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Property of 
Alleghany Highlands 
Genealogical Society 



r 








FV 

LIBRIS 



Property of 
Alleghany Highlands 
Genealogical Society 



'CiC 


County Fair 
Edition 






PUFFS EPATCHh 

VDL.IV 



utLlsltEcI tyl'llE Sf’udEMl'S 

COVINGTON 
HIGH SCHOOL 

^OYJMCTOH ¥I£&IKIA 




t. . Vn. ' 


^oreipord 

since the ancient Qreeks held their games on Mount 
Olympus, mankind has felt it to be pleasurable and 
profitable to gather together an exhibit in order that all may 
see horn his accomplishments compare mith the achieuements 
of his neighbors. Because of his desire for recognition, he, 
enjoyed riualry in activity; and because of his desire for mirth, 
much laughter^prouoking entertainment and social intercourse 
mas mingled mith the more serious aspects of Medieual Fairs. 

Q| This uolume of PUFFS AND PaTCFIES is something in the 
nature of a modern Fair. It is an exhibition of the fruits of 
our labor; it shoms the results of good natured riualry, and it 
is filled luith as many laughs as you’ll find on any Midruay. 

C]| The past and future may hold larger and better Fairs and 
C. H. S. may produce larger and better year books in the 
future, but today rue present this Uolume of PUFFS AND 
PaTCFIFS for your inspection. 



Cdldloque of Depdrtmenls 


1. 

Dedication 


II. 

Annual Staf. — ’Board of Directors 


Ill 

Faculti] and School Board. — ^Judqes Stand 

lU 

School Building — Fair Qround and Qrand Stand 

V. 

Classes. — .Exhibits 



1. Senior. — Prize IPinninq Fruit 



2. . Junior. — Purebred Liuestock 



3 . Sophomore. — ^Pediqreed Poultrij 



4 . Freshman'— Qreen Ueqetables 


VI 

Athletics. — The Races 

Property of 

Vll. 

Actiuities^The Midruau 

Alleghany Highlands 

vm. 

Rumour. — .Clomning It 

Genealogical Society 

IX. 

Aduertisements. — .Firemorks 



dedication 

I^ ERE'S to your long life and prosperity, RUFUS JOSEPH 
COSTEN, for four years friend and mentor to the 
class of 1927 . Ifou set us trauelinq the unroyal road to 
learning, domn the Midmay of High School Days, and since 
me first began that perilous fourney, you haue our patient, 
kindly guide. Ijou are the King of shommen and your shorn 
is Education into mhich you coax, curious youth mith cajoling, 
flatteries, and gorgeous promises of regards. But you can-^ 
not fool us, O Pretentious Onel IPe knom that, although 
your head is a treasury of misdom and lore, your heart is the 
biggest part of you, and so me dedicate this Fair Polume of 
Puffs and Patches to you, that you may preserue us in 
your heart, as me do you 



Staff of Puffs and Patches 1927 


I']knls'I' JMcCalel! . 
CifKisTiNi; Sizer . . 
1!vkon Du kson , 
Jack I’ersixger . . . 

lx AT H EK I i\ E ]\1 1 LEEK 

Eleanor (iLEAsoN 
Caralyn Ham 
Paul Eli nt 
Forrest Kincaid 

E\'elyn Jackson . . . 

Ruby Hoikols 

R EM I'S ArR 1 NGTON . 


Editor-in-Cliicf 

Editor 

Business Manu(jcy 

. .. Issislant Business Munai/er 
.Irt Editor 

-Issislant Art Editors 

take Editor 

Fhotoj/rapliic Editor 

Assistant Plioto</rapliie Editor 


I'.DITC )RIA]. I’.( )ARI) 

V 1 RGI N I A Sc 1 1 M ADER ClI EE( )RD 1 T ARKI Z 

Xancy i\loNTEiTii William Adelson 


Robert Thomas 


Ruth Floyd 


Katherine I low ell 


RES I NESS I ’.OAR I ) 

Ellis Hughes Marjorie Kidd 

Killian Woods VevaKidd 


Dorothy Parker 



The Board (jf Directors 



Master of Ccreiiioiiics 
Jamks Cl . 

Snf'criiitciident of Selwols. .dlleylniiiy Connly 




School Board 


I)IKrXT( )KS 


Prof. |Aj\!i-,s(}. Siipcriiitciuiciil 

Covington, \' irginia 

Mr. ]. M. Hhnnicti' 
i\ich Patch, Virginia 

Mr. Ciiarlius S. Siiin’iiKRD 
Covington, Virginia 


Mr, Tiioma.s (]. Mas.sik, Clerk 
Covington, Virginia 

Mr. Allen Persinc.i^r 
nine .S])ring I\un, Virginia 

Mr. I’>en (iRiffitii 
Ihirher, Virginia 


Judges Stand-Jugglers of Human Beings 



MR. RL'FUS J, CC.)STEN, A. B., A. AI. 


I'H 1 DELT/V K.\PF.-\ 

[' iiii’crsity of Virginia 

A man equal in c\'ery resiiect to liis i)<.)sition 
as iiriiicipal of the sclio(.)ls of Coeingloii. 


MR. W ALTER R. CURFMAN, A. B. 

St. .1 olllL\' Colll'IJC 

'I'lie smiling Assistant I’riiicipa! whose duty 
is to teach Mathematics and tict as nurse to 
the Athletic Association. 


.MR. JAMES T. CULBERTSON, B. S. 
II 'illiiiiii and lilary College 
A rtire specimen is the Biology lU'ofessor. 


MRS. NANCY T. SIZER 
I ’ iih'er.nly of Alarylaiid 
(,et your teeth filled and tonsils extracted.” 


) D n o bi M S 



AI ISS KLVIKA JONES 
Sltilr l i'achcrs' Collci/c 
l';inn\ illc, Virginia 
Colinuhia I 'iin'crsily 

'rcacinng history is a small part of what she 
does. 


MISS KIM’.KCC.X S.WNDKKS 

* Si oil i'ollc(/c 

Here is one of those geniuses who under- 
stands Latin, 


.M ISS K.M'HRYN TALLh'.Y 
Ccniciniry Collc</c Coiiscri'dlory 
Ihiii'iTsily of I ’ir(/iii!(i 

Ne comprenez-\()US pas? VWdl, it’s your 
Itiult if yoti are a |)Upil in the h'rench class. 


MISS AfAKY TAYLOK I )uPUY, A. LI. 

Raiidolfli-Al lU'un II 'omen's Collei/e 

'file h.nglish ti'acher seeks to revive the 
English language. 




MISS CATHERINE CLYNES 



Slate Tcaehers’ College 

Ercclcricksliurg, X'irginia 

V iiiz'ersily of Kentucky 

Commercial work is more than a liread- 
winning acconijilishment. 


MISS JESSIE .MURRAY HAM MERRY 
State Teachers’ College 
Frederickshurg, X’irginia 
Columbia I hiiz’crsily 

d'he ] )omestic Science teacher softens the 
bride’s biscuits. 


.MISS M.VRC.ARET AEREN, A. Ik 

lull I'.i'.r.e K.\i’r.\ 

Randolfh-Macon ll'omeii's College 

t hemistry and mathematics are her subjects, 
and it were well for her pupils that they learn 
them. 


MISS ANNE S.MITH JETER, A. B. 

Randal fh-M aeon H'oinen's College 

Uur only newcomer among the faculty this 
year brings us luck. Ratiu is her forte. 



The Big Grand Stand 

AT NINE AND THREE 

Grav stones, grim skies, gray ]>aths that lead vvitliin. 

The lagging f(jotste])S of the silent crowd, 

The gioomv ringing of the gong, and stragglers Inirrying 
I'rom out the damj) and foggy mist — 

The doors close ; school has begun. 

Rright golden walls painted in sunshine and many ])aths that lead without, 
The tripping footsteps of the happy crowd. 

The merry jingling of the bell, and shouts of glee fading 
Awav with the laughter into the glorious sunshine — 

The doors close ; school is out. 


Inside the Gates 






Office 
I .IHUARY 








* 







Prize Winning, Fruits of Alleghany 


THE SENIOR CLASS OE C. H. S. 

Miss Cathkkix Ci.vnes Teacher 

COLORS FLOWER 

("told and White Mock ( drange 

MOTTO 

“He Conquers Who End ares" 

OFFICERS 

Ekn'i;st McCali-ji 

Evkia'n Jacksox 

CkKTKL'DE IMcALLISTEk 

IaCK I’l'KSIXni'.K 


President 

Vice-President 

Sec re t a ry- Treasure r 
Usher 


MEMBERS 


Ca I iii-.in.NM', CkaI' I 
Alma I 

l-j-izAi’.i-a n FiJi'i'o 
Ki.icwon ( a.i'.Asnx 
krr.Y Hoik.ks 
M AlJAl.KX’K H AliUlZ 

I''.via.YN Jackson 
Alice Luoak 


II II.DA I J-.ll.HION 
lii-KNicE La in 
Ca i h kki n l .\ 1 c.\ i.Li s ri'.K 
Clara McAllisier 
( iERTRUliE M cAeLIs TER 
Kathryn Milli:r 
Lccille Newman 
Sally Henry I’ayne 
Chris'i ine Sizer 


l'.> 1 1 1 ER Si'Ronsi-: 

1 1 i-.LEN M . Sm ri II 

1 1 ELicN E. Sm n 1 1 

i I ILIIREI H Sxi- All 

Nancy Monteo ii 
Ceara \’est 
Mary Helen W'oltt; 
Arbutus Grotz 


Inez Rose 
IM aius Arrini.ton 

OrvII.ET: I IRESSLER 

Byron I iickson 
Ernest McCaleb 
Jack 1 ’i:rsin(,er 
John Irvine. 
Horace Thom eson 



r-officio Prrside)i1 


CATHl^RINE CRAFT 



Rci/istt'i'cd (is: “Kitten." 

Riilcred for: Candidate for matri- 
mony. 

I’reiniuuis held: Sidney I. aider Lit- 
erary Society 24-25-26; Rooster Clnli 
24-25; Cirls' J’asketliall d’eam 2(); 
Secretary of "Alice L. Edwards" 
Science (. Inli 27; lennis Team 25; 
Athletic Association 2(); Science Clnh 
27. 

R.vee ftioua! f’oiuls: Rig Line eyes, 
cheerful smile, constant iiffections. 

Jitdi/e’s rciihirks : "Idttle hnl lond." 


REMUS ARRINGTON 

Ki'!/isl,'r('d as: “Remns.” 

hulcrcd for: Rlnshin.g .Senior. 

Frciiiiiuiis held: V\i Isold an Liter- 
lary .Society 24-25-2(); Fooihall 2(); 
Monogram Clnh 27; Animal I’hoto- 
graiiher 27. 

Exeel'iioiial poiiils: (ireat hidght, 
williiygncss to help in all class acti\ i- 
ties. 

Judfie's remarks: “Slow and s1e;id\' 
wins the race." 


AlAfA DRESSLER 

Re(/istered as: “Mick." 

Entered for: Prize conscieni ions 
student. 

Rreiiiiuin held: 

Exeeftional points: Rosy cheeks, 
winning sndle, sweet disposition, care- 
fully prepared lessons. 

Judi/e’s remarks: "Kee|i that school 
girl com])lexion." 



EIJZABETH FLII’1‘0 

Rc(/tslcrcd as: “Elizal)L-tli.” 

hatcrcd jor: J’rizc sweet smile. 

I’rcimiuus held: Editorial Staff An- 
imal 24 ; Sidnev Lanier l^iterary So- 
ciety 24-25-20; ISooster C'lnli 24-25; 
Editorial liSoard Cohisro 25-27; Ath- 
letic .Association 2b; Student Eouncil 
27. 

h.Vi c htional points: Alulity to cnrl 
her hair e\cry morning and not he 
late; dri\e car down street and hit 
e\ er\' water plug. 

Judi/r's remarks: “Smile, there’s 
enough sorrow in the world.’’ 


BYRON DICKSON 

Reijistered as: “Sleepy.’’ 

^ hale red for: Business he;ul of the 
Senior C hiss. 

Premiums held: Baskethall 24-25- 
20; Circnhition Manager iohiseo 2() ; 
Assistant Manager Poothall 2(i ; Bus- 
iness Manager Annind 27; Business 
ARmager Cohisco 21; Monogram 
Ohih 20-27; Science Cluh 2b; Class 
Usher 25-20; Manager Ihiskethall 2(i; 
.Student Council 27; Athletic .Associa- 
tion 2.-i-2(); Wilsonian Literary .So- 
ciety 25-2o. 

I: veep/ioiial points: C urly hair, 
po|)ularity, nuinaging ability. 


EI.EANOR OLEASON 

Pet/istered as: “Bohhy.’’ 

P.ntered for: A'ersatile. 

Premiums held: Cohiseo SltiiT 24- 
25; Canttiin Girls’ Ihiskethall Tetim 
24-25; I’rogram Committee, Wilson- 
ian Literary Society 25-2(); Athletic 
'Association 24-25-20; Annual Staff 
20-27; Tennis Cluh 26-27; Girls Or- 
chestra 20-27; Latin Cluh 27; Order 
.Monitor 27 ; Class I’rophet 27. 

J’.xeeptional points: W ide inlUicnce, 
hig ])lue eyes, hoi ish ways. 

litdije’s remarks: “A smile for all, 
a greeting 
glad, 

A lovahle, joll_v 
way she had.” 


ARliL’TUS GKOTZ 



Rctiisicrcd as: “Arliutus.” 

Iiiilcrcd for: 1'lie llowcr of Sc'lma. 
Vrcimuius held: 

l:.reet>lioinil foiiils: Uiil ailing gcx.xl 
liiimor, indiislrioiis liahits. 

Judfic's remarks: "l.augli and the 
world laughs with you.” 


()R\'ILLK I tRESSIJfk 

Registered as: ‘'()r\ illc.” 

liiilered for: I’rizc iicnuancnt 
wave. 

I'reiiiiiiiiis held: Wilsonian Liter- 
ary Society 24-25. 

li.vee/'lioiial I'oiiils: ,\hility lo 
hlush, laziness, good disposition. 

Jitdi/e's remarks: “ISashfnl in class, 
hut a hear among hnlies.” 


AIM tELIvNL HAKRIZ 

Rei/islered as: ‘‘lUister.” 

liulered for: Prize I’rima I )onna. 

I’remiiiiiis held: Wilsonian Liter- 
ar\' Society 24-25-2(>; .Athletic /Asso- 
ciation 26; Girls’ llaskethall Team 
27; ISnsiness Hoard Cohiseo 26. 

llxeeftioinil faints: Curly hair, so- 
lirano \’oicc. 

Jitdi/e's remarks: “The ‘.Alarion 
Talley’ of the future.” 


RUBY HODGES 



Ri'ljislcrcd as: “Slippy." 

Entered for: I’rize American girl. 

Preininiiis held: Sidney Lanier Lit- 
erary Society 24-25-20; Booster Clnli 
24-25 ; .Science Clul) 27 ; Girls’ Bas- 
ketball Team 24-25-20 ; Track Team 
2b; Annual Staff 27; Athletic Asso- 
ciation 24-25-20. 

E.veeptioiuil points: Good humor, 
if ricndliness, happy go-lucky disposi- 
tion, popularity. 

Judge's remarks: “.\s merry as the 
day is long.’’ 


JOHN 1R\ INK 

Registered as: "Bill," 

Entered for: 1 lignit}' of bearing. 

I'remiums held: Wilsonian Liter- 
ary Society 2b; .Science O'lul) 27; 
Class LawA'cr 27. 

E.reeptional points: Bash fulness, 
keen sense of humor, good marks, 
and brown eyes. 

Judge's remarks: “ ’Tis good to be 
valued at one’s true worth.’’ 


EA’ELYN JACKSON 

Registered as: "W it." 

Entered for: I'rize school and class 
spirit. 

I’remiums held: Sidney Lanier Lit- 
erary Society 24-25-2() ; Science Club 
27 ; Business Board, Cohiseo 25-26- 
27; Joke Editor Annual 27; \’ice- 
I’resident Class 2b-27 ; Cheer Leader 
2(1-27. 

Exeeptional points: Popularity 
willingness to work and ability to ac 
com|)lish ; j(jlly disiiosition ; depend- 
ability. 

Judge's remarks: "Hang sorrow; 
care’ll kill a cat." 


* 



RERNJCE LAIR 

Rc(/istcrcd as: “Bcniic." 

linicrcd for: Modesty. 

Frciiiiiuiis held: V\'ilsonian Liter- 
ary Society 24-25-26 ; Athletic Asso- 
ciation 25-2() ; Raskethall 26-27; Girls' 
Orchestra 27. 

Exceptional points : I'horoughiiess, 
youth fulness, hahit of daily study. 

Judi/e's reniarPs: “A \iolct hy a 
mossy stone.” 


ERNEST :\IcCALER 

Re(/islered as: ‘‘Ernie." 

Entered for: Prize l>olshe\ik. 

Eirst Class I'reniiunis held: Class 
President Z(:t-27 ; Foothall 27; Class 
Treasurer 24-25 ; Sidney Lanier Lit- 
erary Society 25-26; President Mono- 
gram Cluh 27; Editor-in-Chief PuFi'S 
ANii P.'\TCHEs 27 ; Circulation Man- 
ager Cohiseo Outburst 25 ; Editorial 
Ifoard Cohiseo Outburst 2b; Editorial 
ITiard Puffs anu Patches 2b. 

Exceptional points: Almndant hair, 
revolutionary ideas, unlimited brass, 
ready wit, gift of clever ex])ression, 
quality of leadershiii. 

Judge’s remarks: First award. 
Makes crimson look pale pink liy 
comparison with nearest competition. 


FI I El )EI5RAN1 ) LElGFFrON 

Registered as: “Brandy.” 

Entered for: Prize Housekeeper. 

Premiums held: Sidney Lanier Lit- 
erary Society' 24-25-26; Alice L. Fid- 
ward’s Science Cliil> 27. 

Exceptional points: Long curls; 
ahility to cook and sew; willingness 
to work. 

Judge’s remarks: “Vv'ondcrful com- 
hination for happiness.” 



ALICE LUGAR 

Registered as: “Shorty.” 

Entered for: Scholastic Rcconl. ' 

Freniiiuiis held: Sidney Lanier Lit- 
erar\' Society 25-26 ; Science Club 27. 

Exeeptioiial points: Remarkable 
memory, intent expression, excellent 
grades, modesty. 

Jitdi/e's remarks: “Small in stature, 
great in wisdom.” 


JACK PERSINGER 

Registered as: “Jack.” 

Entered for: First prize conscien- 
tious well-doer. 

P’renniuns held: Football 25-26; 
Baseball 2b-27 ; Sidney Lanier Liter- 
ary Society 26; Business Board Co- 
hiseo 26; Assistant Business Manager 
Cohiseo and Annual 27 ; Athletic As- 
sociation 25-26; LKher Senifir Class 
27 ; Student Council 27 ; Giftorian 27 ; 
Science 27 ; Alonogram Club 27. 

Exeeptioiial points: Cheerful dispo- 
sition, habit of preparing each day's 
work, dej)en(labiiity. good recitations. 

Judge's remarks: “Well done, thou 
good and faithful seiwant.” 


CLARA AIcALLISTER 

Registered as: “Clara.” 

Entered for: J’rize conscientious 
student. 

Premiums held: 

E.veeptioiial points: Pretty com- 
idexion, ability to grasp ami e.x])re.ss 
information, conscientious worker, 
excellent record. 

J udge’s r e m a r k s : “Persistence 
o\ crcomcs difliculty.” 


CiERTKUl )E AIcALEISTER 



Rcfjisicrcd as: “l)irty Mac.” 

lintcrcd for: Prize Hapjier, 1927 
mndcl. 

I’reiiiiunis held: Secretary of Class 
24; Sidney l.anicr 24-23-2() ; y\thletic 
Asst)ciatiun 25-26; Science Clnli 27; 
Pusiness Hoard of I’liFi's anii 
I’.VTCHE s 25; Ijiisiness Hoard of Co- 
hisco Oiilhurst 24-25; Class Treas- 
urer 27 ; Senic>r Council 27, 

Hxccftional points: Cift (jf gal>, 
ability to get good marks, blond hair, 
siirj)rising amount of conscience. 

Jiidfie's remarks: ‘‘Precious articles 
come in small packages.” 


CATl I EKINE McALPI STER 

Renisiered as: “Cat.” 

Lettered for: Hair like gold. 

Rreiiiiuuis held: 

Ilxee ptional points: Cheerful and 
lovable disposition, hard worker, ])ret- 
ty hair, couscieiitious temperament. 

Jiidi/e’s remarks: “Would that 
there were more like her.” 


KATHRYN MILLER 

Rei/islered as: “Trib.” 

Entered for: Striking nose. 

PremiiDns held: .Sidney Ltmier Lit- 
erary Society 24-25-26: Hooster Club 
24-25; Cohiseo .Stafl' 25-26; Assistant 
Art Editor Antiual 26; Art Editor 
Annual 27; Girls’ Hasketbai! Team 
24-25-z;() ; i rack Team 26. 

Exeeptional points: Artistic tem- 
perament, melodramatic personality, 
indifference, willowy figure, ungov- 
ernable hair. 

Jndfje’s remarks: “A long drink of 
w ti L c r . 


NANCY MONTEITH 



Rcf/istcrcd as: “Naiici.-.” 

Entered Ejr: Serenity. 

Frcimums held: Sidney Lanier Lil- 
crtiry Society 23-26; Athletic Associa- 
tion 25-26; Editorial Hoard Culnseo 
26-27; Baskethall 26-27 ; Science Cliih 
27 ■ Editorial Board i\nnual 2b-27. 

E.veepliuiial foinls: Originality, lit- 
erary aliility, neatness, and accuracy. 

Judge’s remarks: “If ^'oii would 
liax’C a thing well done, ask Nancy to 
do it." 


LUCILLE NEWSMAN 
Re(/islered as: “Tootsie.” 

iinlered for: Brize sweet disposi- 
tion. 

I’remiitm held: W ilsonian Literary 
Society 23-24-25-2(). 

Judye's remarks: Still waters run 
deep.” 


SALLY HENRY I’AYNE 

Registered as: “Chi.x.” 

Entered fur: Prize speech maker. 

Rreminms held: Reporter Sidney 
Lanier Literary Society 24, IMcmlicr 
25; Cantain Girls’ Baskethall Team 
24-25-26; Girls’ Ctrcliestra 27. 

Exeeftional points: ( lolden haired, 
independent, good sport. 

Judge’s remarks: “Jtul she is su 
determined.” 





INEZ ROSE 

Registered as: ‘‘Rose." 

iliilered for: I'rize cluli W(jrkcr. 

Preiiiiiiins held: Sidney Lanier Lit- 
erary Sciciety 25-26; Athletic Asso- 
ciation 23-26. 

Judge's remarks: “She says little, 
but accomplishes much.” 


C'JiRI STINE SIZER 

Registered as: “Christina.” 

hiitered for: All-round Senior. 

I’remiitiiis held: Athletic Associa- 
tion 25-26; Sidney Lanier Literary 
25-26; Basketball 25-26-27; Assistant 
Editor Annual 27; Chiss Ilistorian 
27; Stmlent Council 27. 

Exeeftioiial faints: (lood marks, 
class spirit, modest}', accomodating 
disposition. 

Judge’s remarks: “Her intellect is 
su rprising.” 


HELEN E. SAiri'll 

Registered as: “Speed.” 

Entered for: Most constant alTec- 
lions. 

Premiums held: Sidney Lanier Lit- 
erary Society 24-25-26; Boosters Club 
24-25; Girls’ Basketball d'eam 24-25- 
26; Track Team 26; Giftcjrian 27; 
y\thletic Associatioii 24-25-26. 

P.xee ftional points: I’l'ett}' eyes, t}'pe- 
writing speed, good marks. 

Judge's remarks: “A creature not 
too bright nor 
gOO{l 

For human 
nature’s daily 
food.” 



FfRST 

PRIZE 


FIRST/ 

PRIZF/ 


HELEN Al, SAIITH 

lictjislcrcd (is: ‘‘Jimmie.” 

Entered for: Prize Chalterlio.x. 

Preniiuins held: Sidney Lanier l.it- 
crary Society 24-25-20 ; Girls' llaskel- 
hall Team 24-25; Cohiseo Staff 27; 
-Athletic .Association 24-25-20. 

E.veefiional foinis: Constant con- 
versation, lirown eyes, good looks, 
chccrfnlness. 

Judf/e's remarks: ‘‘Couldn't get a 
word in edgewise. " 


HILDRETH SNL.AD 

lE'f/islered as: ‘‘Hille.” 

Entered for: Prize Bookkeeping 
shark. 

E renniuus held: Wilsonian Liter- 
ary Society 23-24, 24-20. 

E.veef'tional f’oints: Quiet xoice, 
long hair, hahit of taking notes. 

Judge’s remarks: ‘‘A \'oice e\'er 
gentle, sweet, and 1(.)W — an e.xcellent 
thing in woman." 


ESTHER SPROUSE 

Registered as: ‘‘Esther.” 

Entered for: Prize dreamer. 

Premiums held: Sidney I. aider Lit- 
erary Society 25-20; Basketliall 25-2(); 
.Athletic .Association 25-26. 

Judge's remarks: “W here there's a 
will there’s a way'.” 

Exee ftional I'oints: 1 )rc:un_v eyes, 
steady', depeiidahle personality, deter- 
mined to rise. 



CLARA VEST 



Rc(jislcrccl (is: “Clara.” 

Eulcrcd for: I’rizc old fashioned 
girl. 

Frcininiiis held: Sidney l^anicr Lit- 
erary Society 24-25-26 ; Athletic As- 
sociation 25-2f.i ; Science Clnl) 2()-27 \ 
Latin Cluh 2(>21 . 

Exec fiioiHil points: Pretty l)liu' 
eyes, quiet, sweet, demure personality, 
studious teni])erament. 

Jiuhje’s remark's: “And all was 
conscience and tender heart.” 


VARY HELEN WOIJ-E 

Rei/istered as: “Mary Iliden.” 

Entered for: Prize record through- 
out High School career. 

Ereiuiiuns held: Sidney Lanier Lit- 
erary Society 24-23-26; Athletic /Vsso- 
ciation 23-26; Secretary and 'Preas- 
urer Science Cluh 2()-27 ; Editor-in- 
Oiief Cohiseo 21 \ Editorial Hoard of 
Annual 25-26. 

Execptional points: Mania tor car- 
rying a liook, abnormal al>ility to 
read Virgil, greedy lor hard work in 
editing the Cohiseo, willingness to 
hel]) anyl)o<ly do anything. 

. ndi/e's remarks: “Her brilliant 
record roves that she has outgrown 
her l)al)v face." 


CATHER I NE CLYNES 

Rcijistered as: “Catherine.” 

Iiiilered for: Pusiness mind. 

Rreiniums held: One of the best 
teachers in “Covington Hi.” 

Exec ptional points: Black hair, 
snapping black eyes, winsome smile. 

Jiidi/e’s remarics: “Too good to be 
true.” 


Class History 

III', local fairs have become so much a part of our \-earl\- routine 
that they have a rej^ular ]>lace on the calendar. We speak of cer- 
tain events as hapi)eninii' "at the fair" in a certain conntv, and 
every one knows exactlx' when and where that particular event 
occnred. Ifvery year hriiiii's a new fair, and eveiw fair hrinj^s 
new op])ortnnities to measure x'our pro,ii'ress as an individual or 
as a class, thnxugh comparing it witli that of previous years. The annua! fair 
others almost limitless amusement, and furnishes abundant labor stimulated by 
friendly rivalrx' and contests. Always there are many happy memories in the 
minds of those fortunate ones who attend a fair. Wdien we rummage in that old 
chest labeled "Past Experiences," which we all carry through life, there is no 
lover's kee])sake we drag forth to view which affords us the same jileasure as the 
memories of the fairs of vesterdax'. It has been my goi.xl fortune to attend four 
of these delightful gatherings, and nothing gives me greater pleasure than to 
recall them. 

W ell do 1 rememlier the half jileasnrahle, half painful mixture of fear, excite- 
ment, and curiositx’ which tilled m\' heart as I drew near the gates to enter nw 
hrst fair. 

A number of m\- jials and I decided to attend a fair beginning in .September, 
1P23, in the countx' "hd'eshman," allhougli we heard tliat our welcome was doubt- 
ful and that the gate-keeiier exacted a large fee from strangers. This we found 
to he onlx' too true -wdien we reached the fair grounds, for we were given large 
])lacards to wear around our necks labeled "Pats” in large green letters. As we 
liad been told that there were manx' interstmg exhibits at this fair, xx’e timidlx 
entered one tent covered xxith curious sx'inhols and letters, maiw of them "un- 
knoxxn." This, someone ex}ilained, xxas "/Mgehra," a veiw curious S])ecimeu. We 
linally overcame our fear of it and ]iassed out into the Imrrving, good-nalnred 
croxvd streaming ])ast the tent. 

W e mingled xxith and folloxxed the crowd until xxe stopjied before a side 
show xvhich held the xvorld’s strongest man - l.atin. It was announced that he 
xxas also the xx'orld’s greatest xxu'estler and xxould give a ‘‘ninetx'” to anx’one xxho 
could overjioxx’er him. The Class decided to "take him on," and trx' for the judze. 
lie was certainlx' as advertised, "the strongest man in the world.” It was a hard 
struggle, xxith first one and then the other as victor, h’or a xxdiile the outcome 
seemed doubtful, liut by a mighty effort "I'he Cdass,” though injured by the loss 
of a fexx members, finally conquered fhe famous xvrestler. We thought "Patin" 
exhausted, and left the ring in triumph. 

After our hard struggle we felt xxeak and exhausted and greativ in need of 
refreshment: so it was wdth great joy that xxe Sjiied a large "Domestic Science" 
booth xvhere xve olitained xvelcome refreshments. This xvas quite a treat, and as it 
came right after our great struggle xve enjoyed it more than ever. 

Wdien xve had done justice to the delicious viands, xve once more sauntered 
out into the ]>leasure-seeking croxvd. As they all seemed to be going to one ])ar- 



ticular place, we decided to “follow the crowd.’’ Glancing at onr programs, we 
learned that the excitement was about a balloon race. Just as we ai'rived, two 
balloons were released and rose slowly from the ground. They were named 
“Babylonia” and “Egypt.” Now “Egypt” is leading, now “Babylonia,” no, they 
are exactly even! Slowly, majestically they rise, exjiaTiding, becoming larger and 
larger, the higher they go. Suddenly the tense, eager crowd is startled b\' a loud 
report, caused by the explosion of tlie two balloons, the fragments of which are 
now rapidly approaching the earth once more. So excited had we been over the 
hrst two balloons, that we had not noticed three others arising just below them. 
The letters, which we could scarce!}’ distinguisli, identified them as “Ehoenicia,” 
“Assyria,” and “Eersia.” These also rose to a great height and exploded. 

The last two released were larger and more S])lendid than the others, and how 
majestically they rose, one below the other, lluge, beautiful, wonderful, “tireece” 
and “Rome,” in the final race, rose slowly, expanding as they ascended. The 
cause of this rise and expansion was very interesting to study. Higher they sailed 
to a height not reached by any of the others. Mighty “Greece” fell (irst, and still 
the other floated on. Suddenly an explosion, greater than ever, startled the crowd 
as powerful “Rome” came hurtling through space. Some of the occupants only 
escaped death by climbing into a parachute, “Constantinople.” 

When we turned away from this marvelous display we learned that this, the 
“History” exhibit, was the last event that would take place at the Eair that year. 

We reluctantly started to leave when, much to our sur])rise, the manager told 
us that we must pass f)ut through another gate calleil “ ISxaminations.” The war' 
to this gate was rough and rugged, with many little itebbles, called “tests,” in the 
])ath. At the gate there were so many people crowding and ])ushing through th:it, 
in the immense crowd, a few of my com|)anions were lost. However, we voted 
the fair a great success and decided to visit another (me next \’ear. 

When September, 1924, came, some of us grew restless and, calling a meeting 
of our old band, we decided to visit another fair, in the County “.Sopliomore.” 
We were "hardboiled” by now, and entered the fairgnjunds witli fearless ste]i, 
eager for the fun which we knew was sure to come. 

We were in hopes that we were to see many new exhibits, but imagine our 
surprise when we saw the strong man — whom we thought we had conc|uered — 
back again. Having overcome him the year before, we did not hesitate to wrestle 
with him again. 'V'ery much to our surprise, he was in better training than the 
jirevious year, but perseverance overcame him at last. 

Walking triumphantly out of the tent after our second victory over the cham- 
pion wrestler, w'e were ready for anything. As a contest was then beginning we 
entered without making any inquiries as to the nature of the game. We w-’ere told 
that this was an “English” contest, and that w'e were required to wudte a para- 
graph ; the one writing the best one in five minutes w-’Otild win the first prize. 

What scribbling, and biting of pencils went on during those short minutes! 
We had only a good start when, “Time!” called th.e judge. After a good deal of 
rustling of papers, looking wise, and clearing his throat, the judge condescended 
to announce that the first prize was won by “The Class of ’27.” 


Growing tired of the pushing, bustling crowds, we wandered into a tent, 
whence issued soft strains of music. There were also several orators who gave us 
much good advice. After listening to the speakers and to several livel}' selections 
i)f the band, we found that it was time to leave. 

Again we passed through the crowded gatewav after a long struggle. Worn 
out bv the hardships of this fair, we decided that we would not attend another 
fine in the near future. 

When Se])teml)er, 1925, came, we decided that after seeing two fairs we could 
not remain quietly at lujme, w hen there were some we had not visited. We were 
an adventurous crowd and could not resist the desire to see new e.xhibits and enter 
new C(jntests. So it was that we \vent to the County “Junior,” where we h;id 
heard of rare e.xhibits, and of man_\' attractions offered the pleasure-seekers. 

We were wandering around the grounds wdien we espied a tent where mam’ 
“freaks” were on disjday. In a cage was a huge monster with eyes like circles, its 
head an immense semi-circle, its laxly the shape of a rectangle, its feet large 
squares, and its mouth the shape of an enormous triangle. We were greatly 
])U//led as to what this curious animal was su])])Osed to l)e, when some enliglitened 
personage informed us that its name was “Geometry.” 

Deciding that we had seen all the “freaks” we wanted to see, we left the tent 
and mingled with the crowd once more. \’ery much to our suri)rise we found our 
“strong man” back once more, liale and hearty as ever. Me had a partner with 
hini now, wh.oni he called “h'rench." The “class” divided, some putting on a bout 
with “l.atin,” the others, with “French." We were the victors in botli matches, 
those who wrestled with “1^'rench" re])orting a much etisier victory than those 
wh.o tigain took on “Latin.” 

We were then invited to inspect the new dei)artment for culinary e.xhibits. It 
w;is loctited in a beautiful new building, which was to be the permanent bootli for 
this exhibition. Handsome, new, electric hot-i)lates, white-top[)ed tables, and 
other conveniences were on dis])la_\'. Man}’ delici(jus viands were disi)hi_yed in 
teinjiting ;irra\’. In the next room was the sew’ing exhibit. Uit(jn closer e.xamina- 
tion I recognized the htmdiw’ork of some of m}’ classnitites, all bearing blue 
ribl;ons. 

As we left this tent w’e saw a furious storm called “Physics” approaching, 
ddie Tcaging elements caught us before we had time to seek shelter, and, picking us 
up ;is though w’e w’ere leaves, carried us to the tent w’here we found the S])eed 
niarvel of the world. This w’onderful mtichine w’as ctip.able of the greatest speed : 
it was so interesting that there was alwa\’S a crow’d around the “typewriter.” 

We got out of this tent just in time for the ballof)n ascension. A large bal- 
h)(/n W’as slow’ly but steadily rising from the ground. More beautiful than any we 
had ever before seen was this one, “The Lhiited States.” With much interest w-e 
studied the cause of the rise and exjxansion of this balloon of balloons. Higher 
and higher it rose, becoming larger as it ascended, it reached a marvelous heiglit. 
Twice was “The United States” eiidangered by adverse w’inds, but still it rose 
sujjerior to every conflict. No sudden e.xjdosion this time, no c|uick hurtling to the 
ground, higher, higher, reaching a marvelous height, it continued to light up all 


the sky as it floated serenely over our heads. Tn some way its makers had made 
this balloon iinjiref^nable to outside storm and itrovided it with the means to 
expand without bursting. 

Satisfied at last with our experience for one year, we turned our weary foot- 
steps towards the exit gate. It was rougher this time than ever liefore, and the 
rush greater than in previous years. Freedom was glorious after the hard strug- 
gle, and we were glad to go home. 

Ilefore settling down to a (piiet and peaceful life, my former companions and 
1 decided to attend a fair in the next county. Although we were warned that we 
could expect a very hard time in 1926-27 in the County “Senior,” we were ex- 
perienced travelers now and did not hesitate to go. After traveling through some 
beautiful countrv, we came to the jjark where the fair was to be held. We were 
eager for anv adventure that awaited us within those dusty tents or in mingling 
with the carefree crowd. 

The first place we entered was the “Domestic Science” exhibit. Some changes 
had been made in this department ; lunches were now being served. The sewing 
club had a s])lendid e.xhibit with many blue-ribbon winners. 

From this crowded tent we went to the tent of the juggler. He was famous 
the world over as a wizard, not in juggling lighted sticks, balls, or any of the usual 
things, but figures. That was his specialty. Spellbound, we watched him as he 
made columns oi figures balance and performed other feats too numerous to 
mention. Then he told some of us to try, but we decided it must be sleight of 
hand, for try as we wajuld, some of those figures were sure to be in the wrong 
place. However, we finally mastered it, and were told that we had learned 
" liookkeeping.” 

Someone suggested that we ought to see the great city, called “Chemistry.” 
How busy those ])eo])le were! Some were reading, some were taking notes, and 
others were mi.xing siime cpieer concoctions in little tubes, d'hey jiaid no attention 
to us at all, but kept on “experimenting” with their city. We left as soon as we 
could, for the whole ]dace was filled with a jieculiar odor. 

As we left this tent, we iierceived a black cloud known as “Civics” rapidly 
a])])roaching. This jiroved to be a miniature cyclone, which we were unable to 
escape. After rushing us along like so many snowflakes, the storm abated as sud- 
denly as it had come up. There was the usual confusion in a great crowd after 
the storm had abated, and we had very much difficulty in all keejiing together. 

Tn the general confusion, we found ourselves before the tent of our old 
friends, the strong men. They were eager for a wrestling match, so we again 
agreed to a round. It was harder work than ever, and “hh'ench” certainly had 
grown stronger since last year. After a hard struggle, we defeated them again, 
and proudly left the tent. 

The “Ifnglish” contest was just organizing when we came out, so we en- 
tered. This time, it was a game of “/Vuthors,” very interesting, Tnit retpiiring 
hard work and quick thinking. We won first ])rize for a high score of ninetv-five. 

We exjierienced man_\- difficulties on tlie way back to the gate, but we reached 
it at last with with many ex])ressions of delight. before they would let us 
through the gate this time, we had to present tickets, which thev called “essays.” 

As we stepped forth from the I-'Tir Grounds for the last time, slowly, sadly, a 
final burst of color compelled us to look back. There, high in the heavens, shot 
the last sky-rocket, a shining path towards the stars, the eternal fireworks towards 
which we would ever gaze. 

I — k’ccordcd by: Ciikistini-: Sizkk. 

1 Class I listoriaii, 27 . 


Our Future Goal 


We were the dreamers of dreams 

As we wandered gaily through life, 

W e lingered with yf)uth hv its streams — 

Not knowing or feeling your strife ; 

Now we must arise and seek 

The task that awaits us t(jday. 

While hope holds our life at its peak 

May we march gladly, on life’s highway. 

IMusing in silent thought 

We inust banish our dreams empty as air. 

To new roads of life we’ve been hnnight. 

New roads we must conquer and dare. 

Now all idle dreams must end 

We leave them and turn them away ; 

W hatever the future may send 

Let us meet it, on life’s highway. 

Now this be our strength forever, 

W e will surely he ])atient t(j wait. 

Till fame crowns our hearts’ endeavor 

And numbers r)ur names with the great. 

The school days we’ve spent together. 

The friendships we hold today; 

W ill serve as a torch in rough weather 
To guide us, on life’s highway. 

— Kvei.yx Jac k.son. 

Class Pud. 



! 

I 

i 

,] 


I ’kofkssok Tintype's Studk.) 
I’icturcs Finislicd While You Wait 



Foreword 


Al.MlSTS, mystics, and spiritualists are 
usually well enf)Ugh represented at lairs, 
but by far the most marvelous perform- 
ance in baring the future that I ever saw, 
occurred at last _\ear’s Alleghany County 
bdur where a magic jirinter, by means of a 
dye known to sorcery, astonished the ])opulace by publishing 
])rophetic editions of that ])rogressive weekly, The Byllc 
Board. The ])a].)ers that he ])rints with the aid of this dye 
contain the news exactly as it will be i)rinted in the future; 
and the magician is able to select any given date of the ])ul)- 
lication bv registering the desire to do so. We include 
herein the Ajual 1, l'^37 edition of The Byllc Board. In 
this ])ublication the future of the Class (.)f ’27 is as clearly 
])ortrayed as a chorus girl’s tigure. 

1 f L liA N o K ( ; 1. 1-; A so N , 

Class Froplicf '21 . 




The Bylle Boarde 


The Class Digest and Prophetic World Review 


April 1, 1937 (no fooling) Almost No Charge 


MAMMOTH MELODRAMA 
RELEASED 

An epochal achievement in the cinema 
industry is considered to have been made 
with the completion of the latest picture 
of Clara Vest, the star of the people's 
hearts, whose marvelous success in “She 
Loved But Was Lured Away’’ swept the 
country on a tidal wave of popularity 
six months ago. The new production 
entitled “Broken Arches” or “What is 
Home Without a Roof” is hailed as the 
greatest picture of the age. It illustrates 
the giant strides of progress the silent 
drama has made, costing as it did $50,- 
000,000 and employing 40,000 people. 
o 

GHIL BANDITS ARE 
APPREHENDED 


Bad News Service, Chicago, Illinois, 
March 28 — Another splash of the local 
crime wave was recorded here yesterday 
when two girls, both of them sisters, 
robbed three banks and were in the act 
of holding up a five and ten cent store 
when fifty daring local policemen crept 
up behind them and called upon them 
to surrender. The girls gave their names 
as Catherine and Clara McAllister, of 
Covington, Virginia. 

o 

WEDDING OF INTEREST 
RUMORED 

Covington, Va., April 1, 1937 — An- 
nouncement was received here today over 
the radio of the marriage of two per- 
sons, sjiid to be from this place. Only 
one name, though was distinguished, and 
that was Smith. However, it is reported 
that the other individual is said to be 
of “Dutch” origin. 


PRIMA DONNA’S VOICE 

BRINGS ROOF DOWN 

New York, May 1 — Madalene Harriz, 
famous soprano, last night literally 
brought down the roof when as Madam 
Butterfly in the Metropolitan Opera 
House she reached high “C” and sent 
a stray note crashing against the ceiling, 
cracking it and knocking the heads of 
the audience who sat unheeding, so en- 
thralled were they with her singing. 
Hereafter, it will be arranged that Miss 
Harriz sing at the Polo Grounds in 
order that another occurrence of so 
dangerous a nature may be avoided. 

o 

GRID MENTORS OPPOSE 
CHANGE 


Bad News Service, April 1, 1937 — The 
two foremost authorities on football to- 
day, coaches Persinger, of Yale, and 
Arrington, of Alabama, went on record 
as opposing proposed changes in the 
rules which would eliminate bodily con- 
tact between rival teams and make foot- 
ball a sport closely resembling basket- 
ball, only less rough. Jack Persinger 
and Remus Arrington, who have made 
gridiron history with championship teams 
in the past three years and who, by a 
remarkable coincidence played on the 
same team at Covington High School 
in 1927, unite in saying that the changes 
now under consideration by the rules 
committee, if given effect would make 
football a parlor game. 


DANCER STRESSES EARLY 
TRAINING 

The Clothes Press, April 1 — Broad- 
way’s newest idol, Lucille Newman, the 
exquisite Southerner, whose fragile 
grace has captivated blase Manhattan, 
in an exclusive interview with a Qothes 
Press reporter told the secret of her 
success. She failed to attribute her vog- 
ue to the daily use of either Moonlight 
Beauty Lotion or Ivory Soap, but said 
quite simply “When I was in high school 
we were given every encouragement to 
dance, and one day in working out a 
geometry problem I did a mental gym- 
nastic which when set to music, proved 
the perfect dance step. Miss Newman 
was graduated from Covington High 
School in 1927. 

o 

POET’S WORK WELL 
RECEIVED 

Clifton Forge, Virginia, March 30 — 
Nancy Monteith, author of “Low Moor 
Lyrics” has again brought the critics to 
her feet with her latest poems under 
the title of “A Bust Up In A Bus or 
Why Did The Driver Turn To The 
Left On A Right Hand Curve.” This 
collection of sentimental ballads por- 
trays the moving spirit of our machine 
age. 

o 

IN SERIOUS CONDITION 

Bad News Service, Richmond, Va., 
March 7 — Three prominent young wom- 
en are said to be in a critical condition 
at St. Johns Hospital due to the effects 
of over-study while pupils in Covington 
High School ten years ago. They are 
Misses Alice Lugar, Bernice Lair and 
Hilda Leighton. 


2 


THE BYLLE BOARDE 


THE BYLLE BOARDE 

The Class Digest and Prophetic 
World Review 

April 1, 1937 (no fooling) 
Almost No Charge 


Class Ensemble of ’27 
Showing 

Force in World’s Progress 


EDITORIAL STAFF 


Editor-in-Chief Ernest McCaleb 

Business Manager Byron Dickson 

Agonizing Artist A. Painter Shoppe 

Disassociated Editors 

1. Parkington Pancake 

2. Dobsom Duster 

3. A. Cradlerocker 

Printers Devil Norman Leek 


RAVINGS BY THE EDITOR 

The world is all wrong. Let us change 
it. Two days ago I saw an urchin cheat 
a millionaire out of three cents. What 
is the nation coming to when such fla- 
grant dishonesty is allowed to go un- 
punished? We are leaning farther and 
farther toward socialism. Some day 
we will fall for it and then what — 

!**??! — ! oblivion. Prohibition will 

be a failure because the wealthy will be 
forced to share drinks with the penur- 
ious. Many a member of the Four 
Hundred is already down to his last 
$500,000. Skirt goods is going higher 
and higher; it is almost out-of-sight to- 
day. The output of fleece and fresh- 
caught fish from Wall Street has shrunk- 
en to a shadow of its former volume. 
What will happen to the poor financier 
when he runs out of buyers for gold 
bricks? Not long ago the scion of a 
wealthy family was fined not less than 
$50.00 and costs for torturing a plebian 
to death on Sunday. These infamous 
blue laws are the abomination of the 
land. Such reforms as polygamy, the 
abolition of public schools, and the dis- 
franchisement of men with less than 
$50,000 are not regarded favorably by 


this generation. The only thing I see 
left to do is to put enough dynamite 
under the American continent with the 
sole exception of Newport and Fifth 
Avenue to blow it into Mars. 

o 

THE CHANCE OF A 
LIFETIME 

A limited number of copies of the 
History of The Class of ’27 of Coving- 
ton H. S. will be sold at the reduced 
price of $10.00 while they last. Written 
and revised by Christene Sizer, histor- 
ian. Guaranteed to be authentic. The 
inspirational, dramatic story of a flock 
of geniuses. Telegraph or radio 32 or 
40, Baltimore, Md. 

• — o 

PRINCE OF WALES 

ATTENDS LUNCHEON 

The Clothes Press, Washington, D. C., 
March 31 — American aristocracy and 
English royalty met when the Prince of 
Wales was entertained by Miss Inez 
Rose, leader of the smart set here, and 
formerly of Covington, Virginia. The 
prince appeared to be much attracted by 
his charming hostess. 

o 

CHARTOGRAPHY PROVES 
OF INTEREST 

New York, March 29 — When it was 
announced that educators in New York 
had induced the well known Professor 
John Irvine to deliver a series of lec- 
tures on chartography, all the tired bus- 
iness men allowed their wives to bring 
them out because they thought that they 
would surely be able to sleep through a 
speech on such a subject, but Irvine, 
member of the famous class of 1927, 
Covington H. S., fooled them. He made 
such lightning geometric calculations 
that he charged the atmosphere in the 
lecture room with a high voltage current 
of electricity which prevented sleep. 
The learned professor made the fourth 
dimension so human and interesting that 
several of the audience claimed they 
could see it crawling on the wall. 
o — 

Kent Marshall, he is so small. 

A Senior could eat him, hat and all. 


FASHION HINTS BY NOTED 
DESIGNER 

The Clothes Press, March 26 — Made- 
moiselle Elizabeth Flippo, fashion arbi- 
trator and owner of the most exclusive 
woman’s shoppe in Paris shows in her 
latest creations an exaggerated form of 
the modern “back to Eden” trend with 
emphasis placed upon the fig leaf effect. 
One of her most intriguing costumes is 
an affair composed entirely of bracelets, 
made for midsummer wear, and known 
as the Slave Dress. 

• o 

JOKES 

He : “I’ve heard he’s a regular lady- 
killer.” 

She : “He may be, he certainly tried 
to starve me to death.” 

Cleva : “Did you ever catch your 
beau flirting?” 

Veva: “Sure, that’s how I catch all 
my beaux.” 

Hubert ; “What three things help a 
person get up in the world. 

Lawrence: “I’ll bite. 

Hubert: “Alarm clock, elevator, and 
a ladder. 

Albert Gibson : “I ain’t never made 
but one grammatical mistake ; and as 
soon as I seen I done it, I taken it back.” 

Miss Jones: “Describe the manners 
and customs of the people of India.” 

Freshman : “They ain’t got no man- 
ners and they don’t wear no customs.” 

Bizz Bailey: “Hey! Where ya’ go- 
in’ with those nine buckets of water?” 

Puny Otten : “I am going to drown 
our old cat.” 

Marie (to grocer) : “I want a chick- 
en.” 

Grocer: “Do you wanna pullet?” 

Marie: “No I want to carry it.” 

Miss Allen (walking briskly into 
room) : “All right class, order.” 

Kent (waking up from sound sleep) : 
“One ham sandwich, please.” 


THE BYLLE BOARDE 


3 


NEW STAR IN LITERARY 
FIRMAMENT 


Covington — Word has been received 
here that America’s intelligentsia has 
gone wild over the verses of Alma 
Dressier, who has been publishing poetry 
of unusual beauty in “The Illiterate In- 
digestion” for the past year. Recently 
her poems have been collected into a 
volume entitled “Pastoral Paragoric.” 
This book of modernistic poetry is the 
recipient of high praise from critics 
throughout the country. The following 
is one of Miss Dressler’s most exquisite 
and sensitive poems: 

IMPRESSIONS FROM A BOVINE 
ABODE 

I wandered at early dawn into a rum- 
nant’s dwelling. 

Ah how the smell of fresh manure smote 
on my nostrils; 

And the titillations of the crickets sound- 
ed a sweet symphony in my ears. 
Yet the cows, the philosophical cows, 
stood contemplatively masticating, 
Ah, I would be a purple cow standing 
knee deep in a barnyard. 

o 

WOMAN REVIVALIST 
SUCCESSFUL 


Covington, Virginia, March 28, 1937 — 
Helen E. Smith, greatest woman preach- 
er since Aimee Semple McPherson, an- 
nounces that she has about completed 
her campaign for the “Eddy”fication of 
the “Layman” of this section and will 
soon retire to enjoy domestic bliss. 
o 

BOOK REVIEW 


By Percival Pinecone 


One of the most notable of the latest 
publications is Eleanor Gleason’s “An- 
nabelle’s Hannibal,” a very clever and 
amusing novel in which the author re- 
veals a keen penetration of the shams 
of society and a rare depth of philos- 
ophy. This is Miss Gleason’s premiere 
novel and we hope it will be the first 
of many. 


Norman: “Mother, will you answer 
just one more question?” 

Mother: “All right what is it?” 
Norman: “Why is it that little fisehs 
don’t drown before they learn to swim?” 
o 

NEW DISCOVERY ROCKS 
SCIENTIFIC WORLD 


The Im Press, March 27 — Dr. Sallie 
Henri Payne, Saturday, made public the 
result of investigations which have cov- 
ered a period of years and involved end- 
less patient labor. Among her startling 
revelations, are the nocturnal habits of 
the herbiferous, moon-eyed Wumpus 
and' some formerly unrevealed charac- 
teristies of the genius Hystericatus 
Brainstormitus. These discoveries are 
of infinite importance to the biological 
world. 

DRESSED 

CHICKENS 

Write 

Trudey McAllister 

‘THE HATCHERY” 

Love Nest, Virginia, 
for Particulars 


SEE THE NEW BUICK 

When BETTER Cars are Built 

BUICK 

WILL BUILD THEM 
Body by 
FISHER AND 
KATHRYN MILLER 


NEW SONG HITS 
PUBLISHED 

You Can’t Go Wrong On 

“MY SWEETIE WALKED OUT 
ON ME TO WAIKIKI” 
and “HONOLULU LULU,” 

“I’M JEALOUS OF YOU” 
the latest Feist songs by 

EVELYN JACKSON 

successor to Irving Berlin 

Rough and Tough 
Carpenter Work 

ORVILLE DRESSLER & CO. 

We Guarantee Your Building Will 
Not Fall Down After 
WE Build it. 

Phone 131313, Covington, Va. 

OR COME YOURSELF 


4 


THE BYLLE BOARDE 


JOKES 


“How did you lose your tooth, John- 
ny?” asked the neighbor. 

“Shifting gears on an all-day sucker,” 
returned the motorist boy, with a broad 
grin. 

Marjorie: “Is it really dangerous to 
drive with one hand?” 

Vincent: “You bet? Many men have 
run into the church doing it.” 

Bob Ergenbright: “I have a thous- 
and dollars and don’t know whether to 
buy a car or get married." 

Louise: “If you want to get married 
you had better spend half of it for a 
car.” 

When you’re sitting in Study Hall 
And havin’ lets of fun 

A laughin’ and a jabbering 
As if you’re awful dumb. 

You’d better watch the door. 

And keep lookin’ all about 

For the teachers will get you 
If you don’t watch out. 

Fortune Teller : “Your husband will 
be brave, generous, handsome, and 
rich — 

Mrs. Costen: “How delightful ! Now 
tell me, how am I to get rid of the one 
I have now?” 

ADVERTISE in 

THE BYLLE BOARDE 

Dickson Guarantees 
Globe Circulation 

NOW YOU WILL LIKE 
SWEETS 

CATHERINE CRAFT, 
president of the makers of O. 
Henry, the fastest selling con- 
fection in America says, “I 
personally like O Henry as 
well as anybody. It is all you 
want for 10c. In all my years 
of connection with the concern 
I never met a single man who 
would not admit that this de- 
licious sweetness was not all 
“Wright.” 


ATTENTION 
The Spanish Serenaders 
Featuring 

MISS MARY HELEN WOLFE 

at the Piano will broadcast an 
evening’s entertainment from 
Station STATIC at the Hotel 
Vanderblitz, Chicago, April 14, 
1937 from 7 till 7. 

The Erratic Radio Corp. of 
America 


PRIVATE TUTORING 

done (or public if you prefer) by 

Miss Hildreth Snead 

Phone 111110-J 

Covington : : : : Virginia 


TYPEWRITING MADE EASY 
BY EXPERT 

Learn to Typewrite with ease and 
speed by a new and different meth- 
od devised by the world’s fastest 
typist, 

MISS ESTHER SPROUSE 

who has been typing ever since as 
a girl in C. H. S., she had to stop 
her music lessons when the player 
piano broke down. 


The 

“BUDDY” BEAUTY SHOPPE 

For Engagements Call 

Miss Ruby Hodges 

Phone 000 
Main Street 

Covington : : : : Virginia 

DIPPYNOODLES’ HERB 
CONCOCTION 

$1.00 a Bottle 

AT ALL DRUG STORES 


A PERSONAL TESTIMONY 
Gentlemen : 

I think it only fair to state that 
Dr. Egbert Dippynoodle’s Herb 
Concoction is the only medicine 
that ever did me any good. I was 
in a nervous, run-down condition 
brought about by concentrated 
study while I was a wisp of a girl 
in High School, and I was unable 
to play football, swim, or take part 
in any other genteel sport before 
taking Dippynoodle’s. Only two 
bottles worked a marvelous cure 
and I was enabled to swim the Gulf 
of Mexico last summer through the 
strength it brought me. 

Sincerely yours. 

Arbutus Grotz. 


Popular Song Hits 


WE LOVE THE TOW'N OF 
COVINGTON 

(Tunc: “Marine Corps Hymn”) 
\'\'c love the town of Covington 
And we’re proud of C. H. S. 

Of all the places in the world 
Wc love our school the l)est. 

If you stand for love and honor 
And all that’s good and true, 

Then wear your colors on your heart, 

The dear ohl gold and hluc. 

We’ll win a game for Covington 
W'ith a team from C. H. S. 

We’ll make old Clifton hunt a hole 
And we’ll never let her rest. 

If you want to see g(.)od foothall. 

Come out on the fiehl today. 

And sec the touchdowns we will make 
W'hen our team goes out to play. 

r’AKTlNG 

(Tune: “Cornin’ Thru the Kye”) 

If a senior meets a senior 
Coming through the hall. 

If a senior greets a senior 
Here is what he’ll call : 

CH(.)RUS 

Every class has its parting, 

WT, too, say good-bye, 

But we hope to greet each other 
In the bye and bye. 

If a senior meets a senior 
In some future day. 

Let a senior greet a senior 
In the same old way. 

CHORUS 

Every class has its parting, 

But we meet once more, 

And so we always greet each other. 
As we did in days of yore. 


HIT THE IJNE FOR COVINGTON 
C-o-v-i-n-g-t-o-n 

Oh, hit the line for Covington, for 
Covington wins todav. 

We’ll show the boys from Clifton Forge 
d'hat the blue and gold still holds sway. 
Beat it down the held, boys. 

Victory or die. 

And we’ll gi\'C a grand old hurrah ! 

As Covington’s Backs Hash by. 

SONG 

(I'une: “Always”) 

Love the gold and blue, always 
W ith a love that’s true, alwaj'S 
(live a rousing cheer, for the colors dear 
Let the whole world hear, always, always, 
W'e shall play the game, always. 

Adding to our fame, always 
Not for just an hour, 

Not for just a day. 

Not for just a year. 

But always. 

(Tune: “Bye, Bye, Black Bird”) 

C. H. S.’s football squad 

Will make old Clifton bite the sod. 

Bye, bye, Clifton. 

1 don’t know, but still I think 
VWTi put old Clifton on the blink. 

Bye, bye, Clifton. 

With Coburn making those end runs 
And Easton with that wicked line plunge. 
Old C. H. S. will be there 
To fight it out fair and square, 

Rah-Rah, our team. 


Last Will 


E, THE outgoing directors of the C. H. S. h'air, in the city of Covington, 
in the Ciimmonwealth of \’irginia, in the year of our Lord, one thousand 
nine luindred and twenty-seven, do hcreliy write and order this to he pub- 
lished, our last will and testament : ]"'irst, in order that the officials and 
apprentices may keep these in remembrance of the directors of ’27, and 
secondlx', that they may profit by the example set by this illustrious hoard 
of directors. 

Item 1. To the honorable (ientlcmen, the School Board, we leave of 
the profits, hoping they will use them for the benefit of C. H. S. 

liE.M 2. To our helo\ed Superintendent we will the tents, grandstand, and fairground 
which we formerly occupied, so we may ticcomodate the future students of C. H. S. 

liEM 3. To Rufus Joseph Costen, our most esteemed i>rincii)al, we liequeath a complete 
ringmaster’s outfit, and a whole sheaf of yard-sticks, and we recommend that he use them in 
discii)lining the C. H. S. kindergarten. 

l'n',.\i 4. To .Miss Catherine Cecilia C lynes we hetpieath an all-time position as business 
manager of the Fair. 

liE.M ,T. To .Miss Fdxira Houston [ones we he(|Ueath a roll of tardy tickets; may she 
ne\cr ha\c much use for them. 

kiEM 6 . To Miss Bonnie Kathryn Talley, we lea\e a tent and forty snakes, which we 
leel sure she will charm with the utmost ease. 

I'li.M 7. To Miss Margaret .Mien we hc(|ue:ith the position of chairman of the fireworks 
committee. 

S. d'o Miss Anne Jeter, we leave a nice howl of “Beans” without “Chili’s” sauce. 

Item 9. To Captain \\’. K. Curlman we bequeath ;i i)air of President Coolidge sus- 
I>enders. 

l iEM 10. lo Miss Rebecca Saunders we leave the position of judge of the “pony” race. 

kiEM 11. To Miss Mary Taylor 1 luPuy w'e he(|ucath forty uneducated monkeys, to which 
we leel sure she can interpret the Ivnglish language. 

I'lE.M 12. To Mr. James T. Culbertson we will and hefineath a complete set of unbreak- 
able glass containers, in which he may preserve his rare “species.” 

liE.M 13. To Miss Jesse Murray Hammcrly we he(|ueath the complete charge of the 
1 lomestic Science Exhibit. 

Ite.m 14. To Miss Jean Marie W yatt we will and he(|ueath a new “W illys Knight,” as 
the present one is too slow in getting her to the Fair (Iroiind. 

Item 13. To .Arthur, our janitor, we give sixteen new brooms and fift_v dollars for his 
services in cleaning up the fairgrounds. 

1 1 'EM 16. lo the Junior Class we leave the front row of seats of the grandstand. 

I'lEM 17. lo the Sophomore Class we hetiueath sole jiroprietorship c)f the “Sideshows 

for F'reaks.” 

liiM 18. lo the Freshman Class we letive one free ride on the “Merrj'-go-round.” 

1ii:m 19. To the incoming F'rcshmen we he(pieath a hag of i)canuts apiece to feed the 
monkev's. 

'I'o the above we wish t(.) add a few extra items: 

liEM 20. lo Norman Leek we leave a set of monkey ancestors in order that his family 
may not he ashamed cT him. 

I iEM 21. lo I )adie Kincaid, Kathryn Miller’s canvas and palate. 

Iri'.M 22. lo Boh Friend we leave some lite-time banjo strings in order that he may re- 

train from running the orchestra in debt. 

I'lE.M 23. To Boll F.rgenhright, some new excuses for being absent, as he has exhausted 
all known ones. 

I I EM 24. lo I lorothy Parker we leave the excellent grades of Alary Helen W'olfe. 

Item 23. W e tried to leave Eflgar Curtis and Hubert Otten, the C. H. S. nuisances, to 

someone, but found it impossible. 

In witness whereof, we, the .Senior Class of ’27, the testator, have to this, our last will 
and testament, set our hands and seal, this seventh day of June, ,A. I). 

(.'Signed) John Ikvine. 



Incomparable Herd of Pure-bred Livestock 


JUNIOR CLASS 



Afir Jat 


, Tcuihcr 


)RS 

Silver 


FLOWER 
R( ise 


MOTTO 

I’UdCIJUM I’lMCMIlTM 


OFFICERS 

Cr-ii'Kokn Hakulz Frcsidi’iil 

ViiVA Khm) I’iic-l’rcsidcnt 

Cai heiune HowI'.ei Sccrctury and Treasurer 


MEMBERS 

(ilRI.S 


PiikniE Aeekei) 
Hazel Bazzakice 

KaI HEKINE PjEAN 
I )ELliER'l A ]5 eLL 
OdELLE 1 )|<ESSLER 


Ci.i'.vA Kiiin 
Veva Kiiiii 

VlR(.l N I A K NK.H'ION 
EmNA LoC'KilAR'l 


I )(/Rin II Y Parki R 
Jane I Ri'.in 
LvLI.IAN RnHINSMX 
Bici'i.aii Sneaii 
I {I'JJ'.N W'arini, 


Hiss 


NecEIUI' Pj.LlS 
PI AI.IAE I’'lsnER 
Emma Hamlett 
Ca'I'H ARINE I loWEI.L 
I NA JoilNSdN 

BOYS 

VlNCl'NT (ill, MORI'. Cl.lEI'-DRI) 1 IaRRIZ 

Lee He IRON iM Us Rai.imi Leake 

How'ari) Jameson 

JUNIOR 15 

Anne Jeter Teaelier 

FLOWER 

l-iose 

MOTTO 

Riici.iuM Pk.emhim 


Carlos Counts 
RoHER'I' P'rIIlNII 


I 'aui. Stull 

Ar i II UR Tiuirston 


COLORS 

Lavender and 


C 


Ilmme'it Easton 
P ii HEL McCauley 
Bernice Bykh . . . . 


M AIUE Alher'e 
Ethel Bazzaree 
Makel Benne/tt 
Nancy Byers 
PjErnice Byrii 


Ira Bailey 
E nwARi) Bennett 



OFFICERS 


Lyniiell Car renter 
W’anetta Carter 
Mary Clark 
1)ell.\ Cook 
Mabel Crae't 


MEMBERS 

GIRLS 

Helene; I )avis 
Louise I )riscoll 
Ruth P'loyii 
J’aiti.ine Heeler 
J lIANLI A Hoiioes 


Preside II I 

Viee-Presideui 

Seeretarv and Treasurer 


Pil.LEN LiNTHICUM 
Helen Moyer 
P'.' i iie;l McCauley 
Susie: Penuleton 
J L iANiTA Tyree 


BOYS 

Em mett Eas'I'on Robert Eroenp.ru, ht 

Sylvia P'ntsmjnoer William Francis 

Ashby Tyree 


H UBER T Ot'i en 
Lawrence; 1\ea 



SM-pmu- 




JiMIBHEK, 


L,ft08m.-;O'i 


EiBEStfeTT 


utt^mraTf, 


&a>rsBmiBK. 




PUKKHKEI) I.IVES'J OCK 



rUklUSKi: I) T.IVES'ldCK 



I’edii.keeii 1 ’dultry 


Pedigreed Poultry 


SOIM |()MORl<: CLASS 


COLORS 

I’ui'jile and Gold 



Violet 


MOTTO 

Stead fdsl to Purpose 


OFFICERS 

VikOINIA SCTIMADl'.K 

llll.lJAkD McCaLKI! 

I lAkkY 1 1 a II N 


President 

I 'iee-lP'esident 

Seeretary and Treasurer 


MEMBERS 

SDlMlOMCdRE A1 

A'l I ss M Ak( :a kET y\ i j,en T eaeli er 


1 1 1'.LicN Akki'i r 

Louise W’fi kel 

Maiue Brown 

1 loRoi II y Wines 

M ARY Crai-t 

Iames Ijoyd 

d'HI-XMA I<'ishER 

Elmo Cron k 

Elizahicth 1‘erkins 

ISaxter I'i.ii'I’o 

O'l ilF.LlA I’oWELl. 

Tazewicll Fowler 

VlROlNIA Sen MAIIF.R 

Albert CiiissoN 

K 1 . 1 Z A RE T H Sc H U 1 1 I^R 

Harry Hahn 

Rosa Schwaoek 

Kennili H Lea BE 

Estelea Si m mons 

Harry McCarthy 

Al ARY Sm I'I H 

Aim H UK Rea 

1^'eorence Snead 

ILirrest Sutphin 

\'iR(,iNiA Steele 

1 loLLis Wii.kerson 

SORll()MORl': A2 

iikYN Talley 


Elizabeth Hailey 

William Adelson 

Mable Huroer 

Lake Pjurke holder’ 

Helen Deacon 

Ryland Hepler 

Mae Belle Gibson 

Iallis H ui.hes 

Carolyn Ham 

Wiley Jennings 

Lillian Htie 

Harrison Jones 

Elizabeth Huohes 

Eorres i’ Kincaid 

Eiazabeth Jordan 

Norman Leek 

H ILLIARD ATcCaLEB 

Edward Lewis 

Eleanor Owens 

Kent Marshall 

Roth Swift 

( )lin M I leer 

Iaiuise Snead 

Francis Smith 

Betty Warinc. 

(Rista Smith 


Tear her 



Vl'l.l'.l AHI.I', I'AllillM 


A Presentation of Green Vegetable Varieties 

FRESHMAN CLASS 



COLORS 

Cireen and Wliite 


FLOWER 

Sweet Pea 


MOTTO 

Never try dyiii;/, die iryimj 


OFFICERS 

FRESHMAN A1 


Richard IJeirne 
Ray r)URGEK . . . , 
IxjuisE Crowder 


President 

I'iee-Presideiif 

Secretary and Treasurer 


Marjorie Kidd . 
William Clarke 
Margaret Leary . 


FRESHMAN A2 


President 

I'iee-President 

Seeretary and T reasnrer 


MEMBERS 

Freshman A1 — Miss Mary Taylor Hu Puy Teacher 


X’lRiaNiA Balsily 
Louise Butlek 
I. onisE Ckowiiek 
[ IeLEN 1 liCKSON 
Maxine Eli.io'i i 
1 NA Ellis 
M ARCAKET Fridley 
Martha Gathrh.h'i 
Elsie Hanna 
M ary Hayse 

Freshman A2 — Miss 

Hallie Ailstock 

M ILIIREII ArMENTROI''! 

Elizaheth Arkitt 
\' iR(aNiA Benson 
Mary Frances Brown 
Allene Campbell 

M ILIIREII Cam PBELL 

Ijcola Chenault 
Lillian Childs 
M ABEL Counts 


Aha Hlint 
Gladys Knioh ton 
Emily McAllister 

ViRi.lNIA AfeCoRKLE 

Harriet M iller 
Lelia Miller 
M ari.aret N ichols 
M ari.aret Otten 
Annie Reardon 


Rebecca Saunders. 

Tjzzieanna Flesh .man 
Elizabei H Gilbert 
Gerretta Hepler 
Ethel Jennini.s 
Marie Kern 
Marjorie Kidd 
I lOROTH Y KnIOHTON 
At aroaret Leary 
Emily Iattleton 


Edna Sartain 
I NEZ W alton 
Lillian W oods 
Clinton Baber 
Richard Beirne 
Edward BjRooke 
Ray Buri.er 
Julian Clarke 
Julian Cofeman 

W'lLI.IA M I lUNBRACH 


Ola Olivier 
Claudine Ray 
Liicille Robinson 
Ruth Robinson 
Mary Roth well 
I i.AisY Sartain 
1’hyllis Sizer 
M iNNiE Snyder 
.M ay Suddar'th 


I j-isi.iE Faudrel 
1 ’.AVH. FlINI 
John Ha'icher 
I’aiil Hepler 
Hobson J a.m ison 
y\RLiE Jones 

G \RLAND LeEFLER 

.Albert Roc.ers 
Robert Thomas 
Edward Schuder 

T eacher 

Ri ba Tiicker 
I DA Yes T 

W ILI.IA M Cl.\rke 
('h.xrles Coiuirn 
Raul Conway 
Ildward Cur tis 
Francis Fltzi.erald 
W eldon Garber 
M cl lowELL Perkins 
1 Iavis 1 Iriscoll 


1 



Home Economics Class 


Hot Dog Stand 

MOTTO 

“All lutiitan history attests 
That happiness for man — the hunejrv sinner — 
Sinee Ez’a ate apples — nineh depends on dinner!" 

COLORS 
( iold and White 

OFFICERS 


Kmily LrxTLKToN President 

Cathekink Ckaet Secretary 

1 Iarriet A1 iLia:R T reasurer 

Alice L. Edwards Sponsor 

J ESSE A1 . 11 a ii M ERi.Y T eaclicr 






N )K K Ex 1 1 1 hit 

Sewing Class 


1 IaI.I.IE All ,^'H)Clv 
M iiJiRi;ii ArmI'.n I Roll I 
Ei-izaisI'.'i h Anri it 

\’|R(,IN 1 A BaLSI V 
\'|K(,INIA BiCNSUN 

Mary Frances Brown 
I Aiuisi; Bu i i.i:r 
/\i-LI';ne; CAMrisi'.i.i, 

Ij-.iila Chenauiti 

I, II, MAN ChII.IIS 
M Altl.E CoEIN I S 
Ca'i iierine Crae'i 
Eoeuse Crdwiier 
I I ELEN Hickson 
I NA Ellis 

1 UZZIEAN NA FlES I I iM A N 


MEMBERS 

Mari, ARE. I I" KIHLEY 
.\1 .\RTll A ( iA I II RIOHT 
tj.lZAIiE7l II ( ill, HER r 

Elsie 1 1 anna 
M.sry Hayse 
( iERRE T'l .\ f 1 lU'LE.R 
Aha I i UNT 
Ethel Jennincs 

.M ARIE KiCRN 
M AR lORlE K mil 
I lllROI II y Knk.hkin 
Glahys Knh.h idn 
M ARI.ARE I 1,EARY 
H ILHA LeK, n TON 

Emily Ihtti.eton 
Em ILY Mcy\LLIS I ER 


l,E,LI.\ M lELER 
I I .\RRIE'I M lEI.E.R 
,M ARI.AREI N ICKIILl- 

Oi.A Oliver 
M.nrcarei OriEN 
Clai'iie Ray 
,\nnie Re,\RH(IN 
Mary Rm ii vvi el 
Ehna Sartain 
I lAisY Sar i AIN 
M iNNiE Snyder 
May Sudd.mci i[ 
Reha 'Fucker 
Id.\ Vest 
I NEZ Walton 
Lillian Woods 



B u s I N i: s s AT a n a ( , i: k s 


Commercial Class 


Ira Baii.ky 


Helen AIoyer 

Eiivvaku 1E-A\N1/I 1 


Ethel AIcCauley 

Em mktt Eamox 

Wanita Carter 

Susie Pentleton 

Svi.viA Entsmi.\(,lr 

Mary Clark 

Juanit a Tyree 

UnBERT Eri'.EXBRIi.II 1 

% 

1 )ELLA CnoK 

Remus .\rrinut()N 

William Francis 

Mabel Craft- 

Orville 1 Iressli.r 

[fisBERi Otten 

Helene 1 )avis 

Elizabeth ('lippii 

Lawrence Rea 

LuLMSE I )R1SC0L 

Maiialene Harriz 

Ashi'.y Tyree 

Rut h L'ijiyd 

Bernice Lair 

Marie Albert 

1 ’alt, INF 1 Iepler 

Lucille Niiwma.n 

Ethel Bazaree 


Christine Sizer 

Juanit a Hudces 

Esther Sprouse 

Mabel Bennett 

Ellen Lint hicum 

ELancy Byer 


Helen E. Smit h 

Bernice Byiui 


Helen ]M. Sm ti h 

L\ ndell Carpen i er 


Hildreth Snead 






Animal Trainers 



If tlicre is any \ ital i)art of this school which deserves 
more credit than our coaching staff, it has not yet been dis- 
covered. Our appreciation is not exi)rcssahle in mere 
worfls. d'hesc four fine gentlemen, who have given their 
most valnahle time and instruction without compensation, 
deserve the apprcciati<.)n of the student body. 

/\t times the turn-out of candidates was disappointing. 
In other dark moments their wajrk was not np to ])ar. 
However, these coaches, all college letter men, have given 
unstintinglv of their best; no more can he asked of them. 
\^’e only hoj)e that the services of these mentors will he 
available for the directing of our athletics for many years 
to come. 

Air. (. urfmau was financial adviser and general su|)er- 
\isor of all branches of sports. Air. Rice was head coach 
of all three major sports — football, baseball, and basketball. 
Air. Luke was an able assistant to Air. Rice as line coach 
of the nine and (iold Eleven. Air. W hitlock was iiualuable 
to the baseball s(|uafl ; his arrival late in the season pre- 
vented him from helping the football sipiad. Next year, 
however, his services will lie available for both football 
and baseball. 


An Absolutely Supreme Feature 

'I'lijs (tENKration wile nevi-:i; witni<:ss a gki-wter 

EXIIII’.ITION 


E(.)(.)TI’,ALE SCI II*: DU El' 



12- 

-C 

1 1 

S 

0 

lluena Vista lligh .School. . . . 

. . 0- 

-C. 

H. 

S 

21 

Alderson High .School 

. . 12- 

-C. 

H. 

s 

7 

Ashwfjod High .School 

. . 6- 

-C. 

H. 

s 

78 

( Ireenliner A'1 .S Reserves 

13- 

-C 

11. 

c; 

0 

Clitton Eorpe Hi.i>h .School 

. 6- 

-C 

1 1 

S 

0 

Harrisonburg High .School... 

. . 26- 

~c. 

11. 

.s 

6 


No school in the country liaving the misfortnnc to lose nine letter men could 
])roduce a team of equal calibre from j^reen material. C. 11. S. is no excei)tion. 
With tlie help of two experienced coaches, blr. Cuy Rice, assisted by Mr. Hill 
Euke, and an addition of new material from the Graded School, a hard-hqiiling 
hut light team was i)ut on the held. There was a record turnout of candidates for 
every position. 

The hoys iourneved to Alderson for the oi)ening game of the season. The 
locals were defeated 12 to 0 in a game which was listless hecause of the hot. 
weather. 

In the hrst home game of the season at Westvaco, C. 11. S. stepped out and 
won 21 to 0 from the dangerous lluena Vista team. 

Playing a return game with Alderson, C. 11. S. rallied des])erately, hut Eady 
Euck gave Alderson the breaks. We lost bv a 12 to 7 score. It has been dehniteh' 
]>roved that Alderson ])layed a “ringer” in this game. This man made the win- 
ning touchdown. 

C. fl. S. ran rough-shod over the inexperienced Ashwood team. Fhe second 
team gave a good account of themselves in this game ; the slaughter ended with 
the score 78 to 6 in our favor. 

(Tie of the best teams C. 11. .8. faced was Greenbrier M. S. Reserves. ( )ur 
warriors fought hard, but were no match for them. Greenbrier came out on the 
large end of a E^ to 0 score. 

In the big game of the year with our ancient rivals, Clifton Forge, honors 
were about even, but with a minute left to ])lay in the hrst half they tallied the 
lone touchdown of the game. We cf)nstantly tln'eatened their goal in the last half, 
but could not score. Score — C. 11. S. 0, Clifton Forge 11. S. 6. 

As usual, the season closed with the playing of the 1 larrisonlmrg Hlue 
.Streaks. Possibly they were the best team which we faced. 1 )is])laying an un- 
equalled offense and strong defense, thev won 26 to 6. 



Football 


STARS ( )I- THE FIRST MACiXITUDE 
ELAY ANYWHERl-: AT ANY TIME 

I’.YROX DICKSCJX 

"Sleep) " ])rove(l himself a capable manager. We appreciate his sincere work 
and heartily wish that he could he with us next year. 

IfEEIS HL'EIIES 

"Tubin'" was Acting Cai)tain of the Illue and (Sold. I lis pep and "never-say- 
die” S])irit was the determining factor in many cl(.)se contests. At tackle he was 
one of the bulwarks of the line. 


WIEEIAM EL'Kl-: 

Mr. Luke’s most eflicient services in ])utting the linemen through their paces 
was invaluable to our overwcjrked head coach. 

fiL’Y RICE 

As head coach, Mr. Rice gave his services unstintingly. His experience at 
V. R. I. and tutelage under Knute Rockne was an aid and inspiration to the team. 




Football 

JACK I’ERSINCER 

Jack’s line defensive work must not he overlooked. He may have keen slow 
in slartinj^-, hut he got there just the same, and it took a good man to get hy him. 
I lalf is his j)osition. 


R ( ) 1 1 E R 1' If R Gif N 1 : R 1 G 1 TF 

"Starky’s” accurate passing from center was a great aid in avoiding fumliles. 
Injuries handica])ped him in his otherwise stellar role. 

IfMMlfTT IfA.STON 

Irmmett was light hut ca])ah!e, as is shown hy his terrific line ])lunging which 
chilled the hearts of the opjiosing linesmen. The team’s esteem of him is shown 
hy his election to the Captaincy of the 1927 eleven. 

yVLR.lfRT GllkSON 

“Gip’s” hulk should make him an "All-American.” l)es])ite a broken nose 
in an early game he came hack strong at the end of the season, and was a hulw.ark 
of strength at the tackle jiosition. 

I'AZIfWEEL I^VEER 

"Taz’s” indomitahle lighting S]>irit ke])t him jilugging on and eventually he 
was awarded his monogram for his good work as a wingman. 




Football 

IRA BATLPIY 

"Buzz" was a late coiuer to the ranks, but liis height and grit soon ushered 
him into a tackle position. 

IIARRBSOX JONES 

"Dits” was small, but this seemed to be no handicap to him. His fine work 
in snatching j)asses and eluding tacklers is worthy of mention. 

CARLOS COUNTS 

"Cootie" performed well at a guard position when in the mood. Let’s hope 
that he has more of these moods in the next year. 

GUSTA SMITH 

"Ihll" was a power in interference, and his uncanny way of smashing holes 
in the line was largely resjionsible for the success of our fast-moving backs. He 
was a regular at guard. 

ERNEST McCALEB 

Ernest, though handicapped by a "forced hunting trip,” returned to the de- 
pleted ranks in time to save his letter. C. H. S. opponents will gladly miss him 
next year, for he is a handy man to have around at halfback. 


A Wee Tastie O’Scotch 



OW that I’roliiliition is witli us for ln’tttr or for worse, all that we have 
of Scotch is the perennial horde of Scotch jokes. 'I'hese we always have 
with ns. “Hoot mon, ha’ ye heard this one?” , 

Jack was out on a Sunday afternoon walk with his little son, I tonglas, 
and having noticed that the suit he ha<l hought seven years before was 
wearing well, he was happy until the senifling sound of small feet pene- 
trated his consciousness and caused him to turn reprov ing eyes on small 
.Douglas and say, “Gad, ye maun take longer steps. I )on’t yoti know that 
you are wearing your Sunday shoon ?” 

That reminds us of the two Scotchmen who went swimming, and being in a holiday 
mood, made a wager of ten cents as to which couhl stay under water the longest. Neither 
ever came to the surface. 

Another exposition of the canny thriftiness of the Scot is recalled in the case of Stuart 
Campbell, who once had occasion to put up at ;ui inn across the street from the town clock. 
Upon going to bed he thought for a while of the exi>enscs of the day and was just dozing off 
to slumber when of a sudden he sat uj) in bed awtire of the ticking of his watch in his wal- 
let on a nearby chair. A grievous waste was being committed ! He jumped out of bed and 
stopped the w^atch in nervous haste, then nodded at the luminous face id' the town clock, 
visible through his window, and turned hack to his couch satisfied. 

'I'hc trait of the Gaelic is also apparent in their children. A camly-maker once aji- 
jiroached a Scotch child to buy an all-day sucker. The hoy thought for a moment and then 
shook his head. It was then three o'clock in the afternoon. “Come hack in the morning,” he 
said, “and I’ll do business wi’ ye.” 

Again, we have the Scotchman who turned ofl' his radio while listening in on a church 
service because the collecti(.)n was about to he taken up. 

d'his rivals the one in which a highlander, visiting .America, stood on the brink of 
Niagara, watching this greatest of nature’s splendors, when a ])asser-hy stopjied and hurled 
a coin into the foaming cataract. Scandalized by this piece of unwarranted extravagance, 
the Scot could not refrain from breaking through his natural reserve and iiupiiring of the 
stranger the reason for such strange behavior. The other good naturedly explained that a 
])cnny thrown over the falls was supjjosed to firing gocid luck. At this the Scotchman pulled 
out a cent and surveyed it in indecision, then struck by a happy thought turned to the .Ameri- 
can and asked, “Mon, ha’ ye a hit o’ string aboot ye?” 

Another member of that nationality which shares with the Jew the distinction of being 
the butt of all jokes dealing with penuriousness was in very had health, and upon visiting the 
nearest city was told by a doctor that he might die at any minute. On his return home, the 



conductor of the train noticed that the Scotchman was getting off at each station, no matter 
how small, and staying until he harel}' had time to catch the train again as it pulled out. 
After the twelfth episode of this nature the conductor ajiproached the man and made known 
his curiosity. Scottie explained to him that he might die at any minute and that it would, 
therefore, he wasteful to buy a through ticket. 

On one occasion the wife of Sandy Graeme was \ery ill. and her husband was so anxious 
about her that he stayed at her bedside night and day. On a night as he sat with her in her 
bedroom, the doorbell clanged, and as there was no one else in the house e.xcept these two, 
he arose to answer it. “Lizzie,” he said as he was about to go down, “tha mun be some 
neighbor inciuiring aboot ye, and it may take several minutes before 1 can explain how ill 
you are. 1 am going to leave this wee liit o’ ctindlc l)uruing at your elbow, ;ind if you feel 
yersel’ sinking, blow it out.” 

.Another rather grim .Scotch joke is the one al)out the -Scot who awoke to find his wife 
<lead in bed beside him. W ith no hesitation as to the proper procedure in such a case, he 
rushed to the back stairs and called down to the cook to boil only one egg. 

To give the .Scotch the best of an argument for once, we relate the story of the Ameri- 
can visiting in Scotland who hired a nati\e to take him about and show him the principal 
points (d’ interest. The .American was unduly critical, and in reviewing the Trossachs, Hen 
Nevis, and Lock Katrine, he compared each unfavorably to scenic wonders in .America. Last 
of all, they came to that beautiful gem of turquoise water nestling among the hills. Loch 
Lomond. 'I'he Scot was triumphant as he turned to the .American and demanded, “Can ye 
truthfully say that ye ha’ any scenery in .America to rival this?” 

The American shook his head slowly. “1 can’t recall any spot in our country (luitc like 
this,” he said, “but no doubt there are many lakes in our western mountains as beautiful as 
this one. Still, 1 wish we had I.och Lomond in the good old lb .S. A. W'e would turn it 
into a recreation park and give it an up-to-date-name.” 

The mounting wrath of the other boiled over at this. “You can easily do that,” he told 
his companion. “.All yc ha’ to do is lay a line o’ two-foot i)ii)C under the Atlantic, get a’ the 
ilea end, and if ye arc as good a sucker as ye arc a blower, ye will ha’ it all over in twenty- 
four ’otirs.” 

Speaking of water, a wealthy Scotchman heard of W'rigley’s inducement of $25,000 to the 
first man who swam from the mainland of Califcumia to Catalina Island, and thought well of 
it as an advertising scheme, so he gave it out to the newspapers that he would pay $100,000 
to the first man who swam the Atlantic Ocean. 

Weed, week they he a canny lot, the Scots, but I ken ye are unco glad to hear o’ them, 
gin ye ha’ the chance. 




Grandstand Program 

September 20 — School starts. W e entertain both regret and hoiie. 

Clctober 8 — Cohisco Outburst (school paper) i)iiblishes first edition. 

October 15 — The footl)all team injects punch into a 21 to 0 win (.)\'er Buena Vista High 
School. 

No\ emlier 1 — Hallowe’en is over and the school is still standing. 

November 5 — A i)arty is staged to celeiirate C. 11. S.'s 78 to 6 win over Ashwood High 
School. 

November 12 — Clifton Forge High School downs Covington in the big game of the year 
6 to 0. 

Decemher 5 — ‘‘The Romancers,” school play, is plenty good. 

1 )ccember 10 — Juniors gi\e Fresh a pirate mas(|uerade party. 

I tecember 22 — School closes for Christmas. W e believe in Santa Claus. 

January 2-1 — Exams begin. 

January 28 — C. H. S. defeats Buchanan High in hasketball, 40 to 24. 

I'ehruary 4 — Annual work gets under way. 

h'ehruary 15 — Tessie Orchestra memhers presented with sweaters in chapel, 
h'ebruary 27 — C. H. S. loses fast game at Bridgewater, 27 to 22. 

March 4 — High School Circus plays to hig crowd. 

March 18 — Basehall practice starts. 
iMarch 25 — Another ])arty gi\cn. 

March 51 — Latin Clul) holds entertaining program. 

April 12 — Buena Vista defeated b\- the strong C. H. S. team by a score of 8 Pi 0. 

April 15 — Annual goes to press. 

April 18 — Easter Holiilay. 

April 29 — Science Club meets. 

Alay 51 — Exams start. 

I line 6 — Commencement. 


HOBBY HORSES 



Horse Jockey 

“Pop Tests” Miss Du Puy 

“Honor System” Alu. Costen 

“Straight Seams and Careful Measures” Miss H.vmmerly 

“Hooks” Miss Allen 

“Bugs” Miss Culbertson 

“Je Vous Aimes, Je Ne Vous y\imes Pas” Miss Talley 

“Tardy Excuse” ■. Miss Jones 

“Lahor Omnia Vincit” AIiss Saunders 

“Speed Test” Miss Clynes 

“Money and Alary land” AIk. Curfman 

“Beans” AIiss Jeter 



Monogram Club 

l'',KNi:sT McCalI'J! President 

1 j-;k 1 1 El KON I M us Seeretary- Treasurer 


l.AWKENCE I'i.EA 
AeHEKT Cil I'.SON 
I'j.LlS I I UCUES 
l’>YKON Dickson 
Charles Coburn 
Rob er'I' Er(.: e n b r i o i i 'I' 
Emmett Easton 
Arthur Rea 


[ra Bailey 
I vEMUs Arrington 
i^LMo Cron k 
Olin Miller 

T A Z E W I'lLL Fo VV LI-: R 
Harrison Jones 
Gusta Smith 
Jack Persinger 


Carlos Counts 




I’UBF.ICITY Mi:n 


Publicity Men 


jMaky Helen Wolee 

r>YK()N Dickson 

Sylvia Entsmingek 


Virginia Sciiimaoer 
Clifford I Iarriz 


I'A'ELYN Jac kson 
1 1 ELEN M. Smith 

William Clark.... 


I'.DITORIAL liOAKl) 

William Adflson 
Hlizaiietii FlII’I’O 

I’.CSINESS I’.OARD 

Veva Kidd 
I )OROTIIY 1’arker 
ID.izaiiei ii Jordan 


Editor 

Hitsincss MdiiOf/cr 

.Issistaiil /Jitsiitcss Mainuicr 


Xancy ^Montietii 
Ret 1 1 Floyd 


Jack I’ersinger 
Ellis H cgii es 

. . Circidulion iMaii'U/cr 



Tessie Teasers 



f 

Tessie^s Teasers 

1 ■ l<( ) F'ESS I ( )N ALL V I ’ I-: K 1 - ECT I 'KR lAlL M I'.K S 
iMiss I'Avira Jonks Ihicully . l(knscr 


Miss Makii': Wyatt 


Pircclor 


lu.tjs Hue; 1 1 ITS 


Maiuu/cr 


MI-'.MHItRS 


Jack GilmokI'; Piano 

Hyrok JJickson Saxo ylionc 

V I N CENT G I LlM ( )R E l^ioUll 

Norman Leek I 'iolin 

Roisiorr Ekiend Han jo 

Roi'.ert Itrgeni’.kkijit Tronihonc 

Iteeis Hughes Traps 


Don't miss the opportunity of a life-time to hear these clever artists. I'hev 
have kept audiences of unlimited numbers enthralled for hours. You will never 
regret hearing these Jim-Jam-Jems of a Jazzy jaml)oree. 



The Science Club of C. H. S. 

OFFICERS 

I'j.KAXdK (iLKAsox President 

Lvi.liax Koitixsox I'iee-Presidenf 

.Mary II. Wolff. Secretary and Treasurer 

FACULTY ADVISERS 

Al ISS AlLFX Mr. Cui.liFKT.sON 

/\ii orj^anization, wliich has created nuich interest and comment, sprung into 
being this year. At the suggestions of Miss yMlen and Mr. Culbertson a Science 
Clul) was formed and a constitutifui eml)odying the laws governing the club was 
adopted. iMonthl_\- meetings are held, and from observation it seems that a stand- 
ing organization has been fcjimded in C. II. -S. 





Gild. s’ Okc hes i i(.\ 


The Spanish Serenaders 

FIT TN ANYWHERE, ANY TIME! 
Youth in .III Its Mad, Musical lYlrirl 


Miss Saunders 


Director 


eersonn]-:l 


Mary Helen Wolee 

“Chix” Eayne 

Miss Saunders 

Miss McPherson . . , 

Miss Asher 

IAima Hamlet 

Louise I’utlek 

Eel I A Miller 

Thelma Els her . . . . 

Mary Crai-'t 

Lillian Hite 

IWeanor Gleason . . 


J^iaiio 

/ ’ioliii 

I’ioliii and Mandolin 

I’iolin 

G iiitar 

G' altar 

Ukclclc 

Ukclclc 

Ukclclc 

Ukclclc 

II an jo 

Tra ps 


The Spanish Serenaders draw the spotlight of favor with their thrills and 
trills of harnionv that can be heard for miles awav. 




Latin Club 

MOTTO 

liulusiria csl iiiil'niiii sa f>'u'iil!a' 


i\l ISS SArNDI'.KS 


/^'acuity . idz'iscr 


AIaKY IIkLKX VV’OLI'K Cuiisitl 

I )i:i.BKKTA ]’>KLL FrcClOf 

X'iRC.lMA SciUrADKR •. (}it(cstor 




.Edilc 


MEMBERS 


SI'-NATORS : 

Im.KANOR CiLEASON 
Cl-AKA VkSI 
Ch IX I’ayne 
XFary Heijcn W’oli'f: 
Nancy MiiN'iiui h 
Ekni;st McCai.ei! 

I’.V'RON I )ICKS(IN 

KNKRiTS: 

I IKI.ISKRTA JjELL 
1 loRo'i H y Parker 
Catherine Bean 
R AEPH I.eake 
Carolyn Ham 
Iali.ian Hite 


CiRCINIA Sch M Aill-IR 
Ruth Swif'i 
Rosa Sc hw Acer 
I i ELEN Arri i r 
M ARY Sm ri h 
Elizahe'i H Sch imhcr 
P oRRES'l SuTRHlN 
William Ahelson 

PLEBIANS : 

El HEL JeN'NINI.S 
Eeola Chenault 
Elizabeth Arkii i' 
Reba Tucker 
I^oretta Heeler 
ALary Frances IjRovvn 
Lillian Woons 


Clauiie Ray 
l^ouisE Butler 
luLLlAN CiriLiis 
M ABEL Counts 
Lelia M iller 
AIaroaret Leary 
Elizabeth Joriian 
A l arcaret Otten 
AIary Hayse 
Elizabeth Gilberi 
Estella Simmons 
Lucille Robinson 
FLlsie Hanna 
Helen Arritt 

Al II.IIRED ArMENTROUT 

I NA Ellis 
Hallie Ailstock 




A I^oDK In 


The Baby Show 

\1)IES, step right inside tuid \ie\v the delight of mothers’ hearts. By 
special arrangement with the Society lor the Care and Brevention ol In- 
fants, we ha\e within, a show unparalleled in the history of the sawdust 
trail; in brief, a hahy show. We have hahies ol all kinds, dear little gurg- 
ling darlings, any one of whom might pose for a Mellin’s Food advertise- 
ment. That's right, ladies, step right inside for the mere modicum of 
twenty-five cents tidmission." 

"On your right, yon ohserw W illiam Adelson, the world's wonder 
Ifahy Elephant (1). 'riiough of a tender age, he is so educated he is :d- 
most human. Me can add unhelie\ ahl\' large figures and snhtract to $2.hS. At the Co\inglon 
l ligh School Zoo, where he is generally confined, he ahirms his keepers with loud s(|nealings, 
hut he is in realitt’ quite harmless." 

"Next, we ha\e ou display the original Ikdiy Bolshevik (2), secured direct from Russia. 
Me was horn with an inulerdog in his mouth (under ;i slice of hread), ;ind since then he has 
heen the avowed champion of the wiencr-wurst. Mis juvenile utterances h;i\e all heeii com- 
jilaints tigainst his guardians, and he is never satisfied to take his milk without hiting a piece 
out of the ciqi it is in. Mis name is Ivrnest Mct aleh." 

"The Bahy Smart-.Meck (3) which vou here view is none other than Norman Leake. 
'I'his hahy can talk, although he does not know what he says. No one else does either, which 
may he considered a blessing. Me thinks that an orchestra insignia should entitle him to tid- 
mission to the Monogram (^’luh. W’e shoiddn’t he surjiriscd if he died young.” 

"Mere we have on exhibition, the Baby W ise-cracker (4), who has a childish habit of 
making remarks out of turn. Me has a f:icidty, which few possess, of discovering the jioint 
to his own jokes, though it is seldom tluit he gets the meaning of any others save his own. 
Me has a jiromising future as a movie comeditin, for he can act dumb verv naturally. Mis 
name is Ellis Mughes, and he is forever ]ioundiug on something." 

“One of our most interesting children is the Nize Baby (5). At a very early age he 
evinced a preference for the society of girls, and now he won't let anybody hut females pet 
him. 1 ladie Kincaid is a living examjile of The Ladies 1 lelight, or W hy (lirls Come Home. 
Me has a good line of i)rattle, and he can juit his toe in his mouth to the time of ‘Black 
Bottom ." 

"Ladies, you now observe a child who, though small, is the center of many affections. 
W hen he was two months old he weighed oidy a (juart, and since that time his chest exjian- 
sion has barely kejit pace with his waist-line. We call him Baby Bunting (()) because his 
favorite jioetry by which his mother lulls him to slumherhmd, is: 

I'ye Hahy lUintiiig 
Daddy's nunc adumting 
To Kct a little rahhit skin 
To vvrtip liis I'ahy lliintinjt in. 



His itarents call him Abbey Gibson." 

"1 present to you now, without any recommendations, Ifoh Friend, the Ifahy Sophisticate 
(7). Me is the tyjie of child that mothers warn their little angels against, .-\lthough hardly 
old enough to blow his own nose, he has e.xperienced almost everything that is being done in 
these hectic times, and could give his seniors some points on what to exjiect when in unex- 
pected situations. He is too lazy to wind the victrola when it runs down, hut he has a droll 
way of telling naive stories, which may he jiroperly termed bedtime, because it is time to say 
goodnight after listening to one.” 

“W'e have thought of calling this one the 'Nurse's Nightmare,' hut finally settled on the 
“Aggravating Bahy” (8) as more generally descriptive. He has the manner of a laughing 
undertaker and an imjiish sjnrit. As Mr. Costen will tell you, his ‘attitude’ is entirely wrong. 
He is entirely good humored as he hangs one of his fellows hetw'een the eyes with a hook, 
and, as he playfully jiushes a hug down a girl's neck, he laughs and ejticidatcs, ‘That's one on 
you.' Mitz Jones is the name of this cut-up. 

“( loo goo ! Goo’ hj'e !” 



Baisy Show 



The Romancers 


ll>' ] )ecenil)t-r the Athletic Association was fcelitig the full hiirden of its annual accumu- 
lation of (Ichts, so a play was engineered hy the girls of the school to help dislodge this “old 
man of the sea." W hen this play was produced, h(nvcvcr, it proved to he much more than ;i 
mone>-making enterprise, for several hundred people enjoyed an e\ening of high grade en- 
tertainment at the Jeter .\tiditorium 1 lecetnher 3, and left with a higher c\aluation of local 
talent productions th:in they had before. Considering it from a disinterested viewpoint, it 
w:is a very i)rofitahle etening for C. 11. S. in every way. The cast in "The Romancers” dis- 
phiyed ;i good deal of histrionic ability in getting the play across withottt a hitch, d'he chorus 
w;is till embodiment of grace ;md chtirm, :md their singing of seteral poiudar ntimhers w;is 
\ery excei)tional. 


The Skinless Sausage 

( iraiid o])cr;i h;id its innings when the hoys of the high school, not to he otitdonc hy the 
girls, ga\e a ]icrformance of that wonderful old drama, “The I )rums of Drumadorc, or The 
Skiidess Sausage," at the Strand Theatre on the e\'euing of February, the twenty-second and 
the twenty-third, with a matiitee appearance on the twenty-third. I'here w;is a shriekingly 
ltmn_\’ hurlesquc in which the formula of modern melodrama was caricatured. The dastardly 
\illaiu wtis at last foiled in his ;ittemi)tcd abduction of the heantiful heroine, and yoting 
Edgar Tonsilitis is tinallx’ united with her after his identity as a scion of a noble family is 
proxen. Meanwhile a number of good gags were gotten off and the audience sent into 
ptiroxx'sms of laughter hy the notes registered hy the cast in doing the grand oi)er:i singing, 
rile singers of the towti xery ohligiuglx hclpeil the High School hy rendering some additional 
ntimhers. 


The Circus 


The greatest event in the calendar of events presented hy the High School, and spon- 
sored hy the Senior Class, was the Circus, d'he jiarade in itself was a triumph, with a 
caliope, an ele|ihant, a giraffe, a brass hand, and all the other paraphcrtialia of the Big Tent, 
Immediately following the iiarade, a jicrformance was gixeu in the Jeter Auditorium wit- 
nessed hy what was probably the largest crowd that ever attended a high schoid production. 
Acrohtits, dancers, animal trainers, and clowns xied with one another in ])lcasing the assem- 
blage, and it seemed that they succeeded exceedingly well, judging hy the laughter and ap- 
plause they excited. It is hoped that the Barndoor and Bailhay Circus will tigain xisit C. H. 
S. ne.xt year. 



M IDWAY A’l l UAC'I IONS 


An Hundred Pretty Ladies 


An hundred pretty ladies 

May come my way some day; 
l!ut if you'd ha\e it so, my sweet, 

I'll send them all away. 

Not Solomon's seraglio, 

Xot Hezekiah's wives. 

I’d rather ha\e just you, sweetheart, 
Y(ju — all our li\es. 

I\ich maids in silks and ruffles, 

W horn men gi\ e homage due, 

W ill ne\ er tempt me, girl of dreams. 
When 1 rememher you ; 

I'or e\ery golden curl I see 
I'll know a fairer hue; 

I'll ne\er counterfeit a love 
( ) f '’(jurs in lieu. 


The licauties of old ages — 

Troy's Helen, Anthony’s jade, 

If they were here lieside us, you 
W ould put them iu the shade. 

The coquette senorita. 

The Tunis tiger-girl 
.Are l)Ut as ash and ragweed 
To you, my ])earl. 

An hundred pretty ladies 

Alay come my way some day. 

But though thc>' sigh, hut though they cry, 
I’ll send them all away. 

'I'hey'll beg and they’ll entreat me 
lint 1, for all their lures, 

Will be to them disdainful, 

.My hive is yours. 

— Ernest AIcC.vi.f.h. 


My Obsession 


.Afraid ? 

()f that great, glaring orbit 
.M en call the sun ? 

()l the long, hard days 

That may ])ass me, one hy one? 

f)l the wailing, weeping wind 
d'hat mo\cs so mysteriously? 

Of dai'S, and weeks, ami years, 

■ And all eternity? 

()f the black and lonely darkness, 

• And sounds that crecqi at night? 

f)l the moon, the stars, and all things 
I'hat come and go with light? 

the awing desert stillness, 

.And thirst that dri\es men mad? 

.A I raid to stand in His i)resencc 
AA hen my share of life I’ve had? 

.Afraid to face myself — 

To know that I may fail? 

.Afraid to take the test? 

'I'o lea\e the heaten trail? 


.Afraid to be alone? 

To live, to love, to die? 

To say and think the Right? 

The AA’rong always decry? 

No — a thousand times. 

’Tis not these 1 fear; 

Hut the thought of one thing — 

My being domineers. 

A\ hen of the burdens of life I’m weary, 
.And ha\e laid me down to rest — 

\A hat if my conscience whispers, 

“You hare not done your best”? 

“By carelessness of yours 
Some one has failed to win. 

Some one who trusted you 
To do your best for him’’? 

And so i try to gi\’e 
To all who come to me 
The best — whene’er they ask — 

Of my ability. 


— N.vncy AJontieth, ’27. 



Clowning It 


Jokes 

“I licar you lia\e an a<l(litit)n to your family, Mrs. Cat. VX'as it a lioy or a girl?” 

“Oil, just six of one and a lialf dozen of the other, my dear.” 

(lirls and gollers seem to have the same amhition — to go around in as little as ixissihle. 


.\ certain little girl tells us that she has been spanked as far hack as she can rememher. 

-Miss ItuPiiY: Do you know anythiipg ahout .Milton’s works? 

S^ l.vl.^: No, what kind of a lactory is it 

"What do you think of that, wific? d'hat waiter wanted to make me pay cover charges.” 
"Well, darling, what did you tell him?” 

"Why, 1 told him we were going to sleep at home.” 

“Why is .Mr. Curfman a hachelor?” 

"ISectiuse he didn’t have a car when he was young.” 

11k: All! You have a lovely mouth. 

Slit.: You’ve heen all over that hefore. 


SIDK snow ( h'Rlf.MxS) 

lleadlcss VN'onder 

ISoa Constrictor 

Sword Swallower 

hire Cater 

h'at Lady 

Skeleton 

\\ ild Men of llornco 

( liants 

.Midgets 

h'akir 

h'ortunc Tellers 

Wiggle Worm 

Human fliraffc 

Roaring Lion 

Laughing Hyena 

Strong Alan 

Trained h'leas 

Human Scl I -w inding Phonograph 

Ruhher-honed Wdnders 

Ivducated Rats 

Dancing Bear 


Boh h'riend 

Huhert Otten 

Iflmo h rank 

Ernest AIcCaleh 

"Trih” Miller 

Florence Snead 

James ISoyd 

...Paul Flint, Kent Marshal 
Laurence Rea, ,\hhy (iihson 

Fdeanor (lleason 

Tcodur’s (irade Bo(.)ks 

.\rlie Jones 

,'\shhy Tyree 

Mr. Costen 

Ola Oliver 

.Mr. Curfman 

....Norman Leek, Paul hdint 

Helen F. Smith 

"Tuhhy” Hughes 

The Freshmen 

Daidy Kincaid 




SAU BUT TRUE 
I f students in our high School 

Were allowed to have their way 
You’d find things very different 
Itefore the end of day! 

We all would he exalted 

And the faculty appear 
As unimportant creatures 

in an unimportant sphere. 

But — what’s the use of wishing 

I f you cannot change the game 
In spite of all our dreaming 

W'e’ll kce]i grinding just the sanie. 
d'he teachers — they’re exalted, 

And we students must appear 
As the least imp<,(rtant creatures 
Of the least imi)ortant si)here. 

Teach f.k: How dare you sw'ear he fore me? 

Senior: How do you think 1 knew you wnuited to swear first? 

Mr, Barker (addressing the (grammar School faculty): My mis ion in lile is to saw 
young men. 

Chorus From the Teachers: Mr. Barker, sa\c one ff)r me! 

Busjness Man: Yes, I adxertised for a hoy about your size. Do you smoke? 

Dnz: No, thanks. But you can hlow-’ me to an ice cream soda, it you want ti). 

Fresh : What would you do if you were in my shoes? 

Senior: Get ’em shined. 

Betty: No sane jierson can understand this Latin. 

.\rthiik: Let me see it. 

Norman : T am going to give you this \ iolin. 

Vincent: y\ii out and out gift? 

Norman: .Absolutely! No strings to it. 

Poi'Ui.AK Byron: I feel just like a loaf of bread.,- Wherexer 1 go they toast me. 

Waiti-:k: W'hat is your order sir? 

Oe!n : A demi-tasse, please. 

Waiter: And yours? 

Authur: I’ll take the same thing and a cup of coffee please. 

Dot: Can you see me? 

Baioy: Yeah! 

Dot: Well, see me home — Will you? 

Miss Ai.i.en : Where is Berlin? 

Tazwell : In New York, writing a new song hit. 


SiNHLE: Docs your wife select your clothes? 
Married: No, hut she picks the [Kickets. 


1 he (litterence lietween kissing in 190(1 and 1927 is the difference between discussion and 
per I'ormancc. 


Customer 
Ai iiinn' ( i. 

t'uSTOMEK 

Ai.iu'.iii (i. 


Fi\e pounds of coffee, |)lease. 

Yes, anything else today? 

Well, if it i'n't too hea\y a package. I’ll take it with me. 
Oh, IK.) it’ll only weigh three or four pounds. 


Imoxik: Yes sir-ee. 1 bought this hat two years ago. Had it cleaned twice, exchanged 
it in a rcsturant once, and it still looks as good as new. 


(Ieim iu’de: W ho is that ugly brute w ith _\'ou ? 

Dot; llushl That’s m_\- fiance and I want you to know that beauty is only skin dcc]>. 
( lEKi lU'Pt, : A\'cll take that ugly thing home tind skin him. 

INHEklTKI) IDK.XS 
'rE.\eiiEK: How many seasons are there? 

Pupil: Two. 

Te.achek; Why! Il there are (.miy two seasons, please name them. 

PtuMi, : Busy and Dull. 


BKW’.\KF, Oh’ BF.M TY ADS 
On going to bed on a dark dreary night, 

I thought of the “ads” I had read with delight, 

-Ml concerned beauty which interested me most. 

So on my friends 1 tried to i)lay a joke. 

I sent for a lotion — “Ivemoxes Freckles,” it said. 

But my poor comi)lexion it turned brownish red. 

In horror I sent for some I’almolixc Eoai>, 

It spread o\cr my face a thin greenish coat. 

In haste, 1 procured some vanishing cream; 

But it hurnefl me so much that 1 wanted to scrcar'' 

Iwory, Octagon and Lye soa|i did their best. 

But it seemed that my face was to stay in a mess. 

I was looking for a mirror, my comple.xion to view 
W hen my maifl said, “.A lady has come to see you.” 

Dropping the glass 1 screamed in my fright 

.\nd awoke from my nightmare to find it still night. 

So fair ladies take warning about this fnnn me; 

Believe nothing 3 'ou read about and half you see. 

If you must be a beauty instead of a fright 
fio to bed early and slee|i every night. 

Tic.vciier : W'hy are you mit writing? 

Pupil; .Ain’t got no pen. 

Te.-vchek: Where’s your grammar? 

Pupil: She’s dead. 

.Miss DuPuy (to civics class) : For tomorrow's lesson vve have the subject of punish- 
ment for crime — I think you will get a lot out of this from your own experience. 

h'.MHER: Remember, a man learns most who begins at the bottom. 

Boy: How about a guy learning to swim? 



JmUI- WORKS 


I; 




Patronize Our Concessions 


The Staff of “Puffs and Patches” recommends 
to your attention the organizations whose 
advertisements you find on the ensuing pages. 
You cannot find better places to do business 
than the firms represented in this book 
They are the wide-awake, public -spirted men 
who make possible “Puffs and Patches” as 
well as the other worth while activities of the 
high school and town. 




I Greater V alues i .fyjx. 

i‘4 V Y I I 


The Parker Department Store 


INCORPORATED 


Covington’s Biggest and Be^ Store 


— Phone 140 — 


CdVINGTON :: :: :: VIRGINIA 

People want what they have always wanted — value for their 
money. Jn this day of blatant advertising, the public is u]) in 
the air; people are a bit doubtful of what a dollar is worth. 
It’s up to US as reliable merchants, to keep a tine sense of 
value and to hold the confidence of folks who have trusted us. 
WA follow the good old reliable system of merchandising; we 
study our customers and their needs; we keep in close com- 
munication with the markets; we use our knowledge of both 
to buy for as little as possible the sort of goods oui' peo])te will 
want and we mark everything at a fair price. 


PAY THE CASH AND PAY LESS — 






-« LITTLE - 
SPINOORAPHS 


CHIROPRACTIC HEALTH SERVICE 


L W. ZARRELL, D. C., Ph. C. 

Office riione — 97 
Ixcsidence I’lionc — 1-4() 


PKOl-LIfS HANK r.UILDlNfi 
.1 NOTON :: ;: X'lKOINlA 


YOU COULD NOT 

ASK FOR BETTER 

I )rv Cleaning of Dainty, Costly Gar- 
ments tlian W'Il are prepared to give 
\’ou. Our LONG IrXPlrR ! I lNCTl in 
catering to the wants of ['articular 
rvoiucii has enaliled us to study their 
requirements. OLfR Idry Cleaning 
Facilities assure you of F i N If S T 
work. 

Tliis being true, the owner's experience does not necessitate aflvice from help 
that are onh' interested in their wages, as is many times the case. If you 
have clothes that are a missht, you will find the best authorities in Cov- 
ington here alwavs ready to serve you courteous!}’ and honestly. 

GRADUATION SUITS FURNISHED BY US 

STANDARD CLEANERS 

NEXT TO FIREHOUSE 

O. K. MANN, PkOPRurroR 





PAINTER & ROBINSON 


COV 1 NGTON 


VIRGINIA 




THE STRAND THEAl 


COVINGTON 


VIRGINIA 




The New Collins Theatre 


COVINGTON 


VIRGINIA 




C. A. Fudge Hardware 
Company 


The n inchester Store 



HARDWARF 


Try DUCO — it Dries Quickly 


Covington 



SPORTING GOODS 


I 'hone K8 


Virj^inia 




PIGGLY WIGGLY 

HELPS THOSE WHO HELP THEMSELVES 


SERVICE 

Service hy allowin;^ vou to pick out ycnir own goods, in stores scrupu- 
l(jusl\' clean, con venientl}’ arranged and stocked with the best of everything 
the market affords; service lyv letting you take one minute or Fifteen to 
make your jnirchases ; service by the constant attendance of courteous store- 
men. who gladly render assistance when it is needed, and service by selling 
you every article you purchase at the lowest possilile price, because of our 
economical o|jerating system. 

riiis service is the real service which the housewife wants. This ser- 
vice is the reason for the growth of T’lGGLY WTCiGLY in Covington. 




WHAT PRICE— SAFETY 


c 

L 

E 

A 

N 

I 

N 

(; 



A 

L 

T 

E 

R 

I 

N 

G 


“A Woman Who is Wise at Heart; 
Studies Well The Saving Art’ 


\\A Don’t Simply Do Dry Cleaning-, We T)o 


SUPERIOR CLEANING 


— Remove ALL of the Soiled Distress of the 
Carment and send it hack h'resh and Clean. We 
are doing a lot of Steamnig and F’ressing for 
the men folks. 


536 Main Street 



Truck Rims Daily to Hot Springs- 


Phone 328 


214-216 Court Street 


Clifton Forge, Va. 


Covington, Va. 


Phone 126 


Sanitary Cleaning and Pressing TPorks 






Covington Hard ware and Furniture Co. 

-Telephone 7 ^— 

McAllister lluildine 


C'oviiielon 


X'iri’inia 


FULL LlXlr Ol- 

PAINTS 

HUILDERS' AND FARM HARDWARE 

MAJESTIC RANGES VICTROEAS, RECORDS 

PIANOS, PEAYER PIANOS and ROEES 
SEEDER’S KITCHEN CABINETS 
FLOOR COVERING 


C O M P E I M E N T S 


O F 


Nettleton and Company 


c ( ) \' I X r, T o X 
\ I R (1 I X I A 










West Virginia Pulp and Paper 


Company 

CON’INCTON, VIRGINIA MILL 


MAXUFACTLlGiRS 


OF 


High Grade Book and Craft Papers 


LOCATION OF MILLS 


Meclianicsville, New York 
V illianisliiir<>:, Pennsylvania 
Tyrone, Pennsylvania 
Pieilnionl, West Virffinia 


Luke, Maryland 
Covinfiton, \ ir^jinia 
Cass, West Virginia 
Spruee, West Virginia 


SALFS OFF ILLS 


200 Fifth Avenue 
New York 


Sherman and Polk Streets 


Chicago 


oO.) Market Street 
San Franeiseo 






Hammond-Sites Co. 

— 329 Main Street — 

CnviiiPton :: Virninia 


Dry (roods N(»tions 

Men’s, Women’s and Children’s Wearin,r;‘ Apparel 
Shoes for the Entire Family 


Rugs, Linoleums 


Curtain (roods 


W indovv Shades and Kirche Rods 




D R IJ Cr S 


S 0 I) A S 


O’Neil’s Pharmacy 


CANDIES 


HOT LUNCH 






C O M P L 1 M E N T S 

0 F 

THE 

C O \ I N G T 0 N 
N A I 0 N A L 
G A N K 


XP)rman: “1 went to Ceylon, 

this summer." 

\’inny: "\\'ell, well, and how 
was EonC 

Kno: “Did you hear about the 
shi])-wrecked man who n earl }■ 
starved to death on a desert is- 
land 

Hope: “No, how did he live?” 

Kno: “Oh, he pulled out an in- 
surance policy from his jxjckel and 
found enou.t^h provisions in it to last 
him.” 

“I'd like to be a soda ierker.” 

“Yes! Why?” 

“d'hey lead such stirriiy^' lives.” 




I'ather: “The man who marries 
my dautthter will get a ])rize.” 

Ardent .Suitf)r : “Ma\' I see it, 

])lease ?” 

“Come on," muttered the con- 
demned con\ ict, as the executioners 
seemed in no hurry to spring the 
trap. ”1 can’t he hanging around 
here all day.” 

P.oh : “Dearest, 1 always think 
of you — always.” 

Louise: “You do think of the 
most wonderful things.” 


If It's PRICE and (JUAEITY 
You Want Come to 

SHARPE’S GENERAL STORE 

on Ri Vermont 

We have them both and are 
ready to serve you at any and 
all times. Ylake CUR store 
’ST)UR store. We are here tf) 
please you. A n y i)atronage 
will he appreciated. 

— Yours to Scrz’c — 

EARXICST G. SIIARPh: 







D. ROOKLIN 


THE 

LILY 

MEAT 

MARKET 


LADIES’ AND (il^NTS' 


OUTFITTERS 


LuN'ingliin : : : X’irt^inia 




WILL L. EREDEKING, lINC. 

ji-:\\iaj-:rs 

1 1 Kill SCHOOL 
CLASS RIX(iS AND I’lXS 

A Sl’l'X lALTV 

//'(■ Ihiild U t" to a Standard 
Xot Doiou to a Price 


X'Skcinja’s Finest MAkKiTr 
••S1-:R\ ICE AND OUALITY’’ 

IS 

OUK 

MOTTO 

-Pci'f Tenderloin a S I'eeialty- 











1 ^ 

YOLM< CRhiDIT | 

1 IS GOOD AT ^ 

1 1 

1 STOUGHTON | 

1 

1 andMATHERS I 

WEIFORD’S BIG STORE | 

1 I’.UILDING 1 

1 ev]-:rytiiing I 

1 CONTRACTORS 1 

1 TO 1 

1 liNGINEERS 1 

1 k-AT 1 

I I 

! AND 1 

w Covinglon :: Virjrinia | 

1 \ V h: A R 1 

§ Court Street | 

I 

1 Phone — 326 i 

Pkomi'I' Delivery § 

1 1 

f Phone 26.^ ^ 

1 

1 Maryland Avenue » 


§ Snooky : “Could you take a joke | 

COM PE imp: NTS I 

S seriously?” | 

1 

§ Mary: “1 scarcely know you | 

" '' i 

1 ' 1 - 1 

i . 1 DRUGGIST i 

§ Mr. Curfnian: "Pyron have you 8 8 

8 studied these?” | 

1 I 

® Ryron : “1 looked it over.” | 

1 c o V 1 N e; '1' i) N i 

§ Mr. Curfman : “You mean you 1 

i i 

g overlooked it.” j 

1 VIRGINIA 1 






SIX lUvST SHORT STORIES 

1. “I was too ill to come to school this morning.” 

By Ih'ISERT O'iTEN. 

2. "My o])inion of myself is growing less every day.” 

By Boh Friend. 

2. ”1 never study.” By Mary Helen Wolee. 

4. "The girls’ orchestra has the hoys' orchestra beat a mile.” 

By Ellis Hughes. 

5. ”1 hate the masculine se.\.” By Lillian Woods. 

6. "Mr. Curfman is a shiek.” — Aitoiiyiiioiis. 

‘‘Hubert is not nearly as big a fool as he used to be.” 

"So I have noticed, dieting, isn’t he?” 

Teacher: "What’s the difference between a door and a gate?” 
Frank : "A door tills up all the hole and a gate doesn't,” 




Compliments o\ 


Riley Young 
K. L. Hatcher 
Johnny Knighton 
Chili Bean 

FIaRRISON t'RIDLEY 

J. C. Gilliam 
J. W. Whiteside 

^ ILBUR L. ObEN CHAIN 
P. C. Driscoll 
Jimmie H. Ferguson 

The Iyidi) Twins, Dot 




Mrs. Ivatherine S. McAllister 
Harry Robertson, Jr. 

E. H. Barr 
Norman Leek 
Mr. Covington 
Mr. R. C. Stokes 
Mr. Waggoner 
C. C. Collins 
“1R)b” Young 

Parker, IWeanor Gleason 




E. A. Snead Furniture Co. 

INCORPORATED 

EXCLUSIVE FURNITURE DEALERS 

Will Fit Up Your Home Completch' on Easy Paynient Plan or Cash 
Round Oak Ranges and Hoosier Kitchen Cabinets 

— Your PalroiKuic is Solicilcd — 


CoviiiLhon 




Miss Dul’uy; “1 will ftive you 
two more minutes on the test.” 

l^lizaheth F. : “Wait a minute. 
Miss DuPuy.” 

Miss DuT’uy: “1 sai<l P<1 wait 
two minutes.” 

Mr. Costen to a class ol j^irls: 
“My wife never dressed like you 
j,drls do today, to catch a huhsand.” 

ScIkjoI Girl ; “Yes and look 
what she J^ot.” 

She was only a pirates dau,s;hter 
— hut, oh l)oy, what a Kidd !” 



W . (). W()()l\lf, Manaokk 
207-09 Ma])le Avenue 



BENSON’S 
NEWS AND MUSIC 
STORE 

MAGyX/JNlCS 

CANDIES 

AND 

LATEST MUSIC 

A. L. I’.KN.soN, f^ropriclor 




mmmsmmmmmmmem 






I M E R N A T T O N A L TRUCKS 


The Noel Motor Sales Company, Inc 


cox ix(;tox 


\TR(;iXIA 




C () M P E I M E N T S 


Cuvin.iLitun 





Covington Grocery Company 


INCORPORATED 


I, II. CAkl’lCXTER, Rkk.sioknt 


— W HOLES ALE GROCERS— 














Alleghany Milling Co. 





Pond Lilly 


Every Day Self-Rising Flour 


WOOD 


’hone 79- 


Cnvington 


Virginia 




Hiofi M. McAllister 

CAXDIDATF. 

r( )k 

TRi: ASrRh:K 

OK 

ALLKGIIAXV COUNTY 

h.lection Xovemher 8, 1927 
Will Ajipreciatf Your Support 


JACK’S POOL PARLOR 
AND LUNCH ROOM 

SUCCESSOK 

"PeEKI-ESS llll.ElAkD pAkLOk" 

I.UXCHKS 

AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Come in and have an eveniiiff 
of recreation at a LOW' rate 

L A. 1)01)1). F’koi>kiETOk 






Ri 


.RIDE governs every move in the 
making of our books. It is but fit- 
ting that the volume which brings 
back tender memories should be a 
work of art and a tiling of beauty. 


THE McCLURE COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

PRINTERS - ENGRAVERS - BINDERS 

19 W. FREDERICK ST. 

STAUNTON ----- VIRGINIA 


Not content to rest on laurels won, 
we are continually making our ser- 
vice more helpful to editors, business 
managers, and faculty advisers who 
publish school or college annuals. . . 


WE PRINTED THIS BOOK 


Alleghany Floral Company 

CUT FLOWERS and FLORAL DESIGNS 

FOH ALL OCCASIONS 

I );iy I 'hone-- 196-j Night PIkjiil* — 1%-\V 

GIN'.ICN IIOUSIG LOW MOOR 

-- Coiiir in and See Us — 

THE FLOWER SHOP 

--Rhone 49S — 


LLI l'T( )X 19 )kGl-: 


VIIGIINIA 



1 

1 Oil F. F. WOODS 

The 1 

i Midland Trail Service Station | 


W II K \i K 1 

1 - Dentist — 1 

S 1'. li V 1 G h: 1 


OKI G 1 N A T 1-: 1 ) 1 

g iVniiles I'.aii’' I’.uililing 5 

1 ['ll ox [•; g 

i o o 4 g 




1 llEST 01'- SERVICE 


i 

1 CLEAN 


W 

1 SANITARY t 

1 COMPLIMENTS I 

1 LP-TO-DATE 

1 RARRER SHOP 

1 O F » 

Dr. I. C. WAGNER I 

g KKASONABl^E 4 

— D If N T ! S T — 1 

a PRICES 1 


i 

1 E. B. WEIKEL 1 


i 


1 Clifton Forge Mutual 1 

1 Telephone Company I 

\ Regardless — 

a 

1 1 

1 of the Car you huy or Price s 

i A telephone costs, monthly an 1 

1 you pay, there is no 

i value than in a 

greater 1 

1 amount e(|ua! to an office hoy’s s 


1 (lay wages. It does the work 1 



i of many efficiently. | 

5 1 VAt,Vt-IW-HE*S j ^ 

i 

1 Walking, riding, or writing is a I 

1 

i 

i waste of time when you can | 

^ f / MOTOM CAM 

§ 


1 

1 save m o n e y using the tele- y 

I ])hone. I 

i SNEAD BUICK COMPANY | 

i — “Cal! us in Regard to Rates " — s 

1 Covington, Virginia « 



I'ACULTY and STL! dents 
ARE ALWAYS W'ELCOME 

York PATRON AGF. 

APl’KFGIATKl) 

AT 

THE 

COVINGTON PHARMACY 

INC. 

— “Ill The Heart of The City ” — 


Harrison Jones is a good looking shiek, 
But I grieve to say he has bow-legged feel 
He walks on his heels and hits on his toes 
And si)lattcrs mud on his Sunday clothes. 

'Phere was a boy named Arthur I'lea 
In school he liked to laugh and play 
But when we left at the end of the day 
Ibior little Arthur had to stay. 

There W'as a boy named Julian Clarke 
He played in school full many a lark 
/\nd then he stayed in study hall 
W hen we went out to jiitch some ball. 




CITY GASOLINE & OH. CO. 

INC. 

COME 

AND 

(HAS 

vv n H 

US 

Street 

W. !■'. Ria’frgomp, Maitaijer 


HANSON AND HODGES 

dfalfr in all kind.s 

— Musical Instruments — 

I ’.RUNS WICK 
COLUMBIA 
EDISON 

niSTRIliUTOK.S 

Phone 172 Box 208 

Co V i ngton , V i rgi n ia 







The 

Betty A — Beauty Shoppe 

215 Court Street 

Modern Sanitary 

Convenient! y Located 
All W'ork Cuaranteed 



M A G A Z I N F. S 


--I’hone 578- 


lloi.Li> 11. Wd iKEL, Pro['rictor 


S A T ] O N 15 R Y 




CovinGton Nlachinc Company 


IN C O U P O K A T E I) 


FOUNDKRS AND MACHINISTS 






Graduates Will Remember 

Tlic (iilt Received From the Store of I Ieneury &: Son llccause of a Known 
Reputation for wStyle — Ouality — and Fascinatinj; Gifts. W'e also offer tlie 
I>est Values Obtainable Anywhere. 


Diamond Rini;s .... 

$25.(X). 

$50.00, 

$100.00 

up 

W fist W atches 

20.00, 

.55.00, 

50.00 

up 

Rocket Watches . . . . 

15.00, 

25.00, 

50.00 

up 

( )ther Gifts 

l.(K) 

to 10.00 

and tip 



Diomond Merchants and Jewelers 

do West Campbell Avenue 



\ IRtilNlA 




The 

Covington Evening Virginian 

f'oUNIIKli 191-1 

bargcsl Circulation of any news|ia|>cr 
between Staunton and Charleston. 

1 levotcd to the interests ot the iieoplc 
of the Alleghany Alonntains. 

W hen established Tin-; V i ki, i n i .\ n 
adopted the slogan : 

“GOOD ROADS, GOOD CHURCHES, 
GOOD SCHOOLS,” 

and has worked nntiringl\' for their 
their promotion throughout its entire 
history. Eor without these we cannot 
have a good citizenship and vsithout a 
good citiz.enshiii we cannot have any- 
thing really worth while. 

RICHARD F. BKIRNE 
I’resident (.)f 

Tiir, Cjvjn(.ton Vikoinian, Inc. 










COMPLIMENTS 


O F 


Stull CS, O’Conner Furniture Company 


332 Main Street 


Covinnton 


Virginia 


It is our aim and desire to serve the huyinj^' pnhlic in a way that 
will merit their conhdence, and lead them to a|)i)reciate the t|uality 
of goods offered, service rendered, and reasonable prices t|uoted. 

— Everything; to Furnish a Home Complete — 


DIAMONDS 

ELGIN AND WARWICK WRIST WATCHES 
WATCH REPAIRING JEWELRY REPAIRED 

CAMPBELL’S JEWELRY STORE 


Covineton 


219 North Maple Avenue 

IWKKYTI I I .\(; IX 

111(111 CLASS JEWELRY 

CHINA, CUT CLASS, COLORED CLASS 
STERLINC SlLVlfR WARE, ELATED SILX'ER 

— Satisfied Cusloiticrs Our Motto — 


X'irginia 





The New York Giants had the 
best catcher in the League, hut they 
had to let liinr go because he was 
Scotch and woulfln’t give the pitch- 
er the sisjnals. 


Miss Allen certainly gives good 
advice. She told the chddren in 
study period to "pass out (|uietly.’' 






Granbery Memorial Church 

“THE CHURCH WITH A PROGRAM” 

J. Herbert Bean, Minister 

— 528 Riverside Avenue — 


A WOKSillRia'L AdAlOSI’MIrKK 
(iOOl) MUSIC COSI’IvL SlvRMONS 

Here tlie old and new, coinniin,i>'lin,^', meet — the 
old, old story in ever iK'wness ot speech and 
fashion of presentation. 


Covington Baptist Church 

B. F. Skinner, Pastor 

— The Church of the Old Book and the Old Faith — 

The Church That Has a TLACh' for and an INTlfRlfSd' in 
YOUNt; People 


-In Your lulucati(m. Do Not Leave Out The Spiritual 
“Conic Thou ICitli Us and lid’ \Vi/l Do Thcc Good" 







w 

A REWARD OF HONOR 

\\ believer an honor is to be conferred — such 
as to a retiring business executive or to some 
one who has achieved sjiecial distinction — a 
Gkunx Watch is the ideal gdft. 

Its unusual beauty and high reputation for 
accuracy make it the accepted leader of hue 
timepieces today. The man vvdio receives it, 
instantly recognizes in the (ikCKN name an 
expression of the highest regard — a true re- 
ward of honor. 

You will find just the ri(jlit watch for such 
occasions in our large selection of (hu’ENS, 
including the world-famous \'eri-Thins. 



GRUEN VERITHIN 


Hodges’ Jewelry Store 


CO V 1 NGTON 


Gee I Cl A L G K C I 

d'. C. lIoDCES, Pro brief or 
:: .CH Main Street 



'riiF, AIan That ATaiie The Pictuiucs 

L. B. HODGES 

PHOTOGRAPH HP 
Covingtiiu : : : : Virginia 







i i ^ 

1 \VANT]{I) 

1 — H. B R 0 0 K S— 1 

» Two maids (colored). Musi pro- ' 

1 Men’s, I.adies' and Children's » 

« duce reference because of the .^reat i 
» responsibility of carin" for Hob j 

1 OCTI'lTTIfRS 1 

g I'riend and Lawrence Rea. Apjih' ; 

1 W. L. DOLhdLAS SllOlfS | 

» Juniors. j 

1 1 

S A caretaker. A])])ly, Lee Mei- I 

1 In All Sizes § 

§ roninius. i 

1 i 

S A solution of (leoinelry. IL' | 

1 KlfRClir.AUM’S CLOTH IfS | 

g Junior Class. • 

3 1 Carry a Conpilele Line of 8 

^ A red headed ‘'I’ai)a.'' l!y Made- i 

1 J. lb STETSON HATS I 

g line llarriz. < 

1 C(j viiytjton : ; : \ iri.jinia s 


1 A L L K (; H A N Y 1 

i W'ANTlfl) 1 

1 I C E COMPANY 1 

? A jiony \\'ith a ^reen back. Ry g 

1 1 finest McCaleb. ^ 

i I 

< A device to take the curl out of § 

1 —ICE— I 

< curl\' hair. Hv Helen If. Smith. ^ 


1 A “brown-eyed Susan.” R>y ® 


; 1 lorace Thompson. g 

I I’LM^L i 

■ An addinp^ machine to add study g 

1 Dl.bTlLLl-d) 1 

• hall lime. Hy Charles Coburn. g 

1 W'ATER 1 C If 1 

; Some more excuses for not do- » 

» is Safe, Silent, Odorless, and | 

. my work, as I've used up all the ® 

. < 4 ‘ood ones 1 know. Hv Eorrest § 

g 1 )oes Not Let (Jut of Order i 

1 Kincaid. g 

1 g ^ 


C O M P T. I M E N T S 

O F 

The Covington-Hot Springs 
Rotary Club 



\\'i<: mi-:i-:t I'.vi^ky priday r:3() v . m . 

ICiuiautH Club uf (Enuington 

Utruiutn 




1927 

“WE BUILD” 

COVINCiTON, VII^GINIA 












Contractors and Carpenters 
Endorse Andersen Frames 

CONTRACTORS and carpenters everywhere endorse 
Andersen Standard Window Frames because of their 
economy of time and labor. 

Here’s a window frame you can easily nail up in ten 
minutes. It comes in two compact bundles containing 
just seven units. We can deliver immediately any one of 
121 different sizes. This ease of nailing up, and the 
elimination of delay in getting Andersen Frames, means 
a saving of money to you. 

When building your own frames or ordering frames 
made, you pay for a certain amount of waste lumber. 
There is no waste in Andersen Standard Frames. When 
we deliver Andersen Frames to you they are complete — 
even the pockets and pulleys are in place. 

Andersen Frames are noted for their accurate work- 
manship and well-chosen materials. All exposed parts 
are of Genuine White Pine. The White Pine gives them 
long life and keeps them accurate and smooth running 
^ for all time. 

Save money on your new building. Come in and let 
us show you how Andersen Frames save you time, labor 
and money. 

EUGENE MATHEWS COMPANY 

FR.AMES 



Conclusion 


I'he ( Iraiulhtand is doserted, the lights are dying out, the exliihits are packed 
away, the clever little ponies are in their stalls, and the last hrilliant wheel of the 
hre works fades into oblivion. The Ibiir is over. Only the Fair ground remains 
ready and waiting for another year’s exhibit. This volume of and Patciies 

closes in (jur hands, but C. H. S. remains an apiu'opriate setting for other exhibits 
of love, laughter, and labor in the r’ears t(.) come. 


Property of 
Alleghany Highlands 
Genealogical Society