefish, Fresh " 446.457 1,517,395 

Trout, Salted " .... 74.300 90,800 

Trout Fresh " 1,660.957 2,659.057 

Pike " 17.806 18.354 

Pickerel (Dore) " .... 70.070 107,282 

Sturgeon " .... '^.082 6,003 

Eels " 500 

Perch " .... 

Tullibee " . . 

Catfish " . . 

Carp " . . 

Mixed and Coarse Fish .... " . . 

Caviare '. " . . 

Sturgeon Bladders No. . 

Lake Huron, (North Channel). 

Herring, Salted lbs.. . 

Herring, Fresh " . . 

Whitefish, Salted " . . 

Whitefish, Fresh " . . 

Trout, Salted " . . 

Trout, Fresh " . . 

Pike " . . 

Pickerel (Dore) " .. 

Sturgeon " . . 

Eels " 

Perch " .... 24.731 11,049 

Tullibee " 1 1 1 . 737 (57. 364 

Catfish " 122 

Carp " 68 64(5 

Mixed and Coarse Fish " .361.909 .329.316 

Caviare " 53 103 

Georgian Bay: 

Herring, Salted lbs 3.800 26.300 

Herring, Fresh " 90,. 3(50 75. (594 

Whitefish, Salted " 46.600 (59. 150 

Whitefish, Fre.sh " 415.185 3(52.137 

Trout, .Salted " (52. 400 208. 850 



17,600 

1,238,408 

9,800 

1,070,9.38 

16,-500 

998,100 

548 

.37,212 

921 

500 



10 

700 

332.774 

22 

10("l 



1.800 

38.564 

21.100 

594,0.35 

6.600 

1.475.754 

112.488 

26!).. 321 

12.103 



8,873 


8,873 


75 


8'-'0 


120 
421,967 




754.741 






99 




100 


1,7(J0 
6 473 


32',(")9i" 

94,08(5 

1.900 
141,891 


100 


4,200 

(588,121 

8.. 500 

1,617,645 


16,900 



.59.869 

194,612 

12,114 



11 



578 
50 

22,-500 



22,-550 
i 46 ! 4-50 



52,619 
65,709 



13.682 

44.373 

122 



32,-593 



14,666 
'53",(J48' 



1920 



GAME AXD FISHEEIES. 



35 



Comparative Statement of yield for 1917-lS. according to Districts — Continued. 





1917. 


1918. Increase. 


Decrease 


Georgian Bay — Continued : 

Trout. Fresh lbs.. 

Pike " . 


... 1.230.878 

81.687 

54.598 

3.239 


1.128.314 

38.927 


1(J2.564 
4^ 760 


Pickerel (Dore) " . 


66.655 12.057 
2.612 




Sturgeon . " . 


6fl7 


Eels " . 






Perch " . 


2.915 

176.828 

6.940 

11.868 

32.810 

410 


2.500 


415 


Tullibee " . 


75.759 


101 . 069 
2,600 
6.745 
3 8.^0 


Catfish " . 


4.. 340 


Carp " . 


5.123 

28,980 


Mixed and Coarse Fish .... " . 
Caviare " . 


1,170 760 

13.900 

250.100 

2.700 




Lake Huron f proper j: 

Herring, Salted lbs. . 

Herring Fresh " . 


46.600 

376.815 

8.200 

60.135 

33,400 

783.078 

1.737 

185.923 

18.406 

'.'.". '"*"ii9".4i7" 

530.594 

556 

4.558 

123.656 

923 

127 


32.700 

126.715 

5.500 


Whitefish, Salted " 


Whitefish, Fresh " 

Trout. Salted " 


62.968 2.833 
43.354 9.9.54 

732.331 

1 . 449 

204.358 18.435 
18.783 377 
4 4 
64 014 


Trout. Fresh " 

Pike " 


50.747 
288 


Pickerel (Dore) " 


Sturgeon " 




Eels " 




Perch " 


55.403 

298.736 

56 


Tullibee " 


231.858 

500 


Catfish " 


Carp " 


8.212 3.654 

144. U21 2(1.365 

8S7.1 


Mixed and Coarse Fish .... " 




Caviare " 


35^ 


Sturgeon Bladders No 

Herring. Salted lb? 


49 


78 


Whitefish, Salted " 

Whitefish. Fresh " 

Trout. Salted " 

Trotit. Fresh " 

Pike 




950 950 








30,150 


29.010 


1.440 








58.023 
64,-389 
14.350 


62.(J30 4.111)7 
40 871 




Pickerel (Dore) " 


23.. 518 


Sturgeon " 

Eels 


14.700 350 


Perch ■' 


131,765 


147.481 15.716 




Tullibee 




Catfish 


63.462 

1(12.950 

685.691 

280 


62.593 

224.455 121.5(15 
397.141 


869 


Carp 


Mixed and Coarse Fish .... " 
f'-'viarp ... . . " 


288'5.5('j' 


451 171 
550 551 1 




Pickerel (Blue) " 

lake Eri'p: 

Herring, Salted lbs 

Herring. Fresh 

Whitefish. Salted . . 
Whitefish, Fresh ... " " 
Trout. Salted 








. ... 14,157.839 


13.531.993 


625,846 


. ... 1,239.521 


1.128.2.56 


111,265 


Trout, Fresh 


2.344 

141.682 

227.459 

47,163 

18.936 


2.446 102 
229.131 87.449 

184.379 

51.928 4,76" 




Pike 




Pickerel (Dore) . " 


43JJ86' 


Sturgeon 


Eels ; .. 


18.936 



36 



THE REPORT UPOX 



Xo. 14 



Comparative Statement of yield for 1917-lS, according to Districts— Continued. 




Lake Erie.— Continued : 

Perch lbs 

Tiillibee " 

Catfish '' 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse Fish .... " 

Caviare 

Sturgeon Bladders No 

Pickerel (Blue) lbs 

Lake Ontario: 

Herring, Salted lbs. 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish, Salted " 

Whitefish, Fresh " 

Trout, Salted " 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike " 

Pickerel ( Dore) " 

Sturgeon 

Eels " 

Perch " 

Tullibee " 

Catfish " 

Carp " 

Mixed and Coarse Fish .... " 

Caviare " 

Sturgeon Bladders No. 

Pickerel (Blue) lbs. 



Inland "Waters: 

Herring, Salted lbs.. 

Herring. Fresh " . 

Whitefish, Salted " . 

Whitefish, Fresh " . 

Trout, Salted " . 

Trout, Fresh " . 

Pike " . 

Pickerel (Dore) " . 

Sturgeon " . 

Eels " . 

Perch " . 

Tullibee " . 

Catfish " . 

Carp " . 

Mixed and Coarse Fish .... " . 

Caviare " . 

Sturgeon Bladders No. 



995,413 

12.22-5 

36,707 

666.778 

668.986 

3.149 

24 

565 . 476 



4,100 

1.980,186 

21,000 

1.140.445 

2.400 

463,924 

2^0.377 

53.(i(iO 

2.261 

126,034 

213,623 



225,348 

391,249 

717,714 

63 



100 

9,-506 

100 

37,176 



16,245 
76,211 

78,773 

9,430 

24,015 

28.526 

8,080 

100,883 

241,182 

332,208 

116 

700 



2.056.214 1. (Kill. SOI 

12.225 

47.400 10.693 

711,493 44.720 

766.522 >)7..586 

1.820 1.829 

12 12 

784.953 219.477 

6.450 2.350 

1.795.052 135.134 

63.000 42.000 

1.278.501 188.0.56 

1 . 850 550 

385. (iOl 78.328 

212.800 (i7,-577 

15,141 38. -519 

1 . 600 661 

136.428 10,394 

108.469 105.154 

3-50 350 

235.796 10,448 

142.378 248.871 

709.806 7.908 

300 237 

2.000 2.000 

14.941 14.941 

10(1 

42.215 32.709 

12.600 12,500 

88.419 -51.243 

30.000 30,001) 

61.501 45.2-56 

90.497 14.286 

1-58.667 74.S94 

107.118 97.688 

24.110 95 

81.205 2.(i79 

8.272 192 

112. .8-54 11.521 

108.180 138.0-52 

284.859 97.849 

8.723 8.(307 

700 



1920 



GAME AXD FISHEEIES. 



S7 



Statement of the yield and value of the Fisheries of the Province for the year 1918. 



Kinds of Fish. 



Quantity. 



Price. 



Value. 



Herring. Salted lb= 

Herring. Fresh " 

Whitefish. Salted " 

Whitefish, Fresh " 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel ( Dore ) , 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp " . 

Mixed and Coarse Fish " , 

Caviare ' . 

Sturgeon Bladders No. 

Pickerel (Blue) lbs. 



ayi 
19.. 384 

1(55 
5.827 

613 
6.681 
1.386 
1.72U 

239 

161 
2.428 

632 

670 

1,208 

3.729 

9 

2 

813 



. 55U 

.086 

.650 

.513 

.154 

.100 

.818 

.335 

.149 

. 042 

. 200 

.894 

.507 

.258 

.323 

.277J 

.061 

.259 



Total 



lu 


33.155 GO 


5 


969.204 30 


10 


16.565 00 


111 


582.751 m 


111 


61.315 40 


lu 


668.110 00 


s 


110.945 44 


111 


172.0.33 50 


lo 


35.872 35 


t) 


9.662 52 





121.410 00 


(5 


37.973 64 


8 


53.640 56 





24.165 16 


5 


1 86. 466 15 


1 00 


9.277 50 


60 


1.236 60 


111 


81,325 90 




3.175.110 32 







Comparative Statement of the yield of the Fisheries of the Province. 



1917 



191.S 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



Herring, Salted lbs. , 

Herring. Fresh " , 

Whitefish, Salted " . 

Whitefish, Fresh " . 

Trout, Salted " . 

Trout. Fresh " . 

Pike " . 

Pickerel (Dore) " . 

Sturgeon " . 

Eels " . 

Perch " . 

Tullibee " . 

Catfish " . 

Carp " . 

Mixed and Coarse Fish " . 

Caviare '• . 

Sturgeon Bladders No. 

Pickerel (Blue) lbs. 

Total Pounds 

Total Increase Pounds. 191S . . . 



321.900 

19. 214. .391 

101.900 

4.644.121 

179.. 350 

5.744.984 

1.557.370 

1.956.846 

132.494 

168.985 

1.517.069 

1.013.9(J9 

442.043 

1.419.521 

3.848.386 

5.806 

1.628 

565 . 476 



331,550 

19.384.086 

165.650 

5.827.513 

613.154 

6.681.100 

1.386.818 

1.720.3.35 

2.39.149 

161.042 

2.428.200 

6.32.894 

670.. 507 

1.208.2.58 

3.729.323 

9. 277 J 

2.061 

813.259 



9.650 

169.695 

63.750 

.183.. 392 

433.804 

936.116 



1116.655 



Mil. 131 



228.464 



3.47U 
433 
247.783 



17U.5.52 
236.511 

"7!943' 

.38i'.oi5" 



211.268 
119,063 



42.834.551 46.lin2.115i 



,167.564* 



38 



THE REPORT UP OX 



Xo. 14 



Value of Ontario Fisheries from 1870 to 1918, Inclusive. 



Years. 



Value. 



Years. 



Value. 



$ c. 

1870 264,982 00 

1871 193,524 00 

1872 267,633 00 

1873 293,091 00 

1874 446,267 GO 

1875 453,194 00 

1876 437,229 00 

1877 438,223 00 

1878 348,122 00 

1879 367,133 00 

1880 444,491 00 

1881 509.903 00 

1882 825,457 00 

1883 1,027,033 00 

1884 1,133,724 00 

1885 1,342,692 00 

1886 1,435,998 00 

1887 1,531,850 00 

1888 1.839,869 00 

1889 1,963,123 00 

1890 2,009.637 00 

1891 1,806,389 00 

1892 2,042,198 00 

1893 1,694,930 00 

1894 1,659,968 00 

1895 1,584.473 00 



1896 1.605,674 00 

1S97 1,289,822 00 

1898 1,433.631 00 

JS99 1,477,815 00 

1900 1,333,293 00 

1901 1,428,078 00 

1902 1,265,705 00 

1903 1,535,144 00 

1904 1,793,524 00 

1905 1,708,963 00 

1906 1,734,865 00 

1907 1,935,024 90 

190S 2,10a,078 63 

1909 2,237,544 41 

19111 2,348,269 57 

1911 2.419,178 21 

1912 2,842,877 09 

1913 2.674.686 76 

1914 2.755,293 11 

1915 3,341,181 41 

1916 2,658,993 43 

1917 2.866,424 00 

1918 3.175,110 32 

Tntal 74.322,013 84 



Statkmext 

oi the number and value of the Tugs. Gasoline, Sail or Row Boats. Xets. Spears, etc. 
used in the Fishing Industry of the Province of Ontario during the year 1918. 



Xuniber. 



Value. 



Tugs (3,198 tons) 

Gasoline Launches 

Sail or Row Boats 

Gill Nets 

Seines (36,402 yds.) 

Pound Nets . . . 

Hoop Nets 

Dip and Roll Nets 

Paited Hooks 

Spears ; . 

I'Yeezers and Ice Houses 
Piers and Wharves 



1 
H.(H)5 



58 



125 
70B 
17(i 
, ()(i7 
179 
,069 
,332 
36 
500 

2m 

()31 
24S 



yards 



Total 



Number of men employed on Tugs 

do do Gasoline Launches 

do do Sail or Row Boats 



(>50.495 


1 


335 1 20 


00 


65.338 


00 


(532.037 


48 


22.347 


(III 


621, OHS 


01) 


5i».44(> 


00 


2. 249 


70 


3.134 


5(1 


85 S 


511 


238,561 


Oil 


74.778 


00 


2.(i^i(>.443 


IS 


774 




1.564 




1,580 





3.918 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Department of Public Highways 



ONTARIO 



1919 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




Toronto : 
P*rinted by Clarkson W. James, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1921 



Printed by 
THE RYDRSON PRESS. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Letter of Transmission o 

Report of Deputy Minister 7 

I. County Roads 7 

II. Provincial Highways 9 

III. Provincial Highway Construction 17 

IV. Width of Main Highways 21 

V. Temporary Inconvenience 23 

VI. Provincial Aid Roads 24 

VII. Dominion Aid 25 

Appendices: 

1. Schedule: Expenditure on County Road Construction (not including 

Provincial County Roads) during 1919 26-27 

2. Schedule: Expenditure on Provincial County Road Construction during 

1919 28-29 

3. Schedule: Expenditure on Maintenance and Repair of County Roads 

during 1919 (not including Provincial County Roads) 30-31 

4. Schedule: Expenditure on Maintenance and Repair of Provincial County 

Roads during 1919 32-33 

5. Reports of County Road Inspection 34 

6. Report of Chief Engineer on Provincial Highways 50 

7. Motor Vehicle Statistics 91 

Index 96 



To His Honour Lionel H. Clarke, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May it Please Your Honour: 

I herewith beg to present for your consideration the annual report of the 
Department of Public Highways, relating to Highway Improvement in the Province 
of Ontario. 

Eespectfully submitted. 

F. C. BiOGS, 

Minister of Public Worlcs and High ways. 



[•>! 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Department of Public Highways 

Report of the Deputy Minister 



HOXOUKABLE F. C. BiGGS, 

Minister of Public ^yorks and Highways, 
Ontario. 

Sir, — Eoad improvement in 1919. particularly that for which county councils 
arc responsible under the Highway Improvement Act, made apparent the more 
favourable influence of Peace conditions. Various counties have taken steps toward 
more efficient organization, and larger appropriations were made in numerous cases. 
Still further advances may be anticipated for the ensuing year. With the estab- 
lishment of a system of county roads in Peterborough, every county is now 
operating under the Hio:hwav Improvement Act. 

I 
COUNTY ROADS 

The Highway Improvement Act was initiated in 1901, when an appropriation 
of $1,000,000 was made with a view to aiding a limited amount of construction : 
the grant in each case being one-third of the couritv expenditure. The first counties 
to pass the necessary by-laws were Simcoe and TVentworth. which were adopted 
in June, 1902, and November, 1902, respectively. 

By a process of evolution, this Act, which provides for county road systems 
of leading market roads, has been placed on a permanent and satisfactory Ijasis. 
Counties now receive from the Province 40 per cent, of expenditure for both con- 
struction and maintenance, and for the more important roads, 60 per cent. The 
co-operation of cities has also been secured in the construction and maintenance of 
the leading roads radiating from the cities under a system of Suburban Eoads. 

The total length of county road systems in 1919 amounted to 9,953 miles. 
(This mileage will be lessened when the complete system of Provincial Highways 
is established). Expenditure on county roads in 1919 was as follows: 

Total Provincial 
Maintenance. Expenditure. Grant. 

Provincial Countv Roads $585,992 5S $351,595 56 

County Roads 1,160.971 84 464,446 11 

Total Maintenance $1,746,964 42 $816,041 67 

Construction. 

Provincial County Roads $1,689,864 56 $1,013,918 75 

Countv Roads 4,022.390 50 1,608,956 26 

Deferred Payments 2,683 13 844 23 

Total Construction $5.714,'438 19 $2,623,719 24 

Summary. 

Total Maintenance $1,746,964 42 $816,041 67 

Total Construction 5.714,938 19 2,623,719 24 

Total Expenditures $7,461,902 61 $3,439,760 91 



REPORT UPON HIGHWAY 



No. 15 



The work on which the foregoing expenditures for construction were made included 
the following: 

Grading 166 . 52 miles 

Gravelled surface 76.97 miles 

Waterbound macadam 151 . 17 " 

Cement concrete 11 . 60 " 

Bituminous penetration 30 . 80 

Asphaltic concrete 1.31 

Total surfaced 271.87 miles 

Bridges over 10 feet span ■ • 163 

Pipe and tile culverts 1,406 

Other culverts 319 

Among the larger road improvements effected during the year, indicating the 
accumulating benefits of county road organization may be mentioned the following 
works : 

A concrete pavement, 18 feet wide, on the Front Road in Essex County, 3.5 
miles in length from Ford City easterly, and costing $105,000. Also, Huron Line^ 




Lincoln County Road 

Three-inch tar penetration surface on six-inch broken stone foundation 
sixteen feet in width. 



a concrete pavement 18 feet wide, one mile in length, from Town of Sandwich 
southerly, and costing $29,000. 

A concrete pavement, 16 feet wide, on the Elmira Road, in Waterloo County: 
1.4 miles in length from St. Jacobs southerly, and costing $21,690, including five 
concrete culverts. 

The Tansley Bridge over the Twelve Mile Creek in Halton, on Dundas Street, 
in the Township of Nelson, was erected at a cost of approximately $115,000. This 
bridge has a maximum height of 98 feet above the crock hod, concrete abutments 
and four piers, has a steel superstructure 542.5 feet in length, and concrete floor 20 
feet in width. 

In Lanark County a bridge was completed over the Mississippi River at 
Ferguson's Falls, consisting of five steel spans, each 421A feet long, with concrete 



1920 . IMPROVEMENT IN ONTARIO. 9 

retaining wall, at a cost of $21,000. Also in the same county, under the Smith's 
Falls Suburban Area Road Commission, about 2 miles of macadam road was built 
with metal 16 feet in width, twelve culverts and two bridges, at a cost of $37,000. 

Adjacent to the Town of Lindsay, the County of A^ictoria built 1% miles of 
asphaltic concrete pavement on a concrete foundation, 16 feet in width. 

In the United Counties of Prescott and Russell, on the Ottawa-Point Fortune 
Road, there was built over four miles of bituminous penetration surface on a 
macadam base. With pavement 16 feet wide and twenty-nine concrete culverts, 
the expenditure was $110,000. Elsewhere in these counties, water-bound macadam 
roads were built aggregating ten miles in length. 

Near Sydenham, in Frontenac, a grade reduction through rock was carried 
out, and two miles of broken stone road constructed. 

In Elgin an important work of grade reduction is in progress on what is 
known as Springer Hill, between Aylmer and Tillsonburg, including the construc- 
tion of a 40-foot concrete culvert. 

On the road from Kincardine to Tiverton in Bruce County, substantial con- 
struction is in progress, seven miles having been graded and widened, and five miles 
surfaced with crushed gravel. The work included fifty-one concrete culverts and 
three bridges. 

Easterly from "Wallaceburg, on the River Road, in Kent County, half a mile 
of concrete road was built. 

One mile north of Markdale, on the Toronto-Owen Sound Road, the County 
of Grey made substantial progress in grade elevation through a swamp, in which 
exceptional difficulty has arisen. 

Norfolk County undertook the construction of bituminous penetration roads 
of a substantial type in the village of Port Rowan, and adjacent to the Town of 
Simcoe. 

The Suburban Area Commission of Brantford built nearly a mile of concrete 
pavement; as did the Suburban Area Commission of St. Catharines. 

Lincoln County, in a series of sections, constructed in all over sixteen miles 
of bituminous penetration on broken stone base, the paved surface being 16 feet 
wide; also seven miles of broken stone on rubble foundation, ready for the bitu- 
minous surface, 

Haldimand County carried out a substantial amount of construction,- including 
a water-bound surface 12^2 miles in length on the Caledonia Road between Jarvis 
and Wentworth County ; nearly five miles of macadam in the vicinity of Selkirk ; 
3I/2 niiles from Cayuga westerly, and 2I/2 miles of bituminous penetration in the 
Village of Caledonia. 

York County built nearly seven miles of bituminous penetration, and seven 
miles of water-bound macadam, with from 15 to 18 feet in width of metal surface. 

n 

PROVINCIAL HIGHWAYS 

The Provincial Highway System on December 31st, 1919, amounted to 422 
miles and, with the exception of sections in urban municipalities, comprised the 
main road from London via Tngersoll, Woodstock, Paris and Brantford to Hamil- 
ton; from Hamilton via Grimsby and St. Catharines to the Niagara River at 
Queenston ; from York County (River Rouge) easterly, following the main road 
along Lake Ontario and the River St. Lawrence to the Quebec Boundary; and 



10 



EEPOET UPON HIGHWAY 



No. 15 



from Prescott to Ottawa. These roads traverse the oldest and most populous 
portions of the Province, and may be expected to carry the heaviest of inter-urban 
traffic likely to develop on any continuous route. Special care therefore is being 
given to preliminary construction. 

Expenditure on this work amounted to $1,244,002.29 for construction and 
to $94,689.76 for maintenance in addition to sundry general expenditures. 

First effort on the Provincial Highway has had in view the development of 
a road continuously safe and reasonably passable for traffic. Advantage was taken 
of local conditions as far as possible, to utilize existing gravel and broken stone 
sections ; and work was hastened on intervening sections to grade them, and provide 
at least a single track of metal. As a result, and within a very short period of 
actual labour, much improved traffic conditions have resulted. 




Waterloo Provincial County Road. 

Seven-inch cement concrete pavement, sixteen feet in width. 



Yoric County to Wliitby 

This section commencing at the Eouge River, has been one of the most difficult 
and expensive with which the Department has had to deal, ^fuch earthwork has been 
necessary to produce satisfactory grades, to widen narrow portions at old culverts and 
bridges, and provide adequate drainage. The soil of the district is not favourable 
to road building, being generally a clay with many springs and planes of seepage, 
particularly on the hills, and drainage has therefore been given careful attention. 
Very little gravel of a suitable kind was available locally. 

A railway siding and storage yard for stone has been provided at Pickering 
Village. During the past winter, stone was received at this yard, and to take 
advantage of available labour at that period, much of the material was teamed 
and spread on the road. Temporary inconvenience will no doubt be caused until 
this stone has been consolidated, but scarcity of labour makes it necessary to adopt 
every reasonable expedient to hasten the work. 



1920 IMPROVEMENT IX ONTARIO. 11 

When this section of the highway was assumed by the Department on August 
31st, 1917, dangerous conditions existed at many points. Culverts and bridges 
were, as a rule, old wooden structures of insufficient width, and the approaches 
to them were narrow. All these structures have been replaced or are in process 
of renewal; and the approaches has been widened. At the River Rouge a very 
winding, narrow section existed, about three-quarters of a mile in length, with 
obstructed vision and dangerous turns. A new steel bridge on concrete founda- 
tions is in process of erection, with safe and adequate approaches. It is anticipated 
that this bridge will be opened for traffic in July, 192U. 

At Pickering Village a new steel bridge 130 feet in length on concrete abut- 
ments has been erected. East of Pickering Village, what is locally known as Eagle 
or Post Hill has been lowered and widened, a work of much advantage to the road. 

Earthwork and grade reduction has still to be done at the easterly end of 
the Rouge Hill, in the vicinity of Dunbarton Village, and at Pickering Village, 
but only of minor extent. The greater portion of the road to Whitby has been 
ditched, so that comparatively little earthwork has still to be done, a condition 
whicli will greatly facilitate the further improvement of this road for more satis- 
factory traffic conditions. 

Whitby to Belleville 

This portion of the Provincial Highway traverses a gravel district, much more 
favourable to road improvement than the section from York County to Whitby. 
A gravel road has been developed, and traffic between these two points is now 
fairly well served, although much improvement can still be effected with a view 
to more permanent conditions. The usual plan has been followed of providing 
adequate drainage, constructing permanent culverts and bridges, widening ap- 
proaches and reducing grades. 

At Bowmanville three steel bridges have been built; 212 feet, 54 feet and 
36 feet in length; one 40 feet long at Wilniott Creek; a o2-foot span at Gages 
Creek and one 26-foot span two miles east of Cobourg. 

Two small deviations to avoid dangerous curves are now being made, one at 
the west side of the Town of Port Hope, and one at the west end of the Town of 
Cobourg. 

A gravel surface has been maintained throughout, with special attention to 
drainage at points which at wet seasons of the year were formerly ven,- bad or 
impassable. The widening of certain parts of this highway, notably between 
Bowmanville and Port Hope. Brighton and Grafton, lias produced excellent results. 
At what is known as Roseberry Hill in Hope Township, during the past winter 
a very considerable improvement has been effected involving the moving of a large 
quantity of earth by steam shovel. A similar improvement is in progress one mile 
west of Oshawa and Bowmanville Town. Between Trenton and Belleville, a series 
of small concrete bridges were built, notable for the difficulty in obtaining founda- 
tions in wet and soft situations. 

Belleville to Napanee 

As assumed by the Department on June 27th, 1919, this portion of the Pro- 
vincial Highway was, in many portions, in a very inferior condition. Passing 
through a limestone district, immediate improvement has not been so rapid as 
in sections where gravel is plentiful, as the production of broken stone i> neces- 
sarily a slower and usually more expensive process. 



12 REPOKT UPON HIGHWAY. No. 15 

From Belleville to a point I14 miles east of Shannonville, broken stone 
from the Point Anne Quarries was applied in a single track to provide immediate 
service and to keep the road passable under autumn and spring conditions. 

At Shannonville, a considerable deviation is being made in order to better 
the alignment and straighten the route. This work now under contract is pro- 
ceeding rapidly. 

From the end of the stone to Marysville, gravel has been applied, and the 
road straightened and widened. From Marysville south to Deseronto much earth- 
work was necessary, also a new bridge over Sucker Creek, 45-foot span. This part 
under contract is nearing completion. Hill reduction, widening and alignment 
have produced much improvement on this section of the highway. From Deseronto 
easterly to Napanee a marked improvement has been effected by the construction 
of a mile of heavy rubble base with macadam surface. For 314 niiles stone was 
spread about 12 feet wide. 

Another deviation, eliminating dangerous curves is being made one mile east 
of Deseronto. 

Twenty-one concrete culverts have been constructed varying in sizes from 
3 X 2 to 6 X 4 openings. Many farm entrance culverts and side road culverts 
have been installed. 

Napanee to Kingston 

This section of the highway was built at one time in a substantial manner 
as a toll road, known as ''' The York Road '' and has more recently been maintained 
as a county road, but was much in need of improvement and reconstruction. At 
Napanee a limestone hill is in process of reduction, the material being converted 
into broken stone for road purposes, A useful and permanent improvement Avill 
result. 

In North Fredericksburg Township the road has been substantially built with 
a heavy rubble base and a macadam surface 20 feet wide, for a distance of three 
miles, and much material is available for a large amount of important work. Four 
concrete culverts varying from 18 inches in diameter to 16 feet span were built. 

In Ernesttown Township, 314 miles of road ha^^ received a cobble base IS feet 
wide, with a temporary gravel surface. In all, about eight miles has been either 
surfaced with gravel or patched with broken stone. The work of surfacing in 
Kingston Township is being handled by contract, together with the culverts. 
Much repair work has been undertaken and it is expected the surface will be 
completed in 1920. A new steel bridge, 45-foot span, with two sidewalks, and 
two culverts, 5-foot span have been built at Odessa. 

Kingston to Gnnanoque 

A limited amount of improvement only was possible on this section, owing 
to the comparatively late date in 1919 upon which work could be commenced, 
but betterment has been effected from Kingston across Barriefield Camp, including 
a short section of bituminous penetration. A contract has been awarded for 
widening and raising the grade at liong Grass Swamp, a work urgently needed 
as existing conditions are very unsafe. 

Ditching, grading and widening the roadbed has been carried out on seven 
miles of the road. At Barriefield and Gananoque ends, this work was done through 
a rock country. Two crushing oiitfits are located on this section and l^A miles 
of roadway has been surfaced with crushed stone 18 feet wide, and li-> miles 



1920 



IMPEOVEMEXT IX OXTARIO. 



13 



9 feet wide; the rest of the section has been patched with gravel or broken stone. 
Seventy-two pipe culverts were installed. A contract is now in progress for con- 
structing the remaining culverts in Leeds Township, west of Gananoque, and 
tenders are being obtained for the grading of this section. 

Qananoque to Brockville 

This section included some very inferior road, which had received little pre- 
vious improvement, due in part to the character of the country traversed, as it 
offers natural obstacles to road making such as local municipalities find difficulty in 
overcoming. Rock exposures, inferior drainage outlets, problems of re-location 
were involved. Substantial progress has been made, however, and through the 
Township of Leeds 2i/^ miles of road has been gravelled, the shoulders graded, 
ditches cleaned, and culverts repaired. The road surface through Lansdowne 




Rerair — Cutting Shoulder. 

Sod and earth thrown to roadside. 

Township was in fair condition. For three miles the shoulders were graded, and 
a light coat of gravel placed on the surface. 

Through the Township of Escott, the drainage, grades and alignment were 
bad. Much improvement has been done to each despite the outcrop of granite 
rock, which covers practically the whole distance. Two miles of road were surfaced 
with crushed stone, 9 feet wide; and four miles of road were repaired. 

At Mallorytown half a mile of road was ditched and the surface repaired 
with stone. 

In Elizabethtown Township, west of Brockville. some heavy grading was- 
carried out to relieve steep grades and poor alignment. During the winter a 
large amount of field and quarry stone has been piled close to the road for crushing- 
purposes. 

On this entire section fifty-four pipe culverts were installed, one large con-. 
Crete culvert and one 36-inch galvanized pipe culvert encased with concrete. 



34 1{?:P0KT UPOX highway No. 15 



Brockville to Prescott 

Until recently this was a toll road, but in 1918, prior to the designation of 
the Provincial Highway, was purchased from the company by the counties' council 
of Leeds and Grenville. Although an old macadam road, it is now in very inferior 
condition, and will require substantial improvement to serve the traffic between 
these two towns, a distance of ten miles. Work was commenced late in the season ; 
however, three-quarters of a mile of road east of Brockville received a good coat 
of crushed stone. Some ditching and rock cutting was carried out. One concrete 
culvert was built, and from Maitland to Prescott, a distance of five miles, the road 
was surfaced with gravel. 

Prescott to Cornwall 

following closely the shore of the St. Lawrence Eiver, this portion of the 
Provincial Highway crosses outlets of numerous streams, and the rebuilding of 
many small bridges has been necessary before much progress could be made with 
grade and surface improvement. 

Portions of this road from Johnstown to Cornwall are on canal banks, and 
are under the control of the Department of Railways and Canals. 

Fieldstone is being largely used in this section. During the past winter, a 
considerable amount of material has been hauled to the road, and crushing is in 
progress. East and west of Cornwall, an effort has been made to meet the need for 
immediate betterment, and foundation has been laid about lYi miles in extent. 

In Edwardsburg Township the roadbed was widened out to 30 feet for a 
distance of one mile, three-quarters of a mile of road was surfaced with gravel 
12 feet wide, and three-quarters of a mil-e stoned 10 feet wide. A grading 
contract has been awarded which will straighten and reduce grades. 

In Matilda Township eight miles of road were patched with gravel and 
broken stone, and one mile was given a base course of crushed stone. During 
the winter about 2,000 cubic yards of crushed stone was placed in a stock pile. 

The road in Williamsburg Townshi]) was graded for a distance of seven miles. 
Tlie road surface was patched and holes filled with broken stone. 

In Cornwall Township the road for a distance of one mile received a cobble 
base 20 feet wide. During the winter about 3,000 cubic yards of fieWstone was 
hauled to stock piles for construction purposes. East of Cornwall the road was 
metalled for 11/2 miles 12 feet wide. One large concrete culvert 16-foot span 
was built in Osnabruck Township. One-fifth of a mile was widened and ditched. 
Several carloads of vitrified pij^e have been delivered to tho road and many pipe 
culverts have been installed. Sand was delivered to the site of many culverts 
durino- the winter ready for construction purposes. Three culvert contracts have 
been awarded and work commenced. 

Cornwall to the Quebec Boundary 

East of Cornwall, the Provincial Highway follows the St. Lawrence to the 
Quebec Iwundarv east of Bainesville. Drainage conditions become somewhat diffi- 
cult i^articularly in the Townships of Cbarlottenburg and Lancaster. A bridge 225 
feet* in lenctb will be erected at I>ancaster Village. During the winter a con- 
siderable amoiint of fieldstone has been teamed and crushed for foundation 

])urposes. 

Five miles of roadwav liavc been gravelled and the road has been patched 
on most of the section: also two miles has received a ba>e course L") feot wide, 
antl i- now being rolled. 



1920 



IMPEOVEMEXT IN ONTARIO. 



Ottawa=Prescott l^ighway 

This section of the Provincial Highway is one which connects the Capital 
of the Dominion with the main east and west route of the Provincial Highway, 
and also connects, by the Ferry from Prescott to Ogdensburg, with the highway 
system of the State of New York. Leaving Ottawa at the Dominion Experimental 
Farm, it follows closely for 141/2 miles the bank of the Eideau Eiver, then 
traverses centrally the Township of North Gower, and crosses the Eideau at 
Becketts Lauding, two miles north of Kemptville. From Kemptville. it passes 
through the Village of Spencerville, and connects with the St. Lawrence Highway 
three miles east of Prescott, at what was formerly the Village of Johnstown. 

The completion of this road will undoubtedly be of great service in developing 
the rural district through which it pas-ses, but will also provide the City of Ottawa 
with a route of much commercial value. 

The greater part of this road has been graded from the St. Lawrence Eiver 
to the Village of North Gower, while on several stretches north of that point, 
substantial grading has been done. 




AAaintJra :ce. 
Outfit for Applying Bituminous Materials in Maintenance Work. 



A bridge 72 feet in length has been erected at Spencerville, and contracts have 
been let for a bridge 80 feet in length over the Jock Eiver north of the Village 
of Manotick. Work of grading has been delayed, more especially in the vicinity 
of Ottawa, by failure of the contractor to construct culverts in the Township of 
Nepean, and it has been necessary to re-let this work. 

A considerable amount of gravel was supplied to the road during the fall 
and winter of 1919-20: and crushed stone has been applied southerly from Ottawa 
two miles, and shorter lengths at other points. In all, 2~) miles have receiv;^-] 
.substantial surface covering of gravel or stone. 

The original condition of this road was very inferior and much work is 
involved in producing a satisfactory foundation. The greater part of the right- 



16 



REPOET UPON HIGHWAY 



No. 15 



of -way was between 30 and 40 feet wide, the fence lines grown up with brush, and 
in many cases filled with field stone. Swamp conditions, boulder-clay hills, and 
inferior drainage outlets are also some of the difficulties being overcome. 

Owing to the exceptional foundation conditions on this road, unequal settle- 
ment is to be anticipated for a period, and while the construction of a surface 
of a so-called " permanent " type would be a mistake at the present time, it is 
anticipated that a serviceable road will be produced from Ottawa to Prescott by 
the end of 1920; following which, more permanent surface construction can be 
carried on as foundation conditions permit. 

Forty-one concrete culverts have been constructed with varying openings of 
2 feet X 2 feet to 17 feet x 8 feet. Tenders have been called and contracts awarded 
for the remaining bridges and culverts. 

< 
Hamilton=Queenston Road 

The Hamilton-Queenston Provincial Highway follows the route of the old 
military road that connected Queenston, on the Niagara River, with Grimsby, on 
Lake Ontario, and latterly was extended to the City of Hamilton. The Niagara 




Repair — Patrolman at Work. 

1. Applying stone to pothole after thorough cleaning. 



escarpment follows tlie shore of Lake Ontario at a distance of from one to three 
miles from the Lake, the intervening country having a gradual slope to the north. 
It is this strip of the Niagara Peninsula that is famed as a fruit district, the 
greater part of the area being devoted to the growing of small and large fruits. 
The centre of the fruit belt is tapped by the Hamilton-Queenston Highway, which 
came under the control of the Department in August, 1918. 

Traffic on this portion of the Provincial Highway is exceedingly hea^'y as 
it is the through road from points north and east of the City of Hamilton to the 
American frontier. It also constitutes a section of the direct route from Windsor 
and Detroit to Niagara Falls and Buffalo. 

When assumed as a Provincial Highway this road had an old stone surface 
which had been constructed and maintained by the counties of Lincoln and Went- 
worth. Little attention had, however, been paid to drainage, owing to the fact 
that all funds available were required to maintain the surface for the heavy traffic. 



1920 IMPEOVEMENT IX ONTARIO. 



The Department therefore undertook the construction of proper drainage^ which, 
on account of the fact that the road lies across the natural slope of the country, 
necessitated the installation of adequate ditches on the south or uphill side for 
the entire length of the road and for a greater portion of its length on the north 
side. The drainage has been almost completed and a number of concrete culverts 
have been constructed. 

Several miles of road have been brought to the final grade and a heavy- 
foundation of vraterbound macadam has been laid where the old surface was moved. 

At a sharp corner known as Cape Horn, in Clinton Township, the high bank 
was cut back, the grade of the road raised, and a slightly banked curve constructed 
with the result that practically all danger due to the curve and to obstructed view 
has been eliminated. 

During the summer of 1919 the road was oiled for its entire length and a 
coating of screenings applied over the oil. This eliminated the dust and improved 
the surface to a great extent. 

Hamilton=London Provincial Highway 

Commencing at the westerly limits of the City of Hamilton, the Provincial 
Highway follows the Dundas Eoad to Binkley Corners and from there the Ancaster 
Eoad to the City of Brantford. Passing through Paris it joins the old Governor's 
Eoad at a point about four miles west and continues through "Woodstock, Ingersoll 
and Thamesford to London. 

When assumed as a Provincial Highway by the Department in June, 1919, 
the roadway was narrow and uneven. A large grader pulled by a heavy steam 
tractor was used to round the surface, widen the grade and make temporary ditches. 
About forty miles of road were improved by this means. 

In the ^"icinity of Princeton the rcadway was narrow and rolling. About 
three miles of this was widened, the small hills cut down and light fills made. 
This work was done economically by wheel and drag scrapers as the soil was for 
the most part light sand. Immediately east of Thamesford a bank was cut back 
to improve the view and the earth removed was used to construct a curve in place 
of the sharp turn at the easterly approach to Thamesford bridge. Between Brant- 
ford and Paris, at several points the road was widened and the grade improved 
by using the earth to raise the road across small gulleys. At several points between 
Ancaster and Brantford, where the road ran through narrow cuts, the banks were 
cut back, the road widened and the grade raised in the immediate vicinity. 

Between "Woodstock and Ingersoll a considerable quantity of gravel was taken 
from pits owned by the Department and spread on the road. This was kept in 
shape by the use of a three-section drag and a first-class gravel road has been 
obtained. The same class of work was carried on easterly from the City of London, 
and between the City of Brantford and Cainesville. a large quantity of gravel 
being placed on the road. 

in 

PROVINCIAL HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION 

Certain factors should be clearly stated in order to determine the policy which 
should be followed with respect to the construction of Provincial Highways, and 
the various stages through which their development should pass. 

(a) Highways should be built in proportion to the traffic over them. 



38 REPOET UPON HIGHWAY Xo. 15 

(b) The need is not merely for a system of fully built highways ten years 
hence; but immediate service in a reasonable degree. 

(c) Many of the routes which form the Provincial System have had more 
or less improvement, and are capable of a certain degree of restoration for imme- 
diate use. 

(a) Building in Proportion to Traffic 

The number and weight of vehicles passing daily over a given mile of highway 
is the gauge by which the design of a highway should be determined in respect of 
strength of foundation, durability of surface, width of surface, and other details 
of construction. An inexpensive gravel surface on a lightly travelled road may 
readily give better and more satisfactory service than will a concrete or asphalt 
pavement on a road of heavy traffic. Conversely, it may be a useless expenditure 
to build, at high cost, an asphalt pavement on a road which serves only a few 
vehicles daily. 




2. Applying screenings. 

A waterbound macadam road may be satisfactory for a road which carries 
horse-drawn vehicles only ; but such a road wears out very rapidly under the traffic 
of motor vehicles; and for heavy motor traffic, a protective trefrtment of oil or 
tar is needed, or with heavier traffic, a concrete or heavy bituminous surface. 

If the traffic of heavily loaded motor trucks is anticipated, the foundation 
of the road must be correspondingly strengthened, using a greater depth of stone, 
or a concrete foundation. While fast moving motor vehicles require a protected 
surface, it is the foundation which is disrupted by excessively heavy loads. 

(b) Immediate Service 

The best known highway systems of the Eastern States, such as those of New 
York, New Jersey, Connecticut or Massachusetts, liave been under construction 
for a long term of years — a quarter of a century or more. They have been built 
in short sections, commencing at urban centres, and have been extended from year 
to year until the present connected systems have resulted. 

Such a plan would be a severe tost on the patience of the people of this 
Province, as the present need for a connected system of main roads throughout 
Ontario is urgentlv felt. 



1920 IMPROVEMENT IX OXTAEIO. I') 

On the other hand, an endeavour to bring to completion for immediate use, 
fully paved, a lengthy system of main roads, is an undertaking that is not only 
prohibitive in cost, but does not recognize the value of time as a factor in road- 
building. The amount of plant, equipment and organization necessary for the 
immediate completion of pavements in long stretches is not available iu the 
Province, while infinitely better results can be obtained by carrying on development 
no more rapidly than complete settlement of earth grades, and foundation can 
be obtained. The final settlement that takes place iu a road bed cannot be pro- 
duced by roller or other mechanical means: exposure to weather and wear under 
traffic are the only means of obtaining complete settlement. If a " permanent " 
surface is placed on a partially settled road bed, unequal settlement of the founda- 
tion must result ; and when the foundation sinks, the surface must follow with 
disastrous results to the pavement. 

(c) Restoration of Old Roads 

The highways comprised in the Provincial System were in many cases old 
toll roads, or were formerly main county or township roads, had in some cases 




o. Watering patch. 

been Avell graded, and surfaced with gravel or broken stone. While in many 
instances, much deteriorated for lack of maintenance, nevertheless they may b." 
repaired for present use by rapid and inexpensive methods. By cutting away 
high sod shoulders, raising the centre with a new application of gravel or stone, 
improving the drainage, and supplementing this with a system of patrol mainten- 
ance, a very marked improvement can be effected. 

By first establishing a maintenance system over the Provincial Highways as 
a whole, and giving immediate service on a well-repaired system of roads, perma- 
nent construction can follow with least inconvenience to the public, and as rapidly 
as may be expedient. 

Having the foregoing fa':tors in view it is in general, a proper policy to 
follow, upon taking over Provincial Highways, to at once establish a system of 
repair which will restore the roads for immediate use. "With this work, unimproved 
sections, the Mcakest links, are given first attention, to properly grade and drain 
them, and to proVide a preliminary surface coat or foundation which will permit 
immediate use. Culverts are built, bridcres are re-constructed, foundations 



20 EEPOET UPON HIGHWAY No. 15 

generally are strengthened, and the road, while being improved for immediate 
use, is consistently brought to a condition, as a foundation, that will sustain any 
form of surface that traffic may require. An adequate mileage of well-located, 
well-graded highways, with permanent 'foundation^ culverts and bridges, with 
pavement as good as is consistent, having consideration to all factors, it is a broad 
and effective policy that will give the best results. 

Class of Surface 

Having produced a grade that is of adequate width, is well drained, is pro- 
vided with permanent culverts and bridges, and is provided with at least a tem- 
porary surface, the construction of a surface that is adequate for traffic can be 
carried on as conditions permit. The use of the temporary surface by vehicles 
will do much to produce a well-settled foundation. The impatience for good roads 
has in many eases led to the construction of surfaces before the foundation was 
ready; and more financial loss and failure of pavements has resulted from this 
than from any other cause. 

The surface which will be used on the Provincial System will not be of one 
class throughout, but will be varied according to traffic and local material available. 
Under present conditions at least, gravel of a good quality, if obtainable locally, 
will be employed where traffic is not heavy. Water-bound macadam will naturally 
be used where gravel is not available, but where crushed stone can readily be 
obtained. Asphaltic oil, or cold applications of tar will necessarily be employed 
in the treatment of gravel and water-bound macadam to prevent dust, or protect 
the surface where the limit of motor traffic is greater than these materials can 
economically resist. Under increasing traffic, there comes a stage where the cost 
of repair, or insufficiency of service, renders necessary a more substantial wearing 
surface than gravel or macadam, either without treatment or with light surface 
applications of oil or tar. 

The more durable classes of surface ordinarily available include, broadly — 
(a) Bituminous Macadam (or bituminous penetration) ; (&) Bituminous Concrete 
or ("Hot Mix") ; (c) Cement Concrete. 

The first of these, bituminous macadam, is a form of surface made by first 
following the process of building an ordinary macadam road ; but into the top 
layer is poured hot tar or asphalt, penetrating to a depth of two or three inches. 
This is rolled and finished with a carpet coat of bitumen, and sand or stone chips. 
This form of construction has been largely used in England, where its success has 
been due in part to the fact that it is usually laid over old and well-settled stone 
foundations. Conversely, many failures on this continent have been due to the 
hasty attempt to produce earth grade, foundation and surface in one operation. 
Unequal settlement and failure of the surface has inevitably resulted. 

Bituminous concrete is usually a carefully graded mixture of fine stone, sand 
and asphalt; all materials being heated before being mixed. Over a foundation 
of concrete or stone, this mixture is spread, while hot and plastic, and rolled to 
a depth of two to three inches, forming a highly protective and resistant wearinsi 
surface. By a very similar process, a cheaper mixture of fine gravel and asphalt 
is used in some of the New England States and will be tested in this Province. 

Cement concrete as now commonly laid is composed of one part of Portland 
cement, one and one-half parts of sand and three parts of broken stone. Concrete 
of the most perfect type is necessary. The sand and stone must be clean and 
of the best grade, the cement should lie rigorouslv tested, ^fixing and all 



1920 IMPROVEMENT IX OXTARIO. 21 

manipulation must be complete and of the best workmanship. Work and materials 
which may be sufficient for concrete in its ordinary uses, cannot be accepted for 
concrete paving without extreme danger of failure. The marked success which 
has attended the use of concrete roadways can only be had by the closest att-ention to 
details in construction. 

IV 

WIDTH OF MAIN HIGHWAYS 

Portions of the Provincial Highway where telephone, telegraph, power and 
electric railway lines are in existence or may be built, are being brought to standard 
widths of 86 to 90 feet where practicable. This applies only to the main lines 
of the system. 

The majority of road allowances in Ontario were in the original surveys, 
placed at 66 feet; although some, particularly in Eastern Ont-ario, were surveyed 
as narrow as 40 feet. 




4. Brooming binder into patch. 

The width of highways was placed at 66 feet many years ago, and at a time 
when horse-drawn traffic only had to be considered. Under the original conditions, 
it was usually quite possible to grade and build a highway within 66 feet; and 
to maintain along it lines of shade trees. 

Since that time, the telephone, telegraph and electric power lines, motor cars 
and motor trucks, have all found a place on the highway, in addition to horse-drawn 
vehicles. We find that trees are being mutilated and destroyed on the public 
highways, owing to the necessity of keeping the wiring free from contact with 
the trees. When trees come into contact with electric power lines, very dangerous 
conditions arise and deaths have been caused in numerous instances. 

Most of the highways are supposed to be 66 feet in width, but we find this 
verv' seldom the case. Property owners have commonly built rail fences outside 
the 66 foot line, and wire or other fences have been later constructed outside of 
the rail fences. Only 11 per cent, of the existing highway from Ottawa to Toronto 
is 66 feet in width, the greater part being 54 or 56 feet wide and many portions 
much less. 



22 REPORT UPON HIGHWAY No. 15 



It is very generally accepted that the Provincial Highway should be of such 
width that lines of trees can be maintained on it, and this is impossible on the widths 
of highway as they now exist. In many cases, the width of 86 feet is absolutely 
necessary where the cuts and fills are made. Throughout the system generally, the 
extra width of allowance reduces the cost of grading, provides additional eartli 
where necessary, or a convenient area for disposing of excess material within the 
right-of-way. 

Owing to the narrowing of the highway by property owners to widths varying 
from 35 to 56 feet, a large amount of fence moving is necessary in any ca-e. The 
86-foot right-of-way only requires two and one-half acres additional per mile, as 
compared with 66 feet. This means only between one-quarter and one-third of 
an acre for each one hundred acre farm fronting on the highway. The extra cost 
from this source has by some been over-estimated, as the cost of land required 
is comparatively small. Buildings seldom have to be moved; and in all cases inter- 
ference with expensive structures is avoided. 




5. Tamping patch. 

The amount of traffic which grows up on a Provincial Highway makes foot- 
paths necessary for the safety of pedestrians ; and a right-of-way only 66 feet in 
width is found to be too narrow for this purpose, as experienced on the Toronto- 
Hamilton Highway. 

Weed cutting can be more conveniently carried out on a width of 86 feet, 
as the greater width facilitates the use of a mowing machine. Where the roadside 
between the ditch and the fence is narrow, and occupied by poles, it is commonly 
necessary to do the work by hand. 

One of the advantages of the 86 foot width is in connection with snow roads, 
and the reduced cost of keeping them open in winter will be a very substantial 
return on the extra cost of widening. Where the road is only 66 foot in width 
and orchards exist along it, or whore brush, shrubs, hedges, etc., grow along the 
fences, there is insufficient width to take care of snow drifts. On an 86-foot 
right-of-way this difficulty is almost entirely overcome, as drifts seldom reach the 
travelled portion of the road. 

Having regard to the circumstances outlined, the requirements of telephone, 
telegraph and power lines, the desirability of maintaining trees along the Provincial 



1920 



IMPROVEMENT IX ONTARIO. 



Highway, the need of foot-paths, the reduced cost of grading, the better facilities 
for drainage, the necessary expenditure in any event for widening the highway 
from present narrow conditions, the convenience and reduced cost of keeping snow 
roads open, the comparatively small area of land required for the extra width, 
all combine conditions which make a very strong case in favour of the <^6-foot 
right-of-way. 

The highway is not, as a rule, being widened through villages and towns for 
the reason that, as they are now built up, the cost would be too great. The difficulty 
is, in part, overcome in towns by using underground storm sewers in place of open 
ditches. This condition as it exists in towns, indicated that the greater width 
should be acquired in the open country now, as the cost will every year become 
greater because of new buildings and other improvements ^ong the road. 

The advantages to property owners in having their land situated on a highway 
of this description are obvious. Land values along this class of highway invariably 




6. Repaired surface. 

show decided increases, and their improvement by widening to 8G feet should have 
the co-operation of all property owners in their own interest. The immediate 
inconvenience is a very temporar}- one, and will quickly disappear through the 
development of much more satisfactory conditions. 



TEMPORARY INCONVENIENCE 

The main highways of the Province are involved in the Provincial System; 
and, carrying a large proportion of traffic, a maximum of inconvenience will tem- 
porarily exist while construction is in progress. Inconvenience to the travelling 
public, during the period of road construction, and during periods of extensive 
repair, in unavoidable. While works of grading, drainage, foundation construction, 
bridge and culvert building have been in progress, to the present time the Depart- 
ment, as far as practicable, and in an exceptional degree, has avoided lengthy 
detours. When the finishing of a macadam or final surfacing is in process, however, 
it becomes necessary to detour trafiic ; and this situation is one which drivers of 
vehicles must be willing to accept as essential and in the public interest. 



24: REPORT UPON HIGHWAY No. 15 

k _^ 

During the first years of construction on the Provincial Highways, a con- 
siderable amount of misunderstanding is anticipated as to the objects and purposes 
of the work in its various details. Most users of vehicles appreciate the finished 
surface only, and are apt to be impatient with respect to the preliminary work. 
But good grades, good alignment, good foundation are the only permanent part 
of the work, are essential to durability of surface — and cannot be put under the 
surface after it is laid. 

To correct a common misunderstanding, it may be further explained that 
comparatively moderate hills in many cases are cut, not to reduce the grade of 
the hill, but to widen the top for safety or for drainage, or to provide earth 
for widening the grade at the foot of the hill, as circumstances may require. 
The purpose of a multitude of such works is not apparent, without an under- 
standing of the ultimate intention of the engineer. Material placed for founda- 
tion and left temporarily for settlement is often assumed by users of the road 
to be the final surface. From all such sources, misunderstanding has, and will 
continue to arise, until the public become familiar with the process of road- 
building as carried out on a substantial scale. When users of the roads in Ontario 
learn, as in other countries, that such situations are a necessary part of road 
development and maintenance, the work of highway construction throughout the 
Province will be facilitated. 

VI 
PROVINCIAL AID TO ROADS 

Provincial aid to road improvement has, since 1901, been a matter of pro- 
gressive evolution. The Legislature now in session has enacted most important 
amendments which should have a far reaching and beneficial influence on road 
conditions throughout the Province. This applies more especially to the assistance 
provided for township roads. 

Under present legislation, roads of Ontario in respect of Provincial aid may 
therefore be classified and described as follows : 

1. Township Roads; under the control of township councils, to which the 
Province contributes 20 per cent, of the cash expenditure. If the township appoints 
a road superintendent, the Province pays 40 per cent, of his salary. Statute labour 
is not eligible for subsidy; but failure to abolish statute labour does not debar the 
township from receiving 20 per cent, of the remaining cash expenditure. 

To qualify for this grant, the township council must annually pass a by-law 
making their cash appropriation of township funds, and deposit a copy of the by-law 
with the Department of Highways. 

2. County Roads; designated by county by-law and under the control of the 
county council. 

(a) County Roads generally, receive a Provincial subsidy of 40 per cent, for 
construction and maintenance. 

(h) Provincial County Roads receive a Provincial subsidy of 60 per cent, for 
construction and maintenance ; are usually recommended in the first instance by 
the county council, but are subject to the special designation of the ^linister of 
Highways. 

(c) County Suburban Roads are constructed and maintained in the propor- 
tions of 40 per cent, by the Province, 30 per cent, by the city, and 30 per cent, by 
the countv ; and are designated by and are under the management of a special 



1920 IMPEOVEMEXT IX OXTARIO. 25 

commission representing the city and county. When a Provincial County Road 
is included in a county suburban system, the Province contributes 60 per cent., 
the city 20 per cent, and the county 20 per cent. 

3. Provincial Highways are designated by and are under the management 
of the Department of Public Highways. 

(c) On Provincial Highways generally^ the Province assumes 80 per cent, 
of the cost, and levies 20 per cent, on the county in which the work is situated. 

(&) Provincial Suburban Highways adjacent to the cities, are designated by 
the Department, and the city is required to contribute 20 per cent, of the 
expenditure. 

VII 

DOMINION AID 

The Dominion Government has set aside $20,000,000 in aid of highway con- 
struction. This is apportioned among the Provinces according to population, 
Ontario's share amounting approximately to $5,800,000. This is payable in the 
proportion of 40 per cent, as the work progresses. The grant is applied to con- 
struction only; and maintenance, machinery, bridges, subways, land and overhead 
expenditures are not eligible for subsidy. The Province is required to guarantee 
the proper maintenance of the roads for which a Dominion subsidy is received, so 
that the grant is limited to expenditure on Provincial Highways only. 

SPECIAL AND DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS 

Hereto attached as appendices, are the reports of the Engineer of Highways; 
with respect to Provincial Highways; the reports of the Inspecting Engineers of 
Count}- Eoads ; the report of the Eegi|;trar of Motor Vehicles ; the annual report 
of the Ontario Good Eoads Association; together with regulations and other 
publications of the Department of Public Highways. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. A. McLean, 

Deputy Minister. 



26 



REPORT UPON HIGHWAY 



No. 15 



APPENDIX No. 1 — 
Statement of Work and Expenditure 









Work Done Daring Year 








County 


Miles 
Graded 


Miles Stoned 


Miles 
Gravelled 


Tile 
Drain 
Rods 


Bridges 


Pipe 
and Tile 
Culverts 


Other 
Culverts 


Roads and 
Culverts 


Brant 


3.10 [ 


Concrete 


.5 

1.0 


! 


442.42 
51.8 


H 

3 
3 

4 
5 

9 

1 

2 


89 

13 
25 
83 
40 
3 
21 


3 

12 
6 

5 
6 
5 
2 

3 

7 

1 


$43,159 48 
6 626 91 


Bruce 


Carloton 


l-^.iO 

.S 

I. -18 




5 1 1 -'O 


65 957 91 


Duffprin 


1.9 
1. 

4.75 
9. 




21.8 
122. 
100. 


15,612 9-' 


Elgin 


5.28 


44 9-'8 21 


Esstx 


146 089 68 


FrontPnac 


:l.h() 






12 808 -'5 


Grey 








2,054 86 


Haldimand 


10.25 


4.7") « .".0 




47 
12 


43,046 13 


Halton 








1 
5 

6 

7 

1 

4 

1 

3 

3 
3 


27,541 20 


Hastinjrs 








Huion 


.06 , 

.72 Concrete 
6.03 1 


4.k; 
09 






6 
14 
22 
11 

20 

2 

363 

13 
10 

1 
52 

37 
48 

8 


6 
3 
6 


8,985 82 


Kent 




1.676. 
881. 


16,047 03 


Lambton 


1. i K.l 

6 1 I '> 


27,567 55 


Lanark 


23.380 81 


Loeds and Grenville 


... j 


Gran. 

Concrete 
Pen. Mac. 


2.5 

io!o 

2. 

1.33 
16.10 
7.2 


) .,,, 


242. 


7 


55.979 75 
8,078 83 


Lincoln 

Middlf-s.x 


.2R 
1 12 





287. 

2,987. 
787. 


4 

2 

6 

5 
4 


4E0.391 64 
8,857 24 


Norfolk 


I>pn \TMf 




11,440 16 


Dnrham 






'.i6 


3,916 01 


Ontario ... . 


.17 

1 

1.3.08 i 
4.38 ! 


.61 




4 


8.887 01 


Oxford 


1 

4.25I .46 
.83! 1.88 
.89.) 
.7 \ 7.83 


5.132. 


57,380 S'> 


Peel 




20,372 88 


Perth 


j 


Stone 

Tai via Mac. 

Cpment 


1,554. 


4 

4 

1 
5 
8 

3 
2 

3 


1 


82,334 94 


Peterboro 


( 


Proscott and Ru.ssell 


3.37 { I^^^P- ^''"^- 
..38 Rork 


1.25 
9.75 


1 




25 

10 
40 
16 

is" 

2 

20 
27 
21 

41 


3 


89.886 71 


Prince Edward 


( 


2S. 
150. 


15.029 74 


RenfiPw 


5.25 
.06 






2 

7 

10 
2 

S 

27 
5 

48 


44,041 98 


Simcoe 


.06 
26.47 


* 


7,563 77 


Stormont. Dundas and 
OlenKarry.. 






67,327 10 


Victoria 




.\sp. Concrete 
Concrete 




2..S 


7^9 74 


Watprloj 


.10 


.37 

1 ^"i 


1 


14, OU 32 


Welland 




i 




26,250 30 


Wellincton 


.18 
11 






1 . 25 




13 

1 

6 


10,277 61 


Wont worth 






45.4 


45 921 67 


York 


3,, [Hit. Mac. 


3.9.i ) 

5.41 » ' -^ 


191,425 63 








Totals 


131.85 I 


113.19 57.78 


14,529.22 


123 


1,105 


208 


1.7i).S.9S2 62 



Includes — 
111.34 miles Stone. 

8.50 do. Concrete and Cen\ent. 
23.09 do. Bituminous I'pnptration. 
.56 do. Asnhaltic Concrete. 



1920 



IMPROVEMENT IX ONTARIO. 



27 



SUMMARY, 1919 

on County Road Construction 



Approved Exoenditure for Year 



Bridges 



Machinery 

and 

Repairs 



Special Purchase 
Grants to of Toll : g^p^jn- 
Towns jRoadsand; tendencc 

and I Gravel 
Villages 1 Pits 



Total 
Aporovt-d 
Expendi- 
ture on 
Construc- 
tion 



Total 

Approved 

Expenditure 

on 
Maintenance ; 



Total 

Approved 

Expenditure 



Govern- 
ment Dis- 
Grant allowed 
40 per cent. 



fl3J28 41| $19,948 llj $2,300 00 

3.121 53| 16,798 061 $2,089 56; 

11,383 7\' 6,866 55' ! 

8,374 16i 24,089 37; ' 

5.865 94; 2,506 00; 4,621 36 

26.413 85; 5.458 55 1,500 00 54,768 20 

7,939 47 5,681 49 



7,384 46; 60,702 



5,162 391 
10,775 77 
80,949 95 1 
16,028 04) 
28,209 97; 

22,253 35 

I 

6,096 78' 
767 43: 

7,448 76, 

12,668 52; 
14,455 89; 



9.050 251 



33,891 35 



762 
23,804 
19,129 

4,862 
2,970 



5,454 29 



28,012 
2,727 



3,724 81 
774 65 
11,993 67 
18.163 85 
3,019 35 
4,722 38 
13,207 37 

1,773 92 

22,611 31 

35,575 52 



15,014 50 



2.809 46' 
3,585*91 



$3,175 02| $82,011 02; $15,231 99 



3,315 51 
2.650 45 



3,136 72 
2,513 70] 
1,175 35 
3,129 85! 
2.210 98! 
1,347 11: 



2,941 671 
2,339 07, 
1.361 34 
2,918 08 
1.947 66: 
2.386 47| 
1.966 18' 
2.314 871 

2.220 71 

1.680 45 

4,020 06' 



3.241 62 

31,518 82 17.214 61. 



13,075 781 17,947 73, 8,250 OOi 
9,386 00 8.439 48 5,016 79 ' 



3,6£2 92 
2,919 55' 



51 91 

58 45 



31,772 78 
86,721 87 
49,252 10 
61,051 39 
236,441 26 
27,776 32 



73,083 79 
64,124 51 
34,8.59 58 
25.687 52, 
52,856 74 
37.480 89i 
66.051 99- 
61.156 40 

69,386 67 i 

35,788 47' 

477,4.35 98; 

28,460 ZO 
77.649 03 

44.941 43 
34,4g7 73 



10.600 641 5.933 71 ! 1,826 49 75,74164 

2,084 641 1 1,678 50i 24,136 02 



563 611 
925 00' 



1,293 00| 84,191 55, 
834 60I 10.809 851 



53,857 82 

5,785 83 
43,7.=;3 87 



1,281 47 
11,015 87 

1.867 69 



2,906 40; 179,84? 28| 

,884 62 I 
,433 29! 
,838 24- 



2,306 97 
3,833 27 
2,308 35 



26,008 20 



16,221 46 



Stone 
I Quarry 

14. .361 27 2,212 40 

8.059 92| 11.312 25, 

4,044 20 I 

4.?58 43 



I 

3,705 14! 
1,921 25 I 

2,058 711 



2,137 88 
2,675 28' 
4,041 54 r 



23, 
115, 
46, 



23.393 01: 



961 85 
337 65; 
735 36 : 



29,282 07 
29.367 04 
27,459 80 

56.434 42 

12.435 03 
22,754 31 



36,343 32 
4,210 77 
12,646 80 
60,823 84 
55,4S9 90 
40,522 09 
18,367 60 
22,886 28 

34.978 68 

12,447 39 

19.975 85 

106,276 56 
20,121 95 

27,426 24 
33,628 03 



18,134 40 
20,174 63 



16,081 45 
11,032 3 



14,971 29 

20,389 18 

9,376 91 

51,317 36 

53,852 53 
26.008 68 

17.563 09 



4.158 31 216.763 83 



68,217 73 
47,142 17 
55,411 14 

32,176 95 



$97.24301' $.38. 897 40 

61,054 85 24,421 94 $1,019 65 

116,088 91; 46,435 56 

76,711 90 .30,684 76 803 95 

117,485 81, 46.994 22 127 23 

248,876 29 99.550 52 

50,5.50 63 20,212 25 14 60 

1,130 OOj 452 00 Hold 
back on 

i bridge in 

I 1918 

109,427 Hi 43,770 84 346 68 

68,335 28 1 27,334 11 282 20 

47,486 38 18,994 55 ;.. 

86,513 36 34,605 34 

108,356 64! 43,342 66 

78,002 98 31,201 19 587 00 

84,416 59 33,767 84 

84,042 68 33,617 07 

104.365 35 41.716 14 

48,235 86; 19.294 34 

497,411 83' 198,964 73^ 7,679 61 

134,736 86 53.894 74 

97.770 S8, 39,108 39 

72.367 67 28.947 07 

68.115 761 27.246 30 

409 00 163 60; Rental 
' of road 
' roller in 
1918 

93,876 04 .37,550 42 375 00 

44.310 65 17.724 26 

109,273 00 40.109 20 

I 

21.842 22 8.736 89 

1.143 13 228 63 1918 

i M fee. 

194.813 57 77,925 43, 3.217 04 

44,273 80 17.709 52* 450 90 

124,810 20 49,924 08; 840 33 

98,155 60 39,262 24! 8,802 88 

151,028 3l| 60,411 32 

68.724 60 27,489 84, 8 80 

40,956 lOj 16,382 44 811 47 

1 

113,179 58' 45,271 83 

107,479 82 42,991 92 

112.146 50, 44,858 60I 

248,940 78 99,576 31 2.870 45 



385,001 73 477.932 58 136.077 .32 67.530 60| 90,893 81 2.861,418 66 1.160.971 84. 4.025,073 63 l-, 60i >,& Uii J 9 28,237 59 



28 



REPORT UPON HIGHWAY 



No. 15 



APPENDIX 

SUMMARY. 
Statement of Work and Expenditure on 









Work Done during Year 






County 


Miles 
Graded 


Miles 
Stoned 


Miles 
Gravelled 


Tile Drain 
Rods 


Bridges 


1 

Pipe and 

Tile 
Culverts 


Other 
Culverts 


Braut 


.75 
2. 


Cone. .25 




26.65 
21. 


5*' 

1 


26 
56 




Bruce 


5. 


9 










1.4 
.25 


Pen. Mac. 33 
1.3 
.5 

Cone. . 37 

1.75 

10.37 






10 


1 


Elgin 


.62 


150. 
472. 


1 


12 


Essex 






.75 
.34 
7.5 
2. 




2 

7 
1 

1 
2 


19 

20 

47 

9 


1 








22 


HfllHimnnH .... 


16. 








Halton 






























1 


Kent . 


.45 
1.4 
.5 


Con. .36 
.12 
2. 




401. 
1.114. 


2 
2 
3 


"""io" 

12 


') 


Lanabton 


.95 


6 














Lennox and Adding- 
































Middlesex 










2 


3 
3 




Norfolk 


.94 


Bit Mac. 2.87 








Northumberland and 
Durham 










Ontario 




.09 




14. 




6 


3 


Oxford 










Peel 










1 
3 


8 
4 




Perth 








984. 
















7.69 


Bit.Mac.3.2] 
.87 
.42 

Cone. .75 

2.75 

Asp.Coa. .75 
.87 

Con. 1.37 
.67 






1 


30 
3 
6 

10 

s" 

3 
2 


1 


Prince Edward .... 




3. 




Renfrew 


4.89 
.75 




2 




Simcoe 


12.5 




1 


Stormont.Dundas and 
Glengarry 


121. 
24.2 


2 


1 


Victoria 


.87 




3 


Waterloo 




2 





Welland 


2. 






3 


Wellington 


.12 






2 






.04—2.08 
Bit.Mac. 1.32 






1 
5 


3 


York 


.18 




272. 




38 










Totals 


34. 6() 


*51.41 


19.19 


3,602.8S 


40 


301 


111 







* Including 39.83 miles stone, 3.10 miles concrete and cement, 7.73 miles Penetration 
Macadam, .75 miles Asphaltic concrete. 



1920 



IMPEOVEMENT IX ONTARIO. 



29 



No. 2 

1919 

Provincial County Road Construction 



Approved Expenditure During Year 



Roads 

and 

Culverts 



Bridges 



Special 
Grants to 
Towns and 

Villages 



Total 

Approved 

Expenditure 

on 
Construction 



Total 

Approved 

Expenditure 

on 
Maintenance 



Total 

Approved 

Expenditure 



Government 
Gi-ant 



60% Dis. 
allowed 



$10,494 18 
38,266 63 



8,279 38 
19,133 46 
10,083 50 

7.041 34 

99,452 17 

139,930 77 

5,642 34 



$10,644 94 
71,498 75 

526 20 
21,213 49 



1.226 10 
11,805 55 
17.334 86 
20.589 90 



1.769 65 
10.966 77 

2.693 42 
66.246 64 

4.095 50 



2.756 74 
2.153 18 
8.617 39 



$24,712 00 



1.579 42 



$10,494 18 
48,911 57 
71,498 75 

8,805 58 
40,346 95 
10.083 50 

8.810 99 

110.418 94 

167,336 19 

71,888 98 

4,095 50 

1,226 10 
14.562 29 
21,067 46 
29,207 29 



$8,786 17 

18,705 61 

6,135 62 

2.758 85 
22.661 80; 

3.657 96 
11,562 37 
10,190 14 

7.647 06 

3.987 91 
47,898 30 
21,816 35 

5,435 47 
10,795 35 
14.378 10 



$19,280 3) 
67.617 18; 
77.634 37! 

11,564 43 
63,008 75 
13,741 46 
20.373 36 

120,609 08! 

174.983 25: 
75,876 89| 
51,993 80 
23.042 451 
19.997 76 
31.862 81 
43.585 39 



$11,568 21 
40.570 31 
46.580 62 

6.938 66 
37.805 25 
8,244 88 
12.224 02 
72.365 45 
104.989 95 
45.526 13 
31.196 28 
13,825 47 
11.998 66 
19.117 69 
26.151 28 



2,694 00 



2,694 00 



20,677 86 



23,371 86 



14,023 12 



345 15 
56,473 69 



6,598 24 



2,836 67 



747 35 
2,125 78 



858 51 
1,618 00 



6,943 39 
56,473 69 



1.446 26 



4,282 93 



1,605 86 
3,743 78 



24,346 22 
3,616 51 

38,316 68 
13,894 48 
4,305 72 
28,040 81 
12,751 02 



31,289 61 
60,090 20 

38.316 68 
18.177 41 
4.305 72 
29.646 67 
16,494 80 



18.773 77 
36,054 12 

22,990 01 
10,906 45 

2,583 43 
17,788 00 

9,896 88 



97,470 25 

7,609 01 

23,246 19 

33,685 43 

27,369 38 
27,359 46 

37,209 27 
6,506 40 
1,555 87 
4,983 53 

92.951 58 

811,755 19 



4,266 00 



16,792 94 



9,380 84 



7,392 02 
106 66 

1.578 85 



242.393 89 



9.910 38 



101.736 25 

7.609 01 

40.039 13 

43,066 27 

34,761 40 
27,466 12 

38,788 12 
6.506 40 

11.466 25 
4,983 53 

92.951 58 



49.722 90 



1,103,871 98 



12,419 49 

23.714 39 

1,800 90 

12,628 40 

58,773 35 
14,829 77 

10,355 26 
21,962 47 
47.508 03 
17.934 05 
21.700 11 



585,992 58 



114,155 74 
31,323 40 
41,840 03 
55,694 67 

93.534 75 
42,295 89 

49.143 38 

28.468 87 

58.974 28 

22.917 58 

114.651 69 

1.689,864 56 



68.493 44 
18,794 04 
25,104 02 
33,416 80 

56,120 85 
25.377 53 

29.486 03 
17.081 32 
35.384 57 
13.750 55 
68.791 01 



1,013,918 75 



1.516 92 



1,516 92 



30 



EEPOET UPON HIGHWAY 



Xo. 15 



SUMMARY, 
APPENDIX 



County 



Brant 

Bruce 

Carle ton . , . 
Duffer in . . . 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac . 

Grey 

Haldimand . 

Haiton 

Hastings. . . 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton . . 



Schedule of Expenditure on Maintenance 

For the period beginning Jan. 1st, 1919, 



Grading 



Culverts 



Resurfacing 



Dragging 



Lanark 

Leeds and Grenville 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Northumberland and Durham 

Ontario • 

Oxford 

Peel 

Perth 

Pet^rboi 

Prescott and Russell 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Stormoiit, Dundas and Glen- 



$ c. 
292 57 
3,485 42 
4,532 21 
3,087 98 
3,320 24 



3,993 54 
1,606 65 



4,191 04 
4,542 62 
3,079 59 

2,409 49 



garry 
Victoria 



Waterloo . . 

Welland . . . 
Wellington. 

Wentworth 

York 



Totals 



3,894 93 
281 19 
521 53 

6,953 19 

3,838 17 
900 00 

7,114 58 

17,197 52 

153 65 

2,827 68 
292 80 

3,545 71 
514 00 

1,070 18 

2,141 93 

11,156 70 
3,208 59 

420 00 

5,387 85 
5,898 96 

6,261 53 

5,105 39 



123,227 43 



$ c. 

69 80 

212 03 

417 91 

825 74 

1.241 22 

91 05 



2,247 22 

2 75 

661 36 

500 68 

1,101 26 
878 27 

372 03 

28 50 
1.657 56 
119 09 
204 25 
1.454 21 
611 78 
172 00 
624 56 
330 10 



28 60 
826 51 
555 52 
251 81 
2,557 41 
277 70 

1.842 20 
330 73 

155 43 

120 29 
1.281 52 



22,051 09 



$ c. 
10,370 24 
23,996 81 
22.853 57 
22.974 86 
43.199 15 
1,856 97 
21.855 18 
28.000 00 
243 22 
11,329 15 
54,911 09 
46,758 79 
19,. 310 74 

8,961 27 

21,276 76 
26.378 62 
11.705 08 

3.499 81 
84.599 85 
10,663 82 
25.471 68 
23,243 66 
21 15 
18.093 42 
12.317 00 

9,470 74 

1,628 80 
18.897 12 

4,807 06 
46,341 86 

34,729 89 
19,297 33 

12.115 43 

59,188 20 
33.504 10 

43.123 34 

13.007 65 



850,003 41 





$ 


c. 


3 


,040 


52 




632 44 1 


1 


,009 


80 




138 


59 


7 


,162 26 1 


10 


322 


94 



283 40 

2,. 331 90 

123 30 



481 35 
13,845 53 

5,655 81 

34 15 
1,491 79 



9,686 83 

3,344 03 

1,761 75 

882 56 

1.550 41 

260 29 

264 55 

72 50 



3,390 30 



775 49 
1,036 44 

2,556 80 
296 30 

1,055 40 

1.405 59 
836 82 



1,877 58 
77,607 42 



Oiling or 
Tarring 



$ c. 

867 46 



899 13 



49 89 



5,559 36 
4.473 38 



3 n 

"ii649*i2' 



1.150 16 



1,847 34 
2.377 19 

5,585 21 

11.071 83 



34.933 18 



1920 



IMPROVEMENT IX OXTARIO. 



31 



1919. 
No. 3 

and Repair of County Roads 

ending Dec. 31st, 1919. 



Snow 
Shovelling 



Bridges 



Ditchiog I Cutting 

and I Weeds and 
Draining Brush 



Wire Fence 
Bonus 



Total 
Expenditure 



Total 
Governmeat 
Grant, 40% 



$ c. 
'99' 72' 



84 30 
12 00 



536 00 



64 20 
83 20 



82 50 

84 98 

2 00 

54 69 

881 91 



105 02 



86 20 
7 50 


2,721 95 

265 60 

32 00 



133 00 

43 85 



12 80 
157 95 



381 28 
5.932 65 



$ c. 

27 00 
796 90 
468 05 
320 93 
809 49 
164 07 



531 38 



483 10 
1,158 83 
2,009 41 
2,424 65 

194 55 

74 50 

962 33 

204 55 

187 22 

1,578 31 

2,242 02 



238 38 
325 34 
527 69 
828 17 
54 82 

3.129 01 
460 65 
134 77 

1,324 03 

734 72 
83 73 

3,627 43 

81 91 
2,464 44 



^ c. 
17 50 



85 50 
17 40 



244 93 



196 55 
887 74 
Opertg.Ferry 
480 85 



510 95 



2,911 65 
25 25 



Survey 
37 7 
Storm Fence 
189 40 



733 22 
29.385 60 



Guard Rail 
441 06 



6,046 53 



$ c. 
546 90 



10 00 
690 06 



26 25 



326 72 
9 00 

293 60 



314 85 

907 25 

97 25 



432 71 



387 50 



1,165 08 
92 70 



173 75 



5,473 62 



$ c. 
58 '75' 



506 85 



86 57 



1.472 37 
52 50 



315 60 



195 40 

383 98 
2,617 70 



621 19 



6,310 91 



15 
29 
29 
27 
56 
12 
22 
36 
4 

12 
60 
55 
40 

18 

22 

34 
12 
19 
106 
20 
27 
33 
18 
20 
16 
11 
14 
20 
9 
51 

53 
26 

17 

68 
47 

55 

32 



c. 
231 99 
282 07 
367 04 
459 80 

434 42 

435 03 
754 31 
343 32 
210 77 
646 80 
825 84 
499 90 
522 09 

367 60 

886 28 
978 68 
447 39 
975 85 
276 56 
121 95 
426 24 
628 03 
134 40 
174 63 
081 45 
032 37 
971 29 
389 18 
376 91 
317 36 

852 53 
008 68 

563 09 

217 73 
142 17 

411 14 

176 95 



1,160,971 84 



$ c. 

6,092 80 

11,712 83 

11,746 82 

10,983 92 

22,573 77 

4,974 01 

9,101 72 

14,537 33 

1.684 31 

5,058 72 

24,330 34 

22.199 96 

16,208 84 

7,347 04 

9,1.54 51 

13,991 47 

4,978 96 

7,990 34 

42,510 62 

8,048 78 

10,970 50 

13.451 21 

7,253 76 

8,069 85 

6,432 58 

4,412 95 

5,988 52 

8,213 03 

3.750 76 

20,526 94 

21,-541 01 
10,403 47 

7,025 24 

27,287 09 
18,856 87 

22,164 46 

12,870 78 

464,446 11 



32 



REPORT UPON HIGHWAY 



Xo. 15 



>- 

< 



3 
5/5 



O 
Z 

X 

5 
z 

u 
& 
a 



(/) 

Q 
O 

> 
Z 

o 
o 

z 

> 

o 

or 

a 

u. 

o 



< 

O 
Z 

o 
z 

< 
z 

m 

H 
Z 

< 

z 

o 

u 

:2 

H 
C 
Z 

u 

0. 
X 

u 

u. 

o 

u 

Q 

u 

E 
O 
V) 



Total 
Govern- 
ment 
Grant 60% 


• Oi^t— -^aooocMoo-f^ao-Hoc-^co 
oi--Mooroot^'*ocMc^3:30CMrM3o 

— JOO'^int fh-.-f:CCM3033.-^t-«CO 

»6-i^Maoi-O3333r0'-"303)CO00cor-cvi 
CMCMcocoi«^3:-"moot^ocM'*o 

lo' ^' ro* T^ ttic-y co' o* -^ cm" so" oo' no co" 3C 


12.406 72 

'i4!667*73 
2.169 91 

22.990 01 
8.336 69 
2.583 43 

16.824 49 
7.650 61 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture 


• t~--CMi-'5 0cor--»>co-HOiret--LOO 

o.-Hcoco^0303^oO'-l033roro-*^o-H 

comiooo-Ht— CMOh-t^oc^mmoo 

^30 ooouoomoo-^oocsi-Hfocit^ 

t--.t^r^t-.COCOUD-^0333000 •^.t^ CO 

Oo'3o"cO Cm'cvI fo'^'o'f- ro'h-"— <*kO O "* 
r- cm rH ^ ■<* CM 1-1 rH 


20.677 86 

* 24 '.346* 22 
3.616 51 

38.316 68 
13,894 48 
4.305 72 
28.040 81 
12.751 02 


Wire 
Fence 
Bonus 


« • 33 

^ is 








• o 

•CM 

•00 

•-* 














: ^ : 

• 33 • 






• in in 

•CM-^ 

• 00 t-- 

• ^M CO 

•CO 






Cutting 

Weeds and 

Brush 


$ c. 
230 80 


' -00 

. .00 






• in 

• t^ 

•33 

• t^ 




• o 

• o 

•lO 










• • 00 

• 'foco 

• -ino 

• •SM 1—1 


• 1—1 CO 

• 0^ 

•CM 






Ditching 

and 
Draining 


4^ 


















•CO in 

• •* CM 

•oor^ 

CO 1— 1 
CM 








• •CMO 

• •OO 

• -ooo 

• • 00 in 

• • CO ^H 

• • 1—1 












as 




403 29 
38 75 

50*30 

6 00 


• OO 0-* 033 O 

• o o CO t^ in ^H in 

• M O 33 30 CM t^ 00 

• CO ■* ^^ SO "-H in 33 

'^f ooco i-H 




444 03 

"*326'92 
149 35 


OOOCMO • 

t^ «o • 

30 33t~'^ • 
t^ t^OMCO . 


Snow 
Shovelling 




1— ( 


o o 

CO^ 

CM 30 
-H CO 




• OO 

•CM 

•33 
;30 




• o 
•in 

•CO , 

• in 








o -in 
CO "* 

• »— 1 • 




00 00 in • 

inx>fot>. • 

t^ soooco • 

CM 00?a 


Oiling 

or 
Tarring 


• CO 

O.-M 

30 
4«&CM 

30 






• fO 
•33 

•r~ 

•33 




















.CD • 
.00 • 

•CM • 

• CO • 

• -* • 




88 46 

3 32 

1,721 23 




Dragging 


. CO O O O UO CO 
«0 30 CM O CO 33 

CM lo tn o t-- to 

WSi-Tl- ^-^ r-< CO lO 
CM 30 lO r^ 

«m"oo" 


95 50 

2.394 10 

351 15 

"206'65 

1,756 95 

1.557 85 

69 95 




" "964*47 
387 05 

464 11 

1,057 72 

161 96 


in • 
^- • 

CM • 


o 

«« Cub 

3.S 
en 


•OO^HCOiraOt— -H-rf-M33r-JO^HlO 
CJ TJ. rl ^^ t-» r^ O CO 30 -* » LO CM ■* -^ '^ 

'*rocM«^oolOCM33-^oooo^^3033^o 

«9-rO-HCO — -H33COI^CMO3300;OOO 
000'*;0-*-:»<l0 3033lftOO»3035CO 

f-inuocMO -Hr-.rooo-^33cv>t^-* 


19.659 72 

'i8!262'38 
2.290 74 

31.014 47 

9.416 45 

1.040 67 

25,462 03 

10,146 00 




• • C^ O 33 30 • 
43 .O— <rH0O • 

• COCM ;oo • 

v^ •■^ lO CO • 




o t^ o OO o o in • 
t>- in CM •^ »n o o • 

>J 33 33 33 CM OO in • 

in in 1-H CM in OO t— • 

.-O -^ t— CM -H • 




216 01 

""536 '73 
283 25 

1,475 00 

144 15 

1 20 

16 50 

26 00 


a 


$ c. 

450 65 

1.816 42 


627 46 

63 60 

2.258 78 




o o in-* «3 0-* • 
30 CM CO in in CO OO • 

30 CM I- CO 33 CM -* • 

CM lO 33 o o o in • 
-^ :o T >-H r- 33 • 

^ in ^' j 




113 00 

"2ii45*39 
401 12 

5,363 10 
2,406 74 
2,932 52 
685 13 
2.522 52 


1 


a 
2 

CQ 


i 

3 
23 


d 

0) 

ci 
O 


c 

03 

3 


a 


X 

43 

ai 


CJ 

c 

i 


>> 


-3 

s 


a 
o 

33 


05 


c 
o 

3 

35 


a 

13 


a 
o 

a 

S 


ClJ 

a 


c . 

03 . 
»-i . 
O ; 

-a I 

3 • 

43 > 


-3 • 

< : 

-o I 

a . 
^ a 

Is 


Lincoln 

Norfolk 


-a '. 
a _ 
rt a 

i5 


c 



"2 

"x 




"v 

^ 


5 


0* 


S 

_a3 



1920 



IMPEOYEMEXT IX OXTAEIO. 



33 



s 




-1- 


^ 




3C 


;£ 


-f 


rvi 

30 


-t 


r; 


S 


— ' 3C O t^ 
LC ^0 30 t- 

•^^3 1.': 


;rh t:; ^ t^3; 


11 


IS 


t^ -* ^- t>- LO 3C 


"~ — r>i 


2^ 


ire 


-* rocs'* 


iffl t-- o t^ re 


ire ^ 


3C 

ire 


a> •* O 3C 

'-H -^ ;r J^] 
•^ t^ 50 :c 


re r; LI r^^ 30 •* 3 
t^ M m :c s= re ^ 
t^ 3c re c: ift r: t- 


^1 


r.1 ro — < CM 


or; -^ 

le '— • 


=; — t^ t-- — 
>— ^] Tt- — ^J 


ire 

ire 














Xi 

Tf 






i 30 

re 










re X 






ivi 






1 o 










uere 




2 '. 






ire 














t^ ■ 






ire 

■»*■ 












Le 












ire 

CM 












-f 












^>1 
30 


:v3 






t— 1 Le 






o 




•5 


O 

ire 


o 




2 


t^^ 
x; 






iv'l 

-r 




^ 
X 


30 

30 

SO 


?] 5c iS 


re t^ 






IC 




§ 






•* 30 






le 




- 












t^ • 


= t^ 30 

O t-- -rf 


30 ir 


S 












•-f ^ 31 

t--. li^ re 
:m ue le 




. 13: 










re • 


— — re 


— >: 


re 

CM 


30 
CVJ 




lO o 


S ^ lS 




^ 


> o 




o 5« 

-* ^ 


r^ ^ 


X re s 
re re -»• 




-1 


30 

1 ^1 
1 30 


CVl 












o 

CM 


o •* o c 


f- re t>- o re lO ;c 
-^ -Tf ue ue 30 :\] ^ 


> CM 


in O LO — 
3C 31 r- := 


t^ 30 o le LO t^ h- 
cc-f o — nt t^ c 
o re r^ t^ re ^ c 


= 1 ?3 


" CM ^ 


c: r^i 30 30 -f le 3: 
-+ — . — r^i — . 


CVJ 



o-r CVl c: 
CVl re re t^ 

rt re re 



i^ svi o :3 ~t -s 

t^ o o •* ire o 

!0 00 CVl ce r.5 o 



c: CVl — ^1 



t^ -^ o ire 
C5 ire ire o 
r- cv] t- re 




- f^W'^M >^^^^>^ 



34 REPOKT UPON HIGHWAY No. 15 



APPENDIX No. 5 

REPORTS OF COUNTY ROAD INSPECTION 

Toronto, January 6th, 1920. 
W. A. McLean, Esq.. 

Deputy Minister of Highways, Ontario. 

Sir: 

I have the honour to submit a summary report on the improvement of the County 
Roads during the year 1919, in the Counties of Carleton, Elgin, Frontenac, Grey, 
Lincoln, Peel, Peterborough, Welland and Wellington, according to the provisions of the 
Highway Improvement Act. 

During the year several special visits Avere made at the request of the County 
Councils and the Road Superintendents, when matters of special importance were 
being considered. The assistance and advice of the Department in such cases is much 
appreciated by the members of the Councils. 

Owing to the scarcity of labour, comparatively little permanent work, other than 
the construction of necessary bridges and culverts, was undertaken by the above named 
counties. An attempt was made to keep the roads in a passable condition, pending the 
return of more favourable conditions for permanent, work. 



Respectfully submitted. 



RORT. C. MUIR. 

Engineer of County Roads. 



Carleton 



The outstanding feature of construction was the building of the Wilson Bridge, 
consisting of one 16,0-foot span and two 64-foot spans with a 20-foot clear roadway, at a 
cost of .'P71,498. This bridge is on the Provincial County Road and known as the 
Ottawa-Pembroke Road. Other work on the Provincial County Roads was chiefly 
resurfacing, in short stretches, with'gravel. 

The construction work on the County Roads consisted in building gravel or macadam 
roads in stretches varying from 0.30 to 1.30 miles in length, 9 feet wide and 9 inches 
deep, approximately 16 miles of road were built, together with 12 miles of grading. 
A bad feature of road construction in this County is that the grade is too narrow and too 
high. A grade of 24 feet wide, with a fall of 14 inches from the crown of the road to 
the shoulder, is to be recommended. In addition, three bridges. 16-foot to 30-foot span, 
were built, together with six concrete box culverts and twenty-five pipe culverts. One 
gasoline tractor was purchased during the year at a cost of $2,286. 

It is the intention of the County Council at the January session to abandon the 
township system of carrying out the work, and adopt a County Road System, and it is 
hoped that better results will be obtained. 

Elgin 

The outstanding piece of work carried out during the past year was the building 
of a 40-foot reinforced concrete arch bridge and grade reduction at Springer Hill. 
.Approximately $28,000 was expended on this work. Other work on Provincial County 
Roads consisted of surfacing with gravel or crushed stone, and the layin;; of ( orrugated 
iron pipe culverts. 

The chief work carried on in this County is the reshaping of old gravel roads, and 
applying gravel in thin layers. A system of road maintenance has been adopted, and 
excellent results have been obtained. The gravel roads are kept in first class shape by 
the constant use of the road drag. By this systematic dragging, the reconstruction of 
these roads is in many cases deferred, enabling the County to devote attention to more 
urgent problems. This system of maintenance is commended, and many other counties, 
where gravel is used for surfacing, would be well advised to adopt a similar method. 
The system of book-keeping and method of passing and paying accounts is also to be 
commended. 

Frontenac 

The construction work on the Provincial County Roads consisted chiefly in laying 
a large number of concrete tile culverts, and surfacing with crushed stone. Approxi- 
mately two miles of macadam road were completed and two reinforced concrete bridges 



1920 IMPROVEMENT IN ONTARIO. 35 



of 14-foot span and 22-foot clear roadway were built. An excellent finish has been 
obtained on all concrete work carried out by day labour. Many miles of stone roads 
were resurfaced with crushed stone. 

Extensive grade reduction through rock, in the township of Loughborough, was 
carried out, the material being used for widening, and crushed for surfacing. Numerous 
concrete tile culverts were laid on several of the County Roads, together with two 
5-foot span reinforced concrete arch culverts. A 40-foot span reinforced concrete arch 
bridge, 22-foot clear roadway, was built near Westbrook, together with the erection of a 
guard rail, widening and raising of old grade. A decided improvement has been carried 
out at this point. 

The lack of outfits to carry on the work is a hindrance to extensive road building 
in this County. With more machinery at the disposal of the superintendent, more 
satisfactory results could be obtained. 

Grey 

With the exception of building three concrete box culverts, and completing the 
steel superstructure on a bridge, the construction work was confined to Provincial 
County Roads. The County Roads are kept in passable condition, the sod shoulders in 
many places being cut down, the ditches cleaned and the road resurfaced with gravel. 

The construction work on the Provincial County Roads consisted chiefly in building 
seven reinforced concrete bridges, varying from 12-foot to 50-foot span, and building 
approximately 7.50 miles of water-bound macadam road, 18 feet wide and 10 inches 
deep. An exceptionally bad feature in building macadam roads in this County is the 
use of too small a stone for surfacing, the practice being to obtain a crown by using 
stone passing a li/4-inch ring. Road of this construction will soon deteriorate. On a 
part of the Toronto-Sydenham Road, three miles north of Markdale, the work of raising 
and widening the road through a swamp which was commenced in the fall of 1918 was 
again in progress. This is an exceptionally bad spot, as it is difficult to obtain a stable 
roadbed. The work is being carried out by contract at a cost of 90 cents per cubic yard. 

In order to construct water-bound roads, three complete outfits were purchased 
during the year, each outfit consisting of — 12-ton steam roller; stone crusher, with 
screen and bin; grader; water tank; tractor, 20-40; gasoline engine and pump; pick 
plow; slush scrapers; four dump wagons; steel drags; 1-ton motor truck; together with 
the necessary steam drills and boiler for use in the quarry. These outfits have been in 
constant use during the greater part of the year. Approximately $57,000 was expended 
on new machinery. 

Lincoln 

As in 1917 and 1918, extensive grading was carried out, approximately 19.5 miles 
of road being graded to a width of 24 to 28 feet. This County has paid special attention 
to this class of work, with the result that many miles of poorly drained roads have been 
put into excellent shape. These roads are kept in good shape by the constant use of 
the log drag. Gasoline tractors are used on this work. The grades are reduced, and 
the roads widened and strengthened. 

A minimum width of 16 feet of metalled surface on all classes of roads was adopted 
by the Council before work for the year was commenced. During the year approximately 
29 miles of roads were surfaced, consisting of 16 miles of bituminous penetration, 
1.5 miles of cement concrete, 7 miles of water-bound macadam, and 4.5 miles of gravel. 
Approximately 2,600 cubic yards of stone were obtained from the two quarries owned 
and operated by the County, the remainder being imported from several commercial 
quarries. The County purchased another quarry in the vicinity of Jordan at a cost 
of $800. 

The cost of constructing the bituminous penetration roadway, consisting of a base 
of six inches of crushed stone, and a 3-inch penetration top, varied from $1.52 to $1.68 
per square yard. The cost of the cement concrete pavement, seven inches deep, was 
$2.60 per square yard. 

Three bridges, consisting of spans varying from 18 to 70 feet, were built during 
the year, together with three concrete box culverts. Approximately one mile of tile 
underdrains were laid, together with 365 corrugated iron pipe culverts. 

The chief units of machinery purchased during the year consisted of the following: 
Two 15-ton steam rollers at a cost of $4,060 each; stone crusher, complete, $3,060; two 
traction engines, $3,300 each; derrick and hoist, $3,422; asphalt heating pans, $2,700; 
three vertical boilers (10 h.p.) for heating bituminous material, $467 each. This 
County owns a most extensive plant, all the work being done by day labour. 



36 REPORT UPON HICtHWAY Xo. 15 

Peel 

Construction work in this county consisted chiefly in grading, grade reduction, 
laying pipe culverts and surfacing with gravel or crushed stone. Corrugated iron pipes 
were used throughout as culverts, the majority of these being used at farm entrances. 
Approximately 4l^ miles of grading and 3 miles of surfacing with gravel or crushed 
6tone were completed. 

The construction work on the Provincial County Roads consisted in laying pipe 
culverts where required, erecting a guard rail and building a 14-foot span reinforced 
concrete bridge. 

The majority of the stone or gravel roads in the Township of Toronto had a light 
surface treatment of asphaltic oil, many of the roads being scarified and reshaped with 
the addition of new stone. 

During 1919 the County Road System was extended from 140 to 178 miles, being 
approximately 21 per cent, of the total road mileage in the county. 

Construction work in this county has been greatly retarded by not having a per- 
manent gang; the work at present being carried out on a township system, with the 
result that the work is done in short stretches, and is very unsatisfactory. 

Peterborough 

The County Road System in the County of Peterborough came into effect with the 
passing of the necessary by-law on the 30th day of June, 1919, when the townships of 
North Monaghan, Otonabee and Asphodel assumed a county road milea^ge of 108 miles. 
At a later session of the County Council, held on July 25th, 1919, the township of 
Belmont came into the system, bringing the County Road mileage up to 137 miles. 

Owing to the late date of commencement of operations under the Act, it was not 
expected that much more than organization work would be accomplished this year. 
A start, however, was made on replacing several old wooden bridges with reinforced 
concrete structures, and resurfacing many of the neglected gravel roads. 

The County Road Superintendent is Mr. Duncan McFarlane, Keene, Ont. 

Welland 

The construction work on County Roads in this county during the year 1919 con- 
sisted chiefly in grading, laying a large number of pipe culverts, and building twenty- 
one concrete box culverts, varying from 3-foot to 8-foot span. Approximately 15.50 
miles of road was graded to a width of twenty-six feet. Two miles of water-bound 
macadam road, ten feet wide a.nd nine inches deep, were constructed by contract, at a 
cost of $4,860 per mile. A stone quarry was purchased in the Township of Pelham. 

The four outfits belonging to the county were used on maintenance work, consisting 
of resurfacing with crushed stone, with satisfactory results. Many of the roads were 
given a bituminous surface treatment. 

The work on the Provincial County Roads consisted of three miles of grading, 
three concrete box culverts, and about one mile of water-bound macadam road, sixteen 
feet wide, and nine inches deep. Work of the nature of widening of the macadam 
surface from ten to sixteen feet was carried out in several places. 

The chief units of machinery purchased during the year were: One 10-ton steam 
roller at a cost of $4,850, and one 1-ton motor truck at a cost of $2,875. 

Wellington 

As in previous years, the chief work carried out in this county was the building of 
bridges. Thirteen bridges were built, varying in spans from twelve to thirty-eight 
feet; the majority of these are of the overhead reinforced concrete arch truss type. 
Approximately $28,000 were expended on bridge construction during the year. No road 
surfacing of any extent was carried out during the year. 

The other features of construction were the building of a concrete abutment, con- 
crete breakwater 120 feet long, and a retaining wall 100 feet long, in the village of 
Drayton; the raising of the steel trusses and laying a treated wood block floor on the 
Elora bridge; also the building of a concrete retaining wall at Mount Forest bridge. 
Several short stretches of macadam road were treated with a surface treatment of tar 
and sand. Approximately $95,000 were expended in maintaining the roads, which con- 
sisted chiefly in resurfacing with gravel. One 12-ton steam roller was purchased in 
1919, and is used exclusively on roads under the jurisdiction of the Guelph Suburban 
Roads Commission. 

As in the case of many of the other counties the work is carried out under a town- 
ship system, and which is the main reason why no permanent road surfacing to any 
extent has been accomplished. This county might be well advised to follow the pro- 
cedure adopted in several other counties, by abandoning the present system and carry- 
ing on the work on a purely County Road basis. 



1920 IMPROVEMEXT IX ONTAEIO. 37 

Toronto, April 7th, 1920. 
W A. McLean, Esq., 

Deputy Minister of Highways, Ontario. 

Sib: 

Herewith I beg to submit a report on the improvement of the County Road Systems 
in the Counties of Bruce, Huron, Middlesex, Wentworth, Halton, York, Ontario, Victoria, 
Prescott and Russell, and Lanark for the year 1919, in accordance with the provisions 
of the Highway Improvement Act. 



Respectfully submitted. 



J. A. P. Marshall, 

Assistant Engineer. 



Bruce County 



The most important work undertaken by Bruce County during 1919 was the con- 
struction of seven miles on Provincial County Road No. 51 between Kincardine and 
Tiverton. This is on what is known as the Saugeen Road. The old roadway was from 
twelve to sixteen feet wide, of travelled surface and many hills of excessive grade. 
The work was let by contract on a cost plus basis. This consisted of grading and 
ditching the entire length, and gravelling five miles to a width of sixteen feet and from 
nine inches to twelve inches in depth. There were fifty pipe and tile culverts placed, 
and one reinforced concrete box culvert built. Three bridges — Munro's, McLennan's 
and Montgomery's Bridge, consisting of l2-foot and 17-foot and 12-foot spans, were con- 
structed at a cost of $7,000 approximately. Considerable hill cutting was also under- 
taken. The contract calls for the work to be completed by the middle of July, 1920, 
and as yet 2i/^ miles are to receive additional gravelling. The total cost of the w^ork 
so far completed is approximately $42,500. 

On Provincial County Road Xo. 52, Fischer's Bridge in Lot 15, Con. " C ' and " D," 
of Carrick Township, one 10-foot soan reinforced concrete slab bridge was constructed. 
On Provincial County Road No. 6, the Arranvale bridge, at the deviation of the 30th 
side road. Con. VI. of Arran Township, was constructed. This structure consists of two 
12-foot reinforced concrete slab spans. 

On County Roads the only construction work undertaken was the construction of 
thirteen pipe and tile culverts, twelve concrete culverts of spans varying from four to 
eight feet, and three bridges. These bridges were the E'nniskillen bridge, in Lot 60, 
Greenock Township; in Con. III., Kinloss Township; and Con. VIIL, Sideroad 20, Huron 
Township. These spans were eighteen feet, ten feet, and sixteen feet. 

Work was also undertaken under the special grants in Hepworth, Mildmay, Port 
Elgin, Tiverton, Tara, Paisley and Teeswater. 

During the year approximately $16,000 was expended on new machinery, which 
consisted of four gasoline tractors, 17.34 h.p.. two 12-20 h.p.. and one 15-27 h.p., five 
graders, stone crusher, elevator, bin and screens, a number of wheel scrapers and steel 
road drags. 

Maintenance work on County Roads for 1919 amounted to $29,282.07, over 223 miles, 
on an approximate expenditure of $131.30 per mile. 

Huron County 

During 1919 Huron County spent most of their expenditure on maintenance work. 

The Provincial County Road construction consisted of a reinforced concrete arch 
culvert opposite Lot 42, con. XIII., I^ast Wawanosh Tov.-nship. The maintenance for 
these seventy-four miles amounted to $21,816.35, or an expenditure of $295 per mile 
for 1919. 

On County Road work, four miles of crushed gravel surfacing was undertaken, 
along with six small pipe and tile culverts, and five concrete culverts. Five bridges 
were constructed, ranging in spans from ten feet to eighty feet. A commendable 
feature of the work as undertaken is the neat design and construction of the concrete 
bridges and culverts. The maintenance work for these 344 miles amounted to $55,500, 
or approximately $161.30 per mile during 1919. 

During 1919 approximately $17,000 was expended on new machinery. This consisted 
of three gasoline tractors of 10-20 h.p., nine graders and two wheel scrapers. One 
crusher complete with screen bin and elevator was also purchased. The gasoline 
tractors did splendid work in light grading. 

During the year a number of additional miles have been added to the County 
System. These consist of important connecting links to adjoining counties and also 
extensions in the villages lying opposite to agricultural lands, and otherwise balancing 
out the System as a whole. 



38 . EEPORT UPON HIGHWAY Xo. 15 



In DficemlKT, owine to ill-health, Mr. Donald Patterson, who has been County 
Engineer of Huron County and County Road Superintendent since Huron County 
adopted the County Road System, was forced to relinquish his duties. His position has 
been taken by his son, Mr. T. R. Patterson. 

The total road mileage to the end of 1919, under the jurisdiction of the County of 
Huron, is 418 miles, of which 74 miles are designated as Provincial County. Roads. 

Middlesex County 

A commendable feature of the County Roads System in 1919 was the doing away 
with the township idea in regard to the management of the County Road System. The 
County Council at the June meeting was unanimous on this move to put the County 
Road System on a purely county basis. 

On the Provincial County Roads, which take in the Longwoods Road, Sarnia Gravel, 
Proof Line, and Wyton-St. Mary's Road, a number of small culverts were constructed. 
On the Longwoods Road, just west of Delaware, the Seabrook bridge was constructed. 
This structure consists of a 12-foot span of reinforced concrete slab design. The cost 
was $1,840. The Birr bridge, in Con. XII., of London Township, on the Proof Line Road, 
consisting of a 50-foot span of reinforced concrete and steel, was constructed at a cost of 
$4,758.24. This completes the permanent structures on the Proof Line Road. 

On the Provincial County Roads, consisting of eighty-nine miles, $24,346.22 was 
spent in maintenance, and an expenditure of $273.56 per mile during 1919. This work 
consisted of grading, resurfacing, dragging, oiling, snow roads, cutting weeds, opening 
drains and repairing culverts and bridges. 

On the County Roads 2,987 rods of tile draining were laid. Thirteen small pipe 
or tile culverts and two concrete culverts were constructed. In Con. XVI. of London 
Township, on County Road No. 16, a steel and concrete bridge of 24-foot span 
was constructed at a cost of $1,467.10. On County Road No. 17c, in Lot 30, Con- 
XVIII-XIX. of East Williams, a 50-foot span was built. Owing to the lateness of the 
season the concrete floor was not built. Over the Sydenham River, in the Town of 
Strathroy, a 75-foot span steel-concrete bridge, with a 6-foot sidewalk, was built. As in 
the case of the bridge in East Williams, the concrete floor was not laid owing to the 
cold weather setting in. The total bridge expenditure on these three bridges amounted 
to $12,668.52. 

On the County Roads there was an expenditure of $90,201.16, on maintenance on a 
mileage of 284 miles, and an expenditure per mile of $353.17, during the 1919 season. 

On the London Suburban Roads, which comprise a mileage of forty-four miles, 
an expenditure of $16,075.40 was made on maintenance, or an average expenditure of 
$365.33 per mile during 1919. On some of these roads adjacent to the city of London 
conditions have changed considerably, due to traffip developments during the last few 
years. It seems almost imperative that a more lasting surface should be laid on these 
roads in the close proximity of London. 

Some oiling was done on the Pipe Line Gravel Road between Springbank and Lon- 
don. Arrangements are being made whereby additional roads will be oiled during 1920. 

During 1919 approximately eighty additional miles was added to the County Road 
System. These additions were put on to round out the System and connect up numer- 
ous disjointed portions. The System at the end of 1919 comprises 506 miles, of which 
eighty-nine miles are designated as Provincial County Roads. 

Prescott and Russell 

During the year the United Counties of Prescott and Russell undertook an exten- 
sive programme of road construction. The programme of construction as carried out 
by these counties consisted of considerable work on the Provincial County Road from 
Orleans to Point Fortune. 

The contract for the construction of five miles of this Provincial County Road of 
bituminous macadam (asphalt binder), beginning at the Carleton boundary, at the 
village of Orleans, was awarded early in 1919 at the price of $3.35 per cubic yard for the 
crushed stone, and 36c. per square yard for the asphalt binder. About half a mile of this 
road is completed, and two and one-half miles with the bottom course laid down. Con- 
siderable work was done in order to prepare the sub-grade into shape, such as grading, 
rock cutting and draining before placing the stone. This latter work was done by day 
labour. 

In the vicinity of Rockland a contract was awarded for the construction of seven 
miles of road, beginning at the western liniits of the village, and running westward in 
order to connect with the above portion of road. The price was $3.30 per cubic yard 
for the crushed stone and 44c. per square yard for the Tarvia binder. About half a 
mile of this road is completed and another half mile with the bottom course laid down. 



1920 IMPROVEMEXT IX OXTAIUO. . 39 

At L'Orignal two miles of bituminous macadam was constructed. The surface was 
laid 16 feet in width on a 28-foot grade. The cost of this work was approximately 
?35,000. The contract price was $3.35 per cubic yard for the crushed stone and 
43c. ner square ?/ard for the tarvia binder. 

Preliminary grading, grubbing, and clearing right-of-way has been done for a dis- 
tance of three miles east of the village of Plantagenet. 

OoDosite Lot 14, Con. I., in East Hawkesbury, near Chute a Blondeau, a concrete 
beam bridge of 22-feet span was built at a cost of $4,266. 

On the maintenance of this Provincial County Road from Orleans to Point Fortune, 
a distance of sixty miles, the sum of $12,419.49 was spent, or approximately $207 per mile 
for the year 1919. 

On County Road No. 15, in the Township of East Hav.kesbury, westerly from the 
Quebec boundary. II/2 miles of waterbound macadam was constructed, at a cost of 
$9,547.23. Day labour was employed on this particular work and field stone used. 

On County Road No. 15, in the Township of West Hawkesbury, 1.12 miles of 
bituminous macadam, using asphalt as a binder, was constructed just south of Vank- 
leek Hill. This was done at a price of $3.35 per cubic yard for the crushed stone and 
42c. per square yard for the asphalt penetration. The cost of this work is approximately 
$14,000.00 to dateL 

On County Road No. 7, in the Township of South Plantagenet, three miles of water- 
bound macadam was constructed northerly from the village of St. Isidore. This work 
was undertaken by day labour at a cost of approximately $27,500, using quarried stone. 
Considerable drainage work was undertaken in the village of St. Isidore. 

In the Township of North Plantagenet, from Plantagenet village southerly to the 
Canadian Pacific Railway, a distance of IV2 miles was improved by building a water- 
bound macadam roadway. This was built by day labour at a cost of -"^g, 934. 19. and using 
quarried stone. 

In Russell Township, easterly from the Carleton boundary into the village of 
Russell, on County Road, metalling was done and three miles of waterbound macadam 
completed. This was built at a cost of approximately $18,000 by day labour, and 
using field stone. In comparison with the other work as undertaken by the counties 
during the season, this work at Russell was the cheapest, as far as the building of 
waterbound macadam construction is concerned. 

On County Road No. 8, in Clarence Township, 0.75 miles of waterbound macadam 
were built at a cost of approximately $2,900, near the village of Clarence. 

Four bridges were built during 1919 on the County Roads in Prescott and Russell 
and some of the approaches and finishing up completed on the 1918 work. These are all 
of reinforced concrete and steel design, and are of neat appearance and design. 

During the year approximately five miles were added to the County Road System; 
these consisted of small stretches at Clarence, Russell, Casselman, Rockland and at 
Bourget. 

The total mileage of the County Road System in Prescott and Russell at the end 
of 1919 consists of 228 miles, of which 60 miles are designated as Provincial County 
Roads. 

Ontario County 

During 1919 Ontario undertook a systematic maintenance of the roads under the 
County Road System. Construction work consisted chiefly of bridge and culvert con- 
struction. Early in the year, the Centre Road, running northerly from Whitby to 
Atherly, was approved as a Provincial CoUnty Road. Later in the year the road from 
Manchester through Port Perry, Sonya and Seagrave, to connect with Victoria County's 
Provincial County Road on to Lindsay, was also approved as a Provincial County Road. 

On these Provincial C-ounty Highways a number of culverts were built, and approxi- 
mately $14,000 was spent on maintenance work, which consisted of grading, light 
gravelling, ditching and general upkeep of the road surface. 

On the County Roads, four bridges, all of 16-foot span, and consisting of reinforced 
concrete slab, were constructed, viz.: The Columbus bridge, and the Hayes bridge in 
East Whitby Township, and Lehman's bridge and the Brock Road bridge in Pickering 
township. These four bridges have a good appearance and cost approximately 
$9,400. 

Oji County Road No. 7, in the Township of Uxbridge, the old road crossed the 
Grand Trunk Railway twice within a few rods. A new right-of-way was purchased to 
the east of the railway, and the right-of-way graded and gravelled for a distance of 
fifty-five rods. This is a great improvement over the old conditions, as it does away 
entirely with having to cross the railroad tracks. 

On County Road No. 14, Scugog Township, a concrete culvert was built, replacing 
an old wooden s-'tructure, which was unsafe for traffic. The height of fill at this point 
was 13 ft. 6 in., which made it necessary to build a long culvert 45 ft. long and 6 ft. 
square, of reinforced concrete. The approaches were widened considerably and a big 
improvement has been made. The cost of this work was approximately $1,800. 



40 REPORT UPOX HIGHWAY No. 15 



The maintenance work on the County Roads for 1919 totalled $33,628.03, which was 
expended on 173 miles, or approximately $136.60 per mile. 

During the year the following machinery was purchased: Two (12 ton) steam 
rollers, one heavy grader, and two wheel scrapers. Considerable work was done in light 
grading with a kerosene tractor of 15-30 h.p., purchased in 1918. 

The advisory committee consists of three members of the County Council. A change 
was made in the County Road Superintendents this year. 

A number of additions were made to the County Road System in Ontario County 
during the year 1919, approximately ten miles in all. This now makes a total road 
mileage under jurisdiction of the County Council of 243, of which 70 miles are desig- 
nated as Provincial County Roads. 

The County Road Superintendent is Mr. D. J. Kean, of Whitby. 

Wentworth County 

During 1919 approximately ninety miles was added to the County Road System of 
Wentworth County. Early in the year County Road No. 10. known as the Caledonia 
Road, and also County Road No. 1. known as the Dundas and Waterloo Road, were both 
designated as Provincial County Highways. During the fall the Burlington and Stoney 
Creek Road was also designated as a Provincial County Road. These, along with the 
Town Line Road, which was designated as a Provincial County Road in 1918, make a 
total of thirty-seven miles of Provincial County Highways. 

On Provincial County Road No. 56, known as the Dundas and Waterloo Road at 
what is known as Christie's Corner, two reinforced box culverts of 112 feet in length 
and 78 feet, were built across the intersection. On the intersection considerable grading 
and metalling was done. This is a great improvement over the old conditions. At 
Dwyer's, in Lot 36. Beverly Township, a reinforced concrete culvert was built. Main- 
tenance on these Provincial County Roads amounted to approximately $18,000, or an 
expenditure on these thirty-seven miles of $484.70 per mile during 1919. 

About ten miles of preliminary grading hag been done, all on the additional mileage 
added to the County Road System during the year. Two miles of metalling were also 
completed. Twenty small pipe and tile culverts and four concrete culverts were built. 
On County Road No. 20, opposite Lot 29, Con. III-IV, Beverly Township, a reinforced 
concrete slab bridge of 16-foot span with 24 feet of a clear roadway, was constructed. 
Wentworth County has a concrete crew under an experienced foreman, who do all the 
concrete work on these structures. ThisJ crew is supplied with a portable cook-house, 
tents, etc. 

On the suburban area, work was carried out at Hog's Back, in Con. I, West 
Flamboro. This work consisted of the filling of approximately 4,800 cubic yards, and 
the widening out of what was previously a narrow, dangerous turn in the road just 
south of the Grand Trunk Railway. A 4-foot concrete culvert. 75 feet in length, was 
also constructed. On Barton Street about half a mile of macadam road was built here 
and three concrete culverts. Good results have been obtained by oiling these suburban 
roads. 

Wentworth County Road mileage at the end of 1919 is 245 miles, of which 37 miles 
have been designated as Provincial County Roads. 

Victoria County 

During the season of 1919 Victoria County spent $27,359.46 on the construction of 
Provincial County Roads. An asphaltic concrete roadway, sixteen feet in width, extend- 
ing along the road allowance between Cons. VI-VII in the Township of Ops. from the 
south corporation limit of the Town of Lindsay, being the line between Lots 18 and 19, 
to a point opposite the south limit of the Riverside Cemetery, was laid a distance of 
3,88'r lin. feet. On Provincial County Road No. 40. in the Township of Ops. 280 rods of 
grading was undertaken. A number of culverts, pipe, tile, and concrete, completed the 
construction work done on these Provincial County Roads. 

On the maintenance and repair of Provincial County Roads the sum of $14,829.77 
was spent, or an expenditure of $218.08 per mile over the sixty-eight miles comprising 
these Provincial County Roads. 

On County Roads a number of small culverts were constructed. On County Road 
No. 9, what is known as Spring Creek Bridge, in Lot 15, Con. XIII, Mariposa Township, 
was constructed. This bridge was built of reinforced concrete slab of 12-foot span, and 
18 feet clear roadway. On County Road No. 8, what is known as Glenny's Bridge, in 
Lnt 17, Con. v., of ^lariposTi Township, was constructed. This bridge consists of a 
reinforced concrete arch with suspended floor, and is of a 40-foot span. 

Considerable work was done in the urban municipalities of Lindsay, Bobcaygeon. 
Fenelon Falls, Omemee, and Woodville. 



i 



1920 IMPROVEMEXT IX OXTARlo. 41 

In the Town of Lindsay, Queen Street from St. David Street to the boundary, St. 
David Street from King Street to Queen Street, and Lindsay Street from Mary Street, to 
the boundary, were paved with asphaltic concrete. 

1. Queen Street — St. David Street to boundary — 4,103.3 square yards $14,070 36 

2. St. David Street — King Street to Queen Street 946 60 

3. Lindsay Street — Mary Street to boundary 4,994 75 



520,011 71 



In Bobcaygeon, Joseph, Bolton and King Streeta were improved. This work con- 
sisted of macadam, tile draining, and one culvert. 

In Fenelon Falls, Colborne Street was improved. A new concrete culvert was con- 
structed and considerable grading and gravelling. 

In Omemee — one mile of macadam, eleven feet in width, eight inches in depth, was 
built on King Street. 

In Woodville, on King Street and Eldon Street about lOO rods of macadam roadway 
was h'liilt. 

Approximately $26,008.68 was spent on the maintenance and repair of 160 miles of 
County Roads, or an average expenditure per mile of -5162.55, during 1919. 

During 1919 the sum of $10,302.61 was spent on the purchasing of new machinery, 
including a steam roller, crusher complete, steel tank, a number of drags and scrapers, 
dump wagons, two portable cabins, and other small tools and supplies. 

Additional mileage was added to the County Road System during 1919. The total 
mileage uner jurisdiction of the County Council at the end of 1919 is 228 miles, ol 
which 68 miles have been designated as Provincial County Roads. 

Lanark 

During 1919 seventy-one miles of Provincial County Roads were designated and 
approved of. These are the Calabosie. Perth and Smith's Falls Road, the Perth-Carleton 
Place-Ashton Road, and the Perth-Rideau Ferry Road. 

A suburban area has been established about Smith's Falls, and opposite Lot 1. Con. 
II, Elmsley, on the Smith's Falls-Perth Road two mi-les of macadam roadway has been 
built during 1919. The Black Creek Bridge opposite Lot 4, Ccn. III. in North Elmsley 
Township, consisting of two spans of 30 feet each, of concrete steel, was built at a cost 
of $4,623.00. The Swalo Bridge in Lot 1, Con. II, North Elmsley Township, was con- 
structed of concrete and steel, consisting of a 24-foot span and costing $1,975.00. 

On Provincial County Road No. 83, in Lot 1, Con. III. Drummond, a concrete and 
steel bridge was erected of 24-ft. span at a cost of approximately §2,000.00. 

An expenditure totalling $14,378.10 was spent on the seventy-one miles of Pro- 
vincial County Roads on maintenance and repair work during the year, or an average 
expenditure of $202.20 per mile. 

Approximately GVj miles of macadam and ll-j miles of gravel road were built on 
the country- roads. 

The Ferguson Falls Bridge over the Mississippi River in Lot 18. Con. XII of Drum- 
mond Township was constructed during the year. This bridge consists of five spans 
each of 42 feet 6 inches in length. The structure was constructed of concrete and steel, 
a.nd the cost was $20,751.65. 

Lanark County do all their own concrete work by day labour for bridge abutments 
a-Dd culverts. 

A commendable feature of the Lanar'K. Organization is the system of road camps. 
At present there are three of these complete camps with tents, stable tents, cook house 
and kitchen. These are m.oved from nlace to place as the work brogresses. and save 
an immense amount of time, as well as making for the comfort of the men employed. 

Haltoo County 

On account of the scarcity of labour, Halton County was unable to get as much 
work completed for 1919 as was contemplated. Considerable grading and hill cutting 
has been done, so that approximately twelve miles are now ready for metalling. 

The most important work undertaken during 1919 was the completion of the 
Tansley Bridge. The Tansley Ravine is about 650 feet wide and 120 feet deep, and 
was formerly crossed by a 90-foot steel bridge about 25 feet above the stream, the 
approaches making a detour down the sides of the hills. These approaches were dan- 
gerous and practically impassable in bad weather, being on a curve, with grade as high 
as 161^ per cent. This steel structure, built in 1885, was badly rusted and was found 
to be too light for the traffic at the time Dundas Street became a Provincial County 



42 REPORT UPOX HIGHWAY No. 15 

Road. The County Council of Halton decided to build a new high level structure from 
the Centre Line of Dundas Street on the east to a point about 45 feet south of Dundas 
Street on the west side in order to shorten the structure by avoiding the cut made by the 
present road. Investigations and plans were then made by Mr. A. W. Connor, C.E., of 
Bowman & Connor, Consulting Engineers, Toronto. In August, 1917, the contract was 
awarded to Norman McLeod, Ltd., Toronto, who submitted a proposal to use old I.C.R. 
deck latticed girders, that had recently been replaced by heavier structure. 

The superstructure consists of five-deck latticed girders of 108 ft. span, 13 feet 6 
inches centre to centre with concrete floor beams and a concrete floor slab, 20 ft. wide 
from curb to curb. The curbs are 12 inches high by 10% inches wide, and the concrete 
panel railing is 4 feet high. 

The substructure consists of concrete abutments, with reinforced slab and counter- 
fort wing walls and four concrete piers. The floor of the bridge is about 98 feet above 
low water level, and about 20 feet below the level of Dundas Street on the west side. 
The cut for the west approach will have a maximum depth of about 6 feet, and the 
approach will have a grade of 5 per cent. This approach reaches Dundas Street by a 
reverse curve of 253 foot radius. 

The old cut on the east side was utilized and filled to the new grade of 5 per cent. 
The maximum depth of fill was 35 feet. Some of the grading and macadamizing of 
the approaches will not be completed until spring, but the bridge is now open for 
traffic. 

The total length of the structure is 542.5 feet, or with approaches 1,450 feet. It 
was designed for Class C loading of the Ontario Department of Highways (20-ton con- 
centrated load). 

The launching of the girders without falsework was probably the most interesting 
feature of the work. A pilot (or pair of triangular trusses 60 ft. long with cross 
bracing) was used to carry each girder across its span. 

The bridging of this Twelve Mile Creek and the proposed bridging of the Sixteen 
Mile Creek will enable this road to be so improved as to provide a main route between 
Toronto and Hamilton (via Cooksville and the Eaton Highway) relieving the traffic on 
the present Toronto-tHamilton Highway. 

The work on the Tansley Bridge was done on a cost plus basis, and the total 
expenditure was about $110,000.00. 

Approximately .$4,000.00 was spent on maintenance on the thirty-eight miles of 
Provincial County Roads, or an approximate expenditure of $105.00 per mile. 

York County 

During the year the following main county roads were assumed and designated as 
Provincial County Roads: 

(1) Yonge Street, northerly from the City of Toronto to the boundary of the County 
of Simcoe, except those portions within the \iillage of Richmond Hill and the town of 
Aurora. 

(2) The Sutton Road, from Yonge Street easterly and northerly to the Ontario 
County boundary, except those portions within the town of Newmarket and the village 
of Sutton. 

(3) The Kingston Road, from the City of Toronto easterly to the Ontario County 
boundary. 

(4) Dundas Street, from the City of Toronto westerly to the Peel County boundary. 
On Yonge Street from Lots 91 to 93 inclusive, approximately 0.75 miles of bitumin- 
ous macadam was laid, 18 feet in width. 

On the Sutton Road, what is known as Eagle Street from Yonge Street easterly to 
the Newmarket limits, approximately 0.75 miles of bituminous macadam, 18 feet in 
width, was laid. The old narrow road here was widened, the fences moved back, and a 
great improvement has been made. On Huron Street, from Newmarket to Con. Ill, 
3,000 feet of bituminous macadam were laid. A number of concrete culverts were con- 
structed northerly in the Townships of East Gwillimbury, North Gwillimbury and 
Georgina. 

On the Kingston Road, oqiposite Lots 1-7, Con. I. Scarboro Township, approximately 
1.5 miles of waterbound macadam were laid. 

Approximately $21,700.00 was spent on maintenance and repair work on these 
68 miles of Provincial County Roads, or an average expenditure during 1919 of ap- 
proximately $319.00 per mile. 

On County Roads, 3.95 miles of bituminous macadam, and 5.41 miles of waterbound 
macadam were laid. 

Bituminous macadam using a concrete base was laid in Aurora. Bituminous 
macadam was laid on Vaughan Road from city limits to Wychwood Avenue — from 



1920 IMPROVEMENT IN ONTARIO. 43 

Lots 11 to 15, Concession IV, Vaughan — on the Weston Road from city limits — Weston 
Road south, and also on the Mount Albert Road, opposite Lot 10, Concession VII, East 
Gwillimbury. 

Waterbound macadam was laid on the following sections of County Roads: On the 
Kennedy Road Townline, Con. VI to Con. VII — on the Weston Road from Woodbridge 
limits to Lot 12, Con. VII, Vaughan — on the Markham Road. Cons. I, II, III of Markham.J 
and on the Malton Road opposite Con. B, Etobicoke. 

A number of culverts, 41 pipe and tile culverts, and 48 concrete culverts, have been 
constructed on these county roads. Considerable preliminary grading has also been 
done in preparation for future work. 

The Union Bridge in Schomberg, the Cedar Brae Bridge and the Curtis Bridge in 
King Township, the Vandorf Bridge in Whitechurch Township, and the Gorham B.ridge in 
Newmarket, were constructed during 1919. These are all of neat reinforced concrete 
design. 

A commendable feature in York County has been the erection of neat motor signs 
at all the important road intersections. These signs are erected by the County, and 
space is rented annually. Below the directing signs and advertising space is a small 
bill board where farmers are allowed to post sale bills. The revenue derived from the^e 
signs, after paying for themselves in about three years time, is devoted for miscellaneous 
expenditure on the highways. 



Toronto, May 12th, 1920. 
W. A. McLean, Esq., 

Deputy Minister of Highways, Ontario. 
Sir: 

I have the honour to submit a report of my inspection of the county road work 
done in 1919 by the Counties of Essex, Kent, Norfolk, Brant, Northumberland and 
Durham, Hastings, Prince Edward, Renfrew, and Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry. 

A pronounced forward step was taken by nearly all of the counties, but owing to 
the scarcity and high cost of labour, and difficulty in securing machinery, early expec- 
tations of results obtainable were not fulfilled. In some places the authorities were 
not reconciled to post-war costs and wages, which invariably resulted in lowering the 
energy put forth by men and teams, especially the latter. It costs more to pay $5.00 
for a one-yard load than it does to pay $7.00 for a yard and a half. Generally speaking, 
if even the pre-war efficiency of labour were obtainable, the wages paid last year would 
have been remarkably cheap in comparison with the amount of currency in the country 
and with living costs. It would therefore seem that municipalities should not hold 
back in expectation that construction costs will be lower in the near future. 

Arthur Sedge^vick, 

Assistant Engineer. 

Brant County 

As in Norfolk, attention last year was concentrated on high class construction of 
the leading roads, particularly in the suburbs of Brantford. Owing to gravel being 
available, and to the experience gained by the city, the preference in this county is for 
concrete roads. Even with gravel available in the vicinity, this class of surfacing is 
more expensive than tar-macadam. 

The principle piece of work done during the year was the grading, draining and 
concrete surfacing of the hill on the northern outskirts of the city on road No. 7. The 
total cost of this half-mile of work was about $20,000. The pavement varied from 18 
to 21 feet in width. The heavy grading, removal of trees, construction of catch-basins 
and retaining wall, with the high prices prevailing for labour, made this work very 
costly. 

Work was also undertaken on the Mount Pleasant Road, in the southern suburbs 
of the citv. A little more than one-quarter mile of concrete pavement cost nearly 
$9,000. Included in this cost was some 600 feet of two foot filling, and 418 feet of 12- 
inch metal pipe for property entrances. 

Some waterbound macadam construction was begun east of St. George. It was 
intended to lay a double track road, but the delays in stone delivery forced the engi- 
neer to restrict the stone to eight feet wide to tide the traffic over until the next year. 
A mile and a half of grading, and one mile of surfacing was completed. A feature of 
this piece of work was the use of a mechanical unloader. 

One 80-foot bridge was built over the Whiteman Creek, and the road grade through 
the flats raised. Numerous other small culverts were constructed. A little grading 
and dragging was done in other parts of the county. 



U EEPOFiT UPON HIGHWAY Xo. 15 

Essex County 

In this county construction was not commenced until midsummer. Wlien winter 
set in about five miles of concrete roadway had been laid in the vicinity of the " Border 
Cities." The price of this pavement averages $2^5 per square yard, or $30,000 per 
mile, reflecting the unusually high labour costs prevailing in the south-western peninsula. 

On what is known as t)he Front Road east of Ford City, the materials were delivered 
by scows to a dock at the road side, and from there distributed on the road by indus- 
trial railway. 

The county has purchased another thirty-five acres of gravel pit property, con- 
tiguous to the Michigan Central Railroad, and the W.E. and L.S. Railroad. Railroad 
spurs have been put in and everything is being made ready to ship gravel to the whole 
of the county roads by rail or motor truck in the coming year. The price paid for the 
gravel was a thousand dollars per acre, but there is more than sufficient gravel to 
surface the whole of the county system of roads. 

Much of the bridge work remained uncompleted when cold weather set in. A 
70-foot span steel bridge was built over the Ruscourt River on the middle road Ro- 
chester, and a 76-foot span over the Hillman Creek in Mersea. A number of others, 
ranging from twelve to twenty feet span are being constructed in various parts of 
the county. Generally speaking, the cost of concrete for bridge work is high, owing to 
the long distance gravel or stone has to be hauled. 

An endeavour has been made to keep the log-drags working on the clay roads. 
The farmers,- however, to whom this work is entrusted, are not showing the same 
interest, or have not always the necessary time at their disposal, and in the fall when 
the roads are in the worst condition and the greatest crop movement is taking place, 
the dragging is neglected. To be efficient, this is the season when the road-drag should 
be kept constantly employed. 

Hastings County 

In this county, with largely increased aippropriations, an effort was made to bring 
the roads in the southern portion back into a reasonable state of repair. G-ravel was 
largely used for resurfacing, but local quarried stone was used for resurfacing near 
Belleville and Point Ann, quarry stone was used at Shannonville. 

In the south a total of some sixty miles of road received a resurfacing, generally 
of a more or less light character. 

In the north twenty-eig-ht thousand dollars ($28,000.00) was spent on the Hastings 
Road. On account of the broken nature of the country this is an expensive road to 
improve. Some of the money was used in an effort to reduce some of the many steep 
grades. Very little permanent road material is obtainable unless rock crushing 
machinery is taken in. 

About $15,000.00 was spent reconstructing several concrete bridges from 12 to 32- 
foot span, which has been held over during the war. 

Kent County 

No great activity took place in this county last year. The usual amount of bridge 
and culvert construction was done. Road dragging was not kept up as well as usual 
for reasons already stated. Some gravel resurfacing was done late in the year. 

Two oontract.s were let for concrete pavements on the Provincial County Road at 
Wallaceburg, and in the Chatham Suburban Area. There .was great difficulty in getting 
delivery of gravel, so that the work was badly disorganized and retarded. Only 503 
feet was laid on the Chatham contract, and one-half mile at Wallaceburg. The con- 
tract iprice at these places was $2.45 per square yard. Draining and grading is extra. 
As the pUmtifnl supply of Point Edward gravel is the only hope of the north half of 
the county getting good roads, it is important that the supply be not restricted. 

Norfolk County 

Progress in this county was centred on tar-macadam construction of the Pro- 
vincial County Roads leading south from Simcoe and east from Tilsonburg. The town 
of Simcoe itself did a considerable amount of this class of construction, and the county 
completed two miles of 18-foot roadway from the southern limits of the town. Addi- 
tional grading was done in advance with the expectation of continuing the work to 
Port Dover in 1920. This work was done by day labour at a cost of about $18,000.00 
per mile for grading and surfacing complete. 

Work was also commenced at the county boundary near Tillsonburg. but it was not 
possible. to finish any portion before cold weather. 



1920 IMPROVE M EXT IX OXTAKlO. 45 



Work was also begun on tar-macadam for the Main Street in Port Dover, but the 
shortage of stone prevented the work being completed last year. More than a mile of 
road has been underdrained on both sides, and the foundation course of stone placed 
for a total expenditure of $17,000.00. 

The Franklin bridge in South Walsingham, over Big Creek, which was commenced 
in 1918, was completed, and the approaches raised and graded. Considerable cutting 
and filling was done on Road No. 9. leading east from the bridge. 

New concrete abutments were placed under the bridge at Teeterville, and con- 
struction of a new overflow bridge in Con. IX, Walsingham. 

With attention being concentrated on these important works it is natural that 
maintenance and improvement of the remaining road should suffer in comparison. 
This defect should be righted in succeeding years. 

Northumberland and Durham 

In this county an endeavour is being made to immediately bring a large mileage 
of road to a reasonable state of repair with a minimum outlay. Gravel is fairly 
plentiful and well distributed throughout the county. 

With the use of a mechanical tractor and heavy grader, the shoulders were cut off 
the Provincial County Roads leading north from Port Hope and from Bowmanville, and 
a considerable amount of grave!ling done. A motor truck was purchased for this work, 
but did not give the results anticipated. The Cobourg to Hastings Road was also put in 
good shape, and also some patching done on the Trenton to Campbellford road. 

The usual annual grants were made to the towns and villages, making a total of 
$1,800.00, with which six miles of gravelling was done, and a concrete pavement laid in 
the subway under the G.T.R. and C.P.R. at Cobourg. 

About $25,000.00 worth of patching and other repairing was done on the remaining 
county roads. 

No bridge construction was undertaken last year. 

Prince Edward County 

Among the chief works undertaken in this county was the reconstruction of the 
causeway to Big Island. The causeway which is a half mile long, was raised, widened, 
fenced and gravelled, and a new wooden culvert constructed over the channel, at a 
total cost of about §9,000.00. 

One and one-quarter miles of new waterbound macadam construction was partiallj*^ 
completed at Glenora, and one mile of double track road was built in the Mount Plea- 
sant section of the Belleville road on a portion which had been particularly bad every 
spring. In addition to the above, nearly two miles of gravel resurfacing was done on 
Missassaga Island, and nearly four miles of macadam resurfacing north of Bloomtield. 

On the Picton to Trenton Road over four miles of repairing was done in Hillier 
and Hallowell Townships. On road No. 7, 3^^ miles of heavy resurfacing was done 
from Demorestville south. On road No. 16, I14 miles of resurfacing was done, and 
other Light maintenance work was performed generally throughout the county. 

Renfrew 

Delays in delivery of machinery was the cause of this county not getting under way 
until late in the season. Three separate plants were started at Arnprior, Renfrew and 
Perabroke. 

The road from Arnprior to Braeside was graded for three miles, and a half mile of 
double track waterbound macadam built. From Arnprior west, a half mile of water- 
bound macadam was built. The stone quarried at Braeside is inclined to be soft, but 
can be quarried and delivered on the road in that vicinity at a reasonable cost. 

West of Renfrew a quarry was opened up and a large amount of stone taken out 
and piled ready for the crusher. The stone in this region is extremely hard, which 
will make it very expensive to work. About one mile of read has been graded. 
Grading was started at Pembroke and extended south towards the stone quarrv, which 
was opened up at Shady Nook. 

On the Provincial County Road one 12-foot arch bridge was built over the Ber- 
lanquet Creek in Adamston Township, at a cost of $7,400.00, and a 16-foot fllat slab 
bridge over the Hennesy Creek in Stafford Township, at a cost of $9,400.00. In each 
instance a considerable part of the cost was incurred in grading the approaches. 

A 50-foot bridge, with two sidewalks, was built in the Village of Beachburg at a 
cost to date of $12,500.00. A 100-foot timber trestle bridge was built at Snake River at 
a cost reported to date of some $900.00. Other small bridges were built in other parts 



4G EEPORT UPON HIGHWAY Xo. 15 

of the county. The approaches to Claybank Bridge, over the Madawaska River, in 
McNab Township, have been greatly improved at considerable expense. This work was 
rendered necessary by the slipping away of the former roadway. 

Light repairs have been performed generally throughout the system. 

Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry 

In this county the almost imjpassability of the roads, especially during the early 
spring weeks, created a demand for the speedy resurfacing of large mileages and con- 
sequently with low mileage costs. During the past year a number of contracts were 
let and isome fifty miles were surfaced with loose crushed field stone. Much of this 
work will only serve to keep the traffic above the mud until a more permanent sur- 
facing can be applied at some time in the future. At the same time several pieces of 
more permanent waterbound macadam work were commenced in various parts of the 
United Counties. These works are serving as object lessons, and there is evidence that 
more permanent work generally will be demanded. 

From Green Valley .South three miles, a nine foot waterbound macadam was con 
structed and Tarvia B was later applied from two miles north of Alexandria, and con- 
tinued to one and one-half miles south of the same place. The construction of the 
connecting link in Alexandria was deferred until the coming year. One miles of 12- 
foot waterbound macadam on an 8-inch cobblestone .foundation, was built west of 
Dalkeith, at a cost of $12,000.00. 

Construction was commenced on the road running north of Maxville. Three miles 
of 12-foot cobble foundation was laid in the worst fpart of the road at a cost of $7,000.00. 
The road allowance here was only forty feet wide, and it is worth commenting that 
the property owners donated sufficient land for a 66-foot right of way, and moved the 
fences back at their own expense. 

North of Cornwall one and one-quarter miles of 16-foot waterbound was built at a 
cost of $10,000.00, and at Winchester one and one-half miles of 16-foot road for 
$17,000.00. 

In the Village of South Mountain three-quarter miles of 16-foot macadam was built 
for $6,000.00. 

The bridge building was restricted to two 25-foot concrete spans on the Provincial 
County Road north of Cornwall, and several smaller concrete structures in other parts 
of the county. 



W. A. McLean, Esq., 

Deputy Minister of Highuays, Ontario. 

Sm: 

I have the honour to submit a brief report on the work carried out on county roads 
during the year 1919 in the Counties of Lambton, Haldimand, Waterloo. Perth, Oxfprd, 
Dufferin, Simcoe, Lennox and Addington, and Leeds and Grenville, in accordance with 
the provisions of the Highway Improvement Act. 

In addition to the regular inspection of the Department, a number of special visits 
were made during the year at the request of the Road Superintendents. 

The various County Councils and Suburban Commissions, as well at Road Super- 
intendents, seemed at all times to ajppreciate the aid and advice of the Department. 

The lal>our proposition, with one or two exceptions, as in previous years, was the 
chief factor in retarding work in the several counties. However, considerable new 
road machinery was bought, and the outlook for increased and improved construction 
In the near future looks very promising. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Lambton County 



W. CORXKIL. 

As.<iista7it Engineer. 



Lambton County Road System was only established in 1918, and consists, up to date- 
of 256 miles of County Roads, and 103 miles of Provincial County Roads. 

Extensive road construction has not been undertaken, so far the count v apparently 
contenting themselves with perfecting their organization, constructing bridges and 
culverts, and adopting a system of maintenance. 

The total expenditure on bridges was $30,363.15. the main item of which was the 
Wilkesport Bridge, which consisted of two 80-feet steel sipans on a concrete sub- 
structure, and was completed at a total cost of approximately $21,312.00. 



1920 IMPEOVEMENT IN ONTAKIO. 47 

In the matter of maintenance and repair, the county spent a sum equal to 
approximately $105.00 per mile of Provincial County Roads, and $72.00 per mile of 
Coiinty Roads. 

The county suffers to a great extent through the unequal distribution of suitable 
road material, the north half being fairly well supplied, while the south half cannot 
obtain adequate supplies without adding very materially to the cost of 
construction, through the excessive long haul of materials. Negotiations are 
under way to offset the scarcity of material in the south half of the county, by putting 
in a siding at Petrolia to connect with fifty acres of gravel purchased at this /place. 
The idea is to transport the gravel in the winter time by rail to the nearest point where 
construction is to take place the following season. 

The organization in this county, while not established on strictly township lines, 
provides for an adjustment of the expenditure in each township every five years. 

Haldimand County 

An extensive programme of construction was carried out during the year by the 
county, the most important of which was the construction of thirteen miles of water- 
bound macadam roadway, 16 feet wide, and 6 inches thick, between Caledonia and 
Jarvis. This work was done by contract at a cost of approximately $7,400.00 per mile, 
and will serve as a base for a bituminous surface at some future date. 

In addition to the above, the county also operated two rock quarries, and had two 
construction outfits of their own at work; one east of Nelles' Corners on Provincial 
County Road No. 60, and the other on County Road No. 7, from Selkirk northerly. 
The work on Provincial County Road No. 60, consisted of the construction of 3.5 miles 
of waterbound macadam roadway, 16 feet wide and 9 inches thick, from Cayuga 
westerly, built at a total cost of $30,290.79, while the work on County Road No. 7 
consisted of 4.75 miles of waterbound macadam 10 feet wide and 8 inches thick, from 
Selkirk northerly, and was built at a total cost of $23,622.28. 

The county has also undertaken quite an extensive programme of grading in pre- 
paration for a large mileage of construction next year. 

The County System comprises 123 miles, or 13.7 per cent, of the total mileage of 
the county; of this 53 miles is Provincial County Roads, and 70 miles is County Roads. 

It is gratifying to note the practical enthusiasm shown by the different county 
officials in the good raads movement, and if a system of systematic maintenance is 
now established on the roads as they are constructed, along with the present rate of 
construction, it should not be long before the clay roads disappear on the Haldimand 
County System. 

Waterloo County 

The County of Waterloo adopted a County Road System some years ago, and to 
date the system comprises 176 miles of County Roads, 23 miles of Provincial County 
Roads, and 30 miles of Suburban Area, the total being 26.8 per cent, of the entire road 
mileage of the county. Some few miles were added to the system this year to provide 
for continuity. 

The principle work undertaken this year was the construction of three miles of 
concrete road 16 feet wide and 7 inches thick, on Provincial County Road No. 75; one 
and one-half miles on either side of St. Jacobs. This work was let by contract for the 
sum of $1.87 per square yard, the county to do the grading for the sub-grade, and also 
make the shoulder fill. Approximately 1.25 miles of this concrete roadway was com- 
piled this year, and it is the intention to complete the remainder just as soon as 
weather conditions will permit in the spring. 

In addition to the above, 1,076 lineal feet of pavement, 20 feet wide and 7V2 inches 
thick, was laid in the Village of Wellesley at a total cost of $4,735.88. 

The only other work of importance in this county, outside of some small bridges 
and culverts, was a mile of tar penetration road, built in the suburban area of Gait, 
and a mile on either side of Fenwood graded and gravelled. 

The organization in this county is established on strictly township lines, and while 
all the work is under the supervision of a county road superintendent, yet with the 
heavy traffic demands in the centre and southern part of the county, where the pros- 
perous towns and cities are situated, it would seem that the sooner the township 
system can be done away with the sooner will the real effectiveness of the concrete 
road policy started, be realized. 

Perth County 

One of the principal items of construction undertaken in Perth County this year 
was the construction of 7,756 lineal feet of concrete pavement on County Roads 46 and 



48 REPORT UPON HIGHWAY Xo. 15 

■17 in the town of Listowel. The streets were paved the full width, and a concrete 
curb was also constructed on both sides. The Department subsidized the county to the 
extent of iO'A on a width of IG feet. The work was done by contract at a cost of $2.10 
per square yard, the total cost of the 16-foot width being $36,331.61. The town itself 
constructed quite an area of concrete pavement on its main streets in 1917. This work, 
along with the present construction, gives the town quite a large area of permanently 
paved streets. 

In addition to above, a few small concrete bridges were constructed, and 984 rods 
of tile laid on Provincial County Roads. 

The County Road work consisted chiefly of grading, gravelling and tile draining. 
In all about 4.43 miles of road graded. 7.83 miles of gravel roads were constructed 

8 feet wide, and 6 inches to 8 inches thick, and 155.4 rods of tile drains were laid. 

On County Roads 50, 51 and 52, in the town of Mitchell, .88 miles of broken stone 
road were constructed, 16 feet wide and 10 inches thick. 

Dufferin County 

This is the third year for this county in the County Road System, having adopted 
the same in 1917. 

The work on Provincial County Roads consisted of the construction of 2.33 miles 
of crushed stone road, 16 feet wide and 10 inches thick, while on County Roads .8 miles 
were graded and 1.9 miles of crushed stone road were built 9 feet wide and about 

9 inches thick. 

The principal item of bridge construction consisted of a 50-ft. span through girder 
concrete bridge, on Road 19, opposite lot 15, and was built at a total cost of $3,761.55. 

In addition to the above two other smaller bridges were built, one 12-ft. span con- 
crete slab bridge with railing, on road 18, E. V2 concession 5. Amaranth, at a total cost 
of $1,365.42; and the other one was a 20-ft. span deck girder bridge with railing, on road 
22, opposite lot 26, East Luther, built at a total cost of $1,578.26. 

The County purchased this year two new road rollers and 3 complete crushing out- 
fits, along with a number of road graders and drags. With the new machinery available. 
the outlook for increased and effective road construction, looks promising. 

Simcoe County 

Simcoe County's system consists of 451 miles of road; of this mileage 340 miles is 
county roads, and 112 miles Provincial County Roads. 

The principal items of road construction consisted of 3.25 miles of slag and gravel 
road constructed from the town limits of Midland to the town limits of Penetang, .75 
miles of concrete road 20 feet wide, constructed on Provincial County Road No. 73, from 
Orillia easterly, and one mile of gravel road constructed at Orr's Lake. 

The principal items of bridge construction consisted of the Dumford Bridge, a 28-ft. 
span girder bridge with concrete floor slab and rail, built on the townline of Tay and 
Matchedash, at a total cost of $2,500.63. The Tracy Bridge of similar construction on 
Con. 5 and 6, Adjala, built at a cost of $2,129.60. The Vesper Bridge, a 30-foot span 
girder with a concrete floor slab, on lot 2, Con. 8 and 10, Vesper, built at a total cost of 
$3,097.53, and the McMaster Bridge, a 40-foot span, concrete beam and slab, on lot 29. 
Con. 6 and 7, Vesper, built at a total cost of $5,504.46. In addition to the above the 
Deadman Bridge, a 60-foot span, was completed, and three other smaller bridges were 
constructed, ranging from 12 feet to 15 feet in span. 

The road at Orr's Lake was in very bad condition, as it was very little above the 
lake level, and w'as more or less of a mire hole. They have now graded it about 3 feet 
above lake level, ditched it and put on a double coat of gravel. 

With the exception of the above, and the work in the towns which was covered by 
grants, very little construction was undertaken, the county contenting themselves with 
maintaining the roads with the funds available. In fact an elaborate system of construc- 
tion could not be effectively undertaken until such time as the county obtains adequate 
road machinery for the purpose, which they do not possess at the present time. 

Lennox and Addin^^ton 

Lennox and Addington's system consists of 76 miles of Provincial County Roads, 
and 107 miles of county roads, or approximately 24 per cent, of the total road mileage 
in the area served by county roads. 

The County did not undertake very much that could be called construction this 
year, but contented themselves principally with maintenance and the purchase of new 
macliinery. 

The maintenance on Provincial County Roads amounted to approximately $272.00 
per mile while the County road maintenance was approximately $116.00 per mile. 



J 



1920 IMPROA'E.MEXT IX OXTAHIO. 4!> 



The new machinery purchased consisted of 2 rock crushers, 1 screen and bin, 2 
road rollers, 1 engine and 9 spreading wagons, as well as considerable smaller equipment. 
The chief drawback in this County is the narrow right-of-way. It will be necessary 
before effective construction work can be undertaken, especially on Provincial County 
Roads, that the fences be moved back to give them a clear right of way of 66 feet. 

With the road machinery at their disposal, a vigorous road building campaign 
should be in evidence in this County in the near future. 

Leeds and Qrenville 

Leeds and Grenville system consists of 433 miles of county roads, and 6 miles of 
suburban roads in Smith's Falls, or a total mileage of 439 miles. The total mileage 
road in the United Counties is 1,775, tiherefore, the county road mileage is 24.7 per 
cent, of the total mileage '^if the Ignited Counties. 

The work in this county this year consisted chiefly of grading and metalling with 
crushed granite and limestone. Considerable work has also been done in widening and 
straightening the roads in places, and also in the reduction of grades. 

In addition to the above five small concrete bridges were built, ranging in span 
from 12 feet to 25 feet. 

This county, as well as most of the others, has suffered from the scarcity and high 
price of labour. However, with advent of changed labour conditions along with the 
unlimited quantities of road material possessed by the county, -an extensive road build- 
ing programme should be in evidence. 

Oxford 

Oxford's system consists of 250 miles of County Roads and 26 miles of Provincial 
County Roads, or a total of 276 miles, being -21 per cent, of the tO(tal road mileage. 

The work in this county consisted chiefly of grading and metalling, the greater part 
of the material used was crushed gravel, though in a few cases crushed stone was used. 

The most extensive improvement consisted of S^a. miles of road graded and partially 
metalled, on County Road. No. 4, in East Oxford. The grading was completed, but owing 
to the lateness of the season and bad weather, the metalling w^as not all completed. 

Similar work was undertaken on a number of other roads. In all about 15 miles 
of road was graded, and about 5 miles metalled, in addition to the ordinary maintenance 
and repair. 

Very good work was also done in scarifying and re-shaping some of the rutted 
macadam roads. 



50 REPORT UPON HIGHWAY Xo. 15 



APPENDIX No. 6 



PROVINCIAL HIGHWAYS 

W. A. McLean, 

Deputy Minister of Highways. 

Sir,— 

In pursuance of provisions of tlie Provincial Highway Act, I have the honour to 
submit the attached statements of work and expenditures on Provincial Highways for 
the year 1919. 

All charges included in the several totals cover pay sheets for men and teams, and 
accounts for materials used in maintenance and construction for the period January 31, 

1919, to January 31, 1920, unless otherwise indicated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Geo- Hogarth, 
Engineer o/ Highways. 

WENTWORTH COUNTY 
Ancaster Township 

Maintenance work was carried on through the entire township, and construction 
work only where it was absolutely essential because of the great difficulty in getting 
labour. The road was an old worn-out macadam, badly rutted in many places and for 
the most part without side ditches. 

From Dundas turn to the Village of Ancaster. the ditches were deepened and 
widened and in the cuts it was necessary to do considerable wheeler and slusher work 
to put in even temporary ditches which were badly needed. West of the Village the 
cuts were very narrow and these were widened and the necessary ditches constructed, 
but none of the work was brought up to standard cross-section, as men and teams could 
be secured only periodically. 

The following entrance culverts were put in, and the cost of the pipe was charged 
to construction and the laying to maintenance as they were not placed in their final 
location; 450 feet of 12-inch, 15-inch and 18-inch vit. pipe; 320 feet of 8-inch. 10-inch. 
12-inch and 14-inch corrugated pipe; 84 feet of 8-inch and 10-inch concrete pipe were 
cleaned out and relaid. The maintenance charges in connection with laying and relay- 
ing entrance culverts, the cleaning out of existing pipe culverts and rebuilding a par- 
tially collapsed stone masonry culvert are $79.60. The construction charges for entrance 
culverts include the cost of vitrified pipe, which is now in stock for future use. and. 
in addition to freight and delivery charges, make up a total of $346.56. In January. 

1920, preparations were made for building new culverts on Ancaster grade and ex- 
penses incidental to delivery of equipment and materials for this work amounted 
to $62.55. 

As soon as the road was taken over by the Department, the shoulders were trimmed 
off and the surface of the road evened up and given a proper crown by the use of an 
exceptionally heavy road grader pulled by a steam tractor. In addition temporary 
ditches were constructed by the grader with the result that the general condition of 
the road was greatly improved. In addition the ditches through the village of Ancaster 
were cleaned out and the surface of the road patched with crushed stone. This con- 
stitutes the maintenance work and the charges amount to $2,168.03. Approximately 
IV'j miles were resurfaced without using a roller at cost of $4,22.^.11. 

Charges amounting to $81.25 were incurred in connection with delivery of equip- 
ment and erection of buildings in preparation for operating Ancaster Quarry. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township. 

Earthwork $3.417 20 $1,025 16 

Road Surface 4.225 11 1,267 53 

Bridges and Culverts 62 55 18 76 

Side Entrance Culverts 346 56 103 97 

Quarry 81 25 24 37 

$8,132 67 $2,439 79 $2,439 79 



Maintenance 

$2,168 05 
79 60 


$650 41 
23 88 




$2,247 63 


$674 29 


$674 29 


hip 


$3,114 08 









1920 IMPROVEMENT IX OXTAEIO. 51 



Road Surface $2,168 03 

Bridges and Culverts 



Total Cost for Township 



Saltfleet Township (Queenston Road) 

Ditches were excavated on the permanent line to final grade for drainage: the 
road hed brought up to standard cross section for 2 1-5 miles; 3-5 mile was ditched to 
final grade on the north side of the road and 3-5 mile ditched on the south side. 

The south side of road, where ditches were excavated on that side only, was 
brought up to final grade and cross section. The total cost of the work was $6,748.32 
and is chargeable to construction. 

Fortv-seven side entrance culverts (15-inch tile) and eighteen culverts (12-inch 
tile) were constructed, and in places these were lengthened. One hundred and ninety- 
three (193) feet tile were put in side road crossings at different points across the 
to'WTiship. Three 18-inch tile were encased in concrete with standard head wall, the 
length of each being 33 feet across the road. 

The total cost of this work, including tile on hand, was $3,268.01, and is chargeable 
to construction. 

The road from the Main Street intersection east was patched continually as re- 
quired and oiled during the season. Two and three-quarter (2%) miles were treated 
twice with refined coal tar and fine stone chips. 

Continual dragging and grading with road machine was carried out when necessary. 

Stone was put on in fairly large quantities without a roller to build out the present 
road to proper width. 

The total cost of this work, chargeable to construction, was $5,566.80, and the 
total to maintenance was $9,105.49. 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure Cost for Township. 

Road Surface $7,199 42 $2,159 83 

Guard Rail 90 27 

Oiling 1.906 07 571 82 



$9,106 39 $2,731 92 

Construction 

Earthwork $6,478 32 $1,943 50 

Tile and Pipe Draining 10 95 3 27 

Road Surface 5,566 80 1.670 04 

Bridges and Culverts 2.044 62 613 39 

Side Entrance Culverts 1.201 49 360 45 



$15,302 18 $4,590 65 

Total Cost for Township $7,322 57 



Barton Township 

The road was resurfaced with stone without a roller for ^4 mile at the west end of 
the township on Main Street. 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township. 
Road Surface $820 40 $246 12 



52 



rJEPOET UPON HIGHWAY 



Xo. 15 



Summary for Wentworth County 





C onstructioa 


Mainteaance 


Total 


30% 

Payable by 

County 


Saltfleet, Tnvd 

Ba "ton '' • 


$ c. 
15,302 18 


$ c. 
9,106 39 

820 40 

2,247 63 


$ c. 
24,408 57 

820 40 

10,380 30 


$ c. 
7,322 57 

246 12 


Ancaster ' ' 


8,132 67 


3,114 08 








23,434 85 


12,174 42 


35,609 27 


10,682 77 



LINCOLN COUNTY 
Township of Clinton 

Ditches were built on both sides of the road, which was graded to final cross-section 
for 3 9-10 miles across the township, earth from ditches being used to build up 
shoulders of road. 

Two knolls were cut down and a slight fill made to even grade. 

In one place a fill of about 3 feet was made, and a long stretch of road cut down 
to grade. One point was cut off to improve the vision, which is now good. The cost 
of this work was $23,939.62. 

Eighty side entrance culverts were built; also some 8-inch galvanized pipe where 
the tile could not be used. Two 3x2 standard concrete culverts were built, to replace 
old culverts in poor condition. The total cost of this work, $3,475.92, is chargeable 
to construction. 

Macadam foundation and surface were put down over 2% miles of road where grad- 
ing had already been completed. A heavy rubble foundation was laid where knolls had 
been reduced and a small fill made. 

The road was patched as required during the season, and oiled, a coat of screen- 
ings being put on the oil. 

The rubble foundation was taken out of Sutton's Quarry by the Department. 

The total cost of construction on this work was $40,552.23, which includes about 
18,000 tons of stone stored at Beamsville for construction. Maintenance charges are 
$5,491.20. 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toicnsliip. 

Road surface $3,541 76 $1,062 53 

Removing snow, etc 30 28 9 08 

Oiling 1,919 16 575 75 

$5,491 20 $1,647 36 



Construction 

Earthwork $23,939 62 $7,181 89 

Tile and pipe draining 36 00 10 80 

Road surface 40,140 51 12.042 15 

Bridges and culverts 3,111 67 933 50 

Guard rail 3 00 90 

Side entrance culverts 325 25 97 58 

Hauling 5 07 1 52 

Rockwork 403 65 121 09 

$67,964 77 $20,389 43 

Total cost for township $22,036 79 



1920 IMPROYEMEXT IX OXTAKIO. 



Township of Grantham 

The road was ditched and brought up to standard cross-section for '-'i mile, and 
ditches were excavated on the south side of the road for ^2 mile. Heavy fills were made 
and brought up to grade and final cross-section. Cuts taken out and grades reduced. 
Some fairly heavy cuts and fills were made in the township. The total cost of this 
work was $11,371.72. 

Seven entrance culverts were put in and two large culverts extended. One 18-inch 
jplpe was enclosed in concrete with head-walls. The total cost of this work was $2,691.15. 

The road surface was patched continually and well oiled during the season. 

Macadam foundation and surface was laid for about one mile, and foundation of 
stone put on fills and cuts east of St. Catharines. The road west of St. Catharines, 
where stone was put on, was rolled, and east of St. Catharines was not. The total cost 
of the work was: Construction, $17,078.82; Maintenance, $5,871.06. 

Alaintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost -for ToicnsJiip. 

Road surface $4,559 11 $1,367 73 

Removal of snow 32 70 9 82 

Oiling 1,279 25 383 77 

Construction 

Earthwork $11,371 72 $3,411 52 

Road Surface 17,078 82 5,123 65 

Bridges and culverts 2,474 05 742 21 

Side entrance culverts 217 10 65 13 

$31,141 69 $9,342 51 

Total cost for township $11,103 83 



Township of Qrimsbv 

Ditches were excavated to final grade for 214 miles on the south side of the road. 
and the earth was used to build up the shoulders of the road on that side to final cross- 
section. One-quarter mile was ditched on the north side. The total cost of this work, 
which is chargeable to construction, is $5,062.29. 

One 2x2 standard concrete culvert was built and 31 side entrance culverts put in. 
In some places these were lengthened on account of the H. G. & B. Railway being close 
to the ditch. One hundred and fifteen feet extra tile were required at stops 135 and 
137, K. G. & B. Railway. 

Ten galvanized iron pipes were put in at temporary side entrances, to insure drain- 
age where road was not to final grade. The total cost of this work was $1,157.09, and 
is chargeable to construction. 

Stone was put on the road without a roller in some places to widen the present 
surface and to be used as a foundation, and in addition to this .'5 mile of foundation 
and surface was put in and rolled at the east end of the township. The road surface 
required a great deal of patching and resurfacing, which was done as required. The 
road through the township was oiled, in some sections twice during the season, screen- 
ings being used to hold the oil. 

The cost of the work chargeable to construction was $5,536.23, and to maintenance 
$7,960.11. Guard rails were maintained at the cost of $5.70. 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township. 

Road surface $6,163 96 $1,849 19 

Bridges and culverts 2 90 87 

Guard rails 2 80 84 

Oiling 1,796 15 538 84 

$7,965 81 $2,389 74 



54 



REPOET UPON HIGHWAY 



No. 15 



Construction 

Earthwork $5,062 29 $1,518 69 

Tile and pipe draining 84 50 25 35 

Road surface 5,536 23 1,660 88 

Bridges and culverts 468 00 140 40 

Guard rails 35 50 10 66 

Side entrance culverts 604 59 181 35 

$11,791 11 $3,537 33 

Total cost for township $5,927 07 



Township of Louth 

Ditches were excavated on both sides of the road, and the road brought up to final 
grade and cross-section for 13,^ miles. Several fills were raised and knolls cut down to 
Improve grades. Two and one-eighth (2ys) miles of ditches were constructed on the 
south side of the road, and that side of the load brought to final grade and cross-sec- 
tion. Total cost of this work, which is chargeable to construction, is $■13,632.91. 

Four standard 2x2 concrete culverts were completed, and one 14 x 6 concrete cul- 
vert started, but not completed. 

Seventeen (17) side entrance culverts were built to allow our ditches to carry 
vN'ater on. Culverts were cleaned out. The cost of this work was $7,250.65, which is 
chargeable to construction, and $7.91, chargeable to maintenance. 

Macadam foundation and surface were laid over 1% miles of road at the east end 
of the township. Stone was put on the road near Jordan without a roller. This road 
was patched continually all season as required, which was often, considerable resur- 
facing being necessary. Oil was used in the west of township to within V.i miles of 
the east end. The total cost of this work chargeable to construction is $21,654.75, and 
cost chargeable to maintenance was $7,887.42. 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toicnship. 

Road surface $6,404 33 $1,921 30 

Bridges and culverts 7 91 2 38 

Guard rail 16 78 5 03 

Patrol 32 20 9 66 

Oiling 1,434 11 430 23 

$7,895 33 $2,368 60 

Construction 

Earthwork $13,632 91 $4,089 87 

Road surface 21.654 75 6,496 43 

Bridges and culverts 6,975 20 2.092 56 

Guard rail 45 83 13 75 

Side entrance culverts 275 45 82 63 

$42,584 14 $12,775 24 

Total cost for township $15,143 84 



Summary 


for Lincoln 


County 








Construction 


Maintenance 


Total 


30 -70 

Payable by 

County 




$ c. 
67,964 77 
31,141 69 
11,791 11 
42,584 14 
14,552 33 


$ c. 
5.491 20 
5.871 06 
7.965 81 
7.895 33 
4,557 37 


$ c. 
73.455 97 
37.012 75 
19,756 92 
50.479 47 
19.109 70 


$ c. 
22.036 79 




11.103 83 


Griiiisbv Tsvp 


5.927 07 


r^uth Twp 


15.143 84 




5,732 91 








168.034 04 


31,780 77 


199.814 81 


59.944 44 



1920 IMPKOVEMEXT IX OXTAKIO. 55 

BRANT COUNTY 

Brantford Township 

From the Ancaster Township line to the city of Brantford the road was of clay, 
with but very little road metal, and during the wet weather it was very difficult to keep 
it in a passable condition. This was especially so in the cuts which, owing to lack of 
drainage, became deeply rutted and with numerous sink holes. Between Brantford 
and Paris conditions were vastly better, as the gravel road was in fairly good condition. 
West of Paris the road was also in fair shape for traffic. 

There is considerable heavy earth grading to be done in this township, but east of 
Brantford no construction work of bringing the road up to standard cross-section was 
undertaken, owing to lack of labor and teams. The cuts which were narrow were 
widened and temiwrary ditches constructed, and the earth, which was removed by 
wheelers and slushers, was used in widening the adjacent fills. Between Brantford 
and Paris several heavy cuts were partially taken out but not completed, as widening 
had not been secured. Scott Hill cut was taken out, but the ditches were not entirely 
completed before the frost came. Northerly from Scott Hill for three-quarters of a 
mile the ditches were taken out to grade, and the earth used to build up the shoulders 
and bring the road up to standard cross-section. The total cost of all this earthwork 
was $7,404.93. 

Existing pipe culverts were cleaned out and extended where fills were widened. 
Temporary farm entrances were put in the temporary side ditches where needed. A 
total of 160 feet of 18-inch and 15-inch vitrified pipe was used for this purpose, and also 
160 feet of 6-inch was nsed through Echo Place, where only shallow ditches could be 
put in. In addition, 194 feet of 8-inch and 68 feet of 12-inch concrete entrance pipes 
were taken up, cleaned out and relaid. The total labor charges for this work amounted 
to $59.35. Where the road was graded to standard cross-section and ditches completed, 
48 feet of 15-inch vitrified pipe entrances were laid, and the charge for this, together 
with the cost of the pipe that was laid temporarily and that of a considerable quantity 
of 15-inch and 18-inch vitrified pipe now in stock, was $305.62. 

For the entire distance through the township the road was graded, crowned and 
temporary ditches constructed with a road grader, and the road kept in shape thereafter 
by the use of road drags. Through Echo Place and Cainsville 2^^ miles of road were 
treated with asphaltic oil to keep down the dust, which was excessive. From time to 
time the dust was removed from the shallow side ditches in these village?, the catch 
basins cleaned out and the road surface patched. Between Brantford and Paris the 
gravel road was cleared of dust and two cars of asphaltic oil applied. The total cost 
of this maintenance road surfacing was $4,197.30. For approximately 1^/2 miles in 
Echo Place and Cainsville the road was surfaced wuth gravel, and near Paris, to the 
north of Scott Hill, approximately %, of mile of new fill was gravelled. The total cost 
of this was $3,037.86. 

Through the entire township the weeds were kept cut at an expenditure of $184.52. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for ToicnsJiip. 

Earthwork $7,404 93 $2,221 48 

Side entrance culverts 305 62 91 68 

Road surface 3,037 86 911 36 



$10,748 41 $3,224 52 

Maintenance 

Road surfacing $4,197 30 $1,259 19 

Side entrance culverts 59 35 17 80 

Cutting weeds, etc 184 52 55 35 



$4,441 17 $1,332 34 



Total cost for township $4,556 86 



Brantford and South Dumfries 

The road in this section is the boundary line between the two townships, and was 
of gravel construction with a fairly good traffic surface, but inadequate side ditches. 

The sod was removed for the entire distance on both sides of the road where the 
ditches were to be constructed, and the ditches partially taken out and the earth hauled 
in wagons to make the fill to the east of the G. T. R. subwav. The cost amounted to 
$557.50. 



5i; EEPORT UPON HIGHWAY Xo. 15 

Five 15-inch side entrance culverts were put in, at an expenditure of $42.12. 

The road was crowned and temporary ditches put in with a road grader and also 
with asphaltic oil, at a cost of $104.79. A fill east of the G. T. R. subway was gravelled 
for about an Vs of a mile at an expenditure of $248.45. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for township. 

Earthwork $557 50 

Road surface 248 45 

Side entrance culverts 42 12 



$848 07 $254 42 

Maintenance 

Road surface $104 79 $31 43 



C03t for township $285 85 



Burford Township 

The portion of the Highway in the township is less than a mile long, and the only 
"work of any extent carried on was starting work on the erection of the Faulkland 
culvert. 

The only work of this class was the removal of a considerable number of trees in 
the vicinity of Faulkland culvert, at a cost of $35.50. 

The gravel road was shaped up, given a crown and grader ditches constructed, 
and kept in shape by the use of a road drag at an expenditure of $51.75. 

The footings for the Faulkland culvert were taken out and some of the materials 
Jiauled for its construction. Cost of labour and materials, $833.46. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for toicnship. 

Earthwork $35 50 $10 65 

Bridges, 7 culverts 833 46 250 04 



$868 96 $260 69 

Maintenance 

Road surface $51 75 $15 52 



Total cost for township $276 21 



Blenheim and Burford Townships 

The road which is the dividing line between these two townships was of very light 
gravel construction, with no crown, the grade narrow, and without ditches or very 
inadequate ones. Through several siwampy places the roadbed had to be raised to secure 
proper drainage. 

At Eatonia two cuts were taken out with wheelers and slushers, and the material 
used to raise the adjacent fills to grade. The ditches were also taken out on both sides 
and the road brought up to standard cross-section for ^4 mile, and another ^i mile of 
grading was only partially completed. From Princeton Corner nearly to Creditville. 
with the exception of the cuts on either side of Princeton Creek, tho road was graded 
and ditched to standard cross-section for a total distance of four miles. The cost for 
this construction work was $15,627.65. 

The steel bridge over Princeton Creek was replanked with 3-inch plank, at an ex- 
penditure of $225.97. A total of 1,042 feet of side entrance culverts of S-inch. 12-inch. 
15-inch and IS-inch vitrified pipe were put in, and an additional 200 feet of 24-inch 
and IS-inch vitrified pipe used to extend existing pipe culverts under the roadbed. The 
cost of this work was $1,800. ri2, and includes a considerable number of vitrified pipe 
on hand for future use. 



1920 



IMPROVEMEXT IX ONTARIO. 



57 



From the easterly limits of Princeton Corner, about four miles, the road was 
crowned and grader ditches constructed. An additional mile at the west end was simi- 
larly treated, and the total cost of the five miles of this work was $409.96. From 
Princeton Corner westerly the new grade was gravelled for nearly % of a mile, at ft 
cost of $987.73. 

The weeds and small brush along the road for the entire length of the township 
were cut at a cost of $61.25. 

In a number of cuts the earth was removed from around the poles, and this necessi- 
tated the lowering of them at an expenditure of $22.80. 



Construction 

Total Expenditure 

Earthwork $15,627 65 

Bridges and Culverts. 1,800 52 

Eoad Surface 967 73 

Texenhone Repairs 22 80 

$18,418 70 

Maintenance 



Cost for Township 



$5,525 61 



$5,525 61 



Eoad Surface 

Bridges and Culverts . 
Cutting weeds 



409 96 

225 97 

61 25 

697 18 



$209 15 



Total cost for Blenheim Twp $2,867 38 

Total cost for Burford Twp 2,867 38 



Summary for Brant County 



209 15 
$5,734 76 



Construction 



Maintenance 



Total 



30% 

Payable by 

County 



Brantf ord, Twp 

B'-antford • ' and (S. Dumfries) 
South Dumfries and (Brantford). 

Burford, Twip • ■ 

Burford ' ' (Blenheim) 



$ c. 


10.748 41 


424 03 


424 04 


868 96 


9,209 35 


21,674 79 





$ 


c. 


4 


,441 


17 




52 


40 




52 39 1 




51 


75 1 




348 59 


4 


946 


30 



$ 


c. ' 


15,189 


58 


476 


43 


476 


43 


920 


71 


9,557 


94 


26,621 09 



$ c. 

4.556 87 
142 93 
142 92 
276 21 

2,867 38 

7.986 31 



OXFORD COUNTY 
Blandford and E. Oxford 

The easterly two miles of this section the road is clay, without any road metal 
for the greater part of the distance, and consequently in wet weather it was almost 
impassable. From Eastwood westerly for two miles there is a water-bound macadam 
road in fair condition, but for the remaining two miles to Woodstock the old macadam 
road was badly rutted and worn out. 

From Eastwood easterly for one-quarter of a mile ditches were constructed and 
material removed used to widen the shoulders and bring the grade up to standard 
cross-section. For another half-mile easterly similar work was carried on, but was 
not completed. In addition a considerable amount of clearing was done. Total ex- 
penditure, $658.60. 

Several pipe culverts under the road were cleaned out and put in proper con- 
dition at an expenditure of $6.00. A total of 82 feet of 8-inch vitrified pipe entrance 
culverts were put in the completed ditches and, with the cost of vitrified pipe on hand 
for future use, the expenditure amounted to $326.61. 



REPORT UPON HIGHWAY No. 15 



From the easterly limits to Eastwood ilie road was crowned and grader ditches 
constructed. From Eastw^ood to Bonn's Corners the existing side ditches were cleaned 
out and improved with the road grader. For the remainder of the distance to Wood- 
stock the old macadam road was in very bad shape, but by using the grader the top of 
the road was shaved off, and this material was used in filling the ruts and there con- 
solidated by the traffic. The shoulders, which were higher than the roadway, were then 
cut off and thrown outside of the temporarily constructed grade ditches by the use of 
the road grader, with the result that the roadway was greatly improved. In addition 
a considerable quantity of crushed stone was piled at convenient places between East- 
wood and Bonn's Corners, and part of it used to patch the macadam road, and the re- 
mainder will be used for the same purpose, as needed. Total expenditure on thif 
maintenance work was $782.73. The completed new grade was surfaced with crushed' 
stone and a quantity piled for future use. Total cost, $1,039.46. 

The weeds and small brush along the road were cut at a cost of $65.00. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure Co.st for Township 

Earthwork $«o8 20 

Road Surface 1,039 46 

Side Culverts 326 61 

$607 28 $607 28 



Koad Surface. 

Culverts 

Cutting weeds 





$2,024 


27 


Ml 


aintenance 




782 

6 

65 


73 
00 
00 



$853 73 $256 11 256 11 

$863 39 
Total cost for East Oxford Twp.. .. $431 69 
Total cost for Blandford Twp 431 70 



West Oxford 



For the entire distance between Woodstock and Ingersoll, with the exception of 
the portion in Beachville, the road was in very bad shape. Sections of it had recently 
been gravelled, but not properly spread before being consolidated by traffic, and the 
remainder was very much in need of proper patching and resurfacing. Drainage, es- 
pecially on the south side between the radial and the road, was either entirely inade- 
quate or there was none at all. 

Between Woodstock and Beachville it was necessary to remove considerable earth 
by wagons to bring the road to grade, and excavate ditches. From Beachville to Wood- 
stock considerable difficulty was encountered in construction because of the number of 
boulders it was necessary to excavate by hand. Over the entire section the trees and 
brush were cleared from the right-of-way. Total cost of work, $8,510.71. 

The entire road, with the exception of through Beachville, was gone over with the 
road grader and rounded into proper shape. Through Beachville the ditches were 
cleaned out and the surface patched as needed. Temporary side entrances were put in 
and gravelled for protection, as the ditches were very shallow next to the radial tracks. 
West of Beachville the grader was used in putting the road surface in shape and in 
constructing temporary ditches. The road, except through Beachville, was frequently 
dragged and kept in shape with a three-section road drag, used as one unit and as 
individual units with excellent results. A mile and a quarter of the road in Beachville 
was treated with asphaltic oil. Total cost of this maintenance work was $2.153.9f>. 
East of Beachville % mile of the road was gravelled, and west of the village of lU 
miles, at a cost of $992.22. 

The numerous pipe culverts under the road were cleaned where necessary, and 
eleven of them extended with vitrified pipe. The temporary pipe culverts, one 12-inch— 
30 feet long, and one 15-inch— 40 feet long of vitrified were put in. Total expenditure 
on this maintenance work, $43.90. In addition 762 feet of entrance culverts of 6 feet— 
S-inch 12-inch, 15-inch and 18-inch vitrified pipe were put in. and a considerable stock 
of vitrified pipe is still on hand for future use. Total cost, including pipe in stock, 

"The weeds and small brush were cut and kept out in the right-of-way at a cost 
of $96.25. 



1920 IMPEOVEMENT IX ONTAEIO. 59 

Construction 

Total Expenditure Cost for Townshiy 

Earthwork $8,510 71 

Road surface 992 22 

Culverts 452 38 

$2,986 59 $2,986 59 



$5,955 31 


Maintenance 


2.153 
43 
96 


95 
90 
25 



Boad surface 

Bridges and Culverts 

Cutting weeds 

$2,294 10 $688 23 688 23 



Total cost for Township $3 . 674 82 



North Oxford 



The road in this township was in fair shape with the exception of the easterly 
end, which has become badly rutted. The under-drainage was exceptionally good, there 
being a line of tile on each side of the road for entire distance, and for the most part 
the road was suflSciently high to give good surface drainage. 

The westerly three-quarters of a mile in this township was graded to standard 
cross-section, but was not entirely completed. A large cut about one-half mile east of 
the village of Thamesford was taken out, and the material used in making the fill at 
the Thamesford turn, to permit an increased radius of curvature. Cost of work. 
$2,606.51. 

The shoulders of the road were trimmed off and the road smoothly graded, and the 
large surface stones raked off. Sections previously gravelled were very wavy, and this 
condition was improved as much as possible. Road drags were used as much as possible 
to keep the road from rutting and to a proper crown. Two and one-half miles of the 
road were treated with asphaltic oil. Total maintenance expenditure, $949.39. The 
easterly mile in the township was gravelled also two-thirds of a mile west of Dicken- 
son's corner and one-eighth of a mile east of Thamesford. Total cost of this work was 
11,970.92. A 42-feet 24-inch vitrified pipe culvert was put in, and in addition 80 feet 
of 12-inch vitrified entrance culverts. Cost was $31.73. 

The weeds along the road were kept cut at a cost of $50.10. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure Cost for Township 

Earthwork $2,606 51 

Real surface 1 ,970 92 

Culverts 31 78 



$4,609 16 $1,382 75 $1,382 75 

Maintenance 



Road surface $949 39 

Cutting weeds 50 10 

$999 49 



$299 85 299 60 



Total cost for Twp $1,682 35 



North Oxfyrd and East Nissouri 

A large portion of this section is through the village of Thamesford, and the 
gravel road was, for the most part, in good travelling condition. 

To the west of the village the road was greatly improved by using a road grader 
to smooth out the ruts and to cut off the shoulders of the road, which in many places 
were too high. A road drag was then used to keep it in good shape. About a mile of 
the road west of the village was treated with asphaltic road oil. Total cost of this 
maintenance work was $373.98. Three sections, making a total of half a mile, were 
gravelled at a cost of $375.83. 

The weeds along the road were kept cut at an expenditure of $18.75. 



60 



HEPORT UPON HIGHWAY 



No. 1& 



Construction 

Total Expenditure 
Road surface $375 83 

Maintenance 

Road surface $373 98 

Cutting weeds 18 75 



$392 73 



Cost for Township 
$112 75 



$117 82 



Total cost for North Oxford Twp. . 
Total cost for East Missouri Twp. 



$112 75 



117 82 

$230 5T 

$115 28 
115 2a 



East Nissouri and North Dorchester 

Only maintenance work was done on this section, as the gravel road was in fair 
travelling condition. 

The shoulders of the road were removed with a road grader, and afterwards kept 
In shape by the use of a road drag. A light coat of asphaltic road oil was "applied to 
keep down the dust. Gravel was used to patch the road surface as needed. Cost of 
the work, $103 94. 

Weeds were cut at a cost of $3.25. 



Maintenance 



Road surface 
Cutting weeds 



Total Expenditure. Cost for township. 

$103 94 
. ' 3 25 $32 16 



Total cost for East Nissouri Township 
Total cost for North Dorchester Township 



$107 19 



$16 08 
$16 08 



Summary 


for Oxford 


County 








Construction 


Maintenance 


Total 


30% 

Payable by 

Municipality 


Bleolieim. Twp 


$ c. 
9,209 35 
1.012 13 
1,012 14 
9,955 31 
4,609 16 
187 92 
187 91 


$ c. 
348 59 
426 87 
426 86 
2,294 10 
999 49 
196 37 
196 36 

53 60 


$ c. 

9,557 94 

1,439 00 

1,439 00 

12,249 41 

5,608 65 

384 29 

384 27 

53 60 


$ c. 
2.867 38 


Blandfoi-d, " 


431 70 


Oxford, E " 


431 69 


West Oxford, Two 


3.674 82 


North Oxford " 


1.682 60 


North Oxford " 


115 29 


East Nissouri ' ' 


115 28 


East Nissouri • 


16 08 










26.173 92 


4,942 24 


31.116 16 


9.334 94 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY 
East Nissouri and North Dorchester 

Only maintenance work was done on this section as the gravel road was in fair 
travelling condition. 

The shoulders of the road were removed with a road grader and afterwards kept 
in shape by the use of a road drag. A light coat of asphaltic road oil was applied to 
keep down the dust. Gravel was used to patch the road surface as needed. Cost of 
the work, $104,94. 

Weeds were cut at a cost of $3.25. 



1920 IMPROVEMEXT IX OXTARIO. 61 

Maintenance 

Total Eirpenditure. Cost for Toicnship. 

Road surface $103 94 

Cutting weeds 3 25 



Total cost for East Nissouri Township, $16.08. 
Total cost for North Dorchester Township, $16.08. 



$107 19 $32 16 



West Ni.NSOuri and North Dorchester 

From the easterly limits of Doty's Creek the gravel road was in fairly good shape, 
but between Doty's Creek and Crumlin the roadway was of extra width, and as the 
shoulders were higher than the travelled road it became badly rutted. 

Through the swamp from the fence lines to the edges of the road there was a 
thick growth of trees and underbrush, and this was cleared at a cost of $137.80. 

From Doty's Creek to Crumlin the work of removing the shoulders of the road 
■which were too high with a road grader was not entirely completed. Before gravelling 
this section the old, badly rutted road surface was scarified and evened up with the 
road grader. East of Doty's Creek the road was kept in shape by use of road drags. 
Total cost of maintenance, $276.22. For the entire distance the road was gravelled at 
a cost of $5,218.24. 

The cost of cutting the weeds along the road amounted to $7.50. 

Construction 

Construction. Cost for Toicnship. 

Road surface $5,218 24 

Earthwork 137 80 



$5,356 04 $1,606 81 



Maintenance 



Road surface $276 22 

Cutting weeds 7 50 85 11 



Total cost for "West Nissouri Township, $845.96. 
Total cost for East Dorchester, $845.96. 



$283 72 $1,691 92 



Township of London 

In this section the width of the road is from 30 to 40 feet, and the gravelled surface 
was very badly rutted, thus preventing the surface water from reaching the ditches. 
The result was that the road was in a very bad shape for trafhc. 

Just east of the concrete bridge at London a cut was taken out of the roadway 
and the material used to raise and widen the fill at the bridge. Ditches on both sides 
of the road for one-third of a mile were put in. Cost of this work amounted to $984.35. 

The old gravelled road was scarified and then smoothed and rounded into proper 
shape with a road grader. A road drag was used to keep it in proper condition. Cost 
of maintenance work was .$513.81. For the entire length of this section after the road 
was scarified and smoothed, it was gravelled, and the westerly half was consolidated 
with a road roller. Total cost was $5,766.80. 

The existing pipe culverts under the road were cleaned out at a cost of $6.30. A 
total of 240 feet of 15-inch and 18-inch vitrified pipe entrance culverts were put in. 
costing $125.29. 

The guard rail along fill by concrete bridge east of London was repaired at an 
expenditure of $3.32. 

The cost of cutting the weeds along the road amounted to $14.55. 



62 



EEPORT UPON HIGHWAY 



No. 15 



Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township. 

Earthwork $984 35 

Road surface 5,766 80 

Culverts 125 29 

$6,876 44 $2,062 93 

Maintenance 

Road surface $513 81 

Bridges and culverts 6 30 

Guard rail 3 32 

Cutting weeds 14 55 

$537 98 $161 39 

Total cost for Township $2,224 32 



Summary for Middlesex County 



Construction 



Maintenance 



Total 



30% 

Payable by 

County 



N. Dorchester (E. Nissouri) Twps , 

W. Nissouri and N. Dorchester, Twps. . , 
London, Twp 



$ c. 



5,356 04 
(5,876 44 



12,232 48 



$ c. 
53 59 

283 72 

537 98 



875 29 



$ c. 
53 59 

5,639 76 

7,414 42 



13,107 77 



$ c. 
16 08 

1,691 92 

2,224 32 



3,932 32 



COUNTY OF ONTARIO 
Picltering: Township 

West from Rouge Bridge to the top of Rouge HiU, a distance of fifteen hundred 
feet, very heavy grading was completed. Bad winds in the road were straightened, 
the grades were reduced and visibility given across the Rouge Valley. East of the 
Rouge the road was ditched and widened for six hundred feet. From Petticoat Creek 
east for half a mile the highway was ditched and graded to a width of thirty feet. 
Heavy grading was carried out on the hill east of Petticoat Creek and grades were 
raised in front of Holmes farm. From Dunbarton church east for seven-tenths of a 
mllo, the road was ditched and graded; grade was reduced on the hill west of Liverpool 
Corners. From the east side of Bunker's Hill west for half a mile, the road was Avid- 
ened to thirty feet, ditched and grades reduced. This work involved heavy earthwork 
and rock work at Bunker's Hill and in front of Allison's farm. About a quarter of a 
mile east of Bunker's Hill eight hundred feet of the road was widened and a sharp 
knoll reduced at the cross-road. Very heavy earthwork was completed at Eagle Hill, 
where grades were reduced from 7.5'/r to 5% and a mile of highway was widened and 
ditched. The creek, west of Eagle Hill, was diverted for four hundred feet to allow 
for widening t'he road. From Whitby township line west for one mile, the road was 
ditched and widened. The total cost of the above earthwork was $51,031.60. 

Crushed stone was brought in from Point Anne Quarries and a coat of stone 5 
inches deep and 20 feet wide has been hauled on 3.22 miles of road and a large quantity 
of stone is now stored for next season's work. A heavy coat of gravel was placed on 
4 5 miles of highway. The total cost of this work was $38,456.16. 



1920 



IMPPiOVEMEXT IX OXTAEIO. 



63 



Eight concrete culverts were installed under the highway as follows: 

One 4 X 3 X 50. 

One 17 X t X 33. 

One 6 X 4 X ae. 

One 17 X 7 X 58ft. 6in. 

One 3 X 3 X 45. 

One 10 X 6 X 39ft. 6in. 

Two 18in. pipe culverts with 6in. concrete box reinforcement 40ft. long. 

Independent telephone poles were moved off the new grading at Rouge Hill, Picker- 
ing Bridge, Bunker Hill and Eagle Hill. A total of 1.2 miles were moved at a cost of 
$493.74. 

Thirty-three culverts were installed under side entrances and side roads. This 
includes two 24in. galvanized iron pipe culverts 20 feet long, one 30in. galvanized 24 
feet long, six hundred and ninety-three feet of loin, vitrified pipe and two hundred 
and eighty-six feet of 18in. vitrified pipe. The total cost of these culverts was §1,045.75. 

Sufficient ISin. tile (vitrified) is on hand for the drainage of Rouge Hill. This 
tile cost 31,423.10. 

The maintenance charges cover the cost of placing a light coat of gravel on 1^4 
miles of road, dragging the whole road, cutting the shoulders off the road in several 
places with the grader, and v.eed cutting. Floors of culverts at Liverpool Corner and 
Flemings were repaired. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toicnship. 

Earthwork . . $51,031 60 $15,309 48 

Rockwork 150 00 45 00 

Road surface 38,456 16 11,536 85 

Bridges and culverts 13,145 27 3,943 58 

Moving poles 493 74 148 12 

Side entrajice culverts 1,045 75 313 73 

Tile and pipe draining 1,423 10 426 93 

$105,745 62 $31,723 69 

Maintenance 

Road surface $1,390 58 $417 17 

Bridges and culverts 37 90 11 37 

Cutting weeds 34 50 10 35 

$1,462 98 $438 89 

Total cost for township $32,162 58 



Pickering Village 

Two coats of oil were placed on the highway through the village at a total cost of 
$539.45. 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Village. 
Road surface $539 45 $161 83 



Whitby Town 

A heavy coat of gravel was placed on one and eight-tenths miles of the highway 
assumed inside the town limits. Hydro-Electric poles were moved off the new grading. 

The total length of road assumed inside the town was scarified, levelled and con- 
solidated with a steam-traction outfit and four thousand feet of the highway was oiled. 



Construction 



Road surface 
Moving poles 



Total Expenditure. 
$1,307 03 
31 96 



Cost for Touns. 
$392 11 
9 59 



$1,338 99 



$401 70 



64 EEPORT UPON HIGHWAY Xo. 15 

Maintenance 

Road surface $725 58 $217 67 



Total cost for town $619 37 



East Whitby Township 

The highway was ditched and graded for a distance of 1,200 feet east from Oshawa 
town line, at a cost of $493.00. 

Two and eight-tenths miles of highway were gravelled at a cost of $3,095.95. 

Two-side entrance culverts were installed, and pipe is on hand for next year's work. 
The cost of this pipe was $258.65. 

A concrete culvert, 6 x 5 x 66 feet long, was constructed west of Oshawa Cemetery, 
and the excavation work for a culvert near Harmony was completed. The total cost 
of this work was $2,667.19. 

Two and one-quarter miles of highway were patched and oiled. Culverts and guard 
rails were kept in repair and weeds were cut. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. 

Earthwork $493 08 

Road surface 3,095 95 

Bridges and culverts 2,667 19 

Side entrance culverts 258 65 



$6,514 87 



Maintenance 

Road surface $1,104 70 

Bridges and culverts 67 50 

Guard rail 25 61 

Cutting weeds 9 75 

$1,207 56 

Total cost for township 



Cost for Toi 

$147 

923 

800 

77 


cnship. 
92 
73 
16 

60 


$1,954 


46 


$331 41 

20 25 

7 68 

2 93 


$362 


27 


$2,316 


73 



West Whitby Township 

From Pickering Township line east for eight-tenths of a mile, the highway was 
ditched, graded and the grades reduced. The cost of this earthwork was $3,224.60. 

Crushed stone was brought in from Point Anne Quarries and an S in. coat 20 feet 
wide was placed on the road for a distance of nineteen hundred feet. A coat of gravel 
6 inches deep and 16 feet wide was placed on one mile of the highway. The total cost 
of this road surfacing was $6,202.11. 

Two concrete culverts, one 4 x 3 x 33 and one 3 x 3 x 33, were constructed about 
half a mile west of Whitby town line. These culverts replaced two wooden culverts 
which were in very bad condition. The total cost of these culverts was $1,549.40. 

Four vitrified tile culverts were installed under side entrances, and one culvert 
under a side road. A total of 112 feet of 15-inch vitrified tile pipe was installed, at a 
cost of $193.33. 

Maintenance charges cover the cost of scarifying and rolling about one mile of 
highway and repairing floors of culverts and guard rail. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toicnship. 

Earthwork $3,224 60 $ 967 38 

Road surface 6,202 11 1,860 63 

Bridges and culverts 1,549 40 46^ S2 

Guardrail 25 00 7 60 

Side entrance culverts 193 33 58 00 

$11,194 44 $3,358 33 



1920 



IMPROVEMENT IX OXTAEIO. 



65 



Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toictiship. 

Road surface $291 50 $87 45 

Bridges and culverts 27 83 8 35 

Guard rail 9 15 2 74 

$328 48 $98 54 

Total cost for township $3,456 87 



i 



Ontario County 

Masonry work was comnleted at Pickering Bridge and nineteen pedestals and one 
abutment constructed at the Rouge River Bridge. The total cost of this work was 
$28,833.52. I 

Summary 

Total Expenditure. Cost to County. 
$28,833 52 §8,650 06 



Bridges and culverts 



Summary for Ontario County 



ConstiTiction 



Maintenance 



Total 



30 ff 

Paj-able by 

County 



Pickering, Twp .... 
Pickering, Village . . . 

Whitby, Town 

East Wliitby, Twp., 
West Whitby, Twp. 
Ontario, CouQty 



? c. 
105,745 62 



1,338 99 

6,514 87 

11,194 44 

28,833 52 



153,627 44 



1,462 98 
539 45 
725 58 

1.207 56 
328 48 



107,208 60 

539 45 

2,064 57 

7,722 43 

11.522 92 

28,833 52 



4,264 05 I 157,891 49 



32,162 58 

161 83 

619 37 

2,316 73 

3.456 87 

8,650 06 



Less amount overpaid by Whitby. W., 1919. 
" "by Whitby Town 



$280 33 
647 23 



47.367 44 



$927 56 



Total payable by County $46,439 88 



UNITED COUNTIES OF NORTHUMBERLAND AND DURHAM 
Town of Brighton 

From the west limits of the town east for thirty-two hundred feet, the road was 
ditched and graded to a width of 30 feet at a cost of $249.40. 

Two heavy coats of gravel were placed on the above grading at a cost of $2,140.50. 

Five culverts of 15-inch vitrified pipe 20 feet long were installed under side entrances 
at a cost of $167.80. 

Two-thirds of a mile of independent and hydro poles were moved at a cost of $170.25. 

Maintenance charges cover the cost of patching and dragging one-and-a-half miles 
of highway. The culvert at the mill, west side of the town was filled in at a cost of 
$17.60. 



Construction 

Total Expenditure. 

Earthwork $249 ^0 

Road surface 2,140 50 

Side entrance culverts 167 80 

Moving poles ." 170 25 



Cost for Municipality. 
$74 82 
642 15 

50 34 

51 07 



$2,727 95 



1818 38 



66 REPORT UPON HIGHWAY Xo. 15 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Municipality. 

Road surface $330 30 $99 09 

Bridges and culverts 17 60 5 28 

$347 90 $104 37 

Total cost for iminicipality 922 75 



Brighton Township 

One and two-tenths miles of highway were ditched and graded to a width of 30 feet 
at a total cost of $1,850. 

Two heavy coats of gravel were placed on the above grading at a cost of $4,808.65. 

Two 18-inch concrete pipes were lengthened and two concrete culverts 4 x 3 x 38 ft. 
were constructed under the highway at a total cost of .$2,118.50. 

Nine culverts of l.")-inrh vitrifierl nipe 20 feet long were installed under side 
entrances and one carload o'f tile is on hand for next season's work. The total cost was 
$569.66. 

A quarter of a mile of independent telephone poles were moved at a total cost of 
$103.16. 

Maintenance charges cover the cost of patching and dragging the entire length of 
the highway, cutting the shoulders off the road with a grader in several places, keeping 
culverts and guard rails in repair and cutting weeds. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Municipality. 

Earthwork $1,850 00 $.555 00 

Road surface 4,808 65 1,442 59 

Bridges and culverts 2,118 50 635 55 

Guard rail 24 40 7 32 

Side entrance culverts 569 66 170 90 

Moving poles 103 16 30 9'') 



$9,474 37 .?2.84.2 31 
Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Municipality. 

Road surface $840 65 $252 19 

Bridges and culverts 11 94 3 58 

Cutting weeds 8 00 2 40 

$86( 5J; $258 17 

Total cost for municipality $3,100 48 



Town of Col borne 

Three hundred feet of highway w-as ditched and graded over the new culvert con- 
structed west of the town. The cost of this earthwork was $51.20. 

Two heavy coats of gravel were placed on sixteen hundred feet of road west of the 
town, and a heavy coat of gravel placed on a quarter of a mile of road east of the town 
at a total cost of $1,348.29. 

One culvert 5x4 ft. 6 in. x47 ft. 6 in. was constructed at a cost of $986.22. 

A side entrance culvert was lengthened at a cost of $19.80. 

Maintenance charges cover the cost of patching one and one-quarter miles of highway 
and keeping guard rails and culverts in repair. Eleven barrels of oil are stored for 
next season's use. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost fc r Municipality. 

Earthw^ork i . .* $51 20 $15 36 

Road surface 1.348 29 404 49 

Bridges and culverts 986 22 295 86 

Side entrance culverts 19 80 5 94 

$2,405 51 $721 65 



1920 IMPROVEMENT IX ONTARIO. 



Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for MioiicipaVity. 

Road surface $595 34 $178 60 

Bridges and culverts 6,00 180 

Guard rails 2 25 67 

$603 59 $181 07 

Total cost for municipality $902 72 



Cramahe Township 

Ditching and grading to a width of 20 feet was completed over the following 
sections of highway; from Haldimand township line east for a quarter of a mile; from 
Salem w^est for eight-tenths of a mile; from a quarter of a mile west of Brighton town- 
ship line west for a n.ile and a half. The cost of this earthwork was $4,636.50. 

Two and six-tenths miles of highway were given two heavy coats of gravel at a cost 
of $8,089.08. 

The following concrete culverts were constructed under the highway: One 3 x 3 x 48; 
one 3x3x54 box culvert; one 17x8x50. The total cost of the above culverts was 
$5,552.79. 

New guard rails were constructed at a cost of $22.50. 

One mile of independent telephone line was moved off the new grading at a cost of 
$361.05. 

Thirty-seven culverts of 15-inch vitrified pipe were installed under side entrance 
and four culverts of 15-inch vitrified pipe were installed under side roads. A total 
length of 912 feet of pipe at a cost of $1,076.32. 

Maintenance charges cover the cost of patching and dragging the entire length of 
highway, keeping culverts and guard rail in repair and cutting weeds. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Co.'it for ^hDiivipaUti/. 

Earthwork $5,636 50 $1,690 95 

Road surface 8,089 08 2,426 72 

Bridges and culverts 5,552 79 1,665 84 

Guard rail 22 50 6 75 

Moving poles 361 05 108 32 

Side entrance culverts 1,076,32 322 89 



$20,738 24 $6,221 47 

.Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Munivipality. 

Road surface $401 59 $120 47 

Bridges and culverts 10 00 3 00 

Guard rail 30 05 9 02 

Cutting weeds 74 80 22 44 

$516 44 $154 93 

Total cost for municipality $6,376 40 



iialdimand Township 

From Grafton west, a distance of nine-tenths of a mile, tlie highwav was ditched 
aftd graded to a width of 30 feet. Grades were reduced and road straightened out at 
Grafton toll-house, which necessitated heavy earthwork. Road was graded from Fair- 
view Cemetery west for one-third of a mile and grade was raised three feet over the 
new culvert. From Cramahe Township line west for one and seven-tenth miles, road 
was ditched, bad winds taken out and widened to a width of 30 feet. The total cost of 
the above earthwork was $10,911.22. 

Two miles of highway were very heavily gravelled at a cost of $6,729.70. 



08 KF:rORT UPON HIGHWAY No. 15 

Five concrete culverts were constructed as follows: One 12x6x39 two miles west 
of Colborne; one 5x5x44 two and one-half miles west of Colborne; one 10x6x42 half 
a mile east of Grafton; one 6 x 3 x 41 half a mile east of Graft:>n; one 12 x 5 x 42 
Cine and one-half miles west of Grafton. The total cost oif these culverts was $8,936.51- 

Guard rail was constructed on the new grading at several places at a cost of $67.50. 

Eleven hundred feet of independent telephone line was moved at a cost of $99.42. 

Thirty-one culverts were installed under side entrances and side roads, including 
one 36-inch galvanized iron pipe 20 feet long and one 36-inch galvanized iron pipe 33 feet 
Ions. Five hundred and fifty feet of 15-inch tile are on hand for next season's work. 
Total cost of above was $954.50. 

Maintenance charges cover the cost of patching and dragging the entire road, 
placing a light coat of oil through Grafton Village, cutting the weeds and repairing and 
whitewashing guard rails. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Municipality. 

Earthwork $10,911 22 $3,273 37 

Road surface 6,729 70 2,018 91 

Bridges and culverts 8,936 51 2,680 95 

Guard rails 67 50 20 25 

Moving poles 99 42 29 83 

Side entrance culverts 954 50 286 35 



$27,698 85 $8,309 66 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Municipality. 

Road surface $624 10 $187 23 

Bridges and culverts 46 60 13 98 

Guard rails 19 50 5 85 

$690 20 . $207 06 

Total cost for municipality $8,51& 72 



Murray Township 

One and three-quarters miles of highway were ditched and graded to a width of 30 
feet at a cost of $2,400. 

Two heavy coats of gravel were placed on all the above earthwork at a cost of 
$5,019. 

Three 18-inch concrete pipe culverts under the highway were extended to allow for 
the extra widening at a cost of $200. 

Ten culverts of 15-inch vitrified pipe 20 feet long were installed under side en- 
trances at a cost of $218.28. 

One-half a mile of independent telephone line was moved at a cost of $105.17. 

New guard rail was constructed when required at a cost of $13. 

Maintenance charges cover the cost of patching, dragging, cutting the shoulders off 
the road with a grader, cutting the weeds, and keeping the culverts in repair. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure Cost for Municipaliti/ 

Earthwork $2,400 00 $720 00 

Road surface 5.019 05 1,505 72 

Bridges and culverts 200 00 60 00 

Guard rail 13 00 3 90 

Side entrance culverts 218 28 65 48 

Moving poles 105 17 31 55 

$7,955 50 $2,386 65 



1020 IMPEOVEMENT IN ONTARIO. 69 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure Cost for Municipality. 

Road surface |706 &0 $211 98 

Bridges and culverts 15 00 4 50 

$721 60 $216 48 

Total cost for municipality 12,603 13 



Town of Cobourg 

At the west limits of the town a sharp turn was cleared and partly graded. The 
cost of this work was $48.75. 

A light coat of gravel was placed on a half-mile road, at a cost of $94. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Municipality. 
Earthwork $48 75 $14 63 

.Maintenance 

Road surface $94 00 $28 20 

Total cost for municipality $42 83 



Bowmanville Town 

From the east limits of the town west for 2,200 feet, the highway was ditched and 
widened to 38 feet, extra widening being made to accommodate a new sidewalk and 
heavy grading carried out. West of the town the road was graded for 600 feet. The 
total cost of the above earthwork was $4,525.25. 

A heavy coat of gravel and a coat of cinders was placed on the new grading east 
of the town, and the cinder walk was constructed. The cost of this work was $698.75. 

Construction of concrete abutments, piers, sidewalks and floors, the supply and erec- 
tion of steel for three bridges in Bowmanville Town, to complete, $50,927.04. 

A quarter of a mile of road was gravelled and the total length of road assumed was 
patched and kept in repair. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Municipality. 

Earthwork $4,525 25 

Tile and pipe draining 4 05 

Road surface 698 75 

Guard rail 1 35 



$5,229 40 $1,568 82 

Bridges and culverts as per attached statement 10,315 02 

.Maintenance 

Road surface $620 00 $186 00 



Total cost for municipality (county) $12,069 84 



KEPOIJT UPON HIGHWAY Xu. 15 



Bowmanville Bridges 

STAT /OX ','.>. -,l..)( I 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Municipality. 
Cost to Jan. 31. 1919. 

Cost from Feb. 1, 1919, to Jan. 31, 1920 $7,177 21 

Total cost to Jan. 31. 1920 1.522 82 $8,700 03 

STATION .J.060 „ _ 

Cost to Jan. 31. 1919. 

Cost I'lom Feb. 1, 1919, to Jan. 31, 1920 $2,992 20 

Total cost to Jan. 31, 1920 4,999 29 7,991 49 

STATION 0026 

Cost to Jan. 31, 1920. 

Cost from Feb. 1. 1920, to Nov. 30, 1920 $31,509 06 

Total cost to Nov. 30, 1920 13,900 77 45,409 S3 



Total cost of three bridges $62,101 35 

Total due to province in accordance with statement to county.... $17,019 60 
Statement rendered to Bowmanville June 24, 1919 6,704 58 



Balance due from county $10,315 02 



Clarke Township 

Between Darlington township line and Newcastle 1.44 miles of highway were ditched 
and graded to a width of 30 feet. Heavy earthwork was carried out at Wilmot Creek 
when the grades were raised 5 feet and approaches to the new bridge constructed. 
Wilmot Creek was diverted on the north side of the bridge to prevent wall on the high- 
way, and trees were cut for better visibility. The road was graded and ditched for hall' 
a mile east from the C. P. R. subway and for five hundred feet in Newtonville village. 
At Thompson's culvert the grade was raised and a quarter of a mile of highway graded 
and ditched. The creek at this point was diverted and the channel deepened. The total 
cost of the above work was $9,495.99. 

A heavy coat of gravel was placed on the road from Darlington Township line to 
Newcastle, from the C. P. R. subway east for half a mile, seven hundred feet at Newton- 
ville village, and from the Hope Township line west for two and six-tenths miles. The 
total cost of this work was $4,814.90. 

The following culverts and bridges were constructed: 

Two IS-inch concrete pipe culverts, 40 feet long. 

One steel span bridge with concrete abutments and floor at Wilmot Creek. 

One 7 X 6 X 38 feet long a mile west of Newcastle. 

One 8 X 8 X 81 feet culvert at Thompson's. 

Tlie total cost of these culverts was $8,486.66. 

Brush was cleared to the full width of the highway in the swamp, three miles east 
of Newcastle. 

Three side entrance culverts of IS-inch vitrified pipe, 20 feet long; five side entrance 
culverts of 15-inch pipe, 20 feet long, and two culverts across side roads of 18-inch vit- 
rified pipe, 33 feet long, were installed, at a total cost of $126.20. 

Maintenance charges cover light gravelling, patching and dragging the entire road, 
oiling Newtonville village and keeping the culverts in repair. 

Construction 

Total E.rpcnciiture. Cost for Municipalitu. 

Earthwork $9,495 99 $2,848 80 

Road surface 4.814 90 1.444 47 

Bridges and culverts 8.486 66 2,546 00 

^Ioving poles 126 20 37 S6 

brushing 92 00 27 60 

Side entrance culverts 616 87 185 06 

$23,632 62 $7,089 79 



1920 IMPROVEMENT IX OXTAKIO. U 

Maintenance 

Road surface $905 31 • $27159 

Bridges and culverts 13 50 4 05 



$918 81 $275 64 



Total cost for municipality $7,365 43 



Darlington Township 

All ditching and grading was completed between Bowmanville and Clarke Township 
line and twelve hundred feet of the highway situated about two miles west of Bowman- 
ville was ditched. The total cost of above earthwork was $2,121.70. 

Two heavy coats of gravel were placed on seven and eight-tenths niiles of the high- 
way; at a cost of $8,024.73. 

A few independent telephone poles were removed from the new grading at a cost 
of $21. 

Thirteen culverts of 15-inch vitrified pipe were installed under side entrances and 
side roads, a total length, of 360 feet of pipe, at a cost of $254.63. 

Maintenance charges cover the cost of oiling at Courtice and Tooley's Hill, patching 
and dragging over 7.8 miles of road, keeping culverts in repair and cutting weeds. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Municipality. 

Earthwork ' $2,121 70 $636 51 

Road surface 8.231 43 2,469 43 

Guard rail 32 00 9 60 

Side entrance culverts 254 63 76 39 

Moving poles 21 00 6 30 



.$10,660 76 $3,198 23 

Maintenance 

Road surface $1,035 85 $310 75 

Bridges and culverts 13 00 3 90 

Cutting weeds 12 00 3 60 



$1,060 85 318 25 



Total cost for municipality $3,516 48 



Hope Township 

Very heavy earthwork was undertaken and partly completed at Koseberry Hill. This 
work is half a mile long, and reduces the grade from !'/< to 59r, and widens the road to 
standard width. Heavy earthwork was completed, reducing the grade and widening the 
road from Marvin's farm west for one mile. Four hundred feet of grading was finished 
one and one-half miles west of Welcome. Welcome corner was cleared and eight-tenths 
of a mile of highway graded and ditched between Welcome and Port Hope. From 
Hamilton Township line west for 3.700 feet the highway was ditched and graded to a 
width of 30 feet. The total cost of this earthwork was $12,609.24. 

Two heavy coats of gravel were placed on the above grading at a cost of $7,093.70. 
The following concrete culverts were constructed under the highway: 

Two culverts, 3 x 3 x 33. 

One culvert, 4 x 3 x 33. 

One culvert, 4 x 3 x 38. 

One culvert, 6 x 3 x 33. 

One culvert, 6x4 x 44. 

One culvert, 11 x 6 x 42. 
Two culverts started before January 31, 1918, were completed. The total cost of the 
above culvert work was $9,235.35. 



72 REPORT UPON HIGHWAY Xo. 15 

Seven side-entrance culverts of 18-inch vitrified pipe, 20 feet long; one side-entrance 
culvert of 24-inch concrete pipe, 26 feet long, and one culvert across a sideroad IS-inch 
vitrified pipe, 33 feet long, were installed. Sixty feet of 18-inch concrete pipe were 
installed at Helm's Corner. One carload of 15-inch vitrified pipe is on hand for next 
year's work. The total cost was $712.29. 

One mile of independent and G. N. W. telephone lines was moved at a cost of $512.78. 

Maintenance charges cover the cost of patching and dragging the entire length 
of highway, cutting weeds, repairing culverts and oiling from Welcome to Port Hope. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Municipality. 

Earthwork $12,609 24 $3,782 78 

Road surface 7.093 70 ' 2.128 11 

Bridges and culverts 9,235 35 2,770 60 

Guard rail 4 50 1 35 

Moving poles 512 78 153 83 

Side entrance culverts 712 29 213 69 



$20,167 86 $9,050 36 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Municipality. 

Road surface $1,008 29 $302 48 

Bridges and culverts 14 06 4 22 

Cutting weeds 4 20 1 26 

$1,026 55 $307 96 

Total cost for municipality $9,358 32 



Newcastle Village 

From the west limits of the village east for a quarter of a mile the highway was 
ditched and graded to a width of 30 feet at a cost of $601.45. 

A heavy coat of gravel was placed on half a mile of road at a cost of $542.85. 

A man-hole was constructed at a cost of $28. 

Maintenance charges cover the cost of patching, dragging, weed cutting and repairs 
to guard rails and culverts. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Municipality. 

Earthwork $604 95 $181 48 

Road surface 642 85 192 85 

Guard rail 7 10 2 13 

Bridges and culverts 28 00 8 40 

$1,282 90 $384 86 

Maintenance 

Road surface $257 75 $77 33 

Total cost for municipality $462 19 



Town of Port Hope 

The corner at Walton Street and Toronto Road was cleared, and hedge and trees 
cut down. This work cost $18.50. 

Half a mile of highway was heavily gravelled at a cost of $547.70. 

A light coat of gravel was placed on the road from King Street East, a distance of 
1,000 feet and a light coat of oil placed on half a mile of the highway. A culvert was 
repaired at the west end of the town at a cost of $12. 



1920 LMPKOVEMENT IX ONTARIO. 



Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Town. 

Earthwork $18 50 $5 55 

Road surface 547 70 164 31 



$566 20 .. $169 86 



Maintenance 



Road surface $383 77 $115 13 

Bridges and culverts 12 00 ' 3 60 



$395 77 $118 73 



Total cost for town $288 59 



liamilton Township 

Two and one-half miles of highway were ditched and graded to a width of 30 feet. 
At Massey's Bridge heavy earthwork was required to widen the road and raise the grade 
three feet. The total cost of this work was $3,656.15. 

A heavy coat of gravel was placed on the above earthwork after grading was com- 
pleted, at a cost of $4,529.81. 

One steel bridge, 26-feet span, with concrete abutments, was completed at Massey's 
Creek, and the concrete work complete and steel in place for a 45-feet span steel bridge 
at Gage's Creek. The cost of these bridges was $11,481.46. 

Eleven culverts of 15-inch vitrified pipe, 20 feet long; two culverts 36-inch galvan- 
ized iron pipe, 20 feet long, and one 24-inch galvanized iron pipe, 30 feet long, were placed 
under side entrances at a cost of $688.05. 

New guard rails were constructed at a cost of $18. 

Maintenance charges cover the cost of cutting off the shoulders of the road in 
several places, dragging the entire road, cutting weeds and repairing decking on 
Massey's Bridge. Danger-crossing signs were placed at C. P. R. and C. X. R. crossings. 
Three toll-gates and houses were removed and their foundations levelled. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Municipalit}/. 

Earthwork $3,656 15 $1,096 85 

Road surface 4.529 81 1,358 94 

Bridges and culverts 11,481 46 3,444 43 

Side-entrance culverts 688 05 206 42 

Guard rail 18 00 5 40 



$20,373 47 $6,112 04 



Maintenance 



Road surface $226 81 

Bridges and culverts 66 74 

Cutting weeds 42 00 



Total cost for municipality $6,212 70 



$68 
20 
12 


04 
02 
60 


$100 


66 



REPORT UPON HIGHWAY 



Xn. 15 



Summary for Northumberland and Durham Counties 



Construction 



Maintenance 



Total 



Payable 
by 

County 



Brightoii, Town .... 

Brighton, Twp 

Colborne, Town 

Cramahe, Twp 

Haldimand, Twp. , . . 

Murray, Twp 

Cobourg, Town 

Bowmanvilie, Town . 
Bowmanville. Br'dge 

Clarke Twp 

Darl'ngton, Twp 

Hope, Twp 

Newcastle, Village. . , 

Port Hope, Town 

Hamilton, Twp 



$ c. 

2,727 95 

9,474 37 

2,405 51 

20,738 24 

27,698 85 

7,955 50 

48 75 

5,229 40 

50,924 04 

23,032 62 

10,660 76 

30,167 86 

1,282 90 

566 20 

20,373 47 



213,889 42 



$ c. 
347 90 
860 59 
603 59 
516 44 
690 20 
721 60 

94 00 
620 00 



918 81 
1,060 85 
1,026 55 
257 75 
395 77 
335 55 



8,449 60 



$ c. 

3,075 85 
10,334 96 

3.009 10 
21,254 68 
28,389 05 

8,677 10 
142 75 

5,849 40 
50,924 04 
24,551 43 
11,721 61 
31,194 41 

1,540 65 

961 97 

20,709 02 



222,339 02 



$ 0. 

922 75 

5,100 48 

902 72 

6.376 40 

8.. 516 72 

2.603 13 

42 83 

1,754 82 

10,315 02 

7,365 43 

3,516 48 

9.358 32 

462 19 

28S 59 

6.212 70 



61.738 58 



HASTINGS COUNTY 



Sidney Township 

The thickly-settled section between the Town of Trenton and the City of Belleville 
has necessarily caused the new road to follow very closely the old alignment. Advantage 
has been taken, however, of every situation that allowed the centre line to be shifted so 
as to flatten or obliterate the curve. 

During the season an attempt was made to drain the highway across the entire town- 
ship. Due to scarcity of labour, however, it was found that it was possible to bring only 
short lengths of road to the proper cross-section. Over the remaining sections the grader 
witli trartor was used. The ditches were then cleaned, brush and rubbish cut out and 
removed, and drainage opened up. The following stations indicate the lengths of road 
graded to required cross-section: 

Station 1300-57 to 1 304-38 

1351-61 " 1355-00 

1417-77 " 1423-04 

1527-00 " 1532-00 

1541-90 " 1573-00 



Stations 1640-00 to 1730-79 — This section, was ditched. The cross-section is such 
that road is ready for surface construction. In all, approximately one mile of road was 
graded to cross-section. 

In view of the close relationship between ditching, placing farm entrance tile and 
light earthwork, some difficulty was experienced in securing unit costs. A total of 562 
feet of farm entrance pipe was laid, and one road intersection culvert of 40 feet in 
length. The total cost of the above work was $1,747.33. 

Culverts were constructed, one of each of the following sizes: 3 x 3 x 33. 16 x 5 x 36 
ft. 3 ins . 6 X 5 X 33. 4 X 5 X 33. 5 X 5 X 33, and 12 x 5 x 33; also 11 15-inch concrete pipes 
reinforced with 6-inch concrete and masonry end walls. The total cost of this work 
was $12,466.27. 

The road was gravelled throughout the township. Stations 1248 to 1739-80, to an 
average depth of 5 inches and a width of approximately 18 feet. Log drags were used 
to maintain and help consolidate this material. The total cost for placing gravel and 
consolidating same was $17,282.19. Approximately 8,470 cubic yards of gravel was used, 
making an average cost of $2.40 per cubic yard. This section of road was considered in 
excellent shape at the end of 1919 season. 



1920 IMPROVEMENT IX OXTAIJIO. 



Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toiinship 

Earthwork and side-entrance culverts ^i.'iVi 6'6 $o^4 zv 

Tile and pipe draining 14 40 4 32 

Road surface 17,282 19 5.184 66 

Bridges and culverts 12,466 27 3,739 88 

Guard rail 162 50 48 75 



!1,672 69 $9,501 81 



Tyendinaga Township 

Very little change of alignment is anticipated through this township, the only 
deviations necessary being in the Village of Shannonville, where the road crosses the 
Salmon River direct, and at Marysville, where the road turns south to Deseronto, pass- 
ing behind the buildings at this point. 

Temporary drainage was undertaken where it was impossible to attempt to bring 
the road to the proper cross-section. All culverts were also cleaned and repaired. 

The following lengths of road were graded to proper cross-section: Stations 99-77 
to 136-66, Stations 403-25 to 493-50, Stations 766-87 to 791-06, making a total of 3 miles 
at a cost of $9,910.98. This also includes the laying of 180 feet of farm entrance tile. 
A heavy cut through hill half mile south of Marysville accounts for large percentage of 
this amount. 

The following culverts were built: One. 6 x 4 x 38; two, 3 x 3 x 36; and 15-inch con- 
crete reinforced tile with concrete end walls, at a total cost of $2,998.73. 

The road surface through this township was also in an extremely bad condition. 
Repairs were made as follows: 

Stations 97-77 to 137-50 — Four-inch limestone was used. This was spread to a 
width of 18 feet and consolidated to 6 inches in depth by rolling. Pit gravel was used 
as a filler. 

Stations 403-20 to 682-35 — Pit gravel was used. This was spread to an average 
width of 12 feet and 5 inches in thickness, the whole being consolidated by log drag. 

Stations 682-35 to 780-00 — Two-inch stone was spread to a width of 15 feet and 6 
inches in depth, and covered with limestone screenings. This same method of repair- 
ing was used from Stations 780-00 to 824-58, except that the width of metal would not 
average over 12 feet. Approximately 11,740 cubic yards of material was placed on the 
road at a cost of $23,368.39. Metalling was completed, as shown above, across the town- 
ship, approximately 9 miles. 

^ Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Tounship. 

Earthwork and entrance culverts S9,910 98 $2,973 29 

Bridges and culverts 2,998 73 899 62 

Road surface 23,368 39 7,010 52 

$36,278 10 $10,883 43 

Total cost for township $10,883 43 



Indian Reserve 

The alignment through the Reserve follows very closely the old road. No deviation 
from this at present has been assumed. 

No attempt was made to maintain the present ditches. Some grading was under- 
taken, however, and the road finished to the proper cross-section from Station 65-00 to 
97-77. Sucker Creek Hill. Station 30-00, was also lowered. 3,100 cubic yards being taken 
from same, but the work was not finished to grade. The total cost of earthwork was 
$4,071.08. 

One of each of the following sized culverts was constructed: 4 x 3 x 40, 6 x 2 ft. 6 
In. X 38, 3 X 3 X 50, 3 x 3 X 33, 4 X 3 x 36. 



7() 



REPORT UPON HIGHWAY 



No. 15 



No attempt was made to gravel the section from Deseronto West to Marysville side- 
road. From this point, however, beginning at Station 0-00 to Station 35-00, 2-incli stone, 
dressed with screenings, was used. From this point to Station 65-00 the road was given 
a light coat of pit gravel, these sections averaging 10 feet in width and 5 inches in 
thickness. From Station 65-00 to 97-75 4-inch stone was used, being spread to 18 feet in 
width and consolidated with roller to 6 inches in depth. Pit gravel was then used as 
a binder. Approximately two miles were metalled, 3,552 cubic feet of material being 
used at a total cost of $7,359.27. 

Construction 



Total Expenditure. 

Earthwork and entrance culverts $3,457 08 

Bridges and culverts 3,579 43 

Road surface 7,359 27 



$14.39£ 7^ 



Cost for Reserve. 
$1,037 12 
1,073 83 
2,207 78 

$4,318 73 



Thurlow Township 

Through this tow^nship some change in alignment has been found necessary. The 
land, generally of a shallow nature, lends itself quite readily to any deviations required, 
very little tillable land being interfered with. Deviations are short, however, the new 
centre line following the old grade fairly closely. 

On account of lateness of season and scarcity of men, very little grading was under- 
taken, only 1.200 feet of road being brought to the proper cross-section. The ditches 
were cleared and all culverts were cleaned and rebuilt. The total cost for this work, 
including the laying of 120 feet of entrance culvert, was $436.80. 

The following culverts were constructed: Two 3 x 3 x 36; three 3 x 2 x 33, and one 
4 X 3 X 36. The cost of this work was $4,478.58. 

Work was commenced in this township July 21st, and on account of the extremely 
bad condition of the road it was thought advisable to put the surface in passable con- 
dition at once. Crushed stone and gravel were used in all, approximately 7,000 cubic 
yards of material, at a total cost of $16,862.24. The stone was spread to a width of 
12 feet and an average depth of 6 inches, a layer of screenings placed over the surface, 
and the whole consolidated by the use of a split log drag. Metalling was completed, as 
shown above, across the township, approximately 6 miles. 



Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township. 

Bridges and culverts $4,478 58 ' $1,343 58 

Earthwork and farm entrance culverts 436 80 131 04 

Road surface 16,862 24 5,058 67 



$21,777 62 



$6,533 29 



Summary for Hastings County 



Consti'uction 



I 30% 

Maintenance; Total Payable by 

County 



Sidney. Twp 

Tyendhiaga, Twp 
Indian Reserve. . . 
Thiirlow, Twp . . . 



$ c. 
31,672 69 
36,278 10 
14,395 78 
21.777 62 

104,124 19 



$ c. 

31.672 69 

36,278 10 

14.395 78 

31,777 62 

102,124 19 



$ c. 

9.501 81 

10.883 43 

4.318 75 

6.533 29 

31.237 28 



1920 IMPROVEMENT IX OXTAKIO. 



LENNOX AND ADDINGTON 



Ernesttown Township 

Work was started in this township early in May. Grading commenced in the west 
boundary; Station 273-50 completed to Station 363-27. From this point to east boundavy 
of township, Station 866-30, the cross-section is such that construction may be proceeded 
with at once. 

Farm entrance and road intersection culverts were placed over the section graded, 
in all 440 feet being laid. The cost of earthwork and side-entrance culverts was $2,133.83. 

A new steel bridge, span 45 feet, and two culverts, 6 x 4 x 36 and 5 x 5 x 43, were 
constructed at a cost of $9,758.83. 

From Station 273-50 to 417-27 road was patched with broken limestone and con- 
solidated with roller. Stations 417-10 to 542-13 — the road was given a light surfacing 
with pit gravel. Stations 564-80 to 743-00 — a rubble stone was used. This was spread 
to 18 feet in width, consolidated with roller, with pit gravel and sand as binder. It was 
intended that this course should act as base for future construction. On a short section 
near Village of Odessa screenings were used instead of sand as binder. Approximately 
8 miles were metalled, 7. 986 cubic yards of material being used at a cost of $17,426.25. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township, 

Earthwork and side-entrance culverts $2,133 83 $640 15 

Bridges and culverts 9,758 96 2,927 68 

Road surface 17,426 25 5,227 88 



$29,319 04 $8,795 71 



North Fredericksburg Township 

No change in alignment was considered in this township, the new road following 
the centre line of old location. 

Light grading, such as ditch maintenance, had been undertaken duing the Fall of 
1918. This was continued in the Spring of 1919, and completed to cross-section in 
August. The cost of this earthwork, including the laying of 760 feet of entrance and 
road intersection culverts, was $2,950.68. 

The following culverts were constructed: Two IS-inch concrete pipe, reinformed 
with 6-inch concrete and concrete masonry end walls; one 5 x 4 x 36. and one 16 x 4 feet 
5 inches x 36, at a cost of $4,080.50. 

Construction of macadam road was undertaken in this township and completed 
from Station 93-00 to 251-00. A rubble base 20 feet wide and 8 inches deep was con- 
solidated, and on this a layer of 2-inch stone consolidated to 4 inches in depth, with 
limestone screenings as binder. The cost of this construction work was $36,503.37, or 
approximately $12,167.79 per mi;e, with 14,860 cubic yards of material used. These 
costs, as shown above, include placing crushed stone over all entrance culverts and 
building a short section across the highway at all cross-roads. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Tounship. 

Earthwork and side-entrance culverts $2,950 68 $885 20 

Bridges and culverts 4,080 58 1,224 18 

Road surface 36,503 37 10,951 01 

Rockwork 118 50 3.5 .5.5 

$43,653 13 $13,095 94 



Napanee Hill 



The rockwork at Napanee Hill was undertaken late in the Fall. The object of grade 
reduction at this point was partly to secure material for macadam construction and 
also to reduce a heavy grade. 

The following amount was expended before the end of January: — 

Construction 

Cost in Tounship. 
$2,070 00 $621 00 



Total cost for township $13,716 94 



REPORT UPOX HIGHWAY 



Xu. 15 



Richmond Township 

The road allowance through this township when assumed had an average width 
of 40 feet Before ditching or grading could be undertaken it was necessary to purchase 
additional land so that the road might be straightened and widened. This was done 
for 2V> miles directly west of Napanee, the remaining 31/2 miles of road not being 
widened Generally the new centre line follows closely the old alignment. 

Grading commenced in this township about July 21st. From Station 58-60 to 120-30 
the road was brought to the proper cross-section. Due to numerous small hills in this 
section the grading was comparatively heavy. This earthwork, including the placing of 
275 feet of farm-entrance culverts, was done at a cost of $4,258.62. 

Culverts were constructed as follows: 2 24-inch tile, 40 feet long, reinforced with 
9-inch concrete and concrete head walls, 5 x 4 x 44, 3 x 2 x 38, 3 x 2 x 36, 3 x 2 x 33, and 
the cost was $3,538.70. 

Construction and repairs were undertaken as follows: 

Stations 63-00 to 120-00— Road macadamized. This work was completed in two 
courses, 8-inch rubble base, 20 feet wide, and 4 inches of 2-inch stone, and stone screen- 
ings being used as a binder. , . , ^ . , , 

Stations 120-00 and 188-00— Only light patchwork was undertaken, bad holes and 

rat£ b^ing filled. ^ „ . , . j , , 

•stations 188-00 to 302-50— Hoad received a heavy coat of 2-inch stone, spread loosely 
ou the road an average width of 12 feet and 6 inches deep. This was covered with 
stone screenings and consolidated with log drag. Approximately 5 miles of road was 
metalled, 7,770 cubic yards of material being used at a cost of $25,468.74. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township. 

Earthwork and side-entrance culverts $4,258 62 $1,277 58 

Bridges and culverts 3.538 70 1,061 61 

Road surface 25,468 74 7,640 62 

Guard rail 3 17 96 

$33,269 23 $9,980 77 



Summary for United Counties 



iM-nesttown. Fwp • 

North f'redoricksburti. Twii., 
Richmond, Twp , 




c. I $ c. I $ cs 

2!i.8i9 04 ' 2:S.319 04 

45.723 13 t 45.723 13 

33.269 23 | 33.269 23 



8.795 71 

13,716 94 

9.980 77 



108.311 40 



108.311 40 I 32.493 42 



FRONTENAC COUNTY 



Pittsburg Township 

The surface of the road when taken over was in a very rough condition, badly 
drained, and of varying widths. From the Leeds Township line west, a distance of 
35 700 feet, the curves were very sharp, and had to be eased. The road was very hilly 
and rough,' it being close to the River St. Lawrence. From Grass Creek west, a distance 
of 11 300 feet the road was almost impassable, making it necessary to ditch, widen and 
reduce grades. Just east of Kingston, through Barriefield Camp, for a distance of 7.800 
feet the alignment was fairly straight with the exception of one place, where the old 
road ran around a rock ledge. This was straightened by cutting out the rock.. The 
curve at Barriefield Village was eased. 

There were 4,900 feet of fence moved back to regulation width. We have considerable 
fence still down, but were unable to build same owing to the lateness of the season. 
As soon as the frost is out it will be erected in the proper location. 

From Leeds Township line west for a distance of 35.700 feet we graded, ditched 
and reduced the grades. Owing to the lack of labour and plant, we were nnable to 



1920 IMPROVEMEXT IX OXTAPJO. 79 

build the necessary culverts, so replaced 14 old culverts under the road with IS-inch 
vitrified tile. We placed 37 side-entrance culverts with 15-inch vitrified tile. West of 
Grass Creek there were two grades reduced from 7 and 8 per cent, to .5 per cent. Ten 
vitrified tile were placed under the road to replace old culverts which were blocked, and 
ten side culverts. The material moved was mostly earth. At Barriefield the road was 
ditched and widened to the regulation width of 30 feet through limestone. Crushed 
stone was placed on the above to a depth of 4 inches and 18 feet wide for a distance 
of 7,800 feet. 

From Mr. Maxwell's to the top of Barclay's Hill the road was stoned 20 feet wide 
with stone quarried and crushed from Mr. Barclay's. From Barclay's west for 1^2 miles 
the road w^as stoned 9 feet wide from MacFadden's Quarr%-. The haul was over two 
miles, but, from general appearance, it is better wearing stone than that placed on the 
east end. 

We reduced a number of grades. The most important changes were raising the 
fill in front of Mr. Brash's from two to three feet, widening the road from fifteen to 
thirty feet. This fill was made by cutting down the hills east and west; the hill west, 
known as Barclay's Hill, had an 8 per cent, grade, which was reduced to 4.5 per cent. 
This hill was rock, and required a cut of 3 feet, with a vertical curve at its summit. 
At Barriefield there were four rock knells cut through to reduce the grades and improve 
the vision. 

The road west of the Half-waj' House was covered with weeds and brush: this was 
cut and the shoulders graded. The road at Long Grass Creek was deeply rutted, and 
after every rain the men had to dig across to let off the water. The bridge at Long 
Grass Creek v\as replanked. The bridge over Grass Creek was quite dangerous, the 
east abutment having settled over two feet. We raised the bridge by placing elm logs 
on the abutment, and replanked it. Twenty-one hundred feet of bituminous road west 
of Kingston was patched and resurfaced. Eight thousand feet was patched with gravel 
at the Half-way House. 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toicnship. 
Road surface, bituminous patching, half mile S363 00 $108 90 

Patching with gravel 426 30 127 89 

Cutting off shoulders and dragging 1.093 59 328 08 

Bridges and culverts 575 71 172 71 



$2,458 60 $737 58 



Construction 



Grading, earth and rock, 5 miles iil4,4S4 26 4.345 28 

Road surface, crushing, 2.5 miles, quarrying, 

hauling, spreading 21,128 56 6,338 57 

Guard rail 4 00 1 20 

Moving plant 69 SO 20 94 

Side entrance culverts. No. 47 1.5-inch vit. pipe 

Pipe culvert under highway. No. 24. 18-inch 1,621 23 486 37 

$37,307 85 $11,192 36 

Total cost for township $11,929 94 



Kingston Township 

Grading work was generally undertaken in short sections and was principally rock 
work. It consisted chiefly of opening ditches through rock, ledges, cuts, etc. The 
cost of this work was $1,629.60. Earthwork was also light and scattered: the cost of 
this, including the placing of 580 feet of entrance and road intersection culverts, was 
$829.35. 

Only patchwork was unoertaken through this township. This work was handled 
by contract. An attempt was made to fill up bad holes, ruts, etc.. preparatory to con- 
struction in 1920. Approximately 2,500 cu. yds. of broken stone was used acoss the 
entire township for this work, which cost $5,950.43. 



80 



EEPOET UPON HIGHWAY 



No. 15 



Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township. 

Earthwork and side entrance culverts $829 35 $248 80 

Road surface 5,950 43 1.785 13 

Moving poles 62 47 18 74 

Permanent light 45 33 13 66 

Rockwork 1,629 60 488 88 

Guard rail 90 27 

Totals $8,518 08 $2,555 42 

Total cost to township $2,555 42 



Summary for Frontenac County 





Construction Maintenance 


Total 


30% 

payable by 

County 




.$ c, 
8,518 08 

37,307 85 


$ c. 


$ c. 
8,. 518 08 

39,766 45 


.$ c. 
2,. 555 42 


Pittsbure Two 


2,458 60 


11.929 94 








45,825 93 


2,458 60 


48 284 53 


14,485 36 



CARLETON COUNTY 



Marlborough Township 

Two parties were working in this township during part of the season moving 
fences, clearing brush from the right of way, putting up a grade 30 feet wide to the 
top. with varying depths, and constructing entrances into farms. On this section 
6,190 feet of grade has been completed and 1,400 feet half completed. Stone fills, in 
old ditches have been made for a new foundation, for a distance of 600 feet across 
some soft areas. 

The cost of this work was as follows: 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township. 

Earth work $2,668 31 $800 49 

Road surface 44 75 13 42 

Side entrance culverts 417 95 125 39 

Total $3,131 01 $939 30 



Nepean Township 

During the season two parties were at work in this township, removing old fences, 
clearing right of way of brush, stumps, rock and similar materials, cutting down hills, 
making fills, constructing new grades and putting in pipe culverts for farm entrances. 
Grades were built with top surface of 30 feet as follows: 14,200 feet completed; 1,900 
feet half completed; 800 feet about one-third completed. About 7,500 feet of this new 
grade has been surfaced with a heavy coat of gravel 20 feet wide. Stone fills across 
soft areas for a distance of 1,500 feet were constructed. In the vicinity of Ottawa the 
right of way for extra widening has not been acquired and conditions would permit 
of making the grade of top width of 24 feet, which was completed for a distance of 
9,700 feet. A third party of men with a road roller, sprinkler and other necessary 
tools, and were employed in the vicinity of Ottawa from about July 1st to end of the 
season, putting down water-bound macadam. 20 feet in width, the crushed stone for 
same being supplied on the ground by the contractor. This party completed 8,250 feet 
of this road, laid first course of stone for a distance of 1,450 feet, and repaired the 
roadbed of the old toll road for a distance of 3,400 feet. 



1020 



IMPROVEMENT IN ONTARIO. 



SI 



Side entrance cost includes cost of several hundred feet of pipe on the ground but 
not in place. 

In addition to this work during the season Contractor Allen built four reinforced 
concrete culverts: 5 x 5 x 60; 4 x 4 x 33; 4 x 6 x 36; 7 x 4 x 55. 

All charges included in the following totals for work done in the township of 
Nepean cover only paysheets for men and teams and accounts for material used in 
construction of the road for the period stated. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township. 

Culverts $4,455 77 $1,336 73 

Earthwork 14,430 45 4,329 13 

Road surface 31,441 84 9,432 55 

Side entrance 1,243 12 372 97 

Total $51,571 18 $15,471 35 



North Qower 

During the season three parties were at work in this township removing old fences, 
clearing new right-of-way of brush, stumps, rock and similar materials, cutting down 
hills, making fills and building new grades with the top width of 30 feet. Of these 
grades 34,300 feet were completed, 7,100 feet half completed, and 4,450 feet one-third 
completed. Of the completed grades 10,000 feet have been surfaced with a heavy coat 
of gravel 20 feet wide, 4,900 feet of rubble bottom have been laid, and for a distance 
of 11,280 feet old ditches in soft areas have been filled with a base of rock. Many side 
entrances to farms were built, and the total cost of this work was as follows: 

All charges included in the following totals for work done in the township of North 
Gower cover only pay sheets for men and teams and accounts for material used in con- 
struction of the road for the period stated. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure Cost for Township. 

Earthwork $28,856 27 $8,656 88 

Road surface 4.460 05 . 1,338 01 

Road foundation materials 1,630 00 489 00 

Side entrance culverts 456 55 136 97 

Total $35,402 87 $10,620 86 

Summary for Carleton County 



[Construction 



Maintenance 



Total 



30% 

Pa.vable by 

County 



I $ c. 

North Gower Twp •. | 35,402 87 

Nepean Twp \ 51 ,571 18 

Marlborough Twp i 3,131 01 



90,105 06 



$ c. 



$ c. 
35.402 87 

51.571 IS 

3.131 01 



90,105 0() 



$ c. 
.10,620 86 

15.471 35 

939 30 



27.031 51 



LEEDS AND QRENVILLE 



Escott Township 

This road was in a very bad condition, owing to its crooked alignment, trees and 
shrubbery overhanging the road, bad drainage, and heavy grades. This necessitated re- 
running and locating a new centre line for the road, clearing, ditching, building cul- 
verts, and reducing the grades. A large portion of this grading was through granite 
rock, which required drilling and dynamite, making progress very slow. Labour was 
scarce. 



REPORT UPON HIGHWAY No. 15 



Between Lansdowne Township line and the village of Escott, a distance of 10,600 
feet, the road was straightened, so that as much of the old road as possible could be 
used. In this distance the number of curves was reduced to five, whereas formerly 
there were from 10 to 15. There was considerable fencing done, and two miles of tele- 
phone poles, owned by the Lansdowne Rural Telephone Co., moved to their proper loca- 
tion. Four grades were reduced, the heaviest being half a mile west of the village of 
Escott; this necessitated a side hill cut off from 4 to 10 feet. The material from the 
cut was not used in the fill, but was crushed and spread over the graded road. The 
fill was 200 feet long and 8 feet deep over a swamp; the material was procured from 
a clay hill east of the fill. Moulton's Creek was diverted through soild rock, thus giv- 
ing the water an outlet, whereas before it had always remained along the road. At this 
point we had to build a fill 6 feet deep and 150 feet long. It was rip-rapped with stone 
on the stream side, to save it from the ice in the spring. There was an 8 x 7 concrete 
culvert built to replace an old concrete arch. This was built late in the fall, as we 
could not get a concrete mixer earlier. In the fill half a mile west of Escott a 36-inch 
corrugated pipe was laid on a 6-inch concrete base, and a casing of concrete placed 
around the barrel. This was mixed by hand. Owing to the scarcity of labour and 
machinery we were unable to build culverts so placed — 6 18-inch vitrified pipes under 
the highway and 16 15-inch vitrified in side entrances. 

The road was surfaced "with crushed stone to a width of 9 feet and 6 inches deep. 
The stone was procured through the township allowing me to use Mr. MacRow's crush- 
ing plant for a limited time, as there was no other crusher available. 

From the village of Escott east to Yonge Township line the shoulders were graded, 
ditches opened, ard a thin coat of gravel put on and dragged. One bridge at Escott 
was replanked. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township. 

Grading, earth and rockwork, 2 miles $9,213 60 

Surfacing, crushing, hauling, spreading, 2 

miles 

Concrete culvert under highway 

Corrugated pipe under highway, 48-inch 

Side entrance culvert 15 15-inch vit. pipe 

$15,481 28 $4,644 38 

Maintenance 

Surfacing — shoulders graded, road patching, 

gravelling 4 miles $2,900 26 $870 08 

One bridge replanked 43 36 13 01 



4,032 


97 


1,731. 


71 


225 


60 


277 


40 



$2,764 


08 


1,209 


89 


519 


51 


67 


68 


83 


28 



$2,943 62 $883 09 

Total cost . $18,424 90 

Total cost for township $5,527 47 



Yonge Township 

This township has fairly good roads, with the exception of the stretch running 
from Yonge Mills east to the Elizabethtown township line, which has not been finally 
located and approved of by the Department. However, we ditched, patched the worst 
places, and dragged the above stretch. A distance of 3,000 feet through the village of 
Mallorytpwn was ditched, and patched with crushed stone from Point Anne. Six pipe 
culverts were installed at farm entrances. 

■*■ Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toicnship. 

Half-mile graded $672 00 $201 60 

Half-mile stoned 551 19 165 37 



$1,223 19 $366 97 

Maintenance 

Repairs to culverts $66 85 $20 05 

Shoulders cut with grader and road patched 554 SO 166 44 



$621 65 $186 49 

Total cost $1,844 84 

Total cost for township $553 46 



1920 IMPROVEMEXT IX OXTARIO. S:5 

Lansdovsne Township 

This road was in a fair condition. Shoulders were graded, ditches cleaned, cul- 
verts repaired, and the road gravelled for a distance of 15,300 feet east of the Leeds 
Township line. Between the two roads leading to Lansdowne, a distance of 9,200 feet, 
the undergrowth and weeds (which were very thick and obscured the vision to traffic) 
were cut and the road patched. 

Owing to the lack of plant and labour, construction through this township was im- 
possible. However, we gravelled two miles late in the fall. 

Construction 

TotQl Expenditure. Cost for Township. 

Road surfacing — two miles gravelled §658 85 §197 66 

Side entrance culverts — pipes under road.. 389 32 116 79 

Moving telephone poles 42 00 12 60 



?1,090 17 §327 05 



Maintenance 



Road surface — 4 miles, shoulders graded. 

ditches and culverts cleared $2,677 04 $803 11 

Three stone culverts repaired 37 50 11 25 

Two miles brushed and road patched 309 50 92 85 



$3,024 04 $907 21 

Total cost $4,114 21 

Total cost for township $1,234 26 



Leed.s Township 

This portion of the highway was in fair condition, so did very little permanent 
work. 

Graded, ditched, straightened alignment, and reduced grades for 2.000 feet three 
miles west of Gananoque. The progress here was very slow, owing to the hardness of 
the rock, it being granite and very hard to handle. 

From Gananoque west for a distance of 9,500 feet shoulders were graded, a light 
coat of gravel placed over the same and dragged. From Gananoque east for a distance 
of 13.600 feet shoulders were graded, surface patched with stone, and rolled. Seventeen 
pipe culverts were installed at farm entrances, and seven across the road. It was neces- 
sary to put in these new pipes, as the old ones were broken and blocked. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toicn^hip. 

Half-mile graded, ditched $1,321 80 $396 54 

Road surface — 15 mile gravelled, dragged.... 84 00 25 20 
Pipe culverts under highway — 4 18-inch vitri- 
fied 220 80 66 24 



$1,626 00 $487 98 

Alaintenance 

Road surface — 5 miles, shoulder graded, 

ditched and gravelled $4,834 08 $1,450 23 

Pipe culverts under highway, 3 18-inch vit- 
rified 

Side entrance culverts, 11 15-inch vitrified.... 199 85 59 96 



$5,033 93 $1,510 19 

Total cost for township $1,998 17 



Elizabethtown Township 

The surface of this road when taken over was in a very rough condition, badly 
drained, and varying in width, hilly and very poor alignment. From Yonge Township 
East to Powell's Hill it v.-as a sand road. From Powell's for two miles west we re- 
located the road, as it was very crooked — in fact, some of the turns were quite 



84 REPOET UPON HIGHWAY No. 15 

dangerous. On this two miles we graded 5,800 feet. This was sand and shale rock, 
but we were able to plow the same with a pick plow and two or three teams. Around 
Powell's Hill there were considerable trees to be cut, so located our line to avoid cut- 
ting the best. We reduced the grade at Lothums summer hotel by raising the fill 4 feet 
and widening. The two hills were solid rock, and the grades were reduced from 8% 
to 5%. This piece of work was very difficult to handle, owing to the house being so 
close to the present road. iWe have stone piled ready for crushing. This stone was 
taken from the fences along the road, and had to be moved to allow the ditches being 
made. Owing to lack of machinery we were unable to build permanent culverts or 
crush the stone. We placed six 18-inch vitrified tile and one 18-inch concrete pipe 
under the highway and built eight side entrance culverts. East of Brockville, for half 
a mile, the road was graded and ditched. One rock cut was taken out at the Ontario 
Hospital. 

From Brockville west to the Cemetery, a distance of half a mile, the road was 
cleared of underbrush, ditches and old culverts cleaned. Three bridges were replanked 
and guard rails repaired. East of town the road was patched to town line of Augusta 
with crushed stone. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toivnship. 

One mile earth and rock grading $6,465 16 $1,939 54 

1 18-inch concrete tile under highway 121 25 36 37 

Side entrance culvert (8 15-inch vit. tile); 

culverts under highway (6 18-inch vit. tile) 873 27 261 98 

Dragging road surface 26 29 7 88 

Culvert pipes delivered to road 445 05 133 51 



$7,931 02 $2,379 31 



Maintenance 



Shoulders graded, ditches cleared, brushed, 

and road patched $1,041 60 312 48 

Three bridges replanked 132 99 39 90 

$1474 59 $352 38 

Total cost for township $2,731 69 



Edwardsburg Township 

The road surface on the Provincial highway through Edwardsburg Township was in 
a very rough condition when taken over, particularly the road for a distance of about 
one mile westerly from the east boundary. This section was almost impassable for 
traffic. 

The road was graded, shoulders cut off, and crown formed with the road grader 
for a distance of about seven miles. One and one-quarter miles of road east of Car- 
dinal were given a coat of cinders 10 feet wide by 6 inches deep. 

Two miles of road from station 136-44 easterly were very badly drained. This 
necessitated ditching. 

The total cost of above work was $2,697.61. 

The floorings on old timber culverts at station 32-00 and station 223-00 were in a 
dangerous condition; these were replaced at a cost of $53.50. 

The road from station 136-44 westerly was very narrow. The road was widened 
out to 30 feet, and standard cross-section constructed, with ditches on both sides for 
a distance of one mile. Three-quarters of a mile of road was given a coat of gravel 
12 feet wide by 6 inches deep. 

Fences were removed and the roadway widened out to 86 feet for a distance of 
three-quarters of a mile. 

Three-quarters of a mile of road west of Cardinal was metalled 10 feet wide by 6 
inches deep. This stone was shipped from Point Anne Quarries. Point Anne, Ont. 

Total cost of above work was $5,672.35. 

One carload of 15-inch vitrified pipe was delivered, and seven 15-inch vitrified pipe 
culverts were built at side entrances and across the road at a cost of $455.36. 

About 300 cubic yards of concrete and sand have been delivered at culverts for 
fulvert work during the season of 1920 at a cost of $275.10. 



1920 IMPIJOVEMEXT IX ONTAIUO. 85 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for TownsMp. 

Road surface — grading 7 miles, dragging 7 
miles, 11^4 miles cinder road 12 ft. wide, 6 in. 
deep; two miles ditched $2,697 61 $809 28 

Culverts — 2 new floorings on old timber cul- 
verts 53 50 16 05 



$2,751 11 $825 33 



Construction 



One mile standard cross-section, with ditches: 
% mile gravelling, 12 feet x 6 inches deep; 
% mile fences moved and rebuilt on 86 
feet line; % mile metalling, 10 feet by 6 
inches deep $5,672 35 $1,70170 

Bridges and culverts — 300 cubic yards con- 
crete sand delivered on side for culvert 
construction 275 10 82 53 

One carload 15-inch vit. pipe delivered, and 
seven vit. pipe culverts built at side en- 
trance and across the road 455 36 136 61 

$6,402 81 $1,920 84 

Total cost for township $2,746 17 



OTTAWA— PRESCOTT HIGHWAY 

The work carried on upon this section of the highway during this period was 
largely construction work, there being very little expenditure on maintenance. When 
this road was taKen over, the right-of-way was very narrow, being only from 35 to 40 
feet wide throughout the greater part of its length. The fences in many places were 
built of logs and rail, and considerable amounts of rubble stone and boulders had been 
piled against these fences, with thick brush coming out through and amongst them. 
For long stretches there were no ditches, and grades were flat or none at all, and brush 
grew along the roadside up to the edge of the wheel track. At certain seasons of the 
year long stretches of this road were almost impassable, particularly the section just 
east of Prescott, the section north of Kemptville to the Rideau River, the section 
through Cranberry Marsh, in the township of North Gower. and a long section in 
Nepean Township from near Manotick to near the city of Ottawa. 

Edwardsburg Township 

Throughout this township old fences have been removed in almost all instances, 
brush and stumps removed, and the stone piled along fences built into the roadbed over 
deep fills and through soft areas. Many side entrances to farms have also been con- 
structed. Work was carried on simultaneously at many points with seven different 
parties of men and teams, each party working under a separate foreman. It cost con- 
siderable money to clear the right-of-way and remove rock and other debris. During 
this season grades of varying heights, from 24 inches to 36 inches, and 30 feet wide 
on top, were constructed as follows — 47,925 feet completed grade; 17,156 feet of grade 
half completed; 6,100 feet of grade one-third completed. 

Of these completed grades, 1,000 feet has been surfaced with water-bound macadam, 
25,900 feet has been surfaced with a heavy coat of gravel 25 feet wide, which is now 
ready for rolling during the coming season. During the season of 1^)19 a roller was 
kept working upon the new grade from July 1st to the end of the season, with the ob- 
ject of consolidating the new material. A total of 25,900 feet of this new grade was 
built on a rubble stone base, and for 31,800 feet it was found necessary, because of the 
narrow travelled way, to fill the old ditches and make the sides of new roadbed with 
rock. The cost of the work done in this township was as follows: 

The side entrance cost includes a few feet of pipe on the ground, but not placed 
to date. 

On this section 41 reinforced concrete culverts, varying in size from 2 feet x 2 feet, 
with variable lengths of 33 to 69 feet, to culverts of 17 feet x 8 feet x 38 feet long, as 
well as the concrete abutments for the Spencerville Bridge, were constructed by con- 
tractor Lucius E. Allen, at a cost of $25,936.80. 



SG 



EEPORT UPON HIGHWAY Xu- 15 



Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Totvnship. 

Bridges and culverts $25,936 80 $7,781 04 

Earthwork 63,891 59 19,167 47 

Road surface - 9,231 59 2,769 47 

Rockwork 8,241 63 2,474 48 

Hauling stone 1050 5o 31o 1^ 

Side entrance culverts 1,309 42 392 82 

$109,661 58 $32,898 47 

Total cost for township $32,898 47 



Oxford Township 

During the season three parties were working in this township under separate 
foremen, removing fences along the entire length of the road, clearing the right-of-way 
of brush, stumps and boulders, cutting down hills and building grades having a top 
width of 30 feet for a distance of over 45,100 feet. Of this finished grade 2,000 feet 
have been surfaced with crushed stone to a width of 20 feet, and 21,200 feet have been 
surfaced with a heavy coat of gravel 20 feet wide. Rubble stone base has been placed under 
10,000 feet of this new grade, and for 25,033 feet stone fills have been made in the old 
ditches and across soft areas. A road roller was employed on this section continuously 
from about July 1st to the end of the season, working on the new grades to consolidate 
them and get the road in proper shape. A crushing plant was used at Kemptville for 
about a month. Side entrances to farms were constructed at many points. 

This side entrance cost includes a few hundred feet of pipe on the ground, but not 
placed to date. 

Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toicnship. 

Brushing $53 20 

Earthwork 44,024 23 

Road surface 6,432 90 

Rockwork 677 20 

Road foundation material 2,958 50 

Side entrance culverts 429 85 

$54,575 88 $16,37: 



$15 


96 


13,207 


26 


1,929 


87 


203 


16 


887 


55 


128 


96 



Augusta Township 

There was no construction done in this township, but material was delivered for 
construction. There was one bridge replanked, and a few loads of gravel placed in 
holes. 

All charges included in the following totals for work done in the township of 
Augusta cover only pay sheets for men and teams and accounts for material used in 
the construction and maintenance of this portion of the road during the period stated. 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toicnship. 

Road surface $4 80 $1 44 

Bridges and culverts 43 25 12 9 < 



h8 05 $14 41 



Construction 



Road surface $30 42 $9 13 

Side entrance pipes 526 16 157 85 

$556 58 $166 98 



1920 



IMPROVEMEXT IX OXTAlMo. 



Si 



Summary for Leeds and Grenville Counties 




Escott Twp 






$ c. 
15,481 28 
1.223 19 
1.090 17 
1.626 60 
7,931 02 

116,064 89 

54,575 88 

556 58 


$ c. 
2.943 62 
621 65 
3,024 04 
5,033 93 
1,174 59 

2.751 11 

is'os' 


$ c. 
18.424 90 
1.844 84 
4.114 21 
6,660 53 
9,105 61 

118,815 50 

54,575 88 

604 63 


5; c. 
5.527 47 


Yonge Twp. (Front of) 

Lan-downe Twp 

Leeds Twp 


553 46 
1.234 26 
1.998 17 


Elizabethtown Twp 


2.781 69 


Edwardsburg Twp. (Ottawa. 

109.661.58; Prescotl-Bouadai 
Oxford Twp 


Prescott) 
y 6,402.81 


35.644 64 
16.372 76 


Augusta Township 






181 39 




198,549 11 


15.596 99 


214.146 10 


64.243 84 



STOR/MONT, DU.NDAS AND QLENQARRY 



Williamsburg Township 

The road surface on the Provincial Highway tlirougli Williamsburg Township, 
when taken over, was badly rutted. The road was graded, shoulders cut off. and crown 
formed with the road grader for a distance of about 7 miles. The road surface was 
patched and holes filled with broken stones. A new flooring was placed on an old tim- 
ber culvert 9 feet x 5 feet, lot 3. 

Two carloads of broken stone were unloaded for bridge construction, at a cost of 
$37.10. 

One carload of 15-inch vitrified pipe was delivered for side entrances, at a cost of 
?322.75. 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toiinship. 
Road surface — grading 7 miles; patching 

holes with broken stone— 7 miles $1,4S2 64 $438 80 

Bridges and culverts, one new timber flooring 30 99 9 30 



$1,493 63 
Construction 

Bridges and culverts — ^unloading two carloads 

of broken stone $37 10 

Side entrance culverts — one carload of 15-inch 

vitrified pipe, delivered 322 75 

$359 85 
Total co.st for township 



S448 10 

$11 13 

96 82 

$107 95 
S556 05 



Alatilda Township 

The road surface on the Provincial Highway through Matilda Township was in a 
very rough condition when taken over. The road was graded, shoulders cut off and 
crown formed with the road grader for a distance of about 8 miles. The road was 
patched throughout with gravel and broken stone. One-half mile of road was given a 
6-inch coat of cinders. Ditches were cleaned out. to afford better drainage. 

The road west of the Canal Bank Road for a distance of about half a mile was very 
narrow and badly drained. This necessitated widening the road out to 30 feet and 
ditching. For a distance of about 200 feet a stone fill was made. 

Three miles east of Iroquois, for a distance of one mile, the road was very narrow, 
and this necessitated widening the road to 30 feet. Ditches were deepened to afford 
better drainage. 



88 REPORT UPOX HIGHWAY Xo. 15 

Eighteen 15-inch pipe culverts were constructed at side entrances and across the 
road. About one mile of road was given a base course of crushed stone 20 feet wide 
by 6 inches deep. 1,800 cubic yards of crushed stone were placed in a stock pile. This 
stone was mostly quarry stone from a local quarry; some fieldstone was used. 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township. 
Road surface — grading, 8 miles; patching road 

with gravel and broken stone, 7 miles... $1,397 30 $419 19 

Cinder road, Ik mile; culverts — 2 12-inch cor. 

pipe repaired 15 88 4 76 



$1,413 18 $423 95 



Construction 



Earthwork, 1M> miles; stone fill, 200 feet; 

road surface $5,901 37 $1,770 41 

One mile metalled 20 feet wide x 6 inches 

deep 11,055 70 3,316 71 

1,800 cu. yd. in stock pile 5,460 00 1,638 00 

Side entrances — 18 15-inch vit. pipe culverts 348 40 104 52 

Total cost in township $22,765 47 $6,829 64 



Cornwall Township 

The road surface on the Provincial Highway through Cornwall Township was in a 
very rough condition when taken over. Two and one-half miles of road were graded 
with the road grader. The road for a distance of some 6 miles was patched with 
gravel and broken stone. Two washouts at culverts were repaired. 

The foundation of the road west of the N.Y. & 0. Railway was very unstable. 
This necessitated putting in a cobble base. In order to obtain a uniform foundation, 
the surface of the old road was torn up, and a cobble base laid 20 feet wide by 9 inches 
deep for a distance of about one mile. Fieldstone was used for this work, the average 
haul being about 3V2 miles. Since the freeze-up last fall about 3,000 cubic yards of 
fieldstone have been hauled to stock piles along the road for construction purposes 
during the season of 1920. East of Cornwall IV2 miles of road were metalled 12 feet 
wide by 6 inches deep. Fieldstone was used for this work. 

One carload of 15-inch vitrified pipe was delivered, and six pipe culverts were built 
at side entrances and across the road. 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toictiship. 
Grading — 21'- miles: patching road with 

gravel and broken stone, 6 miles $822 80 $246 84 

Culverts — repairing two washouts 19 37 5 81 



$842 17 $252 65 



Construction 



Grading and ditching — 1 mile; cobble base 20 
feet wide x 9 inch deep, 1 mile; hauling 
3,000 cubic yards fieldstone to stock piles. $22,194 60 

IMetalling l^i miles 12 feet wide x 6 inches 
deep 8,992 50 

Side entrances — one carload of 15-inch 
vitrified pipe was delivered, and six pipe 
culverts built at side entrances and across 
the road 460 59 

Moving poles 2 00 

$31,649 69 
Total cost for township 



$6,658 


38 


2,697 


75 


138 


18 
60 


$9,494 91 
$9,747 56 



1920 IMPROVEMEXT IX OXTARIO. S9 



Osnabruck Town^^hip 

The road surface on the Provincial Highway through Osnabruck Township, when 
taKen over, was in a very rough condition and badly drained. The road was graded, 
shoulders cut off and crown formed with the road grader for a distance of 10 miles. Six 
miles of road were maintained with road drags. Holes were patched with gravel and 
broken stone. A pipe culvert, 12-inch concrete tile, was constructed across the road 
at lot 7. 

The former concrete culvert east of Farran's Point washed out early in June A 
concrete bridge 16 feet x 8 feet x 47 feet 6 inches long, with reinforced concrete beams 
and slabs, was constructed. The road was brought to grade with a 7-feet fill over the 
bridge. One-third of a mile of road was widened and ditches cut. Two carloads of 
15-inch and 18-inch vitrified pipe were delivered for side entrances. Two and one-half 
miles of road were given a coat of gravel 10 feet wide by 5 inches deep. 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Tounship. 
Road surface — grading 10 miles, dragging 6 

miles $1,092 62 $327 79 

Bridges and culverts 20 80 6 24 

Construction 

Gravelling 10 feet x 5 inch deep, 2H miles.. $3,478 55 $1,043 56 

Earthwork— 1/3 mile 564 77 169 43 

Bridges arc — 16 feet x 8 feet x 47.5 feet long 8,589 55 2.576 86 
Side entrance culverts — 2 carloads 15-inch and 

18-inch vit. pipe, delivered 587 47 176 34 



$14,333 76 ?4,300 13 

Total cost for township $4,300 13 



Lancaster Township 

The road surface on the Provincial Highway through Lancaster Township when 
taken over was in a very rough condition. The existing road is an earth road. The 
road was graded, shoulders cut off and crown formed with the road grader for a dis- 
tance of about 7-4 miles. Ditches were cleaned out to afford better drainage. The 
road was maintained with road drags for a distance of about 9 miles. Weeds were 
cut and brush cleared from the right of way for some 5 miles. 

The timber culvert on lot 1 was straightened up and washout on approaches filled. 
Two stringers were placed in the timber bridge over Wood's Creek. Six 18-inch con. 
pipe were placed across the road at the Curry Hill side road. 

One thousand seven hundred and sixty cubic yards of fieldstone were piled in 
stock piles. Two carloads of concrete pipe, sizes 18-inch to 30-inch, were delivered, at 
a cost of $892.12. Two and one-half miles of fences were removed and rebuilt on the 
86-foot line, and the right of way was cleared of brush, at a cost of $213.78. A crush- 
ing plant was unloaded and set up, at a cost of $159.85. 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Toicnship. 

Road surface — grading. 7% miles; dragging, 
9 miles; weeds cut and brush cleared, 
Smiles $3,022 15 $906 64 

Bridges and culverts — lot 1, culvert straight- 
ened; Wood's Creek, 2 new stringers; Curry 
Hill side road, 6 18-inch con. pipe 63 42 19 03 

$3,085 57 $925 67 



!)0 



IJErOHT UPON HIGHWAY 



Xo. 15 



Construction 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township. 
Road surface — 1,760 cubic yards fieldstone 

placed in stock piles on road $4,228 70 $1,268 62 

Side entrance culverts — 2 carloads 18 30-inch 

con. pipe delivered 892 12 267 64 

Clearing and grubbing — 2 miles 213 78 64 13 

Unloading and setting up crushing plant 159 85 47 95 

$5,494 45 $1,648 34 

Total cost $8,580 02 

Cost for township 2,574 01 



Charlottenburg Township 

The road surface on the Provincial Highway through Charlottenburg township was 
in a very rough condition, and poorly drained, when taken over. About six miles of 
road were graded, shoulders cut oit and crown formed with the road grader. Twelve 
miles. of road were maintained with the road drags. Holes over some five miles of road 
were patched with gravel and broken stone. At BJack River Bridge eleven new stringers 
and twenty-four planks w-ere put in. New floorings were placed on old timber culverts 
at lots E. 1 and 26. 

Seven thousand cubic yards of fieldstone have been hauled to stock piles along 
the highway for construction purposes during the season of 1920. About two miles of 
road were given a heavy coat of gravel, 12 feet wide by 8 inches deep. 

Maintenance 

Total Expenditure. Cost for Township. 
Road surface — grading, 6 miles; dragging, 

12 miles $1,043 23 $312 97 

Bridges and culverts— Black River Bridge, 11 

stringers, 20 floor planks, 3 new timber 

floorings to culverts 210 30 63 09 



$1,253 53 $376 06 
Construction 

Gravelling, two miles, 12 feet wide x 8 inches 

deep 6,268 63 1,880 59 

Road surface— earthwork 311 60 93 48 

7,100 cu. yds. fieldstone, delivered to stock 

piles 10,795 80 3,238 74 

$17,376 03 $5,212 81 

Total cost for township $5,588 87 



Summary for United Counties 





Construction 


Maintenance 


Total 


^0% 

Payable by 

County 


Williamsbun,' Twp 


$ c. 
359 85 
22.765 47 
31.649 69 
13.220 34 
5.494 45 
17.376 03 


$ c. 
1.493 63 
1.413 18 
842 17 
1.113 42 
3.085 57 
1.253 53 


$ c. 

1,853 48 
24,178 65 
32,491 86 
14.333 76 

8.580 02 
18.629 56 


$ c. 

556 05 


Matilda Twp 


7.253 59 


Connvall Twp 


9,747 56 


Osnabruck Tw d 


4.300 13 


Lancaster Twn 


2.574 01 


Charlotlenburfe' T\vi> 


5.588 87 








90.865 83 


9.201 50 


100.067 33 


30.020 21 



1920 



IMPROVEMEXT IX OXTAIJIO. 



91 



APPENDIX No. 7 



A\OTOR VEHICLES STATISTICS 



W. A. McLea-X. 

Deputy Minister of Highuays. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following statistics for the year 1919 with 
regard to motor vehicles in the Province of Ontario. 



Respectully submitted. 



Counties. 

Algoma 46S 

Brant 1,355 

Bruce 2,337 

Carieton 1,186 

Dufferin 1.229 

Dundas 876 

Durham 1,134 

Elgin 2.185 

Essex 3,919 

Frontenac 947 

Glengarry 492 

Grenvilie 578 

Grey 2,776 

Haldimand 1,642 

Haliburton 96 

Halton 1,481 

Hastings 2.597 

Huron 2,769 

Kenora 59 

Kent 4.057 

Lambton 2,488 

Lanarli 1,253 

Leeds 1,894 

Lennox & Addington 1,100 

Lincoln 2,079 

Manitoulin 314 

Middlesex 2,534 

^luskoka 345 

Xipissing 455 

Norfolk 1,784 

Northumberland 1,646 

Ontario 2,305 

Oxford 2,845 

Parry Sound 434 

Peel 1,376 

Perth 2,089 

Peterboro 1,064 

Prescott 581 

Prince Edw^ard 1.217 

Rainy River 207 

Renfrew 1.409 

Russell '360 

Simcoe 3.777 

Stormont 1,153 

Sudbury 466 

Thunder Bay 112 

Temiskaming 339 

Victoria 1,513 



J. P. BiCKELL, 

Registrar of Motor Vehicles. 
Automobiles 

Cities. Total. 

Sault Ste. Marie 661 1,129 

Brantford 1.136 2^491 

2,337 

Ottawa 2,778 3,964 

1.229 

S76 

1.134 

St. Thomas 771 2,956 

Windsor 1.820 5!739 

Kingston 910 1,857 

492 

578 

2,776 

1.642 

96 

1,481 

Belleville 616 3,213 

2,769 

59 

Chatham 861 4,918 

Sarnia 604 3.092 

1.253 

1.894 

1,100 

St. Catharines 844 2.923 

314 

London 2,570 5.104 

.... 345 

455 

1.7S4 

1,646 

2,305 

Woodstock 413 3,258 

434 

1,376 

Stratford 639 2,72S 

Peterboro 818 1.882 

581 

1.217 

207 

1.409 

360 

3,777 

1,153 

466 

Fort William 583 

Port Arthur 440 1.135 

339 

1513 



92 



REPORT UPON HIGHWAY No. 15 



Counties. Cities. Total. 

Waterloo 2,236 Kitchener 951 

Gait 332 3,519 

Welland 1,902 Welland 570 

Niagara Falls 719 3,191 

Wellington 1,835 Guelph 883 2,718 

Wentworth 2,140 Hamilton 4,948 7,088 

York 3,463 Toronto 21,747 25,210 



80,898 ^6,614 127,512 

Foreign 348 

127,860 

Occupations 

Farmers 46,997 

Business 13,837 

Tradesmen 15,042 

Professional 5,119 

Manufacturers 4,362 

Doctors 3,157 

Firms 1,714 

Liverymen 3,nk42 

Travellers 3,219 

Agents 4,709 

Real estate agents 644 

Insurance agents 819 

Contractors 2,238 

Undertakers 319 

Labourers 1,250 

Managers and foremen 5,595 

Police 195 

Drovers 557 

Unclassified 5,194 

Unoccupied 8,146 

Municipal corporations and public service 279 

Private corporations, banks and railways 151 

Soldiers 521 

Dominion Government 39 

Ontario Government 112 

Royal Air Force 31 

Military units 16 

Munition Board 17 

Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establisliment 91 

Department of Militia and Defence 47 

Military hospitals 1 

127,S60 

Horse Power 

Fords, 22.5 59.306 

15 240 

16-20 16,420 

21-25 32,178 

26-30 15.219 

31-35 2.409 

36-40 1,293 

41-45 382 

46-50 233 

51 and up 26 

Electric 154 

127.860 

Motive Power 

Gasoline 127.705 

Electric 155 

127,860 

Registrations 

New registrations 27,596 

Renewal registrations 100.264 

127.860 



1920 



IMPROVEMEXT IX OXTAKIO. 



93 



Descriptions 



Touring . 
Runabout 
Coupe . 
Sedan . . 
Taxi . . . 
Bus . . . . 



Counties and Districts. 

Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Durliam 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kenora 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox and Adding 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland . . 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough . ... 

Prescott 

Prince Edward . . . 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Sudbury , 

Thunder 



[ton 



Bay 

Teraiskaming 
Victoria . , . 
Waterloo . . , 



Welland . 

Wellington 
Wentworth 
York . ... 



CO.MMERCIAL VEHICLES 



14 
64 
24 
40 
28 
19 
, 29 
42 

282 
24 
1 
13 
81 
33 
2 

114 
66 
66 
3 
55 
58 
19 
42 
55 

135 
13 
90 
11 
21 
39 
67 

130 
62 
13 

109 
43 
29 
15 
47 

o 

35 

8 

149 

26 

58 
9 

45 
56 
95 

144 

36 
205 
450 



3,317 



Cities. 
Sault Ste. Marie 
Brantford 



Ottawa 



St. Thomas 
Windsor . . 
Kingston . 



Belleville 



Chatham 
Sarnia . . 



St. Catharines 
London 



Woodstock 



Stratford . . . 
Peterborough 



Fort 
Port 



William 
Arthur 



Kitchener . . . , 

Gait 

Niagara Falls 

Welland 

Guelph 

Hamilton . . . . 



113.930 

8,471 

2,339 

2,828 

212 

80 



67 

174 

539 



15 
262 
112 



85 
69 



245 
394 



77 



48 
101 



103 
46 



128 
60 
28 
45 
73 

689 



Toronto 4,390 



Foreign 



7,820 



127,860 

Total. 
81 

238 
24 

579 
28 
19 
29 
57 

544 

136 

1 

13 

81 

33 

2 

114 

136 

66 

3 

140 

127 
19 
42 
55 

380 
13 

484 
U 
21 
39 
67 

130 

139 
13 

109 
91 

130 

15 

47 

3 

35 

8 

149 
26 

58 

158 
45 
56 

283 

217 
109 

894 
4,840 

11,137 
291 



11,428 



94 KEPOKT UPON HIGHWAY X^. 15 



COMMERCIAL VEHICLES 

Occupations 

Farmers 825 

Business 2,705 

Tradesmen 532 

Professional 19 

Manufacturers 458 

Doctors 20 

Firms 3,076 

Liverymen 268 

Travellers 24 

Agents 417 

Real Estate Agents 1 

Insurance Agents 3 

Contractors 1,758 

Undertakers 225 

Labourers 53 

Managers and Foremen 57 

Police 2 

Drovers 16 

Unclassified 116 

Unoccupied 108 

Municipal Corporations and Public Service 197 

Private Corporations and Banks and Railways 344 

Soldiers 5 

Dominion Government 32 

Ontario Government 48 

Royal Air Force 3 

Military Units 7 

Munition Board 2 

Dept. of Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment 24 

Dept. of Militia and Defence 78 

Military Hospitals 5 

11,428 

Capacity 

y.'. ton .• 1.526 

1 ■ " 8.254 

11/, " 524 

2 " " 528 

21/, '• 57 

3 ' " '.'. 171 

31/0 " ..•• 193 

4 " " 37 

41/2 " ". 4 

5 " 110 

5V2 " '.'. '■'.. 4 

6 " 12 

6V,. •• 5 

7 tons and up 3 

Total 11,428 

Motive Power 

Gasoline 11,373 

Electric 55 

Steam • • • • 

11.428 

Registrations 

Originals • • 3,784 

Renewals '^•^'^^ 

11.428 



11,428 



11.428 



11.428 



11.428 



1920 



IMPROVEMENT IX OXTAKlO. 



95 



Descriptions 

Delivery 2,469 

Trucks 8.718 

Ambulance 85 

Hearse 138 

Casket Wagon 11 

Patrol 7 



11,428 



11.428 



Counties and Districts. 

Algoma 20 

Brant 34 

Bruce 22 

Carleton 36 

Dufferin 13 

Dundas 9 

Durham 26 

Elgin 16 

Essex 65 

Frontenac 15 

Glengarry 3 

Grenville 6 

Grey 52 

Haldimand 19 

Haliburton 

Halton 39 

Hastings 26 

Huron 35 

Kenora 1 

Kent 36 

Lambton 26 

Lanark 15 

Leeds 22 

Lennox and Addlngton ... 7 

Lincoln 44 

Manitoulin 1 

Middlesex 52 

Muskoka 4 

Nipissing 15 

Norfolk 18 

Northumberland 21 

Ontario 54 

Oxford 59 

Parry Sound 3 

Peel 68 

Perth 35 

Peterborough 16 

Prescott 7 

Prince Edward 26 

Rainy River 7 

Renfrew 34 

Russell 7 

Simcoe 79 

Stormont 10 

Sudbury 4 

Thunder Bay 1 

Temiskaming 22 

Victoria 21 

Waterloo 64 

Welland 95 

Wellington 13 



.MOTORCYCLES 

Cities. 
Sault Ste. Marie 
Brantford 



Ottawa 



St. Thomas 
Windsor . . 
Kingston . 



Belleville 



Chatham 
Sarnia . 



St. Catharines 
London 



Woodstock 



Stratford . . . 
Peterborough 



Fort William- 
Port Arthur . 



Kitchener . . . . 

Gait 

Niagara Falls 

W^elland 

Guelph 





Total. 


51 


71 


53 


87 




22 


185 


221 




13 




9 




26 


25 


41 


68 


133 


38 


53 




3 




6 




52 




19 




39 




48 




35 




1 




60 




43 




15 




22 




7 




83 




1 


122 


174 




4. 
15 




18 




21 




54 




79 




o 




68 


41 


76 


9 


38 




7 




26 




7 




34 




7 




79 




10 




4 


36 




22 


59 




22 




21 


48 




59 


171 


63 




28 


186 


27 


40 



96 



REPORT UPON HIGHWAY 



No. 15 



Counties and Districts. 

Wentwortli 

York 



69 
256 



1,64S 



Cities. Total. 

Hamilton 330 39ft 

Toronto 2,523 2,779 

3,863 5,511 

Foreign 5 



.MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS 



Counties and Districts. 

Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kenora 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

'^Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott 

Prince Edward 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Sudbury 

Thunder Bay 



Temiskaming 
Victoria . . , 
Waterloo . . . 



Welland . . 

Wellington 
Wentworth 
York 



7 
1 

14 
1 
5 
7 
4 
8 

15 
2 
2 
2 

25 
6 

14 
14 
17 

4 
24 
10 

9 
17 

4 



6 

8 

15 

36 

8 

1 

8 

8 

2 

3 

o 

2 

11 

3 

22 

12 

1 

2 

3 

10 

6 

9 

3 

8 

13 

130 



Cities. 
Sault Ste. Marie 
Brantford 



Ottawa 



St. Thomas 
Windsor . . , 
Kingston . 



Belleville 



Chatham 
Sarnia . 



St. Catharines 
London 



Woodstock 



Stratford . . . 
Peterborough 



Fort William 
Port Arthur 



Kitchener . . . 

Gait 

Welland 

Niagara Falls 

Guelph 

Hamilton . . . . 
Toronto 



Foreign 



6 
10 

28 



10 

20 
10 



15 
6 



13 
17 



4 
10 



8 

4 

7 

13 

5 

43 

184 

"435 



5,516 



Total. 
13 
11 
14 
29 

5 

7 

4 
18 
35 
12 

2 

2 
25 

6 

14 
22 
17 

4 
39 
16 

9 
17 

4 
15 

2 
23 

2 

6 

8 
15 
36 
13 

1 

8 
12 
12 

3 

6 

2 
11 

3 
22 
12 

1 

11 

3 

10 

18 

29 

8 

51 

197 

865 
213 

1,078 . \i 



^ 



1920 



l.Mi'UU\E.MEXT iX UM'AKU). 



1)7 



CHAUFFEURS 



Counties. 

Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carletou 

Dufferiu 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron r . . . . 

Kenora 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Xorthuriiberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott 

Prince Edward 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Sudbury 

Thunder Bay 



Temiskaming 
Victoria . . . . 
Waterloo . . . 



Welland . . 

Wellington 
Wentworth 
York 



Registrations. 

Originals 

Renewals 



124 
5S 

132 
47 
10 
52 
76 
35 

158 
38 
29 
69 

229 
45 
12 
82 

193 

224 
14 

110 
68 
98 

128 
84 
55 
42 
55 
39 
86 
41 

160 

210 

146 
32 
38 
Si 



14 
60 
23 
361 
84 
56 



105 

120 

8S 



0() 



4.689 



Cities. 
Sault Ste. Marie 
Brantt'ord 



Ottawa 



St. Thomas 
Windsor . . . 
Kingston . . 



Belleville 



Chatham 
Sarnia 



St. Catharines 
London 



Woodritock 



Stratford ... 
Peterboroujih 



Fort William 
Port Arthur 



Kitchener 130 

Gait . 89 

.Xiagara Falls 146 

Welland Ill 

Giielph 65 

Hamilton 1.033 

Toronto 6.102 







Total. 


181 


305 


192 


250 




132 


527 


574 




10 




52 




76 


107 


142 


335 


493 


144 


182 




29 




69 




229 




45 




12 




82 


129 


322 




224 




14 


125 


235 


73 


141 




98 




128 




84 


176 


231 




42 


539 


594 




39 




86 




41 




160 




210 


92 


238 




oo 




38 


67 


148 


183 


238 




33 






75 






14 






60 






23 






361 






84 






56 


73 




43 


119 




105 






120 



10.662 



Foreign 



Chauffeurs — No fee 



307 

479 

81 

1.078 

6,231 

15,351 
49 

15,400 

6,329 
9,071 

15,400 
1,009 



98 EKPUKT LTOX HIGHWAY Xo. 15 



INDEX 



B. 

PAGE 

Belleville to Napanee, general description of Provincial Highway 11 

Brockville to Prescott, general description of Provincial Highway 11 

Building in proportion to traffic 18 

Brant County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 43 

Brant County, statement of expenditure on Provincial Highways 55 

Bruce County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 37 

C. 

County Roads, report of Deputy Minister 7 

County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineers [[ :'4 

Cornwall to Quebec Boundary, general description of Provincial Highwav 14 

Class of Surface " 20 

County Roarls. expenditure on construction. Schedule of 26-27 

County Kija-at-, exj^enditure on niaintenan< e. Schedule of 30-31 

Carleton County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 34 

Carleton County, statement of expenditure on Provincial Highways 80 

D. 

Dufferin County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 48 

Dominion Aid 23 

E. 

Elgin County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer :;4 

Essex County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 44 

F. 

Frontenac County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 34 

Frontenac County, statement of expenditure on Provincial Highways 78 

G. 

Gananoque to Brockville, general description of Provincial Highway 13 

Grey County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 35 

H. 

Hamilton to Queenston, general description of Provincial Higliway 16 

Hamilton to London, general description of Provincial Highway i ' . . 17 

Huron County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer :;7 

Halton County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 41 

Hastings County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineei- ! ! . . . 41 

Hastings County, statement of expenditure on Provincial Hichways '' 74 

Haldiniand County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer .'..!!.. 47 

I. 

Immediate Service jg 

K. 

Kingston to Gananoriue. general description of Provincial Highway 12 

Kent County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 44 



1920 IMPKOVEMKXT iX oXTARIO. 9«) 



L. 

PAGK 

Lincoln County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 35 

Lincoln County, statement of expenditure on Provincial Highways 52 

Lanark County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 41 

Lambton County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 46 

Lennox and Addington County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 48 

Leeds and Grenville County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 49 

Leeds and Grenville, County, statement of expenditure on Provincial Highway-^ . . 81 . 

Leeds and Grenville, Ottawa-Prescott Highway, statement of expenditure 85 

M. 

-Middlesex County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 38 

-Middlesex County, statement of expenditure on Provincial Highways 60 

Motor Vehicle Statistics 91 

Motor Truck Statistics 93 

-Motor Cycle Statistics 95 

N. 

Xapanee to Kingston, general description of Provincial Highway 12 

Norfolk County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 44 

Northumberland and Durham County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 45 

Northumberland and Durham County, statement of expenditure on Provincial 

Highways 65 

O. 

Ottawa to Pres<:ott, general description orf Provincial Highway 15 

Ottawa-Prescott Highway, statement of expenditure, Leeds and Grenville 85 

Ontario County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 39 

Ontario County, statement of expenditure on Provincial Highways 62 

Oxford County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 49 

Oxford County, statement of expenditure on Provincial Highways 57 

P. 

Provincial Highway, report of Deputy Minister 9 

Prescott to Cornwall, general description of Provincial Highway 14 

Provincial Highway Construction, report of Deputy Minister 17 

Provincial Highway Construction, report of Chief Engineer 50 

Provincial Aid to Roads 24 

Provincial County Roads, expenditure on construction, Schedule of 28-29 

Provincial County Roads, expenditure on maintenance, Schedule of 32-33 

Peel County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 36 

Peterborougli County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 36 

Prescott and Russell County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 38 

Prince Edward County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 45 

Perth County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 47 

Passenger Car Statistics 91 

Professional Drivers' Statistics 97 

R. 

Restoration of Old Roads 19 

Renfrew County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 45 

S. 

Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer. ... 46 
Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry County, statement of expenditure on Provincial 

Highways gj 

Simcoe County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 48 

T. 

Temporary inconvenience 23 



100 llEPOKT UPOX IIKMIWAY No. 15 



PA(iF 

Victoria County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 40 

W. 

Whitby to Belleville, general descrii)tion of Provincial Highway 11 

Width of Main Highways 21 

Wellington County Roads, report of InspectLng Engineer :{6 

Wellington County Roads, reyort of Inspecting Engineer 3fi 

W^entworth County Roads, rejwrt of Inspecting Engineer 40 

Wentworth County, sitatement of expenditure on Provincial Highway 50 

Waterloo County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 47 

Y 

York County tn Whitby, general description of Provincial Highway 10 

York County Roads, report of Inspecting Engineer 42 



LIST OF PUBLfCATIONS ISSUKD BY THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC 

HIGHWAYS 



Pub. No. Title. 

9. Keport of the Ontario Highways Commission, 1914, 

10. Regulations respecting Township Road Superintendents, 1916. 

11. Regulations respecting County Roads, 1920. 

14. Township Road Improvement, 1918. 

15. The Motor Vehicles Act, The Highway Travel Act, The Load of Vehicle- 

Act, The Public ^'ehicles Act, 1920. 

16. General Specifications for Concrete Highway Bridges, 1917. 

17. General Specifications for Steel Highway Bridges, 1917. 

18. Highway Bridges, 1917. 

19. General Plans for Steel Highway Bridges, 1917. 

20. Description of Road Models Exhibit, 1917. 

21. Short Forms for Bridge Tenders, 1917. 

22. Report on Street Improvement, 1917. 

23. Bituminous Surfaces for Macadam Roads, 1917. 

24. Specifications for Bituminous Materials, 1917. 

25. County Road Legislation, as enacted by The Highway Improvement Act, 

The Ontario Highways Act, and The Obstructions on Highways 
Removal Act, 1920. 

26. Motor Vehicle Headlamps and Glare Elimination, 1918. 

27. Widening the Provincial Highway. 1919. 

28. Main Road Legislation, 1919. 

29. Regulations respecting Township Roads, 1920. 

30. Township Road Legislation, as enacted by The Ontario Highways Act, 

1920. 

31. Motor Vehicle Headlamps. 



The Fourth Annual Report 



OF THE 



Superintendent of the 

Trades and Labour Branch 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

INCLUDING THE REPORTS OF THE ADMINISTRATION OF 

The Stationary and Hoisting Engineers' Act, The Factory, 

Shop and Office Building Act, The Steam Boiler Act, 

The Employment Agencies Act, The Ontario 

Government Employment Bureaus, and 

Investigation and Research 

Province of Ontario 

1919 

(PUBLISHED BY THE ONTARIO GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR) 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO : 

Printed by A. T. WILGRESS, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 



Printed by 
THE RYERSON PORESS. 



To His Honour Lionel H. Clarke^ Esq., 

Lieiitenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May it Please Your Honour: 

I have the pleasure to preseut herewith for your consideration the Report 
of the Superintendent of the Trades and Labour Branch for the year 1919. 

This Branch, during the period covered by this report, ^Yas under the adminis- 
tration of the Department of Public "Works. In November, 1919, it became the 
Department of Labour. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. E. ROLLO, 

Minister of Lahour. 



Toronto. 1919. 



m 



•^: .-^ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

1. Labour Conditions in Ontario 7 

2. Labour Legislation, 1919 9 

3. Ontario Government Employment Bureaus 10 

Arnprior 16 

Belleville 16 

Brantford 16 

Brockville 1" 

Chatham 17 

Cobalt IS 

Cornwall 19 

Fort William 20 

Gait 20 

Guelph . .' 21 

Hamilton 21 

Kingston '22 

Kitchener 23 

Lindsay 23 

London 24 

Niagara Falls 30 

North Bay ' 30 

Orillia 31 

Oshawa 31 

Ottawa 32 

Owen Sound 34 

Pembroke 34 

Perth ; 3o 

Peterborough 35 

Port Arthur 36 

Sarnia 37 

Sault Ste. Marie 38 

St. Catharines 38 

St. Thomas 39 

Stratford 39 

Sudbury • 40 

Toronto -42 

Timmins 56 

Walkerville 56 

Welland 57 

Windsor 57 

4. Stationary and Hoisting Engineers 59 

5. Inspection of Factories, Shops and Office Buildings 61 

6. Boiler Inspection 73 

7. Inspection of Labour Agencies 75 

8. Investigation and Research: 

(a) Mothers' Allowances 76 

(b) Vocational Opportunities 77 

9. Course in Employment Management 79 

10. Accessions to the Library 82 



[5] 



fiQ 



£ _ 



z< 

E " 

u 
"5.= 

E »f 






'I 



to 



Ml 'J 
C u 



E 
>. « 

2 3 

ft fl 

c ^ 

u 3 






■0 
le c I 

>,» i 
i> c " . 

.2? » 



1*' 



LABOUR CONDITIONS IN ONTARIO, 1919 

In presenting the reports of the various administrative divisions of the 
Trades and Labour Branch of the Department of Public Works^ a brief survev of 
labour conditions may also be of interest. 

Employment. — The adjustment from war to peace conditions and the re- 
establishment of soldiers in civilian life have been the outstanding employment 
problems of the past twelve months. The fact thftt the close of the year finds a 
demand for both skilled and unskilled labour in excess of the available supply 
is an indication that Ontario has come through this difficult period successfully and 
can face 1920 with an assurance of industrial progress. The thirty-six offices 
of the Ontario Government Employment Bureau system have been largely instru- 
menttd in replacing the soldier in employment. 

^Yages. — In practically every industry there has been an appreciable upward 
tendency in the wages paid. Extensive industrial operations in certain Ontario 
towns, e.g.. "Windsor and Oshawa, have resulted in keen competition for skilled 
workers, with the consequence that wages considerably in excess of union rates are 
being paid at the present Mme. An unusual movement of labour from one centre 
to another has also been a noteworthy phenomenon incidental to the situation. 

Unskilled labour j-emains in greater demand than during the war period. 
The postponement of railway and industrial construction work during four years, 
followed by the activity which manifested itself with the signing of the armistice, 
has created a demand for unskilled workers, which has exceeded the supply, and 
this in spite 'of the fact tliat the general rate of wages offered has risen during 
the year from 3Ti/^c. to 45c. per hour. As the rate paid to the unskilled worker 
is the one which is most quickly affected by change in the industrial situation, 
these figures may be taken as a fair indication of t^e wage trend during 1919. 

Hours. — With the closing of munition plants and other industries engaged in 
war work, the hours of labour decreased temporarily, hut the speeding up of 
production in other lines has practically counterbalanced this tendency, and fac- 
tories throughout the entire Province are showing as much activity as during the 
war period. The demand for a" forty-four hour week has manifested itself from 
time to time in various sections, but the forty-eight hour week probably more 
nearly approaches the standard desired by the majority of employers and workers, 
and a large percentage of plants are still operating on nine hour and ten hour 
schedules. The whole question of hours of labour is one of increasingly active 
discussion in the public press, 'in industrial conferences and generally in industrial 
administration everywhere and it is one in which the general community has a 
right to an active interest! At present the only legislative limitations of hours for 
adult men in Ontario are found in The Mining Act which forbids employment 
underground for a longer period than eight hours at a shift; and the Ontario 
riailway Act, which states that railway employees must not work more than six 
days of ten hours each in anyone week ; nor on two successive Sundays. 

Any general enquiry into the effects of the legal limitation of working 
hours will necessarily take into consideration the industries of the Province, the 
industries of Canada, production, wages, employment and export trade. 

[7] 



■^ £P i^T^O -REPOET OF THE No. 16 

Industrial Unrest. — The year 1919 was marked by increased strike activity 
tliruiighout the world, and Canada and Ontario were not without industrial unrest. 
,0f the total of some 298 strikes and lockouts in Canada during the calendar 
year Ihe Department of Labour reports that 39 per cent, were in Ontario. "The 
. total time loss in Canada has been estimated as 3,942,189 working days and of 
this total, 26 per cent, was lost in Ontario. The class of industry most affected 
was metals and machinery, although the strike of miners at Kirkland Lake from 
June 12 to October 16 was outstanding, involving 525 employees and a time loss 
of 56,175 working davs. 

Fortunately for Ontario, no situation comparable to the general sympathetic 
strike at Winnipeg developed here, and in spite of numerous disputes, especially 
in Toronto, during the summer, the better judgment of the less radical element 
in organized labour did much to avert disaster. On the whole, the industrial 
life of the Province has not been seriously interfered with and the numerous 
■controversies and conferences T\'hich have marked this reconstruction period can 
be interpreted in terms of progress. 

Administration. — The reports of the various administrative divisions of the 
Branch which follow tell their own story of undertaking and accomplishment. 
Constructive legislation has been added to the Statutes of Ontario, the Brancli 
has extended its activities in Investigation and Eesearch, and it is believed that a 
good foundation has been laid for the Ministry of Labour which it is expected 
will soon take its place as one of the executive departments of the Ontario 
Government. 

"W. A. ElDDELL, 

Superintendent Trades and Lalour. 



1920 TEADES AND LABOUH BRANCH. 



LABOUR LEGISLATION, 1919 

A survey of the '" Labour Legislation of Ontario '" was compiled in the 
Trades and Labour Branch after the 1919 legislative session and may be had on 
request. The complete text is available in the Statutes of Ontario, or in a publica- 
tion of the Department of Labour, Ottawa, " The Labour Laws of Canada." 

The Department of Lalour Act, 1919, provides for a Department of Labour 
under the control of a Minister of Labour, as a department of the Public Service ; 
the duties of the Trades and Labour Branch to be transferred to this department 
and a Deputy Minister and staff appointed. 

The Stationary and Hoisting Engineers Act, 1919, provides for increased 
safety in steam and hoisting plants by further restrictions, and for the grading 
of the certificates of stationary engineers in four classes, according to qualifica- 
tions and experience. The fourth class is a certificate for firemen. 

An amendment to the Employment Agencies Act gives the Government power 
to classify employment agencies according to the class of employment secured, 
and to prohibit the granting of licenses to any particular class. 

Amendments to the Factory, Shop and Office Building Act: 

1. Employers of women and girls who during their employment lodge in a 
camp are required to secure permits for the same and to operate the camp 
according to regulation* for health, etc., as provided by Order-in-Council. 

2. In cities of 50,000 or over, workers receiving goods for manufacturing 
purposes are required to hold permitSj and emplo3'ers letting out such goods are 
responsible for ascertaining that such permits are held. 

In all cases, copies of the above Acts, amendments and regulations may be 
secured by application to the Department of Labour. In accordance with the 
Department of Labour Act. the duties of the Trades and Labour Branch were 
transferred thereto early in the fiscal year, 1919-1920, the Hon. W. E. Eollo 
was appointed ^linister and the superintendent, W. A. Eiddell, was appointed 
Deputy ^Minister. 



2 T.L. 



10 REPORT OF THE No. 16 



EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

Report of 
THE ONTARIO GOVERNMENT EMPLOYMENT BUREAUS 

(EMPLOYMENT SERVICE OF CANADA) 

General Supcrinteudent, Office, 

H, C. Hudson. • 15 Queen's Park, Toronto. 

At the beginuing of the fiscal year, 1018-1919, there were eleven Ontario 
Government Public Employment Bureaus in operation in this Province. The neces- 
sity for expansion to meet post-war industrial conditions resulted in an increase in 
the number of offices to 38. Of this number, 15 were operated as "one-man" offices, 
in co-operation with the Federal Department of Soldiers* Civil Re-establishmcnt. 
In these offices the representative of that department liandled the employment 
woi'k. together with the other functions of the Information and Service Branch of 
the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment. In the remaining 23 offices 
an arrangement was effected whereby the -Department of Soldiers' Civil Re- 
establishment had one or more representatives in each Employment Bureau. 
whose function was to assist in the placement of the returned men. 

Early in 1919 the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act came into effect, 
whereby all the Public Employment Bureaus in the Dominion were linked up 
through the Federal Department of Labour, and the title " Employment Service 
of Canada " was adopted to designate the chain of offices which brought together 
employers and employees from coast to coast. 

When the changes noted above went into effect, there was an immediate 
increase in the extent to which the Employment Bureaus were utilized throughout 
Ontario, with the result that 100,209 men, and 14,033 women registered for 
employment ibroughout Ontario during the 12 montlis ending October 31st, 1910. 
In the same period employers called for 116,232 men, and 21.800 women. There 
Avero 80,886 men, and 1L208 women referred to positions and definite word was 
roeeived that 67,311 men, and 7,840 women were placed.* These figures indicate 
that the vqjue of the Employment Service is being appreciated by both employers 
and employees. It is difficult, if not impossible, to measure in dollars and cents 
the saving effected by the existence of a means of bringing together employer 
and employee with the minimum of delay. There is no doiibt, however, that 
the Employment Service lias more than justified its existence when it has found 
employment within a year for more than 75,000 workers many of whom would 
dfiul)tless have had great difficulty in securing immediate employment had it not 
been for the assistance of the bureaus. 

Tlie development of an Em])loynient Clearance system whereby accurate in- 
formation regarding vneaneies in any part of Canada is made available to appli- 
cants for employment bas been of inestimable value in regulating the transfer 
of workers from one part of the country to another. The procedure adopted in 
tonjieetion with this Employment Clearance work is briefly as follows: — 

* See table, page 12. These figures do not include casuals. The number of casual 
positions filled by men, was 592; by women, 15,328. 



1920 TKADES AND LABOUK BKAXCH. 11 

All employiiieiit superintendent receiving an order for workers whom lie 
is unable to obtain locally, transfers the information to a Zone Clearance office, 
Jive of vrhich are situated within the Province at Port Arthur, Toronto, London, 
Xorth Bay and Ottawa. The Zone Clearance officer then endeavours to obtain 
the required help in the other offices in the district. If he is unable to fill the 
order within a reasonable time, he forwards it to the Provincial Employment 
Clearing House in Toronto, from which office it is circulated throughout all the 
other bureaus in the Province. If still unfilled, particulars of the order are 
transferred to the Department of Labour at Ottawa, by means of a Federal 
Clearance Bulletin. The order is then brought to the attention of Employment 
superintendents throughout the Dominion. It will be seen, accordingly, that 
efforts are made in ever-widening circles to obtain the assistance required by any 
employer who makes application to the Employment Service. In the same way 
applications for positions are circulated, in cases where the applicant is prepared 
to leave the locality in which he registers. Arrangements made with the railway 
companies for a reduced transportation rate have greatly facilitated the movement 
of workers from centres where employment was difficult to obtain, to districts where 
employers were in more urgent need of assistance. With the further development 
of the details of the Employment Clearance methods there is every reason to 
believe that unemployment in the Province will be materially reduced, as it will 
be possible to maintain a more equitalile balance of the labour supply and demand 
in various sections of the Province. 

A study of the industrial groups in which placements were effected is most 
interesting, as it indicates the wide range of positions obtained through the 
employment bureaus. Of the 67,311 men placed during the 12 months ending 
October 31st, 1919, 23,558 or 35 per cent, were classified as " General Labourers.^' 
There were 8,968 men placed in lumbering operations which represented 13.32 
per cent, of the total placements. In the manufacture of metals there were 6,045 
placements made, while the building and construction trades accounted for prac- 
tically the same number, or 6,031 placements. The next largest group placed 
was in agricultural work, for which 7,472 vacancies were notified by employers, 
6.803 men were referred to positions and 4,391 men were reported placed. From 
the table on page 13 will be seen the srroups in which the balance of the place- 
ments were made. 



12 



REPOirr OF THE 



No. 16 



TABLE 1. — Report of the Ontario Government Public Employment Bureaus. Xovemijer l.st, 

1918— October 31st, 1919 





Applications 


Vacancies 


Referred to I 
Positions 1 


Placements , 


Offices 


Men 


! 
Women 

1 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Arnpviof 


163 

484 
2,09(i 

855 
2,038 
1,351 
4,542 

489 
1.880 
5.777 
1.275 

694 

339 
2.634 

565 
1.240 

410 

621 

132 
9,341 

575 
1.020 

120 
2.470 
5,128 

717 
2,558 
3.244 
1,633 

546 
4.689 

915 

20.742 

4.223 


7 

181 

3 

1 

14 
73 

60' 

1 . 729 
3 
2 

2 
1.106 

11 
4 
7 

42 

""493" 
41 
26 

47' 

32 
1 
29 
72 
54 
() 
38 

"2 '.343' 
!)53 
3,621 
2.722 

4' 

41 
265 


516 

818 
2.009 

812 
2.070 
1 , 655 
6.719 

640 
2.483 
6.948 
1.380 

808 

324 
2.423 

583 
2.111 

34() 

695 

2.106 

10,197 

647 
1.748 

141 
1,787 
4.899 

723 
3,052 
2.870 
1.698 

838 

7.782 

1.149 

26.059 

2.896 

""""772" 

48 

1.640 

7.060 

167 

861 

3.843 


io' 

2<)8 

12 

1 

15 

141 

6 

63 

2.445 

4 

19 

2 

1.452 

15 

1 

35 

42 

"""874" 
58 
29 

72' 

82 
5 

;>5 
184 
131 

19 

52 

"5'. 329' 

9<>8 
1.745 
7,314 

5 

8() 

230 


171 

474 
1,774 

834 
1,998 
1,171 
3,070 

482 
1,598 
5,278 
1.194 

6(>9 

360 
1 .9<i6 

525 
1 . 153 

338 

611 

126 
9.396 

509 
1.043 

117 
1,943 
4.104 

702 
2,500 
2.9<)4 
1,367 

564 
4,203 

890 

13.986 

2.719 

"i!623' 

49 

1,647 

3.172 

144 

747 

3.305 


7 

175 

4 

1 

IB 

40 

54" 

1,459 

3 

2 

2 

1,010 

11 

1 

7 

42 

'""477" 
35 
26 

53' 

24 
1 
25 
69 
63 
1 
25 

"2.452" 
1,011 
1,710 
2.254 

4' 

33 
204 


161 

480 

1,748 

765 

1.998 

1.161 

2.301 

475 

1,172 

4,671 

1.105 

642 

302 

1.765 

510 

1,153 

337 

610 

119 

8.425 

482 

979 

103 

1,839 

3,858 

698 

2.469 

2,703 

1,297 

486 

3.894 

876 

7.226 

939 

""""69i" 

4(5 

1 , 480 

3.156 

144 

654 

3.391 




Belleville 


5 


Brautford. 


175 


Brockville 


B 


Chatham 

Cobalt 


1 

10 


Fort William 

Gait 


27 


Guelph 


52 


Hamilton 

King.stoii 


776 
3 


Kitchener 


V 


Lindsav 


9 


Jjondou 


727 


Niagara Falls 


11 


North Bay 


1 


Orillia 


5 


Oshawa 


42 


Ottawa — Dalhousie St. . 

Ottawa — Queen St 

Owen Sound 


" '389' 
33 


Pembroke 


17 


Perth 




Peterborough 


32 


Port Arthur 


24 


Sarnia 


1 


Sault St. Marie 

St. Catherines 

St. Tliomas 


22 
56 
54 


Stratford 


1 


Sudburv 


19 


Timmiiis 

Toronto — Industrial ... 

— Clerical 


638 
1,129 


— Domestic .... 




1,610 


— Professional . 
— Handicap . . . . 
— Bloor Street. 
—Front Street. 
Walkcrville 


2.463 
84 

2,403 

4.871 
364 
775 

3,833 


4 


We] land 


25 


Windsor 


193 


Totals 


100,299 


14,033 


116,323 


21.809 


80 . 886 


11,298 


67,311 


7.840 







1920 



TRADES AND LABOUE BEANCH. 



13 



TABLE 2.— Comparative Industrial Statemeut of the work of the Outario GoTemment Public 
Employment Bureaus, November 1st, 1918 — October 31st, 1919 



MEX 



Kind of Work 



Applications 



Vacancies 



Referred to 
Positions 



Placements 



Agriculture . .-. 

Building and Construction 

Commercial and Clerical 

Domestic and Personal . . 

Fishing and Hunting 

General Labour 

Lumbering 

Mfg. Clay Products, Etc. 

Mfg. Chemicals, Rubber 
Etc 

Mfg. Fcod, Drink, Tobacco 
Etc 

Mfg. leather Goods 

Mfg. Metils 

Mfg. Paper and Printing 

Mfg. Textiles 

Mfg. Vehicles 

Mfg. Furuiture and Wood- 
working 

Professional and Tech- 
nical 

Quarrying and Mining... 

Rly. Construction 

Rly. Operation 

Shipping and Longshore. 

Miscellaneous 

Totals 



8,()34 

7.819 

7,8()8 

2,709 

4.3 

32,223 

9,621 

155 

055 

858 
398 

9,935 
522 
472 

1,()03 

1,065 

2.215 
1.085 
1,265 
1.943 
1.251 
8,560 



100,299 



7,472 

9,880 

4,. 380 

2.843 

42 

34,246 

20,666 

385 

1,408 

1,.311 
529 

9,766 
616 

1,204 

1,162 

3,052 

838 
1,643 
3,078 
2,218 
1,3.38 
8.246 



116.. 323 



6.803 

7,156 

4,823 

2,446 

27 

27,247 

9,116 

140 

620 

712 
311 
7.343 
4.31 
372 
931 

1,023 

1.064 
969 
1,211 
1,402 
1,043 
5,69(} 



80.886 



4.391 
6.031 
3,386 
],79(j 

24 

23,558 

8,968 

97 

535 

599 
208 
6,045 
288 
247 
893 

748 

744 

951 

1,124 

1.214 

937 

4.. 527 



67,311 



Percentage of 
Total Placements 



6.52 

8.96 

5.03 

2.67 

.04 

.35.00 

13.32 

.14 

.79 

.89 
.31 

8.98 
.43 
.37 

1..33 

1.11 

Lll 
1.41 
1.67 
1.80 
1.39 
6.73 

100.00 



In the Women's Department.s of all the bureaus the largest number of place- 
ments in any one group was in the Domestic and Personal section. Of the 7,840 
women placed in permanent positions by all the bureaus during the 12 months 
ending October 31st, 1919, 3,216, or 41.02 per cent. :were placed in Domestic 
and Personal service. There were 1,497 placements in commercial and clerical 
work, representing 19.09 per cent, of the total placements made. It is interesting 
to note that the next largest industry served by the Women's Departments was 
the manufacture of metals, 822 women being placed in positions of this kind, 
representing 10.49 per cent, of the total placements. It is also a fact of interest 
that there Avere 1,064 women referred to positions in various phases of agri- 
cultural work, and 712 were referred to positions in the textile industries. 
The balance of the placements made in the various industries will be seen from 
the table on page 14. Tlie work done in the placing of casual labour is in addition 
to this a:nd is shown in the respective reports of the indivirlual bureaus, notably 
in the Domestic and Personal section of the Toronto Bureau. 



14 



RE:POPiT OF THE 



No. 16 



TABLE 3.— Comparative luduslrial .Statement of the work of the Ontario Government Public 
Employment Bureaus. November 1st, 1918— Oetokn- 31st, 1919 

WOMEN 



Kind of Work 



Applica- 
tions 



Vacancies 



Agriculture 

Commercial and Clerical 

Domestic and Persoiial 

General Labourers 

Manufacturing Clay Products, etc. ... 

Chemicals, Rubber, etc. 

Food, Drink, Tobacco . 

Leather Goods 

Metals 

Paper and Printing . . . 

Textiles 

Furniture, Woodworking 

Professional and Technical 

.Shipping, etc 

Miscellaneous 



1 . 105 

4,459 

5,099 

417 

5 

66 

274 

31 

952 

93 

728 

145 

340 

2 

317 



Totals 14,033 




Eeferred 

to 
Positions 



Place- 
ments 



1,064 



2.282 

4 671 

123 

14 

91 

382 

45 

1.061 

125 

712 

231 

171 

1 

325 



21,809 11.298 



724 

1,497 

3,216 

108 

8 

75 

264 

22 

822 

84 

480 

196 

118 

1 

225 



Percentage 

of Total - 

Placements 



7,840 



9.24 

19.09 

41.02 

1.38 

.10 

.96 

3.37 

.28 

10.49 

1.07 

6.12 

2.50 

1.51 



100.00 



TABLE 4 — Applications and Placements of Soldiers and Civilians, March 1st, to 
October 31st. 1919. inclusive 



District 


Applications 


Total 


Placements 


Total 


Soldiers 


Civilians 


Soldiers 


Civilians 


Kingston 


4.033 
8.275 
2,714 
4,150 
2.376 
18.509 


1,257 
5,024 
7,420 
5,261 
4.931 
21,121 


5.2<)0 

13.299 

10.134 

9.411 

7.307 

29.630 


3,632 
7.613 
2,539 
3.122 
1.537 
13.907 


825 
3,814 
6,576 
5.200 
3.420 
9,445 


4.457 




11 427 


North Bay 


9,115 


Ottawa 


8.322 


Port Arthur 


4,957 


Toronto 


23,352 








40,057 


45,014 


85,071 


32.350 


29,280 


61.630 



1920 



TRADES AXD LABOUE BRANCH. 



15 



INDUSTRl ES 

Mrs METAI_S 6867 

BUDS. & CONST 603 I 
ASR I C ULTURE 5 I 1 J 
OOM ti PERSONAL.J0 I 1 
COI^M 4 MERC. 4883 
RUY OPERATION I2i4 
RLY COMST I I 24 

O.0ARRY SiMlNlNG $31 
MFG WOODWORK 9 -> 4 
LONSSHORe 333 

MFG VEHICl-ES 833 

MFG rooD 
PROF S, TEC H 
MFG -TEXTIUES 
MFG CHE'MICAUS 610 
MFG PAPER 372 

MFG LEATHER 230 I 

MFG BRICK 
FISHING Z4 

MISC ELLAMEOOS 47^2 




863 
86Z 

727 C 







I I WOMEN 



ANALYSIS or PLACEMENTS 

ONTARIO EMPLOYMENT SERVICE — I 91 8 



16 REPOKT OF THE No. 16 



ARNPRIOR 

A branch of the Employment Service was conducted in Arnprior during the 
month of October, with Mr. G. Lodge as Superintendent. One hundred and 
sixty-thKee applications for work were received at this office. Employers notified 
the Superintendent of 516 vacancies, and 161 placements were made. 

]\lany of the vacancies noted were duplications of orders previously received 
by tlie Ottawa and Pembroke offices, and it was considered inadvisable to retain the 
Arnprior Office as a permanent unit in the employment system. The majority 
of placements made and orders received were in connection with lumbering opera- 
tions in the Ottawa Valley. 

BKLLKVILLH 

The Belleville Employment Office was opened in .March, 1919, with -Mr. 
W. J. Nesbitt in charge. He was succeeded by Mr. J. D. O'Flynn, who resigned 
on July 31st, 1919, and Mr. L. F. Green is now Superintendent of the office. 

There has been considerable industrial activity in Belleville during the past 
eight months, such as street paving, factory and warehouse building construction, 
and the Ontario Government has commenced the erection of a large institute 
for the deaf. Such plants as the local cement works furnish steady employment 
for a comparatively large number of labourers. 

Belleville is situated in the centre of a prosperous agricultural district, and 
the Belleville office was of some assistance in supplying the needs of the farmers 
during the past season. 

In common with other smaller centres, the wages paid in Belleville are 
slightly lower than in the larger cities of the Province, but tlie lower cost of living 
largely compensates for the wage scale. 

A total of 480 men 'secured employment through tlie office during the six 
months ending October 31st, the largest number ])]aced in any one month Ix'ing 
.110, in the month of August. 

BRANTFORD 

The Brantford Office was one of the first to be established, having been in 
operation from 1913-1917 as a part time office. The comparatively large numt)er 
of industries in Brantford provide steady employment for both skilled and un- 
skilled workers. The closest co-operation exists between the local office and the 
various plants, which have learned to depend upon the Kmjiloyment Bureau for 
their assistance to a greater extent than in any oibcr industrial centre of the 
same size in the Province. This close co-operation has made itself evident in 
many ways, amongst them being the willingness of the local manufacturers to 
release men for short periods during tlic >uinni(M- at the reqiiest of the local 
superintendents to assist the fanners oC the vicinity in their busy season. 

It is expected that at least f(uir new industries will be opened in Brantford 
during the next six months, which will ])i'o\i(le additional em]>loyment for between 
300 and 400 men and •s^omen. 

Piece rates are paid in ]iractically every industry in r>rantford. Outdoor 
labourers were in receipt of 45 Vents an hour, and inside labourers 35 cents an 
hour during the past season. The majority of fack)ries have adopted a 48 hour 



1920 TEADES AND LABOUR BEANCH. 17 

week, with a schedule of pay equal to the 50 hour week. All industrial disputes 
during the past 12 months have been settled v.ithout resorting to strikes or lockouts. 
There' has been the same fluctuation in the number of placements throughout 
the different months as is seen in other bureaus. The largest number of placements 
made was in the month of June, when 188 men and .26 women Avere referred to 
positions. During the 12 months ending October 31st, the Bureau placed 1,718 
men and 175 women in regular employment, in addition to which casual jobs 
were obtained for 221 men and 326 women. 

BROCKVILLE 

Reporting on the work done by the Brockville Employment Bureau, ]\Ir. 
H. G.-Breakell, Superiutendeiit of that office makes the following statement: — 

" Since the opening of this office at 137 King Street West, Brockville, on 
jMarch 14th, 1919, we have experienced fair success in adjusti-ng the difficulties 
coincident with the requirements of the unemployed and returned men. After 
insuring the co-operation of the managers and employers, it was an easy matter 
to obtain notice of prospective vacancies to such an extent that at the present 
time it is unnecessary for a man seeking employment to apply at any factory, 
except one, for information regarding positions. This can be immediately supplied 
at tliis office." 

The wages paid unskilled labour during the summer season of 1919 averaged 
$3 for a nine hour day, although a few factories paid slightly higher wages, and 
worked less than nine hours. 

During the seven months ending October 31st, 855 men applied for work at the 
Brockville Bureau, and during the same period employers notified the superin- 
tendent of 812 vacancies. There were 765 men placed in positions during the 
seven months, the largest ntimber -in any one month being 152 placed in 
September, 

CHATHAM 

The Chatham Branch of the Employment Bureau Svstem was opened at 
189 King Street West, Chatham, in March, 1919,. with Mr. G. W. Wands as 
Superintendent. At the time the office was opened there were approximate! v 
60 returned soldiers out of employment, together with a number of civilians, but 
within two weeks all of these unemployed workers had been placed and since 
that time no unplaced applicants have been carried over a week-end. This is a 
record unsurpassed by any office in the Province. 

The Superintendent reports that "the relation of supply and demand in 
different occupations was kept well balanced by the assistance of other employment 
offices in the Province. In the early part of April and May w^e secured for the 
Canadian Des Moines Steel Company through the Employment Clearance ITouse ' 
127 expert structural steel workers to send to France to erect wireless stations. 
These men received extra good pay. As this work required men able to climb 
850 feet and wc were able to fill the order in less than three weeks, the efficiency 
of the Employment Service was demonstrated." 

Tn July, 1919, the Industrial Relations Committee of the Chatham Chamber 
of Cc^imerce recommended to^all manufacturers in the district that they should 
secure all their help through the Government Employment Bureau. This has 
resulted in a close degree of co-operation between the local bureau and the em- 



18 EEPOirr OF THE Xo. 16 

plovers. The fact that the Superintendent of the office i.s first Vice-Pre^^ideut 
of the Chamber of Commerce, and is also Chairman of the Public Utilities Coni- 
nii.<>iun has been of decided benefit, both in securing employment for men, ami 
in planning the expenditures of the city's money in a way which would best nu'(>i 
the unemployment situation. 

The bureau was instrumental in placing a large number of men and boys 
on farms, particularly during the months of April, May and June. A number 
of expert farm workers, who drifted in from Ohio and Michigan were placed on 
farms in the vicinity of Chatham, and rendered satisfactory service. 

During the seven months ending October 31st, 1,998 men were placed in 
positions, and during the same period employers notified the office of 2,070 
vacancies. The greatest volume of business was handled in July, when 434 men 
registered for work and 428 placements were made. 

The wages paid in Chatham and the- district surrounding are slightly higher 
than in other centres of a similar size elsewhere in the Province. General labourers 
have been receiving from 35 to 50 cents an hour, working nine hours a day. 
Machinists, working on an eight and nine hour day basis have received 60 to TO 
cents an hour; painters, 50 to 60 cents an hour: carpenters, 50 to 65 cents an 
hour ; bricklayers, 75 to 90 cents an hour : structural steel workers 85 to 90 
cents: semi-skilled labour in the sugar factory 40 to 421/2 cents an hour, working 
on a 12 hour shift. Cabinetmakers, the majority of whom are employed in -the 
auto body plants, receive 50 to 60 cents an hour, while auto-machinists were paid 
50 to 75 cents an hour. Other auto body builders working on a piece-rate basis 
average from $3.50 to $5 a day. 

Single men working on farms are paid $35 to $50 a month. Married men. 
who are experienced are paid $500 to $600 a year, with free house, and fre- 
quently many privileges. Farm labourers paid by the clay receive $2 to $4, together 
with their board. 

COBALT 

The Cobalt Bureau was opened on March 7th, 1919, with Mr. H. P. Charlton 
as Superintendent. During i*he first three weeks 153 men registered for work, and 
64 placements were made. The local employers of labour had been accustomed 
to deal with private agencies, and also to obtain some of their help through a 
free employment bureau operaterl by the ]\rine Managers* Association. Wlien 
the office established itself with tlio employers the placements showed a steady 
increase, employment being found for 188 men during the month of October. 
During the eight months ending October 31st, 1,351 men and 14 women applied 
for positions, and 1.161 men and 10 women were placed. 

Peporting on the industrial situation in tbo Cobalt district, the Superinten- 
-<lent writes : — 

■'The cliiof industries in tliis zone — mining and lumbering — have, in the 
past, been in ennstant need of men. and it has always been difficult to >eeure a 
sufficient nund)er for work of this nature. The strikes at the Kirkland Lake 
Gold Camp, and tlie Cobalt Camp hindered the absorption of a large number oF 
men, during the summer months of tliis year, but as both of these disputes are 
now at an end, development work on a larger scale at the mines will, ^i all 
probibility, be gone ahead with.'' 



1920 TRADES AXD LABOUR BRAXCH. 19 

The Bureau was of considerable assistance in obtaining worker^ on the govern- 
ment roads, but the attraction of higher wages in the mines rendered it difficult to 
meet the demand for men for this class of work. 

With regard to wages, the Superintendent reports that the greatest demand 
for labour is in *the Porcupine Camp, due to the fact that higher wages and 
better accommodation are available in the Cobalt Camp. '"The wages in this camp 
(Cobalt) are based on a bonus paying scheme, while those of the gold camps are 
not. As a result of the strike the base wage in Cobalt was raised from $3.50 to 
$3, but the bonus which was calculated on the price of silver at 60 cents and 
over, is now determined on silver at SO cents and over. As the wages are 
regulated according to the value of silver, it is rather difficult to state a scale, 
Imt at the present time the minimum wage is $4 per day for surface men, and a 
rising scale fi>r underground and mill men. In the Gowganda and Boston Creek 
Camps, the wages are on a par with those in Cobalt, some of the mines in Boston 
Creek having a level rate for all underground men. The mines in Kirkland Lake 
pay a lower rate, the wages being on a par with those of the Porcupine Camp. 
In this camp a mucker and machine-runner receive usually the same rate^ the 
wage being $4 per day, $1 a- day being deducted for board, while in the case 
of shaft work and mill work, the wages are sometimes higher. In all the mines 
the length of the working day is the same, an eight hour shift underground 
and nine hours on the surface. 

'■ As a result of interviews with the unemployed and employers, I have found 
that the Employment Bureaus, as established by the Government, are greatly 
appreciated and .their popularity assured, particularly owing to the unsatisfactory 
manner in which the private employment agents have, in the past, conducted 
their offices. Both returned soldiers and civilians are using this office to a great 
extent, and I am pleased to state that unemployment is at a minimum in this 
country. 

CORNWALL 

The Cornwall Office was opened on October 1st, 1919, with Mr. J. C. 
Broderick, of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Ee-establishment as Superinten- 
dent, and another returned soldier, Mr. E. W. Hodge, as stenographer. As the 
office was opened such a short time before the close of the fiscal year, it has been 
impossible to estimate with any degree of accuracy the extent to which the Bureau 
will be able to serve the community in which it is located, although the first 
month's work — 64 placements out of 75 applications — may be considered as very 
satisfactory. The Cornwall Office is located in a prosperous farming community, 
comprising the counties of Dundas, Stormont and Glengarry, and in the future 
should be of considerable assistance to the farmers of that district in securing 
satisfactory farm help. 

The largest employer of labour in Cornwall is the Canada Cottons Limited. 
a firm employing over 2,000 workers. Other industries in the town are engaged 
in the manufacture of furniture and paper. There is no shortage of employment 
in Cornwall, as all the plants in the vicinity are working full time, and have 
unfilled contracts ahead of them, which will take many months to complete. It 
is expected that a large textile firm will furnish employment to a large number 
of skilled and unskilled workers. Emplo^Tuent will also be furnished to the 
workers who will be needed to build houses for the employees of the proposed 
company. 



20 ^ REPOET OF THE ' No. 16 



FORT WILLIAM 

The Fort William Office is one of the older bureaus and shows a very 
creditable increase over the placements reported during the first year of its 
existence. There has been marked industrial activity in Fort William and Port 
Arthur, which has been reflected in the large number of placements made in 
both offices. The registrations for the 12 months ending October 31st, 1919, 
show that 4,615 workers applied to the office for positions, 3,110 were referred to 
position's, and 2,328 placements were made. The greatest volume of business was 
handled during the month of October when 327 men secured employment througli 
the office. It was impossible to fill all the orders received in the Fort William 
Bureau, employers notifying the office of 6,860 vacancies during the 12 months. 
The largest number of workers called for in any one month was in September, 
when the demand shows requests for 1,523 workers. 

The Employment Clearance system has accomplished much in helping to 
meet the local demand for help, workers having been brought from other sections 
of Ontario, and from the Western Provinces through the Employment Clearance 
system to fill positions in this vicinity. 

Wages have been high. Carpenters receive 65 to 75 cents an hour; labourer?, 
40 to 55 cents an hour; bricklayers, 90 cents an hour; plumbers, 821/^ cents an 
hour. As in a few other centres in the Province, the Employment Bureau has 
unintentionally served as a medium for stabilizing wages. In this connection, the 
Superintendent reports that " We have been asked what men are being paid in 
various occupations and when I have informed them of the wages, employers have 
accepted my statement as official, and paid their help accordingly." 

GALT 

The Employment Bureau at Gait was opened on IMarch 3rd, 1919, with 
Mr. A. E. Lamond as Superintendent. The industrial life of Gait is of a more 
conservative type than many other towns in Ontario, an extremely large per- 
centage of the workers owning their own homes, and the city having practically 
no floating population. There is a continuous demaiid for workers in the textile 
and woodworking plants in Gait, and it has been at all times possible to place 
anyone experienced in tlieso Tines of activity. 

Factory labourers arc paid from 35 to 40 cents an hour. Unskilled outside 
]a1)onr receives from 40 to 45 cents. Experienced carpenters receive 50 cents 
an lionr. and bricklayers and masons 60 cents a-n hour. Journeymen in the metal 
tradc'^ arc paid from 45 to 55 eents an hour. These wages arc considerably lower 
ilian ilii> wages paid in 1919 in tlie larger centres, but this is offset to a certain 
extent l)y the lower cost of living in Gait, rents ]iarticiilarlY being below the 
average ol the Province. 

Civic employees work eight hours n day. but the majority of the other outside 
occupations are operated (Ui a 10 hour a day basis. INfost of the foundries are 
working on a nine lutur day basis, with a half day Saturday. The textile indus- 
tries are operated on tlie same 50 hour week basis. 

I'our liundred and eigldy-nine men applied for work at the Gait Bureau 
during the seven nuuiihs ending Oitolier 31st. 482 of these were referred to 
positions and 475 were reported as placed. The largest number of placement? 
in any one month was in June when 87 positions were secured through the office^ 
Praeticallv the entire registration at this bureau consisted of returned soldiers. 



1920 TEADES AND LABOUR BRANCH. 21 



QUELPH 

The Employment Office which was opened in Guelpli in ]\larcli, lUil), with 
Mr, A. W. Taylor as Superintendent commenced iriimediately to have the support 
of the local employers of labour. A personal canvass was made of the larger 
firms, and orders for workers were secured from tlie majority of the manufacturers. 
Building contractors have also secured through the Employment Bureau a large 
percentage of the skilled mechanics and labourers which they required. 

Guelph is situated in one of the finest farming districts in the Province, 
and the Bureau has been able to serve the farmers of that section of the country 
to a large extent, although the demand for farm help has exceeded the supply 
at all tjmes. 

As in other offices throughout the Province, every effort has been made to 
induce civilian, as well as ex-soldier workers to make use of the bureaus, and the 
large number of civilian placements made indicates the extent to Avhicl/this result 
lias been accomplished. During the eight months ending October 31st, 1,880 men 
and 60 women ap])lied at the Guelph Employment Office for assistance in securing 
work; 1,598 men and 51 women were referred to positions during the same perio>l : 
while 1,172 placements of men, and 52 placements of women were reported during 
the eight months. The greatest number of placements Avere made in July, when 
.'')n2 men and 23 women were referred to positions. 

HAMILTON 

MEN 

The Hamilton Employment Office, which is situated at 85 James Street 
Nort[i, Hamilton, was one of the first to be opened in the Province, and tlie 
continued progress it has made indicates the extent to which a service such as 
that rendered by the Employment Bureau becomes appreciated and utilized by 
employers of labour. During the 12 months ending October 31st, 1918, 1,361 men 
were referred to positions, while during the 12 months ending October 31st, 1919, 
5,278 men were sent out from the Bureau, representing an increase of almost 
300 per cent. It is interesting to note that the vacancies during 1918 and during 
1919 were in excess of the supply of men available, 4,269 positions being reported 
vacant in the former year and 6,948 in 1919. The peak of tlie Bureau's activities 
was reached in March, ]919. when 801 men were placed in positions. The 
records show that slightly over 60 per cent, of the, men who applied during the 
past year have been returned soldiers. As in all other offices preference has been 
given to these men in every instance. The total placoments for the year were 
4,671 in permanent positions and 31 in casual jobs. 

The demand and supply in agriculture and stock-raising occupations have 
been about equal in the Hamilton district; in railway construction work the 
demand has exceeded the supply liy approximately 30 per cent., as was also 
the case in the labouring group. It has never been possible for the Bureau to 
supply the number of tailors, weavers and textile workers generally for whom 
application has been made to the Bureau. 

An attempt was made in Hamilton to organize an Advisory Council to the 
Bureau, representatives of manufacturers, trade unions and employees being 
included in the group which was known as the Triangle Committee. The scheme 
failed to aecoraplisb the nbjeets for which it was organized and was discontinued. 



22 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 16 



WOMEN 

.Miss Myrtle Eraser was appointed Director of the Women's Section of the 
Employment Bureau in Hamilton, in August, 1919. 

In every phase of the work done by this Bureau as compared with the 
previous 12 months, progress is apparent. This was due in part to the change 
in 'location of the office and in part to the natural increase in the extent to which 
an Employment Bureau is used as the' service it renders becomes more widely 
known. There were 1,729 applicants for work at the Bureau in the 12 months 
ending October 31st, 1919, as compared with 1,552 applicants during the previous 
12 months. The vacancies of which the Bureau was notified totalled 1,779 in 
1918 and 2,445 in 1919; while there were 1,434 referred to positions in the 
previous year and 1,459 in the year ending October 31st, 1919. Ir 1919, 770 
women were placed in permanent positions, and 409 in casual jobs. 

With regard to the relation of the demand and supply of women workers in 
namilton \he Director reports that, in the commercial field the supply exceeds 
tlie demaiid Ijy approximately 10 per cent., due largely to .the number of appli- 
.oaiits M'ho liave only clerical experience whereas the employers are anxious to- 
secure workc'i'> with a knowledge of stenography or typewriting or a combination of 
these. • 

The demand for household workers in Hamilton is greater than the supply 
and the number of workers who are willing to go out by the day has not materially 
affected the situation because of the wage demands of these workers and the short 
hour; they are willing to work. 

Ke]X)rting on the Employment Clearance system as it affects the Women's 
Department in the Hamilton office, Miss Eraser says: — 

"^ Through co-operation with the Clearrance House we have succeeded in 
securing employment for women whom we were unable to place otherwise, as 
well as filling orders we were nnaV)le to fill locally. This is a great as^et in 
our work." 

The modern idea of employment management is in evidence in Hamilton 
where five firms employing women have officials with the title of Employment 
■Vfannner. These officials have more or less complete control over the personnel of 
ilio ]ilant> in which they are employed and their appointment is a step in the 
I'ight direction inasmuch as frequently labour prol)lems may V)e readily solved 
when workers know that there is an executive in the plant whose sole duty it is 
to look after the mutual interests of oniployer and employee. 

Reporting on the difficulty of placing certain classes of workers the director 
sl;i(c.;: '^ The inefficient worker and tlie drifter are daily problems. These are 
constantly seeking new ground. The mother with one or two children to accom- 
pany her and desiring a position as housekeeper is also difficult to place par- 
ii<uliirly wlinn unwilling to leave tlio district." 

KINGSTON \ 

Captain TT. D. Wigliiinan wa^ aj^pointed as Sn]")erintendent of the Employ- 
ment Bureau in Kingston early in -Tune. 1019. and served in that capacity until 
after the close of the fiscal year. lie reports that the Kingston office has been of 
very material assistance in re-establishing the returned soldiers in the Kingston 
district. In view of the fact that Kingston has always been an important military 
centre rather than a mannfaeturing city the greater part of the work in Ibe 
Kingston offiee has been the ]il;ieing of soldiers. 



1920 TRADES AXD LABOUR BRAXLlL 23 

y^Uthough only iu operation five and a half months prior to the close of the 
fiscal year the Kingston office placed 1,105 men in positions out of the J, 275 
who applied for assistance in securing work. During the period covered em- 
ployers asked for 1,380 men the greatest demand being in September when 436 
workers were called for. The largest number of applicants in any one montli 
was in July when 328 men registered at the Bureau. 

The Superintendent reports that the supply and demand in the various 
trades and manufacturing plants appear to be about equal. In the case of 
unskilled labour the supply during the summer was slightly above the local 
demand. The Bureau in Kingston was known to the farmers of the district in 
previous years through the co-operation of the employment service with the 
local Agricultural Representative. As a result quite a few farmers applied to 
tlie Bureau for help and ever\- effort was made to secure the required assistance, 
the Superintendent emphasizing to applicants the advantages of securing a 
position where board and lodging are provided. 

By the use of circular letters addressed to' trade union secretaries, to em- 
ployers of help, and to soldiers' organizations around Eangston an attempt has 
been made to extend the work of the Bureau to the greatest possible efficiency. 

KITCHENER 

The Employment Bureau in Kitchener was opened in April, 1919, in con- 
junction with the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment with Mr. W. J. 
Caswell as Superintendent. During the^early months of its existence the Kitchener 
Bureau dealt with ex-soldiers almost entirely and was of great value in assisting 
to re-establish the returned men. The industrial activity of Kitchener has been 
so great that it has been possible to place practically all the applicants who have 
applied to the Bureau for assistance in securing work, 642 placements having 
been, made from the 694 applicants at the Bureau during the seven montlia 
ending October 31st, 1919. In this period employers asked for 808 men, a large 
percentage of the workers required being cabinet makers, whom it has been 
impossible to secure either locally or through the employment clearance s3^stem. 

The high wages paid to factory help in Kitchener and the other towns in 
the immediate vicinity have made it almost impossible for the Kitchener Btireaii 
to be of great assistance to farmers, although many applications for farm help 
have been received from time to time. "With regard to the situation in general, 
the Superintendent reports that there is a marked shortage of help in Kitchener 
due largely to the difficulty workers coming into the city experience in securing 
accommodation, particularly in the case of married men. With the expansion 
of se'^eral of the factories in Kitchener there is no doubt but that the Employment 
Bureau could induce lacge numbers of workers to accept positions in Kitchener 
provided there was any guarantee of suitable housing conditions. This state ot 
affairs is not confined to Kitchener alone but is noted in many other towns and 
cities in Ontario at the present time. 

LINDSAY 

The Lindsay Office was opened on March ITth, 1919. with Mr. W. S. Pago, 
of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment in charge. Up to the clo?c 
of the fiscal year the Bureau was instrumental in placing 304 persons in positions. 
Of these. 257 were returned soldiers. 



24 REPORT OF TPIE No. 16 

Local employers and farmers in the vicinity have made fairly extensive use 
of the office, which has elfectively fulfilled its purpose as a medium for re-establisli- 
ing the returned men of Lindsay and district. As in some other centres in 
Ontario the impression seems to have prevailed in Lindsay, particularly during 
tlie early months of the year that the Employment Office was meant only as a 
means of placing soldiers. This has prevented the development of the work of 
the office to the point which it might otherwise have acquired. 

The majority of the clients in Lindsay operate on the 10 hour day basis. 
The Dominion Arsenal, however, is run on a 41 hour week basis. The wages 
paid in Lindsay are slightly lower than in the larger centres. Labourers, for 
instance, received 30 to 45 cents per honi: during tlie pa>t summer. 

LONDON 

MEN 

The Jjondon I']mploymcut Bureau, which has been situated at the corner 
oL' T.'.ihot and Dundas Streets in London since it was opened in February, 1917, 
continues to' make progress in, service to the local employers of labour, and to the 
farmers in the Loildon district. As in other centres of the Province a consider- 
ahlo numltcr of men were thrown out of employment at the time of the signing 
of tlio armistice when local firms ceased to manufacture munitions. Reporting 
on the situation, the Superintendent of the office, Mr. H. Tutt, states: 

" Apparently owing to the high rate of wage paid munition workers, those 
affected did not immediately make heavy demands on the Bureau and unemploy- 
ment was not noticeable until after Christmas when it became quite pronounced. 
During the subsequent winter months, lists Avere compiled weekly showing the 
numl)er and qualifications of applicants listed at the Bureau for work. Copies 
of these lists were sent to the Secretary of the London Chamber of Commerce, 
Avho posted them in a conspicuous place in his office. Twists were also sent to all 
of tlie leading manufacturers and employers and also the Mayor and City Engineer. 

"Apparently owing to this publicity, municipal public works were commenced 
at least one month earlier than originally anticipated. 

'^Witli the brealcing -up of Avintcr, contractors and construction companies 
commenced operating on several large buildings and since that time the demand 
for general labourers and practically all classes of workers has been in excess 
of the supply." 

The placing of a representative of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Ro- 
cstablishment in the Tiondon offi(^c was of benefit to all concerned. Tn this con- 
nection Mr. Tutt writes as below: 

'■'The placing of a 'D.S.C.R. representati\e in this office occasioned large 
nninbers of returned soldiers seeking work to apply hero. This was very beneficial 
to the bureau as it eliniinnted to a groat extent the overlapping which heretofore 
existed, as previously returnod sol(li(M's in a largo number of cases applied to the 
Soldiers' Aid Connnission or other recognized scdditM's' associations. It also gave 
tl\e Bureau an o]iportanity to give extensive service to the returned soldier not 
only as an establish mont where em]iloyment could be found, but also as a service 
from which they ci^ild soi'un^ all in format ioTi re pensions, vocational training, etc. 

The demand for farm help was not nearly as heavy as the preceding year: 
nor \o{ was the suj'tply. TTowever, the Bureau was able to find a job for every 
a])])lieant for that class of work. The report of the Bureau reads: — 



1920 TEADES AND LABOUR BEAXCH. 25 



•■■ The wage paid farm labourers for 1919 ranged from -$20 to $60 per montli 
according to experience and season. This spring when the City of London com- 
menced public works, sewer excavation, gutter and cement work they filed an order 
with u^ for labourers at 30e. an hour. This wage was gradually increased until 
it is now 45c. to 47c., nine hour day. Other building and construction labourers 
are now receiving from 45c. to 47c., but this wage did not exist until after the 
demand became excessive, previous to which 35c. to 40c. was the wage offered, 

8 to :l hour day. Carpenters, bricklayers and all mechanics in this group received 
wages in excess of tliat called for by the unions, eight hour day, time and a half 
for overtime. Candy and biscuit-makers are rated as follows : Boys, 17c. to 25c. 
per hour; labourers, 25c. to 35c.; experienced candy-inakers 35c. to 40c.; biscuit- 
mailers, 35c. to 45c., 9 hour day. In the group metals gjid machinery, wages vary 
according to the article manufactured. Labourers and handymen receive from 30c. 
to 40c. per hour. One firm places labourers on machines at a nominal wage say, 
35c. per hour. After a few weeks^ training, they are supposed to work on a piece 
rate basis, which gives the industrious man an opportunity of making better wages. 
Another firm puts labourers in their moulding shop on sectional work at 321/^ 
cents an hour, and after about two months' tuition, places them on a piece rate 
l)asis. . Experienced moulders, core-makers, etc., employed by this firm work at 
piece rates. Other moulders receive from 65c. to 80c. per hour ; machinists 45c. 
to 65c.; machine hands 35c. to 45c:; toolmakers 65e. to 80c.; tinsmiths (mostly 
piece work) ; boilermakers from 65c. to 80c.. and shippers 35c. to 40c. per hour. 

9 to 10 hour day. In the manufacture of leather the scale of wage is as follows : — 

Boys (mostly piece work) earn $10 to $14 per week. 

Sole cutters (piece work) earn $25 to $35 per week. 

Machine men 45c per hour and 109o bonus. 

Rolling machine (piece work) $35 per week. 

Labourers 42i4c per hour and 10^ bonus (50-hour week). 

"Woodworkers, such as cabinetmakers, finishers, turners, machinists, etc., 

from 35c to 40c per hour (nine to ten-hour day). 
R.R. steam operatives and construcrion workers as per the McAdoo award. 

During the 12 months ending October 31st, 1919, 2,634 men applied for 
work at the London Bureau, an increase of 736 over the number applying during 
the previous twelve months. During the same time employers called for 2,423 
workers, and 1,966 men were referred to positions^ the increase in the numl)er 
who were referred to positions being 612 more than tire number wha were sent 
to jobs during the previous year. The largest number o£ men applying in anr 
single month was 338 in March, 1919. The highest number of placements was 
in ^lay when 232 workers received employment through the Bureau. The total 
number of placements in permanent positions was 1,765 with 93 in casual jobs. 

With the division of the Province into Employment Clearance zones, the 
importance of the London office has increased, and the London Superintendent 
has been placed in charge of the clearance work in South-western Ontario. 

WOMEN 

The Women's Department of the London Employment Bureau is now in 
charge of Miss S. B. Sutherland, who succeeded ^liss Ethel McEobert in October, 
1919^ 

During the year employers called for 1,452 Avorktrs. As there were only 
1,106 registered during the year, it was impossible to meet the local demands. 



26 REPORT OF THE :No. 16 < 



01; the 1,106 who were registered 1.0 10 were referred to positions, and definite 
information was received that ■<2( of these had been hired. In addition, 18() 
workers were placed in 624 casual jo])s during the year. 

On page ?7 will be found a summary of the employment situation in London, 
a< indicated by the records of tiie Women's Department. This statement has 
been reproduced in detail as a typical example of the extent of the information in 
the possession of employment superintendents. The possession of this informa- 
tion enables them to render the highest possible degree of service, both to employers 
and employees. 



1920 



TRADES AXD LABOUE BRAXCH. 



2: 



Z o 



sJ3 



E^ 





.a^ C 


C : 


; 




«l 








j;. 






1 




S cS 


3 C 




<u 




03 








3 


C 




eS H 


0. 










•1 


— C 
c 




2 -2 




■ 93 





p 






B3 






: a ^ .-i- 




0/ 


-= 


a 


c 






^ 


i!^ — 




• — -z 




> ^ 


>, 


Q 









a 










2 «• 

a c 




■A 

^ 3 




03 

a; 

0) 




c.'"" ^ 




~ E '■" = 




^ " . 


-i 


> 


"5 . 




_o 




tll 




. S -3 i^ 




>-|f 


.U -tJ 


33 


S F 




a 

<D 




C •-" 






















S: 5 3 




: = r ^ 




iH 2 - 


E 


^ 


5: S 




^ 




z 


^ " f ~ 




S 


IL 


3 










^^ , • 




























£ 




















- *^ .' 










































5* 


? . 3^ 


- 


"x. 




ST 






c 








^ 


.Z i. -3 


>. 


'" 




•— 






■^ 










^ ^ J-< 


— 


~_ 




i^ 














i-^ ^ 


~ 


1 




= 


c 


^ 


P 




L- 




^ 


:^ 


X 




— 




— 


> 




— 




■ — . — 


■; 


c 


















"d 
























c 
























a! 


^ ' 


T 


,^^ 






^, 


,^, 


,,^ 




,4_i 


a 


5 




E 




1 


z: 


E 


= 




5 


Q 






















X 




r. 




f. 


X 


7: 


7; 




7; 




S 










































c 




3 




* 


3 


c 


3 




c 


























^-^ 




'«-' 




N-^ 


'^ 


^^ 


^^ 




^^ 








s 


1 




•T. 











a 


•0 


03 
0) 




c 


= s 


§ 


^ 


^- 






.S 


3 


ct 


















c 




^ 





L.- 


~, CI 


= 


L.* 


t'i 


s 




c 

c 



■ a 




im' 


^ 




1^ 


;- 


Vr- 


^. 








de- 


i 


-■ c 


3 


V5- 




■=^ 




" 


. 


1 




c ~~ 




■s. 


— 








— 









"^ 7: 


— ■=/= 


- -ix 


-jL 


;^ 


u* 


<= 


— . 




^ 




c — 




c 


— . 


•oc 


t-- 


=c 


— i 




•5/3- 


«p 


>■ — C 





'- 


■=r5- 


■=/?• 


4^ 


«.e- v=- i 




, ■ , 


i 


'. • 










^ 


fc 


fc 






. 


n 




rc 


1 t^ 






s- ! ! 


c 


c 


^ 












t~^ 






















= ^ 








- -; <: 




5 : ^ 


sS 


s' 


s 




k^ 






























^ -^ 


_• 


" 




: . _ 




^ • 


— 


— 


"~ 









r' — 


3 




• .— 




X : j2' 


;, 


•^ 


> 




^ 




> : 


ri 3 =. 




■ j_ 






^' 


^ 


^ 


























1 







■r i 


f • f^ t- 


\ 7 


' y^ 




:= • ^ 


= 


= 


= 




33 


l^ 


5 "= 


y— t- tC 




; -. 




!?: ; ^ 


X 


6c 


oc 






K 


000 


i: ^ 


■:t T 'Z. 


5 - 


~ — 


f^ r"^ 


~. 0^ 


g 


c; 


H 






L^ -^ U* 

ro s 


•— ^ 


3% t-^ t^ 


'i ^ 


[- > 


'" K^ "t^ L-t t; 


2 


'* 


5 






:; ~ 


5 — ft 


^r •- 


ft r- 


ji § K 9 X 


^ 


~ 


— 


, 


























■yi 06 c- 


— 


t~ \z 


ts 


r- 


[>• 00 ::» 


00 


cc 


oc 










■ v: 




































































7: 




































a 






■ 7: ^ 


^ 




" ;J -3 


t. 


c 













• 33 Z. 


5 




5 


i 


"^ 






^ 


■s 


_:§2 

2j 13 2 


1a 




~ 


S 


■!^ 


3 




M 

53 


1 - 


- 


— b ^ 


- 


r 


- u = 


- 


f - 


^ 





























5 i 


-^ 


u 


"::: 


> 


~ 


-C: 


;^ "^ 








^ — " 


' 


'-^ 


"~^ 


c 


^^ 


'— ' 


"-' 






























— 










"*■ 














1 



28 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 16 



M 



n I cc 



3 



c8 



O 






;^ 


•n 








cS 


■)-> 


r: 


u> 






c« 






5 '"^ ct T* ® 



5 to c i c 

O <D Q) "^ O 

^ O S -C rt 

X o hr ^ •- 

o c cc ci 

C 5'ci S:^ 



_ o 



til S ^ £ ^ 



•^ £ o 






^ ? 



- c 



H ^ o 

g tt> C 



rt '— "2 





M ,w 


a >; 




<u ^, 






OJ o 


O 
-t-i 


p. o rt 


^2 



a 



!s 


St iE 


.^ 


^ 


c 


r; 


Is 


^ 


- 


s 


c 






^ — 




C 


c 


3 


— ' 


^ 


^ 


^ 




~ 


'/ 


7 


^ 


Z. 




— 


— 


— 


£=- 


<C 


C 


-^ 




















































TO 
































^— 


-i-> 


■^^ 


.,_> 


.*^ 


.^j, 










o 






TO 


c 


a 


c 


c: 


c 


















c* 


« 


« 


CC 


rt 











■^ o 

re -? K 

C t£ TO 

C — a 

72 J W 



U 



o o 

l» o 
00 00 






«='^ 

4/i-O 



'Co ^• 
7j <^ '^ c^ 

.2 I C! I 
fc- J a> o 
a; c; T o 
=■=: fco 



it: 3= 
c o 

%^ 

a; Oh' 

>> >» 



rt f:i 



■ir, i 


■^ 










c a 


fee 




CO +J 






S (3 


05 

o 




^ 0) 




2£ . 


o 




tal 
nsu 
tlon 


o 
C 






CO 




-^ rt w 




<D 






O 


many 
Inlng 
Inary 


e 

rt 
o 

> 






rt 


<L 


o -^^ 


c 


■^ 


E^ 


Ji. 





*j t3 ,, 



ft 
^v _ !*> ft 
•- ° C rt 
G o rt . 



*j rt 

o . 

ft 

ft i? 

a£ 



Ph :: ;i; 



« — t- 



>. >. 

rt rt 

~ -a 



cs rt 
c/5 W 



lip us 
o o 

CO o 
t^ oo 



lo a> 



=^ t: rt 

— C ^ 

o 

rt t- rt 



O 



2 « '£ =* 
TO c o rt js. 



= '•5 5 5 

4J O O O 



- rt — 



C M 

•r o 



^ -^ ■£ S 

~ o S ? 



1920 



TRADES AND LABOUR BRANCH. 



29 









a-S 



a o 



2 a 

O ® 3 

art ^ fl 



S ^ 



I— I o 

1 s* 





.JL, aj © ' JL <u 








<n > . 03 > 




tJD 




p cS ,Q . ci .a . 




c 




0^^ ^^^ ^ 




S 


t. 


one. 
tions 
t 
sougl 
one. 
tions 
t 


c 


a 



r 


c 


^ 


c 


c 


r- 


A. 


^ Z 


;^ 







30 PtEPORT OF THE No. 16 



NIAGARA FALLS 

The Employment Ollice at Niagara Falls wa.s oprned early in April, J!) I'.), 
with Mr. W. H. Pace as Superintendent, and has provetl of great value in the- 
re-estahlishment of returned soldiers. A niaiked degree ol' co-operation between 
the manufacturers and the Bureau has resulted in very successful placement 
work being done. i 

During the seven mouths ending October olst, llM'J. -jIo men and 11 women 
were jilaced in positions through the Niagara Falls Bureau, the largest uuml)er 
of placements in any one month being in .Tnly wIkmi i>ositions were obtained for 
!)<S moji and 9 women. 

On account of its position as a border city, Niagara Falls has been the centre 
of a comparatively large ebb and flow of workers, the majority of whom have 
secured positions through the Employment Bureau. The alternate periods of 
activity and inactivity on the ]iower development w^ork in the district has made 
the Bureau the centre for a greater degree of employment work than it might 
otherwise have become, as Avorkers have realized ever since the inception of the 
Bureau that the local superintendent could obtain positions for them either in 
Niagara Falls or elsewhere through the Clearance system. 

The majority of the factories in Niagara Falls are operated on a nine hour 
basis, wdiile the building trades work 8 hours. The wages paid in Niagara Falls 
are approximately the same as the wages paid for the same work in other sections 
of the Province. Carpenters and bricklayers receive 75c. to 85c. per hour; iron 
workers 85c. to $1 per hour; aiul labourers for outside w^ork from 45c. to 50c. 
per hour, 

NORTH BAY 

The Employment Bureau in North Bay was opened March 15th, 1919, in the 
Banner Block, which is situated on the main street of the town, and has proven 
a most satisfactory location. Because of North Bay's position as the gateway 
to a mining and lumbering ccmntry of almost unlimited extent the bureau has been 
able to provide employment for large num1)ers of workers and the placements 
show a decided increase monlh after month as the work of the office becomes 
more widely known. During ibe nionib of June, IDS men were placed in positions; 
in July, 156; in August. '^5!). anil in September, ri'^S. Between the middle of 
^lay and end of October. cnii>loycis asked for 2.111 men. which represented 
approximatelv 1.000 more wcn'kei's llian the office was able io supply. With the 
(h'\clopnient of the iMnploymeni ( 'icaranct^ system, it is now found possible to 
bring workers in from other sectitni^ of the Province to till unusmil demands, sucli 
as iliose ex])erienced in thi^ case. The total number of men placed from May 
to October was 1,153. 

The majoriiv of placements through the North Bay ofiice have been miners, 
lumb(M'men and Iraik workers. On aci-onnt of the nature of tlie country around 
North Bav there is very tittle demand for farm help. 

Peporting on the rates of wages in and around North Bay. the Superintendent 
states that bushmen are receiving from ^iW to $(55 a nu>nth and board; tracknuui 
•10c. per liour. working 8 to 10 hours a day. Other classes of unskilled outdoor 
labour received as high a< 50c. ])er hour, which is somewhat offset by a charge 
of from $1 to $1.20 a day for l)oard. 

With the ai>]iroaching develo]nncnt of Northern Ontario . the North Bay 
IvUiplovment OHiee should serve a most useful ]turpose in providing the labour 
required to open up the country. 



1920 TRADES AND LABOUR BRANCH. * 31 



ORILLIA 

The Employment Office in Orillia was opened on Marcli lOtli, 1919, in co- 
operation with the Department of Sokliers' Civil Re-establishment as a one-maji 
office, with ^Ir. R. L. Clark as Superintendent. By careful selection of workers 
and by the same thorough canvassing which has marked the work of many of the 
other employment offices in the Provim-e the Superintendent has been enabled to 
render a real service to the manufacturers of Orillia and the surrounding territory. 

During the eight months ending October 31st, 1919, 410 men and 7 women 
applied for work at the Bureau and positions were found for 337 men and •"> 
women. Employers notified the office of 381 vacancies, 35 of which were for 
women. 

OSHAWA 

The Employment Bureau in Oshawa was opened on April 1st, 1919, as a one- 
man office, with Mr. C. J. Wilcox of the D.S.C.R. in charge. The fact that 
this office is not situated on the ground floor has possibly affected the extent to 
which it has been utilized locally, but in spite of this, 621 men and 42 women 
applied to the Bureau for assistance in securing employment during the six 
months ending October 31st, 1919. Positions were found for all of the women 
who applied and for 610 of the men. An exceptionally high percentage of the 
men applying were placed. 

The greatest volume of business as indicated by the records of the Oshawa 
office was during the month of July when 163 men and 12 women applied for 
work and 159 men and 12 women were placed. The Superintendent reports that 
" industrial conditions in Oshawa have been good since the Bureau was opened^ 
and the result is that the majority of, returned men have been taken back by 
their former employers and, therefore, they have had no cause to patronize the 
Bureau. 

" Touching upon the question of tlie relationship of supply and demand in 
the vnrious occupations, I would say that as a good deal of construction work 
has been going on in this district, the demand has exceeded the supply. Almost 
all the construction companies have been unable to secure enough carpenter?: 
and bricklayers, and at times the general labourers have not been sufficient. This 
situation seems to be general throughout the Province, as use has been made of 
tlie Clearance Bulletin in this connection but without results, as practicallv every 
office in Ontario seemed unable to supply the demand for this class of work. 
There has been no scarcity in the supply of factory hands for the different fac- 
tories as the majority of men who patronize this Bureau are men of no trade 
or occupation, nor are they tlie real construction worker, and in most cases after 
a few days' work in the factory, the man has picked up his part of the work and 
can carry on. 

" The number of men placed with farmers through this office is very small. 
It seems almost impossible to get men to go on the farm. As a matter of fact a 
number of applicants for employment in this office were men who had been 
working on farms and were coming into the city for work." 



32 REPORT OF THE Xo. 16 

OTTAWA 
Queen Street 
MEN 

The main avenue; of employment in the Ottawa zonq are agriculture, lumber- 
ing and bush work, and in the city itself the headquarters of the Federal Civil 
Service. In connection with the agricultural activities of the Ottawa Burca.i 
the Superintendent, Mr. J. C. Spencer, writes : — 

" Placements in agricultural positions for the present year have shown a 
very healthy growth. Office records show that during last year with all the 
production propaganda inducing the civil servants, high school pupils, and other 
citizens to give the farmer their assistance, our placements were 990. The lirst 
eleven months of the present year shows 1,015 placements. This was accom- 
plished without any popular movement of free Government transportation of 
former years." 

Large numbers of workers have been referred to positions in the Civil Service 
through the close co-operation of the Bureau with the Civil Service Commission. 
The majority of such placements have, of course, been returned soldiers. Ap- 
proximately 40 per cent, of the placements in the Ottawa office are building 
construction workers. The great demand for constniction to meet war emer- 
gencies made it necessary to employ the rough carpenter or handy man for this 
work, but with building more or less back to normal only first class tradesmen 
are now in demand and the result is that the handy man has been forced to return 
to the ranks of unskilled labour. 

Commenting upon the placement of workers in the various phases of tlKj 
lumbering industries, Mr. Spencer writes : 

'•' The growth in handling labour for this industry has been the most encourag- 
ing of all departments, due to the tremendous increase in lumber production, 
and the one cent per mile concession granted by the railroad companies. Then, 
too, the lumber companies have been for years so victimized by the private employ- 
ment agent, who controlled that labour that they were more than anxious to turn 
to the Government Bureaus for relief. 

" Some idea may be formed of future work to be accomplished in this depart- 
ment by comparing placements of last year with those of the 4)resent. Records 
show 46 lumbermen placed in 1917-18, while eleven months of the present year 
give 2,006, mostly in July, August aiid September. 

'' The season of employment for loggers and general bushmen covers from 
mill -July to the following April or May, when they come back to the lumber 
mills, farms and cities. For years they have been handled entirely by the private 
employment agent and, therefore, will require considerable educating before they 
use freely the Government Bureaus in seeking employment. 

" The heavy season will 1)e August to December with small orders coming 
in to keep camps up to full strength until the end of the season. At that time 
lumber mills are put in operation, so we may reasonably expect the replacement 
of many returned men in that capacity. Throughout the whole year there is 
always a demand for pick and shovel, and railway constructional labourers, so that 
in a very short time the branch could be developed into a permanent bui^y 
institution." 

The Ontario Government Employment Bureaus have proved of almost in- 
estimable value to the returned soldier in Ottawa, as well as throuffhout the rest 



1920 TRADES AND LABOUR BUA^X■H. 33 

of the Province. " Up to the time when the majority of the men left Canada, 
the Employment Service was not well known, and the reputation of the private 
. employment agent was none too good. Accordingly, when the returned man 
found himself anxious to re-enter civil life he was pleased to learn that the 
Government Employment Office and the Information and Service Branch of the 
Department of Soldiers' Civil Ee-establishment stood ready to help him solve 
the tremendous problem of re-establishment. The realization that " preference 
for the returned man '"' was not merely a meaningless phrase, but was an actual 
principle upon which the Bureaus were operated gained the confidence of the 
returned soldiers to such an extent that the records show that one-third of the 
men discharged from the Canadian Expeditionary Force have applied to the 
Bureau for assistance in obtaining employment. 

During the twelve months ending October 31st, 1919, 9,3-11 men applied at 
the Ottawa Bureau. The largest number in any one month was in August when 
there were 1,698 registrations. During the 12 months employers called for 10,197 
workers, 3,911 of which were asked for during the months of July and August, 
when the majority of the orders for lumbermen were placed with the service. 
There were 8,425 men placed during the year, 1,618 of whom secured positions 
in August, which represented the greatest volume of business handled by the 
Bureau in any one month. 

Dalhousle Street 

In order to handle the volimie of extra business occasioned by the wholesale 
placement of bushmen throught the Ottawa Bureau a branch office was opened 
at 271 Dalhousie Street on October 1st, 1919. During the month of October 
orders were received for 2,106 men while 132 workers registered at the Bureau 
and 119 were placed in positions. 

The convenient location of this office in the centre of the lumbermen's hotel 
district, and its close proximity to the station, quite justified the opening of this 
branch to assist in the placement of bushmen and other unskilled workers. 

WO.MEN 

Previous to the month of July, 1919, the employment of women constituted 
part of the duties of the regular staff of the office. At that time, however, it 
was decided to open a separate "Women's Department, and Miss Edith Appleton 
was placed in charge. 

Reporting on the demand for help in the Ottawa district, the Superintendent 
states that the supply is insufficient to meet the situation in practically every 
occupation, particularly, of course, in domestic work. It seems necessarv to make 
domestic work more attractive in order to induce girls to enter this field. The 
establishment of a hostel in the larger cities where girls may entertain friends 
is suggested, while a shortening of the hours is also necessary in order to meet 
the competition of other lines of work. 

Wages for work in Ottawa appear to be somewhat lower than elsewhere in 
the Province, factory workers receiving an initial wage of $6 to $7 a week, and 
sales clerks receiving from $6.50 to 88 a week. This condition has made it easier 
to fill out of town positions from the City of Ottawa, the girls preferring to 
leave town to accept employment where they are guaranteed minimum wages of 
at least $10. and where possibilities of advancing to $13, $15, or even $18 depend 
practically upon their own ability. 

3 T.L. 



34 REPOET OF THE Xo. 16 

The discrepancy between the demand and supply is indicated by the fact 
that employers called for 874 workers during the 13 months ending October 31st, 
while only 493 girls and women registered during this period. Of this number, 
477 were referred to positions, and information was received that 389 had been 
placed. In addition, 156 casual workers were placed in 18G jobs. 

OWEN SOUND 

The Owen Sound Bureau was opened on April 1st, 1919, as a one-man office, 
with Mr. C. E. Little as Superintendent. Although the district around Owen 
Sound had not previously been served by an employment agency of any description, 
local employers, almost without exception, soon availed themselves of the facilities 
of the office, with the result that it has been possible to find positions for the 
majority of the workers who have applied during the seven months ending 
October 31st. In this period, 575 men and 41 women applied for employment and 
i82 men and 33 women were placed. The greatest volume of business in any one 
month was handled in October, when 114 men and 8 women were placed in 
positions. 

Eeporting upon the question of wages and hours, the Superintendent states: 
" Wages offered here are lower in many lines than in most places, particularly 
in the furniture trade where the ordinary machine operator averages from $2.25 
to $2.50 per day. Unskilled labour receives from 30 cents to 35 cents per hour. 
In the iron and steel industries, the wages here are almost as high as in the 
other parts of the Province. Nine hours is the standard working day in the 
various industries in Owen Sound." 

PEMBROKE 

The Pembroke Employment Bureau was opened as a one-man office on 
March 6th, 1919, with 'Mr. C. E. Stewart as Superintendent. On account of 
the fact that private employment agents have for years monopolized the hiring, 
particularly in the lumber industry in and around Pembroke, it was difficult 
for the Government Employment Office to obtain the co-operation of local em- 
ployers. By careful attention to the trial orders which were placed with the 
Bureau, however, local firms soon realized the fact that the Pembroke Employment 
Bureau could serve their best interests quite as efficiently and much less expen- 
sively than the private agents. As a result, at the time of writing, the difficulty 
is not to secure orders, but to secure a sufficient number of men to fill the orders 
Avhich are on hand. 

The unjustifiable suspicion shown by some classes of workers was evidenced 
in the Pembroke Bureau by the diffidence on the part of applicants to fill out 
the application forms required for record purposes. It appeared at first that the 
information thus obtained M'onld be used to their disadvantage in some mvstorious 
fashion, possil)ly in eonnoction with a Military Service Act. 

Pembroke is essentially a lumbering centre, and the Emplovment Bureau 
has served as a distributing point for bushmon sent through other sections of 
the Province. At the same time, there has ])eon good demand for farm hands, 
tlie siipply of which was not by any means equal to the call for help of this kind. 

During the eight months ending October 31st. 1919, 1,020 men and 26 
women applied to the Bureau for assistance in securing work. Of this number, 
979 men and 17 women were definitely reported as placed. The greatest volume 



1920 TRADES AND LABOUR BRANCH. 35 

of business handled in any one month was during September, when 189 men 
and 8 women registered, and 188 of the men and 5 women were placed in positions. 
Between March 6th and October 31st, employers asked for 1,777 workers, which 
is an indication of the extent to which the Bureau has entered into the industrial 
life of the community. 

PERTH 

On account of the comparatively large number of men, who were recruited 
for overs'eas service in Perth and vicinity, an Employment Office was opened 
in the Town of Perth in the month of April. It was found, however, that the 
number of men handled by this office did not reach the anticipated figure, and 
the office was closed at the end of August. 

While the Bureau was open, with Mr. G. A. Scott as Superintendent, 120 
men applied for work, 141 vacancies Avere notified, and 103 placements were 
made. As Perth is the centre of a rich agricultural district the majority of the 
placements were on farms in Lanark County. 

PETERBOROUGH 

The Ontario Government Employment Bureau has been in operation in 
Peterborough since February 4th, 1919, with Mr. Hugh Robertson as Superin- 
tendent. The fact that there is a great deal of manufacturing carried on in 
Peterborough has made it possible for this office to place 1,839 men and 32 women 
in positions in nine months. During the same period 2,517 workers applied 
at the Bureau for positions. 

Commenting upon the difficulties of placing returned soldiers in positions, 
tlie Superintendent reports as follows: 

■' The extent to which the Bureau has been of service to the returned soldiers 
has been very great, and many firms have helped that Department all they could. 
T find that an appeal for ex-soldiers meets with a ready response, but some of the 
returned men are not in shape to hold down a job in competition with civilians 
who have been employed during the war at their usual occupations. The result 
is they very often become discouraged and leave. We also have another class, 
which I am pleased to say is not very large, who are not looking for work, or if 
they do, want jobs which should properly go to disabled men. This is the hardest 
class we have to deal with, and sometimes employers make them an excuse for 
not hiring the returned men. There are also the young men who went overseas 
under age, and tlie disabled men, who are either taking vocational training, or 
liave already received same, who are not fit to carry on the work for which they 
were supposed to have been trained. ^Vlany firms are not very anxious to engage 
such men. However, we expect that in time they will fit in some place and 
become self-supporting." 

As in other centres the impression has .been more or less prevalent that the 
Employment Bureaus were established solely for the placement of returned men, 
altliough the idea of the Government was, and is, that these Bureaus should serve 
ox-soldiers and civilians alike, with the general understanding, of course, that 
profei-ence in employment be given to returned soldiers. In this connection the 
Superintendent states : 

" The majority of civilians making application here are under the impression 
that the Labour Bureaus are only for the benefit of returned men, and that we 
do not give them a chance when vacancies do occur. However, I have explained 



36 EEPOET OF THE No. 16 

to a great many that it is our duty to place the sohlier back in his old job, or in 
one that he is capable of doing. There are still some that will not make use of 
the Bureau, but we hope that as the benefit derived from same becomes better 
known it will be recognized by all those seeking work and workmen." 

Every attempt was made by the Superintendent to secure the farm help 
requested by farmers in the vicinity of Peterborough, but it proved difficult at 
first 10 bring together the applicant and the employer, until the plan was adopted 
of sending out cards to the farmers and farm labourers, asking them to be at the 
Bureau at a certain hour on Saturdays. This proved to be a very satisfactory 
means of effecting farm placements. 

" The wages offered in some of the different occupational groups were in- 
creased, but this was mostly in the organized trades. Labourers received from 
30c. to 45c. per hour with an eight hour day on city work, nine hours in the 
majority of the factories and in one large plant ten hours. Skilled mechanics 
in the iron trade averaged 75c. an hour. 

" Building Trades. — Carpenters, 65c. ; bricklayers, stonemasons, 75c. ; painters 
and decorators, 50c., 60c., and 65c. per hour; weavers averaged $15 per week for 
50 hour week; canoe builders, $3 to $4 per nine hour day; linemen, 40c. to 50c. 
per hour; electricians, 60c. per hour; farm labourers, $35 to $50 per month 
and board." 

PORT ARTHUR 

The Port Arthur Employment Bureau was opened for business on jMarch 1st, 
1918, and each month furnishes more positive evidence of the extent to which the 
office is of service to local employers and employees. During the 12 months 
ending October 31st, 1919, 5,128 men and 32 women applied at the Bureau, and 
3,858 men and 24 women were placed in positions. During the same period 
employers called for 4,899 men and 82 women. The largest volume of business 
handled in any one month was in September, 1919, when 696 men applied for 
work and 679 of these were placed in positions. Each month in the year shows 
a registration of over 200 men, in itself an indication of the extent to which the 
Bureau is used. 

Reporting on the co-operation between the Employment Bureau and the 
local employers, the Superintendent, Mr. Frederick Urry, states: 

"' In this work I have been very generously supported by the employers of the 
city and district, the returned men receiving first consideration in all positions 
that have been open. This work, however, would have been i^o much for me to 
have handled satisfactorily, as the soldiers began to arrive in large numbers, so 
that I more than welcomed the presence in this office of Sergeant A. C. Wood. 
of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Pe-establishment, wlio since the first of 
February of this year has been associated with me at this office, and whose duty 
it is to register and look after the interests of returned men." 

The demand and supply of skilled workers liave boon approximately equal, 
except in the case of carpenters, wliere the number of requests have exceeded 
1)V 20 per cent, the nunil)er of men available. In this connection the Superin- 
tendent reports : 

" General labourers, especially for railway work have been very hard to get 
and only about 33 per cent, of the demands have been supplied. The employers 
knowing the scarcity of men have probably asked for more than they could have 
placed, so that T do not tliink the actual shortage of help was quite so great i<5 
the figures returned in wookly reports would indicate.'"' 



1920 TRADES AND LABOUE BRANCH. 37 

" This is a settler's country in the immediate vicinity of Port Arthur, and 
consequently few applications come in for farm help. AVe do our best to fill 
these requirements, but as a rule farmers do not otfer an equivalent rate of pay 
contrasted with general labour work, and the few applications for help we get 
we find rather difficult to fill on this account.'' 

The criticism is sometimes made that the Government Employment Bureau, 
whose hours are shorter than those of the average private employment agent, 
cannot render the same service, but the statement below from the report of the 
Superintendent is typical of the service rendered throughout the Province wherever 
necessary. 

" Another important industry with whom we got into close touch, and have 
kept up the connection is the Hydro-Electric camp at Cameron Falls. We ship 
out men to this camp three times a week as also to the different points for the 
C.N.R. and I have made it my business to meet the train on these mornings at 
6.30 during the summer and fall, and 7.30 for the winter to see the men safely 
off to their destinations." 

Commenting on the situation with regard to wages and hours of labour, ]\Ir. 
Urry states : 

"With regard to wages, this district has never seen higher wages offered 
than this summer. We sometimes hear the remark made by returned men that 
while they were away men were making big wages which cannot be obtained now. 
I have repeatedly proven to these men the error of that statement. It is true 
that not so much overtime is being worked now as was the case in 1917 and 1918, 
but the wages are higher to-day than at that time. 

" At the present, wages range for unskilled labour from -lOc. to 55c. per hour, 
with generally a ten hour day. In some instances the eight hour and nine hour 
day has been tried, but unless the eight hour day contains 10 hours' work with 
time and a half for last two hours, the eight hour day is not popular with the 
unskilled worker." 

As in other centres of the Province the Port Arthur Superintendent has 
received, and has appreciated the co-operation of the local press. The publicity 
wliich has been given to the efforts of the Employment Service has undoubtedly 
extended the field whicli the Bureaus have been able to cover. 



SARNIA 

Sarnia is a one-man office, operated in co-operation with the Department of 
Soldiers' Civil Re-estal)lishment, and was open for l)usiness on !^^arch 3rd. 1919, 
at 120 Front Street. On account of the novelty of tlie idea of a Public Employ- 
ment Bureau, manufacturers and other employers of labour first showed some 
diffidence in making use of the Bureau, but they have now become convinced 
that the office is operated solely for the mutual benefit of employers and employees, 
and they are making ever increasing use of the service. 

During the seven months ending October 31st, 1919, 717 men applied to the 
Bureau for assistance in securing work, 702 were referred to positions, and 
reports of placements were received in 698 cases. The supply and demand for 
labour in the various occupations have been about equal, except in the building 
trades, where there has been noted a shortage of carpenters, bricklayers and 
plasterers. As the Bureau l)ecomes more widely known, it is expected that a 
large number of farmers who have previously applied to the London office for 



S8 EEPORT OF THE Xo. 16 

help will communicate with the Sariiia Bureau for the assistance which they 
require. 

The wages in some of the industries in Sarnia at October 31st are as follows: 
Machinists and boilermakers, G5c. to 721/2^. per hour; blacksmiths, 60c. to 70c. 
per hour; tinsniith^ and jDlumbers, ooc. to 60c, jjer hour; carpenters, 60c. to 6.5c. 
per hour; general labourers, 45c, per hour. 

SAULT STE. MARIE 

The Employment Bureau in Sault Ste. Marie was opened on March 1st, 1919, 
at 349 Queen Street. The larger employers of labour in the district have found the 
Bureau particularly useful, such concerns as the Algoma Steel Corporation and 
the Spanish River Pulp & Paper Company having called on the office for all 
classes of skilled and unskilled labour. Large numbers of miners, lumbermen, 
oooks, tiemakers and bridgemen have been sent from Sault Ste. Marie to the 
mines and lumber camps of the above mentioned, as well as many other com- 
panies. During the summer months applications \vere received for a number 
of firemen, deckhands, wheelsmen, watchmen and cooks for the boats passing 
through Sault Ste. Marie. The Bureau has also supplied various Government 
survey parties with cooks and axemen during the summer, and haj sent men to 
work on the Government roads in the Sault Ste. Marie district. The railways 
have called on the bureau for clerical workers, labourers for freight shed and 
construction work, while local contractors and local industries have utilized the 
Bureau to a great extent. This is indicated by the fact that during the eight 
months ending October 31st. 1919, employers asked for 3,052 men and 35 women, 
the largest number called for in any one month being in October, when orders 
were received at the Bureau for 550 workers. During the eight months above 
mentioned, 2,558 men and 29 women applied at the Bureau. Of these, 2,469 
men and 22 women were placed in positions. Commenting upon the local farm 
situation, the Superintendent states that "We have had very little call for farm 
help, as our office is not located in a farming district; however, we have been 
successful in placing a few men at this work." 

Work at the steel plant is carried on in eight, ten and twelve hour shifts. In 
the paper mill, and in the majority of other smaller industries the eight hour day 
is in force. Bushmen and miners work ten hours a day. The wages for bushmen 
range from $55 to $65 a month and board ; for general labourers 35c. to 45c. per 
hour, and for underground labourers, $4.25 a day. Certain factory work pays 
from 45c. to 60c. an hour, while local organized mechanics receive the regular 
union scale of wages. 

ST. CATHARINES 

The Employment Office in St. Catharines was opened February 14th, 1919, 
with ]\rr. Robert Eakins, of the Toronto Employment Office, as Acting-Superin- 
tendent, lie was succeeded by ^Ir. Roy l\riller, who later resigned to accept a 
position with a private concern, and Air. A. TT. Ellis was appointed as Suporin- 
tonflont early in August, 1919. 

That the Bureau has bocu widely used by emplo.yers of labour in St. Catharines 
is indicated by the large number of placements made up to the end of October, 
positions having been found for 2.703 men and 56 women during that time. 
The largest number of placements in any one month was recorded in June, when 
employment was fmind for 4 17 men and 5 women. Employers' orders during the 



1920 TEADES AXD LABOUR BKAXCH. 39 

nine months for men totalled 2,8 TO, while 184 women were also a^ked for through 
the Bureau. The applications for work totalled 3,316, the largest number in any 
single month being, as in the case of placements, in June when 490 workers applied 
to the Bureau for assistance in securing employment. 

The office has been used to a very large extent by farmers of the district, 
who have secured many workers by application to the superintendent. It has 
also served as a valuable distributing point for women farm workers, who have 
been recruited in the Toronto office, and who were referred to the St. Catharines 
Bureau for final directions as to the best means of reaching the farms in the 
district to which they were assigned. Xow that the Bureau has become more 
widely known there is every indication that it will be of great service to -the 
rural community. 

Keporting on the scale of wages and hours in the St. Catharines district, 
the Superintendent states that labourers receive 50c. an hour, working 8 hours a 
day on union work, and 4.5c. an hour for a 9 hour day on contract work. He 
further states that "mechanics in nearly all factories are paid union wages, 
although a great many do piece work, making from $5 to $8 a day." 

ST. THOMAS 

The Employment Bureau in St, Thomas was originally opened as a part- 
time office, but in March, 1919, the Bureau was made a full-time office with the 
Superintendent, Mr. "W. J. Peacock, still in charge. Like other offices in the 
Province, the St. Thomas Bureau has been of great assistance in the re-establish-' 
ment of the returned soldiers by whom it has been extensively used. 

Employers have made much greater use of the Bureau since we have opened it 
as a full-time office, as will be seen by the fact that during the seven months 
ending October 31st, orders were received for 1,439 workers, as compared with 
orders for 259 received during the previous five months. The registrations showed 
a similar increase with the result that the Bureau was able to place 1,133 men 
during the seven months ending October 31st, and a total of 1,297 men during 
the year. Positions were also found for 54 women. As St. Thomas is primarily 
a railroad centre, the majority of placements have been in work on or directly 
connected with the railroads. The farms of the district have, however, made 
fairly extensive use of the Bureau, and the Bureau has been able to fill practically 
all the orders for farm help received during the past summer. 

Wages for building construction labourers range from 40c. to 45c. an hour; 
railway construction workers receive 45c. to 53c. an hour; machinists, boiler- 
makers and railway carpenters and electricians received 68c. an hour previous to 
October, 1919, since when they have been paid at the rate of T2 cents an hour. 

STRATFORD 

The Emploiment Bureau in Stratford was opened on March 8th, 1919, as a 
one-man office, with Mr. A. W. Deacon in charge. Up to the end of October, 1919, 
the Employment Office records show 486 men and one woman placed in positions. 
The furniture factories in Stratford are constantly calling for skilled workers, and 
if a sufficient number of this class of help were available employment would be 
forthcoming for additional labourers. The Superintendent reports : 

"The metal industries are well filled up: the railway shops have sufficient 
machinists, and are onlv taking on odd labou'^ers to replace anv who leave from 



40 EEPORT OF THE No. 16 

time to time. I do not anticipate any large increase in employment in any of our 
local concerns for some time to come, although there will be a certain number 
of vacancies constantly occurring. 

" The furniture factories are paying wages ranging from 30c. to 55c. an 
liour. The railway employees in the shops are on a regular schedule of pay, 38c. 
for labourers, 45c. for helpers and 68c. for machinists. The G.T.R. shops are now 
running 48 hours per week. 

" Farm helj:* was extremely scarce in this neighbourhood this summer, and 
it was difficult to induce men to go on the farm during the season. During the 
season we placed 34 men with farmers. 

" The clearance system is proving beneficial ; it has enabled us to secure 
men for vacancies from Toronto, London, Hamilton and Welland, and I have 
been able to place men in Toronto, London, Kitchener, Hamilton, Brantford and 
St. Thomas." 

SUDBURY 

The Ontario Government Public Employment Bureau, Sudbury, was opened 
January 2nd, 1919, on Station Street, directly opposite the C.P.R. station. During 
the opening, employers notified the Superintendent, Mr. E. H. Manor, of 2G0 
vacancies, 41 of which were filled. The orders and registrations have steadily 
increased, and the office has averaged over 100 placements a week up to the 
end of October. In the 10 months ending October 31st, 4,689 men and 38 women 
applied for positions, and 3,894 men and 19 women were placed. During the 
same period, employers called for 7,782 men and 52 women, the largest number 
of orders received in any one month being in August when employers called 
for 1,621 men and 3 women. The greatest number of placements in one month 
was during October, 1919, when 708 men and 1 woman were placed in positions. 

Sudbury had been for years a stronghold of the private employment agent, 
but when employers realized the logical benefits rendered by the Employment 
Service they were not slow in availing themselves of the opportunity offered them. 
On account of its prominent location, the Sudbury Bureau is seen by practically 
everyone entering the town over the C.P.E. lines, and this fact has been partially 
responsible for the large number of applications and placements. 

" This Bureau with the assistance of the Soldiers' Civil Ee-establishment 
representative has jjlaced 559 returned soldiers out of 577 who applied for work. 
The records show 5§1 vacancies, which were suital)le for returned men. We 
find very little difficulty in placing the returned soldiers in this district, as the 
applicants show their willingness to accept the positions which we select for them, 
and in very few cases have we had to renew their applications. 

" Below will be found the principal industries which have received the largest 
numbf^r of workers from this Bureau : 

Bushmen 

I^abourers (Railway) 

Labourers (General) 

Miners and Muckers 

" The above shows a great shortage in tlie number of bushmen available ; 
also railway labourers, for which the demand is the greatest as per our records. 

As the country surrounding Sudbury is not adapted to farming, and most farms 



Vacancies 


Supplied 


Percentage Filled, 


2,291 


823 


35% 


1,919 


693 


36% 


1,191 


734 


61% 


603 


333 


55% 



1920 TRADES AND LABOUR BRAXCH. 41 

are small, there is not much demand for this line of help. Our records show 
only 33 vacancies, of which we have filled 26." 

The records of the Bureau show that wages of $60 to $65 a month represent 
the average amount offered for bush work with a few offers of $70 to $80 a month 
for fully experienced men. General labourers receive 35.c. to -iSc. an hour, except 
on concrete work where the rate is 50 cents an hour. The rate of pay on track 
work during the summer of 1919 was 35c. an hour for an 8 hour day on one 
railroad, and a 10 hour day on another line. The greater number of men hired 
for this extra gang work were of foreign birth, and the emigration of these men 
will probably help to bring about a shortage of workers for this kind of employ- 
ment during 1920. 

" "We find the unsettled conditions in the lumber camps partially due to the 
improper rating of the scale of wages; this fall owing to the shortage of men 
available a large majority of the men shipped to the woods are inexperienced, 
and drawing the same wage as the experienced bushmen, upon whom the bulk 
of the work falls. That is one of the reasons why the experienced man is going 
into camps where they are offering piecework." 

An analysis of the classes of workers applying to the Sudbury Bureau is 
seen below: 

Occupation Number of 

Applicants Registered. 

Bushmen 907 

General labourers 881 

Railway labourers 838 

Miners 195 

Trammers 152 

Cooks 99 

Section hands 98 

Cookees , 97 

Millmen 96 

Machine runners 69 

Fire rangers 79 

Casual workers 59 

Carpenters 56 

Teamsters 45 

Clerks 44 

Electricians 34 

Machine help 33 

Bridgemen 33 

Steel workers 32 

Engineers and Firemen 31 

Blacksmiths 29 

Policemen 29 

Other occupations ( 20 ) 1"2 

Total 4,108 

Of the 577 ex-soldiers who registered for employment, 243 were classified 
as labourers, 116 as buslimen, 40 as clerks, 22 as miners, 19 as teamsters, 13 as 
firerangers, 12 as janitors and watchmen, 11 as carpenters, and the balance in 
19 other occupations. There were 244 ex-soldiers placed as labourers, 116 as 
bushmen, 39 as clerks, 22 as miners, 15 as teamsters, 13 as firerangers, and 112 
in 22 other occupations. 

4 T.L. 



42 EEPOKT OF THE No. 16 



TORONTO 

On account of the fact that it is the largest industrial centre in Ontario, 
Toronto's employment problems are more varied and more extensive than the 
problems which have to be met in other centres. The work of the Ontario Govern- 
ment Public Employment Bureau in Toronto has been functionalized to meet the 
needs of the situation so that the work is now divided into the following main 
divisions : 

Men's Industrial and Clerical Section. 

Men's Farm Section. 

Men's Professional and Business Section. 

Women's Industrial and Clerical Section. 

Women's Domestic Section. 

Women's Farm Section. 

These sections of the work are dealt with at the main Toronto Office, 45 
King Street West. Positions in lumber camps and in labouring and construction 
work are handled through a separate office, situated at 172 Front Street West, 
while a Branch Office located at 1,252 Bloor Street West, looks after the gener.il 
employment needs of the western section of the city. 

Men's Industrial and Clerical Section 

Shortly after the signing of the armistice, the work of the Men's Industrial 
Section increased in volume as the demobilized soldiers began to seek positions 
through the Employment Service. During the months of December, 1918, and 
January, 1919, this volume of business was handled without any radical changes 
in method. In February, the arrangement made between the various Provinces 
and the Department of Soldiers' Civil Ee-establishment resulted in representatives 
of that organization being allowed space in the Employment Office to assist in 
the task of re-establishing the returned men. The closest co-operation has been 
maintained between the Employment Service and the Department of Soldiers' 
Civil Ee-establishment in this office as in all other offices throughout the Province. 

As was to be expected the majority of the applicants were returned men, 
and the records show that between 75 and 80 per cent, of the soldiers applying for 
positions during the past twelve months have been placed, while during the same 
period 33 per cent, of the civilians applying for work have been referred to 
positions. 

Numerically, taking the year as a whole, the demand for men and the avail- 
able supply have been approximately equal, but of course this does not indicate 
that every applicant could be immediately placed in the kind of work for which 
he was qualified. 

Employers willing to pay the standard wages for any occupation generally 
found it possible to o])tain the class of help thoy required through the Bureaus, 
with the exception during the past season of building tradesmen, whose services 
are in such demand tliat they have not found it necessary to apply to the Employ- 
ment Offices for assistance in securing employment. 

The working liours as eom])iled from the orders received in this Department 
show that the eight and nine hour day is well established in Toronto. Occasionally 



1920 



TEADES AND LABOUR BRANCH. 



43 



eniploj'ers require that their workers put in ten hours per day, but such cases 
are the exception rather than the general rule. 

There is no division of the employment work in Toronto from which larger 
and more satisfactory results may be expected than from the Men's Industrial 
Section. Every effort is being made to select the right man for the right job, 
and with the continued co-operation of the employers of the city, the number of 
employers and employees using the Bureaus should continue to record the increase 
which has marked the first two years of service rendered by this section of the 
Employment Bureau. 

TABLE 5. — Annual Statement, 45 King Street West, Toronto. 
November 1st, 1918— October 31st, 1919. 

MEN'S INDUSTRIAL AND CLERICAL SECTION. 



1918-19 



Applications 
for Work 



Vacancies 
Notified 



Referred to 
Positions 



Placements 



November . . . 
December . . . 

January 

Februar.v 

March 

April 

May 

J une 

July 

August 

September. . . 
October 

Total: 



836 
1,306 
2.151 
1.648 
1,695 
2,308 
1,707 
1.609 
1.969 
1,570 
2.001 
1,942 



1,242 
1.486 
2.357 
1,328 
1,963 
1,843 
2,412 
2,278 
2.937 
2,670 
2.881 
2,662 



20,742 



26,059 



484 
540 
866 
1,095 
1.288 
1,742 
1,504 
1,193 
1.444 
1.237 
1.404 
1.189 



81 
111 
132 

209 

187 

363 

887 

1.086 

1,406 

1,060 

1,006 

698 



13,986 



7,226 



NOTE. — In addition to the above 49 Casual jobs were filled by 48 workers. 



Men's Farm Section 

Although there were no Province-wide or local campaigns to persuade workers 
to engage in farm work during the year 1919, the Ontario Government Employ- 
ment Bureaus, particularly in Toronto, at all times urged applicants to accept 
farm positions, the remuneration for which, while not so high when measured 
by the financial return only, really compares favourably with other employment, 
when free board and lodging and other similar privileges are taken into considera- 
tion. As a result the registrations for farm work each month during the past 
year at the King Street Employment Bureau have been most gratifying. The 
number of men referred to positions reached the grand total of 2,719 during 
the year, the largest number in any one month being in July, when 430 workers 
were referred to farm employment. There were 2,896 orders for farm help 
received during the year, which is in itself an indication of the extent to which 
the rural population of the Province has learned to depend upon the Toronto 
Bureau. Without any solicitation or widespread advertising of any kind orders 
were received from farmers in practically every section of the Province, as well 
as from Western Canada. Below will be found a brief summary of the work of 



44 



EEPOKT OF THE 



Xo 16 



the Farm Department which has been under the immediate direction of !Mr. 

J. A. Miller since it was first organized in 1917: 

Applications Referred to 

1918-19 for work. positions. 

November 110 90 

December 171 114 

January 298 178 

February 308 189 

March 436 266 

April 539 354 

May 555 259 

June 533 348 

July 622 430 

August 282 200 

September 233 181 

October 136 110 

Totals 4,223 2,719 



Men's Professional and Business Section 

Shortly after the signing of the armistice it was realized that the creation 
of a separate section of the Employment Service to deal with the placement of 
men with special technical or business training was a necessity. Accordingly, in 
March, 1919, such an office was opened in conjunction with the Department of 
Soldiers' Civil Ee-establishment. The office was located in the King Street Branch 
of the Ontario Employment Service, with representatives of the Department of 
Soldiers' Civil Ee-establishment, F. S. Eutherford and E. D. Galbraith in charge. 
The demand for such an office was immediately made apparent by the large 
number of applicants who applied. During the eight months ending October 31st. 
2,463 men registered, the largest number in any one month being in May when 
523 men applied for assistance in securing positions. The average number of 
registrations has been 345 a month. 

TABLE 6. — Annual Statement. 45 King Street West, Toronto. 
March 1st, 1919— October 31st, 1919. 

MEN'S PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS SECTION. 



1919 



Applications 
for Woi'k 



Vacancies 
Notified 



Referred to 
Positions 



Placements 



March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

AURUSt 

September 

October 

Totals 



48 
198 
523 
357 
87fi 
378 
355 
228 



2,463 



19 

53 

75 

84 

126 

106 

106 

203 



772 



19 

53 

75 

84 

288 

268 

106 

130 



1,023 



19 

53 

75 

84 

126 

106 

106 

122 



691 



Bloor Street Office, Toronto 

While this office is a small one in comparison with the main Toronto Office, 
at 45 King Street West, it has filled an important place in the local emplo^Tnent 
situation. Being very close to the factory district in West Toronto, it has kept 
in close touch with the supply of and the demand for workers in this section 



1920 



TRADES AXD LABOUE BEAXCH. 



45 



of the city. The office was opened iu February^ 1919, with Mr. George Eeeves 
as Superintendent, and throughout the 3'ear there has been a steady though small 
demand for both tradesmen and labourers. 

""We have found that in some of the larger factories of this district every 
effort has been made to re-establish the returned soldier, and this Bureau has been 
of great service to the management in carrying out this policy, and of great 
benefit to the returned soldiers of the district, who have applied to this office 
for advice and assistance. In one or two of the factories near here, every applicant 
for a job is told to first make application to this Bureau, as all vacancies are 
reported to us, and are filled from this office. As it is our policy, as well as that 
of the management of these factories, preference is given to the returned soldier 
in filling these vacancies. 

" While some factory employment managers are somewhat slow to see that 
the Government Employment Bureaus are of great assistance to them in filling 
vacant positions, yet one by one they are beginning to realize that they are indeed 
of great benefit, and are telephoning in their orders as the vacancies occur. If all 
factory managers would adopt this or some similar course, a splendid system of 
co-operation would soon develojD between factory management and the Bureaus 
and then indirectly to all returned soldiers and civilians seeking employment."' 

At the time of the opening of the Bureau the rate of wages for inside factory 
work was 35c. and STi^c ^tl hour. It was extremely difficult to obtain workers 
at these rates, but when 40c. to 4.5c. an hour was adopted as the prevailing wage 
scale, comparatively large numbers of men were obtained for this kind of employ- 
ment. The average factory in the district is running on a 50 hour week basis. 
The rubber industry runs from 44 to 50 hours a week; the meat industry 48 
hours, and other trades about 50 hours per week. 

During the nine months ending October 31st, employers notified the Bureau 
of 1,640 vacancies. In the same period, 2,403 workers registered at the Bureau, 
1,647 were referred to positions, and definite word was received that placements 
had been made in 1,480 cases. The greatest volume of business handled in any 
one month was in August when 302 men registered, employers called for 299 
workers and 252 placements were made. 

TABLE 7.— Annual Statement, 1,254 Bloor Street West, Toronto. 
February 1st, 1919— October 31st, 1919. 

MEN". 



1919 


Applications 
for Work 


Vacancies 
Notified 


Referred to 
Positions 


Placements 


February 


168 
311 
194 
338 
271 
329 
302 
274 
216 


37 
147 
116 
177 
165 
279 
299 
241 
179 


33 
155 
116 

181 
170 
291 
267 
261 
173 


33 


March 


155 


April 


116 


Mav 


168 


June 


128 


July 


236 


August 


252 


September 


239 


October 


153 






Totals 


2.403 


1.640 


1,647 


1,480 







46 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 16 



Front Street, Toronto 

lu order to handle the large volume of unskilled workers applying at the 
Emplo3'ment Bureau on King Street, arrangements were made in January, 1919, 
whereby the down town office of the Department of Immigration and Colonization, 
at 173 Front Street West, was obtained for use as an unskilled labour office. 
Employers soon came to dejtend upon this office for securing help, orders being 
received for 7,060 men during the nine months ending October 31st, 1919. In 
the same period 4,871 men applied for work, and 3,156 were placed. It will be 
seen accordingly, that the demand exceeded the supply by approximately 50 
jDer cent. 

" At the beginning of the season men were plentiful for construction work, 
but as the wage then paid was small, it was impossible to induce many of the 
applicants to accept the work, but when the scale of wages was raised from 35c. 
to 40c. per hour, more men were placed. The demand for factory labourers has 
been small, and the wages paid for indoor work rather low, ranging from 35c. to 
37c. per hour. In the opening of the fall season orders were received for approxi- 
mately 3,000 bushmen at wages ranging from $45 to $75 per month and board." 

In this office probably more than in any other of the Bureaus in the Province, 
the advantages of the Public Employment Bureau over the private agency can 
be seen. The class of workers handled by this office is one whose usual financial 
condition is such that the imposition of what amounts to a penalty of one or 
more dollars for securing work frequently constitutes a real hardship. More 
than this many of the unskilled workers, particularly those of foreign birth 
could never feel entirely safe while dealing with some of the unscrupulous private 
agents, as they had not the assurance that employment conditions were being 
correctly stated to them. In addition, the worker was aware of the fact that in 
dealing with the Public Employment Bureau he could depend upon the local 
superintendent to investigate any apparent overcharges made against men who 
were en route from the city to the place of employment, and he realized that he 
could also depend upon the Employment Bureaii to investigate anv other violation 
of his employment contract. 

TABLE 8.— Annual Statement, 172 Front Street West, Toronto. 
January 1st, 1919— October 31st, 1919. 

MEN. 



1919 



January 

February , 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August , 

September 

October 

Totals 



Applications 
for Work 



Vacancie;- 
Not! tied 



Referred to 

Positions 



Placements 







■ 





102 


595 


48 


48 


282 


89 


89 


89 


422 


13 


95 


95 


1.012 


9 


186 


186 


722 


514 


490 


477 


328 


815 


282 


279 


371 


1.344 


371 


371 


500 


2,828 


500 


500 


46(5 


455 


466 


466 


6Bfi 


398 


645 - 


645 


4.871 


7.0()0 


3.172 


3,156 



1920 TRADES AND LABOUR BRANCH. 47 

Women's Industrial and Clerical Section 

The signing of the armistice completely revolutionized the employment situa- 
tion Insofar as it affected the thousands of Avomen workers in Toronto. By the 
end of December, 1919, all munition plants had closed, and it became necessary 
for the women who had been working in such plants to follow a different line 
of activity, either as wage earners, or home-makers. In this connection Miss 
M. C Findlay, in charge of the Industrial and Clerical Section of the Employ- 
ment Bureau, King Street, reports as follows : 

" Those who remained in industry had to adapt themselves to new conditions 
of work, hours and wages. As far as possible girls were returned to their pre- 
munition trades, but many who had become skilled munition workers were un- 
skilled in any other line. Such workers were usually attracted by the work on 
farm implements at the Massey-Harris firm, assembling, inspecting and operating 
on small valves, electrical plugs and heaters. Women have proved themselves 
specially adapted to such work which requires deftness, accuracy and patience." 

Industrial : 

During the early months of 1919 there was a tendency on the part of manu- 
facturers to " wait and see " and on the part of wholesale buyers to wait for an 
expected post-war drop in prices. Commenting on the situation. Miss Findlay 
states : 

" In the clothing industries, foreign orders such as the Roumanian order for 
knitted goods, tided over a difficult period, and before many months retailers were 
sending in larger orders than usual. Wholesale houses found their stocks depleted 
so that pressure was brought to bear on the manufacturers. By June, the demand 
for skilled workers far exceeded the supply and since then there has been an 
increasing shortage of even inexperienced help. No satisfactory explanation of 
this fact has yet been offered, except the increase in the number of marriages 
with the return of the soldiers. Manufacturers found this shortage of women 
workers a serious handicap, coming at a time when it was important for Canada 
to build up foreign trade. Some firms made efforts to have experienced workers 
along various lines brought from England and Scotland, but so far nothing 
definite has been done in this direction.'* 

The Clearance System has been prevented by the scarcity of women workers 
from accomplishing the results which might be expected under more normal 
labour conditions. When the situation returns to a normal basis, and there is a 
surplus of women workers, the Clearance System may be expected to function 
almost as efficiently as it does at present in the case of transferring male workers 
from place to place. 

There has been a general movement towards shorten incc the hours and increas- 
ing Ihe pay in local factories, many having adopted the 8 hour day, and other,': 
having reduced the working liours to 8^. Most factories which make use of the 
Bureau have now a minimum wage of $10 a week for unskilled help, and packing 
houses pay as high as 27c. to 30c. per hour for such work. The demand for ex- 
perienced chocolate dippers is such that their wages run from $16 to $25 a week, 
representing probably the highest paid factory work, except in certain sections 
of textile trades, where the piece-rate system is not in vogue. In the candy-mak- 
ing industry, as in tobacco, and biscuit factories, the plants are run on a 44-hour 
week basis. In plants manufacturing leather goods, purse-makers and small leather 
goods workers are paid 19 cents an hour to start ancl from 23c. to 25c. an hour 



48 



EEPOET OF THE 



No. 16 



when experienced. Shoe workers receive from $10 to $12 a week to start, and when 
expereinced earn $15 to $25 a week. 

In the metal mannfacturing industries, inspectors and assemblers earn from 
$10 to $13 a week. Coremakers earn 30 cents while learning and 45 cents an hour 
when they become experienced. The hours in this industry are from 44 to 48 
a week. 

In the manufacture of paper goods, experienced paper boxmakers earn from 
$15 to $20 a week on a piece-rate basis, while bindery workers, press feeders, and 
envelope operators earn $15 to $17 a week. Practically all the plants in this 
industry run on a 44, or a 461/2 hour week basis. 

In the textile trades operators are paid from $10 to $15 while learning, 
and their wages run from $18 to $25 a week when thoroughly experienced. 
Finishers in the textile trades receive slightly lower wages, the remuneration for 
experienced workers being from $12 to $18 a week. This industry is operated 
exclusively on a 40 to 44 hour week basis. 

The scarcity of women Avorkers, and the insistent demand for greater pro- 
duction has resulted in a marked improvement in factory working conditions 
and wages. The placements made during the year have by no means equalled the 
demand for women factory workers, although 1,698 women and girls were referred 
to such positions during the year. At. the same time they make a very creditable 
showing and indicate that large numbers of workers consider the Employment 
Bureau as the logical medium through which to obtain factory work. The installa- 
tion of cafeterias, rest rooms and the provision of various recreational facilities 
has been largely actuated by the keen competition amongst manufacturers for 
female help, although it is also tangible evidence of the change in industrial 
relations which has made itself apparent, particularly during the past five years. 
Several factories have engaged women supervisors or employment managers, and 
are making special efforts to remove causes of dissatisfaction and unrest among 
their employees, seeking to reduce labour turnover and to produce greater effi- 
ciency. The largest number of placements was in March, 1919, when 286 girls 
and women were given factory positions. As was to be expected, the placements 
dropped to a low figure in the summer months, 67 being placed in August and 
the same number in September. 

TABLE 9. — Annual Statement, 45 King Street West, Toronto. 
November 1st, 1918 — October 31st, 1919. 

WOMEN'S INDUSTRIAL SECTION. 



1918-19 



Applications 
for 'Work 



Vacancies 
Notified 



Referred io 
Positions 



Placements 



XovemV)er 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

Totals 



836 
124 
179 

89 
5(15 
34n 
lfi9 

95 
155 
108 
133 
110 



2,343 



569 
183 
1,078 
253 
71» 
442 
415 
351 
188 
181 
584 
375 



5,329 



468 
197 
234 
198 
402 
292 
154 

92 
123 

76 
115 
101 



2,452 



303 

118' 

140 

145 

306 

230 

126 

81 

93 

67 

67 

75 



1,751 



1920 



TEADES AXD LABOUE BEAXCH. 



49 



Clerical : 

The signing of the armistice had its effect upon the clerical, as well as upon 
the industrial situation. The closing of many offices dealing directly and indirectly 
with militan- officials left a great number of stenographers and clerks without 
positions, rendering necessary an adjustment of these workers to new conditions 
and altered scales of wages, 

'' Wlien soldiers were being discharged and established in work, hundreds of 
girls gave up their positions to returning men and wherever possible new openings 
were filled by men. "While the Bureau naturally encouraged such action it made 
the problem of placing the women and girls more difficult." 

During the holiday months when there was a marked shortage of expert 
stenographers, $30 a week was a wage frequently offered for purely temporary 
assistance. Inexperienced stenographers asked and received $10 to $14 a week, 
while the wages for experienced workers throughout the entire year ranged from 
$15 to $30. The salaries paid clerks ran from $10 to $13 for inexperienced 
workers; $12 to $18 for those with experience. The wages paid experienced 
bookkeepers ranged from $15 to $25 a week. 

The Clerical Department has been instrumental in placing many women with 
special ability, training and experience and in addition the Bureau staff has fre- 
quently been called upon for advice as to further training for universitv graduates 
and matriculants. The importance of the placement of workers with special 
training and qualifications is so great that plans are underway to extencl this 
phase of the Bureau's activities. 

During the year 1,196 women and girls were placed in clerical positions, 
the greatest activity in this field being during the months of March. April and 
^May when 122, 136 and 142 workers respectively, were placed in positions of 
this nature. 

TABLE 10. — Annual Statement, 43 King Street West. Toronto. 
♦December 1st, 191S — October .31st, 1919. 

WOMEN'S CLERICAL SECTION. 



December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

Ocloljer 

Totals. 



Applications 


Vacancies 


Referred to 


■ for Work 


Notified 


Positions 


308 


125 


145 


362 


147 


167 


280 


126 


134 


514 


]80 


179 


415 


145 


195 


408 


197 


205 


255 


179 


141 


240 


200 


143 


227 


129 


98 


348 


207 


1 6 


264 


110 


127 



3,621 



1 . 745 



1.710 



Placements 



113 

84 

97 

122 

]36 

142 

103 

99 

66 

86 

81 



1,129 



'=The clerical report for November is combined with the Industrial above. 



50 REPOET OF THE Xo. 16 



Household Workers' Section 

During the past year the supply of all classes of household workers, both for 
private homes and for institutions was inadequate to meet the demand. It was 
confidently expected that the signing of the armistice would release large numbers 
of workers from munition factories, and other war work activities, who would be 
available for domestic employment. This did not happen, however, the registra- 
tion during November and December, 1918, showing only a small increase over 
the registration for previous months. Many of the girls and young women, 
who were engaged in war work had previously been employed in household service. 
Various factors enter into their refusal to return to this form of employment at 
the conclusion of the war, the principal cause undoubtedly being the great dif- 
ference between the wages paid in the two occupations. The possession of fairly 
substantial bank accounts as a result of war work, the great increase in the 
number of marriages subsequent to the return of the troops, and the disinclination 
to return to an occupation whose social standing is erroneously rated below that 
of factory work may be mentioned as other reasons why the expected increase in 
the registration for domestic work did not materialize. In addition the supply 
was further depleted by the return to England of large numbers of household 
workers. 

During the winter months there was an unlooked for decrease in the demand 
for casual workers, but when the usual spring cleaning calls began to be registered 
at the Bureau, the situation for this class of worker was again relieved. 

Commencing in April, and continuing until September the Bureau was called 
upon to fill many orders for summer resort workers. This phase of the Bureau's 
activities necessitated much extra work in the form of long distance telephoning 
and correspondence, but was carried out with a degree of satisfaction, which 
proves the Employment Bureau's ability to function quite as efficiently as the 
private agents who previously handled this kind of employment work. 

The closing of school resulted in a few young girls, principally of foreign 
birth, applying for work, but it was impossible to place the majority of these, 
as the positions for which they were best suited were too far from, their homes. 

The wages paid to household workers vary according to employers' incomes. 
This is indicated by the fact that orders for adult families of two range from 
$20 to $60 a month for practically the same kind and amount of work. In 
institutions there has been a general wage increase, which has had a tendency to 
standardize the remuneration paid. 

Reporting on working conditions, the Director of this section of the Bureau 
writes as below: 

'' The working conditions on the whole seem to be favourable but there are 
exceptions. Workers sometimes report tliat too many are asked to occupy the 
same room, that the quarters for the help are in the basement and are very 
damp, and that conveniences for doing the Avork are lacking. 

'' Many orders for non-resident workers still cover a period of twelve hours 
a day, a few employers preferring to have the same worker, and allow her two 
or three liours freedom in the afternoon. This arrangement does not seem to 
be as acceptable to the majority of workers as the eight hours of continuous 
work. On the other hand many employers have met the demands of workers 
having this preference by adapting their needs to the workers' demands. The 



1920 



TRADES AND LABOUR BRANCH. 



51 



close of this year, therefore, finds us with a great many orders for non-resident 
workers on the eight hour day basis, but owing to the shortage most of them 
are unfilled/^ 

Assistance was rendered to the representatives of the British Government, 
who were sent to Canada in the interest of emigration to inquire into the matter 
of wages, hours, and living conditions of the different classes of household workers 
in Canada. The Secretary of the Women's Council for Emigration of Household 
"Workers also spent some time in the household workers' section investigatino- the 
opportunities for domestic workers, and placing particular emphasis on their 
reception and housing while awaiting placement. 

The director of this branch of the work has at all times worked in close co- 
operation with the following social agencies: — The City Relief, Neighbourhood 
Workers' Association, Social Service Commission, Big Sister A^-ociation, Public 
Health Department, Catholic Charities, Victor Home, and the Girls' Friendlv 
Club. This makes possible successful social work in co-operation with the reo-ula'r 
placement work of the Bureau. 



CLASSES OF WORKERS CALLED FOR BY EMPLOYERS. 



Pbitate. 


IX-STITUTIOXS. ClI-j 




BOATS, HOSPITALI 


Butler. 




Chauffeur. 


Butler. 




Chaperone. 


Companion. 


Chauffeur. 


Cook. 




Cook-General. 


Cook. 


Cook-Housekeeper. 


Cook-General. 


Dietitian. 


Cook-Housekeeper. 


Dressmaker. 


Counter Girl. 


General. 


Dietitian. 


Housemaid. 


Diningroom Girl. 

General. 


Housemaid-Laundress. 




Hall Maid. 


Housemaid-Waitress. 






Housemaid. 


Houseman. 






Housemaid-Waitress. 


Handy Man. 






House-Parlormaid. 


House-Parlormaid. 






House-Sewing Maid. 


House-Sewing Maid. 


Housekeeper. 


Housekeeper. 


Janitor. 


Lady's Maid. 


Janitress. 


Laundress. 


Kitchen Maid. 


Mother's Help. 


Laundress. 


Nurses — Child's Xurse. 


Linen Maid. 


Nursery Governess. 


Matron — Kitchen. 


Nurse Housemaid. 


Laundry. 


Practical Nurse. 


Sewing. 


Trained. 


Pantry Maid. 


Waitress. 


Porter. 




Stewardess. 




Seamstress. 


Casual. 


Superintendent. 


Cleaner. 


Office Cleaners. 


Ironer. 


Waitress. 


Washer. 


Ward Maid. 



52 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 16 



TABLE 11. — Annual Statement, 45 King Street West, Toronto. 
November 1st, 1918— October 31st, 1919. 

HOUSEHOLD WORKERS' SECTION— Permanent. 



1918-19 


Applications 
for Work 


Vacancies 
Notified 


Referred to 
Positions 


Placements 


November 


129 
123 
210 
119 
225 
239 
256 
214 
282 
264 
339 
322 


459 
415 
634 
460 
507 
647 
729 
683 
645 
600 
888 
647 


188 
161 
227 
192 
160 
172 
188 
153 
190 
189 
218 
216 


140 


December 


110 


Januarv 


180 


February 


118 


March 


112 


April 


130 


May 


129 


June 


126 


July 


134 


August 


155 


September 


119 


October 


157 






Totals 


2,722 


7,314 


2.254 


1,610 







TABLE 12.— HOUSEHOLD WORKERS' SECTION.— Casual. 



1918-19 


Applications 
for Work 


Positions 
Filled 


November 


550 
673 
909 
759 
667 
718 
727 
557 
832 
698 
595 
652 


1.049 


December 


1,019 


January 


1 , 165 


February 


798 


March 


1,055 


April 


1.505 


May 


1.541 


June 


1.024 


July 


1.218 


August 


1.176 


September 


1,250 


October 


1.003 






Totals 


8,337 


13.803 



Women's Farm Section 

The Women's Farm Section started its work for the season of 1919 in 
February when plans were put before the Annual Meeting of the Ontario Fruit 
Growers' Association. A Committee of the growers conferred with a committee 
of girls who had worked the previous year and a minimum scale of wage was drawn 
up wliich was satisfactory to both parties. 

Early in April the Director of this section accompanied by a representative 
of the Young Women's Christian Association visited the various districts where 
girls had been employed in previous years and talked over Avith the farmers the 
matter of establishing National Service fruit picking camps. The men were asked 
to guarantee work at stated wages for a certain number of girls at certain times. 
Tf a sufficiently largo number of workers was required and if tlie growers provided 



1920 TRADES AXD LABOUR BRANCH. 53 

a satisfactorily equipped house and tents, the Young AVonien's Christian Associa- 
tion undertook to run camps — charging the girls a small amount for board. 
Camps were thus arranged in a great many of the districts. In some sections 
the men felt they could get enough local help and in others they had made 
arrangements to have girls who had been there before and whom they expected 
to return. 

To interest workers, regi-stration cards and circulars were sent to all girls 
who had worked in 1918, circular letters about the work were sent to all the high 
schools, private schools and colleges in Ontario, a short circular was sent to all 
the newspapers in the Province, and full information about the plans was for- 
warded to all the Government Employment Offices and district representatives 
of the Department of Agriculture. 

Prospective workers also received a pamphlet of information about the work, 
giving the minimum wages agreed upon, rules of the camps, and the equipment 
they were required to bring. This pamphlet was prepared as a result of a con- 
ference between the Y.W.C.A, and the Director of Women's Farm Work in order 
that the standard should be the same for girls in all camps. Those women and 
girls who wished to undertake the work were asked to till in the registration 
cards and return them to the Toronto office. ■ They would then be notified when 
and where to report for work. 

The staff of the Toronto office consisted of a Director of the Work, an assist- 
ant who did most of the interviewing of applicants, a district secretary who 
visited all the camps regularly and thus kept in touch with the girls and the 
growers, and a stenographer. 

As the season advanced and the different camps opened, those who had 
registered for work were notified of the exact date they would be required. 

Two great difficulties were experienced at this time. First, on account of the 
extraordinary warm weather the strawberries ripened about two weeks earlier 
than usual and as school had not closed and the teachers and pupils were not 
available, it was extremely difficult to get enough workers. Secondly, there seems 
to be a lack of sense of responsibility on the part of some of the workers. Many 
workers who had put in their cards asking for work, when notified where to go 
failed to arrive. They did not notify the office of their change in plans and 
consequently were relied upon to fill the orders. 

There was a great shortage of workers for the first week of the strawberry 
season. At the end of that time some teachers and high school students were 
free to go. From then on the office was able to fill all the orders except in a 
couple of cases where a few extra workers were required for a short time in a 
rush season. 

There were not nearly as many applications for the work this year. This 
was probably due to the feeling that it was no longer a necessary war work. The 
patriotic impetus was lacking and girls went out either because they liked the 
outdoor life and work or because thoy wished to make money. In the short rush 
seasons a very good wage can be made at piece work, but the average between 
seasons is considerably lower. Wages this year were higher than the previous 
years and in several camps the girls were very well paid; two girls made $20 
a week in the rush season. 

On mixed farms, women were not badly needed. A few orders for this tvpe 
of worker were received and eleven girls in all were placed. 



54 REPORT OF THE No. 16 

The demand for domestic workers for country homes continues unlimited. 
The wages offered are much better than formerly and in many places, the worker 
is treated as a member of the family and finds a kindly welcome in the life of 
the c(>mmunity. In several cases it has been possible to place satisfactorily women 
with one or even two children as housekeepers or general houseworkers. 

The usual wages are: $20-$25 for a single woman; $15-$20 for a woman 
with a child; $10-$15 for a woman with two children. 

There are now practically no women applying for this type of work although 
the demand continues to increase. 

April— October, 1919. 

1. Number of camps supervised by the Y.W.C.A. in co-operation with the Ontario 

Government Employment Bureau 22 

2. Number of camps organized privately and supervised by the Ontario Govern- 

ment Employment Bureau 10 

Total 32 

^. Number of women and girls placed 

On fruit and vegetable farms 566 

On mixed farms H 

In farm houses , 66 



Total 643 

4. Information re Workers on Fruit and Vegetable Farms. 

(a) Age of Workers Per cent. 

15 years 5 . 61 

16-17 " 18.39 

18-20 " 33.33 

21-25 " 23.36 

26-3(> " 6.85 

30-40 " 9.97 

40-60 " 2.49 

(b) Occupation of Workers. Per cent. 

High and private school students 26 . 48 

Leisured — at home — including married women 29 . 90 

Teachers 11.21 

Business women 17.13 

Factory workers 10 29 

Domestics 4.68 

Professional .31 

(c) Education of Workers. Per cent. 

Public school only 41 . 75 

High school 58.25 

Also having teacher's training 9 . 97 

University 2 . 49 

(d) Experience of Workers. Per cent. 

Brought up on a farm 17 . 13 

Experienced In fruit work 54 . 83 

No experience 47.17 

(e) Natio7iality of Workers. Per cent. 

Canadian 65.11 

English 23 . 68 

Scotch 5 . 61 

Irish .31 

U. S. A 4.67 

Other nationalities .62 



1920 



TEADES AND LABOUE BEANCH. 



55 



Kinds of Work Done by National Service Qirls 

Amoiig growers of small fruits and vegetables there is always the problem 
of getting the crops picked for factory purposes. This is work women can do, 
picking corn, tomatoes, beans, asparagus and small fruits. 

The fruits picked for. shipping purposes were strawberries, raspberries, cur- 
rants, lawtonberries, cherries, peaches, pears, plums, apples. Girls employed for the 
longer term did hoeing, pruning, cultivating and in the early season a great deal 
of weeding. One girl gained considerable experience in bee keeping. About 90 
fruit growers employed girls in season 1919. 

Weekly Earmxgs of Natioxal Service Workers ox Fruit axd Vegetable Farms. 





* A mount per Week 


Earnings, 1917 


Earnings, 1918 


Earnings, 1919 


Between 


$14-.$15 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 
.18 

1.29 

1.99 

1.59 

3.41 
30.56 
19.36 
19.36 
13.80 

5.40 


Per cent. 
.41 




13- 14 




7.32 




12- 13 


1.75 

1.75 

2.25 

2.25 

4.25 

12.00 

24.00 

30.00 

18.00 

3.50 


2.85 




11-12 


6.10 




10-11 


13.41 




9- 10 


23.17 




8- 9 


21.54 




7- 8 


17.48 




6- 7 


5.69 




5- 6 


2.03 




4- 5 




Under $4 

















1917 — 8% averaged over $9.00 a week. 
1918—42.1% " " 9.00 

1919—53.26% " " 9.00 

1917—75.75% averaged under $7.00 a week. 
1918—19.20% " " 7.00 

1919— 7.71%" " " 7.00 

Hours. — When the committee of workers conferred with the committee of 
fruit growers the matter of hours was discussed at some length. It was finally 
decided that a nine hour day should be the standard. This was generally adhered 
to although in some districts in rush seasons the girls worked for the ten hours 
for a short period. 

There seems to be very little doubt that women workers on the land have 
established themselves in all the fruit districts and that the demand for this 
type of worker will continue to increase. 

Also there will probably always be women and girls who prefer the work 
in the country to that in the cities — particularly in the summer months. The 
great problem is to link up the growers and the workers in a satisfactory manner, 
to see that the growers are able to procure workers at the season they need them 
and that these helpers are given a reasonable wage and living and working condi- 
tions tliat are up to the standard. 



*This summary does not include the wages of those who stayed less than two weeks 

or who worked very Irregularly. 
Where girls' wages were lower than $7 a week it was usually due to inefficiency or 

time off for rain, etc. 



56 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 16 

For the past three years the Government Employment Bureaus have not 
only recruited women farm workers but have taken executive responsibility for the 
organization and maintenance of camps. They have also assisted in negotiations 
for minimum wage rates and their secretaries have been intermediaries in cases 
of dispute. 

With the change from war to peace conditions, however, a new era has begun 
and hereafter farm employment will have a similar relation to Government super- 
vision, as far as women workers in camps are concerned, as has industrial employ- 
ment. 

In order to maintain as far as possible the standards of living and working 
conditions which the experience of the past has evolved, the Legislature in 1919 
passed an amendment to the Factory, Shop and Office Building Act, and camps 
for women workers will hereafter be operated according to regulations passed 
by Order-in-Council. Copies of these may be secured from the Deputy Minister 
of Labour, who issues all permits for Women's Farm Camps. 

TIMMINS 

The Timmins office was opened on April 1st, 1919, in co-operation with the 
Department of Soldiers' Civil Ee-establishment as a " one-man '^ office with Mr. 
H. C. Garner in charge. The extent and variety of the employment work, how- 
ever, became so great that it was shortly found necessary to appoint an additional 
representative, and Mr. D. S. Ryan was placed in charge as Superintendent of 
the office. The position of Timmins in the centre of a district where men are 
constantly coming and going to jobs has resulted in a steady volume of employ- 
ment work, which shows a continual increase throughout the seven months ending 
October 31st, 1919. 

Between the time the Bureau was opened, and the close of the fiscal year, 
employers asked for 1,149 workers through the office. There were 915 applicants 
for employment, 890 of whom were referred to positions and reports of placement 
received in 876 cases. 

The Clearance system has been of considerable value in connection with the 
work of the Timmins office in view of the fact that the district has no reserve 
supply of workers from which to draw, and application must be made to the 
larger centres in order to keep the supply anywhere nearly equal to the demand. 
The reduced transportation rate has greatly facilitated clearance in the case of the 
Timmins office, the distance from the larger centres of population being so great 
that a very material saving is affected for workers, who are placed through the 
Ontario Government Employment Bureau and consequently travel on the reduced 
rate. 

The demand for workers in the Timmins district is primarily for bushmon 
and miners, the rate of pay for the former being reported by the Superintendent 
as $70 to $85 a month with board, and for the latter $4 to $4.50 per day, with 
board costing approximately $1, 

WALKERVILLE 

The Bureau in Walkerville was originally opened as a part-time Bureau, 
and was continued when the Employment Service was reorganized until the end 
of September, 1919. During the 11 months ending September 30th, 364 men 
and 4 women applied for positions, and 144 men and 4 women were placed. During 
the same period employers called for 167 men and 5 women for regular work, 
and orders were received for 4 casual jobs, all of which were filled. 



1920 TRADES AND LABOUR BRAXlH. 57 



WELLArSD 

The Wellaud Branch of the Ontario Employment Service was opened on 
April 13th, 1919, in a portion of the office occupied by the Agricultural Eepre- 
sentative for "Welland County. Mr. M. H. Dickie is Superintendent of the 
Welland Office, and the Department of Soldiers'" Civil Ee-establishment has as its 
representative Mr. S. H. Cox. 

The Bureau has served a useful purpose, more particularly to the employers 
engaged upon contract work, such as building and construction as will be noted 
from the fact that a large percentage of the placements were in the labouring 
group. As there has been no scarcity of men seeking factory work but rather the 
reverse, manufacturers have not availed themselves of the services of the Bureau 
as much as might have been expected. Local employers have, however, co-operated 
satisfactorily in placing returned soldiers. 

With regard to the service which the Bureau has rendered to the farmers 
in the district, Mr. Dickie reports as follows: 

'' To the farmer seeking farm workers the Bureau has been helpful. During 
the spring, early summer and the harvest season the demand for workers at all 
times greatly exceeded the supply. A considerable number of placements were 
effected notwithstanding the attitude of work-seekers, who for the most part had 
no desire to even consider employment of that nature. This coming season the 
existence and work of the Bureau will be more fidly known to the farmers of 
the district, and in the event of farm workers becoming more plentiful the 
service of the Bureau will be to them a great value." 

The question of securing an adequate supply of female workers by immigration 
or otherwise is one which will have to be solved before the Bureait can be of its 
greatest usefulness to the community. 

The Superintendent reports that : 

" Manufacturers and private employers seeking female help for factory work 
and domestics have not been materially assisted. There is unquestionably a 
shortage of this class of worker, and it has been impossible to fill orders. Appli- 
cants have been few and of doubtful quality, consequently the number of placements 
effected has been small. Were female workers to become available through in- 
creased immigration the Bureau would serve as a medium of control in distribu- 
tion, and be of inestimable value to employers seeking that class of help."' 

During the year it was noted that the demand for unskilled labourers, trades- 
men for the building and construction trades, farm and women workers has at all 
times exceeded the supply, while there has been a practically continuous surplus 
of semi-skilled workers seeking employment. 

An analysis of the hours of labour in eighteen of the leading industries in 
Welland shows that seven industries work 8 hours a day, one 81/^, three 9, one 
914, and in six. 10 hours represents the day's work. Seven of the industries, 
five of which are in the metal working group, one a cordage plant, and one a 
carbide plant, operate a night shift. 

WINDSOR 

The Windsor office was opened on March 1st, 1919, with 'Sir. A. J. Cooper as 
Superintendent. From its inception this office has handled a volume of business 
which has been greater in proportion to the size of the city than the business 
handled by any other Bureau in the Province, This has undoubtedlv been due 



58 REPORT OF THE Xo. 16 



to the great industrial activity in tlie border cities. Tlie demand fur skilled 
mechanics in Windsor and the neighbouring cities of Ford, Sandwich and ^^'alker- 
ville has at all times greatly exceeded the supply with the result that the Clearance 
system has been used to bring workers from all sections of the Province to Windsor. 
There has been a great deal of building construction in Windsor, which has 
furnished emproyment at high rates of wages to carpenters, and other building 
trades. On account of the great difficulty in securing accommodation in Windsor, 
many of the workers who have journeyed to that city from other parts of the 
Provmce found that the increased cost of living largely offsets the higher wages 
paid. Reporting on the question of wages the Superintendent states: 

" The wages for all skilled trades in this district have advanced from 30 to 
40 per cent. Since the opening of this office wages for unskilled labour have 
advanced accordingly. For example, carpenters' wages advanced from 60c. to 85c. 
an hour, with an 8 hour day, and time and a half for overtime, with double 
time Sundays and holidays. Bricklayers advanced from 75c. to $1.10 an hour 
under the same conditions. Unskilled labour rates advanced from 35c. to 55c. 
an hour with a simultaneous advance from an 8 to a 10 hour day with no 
increased rates for overtime." 

The Superintendent further states : 

" The building trades have been held up temporarily on several occasions, 
owing to the shortage of materials. At the present time there is still a shortage 
of houses in the border cities. This has resulted in a great increase in rents, 
thus increasing the already high cost of living prevailing here. The cost of living 
is fixed to a certain extent by that in Detroit, Mich., and the scale of wages is 
affected in the same way." 

An analysis of the reports of the Windsor office indicates the extent to which 
the Bureau has been used by employers and employees since it was opened. During 
the first month of its existence 366 men and 31 women registered for work, and 
positions were found for 127 men, and 10 women. During the month of October, 
1919, 483 men and 17 women registered at the Bureau, and 435 men and 14 
women were placed. These figures are most significant, indicating as they do 
the extent to which the Bureau has obtained the confidence of the employers, 
enabling the office to place 93 per cent, of the workers in October, as compared 
with 35 per cent, in March of the same year. 

During the eight months ending October 31st, 3,833 men and 365 women 
applied for work, and of this number positions were found for 3,391 men and 
193 women. Employers asked for 3,843 men, and 230 women during the same 
period. The greatest volume of business in this, as in the majority of other 
offices, was handled in June when 594 men and 64 women registered for work, 
and 544 men and 52 women were placed. The peakload of the orders came in 
August, however, when employers asked for 894 men and 18 women. 



1920 TEADES AXD LABOUR BEAXCH. 59 



STATIONARY AND HOISTING ENGINEERS 

BOARD: W. C. McQHlE, Chairman; CHAS. AlOSELEV ; W. CORRIGAN ; 
Inspector— Q. W. PORTER 

Office: IS Queen's Park, Toronto 



Number of stationary engineers' certificates granted for the year 1919 9,855 

Candidates who qualified .by examination 895 

" " |5 renewal fee 101 

|1 renewal fee 8.823 

" " $1 renewal fee (fees deposited in year 

1918) 12 

" " $1 proAisional certificate 24 

9,855 

Number of hoisting engineers' certificates granted for the year 1919 1,470 

Candidates who qualified by examination 234 

" " $5 renewal fee 20 

$1 renewal fee 1,209 

" " |1 renewal fee (fees deposited in year 

1918) 2 

" " ^1 provisional certificate 5 

1,470 

During the year 1919, there were 75 applications for Stationary Engineers' 
Certificates and 10 applications for Hoisting Engineers' Certificates refused, the 
causes for refusal being low percentage in examination. 

During the year 1919, there were no Stationary Engineers' Certificates nor 
Hoisting Engineers' Certificates revoked, cancelled or suspended. 

Amount of Stationary Engineers' fees deposited from Xovember 1st, 1918, 
to October 31st, 1919: 

November. 1918 $4,070 15 

December, " 3,727 00 

January, 1919 1,618 06 

February " 479 25 

March, " " 482 00 

April. " 401 00 

May, " 444 no 

June, " 329 00 

July, " 110 00 

August, " 553 15 

September. " 393 00 

October, " 442 00 

$13,048 61 

Less stationary engineers' fees transferred to hoisting engineers' 

fees (see folio 498 of No. 1 Cash Book) S77 00 

$12,971 61 

Plus hoisting engineers' fees transferred to stationary engineers' 

fees (see folio 497 of Hoisting Cash Book) S27 00 

Total $12,998 61 



60 EEPOET OF THE Xo. 16 



Amount of hoisting engineers' fees deposited from November 1st, 191S, to October 
31st, 1919: 

November, 1918 $713 00 

December, " 368 00 

January, 1919 211 00 

February, " 84 00 

March, " 77 00 

April, " 120 00 

May, " 140 00 

June, " 146 00 

July, " 33 00 

August, " 185 00 

September, " 86 00 

October, " 166 00 

$2,329 00 
Less hoisting engineers' fees transferred to stationary engineers' 

fees (see folio 497 Hoisting Cash Book) $27 00 

$2,302 00 
Plus stationary engineers' fees transferred to hoisting engineers' 

fees (see folio 498 No. 1 Stationary Cash Book) $77 00 

$2,379 00 
Total $2,379 00 

Total amount of cash deposited as follows: 

Hoisting engineers' fees $2,379 00 

Stationary engineers' fees 12,998 61 

Grand total $15,377 61 

Number of candidates examined by the Board of Examiners during the year 1919: 

Stationary 1,019 

Hoisting 287 

Total 1,306 



1^20 TEADES AND LABOUR BRANCH. 



61 



INSPECTION OF FACTORIES, SHOPS AND OFFICE 

BUILDINGS 

Chief Inspector: JAMES T. BURKE 
Office: 46 Richmond Street West, Toronto 



INSPECTORS 



(Milton, Branch^on ank Ini'rsoll^Jun'Jtiof bSn^g'^exlS" ' "'" '"' ^"'^^^^' 

York'^sfreet'SnWetL''; A^rue' an^' IZ^' " /^. ^^^^^ ^^^^"^* ^^ ^^ to, east of 
Jackson-s Point iMetrZouZ7%TnL fl^Zin^^st^^^^ ^^^-^'- ^^^^ ^^ 

Algor.Jn^rrrndl/'^.^^P^.^L'ilwar^^"^ ''^- "^^^^^^^"^ '''''''' '' ^^'' °^ ^^^^^ ^^^' 

and toX ^™d<?:n^^l:;^t^^B^r°^-,,f-^2;!-- is Toronto, east 

hmxts; east, including Yor. Street, Univer^sitfr^e^nurT^d^lvrrird; ^^^.^^o Tl^^ 

Of. ^^ut^XdrnrLa^n^s^do'lTfienr^^^^^^ T?%'' "^^^^^ -- 

ford. PeLtanguishene, and^^rbpR anfcNR lin'l"? I^"'^^' Collingwood, Mea- 
Orillia, Elmvale to Toronto; G^.R^^oinTs^&^''incmded° '^""' ''""" (inclusive); 

Gowanstowrs'mVo'rl'st'^^^^^^^^^^ Lond'oft'^T. """ "^^"i^"'^ ^^^^^"^'^ - ^-^wich. 
west to border line, including IngersollJun? inn tnt? ^n'^x.^"'' ^*^"^^^= ^^^^^ ^^^ 
Teeswater, Kincardine, Goderich! etc •^"^'*^°^ to the C.P.R. and north, including 

H. Stevenson, 6(> Hamblv Ave Tomntn- lu,. c-f„ ... 

Street, both sides, south of King Street Ki^^- JI f^venson's district is Parliament 
Street at Don. Queen Street east to Ttv S?« ./* ,f '* *^ "^" ^'^^^^^^^ ^>th Queen 
G.T.R. main line east to Kingston, C.Nl'Ssive '" ''"'' '' '^'^'^^ ^^^^^*' ^-P-^' 

Stree'J;both''Ss,'Lr:fLn\'kTe7rp[n\'^^^^^^^ ^""'^ ^^^^^^^ - ^-^--ent 

Street to city limits; C.P.R. east to rhlrbot LTe G TT'ncirth''' ^f h^^'*!^ "' ^"^^° 
including North Bay and Abitibi Falls. °'^*^' ^^^luding Orillia, but 

Miss M. Cablyle, 68 Grace St Tnrnntn- nt^ ^p n- 
Street, north to city limits. Toronto. City of Toronto, west side of Yonge 

Mbs. A. Brown-Reddick, 437 Crawford St Tomntn- nt^ ^f rr, 

Yonge Street to Quebec boundary line to bttewa Man.l. J^'r*?,' '^'* ''^^ °' 

Palmerston, Owen Sound, Wiarton^outhampton. Shake^pelrl no^th t^ f.'^' -.^"^'^7' 
to include West Toronto. oudKespeare. north to the city limits 



62 



REPOPiT OF TPIE 



No. 16 



The admiBistration of this Branch of the service has followed the terms oi 
the Factories, Shops and Office Buildings Act and its amendments Tours of 
n spection ha've induded besides cities, towns and villages -ny o^t^y^ 
districts especially for the inspection of the boilers of cheese ^f^'f^^^'f^ 
inspections will be further increased in the coming year due to addition, to 
Section 40 of the Act, whkh prohibit the employment of women and girls who 
durincr their term of employment lodge in a camp, without a permit from the 
Depufy Minister of Labour, and make such permit contingent upon compliance 
with regulations regarding sanitary and other conditions, and proper supervision 

Inspection was made again in 1919 of the Exhibition Grounds Toronto, and 
satisfactory improvement noted as a result of the recommendations ot former years^ 

Total" inspections for the year numbered 10,844. This represents some 6,910 
industries and mercantile establishments visited. 

' . . ,. 7,452 

First inspections o 399 

Second inspections or re-visits "' 



Total 



10,844 



Employees in 



the above places are as shown in the following table 
TABLE .No. 1. 




Females Females | Children 

over 18 years ■ 14-18 | under 14 



ToUl 



71,477 



6,994 



179 



244,008 



Birth certificates were required and secured from 166 youthful employees, 
and all showed that the legal age had been reached. 

HORSE POWER USED. TABLE No. 2. 




631.836 



Orders issued in connection with the various requirements of the Factories, 
Shops and Office Buildings Act, numbered 5,798. 

Overtime Permits. 
Fewer applications were received this year for overtime permits. The decrease 
is chiefly in war measure issues, the ending of the war obviating the necessity 
for permits under Sections 32 and 70. the latter special bakeshop permit.. 

TABLE No. 3. 



Year 

1918 
1919 



Sec. 34 
Regular 



207 
198 



Sec. 32 
Munitions 



33 
1 



Sec. 70 Sec. 70 

Bakeshops WarMeas. 



Sec. 69 



50 
71 



64 



Sec. 52 



Total 

359 
274 



1920 TIRADES AXD LABOUE BEAXCH. 63 

Section 69 relates to the sale of bread in Ontario from other Provinces and 
the United States, Section 52 to clothing manufacturers and contract workers' 
permits. 

Peosecutioxs. 

The greater part of the administration of the Act has been carried on by 
negotiation, and the ordinary work of inspection has gone forward with little 
or no friction. Only eight prosecutions were instituted during the year for non- 
compliance with orders issued. One case was dismissed. In seven, convictions were 
recorded and fines amounting in all to $180 were imposed. 

Charges were laid under the following Sections : 

Under Section 25, employment of child labour 1 case $10 

70. Sunday work in bakeshops 1 " $30 

" " 49. failure to provide room separate from laundry for 

eating and sleeping. (Chinese.) 4 " $40 

" " 41, failure to provide conveniences 1 " $50 

34, illegal overtime 1 " $50 

Gexeeal Coxditioxs. 

'' Improvement in conditions " or " conditions good '"' seem more or less 
stereotyped phrases, but they express very fairly the existing state of the establish- 
ments inspected. "While each year large numbers of orders are issued in con- 
nection with the requirements of the Factories, Shops and Office Buildings Act, 
it does not follow that there is any serious violation of the law, and the general 
conditions of most places inspected is recorded as satisfactory, and compliance with 
instructions is pretty general. 

Many industries which had been engaged during the war in making munitions 
have now reverted to their legitimate business with staffs reduced, so that m 
some cases requirements that seemed desirable with increased numbers of em- 
ployees, are not in existing circumstances necessary. There is evidence of neglect 
of many minor requisites in some quarters but on the whole conditions measure 
up well with former years. 

In fur, wearing apparel, tobacco or chemical plants reports indicate a fair 
condition, and there appears to be little fault to find, and few recommendations 
were necessary. 

In bakeshops, a similar condition prevails as last year ; the majority are 
pronounced fair, but some require a good deal in the way of cleanliness. Chinese 
laundries may also be said to be about the same as last year, and in spite of some 
contraventions of the Act, a fair standard is maintained. 

Rest axd Luxch Rooms. 

The women inspectors especially have been endeavouring to secure more com- 
forts for girls employed in industrial establishments in the way of rest and 
lunch rooms, and have met with a measure of success. Although such provision 
is a legal requirement only where 35 or more females are employed, many others 
have been induced to comply with recommendations made and plants have been 
better equipped accordingly. Lack of space is frequently all that prevents em- 
ployers from making satisfactory provision of this kind. Sometimes also ?ood 



64 



EEPORT OF THE ^'^o. 16 



intentiom may be misunderstood as in one case where a cloak room for the girl= 
was installed at considerable expense and in compliance with the recommendation 
of the Inspector, but the employees refused to use it. 

Boiler Inspection. 

Insistence on the observation of Sec. 57 relating to boiler inspection is fre- 
quently necessary, as there is a tendency on the part of some owners of boilers to 
kno^o or postpone this requirement until a "more convenient season 

Eeports on all uninsured boilers are required to be sent in to the department 
before the end of each calendar year, when they are closely examined to see that 
the inspection has been thorough, and made by a fully qualified engineer 

The few violations of the Stationary Engineers' Act brought to the attention 
of this Department, by arrangement, are promptly turned over to the Stationary 
Engineers Board to be dealt with by them. 

Safety. 

Alea^ures of safety in connection with elevators electrical devices and guards 
for machinery received the usual large share of attention, 55 per cent, of the 
orders issued relating to these matters, which perhaps rank first in importance, 
but the ordinary requirements of the Act received a full measure of attention as 
well About 130 orders for the erection of fire escapes or other fire protection 
• were -iven, and 22 have been passed upon as conforming to Government speci- 
fications, and certificates issued. Others are in cour.se of erection but are not 

yet completed. 

Night Work for Women. 

Durino- the war, owing to special conditions a number of special permits were 
issued to allow manufacturers to employ women and youths on all-night duty, 
but this was considered only when the firm was actually furnishing supplies to the 
allied governments. Even then these permits were limited finally to 8 hour 
shifts because of the well known fact that long hours of labour have an injurious 
effect on the health of the workers and are not conducive to the best work In 
fact authorities are now pretty well agreed that "those who work long hours 
conveyed the impression that long hours of labour have tendency to stifle the 
intellect to impair the energy and vital organs of the body, and to reduce tae 
opportunity for mental and physical improvement. One has only to watch for a 
few moments, females and youths who work 8 hours, and then observe those who 
work loncrer hours, to see the different spirit and changed look m the eye. Those 
workin- the short shift have a firm quick step, others working longer hours 
exhibit fatigue and therefore are incapable in many cases of thinking for them- 
selves or others, whereas those who worked 6 hour shifts displayed keener alertness 
than those working longer hours." 

Accidents. 

There is a decrease in the number of accidents this year, 4,029 being reported 
in 1919, with 57 or 1.41 per cent, fatal, as compared with 4,907 in 1918, with 
78 or 1.89 per cent, fatal. 

Of the total number, 20.43 per cent, were due to mechanical causes, and 
79.57 per cent, to non-mechanical. 



1920 



TEADES AXD LABOUR BRANCH. 



65 



One fatality reported was caused by heart failure, the others were due : 

To machinery and its connections 11 

" elevators 6 

" falls 6 

" boiler explosions 5 

" other explosions 2 

" electricity 4 

" struck by falling or flying substances 6 

" trucking 2 

" engines and cars 3 

" collapse of floor 1 

" suffocation 1 

" bursting of emery wheel 1 

" cranes 2 

" saws 2 

" crushed 1 

" rollers 2 

" burns 1 

As a result of six explosions, twenty-nine persons were injured this year. 

nine fatallv. 

TABLE No. 4. 



Kind 



Number 


Injuries 


Total 


Fatal Non-fatal 


2 
1 

1 
1 
1 


5 9 


14 
2 


11 


11 






9 


9 







Boiler 

Gas or Gasoline. 

Cylinder 

Air Tank 

Chemical 

Total... 



2U 



29 



Injuries and causes of all accidents are shown in tables appended. Particulars 
of fatalities are as follows : 

Frank Palmer, employed by Christie Brown & Co., Toronto, received fatal 
injuries when cable of elevator broke causing elevator to fall. 

George Lovatt, died from injuries received through being crushed between 
elevator platform and beam at fourth floor ceiling, employed by The T. Eaton 
Co., Toronto. 

Kenneth Wilson, an employee of the Gutta Percha & Rubber Co.. Toronto, 
fell from an upper window to the pavement. 

James Orser, an employee of the Gerhard Heintzman Co., Toronto, while 
getting off truck before it had stopped caught leg in wheel and was badly crushed, 
causing death. 

Frank Ruffo, employed by Joseph Simpson & Sons, Ltd., Toronto, while 
operating dyeing machine was caught between the bars on sides of machine and 
drawn in. 

Pietro Collasso. an employee of Thomson Bros., Toronto, was caught in 
between elevator and ceiling and killed. 

5 T.L, 



66 EEPORT OF THE No. 16 

Albert Crouteau, emi^loyed by the x\bitibi Power & Paper Co., Iroquois Falls, 
was caught in shaft while putting an electric light globe in socket. 

The following fatalities occurred in the Algoma Steel Company's plant, 
Sault Ste. Marie : 

J, Junkin, had arm amputated and l)ody crushed, while working under 
train and protected by blue flag. Train backed into standing cars. 

E. Myers was also killed in like manner. 

Fred Bill, died from septic meningitis, caused by piece striking head when 
changing bottom on vessel. 

D. Newman was severely injured while watching out blasting in ore pile, 
and afterwards contracted pneumonia which is believed to have caused death. He 
was also struck by piece of flying ore. 

James A. McDonald, while finishing mould under cope of -casting for steel bell 
was buried under sand which collapsed in mould. 

Benjamin Johns, was electrocuted; was taking down accumulator with rope 
when he touched terminal. 

Frank Tambroro, fell under car wheels and was mangled; died from injuries. 

N. Lamontagne, was killed by hatch cover falling on him while getting a 
drink of water. 

John Edgren, was struck on head when fly wheel on paper machine burst. 
He was employed l^y the Dryden Pulp & Paper Co., Dryden. 

J. Jackson, employed by the Lake Superior Paper Co., Ltd., Sault Ste. !Marie, 
was wound around shaft and head struck concrete floor. 

George Steward, an employee of the C. P. P., Echo Lake, was struck on 
breast by truck which swung when being lifted by crane. 

Hermedas Lamoureux, employed l)y Edwards & Co., Kockland, was struck on 
side of head by board rebounding from saw. 

Frank Ford, an employee of the Toronto Paper Co., Cornwall, was electrocuted. 

Alex. Hamilton, employed by the Algoma Steel Co., Sault Ste. Marie, was 
crushed against side of l)oat; while crossing hatch was struck by clam shell. 

George Neal. an employee of the Salisbury Electric Co., Toronto, was crushed 
by passenger elevator wliile trying to board same after it had started. 

Walter Bennett, an employee of the Steel & Radiation Co., Ltd., St. Catharines, 
fell from ladder while whitewashing power house and was killed. 

Wm. Pae, an om])l(>yee of tlie Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton, was blown against 
furnace when explosion occurred and received injuries from which he died. 

The following, also, employees of the Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton, were 
fatally injured : 

^Fark Skingley was killed ]\v explosion while blasting. 

James S. Miller was struck l)y l)()ards which blew off pipe during wind 
storm causing injuries from which he died. 

Sam Puipic, while cleaning sewer received injuries which caused his death; 
ingot caught side of guard at rollers knocking it over, 

W. McClemont, fell from buggy to ]-»usher track and was caught and dragged 
by pusher. 

A. Barrack, employed by Jos. Simpson & Sons, Toronto, was caught in 
shafting while white wa.'shing and killed. 

George Parks, employed by the Dominion Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Toronto, 
fell from scaffolding and sustained injuries which resulted in death. 

John E. Donaldson, an employee of the Lake Siracoe Ice Supply Co., Toronto, 
attempted to remove coating of ice from ro^ without shutting off power and 
M'as jerked against saws. 



1920 TRADES AND LABOUR BRANCH. 67 

Ralph ^IcPherson, employed by McGregor & Mclntyre Co., Toronto, came 
ill contact with, or grasped trolley wires, and was electrocuted. 

Joseph Soineson, employed by the Canadian Allis-Chalmers, Ltd., Toronto, 
while unloading machine with travelling crane was struck by piece which fell 
when hook broke. 

Chas. Sheryer, employed by the Consolidated Felt Co., Kitchener, was fatally 
burned by fire caused by explosion. 

Chas. Eade, Alfred Bishop, Nellie McGhee, Alex. McTavish, John Booth, 
employees of the Wm, Cane & Sons Co., Ltd., Newmarket, were fatally injured 
when boiler exploded. 

Melvin Snider, employed by the Dominion Tire Co., Kitchener, had skull 
fractured and abdomen lacerated; while assisting to remove vulcanizer by operat- 
ing winch, vulcanizer dropped causing ''I beam'" to strike abdomen and bolt 
to strike head. 

Samuel Leake, employed by the Knechtel Furniture Co., Walkerton, was 
found wound around a revolving shaft; he had gone down log-track to bring 
up logs. 

I. Nunn, employed by the Willys-Overland, Ltd., Toronto, was caught in 
belt while placing same on grinder, and had arm torn off; also suffered internal 
injuries. 

Edward Campliell, an employee of Baird & Son Co., Parkhill, was caught 
between belt and pulley and skull was fractured; had finished oiling machinery 
and passed through main drive belt when engine started. 

Harry Cox, an employee of the Canada Flour Mills, Ltd., Chatham, was 
killed by being caught on shaft. 

Alex. Grezenzen, employed by the Dominion Sugar Co., AVallaceburg, was 
killed while cleaning sacchrate tank in which revolving and stationary arms are 
located. 

T. D. Nichol, employed by the Dominion Canners, Ltd., Strathroy, was fatally 
injured when floor gave way owing to weight of caniied goods. 

R. B. Carter, an employee of the Dominion Sugar Co., Chatham, dropped 
dead while sweeping; supposed to be heart failure. 

— Beale, employed by the Ford Motor Co., Ford, fell wliile washing windows 
and injured head, with fatal results. 

John Sturgess, Ailsa Craig, employed by the Ontario Flax Co., Ltd., was 
wound around shafting and killed; while helping to put belt on machine stepped 
on coil of belt and was drawn up. 

Kenneth Service, employed by the Pure Milk Co., Hamilton, fell down 
elevator shaft, was walking t)ackwards with truck and when he fell truck fell 
on top of him. 

Dominico Petricci, was electrocuted. Was fixing leaking roof and on finding 
that he had diverted the water to a wooden roof of cabin in which motor was 
installed, he slid down an iron post, and when his feet touched the shed room 
he received shock from which he died. He was an employee of the Pilkington 
Bros., Thorold. 

Homes Gray, employed by the National Steel Car Co., Ltd., Hamilton, sus- 
tained laceration of the scalp and fractured skull; he was pushing a truck loaded 
with steel scrap bucket, when book on the bucket caught in door pulling bucket 
back on him. 



68 REPORT OF THE No. 16 

Frederick Oliver, an emploj^ee of the Matthews-BIaekwell, Brantford, wa3 
struck on head by empty barrel which rolled from second floor through elevator 
gate and fell on him as he was ascending in hoist. 

John Crabb, employed by the Dominion House Furnishing Co., Hamilton, 
was caught between floor of elevator and basement ceiling. 

Edward W. Bingham, an employee of the Dominion- Steel Foundries, Hamilton, 
was crushed under roller in sand hill. 

E. Green, an employee of the Brantford Carriage Co., fell while climbing 
up ladder and received intestinal injuries from which he died. 

John Pschick, employee of the Fort Frances Pulp & Paper Company, Fort 
Frances, was caught in reel, while changing reel, piece of paper caught in drum 
and in reaching to take it out was caught. 

August Haupschild, employed by the . Canadian Consolidated Felt Company, 
Kitchener, was killed l)y falling roof and masonry, as result of explosion of 
gasoline. 

Falls. 

Injuries from falls are as a rule of a temporary character and although 
in some instances they have had serious results the majority are minor accidents. 
Six fatalities, however, this year resulted from falls. 

This cause of accident is difficult to regulate, because much depends on the 
workman. Oily steps, smooth pieces of iron, loose material lying around floors 
are causes which may be remedied to some extent by proper supervision of foreman 
or superintendent, but ordinarily only the injured themselves can prevent an 
accident of this nature. Insecurely placed ladders, planks breaking or falls of 
scaffolds were responsible for quite a nvmiber of accidents reported ; two of the 
fatalities were falls, one from a ladder and one from a scaffold. Various other 
causes for falls are shown such as tools slipping, or the sudden giving away of an 
article which is being handled. 

Machinery and its Connections. 

Belts, pulleys and shafting account for 19.29 per cent, of the fatal accidents 
reported. In most cases the cause appears to have been lack of caution in passing 
or working around revolving belts or under shafting, or adjusting belts while 
the machinery was in motion. It is remarkable that one or two occurred in 
places difficult to reach ; a projecting set screw which was responsible for an 
accident was said to be the only one in the factory, and that in an out of the 
way place, but it only goes to show that it is not necessary to have more than 
one of the wrong kind to produce disastrous results, 

A great deal has been written about the necessity for educating the employee 
to the danger of his work, and this is borne out by the fact that more than 75 
per cent, of the accidents reported arc due to causes other than machinery. 

Elevator Accidents. 

Elevator accidents were not as numerous as last year and onlv 6 fatal results, 
whereas in 1918, there were 12 fatalities. Only one due to a defect in elevator 
equipment, others were, two from falls down the shaft, and three from attemptr 
to board the car after it had started, and as long as such risks are taken, no 
matter in how good a condition an elevator may be. accidents will continue 
to occur. 



1920 



TEADES AND LABOUE BRAXCH. 



69 







, 


— 


-! 






— 


-- 


-t 


— 


— 




i-t 




I- 


._~ 


— 


1 r 








-^ 




r^ 










— 


-JZ 


(^ r- 


-r 






X 


?3 1 r>J 






-»i 


w 


, 
















c^ 


— 








:v 


J ^ 






o 






































H 


?j 






























-i 


D 




WM 


cvi 


... 


. —. r-, OO 


• t^ oc 


i^ 1— 


• in 






. „ CM |g 








"^ 


CM 


JVJ 


CO 




— 





CM IC 


3i 




'^ OC -^ 1 cc 






oidtlinK 


CM 












: 






r-l CM 










, 

coj 




n 


laan 


















1 


1- 






s 


f-^ 






1—1 




1— 




1— 


— 


t^ 






~ 


— 






*3 

a 

£ 


S90X 


S" 














: 














CV 








99Q3 


in 


; '" 


; 




— 


?CI 


^ 


10 CO 








-a 


Its 






:c 


.— ! 1-1 




-1 


■^ 


— 


1—1 


CM 


CV] 







^ 


^ 


oc 


•^ 




(3 


;ooj 


CV] 




























" 


^ 


- 






c 








1—1 




1— 






CVJ 


CV] 






,— 


ct: 






1 


9PITIV 


-^ 
































_ 






— 












— 


-rp 


;0 




3C 




^- 


— 


t^ 


c 




397 


o 
I— I 








: 






















'^ 








sdtH 
qoBTnoig 


CO 






'■' 




I— 1 




CM 


• 






— 




1^ 




CM : 


















icvj 




o 














1.^ 


1— 


I— 








f_ 


m 


1 1— 




i 


apis 






















' 










1 ^ 






qsiq.L 


j^ • 














1—1 










\^ 




uTOjg 


•^ 












"=t 


CM 










IS 




u9raopqv 


00 


'-' 












^ : 




'- 


evj 


12 




I— t 


CM 










'^ 


CVJ 


00 


00 






evj 


tr. 


15 




r- 


CM 


i-H 




00 




-^ 


• 


1—1 


in 


. 






CO 


t- 




>-l 




JlOBg 


^^ 














: 






: 










^ 




'it 


lS9qo 


35 




I 


: : : : : ^ : 






CVJ 


152 


7^, 




s9iJTirTr[ 


O 
00 








1— ( 


•* 


CV] 


" 


'■ 


^ 


•,0 






'- 


c 


C£ 


1 




J9q;0 




































1 


^-s 


CO T— 


•* 


C!t 


lO 


CV 


t-- 


CO 


,— 


«> 


10 






IS 


c 


t^ 


~l 


V5 


sj9gm^ 


t^ 














00 




•^ 


eo 








■=T 


X 


. 


, 




oc 


jv; 






_ 






l~ 


-^ 


CM 


CM 






CV 


L-: 


•^ 


a: 




qranqx 


CO 






























CV 




'^ 




ac 


m 


OC 


CVJ 


• 


IC 


1— 


m 


^ 




CM 






— 


^ 








paBH 


M 


















CV 








" 




in 


C5 




— 


— 1— 








i^ 


ro 


M 


CVJ 


•■C 


— . 






— 


CV 


CO 


< 


»4 

1 


^STJ^i 


^- 






























"^ 


s 






c>a 




CVJ 




,— , 




CO 


^r 


OC 


t- 


OC 






in 


1— 


IS 




^ 


rniy 






























*" 


IS 


! ■ 
4 ■ 




japinoqs 


00 

CM 








I— 1 


CM 


'- 










cr. 


IC 


\^ 






aso^ 


lO 












: : " : 






• '■ 


' r 




3{09N 


CO 














— 














1^ 




1 


pB9q9J0^ 

sdii 
S3l99qo 


IS 

>— 1 


^ 
















^] 










1 ^J 

1 CVJ 




C5 ; 


: ^ 






. CO • 








12: 


* I 




:3 


■ 


. • r-l 






'- 




■- 


••£. 


'"' 




"" 


CV 


CV 


' 1^ 




c3 




m 


^^ 


X 








:v 


• 


CV 


-^ 


CO 






rr^ 


^ 


CO ; 




1 


S9^a 


oc 

CVJ 






























10 : 
CO 




SJBg 


CM • 














'-' 








"- 


!-* 




m 


,_■ 


■^ 








C«J 


• 


•rr 


in 


^r 






l- 


CVJ 


'* 






PB9H 


m 






























OS , 






























T 
















>> 






























































5 


















3 








If. 
















r 










( 






TT 






















*- 


































































































—I 




...^ 


















« 


1" 


,— 














, 






















M 




„ 


















„ 


















^ 




;.. 








1 










■J. 


, t 




. 












* 




~ 
















? 








> « 


■y 




■if 






- 




^ 






-I' 






-^ 


E- 


5 -r 






■55 









■f 




^ 




- 


[ ^ 




^ 






o 


>. ^ 






) X 






^ 


« 






- 


~ 


^ 


— 


3 








1— 


« 1 






c3 




•J 


rr-f 


^„ 




^ 




•, 


~ 




r , 








^ 


> c 


3 ~ 








t: 


1 


.— 








— 


— 




•- 










a ~ 


." 




' 




c 


y 


c 






zr 


_ 


—^ 


1 








S 


O C 


! ^ 


C 


> S 


C 


. ^ 


e 


£^ 


HI 


-^ 


^ 


J] 


^ 




1 



70 



REPOET OF THE 



Xo. 16 



moji 


Si 




-f 


re 


~ 


.— ro -^ ci o 
rv] -+ -^ CO i^ 


re 
oi 




^ 


X.— 


O 05 

OC CM 

C^l 


OS 
CM 

5 


sia^aAia 


CO . 
















: : l'^ 


S9U!H0'Bin aaij. 












: : : : : 








'- ! — -1 














•!* 










1^ 










•^ 








\ \ 


1- 


stnooq 












. la 








'■ ' 


1^ 


S.TOjfaAUOn 












CO CO 




M • 




■ '• 


l"^ 


sauuio'Bm 3ui.xog 


05 








;;;'"'; 












Ii:i 


saapuuif) 




















: - IS 


•qom SuiAVBapaatjVi 


t- 


















: : 1^ 


sTIoa 


05 ; 








>* r-t 




'~ I 




: * l?S 


S9ii% guiipn^H 














OS . 




: : I'' 




















1^ 1 r^ 


so'j.nqo -^v 


O • 


















: : IS 


sj-eaqs 


03 
CO 










I-H 






1 -^ 


siarani'BH 


CO 










I— ( 






: : 


IS 


s.xgd'Bqs 










CM • 


CM 






' 


1^ 


suoTSOXdxa 


CM • 








lO CM .CO • 




; '■ 


r;^ 


S9nt3ua puB si'BO 


oo 

1— 1 








I I I I I 




'. 


liii 


SJ9n'B[J 


o 








t^ . .— 1 - • 




•^ 


l?9. 


santqo'Bra aaq'^O 






t^ O) 


1 1^ 


sja'^uiof 


I— ( 






t^ . • . . 




.-1 1 OS , 


saq^'Bq 


{M 






„ . .CO • CO T-( • 




• 1 CO 1 


SMlBg 


OC 








rH -H . . 00 r-t 1-1 >-l 
CM 




1 CO 


S9SS9JcJ 








,-1 . -^ . ^ ^ T-i -tr 




: " IS 


agraBga 


c^ 




I— 1 • • • • • • 








i-^i 


A\9.X0S 

198 'sj-egs 'sSoQ 


CO 






I— 1 ^^ . • . ro 


i " 




C^l M 


00 

y—< 


s^j'Bqs puB 


CM 






r- -^ CM CM i-H 


Ki 




CM ^^1 


•* 


sJioTJLjgp jy S9UBJ0 


t^ 

•* 




-- 








. 1 JC 

• 1 ^t 


9j£9 UT 
90U'B1SqTlS U3T9J0^ 


O 
00 




i^ 


^ . . ^ l^ ^ 
CM 




t— 


lO 
CM 


SJO^BAOia 


05 


" : 


CM . O I— 1 CO 


I— 1 1— 1 1— I 


1 lO 
1 CM 


sgpi^i'Bism'BS'B JO 
n99M';9q piinirn'Bf 


CM 

CO 




•* 


»o ;o CO . Ti< r^ 

• CM 




00 00 


CO 


SuiJioiux 


1—1 1— ( 






r-. . CO CM T-i . -^t 




CO CM 1 00 : 


S9[0I'^.T'Bd .10 

S9|issim Suiif^j 


IC I— 1 
CM 

I— 1 






rrt" • -^ .— 1 O K5 




CO —1 




S9^q'B0 

pn-B suT'Bqo 'sJiooff 


O 






rl T-i ri .-H CM CO CO 




^ CO 


Hi 


spgqM jtjgrag 


If 


] 






r-H CM i-H 




■ : :\U 


siu-ia 


3 y-t 
1 


.■M 


CM • "* 






: : : IS 


sujnq pu'B sppog 


CM 




COi-lCMCOCOOOlfllO 




;o 1-H t^ CO 1 


jS^iota^ogjjq 


1— ( 




::'"':::: 


1-S 




: : : 1^ 


S{oo^ pu^H 
S9sn'B0 J9q'io 


CM W 

CO 


: '"' 


'S- CM 


T-I to 




• CO CO ^^ 


-1> OJ r-< rl 


e>jiooj;o«*ocoi-H 

,— 1 rH "* CM 


00 o oo 


SUM 


CO lO 1— ( l>- 

CM 

CM 


rf CO so CM fO O «0 
. CM 'H 




1-^ 1-H 


S3 




O ^ 






,-('*'*< 




eo CO 

. . 1-i OS 


spanoA\ p9';o9jaT 
'Sumosioa poo^g 

s93UB;sqns 3u(n'Bi[ 


.—1 CO 

o 
1—1 






i-t rH • 




CM CO tH 
.-( CM 

»— 1 


S3 '^ 


CM 


CO CO "^ CO »-( o oo 

CO CM 




■^ 00 ( 1-1 

—< •>* t— 

1 «2 


05 

'C < 

Is 

% 


5 - 

> 

d 


• 

1 t 


3 ^ 

::k 1: 
a - 
Q C 


3 : : : ^ 

n Tj . • .S 
;. D O fc ^ E 


* ■- 

n 
-> E 


a » 

St 

n 

3 , 


'li 




Baa 


3' 

o 

i 

1 



1920 



TRADES AXD LABOUR BRANCH. 



71 




^<r? 



A'S* 



<^ 



V 



£?:o 



/(/ 




^OWEf, 22.39 



^X 



^^e 



A4/- 



'es. 





1919 
Accident Injuries. 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 16 




TB^^ 



K\NG' 



t?^?,NG CBANES 



16.65 ^'c 
PALLING SUBSTANCES. 



-.e^ 



.c^^^ 



^^• 




r -g 




1919 
Accident Causes. 



1920 



TEADES AXD LABOUR BRAXCH. 



73 



BOILER INSPECTIOiN 

Chief Inspector: D. A\. MEDCALF 

Office : 46 Richmond Street West, Toronto 

Inspectors: H. BROWN, F. SWARBRFCK, J. A. FINDLAV, WM. BURNS, 
T. J. MAIN. J. R. DEY 



Dba-svixgs AXD Specifications Suex'eyed axd Registered. 

Boilers 22 designs S5.00 per design $110 00 

Boilers 43 " In. 00 " " 430 00 

Boiler fittings 21 

Blow-off tank 1 

Pipe lines 35 

" 10 

9 

Pressure vessels 26 

Vulcanizers 3 " 

1 

Digester 1 

Tanks 19 

Re-Survey of design 1 " 

192 

IxsPECTiox Work. 
Xumber- of Xeic Boilers Inspected: 

Ontario 453 $2,265 00 

Great Britain 13 64 19 

United States 27 135 00 



In. 


00 


3, 


.00 


5 


.00 


7 


.50 


10 


.00 


5 


.00 


5 


.00 


10 


.00 


10 


.00 


5 


.00 



63 


00 


3 


00 


. 175 


00 


75 


00 


90 


00 


. 130 


00 


15 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 10 


00 


. 95 


00 


1 


00 


$1,207 


00 



49c 



Xumber of Xeic Tanks Inspected: 
16 



$2,464 19 
$80 00 



Pressure 
Xumber 



Vessels Repaired, Sold or Exchanged: 

of used boilers inspected 692 

" boilers scrapped 3 

" boilers condemned 10 

" pipe lines inspected 4 



" pressure vessels inspected 7 

" vulcanizers inspected 3 

" aid tanks inspected 1.") 

Testing of safety valves 21 



$5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



per 



inspection $3,460 00 

15 00 





50 


OC 




20 


00 




20 


00 




35 


00 




15 


00 




75 


CK) 




21 


00 


$3, 


711 


00 



MrscEiXAXEors. 

Class "A" certificates issued 405 

Class "B"' certificates issued 624 

Heating boiler certificates issued 205 

Pressure vessel certificates issued 33 

Letters— Inwards 4,060 

Letters — Outwards 4.563 

Wires — Inwards 108 

Wire.s — Outwards 115 

During the year there has been a decided increase in the number of boilers 
constructed in the Province, due largely to the fact that manufacturers were able 
to secure materials for building, the supply of which was limited during the war. 

6 T.L. 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 16 



This increase necessitated the survey of additional designs for both boilers and 
steam pipe lines. The Revenue Statement of the Branch shows a corresponding 
increase also. 

Revenue Stateme.xt. 

Dr. Cr. 

Fees for designs surveyed . . . $1,207 00 Amount of monies transmitted 

" " new boilers inspected 2,464 I'J to Treasury Department 

" " used boilers inspected 3,711 00 through Trades & Labour 

" new tanks inspected. 80 00 Branch $10,851 10 

Heating certificates issued at Amount of monies received 

$1.00 205 00 direct by Treasury Depart- 

Pressure vessels' certificates ment 469 45 

issued at $1.00 20 00 Balance outstanding at year 

Travelling expenses 3,602 15 ending 31st October, 1919.. 83 80 

Balance outstanding at end of 

year, October, 1918 117 01 

$11,406 35 $11,406 35 

To balance forward $85 80 

A number of special inspections were made during the year and engineering 
advice furnished upon the request of manufacturers. The Branch, however, has 
not sufficient staff to continue this indefinitely and for the most part the work 
was hmited to the actual demands of the Steam Boiler Act. 



TYPiCiL Explosions. 

On November 12th, 1918, a steam mangle exploded in the T. Eaton Com- 
pany's plant in Hamilton injuring six girls. The steam cylinder which was of 
cast iron % in. thick, 341/2 in. inside diameter and 7 feet long, was projected 
through the wall of the building and cra.shed through the roof of a garage across 
the street. 

From information received the steam mangle had just been installed and the 
steam turned on at full boiler pressure, 115 pounds, when the vessel let go im- 
mediately. This cylinder was subject to Government inspection but no inspection 
had been made because there had been no notification of sale. Government 
regulation could have allowed a maximum working pressure of 65 pounds only 
on the shell, and 30 pounds on the heads, the latter pressure being the governing 
factor. 

On January 28th an air receiver exploded in the Dominion Shipbuilding 
Company's plant, Toronto, completely destroying the building in which it was 
installed and damaging the property to the extent of $500. The exploded vessel 
was 30 in. in diameter and 5 feet long, and was made up of shell plates 3 ft. 6 in. 
and heads 1/4 in. with all the joints and seams welded. Upon examination it was 
found that the rupture occurred at the longitudinal seam. 

Other explosions reported to the Branch occurred on February 25th in the 
Windsor Steam Laundry, Windsor; on June 12th in the William Kane & Sons' 
plant in Newmarket; and on July 26th in a cheese factory owned by Thos. Anglin, 
of Joyceville. In every instance investigations were made with a view to guarding 
against the recurrence of similar accidents. A number of air tank explosions 
and breakages in steam and ammonia pipe lines were also reported and similarly 
investigated, although these do not come under the jurisdiction of The Steam 
Boiler Act. 



1920 TRADES AXD LABOUE BRANCH. 75 



INSPECTION OF LABOUR AGENCIES 

During the Legislative Session of 1919, Orders-in-Council were passed limit- 
ing tbe number of Private Employment Agencies in Ontario (exclusive of Nurses' 
Registries) as follows: 

In Toronto 5 

In Sudbury 3 

In North Bay 2 

In Ottawa 2 

and in all other municipalities in the Province not more than one each. The 
result was that the number of Private Emplo}Tnent Agency licenses issued for the 
year 1919-20 was some 70 per cent, less than in the previous year. 

There were no prosecutions during the twelve months ending October 31st, 
1919, but the private employment offices were asked to furnish the Deputy Minister 
of Labour with a detailed report of their operations each month. Through close 
co-operation with local police departments the work done by these private agencies 
was kept under constant supervision. Below will be found a list of the Private 
Employment Agents licensed to carry on business in Ontario during the license 
year 1919-20. 

Arnprior J. Warnock. 

Fort William J. T. Reid. 

North Bay B. Ferro. 

J. B. Weller. 

Ottawa *H. Deschambault. 

P. H. Wright. 

Port Arthur J. C. Stewart. 

Sault Ste. Marie ;R. Blair. 

Sudbury J. Andrejczuk. 

A. St. Denis. 

A. E. Woods. 

Toronto Misses Buckingham & Boyle. 

G. C. Burnham. 

H. A. Lay. 

" R. Verity. 

R. C. Wood. 

Miss A. Geldard. 

Miss E. M. Mcilullen. 



♦Deceased. 
tLicense cancelled. 



76 REPORT OF THE No. 16 



INVESTIGATION AND RESEARCH 



Mothers' Allowances 

In January, 1919, the Prime Minister of Ontario, Sir William Hearst, in- 
structed the Superintendent of Trades and Labour to conduct an investigation 
in the Province on the subject of Mothers' Allowances, the process of the investiga- 
tion to include an enquiry into the evidence of public opinion and into the 
social, moral and economic results of the operation of such legislation elsewhere. 
The letter of the Prime Minister asked the Superintendent to give his own 
personal recommendations as to terms and procedure at the present time in the 
light of the evidence at hand, to prepare legislation, estimate its cost, and provide 
for the administration of a Mothers' Allowances Act. 

As an immediate result, special investigators were appointed, public hearings 
held and every possible source of information relative to the subject in hand was 
approached. An interim report was presented to Sir William in April and at the 
close of the year the complete report is almost ready for publication, and very 
shortly will be available for distribution. The Table of Contents is as follows : 

I. The Process of the Investigation. 

IT. The Demand: 

Resolutions and petitions. 

The committee on mothers' allowances. 

Public hearings. 

The press. 

III. The Need: 

General Social Statistics. 
Evidence at public hearings: 

Infant mortality; 

Health; 

Home life; 

Delinquency; 

Education. 
Homes visited, urban and rural. 
The evidence of other Provinces, States, etc. 

IV. Extent of Application: 
Widows. 

Wives of the incarcerated insane. 
Wives of the permanently Incapacitated. 
Wives of the temporarily incapacitated. 
Wives of prisoners in penal Institutions. 
Dese^rted wives. 
Others. 

V. Estimate of Cost: 

Comparison with various States of America. 
Comparison with Manitoba. Alberta and Saskatchewan. 
Estimates based on Canada Registration, etc. 

VI. Modification of Estimates: 
The size of the family. 
The nationality of the father. 
The maximum age of the children. 
To include the families of the insane. 
To include the families of the permanently incapacitated 
To include the families of prisoners. 
To include deserted families. 
To include illegitimacy. 
Cost of institutions reduced. 



1920 TRADES AND LABOUR BRAXCH. 



VII. Source of Funds, 

Vlir. Administration: 

Central organization. 
Local organization. 

IX. Recommendations. 

X, Estimate of cost based on the above recommendations. 
XI, Social, moral and economic results of Mothers' Allowances Legislation. 

Appendices : 

A. Canadian Mothers' Aid Laws. 

B. Prison labour. 

C. Orphanages in Ontario. 

D. Legislation re Illegitimacy. 



Vocational Opportunities in the Industries of Ontario 

During the j^ast two years the Trades and Labour Branch has been conducting 
an investigation into vocational opportunities in the industries of Ontario^ and 
reports will shortly be available giving the results of this research. 

The need for such a survey of Ontario industries became apparent following 
the ostablishment of Employment Bureaus in the Province^ and it is hoped to 
provide in this way a basis of knowledge for the intelligent guidance of the large 
number of boys and girls who year by year leave school to join the vast industrial 
army. 

The plan of the investigation has been endorsed by a number of public 
organizations, members of which have been impressed by the large number of 
3'-ouths and young girls who drift about aimlessly or enter occupations for which 
they are quite unsuited, and consequently become bewildered, inefficient, low- 
wage earners. 

It is evident that the trouble is due largely to lack of knowledge on the 
part of parents, teachers and the boys and girls themselves of the occupations open 
and of the training and other qualifications necessary to success. The bulletins 
on Vocational Opportunities, accordingly, undertake to give data regarding: 

(a) Desirable trades, occupations and professions. 

(&) The temperament and moral qualities necessary for success in each of 
these. 

(c) The education and preparation necessary for entrance and advancement 
in each, 

{d) The approximate cost in time and money such preparation involves, 

{e) The possibilities for advancement and remuneration to be expected in each. 

The intention is that with the co-operation of the Department of Education 
this information may be spread throughout the Province, that teachers may be 



KEPORT OF THE No. 16 



better qualified to act as vocational guides to their pupils leaving school, and that 
before long there should be organized a separate section of- the Government Em- 
ployment Service devoted to the placing of juveniles in suitable employment. 

The actual field work of the investigation was completed early in 1919. In 
order to obtain a true picture of the vocational opportunities in the different 
industries, employers, employees and others were consulted in twenty-three dif- 
ferent industrial centres, extending from Ottawa on the east to Windsor on the 
west. The authority provided under the Department of Labour Act which em- 
powers the Deputy Minister to " require from employers, workmen and other 
persons such information concerning rates of wages, hours of work, regularity of 
employment and other matters as he may deem necessary for the proper carrying 
out of this Act or any of the Acts administered by the Department " made it 
possible for the investigators to have access to the original sources of such informa- 
tion, including the pay rolls and other records of the plants visited, and to this 
extent absolute accuracy could be guaranteed. 

A number of bulletins are now about ready for distribution. The first in fKe 
series gives a general introduction to the whole surve}', together with an appendix 
containing statistics based on material supplied by the Dominion Statistician. 
The introduction presents the need of vocational guidance, the use of juvenile 
departments in Labour exchanges, the extension of technical education in Ontario, 
and the various considerations which should affect the choice of one's life work. 
Employment methods in various industries are also discussed. 

The second bulletin, on Department and Notion Stores, has also an appendix 
giving wage statistics for some eighteen industries. 

The following bulletins as planned will deal with Biscuits and Confectionery, 
Boots and Shoes, Dressmaking and Millinery, Foundries and Machine Shops, 
Furniture and Upholster}', Garments, Harness and Saddlery, Printing and allied 
trades and Textiles. 



1920 TEADES AND LABOUE BEANCH. 



COURSE IN EMPLOYMENT MANAGEMENT 

Having been approac-hed on several occasions by a number of citizens in- 
terested in progressive business management as to the advisability of the under- 
taking, the Trades and Labour Branch was able in the summer of 1919 to secure the 
linancial aid of the Government and the co-operation of the University in the 
presentation of a short course on Employment Management given in the month 
of September under the combined auspices of the University of Toronto and the 
Employment Service of Canada. The course lasted for three weeks with lectures 
daily, except Saturday, during the afternoon and evening, one hour in each session 
being devoted to each of the three main divisions, viz. : 

1. Personnel Management : Principles and Practice. 

2. Industrial Psychology. 

3. Economic Principles and Methods. 

The management of the course was fortunate in securing the services of 
recognized experts in each of these subjects. The first was presented by Lieut.-Col. 
John J. Coss, of Columbia University, who both as a teacher of this subject and as 
a member of the War Industries Board of the United States, has been intimately 
connected with the theory and the practice of personnel management. The second 
course was led by Dr. E. K. Strong, of the Carnegie Institute of Technology, 
Pittsburg, who, besides direct business experience, has had unusual opportunities 
for studying the application of psychology to industry, most recently as a member 
of the Committee on the Classification of Personnel in the United States Army. 
The third course on Economic Principles and Methods was given by Prof. E. M. 
Mclver, Department of Political Economy, Toronto University, already well known 
throughout Canada as a leader in constructive economic and social enterprise and as 
the author of " Community " and other able works. 

The schedule of discussion in the courses was as follows: 

I. Persoxxel Maxage^iext: Peixciples axd Practk e. 

A.— The Man and the Jol). 

1. Helpful and harmful attitudes in business — the opposing roles which may be played 

by capital, management, labour and the consumer. (Analysis of one worker.) 

2. The variety of human abilities and the factors in their analysis — man analysis. 

(The analysis of one job.) 

3. The specifications of a job. 

(Personnel specifications for one department.) 

4. The inter-relations of man analysis and job analysis with production as a whole. 

(The promotion line of a worker from day labourer to department head.) 

5. Promotion order as a part of personnel specifications. 

(List of determining factors in a reasoned fixing of a wage.) 

B.—The Conditions of the Worker: Industrial Stability, Loyalty and Co-operation. 

6. "U'ages. — Their determination and their part in keeping the worker satisfied. Limits 

of profit-sharing 

(A worker's yearly budget.) 

7. Hours. — The efficient limits of work. Shop conditions and work. 

(How to get a worker to change his way of work.) 
S. Scientific management and labour. 

(The agencies in the community helpful and harmful to workers.) 
?. Extra-industrial conditions. — Housing, food, education, amusement. 

(How federated or international unions help and harm the worker and the 

employer.) 



80 REPORT OF THE Xo. 16 



10. Personal relations. — The right to organize and bargain collectively. 

(How inside unions and participation in management help and harm worker 
and employer.) 

11. Inside unions and industrial participation. 

(Study of English models and proposals and International Harvester plan.) 

12. Inside unions and industrial participation. English and American plans for in- 

dustrial democracy. 

(Organization chart and personnel specifications for the office of a personnel 

manager.) 

C: — Tlie Administrative Features of Personnel Management. 

13. The scope and organization of the personnel manager's office. 

(How to gain the support of management and labour for personnel work.) 

14. The relation of the personnel office with management and foremen. 

(A record card for employees — personal and ability items.) 

15. The employee's record card — personal and ability records. 

(Record card — efficiency items.) 

16. Visit to personnel offices of Toronto plants. 

(Special meeting. Saturday, September 20.) 

17. The record card — efficiency and promotion records. 

(Plan for recording turnover.) 

18. The turnover record. 

IP. — IKDUSTP.IAL Psychology. 
A. — The M easier ement of Ability. 

1. The applications of psychology to business. 

2. The history of human measurements. 

3. The technique of human measurements. 

4. The measurement of intelligence. Definition of what is measured. Individual 

differences. Application of tests used in the United States army. 

5. Presentation of commercially obtainable tests and interpretation of results. 

6. Practice in giving tests. 

7. Practice in giving and scoring tests. 

8. Limitations of intelligence tests. Other traits that require measurement. The 

rating scale. 

9. Practice -in making and using the rating scale. Discussion of scales presented by 

the class. 

10. Theory of trade tests. How trade tests are made. 

11. Application of trade tests and discussion of tests presented by class. 

12. Trade examinations (less exact tests). 

B. — Training the WorTcer. 

13. Training in industry. The measurement of learning. 

14. The "project method" of teaching. 

15. Discussion of project plans presented by class. 

16. Discussion of project plans presented by class. 

C. — Industrial Morale. 

17. The psychology of morale — the basis of individual group antagonisms. 

18. The basis of co-operative endeavour. 

III. — ECOXOMKS AND InDU.STRY. 

1. The rise of modern industry — the age of machinery. 

2. The theory of free competition. 

3. The growth of business combinations. 

4. The theory of state regulation. 

5. The rise of labour organizations. 

6. and 7. Trade unionism; kinds, objects and methods. 
8. and 9. Arbitration, conciliation and mediation. 



1920 TRADES AXD LABOUE BEAXCH. ' 81 

10. Profit-sharing and "co-partnerslilp." 

11. Industrial councils, the Colorado and the Whitley plans. 

12. Collectivist solutions of the labour problem. 

13. Principles of labour legislation. 

14. Social insurance: (1) unemployment. 

15. Social insurance: (2) sickness and invalidity. 

16. Social insurance: (3) accident and industrial poisoning. 

The purpose of the Employment Management Course was to bring together 
for study and discussion men and women immediately interested in the solution 
of industrial problems especially as they occur in the selection, training and 
supervision of workers, and that this opportunity was appreciated is shown by 
the fact that approximately seventy-five persons were registered in the course and 
that the attendance and interest throughout were sustained. 

An immediate outcome is promised in the organization in Toronto of an 
Employment Managers' Association for the purpose of continued study of and 
conference on the Science of Industrial Eelations. 

Copies of notes on the Employment ■\Ianagement Course may be secured from 
the Department of Labour. 15 Queen's Park, Toronto, on application. 



82 EEPOKT OF THE Xo. 16 



ACCESSIONS TO THE LIBRARY OF 
THE TRADES AND LABOUR BRANCH DURING THE YEAR 1919 

Education. 

Bureau of Education, Washington, Clothing and Textile Courses. 

Home Economics. 
" " rnstruction in Music. 

" '• " Rural Education, 1919. 

Corless, C. V., Educational Reform, Toronto, 1918. 
Dean, A. D., Our Schools in War-time and After. 
Van Kleek, M., Working Girls in Evening Schools. 

Employment. 

Blackford, Analyzing Character. 

Collins. Jas. H., The Art of Handling Men. 

Federal Board for Vocational Education, Employment Management, Washington, 1918. 

Hollingworth, H. J., Vocational Psychology. 

Kelly, R. W., Hiring the Worker. 

Link, Henry C., Employment Psychology. 

Merton, Holmes W., How to Choose the Right Vocation. 

Bureau of Labour, Washington. U.S.A., 

Public Employment Offices, 1918. 

Employment Managers' Conference, 1919. 

Descriptions of Occupations. 

British System of Labour Exchanges, 1916. 
Boston, Bureau of Statistics, Public Employment Offices, 1919. 
U.S. Shipping Board, Emergency Fleet Corporation. 

Handbook on Employment Management in the Shipyard. 

Bulletin 1. Organizing the Employment Department. 

Bulletin 2. The Employment Building. 

Bulletin 3. Selection and Placement of the Worker. 

Special Bulletin. — Labor Loss. 
Wanamaker, John., Handling Men. 

Government Reports, Bulletins, etc. (periodic). 

Australia: 

Annual Report, Department of Labour, Queensland. 

Annual Report, Department of Labour, Western Australia. 

Industrial Gazette, Department of Labour, New South Wales. 1 

Board of Trade Bulletin, Sydney, New South Wales. ] 

Industrial Gazette, Brisbane, Queensland. i 

Government Gazette, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Canada: 

Annual Report, Department of Labour, Ottawa. 

Labour Gazette, Department of Labour, Ottawa. 

Weekly Bulletin, Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa. 

Agricultural Gazette, Department of Agriculture, Ottawa. 

Public Service Bulletin, Winnipeg. Man. 

Public Service Bulletin, Toronto, Ont. 

Public Service Monthly, Regina, Sask. 

Great Britain: 

Labour Gazette, Ministry of Labour, London. 



Italy 



Mexico: 



Bolletino. Officio del Lavoro, Rome 
Boletin de Tndnstria. .Mexico. 



1920 TRADES AXD LABOUR BRAXCH. 83 

U.S.A.: 

Federal Report, Bureau of Labor, proceedings. 
Monthly Labour Review, Department of Labour, Washington. 
Annual Reports — State Departments and Bureaus of Labor. 
Labour Market Bulletin, Industrial Commission, Albany, X.Y. 

Industrial Health and Safety. 

Eastman. E., Work, Accidents and the La"w. 

Health Hazards — Industrial Commission, State of New York, 1918. 

Health insurance Commission, Report, Columbus, 1919. 

Industrial Health and Efficiency, Final Report 'of the British Health of Munition 
Workers' Committee. 

Industrial Safety Standards, Handbook of 

International Association of Industrial Accidents. Proceedings of. Dept. of Labor, 
Washington, 1919. 

Kober, G. M., Diseases of Occupation. 

Lee, F. S., The Human Machine. 

Miners' Pythisis, Xew South Wales. Board of Trade, Sydney. 1919. 

National Safety Council, Proceedings, St. Louis, 1918. 

Oliver, Sir Thomas. Occupations. 

Respirator for Dust Protection. Dept. of Labour, N.Y. 

Safety Congress, Proceedings of, 1917, State Industrial Commission, New York. 

Safety Congress, Proceedings of, 1918, State Industrial Commission, Syracuse, N.Y. 

The Safety Movement in the Iron and Steel Industrv, U.S. Dept. of Labour, Washing- 
ton, 1918. 

Sanitation of Rural Workmen's Areas. Public Health Reports. Washington, 1918. 

Shop Safety, Sanitation and Health Organization, Industrial Commission, State of New 
York, 1919. 

Industry, Economics and Finance. 

Academy of Political Science, N. Y., Proceedings. 1919. 

American Federation of Labour, Washington. Reports of Proceedings, 1916, 1917, 1918. 

Among Industrial Workers, Y.M.C.A., New York. 

Andrews, John B., Labor Problems and Labor Legislation, N.Y. 

American Association for Labor Legislation. 1919. 

Association of Government Labour Officials, Washington, Proceedings, 1919. 

Apprenticeship in Wisconsin, Industrial Commission, 1918. 

Boissenden, P. F., Labour Turnover. 

Brooks, J. Graham, American Syndicalism. The I.W.W. 

Bryner. Edna, The Garment Trades. 

Canada's Part in the Great War. Dept. of Public Information. Ottawa, 1919. 

Cohen. Julius Henry, Law and Order in Industry. 

Cole, C. D. H., The World of Labour. 

Commons, John K., Industrial Goodwill. 

Commons and Others, History of Labour in the United States. 

Cotton Production, Bureau of the Census, Washington, 1918. 

Deeley, Labour Difficulties. 

Effect of the Air Hammer on the Hands of Stone Cutters. Washington, Dept. of 

Labour, 1918. 
Elmer, Manuel C, Technique of Social Survey. 
Engineering and Inspection Staff, Travellers' Insurance Co. 
Ely. R. T., Outlines of Economics. 
A Federation of American Industries. National Industrial Conference Board. Boston, 

1919. 
Friedman, Elisha M., American Problems of Reconstruction. 
Galloway, Lee, Office Management, Its Principles and Practice. 
Gantt. Work, Wages and Profit. 

Garton Foundation, Memorandum on the Industrial Situation after the War. 
Going, C. B., Principles of Industrial Engineering. 
Gompers, American Labour and the War. 
Herrick, M. T., Rural Credits. 
Hobson, S. G.. National Guilds. 
Hunter, R., Violence and the Labour Movement. 
Industrial Council Plan in Great Britain, Whitley Committee. 



84 EEPOET OF THE No. 16 



Industrial Education, Washington, Bureau of Education, 1918. 

Industrial Readjustment, National industrial Conference Board, Boston, 1919. 

Kent, William, Investigating an Industry. 

Kimball, Principles of Industrial Organization. 

King, W. r., Wealth of the People of the U.S. 

King, W. L. MacKenzie, Industry and Humanity. 

King, W. L. MacKenzie, Report, Ottawa, 1915. 

Labour and the War, Labour Federation, Washington, 191S. 

Leitch, John, Man-to-Man. 

Living Wage (men). Board of Trade, Sydney, 1918. 

Logging Camps and Sawmills, Dept. of Labour, Washington, 1918. 

Lutz, R. R., The Metal Trades, Philadelphia. 

Lutz, R. R., Wage Earning and Education. 

O'Leary, Ivis Prouty, Department Store Occupations. 

Opportunities in Shipbuilding, U.S. Shipping Board. 

Potter, Z. L., Industrial Conditions in Topeka. 

Priestman, Wm. Dent, Payment by Results. 

Rest Periods, National Industrial Conference Board, 1919. 

Rockefeller, Foundation, Synopsis of Information to U.S. Commission on Industrial 

Relations. 
Rockefeller, J. D., The Colorado Industrial Plan. 
Rockefeller, J. D., The Personal Relation in Industry. 
Rockefeller, J. D., Philanthropic Boards established by. 

Rockefeller, J. D., Representation in Industry. Chamber of Commerce, Atlantic City. 
Rockefeller, J. D., Statement, 1915. 

Scott, Walter Dill, Increasing Human Efficiency in Business. 
Seligman, E. R., Principles of Economics. 
Shackleton, D. L., Works Committees, U.S. Shipping Board. 
Shaw, Frank L., The Building Trades. 
Shaw, Frank L.. The Printing Trades. 
Slichter, S. H., Turnover of Factory Labour. 
Squires, Benj. M., Operations of Industrial Disputes' Investigation Act. Washington. 

Bureau of Labour Statistics. 
Stevens, Bertha M., Boys and Girls in Commercial Work. 
Tarbell, I. M., New Ideals in Business. 
Tead, Ordway, Instincts in Industry. 

Trades and Labour Congress, Report of Proceedings, Quebec, 1918. 
Trades and Labour Congress, Report, Vancouver, 1915. 

Wartime Changes in Cost of Living, National Industrial Conference Board, Boston, 1919. 
Water Transportation, Dept. of Labour, Washington, 1918. 
Webb, Sydney and Beatrice, Industrial Democracy, London. 
Welfare Work for Employees, 1919, Bureau of Labour Statistics, Washington. 
Western Efficiency iSociety, Questionnaire Digest on Methods of Wage Payments, 1918. 
Wholesale Prices, Department of Labour, Ottawa, 1919. 
Wildman, E., Reconstructing America. 



Labour Legislation. 

Department of Labour, Ottawa: Labour Legislation in Canada, 1918. 

The Labour Legislation of Ontario. 

Ontario: Acts Relating to Prisons, Hospitals and Charitable Institutions. 

Handy Guide to the Laws of Ontario: E. Lang. 

National Labour Legislation, London, England. 

Labour Laws of the United States. 

Labour Laws of Connecticut. 

Labor Legislation, Massachusetts. 

Labor Laws, New York. 

Industrial Code, ,New York. 

American Legislation Review (periodical). 

New South Wales, Australia, Department of Labour; Report of Working of Factories 

*Act. 
Bureau V. D., Statiskiek's Gravenhage, Donnees Sociales et economiques. 



1920 TRADES AND LABOUR BRAXCH. 85 



Miscellaneous. 

Canada: 

Dept. of Agriculture, Ottawa. Agricultural Gazette. (Periodical.) 

Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Canada Year Book. 191S. 

Canada Food Board — Report, 1918. 

Canadian Almanac, 1918 and 1919. 

Canadian Brotherhood of Railroad Employees, Convention Publication, Halifax 

1918. 
Federated Trades and Labour Council, Commemoration, 1903-1918. 
rmperial Institute, London, Bulletin, 1916. 
Kahn, Otto H., When the Tide Turned. 

National Civil Liberties Bureau, Political Prisoners, N.Y., 1918. 
Owen, Margaret B., Secret of Typewriting Speed. 

Porto Rico — Commissioner of Agriculture— Report of Agriculture of Porto Rico. 
Smith, J. Grove, Commission of Conservation, Fire Waste in Canada. 

Toronto: 

Bureau of Municipal Affairs, Report re Housing. 1919. 

Bureau of Municipal Research, What is the Ward going to do to Toronto. 1918? 

Toronto Stone Cutters, Building Stones. 



Spain: 



Institute Geografico, Madrid, Anuario, 1918. 



United States: 

American Labour Year Book, 1917-1918. 
United States Army, Trade Specifications and Index. 
Dept. of Labour, Washington, Mines and Mining. 
Dept. of Labour, Washington, Medicinal Manufacturing. 
Dept. of Labour, Washington, Office Employees. 
Madison, Industrial Commission, Factory Equipment. 
Montana, Bureau of Agriculture, Reports, 1900 and 1906. 
North Dakota, Bureau of Agriculture, Report. 
W^eaver, E. P., Social Service Directory. Toronto. 
Whitaker, E. P., Social Service Directory, Toronto. 
AVhitaker, Almanac, London, 1919. 

Red Cross Institute Puhlicatiotis. 

Bedside and Wheel-chair Occupations. 

Handicapped Men. 

Wright and Hamburger, Education and Occupations of Cripples. 

American Journal of Care for Cripples. 



Sociology. 

American Sociological Society; Papers and Proceedings, Chicago, 1917. 

Aronovici, The Social Survey, Philadelphia. 

Dawson, W. H., The Vagrancy Problem. 

Devine, E. T., The Spirit of Social Work. 

Ellwood, Chas. A., The Social Problem. 

Ellw-ood, Chas. A.. Sociology and Modern Social Problems. 

Hopkinson, Sir Alfred, Rebuilding Britain. 

Russell. Bertrand, Roads to Freedom. 

Rockefeller, J. D., Brotherhood of Men and Nations. 

Seager, H. R., Social Insurance. 

Todd, A. J., Theories of Social Progress. 

Veiller, Housing Reform. 

Wilson, Lucius E., Community Leadership. 



86 EEPORT OF THE TIJADES AXD LABOUE BRANCH. Xo. 16 



statistics. 

Australia. — Western Australia. — Statistical Register, Perth. 1918. 

Canada, Ontario, Registrar-General, Births, Mjarrlages and Deaths. 

Netherlands — Bureau v.d. Statistiek, Maandschrift, 's Gravenhage, 1919. 

United States. — Bureau of the Census, "Washington, Financial Statistics of Cities, 1917 

and 1918. 

Bureau of the Census, Washington, Mortality Statistics, 1916 and 1917. 

Dept. of Commerce. — Washington, Birth Statistics, 1916. 

Boston, Bureau of Statistics, 1918. Report. 
Uruguay. — Dir. Gen. de Estadistica, Montevideo, Anhuario Estadistica, 1918. 

Wages and Hours of Labour. 
United States: 

Dept. of Labour, Washington, Union Scale of Wages, 1919. 

Dept. of Labour, Bureau of Labour Statistics, Washington, Wages and Hours 

of Labour, 1918. 
Massachusetts, Bureau of Statistics, Union Scale of Wages and Hours of Labour 
in Massachusetts, Boston. 1918. 

Women and Children in Industry. 

Butler, E. B., Women and the Trades. 

Children's Bureau, Washington, The States and Child Labour. 

Department of Labour, Washington, Women in the Lead Industries. 

Hewes, A., Women as Munition Makers. 

Industrial Commission N.Y. State. Weekly earnings of women in five industries. — 

(Paper Boxes, Shirts and Collars. Confectionery, Cigars and Tobaccos, and 

Mercantile Establishments.) 
National Industry Conference Board. Wartime Employment of Women in the Metal 

Trades. 
Odencrantz. — Italian Women in Pndustry. 
Slingerland, W. H., Child Welfare Work in California. 
Slingerland, W. H., Child Welfare Work in Pennsylvania. 
Van Kleeck, Artificial Flower Makers. 
Van Kleeck, A Seasonal Industry. 
Van Kleeck, Women In the Bookbinding Trade. 

WorTcmen's Compensation. 

Bureau of Labour, Washington, Workmen's Compensation. 
Thodes, Workmen's Compensation. 
Workmen's Compensation Board, Reports, Ontario. 
Workmen's Compensation Board, Reports, Manitoba. 



/ 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Education 

Province of Ontario 

FOR THE YEAR 

1919 



PRINTED BY ORDER OP 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO : 
Printed and Published by A. T. WILGRESS, Printer to the King's Mott Excellent Majesty 

19 20 



Printed by 
THE RYERSON PRESS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FAQl 

REPORT OF THE MINISTER V 

APPENDICES 

Appendix A. — Report of the Chief Inspector of Public and Separate iSchools ... 1 

Appendix B. — Report of the Director of Industrial and Technical Education . . 9 

Appendix C. — Reports of the Inspectors of Continuation Schools 19 

Appendix D. — Reports of the Inspectors of High Schools 29 

Appendix E. — Report of the Inspector of Manual Training and Household 

Science 40 

Appendix F. — Report of the Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Classes .... 45 

Appendix G. — The Library of the Department 73 

Appendix H. — Report of the Inspector of Public Libraries 75 

Appendix I. — ^Statistics of Elementary and Secondary .Schools: 

Summary of Statistics 

I. — Elementary Schools 83 

II. — ^Secondary ,Sx;hools 84 

III. — General: Elementary and Secondary Schools 86 

Comparative Statistics, 1867-1918 

I. — Public Schools (Including Separate Schools) : 

1. School Population, Attendance 87 

2. Classification of Pupils 88 

3. Teachers' Certificates 89 

4. Salaries and Experience 90 

5. Receipts and Expenditures 91 

Cost per Pupil 91 

II. — Roman Catholic Separate Schools 92 

III. — Protestant Separate Schools 93 

IV. — Continuation Schools 93 

V. — Collegiate Institutes and High Schools: 

1. Receipts, Expenditure, Attendance, etc 94 

Cost per Pupil 94 

2. Occupation of Parents of Pupils 95 

3. Destination of Pupils, and Schools charging Fees 95 

VI. — Teachers' Institutes 96 

VII. — Departmental Exajviinations, Normal School Attendance, etc 96, 97 

Public Schools 

I. — Table A. — Total and Average Attendance, etc 98 

11. — Table B. — Pupils in the various branches of instruction 102 

HI. — Table C. — Teachers, Salaries, Certificates, Experience 118 

IV. — Table D. — School Houses, Prayers, Maps, etc 124 

V. — Table E. — Financial Statement, Value of School Property 128 

Roman Catholic Separate Schools 

I. — Table P. — Financial Statement, Value of School Property 136 

II. — Table G. — Teachers, Salaries, Certificates, Attendance, Pupils in the various 

ihranches of instruction, etc 142 

[iii] 



iv TABLE OF CONTENTS No. 17 

.^ . . . d 

Continuation Schools 

PAGE 

I. — Table H. — Financial Statement 154 

II. — Table I. — 'Schools under Public School Board, Equipment, Destination of 

Pupils, etc 160 

III. — Table J. — Attendance, Pupils in the Schools and in the Various Subjects, etc. 166 

Collegiate Institutes and High Schools 

I. — Table K. — Financial Statement 178 

II. — Table L. — Boards of Education, Approved Schools, Equipment. Destination 

of Pupils, etc 194 

III. — Table M. — Attendance, Pupils in the Schools and in the Various Subjects, etc. 210 

Industrial, Technical and Art Schools 

I. — ^Table N. — Day Schools, Attendance, etc., Pupils in the Various Branches of 

Instruction and Equipment 226 

II. — Table O. — Night Schools, Attendance, etc., Pupils in the Various Branches of 

Instruction 230 

III. — Table P. — Day and Night Schools, Financial Statement 236 

Miscellaneous 

Table Q. — Protestant Separate Schools 238 

Table R. — Report on Night Schools 239 

Table S. — Report on Truancy 240 

Table T.— General Statistical Abstract 244 

Appendix J. — Teachebs' Instltutes, Fixancl&l Statement, 1918 254 

Appendlx K. — Fifth Classes, 1918-19 258 

Appendix L. — Rural School Libraries, 1918-19 264 

Appendix M. — Cadet Corps, 1919 266 

Appendix N. — ISupebannuated Teachers 267 

Appendix 0. — Financial Statements of the Faculties of Education 268 

Appendix P. — List of Inspectorates and Inspectors 272 

Appendix Q. — Junior High School Entrance Examination, 1919 277 

Appendix R. — Junior Flblic School Graduation Diploma Examination. 1919 . . . 282 

Appendix S. — List of Certificates Issued by the Department, 1919 283 

Appendix T. — Orders in Council, 1919 294 

Appendix U. — Provincial Normal and Model Schools. 1919-20 297 

Appendix V. — Autumn Model iSchools, 1919 300 

Appendix W. — List of Associate Examiners, and Continuation and High School 
Principals and Assistants: 

I. — Associate Examiners, 1919 301 

II. — Principals and Assistants of Continuation Schools, 

January, 1920 304 

III. — Principals and Assistants of Collegiate Institutes and 

High Schools, January, 1920 316 

Appendix X. — Report of the School for the Deaf, 1918-19 353 

Appendix Y. — Report of the School for the Blind, 1918-19 366 



REPORT 

OF THE 

MINISTER OF EDUCATION 

FOR THE YEAR 1919 



To His Honour 

Lionel H. Claeke_, Esq._, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

YouE HoxouE, — I beg leave to present the annual report of the Department of 
Education for the year 1919. The reports from the various officials of the Depart- 
ment appear in the form of appendices, and the statistics relative to the ele- 
mentary and secondary schools are given in the usual fulness of detail. They 
cover chiefly the calendar year 1918. A summary of the orders-in-council, which, 
in accordance with the statute, are laid before the Legislature a few davs after 
it assembles, is appended to this report as a matter of convenience. 

Education at the Close of the War 

The conditions set forth in the various reports reflect with a fair degree of 
accuracy the state of education in Ontario at the close of the Great War. Looking 
back over the four years of the conflict, it cannot be asserted that the schools of 
the Province escaped all the evil consequences which flowed from the moral and 
material upheaval of the world. The schools of Ontario, however, came through 
the ordeal successfully. It is doubtful if any other English-speaking community 
of the same extent fared so well. Although the diminishing number of male 
teachers fell still lower, the supply of teachers as a whole continued adequate. 
This was due partly no doubt to economic causes, which rendered other occupa- 
tions less attractive and secured a good attendance at the training schools. In 
the main, however, we must attribute the fortunate position of the Province in 
respect to the staffing of the schools to the loyalty and devotion of the teaching 
body, whose members, despite many discouragements, stuck to their tasks with 
the energy and fidelity so characteristic of them. Not only did they maintain their 
due share of the work of instruction, but in addition they played a leading part 
throughout the Province in those philanthropic and patriotic tasks which were 
entailed by the War. The curtailment of expenditures, especially in providing 
new buildings and improving old ones, also affected the school system. It should 



vi THE REPORT OF THE Xo. 17 

— — ■ . . — . — - ■< 

be noted, however, that not a few localities cheerfully bore the additional taxation, 
and erected new schools where such were deemed necessary. The policy of the 
Department during the four years was not to urge capital expenditures, and 
there is no reason to think that this course was unwise. The War likewise affected 
attendance. This was not so apparent in enrolment as in irregularity of attend- 
ance, which is, in itself, one of the most serious drawbacks to the progress of the 
pupils, injuring both the individual and the general efficiency of the school. The 
rural schools suffered more from the various disturbing influences of the period 
than the urban schools, and this fact accounts, in no slight measure, for the 
demand that the policy of reconstruction should begin with a thorough considera- 
tion of the remedies required to improve rural education. The awakened interest 
in the training of youth is one of the few beneficial legacies of the "War, and there 
is little doubt that the people of Ontario will prove themselves fully equal to the 
educational problems that confront them. 

The Elementary Schools 

The statistics for 1918 reveal the extent and importance of the elementary 
school system. The number of schools, both rural and urban, was 6,685, an 
increase of 34. The value of the school property was $45,105,000. Their equip- 
ment was valued at $1,848,552, an increase of $80,000 in the year. The cost of 
staffing the schools has risen in ten years from an annual charge of $4,643,571 to 
one of $9,027,151. The salaries advanced steadily during each year of the War, 
but not, of course, proportionally to the needs of the teachers. The salary bill is 
one indication that the Province, beset by many other obligations and embarrass- 
ments during the past ten years, has not proved unmindful of its duty toward 
education. The grand total of expenditures upon the elementary schools has 
increased in ten years from $7,943,826 to $15,176,723. In view of these state- 
ments, the idea that the schools have suffered from neglect or parsimony on the 
part of the people at large must be set aside. The enrolled attendance in these 
schools during 1918 was 528,917, which was the highest on record, although the 
average attendance, for reasons already touched upon, was not quite so good. 
The educational trust, which is expressed in the elementary school system is, there- 
fore, one of magnitude; one not to be overlooked in the extensions and improve- 
ments which must also attend secondary and university education ; and one which 
exhibits in its essential features, a healthy and substantial condition. 

The Rural Schools 

The rural schools in 1918 numbered 5,757 and of these at least five thousand 
are one-teacher schools. The sum spent upon these schools in that year exceeded 
$5,700,000, of which the school sections themselves contributed over $3,000,000. 
The township grants amounted to $1,807,004, and the grants voted by the Legis- 
lature to $698,913. By far the largest sum went in salaries to teachers, namely, 
$3,744,635. The value of rural school property was $12,600,343, and the equip- 
ment was placed at $863,688. The schools are economically managed, and since 
so large a proportion of the expense is borne by the ratepayers themselves, it seems 
reasonable that local control should prevail unless the people most concerned 
are convinced that larger school areas, with township or consolidated trustee 
boards, would redound to their advantage and enhance the efficiency of education. 
It is upon the principle of voluntary combination by the localities, and not upon 
enforced action by the State, that the policy of consolidated schools for Ontario is 



1919 DEPARTMEXT OF EDUCATIOX vii 

■ . ■ . — II - , — ^ 

based. This subject, -which will be dealt with later on, is vitalh- related to the 
rural school problem. In a number of small schools, where increased attendance 
cannot be looked for, no expenditure on a larger scale and no reform in the 
course of study could hope to raise the standard of efficiency to the high point 
which the rural population has the right to expect. The salary scale for teachers 
has improved year by year, but the unprecedented economic conditions of the 
present time render it inadequate. The rural schools are taught chiefly by women 
teachers. But 6.27 per cent, of the teachers in them are males. The average salarv- 
of the woman teacher has increased from $382 in 1908 to $609 in 1918, and, as 
everyone is aware (although complete statistics are not yet available for the 
past year), a remarkable improvement has since taken place. As long, however, 
as urban salaries are so much better — the average salary for the woman teacher in 
urban schools in 1918 being $822 — the rural school will continue to suffer from 
frequent changes and from the difficulty of securing and holding the most ex- 
perienced teachers. The salary is not the sole factor in this condition, but it is the 
most potent. My own experience of rural conditions leads me to the conclusion 
that the comfort of the teacher must also be closely looked after, if we are to 
command the services of those best fitted to instruct the young people whose homes 
are in the country. It is an imperative necessity to plan and carry out a com- 
prehensive scheme of improvement for rural schools. In this programme every 
effort must be made on behalf of the teacher who will inevitably move toward 
the attractions of the urban centres if conditions are not made satisfactory. 

The Work of the Inspectors 

The Government invited all the Inspectors to gather in conference during 
the Easter recess at Toronto and consider the best means of meeting the excep- 
tional needs of the present time. The result of this conference is referred to 
later. The annual reports of these officers to urban boards, to county councils, 
and to this Department deal generally with the outstanding educational facts of 
the year 1919. They have found the school system as a whole to be in good 
condition. But they have done their duty fearlessly in pointing out the defects 
that call for remedy: many schools with small attendance, inadequate salaries, 
indifference in some quarters, the frequent changes of teachers in rural schools, 
the need of school attendance officers, and a course of study that requires modifica- 
tions. In these particulars, with the evils that flow from them, are to be found 
the chief difficulties of the situation. It is gratifying to note that women trustees 
are beginning to appear as members of rural school boards. This is a new and 
welcome movement. It should be encouraged everywhere. The special grants to 
mcrease salaries last year took effect in many localities. The results, as a general 
rule, were encouraging, and during 1920 the same policy, which is to be continued 
on a larger scale if the Legislature approves, should produce even more sub- 
stantial advances. The small and irregular attendance is a serious menace and 
the Inspectors in some counties give striking pictures of what it means — a low 
vitality in the school, indifferent teachers, a heavy cost of instruction per pupil 
as compared with urban schools. The argument is made that the grouping to- 
gether of several small contiguous schools would be a real gain educationally and 
financially and that wider areas administered by township boards would provide 
the required impetus. The advocacy of consolidated schools is general although 
not universal. The idea is regarded with greater favour in some counties than 
in others. 



viii THE REPOET OF THE No. 17 

— . — . < 

The Policy of Consolidated Schools 

The problem of consolidation of schools is complex, varies according to the 
locality, and aims not at cheapness but betterment. It is not the fashion of 
Ontario to adopt drastic changes heedlessly. The people have been accustomed 
for generations to local control of their section schools. The campaign for con- 
solidation must be one of exposition and persuasion. The officers of the Depart- 
ment, who have discussed the question in all its bearings at public meetings during 
the past year, have so treated it. The county Inspectors have lent their valuable 
assistance, as have many intelligent and progressive individuals whose unselfish 
efforts in behalf of education cannot be too cordially recognized. In Ontario, 
consolidation of schools as a practical reality is new, although, of course, the 
policy is not new in other communities. The first consolidated school was estab- 
lished in Massachusetts as long ago as 1874. After 45 years of successful work, 
it still exists. Many of the United States have followed the example of Massa- 
chusetts. In 1919 there were 13,000 of these schools in the Eepublic and forty- 
three States have adopted it as their policy. 

In the Canadian Provinces, Manitoba has about 100 consolidated schools and 
Alberta, about 60. Ontario has been less easy to convince, because the conditions 
are widely different from those in the younger Provinces and because each school 
section has a tradition to which its people are attached. There are two examples 
of this kind of school now established in Ontario, but only one, the Hudson Con- 
solidated School, situated in the Timiskaming District, can be cited as a type, 
with experience to commend it. This school gives satisfaction to the people, and 
the pupils are conveyed long distances to it. When the school was unfortunately 
burned down a few years ago, the ratepayers decided to re-erect it. The other 
places in which consolidation is being adopted and should be accomplished during 
the present year are Burriss, Stratton, Tarentorus, Mindemoya, Mallor5i;own, 
Hickson, and Nobel. 

One of the causes which will hasten consolidation is the displacement of rural 
population. In 1918, Ontario, out of a total of 5,757 rural schools, had 5 schools 
with an average attendance of 1 pupil, 12 with 2 pupils, 33 with 3 pupils, 46 with 
4 pupils, 79 with 5 pupils, 524 with from 6 to 9 pupils, and 1,400 had 10 or less. 
There is plenty of scope for the movement in these and many other localities. 
Too many country boys and girls are not receiving the equality of opportunity in 
education to which they are entitled. Their chances of taking up High School 
work without leaving home and going to some town or city being remote, the result 
is that some do not stay long enough at school to pass the high school entrance 
examination. It has been found in the United States that only half as many 
complete the elementary grades under the District School System as under the 
Consolidated School System. Another advantage of consolidation is the improve- 
ment of school equipment and accommodations. New buildings are built in accord- 
ance with the latest ideas, with good ventilation and lighting, proper blackboards, 
and such provision for class-rooms as will enable the organization of the school 
and the arrangement of the teaching periods to do as much as possible for the 
pupil. The natural consequence is that the school life of the pupil in consolidated 
schools is longer. A comparison has been made of 376 district school children 
with 451 consolidated school children. The average age for beginning with the 
first group was 6.6 years and entrance standing was reached at 15. In the con- 
solidated school group, they began at 7.2 years and took entrance standing at 14.1 
years. This is a clear gain of 1>4 years. 



1919 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ix 

^ * 

To the elementary instruction in a consolidated school, carried on, as its 
promoters argue, with much greater efficiency than in a local school, there can 
be added the subjects of Manual Training, Domestic Science, Agriculture, Nature 
Study, Art, and Music. In other words, a Continuation School is brought to the 
door of every farmer in the area, taking the pupil up to university matriculation 
or entrance to a Normal School. At the same time sufficient elasticity of curri- 
culum is permitted so that the pupil receives such vocational training and practical 
instruction as will prepare him for life on the farm if he does not wish to go into 
industrial pursuits or take up a profession. This is an attraction to those parents 
who have to consider the expense of sending their children away to town for a 
High School education. According to estimates made by American educators who 
have given the subject careful thought, the earning capacity of pupils receiving 
the better education is increased. The Cornell Agricultural College authorities 
in investigating the labour income of 1,000 farmers found that those with only 
Public School education made $318.00 per year; those with High School education 
made $632.00 per year; and those with College education made $847.00 per year. 
This calculation showed that every year of additional education was worth from 
$60 to $75 in labour income. 

Consolidation has also improved both the enrolment attendance and the aver- 
age attendance. In Wellwood, Manitoba, before consolidation, there were enrolled 
94 pupils with an average daily attendance of 55. In the first year after the same 
area had been consolidated, 110 pupils were enrolled and the average daily attend- 
ance was 85. This increase in enrolment is usually among the older boys and 
girls who otherwise would cease to attend school. Moreover, the consolidated 
school promotes community life. Good roads usually follow in the wake of these 
schools because there is the added reason and stimulus for keeping the roads good 
in the fact that the children are driven over them twice a day. Good buildings 
which are possible under consolidation do much to dignify the school as a social 
centre. The place can be made a beauty spot in the centre of the community 
where its whole spirit and aims may be visualized. In Ontario the idea of a 
Community Hall aided by Legislative grant has been linked to the Consolidated 
School idea. This Department is offering special grants for certain kinds of 
equipment, such as a piano or other musical instrument, a projection lantern or 
motion picture machine. The grant pays 40 per cent, of the cost the first year 
up to $400, and 20 per cent, up to $200 in each of the three following years, so 
that the whole is paid for in four years. The Ontario Act calls for a minimum 
of five acres of ground. Here in the centre of the community, with good roads 
leading to it, there is space enough to provide a playground where the whole of 
the people, young and old alike, may find some attractive form of play life. 

A pamphlet setting forth the advantages of consolidated schools has been 
prepared and will shortly be available for distribution throughout the Province. 
In its pages will be found a summarized statement in outline of the features of 
the system as follows : 

1. Efficiency is gained in teaching through : 

(a) Grading and classification; 

(6) Numbers creating interest and emulation; 

(c) Time for recitation and close personal work is three times greater; 

(d) Absence from school reduced 50 per cent.; 

(e) Saving 1^/2 years time up to Entrance; 
2 E. 



THE EEPOET OF THE No. 17 



(/) Fewer and hence better teachers, who are specialists with higher qualifi- 
cations ; 
(g) Introduction of Manual Training and like subjects; 
(h) Introduction of Organized Play Life; 
(i) Closer expert supervision; 
(y) Improved buildings and equipment; 
(fc) Tenure of Teacher's office lengthened. 

3. Continuation work up to the stage of matriculation is feasible for all. 

3. Enough money is probably spent now in sending boys and girls to town 
and city High Schools to more than pay the additional cost. 

4. Four or five times as many boys and girls will get a High School' course. 

6. This High School course will be in terms of country life which 90 per cent, 
of those taking it will adopt as their life work. 

6. The cost per month per pupil in attendance (not simply enrolled) is less 
under consolidation because of increased enrolment and average attendance. 

7. Higher salaries are paid and thus better teachers are secured. 

8. The advancing salaries and other expenses will tell increasingly in favour 
of consolidation as a means of economy in overhead charges. 

9. The present cost of schools cannot be fairly compared with those under 
consolidation without keeping in mind the rising cost of education even without 
the change suggested. In 1902, the cost per pupil enrolled throughout Ontario 
in all schools was $11.40i, whereas in 1917 it was $39.74, an increase of 160 per 
cent. Based on average attendance, the cost in 1902 was $19.93 as compared with 
$45.61 in 117, an increase of 128 per cent. 

10. Pupils' earning capacity is increased. 

il. The moral conditions of school life are under closer control. 
12. A wider use of the school is possible for community purposes. 

Secondary Schools 

The conditions in the Secondary Schools of the Province call for a few ob- 
servations. These may be supplemented by a scrutiny of the reports of the High 
School Inspectors and the Continuation School Inspectors. The close of the 
War found the High Schools generally in tlie state of efficiency which these 
schools, especially in the larger centres, have maintained for many years. It is 
not difficult to realize that the highly trained and experienced teachers, the 
maturity of the pupils, the superior salary scale usually maintained have rendered 
these schools for many years an important part of the system. As soon as the 
war was over, the attendance largely increased, and as there has been little capital 
expenditure on building since, the over-crowded class rooms have presented a 
complicated situation. It is satisfactory to note that the tests of the funda- 
mental branches of knowledge, like Heading, Writing and Spelling which reflect 
the results of training in the elementary schools, show that the pupils have made 
a steady improvement during the last ten years. The plea for higher salaries 
for teachers in the secondary schools is as strong as it is for the teachers in the 
elementary schools. The Continuation Schools present problems which cannot 
with safety be ignored. The Inspectors report a scarcity of teachers and a low 
salary scale. Probably one-half the attendance in these schools consists of 
pupils whose parents are engaged in agricultural pursuits, and the upbuilding 
of these schools is, therefore, part of the whole rural school problem. The com- 



i 



1919 DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATION xi 



plaint is general that the Continuation Schools receive inadequate financial 
support for the work they have to do, and it is the duty of the Legislature to 
remedy these conditions. The counties pay more generously for the education 
of High School pupils than they do for the same grade of instruction in the 
Continuation Schools. It is true that a numher of counties pay larger grants 
than the county equivalent of the Legislative grant which is provided by law. 
But even with this extra assistance the schools suffer. It is proposed at the 
present session to increase greatly the Legislative grant and to provide more 
adequately for county support toward the education of county pupils. 

Some misapprehension exists as to the number of pupils who go on from the 
elementary schools to the secondary schools. The impression exists that no more 
than five per cent, to eight per cent, of the school population go forward. This 
calculation, however, is not warranted by actual facts. The statistics available in 
the Department indicate that on the average about 87,200 pupils enter the elemen- 
tary schools every year and 14,656, the secondary schools. This would be about 16.8 
per cent, of the elementary school attendance. In addition, there should be kept 
in view the considerable number who take their secondary school education in 
private schools or colleges. It would appear, therefore, that the showing is not 
as meagre as is generally supposed. 



The Salary Question 

The existing discontent with the salaries paid to teachers in both elementary 
and secondary schools is too significant a factor in educational life to be passed 
over. In all progressive communities — in Great Britain, in the neighbouring 
States, in all the Provinces of Canada, not least in Ontario — the teachers them- 
selves have been obliged to call attention to the insufficient rate of remuneration 
paid to them. Many school boards have risen to the occasion, promptly and 
effectually. Every credit is due to them. In no case has the attention of the 
Department been called to murmurs from the taxpayers arising from the addi- 
tional taxation involved. It is rare to hear of complaints about the school rate, 
although the municipal rate is scrutinized everywhere with jealous eyes. Public 
opinion is fairly well agreed that no portion of our provincial expenditure 
furnishes such satisfactory results as the amount spent for education. It is for 
school boards that have taken no action as yet in respect to salaries to consider 
well how far they represent the wishes of the ratepayers in this policy, or rather 
want of policy. The following observations on this question are taken from the 
report of Dr. Waugh, Chief Inspector of Public and Separate Schools, and have 
my cordial endorsement: 

" The success of the schools depends primarily on the efficiency of the 
teachers. The increase in the supply of efficient teachers depends upon the re- 
muneration offered for their services. If salaries are inadequate, the supply will 
be impaired, for whilst it may be possible to hold men and women in the pro- 
fession for which they have been trained and which they have selected for their 
life work for a few years at salaries less than they might secure in other lines of 
work for services requiring equal training and ability, all but the most unpro- 
gressive will soon effect the necessary re-adjustment and seek employment in new 
fields. A profession which fails to hold its most experienced and efficient mem- 



Xll 



THE EEPORT OF THE , No. 17 



bers must equally fail to attract new members to its ranks. The higher the 
rewards offered, the keener will be the competition for these rewards. It will 
not do to depend upon a very general belief that teaching is a vocation and that 
there will always be those who will be prepared to sacrifice themselves to the 
work. It may be true that the highest paid teachers are not always the best; but 
it is always true that the way to get good teachers is to pay good salaries." 

Development of Technical Education 

From the point of view of future development of our system of schools, the 
most suggestive subject is that of industrial and technical education. This is 
true not merely because of the importance of this branch of instruction, but also 
because it is associated with the extension of the school age and the provision of 
training, either in whole or in part, for pupils beyond the age of fourteen years. 
There is general agreement that the compulsory period is too short. There may 
be difference of opinion as to how the extension of school training can best be 
applied. The Act of 1919 which provides for it is not yet in force. But the 
date for putting it into effect, by proclamation, cannot be delayed. The outline 
of this new law to be found in the report of Dr. F. W. Merchant, Director of 
Industrial and Technical Education, will be read with the deepest interest by 
all who appreciate the vital necessity of such a reform. The policy embodied 
in this measure is honourably associated with my predecessor in office and I am 
in full sympathy with the general scope and aim which it sets forth. In extending 
the age for instruction to pupils beyond fourteen years, the law is reasonable 
and practicable. It allows for the exceptional cases, in urban and rural parts 
alike, where lads and girls are needed for the support of themselves and their 
relatives and where in the case of rural parts, their services may be needed on 
the farms. For them part-time instruction will be provided, so that we may 
have a revival of what was common enough in days gone by of young persons 
taking special courses in the Winter months who could not spare the time in the 
Spring and Autumn. As either part-time or whole-time attendance will be 
compulsory under the Act, in all urban centres with a population of 5,000 or 
over, the development of schools where these extended courses may be taken up 
becomes a matter of great and immediate consequence throughout the Province. 
Steps should be taken at once to this end. It may entail additional expense, 
because many localities are not in a position to provide, unaided, the school 
facilities that will be required. In contributing its share, the wisdom of the 
Legislature may safely be relied upon. In the small urban centres and in rural 
parts the establishment of these courses is optional, but if we are to make progress 
in education all round, the policy should not overlook any part of the Province. 
The new Act also entails part-time instruction for young people between the 
ages of sixteen and eighteen, and the arrangements for these courses as regards 
times and seasons may be made to fit local conditions. 

The Province is about to benefit from the Federal grant to promote 
technical and industrial education, and an agreement has been signed between the 
Minister of Labour at Ottawa and this Department embodying the terms on 
which the money shall be employed for the development of this form of training. 
The Federal subsidy, supplemented by the Provincial and local aid, should mean 
the provision of facilities for many places which have hitherto been unable to 
develop instruction commensurate with the needs of their young people. The 



1919 DEPARTMEXT OF EDUCATIOX xiii 

, . , i 

details of this agreement will be found in Dr. Merchant's report. A copy of it 
has been laid before the Legislature with the other orders-in-council relating to 
this Department, 

The Public Libraries 

The present is an excellent opportunity to promote the public libran' movement 
throughout Ontario, with all its educational possibilities. It is proposed to lay 
before the Legislature this Session a revision of the Public Libraries Act. The 
educational value of these institutions has long been seen and in some cases acted 
upon, but the time is ripe for embarking upon a more thorough policy designed to 
place favourable opportunities for study within the reach of adults and adolescents 
who desire to continue their education. The libraries have been limited as to means 
in their natural desire for expansion. Many municipalities have been unable, 
owing to the terms of the law, to give as much as they could afford and as they 
wished in aid of their libraries. Their desire to do this should not be unduly cur- 
tailed. In the revision of the Act this fact has been kept in view. Wider powers 
should be given to municipal councils, and a tax rate which is in many places too 
low to support a free library may wisely be changed so as to operate no longer as 
a bar to legitimate growth and necessary efficiency. The complete consideration of 
the public library and the school library may be the work of time, but there is no 
serious obstacle to immediate development along such lines as shall strengthen 
this educational force as a valuable adjunct to the schools. One provision of the 
revised Act, which should accomplish much for readers and students in the rural 
parts of the Province, is the encouragement to form township libraries. Those who 
are far from a large urban centre are practically debarred by the high prices and 
inaccessibility of books from keeping abreast of the latest knowledge. The prob- 
lem of access to the best books is allied to other limitations under which the rural 
schools have suffered, and in developing the courses of study in these schools, the 
school library cannot for a long time be equal to the work of supplying to ambi- 
tious pupils the literature they ought to have. The present library system is cred- 
itable to the Province, but it is capable of much improvement. The association 
libraries, which are not free, are still too large a factor in the situation. Of 425 
libraries in Ontario, more than 280 have less than $500 income annually. The 
report of Mr, Carson, Inspector of Public Libraries, upon the year's progress con- 
tains a general review of the position of affairs and forms a basis upon which to 
estimate the work to be done. The valuable work of the training school which is 
providing librarians and assistants for the libraries of the Province is bound to 
give a marked impetus to the movement. 

Special Instruction 

The reports upon agricultural, domestic science, and manual training courses 
show satisfactory progress and an extension of these forms of instruction which is 
most encouraging. The annual statements of the Ontario School for the Deaf, 
and the Ontario School for the Blind, indicate the excellent work being done in 
these special institutions. The vote of $50,000 for the Xational Institute for the 
Blind, which is furnishing both instruction and occupation for the adult blind, 
is a token of the interest taken by the Province in this necessary task. 



xiv THE EEPOET OF THE No. 17 



Attendance in the Training Schools 

The attendance of students-in-training in all the Faculties and Schools main- 
tained for the supply of teachers who annually replace those who withdraw is good. 
There are 331 students in the Faculties at Toronto and Queen's Universities. 
The number in the seven Normal Schools is 1,226. The English-French training- 
schools at Ottawa, Vankleek Hill, Sturgeon Falls, and Sandwich contain 123 stu- 
dents. The supply of teachers will be maintained only if the salaries paid are 
sufficient. 

Military Service of Teachers 

The part taken by the teachers in the War and the home-work arising out of 
the war constitute a splendid page in the history of the profession. A special 
return is being prepared as a permanent record of the actual military service of all 
Ontario male teachers who entered the Canadian Army. 

I desire to thank all those who are co-operating with the Department in making 
the Kst as complete and accurate as possible. The following particulars will illus- 
trate the distinctions won by our teachers in the military service : 

Total number of teachers who served 573 

Number killed 85 

Number wounded 148 

Decorations: 

Victoria Cross 1 

D.S.0 3 

Legion of Honour 1 

D.C.M 3 

M.C 12 

Bar 1 

M.M 13 

Croix de Guerre 1 

Belgian Croix de Guerre 1 

Total 36 

Eecommended for Decorations : 

M.C 1 

D.C.M 1 

MM 3 

Conference with the Inspectors 

The Inspectors of the Province were called in conference to the Department 
during the Easter recess and discussed the outstanding questions in present-day 
educational needs. The meeting was addressed by the Prime Minister, Hon. Mr. 
Drury, Dr. James L. Hughes, and myself. The following suggestions were 
unanimously offered by the Inspectors : 

1. That the greatest needs of our rural schools are more mature teachers, a 
greater continuity of service, and a larger proportion of male teachers. 



I 



1919 DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATIOX xv 
.^ — « 

2. That the present small schools with an average for the Province of less 
than twenty pupils make impossible, from an economic standpoint, the employ- 
ment of adequately paid teachers, with the result that the greater number of our 
rural schools employ as teachers young and inexperienced women who give only a 
brief service. 

3. That any permanent solution of the rural school problem can be brought 
about only through a proper system of consolidation of schools. 

4. That in our opinion the necessary and desirable consolidation of Ontario 
schools can be brought about only with great difficulty, so long as we have in the 
Province thousands of small school sections, each more or less jealous of its powers 
of self-government. 

5. That in our opinion the Government would be justified in bringing into 
operation a larger unit of school administration. 

6. That in our opinion the Ontario counties ought ultimately to become the 
units of school administration, and that the support of elementary and secondary 
schools outside of towns and cities ought to be by means of a uniform tax: rate 
levied throughout the county. 

7. That the present Act governing the consolidation of schools should be 
amended to provide that a consolidated area approved by the Government shall 
become a consolidated school section, on a majority vote of the ratepayers within 
this area. 



Eespectfully submitted, 



E. H. Graxt, 
Minister of Education. 



ToEOXTO, April, 1920. 



i 



APPENDIX A 

REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC AND 

SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

To THE Honourable E. H. Gkant, M.P.P., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit, herewith, my report upon the Elementary 
Schools throughout the Province. The information is derived in part from the 
annual and special reports of the Public and Separate School Inspectors. 

Reorganizations Already Effected 

During the last school year some important reorganizations of Inspectorates 
have been effected for the purpose of relieving or equalizing the work and increasing 
the efficiency of the ser^ace. These reorganizations were: (1) an equalization of the 
inspectoral divisions covered by Inspectors Dowsley and Craig, (2) a readjustment 
of inspectoral boundaries between the 'Counties of Lincoln and Welland whereby 
Inspector Carefoot was relieved of that part of Welland formerly under his juris- 
diction and was left free to devote his whole time to the County of Lincoln, whilst 
the County of Welland was divided into two Inspectorates, Inspectoral Division 
No. 1 being placed in charge of Inspector Marshall and No. 2 in charge of the 
newly appointed Inspector, J. McNiece, formerly of the Guelph Collegiate Insti- 
tute. (3) The inspectoral divisions in the districts were rearranged; and an 
additional Inspector, Mr. W. A. Wilson, of Haileybury, was given charge of the 
schools of the Cochrane Division. (4) Dr. J. B. MacDougall, of the North Bay 
Normal School, was appointed to take general charge of the schools in the Districts, 
among other duties; his special knowledge of local conditions has contributed in 
a large measure to the better administration of the District schools. All the 
changes made have worked out to the satisfaction of everybody concerned. The 
only difficulty which has arisen was encountered in the southwestern part of the 
Province in providing for the adequate inspection of the schools in the County 
of Huron. 

Reorganizations in Prospect 

In view of the rapid development now going forward in Northern Ontario 
it will soon be necessary to add another District Inspector. An additional Separate 
School Inspector should be appointed to begin his duties at the opening of the 
school year; and it will be necessary to appoint a successor to the late Inspector 
Payment whose decease in the early autumn of the present school year deprived 
the Department of Education of the services of one of its most talented and 
zealous officials. 

Other Changes 

Mr. E. C. Eoss replaces Mr. Willis Froats as Inspector for the County of 
Carleton; and Major E. E. Snider and Major J. W. Odell have taken the places 
left vacant by the retirement of Inspectors Dr. W. E. Tilley and Mr. Albert 
Odell in Durham and Northumberland. The retiring inspectors had devoted 
talents and energies of a very high order to the cause of education and were 
known to their fellow workers as men wise in counsel, reliable and helpful. 

[1] 



2 THE EEPORT OP THE No. 17 

Provision will be made during the coming year by which public school 
inspectors will be given the opportunity of visiting Normal Schools or schools in 
other parts of the Dominion or in the United States. This should tend to widen 
their outlook and increase their efficiency. 

Educational Reconstruction 

(1) The Aibolition of the Office of Superintendent. 

Perhaps the most significant reconstruction, from the point of view of under- 
lying and determining causes, was the abolition of the office of Superintendent 
of Education, left vacant by the lamented death of Dr. John Seath, whose organiz- 
ing genius and dynamic force had controlled and directed the whole field of 
educational activity for nearly fifteen years. 

(2) The Appointment of a Provincial Attendance Officer. 

The first forward step in the policy of reconstruction was the appointment 
of a Provincial Attendance Officer to begin his duties on January 1st, 1920. The 
man selected was Major Cowles, who, from his position as Principal of the Dunn- 
ville High School, had enlisted for overseas service. 

On September 1st he began to lay plans and prepare for the organization 
of his work. He visited many parts of the Province and was of substantial 
assistance in the negotiations he conducted for opening new schools, for the convey- 
ance of pupils where schools were not sufficiently accessible, and for the consolida- 
tion of schools where that appeared to be the best solution of the educational 
problem. 

The average registered attendance for the Province is about 65 per cent, of 
those of school age or, making all necessary allowances for errors and defects in 
the method of reporting, possibly 73 per cent. The new Attendance Act makes 
the appointment of Attendance Officers compulsory, and their work is to be super- 
vised by the Provincial Attendance Officer. Possibly it is not too much to expect 
that the improved arrangements will bring the general average up to 85 per cent, 
within a few years. An increase of 10 per cent, in the average attendance means 
possibly an increase of 25 per cent, in the social efficiency of the product of the 
schools. 

(3) The Official Trustee. 

The Provincial Attendance Officer was given the powers of an Official Trustee 
in the Districts and has power to open and conduct a school where the local 
authorities neglect or refuse to exercise this privilege. 

(4) Medical and Dental Inspection. 

The provisions for Medical and Dental Inspection of Schools in the Eegula- 
tions of 1907 had not borne much fruit; a few of the more progressive and more 
populous centres alone had taken advantage of the opportunity. The Women's 
Institutes had been doing a pioneer work of great value in this direction, but 
they were seriously handicapped by lack of means, opportunitv', and facilities for 
carrying on the work, the necessity of which had been emphasized by the lessons 
of the war. The Department of Education then made a working arrangement 



1919 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 3 

for co-operation with the Institutes so as to render the work effective. This 
arrangement has worked very smoothly; and to the Institutes is due in large 
measure the complete success which has attended the movement for " Health in 
the Schools." The sum of $20,000 was voted by the Legislature to carry on the 
work. Dr. McKenzie Smith, Dr. Sirrs and Dr. Elizabeth Gray, prominent workers 
in this field for the Women's Institutes, were taken over by the Department of 
Education. Three nurses were appointed, all women of sagacity, tact and ex- 
perience; Nurse Jamieson, Nurse Gray don and Nurse Campbell, and the Medical 
Survey of the Schools of the Province, which, it is estimated, will conxmue for three 
years, was begun on May 5th, 1919. Up to the present, rural Medical Inspection 
Surveys have been made in the Counties of Simcoe, Peel, Halton, Wentworth, 
Hastings, Brant, Wellington, Perth and Essex. Everywhere the workers have met 
encouragement and generous assistance. Concurrently with the appointment of 
the Medical School Inspection Officers, Dr. Conboy, Professor of Dental History 
of the Eoyal College of Dental Surgeons, was appointed Chief Dental Inspector 
for the Province, and the Dental Survey has been carried on for the most part 
by the enlistment of the voluntary services of the local dentists who, in the most 
praiseworthy spirit, have given their time ungrudgingly to the carrying on of this 
work. 

The object of the survey is fourfold. First, to have at hand on the official 
record reliable statistics on Health in the Schools ; statistics which will serve to 
map out the way for needed improvements. Second, to encourage the appointment 
of local School Medical Officers to continue and extend the work already accomp- 
lished. Third, to interest the people directly in the health of the children through 
demonstration and personal appeal. Fourth, to improve and standardize the 
systems of inspection where these have previously been introduced. 

The Consolidation of Schools 

This reconstruction is one of the methods introduced to solve what is 
usually called the rural school problem. The difficulties rural schools have to 
contend with are (1) the small numbers in attendance at each school, (3) the 
inaccessibility of the schools, (3) the lack of community interest in the school, 
(4) the shortness of the school period, (5) the number of subjects requiring 
attention to fit the pupils to meet the demands of modern life. 

The small numbers in attendance at the ungraded rural schools make it im- 
possible to supply the best kind of accommodations and equipment without unduly 
increasing the cost per pupil by overhead charges. The number of pupils in such 
school sections is often too small to encourage school spirit, and that healthy rivalry 
and emulation, upon which social progress is based. It is pretty well established 
that a graded school of two or more teachers is a very much superior educational 
instrument to meet the conditions for teaching the required programme, and this 
is out of the question where the numbers are small. 

The rural schools are often inaccessible for parts of the year. Many children 
have to walk from two and a half to three miles to school. 

The period of the child's life actually spent in the rural schools is quite 
inadequate under the present, perhaps under any system of organization and 
administration, to prepare him for citizenship. It will be seen that the Consoli- 
dated School successfully disposes of the difficulties enumerated above, and 
offers to the country boy and girl an education at least the equal of that now 
enjoyed by the children in the urban centres. It is impossible here to give any 



THE EEPORT OF THE No. 17 



adequate account of the great interest which has been shown by the public in 
this scheme. Over one hundred public meetings have been conducted by the 
oflBcials of the Department at the request of trustees and ratepayers, and the 
speakers have, in almost every instance, been accorded enthusiastic hearings. Very 
considerable areas have been subjected to a careful survey to ascertain the preferred 
groupings of sections at each consolidation centre, and the most advantageous and 
economical routes for the vans. 

A very important by-product of the agitation has been that the Public School 
Inspectors, in the course of the discussions, have been brought into a new and 
more vital relation with their constituents, and a new interest in the school and 
the general problem of education has been aroused. 

The work of organizing the Consolidated School propaganda has been entrusted 
largely to Mr. W. I. Chisholm, the Assistant Chief Inspector of Public and 
Separate Schools, to whose untiring efforts and capable administration the success 
of the campaign is largely due. Dr. S. B. Sinclair, Mr. Alex. MacLaren and a 
number of the Public School Inspectors have rendered valuable assistance in this 
work. 

But consolidation is not in all cases practicable, in some it is indeed inadvis- 
able, and in any case it will be impossible for many years to come to secure 
the consolidation even of a majority of the schools of the Province. Sometimes, 
indeed, the manifest remedy is distribution, not consolidation. Sometimes it con- 
sists in taking one or more of the desirable features of consolidation as e.g., 
transportation, or the union of several school sections in a central school for 
senior work and night school purposes. Sometimes, especially in the Districts, 
the difficulties will have to be met by the itinerant teacher and perhaps the 
travelling school. Sometimes, indeed, none of these remedies is available and 
we are brought face to face with the question " How can the ungraded rural school 
be made more efficient? " 

Increasing the Efficiency of the Ungraded Rural School 

Whilst the rural schools of to-day are, of course, vastly superior to their 
predecessors of earlier days in accommodations and equipment, in the education 
and training of their teachers, in their broadened curriculum, in the greater 
opportunities for general culture afforded by the school library, and in better 
and more directive inspection, they have suffered certain serious impairments. 
The attendance has greatly diminished ; the big boys and big girls, the winter pupils 
of earlier days, have disappeared ; the supply of male teachers has steadily decreased, 
and the senior pupils have either left school or have found their way to a neighbour- 
ing High or Continuation School. The division of labour, effected by the rise of 
the High Schools, is perhaps the most significant feature of the change from the old 
to the new. Where only one or two pupils are left to carry on the higher work in 
the rural schools, the trustees are unwilling to introduce fifth forms. How can 
these disadvantages be repaired ? 

In schools where the average attendance is twelve or under, the tutorial method 
can be introduced and the lack in numbers can be made up for, (1) by the greater 
attention which it is possible for the teacher to give each pupil, (3) by the greater 
elasticity which is possible and desirable in the organization of the school, (3) by 
the greater opportunity afforded for individual self-expression, but all this will 
require teachers trained for this kind of work, teachers of tact and initiative. 

Is there any way of bringing back the winter pupils to the rural schools? 
There is little doubt that the more rigid organization and classification of the 



1919 DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATION 



schools was a contributory cause to the withdrawal of this class of pupils. 
Boys and girls of fifteen, sixteen and over, whilst anxious enough to get additional 
instruction along special lines, are unwilling to carry forward all the subjects of 
the general curriculum. Given reasonable powers of selection of subjects, it is 
reasonable to expect that some would return. But the school to which they are 
admitted must be in charge of teachers of breadth of mind and experience. 
On the other hand, it is not possible or even desirable to prevent pupils 
in a position to do so from continuing their education in a High or Continuation 
School ; but provision should be made for the rest, wherever possible, by necessary 
modification in the Course of Study to allow time for conducting the higher work, 
or by the partial consolidation referred to above, or by the introduction of the 
rural night schools, conducted by a committee for one, two, three or four adjoining 
schools, receiving liberal provincial aid. The course of study in such rural night 
schools might be left largely in charge of the local committee, subject, of course, 
to the approval of the Minister of Education, but it is again obvious that the 
teachers in such cases must be persons of character, experience and enthusiasm 
for their work. 

It is plain then that whatever advantages may be derived from special methods 
and greater flexibility of organization there are just two things that, when every- 
thing else has been done, must be the final determining factors in the success of 
the rural schools — (1) The continuity and duration of the school period, (2) the 
efficiency of the teachers. It may be assumed that the continuity of attendance 
will be taken care of by the provisions of the School Attendance Act of 1919. 
The significance of the duration of the school period is not sufficiently understood. 
Whilst it is possible for the boy between the ages of 8 and 14 to learn many 
things, the forces, spiritual and intellectual, which are to determine his future 
place in society have scarcely yet begun to function. The character moulding 
period lies between the ages of 14 to 21. Up to the age of 14 the boy has 
been acquiring habdts, affections and ideals, largely under the influence of 
authority; from the age of 14 onward he begins to acquire principles of conduct 
and to regulate his life more or less consciously upon these principles; in other 
words, he is reaching the conception of the world as a reasonable world and of 
himself as a reasonable agent within it. In intellectual as in moral progress age is 
an essential element, and fourteen years is all too young for the reception of those 
ideas that fit a man for citizenship. The Adolescent Act of 1919, when proclaimed, 
may do much if it can be enforced through the strength of public sentiment to 
furnish opportunity for the operation of those regulative and directing influences 
throughout the period from 14 to 18, so important for the child's future as a citizen 
and for the safety, security and progress of society itself. 

But how are we to secure better teachers for our rural schools, for, in the 
end, everything depends upon that. 

First, by giving the training of teachers in the Normal Schools a more 
practical and less theoretical turn than hitherto. Steps in this direction have 
already been taken by the modifications of the Normal School curriculum. 

Second, by the special training of rural teachers for the various types of 
ungraded rural schools. Hitherto emphasis has been placed mainly upon what 
are at present the superior types found in the near vicinity of the city normal 
school. 

Third, by giving the teachers some kind of permanent interest in the school 
and the locality by the erection of teachers' residences or otherwise. 



THE REPOET OF THE No. 17 



Fourth, and most important, by paying adequate salaries for the teachers' 
services. 

The success of the schools depends primarily upon the eflBciency of the teachers. 

The increase in the supply of efficient teachers depends upon the remuneration 
offered for their services. If salaries are inadequate, the supply will be impaired, 
for whilst it may be possible to hold men and women in the profession for which 
they have been trained and which they have selected for their life work for a few 
years at salaries less than they might secure in other lines of work for services 
requiring equal training and ability, all but the most unprogressive will soon effect 
the necessary readjustment and seek employment in new fields. A profession which 
fails to hold its most experienced and efficient members must equally fail to attract 
new members to its ranks. The higher the rewards offered, the keener will be 
the competition for these rewards. It will not do to depend upon a very general 
belief that teaching is a vocation and that there will always be those who will 
be prepared to sacrifice themselves to the work. It may be true that the highest 
paid teachers are not always the best; but it is always true that the way to get 
good teachers is to pay good salaries. 

Thirty years ago the rural male teachers received salaries ranging from $350 
to $500 per annum. Taking into account the purchasing power of the dollar, these 
salaries would be the equivalent to-day of salaries ranging from $1,050 to $1,500, 
but the actual present range is at least $250 lower at both ends of the scale. 
To maintain the existing supply of teachers, it will be necessary to increase the 
present wage scale at least 25 per cent. 

There are two reasons why the salaries of teachers have not risen proportion- 
ally to the increased cost of living. First, it is a general economic law that 
the prices of commodities fluctuate readily to the law of demand and supply, 
and the same thing is true of the wages of the worker employed by the day or 
the week. The salary earner, on the other hand, engaged for a longer period at a 
fixed stipend per annum receives only small advances from year to year. Second, 
there is always the temptation to substitute a cheap worker for a high grade worker 
when it is difficult to evaluate his services in terms of dollars and cents, especially 
when the financial interests of his employers are not directly at stake. 

To counteract and rectify the operation of these two principles, the legislative 
grants have been increased from time to time and have been paid on a basis to 
encourage the payment of higher salaries. A table showing the increase in the 
legislative grants to rural schools in the counties is given below : 

1905 $120,000 

1907 380,000 

1913 400,000 

1918 500,000 

1919 750,000 

In order to supply the necessary inducement to increase the salaries of the 
teachers above the shoal level, it will be necessary this year to increase the amount 
to one million dollars. 

In making these increases the legislature has been simply following the path 
marked out by Ryerson in his demand for " free elementary schools." This term 
does not necessarily mean schools supported wholly by the legislature, but it does 
mean schools whose cost is evenly distributed over all the people; and legislative 



1919 DEPAETMEXT OF EDUCATIOX 7 

« 

grants are certainly a necessary and very practical method of securing this distri- 
bution. The evident advantages of local levies for educational purposes need not 
be discussed here. 

But the increase from $?50,000 to $1,000,000 in the legislative grants will 
not be sujfficient to solve the problem of maintaining and increasing the efficiency 
of the rural schools. The township grants must be increased. In order to distribute 
the burden of education equally over the township, the legislature in 1906, in the 
ca^e of the richer townships, increased the township grants from $150 to $300 
for each principal and from $100 to $200- for each assistant; at that time the 
salaries paid principals averaged about $450, i.e., the township grant represented 
about two-thirds of the teacher's salary. To restore the balance, it will be necessary 
to double the township grant. The legislation in this direction has already been 
anticipated in certain townships of the Province. 

There is little doubt that if these measures are put into effect, the irritation 
which sometimes arises in the endeavour to enforce the payment of adequate 
salaries would disappear, and that the Public Schoo • ' 3v would be relieved 

of what is, at present, one of his most unpleasa^"^ "i.oies and would be left free 
to devote his energies more entirely to his chief duty, which is to encourage, direct 
and inspire the teachers imder his charge, and to interpret and mould educational 
opinion in his constituency. 

From time to time, during the la^t fifty years, for the purpose of distributing 
the load more equitably and of securing a better unit of administration, proposals 
have been made to abolish section boundaries and replace the present section 
Boards either by Township or by County Boards of Trustees. In deference to 
these proposals the Legislature in 1871 introduced an amendment to the Schools 
Act allowing the school sections of a township to unite under a single Township 
Board. This law is still on the statute books, but has been acted upon in only a 
few cases. This is perhaps due to the difficulty of securing a majority vote in all 
the sections and also to the reluctance of the school sections to surrender local 
control. Xo doubt an amendment authorizing Township Coimcils, at the request 
of a certain number of ratepayers, to submit the question to a plebiscite at the 
municipal elections would meet a freer response. There is little doubt that under 
a Township or County Board System the problem of consolidation and of readjust- 
ing section boundaries, where necessar}-, would be very much easier to solve; and 
it is only reasonable to suppose that it would be possible to secure a better adminis- 
trative body with a wider and more independent outlook if its numbers were 
selected from the enlarged area. Whether, however, this step might not tend to 
diminish local interest in the schools, and might not result in inadequate attention 
to the poorer parts of the district is still open to question. There are practical 
difficulties in the way of the adoption of the coimty as the unit of administration, 
which, if not insuperable, are still serious. 

In certain states of the Union a compromise system is in vogue by which 
whilst the local Boards retain and continue to exercise some of their functions 
the larger part of the Administration is in the hands of the County Board. But 
whether the County Board scheme be brought into operation or not, it is surely 
not unreasonable to expect that a much larger grant for the accommodations and 
equipment of the rural schools should be derived from the county than at present. 

More conservative schemes than those referred to above would seek to reform 
rather than to abolish or limit the powers of the local Boards, by requiring that the 
number of Trustees be increased from three to five, or that the majority of the 



8 THE KEPOET OF THE Xo. 17 



members be the heads of families with children attending the school, or that two 
members out of five, or one out of three, as the case may be, should be women. 
All these proposals seem to indicate that public opinion is insisting that the 
next step in educational progress must be in the direction of a reorganization of 
the local Boards of Trustees. 

Conclusion 

The past two or three years have witnessed great changes in the educational 
system of the Province, especially in the direction of effecting new contacts between 
the home and the school, between the outdoor life of the child and his life in the 
school, between the world of things and the world of books, and it will be some time 
before the new content of the curriculum can be properly blended into the general 
course. Nature Study, Art, Music, and Hygiene will, as time goes on, present 
less and less the appearance of weighing down an overloaded curriculum and will 
be found to have the effect of lightening and enlivening the studies which have 
for generations constituted the ground work of education. In these strange and 
striving times, in the universal upheaval and unrest, it will be necessary for the 
educational worker carefully to observe the currents and cross currents of public 
opinion, the trend of the economic changes now taking place, the changing weave 
of the social fabric. It will be necessary for him to reconstruct his theory and 
practice to suit whatever appears likely to be permanent and fundamentally sound 
in these changes, and perhaps not less necessary to resist to the uttermost what 
is merely specious and ephemeral. The world to-day looks to the schools more than 
to any other agency to heal and guard the past and to direct and stabilize progress 
in the future. 

I have the honour to be, 

Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Jno. Waugh, 
Chief Inspector of Piihlic and Separate Schools. 
Toronto, February, 1920. 



1919 DEPAETMEXT OF EDUCATIOX 



APPENDIX B 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF INDUSTRIAL AND 
TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

To THE HoXOUPuABLE E. H. GrAXT, 2I.P.P., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

I have the honour to submit herewith my Annual Eeport on Industrial and 
Technical Schools. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

F. W. Merchaxt. 
ToEOXTO, February 18th, 1920. 

Advance During the Year 1919=20 

The present year marks the most important advance made in industrial and 
technical education since the passing of the Industrial Education Bill of 1911, 

The opportunities for instruction have been materially widened by the opening- 
of new schools in a large number of centres and by a remarkable increase in at- 
tendance at both day and evening classes. The organization has been strengthened 
also by a more direct adapt-ation of courses to meet the needs of workers and in- 
dicfries. The extension of the facilities for training in many centres is restricted 
now only by the limitations in the accommodations and equipment available. 

The Dominion Technical Education Act of 1919, which sets aside ten millions 
of doUars for promoting and assisting technical education in Canada, and the 
more liberal provision made by the Province through its present scheme of grants, 
have stimulated municipalities to enter upon an extensive programme of building 
operations. 

But, unquestionably, the most important forward step taken during the year 
was the passing of the Adolescent School Attendance Bill of 1919. The Act secures 
to adolescents of all classes more equal and adequate opportunities for training and, 
at the same time, tends to increase our national resources by providing the means 
for rendering available for more effective service a much larger proportion of the 
potential talent in our youth. 

Evening Schools in New Centres 

Evening schools were opened during the year at Beamsville, Iroquois Falls,. 
Kingston, Lindsay, Midland, Port Hope, Orillia, Oshawa, Sarnia, St. Thomas, 
Sturgeon Falls, Timmins, Walkerville. 

The enrolment in these schools has been exceptionally large. The spontaneous 
response to the opportunities offered is an additional evidence of the important 
service to be rendered by evening schools. 

Walkerville offers a typical illustration. Early in the autumn the Department 
received enquiries from the School Board regarding the possibilities of evening 
classes. A member of the staff was sent to make a preliminary survey and to offer 



10 THE REPORT OF THE Xo. 17 

advice. The School Board took up the work of organization with energy, and its 
action was heartily supported by the management of the industries in Walkerville 
and Ford. An evening school was opened with the following enrolment : Machine 
shop practice 142, draughting 92, blue-print reading 30, electricity 13, stationary 
engineering 14, tool making 67, die making 22, dressmaking 39. Total 417. The 
management of the Ford Company placed temporarily at the disposal of the Ad- 
visory Industrial Committee its machine shops to provide accommodation and equip- 
ment for evening instruction in machine shop practice. The board has purchased 
an extensive equipment which will be used for this purpose as soon as it is installed. 

Sarnia affords another illustration of the existence of a large and, perhaps, un- 
suspected field of service for evening schools. In 1917 and again in 1'918, the 
Board of Education considered the matter of opening evening classes and went so 
far as to send special deputations to other places to enquire into their working. 
However, it was felt that, partly on account of inadequate accommodations and 
partly on account of an apparent lack of public demand for instruction, the time was 
not opportune. Last autumn the question was again taken up by the board, 
and it was decided to make a beginning. The response was overwhelming; six 
hundred and eighty-five persons applied for the various forms of instruction offered. 
A day technical school will be organized when the new combined Collegiate In- 
stitute and Technical School is opened. '' 

The importance of the organization of evening schools in such places as Iro- 
quois Falls, Sturgeon Palls and Timmins in Northern Ontario should not be over- 
looked. These communities have important industries employing a large number 
of workers who need training, but they are far removed from the educational 
centres of the Province. Evening schools, therefore, are proving to be of great 
assistance. The demand is mainly for instruction in English and in the theoretical 
and practical work connected with employments in the industries. The following 
list of classes at Timmins is of interest because it give^ an indication of the varied 
needs of those applying for instruction: Machine drawing, arithmetic, shop 
mathematics, senior English, junior English for mixed nationalities, English for 
Finns, English for Chinese, sewing, chemistry. 

Increase in Attendance at Evening Schools 

There has been a marked increase in the attendance at the evening schools that 
have been in operation for several years. As my reports have shown, a constant 
increase in attendance has been maintained from year to year in these schools 
througliout the war, but with the return of the men from overseas, special' demands 
are being made for instruction. It would appear from the reports received at the 
Department that the attendance during the year 1919-20, will probably be fifty per 
cent, in advance of that for the previous year. 

The enrolment does not include the attendance of partially disabled men 
receiving vocational training at day classes under the direction of the Soldiers' 
Aid Commission, but these classes have affected indirectly the attendance at even- 
ing schools, because many of the men who have completed day courses continue 
their instruction at evening classes. Moreover, the suiccess of the day classes in 
fitting partially disabled men for occupations has induced a large number of men 
who do not qualify under the Regulations of the Department, of Soldiers' Civil 
Re-establishment for day class instruction to enter upon vocational courses at even- 
ing schools. 



1919 DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATIOX 11 

A Wider Adaptation of Courses to Meet the Needs of Workers and Industries 

It has been the aim of the Department through the organization of the In- 
dustrial and Technical Schools to provide for a thorough training in the essentials 
of a general education as a basis for citizenship and vocational efficiency and, at 
the same time, to furnish specialized training in the subjects and operations 
Avhich are fundamental to trades and industries. 

The first of these aims has been very fully attained in connection with the 
day schools. A fair share of the time and attention of the organizers during the 
autumn was devoted to realizing more fully the second of these aims by assisting 
Advisory Committees and Principals of schools in widening materially the field 
of theoretical and practical instruction offered, especially in evening class courses. 

The more important extensions have been connected with providing courses 
for stationary and marine engineers, masters and mates, railroad employees, and 
electrical workers. 

A new act respecting licenses for stationary engineers came into eSect on 
January 1st, 1920. This act grades engineers into four classes according to exper- 
ience and technical knowledge. To provide an opportunity for men to obtain 
theoretical and practical instruction for the different grades of certificates, it was 
found advisable to organize evening classes in a number of the towns and cities. 
The work was undertaken at the suggestion of the Canadian Association of Sta- 
tionary Engineers, and it has had the hearty support of the Provincial Department 
of Labour. 

Through the request of the National Association of Marine Engineers classes 
in marine engineering to prepare men for the higher grades of certificates have 
also been established. Such classes are now in operation in Sarnia, Owen Sound, 
Colli ngwood. Midland, Fort "William and Kingston. 

Classes for masters and mates to prepare for the examinations for the various 
grades of certificates have been organized in Port Arthur, Owen Sound and Sarnia. 
A school for navigation has been conducted for some years in Kingston, and schools 
under private auspices carried on in Toronto and Collingwood. The school 
in Collingwood under Captain Inkster has been taken over by the Advisory Indus- 
trial Committee. The masters and mates are, as a rule, free from duty during the 
winter months; accordingly, the courses, which are of a intensive character, may 
be provided for in day classes, 

Th^ schools entered a new field this year in providing instruction for railway 
engineers, firemen and train hands in the operation of air brakes and other special 
equipment. A beginning was made in connection with the school at Lindsay. The 
railway companies are giving their support and assistance in providing charts and 
other equipment. This field will probably have important extensions in the 
future. 

The rapid growth of the Hydro-Electric system in Ontario, and the consequent 
displacement of coal by electricity, is bringing into existence a new industry. The 
manufacture, installation and maintenance of electrical devices, transmission lines, 
generators, motors, transformers, and control devices is affording employment to 
an increasing number of workers. Many of these workers are stationary engineers, 
machinists, or handy men who have become engaged in the industry with an inade- 
quate training for promotion in the work. The industrial and technical schools 
offer them an opportunity for instruction and many are taking advantage of it. 



12 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



Organization of Evening School Courses 

The length and the type of evening school courses are receiving more attention 
from Principals and Advisory Industrial Committees. In some cases, it has been 
found advisable to offer courses which extend throughout a year or even a succes- 
sion of years. The Technical Schools at Toronto and Hamilton offer first, second, 
third and fourth year courses in a number of subjects and departments, and these 
courses are taken from year to year" by students with the regularity that marks the 
progress of High School or University instruction. Other Technical .Schools are 
beginning to offer extended courses of a similar nature. But the greater part of 
the work accomplished through evening school instruction has been done through 
shorter courses. Taking into account the needs of most communities, a short 
unit course designed to give instruction in some narrow, but well-defined field, is 
found to be, on the whole, the most effective means of evening school instruction. 
By arranging unit courses in sequence it may be made possible to lead students 
from topic to topic throughout a series in an extended course when they could not 
be induced to enter a course planned on the basis of long and continuous attendance. 
The units of such a course should be so arranged as to deal with one specific topic 
at a time and the instruction in each topic should, as far as possible, be complete in 
so far asi it goes. In this way, the knowledge of definite accomplishment becomes 
an incentive to further progress. 

The appendix to the Recommendations and Regulations of the Department 
contain suggestive unit courses in a variety of subjects for men and women. 

Building Operations 

The chief obstacle in the way of the establishment and extension of day schools 
has been the lack of accommodations. This obstacle will, in the near future, be 
removed in the case of most of the larger industrial centres. 

The liberal grants offered by the Department of Education for buildings and 
equipment for technical education have made it possible for a number of muni- 
cipalities to enter upon extensive building programmes. In some cases the schools 
proposed are to be made departments of the Collegiate Institutes or High Schools ; 
in others, they are to be established as independent institutions. Niagara Falls and 
Fort William have buildings in process of construction. Sault Ste Marie, Sudbury, 
Sarnia, and Kitchener have decided to build and have their pkns in 
various stages of completion. The large new Central Technical School at Toronto 
is already overcrowded and the Advisory Industrial Committee are considering plans 
for additional accommodations in a new school in the eastern part of the city. The 
question of building is being considered also by Belleville, the Border Cities (includ- 
ing Windsor, Walkerville, Ford, Sandwich and Ojibway), Brantford, Collingwood, 
Gruelph, Owen Sound, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Stratford, and other muni- 
cipalities. 

Industrial and Educational Surveys 

In order to determine the data necessary for giving advice to Advisory Indus- 
trial Committees on many questions referred to the Department, such as the char- 
acter of the courses to be established, and the accommodation and equipment to be 
provided for day and evening schools, the officers of the Department made during 
the year a number of industrial and educational surveys. 

These surveys were of special value in the case of municipalities, where building 
operations were under consideration. They furnished definite information about 



1919 depaetme:ntt of education 13 



the occiipations in which the people were engaged, the number of workers in each 
occupation, and the number of adolescents likely to attend a day technical school. 

In each of the cities where a survey was made, the important industrial plants 
were visited and information obtained concerning the number of men, women, 
boys and girls employed and their distribution into skilled, semi-skilled and un- 
skilled workers. An enquiry was made into the nature of the product of the plant 
and an analysis made of the processes of manufacture with a view of determining 
what parts of these processes could be made subjects of study in day or evening 
classes. 

Information was obtained from the employers or superintendents concerning 
the educational attainments that young people should possess in entering upon 
work and the courses of instrutetion that would prove helpful to workers already 
engaged in the industry. 

The opinions of both employers and employees respecting the best means for 
providing industrial or technical training, were sought and their attitude towards 
co-operating with school authorities determined. 

The relation of these surveys to the problem of organization is best shown by 
an illustration. The part which electricity as a source of energy is beginning to 
play in the industrial and home life of the Province was amply illustrated in most 
of the surveys. In the City of Fort William, the survey showed that practically no 
motive power was being generated from coal, except in locomotives, and that even 
in this field electric power is being seriously considered. There were found to be 
very few stationary engineers and those engaged "vv^ere acting mainly as firemen to 
generate steam for heating purposes. On the other hand, the number of men who 
were enployed in the installation and maintenance of electric devices and prime 
movers was unexpectedly large. Over 2,500 motors are used in this city alone. 

A similar condition was found to obtain in Niagara Falls. Here, however, 
the electrical workers were concerned not so much in the use of electricity as power 
as in its development. Their work was concerned with the installation, supervision 
and maintenance of generating and transmission machinery and equipment. 

The facts obtained in these cities were of direct value as data in determining 
the character of the accommodation and the equipment required in the technical 
schools to be built. Both municipalities are providing in the new buildings ade- 
quate accommodation for giving instruction to electrical workers. The equipment 
of the electrical laboratories and workshops will, of course, differ with the differ- 
ences in the character of the instruction required in these places. 

Federal Aid to Industrial and Technical Education 

The movement to secure federal aid for industrial and technical education, 
supported by Provincial Departments of Education, Manufacturers' Associations, 
labour organizations, and by the report of the Eoyal Commission was retarded 
through the stress of war conditions ; but after the war the Dominion Government 
responded to the demands, and, as a phase of their legislation for reconstruction, 
passed the Technical Education Bill. 

The Technical Education Act as contained in Chap. 73 of the Statutes of 
Canada 9-10, George 5, 1919, provides that for the purpose of promoting and 
assisting Technical Eclucation in Canada sums aggregating $10,000,000.00 shall be 
appropriated and paid out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund of Canada during 
each fiscal year for the period of ten years beginning -with the year ending the 31st 
of March, 1920. 



14 THE EEPORT OF THE No. 17 

In accordance with this Act, $700,000.00 will be appropriated for the fiscal 
year ending the 31st of March, 1920, with an increase of $100,000.00 for each 
succeeding year until 1924, when the sudqj will be $1,100,000.00 ; at this fixed sum 
the annual installment remains until the end of the period. 

Each of the provinces wi\\ be paid a fixed sum of $10,000 yearly, and the re- 
mainder of the appropriation will be allotted and paid to the Governments of the 
respective provinces in proportion to the population of the said provinces re- 
spectively, as determined by the last federal decennial census. 

Ontario's share df this appropriation for the fiscal year ending 31'st March, 
1920, will be $224,382.30. 

By a Provincial Order-in-Council the Province signified its desire to take ad- 
vantage of the Act and an agreement has been made between the Dominion and 
Provincial authorities setting forth the conditions upon which the Dominion funds 
will be made available for Provincial expenditure. 

In accordance with the terms of this agreement technical education is defined 
to mean and to include education or instruction which is supplementary to and 
distinct from the general educational system of the Province, and the controlling 
purpose of which is to fit young persons for useful employment in vocational, techni- 
cal, or industrial pursuits or to improve the efficiency of those already employed in 
any such pursuits, subject, however, to the following limitations: — 

(1) No person under thirteen years of age who has not passed the third class 
in an elementary school of the Province shall be admitted to technical day classes. 

(2) No person under fourteen years of age shall be admitted to technical 
evening classes. 

(3) Courses of instruction of college grade are not included. 

(4) All courses of instruction for persons over fourteen years of age extending 
over one or more years, shall include " Fundamentals of Business " and " Socio- 
logy " for males and " Child Welfare and Elements of Nursing " for females. These 
subjects shall also be included in shorter courses of study in all cases where it is 
practicable. 

In addition to the stipulations contained in the Act, the agreement provides 
that in determining the amount spent by the Province on technical education no 
account shall be taken of: — 

(1) Any payments or support given to any religious or privately owned school 
or institution. 

(2) Any expenditures which have been made in respect of any educational 
work for which a grant is paid to the Province by the Minister of Agriculture of 
Canada. 

The following expenditures and no others shall be deemed to be properly made 
on technical education: — 

(1) Purchase of land, buildings, furnishings, and equipment to be used ex- 
clusively for technical education. 

(2) Maintenance of buildings, insurance, rentals, light, water, gas, power and 
fuel for institutions or departments used exclusively for technical education. 

(3) Salaries and travelling expenses of persons employed for purposes of 
technical education. 

(4) Salaries of all teachers who are employed to conduct technical education 
classes which are not a part of an elementary or high school course. 

(5) Training of teachers specifically for technical education. 



1919 DEPAETMEXT OF EDUCATIOX 15 



The Province is required to furnish the Department of Labour with the follow- 
ing information: — 

(1) A monthly statement of the work done during each month on a form 
to be prescribed by the Minister. 

(2) At the end of each quarter of the federal fiscal year a detailed financial 
statement showing the amount' expended by the Province under this agreement. 

(3) Such evidence as the Minister may require to show that the amounts 
paid to the Province are expended in accordance with the terms of the agreement. 

(4) Plans and specifications of all proposed new buildings or extensions and 
new equipment. 

The Minister of Labour or anyone authorized by him shall at all times have 
the right to inspect any work of technical education existing or being carried on 
under the terms of this agreement, and if the accommodation, equipment, text- 
books, courses of study, discipline, or qualifications of teachers are in his opinion 
not adequate or satisfactory, or if such wark is not being carried on to his satis- 
faction, he may withhold payment of any moneys remaining unpaid under the 
terms of this agreement. Persons appointed by the Minister under this section to 
inspect shall not have any directive control over any part of the educational organ- 
ization of the Province, but shall have opportunity to witness any part of the work, 
as normally conducted, from time to time. 

The Province agrees also to take the necessary steps to provide for the ade- 
quate training of a sufiicient number of teachers, and to furnish such other ofiicers 
as may be necessarj^ to carry- out the provisions of the agreement. 

Adolescent School Attendance Act 

The public possibly scarcely yet realizes the importance of the forward step 
taken by the Provincial Legislature last session in passing the Adolescent School 
Attendance Bill. We have been prone in lat^ years to give attention in discussing 
the means for improvement in education mainly to the varying factors which modify 
instruction for those at present in attendance at elementar)^ and secondary schools 
and we have overlooked the large body of young people who drop out of school at 
an early age. It is true that from time to time we have discussed the position of 
the 80 per cent, whose education terminates with the Public Schools, but, in this 
connection, we have been concerned mainly in overcrowding the Public School 
course of study in the interests of those who are expected to leave at fourteen years 
of age and we have failed to provide an adequate solution of the real problem in- 
volved, that of extending the period of education for all through some form of 
compulsory attendance. The aim di the Adolescent School Attendance Act is to 
make provision for such an extension. 

I make the following quotations from a recent work, " Problems of National 
Education " by Twelve Scottish Educationists, edited by John Clarke, for two rea- 
sons, first, because they furnish an admirable summary of the needs, the principles 
involved, the scope, and the ends to be attained through such legislation as we 
have secured in Ontario and, second, because they show that we are attacking 
a problem which is not peculiar to one part of the Empire, and that our means 
of attack has the support of thoughtful and experienced educators in a country 
that, admittedly, has been foremost in educational thought and practice. 

*" Better education and more education are an urgent necessity, national and 
democratic. We require to mobilise the intellectual resources of the nation against 

*From the Editor's preface, p. xix. 



16 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



the arduous times that lie ahead, when 'parts' developed by education will be of 
more and more account. Experience tends to sho^y, has indeed shown, that brains 
capacity, talent-whatever name we prefer-are not ^h\P^^^^f ^^^^\"^„^7^,^''' 
class, but are diffused in an irregular and uncertain fashion through all classes 
though unfortunately in many cases arrested, stunted, perverted through lack ot 
training. All this store of potential capacity must be conserved for the nation. 
Every source of energy must be tapped. In order to recover the concealed gold, 
the whole body of ore must be treated. Every child of every grade of society 
must have his chance. No one will henceforward be precluded from the full advan- 
tages of education until he (or she) has proved his inability to benefit by them. 
Equality of opportunity will become a reality, so far as legislation can make it so 
No distinction between higher and lower grade will be drawn artificially, it will 
be left to reveal itself automatically in process of treatment. Greater variety ot 
method will be rendered possible and will be adopted. Material refractory under 
one course of treatment may respond to a different method. For example, many 
pupils, particularly boys, who appear to show no aptitude at all for school studies, 
the practical bearing of which they may fail to appreciate, not infrequently 
develop ability in some special direction when they are released from school, 
thrown on their own responsibility, and brought to concentrate attention on 
studies relative to their employment. And there are numerous other varieties 
of pupils for whom education at present does far less than it might do. ihe 
future will endeavour to prevent this waste and failure, and to secure for each 
and all their chances in life." 

f " It is difficult to exaggerate the importance of the new principle embodied m 
the Education Acts for England and Scotland by which compulsory training for 
young persons during working hours is made operative. As has been already stated, 
the modern workshop no longer provides an adequate training for the apprentice by 
which he can become master of his craft, and the technical school has had to be 
satisfied with scraps and snippets of time in the evening and on Saturday after- 
noons and with tired pupils, incapable, in very many instances, of sustained effort. 
The State has been playing with the question of systematic technical education and 
wasting large sums of money with very inadequate results. Those responsible for 
technical education have long felt that no real progress was possible under the 
former system. The claim of part of the time of the workshop for systematic 
training is only just and right, and for the first time puts technical education in 
its proper place and gives it well-deserved opportunities. 

The results which will be obtained will, one feels confident, be remarkable. 
Every one responsible for education longs to deal with the young mind between 
the ao-es of fourteen and eighteen; each year shows a rapidly increasing mental 
capacity and ability to grasp principles. They are the most fruitful years intellec- 
tually, and the mental gain and the moral discipline which the pupil will obtain as 
a result of systematic study will be very marked. 

The new scheme is only a beginning, but it is a recognition of the right of the 
young of the working classes to education during those years, and a recognition alsc 
of the fact that technical education and a thorough knowledge of a handicraft ar€ 
not matters to be despised, but worthy of the utmost consideration of the State 
Whether regarded from its purely material aspects or from its importance as estab- 
lishing the only possible principle upon which the great industrial democracy cal 

i Prom the article on Technical Education, by Dr. A. P. Laurie, Principal Herioj 
Watt College, Edinburgh, p. 247. s 

J 



1919 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION' 17 

attain a position of stability, the claiming of these hours for education marks the 
most important advance since compulsory elementary' education was first intro- 
duced." 

Provisions of the Adolescent School Attendance Act 

Two plans have been adopted by different countries for the extension of the 
period of compulsory education of the youth beyond fourteen years of age: (1) to 
provide for compulsory full-time education beyond the period of fourteen years of 
age; (2) to provide for part-time education. 

The aim of the Act is to combine the essential features of these two plans in 
so far as they are applicable to Ontario under present conditions. The provision? 
of the leading sections of the Act fall into three divisions: 

Division 1: The provisions for the extension of the full-time education of 
adolescents from fowteen to sixteen years of age. 

Where courses are established which will be of profit to adolescents, full-time 
attendance is compulsory for all adolescents between "fourteen and sixteen years, 
except in cases where parents or guardians can show that the part-time employment 
of those under their care is a necessity. 

Those necessarily at work must attend school at least 400 hours a year, 
but it is understood that the selection of the period of attendance can be so arranged 
as to be of the greatest advantage, both to young persons concerned and the ser- 
vices in which they are engaged. For example, young persons in rural sections 
who are necessarily employed on the farms during the busy seasons may, as was 
customary in pioneer days, attend school during winter months, when special courses 
can be arranged to meet their needs. 

There has been a demand in some quarters for the full-time attendance, with- 
out exemptions, of all persons between fourteen and sixteen years of age, but it 
would appear that until the State provides more adequately for the support of 
orphans, widows, and dependants, there is a real necessity for certain adolescents 
between these age limits to secure employment. Moreover, a reasonable amount of 
work, especially in agricultural and industrial employments, under proper condi- 
tions, may be made to contribute directly to the educational development of the 
youth. 

The purpose of this section of the Act is to ensure that all persons who are 
not necessarily employed are under instruction in an approved school when their 
educational status is not satisfactory. 

Division 2: The provisions for part-time instructi-on of adolescents between 
sirteen and eighteen yecars of age. 

Adolescents between sixteen and eighteen years of age who have not attained a 
satisfactory educational status, and who are not in full-time attendance at an 
approved school or college, are required to attend part-time courses of instruction 
for an aggregate of 320 hours per year when such courses of instruction are estab- 
lished in the municipality in which they reside or are employed. But in this case 
also the hours of attendance may be distributed as regards times and seasons to 
suit the circumstances of each locality. 

Division 3: The provisions for the compulsory establishment of part-time 
courses of instruction. 

The Act, in so far as it applies to the smaller urban municipalities and to 
rural school sections, provides that the establishment of part-time schools be 

3 E. 



18 THE EEPOPiT OF THE Xo. 17 

optional with school boards. The organization of schools in these cases is made 
to depend upon voluntary efforts because the providing of an adequate and economi- 
cal system of schools for the purpose would necessarily involve readjustments of 
present school areas, and it is manifest that permanent readjustments can be 
effected only through the voluntary co-operation of all parties concerned. Any 
attempt to force a change in boundaries, through consolidation or otherwise, would 
but impede the movement for more satisfactory school organizations. 

But the Act makes it compulsory for an urban municipality with a population 
of 5,000 or over, to organize suitable part-time courses of instruction for adoles- 
cents. 

In such municipalities the necessary courses for adolescents can be economi- 
cally provided, either through the extension of the present High School courses or 
through the organization of additional schools, without involving modifications in 
established school areas. 

Courses within the limits of the Public and Separate School course of study 
are to be provided by the boards in control of Public or Separate Schools. Courses 
within the limits of the High School course of study are to be provided by the 
boards in control of Continuation Schools or High Schools. 

The vocational courses for those engaged in trades or industries are to be pro- 
vided by and to be under the control of Advisory Industrial Committees, and the 
vocational courses for those engaged in commercial occupations are to be proxided 
by and to be under the control of Advisor^' Commercial Committees, provided for 
in the Industrial Education Act. 

The Act also makes provision for the machinery necessary to its effective 
operation, and for reimbursing municipalities that have established part-time 
courses of instruction through grants to be made from sums voted by the Legislature 
cither for this special purpose or for industrial or agricultural education. 

Comparison of the Adolescent School Attendance Act with Similar 
Laws in Other Countries 

The provisions of the Act are in all respects as far advanced as similar legisla- 
tion in other countries. 

Tn England full-time education is extended bv the Fisher Bill onlv to fourteen 
years of age, with provision for an extension later to fifteen years. In Scotland, 
the limit of the period is fifteen years. In Minnesota and Pennsylvania, the fore- 
most states in this respect in the United States, while the period of extension is 
the same as in the Ontario Act, the exemptions are more liberal. For example, in 
]\liiinesota a child who has completed the studies ordinarily required in the eighth 
grade (Form IV of the Public Schools in Ontario) is exempt. In Pennsylvania 
all engaged in domestic or farm service are exempt. 

In respect to the part-time education between sixteen and eighteen years of 
age the provisions of the Act are practically tlie same as those of the Fisher Bill 
and the Scotch Education Act; limit of period eighteen years: hour? per year at 
school, three hundred and twenty. These provisions, in respect to the limit of the 
period and to the number of hours per year at school, are also as far advanced in the 
line of progress as the most liberal provisions in the school laAVs of tlie State Depart- 
ments of Education in the United States. In Pennsylvania the limit of the period 
is sixteen years; in Wisconsin, seventeen years: and in New York and Utah, 
eighteen years. In Pennsylvania and Wisconsin the number of hours at school is 
eight per week; in New York, it is not less than four nor more than eight per week; 
in Utah, it is one hundred and forty-four hours per year. 



1919 DEPAETMEXT OF EDUCATIOX 19 



APPENDIX C 

REPORTS OF THE INSPECTORS OF CONTINUATION 

SCHOOLS 

I. REPORT OF INSPECTOR MILLS 

To THE HOXOUEABLE E. H. GeAXT, M.P.P., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

SiK _I have the honour to submit the following report on the Continuation 
Schools of the western portion of the Province which were under my supervision 
for the academic year 1918-1919; with some reference to salaries and qualifications 
of teachers in the schools of eastern Ontario inspected during the fall term of 1919. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

^' Your obedient servant, 

G. Iv. Mills. 
Toronto, December 31st, 1919. 

In this western part of the province there are sixty-eight schook, divided as 

f oUows : „ 

Grade A Schools (three teachers giving full time) f 

Grade B Schools (two teachers giving full time) • • ■ ^^ 

Grade C Schools (i) the full time of one teacher and half the time ot a 

second teacher 

(ii) the full time of one teacher '^ 

Qualifications of Teachers 

In these schools there were one hundred and twenty-eight teachers giving 
full time, and four teachers giving half time to the work. Thirty-six were 
male teachers of whom thirty-one were Principals. Of the teachers m these 
Continuation Schools thirty-five were graduates of Universities, of whom six were 
specialists in some department. The other teachers held either First Class or High 
School Assistant certificates. During the school year it was necessary to issue 
eleven Temporary- certificates in Art and nine in Physical Culture. 

Changes in Schools 

DurincT the school vear 1918-9, the School Boards of Exeter, Milton and Bur- 
lington decided to give'their schools the status of High Schools. The attendance 
had increased until for some time it had been necessary to employ a third teacher 
As the majority of the pupils come from the country, the change to a High School 
will be of considerable financial advantage. 



20 THE EEPOET OF THE Xo. 17 

The School Boards of Delaware, Mount Brydges and Dryden decided to add 
another teacher to the staff, and on September 1st the status of these schools Teas 
raised from Grade C to Grade B. In order to provide the necessary class rooms, an 
addition was built to the school, or other buildings were suitably remodelled. 

After investigation, the Public School Boards at Port Credit, Milverton, 
Hepworth and Lion's Head decided to establish Continuation Schools to open 
September, 1919, and these schools are now in operation. 

Scarcity of Teachers 

In my report of last year, I drew attention to the rapid falling off in the 
number of teachers available for Continuation School work. The hope that the 
end of the war would bring a return to the profession of those male teachers who 
had enlisted, and of many women who had taken up some form of war work or 
business occupation has not been fulfilled. The number returned has been more 
than balanced by the number who have left owing to marriage and to the more 
attractive salaries and better working conditions of business life. 

Salaries of Teachers 

That the scarcity of teachers is in great part due to the wholly inadequate 
salaries offered, may be seen from the following tabulated statement of salaries 
paid in 1915 and 1919. It should be remembered that in order to obtain the lowest 
grade of qualification necessar}- to teach in these schools a student must spend 
at least seven years in school, after having passed the Entrance examination. In 
addition to this many of the teachers have spent three or more years at a Univer- 
sity. The schools referred to are those of Eastern Ontario that I have inspected 
during the fall term of 1919. I have some reason to believe that the schools of 
my division not yet inspected have been somewhat more generous in the salaries 
offered and have a greater proportion of qualified teachers. 

From tliis table it will be seen that the increase in salan- for the four 
years 1915 to 1919, varies from nothing to 63.6 per cent., but the average for 
the thirty-one schools is 19.1 per cent. When one is aware that the index number 
of the wholesale prices was 299.6 in October, 1919, as compared with 134.6 in 
October, 1913, the increases in most cases must be regarded as pitifully small. 
One of the most important causes for the low salaries offered to the Continuation 
School teachers is set forth later, when referring to the claim for more liberal 
support from the county. 

It may also be seen that for the thirty-one schools inspected during the past 
fall term it has been necessary to issue thirty-six Temporary certificates. With 
60 many young, inexperienced, unqualified and constantly changing teachers, the 
vast majority of whom hope to leave the work in a very few years, the effort to 
improve the work done and to extend the service that may be given by these schools 
to the youth of surrounding communities does not give promise of gratifying 
results. 



1919 



DEPAETMEXT OF EDrCATIOX 



21 



Name of School 


Salary 1915 


Salary 1919 


Increase 
per cent. 


Temiwrary certificates 
necessary in 1919. 




$ 


$ 






Bancroft 


1.100 
700 


1,700 
900 


44.4 


Art. 


Bath 


850 
650 


1,100 
700 


20.0 


Art. 


Bowesville 


800 


850 


6.2 




Cardinal 


1,000 


1,000 


5.8 


Assistant, Art, Physical 




700 


800 




Culture. 


Eganville, P.S 


11,000 


1,200 
775 

800 


20.0 
0.0 




EganviUe, E.C.S.S... 


800 






700 


700 






Ennismore 


800 
700 


1,050 
820 


24.7 


Principal, Art, Phvsical 




Culture 


Frankford 


1,100 
600 


1,200 
750 


14.7 


Art. 






Finch 


1,000 
750 


1.150 
1.025 


24.3 








Jockvale 


800 
800 


900 
1,000 


12.5 
20.0 




Ears 


Assistant, Art, Phvsical 




700 


800 




Culture. 


Kenmore 


800 
575 


1,400 
850 


63.6 


Assistant, Art. 






*Kinbarn 


1,000 


1,100 
800(i time) 


10.0 


Principal, Art, Physical 




Culture. 


Lanark 


900 


1,000 


12.1 


Principal, Art, Physical 




750 


850 




Culture. 


Lansdowne 


775 

850 

650(1 time) 


1,100 • 

1,100 
850(1 time) 


42.0 
29.4 


Physical (Culture. 


Malakoff 


Principal, Art, Phvsical 




Culture. 


Merrickville 


1,000 
700 


1,000 
800 


5.8 


Physical Culture. 


Metcalfe 


900 
700 


1,200 
800 


25.0 


Assistant, Physical 




Culture. 


Mount Alb..'rt 


1,000 
700 


1,200 
900 


23.5 




*Xavan 


1,000 


1,100 

800(1 time) 
1.500 


10.0 








New Liskeard 


1.300 


21.9 


Physical Culture. 




750 


1,000 






North Augusta 


900 
775 


1,350 
900 


34.3 


Art. 


North Gower 


950 
700 


1,050 
850 


15.1 




Pakenham 


1.200 
850 


1,400 
900 


12.2 




RusseU 


1,000 
650 


1,200 
1,000 


33.3 




tSouth Mountain 


900 
750 


1,050 
750 


9.1 


Assistant, Art. 


Spencerville 


950 
750 


1.050 
725 


4.4 


Physical Culture. 


Stella 


1900 


900 

750 

1,125 


0.0 
12.5 


Art. 






Sutton 


11,000 








800 
1,100 


3.7 




Warkworth 


1,175 






850 


1,000 






Westmeath 


1,100 


1.200 


9.1 


Principal, Art, Phy. Culture 







* Established 1916. + Established 1917. 

I Where a second teacher has been added since 1915, the percentage of increase is calculated 
on the salary paid to the Principal. 



22 THE EEPOET OF THE Xo. 17 

Why Continuation Schools are entitled to more liberal support from the County 

1. The ratepayers of the village or school section in which the school is located 
must pay the entire cost of building, furnishing and equipping the school. Although 
this school provides the necessary accommodation for the youth of the surrounding 
country, the county contributes nothing toward the cost. 

2. Owing to increased cost of fuel, caretaking, school furnishings, equip- 
ment and supplies, and to increase in teachers' salaries, the cost of maintenance 
has increased rapidly in recent years. As the grants from the Legislature and 
County have remained the same, this additional cost of maintenance must be borne 
by the ratepayers of the Section in which the school is located. 

3. The county must pay the total cost of maintenance of county pupils 
attending a High School. In this way the county bears a share of the increased 
cost of maintaining High Schools. A comparison of the County grants paid to 
a High School and to a Continuation School similarly situated and having about 
the same attendance will show that the High Schools in most counties receive 
much more liberal assistance from the county than Continuation Schools. This 
comparison may be made by referring to the report of the Minister of Education. 

4. In the Continuation Schools Act an attempt was made to even up this 
difference by permitting a Continuation School Board to charge such fees as it 
may deem fair iip to the average cost of maintenance per pupil, whereas High 
Schools can charge only $10 per year. This would seem to open up a way whereby 
Continuation Schools might be maintained without serious burden to the village 
or rural section, but in actual practice it has not been found feasible to charge 
higher fees than are charged by the neighbouring High Schools. If higher fees 
are charged the effect is to drive the pupils to the nearest High School where the 
fees are lower and the staff is larger. If the children go to the neighbouring town, 
the parents go there frequently and take their trade away from what has been their 
usual place of business. After more than ten years of actual practice very few 
Boards charge higher fees than those charged at the neighbouring High Schools. 

5. Such a method of providing for the maintenance of Continuation Schools 
involves a decided injustice. ' Since the county as a whole pays the cost of main- 
tenance of county pupils attending High Schools, it is not fair that a man who 
happens to live near a High School should be able to obtain a High School edu- 
cation for his child for a fee of $10 per year, while another man should have to 
pay the whole cost of educating his child at a Continuation School (which averages 
$60 per pupil) besides paying in his county rate a part of the cast of educating 
the other man's child. 

6. At the beginning of the war, Legislative grants to Continuation Schools 
were reduced about 15 per cent, and those to High Schools about 20 per cent. 
This means a corresponding reduction of the county grants as, under the Act, 
the county has to pay only the equivalent of the Legislative grant. 

7. Owing to changed industrial conditions almost every industry- that had 
formerly been located in these small village centres has been either closed up or at- 
tracted to the larger towns or cities, leaving little opportunity for profitable employ- 
ment for many of the people. The development of the mail order departments 
of large departmental stores, parcel post, rural mail delivery, and co-operative 
buying and selling all tend to destroy their former commercial prosperity. As a 
result, small urban centres have shared less in the general prosperity of the country 
than any other part of the province and should not be expected to bear a large 
part of the cost of educating county pupils. 



1919 DEPAETMEXT OF EDUCATIOX 23 

It is iiies"itable that salaries must increase rapidly for some years if we hope 
to retain the services of efficient teachers. Since these schools provide for the 
educational needs of the surrounding country, the small village or rural section 
should not be expected to bear the whole of the increased cost of maintenance 
as well as the cost of providing the necessar}- school accommodation. Particularly 
in the case of those sections where it has been necessary in recent years to build 
new schooLs or extend the old ones in order to provide room to carry on Continu- 
ation School work is the present condition becoming an unfair burden. In addition 
to the usual cost of carrying on the school the ratepayers are paying the debenture 
debt on the building and are bearing almost all of the increased cost of maintenance 
due to present conditions. It is not intended to convey the idea that, since the 
county pays the total cost of maintenance of county pupils, the financial condition 
of High Schools is on a satisfactory basis, but it is on a more satisfactory basis 
than that of Continuation Schools. In view of the general prosperity of the country 
the time has arrived when school fees should be abolished and secondars- education 
made free to all. Such a move will necessitate much more liberal Legislative and 
Municipal grants to all classes of secondar}- schools. 

Extra Assistance given by County Councils 

It is true that many County Councils recognize the value of the work done 
by these Continuation Schools and the justice of their claim for more libera) 
support, and give extra grants over and above the equivalent of the Legislative 
grant which the law requires. Several of the County Councils, in particular those 
of Elgin, Bruce, Huron and Simcoe. deserve special commendation for tl;e spirit 
shown in providing for the support of Continuation Schools of the county. I am 
convinced that other County Councils will do as much if the claims of the schools 
are fairly presented. The following table shows the extra grants (over and above 
the equivalent of the Legislative grant) given by the different cotmties. The 
great variation in the amounts paid by the different counties illustrates the 
inequalities that vert* quickly arise from permissive legislation. However, it is 
worth noting that only five counties in the province that have Continuation Schools 
have so far failed to give some assistance beyond that required by law. 

County County Grants to Continuation Schools Over and Above 

the Equivalent of the Legislative Grants. 

Brant $300.00 in 1919 to each school. 

Bruce lOO^r plus $200.00. 

Carleton $100.00. 

Dufferin $100.00 and $15.00 per pupil. 

Elgin 150%. 

Essex $200.00. 

Grey 50%. 

Haldimand $200.00. 

Hastings $300.00 to Bancroft: other schools a proportionate amount 

based on attendance as compared with Bancroft. An 

extra special of $400.00 to Bancroft in 1919. 

Huron lOO'/c. 

Kent $250.00. 

Lambton Lower School course only, $150.00; Middle School course, 

$250.00. 

^^^^'"^ On same basis as High School grants. 

Leeds & Grenville $150.00 to each school. 

Lennox & Addington Usually an amount to cover deficit in one school and then 

^.,,. an equal amount to others; $250.00 in 1919. 

Middlesex $100.00 and cost of maintenance outside Continuation 

School district on same basis as High Schools. 



2i THE EEPOET OF THE Xo. 17 

County Grants to Continuation Schools Over and Above 
County. the Equivalent of the Legislative Grants. 

Norfolk ' $150.00; no definite basis. 

Northumberland & Durham., Warkworth, $400.00; Orono, $300.00; Millbrook, $300.00; 

$15.00 per pupil to Frankford, Hastings County. 

Ontario $100.00. 

Oxford $150.00. 

Perth Only one school — established September, 1919. 

Peel • Only one school — established September, 1919. 

Prescott & Russell $300.00 to each school. 

Simcoe 100%. 

Stormont, Dundas and Glen- 
garry 507f . 

Welland $100.00. 

Wellington $200.00 in 1919. 

Wentworth $200.00. 

York ' One-third of the Legislative grant. 

Advantages and Disadvantages 

It is a great advantage to parents to have a High or Continuation School at 
their doors and for this advantage they should be prepared to pay a fair proportion 
of the cost. It means that at relatively small cost and without having to .send 
their children away from home, they may obtain for them the advantages of a 
High School education. 

In the country home the problem is entirely different. If, notwithstanding 
the distance from school, unfavourable weather, bad roads, and need for help at 
home, the child has had the opportunity to attend school with sufficient regularity 
to reach the standard of Entrance examination, the parents must now face the 
necessity of sending the boy or girl of thirteen or fourteen years of age away from 
home to a boarding house and of paying weekly board. Only the parent who has 
had experience knows the anxiety and the cost of doing this. The youth, subject 
to other surroundings, customs and associates, and without parental control, care 
and influence, is being weaned away from home. He forms new companionships 
and insensibly conforms to their standard of conduct, habits and attitude towards 
things in general. In this lies the pull away from the farm and he rarely returns 
to the home with the same spirit of interest and affection he had when he left. 
Apart from the cost of sending the boy or girl away from home for four years to 
attend school there is the far more serious matter of the loss of the companionship 
and affection of the child at an age when it is dearest to the parent and most 
valuable to the youth. 

For the Province to provide opportunities for an education beyond that given 
by the public school is no longer a beneficence but an obligation. The problem to 
be solved is how this may be done with the least injustice to anyone. So long 
as the ratepayers of the small urban or rural centre have to provide school accom- 
modation free for the children of the surrounding country and bear all of the 
present increased cost of maintenance, there will be the feelino: that this arrange- 
ment is unfair. To expect the ratepayers of the country to pay the same proportion 
of the cost of school accommodation and maintenance as those who have the school 
at their doors would be manisfestly unfair. 

Recommendations 

I recommend the following amendments to the Continuation Schools Act and 
Regulations : 

1. The Legislative and County grants shall be greatly increased. 
'2. Xo fees shall be charged. 



1919 DEPARTMEXT OF EDUCATIOX 2o 

3. The Continuation Schools shall be placed on the same basis as High Schools 
in regard to cost of maintenance of county pupils. 

4. The definition of " maintenance "' shall include four per cent, of the cost of 
accommodations used for Continuation School purpose.?. 

5. Where, in order to provide room to carry on the work of a department 
of Agriculture or Household Science, it becomes necessar\- to erect a new building 
or to enlarge the pjesent building, similar assistance shall be given by the Legisla- 
ture to such rural or small urban centres as may be given toward the erec'.ion of 
Technical Schools in the larger urban centres. 

6. When it becomes necessary to add a third teacher to the staff of a Con- 
tinuation School in order to carr\' on the work of a Department of Agriculture 
or Household Science, the school shall still be regarded as a Grade B schcol and 
the courses of study, the qualifications of the staff, and the grants shall be those 
prescribed for Grade B schools with the addition of such subject? of study, qualifi- 
cations of teachers, and grants as may be prescribed for the work and maintenance 
of the particular departments that are carried on in the school. 



II. REPORT OF INSPECTOR HOAQ 

To THE Hoxoup.ABLE E. H. Geant, M.P.P. 

Mitiister of Education for Ontario. 

SiG^ — I beg to submit for your consideration the following report on the Con- 
tinuation Schools under my supervision for the year 1918-19. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. P. HOAG. 

Toronto, January. 1920. 

During the six months from January to June, 1919, I, as Continuation School 
Inspector, hrfd charge of the Eastern and Xorthern Districts of Ontario. In Sep- 
tember, however, following the usual custom, Inspector ^lills took over charge 
of the Eastern and Xorthern Districts, while I took charge of the Western Penin- 
sula of Ontario. I am in a position, therefore, to have some knowledge of con- 
ditions as they exist in the Continuation Schools of the Province. It is a pleasure 
to be able to report that in the main good work is being done, that trustees, teachers 
and pupils are interested in the welfare of the schools, and are desirous of im- 
proving the opportunities provided in them for secondary education. 

Financial Support 

Most of the Continuation Schools are maintained by small urban or entirely 
rural districts. It follows, therefore, that the cost of supporting them is often a very 
heavy one. At present the Province pays annually grants distributed under four 
heads, (i) Accommodation as graded by the Inspector; (ii) Equipment: (iii) 
Salaries, 20 per cent, of salaries over $-400 in the case of one-teacher schools and 
over $800 in the case of two-teacher schools, up to a maximum on salaries of $120 
to $240, and (iv) Fixed grants of $100 for one-teacher schools and $200 for two- 

4 E. 



26 THE REPORT OF THE Xo. 17 

teacher schools. Under the Continuation Schools Act the County Council of the 
County in which the Continuation School is situated must pay an amount equal 
to the Legislative grant. Many counties are at present paying twice the amount 
of the Legislative grant and one county is paying two and one-half times such 
grant. But all payments over the equivalent of the Legislative grants are optional 
on the part of the counties concerned. A number of counties, therefore, pay only 
the minimum amount required by law, namely the equivalent of the Legislative 
grant. 

Many, if not most, of the Continua,tion School Boards collect fees either from 
all the students in attendance at the schools or from those attending from outside 
the school district. 

The Legislative grants, the County grants, and the fees collected from stud- 
ents do not, of course, pay the entire cost of carrying on a Continuation School; 
the balance is borne by the district in which the Continuation School is 
situated. As in matny cases many of the students attending Continuation Schools 
reside outside the district in which the school is situated — in a number of cases 
from one half to three-fourths of such students are non-residents — it will be seen 
that the districts maintaining Continuation Schools have a heavy financial burden. 
When one considers that the ratepayers of the district must pa/y their share of the 
county grants, one can see that the burden is sometimes somewhat unfair. In 
a few cases where the Continuation School is near the border of the county, many 
students from the adjacent county attend. Under the Continuation Schools Act, 
no grants are required from the adjacent county. 

It seems that the matter of financial support of the Continuation Schools is 
one which might well be reconsidered. A few years ago while the war was going 
on, the Legislative grants to Continuation Schools were cut doAvn considerably and 
the maximum amounts paid on salairies were based on salaries as paid in pre-war 
times. As a result of the cutting dowTi of the Legislative grants, the county equi- 
valent grants were also cut down. 

May I respectfully suggest that relief to the Continuation School Boards might 
be given (a) by restoring the pre-war grants by the Province or even by increasing 
them, (h) by placing Continuation School Boards in the same position as High 
School Boards in regard to the cost of educating pupils from the county in which 
the school is situated or from adjacent counties. 

Art 

Last year I referred to the subject of Art on the course of study. I am 
more firmly convinced than ever that to make Art an obligatory subject for all 
students desiring to enter Model or Normal Schools, which means on ajll students 
of the Lower School Course of the Continuation Schools, is a mistake. Surely if 
it is necessary for all teachers to know Art so as to be able to teach it, the Normal 
Schools) and the Summer Schools can provide instruction. I am strongly of the 
opinion that Art should be optional in all Continuattion Schools. I, therefore, ven- 
ture to repeat what I said last year on this matter : " In many schools I find that 
the work in Art is not satisfactory. This is due in some degree to the fact that 
many teachers are not well quaHified to teach Art. It is, however, due also to some 
extent to the fact that many parents and trustees and most of the boys look upon 
the Art work as of little use. Indeed, some Boards have asked if they might not 
substitute simple commercial work and drawing for the colour work in Art. In 
the large High Schools and Collegia]te Institutes it is possible to teach both Art 



1919 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIOX 37 



and Commercial work, but in a two-teacher Continuation School this is impos- 
sible as the time of the teachers is fully taken up w:'h compulsory subjects of which 
Art is one. 

" It would appear that a certain amount of elasticity in the choice of such sub- 
jects as Art, Agriculture and Horticulture and Commercial work might be per- 
mitted so that School Boards having control of two and three-teacher schools 
might, with the approval of the Inspector, select the subject most suited to the 
youth of the communit}'. Thus one school might teach Art; another. Agriculture 
and Horticulture; and another. Commercial work. I feel assured that as much 
use and cultural value may be found in any one of these subjects as in any other 
but it is clearly impossible for a small school to provide for all of them. Too much 
attention has, I feel, been given to Art in the past." 

Use of Books of Reference 

While teaching in a Normal School I was surprised to find that a large per- 
centage of the students entering did not know how to use so simple a book of refer- 
ence as a dictionary. Most of the students were painfully slow in finding a word 
and when the word was found very many were unable to tell from the diacritical 
marks or from the spellings used in the dictionary what the pronunciation was, while 
others had very great difficulty in choosing the meaning which would fit the word 
in the context chosen. Indeed, it was necessary to give a lesson or two eajch year 
on how to use a dictionary. 

As Continuation School Inspector I have found the same conditions prevailing 
among the students of the Continuation Schools. The average High School en- 
trant knows only that the words in a dictionary are arranged alphabetically as to 
the first letter of each word. Beyond that, his knowledge is nil. I have for some 
years been endeavoring to impress upon teachers the importance of instructing 
pupils in how to use the ordinary tools of an intelligent reading man, namely the 
Dictionary, the Dictionar}' of Names and the Encyclopedia. I refer to the mat- 
ter here in the hope that the reference may lead to greater attention to this matter. 

Consolidated Schools 

Last year I referred to the movement for consolidation of schools so far as it 
affected Continuation Schools. I venture to return to the subject again this year 
and to quote from a report made in 1914 jointly by Inspector Mills and myself after 
a visit to schools in the United States, particularly in the State of Indiana : — 

Township Trustee 

" Nearly half a century ago Indiana did away with the system of having three 
trustees for each school district in the iState, and placed the control of all schools 
in a township in the hands of the township trustee. To a British subject from 
Canada the powers of the township trustee seem startlingly great. The powers and 
duties of our township councils, township clerk and treasurer, and of all the town- 
ship school trustees, seen to be combined and placed in the hands of one man. The 
township trustee is, in fact, a township commissioner who manages all the township 
affairs. , 

" So far as school matters are concerned, the township trustee has power to 
employ teachers, to locate and to maintain schools for all the children of the town- 
ship. Any trustee may also establish and maintain in his respective township, as 



28 THE EEPORT OF THE Xo. 17 

near the centre as seems wise, at least one graded High School. In fact, in school 
matters the township trustee is clothed with almost autocratic powers, he may under 
certain conditions cause district schools, to be abandoned and cause to be erected a 
consolidated school. The school law gives him power to pay for the transportation 
of pupils from the abandoned schools to the consolidated schools. In the last report 
of State Superintendent Greathouse, it is proposed that power l^e given the trustee 
to pay for the transportation of pupils in a school district itself, and this proposal 
is made because of demands from parents and ratepayers that such power be 
granted. 

Consolidated Schools 

""As a result of the wide powers of the township trustee, the advancement 
along the line of consolidation of schools in Indiana has been very great. Nearly 
eight hundred consolidated schools are now in operation in the State. The system 
Js so well established that argument for its value is hardly needed. It is felt that 
the people of the rural districts are entitled to just as good school facilities as the 
people of urban districts. With consolidation they can have schools as good as the 
best. 

" These schools are centres of township social life, as well as da}' schools for 
children. The people of the neighbourhood use the buildings for school entertain- 
ments and lecture courses, and as a result the community spirit brings about a bet- 
ter attitude toward the school and more willing financial support. We were in- 
formed that the value df the land had increased more in the districts where schools 
were consolidated than in districts where they were not. 

" Such subjects asi agriculture, household science,; manual training, music and 
drawing are receiving attention, and good results, it is claimed, are obtained, parti- 
cularly through the teaching of agriculture. In fact, the consolidated school in 
Indiana has brought to the country community a well classified, well equipped, well 
taught school, the absence of which has heretofore driven so many boys off the 
farm. It is no longer necessary for the farmer to move to town to educate his 
children nor to send them to boarding houses away from parental control. 

Township or County Boards. 

" Whatever has been accomplished for good along educational lines in Ontario 
has been accomplished largely because of our centralized provincial system. Has 
not the time come for the application of the principle of centralization to the 
township or county so far as the schools are concerned? We feel that if township 
boards or county boards of trustees could be chosen to replace the present system 
in Ontario, a great step toward the solution of the rural life problem would be 
taken.'' 



1919 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 29 



APPENDIX D 
REPORTS OF THE INSPECTORS OF HIGH SCHOOLS 

I. REPORT OF INSPECTOR HOUSTON 

To THE HOXOUEABLE E. H. GeANT, M.P.P., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

SiR^ — I beg to submit for your consideration a brief report on the general 
condition of the Collegiate Institutes, High Schools and private institutions which 
were under my supervision during the academic year 1918-19. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. A. HousTox. 



Toronto, December, 1919. 



Schools Visited 



During the year I visited the Collegiate Institutes at Brantford, Chatham, 
Gait, Ingersoll, Kitchener, London, St. Marys, St. Thomas, Sarnia, Stratford, 
Strathroy, Toronto (Harbord), Toronto (Humberside), Toronto (Jarvis), Toronto 
(Malvern), Toronto (Oakwood), Toronto (Parkdale), Toronto (Eiverdale), "Wind- 
sor and Woodstock, twenty in all, and the High Schools at Amherstburg, Aurora, 
Aylmer, Dutton, Essex, Forest, Georgetown, Glencoe, Hagersville, Learning-ton, 
Lucan, Xewmarket, Oakville, Paris, Parkhill, Petrolia, Port Dover, Port Eowan, 
Simcoe, Streetsville, Eidgetown, iSTorth Toronto, Tillsonburg, Vienna, Wardsville, 
Waterford, Watford, and Wallaceburg, twenty-eight in all. 

I also visited the following private schools : — The Ursuline Convent, Chatham ; 
The Loretto Convent, Stratford; St. Anne's Convent, Kitchener; Loretto Abbey, 
Toronto; Loretto Day School, Toronto; St. Angela's College, London; Bishop 
Strachan School, Toronto ; Alma College, S't. Thomas : and St. Mary's Academy, 
Windsor. Thus I had under my charge twenty Collegiate Institutes, twenty-eight 
High Schools and nine private schools, employing in all over four hundred teachers, 
and all preparing candidates for one or more of the non-professional examinations 
leading to admission to the teachers' professional training schools. 

Accommodations 

I have no new building to report as having been erected during the year, but 
in the great majority of the schools there has been a marked increase in the attend- 
ance over that of the preceding two or three years. This means in many cases that 
additions will have to be made to the present buildings in the very near future, 
and a number of the towns are now preparing to extend tlieir accommodations, 
and the larger centres are planning to make special provision for technical and 
vocational work in addition to the ordinars' academic studies. The Boards of 
Education on the whole seem to realize the responsibility laid upon them and are 
endeavouring with as much speed as may be to carr}- out the recommendations of 
the Department and the Inspectors, even in the face of most adverse conditions 
as regards building and equipping new quarters for their schools. 



30 



THE REPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



Grading of Accommodations 

I append a tabulated statement showing the grading of the various items in- 
cluded iTnder the term " accommodations : " 



Collegiate Institutes (20) 



1918-1919 



Number 

of Schools 

Grade I 



Number 

of Schools 

Grade II 



Number 
of Schools 
Grade IIL 



Number 
of Schools 
Grade IV 



Number 

of Schools 

Grade 



Closets 

Water Supply . . 

Grounds 

Buildings 

Class Rooms . . . 

Halls 

Waiting Rooms . 

Cap R ooms 

Teachers' Rooms 

Desks 

Blackboards 

Lighting 

Heating 

Ventilation 

Gymnasium , 

Assembly Room . 



15 

18 

12 

16 

10 

15 

8 

9 

12 

14 

13 

8 

16 

7 

2 

9 



3 
2 
6 
2 
8 
3 
5 
9 
5 
5 
6 

10 
4 
6 

11 
5 



High ScJwols (28) 



Closets 

Water Supply . . . 

G rounds 

Buildmgs 

Class Rooms 

Halls 

Waiting Rooms . . 

Cap Rooms 

Teachers' Rooms. 

Desks 

Blackboards 

Lighting 

Heating 

Ventilati on 

Gymnasium 

Assembly Room . . 



14 
12 
16 
6 
7 
2 
6 

10 

15 

13 

7 

21 
8 



4 
6 

12 
6 

20 

10 
7 
9 

11 
8 

11 

15 
6 

13 
1 
1 



12 
6 
3 
5 
1 
6 
2 
4 
8 
5 
2 
5 
1 
5 
1 
2 



2 
16 

7 
3 



24 
25 



In connection with the above grading in both Collegiate Institutes and High 
Schools, I may point out, as I did in a previous report, that to receive first class 
grading the water supply must be inside the building and the means for its use 
must be thoroughly sanitary; the grounds must be ornamented with trees, shrubs 
and flowers, and must be large enough to furnish recreation space for all the pupils; 
the class rooms must be suitably decorated with pictures; the halls must be pro- 
vided with separate entrance? and stairways for boys and girls; teachers' rooms 
must be commodious and tastefully furnished; desks must be single, not double; 
blackboards must be either slate or ground glass; lighting must be from the left 
only; the ventilation system must be such as will provide a constant supply of 
pure air under any atmospheric condition. 



I 



1919 DEPARTMEXT OF EDUCATIOX ' 31 

Reading, Writing and Spelling 

During mv visits to the schools I systematically tested the pupils of the first 
year in the three elementan- foundation subjects, reading, writing and spelling, 
and the pupils of the second year in at least reading. Of these tests I kept full 
records, and the figures are in some ways rather interesting as well as suggestive. 

In Form I Reading 1.750 pupils were examined, and of these 1,119 were 
graded good, 551 fair and 80 poor. 

In Form I Writing 2,137 pupils were tested, and of these 1,063 were good, 
657 fair, 377 poor and 40 bad. 

In Form I Spelling the same 2,137 pupils showed 391: good, 616 fair, 574 
poor and 553 bad. 

If the results are expressed in percentages it shows that in the Reading of 
both Form I and II nearly 65 per cent, were graded good and over 30 per cent. 
fair: in writing about 50 per cent, were good and 30 per cent, fair, but in the 
spelling scarcely 20 per cent, were graded good, while some 25 per cent, were bad; 
the greater number in this subject ranked either fair or poor. 

Comparing these results with my figures of some ten years ago I find that 
in all three subjects progress is shown, improvement is being made, handicaps 
are being overcome and both teachers and pupils are making an honest endeavour 
to prove that the criticism is no longer justified that our graduates can neither 
write nor spell satisfactorily. 

Approved Schools 

A few years ago regulations were framed which provided that special grants 
should be given to such High Schools and Collegiate Institutes as reached certain 
standards in the way of accommodation, equipment, organization, etc. The basic 
idea underlying the regulation was that the privilege of having the status of an 
approved school and of being entitled to receive the special grant that accompanied 
that rank would be substantial encouragement to Boards of Education to provide 
to the fullest extent all that was required to carry on the academic work to the 
best possible advantage. The requirements for approval are such as will commend 
themselves to even the man on the street, and may be briefly summarized as 
follows : — 

(i) The accommodation and equipment shall be thoise prescribed for the 
particular class to which the school belongs, and shall be both adequate and suit- 
able for the courses taken up. 

(ii) The members of the staff shall be legally qualified and competent to 
teach all the subjects under their charge. 

(iii) The organization and management of the whole school shall meet the 
requirements of the Regulations and the necessities of the situation. 

(iv) The general work of the pupils shall be of a satisfactory' character. 

The fact that for the academic year 1918-1919 only 16 schools received tbe 
highest grade of approval, 71 received the second grade and 77 received no approved 
standing at all, furnishes food for serious thought. The question naturally arises 
as to what are the general deficiencies which prevent approval. In the great 
majority of the schools, especially those in the larger centres, the explanation is 
found in the fact that the school has outgrown its quarters, there are not enough 
class-rooms, the classes become congested and there is no room to increase the 
teaching power so as to cope with the situation. These are matters for which 



3-3 THE REPORT OF THE Xo. 17 

the Boards are solely responsible and which cannot be controlled by the Principal 
or his staff. Again and again the Inspectors have to report that the management 
and the work of the staff are all that could be desired, but that the classes are badly 
congested, the equipment deficient, or the provision for carrying on the work is 
quite inadequate. But little capital expenditure was made during the years of the 
war ; since its close there has been a marked increase in the attendance ; congestion 
has become the rule rather than the exception. Many of the smaller schools, how- 
ever, could be easily placed in a position to merit a grade of approval by an expen- 
diture that would be largely met by the increased grant which they would receive. 

In this connection it is but fair to point out that, as the law stands at 
present, the counties are not liable for any share of the capital expenditure to 
provide accommodation, even though such increased accommodation is rendered 
necessary by the attendance of county pupils. Many of the present difficulties 
would disappear if the counties paid a share of the cost of the buildings, as well 
as of the cost of maintenance. 

The general establishment of Consolidated Schools throughout the rural dis- 
tricts would in a certain measure also relieve the situation as it would provide 
for advanced education at home and thus do away with the necessity for the chil- 
dren from the farms going to the cities and towns to attend High School. 

Changes in Regulations 

There have been several changes in the Regulations regarding certificates and 
Courses of Study, to which I may be allowed to make a brief reference. These 
changes have been made largely for the purpose of removing certain disabilities 
from non-graduate High School Assistants and of relieving to a certain extent 
the pressure on the pupils. 

Only graduates in Arts of a British University are eligible to enter upon the 
professional course leading to a High School Assistant's certificate ; non-graduates, 
if they enter the Faculty of Education, must take the course leading to a Grade 
B or a Grade A Public School certificate. May I point out that this arrangement 
does not in the slightest degree interfere with the standing already given to any 
non-graduate? Any High School Assistant's certificate, interim or permanent, 
granted by the Ontario Department of Education at any time in the past will be 
accepted at its face value, and will qualify its holder for a position as assistant 
in any High School or Collegiate Institute. This does away with part of tlie 
Amended Regulations of 1918, removes certain disabilities under which non- 
graduates were placed by those Amended Regulations, and leaves Boards free to 
engage any teacher, graduate or non-graduate, who holds a regitlarly issued cer- 
tificate from the Department. 

The removal of the demand for a collection of insects by first year pupils ant? 
a collection of flowers by the pupils of the second year, has been a relief to all 
concerned. Much difficulty was experienced in many places in carrying out this 
part of the course, and it was found that not only was the work burdensome, but 
it had not the educational value and did not accomplish the results expected of 
it. In some other respects the Course in Elementary Science has been shortened 
and brought more into harmony Avith the advanced work; there should now be no 
difficulty in covering experimentally and practically all that is demanded, with profit 
and pleasure to both clas5 and teacher. 

The burden of "STar History has been for the past few years almost a night- 
mare to the conscientious teacher. The amount of material to be handled, the 



1919 DEPAETMEXT OF EDUCATION 33 

difficulty of distinguishing between the important and the unimportant, the lack 
of proper perspective, made the work very unsatisfactory. The coming of peace 
has placed the story of the war, so far as examinations are concerned, only in the 
Lower School Course, as the other courses do not formally include current history. 
The war is now to be studied as one would study the war of 1812-15, giving special 
attention to causes, course, conclusion, and results so far as they can be deter- 
mined. Xaturally the part played by Canada and the other overseas dominions 
will receive special attention in Canadian schools. 

The re-uniting of the examinations for Middle School Xormal Entrance and 
Junior Matriculation as they were previous to 1908 may have far-reaching results 
in certain directions, but it will not directly aft'ect either the organization or tlie 
teaching in the schools. For all practical purposes the courses and the percentages 
have been the same for the last few years, and there seems to be no valid reason 
why the combined examinations should not prove quite satisfactory to both the 
Universities and the professional training schools. Other change* are under con- 
sideration with a view to further harmonizing the various courses and giving to 
the principals of the schools more freedom in regulating their organization to 
suit their particular requirements. 

Habits of Reading 

The pupils in our secondary schools are at a critical period in their lives in 
more ways than one. The school and its influences are giving the training which 
is to produce the future character. For time and for eternity, boys and girls are 
being made or marred, for the most part before they are sixteen years of age. In 
our lower forms the courses of study are practically settled for us in Mathematics, 
Science, foreign languages, but in Literature we have a free hand to select as we 
feel inclined. I often wonder if the teachers of English Literature quite appre- 
ciate the opportunity that is given them of creating in their pupils a desire for 
the better and higher cla^s of books, enabling them to become good company for 
themselves through their books, putting into their hands tools which will never, 
fail them. 

The boy or the girl who has learned to read is on the way to become an 
educated man or woman no matter what may be the results of the school course. In 
the matter of literature, the teacher is not hampered by examination requirements, 
the literature class may be made one of the joy periods of the day, an interest may 
be aroused whose results are simply incalculable. A fondness for books is in itself 
a liberal education, and in the lower forms of our schools an opportunity is given 
to create a love of books and of reading which will influence a pupil through all 
his after life. Some months ago I clipped from some newspaper a paragraph which 
I shall here quote as well expressing what should be the constant aim of ever}- 
teacher. 

" In the past we have thought relatively too much about teaching people how 
to read and not enough about getting them to read after they learn how. To 
develop ' the reading habit ' in each pupil should be one of the chief aims of every 
teacher. Train any child so he likes to read, so he is a real book-lover, and he 
will educate himself even if he never goes to school another day. Moreover, if a 
school has a good library, it should aid greatly in educating the older people whose 
school days are over but whose learning days should never be over. The saying of 
old Thomas Carlyle, ' the true university of these days is a collection of books,' 
cannot be too often repeated." 



34 THE EEPOET OF THE No. 17 

II. REPORT OF INSPECTOR LEVAN 

To THE Honourable R. H. Grant, M.P.P., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

SiR^ — I have the honour to submit for your consideration the following report 
for the year 1918-19:— 

During the year I inspected the following schools: — 

Collegiate Institutes: — Barrie, Clinton, Collingwood, Fort "William, Goderich, 
Guelph, Hamilton, Niagara Falls, North Bay, Orillia, Owen Sound, Port Arthur, 
Sea forth, St. Catharines.— Total, 14. 

High Schools: — Alliston, Arthur, Beamsville, Bracebridge, Bradford, Bramp- 
ton, Caledonia, Cayuga, Chatsworth, Chesley, Dundas, Dundalk, Dunnville, Dur- 
ham, Elora, Fergus, Flesherton, Fort Frances, Gravenhurst, Grimsby, Haileybury, 
Harriston, Kenora, Kincardine, Listowel, Markdale, Meaford, Midland, Mitchell, 
Mount Forest, Niagara Falls South, Niagara-on-the-Lake, range ville, Parry 
Sound, Penetanguishene, Port Elgin, Sault Ste. Marie, Shelburne, Smithville, 
Sudbury, Thorold, Walkerton, Waterdown, Welland, Wiarton, Wingham. — Total, 46. 

Under instructions from the Minister I also visited the following private 
schools: — De La Salle College, Aurora; Loretto Academy, Guelph; Loretto 
Academy, Hamilton; St. Joseph's College, Toronto. 

Accommodatiojis 

During the war little was done to improve the school accommodations, either 
by erecting new buildings or enlarging the old ones to meet pressing needs. Con- 
ditions were unfavourable in the financial and labour markets ; and it was generally 
felt that all our financial strength should be devoted to the supreme need of win- 
ning the war. Accordingly, many needed improvements were postponed, to be 
undertaken at a more favourable time. There has not been, however, complete 
stagnation. I am able to report the erection of three new schools, at Beamsville, 
Barrie and Brampton, respectively. The new building at Beamsville was erected 
to provide for the High School a home of its own, separate from the Public School, 
and to enable the High School to meet the demand for instruction in Agriculture 
and Household Science. The new buildings at Barrie and Brampton were rendered 
necessary by the destruction of the foTmer buildings by fire during the winter of 
1917. These three building are all substantially built and are designed upon the 
most approved modern principles of school architecture. Special provision has 
been made in them all for the practical teaching of Science. All are provided 
with Assembly Halls and Gymnasiums. Lighting, heating aud ventilation have 
been carefully provided for, and excellent provision has been made for lavatory 
accommodation. The building at Beamsville was erected at a cost of $46,000 ; that 
at Brampton at a cost of $73,000 ; and that at Barrie at a cost of $110,000. These 
buildings are all a credit to the municipalities which have erected them, and I do 
not doubt that they will all exert a marked influence in stimulating secondary 
education in these localities. 

At Listowel the High School building bas been enlarged by the addition of 
a wing to the main building, designed to supply additional classroom .space and 
better facilities for the teaching of Science, together with cap-room and lavatory 
accommodation. 



1919 DEPARTMEXT OF EDUCATIOX 35 

Now that the war is over, there will doubtless be a revival of activity in pro- 
viding new buildings or improving the old ones. In manv places there is urgent 
need of better accommodations. In as many as seven of the Collegiate Institutes 
and eight of the High Schools in the district of which I have charge, the attend- 
ance has outgrown the capacity of the school building. In some cases the condition 
can be remedied by the addition of a wing; in others the only suitable remedy is 
the erection of an entirely new building. 

Eleven of the High Schools in my district are occupying buildings in common 
with the Public School classes. In most of these buildings there is little other 
accommodation than classrooms. Usually one of the classrooms is made to serve 
the purposes of a Science laboratory. Occasionally, the lighting, heating and ven- 
tilation are very poor, and the conditions for carrying on the work of the school 
efficiently are most unfayourable. 

Changes in the Course of Study 

It is a common criticism directed against the High School system of the Pro- 
vince that the curriculum is overloaded, and that in the multiplicity of subjects 
attempted there is a sacrifice of thoroughness. The criticism is not wholly unjust. 
The course of study is very wide and imposes a heavy burden on teachers and pupils 
alike. With the object of affording some relief for this condition, an interim 
revision of the work prescribed was made last summer. The changes dealt chiefly 
with the work of the Lower School, where the burden is heaviest. They affected 
the courses in Arithmetic, Art, Elementary Science and History, and have afforded 
considerable relief to the pupils. The teachers, too, have benefited by the changes, 
the teachers of History particularly, as the burden of the work in the history of 
the Great War has been taken off the Middle and Upper School courses. The history 
of the Great War has laid a very great burden on the shoulders of the teachers, who 
in the absence of a text-book, were obliged to gather material for their lessons from 
current articles in newspapers and magazines, and digest all this material before 
presenting it to their pupils. It had to be prepared in a form suitable for the pupils 
of the Lower School, in greater detail for the pupils of the Middle School, and in 
still greater detail for the pupils of the L^pper School. And all this had to be done 
while they were already carrying a staggering load of work. The history of the war 
has now been removed from all the courses except that of the Lower School. If it 
is to be retained permanently on this course, no time should be lost in adding to the 
text-book a chapter dealing with it, so as to provide the pupils with the definite 
facts which they will be expected to know. 

Teachers and Salaries 

During the last four or five years, teachers have had to face a new and in- 
creasing difficulty in the problem of the high cost of living. This has now become 
a serious problem, and is constantly growing more serious. Even before the war 
it was generally admitted that the work of the teacher was underpaid. Since 1914 
the cost of living has risen more than 100 per cent., but the salaries of the teachers 
have not increased an average of 35 per cent. When one considers the arduous 
nature of the teacher's work and its importance and rasponsibility, one wonders 
that it has not been more generously rewarded. The teacher's work is of national 
importance ; in proportion as it is well or ill done, the nation gains or loses enor- 
mously. The teacher has to fit the boys and girls of to-day to be the men and 



36 THE EEPORT OF THE No. 17 

women of to-morrow. He trains their minds, shapes the morals, and inspires the 
ideals of the generation that is to take our places. His calling demands superior 
training and superior qualities of heart and mind. When one considers all that 
is expected of him, one wonders that his work has not brought him the 
financial reward that is bestowed on workers in other callings. The policy of 
refusing him adequate pay for. the services he is expected to perform is already 
showing its effects. The profession offers few attractions to men and women of 
strong character and commanding personality; and those who might grace and 
honour it are seeking employment in other spheres, where talent and ability and 
hard work are more liberally rewarded. 

These remarks are made in justice to a high-minded, self-sacrificing and long- 
suffering body of men and women, who are discharging their duties faithfully and 
are earnestly trying to live up to their high responsibilities in the hope that their 
work may be of some service in elevating the character of our national life. 

I have the honour to be. 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

I. M. Levan. 
Toronto, Dec. 31st, 1919. 



III. REPORT OF INSPECTOR ROGERS 

To THE Honourable R. H. Grant, M.P.P., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I beg to submit the following report on the Collegiate Institutes and 
High Schools which I visited during the year 1918-19. 

I have the honour to be, 'Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Geo. F. Rogers. 
Toronto, December, 1919. 

Schools Visited 

During the year 1918-19, I inspected the Collegiate Institutes in Brockville, 
Cobourg, Kingston, Lindsay, Morrisburg, jSTapanec, Ottawa. Perth, Peterborough, 
Picton, Renfrew, Smith's Falls, Vankleek Hill, and the High Schools in Alexandria, 
Almonte, Arnprior, Athens, Avonmore, Belleville, Bowmanville, Brighton, Camp- 
bellford, Carleton Place, Chestcrville, Colborne, Cornwall, Deseronto, Gananoque, 
Hawkesbury, Iroquois, Kemptville, Madoc, Markham, Morewood, Xewburgh, New- 
castle, Norwood, Omemee, Oshawa, Pembroke, Plantagenot, Port Hope, Port Perr}', 
Prescott, Richmond Hill, Rockland, Stirling, S'ydenliam, Trenton, Tweed, Uxbridge, 
A^liitby, Williamstown, Winchester and Weston. 

The above classification is, to some extent, not as significant as it appears — 
the only difference between some of the High Schools and some of the Collegiate 
Institutes being one of name. One wonders, indeed, if the time is not ripe — 
having in mind the simplifying tendency of the age — to do away with the some- 
what pretentious name " Collegiate Institute " and call all secondary schools High 
Schools. 



1919 DEPARTMEXT OF EDUCATIOX 37 

Accommodations 

Generally speaking the school buildings give evidence that building operations 
were, to a great extent, suspended during the period of the Great War. -Unfortu- 
nately, normal conditions as to cost of material, labour, etc., do not, even yet, exist, 
and Boards of Education hesitate to assume the financial burden, consequent on 
any extensive improvements in accommodations being made at the present time. 

As far as I have learned Campbellford is the only town in my inspectorate 
where a new High School building has been definitely decided upon. Almonte, 
Belleville, Carleton Place, Xewburgh, Renfrew and Pembroke are very much in 
need of new buildings; while extensions and improvements are as urgently needed 
in Iroquois, ]\Iarkham, Morrisburg and TJxbridge. 

The fine Collegiate Institute in Ottawa is overcrowded, and I understand 
the Board has in view the erection of another building in the southern part of the 
city. 

The new High School building in Trenton has been completed. It is one 
of the best. The enterprise of the Board in that town has been fully Justified 
by the greatly increased attendance and the growing interest in the work of the 
High School throughout the community. 

Department of Natural Science 

Of all branches of school work the one which suffers most from lack of 
adequate accommodations is the department of Xatural Science. In all High 
Schools, large or small, there should be at least two science rooms, viz., a chemical 
and a physical laboratory. Many schools, otherwise satisfactory as regards accom- 
modations, have only one laboratory for teaching all the subjects of the science 
courses. This is especially true of the older buildings, and the obvious remedy 
is the building of a wing which shall contain modem laboratories. 

Cramped quarters for science teaching means more than inconvenience. It 
means, in some cases, poor science teaching, although I must bear testimony to the 
splendid way in which many science masters have overcome the difficulties of 
inadequate laboratorv' accommodations. 

But this is only one of the difficulties that confronts the teacher of science. 
Others just as serious can he solved locally, while others — and in the eyes of the 
teacher these loom largest — necessitate a re-casting of the science courses. 

(i) The science master needs — what he seldom has — at least one period a 
day for preparing apparatus and material for laboratory work. In twenty-four 
schools in my inspectorate the principals are also the science masters; and when 
to a full programme of teaching, the many duties of a principal are added the 
burden is almost too great to be borne. The solution to this difficulty seems easy, 
but as a matter of fact many of the schools which I have visited are undermanned. 

(ii) The smaller High Schools and some of the larger ones are organized in 
such a way that the Matriculation and Xormal Entrance Course is a three-years 
one. This is not without its advantages, for I am convinced that much harm may 
be done to clever students by compelling them to take four years to cover work 
which, by diligence, they can complete in three. 

The disadvantages have to do mainly with the Middle School Physics and 
Chemistry — particularly the former. It is practically impossible to cover the 
present Middle School Physics course, experimentally, in one year. The result 
is that in too many cases the experimental work is not done by the students, who 



38 THE EEPORT OF THE No. 17 

become mere observers of demonstrations by the teachers. Tliis is especially true 
in schools where, although large sums of money have been expended in elaborate 
and expensive pieces of apparatus, much of which is for Avork beyond the scope 
of the present science curriculum, there has been very little provided in the nature 
of students' sets of apparatus. For instance one frequently finds that $40,00 
or $50.00 has been spent in buying a delicate chemical balance, which is nothing 
but a show piece, when the same amount of money would buy four or five service- 
able physical balances sensitive enough for such quantitative work as is practicable 
in either chemistry or physics classes. Of course if the schools can afford both the 
simple and the more elaborate apparatus, so much the better. 

(iii) The Lower School course in Elementary Science is not, even in its 
present modified form, a conspicuous success, and it has added not a little to the 
burden borne by the conscientious science teacher. In this course the schools have 
attempted to give pupils, during their first and second years in the High School, 
a sort of general survey of biological and physical sciences. The results have 
proved what a knowledge of the pyschology of the immature pupil could have 
foretold, viz., that pupils of the early " teen " age cannot gain any general view of, 
say, biology, by touching lightly here and there the various types of plant and 
animal life. 

The difficulties of the course have been increased by insisting on the pupils 
making their own text-books. This has led the teacher to choose the one of two 
evils which he considers the less objectionable; he may stress the notebooks, and 
in so doing be forced to give diagrams and drawings and only slightly camouflage 
the dictation of notes, or he may stress the practical work, discard all book-draw- 
jngs or blackboard drawings and refuse to dictate any notes, and as a result be 
satisfied with mediocre notebooks, which cannot be of much assistance to the pupils 
when they come to review their work for the Lower School examination. 

The crying needs of the Lower School Science course are a new syllabus in 
biology and a well-illustrated authorized text-book in the same subject. 

Reading, Writing and Spelling 

As is customary, I examined the first and second classes in Eeading and the 
first year classes in Writing and Spelling. In most of the schools I found a marked 
improvement taking place in the Eeading throughout the Lower School, particu- 
larly where the teacher of Eeading had charge of the classes in Literature as well, 
and made little difference between the two subjects in the method of teaching 
employed. 

In some cases young teachers fresh frnm the professional schools had difficulty 
in getting results in Eeading, because they had been advised against reading to 
their pupils. These pupils, never hearing good reading, were naturally in the dark 
about what they were expected to do. The more experienced teachers realize that 
some of the theories of professional schools do not work out in practice. 

I found the best results in Writing in a small High School, where all the first 
year pupils hand in to the teacher a short exercise in writing every school day. 
In general the pupils write best in schools where the teachers are all good writers, 
and where the matter of writing is not left solely to one member of the staff. 

In Spelling the urgent need appears to be for a new spelling-book with properly 
graded exercises. 



1919 DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATION 39 

Physical Culture 

The attention which is being given to this important part of the work of the 
school is worthy of note. It is not an uncommon thing to find half an hour devoted 
to Physical Culture in all the classes every day of the week. This arrangement 
is productive of very gratifying results. 

Eortunately, there are now in the schools a number of young men who have 
been in the army and, without exception, I found their classes in Physical Culture 
doing superior work. 

A few schools have adopted a uniform dress for the girls, and to other obvious 
advantages this has the added outstanding advantages of ensuring freedom of move- 
ment in the physical exercises and of securing a perfection in concerted action 
which, I do not believe, can be attained in any other way. 

Private Schools 

I visited the following private schools : — St. Joseph's Academy, Lindsay ; 
The Academy of St. Mary Immaculate, Pembroke; Albert College, Belleville; 
Ontario Ladies' College, Whitby : and the Convent of Notre Lame, Kingston. 

My reports on these schools covered the work of the Science and the Art 
Classes only. In Art the work is of a uniformly high character. The provision 
for practical work in Science is generally satisfactory. 

The observations which I have submitted are the result of a very short ex- 
perience as High School Inspector. The experience has been such a Tielpful one 
to me personally that I wish it were possible for the teachers of the Province to 
visit each other's schools to a greater extent than they do- now. If an inspector 
does nothing else, he may be regarded as not a " total loss," if he acts as a medium 
through which ideas are passed from one school to another. 

There are many special features in connection with certain schools which might 
be mentioned for their suggestiveness, but the modest limits of a first report forbid 
my noting more than one or two. 

In the Ottawa Collegiate Institute all the pupils gather in the splendid audi- 
torium as soon as they come to school in the morning — usually some minutes before 
nine o'clock — and engage in chorus singing under the baton of a competent con- 
ductor and to the accompaniment of a school orchestra. This is kept up for ten 
minutes or so before the regular opening exercises, and forms a happy ushering-in 
of the school day. Incidentally, this results in the number of " lates " being 
reduced to a minimum. 

In Eichmond Hill a choral club of all the pupils in the High School has been 
organized. This club meets every Friday afternoon from 2.30' to 3.30, and is 
trained in singing by a professional conductor. All the expenses in connection 
therewith are gladly borne by the pupils themselves. Eecess in this school on days 
when the weather is unsuitable for outdoor sports means a general " sing-song."' 
The musical talent which is being evolved is decidedly worth while, and the bene- 
ficial effect on the tone of the school is evident. 



40 THE REPORT OF THE Xo. 1' 



APPENDIX E 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF MANUAL TRAINING 
AND HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

To THE HoxouEABLE R. H. Graxt, M.P.P., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my nineteenth annual report on 
Manual Training and Household Science as carried on in the schools of the Province. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

♦. Your obedient servant, 

Albert H. Leake. 
Toronto, January, 1920, 

Number and Location of Manual Training Centres 

There are now one hundred Manual Training centres in actual operation. These 
are situated in the following places : Brantford, Brockville, Chatham, CoUingwood, 
Cornwall, Fort William, Gait, Guelph, Hamilton, IngersoU, Kingston. Kitchener, 
London, Madoc, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Port Arthur, Sarnia, St. Thomas, Sault Ste. 
IMarie, Smith's Falls, Stratford, Toronto, Walkerville, Windsor, Woodstock, Xorth 
Bay, Port Perry, Whitby, Oakville, Orangeville and Listowel. 

The larger cities — Toronto. Ottawa, Hamilton, London, Windsor — have each 
a number of centres, while in the smaller places one or two centres afford accommo- 
dation sufficient to provide instruction for all pupils above the Junior or Senior 
Third classes which are the grades usually sent to the Manual Training rooms. 

Absence of Manual Training in Smaller Centres 

x\s noted in previous reports, there are still ten toi^iis in the Province with a 
population of more than 5,000 each that have not yet provided facilities for giving 
instruction in either Manual Training or Household Science. In towns of this size. 
if the work is properly organized, it should not l^e difficult to occupy the whole time 
of one teacher. He should be given charge of the whole of the manual work from 
Grade I to the end of the Public School course. In this way a graded scheme 
could be carried on throughout all the forms of the schools in that particular town. 

Other towais might well co-operate in this matter and employ a teacher be- 
tween them. It should not be difficult to form a group of three or four towns 
within easy reach of each other, each having its own manual training centre and 
equipment and each paying its share of the special teacher's salary, according to the 
time spent in each place. Now that radial lines are being rapidly extended through- 
out the Province, the possibility of such co-operative action is becoming greater. The 
attention of the local inspectors is directed to this matter. Such co-operative ac- 
tion would not only result in the introduction of Manual Training and Household 
Science, but would also promote a bettor feeling among the different municipalities 
and lead to combined action in other fields of civic betterment. 



1919 DEPARTMEXT OF EDUCATIOX 41 

Character of the Work 

The "work throughout is gradually being improved in character and, consider- 
ing the limited amount of time that is allowed for it, is generally satisfactory in 
quantity. The equipments provided are being kept in good order, though in some 
cases suiJicient attention is not being paid to the condition of the edged tools. Of 
course, it is but a truism to say that good work cannot be done with blunt tools, 
but a few teachers seem to have the idea that time spent in sharpening tools is 
wasted. A comparison of the work in such a centre with that of a centre where 
the tools are kept in good working condition demonstrates very effectively the ad- 
vantage of keeping tools in the best working condition. 

In all the Manual Training centres, with one or two exceptions, the work is 
progressing satisfactorily. Some prevalent tendencies should, however, be carefully 
guarded against: — 

1. The pupil should always be the first consideration, the producer and not 
the product, and while accuracy and finish should always be insisted upon, no process 
should be allowed to be repeated until it becomes automatic, for directly that point 
is reached all educational value is lost. 

3. Ornament should not be allowed to over-shadow sound construction. Con- 
struction should come first and ornament second. It should not be the purpose 
to find a place for decoration, but to decorate a place already existing, or, to use 
the words of Euskin, " It should not be the purpose to construct ornament, but 
to ornament construction." The capacity to appreciate the beauty of unadorned 
simple construction is in great need of cultivation, 

3. The individuality of both teacher and pupil should be allowed as much 
scope as is consistent with correct methods and sound instruction. As far as pos- 
sible, the needs and desires of the pupil should be allowed to dictate the work he 
should do in the Manual Training room, guided always, of course, by the superior 
knowledge and greater skill of the teacher. 

4. The woodwork or metal work should not be regarded as of greater im- 
portance than the " working drawing '' but adequate attention should be paid to 
each. While the drawing generally proves less attractive than the actual con- 
struction its educational value is no less and its execution is necessary in order that 
the actual work of construction may be intelligently done. In place of the working 
drawing a free hand dimensioned sketch may occasionally be substituted. The 
practice of rapid free hand sketching is too much neglected and the boy who 
possesses the ability to rapidly transfer his ideas to paper always has clearer 
thoughts and is a more efficient workman than one who has not this power. 

5. More attention should be paid to simple lettering as the drawings are con- 
siderably improved by its use, and in the industrial world lettering is always em- 
ployed. 

6. The decoration of the Manual Training room should also be attended to. 
There is no reason why this room should look like a barn and there is sufficient 
material connected with the work to make the room attractive and thus exercise 
a beneficial and educative influence upon the students. 

Farm Mechanics in Connection with Agricultural Courses 

The Farm Mechanics courses that have been recently introduced in connection 
with the Agricultural departments in connection with High and Continuation 
Schools continue to make satisfactory progress. Owing to various practical diffi- 



42 THE EEPORT OF THE Xo. 17 

unities four schools only have as yet taken up this subject, — Whitby, Port Perry, 
Oakville and Beanisville — but the success achieved in them warrants the hope that 
this number will continue to grow. Most agriculturists are coming to believe that 
the success of farming operations depends very largely upon the condition of the 
material equipment of the farm and these courses concern themselves with that 
aspect of farm life. Some of the work done has been as follows : Making articles 
required on the farm and in the home, e.g., wood-box, book-shelf, milk-stool, saw- 
horse, feed boxes, etc. ; cement side walks, fence posts, troughs, etc. ; using the forge 
and making simple repairs; building, repairing and re-adjusting gates; replacing 
broken window panes; the planning, making out bill for material, purchasing and 
building new poultry house, pig pen and shed. Work of this character being done 
in the schools and encouraged in the homes has a direct bearing upon the agricul- 
tural processes of the farm and has been received with approval wherever it has been 
introduced. 

Training of Teachers 

There has been for some time a scarcit}- of fully qualified Manual Training 
teachers and the elementary certificate has had to be accepted in a number of cases 
where the ordinary or specialist's certificate is required. In order to remove this 
shortage, a class was opened last July and will continue until the end of May or 
June. This class is composed of thirty returned soldiers. These men are of the 
highest type and will be able to render good service to the schools. The majority of 
them were skilled mechanics before enlistment and the work they have done is 
marked by soundness of construction, originality of design and beauty of finish. 
They are being given ^a thorough course in all branches o(f the subject, — clay, paper, 
cardboard, strip wood work, bent iron work, forging, wood-turning, woodwork and 
drawing. In addition to the practical work they are receiving an academic course 
in English, Composition and Mathematics. Arrangements are being made for 
€very man to give twenty-five lessons under experienced teachers from whom they 
will receive advice and encouragement as to their conduct and management of 
the various classes. These men will be ready for service in the schools in September 
next and it is earnestly hoped that positions will be available for them. 

In addition to this course, a Summer School wias held in Toronto during July. 
The attendance was greater than ever before, forty teachers attending for the full 
five weeks. These teachers were largely from rural districts and a number of them 
have already introduced the subject into their schools. A letter from one of these 
teachers reads as follows : " I am teaching in S. S. No. 3 Nepean, which school 
serves the village of Britannia and surrounding district. I made a bold beginning, 
had the School Board get me a few supplies and soon had the pupils delighted with 
the new work and consequently the parents. We have started with plasticine work, 
paper cutting, pasting and folding and cardboard construction. At Christmas I 
held an entertainment and Manual Training exhibit. The parents all came 
and showed great interest in the work. I took some pictures of the exhibits, but 
am sorry they are not good enough to send you. 

"We made all the decorations for the Christmas Tree and class room during 
the Manual Training period and we had the walls covered with paper cuttings and 
mounted pictures. Nearly every pupil had on exhibit a piece of plasticine modelling. 
I exhibited my own work including the wood-work to give the parents an idea 
of the extent of the work. The pupils took great delight in showing the parents 
their own particular pieces of work. 



1919 DEPARTMEXT OF EDUCATIOX 43 

'• I am sure Manual Training has helped me greatly in my work. I received 
an increase of $100 at Christmas and plans are under way to re-model our school, 
make two rooms and get an assistant teacher. I feel that I shall have no trouble 
in getting a Manual Training room in the re-modelled school with several benches 
for woodwork, and possibly I shall have the assistant teacher, if it be a lady, 
introduce Household Science for the girls.'"' 

Number and Location of Household Science Teachers 

There are ninety-five Household Science centres in operation in urban muni- 
cipalities. These are situated in the following places : Belleville, Brantford, 
Brockville, Chatham, Collingwood, Cornwall. Fort William, Gait, Guelph, Hamilton, 
Ingersoll, Kingston, Kitchener. London. Madoc, Xiagara Falls, Xiagara Falls 
South, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Paris, Port Arthur, Sarnia, St. Thomas, Sault Ste. 
Marie, Smith's Falls, Stratford, Toronto. Walkerville, AVhitby. Windsor, AYoodstock, 
Cobourg, Peterborough and Port Perry. 

Recent Developments 

There is to be noted an ever-growing tendency to place a wide interpretation 
upon the term " Household Science." Up to within recent years, the subject was 
looked upon as consisting of cookery only and the other activities of the household 
were neglected. In order to counteract this tendency, many schools are now ex- 
tending their work and are devoting a certain amount of attention to other features 
of home life. All the newer schools of Toronto are being fitted with sewing rooms, 
dining rooms and bedrooms, in addition to the kitchen and all the activities of the 
household are receiving as much attention as the limited time available will per- 
mit. Much more attention is being devoted to sewing than formerly and the 
I'esults being accomplished are highly satisfactory. Even in those schools not pos- 
sessing special equipment for Household Science, there is no reason why sewing 
should not be taught as the equipment needed for this subject is very light and in- 
expensive. Every effort is now being made in the majority of schools to relate this 
work to the actual requirements of the home and home practice is being universally 
encouraged. This home practice is essential if the teaching of the school is to be 
effective and achieve the best results. The teachers are receiving many letters from 
parents, speaking in high terms of the help the girls are rendering in the homes, 
owing to the teaching received in the schools. 

Rural Schools 

The Manual Training and Household Science dealt with so far in this report 
has concerned city and town schools, but the rural school must not be neglected in 
this connection. It is gratifying to be able to report great progress in this field, 
notwithstanding the obstacles that have to l)e overcome. The Manual Training- 
taken in the rural schools differs materially from that taken in the city schools and 
if it did not so differ would defeat its own purpose. The rural school has its own 
problems and these problems are essentially d