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Manassas Park High 

School 


8200 Euclid Avenue 
Manassas Park, Virginia 22111 



Reflections 1994 

PRINCE WILLIAM PUikfo „ , t 

LIBRARY SYSTEM iltle 1 

Prince William, VA 


































11 


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all 0 && 


As this school year 
aegan, Manassas Park 
students realized that 
small changes meant 
big adjustments. Ad¬ 
justments in the teach¬ 
ing staff, the atten¬ 
dance policy, and the 
school's goals for the 
students. Not 


only were there 
changes for the stu¬ 
dents to face, but the 

faculty and parents as 

well, with the new 
non-smoking policy 
and a brief leave for 
an administrator late 

in the year. So with all 
that's happening this 
year, the 


yearbook staff de 
cided to takeyoubacl 
to times since past and 
also show the smal 
changes of this yea 
in a positive light. Th 

hope is for big chang 

for Manassas Park 1 
the years to come, i 



2 Opening 



























Table of Contents 


Student Life 


p. 4 - 23 


Mug Shots 


p. 24 - 61 


Academics 


p. 62 - 79 


Sports 


p. 80 - 111 


Clubs 


p. 112 - 127 


Advertisements p. 128 - 135 


Table of Contents 


4 Student Life 




























































Changing Times 


In the life of a student there 
are always changes. Small 
and large. It could simply be 
changing classes, hairstyles, 
jobs, or facing the changes of 
life. Each year we make deci¬ 
sions and experience new 
things, making each year all it 
can be. Walk through the 
changes this year in student 





Charlotte Wilson 



Luke Smith 

Age: 15 

Grades: A's - B's 
Clubs: ski, BETA 
Sports: basketball, football, track 
Goals: To go to college. 

Best childhood memory: Going to Kings Dominion 

last year with his fellow classmates. 

Long terrm goals: Luke says, "When I graduate from 
college I want to become an F.B.I. agent." 


14 


Age: 

Grades: A's 

Clubs: Cougar Courier, BETA 

Sports: volleyball 

Goals: Charlotte says she would like to become 
architect / interior decorator after graduating 

college. 

Best childhood memory: Was going to Kin 

Dominion on a class trip. 



6 Student Life 



Melissa Olson 


Age: 15 

Grades: A's-B's 

Sports: volleyball, softball 

Coals: Graduate from high 

school, and go on to college. 
Childhood memories: Mel¬ 

issa says "The best memory was 
when I started to play softball." 
Long term goals: To 

sucessfully graduate from college 
and become a Marine Biologist, 
she also staated that she would 
like to marry and have children. 
Thoughts of MPHS: Melissa 
says, "I like MPHS because its 
small and you know the people." 


Donald Sheumaker 

Age: 15 

Grades: A's - B's 

Clubs: SADD, BETA 

Sports: cross country, 

marching band 

Goals: Donald says," I would like 
to graduate from school and 
college with honors, I would also 
like to attend the National Confer¬ 
ence next year. 

Best childhood memory: 

"When I learned to ride my bike. 
Thoughts on MPHS: "I 

like our school, but it would be 
alot better if the teachers got more 
respect." 















It’s almost the end. 

JUNIORS 

Three down and one to go ! 


Brad Polk 

Age: 17 
Grades: A-C's 
Sports: baseball 
Job: currently works at 
Blockbuster Video 
Thoughts on MPHS: 
"People run their mouths 
too much!" 



Bobby Anderson 
Age: 17 

Grades: A's - B's 

Sports: basketball, football, track 
Goals: To be as good as he can at what he 
does. 

Job: no job 

Clubs: Walkers club, Cougar letter club 

Long term goals: Bobby plans to go to col¬ 
lege and play Pro - Basketball. 

Best childhood memory: Bobby says I'll 

never forget when he got his first Nintendo. 
Thoughts on MPHS: Anderson says, "I 

like how everybody knows everbody else, but I 
don't like the disrespect toward other students 
and teachers." 



8 Student Life 
















April Rotenberry 


Hope Slawson 
Age: 16 

Grades: B's - C's 

Sports: basketball, volley¬ 

ball, softball 
Job: Marshall's 
Clubs: DECA 

Goals: To successfully graduate 
Childhood memory: When she 
went to New York. 

Long term goal: To become a 

Fashion Designer 
Thoughts of MPHS: S 1 a w s o n 
said, "I think the school needs some 
improvements, it's small, but it's 
good knowing everyone. 



Age: 18 

Grades: A's - B's 

Sports: basketball, volleyball, softball 
Clubs: Ski Club 
Job: babysitting 

Goals: April wants to go to a four year 
college, she wants to be an marine 
biologist or get a job that deals with 
little kids. 

Childhood memory: April says, "I 
remember when I got my first and only 
pony and when she started playing 
softball. 

Thoughts on MPHS: "People need to 
have more school sprite." 





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Student Life 9 












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10 Student Life 











Working Hard For Their Money 



Dne of our well known Manassas Park 
Uudents, Melanie M;u tin, worked at .1 usl 
Shirts lor credit for Marketing COOP 
:lass. 



Carolyn Wilson, a senior and yearbook 
staff member, keeps busy and earns ex¬ 
tra money at Petstuff. 


Students like Carolyn 
Wilson, Larry Peters, Melanie 
Martin, and Heather Shifflett 
are getting an early start on 
their future. These four stu¬ 
dents, like many other Ma¬ 
nassas Park tudents are work¬ 
ing hard for their money. To 
spend not only on themselves, 
but on many other responsi¬ 
bilities- such as car payments 
like insurance, gas, etc... Last 
but most certainly not least, 
many save money for college. 



These young MP stu¬ 
dents are setting a great 
example of not only re¬ 
sponsibilities, but deter¬ 
mination as well. Carolyn 
says" although I don't like 
my job, having a little 
extra money never hurts. 
Carolyn works at Pet 
Stuff, Brad works at 
B1 ockbuster, Heather 
works at Shopper's , and 
Larry works at Service 
Merchandise. 

Brad Polk is caught at Block¬ 
buster. Besides being a good 
student and athlete, Brad finds 
tune in his schedule to work 
evenings. 


Student Life 11 















4' 



Top left: The high school guid¬ 
ance counselor and all around 
great guy, Mr. "Z" (Zaveski). 
Top right: Our own personal 
weather man, Brian Bridges 
poses with Seniorita Anastasia. 
Bottom left: In the wrestling 
room, the sophomores, Crystal 
Stanley and Alexis Madary work 
on the sophomore float. Bottom 
left: Charlotte Wilson partici¬ 
pates in the annual Homecoming 
Week competition. 



Each year during the month of 
October, you may notice some 
odd groups of people starting to 
form. People you never thought 
you'd see together. All of these 
people are working towards one 
common goal- "beating the pants 
off "the other classes in the Home¬ 
coming Spirit Week competition. 
Enemies become allies, girls and 
guys work together without con¬ 
cern for being "cool." Home¬ 
coming week brings out the cra¬ 
ziness in all- students, teachers, 
to administrators. It a chance to 
dress up in theme costumes, yell 
loudly at pep rallies, and deco¬ 
rate halls, classrooms, lockers, 
and faces. It just a time when 
everyone celebrates school spirit 
and traditions of high school. 


12 Student Life 










Left- The best of friends. Could be the only 
words to describe this years graduating class. We 
caught them at one of their best moments... Jenni¬ 
fer McCarthy, Krystal Wilson, Molly Rigney, 
Carissa Dicks, Heather Whorton, Kim Morris, 
Tabitha Courtland, Jennifer Asuncion, April 
Rotenberry, Laura Van Dyke, and Jessica Ficarro 
posing on Hee-Haw day during the Senior Auc¬ 
tions. 

Below- Sitting in the gym is Sophomore Robbie 
Havle and soon to be Sophomores Angie Dillion , 
Melissa Whorton, Michelle Michell, and Jennifer 
Pennington. 

Below- Seniors Jennifer McCarthy and Carissa 
Dicks lounging in our favorite U.S. History teach¬ 
ers class, on clash day. 




Above- Ms. Sweet, Shelly Cupps, Meghan Ficarro, 
Michelle Wilson, Crystal Stanley, and Cliff Hughes on 
inside-out day , in 2nd period Biology Class. Cliff w as 
one who always tried to be the ceter of attention. 


Student Life 13 





Home *93 - 1 94coming 



Above- The sophomore's second place wall, to bad that they didn't 
get first. 

Above,right- The class of 1995's float goes by in the Annual Home¬ 
coming Parade. 

Below- Seniors Jamilah Shabazz and Jennifer Asuncion painting their 
section of the wall competition. 



There's an endangered species at l 
Manassas Park, one that you might I 
not know about. A species that's j 
been around for close to 17 years. I 
That's longer than most MPHS stu- P 
dents have been alive. No it's not an ij 
animal or even a living thing, it's j 
more like a tradition; one that gets I 
smaller and harder to have approved 
each year. That's right, you guessed 
it, it's the MPHS annual Homecom¬ 
ing parade. A parade that once was 
an anticipated community event, 
where the roads were blocked off, 
and little kids ran along side the 
floats in order to snag more candy. 
One that now has to compete with 
rush hour traffic and stop at stop¬ 
lights. So spread the word and save 
one of the last of it's kind. Save the 
MPHS Homecoming parade. 


14 Student Life 

























It was a cold, dark night 
but that didn't stop the 
Cougars from getting fired 
- up. The Homecoming 
Game v.s. Page County 
Panthers ended up in a 
loss, we fought till the end 
with the score ending up to 
be 8 - 31! 

The crowds were cheer¬ 
ing, the bands were play¬ 
ing and the cheerleaders 
were screaming louder 
than ever. The half-time 
show had a tremendous 
turn out. The band, led by 
Mr. Basham, played an 
opening song just before 
the nominees for Home¬ 
coming queen and prin¬ 
cesses circled the football 
field, in the cars of they're 
choice. 




Student Life 15 
















A LOT HAS CHANGED 



HOMECOMING 

Top left: Wendy Faircloth, Melanie Wright, Sherrie 
Richards, and Dana Widden cheer our Cougars on at the 
Homecoming game. Top right: Acting drum major 
Melissa Frank salutes the band. Below left: Our most 
enthusiastic Mom's, Mrs. Key, mother of Daniel Key and 
Juanetta Slaughter, mother of Edward Slaughter. Below 
right: band member Philana Handler sits with friend 


What would any football team do without 
it's cheerleaders or supporting fans. Espe¬ 
cially on a night as important as Homecoming. 
A night where parents sport looks of pride in 
their children, alumni dream of high school 
days long past, and students think ahead to the 
dance later that night. Homecoming has it's 
own spirit. A spirit that touches players, stu¬ 
dents, band members, and fans. Homecoming 
would be nothing without the roar of that 
mighty Cougar crowd. Nothing without it's 
spirit. 


Michelle Price. 


16 Student Life 











A CHANGE IN SCENERY 



Homecoming King Axel Tamburo dances with Queen April Rotenberry. It is a Manassas 
Park tradition for the King and Queen to dance one dance together. Below,, left: Jennifer 
Asuncion and Sean Roark smirk after leaving the dance floor. Below, right: Corinne Griffin 
takes a break from dancing to talk to her friends. 


Some came 
early, some came 
late, but all who 
came had a great 
time. With Rip 
Tide D.J. playing a 
variety of music, 
both old and new. 
Teachers like Ms. 
LeGrys and Mr. 
Leonard found a 
new dance for ev¬ 
ery song. Students 
were very excited, 
dancing in chains to 
various songs. The 
decorated walls and 
hallways added to 
the atmosphere. 
Each class did there 
part in the decorat¬ 
ing for spirt week 
which ultimately 
became the decora¬ 
tions for the dance. 



Student Life 17 





It's All Over ! ! 



Above: Missy Whorton, Jennifer Pennington, 
Heather Whorton, Heather Conner, Marty 
Shafer, Carissa Dicks, Ms. Melissa Moore, 
and Meghan Ficarro enjoy the music. 


i 

Above: Darrell Milbourne and date, dance at 
Homecoming, next to J.C. Brown and Tasha 
Cisler 



Above: At the 1994 Homecoming dance, 
you can't stop Manassas Park students from 
doing the "Electric Slide." This dance is 
one of the many line dances students learn 
in and out of school. 



18 Student Life 











Last year at the 1993 Prom, 
hmee Harris and Randy Davis 
vere crowned king and queen, 
kpril Rotenberry and Joe Canham 
vere Prom princess and prince, 
rraditions are a part of high school, 
>eginning with Homecoming and 
:ontinue throughout the year to 
J rom. "Royalty" is part of those 
raditions. 




Above: HealherWhorton iscaught really dancin'. 
Jessica Ficarro joins in with enthusiasm, ex¬ 


pressing her enjoyment for all to see. 


A 

Look 

At 

The 

C 

H 

A 

N 

G 

E 

S 


Student Life 19 







Prom: Changing Faces i 


To the right: Mrs. 
Polk, Jessica Ficarro, 
Heather Whorton, 
Heather Connor, and 
Mrs. Lent dance to 
the "Electric Slide." 
Although the musi¬ 
cal selections left 
some students unsat¬ 
isfied, the students 
had a great time. 
Below: John Clark 
and Jenny Elsey 
dance to a slow song 
and don't they look 
romantic. Below to 
the right: Michele 
Price and date pose 
for a picture. 





Prom brings a special magic tc 
the air. Each year the junior clas; 
struggles year long to raise enougl 
funds to sponsor a spectaculai 
prom. Throughout the year the 
juniors sold candy, had car washes! 
sponsored a Sweetheart Dance, hac 
a free throw contest, and othei 
fundraisers. For the last two years 
the prom has been held at the Dulles 
Ramada Renaissance ballroom, an 
expensive acquisition. It is a very 
sophisticated and romantic setting 
that allows the students to feel a 
little more special. 


20 Student Life 













Ramada Renaissance 


^rom left to right: 

Teachers Mrs. Upperman and Mrs. Spoede sit with 
ijheir husbands. Teachers are always at prom, to chap- 
llron and to just see their students dressed in tuxedoes 
md gowns. Lee Holdaway looks surprised as we did 
When we caught him standing near the buffet. The junior 
blass had drinks and food catered by the hotel. 





Shelly Rose 
and her date 
pose for a pic¬ 
ture at Prom. 


Larry Peters and Heather Shifflett sit and rest for a brief moment after dancing. This sweet couple 


| 

even took enough time out of their night to let us capture them for a moment. A pair who has been 


together for quite a long time and still look happy and in love. 


Student Life 21 


















The adorable 
couple, Tonya 
Fisher and Jimmy 
Duvall take a 
break and grab a 
drink after dancing 
to the sounds of 
Riptide. The two 
seemed to have 
enjoyed them¬ 
selves at this 
year's junior -se¬ 
nior prom. 




A ball or a fashion show? 
If you took a look at the 1994 
Prom you may not be able to 
tell. Everyone got dressed up 
in their best and danced the 
night away. King and Queen 
Jamie Tinnell and Jennifer 
Coates, along with Prince and 
Princess, Noah Metz and 
Shawnte Brooks danced the 
traditional dance together in 
style. 



22 Student Life 












The prom went off without a hitch this 
year. Though dancing was not in the 
vocabulary of many people at prom, our 
never ending group of "goofballs," 
Heather Whorton, Jessica Ficarro, April 
Rotenberry, and Heather Connor kept 
some entertainment going the entire time. 
Pictures were taken and food was eaten 
ind all ended with a bang. We'll see you 
ill next year and we hope that next year's 
nrom goes as well. 



Above: Noah cracks a joke, 
"stuff." Danny cracks up thi< 
of the junior-senior prom. 



as usual, and tries to show his 
. Noah later became the prince 




Laura Van Dyke, April Rotenberry, 
and Jimmy Campbell take time out 
from "getting down" to strike one for 
camera. Far left: Our oh-so-original 
weatherman, Brian Bridges, is smooth 
and dapper at prom this year. When 
asked how prom was, he replied, "fair 
to partly cloudy." 


Student Life 23 





24 Mugshots 





















































"Changing 

Faces" 


With the building of the new 
housing development, Blooms 
Crossing, came many new faces. 
For Manassas Park, this is not a 
common occurrence since MPHS 
is the place were everyone 
knows your name. It was weird 
not being able to place students 
names and faces you passed in 
the hall. Even weirder is the 
thought of a new high school 
being built in the near future. 


Mugshots 25 



SENIOR SUPERLATIVES 
A survey was sent out to all seniors asking them to choose 
which of their fellow classmates best fit the categories of: 
"Most Talkative", "Class Clowns", "Most Likely to Suc¬ 
ceed", "Most Athletic", "Best Looking", "Best Eyes", "Best 
Smile", "Most Likely to Need a Wake-Up Call", "Brown 
Noser", and "Best Dressed". And the winners are...(starting 
top left comer) "Most Talkative" Heather Whorton and 
Thomas Pilot, which is no surprise to any one who knows 
them. Next to them is as goofy as they get, "Class Clowns" 
Nakia Harrington and Christian Victor showing a little bit 
of their "circus humor". With the look of disorganized 
genius’s Bryan Robinson, Jennifer McCarthy, and Brad 
Polk are "Most Likely to Succeed". Below is William 
Talent and Jessica Ficarro showing what true spoils they 
are in the "Most Athletic" picture. Last but not least on this 
page we have April Rotenberry, and Brad Polk primping in 
cosmetology for the all important "Best Looking" picture. 


26 Seniors 




















SENIOR SUPERLATIVES 
Starting top left comer we have three bright eyed students, 
Jennifer Coates, Jamie Tinned, and Heather Whorton 
whose classmates felt they deserved the title of "Best Eyes". 
At your local grocers freezer your likely to see these three 
seniors Bryan Robinson, Jenny Me Carthy, and Kellie 
Hogan stocking up on cartons of milk to maintain their 
award winning "Best Smiles". As you can see here there 
are not enough hours in the day for these two "sleepyheads" 
Heather Conner and Sean Roark who are "Most Likely to 
Need a Wake Up Call". Groveling at the feet of our leader 
Mr. Kiser, is Jessica Ficarro and Thomas Pilot our resident 
advisors on the fine art of kissing up who are otherwise 
known as "Best Brown Nosers". To keep up with the 
latest fashions you have to go no further than the halls of 
MPHS where "Best Dressed" winners Jennifer Coates and 
Bryan Robinson reside. 



Seniors 27 












Jen Asuncion 


(David Marreros 




‘Wendy CastCe 


‘Waverty Cerio 




Odeatfier Conner 


< Ta6itfia Courtland 




As you can see these 
students aren't eating 
in the cafeteria like 
most students. They are 
taking advantage of 
one of the many privi¬ 
leges of being a senior, 
eating outside. Thanks 
goes to the class of 93' 
who last year donated 
these wooden picnic 
tables to be used by 
seniors this year and 


28 Seniors 


















in the years to follow. 
This gives every senior 
a chance to get away 
from the noise and 
chaos the underclass¬ 
men create, and to 
enjoy their lunch in 
the great outdoors. 
Pictured left : 

Joe Canham, Trevor 
Dill, and Jamie Tinned 
Pictured right: Adam 
Austin, and Jen Coates. 




Juanita Caison 



John Charf^ 




Joe Canham 



Jennifer Coates 



Carissa CDichs 


Seniors 29 












Egbert ‘Ennis 



‘Nokia lHarrington 




Jessica ficarro 


Larry foster 




%ettie J-Cogan 


Sarmad Joboory 



Prom night would be nothing without refreshments which is 
why these seniors stop to take their fill before heading home. 



30 Seniors 














BauC Qarner 



BgcheC (jray 



Shane QreenzvaCt 



Melanie ‘Kirkland 


‘Tien Mai 


‘Barbara Lang 



‘Rachel Leach 



The five most crazy seniors at MPHS strike a serious pose for our 
camera.They are: Heather Conner, Jessica Ficarro, Heather 
Whorton , Laura Van Dyke, and April Rotenberry. 


Seniors 31 















Stephen Marshall 


Jennifer McCarthy 



feorge Moran 




Chris Mullins 



These two well dressed seniors Carissa Dicks and Jenny Me Carthy 
are escorted by two equally handsome and well dressed men. 


32 Seniors 


















Homecoming '93 was once again a success for the class of '94 who has won three homecomings in four years, but 
this year was different it was their last effort to come together as a class, and as you can see here they did. 



Skip /'skip/ v. to faii 
to attend or to leave 
secretly 

It may look like these 
people are eating a 
nice, normal, pleasant 
Shoney's breakfast, 
but in reality they are 
practicing in an evil 
ritual known as... 
SF-NIOK SKIP -HAY 

On May 6, 1994 
about 25 seniors in all 
gathered at 9:30 an 
to eat andwreak havoc 
on theschool by 
parading around in 
decorated cars aid 
yelling to anyone who 
would listen. All in 
all I wouldsay they were 
farly successful. 


Seniors 33 











Richard Parades 


Sherry Pearson 


Pftomas PiCot 




Victor Rodriguez 




James Seay 


April Rptenherry 


34 Seniors 









''Bryan J{p6inson 


J(usty Robinson 




JamiCah Sha6azz 


Joe Smith 


Jdebody Snyder 


Seniors 35 


9NH 








‘WiCCiam 'latent 




Jb(eC < Tam6uro 


‘Lrickjlanchez 



Carrie ‘Tinnetf 


James < Tinnett 


ChristopherTurner 



Christian Victor 


Jteather Whorton 


Carofyn Wilson 


36 Seniors 



























Laura Van CDyl<ie 


JQystat WiCson 


tPauCLRoCen 


Seniors 37 


















Friends since the beginning of time, Joe Canham, Jennifer 
Coates, Heather Conner, and Jessica Ficarro. 


If you have trouble figuring out who these two young 
patriots are, just ask Thomas Pilot and Christian Victor. 


imHBTi |-|w if^STRANGE TRIP 

“’ll LONGit's been 


Picture it, 1981 
the beginning of 
the Reagan era and 
the beginning of 
the class of 1994s' 
journey to gradua¬ 
tion day. Many 
things have been 
witnessed by this 
class along the way 
things such as, 
the space shuttle 
Challenger blowing 
up on national 
television, the 
fall of the Berlin 
Wall, and the inci¬ 
dent of John Bobbit 
that happened right 


here in Manassas.These 
events, although 
important, shy in 
comparison to the many 
memories this class 
has shared over the 
years.Memories like 
the alphabet people, 
the 6th grade trip to 
Jamestown, Lake Anna, 
eating lunch in what 
is now ISS, the prin¬ 
cipals we went through 
,and the many Homecom¬ 
ing events won. MPHS 
won't be the same with 
out the class of ‘94, 
who always took the 
road less traveled. 



Once in T.A.X.I. always in 
T.A.X.I. Look at these guys 
who have been in it since this 
picture was taken in 1985. 


(top row) Brad Polk, Heathei 
Conner, moved,Sean Roark, 
(bottom row)moved, Jenny 
Me Carthy, andChris Turner 


38 Seniors 



























Here's a survey 
that was taken in 
1981-82 by MPHS 
students+ 

Beat c lo th e s; Levis 
blue jeans 
Best song; "Another 
One Bites the Dust" 
-Queen 

Best movie: "Smokey 
& the Bandit 1 & 2 " 
Best T.V. show; 

Dallas 

Best saving : "Right" 
Favorite place to 

eat : Me Donalds 


he class of ^s spirit stayed strong tlirough the yeqrs with the help of: Kellie Hogan, 
janita Caison, Carissa Dicks, Chris Turner, Jenny Me Carthy, and George Moran. 



These atheleles have been the 
tekbone of womens' sports at MPHS 
>r many years they are: (top row) 
essica Ficarro, Carrie Tinned, 


Heather Whorton, Ruscel Robinson, 
moved, (bottom row) Laura Van 
Dyke, moved, Kim Moms, Barbara 
Lang, and April Rotenberry. 


Favorite sport: Football 
Most disliked public figure; 

Ayatollah Khomeini 
Most liked public figure; 

Ronald Reagan 

Here's the results of the 
same survey taken by the 
class of * 94 , See How 
Times Change. 

Best clothes: anything baggy 
Best song; " What's my name ? 

" -Snoop Doggy Dogg 

Best movie; "Philadelphia" & 

"Menace II Society" 

Best TV show: Martin 
Best saving: " Basically, 

Types of Stuff, With it" 
Favo rite place. £2. e at i . Taco 
Bell 

Favorite sport; Basketball 

Mpg t 41gll&§a..&u£lig, iiaurei. 

John Bobbitt and Bill Clinton 

Most liked public figure; 

Lorena Bobbitt 


Seniors 39 



































































Sherrie and 
Chris show off 
Luke Smith 
galaxy 
project. Good 
job Luke! 


Travis 
Mosher puts 
vinegar into 
his volcano 
that soon will 
erupt. 


TABITHA ABERTS '96 
TIMOTHY ALEXANDER '97 
CARLOS ALFARO '97 
MIRZA ALFARO '95 


RICHARD ALKIRE '97 
BOBBY ANDERSON '95 
MITZI JO AUSLEY '97 
LISA BALDRIDGE '97 










RAYMOND BALLARD '97 
BEN BARNES '97 
CHRIS BARR '97 
RICKY BEARD '96 


JAZMINE BEARS '97 

CHRIS BENEMANN '97 
SHAUN BIGLEY '96 


BRIAN BRIDGES '95 

EISA BRINSON '96 
SHAWN'TEE BROOKS '95 


JACK BROTIIERTON '96 
EDGAR BRANHAM '96 



40 Underclass 







































OUT OF THIS WORLD! 


1 



Aligning the planets 
or volcanic acitivy? 
Which would you choose? 
Ms. Goin's ninth grade 
earth science classes had 
to make the choice a real¬ 
ity. Students showed their 
creativity by selected 
unique materials to build 
erupting volcanoes. One 



student,Nicole Humbert 
commented, "My project 
was a volcano. It took 
over a week to complete." 
Others visually depicted 
the planets and their po¬ 
sitions to the sun. The "3- 
D" galaxy projects showed 
others what the students 
learned. 


J.C. BROWN '97 
TIKA BROWN '96 
BRENDA BURGE '97 
FASIH BUTT '95 



ANDY CASSELL '96 
CHARMAINE CATALE '96 
OUTHANECIIASENG' 96 
TASHA CISLER '96 



LAURA COMBS' 95 
STEPHANIE COMBS '97 
KIRK COOPER '97 
CHRISTINA COX '97 



SARA COX '97 
MIKE CRABILL' 97 
NIKKI CROUCH '97 
MIKE CUMMINGS '96 






DALE CUNNINGHAM '97 
SHELLY CUPPS 96' 
JOSEPH DANBRUSKI '97 
KEVIN DANIELS '97 


Underclass 41 

















ANDY DAVIS '95 
BELINDA DAVIS' 95 
DAVID DEAN ’96 
ERMA DIAMOND ’95 



TREVER DILL ’95 
ANGELA DIUON ’97 
CHIEN DOAN ’96 
JENNIFER DOTSON ’96 



TRAVIS DOTSON ’95 
ANGELA DOYLE '96 
JIMMY DUVALL '95 
MELISSA EDMONDS '97 



JENNY ELSEY '95 
JULIE ENGIAND '96 
LEROY ENNIS '96 
JENNY ESTRIGHT' 95 



CORRINE EVERLIT '96 
CRYSTAL EVERSOLE '96 
WENDY EAIRCLOTH '95 
SAMANTHA FERGUSON '97 





BD SOPHOMORES PLAN 
FOR THE FUTURE? 


It's not just a question 
it's an answer.While 
going downthe hallway 
we asked Jennifer 
Dotson how does it feel 
to be asophomore? 
"Being a sophomore is 
different it makes you 
feel good, because we 
need to think about 


what we are going to do in 
the future." Also asked 
was Andy Cassell, he said 
"Sophomores think about 
what they're going to be 
because they only have 2 
years left." So it's safe to 
say that on the mind of 
most sophomores is their 
future and what it holds. 


42 Underclass 

























! 





MEGHAN FICARRO '96 
TONYA FISHER '95 
MELISSA FRANK '95 


AEYSIA FRANKLIN '97 
KAREN FROCK '95 
DINO GAEIANO '96 
EDWARD GARDNER '97 


JONATHAN GARNER '96 
CHRISTIAN GATES '96 
JEREMY GLASCOCK '97 
SANDRA GONZALEZ '96 


YANIRA GONZALEZ '96 
TIMOTHY GORGAN '97 
DAVID GREY '96 
GWEN GRIFFIN '97 


KENNY GRIFFIN '96 
CORRINE GRIFFITH '97 
FI III ANA HANDLER '95 
CHRISTINE HARRIS '97 
TRACEY HARRIS '96 





Students don't always "YOU GUYS!" 
rush to class when Ms. Sweet's class 
the sprint bell rings, goofs off just a little. 


Underclass 43 

























W h i 1 e M r s . 
Richardson trys 
to teach class, 
Nora Membreno 
thinks of what 
she coulc be do¬ 
ing at home. 

MPHS Football 
players show 
their spirit by 
participating in 
theYearbooks' 
face painting on 
home game days. 


DOUG HARRISON '96 
JEFF HARRISON '96 
MIKE HARTMAN '96 
ROBBIE FIAVLE '96 



JOHN HAWKINS '95 
CARNIS HELTON '97 
JEFF HELTON '96 
DANYL HENDERSON '95 



DANNY HENRY '96 
AMBER HERNDON '97 
SHAWN HESS '97 
RONALD HILL '95 


LEE HOLDAWAY '95 
SHELLY HORTON '96 
CLIFF HUGHES '96 
ERIC HUGHES '95 



NICOLE HUMBERT '97 
MICHAEL HUTCHISON '97 
MY-TRINH HUYNH '97 
SUHAD JABOORY '96 






44 Underclass 































MANASSAS ON THE 

MAW 


Thecontroversial 
Bobbitt trial amazed the 
country, as well as put¬ 
ting the small town of 
Manassas Park on the 
map, and into tabloid 
heaven. So we asked a 
few Manassas Park stu¬ 
dents what they 
thought. Robbie Havle 
had only one word to 


say and that was 
"ouch". Another 
studentDonald 
Shumaker said,"If she 
was abused then she 
should have gotten 
off, but if she wasn't 
than she's guilty all 
the way." 

That's their opinion 
What's yours? 



CAREY JACKSON '97 
KEVIN JAMES '97 
CARLA JENKINS '96 
JENNY JOBBER '96 



MARCUS JOHNSON '97 
ROBERT JOHNSTON '96 
DANNY KEY '96 
BETHANY KIRKLAND '97 






HANNA KISER '97 
A.T. KOONKONGSATIAN '97 
JOHN LANHAM '95 
AL LEYVA '97 



CHRIS LUDVIGSEN '97 
TRAVIS LUDVIGSEN '95 
ALEXIS MADARY '96 
JUNE MAHONEY '97 


TOMMY MAHONEY '95 
TAN VAN MAI '95 
ROBERT MAITLAND '96 
ELIZABETH MARSHALL'95 







Underclass 45 






















MICHAEL MARSHALL '96 


J.R. MARTIN '96 
MLIANIL MARTIN '95 



GINA MARTINEZ '95 
JAMIE MC CAW '96 
CANDICE MC CONVIEEE '97 
PATRICK MC CONVIEEE '96 




ANDREA MC EEATERS '96 
CRYSTAL MCINTOSH '97 
YOLANIS MEDRANO '95 


No Photo 
Available 


NORA MEMBRENO '95 
NOAH METZ '95 
MICHELLE MICHAEL '97 
DARRELL MIEBOIJRNE '97 



CIIRISSY MILLER '95 
REGINA MILLER '95 
VICTORIA MILLER '97 
MACKENZIE MITCHELL '95 
EESIIAN MOORE '95 
NESTOR MORI ERA '95 










Sweetums 


This year the Jun¬ 
ior class held a" match¬ 
making" dance. Prior 
to the dance, students 
filled out a question¬ 
naire to compile data 
on other students in 
the schooL When the 
questionnaires were 


returned, students 
could purchase a list of 
their "most compat¬ 
ible" matches for one 
dollar. It was all for 
fun. "Mostdiditjustfor 
the fun of it," com¬ 
mented junior class 
sponsor Ms. Hurst. 



46 Underclass 




















STEPHEN MOSS '96 






C.J. MULLINS '96 
JIMMY MULLINS '97 



LINDA MUNOZ '97 
DAVID MURPHY’97 
JENNIPER MURPHY ’97 
LORENZO NICHOIS ’96 


MELISSA OLSON ’96 
MICHAEL ONRUBIA ’97 
DANIA PAREDES '96 
FRANKIE PAYNE '95 



MELISSA PAYNE '97 
TIM PEARSON '97 
JENNIFER PENNINGTON '97 
ELIZABETH PEPIN '97 



ENOCH PEPIN '95 
LARRY PETERS '95 
KIKO PHELAN '97 
AARON PIETROWSKI '96 
STEPLI PIIJMADORE '96 
GWEN PUCKETT '97 




Kenzie and Danyl pose 
during the Sweetheart 
dance. 



"Do you want a 
cookie," says Jenny 
Jobber during a 
track meet. 



Underclass 47 






























Don't worry Tommy 
Mahoney, she'll get 
there. Tommy waits 
in anticipation dur- 
ing the Senior Olym¬ 
pics. 



DARRELL RANDOLPH '96 
CARL REICH '97 
SHERRY RICHARDS '95 
MELISSA ROARK '97 


AARON ROBINSON '95 
SHIRRIE ROBINSON '97 
CARRIE ROBISON '97 
KEVIN ROBISON '96 










CLAUDIA RODRIGUEZ '95 
MIKE ROSE '97 
SHELLY ROSE '95 
RAEGAN ROTRAMEL '96 






ANA SANTOS '95 
JOSE SANTOS '97 
MARTY SCHAEFFER '97 
MATT SCOUTEN '97 


BRYANT SEAY '97 
REGGIE SHEETZ ’96 
TAMMY SUET LEY ’96 
DOUG IE SHIFFLETT '97 



48 Underclass 



























During the vol¬ 
leyball relay, 
junior Jenny 
Estright hops as 
fast as she can. 

Hurry up John! 
John Lanham 
rushes to get his 
shoes tied. 




HEATHER SHIFFLETT '95 
COLLEEN SI 11 LUNG BURC.'96 
JR SHILLINGBURG '96 
DONA IT) SIIUEMAKER '96 



LINDSEY SHUGARS '97 
JENNIFER SIMPSON '97 
MELISSA SLATER '96 
DARRIN SLAUGHTER '96 




HOPE SLAWSON '95 
JASON SMITH '96 
LUKE SMITH '97 
MIKE SMITH '96 




ANGIE SOUTHWICK '96 
SUSAN SPENCER '96 
SHANNON STIEGLBAUER '97 
CHRIS STINNETT '95 



ZIANA STRASSER '97 
RICHARD STAWSER '97 
VICTORIA. TANCHEZ '96 
ANGEL TAYLOR '97 


Underclass 49 





































JOY TAYLOR'97 
JENNIFER THOLEN '96 
FELICIA TIBBS '96 
BRANDON TILLER '96 


ANDREW TONKIN '96 
WILLIAM TONKIN '96 
EVONNE TURNER '95 
MELANIE TURNER '97 



PAUL WALZAK '97 
MELISSA WAMPLER '96 
NICOLE WEDDING '96 
CARRIE WELCH '96 



JOHN WELCH '96 
KIM WELCH '95 
HAVEN WFIEJ SELL '96 
DANA WHIDDEN '95 



CHRISTI WHITMER '95 
JASON WHITMER '95 
MISSY WHORTON '97 
DANIELLE WILUAMS '95 






Go Cougars! Go Cou¬ 
gars! The crowd was 
loud during Home¬ 
coming. Everyone 
wanted to win the big 
game.The underclass 
men and women play 
a crucial role in sup¬ 
porting athletics at 
Manass Park, includ¬ 
ing football. 


50 Underclass 




































CHARLOTTE WILSON '97 
MICHELLE WILSON '96 
RICHARD WILSON '97 
DAVID WILT '95 


MATT WISEMAN '95 

JEREMY WOOD '96 
STACY WOODARD'95 




DARVELL WOODEN '97 
MELANIE WRIGHT '96 


WHERE DO UNDERCLASSMEN AND WOMEN GO ON THEIR 




Mr. Zaveski 
gets caught 
checking 
out the en¬ 
vironmen¬ 
tal tee shirt 
brochure 
used as a 
fundraiser. 


PICTURES NOT TAKEN: 


Kevin Carlyle 
Milton Chew 
Robert Hanson 
John Hare 
Kevin Harris 
Mystery Harris 
Tracy HeHin 
Howard Johnson 
Mary Lanham 
Andre Lightfoot 
Josh Lubbers 
Eric Melton 
Victor Mosher 
Damelle Mullins 


Jeffrey Pennington 
Katherine Ramsey 
Charles Rigney 
Samuel Roark 
Johanna Rodriquez 
Albert Sheetz 
Pony Shillingburg 
Martin Stamper 
Crystal Stanley 
Jonathan Stevens 
Charles Tamburo 
Donnie Tyndall 
Chris Whalan 
Stephanie Wyatt 


Underclass 51 































MANASSAS PARK 
ELECTRO-CAT 


It all started with one 
little car, a Volkswagen 
Rabbit, purchased by Mr. 
Quastand Mr.Stevas. This 
years Auto Mechanics 
class participated in the 
Electric Car Competition 
sponsored by NOVEC. The 
car had to go through a 
tremendous transforma¬ 
tion, from the inside out. 
All parts of the car had to 
be modified to support the 
"electric" powering. This 
made for some very long 
nights and days for the 
teachers and students. 


The EV team consisted 
of: John Clark, John Lanham, 
Travis Ludvigsen, Victor 
Mosher, April Rotenberry, 
AlbertSheetz,Mike 
Hartman, Jeff Harrison, and 
Krystal Wilson. Mr. Stevas 
and Mr. Quast were advi¬ 
sors for the team. The stu¬ 
dents accompanied the car 
to Richmond for competi¬ 
tion. Jeff Harrison and April 
Rotenberry were the "des¬ 
ignated drivers." After a 
great deal of effort, time, 
and energy it was gratify¬ 
ing to place seventh out of 
sixteen schools. 


April Rotenberry is nc 
one of only four women ele 
trie car drivers in the Unite 
States. When asked for cor 
ments she said, "No or 
thought Manassas Park 
Auto Class could build a 
electric car, but we prove 
them wrong!" Their succe 
was apparent and made 
name for Manassas Park i 
this competition. "It was 
lot of work. Whatimpresse 
me the most was how t± 
kids pulled together as 
team," said teacher-advisc 
Alan Stevas. 


Jeff Harrison gets the EV car ready 
to go home after a long weekend in 
Richmond. 


The Manassas Park EV tea 
push the EV car down p 
road for the speed race. 





52 Underclass 











The EV team 
sits and rests, 
awaiting an¬ 
other event to 
begin. 

Manassas 
Park's EV tam 
gets the car 
ready for the 
"show and 
shine" 
events. 


ff Harrison, 
p r i 1 
)tenberry, 
r a v i s 
ludvigsen, 
)hn Clark, and 
rystal Wilson 
ry to rest and 
ilk after a long 
lay of events. 


eff Harrison 

I j 

jets April 
totenberry 
eady for her 
race and of- 
ers some last 
ninute in- 
;tructions. 



Underclass 53 





























KL 
























CRAIG BARBER 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

MICHAEL BASHAM 

BAND / MUSIC 

KAREN BEFUMO 

MATHEMATICS 

BETH BOONE 

ENGLISH & 

CREATIVE WRIGHTING 

LUCY BREWER 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

MARCIA CONTATORE 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

JACKIE DELGIORNO 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

CAROL DIXON 

FOOD SERVICES / FLE 

ROB EWING 

MATHEMATICS 

SABRINA GLADNEY 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

DONNA GOINS 

EARTH SCIENCE 

HILDA HAGARTY 

US / VA GOVERNMENT & 
HISTORY 

SANDY HAMMERSLY 

PE. / HEALTH 

PENNY HAND 

ART 

ALICE HURST 

COSMETOLOGY 


TEACHERS 



56 Faculty 








































'HANGING YOUR MIND 



CARA Le GRYS 

MARKETING EDUCATION 

TERRI LENT 

LIBRARIAN 

CHARLES LOWRY 

FOREIGN LANUAGE & 

US / VA HISTORY 

JOE Me ELFISH 

P.E. / HEALTH 

MELISSA MOORE 

GEOGRAPHY / HISTORY 

AMY O' CONNOR 

ENGLISH 

MARY SUE POLK 

MEDIA TECHNICIAN 

GREG QUAST 

TECNOLOGY EDUCATION 

LOUISE RICHARDSON 

ENGLISH 

BETHANY ROBBINS 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

LYNN RUSHDI 

FOOD SERVICES 

SAM SODA 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

MARY SPOEDE 

ENGLISH AS A SECOND 
LANGUAGE 

ALAN/ STEVAS 

AUTO TECHNOLOGY 

MELISSA SWEET 

BIOLOGY & CHEMISTRY 


Faculty 57 







































Rarely did students consider 
theirteachers outside the class¬ 
room. It amazed them to imag¬ 
ine theirteachers shopping, cook¬ 
ing, uacationing, playing sports 
or going to the mouies. 

If a student saw a teacher in 
public on the weekend, it was 
certainly talked about the next 
day in class. Students thought 
theirteachers were lesson plan¬ 
ning, paper grading machines. 
LlJhy couldn't they accept them 
as "real people"? 

Ms. DelGiorno our special edu¬ 
cation teacherhelps out in the ski 
club, coaches j.u. cheerleading 
sponsor. She's also a freshman 
class aduisor. 

Mr. Zaueski is more than a 
guidance counselor. He's a pro¬ 
fessional wrestler. He has been 
wrestling for 2 1/2 years,and 
calls himself ' Sweet Jimmy Z". 
He wrestles in the upper 500. He 
has wrestled in 35 matches, and 
he has won 15 / lost 13 and has 
7 OQ's (time limit). 




Ms. Hurst and student 
Danyl Henderson take time 
to pose fora Kodak moment 
at the Sweetheart dance. 


Student teacher for Ms. 
Hagarty's world history 
classes Ms. McCann, 
assists student Nora 
Membrano . 


58 Faculty 

















































: -***»-' ' 


* ' 




Ms. Shirley Bazdar; 
Assistant Principal 


Office and Guidance 


Ms. Jo Moore; Secretary 


Ms. Yvonne Williams; Bookkeeper 


Ms. Sheila Buhl; School Nurse 


Ms. Robin Lady; 7 & 8 grade guidance 
counselor 


Mr. Jim Zaveski; Guidance Director 


Ms. Carol Jacob; Guidance Secretary 


Administration 

Mr. Ben Kiser; 
Principal 


Ms. Shirley Bazdar; 
Assistant Principal 



Ms. LeGrys, Ms. 
Moore, Ms. Goins, Ms. 
DelGiorno, and Ms. 
Sweet spend their 
spring break in 
Florida. 

Who said teaching was an 
inside job? Well health 
teachers Mrs. Hanimersly and 
Mr. McElfish are cought in a 
cougar snap shot. 



Faculty 59 


































Work, Work, Work! 
That's about all we 
seeMs. Harnmersly 
doing. She's been 
workingfor our 
school like this for 
1 9 years! 


Ms. Taylor, with her whistlf 
by her side, listens atten¬ 
tively to this student hyinf 
to slide by . Will Ms. Taylo 
fall for her excuse? I don' 
think so! 




Nineteen Years and Still Counting! 


In the year 1974, Manassas Park High 
School was developed. The brand new school 
was ready for brand new students and brand 
new teachers. Most of those brand new teach¬ 
ers have left us, although we still see four of 
them lingering around the hallway. Those 
four consist of Ms. Lynn Rushdi, Ms. Pam 
Taylor, Ms. Sandy Harnmersly,and Mr. Chuck 
Lowery. I have spoken to these four teachers, 
and they have allowed me to share their 
comments with you about how the school has 
changed throughout the years." We have 
bells now!! Ms Taylor doesn't have to stand in 
the middle of the 200 wing at the beginning 


and end of each class and blow her "Acme 
Thunderer" whistle, we have bells now!!" ex¬ 
claims Ms Rushdi. 

"We didn't have a gym or any equipment, but 
for a volleyball or two and a net, and a football or 
two until the second semester. We also had a lot 
more field around here. Classes weren't coed 
either," said Mrs. Harnmersly. Ms. Taylor says 
we have a paved road, we had just a dirt road 
down here for a while. We also have the voca¬ 
tional wing, the office, and the gym now." 

Mr. Lowiy comments. "We're better organized, 
and have a proper cafeteria." Talking with them 
allowes us all to understand the way it was. 


60 Faculty 









(To the left), Ms. Rushdi 
walks happily down the 
hall. She stops strikes a 
pose and exclaims,' Take 
a picture of me! Yeah 
me!" Ms. Rushdi has 
been a constant at Ma¬ 
nassas Park. She's fa¬ 
mous for her delicious 
cakes, cheerful smile, 
and words of encourage¬ 
ment. 



(To the left) Mrs. 
Hammersly works 
steadily at her desk, 
thinking "Boy health 
is such a bummer 
with all the work I 
have to do. "Mr. Lowry 
stands in his room 
looking "dapper" for 
the camera. Both are 
"original" teachers. 



Faculty 61 













Working Towards the 

Money 


Ldhenitcomesdowntoit, euery- 
one is here for the sake of learn¬ 
ing. Social interaction and ex¬ 
tracurricular actiuities arefun 
mays to learn, but there comes a 
time when you haue to buckle 
down and hit the books. Of 
course, no one euer said that 
academics can t be fun too. LUith 
courses of studies ranging from 
Fun LUith Foods to College Trigo¬ 
nometry, there a subject or uo- 
cation to suit euergone s needs. 
So by utilizing all of the schools 
resources students start out with 
only Small Change, but end up 
with the Big Money. 


62 Academics 



MP State of Affairs 

up 



Richard Paredes was one of 
the three selected males to 
attend Boys State this past 
summer at Longwood College. 


Senior Luara VanDyke gives 
the camera a smile because 
she was one of two females 
selected to attend Girls 
State. 



Future William and Mary student Jenny 
McCarthy, gained many insights into 
the working of our government while 
she was at Girls State. 




While 
sittingin 
govern¬ 
ment class 
Brad Polk 
dreams of 
the good 
old days 
b a c k a t 
BoysState, 
where he 
was a par- 
ticipant 
last sum¬ 
mer. 


Academics 63 






English? Where For Art Thou? 


Past or present? If you 
took a few minutes to stop in 
the English classes you may 
hear a line from MacBeth or 
even Romeo and Juliet These 
plays are a few favorites of 
Ms. O'Connor, Ms. Boone and 
Ms. Richardson. But plays 


aren't the only things on 
these teachers minds.Ms. 
O'Connor has novel feasts 
throughout the year for her 
honors class. They bring in 
foods to represent the nov¬ 
els they have read. Ms. Boone 
is a litte different 


though. She enjoys ha^ 
ing her students use the 
imagination and writ 
their own stories. M: 
Richardson prefers ha\ 
ing her students d 
projects on the plays th 
have read in class. 



Krystal Wilson takes time out to pose 
for the camera while reading the play 
MacBeth in Ms. Richardson's English 
class. 


Robbie Havel concentrates on his 
reading assignment in English. 



This down to Earth teacher is none 
otherthan the famous Ms. O'Connor. 
She took a brief moment to pose for 
the camera between her English 
classes. 


64 Academics 




























Chris Turner takes time out of his 
busy schedule to take a nap in Mrs. 
Richardson's English class. 


Dania Paredes 
Brotherton read in 
English class. 


and Jack 
Ms. Boone's 


Academics 65 









HISTORY CONSTANTLY CHANGING 


When walking into any 
of the following classes, 
you may often get wisked 
away to different coun¬ 
tries, U.S. Government and 
Virginia History . Lets see 
what we discovered IWhen 
we went in for a closer 
look. 


Ms. Moore teaches 
WorldGeography. In her 
class you'll cover the land 
scape, location, culture of 
the United States and other 
foreign countries, from the 
smallest to the biggest the 
richest to the poorest. To 
all ends of the earth. 


Mr. Lowry and Mrs. 
Hagarty, with the help 
of her student teacher 
Ms. McCann, each teach 
U.S. VA. History. Mrs. 
Hagarty also teaches 
US. Government. All 
are required courses 
for graduation. 



Can you tell if this is Virginia 
History or a U.S. social? Our cam¬ 
era can't, especially by the ex¬ 
pression on MacKenzie Mitchell's 
face, during fourth period. 


Ms. Hagarty’s student teacher Ms. 
McCann helps Ragina Miller on her 
homework assigned in Government 
class. 



Mrs. Hagarty, during her duty period, finds 
a few spare moments to chat with Mrs. Moore. 
Teachers have different assigned duties dur¬ 
ing the day in addition to teaching. 


66 Academics 












Who is that in Ms. Moore's desk? Laura Van Dyke takes over Ms. Moore's 
classes on Senior Takeover Day. 



June Mahoney and partner do one of 
the many maps during World Geog¬ 
raphy. 


Organization is the key to success. 
Paul Garner organizes his notebook in 
Mrs. Hagarty’s government class. 



Academics 67 
















Danny, Darvell, and Shannen take notes to prepare them 
for today's lesson. Math takes knowledge and practice 
for mastery. 



"When are we ever going to 
use this"? The famous question 
asked by almost all math students 
at one time or another. Ms. Befumo, 
Ms. Taylor and Mr. Ewing do their 
best to answer that famous ques¬ 
tion. 

The math courses offered by 
these brilliant teachers are Ap¬ 
plied Math I & II, Algebra I & II, 
Geometry, and General Math. Each 
teacher tries to make math more 
relevant to the real world, by usina 
problems and cases related to work 
or home. It's important to realize 
how math is involved in our world. 
From writing checks and using 
credit cards to buying a car and 
calculating your gas mileage. 



Missy Whorton hurries to finish 
her work before the bell, while 
Patrick McConville waits pa¬ 
tiently. Time doesn't "fly" for all 
math students. 

J.R. Shillingburg and Stephanie 
Plumadore ask Mr. Ewing to 
help them with a challenging 
word problem. Word problems 
can be confusing, but Mr. Ewing 
always makes them easy. 


68 Academics 









) 




Ms. Goins double checks to 
make sure all her students have Nicole Humbert demonstrates the volcano that she has made for Earth 
shown up for class today. Science class. She used a combination of baking soda and vinegar to 

make a life like eruption. 




Jamie Me Caw 
works diligently 
on a biology 
assignment for 
firstyear 
teacherMs.Sweet, 
who has added a 
fresh new outlook 
on science for her 
studentsthisyear. 


Academics 69 










It's a Small World 



A French student studies in Mrs. Upperman's classroom. 
French offers a challenge to many students. 


Flola, bonjour, salve 
and hello. Yes, here it is 
again folks in time for 
foreign language with our 
hosts Ms. Upperman, Mr. 
Lowry, Ms. Williams, and 
last but not least, 
M s . S p o d e . 

They work hard all 
year to try and get their 
students to learn, speak, 
write, and understand 
each of the languages. Ms. 
Upperman teaches Span¬ 
ish I & II, and French l-lll. 
Mr. Lowry teaches Latin 
l-lll, Ms. Williams 
teaches Spanish III and 
Ms. Spode teaches English 
as a Second Lanaguage. 



Mrs. Upperman hosted a student 
teacher this year. She provides 
instruction in French, one of the 
three choices students have in 
foreign languages. 



Franky Payne, Philana Handler, Andy Davis, Gina Martinez, 
Melissa Frank, Richard Paredez and Bobby Anderson wait 
for Ms. Williams to start class. 


70 Academics 















Discovering Art 



April Rotenberry practices her basket weaving while Sean 
Roark and Ricky Reffo concentrate on their paintings. Art 
encompasses many skills, and brings out talents that were 
otherwise unknown. 



Is this a Rembrant or a Reffo in disguise? Art III gives students 
(or future artists) a wide variety of assignments to unleash 
their art making skills. 


Academics 71 









It's Off To College We Go . . . 



Freshmen in College or Seniors 
in high school? This was a ques¬ 
tion asked by several seniors 
this year. Northern Virginia 
Community College helps Ma- I 
nassas Park seniors further 
their education in classes such 
as: Physics, Algebra, T rigonom- 
etry, and English. The students 
that successfully complete 
these courses receive college 
' and high school credit. Many of 
the courses offered by 
NOVAgive these students an 
advantage over other students 
in the sense that they experi¬ 
ence college life a year earlier. 

: Jii 



Senior Jamilah Shabazz took both Technical Writing and 
English 111. These classes developed and used writing 
skillsthat will be crucial in college. 




This 1 2th grader Layla Morgan moved 
from Colorado this past year where she 
took several Advanced Placement 
classes, like college classes they also 
prepare you for the future. 

Pictured here in the library where she 
spends most of her days is senior 
Jessica Ficarro. Jessica who as junior 
took Physics, College Trigonometry, 
and Statistics opted to take only the 
English classes this year. 


72 Academics 













TAKING T.A.X.I. FOR A 
BETTER EDUCATION 


„ 


Brad, Brad, Brad of the jungle 
watch out for that tree!! Brad 
Polk swings down the zip-wire 
at Hemlock on a TAXI fieldtrip. 


As usual, Donald is so eager to be in class that he 
can’t bear to leave once the bell has rung. 



"O.K. Laura, 
make sure 
you hold on 
tight to me 
so I don't 
fall" says 
Chris 
Waylan. 


Academics 73 









MPHS gets PHYSICAL 


Up...one, up...two. These are 
the most familiar sounds to any Fresh¬ 
man or Sophomore you meet Ms. 
Hammersley and Mr. Me Elfish try hard 
to keep their students fit, and up to 
date with the health studies, and 
driving statistics all year. MP only 
requires you to take P.E fortwooutof 
four years, but for those who really 
enjoy P.E. can take advanced P.E 



Michelle Wilson and Melissa Olson 
watch as David Dean does his V sit and 
reach for the physical fitness test 






Lisa Brinson practices her spike in a competitive 
game of volleyball during gym with her fellow 
classmates.They often play volleyball or basketball 
the last few miutes of class. 



Joe Danbruski prepares 
to bat while his team¬ 
mates cheer him on. 


74 Academics 


Ms. Hammersley prepares to pitch her fast ball 
during a game of softball with her freshmen class 
fourth period. 
















Reaching the Grade 


After the inductions ceremony, old 
and new members mingle over re¬ 


gain Austin, Layla Morgan, Melodie Snyder, Jessica Ficarro, 
Nslissa Frank, Jenny Estright, Brad Polk, Laura Van Dyke, Adam 
Foster, Heather Conner, Jennifer McCarthy and Ms. Richardson 
ae the members and sponsor of the National Honor Society at 
PHS. 



freshments. 



lelanie Snyder, Brad Polk, Adam Foster, Melissa Frank, Jenny 
stright, Franky Payne, and Laura Van Dyke await the induc- 
10 ns ceremony. 


Jennifer McCarthy, Layla Morgan, Jessica 
Ficarro, Adam Austin, and Brad Polk sign the 
National Honor Society book after their induction. 


Academics 75 













It doesn't look like Gina and Brian are pre¬ 
paring for anything but a referral from the 
teacher for not paying attention in class! 


Vocational classes offer a taste c 
the "real world." Students are expose 
to cars, machinery, cooking, famil 
and life, computers, cosmetology sei 
vices, and marketing. Each course ol 
fers knowledge, yet more importantly 
skills. "Marketing is really job re! 
lated. We'll learn something in clas 
and I'll see or experience it at work, 
commented Carolyn Wilson. Vocation? 
classes are electives, so students choos: 
to be enrolled. Often rather than boo 
work, students get to use their hand 
and minds by "doing." " I've learned th 
parts of an engine and how it runs. Nov 
on my own vehicle, I know what to loo 
for," expressed Krystal Wilson. 




Jason Whitmer helps David 
Barreros down the steps in a 
trust building exercise in 
Marketing. 


Karen Frock and Leshan Moore 
make and decorate a cake 
during fun with foods. 


76 Academics 






















































j$ryan Alkire and Tony Shillingburg 
ask Mr. Quast for help on an as- 
;ignment during Construction 
:lass. 




Travis Ludvigsen lowers 
the legendary Electric Car 
down after making some 
final adjustments. 

Heather Shifflet, Mrs. Rushdi, 
John Lanham, Hope Slawson, 
and Mackenzie Mitchell enjoy 
their Thanksgiving diner dur¬ 
ing Fun With Foods. 


Preparing for the Future 


Academics 77 












VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 


Skills to Last a 
Lifetime 


Fixing a car, typing a letter, 
making a meal, giving a perm- these 
are just a few of the vocational edu¬ 
cation classes offered by MPHS and 
were recognized nationally on Feb. 
14-1 8 of this year. Displays were 
set up in the cafeteria, and were 
scheduled to be set up at Manassas 
Mall, but due to snow was cancelled. 
The VOED classes displayed their 


accomplislments and course options of¬ 
fered by Mr. Quast, Ms. Rushd, Ms. 
Dixon, Ms. LeGrys, Mr. Stevas, Ms. Hurst, 
Ms. Brewer, and Mr. Barber. 

Several guest speakers came in 
and spoke. The Chamber of Gomerce held 
a "What it takes" presentation outlining 
their success stories and some optional 
job paths for students to take while 
conddering a career. 


I 

1 



Cosmetology once again displayed their famous 
mannequins of recent and up to date hair styles. 
The display also shows how the students used 
their techniques not only on mannequins but on 
customers. 


Leshan Moore with the 
help of Belinda Davis 
cut, styled and permed 
hair during one of the 
many Hair-A-Thon's of 
the year. 

The FBLA creatively 
displays their differ¬ 
ent courses options 
that are available to the 
students throughout 
highschool. 




wora 

Protesting 


78 Academics 











Recognize him? It's Adam Aus- 
ke other vocational classes, Marketing/DECA shows off the tin showing off the Cosmo man- 
fferent employment opportunities and chances to excel in nequin. 
le marketing field. 



Nicole Humbert, Crystal Me Intosh, 
Johnathan Stephens, Carry Jack- 
son, and Dale Cunningham partici¬ 
pated in the DECA District Leader¬ 
ship Conference. 



Academics 79 









80 Sports 




















































"Changing 
the Score" 


For this 1993-1994, the 
Manassas Park High School 
Sports program was looking 
for a little change. A chance to 
push away the storm clouds 
that have reigned over it for 
some time. This year looked 
full of young talent, that 
should promise to make an 
improvement in winning 
mentality of the school. And 
next year maybe there will 
be a chance to change the 
score. 





Front (right-left): Lisa Brinson, William Tonkin, Angie 
Southwick. Back (right-left): Coach Hammersley, Andrew 

Lisa Brinson comments on 
Cross Country: 

"I think the season went very 
well, even though we couldn't score. 
We had lots of fun this year even 
though we didn't have a full team. 

I improved a lot from the begin¬ 
ning to the end of the season. I won 
the Coach's Award this year. My 
goal next year is to strive to be 
better and make it to regionals." 


Tonkin, Donald Shuemaker. 



82 Sports 










I 


In the LotlgRun 


Five runners short. 
That is all this years Cross 
Country team had to 
work with. The team was 
determined to run their 
hardest even though 
their record may have 
not shown it. With only 
five runners, it was im¬ 
possible to place. "You 
must have at least five 
girls and five boys to com¬ 
plete and rank," Lisa 
Brinson explained. It 
takes determination, 
dedication, and endur¬ 
ance to be a good runner. 



"The performance of the 
team, overall, was great. 
Everyone was hard work¬ 
ing and committed," added 
Donald Shuemaker. "I was 
satisfied with the overall 
performance of the team. 
We had a lot of young tal¬ 
ent and it showed. We 
didn't have a full team, so 
it was hard to place. I look 
forward to next season and 
building on the young tal¬ 
ent to makes a solid foun¬ 
dation for the next 
year,"addedCoach 
Hammersley. 

Donald Shuemaker 
comments on the season: 

"I think the season went very 
well. I think we had people who 
were really committed, and you have 
to have that to succeed in cross coun¬ 
try. 

My performance this year was 
self satisfying, but there is always 
room for improvement. Next year I 
would like to go to regionals and I 
hope we have more participation next 
year also." 

Donald won the MVP Award. 


Sports 83 



















PAINS and GAINS 


Cougars celebrate against Luray Bulldogs as the referee give 
the signal for the score. Scores and wins were seldom this sea¬ 
son, but the Cougars plan to bounce back into the swing of 
things next year. 


NO RETREAT, NO 
SURRENDER! That was the 

Cougars motto for the 1993 Manas¬ 
sas Park Cougars Varsity Football 
squad. This year's Cougar team was 
very young and that means promis¬ 
ing things to come. There was con¬ 
troversy off the field. " The Florio 
resignation situation brought us 
closer together. It was great that we 
stuck together as a team on and off 
the field, " were the remarks of wide 


receiver Darrin Slaughter. Eve 
though it didn't show in the win/los 
column, the Cougars played hard an 
with confidence, giving their fan 
much excitement. Their inexper: 
ence showed in some tough losse 
this year." We have a young tear 
and we are going to take som 
bruises," Darrin Slaughter added. Ne> 
year promises more opportunitie 
for a good district showing and hope 
for the best. 


84 Sports 



















: ront Row: Left to Right; Jeff Harrison, Mike Smith, Shane Green wait, Darrell Randolph, Dino Galiano, Douglas 
Garrison, William Talent. 

Znd Row : Jimmy Duvall, Noah Metz, tee Holdaway, Sarmad Jabooiy, Tommy Mahoney, Reggie Sheetz. 

3rd Row : Coach Florio, Jack Brotherton, Victor Mosher, Danny Key, Steve Moss, Fasih Butt, Marcus Johnson, 
(John Lanham. 

4th Row: Coach Barber, Mr. Hardy, Ed Blevins, Bobby Anderson, Ricky Beard, Coach Lloyd, Coach Mamon, Coach 
^onard. 

Darrin Slaughter: 4 Touchdowns, First Team Bull Run District 
Wide Receiver. 

" I think we could have done better. It was fun, but too bad 
Mr. Florio had to leave. The Coach Florio resignation situation 
brought us together. It was great that we stuck together as a 
team. That brought us closer on the field also. 

We have a young team and we are going to take some 
bruises, but we should be back strong for next year. 

One of my goal for next year is to make it to the playoffs. 
I hope we stick it out and win some games. " 

Jimmy DuVall: Running Back 

"It was a blast and I can't wait until next 
season." Jimmy will return as a senior run¬ 
ning back next year. 

FFe will provide team leadership, experience, 
and confidence to the Cougar squad. A core of 
seniors will help support a winning season. 






Sports 85 


















. 


I - 






- 


•m. 








Manassas Park runningback Danny Key agonizes #41, Jimmy Duvall breaks tackles as he threatens to score 

Sa P son n 'thewere tomtom™'wfo^l.h^gm^y lhe Brentville Tl 8 ers ' As ™>mngback he was an essentials part 
key players fall to the hands of injury. of the team. Duvall will be returning next year as a Senior. 



M.P.’s offensive line gives #5, quarterback Steve Moss, some time to #32 M.P. cornerback, Darrin Slaughter, run 
fade back and pass against The George Mason Mustangs. The Cougars down a Luray wide receiver and bats the bal 
offensive line is the key ingredient to a successful offensive play. avvay ^ j n doing so saves a touchdown 


Time For Some Action 


ports 








Sports 87 




















First Row (R-L): Chris Burke, Somkhit Chaseng, Carl Rich, Darryl Milboume, Otis 
Martin. Second Row: Alex Rojas, Lee Howsden, Tim Pearson, Mike Crabhill, Luke 
Smith, Jonathan Adams. Third Row: Eddie Gardner, Jose Santos, Mike Rose, Mike 
Rose, J.C. Brown, A1 Leyva. Back Row: Coach Barber, Tim Gorgan, Mike Hutchison, 
Chris Barr, David Murphy, Chris Belandres, Coach Lloyd. 


Shining Bright. The 
J.V. Football team finished 
another winning season 
with a bang. With a rocky 
road start, the Cougars did 
a 360' turn and ended the 
season with much prom¬ 
ise. With many of the J.V. 
players being eighth grad¬ 
ers, the Cougars were not 
very big in size. They 
utilized their quickness 


and intelligence and 
pulled out a four win sea¬ 
son. A majority of this 
year's J.V. players should 
look forward to a spot on 
the Varsity squad next 
year. First year head 
coach, Jeff Lloyd, proved 
to have what it takes to 
win. "The kids improved, 
worked hard, and there is 
a lot of young talent that 


will eventually help the 
Varsity program." Coach 
Lloyd and assistant Coach 
Barber brought fresh idea? 
to team. This was Coach 
Lloyd's second year with 
the J.V. team and Coach 
Barber's first year ."It 
was an exciting year. 1 
was impressed with the 
continued dedication of all 
players towards the team," 
said Coach Barber. 


88 Sports 













Sports 89 















TALKIN' LOUD 


Top row: Wendy Faircloth, Megan McCarthy, Melanie Wright. Middl 
row: Nicole Humbert, Krystal Wilson, Candice McConville. Froncentei 
Erika Ewell 




Shout It Out!, Th 
Varsity Cheerleadin 
squad finished anothe 
raucous season. Th 
cheerleaders cheeret 
like wild women to sup 
port the activities .Th 
squad gave their all 
mght in and night out h 
hopes of helping th 
Cougars achieve victor) 
They sent vibes througl 
the air which pumpe< 
up the players as wei 
as the Cougar fans. The; 
were the driving fore 
who started the cheer 
for the comeback wha 
the Cougars were dowr 
So when victory was u 
the Cougars hands, th 
cheerleaders were ; 
part of the proces 
which made it happen 


90 Sports 





















Look Who's Talkin' 




(heerleaders seem 
d get caught in the 
sjct. They support 
ne team in all kinds 
<f weather and 
ituations. These 
pots, taken during 
fie football season 
jepicts all sides of 
ur cheerleading 
;quads, from 
downing around, to 
erious concentra- 
ion, to celebration. 


, & 

% * 

m 


bottom front: Lindsay Gregoire. Bases: Trish Reffo, Valerie Estright, 
'hristy Henry, Melanie Grey. Top: Tricia Crabill, Crystal McIntosh, 
"iffany Prout. 


Sports 91 





































Top row: Wendy Faircloth, Chrissy Miller, Regina Miller, Crystal 
Eversole, Heather Whorton, Laura Combs. Bottom row: April 
Rotenberry, Jenny Elsey, Nicole Wedding, Laura Van Dyke, Jessica 
Ficarro, Nakia Harrington. 



Heather Whorton 


Heather Whorton: 

" We had a good time fi¬ 
nally because we were win¬ 
ning games. The new coach¬ 
ing staff brought lots of new 
ideas and motivated us. The 
biggest victory we had was 
beating Central Woodstock. 
They had beaten us 104-7 in 
ninth grade and this year we 
sought revenge. We ended up 
beating them. That was 
great!" 



April Rotenberry & 
Laura Van Dyke 


April Rotenberry: "Coach Young had a 
different way of going at tilings. It 
motivated us. We thought we did better 
than we expected at the beginning of the 
year. This year was kind of a let down 
because we should have went fardier. 
We should have one a lot more games." 
Laura Van Dyke: "I think we could have 
done a lot better, but I was glad we won 
more games than we ever had. I diink it 
was good we had a new coach, we did 
things a litde different. He was a nice 
guy." 



Jessica Ficarrc 


Jessica Ficarro: 

" I think this season w 
fairly successful, especial 
more so than last season, 
think there was a lot of ii 
provement and it was ha 
adjusting to a new coach, 
think Coach Young helped 
in getting over the hum 
this year." 

" I plan to play basketbt 
in college, but I am still und 
cided." 


92 Sports 





































Sports 93 
























JUMP Start! 


* 


Front Rdelissa Whorton, Trish Reffo, Michele Michaels, Annie Turner, 
Tiffany bur, Latoya Landsdowne. Back Row: Coach Young, Angie Dillion, 
Stephannbs, Melissa Martin, Jennifer Pennington, Melissa Payne, Shirrie 
Robinsoich Baltimore. 



Shirrie Robinson : 5'5 Freshman Fowar: 

" I had fun this season. I think that Mr. Bali- 
more had a lot to do with that. He is a good coac 
He really made the difference for this team. I 
made us feel confident and pushed us to pli 
like we know we can. We had a really good ye? 
We had a little let down in the middle, but we g.i 
over it, and we should be even better next yei 
because we will have the experience. I real) 
look forward to it." 



Missy Whorton: 

Average points per game: six 
"I liked our new coach a lot and I hope he com 
back next year. He (the coach) really helped o 
team out. We did a lot better than last year. V 
started playing as a team not as individuals." 


94 Sports 














iMissa Martin lobs a pass to Missy 
V lorton as they try to stretch the 
led against the Warriors. 


Up in a hurry, the J.V. 
Girl's Basketball team 
started this 1993 basket¬ 
ball season with a flash. 
With an undefeated spurt 
at the beginning of the sea¬ 
son, the J.V. Lady Cougars 
held off all competition to 
have a successful winning 
season. First year coach, 
Eugene Baltimore was the 
motivating force behind the 
squad. Coach Baltimore had 
the Cougars in tip top shape, 
ready to play. Most of the 
J.V. players will move up to 
Varsity next year and try 
to continue the winning at¬ 
mosphere at the next level. 

Angie Dillion and Missy 
Whorton rush to the bench to 
get quick instructions from 
Coach Young and Baltimore. 



' •• - 

- L 

1 # 







Sports 95 
























Front row: Danny Key, Noah Metz, Steve Moss, Eric Hanson, Darren Slaug- 
ter, Bryan Robinson. Back row: Coach Zaveski, Darvell Wooden, Bob 'y 
Anderson, Shaun Bigley, Aaron Robinson. 







Eric Hanson fires up a three pointer versus Brentsville. Darvell 
Wooden sets up to fight for the rebound. With a team mostly made u 
of juniors, next year should prove to be exciting. 


96 Sports 



























































teve Moss: 

"I have been playing basket- 
fall for three years. We should 
[ave won more games but we 
lways ended up tying. The sea- 
pn was exciting but next year 
hould be even better." 



Aaron Robinson: 

"This season was a failure in my view. 
We didn’t play up to our full capabilities. 
We should have won many more games 
than we did and we should have made the 
playoffs. This season was really disap¬ 
pointing for me. when I went down with 
the injury 1 felt bad that 1 wasn't there to 
help the team. 1 really look forward to next 
season, because we have a young team 
and we will be contenders for the district 
title." 


obby Anderson: 

"1 was disappointed with this 
ear’s season. We should have won 
lany more games and made the 
layoffs. I'm really looking for¬ 
ward to next year. We will win a 
majority of our games and hope- 
ully go far in the playoffs." 



Bryan Robinson: 

"I feel this is a good team 
even though the scores didn't 
always show it. Hopefully 
next year it will. I still had 
fun and I'll miss playing with 
the team." 


Sports 97 














98 Sports 



























Bouncing BACK 



vTont row: Chris Burke, Darrell Randolph, Luke Smith, Kevin Daniels, Tim Pearson, Eddie 
i (ardner. Back row: Coach Zaveski, Dino Galiano, David Dean, Reggie Sheetz, Gregory Nooner, 
1 Oach Mammon. 


The Manassas Park. J.V. Coll¬ 
ars Basketball team finished 
fc bother season in the shadow of 
I le Varsity squad. The Cougars 
I ere competitive in every game 
b. ven though year after year 
l ley have to rebuild wi th young 
' dent After the teachings of 
fe rst year Coach Jim Zaveski, the 
f 3am improved throughout the 
^ear." I think this season went 
/ell, we had a lot of young 
alent, and it showed in the close 
ames. Over all I was proud of 
e guys." With key returning 
layers from last year, like 
ell Randolph, David Dean, 
d Reggie Sheetz, the Cougars 
re in every game to the end 
e J.V. team looks for even 
nore success next season. 



Sports 99 

























S ET APART 




J.V. Volleyball: Front Row: Iesha Carlisle, June Mahoney, Vann Chhim, Charloi 
Wilson, Annie Turner, Carey Jackson. Second row: Margo Pendleton, Melis 
Olson, Heather Abrams, Carrie Shillingburg, Jenny Morris, Sherri Robinson, Nao;: 
Copper. Third row: Coach Silliman, Crystal Pendleton, Jennifer Simpson, Meloo 
Wampler, Melissa Martin, Coach Lady. 


Varsity Volleyball: Front row: April Rotenberry, Dana Whidden, Kim Morris 
Nicole Wedding, Hope Slawson. Back row: Coach Silliman, Lindsey Sugars, 
Meghan Ficarro, Barbara Lang, Jessica Ficarro, Coach Lady. 


100 Sports 






























Sports 101 




































Pin-Pointing 


Front, L to R: Joe Damron, Carlos Chinchillo, Kirk Copper, Yogerly Paredes, Earl Smith, Johrl 
Hawkins, Darrell Milbourn, Chris Gue, Second row: Tim Jones, Chris Toner, Alexander Rojas 
Jeff Harrison, Mike Smith, Mike Crabill, Kennth Lanham, Travis Ludvigsen, Third row 
Coach Jeff Florio, Eric Hughes, David Murphy, John Lanham, Ben Barnes, Doug Harrison 
Coach Tony Leonard 



Once again, Manassas 
Park's wrestling program made 
us proud. With a successful sea¬ 
son topped off by several cou¬ 
gar wrestlers representing the 
team at the Virginia State 
Championships, the team once 
again brought fear into the 
hearts of their opposition. Head 
coach Tony Leonard, and assis¬ 
tant Coach Jeff Florio, whipped 




the team into shape and did v 
astonishing job with less tha^ 
full roster. Most everyone ■ 
volved with the wrestling p • 
gram agreed that it was fi., 
and excited to do so well, r 
modest John Lanham, te; 
leader, and high-roller at sta 
said simply "We did okay fo« 
young team." 


102 Sports 



























Sports 10 





















Line Drive 



y '#tni mu 





Girl's Softball: Front 
row: Kim Morris, Missy 
Whorton, Alysia Franklin, 
Sara Cox, Melissa Olson, 
Jenny Estright. Middle: 
Jessica Ficarro, Meghan 
Ficarro, Angie Dillion, Hope 
Slawson, Laura Van Dyke, 
Jennifer Murphy, Nicole 
Wedding. Back: Coach 
Moore, Jenny Morris, 
Heather Whorton, Carrie 
Tinnell, Laura Combs, 
Annie Turner, Coach 
Dobberthein. 


April Rotenberry is 
safe at third. April, 
one of the several 
seniors on the team, 
helped propel the 
team towards Dis¬ 
tricts. 



Headed straight for victory. Tl; 
1994 Cougars are on the pro; 
With only one loss early in th 
season, the Lady Cougar SoftbJ 
team seems to be on their way to or 
of the most successful seasons i 
the high school's history. With thi 
help of a talented team, Coach Moc I 
has built a strong squad. "Thusf 
we are playing as we had hope, 
and set our goals for the season. V: 
thought we could contend for tl; 
District Championship when th 
season started. The senior class 
providing leadership on and o 
the field and is part of the reasc 
for our success." Sucess came i 
the form of District Champs. 



104 Sports 










t Another run for the Cougar 
sftball team. Batting was a 
s'ength of this team. 


The dugout is the place for developing strategies and 
getting motivated for the win. Humor could be found 
there too. 




i 

i 


i 1 

I 

i 




To the left, Laura Van Dyke, 
April Rotenberry, Jessica 
Ficarro, and Heather 
Whorton - senior softball 
players. 

Goofballs.Seniors, 
Heather, Jessica, and 
Laura show us what it 
takes to be successful 
softball players, concen¬ 
tration. 

Kim Morris, one of 
the power hitters for 
the Cougars, swings 
at a pitch. Kim added 
"pop" to the Cougar 
lineup. 


Sports 105 




























Coach Melissa Moore: 

"The girls did really well. It 
was the first time in years that 
the team went on to Regional com¬ 
petition." Coach Moore was the 
assistant coach in 1993. 


Cougars Softball 

Front: April Rotenberry, Jenny Estright, M 
lissa Olson, Laura Van Dyke, Hope Slawso:,| 

Tony Harrison. Back: Jenny Morris, KiJ 

■ 

Morris, Laura Combs, Shawnte Brooks, Jenn 

j| 

fer Dailey, Coach Moore. 


106 Sports 
















Ad¬ 
vance¬ 
ment 
to Semi- 
Finals 


The 1993 Softball squad was solid. With a 12-5 season 
ecord, the team proved that they had depth. They finished 
lie season in second place. In post season play, the Lady 
(ougars placed second in the DistrictToumament. At regionals, 
lie squad advanced to the semi-final round, losing the the 
‘tate Champs, Powhattan. 


of 

Regionals 


Sports 107 












Baseball-Alive Again! 



Varsity Baseball: Front: 
Kevin Daniels, Mike Rose, 
Dale Cunningham, Doug 
Shifflet, Patrick 
McConville. Middle: David 
Grey, Danny Key, Noah 
Metz, David Murphy, Dino 
Galiano, Mike Crabill. 
Back: Coach Lloyd, Shawn 
Bigley, Brad Polk, Doug 
Harrison, Coach Barber. 
Comments from: 

Coach Lloyd: "The Base¬ 
ball team this year has 
laid a foundation to be¬ 
come a very good pro¬ 
gram. We've surprised a 
lot of people this year with 
our success. We have a 
few kids who have a 
chance to be all District." 


Doug Harrison advances to third 
He looks for the signal to steal. 


Backup pitcher,Dino Galiar 
warms up near the stands. 











108 Sports 











Below, theteam 
celebrates af¬ 
ter a three 
runhomerun 
from Brad Polk, 
clinches the 
game. 


Coach Lloyd and Coach Barber look towards 
the field during the Rappahannock game. 
Both brought a new enthusiasm to the team. 




Sports 109 










Star 

Track 



"The girls did their personal best. If they scored 
that was even better. They worked hard and I had 
fun with them ," commented Coach Sweet. 



Front:J. Damron, M. Mart os, M. Hartman, L. Brinson, Y. Paredes, A. RojasMiddle: 
J. Jobb e r, S. Rob i n son, J. Wo od s on, L. Sm i t h, E. G arn er, W. Ton kin, R. Sheet z. Back: Coach 
Sweet,M.Johnson,B.Anderson,D.Wooden,A.Tonkin,Coach McElfish. 



110 Sports 























Sports 111 


mm 






















"Changing Groups' 







Clubs are often an extension 
of the classroom. The students 
were able to meet during the 
school day this year - the last 
Friday of each month. These or¬ 
ganizations often help the com¬ 
munity, local charities, and the 
school. They often make a "small" 
difference in our "changing" city. 


112 Clubs 


c 
























































Clubs for 94 



Above right: We know you have seen 
these faces before because they are on 
t.v. every morning. Pictured are Thomas 
Pilot, Chris Turner, Brian Bridges, and 
advisor, Mrs. Lent. Above: Coach 
Barber signals the J.V. Football team. 
He sponsors the FBLA club. 

To the left: Mr. Barber 
poses with his FBLA club 
during a club day. The 
Future Business Leaders 
of America work to help 
local charities in their 
fundraising activities. 




Clubs 113 









{ **flf f 


To the right: Ms. LeGrys' first period 
Marketing class poses for the cam¬ 
era. They are celebrating DECA 
day, the day set aside each year to 
publicize the club associated with 
Marketing. 



Above: Nicole Humbert 

leads Crystal McIntosh to 
the football field in a trust 
building exercise in her Mar- 
keting/DECA class. 



DECA equals Marketing. The Marketing students in 
Ms. LeGrys'classes are partofthe DECA club the first day 
they walk into the classroom. The students do a number 
of activities associated with the marketing concepts they 
learn in class. They run the school store, compete in 
District wide competitive events, receive credit for their 
employment, celebrate DECA Day, and build leadership 
skills. Overtime, DECA helps to re-inforce what is taught 
in the classroom. 



114 Clubs 












ETA club is an academic club based on GPA. 
/ear for this organization at Manassas Park. 


Mrs. Hagarty is the sponsor. This is the second 




B 
E 
T 

Charlotte Wilson was crowned BETA club member Donald Shuemaker 

freshman class princess at the is also part of the track team. He is 

Sweetheart Dance this year. Char- involved many other activities at 

school. 

lotte must have a 3.0 GPA to be a 
BETA club member. 



C 

L 

U 

B 




Clubs 115 








Bobby Anderson is more 
than sport player, he is also a 
member of the chess club. 



Craft club member and 


Sophomore Angela Doyle 
is planning her next project. 



Earth Science teacher and Science club sponsor, Ms 


Goins assists club members with their new projects. 
Science gives students a chance to explore the world 
around us. 


116 Clubs 









The clubs below are 
Science, Craft, and 
3hess. Each, in there 
Dwn right, gives students 
an opportunity to explore 
in more depth, their inter¬ 
ests in these areas. The 
Science club explores 
subjects that are taught 
in class in further detail. 
The Crafts club makes 
quilts, baskets, jewelry, 
and other sundries. The 
Chess club hos' 
matchesforthestuder 




The Chess club members are busy 
playing there games to see who's 
has the next match. Noah Metz, 
Christian Victor, and Bobby Ander¬ 
son seem to have their own strate¬ 
gies for victory. 

Members of the Crafts club 
listen closely to Mrs. Hand 
whilesheexplainstothem how 
to sew the fabric to create a 
quilt. 


Us 

s, 


fid 


Science, Chess, and Crafts 


Clubs 117 













tudent 



ounci 



ssociatioi 



Don't hide John, the camera does not bite! John Clark i 
putting together a tree to help celebrate the holidays. Yo. 
don't think he is having any trouble do you? 


Senior Heather Whorton helps tie "Happy 
Holidays" messsages to the candy canes 
that were passed out to all of the students 
before the break. 


118 Clubs 






































I looks like Laura Van Dyke 
i: having the time of her life. 
Vay to put the string in the 
ble Laura! 


3 Holiday season 



Shane Greenwalt helps pro¬ 
mote the holiday spirit by 
folding the messages that will 
soon be tied to the candy canes. 


enior April Rotenberry is concentrating on get- 
ing those cards folded just right. Smile April, 
ou are almost done! 



Jennifer 
Asuncion, 
Shelly 
Cupps, 
and 

Meghan 
Ficarro 
put on 
the 

finishing 
touches. 

Serving the school. The student gov¬ 
ernment works hard the entire year, 
serving the students and the commu¬ 
nity. The members starts off the year 
with their sponsorship of Homecoming- 
the dance, parade, half-time, and food 
drive: Operation Turkey. One of the 
biggest project and most successful, 
was the collection of Giant and Safeway 
register receipts. During the holiday 
season, the SGA sponsored two under¬ 
privileged students, buying them pre¬ 
sents from Santa. The Senior Olympics 
competition was run and organized by 
the students as well. The student gov¬ 
ernment works to keep high school 
events, traditions. 



Clubs 119 
















MEDIATION 


In only it's second year, 
the Mediation program has 
cut it's number of conflicts 
sessions in half, from thirty- 
three last year to fifteen this 
year. One reason may be 
that the mediators are bet¬ 
ter trained.Each went 
through a training session. 


Program sponsor, Ms. Dixon 
commented, "I am extremely 
impressed with the skills of 
the mediators and their ability 
to handle any situation." It 
can be "touchy" dealing with 
your peers, yet insightful. It 
gives the mediators a chance 
to counsel, give advice. 


With an influxof freshmen me¬ 
diators each year, this prej; 
gram has a bright future, 
gives students a chance t 
handle student problems b( 
fore they reach "the breakini 
point." It is a new role f( f 
students-taking the place < !* 
teachers in handling dispute 


120 Clubs 













Clubs 121 











Dramatic 



Stage hands. Stage calls. 
Props. Make-up. Costumes. 
Music. Lights. Assuming the 
role. The Drama Club allows 
for all of the above. Students 
get an opportunity to take a risk 
and put themselves into stories 
and skits depicting life. Mostly 
for humor, like Spring Fever II . 
the skits are parodies of life, 
especially life in our own world 
of high school. 



COSV^HIAN 


Above left: "I can't belie\ 
you have done this to me 
yells Gina Martinez to h 
husband Brian Bridges. T( 
right: Philana Handler trie 
to force a kiss on her r 
mantic interest, Brie 
Bridges. Left: Philana Hai 
dleris shocked by what Co 
mopolitan recommenc 
about handling men. 


122 Clubs 














I*rian Bridges looks amazed as he sees a bird 



Oh my goodness! Jack 
Brotherton, what are you do¬ 
ing under all of the hair? It's 
not you! 



<n his shoulder. Tabitha Courtland played the 
'ery vibrant and colorful "animal." 


M l bve the Medusa look," comments 
Tabitha Aberts whi le getting prepared 
for the big show back stage. 


Clubs 123 







The Pride in Manassas Park 



- i 


Marching Cougar Band and Flag Corp 


Rowl: Laura McCarthy, Tricia 
Crabill, Evonne Turner, 
Michele Price, Hanna Kiser, 
Megan McCarthy, lesha 
Carlisle. Row 2: Melissa 
Frank, Noel Speaks, Jason 
Barr, Michelle Reynolds 


Melissa Ramirez, Maria 
Merlos, June Mahoney, 
Chris Bawley. Row 3: 
Curtis Rotenberry, Ben 
Barnes, Jennifer Tackett. 
Cprrome Everett, Jason 
Smith, Peter Vu, BArett 
Mullins, Amber Lorton, 
Chris Ludvigsen, Heather 


Abrams. Row 4: Billy Price, Mat 
Scouten, Donald Shuemaker 

j 

Kristen Murphy, Audrey Bush 
Vicki Graham, Khvong Thung 
Travis Mosher, Joey Alkire, Davie 
Murphy, Tiffany Roberts. Not pic 
tured: Rena Matin. 


124 Clubs 












Concert Band 

Rowl: Melissa Frank, Jason 
Burr, Noel Speaks, Kristen 
Palmer, Maria Merlos, Melissa 
Ramirez, Michelle Reynolds, 
June Mahoney, Chris Rawley, 
Amber Lorton, Mr. Basham. 
Row 2: Kristen Murphy, Ben 

It 

, 

Barnes, Corrine Everett, 
JasonSmith,Chris 

Ludvigsen,Curtis Rotenberry, 

Peter Vu, 


Audrey Bush, Joey Alkire 
Heather Abrams. Row 3: 

Billy Price, Matt Scouten, 
Donald Shuemaker, Sean 
Dove, Travis Mosher, David 
Murphy, Trevor Melton, 
Khunong Thung, Barrett 
Mullins, Tiffany Roberts. Not 
Pictured: Rena Matin, Layla 
Morgan. 


Flag Corps 

Left to right: Laura McCarthy, 
Tricia Crabill, Evonne Turner, 
Michele Price, Hanna Kiser, 
Megan McCarthy, lesha Carlisle. 
Not pictured: Carla Brinson. 


Clubs 125 


















A CHANGE INI 




There are many different forms of band. Sue! 
as concert, jazz, and marching band. With th< 
concert band there is an accompanying chorus 
with the marching band, there is the flag corp 
There are many Manassas Park students in th< 
band program. It takes a great deal of work 
patience, and devotion to succeed in the banc 
program. 


126 Clubs 











3 ERFORMANCE 



Eionne Turner performs in the flag corp. They performed "Under the Sea" 
f< the Homecoming game. 


Not rain, nor hail, nor storm can stop 
this band from giving their all for the 
Manassas holiday parade. 




fr. Basham conducts the chorus during the holiday perfor- 
rance. The chorus performed during a school assembly ana 
her for the parents. 


Flute players Melissa Frank and June Mahoney march 
towards the office to circle the gym for a pep rally. 


Clubs 127 









128 Ads 
















































Spare Change 


Small change. Collecting 
pennies, nickels, dimes, and 
quarters to help fund the 
yearbook. It cost five cents in 
Ms. LeGrys' class to say "shut 
up" with all proceeds going 
to the yearbook. Advertising 
helps pay the cost for pro¬ 
duction. Every little bit 
helped, dollars to "spare 
change." 





Shane, 

From the day you 
were bom, to the day you started 
walking and talking, you made 
us proud of you. But nothing 
compares to the feeling that 
you are giving us as we watch 
you prepare to walk up on that 
stage and receive your diploma. 
We love you and are very proud 
to have you as our son. This is 
your biggest year yet. 


Congratulations widi love, 
Mom & Dad 


Brad, 

It doesn't 
matter how old you 
get, you'll always be 
our baby. We wish 
you the best in life. 
Follow your dreams 
and be your own 
person as you al¬ 
ways have. 

Lots of Love 
Mom & Dad 



John, 

Good Luck! 
We are really 
proud of you. 

Anchors 

away, 

Mom & Dad 




< ■ 


Melanie, 

Continue to 
be true to your¬ 
self first, others 
second, and the 
future will pro¬ 
vide great things 
for you. 

We love you 
Always, 

Mom, Dad, Bethany 
& Blue Jay 



Carissa, 

Congratula- 
tions, we are 
proud of you. 
You hung in 
there when it 
got difficult. 
We wish you a 
great future. 
We love you. 

Mom & Dad 


Nakia, 


Thank God, 
We made it. 
I Love you. 


MA 



ij 

j 


130 Ads 
























April, 

Always keep your 
goals in sight. They 
will take you where 
you want to be. 
Don't lose that bit of 
Devil within yourself. 
We are very proud 
of you. 

Love you, 

Mom and Dad 


Beaglie, 

You are liv¬ 
ing proof "Chil¬ 
dren are truly a 
gift from God." 
You've worked 
hard and learned 
that's what it 
takes. The future 
is now yours. You 
done good Kid. 
Love, 

Mom 



Heather, 

We remember 
your pigtails that 
bounced when you 
walked, and your fa¬ 
vorite blanket with 
the fringe, and for¬ 
ever will cherish a 
picture in thought of 
your 5 yr. old tooth¬ 
less impression of a 
grin. Trust in God 
and you can never 
fail. We are so proud 
of you! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, 
Missy & Bubba 

i._ _ 




When Layla was 
five, this picture said 
it best:"Our Sunshine' 
Today we are proud 
to witness a young 
lady who is on her 
way to warming the 
hearts of anyone 
lucky enough to be¬ 
come a part of her 
life. 

'CONGRADULAHONS!!' 

From your 
loving family 




l 



"I still 
look this 
good in 
curlers ." 
Love 
Mom 
& Dad 



Heather, 

We are proud 
of you. Re¬ 
member learn¬ 
ing is a life 
long process. 
Graduation is 
only the first 
step. 

We love you 
Mom & Dad 



Ads 131 
































Rick, 

Make me feel 
proud and also 
old, with you 
graduating. 
Good luck to 
your future. 
Now you can 
get a real 
job. 

Mom 


CONGRATULATIONS! 

Jennifer McCarthy 

Class of 1994 

Have fun at Bill & Sues, (oops) I mean 
William & Mary. 

From the Ludvigsens 


you once said: 

1 Life is like a ‘Toilet (BozvC 

Wed, loot out - 

here comes the first Thus hi! 

We love you and 

are very proud of you!! 

Mom & (Dad 















A majority of the seniors went to Shoney's on senior skip 
day for breakfast. When they left, there were different 
messages written on their cars with white shoe polish. 

132 Ads 



Sudman rehangs a wall picture at Shoney's after a Senio 
group photo. Everyone ate at the wonderful breakfast 
bar that morning and then went bowling at Fairlanes. 




























I've known you all collectively for about 42 years. And in those years, I've 
learned many things from each of you. Things I'll take with me when I go. You 
guys have touched my life and I'll never forget all the good and bad times we 


shared. I love you guys and hope all your dreams come true. 



Love 

Heather ''Bubba” Conner 
Class of '94 


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Ads 135 



































































A Final 


Thanks for everyone who supported the year¬ 
book. I'd really like to thank Ms. LeGrys and 
Mr. Kiser. Thanks Ms. LeGrys for everything 
especially for putting up with our class. IT'S 
ALL GOOD!! -Juanita 

Ms. LeGrys, thank you for being so patient with 
all of us. You're a great teacher. I admire your 
patience with us all. -Love Meg 
Thanks to Ms. LeGrys for supplying the com¬ 
puter that occupied hours of my lunch time. 
Thanks to our Administration who gave us the 
option to be able to do this and good luck to 
anyone who wants to be in yearbook next year. 

It was quite and interesting experience. (I mean 
that in a good way!) PS. I think I might actually 
miss this place when I'm gone.-Heather Conner 
Thank you to the faculty and staff for their 
cooperation and patience. Thanks to Mr. Kiser 
and "Bazdar" for their support during the insane 
times. A special thanks to the ’YB" staff mem¬ 
bers who stuck it out. You are awesome and 
will not be forgotten. -Ms. LeGiys 

M— III II —- 1 - r—— 


Thank you Ms. LeGrys for putting up with all of 
us this year. -Yanira 

Thank you Ms. LeGrys for putting up with me 
bugging you. And thanks for letting me take a 
lot of pictures. -Katie 

Thanks to everyone who supported the 93-94 
yearbook and thank you Ms. LeGiys and Mr. 
Kiser for making it all possible. -Kellie 
Thanks to everyone who bought a yearbook and 
supported funding. Maybe in a couple of years 
you'll have your own darkroom to work in.- 
Carolyn 

Thank you yearbook staff. I dedicate this sport 
section to Erick Tanchez, Eric Hanson, Darrin 
Slaughter, Scurvy Wooden, Enoch Pepin, James 
Seay, Tien Van Mai, Chris Whalan, Bobby 
Anderson, Milton Chew and the little people we 
couldn't think of right about this time. Gee-ya! - 
Bryan & Aaron 

Thanks to all of the people for making this 
possible. We needed all the help and support we 
got. Thank you. - Andrea 


136 Thank you 











e 
















EM 


RELIC 371.8976 Man 
1994 

Manassas Park High School (Manass 
Reflections / 


PR 


NCE WIL 


JAM PUBL 


CL 


RARY SYS1 


3 3159 01182 3296 


Prince Wm VA Pub Lib Sys (BR) 


For Reference 

This item for use in the library only. 



Prince William Public 
Library System