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*c7s: 



REGULATIONS 



FOR ras 



ARMY OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES, 



1862. 



RICHMOND, VA. 

WKST & JOHNSTON, 145 MAIN STREET- 

1862. 



Macwavlxus & FiBOUBBON, Printers, Richmond, Ye. 






•^3. 



J 



^2j 



WAR DEPARTMENT, 

Richmond, November l$t, 1862. 
Tlie following Jiegulatwns for the Army of the Confederate States are 
published by direction of the President, for the government of till con- 
oerned. They will accordingly be strictly obeyed, and nothing contrary 
to them will be enjoined or permitted in any portion .of the forces of the' 
Confederate States by the officers thereof. 

GEO. W. RANDOLPH, Stcretary of War. 



INDEX. 



NoTK. — The numbering in this Index is of the paragraph. Where 
the page or Article is referred to, it is ."peciallj stated. 



A. 

ABSENCE, No. of paragraph, 

leave of, not to be granted to officers on tendering their 

resignation, unless, . . . .28 

leaves, to officers, .... 166 to 174 
temporary leave of, officers on, not deprived of their 

fuel and quarters, .... 973 

leave of, officers on, not entitled to transportation, when, 1000 
without leave, officers on, not to receive pay, unless, . 1069 

ACCOUNTS, 

Subsistence Department, 1135 to 1141, and pages 198, 199 

Ordnance Department, • _ . . 1339 to 1344 

supervision of, <kc., . . . 890 to 957 

, of money and property to be rendered to, . 935 

to be endorsed by, .... 936 

suspended, • . . . 937 

to be rendered in Quartermaster's Department to the 

Quartermaster General, . . . 1049 

to be rendered to the Surgeon-General, . . 1058 

to be ri^ndcred in the Couinussariat to the Coramissary- 

(Jencral, . . . . 1135 

physicians, of pay, to be sent to, . , . 1203 

pay, when not to be transferred, &c., . . 1067 

to be rendered to the Paymaster-General. . . 1088 

to be rendered to the chief of the Corps of Engineers, 1379, 1380 
to l>e rendered to the chief tf Ordnance, . 1339 to 1344 

to be rendered by officers on recruiting service, . 1333 

ADJUTANT, 

hovi' appointed, . . . . 68 

affi lavits may be taken before, . . . 924 

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT, 
resignations to be forwarded to Adjutant and Inspector 

(;e!.oral, .... 24 

Adjutant and Inspector General to report the state of an 
officer's accounts before presenting his resipnation, . 26 



VI INDEXL. 

No. of paragraph. 

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT, 

blank warrants, discharges, &e., furnished from, 73, 158, 448 
inventories of deceased officers and soldiers to be for- 
warded to, . . . . 145, 146, 147 
orders assigning the stations of officers of Engineers, 

&c., will be made through the, • . . 427 

returns and reports' made to the, by commanders of 

divisions, regiments, &c., . . . 445 to 460 

officers of the, to be assigned to head-quarters of armies, 

divisions, &c., . . . • 475 

Adjutant General to conduct the recruiting service. See Art. xlvi 

AIDES-DE CAMP, , ■ 

how appointed, . ' . . . 31, 32 

AMBULANCES, . . . - . page 284 

AMMUNITION, 

care of, . . . . . 52, page 319 

in charge of company officers, • . 99, 100, 101 

in convoys, . . . . 733 

in transports, * . . . * . 833 

not to be taken into hosmtal, • . . 1180 

APPOINTMENT, 

of officers, . . . . . 20, 21 

^ of citizens, . . . , ' 22 

on the staff, . . . . . 31 to 34 

citizens receiving, not entitled to transportation except, 

1001, 1002 
applicants for, as assistant surgeons, 1150, 1211, 1212, 1213 

officers temporarily in the militia, . . 1085 

ARMAMENT, 

care of, • . . . . 48 to 52 

armories, arsenals, &c., service at, . . page 288 

ARMS, 

in possession of companies, . 87, 91, 93, 94, 97, 98 

of deserters to be turned over to, . . 763 

care of, on transports, . . v . 832 

required for an officer- for his own use, . . 1283, 1284 

needing repairs may be sent to, . . . 1294 

small arms, . ' . . , page 318 

prices of, .... page 310, 311 

not to be loaned, &c., . . . 1285 

accoutrements, . . . page 312 

ARMS OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES, 

to be painted on drums, . . . 105 

ARRESTS, 

of officers and non-commissioned officers, . 208 to 216 

ARTILLERY, 

* practice of, &c., regulated, . . . 53 to 65 

commander of, duties in sieges, . . 774, 791, 807 

classification of, &c., . . . page 313 

carriages, &c., f' . , . ; '' 314 

implements and equipments, . • . • " 315 



INDEX. 



Vll 



ARTILLERY, 

projectiles and appendages, 



No. of paragraph, 
page 317 



B. 



1129 to 1132 
751 to 758, 992 



• 


It 

75 
76 


r of, 


• . 955 

960 to 984 

972 


. 


92, 853 


. 


696 to 722 


. 


528 to 535 




. 73, 158 



BACK RATIONS. . 
BAGGAGE TRAINS, 

oaio and conduct of, 
BAKING, 

savinji in tlie flour ration by, to -constitute the post 

fund, . . ' . . 183, and page 197 

BANDS, 

number of men allowed for, . 

how mustered, 

to be at liead-quartera, p^ovi■ied, 
BARRACKS AND QUARTERS, 

not to be erected or altered but by orj.ler 

allotment, care of, «S;c., 

when commuted, 
BATH I NO, 

men to bathe, 
BATTLES, 

dispositions for, 
BIVOUACS.. 

formations of, &c., . 
BLANK FORMS, 

of warrants. &c., furnished jrom. 

of returns required from t.lie commanders of divisions, 

&c , to be furnished by. . ' . . 448 

for Quartermaster's and Pay Departments will be pro- 
cured by, , . . . 1019 

for Subsistence Department, no charge for printing al- 
lowed, . . . . .1138 

for Engineer Corps, . . . 1227 

for Ordnance 1 1290. 1265, 1266, 129i. 1312, 1350, 1353, 1341, 
Department, J 1342, 1251, 1340, 1343, and pnge 327 to 360 

for Recruiting Service, 1431 to 1433, and pages 396 to 401 

BOARD OF EXAAflNATION, 

for the appointment of any citizens to the army, . 22' 

medical, .... 1211 1212 

BOARD OF INSPECTORS,. 

(m recruits unfit for service, . . 1453 to 1456- 

BOARD OF SURVEY, 

to examine injured stores, &c., . 910, 925, 926, 931 

to take an inventory of public property in charge of a 

deceased officer, .... 932 

BOOKS 

for record of artillery practice, . .54, 55, 56 

regimental, . . . , .SO 

P"^t. • . . - . ' 81 

company. ..... 120 

how obtained, • \ , . 1019 



via INDEX. ■ 

BOOKS, No. of paragraph. 

^charge for printing not allowed, . . . 1138 

for inedieal officers, . . . page 248 

to be kept by Ordnance officers, . . . 1355 

for Corps of Engineers, . . . 1381 
blanks fur recruiting service, how obtained, &c., 1431 to 1433 

BREVET 

rank, takes eflFect when, . . . . 9, 10 

C. . 

CADETS, \ ■ 

b.ov^ assigned, at present' . . . 21 

CAMPS, ' 

formation of, &c., .... 486 to 527 
troops in, to be exercised, • . • . 543 

CANTONMBNTS, 

formation of, &c., .... 536 to 541 

CAPTAINS 

niu:?t 8erve with tlieir companies, . . . 67 

of companies, duties ofv . . • 82 to 119 

to furnish certificates of account, ■when, . . 157 

to ibrward certificate of disability in case ofj . . 160 

to keep blanks in their own custody, . ., . 163 

CAPvDS, 

disbursing officer not to bet at, . .* . 897 

CASUALTIES, 

returns of, . . . . . 450 

CERTIFICATE ' 

of account, . . . . . , 157 

of disability to be sent, &c., . . . 160, 161 

blank, to be in charge of company commander, . 163 

applications for a leave of absence on account of sickness 

to be accompanied by, . . - . • 173 

medical, to be forwarded, . '. . 160 

to private servants, . . , • . 760 

to laundresses, . . . . .761 

of attendance on a court, . . . . 1024 

CHAPLAINS, 

how employed, &c., .... 195 

amc unt of pay, . . . . 195 

. how paid, ..... . 1061 

when pav ceases to be. reported to, . . 1082 

CLOTHING, * 

how supplied, allowances, &c., . . 1028 to 1048 

articles of, issued to recruits, . . . 1415 

COMMAND, 

officer highest in rank.to . ... 7 

officers of Engineers or Medical departments, not to exer- 
cise, . . ... .. 11, 12 

officers of Quartei master and Subsistence departments, not 

to assume, . . . . .13 

succession in, , . . 14, 15, 16, 22 



INDEX. IX 

COMMAND, No. of paragraph, 

according to brevet rank, '. . . . 9, 10 

COMMANDING OFFICERS, 

temporary, not to annul standing orders, . . 17 

to forward reports of target practice, . . ' . 63 

of regiments, duties of, . . . . G8 to 72 

of companies, . . . . 82 to 119, 204 

of posts, . . . . . 196, 197 

of division?, &c., in tlie field, . . 470, 471, 472, 473 

of districts or departments, siiall require abstracts, &C-, 

to be ron'dcred, . . . . 949 

to enforce a rigid economy in public expenses, . . 948 

may order issues of clothing, &c., . . . 1040 

to make a report to the Chief of Ordnance, 

when .... im 1350, 1358 

COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT, W 

oflScers of, though eligible to command, not to 

assume the command except, &c., ' . .13 

senior Lieutenant holding the appointment of Assistant 
Commissary of Subsistence, entitled to perform the duty, 34 

Lieutenant acting as Assistant, . . 1142 

oflBcers in, to give bonds, . ... . 890 

duties of. ' See Art. xlii. 
forms in, . . . . page 200 to 228 

COMPANIES, 

take place in battalion according to . . 66 

interior management of, , . . . 82t0 119 

par.adcd for payment to be attended by an officer, . 1 9 

commanders of, responsible for arms, &c., . . 1293 

CONTRACTS, 

by whom directed, How made, &c., . . . 938 to 948 

^subsistence stores to be obtained by, . . 1097 

for subsisting recruiting parties, . . 1119 to 1126 

for Ordnance, &c., how made, . . 1336 to 1338 

CONTRIBUTIONS, 

in monev or kind may be levied, . . . 479 

CONVOYS AND THEIR ESCORTS, 

formation and conduct of . . . 726 to 750 

COOKS, . . - . . .197 

CORPS OF ENGINEERS AND TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGK 
NEERS. See Engineers. 

CORRESPONDENCE, . • 

general rules for military, . . 424, 435, 430 to 444 

to Adjutant-General on recruiting service, 'how endorsed, 1440 

COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION 

to establish the price of washing soldiers' clothing, . 122 

post, . . ' . . 146, 147, 178 to 182 

company, ..... 192, 193 

COURTS MARTIAL, 

composition of, (tc, . • . . . 058 to 681 

members li.ible to duty on adjournment of three days, 881 

stationery f«.>r . .' . ' 1017 



INDEX. 



COURTS-MARTIAL. 

expenses of, . 



No. of Paragraph; 
1021 to 1024 



D. 



217 
495 



DAILY DUTIES 

in garrison and camp, hours prescribed by commanding 
officers, . . 

in camp ; hours, details, &c., how announced, 
DECEASED 

officers, . . . . • . 142 to 144 

n in-commissioned officers, , • . 145 to 147 

soldiers, amount due laundress, . . . 1072 

officers, inventories of property in charge, . . 932 

non-^Bimissioned officers and privates, 145 to l47, 451, 1179 
DEFENCE OT FORTIFIED PLACES, 

instructions for the, . . . . 817 to 829 

DEPARTMENTS. 

military geographical, will be established by, . 35 

DEPOTS 

for an army in the field, . . . 

for the wounded, 

for recruits, how established, 
DESERTERS 

to be reported, . • . 

rewards for apprehending, 

expenses for pursuing, . . 

to make good time lost, . 

not to be restored to duty without trial, except, &c., 

to have rewards and expenses for apprehending, &et 
against pay, .... 

not to receive pay while, awaiting trial, 

from the enemy to be disarmed and secured, 

arms, &c., of, . . 

clothing of, . 

to forfeit all pav, &c., 
DETACHMENTS, 

formation and conduct of, „ 

on transports, .... 
DISCHARGES, 

authority to grant .... 

duplicates forbidden, .... 

•cause of, to be stated, . . . . - . 

of soldiers absent from companies, to be reported, 

blank to be in the custody of the company commander, 
DISCIPLINE, 

military, . . . . . I, 2, 3 

of regiments and companies, : , .06 to 123 

DISCUSSIONS, 

what kind of, prohibited, . . -. 207 

DRESS 

of the army. See Art. li. 



485 

714 

1441 

148 
149 
150 
151 
152 



153 

155, 1071 

629, 762 

7.63 

. ' 1045 

1070, 1071 

637 to 043 

829 to 857 



156 
158 
160 
102 
163 



INDEX. xi 

DRESS PARADE, No. of paragraph, 

form of, . , . . . 324 to 335 

oflicers to attend, . .. . . 334 

not to be dispensed with, . . . 335 

DRUMS, 

how painted and marked, . . • . 105 

E. 

ENCAMPMENT, 

order of; for infantry, , . . 503 to 511 

cavalry, . . . . . 512 to 524 

artillery, . . . : . 525 to 527 

ENGINEERS, 

officers of, not to assume nor to be ordered on ^uty 

other than, &c., ... . .21 

officers of, assigned to head-quarters of armies, &c., . 475 

to be consulted, when, .... 476 

to report to their immediate commanders, . . 477 

chief of, in the field, .... 478 

■ during a siege, . . . 774, 791, 807, 815, 8i6 
corps of, duties, &c., . . . . 136G to 1382 
reports and returns, . . . 1374 to 1378 
books, . . . . . 1381 

■ forms, .... page 368 to38 3 
ENLISTMENTS 

to be taken in triplicate, . . . "" . iSll 

EQUIPAGE, 

allowance, care, &o., of camp and garrison, ' .' 1028 to 1032 

ESCORTS 

of honor, . . . . . 258to26l 

funeral, . . . . • 262 to 289 

EXCHANGE AND TRANSFER 

of .officers, . . . ' . . 29, 30 

of sftldiers, . . . . l38 to l4l 

EXTRA DUTY, 

- compensation for soldiers on . . . 882 to 889 

rolls for . . . . . 1025 

soldiers employed in Commissariat to be paid the regular 

allowance, . . , . ' . 1133 

extra duty men, ... 1133 to 1134 

F. . 

FLAG OF TRUCE, 

caution to be observed respecting bearers of, . 627 

FORAGE, 

allowance of, &c., . . . l007, 1008, 1009 

FORMS 

of Quartermaster's Department, . . page 115 to 188 

Subsistence Department, . . . " 200 to 235 

Medical Department, ." 258 to 285 



XU INDEX. 

FORMS, No. of paragraph. 

Pay Department, . . . page. See p. 113 

Corps of Engineers, . . . *' 369 to 383 

Ordnance Department, . . " 327 to 365 

Recruiting Service, . • . . " 396 to 401 
FORMS OF PARADE, 

dreas parade, review, &c., . ' . . 324 to 385 
FORTIFICATIONS, 

care of, . . . ._ .36 to 47 

care of, armament, &c., . . ' .. 48 to 52 
FUEL, 

allowance of, . . . . . 962 

- for mess room, . . . . . 965 

not consumed to be returned, . ... 966 

issued only in the month for which duo, . . 967 

• when commuted, . . . 972, 973, 974 
FUND, 

post, ... . . . 183 to 191 

regimental, . . '. . . ' l86 

cotjpany,. . , . . . l92 to 194 
public not to be expended for the purchase of any land, 

unless, ..... 954 

turned over by one paymaster to another, to be entered in, 1083 

for recruiting service, how obtained, . . 1288 
FURLOUGHS 

to enlisted men, . . . . 175 to 177 

FURNITURE, 

mess, for soldiers in the field, . . .114 

• for soldiers' barracks, . . , ' . 9T6 

H for each oflScer, . . . • . • . . ~ 977 

will be provided for ofi&cers, quarters when, . . 978 

G. 

GENERAL POLICE 

in camp, . . . , . 759 to 765 
GUARD MOUNTING, 

form of, . . . . .362 to 385 
GUARDS, • 

to be relieved every •twenty-four hours, . , 362 

when organized, . . . . . 363 to 372 

duties of, . , . • . . 386 to 417, 418 

form of report, . , . , . . pa^e 44 
in camp, . . . 488, 495, 507, 508^ 523 

police, duties of, . . . : . . 561 to 589 

. ■. g^and, . . • . . 590 to 630 

advance and rear, composition of, . . 667, 668 - 

advance may be posted to aid' the pursuit, . . 701 

for trains, . . . . . 754 

in a siege, in case of a sortie, duties of, . . 802 

in transports, . . . . . 335 



INDEX. X 

H. 

HAVERSACKS No. of paragraph, 

will be marked, . . . . 104 

to be searched, . . . . . 675 

HONORS, 

to whom given, . . . . 224 to 244 

salutes, . . . . . 245 to 257 

escorts, . . . .. 258 to 261 

funeral, . . . . .• 262 to 289 

paid by guards in camp, . . . . 566 

not to be paid by troops on the march. . . 690 

not to be paid in the trenches, . . . 798 

HORSES, 

care of on transports, : . , . 854, 855, 856 

to be branded, . . . . . 9l7 

incurably unfit for any public service, . last part 925 
of officers, which are to be transported to be authorized 

by, . . . . . .991 

mounted officers, may purchase from among the public 

horses, when, &c., ' . . . . 1027 

of mounted officer?, to be shod by, . . 1027 

HOSPITAL STEWARDS, 

allowance of, to hospitals, . . . 1189 
how appointed, duties, <fcc., 

1216, 1217, l2l8, 1219, 1221, 1222, 1223 

HOSPITALS, 

payments, persons, &c., employed in, . , 1058 

issues to, and purchases for, . 1111, 1112, 1113, 1117 

how supplied with medical stores, . . 1160, 1161 
duties of senior medical officers of, 

• 1167 to 1174, 1184, 1186, 1187, 1195, 1217 

laundresses of^ .... 284 

attendants of, . . . . 1189 

tents, h'ow to be made, . . . page 284 

I. 

NDIANS, 

issues to, . . . . . 1115 

tJSPECTION 

of Armories, Arsenals, Powder Works, and Ordnance 

depots, , . . . page 287 

of troops, . . • . . 290 to 313 

of hospital quarters, &c., . 307, 308, 309, 310 

of public works, . : . . 1371 

of books and accounts, . . : 311, 312, 313 

reports will show, <fec., . . . 459 

reports of stores reported unserviceable, . . 926 

of public buildings, will be made, . . 979 to 9.SI 

of armories and arsenals, to be made, . 1233, 1234 

tours of, by superintendents of recruiting service, will 
be made only, .... 1395 



INDBX. 



INSPECTION, . No. of paragraph. 

reports of inspection will show the discipline of the 

troops, &c., , . • ■ . 459,460 

Inspector General to examine military stores reported 

unserviceable, . . . • 926 

ISSUES 

how made, regulated, &c., . 1110 to 1118, 1149 

JUDGE ADVOCATE 

of a Court-martial, duties of, . 868 to 881, 1024 

per diem to, . . . • • 1022 

L. 

LAUNDRESS, ..... page 284 
allowance of, per company, . : . . 121 

price of washing by, how fixed, . . 122 

debts due the, how collected, • . . 123 

following the army, to be furnished with a certificate, 761 

separated from company, may draw rations when, . 1114 
ration of, . . . ' . . page 197 

medical attendance upon, , . - . 1190 

for hospitals, .... 1187 

amount due, from deserters, to be mentioned on muster- 
roll of, . . . . . 1185 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE, 

not to be granted when a post will be left without a 

commissioned oflScer, . . . 166 

when to commence, .... 167 

who may grant, . . . . • 166, 168 

• , limit of, . , . . . 166, 168, 170 

application for, to be endorsed by, . . 169 

commander of a post to report, on- leaving. . 
not to go beyond department, unless, . • 
on expiration, to join post, 

application for, to be accompanied by medical certifi- 
cate, . . . ' . . 
form of certificate, . . . v • 
applicant must state length of absence heretofore on 
same account, . . . .' 

LIEUTENANTS 

holding an appointment of Assistant Commissary of 

Subsistence, .... 

to assist the Captains in the performance of all compa- 
ny duties, &c., • . . . 

LUMBER, . . . ■ • . " , page 322 

LIGHTS, . . ... . page 197 



170 
171 
172 

173 
173 

174 



34 

83 



M. 



,MARAUDING. 

forbidden, 
MARCHES, 

arrangements for, &c., 



765 
665 to 695 



INDEX. 



XV 



No. of pnmgraph. 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT, . . . 1150 lo 1223 

official communications for, . . . pnge 285 

officers of, not to cxercisa»commancl exce'pt, . . 12 

officers of, not to be put in arrest, ordinarily, . 211 

officers of, having; charge of hospitals, to inspect, . 29(> 

Addenda, .... V^K^ 284 

officers of, in transport, duty of, • , 850, 851, 852, page 284 

cliief of, to regulate the employment of hired persons 

requisite for, . . . .011 

supply table, &c., for, . . . pfige 244 

duties of the, ... . 1150 to 1223 

forms of returns, &c., . • . page 258 to 2^'5 

Medical Director and Purveyor, allowances to, . page 284 

MESS, 

soldiers, .... 110 to 114 

on transports, .... 837 . 

rooms, allowances of, . . . . ' 965 

MILEAGE, 

when an officer is entitled to, . • 997 to 1006 

how computed, , . ' ' . . 999 . 

MUSTER ROLLS, 

how made, .... 320 

where sent, ...... 321 

to be accompanied by a letter of transmission, . 440 

MUSTERS, 

by whom, and when made, . . . 32, 314, 315 

to bo preceded by inspection, &c., . . 316 

form of, &c., : . . . 317 to 320 

N. 

NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS, 

how appointed, . . . . 08, 60 
how reduced, . . . , .72 
not to be sent to the guard house, . . 71 
to be furnished with a w?irrant of rank, . . 73 
in command of squads, responsibility of, • 93 
not to be employed in any menial service, . . 119 
appointed ordnance sergeants, to be dropped. Sec, &c., 131 
not to be transferred from one regiment to another, ex- 
cept, &c., _ . . . . 138 
duties of, when in action, . . .712 
may reenFist in company or regiment within two 

months, . . . , 1411 



0. 
OFFICERS, 

how appointed and promoted, 
resignations of, 

OTrOmnn-o f>r (rnncfA»" of. 



18 to 22 

23 t(, 28 

29,30 

31 



XVI INDEX. 

OFFICERS, No of paragraph. 

in temporary command, not to alter or annul standing 

orders, . . . . .17 

of mounted corps, not to be separated from their regi- 
ments, except, &c., ... 33 
to be cautious in reproving non-commissioned oflBcers, 

&c., ..... 71 

travelling under orders, to report, • . 164 

on leave of -absence to report to, . , . . 167 

in arrest, ..... 208 to 216 

of staff corps, are assigned to the headquarters of ar- 
mies, &c., . . . - . . 475 
important orders, &c., to be intrusted to, . 644, 545 
to attend to packs and girths on marches, . . 675 
who accompany escorts not to exercise command, ex- 
cept, &c., • . . . 731 
not to take receipts, &c., ■without paying creditor, . 895 
who shall sell or dispose of, for a premium, any draft, 
_&c., . .... 896 

disbursing, who bet at cards, . . . 897 

not to take a receipt in blank, . . 898 

not to bo concerned in purchases, &c., . . 901 

not to purchase supplies from persons in the military 

service, ..... 903 

disbursing, not to receive extra allowance for, . 904 

have no authority to insure public property, • 9l5 

shall not keep accounts when intrusted with public 

funds, ... . . .909 

not to settle with heirs, &c., except, . . 916 

on property to render returns, &c., 934,'935, 1049 to 1054 

shall occupy his proper quarters, . . 964 

to select quarters according to rank, &c., . 968, 972 

in the field, not entitled to commutation, . 974 

horses of, to be shod by, . . . 1027 

in Quartermaster's Department, to furnish useful infor- 
mation of routes, &c., , . . 1055, 1384 
may draw subsistence stores, &c., . . . 1127 
commanding companies to attend payment of company, 1059 
how paid, &c., .... 1061, 1064 

not entitled to pay when, &c., . 10Q2, 1063, 1065, 1069 

for recruiting service, detailed by, . . 1384 

intrusted with the command of recruits will forward, 1459 

OFFICERS OF THE DAY, 

to repair to the office of commanding oflBcer, , 390 

to see that the officer of the guard is furnished with the 

countersign, . . • . . 391 

to visit the guards day and night, . 392, 574 

to make remarks on the guard report, . . 393 

is charged with the order and cleanliness of cf\mp, &c., 565, 587 
prescribes patrols, &c., . . . . 574 

in transports, • . ' . . 836, 846 



INDEX. XVll 

OFFICER OF THE GUARD, No. of paragraph, 

duties of, in garrison, . . . 394, 397, 398, 399 

duties in camp, 573, 577, 578, 579, G0>, 602, Cl4, Gl8, 628 

in transports, to be officer of the day, . . 835 

ORDERS. 

enunricration of, . . ' . . 4l9 

general, . . . • . 420 

special, . . • . . 421 

to be read Ry the officer, &c., . . 422 

form of, . . . " . 423, 424 

liow transmitted, . . . . ^ 425 

bow addressed, .... 426 

assigning oflSccrs to stations, to be given by, . 427 

a file to be kept, &o., . • . .428 

if not received in regubir succession, to be«reported, 

&c., . . . . • 429 

orderly hours for giving and receiving, . . 430 

on marches, &c., how sent, . . . 431 

orders to go on duty, to designate, <fec., . . 432 

involving expenditure, to be sent, &c., . . 433 

orders, conflicting, .... 434 

copies of, to be sent to, . . ' . 435 

in the field, to be carried by, . . 544, 545 

marching, execution of, not to be delayed, . 678 

may be printed by order of, . . . 1018 

ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT, . . .1124 to 1362 

classification of ordnance and ordnance stores, "V^S^ 3l3 

after a battle, officers of, collect thft munitions, &c., . 7l9 

duties of, &c., .... 1228 to 1281 

forms for, .... page,327 

stores in service, . " , . . 1279 to l3ll 

unserviceal>lc, . . . I3l2 to l3l5 

issue to militia, .... I3l6 to 1319 
inspection of, . . , . . 1320 to 1335 

ORDNANCE SERGEANTS, . • . 1276 to 1 278 

how selected, appointed, and assigne<i to posts, 

124, 125, 126, 127, l28, 129 
130 
131 
136 
132 to 135 
135 
128 
129 
137 



appointment and removal of, to be reported, 
to be dropped from company rolls, 
how mustered and reported, 
duties of, . ' . 

to appear under arms, 
'may be re-enlisted, not discharged, 
caution to officers in recommending, 
how paid wlien tlie troops are withdrawn from the post, 
copy of enlistment of, to be sent to, . . I4l0 

ORGANIZATION 

of regiments, . . . . 66 to 81 

of brigades, <tc., forbidden in time of peace, except by, 35 

officers, (tc, in the -field, . . 461 to 478 



INDEX. 



OVENS " No. of paragraph, 

may be built, and paid for by, • , , page 197 



PARADE, 

forms of, . . . . 322 to 335 

arrangement of troops on, . . • 4G8 
PARTIES, 

;vorkinjr, . •. . / . 829 to 857 , 

PARTISANS AND FLANKERS, . . 652 to 664 
PAY, 

extra duty to soldiers, . . . . 882 
no extra allowed to persons whose pay is fixed by law, 

unless, &c., - . . . . 904 
extra duty,pay of sadler paid by, . . . 88G 
officers' of, to give bonds, . . '. 890 
, chief of sliull take care th^it no more money than actu- 
ally needed is in the hands of, &c., ' . . 892 
of hired persons, how regulated, &e., . . 911 
papers, transmission to ordnance department, 1360 to 1362 
PAY DEPARTMENT, 

duties of, &c., • . . 1056 to 1096 ' 

forms of, • . . . page 183 to 191 
PAY ROLLS 

will be made on printed forms, &c., . . 320 

of men on extra duty to be made monthly, . ... 912 

payments to be made on, . . . 1058 

payments to be witnessed by, . . ■ ' . . 1060 

stoppages t.o be noted,' &c., . . . 1073 to 1074 

of militia, to be according to form, • . 1094 

, volunteers and militia not paid till when, . 1095 
POLICE, 

in quarters, . . . . . 89, 90, 91 

^n camp, . . . . . 565 

general, ~ . . . . 759 to 765 
on transports, . . . 836, 839, 841 to 854 
POSTAGE, 

public will be refunded, .... 1026 
POSTS, 

intrenched, .... 631 to 636 

PRECEDENCE, 

of officers and non-commissioned officers, . . 4 to 13 

of troops on parade, . . . . 468, 470 

when two corps meet on the same road, &e., . 693, 694, 695 
PRISONERS Or WAR, 

return to be made, . . ... 457, 723 

to be disarmed, . . . . 723 

private property i*espected, . - ■ . 724 

. exchanges and release of, depend on, . . 725 

PROMOTIONS, 

of officers, . ; . . . . 1819 



* INDEX. XIX 

PUBLIC PROPERTY, MONEY AND ACCOUNTS, No. of paragraph. 

return, supervision of, &c., ' . . 890 to 956 
PUBLICATIONS, 

what character of, prohibited, . • 207 

Q. 

QUARTERS, 

allowance of, . . ... 9G2, 904, 965 

allotment and selection of, . . . 968 to 971 

commutation of, . . • 972, 973, 974 

how obtained, .... 975 

furniture for, will be supplied when, . . 978 

when vacated, to be inspected by, . . 983 

QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT, 

otlicers of, thouf!;h elis;ible to command, not to assume 

command unless, &c., . . . ,14 

duties of, performed by, during the absence of Quarter- 
master-General, .... 15 
rej^imental Quartermaster, . . .68 
duties of, in the field, 490, 491, 492, 713, 716, 117, 719 
oiUcers of, have charge of baggage trains, . 751 
oHicers of, to give bonds, . . . 890 
chief of, to take care that no more funds than are needed 

are in the hands of any oflicer of the department, 892 

chief of, to reguhtte the employment of hired persona 

roqurred for the administrative service, &c., . 911 

chief of, to designate where purchases shall be made, . 938 
duties of the, .. . . , . "958 to 1055 

barracks and quarters, , . , 960 to 984 

transportation, " . . . . 985 to 1007 

to supply store-room, . . . . 1103 

to procure medical supplies, . 1156, 1160, 1161, 1162 

forms fcr, .... page 115 to 191 

forage, straw, &c., . ... . 1007 to 1013 

stationer;^ in, . ". . . 1014 to 1020 

expenses of courts-martial, . . . 1021 to 1024 

extra duty men, .... 1025 

postage, , . . • . 1026 

horses for mounted ofllcers, . . . 1027 

clothing, equipage, &c., . . . . 1028 to 1048 

returns for Quartermaster's Department, . 1049 to 1055 

pay regulations, &c., . . . 1050 to 1096 

R. 

lANK, 

officers and non-commissioned officers, . . 4 

officers of same date of commission, . . 5 

officers having brevet commissions, &c., . . (> 

brevist takes effect only, ; . . 9, 10 

of reginienls and corps, .... 408, 470 



XX * INDEX. 

RATION, No. of paragraph. 

' forage, • ^ ^ 1107 to 1109, 1128, and pages 197, 198, 1007 

soldier's composition of, . 
of men absent from company, 
back rations may be drawn if, &c., 
may be commuted when, 

r^' commuted value of, 

to persons employed with the army, 

RECONNOISSANCES, 

object of, &c., . 

RECRUITING SERVICE, 

issues of subsistence to recruiting parties, 

how conducted, 

duties of Superintendents, . . 

duties of Recruiting officers, '. 

blanks for, . . . 

furniture and stationery, 

accounts, returns, &c., . . ' 

rules for accounts and papers of, 

depots for collecting and instructing recruits, 

inspection of recruits, &c., 

rejected recruits, . . 

regimental recruiting, 

form of agreement for supplies, for, &c., 

other forms for, . . 1 

REGIMENTS, 

, vacancies in, how filled, 
interior management of, . 
Regimental Quartermasters, . 

RESIGNATIONS, 

f.f oflTicers, . . . . . 23 to 28 - 

RETURNS AND REPORTS, 

monthly, of posts, made by commanders, . 445 to 449 

annual to exhibit, &c., , . ■ . . 450 

of deceased soldiers, . • . , . 451 

field, ..... 452, 453 

. of appointments, removal, &c., of staff offijers, changes 

of troops, &c., to be reported, . . 454, 455 

of prisoners of war and of captured property, 457, 458, 723 

of inspections to exhibit. &c., . . 459,400,926 

of inspections to be made by, . . . 473, 

of the senior officer of Engineers, &c., in the field, . 478 

of reconnoissances, . • . , 650, 651 

of battles are made by, &c. . . 720, 721, 722 

of field officer in the trenches, . . 809 

in Quartermaster's Department, . 1049, 1050, 1051, 1052 

in Subsistence Department, . . . 1097 

in Pay Department, . , . see page 113 

of Medical Purveyors, . . . ; 1157 

of officers of Engineers, . . , . , . 1372 to lo79 

in Ordnance Department, . , . 1345 to 1359 

of officers ou recruiting service, . • . 1439, 1440 



. 1107, 1108 


1118 


1128 


1129 


. 1129, 1131 


page 197 


. 644 to 651 


llI9toll26 


. 1383 to 1465 


1387 to 1395 


. 1396 to 1430 


1431 to 1433 


. 1434 to 1438 


1439 


1440 


1441 to 1452 


1453 to 1456 


. 1459 to 1461 


1402 to 1465 


page 396 


page 397 to 401 


18 


. 66 to 80 


68 



INDEX. 



XXI 



REVIEW, ■ , No. of parngraph. 

form of . . . . . 33G to 3G1 

ROLL CALLS, 

number of, &c., . . . 221, 222, 223 

ROSTER. 

principles and detail of the, . . 550 to 560, 641 

Captains to be added to that of Lieutenant-Colonel's, &g., 592 
Members of a court-martial, which has, adjourned for 

three days," liable to duty, . . . 881 



766 to 770 

245 to 257 
407, 4U8 



SAFEGUARDS, 

object of, Jbc, 
SALUTBiS, 

at posts, in honor of, 

of sentinels, 
SENTINELS, 

form of relieving, .... 380, 381 

time of relieving, . , . . S^fG 

not to take orders, Ac, .... 400 

duties of, . 400 to 416,- 567 to 671, 608 to 614 

instruction? given to be reported, . . . 417 

on transports, to be kept over the fires, . . 836 

SERVANTS, 

how selectedj &c., . ... . 117, 118 

non-commissioned officers not to be employed as waiters, &c., 119 

private, not soldiers, not to vrear the uniform of any corps, 700 
SIEGES, 

instructions for, .... 771 to 828 

SIGNALS. . . . . .219 

SOLDIERS, 

when mustered a? artificers, 

to wear the prescribed uniform, 

employed as company clerk, servant, itc, 

how transferred, &c., 

deceased, 

who desert, &c., 

who arc discharged, &c., 

on furlough, 

children of, expenses at post school, how paid 

in confinement, 

to salute otiicers, 

returns of deceased, 

as orderlies, 

who deserve mention for conduct in action, 

legal punishment for, 

on extra duty, . 

charges against, to be placed on muster-roll, 

transferred, account of clothing, 

in hospital, how musfered. 



77 
107 
115 to 119 
138 to 141 
145, 146, 147, 1179 
148 to 155 
156 to 162 
176 
187 
212. 213 
243,244 
• 451 
480 to 484 
721 
87.S 
882 to 889 
921 
1043 
1178 



may rcenlist in company or regiment within two months, 1411 



XXII . INDEX. 

STATIONERY, &o., No. of paragraph, 

allowance of, &c., . . . 1014 to 1019, and page 324 

for recruiting service, . . . 1434 

STRAW, 

allowance of, &c., . . . 1010 to 1013 

SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT, 

officers, though eligible to Command, not to assume 

command unless, &c., . . . 13 

senior-Lieutenant present holding the appointment of 

Assistant Commissary of Subsistence to perform the 

duty, . . , ... 34 

chief of, to take care that no officer has on hand more 
, money than is actually needed, . . 892 

chief of, to regulate the appointment of hired persons, 911 

chief of, to designate the places where purchases shall 

be made, . . * . . . 938 

duties of, . . . . 1097 to 1149 

forms of, . . . . page 200 

SUTLERS, 

how appointed, and privileges, &e., . . 196 to 206 

T. 
TRANSFERS, 

of soldiers, . . . . . 138 to 141 

TRANSPORTATION, 

how provided, regulated, &c., . . - . 985 to 1006 

of recruits, how procured and paid, . 1419, 1420 

no expenses of officers on recruiting service will be 

admitted except, . . . . 1421 

TRANSPORTS, 

troops on board of, . . . 829 to 857 

cabin passage will be provided for officers, &c., . 996 

TRAVELING, 

on duty, . 1G4 ]65*- 

TROOPS IN CAMPAIGN, ' . ' . ' . 461 to' 847 
tools, &c., . . . . page 321, 324 

U. 
UNIFORM, 

prescribed, to be worn, . . • . 106, 107 

UNIFORM -AND DRESS OF THE ARMY. 

See Article xlvii. ' ■ 

W. 

WATCHWORDS, 

parole and countersign, . , . 546,547.548 

WARDMASTER, 

dutieis of, . , * 1147 

WORKING PARTIES, 

allowance to men employed upon, »S;c., . *- 882 to 889 



REGULATIONS FOR THE ARMY. 



ARTICLE I. 

MILITARY DISCIPLINE. 



1. All inferiors arc required to obey ptrictly, and to execute 'with 
alacrity and good faith, the lawful orders of the superiors appointed 
over tlicm. r 

2. Military authority ia to be exercised wjth firmness, but with kind- 
ness and justiot to inferiors. Puuishinents shall be strictl}' conforma- 
ble to military law. 

3. Superiors of every grade are forbid to injure those under them by 
tyrannical or capricious conduct, or by abusive language. 

ARTICLE IL 

RANK AND COHlfAND. ^^ 

4. Rank of officers and non-commissioned officers: 
Ist. General. 10th, Cade*. 

2d. Majiir-Gcneral. 11th. Sergeant-Mnjor. 

3d. Brigadier General. 12th. Quart ermastcr Sergeant of a 

4th. Colonel. Regiment. 

5lh. Lieut Colonel. 13th. Ordnance Sergeant and IIos- 

6th. Major. pital Steward. 

7th. Captain. 14th. p'irst Sergeant. 

8tli. First Lieutenant. 15th. Sergeant. 

9th. Second Lieutenant. IGth. Corporal. 

And cadi grade liy date of commission or appointment. 

5. When commissions are nf the same date, the rank is to be decided 
between officers of the smimg regiinont or curps by the order of appoint- 
ment; between officers of (liflcient i-eginu^nts or corps: 1st, by rank in 
actual service when appointed ; 2(1, by fovnier rank and service in the 
army or marine corps; 3d, by lottery .•inumg such as have not been in 
the military service of the Confederate States. In case of equality of 
ranks by virtue of a brevet commission, reference is ha4.to commissions 
not brevet. 

6. Officers havingbrevets or commissions of a prior date to those of 
the corps in which Ihey serve, will take place on courts-martial or of 
inquiry, and on boards detailed for military purposes, when composed 
of different corps, according to the ranks given them in their brevets or 
former commissions; but in the regiment, corps, or company to which 
such officers belongs, they shall do duty and take rank, both in courts 
and on boards as aforesaid, which siiall lie composed of their own corps, 
according to the commisgions by which they are there mustered. 



2 SUCCESSION IN COMMAND OR DUTY. 

7. If, upon marches, guards, or in quarters, diflferent corps shall hap- 
pen to join, or do duty to<i;ether, the oiEcer highest in rank, according 
to the commission hy which he is mustered in the army, navy, marine 
corps, or militia, there on duty by ordeia from competent authority, 
shall command tlie whole, and give orders for what is needful for the 
service, unless otherwise directed by the President of the Confederate 
States, in orders of special assignment providing for the case, 

8. An officer not having orders from competent authority, cannot put 
himself on duty by virtue of liis commission alone, 

9. Brevet rank takes effect only in the following cases: 1st, by special 
assignment of the President in commands composed of different corps ; 
2d, on courts-martial or of. inquiry, and on boards detailed for military 
purposes, when composed of different corps. Troops are on detaclimeni 
only when sent out temporarily to perform a special service, 

10. In regularly constituted commands, as garrisons, posts, depart- 
ments, companies, battalions, regiments, corps, brigades, divisions, ar- 
my corps, or the army itself, brevet rank cacnot be exercised except by 
special assignment. » 

11. The ofiBcers of engineers are not to assume nor to be ordered on 
any duty beyond the line of their immediate profession, except by the 
Bpe.Mal order of the President. , 

12. An officer of the Medical Department cannot exercise command 
except in his own department, or over enlisted men, as a commissioned 
officer. 

13. Officers of the Quartermasters or Subsistence Departments, though 
eligible to command according to the rank they hold in the army of the 
Confederate States, not subject to the orders of a junior o%cgt, shall 
not assume the command of troops unless put on duty under orders 
vrhich specially so direct by authority of the President, 

ARTICLE III. 

SUCCESSION IN COMMAND OR DtJTr. 

14. The functions assigned to any officer in these regulations by title 
of office devolve on the officer acting in his place, except as specially 
excepted. 

15. During the absence of the Quartermaster-General, or the Chief 
of any Military Bureau of the War Department, his duties in the bu- 
reau prescribed by law or regulations, devolve on the officer of his 
department empowered by the president to perform them, in such ab- 
sence. 

16. An officer who succeeds to any command or duty stands in regard 
to his duties in.the same situation as his predecessor. The officer re- 
lieved, shall turn over to his successor all orders in force at the time, 
and all the public property and funds pertaining,to his command or 
duty, and shall receive therefor duplicate receipts, showing the condi- 
tion of each article. 

17. An officer in a temporary command shall not, except in urgent 
cases, alter or annul the standing orders of the regular or permanent 
commander, without authority from the next higher commander. 



APPOINTMENTS, RESIGNATIONS,- AC. 



ARTICLE IV. 

ArrOlNTMEXT AND PROMOTION OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 

18. All vnciincies in establislieil rcirinienta and corps to the rank of 
Colonel, shiill he filled by pmiiiotion atx?oiding to senioritj, except ia 
cases (if disaliiliiy or other inconipctcncj'. 

19. Promotions to the rank of Colonel elmll be made regimentally, 
according to the arm, as infantry, cavalry, &c.; and in the Staff Depart- 
ments, and in the Engineers anii other corps, according to corps. 

20. Appointments above the rank of Colonel will bo made by selec- 
tion from the army. 

21. Cadets appointed under 'Confederate law, shall be assigned to such 
duties, governed by exigencios of the service, as will best promote tlieir 
military experience and improvement, until a military school shall lie 
established by the Government for their instruction, 

22. Whenever the public service may require the appointment of any 
Citiien to the army, a board of olKucrs will be instituted, before whioJi 
the applicant will appear (or examination into his physical ability, mo- 
ral character, attainments a^id general fitness fur the service. If the 
board report in favor of the applicant, he will bo deemed eligible for a 
commission in the army. 

ARTICLE V. 

RESIGNATION OF OFFICERB 

23. No officer will be considered out of service on the tender of. Iiis 
resignation, until it shall have been duly accepted by the proper au- 
thoritv. 

24. Resignations will be forwarded by the aommanding officer to the 
Adjutimt and Inspector-General of the army for decision afc the War 
Department. 

25. Resignativins tendered under charges, when forwarded by any 
commander, will always be accompanied by a copy of the charges; or, 
in the absence of written churges, by a report of the case, for the infor- 
mation of the Secretary 4)f War. 

26. Before presenting the resignation of any officer, the Adjutant and 
Inspector-General will ascertain ;uwl report to the War Department the 
ftate of such officer's accounts of money, as well as of public property, 
for which he may have been responsible. 

27. In time of war, or with an army in the field, resignations shall 
take effect within thirty days from tiie date of the order of acceptance. 

28. Leaves of absence will not be granted by commanding officers to 
officers (m tendering their resignation, unless the resignation be uncon- 
ditional and immediate. 

ARTICLE VI. 

EXCHANGE OR TRANSFER OF OFFICERS. 

29. The transfer of officers from one regiment or corpR to another, 
will be made only by the War Department, on the mutual application 
of the parties desiring the exchange. 

30. An^ officer shall not be transferred from one regiment or corps to 



^ APPOINTMENTS, rORTIl'ICATIOJNS, iC. 

nmthor, with prejudice to the rank of any officer of the regiment er| 
corps to which lie is transferred. • 

ARTICLE Vll. 

\ . APrOINTMENTS ON THE STAFF. 

SI. General Officers appoint their own Aides-de-camp. 

32. Officers on duty as Brigadier and Major General, by virtue of i' 
Brevet Coniniisvsions, may, with the special sanction of the War De- 
partment, be allowed the Aids de-Camp of tlie grades corresponding to 
their brevets ; but without such sanction, the number and rate of pay of 
the Aids will be regulated accordinj^ to the lineal grade of the General. 

33. An (.fficer of a mounted corps shall not be separated from his 
regiment, except for duty connected with his particular arm. 

34. The senior Lieutenant present, holding the appointment of A-S- 
sistant Commissary of Subsistence, is entitled to perform the duties. 

ARTICLE VIIL 

"DISTRIBUTION OF THE TROOPS. 

*35. The military geographical departments will be established by the 
War DepartiVient. In time of peace, brigades or divisions will not be 
formed, nor the stations of the troops changed, without authority from 
the War Department. 

ARTICLE IX. 

CARE OF Fortifications. 

36. IsTJ) person shall Dfe permitted to walk upon any of the slopes of a 
fortification, except the ramps and glacis. If, in any ca«e, it be neces- 
sary to provide for crossing them, it should be done by placing wooden 
steps or stairs against the slopes. The occasional walking of persons 
on a parapet will do no harm, provided it be not allowed to cut the sur- 
face into paths. 

37. No cattle, hyrses, or other animal shall ever be permitted to go 
upon the slopes, the ramparts, or tiie parapets, nor upon the glacis, ex- 
cept witlin fenced limits, which should not approach the crest nearer 
than 30 feet. 

38. All grassed surfaces,- excepting the glaais, will be carefully and 
frequently mowed, (except in dry weather,) and the ofiener the better, 
while growing rapidly — the grass being never allowed to be more than 
a few inches high. In order to cut the grass even and close, upon small 
slopes, a light one handed scythe should be used; and in mowing the 
steep slopes, the mower should stand on a light ladder resting against 
the slope, and not upon the grass. Crops of hay may be cut on the glacis; 
or, if lenced, it may be used as pasture, otherwise it should be treated 
as other slopes of thq, fortification. On all the slopes, spots of dead 
grass will be cut out and replaced Dy fresh sod. All weeds will bo 
eradicated. , 

39. The burning of grass upon any portion of iv fortification is strict- 
ly forbidden. 

40. Particular attention is required- to prevent the formation of gul- 
lies in the parade, tcrraplein, and ramps, and especially in slopes where 
grass is n.)t well established. 

41. E.vrth, saud or ashes, must, riot be placed against wood work ; a 



FORTIFICATIONS, AC. ' 5 

free ventilation must be preserved aroiind it ; *nnd all wooden floors, 
platformn, bridges, &c., will be^ept clean swept. 

42. The machinery of draw bridges, g.ltes, and posterns mnst be 
kept in good wor-king order by proper cleaning and oiling of the f^jirts ; 
the bridges will be raised, and the gates and posterns opened as often 
as once a week. 

43. The terrepleins of forts, the floors of casemates, caponniers, store- 
rooms, barracks, galleries, posterns, magazines, (fee, and the ^ide-walks 
in front of qunrters, a,s well as other walks, are sometimes paved witli 
brick or stones, or formed of concrete. These su. faces must be pre- 
served from injury with great care. In transporting guns and carriages, 
and in mounting them, strong way-planks will be used, and neither the 
wheels nor any other part of the carriages, nor any machiner}-, such as 
phcars, gins, &c., nor any ban.lspike or otlier implements, will be al- 
lowed to toucli those surface-!. Unless protected in a similar manner, 
no wheel barnnv, or vehicle, or barrel, sliall be rolled on said surfaces. 
No violent work will be done, nor any heavy weight suffered, to fall 
upon them. In using machines, as gins, &c., in casemates, care miu«t 
be taken notto injure the arch, or ceiling, or floors. Neajfci of these 
precautions may cause injuries appfirently slight, but serious in effect, 
from leaking of water into masonry, casemates, «&c. 

44. The doors and windows of all store rooms and occupied case- 
mates, quarters, barrack.^, t%o., will be opened several times a week for 
thorough ventilation. 

45. Masonry shot-furnaces will be heateil only on the approach of an 
enemy. For ordinary practice with hot shot, iron furnaces are provided. 

46. Tlie foregoing matters involve but little expense ; the lal)or is 
within the means of every garrison, and no technical knowledge is re- 
quired beyond what will be found among soldiers. Other repairs re- 
quiring small disbursements, such as repainting exposed wood or iron 
work, can be also executed by the garrison ; but reports, estimates, and 
requisitions, may be Necessary to obtain the materials. 

47. No alteration will be made in any fortification, or in any build- 
ing whatever belonging to it, nor in any building or work of any kind ; 
nor will any building or work of earth, masonry, or timber, be erected 
witi.in the f)rtifii;i\tion, or on its exterior, within half a mile, except 
under tiie superintendence of the Engineer Department, and by au- 
thority of the Secretary of AV^ar. 

ARTICLE X. 

CARE OF ARUAMENT OF rORTIFICATIGNS. 

48. At each permanent post with a fixed battery, and garrisoned by 
not more than one company, there will Ije kept mounted for purposes of 
instruction and target practice, ffircc iieavy guns; and at posts garri- 
Boned by more than one company, at the rate of two for each of the 
companies comrosing its garrison. The other guns dismounted will be 
nropcriy placed within their own traverse circles, and tiie carriages 
preserved from the weather. 

49. All guns sliould be sponged clean, and their vents examined to 
see that they arc clear. The chassis should be traversed and left in a 
different position, the top carriage moved backward and forward, and 



6 ARTILLERY PRACTICE. 

• 

left alternntaly over the front and rear transoms of the cliassis; the 
elevating screws or machines wiped cleati, worked and oiled if required, 
and the nuts of all bolts screwed up tight. This should all be done 
regularly once in every week. 

60. When tarpaulins, or pent bourses, are placed over the guns, they 
should be removed once a week when the weather is fair, the carriages 
and guns brushed off, and if damp, allowed to dry. 

51. An old sponge staff and head, should be used for drill. The nevr 
sponges should never be used unless the gun is fired. The implementa 
Bhould be kept in stores, under cover, and bo examined, wiped clean, or 
brushed at least once a month. In ease of leather equipments, due 
care should be taken for their preservation, by the use of oil, but -never 
using varnislr. 

52. Magazines should be frequently examined to see that the powder 
is well preserved. Tiiey should be opened every other day, when the 
air is dry and clear. Barrela of powder should be turned and rolled 
occasionally. Under ordinar}' circumstances, only a few cartridges 
should be kept filled. If the paper bodj of the cartridge becomes soft, 
or loses its ^in^r, it is certain that the magazine is very dump, and 
means shoula be fouml to improve the ventilatitm. Cartridge bags may 
be kept in the magazine ready for filling; also port-fires, fuses, tubes, 
and primers. Stands of grape, cannister, and wads, for barb«tte guns, 
should be kept in store with the implements. In casemate guns, wads 
may be hung in bundles, and grape and oannister near the guns. Shot, 
well lacquered and clean, may be pi iced in piles near the guns. 

ARTICLE XL 

ARTIIiLERY PRACTICE. 

53. At all posts with fixed batteries, the position of every gun, 
mounted or to be mounted, will haye its number, and this number be 
placed on the gun when in position. 

54. Foe every such work a post-book of record will be kept, under 
the direction of the commander of the post, in which will be duly en- 
tered the number of each mounted gun, its calibre, weight, names of 
founder, and its inspector, and other marks : the description of its car- 
riage and date of reception at the post ; where from, and the greatest 
field of fire of the gun in its position. 

55. Every commander of a fort, or other fixed battery, will, before 
entering on artillery practice, carefully reconnoitre, and cause to be 
eketched for his record book, the water channels, with their soundings 
and other approaches to the work. Buoys or marks will be "'placed at 
the extreme and intermediate ranges of the guns, and these marks be 
numerically noted on the sketch. A buoy at every five hundred yards 
may sufiice. 

•'^6. At the time of practice a distinct and careful note will be made 
rorthe record book, of every shot or shell that may be thrown, desig- 
nating the guns fired by their numbers, the charges of powder used, 
the time of flight of shots and shells, the ranges and ricochets, and the 
positions of guns in respect to the horizontal and vertical lines. 

57. The time of flight of a shell may he noted with suflBcient aacurocy 
by a stop-watch, or by counting the beats (previously ascertaining theiy 



REGIMENTS. t 

value) of other watclies, and the range may sometimes be computed by 
the tinm of flight. Other modes ascertaining the range will readily oc- 
cur to officers of science. 

58. When charged shells with fuze are thrown, tho time of bursting 
will be noted. If they are intended to fall on land, only a blowing 
charge will be given to the sIicIIh, so that they may be picked up for ' 
further use. 

59. On filling from the barrel, the proof range of powder will be 
m;nkcd on the cartridges. . 

60. The general ohjects of this practice arc, to give to officers and 
men the ready and effective use of batteries ; to pret-crve on record the 
more important results for the benefit of the same, or future command- 
ers, and to ascertain the effieiencj' of guns and carriage*. 

Gl. Tiie commanders of field artillery will also keep registers of their 
practice, so that not a shot or shell shall be thrown in the a^my, for in- 
struction, without distinct objects, such as range, accuracy of aim, num- 
ber of ricochets, time of burstmg in the case of shells, &c. 

62. The issue of blank cartridges fur tho drill and instruction of the 
liglit artillery companies M-ill be authorized in such quantities as may 
be necessary, on requisitions duly approved bj' the proper department. 

63. For artillery there will be three annual periods of practice in 
firing, viz : in April. June and October. At the termination of each 
period the commanding officers of posts will transmit to the Adjutant- 
General full reports of the results. 

61. To determine accuracy in firing shot and shell, butts or targeti 
will be used. If no natural butt presents itself, targets will be erected. 

65. As practice in gunnery is a heavy expense, commanders of com- 
panies, and their immediate superiors, are charged with the strict exe- 
cution of the foregoing details ; and all officers on inspection duty will 
report, through the proper channels, upon such execution. 

ARTICLE XII. 

REGIMENTS. 

66. On the organization of a regiment, companies receive a permanent 
designation by letters beginning with A, and the oflicera are assigned to 
companies ; afterward, company officers succeed to companies, as pro- 
moted to fill vacancies. Companies take place in the battalion accord- 
ing to the rank of their captains. 

67. Captains must serve with their companies. Though subject to 
the temporary details of service, as for courts martial, military boards, 
&c., they shall not bo detailed for any duty which may separate them 
for any consideralJle time from their companies. 

6S. The commander of a regiment will appoint the adjutant from the 
subalterns of the regiment, lie will nominate the regimental quarter- 
master to the Secretary of War fur appointment, if approved. lie will 
appoint the noncommissioned staff of the regiment ; aiid, upon the re- 
commendation of tho company commander, the sergeants and corporals 
of companies. 

69. In cases of vacancy, and till a decision «an be had from regimen- 
tal headquarters, the company commanders may make temporary np- 
puintinents of non-commissioned officers. 



8 ' REGIMENTS. 

70. Commnnders of regiments are enjoined to avail themselves of 
every opportunity of instructing both officers and men in the exercise 
and management of field artillery; and all commanders ought to en- 
courage useful occupations, and qianly exercises, and diversions among 
their men, and to repress dissipation and immorality. 

71. It is enjoined upon all officers to bo cautious in reproving non- 
commissioned officers in the presence or liearing of privates, lest their 
authority be weakened ; and i:on-commissioned officers are not to be sent 
to the guard-room and mixed with privates during confinement, but be 
considered as placed in arres't, except in aggravsited cases, where escape 
may be apprehended. 

72. Non-commissioned officers may be reduced to the ranks by the 
sentence of a court-martial, or by order of thr> commander of the regi- 
ment on the application of the company commander. If reduced to the 
ranks by garrison courts, at posts not the headquarters of the regiment, 
the company commander will immediately forward a transcript of the 
order to the regimental commander. 

73. Every non-commissioned officer shall be furnished with a certifi- 
cate or warrant of his rank, signed by the colonel and countersigned 
by the adjutant. Blank warrants are furnished from the Adjutant- 
General's office. The first, or orderly sergeant, will be selected by the 
captain froui the sergeants. 

74. When it is desired to have bands of music for regiments, there 
will be allowed for each, sixteen privates to act as musicians, in addi- 
tion to the chief musicians authorizcd'by law, provided, the total num- 
ber of privates in the regiment, including the band, does not exceed the 
legal standard. 

75. The musicians of the band will, for the time being, be dropped 
from the company muster-rolls, but they will be instructed as soldiers, 
and liable to gerve in the ranks on any occasion. They will be mustered 
in a separate squad under the chief musician, with the noncommissioned 
stafi", and be included in the aggregate in all regimental returns. 

76. When a regiment occupies several stations, the band will be kept 
at tlie headquarters, provided troops (one or more companies) be serving; 
there. The field music belonging to companies not stationed at regi- 
mental headquarters, will not be separated from their respective com- 
panies. 

77. No man, unless he be a carpenter, joiner, carriage maker, black- 
smith, saddler, or harness maker, will be mustered as an "artificer." 

78. Every article, excepting arms and accoutrements, belonging to 
the regiment, is to be marked with the number and name of the regi- 
ment. 

,79. Such articles as belong to companies are to He marked with the 
letter of the company, and number and name of the regiment ; and such 
as belong to men, with their individual numbers, and the letter of the 
company. 

80. The books for each regiment shall be as follows: 
1. Original copies of general orders will be tied together in book form, 

and properly indexed as they are received, and at length bound in 

volumes of convenient-size. 
% Reymenial Order Book, of three quires of paper, 16 inches by 10} 

inches, to contain regimental orders, vrith an index. 



COMPANIES. 



9 



3. Letkr Book, of tliree quires of paper, IG inches by JOJ inches, to 
coritain the correspimdence of the commanding oflBcer on regimental 
subjects, witli an index. 

4. An index of letters required to be kept on file, in the following form : 



No. 



NAME OF WRITER. 



1 |C' ptaiii A. B., 

2 |A(lj"t General R. J., 

3 Captain F. G , 

4 Lieutenant C. D., 



July 15, 185C). 
Sept. 4, 1846. 
Oct. 14, 1846. 
Nov. 2. 1846. 



Appdin't Non-Com. Olllccrs. 
Recruiting Service. 
Error in Company Return. . 
Application for Leave. 



The date of receipt should be endorsed on all letters. They should 
be numbered to correspond with the index, and filed in regular order, 
for easy reference. 

5. Descriptive Book, of five quires of paper, 16 inches by 10-} inches, to 
contain a list of the officers of the regiment, with their rank, and 
d.ites of appoilftment and promotion ; transfers, leaves of p,bsence, 
and places and date of birth. To contain, also, tlie names of all en- 
liste(\ soldiers entered according to prit)rity of enlistments, giving 
their description, the dates and periods of their enlistments ; and un- 
der the head of remarks, the cause of discharge, character, death, 
desertion, transfer — in short, everything relating to their military 
history. This book to be indexed. 
One copy of the monthly returns to be filed. 



POST BOOKS. 

81. The following books will be kept at each post : A Morning Report 
Book, a Guard lleport Book, an Order Book, a Letter Book, eaeh two 
quires foolscap ; also, copies of the monthly post returns. 

ARTICLE XIIL 

COMPANIES. 

82. The captain will cause the mm of tiie company to be numbered, 
in a regular series, including the non-commissioned officers, and divided 
into four squads, each to be put under the charge of a non-commissionod 
officer. • 

83. Each subaltern officer will be charged with a sqyad for the super- 
vision of its order and cleanliness; and captains will require their lieu- 
tenants to assist them in the performance of all company duties. 

84. As far as practicable, the men of each squadron will be quartered 
togetlier. 

85. The utmost attention will be paid by commanders of companies 
to the cleanliness of their men, as to their persons, clothing, arms, ac- 
coutrements and equipments, and also as to their quarters or tents. 

80. The name of each soldier will be labeled on his bunk, and hia 
company number will be placed against his arms and accoutrements. 

87. The arms will be placed in the arm-racks, the stoppers in the 
mnzzies, the cocks let down, and their bayonets in their scabbards ; tiio 
acoiiutrcmcnts suspended over the arms, and the swords hung up by 
the belts on pegs. 



10 * ' COMPANIES. 

I 

88. The knapsack of each man will be placed on the lower shelf of 
his bunk, at its foot, packed with his effects, and ready to be slung ; the 
great-coat on the same shelf, rolled and strapped ; the coat, folded in- 
side out, and placed under the knapsack; the cap on the second or up- 
per shelf; and the boots well cleaned. 

89. Dirty clothes will be kept in an appropriate part of the knapsack ; 
no article of any kind to be put under the bedding. 

90. Cooking utensils and table equipage will be cleaned and arranged 
in closets or recesses; blacking and brushes out of view; the fuel in 
bosep. 

91. Ordinarily the cleaning will be on Saturdays. The chiefs of 
squads will cause bunks and beddings to be overhauled ; floors dry 
rubbed ; tables and benches scoured ; arms cleaned ; accoutrements 
whitened and polished ; and everything put in order. 

92. Where conveniences for bathing are to be had, the men should 
bathe once a week. The feet to be washed at least twice a week. The 
hair kept short, and beard neatly trimmed. ^ 

93. Nm-commissioned officers, in command of squads, will be held 
more immediately responsible that their men observe what is prescribed 
above ; that they wash their hands and faces daily ; that they brush or 
comb their heads ; that those who are to go on duty put their arms, ac- 
coutrements, dress, &c., in the best order, and that such as have per- 
mission to pass the chain of sentinels, are in the dress that may be or- 
dered. 

94. Commanders of companies and squads will see that the arms and 
accoutrements in possession of the men are always kept in good order, 
and that proper care be taken in cleaning them. 

95. When belts are given to a soldier, the captain will see that they 
are properly fitted to the body ; and it is forbidden to cut any belt with- 
out his sanction. 

96. Cartridge-boxes and bayonet-scabbards will be yolished with 
blacking ; varnish is injurious to the leather, and will not be used. 

97. All arms in«tlie hands of the troops, whether browned or bright, 
will be kept in the state in which they are issued by the Ordnance De- 
partment. Arms will not be taken to pieces without permission of a 
commissioned officer. Bright barrels will be kept clean and free from 
rust without polishing them ; care shculd be taken in rubbing not to 
bruise or bend*the barrel. After tiring, wash out the bore ; wipe it dry, 
and then pass a bit of cloth, slightly greased, to the bottom. In these 
operations, a rod of wood, with a loop in one end, is to be used instead 
of the rammer. The barrel, when not in use, will be closed with astop- 
per. Pur exercise, each soldier should keep himself provided with" a 
piece of sole-leather to fit the cup or countersink of the hammer. 

*98 Arms shall not be left loaded in quarters or in tents, or when the 
men' are off duty, except by special orders. 

99. Ammunition issued will be inspected frequently. Each man will 
be made to pay for the rounds expended without orders, or not in the 
way of duty, or which may be damaged or lost by his neglect. 

100. Ammunition will be frequently exposed to the dry air, or 
sunned. 

101. Special care shall be taken to ascertain that no ball-cartridges 
are mixed with the blank cartridges issued to the men. 



COMPANIES. 11 

102. All knapsacks are to be painted black. Those for the artillery 
will be marked in the centre of the cover with the number of the regi- 
ment only, in figures of 'one and a-half inches in length, of the charac- 
ter called full-face, with yellow paint. Those for the infantry will bo 
marked in the same way, in Avhite paint. The knapsack straps will be 
black. 

103. The knapsacks will also be marked upon the inner side with 
the letter of the company and the number of the soldier, on such part 
as may be readily observed at inspections. 

104. Haversacks will be marked upon the flap with the number and 
name of the regiment, the letter of the company, and number of the sol- 
dier, in black letters and figures. And each soldier must, at all times, 
be provided with a haversack and canteen, and will exhibit them at all 
inspections, it will be worn on the left side on inarches, guard, and 
wlien paraded for detached service — the canteen outside the haver- 
sack. 

105. The front of the drums will bo painted with the arms of the 
Confederate States, on a blue field for the infantry, and on a red field 
for the artillery. The letter of the company and the number of fl)0 
regiment, under the arms, in a scroll. 

106. Officers at their stations, in camp or in garrison, will always 
wear their proper uniform. 

107. Soldiers will wear the prescril)cd uniform In camp or garrison, 
and will not be permitted to keep in their possession any other clothing, 
"NViien on fatigue parties, they will wear the proper fatigue dress. 

108. In camp or barracks, the company officers must visit the kitchen 
daily, and inspect the kettles, and at all times carefully attend to the 
messing and economy of their respective companies. The commanding 
officer of the post or regiment will make frequent inspections of the 
kitcliens and messes. 

109. The bread must be thoroughly baked, and not eaten until it is 
cold. The soup must be boiled at least five hours, and the vegetables 
always cooked sufficiently to be perfectly soft and digestible. 

110. Messes will be prepared by privates of squads, including private 
musicians, each taking his tour. The greatest care will be observed in 
washing and scouring the cooking utensils; those made of brass and 
copper should be lined with tin. 

111. The messes of prisoners will be sent to them by the cooks. 

112. No persons will be .allowed to visitor remain in the kitchen, 
except such as may come on duty, or be occupied as cooks. 

113. Those detailed for duty in the kitchens will also be required to 
keep the furniture of the mess-room in order. 

114. On marches and in the field, the only mess furniture of the sol- 
dier will be one tin plate, one tin cup, one knife, fork and spoon, to each 
man, to be carried by himself on the march. 

115. If a soldier be required to assist his first sergeant in the writing 
of the company, to excuse him from a tour of military duty, the captain 
will previously obtain the sanction of his own commander, if he have 

I one present; and whether there be a superior present or not, the cap- 
tain will be responsible that tlie man so cmpbycd docs, not miss 
two successive tours of guard duty by reason of such* employment. 



12 ORDNANCE SEROJIANTS. 

116. Tradesmen may be relieved from ordinary military duty, to 
make, to alter, or to mend soldiers' clothing, &c. Company commanders 
will fix the rates at which work shall be done, and cause the men, for 
whose Vjenefit'it is done, to pay for it at the next pay day. 

117. Each company officer, serving with his company, may take from 
it one soldier as waiter, with his consent and the consent of his captain. 
No other officers shall take a soldier as a waiter. Every soldier so em- 
ployed shall be so reported and mustered. 

118. Soldiers taken as officers' waiters shall be acquainted with their 
military duty, and at all times be completely armed and clothed, and in 
every respect equipped according to the rules of the service, and have 
all their necessaries coiSplete and in good order. They are to fall in 
with their respective companies at all reviews and inspections, and are 
liable to such drills as the commanaiug officer shall judge necessary to 
fit them for service in the ranks. ' 

119. Non-commissioned officers will, in no case, be permitted to act 
as waiters ; nor are they, or private soldiers, not waiters, to be employ- 
ed in any menial office, or made to perform any service not military, for 
th§ private benefit of any officer or mess of officers. 

■ COMPANY BOOKS. 

120. The following books are allowed to each company: one descrip- 
tive book, one clothing book, one order book, one morning report book, 
each one quire, sixteen inches by ten. One page of the descriptive book 
will be appropriated to the list of officers ; two to the non-commissioned 
officers ; two to the register of men transferred ; four to the register of 
men discharged ; two to register of deaths; four to register of deserters 
— the rest to the company description list. 

LAUNDRESS. 

121. Four women will be billowed to each company as washer-women, 
and will receive one ration per day each. 

122. The price of washing soldiers' clothing, by the month, or by the 
piece, will be determined by the Council Administration. 

123. Debts due the laundress by soldiers, for washing, will be paid, 
or collected at the pay-table, under the direction of the captain. 

ARTICLE XIV. 

ORDNANCE SERGEANTS. 

124* The Secretary of War selects from the Sf^rgeants of the line of 
the army, who may have faithfully served, as many ordnance sergeants 
as the service may require. 

125. Captains will report to their Colonels such sergeants as by their 
conduct and service merit such appointments, setting forth the descrip- 
tion, length of service of the. sergeant, the portion of his service he was 
a non-commissioned officer, his general character as to fidelity, and so- 
briety, his qualifications as a clerk, and his fitness for the duties to be 
performed by an ordnance sergeant. These reports will be forwarded 
to the Adjutaut and Inspector General, to ^e laid before the Secretary 
of War, with an application in the following form: 



ORDNANCE SERGEANTS. 



13 



* Headquarters, drc. 

To the Adjutant and Inspector General: 

Sir — I forward for the consideration of tbe proper authority, an ap- 
plication for the appointment of ordnance sergeant. ', 





c 

IB 

a, 

E 
o 
O 

o 
o 
o 


Lpngth of Service. 




Name and Regim'nt. 


As non-comniis- 
sioned Officer. 


•In the Army. 


Remarks. 




YBAnS.! MONTHS. 

1 


YEARS. 


MONTHS. 




* . 















Inclosed herewith you will receive the report of 



— , the officer 
commanding; the company in which the sergeaiit has been serving, to 
wiiicli I add the following remarks: 

, Commanding Regiment. 

12G. When a company is detached from the headquarters of the regi- 
ment, the reports of the commanding officer in this matter, will pass to 
the regimental headquarters through the commanding officer of the post 
or detachment, and be •accompanied by his opinion as to the fitness of 
the candidate. 

127. Ordnance Sergeants will be assigned tn posts when appointed, 
and are not to be transferred to other stations except by orders from the 
Adjutant and Inspector General's office. 

12S. At the expiration pf their term of service, ordnance sergeants 
may be re-enlisted, provided they shall have conducted themselves in a 
becoming manner, and performed their duties to the satisfaction of the 
commanding officer. If the commanding officer, however, shall not 
think proper to rc-cnlijfit the ordnance sergeant of his post, he will not 
di.-icharge him at the expiration of his service, unless it shall be tlio 
wish of the sergeant, but will communicate to thre Adjutant and Inspec- 
tor Tieneral his reasons for declining to re-enlist him, to be submitted to 
tlie War Department. 

120. The officers interested must«be aware, from the nature of tho 
duties assigned to ordnance sergeants, that the judicious selection of 
them is of no small importance to the interests of the setvico ; auvl that 
while the law conteniplates,»in the appointment of ihosc noncommis- 
eioncd officers, the better preservation of the ordnance and ordnance 



14 ORDNANCE SEKGEANTS. 

stores in deposit in the several forts, . there is the further motive of 
offering a reward to those faithful and -welltried sergeants who have 
long served their country, and of thus giving encouragement to the sol- 
dier in the ranks to emulate them in conduct, and thereby secure sub- 
stantial promotion. Colonels and Captains can not, therefore, be too 
particular in investigating tlie characters of the candidates, and in giv- 
ing their testimony as to their merits. 

130. The appointment and removal of, ordnance sergeants, stationed 
at military posts, in pursuance of the above provisions of law, shall be 
reported by the Adjutant and Inspector General to the Chief of the 
Ordnance Department. 

131. When a non-commissioned officer receives the appointment of 
ordnance sergeant, he shall be dropped from the rolls of the regiment 
or company in which he may be serving at the time. 

132. The duty of ordnance sergeants relates to the care of the ord- 
nance, arms, ammunition, and other military stores at the post to which 
they may be attached, under the direction of the commanding officer, 
and according to the regulations of the Ordnance Department. 

133. If a post be evacuated, the ordnance sergeant shall remain on 
duty at the station, under the direction of the Chief of the Ordnance De- 
partment, in charge of the ordnance and ordnance stores, and of such 
other public property as is not in chai'geof some officer or agent of other 
Departments ; for which ordnance stores and other property he will ac- 
count to theoliiefs of the proper departments until otherwise directed. 

134. An ordnance sergeant in charge of ordnance stores at a "post 
where there is no commissioned officer, shall be held responsible for the 
safe keeping of the property, and he shall be governed by the regula- 
tions of the Ordnance Departnaent in making issues of the same, and in 
preparing and furnishing the requisite returns. If the means at his 
disposal are not sufficient for the preservation of the property, he shall 
report the circumstances to the Chief of the Ordnance Department. 

135. Ordnance sergeants are to be considered as belonging to the non- 
commissianed staff of the post, under the orders of the commanding 
officer. They are to wear the uniform, with the distinctive badges pre- 
scribed for the non-commissioned staff, of regiments of artillery ; and 
they are to appear under arms with the troops at all reviews and in- 
spections, monthly and weekly. 

136. When serving at any post which may be the headquarters of a 
regiment, ordnance sergeants shall be reported by name on the post re- 
turns, and mustered with the non-commissioned staff of the regiment; 
and at all other posts they shall be mustered and reported in some com- 
pany stationed at the post at which they serve ; be paid on the muster- 
roll, and be charged with the clothing and all other supplies previously 
received from any officer, or subsequently issued to them by the com- 
manding officer of the company for the time being. Whenever the 
company may be ordered from the post, the ordnance sergeant will be 
transferred to the I'olls of any remaining company, b/ the order of the 
commanding officer of the post, 

137. In the event of the troops being all withdrawn from a post at 
which there is^n ordnance sergeant, he shall be furnished with his de- 
scriptive roll and account of clothing and pay, signed by the proper 
officer last in command, accompanied by the remaf k" necessary for nis 



TRANSFER OP SOLDIERS — DECEASED OFFICERS. ^ 15 

. . ' . . . ft • 

niiKtary history ; and on his exhibiting such papers to any Quartermas- 
ter, with a letter from the ordnance office acknowled^inix the receipt of 
his returns, and tliat they arc satisfactory, he will be paid on a separate 
account the amount which may be due hini'tit the date of the receipt of 
the return mentioned in euch letter, together with commutation of ra- 
tions, according to the regulations of the Subsistence Department. A 
certified statement of his pay account will be furnished the Ordnance 
sergeant by the Quartermaster by whom he may be last paid. When 
there are no troops at the post; the ordnance sergeant will report to the 
Adjutant and Inspector General's office by letter, on the last day of 
every month. 

ARTICLE XV. 

TRANSFER OF SOLDIERS. 

138. No non-commissioned officer or soldier will be transferred fuom 
one regiment to anotiier without the authority of the commanding 
General. 

139. The Colonel may, upon the application of the Captains, transfer 
a non-commissioned officer or soldier from one company to another of 
his regiment — with consent of the department commander in case of 
change o"f post ; but in no case from one regiment to another where 
serving in different departments. witliout approval of department com- 
manders, and then at expense of parties transferred, except where trans- 
fer is required by interests of public serviee. 

140. When soldiers are authorized to be transferred, the transfer will 
take place on the first of a month, with a view to the more convenient 
Eeftlement of their accounts. 

141. In all cases of transfer, a complete descriptive roll will accom- 
pany the soldier transferred, which roll will embrace an account of his 
pay, clothing, and other allowances; also, all stoppages to be made on 
nccounfof the Government, atid debts due the laundress, as well as such 
other facts as may be necessary to show hi? character and military 
history. 

ARTICLE XVI. 

DECEASED OFI ICERS. 

142. Whenever an officer dies, or is killed at any military post or sta- 
tion, ()r in the vicinity of the same, it will be the duty of the command- 
ing officer to report the fact direct to the Adjutant and Inspector Gene- 
ral, with the date, and any other information proper to be communica- 
ted. If an officer die at n distance from a military post, any officer 

'havisg intelligence of the same will in like manner communicate it, 
specifying the day of his decease ; a duplicate of the report will be sent 
to department headquarters. 

143. Inventories ot' the effects of deceased officers, required by the 94th 
article of war, will be fi-ansmittcil to the Adjutant and Inspector General. 

144. If a legal administrator or family connection be present, and 
take chnrge of the effects, it will be ^o stated to the Adjutant and In- 
spector General. • 

ARTICLE XVII. 

DECEASED SOLDIERS. 

145. Inventories of the effects of deceased non-commissioned officers 



16 DECEASED SOLDIERS-^DESERTERS. 

• 

and sofdiers, required by the 95th nrticle of war, will be forwavdefl to 
the Adjutant and Inspector Ge*neral, by the commander of the ccmpan-y 
to which the deceased belonged, and a duplicate of the same to the Colo- 
nel of the regiment. Final statements of pay, clothing, &o., will be sent 
with the inventories. When a soldier dies at a post or station absent 
from his company, it will be the duty of his immediate commander to 
furnish the required inventory, and, at the same time, to forward to the 
commandini; officer of the company to which the soldier belonged, a re- 
port of his death, specifying the date, place, and cause ; to what time he 
was last paid, and the money or other effects in his possession at the 
time of his decease ; which report will be noted on the next muster roll 
of the company to which the man belonged. Each inventory will be 

endorsed, " Inventory of the effects of •, late of company ( — ) 

regiment of , who died at-^ , the day of , 186 — ." 

If a legal representative receive the effects, it will be stated in the re- 
port. If the soldier leave no effects, the foct will be reported. 

146. Should, the effects of a deceased non-commissioned officer or sol- 
dier not be administered upon within a short period after his decease, 
they shall be disposed of by a Council of Administration, under the 
authority of the commanding officer of the post, and the proceeds depos- ' 
ited with the Quartermaster, to the credit of the Confederate States, 
until they shall be claimed by the legal representatives of the deceased. 

147. In all such cases of sales by the Council of Administration, a 
statement in detail, or account of the proceeds, duly certified by the ' 
Council and commanding officer, accompanied by the Quartermaster's 
receipt for the proceeds, will be forwarded by the commanding officer to 
the Adjutant and Inspector General. The statement will be indorsed, 
"Report of the proceeds of the effects of , late of company ( — ) 

' regiment of ■ , who died at , the day of ^, 

186—." 

ARTICLE XVIII. 

J)ESERTERS. 

148. If a soldier desert from, or a deserter be received at, any post 
other than the station of the company or detachment to which he be- 
longed, he shall be promptly reported by the commanding officer of such 
post, to the commander of his company or detachment. The time of 
desertion, apprehension and delivery will be stated. If the man Ije a 
recruit, unattached, the required report will be made to the Adjutant 
and Inspector General. When a report is received of the apprehension 
or surrender of a deserter at any post other fhan the station of the com-, 
pany or detachment to which he belonged, the commander of such'com- 
pany or detachment shnll immediately forward his description and ac- 
count of clothing to the officer making the report. 

149. A reward of thirty dollars will be paid foi^the apprehension and 
delivery of a deserter to an officer of the Army, at the most convenient - 
post cr recruiting station. Rewards thus paid will be promptly repol-ted 
by the disbursing officer to the ^jfficer commanding the company in 
which the deserter is muster?d, and to the authority competent to order 
Ilia trial. The reward of thirty dollars' will include the remuneration 
for all expenses iocurred for apprehending, securing and delivering a 
deserter. 



' DISCHARGES. * 17 

150. When non-commissioned officers or soldiers ore sent in pursuit 
of a deserter, the expenses necessarilj- incurred will be paid whether ho 
bo nppreliended or not, and reported as in ca.so of rewards paid. 

1 JI. Deserters shall make good the time Ji^st by desertion, unless dis- 
cliarj^ed by competent authority. 

I V2. No deserter shall be restored to duty without trial, except by the 
authority competent to order the trial. 

1 •">;>. Rewards and expenses paid for apprehending a deserter, will bo 
s('( ,i;;ainst his pay, when atljudged by a court-martial, or when ne is 
ri'-t'ired to duty witliout trial on sucii condition. 

I "'4. In reckoning "the time of service, and the pay and allowances of 
a ilosortcr, he is to be considered in service ^Yhcu delivered up as a dc- 

i tcr to the proper authority. 

l'>5. An appre^jended desertfir, or one who surrenders himself, shall 
receive no pay^wliile waiting trial, and only sUch clothing as may be 
actually necessary for him. 

ARTICLE XIX. 

• DISCHARGES. ^ 

15G. No enlisted man sh^ll,be discharged before the expiration of his 
term of enlistment without authority of the War Department, except by 
sentence of a general court-martial, or by tlie comman«ler of the depart- 
ment, or of an army in the field, on certificate of disability, or on appli- 
cation of the soldier after twenty years' iiervicvi. 

157. When an enlisted man is to be discharged, his company com- 
mander shall furnish him certificates of his account, according to form 
4, Pay Department. 

15S. Blank discharges will be furnished from the Adjutant and In- 
spector-General's office. No discharge shall be made in duplicate, nor 
shall any certificate be given in lieu of a discharge, except by order of 
the War Department. 

159. The cause of disciiarge will be stated ^n the body of the dis- 
cbarge, and the space at foot for character cut ofi", unless a recommen- 
dation is given. 

100. When a non-commissioned officer or soldier shall be unfit for 
military service in consequence of wounds, disease or infirmity, his cap- 
tain shall forward to the commandant of the Department, or of the army 
in the field, through the (Jommander of the regiment or post, a state- 
ment of the case, with " certificates of disability," signed by the senior 
surgeon of the regiment or post, according to the form prescribed in the 
medical regulations. If the recommendation for the discharge of the 
invalid be approved, the authority therefor will be endorsed on the 
"certificates of disability, which will be sent back to be completed, 
and signej by the commanding officer of the regiment or command to 
which the invalid's company belongs, who will also sign the dischj\rge, 
and cause the final statements to be made out, and forward the certifi- 
cates of disability to the Adjutant and Inspector General. 

IGl. When a noncommissioned officer or soldier is absent from his 
regiment or company, in hospital, and shall be unfit for military service^ 
for the reasons set forth in the preceding paragraph, the senior surgeon 
of tlie hospital will make out " certificates of disability," and forward 
them, through the commander of the company or rt^ment, to the com- 



18 TRAVELING <JN J)UTY — LEAVES OP ABSENCE. 

mnnder of the department or of the army in the field, -whoso approvi\l 
beinf!; given, the commandingtifficer will complete and forward the cer 
tificates of disability to the Adjutant and Inspector General, and send 
the papers of discharge to |,Iic surgeon. But when access to comman- 
ders is difEcult, and attended with great dolay, the certificates of disa- 
bility may, in urgent cases, be forwarded by the surgeon to the surgeon 
general for approval : which being given, the discharge will be author- 
ized from the Adjutant and Inspector GencriU's office ; and the surgeon 
will*make out final statements. 

162. The date, place, and cause of discharge of a soldier absent from 
his company, will be reported by the commander of the post to his com- 
pany commander, 

. 163. Company commanders are required to keep the Clank discharges 
and certificates carefully in their own custody. , 

ARTICLE XX. 

TRAVELING ON DUTT. 

164. Whenever an officer, traveling under orders, arrives at his post, 
he will submit to the commanding officer a report in wrking, of the time 
occupied in the travel, with a copy of thf qjders under which the jour- 
ney was performed, and an explanation of any delay in the execution of 
the orders ; which report the commanding officer shall transmit, with 
hia opinion on it, to department lieadquarters. If the officer be superior 
in rank to the commander, the required report will be made by the 
senior himself. 

165. Orders detaching an officer for a special duty, imply, unless 
otherwise stated, that he is thereafter to join his proper station. 

ARTICLE XXI. 

LEAVES OF ABSENCE TO OFFICER?. 

166. In no case will leaves of asence be granted, so that a company 
be left without one of its commissioned officers, (^t X\\&t & garrisoned post 
be left without two commissioned officers and-competent medical attend- 
ance ; nor shall leave of absence be granted to an officer during the sea- 
son of active operations, except on urgent necessity, and then as follows : 
The commander of a post may grant seven days leave — the commander 
of an army thirty. 

167. When not otherwise specified, leaves of absence will be consid- 
ered as commencing on the day that the officer is relieved from duty at 
his post. lie will report himself monthly, giving his address for the 
next thirty days, to the commander ol his post, and of hisregiment or 
corps, and to the Adjutant and Inspector-General ,- and in his first re- 
port state the day when his leave of absence commenced; at the expi- 
ration of his leave he will join his station. 

168. Ayiplications for leave of absence for more than thirty days, must 
te referred to the Adjutant and Inspector-General for the decision of the 
Seeretapy of War. In giving a permission to apply for the extension of 
a leave of absence, the term of the extension should be stated. 

. 169. The immediate commander of the officer applying for leave of 
absence, and all intermediate commanders, will endorse their opinion 
on the application before forwarding it. 

170. The comrallnder of a post may take leave of absence not to ex- 



FURLOUGHS TO ENLISTED MEN. 19 

ceed seven days at one time, or in the same month, reporting the fact 
to his next superior. 

171. Leaves of absence on account of sickness will not be granted to 
go beyond the limits of the Military Department within which they are 
stationed, unless the certificate of tlio medical officer shall explicitly 
state that a greater change is necessary to save life, or prevent perma- 
nent disability. Nor will sick leaves to go beyond the Department limits 
be given in any case, except of immediate urgency, without the previous 
sanction of the War Depart nicnt. 

172. On the expiration of a leave of absence given on account of sick- 
ness, if the officer be able to travel, ho will forthwith proceed to his 
post, although his disability may not have been removed. Exceptions 
to this general rule must be made in each case by tlie War Department, 
on full and explicit medical certificates setting forth the reasons for delay, 
and the length of time delay is considered necessary. 

173. An application for leave of absence on account of sickness, must 
be accompanied by a certificate of the senior medical officer present, in 
the following form : 

, of flie regiment of , having applied for a certificate 

on which to .ground an application for leave of absence, I do hereby 
certify that I have carefully examined this officer, and find that — [Hei-e 
the. nature of the disease, wound, or disabiliti/, is to be^hiUt/ stated, and 
the period during which the officer has suffered under its ejf'ccts.] And 
that in consequence thereof, he is, in rqy opinion, unfit for. duty. I 
further declare my belief that he will not be able to resume his duties 

in a less period than — ■ . [Here state candidly and explicitly the 

opinion as to the period which will prohaldy elapse before the officer will 
he able to resmne his duties. When there is no reason to exped a recovery, 
or when the prospect of recovery is distant and unco-tain, or ichen a chancje 

of climate is. recommended, it niust be so stated. | Dated at , tiiis 

day of . Signature of the Medical Officer. 

174. In all reports of absence, or application for leave of absence on 
account of sickness, the officer shall state how long he has been absent 
already en that account, and by whose permission. 

ARTICLE XXIL 

FURI-OJ-GHS TO ENLISTED MEN. 

175. Furloughs will be granted only by the commapding officer of the 
post or the commanding officer of,the regiment actually quartered with 
it. Furloughs niay be prohibited at the discretion of the officer in com- 
mand. 

176. Soldiers on furlough shall not take with them their aims or ac- 
coutrements, but in all cases of h>ng expected absence, should be fur- 
nished with descriptive and clothing accounts, by their Captains, to 
.enable them to draw their pay. 

1"7. Form of furlough : * 

TO ALL WHOM IT MAY COXCERV. 

The bearer hereof, , a sergeant (corporal, or private, as tbe 

case may be) of Captain company, — regiment of , 

ngfd — year, — feet — inches high, completion, eyes, 



20 COUNCILS OP ABMTNISTIIATION. 

hair, and by profession a , born in the — '^— of , 

and- enlisted at , in the of , on the day of , 

eighteen hundred and , to. serve for the period of , is hereby 

permitted to go to , in the county of , State of -, he 

having received a furlough from the — day of , to the — day 

of , at vt'hich period he will rejoin his cunpany or regiment 

at , or -wherever it then may be, or be considered a deserter. 

Subsistence has been furnished to said , to the day of 

, and pay to the day of , both inclusive. 

Given under my hand, at , this day of , 18 — . 

Signature of the officer \ 
giving the furlough, j 

ARTICLE XXIir. 

COUNCILS OF ADMINISTRATION. 

178. The commanding ofBcer of every post shall, at least once in every 
two months, convene a Post Council of Administration, to consist of 
iliree regimental or company officers next in rank to himself; or, if there 
be but two, then the two next ; if but one, the one next^^ and if there be 
none other than himself, then he himself sh'all act. 

179. The junior member will record the proceedings of the council in 
a book, and submit the same to the commanding officer. If he disap- 
prove the proceedings, and the council, after a reconsideration, adhere 
to its decision, a copy of the whole shall be sent by the nfficer command- 
ing to the next higher commander, whose decision shall be final, and 
entered in the council book, and the whole be published in orders fcr 
the information and'government of all concerned. 

180. The proceedings of Councils of Administration shall be signed 
by the president and recorder, and the recorder of each meeting, after 
entering the whole proceedings, togdllier with the final order thereon, 
shall deposit the book with the commanding officer. In like manner, the 
approval or objections of the oflicer ordering the council will be signed 
with his own hand. 

181. The Post Council shall prescribe the quantity and kind of cloth- 
ing, smnll equipments, an ! soldiers' necessaries, groceries, and all arti- 
cles which the sutlers may be required to keep on hand ; examine the 
sutler's books and papers, and fix the tariff of prices of the said goods or 
commodities ; inspect the sutler's weights and measures ; fix the laun- 
dress clMirges, and make the regulations for the post school. 

182. Pursuant to the oOth Article of War, commandmg officers -re- 
viewing the proceedings of the Council of Administration will scrutinize 
the tariff of prices proposed by them, and take care that the stores ac- 
tually furnished by the sutler correspond to the quality prescribed. 

p.. ST ruND. 

183. A post fund shall be raised at each post by a tax on the sutler 
of 10 cents a month for every officer and soldier of the command, accord-i 
ing to the average in each month to be ascertained by the council, and 
from tlie saving on the flour ration, ordinarily 33 jjer c^-'nt., by baking 
the soldiers' bread at a post bakery : Provided, that when want of vege- 
tables or other reasons make it necessary, the commanding officer may 
order the flour saved, or any part of- it, issued to the men, aftei paying 
expenses of baking. 



POST AND COMPANY FUND. 21 ' 

184. Ihe commanding officer sliall desijrnatean officer to be post trea- 
surer, who shall keep the account df the fund, sul>ject to the inspection 
of the council and cummandintr officer, and disburse the fund on the 
V'arrants of the commanding officer, drawn in pursuance of specific re- 
solves of the council. 

185. At every settlement of the post fund by the Council of Adminis- 
tration, the amount of the sutler's tax since the preceding settlement 
■will be apportioned to the regiments represented at the post in the ratio 
of the number of companies of each present; and tho results commu- 
nicated by the Council to the Adjutant of the regiments aifected and to 
tlie headquarters of the department in which the regimental head- 
quarters are stationed. The 'tax will enter into the post-treasurer's 
accounts, and will be transmitted by him to the Regimental Treasurers 
in accordance with the apportionment of the post-council. 

ISG. In eacli regiment the fund accruing to it as above, or as much 
of it as may be necessary, will be appropriated to the maintenance of 
the band. It will be administered by the regimental commander, the ' 
Adjutant as treasurer, and a regimental council, and be accounted for 
to department headquarters, on the same plan as that prescribed by 
regulations for the post-fund. 

187. The following are the objects of expenditure of the post fund : 
let, expenses-of the bake-house ; 2d, expenses of the rt)ldiers' children 
at the post school. 

188. On the last day of April, August and December, and when re- 
lieved from the duty, the treasurer shall make out his account with the 
fund since his last account, and submit it; with his vouchers, to the 
Council of Administration, to be e^mined by them, and recorded in 
the council book, and then forwarded by thexjommanding officer to de- 
partment headquarters. • 

18'J. At each settlement of the treasurer's account, the council shall 
distribute tiie unexpended balance of the post fund to the several.com- 
luinies and other troops in the ratio of their average force during the 
period. 

190. When a company leaves the post, it shall tlien receive its distri- 
butive share of the accrued fund. 

191. The regulations in regard to a post-^und will, as far as practica- 
ble, be applied in the field to a rei?imental fund, to be raised, adminis- 
tered, expended, and distributed in like manner, by the regimental com- 
mand and a regimental council. 

COMPANY FUND. 

192. The distributions from the post or regimental fund, and th.e 
savings from the company rations, constitute the Company fund, to be 
disbursed by the captain for the benefit of tUe enlisted men of the com- 
pany, pursuant to resolves of the Company Council, consisting of all the 
company officers present. In case of a tie vote in the Council, the com- 
mander of the post shall decide. TheWouicil shall be convened once 
in two months by the captain, and whenever he may think proper. 

19.3. Their proceedings shall be recorded in a book, signed by all the 
Council, and o]>en at all times to the inspection of thecoiumander of the 
post. Every four months, and wheneM* another officer takes command 
of the company, and when the company leaves the post, the account of 



22 CHAPLAINS — SUTLERS. 

the company fund shall be made up, audited by the Council, recorded 
in the Council book, and submitted, with a duplicate, to the post com- 
mander, who shall examine it and forward the duplicate to deparcnient 
headquarters. 

194. The supervision of the company fund by the post commander 
herein directed, shall, in the field, devolve on the commander of the 
regiment. 

ARTICLE XXIV. 

CHAPLAINS. 

195. The posts at, and regiments with, which Chaplains may be em- 
ployed, will be announced by the War Department, upon recommenda- 
tions made by the commanding officer of posts or regiments, and the 
pay of a Chaplain will be $50 per monih. 

ARTICLE XXV. 

SUTLERS. 

196. Every military post may liave one sutler, to be appointed by the 
Secretary of. War on the reconimendiitinn of the Council of Adminis- 
tralinn, approved by the commanding; officer, 

197. A sutler shall hold his office for a term of three years, unless 
sooner removed; but the commanding officer may, for cause, suspend a 
sutler's privilege until a decision of the War Department is received in 
the case. 

198. In case of vacancy, a tiemporary appointment may be made Vjy 
the commanding officer upon the nomination of the Council of Admin- 
istration. - r 

199.- Troops in campaign, on detachment, or on distant service, will 
be allowed sutlers, at the rate of one for every regiment, corps, or sepa- 
rate detachment ; to be appointed by the commanding officer of such 
regiment, corps, or detachment, upon tiie recommendation of the Council 
of Administration, subject to the approval of the general or other officer 
in command. 

200. No tax or burden in any shape, other than the authorized as- 
sessment for the post fund, will be imposed on the sutler. If there bo 
a spare building, thte use i)i it may be allowed him, he being respon- 
sible that it is kept in repair. If there be no such building, he may 
be allowed to erect cne; but this. article gives the sutler no claim to 
quarters, transportation for himself or goods, or to any military al- 
lowance whatever. 

201. The tariff of prices fised by the Council of Administration shall 
be exposed in a conspicuous place in the sutler's store. No difference 
of prices will be allowed on cash or credit sales. 

202. Sutlers are not allowed to keep ardent spirits or other intoxi- 
cating drinks, under penalty of losing their situations. 

203. Sutlers shall, not farm out, or underlet the business and privi- 
leges-granted by their appointment. 

£04. No sutler shall sell to an enlisted man, on credit, to a sum exceed- 
ing one-third of his monthly pay within the same month, without the 
written sanction of the company commander, or the commanding officer 
of the post or station, if the imfti does not belong to a company ; and 
not exceeding one-half the monthly pay with such permission,. 



MILITARY DISCUSSIONS AND PUBLICATIONS — ARRESTS. 23 

205. Three days before tlio Inst of every month, the sutler shall ren- 
der for verification, to the company comuiiinder, or to the commanding 
oflBcer, as the case may be, according to the meaiun;? of the preceding 
paragraph, a written and separate account in eacli Case, of any cliarges 
he may have against enlisted men for collection, and the officer shall 
submit the accounts to the soldier for acknowledgment and signature, 
and witness the same. In the case of a soldier's deat(), desertion, or 
removal from the post, the account will be rendered immediately. If 
the soldier dispute the account, and the sutler insist, and in case of 
death and desertion, the sutler will be required to establish the account 
by affidavit endorsed on it, before any officer authorised to administer an 
oath. Such verification will establish the debt unless disproved, and 
the amount may be collected at the pay table where the soldier is pre- 
sent, otherwise provided for in succeeding paragraph. 

206. All accounts of sutlers against enlisted men, which are not col- 
lected at the pay table — as of those who have died, deserted, or been 
removed beyond the reach of the sutlei- — after being duly audited as 
above, will be -entered on the next succeeding muster-roll, or on the de- 
scriptive roll, or certificate of discharge, as the case may be, and the 
same shall be retained from any balances due the soldier, after deduct- 
ing forfeitures and stoppages for the Government and laundress, and 
be paid to the sutler, on application to the second auditor of the treasury, 
through the Quartermaster-General. 

ARTICLE XXVI. 

-MILITARY DISCUSSIONS AND PUBLICATIONS. 

207. Deliberations or discussions among any class of military men, 
having the object of conveying praise, or censure, or any mark of ap- 
probation toward their superiors or others in the military service ; and 
all publications relative to transactions between officers of a private or 
personal nature, whether newspaper, pamphlet or hand-bill, are strictly 
prohibited. 

ARTICLE XXVIL 

ARKESTS AND CONFINEMENTS. 

208. None but comnr.inding officers have power to place officers under 
arrest, except for ofl'ences expressly designated in the 27th article of war. 

209. Officers are not to be put in arrest for light offences. For these 
the censure of the "commanding officer will, in most cases, answer the 
purpDse of di-icipline. 

210. An ofllcer in arrest may, at the discretion of his commanding 
officer, have larger limits assigned him than his tent or quarters, on 
written applitation to that effect. Close- confinement is not to be re- 
sorted to unless under circumstances of an aggravated, character. 

211. In ordinary cases, and where inconvenience to the service would 
result from it, a medical officer will not be. put in arrest until, the court- 
martial for his trial convenes. 

212. The arrest of an officer, or confi^ment of a soldier, will, as soon 
as practicable, be notified to his immediate commander. 

21S. All prisoners under guard, without written charges, will be re- 
leased by the officer of the day at guard-mounting, unleae orders to the 
contrary be given by the commauding offi-er. 

214. On a march, campany officers and non-commissioned officers in 



24 HOURS OF SERVICE AND ROLL CALLS. 

arrest will follow in the rear of their respective compiinies, unless other- 
wise particularly ordered. 

215. Fi^id officer^coramissioned and non-commissioned staff officers, 
under the same circumstance^, will follow in the rear of their respective 
regiments. 

210. An officer under arrest will not wear a sword, or visit officially 
his commanding or other superior officer, unless sent for; and in case 
of business, he will make known his object in writing. 

ARTICLE XXVIII. 

■ • 

HOURS OF SERVICE AND ROLL CALL. 

217. In garrison, reveille will be at day-break ; retreat at sunset; the 
troop, siirgeoii's call, signals for breakfast arid dinner at the hours pre- 
scribed by the commanding officer, according to climate and season. In 
the cavalry, stable calls immediately after reveille, and an hour and a half 
before retreat; water-calls at the hours directed by thecommanding officer. 

218. In camp, the commanding officer prescribes the hours of reveille, 
reports, roll-calls, guard-mounting, meals, stable-calls, issues, fa- 
tigues, &c. 

SIGNALS. 

219. 1. To go for fuel — poing-slroke and ten stroke roll. 

2. To go for water — two strokes and a flam. 

3. For fatigue party — pioneej-'s march. 

4. Adjutaut's cM—Jirst part oj' the troop. 

5. First sergeant's call — one roll and four taps. 
G. Sergeant's call — one roll and three taps. 

7. Corporal's call — one roll and two taps. 
S. For the drummers — tlie drummer's call. 

220. The di-ummers call shall be be^t ijy the drums of the police 
guard five minutes before the time of beating the stated calls, when the 
drummers will assemble before'the colors of their respective regiments, 
and as soon as the beat begins on the right, it will be immediately taken 
up along the line. 

ROLLCALLS. 

221. There shall be, daily, at least three stated roll-calls, viz : at re- 
veille, retreat, and tattoo. They will be made on the company parades 
by the first sergeants, superintended by a commissioned officer of tha 
company. The captains will report the absentees vfithout leave to the 
colonel or commanding officer. 

• '222. Immediately after reveille roll-call, (after stable duty in the caval- 
ry,) the tents or quarters, and the space around them, will be put in 
order by the men of the companies, superintended b}' the chiefs of 
squads, and the guard-house or guard tent by the guard or prisoners. 

223. The morning reports of companies, signed by the Captains and 
First Sergeants, wijl be handed to the Adjutant before eight o'cluck in 
the morning, and will be consolidated by the Adjutant within the next 
hour, for the information cf th* Colonel ; and if the consolidation is to 
be sent to higher authority, it will be signed by the Colonel and the 
Adjutant. 

ARTICLE XXIX, 

HONORS TO BE PAID BT THE TROOPS. 

224. The President or Vice-President is to be saluted with the highest 



HONORS TO BE PAID BY THE TROOPS. 25 

honors — all standards and cfllora dropping, officers and troops saluting, 
drums beating and trumpets sounding;. 

2^5. A General is to be received — by rfavalry, with sabres .presented,* 
trumpets sounding the march, antl» all the officers sakuiug, standards 
dropping; by infiintry, with drums beating ^lie march, colors dropping, 
officci's saluting, and arms presented-. 

22G. A Major- General is to be received — by cavalry, with sabres pre- 
sented, trumpets sounding twice the trumpet flourish, and officers salu- 
ting ; by infantry, with tlirco ruffles, colors dropping, officers saluting, 
and arms presented. 

227. A Brigadier-General is to be received — by cavalry, with sabres 
presented, trumpets sounding once the trumpet flourish, and officers 
saluting; by infantry-, with two rufllcs, colors dropping, officers salu- 
ting; and arms presentc<l. 

228. An Adjutant- General or Inspector- General, if under the rank of 
n General officer, is to be received at a review or inspection of the troops 
underarms — by cavalry, with sabres presented, officers saluting; by 
arms presented. The same honors to be paid to any field-officer, author- 
ized to review and inspect the troops. When the inspecting officer is 
junior to the otlicer commanding the parade, no compliments will be 
paid ; he will be received only witli swords drawn and arms shouldered. 

229. All guaxxis are to turn out and present arms to General officers 
as often as they pass them, except tho personal guards of General offi- 
cers, which turn out only to the Generals whoso guards they are, and 
to officers of superior rank. 

230. To commanders of regiments, garrisons, or camps, their owa 
guards turn out, and present arms once a day ; after which, they turn 
out with shouldered arms. 

231. To ihc members of the Cabinet; to the Chief Justice, the Presi- 
dent of th^e Congress of the Confederate States ; and to Governors within 
their respective Slates and Territories — the same honors will be paid as 
to a General. 

232. Ofticers of a foreign service may be complimented with the 
honors due to their rank. • 

233. American and Foreign Envoys of Ministers viill be received with 
the couipliments d'ue to a MnjorGcneral. 

231. Tlic ool'irs,(if a rc^^imeut ji is-ing a guard are to be saluted, the 
trumpets t^ouncling, uuA (Kc dniriis beiiting a march. 

235. When (JeneraKoffi>ers m peisoiis entitled to salute, patss in the 
rear of a guard, tlio officer is only tn make Iws men stand shouldered, 
anfl. !iot to face his guard about, or beat his drum. 

230. When General officers, or persons entitled to a salute, pass guards 
while in the act of relieving, both guards are to salute, receiving the 
word of command from the senior officer of the whole. 

237. All guards Hio trt !« under arms when armed parties approach 
their posts; and to parties conniianded by commissioned officers, they 
are to present their arms, drums beating a march, and officers saluting. 

238. No compliments by guards or sentinels will be paid betweeirr«- 
trcat and reveille, except as prescribsd for grand rounds. 

230. All guards and .sentineU are to pay the same c ompliments to the 
officers of the navy, marines, and militia, in tho 8orvice«f the Confodo- 
2 



26 fiALUTE*. » 

rate Stutes, ns are directed to be paid to th"b officers of the army, accorcJ- 
in<!; to tlieir relative ranks. 

* 240. It j.8 equally the duty of non-comm/ssioned officers and soldiers, 
at all times, and in rll situations, toyiay the proper coinplimenta to oflS- 
cers of the navy and mariue.'^, and to officers of other reg'rmer.ts, -vThen 
in uniform, ns to officers of their own particnlnr reginnents and corps. 

241. Courlesj among military men ia indinpenaablc iu discipline. 
Beapect to superiors if ill not be confined to obedience on duty, but will 
be extended to all occasions. It is always the duty of the inferior to 
accost or to oifer first the customary salutation, and of the. superior to 
return such complimentary notice. 

242. Sergeants, with swords drawn, will &akite by bringing them to 
a present — with muskets, by bringing the left hand across the body, so 
as to strike the musket near the right shoulder. Corporals out of the 
Tanks, and privates not sentries, will atrry their muskets at a shoulder 
as sergeant, and salute in like manner. 

243. When a soldier witboyt arms, or with sJde-.irms only, meets an 
officer, he is to raise his hand to the right side of the visor of his cap, 
palm to the front, elbow raised as high as the shoalder, looking at the 
same time in a respectful and soldier-like manner at the officer, who 
■will return the compliment thus ofi'ered. 

244. A non-commissioned officer or soldier being seated, and without 
particular occupation, will rise on the approaeli of an officer, and make 
the customary salutation. If standing, he will turn toward the officer 
for the same purpose. If the parties remain in the same place or on 
tho same ground, such compliments need no's, be repeated. 

SALUTES. 

245. The national salute is determined by the number of States com- 
posing the Confederacy, at therate of one gun for each State. 

246. The President of the Confederate States alone is to receive a na- 
tional salute. 

247. The- Vice- President is to receive a salute of two guns lessihan n 
national salute. 

248. The Heads of the great Execlltive Deportments of the National 
Government ; the Gencrats ; the Governors of States and Territories, 
within their respective jurisdictions, two g»n3 less than Vice-President. 

249. A Major- General, one gun less .than General. • 

250. A Brigadier- General, one gan less than Major-Genera!. 

251. Foreign shij^s of tvar will be saluted in return for a similar com- 
pliment, gun for gun, orp notice being officially received of such inten- 
tion. If there be several posts in sight of, vr Avithin six miles of each 
other, the principal only shall recipfocate compliments with ships 
passing. 

252. Officers of the Navy will be saluted according to relative rank, 

253. Foreign officers invited to risit a fort or"post,B)ay be saluted ac- 
cording to their relative rank. 

254-. Envoys and Ministers' of the Confederate States and foreign 
powers are to be saluted with 7 guns. 

255. A General officer will be saluted hot once in a year at each post, 
and only .when notice of his intention to visit the post* has been 
given, ' 



ESCOttTS OF nONOR. 27 

256. Salutes to individyuls sire to bo fired on their arnva? only, 

257. A national salute will bP fired at meridian on the anniversary of 
the adoption of the Provisional Constitution, 8th February', IFOf, at each 
military post and camp provided vfith artillery and amino nitjo?i. 

* ESCORTS OF HONOR* 

258. Escorts of honor may Ije Qt»inpo?ei of cavalry or itilauiry, or 
lioth, accordinp: to circumstances. 'They are guards of- honor for tho 
purpose yf receiving and cscortinjj; persouaj^es of high rank, civil ov 
military, Tli« tr<H»ps fe)r this purpose will be selected for their soldier- 
ly appearance a«i(4 t'ui>erior discipline. 

250. The escort will be drawn up in line, the centre opposite to the 
jilace where tlie personage presents himself, with an interval between 
tli9 wings to receive him and his retinue. On hh appearance, he will 
be received with the honors due to his rank. When he has taken his 
place in the line, the whole will be wheeled into platoons or companies, 
as the ca^e may be, and take up the march. The same ceremony will 
be observed, and the same honors paid, on iiis leaving the escort. 

26l>. When the position of the escort is at a considerable distance 
from the point where he is ospected to be received, as, for instance, 
wl)ere a cotirt yard or wharf intijrvenes, a double line of santinels will 
be posted from that point to the escort, facing ioward, and the sentinels 
'vvill successively salute *as ho passes. . 

201. Ah ofPcer wiil be appointed to attend him, to bear such comma- 
nications as he may have to make to the commander of the escort. 

fUXERAL nONOiK. 

'2C)2. On tiic receipt of ofiBcial intelligence Af the death of the Presi- 
dent qf the. Confederals Stale.'i, at any post or camp, tho commanding 
oflicer sliall, on tiie following (hiy, cause a gun to be fired at every half 
bour, beginning at sunrise and ending at sunset. When posts are con- 
tiguous, the firing will tike plaoe at the post only commanded by the 
su|ierior o'licer. 

2G3. On the day of interment of a Gcna'al<:oni7)ian(linr/inchkf, a, 
gun will be fired at every 4ialif hour, until the procession moves, begin- 
ning at sunrise. * ' •" 

201. The fuoaral escort of a (rtuem? §ha11 consist of a regiment of 
infantry, a S(juadr<in of cavalry, and sis pieces of artillery. 

2G5. That of a Afajor- General, a rogiment of infantry^ a squadron of 
cavalry, and four pieces of artillery. 

206. Tliat of a Brujadicr- General, a regiment of infantry, one com- 
(lany of cavalry, and two pjecefi of artillery. 

207. That of a C>>/onel, a regiment. 

2GS. That of a Lkulenfiid-Cvlond, six companies. 
260. That of a 3/"yo>-,.fonr~'conipaniea. 

270. 'I'hat of ft Ciip/(t>ii, one.company. 

271. That of a Siibu'lent. half a company. 

272. The f«'nera' ceeort shall always be commanded by an officer of 
the same rank with the deceased ; or, if none such be present, by one 
of tlie next inferior grade. ' • 

27o. Tho funeral escort of a non.-commissionod staff ofiBcer shall cnn- 
fiist cf sijilcfin rtuik and flle, oouimanded by a Sergeant. 



28 FUNERAL HONORS. 

274. That of a Sergeant, of fourteen rank and tile, commanded by a 
Sergeant. • 

275. That of a Corporal, of twelvo rank and file, commanded by a 
Corporal ; and * 

276. That of a Private, of eight rank and file, commanded by a 
Corporal. 

277. The escort will be formed iu two ranks, opposite to the quarters 
or tent of the deceased, with shouldered arms and bayonets unfixed, 
the artillery and cavalry on the ri;j;ht of the infantry. 

278. On the appearance of the corpse, the oflBcer commanding the 
escort will command, . 

Present Arms ! 

•when tlie honors due to the deceased will be paid by the drums and 
trumpets. The music will then play an appropriate air, and the coffin" 
■will then be taken to the right, where it will be halted. The comman- 
der will next order, 

1. Slionlder Arms. 2. By eompamj, [o?' platoon) left wheel. 3. March. 
4. ^eWse Arms. 5. Column, forward. 6. Guide rigid. 7. March. 

The arms will be reversed at the order by bringing the fire-lock un- 
der the left arm, butt to the front, barrel downward, left hand sustain- 
ing the lock, the right steadying the fire-lock Vrehind the back ; swords 
are reversed in a similar m'anner under the right arm. 

279. The column will be marched in slow time to solemn music, 
and on reaching the grave, will take a direction so as that the guides 
Bhall be next to the grave. When the centre of the column is opposite 
the grave, the commander will order, 

1. Column. 2. Halt. 3. Eight, into line whtel. 4. March. 
The coffin is then brought along the front, to the opposite side of the 
grave, and the commander then orders, 

1. Slionlder Arms. 2. Present Arms. 
And when the coffin reaches the grave, he adds : 

1. Shotilder Anns. 2. Rest oji Arms. 
The rest on arms is done by placing the muzzle on the loft foot, both 
hands on the butt, the head on tlie hands or bowed, right knee bent. 

280. After the funeral service is performed, and the coffin is lowereJ 
into the grave, the commander will order, 

1: Attention! 2. Shoidder Arms. S. Load at will. 4. Load. 
When three rounds of small arniswill be fired by the escort, taking 
care to elevate the pieces. 

281. This being done, the comman-der will order, 

\. By company, {or platoon) right icheel. 2. "Makch. 3, Column, for- 
ward. 4. Guide left. b. Quick March. 
The music will not begin to play until the escort is clear of the enclo- 
sure. 

282. When the distance to the jrlace of interment is considerable, the 
escort may march'rn common time,, and in column of route, after leav- 
ing the camp or garrison, and till it approaches the burial ground. 



INSPECTIOfIS OF Tire TROOPS. 



20 



2R3. The pall bfffirci's, six in number, will be selected from tbe gfadc! 
of the deceased, or from the grade or grades next abote of below it. 

'2M. At the funeral of an officer, as many in coinniission of ^the army;, 
(divisioiW, brigade, or regiment, according to the rank of the deceased, 
■fts can cotavifciiiently be spared from other duties, will join in procession,^ 
in unifihrra and wct!i side-arms, 'ilic funeral of a non-commissioped 
•oflBoer or |>ri.vRt3 v'dl be attended, in like manner, by the non-commiar 
.■eioned ofcoer* or privvate* of tlje regiment or coiffpany, according to the 
rank of tlve deceased, with side-arms only. ... 

285. Persons j&iniittg id the procession, follow the coflSn intha in- 
verse order of tlveir rank^ 

28G. The usual badg« of military mourning is a piece of black crapoi 
flvonnd the left .arm, akov« tlve elbow, .tnd also upon the sword hilt, and 
will be worn wlven in full or m undress. 

287. As fs.mily iMourning, er»pe will Ue worn by officers (when in 
uniform} ^nly around the left arna, 

288. The (irums of a funieral escort will be covered with black crape, 
or thin black serge. 

289. Funeral hofiors will be paid to deceased officers without military 
rank according to their assimilated grades, 

ARTICLE XXX, 

INSPECTIONS OF TOE TROOPS, 

290. The inspection of troops, as a division, regiment, or other body 
composing a garrison or command, not less than a comptiny will gene- 
rally be preceded by a review. 

291. There will be certain periodical inspections, to wit: 

1. The commanders of regiments and posts will make an inspection 
of their commands on the last day of every month. 

2. Captains will inspect their companies every Sunday morning. No 
fioldier will be excused from Sunday inspection except the guard, tho 
sick, and the necessary attendants in*tlic hospital. 

3. Medical officers having charge of hospitals will also make a tho- 
rough inspection of them every Sunday morning. 

4. Inspection when troops are mustered for payment. 

292. Besides these inspections, frequent visits will be made by the 
commanding officer, company and medical officers, during the month, 
to the men's quarters, the hospital guard-house, &e. 

• FOKH OF INSPECTION. 

293. The present example embraces a battalion of infantry. The 
inspecting officer and the field and staff officers will be on foot. 

294. The battalion b%ing in the order of battle, the Colonel will cause 
it to break into open column of companies, right in front. He will next; 
order the ranks to be'opencl, when the color-rank and color guard, un- 
der trhe direction of the Adjutant, will take post ten paces in front, and 
the band ten paces in rear of the Column. 

295. The Colonel, seeing the ranks aligned, will command, 

1. Officers and Sergeants, to'the front of your companies. 2. Marcu. 



^0 . FORM OF INSPECTION. 

The officers will form themselves in one rank, eit^ht paces, aad the ribn- 
commissioned officers in one rank, six paces ia iuivance, alon^ the ■wliolo 
fronts of their respective companies, from right to left, in the order of 
seniority ; the pioneers and music of each company, in one rank, two 
paces behind the non-conTmissioned officers. 
29G. The Colonel will next command, 

FicI(Pand S(af io the front, March. 
The commissioned officers thus designated will form themselves in one 
rank, on a line equal to the front of the column, ^s paces in front of 
the colors, from right to left, in the order of seniority ; and the non* 
commissioned staff, in a similar manner, two pacea in rear of the pre- 
ceding rank. The Colonel, seeing the movement executed, will take 
post on the right of the Lieutenant-Colonel, and wait the approach of 
the inspecting officer. But such of the field officers as may be superior 
in rank to the Inspect ir, will not take post in front of the battalion. 

297. The Inspector will commence in front. After inspecting the 
dress and general appearance of the field and commissioned staff under 
arms, the Inspector, accompanied by these officers, yill pass down the 
open column, looking at every rank in front and rear. 

298. The Colonel will now command, 

1. Order arms. 2. Rest. 
When the Inspector will proceed to make a minute inspection of th* 
several ranks or divisions, in succession, commencing in front. 

299. As the Inspector approaches the non-conimissionsd staff, color- 
rank, the color-guard, and the baud, the Adjutant will give the neces- 
sary orders for the inspection of arms,. Ixjxes, and knapsacks. The 
colors will be planted firm in the ground, to enable tb& coior-bearers to 
disphiy the contents of their kn;ips;icks. The nourcoramissiongd staff 
may be dismissed as soon as inspected; but the color-rank and color- 
guard will remain until the colors pj'c to be escorted to the place from 
which they were taken. 

300. As the Inspector sueces^vely approaches the companies, th© ■ 
Captains will command, 

1. Atleution. 2. Company: 3. Inspection — Arms. 
The inspecting officer will then go through the whole company, ftnd' 
minutely inspefit the arms, accoutrements, and dress of eas-h soldjer. 
After this is done, the Captain command, 

(?pe«-— Boxes. 
When the ammunition and the boxes will be efamined. 

301. The Captain will then coniDmnd, 

1.- Shouldey — Arms. 6. To the rear, open &rder. 

2. Close order. 7. Marcs.' 

3. March. 8. Front rank, About— Yacii>. 

4. Order— An-iis. ' 9. Uasling Knapsacks. 

5. Stack — Arms. 10. Open—Knajpsasks. 

302. The Sergeants will face inward at the 2d command, and close 
upon the centre of the 3d, and stack their arms at the 5fh cOYnmand ; 
at the 6th command they face outward^ jtnd resume their posltluas ai 



* ■ FORM OF INSPECTION. 31 

the 7th, When the ranks arc closed, preparatory to take arms, the Ser- 
geants will also close upon the centre, and at the word, take their arms 
and resume their places. 

30o. The knapsacks will be placed at the feet of the nien.^the flaps 
from them, with the great coats off the flaps, and the knapsacks leaning 
on the great cuats. In thie position the Inspector will cxai\iine their 
contents, or so manj' of them as he may tliink necessary, commencing 
with the non-commissioned officers, the men stainling at attention. 

o04, When the Inspector has passed through the company, the Cap- 
tain will command, 

Re-pack — Knapsacks, 
when each soldier will re-pack and buckle up his knapsack, leaving it 
on the ground, the number upward, turned iVum him, and then stand 
at rest. 

305. The Captain will then command, 

1. Altention. 2. Company. 3. Slhuj — Knapsaclcs. 

At the word slifig, each soldier will take his. knapsack, holding it by 
the inner straps, and stand erect ; at the last word he will replace it on 
his back. The Captain will continue, . 

4. Front rank, About — Face. 8. Shoulder — Arms. 

5. Close order. 9. Ojjicers and Sergeants, to your 

6. March. posts. 

7. Take — Arms. 10. Marcu, 

and will cause the company to file off to their tents and quarters, ex- 
cept tlie company that is to re escort the colors, which will await tho 
further orders of the Colonel. 

300. In an extensive column, some of the rearmost companies may, 
after the inspection of dress and general appearance, be permitted to 
stack arms until just before the Inspector approaches them, when they 
will be directed to take arms and resume their position. 

307. The inspection of the troops being ended, the field and staff will 
next accompany the Inspector to the hospital, magazine, arsenal, quar- 
ters, sutler's shop, guard-house, and su«h other places as he may think 
proper .to inspect. The Captains and subalterns repair to their compa- 
nies and sections to await the Inspector. 

; 08. The hospital being at all tindtep an object of particular interest, 
it will be critically and minutely inspected. 

309. The men will be formed in the company quarters in front of 
their re.-pective i unks, and on the entrance of the Inspector, the word 
Attention! will be given by the senior non-commissioned oflicer present, 
when tiie whole will salute with the hand, without uncove. ing. 

310. The Iusp«ctor attended by the company oflicers, will esamino 
the general arrangement of the interior of the quarters, the bunks, l)ed- 
ding, cooking, and table utensils, and such other objects as may present 
themselves ;• and after .vards the exterior. 

311. The Adjutaiit shall exhibit to the Inspector the regimental books 
and papers, including those relating to the transactions of the council 
of administration. The company books anil papers wJll also be exhib- 
ited, the whole together, generally at the Adjutant's office, and in the 
presence t)f the officers not otherwise particularly engaged. 



32 MUSTERS — FORMS OP PARADE. 

♦ 

312. The Inspector will examine critically the books and accounts of 
the administrative .and disbursinij; officers of the command, and tho 
money and property in their keeping. 

31o. TJie inspection of cavalry arw^ artillery will conform to the prin- 
ciples laid down in the foregoing paragraphs, regard being had to tho 
system of instruction for those arms^ of eervice respeotively. 

• ARTICLE XXXI. 



314. IHie musters will be made by an Inspector-General, if present, 
otherwise by an officer specially designated by the commander of the 
army, division, or department ; and in absence of either an Inspector- 
General, or officer specially designated, the muster will be made by-the 
commander of the post at the end of every month. 

315. When one inspecting otHcer cannot muster all the troops him- 
self on the day specified, the commanding officer will designate such 
other competent officer as may be necessary to assist him. 

315, All stated musters of the troops shall be preceded by a minute 
and careful inspection in the prescribed mode ; and if the command be 
more than a company, by a revieiv, before inspection, 

317. The mustering oftJcer having inspected the companies in suc- 
cession, beginning on the right, returns to the first companyto muster 
it. The company being at ordered arms, with open ranks, as when in- 
spected, the Captain will, as tho mustering officer approaches, command, 

1. Attention. 2. Company. 3. Shoulder — Arms. 4. Supjjori — Arms. 

The mustering officer will then call over the names on the roll, and each 
man, ns his name is called, will distinctly answer. Here! and bring his 
piece to a canrij and to an order. 

318. After each company is mustered, the Captain will order it to be 
marched to the company parade, and there dismissed to quarters to 
await the Inspector's visit. . 

319. After mustering the companies, the mustering officer, attended 
by the company commanders, will visit the guard hospital, to verify the 
presence ( f the men reported tliere. 

320. The miister and pay-rolls ^riH be made on the printed fornia 
furnished from tho Adjutant andd^nspector-General's office, and accord- 
ing to the directions given on them. On the muster-rolls companies are 
designated by the name of the Captain, whether present or absent. The 
pay-roll is left blank, to be filled by the Quartermaster. 

321. One copy of each muster-roll will be transi'.iitted by the muster- 
ing officer to the Adjutant and Inspector-General's office, in the War 
Department, within three days after the muster. 

ARTICLE XXXIL 

FORMS OF PARADE. 

322. On all parades of ceremony, such as reviews, guard-mounting, at 
Troop or Retreat parades, instead of the word " Rest," which allows 
the men to move or change tWfe position of their bodies, the command 
will be, " Parade — Rest." 'At the last word of this command, the sol- 



FORMS OF PARADE. 33 

dicr will carry the right foot six inches in the rear of the left heel, tho 
left knee sligh'ly bent, tiie body upright upon the right leg ; the ntus- 
.kct resting against the hollow of the right shoulder, the hands ci'ossad 
in front, the backs of them outw^xl, and the left hand'uppermost. At 
-the word " Attention ! the soldier will resume the correct position at 
order arms. In »tho position here indicated, the soldier will remain 
silent and motionless; and it is particnhuly enjoined upon all officers 
to cause the commands above given, on tho part of the soldier, to be 
executed with great brtskncs.s and spiri.t, 

323. Officers on all duties under arms are to have their swords drawn, 
without waiting for any words of command for that purpose. 

I. DRESS PARADE. 

324. There shall be daily one dress parade, at Troop or Retreat, as 
the commanding officer may direct. 

325. A signal will be beat or sounded half an hour before Troop or 
Eetreal, for the music to assemble on tho regimental parade, and each 
company to turn out under arms on its own parade, for roll-call and in- 
spection by its own officers. • 

326. Ten minutes after that signal, the Adjutant's call will be given, 
•when the Captains will march their companies (the band playing) to 
the regimental parade, where they take thgir positions in the order of 
battle. AVhen the line is formed, the Captain of the first company, oa 
notice from the Adjutant, steps one pace to the front, and gives to his 
company the command, " Ordfr — Arms, Parade — Rest," which is 
repeated by each Captain in succQs.^ion to the left. The Adjutant takes 
post two paces on the right of the line : the Sergeant-Major two paces 
on tho left. The music will be formed in two ranks on the right of the 
Adjutant. The senior oilicer present will take the command of»the pa- 
rade, and will take post at a suitable distance in front, opposite the 
centre, facing the line. 

327. When the companies have ordered arms, the Adjutant will order 
the music to beat off, when it will commence on tho right, beat in front 
of tho line to the left, "and back to its place on the right. 

328. When tiie music has ceased, tho Adjutant will step two paces to 
the front, face to the left, and command, 

1. Attention. 2. Battalion. 3. Mf^tlder — Arms. 4. Prepare to open 
ranks. 5. To the rear, o))en order. Q. March. 

At the sixth command, the ranks will be opened according to the system 
laid down in the Infai.try Tactics, the commissioned officers marching 
to the front, the company officers four paces, filed officers six paces, op- 
posite to their positions in the order of battle, where they will halt and 
dress. The Adjutant, seeing the ranks aligned, will command, 

Front ! 

and march along the front to the centre, face to the riglit, and pass the 
line of company olTiceis eight or ten paces, where he will come to the 
right about, and command. 

Present — Ar,ms ! 
when arms will be presented, officers saluting. 



3*4 . FORMS OF PARADE. 

329. Seeing this executed, he will face'about to the commanding offi- 
cer,, salute, and report, "Sir, the parade is formed." The Adjutant will 
tnen, on intimation to that effect, take his statfon three paces on the left 
of the commanding officer. 'one pace Wtired, passing round his rear. 

330. The commanding officer having acknowledged the salute of the 
line by touching his hat, will, alter the Adjutant has tak««n his'post, 
draw his sword and command, 

1. Battalion. ^.2. Shoulder — Alms! 

and add such exercises as he may think proper, concluding with 

Order — Arms I 

then return his sword, and direct the Adjutant to receive the reports. 

331. The Adjutant will now pass round the right of the commanding 
officer, advance upon the line, halt midway between him and the line of 
company officers, and command, 

1. First Seiyeaiiis, to the front and centre. 2, March. 
At the first command, they will shoulder arms as Sergeants, march two 
paces to the front, and face inward. At the second command, they 
will march to the centre and halt. The Adjutant will then order, 

1. Frcmt— Face. 2. Report. 
At the last word, each in succession, beginning on the right, will salute 
by bringing the left hand smartly acros»the breast to the right shoulder, 
and report the result of the roll-call previously made on the company 
parade. 

332. The Adjutant again commands, 

1. First Sergeants, outward — Face ! 2. To ijour posts — March I 
when they will resume their places, and order arms. The Adjutant 
will now face to the commanding officer, salute, report absent fficers, 
and give the result of the First Serjeants' reports. The commanding 
officer will next direct the qrders to be read, when the Adjutant will 
face about, and announce, 

Attention to Orders. 
He will then read the orders. «B 

333. The orders hiding been reao, the Adjutant will face to thi\ com- 
manding officer, salute, and report ; when, on an intimation- from the 
commander, he will face again to the lino, and announce, 

Pcbrade is dis7nissed. 
All the officers will now return their swords, face inward and close on 
the Adjutant, he having taken position in their line, the field officers on 
the flanks. The Adjutant commands, 

1. Front — Face ! 2. Forward — March ! 
when they will march forward, dressing on the centre, tlio music play- 
ing ; and when within six paces of the commander, the Adjutant will 
give the word. 

Halt! 
The officers will then salute the commanding officer by raising the hand 



FORMS OF PARADE. 35 

to tlio cap, and there remain until he shall have communicated to them 
such instrutitiona as he may have to give, or intimates that the ceremo- 
ny is liiiislied. As the officers disperse, the FirsB Sergeants will close 
the ranks of their vespe^tive companies, and march them to the com- 
pany parados, where they will be dismissed, the band continuing to play 
until the companies clear the regimental parade. 

334. All Geld and company oncers and men will be present at dress 
parades, unless especially excused, or on some duty-incompatible with 
such attendance. • 

335. A dress parade once a day will not be dispensed with, except oa 
extraordinary and urgent occasions. 

II. REVIEW OF A BATTALION OF INFANTRY. 

330. Preparatory to a review, the Adjutant will cause a camp color 
to be placed 8Q or 100 paces, or more, according to* the length of the 
line, in front of, and opposite to, where the centre of the l)attalion will 
rest, wlicre the reviewing oflGccr is supposed to take his station ; and, 
although he may choose to quit that position, still the color is tft<b"e con- 
sidered as the point to which all the movements and forrnations are 
relative. 

337- The Adjutant will also cause poinls to be marked, at suitable 
distances, for the wheelings of the divisions, so that their right flanks, 
in marching past, shall only be about four paces from the camp color, 
whore it is supposed the reviewing officer places himself to receive the 
i salute. 

338. The battalion being formed in the order of battle at shotddercd 
anii.f, the Colonel will command, 

1. Battalion, prepare for review. 2. To the rear, open order. 3. Marcii 
At the word AlARcn, the field and staff officers dismount; the company 
officers and the color rank advance four paces in front of the front rank, 
and place tliemselves opposite to- their respective places in the order of 
liattle. The color-guard replace the color-r^nk. The staff officers place 
tliemselves, according to rank, three paces on the right of the rank of 
company officers, and one pace from each other; the music tJikes post 
as at parade. The non-commissioned s*.aff take post (me pace from each 
other, and three paces on the right of the front rank of the battalion. 

339. Wlien the ranks are aligned, the Colonel will command. 

Front ! ^ 

land place himself eight paces, and the Lieutenant-Colonel ryid Major 
'will place themselves two paces, in front of tlie rank cf company offi- 
icers, and opposite to their respective places in the order of battle, all 
ifacing to tlie front. 

340. When tlie reviewing officer presents himself before the centre, 
jmd is fifty or sixty paces distant, the Colonel will face about, and com- 
mand, 

Present — ArmsI 

land resume his front. The men present arms, and the officers salute, 
so as to drop their swords with the last motion of tlio fire-lock. The 
iion-commissioned staff salute by bringing the sword to & poise, the hilt 



' 36 FORMS OF PARADE. 

resting on tbe breast, the blade in front of the face, inclining a little 
outward. The music will play, and all the drums beat, according to 
the rank of the reviewing officer The colors only salute such persons 
as, from their rank, and by regulation, (see Article XXIX.) are entitled 
to that honor. If the reviewing officer be junior in rank to the_^com- 
mandant of the parade, no compliment will be paid to him, but he will 
be received with arms carried, and -the ofiBcers will not salute as the 
column passes in review. , 

341. The reviewing officer having halted, and ackTiowledged the salute 
of the line by touching or raising his cap or hat, the Colonel will face 
about, and command, 

Shoiilder — Arms ! 
>vhen the men shoulder their pieces; the officers and non-commissioned 
Btafi' recover their swords with the last motion, and the Colonel faces to 
the front. 

342. The reviewing officer will then go toward the right, the whole 
remainjag perfectly steady, without paying any further compliment, 
while, he passes along the front of the battalion, and proceeds round the 
left flank, and along the rear of the file-closers, to the right. While 

- the reviewing officer is going round the battalion, the band will play, 
and will cease when he has returned to the right flank of the troops. 

343. When the reviewing -officer turns off, to place himself by the 
camp color in front, the Colonel will face to. the line and command, 

1. Close Order. 2. March ! 
At the first command, the field and company oGScers will face to the 
right-about, and at thp second command all persons, except the Colonel, 
will resume their places in the order of battle ; the field and staff offi- 
cers mounb. 

344. The reviewing officer having taken his position near the camp 
color, the Colonel will command, 

1. By company, right whetl.' 2. Quick — March! 3. Pass in review, 
. 4. Column, fonuard. 5. Guide right. 6. March ! 

The battalion, in column of cempanies, right in front, will then, in 
common time, and at shouldered arms, be put in motion ; the Colonel 
four paces in front of the Captain of the leading company: the Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel on a line with the leading company ; the Major on aline 
■with the real- company; the Adjutant on a line with the second com- 
pany; the Sergeant-Mjijor on a line with the company next preceding 
the rear — each six paces from the flank ( left ) opposite to the reviewing 
officer; the staff officers in one rank, according to the order of prece- 
dency, from the right, four paces in rear of the column ; the music, 
preceded by the principal musician, six paces before the Colonel ; the 
. pioneers; preceded by a Corporal, four paces before the principal musi- 
cian ; and the Quartermaster-Sergeant two paces from the side opposite 
to the guides, and in line with the pioneers. 

345. All other officers and non-commissioned officers will march past 
in the places prescribed for them in the march of an open cidumn. 
The guides and soldiers will keep their heads steady to the front in . 
passing in review. 



FORMS OF TARADE. 87 

346. The color-bearer will remain in the ranks while passing and 
saluting. 

.'!47. The music will begin to play at the command to march, and 
after passing the reviewing utBeer, \Vhcel to the left out of the column, 
and take a position opposite a*nd facing him, and will'continue to play 
until'the rear of the column shall have passed him, when itnvill cease, 
and follow in the rear of the battalion, unless tbe battalion is to pass in 
quick time, also, in which case it J»vill keep its position. 

348. The officers will salute the revievfing officer when they arrive 
within six paces of him, and recover their swords when six paces past 
him. All officers, in saluting, will cast their eyes toward the reviewing 
officer. 

349. The Colonel, when he has saluted at the head of the battalion, 
will place himself near the reviewing office;, and will remain there 
until the rear has passed, when ho will rejoin the battalion. 

350. The colors will salute the reviewing oflii^r, if entitled to it, 
when within six paces of him, and be raised when they have passed by 
him an equal distance. The drums will beat a march, or ruffle, accord- 
ing to the rank of the reviewing officer, at the same time that the colors 
salute. 

351. When the column has passed the reviewing officer, the Colonel 
will direct it to the ground it marched from, and command, 

Guide left. 
in time for the guides to cover. The column- having arrived on its 
ground, the Colonel will command, 

1. Column. 2. Halt 1 
form it in order of battle, and cause the ranks to be opened, as in para- 
graph 341. The review will terminate by the whole saluting as at the 
beginning. 

352. If, however, instructions have been previoHsly given to march 
the troops past in quick time, also, the Colonel will, instead of changing 
the guides, halting the column and wheeling it into line, as above di 
rected, give the command, * • 

1. Quick time. 2. March. 

In passing the reviewing officer again, no salute will be offered by 
either officer or men. The music will have kept its position opposite 
the reviewing officer, and at the last cummand will commence playing, 
and as the column approaciies, will place itself in front of, and march 
ofi* with the column, and continue to play until the battalion is halted 
on its original ground of formation. The review will terminate in the 
same maqner as prescribed above. 

353. The Colonel will afterwards cause the troops to perform such 
exercises and manoeuvres as the reviewing officer may direct. 

354. When two or more battalions are to be reviewed, they will be 
formed in parade order, with the proper intervals, and will also perform 
the Same movements that are laid down for a single battalion, observing 
the additional directions that arc given for such movements when ap- 
plied to the line. The Brigadier-General and his staff, on foot, will 
place themselves opposite the centre of the brigade; the Brigadier- 



38 FORMS OF PARADE. 

General two paces in front of the rank of Colonels, hie aid two paces 
on his rip:ht, and one retired; and the other brigade staff officers, those 
having the rank of field officers, in the. rank of Lieutenant Colonels 
and Majors and those below that rank, in ti»e rank of company officers. 

355. In passing in review, a Major-General will be four paces in 
front of tire CoUmel of the leading battalion of his division, and the 
Brigadier General will be on the right of the Colonels of the leading 
battalions of their brigades ; staff officers on the left of their Generals. 

356. When tlie line exceeds two battalions, the reviewing officer may 
cause them, to march past in quick time only. In such cases, the 
mounted officers only will salute. 

357. A number of companies less than a battalion will be reviewed 
as a battalion, and a single company as if it were with the battalion. 
In the latter case, the company'niay pass in column or platoons. 

358. If several brigades are to be reviewed together, or in one line, 
this further differenee will be observed : the reviewing personage, joined 
t)y the General of the division, on the right of his division, will proceed 
down the line, parallel to its front, and when near the Brigadier-Gen- 
erals respectively, will be saluted by their brigades in succession. The 
music of each, aft6r the prescribed salute, will play while the review- 
ing personage is in front, or in rear of it, and only then. 

359- In marching in review, Avith several battalions in common time, 
the music of each succeeding battalion will commence to play when the 
music of the preceding one has ceased, in order to follow its battalion. 
When marching in quick time, the music will begin to play when the 
rear company of the preceding battalion has passed the reviewing offi- 
cer. 

360. TiiC reviewing officer or personage will acknowledge the salute 
by raising, or taking off his cap or hat, when the commander of the 
troops salutes him ; and also when the colors pass. The remainder of 
the time occupied by the passage of the troops he will be covered. 

361. The review of cavalry and artillery will be conducted on similar 
principles, and according to the systems of instruction for those arms 
of the service. 

• III. GUARD-MOUNTING. 

362. Camp and garrison guards will be relieved every twenty-four 
hours. The guards at outposts will ordinarily be relieved in the same 
manner; but this must depend on their distance from camp, or other 
circumstances, which may sometimes require their continuing on duty 
several days. In such cases they must be previously warned to provMe 
themselves accordingly. 

363. At the first call for guard-mounting, the men warned for duty 
turn out en their company parades for inspection ly the !First Ser- 
geants ; and at the second call, repair to the regimental or garrison 
parade, conducted by the First Sergeants. Each detachment, as it ar- 
rives, will, under the^ direction of the Adjutant, take post on the left of 
the one that preceded it, in open order, arms shouldered and bayonets 
fixed; the. supernumeraries five paces in the rear of the men of their 
respective companies ; the First Sergeants in the rear of them. The 
Sergeant-Major will dress the ranks, count the files, verify the details, 



FORMS OF PAHADE. 39 

land wlicn the guard is formed, report tu tlio Adjutant, autl take post 
two puces on tlio left of the front rank. 

304. The Adjutant then commands Front, when the officer of the 
j guard takes post twelve paces in front of tlie centre, tlic Sergeants in 
lone rank, four paces in the rear of tlie officers ; and the Corporals in 
one rank, four paces in the rear (tf the Sergeants — all facing to the 
fr'Diit. Tlie Adjutant then assigns their places iu the guard. 
3()5. The Adjutant will then -command, ^ 

1. QlJicer, and noii-co)nmissio7ie(l ojju'a-.f. 2. AboidsY ace\ 3. Insiiec^ 
your guards — MAUcnl* , ~ 

The non-coinmissioned officers then take their posts. The commander 
of the guard then commands, 

1. Order — Arms! 2. Inspection — Arms! 

and inspects his guard. When there is no commissioned officer on the 
guard, the Adjutant will inspect it. During, inspection, the band will 
play.^ ... 

30G. The 'inspection ended, the officer of the guard takes post as 
though tiie guard were a company of a battalion, in open order, under 
review; at the same time, also, the officers of the dfly will take post in 
front of the centre of the guard ; the old officers of the day three paces 
on the riglit of the new officer of the day, one4)ace retired.- 

3G7. The Adjutant wnll now command, 

. I. Parade — Rest ! Troop— Beat off! 
when the music, beginning on tiie right, will beat down the line in front 
of the officer of the guard to the left, and back to its place on the right, 
where it will cease to plaj'. 

308. The Adjutant then commands, 

1. Attention! 2. Shoulder — Arms! 3. Close order — MARcn ! 
At. the word "close order," the officer ^111 face about; at " march,' 
resume his post in line. The Adjutant tlten commands, 

Present — Arms! 
at which ho will face to the nev officer of the day, salute, and report, 
" Sir, the (jnard is formed." The now officer of the day, after acknowl- 
edging the salute, will direct the Adjutant to march the g\uird in re- 
view, or by Hank to its post. But if the Adjutant be senior to the offi- 
cer of tlie day, lie will report without saluting with the sword then, or 
when marching the guard in review. 

309. In review, the guard march past the officer of the day, accord- 
ing to the order of review, conducted by the Adjutant, marching on 
the left of the first division ; the Sergcant-Major on the left of the last 
division. 

370. When the Cjilumn has -passed the officer of the day, the officer 
of the guard marches it to its post, the Adjutant and Sergeant Major 
retiring. The music, which has wheeled out of the column, and taken 
post opposite the officer of the day, will cease, and the old officer of tho 
day salute, and give the old or stAnding orders to the new officer of tho 
day. The supernumeraries, at the same time, will be marched by tho 
First Sergeants to their respective company parades, and dismissed. 



40 FORMS OF PARADE. 

371. In bad weather, or at night, or after fatiguinjz; marches, the 
ceremony of turnino; off may. be dispensed with, but not the inspection. 

372. Grand guards, and otlicr brigade guards, are organized and 
mounted on the brigade parade by the stall' officer of tlie parade, under 
the direction of the field officer of the day of the brigade, according to 
the principles here prescril)ed for the police guard of a regiment. The 
detail of each regiment is assembled on the regimental parado,"A'eritied 
by the AdjuMnt, and marched to the brigade parade by the senior offi- 
cer of the detail. After inspection and review, the officer of the day 
directs the several- guards to their respective posts. 

373. The officer of the old guard having his guard paraded, on the 
approach of the new guard, commands, • 

Bresent — Akms! 

374. The new guard will march, in quick time, past the old guard, ut 
shoulder arms, officers saluting, and take pest four paces on its right, 
where, being aligned with it, its commander will ordei', 

Present — Arms ! 
The two officers will then approach each other and salute. They will 
then return to their respective guards, and command, 
1. Shoulder — Arms! 2. Order — Arms. 

375. The officer of the new guard will now direct the detail for the 
advanced guard to be formed and marched to its post, the list of the 
guard made and. divided into three reliefs, experienced soldiers placed 
over the arms of the guard and at the remote and responsible posts, and 
the young soldiers in posts near the guard for instruction in their 
duties, and will himself proceed to take possession of the guard-house 
or guard-tent, and the articles and prisoners in charge of the guard. 

370. During the time of relieving the sentinels and of calling in the 
small posts, the old commander will give the new all the information 
atid instructions relating to his post. 

377. The first relief having been designated and ordered two paces 
to the front, the Corporal of thenew guard will take charge of it, and 
go to relieve the sentinels, accompanied by the Corporal of the old 
guard, who will take command of the old sentinels, when the whole are 
relieved. ' 

378. If the sentinels are numerous, the Sergeants are to be em- 
ployed, as well as Corporals, in relieving them. 

379. The relief, with arms at a support, in two ranks, will march by 
flank, conducted by the Corporal*on the side of the leading front-rank 
man ; and the men will be numbered alternately in the front and rear 
rank, the man on the right of the front rank being No. 1. Should an 
officer approach, the Corporal will command carry arms, and resume the 
support arms when the officer is passed. 

380. The sentinels at the guard-house or guard-tent will be the first 
relieved and left behind ; the others are relieved in succession. 

381. When a sentinel sees the relief approaching, he will halt and 
face to it, with his arms at a shoulder. At six paces, the Corporal will 
command, 

1. Relief. 2. Halt! 



FORMS OF PARADE — GUARDS. ' 41 

when the relief will halt and carry arms. The Corporal will then add, 
"No. 1," or "No. 2," or "No. 3," according to the number of the post, 

Arms—'PoR'fl 

The two sentinels will,»with arms at pari, then approach each other, 
when the old sentinel, under the correction of the Corporal, will whis- 
per the instructions to the new sentinel. This done, the two sentinels 
will shoulder arms, and the old sentinel will pass, in quick time, to his 
place in rear of tlie relief. The Corporal will then eommand, 

1. Support — Arms ! 2. Fortcard. 3. Marcu ! 

and the relief proceeds in the same manner until the wnblff are re- 
lieved. 

382. The detachments and sentinels from the old guard having come 
in, it will be marched, at sJionlder arms, along the front of the new 
guard, in quick time, the new guard standing at present arms; offi- 
cers saluting, and the music of lotli guards beating, except at the out- 
posts. 

383. On arriving at the regimental or garrison parade, the commander 
of the old guard will send the detachments composing if, under charge 
of the non-commissioned officers, to their respective regiments. Before 
the men are dismissed, their pieces will be drawn or discharged at f\ 
target On rejoining their companions, the chiefs of squads will ex- 
amine the arms, &c., of their men, and catise flie whole to be put away 
in good order. 

384. When the old guard has marched off fifty paces, the officer of the 
new guard will order his men to stack their arms, or place them in the 
arm racks. , 

385. The commander of the guard will then make himself acquainted 
with all the instructions for his post, visit the sentinels, and question 
them and the non-commissioned officers relative to the instruction* they 
may have received from other persons of the old guard. 

ARTICLE XXXIII. 

GUARDS. 

38G. Sentinels will be relievea every two hours, unless the state of 
the weather, or other causes, should make it necessary or pre per tliatit 
be done at shorter or longer intervals. 

387. Each relief, before mounting, is inspected by the commander .of 
the jruard or of its pust. The Corporal reports to him, and presents 
the old relief on its return. 

388. Tiie covnfcrst'i/n, or watchword, is given to such persons as are 
entitled to pass during the night, and to officers, non-commissioned offi- 
cers, and sentinels of tiic guard. Interior guards receive the counter- 
sign only when ordered by th» commander of the troops. 

380. the })aro!c is imf.arted to such officers only a^ have a right to 
visit the guards, and to make the grand rounds; and to officers com- 
manding guards. 

. 390. As soon as the new jrunri has been'marched off, the officer of 
the day will repair to the office of the commanding officer and report 
for orders. 



42 ' GUARDS. 

391. The officer cf the day must see that the officer of the guard 13 
furnished with the parole and countersign before retreat. 

392. The officer of the day .visits the guards during the day at such 
times as he may deem necessary, and makes his rounds at night at least 
once after 12 o'plock. • 

393. Upon being relieved, the officer of the day vnW make such re- 
marks in the report of the officer of the guard as circumstances require, 
and present the san'C at headquarters. 

394. Commanders of guards leaving their posts to visit their senti- 
nels, or on other duty, are to mention their intention, and the probable 
time of thefr absenpe, to the next in command. 

395. 1Jh# officers are to remain constantly at their guards, except 
while visiting their sentinels, or necessarily engaged elsewhere on their 
proper duty. 

396. Neither officers nor soldiers are to take off their clothing or 
accoutrements while they arc on guard. 

397. The officer of tlie guard must see that the countersign is duly 
communicated to the sentinels a little before twilight. 

398. When a fire breaks out, or any alarm is raised in a garrison, all 
guards are to fee immediately underarms. 

399. Inexperienced officers are put on guard as supernumeraries, for 
the purpose of instruction. 

400. Sentinels will not take orders or allow themselves to be relieved, 
except by an officer or rfon-ctmimissioned officer of their guard or party, 
the officer of the day, or the commanding officer; in which case the 
orders will be immediately notified to the commander pf the guard by 
the ojficer giving them. 

401. Sentinels will report every breach of orders or regulations they 
are instructed to enforce. 

402. Sentinels must keep themselves on the alert, observing every 
thing that takes place within sight and hearing of their post. They 
will carry their arms habitually at support, or on either slioulder,^but 
w^ll never quit them. In wet weather, if there be no sentry-box, they 
will secure arms. 

403. No sentinel shall quit his post or hold conversation not neces- 
sary to the proper discharge of his duty. 

404. All persons, of whatever rank in the service, are required to 
observe respect toward sentinels. 

405. In case of disorder, a sentinel must call out the guard; and if 
a fire take place, he must cry — " Fire!" adding the number of his post. 
If tu either case the danger be great, he must discharge his firelock be- 
fore calling out. 

40G. It is the duty of a sentinel to repeat all calls made from posts 
more distant from the main body of the guard than his own, and no 
sentinel will be posted so distant as not to be heard by the guard, either 
directly or through other sentinels. 

407. Sentinels will present arms to general and fiel<l officers, to the 
officer of tlie day, and to the commanding officer of the post. To all 
other officers they will carry arms. 

408. When a sentinel in his sentry-box sees an officer approaching, 
he will stand at attention, and as the officei: passes will salute him/by 



GUARDS. 43 

brin.c;ing the left Land briskly to the musket, as high as the right 
shoulder, 

409. The sentinel at any post of the guard, when he sees any body 
of troops, or an officer entitled to compliment, approach, must call 
" Turn outjhc guard!" and announce wlio approaches. 

410. Guards do not turn out as a mattar of compliment after sunset; 
but sentinels will, wlicn officers in uniform approach, pay them proper 
attention, by facing to the proper front, and standing steady at shoul- 
dered arms. This, will be observed until the eveningils so far advanced 
that the sentinels begin challenging. 

411. After retreat (or the hour appointed by the commanding officer), 
until broad daylight, a sentinel challenges every person who approaches 
I im, taking, at the same times the position of arms port. He will suf- 
fer no person to come nearer than Avithin reajh of his bayonet, until the 
person has given the countersign. 

412. A sentinel, in challenging, will call out — " W/io comes there ?" 
If answered — " Friend, with the countersign," and he be instructed to 
pass persons with the countersign, he will reply " Advance friend, with 
the countersign!" If answered — "Friends!" he will reply, " Halt 
friends! Adt-ance one, with the countersign !" If answered-^" iWj>/," 
** Patrol, ov "■Grand rounds," he will reply — "Halt! Advance, Ser- 
geant [or Corporal) with the countersign !" and satisfy himself that the 
party is what it represents itself to be. If he have i;o authority to pass 
persons with the countersign, if the wrong countersign be given, or if 
the persons have nut the countersign, he will cause them to stand^ and 
call, " Corporal oj the Gnard!" 

413. In the daytime, when the sentinel before the guard sees the 
officer of the day approach, he will call — " Turn out the g>iard ! Officer 
of the day." The» guard will be paraded, and salutu with present il 
arms. 

414. When any person approaches a post of the guard at night, the 
sentinel before the post, after chalfenging, causes him to halt until ex- 
amined by a non-commissioned officer of the guard. If it be the officer 
of the day, or any other officer entitled to inspect the guard and tomuko 
the rounds, the noncommissioned o'tlccr will call—" Turn out the 
guard!" when the guard will be paraded at shouldered arms, and the 
officer of the guard, if ho thinks necessary, may demand the counter- 
sign and parole.' 

415. The officer of the day, wishing to-make the rounds, will take 
an escort of a norf-commissioned oft"cei;an(J two men. When the rounds 
are challenged by a sentinel, the Sergeant will answer — " Grand 
rounds!" and the sentinel will reply — "Half, grand rou)ids ! Advance, 
Sergeant, ivith the countersign .'" Upon whiclf the Sergeant advances 
and gives the countersign. The sentinel will then cry — " Advance 
rounds!" and stand at a shoulder till they have passed. 

41G. When the sentinel before the guard challenges, and is answer- 
ed — " Grand rounds ."* he will reply — " Half, grand rounds ! Turn out 
the guard : graiid rounds!" Upon which the guard will be dyiwn up 
at shouldered arms. The officer commanding the guard will then order 
n Sergeant and two men to advance; when within ten paces, the Ser- 
geant challenges. The Sergeant of the grand round answers — " Grand 
rounds ''" The Sergeant of the guard replies — " Advance, Sergeant, 



44 



FORM OF GUARD REPORT, 



FORM OF GUARD REPORT. 
Report of Guard mounted at , on the , and relieved on the 



Parole. 


CO 

C 

S 

1-3 


a 
re 
u 

D 


re 
o 




■ 

c 

re 
'5 

'1 


> 


o 
H 


re 

<5 


Articles in 
charge. 


6" . !^ 


Countersign. 












<2 • - c'-' 

1.2 S 

-•"^ 
a> <! 

"5 

o 

PS 


Detail 














• 

























LIST OF THE 


GUARD. 


'. 




Reliefs, and when posted. 


Where posted. 

• 

Guard house. 
Magazine. 
Quarm'r store. 




1st Relief. 
Frotn — to — , 
and — to — . 


2d Relief 

From — to — . 

and — • to — 


3d Relief. 
From — to — , 
and — to — . 


Remarks. 


i 


Name. 


Co. 


Rt 

1st 
-Ith 
fith 


Name. 


Co. 

D. 
E. 
F. 


Rt. 

3d 
•2d 

5th 


Name. 


Co. 


Rt. 

8th 

9th 

10th 




1 

2 
3 


C. D. 

E: F. 
G. H 


A. 
B. 
C. 


I. J. 
K. L. 

M. N. 


q'. K. 

S. T. 


G. 
H. 
I. 




1 

2 
3 


Sergea 
Corpoi 
Corpor 


ntV 
al V 
al Y 


V. \ 


^, Co. A 

I., Co. B 
, Co. C, 


, Is 
Is 
3d 


t A 

Inf 

in fa 


tillery. 

antry. 

ntrjr. 






Serg't guard. 
Corp'l ■ " 













LIST 


OF PRISONERS. 












S 

To 

a> 

p: 


•Confined: 


B3 


<u 






0} 

s 

re 


d 

£ 

o 




i£ 

5. 


C 
C 


Remarks 


o 


^Vhen. 


By whom. 


1 

2 






• 










3 
4 


• 








" 









A. B. C, 



Lieut. 



Regiment 



Commanding the Guard. 




ORDERS AND CORRESPONDENCE. 45 

vnlh the countersign!" The Sergeant of the round advances alone, 
gives tlie countersign, and returns to his round. The Sergeant of the 
guard calls to his of cer — '^T/ie coii>ilersi(}?i is right. '" on which the oflB- 
cer of the guard calls — "Advance, roi(7ids .'" The.officer of the rounds 
then advauces alone, the guard standing at shouldered arms, Tlie offi- 
cer of tlie rounds passes along the front of the guard to the oflBcer, wlio 
keeps his post on the right, and gives him the parole. He then exam- 
ines the guard, orders back his escort, and, taking a new one, proceeds 
in the same manner to other guards. 

417. All material instructions given to a sentinel on post by persona 
entitled to make grand rounds, ought to be promptly notified to tlio com- 
mander of the gu.fk-d. 

418. Any General officer, or the commander of a post or garrison, 
may visit the guards of his command, and go to the grand rounds, and 
boxeceived in the^amc manner as prescribed for the officer of the day. 

ARTICLE XXXIV. 

ORDERS AND CORRESPONDENCE. 

419. The orders of commanders of armies, divisions, brigades, regi- 
ments, are denominated orders of such army, division, &c., and are 
either general or special. Orders arc numbered, general and special, 
in separate series, each beginning with the year. 

420. General orders announce the time and place of issues and pay- 
ments, hours for roll calls and duties ; the number and kind of order- 
lies, and the time when thoy shall be relieved ; police regulations, and 
the prohibitions required by circumstances and localities ; returns to be 
made, and their forms ; laws and regulations for the army ; promotions 
and appointments ; eulogies or censures to corps or individuals, and 
generally, whatever it may be important to make known to the whole 
command. 

421. Special orders arc such as do not concern the troops generally, 
and need not be published to the whole command ; such as relate to the 
march of some particular corps, tiio establishment of some post, the de- 
taching of individuals, the granting requests, &c., itc. 

422. A general order, and an important special order, must be read 
and apnrovcd by the officer whose order it is, before it is issued by the 
staff officer. 

423. ^n order will state at the head, the source, place and Sate, and 
at the foot, the name of the commander who gives it ; as for example : 

Ilcadqi^riers of the First Brigade, Second Division. 

Camp at , Isl June, 18G — . 

General Orders, ] 

No. . j • 

, By command of Brigadier-General A. B. 

C. 1)., Assistant Adjutant-General. 

424. Orders may be put in the form of ktters, but generally in the 
etrict military form, through the otfce of the Aijutant or Adjutant 
and Inspector-General of the conynand. 

425. Orders are transmitted througii all the intermediate commanders 
in the order of rank. Wheo aa intermediate commander is omitted, 



46 ORDERS AND CORRESPONDENCE. 

the oflScer who gives the order shall inform him, and he who receives 
it shall report it to his immediate superior." 

42G. Orders for any body of troops will be addressed to the com- 
nianderf and will be opened and executed by the commander present, 
and published or distributed by him when necessary; printed. order.-i, 
however, are generally distributed direct to posts from tlie headquar- 
ters' where issued. 

427. Orders assigning the stations of officers of engineers, ordnance, 
and of the staff departments, except as provided in the regulations for 
troops in the campaign, will be given by the Secretary of War, through 
the Adjutant and Inspector-General's office, or by commanders of geo- 
graphical departments, under the special authority Of the War Depart- 
ment. The commander of a department, who, in consequence of the 
movement of troops or other necessity of the service, removes an officer 
from the station assigned to him by the Secretary of War, shall prompt- . 
ly report the case to the Adjutant and Inspector-General. 

428. A file of the printed orders will be kept with the headquarters 
of each regiment, with each company, and at each military post, and 
will be regularly turned over by the commander, when relieved, to his 
successor. 

429. If general orders a;e not received in regular succession, com- 
manding officers will report the missing numbers to the proper head- 
quarters. 

430. The orderly hours being fixed at ^ach headquarters, the staff 
officers and chiefs of the special services either attend in person, or 
send their assistants to obtain the orders of the day ; and the First Ser- 
geants of crmpanies repair for that purpose to the regimental or garri- 
son headquarters. 

431. During marches and active operations, and when the regular 
orderly hours cannot be observed, all orders will be either sent direct 
to the troops, or the respective commanders of regiments or corps will 
be informed when to send to headquarters for them. Under the same 
circumsta^ices, orders will be read to the troops during a halt, without 
waiting for the regular parades. 

432. Orders to any officer to make a tour of travel on duty, as for 
the inspection or payment of troops, &c., shall designate the troops and 
posts he shall visit, and the order in which he shall visit them, and the 
route of travel. • 

433. Every commander who gives an order involving an expenditure 
of public mimey, shall send a copy, without delay, tq.the bureau of the 
War Dop^-tment to which the expenditure appertains; and if such 
commander be fierving in a military department, ha shall send a copy 
of the order to the headquarters of the Depsirtmont. 

434^ If a military commander shall give to a disbursing officer any 
order in conflict .with orders received by him from the officer in cliargo 
of his department, at any superior headquarters, such commander shall 
forthwith transmit the order to such headquarters, with explanation of 
the necessity /vhich justifies it. 

435. Copies of all orders of the commanders of armies, departments, 
divisions, and detached brigades, and 6f the superintendent of the re- 
cruiting service, will be forwarded at their diites, or as soon thereafter 



RETURNS AND REPORTS. ' 47 

ns practicable, in separate series, on full shrcts of letter paper, or as 
printed, to tlie Adjutant and Inspector-General's offce. ** 

436. Written communications from a commander to those under his 
command may be made by his staff officer. In all other cases, by the 
oflicer himself. • 

437. In signing an official communication, the writer shall annex to 
his name his rank and corps. Wlien he writes by order, he shall state 
by whose order. All communicatihnj requiring answers must indicate 
the Post-OOBce to which they s4iould be sent. 

438. Communications to a commander from those under his com- 
mand are addressed to the proper officer of his staff; to the chief of the 
^djutant and Inspector-General's DeparJ^mcut, in wliat relates specially 
to his bureau, or to the service generally ; to the chief of any other de- 
partments of the staff, in what relates specially to his branch of the 
service. Communicatioug to the Secretary of War will be mafle through 
the Adjutant^ arid Inspector General's oilicc of the War Department, 
unless it be a case of claim, allowance, or other busiitess specially ap- 
pertaining to some other bureau ; for example — claims of pay or for 
mileage, or quarters, will be transmitted through the Quartermaster- 
General. All communications, except rolls and stated returns, and 
accounts, are to bo passed through the intermediate commanders. The 
same rule governs in verbal applications ; for example — a Lieutenant 
seeking an indulgence must apply through his Captain. Communica- 
tion from officers of the staff and administrative services to their own 
chiefs do not pass through the military commanders under whom they 
serve, except estimates ibr funds or supplies. 

439. Copies of all important communications from the bureaus of the 
AVar Department to disbursing officers, relating to the service in a mili- 
tary department, shall be sent from the bureau to the departnient com- 
marftler. 

440. Rolls and relurnfl will be accompanied by a letter of transmittal, 
enumerating them, and referring to no other subject. 

441. Gerterally, oflicers who forward communications, indorse on them 
their remarks or opinion, without other letters uf transmittal. 

442. Official letters should generally refer to one- matter only. In I'e- 
gard to an enlisted man, the company and regiment must be stated. 

443. Letters on letter paper will be folded in three folds, parallel 
with the writing. 

444. All communications on public service are to be marked on the 
cover, "0/licial business," and to receive attention, must conform to the 
requirements of p^agraph 438. 

ARTICLE XXXV. 

RETURNS AND REPORTS. 

MONTHLY RETURNS. 

445. Commanders of Army corps, regiments and battalions, will 
make to the Adjutant and Inspector-General's office of the War De" 
partmcnt, monthly returns of their respoctivc corps, regiments and bat" 
talions, on the forms furnished from that office, and according to tho 
directions expressed on them. 

In like manner, Captains make monthly company returns to regi- 



48 , ANNUAL RETURNS. — HELD REPORTS. 

mental headquarters. All monthly returns will be forwarded on the 
first day of tne next month, except regimental returns, which are for- 
warded as soon as all the company returns are received. 

446. If any company be su far from regimental headquarters as to 
delay the transmhtal of the monthly return to the 10th of the month, 
the Colonel will not wait f )r the return of such company, but leave 
space for it to bo entered at the Adjutant and Inspector-Generars of- 
fice; 'for which purpgsc tiie Captain will transmit a copy of the return 
direct to the Adjutant and InspectorGeaeral, as well as to regimental 
headquarters. 

447. In campaign, monthly returns of divisions and detached bri- 
gades will be made to the Adjutant and Inspector-General's office. They 
will exhibit separately the several regiments, and detachments, and staff 
corps, and the strength of each garrison within the command. These 
returns, ai?d those of regiment^s, corps, and 4)osts, in campaign, will, 
unless obherwif^e ordered, be transmitted through the inte^jpiediate com- 
manders. * 

448. 'ihe established printed S^vrn^ and blanks of all returns required 
from the conunanders of divisions, brigades, regiments, corps, compa- 
nies, and posts, will be furnished from the Adjutant and Inspector- 
General's office on their requisitions annually m^^de', or oftener, if ne- 
cessary. The receipt of these forms and blanks will be immediately 
acknowledged, and afterward accounted for on the next monthly returns. 

449. Manuscript returns, rolls, certificates, and other documents, are 
prohibited, unless the proper printed forms have not been.received in 
time. Regimental returns must be made out in the name of the Colo- 
nel, whether he be present or ai)sent. 

ANNUAL RETUHNS — CASUALITIES. 

450. This return will exhibit the various changes and alteraJions 
which may have taken place in the regimeirt during the preceding 
twelve months ; that is to say — a statement of the number of resigna- 
tions, transfers, deaths, &e., of commissioned, officers; the number of 
men joined by enlistment, transferred and discharged ; the number tried 
by courts-martial or by the civil law, and the nature of their offences ; 
the number of discharges, deaths, dismissals, and desertions ; number 
joined from desertion, pardoned, &c. 

RETURN OF DEQEASED SOLDIERS. '^ 

451. To be forwarded to the Adjutant and Inspector-General, by the 
Colonels of regiments, quarterly. Also, a duplicate % the Second,Audi- 
tor of the Treasury. 

FIELD RETURNS. , 

452. Besides the stated returns of the troops, such other ^e^d returns 
and reports will be made as may be necessary to keep the government 
informed of the condition and strength of the forces. 

453. After an action or affair, a return of the killed, wounded, and 
missing will be made, in which the name, rank, and regiment of each 
officer and soldier will be ^peeifieil, witK such remarks and explanations 
as may be requisite for the records of the Department of War, or be 
necessary to establish the just claims of any individual who may have 



R^ORTS. — PRISONERS OF WXK. — PROPERTY. 49 

been wounded, or of the heirs and repregentntives of iiny killed in ac- 
tion (taking care to specify the nature of the {found, the iitne and place 
of its ucciirrence, the company, regiment, or corps, arid the name of the 
. Captain, Colonel, or other commanding officer.) 

•^ REPORTS. . 

454. The date of appointment, of detail, and of removal of all etaflf 
officers, or of officers selected for duty in staff departments, which may 
entitle them to receive additional pa3', will be immediately reported by 
the olticer making such appointment, detail, or removal, to the Adjutant 
and Inspector-General, and to the Quartermaster of the department or 
command io which such officers belong. 

455. Whenever any change takes place in the position or location of 
troops, the fact will be immediately r^orted by tha commanding oflScer 
to general, division, and department head-quarters, specifying the date 
of departure iif the whole or any part of the troops, or of the arrival of 
any detachment ; as well as all other circumstances connected with 
such changes in the command. These special reports will always be 
accompanied by an exact return of the troops according to the establish- 
ed printed forms. A similar report will be noted on the next monthly 
return of the p ist or station. If a new post or position be established, 
•its situation, and the nearest post-office and proper route to it, should 
be reported. 

45^. Olicers on detach.^d duty, will report monthly to the command- 
ers of their posts, of their regiments or corps, and to the Adjutant and 
Inspector-General — sucli reports will give the officer's station, the na- 
ture of his duty, and the authority placing him thecfon. Those visiting 
dlic seat of government will register their names at the office of the Ad- 
jutant and Inspector-General. / 

PRISONERS OF WAR — CAPTURED PROPERT/. 

457. A return of prisoners, and a report of the number and descrip- 
t ti<in of the killed and wounded of the enemy, will be forwarded to the 
f Adjutant and Inspector General's ott>ce, Richmond, Va. 
% 458. A return of all property captured will be made by the command- 
i ing officer of the troops by wliom such capture was made, to the Adju- 
* tant and Inspector General, at Richmond, ift order that it may be dis- 
posed of according to the orders of the War Department. 

INSPECTION' REPORTS. 

459- Inspectioiui'cports will show the discipline of the troops ; their 
instriTction itr all military exercises and duties ; the state of their arms, 
clothing, eJ^uipments, and accoutrements of all kinds; of their kitch- 
ens and messes ; of the barracks and quarters at the post ; of the guard- 
house, prisons, hospital, bake house, magazine, storehouses, and stores 
of every d(?scription ; of the stables and horses; the condition of the 
post school ; the management and ap;r^lication of the post and company 
• funds; the state of the post, and regimental, and company books, pa- 
pers, and files ; the zeal and ability of the officers in commancVof troops ; 
the capacity of the officers conducting the administiative and staff ser- 
vices, the fidelity and economy of their disbursements : the condition of 
all public property, and the amount of money in the hands of each dia 



50 ORGANIZATION OF AN AKMT IN THE FlELlf. 

bursing officer; the regulari^ of issues and payments; the mode of 
enforcing discipline bj couvts-martia), and by the authority of the ofli- 
cers ; the propriety and legality of all punishments inflicted; and any 
information whatsoever, concerning the service in any matter or partic- 
ular that may meriS notice, or aid to correct defects or introduce im- 
proveme.its. 

460, Inspectors are required particularly to report if any officer ia of 
intemperate habita, or imtit ior active aeryiccbj iufirmity or any other: 
«5vuse, 

ARTICLE XXXVI. 

TROOPS IN CAMPAIGN. 

ORGAJflZATlOlSf OF *N ARMY IN THE JIELP. 

4^11. The formation by divisions is the basis of the organizatioa and 
administration of armies in the Beld. 

462. A division consists usually of tv?o or three brigades, either of 
infantry or cavalry, and troops of other corps in the necessary propor- 
tion. 1 

463. A brigade is formed of tvro or more regiments. The first num-l 
her takes the rinht. ^ 

464. Mixed brigades are sometimes formed of infnntry and light cat'^ I 
airy, especially fur the advance guards. !l 

465. As the truops arrive at the rendeavous, the general commaflding-[ 
in-chief will organize them into brigades and divisions. 

466. The light cavalry is employed as flankers and partizans, and 
generally for all senvice out of the line, 

467. ileavy cavalry belon;.';3 to the reserve, and is covered, when ne- 
cessary, in marches, camps, or bivouacs, by light troops, or infantry of 
the line. 

468. The arratigement of the troops on parade and in order of battle' 
5a — 1st, the light infantry; 2d, infantry of the line; 3d, light cavalry ;| 
4th, cavalry of the line ; 5th, heavy cavalry. The troops of the artil- 
lery and engineers are in the centre of the brigades, divisions, or corps 
to which they are attached ; marines take the left of other infantry ; 
volunteers and militia take the left uf regular troops of the same arm, 
and among themselves, regiments of volunteers or militia of the same 
arm take place by lot. This arrangement is varied by the general com- 
manding in-chief, as the circumstances of war render expedient. 

469. Brigades in divisions, and divisions in the army, are numbered 
from right to left ; but in reports of military operations, brigades and 
divisions are designated by the name of the general commai*ding them. 

470. The order of regiments in brigades and of brigades in divisions 
may be changed by the commander of the diyision for important rea- 
sons, such as the weakness of some corps, or to relieve one from march- 
ing too long at the rear of the column. Such changes must be reported 
to the general commanding-in chief. 

471. Ti\e g«neral commandiog-in-chief assigns the generals of divi- 
sions and of brigades to their respective commands, when the assign- 
ment is not made by the Department of War. 

472. The general of brigade inspects his troops in detail, by cornpa- 
uiep, when ho takes the command ond at the opening of the campaign, 



' CONTRTIJUTIONS — ^ORDERLIES. 51 

and AS often as mny bo necessary to ascertain exactly their condition. 
The general of divisi(H» ninkes similar inspections when he thinks pro- 
per. At these inspections tlio generals exjiminc the arms, clothing, 
equipments, hartvess, horses, ^e. ; direct the necessary repairs, and dc- 
eignate the men and horses to remain in depot, or march with the train. 

473. Repiirts of inspections are made by the general of lirigade to 
the general of division, and by the general of division to the general 
commanding in-chief- 

474. During marches and all active operations, generals of brigades 
k,eep themselves exactly informed, by reports of corps and by their in- 
spections, of the actual strength of the regiments, so as always, and 
especially after an eng«genient, to make accurate returns to tlie general 
of division. 

475. Staff officers and officers of engineers, and artillery, according 
to the nature of the -service, arc assigned to the ftead-quartera of ar- 
mies and divisions, and detached brigades, by order of the general com- 
inanding-iachief, when the distribution cf these officers has not been 
regulated by the War Department. The necessary staff will be assign- 
ed to commanders of Itrigades. 

4~Q. When an Engineer' or other ofiToor is v^harged with directing an 
expedition or making a reconnoisance, without having command of the 
<?scort, tlie commander of the escort shall consult him on all the arrange- 
ments neoossnry to secure the success of the operation. 

477. Staff officers, and commanders of engineers, and artillery, re- 
port to their immediate commanders the state of the supplies and what- 
ever concerns tlie service under their direction, and receive their orders, 
nnd comijuiuicate to them those they receive froi« their superiors in 
their own corps, 

478. The senior ofScer of engineers, of artillery, and the departments 
of the general staff serving at the chief head-qnarte»'s in the field, will 
transmit to the bureau of liis department at Richmond, at the dose of 
die campaign, and such other times as the commander in the field may 
approve, a fuH report of the operations of his department, and what- 
ever information to improve its servi<;c he may l>e able to furnish. 

The report of tiie officer of engineers will embrace plans of military 
works executed during the campaign, and, in ease^i^ siege, a journal of 
the attack or defence. 

CONTKISt'TIONS. 

• • 

479. When the wants of the army absolutely require it, and in other 
cases, under special instructions from the War Department, the general 
commijnding-the army may loiy contril»Htioiis in money or kind on the 
enemy's country occupied by the troops. No other comnnmder can levy 
e«cli eontriliutioos without written authority from the general cummand- 
ing in-chief. 

• ORDERLIE*. 

480. At the opefiing: of a campaign, the commander of an army de- 
termines and announces in orders the number of orderlies, mounted or 
foot, for the (uMierals, and the cordis or regiments by which they are to 
be sif^iplied, and the periods at which they shall be relieved. 

481. Jn marches, the mounted orderlies follow the Generals, and 



'xi2 J)i;POTS — CAMPS. 

perforift the duty of escorts, or march with orderlies on foot at the head 
of the division or brigade. 

482. The staff officer who distributes the orderlies to their pos.ts setids 
with them a note of the time and place of departure ; 4hose relieved re- 
ceive a like note from the staff offu-er at head quarters. 

483. Mounted soldiers are to be employed to carry dispatches only in 
special and urgent cases. 

484. The precise time when the dispatch is sent off, and the rate at 
which it is to be conveyed, are to be written clearly on tha covers of all 
letters transmitted by a mounted orderly, and tiie necessary instruc- 
tions to him, and the rate of travel going and returning, are to be dis- 
tinctly explained to him. 



485. The grand depots of an army are established where the military 
operations would not expose them to be broken up. Smallei^clepots are 
organized for the divisions and the several arms. They are commanded 
by officers temporarily disabled for field service, or by other, officers 
when necessary, and comprise, as much as possible, the hospitals and 
depots for convalescents. When conveniently placed, they serve aa 
points'for the halting and assembling of detachments. They receive 
the disabled from the corps on the march ;,and the officers in command 
of the depots send with the detachments to the army those at tho depots 
who have become fit for servi^'e. 



486. Camp is the place where troops are established in tents, in huts, 
or in bivouac. Cantonments are the inhabited places which troops 
occupy for shelter when not put in barracks. The eaiuping-pnrty is a 
detachment detailed to prepare a camp. 

487. Reconnoissances should precede tho establishment of the camp, 
J'or fi camp of troops on the march, it is only necessary to look to tiie 
health and comfort of the troops, the facility of the eomnumications, the 
convenience of woodland water, and tho resources in provisions and 
forage. The ground for an intrenched camp, or a camp to cover a 
country, or one designed to deceive the enemy as to the strength of the 
avmy, must be selected, and tiie camp arranged iiir the object in view. 

488. The camping-party of a regiment consists of tho regimental 
Quartermaster and Quartermaster-Sergeant, and a Corporal and two 
men per company. The General decides whether the regiments camp 
separately or together, and whet!>er the police guard shall accompany 
the camping- party,' or a larger escort shall be sent. 

489. Neitlier baggage nor led horses are permitted to move with the 
cam ping- party. * , • 

490. When the General can send in advance to prepare the camp, he, 
gives his instructions to tlie chief of the Quarterinaster's Department, 
who calls on the regiments for their camping-parties,. and is acc(in)pa- 
jiied, if necessary, by an Engineer, to propose the defences and com- 
munications. ' * 

• 491. The watering-places are examined, and signals placed at those 



CAMP or INFANTRY f>g 

that are dangerous. Any work required to make them of easier access 
J8 done by the police guard or Quartermnstcr's men. Sentinels, to be 
relieved by the guards of the regiment when they come up, are placed 
by the camping-party over the water if it is scarce, and over the houses 
and stores of provisions and forage in the vicinity. 

492. If the camping-party docs not precede the regiment, the Quar- 
termaster attends to these things as soon as the regiment reaches the 
camp. 

493. On reaching the ground, the infantry form on the color front ; 
the ciivalry in rear of its camp. 

494. The Generals establish the troops in camp as rapidly as possible, 
particularly after long, fayguing marches. • 

495» The number of men to be furnished for guards, pickets, and 
orderlies; the fatigue parties to be sent for supplies; the work to be 
done, and the strength of the working parties; the time and place for 
issues; the hour of marching, &c., are then announced by the Briga- 
dier-Generftls to the "Colonels, and liy them to the field officers — the 
Adjutant and Captains formed in front of the regiment, the First Ser- 
geants taking post beliind their Captains. .The Adjutant then makes 
the details, and tI:o First Sergeants warn the men. The regimental 
otltcer of the day forms the ]>iL'ket, and sends the.gnards to their posts. 
The colors are then planted in the centre of the color lino, and the arms 
iire stacked on the line ; the fatigue parties to jirocure supplies, and the 
working parties form in rear of the arms; the men not on detail pitch 
the tents. 

496. If the camp is near the enemy, the picket remains under arms 
until the return of the fatigue parties, and, if neccsssary, is reinforced 
by details from each cjmpany. 

497. In the cavalry, each triMjp moves a little in rear of the point at 
which its horses are to be secured, and forms in one rank ; the men then 
dismount ; a detail is made to hold the horses ; tiie rest stack their arms 
and fi.K the picket rope ; after the horses are attended to, the tents are 
pitched, and each horseman places his carbine at the side from the 
weatlier, and hangs his sabre and bridle on it. 

495. The standard is then carried to the tent of the Colonel. 

499. The terms front. Hank, right, loft, file, and rank, have the same 
uieaning wiien applied to camps as to the order of battle. 

5U0. The front of the camp is usually equal to the front of the troops. 
The tents are arranged in ranks and files. The number of ranks varies 
with the strength of the companies and the size of the tents. 

501. No othcer will- be all.iwed to occupy a -hou-e, although vacant 
and on the ground of his camp, except liy permission t)f the commander 
of the brigade, who shi^U report it to the commander of the division. 

602. The staff officer charged with establishing the camp will desig- 
nate the place for the shambles. The offal will be buried. 

CAKT OF INFANTRV. 

503. Each compaiyr has its tents in two files, facing on a street per- 
pendicular to the color line. The width of the street depends on the 
front of the camp, but should not be less than five paces. The interval 
l^etween the ranks of tents is two paces ; between the files of tents of 
adjacent companieB, two paces; between regiments, twenty-two paces. 



54 CAMP OF CAVALRY. 

504. Tlie color line is ten paces in front of .the front rank of tents. 
The kitchens are twenty pae-es behind the rear rank of company tents; 
tiie nontctimniis.-iioned staff and sutler, twenfy ^aces in rear of tho 
kitolioii ; the company officers, twenty paces fartlier in rear; an'd the 
field and stuff, twenty paces in rear of the company officers. 

505. Tlio company officers are in rear of their respective companies; 
the Captains on the rijrht. 

50G. The Colonel and Lieutenant Colonel are near the centre of the 
line of field and staff; the Adjutant, a Major and Surgeon, on the right; 
the Quartermaster, a Major and Assistant Surgeon, on the left. 

507. 'Th6 police guard is at the centre of the line of the non-conimfs- 
sioned staff, the tents facing to the front, the^tacks of arms on the left. 

508. The advanced post of the police guard is about 200 pnces in 
front of the color line, and opposite the centre of the regiment, or on the 
best ground ; the prisoners' tent are about four paces in rear. In a regi- 
ment of the second line, the- advanced p 'st of tli^ police guard is 200 
paces in rear of the line of its field and staff. 

509. The horses of the staff officers and of the baggage train ni^ 
twenty-five paces in rear of the tents of the field and staff; the wagwns 
are parked on the same line, and the men of the train camped neai* 
them. 

510. The sinks of the men are 150 paces in front of the color line — 
those of the officers 100 paces in rear of tho train. Both are concealed 
by bushes. When convenient, the sinks of the men may be placed in 
the rear or on t*lie flank. A portion of the earth dug out for sinks to 
be tiirown back occasionally. 

51 1. The front of the camp of a regiment of 1000 men in two ranks 
•will be 400 paces, or one-fifth less pi.c^s than the number of files, if the 
camp is to have the same front as the troops in order of battle. Btit 
tlie front may be reduced to 190 paces by narrowing the company 
streets to five paces ; and if it be desirable to reduce the front still more, 
the tents of companies may be pitched in single file — those of a divis- 
ion facing on the same street. 

CAMP OF CAVALRY. 

512. In the cavalry, each conipany has one file of tents — the tenta 
opening on the street facing the left of the camp. 

513. The horses of eacJ) company are placed in ft single file, facing 
the opening of the tents, and are fastened to pickets planted firmly in 
the ground, from three 'to six puces from the tents of the troops. 

514. The interval betvveen tlie tile of tents should be such that, the 
regiment being broken into column of companios, each company should 
be on the extension of the line on which the horses :ire to be picketed. 

515. The streets separating the squadrons are wider than those 
between the companies by the interval separating squadrons in line; 
these intervals are kept free from any obstruction throyghout the camp. 

51G. The horses of the rear rank arc placed Ott the left of those of 
their file leaders. 

517. The hoxses of the Lieutenants are placed on the right of their 
platoons ; those of the Captains on the right of the company. 

518. Each horse occupies a space of about two paces. The number 



Camp of a Regiment of Infantry; '• M aicBD 



MENS 






^INKS 



COLOR LINE. djA^S TACKS OF ARMS 



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Page 54 



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CAMl' OF ARTILLERY — BIVOUACS. 55 

of horses in the company fixes the depth of llic camp and the distance 
between the files of tents ; the forage is placed between the tents. 

519. The kitchens are twenty paces in front of each file of tents. 

520. The non-commissioned officers arc in the tents of the front rank. 
Camp, followers, teamsters, itc., are in the rear r.ank. The police guard 
in the rear rank, near the centre of the regiment. 

521. The tents of the Lieutenants are 30 paces in rear of the file of 
their company; the tents of the Captains 30 paces in rear of the Lieu- 
tenants. . , 

522. The Colortel's" tent 30 paces in the rear of the Captains', near 
the centre of the regiment; the LieutenantCulonel on hisf right; the 
Adjutant on his left; the Majors 'on the ."ame line, opposite the second 
company on the right and left ; the Surgeon on the left of the Adjutant. 

523. The field and staff have their horses on the left of their tents, 
on the same line with tiie company horses ; sick' horses are placed in 
one line on the right or left of the camp. Tlie men who attend thorn 
have a separate file of tents ; the forges and wagons in rear of this file. 
The horses of the train and of camp-followers are in'one or more files 
extending to the rear, behind the right or left squadron. The advanced 
•post of the police gua*d is 200 paces in front, opposite the centre of the 
regiment ; the horses in one or two files. , 

524. The sinks for the men are 150 paces in front — those for oflBcers, 
100 paces in the rear of the camp. 

CAMP OF .\R'WI,I,ERV. 

525. The -artillery is encamped near the troops to which it is attached, 
80 as to be protected from attack, and to contribute to the defence of 
the camp. Sentinels for the park are furnished by the artillery, and, 
when necessary, by the other troops. 

526. For a battery of si.^ pieces, the tents arc in three files — one for 
each section; distance between the ranks of tents, 15 paces; tents 
opening to the front. The horses of each section are picketed in one 
file, 10 paces to the left of the file of tents. In the horse artillery, or if 
the numhcr of horses makes it necessary, tlie horses ■^ve in tv>'o files, on 
tlie right and left of the file of tents. The kitchens are 25 paces in 
front of the front rank of tents,* The tents of the oflQcers are in the 
outside files of company tents, 25 paces in the rear of the rear rank — 
the Captain on the right, the Lieutenants on the left. 

527. The park is opposite the contre of the camp, 40 paces in rear of 
the officers' tents. The carriages in files four paces apart; distance 
between ranks of carriages sufficient for the horses when harnessed to 
them ; the park guard is 25 paces in rear of the park. The sinks for 
the men, 1.50 paces in front; for the oflBcers, lOQ paces in "therear. 
The harness is in the tents of the men. 

RIV0U.\CS. 

528. A regiment of cavalry being in order of battle, in' rear of the 
ground to be oocnpied, the" Colonel breaks it by platoons to the right. 
The hor.-es of eai;h platoon are placed in a single row, and fastened as 
prescribed for camps; near the enemj', they remain saddled all night, 
with slackened girths. The arms are at first stacked in rear of each 
row of h.orses ; the sabres, with the bridles hung on them are placed 
against the stacks. 



56 CANTONMENTS. 

529. The forage is placed on the right of each row of horses. Two 
stable-guards for each platoon watch the horses. 

§30. A fire fur each platoon is made neal- the col5r line, 20 paces to 
the left of the row of horses. A shelter is made for the men around 
the fire, if possible, and each man th^n stands his arms and bridle 
against the shelter, 

531. The fires and shelter for the officers are placed in rear of the 
line of those for the men*. ' ' 

532. The intervals between the squadrons must be without obstruc- 
tion throughout the whole depth of tlie bivouac. 

533. The interval between the shelters should be such that the pla- 
toons can taVe up a line of battle freely to the front or rear. 

584. The distance from the enemy decides the manner in which the 
horses are to be fed and led to water. When it is permitted to unsad- 
dle, the saddles are placed in the rear of tlie horses. 

535. In infantry, the fires are made in rear of the co7o7" 7('/)e, on the 
ground that would be occupied by the tents in camp. The companies 
are placed around them, and, it possible, construct shelters. When 
liable to surprise, the infantry should stand to arms at daybreak, and 
the cavalry mount until the return of the reconuoitering parties. IP 
the arms are to be taken apart to clean, it must be done by detach- 
ments, successively. 

CANTONMENTS. 

536. The cavalry should be placed under shelter whenever the dis- 
tance from the enemy, and from the ground where the troops are to 
form for battle, permit it. Taverns and farm-houses, with large stables 
and free access, are selected for quartering them. 

537. The Colonel indicates the place of assembling in case of alarm. 
It should generally be outside the cantonment ; the egress from it .should 
be free, the retreat upon the other positions secure, and roads leading 
to it on the side of the enemy obstructed. 

538. The necessary orders being given, as in establishing a camp, -the 
picket and grand guards are posted. ^ sentinel may be placed on a 
steeple or high house, and then the troops are marched to the quarters. 
The men sleep in the stables, if it is thought necessary. 

539. The above applies in the main to infantry. Near the enemy, 
companies or platoons should be collected, as much as possible, in the 
same houses. If companies must be separated, they should be divided 
by platoons or squads. All take arms at daybreak. 

.540. 'When cavalry and infantry canton together, the latter furnish 
the guards by night, and the former by day. 

54l. Troops cantoned in presence of the enemy, should be covered 
by advanced guards and natural or artificial obstacles. Cantonments 
taken during a cessation of hostilities, should be established in rear of 
a line of defence, and in front of the point on which the troops would 
concentrate to receive an attack. The General commanding-in-chief 
assigns the limits of their cantonments to the divisions, the comman- 
ders of divisions to brigades, and the commanders of brigades poet 
their regiments. The position for each corps in case of attack is care- 
fully pointed out bj the Generals. 



HEADQUARTERS — ISSUES. T)? 

nEAIKJUARTERS. 

542. Generals take post aLthe centre of their commands, on tliemain 
cliantiels to communic ition. If trogps bivouac in presence of the enemy, 
the Generals bivouac with them. 

MILITARy EXERCISE?. 

543. When troops remain in camp or cantonment many days, the 
Ciilcincls require them to be exercised in the scliool of the battalion and 
squadron. Regiments and brigades encamped by division are not 
united for drills without the permission of the General of division. 
The troops must not be exercised 4it the firings without the authority of 
the General conimandingin-chief. The practice of the drums must 
never begin with the " general," or the " march of the regiment ;" 
ner tlie trumpets with the sound " to horse." The hour for practice is 
always announced. 

ORDERS. 

544. In the field, verbal orders and important sealed orders are car- 
ried by officers, and, if poFsil)lo,«by staff officers. When orders are 
carried by ordeflies, the place and time of departure will be marked on 
them, and place and time of delivery on the receipt. 

DISPATCHES. 

545. Dispatches, particularly for distant corps, should be entrusted 
only to officers to whom their contents can be confided. In a country 
occupied by the enemj', the bearer of dispatches should be accompanied 
by at least two of the best mounted men ; should avoid towns and vil- 
lages, an^ the main roads ; rest as little as possible, and only at out-of- 
the-way places. Where there is danger, he should send one of the men 
in advance, and be always ready to destroy his dispatches. lie should 
be adroit in answering questions about the army, and not be intimi- 
dated by threats. 

WATCHWORDS. 

546. The parole and countersiim are issued daily from the principal 
headquarters of the command. The countersign is given to the senti- 
nels and non-commissioned officers of tlie guards ; the parole to the 
commissioned officers of guards. The parole is usually the name of a 
Gengral ; the countersign of a battle. 

547. When tlie parole and countersign cannot be communicated Haily 
to a post or detachinent wiiich ought to use the same as the main body, 
n series of words may be sent for some days in advance. 

548. If the countersign is lost, or one of the guard deserts with it, 
the commander on tlie spot will substitute another, and report the case 
at once to the proper superior, that immediate notice may be given to 
headquarters. * 



549.. At what time and for what period issues are made, must depend 
on circumstances, ^nd be regulated in orders. Wlien an army is not 
movinj*. rations arc generally issued for four diiys at a time. Issues to 
the companies of a regiment, and the fatigues to receive them, are su- 



08 ROSTER. 

peyintended by an oflScer detailefl from the regiment. Issues are made 
from one end o£ the line to the other, beginning on the right and left 
alternately. An issue commenced on one regiment will not be inter- 
rupted for another entitled to precedence if it had been in place. 

THE ROSTER, OR DETAILS FOR SERVICE. 

550. The duties performed by detail are of three classes. Tiie first 
class comprises, 1st, grand guards and outposts ; 2d, interior guards, as 
of magazine, hospital, &c. ; 3d, orderlies ; 4th, police guards. 

The second class comprises, 1st, detachments to protect laborers* on 
military works, as field-works, communications, &c. ; 2d, working par- 
ties on such works ; 3d, detachments to protect fatigues. 

The third class are all fa.tigues, without arms, in or out of camp. 

In the cavalry, stable-guards form a separate roster, and count before 
fatigue. 

5''1. The rosters are distinct for each class. Ofiicers are named on 
them in the order of rank. The details are taken in succession in the 
order of the roster, beginning at the head: 

552. Lieutenants form one roster," and First and Second Lieutenants 
are entered on it alternately. The senior First Lieutenant is the first 
on the roster; the senior 'Second Lieutenant is the second, &c. The 
Captains form one roster, and are exempt from fatigues, except to su- 
perintend issues. A Captain commanding a battalion temporarily is 
exempt from detail, and duty falling to him passes. Lieutenant- 
Colonels and Majors are on one roster. I'hey may be detailed for duties 
of the first and second classes, when the importance of the guards and 
detachments requires it. Their roster is kept at division and brigade 
headquarters. In the company, Sergeants, Corporals and privates form 
distinct rosters. • 

553. Officers, non-commissioned officers, and soldiers take duties of 
the first class in the order stated, viz: the first for the detail, takes the 
grand guards; the next, the interior guards ; the last, the police guar.is ; 
and the same .rule in regard to the details and duties of the second 
class. In the details for the third class, the senior officer takes the 
largest party. The party first for detail takes the service out of camp. 

554. When the officer whose tour it^, is not able to take it, or is not 
present at the hour of marching, the ne'xt after him takes it. When a 
guard has passed the chain of sentinels, or an interior guard has reached 
its post, the officer whose tour it was cannot then take it. lie takes the 
tour of the officer who has taken his. AVhen an officer is prevented by 
sickness from taking his tour, it passes. These rules apply equally to 
non-eominissioned officers and soldiers. 

555. Duties of the first and second classes are credited on the roster 
■when the guards or detachments have passed the chain of sentinels, or 
an interior guard has reached its post; fatigue duti«3 when the parties 
have passed the chain or begun therduties in camp. 

55G. Every officer, non-commissioned cffioer, or soldier on duty of the 
first class, or who is of. the next detail for such duty, takes, when re- 
lieved, the duty of the second or third class that Jias fallen to him 
during that time, unless he has marched for dccachmeut of more than 
twenty-four hours. 

557. Soldiers march with knapsacks on all duties of the first class; 



POLICE GUARD. 59 

anrl vrith arms and equipments complete on all working parties out of 
tlio camp, unless otherwise ordered. In the cavalry, horses are packed 
for all mounted service. 

558. In the cavalry, dismoimted men, and those whose horses are 
not in order, are preferred for the detail for dismounted service. Thoge 
who are mounted are never employed on those services, if the number 
of the other class are sufficient, 

r)50. Every noncommissiond officer and soldier in the cavalry de- 
tailed for dismounted service must, before he marches, take to the First 
Sergeant of the troop, or Sjrgeant of his squad, his horse equipments 
and his valise ready packed, In ca.^e of alarm, the First Sergeant sees 
that the horses of thesomen are equipped and led to tiie rendezvous. 
• 560. These rules in regard to the roster apply also to service in gar- 
rison. 

POLICE GUARD. 

5G1. In each regiment a police guard is detailed every day, consist- 
ing of two Sergeants, three Corporals, two drummers, and men enough 
to furnish' the required sentinels and patrols. The men arc taken from 
all the coinpa»iies, from each in proportion to its strength. The guard 
is commanded by a Lieutenant, under the supervision of a Captain, as 
regimental officer of the day. It furnishes ton sentinels at the camp; 
one over the arms of the guard; one at tlie Colonel's tent ; three on 
the color front — one of them over the colors ; three, fifty paces in rear 
of the field officers' tents; and one on each flank, between it and the 
next regiment. If it is a flank regiment, one more sentinel is posted 
on the outer flank. 

5G2. An advanced post is detached from the police guard, composed 
of a Sergeant, a Corporal, a drummer, and nine men to furnish senti- 
nels and the guard over the jjrisoners. The oien are first of the guard 
roster from each company. The men of the advanced post must not 
leave it under any pretext. Their meals are sent to the post. The ad- 
vanced post furnishes three sentinels; two n fewpaces in front of the 
post, opposTtc the right and left wing of the regiment, posted so as to 
»ce as far as possible to the front, and one over the arms. 

503. In the cavalry, dismounted meo are employed in preference on 
the police guard. The mounted men on guard are sent in succession, 
apart at a time, to groom their horses. The advanced post is always 
formed of mounted men. 

50-1. In each •company, a Corporal has charge of the stable-guard. 
His tour begins at retreat, and ends at morning stable-call. The stable- 
guard is large enough to relieve the men on post every two hours. They 
sleep in their tents, and are called by the Corporal when wanted. At 
retreat he closes the streets of the camp with cords, or uses other pre- 
cautions to prevent the escape of loose horses. 

5()5. The oflioer of the day is charged with the order and cleanliness 
of the camp: a fatigue is furnished to him when the number of pris- 
oners is insufficient to clean the camp. He has the calls beaten by the 
drumjner of tlie guard. 

500. ']'he police guard and the advanced post pay the game honors as 
other guards. TRey take arms when an armed body approaches. 

507. The sentinel over the colors has orders not to permit them to 



00 POLICE GUARD. 

be moved, except in presence of an escort ; to let no one touch them 
but tlie color-bearer, or the Sergeant of the police guard when he is 
accompanied by two armed men. 

508. The sentinels on the color front. permit no soldier to take arms 
from the stacks, except by order of some oflieor, or a non-commissioned 
bficer of the gnard. The sentinel at the Colonel's tent has orders to 
warn him, day or nignt, uf any unusual movement in or about the camp. 

5G0. The sentinels on the front, flanks, and rear, see that no soldier 
leaves camp with Lorse or arms, unless conducted by a non-commis- 
sioned officer. They prevent non-commissioned officers and soldiers 
from passing out at night, except to go to the sinks, and mark if they re- 
turn. They arrest, at any time, suspicious persons prowling about the 
camp; and at night, every one wiio attempts to enter, even the soldiew 
of other corps. Arrested persons are sent to the officer of the guard, 
who sends lhem,«if necessar}', lo the officer of the day. 

570. Tlie sentinels on the front of the advanced post have orders to 
permit neither noncommissioned officers or soldiers to pass the line, 
withuut reporting at the jTdvaneed pott ; to warn the advanced post of 
the approach of any armed body, and to arrest all suspicious persons. 
The Sergeant sends persons so arrested to the officer of ^he guard, and 
warns bim of the approach of any armed body. 

571. The sentinel over the arms at the advanced post guards the 
prisoners and keeps sight of them, and suffers no one to converse with 
them without permission. They are only permitted to go to the sinks 
one at a time, and under a sentinel. 

• 572. If any one is to be passed out of camp at night, the officer of the 
guard sends him under escort to the advanced post, and the Sergeant of 
the post has him passed over the chain. 

573. At retreat, the ofiicer of the^ guard has the roll of his^uard 
called, and inspect arms, to see that they are loaded and in order; and 
visits the advanced post 'for the same purpose. The Sergeant of the 
police guard, accompanied by two armed soldiers, folds the colors and 
lays them on the trestle in^the rear of the arms. He sees ti)at the sut- 
ler's stores are closed, and the men leave them, arid that the kitchen 
fires are put out at the ag^ipointed hour. 

• 574. The officer of the day satisfies himself frequently during tlio 
night of the vigilance of the 'police guard and advanced post. He 
prescribes patrols and rounds to be made by the officer and non-com- 
missioned officers of the guard. The officer of the guard orders them 
when he thinks necessary. He visits the sentinels frequently. 

575. At reveille, the police guard takes arms ; the officer of the guard 
inspects it and the advanced post. The Sergeant re plants the colors in 
place. At retreat and reveille the advanced post takes arms; the 
Sergeant makes his report lo the officer of the guard when he visits the 
post. ^ 

576. When necessary, the camp is covered at night with small out- 
posts, forming a double chain of sentinels. These posts are under the 
orders of the commander of the police guard, and are visited by his pat- 
rols and rounds. 

577. The officer of the guard makes his report of his tour of s'ervice, 
including the advanced post, and sends it, after tire guard is marched 
off, to the officer of the day. 



POLICE GUARD. - 61 

578. When the regiment marches, the men of the police ^uard return 

»to tlieir companies, except those of the advanced post. In the cavalry, 

at the sound " boot and saddle," the ofliver of the guard sends one-half 

the men to saddle and pack ; when the regiment assembles, all the men 

join it. . 

f)79. When the camping party precedes the regiment, and the new 
police gual-d marches with the camping partj', the guard; on reaching, 
the camp, forms a line thirty paces in front of the centre of the ground 
marked for the regiment. The oEicer of the guard furnishes the senti- 
nels required l)y the commander of the camping party. 

The advanced post takes its station. 

5^<0. Tlie advanced post of the old police guard takes charge of the 
prisoners on the march, and marches, bayonets fixed, at the centre of 
the regiment. On reaching the camp, it turns over the prisoners to the 
new advanced post. 

581. Tiie detail for the picket is made daily, after the details for duty 
of first class, and from the nest for detail on the roster of tliat «hiss. 
It is designed to furnish detachmehts and guards unexpectedly called 
for in the twenty-four hours ; it counts as a tour of the first class U) 
those who Iiave marched on detachment or guard, or who hfwe passed 
the nigiit in bivouac. • . ^ 

5Ji-2. The officers, Tion-commissioned oflScers, and soldiers of the picket 
are at all times dressed and equipped; the horses are saddled, And 
knapsacks and valises ready to be jmt on. 

5y3._ Detachmetits and guards from the picket are taken from the 
head of the picket roll in<<each company, and, if possible, equally from 
each com[)any. The picket of a regiment is composed of a Lieutenant, 
two Sergeants, four Gorporals, a drummer, and about forty privates. 
For ft smaller force, the picket is in pToportion to the strength of the 
detach men^. • • 

584. Officers and men of tne picket who ftiarch on detachment or 
guard before retreat, will be replaced. 

585. The picket is assetnblcd by the Adjutant at guard-mounting; it 
is posted twelve paces in the rear of the guard, and is inspected by its 
own commander. When the guard has marched in review, the com- 
mandant of the picket marches it to tlie left of the police guard, where 
it stacks its arms, and is disiiiissed; the arms are undercharge of the 
sentinel of the police guard. 

58G. The picket is onl^ assembled by the orders of the Colonel or 
officer of the day. It forms on the left of th^ police guard. 

587. The oHicer of the day requires the roll of the picket to be called 
frequently during the day ; the call is sounded from tlie police guard. 
At roll-calls and inspections, infantry pickets assemble with knapsacks 
on; cavalry on foot. Tlie picket is assembled at retreat; the officer 
has tlie roll called, jjnd inspects the arms. The pickets sleep in their 
tents, hut without undressing. 

588. The picket does not assemble at night except in cases of Alarm, 
or when the whole or a part is to march ; then the officer of the day 
calls the officers, the latter the non-commissioned officers, and tliese^he 

. men, for which purpose each ascertains the tents of those he is to call ; 
they are assembled without beat of drum or other noise. At night 
cavalry pickets Assemble mounted. 



(j:i GRAND GUARDS. ' 

589. Pickets rejoin their companies* whenever the regiment is under 
arms for review, drill, march, or battle. 

GRAND- GUARDS AND OTHER OUTPOSTS. 

500. Grand guards are the advanced .posts of a camp or cantonment, 
and should cover the approaches to it. Their number, strength, and 
• position are regulated by the commanders of brigades ; in detached 
corps, l)y the cummaiiding officer. When it can be, the grand guards 
of cavalry and infantry are combined, the cavalry furnishing the ad- 
vanced sentinels. When the cavalry is weak, the grand guards are in- 
fantr)', but furnished with a few cavalry soldiers, to get and carry in- 
telligence of tlie enemy. 

591. The strength of a grand guard of a brigade will depend on its 
object and the strength of the regiments, the nature of the country, the 
position of the enemy, nnd the disposition of the inhabitants. It is 
usually commanded by a Captain. 

592. Under, the supervisions of the Generals of Division and Brigade, 
the grand guards are specially under the direction of a field officer of 
4he day in eacii brigade. In case of necessity. Captains may be added 
to the roster of Lieutenant-Colonels and. Majors for this detail. 

5l 3. Staff officers sent from division headquarters to inspect the 
posts (f grand guards, give them orders only in urgent cases, and in 
the absence of the field oflScer of the day of the brigade. 

594. Grand guards usually mount at the same time as the otl^r 
guards, but may mount before daybreak if the General of Brigade 
thinks it necessary to double tfte outposts ni that time. In this case 
they assemble and march without noise, and during their march throw 
out scouts; this precaution should alwa^'s be taken in the first posting 
of a grand guard. The doubling of guards weakens the corps and 

' fatigues the men, and should seldom |^ resorted to, and,never when 
preparing to march or fight. 

595. A grand guard is conducted to its post, in the first instance, by 
the field off cer of the day, guided by a staff officer who accompanied 
the General in his reconnoi?sance. After the post has been established, 
tlie commander sends to the field officer of the day, when nec^.^sary, a 
soldier of the guard to guide the relieving guard to the post. He also 
sends to him in the evening a Corpoial or trusty man of the guard for 
the note containing the parole and countersign, and sends them before 
dark to the detached posts. He will not suffer his guard to be relieved 
except by a guard of thelarigade, or by special orders. 

596. If there is no pass to be observed or defended, the grand guards 
. are placed near the centre of the ground they are to observe, on shel- 
tered, and, if possible, high ground, the better to conceal their strength 
and observe the enemy ; they ought not to be placed near the edge of a 
wood. When, during the day, they are placed vei^y near or in sight of 
the enemy, they fall back at night on posts selected farther to the rear. 

597. In broken or in mountainous countries, and particularly if the 
inhabitants are ill-disposed, intermediate posts must be established 
w4ien it is necessary to post the grand guard distant from the camp. 

598. Grand guards are chiefly to watch the enemy in front; their 
flanks are protected by each other, and the camps must furnish posts to 
protect their rear and secure their retreat. 



GRAND GUARDS. 08 

599. Grand guards are seldom intrenched, and never withouj; the or- 
ders of the General, except by a barricade or ditch when expgsed in a 
plain to attacks of cavalry. 

GOO. The General of Division, if he thinks proper, changes the sta- 
tions and orders of these ji;uard8. and establishes posts to connect the 
brigades or proteot the cxtoricrOanks. 

GOl. After a grand guard is posted, the first care of the commander 
and of the field offiiier of the day js to get news of the enemy ; then to' 
reconnoitre his position, and the roads, bridges, fords, and defiles. 
This reconnoisance determines the firce and posititn of the small posts 
and their sentinels day and night. Tiiese posts, according to their ini- 
pi.>rtance, are commanded by officers or non-commissioned officers; the 
cavalry posts may he relieved every four or eight hours. 

602. The commander of a grand guard receives detailed instructions 
from the General and field officer of the liay of the bi^ade, and in- 
structs the commanders of the small posts as to their di>^s and the ar- 
rangements for the defence or retreat. Ihe commanders of grand 
guards may, in urgent cases, change the positions of the small posts. 
If the small posts are to change .their positions at night, they wait until 
the grand guard liave got into position and darkness hides their move- 
ments from the enemy ; tli'en march silently and rapidly under the 
charge of an officer. 

603. In detached corps, small posts of picked men are at night sent 
forward on the roads by which the enemy may attaeic or turn tlje p si- 
tion. iThey watch the forks of the roads, keep silence, conceal them- 
selves, light no fires, and often change place. They announce the ap- 
proach of the enemy by signals agreed upon, and retreat, by routes 
examined during the dny, to places sel^ted, and rejoin the guard at 
daybreak. ^ • 

604. Grand guards have spipial ordeus in each case, and the fyllow- 
ing in all cases : to inform the nearest posts and tlie field officer of the 
day, or the General of Brigade, of the march and movements of the 
enemy, and of the attacks they receive or fear ; to examine every per- 
son passing near the post, particularly those cominir from without; to 
arrest suspicious persons, and all soldiers and camp followers who try 
to pass out without permission, and to send to the General, unless other- 
wise directed, all country people who come in. 

603. All outguards stand to arms at night on the approach of pat- 
rols, rounds, or other parties ; the sentinel over the arms has orders to 
call them out. • 

606. Advanced posts will not take arms for inspection or ceremony 
when it would expose them to the view of the enemy. 

607. Grand guards are often charged with tlie care and working of 
telegraphic signals. 

6U.S. The sentinels and videttes are placed on points from which they 
can see farthest, taking care not to lireak tlieir connection with each 
other or wi]h their posts. They are concealed from flie enemy ns much 
as possible by walls, or trees, or elevated ground. It is generally even 
of more advantage not to be seen^than to see far. They should not bo 
plac'ed near covers, where the enemy may capture them. 

609. A sfntinel should always be ready to fire, videttes carry their 
pistols or carbines in their hands. A sentinel must be sure of the 



64 ' URAND GUARDS. 

presencQ of an enemy before he fires; once satisfied of that, lie must 
fire, though all defence on his part be uf^eless, as the safety of the pust 
may depend on it. Sentinels fire on all persons deserting to the enemy. 

610. If the post must be where a sentinel on it can not communicate 
with the guard, a corporal and three men are detached for it, or the 
sentinels are doubled, that one may communicate with the guard. 
Poring the day the communication may be made by signals, such as 
raising a cap or handkerchief. At njght sentinels are placed on low 
ground, the belter to see objects against the sky. 

Cll^ To lessen the duty of rounds, and keep more men on the alert 
at night, sentinels are relieved every hour. To prevent sentinels from 
being surprised, it is sometimes well to precede the countersign by sig- 
na's, such as striking the musket with the hand, striking the hands to- 
gether, &o. 

612. On ^lifc approach of any one at night, the sentinel orders — 
" Halt!" Iflhe order is not obeyed after once repeated, he fires. If 
obeyed, he calls — " Who goe^s there?" If answered — " Eonnds" or 
" Patrol,'' he says — "Advance with the countersign." If more than one 
advance at the same time, or the person who advances fails to give the 
countersign or signal agreed on, the sentinel fires, and falls back on his 
guard. The sentinel over the arms, as soon as his hail is answered, 
turns out the guard, and tlie CdrporaT goes to reconnoitre. When it is 
desirable to hide the position of tlie sentinel from the enemy, the hail 

• is replaced by signajs ; the sentinel gives the signal, and those approach- 
ing the counter signal. ' • 

613. With raw troops, or when the light troops of the enemy are nu- 
merous or active, and when the country is broken or wooded, the night 
stormy or dark, sentinels should be doubled. In this case, while one 
watche--, the other c^led a flying*sentinel, moves about, examining the 
paths.and hollows. • • 

614. The commandants of grand guards visit the sentinels often ; 
change their positions when necessary ; make them repeat their orders ; 
teach them under what circumstances and at what signals to retire, and 
particularly not to fsill back directly on their guard if pursued, but to 
lead the enemy in a circuit. 

615. At ni;;ht, half the men of the grand guard off post watch under 
arms, while the rest lie down, arms by their side. The horses are al- 
ways bridled ; the horsemen hold the reins, and must not sleep. 

616. When a grand guard of cavalry is so placed as not to be liable 
to a sudden attack from the enemy, the General may permit the horses 
to be fed during the night, unbridled for this purpose a few at a time — 
the horsemen being vigilant to prevent them from escaping. 

617. An hour before break of day, infantry grand guards stand to 
arms, and cavalry mount. At the advanced posts, some tif the infantry 
are all night under arms, some of the cavalry on horseback. 

618. The commander of a grand guard regulates the numbers, the 
hours, and the march of patrols and rounds, according to the strength 
of his troop ai;d the necessity for precaution ; and, accompanied by 
those who are to command the patrols and rounds during the night, he 
will reconnoitre all the routes they are to follow. 

619. Patrols and rounds march slowly, in silence, and.with great 
precaution ; bait frequently to listen, and examine the ground. The 



GRAND ROUNDS. 86 

rounds consist of anoflBcer or non-commissioned officer and two or three 
men. • 

.620. Toward the break of day the patrols ought to be tnore frequent, 
and sent to greater distances. They examine the hollow ways, and 
ground likely to conceal an enemy, but with great caution, to avoid be- 
ing cut oft', or engaged in an unequal combat; if they meet the enemy, 
iiiey lire and attempt to stop his march. While the patrols are out the 
posts arc under arms. 

G21. C;ivalry patrol.^should osamine the country to a greater distance 
Ihan infantry, and report to the infantry guard every tiling tliey ob- 
serve. The morning patrols a^d scouts do not return until broad day- 
light; and when they return, the night sentinels are withdrawn, »nd 
the posts for the day resumed, 

C2-2. When patrols are sent beyond tl^ lidvanced ^osts, the posts and 
sentinels should be warned. 

623. On their return, commanders of patrols report in regard to the 
ground and every thing the}' have obsenved of the movements of the 
enemy, or of his posts, and the commandant o£ the grand guard reports 
to tlie lield oflicer of the day. 

G24' The tires of the grand guards should be hidden by a wall, or 
ditch or other screen. To deceive tiie enemy, fires are sometimes made 
on ground not occupied. Fires are not permitted at small posts liable 
to surprise. 

025. The horses of cavalry guards are watered or fed by detachments ; 
during whioli the rest are ready to mount. 

020. If a body of troops attempt to enter the camp at night, unless 
their arrival has been announced, or the commander is known to, or is 
tlie bearer of a written order to the commander of the grand gflards, 
he slops them, and sends Hie commander under escort to the field offi- 
cer of the da}', and warns the |f>ost near him. 

027. Baarers of flags are not permitted to pass the cuter chain of 
sentinels; their faces are turned from the post of army ; if necessary 
their eyes are bandaged ; a non-commissioned officer stays with them 
to prevent indiecretiou of the sentinels. 

628. The commandant of the grand guard receipts for dispatches, and 
sends them to the field officer of the day or General of Brigade, and dis- 
misses the bearer; but if he has discovered what ought to be concealed 
from the enemy, he is detained as long as necessary. 

029. Deserters are disarmed at the advanced posts, and sent to the 
commander of the grand guard, who gets from them all the information 
he can concerning his post. If many come at night they are received 
cauiiottsl!/, afewjit a time. They are sent in the morning to the field 
officer of the day^ or to the nearest post or camp, to be conducted to tho 
General of the brigade. All suspected persons are searched by com- 
manders of the posts. 

030. When an enemy advances to an attack, unless he is in too great 
force, or the grand guard is to t'efeiid an intrenched post or a defile, it 
will take positions and execute tllfe movements to check the enemy, act- 
ing as skirmishers, or fighting in close or open order, as may be best. 
The guard joins its corps when in lino, or when a sufficient number of 
troops have reached the ground it defends. 



66 INTRENCHED POSTS. • 

. INTRENCHED POSTS. 

• 

631. Unless the army be acting on the defensive, no post should be 
intenched, except to cover the weak parts of the line, or at points which 
the enemy cannot avoid, or in mountain warfare, or. to the close of a 
defile, or to cover winter quarters. 

632. Posts connected with the operations of an army are intrenched 
only by order of the Genel'al commanding-in-chief or a General of Di- 
vision. • 

■ 633. Any intrerichnient that requires artillery is considered as a post, 
and a guard or garrison and commander ^are assigned to it. 

634. The General who establishes an intrenched post gives to its com- 
mander detailed instructions in regard to its defen,ee, and the circum- 
stances under which the defe"Dcft should cease. 

635. The commander reconnoiters his post; distribute^ the troops; 
posts the officers and non-commissioned officers ; forms a reserve ; gives 
orders for all contingencies, he can foresee; supposes an attack, "and 
arranges his troops for defence, so as to prepare them for an attack, day 
or niglit. 

636. In dark weather he redoubles his vigilance, and chanjfes the 
hours and directi'^n of the rounds and patrols. lie permits no flags of 
truce, deserters or strangers to enter. If a flag ought to pass his post, 
he bandages his eyes; lie refuses admittance to a relief Or any other 
party until he has carefully examined them. In case of an attack, he 
does not wait for orders or hold a council. Having defended his post 
to the last extremity, or till the purpose of the defence, according to his 
instructions, is answered, he may then spike his guns and rejoin the 
iirmy under cover of night, or ly cutting his way through the enemy. 

DETACHMENTS. 

Oj7. When a detachment is to be formed from the different regiments 
of a brigade, the Assistant Adjutant-General of the brigade assembles 
it, and turns it over to the commander. 

638. When a detachment is to be formed from different brigades, the 
Assistant Adjutant-General in each, forms thd contingent of the brig- 
ade, and sends it to the place of assembling. 

630. Detachments are generally formed by taking battalions, squad- 
rons, companies, platoons in turn, according to the roster for such de- 
tail. 

640. When the detachment is to consist of men from every comp(iny 
or troop, the first on the roster for guard are taken. 

641. Officers, non-commissioned officers, and soldier*, whose tour it is 
to go on detachment, if employed otherwise at the time, are relieved 
from tho duty they are on, if they can reach vhe camp in time to march 
with the detachment. 

642. When detachtnents meet, the command is regulated while they 
serve together as if they formed one detachment. But the senior otK- 
cers cannot prevent the commander ?»f any detachment from moving, 
when he thinks proper, to execute the orders he has received. 

643. On the return of a detachment, the commander reports to the 
headquarters from which he received his orders. 



RECONNOiaXNCES — PARTISANS AND FLANKERS^ 67 

RECONNOISANCBS. 

644. Near tlie enemy, daily reconnoisances are made to observe the 
gruuiid in front, and to discover whether the advanced guards of the 
enemy have been increased^ or put in motion, or any other sign of his 
preparation for march or action. 

645. They are made by small parties of cavalry and infantry, from 
the brigade, under direction of the General of Division or the General 
of a separate brigade, Jind to less dir^tance by the pastoral of the grand 
guard, and are not re])eated at the same hour or by the same route. On 
the plain, reconnoisances are made by cavalry; among mountains, by 
infantry, witli a few horsemen to carry intelligence. 

640. Recimnoitering parties observe tho following precautions: to 
leave small posts, or sentinels at intervaia, to transmit inteliigence to 
the advanced posts of an arm}-, unless llie return is to be by a different 
route; to marcli with caution, to avoid fighting; and see, if possible, 
without being seen ; to keep an advanced guard ; to send well mounted 
men ahead of the advanced guard; and on the flank. of the party; to 
instruct tlic scouts that no two should enter a defile or mount a hill to- 
gether, but to go ona at a time, while one watches to carry the news if 
the other is taken. 
# G47. Before daybreak the advanced guard artd scouts are drawn closer ; 
the part}' tlien marrli slowly and silently, stop frequently to listen, and 
keep the horses that neigh in the rear. The party should enter no 
wood, defile, village, or inclosure, until it has been fully examined by 
the scouts. . 

648, Special reconnoisances are made under the instruction of the 
General in command, by such officers and with such force as he may 
direct, 

649, Offensive or forced reconnoisances are to ascertain with certainty 
points in the enemy's position, or his strength. They are sometimes 
preludes to real actions, and sometimes only demonstrations. They 
drive in his (futpnsts, and sometimes engage special corps of his line. 
They are only made by order of the General commanding-in chief, or 
the commander of an isolated corps, 

650, In all reports of reconnoisances, the oflBcer making them shall 
distinguish expreosly what he has seen from the accounts ke has not 
been able to verify personally. 

651, In spcciaf and ofi'ensive reconnoisances, the report must be ac- 
companied by a field sketch of ttie localities, the dispositions and de- 
fences of the enemy, 

PART1S.\NS AND FLANKERS, 

652, The operations of partisan corps depend on the nature and thea- 
tre of the war; they enter into the general plan of 'operation,';, and are 
conducted under tiieorders of the General commanding-in-chiof. 

653, The composition and strength of partisan corps and defacfimcnt 
of flankers depend on tiie object, the dilHculties, the distance, and the 
p.obable time of the expedition. 

654, The purpose, of these isolated corps is to reconnoitre at a dis- 
tance on tlie flanks of the army, to froteet its operations, to deceive the 
enemy, to interrupt his communications, to intercept his couriers and 
his correspondence, to threaten or destroy his magazines, to carry off 



68 MARCHES. 

his posts and his convoys, or at all events, to retard his march by 
making him detach largely for their protection. 

655. While these corps fatigue the enemy and embarrass his opera- 
tions, thCy endeavor to inspire confidence and secure the good will of 
the inhiibitants in a friendly country, and to hold them in check in an 
enemy's country. 

656. They move actively, appear unexpected!}'' on different points, in 
such a manner as to make it impossible to estimate their force, or to tell 
whether tliey are irregular forces or an advanced- guard. 

657. These operations require vigilance, secresy, energy, and prompt- 
ness. The partisan commander must frequently supply by stratagem 
and audacity what he wants in numbers. 

658. These detachments are sometimes composed of different arms, 
but the service belongs more particularly to the light cavalry, which 
can move to a distance by rapid marches, surprise the enemy, attack 
unexpectedly, and retire as promptly. 

659. Stormy weather, fogs, extreme heat, artd the night above all, 
i»are favorable to the success of ambuscades; when the enemy are care- 
less, the break of day is the best time. A partisan commander should 
communicate to his second in command, his secret orders, the direction 
and oljject of the expedition, and the different points of junction with 
the army. . , ' 

660. Guides of the country and spies are often necessary to the parti- 
san. They are examined separately, and confronted if their accounts 
differ. When there is but one guide, he marches with the advanced 
guard, guarded by two men, and bound if necessary. . Peddlers and 
smugglers are specially suitable for sties. 

661. A fit time to attack a convoy is at a halt, or when they begin to 
park, or whenthcy are watering, passing a'wood or a defile ; at a bend 
of the road, a bridge or steep ascent. 

662. The attacking party may be principally cavalry, with some in- 
fantry. The first object is to disperse tlie escort. A part of the de- 
tachment attacks the main body of the escort, another the wagons, and 
a third isf in reserve; skirmit'hers line the road, and try to cut the 
traces, and to seize the front and rear wagons, and turn them across the 
road, to prevent the train from advancing or retreating. 

663. If the convoy is parked, the cavalry surrounds it, assails the es- 
cort, and tries to draw it away from the train. The infantry then en- 
gage the troops remaining at the pafk, slip under the wagons, and get 
into the park. When the cavalry is alone and the enemy are shaken, 
they dismount a portion of the men to supplythe want of. infantry. 

664. If it is a large convoy, the principal attack is made on the cen- 
tre ; the most valuable wagons are also selected and additional horses 
are put to them if the attack is successful. Those that cannot be car- 
ried off are burned. 



665, The object of the movement and the nature of the ground de- 
termine the order of march, the kind of troops' in each column, and 
the number of columns. • 

666. The force is divided into as many columns as circumstances per- 
mit, without weakening any one too much. They ought to preserve 



iMARCHES. 69 

their communications, nnd be within supportinj; distance of each otlier. 
The comtnandcr of each column ouj^lit to know the strength anil direc- 
tion of the others. 

6G7. The advance and rear guards are usually li{];ht troops; their 
strength and composition depend on the nature of the ground and the 
position of the enemy* Tliey serve to cover the movenientf*" of the 
array, and to hold the enemy in check until the General iins time to 
make his arrangements. 

068. The advance guard is not always at the head of the column ; in 
a march to a flank, it takes such positions as cover the movement. 
Sappers arQ^atlached to the advanced guard if required. 

(360. The "f/eneml," sounded ono hour before the time of marching, 
is the signal to strike tents, to load the wagons, and pack horses, and 
send them to the place of assembling. The fires are then put out, and 
care taken to avoid Vjurning straw, &e., or giving to the enemy any 
otlier indication of the movement. * • 

070. The " march" will be beat in the infantry, and the "advijnce" 
sounded in the cavalry, in succession, as each is to take its place in the 
column. 

671. When the army should form suddenly to meet the enemy, the 
" toiig roll" is beat, and *'/o horse" sounded. The troops form rapidly 
in front of their camp. 

672. Batteries of artillery and their caissons move with the corps to 
which they are attached ; the field tiain and ambulances march at the 
rear of tlie column ; and the baggage with the rear guard. 

673. Cavalry and infantry do not march together, unless the proxim- 
ity of the enemy makes it necessary. 

674. In cnvalry marches, when distant from the enemy, each regi- 
ment, and, if possible, eacii squadron, furms a separate oohimn, in order 
to keep up the same gait from front to rear, and to trot, when desirable, 
on good ground. In such cases, the cavalry may leave camp later, and 
can give more rest to the horses, and more attention to the shoeing and 
harness. Horses are not bridled until the time to start. 

075. When necessary, the orders specify the rations the men are to 
carry in their haversacks.. The field oflScers and Captains make inspec- 
tions frequently during the march ; at halts they examine the knap- 
sacks, viilisos and haversacks, and throw away all articles not author- 
i/ed. Tlie oflSoers and non-comtnissicmed oflicers of cavalry ccynpanies 
attend personally to the packs and girths. 

676. When it can be avoided, troops should not be assembled on high 
roads or other places where they interrupt the communication. 

677. Generals of Division and commanders of detached corps send a 
stafi' oflScer to the rendezvous, in advance, to receive the troops, who, 
on arriving, take their place in the order of battle, and form in close 
column, unless otherwise ordered. Artillery, or trains halted on tho 
roads, form in file on one side. 

678. The execution of marching orders must not be delayed. If tho 
commander is not at the head of his trofips when they are to march, 
the ne.xt in rank puts tho column in motion. \ 

679. If possible, each column is preceded by a detachment of sappers, 
to remove obstacles to the match, aided, when necessary, by infantry, 
or the people of the c(tuntry. Tho detachment is divided into two sec- 



MARCHES. 

; one stops to remove the first obstacle, the other moves on to the 

580. In nio;ht marches, and at bad places, and at cross-roads, when 
/ecessary, intelligent non commissioned officers are posted to show the 
way, and are relieved by ti.e regiments as they come up. 

G81. On the march, no one shall fire a gun, or cry "halt," or "march," 
without orders. 

G82. Soldiers are not to stop for water ; the canteens should be filled 
before starting. 

083. It is better to avoid villages ; but if the route lies through them, 
officers and non-commissioned offieers are to be vigilant to prevent 
straggling. Halts should not take place at villages. 

G84. Besides the rear guard, the. General sometimes takes a. detach- 
ment from the last regiment, and adds to it non-commissioned officers 
from each regiment, to examine villages and all hiding-places on the 
routg, to bring up stragglers and seize marauders. 

685. In night marches, the Sergeant-Mdjor^f each regiment remains 
at J,he rear with a drummer, to give notice when darkness or difficulty 
stops the march. In cavalry, a trumpet is placed in rear of each 
squadron, and the signal repeated to the head of the regiment. 

686. The General and field officers frequently stop, or send officers to 
the rear, to see that the troops march in the prescribed order, and keep 
their distances. To quicken the march, the General warns the. Colo- 
nels, and may order a signal to be beat. It is repeated in all the rcgi- 
metits. 

6*^7. In approaching a defile, the Colonels are warned ; they close 
their regiments as they come up ; each regiment passes separately, at 
an accelei'ated oace, and in as close order as possible. The leading regi- 
ment having passed, and left room enough for. the whole colunin in 
close order, then halts, and moves again as soon iis the last regiment is 
through. In the cavalry, each squadron, before quickening the pace to 
rejoin the column, takes its original order of march. 

688. When the distance from the -enemy permits, each regiment, 
after closing up in front and rear of the defile, stacks arms. 

689. Halts to rest and re-form the troops ar^ frequent during the day, 
depending on the object and length of the march. They are made in 
preference after the' passage of defiles. 

690. No honors are paid by troops on the march or at baits 

691. The sick march with the wagons. 

692. Led horses of officers, and the horses of dismounted men, follow 
their regiment. The baggage wagons never march in the column. 
"When the General orders the field train and amiiuhinees to take place 
in tlie column, he designates the position they shall take. 

693. If two corps meet on the same road, they pass to the right, and 
both continue their march, if the road is wide enough ; if it is not, the 
first in the order of battle takes thoroad, tiie other lialts. 

694. A corps in march must not be cut by another. . If two corps 
meet at cross-roads, that which arrives last halts if the oilier is in mo- 
tion, A corps in march passes a Curps at a halt, if it Ins precedence 
in the order of battle, or if the halted corps is not ready to move at 
once. 

695. A column that halts to let, another column pass resumes the 



BATTLES. 7 1 

march in advance of the train of this column. If a column has to pass 
a train, the train must halt, if necessary, till the column passes. Tlie 
column which has nrecedoncc must yield it if the commander, on seeing 
the orders of the other, finds it for the interest of the service. 



696. Dispositions for battle depend on the number, kind, and qu:\lity 
of the troops opposed, on the ground, and on the objects of the war ; 
but the fo'Iowinj; rules are to be observed generally : 

697. In attacking, the advanced guard endcavors-to capture the ene- 
my's outposts^ or cut t'lem off from the maiii body. Having done to, 
or driven them in, it occupies, in advancing, all the points that can 
cover or facilitate the march of the-army, or secure its retreat, such as 
bridges, defiles, woods, and heights; it then makes attacks, to occupy 
the enemy, without risking too much, and to deceive them as to the 
march and projects of tlie army. ■■ 

698. When the enemy is hidden by a curtain of advanced troops, the 
commandant of the advanced guard sends scouts, under intelligent offi- 
cers, to tlie right and left, to ascertain his position and movements. If 
he does not succeed in this way, he tries to unmask the enemy by 
demonstriitions ; threatens to cut the advance from the main body; 
makes false attacks ; partial and impetuous charges in echelon ; and if 
nil fail, he makes a real attack to accomplish the oliject. 

699. Detachments left bj' the advanced guard to hold points in the 
rear, rej.)in iC when other troops come up. If the army takes a posi- 
tion, and the advanced guard is separated from it by defiles or heights, 
the communication is secured by troops drawn from the main body. 

700. At proper distance from the enemy, the troops are formed for 
the attack in several lines; if only two can be formed, some battalions 
in column are placed behind the wings' of the second line. The lines 
may be formed of troops in column or in order of battle, acoording to 
the ground and plan of attack. 

701. 'Ihe advanced guard may be put in the line or on the wings, or 
other position, to aid the pursuit or cover the retreat. 

702. The reserve is formed of the best tfoops of foot and horse, to 
complete a victory or make good a retreat. It, is placed in the rear of 
the centre, or chief point of attack or defence. 

703. The cavalry should be distributed in echelon on the wings and 
at the centre, on favorable ground. 

704. It should be instructed not to take the gallop until within charg- 
ing distance ; never to receive a charge at a halt, but to meet it, or, if 
not strong enough, to retire manojuvring; and in order to be ready for 
the pursuit, and prepared against a reverse, or the attacks of the re- 
serve, not to engage all its squadrons at once, but to reserve one third, 
in column or in echelon, abreast of or in the rear of one of the wings; 
this arrangement is better than a second line with intervals*. 

705. In the attack, the artillery is employed tcT silence the batteries 
that protect the position. In the def^iWB, it is better to direct its fire 
on the advancing troops. In either case, as many pieces are united as 
possible, the fire of artillery being formidable in proportion to its con- 
centration. 

706. In battles and military operations it is better to assume the 



72 BATTLES, 

offensive, nnd put the enemy on thedefensive ; but to be ^fe in doing 
so requires a larjjer force than tlie enemy, or better troops, and favora- 
ble ground. When obliged to act on the defensive, the advantage of 
positiiin and of making the attack may sometimes Ifc secured by form- 
ing in rear of the gsound on which we are to fight, and advnncing at 
the moment of action. In mountain warfare, the assailant has always 
the disadvantage ; and even in offensive warfare, in the open field, it 
may frequently be very important, when the artillery is well posted, 
and any advantage of the ground may be secured, to await the enemy 
and compel him to attack. 

707. The attack should be made with a superior force on .the defen- 
sive point of the enemy's position, by masking this by faise attacks and 
demonstrations on other points, aod by concealing the troops intended 
for it by the ground or by other troops in the front. 

• 708. Besides tlie arrangements which depend on the supposed plan 
of the enemy, the wings must be protected by the ground, or supported 
by troops in echelon ; if the attack of the enemj' is repirlsed, the offen- 
sive must at once be taken, to inspire the troops, to disconcert the ene- 
my, and often to decide the action. In thus taking the offensive, a 
close column should be pushed rapidly ou the wing or flank of the ene- 
my. The divisions of this column form in the line of battle succes- 
sively, and each division moves to the front as soon as formed, in order, 
by a rapid attack in echelon, to prevent the enemy from changing front 
or bringing up his reserves. In all arrangements, especially in those 
for attacks, it is most important to conceal the def^ign unt»:I the moment 
of execution, and then to execute it with the greatest rapidity. The 
night, therefore, is preferred for the movement of troops on the flank 
or rear of the enemy, otherwise it is necessary to ma^k their march by 
a grand movement in front, or by taking a wide circuit. 

709. In making an attack, the communications to the rear and for re- 
treat must be secured, and the General must give beforehand all neces- 
sary orders to provide for that event. 

710. When a success is gained, the light troops should pursue the 
enemy promptly and rapidly. The other troops will restore order in 
their columns, then advance from position to position, always prepared 
for an attack or to support the troops engaged. 

711. Before the action, the Generals indicate the places where they 
•will be; if they change position, they give notice of it, or leave a staff 
ofiBcer to show where they have gone. * 

712. During the fight the officers and noncommissioned officers keep 
the men in the ranks, and enforce obedience if necessary. Soldiers 
must not be permitted to leave the ratiks to strip or rob the dead, nor 
to assist the wounded, unless "by express permission, which is only to 
be given after the action is decided. The highest interest and duty is 
to win the victory, which only can insure proper care of the wounded. 

71-3. Be£,ore the action, the Quartermaster of the division makes all 
the necessary arran«sements for the transportation of the wounded. Ho 
establishes the ambulance d^wts in the rear, and gives his assistants 
the necessary instruction for the service of the ambulance wagons and 
Other means of removing the wounded, 

714. The ambulance depot, to which the wounded are carried or di- 
rected for immediate treatment, is generally established at the most 



"-M BATTLBS— ^PRISONERS OF WAR. To 

• ■ 

oinvenient building nearest the field of battle. A i-ed y!ag vnaxkB \tR 
place, or the way to it, to the conductors of the ambulances and to the 
wounded who can walk. 

715. The active ambulances follow the troops engiacjed to succor tjie 
wounded and remove thenr to the depots ; fur thi?! purpose the conduc- 
tors should always have tlie nece.'jsary assistants, that the soldiers may 
have no excuse to leave the ranks for tiiat c^iject. 

716. The medical director of the division, after consultation with the 
Quartermaster-General, distributes the medical officers and hospital at- 
tendants at his disposal, to the depots and active ambulances. He will 
send officers aqd attondAnts when practicable, to the active ambulances, 
to relieve the wounded who require treatment before being removed 
fj-om the ground. -He will see that the depots and ambulances are 
provided with the necessary apparatus, medicines and stores. He 
will take post and render his professional services- at the principal 
depot. 

717. If the enemy endanger the depot, the Quartermaster takes the 
order.s of the General to remove it or strengtben its guard. 

718. The wounded in the depots and the sick are removed as soon as 
possible to the hospitals that have been established by the Quartermaa- 
ter-Geueral of the army on the flanks pr rear of tlie army. 

719. After an action, the officers on ordnance duty collect the muni- 
tions of war left on the field, and make a return of them to the Gene- 
ral. The Quartermaster's Department collects the rest of the public 
property, captured, and makes the returns to headquarters. 

720. Written reports f<u" the General commanding-iiichief are made 
by commandants of .regiments, batteries, and separatg squad, ons, and 
bj' all commanders of a higlicr grade, cacli in what concerns his own 
command, and to his immediate commander. 

721. When an otlicor or soldier deserves mention for conduct in ac- 
tion, a special report shall be made in his £ase, and tiie General com- 
manding-in-chief decides whether to mention him in his report to the 
government and in his orders But lie shall not be meniioned in the 
report until he has been mentioned in the orders to the army. I'hese 
special reports are examined with care by the intermediate command- 
ers, to verify the facts, and secure commendailion and rewards to the 
meritorious onjy. 

722. The report of battles, which must frequently be mad a before 
these special reports of persons are ^rutinized, is confined to general 
praise or blame, aud an account of the operations. 

PRISONERS OF WAR. 

723. Prisoners of war will be di-sarmed arfd sent to the rear, and re- 
ported as soon as practicable to the headquarters. The return of pri- 
soners J'rom t^^e headquarters of the Army to the War Department 
will specify the number, rank, and corps.^ 

724. The private property of prisoners will be duly respected, and 
eacii shall be treated with the regard due to his rank.. They nre to 
obey the necessary orders given them. They receive for subsistence 
one ratiim each, witliout regard to rank ; and the wounded are to bo 
treated with the same care as the wounded of the army. Other ollow- 

4 



74 CONVOYS AND THEIR ESCOKTg. 

juices to them will depend on conventions with tho enemy. Prisoner's 
hordes will be taken fur the army. 

725. Exchansies of prisoners and release of officers on parole depend 
OHj^the orders of the General cummanding-in-chief, under the rnstnic- 
tioiis of government. • 

CONVOVS AND THEIR ESCORTS. 

726. The strength and -composition of the escort of a convoy depend 
on the country, tlie nature and value of the convoy, and the dangers it 
may incur. A larger escort is required fur a convoy of powder, that 
the del'ence may not be near thetrain. 

727. Cavalry is employed in escorts chiefly to reconnoitre ; the pro- 
portii n is arger as the country is more open. 

728. Pioneers or working parties are attached to convoys to menS 
roads, remove ohstacles, and erect defences. The convoys should always 
be provided with spare wheels, poles, axles, &c. 

729. The commandant of the escort should receive detailed instnlc- 
tions in writing. 

730. As far a? tho defence permits, the commander of the escort 
shall refer to the officer in oharge of the convoy for the hours of depar- 
ture, the halts, the parking and order of the train, and the precautions 
against accidents. 

731. Officers who acc.impany the convoy, but do not belong to the es- 
cort, shall exercise no authority in it except bv consent of the comman- 
der. If tliese officers are junior to the commander, he may assign them 
to duly if the defence requires it. 

732. Large convoys are formed into divisions, eafh with a conductor. 
The distance between the wagons is four paces. A small party of in- 
fantry h> attached to •each division. 

■ 733. Genetnlly, munitions of war are at the head of the convoy, sub- 
sistence next, and then other military stores ; the sutler last. I3ift al- 
wa.ys that part of the convoy which is most important to the army shall 
be where it is most secure from danger. 

734. The commandant should send out reconnoitering parties, and 
never put the convoy in motion until their reports have been received. 
He always forms an ac^^aiice and rear guard, and keeps the main body 
under his immediate order at the most important poi^nt, with small 
guards_( r posts at other points. ' , 

735. In an open country the main body marches by the side of tho 
road, opposite the centre of the c'nvoy ; in other cases at the head or 
rear of tlie column, as the one or the other is more exposed. 

736. The advance guard precedes tt.e convoy far enough, to remove 
all obstacles to its advance. It examines the woods, defile.', and vil- 
lages, and by mounted men gives information to the commander, and 
receives his orders. It reconnoitres places for halts and parks. 

737. If tho head of the column is threatened, the advanced -guard 
seizes the defiles and places which the enemy might occ'upy, and holds 
them until the main body iWvances to tlie front and relieves it ; the 
■main body holds the positions until the head of the convoy arrives, aud 
then leaves detachments, which arc relieved by the parties marching 
■with the divisions ; the poets are not abandoned until the whole convoy 
has passed and the position 13 ny longer impcrtant. 



*- CONVOYS AND THEIR ESCORTS. (0 

738. When the reftr is thi-cntcned, like measures nre *nken ; therenr 
pimnl deftTids the 2;ronnds and retards the enemy by breaking thg 
bridifRs and blocking tlie road. 

73i). If the flanks are threatened, and the ground is broi.. -.i, -vnd many 
defiles are to bo passed, the defence of the e<mv(iy beenmes h.ore diffi- 
cult; the advance and rearguards must bo reduced, the (lanks strenirth- 
ened, and po.sitiuns which will cover the nmreh of the convoy must be 
occupied by the main body of the troops before the head of the convoy 
reaches them, and until it has passed. 

740. If Uio convoy is large, and has topnss places that the force and 
position of the enemy make dangerous, the loss of the whole convoy 
must not be risked ; it must pass by divisions, which reunite after the 
passage. In this case the greater partof the troops guard the fust, di- 
"vision ; they seize the important points, and ^)ver them with light 
tro«ps,or, if necessary, with small posts, and hold theni until all the 
divisions have passed. * • 

741. If there is artillery in the convoy, the commander of the escort 
uses it for the defence. 

742. To move fastei- and make the defence easier, the wagons move 
in double file whenever the road al'ows it. _ If a wagon breaks, it is at 
once removed from the road ; when repaired; it takes the rear ; Avhen it 
cannot be repaired, its load and hm-ses are distributed to some of tho 
other wagons kept in the rear for that purpose. 

743. Cenvoys by water arc escorted on the same principleg. Each boat 
has a small infantry guard ; one portion of the escort precedoe or follows 
the convoy in l)oats. The cavalry march opposite Ihp convoy; the ad- 
vance and rear guard move by land, and all are connected by flaftkera 
with the convoy. Where a river runs through a narrow valley, the body 
of the infantry moves by land to prevent the enonjy from occupying the 
lieights and disturbing the convoy, 

7^4. Convyjs halt every hour to let the horses take bVeath and the 
wagons close up. Long halts are made but seldom, and only in places 
that have been reconnoitered and found favorable for defence. At night 
the park is arranged for defence, and in preference at a distance from 
inhabited places, if in an enetny's country. 

745. The wagons are usually parked in ranks, axle against axle, tho 
poles in the same direction, antl with sulHeient space between tho ranks 
for the horses. If an attack is feared, they are parked in square, tho 
bind wheels outsi<le, and the horses inside. ^ 

746. On the appearance of the enemy during the march, the com- 
mander closes up the wagons and continue^^ his march in order ; ho 
Jlvoids fig^hting ; but il" the cnertiy seizes a position that commands his 
road, he attacks vigoronsly with the mass of his force, Init is not to con- 
tinue the pursuit far front the convoy. Tho convoy halts, and resumes 
the march when the position is carrie 1. 

717. When the enemy is too strong to be nttacked, the convoy is 
parked in squme'if theie is room ; it not closed up in duuble filf ; at 
the fnmt and rear the road is blocrked by wagons across it. The dri- 
vers are di<mi>unted at the heads of tho horses. They ure not permit- 
Jed to ni:iko tlieif esciipe. ■ The "light troops keep the e-ieniy at a dis- 
tafipe as long as possible, rfnd nre supported when necessary, but pru- 
dently, as the troops must be kept in hand to resist the maiu attack. 



76 BAGGAGE TRAIN'S. 

748. If a wagon takes lire in the park, remove it if possible ; if not, 
remove first the ammunition wii«;(ins, then those to leeward of the fire. 

749. When a wliole convoy eanmit be saved, the most valual'le part 
may sometimes be by abandoniiif; the rest. If all efi'orts fail, an'!,there 
is. no liope of suci'or, the convoy must be set (sn 'fire and the horsed 
killed that cannot be Saved ; the escort may then ctft its wny throujih. 

750. If the convoy is of iprisoners of war, every eifurt should be made 
»to.reach a village or strong building where tliey may be confined; if 

■ft)rced to fight in the field, the prisoners must be secured and made to 
lie down until the action is over. . , 

BAGGAGE TRAINS. 

751. The baggage train of general headquarters and tlie trains of 
the several divisionsynre each ' under the charge of an oflicer of tlie 
Quartermaster's Department. These oflieers command and conduct tlie 
trains under the orders they receive from their respective headquarters. 
"When the trains of different divisions march together, or the train of 
a division marches with the train of general headquarters, the senior 
Quartermaster directs the whole. 

752. The regimental Quartermaster has charge of the wagons, horses, 
equipments, and all means of transport employed in the service of the 
regiment. Umier the orders of the Culor.gl, he assembles them for the 
inarch, and maintains the order and police of the train in park on the 
march. On marches, the regimental trains are under the orders of the 
Quartermaster of the division. When the march is by brigade, the 
senior Regimental Quartermaster in the brigade, or the Quartermaster 
of tbe brigade has the direction of the whole. The necessary wagon- 
masters, or non-commissioned. oiliceTS to act as such, are employed with 
the several trains. ' _ 

753. None but the'authorized wagons are allowed to march with the 
train. Tiie wagons'of the several headquarters, the re";imental |^ag- 
ons, and the wagons of sutlers authorized by orders from headquarters 
to march with tiie train, are all to l)e cimspionously marked. 

754. When the train of headquarters is to .have a guard, the strength 
of the guard is regulated by the General. Generals of Brigade guard 
their trains by tlie men attached to the train of the first regimentof 
their brigades. The rej^mental trains ai;e loaded, unloaded, and guard- 
ed, .as far as practicable, by convalescents' and men not effective in the 
ranks; in the cavali-y, by dismounted men. When the guard of a 
train is tlie escort for its*defcnce,.the regulations in regard to coDVoys 
and escorts take etfect. 

■ 755. Habitually each division is foUawed by its train, the regimental 
trains, uniting at the brigade rendezvous. When otherwise, the order 
tyr the movement of the'ilivisions, brigades, and regiments contains the 
necessary directions in regard to the assembling and marclting of the 
respective trains. The several trains march in-an order analogous to 
the rank of the generals, and. tlie order of battle of the troops to which 
they belong. Trains are noyvllowed in any case to be in the midst of 
the troops, or to impede the march of the troops. 

756. The wagon-masters, under the.orders of the officers of the Quar- 
termaster's Department, exercise the necessary restraints over. the team- 
Bters and servants who kave their teams, or do not properly con- 



GENERAL POLICE. / t 

duct them ; or who ill-treat their horses, or •who attempt to pillage, or 
run away in case of attack. 

757. The General commanding; the army, and the Generals of Division 
wi!l not permit any gencial or staff officer, or regiment nnder their or- 
ders, ov any person whatsoever, attached to their command, t^) have 
more than the afthorized amount or means of transportati(m. Fur this 
purpose Ihoy will themselves make, and cause to be made, frequent re- 
views and inspections of the trains. Tiiey will see that no trooper is 
employed to lead a private horsej no soldier to drive a private vehicle, 
an(i that np trooper is put orf foot to lend his horse to nn officer. They 
will not permit the wajrons of the artillery or of the trsfin to be loaded 
with anything foreign to their proper service, nor any jtublio horse, for 
any occasion, to be harnessed to a private carriage. 

758. The oflicnrs of the Quartermaster's Depairtment, the wagon mas- 
ters, and all conductors of trains, are charged with watching that the 
regulations respecting transportation allowances are strictly observed. 

GENERAL POLICE. 

759. When necessary, tho General-inohief, or General of Division, 
jiiav appoint a provost martial to take charge of prisoners, with a suit- 
able guard, or other police -force. 

700. Private servants, not soldiers, will not be allowed to wear tho 
uniform of any corps of the army; but each will lie rccjuired to carry 
witii iiim a certificate from the ofl^er who employs hiu), verified, for 
•regimental ollieors, by the signature of the Colonel ; for other iifficcrs 
under the rank of Colonel, by the chief of their corps or department. 

7G1. Li\undresses permitted to follow the army will be furnished with 
certificates, signed as in the preceding paragraph, and no woman of b:id 
character will be allowed to follow the army. Other persons with the 
army, not officers or soldiers, such as guides of the country, interpre- 
ters, &c., will carn^ about them similar certificates from the head- 
quarters that employs them. , 

702. Deserters frwm the enemy, after being examined, will be secured 
for some daysj as they may be spies in disguise ; as opportunities ofter, 
they will bo- sent to the rear; after whicli, if they are found lurking 
about the army, or attempting to return, to the enemy, they will bo 
treated with severity. 

703. The arms and accoutrements of deserters will be turned over to 
tl>e Ordnance Department, and their horses to the corps in want of thera, 
after being branded with the letters " C. S." The compensation to be 
accorded to deserters, for such objects, will be according to appraisement, 
made under tne direction of the Quartermaster's Department. The en- 
listment of dcsertci^i, without espresB permission from General heUd- 
quartore, is prohibited. 

7G+. It is forbidden to purchase horses without ascertaining the right 
of the party to sell. Stolen horses shall be restored. Estrays, in the 
enemy's country, when the owner is not discovered, are taken for the 
army. 

7G5. Plundering and marauding, at all times difsgraceful to soldiers, 
when committed on tho persons or property of those whom it is tho 
duty of the army to protect, become Crimea of such enormity as to ad- 



78 SAFEaUABDS — SIEGES. 

niit of no rfinisBion of the nwful punishment which the military law 
awards r.gainst ofiences of this nature. 

SAFEGUAKDS. 

766. Safe p; navels are protections granted to persons or property in 
forei^rn parts by the commanding; general, or by offier commanders 
within the limits of their command. 

767. Safeguanis are usually given to protect hospitals, public ■estab- 
lishments, e.stablishinens of religion, charity, or instruction, nluseums, 
depiifeitiirics of the arts, mills, post-wffices, and other institutions of pub- 
lic benelit; als* to individuals whom it may be the interest of the army 
to respect. 

768. A safeguard may consist of one or more men of fidelity and 
firmness, generally notieffective non-commissioned officers, furnislied 
with a paper setting out clearly the protection and eseiiiptions it is 
intended to secure, signed by the commander giving it, and liis staff 
officer; or it may consist of such a paper, delivered to the party whose 
person, family, house and property it is designed to protect. These 
safeguards must be numbered and registered. 

769. The men left as safeguards by one corps may be replaced by 
anothei'. They are withdrawn when the country is evacuated ; but if 
not, they have orders to await the i\rrival -of the enemy's troops, and 
apply to the commander for a safe-conduct to the outposts. 

' 770. Form of a safeguard : 

By authority of , 

A safeguard is hereby granted to [A. B , or the house and 

family of A. B ■ — , or the college, mills, or property, stating pre- 
cisely the place, nature and description of the person, property or 
buildings.] All officers and soldiers belonging to the army of (he Con- 
federate States are therefore comnumded to respect this safeguard, and 
to afford, if necessary, protection to [the. person, family, or property of 

, as the case may be. ] 

Given ut Headquarters, the day of . 

A. B . Major General commanding-in-chief. 

By command of the General. 

C. D , Adjutant-General. 

65th Article of the Enles and Articles of War. 
"Whosoever belonging to the armies of the Confederate States, em- 
ployed in foreign parts, shall force a safeguard, shall suffer death." " 



m\. In the following regulations the besieging^ force is supposed to 
be two divisions of infantry and a brigade of cavalry. The sanie prin- 
ciples govern in other cases, 

772. Tie BiigaTtier-Generals of infantry serve, in turn, as Generals 
of tlie tri.ictjes ; one or more, of tliem are detailed daily, according to 
the irojjt and number of attacks ; they superintend theoperations, and 
dispose the '.liirds of the trenrihes tu.repiilso sorties and protect the 
works." Officers of the general staff are assigned to them to transmit 
their orders and utteatTto the details of service. 



SIEGES. 7^ 

773. The Colonels and Lieutenant-Colonels of infantry alternate for 
duty in the trenches ; o~ne or more are detailed daily ; they superintend 
the service of the guards and ■workmen in thepart of tlie work to whiqh 
the general of the trenches Assigns them, being posted with troi.ps of 
their own regiments in preference. The commandant of the siege may 
place the Coh)ne1s on the roster with the Brigadier-Generals. 

774. Tlie commandants of engineers and mtillery accompany the 
first troops befiire tlie place to examine the works and the approiiches. 
When the engineers have Coniirletcd the rccounoissanco oi tlie works, 
and of each front as far as practicable, the commandant of engineers 
makes a plan of the woiks as exact and detailed as p,i.ssihle, and under 
the instructions of the General commanding the siege, draws up the 
general plan of the siege, and discusses it with the commandant of ar- 
tillery in regard to the best eivployment of that arm. These otiicers 
then submit their joint or separate opinions to the General who decides 
on the plan of the siege, and gives the orders for the execution. The 
commandant of engineers directs the construction of all. the works of 
the siege, under the authority of the General, and lays before him every 
day a report of his operations, and a plan showing tiie progress of the 
attack. "The commandant of artillery also makes daily reports to the 
General of all that relates to his branch of the service. 

775. The Quartermaster General establishes the hospitals, and orga- 
nizes the. means for transporting the wounded to them. 

77G. The commanding General^ppoints afield officer of the trenches, 
who is aided by one or two Captains or I^ieuteuants. 

777. The field offcer of the trenches is charged with all the details 
relative to the assembling of the guards and the workmen. lie distri- 
butes the guards on the diflelent points of the attack agreeably to the 
orders of the General of the treifchcs, and forms the detachments of 
workmen for the engineers .and artillerj' ; that he m.ay be prepared for 
this distribution, he receives every day from the Adjutant-General a 
statement of the details for the nex.tdjiy. 

778. On tfce arrival of the General of the ii'^nches, the field oEGcer of 
the trenches gives him all the information -tji^tssary t^enablc him to 
statiim the troops, attends him in his visit.)i|i the tren^^hes, and takes 
his orders on the changes to make in the position of the troops. The 
execution is intrusted to the commandants of the troops. ; 

779. The field officer of the trenches sees that men and litters are 
alwa.v'' ready to Tiring "oiF the wounded. One or more companies of the 
guards of the trenches are put under his immediate orders. for the prc- 
BCrvntion of order and police in the trenches. 

780. The divisions, brigades, regiments, and battalions, are encamped 
during the sietre in the order of battle. The service of camp is con- 
ducted a» heretofore prescribed. 

781. The infantry has two kinds of siege service — the guard of the 
trenches^nd the worlfrof >he trenches. 

782. The guards of the trtnches mount every day by battalions, in 
such order of detail- that all the troops may take an equal share, and 
no part of the line to be left too weiik. If only one battalion is required, 
eacii division furnishes it alternately ; if two are required, each divi- 
sion gives one ; if three, one divisitfti furnishes two, the other one, al- 



80 SIEGES. 

ternately. The iwo battalions of the same divisions are not taken from 

the Pfimo brio;ade. 

783. The detail for work of the trenches is by company, from all the 
regiments at one time, or in turn, and continues geneinlly twelve Iiouvs. 
The detail from any regiment should never be less than a company. 
If. only lialf a company would be needed from all the regiments at a 
time, every other regimant furnishes a full company alternately. 

784. The battalions for guard are 'detailed at least twelve hours in 
advance; they furnish no other details during this tour. If the whole 
regiment is called out, it leaves a sufficient police guard in camp, 

785. Twenty-four hours, or twelve at least, before mount'ng guard in 
the trenches, the battalions detailed for guard do not furnish workmen ; 
and the companies of these battalions whose tour it would have been 
to work-in the trenches do not go there for twenty four hours after 
guard, if possible, or at the least twelve. 

786. The workmen who are required for other work than that of the 
trenches, are taken from the roster for fatigue from the battalions and 
companies not empjloyed in the trenches. 

787. The battalions first for detail for guard of the trenches, and the 
companie's first for detail for work in the trenches, furnish np other de- 
tails, and are held on picket, ready to march at the call of the field 
officer of the trenches. 

788. Materials for the si-ege, such as fascines, gabions, hurdles, 
pickets, &c., are furnished by the#iiFercnt corps, in the proportion 
ordered by the General. 

789. Guards and workmen going to the trenches, march without beat 
of drum or music. - 

790. At all times, and especially on the day the trenches are opened, 
everything is avoided likely to attract the attention of the enemy. With 
this view, the General may vary the hour of relieving guards. 

791. The chiefs of engineers and artillery make requisitions for 
workmen in advance, that the details may be made in time to prevent 
any delay in the work. They should exceed the number strictly re- 
quired, that tiTfere may be a reserve for unforeseenw'ants. If this re- 
serve is found insufficient, the General directs the field officer of the 
trenches to call on the picket. 

792. Before the guards and workmen march, the field officer of iJie 
trenches arranges them so that each detachment can reach its ground 
without confusion. The troops are posted in the trenches according to 
the positiiMi of their regiments in the order of battle, and, as far as 
possible, the companies of workmen in like order. The reserves of 
workmen are placed at the depot of the trenches, or the nearest suita- 
ble place to the works. 

793. The workmen leave their knapsacks and swords in camp, and 
march with their fire-arms and cartridge-boxes, which they place near 
them while at work. They always carry their overcoats, to cOver them 
in resting or when wounded, ♦ 

794'. The guards always enter the trenches with arms trailed, and 
the workmen also, unless they carry materials or tools, when the arms 
are in the sling. • 

7-95. The guards and detachmenfs of workmen send a Corporal to the 



SIEGES. 81 

openings of the trenches to guiilo the relief. They march out of tho 
trenches by the flank, with trailed arms. 

790. Sandbags, forming logp-holos, are placed ft intervals on the 
parapet to protect the sentinels ; they are more numerous than the sen- 
tinels, so that the enemy may not know where the sentinels are placed. 

797. When detachments are placed^t night in advance of tho trench- 
es, to cover the workmen, the men sit or lie down, with their tire-arins 
in their hands, to hide themselves better from tlje enemy ; the sentinels 
put tlieir ears to tlie ground frequently, that they may hear troops com- 
ing out of the place. To prevent mistakes, the workmen are told what 
troops cover them. 

798. No honors are paid in the trenches^ " When the General com- 
manding the siege visits them, the guards place themselves in rear of 
the bonquette, and rests on their arms. The colors are never carried 
to the trenches unless the whole regiment marches to repulse a sortie 
or make an assault. Even in this case, they are not displayed until the 
General commanding the siege gives a formal order. 

799. The materials of the siege of all kinds, together with the tools, 
are collected in part at the depots of the trenches, and in part at the 
opening of the trenches, or in such other place as has been appointed 
for the ciiavenience of the service by the field oflBcers of the -trenches, 
on the advice of the chiefs^ of artillery and engineffrs. 'I hey are in 
cjiarge of officers of engineers and artillery, with guards or noii com- 
missioned officers of both corps. But if these corps cannot furnish 
them, the chiefs apply for assistance from uie infantry. 

800. The workmen, in going to the trenches, carry such tools and 
materials as are required by the artillery and engineers. In tliis case, 
the Held officer of the trenclresiai-notice and superintends it. 

801. The soldiers sent to the trenches gd with their cartridge-boxes 
filled. Cartridges, wlien needed, are sent to tho trenches on the requi- 
sition of commanders of battalions, approved by tho General of the 
trenches. , ' , 

802. In the case of a sortie, the gflards move rapidly to the places 
that have been designated by the General of the trenqjbes, and which 
afford the best defence for the head of tlie works, the bauerics, tlio com- 
munications, or ihe flanks, or best enable them to take the sortie itself 
in_ flank or reverse. Having lined the banquette to fire on the enemy, 
the troops form on the reverse of the trench to receive him. The work- 
meii take arms, retain their positions, or retire with their tools, -as or- 
dered. The officers commanding tRe detachments of workmen see'ttat 
their movements are made promptly and in good order, so as to avoid 
all confusion in the communications. 

803. Tlic troops that advance beyond the trenches to repulse the sor- 
tie, must not follow in pursuit. Tho General takes care tliat they re- 
turn to the trenches before the retreat of the sortie allows the artillery 
of the place to open op them. When the workmen return, the officers 
and non-commissioned officers, of the detaclm>cnts call the roll without 
interrupting tho work, whieli is immediately resumed. 

804. When it is necessary to 'dismount cavalry and send them to the 
trenches, they should be employed i^s near their ca'mp as possible, and 
posted between the detachments of infantry. 



S% SIEOE?. 

805. Men belonging to the cavalry may, in assaults, be employed In 
carrjini fascines an'1 other materials to fill ditches and make passages. 

80G. The general officers of cavalry are more particularly employed 
in the service of posts and detachmehts placed in observation to protect 
the siege. Tlicy and* the field officers of tii is arm are employed in the 
command of escorts to convoys, 5f whatever arms the escorts may be 
composed. When these duties are not suEcient to employ them, they 
tako-their share of the/duty of the trenches. . ". 

807. The officers of engineers and artillery of the trenches*makc to 
the General of the trenches a return of all losses in their troop.«, and 
such other reports on the work as he requires, in addition to the reports 
direct to their respective chiefs on the details of the service. 

808. At the end of each tour, the field officer of the trenches draws 
up a report for the twenty-four hours to the General of the trenches. 
The General of the trenches reports to the General commanding the 
siege. 

809. The commanders of the several corps in the trenches report, 
when relieved, to their respective headquarters the losses during the 
tour, an<i the conduct of the offii'ers and men. 

810. However practicable the breach may appear, or however ruined 
the work in rear of it, the heads of columns must always be supplied 
with ladders to g^t over unexpected obstacles. 

_ 811. The General commanding the siege designates picked comp^,- 
nles to protect property and persons, and prevent pillage and violence, 
from the moment the place is carried. The officers exert themselves to 
restrain the men. 

812. The General designates the places requiring^ particular protec- 
tion, such as churches, 'asylums, hospitols, colleges, schools and maga- 
zines. The order of their. protection should remind the soldiers, at the 
time, of the penalty of disobeying jt. • 

813. Whether the place be taken by assault or by capitulation, the 
provisions and the military stores, and the public funds, are reserved 
lor the u«e of the army. * . ^ 

814. The corimiander of engineers will keep a journal of the siege, 
showing the d^erations of each day in detail, the force employed on the 
work, the kind and quantity of materials used in them, &c. He will 
also mark on a plan of the ground the daily progress of the works, and 
make the necessary drawings explanatory of their construction. 

815. The commander of the artillery will keep a daily journal ofithe 
operations under his direction, shovsing the number and kind of pieces 
in"battery, the force employed in serving them, the kind and quantity 
of ammunition expended, the number of rounds fired from each piece 
of ordnance, the effect of the fire, andall other particulars relative to 
his branch of the service. 

810. These journals and drawings will be sent after the siege, with 
the report of the General, to the War Department.. 

DEFByN'CE OF FORTIFIED PLACES. 

817. In war, every commander of a fortified y)lace shall always hold 
himself prepared with Kis plan of defence, as if at any time liable to 
attack. He arranges this plan according to the probable mode of at- 
t&6]f ; determines the posts of the troops in the several parts of the 



SIEGES, 83 

work;?, the reliefs, tlio reserve:?, and the details of serviae in all tho 
corps. He (Iniws up instructions for a case of attack,*nnd exercises the 
garrison according; to his plan of defence. In sea-coast works he pro- 
vides the instructions for the different batteries on the approach of 
ships. *■ 

818. In framing; his plan, ho studies the ■works and the exterior with- 
in tlio lailius of attack and investment,' the strength of the garrison, 
the artillery, the munitions of war, subsistence and siffiplies of all 
kinds, and takes immediate measures to procure whatever is deficient of 
troops or supplies, either by requisition on theXjiovernmcnt, or from tho 
means put at his disposal. , 

819. On liie approach of aneaemy, he removes all houses and other 
objects, within or without the place, that cover the approaches, or in- 
terrupt the fire of tiie guns or the movements of the troops, lie as- 
sures himself personally that all posterns, outlets, or embrasures, &c., 
are in proper state of security. 

8'20. He shall be furnished by the Department of "War with a plan of 
the works, showing all th(f details of the fortifications and of the exte- 
rior within the radius of attack; with a map of tht environs withinthc 
radius of investment, with a map of the vicinity, including the neigli- 
boring works, roads, watsr-cliannels, coasts, &Ck ; ^vith a memoir ex- 
plaining the situation and defence of the place, and the relations and 
bearings of tlie Several works on each other, and on the approaches by 
land and water — all of which he carefully preserves, and'coniuiunicates 
only to the council of defence. 

821. He consults his next in rank, and the senior oflBcer of the engi- 
neers and of the artillery, either separately, or as a council of defence. 
In the latter cas^, he designates an ofl'cer to act as secretary to the 
council, and to record their proceedings and their jofnt or separate 
opinions, which are to be kept secret during the siege. The members 
may record their opinions under their owji signature. In all cases, the 
«ommander decndes on his own responsibility. * , 

8'2'2. The commander of the place, and the chiefs of engineers and of 
artillery, shall keep journals of the defence, in which shall be entered, 
in order of date, without blank or interlineation, the orders given or 
received, tho manner in which they are executed, their results, and 
every event and circumstance of importance in 'the progress of the de- 
fence. ThcsQ journals, and. the proceedings of tho council of defence, 
shall be sent, after the xsiege, to the Department of War. 

823. There shall be kei)t in the ott ce of the commandant of (he place, 
to be sent after the siege to the De|">nrtment of War, a map of the envi- 
rons, a pfan of the fortifications, and a special plan of the front of at- 
tack, on which the chief engineer will trace, in succession, the positions 
occupied, and tho works executed by the enemy from the investment; 
and also the works of counter approach of defence, and the successive 
positions of the artMlery and other troops of the garrison during the 
progress of the siegQ. 

824. The ^jminander shall defend in succession the advanced works, 
the coverpd way and outworks, the body of the work, and tho ihterior 
entr>»nchments. He will not be content with clearing away the foot of 
the breaches, and defending them by abattis, mines, and all the means 
usod in sieges ; but he shall begin id good time, behind the bastions or 



84 TKOOPS ON BOARD OF TRANSPORTS. 

front of attack, the necessary entrenchments to resist assaults on the 
main work. 

825. lie shall use his means of defence' in such manner as always to 
have a reserve of fresh troops, chosen from his best soldiers, to resist 
assaults, re-take the outworks, and especially to resist assaults on the 
body of the place ; and a reserve of provisions for the last period of the 
siege, and of ammunition for tr.e last attacks. 

82G. He rnust, in every case, compel the besieging force to approach 
by the slow and succQ:Ssive works of siege, and must sustain at least one 
assault on a practica-ble breach in- the body of the place. 
'827. When the c»mmandai' thinks that the end of the defence has 
come, he shall still consult the counoil of defence on the means that 
may remain to prolong the siege. But in all cases he alone will decide 
on the time, manner, and terms of the surrender. In the capitulation, 
he shall not seek or accept better terms for himself than for the garri- 
son, but shall share their fate, and exert his best endeavors for the 
care of the troops, and especially of the sick and wounded. 

828. No commander in the field shall w'ithdraw troops or supplies 
frofti any fortified p°lace, or exercise any authority over its commandant, 
unless it has been put subject to his orders by competent authority. 

ARTICLE XXXVII. 

• , TROOrS ON BOARD OF TRANSPORTS. 

829. Military commanders charged with the embarkation of troops, 
and officers of the Quartermaster's Department intrusted with the se- 
lection of the transports, will take care tliat the vessels are entirely sea- 
worthy and proper for such service, and suitable arrangements are 
made in them for the health and com.fort of the troops. ^ 

830. If, in the opinion of the officer commanding the troops to be em- 
barked, the vessel is not proper or suitably arranged, the yfficer charged 
with the.embarkation shall cause her to be inspected by competent and 
experienced persons. 

831. Immediately after embarking, the men will be assigned to quar- 
ters, equal parties on both sides of the ship, and no man will be al- 
lowed to loiter or sleep on the opposite side. As far as practicable, the 
men of each company will be assigned to the same part of the vessel, 
and the squads, in the same manner, to contiguous berths.. 

832. Arms will be so placed, if tliere be no racks, as to be secure from 
injury, and enable the men to handle them promptly ; bayonets unfixed 
and in scabbard. 

833. Ammunition in cartridge-boxes to be placed as to be entirely 
secure from fire ; reserve ammunition to be reported to the master of 
the transport, with request that he designate a safe place of deposit. 
Frequent inspections will be made of the service ammunition, to insure 
its safety and good condition. 

834. No officer is to sleep out of his ship, or to quit his ship, without 
the sanction of the ofBcer commanding on board. & 

835." The guard will be proportioned to the number. of sentinels re- 
quired. At sea, the guard will mount with side arms only. The offi- 
cer of the guard will be the officer of the day. 

836. Sentinels will be kept over the fires, with buckets of water at 



TROOPS ON BOARD OF TIlANSPORTS. • 8o 

hand, promptly to extinp;uish fires. fSmuking is prohibited between 
decks or in the cabins, al all timos ; nor shall any lig;hts bo allowed be- 
tween decks except such ship lanterns as tlie master of the transport 
may direct, or those carried by^the otiiocr of the day in the execution of 
his duty. . ■ 

837. Regulations will be adopted to ena1)lo coiflpanies or messes to 
cook in turn; no others than those whose turn it is will bp allowed to 
loiter round or appn>acli the galleys or other cooking places. 

.838. The commanding oHicer will make arrangements, in concert 
with the master of the vessel, for calling, the troops to nuariors, so that 
in case of alarm, by stormi or fire, or the aif proacli of the enemy, every 
man may repair promptly to hid station* But he will take care not to 
crowd the deck. The troops not wanted at the guns, or to assist tho 
sailors, and those who cannot be iwlvantageously employed with small 
arms, will be formed as a reserve I etween decks. 

839. AlUlie troops will turn out at A. M., without arms or uni- 
form, and ( in warm weather) without shoes or stockings; when every 
individual will -be clean, his hands, fac-3 and feet washed, and his hair 
combed. The same personal inspection will" be repeated thirty minutes 
before sunset. The cooks alone will hs exempted from one of these in- 
spections-per day, if necessary. 

840. llecruits or awkward men will bo exercised in the morning nnd 
evening tn the use of arms, an hour each time, when the weather will 
permit. • . 

841. Officers will enforce cleanliness as indispensable to health. When 
the weather will permit, bedding will be brought on deck every morn- 
ing for airing. Tubs may be fixed on the forecastle for bathing, or the 
men may be placed in the chains and have buckets of water thrown 
over thenv 

842. Between decks will nnt be washed oftener than'once a week, and 
only when the A'eather is fine-. Tlie boards of the lower berths will bo 
removetl once or twice a week to change the straw. Under the direc- 
tion of the Surgeon ^xnd the oCBcer of the da_y, frequent fumigations will 
be performed between decks. The materials required are — common 
salt,- four ounces ; powdered oxide of manganese, one ounce ; sulphuric 
acid, one ounce, diluted with two ounces of water. The diKited acid is 
poured over the other ingredients in a basin placed in a hot Si^nd bath. 
Solutions of oiiloride of lime and chloride of zinc are excellent disin- 
fecting agents. 

843. During voyages in hot weather, the master of the vessel will be 
desired to provide wind-sails, whcli will be kept constantly hyng up, 
and frequently examined, to see that they draw well and are not ob- 
structed. ■ . * 

844. During cooking hours, the oCGcers of companies visit the ca- 
boose, iPnd sec that the messes are well prepared. The coppers and other 
cooking utensils are to.be regularly and well washed, both be/ore <vnd 
aftei' use. 

845. The beiding will be_replaoe<l in the berths at sunset, or at an 
earlier hour when there is a prospect of bad weather; and wt tattoo 
every m-an not on duty will be in his berth. To insure the execution 
of this regulation, the officer of the day, wTth a lauterp, will make a tour 
between decks. 



8'6 TROOPS ON BOARD OF TRANSPORTS. 

846. Lights will be extinguished at tattoo, excet such as are placed 
under sentinels. The offiuer of the day will see to it, and report to the 
commanding ofScer. The officers' lights will be extinguisiud at 10 
o'clock, unless special permission be given to continue them for a longer 
time, as in case of sickness or other emergency. 

847. For the sak^of exercise, the troops will be occasionally called to 
quarters by Uie beat to ariii,s. Those appointed to the guns will be fre- 
quently exercised in the. use of them. The arms and accoutrements 
will be frequently inspected. The metalic parts of the former will be 
often wiped and greased again. 

' 848. The men will not be allowed to sleep on deck in hot weather or 
in the sun ; they will be encouraged and required to take exercise on 
deck, in squads by succession, when necessary. 

849. At morning and evening parades, the Surgeon will examine the 
men, to observe whether there be any appearance of disease. 

850. The sick will, as far as practicable, be separated from the healthy 
men. On the first appearance of malignant coutagion, a signal will be 
made for the hospital vessel ( if there be one in company,) and" the dis- 
eased men removed to her. 

851. A good supply of hospital stores and medicines will be taken on 
each vessel, and used only for the sick and convalescent. 

852. The Surgeon will guard the men against costiveness on ap- 
proaching a hot climate. In passing through the West Inc^^es to the 
Southern coast, for instance, and for some weeks after landing in those 
latitudes, great care is required in the use of fruit, as strangers would 
not be competent to judge of it, and most kinds, after long voyages, are 
prejudicial. . - 

853. In harbor, where there is no danger from sharks, the men may 
bathe; but not more than ten at a time, and attended by a boat. . 

854. In fitting up a vessel for the transportati()n of horses, care is to 
be taken that the requisite arrnngement* are mad> for conveniently 
feeding and cleaning them, and to secure them from injury in rough 
weather by ropes attached to breast-straps and luecching, or by other 
suitable means ; and especially that proper ventilation is provided by 
openings in the upper deck, wind-sails, &c. The ventilation of steamers 
may be assisted by using the engine for that purpose. 

855. Horses should not be put on board after severe exercise or when 
heated. In hoisting them on board, the slings should be made fast to 
a hook at the end ot the fall, or the knot tied by an expert seaman, so 
that it may be well secured a^nd easily loosened. The horse should be 
run up_ quickly to prevent him from plunging, and should be steadied 
by guide ropes. A halter is placed on him before he is lifted from the 
ground. 

856. On board, care is to be taken that the horses are^ not overfed ; 
bran should form part of their ration. The face, eyes, and nostrils of 
each horse are to be washed at the usual stable hours; and occasionally, 
the manges slipuld be washed and the nostrilsof the horse sponged with 
vinegar and water. 

857. In loading vessels with stores for a military expedition, the car- 
go of each should be composed of an assortment of such stores as may 
be available fur service in Cise of the non-arrival of others, and they 
should be placed on board in each a manner that they may be easily 



COURT- MARTIAN. 87 

readied, in the orrlcr in -which they (vre required for service. Each 
storesliiii ,«hi)uld ho. marked, at the bow an(l stern, on botli sides, in 
liirjje cliaracters, with a distinctive hotter and nnmhSr. A list is to be 
made of the stores on board.-of each vessel, and of the place where they 
ara to be found in it ; a copy of this list to be sent to the chief officer of 
the proper department in the expedition, or at the place of destination. 

ARTICLE .XXXVIII. 

COURT MARTIAL. 

858. In appnintinjc; a general court-martial, as manyjnenibers will be 
detailed, from five to thirteen kiclusive, as can be assembled without 
manifest injury to the service. 

859. The decision of the officer appointing the court, fs to the num-. 
ber that can be assembled without manifest injury to the service, is con- 
clusive. 

860. A President of the court will not be appointed. The officer 
hijiiiest in rank present will lie President. 

8GI. Form of -order appointinj:; court-marti.il, the last paragrapli 
emitted wlien the court can be kept tip with. thirteen members: 

Headquarters, itc. 

A general ctvirt-martial is hereby appointed to meet at -, on 

the g- day of , or as soon thereafter as practicable, for the 

trial of , and such othgr prisoners as may be brought before it. 

Detail for {lie Cotirt : 

1 : §. .; , 

2 ■ f). .' 

3 .......:. 10 ! 

4 11 

1:2. ; 

6. .:.. :. 13 ■ 

%■ ;. • 

-; , Judge Advocate. 

No other officers than those named can be assembled without mani- 
fest injury to the service. 

By order of —^ — , commanding. - 



-, Assistant Adjutant-General." 



8(')2. In the detail the members will be named, and they will take 
place in the court, in the order of their rank. A decision of the pro- 
per authority in regard to the rank oi" the members cannot be reyersed 
by the court. 

863. The place of holding a Court is appointed by the authority con- 
vening it. 

8t')4. Application for delay or postponement of trial must, when prac- 
ticnhh% be made to the authority convening the court. When made, to 
the court, it must be before plea, and will then, if in the (yiinion of the 
court well founded, be refcrrpd to the authority convening th"^ court, to 
decide whether the court shall be adjourned or dissolved, ami the charge? 
reserved for anotiicr court. 

80"). Upon ajiplication by the accused for postponement on the ground 
of absence of witness, it ought distinctly to appear on his oath, 1st, that 



88 COURTS-MARTIAL. 

the witness is ninterisil, and how; 2d, that the accused has used due 
diligence to procure Ins attendance, arid 3d, that he has -reasonable 
^rnuind to believe,*and does believe, that he will be able to procure such 
attendance within a reasonable time statecj^ 

866. The President of" a cnurt-martial, besides his duties and privi- 
lej!:es as member, is the (jrgan of the court, to keep order and conduct 
its business, lie speaks and acts for the court in each case where the 
rule has been prescribed by lasv, rej^ulation, or its own resolution. In 
all their deliberations the law secures the equality of the members. 

867. The 76th Article .of War does not confer on a court-martial the 
power to punish. its own members. For disorderly conduct, a member 
is liable as in other oifences against military discipline ; improper words 
are to be taken down, and any disorderly conduct of a member reported 

•to the^iuthori^ conveninj^ the court. 

"868. 'jChe Judge Advocate shall suqimon the necessary witnesses for 
the trial ; but he shall not summon any witness at the expense of the 
Confederate States, nor any officer of the army, without the order of the 
court, unless satisfied that his testimony is"ttiaterial and necessary to 
the ends of justice. 

•863. Every court-martial shall k'eep a_complete and accurate record 
of its proceedings, to be autheniicated by the signatures of the Presi- 
dent-and Judge Advocate, who. shall also certify, in like manner, the 
sentence pronounced by the court in each case. The record ruust show 
that the court was organized as the law requires ; that the court and 
Judge Advocate were duly sworn in the presence of the prisoner; that 
he was previously asked whether he had objection to any member, and 
his answer thereto. Acopyof'tlie order appointing the court will be 
entered on the record in eacli case. 

870. Whenever the same court-martial tries more prisoners than one, 
and they are arraigned on separate and distinct charges, the court is to 
be sworn at the commencement of each trial, and the proceedings in 
each case will be made up separately. . ' . " 

871. The record shall be clearly and legibly written ; as far as prac- 
ticable, without erasures or interlineations, the pages to be numbered, 
with a margin of one inch on the left side of each page, and at the top 
of the odd and bottom of the even pages ; through this last margin the 
sheets to be stitched togetiior ; the ^documents accompanying the pro- 
codings to be noted and marked in such a manner "as to afford an easy 
reference. 

872. No recommendation will be embraced in the body of the sen- 
tence. Those members only who concur in. the recommendation will 
sign iC. 

873. The legal punishnaents for 8oldie<'8by sentence of.a court-martial 
according to the offence, and the 'jurisdiction of the court, are — death ; 
corporeal punishment by flogging; confinement; confinement on bread 
anjl water diet ; solitary confinement ; hard labor; ball and chain ;. fi;r- 
feUure of pay and allowances; discharges from service; and reprimands. 
Solitary coiitiiiement, or confipfeinent on bread and water, shall not ex- 
ceed fourteon days at a time, with intervals between the periods of such 
confinement not less than such periods, and not exceeding eighty-four 
days in one year. 

874. A court-martial cannot assign and make oyer the pay of a sol- 



COUKTS-MARTIAI. — WORKING rAUTlES. 89 

dier to any olher person, and the receipt of snch person -vrill not be a 
sufficient vmicher fur the disbiirsinn; officer. Nor can a soldier be re- 
quired to receipt for money paid witlimit his consent U) another person. 
The hvw prohibits any receipt or voucher in accounts of public money, ' 
unless the full amount of the receipt is paid to the party who sijrnedjt. 

875. The jurisdiction and authority of courts-martial are the same 
with reference to Ordnance, Sergeants and Hospital Stewards as in the 
cases (if other enlisted men. When, however, an Ordnance Sergeant 
or Hospital Steward is sentenced by an inferior court to be reduced to 
the ranks, such sentence, though it may be. approved by the reviewing 
officer, will not be carried into effect utitil the case has been referred to 
the Secretary of Warfcft- final action. Jn these cases uf reduction, the 
application of the man for discharge from service, though not recogni- 
zed as a right, will generally bo regarded with favor, if his off'eDce has 
not lieen of too serious a nature, and especially where he has not, been 
recently proaioted from the ranks. . 

876. Tlie Judge Advocate shall transmit the proceedings, without de-, 
lay, to the officer having authority to confirm the sentence, who shall 
state, at the end of the proceedings in each case, his decision and orders* 
thereon. 

877. The original proceedings of all general courts-martial, after the 
decision on them of tnc reviewing authority, and all proceedings that 
require thp decision of the President under the 65th and 89th Articles of 
War, and copies of all orders confirming or disproving, or remitting 
the sentences of courts^-martial, and all official communications for the 
Judge Advocate of the army, will be addressed to ." The Adjutant and 
Inspcdor- General of the Army, War Department," marked on the cover, 
" Judge Advocate," 

878. The proceedings of garfison and regimental courts-martial will 
be transmitted without delay, by the garrison ot" regimental comman- 
der, to the de[)artment headquarters for the supervision of the depart- 
ment cfimmander. • 

87'.). The power to pardon or nntigate the punishment ordered by a 
court-martial, invested in the authoriry confirming the proceeding^!, and 
in the President of the Oonfe^lerato States. A superior military com- 
mander to the officer confirming the proceedings may suspend the exe- 
cution of tlie sentence when, ii^his judgment, it is void upon the face 
of the proceedirrgs, or whet; he sees' a fitt case for executive clemency. 
In such cases, the record, with Ids order prohibiting the execution, shall 
be transmitted for the final orders of the President. 

880. When a court-martial or court of inquiry adjourns without. day, 
the members will return to their respective posts and duties, unless 
otiierwise orde^^ed. 

881. When a court adjourns for three days, the Judge Advocate shall 
report the fact to the commander of the post or troops, and the me:\i- 
bers belonging to the command will bo liable to duty during the time. 

ARTICLE XXXIX. - 

Wr.HKING.TARTIES. 

882. W^hen it is necessary to employ the army at work on fortifica- 
tions, in burvcys, in cutting roads, and other constant labor of not less 



90 WQRKING PARTIES — PUBLIC PROPEKTY, AC. 

than ten days, the noncommissioned officers and soldiers so employed 
are enrolled as extra-duty men, and are alhnved twentytivcrents a day 
when employed as laborers and teamsters, and forty cents a day wlien 
'employed as mechanics, nt all stations east of the Rocky Mountains, 
and tliirty-five and fifty cents per day, respectively', at all stations west 
of those mountains. 

SS3. Enlisted men of the Ordnance and Engineer Departments, and. 
artificers of artillery, are not entitied to this allowanc-e when employed 
in their appropriate work. 

884. Soldiers will not be £mployc<l as extra-duty men for any labor 
in camp or garrison which can properly be performed by fatigue par- 
ties. . " * - 

885. No extra-duty men, except those required for the ordinary ser- 
vice of the Quartermaster, Commissary, and Medical Departments, and 
saddlers in mounted companies, will be employed without previous au- 
thority from department headquarters, except in case .of necessity, 

., which shall be promptly reported to the department commander. 

886. Extifi-duty pay of a saddler in a mounted company will be 
charj^ed on the company muster-roll, to be paid l)y the Quartermaster 
and refunded by the Ordnance Department. Extra-duty pay of cooks 
and nurses in the hospital service will be paid by the Quartermaster, in 
the absence of a medical disbursing officer, and r'efunded by the Medi- 
cal Department. The extra pay of cooks and nurses will be charged 
on hospital muster-rolls. 

887. -The officer commanding a working party will conform to the 
directions and plans of the engineer or other officer directing the work, 
without regard to rank. . * ' '' 

888. A day's work shall not exceed (en hours in summer, nor eight 
in winter. Soldiers are paid in proporRon for any greater number of 
hours they are employ?(d each day. Summer is considered to commence 
on the 1st of April, and winter on the 1st of October. 

889. Although the necesswies of the service may require soldiers to 
be ordered on working parties as a ^^xtj, commanding officers are to 
bear in mind that fitness for military service by instruction and disci- 
pline is the object for which the army is k^pt on foot, and that they are 
not to employ the troops when not in the field, and especially the 
mounted troopff; in labors that interfere* with ttieir military duties and 
exercises, except in cases of immediate necessity, Avhich shall be forth- 
with reported for the orders of the AVar Department. 

ARTICLE XL. 

PUBLIC PROPERTY, MONEY, AND ACCOUNTS. 

890. All officers of the Commissary and Quartermaster's Depart- 
ments, and military store-keepers, shall, previous to their entering on 
the duties of their respective offices, give j'ood and sufficient bonds to 
the Coiifeflerate States fullyf to account for all monies and puljic pro- 
perty which they may receive, in such sums as the Secretary of War 
shall direct; and the ofHcers aforesaid shall renew their bonds every 
four .years, and oftener if the Secretary oi' War shall so require, and 
whenever they receive a new commission or appointment. 

891. The sureties to the bond shall be bound jointly and severally for 



PUBLIC PROPERTY, AC. 91 

the whole amount of the bond, nnd shall satisfy the Secretary of War 
thnt tiiey are worth jointly double the amount of the boncJ, by tl>e affi- 
davit of each surety, stating that lie is worth, over and above his debts 
and liabilities, the amuiHit t>f tlie bynd, or such other sum as he may 
specify, and each surety shall stateliis place of residence. 

892. Tlie chiefs of distiursinj:; departments who submit requisitions 
for money to be remitted to disbursing oflioers. shall take care that no 
more mimey than is actually needed is in the hands of any < fOcer. 

893. Tbe Treasury Department havil-g provided, *by arrangement 
with the Assistant Treasurers at various puiots, secure depositories for 
funds in the hands of disbursing officers, all disbursing otTicers are 
re(jiiired to avail- themselves, as far as p()ssil)le, of tiiis arrangeuient, 
by depositing with the Assistant Treasurers such funds as are not 
wanted for immediate use, and drawing the "same in convenient sums 
as wanted. 

894. No public funds sh"?4ll bo exclianged -except for gold and silver. 
When the funds furnished are gold and silver, all payments shall be in 
gold and silver. When the funds furnished are drafts, they shall be 
presented at the place of najment, and' paid according to law; and 
payments shall be made in tlie funds so-received for the drafts, unless 
paid funds or said dral'ts can be exchanged for gold and silver at par- 
If any disbursing otEoer shall violate any of these provisions, he shall 
he suspended by the Secretary of War, and reported to the President, 
and promptly removed fntm ofhce or restored tojiiis trust and duties, as 
to the President may se^m just and proper. 

8'v)5. N.o disbursing ofiicer shall accept, cr receive, or transmit to the 
Treasury to be allowed in his favor, any receipt or voucher from a cred- 
itor of the Confederate Statps without having paid to such creditor, in 
such funds as he received for disliursemcnt, or such other funds as ho is 
uuthnrized by the preceding article to take in exchange, the full amount 
specified in such receipt or voucher ; and e\ery such act shall be deemed 
to be a conversion to his own use of the amount specified in such receipt 
or voucher. And no "otlicer in tbe military servic(? charged with the 
safe-keeping, tmpsfer, or disbursement of public. money, shall convert 
to his own use, or invest in any kind of merchandise or property, or loan 
with or without interest, or deposit in any hank, or exchange for other 
funds, except as allowed in the preceding aj"ticle,any public money en- 
trusted to nim ; and every such act shall bo deemed to bo a felony and 
an embezzlement of so much money as may be so taken, converted, in- 
vested, used, InaneJ, deposited, or CKchanged, 

890. Any ofiicer who shall directly or indirectly sell or dispose of, for 
a premium, any treasury note, draft, warrant, or other public security 
.in his hands for disbursement, or sell or dispose of the proceeds or avails 
thereof without making returns of such premium and accounting there- 
for by char;;ing it in bis accounts to the credit of the Confederate States, 
wiU forth with be dismissed by the President. 

897. If aiiydisbursing ofTioer shall bet at cards or any game of hazard, 
liis commanding ollloer shall suspend his functions, and require him to 
turn over all tlie public f.inds in bis .keeping, and shall immediately 
report the case t) the proper bureau of the War Department. 

898. All oliicers are forbid to givo or take any receipt in.bhink for 
public money or property ; but in all cases the voucher shali be made 



92 PUBLIC rROrERTY, AC. 

out in full, jfnd the true date, place, and exact amount of money, in 
word*, shall be written out in the receipt before it is signed. 

899. When a signature is not written by the hand of the party, it 
must be witnessed. 

900. No advance of public money shall be made, except advances to 
disbursing ofncers, and advances by order of the War Department to 
ofRcers on distant stations, where they can not receive their pay and 
emoluments rej^ularly; but in cases of contracts for the performance of 
any service, or the -deliver}' of tirticles of any description, payment shall 
not exceed the value cf the service rendered, or uf tlie article delivered, 
previously to payment. 

901. No officer disbursing or directing the disbursement of money for 
the military service shall be concerned, directly or indirectly', in the 
purchase or sale, fo'v commercial purposes, of any article intended for, 
makino- a part of, or appertaining to tlie department of the public ser-- 
vice in •which he'is engaged, nor shall take oV apply to his oven use any 
gain or emolument for negotiating or transacting any public business 
other than whaj. is or may be allowed by law. 

902. No wagon-master or 'forage-master shall be interested or con- 
cerned, directly or indirectly, in anj wagon or other means of trans- 
poit employed by the Confederate States, nor in the purchase or sale of 
any property procured for or behmging to the Confederate States, except 
as the agent of the Confederate States. 

903. No oflicer or agent in the military service shall purchase from 
any other person in the military service, or make any contract with any 
such person to furnish supplies or services, or make any ^purchase or 
contract in which such person shall be admitted to any'sharc or part, or 
to any benefit to arise therefrom. 

904. No person in the m.ilitary service whose salary, pay, or emolu- 
ments is or are fixed by law or regulations, shall reteive any additional 
pay, extra allowance, or compensation iw any form whatever, for the 
disbursement of public money, or any other service or duty whatsoever, 
unless the same shall be authorized by law, and fexplicitly set out in tho 
appropriation. • ^ 

905. All accounts of expenditures shall set out a siimcient explana- 
tion of the object, necessity and propriety of the expenditure. 

90G The facts on which an. account depends must be stated and 
vouched by the certificate of an officer, or other sufficient evi(5ence. 

907. If any account paid on the certificate of an officer to the facts is 
afterwards disallowed for error of fiict in the certificate, it shall pass to 
the credit of the disbursing officer, and be charged to the officer who 
gave the certificate. 

90S. An officer shall have credit for an expenditure of money or pro-, 
perty made in obedience to the order of his commanding officer. If the 
expenditure is disallowed, it shall be charged to the officer who ordered 
it. 

909. Disbursing officers, when they have the money, shall pay cash 
and not open an account. Heads of bureaus shall take care, by timely 
remittances, to obviate the necessity of any purchases on credit. 

910. When a disbursing officer is relieved, he shall certify the out- 
standing debts to his successor, and transmit an account of the same to 
the head of the bureau, and turn over his public money and property 



. I'UBLIC PROPERTY, &C. . . ". 98 

nppcrtainlnpj to tbe service from which ho ia relieved to his successor, 
unlftss otherwise ordered. 

Oil. The chief of eiich military burcnu of the War Department shall, 
iiniier the direct'on of the Sei.TPtary of War, regnhite, na fir a" practica- 
ble, the emplnyment of hired persona required for tbe administrative 
service of his department. 

912. When priicticable. persona hired in the military service shall be 
paid at the end of the calendar month, and when discharged. Separate 
pay-rolls shall be made for each mcmth. " 
* 913. Wheg a hired person isdificharged and not paid, a certified state- 
ment of his account shall be given him. 

914. Pioperty, paid for or not, must be taken up on the return, and 
acooimtcd for when received. 

915. No officer has i^nthority to insure public property or mol:^e3^ 
OIG. Dishursinjj; officers are not aitthorizcd to settle with heirs, execu- 
tors, or administrators, e.Noept by instructions froni the proper bureau 
of the War Department upon accounts duly audited and certified by the 
pro^'r accounting ofhcers of tbe 'J'reasury. 

917. Public horses, mules, ox( n, tools, and implements shall be brand- 
ed conspicuously C. S; before being used in service, aiid nil other public 
property that it mpy be useful to uuirk ; and all public property hav- 
ing the brand of tlie C\ S. when sold or condemned, shall be branded 
with the letter C* 

918. No public property shall be used, nor ]i\i)or hired for the public 
be employed, for any. private .use whatsoever not authorized by the regu- 
lations ot the service. 

9 19. When public property becomes damaged, except by fair wfear 
and tear, the officer accountal)le for the property'shail report the case 
to the commanding officer, who shall appoint a board of survey of two 
or more ' fiicors to examine 'the propertyand ascertain the cause and 
amount of damage, and whether by any fault of any person in the mili- 
tary service, and report the facts and their opinion to him ; which 
report, witli his opinion thereon, he shall transmit to the chief of tho 
department to j|Mch the property^appertajns, and give a copy to the of- 
ficer accountable for the property and to the person chargeable for the 
damage. 

920. If any article of public property be lost or damaged by neglect 
or fault of any of^cer or soldier, or person hired in the public service, 
he shall pay tlie value of such article, or amount of damage, or cost of 
repairs, in either case at Such rates as a Board of Survey, with tlie ap- 
proval of the commanding officer, may assess, according to the place 
and circumstances of the loss or damage. 

921. Cliiirges against a soldier shall be set against bis pay on the 
muster-roll. Charges against an officer to be set against his pay shall 
be promptly reported to tlie Sx-cretary of War.* 

922. If any article of public* property be embezzled, or by neglect 
lost or daina;^ed, by any person hired in "the public service, flie value or 



*If tlie |Day of an officer or solriier is wrongfully withheld for arrears oi 
liahiUties to the Confederate Slates, a civil remedy is provided l*y law. 



94 • • PUBLIC PROPERTY, fcC. 

danifige shall be charged to him, and set against any pay or money due 
him, (o he deducted on pay-roll next following. 

923. Pulilic property lost or destroyed in the military service must be 
accounted for by affid;ivit, or tbe certificate of a cunimissioned ofiiccr, 
or i>tber satisfactorj' evidence. 

924. Affidavits or depositions may be taken before any officer in the 
list, as follows, when recourse can not be had to any before named on 
said list, which fact shall be ceititied by the officer offering the evidence : 

J.st. a civil magistrate competent to "administer oaths ; 2d. a judge advo- 
cate ;. 3J. the; recorder of a garrison or regimental court-martial: 4th. 
the Adjutant of a regiment ; 5th. a commissioned ofllcer. 

925. When military stores or other army supplies are unsuitable to 
the service, the officer in charge thereof shall report the case to the com- 
manding officer, who shall refer the report, with' his opinion thereon, to 
the bureau of t!ie depar.tment to whi(th the property appertains, for the 
order in the case of the Secretary of War. But if, from the nature or 
condition of the property or exigency of the service, it be necessary tj^act 
without tiie deliiy of such reference, in such case of necessity the com- 
manding officer shall appoiut a board of survey, composed' of two or 
moie competent officers, to examine the property and report to him, 
subject to bis approval, what dispo^^ition the ptiblic interest rei|uiru;s to 
be made of it; which he shall cause to be made, and* report the case to 
the proper bureau of the War Department for tlie information of the 
the Secretary of War. The.-e cases of necessity arise when the proper- 
ty is of a perishable nature, and can not be Ifept, or when the expense 
of keeping it is too great in proportion to its value, or Vhen the troops, 
in movement, would-be compelled to abandon it. Horses incnialily un- 
fit for any public service may also constitute a cage of necessity, but 
shall be put to death only in case of an ineurable wound or contagious 
disorder. 

920. When military stores or other array supplies are reported to the 
War Department as unsuitable to the service, a proper inspection or 
survey of them shall be made by an Inspector Gener^, or such suitable 
officer or officers as the Secretary of "War may appoint for that purpo.se. 
(Separate inventories of the stores, according to the disposition to bo 
made of them, shall accompany the inspection report: as of articles to 
be repaired, to be brciken up, to be sold, of no use or value, and to be 
dropped, &c., &c. The inspection report and inventories shall show the 
exact condition of the different articles. 

927. Military stores and other army supplies found unsuitable to the 
public service, after insfiection by an Inspector General, or such special 
inspection as may have been directed in the case, and ordered for sale, 
shall be sold for cash at auction, on due pulilic notice, and in such mar- 
ket as the public interest may require. Theiiffii-er'making the sale will 
bid in and suspend the sale when, in-his opinion, better prices maybe 
got. Exnenses of the sale will be paid from its jiroceeds. The auc- 
tioneer's certified account of tlie sales in detail, and the vouchers for 
the expenses of the sale, will be repurtcd to the chief of the department 
to which the pruperty belonged. The nett proceeds will be applied as 
the Secretary of War may direct. 

928. Jv^o officer making returns of property shall drop from his return 



PUBLIC rnorERTY, AC. 95 

any public pvoporty aa worn out or unserviceable, until it has been con- 
deiniicd, iifter proper inspection, ;inii ordered to be so dropped. 

929. An oJFiL'cr issuing stores sliuU deliver or transmit to tlie receiv- 
ing olficer an exact list of tlicni in duplicate invoices, and the receiving 
offi'.'er sliail return liim duplicate receipts. • 

930. When an nfficer to whom stores are fd^-wardcd has reason to sup- 
pose theji) miscarried, he shall promptly inCorm tiie iscuinn; and for- 
wardinir officer, and the bureau of the department to vrhich the proper- 
ty appertains. . - 

9 Jl. When stores received do not correspond in amount or qviality 
■witli the invoice, they will be examined by a board of survey, and their 
rejxirt communicated to the proper bureau, to the issuinj^ and forward- 
ing officer, arid to the oflioer autliorized to p:iy the transportation nc- 
(jount. Datyages recovered from thb carrier or other purty liable, will 
be refunded to tlie proper dcpartiwent, 

932. On the death of any officer in charge of public property or 
money, the commanding officer shall appoint a board of survey to take 
an inventory of tiie same', whicK he shall forward to the proper bureau 
of tiie War Department, and he shall designnte an officer to take charge 
of the said property. or money till orders in the case af% i-eccivcd from 
the proper authority. . • ■ . 

933. W*ien an officer in charge of public property is removed from 
the care of it, the commanding oiiicer shall designate an officer to re- 
ceive it. or take charge of it biiuself, till a successor be regularly appoint- 
ed. When no officer can-reniain to receive it, the commanding officer 
•will take suitabke means to secure it, and report the facts to the proper 
auth<irity. . ' 

934. Every officer having public moneys to account for, and»failing to 
render his accoiint thereof quarter-yearly, with the vouchers nece^.-ary 
to it.s correct and prompt settlement, within three months after thft ex- 
piration of the quarter if resident in the Confederate States, and within 
six months, if resident in a foreign country, will be promptly dismissed 
by the President, unless he shall explain the default to the satisfaction 
of the Presiderft.. 

935. Every officer intrusted with public money or property shall ren- 
der all prescribed returns and- accounts to the boreau of the depart- 
ment in whicfi he-is serving, where alt such returns and accounts shall 
pass through a rigid administnitive scrutiny before the money accounts 
are transmitted to the proper officers of the Treasury Department for 
settlement. 

936. The head of f^e bureau shall cause his decision on each account 
to be endorsed nn it. lie shall bring to the notice of the Secretary of 
War all accounts and matters of account that require or merit it. When 
an account is suspended or disallowed, ^le bureau shall notjfy it to the 
officer, that he may have an earjy opportunity to submit explanations or 
take an appeal to the becrctary of War. 

937. When nn itccount is suspended or disallowed in the proper office 
of the Treasury Depjtrtment, or explanation or evidence required from 
the ofTuer, it shall be promptly notified to him by tlie head of the mili- 
tary bureau. And all vouchers, evidence or explanation returned by 
him to the Treasury Department shall pass through that bureau. 

938. Chiefs of the disbursing dopartmeDts shall, uudcr the direction 



96 rUBLIC PROPERTY, AC; 

of the Secretary of War, designate, as f\ir as practicable, the place-^ 
■where the principal contract and purchases shall be'niade and supplies 
procured fur distribution. 

9i 9. All purchases and contracts for supplies or services for the ar- 
my,*except personal servicjCs, when the public exigences do not require 
the immediate delivery of the article or performance of the service, 
shall be made by advertisirg a sufficient time previously for proposals 
respecting the same- 

• 940. The officer advertising for proposals- shall, when the intended 
contractor purchase is considerable, transmit forthwith a copy of the 
advertisement and report of the case to the proper bureau of the War 
Department. 

941. Contracts will be made with the lowest responsible bidder ; and 
purchases from* the lowest bidder who produces the proper article. Bu* 
when such lowest bids are unreasonable, they will be rejected, and bids 
again invited by public notice; and all bids and advertisemenis shall 
be sent to the bureau. . , , 

942. When sciiled bids are required, the time* of opening them shall 
be specified, !\nd jD'idders have privilege to be present at the opening. 

943. When imimediate delivery or performance is required by the 
public exigency, the article or service required may be procured by 
open puichase or contract at the places, and in tiie mode in which such 
articles are usually bought and sold, or such services engaged, between 
individuals. 

944. Contracts shall be'made in quadru]5licate : one to be kept by the 
officer, one by the co. .tractor, and two to be sent to the^nilitary bureau, 
one of ■vvhicli for the offi«er of the Second Comptroller of the Treasury. 

945. TTie contractor shall give Ixmd, with good and sufficient securi- 
ty, foi- the true and faithful performance of his contract; and each surety 
siian state his place of residence. 

946. An express condition shall be inserted in contracts that no mem- 
ber of Congress shall be admitted to any share or part therein, or any 
benefit to arise therefrom. 

947. No c(mtract shall be made except undera law authorising it, or 
an appropriation adequate to its fulfilment except contracts by the Sec- 
retary of War for the subsistence or clothing of the arm^ or the Quar- 
termaster's Department. 

948. It is the duty of every commanding /)fficer to enforce a rigid 
economy in the public expenses. • 

949. The commander of a geographical district or department shall 
require abstracts to be rendered to him, at least once in each quarter, 
by every officer under his orders who is charged with the care of pul)lio 
property or the disbursement of public money, sho.wing all"*property 
received, issued and expended by the officer rendering the account, 
and the property remaining on hand, and all moneys received, paid 
or contracted to be 'paid hy him, and the balances remaining in his 
hands; and where such officer is serving under <nny intermediate com- 
mander, as of the post, rej^ment, &c., the abstracts siiall be revised by 
such commander ; and both the accounting officer and the commanding 
officer shall accompany the abstracts with full explanations tf every 
circumstance that may be necessary to a completJ understanding, by 
the commander of the department, of all the items on the abstracts. 



PUBLIC PROPERTY, AC. 07 

These Jiristracts, where tlic accounting officer is serTing in more than 
one staft" appointment, will lie niiuie sepaiiitely for each. • 

.950. The c.nnniander of the liepartnient shall promptly cnrre'^t all ir- 
regularities an<l extravaiiances »hicli be may discover. He shall also 
for\vai-ii, asi soon as nrai^ticahle. the money aljstiacts to the bureau of 
the War Department to which the aecounfb appertain, with such re- 
marks as may l>e necessary to, explain his opinions anj action therenn. 

Pol. All estimates fr supjilies <if property or money for the puiiiic 
service within a department sliall be forwarded through the (jomnia'ider 
of . the dejiartmcnt, and carefully revised by him. And all such esti- 
mates shall go through the immediato' onnnnandef, if such there be, of 
the officer rendering the estimate, as of the post or reginjent, who shall 
l>e required by the <lepartnient commander to revise the. estimates for 
the service of his own command. 

95'2. The administrative control exercised by department command- 
ers shall, when troops are in the field, devolve on the commanders uf 
divisions, nr, when the command is less than a division, on the cum- 
niander of the whole. 

953. No land shall be purchased for the Confederate States except 
uniler a I \yv aufhurizing sucb purchase,., 

954. .No public money shall be expended for the purchase of any 
lanil,.nor for erecting armories, iirsenals, forts, fortifications or other 
puMic buildings, until the written opinion of the Attorney General 
shall he had in fav(u- of the validity of the title to the land or site, nor, 
if ihe land be wirhin any .State of the Confederate States until a cess on 
of the jurisdicti(ui by the Lcjiislature of the State. 

955. Ni pern)auent» buildings for the ariny, a.s Ixirracks, quarters, 
hospitals, store-houses, offices, or >tables. or pie s, or wharves. sUaW be 
erected but hy order of tlie Secretary of War, and according to the plan 
directed liy him, and in cons<*qiLei'Ce of appropriations made by law. 
'And no alleruiion shall lie made -in any such public building witliout 
autliority from the War De^vu tnun;. 

956. Com [dele tirle papers with lull and exact maps, plans, and 
drawings (tf the public lands purchaseil, appropriated, or de<^igne'l for 
permanent military fortitl.ations, will lie collected, recorded and filed 
in the Bureau of the Corps of Engineers; of the public land-^ an|)ro 
priated ur designated for arm(»ries, ai'senals, and ordnance depots, will 
be collected, recorded, juid filed in the Ordnance Bureau : of all other 
land heloijgiiig to the Confederate States, and under the charge of the 
\yar Departa<ont for barracks, posts, cantonments, or otlier military 
uses, will be cidiectW, rrcord.»d- and filed in the office -of the Quarter- 
master General of the army. 

957.^ copy of tfie survey of the land at each post, fort, arsenal, and 
depot, furnished from the proper l)ur<^, will be carefully preserved ia 
the office of the commanding officer. 



9S quartermastek's department. 

• ARTICLE XLI. 

quartermaster's department. 

958. This department provides the quarters and transportation of the 
army ; storage and transportation for all army supplies ; army cloth- 
ing ; oanip and garrison e(^uipage; cavalry and artillery horses ; fuel ; 
forage ; straw, and stationery. 

959. The incidental expenses of the army paid throngh the Quarter- 
master's Department, include per diem to extradutj^ men ; postage un 
public; service; the expenses of courts martial ; of the pursuit vnd ap- 
prehension of deserters ; of the burials of officers and soldiers ; of hired 
escorts ; of expresses, interpreters, spies, sxhd guides ; of veterinary 
surgeons and medicynes for h:>rses, and of supplying posts with vrater ; 
and generally the proper and authorized expenses for the movements 
and operations of an army not .expressly assigned to nny other depart- 
ment. 

BARBACK3 AND QUARTERS. 

960. Under this head are included .the permanent buildings for the 
use of the, army, as barracks, quarters, hospital, stof e-houses, ofi&ces, 
stables. 

961. When barracks and quarters are to be occnpied, they will be 
allotted by the quartermaster nt the station, under the control of the 
commanding officer. 



QUARTERMASTER S DEPARTMENT. 



99 



962- The number of rooms and amount of fuel for officers and men 
are as follows: 



A Brigailier-Geiieial or Colonc^, 
A Lieiucnaui-Coloiiel or Jlujoi-, 
A Captain, .. .... 

Lioiitcnant, . . ... 

The General c*.>i5im;tn(\in^ the army, 

The e<iinman(}jnf; oflicer of a division or dcjwrlnient 

an assistant or deputy Quarte*niaster-General, 
The coniinandiiig olfit-er of a re<riiiient or post, Quarter 

master, AssisMiut Qnartennivster, or Conimissa.ry 

Subsistence, ..... 
An Acting Assistant Qnartermasier when approved by 

'the Qnatterinasiec-General, , '. 

Wagon and fnrai»e master, Ser^cant-Mtijor, Ordnance 

Serfjeaiit, or Quartermaster Sergeant-. 
Each nun-coiHmissioned oHicer, •musician, privlVte, and 

washerwoman, .. . . .... 

Each necessary fire (<)r <he sick in hospital, «o be regii 

lated by tiie sui-tjeon and eoiumanding officer, not 

exceeding, . ■ . 

Each (;nard fire, to be regiilaVcd by tlio connnanding 

oflicer, not e.rrcediiip;, . . . 

A commissary or rpiartermasler's storehouse, whei 

necessa.y, ivol fxrteding^ ^ 

A reginicfil or post tness. 
To e\cfy six non-commissioned officers, ninsicians, pri 

vates, and washerwdfcien, 2HG square feet of room. 



Rooms. 



Cords of 

woofl per 

month.* 



re 



1- 



4 

H 

3 



1 

1-6 

2 

3 

1 
1 



*0r coal, at llie'i||^e of 1,5U0 pounds antJjracite, or 30 bushels bitumin- 
ous to til e cord. 



100 



QUARTERMASTER S DEPARTMENT. 



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quartermaster's department. 101 

• 

963. Merchantable hard wood is tlie standard ; the cord is 128 cubio 
feet. 

964. No officer rIi.tH occupy more than his proper quarters, except ^y 
order of the enminuiidinj!; ( IBcer, wlien there is an excess of quarters at 
the station ; whldi order the quartermaster shall forward to the Quar- 
termaster Gciicrnl, to be laid before the Secretary of War. But the 
amount of quarters shall he reduced pro rata by the commanding (offi- 
cer when the number of officers and troops make it neccssai'V ; and 
when tlie public liuildincjs arc not sullicient to quarter the tronps. the 
commandini!; ciflicer sliall report to the coiiftiiander of tlie department 
for authority to hire qmirtFis, or other necessary oriiers in tlie case. 
Tiie department comniiind^r shall report the case and his orders therein 
to the Quartermaster General. . • 

965. A mess-room, and fuel for it, are allowed onlj' when a majority 
of the officers of a post or reji;imeiit unite in a mess; never to leSs than 
three officers, nor to any who live in hotels or boarding houses. Fuel 
fur a mess-room shall not be used elsewhere, or for any otlicr purpose. 

966. Fuel issued to officers or troops is public property for their use ; 
what they do not actuiiUy c<«isume, shall he returned to the Quarter- 
ninstei- and taken up o»i his quarterly return. 

967. Fuel shall be issued onl^ in the montli when due. , 

968. In allotlinif quarters, officer'^ siiall have choice according to rank, 
but the cjuimanduis; c^fficer may direct tiic ofiicers to be stationed con- 
venient to tlieir troops. 

969. An officer may select quarters occupied by a junior ; but, having 
mode his choice, he. must abide by it, and shall not again at the post 
displace a junior, unless.hiinself displaced by a senior. 

970. Tlie set of rooms to each quiirters will be assigned by the Quar- 
termaster, under the control of the commanding officer; attics not 
counted as rooms. • 

971. Officers cannot choose rooms in different sets of quarters. 

972. When public quarters cannot be furnished to (fficers at stations 
without troops, or to enlisted men at general or department headquar- 
ters, qu irters will be commuted at a rate fixed by the Secretary of War, 
and fuel at the market price delivered. \\'lien fuel and vjiuirters are 
commuted to an officer by reas(m of his emiiloyment on a civil wiuk, the 
commutation shall he charged to the appropriation for the work. No 
commutation of rooms or luel is allowed for offices or messes. 

973. An officer is not deprived of his quarters and fuel, or commuta- 
tion, at his station, by temporary absence on duty. 

974. Officers, and troops in the Held are not entitled to commutation 
for quarters. or fuel. 

975. An officer arriving at a station shall make requisition on the 
Q.u,art«rmaster for his quarters and fuel, accompanied by a copy of tho 
order putting him on diity at the station. If in command of troops, his 
requisition shall bo for the whole, and designate the number of officers 
of each grade, of non-coiitmissioned officers, soldiers, and waslrcrwomen. 

976. BunKs, benches, and tables provided for soldiers' barracks and 
hospitals, are not to be removed from ^hem, except by the Quartermas- 
ter of the station, or order of the commanding officers, and i^hall t;ot be 
removed from the station except by order of the Quartermaster General. 

977. The furniture for each office will be two common desks or tables, 



■102 QUARTERMASTEll'S DEPARTMENT.. 

six common chairs, one pair common andirons, and shovel and tongs. 

978. Furniture will^ be provided for officers' quarters when special 
appropriations for that purpose are made. Salen to officers of mate- 
rials for furniture may be made at cost, at posts where they cannot be 
otherwise obtained. 

979. When buildings are to be OQCupied or allotted, an inspection of 
them shall be made by the comman^ding officer and Quartermaster. 
Statements, in triplicate, of their conditiim, and of the fixtures and fur- 
niture in each room, shall be made bj the Quartermaster, and revised 
by the commanding officer. One of these shall be retained by the com- 
manding officer>,one by the Quartermasters and the third forwarded to 
the Quartermaster- General. 

980. Like inspection of all buildings in the use of troops will be made 
at the monthly inspection of the troop?, and of all buildings which have 
been in the use of oflBcers or troops, whenever vacated by them. Dam- 
ages will be promptly repaired if tiie Quartermaster lias the means. 
Commanding Oiiicers will take notice, as a military offence, of any neg- 
lect by any officer or soldier tofake proper care of the rooms or furni- 
ture in his use or occupancy ; but such pflBcer or soldier may be al- 
lowed to pay the cost of the repairs when the commanding officer .deems 
that sufficient in the case. Commanding officers are required to report 
to the Quartermaster-General their proceedings in all cases of neglect 
under this regulation. 

981. An annual inspection of the public buildings at t!ie several sta- 
tions shall be made at the end of June by the commanding officer and 
Quartermaster, and then the Quartermaster shall make the following 
reports: 1st, of the condition and capacity of the buildings, and of'the 
additions, alterations and repairs tliat have been made during the past 
year; 2d, of the additions, alterations and repairs that are needed, with 
plans and estimates in detail. 

These reports tPie commaneiing officer shall examine and forward, with 
his views, to the Quartermas-ter General. 

982. Necessary repairs of public buildings, not provided for in the 
appropriations, can only be made by the labor of the troops. 

983. Y/hen private buildings, occupied as barracks or quarters, ov 
lands occupied for encampments, are vacated, the commanding officer 
and Quartermaster shall make an inspection of them, and a report to 
the Quartermaster-General of their condition, and of any injury to them 
by the use of the Confederate States. 

984. Military posts evacuated by the troops, and lands reserved for 
military use, will be put in charge of the Quartermaster's Department, 
unless otherwise specially ordered. 

ARMY TRASPORTATION. 

985. When troops are moved, or officers travel with escorts or stores, 
the means of transport provided shall be for the whole command. 
Proper orders in the case, and an exact return of the command, inclu- 
ding company women, will be furnished to the Quartermaster who is 
to provide tlie transportation. 

98G. The baggage to be transp*orted is limited to camp and garrison 
equipage, and officers' baggage. Officers' baggage shall not exceed 
( mess chest and all personal effects included ) as follows : 



quartermaster's department. 103 



• 


In the field. 


Changing stations 


(Jcu'ernl ofticcrs, - - - . 
Field olliccrs, - - . . 
Cnptains, , - •• 
Sniialterns, - - - 


I'^Ti pounds. ■ 
100 
SO 

so 


1000 pounds. 
800, " 
700 '.' 
600 



These amounts shall be reduced pro raia by .the commanding officer 
when necessary, and may be increased by the Quartermaster-Generrtl 
on transports by water, when pr(>per, in speoiul cases. 

987. The rc<;imental and «onipany desk prescribed in army regula- 
tions will be transported ; also fir staif oflicers, the books, papcrg, and 
instruments necessary to their duties; and for inedical officers, their 
medical chest. In doubtful cases under this regulation, and whenever 
bay;gage exceeds the regulated allowance, the conductor of the train, or 
offiiier in chargQ of the transportation, will report to the commanding 
officer, who wil] order an inspection, and all excesses to be rejected. 

988. Estimates of the medical director, approved by the commandino; 
officer, for the rfecessary transportation to be provided fbr the hospitiil 
service, will be furnished to the Quartermaster. 

989. The sick will be transpfh-ted on the application of the medical 
oHiccrs. ^ ' 

990. Certified invoices of all public stores to»be transported will be 
furnished to the Quartermaster by the officer having cliarge of them. 
In doubtful cases, the orders of the commanding offi; or will be req'uired. 

991. Where officers' horses ate to bo transported, it must be author- 
ized in the orders for the movement. 

992. The baggage trains, a-.nbulances, and^all the means of transport 
continue in charge of the proper officers of the Quartermaster's De- 
partment, under the control of the commanding officers. 

993. In all cases of transportation, whether of troops or stores, an 
exact ret-urn of the amount and kind of transportation employed will 
bo made by the Quartermaster to the Quartermaster-General, accompa- 
nied by the orders for the movement, a return of the troops, and an 
invoice of the stores, 

994. Wngons and theii" equipments for the transport service of ihe 
army will be procured, when practicable, from the Ordnance Depart- 
ment, and fabricated in the governinent establishments. 

99o. When army supplies are turned over to a (Juartermasterfor 
transportation, each package shall be directed and its conterfts marked 
on it ; and duplicate invoices and receipts in bulk will be exchanged 
between the issuing and forwarding officer. 

99G. On transports, cabin passage will be provided for officers, and 
reasonable and proper accommodation for the troops, and, when possi- 
ble, a separate apartment for the sick.* 

997. An officer who travels not less than ten miles without troops, 
escort, or military stores, and under special orders in the case from a 
superior, or a summons to attend "a military court, shall receive ten 
cents mileage, or, if he prefer it, the 'actual c(#t of his transportation 
and of the trnnsportaiion of his allowance of baggage for tlic whole 
journey, provided he has traveled in the customary reasonable manner. 



104 quartermaster's bepartment. 

Mileage will not be allowed where the travel is by government convey- 
ances, which will be furnished in case of necessity. 

998. If the joiirne'y be to cash treasury drafts, the necessary and ac- 
tual cost of transportation only will be allowed, and the account must 
describe the draft and state its amount, and set out the items of ex- 
pense, and be supported by a certificate that the journey was necd^sary 
to procure specie for the draft at par. 

999. If an offi,cer shall travel on urgent public duty without orders, 
he shall report the case to the superior who had authority to order the 
journey; and his approval, if then given, shall allow the actual cost of 
transportation. Mileage is computed by <the shortest mail route, and 
the distance by the General Postoffice book. When the distance cannot 
be so ascertained, it shall be reckoned subject to the decision of the 
Quartermaster-General. " 

1000. Orders to an officer on leave of absence to, rejoin tlfe station or 
troops he left, will not carry transportation. 

1001. Citizens receiving military appointments, join their stations 
■without expense to the public. 

1002. But assistant Surgeons approved by an exairMning board and 
commissioned, receive transportation in the execution of their first order 
to duty, and graduates of the Mi]itary«iAcademy receive transportation 
from the Academy to their stations,* 

1003. When officers^ are permitted to exchange stations, the public 
will not be put to the expense of transportation, which would have been 
saved'if such exchange had not been permitted. 

1004. A paymaster's clerk will receive the actual expenses of his 
transportation while travelifig under orders in the discharge of his duty, 
upon his affidavit to the account of expenses, and the certificate of the 
paymaster that the journey was on duty. 

1005. Travel of officers on business of civil works will be charged to 
the appropriation for the work. 

lOOG. No officer shall have orders to sfttend personally at the seat of 
government, to tlie settlement of his accounts, except by order of the 
Secretary of War on the report of the bureau, or of the Treasury, show- 
ing a necessity therefor. 

FORAGE. 

1007. The forage ration is fourteen pounds of hay and twelve pounds 
of oats, corn, or barley. 

1008. In time of war, officers of the army shall be entitled to draw 
forage for horses according to grade, as follows: A Brigadier-General, 
four ; the Adjutant and Inspector-General, Quartermaster-General, 
Commissary-General, and the Colonels of Engipeers, Artillery and 
Cavalry, three each : all Lieutenant-Colonels, and Majors, and Captains 
of the general staff, Engineer Corps, Light Artillery and Cavalry, three 
each ; Lieutenants serving in tlie Corps of Engineers, Lieutenants of 
Light Artillery and of Cavalry, two each. In time of peace, general 

. and field officers, three. Officers below the rank of field officers in the 
general staff, Corps of Engineers, Light Artillery and Cavalry, two. 
Aids-de camp and Avlj^ant's forage for the same number of horses as 
allowed to officers of the same grade in the mounted service, in time of 
war and peace : provided, in all cases, that the horses are actually kept 



quartermaster's department. 



105 



iu service and mustered. No enlisted man in the service 'f the Con- 
federate States shall be employed as a servant by any oOicer of the 
army. ^ ^ 

1009. No oflieer shall' sell forage issued to him. Forage issued to 
public liorses or cattle is public property; what they do not actually 
consume, to be properly accounted for. 

STRAW. 

1010. In barracks, twelve p':iunds of strnw per month for bedding 
will bo allowed to each man and company woman.. .- 

1011. Tlio allowance and change tjf straw for the sick is regulated by 
the Surgeon. 

1012. One hundred pounds per month is allowed for bedding to each 
horpe in public service. 

1013. At .posts near prairie land owned by the Confederate States, 
•hay will be used instead of straw, and jirovided by the troops. 

Straw not actnally used as bedding sliall be accounted for as other 
public property. . , 

STATIONERA'. 

1014. Issues of stationery are made quarterly, in amount as follows: 



Commander of an army, department, or tlivision, 

(what may be necessary for hnnself and staff for 

their public duty ) 
Commander of a brigade, for himself ajid staff, . 12 1 50 1 8 2 i2 

OHicer commanding a regiment or post of not less than 

five (jompanies for himself and staff, . . lOfl 40 1 6 2 |1 

Oillcer commanding a post of more than two and less 

than five companies, . . '» . . 8 ^ 30 ^ 5 1 ll 

Commanding ollicer of a post of two coiTipanie-s, . 6 ^25 ^ 4 1 |l 
Commanding odiccr of a post of one company or less, 

and commanding (^cer of a company, . . 5 ^20 J 31 jl 

A Lienicnant ColoneRr "Major not in command of a 

rogimcni or pos4 . . .. . 3 4^ 12 J 2 1 1 

Offu-i'is of the Inspector-General's Pay and Qtiarter- 

mastcr's Department (the jn'qscribcd bianlc books 

and .printed forms, and the stationery requiretl for 

iheir pid^lic duly.) 
All ollicers, not enumerated above, when on duty 

and not supplied l>y their respective de]iartmenls, 

































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Steel pens, with one holder, to 12 pens, may be issued in place of 



106 quartermaster's department. 

quills, and envelopes in p'luce of envelope paper, at the rate of 100 to 
the quire. 

1015. AVhen an officer is relieved iu commaiid, he shall transfer the 
office stationery to his successor. 

1016. To each office table is allowed one inkstand, one stamp, one 
paper folder, one sand-box, one wafer-box, and as many lead pencils as 
may be required, not exceeding four per annum. 

1017. Necessary stationery for military courts and boards will bo 
furnished on the rfequisition of the recorder, approved by the presiding 
officer. 

1018. The commander of an army, department or division, may di- 
rect orders to be printed, \^hen the requisite dispatch and the number 
to be distributed make it necessary. -The necessity will be" set out in 
the order the printing, or certified on the account. 

1019. Regimental, company, and post-books, and printed blanks for* 
the officers of Quartermaster and Pay Departments, will be procured 
by timely requisition on the Quartermaster General. 

1020. Printed matter procured by the Quartermaster General for use 
beyond the seat of Government, may be procured elsewhere, at a cost 
not to exceed the rates prescribed by Congress for the public printing, 
increased by the cost of transportation. 

EXPENSES OF COURTS- MARTIAL. 

1021. An officer who attends a general court-martial or oourt of in- 
quiry, convened by autlrority competent to order a general court-mar- 
tial, will be paid, if the court is not held at the station wh^re he is at 
the time serving, one dollar a day while attending the court and travel- 
ling to and from 'it if entitled to forage, and one dollar and twenty-five 
cents a day if not entitled to forage. • ' , . 

1022. -The Judge Advocate or Recorder will be paid, in«addit.ion to 
the above, a per diem of one dollar and fc^venty-five cents for every day 
he is necessarily employed in the' duty of the court. When it is neces- 
sary to employ a clerk to aid the Judge Advocate, the court may order 
it ; soldier to be procured when practicable. 

1023. A citizen witness shall be paid his actual transportation or 
stage fare, and three dollars a day while attending the court and trav- 
elling to and from it, counting the travel at fifty miles a da}^ 

1024. The certificate of the Judge Advocate shall be evidence of the 
time of attendance on the court, and of the time he was necessarily em- 
ployed in the duty of the court. Of the time occupied in travelling, 
each officer will make his own certificate. 

EXTRA DUTV MEN. " • 

1025. Duplicate rolls of the extra duty men, to befiaid by the Quar- 
termaster's Department, will be made monthly, and certified by the 
Quartermaster, or other ofiiccr having charge of the work, and counter- 
signed by the commanding officer. One of these will be transmitted 
direct to the Quartermaster General, find the 'other filed in support of 
the pay-roll. 



QUARTERiMASTER S DEPARTMENT. 



107 



rUDMC rOSTAGE. 

I02G. Postage and des^iatches by tcle^rapli, on public business, paid 
by an officer, Avill be refunded to bim on his certificate to the account, 
and to the necessity o'f the comnuinication ]>^ telegraph. The amount 
for postage, and for telc|;raph despatches, will be stated separately. 

nORSES FOR MOUNTED OFFICERS. 

1027. In the field, or, on the frontier, the commanding oflicer may au- 
thorize a mounted officer, wlio cannot otherwise provide himself ■with 
two horses, to take them from the public at the cost price, when it can 
be ascertained, and when not, at a fair valuation, to bo fixed by a board 
of survey, provided be shall not take the horse of any trooper. A horse 
so taken shall not be exchanged or returned. • Horses of mounted offi- 
cers shall be shod by the public farrier or blacksmith. # 

CLOTHING, CAMr AND GARRISON EQUIPAGE. 

1028. Supplies of clothing and camp and garrison equipage will bo 
sent by the Quartermaster General from the general depot to the officers 
of his department stationed with the troops. 

1020. The contents of each package, and the size of clothing in it, 
will be marked on it. - " • 

1030. The receiving Quarterma94er will give duplicate receipts for 
the clothitig^s invoiced to him, if the packages as received and marked 
a^ee with the invoice, and^appear rightly marked, and in good order; 
if otherwise, an inspection will be made by*i board of survey, whose 
report in case of damage or deficiency will be transmitted, one copy to 
the Quartermaster General and one to tiie q^ccr for'frarding the sup- 
plies. In case of damage, the board will assess the damage to each ar- 
ticle. 

1031. Ali.ou-ance of camp and garrison equipage. 



• 


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A General, • , . .. , 

Ficlil or stafT oflicer abovQ llie rank of Captain. . 

Other staff ofliccrs or Captains, 

Subalterns of a company, ty every two, . 

To every 15 foot and*! 3 mounted men, . 


2 


5 



1032. B§d-8acTre are provided for troops in garrison, and iron pots 
may be furnisiiod to them instead of camp kettles. On the march and 
in tlie field, the only mesa furniture of the soldier will be one tin plate, 
one tin cup, one knife, fork and spoon, to each mi\n, to be carried by 
himself on the march.* lleqiiisitions will be sent to the ,(i>uartennaster 
General for the afithorized flags, colors, standards, guidons, drums, fifes, 
bugles and trumpets. 



108 



quartermaster's department. 



ALLO\rANCE FOR CLOTHING. 



1038. A soldier is allowed the uniform clothing stated in the follow- 
ing table, or articles thereof of equal value. When a balance is due 
him at the end of the year, it is added to his allowance for the next. 



GLOTHING. 



Cap, complete, 

Cover, 

Coat, ■ 

Trowsers, 

Flannel shirts, .' t. . . . 

" drawers, 

Bootees,* pairs, 

Stockings, pairs, 

Leather stock, 

Great coat, 

Stable frock (for aioinited men.) ... .. 
Fatigue overall (for engineers and 

ordnance,) * 

Blanket, 



FOR THREE YEARS. 








1st. 


2nd. 


3d. 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


3 


2 


. 2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


'4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


1 






1 






1 

1 


1 


1- 



Total in 

' the three 

years. 



4 
3 
4 
7 
9 
7 
12 
12 
1 
i 
1 



1034. One sash is allowed to each company for the first sergeant. 
This and the niet^lic scales, lette^s, number, castles, shells, and flames, 
and the camp and garrisfln equipage, will not be returned as issued, 
but borne on the return while tit for service. They will be charged to 
the person in whose use they are, when lost or destroyed by his fiiulfc. 

1035. Commanders of companies draw the clothing of their men, 
and the camp and garrison equip;ige for thff officers and men of their 
company. The camp and garrison equipage of other officers is drawn 
on their own receipts. 

1036. When clothing is needed for issue to the men, the company 
comman.der will procure.it from the Quartermaster on requisition, ap- 
proved by the commanding officer. 

1037. Ordinarily the company commander will procure and issue 
clothing to his men twice a year; at other times, when necessary in 
special cases. 

1038. Such articles of clothing as the soldier may need will be issued 
to him. When the issues equal in value his allowance for the year, 
further issues are extra issues, to be charged to .him oa the next muster- 
roll. • 

1039. The money value of the clothing, and of each article of it, 
will be ascertained annually, and announced in orders from the War 
Department. 



* Mounted men may receive one pair of "boots and tu-o pair of bootees,'^ 
instead of /oM?- pairs of bootees. 



quartermaster's department. 109 

1040. Officers receiving clothing, or camp and garrison equipage, 
will render quarterly returns to the Qdartermastor General. 

1041. Coninianders of companies will take the receipts of their men 
for the clothing issued to them, on a receipt rtill, witnessed hy <Tn offi- 
cer, or in the absence of an officer, hy a non conmiiseioned officer ; tho 
witness to he witness to tlie fact of the issue and the acknowledgment 
and signature of the soldier. The several issues to a soldier to he en- 
tered separately on the roll, and ail vacant spaces on the roll to be filled 
with a cipher. This roll is tlie voucher for the issue to the quarterly 
return of the company commander. Extra issues will be so noted on 
the roll. . ■ 

1042. Each soldier's clothing account is kept by the company com- 
mander in a company hook. This account sets out only the money 
value of the clothing which he rfeceived at each issue, {or which his re- 
ceipt is entered in the book, and witnessed as in the preceding para- 
•graph. > 

1043. When a soldier is transferred or detached, the amount due to 
or hy him on account of clothing will he stated on his descriptive list. 

1044. When a soldier is discharged, the amount due to or by him for 
clothing will be stated on the duplicate certificates given for the settle- 
ment of his accounts. 

1045. Deserters clothing will he turned into store. The invoice of 
it, and tlie Quartermaster's receipt foflr it, will state its condition and 
the name of tl^ deserter. 

104G. The inspection report on damaged clothing shall set out, with 
the amount of damage to each article^ a list oi such articles as arc fit ^^KF. 
for issue, at a reduced price stated. ' "" 

1047. Commanding officers may order necessarry issues of clothing to 
prisoners and convicts, taking deserters or other damaged clothing 
when there is such in store- 

1048. In all cases of deficiency, or damage of any article of clothing, 
or camp or garrison equipage, the officer accountable for the property 
is required by law "to show by one or more depositions setting forth 
the circumstances of the case, that the deficiency was by unuvoidai)lc 
accident or loss in actual service, witliout any fault on his part, and in 
case of dama;e, that due care and intention were exerted on his part, 
and that the damage did not resjilt from neglect.' 

RETCRNS IN TUE QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT. 

1049. All officers and agents having money and property of the De- 
'partment to account for, are required to make the monthly and quarter- 
ly returns to the Quartermaster General prescribed in the following ar- 
ticles : ^ 

1050. Monthly returns, to he transmitted within five days after the' 
month to which thej- relate, viz: A summary siatement (Form 1); re- 
port of persons and things (F'orm 2); roll of extra-duty men (Form 3) ; 
report of stores for transportation, &c., (Form 4); return of animals. 
Wagons, harness, &e., (Form 5) ; report of forage (Form 0) ; report of 
fuel nnd quarters commuted (Form 7) ; report of pay due (Form b) ; an 
estimate of funds for one month (Form '.*) will be sent with the month- 
ly returns. The estimat* for it will be for the current month, or such 



110 quartermaster's department. 

subsequent month as may give time to receive the remittance. Otlier 
special estimates jvill be transmitted when necessary. 

1051. Quarterly returns, to be transmitted within twenty days after 
the quarttn.' to which they relate, viz : An account current of money 
(Form 10.) Avith abstracts and vouchers, as shown in Forms Nos. IL to 
22 ; a return of property (Form 23,) with abstract and vouchers, as 
shown in Forms 24 to 45. A duplicate of the property return without 
abstracts or vouchers ; and a quarterly statement of the allowances 
paid to officers (Form 46.) 

1052. A distinct account current will be returned of money received 
and disbursed under the appropriation for " contingencies of the army." 
(See Forms Nos. 47, 48, and. 22, for the forms of the account current, 
abstracts,- and vouchers. ) Necessary expenditures by the Quartermaster 
from the Medical Department are entered on abstract C. (See Forms 49 
and 50.) The account will, ordinarily, be transferred from " army con- 
tingencies" to the appropriation for the* Medical and Hospital Depart- 
ment in the Treasury. 

1053. Forms 51 and 52 are the forms of the quarterly returns of 
clothing, camp and garrison equipage and the receipt roll of issues to 
soldiers. 

1054. When persons and articles hired in the Quartermaster's De- 
partment are transferred, a descriptive list (Form B3) will be forwarded 
with them to the Quartermaster t« wiiom tliey are sent. 

1055. Officers serving in the Quartermaster's Department will report 
to the Quartermaster General useful information in regard to the routes 
and means of transportation and of supplies. 

PAY BUREAU ©F THE QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT. 

1056. The troops will be paid in such manner that the arrears shall 
at no time exceed two months, unless the circumstances of the case ren- 
der it unavoidable, which the Quartermaster charged with the payment 
shall promptly report to the Quartermaster-General. 

1057. The Quartermaster General shall take care, by timely remit- 
tances, that the Quartermasters have the necessary funds to pay the 
troops, and shall notify the remittances to the Quartermasters and com- 
manding officers of the respective pay districts. 

1058. The paj'ments, except to officers and discharged soldiers, shall 
be made on muster and pay rolls; those of companiesand detachments, 
signed by the company or dctauhhient commander ; of the hospital, 
signed by the surgeon; and all muster and pay-rolls, signed by the 
mustering and inspecting officer. 

1059. When a company is paraded for payment, the officer in com- 
mand of it shall attend at the pay-table, 

1060. .When a receipt on a pay-roll or account is not signed by the 
hand of the party, the payment must be witnessed. The witness to be 
a commissioned officer when practicable. • 

1061. Officers are paid on certified accounts, as in Form 57 ; dis- 
charged soldiers, on accounts according to Form 59, and certificates. 
Form 58. An officer retiring from service must make affidavit to his 
pay account, and to the certificate annexed to it, and state his place of 
residence and (he date when his resignation or removal takes effect. 



quartermaster's department. Ill 

Pay accounts of post chaplains arc to bo certified 1^ tlic commanding 
officer of tiie post. 

10G2. When an officer is dismissed from the service, he shall not be 
entitled to pay beyond the day on which the order announcing his dis- 
missal is received at the post where he may bo stationed, unless a par- 
ticular day beyond the time is mentioned in the order. 

10G3. No officer shall receive pay for two staff appointments for the 
same time. • ' 

1004. OiTiccrs are entitled to pay from the, date of the acceptance of 
tlieir appointments, and from the date of promotion. 
. 10C5. No account. of a restored officer for time he was out of service 
can bo paid, without order of tlio War Department. 

lOtiC). As far as practicable, officer* "^ire to draw their pay from the 
Quartermaster of the district where they may be on duty. 

10G7. No officer shall pass away or transfer his pay account not ac- 
tually due at the time ; and when an officer transfers his pay account 
he shall report the fact to the Quai^termaster-General and to the Quar- 
termaster expected to pay it. 

1008, No person in the military service, while in arrear to the Con- 
federate States, shall draw pay. When the Secretary of War shall find 
by report of the Comptroller of the Treasury, or titherwise, that an of- 
ficer of the army is in arrears to the Confederate States, the Quarter- 
master-General sliall be directed tostop his pay t<) the amount of such 
arrears, by giving notice thereof to the (Quartermasters of the Array, 
and to the officer, who may pay over the amount to any Quartermaster. 
And no Quartermaster shall make to him any payment on account of 
pay, until he exhibits evidence of havuig refunded the amount of the 
arrears, or that his pay accrued and stopped is equal to it, or until the 
stoppage is removed by the Quartermaster General. 

1009. No officer or soldiet shall receive pay or allowances for any 
time during which he was absent without leave, unless a satisfactory 
excuse for such absence be rendered to his commanding officer, evidence 
of which, in case of an officer, shall he annexed to his pay account, 

1070. Kvery deserter shall forfeit all pay ami allowances due at the 
time ot desertion. Stoppages and j^cCes shall be paid from his future 
earnings, if he is apprehended aniRontinued in service; otherwise,* 
from his arrears of pay. 

1071. No deserter shall receive pay before trial, or till restored to 
duty without trial by the authority competent to order the trial. 

1072. In case of a soldier's deatli, desertiorf^ or discharge without pay, 
or the forfeiture of his pay by sentence of court martial, the account 
duo the laundress will be noted on the muster-roll. 

1073. When an improper payment has been maile to any enlisted 
soldier, and disallowed in the settlement of tlie Quartermaster's ac- 
counts, the (^lartermaster may report the fact to the commander of tiio 
company in which the soldier is mustered, who will note on the nuistcr- 
r(dls the amount to bo stopjtoii from the pay uf the soldier, that it may 
be refunded to the Quartermaster in v^hose accounts <he improper pay- 
ment has been disallowed. 

1074. Authorised stoppages to reimburse the Confederate States, as 
for loss or damage to arms, equipments, or other public property ; for 
extra issues of clothing ; for tlie expense of apprehending deserters, or 



112 quartermaster's department. 

to reimburse individuals (as tlie Quartermaster, laundress, &c. ;) for- 
feitures for desertion, and fines by sentence of court-martial, will be 
entered on the roll and paid in Uic order stated. 

1075. Tl'.e Quartermaster will deduct from the pay of the soldier the 
amount of the authdVized stoppai^es entered on the muster-roll de- 
scriptive list, or certificate of discharge. 

107G. The travelling pay is due to a discharg;ed officer or soldier un- 
less forfeited by sentence of a cdurtiuartiai, or as provided in para- 
graph 1U78, or the discharge is by tray of punishment for an offenco. 

1U77. In reckoninp; the travelling allowance to discharged officers or 
soldiers, the distance is to be estimated l)y tjie shortest mail route; if 
there is no mail route, by the shortest practicable route. 

1078. Every enlisted man discharged as a minor, or for other cause 
invidving fraud on his part in the enlistment, or discharged by the 
civil authority, shall forfeit all pay and allowance due at the time of 
the discharge. 

1079. Quartermasters or other officers to whom a discharged soldier 
may apply, shall transmit to the Quartermaster-General, with their re- 
marks, any evidence the" soldier may furnish relating to bis not haying 
received or having lost his certificate of pay due. The Quartermaster- 
General will transmit the evidence to the Comptroller for .the settlement 
of the account. 

1080. No Quartermaster or other oflacer shall be interested in the 
purchase of any soldier's certificate of pay due, or oth^r claim against 
the Confederate States. 

1081. The Quartermaster-General will report to the Adjutant-General 
any cause of neglect of company officeis to furnish the proper certifi- 
cates to soldiers entitled to discharge. 

1082. Whenever the garrison is withdrawn from any post at which a 
chaplain is authorized to be employed, his pay and emoluments shall 
cease on the last day of the month next ensuing after the withdrawal 
of the troops. The Quartermaster-General will be duly informed from 
the Adjutant-General's office wlienever the appointment and pay of the 
Post Ciiapiain will cease under this Regulation. 

1083. Funds turned over to oth.er Quartermasters, or refunded to the 
-Treasurer, are to be entered in a(Seount current, but not in the abstracts 
of payments. 

1084. 'JVhenever money is refunded to the Treasurer, the name of 
the person refunding, and the purpose for which it is done, should be 
stated in order that the ofi?fcer8 offthat Department may give the proper 
credits. 

1085. When an officer of the army receives a temporary appointment 
from the proper authority, to a grade in the militia then in actual i?er- 
vice in the Confederate States, higher in rank than th^t held by him in 
the army, he shall be entitled to the pay and emoluments of the grade 
in which he serves. But in no case .can an oH cer receive ihe compen- 
sation of two military commissions or apj^ointments at the same time. 

108G. Whenever the Quartermaster-General shall discover that an of- 
ficer has drawn pay twice for the same time, he shall report it to the 
Adjutant- General. 

l087. Tlie Quartermaster General shall transmit to the Second Audi- 
tor, in the month of Mtiy, a statement exhibiting the total amount du- 



quartermaster's department. 113 

rinr; tlie year up to the 31st December firecedinjc, of stoppages against 
(>fficers and soldiers on account of ordnance and ordnance stores, that 
jthe amount may be refunded to the proper appropriations. Those stop- 
pages will be regulated by the tables of cost published by the chief of 
the Ordnance Department, and shall have precedence of all other claims 
on the pay of officers and soldiers. 

108S. The fidlowing returns are to be transmitted to the Quartermas- 
ter General after each payment : 

1. Estimate for succeeding months, (Form 54.)' 

2. Abstract of payments (Form fiO), aocdnipanied by the vouchers. 

3. General account current, in djipbcnte (Form 01.) 

4. Monthly statement of funds, disbursements, (tc, (Form 63.) 

10'.13. The accounts and Vouchers for the expenditures to the regular 
army must be kept separate and distinct from those to voluj^teers and 
militia. 

1094. Pay-roll of militia will be aco<irding to Form 62, the certificate 
at the foot to be signed by all the oompaity officers present. 

1095. No militia or volunteers shall be paid'till regularly mustered 
into servit'C, as provided in the general legulations. 

. 109G. When volunteers are furnished with clothing, by tailors or 
other persons, the furnisiier may secure his pay at the first payment of 
the company, upon presenting to'the paying Quartermaster the receipt 
of the individual furnislied, verified by the certificate of the captain as 
to its correctness — but'tliis receipt will not be respected for an amount 
above the twenty^five dollars allowed for mx months" service. . 



IT o n isd: s 



quartermaster's DErARTMENT — FORMS. 



115 



m £ £ « 
o _ •" 



^ 


-d 


.— 


^^ 


a> 


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<a 


;> 


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rt OS s o 

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116 



quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



No. 2. 
Report of Persons and Articles employed and hired at 



w 


m 




• 


Service 
during 


Rate of hire 




E 




Names 


Designati'n 


the* 
month. 


compensatton. 


Date of 
contract. 


I?^ 


— 


of persons and 
articles. 


and 
occupation. 






agreement 
or 


WD 


o 


.. 








i)ay, 




6 






s 

1 


6 

H 

31 


Pi 
31 


Amount. 


month, 

or 
voyage. 


entry into 
service, 


1 


House, 3 rooms, 


Quarters, 


$40 GO 


Month, 


July 1,1S50, 


2 


2 


House, 4 rooms. 


Storehouse, 


3 


3] 


31 


31 GO 


Month, 


-Dec. 3, 1849, 


3 


3 


House, 2 rooms. 


Gua'd-lio'e, 


1 


31 


31 


19 GO 


Month, 


Dec. 3, 1840, 


1 


1 


Ship Fanny, 


Transport, 


1 


31 


31 


•22000 00 


Voyage, 


May 3, 1850, 


2 


-2 


Schr. Heroine, 


Transport, 


1 


31 


31 


700' 00 


Month, 


Jun.4. 1850. 


1 


1 


Wagon & team, 


. 


1 


31 


31 


100 00 


Months 


Jan. 1, 1850, 


1 


1 


Clias. James, 


Clerk, 


1 


31 


31 


75 00 


Month, 


Dfc.3, 1850, 


2 




Isaac Lowd, 


Interpreter, 


7 


10 


'^l 


2 GO 


Day, 


Jan. 7, 1851, 


3 




Peter Keene, 


Express, 


7 


12 


9 


40 GO 


Mouth, 


.Tan. 7, 1851, 


4 




John Peters, 


BJEicksm'li, 


•m 


31 


7 


2 00 


Day, 


Jan. 1,1851, 


5 




Tlios. Cross, 

Confedere States 
Steam'r Fushioti. 


Laborer,- 


1 


31 


31 


20 00 


Month, 


May 3, 1850, 

• 


3 

2 




Jas. Corwin, 
Geo. Pratt, 


Captain, 
Engineer, 


k 


31 
31 


3 

3 


150 00. 
lOG GO 


Month, 
Month, 


Dec. 1,1850. 
Dec. 1,1850, 


3 




John Paul, 


Ma'te, 1 


1 


31 


3 


5'0 00 


Month, 


Dec. 1,1850, 



Amount of rent and hire during the month, 



I certify, on honor, that the above is a true report of all the persons and 
tha-t the observations under the head of Remarks, and the statement of 
Exainined * 



C. D,, 



Commanding. 



QUARTERMASTER S DErARTMENT — FORMS. 



117 



-, during Oie month of ■ 



No.;j. 



By wliom 
owned. 



A. Byrne, 
Jas. Black. 
Jas. Black, 
G. Wilkins, 

T. Browne. 
Jas. Barry, 



Amou't 

of 

rent (^ 

pay 

n the 



RemSrks allowing by wliDrniiTime'and amount due 



tihe buildings were ocf^upied 
and for what purpose, anil 
how the vessels and men 
were employed dining ihei 

.. rnontli. 

month. ; (Transfer and drscharges willi 
be noted under this fiead.). 



and remuining unpaid. 



$40 00 JMajor 3d Infantry, . 
'29 OOliSubsisience Store and Office, 
lO 00,'Compaiiics I & K, 3d Infantry. 
jTran^ttjrting stores to Benicia. 

It ransporting stores to Brazos, 
Hauling stores to San Antonio, 

^Quartermaster's Olliee. 

^ni7)loyed b)' Coin'ing Gen'l. 

iKxpress to Indianoki. 

jShoei'ng public l^Nes. 
Helping blacksmith. • 



700 00 

100 go 

75 00 

8 00 

7 01 

14 00 

20 00 



1 50 00 1 ^ 

100 On!i > Steamship sent to Brazos, 

50 00 I S 



From. 



1S60. 
Dec.l 
Dec. 5 

Voy'e 
"18G1. 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 



Julyl 
Julyl 
jJuIy 1 



To. 



1861. 
Jan. '31 
Jan. 31 

notcom 

ISrtl. 
Jan. 31 
Jan. 31 



July 31 
July 31 
July 31 



1303 74 Total ajjiount due and remaining unpaid, 



Amo't. 



$80 00 
60 DO 

pleted. 

700 00 
100 00 



150 00 

100 00 

50 00 



Lfi40 00 



articles employed an<l hired by me during the iiionthof • 
amounts due and rcinaining un])uid arc correct. 
E. F., • 

Jsst. Qr. Mr. 



ISG , ami 



118 



quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



^ 



IS 

e 






'^ 



How- em- 
ployed. 


Remarks. 




'• 


■- 


Rate of pay 
or compensation. 








1 


' 


«©.' 






• 


d 


•sXup -0^ 




1 


o 


•ox 




■uio.ij 




Nature 
of service. 

<> 


Byvv hose or- 
der empl'yd. 

* 


•juauiiSay; 




■iiicdtuoQ 




Rank or 

designation. 


Names. 


^ 




6 

2; 












p 


o 


a 
















;^ 


C3 


(1) 


C 






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>H 



o 
o 


a 


ol 


o 






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■.-J 






<V 


c 


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o 


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.£1 





quartermaster's department— forms. 



119 



Pi 



•UOlJ'BUUSOp 

aitiuiiilfl 



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ajBipama'ajuj 



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120 



QUARTERMASTER S DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



V. 



s^ 



" oo 



't^ 



O -^ 









^ 



s 



f^ 
s 






Remarks. 


18 horses purchased j average cost 

Wagons purchased at . 

6 horses received from . 




Horses transferred to . 

Wagons transferred to . 

1 hoirse sold ; — horses died on the 
road to '. 


' 


•xnBan>!q 
puB sppis 










■saS.tuq 
puB SJBOg^ 










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'ssairaBq pua-j 






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•sasjojj 








Onhanil, . 

Pitrc.hased during the month. 
Received from officers. 

Total to be accounted for, 

* 

Transferred, 

Sold and worn out, . 

Died and lost. 

Total issued and expended, . 

Remaining on hand. 


■aiBd 


1 






I 



QUARTERMASTER S DErARTMENT — F^RMS. 



121 



e 

•pa 



«s 



i 






I 





Remarks. 


» 


Hay purchalbd at , 

• sP .per 100 lb?. 
Corn purchased at , 

and hauled at , 

per bush. 
Fodder delivered at the 

post, at pei IGO 

lbs. 




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to 

o 
o 

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bo 
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> 
< 


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'OOT Jad Jappoj 


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iftif ARTERMASTER'a DEPARTMENT — FORIVTSv 



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tQUAECTBRMASTER J? DEPARTMENr — PORMS. 



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12i quartermaster's department — FORMf>. 



• No. 9. 
Edimate of Funds required for tin service of the Qiiartermasier^s De- 
partment at , hy , in the month of^ , 186 . 





For Fuel, - - 


Dolls. 


Ct3. 


^ ] 


i 




2 


Forage, - - - 






3 


Strnw, --.---- 






4 


Stationery, . - - - - 






i> 


Alaterials for building. (State what, and for what.) 






c 


Iliio for mechanics. ( Slate for what work.) 






7 


Hire for laborers. ( Slate for what service.) - 


. 




8 


Hire of teamsters. (State on what service.) 






•J 


^ Pay of extia-dut^ men. ( State for what work.) 






10 


Pay of wagon and forage masters. 






11 


Hire of clerks, guides, escorts, expenses 'of conrts- 
maitial, of burials,' of ajiprehending deserters, and 
other incidental expenses, - . . - 






12 


Hire or commutation of officers' quarters, 


* 




13 


Hire of quarters for -troops, or ground for encamp- 
ment or use of miliiar/ stations, - 






14 


.Hire of store houses, offices, '&c. ("For \\hat use.) - 






15 


^lileage to officers, j^ ' - 






16 


Army transportation, vii; : - ... 
Of troops and theii^ baggage, - - - 
'Of Quartermaster's subsistence, ordnance, and hos- 








pital stores, - ... 


• 




17 


Purchase of horses and mules. ( Q. M. Dcp.,) 






18 


Purchase of wa;4ons and harness, do. 






19 


^ Purcha.se' of horses for ^jiounted troops, viz : 

Horses for Company — Cavalry. 

Horses for Company Artillery, &c., > - 






20 


Outstanding Debts,* . « . . . 
Deduct actual or-probablc balsfnce on hand, - 







*To be accompanied by a list giving the name and ainoant du#eacli 
individual, or firm, and on what account due, 



quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



126 



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quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



127 



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quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



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Date of the ad- 
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QUARTERMASTER S DEPARTMENT — FORM^ 



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130 • ^UARTERJIASTER'S department — FORMS. 



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QUARTERMASTER S DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 






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QUARTERMASTERS DErARTMENT — FORMS. 



133 



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134 



quartermaster's BEPARTBIENT — FORMS. 



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quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



135 



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13<5 



QUARTERMASTERS DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 






25 






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CiUARTERMASTEIl's DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 187 



• No. 25. 

QUARTERLY RETURN OF QUARTERMASTER'S STORES. 

Iieceived, issued, a7id remain on hand at , in the quarter ending 

on the of , 186 . 

A. B., Quartermaster. 



NOTE. 

The property on this return (which does not include clothing, camp and 
garrison equipage) will be classed as follows: 

1. Fuel. 

2. Forage. 

3. Straw. 

4 Stationery. 

5. Barrack, Hospital, and office Furniture. 

6. Means of Transportation, including Harness, &c. 
7 Building Materials. 

8. Veterinary Tools and Horse Medicines. 

9. Blacksmiths' Tools. 
l(i. Carpenters' Tools. 

11. Wheelwrights' Tools. 

12. Masons" and Bricklayers' Tools. 

1.3. Miscellaneous Tools for Fatigue and Garrison purposes.' 
14. Stores for Expenditure, such as Iron, Steef, Horse-shoes, Rope, &c. , 
&c., to be classed alphabetically. 



138 



quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



No. 23. — Quarterly Reinim of Quartermaster's Stores received and issued 

.m Con 



Classes, . 


1. Fuel. 




Abstracts, &c. 


• 
• 


Wood. 


Coal. 


Date. 


'E 
3 
u 

No. 


No. 


.a 
o 

No. 


6 

'5 

« 

< 
Lbs. 


o 
c 

r-* 

M 
Bu. 




Per last return, 
Abstract D, 
E, 

N, 


On haml, 

Received by purchase, 
" from officers, 
Fabricated, taken up,&c., 













Total to be 'accounted /or, . 












Per Abstract F, 
G, 

" \ 

K, 
L, 

M, 


Fnel 

Fovagjg, 

Straw, ... 
Stationery, ... 
Special issues. 
Expended, sold, . 
Tran^erred, 










i 


Total issued and expended. 











Total remaining on band, . 








Condition \„ 
a o 

~) • 

" 3, . . 


In good order, . . . | 
Unfit for service, but re-j 

*pairable, 
Totally unfit for service, 











0/ 

tinued. 


quartermaster's department — FORMS. 

• 

-, j"?» /he qiiavier ending on the of — — -- , 


186 


139 

• 


2. Forage. 


3. Straw. Stationery. ^ 


c 

o 


2 

s 




• 




For Bedding. 
Foolscap Paper. 




V 

6 
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W 


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> 


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o 

• 
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140 



QUARTEKMASTER'S department — FORMS. 



No. 23. — Quarterly return of Quartermaster'' s Stores, received and isstied 

Con 



Stationery. 



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QUARTERMASTERS DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



141 



at , ??i t/ic quarter ending on the ■ of — — , 18G , hy 

tinued. 

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I certify, on honor, tliat the foregoint; return exhihits a true and correct 
statement of all the property vliich has conie into my liands on account 

of tlie Quartermaster's Department, during the quarter ending on the 

of . I8t5 . • . ■ A. B.. Quarlermastfr. 



142 



quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



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quartermaster's DEPARTIMENT — FORMS. 



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QUARTERMA STER S DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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quartermaster's department — F0RM8, 





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quartermaster's department — FORMS, 









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QUABTERMASTER'S department — FORMS. 



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quartermaster's BEPARTMENT — FORMS. 






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156 



quartermaster's department — FORMS. 






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QUARTIRMASTER's department — FORMS. 



157 



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quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



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quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



159 



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160 



quartermaster's department-— forms. 



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'»*,. -i-n'^TJARjTBRIkt aster's UEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



161 






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162 



quartermaster's department— -fORitfS. 



't^ 






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^ 































































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• 


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V 
to 

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To wliom transferred. 




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H-. iZi S •* 



quartermaster's department— forms. 



168 





o 














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3 








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From whence received. 


Found at the post, .... 
Manufactured, ■ * • 
Part^ of articleg broKen up. 
Heretofore issued, but not consumed, 
Captured from the enemy, 
i' 


1 




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11^ 



164 QUARTEEMA-STEB'S depabtment— form^. 



No. 46. 

Quarterly Statement of Allowances paid to Officers of the Army in money ^^ 

the quarter end 





« 
Rank and 
Corps. 


For Fuel. 


Quarters. 




















In money. 


In kind. 




(Rank being 
that for 




Am'h 






0) 










6 


which they 














Cli 

c 


were paid, 


Period. 










j; 


rn 


or 






Period. 




Period. 


O 


o 


allowances 
furnished.) 


, 












o 




•^ 


$ c. 




% c. 




o 




c 


1861. , 




1861. 




1861. 




w.s 


Major Genl. 


July, Aftig. Sep. 


96 0(3 


JuIy,Aug.Sep. 


120 00 


_ 


_ 


J.T 


Brig. Genl. 


July, . 


30 00 


Jniy.Aug.Sen. 


80 00 


_ 


_ 


K.J 


Col. Ajt. Gl. 


August, 


30 00July,Aug.Sep. 


90 00 


_ 


_ 


T.M 


Col. Q. M. D. 


August, 


30 00 


July,Aug.Sep. 


SO 00 


_ 


_ 


T.L 


Maj. Pay Dt. 


July, Aug. Sep. 


30 00 


Aug. Sep. 


80 00 


July, . 


3 


L.B 


Col. Engrs. 


July, Aug. Sep. 


39 00 


_ 


80 00 


_ 


_ 


B.L 


^Ij.T.Engrs. 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


B.B 


Cols. Drags. 


" - 


- 


_ 


_ 


July,Aug. 


4 


J.C 


Col. Art. 


July, Aug. 


20 00 


- 


- 


July, Aug. 


4 


F.E. 


Maj.. Infty. 


July, Aug. 


12 00 


- 


- 


July, Aug.. 


4 



QTARTERM aster's DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



165 



No. i6. 

or furnished in kind, with the money value (hereof, ty 
ing , 186 . 



-,at 







'• 














_o 


: 


■i 










Rent. 


r « 


o 






c 










o . 


a) . 




§ 

S 


%\.bstract and 






Remarks. 




Jo 




15 

o ■"' 


a 


•CJ 

o. 


voucher. 






fc 


Cu, fa 


00 


H 


• 


* 


f c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 






120 00 


40 00 


20 00 


396 00 


f l,dL 9—1 9 




- 


90 00 


- 1 


15 70 


215 00 B 2,Tl, 14—14 




- 


. - 


- 1 - 


- 


120 OO'b 17 




- 


_ 


•_ 


- 


- 


110 00 


B21 




30 00 


60 00 


— 


30 00 


- 


230 00 


B 4, 20— G 13 




- 


« _ 


_ 


_ 


- 


130 00 


B 10 




- 


100 00 


' _ 


_ 


_ 


110 00 


B 26, 27 




30 00 


30 00 


40 00 


37 50 


_ 


139 50 


B27,30— G 14 




35 00 


70 00 


- 


- 


•- 


126 50 


B 28, 32— H 2 






— 


- 


- 


- 


12 50 


F 4— H 6, 


Public quarters^ 



I certify tbat.lhe above is correct. A. B., Quarterrtutster. 

Note. — When officers occupy quarters owned by the public, the number 
of rooms only will be reported. 



166 



quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



i^ 6 



. o 


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quartermaster's department — rORMS. 



w 






P3 £ 



o» - 

O §00 



:S 






C.5 






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14 



■m A 



168 



quartermaster's DEPARTMENT-t-FORMS. 



" "i 


1 


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11 







% 



QUARTERMASrER S DEPARTMENT — rORMS. 



169 




con 



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w' 



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170 



QUARTEKMASTER^S DjETPARTMENr— FftRMS^ 



No. 51. — Quarterly Return of Clothing', Camp and Garrison Eqai- 

day of ■ ■ 





aJ 
u 

'S 

> 
a 

a. ■ 


OF WBOM EECEIVED. 

Qn hand per last" re 
turn. 






to 

2 

> 


♦a 
a. 

S 

s 


6 

03 rs 

a 
o 


CD' 
> 
O 

o 

; a, 


Pompons. 


WHEN RECEIVED. 


Color. 






• 


• ■. 












j 


Toial to Ije 


accot 


mtetj for. 




■ 




— • 






\vbEN ISSUED. 


c '- 


TO WHOM ISSUED. 












1 

1 






_r| 






. 




Toial issnec 


, 














On hand to be accoiintet) for, ... { 













QIJARTERMASTER's nEPA.RTMENT — FORMS. 



171 



psijc, recei'i'cd and is"ued at 
lb6 , 6// ~ . 



ill the quarter ending en i>ir 



. 


• 






CLOTHING. 

• 




n 

> 

a 

c 
'El 


COATS. 


MKTALLIC BEIALS 


• ; 


to 

a 

-:i 
c 

_» 

Ml 
K 


S 

c 

it 

« 


si 

1- 


a 
a 
ti 


c 
.2 

a* 


"to 

d 
ea 
at 

11 


"a} 

C 
Si 

a> 
u. 




a 

3 
75 

3 


1. 
•* 

• 


it 


n 


ei 
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d 

• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




• 












. !', 




.. 










j 






— 


• 

4 






• 








K 


4 


1 

i 
i 


! 

1 






♦ 


'4 






1 


















» 






' 






- 


1 





172 



QUARTBRMASTXa'S DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



No. 61. — Qimrtirly Retwrns^ &f Clothmgr Camp and Garrison 



( 







' 




CLOTHING. 






• 










3 


































^ 


v: 








UNIFOBM . 


•AGKET3. 














tn O 


^ u 
















fci) 
IS 




S 


o 

to 


'S 

> 


P. 
s-i 


O 

'S . 

PL. 


OS 

a 






si 
o 
bc 










1-t 




























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3 


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bJ3 


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o 
o 




to 

^■ 

a 


o 




<0 

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a 


OS 


o 

o 

Q 


Q 

o ■ 


o 
o 


0) 


.CO 


S' 


^ 


«} 


U 


.•Ph 


•H 


>H 




fit 


W 


m 


pa 


w 


H-I 






'm 














• 


, 


1 


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• 
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. ■ 




















1 ■ 





«» 


4«:' 


^ 


1 


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1 


1 ' 
: 


1 




: 


• 


! 




1 i 




i 



quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



178 



Equipage, received and issued, d-c. — Continued. 



• 

CLOTHINQ. 


EQUIPAQB. 




o 

m ft 

(^ a 

M 3 
n C 

eS 
O 
u 

rt 
u 

M 


S 

H 


a 
M 






% 




BED SACKS 


J. 


hi 

■f 




P. 

i 


j 

eS| 
=^ 

Si 
o 


O 
O 

(6 

o 


bO 

c 


o3 

S 

a 

a 
























* 




1 

j 































■ 


i 

I 

.•1 

1 


• 




i 

i 
1 

1 

1 i 



174 



quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



No. 51. — Quarterly Return of Clothing, Camp and Gar 



EQUIPAGE, 





c 

etf 

33 


m 

2 

HI 

1 


■c 
o 

C2 


bD 

eS 

5 

rt 
O 


tic 
£ 

■s 


tn 
M 

Ctj 

bO 
C 

O 

PS 


_5 

CO "^ 

_c 

'5 

u 
o 

<D 


1 

s 


1 


0) 


OJ 

u 

01 

3 

cq 




DRUMS. 


■ o 

U 

K 

£ 

■6 


6 

'o 


* 
-a 

in" 

-a 

CS 

M 






















• 


' 






" 


























• 






:■' . 




























. 


#. 






- 




- 






— 




* 




J — ! 














( 































quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



175 



rison Equipage, received and issued, d'C — Continued. 



EQUIPAGE. 




DRUMS. 


01 


1) 

1 


c 

ci 

c • 


c 

HI 

c 
o 
E 


a-: 


o 

E 

O 


0) 

X 

eB 

J! 

O 


0} 

c 

X 

a 

o 

a! 


- 


■ 


« 


- 


« 


4 


BOOKS AND BLANKS. 


c 


fee 




C3 
O 

.a 
o 

P 


o 


a. 

c 


8 

a 

.fcC 

o 
O 


'i- 
O 


o 
o 

-a 
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in 

a 

C 

3 

5 


_2 
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a. 
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1 




• 




^ 

























« 










1 


\ 




« 





176 



QtJARTERM aster's DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



- No. 52. " , . 

We, the undersigned, Non- Commissioned Officers, Artijicers, Musicians, 

the several articles of Clothing 





Name and desig- 

natiorw of the 

soldier. 




> 
o 

o 

a 


a 
o 

£ 
o 
PL, 


c 

s 

H 


UNIFORM 
COATS. 


UNIFORM 
JACKETS. 




Date of the 

issue. 


03 

;2i 


'in 

C 
ni 
<B 

CD 


o 

Oh 

o 


C 
'c 

'cO 
3 






O 

h 
O 
O 


'o 


4) 
> 

CL, 


' • 











NoTKS. — Erasures and alterations of entries are prohibited. 

Regular and extra issues will be distinguished on the receipt-roll. 
Each signature, whether written by the soldier or acknowledged 

by mark, must be witnessed. 
Vacant space will be filled by a cipher. 
Mounted men may receive one pair of " boots'' and two pairs of 

"bootees," instead oi four pairs Of bootees. 



quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



177 



and Privates of 

set opposite our respective names. 



No. 52. 

-, do hereby acknowledge to have received of 



*3 
p. 

«0 
IH 

0) 

2 


m 

at 

S 

c 




'5 

>■ 
s) 

m 

o 


CO 

•a 

&. 

c 
c 

O 


c 

o 


0) 

o 


to 

a) 


CO 

a 

o 

o 


1 

> 

o 

ID 

.1 


o 


<» 

in 

c 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




• 
Signatures. 


Witness. 




• 








1 


1 








1 





















As the metallic shoulder scales, letters, numbers, castles, and shells and 
flames will last for many years, they will be borne on the returns as com- 
pany j)roperty, in the same manner as are sashes, and other articles of 
camp an<l garrison equipaf^e, and will be charged to the soldier only when 
lost or destroyed through neglect. 



.178 



quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



1 


Remarks. 


• 


■ 


•ai3qAv piiB psuAVo xiioqAV j(g 






•aoiAias oiiir jCjiua jo 
'juaiu8a.i2B 'jouaiuoo jo oibq; 






o ^ • 

• s^ 


•SJU03 






•S-IBIIOQ 




Rate of hire on 
compensation. 

• 


■gSuXoA 
.TO /up 'qiuoj^ 


- 


= 
o ; 

5 

o 

H 


•sjuaQ 




•sjwiioa 


' 


o 

11 


•SA-BQ j 


•qmoi^ 1 




•OX 




■lUOJJ 


• 


•uoTiBdnooo puB iioijBuSisaQ 


• • 


Articles and names 
of persons. 

• 


K. 


•sst 


ijo ipBo JO .laqttin^ | 








-o n! J5 



quartermaster's department — FORMS. 



179 



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187 



Form No. 58 
Cert^caie to he (liven a soldier at the'time of his discharge. 

J certify that the within named a of Captain company. 

( .) di" the regiment of , horn in , in ihe State of , 

atrod years, — feet — inches higli, complexion, eyes, and 

by a —, — was enlisted b)' at — » — on the- day of 

1S6 , to serve years, ?ind is now entitled to discharge by reason 

o*f . 

The sttid was last paid by , to inckuie the — tlay of 186 , 

and has pay due him from that time to the present^late. 

There is due to him dollars travelling expenses from- ,tlie place 

of discharge to — , to the place of enrollment, transportation not bei^ig 

furnished in kind. 

There is dne him . 

Hi' is indebted to the Confederate Staic^ dollars, on account of . 

Given in tlnplicate at. , this — day of ISG 



Commanding Company. 

Note. — When this certificate is transferred it miK<t be on the back, wit- 
nesstd by a cymmissioned officer, if practicable, or by some other reputable 
person, well known to the Quartermaster. 



Form No 59. 
Account to he made by Quartermaster. 



For pay frofn of 186 , to of 186 , 

being months and days, at dollars per 

iVoiith, 

For pay for travelling from »- to , bein;; miles, 



Amount, ; . . . 

Deduct for clothing overdrttw n, . 



Balance paid, 



-, C. S. Army, this day 8f 186 , 



Recerved of - 

dollars and — cents, in full of the above account. 

( Signed duplicates.) 
AVitncss ; . 



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By bakince to be accounied for,'as 
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By cash received of-—, as per my 
receipt dated the - day of- 18 — . 

By amount received of — , for — , 

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for ani't ^xpended, asiper abst);'t 
and vouchers herewith, in pay- 
ing: the' troops sincer the — of — 
IS — , the date of the last account 


For amount tfariied over to — —, 
Due the Coufederate States, to be 
accounted for in the next acc'nt, 


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■QUARTERMASTER S DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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192 ' SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. 

ARTICLE ,XLII. 

SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. 

SUPPLIES. 

1097. Subsistence stores for the army, unless in particular and prgent 
cases the Secretary of War shall otherwise direct, shall be procured by 
contract, to be made by the Commissary-General on public notice, to be • 
delivered on inspection in the bulk, and at such places as shall be stipu- 
lated ; the inspector to give duplicate inspection certificates (see Form 
Nc. 15), and to be a legal inspector where there is such officer. 

1098. Purchases, to supply such corps and posts as by reason of thrir 
position, the climate, or for other sufficient cause the Secretary of "War 
may specially direct to be supplied in that vjay, will be made in open 
market, on public notice^ from ihe lowest bidder who produces the 
proper article. . • 

1019. And whenever a deficiency of subsistencestores make it neces- 
sary to buy them, the commissary, where they are needed^ will make 
a requisition for that purpose on the proper purchasing commissary, or 
buy them himself, of good quality, cm-responding with the contract. 

1100. When subsistence is received under contract, ftie Q§mmissary 
will receipt for it on the inspection certificates (see Form No. 15). He 
will deliver one of these to the contractor, and forward the other tolhe 
Commissary-General, with a report on^he q^uality of the provisions and 
the condition of the packages, * 

1101. Whenever subsistence stores are purchased, the advertisements 
'and bids, and a copy of the bill of purchase, with a statement of the 

cause of purchase, will be forwarded by the purchasing officer to the 
Commissary-General. This rule does not apply to the ordinary pur- 
chase of hospital supplies. Pork, salt beef, and flour mustbe inspected 
before purchase by a legal inspector wiiere there is such officer. Dupli- 
cate certificates of inspection (see Form No. 15) will be taken as sub- 
youchers to the vouchers for the payment. 

1102. Fresh beef, when it can be procured, shall be furnished as often 
as the commanding officer may order, at least twice a week, to be pro- 
cured by the commissary, when practicable, by contract. (For form of 
contract and bond, see Forms 27 and 28.) ■ When beef is taken on the 

* hoof, it will be accounted for on the provision return by the mimber of 
cattle and tiieir estimated weight. When the pasture is insufficient, 
hay, corn, and other forage will be procured for public cattle. 

1103. Good and suflicient store-room for the subsistence stores will 
be procured by the commissary from the Quartermaster. Care shall be 
taken to keep the store-rooms dry and ventilated. Packages shall be so 
stored as to allow circulation of air among and beneath them. The 
flour should occasionally be rolled into the air. 

1104. Before submitting damaged commissary stores to boards of 
survey, the commissary shall separate and re-pack sound parts. 

1105. Wastage on issues, or from evaporation cr leakage, will be as- 
certained quarterly, or when it can J)e most conveniently ; and the ac- 
tual wastage thus found will be charged on the monthly return. Loss, 
from whatever cause, exceeding ordinary waste, must "be accounted for 
by the certificate of an officer, or other satisfactory evidence. Ordi- 
nary waste on issues should not exceed, £ay 10 per cent, on pork, bacon, 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. l03 

sugar, vinegar, and soap, and 5 per cent, on hard bread, beans, rice, 
coffee, and salt. 

1106. No wastage is admitted on issues of fresh beef furnished the 
company detachment, or regiment, directly from the butcher. But in 
beef ou the hoof, errors in estimated weight, and losses on cattle strayed 
or stolen, will be accounted for by the certificate of an officer, or other 
satisfactory evidence. When cattle are transferred, they should be ap- 
praised, and loss in weight reported as wastage, by the officer deliveriqg 
them. Fair wastage in transportation of stores is accounted for by the 
receiving officer. 

4ft 

; THE RATION. 

1107. The ration is three-fourths of^a pound of pork or bacon, or ono 
and'a fourth poundd of fresh or salt beef; eighteen ounces o£ bread or 
flour, or twelve ounces of hard bread, or ohe and a fdurtli pounds -of 
com moal ; and at the rate, to one hundred rations of eiglit quarts of 
peas or beans, or, in lieu thereof, tma pi^nds of rice; six pounds cofi'ee; 
twelve pounds sugar; four quarts of vinegar; one riid a half pounds 
of tallow, ^r one and a fourth pounds adamantine, or one. pound sperm 
candles : four pounds of soap, and two quarts iif salt. 

1108. The annexed table shows the quantity' uf each partT)C the ration 
in any number of rations from one to ten thousand. 

1109. On a campaign, or on marches, or on board of transports, tho 
ration of hard bread is one pound. 

ISSUES. 

1110. Returns for issues to companies, will, when practicable, be con- 
solidated for the post or regiment (see Form 14). At the end of the 
month, the -issuing commissary will make duplicate abstracts of tho 
issues, wliich the commanding officer will comp.ire with the original 
returns, aq^ certify^see Form .2). Tliis abstract is a voucher of the 
issue for the niontliiy return. 

nil. Issues to the hospital will bo on returns by the medical ofRcer, 
for such provisions only as are actually required for the sick and the 
attendants; The cc st of such parts of the ration as are issued w 11 be 
charged to the hospital at contract or cost prices, and the hospital will 
be credited by the whole number of complete rations due through tho 
month at contract or cost prices (see Note 7) ; the balance, constituting* 
the Hospital Fund, or any portion of it, may be expended by the com- 
missary, on the requisition of the medical officer, in tiie purchase of any 
article for the subsistence or comfort of the sick, not authorized to be 
otherwise furnished (see Form 3). . At large depots or general hospitals, 
this fund may be partly expended for the benefit of dependent posts or 
detaclimentff, on rei uisitions approved by the medical director or senior 
Surgefln of the district. 

11 12. The articles purchased for the hospital, as vrell as those issued 
from the subsistence store-house, will I e included in the Surgeon's cer- 
tificatea of issues tc the hospital, and borne on tho monthly return of 
provisi'ms received and issued. Vouchers for purchases fo» the hospital 
must either be certified by the Surgeon, or accompanied by his requi- 
sition. 

9 



194 SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. 

» 

Ills. Abstracts of the issues to the hospital will be made by the eoro- 
niissary ce^tified by the Surgeon, and countersigned by the commsinding, 
oflBcer (see Form 3). When there is a hospital fund, every article sup- 
plied by the subsistence department for the use of the hospital, will bo 
charged against that fund. * . 

1114. In order that the authorized women" of companies may draw 
their rations while temporarily separated from their companies, the of- 
ficer commanding the company must make a report to the commanding 
officer of the post where the women may be left, designating such aa 
are to draw rations as attached to his company. Their rations are not 
comniuted,«ind they can only draw them at a military post or station 
where there are supplies. 

1115. When provisions can bfe spared from the military supplies, 
co*fcQmandiug oflBcers have discretion to order issues to Indians visiting 
military posts on the frontiers, or in their respective nations, and to- 
order sales of subsistence to Indian agents for issues to Indians. The 
returns for issues, where there is no Indian agent, will be signed by the 
commanding offcer. The sales*'will be for cash, at cost, including all 
expenses ; to be entered on the monthly return, and credited on the 
quarterly acccfunt current, 

1116. Issyes to volunteers and militia, to sailors^ to marines, to citizens 
employed by any ot the departments, or to Indians, will be entered oa 
separate abstracts to the monthly return. 

^ 1117. An extra issue of fifteen pounds of tallow or ten of sperm can- 
dles, per. month, may be made to the principal gusn-d of each camp and 
garrison, on the order of the commanding officer. Extra issues of soap, 
candles and vinegar, are permitted to the hospital when the Surgeon 
does not avail himself of the commutation of the hospital rations, or 
when there is no hospital fund ; salt in small quantities may be issued 
for public horses and cattle. When the officers of the Medical Depart- 
ment find anti-scorbutics necessary for the health of the troops, the com- 
manding officer may order issues of fresh vegetables, pickled onions, 
sour krout or molasses, with an* extra quantity of rice and vinegar, 
(Potatoes are usually issued at the rate of one pound per ration, and 
onions at the rate of three bushels in lieu of one of beans.) Occasional 
issues (extra) of n>olasses are made — two quarts to one hundred 
rations — and of dried apples, of from one to one and a half bushels to 
one hundred rations. Troops at sea are recommended to draw rice and 
an extra issue of molasses in lieu of beans. When anti-scorbutics are 
issued, the medical ofilcer will certify the necessity, and the circum- 

"etances which cause it, upon the abstract of extra issues, (see Form 4), 
1118. When men leave their company, the rations they have drawn, 
and left with it, will be deducted from the next return for the company; 
a like rule when men are discharged from the hospital will govern Ih© 
hospital return. 

RECRUITING SERVICE. 

. .1119. When subsistence cannot be issued by the Commissariat to re- 
cruiting parties, it will be procured by the officer in charge, on written 
contracts for^complete rations, or wholesome board and lodging (see 
Form 26). 

1120. The contractor will send, monthly or quarterly, aa he may 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. 196* 

citioose, liis account for rations issued, to the Commissary-Generfil for 
payment vouched by the abstract of issues (Form 17) certified by the 
officer. 

1121. When convenience nnd economy require that the contrai I ^hall 
be for board and lodging, the officer in charge shall estimate the cost of 
the raticn, for which the contractor shall be paid as before directed, and 
Bhall pay the amount due to lodging from fhd recruiting fu,nd. 

1122. At temporary rendezvous, advertising may be dispensfed with, 
and a contract made conditioned to be terminated at the pleasure of the 
officer of the Commissary-General. 

1123. The recruiting officer will be required, when convenient, to re- 
ceive and disburse the funds for the subsistence of his party, and to ren- 
der his accounts quarterly to the Commissary-General. 

1124. When a contract CAunot be made, the recruiting officer may pay 
the necessary expenses of subsisting and boarding his party. 

1125. The expenses of subsistence at branch reiftlezvous, and all ex- 
penses of advjertising for proposals, will be paid by the contractor at the 
principal station, and included in his accounts. 

112G. Issues of provisions will be made on the usual provision re- 
turns, and board will be furnished on a return showing the number of 
tlie party, tbe daj&, and dates. 

SUBSISTENCE TO OFFICERS. 

1127. An oflBcer may draw subsistence stores, paying cash for them, 
at contract or cost prices, without includtng cost of transportavion, on 
his eertificat« that they are for his "own use and the use of his fiunily. 
These certified lists the commanding officer shall compare with the 
monthly abstracts of sales, which he shall countersign, (sec Form 5.) 
The commissary ,will enter the sales on his monthly return, and credit 
the money in his quarterly account current. . 

BACK RATIONS. 

1128. When th« supplies warrant it, back ratiojis may be drawn, if 
the full rations could not have been issued at the time; except when 
eoldiers have been sufficiently subsisted in lieu of the ration. The re- 
turn for back rations shall set out the facts, and the precise time when 
rations were not issued, or the troops otherwise sufficiently subsisted, 
which shall appear on the abstract of issues. 

COMMUTATION OF RATIONS. 

1129. When a soldier is deta^'od on duty, and it is impracticable to 
carry his subsistence with him, it will be commuted at seventy five cents 
ft day, t<i be paid by tRe commissary when due, or in advance, ori the 
order of tlie commanding officer. The officer detaching the soldier will 
certify, on the voucher, that it is impracticable for him to carry his ra- 
tions, and the voucher will show on its face tlie nature and e.\tent of the 
duty the soldier-was ordered to perform. (See Form 18.) 

1130. The expenses of a soldier placed temporarily in a privnle hos- 
pital, on the advice of the seryor Surgeon of the post or detachment, 
sanctioned by the commanding officer, will bo paid by t^o Subsistence 
Department, not to exceed seventy-five cents a day. 

}J31. The ration of a soldier stationed in a city, with no opportnnity 



•196 . SUBSISTENCE DEPARTafENT. 

of'messing, •vrill be commuted at sixty cents. The rations of the non- 
commissioned regimental staff, when they have no opportunity of mess- 
ing, and of soldiers on furlough, or stationed where rations connot be 
issued "u kind, may be commuted at the cost Or value of the ration at 
the post. The rations of Ordnance Sergeants may be commuted at 
thirty cents. 

1132. When a soldier on-duty has necessarily paid for his own sub- 
sistence, he may be refunded the cost of the ration. When more than 
the cost of the ration ia claimed, the account must bo submitted to the 
Con^missary-General. 

IXTBA-BUTY MEN. 

1133. The commanding officer -will detail a suitable non-commissioned 
oflBcsr or soldier from extra-duty, under the. orders of the Commissary, 
and to be exempt from ordinary company and garrison duty. All extrar 
duty men employed in the Commissariat vfill be paid the ref!;ulated al- 
lowance (see Article XXXIX.) by the Commissai-y, if not paid extra- 
pay in any other department. . 

1134. Barrels, boxes, hides, tallow, &c., will be sold, and the proceeds 
Credited in the quarterly account current. 

ACCOUNTS. 

-1135. The following are the accounts and returns to be rendered to 
the Commissary-General : ^ 

. Monthly. 

Return of provisions and forage received and issued in the 

month, . . . . . ^ . Form 1 

Invoices of subsistence stores received, . . . " • 22 

Abstracts of issues to troops, &c. (See pamgraph 1116,) . " 2 

Abstract of issues to hospitals, . ' . . .*. " 3 

Abstract of extra issues, . . . -. " 4 

Abstract of sales to officers, . . . . " 5 • 

Abstract of purchases, without vouchers, . "■ . " 8 

Receipts for subsistence transferred, . . . " ^4 
Summary statement of money received and expended during 

. the month, . . . . . " 6 

Report of persons and articles employed and hired, . " 20 

Quarterly. 

Acoount current, , . • . • . • . Form 7 

Abstract of all purchases of provisions and forage during the 

quarter, . ... . . " 8 

Abstract of all expenditures in the quarter, except for purchase 

of provisions, and forage for cattle, (paragraph 1103,) • " 9 
Coneolidated abstract of sales to officers during' the quarter, . " 10 
Distinct abstract of other sales; 
Quarterly return of all property in the department; except 

provisions, %nd forage for cattle, . . . " 12 

Estimate of funds required for next quarter, . . " 11 



BUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. ^97 

1136. The abstfactp! of issues will show the corps or detachment. 
When abstracts require more than one sheet, the sheets will be num- 
bered ia series, and*not pasted together ; the total at the foot of each 
<;arried to the head of tlie next, &c., itc. 

1137. All lists of subsistence shall run in this order: meat, bread- 
etuff, rice and beans, coffee, sugar, vinegar, candles, sgap, salt, anti- 
scorbutics, purchases for hospital, forage for cattle. 

1138. No charge for printing blanks, as forms, will be allowed. 

1139. A book will be kepti by the commissary at each post, in which 
will be entered the monthly returns of provisions received, and issued, 
,(Form 1.) It will show from what the purchases have been made, and 
whether paid for. -It re called tlve Commissary's book, and will not be 
creraovod from the post. 

1140. Wh^n anj oflBcer in the 'Commiss&riat is relieved, he will close 
his property accounts ; but money account* will 1>e kept open till the 
«nd of the quarter, unless he ceases to do duty in the department. 

1141. Comhiissaries of subsistence in charge of principal depots, will 
render (Quarterly statements of the cost and quality 'of the ration, in all 
its parts, at their e^tations. 

NOTES. 

1. Stores longest on hand will be issued first. 
• 2. Armorers, cw'iage-mal^ers and b'ackemiths, of the Ordnance De- 
partment, are entitled to one and a half .rations per day ; nil other en- 
listed men, one ration. Laundresses, one ration. No hired person 
shall diaw more than one ration. 

3. One ration a day may be issued to any person employed with the 
army, when the teruis of his engagement require it, or on paying the 
full cost of th^aticn when he cannot otherwise procure food. 

4. Lamps and oil to light a fort or garrison are not allowed from the 
Subsistence Department. 

5. Id^urchasing pork for the Southern posts, a preference will be 
given to that which is put up in small pieces, say from four to'six 
poands each, and not very fat. 

6. As soldiers are expected to preserve, distribute, and cook their own 
eubsistfinee, th« hire of citizens for any of thes« duties is not allowed, 
except in extreme cases. 'The expenses of bakeries are paid from the 
post fund, to which the profits aecrne by regulations, (see paragraph 
183,) such as purchase of hops, y-east, furniture ; as sieves, clotos, &c., 
find the hire of bakers. . Ocens may be built or paid for by the Subsis- 
tence Department, but not bake houses. 

7. Mode'of ascertaining tbo hospital ration: ]00 complete rations 
consist of, say — , 

Cost. 

32 rations of fresh beef is 40 lbs, at 4 cents, . $1 fiO 

08 " pork is 51 lbs. at G cents, . ■ " . 3 OG 

100 " flour is 112 lbs. Rt 2 cents. . .2 25 

1100 " beans is 8 quarts at 4 cents, 32) 

or "• y0 4« 

■100 " rice is 10 lbs. at G cents, . " 60 ) 

100 " coffeo is 6 lbs. at cents, . . 5i 



96 


20 


18 


24 


06 



198 SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. 

100 rations of sugar is .12 lbs. at 8 cents, . 
100 " vinegar is 4 quarts at 5 cents, 

100 " candles is U lbs. at 12 cents, * 

100 " soap is 4 lbs. at 6 cents, 

100 " salt is 2 quarts at 3 cents, . 

Cost of one hundred rations, . $9 55 

or 9 cents 5 mills per ration-. ^ 

8. A box, 24 by 16 inches square, and,. 22 inches deep, will contain 
one barrel, or 10,752 cubic inches. 

9. A box' 16 by 16.8 inches square, and 8 inches deep, will contain 
one bushel, or 2150.4 cubid inches. • • 

10. A box, 8 by 8.4 inches square and 8 inches deep, will contain 
one peck, or 537.6 cubic inches. 

11. A box, 7 by 4 inches square, and 4.8 inches deep, will contain a 
half gallon or 131.4 cubic inches. , , 

12. A box, 4 by 4 inches square, and 4.2 inches deep, will contain 
one quart or 67.2 inches. 

13. One bushel of corn weighs 

wheat 

" rye " 

" " buckwheat " 

" " barley 

■ " " oats " 

" " beans " 

" " ' potatoes " 

" " onions " 

" " dried peaches " 

" " dried apples " 

salt 

Ten gallons pickled onions ". 

" " sour krout , " ^ 

1142. Lieutenants, acting as Assistant- Commissaries of Subsistence, 
are allowed $20 per month for such services, to be paid by the Pay De- 
partment, on accounts certified to by the Cominissary-General,*to tho 
effect U;at proper returns were rendered for the period charged for. 

114^ A Regimental or Depot Commissary of Subsistence may pur- 
chase, at first cost price, of the Captains or commanding officers of com- 
panies, in the service of the Confederate States, such articles or parts 
of the ration as are not drawn, nor consumed. But this applies only 
to such articles as were actually issued and not consumed, or would ac- 
. tually have been issued, and does not apply to such parts of the ration 
as the Commissary does not habitually have on hand for issue. 

1144. The accounts for such purchases will be made in duplicate, 
(see Form No. 19,) and the articles will be taken up by the Commissa- 
ry on his monthly return, as if it were an original purchase. The 
nfioney paid to the Captains constitutes a company fund. 

1145. 1st. Duplicate originals of all contracts on account of subsis- 
tence will be sent to the Commissary-General's office tJiivugh the prin- 
cipal Commissary of Subsistence of the Military Department in which 
the contract is made. The place of reaidmcc of each surety to the bond 



56 


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81 





SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. 199 

must be named therein with particularity. Where the form is pre- 
scribed it will be foll(iwed ; in all cases contracts must be drawn up and 
executed to meet the requirements of the law. Every contract, whether 
for services or for the furnishing of supplies, which contemplates a par- 
tial performance, from time to time, continuing until, the whole duty is 
performed, or the whole delivery of the enumerated articles is effected, 
must provide in express terms for its earlier termination, if the Com- 
missary-General shall so direct. 

1146. Estimates for funds must be rQB^ered in duplicate. 

1147. In order to establish an invariable rule for ascertaining the 
nett weight of beef cattle received on the li^of, the following mode is 
adopted, and for the future, in all cases will be observed : 

1. When practicable, cattle presented for acceptance must be weigh- 
ed upon the scales. From the live weight of a steer, thus ascertained, 
his nett weight shall be determined by deducting forty-five per centum, 
whcn«his gross weight exceeds thirteen hundred (1300) pounds, and 
fifty per centum when it is less than that, and not under eight hundred 
(800) pounds. 

. 2. When it is impracticable to weigh upon the scales, one or more 
average steers must be selected, killed and dressed in the usual manner. 
The average nett weight of these (neck and shanks excluded) will be 
accepted as the average nett weight of the herd. In all written instru- 
ments for the delivery of cattle on the hoof, the manner prescribed 
above, for ascertaining nett weight, must, in express terms, be inserted ; 
in verbal agreements, it must be understood and accepted by tlie party 
delivering the cattle. Vouchers for the payments of cattle will state 
the manner pursued in determining their nett weight, except where 
payment has been made on the certificate of an officer, in which case 
the certificate will state the mode followed. 

3. With a view to the prevention of losses now so frequiently occur- 
ring, from over-estimating the weight of dflttle received on the hoof, the 
serious attention" of officers and agents serving in this department is 
specially called to the exercise^of greater care in the discharge of this 
important duty. 

1148. When fresh beef can be provided, it will be issued to the troops 
five times per week. When the circumstances are favorable, and it can 
be done with advantage to the Government, the Subsistence Department 
will keep beef cattle to supply the issues. 

1149. The following issues and substitutions may be made : When, 
from excessive fatigue or exposure, the commanding officer may deem 
it necessary, he may direct the issue of whiskey to the enlisted men of 
bis command, not to exceed a gill per man fur each day. Tea may bo 
issued in lieu of coffee, at the rate of one and a half pounds per one 
hundred rations. Two "issues' per week of " desiccated vegetables" 
may be made in lieu of "Ijeans" or "rice." Potatoes and onibns, when 
issued, will .always be in lieu of rice or beans. Potatoes at the rate of 
a pound per ration ; onions at the rate of three pecks per hundred ra- 
tions. 



200 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



Form *1. 
Return of Provisions received and issued at 



-, during fhe month 
Confederate 



DATE. 

(1860.) 



Oct. 16 


1 


" 3Q 


2 


" 31 


3 


" 31 




" 31 




." 31 





FROM WHOM RECEIVED. 



Balance on hand, as per last return, 
2d Ueut. J. R., 4lh Infantry, A. A. C 
H. C, agent Subsistence Department 
Major T. W. L., C. S., C. S. A., 
W. J. R., cor>tractor for fresh beef. 
Purchased this month, as per abstract, 
Gained in issuing, 



Total to be accounted for, 



31 


1 


31 


2 


31 


3 


31 


4 


31 


5 


3] 


6 


15 


7 


13 


S 


23 


9 


31 


10 



To troops (regulars) as per abstract, 

To volunteers do 

To citizens in the Qr. Mr's Dept., as per abstract. 

To sick in hospital, as per abstract. 

To extra issues, do 

To sales to ollicers, do 

Capt. G. T. H., A. C. S., mil. service, 

H. P. C, Agent Subsistence Department, 

Capt, W. W., A. Qr. M: for transportation. 

Wastage, as per certificate, . 



Total issued, 



Balance on hand. 



SUIWttlEIifi^ DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



201 



Form 1. 
of , 18 , "by , Assistant Commissary of Subsistence, 



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202 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



Form 1 — Continued. 



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• 



A. J., 
Assistant Commissary. 



SUBSISTENCE DKPARfMENT — FORMS. 



303 



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204 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — ^TORMS. 



Form 3. 

Abstract of Provnions issued from the ■ to the • day of 

charge of • — , Assistant Surgeon, C S. Army, by 







— ■ 






— 7 




















ta 
























































RATIONS ACTUALLY REQUIRED FOR. CONSUMPTION IN 














« 


' THE HOSPITAL 








In 








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Oct, 18 

" 18 


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40 




30 


40 


40 


40 


— * 
50 


40 


3 
4 


27 

78 


4 
5 


" 20 
" 20 


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23 


108 
468 


108 




,,108 




108 


108 


108 


108 


108 


5 


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4 


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184 


100 


168 


468 




368 


200 


468 


300 


468 


6 


122 


6 


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u. 


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732 




■84 


130 




184 


184 


184 




184 


7 














130 


300 


• 697 






402 


732 




732 


8 


























84 






Total rations due JiospitBl, 


1531 










700 










Total quantity issued. 


378 


552 


1433 


10 


934 


1616 


448 


1532 


W 








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56 


193 


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15 


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Quantity in bulk. 


5 



I 



I certify, on honor, that I have carefully compared the above "abstract" with the 
seventy eight rations of pork, five hundred and fifty two rations of tresh b^ef, fourteen 
rations of rice, nine hundred and thirty-four rations of coffee, sixteen hundfed and six- 
and thirty-two rations of candles, fifteen hundred and thirty two rations of soap, eight 
purchases, amounting to two dollars and seventy eight cents, were required by me for, 
consumption in the hospital. 

Compared with returns of men in hospital, and found correct. 



Commafiding, 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS* 



205 



Form 3. 

, 18 , to men in Hospital at Ncio Orleans, Louisiana, under the 
Lieutenant J. T. J., 3d Infantry, A. C. S. 



• 


REMARKS. 






1 


MONTHLY STATKMEKT OF THE HOSPITAL FCND. 


a. 


D«. To balance due hospital last month, 


«o 


00 


c 


a 


o 
E 


1532 rations, being whole amount due Uiis raontli, -ati^^i 






"o 


c 


cents per ration, 


145 


54 


O 


m 
C 
O 




ISSUED. 






■a 

a 

OS 


1 


• 
Cr. By <he following provisions at contr.ict prices : 












283J^ pounds of pork at 6 cents per pound, 


17 


01 






40 


40 




690 4><'ui«l' "f fresh beef af4 cts. per pound, 


27 


60 








1612^ pounds of flour at 2 cts. per pound. 


32 


24 Ji 






108 
468 
184 
732 


108 
200 


2 


10 . pounds of hJird bread at 3X els. per pound, 




35 








70 pounds of rice at fi cts. per pound, 


4 


20 








56 pounds of coflce at 9 ctj<. per pound. 


5 


04 






400 




193 Ji poaiids of suear at 8 cts. per pound, 


15 


51 








l~)i quarts of vinegar at 5 cents per quart, 




855^ 








100 


10 


15 5-16 pounds of candles at 12 cts. per pound, 


1 


83^ 










611^ pounds of soap at 6 cts. per pound. 


3 


67>!, 












16^ quarts of salt at 3 cts. per qu,irt. 




^0% 













12 gallons of molasses at 28 cts. per gallon. 


3 
112 


36 
18X 












1532 


848 


12 


PORCHASED. 
















2 pairs of chickens at^7X cts. per pair, 


1 


75 




















4 quarts of milk at 7 cts. per quart. 




28 




















3 dozen oranges at 25 cts. per dozen, 




75 










o 










• 






2 


78 








01 




<i 


c 


Total expended, 










114 


96X 


o 


3 


3 


~ 


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0. 


O 


a 


O 





Balance due this month. 


30 


57Jtf 


61 


4 


16 


7 


12 


• 







original returns now in my possession, and find that they amount to three hundred and 
hundred .ind thirty -three rations of flour, ten rations of hard bread, seven hundred 
teen rations of sugar, four hundred and forty-eight rations of vin^ar, fifteen hundred 
hundred and forty-eight rations of salt, .and twelve gallons of molasses; and that Iho 
and issued to, the sick, and that the rations drawn in kind were' actually required for 



(Ddpucatm.) 



J. Cj J. Msiitani Surgeon C. S. Army. 



206 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS, 



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StBSISTKNOE DEPARTMENT— FORMS. 



207 






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208 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — TOBMB. 






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StrfiSIiTENOE DEPARTMENT — rORMS 



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210 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — FOltMS, 



•junotuy 



•siua3 



•su33fOTq3 

•MBS 
•dBOg 

•saipuug 

•I'eSauiji^ 

•jteSng 

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SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — F0EM8. 



211 



•S • 


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By authority, October 16. 

• 




o ♦ 

• o 
o 

Si 

ts 

i 

o 


Commutation of rations. 
Weights and nreasures. , 
rifirlr 


Stationery. 

Per dieni to extra-duty men. 

• 

• * 


nenis, on account of 
quar 


3 

"S 

E 

o 

JS 

o 


• 


i 

1 

1 


Number 

of 
Toucher. 


• f 






, 






f^< 



212 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



Remarks. 






1 




Pounds of fresh beef, at 
Pounds of bacon, at. . . 
Pounds of pork, at, , . . 
Pounds of salt beef, at 
Pounds of flour, at... . 
Pounds of coffee, at. . 
Pounds of sngar, at. . . . 
Pounds of hard bread, at 

Pounds of rice, at 

Pounds of candles, at. . 
Pounds of soap, at. . .'. 


TOTAL 
AMOUNT. 








1 
1 . 












1 




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•JO spunoj 'tiooeg , 






•JO spunod 'jaaq qsaij 






• 


a 
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5 


Ph 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



218 



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214 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMERT — FORMS. 



o 
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1 














1 


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SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



215 





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216 



SUBSISTENCE DtlPARTMENT^— FORMS. 



1* 

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Remarks. 

• 


See the remark 


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SUBSI8TENQE" DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — rORMS, 



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SUBSISTENCE PEPARrMENT — FORM.*. 



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SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — rORMif, 






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8UB8I8TEKCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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222 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — FOBMS, 



i^oRM 20. 
Jieport of Persons and Articles employed and hired at 



du 



s 


to 

J 

o 


Names 


Designati'n 


Service 
during 

the 
month. 


Rate of hire 

or 
compensation. 


Dale of 
contract, 


^ 


o 


of persons and 


and 






agreement 






"S 


c 


articles hired. 


occupation. 


^ 






Amount. 


Day 

or 

month. 


or 

entry into 

service. 


3 

05 


1 






c 


6 

H 


Dols 


Cts. 


1 


J 


■ 
House, 3 rooms, 


Quarters, 


1 


31 


31 


40 


00 


Month, 


July 1,1861, 


2 


2 


House, 4 rooms, 


Storehouse. 


3 


31 


29 


31 


00 


Month, 


Dec. 3, 1860, 


3 


3 


House, 2 rooms. Guard, 


1 


31 


31 


10 


00 


Month, 


Dep.3, 1860, 


1 




Chas. James, |Clerk, 


; 


31 


31 


83 


33 


xMonth, 


May 3,1861, 


2 




Jolin Johns, 


Storekeeper 


7 


10 


4 


50 


00 


Month, 


Jun.4, 1861, 


3 




Slave Tom, 


Messenger, 


7 


12 


6 


20 


00 


Month, 


Jan. 1, 1861, 


4 




Peter Jones, 


Laborer, 


22 


31 


7 


30 


00 


Month, 


Dec. 3, 1860, 


5 




M; Murphy, 


Laborer, 


1 


31 


31 


30 


00 


Montli, 


Jan. 7, 1861, 



Amount of rent and hire during the month. 



I certify, on honor, that the above is a trite report of all the persons 
and that the observationsTurder the heed of Remarks, and the statement of 

Examined : (duplicates.) 

C. D., Commanding 
Note. — Houses must ^lol be hired except in casss ".iv^ere they cannot be 
eronthly.) . 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — lORMS. 



223 



iHng the vionth of 



Form 20. 
, 186 , hy Capt. A. B., A. C. 5., C. S. A. 



• 




j: 


Remarks, showing by w^iora 
the buihlings were occu- 
pied, and for what pur- 
pose ; and how the n^en 
were employed during 
llie month. (Transfers 
and discharges noticed 
under this head.) 


Time and amount due 
and remaining unpaid. 


By wliom 
owned. 


Amou 
or re 
mon 


From 

1860 


To 

1861. 


AMOUNT. 


1 




■ • 


a 


n 

U 


in 


A. Brewer, 

B. Gott, 

C. Robi^on, 

NO Anderson 


40 

29 

10 

83 

6 

4 

7 

30 


00 
00 
0(J 
33 
66 
Qp 
00 
00 


Major 3d Infantry, 
Subsistence store and office. 
Guard for sub. stores. 
Olficeof A. C. Sj, C. S. A. 

By order Commiss'y Gen'l. 

i< a 11 

a II u 
u (( U 


Dec. 1, 
Dec. 3, 


Jan 31, 
JanSl, 


80 
60 


00 
00 




209 


99 


Total amount due ar 


d unpa 


id, 


140 


00 



and articles employed andliired by me during the month of , 186 

amoU/its due and remaining unpaid are correct. 

A. B., Capt. and A. C. S. 



furnished by the Quartermaster's Department. (This report to be rendered 



224 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



>, 


11 


(1) 


^ 


>4 




D 


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^ 


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Witness. 


tn 1 — 1 

c 

d 


Signatures. 


N. 0. Anderson. 
John James. 
A.S. Brewer^owner). 
John Smith (owner). 


c 
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U 


CO o o o 

CO o o o 


1 1 


CO o o >o 
00 >ri oj iH 


6 
o 

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CO o o o . 




CO o o »H 

00 VO Cl 


S 


1 rao. 

1 mo. 

1 mo. 

15 days. 


s 
.2 

p. 

o 
o 

O 


Clerk, 

Store-keeper, 
Messenger, 
Laborer, 


1 


N. 0. Anderson, 
John James, 
Tom (slave), 
Jim (slave). 


f 


5 


CO 
bb 

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SUB8I8TEN0K DBPARTMENT — FORMS. 



225 






'« 



I 

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Remarks. 


Well coopered. . 
Superfine, (well coopered). 
Loose, or in boxes or casks. 

• 

• 
• 

• 


Condition when transferred. 


• 

O . - 
o - - . 
C3 


Cost. 


.$20 per barrel, 
12 cts. per lb. 


Articles. 


Pork, 
Flour, 
Bacon, 


Number and quan- 
tity. 


500 barrels. 

200 

390 lb. 10 oz. 



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226 



SUBSISTENCE BEPAETMENT — FORMS. 



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SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — JOEMS. 



227 



'S, 



£<3 



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5 



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a 
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In good order. 

(( CI 

• 


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— 

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Pork, 
Flour, 
Bacon, 

• 


C 

3 

o 

o 

.a 
E 

s 


100 barrels, 

300 

1,(X)0 pounds, 



'k. 



pq 






2?8 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 229 



Form 2G, 

Articles of Agreement made and entered into this day of , 

Anno Domini one thousand eiglit hundred and sixty- , between , 

an officer in the Confederate Army, on the one part, and , of the 

county of , and State of , of the other part. 

This' agreement-wit nesseth, That the said , for and on behalf of the 

Confederate States of America, and the said heirs, executors and 

administrators, have covenanted an<l agreed, and by tliese presents do 
mutually covenant ajid agree, to nud with each otiier. as follows, viz : 

First. Tliat the said heirs, executors and administrators shall sup- 

ply, or cause to be supplied and issued, at , all the rations, to con- 

sist of the articles h.ereinafter specilied, that shall be required for the use 
of the Confederate States recruits stationed at the place aforesaid, com- 
mencing on the day of , one thousand eight hundred and 
sixty- , and ending on the day of , eighteen hundred and 
, or such earlier day as the Commissary General may direct, at ^le 
price of cents mills for each complete ration. 

Second. Thnt thg ration to be furnished by virtue of this contract shall 
consist of the following articles, viz : One and a quarter pounds of fresh 
beef, or three-quarters of a pound of salted pork, eighteen ounces of bread 
or flour, and at the rate of eight quarts ftf beans or ten pounds of rice, six 
pounds of coflee, twelve pounds of sugar, four quarts of vinegar, one and 
a half pounds of tallow, or one i)ound of sperm candles, four pounds of 
soap, and two quarts of salt to every hundred rations, or the contractor 
shall furnish the men witH*gond and wholesome board and lodgings, at 
the option of the recruiting officer; and the recruiting.party shall have Uic 
privilege of hanging out a flag from the place of rendezvous. 

Third. That fresh beef shaW be issued at least twice in each week, if 
required by the commanding officer. ♦ . 

Fourth. It is clearly understood that the provisions stipulated to be fur- 
nished and delivered under this contract shall be of the first qtxality. 

Fifth. Should any dilTiculty arise respecting the quality of the provis- 
ions stipulated to be delivered under th\i contract, then the commanding 
officer is to apjioint a disinterested person, to meet one of tUe same de- 
scription to be appoirited by the contractor. These two, thus, appointed, 
will have power to decide on the equality of the provisions; but should 
tJiey disagree, then a third person is to be chosen l)y the two already ap- 
pointed, the whole to act under oath, and the opinion of the majority to 
be final in the case. 

JMlness, 



230 SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS, 



Form 27. 

Articles op Agreement made tlih day of , eighteen hun- 

dred and sixty- , between , Assistant Commissary of Subsistence 

in the service of the Confederate States of America, of the one part, and 
, of , in the State of , of the other part. 

This agreement witnessetli, That the said • , for and on behalf of the 
Confederate States of America, and the said , for himself, his heirs, 

executors and administrators, have mutually agreed, and by these presents 
do mutually covenant and agree, to and with each other, in the manner 
following, viz : 

Mrst. That the said shall deliver at , fresh beef, of a good 

and wholesome quality, in quarters, with an equal proportion of each, 
(necks and shanks to be excluded,) in such quantities as may be from 
time to time required for the troops, not exceeding thrice in each week, 
on such days as shall be designated by the Assistant Commissary of Sub- 
sistence. 

This contract to be in force for months, or such less time as the 

Commissary General may direct, commencing on the day of , 

eighteen hundred and sixty- . 

Second. The said shall receive cents and • mills per 

poinS^^fw; every pound of fresh ice/" delivered and accepted under this 
contiae-t. "• 

Third. Payment shall.be made monthly for the amount oC fresh 6«/ fur- 
nished iTnder this contract; but in the event of the Assistant Commissary 
of Subsistence being without funds, then payment to be made as soon af- 
ter as funds may be received for that purpose. • 

Fourth, ITliat wheiiever and as often as the beef specified to be issued 
by tliis contract shall, in the opinion of the commanding officer, be umfit . 
for issue, or of a quality inferior to that required by the contract, a survey 
shall be helii^hereon Jjy two oificers, to be designated by the commanding 
officer; and in case of disagreement, a third person shall be chosen by 
those two officers; the three thus appointed and chosen shall have power 
to reject such parts or the whole of the fresh beef as to them afipear unfit 
for issue, or of a quality inferior to that contracted for. 

Fifth._ That in case of failure or. deliciency in the quality or quantity of 
the fresh beef stipulated to be delivered, then the Assistant Commissary of 
Subsistence shall have power to supply the deficiency by purchase ; and 
the said will be charged with the difference of cost. 

In witness whereof, the undersigned have hereunto placed their hands 
and seals, the day and date above written. . 

Witness, 



SUBSIgTENCi DEPARTMENT — F0RM8. 231 



Form 28. 

Know ALL MEN BY THESE PRESKNTS : That wc, • ami , arc held 

and firmly bound to th<; Confederate States'of America in the sum of 
<lollars, lawfid money of the.Confederc^te States; for which payment well 
and truly to be made, we bind oursselves, and each of tij, our and each of 
our heirs, executors and administrators, for and in the whole, jointly and 
Beverally, firmly by these presents. 

Sealed witli our seals, dated the day of , in the year of our 

Lord eighteen Imndred and sixty- 

The nature of this obligation is such, That if the above bounden 
heirs, executors and administrators, or any of them, shall and do in all 
things well, and truly observe, perform, fulfill, accomplish and keep, all 
and sinijvjiar, the covenants, conditions and ageements whatsoever, which, 
on tlie jiait of the said , heirs, cxeotitors or administrators, are or 

ought to be observed, performed, fulfilled, accomplished and kept, coin- 
]irised or mentioned in certain articles of agreement or contract, bearing 
date ,-one thousand eiirht hundred and sixty- , between 

and the said • , concorning the sujiply and delivery of fresh beef to the 

troops at , or rations to recruits at , according to the true intent 

and meaning of the said articles of agraement or contract, then the above 
obligation to be void: otherwise to remain in full force and virtue. 

Witnesses. 



232 



SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. 





m 






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SUBSISTENCE DEPiJaTMKNT. 



233 



RATION TABLE 

Of Desiccated Potatoes, and Desiccated and Mixed Vegetables, from 1 to 
• "100,000. 



Desiccated Potatoes. 


Desiccated and Mixed Vegetables. 


No. 


• 


lbs. 


oz 


1 


No. 




lbs. 


oz 


1 










100 










100 


1 






1 


41 


1 




. 




88 


2 






2 


82 


2 






] 


76 


3 






4 


23 


3 






2 


64 


4 






5 


64 


4 






3 


52 


5 






7 


05 


5 






4 


40 


6 






8 


46 


6 






5 


28 


7 






9 


.87 


7 






6 


16 


8 






11 


28 


8 






7 


04 


m 9 






12 


69 


9 






7 


92 


•.10 






14 


10 


.10 






8 


80 


20 




Ijl2 


20 


20 




1 


1 


60 


30 




2,10 


30 


30 


« 


1 


10 


40 


40 




3 


8 


40 


40 




2 


3 


21 


50 




4 


G 


50 


50 




2 


14 


00 


60 




5' 4 


60 


60 




3 


4 


80 


70 




6 


2 


"70 


70 




3 


13 


60 


80 




7 





80 • 


80 




4 


6 


40 


OU 




' 7;i4 


90 


90 




4 


15 


20 


100 




813 00 


100 




5 


8 


00 


1,000 




88 2 00 


1.000 




55 


00 


00 


10,000 




88l| 41 00 


10,000 




550 


00 


00 


100,000 




8,812 


\ 8 


1 00 


1 100,000 




5,500 


00 


00 



234 



SUBSISTENGE DEP^-RTMENT. 



Table Showing the Quantity in Bulk or 




8UBBIOT1N0E DEPARTMENT. 



235 



any Number of Bations, from 1 io 100,000. 



COWKK. 


~ SCOAB. 


Vinegar. 


Candlks; 


Soap. , 


Salt. 


c 

§ 


O 


1 

-3 

.g 

o 


0) 

o 

B 
3 

o 


c 
_o 

Is 
O 


3 


in 
6 


m 

a 

3 

.• o 

fin 


o 

c 

3 

O 


-3 

c 

3 
O 
Pi 


u 
o 

B 
3 

o 


3 


5 

Of 


6 




0.96 
1.92 
2.88 




1.92 
3.«4 
5.76 






0.32 
0.6-1 
0.96 




0.24 
0.48 

0.72 




0.64 
1.28 
1.92 






0-16 
0.32 
0.4» 




3.84 




7.68 


• 




1.2S 




0.96 




.2.5« 






0.64 




4.80 




9.60 






1.60 




l.?0 




3.20 






0.80 




5.761 




11.52 






1.92 




1.44 




3.84 






0.»6 




6.72 




13.44 






2.24 




1.68 




4.48 






1.12 




7.68 




lO-.-ifi 






^.50 




1.92 




5.12 






1.28 




8.64 


1 


1.28 






2. 88 




2.16 




5.76 






1.44 




9.60 


1 


3.20 






3.20 




2.40 




6.40 






1.60 


•1 


3.20 


2 


6.40 






6.40 




4.80 




12.80 






3.20 


1 


12.80 


3 


,0.60 




1 


1.60 




7.20 


1 


3.20 






4.80 


2 


6.10 


4 


10.80 




1 


4.80 




9.G| 


1 


9.60 






6.40 


3 




6 






2 






12.(51 


2 








3 


9.60 


7 


3.20 




2 3.20 




14.40 


. 2' 6.40 






1.60 


4 


3.20 


8 


6.40 


. 


2 6.40 


1 


0.80 


2 12.80 






3.20 


4 


12.80 


9 


9.60 




3 1.60 


1 


3.20 


3 3.20 






4.80 


5 


6.40 


10 


12.8 




34.80 


1 


5.60 


3 9.60 






6.40 


6 




t.2 




1 






1 


• 800 


4 






2 




60 




120 




10 


, 




15 




40 






20 




600 




1,200 




100 






150 




400 




6 


8 




f.,000 




12,000 




1,000 


" 


1.500 




4,000 ■ 1 


62 


16 





236 MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

ARTICLE XLIII. 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1150. The Surgeon General is charged with the administrative details 
of the medical department, the government of hospitals, the regulation 
of the duties of surgeons and assistant surgeons, and the appointment 
of acting medical officers, when needed, for local or detached sei'vice. 
He will Tvssue orders and instructions relating to the professional duties 
of medical officers ; and all communications from them, which require 
his action, will. be made directly to him. • 

1151. Th« Medical Director of an army corgs will have the getieral 
control of the medical officers. 

1152. The Medical Director will inspect the hospitals" under his con- 
trol, and se^that the rules and regulations with regard to them and the 
duties of the surgeons and assistant surgeons are enforced. 

1153. He will examine the case books, prescription' and diet books, 
and ascertain the nature of diseases which may have prevailed, and 
their probable causes ; recommend the best method of prevention, and 
also make such suggestions relative to the situation, construction and 
economy of the hospitals, and to the police of the camps, as may appear 
necessary for the benefit and comfort of the sick, and the good of the 
service. 

1154. From the monthly reports of the medical officers of the com- 
mand (Form 1), he will make- to the Surgeon General a consolidated 
monthly report of the sick and wounded. 

1155. He will make to the Surgeon General a monthly return (Form 
2) of the medical oflBcers of the command. ^ 

1156. The Medical Purveyor will, under the direction of the Surgeon 
General, purchase all medical and hospital supplies required for the 
medical department o#the army. 

1157. Medical Purveyors will make to the Surgeon General, fit the 
end of each fiscal quarter, returns in duplicate (Form 3,) of medical 
supplies received, issued, .and remaining on hand, stating to whom, or 
from whom, and when and where issued or received. Other medical 
officers in charge of medical supplies will make similar returns semi- 
annually, on the 30th of June and the 31si of December ; and all medi- 
cal oflBcers will make them when relieved from the duty to which their 
returns relate. The returns will show the condition of the stores, and 
particularly of the instruments, bedding, and furniture. Medical pur- 
veyors will furnish abstracts of receipts and issues, with their returns, 
(Form 4). 

1158. Medical disbursing officers will, at the end of each fiscal quar- 
ter, render to %ie Surgeon General, in duplicate, a quarterly account 
current of moneys received and expanded, with the proper vouchers for 
the payments, and certificates that the services have been rendered and 
the supplies purchased and received for the medical service, and trans- 
mit to him an estimate of the funds required for the next quarter. 

1159. The medical supplies for the army are prescribed in the Stand- 
ard Supply Tables for Hospitals and Field Service. 

1160. Medical and hospitifl supplies will be obtained by making re- 
quisitions, in duplicate (Form 5), on the Surgeon General, forwarding 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 287 

them through the Medical Director of the command. If an army be in 
the field, and there be a Medical rurvcyor in charge of supplies, requi- 
sitions will be niade on him, after receiving the approval of the Medi- 
cal Dictator. Tlie quantities ou hand, of the articles wanted, must be 
stated in all requisitions. 

1161. When it is necessary to purchase medical sdpplies, those which 
are indiiipen.=!able may be procured by the quartermaster, if recourse 
cannot be had to a medical disbursing ofiicer, on a special requisition 
(Form 0), and account (Form 7). 

IIC'2. In everj case of special requisition, a duplicate of the requisi- 
tion shall, at the same time, be transmitted to the Surgeon General for 
Lis information. 

11G3. Au officer transferring medical supplies, will furnish a certified 
invoice to the officer who is to receive them, and transmit a duplicate 
of it to the Surgeon General. The receiving officer will transmit du- 
plicate receipts (specifying articles and quantitig^) to the Surgeon Gen- 
eral, witli a report of the quality and condition of the supplies, and re- 
port the same to the issifing officer. A medical officer who turns over 
medical supplies to a quartermaster for gtorage or transportation, will 
forward to the Surgeon General, with the iuvoicCj the quartermaster's 
receipts for the packages. 

1164. Medical officers will take up and account for all medical sup- 
■pVieif cf the army that come into their possession, and report, Avheu they 
know it, to whose. account they are to be ci*edited. 

1105. Medical supplies are not to be detained or diverted from their 
destination, except in cases of absolute necessity, by commanding gene- 
rals, who will propiptly report the circumstances to the Adjutant Gene- 
ral(Bthat orders may be given for supplying the deficiency ; and the 
medical office*!* receiving them will immediately report the fact to the 
Surgeon General : and, also, when practicable., notify the officer foi* 
whom they were intended. 

116j. In all official lists oT medical supplies, the articles will be en- 
tered in the order of the Supply TaLles. 

1167. Tiie senior medical officer of each post, regiment, or detach- 
ment, will, with the approbation of the commanding officer, select a 
suitable site for the erection of a hospital, or of hospital tents, 

1168. The senior medical officer of a hospital will distribute the pa- 
tients, according to convenience, and the nature of their complaints, 
into wards or divisions, under the particular cTiargo of the several assis- 
tant surgeons, and will visit them himself each day as frequently as the 
state of the sick may require, accompanied by the assistant, steward, 
and nurse. 

116'J. Ilis prescriptions of medicine and diet are to be written down 
at onco in tiie propgr book, with the name of the patient and the num- 
ber of his bed ; the assistants will fill up the diet table for the day, and 
direct the administration' of the prescribed medicines. lie will detail 
an assistant surgeon to'remain at the hospital day and night, when the 
state of the sick requires it. 

1170. In distributing the duties of his assistants, he will ordinarily 
require the aid of one in the care and preparation of the hospital re- 
ports, registers, and records, the rolls, and descriptive lists ; and of an- 
other, in the charge of the dispensary, instruments, medicines, hospital 



238 MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

expenditures, and the preparation of the requisition-? and annual re- 
turns. 

1171. Ho will enforce the proper hospital regulations to promote 
health and prevent contagion, by ventilated and not crowded rooms, 
scrupulous cleanliness, frequent, changes of bedding and linen, occa- 
sional refilling of the bed sacks and pillow ticks with fresh straw, reg- 
ularity in Eieals, attention to cooking, &c. 

.1172. Ho will cause to be printed, or written in a legible hand, and 
hung up in a conspicuous place in each ward, sucli rules and regula- 
tions as he may deem necessary for the guidance of the attendants, and 
the order, cleanliness, and convenience of the patients. 

1173. He will require tlie steward to take due care of the hospital 
stores and supplies; to enter in a book, daily, (Form 8), the issues to 
the wardmiisters, cooks, and nurses ; to prepare the provision returns, 
and receive and distribute ther rations. 

1174. He will require the wardmas-ter to take charge of the effects of 
the patients ; to register them in a bojk, (Form 9 ;) to have them num- 
bered and labeled witli the patient's name, ratik, and company ; to re- 
ceive from the steward tlie furniture, bedding, conking utensils, &e., 
for use, and keep a record of thert, (Form 10), and how distributed to 
the wards and kitchens, and once a week to take an inventory of the 
articles in use, and report to him any loss or damage to them, and to 
return to the steward such as are not required for use. 

1175. Assistant Surgeons will obey the uruors of their senior surgeon, 
see that subordinate officers do their duty, and aid in enforcing the reg- 
ulations of the hospital. 

117G. The cooks and nurses are under the orders of iha steward. 
Ho is responsible for the cleanliness of the wards and kitchens, patients 
and attendants, and all articles in use. He will ascertain 'who are pre- 
sent at sunrise tind simset, and tattoo, and report absentees. 

1177. At surgeon's call tlie sick then in the companies will be con- 
ducted to the hospital by the first sergeants, who'will each hand to'the 
Surgeon, in his company book, a list ot all the sick of the company, on 
which the surgeon shall state who are to remain or go into the hospital ; 
who are to return to quarters as sick or convalescent; what duties the 
convalescents in quarters are capable of ; what cases are feigned; and 
any other information in regard to the sick of the company, he may 
have to communicate to the company commander. 

1178. Soldiers in hospital, patients or attendants, except stewards, 
shall be mustered on the rolls of their company, if it be'.present at the 
post. 

1179. When a soldier in hospital is detached from his company so as 
not to be mustered with it for pay, his company commander^shall cer- 
tify and send to the hospital his descriptive list, and,account of pay and 
clothing, containing all necessary information relating- to his accounts 
with the Confederate States, on which^the surgeon :'eh,all enter all pay- 
ments, stoppages, and issues of clothing to him in hospital. When he 
leaves the hospital, the medical officer shall certify and remit hiff de- 
scriptive list, showing the state of his accounts. If he is discharged 
from the servicejn hospital, the surgeon shall make out his final state- 
ments forjpay and clothing. If he diesjn hospital, the^ surgeon shall 



MEDICAL DEPAETMENT. 289 

take charge of his effects, -and make the reports required in the general 
regulations concerning soldiers who die absent from their companies. 

1180. Patients in hospital are, if possible, to leave their arms and 
accoutrements with their companies, and in no case to take ammunition 
into the hospital. 

1181. When a patient is transferred from one hospital to another, tho 
medical officer sliiill send with him an account of his case, and the treat- 
ment. ■ . 

1182. The regulations fur the. service of hospitals apply, as far as 
practicable, to the medical service in the field. 

1183. In the field, the senior medical officer will inspect camps, and 
urge the enforcement of stringent rules of police. 

1184. The senior medical officer oi each- hospital, post, regiment, or 
detachment, will keep the following records, and deliver them to his 
successor : A register of patients, (Form 11;) a prescription and diet 
book, (Form 12 ;) a case book ; copies of his requisitions, returns of pro- 
perty, and reports of sick and wounded ; and an^rder and letter book, 
in which will be transcribed all orders and letters relating to his duties. 

1185. lie will make the muster and pay rolls of the hospital steward 
and laundress, and of all soldiers in hospital, sick or on duty, de- 
tached from their companies,' on the.furms furnished from the Adjutant 
and Inspector-General's oflBce, and according to the directions expressed 
on them. 

1180. The ejtra pay allowed to soldiers acting as cooks and nurses in 
hospitals, will be paid by the Quartermaster Department, tho extra ser- 
vice being noted on the hospital muster rolls. 

1187. The senior medical oflBcer will select the cooks, nurses, and 
laui^resses, with the approval of the commanding officer. Cooks and 
nurses, taken from the privates, will be exempt from other duty, but shall 
attend the parades for muster and weekly inspection of their companies 
at the post, unless specially excused by the commanding offi(!er. They 
will not be removed except for misdemeanor, and at the request of the 
medical officer, unless in cases of urgent necessity, and then only by the 
order *>f the commanding officer. 

1188. Cooks and nurses, other than enlisted men or volunteers, are 
subject to military contrull They will be paid on the hospital muster 
rolls, by the (Quartermaster Department, at the rates at which thcyjiave 
been engaged, which, in no case, will exceed $18.50 per month, being 
the pay proper of an enlisted man, together viith extra pay allowed in 
paragraph 1186. They should not be employed for a less period than a 
calendar month. 

1189. Ordinarily, hospital attendants are allowed as follows: To a 
general hosnital, one steward, one nurse as wardmaster, one nurse to 
ten patients, one laundress to twenty, and one cook to thirty ; to a hos- 
pital where tho pvmmand exceeds five companies, one steward and 
wardmaster, one cook, two laundresses, and four nurses ; to a post or 
garrison of one company, one steward and wardmaster, one nurse, one 
cook, and one' laundress ; and for every two companies more, one 
nurse ; at arsenals, wh'ere the number of enlisted men is not less than four- 
teen, one laundress is allowed. The allowance of hospital attendants on 
the field wilhbe, for commands of one company and Jiot exceeding five, one 
Bteward, one cook, and for each company, one nurse; for regiments, or 



$i40 MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

commands of over five companies, one steward, two cooks, and for each 
company, one nnrse. 

1190. Medical officers, vv'here on duty, will attend the officers and en- 
listed men, and the laundress authorized by law ; and at stations where 
other medical attendance cannot be procured, and on marches, the hired 
men of the army.' Medicines will be dispensed to the families of offi- 
cers and soldiers, and to all persons entitled to medical attendance ; 
hospital stores to enlisted men. 

1191. Medical officers, in giving certificates of disability, (Form 13,) 
are to take particular care in all cases that have not been under their 
char.ge ; and especially in epilepsy, convulsions, chronic rheumatism, 
derangement of the urinary organs opthalmia, ulcers, or any obscure 
disease, liable to be feigned" or purposely produced ; and in no case 
shall such certificate be given until after sufficient time and examination 
to detect any attempt at deception. 

1192. In passing a recruit, the medical officer is to examine him 
stripped; to see that fte has free use of his limbs; that his chest is 
ample ; that his hearing, vision, and speech are perfect; that he has no 
tumors, or ulcerated or extensively cicatrized legs ; no rupture, or 
chronic cutaneous aifection ; that he has not received any cintusion, or 
wound of the head, that may impair his faculties; that he is not a 
drunkard ; is not subject to convulsions, and has no infectious disorder, 
nor any other that may unfit him for military service. 

1193. Medical officers attending recruiting rendezvous will keep a 
record (Form 14) of all the recruits examined by them. Books for thia 
purpose will be procured by application to the Surgeon General, to 
whom they will be returned when filled. 

1194. As soon as a recruit joins any regiment or station, he shall be 
examined by the medical officer, and vaccinated when it is required. 

1195. The senior medical officer of each hospital, post, regiment, or 
detachment, will make monthly to the Medical Director, and quarterly 
to the Surgeon General, a report of sick and wounded, and of deaths, 
and of discharges for disability, (Form 1 ;) and transmit to th-e Surgeon 
General a copy of the Monthly Statement of the Hospital Fund, (Form 19.) 

119G. After surgeon's call, he will make a morning report of the sick 
to tlie commanding officer, (Form 15.) 

1197. Every medical officer will report to the Surgeon General and 
to the Medical Director, the date when he arrives at a station, or when 
he leaves it, and his ordefe in the case, and at the end of each month, 
whenever not at his station, whether on service or on leave of absence ; 
and when on leave of absence, his post-office address for the next month. 

1198. They will promptly acknowledge the receipt of all orders re- 
lating to their movements ; and in all official communicatiops, when at 
stations the positions of which are not well known, they will state the 
nearest post-office. 

1199. When it is necessary to employ a private physician as medical 
officer, the Medical Director, or if circumstances preclude reference to. 
him, the commanding officer, may execute a written contract, (notifying 
the Medical Director,) conditioned as in Form 16, at a stated compensa- 
tion, not to exceed $50 a month when the number of officers and men, 
with authorized laundresses, is 100 or- more; 3^40 when it is from 50 to 
100, and $30 when it is under. 50. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 241 

1200. But when he is required to Jliaridon his own business, and give 
his whole time to ti^e public service, the contract may be not to exceed 
$80 a month ; anonot to exceed $100, besides transportation in kind, to 
be furnished by tlie Quartermaster's Department, where be is required 
to accompany troops on marclies or transports. But a private physician 
will not be employed to nccnmpany troops oi; marches or transports, ex- 
cept by orders from the War Department, -or, in particular and urgent 
cases, by the order of the officer directing the movement. 

1201. And wlien a private physician is required to furnish medicines, 
he will be paid in addition from 25 to 50 per cent., to be determined jDy 
the Surgeon General, on tlie amount allowed by contract. 

1202. In all cases, a duplicate of the contract, with a particular 
statement of the circumstances which make it necessary, appended, 
will be transmitted forthwith to the Surgeon General for approval ; and 
the commanding officer for the time being will at once discontinue it, 
whenever the necessity for it ceases, or the Surgeon. General may so 
direct. 

1203. The physician's account of pay due must be sent to the Surgeon 
General for payment, vouched by the certificate of the commanding 
officer, that it is correct and agreeable to contract, and that the services 
have been duly rendered. But on the frontier or in the field, when it 
cannot conveniently be submitted to the Surgeon General, the contract 
having already received his ajiproval, tlie account may be paid on the 
order of the commanding ott'cer, not to exceed the regulated amount, 
by a Quartermaster or a medical dislmrsing officer. 

120^. Private physicians, employed by contract, will conform to the 
regulati^s, and accordingly will keep all the records, and make the 
reports, requisitions, and returns required from medical officers. 

1205. Wlien medical attendance is required by otficers or enlisted 
men on service, and the attendance of a medical officer cannot be had, 
the officer, or if there be nti officer, then the enlisted man, may employ 
a private physician, and a just account therefor will be paid by the 
Medical Bureau. 

1200. The accftiint will set out the name of the patient, the date of 
and chargii foj* each visit, and for medicines. The physician will make 
a ccirtificate to tlje account in c;ise of anotloer, or atf davit in case of an 
enlisted man, that the acccunt is correct, and the charges are the cus- 
tomary charges of the place. 

1207. The officer will make hi§ certificate, or. the enlisted man his af- 
fidavit, to the correctness of the account, that he was on service at the 
place, and stating the circumstances preventing him from receiving the 
services of a medical officer. 

1208. When the Charge is against an officer, he will pay the account 
if practicable, and transmit it to the Medical Bureau for reimbursement. 
In all other cases, the account will be transmitted to the Medical Bu- 
reau for s^tlement. 

1209. If the charge is against a deceased officer or enlisted man, the 
physician will make the affidavit, before required, to the account, and 
that ho ha3j)een paW no part of it. 

1210. No charges for .-onsultatiori fees will bo paid by the Medical 
Bureau ; nor will any accoiAit for medical attendance or medicines be 
raid, if the officer or enlisted man be not on service. 

11 



242 MEDICAL DEPART ?! I El^T. 

• 

1211. A hoard of not less than three meiiical officers atHI be nppornicel 
from time to time, by the Secretary of War, to examine api^licajits for 
appointment of assistant surgeons in the regular army," and assistant 
surgeons for promotion. And no one sh^Il be so appointed or promo- 
ted until so exauiined and found qualifieil. 

2212. The board will scrutinize rigidly the moral habits, professional 
acquirements, and physical qualificatioas of the candidajes, and report 
favorably, either for appointment or promotion, in bo case admitting of 
a reasonable doubt. 

1213. The Secretary of War will designate the applicants to be es- 
aniined for apfiointment of assistant surgeon. They must be between 
21 and 25 years of age. Tlie board will' report their respective n.erits 
in the several branches of the examination, i>nd their relative merit 
from tlie wliole ; agreeably whereto, if vacancies happen within two 
years thereafter, they will rsceive appointments and take rank in the 
medical cnrps. 

1214. AVhen an assistant sura^on has served five years, he is subjccfe 
to be examined f<ir promotion. If lie decline the examination, or be 
found not qualified by moral habits or professional acc^uiremeuts, he 
ceases to be a medical otlicei' of the army. 

1215. An applicant for appointment failing at one examination, may 
be alliiwed a second after two years ; but never a third. 

1216. The Secretary of AVar will app<jint, on the recommendation of 
the Surgeim General, from the enlisted n>en of ths army, &r e.vuse to 
be enlisted, as many competent hospital steward's as the service may 
require. • 

1217. The senior medical officer of a command requiring a steward, 
may recommend a competent non-commissioned officer or soldier to be 
appointed, which recnmmendation the son>v»and!ng officer shall forward 
to the Atljutant and Inspector-General of the Army, with his remarks 
thereon, and with the remarks of the company ciimmander. 

1218. When no competent enlisted man can be pl-oeured, the medical 
officer will raport the fact to the Surgeon General. Applications and 
testimonials of competency, frt^n persons seeking tsbe enlisted for hos- 
pital stewards, may be addressed to the Surgeon GeneraF. 

1219. The commanding officer may reenlist a bi.spital steward at the 
expiration of liis term of service, on the recommendation of the medicai 
officer. 

1220. No soldier,- or citizen, will be recommended for appointment 
who is not khdtaii to be temperate, himest, and in every way reliable, as* 
well as sufficiently intellil^^mt, and skilled in pharmacy, f-or the propep- 
discharge of the responsible diuies likely to be*devolved upon him. 
Until this is knoiim, he wiil be appoint«d an acting steward by the med- 
ical officer, with the approval of the commanding officer, and will be 
entitled to the pay and allowances of hospital steward. 

1221. Hospital stewards, appointed by the Secretary of War, when- 
ever stationed in pl.aces whence r>o post return is made to the Adju- 
tant General's office, or when on furlough, will, •at the er.d of every 
month, report themselves, by letter, to the Adjutant General and Sur- 
geon General, as well' as to the Medical Director of the military depart- 
ment in which they may be serving ; to each of whom they will also 
report each now assignment to duty, or change of station, ordered iu 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



243 



t'hcir caso, noli!i>;; carefully the mini1>er, tlnte, and source of tlie ort5er 
<lirectin<; the same. Th«y wiii likewise repoi-t monthly, when on far- 
loapih, tu the medical officer in charge of the hospital to which tliey are 
attfiched, 

1222. The jurisdiction and rruthority of courts martial are the same 
■with reference to hospital stewards as in the c*''.ses of other enlisted men. 
When, hovrovcr, .a llt)spital steward is sentenced hy an inferior court to 
lie reduced to tlie ranks, such sentence, thouiih it may he approved by 
the reviewing; offii-er, will not he carried into effect until the case has 
been referred to the Secretary of War for final action. In these cases 
<if reduction, the application of the aiavM fov dischar<»;e from service, 
I'liou-^li not r-e^'ojrni^ed as of ri^ht, will f^enerally he rejiarded with 
favor,. if his offence has not hcen of too serious a nature, and especiallj 
>vhpn lie h IS not been recently promoted from the ranks. 

^22o. As the hospital stewards, appointed by the iSecretary of AVar, 
are permanently attache^i to tii« Medical Department, th-eir acrcounts of 
pay, ciothiiifi, &c., must be kept Ivy the meiiical iffi 'Crs under who.se 
jnunodiate tlirci'tion they arc servinjj, who are also r»'sponsil)le for (Cer- 
tified statem-etUs of .such accounts, and cornectr de<?criptivo lists of such 
stewanls, to accom|)any them in case of transfer ; as, also, that theii; 
final statements and certificates of dischar<;e are accuratelj made out;, 
■ftJirn tlicv arc at length discharged £r^.m ser.viae- 



*{4 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Standard Supply Table for General and Post Hospitals. 

[In General Hospitals, detached from trcvops, the supplies for eVery 100 
»ick will cosresptiiid with the rsllowance to csmmands of 500 men.] 



MEDICINES. 

AcacisE, ... lb. 

Acidi aceticij - - - ib. 

'• arseniosf, - - oz. 

" benzoici, - - oz. 

. "■ citricir - - - lb. 

" imiriatici, - - l'>. 

'• nitrici, - , - - lb. 

" sulphurjci, - - lb. 

" ' " aromatici, - lb. 

•' tannici, -. - - oz. 

" trtrtarii-i, - ~ - lb. 

Aetlievis sulpliurici loti, -. lb. 

Alcoliolis, - - - bott. 

.Al4MMini.<j ... lb. 

Atnmnniaci, ... )b. 

AnimonisB carbonatis, - - oz. 

" muriatis, - - lb. 

Antflemidjs, - - - Ibv 

Anrrmonii et pota=s._ tartrates, - ©z. 

Argenti nitratis, (crystals,) - oz. 

" " (fused,) - oz. 

ArnrcsB, ... lb.. 
Assafceditse, - - - . oz. 

Eisiniitlii subiiitratis, - - oz. 

Caiiiipliorse," ... lb. 

Ciirdainomi, - . . . • oz. 

fiitoclni, ... IK 
Cerese albas* - - - . lb. 

Cerati resiiKE, - - - lb. 

" sjnaplrcjs, - - lb. 

" zinci carbonatis, - lb. 

Cliloriformi, ... lb. 

Collodii, . - - oz. 

CopfeibtE, - . - lb» 

Creasoti, • - - - oz. 

Cretae preparatse, - - lb. 

Cuini sulphatis, - - oz. 



Quantities for one year for 
comniiinds ef 



From 

100 to 
200 



From 'From 

200 to 300 to 

300 400 



500 
men. 



2 
h 

I 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

2 

2 

• 2 

24' 

1 

8 

i 

1 

1 
1 
1 

4 

4 



4 
1 

2 
2 
1 
2 

2 
2 
4 
4 
4 
48 
2 

IG 
1 

2 
6 
2 
2 



4 

IG 

1 

4 

4 

IG 

4 

2 

1 

10 

•i 



6 


8 




2 
3 


4 


3 


4 


2 
•3 


2^ 
4 


3 


4 


3 


4 


G 


8 


G 


8 


6 


8 


7-2 


9G 


3 


4 


2 
24 


3-2 


2 
3 


2i 
4 





12 


3 


4 


3 


4 


3 


4 


12 
12 


If, 
fG 


G 


s 


24 


32 


2 
G 


8 


G 


8 


24 


32 


G 


8 


3 


4 


6 


8 


15 


20 


6 


8 


3 


4 


G 


S 



* To be issued to posts where simple cerate cannot be sent without be 
oo-ming rancid. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



245 



Supply Table for Hospitals — Continued. 



Quantities for one year for 
commands of 



Si-om From 
lOOtoj-iOOto 
•200 ! 300 



From I 

300 to 

400 



500 



Emplastri adlisosivi, 

" cantliaradis, 

" feiri, 

" hyilraiftyri, 

" iilii'ocolla;, 
Extiacti li^Iladonnse, 

" buclm fiiiiili, 

" colocyntliidis, oomp. 

" colomba; liuidi, 

" C(')nii, 

" cnbebii- flnidi, 

" gentiann^ liuidi, 

" plycyrrtiizEe, 

" hyoscyaini, 

" ijiccaciianlise flnidi, 

" piperisi^nidi, 

" pnmi virjr. (luidi, - ' 

" rliei (luidi. 

" sarsapaiill:i> liuidi, 

" senc^t^iiiiii, 

"• scnnreVuidi, 

" tara"xaci flnidi, 

" valeriann; flnidi, -' 

" zingiberi^ flnidi, 

'crri iodidi, ... 
" et quiiiiae citratis, 
" sulphatis, 
Gambogia;, 

Glycerine, ... 
Gimiaci re?in;r, 
Hydrargyri chloridi. corr: 

" " initis, 

•' cum rreta, 

" iodidi, - •. 

" oxidi rubri, 

lodinii, - •■ 

Lini, 
Liquoris ammonirr, - 

" ferri iodidi, - 
■*' potass ; arscnitis, 

" soil.e clilorinattp, 

" Kinci cbJoridi, 
Magneiia», 



yds. 

lb. 

lb. 

II) 
yd.. 

oz. 

Jb. 
oz. 

lb. 

oz. 

Jb. 

lb. 

lb. 
oz. 

lb. 
oz. 

lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

lb. 
lb. 

lb. 
oz. 

lb. 

oz. 
oz. 
oz. 
oz. 
oz. 
lb. 
oz. 

lb. 

lb. 

oz. 

oz. 

oz. 

Jb. 

lb. 

lb. 

oz. 

Ijott. 

bolt. 

lb 



10 
6 
2 

I 
6 
4 

o 
t^ 

16 



12 
4 
1 
2 



4 

1 
2 
2 

in 
1 

4 
8 
4 
1 
t 
1 
1 
2 
1 
o 

2 
4 



4 
6 

1 



15 
9 
3 
2 
9 
6 
3 

24 
3 

. 3 
3 
3 

18 
G 
2 
3 
3 
3 
6 
2 
3 
3 

24 
2 

6 

12 



20 
12 

4 

2i 
12 

8 

4 
32 

4 

4 

4 

4 
24 

8 

4 

4 

4 
8 

n 

4 

4- 

32 

8 
IG 

8 

2i 

■8 

2i 

2i 

4 

2i 

4 

4 

8 
16 
16 

4 

8 

12 

2J 



246 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Supply Table for Hospitals — Contibued. 







Quantities for one year 


for 


ARTICLES. 






commiuids 


of 
















From From From 
■ ■ 100 to 200 tcfl 300 to 


500 


.100& 






200 1 


300 1 


400 1 


men 


men 


MagnesiEBSwlphntis, . 


lb. 


■25 


50 


1 
7.5 


00 


2 GO 


Massee pil: liydrargi, . 


QZ. 


8 


16 


24 


33 


64 


Mel lis (lespumati, 


lb. 


2 


4 


6 


S 


16 


Mor[)lii8e siilphatis, 


dr. 


2 


4 


6 


8 


16 


Myrrlise, . . _ . 


lb. 


I 


1 


o 


f 


r> 


Olei anisi^ 


oz. 


1 


2 


3 


8 


"■ ciljnpnti, 


oz. 


1 


2 


5 


4 


8 


" caryopliilli, 


oz. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


■ 8 


•' ciniiainomi, 


oz. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


S 


" m.entlisB pipefitEB, 


oz. 


2 


4 


6 


8 


16 


" .moriliuse, 


bott. 


8 


16 


24 


32 


61 


" olivffi, 


bott. 


S 


16 


•24 


32 


64 


" origani-, . 


dr. 


4 


8 


12 


16 


32 


" ricini. 


qt. bott. ■ 


12 


24 


."6- 


48 


96 


" terebinthinEE, 


qt. bott. 


. 4 


8 


12 


16 


32 


" tiglii, . 


dr. 


2 


4 


w 


8 


16 


Opii, 


lb. 


\ 


1 


2 


2i 


5 


Plseis abietis, . 


lb. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


8 


Plunibi acetatis, 


U>. 


1 


•T 


3 


4 


8 


Pota^sn? acetatis. 


lb. 


1 


2 


4 


4 


8 


■•' bivarbnnatis, . 


lb. 


I 


2 


3 


4 


8 


" biiartratis, 


lb. 


2 


4 1 6 


8 


16, 


" chldiati?, 


lb. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


S 


" nitratis, 


lb. 


I 


2 


3 


4 


s 


" , suiphatis, 


lb. 


\ 


1 


2 


2^ 


5 


Potassii cyanureti, 


dr. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


8. 


"■ iodidi, 


oz. 


S 


16 


24 


32 


6!) 


Ptuni virgiiiianw, 


\h. 


4i 


1 


2 


n 


5 


Pulveris ncaciaj, 


lb. 


2 


4- 


6 


s 


16 


" nlxjcs, 


oz. 


4 


8 


12 


16 


32 


'= cantharidis, . 


(Z. 


2 


4 


6 


S 


16 


" caijsici, ■ 


lb 


i 


2- 


3 


4 


O 


" * cinchontB. 


lb. 


1 


.2 


3 


4 


8 


" ferri, 


oz. 


2 


•4 


6 


8 


16. 


« '• per siilpliatis, 


oz. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


S 


" glycyrrhiztE, . 


oz. 


4 


8 


12 


16 


32 


" ipecaciianhtE, . 


lb. 


h 


1 


2 


2| 


■ 7> 


'f '• et opii, 


lb. 


^ 


1' 


2 


2i 


5 


" jalapsc, 


oz. 


4 


8 


12 


16 


32 


" lini^, . 


lb. 


8 


16 


24 


32. 


6-i 


" opii, 


lb. 


* 


1 


o 


2.^ 


5 


" rhei, - 


!b. 


A 

4 


1 


1 


1 


3 


" sfkbinsE, 


o^z. 


1, 


o 


3 


4 


in 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



247 



Supply Table for 


Hospita Is — Con tl n u 


ed. 










Qnantities for one year for 


ARTICLES. 

• 




commands of 






From 


From 


From 


500 


1000 


• 




100 to 


200 to 


300 to 










200 


300 


400 


men 


men 


Piilvciis sinHpis nigra?, 


lb. 


G 


12 


IS 


24 


48 


" ulmi, 


lb. 


2 


4 


G 


8 


16 


Qiiassice, ... 


lb. 


1 


1 


2 


2i 


5 


Quinire sulpbatis, 


07.. 


10-20 


20-40 


30-60 


40-80 


80-160 


Rhei, .... 


oz. 


4 


8 


12 


16 


^32 


Saccliari, 


lb. 


20 


40 


60 


80 


160 


Sapoiiis, ... 


lb 


■1 


S 


12 


IG 


32 


Scillas, - - - 


oz. 


4 


s 


12 


16 


32 


Serjientarift, 


lb. 


h 




2 


2^ 


5 


Sod;c hicarbonatis. 


lb. 


Q 




6 


8 


16 • 


"• borati?, 


lb. 


\ 




2 


2i 


5 


'• et potass : tartratis. 


lb. 


\ 




9 


12 


24 


Speigeli;c, 


lb. 


h 




2 


n 


5 


Spii Jills ammoii: aromatioi. 


07.. 


2 




G 


S 


IG 


'' ajlheiis compositi. 


lb. 


I 




2 


n 


5 


" •' nitrici, 


lb. 


2 




6 


8 


16 


" lavandulas conip : 


lb. 


h 




2 


n 


5 


" villi gallaci 


boti. 


12 


24 


36 


48 


9G 


Strychnia; 


dr. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


8 


Sulphnris loti, - 


lb. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


8 


Syrnpi scilhp, - 


lb. 


3 


G 


9 


12 


24 


Tincture aconiti radicis, 


lb. 


1 


2 


• 3 


4 


8 


" digitalis, 


oz. 


4 


8 


12 


16 


32 


" ergotii' (Dublin), 


oz. 


4 


8 


12 


16 


32 


" ferri chloridi, 


lb. 


h 


1 


2 


n 


5 


" veratri vcridis, 


oz. 


4 


" 8 


'l2 


.16 


32 


Unguenti liydrar;,'yri, ^ 


lb. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


8 


" " nitratis, - 


lb. 


i 


1 


2 


n 


f) 


Veratriic, ... 


dr. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


8 


Vini colchici scminis, - 


lb. 


h 


I 


2 


n 


5 


Zinci acetatis, - 


oz. 


i 


2 


3 


4 


8 


" chlorid, - 


oz. 


1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


" sulphati?, 


oz. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


S 


IXSTRUMBNT8. 




' 










AmputalKig, - . - 


sets. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


o 


Ball forceps, 


no. 


1 - 


1 


1 


1 


2 


Bougies, gunielastic, (1 to 12) - 


no. 


G 


G 


G 


6 


6 


" metallic, (assorted.) - 


no. 


G 


6 


G 


6 


6 


Buck's spoMgoliolder for the iliroat 


, no. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Catheiors, gumelastic, (2 to 10,) 


no. 


6 


G 


G 


6 


ft 


silver, (3, 6, y.) 


no. 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



248 



MEDICAL DEPAKTMUNT. 



Suppli/ Table for 


Hospitals — Continued. 










Quantities 


for one year 


for 


ABTICLES. 






commauds 


of 








« 






" 






From 
100 to 


From 
200 to 


From 
300^0 


500 


1000 






200 


300 


400 


men 


men 


Cathe'tors, cases, 


no. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Cupping glasses, or tins, 


no. 


12 


12 


18 


18 


24 


Dissecting, 


sets. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Lancets, spring,* 


no. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


" thumb,! 


no. 


2 


2 


3 


4 


6 


Needles, surgeons', with pases. 


no. 


6 


6 


6 


6 


12 


Obstetrical, 


sets. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Pocket, - 


sets. 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


Prabungs, 


no. 


6 


6 


6 


'6 


6 


Pulleys, ... 


sets. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Scarificators, . . - 


no. 


2 


2 


2 


3 


4 


Splints, (assorted.) 


sets. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


Stethescopes, . - - 


no. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Stomach-pump and case, 


no. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Syringe, enema, J 


no. 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


" penis, glass. 


no. 


2 


4 


6 


8 


16 


" " rrietallic, 


no. 


6 


12 


18 


24 


36 


" vagina,|| 


no. 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


Teeth extracting, 


sets. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


Tongue depressor, (hinge,) 


no. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


o 


Tourniquets, field, 


no. 


4 


4 


6 


6 


lO 


" spiral. 


no. 


1 


1 


2 


2 


4 


Trepanning, 


sets, 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Trocars, (1 smalll,) 


no. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


Trusses, hernia, 


no. 


3 


6 


9 


l2 


24 


BOOKS. 






• 








Anatomy, 


cop. 








1 




Chemistry, . . - 


cop. 








1 




Dispensatory, - - ^ - 


cop. 








1 




Medical Dictionary, " - * - 


cop. 








1 




" Formulary, 


cop. 








1 




. " Jurisprudence and Toxicol- 












ogy, 


cop. 








1 




" Practice, 


cop. 








1 




Obstetrics, 


cop. 








1 




Regulations for Med. Dept." 


cop. 








2 


2 


Surgery, 


cop. 








1 


1 


Blank, . - - - 


cop. 


2 


2 


2 


3 


4 



* Four extra fleams to each lancet. "I" With cases. 
, 1, 8 07.. II 1 hard India Rubber; 2 glass. 



I 1 Davidson's j 1, 4 



MEDICAL DEPAETMENT. 



249 



Supphj Table for 


HospiMs — Continu 


ed. 










Quantities for one year for 


ARTICLES. 






commands of 
















From 
100 to 


From 
200 to 


From 
300 to 


500 


1000 






200 


300 


400 


men 


men. 


Case, - 


no. 


1 


1 


1 


^ 


1 


Order and Letter,- 


no. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Prescriplion, - 


no. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Register, 


no. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Requisitions, ^ 














Returns, > 


no. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Reports of sick, ) 








» 






HOSPITAL STORES. 














Arrow root, 


lb. 


.O 


10 


15 


20 


40 


Barley, 


lb. 


20 


40 


60 


«eo 


160 


Cinnamon, ■ - - 


lb. 


h 


1 


2 


2i 


5 


Cloves, 


07.. 


4 


8 


12 


16 


32 


Cocoa, - - " - 


lb. 


10 


20 


30 


40 


80 


Farina, - - - 


lb. 


5 


10 


15 


20 


40 


Ginger, ground, (Jamaica,) 


lb. 


i 


1 


2 


2i 


. 5 


Nutmegs, 


oz. 


4 


8 


12 


16 


32 


Tea, - - . . 


lb. 


20 


40 


60 


80 


160 


Whiskey, bottles of, - 


doz. 


2 


4 


6 


8 


16 


Wine, bottles of, 


doz. 


2 


4 


■6 


S 


16 


BEDDINO. 














Bed sacks, 


no. 


10 


20 


30 


40 


SO 


Bedsteads, iron, 


no. 


6-10 


12-20 


18-30 


24-40 


48-86 


Blankets, woollen. 


no. 


10-20 


20-40:30-60 


40-80 


80-1 60 


Coverlets, 


no. 


10 


20 30 


40 


80 


Gutta perchar cloth. 


yds. 


4 


6 8 


10 


16 


Mattresses, - • - 


no. 


2 


4 


6 


S 


16 


Alosquito bars, 


no. 


6-10 


12-20 


18-30 


24-40 


48-80 


Pillow cases, * - 


no. 


25 


50 


75 


100 


200 


flcks, 


no. 


IQ 


20 


30 


40 


80 


Sheets, 


no. 


40 


80 


120 


200 


400 


FiniNITnRB, DRESSING, AC. 












* 


Bandages, suspensory,* 


no. 


4 


8 


12 


16 


33 


Binder's boards, f 


no. 


4 


6 


8 


12 


16 


Corks, assorted. 


doz. 


12 


24 


36 


48 


96 


Cork screws, - 


no. 


1 


1 


2 


2 


8 



•Assorted, f 18 inches by 4, 



250 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Supply Table for Hospitals — Continued. 



•Cotton batting, 

" wadding, 
Flannel, red, 
Funnels, glass, 

" tin, 

Hatchets, 

Hones, (in wood,)* 
Ink powder. 
Inkstands, 

Linen, - - - . 

Lint, - - 

Measures, graduated, - 

" tin)' - 

Medicine cups and glas%es,f - 
Mills, cotlee, - 
Mortars and pestles, glass, 
" " " iron, 

" " " wedgevvood, 

Muslin, ■ - 

JVeedles, sewing. 
Oiled silkj or gutta perclia tissue, or 

India rubber tissue, - 
Pans, bed, ... 

Paper envelopes, J 
Paper, filtering, 
wrapping 

" writing,|| 
Pencils, hair, 
•' lead. 
Pens, steel. 
Pillboxes, - - 

" machine. 
Pins, assorted, - 
Quills, 

Rain guages, ... 
Razors, 

" strojis, ... 
Scales and weights, apothecary's, 

" " '• shop. 



■ lb. 
lb. 

yds. 

no. 

no. 

no. 

no. 
papers. 

no. 
yds. 

lb. 

no. 
sets. 

no. 



no. 
no. 
no. 
no. 
yds. 
no. 



yds. 

no. 

no. 

quires. 

quires. 

quires. 

no. 

no. 

doz. 

papers. 

no. 

papers. 

no. 

no. 

no. 

no. 

sets. 

sets. 



Quantities for one year for 
commands of 



From 


From 


From 


500 


100 to 


200 to 


300 to 


200 


300 


400 


men 


1 


2 


3 


4 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


10 


15 


20 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


.2 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


5 


5 


10 


15 


20 


4 


6 


8 


10 


3 


3 


4 


G 


1 


[ 


1 


1 


3 


G 


9 


12 


2 


2 


2 


3 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


25 


50 


75 


100 


25 


25 


25 


25 


4 


6 


6 


8 


2 


2 


3 


4 


100 


125 


150 


200 


h 


1 


2 


2 


lo 


12 


15 


15 


12 


20 


20 


20 


12 


18 


24 * 


30 


G 


8 


10 


12 


2 


3 . 


3 


4 


3 


G 


9 


12 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


4 


G 


8» 


25 


25 


50 


50 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 



*4 inches by 1. "^'2 cups to 1 glass. J Assorted, 3 sizes — "Official 
bnsmess" printed on each. || Foolscap, letter and note — white; blue ruled. 



MEDICAL DErARTMENT. 



251 



Supply Table for. E6spilah—Cor\t\naed. 



Articlrs. 



Quantities for one year for 
commands of 



Scissors, 


no. 


2 


Sheep skin;;, dressed, . 


no. 


4 


Silk, suffrcons", 


oz. 


i 


" greeji, 


yds. 


. * 


Spatulas, 


-.no. 


3- 


Spoiifre, 


lb. 


^ 


Tnpe,% . 


pieoes. 


< 


Thermometers and hydromete 


rs, no. 


2 


Thermometers, 


no. 


1 


ThreacP, linen, 


07.. 


4 


Tiles, . 


no. 


2 


Tow, 


lb. 


1 


Towels, . . • 


no. 


20 


Twine, 


lb. 


1 


Urinals, 


no. 


2 


Vials, assorted, 


do7,. 


■6 


Wafers, (i oz. boxes.) . 


no. 


1 


Wax, sealing, . 


sticks. 


3 



From j From 

ion to 200 to 

200 I 300 



1 
4 
3 
2 

30- 
1 
3 

12 
1 
3 



12 
2 

1 
6 
3 
2 

r)0 

n 



500 


1000 


men 


men 


3 


4 


10 


12 


J 


1. 


n: 


5 


'3 


12 


J 


1 


10 


32 


2 


2 


1 


1 


6 


S 


. 3 


4 


3 


5 


Vf) 


ISO 


U 


3 


f) 


10 


24 


48 


2 


.3 


4 


6 



One quarter, woollen; three quarters, cotton. 



•If tlie following articles of Hospital Furniture cannot be obtained with 
the hospital fund, they may be procured from a quartermaster or medical 
disbursing officer, by special requisition : 



Basins, wash. 

Bowls. 

Boxes, for pepper and 

salt. 
Brushes. 
Buckets. 
Candlesticks. 
Clothes Lines'. 
Cups. 

Dippors and Ladles. 
Graters. 



ARTICLES. 

Gridirons. 
Kettles, tea. 
Knives and Forks. 
Lanterns. 
Locks and keys. 
Mugs. 

Pans, frying. 
" sauce. 
Pitchers. 
Plates. 
Pols, chamber and chair 



j^Pots, coffee arid tea. 
'• iron. 
Sadirons.* 
Shovels, lire. 
Skillet, with cover. 
Snuflers. * 
Spoons. 

Toni;s and pokcre. 
Tumbleis. 
Wood saws. 



252 



MEDICAL DEPAKTMENT. 



Standard Supply Table for Field Service. 



Articles. 



MEDICINES. 

Acidi nitrici, . lb. 

" sulph. aromatici, lb. 

" taiinici, oz. 

Alcoholis, bott. 

Aluminis, lb. 

Ammonise carbonatis, oz. 

Antiraonii et potass, tartratis, . . .- . . . oz. 

Argenti nitratis (fused),. oz. 

Camphorae, lb. 

Cerati resinse, ... lb. 

" simplicis, lb. 

Chloroformi, lb. 

Copaibae, -. lb. 

Creasoti, oz. 

Cupri sulphatis, oz. 

Emplastri adhcESivi, , yds. 

" cantharidis, lb. 

" iclithyocollEe, . . . .' yds. 

Extract! colocyntliidis comp oz. 

" glycyrrhizse, lb. 

Hydrargyri cliloridi corrosivi, oz. 

" " mitis, lb. 

lodinii, oz. 

Liquoris ammonise, lb. 

" potass, arsenitis, oz. 

MagnesifB sulphatis li). 

Massse pil : hydrargyri, . oz. 

Morplnse sulphatis, dr. 

Olei menthjB piperitoe, oz. 

" olivse bott. 

'' ricini, qt. bott. 

" terebinthinsB, qt. bott. 

" tiglii, Uti dr. 

Pilul : cathartic : comp. : (U. S.), doz. 

opii, (U. S.), doz. 

Plumbi acetatis, lb. 

Potassse bitartratis, lb. 

" chloratis, ..... lb. 

" nitratis, lb. 

Potassii iodidi,; ... — oz. 

Pulveris acacias, , lb. 

" capsici, lb. 



Quantities. 



Reg't 
3 mos 



1 

2 
6 
1 

16 
2 
4 
4 
2 
8 
2 
2 
2 
4 

15 
4 
2 

16 
o 

* 

2 

4 

4 

4 

25 

16 

4 

2 

8 

12 



Bat. 
3 mos 



i 

4 
+ 
8 
1 
2 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
8 
2 
1 
8 
1 

1 
2 
2 
2 
15 
8 
2 
1 
4 
6 
4 
1 
4 
4 
1 
1 
1 

4 

2 

■i 



Comp 
3 mos 



1 
1 
1 
10 
4 
1 
1 
2 
3 
2 
1 
2 
2 

I 
•J- 
I 

2 
1 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



255 



Supply Table for Field Service — Continued. 



Articlks. 



Quanities. 



Pulveris feni per sulphatis, oz. 

" ipecacuanhae, lb. 

" " et opii, lb. 

" lini, lb. 

" opii, lb. 

rhei, lb. 

'' sinapis nigra;, lb. 

Quiiiirc sulphatis, oz. 

Sacchari, lb. 

Saponis, lb. 

Sodaj bicarbonatis, lb. 

SpiritAs ainmonifP aromatici, oz. 

'• ai-theris nitrici, II). 

" villi gallici, bott. 

Syrupi scilire, lb. 

.TincturoB cinchona^ comp., lb. 

" coinmba;, lb. 

" ferri chloridi, '. . . . lb. 

" gentiana; comp., lb. 

" opii, ,. oz. 

Unguenti liydrargyri, ,. lb. 

" " nitralis, lb. 

Vini colcliici seminis, lb. 

Zinci acetatis, ... oz. 

" sulpliatis, oz. 

INSTRUMENTS. 

Amputating, sets. 

Ball forceps no. 

Bougies, gumelastir, (1 to 12), no. 

•• metallic, (assorted), no. 

Catheters, gumelasiic, ("2 to 10), no. 

" silver, (3, 6, 9), . no. 

'* cases, no. 

Clipping glass or tins,* no. 

Lancets, spring, ^. . . . no. 

'• thumbs, (with cases), no. 

Needles, surgeons', (with cases,) no. 



Reg't Bat 
3 mos 3 mos 



4 
1 
h 
IG 
o 

i 

12 
24 

10 
8 
1 
4 
2 

12 
3 
4 
4 
1 
4 

16 
1 
h 



Comp 
3 mos 



* Half glass, half tin. 



254 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT.' 



Supply Table for Field *S'e/-i-jce— Continued, 



Articles. 



Pocket, sets. 

Probanj^s, no. 

Scaiifioators, no. 

Splints, (a.'^sorted), sets. 

Syringes, eneinu, (assorted),* no. 

" i^enis, glass, no. 

'■ '• India rubber, no. 

Teeth extracting, sets. 

Tongue depressor, (hinge), no. 

Tourniquets, field, no. 

" spiral, no. 

Trepanning, sets. 

Trocars, (1 s)nali), no. 

Trusses, hernia, , no. 

BOOKS. 

Anatomy, (surgical), cop. 

Medical Practice, cop. 

Regulations for medical department,, cop. 

SuTgery, (operative),. .. .T cop. 

Thompson's'Conspectus, cop. 

Blank, no. 

HOSPITAL STORES. 

ArroAV-root, lb. 

Candles, (sperm),f lb. 

Farina, lb. 

Ginger, (fluid extract,) lb. 

Nutmegs, *. oz. 

Tea, lb. 

Whi.skey, bottles of, doz. 

BEDDING. 

Bed sacks • no. 

Blankets, (woollen,) no, 



Quantities. 



Reg-t 
3 mo,- 



Bat. 
3 mo I 



1 
4 
8 
8 
1 
1 
]2 
2 
1 
2 
6 



10 



10 


.'J 


1 

8 


4 


30 


15 


3 


2 



20 
30 



* 1 Davidson's; i. hard rtdjber, C oz. 

t lo be reserved for use in siirgical operations in the night 



MEDICAL DEPARTMJPNT 



255 



Supply Tabic for Field Service — Continued, 



Giitta perolia clotli, yd?- 

Mosquito bars, do. 

Pillow ticks, no. 

FURNITURE AND DRESSINGS. 

Bandages ( 1 ), roller, assorted,. . . . doz. 

" suspensory, disserted, no. 

Binders' boards (18 inches by 4 ), no. 

Corks, assorteil, doz. 

Corkscrews, no. 

Collon batlirg, lb. 

" waddiiii:, lb. 

Flannel ( red ), yds. 

Hatchets, * no. 

Hones' (4 inches by 1, in wood), . no. 

Ink, S-ounce bottles, !\o. 

Knajiseicks, hospital (2), no: 

Lanterns, no. 

Lint, lb. 

Litters and stretchers, hantl, no. 

•' horse (3), no. 



Quantitie 


Reg-t 


Bat. ( 


3 mos 


3 nios •' 


20 


10 


20 


10 


20 


10 


14 


7 


12 


G 


18 ■ 


9 


12 


6 


2 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


5 


3 


o 


1 


I 


1 


12 





2 


1 


4 


2 


8 


4 


10 


5 



Co nip 
3 mos 



(1)1 dozen, 1 inch wide, 1 yard long. 
2 " 2 " 3 '• 



2 ' 


n " 


3 


1 ' 


3 


4 


h ' 


' 3i " 


5 


^ ' 


4 


G 



(2) According to pattern of same dimensions with ordinary knapsacks, 
and of light material; to be divided into four compartments or drawers, 
and to be covered with canvas. It is to be carried on a march or in bat- 
tle, by a hospital orderly, who is habitually to follow the medical oflicer. 
The purpose of this knapsack is to carry snch instruments, dressings, and 
medicyics, as may be needed in an emergency on the march or in the 
tield. 

(3) Horses litters required for service on' ground not admitting the use 
of two wheeled carriages, to lie composed of a cnnvas bed similar to the 
p ■■^sent stretcher, and of two poles, each sixteen fcot long, made in sections, 
w I... • cad and foot pieces constructed to act as sii< ichcis to keep the poles 
apart. 



256 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Suppli/ Table for Field Service. — Continued. 



Measures, graduated, assorted (4), no. 

Medicine chest^;, no. 

" cups and glasses (5), . . no. 

" panniers, no. 

Mess chests (see note), , no. 

Mills, coffee, no. 

Mortars and pestles, wedgewood 

(small), _ - no. 

Muslin, yds. 

Needles, sewing (assorted, in a 

case ), no. 

Oiled silk or gutta perclia tissue, 

or India rubber tissue, yds. 

Pans, bed (6), .'.■... no. 

Paper envelopes, assorted (7), . . . no. 

Paper, wrapping ... quires 

• " writing (8), quires 

Pencils, hair, no. 

" lead (of Faber's make, 

No. 2), no. 

Pens, steel, doz. 

Pill boxes (wood), papers 

" (tin), , ... no. 

Pins, assorted (large and medium), papers 

Razors, no. 

'' strops, ^ no. 

Scales and weights, apothecary's, sets. 

Scissors, no. 

Sheep skins, dressed, . no. 

Silk, surgeons' 07.. 

" green, yds. 

Spatulas no. 

Sponge (washed), lb. 

Store chest, . . . ; no. 



Quantities. 



Reg't 


Bat. 


.3 mos 


3 mos 


4 


2 


1 


1 


6 


3 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


20 


10 


25 


25 


8 


4 


2 


• 1 


100 


50 


6 


3 


12 


6 


24 


12 


12 


6 


4 


2 


. 2 


■* 


6 


6 


4 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


, 4 


o 


4 


2 


h 


^ 


1 


4 


6 


3 


1 


i 


1 


1 



Comp. 
3 mos. 



1 
1 

1 
5 

25 

2 
1 

25 
1 
3 

6 

3 
1 
1 
G 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 

1 
J. 



(4) G oz., 2 oz. minim. 

(5) 2 cu]is to 1 glass. 

(6) Of hard India rubber or otlier material. Shovel. 

(7) 50 letter, 25 note, 25 large. " Official Business " prinl J i 
(S) 2 foolscap, letter, 4 note, white ; blue ruled. 



MEDICAL DEPAKTMENT. 



257 



Siipphj Table for Fieli Service. — ^Contlnued. 



Tape, . . . •. pieces, 

Thread linen, oz. 

Tiles, .. no. 

Towels, ... no. 

Twine, lb. 

Vials, assorted (I oz. and 2 oz.), doz. 

Wafers, (^ oz. boxes), no. 

Wax, sealing, sticlis. 



Q 


uantitics. 


Reg-t. 


Bat. 


Comp 


3 nios 


3 mos 


3 ITIOS 


4 . 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


10 


20 


10 


^ 


i 


i 


•1 


2 


1 


I 


1 


1 


o 


1 


1 



NOTE TO PRECEDING TABLE. 



Fl'BNITCRE OF MESS CHEST. 



Basins, tin. 

Boxes, pepper and salt. 

Cups, tin. 

Canisters ( for tea, colfee, sugar 

and butter.) 

Dip[)ers and ladles. 

Grater, 

Gridiron. 

Kettle, tea, iron. 

Knives and forks. 

Mugs (Britannia, half-pint). 



1 Pan, frying. 
1 Pan, sauce. 
S Plates (fi) and dishes (2) tin. 

1 Pot, iron. 

2 Pots, coffee and tea, tin. 

12 Spoons, iron [table (6) and tea 
(0) ]. 
1 iSkillet, with cover. 
1 Tray, tin. 
TuMiblcrs, tin. 



The Standard Supply Tables contain all the articles to be purchased by 
medical purveyors, except on the orders of the Surgeon General ; but any 
less quantity mrvy bo required or any article omitted at the discretion oX 
the medical olficer. 



258 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



^ 



^ 



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CLASSES OP DISEASES. 


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P<4 







MEDICAL DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



259 



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S" c = § 



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— c 



1) -^ ■- 

= K B 



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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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■;3(ScCiB>-. = — 



^ ^ n 5 o 



^ xn ZL .- z, 



Si:>p >z£ 



"^ ii ^ •- 



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y} y. vj yj 



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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT — iORMS. 



263 



Hernia, , 
Luxatio, . 
Morsus Serp 
Punitio, . 
Siib-ltixatio, 
Vulniis Inoi 
Vulnus Cont 
Vulniis Pun 
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All other di 


Amaurosis, 
Cataracta, 
Hemeralopi 
Iritis, 

Nyctalopia, 
Ophthalmia 
Retinitis, . 
All other di 


Otalgia, . 
Otitis, 
Otorrhoea,' 
Surditas, . 
All other di 


AnchyJosis, 
Atrophia, 
Bubo simple 




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266 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT — rOEMS. 



Form 1*— Continued. 
Discliarges on Surgeon's Certificate, and Death. 



Name. 










Rank. 


Regim't. 


X 

S 




Surname. 


Christian 
name. 






•s 

o 




i A 









Disease. 



.^3 4) 



C O 

P -i 



Date of 

death. 



KEMARKS. 

Notes. — Discharges on Surgeon's certificate, and deaths occurring aniong 
those of tlie command not on sick report, will beal?o reported, but sepa- 
rated from the others by a double line drawn acioss the page. The re- 
marks will, in each case, specify the manner in wliich the disease origi- 
nated, when it is known. 

In evei'y case of the death of an officer, whether on duty or not, a spe- 
cial report is to be mad«^ the Surgeon General. 



id^^ 



Form 1 — Continued. 



ENDORSEMENT. 



Eeport of Sick and Wounded for the 
Quarter ending • 186 . 

Station : 

Surgeon.- 

Commtind, » 



Regiments. 



Companies. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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Articles, and Characters, 
and Quautities. 

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MEDICAL DEPAETMBNT — FORMS. 



5 
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The remarks will note 
to whom the articles were 
delivered ; what money, 
&c., were left by those who 
die; and to whom they 
were given. 


When delivered. 


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MiEDICAL DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



275 



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The remarks will state 
how articles have been 
lost, and by whom de- 
stroyed, or the persons sus- 
pected, &c. 


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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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277 



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278 MEDICAL DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



Form 13. 

Army of the Confedbrate States. 

Cerfijjcate of Disability Jor Discharge. . 

A. B., of Captain company, ( — ,) of the regiment of Confed- 

erate States , was enlisted by •, of the regiment of , 

at , on the day of , to serve years. He was born in 

? , in tli« State of , is y*ars of age, feet inches high, 

complexion, eyes, hair, and by occupation, when enlisted, a 

. During the last two months said soldier has been unfit for duty 
days. 
(The company commander will here add a -statement of all the factt 
known to him concerning the disease or wound, or cause of disability of 
the soldier ; the time, place, manner, and all the circumstances under 
which the injury occurred, or disease ortginated or appeared; the duty, or 
service, or situation of the soldier at the time the injury was received or 
disease contracted, or supposed to be contracted; and whatever facfs may 
aid a judgmeat as to the cause, immediate or remote, of the disability, 
and the circumstances attending it.) 

Station : 
Date : 

- ' C. D., Commanding Company. 

(When the facts are not known to the company commander, the certifi- 
cate of any otficer, or affidavit £>f other person having such knowledge," 
will be appended.) 

I certify that I have carefully examined the said of Captain 

company, and find him incapable of performing the duties of a soldier be- 
cause of (here describe particulaily the disability, wound, or disease; the 
extent lo which it deprives him of the use of any limb or faculry, or af- 
fects his Jaealth, strength, activity, constitution, or capacity to labor or 
earn his subsistence). The Surgeon will add, from his knowledge of the 
facts and circumstances, and from the evidence in the case, his profes- 
sional opinion of the cause or oi'sgin of the disability. 

E. F., Surgeon. 

Discharged this day of , 18(3 , at 

I Commanding the Pat. 

Notes— 1. Wljen b. probable case for pension, special care must be taken 
to state the degree of disability. 
2. The place where the soldier desires to be addressed maybe 
here added. Town, County, State . 

(Duplicates.) 

[Blanks for this form are issued from tlie Adjutant General's office.] 



MEDICAL TEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



279 



f^ 






ft^ 



• 

Remarks. 


• 

The remarks \till state 
the cause of rejecting any 
who are examined, &c., &c. 


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280 



MKDICAL DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 281 

Form 16. 
Contract with a Private Physicia7%. 

This contract, entered into this day of , 186 , at , State of 

, between , of the C. S. Army, and Dr. , of , in the 

State of , witnesseth, that for the consiJeratioi^hereafter. mentioned, 

the said Dr. prqjnises and agrees to perfomi the duties of a medical 

officer, agreeably to the Armj|ilegulations, at , {nnd to' fvrnith the ne- 

cetsary medicines.) And the said promij^ and agrees, on behalf of 

the Confederate States, to pay, or cause to be ^Pd, to tlie said Dr. 
the snni of dollars for each and every moptli he sliall continue to per- 
form the services above stated, which shall be Ins full compensation nnd 
in lieu of all allov^ances and emoluments whatsoever, [except that for 
metlicines furnished, which shall be at the rale of per cent, on his numthly 

lay, to be determined by the Surgeon General.) This contract to continue till 
letermined l)y the said doctor, or llie commanding officer for the lime be- 
ing, or the Surgeon General. • 

[seal.] 
Signed, sealed, and delivered,"! 

in presence of — J 

[seal.] 

"I certify that the number of persons entitled to medical attendance 
Bgreeably to regulations, at , is • ; that no competent physician can 

be obtained at a lower rate ; and that the services of a private physician 
arc necessary, for the following reasons : [Here make the particular state- 
ment required in paragr^h 1202; reporting, also, whether a medical offi- 
cer of the army was near, and if so, that his services could not be ren- 
dered; and when the contract allowed $80 per month, Whether irwas ne- 
cessary f«r the physician to abandon his own business, and give his wl^lo 
I' to the jiublic service.]. 

, Mediml Director, 

or Commanding Officer." 



Form 17. 

Form of a Medical Certijicaie. 

, of the regiment of , having applied for a certificate 

on which to ground an api)lication for leave of absence, I do hereby cer- 
tify that I have carefully examined this officer, and find that . [Here 
;he nature of the disease, wound, or disability, is to be fully stated, and 
■.he period during which the officer has sullered under its eflects.] And 
.hat, in consequence thereof, he is, in my opinion, mitit for duty. I further 
lerhire my belief that he will not be able to resume his duties in a less 
jcriod than . [Here state candidly and explicitly the opinion as to. 
.he period which will probably elapse before the officer will be able to re* 
mnic his duties. When there is no reason to expect a recovery, or when 
he prospect of recovery is distant and uncertain, it must be stated.] 

Dated , this day of 



Signature of the Medical Officer, 



282 



MEDICAL ©EPARTMEI^T — FORMS., 



f^ 



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s 







Remarks. , 


1 Steward. 

2 cooks. 

3 laundresses. 
5 nurses. 

49 sick. 

60 total, 










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Camp of Instruction, 
Richmond, 
Virginia. 

Rations due 


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MEDICAL DEPARTMENT — rORMS. 



283 



Form 19. 

A Monthly Statement of ike Hospital Fund at 
of , 186 



, for the month 



Dr. 



To balance due lio.«pita( last montli, 

1532 ratiogs, being wliole amount clue this month, at 9^ cents 
per ration, . . . . « '. 



Cr. By the following provisions, at contract prices : 

283 J lbs. of pork, at 6 cents per pound, 

690 lbs. of fresh beef, at 4 cent? per pound, . . . 

1612 2-16 lbs. of flour, at 2 cents per pound 

10 lbs. of hard bread, at 3j cents per pound,. . . 

70 lbs. of rice, at G cents per pound, 

56 lbs. nf coffee, at 9 cems per pound, 

193 14-16 lbs. ol" sugar, at 8 cents per pound, 

17^ Tirts. of vinegar, at 5 cents per quart, 

15 5-16 lbs. of candles, at 12 cents p«r pound, 

61 J- lbs. of soap, at 6 cents per pound, 

105 qrts. of salt, at 3 cents per quart, 

12 galls, of molasses, at 28 cents per gallon, . . . 



PCRCHASKD. 

2 pairs of chickens, at 87^ cents per pair,. . . 
4 qrts. of milk, at 7 cents per quart, 

3 dozen oranges, at 25 cents per dozen,. . . , 

Total expended, 

Balance due this month, 



.$17 


01 


27 


60 


32 


24i 




35 


4 


20 


5 


04 


15 


51 




85§ 


1 


m 


3 


67J^ 




m 


3 


36 



•112 U 




$0 00 
145 54 



[Date.] 



114 96|. 
30 57i 
j'Swrgcoif. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



ADDENDA. 



1. Officers of the Medical Department, by virtue of their commissions, 
command enlisted men. 



2. The Mediv?al*Director and the Medical Purveyor of a Military De- 
partment are each allowed one room as an- office, and fuel from the 1st 
of October to the 30ch of April, at the rate of one cord of wood per 
month fur each office. 



3. Ambulances are not to be used for any other than the specific pur- 
pose for wliich they ar-e designed, viz: the transportation of the sick 
and wounded. 



4. Hospital laundresses will be paid eight dollars per month, by the 
Quartermaster's Department, on the hospital muster rolls, and will bo 
allowed one ration per diem. 



' 5. A regiment, in the field, is allowed two four-wheeled, and the same 
number of two-wheeled ambulances ; and one wagon for the transpor- 
tation of hospital supplies. 



6. H«epital tents, having on one end a lapel, so as to admit of two or 
more tents being joined and throvrn into one with a continuous covering 
or roof, will be made of these dimensions : ^ 

Length, 14 feet ; width, 15 feet ; height (centre) 11 feet, with a wall 
4^ feet, aijd a " fly" of appropriate size. The ridge pole will be made 
in two sections, measuring 14 feet when joined. • 

This tent will accommodate from eight to ten patients comfortably. 

The following allowance of tents for the sickj their attendants, and 
hospital supplies, will be issued on requisitions "on the Quartermaster's 
Department : 



COMMANDS. 

• 


Hospital 
Tents. 


. Sibley 
Tents. 


Common 

Tents. 


For one company, . . ^ . . 

For tiiree companies, 

For five "' ..... 
For seven " ..... 
For ten . " 


1 

2 ^ 

2 

3 




1 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. * 285 

7. The followiqg Blanks will be issued from the Surgeon General's 
office. 
'Monthly Reports of Sick and Wounded. 

Quarterly Keports of Sick and wounded. 

Cunsolidated Monthly lleports of Sick and Wounded, for Medical 
Directors.) 

Returns of Medical Officers, (for Medical Directors.) 

Returns of Medical and Hospital Property. 

Abstracts of Medical and Hospital Property, (for Medical Purveyors.) 

Requisitions for Medical and Hospital Supplies. 

Medical Purveyors will be allowed to print only their blank Invoices 
and Receipts. Other medical officers will nut have any blanks printed, 
except^iy special authority from the Surgeon General. 

Certificates of Disability for Discharge from the service, and Hospit.il 
Muster Rolls, afo furnished from the Adjutant and Inspector-General's 
office. 



8. Official leUers addressed to the Surgeon General, by medical offi- 
cers of the army, will be written on letter paper (quarto post) when- 
ever practicable, and not on note or foolscap paper. " Tlie letter must be 
folded in three equal'folds parallel with the writing, and endorsed across 
that fold which corresponds with the top of the sheet, thus : 



(Name and rank of ^riter.) 



(Post or station, and date of letter.) 



(Analysis of the Contents.) 



280 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 



ARTICLE XLIV. 

ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 

1224. The senior officer of artillery on ordnance duty is, under the 
direction of the Secretary of War, charged with. the. superintendence 
and administration of the Ordnance Bureau. He shall be stationed at 
the scat of government, and may select an officer on ordnance duty as 
his assistant. 

1225. The officers on ordnance duty shall, under the direction of the 
senior officer, have charge of all arsenals, (for special reasons the ar- 
mory at Ivichmond is placed under the charge of a superintendent, au- 
thorized by law, to be appointed by the'rresident,) the government 
manufactories of powder, ordnance depots and magazines, and illl pro- 
perty appertaining to the Ordnance Bureau, not issued to the croops, 
for the safe-teeping and preservation of which they .shall be held strictly 
responsible. 

They shall furnish all arms, ordnance and ordnance stores required 
for the military service, on proper requisitions, and in conforoaty with 
the regulations of the Bureau.* 

Arsenals, being under the control of the Ordnance Bureau, wiU not 
be interfered with i(y any other branch of the service. 

.1226. No right of choice shall exist in the conymand of ordnance sta- 
tions. Officers will be assigned to such commands, at the discretion of 
the chief of orcfnance, in such manner as the public interest may re- 
quire. . ' 

1227. Officers in command of ordnance stations will not be changed 
oftener than once in four years, except for special reasons, to be appro- 
ved by the Secretary of War. 

1228. The names of ordnance stations will be officially known and 
designated as follows, viz: ' , 



Names of Ordnance Stations. 




POSTQFFICE. 



Fayetteville Arsenal and Armery, 

Kichmond Armory, Arsenal and Laboratory, 

Augusta Arsenal, 

Baton Rouge Arsenal 

Charleston '* ■ 

Mt. Vernon " 

Apalachicola " 

Texas 

Little Rock " 

Savannah Depot 

Montgomery " 

Nashville " 

Government Powder Mills, 



Fayetteville, N. C. 
Richmond, Va- . 
Augusta, Ga. 
Batcm Rouge, La. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Mt. Vernon, Ala. 
Chatahoocliie, Fla. 
San Antonio, Texas. 
Little Rock, Ark. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Montgomery, Ala. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Augusta, Ga. 



* For the present, the Ordnance Bureau will also furnish knapsacks, 
. haversacks, %nd canteens. 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 287 

1229. All orders received from the headquarters of the army, relat- 
ing to the movement of the troops, or the discipline of tlie army, shall 
be circulated through and by the chief of ordnance to every ordnance 
station. 

1230. The senior officer of artillery on ordnance duty, attached to an 
army in the field, shall have the charge and_ direction of the depots of 
ordnance and ordnance stores fo»the supply of such army. All orders 
relating thereto shall he regularly transmitted to him through the office 
of the Adjutant Genwal aptinj> with such army. He will comnnHiicato* 
with the chief aVtillcry officer, to ascertain the actual and probable 
•wants of the army relative to his department, and be prepared to fur- 
nTsh supplic" at the shortest notice. He will also correspond with the 
Chief of Ordnance, and with the oflBcers at the nearest arsenals and 
laboratories, so as to anticipate, if possil^le, and provide for all the 
wants of the a.my connected with his department. , 

1231. The general denomination, " Or(hiauce and Ordnance Stores," 
comprehen'ls all cannon, howitzers, mortars, cannon balls, shot and 
shells, for the land service ; all gun carriages, mortar beds, caissons and 
Jraveling forges, with their equi[>ment8 ; and all other apparatus and 
machines required for the service and manoeuvres of artillery, in gar- 
risons, at sieges, or in the field ; together with the materials for their 
constrii(!lion, preservation, and repair. Also, all small arms, side-arms, 
and accoutrements, fyf the artillery, cavalry, infantry, and riflemen ; 
nil ammunition for ordnance and small arms, and all stores of expendi- 
ture for tlie service of the various arms : materials for the construction 
and repair of ordnance buildings ; utensils and stores for laboratories, 
including standard weights, gauges and measures ; and all other tools 
and utensils required for ordnance dutj'. The ordinary articles of camp 
equipage and pioneers' tools, such as axes, spades, shovels, mattocks, 
«fco., are not embraced as ordnance supplies. 

1232. Ordnance and ordnance stores shall be provided ])y open pur- 
chase, by fabrication or by contract, as may be mist advantageous lo 
the public service. They shall be provided by ordnance officers only, 
except when otherwise specinlly directed by the Chief of Ordnance, or 
in case of urgent necessity ; and in such cases, a report and certificate 
showing the necessity, from the officer ordering the purchase, will be 
required for the admiiision of the account of purchase at the treasury. 

INSPECTION OF NATIONAL ARMORIES, ARSENALS, POWDER WORKS, ANDORD^ 
NANCE DEPOTS. 

1233. Inspections of national armories, of arsenals and ordnance de- 
pots, shall be made under the direction of the Chief of Ordnance, by 
such officers of the Ordnance Bureau as the Secretary of War may, from 
time to time, designate for that purpose. •• 

1234. A thorough and complete inspection of the national armories, 
and nrsenal of construction, shall be made annually, and all other 
ordnance stations at least once every two years. At these inspectiona 
it shall be the special duty of the inspecting oflBcer to see that the laws, 
regulations, and orders of the Bureau are faithfully executed, and to 
give the necessary orders and instructions in writing, at the time of in- 



288 ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 

epection, in correction of any neglect or departure therefrom. He will 
ascertain whether the persons employed in arsenal and armories are 
efficient in the performance of tlieir duties: whether the number ex- 
ceeds that required to execute, by constant emplpyment, the business 
of the establishment ; and in c ise of any excess beyond what may be 
itecessary, he will report the number to the commanding officer for die- 
charge, and immediately after report.the same and the circumstances, 
with copies of all orders and instructions which he may have given 
during his inspections, to tho Chief of Ordnance. It shall also be his 
duty specially to examine the annual reports, and to give such orders 
as, in his judgment, may tend to produce as much uniformity in the 
mode and amount of valuation of property as the circumstances at eSch 
place will admit. 

1235. At the conclusion of each inspection of a national armory, ar- 
senal or construction, or ordnance depot, the inspecting officer will re-, 
port to the Chief of Ordnance the general and particular condition of 
each ; and especially each and every departure from the established 
models and patterns in all articles fiibricated ; and also, how far the laws, 
regulations, and orders may have been violated, and in what respects 
they have not been carried into full operation. He shall keep book's, 
in which shall be recorded all reports which he is requfred to make, 
and all correspondence relating to his inspections. 

SERVICE AT ARMORIES, ARSENALS AND ORBNANCE DEPOTS. 

1236. The commanding officer of an armory shall have the manage- 
ment and direction of tlie business, and shall conduct the correspon- 
dence of the armory. He shall draw up and publish, under the direc- 
tion of the Chief of Ordnance, all necessarv regulatiorrs for its internal 
government ; he shall provide the necessary tools and stores ; he shall 
give directions to the store-keeper, acting as paymaster, in the disburse- 
ment of the public funds ; he shall at all times have free access to the 
books of the store-keeper, and may require of him any information rela- 
tive to the financial concerns of the establishment ; he shall engage aU 
workmen, determine their grades, appoint such number of foremen in 
each branch of the manufacture as hs shall consider necessary, and ho 
may displace or dismiss sai i w irkmen or foremen when he shall deem 
it expedient; he will be held responsible that the number of hi;ed men 
employed at the armory, under his superintendence, shall not exceed 
the number necessary to exectttc, by constant en)ployment, all the busi- 

■ ne§s of the armory. In the absence of the commanding officer, the 
chargQ of an armory shall devolve on the master armorer, unless tho 
Chief of Ordnanc€fshall otherwise direct. 

1237. The commanding officer of an armory shall make annual re- 
ports of the inspection of all arms manufactured at the armory, in con- 
formity with the directions in the^.form number 37 ; and the master ar- 
morer, under the direction of the commanding officer, shall keep a book 
in which sfiall be entered copies of all the inspection reports herein re- 
quired. The originals of said reports shall be forwarded to the Chief 
of Ordnance on the completion of the inspections. 

1238. The commanding officer of an armory shall authorize the issue 
of materials required for fabrication in the workshops in such quanti- 
ties, and at such times, as may be considered necessary : provided the 
supply so issued (which shall in all cases be placed in charge of tho 



ORDNANCE DEPAETJIENT. 289 

• 
master armorer) shall at no time exceed the quantity which may be re- 
quired fur use in the course of three uionihs. 

1239. At each national armory tlu'! master armoref shall keep ac- 
counts with tlie foremen UTr all touls and materials, rnui^h and finished 
Work dehvered to, and received from, them ies|>ectively ; he shall be 
careful to keep each particuhir Inamdi of the manufacture in,an equal 
state of advancement; he shril he the chief inspector of all materials 
and tools, and of all Bnished arms, to be delivered into tlwe public store- 
house ; and he shall be responsilile that the same shall have undergone 
the proofs required Ity 'he Ordnance Bureau, aiyj shall lie conifileted for 
service ; he hliail hold the foremen respinsible for the faithful execu- 

• tion of the part of tlie Work witn which they luay be respectively charged. 

1240. The firemen ai national armories shall keep accounts with the 
individual workmen employed in their re^^pective branches, of tools and 
nniterials, and of work, rou;:K and finished, deliveroi to, or received 
from, them respectively. They ^hall •lie inspectors and comptrollers, 
each in his projier detiartment, of the work executed. Suitable marks 
are to be adopted to ensure the due in?pecti»n of all parts of the work, 
and the responsibility of the foremen. 

1241. The foremen at each of tho national armories shall make out 
and handjjQ the master armorer certified monthly rolls, spedfying the 
names of the persons employed, the (juantity of work performed by 
each dS^'inj; the month, and the amount due f<ir tho same, whether by 
the established re^i^uUitions or particular stipulations. And the master 
armorer shall also certify to the correctness ^f said rolls, and hand 
them to the comnm^dino; ofiicer, that he may cause the general monthly 
pn3' rolls to be made out. The pay-t-olls shall exhibit tbe compensation 
due to each individual for the month, and will become the vouchers on 
"w^ich the payment will be made. The books and accounts of the mas- 
ter arnmrev and foremen stiall be open to the itis|jpction of the com- 
manding officer and his clerks, and are to be carefully preservec^ and 
ultimately dep jsited in the office of the ci mmanding oi cer. 

1242. The commanding officer of a national armory shall, under di- 
rection of tiie Chief of Ordnance, arraivgc all wofk connected with the 
fabrication of arms at the armory under classes or heads, not exceeding 
ten nor les« than five, according lo the diffcent degrees of labor, skill 
or ability required in its execution ; and each workman thereon em- 
ployed shall be assigned to work under some one class; shrill be de- 
nominated of that class, and shall receive a daily compensation corres- 
ponding thereto ; such compensation shall be estayished on the follow- 
ing principles to-wit: First, of an estimate J fair day's work for e\sery 
variety of work under each class ; second, of a just and reasonable per 
diem allowance, corresponding thereto, which shall be greater or less, 
aqgoTding to the greater or less de;:;ree of labor, skill and ability re- 
quired ; third, of the amount of work done, so that each shall receive 
the per diem allowance if he perforin the estimated fair day's work of 
his class ; and if he perform more or le>.4 than such fair day's work, 
then his compensation shall be proportionately greater or less than such 
per difem a'lowance. 

1243. Whenever at national armories, arsenals, or ordnance depots, 
any hired workman shall, through incompetency or de^'ign, spoil any 
piece of work, in the execution of which he may be engaged, it shall be 
13 



290 ORDNATS'CE DEPAFTMENT. 

the duty of tlic oommandinn; uffieer to cuuse tlie amount of injury to be 
esitiuiiiteil, aud^^ive the neces.vary inlbimatiou lo the payniiister to stop 
the'same from tlie jtay of such workman. 

1244. At national armories or arsenals, where dwelling houses, be- 
longing to tlie Confederate States, are occupied by workmen, a quar- 
terly rent-roll, specifying the names of the occupants, the periods for 
which rents ure charged, the price per quarter, and the amount due 
from each peVson, shall he jnepared hy the commanding officer, agreea- 
ably to form' No. 14. The pmper designation shall be added to the 
names of such ]U!rsoris*{is may he entitled to the use of dwellings rent 
free. If the ofBoer who prepares fhe i»ll is not the. disbursing officer, 
he shall furnish the lattei' with one coyiy and shall transmit another to 
the Chief of Oidiiance. The disbursing officer shall retain the roll in 
liis otSce, and shall credit the amount collected in his account current; 
and it is made liis duty to collect the sums due from the several indi- 
vidiKils charged, by retaining in his hands the proper amount when 
making the monthly payments ; it is not required that the rents charged 
and collected shall be entered on the pay-rolls, the credit in the accounts 
current, with the proper rent roll, being sufficient. 

1245. Master armorers and clerks emplnyed at the national armo- 
ries shall be allowed quarters, rent free, where there are buildings be- 
loniiing'tn the CuniVderate States sufficient for their accommo^tion. 

1246. Fuel in kind shall be allowed to armory officers, occupying 
public quarters, at the following rates per annum, viz: 

T<i a master armorer, . . 1^ cords of wood. 

To a clerk. . . . • . 12 " " 

1247. Master armorers at the national armories, when traveling on 
duty under orders from the proper authority, shall be entitled to re- 
ceive ten cents a mile for the distance traveled ; all hired persons in 
the service of the Ordnance Bureau shall, under the same circumstances, 
be entitled to receive eight cents a mile. 

1248. At tJie nati(^al armories, ars-enuls and ordnance depots where 
it may be c(msidered necessary* to enlarge the sites, to erect new build- 
ings or machinery, to make additions or repairs to o^d buildings, to 
provide new wharves or enclosures, or to make any other permanent 
improvements,- plans and estimates therefor shall be made by the com- 
manding officer, and be transmitted in time to be received at the ord- 
nance office in the month of August. Estimates for any of these pur- 
poses shall exhibit fully the objects contemplated, the reason or causes 
wfiich render them necessary, the measures by which it is proposed to 
effect them, and their probable cost. The estimate, if approved by the 
Chief of Ordnance, shall be submitted to the Secretary of War, and, if 
sanctioned by him, shall be embodied in the general estimate subiiiitted 
annually to -Congress. Works oT the description above mentioned shall 
in no case be undertaken or commenced but by special authority from 
the Chief uf the Ordnance "Bureau. 

1249. Authority from the Chief of Ordnance, must, in all cases, be 
obtained before ornamentaltrees growing on the public grounds, at na- 
tional armories, arsenals, or ordnance depots, can be removed or de- 

troyed. 

1250. Horses for the public service in the Ordnance Bureau, shall not 



1 



. ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 591 

\>e purciiased withtJut authority from the Chief of Ordnance. The 
horses imi«t he strong, heavy-dniupht horses. 

1251. Woiknion or others cinph'Vpd by hiro nt nntinnUI armories, ar- 
senals, or ordnance dcpot.'^, slmll ho en<;;af;ed on, daily wa^es and not on 
monthly waf!;ee or palsiric?!. In places where it is found necessary to 
employ blaves on public works, and where the customs of the country 
do not permit of dailj' hire, slaves may be engnj^cd on monthly -wages. 
In such cases, parts of months will ho. set forth as in form No. 18. 

1252. Workmen or others employed by hire in the Ordnance Bureau, 
shall bepaid only for such days or narts of daf s as they may actually 
labor in the service of said BiWlau, for which the certificate upon hcmor 
(tf tlie commaiidino; o'fccr shall he a nece-^Sitry voucher. The working 
hours for hnod men at the ordnance establishments shill be so ar- 
ranj;ed as to avera;:;n ten hours a day throu^ihout the year, working; by 
daylii:;lit only. In cases Where men l!4'or more than the usual number 
of workin;; diys, the commanding officer will Explain on the pay-roll 
the necessity therefor. • 

1253. No sla<*e, the property of any ofiicer ov person in the service of 
the Confederate States, connected with tlie War Department, shall be 
employed in the Ordnance Bureau. 

1254. PSynicnts to hired persons in the Ordnance Bureau shall be 
made ^nthly, unless otherwise specially authorized. 

1255. No receipt shall be tukcn in blank hy a disbursing officer, nor 
unless the money be actually paid ; ami no due hills f)r money on pub- 
lic account shall be }j;iven ; nor shall any tiflieer or agent of the Ord- 
nance Bureau bf concerned, directly or indirectlj', on private account, 
in'au}^ cofttract made for said Bureau, or in the purchase or sale of any 
articles which it niay be his Qufy to purchase or sell on public account. 

125G. When a cnange in the command of an armory, arsenal, or ord- 
nance depot occurs, the ofFii>er relieved shall prepare and adjus^all ac- 
counts, both for money and for stores ;* he shall state such accounls as 
may remain due at the time"of his being relieved, and shall hand them, 
tugeihur witli a certified abstragt of tiie same, t'^the relieving officer, 
for setticiiuMit ; no outstantUng claims, other than those embraced in 
euch accounts and abstract, shall be settled witlujtit instructions from 
the Ordnance Bureau. 

1257. No money shall be disbursed at any national armory, arsenal, 
or ordnance depot»until the pay-roll or other account shall have be.eu 
first examined, ajiproved, and certified to be Correct by the ofiicer hav- 
ing«diarge of such armory, arsenal or depot; «ud the amoiint shall be 
etaled in words and not in figures; and when the disimrsements are 
not uiiidc bj' the commanding officer, such approval and certificate shall 
be a necessary vouchor in the settlement of the accounts of the disburs- 
ing cfHcor. 

1258. it, shall be* the^luty of the paymaster and store keeper at each 
of the national armories, to make all disbursements, to receive in 
charge, and receipt for, all materials procured, alter they shall have 
been inspected by the master , armorer ; tore issue the same on the or- 
der of the commanding officer, and to receive and receipt fur all finished 
«rms. lie shall render accounts and returns according to the forms rc- 
<juired by the Ordnance Bureau. 

12:9. A military store keeper atta'ched to a national armory, an ar- 



292 ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 

senal, or an ordnance depot, sliall Iiavo tlie charge of ordnance and ord- 
nance stores at^lie armory, arsenal, or depot, exceptinuj sucli ordnance 
tools, machines, (ir other stores, including pnhlio horses or oxen, as 
may be required for the current service -of the yuiyt, wli\ch are placed 
in char;i;e of the commandin}:; officer thereof. (See Par. 1350.) The 
store-keeper shall be snhject to the orders of such commanding officer in 
all matters which regard the inspection, preservation, and issue of the 
stores ; and it shall 1)C the viuty of said commanding officer to furnish 
'the storekeeper at all ti«ies with tiie necessary aid from the forces un- 
der his command, to assist in- recoivinji^delivcring, removing and ar- 
ranging the ordnance and ordnani-e stores, and in rejtairing and pre- 
serving all public buildings in which they may be deposited. 

12G0. In case of an arsen;,! or ordnance depot being left without any 
other commissioned officer, tlie charge of the post shall devolve on the 
military store-keeper, w^o shall conform to such instructions as may be 
given him by the commanding offiier on leaving the post. 

1261. A military store Keeper of the Ordtia.ice Bureau shall, when 
required by the Secretary (if War, in addition to his other duties, dis- 
burse the funds for the ordnance service at the post where he may be 
stationed ; and he shall in that case give a I)ond, with approved secu- 
rity, in such sum as the Secretary of War may direct, for the £|iithful 
performance of his duty. 

1262. At arsenals of construction, and other ordnance depots, where 
there is no store-keeper, and at which the annual disbursements exceed 
five thousand dollars, the ifRi-er scj-ond in rank shall, if req'uired by the 
Secretary of War, be the disbursing officer. 

1263. Every disbursing officer of the OrtJnance Bureau shall be held 
respons'ble for the safe-keeping of the funds placed 4fc iiis hands, in the 
manner prescribed by the regulations of the War and Treasury Depart- 
ments.. A disbursing officer, on. being relieved from duty at any post, 
shall pay over the unexpended balance in his hands to the person who 
may b" designated bv the Chief of Ordnance to receive it. 

12G4. The commanding officer of any armory, arsenal, or ordnance 
depot, having a military store-keeper, shall, at the time of the reception 
by the store-keeper of ordnance or ordnance stores, vi-hicii may have 
been obtained by purchase or fabrication, furnisli tlie store-keeper with 
an authenticated abstract for the fabrication, and an account for the 
purchase; and whenever the commanding officer ^hall receive ord-; 
nance or ordnance stores from the commanders of military post^ or 
other agents of the War Department, he shall in like manner hand 
over to tlie military store-keeper the invoices accompanying said pro- 
perty. (See Form Mo, 2.) ■ 

1205. All orders for the issue of ordnance and ordnance stores, in 
charge of any military store-keepe'i-, shall be directed to tlie command- 
ing (liTIcer of the a,rmory, arsenal, or depot, to which such storekeeper 
is attached; and it shall hp the duty of said ccnnnnurding (itTicer to see 
that such orders are f lithfn ly and proTtiptly executed. All issues of 
ordnance or ordnance stores in charge of the store keeper ni, any ar.- 
senal, (irdnance depot, or national armory, for the purposes of con- 
struction in the armory or ordnan.-e shops, or for the current service of 
the arsenal, depot, or armory, shall be made only upon the written or- 
der of the commanding officer, or of some military or armory officer ap- 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 29o 

pointed l>y liim for that pnrpope; nnd an abstract of such orders for 
■ current issuer shall oe iTia<Io ami pre>entp<l liy tlie storekeeper, at the 
endof'eacli quarter, to the eommanding officer, who shall authenticate 
the same. (See form No. 0.) 

12G3. Ordnance or ordnance stores shall not be issued for construc- 
tiiin in the ordnance shops, or for ihe current service of ai.y military 
post, except on the^writteu authority uf the cgmmander, or tliat of some 
military officer, or other responsible person acting under bis order: 
nnd such authority shall, in all cases, state the object of the issue, and 
be filed in the Ordnance or Adjutant's office of the post, in order that the 
quarterly abstract of materials expended or consumed at the post (see 
form No. (i) may be in conformity to the orders f.)r issue. 

12G7. When an order for supplies is received at any armory, arsenal, 
or ordnance depot, the connnandin;; officer shiill cause the articles or- 
dereil (o be carefully packed, and shall turn them over to tlie nearest 
quartermaster, with an invoice. (See form No. 2.) A duplicate of the 
invoice shall, at the same time, be transmitted to the officer to whom 
the stores arc addressed, or for whose command they are designed. The 
dates when the order was received, and the articles turned over for 
transportation, will l>e stated in the next monthly statement of work 
done, (.'^ee form No. L'9.) • 

]2<W. Requisitions for ordnance or ordnance stores, needed at any 
nruKiry, arsenal, or ordnance tlepot, shall exhibit, in addition to the de- 
scription and quantity of propei^y asked for, t^ie amount of similar 
articles on liand. with full explanations, showing the propriety of the 
issue. (See form No 24.) These requisitions f-hnll be forwarded to 
the Chief of Ordnance, anj, if approved bj' liim, the requisite orders 
8li;ill be given. 4k 

12G9. In case of the authorized -alw^nco of a military storekeeper, 
and at arsenals or ordnance depots, where there is no storekeeper, the 
commanding officer will be held responsible for the safekeeping and* 
preservation of all pnblic property committed U> his charge; but ho 
may assign to a junior officer of the arsenal, or depot, the immediate 
charge of it, and also the duty of preparing the proper returns. 
■ 1270. To guard against the embezzlerfient of ordnance and ordnance 
stores, they shall be distinctly and permanently marked, so as to 
identify them as being the property of the Confederate States, previ- 
ously to their beit^ sent from the arseJials or ordnance depots. 

1271. No hired or enli*<ted man engaged in the service of tlie Ord- 
nance Bureau, at any naticnal armory, arsenal, ordnance depot, or 
with any military command, shall be employed fir the private benefit 
of officers or other persons, with or without compensation ; and no pub- 
lic property appertaining to the Ordnance Bureau shall, under any pre- 
tence, be sold, exchanged, or used for the private benefit of aay person 
or persims whntsopve/. The public workshops, tools and materials, 
must be used solely for purposes of public lieupfit ; and all pyvate work 
in tlie public buildinirs; and all other ap[ilic!ition of public means to 
any other than |nil)Iic purposes, is expressly prohibited. It shall be tlio 
spe(!ial dujy of all officers or other n^erfts of the Ordnance Btivpau,and 
"T5speeially inspectors, to see that this regulatjon be strictly observeii. 

1273. The nunibjr of enlisted men authorized by law for the Ord- 
nance Bureau, shall be assigned to the arsenals tind depots by the Chief 



294 ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 

of Ordnance, who sball likewise determine the numbei" of each specified 
grade of workmen to be employed at each arsenal or depot, all of whom" 
shall he enlisted in the jjrade of laborer; from which grade promotions 
shall be made of such as may be found to merit it, at the discretion of 
the conimandin}^ officers of arsenals and depots, under the provisions 
contained in the next articles of thesp regulations. 

1273.' Enlisted men in-the Ordnance Bureau will be mustered in 
either of the grades authorized l)y law, except that of master workman, 
at the discretion of the senior ordnance officer at the arsenal or depot at 
which tiiey may be staticmed ; provided, that every enlisted man shall be 
efficient in the discharge of the duties lequircd of him, according to his 
grade. Enlisted mnster workmen will lie appointed, when required, by 
the Chief of Ordnance, upon recommendations of the senior officers of 
arsenals or depots. Ordnance men will be discharged by their com- 
manders on expiration of enlistment ; but for any other cause they can 
be discharged only by the War Department, or by Sentence of a general 
court martial. 

1274. Enlistments, of ordnance men will be taken in duplicate, ac- 
cording to form No. 2G, one to be forwarded to the Chief of Ordnance, 
and the other to be retained at the post or station where the man was 
enlisted. • ^ 

1275. Enlisted soldiers who may be detailed from the line of the 
army for extra service, under the directioti of an officer of the Ordnance 
Bureau, shall be allowed, while so etfiployed, for every period greater 
than ten days continuously, a per diem of forty cents. 

OKDNANCE SERGEANTS. " 

1276. The Secretary of War sIkiU be au'thorized lo select from the 
sergeants of the line of the army, who shall havefaitmTully served eiglit 
years in the service, four years of which in the grade of non-commis- 
jsioned officer, as many ordnance sergeants as the service may require, 
not to exceed onefor each' military post, whose duty it shall bo to re- 
ceive and preserve the' ordnance, arms, ammunition, and other military 
stores at the post, under the direction of tli^e" commanding officer of the 
same, and under sUch regulations as shall be prescribed by the Secre- 
tary of War, and who shall receive for their services twenty-one dollars 
per month.* 

1277. The appointments and removals of ordn'at^^e sergeants sta- . 
tioncd a,t military posts in pursuance of the above provisions of law, 
shall be reported by the Adjutant General to the Chief of Ordnance. 

1278. An ordnance sergeant in charge of ordnance stores at a post 
where there is no commissioiied officer, shall be held responsible for the 
safe keeping of the property, and he shall be governed by the regulations 
of the Ordnance Bureau, in making issues of the same and in preparing 
and furnishing the requisite rtturns. If the means at his disposal are 
not su'iicient foi the preservation of the property, he shall report 'the 
circumstance to the Chief of Ordnance, who shjiH take measures accord- 
ingly. 

ORDNANCE STORES IN SERVICE. 

1270. In time of war, arms, ordnance, and ordnance stores, for arm- • 
*Tlie operation of this article is suspended until farther orders. 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 205 

ing, equipping, and supplying the troops in pcrvico, \Till be ipsucd upon 
the order of any general or field officer comninnding an army, garrison 
or detacHment, whose ordor shall be transmitted to tlie Ordnflnc6 Bu- 
rea by the oflicer or agent by vlioni the issue is njade. The arming of 
permanent fonifications will be specially directed by the Secretary of 
War. 

1280. Any officer commanding a district or geographical department, 
who, in-tiilie of pence, may require authority to call, at hisdf=creti()n. 
lor ordnance and ordnance stores from the arsenals and depots within 
tlie extent of his command, shall make application for that purpose to 
the Secretary of War through the Adjufant deneral's r^ffice. . 

12S1. No arms nor ordnance stores sliall lie issued otherwise than as 
provided for in tjieso regulations, except by special authority from the 
President of the Confederate States, or in cases of servile insurrcctiorv'or 
foreign invasion. "Whenever issues are made under \his exception, the 
order therefor shall be "immediately forwarded to the ordnance officer, 
accompanied by a statement of the roasons for the issue. 

1282. Ordnance stores issued on urgent occasions, as provided in the 
next preceding article, shall, rf not expended, be carefully stored at 
some convenient ordnance tlepot when the urgency leases. 

1283. Qne complete siet of arn)S and accou*rem« nts of each description 
may, if the state of tia public supplies will permit, be issued to any of- 
ficer of the army for his own use, and no other's, on his payment of the 
cost price theft?of to tiie issuing yffic^r. , 

1284. All ordnance stores issued for the personal use of officers, 
agreeably to Par. 1280, shall be account-ed for on the quarterly re- 
turn of property of the officer making the issue ; and the voucher for 
such issue shiill be tire duplicate acknowledgment of the (fficer receiving 
the stores, stating the fact of having received the same and paid for 
them, the amount paid being likewise stated in the acknowledgment. 
(See form No. 21.) Tlie disbursing officer of Wie arsenal, armory, or 
depot, iVuni which the issue is made, will credit all moneys thus receiv- 
ed in his next quarterly account current. 

1285. Ordnance and ordnance storesin charge of any ordnance of- 
ficer, or the command of any regiment. Company, or detachment, or 
other agent of the Ordnance Bureau, shall in no case be issued orloaned 
to individuals, except as provided in Par. 1280, or authorized by lawj 
nor shall thej', under on}' circumstances, be used for private purposes 
by any oliicer or other agent of thaarmy, or be diverted from their le- 
gitimate use, as inoicated by the regulati'iis and the laws appropriating 
moneys for the service of the Ordnance Bureau. 

1286. Requisitions (according to form 24) for ordnance and ofdnance 
etores for the use of regiments, companies, detacbments, or military 
posts or stations, shall, in time of peace, be transmitted to the Generifl 
or commander of the di^ict m- geographical department within which 
such regiment, company, detacliment, or military post or statiorv,is situ- 
ated, who will sanction, modify, or annul such requisition at his discre- 
tion. If sanctioned or modified, he shall transmit the same through the 
Adjutaitt Generiil for the decision of the General-in-Chief. 

1287. In casps of urgent necessity, the requisitions may be trans- 
mitted direct to the 'Adjutant General for the decision of the General-in- 



296 OiElDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 

Chief, duplicates thereof being immediately forwarded, as prescribed ia 
the precedinp; articlcf. 

11^88. The Chief of Ordnance shall examine all. requisitions* for ord- 
rani;e supplies, and, under tlie direction of the Secretary erf War, shall 
modify and rej^ulate them in such manner as to curtail all extravagan- 
cies, to suit them to the exigencies of the service, to existing appropria- 
tions, and to just and proper views of economy; and in the perform- 
ance of this part of his duty, he shall invariably communicate with the 
General-in-Chief of the army. . 

1289. It shall be the duty of the Chief of Ordnance, under the direc- 
tion of the Generalin Chief, to see that a sufficient quantity of ordnance, 
ammunition and ordnance stores are deposited at every military post 
where troops are stationed. 

1L!90. On the receipt of ordnance or ordnance stores by any officer of 
the Ordnance Bureau, or by any other officer or agent of the army, such 
officer or agent shall cause the same to' be immediately examined and 
entered on the property return of the post, company, or detachment, 
and he shall transmit to the forwarding otticer duplicate receipts for the 
samc^(Form No. 7,) stating the number or quantity, and the condition 
of tiie articles received. If, on examination, it should appear that there 
are less than specified iji the invoice, or iiavo sustained material injury 
in the transportation, it siiall be the duty of sucji officer or agent tore- 
port the amount of loss or damage to the Chief of Ordnance, and also to 
the proper officer of the Quartermnsfer's I)e[iartment, to the end that, if 
Euch loss or damage has been caused, by neglect of the agent of trans- 
pol'tation, it may be deducted from the amount allowed him for that 
purjiose. 

1291. .The receipt of ordnance stores at an arsenal or .ordnai^ce de- 
pot shall be noted on the monthly statement of work done. (Form No. 
29.) The receipt of stores at any otiier military post, or by an officer 
in command of troops, shall be immediately reported to the Chief of 
Ordnance. , 

1292. When an officer or agent ef the army, who shall have received 
an invoice of ordnance or ordnance stores to he forwarded to him, has 
reasi)n to believe that they have been lostor miscarried, or are deposited 
in ii-responsible hands, it shall lie his duty to acquaint the forwarding 
officer of such failure. And it shall be the duty of both officers to mako 
diligent inquiries along the route .of transportation, of all persons into 
whose hands such ordnance or ort^nance stores might probably have 
passed ; %e result of which shall be reported to the Chief of Ordnance. 
Should it be ascertained that the stores have been lost, tlien the oificer 
to whorti they were sent shall enclose a certificate (see Form No, 11)' to 
the forwarding officer, who shall transmit the same, accompanied by 
ffnc from hmiself, (see Form No. 12) tf) ttie Chief of Ordnance, t..i the 
end that he may be relieved from further responsibility on that account. 

1293. The commander of any p(;rmanentIy*mhodied regiment, or (if 
separated by companies or detachments) the commander of each com- 
pany or detachment, will be considered as having the immediate 
charge- of, and will be hold accountable for, alt arras, ordnance 
and ordnance stores at the post, issued for the personal armament of 
the troops of his command. And the commander ef each military post 

.will be considered as having the immediate charge of, and will be hold 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 297 

nccoiintnble for, all ordnance nnd ordnance ptnres at the post, wl ich 
are not, in the exclusive pcrvicc of any vegimont/conipany, or detach- 
n)ent, or not in charjjc of an officer or assent of the Orrfiance Btir^ao. 

1294. The commander of each company phall, as far as practicable, 
retain and keep in store snch numher of small arms and set-; of accou- 
trements as may be snflRcient, with those in use, to eqnip the full 
complement of men established by law for his command ; and when- 
ever any such arms and accoutrements become nnservicejible for want 
of repairs* which cannot be made at the post, it shall be the duty of the 
commander of the regiment or yinst to send them to the nearest or most 
convenient arsenal with a requisition for immediate repair ; liiit in no 
case siiall such unserviceable small arms and accoutrements be ex- 
chaiin;cd for others when they can be made serviceable for repair, nor 
until they have been regularly condemned by an inspecting; officer,* or 
board of inspection organized t)y the commander of^he department.' It 
is made the duty of commanders of regiments to see that this regulation 
is strictly obsej-ved. 

1-95. Arms and accoutfementa condemned as totally irreiiarahle, 
'Under the provisions of the preceding article, shall be broken _^u|), and 
the serviceal)le parts retained and accounted for by the commander of the 
company, to bo used for repairs. The commander of each company 
Bhall also, on his rc(|Uisition, made in tlwe usifal form, be fu-nished by 
the Ordnance Bureau with a due proportion of such spare parts as are 
necessary for'repairs. ' , 

1290. Officers who may execute the duty of repairing ar*is and ac- 
coutrer.ients, under the provisions of paragraph 1294, sliall trar srfiittolhe' 
Chief of Ordnance, in each case of repair, a statement i ( the cost thereof, 
in order that it may accompany* to the treasury the quarterly return of 
the odicer commanding the company to which the articles ITelonged, 
and that such officer may be held accountable for the damages, accord- • 
ing to the regulations. • 

4297- Accoutrements and arffllery equipments, only partly worn, 
which have become' soiled or discolored by use in the field, and which 
are rejtortcd as yet sufficiently strojig to endure much more service, 
shall be cleaned and furbished and restt^red to their original new ap- 
pearance, ns nearly as can be done, when they will be issued to the 
troops for service, on the usual requisitions. 

1298. Whenever an enlisted sohiier is transferred from one compiny 
to another, iiis arms and accoutrements shall l)e retained witl^the com- 
pany to which he belonged, unless the urgency of the service shall 
otherwise require. * , * 

1299. In all cases in which ordnance or ordnance stores are lost or 
damaged by the negligence or misconduct of any officer, cadet, or en- 
listed man, the amount of said loss Or damage^ shall be changed to tho 
delinquent on the next upste^proll, and the facts shall l>c recorded on 
the boiks of the company, detachment, military post, arsenal, «)r ord- 
nance depot. On the next quarterly' retu-n of ordnance and ordnunco 
stores, the name of the delinquent shall be noted, with the amount 
charged, the jiarticular loss or damage for which the charge is made, 
and tho date of the muster ndl on which note<I. 

1300. When, in. compliance with the preceding article, a charge fq^* 
loss or damage of ordnance or ordnance stores is made against any in- 



298 ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 

dividual, it shall be the duty of the commandiug officer, provided it bo 
requested by the individual charged, to asseinble a hoard of examina- 
tion (tt) be eomp^ed of commi^siniied olficers, if-pVacticable,) to'investi- 
gate the {\icts, and report to him the cause of such loss or damage ; and 
their report, with the remarks of the commanding officer thereon, shall 
accompany the nest quarterly return to the Chief of Ordnance. 

1301. Ail charges made in obedience to paragraphsl299 and 1300, of 
these regulations, ibr loss or damage of ordnance or ordnance stores in 
the hands of tlie troops, shall have precedence of all other claims what-, 
soever on the pay of the troops; they shall be regulated by tables of 
cost, periodically published by the Chief of Ordnance, (See rates of 
prices of articles.) 

1302. Whenever stoppages are noted on muster rolls, for loss or dam- 
age of ordnance or ordnance stores, it shall be the duty of the paymaster 
to Avithhold the aiil^unt cliarged, and that of the Paymaster General to 
transmit to the Second Auditor of the Treasury,* in the month of May, 
annually, a statement exhibiting tlie total amount of such stoppages up 
to the 3l8t of December next preceding, to- the end that such amount 
may be refunded to the appropriation to which it may legally belong,. 

1303,'AVhen any person shall fraudulently sell or otherwise dispose 
of any ordnance or ordnance stores, the property of tlie Confederate 
States, or convert the same to his own use, or deface their marks for the 
purpose of concealment, or wantonly waste or destroy such property, 
it shall be the duty of any military officer to whom the facts shall be- 
*come kno\Tin, either personally or on creditable report, to communicate 
the'circamstances to the Chief of Ordnance, who sha,ll adopt such mea- 
sures in the case as the interest of the service may require. 

130-4. Surplus' ordnance and ordna^ice stores in the hands of the 
troops shall be tdrned into~ store, in as good order as possible, at the 
most convenient ordnance depot, for which the officer or agent in charge 
of such depot shall giv* a receipt, stating their condition, 

1305. Surplus ordnance and ordnance stores, at any military past, 
not an ordnance depot, which are considered Hy the-commanding officer 
unnecessary for the service of the post, shall be transported to an.arsenal 
or ordnance depot, provided the removal of such ordnance and ordnance 
stores shall be first sanctioned by an Inspector General, or by the com- 
mander of the department in which they are situated. Officers com.- 
manding posts will report all surplus stores to the commander of the 
department, or to the Inspector General, when present at the post on a 
tour of inspection, who shall designate the place to wdiich they shall be 
removed. *^ 

130G. In case'ordnance or ordnance stores are lost, or rendered un- 
serviceable by unav(5idable accident, the commanding officer shall as- 
semble a hoard of survey to investigate 'the facts, and report to him 
the cause of puch loss or damage. Th^ bofml shall be composed of 
commissioned officers, when practicable, and tlieir report shall be sub- 
mitted to the commanding officer- for his remarks or explanations, and 
shall be forwarded by the pervson responsible for the property with liis 
next quarterly return of property to the ordnance office. 

1307. Whenever any otticer in charge of ordnance or ordnance stores 
shall leave his command or post, with a prospect of being absent for any 
period less than three moo-ths,' it shall not be obligatory on him to take re- 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 299 

ceipts for said ordnance or ordnance storts ; but he may, at bis own discre- 
tioti, either close his accounts or placB tiie ordnance or ordnance stores 
under charfre uf the officer next in cc)mmand, who shall in that case, do 
all duty in rej;ard to ^id ordnance or ordnance stores in the name of 
said absent officer, until his return to the command or post. 

1308. At the decease of any disbuVsinnj officer of the Ordnance Bu- 
reau, or any •filler, or agent chargeable with ordnance or ordnance' 
stores, and responsible for the returns required by paraj^raphs 1348 and 
1350, a board of survey shall be assembled by the senior officer of the 
arsenal, depot, or post, to examine the state of the funds, ordnance or 
ordnance stores, for which said ofiicer or agent was acQpuntable. The 
board will make a report in duplicate, in the eame order of classification 
as in Par. 1305, stating the kinds, quantity, and condition of said ord- 
Tiance or ordnance stores, and the amount of funds ^ki hand, which re- 
port will be immediately transmitted to the Chief of Ordnance*; the du- 
plrcate will be handed to the successor of the deceased. 

130'J. The commander of jeach company in garrison shall constantly 
retain in store, and exhiMt'on his quarterly returns ot* property, the 
regulation arm chests hereinafter n%ntioned, in which all arms a<fB ac- 
coutrements, not in the hands of the troops, shall be at all times securely 
packed for preservation, viz^ to each company of infantry, and to each 
company of artillery armed as infantry, two musket arm-chests ; and to 
each company of riflemen, two riOo arm-chests ; to each company of 
cavalry, one pistol arm-chest; and if armed with carbines^ or rifles, 
then, in additiim, one rifle or 'carbine arm-chest. 

13 10. The commanding ofiicer of any regiment, garrison, company, or 
detacliment, shall be responsible that all surplus chests or cases, other 
than packing boxes, in which arms or other ordnance stores have been 
conveyed to his command arc carefully preserved. They will be re- 
ceipted for and entered upon the property returns as other stofes, and, 
in like manner, reported to the Ordnance Bureau. 

1311. Evoryofficer comoumiling a permanently embodied regiment, 
or a company, garrison or detachment, shall make a report every two 
months to the Ordnance Bureau, stating all damages to arms, equip- 
ments, and im]ilements belonging to ^is command, noting those occa- 
sioned by negligence or abuse, and naming the party by whose negli- 
gence or aliuse the said damages were occasioned : which reports shall 
be consolidated by the Chief oY Ordnance, and transmitted with his re- 
marks and orders thereon, every six months, to the superintendents of 
the national armories and inspecting officers of the Qrdnance Bureau, 
in order to ascertain and correct any defects which may exist in the 
manufacture of arms. 

UNSERVICEAlJl^ ORDNANCE STORES. 

1312. Whenever ordnance o» ordnance stores are reported unser- 
viceable, they shall be examined by an Inspector General, or some other 
officer specially designated .by the. Secretary of War for that purpose, 
who will note on the inventory such as he condemns and such as he con- 
sidei-s repairable. (See form No. 13.) lie shall recommend the stores 
condemned by him either to be broken up at the arsenal, depot, or mili- 
tary post, or to be sold, as may be d?emed most i.dvantageous to the pub- ' 
lio service ; but should it appear to the inspector that the ordnance or 



300 ORDNANCi;' DEPARTxMENT. 

ordnance f tores condemned are c^f too li.ttlc value to cover the expense of 
sale or Breaking up, lie shall recwniraend them to be dropped from the 
return as jseless. Sucli arms and" stores as tlie inspector may consider 
repairable lie shall direct either to be repaired aS flie arsenal, depot, or 
military post, or to be transported to the nearest or most convenient 
arsenal or depot of construcTion a? repairs. The list of condemned stores 
(see form No. 10) with the remarks and opinion of the inspector, shall be 
made in duplicate, and forwarded to the Chief of Qrdnance for the fur- 
ther action of the Presii^nt of the Confederate States. The inventory 
shall be left with the officer having charge of the ordnance and ord- 
nance stores. 

1313. All articles condemned and ordered for sale by the President 
of the Confederate States shall be disposed of at public auction, under 
the superintendent of such officers as may be designated for that pup.^ 
pose bythe Chler of Ordnance, due public notice being given of the 
sale. An auth rized auctioneer shall be employed, and the sale shall be 
conducted in conformity with the established usages of the place where 
made. ' ' * . ' 

13i4. An officer directing a salet)f unserviceable ordnance stores will 
cause the articles to be offered in such lots as he may think will com- 
mand the best prices ; and he is authorizgd to bid in or suspend the 
sale of any articles when, in his opinion, they will command better prices 
at private sale. No article shall be sold at private sale until after it 
shall have been offered at auction, nor then at a price less than that 
offered arpublio sale. 

1315. AU sales shall be for cash. The auctioneer shall make° certain 
bills of sale of the property and deliver them to the superintending offi- 
cer, to whom the money shall be paid 'on delivery of the property. All 
expenses of the sale shall be paid from the proceeds. The auctioneer's 
ceriified account of sales in detail, and the vouchers for the expenses of 
the sale, shall be forwarded to the ordnance office unconnected with 
quarterly accounts, whence, after exsTmination and recqj'd, they shall be 
trajismitted to the proper auditor for settlement; the nett proceeds of 
the sale shall be disposed of in such manner as the Chief of Oiunanco 
shall direct. 

ISSUE OF ORDNANCE STORES TO MILITIA IN THE SERVICE OF THE CONFEDE- 
RATE STATES. 

1316. Whenever any regiment, or company or detachment of militia 
shall be called into the service of the Confederate States, they are mus- 
tered and inspected by an inspector general, or some duly authorized 
officer of the regular troops, who shall ascertain the condition of the 
arms, accoutrements, ordnance and ordnance stores in their possession, 
and if it should be found necessary to supply them with arms and accou- 
trements, or ordnance and ordnance stores, belonging to the Confederate 
States, the commander thereof shall make requisition for the articles re- 
quired, according to form No. 25, wiiich if sanctioned' by the inspecting 
officer, shp.ll be submitted for approval or modification to the commander 
of the regular troops present or in the vicinity ; and upon such requisi- 
tion duly approved by such commander, an3' officer or agent of the Ord- 
nance Bureau may issue the articles required taking duplicate receipts 
therefor, one of which shall be forwarded to the Chief of Ordnance, in 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 801 

order thj»t the same may be charged on the bo ks of the bureau to the 
officer who received them. And tlie oominander^f pucli fcfjiment, bat- 
taliori, company or detachment, shalj be held respimpiWe fur the care 
and preservation of tlie articles tl)us received, and tliat tlie arm? and 
accoutrements are issued to the men cnstituttng l)i.s enmmand, and 
that each individual is cliarged on tlie Cluster roll with the actual num- 
ber of arms and accoutrements delivered to him ; and the same shall bo 
entered upon eacn successive muster roll until the men shall be dis- 
charged. * . ' 

1317. When any militia are about to b« discharged, they are mus- 
tered for payment by an inspe.;tor general, or some other duly autho- 
rized officer of the regular troiJps, who shall, at tTie same time, critically 
inspect the arms and accoutrement* in their posses-ion. in order to as- 
certain if any loss or damage has accrued to them whilst in their pos- 
session, cither by negligence or carelessness ; and if s^^, shall charge the 
amount of said loss or damage, according to the rates established by th'e 
Ordnance Bureau, to emh individual, opposite to his name on the mus- 
ter roll, which amount the paymaster shall deduct from the pay due 
each individual at the tiu^of his discharge. And it shitll be the duty 
of the inspecting f)ffii!er, or of an ol^cer of the Ordnance Bureau,^ the 
time of muster and inspection for discharge, to receive the arms and ac- 
coutrements, ordnance an# ordnance stores, in the possession of the 
regiment, battalion, company or detaidiment, and to giv^ duplicate re- 
ceipts for the same to the commander thereof, in order that he ta;iy set- 
tle his accounts with the Ordnance Bur^iu. 

IS 18. No payments shall lie made to any militia called into the ser- 
vice of the Confederate States until tliey shall have been mustered, and 
shall have delivered up their arms and ace outij^ments, as set forth in 
trie preceding article, unless they were absent by reason of sickness, or 
some other justifiable cause, at the time of. the muster and inspection 
for discharge; and in such case they shall produce Teoeipts *a the pay- 
master that they have deposited their arms and accoutrements with 
some officer antiiorized tio receive tliem, Avho siiall state in the receipts 
the condition of the arms and accoutrements, and the amount of loss 
or damage, (if any has accrued wliilst tlie same were in their posses- 
sion,) according to the rates establisljed by the Ordnance Bureau, which 
amount the paymaster shall deduct from the pay due them at the time 
of their discharge. 

1319. In all cases when arms, nccoutrcments, ordnance, or ordnance 
stores, issued to any officer, non-commissioned officer, or soldier of the 
militia, called into the service of the Confederate States, shall have 

J)een lost by unavoiiable circumstances, it shall be 'the duty of the in- 
specting officer, who shall muster and inspect'tlie same for discharge, to 
require the affidavit of some officer or non-commissioned officer, testify- 
ing to the unavoidable circumstances of the loss, and such affidavit, if 
deemed satisfactory, shall be sufficient anthorfty for the inspecting 
otiicer to relieve the individual who shall liave been charged with the 
loss from all charges on account' of such loss, which shall be entered 
with the affidavit on the proper muster roll. 

INSPECTION OF ORDNANCE AND ORDNANCE STORES. ^ 

1320. Regulations, in detail, for the inspection and proof of all ord- 



302 ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 

nance and orrlnance stores shall be prepared by the Cliief of Ordnance, 
■with the approbation T)! the Secretary of War, and the mode of inspec- 
tion and proof shall be tlie saiue for all articles of the same kind, 
whether fabricated at the ordnance establishments, or procured by con- 
tract or by open purchase, 

I. Inspection of Ordnance and Projectiles. 

1321. The inspection and proof of ordnance .'ind projectiles shall be 
made under the direction of the Chief of Ordnance,- by 'such oflBcers of 
the Ordnance Bureau as heniay^ from time to time, designate for that 
purpose, who will ]>q h.eld strictly responsible that all ordnance and pro- 
jectiles received by them for the Confederate States shall have been 
subjected to the inspection and proof required, and that they shall con- 
form in all respects to the established models. 

. 1322. The inspftting officer of ordnance and projectiles at the foun- 
dries shall give to the contractors triplicate certificates of inspection, ac- 
cording to form No. 32. 

1323. Duplicate reports of inspection of ordnance and projectiles at 
the foundries (forms Nos. 33 and 34) shall^e made immediately after 
eaelJlnspection ; one copy to be forwarded to the Chief of Ordnance; 
and in the month of July a consolidated report (form No. 3.5) of all 
such inspections, made during the year enfling 30th June, shall be for- 
warded^ by the inspecting officer to the Cliief of 'Ordnance. The in- 
specting officer will keep books in which shall be recorded all reports 
which he is required to make,»and all co.rrespondence connected with 
this particular service. These books will be carefully preserved, and, 
in case of reUef, turned over to his successor. 

II. Inspeciion of Small Arms and Accoutrements. ' ' 

1321. All small^arms aiKl accoutrements manufiictured by contract, 
or purchased for th'e service of the Confederate States, shall, before being 
received, be inspected under the direction of the Chief o^Ordnance, by 
officers of the Ordnance Bureau, design*iited for that yiurpose. 

1325. It shall be the duty of the inspecting x>fficer of the contract 
service, under the order of the Chief of Ordnance, to inspect all muskets, 
rifles, carbines, pistols, swords, sarbres, or other small arms and accou- 
trements, that may be manui'actured in the contract service for the Con- 
federate States. He will be held strictly responsible that the feaid arms 
and accoutrements are in exact, conformity with the models and pat- 
terns. To aid the inspecting officer in the performance of these duties, 
such number of assistants, as may be required shall be detailed from the 
National armories, by the commanding officer, on the requisition of tha 
inspecting officer. '. ' • 

1326. Each assistant inspector shall, previousio entering on the duty, 
take an oath before a competent magistrate for its faithful discharge; 
and it shall be the duly of the inspecting officer to see that no assistant 
be allowed to inspect the arms manufactured at the same private estab- 
lishment oftener than twice in succession. 

1327. The inspecting officer of contract arms shall in all cases, 'before 
receiving any such arms for the Confederate States, cause them to be 
taken to pieces in his presence, and the several parts to be closely ex-, 
amined by the. assistants. When arms have been received by the in- 



C ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 303 

spectinpj officers for tlie use of tlie Confederate S]ate=i nt private armo- 
ries, tlie principal inspector will cause tliem inimodia'ely^Ho l)e lioxed 
for trarispnrtatioM in his presence, and will secure each box by fixing 
his ppjils thereon. 

1^28. Inspections of small arms and accoutrements, made by contract, 
shall be niaile quarterly ; and the inspcctinp; offictM* shall make annual 
reports of inspections, (fyrin No. 37,) and at eath reception of articles 
furnished by contract, he siiall j^ive to the contractor triplicate certifi- 
cates, according to form No. liO. 

132^^ The-inspectincj officer of contract ari^is and accoutrements shall 
keep books in which shall bo copied such insppction reports as they are. 
required to niiikc. and all the correspondence connected with this par- 
ticular service. The orijjinal reports shall be f.rwarded to the Chief of 
Ordnance as soon as the several inspections. are completed. The books 
above mentioned shall be carefully preserved, and,^n case of relief, 
turned over to the successors. 

III. Inspection of Gnnpoicder. 

1330. Gunpowder is ordiparily packed in barrels containing one hun- 
dred pounds each. The magazines i|i which it is kept shall be frcq^it- 
ly aired in dry weather. 

1331. Gunpowder in the n|n<:;n:^inee {:ivinfi a proofranc;ej by the es- 
tablished eprouvette, less than one hundred and eighty y«rds, shall not 
be used in the serrfrc charfje.i, but shall be separated from that of 
higher range, and legibly marked ; to be used for firing salutes and for 
blank cartridge practice. That which gives a range less tban one hun- 
dred and fifty yards shall be considered unserviceable. » 

1332. The inspecting officer shall cause *Vach cask to be marked in 
the following manner, viz : on one end the place and year of fabrication 
and description of powder; on the other end the proof range and date 
of proof, taking care to leave space for subsequent pmofs. 

1333. Reports of proof and inspection of powder received from eon- 
tractors, and ofthat in the mrigazine-J, shall be made in duplicate ac- 
cording to form No 39 ; and the proving oflHi'er shall give to ^he con- 
tractor triplicate certificates of inspection according to form No. 38. 
One of the duplicate inspection reports of powder in tiie magazines, 
and of that received from contractors for the'Confederate States, shall 
he forwarded to the Chief of Ordnance on the completion of the inspec- 
tion ; 'the other for powder in magnzines, shall be. recorded at the arsenal 
or depot; the duplicate for powder received for the Confederate States 
shall Ix^ retained by the proving officer. 

1334. Standard powder for the rec'eption proof of all kinds of fire- 
arms, wli^thor -manufactured at the national armories, foundaries, or 
by coiitraot, shall be of sncii quality as to give a range of not less than 
two hundred and'fift;/ yS-ds by the regulation eprouvette. 

1335. All-powder, designed for the proof of firearms, shall be proved 
with the regulation eprouvette, immediately preceding the inspection, 
unless it shall have been so proved witiiin otic year, and there be no 
reason to suspect that it has become deteriorated. 

CONTR.\CTS. • 

133G. No contract for the service of the Ordnance Bureau shall bo 
made by any officer or agent thereof, except by special authority of 



304 ORDNANCE I-EPARTMENT. • 

• 

the Chief of Ordnance, sanctioned by the Seqretary of War : and all 
officers or jfj^ents making contracts, shall strictly observe the provi-- 
sions of the laws on tliat subject. Contracts sliali be made in triplicate, 
one of wliich shall be forwarded to the Chief of Ordnance, at the dato 
of the contract, that it may be depo.'^ited in the office of the comiitrollcr 
within ninety days tliereafter. 

1337. The ri<flits vested in a contractor, for»services to be performed, 
or supplies to be furnidied for the Ordnance Bureau, shuH in no case be 
transferred to any other f^erson or persons; but such contractor shall 
be held to his legal responsibilities, and all payments shall be iftade to 
•him only. 

1338. Payments on account of any contract, to the amount of four- 
fifths of the value of the jvork done, or of services performed in part, 
may be made in case the contract embraces operations of long contin- 
uance. Such payments on account, under an unfulfilled contract not 
being admitted at the treasury, will not be charged in the quarterly ac- 
counts; but a statement of all such, specifying the amount of each, 
will be annexed to the duplicate account cui^ent, which is designed for 
th^ipes of the ordnance office, in order that the true state of the funds 
on hand inay be known. 



1339. Every disbursing officer of the Ordnance Bureau shall transmit 
to the Chief of Ordnance, within twenty days after the expiration of 
each quarter, an account current of all moneys received, expended, and 
r^naining on liand, with the necessary vottchers and abstracts made ac- 
coniing to the forms hereinafter prescribed ; which, after examination 
in the Ordnance office, will be transmitted to the treasury department 
for settlement. ■ ' " ■ 

1^1340. A duplicffte of the quarterly account current, and of the abstract 
menticmed in the preceding paragraph, shall be transmitted at the same 
time to the Ordnance office, to be retained for use there. On a blank 
page of this duplicate account (Current there shall be endorsed a state- 
ment orreceipts and expenditures under each appropriation, (form No. 
22,) and the face of the a))Stract will show as Hir as practicable, the 
quantity and kind of articles purchased. (See form No. 19.) Individ- 
ual accounts for services will show the dates and kind of service 
charged. * ■ 

1341. Vouchers of articles purchased, for supplies furnished, for ser- 
vices rendered, or for other expenditures, will be made agreeably, to one 
or the other of the forms No. 15, IG, 17 or 18, according to the nature 
of^the case: First: Form No. 15 h the form of a voucher fav supplies 
furnished, or for services rendered by an individual. Second: Form 
No. IG is the form of an ordinary receipt-ri!l for s'ervices.. Third: 
Form No. 17 is a pay-roll to be u^ed at armories or arsenals,.whore work 
is done by the piece. Fourth : Form No. 18 is a pay roll for hired 
slaves. FiJ'th:. In all tire acrounts Af individuals against the Confede- 
rate States the niatters and things charged for are to be tlearly and ac- 
curately set forth. No substitution,f)f names, dates, services, prices, or 
things, of any kind shall be made; tiie transaction on wliich the 
charges are made in any account shall, in all eases, be truly represented 
on the face of the voucher. Sixth : In accounts for articles purchased, 



ORDNANCE DEPARTlMENr. 805 

tlio date of each separate purchase, the name and the number or quan- 
tity of each article, the price (»f each, with tlie particular to which the 
price refers — as nuniher, weijjlit or measure, and the amount due for 
each, will he specified in ths body f)f tfie account. If the public use of 
any article he not fully apparent from its name ; or if, from any otlier 
cause, there be reason to apprehend tiiat the charge nmy not he correct- 
ly comprehended by the accounting; officers, the purpose for which it 
■was procured, or other explanation, should be inserted opposite the ar- 
ticle in the column of remarks. ScvciifJi : If an account be for services 
rendered, the occupation or kind of service, the time employed, the 
dates within which the services were rendered, the wages and the amount 
should. be stated in the body of the aciount. If the service charged be* 
of an unusual kind, or if jt be char;i;ed at an unusual rate, or if, from 
any cause, the charge may be liable to misconception, the necessary ex- 
planation should 1)0 given under the head of remarks. The dates to be 
inserted in the left margin of the accounts should represent the time 
when the several sums charged were due to the creditors. Eifihth : At 
armories and at arsenals, wiiere the number gf persons employed is 
consiilerable, the accounts for services rendered will be stated on month- 
ly rolls, specifying the name and occupation of each, the numbW of 
days' service rendered by, the wages of, and the amount due to each. 
Agreeably to forms No. IG.fftid 17. Ninth: In case the authority to 
direct and control expenditures reside in one officer, and the payments 
are made by another, the accounts must ho sanctioned by the signature 
of the directing officer, in the manner indicated by forms No. 15,. 10, 17 
and 18, before payment is made; the date on which the sanction is 
given shall always be sttited. lenth: \n the accounts for the transpor- 
tation of stores Off supplies, the articles carried, with the number or. 
weight thereof, the places from and to which, and the distance convey- 
ed, the period within wliich ttie service was performed, and the priee, 
should be specified. If the charge be for transporting stores.froni the 
post to a distant place, an original liill of lading, and thc^eceipt of the 
person to whom the articles were addressed, or other proper evidence of 
delivery, should be annexed to the voucher, * 

1342. V»ucnEi<s. Firxt: An account for the transportation or travel- 
ling allov?ance of an armory otficer, or other person, will state the dis- 
tance travelled, the purpose of the journe^y, and at what time perform- 
ed; and it must be sustained by theoriginal order directing'the service, 
or a certified copy of, or extract from it, with a certificate that the jour- 
ney charged has been performed. Second : An account for postage of 
letters on public service must be accompanied by a certificate from the 
officer sending or receiving them, setting fortli that the postage charged 
is due exclusively for letters on the public l.)usincss committed to his 
charge. Third : 'If an .account be founded upon a contract ul* agreemeTit, 
reference should be made to the agreement in the body of the account, 
and the original agreement should lie rransniitted with the first account 
arising under it, if the same shall rtot liave been previously transmitted ; 
vouchers referring to a verbal agreemc nt, without a specification of par- 
ticulars, are inadmissible. Fourth: In case a charge is made by one 
person, for a payment made by hiu) to another, for freight, wharfage, 
drayage, or otlicr purpose, the particulars of the charge will be fully 
f peoified in the body of the account, and a receipt from the person to 



306 ORDNA-NCE DEPARTMENT. 

whom the payment is made must be annexed to the account as a sub- 
voucher. Fifth: The prices and amounts in all accounts and rolls will 
be stated in dollars and cents. Sixth: All accounts accruing; during 
any quarter should, if practicable, be adjusted and paid during thecur- 
rent quarter, or within so short a period after its termination as to be 
embraced in the account fur tho appropriate quarter. SeveiL,th : The re- 
ceipt annexed to an account will express the sum paid by words written 
out in full and not by fi<i;ures, and it will state the name of the person 
from whom, the place, where, and the date when, the money is received ; 
the receipt will be signed, if practicable, by the person in whose name 
the account is stated, or if signed by another as agent, proper evidence 
that the agent was duly authorized by the principal to sign receipts 
must accompany the account. When the signature to a receipt does 
not legibly express the name of the writer, it should be witnessed. 
Eighth: If expenditures under different appropriations be contained in 
one voueherj the amount expended under each shall be separately sta- 
ted ; if this occur in an individual account, the items shall be appropri- 
ately designated in the body of it or in the column of remarks : if it 
hapji^en in a pay-roll,- the amount chargeable to such appropriation shall 
be stated at the bottom of the roll, and the sevei'al sums shall be sepa- 
rately stated in the appropriate columns of the abstract. Ninth : If the 
number of persons to be entered on tlic receipt-roll be so considerable 
as to require it, the roll will be made up into book form, similar to No. 
17. Tenth: In all cases where the expenditures are made in pursuance 
of special orders or instructions from the Chief or Ordnance, a reference 
to such orders, specifying the date, will be made in the column of re- 
marks on the voucher, in which the expenditure is charg.ed. If the or- 
ders emanate from any other source than the Chief ofK)rdnance, then a 
certified copy will be appended to the voucher. 

1.343. Abstrac»s. First: All expenditures, for one quarter, will be 
embodied in one abstract. Expenditures under differenj, appropriations 
will be enter^ in separate columns (see form No. 19). Secoiid : The 
vouchers fi^* all expenditures in any quarter shall be numbered in- one 
continued series, according to their dates. Third : If the abstract is so 
large as to require more than one sheet, it will be madron several . 
sheets of the same kind stitche-1 together in book -form. 

1344. Accounts current will be prepared according to form No. 20. 
They should always commence by entering — First, the balance from the 
last account; if that balance shall have been ofBcially ascertained and 
stated to the disbursing officer, he will enter the official balance; if 
otherwise, he will enter the balance as stated by himself in his last ac- 
count. Second: All ouoney received sint-e the last account was render- 
ed. will ther^lje entered specifying, separately the several sums, the dates 
when, and fn)m what source received. The expenditures will then be 
charged, entering the amount under each appropriation separately. 
Third: The accpurit should then be balanced, ceriifi^'d and (fated, agree- 
ably to the prescribed form. 

RETURNS AND REPORTS. 

1345. The Chief of Ordnance shall transmit monthly, to the Adjutant 
General's office, a return, exhibiting the names, rank and stations of all 



ORDNANCE BIEPAETlvfENT. ^ 307 

officers and enlisted men attached to the corps of artillery in the eerrice 
6f the Ordnance Bureau. 

l.'j-J^). The officer havinj; oharpe of each arsenal or ordnance depot 
shall transmit to the Chief of Ordnance, within five days after the ter- 
mination of eacsh month, and according to tlie forms hereinafter pre- 
ficriticd, the following monthly returns, viz: first, of the ordnance of- 
ficers and enlisted men at the post (form No. 27) ; second, of the liired 
men employed (form No. 28) : <hird, of the work dj)ne at the po<*t (form 
No. 29). The commanding officer of each national arnniry shall trans- 
mit to the Chief of Ordnance, within the period al)ove named, a month- 
ly return of army officers and n)en employed, and of small arms and 
their appendages, manufactured at the armory (form No. ?>0). The 
commandinp; officer of each armory, arsenal, or depot, shall transmit, at 
the end of every month, a summary statement of money received and 
expended, (form No. 32,) which shall ho made out by the disbursing 
cUieer. • 

1347. The cnmmandinn; officer of each national armory, arsenal, or 
Ordnance depot, shall transmit to the Chief of Ordnance, at the bej^in- 
ninpj of each quarter, an estimate of the funds required during th(^ 
quarter. (Form No. 29.) » 

134H. Every person liaving the charge and custody of ordnance or 

onlnance stores, shall he held responsible for the same, and shall make 

and transmit to tiie Chief of Ordnance, within twenty days after t|je 

t( riiiination of the quarter, a quarterly return of the same, according to 

t' 'i'lrms referred to in paragraph 1353 of these rrgulations, which return, 

• having been duly e«amined, will be transmitted to the prpper 

r of the treasury. ^ 

19. When an officer commands,* jit the sam-e time, a military post 

also a regiment or company, he shall make a return of ordnance 

nil 1 ordnance stores belonging to the post, separate and distinct from 

those belonging to the regiment or company. 

13.")0. 'Jlie commanding officer.of an armory, arsenrl, or ordlfance de- 
pot, having a storekeeper, shall transmit to the Chief of Ordnance, in 
the month of July of each year, a return according to form No. 1, of all 
ordnance, tools, machines and other stores, including public horses and 
oxen, which may be in current service ; and such commandhig officer 
shall not be required to make the quarterly returns called for in the 
134^^th paragraph; but he shall, at the end of ench month, turn over to the 
Storekeeper all finished articles fabricated during the mouth, and other 
8t( res which may be required in the current service. 

1351. Arms, ordnance, and ordnance stores, shall be arranged on the 
returns and inventories, according to the classification cxenip ificd in 
.paragraph \S65, • 

1 1352. Every person who Is required by paragraph 1348, or 1350, to 
liako a quarterly o^ annual return of ordnance or ordnance stores, 
shall make an exact inventory of the same in the month of June of each 
year, and shall certify, on tiie second quiifter's return, that suck in- 
teutury has been accurately made, and that said return has been com- 
larod with the inventory, and corrected accordingly, if necessary. This 
kventory shall be made according to form No. 13, and shall, if re- 
hired, be exhibited to the Inspcctor-Gweral, or to any other inspecting ' 
fcoer who may visit the post. 



308 ORDINANCE BEPARTMENT. 

1353. All returns of property required I)/ parap;rfiplis 1348 and 1350 of 
these re<!!;nlati(ius sliall be made accordino- to tlie furujs hereinaftjer pre 
scribed, tbat is to say, quarterly and annual returns of prdj-jerty, (ac- 
curding to form No. 1 ;) invoices and vom-hers in support thereof, viz: 
'of articles received, (according; to form No. 2;) abstract of articles fal)- 
ricated, (form No. 3:) alistract of articles purchased, (form No. 4;) al 
stract of articles required, (form No. 5 ;) statement of materials ob- 
tained from condemned stores, (form No. 6 ;) receipts for stores issued 
to the army, (fcu'ms'No. 7 and 21 ;) receipt for stores issued to the^i 
litia, (form N( . 8;) abstract of articles expended or consumed for pin- 
poses iif oonstructi(jn in the ordnance worksliops, or for current service, 
(form No. 9 ;) list of condemned stores stricken from the return Vjy 
order of the President of the Confederate States, (form No. 10;) certi- 
fied invoice, (form No. 2 ;) of stores turned over to the Quartermaster's 
Department for transportation, for which a receipt shall not have been 
obtained in time to accouipany the return ; sych receipt, when obtained, 
shall be marked to correspimd witli the invoice and the return to wliich 
it belonj^s, and shijll be forwarded with the next quarterly return; cer- 
tijicafes of the loss of ordnance stores in transportation, (forms Nos. 11 
'artd 12;) original orders for issue in certain cases, (accordinn; to para- 
■}2:rapli8 1280 and 1281.) All ab.itracfs required above sliall be furnished 
in dnpliciiie to tlie ordnance office. If the vouchers for receipts or issues 
of property are too numerous to he stated sejiarately on the face of tiie 
rSturn, an abstract of tliein will be 'hia/<le in.a form corresponding vritli 
that of the return. In all the vouchers and abstracts accompanying a 
property return, the articles should be arrariged in the same order as 
in the body of the return. 

135?. Eaidi commanding officer*, or other agent of the ordnance de- 
partment, who is required liy paragraphs 1248 and 1250 to make returns, 
shall constantly keep at iiis statiim recorded copies of said returns, to 
be turned over to his successor in the same manner as other property; 
and all i^e books and files of papers required by fliis and tire next fol 
lowing article shall be submitted to'the Inspector General and.other in 
specting officers on their tours of inspection, who shall state in their ren 
ports the order in whicli they are kept. 

1355. Each officer, or other agent of tlie Ordnance Department, re 
quired byparagaphs 1339, 1340, 1346, 1347, and 1358of these regulations, 
to make the uKmth]}' returns, accounts current, and abstracts of reports 
therein referred to, shall constantly keep at lu§ station, to be turned 
over to his successor, tlie following books and files of papers, viz : First : 
A nionlhly return hook, containing copies of all monthly returns nnd 
statements, except the company return, form 28. Second: A compahij 
return bopk, made by binding together the duplicate retarus jvhich are 
retained at the post. Third : An account book, containing copies of nil 
quarterly accounts current, of all abstracfts of money disbursed, of the 
statements endorsed on such accounts and abstract*, dnd of the est! 
niatgs for funds. Foiirtli : A letter book, containing copies of ail officia 
letters written by jiich officer or agent. Fifth: An annual inveatQnj,^ 
ftf^oi, made liy binding together tlie duplicate inventories retained a 
the post. Sixth: Files of tctlers received., containing all original o*cia 
letters received on. ordnance service, regularly endorsed and bundled, 
according to tho years in whicli they are .written. Seventh; Files oj^ 



h- 



■mil 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT* 309 



em neeeived, cnntnimng all original order?, rejrulations and circular 
letteri* received, endnrspfj and Imndled aecordinjij to th(i years in which 
they are written. Ei(fJith: At armories and arsenals of construction, 
such hooks wilUhekefit as may he necessary to sliow tlie nature and 
extent of operntiiins, and tlie details of the applications of funds. 

1356. It sliail he the duty ^i the Chief of Ordnance' to report to the 
Second Auditor nf the Treasury, in the month of June of eacli j'car. all 
persons wiio shall have failed to transmit returni^ within •the periods 
prescril)ed hy the r24Xth titk 12")0t|) parii(jra|)hs of these repulations. 

l.'!')7. Should an officer 6r other auejit of the Ordnance Bureau, 
chnr<^ed with ordiianc'e and oidnance stores, fail to render tlie ]iresciihed 
returns thi-reof, within a reasonahle time after the termination of a 
quarter, a settlement shall he made out of his accounts at the treasury, 
and the moncij rnhte of tlie supplies with which he stands charjjed shall 
be reported atr'vinst him for colfection. Thft deljnquency will also fur- 
nish matter of military aofusatiun,"at the discretion of the propgr au- 
timrity. 

l;>58. The commandinfj officerxif ench armory, arsenal, or ordnance 
depot, shall tratismit to the Chief of Ordnance, in the month of August 
of each year, an annual iriventory and report of operations for theyea* 
ending the 30th June, according to form No. 31. This inventory will 
be made iq duplicate, one copy to be retained at the post. 

1359. A general statemetit, in a condensed form, will he transmitted 
Avith the annual inventury and report, showing the principal operations 
at the post during the year ending June 30th. This statement will 
emhrace 1 .vperiinents, (thfir ohjects and results;) the construction of 
buildings, machinery, or other important works; extensive re^irs or 
alterations, and the general characlei^f the operations at the armorie.s 
and arsenals of construction and in the foundry and inspection service. 

; TRANSMITTING PAPERS TO TUE ORDNANCE OFFICE. 

1360. All papers transmitted .to«|J)e Chief of Ordnance (except |the 
nnnual inventories and the returns or stores, with their vouchers,) shall 
be fidded in such manner that the packet sl.all not exceed three and a 
half inches in width and eight anu a quarter inches in length, and shall 
be, as near as practicahle, of those dimensions. They shall be endorsed 
according to the prescribed forms. The duplicate papers designed for 
the Chief of Ordnance will have the additional words, " Ordnance 
Pj'''i:r," written on the back of each. 

1 '01, All returns, statements, or other papers, which may be trans- 
1 ;ed to the Chief of Ordnance, shall- be accompanied by a letter of 
f] ice. • 

■U>2. The printed blank forms required by these regulatints for the 
vice of the Ordnance Bureau shall, when not otherwise directed, bo 
furnished from the ordnance office to the several posts and stations, on 
rci|nisitioiis to be made annually, in the month of May, by the com- 
nm'iiiers of such posts or stsitions, showing the number of each form 
reipiired -for one yetir's consumption. * 

he printed forms are as follows, viz : Nos 15, 10, 17, 18, 19, 20, £6, 
28, 30,31,33. 



310 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 



RATES OP PRICES OF -SMAtL ARI^^ AND ACCOUTREMENTS. 



PERCUSSION LOCK. 



Musket. 



BaiTel •wiih sight, witliout breech, 

Breech scievv. 

Bayonet or band siiul, 

Tang screw, ' . 

Breech sight, 

Cone,*^ 

Lock plate, 

Tumbler, . 

Tumbler screw, ■. 

Bridle, 

Sear, 

Sear spring. 

Main spring. 

Lock screws, each, 

Hammer, . 

Side |)late, (with band for pistol, 

Side scacws, each. 

Upper band. 

Middle band, 

Lower band. 

Upper band spring, 

Middle baifd spring, 

Lower band S[)ring, 

Guard plate, • 

Guard plate screw.s, each, 

Guard bow without swivel 

Guard bow nut, each, 

Swivels and rivets, each, 

Trigger, . 

Trigger screw, 

Bu4t plate. 

Butt plate screw, each, 

Ramrod, 

Ramrod spring, - . 

Ramrod wires, 

Ramrod stop, 

Stock, 

Bayonet, ■ . 

Bayonet clasp. 

Bayonet clasp screw, 

Box ])late, . 

pox catch, 

Box spring. 




2S 
12 



06 
07 



11 . 


11 


60 


GO 


32 


32 


04 


04 


19 


19 


24 


24 


-12 • 


12 


32 


32 


04 


04 


72 


72 


09 


12 


05 


05 


46 


54 


28 




18 


22 


11 


11 


10 




10 


10 


50 


60 


04 


04 


36 


42 


02 


02 


12 


12 


14 


14 


CTi 


Oi 


36 


63 


.03 


03 


60 


60 


14 


14 


01 


01 


01 


01 


1 74 ■ 


2 22 


1 (>3 




19 




02 






86 




06 




12 



I 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 



PRICES OF SMALL ARMS — Continued. 



311 



PKRCUB8I0N LOCK. 



Musket. 



Box spring screw, 
Box screw, each, 
Rfiinrod swivel and rivet, 
Ramrod swivel and rivet scre'w^ 
Sword'bayonet blade. 
Sword bayonet liilt without clasp, 
Sight base, 
Long»branch (leaf) 
Short, 

Sight screws, each. 
Sight complete, . 
, Barrel complete. . " 
Lock complete, . 
'(Tuard corni)lete, . 
Biiyonet complete, 
Box i)lat(f confiilete, 
lArm complete, 
r Aj)pendages for all arms : 

Screw driver and cone wrench. 

Wiper. 

Bail screw. 

Spring vice. . 

Bullet mould, (rifle calibre.) 



I 



Rifle. 


Pistol. 


D. c. 

02 

03 " 


D. C. 


2 00 
2 00 


30 
02 


6 48 
2 70 
1 49 




1 16 
16 90 




• 




• 





312 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT 



SWORDS^XD SABRKS, 



( Gripe, 
Hilt ^ Head, 
( Guard, 
Blade, 

(" IMoiilli-piece, 
I Body, . 
Scabbard J> Bands and rings, 
■ I Ferrule and stud, 
[Tip, . - . 
Ann complete, 









^ 


_ 








<a 






-^ 




~ c 


(U o 


6 




o 


? ^ 


.2c« 


r^- 


U- 




■" "l_ 


cs 


•^ 


CO 


E 


£ <u 


t>. 


< 




O 


E--P 




— s> 


QJ 


4) 


oO 




# 


•- 




c 


03 


ffi 


< 


S 


o 
15 


D. C. 


D. C. 


D. C. 


D. C. 


D. C. 


40 


34 






4b 


1 40 


8S 


1 74 


3 20 


1 00 


2*20 


1 16 






2 40 


5 60 


3 96 


4 26 


4 26 


4 40 


40 


20 








2 40 


2 00 


1 00 


1 24 


1 32 


1 20 


1 20 








. 30 


26 


50 


80 


70 






50 


50 


70 


14 00 


10 00 


8 00 

• 


10 00 


11 00 



50 
, 60 
3 001 



AccoUTREMENTS-WBlack Leatlier Belts.) 



Cartridge box. 

Cartridge box belt, - 

Bayonet snabbard and frO; 

Waist belt — private's, 

Cap pouch and pick, 

Gun sling, 

Sabre belt, 

Sword belt. 

Carbine or gun sling. 

Powder flask — tin, 

Canteen, 

Canteen strap, 

Knapsacks, 

Haversacks, 




1 


< 


> 


D. C. 


D. C. 


D. C. 


1 75 






75 






75 






60 






65 




65 


35 




35 




1 35 


1 35 




1 00 


1 25 


30 




. 30 


25 


25 


25 


20 


20 


26 


3 25 


3 25 


3 25 


20 


20 


20 



6C 
'6f 



ORDNANCE DEPAETMENT. 313 

1365 — Classification of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores. 

PART GIRST. 

Artillery, Small Arms, Ammuniiion, and other Ordnance Stores. 

CLASS I. — CANNON, 

18 |)dr. brass cannon, Mexican, trophy, weilfht, pounds. 

12 pdr. " French, " " 

9 pdr. " Spanish, " " 
•8,pilr. " French, «< « 
■6 pdr. '' English, tropliy, " " 
4 pdr. " French, _*' " 
3 pdr. " Enj^lish, trophy, ■•* " 

12 pdr. " field, U. S. pattern, 184G, " « 

6 i)dr. " " " " «« 

6 pdr. " old pattern, ** " 

8 incjh brass howitzers, English, trophy, " " 

6 inch " French, *' " 

-'4 pdr. « field, U. S. pattern, 1840, ^' 

12 pdr. « • -* • « u a 

16 inch brass ^ne mortars, Frencli, " " 

12 inch brass mortar, Frciicli, ■" " 
42 pdr. iron cannon, U .S. pattern, 1S31, " . '' 
42 pdr. •' ■ " 1819, • " « 
42 pdT. ^' -" 1840, " " 
32 pdr. " " 1840, - " 

•32 pdr. " rifled, ^' 

24 pdr, " U. S. patten^ 8 19, " ^ 

24 pdr. " " • lS.i9, "' " 

24 pdr. " ^ old pattern, round breech, " " 

24 pdr. iron cannon, rifled, • " " 

18 pdr. '• old pattern, round breecht, ^' " 

18 pdr, ■" *Model 1819, " " 

18 pdr. " model 1839. •" " 

V> pdr. " garrison, model 1819, " " 

13 pdr. " " 1839, " • " 
12 pdr. „ field, model 1819, '' « 
12 pdr. iron cannon, field, inspected 1834, " " 

6 pdr. ■" .c u 

3 inch " field* rifled, " " 

100 pdr. Columbiads, sraooth bore, " " 

TiO pdr. « « ■ ■" " 

10 inch - <i « -« " 
'0 inch « rifled, " " 

S inch " smooth bore,. " " 

8 inch «' rifled, *' ■" 

8 inch iron howitzers, sea coast, model 1840, " " 

Sinch " " " 1839, ■" " 

8 inch « siege, model 1839, • " '•' ■ 

24 pdr. " field, inspected 1834, •*' " . 

24 pdr. ^' for flank defence, •" " 

•24 pdr, « field, ol'l pattern, light, " " 

12 pdr. " field, inspected 1834, *' 

14 



314 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 



10 inch iron mortars, sea coast, inodel 1839, 
10 inch « " " 1819, 

8 inch " siege, model lS-10. 

Unseiviceable. 



weighty pouncij. 



9 pdr. brass cannon, field, 

6 jidr. " " 

8 inch bra^s howitzers, American, old, 
24 pdr. " '■- 

10 inch brass mortars. 
24 pdr. iron cannon, cascable broken, 

6 pdr. " old, various jjatterns, 

6 pdr. " ^wroiight iron, 

Note. — The mean weight of each kind of ordnance, as well as the nuiH- 
ber of pieceSj should be entered on tlie inventories. 

CLASS II. — ARTILLERT CARRIAGES. 

12 pdr. field gun carriages, complete, stock-rail, pattern 1S35. 
12 pdr. -'■ " " " " 1840. 

6 pdr. " " " " ' " 

24 pdr. howitzer, field carriages," "■ " 

12 pdr. " " " " " 

24 pdr. siege gun carriages, " " " 

Mountain howitzer carriages, " " " 

Caissons for 12 pounder guns, complete, stock trail, pattern .1840. 
" 6 pdr. guns, '• " " '• 

" 24 pdr. howitzers, " " " '' 

" 12 pdr. " " • •- " " 

Caissons for 3 inch rifle guns, " " " 18G1, 

Travelling forges. 
Battery wagons. " 

Portable forges for mountain service. 

Chests, with carriage-maker's tools, for mountain service. 
Field battery wagons, with tools and stores complete, C. 
Field travelling ibrges, with " " " A. 

Mortar wagons, for siege service, complete. 

8 inch Columbiad ca.semate gun carriagee. 
'- 8 inch Columbiad casemate chassis. 
32 pdr. casemate gun carriages. _ 

32 pdr. casemate chassis, 
32 pdr. casemate gun carriages, wood. 
24 pdr. " " cast iron. 

24 pdr. " chassis. 

24 pdr. howitzer casemate carriages, for flank defence, complete. 

8 inch sea-coast howitzer, barbette carriages and chassis. 
82 pdr. barbette gun carriages. 
32 pdr. " chassis. 

24 pdr. " gun carriages. 

24 pdrk " • chassis. 

lO.inch see-coast mortar beds, iron. 
10 inch " " wood. 

10 inch " " iron. 

8 incli " " iion. 



<»11DNAN<3E DEPAftTMENr 315 

Unserviceable. 

f} pilv. field tJarriag^s, GriljeaMval pattern, require repairs. 

•0 pdr. -^ StocktraiLl 

Caissons. I \ir ^ i .. 

ij .. „ J'Mai. g battery. 

liattcry wa<;ons. ,' • ' 

Travelling fofgcs. J 

Note — The "field carriage, complete,"' includes the limber and ammn- 
ndtjon clie>t, Iwiit iv3 implements. The " ca.semate or barbette earriage, 
oomplete,'' inchides the upper or gnn carriage and the chassis, wiih all tlie 
wheels, bnt no impleinenis; it is better, however, to enter the gun caj- 
riages and the chassis separately as above. 

• CLASS III. — ARTIIJLERV IJIl'LEJIENTS AND EQUIPMENTS. 

Axes, felling. 
Bricoles. 
.Buckets, sponge, iron for field gnns. 

" " wood for garrison guns. 

" tar, iron for Held guns. 

" water, for field forge. , 

" watering, leathtr. 

B3iidge karfc^ltj. ' 

•Cannon locks, left side, for guns with lock pieces. 

" " without ■" 

i'annon spikes. 

Chocks, for casemate cavriagee. 
Drag ropcfi. 

Fuze augers. , 

" extractms. 
" gimlets. 
" mallets. 
" plngro'iniers. 
■*• rasps. 
" .'aws. 

'"* fectiers, brr.i^s- * 

" •' wood. 

Gunner's callipers. 

^ gimlets for .siiege and gai risoin giint, 
" '■• field |!;uKs. 

" haVersacks, 
" levels. • 

•" ])iiicers. 
■" quadrants. 
H.anoU-pikes, trail, for field cRrriages, 

" ma'Ua'uvriiisg, for garrison carriages. 

" shod, '' ^ 

" truck, iron, casemate " 

" ix>ller, " ii -< " • 

Haj-ness, viz : 

Sets for two wheel horses, pattern 1840. 
" Ic4a5ing '' ^ 

" wheel " 'with Grimsloy's saddles, &c. • 

" leading' " " 

Diauj^Lt for mountain howitzer carria],'C. 



.^16 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 



Pack satklles and bridles for niountaia howitzer carnage. 
Nose bags. 

Whips. .J, 

Ladies and staves for'32 pdr. gun. 
" 24 pdr. gun, 

i2 pdr. guv.'. 
Lanterns, comsion. 

" dark. 

Lanyards for friction primers.. 
Lead apron and straps. 
Linstocks. 
Lock covers., 
JVIeii's harness. 
Pas6 boxes. , 

Pendulum hausses for 12 pdr. field gnns^. 
" 6 pdr. " 

" 32 pdr. field ho'w^i^enfis. 

" 24 pdr. 

12 pdr. 
Pick axes. 
Plummets. 
Pointing wires. 
Portfire cases. 
Poritfir« aliears. 
Portfire stocks. 
Powder funnels, copper. 
Powder measures. 
Priming hsrnp. 
Priming wires ibr siege and garrison gans% 

" for field " 

Prolonges. 
Rammers and staves, viz : 

For .32 pdr. garrison- guns. 
For 24 pds. " 

Rammers and staves — continued. 

For 12 pdr. garrison guns. 
For 1.0 i«'ih Golumbiad'S. 
y'&T 8 ineli sea-coast howitzer'*. 
Shell hooks. 
Shell plug screws. 
Splims. 

Shovels. f>- 

Spong.cs, wollen, & inclU 
" . " 32 pdr. 

" " 24 pdr. 

" J2 pdr. 

" "■ 6 pdr» 

Sponge covers, 32 pdr. 
•" " 24 pdr. 

" " pdr. 

Sponges and rammers, viz-. 

For 3 ine-h siege l.owitzeirs. 
• For 24 pdr. field " 

For 12 pdr. field guns. 
For 6 pdr '- 



J 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 317 

Sponges an 1 staves, viz : 

For 42 pdr. guns. 
For 32 ))clr. guns. 

For 12 pdr. fjnn?, siege and garrison. 
For 10 inch Columbiad, bore. 
For " " chamber. 

For 8 inch sea coast howitzer. 
Tangent scales for 12 jxlr. field gun*. 

" 6 p.Ir. " » 

a 24 pdr. fiehl howitzer. 

" 12 pdr. 

Tarpaulins, large. 
" s^niall. 

Thuinh-pialls 
Tompions and collars 12 pdr. field guns. 

" " 6 pdr, 

Tompi'iifs for 8 inch mortars. • 

Tow ho.iks. 
Tube pouches. 
Vent covers. * 

Veut pciMclic*. 
Worms and staves, viz .• 

For siege and garrison guns. 
For 12 pdr. licUi guns. 
For 6 jxlr. '' 

Note. — A set of harness for two hor-^es inchides everything required for 
them eKc.t!pt whipt and /iost-ftags, wliicn are reported sip^irately. 

CLASS IV. — ARTIM.EKY rROJECTII.ES, AXD THEIR APrENDAGES, UNPREPARED 
FOR SERVICE. 

12 pdr. shot for 12 pdr. gun, fixed, rounds 

12 pdr spherical ca^'e shot for 12 pdr. gun, ^» " 

12 pdr. canisters for 12 pdr. gun, " 

6 pdr. sliot, " 

6 pdr. spherical case shot, " 

6 pdr. eani>ters, " 

V2 pdr. howitzer shells, " 

12 pdr. " spherical case shot, " 

12 pdr. " canisters, " 

32 pdr. howitzer sphericifil case shot, with metal fuzes, " 

12 p<lr. spherical case for 12 pdr. field gun, 
12 pdr. shell " " " 

8 inch shells, strapped for Columbiad. 

8 inch " " sea-coast howitzer. 

12 pdr. howitzer shell, strapped. 
12 pdr. howitzer spherical case shot strapped. 
12 pdr. canister, fyr 12 pdr. field gnn. 

Ci pdr. shot, strapped. 

<■) pdr. canisters. 
12 pdr. grape shot, stands of. 
42 pdr. cannon wads, junk. 
32 pdr. " hay. 

21 pdr. . " groinmet. 



318 ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 

Note. — A " round of fixed anunwiitiotV is here used to indicate the pro- 
jectile with its carliidgc prepared for use, altliotigl. , in some cases, they are 
not actually connected togetlier. A '■'shot strapped" or a "canister, "stanti 
of grape," &c., indicates the projectiles prepared lor making fixed ammu- 
nition, or for service. 

CLASS TI.-=-^SMALL'aRMS. 

Muskets complete, viz: 

National armory, bright, percussion new. 

National armory, brown, flint, 4tli claims, short. 

National armory, bright, altered to percussion. 

National armory, brown, " '' 

Contract, brown, " " 

Contract, bright, " " 

"Miisketoons, artillery, petcnssioni 
" caValry, " 

" sappers, " • 

Eifles, viz : 

Harper's Ferry percussion, new. 

Harper's Ferry percussion, repaired. 

Contract, full slocked, brown, flint. 

Hall's patent, ne>w, without bayonets. 

Hall's patent, new, with bayonets. 
Pistols, viz: 

Percussion, new model. 

Colt's patent. 
Hall's carbines, new, percussion. 
Wall pieces, rifle, 4.oz. calibre. 
Cavalry sabres, pattern 18^0. 
Horse artillery sabres, privates, pattern 1840. 
Non-commissioned otTicers' swords, pattern ] 840. 
Musicians' swords, ])attern 1840. 
Artillery swords, new pattern. 
Cavalry sabres, English. 
Sergeants' swords, Prfiffeian. 
Foot officers' swords, new pattern, 30^ inches. 
Foot officers' swords, new pattern, 32 inches. 
Field officers' swords. 

Unserviceable. 
Muskets, without bayonets. 
Rifles, require repairs. 
Carbines, Hall's patent, irreparable. 

CLASS VII. — ACCOUTREMENTS, IMPLEMENTS AND EQUIPMENTS FOR SMALL 

ARMS. 

Infantry cartridge boxes. Ball ?erews for percussion rifles. 

Cartridge box plates. Bullet moulds for percussion rifles, 
Cartridge box belts, black leather. round balls. 

" " white leather. Bullet moulds for percussion lilies. 

Cartridge box belt plates. conical balls. 

Bayonet scabbards, 16 inches. 'Spring vices. ' 

Bayonet scabbards, IS inches, black Cartjidge boxes for pistols. 

fiogs. Cartridge box pkiies for pibtols. 

Gun slings. Spring vices. " 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 



319 



Waist belts, bl.ack leather. 
Waist belt jilates, inf'ry, privates. 

" '' " sergeants. 

Wipers for percussion muskets. 
Ball screws' " " 

Screw drivers " " 

Spring vices for mnskets. 
Cones for new muskets. 
Cones for altered muskets. 
Cap ponclies. 

Cone piclis. ^ 

RiHe cartridge boxes. 
Rifle cartridge box plates. 
Rifle flasks. 
Rifle ball ponclies. 
Rifle pouch and flask belts, white. 
" '• black. 

Bayonet scabbajd, Hall's rifles. 
Bayonet scabbard belts, Hall's rifles. 
Wipers fur percussion rifles. 
Screw drivers for percussion rifles. 
Spare cones " 

CLASS VIII. — POWDER, AMMUNITION 
Cannon powder, pounds. 

AluskM ]iowder, " 

Rifle powder, " 

Mealed powder, " 

Fulminate of mercury, " 

Nitre, refined, " 

Sulphur, crude, •' 

Sulphur, roll, ■' 

Sulphur, flowers, " 

Sulphur, pulverized, " 

Pulverized charcoal, " 

24 pdr. cartridges, 6 " 

12 pdr. '• 2i " 

O-pdr. " l| 

42 pdr. cartridge bags, paper, with 

flannel bottoms. 
32 pdr. cartridge bags, paper, with 

flannel bottoms. 
24 pdr. cartridge bags, flannel. 
]2pdr. " field, " 

pdr. " " " 

Musket buck and ball cartridges for 

percussion arms. 
Musket buck and ball cartridges for 

flint-lock arms. 
Rifle ball cartriilges for percussion 

arms. 
Pistol ball cartriilges for ])erciission' 

'amis. 
Exiiandiug ball cartridges, calibre 

-OS, percussion. 



■ Screw drivers for pistols. 

Bullet moulds " " 

Ball screws " " 

Spare cones " " 

Screw drivers for Colt's pistols. 

Spring vices '• 

Powder flasks " 

Bullet moulds " 

Artillery SAVord belts. 

Cavalry sabre belts, white, old pat- 
tern. 

Cavalry sabre belt plates, old pat- 
tern. 

Non-comm'd oflficers' sword belts, 
tlouble frogs, black leathar. 

Non-commissioned oflicers' sword 
belt plates. 

Horse artillery sabre belts, black. 

Holsters. 

Housings. 

Musket flints. 

Rifle flints. 

FOR SMALL ARMS, AC, AND MATERIALS. 
Pistol ball cartridges, flint. 
Musket blank cartridges. 
Rifle 

Cartridges for Colt's pistols. 
Musket balls, pressed, (for proving 

muskets,) pounds. 

Musket balls, pressed, " 

Rifle balls. " " 

Buckshot, " 

Laboratory paper, viz : 
No. J, (musket cartridge,) pounds.. 
No. 2, (wrapping,) " 

No. 3, (blank cartridge,) " 

Wrap'g paper, (No. 2,) waxed, " 
Wrapping paper, quires. 
Priming tubes, filled. 
Portfires. 

Quick match, pounds. 

Slow match, '' 

Percus.'^ion caj>s for small arms. 
Percussion caps for Colt's pistols. 
Percussion primers for Maynard's 

locks. 
Percussion primers for cannon, Hid- 

den's. 
Friction tubes. 
Rockets, war, congrcve. 
Rockets, Halo's 3^ inch. 
Rockets, " 2^ inch. 
Rockets, l.inch, signal. 
Fuzes^ 10 inch, filled. 



320 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 



Fuzes, 8 inch, filled. Blue lights. 

Fuzes, paper, for field ammunition. Fire balls. 
Fii7.es, wooden, " , 



CLASS IX. — PARTS. 



OR INCOMPLETE SETS OF ANY OF THE ARTICLES INSERTED 
IN THE PRECEDING CLASSES. 



Parts of barbette carriage, viz: 

Bevil washers for 32 pdr. 
" 24 pdr. 

Elevating screws. 

Iron work for 24 pdr. carriages and 
chassis, complete sets. 

Lunettes. 

Naves. ^ 

Pintles. - 

Pintle plates, 32 pdr. 

Pipes, 32 pdr. 

Rollers, 32 pdr. 

Rollers, 24 pdr. 

Traverse wheels. 

Parts of casemate carriages, viz: 

Bed- plates for elevating screws. 

Elevating screws. 

Handles for elevating screws. 

Iron work for 32 pdr. carriages, com- 
plete sets. 

Pintles, cast iron. 

Traverse wheels, large. 
" small. 

Truck wheels. 

Trunion ])Iates, 32 pdi., pairs. 
Parts of field cartridges, viz: 

Air backs for forges. 
. Axle trees for 6 pdr. gun caringes. 
" limbers. 

Cap squares, 6 pdr. 

Ca|) square chains. 

Cold shut, S links. No. 3. 
No. 5. 

Elevating screws and nuts. 

Fellies. 

Iron work for 6 pdr. carriages, com- 
plete sets. 

Keys for ammunition chests. 

Linch pins. 

Lock chains. 

Nails, No. 1 and 2, pounds. 

Nave bands. 

Nave boxes, cast iron. 

Nuts, assorted. 

Pintle hooks, keys and chains. 

Poles, spare, ironed. 

Pole props. 

Pole yokes. . 



Rondelles, 6 pdr., large. 
" " small. 

Splinter bars. 
• Snokes. 
Suicks, G pdr. carriage, ironed. 
" (caisson, '' 

'' battery wagon, " 

Tire bolts, nuts and washers. 
Washers for axle trees, linch. 
" '• shoulder. 

" for bolls, assorted. 
Wheels, spare. 

Parts of artillery implements. 
42 pdr. rammer heads. 
24 pdr. 
12 pdr. ". . 

6 pdr. " 

42 pdr. sponge heads. 
24 pdr. 

12 pdr. " 

6 pdr. " 

8 inch Columbiad sponge head sand 

staves, for bore. 
8 inch Columbiad sponge head and 
staves, for chamber. 
24 pdr. sponge heads and staves. 
6 pdr. sponge and rammer staves. 
G pdr. worm staves. 
12 pdr. ladles. 

Worms for siege and garrison guns. 
Thimbles for prclonges. 

Parts of artillery harness, viz: 
Drivers' saddles, Grimsley's pat'u. 
Valise " ■"■- 

Bridles, Griinsloy's pattern. 
Bits, brass plated. 
Halters. 
Halter chains. 
Collars. 
Girths. 

Traces, leading, leather. 
Traces, wheel, " 

Leg guards. 
Breast straps. 
'Breech straps. 
Hames, prs. 

Parts of small arms, viz: 
Stocks for percussion muskets. 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 



32r 



Tumbler screws for perftus'n musk's 

Bridle screws 

Sears for 

Sear screws 

Main springs 

Main spring screws 

Sear springs 

Sear spring screws 

Bayonet for Hall's rifles. 

CLASS X 
Garrison gins, old pattern. 

" with ratchet windlass. 
Casemate gins, " 

Field and siege gins, " 

Sling carts, large. 
Sling carls, hand. 
Casemate trucks. 
Hand carts. 
Store trucks. 
Lifting jacks. 
Falls for casemate gins. 
Falls fur garrison gins. 
Falls for siege and gins. 
Trelile blocks, iron. 
Double " " 

Single " '' 

Gin handspikes. • 
Hand-spikesfor mechanical mancen 

vres. 
Long rollers for median, mana-'s. 
Short rollers 
Half rollers 
Blocks 
Half blocks 
()uai'ter blocks 
(iun chocks 



Parts of prepared ammuni'n,.viz. 
Sabots for 12 pdr. field gun. 
Sabots for 12 pdr. howitzer. 
Cylinders and caps for 6 pounder 

field ammunition. 
Plates for 12 pdr. canisters. 
Plates for 24 pdr. grape. 
Rocket cases, 2^ inches, Hale's. 
Rocket cases, paper, 1 in., signal. 

MISCKLLANEOfS. 

Wheel chocks for median, mancp's. 

Roller chocks " 

Skids 

Shifting planks "• 

Trunion chains. 

Mortar eprovettes. 

Beds for " 

Balls for " 

Rocket conductors, Hale's. 

Star gauges with rings for inspecting 

cannon. 
42 pdi. ring gauges for sliot, large. 

" small, old. 

" • " new. 

13 in. ring gang, for shells, large. 

" small, old. 

" " new. 

42 pdr. grape shot gauges, large. 

" small. 

Can'r shot gauges for 12 pdr. gun. 

" " for 12 pdr. how'r. 

Shell callipers for thick, of sides. 

" ■ " " bottom. 

42 pdr. cylinder gauges for shot. 
32 pdr. " '• " " 



PART SECOND. 



TOOLS AND MATERIALS. 

Cloths, Hopes, Thread, rf-c. 

Canvass, yards. Thread, shoe. 

Cotton cloth, '■ Thread, patent, 

Duck, cotton, " Tow, 

Linen, brown, " Twine, bundling, 

Marlin, pounds. Worsted stuff. 

Rope, lump, " Yarn, cotton. 

Rope, manilla, " Yarn, packing, 

Sash cord, '' Yarn, woollen. 



pounds. 



yards, 
pounds. 



822 



Bran, bushels. 
Hay, pounds. 



Bolts, door, number. 

Brass, sheet, pounds. 

Buckles, iron, number. 
" brass, '' 

Chains, iron, pounds. 

Challi, 

Copper, sheet, " 
" bar, " 

" cake, 
" scrap, " 

Emory, " 

Files, assorted, number. 

Ghte, pounds. 

Hinges, iron, butt, pairs. 
" brass, " " 

Horse shoes, " " 

Iron, bar, pounds. 

" sheet, " 

" plate, - " 

" scrap, " 

" castings, " 

Cead, pig, " 

" sheet, " 

" scrap, " 

Locks, assorted, number. 
" magazine, " 

Mica, sheet, pounds. 

Nails, iron, cut, " 

" Wrought, " 

" finishing, " 

" horseshoe, '• 
" bellows, " 

Nails, copper, " 

Pullres, brass, number. 

Rasps, " 

Rivets and burrs, iron, 
, " " copper, 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 

Forage. 

Oats, bushels. 
Straw, pounds. 

h'onmongery. 

Sandpaper, quires. 

Screws, wood, assorted, number. 

Spelter, solder, pounds. 

Steel, cast,. " 

" blister, " 

" shear, " 

" scrap, " 

Tacks, iron, paper. 

" cojiper, i^ounds. 
Tin, block, pounds. 

" sheet, " 

Tubing, wrought iron, feet. 



pounds. 



Wire, iron, pounds. 

" brass, " 

" steel. " 

Acid, nitric, " 

Acid, muriatic, ' " 

Alcohol, " 
Antimony, sulphuret, " 

Borax, '' 

Beeswax, " 

Camphor, " 

Chlorate, potash, " 

Chloride lime, '' 

Flour, •' 

Gum arable, " 

Gum shellac, " 

Nitrate barytes, " 

Nitrate strontia. " 

Quicksilver, " 

Rosin, " 

Sal ammoniac, " 

Soap, " 

Sponge, " 

Tallow, " 
Whiskey, gallons. 



Gun Carriage Timber and Building Materials. 

for limbers. 



For 12 pdr. stocktrail carriage 
Gun carriage stocks. 
•Axle bodies. 

For 6 i)tlr. stocktrail carriage ; 
Gun carriage stocks. 
Axle bodies. 
Cheeks.. 
Axle bodies for limbers. 



Poles 

Hounds " 

Forks " 

Splinter bars " 

Front footboards " 
Axle bodies for caissons. 

Stocks " 
Middle rails 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 



828 



Side mils for caissons. 

Cross bars " 

Front footboards " 

Hind footboards " 

Stocks for forges. 

Axle bodies " 

Side rails " 

Middle rails " 

Cross bnrs " 

Studs, plates and gnides " 

Ends for coal boxes. 

Sides " '• 

Bottoms " " 

Lids " " 

Axle bodies for battery wagons, 

Stoclcs " " 

Lower side rails for " " 

Upper side rails for " " 

Riilge jjoles for " " 

Ends for aninumition chests. 

Sides " " 

Frames for covers for ammunition 

chests. 
Panels for ammunition chests. 
Bottoms " " 

Cover linings for ammunition chests. 
Principal partitions for ammunition 

chests. 
Naves for field carriages. 
Spokes " " 

Fellies " 

Trail handspikes for field carriages. 
Legs for siege and garrison gins. 
Pry poles for siege and garrison gins. 
"Windlasses for siege and garrison 

gins. 
Upper braces for siege and garrison' 

gins.*» 
Middle braces for siege and garrison 

gins. 
Lower braces for siege and garrison 

gins. 
Building materials: 
Brick, red, number. 

". fire, number. 
Fire clay, barrels. 



Handspikes for gins. 
For 32 pdr. casemate gun carriage : 

Cheeks. 

Front transome. 

Rear " 

Slides. 

Axletrees. 
For 32 pdr. casemate chassis 

Tongues. 

Hurters and guides. 

Rails. 

Front transoms. 

Rear " 

For 32 pdr. barbette top car'ge : 

Uprights. 

Braces. 

Front transoms. 

Middle 
For 32 pdr. barbette chassis : 

Tongues. 

Rails. 

Hurters. 

Front transoms. 

Middle 

Rear *' 

Props. 

Spo'kes for barbette carriages. 

Handspikes " " 

Plank, poplar, for interior of ammu- 
nition chests, feet. 

Plank, ash, foi implements, feet. 
" walnut, " 

" cherry, " 

" beech, " 

" white pine, " 

'• yellow pine, " 

Scantling, maple, for rammer heads, 
feet. 

Scantling, poplar, for sponge heads, 
feet. 

Scantling, ash, feet. 

Lime, barrels. 
Sand, loads. 
Slates. 



Note. — The number of pieces of timber for each part of a gun carriage, 
&c., should be reported Re])arately, as above. Miscellaneous plank, scant- 
ling, &c., shoulc be stated in board measure. 

* LEATHER AND MATERIALS FOR HARNESS WORK. 

Leather, bufl^, sides. Leather, sole, pounds. 

" bridle, " Sheep skins, with wool, number. 

" kip^" " " tanned. " 



324 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 



Leather thong;, sides, 
" collar. " 

" harness, pounds. 
" band, " 

" skirting, " 



Black wax, pounds. 

Bristles, " 

Hair, " 

Raw hides, number. 
Whip stocks, '' 



PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, &C. 



Chrome, green. 


pounds. 


Coal tar, 


gallons. 


Copperas, 
Glass, window,' 


pounds, 
feet. 


Lacker, for cannon 


gallons. 


Lampblack, 
Lead, white. 


pounds. 

(I 


Litharge, 


K 


Oil, linseed, 


gallons, 


Oil, neats;oot, 


" 


Oil, sperm, 
Ochre, yellow, 
Putty, 


pounds. 



Pumice stone, pounds. 

Prussian blue, " 

Paint, mixed, olive, " 

" " black, " 

Spirits of turpentine, gallons. 
Tar, 

Umber, pounds. 

Varnish, copal, gallons. 

" Japan, " 

Vermillion, pounds. 

Whiting, " 

Zinc paint, white, " 



STATIONERY. 



Books, office, blank. 

Ink, black, gallons. 

Ink, red, pints. 

India, rubber, pieces. 

Paper, letter, quires. 
" cap, " 

" envelope, " 
" blotting, " 

" drawing, sheets. 



Pencils, lead, number. 
Pens, steel, " 

Pasteboard, pounds. 
Quills, number. 

Sealing wax, pounds. 
Tape, pieces. 

Wafers, pounds. 

Ordnance Manuals. 
Ordnance Regulations. 



Adzes, carpenter's. 

" cooper's. 
Alphabets^ sets. 
Andirons, pairs. 
Anvils. 

Augers, assorted. 
Awls, saddler's. 
Axes, broad. 

" felling. 

" hand. 
Bellows, hand. 
Benches, laboratory. 
Bevils, assorted. 
Bick irons. 
Bits, auger. 
Blocks for tackle. 
Braces. 
Brace-bits. 
Brushes, dusting. 



ForkS: straining. 

Formers, cast iron, assortei^- 
" laboratory, " 
•' for musket cartndg 
" for rifle " 

Fullers, assorted. 

Funnels, copper. 
'' glass. 

Furnaces, tinner's. 

Gauges, assorted. 
" wire. 
" cutting. 
" for rockets. ■ 
" for portfires, 

Gim'ets, assorted. 

Glue pots. 

Gouges, carpenter's. 
" turner's. 
• '' stockers'. . 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 



825 



Brushes, paint. 
Brushes, white-wash. 
Chasing tools. 
Cherries. 
Chisels, cold< 

" firnier. 

" framing. 

'• splitting. 

" for turning wood. 
Clamps, wood. 

" iron. 
Claw tools. 
Compasses. 
Counter-sinks. 
Diamonds, glaziers'. 
Drawing knives. 
Dredging boxes. 
Drifts, assorted. 
Drills. 

Drill bows. . 
Figure stamps, sets. 
Fire buckets. 
Fire engines. 
Flasks, moulders, wood. 

" " iron. 

Flatners. 
Forks, hay. 
Ladles, large. 
" lead. 
Lanterns. 
Lathes, hand. 

" engine. 

Level and plumb. 
Mallets. 

Mandrills, assorted. 
Marline spikes. 
Measuring lines. 
Jlilling tools, 

jNIortars and pestles, brass. 
Nippers, cutting. 
Oil stones. 
Paint mills. 
Pans, copper. 
" paste. 
" stone. 
Pick axes. 
Pincers, saddler's, 
. Plyers. 
Punches, saddler's. 

" cutting rifle patches. 

" for stencils. 

Rakes. 

Reamers," assorted. 
Rules, carpenter's. 
Saws, compass. 



Grindstones. 
Hacksaw frames. 
Hammers, bench. 
" copper. 
" creasing. 

" hand. 

" planishing. 

" trimminj[. * 

Hand barrows. 
Hardies. 

Hatchets, assorted. 
Heading tools. 
. Hoes. 
Holdfasts, bench. 
Horses, draught. 
Horses, «ad<ller's, WDod. 
Instruments, drawing, cases of. 
Jugs. 

Kettles, lead. 
" copper. 
." varnish. 
Knives, pallet. 
" putty. 

" round, .saddler^s. 
" shoe. 
Ladders. 

'• step. 
Shears, tinner's. 
» Shears, small. 
Shovels. 

Shoeing tools, sets of. 
Sickles. 

Sieves, composition. 
" jiarcliment. 

" assorted. 
Sledges. 
Soldering irons. 
Spades. 
Spatulas. 
Spirit levels. 
Spoke shaves. 
Spy glasses. 
Squares, trying. 
Stakes, bench. 
Straight edges. 
Swedges. 
Sand screens. 
Taps, screws. 
Ticklers. 
Tongs, tinner's grooving, 

" smith's. 
Tools for cutting wood screws. 
» " turning iron. 

Tools for making paper fuzes. 
" bending sheet iron. 



326 



ORDNANCE DErARTMENT. 



Saws, cross-cut. 

" circular. 

" hand. 

" . tenon. 

"■ web. 

" whip. 
Saw sets. 
Scales ^ij beams, large. 

'■ " small. 

Scales, counter. 

" graduated. 
Scissors. 
Scoops, copper. 
Screw plates and taps. 
Screw-drivers. 
Scythes. 
Scythe snaths. 
Sets, nail. 



Tools for making metal Aizo?, 

Trammels. 

Trestles. 

Tube moulds. 

Tube wires. 

Vices, bevil. 

" bench. 

" breeching. 

" hand. 
Water buckets. 
Watering pots. 
Wheels, buffing. 
Wheel Ijarrows. 
Wheel cutters. 
Wrenches, screw, 
" tap. 
" assorted. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Arm chests. 

Bands. 

Baskets. 

Boxes, packing. 

Brooms. 

Canisters, tin. 

Carboys.. 

Corks. 

Coal, bituminous, bushels or tons 

Coal, anthracite, pounds. 



Coal,^charred, bushels. 
Demijohns. 
Lightning rod points. 
Oil cans, large. 
Pumjj.'?. 
Ploughs. 
Safes, iron. 
Salt, bushels. 
Wood, oak, cords. 
" pine, " 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 837 



FORMS. 

FORM No. 1.— (See paragraphs 1350, 1353.) 



RETURN 

Of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores received, issued, and remaining on 
liand, at Arsenal, commanded by Major A. B., during the 

quarter ending , 18 . 



N. B. — All Articles sliould he entered on Properly Return in the order 
of classification prescrihed in paragraj)!! 1365. 



:bj^:ei>t ifii^st. 



ARTILLERY, SMALL ARMS, AMMUNITION, AND OTHER 
• ORDNANCE STORES. 



«Wi 



328 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



Form 1. 



• 

Dnte. 
IS . 


"o 

O 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


Second Qparter, 18 . 

• 


AjJi-il 


1 

,!•''' 
10 
22 
30 
30 
30 


Oil liiind from last quarter, - . 


May 
June 




" " Capt. G. A., regiment of artillery, 

Fabricated at the post, during the (juaiter, per abstract, 

PurClia^ed iluring tlie quarter, per abstract, 

Repaired ilu;iiig the quarter, ... 


• 


15 

30 
30 
30 
30 










May 
June 

u 


7 

8 

y 

10 

6 


Condeinued and dropiied from tlie return, by order of 

the President of liie Confederate State?, 

[ssued to sundry persons, per. abstract, 

Expended at the post, per abstract, 

Is.-ued Air current service, per a.bstract, 

Repaired during the quarter, * 




Total issued and expended 




lleuKiining on hand, to l)e accounled for next quarter, 



ORDNANCE BEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



329 



Form 1 — Continued. 



Class I. — Ord- 



Brass Guns. 


Brass 
Howit- 
, 7,ers. 


Brass 

Mortars. 


T ,-. Iron 
Iron uuns. „ 

Howitzers. 


English 
trophies. 


Mexi- 
can. 

• 


u. s. 


U.S. 


French. 


od 

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530 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



Form 1 — Continued. 



NANCE. 


Class II. — Aktillery Carriages. 


Unserviceable. 


Field 
Artillery. 


Barbette. 


Casemate. 


Brass Guns. 

• 


Iron Guns. 


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1 







ORDNANCE DEPARTMERT — FORMS. 



331 



Form 1 — Continued. 



Class III. — Abtillebt Equipments and Implements. 


Cannon 
Lf.rKs. 


Handspikes. 


c 

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332 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



Form 1— Continued. 



Class IV. — Cannon Balls. 


Class V. — Fixed Ammuxition, &c. 1 


Shot. Sliells. 


Spherical 
Case. 


Shot, 
Fixed. 


Spherical 
case, fij^ed. 


Strapped Shot. 


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1 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



33i 



Form 1 — Continued. 



Class VI — Smai.i, Arms. 


Class VII — Accodtbements. 


i 
Muskets. Rifles. 


Pistols. 


Swortis 1 

and 
Sabres. 


For 
Muskets. 


For 
Rifles. 


Cavalry. 


so 
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534 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



Form 1 — Continued. 



Class VIII— Powder, &c. 


Class IX — Parts of 


Powiler, lbs. 


Cartridges. 


Lead 
Balls.lbs. 


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I 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — ^^FORMS. 



335 



Form 1 — Contioued. 



ARTiLi-ERy Cabriages. 


CLASB X — MrSCELLANBOUB. 


Spare parts for field carriages. 


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336 



OEDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



^J^^-SIT ©EC03SrX3. 



TO.OLS AND MATERIALS 



" rtT'Trf'*"'— -•— ''^•^'■"■'■^'M' ' ■*•" ■ 



.1 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



337 



Form 1 — Continued. 



Cloth, Rope, Thread, &o. 


Forage. 


Iron- 


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8sa 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



FoRSf 1 — Continued. 



JHONGERY, &C.. 


Laboratory Stores. 


Iron. 


Nails. 


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ORDNANCE DEPARFMENT — FORMS. 



S39 











Form 1 


— Continued. 












Gun Caeriage Timbbb. Paints and 


For Field Carrifigc. 


For 24 pdr. Barbette Ca-riages. 




6 
o 


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4) 

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12 pdr. Gun 
Carriages. 


n ' 
■Laissons. ^ Chassis. 

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840 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



Form 1 — Continued. 



Oils. 


Stationery. 


Tools. 


Miscellaneous. 


c 

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ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 341 



I (Certify tliat tlic foregoiri!; rctuin exhibiis a correct statement of tnc 
public propejtj in my charge during the quarter, 18 . 



A. B., Captain Commanding. 



C. S. jlrsenal, (Armory or Post.') 
, 18 . 



Note. — For the quarter ending 30th June, add a certificate that an ac- 
curatte inventory of property has been made, and the return corrected ac- 
cordingly. Abstracts of the receipts and issues will be made when their 
number makes it more convenient. 



S43 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS, 



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346 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



Form 6.— (See paragraph 1353.) 

Statement of the serviceable materials obtained from the breaking up of 
condemned Ordnance or Ordnance Stores, by order of the Secretary 
of War, of , 18 . 

See Form No. 10. 



400 


pounds 


wrought iron. 


200 




cast iron. 


50 




brass. 


30 




coi)per. 


50 




old rope for junk. 


20 




leather. 



Signed, 

A. B., Captain Commanding. 
(In duplicate.) 

Endorsement to be as follows : 

"No. . 

" Materials obtained from condemned stores, 
■ quarter, • 18 ." 



I 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. S4? 



FuRM 7.— (See paragraphs 1290, 1353.) 

Received this day of , 18 , of Captain , 

commanding , the following Ordnance and Ordnance Stores, 



VIZ : — 



4 

3 

3 

500 



32 pounder iron cannon. 
24 " casemate carriages, complete. 
24 " barbette carriages, complete. 
Muskets, new, brown. 



C. D., MaJ9r Commanding, 
(In duplicate.) 

Endorsement to be as follows : 

«' >ro. — . : 

"Receipt for issues to the Army, 

« ^ — - ^' ■ ^■ - * quarter, —-=—-* 19 ," 



348 ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



Form 8.— (See paragraph 1353.) 

I hereby acknowledge to have received of the Confederate States, by 
the hands of , of the Confedeiate States Army, the following stores 

and accoutrements, viz : 

100 common rifles, equal in value to 123 1-13 musketSi 
100 sets accoutrements (black leather) for rifles, equal 

in value to 21 11-13 " 

350 pistols, equal in value to 215 5-13 " 

50 artillery swords, " " 16 4-13 " 

175 cavalry sabres, " " 80 10-13 " 

175 " " belts, " " 15 4-13 " 

1000 muskets, '= " 1000 " 
500 sets accoutrements for muskets, (black leather,) 

equal in value to 115 10-13 " 
4 6 pdr. iron cannon, ^ 

4 G pdr. field carriages with > equal in value to 110 3-13 " 
equipments complete, ) 



Total, 1698 9-13 " 

The whole being equivalent to sixteen hundred and ninety-eight and 
nine thirteenths muskets, which are received on account of the quota of 
arms due to the of , under the act of , 18 , for arming the whole 
body of the militia, and for which I have signed tri^Dlicate receipts. 

Given at , this day of , 18 » 

Signed, A. B., Governor, or 

Agent of the State of , 

(To be given in triplicate.) 

Endorsement to be as follows : 

No. . 

Receipt for issues to 
the Militia. 



I 






ORDNANCE DEPARTMINT — PORMft. 



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350 



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ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 351 



Form 11.— (See paragraphs 1292, 1353.) 

I certify that, in obedience to article of the Regulations, I have 

made diligent inquiries for the ordnance and ordnance stores, (referred to 
in Captain A. B.'s invoice accompanying my third quarter's return of 18 ,) 
which ordnance stores have not reached my post after a lapse of 
days; and that the loss or sniscarriage of said stores, as far as can be as- 
certained, must be attributed to the following circumstances, viz : 



(Signed duplicates.) C. D., Captain Commnnding, or 

Receiving Officer. 

Endorsement to be as follows : 
" Certificate of Lost Stores." 



Form 12.— (See paragraphs 1292, 1353.) 

I certify that, in obedience to article of tlie Regulations. I have 

made diligent inquiries for the ordnance and ordnance stores, (referred to 
in my certifieiJ invoice of stores forwarded to Capt. C. D., at . on the 

,) which stores, as appears after a lapse of days, have not 

arrived at his post; and that the Kdss or miscarriage of said stores, as far 
as I have been able to ascertain, must be attributed to the following cir- 
cumstances : -^ 



(Signed,) A. B., Captain, 

Forwarding Officer. 

Note. — The certificate of Captain C. D., in regard to the same stores, 
is hereunto annexed. 

Endorsement to be as follows : 
*' Certificate of Lost Stores." 



352 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



363 



Form 14. — (See paragraph 1244.) 

KENT ROLL. 

Statement of Dwelling Houses belonging to the Confederate States at 
armor)/, {or arsenal,) and of the rents due thereon, on , 18. 



HoUSKS. 


By wliom occupied. 




a 








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0} 


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A. B., com'g officer's clerk. 








2 


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C. D., ma.*ter armorer. 








3 


U II 


E. F., storekeeper. 








4 


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3 


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T. U., paymaster's clerk. 








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Unoccupied. 












1 



I certify that the foregoing roll exhibits a correct account of the 
ilwelliiis; houses at this armory, and of their occupation, and of the 
amount of rent now due on each. 



Armory, 
-. 18 . 



A. B., Commanding Officer. 



Endorsement to be as followB : 

" No. . 

Rent Roll. 
Armory, quarter. 



354 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT— FORMS. 



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ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



Form 21. — (See paragraph 1284.) 

Received, Arsenal, 18 ■ , of Major 

One field officer's sword, 
.One pai? percussion pistols, 

For which I have paid to the said Mfyor the cost prize. 



dollars. 



W. A. N., 
Major AHillery. 



(To ba made in duplicate.) 



Endorsement to be as follows : 

No. 

Receipt for Stores, 

Issued to Major W. A. N., 

For his own use. 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 



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ORDNANCE DEPAKTx^IE^T— FORnT:?. 



Form 23.— (See parngraph 1347.^ 

ildimate of Funds, required at Arsenat, during the fourth qnarisr 

o/'13 . 



Ordnance service in all its branches. 



Police and preservation of post, 

ri:ici#c: arms in racks, 

Tools nnd machinery, . 

Fuel f(ir steam engine, 

Fuljlic Iiorses, 

Office duties, .-,.. - -'^ 

iMnkiiig slinsr carjlsi-^.'- . '^^'^ 

Maki:;g lifiinji jajj^; .,^,-f' 

Purchase of lumber for pacldngboxes, &c., 



Due C. S. from last quarter, 



$^30 68 
500 00 
SOO 00 
350 00 
150 00 
200 00 

l.,G>i27 48 
300 00 
150 00 



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408 16 



$3,000 00 



Required in sums as follows. 



October, 

November, 

December, 



Montli 



Total, 



Ordnance 
service in 

all its 
branches. 



11,200 00 
- 800 00 
1,000 00 



;,ooo 00 



Am sunt. 



1 1,2 GOV 00 ■ 

800 00 * 

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(To be f-fgned by the commanding officer.) 



uiDNANCE DLPAaTMENT— FORM?. 



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ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT — FORMS. 366 



Form 26. — (See paragraph 1*274.) [To be printed.] , 

Btatt of: » 

I, , born in ■ • , aged years, and by occupation a , 

do hereby acknowledge to bavc vohintarily enlisted this day'of , 

18 , as a of ordnance, in the army of the Confederate States of 

America, fur the period of five years, unless sooner discliarged by proper 
authority 5 do also a^ree to accept such boun<y, pay. rations, and clothing; 
as is or may be estnbli.-hcd by law. And I, , . , ilo soleninly swear tliat 
I will boar true and faitlifnl ailofiianco to the Confederate States of Ame- 
rica, and that I will, serve ihcni honestly and fnithfnlly against all llieir 
enemies and opposers whomsoever ; anil tliat I will observe and obey the 
orders of the President of the Confederate States, and the orders of the 
othcers appointed over me, according to the rules and articles of war, and 
the regtdaiions ivhich govern enlisted men of Ordnance. 



J. G., nerruil. 



Sworn and subscribed to at , ) 

this day of , IS . ^ 

S. M., ^lagistrnitf. 

I certify, on'honor, that I have carefnily examined the above named re- 
cruit, and that, in my opinion, he is free from all Ixxlily defects and mental 
infirmity wj^icli would, in any way, disqualify him from performing the 
duties of a of ordnance. A. B., Exantimng Surgeon. 

I certify, on honor, that I have minutelj' ijispected the recruit, . , pre- 
viously to his enli-tincnt, who was entirely sober when enlisted ; and that, 
to the best of my judgnvnt and belief, he is of lawfuj age, and a compe- 
tent mechanic, (carriage-maker, or otliervyise. as the case may be.) Tliits 
recrnit has eyes, hair, complexion, is fe.et inches high. 

(Duplicates j C. D., Recruiting {or Enlisting) Officer. 

• 

Endorsement to be as follows : 

'<No. 

.Tonas Gould. 

K Arsenal, 

February , 18 — ." , 



366 • CORPS OF ENOINEEHa. 

ARTICLE XLV. 

CORPS OF ENGINEERS. ^ 

• 136G. The tliilics of these corps nsunlly relate tp the constractlon of 
permanent ti?if3 tieul fortifications ;' vorks fur the attack and delcnce of 
places; for the iiassage df rivers j fur tlie nuivenients and operations of 
armies in the field ; and sach recdnnnisanees and survcjs as may be 
required for these objects, or for any otlie;' duty which may he assij;;ned 
to them. By special direction of the President of the Confederate 
State-^, oSTicers of engineers may he employed on any other duty ■what- 
soever. (See 63d Article of War.) 

1307. No permanent fortification, or other important work assigned 
to either corps, shail be utidert;iken, until the jdans have been submit- 
ted to a board co.mposed of such ofticers of the corps as the Sevretary of 
War may desij^natc. The report of the ly)ari.l, with complete dravvintrs 
and specifications of the work, and detailed estirR'.ites of tlie cost, shal) 
be made to the bureau of the corps, in the War Department, and be 
submitted to the Secretary of War, without whose sanction no plan 
shall be ad( r^ie^i. A dissenting memlier of the board may present his 
own project, memoir, plans, and estimates. 

1368. The chief engineer, with the approbation of tlve Secretary of 
War, will regulate and determine the number, quality, form, and dimen-. 
blans, &c., of tliC necessary vehicles, pcntoiis, tools, implwnents, arms, 
and other .supplies for the use and scrvi( e of the engineer company of 
sappers, uiinerfi, ami pontoniers, to be procared, as far as practicable, bj 
fabi'ication in the government establishments of the Engineer and Ord- 
nance Departments. 

1369. In any work carried on under the direction of the chief of 
either corps, his authority mu'st be obtained for the erection of any tem- 
porary buildings required in the progress of the work, or the purchase 
of any vessel or boat, or for furnishing mediekies or medical attendanco 
to hired men, and to determine the number and wages of clerks, fore- 
men, and oversetjrs. 

1370. An engineer superintending a work or operation shall disburse 
• the money for the same, and when informed of the funds ap])lical)le to 
•the work, he will furnish to the bureau or office through wliich ho 

receives his instructions, a detailed report of the manner in which ho 
propos<^ to apply the funds. 

J37L Piihlii! works in charge of either corps shall be inspected once 
{fyear, and when com])lete(i, by such officers of the corps as the Secre- 
tary of War shall de>^ignate. A repo-rt of each inspection shall be made 
to the Secretary of War through the bureau (^ the corps. 

1372. Oil the completion of any foi'tiiication or other work, the office? 
in charge will tranMiiit to the a[>propriatc bureau all the books, papers, 
and drawing rehitiiig to it. Df fortifications, the following drawings 
are required: a phin of the finished work and the enviroas within the 
scope of invostm'eiit, on a scale 12 inches to a mile ; a ]ilaH of the main 
work and outworks, on a scale of 1 inch to 5.0 feet, with sections, pro- 
files, and elevations, ou a scale of 1 inch to 25 feet ; and a plan c.f 



CORtS Of ENGINEERS. 367 

the masonry, on a scale of 1 inah to 50 feet, with profiles and eleva- 
tions, on a scale of 1 inch to 25 feet ; and such other drawings as mny 
be necessary to show important details of the work. 

1373. An ofScer charged with a survey will procure the books and 
instruments for the execution of the duty by requisition on the appro- 
priate bureau, and upon his return from field operations will report to 

it. the condition of the instruments in his chaige; on the completion of 
the survey he wil transmit to the bureau a full report thereof, with the 
field notes, and all necessary drawings. 

1374. The following reports and returns for a work or operation un- 
der, the diretion of the chief of either corps are to be sent to the ap- 
pfopriiite liureau of the ciufis by the officer incharge: 

1375. Monthly returns, within fi\e days after thu month to \fhich 
they relate, viz.: report of operations. Form I ; return of officers and 
hired men. Form 2; money statement, Form 3; 

137G. An estimate of funds for one month, in tipie to receive the rc- 
" mittarvce for the service of the month ; 

1377- (^lartcrly returns, within twenty days after the quarter to 
■which they relate, viz. : a money account current, Form 4 ; with ab- 
stract of di&bursenienl<5, Form 5, and vouoliers, Foim^ G, 7, 8 ; and are- 
• turn of property, Form 9, with abf^tracts of receipts and issues. Forms 
10, 11, 12, 13, and 14. 

1378. A quarterly return of instruments, books, &c., Form 15, by 
every ofricer accountable for them ; 

1879. A report, in time to reach the bureau by the 20th of October, 
of the op3rations on the work or survey during the year ending 30th of 
June, witli the necessary drawings, and showing the condition of the 
work, the extent and cost of tlie principal operations (as brick-work, 
stone-work, earth-work, surveys), accompanied by a summary state- 
ment of the e.xpeniTitures during the year, with an estimate of llie funds 
required for tlie next year,, and ancslimate of the amount required to 
complete the work. 

1380, When disbursements are made by the same individual on ac- 
count of different worlje, a separate set of accounts for each must be 
kept and "rendered, as wbove required, a-'- well as separate estimates, re- 
turns, and reports ; the quarterly accounts being accompanied by a 
general statement,' Form 3, of receipts and expenditures during thi> 
quarter on all tlie works. 

1381. The following books and files for each work will be kept by 
the officer in charge: a letter book, for copies of his official letters; file 
of letters received ; file of orders received ; a journal, ccmtaining a 
daily record of the occupations of the persons employed on the work ; 
a book of materials, in which must be entered, under the appropriate 
head, every kind of material received, specifying date of delivery and« 
payment, from whom received, the kind, quality, price, and cost — in 
this liootc the various articles will he entered under the same heads ^us 
in the quarterly return of property ; a ledger, in which an account 
will'he opene<l with every person of Avhom materials or supplies aro 
purchased for the work, including every person not on the rolls ; an nc- 
count-book, containing entries, according to Form 5, of all expenditures 
and copies of the quarterly accounts current, and estimates of funds; a 



368 CORPS OF eKgineirs. 

roll-ljook, showing the nnme, occupation, rate of pay, of each hired per- 
son, nnd time made by him daily in each month ; a book of miscella- 
nies, contitifling accounts of experiments and miscellaneous information 
relatinia; tf' the work. 

1382. Printed forms allowed will be furnished from the bureaus, uqv 
less other-vise directed, on requisition in May for a year's supply, • 



I 



CORPS OP ENGINEERS — FORMS.. 369 

Form •!. 
Report of Operations at Fort for th« month of September, 18 . 

Masons have been employed in 'setting copinfi, N. and W. fronts ; roofing 
caseniated traverse, S. W. axterior front; building breatt-lieight 
iintl traverse walls, covert wiA', ^. E. front ; pointing interior coun- 
terscarps, S. Kx.'find S. VV. fronts. • 

Laboiers, embanking^jreak water, S. W. front; embanking parapet of liigh 
covert way ; excavating for and laying foundations of breast-lioght 
Malts, covert way, S. E. front; soclding S. E. glacis conp6 ; quarry- 
ing stone for masons at S. E. quarry ; aiding masons and carpen- 
ter.^ ; receiving materials. 

Teamsters, levelling S. E. glacis; transporting stone for and embanking 
breakwater, S. W. front ; aiding masons and carpenters ;_r«ceiving 
materials. 

Cariienters, on quarters, E. front; making and repairing tools and machi- 
nery. • 

Wheelrighis and Smiths, making and repairing tools and machinery. 

Plumbers, covering arches, W. front ; leading breast-height walls, covert 
way, S. E. front. 

State any important result.during the month, as the condition of a front, 
bastion, battery, &c. ; progress of a survey. 

Probable operations of the month of October. 

JSIasons, as in September : to commence laying the foundations of S. E. 
exterior front, and to lay the tiaverse circles in the exterior battery 
of N. front. ' » 

Laborers, as in September : to finish breakwater, S. W. " frdnt, arid com- 
mence the embankment of parapet of W. froirt. 

Tenmsters, as in September. 

Carpenters, making and repairing!; tools and machinery. 

Wheel wriglits and Suiitlis, do xlo. do. 

■ Plumber:^, covering arches ; to finish the W. front, and commence the S. 
W. front. 

MoJ. Engineers. 
FoftT , 

October 10, 18 . 

Endorsement to be as follows : 
Fort 
Report of Operations for the month of September, 18 . 



370 



CORPS OF ENGINEERS — FORMS. 



Form 2. 

Jieturn of Officers and Hired Men at Fort 
iemUer, 18 . 



, for the month of Sepm 



Officers. 



Present. 



Z\IaJGr A. B. relievetl Lieutenant E. 
F., in charije September 15, by 
special order No. 14, of August 2. 
Post-ofBbe address -for October, 
Fort 



Absent. • 



Lieutenant E. F. at G. Inland on ser- 
vice by. order of jMajor A. B. Post- 
office adilress for October, Fort 

Lieutenant 0. P. left September 10, 
on leave of absence by order — : — . 
Post-office address for October, In- 
<lianola, Texas. 



Hired Men. 



No. 


Trade or occupation. 


Time or piece work. 


^ -Wages. 


Amoimt. 


30 


Masons, 


700 days. 


$ 2 25 ■ 


- $1575 00 


10 


Do. 


20.0 days, 


1 75 


350 00 


20 


Do. »t piece work, 


700 scip. I't. of granite, 


at 15 cts. 


105 00 


10 


Carpenters, 
. Do. 
Laborers, 
Do. 




2 00 
1 50 
1 00 

yo 




1 


Clerk, 


1 month. 


CO 00 




2 , 


Foreman, 


1 do. 


80 00 




1 


Overseer, 


1 do. 


40 00 






Amount, 




■ 


_ 



G. D.," Majof'Engineffrs. 

Endorsement : 
Ofhcera and Hired Men, 



Fort 
September, 18 



'm. 



CORPS OF ENGINEER? — FORMS. 



371 



¥ Form 3. 

Slatcment of Money received and upended, under .each appropriation, in 
the month of September, 18 • 





Fort 


Fort B. 


Continfcen- 
ciesof forti- 
fications. 


Total. 


Due C. S. from last month, 
Received ill the month, 


§ 70 

4r)0 


00 
00 


$■ 8(1 00 
8000 00 


JiSOO 00 


$ l.^O 00 
8750 00 


Total to be accounted for. 


5-20 


00 


8080 00 


300 00 


8900 00 


• 
Due from C. S. last 'month, 
Expended in llic month,- 


400 


00 


7000 00 


-fOO 00 


400 00 
7400 00 


Total iiccoTinted for, 


400 


00 


7000 00 


400 00 » 


7800 00 


Due 1st Oct. to the G. S.', 
Do. from the C. S., 


120 


00 


1080 00 


100 00 ■ 


1200 00 
100 00 


' 




, 


Due C. S. 


um^ 



C. D., Major Engineers. 



r-'^ 



872 



CORPS OF ENGINEERS — FORMS. 



1 • 
























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a 



CORPS OF ENGINEERS — FORMS 



373 



Form 5. 

Abstract of Disbursements oti account of Fort during th9 quarter 

ending on the 'idlh cf ISeptember, 18 . 







• 


Amount. 


No. of 


Nature of purchase or 


To whom pnid orof whom 


' -^ 


voucher. 


expeiulilnre. 


purchaseil. , 










'Dolls. 


Cts. 


.1 • 
2 
3 

4 . 
- 5 
f) 
7 


Lime, 


Henry King, 


20(J 


00 


Stone, 


Joseph Kinst, 


500 


00 


Bricks, , 


Steiihen.-^on & Co., 


300 


00 


Sumlries, 


Smith & Co., 


60 


00 


Cement, 


Samuel Jones, 


100 


00 


Services, 


Hired men, 


820 


52 


Granite, lime, and bricks, 


Aaron Brown, 

Dollars. 


^3737 


50 




57-24 


02 



Fort 



E. E. 



C. D., Major Engineers. 



October 4, ] 8 



Endorsement to be- as follows : 

Fort 
Abstract of Disbursements by 



Major C. D., C. S. Engineers, during the'3d quarter, 18 , 



S74 



CORI'iS OF ENGINEERS — FORMS. 



Form G. 
The Confederate States, for Fort , 

To Aaron Brow^n, 








• * 


Cost. 

1 


Date. 


Designation. 


Application, 










■ 


Dolls. 

• 


Cts. 


IS . 
July 4. 


For 600 cubic yards dressed gran^ 

ite at per yard. 
For 30 tonsbroken granite, at 

per ton. 
For cutting 700 feet of granite, at 


Scarp wall. 
Backing of scarp. 
Scarp; 


• 




August 1 


per foot. 
For 20 M bard bricks, at per M 
For 100 barrels lime, 3 bushels 
each, at per barrel. 


Casemate arches. 

Found a t i o n- of 

scarp and piers, 






• 




Dollars, . 


3737 


50 



' I certify that the above account is correct and just; the articles to 'be 

(or have been^ accounted for in my property return for qiiarter'of — . 

(Signed) C. D., Majoj- Engineers. 

Received at Fort , this 24th day of September, 18 — , from Major 

C. D., Corps of Engineers, the sum of three thousajid seven hundred and 
thirty-seven dollars and fifty cents, in full iiayment of the above account. 

• (Signed in duplicate.) Aauon Brown. 

$3737 50 

Endorsement to be as follows: 

Fort 

Voucher No. 8. 

Aaron Brown. 

September 24th, 18 — . 

Granite, Lime, Bricks, $3737- 50. 



CO^PS OF ENGINEERS — FOUMS. 



375 



Form 



We, (he subscribers, hereby acJcnhwlcdffe to hate received of 



the sums set opposite our name-i respectively/, being in full for our services 
at Furt A during the month of . 18 — , having signed du- 
plicate receipts.. i 













AMOUNT. 






No. 


Name. 


Occupution. ■ 


Time 
emjiloyetl. 


Rate of 
Pay. 


Dolls. 


Cts. 

* 


Sii,nia- 
inres. 


Wim's 


. 1 
2 
3 
4 
5 


A. B. 
C. D. 
E. F. 
G. H. 
I. K. 


Cleric. 
Overseer. 
.Master Mason. 
Ma.-iOii. -^. 
Laborer. 


I monlli. 
1 do. 
24 days. 
20 do. 
24 tlo. 


#S0 00 

40 00 

2 0(1 

1 7.^) 

1 00 


80 

40 

m 

35 

2-4 

239 

• 


00 
00 
00 
00 

01) 

00 


A. B. 
C. ]). 
E. F. 
G. H. 
I-. X K. 


A.B. 



I certify tliat the foregoing pay-roll is correct and jnsf, 

J. yi., Captain Engineers 



Endorsement : 



Fort A- 
No. — 



Pay-roll for , IS- 

$239 00 



376 



CORPS OF ENGINEERS — FORMS. 



Form 8. 

We, ilie subscrihers, achiowledge to have received of Captain 

the sums set opposite oiir names respediveli/, being in fulljor ilie services 

of our slaves at Fort A during tlie monlh of , 18. having 

signed diiplicate receipts. 



£ 
o 


Name and'oc- 
cuj^iaiiou. 


Time 
employed. 


Rate of 
wages. 


Amount 
for eaeli 
skive. 


AMOUNT 
EECEIVED. 


Signa- 


p. 5 ■ 


Dolls. 


Cts*. 


tures. 


A. B. 
Do. 
Do. 

E.F. 

Do. 


A., mason. 
C, brksmith. 
D., laborer. 

G., laborer. 
II., do. 


I month. 
'25 days. 
1 month. 

12 days. 
L month. 


$40 00 

2 00 

20 00 

$25 a mo 
20 00 


$40 00 
50 00 
30 00 

.12 00 

• 20 00 


$110 

32 
142 


00 

00 
00 


A.B. 
E. F. 







I certify that the above pay-roll is correct and just. 

J. M., Captain Engineers. 

Endorsement : - " 



Fort A 

No. ~. 
Slave-roll for - — ~ 
■ $142 00 



-, 18- 



CORPS OF ENGINEERS — FOEMS. 



877 



d 10 

=: 3 

4) O 

.2 c 












, 


- 


2 .2 
Pi '^ 


saoiB^Ofj 








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. 








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• 


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is 

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05 


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oT 

c 

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B 

o 
be 
C 

'E 

£ 
PC 


Second Quarter, 18 ^ 


On hand. 

Purchases paid for. 

Purchases not paid for. 

Fabricated. 

Rec'd from other posts. 


£ 
c 
o 

V 

o 
a 

a 

X! 

C 

.e2 


Abstract E. Materials used, • 
Abstract F. Forajje issued. 
Abstract G. Provisions issued, 


c 

0) 

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c 

■ m 

o 
H 


•sjoc.ijsqy lo Siaqono^^^ 


Abstract A. 
Abstract B. 
Abstract C. 
Abstract D. 






•aiwcr 


00 





378 



CORPS OF ENGINEERS — FORMS. 



'^ 



^ 

:« 








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o 
o 


o 
o 


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o 
o 

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o 




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- 





conrs OF enoineers — forms. 



379 



Form 11. 

Abstract of Purchases received, and not paid for, at Fort A- 
. quarter, 18 





. 


1 




«; 








t 








v>. 














&> 




X> 










1 




- ss 


' ■ S 




<n 


^ 






" 1 




<y-a 




c 


C 














^ o 


tri 


o 


•^ 














is 3 


i*- 








• 










O 


I ca 


•CO 


o 


■ s 







1 




R. 


i 50,000 




. 


1 








S. 


i 


4000 














T. 


1 




100 


2000 












X. 




















Y. 


I 












1 • 


Anioniit, 


' 50,000 


4000 


100 


2000. ; 







I certify that the above abstract is correct. 



J. M.J Captain Eriginetra. 



Form 12. . 
Abstract of Materials expended at Fort A , quarter, 18 



For wliat purpose. 


Stone, cub. yds. 


* 
o 


.a 
E 


'A 

c . 


Yellow pine 
scantling. 






Sf-arp wall bastion 1. 
Ca«cniato do 
Stalile. 


2000 


50,000' 50 

i ■ 


l.'iOO 


300 






Amoiint. 


20rKJ 


50.0f>0 


50 ' 




300 







I certify that (he aboTC ab«trnct is correct ; Hint tlie issues Bod expen- 
ditures were m«'1e, and were necessary. 

J. M , Captain Enginwru 



8*0 



OOEPS or ENaiKKKRg — FOKMB. 



Form 13. 

Abstract of Foragt iuueil at Furt ihtrinij the quarter md- 

intf on the 30/A Septrmlter, 18 . . 



Dci^ripiion 
of fornge. 



Hdy, pounds. 



Ouif, btiKlicU. 



Com, butli. 



'k « 

a C 

_ s 



13,664 

. 233} 
210 



-^ 



970- 



802 • 



440. 



Dintribulion of th« iMu^t. 



4.<U 



0,9: 

V06 

4 10 



II H 

■ I .1 .1 . Rations. 

b c = <i ' 
~ >. I >. 
^ c K r 



RtfmarV*. 



3 lU 



' .^52 

130 ' f H.tif ration* 

I { 3J 1 

2 02il84— 07« 



552 

3[0(l I 18() — t>0-i 

! ■ |I60' 

3, .12 06 

I 292 184— 440 



I ceiUfy tliiii ilic above abstract is correct; ilia: iIicomics yvcro nia<le, 
ajid were nece»fary. C. !>., Major Enginhrt. 



Ell<!ot^olno^( to be ns AiIIowh : 

Fort . 

Forage Return lor tlie yd <]iinrtcr of — 



CORPS OF ENGINEERS — FORMS. 



381* 



FoRlt 14. 

Abstract of Provisions issued at Port during the quarter endiny 

on tlie ZOtH September, 18 . "^ 



Dcscriiifion of pro- 


Issued in 


No. of 


No. of men to 


Remarks. 


visions. 


the qnartLT. 


Rations. 


wlinni issued 




Pork, pounds. 
Bl^cf — I'rcsh, do. 
Bcaf— .=alt, do. 


•1500 
2500 


2000 
2000 


3fi80 rations. 
3-20 " 

4000 rations. 




Fiour, do. 
Alcal, do. 


\ 




?' 




Bread, do. 


4500 


4000 


"3 




Beans, quarts 


320 

■ 


4000 


E 




Vinegar, do. 


IGO 


4000 


c 




&c.. 


1 




c ao 





I corti/y that tli^ above abstract is correct ; that tlic issues were rnado, 
and wcro nccesi-ary. * C. D., Major of Engineers. 

Endorsement to be a? follows : 
Fort 
Prorision Return for the 3J fniurter of 18 , 



SB2 noBM 0» BMOIIOnftS^ruAMX 

EoM 15. 
JMum 9/ InUmmeiilj, llookt. May 



Van M TkACE. 



I>*iai; 



(^11 tianl |ir( l{i»l II tutn. 
Received JuiiiiK tlic >|uaricr, 

To be ■cooiinloil Ail^ 
l>i*I>o»ed ufaiiirc l«»l return, 

Onlianil ifi« 30Ui Sept., 18 . 



J. 

Z;2IIZ|TLr 



(til liniiil I'fr liiKl rc>liiiii, 
)tri-civcil Jiiriiig ilia <|uarlcr, 

'I'u Us vceouatetl fur, « 

DikpoAcit of »i«c« laii return, 

0.1 linn. I il.c'iOih Si-(.l^ 18 . 









» 
















a 












a 




■0 












M 




1 




• 




• 






^ 


5 e 
4.^ 






• 


% 






"~ 













y l.i 



i 



Endunement to he at fvlUnct : 
Rtfl<irn t>( Iiii>iciim>-iiii>, &<-.. 
in charge of 
Miijor C. D., C. S. EiigiiiccK, iu 3*1 c^uarier, 18 



CORPS OF ENGINEERS — FORMS. 



383 



FoRrf 15. 

Confedcralc Sfatra, received and accounted' for by Major C. D., of tTiC 
ending on the 2>dth of September, 18 . 



^ '^ 



0) 


o 


in 


u 


RS 


_^ 


&. 


I« . 


p 


a 


c 


o • 



p ° K 






AND Plans. 



T^'emarks. 



Exiiibitinp; tlie 
pnrcliase, repair, 
disposition, &c., of 
the articles. 



I certify that the foregoing return is correct. 



, October 1, 18 



C. D., Major Engineer*, 



3»4 



RRCRUITINU SERVICE. 



ARTICLE XLVI. 

BKCmiTINO RIRVICE. 

13S3. The recruiting service will he cunflnctcd \>y the Adjutant nnd 
Inspector (ferrcml, under the direction (if the t^ciThtiry of War. 

l;iH4. FioKl (tfru'er> will he detailed to superintend the recruiting di«- 
trict% an^ lieiitennnt« to take chrtrpe of the recrniting partie**. The re- 
cruiting ser»itc will firm a opecinl roster.. The Adjutant nnd Inspec- 
tor General will detail the field ofl'ii^crs, nml nnnnunce in ordern the 
numher of lieutenattts to be detailed from each regiment hy its Colonel. 
When the detail isnot nce«»rding to the rosterf tne npceiul reason of the 
case cbftll he reported an<l laid before the Sei-retary of War. 

1385. A recruiting party will oonKist generally of one lieutenant, one 
noncommissioned oHicer, two privates, and u drummer and fifer. The 
p.irtieH will he tsent from the [irincipal depots, nnd none but Huilablo 
men selected. , 

13SG. OfficerR on tlie general recruiting service are not to bo«rdcrc(l 
on any other duty, exctpt from the Adjut.int CJenerara Office. 

niTIES or SLTERINTEN DENTS. 

1387. As soon as a recruiting station is designated, the sqperinlen- 
dent sends estimates for funds to the Adjutiiiit (leneral, nnd requinilions 
on the proper department^ (through the Adjutant and Inspector Gene- 
ral) for clothing, camp e<juipago, arm--, nnd ncci>utiements. 

1388. Subsequent aup)dics h>r the statiims in his dihlriot are procured 
by the superitucndcnt on consolidiited estimates ; these are made quar- 
terly for funds, and every six or twelve ujonths for dotliing, ((juipnge, 
arms, and accoutrements. Estimates fur funds will bo in the following 

- form : . » 



EatimaU of ReeruUittg Funds required for the 
■ ending , 18 . 



during the quarter 



Names. 


Rank. 
Regiment. 


c 
o 

S 


Amnui.t ex- 
pended last 
quarter. 


Amount on 
iiand. 


Amount 
required. 


Rem rkc. 




$ 


Cis 


$ 


C& 


$ 


Cu' 




1 
















Tc 


tal amount i 


requi 


red, . . . 













Superintendent. 



RKCaUITING (EBVIOE. SSb 

1389. Funds and supplies of clothinj;, camp and garrison equipage, 
arms and accoutrements, when ordered, will be sent direct to each sta- 
tiun. 

1390. The pupcrintendents will transmit to tho Adjutant Inspector 
General consolidated monthly returns of the recruiting parties under 
their superintendence, according, to directions on tho printed blanks, 
accompanied by one copy of the enlistment of each recruit, enlisted 
within the month. Also a quarterly return of deceased soldiers to the 
Adjutant Inspector General and Second Auditor. 

139L When recruits? shoul J be sent to regiments, a superintendent, 
will report to the Adjutant and Inspector General for instructions in 
reference thereto. 

1392. When recruits are sent from a depot or rendezvotis to a regi- 
ment or po«t, a tnu-ifer and descriptive roll, and an account of clothing of 
the detiicdment, will be gi'ven to the oflBcer assigned to the comnTand of 
it ; and a duplicate of the muster and descriptive roll will be forwarded 
to the Adjutant and Inspector General by the superintendent, who will 
note on it the names of all the officers on duty with the detachment, and 
the day of its departure from the depot or rendszvous. 

1393. The superintendent will report all commissioned or non-coio- 
missioD«4l officerji who may be incapable or negligent in the discharge 
of theJr functions. Where a re«ruiting party fails to get recruits from 
any cause otiier tlian the fanlt of the officer, tho suj.erintendent will 
reronimend another station for the party. * , 

1394. Whpn a rendezvous is closed, the K»iperint«ndent will give t'le 
necessary instructions fur the* safe keeping or disposal of the public 
property, pi as not to involve any expense f<>r storage. 

1395. Tours of inspection by su)»erint**ndents will be made only on 
instruction* from the Adjutant and Inspector Oeieral'rt Office. Officers 
on the recruiting service will not \>e sent from plaoe to place without 
orders froni the same source. 

DUTISS OF KECRriTINO OFFICERS. 

1.''.96. Success in ol^taining recruits d^jpends mach on the activity 

and p^xonal aUenlion of recruiting fifficers, and tliey will not entrust 

f ' men (he dutio for which theniscIvcF only are responsible. 

n no case absent themselves from their stations without au- 

1 M II ■■ .'ii ■•It. — '■'■'■•'■idp^t. 

1397. !• will not all iw any man to be deceived or in- 
veigled iri: fuli-e r^re^^enfations, but will in person ex- 
plain the nature of t < . the l^ninh of the term, the pay, rbitb- 
ing, rationf, and otl' ■ ip« ti whith a No^lier ip entitled by law, 
to pve.-y man hffore tie jigii» ilie ei.!i-tm<«f»«. If min< rs present tbcir- 
«».|r«»«. thf'- are to be I rest fd with .-rf nt 'Mnd-r : the rtanip« imd re.l«•• 
• ' f ' '^ ' < •\r p»ir«»nt« or Koanliniis, if \\\*y hnxe any. must V* a«rpt- 
t , • !. n' ttipv will hp inf.irinwl of th<» niindr'w wish to enlist, that 
■ ' . ■ ■ ■ 'it. 

iiiting '>ffieerp may 
,-c' H--'-nng atten- 

.'i .■ . i. ..^ , . .... ; ..,! a^p of ci^litcen and un- 
der thirlT five ycMH, i^n^ nt \nf\ five feet four and ft half inches bigb, 
17 



386 RECRUITIMCI SERTICrr. 

effective, able-boJieJ, soLer, free from disease, of good cIiaraclGr an«J' 
habits, kind able to speak and understand well the Jjipjlish lancjnajre, 
may be enlisted. This regulation, so far as" respects tlie heiyltt and iuj(^ 
of the recruit, shall not extend to muaicians, or to soldier? -Hho may 
" re-enlist," or have served honestly' and faithfully a pre>'icas enlist- 
ment in the army. ■> ■ • 

1400. No person under the ag3 of twenty-one years is to be enlisted 
vfithout the written consent of liis parent, guardian, or master. Tho 
recruiting officer must be very particular in ascertaining the true ng& 
of the recruit, and will not accept him when there is a doubt of hia 
being of age. 

1401. After the nature of the service and terms of enlistment liavo 
been fairly explained to the recruit, the officer, before the enlistments 
are filled up, will read to him, and offer for his signature, the annexed 
declaration, to be appended to each copy of "liis enlistment : 

I, -, desiring to enlist in the 4-rfny of the Confederate Stat;C3 

for the period of five years, do declare ihat I am, years and 

months of age; that I have neither wife nor child; that I have never 
been discharged from the Conf^erate States service on account of dis- 
ability, or bv a sentence of a court martial, or by order befor» the expi- 
ration of a term of enlistment; and'I know of no impediment to my 
serving hone tly and faithfully as a soldier for five years. 

• 
- Witness : . 



1402. If the recruit be a minor, his parent, guirdian, or master musS 
?ign a consent to his enlisting, which will be added ^ the preceding 
declaration, in the following form : 

I,. , do certify that 1 am tiie {father only surticing parent, 

legal master, o)' guardian) of ; that the said is — . — years of 

age ; and I do hereby freely give my consent to his enlisting as a soldier 
in the Army of the Confederate States for the period of five years. 

Witness : ■ — . 



1403. The forms of declaration, and of consent in case of^ minor, 
having been signed and witnessed, the recruit will then bo duly in- 
spected by the recruiting officer,. and surgeon, if one be present, and 
if accepted, the 20th and 87th Articles of War will be read to liim ; 
after which he will bo allowed time to consider the subject until his 
mind appears to be fully made up before the oath is administered to 
him. 

1404. As soon as practicable, and at least within six dfiys after his- 
enlistment, the following oath-will be administered to tfie recruit: 

" I, A — B — , do solemnly swear or affirm, (as the case may be,).t|iat 
I will bear true allegiance to the Confederate States of Amej-ica, and 
that I win serve them honestly and faithfully against all their enemies 
or opposers wliatsoevcr, and observe and oliey the orders of the Presi- 
dent of the Confederate States, and the orders of the officers appointed 
over me, according to the rulos and articles for the <rovernmcnt of the 
armies of the Confederate Statei?. ' (See 10th Art. War.) 



TIECRUITINO SERYICE. 387 

1405. Uiiilei* tlio Arliclo of Wur above citeJ, a justico of tlio peace, 

'Jio cli'rf niapif-trate <if any town or city corporate, (rtot being an officer 

1 tlic Army,) a notary pviblic, or v.hen recourse cannot be liad to euch 

\\\\ magislrates, a j'.i'.l;;(* advocate, ob any commissioned officer of tiie 

flrmy, •may atlmihister the aliove oatli. 

l4<lO U i-3 the (Juty of the recruiting officer to be present at thc'in- 
f poction of the recruit by the medical officer. In passing a recruit the 
medical nfficcr is to inspect him stripped ; .to see that he hjis free use of 
nil his limbs; that his chest is ample; that his bearing, vision, and 
speech are perfciit ; that he has no tumors, or ulcerated, or extensively 
cicatrized Ic^s ; no rupture or chronic cutaneous affection ; that he has 
not received any contusion, or wound of the head, that may impair hia 
'acuities : that lie is not a drunkard ; is not subject to convulsions ; and 
lias no infectious disorder, nor any other that may uiifit him for milita- 
ry service. 

1407. Recruiting oTilccrs will not employ private physicians, without 
cvithority from the Adjutant and Inspector General's office, for the spe- 

".al purpose of inspecting the recruits prior to their enlisting, 

1408. If it ])Q necessary, as in the case of sickness, to employ a phy- 
f^ician, the recruiting odiccr mR,v <Migage his services by contract, on 
reasonable terms, by the visit^ or"by the inontli. If by the month, the 
inspection of the recruits must i)C stated in the contract as part of his 
dutjb-. The physician will be paid from the recvuitifig funds. 

Mt^Q^ Enlistments must, in all cascS: be taken in triplicate. The re- 
oruiting officer will send one copy to the Adjutant General with his 
quarterly accounts, (paragraph 1280, No. 1,) a second to the superin- 
tendent with his montlily return, (paragrapli 12&0, No. G,) and a third 
to the depot at the same time the recruits are sent there. In cases of 
• )ldicrs re-enlisted in a regiment, or of regimental recruits, the third 
copy of the enlistment will be sent at its duls to regimeutai headquar- 
ters (or lile. 

1410. When ordnance sergeants re-enlist, the recruiting officer will 
im'medintjly send the second copy of tiie enlistment direct to the Adju- 
tant (ioneril, and the third copy to the station of the ordnance sergcaut* 
f V filo. 

1411. A non-commr»8i(med officer, musician, or private soldier, who 
may reenlist into his company or regiment within two months before, 
<»r one mouth after the expiration of his term of service, shall receive 

*• f tliroe niontiis' extra pay — that is to say, the pay ho was re- 

)i;iy of hif grade, and fT« a<Mitional pay fi«r length <'f service 

:. , . , . iificate of merit. This bounty sliall be paid by the recruit- 

•in,' ifh er at the time <if cnli-tmcnt, and noted on the dcsniptiVo list, 

. i t, 1) ii- notice <'f M*!..-iMo re enlictmcnts in a ctmipany must bo 

lohjnd to ' authority, that the necessary funds may 

1. Ordn< lits and ii"spital stewards arc n<in com- 

..ii.^>i.>aed o'liicr.-i cjiiiji;! Ui the bounty i" the caee provided. 

I 112. Kiili-tnients nni.'t, in ni case, ho antedated no as to entitle a 
• 'y whj applies after tlio period allowed for " re enlist- 

nio. A prominra of two dolb^rs will be paid to any citizen, nnn- 
r )i»:)ii»ci jm>J officer, or soldier, for cac'.i accepted rccruil that bo maj 



38S RECRUITING SERVICE. 

bring to the rendejvous ; but not for soldiers •who receive bounty fur 
" re-enlisting." 

1-J14. The recruiting oflEcer will see that the men under his command 
are neat in their personal nppearance, and -wilV require the permanent 
party to wear their military dress in a becoming manner, especially 
when permitted to go abroad. ' 

1415. Only such articles of clothing as are indispensable for immedi- 
ate use, will be issued to recruits at the rendezvons. Their equipment 
■will not be made complete till after they have passed the inspection 
subsequent to their arrival at the depot. 

1416. The instruction of the recruits will commence at the rendez- 
vous from the moment of enlistment. The general superintendent will 
see that all recruiting oflBcers give particular attention to this subject. 

1417. Recruits will be sent from rcadevzous to depots every ten days, 
or oftener, if practicable, provided the number disposable exceeds three. 
The detachments of recruits will be sent from rendezvous to depots un- 
der charge of a noncommissioned ofiBcer. 

1418. Commutation for fuel and quarters, when allowed, is paid from . 
the recruiting funds on the usual vouchers receipted by the officer him- 
self. 

1419. Every officer commanding u "recvuiting party will procure tlio 
necessary transportation, forage, fuel, straw, and stationor3', taking the 
requisite vouchers; but no. non-commissioned oSicer or soldier is to be 
allowed to become a contractor for the supplying of any article which 
may |?e required. 

1420. The transportation of recruits to dfpots, and from one recruit- 
ing station to nnotiier, will be paid from the recruiting funds; trans- 
portation of officers and enlisted men on the recruiting service will be 
paid in the same manner, except when first proceeding to join that ser» 
vice, or returning to their regiments after having been relieved. 

1421. No expenses of transportation of ofiicers will be admitted that 
do not aiise from orders emanating from the Adjutant and Ins) ector 
General's OfiBco, except they be rrqdired to visit branch ov auxiliary 
rendezvous under tiieir charge, v hen they will be allowed the stage,' 
steamboat, or railroad fare, portcnigo included. 

1422. Whenever an officer is relieved or withdrawn from the recruit- 
ing service, he will pay over the balance of any unexpended recraiting 
funds in his possession to the officer appointed to succeed hiui, or to the 
paymaster, if no ofhcer be so designated ; and if there be no paymaster 
or other proper officer convenient to receive such balance, tiie amount 
will be deposited to the credit of tiie Treasurer of the Confederate 
States, with the most convenient Assistant Treasurer, or other deposi* 
tary of public money. In either ease the officer will forward to the 
Adjutant and Inspector General the evidence of the disposition he may 
make of the funds, and report the fact to the superintendent, or to his 
colonel, if on regimental recruiting service. 

RENDEZVOUS, QUARTERING AND SUBSISTING RECRUITS. 

1423. Written contracts Avill be made by recruiting officers for the 
rent of a rendezvous upon the most reasonable terms possible. The 
rent will be pnid from the recfuiting fiind. The termsiof the contract 
will be immediately reported to the Adjutant and Inspector General. 



Recruiting service. < 389 

1424. Wjicn subsistence ciinnot bo issued by the commissariat to re- 
cruiting parties, it will be procured by the officer in clMirge. Written 
contrticts will be made for the subsistence of the reeruits, [see form A,) 
•due public notice being first given inviting proposals for furnishing 
iconipleto rations, (or board — see paragraph 1425.) The original adver- 
tisement, bids, contracts, and bond, will be forwarded to the Comrais- 
gary General of Subsistence, and copies be kopt for the use of the re- 
cruiting station. 

14-25. When convenience and economy require that the contract shall 
he for board and lodrjing, the oflBcer in charge shall estimate the cost of 
the ratii>n for which the contractor shall be paid from the subsistence 
funds, as befure directed ; and shall pay tho amount due to lodgiii*/ 
from the recruiting funds. 

142G. Issues will bo made, or bonrd furnished, (aS the case may be,) 
on regular ^>rovis»on relnrnx, sp^ifying tho number of men, and days 
and dates. A ration in kind may be allowed to one laundress at each , 
principal rendezvous. The contractor will forward his accottnts either 
monthly or quarterly to the Commissary General of Subsistence, {see 
Jorm B.) This account will be supported by an abstract of issues, duly 
;e€rtifiod by the recruitrng officer, [see form C.) 

1427. At temporary rendezvous, advertising may be dispensed with, 
and a contract made conditioned to be terminated at tfic pleasure of tho 
officer or the Commissary General. 

1428. The recruiting officer will be required, when convenient, to re- 
ceive from the Commissary General and disburse the funds for the ffub- 
eistence of his party, and to render Las accounts quarterly to the Com- 
missary General. 

1429. When a contract cannot be made, the recruiting officer may 
pay the necessary expenses of subsisting and boarding his party ; ren- 
dering distinct accounts for amounts paid from the subsistence and re- 
cruiting funds, as in paragraph 1425, 

1430. The expenses of subsistence at branch rendeivous, and all ex- 
penses of advertising for proposals, will be paid by the contractor at 
the principal station and included in his accounts. 



1431. Officers on recruiting service will' make timely requisitions for 
printed blanks, direct, as follows: 

To the Adjutant General. — For enlistments ; re-enlistments ; forms for 
medical inspection of recruits ; mufiter-rolls ; muster and descriptive 
rolls ; monthly returns ; trimonthly reports ; recruiting accounts cur- 
rent; accounts of clothing issued ; posters or handbills. 

To the Quartermaster General. — For estimates of clothing, camp and 
garrison equipage; clothing receipt rolla; quarterly returns of cloth- 
ing, camp and garrison equipage. 

14.32. No blanks of the above kinds will be used, except the printed 
forms furni-shed. Blanks of other kirds, when rcfiuired, must be ruled. 

1433. Blanks for the regimental recruiting service are furnished to 
tho company ccmmandcrs. 

FDRNITUBE AND STATIONERY. 

1434. The articles of furniture and police utensila which may be ab- 



800 lillCRUlTlNQ bEUVXCK. 

noliitolj rccCKsnrj nt n. rccruicinj'Rtotion tnoy be procured hy ihe cffirfr 
in clmr^e d( the rendezvous, on tbe t"|K;cial autlurity of thQ8U|icriiilcn- 
dent 

1435. N<rcc.«8Rry Ptntbhery will be purchn^ed monllily or quarterly, 
not to exoectl, per quarter nt ca<h "Station, sis quiroR of paper, twrn'v 
four <jujll?, or twciitj- four hteel pens and two Inltiens, liaU an <>ui ri 
•wafer!*, cme pajier of inkpowder, one bottle <f red ink, four ounce- . : 
Bcaling wax, one (jwire of carlriilge paper, or one bundred onvclopes, 
one fourth quire of Mottin;; paper, and one /^lieec of tape. If vpcvt-s^- 
ry, an ad<litional nnjiply of one-fourth of these rales will be allowed to 
the recruitin;; uffieer bavin;; charge of one or more auxiliary rendez- 
vous distant from lii."> pdrnianont statioij. At the principal dvpots tbo 
allowance must bo fixid by tl»e wants of the public service, 

1-13G. To each oHicc taljle is allowed one inkstand, cyie wafer stamp, 
one wafer box, ono paper folder, (^ne ruler, and as many lead pencils, 
ns may be required, not exceeding four per annum. 

1 137. Such blatik bo<.k« ns may bo necessary are allowed to tbo gen- 
eral superintendent nnti III I'ftmrMirnt rconiiiinf; depoi.s; also, one de- 
scriptive book for the m^ i tcr of r<:cr»i».-« at riuli pprnianrnt statittn. 
Iflank books will bo ptinlia.-cd by recruiting «-fi!' ei.-, ui.t.'cr instruclioii,"* 
from the supcrintondent. 

11^8. When a recruit i np < fficcr is relieved, tbo blanks, the Iwoks, and 
unexpended stationery, witii all the other public property nt tbe ctntion, 
will bo transferred to hi? successor, who will receipt for tlie !<Hm». 

ACCOU.VTS, RF.TrKN.\ ETC. 

1439. The following; are the acccunis, returns, Ac, to be rendered by 
officers on recruiting service : 

Tu the A(fjii(anl Gtiinal. 

1. Recruit accounts cuYrent, (|unrter|y, with abstract, (form P,) voneli- 
eru, (form K. ) and ono set of enlistmentH. An account will bo rendered 
by every officer who may receive funds, whether be makes expenditures 
or not ([urin;i tho (joartfr. 

2. A fjuurler/i/ return of sfatioi\f5ry, iMi^ks, fuel, straw, and such other 
property an n)ay have bpc:i purclitised with tho recrnitin;; funds. 

3. A moiidthj sunimarif ulaieiuent of money received, expended, and 
remaining on baud, (form V,) to-be transniittcd on the last day of each 
month. 

4. ^\ muster roll of all enlisted men at tho rendexvoua, including tho 
names of all who may have joined, dieil, deserted, Ikjcu transferred or 
discliar;^e<), during the period embjaced in the muster roll. 

5. Tri inontUhj rcporLt of the state of the recruiting serrir^ '^-^ •■ rding 
to the prescribed focui. 

To tlir Siiprrintrmlcnt. 

G. A vumthhj return of recruits and of Iho rocruifing purty, nccom- 
paniod with one copy of the enlieMent of every recruit enlisted, within 
tho month. 

7. Ibiplicale inusfrr rolls for pnt/ of tho perm'anfnt recruiting; party, 
'v!ii. h may r.c sint direct ti ihe nearest paymaster, whfr, authorized 
by tbo superintendent). A tri[€icnte of tliis roll vrill bo rctalpcd at t!iO 
dttition. 



hkcruitino service. 391 

8. Muster and descriptive rolls tintl an account of clolliivg of every de- 
tachment of recruits ordered to the principal depot. If the recruits bo 
ordered to proceed from tlio rendezvous direct, to join any regiment or 
post, these rolls and accounts of clothini; will be delivered to the officer 
in command of the detnciiment, a duplicate of each muster and descrip- 
tive roll only being then made and sent to the superintendent. 

9. Copy of the quarterly abstract of contingent expenses, to be fbr* 
warded within three days after the expiration of each quarter. 

10. Quart/'rhj estimates for funds. , . 

11. Estimotts for clothin;^, and camp and garrison equipage, and for 
arms and accoutrements, for six ot twelve month.«, or for euch times as 
may be directed by the superintendent. 

12. Copy of the return No. 13. 

To the Quartermaster Grncral. 

13. A qvartefly return of clothing and cnmp and garrison equipage, 
and of all quartermaster's property in his possession, not iDcludingsach 
as is purchased with the recruiting funds. • 

To the Ordnance Dej)artmcnt. 

14. A quarterly return of arms, accoutrements, nmmunition, and of 
all ordnance stores. 

RCI.ES FOR MAKING ACCOUNTS ANU PAPERS. 

1440. The following rules must be observed in making out a^d for- 
warding accounts and y);\per8 : 

1. Letters addressed to the Adjutant Geneml " 07i recr\iiiing service," 
will be so endorsed on the envelopes, under the words "official business." 

2. Each voucher must be separately entered "on the abstract of con- 
tingent expenses, (form F,) and only the gross amount of the abstract 
must be entered on the account current. 

3. No expenditure must be charged without a proper voucher to sup-* 
port it. (See form E.) ' • 

4. The receipt to the voucher Inust be signed, when practicable,' by a 
principal. When this is not practicable, the recruiting officer will add 
to his own certificate a statement that the agent is duly authorized to 
sign the receipt. 

5. When an individual mates " his mark" instead of signing bis 
name to the receipt, it must be witnessed by a third person. 

0. Expenditures must bo confined to items stated in the Regulations. 
In an unforeseen emergency, requiring a deviation from this rule, a full 
explanation mnstbe appended to the vouclier for the expenditure; and 
if this V>e not satisfactory, the account will bo charged in the Treasury 
against the recruiting officer. 

7. In all vouchers, tlio different items, with dates, a6d cOst of each, 
must be given. To vouchers fur tranpnrtation of ^officers, a copy of the 
order under which the journey w.is perTormed, must be appended. 

8. In voucher* for medical attendance and njodieincH, the name of 
each patient, date of, and chnr<:;e Cor. c.ioh vihit, and for medicines fur- 
rislied, must be given, .-md the ccrtifuite of the physician added, that 
the rates - ' t,'. ,t ',•(> the u^ual r.ites < f *' •• - ■ i"- 

0. On ■■' ~ f'. premitims. fr ccrnif«, and fees fcr 

oaths of f : , the names of the '■> ■ i whom the expendi- 

ture is made piust be given in alphabetical order, according tothcnOm- 



392 nSCBUITKNU SIEVICE. 

Veering (f tlic enlintmcnUi. The rouchera may bo made in form of ccn- 
»- ilidnt«'l receipt rolls, aathcDticated by tbo officer's certificate thnttiiey 
arr corfjct, 

10. Tlic fee uiually nllowod for ndministering tlic oatli «if enlistment 
l.pinn twenty-five cent* for each recruit, wlicn a greater nniuunt is paiJ, 
the officer inunt certify un ibo vuucher that it is the ruto aliuwed by law 
of the Stauj or Territory. 

1 1. T ) onch voucher for notices in.scrted in newspapers a copy of tbo 
notite >vill lie appended. 

12. Ij'unrlerly ucooiintH current must exhibit the numbers of Trcn-sury 
dr.ifts and d.-ttes (>{ tlioir receipt ; and when funds are trnnKfirrcd, the 
names "f onn..er;< from whom thoy a'e received, or to' w'hom tliey ore 
turned "Vtr. with the dates of transfer. 

l.'i. Fractions of cents arc not to be taken up on accounts current. 

14. Knlstinents muht lie filled up in a fair and legible hand. Tho 
real nanio of the recruit mu.^t be ascertained, correctly spelled, and wril- 
tt!n in tlie a^me wiiy wherever it occurs; the C/iriilian name must not 
lir- ahbr<'viated. Numbers in the Iridy of the enlistment mu.^l be writ- 
ten and not expressed by figures. Each enlistment must be endorsed 
as follows : 

No. -. 

A — - U , 

• ' enlisted at 

Jaruary — , 18 — , 

By Lt. C D , 

* -^ Regiment of 

Tho number in each month to correspond with tho names alphabetically 
arrange J. 

15. Whenever a soldier reenters tho service, the officer who enlisted 
him will endorse on tin; tnlif<tment, next below his own name and rcgi- 
niont, "second (or third) cnIi^tnu'nt," as theca^e may be, tof^ether with 
the name of the regiment and the letter of the company in which tho 
poldier last served, and date of discharge from fornier enlistment. This 
information the recruiting officer must obtain, if jiossible, from tho sol- 
dier's discharge, which he should in all cases be required to exhibit. 
(See 221 Art. of War.) 

K"). I{e-cnlistments munt bo forwarded with recruiting accounts, nl- 
thniigh the liounty due on thcin may not bo paid. When tho bounty ia 
nIl)^eqllentIy paid, tho soldier's receipt is to bo taken on a voucher 
showing date and place of re enlistment, company and regiment, and 
by whom 1^0 enlisted. 

17. The filling uji of, and endorsement on, tho enlistment, will be in 
the handwriting of Uic recruiting officer, or done under his immediate 
inspection. 

1^. To facilitate the firial settlement of accounts of discharged sol- 
diers, the name of the Stale, as well as tho town, where each recruit is 
enlisted, will be recorded on all muster, pay, and descriptive rolls. 

IiKI'OTS KOR (*ol,I,ECTING AND INSTRUCTING RECRUITS. 

' 1441., Tho depots for recruits aro established by orderb from the Ad- 
jutant and Inspcctor-CienorarB olEcc. 



RECRUITING 8EIVVICE. 393 

1442. To each depot there will be assigned a suitable number of of- 
ficers to command and instruct the recruits; and when necessary, such 
number of enlisted men as may be designated at the Adjutant and In- 
spector General's office, will be selected for the permanent party, to do 
garrison duty and for drill masters. 

1443. The number of recruits at depots to be assigned to each arm 
and* regiment is directed from the Adjutant ^d Inspector General's of- 
fice. 

1444. The recruits are to be dressed in uni/brni according to their re- 
Bpective arms, and will be regularly mustered and inspected. They aro 
to be well drilled In the infantry tactics, through the school of the sol- 
dier to that of the battalion, and in the exercise of field and garrison 
pieces. Duty is to be done according to the strict rules of service. 

1445. The general superintendent will cause such of the recruits as 
are found to possess a natural talent for music, to be instructed (besides 
the drill of the soldier) on the fife, bugle and drum, and other military 
instruments ; and boys of twelve years of age and upward may, under 
his direction, be enlisted for this purpose. But as recruits under 
eighteen years of age and under size must be discharged, if they are 
not capable of learning music, care should betaken to enlist these only 
who have a natural talent for music, and, if practicable, they should be 
taken on trial for some time before being enlisted. 

1446. Regiments will be furnished with field music on the requisi- 
tions of their commanders, made, fram time to time, direct on the gene- 
ral superintendent; and* when requested by regimental commanders, 
the superintendents will endeavor to have suitable men selected from 
the recruits, or enlisted for the regimental bands. 

1447. To give encouragement to the recruits, and holdout induce- 
ments to good conduct, the commanding officer of the depot may pro- 
mote such of them to be lance corporals and lance sergeants as exhibit 
the requisite qualifications, not exceedin^the proper proportion to the 
Dumber of recruits at the depot. These appointments will be an- 
nounced in orders in the usual way, and will be continued in force until 
they join their regiments, unless sooner revoked. No allowance of pay 
or emoluments is to be assigned to these appointments ; they are only 
to be considered a« recommendations to the captoins of companies and 
colonels of regiments for the places in which The recruits may have 
acted ; but such non-commissioned officers are to be treated with all the 
respect and to have all the authority which may belong to the stations 
of sergeant and corporal. 

144h. rtrmaHent parties at depots, and nccnii/ing parlies, will bo 
mastered, inspected, and paid in the same manner as other soldiers. 
Recruits will bo mustered for pay only at depots, and when paid thero 
one half of their monthly pay will be retainea until they join their regi- 
ments. 

1449. When recruits are received at a garrisoned post, the command- 
ing officer will place them under the charge of. a commis^ioced officer. 

14.W. Recruit* arc not to, be put to jiny labor or work which would 
interfere with their instruction, nor arc they to be employed otherwise 
than as soldiers, in the regular duties of garrison and camp. 

1451. Every enlisted man discharged as a minor, or for other cause 



.,1 ,.fi-l,. . 


< m. 


i s .Miirrt vr 


r;i ir.^ at 


I'LliP 


.> A.NU l'LI>1.^ 



SM RICBUJT190 Slav in:. 

inrolriog fraud on litn part id tlio enliiitment, or discharged by tlio rWll 
authurity, bbali forfeit all \\\y and alluwanccj due at tlio Utuo of the 
discharge. » 

14.'>l2. The Hi)'"' »•• ' > -tides of War are to ho rend tr» the rrcruita 
fvtry month, al: ■ I'itten ; nud ho innoh thereof ns r<l;ites to 

the dutiea ol i. .' i.i 1 I'fTi. . . * m.'i •- .HiirH vrHl 1 <• rt-.ui tu 

tbcm every week. 

1453. The supcrintcndont or commanding uiTicev \rill cause a minute 
and critical inspection to be nmdc of every recruit received nt n depot 
two days after his arrival : nnd should any recruit be found unfit for 
service, or to hnvo l»ecn cnli-ted contrary to law or reRulationc, he shall 
assemble a Hoard of Insperlor.i, to ox miino int«» flie case. A board 
may also be H^8embIed in a special caj<o, whetl a concealed defect may 
l>ccomo manifobt in a recruit, at any time during his detention at the 
depot. 

14^4. Every detachment ordered from a»d >pot to any regiment or 
post sltall, imuiediatel}' preoedin;; its departure, bo critically insipected 
by the superintendent or commanding officer and surgeon ; and, when 
necessary, a Hoard of Inspectors will liC convened. 

14.').'>. Recruits received at u miliury post or htution shall bo carefully 
inspected by the commandin<; oflicer and surgeon, on the third day after 
their arrival ; and if, ou such inspection, any recruit, in their opinion, 
be unsound or otherwise defective in Such do;;»ce as to di.>-(jualify him 
for the duties of a soldier, then a Board of Inspectors will be assem- 
bled to examine into and report on the case. (See paragraphs 1438, 
14;{i», 1440.) 

14.0G. Hoards for flic in jjectioii of recriiit.- will bo composed of the 
three senior regimentnl officers present on duty, with the troops, in- 
cluding the commanding ufTiccr, and the senior, medical officer of tho 
army present. • 

HEJECTED RECRUITS. . 

1457. In all oases of rrjection, the reasons therefor will be stated at 
large in*a special rrporf/Ut be made by the board ; which, together with 
the surgeon's eertilieiil* of disability fir service, wilt be forwarded by 
the su|)erintendent or cummiinhmt of the post direct" to the Adjutant 
and Inspector (loneral. In all suclucases, the commanding officer will 
cause tho articles of clothing which may have been issued >») tho re- 
cruit, wkh the price of e.icli article, to be endorsed on the certificate of 
disability. If tiie rciomuieiidaticn of the board for the discharge of tho 
recruit be approved, the authority therefor will be cndorscil on tho 
certificate, whicii will be sent Itack to be filled up and signed by the 
commaiVding officer, who will return the same to tho Adjutant and In- 
spector General's olfi.-e. 

145t<. The board will state in the report whether the disability, or 
other cause of rejpctior>, existod liefin-o his enlistment, nnd whether, 
with proper care and cxaminatiiiu, it mi;;ht not have been discovered. 

ItKCBlITS KKNT TO RKGIUKNTS. 

145y. An officer ciitru.stc J with tho command of recruits ordered to 



BEORUITINa SERVICE. 895 

rpgimentu will, on arriving at the phce of destinfttion, forward the fol- 
lowing papers : 

1. To the Adjutant and Inxptetor General and the SuperiniaideTU, 
each, A descriptive roll nnd an account of clothing of such men a<? may 
have dei«ertcil, died, or Ueen left <m the n)Ute from any cause whatever, 
with dato and place ; al!>o, a special report of the date of hie arrival at 
the P"st, the strenfith and condition of th6 defaohment when turned 
over to the commanding Wficer, and all f ircumstawces worthy of remark 
which may have, occurred on the marcli. 

2. To the Comtnaadinr/ Offirrr of the regiment or post, the muster 
and descriptive roll furBished him at the time^f setting out, properly 
signed and completed hy recording the names of th.e recruits prejfnt, 
and liy noting in the column for rornarlta, opi^isifte the appropriate 
spa'^es, the time and place of death, dr-f itiun, apprehension, or other 
casualty that may have occurred on th(f route. 

14f>0. Should an officer be re'ieved in clThrge of a detachment en 
TMitf, licfore it reaches its destination, the date and place, and name of 
the officer by whom it is relieve!, must be re. or'led on the detachment 
roll. Without the evidence of such record, no charge for extra pay for 
clothing accountability of a detachment equal to a'company will be al- 
lowed. 

14dl. The " origlTial muster and d<-'i"ri£>tirp roll" of every detach- 
Aer.t. ^'\'']\ mnarks showing the final lii'iioHtion of each recruit, and 
tho nd letter of the company to which he may be assigned, 

will ;»nd firw.irded U> the AiJjutant and Inspector General by 

tho . inii.ai.ding offif-fr who makts the ns-i^nment. If the recruits 
cmlin'^f'd in nn«» roll happen to be n'^°' t' i to diirerent posts, the origi- 
nal r til the la't nt to its destination, each 
com sdfar a* le recruits left at his post. 
Whfo If ' ' ,\ riill are to be 
made b_v ■ ri'^.^ompany the 

iieveral d- ; , - , , ■, ;;,.■•. , , ,,.- ., • -.r-.-] Ir-r-'^tT 

General as in case of the original roll. 

KEGIMEffTAL SECSCITI^a' 8KRVICB. 

\i(Tl. The regimental recruiting will be conducted in tb« auuiaer 
prescribed for the general Mrvice. 

14r»/l. Every rommatifler of n r«»ginn>nt i« th* « n peri nt^n dent of the 
>■ lf>ep it up to 

-ary funds, 

14''i4. At er nt. rfr any fMri of it, 

tb« o^lofif' ' ' ■ > g 

or ■■'^■"- , ..,, „,,, , . . 

■=»'•' y, with r i 

car 

1 « ' win, W'tb the approbation of 

the c^ ...... i ^ ^. .... '-v. .... ■ .flisi all raitibble HMD. Uo will 



396 RECRUITING SERVICE — FORMS. 

be governed, in rendering his nccounts and returns, by the rules pre- 
scribed for the general Bervice; and when leaving n. post, •will turn over 
the funds in his hands to the senior company oflBcer of his regiment 
present, unless some other be appointed to receive them. 



Form A. 

AbticleS OP AonERMENT made and eniered into this day of , Anno 
Domini one tliouSand eii^lit hundred and , between , an oflicer 

in the Confederate States Army, on the one part, an^ , of the county 

of , and Stnte of , of tlie other part. 

This agreement wilncstrth, Tliat the said , for and on behalf of the 

Confederate States of America, and the said , heirs, executors, and 

administrators, liave covenafited and agreed, and by these presents do 
n;utually covenant and agree, to and with each other, as follows, viz: 

First, lliat the said , heirs, executors, and administrators, shall 

supply, or cause to be supplied and issued, at , all the rations, to 

consist of the articles hereinafter specified, that shgtll be required for the 
use of the Confederate States recruits stationed at the place aforesaid, 
commencing on the day of , one thousand eight hundred and , 

and ending on the day of , one thousand cigUt hundred and , 

or such earlier day as the Commissary General may direct, at the price of 
cents mills for each complete ration. 

Second. That the ration to be iiirnishcd by virtue of this contract shall 
consist of the following articles, viz; One and a quarter pounil of fresh 
beef or three-quarters of a i)oiu)d of salted p'orlc, x;igliteen ounces of bread 
or Hour, and at the rate of eight quarts of beans or ten pounds of rice, 
six ponnds of coflee, twelve pounds of sugar, four quarts of vinegar, one 
and a lialf jKiund of tallow or one poiuid of sperm candles, four pounds 
of soap, and two quarts of salt, to every hundred rations, or the contract- 
or shall furnish the men with good and wholesome board and lodgings, at 
the opt'on of the recruiting ollieer ; and the recruiting party shall have 
the privilege of hanging out a flag from the idace of renilezvons. 

Thinl. That fresh beef shall be issued at least twice in each week, if 
required by the cornmanding officer. ' 

lourLh. It is clearly imdersiood that the provisions stipulated to be fur- 
nished and delivered inider this contract shall be of the first quality. 

Fifth. Should any difTicidty arise respecting the quality of the provisions 
stipulated to l)ii delivered nnd(,'r this contract, then the commanding officer 
is to ap) oint a disinterested perstju to meet one of the same description to 
be apjiointed by the contractor. These two thus ajjpointed will have 
l)Ower fo. decide on the quality of the provisions; but should they disa- 
gree, then a third person is to be chosen 6y the two alrciidy ai>pointed, 
the whole to s^t undM oath, and the opinion of the majority to bo final in 
the case. ' -, 

Witness : 



RECaUlTINO SKBVICB — rORMS. 



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RECRUITINQ SERVICE — FORMS. 



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RECRUITING SEaVICE — FORMS 



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Form P. 

Abstract of dishursements on account of contingencies of the rccruilijtg 

scrbice, by ,• in ihe quarter -ending , 18 , 

at . 



voucher. 



No. of Date of pay- -r- i • i 

„_,.__ * ^ To whom paid 



On what account. 



Amount. 



Dolls. 



Cts. 



Ricruiting Officer. 



400 



RECRVITIN6 BEHVICE — F»RM6. 



T7u Cot{federaU Stales, 



Form E. 



To 



Dr. 



Date. 


For 

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Dolls. 


Cu. 















I cartify that the above account is correct. 



Recruiting Officer. 



Received tliis clay of , 18 — , of , 

recruiting officer, -dollurs and cents, m full of the abi)ve ac- 
count. 



(Duplicate.) 



1 



REORUITINO SERVICE — FORMS. 



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■102 UNlPOttM A.-^D DRESS OP THE ARMV. 

ARTICLE XLVir. 
UNIFORM AND DRESS OF THE ARMY. 



For Commissioned Officers. 

1400. All OITjcers shiJl wear i\ frock-coat of gr.ny cli)tl), known jis ca- 
det pray ; the (<kirt to extend half \vay between the hip iiud the knee; 
double bteaslcd for all j^rades. 

1467. For a Jiriijadier General — Two rows of buttons on* the breast, 
eight J!) each row, placed in pair?; the distance between the rows four 
inche.s at top ar^l three inches at bottom ; stand up collar, to rise no 
higher than to permit the chin to torn freely over it; to hook in front 
at the bottom, and slope thence up and backward, at nn angle of thirty 
degree.-', on each side; cuffs two and u half inches deep on tlic under 
side, there to be buttoned with three small buttons, and sloped upwards 
to a point at a distanic of four inches from the end of the sleeve; 
pockets in the folds of the skirt, with cme button at the hip and one at 
the end of each pocket, making four Buttons on the back and skirt of 
the tunic, the hip buttons to range with the lowest breast buttons. 

140S. For a Colonel — tie same as for a Brigadier (Jeneral, except 
that there will be only seven buttons in each row on the breast, placed 
at er|ual distances. 

14G'J. Fur a Lieutenant- Colonel, Hajor, Captain and Lieutenant — the 
same as for a Colonel. 

For Enlitted Men. 

1470. The uniform coat for ajl cr.listod men shall be a double-breast- 
ed frock C'lat of gray cloth, known as cadet gray, with the skirt extend- 
ing half way between the hip and tlie knee ; two rows of buttons on the 
breast, seven in each row ; the dif-tance between the rowu four inches 
at top and three inches at bottom ; stand-up collar, to rise no higher 
than to pirmit the chin to tiirn freely over it; to hook in front at the 
bottom, and slope thence backwards at an angle of thirty degrees on 
each side; cuffs two<ind u half inches deep at the under beam, to but- 
ton with two small buttons, and to be slightly pointed on the upper part 
of the arm ; pockets in the folds of the skirts. 'I^ho collars and cuffs to 
bo of the color prescribed for facings for the respective arms of service, 
and the edges of the cynt to be trimmed throughout with the same color- 
ed cloth. Narrow'liuing in the skirts of the coat of gray material. 

Facings. 

1471. The facing for General Officers, and for OfiBcers of the Adju- 
tant Gonenil's I)e[iartment, the t^uartcrmasler General's l>epartment, 
the Commissary dmerul's Department, and the Engineers — buff. The. 
ooat for atl officers to bo edged throughout with tho facings designated, 

1472. For tho Medical Departmeut — black. 



CNIF^RM AND DUESS OP TDD ATI MY. 



403 



147.'^ F.ir llic Avtillcry— rc'l. • 

1174. For the ("ivnlry — yellow. 

1475. For the lifimtry— liyht lilue. 

1470. For f.itign' I urpnpe.", ^ light <j;ray l)loii'<o, double breaeted, with 
two rows of. gui.ill l>iittone, seven jn each luw ; smiill, turn-over collar, 
may l>c issued to tlio troops. 

1477, On all ocasions of duty, except fatigtio, and when out of quar- 
ters, the <^o:it will he huttoued and hooked fit the collar, OflBcers on 
bureau duty may wcai^he coat open, 

' Buttons. 

1478. For General Officers and Oflicers of the Ger^eral Staff — brij^ht 
pilt, rounded at t!. ed^c, convex, raised en;;le in the centre, witli ptars 
surrounding; ]iiry»; tize, one incli iu exterior diameter ; Kmall size, hiJf 
nn inch. 

147'.'. For Officer. -5 of the Corps of Finf^inper;-. the panieas for the Gen- 
eral Staff, except tliat, in place of the caglo a; d star?, (here will be n 
rai-od E in Gerninn toxt, 

1480. For Office: s nf Artillery, Infantry, Riilemen and Cavalry — gilt, 
convex* plain, ^iili large rjviseil letter in '.he rertre : A, for the Artil- 
lery; 1, fi,r (he Iiilintry ; II, for the Riflemen ; ' ', for tlie Cavalry; largo 
nize,' M'vcn-cighths uf an inch in eateiior dian oter; email size, b'llf ft" 
inch. 

14^1. ^Aids de-C imp may wear the button of tbe General Staff, or of 
thoir regiincntp or corps, at their option. 

1482.. For enlisted men gf Artillery — yellow, convex, "large raised 
letter A in the centre ; three-quarters of an irch in exterior diameter. 

14S3. For all other eiilibted men, the game ns fi>r the-Artillery, ex- 
cept that the num'pcr of the regiment, in larg^ figurec, will be substi- 
tuted for the letter A. 

Troicsers. 

1484, The unifrirt trowflere for both •fflcer- .and enlisted men will be 
of chith tliroughotit the year; made lo( pc, and to fipread well over the 
foot ; of light (or •^ky) bluo color for regimcr ial officers and enlisted 
men ; and of dark Idue cloth fur all other off: cera ; reinforced fur the 
Cavalry. 

1 I"-'). For (icner.il oflRcer." — two slripec" of gold lace on tbe outer 
seam, onc-eightli ' f an inch apart, and each 1 .c eighths of an inch in 
width. • 

14H0. For Officers of tbe Adjutant General's department, the Qiiar- 
tcri .' T nt, the Comnii.-f>ny General's Department, 

nn 1 one stripe of ^<A (lace on the outer seam, 

Ott<' . . •'■ 

14^7. "nt — a black velvet stripe; one inch 

And :i ' '. II nnl nn f>i , i ] -o • f tli'^ -'ri'.c, 

1 • » 

or" ^ , _ • 

ry. "k iduc. 

I T f' re imrnt? ntid for all per- 

gcnni.'-, a iliiic i-. f :!^n wi n ihe outer r-cam, one and 

!\ C'iart«r incfi in •^id'h : c<^-! Mm of •ervioe. 



404 UNIFORM AND DRi;86 QF THE ABMY. 

1490. For all other enlisted men — plain. 

Cop. 

1491. Pattern — Of the form known as the French Aejji; to be made of 
cloth. 

1492. For General Officers, and Officers of the General Stafif and tiA- 
ginecrs — Dark blue band, sides and crown. 

1493. For the Artillery — Dark blue band ; sides and crown red. 

1494. For the Infantry— Dark blue band ; sides and crovfn ligb't 
blue. • 

1495. For the Cavalry — Dark blue band ; sides and crown yellow. 

Marks to distingutsh Rank. 

1496. Four gold braids for General Officers ; three for Field Officers ; 
two for Captains, and one for Lieutenants, to extend from the band on 
the front, back and both sides to the tup of the cap — and the centre of 
the crown to be embroidered with the same number of braids. 

1497. For enlisted men^the cap will be of tiio same pattern ; the 
band to be dark blue, and, as in the case of officers, the several .arms of 
service will be designated by the color of the sides and crown — Red for 
Artillery ; light blue for Infantry, and yellow for Cavalry. The num- 
ber of the Regiment will be worn in front, in yellow metal. 

1498. In hot weather, a white duck, or linen cover, known as a have- 
lock, will be worn — the apron to fall beliind, so as to proteat the ears 
and neck from the rays of the sun. In winter, in bad weather, an oil 
ekin cover will be worn, with an apron to fall over the coat collar. 

Cravat or Stock. 

1490. For all officers — black. When a cravat is worn, the tie not to 
be visible at the opening of the collar. 

1500. For enlisted men — black leather, according to pattern. 

Boots. 

1501. For all officers — ankle or JeflFerson. 

1502. For enlisted men of Cavalry — ankle and Jefferson, according 
to pattern. 

1503. For other enlisted men — Jefierson, according to pattern. 

Spurs. 

1504. For all mounted officers — yellow metal or gilt. 

1505. For enlisted mounted men — yellow metal, according to pattern. 

Glovfs. 

1506. For General OflBcers, and officers of the General Staff and Staff 
Corps — buff or white. • • 

1507. For officers of Artillery, Infantry and Cavalry — white. 

Sash. \ 

1508. For General Officers— buff silk net, with silk bullion fringe 



end 
pe 



UNIFORM AND J)RE88 OF THE ARMT. 405 

(Is ; sash to go twice aroiiiid the wnist, and to tie hchind the left hip ; 

ndent purt ni)t to extend more thivii eighteen inches below the tie. 

1509 F«ir (ifficMTs of the Oeneral Staff and Engineers, and yi the 
Artillery and Infantry — red silk net. For officers of the Cavalry — yel- 
low silk net. For medical officers — green silk net. All with silk 
bullion fringe ends ; to go around the waist, and to tie as for General 
Officers. 

1510. For sergeants — of worsted, with worsted bullion fringe ends ; 
red for Artillery and Infantry, and yellow for Cavalry. To go twico» 
around the waist, and to tie as above specified. 

Swo7-d Belt. 

1511. For all officers — a waist belt, not less than one and one-half 
inches, nor more than two inches wide; to be worn over the sash ; the 
sword to be suspended from it by slings of the same material as the 
belt, with a hook attached to the belt upon which the sword may be 
hung. 

1512. For General Officers— Russian leather, with three stripes of 
gold embroidery; the slings embroidered' on both sides. 

1513. For all otlier offi-ers — black leather, plain. 

1514. For all non-commissioned officers — black leather, plain. 

Sword Belt Plate. 

1515. For all officers and enlisted men— gilt, rectangular ; two inches 
wide, with a raised bright rim ; a silver wreatii of laurel encircling the 
"arms of the Confederate States." 

Su-ord and Scabbard. 

'l!)\fi. For all officers — according to patterns to be deposited in the 
Ordnance Bureau. 

Sicord Knot. 

1517. For all oflBcers — of plaited leather, with tasselp. 

Badges to distinguish Rank. 

1518. On the sleeve of the coat, rank will be designated by an orna- 
ment of gold braid, (in form as represented in the drawing deposited 
in the Quartermaster General's Office,) extending around the seam of 
the cuff, and up the outside of the arm to the bend of the elbow. To' 
be of one braid fur* lieutenants ; two, for captains; three, for field 
officers; and four, for general officers. The braid to be one eighth of 
an inch in width. 

1519. On the front part of the collar of the coat, the rank of officers 
will lie distin>:ui.shf d as follows : 

1520. General OJHrers' — A wreath, with three stars enclnged, embroi- 
dered in gold. The edge of the wreath to be three-fourths of an inch 
from tiie frout^dge of tlie coU.ir; the stars to he arranged horizontally: 
the centre one to be one and one fourth inches in exterior diameter, and 
the others three-fouftbs of an inch. 



400 UNIFORM AND DRESS OP THE AR-M?. 

•1521. Colonel — Three stars, embroidered in gold, arranged hoTizoQ- 
t;ilh-, and dividing equally tlie vertical space of tlie collar. Each star 
to be one and one-fuurth inclies in exterior'diameter ;;the frdnt star to 
be thr?e fourths of a.i inch fronrthe edj^e of the collar. 

1522. Lieutenant' .Colo nd — Two stars of same material, si-zo and ar- 
rangement as for a eolond. * 

1523. Major — One .star of same material and size as for a colonel ; to 
be ]ilaced three-fourths of an inch from edge of colhu-, and dividing 
equally the vertical space. 

1524. Caplain — Three horizontal bars, embroidered in gold ; each 
one half-inch in width ; the upper bar to b^threc indies in. length ; the 
front Cilge of the bars to incline to correspond with the angle of the 
collar, and to be three fourths of an incli from the eii;^e: the line o^the 
back edges to the vertical. • " ' 

1525. First Lieutenant — Two horiz'Uital bars of fame material and 
size as for captains, and dividing equally the vertical space of collar. 

1526. Second Lieutenant— Ona horizontal bar of sumo materi.il and 
size as for the centre bar of captain, and dividing C(jually the vertical 
space of collar. 

Ohtrcoats for Enlisted Men. 

1527. For mounted men — of cadet gray cloth ; stancl-up collar ; dou- 
ble breasted ; capo to rench to the cuff of the coat, when the arm is ex- 
tended, and to butt'm ail the way up, (buttons, eighteen.) * 

152S. For footmen — of cadet gray cloth ; stand-up collar ;• 5ouble 
breasted ; capo to reach to the elbott-s, when the arm is extended, and 
to button all the way up, (buttons, eighteen.) For the present, to bo a 
talma, with sleeves, of water proof material ; black. 

Chevrons. 

1529. The rank of non commissionoil officers will be marked by 
chevrons on both sleeves of the uniform coat and the overcoat, abovo 
the elbow, of silk, or .worsted binding, half an inch wide ; colur the 
same as the edging of the coat; points down, as follows: 

1530. For a Sergeant J/aJor— tlirco Viars and an arc. in silk,. 

1531. For a Qnartertnaster Sergeant—rthvee bars aiul a tic in silk. 

1532. For an Ordaanc: Scrgeanir—ihveQ bars and a star in silk. 

1533. For a First (or Orderly) Sergeant— iXwaeh^'i and a lozenge in 
worsted. 

. 1531. For a Sergeant— ih\aQ bars. in worsted. 
1535. For a Corporal — two bars in worsted. ^ 

Hair and Beard. 

1530. The hair to be .'^hort: the beatd to. bo worn at the ple.ns'jie of 
the individual ; but, wb'n'worn, to '.■- ^-i*; i^hort and neatly trimmed. 



ARTICLES OF MAK 407 



ARTICLES OF WAii. 

fs ACT FOR ESTABTJSHlNa flDLES AND ARTICLES lOK THE GOVERNMENT OJ" 
THE ARMIES OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES. 

Section 1. 77ie Congress of Hie Confederalc States of America do 
enact, Tliat, fioni and alter the passage of thix net,. the following sliall 
be the rules and articles by which the arniieg of the Confederate States 
sliall be governed : • * 

AinicLE 1. Eveiy olTiccr now in the army of tbe Confederate States 
shall, in six months from the passing of this ju:t, and every ofihccr who 
shall hereafter bo appointed, shall, before he enters on the duties of liia 
office, subscribe those rules and regulations. 

Art. 2. It is earnestly recommended to all officers and foldiers dili- 
' gently to attend divine service ; nnd all ofl'ceis who shall behave inde- 
cently or irreverently at any place of diTine \vor^bilt shall, if commis- 
sioned officers, be brought belore a general court-martial, there to 1)0 
publicly and severely reprimanded by the President : if non-commis- 
aioned olTicera or soldiers, ever}' person so offending i>halI,for his first 
offence, firfeit one sixth of a dollar, to be deducted out of his next pay ; 
for the second offence, he shall not only fqrfeit a like sum, but be con- 
fine twenty-four iiours ; 'and for every like ofi'once, shall puffer and pay 
in like manner; wiiich money so forfeited, shall be applied, by tho 
captain or senior i fficer of the troop or coinpimy, to the use of the sick 
soldiers of the company or troop to which the offender belongs. 

Art. 3. Any niu-commissioned Df^cer or soldier who shall use any 
profane oath or execration, shall incur the penalties expressed iTi tho 
foregoing article : and a commissioned officer shall forfeit and pay, for 
each and every sucii offence, one dollar, to be applied as in the preceding 
article. 

Art. 4, Every chaplain, commissiorted in tlie army or armies of tho 
Confederate States, who shall absent himself i'rom the duties assigiicd 
him (excepting in cases of sickness or leave ( r.a1)sence,) shall, on con- 
viction thereof iK^fiTe}; court-martial, be fined not exceeding one month's 
pay, besides the Itjss of his. pay during his absence: or he discharged, 
as the said court-martial siuill judge proper. 

Art. 5. Any ofticer ^r soldier who shall" us"' contemptuous or disre- 
spectful words agiinst the President of tlie C' nfederatc States, against 
the Vice Presidei.t, thereof, ag.'iinst the Con^'ress of the Confederate 
States, or against the Chief Magistrate or T,egislature of any of tho 
Confederate States, in which he may be quartered, if a commissioned 
officer, shall be <%8hiered, or otherwise puni bed, as a court-martial 
shall direct; if n non-commissioned officer -or soldier, he shall suffer 
such punishment as shall be inflicted on bim by the sentence of a court- 
martial. 

Art. 0. AnyofTjcoror soldier who shall 1 "have himself with con- 
tempt or disrespect towards bis commandii'.g "fficer, shall be punished, 
according to the nafnrc of his offence, ly the judgment of a court- 
martial. 



408 . ARTICLES OF WXK. 

Art. 7. Any officer or soldier who shall begin, excite, cause, or join 
in any mutiny or sedition, in any troop or ccmipany in the service of 
the Confedenite States, or in any party, post;, detachment, or guard, 
shall suffer death, or such other punishment as by a court-martial shall 
be intlictod. 

Art. 8. Any officer, non-commissioned officer, or soldier, who, being 
present at any mutiny or sedition, does nofiJse his utmost endeavoifto 
suppress the same, or, coming to the knowledge of any intended mutiny, 
does not, without delay, give information thereof to his commanding 
officer, shall be punished by the sentence of a court-martial with death, 
or otherwise, according to" the nature cf his offence. 

Art. 9. Any officer or»saldier who shall strike his superior officer, or 
draw or lift up any weapon, or offer any violence against him, being in 
the execution of his otBce, on any pretence whatsoever, or shall disooey 
nny lawful command of his superior officer, shall suffer death, or such 
other punishment as shall, according to the nature of his offence, be 
inflicted upon him by the sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 10. Every non-commissioned officer or soldier, who shall enliaji 
himself in the service of the Confederate States, shall, at the time of 
his so enlisting, or within six days afterward, have the articles for the 
government of the armies of the Confederate States read to him, and 
shall, by the officer who enlisted him, or by the commanding officer of 
the troop or company i.ito which he was enlisted, he taken before the 
next justice of the peace, or chief magistrate of any city or town corpo- 
rate, not being an officer of the army, or where recourse cannot be had 
to the civil magistrate, before the judge advocate, and in his presence 
' shall take the Ibllowing oath or affirmation: '"I, A. B., do solemnly 
swear, or a^rm, (as the case may be,) that I will bear true allegiance 
to the Confederate States of America, and tiiat 1 will serve them 
honestly and faithfully against all their enemies or opposers what- 
soever, and observe and obey the orders of the President of the Con- 
federate States, and the orders of the otBcers appointed over me, ac- 
cording to the Rules and Articles for the government of the armies of 
the Confederate States." Which justice, magistrate, or judge advocate, 
is to give to the officer a certificate, signifying that the man enlisted did 
take the said oath or atfirmation. 

Art. 11. After a non-commissioned officer or soldier shall hav« been 
duly enlisted and sworn, he shall not bo dismissed the service without 
u dischax'ge in writing; and no discharge" granted to him shall be suf- 
ficient which is not signed. by a field officer of the regiment to which he 
belongs, or commanding othcer, where no fielfll officer of tlie regiment in 
present ; and no discharge sliall be given to a noncommissioned officer 
or soldier before his term of service has expired, but hy order of the 
President, the Secretary of War, tiie comiuanduig offii-er of a depart- 
ment, or the sentence of a general court-martiar ; ^or shall a commis- 
sioned officer be discharged the service but by order of the President of 
the Confederate States, or by sentence of a general court-martial. 

Art. 12. Every colonel, or other officer commanding a regiment^ 
troop, or company, and actually quartered with it, may give furloughs 
to non-commissioned officers or soldiers, in such numbers, and for sO 
long a time, as he shall judge to be most consistent with the good of the 
service ; and a captain, or other ittljerioif officer, commanding a troop or 



ARTICLES OF WAR, 409 

compAny, or in any garrison, fort or barrack of the Confederate States, 
(his field officer bcinji; absent,) hiny give furlonghs to non-commis- 
Bioned dflBcers and soldiers, for a time not exceeding twenty days in six 
months, but not to more than two persons to be absent at the same 
time, excepting some extraordinary occasion should require it. 

Art. 13. At every .muster, the commanding oflBcer of each regiment, 
troop, or company, there present, shall pve to the commissary of mus- 
ters, or other officer who musters tlie said regiment, troop, or company, 
certificates signed by himself, sigiiifyinj^ how long such officers, as shall 
not appear at the said muster, have been absent, and the reason of their 
absence. In like manner, the commanding officer of every troop or 
company shall give certificates, signifying the reasons of the absence of 
the non-comissioned officers and private soldiers ; which reasons and 
time of absence shall be inserted in the muster rolls, opposite the names 
of the respective absent officers and soldiers. The certificates shall, to- 
gether with the muster rolls, be remitted by the commissary of musters, 
or other officer mustering, to the Department of War, as f peedily as 
the distance of the place will admit. 

ARt. 14. Every officer who shall be convicted before a general court- 
martial of having signed a false certificate relating to the absence of 
either officer or private soldier, or relative to his or their pay, shall be 
cashiered. 

Art. 15. Every officer who shall knowingly make a false muster of 
man or horse, and every officer or commissary of muster who shall wil- 
lingly sign, direct, or allow the signing of muster-rolls wherein such 
false muster is contained, shall, upon proof made thereof, by two wit- 
net^ses, before a general court-martial, l^e cashiered, and shall be thereby 
utterly disabled to have or hold any office or employment in the e rxice 
of the Confederate States. 

Art. 16. Any commissary of musters, or other officer, who shall be 
convicted of having taken money, or other thing, by way of gratifica- 
tion, on mustering any regiment, troop, or company, or on signing 
muster rolls, shall be displaced from his office, and shall be thereby ut- 
terly dipabled to have or hold any office or employment in the service of 
the Confederate States. 

Art. 17. Any officer who shall presume to muster a person as a sol- 
dier who is not a soldier, shall be deemed guilty of having made a false 
muster, and shall suffer aco<jrdingly. 

Art 18. Every officer who fhall knowingly make a false return to 
the Department of War, or to any of his superior officers, authorized to 
call for such returns, of the state of the regiment, troop, or^ company, 
or garrison, under hiscommaad ; or of the arms, ammunition, clothing, 
or other stores thereunto belonging, shall, on conviction thereof before 
a court-martial, be cashierjed. 

Art. 19. The commanding officer of every regiment, troop, or inde- 
pendent company, or garrison, of the Confederate States, shall, in the 
Tteginning of every month, remit, through the proper channels to tho 
Department of War, an exact return of the regiment, troop, indepen- 
dent company or garrison under his command, specifying the names of 
the officers then absent from their posts, with the reasons for and the 
time of their absence. And any fifficer who shall be convicted of hav- 
ing, through neglect or design, omitted sending such returns, shall be 
18 



410 AETULKS Of WAR. 

punjphed, according to the iinlurc of Lib crime, by llio judgment of a . 
general coiirl-uinrtiul. 

Aht. 20. All iifficorH and poldiers wlin linvr received pny. or linvo 
been duly enlisted in the service of liie Confederate Siatcf, and phnll bo 
convicted of having deserted the enmc, elmll puffer deuth.-or such other 
jiutiibhment ti.«, by the pcntenee of a courtnjurliiil,' pluiii ho iidlictcd. 

Art. 21. Any non-comnli8^^ioned ofDccr or soldier who phall, without 
leave from hit) comuiandin;; offioer, absent himself froin his tn op, coni- 
jtauy, (ir dctaeiimejit, hhall, upon beinp convicted thereof, bo puni^hcd 
according to the iidture of his offence, at tho discruliuu of n courl- 
uiartial. 

AiiT. 22. No non-coninjissioncd officer or Foldier shall enlist himself* 
in any otiier regiment, troop, or company, without a rejiulur difiharKe 
from the regiment, troop, or company in which he last served, on tlio 
penalty of bcin;; repiitcid a dtncrtcr, and siiireriiij;accordin;;ly. And in 
case any offioer shall knowinglv receive and entortain such non-com- 
luissioned officer or s(jldier, or shall not, after his being discovered to bo 
a dcBcrter, inuncdiately confine him and give notice tiiercof tn the corps 
in which bo last served, the taid officer fhall, by a court-martial, bo 
cashiered. • 

Akt. 2.'5. Any officer or soldier who shall he convicted of having ad- 
vised or persuaded any otiier olTii-er or siddier to desert the service of 
the Confederate States, siiall suller death, or such other punishment U8 
bhall be inflit;ted upon him by tho sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 24. No officer vr soldier shall use any reproachful or provoking 
fipeeches or gestures to another, upon pain, if an officer, «if lieing put iu 
arrest; if a soldier, confined and of asking pardon of the party of- 
fended, in the presence of his cominaiidiiig officer. 

Art. 25. No officer or scddier shall send a challenge to another of- 
ficer or soldier to fight a duel, or accept a challenge if sent, upon pain, 
if a commissioned officer, of being cashiered ; if a non commissioned of- 
ficer or soldier, of sull'cring corporeal punishment, at tho discretion of n • 
court-marthd. 

Art. -('>. If any cnnimissioncd or non-commissioned officer comm.nn<I- . 
ing a guard shall knowingly or willingly suffer any person whatsoever 
to go forth to fight a duel, lie shall bo imnished as a challenger; and 
all seconds, promoters, and lairiers of challenges, in order to duds, 
shall bo deemed jirinoipals, and punished accordingly. And it shall ho 
the duty of every olhcer commanding an army, regiment, conifiany, 
pvst, or detachment, who is kno,wing to a challeiigc being given or ac- 
cepted by any ofiloer, noncommissioned oflicer, or soldier under hid 
command, or has reason to believe the sanio to bo the case, immediutely 
to arrest and bring to trial such olliinders. 

Art. 27. All olHcers, of what condition soever, have power to part 
and (juell all <|uarrels, frays, and disorders, -though tho persons con- 
cerned should helong to another regijnent, troop, or compan}' ; and 
either to order officers into arrest, or nun-commissioned officers or sol- 
diers into eonfineinent, until their proper superior officers shall bo ac- 
quainted therewith ; and whosoever shall refuse to obey such officer, 
(though of- an inferior rank,) or shall draw his sword upon him, thall 
be punished at tho <liscretion of a general court-martialv- 

Art. 2y, Any oflicer or soldier who thall ujibraiu another for rofua- 



ARTICLES OF WAR. 411 

in;;; n clirtllcnpo, shall hinisolf l)o pnnislicd as a cliallen^or ; and all of. 
Ccers ami soldi^ers are licieliy tlli'f^har<;cil from any disf!;raco or opinion 
of disadvantage which might arise from tlieir having refused to accept 
of ChalIon;ics, as thc\' will only have acted in obedience to the lavrs, and 
dune tlieir duty as j^ood soldiers who suhject themselves to discipline. 

Art. 2'J. No sutler shall bo permitted to pell any kind of liquors or 
victuals, or to keep their houses or shops open f^ar the entertaininent of 
soldiers, after nine at nij^lit, or before tlio beating of the reveille, or 
upon Sundays, during divine service or sertnon, on the penalty of being 
dismissed from all future sutling. 

Art. 30. AH officers commanding in the field, forts, barracks, or gar- 
risonj of the Confederate States, arc hereby required to see tbat the 
persons permitted to suttle shall supply the soldiers witli good and 
wholesome provi,si(ms, or other articles, at a reasonable price, as they 
shall be answerable for their neglect. 

Art. .31. No officer commanding in any of tho garrisons, forts, or 
barracks of the Confederate States, shall exact exorbitant prices for 
houses or stallylet out to sutlers, or connive at tho like exactions in 
others; nor by his own authority, and for his private advantage, lay 
any duty or imposition upon, or be interested in, tho sale of any vic- 
tuals, licjunrs, or other necessaries of life brought into the garrison, fort 
or barracks, for the use of the soldiers, on the penalty of being dis- 
charged from tl'C service. 

Art. 32. Every ofTicer commanding in quarters, garrisons, or on tho 
march, shall keep good order, and, to the utmost of. his power, redress 
all abuses or disorders which "may be committcdjjy any otiiccr or soldier 
under his command ; if, upon complaint made to him of officers or (sol- 
diers beating or otherwise ill-treating any person, or disturbing fairs or 
markets, or of committing any kiiid of riots, to the disquieting of the 
citizens of the Confederate States, he, the said commanilcr, who shall 
refuse or omit to see justice done to the offender or offenders, and repa- 
ration uia<le to the party or parties injured, as far as part of the offend- 
er's pay shall enaV)!e him or them, sliall, upon proof thereof, be cash- 
iered, or otherwise punished, as a general court-martial shall direct. 

Art. 33. Wiicn any commissioned officer or soldier shall be accused 
of a capital crime, or of having used violence, or committed anj^ offcncn 
airainst the person or property of any citizen of any of tho ('. S., such 
as is punishal)le by tho known laws of the land, tho commanding oHlcer 
and fifUccrs of every regiment, troop, or company, to which the person 
(ir persons so accuse I shall bcl )ng, are herel)y required, upon applica- 
tion duly made by, or in behalf of, the party or parties injured, to use 
their utmost endeavors to deliver over such acctiscd person or persons 
to the civil magistrate, and li'cewisc to be aiding and assisting to tho 
offi "crs of justice in apprehending and securing thopcrs<m or persons sf> 
aCc'J'C«l. in order to bring him nr them to trial. If any commaiding oflM- 
ccr or olIicerH shall wilfully neglect, or shall refuse, upon the aj^plication 
aforesaid, to deliver over such accu-nd pers in or persons to the civil 
ioa;;istr ite", or to be aiding and assisting to the oniocrs oljustice in ap- 
prehending such person or persons, the ofliccr or officers so oifonding 
Khali be c.'isliiorcd. 

Art. 34. If any nnicer shall think himself wronged by his colonel, or 
the commanding ofBctfr of the regiment, and shall, upon due applica- 

V 



412 A&Tiri.KA OF fTAR 

tion b«ing made to kim Iks rcfiiHcd r^Irew, hi: may coiui'hrin to tlio 
General cummaiiding in the State or Territory vlicre sucli ri';;iinent 
»hnll be ptft'.ioiicd. in order to olilain juNtice ; vrlio i» liercliy re<j»iired 
t() examine into «iiid rinnfilaint, and tjiiie proper nio.isun s for re lres^jng 
the wronp cimplnined <if, and transmit, as M»i>n an posKihlc, to tlie l>e- 
partment of War, a true state of 6uch complaint, with the proceedings 
had thereon. , 

Art. o5. If any inferior oflBcer or soldier shall think himself wronged 
by hiR captain or otlier officer, he is to complain thereof to the command- 
ing officer of the regiment, who i;* lierehy required to 8ummon a regi- 
mental court-martial, for the doin;; jiistiic to the comphiinant , from 
wbicli regimental court-martial either pivrly may. if lie think him.-cif 
still aggrieved, appeal to a general court martial. But if. upon :\ second 
hearing, the appeal sliall nnjicnr vexatioun and groundless, the person 
80 appealing .sliall be punisiied at the discretion of j<aid court-nmrtial. 

Art. wG. Any comini.«aionpd officer, storekeeper, or con)mi>.'i:iry, who 
tshall be convicted at a general court martial of having sold, without n 
proper order for that purpose, embezzled, misapplied, /ir wililuliy, or 
through neglect, suffered any of the provi-^ions, forage, aruis, ilothing, 
ammunition, or other military st'^res belonging to the Confederate States 
to I c spoiled or damaged, shall, at h\» own expense, make good the loss 
or damago, and shall, moreover, forfeit uU bis pay, and be dismissed 
from the service- 

Aht. 37. Any non-commissioned officer or soldier who tihall be eon- 
victed at a regimental court-martial of having sold, or designedly or 
through neglect, wasted the animnnition delivered out to him t > !)« em- 
ployed in tiio service of the Confederate Stutcs, shall be punished at the 
discretion of such court. 

Akt. '.'>f<. Kvery non-i'omniicsionc 1 officer or soldier who shall !>€ con- 
victed before a court martial of having sold, lust, or spoiled, through 
neglect, his horse, arms, clothes, or accoutrements, shall undergo such 
weekly stoppages (not exceeding tlio half of his pay.) as such court- 
martial khiill judge sullicient for repairing the loss or damage ; undsiiiiil 
suffer confineuiont^or such other corporeal puuishmtnt a» bis crime 
ttbull deserve. 

Art. 3'J. Every officer who shall be convicted before a court martial 
of having enilje/zled or misapplied any money with which he may have 
been intruhtcd, lor t!ie payment id' the men umler liis command, or fur 
enlisting inci into the service, or for other pnrpo'^es, if a comniis.'iioncd 
officer, sliall be cashiered and conipelIe<l to reliii.d the money ; if a non- 
commisbioncd oflicer, shall be reduced to the ranks, bo put under stop- 
pages until the money bo made good, and suffer such corporeal punish- 
ment as such court martial shall direct. 

A^T. 40. Kvery Captain of a troop or company is charged with the 
arms, accoutrement!!, ammunition, clothing, or other warlike stores bo- 
longing to tl e tioop or com|>nny under his command, which he i.s to be 
accountable tor to his colonel in ease of their being lost, spoiled, or dam- 
aged, not by unuvoiduble accidents, or on actual service. 

Art. 41. All nLtn-commissioned officers aiid soldiers who shall be found 
one mile from the enmp without leave, in writing, from their command- 
ing officer, shall suffer such punishment as tliall be intlicted upon them 
by the sentcnco of a court martial. 



ARTIOLEI or WJlB. M 

Art. 42. No officer or soldier shall lie out of his qunrters, garrison, 
or camp, without leave from liis superior officer, upon penalty of being 
punished according to the nature of his offence, by tho sentence of a 
court martial. 

Art. 43. Every non-commissioned officer and soldier shall retire to 
his quarters or tent at the beating of the retreat; in defivult of which 
he ehall be punished according to the nature of his offence. 

Art. 44. No officer, non-commissioned officer, or soldier shall fail in 
repairing, at the time fixed, to the place of parade, of exercise, or other 
rendezvous appointed by his commanding officer, if not prevented by 
.sickness or some other evident necessity, or shall go from the said placo 
of rendezvous, without leave from his commanding officer, before ho 
shall bo regularly dismissed or relieved, on the penalty of being pun- 
ished, according to the nature of his offence, by the sentence of a court- 
martial. 

Art. 45. Any commissioned officer who shall bo found drunk on his 
guard, p«»rty, or other duty, shall be cashiered ; any non-commissioned 
officer or soldier so offending shall suffer such corporeal punishment as 
shall be inflicted by the sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 46. Any sentinel who shall be found sleeping upon his post, or 
phall leave it before he shall be regularly relieved, shall suffer dea^h,,or 
such other punishment as shall be inflicted by the sentence of a court- 
martial. 

Art. 47. No soldier belonging to any regiment, troop, or company, 
nhall hire another to do his duty for him, or be excused from duty but 
in cases of sickness, disability, or leave of absence; and every such sol- 
dier found guilty of hiring his dut^', as also the party so hired to do 
anothers duty, shall bo punished at the discretion of a regimental 
court-martial. 

Art. 48. And every non commissioned officer conniving at such hir-. 
ing of duty aforesaid, shall be reduced ; and every commissioned officer 
knowing and allowing such ill practices in the service, shnll be punish- 
ed by the judgment of a general court-martial, 

Art. 49. Any officer belonging to the service of. the Confederate 
States, who, by discharginj; of firearms, drawing of swords, beating of 
drums, or by any other means whatsoever shall occasion false alarms in 
camp, garrison, or quarters, shall suffer death, or such other punish- 
ment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a general court martial. 
I |Art. 60. Any officer or soldier who shall, without urgent necessity, 
or without the leave of his superior officer, quit his guard, platoon, or 
divisioo, shall be punished, according to the nature of his offence, by 
the sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 51. No officer or soMier shall do violence to any person who 
brings provisions or other necessaries to the camp, garrison, or quar- 
ters of the forces of the Confederate States, employed in any parts out 
of the said States, upon pain of death, or syoh other punishment as a 
court-mirtial sh.all direct. 

Art. 52. Any officer or S' Idier who shall misbehave himself before 
the enemy, lun away, or shamefully aband"n any f »rt, post, or guard 
which be nr th-'y may be coinmandeJ to defend, or speak words induc- 
ing others to do the like, or shall cast away his arms and ammunition, 
or who shall quit his post or colors to plunder and pillage, every such 



414 ARTICLES OF WAR. 

offeudcr, being duly convicled thereof, shall suffer death, or such other 
punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a general court-martial. 
Akt. 53. Any person bebm^ing to the armies of the Confederate 
States who shall make known the -watchword to any person who is not 
entitled to receive it according to the rules and discipline of war, or 
. shall presume to give a parole or watchword different from what lie re- 
ceived, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be ordered 
by the sentence of a general court-martial. 

Art. 54. All officers and soldiers are to behave them?elves orderly 
in quarters and on their march ; and whoever shall CDinmit any waste 
or spoil, either in walks or trees, parks, warrens, fish-ponds, houses or, 
gtydens, corn-fields, inclosurea of meadows, or shall maliciously de- 
stroy any property whatsoever belonging to the inhabitants of the Con- , 
federate States, unless by order of the then commander-in-chief of the 
armies of the said States, shall (besides such penalties as they are liable 
to by law,) be punished, according to the nature and degree of the of- 
fence, by the judgment of a regimental or general court-mr.rtial. 

Art. 55'. Whosoever, belonging to the armies of the Confederate 
States in foreign parts, shall force a safeguitrd, shall suffer death. 

Art. 56. Whosoever shall relieve the .enemy with money, victuals, or 
ammunition, or shall knowingly harbor or protect an encni}', shall suf- 
fer death, or such other punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence 
of a court-martial. * ' 

Art. 57: Whosoever shall be convicted of holding correspondence 
with, or giving intelligence to, the enemy, either directly or indirectly, 
shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be ordered by the 
sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 58. All public stores taken in the enemy's camp, towns, forts, 
or magazines, whether of artillery, ammunition, clothing, forage, or 
provisions, shall be secured for the service of the Confederate States; 
for the neglect of which the commanding officer is to be answerable. 

Art, 59. If any commander of any garrison, fortres.'^, or post .shall 
be compelled, by the officers and soldiers under his command, to give 
up to the enem}'-, or to abandon it, the commissioned officers, non-com- 
missioned officers, or soldiers who shall be convicted of having so of- 
fended, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall bo inflict- 
ed upon them by the sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. CO. All sutlers and retainers to the camp, and all |jcrsons what- 
soever, serving with the armies of the Confederate States in the field, 
^though not enlisted soldiers, "are to bo subject to orders, according to tho 
rules and discipline of war. 

Art. 01. Officers having brevets or conimissions of a prior date to 
those of the corps in which they serve, will take place on courts-martial 
or of inquiry, and on boards detailed for military purposes, when com- 
posed of differejit corps, according to the ranks given them in their bre- 
vets or former commissions ; but in the regiment, corps or company to 
■which such officers belong, they shall do duty and take rank, both in 
courts and on boards as aforesaid, which shall be composed of their own 
corps, according to the commissions by which they are there mustcicd. 

Art. 02. If upon marches, guards, or in quarters, different corps • 
shall happen to join^ or do duty, together, tho_ oOiccr highest in rank, 



ARTICLES OF WAR. 415 

• 
according to the commission by ■which he is mustered, in the army, 
navy, marine corps, or militia, there on duty by orders from comyietcnt 
authority, shall command the whole, andgive orders for what is needful 
for the vservice, unless otherwise directed by the I'residont of the Con- 
federate States, in orders of special as!s;i;j:nment providing!; fur the case. 

Art. 63. The functions of the -engineers being generally confined to 
the most elevated branch of military science, they are not to assume,. 
nor are they subject to bo ordered on, any duty beyond the line of their 
immediate profession, except by the special order of the President of 
the Confederate States ; but they are to receive every mark of respect 
to wliich their lank in the army may entitle them respectively, and are 
liable to bo transferred, at tlie discretion of the President, fi'um ogp 
corps to another, regard being paid to rank. 

Art. C4. (jleneral court>-niartial may consist of any number of com- 
missioned officers ; from five to thirteen inclusively ; but they shall not 
consist of less than thirteen where. that number can be convened Trilh- 
out manifest injury to tlie pcrvice. 

Art. 05. Any general officer ci mmanding an army, or colonel com- 
manding a separate department, may 'appoint general courts-martial 
whenever necessary. But no sentence of a court-martial shall be car- 
ried into execution until after the whole proceedings shall have been 
laid before the officer ordering the same, or tlie officer commanding the 
troops for the time being ; neither shall any sentence of a general court- 
martial, in the time of peace, extending to the loss of life, or the dis- 
mission of a commissioned officer, or wliich shall either in time of peace 
or war, respect a general bllicer, be carried into execution, until after 
tlie whole proceedings shall have been transmitted to the Secretary of 
War, to be laid before the President of the Confederate States for his 
confirmation or disapproval, and orders in the case. All other sen-, 
teuccs may be confirmed and executed by the ofhccr ordering the court 
to assemble, or tlie commanding officer for the time being, as the case 
may be. 

Art. go. Every officer commanding a regiment "or corps may appoint, 
for his own regiment or corps, courts-martial, to consist of three com- 
missioned <.fliccrs, for the trial and punislnnent of offences not capital, 
and decide upon their sentences. For the same purpose, all officers 
commanding any of the j^irrisons, forts, barracks, or other places where 
tlie troops consist of different corps, may assemble courts-martial to 
consist of three commi>isioned officers, and decide upon their sentences. 

Art. G7. Xo garrison or regimental courtniartial shall have the 
power to try capital cases or commissioned officers; neither shall they 
inflict a fine exceeding one morith's pa3', nor imprison, nor put to hard 
labor, any non-commissioned officer or soldier for a longer time than one 
month. 

Art. G8. Whenever it may be f)und convenient and necessary to the 
public service, tiie ofCcers of the marines shall bo associated with the 
officers of the land forces, for the purpose of holding courts martial, and 
trying olTendcrs belonging to cither ; and, in such cases, the oid(rrs of 
the senior f.ffi.;er (>f eitli'?r corps who may be present and duly author- 
ized., nhall be received and obeyed. 

Aru G'J. The judge advocate or some person deputed by him, or by 
the general, or officer cummanding the army, detachment, or garrison, 



416 AATIOLXIB or WAR. 

shall prosecute in the name of the Confederate States, but shall so far 
consider himself as counsel for the prisoner, after the said prisoner 
shall have made his plea, as to object to any leading question to any of 
the witnesses, or any question to the prisoner, the answer to which 
might tend to criminate himself, and administer to each member of the 
court, before they proceed upon any trial, the following oath, which 
shall also be taken by all members of the regimental and garrison 
courts-martial. 

" You, A. B., do swear that you will well and truly try and deter- 
mine, according to evidence, the matter now before* you, between the 
Confederate States of America and the prisoner to be tried, and that 
y«u will duly administer justice, according to the provisions of 'An 
act establishing Rules and Articles for the government of the armies of 
the Confederate States,' without partiality, favor, or aflPection ; and if 
any doubt should arise, not explained by said Articles, according to 
your conscience, the best of your understanding, and the custom of war 
in like cases ; and you do further swear that you will not divulge the 
sentence of the court until it shall be published by the proper authori- 
ty ; neither will you disclose or discover the vote or opinion of any par- 
ticular member of the court-martial, unless required to give evidence 
thereof, as a witness, by a court of justice, in a due course of law. So 
help you God." 

And as soon as the saicf oath 'shall have been administered to the re- 
spective members, the president of the court shall administer to the 
judge advocate, or person oflBciating as such, an oath in the following 
words : 

"You, A. B., do swear, that you will not disclose or discover the 
vote or opinion of any particular member of the court-martial, unless 
required to give evidence thereof, as a witness, by a court of justice, in 
due course of law ; nor divulge the sentence of the court to any but the 
property authority, until it shall be duly disclosed by the same. So 
help you God." 

Art. 70. When a prisoner, krraigned before a general court-martial, 
shall, from obstinacy and deliberate design, stand mute, or answer 
foreign to the purpose, the court may proceed to trial and judgment aa 
if the prisoner had regularly pleaued not guilty. 

Art. 71. When a member shall be chiillengeJ by a prisoner, he must 
state his cause of challenge, of which the court shall, after due delibe- 
ration, determine the relevancy or validity; and decide accordingly ; 
and no challenge to more than one member at a time shall be received 
by the court. 

Art. 72. All the members of a court-martial are to behave with de- 
cency and calmness ; and in giving their votes are to begin with the 
youngest in commission. 

Art. 73. All persons who give evidence before a court-martial are to 
be exarn'oed on oath or affirmation, in the following form : 

" You swear, or affirm (as the case may be, the evidence you shall 
give in the cause, now in hearing shall be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth. So help you God." 

Art. 74. On the trials of cases not capital^ before court-martial, the 
deposition of witnesses, not in the line or staff of the army, may be 
taken before some justice of the peace, and read in evidence; provided 



ARTICLES or WAR* 417 

the prosCcTjtor nnd person nccused arc present at tho taking the same, 
or are duly notified tlicreof. 

Art. 75^ No cfiu'er shall be tried but by n general court-martial, nor 
b3' officers of nn inferior rank, if it can be avoided. Nor ehall any 
proceedings of trials be carried on, excepting between the hours of 
eight in the morning and three in the afternoon ; excepting in cnsea 
■which, in the opinion of the officer appointing the court-martial, require ' 
immediate example. 

Art. 76. Ni person whatsoever shall use any menacing words, signs, 
or gestures, in presence of a court-martial, or shall cause any disorder 
or riot, or disturb their proceedings, on tho penalty of being punished 
at the discretion of the said court-martial. 

Art. 77. Whenever any offcer shall be charged with a crime, he 
shall be arrested and confined in his barracks, quarters, or tent, and 
deprived of his sword by the commanding officer. And any officer who 
shall leave his confinement before he shall be set at liberty by tho com- 
manding oflBcer, or by a superior officer shall be cashiered. 

Art. 78. Non-commissioned officers and soldiers, charged with 
crimes, shall be confined until tried by a court-martial, or released by 
proper authority. 

Art. 70. Nu officer or soldier who shall be put in arrest shall con- 
tinue in confinement more than eight days, or until such time as a 
court-martial can be assembled. 

Art. 80. No olTicer commanding a guard, or provost marshal, shall 
refuse to receive or keep any prisoner committed to his charge by an 
oiHcer belonging to the forces of the Confederate States ; provided the 
ofTicer committing shall, at the same time, deliver an account in writing, 
figned by himself, of the crime of which the said prisoner is charged. 

Art. 81. No olTicer commanding a guard, or provost marshal, shall 
presume to release any person con:mitted to his charge without proper 
authority for so doing, nor shall he 6ufi"er any person to escape, on the 
penalty of being punished for it by the sentence of a court-martial. 

Art. 82. Every officer or provost marshal, to whose charge prisoners 
ehall be committed, shall, within twenty-four hours after such commit- 
ment, or as sofjn as he shall be relie\ed from his guard, make report in 
writing, to the commanding officer, of their names, their crimes, and 
the names of the officers wlio committed them, on the penalty of being 
punished for disobedience or neglect, at the discretion of a court- 
martial. 

Art. 83. Any commissioned officer convicted before a general court- 
martial of conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman, shall be dis- 
missicd the service. 

Art. 84. In cases where a court-martial may think it proper to sen- 
tence a commissioned ofiicer to be suspended from command, they shall 
have power also to suspend his pay and emoluments for the same time, 
according to the nature and hcinousness of the offence. 

Art. 85. In all cases where a commissioned ofiicer is cashiered for 
cowardice or fraud, it shall be added in the sentence, that the crime,- 
name, nnd plaiiC of abode and punishment of the delinquent, be pub- 
lished in the newspapers in and about the camp, and of the particular 
State from which the offender came, or where he usually resides ; after 
vhich it shall be deemed Ecandalous for aD officer to aEsociate wttb binv 



41' 



ARTU'I.EH Ol- MAii 



tu bo trBDPiH>rt«d to tb« piaoo t^here 



i.( J ; aiiJ lij ■ ": ' r. ii n- 
the ftrmjr, »ba1l To triwl a 



Lcrr;n vx]r 
•r. Hitlt)tpr. or I 

■'■ IiCO. 

'■ \>o liiiKIo to l>c trio<l nnd punUlxsl ItT a 
., , V (.ffenro w>- •'■ -' ■'> -- • ■ '• ■•" ' '-M, 

^n tWK yci\TH hoforo li 

i*<'ti, by rcanon tif 1. i ,, •- •_• 

;>e(liinont, sIiaII not Hato be«n anionabie lo juwtico 



I I ho 
Willi 



t; 

ni 
TV] 

•r 
til. 

Am. -7. .N 
current** f>r ' 
ox 
001 

Art. 

irencrnl 

comniitt 

trial, ut 

dtlier II 

within t' 

AiT. K». Kvery <>ffl<*erauthori7.p<lloor<lcr ft gonernl court i 

hftvo power to pardon or ini(i;;rtto nny puiii^*irTi«"nt "rd<" 

cnurt, except the Ketitenoe of deAlli, or of i n 

in tho ra^es wliere ho hnn ttulliority (liy Ai 

execution, ho r nd, until tiie j ! 

Confederate ^ lio known ; \\ 

copicn of the I ; ill. '■ ■' nirt-iii:ii ii^ii, n 

metlittfely trunnmit to t iit fir IiIh di- 

colonel or cotnioari. ill • ; iho regiment ir 

rej:imenlrtl < i o<>iir( innrlinl nhall he 

miiijjnfe any I t ordered l.y such court t 

AitT. IMl, Kvery ind^e ndviu-ato, or pC|Hon ufliointinf; n» i«iieh, At any 

l^ncral court-ninrtnil, slinll tr:ul«mi». with as much cxpediti'-n v t!:^' 

opI>ortunity of timO and dihtanco <»f pluco can admil, tho ' 

ceedinc* and Henienen of nuch onuri mnrlial t<« lh« Snerel;. 

wliich%»id «'r ' •■''.".'>> oatilu.; 

nn 1 pre^ervl• ; ,,| that tl 

i«onM enli'led til. I. . . .n iv , ,• i ii.ii.i o, oj' 'ii nj'i.u.-.-uion tu- the vaio ui- 

fleer, to (dttnin copied Jhereof. 

The party tried l^v imv .'.•inr.il >'' iMartial ^ha'l "•^■■•< •' • ■! 

thereof, made hy I. r perKon" 

entitled to A copy .1 . :it);;«i of kiii 

Art. i'l. In cnHci* nhrro iho j^eneral, or conunandini; 
ord«-r a court of in(|uiry tti examine into the nature of any i; 
accusation, or imputation ngiiinst any officer or foldier, the 8«id 
Hhall conhiot of one.or more oiliccri*. not i?xcce<linn: three, and n 
advooate, or. other Kuilahle perHon, n«a recorder, to rcduco the pr. ■ i 
io-H an.l evidence to wr.tin;: ; nil of whom Hliall ho sworu to ihe ( . :li 

liil perfTf • (licir duly. Thi« court Khnll have the fnnio'piwcr lo 

putnnvni :in n C'.ur(-n»nrtinl, nn'l to examine tliem on oath. 

Hut thev ■ ^ive iheir opinion on tho merits vf the ca-e. except- 

ins they Hhnil Im« liierelo Kpecinlly rr(|tiired. The patticn n.vu < d ^|,f||| 
aUi) ho permit;e<J to crono-examiije and interrogate tho witnc^i-, '-,. ic 
t« iore^galo fully tho circutn»tances in the question. 



pardon or 
d. 



ARTICLES OF WAR. 419 

Art. 02. The procccJinps of a court of inquiry must bo nuthenti- 
catod Ijy tl)csi{!;nature of tlie recorder atiJ the president, and delivered 
to the ool|«|^aiidin;^ (ifiic'cr, and the said proceedings may be admitted 
as evidcnccliy n court-martial, in cases not capital, or exteudinjj; to the 
dismis.siop of an oHicer, provided, that the circumstances are suoh that 
oral testimony cannot be obtained.. But as courts uf incjuiry may be 
perverted to dishonorable purpose.-s and may be considered as en^^inos 
of destruction to military mea'it, in the hands of weak and envious com- 
mandants, they are hereby prohibited, unless directed by the President 
of the Ctinfcderate States, or demanded by the accused. 

Art. 93. Tjie judge iidvooate or recorder ehall administer to the 
members the following oath : 

" You shall well and truly examine and inquire, according to your 
evidence, into the matter now-before you, without partiality, favor, af- 
fection, prejudice, or hupe of reward. So help you God." 

After which the president shall administer .to the judge advocate or 
recorder, the following oath: 

"You, A. 13., do swear that you \vill, according to your best abilities, 
liccurately ana impartially record the proceedings of the court, and the 
evWence to be given in the case in hearing. So help you God." 

The witne«es shall take the same oath as witjnessca swora before a 
court-martial. 

Art. 94. When any commissioned officer shall die or be killed in the 
service o/ th? Confederate States, the major of the regiment, or the of- 
ficer doing the major's duty in his absence, or in' any post or garrison, 
tiie second oflicer in command, or the assistant military agent, shall im- 
mediately secure all his effects or equipage, then in cump or quarters, 
and shall make an inventory thereof, and forthwitli transmit the same 
to the oflice of the Department of War, to the end that his executors or 
administrators may receive the same. 

AuT. 95. When any non-commissioned officer or soldier shall die, or 
be killed in the service fif the Confederate States, the then commanding 
ofiicer of the troop or company shall, in the presence of two other com- 
missioned" officers, take an account of what eifeets he died possessed of, 
above his arms and accoutrements, and transmit the same to the office 
(if tlie Department of War, which said effects are to be accounted for, 
and paid to tiie representatives of such deceased non-commissii'ncd of- 
ficer or soldier. And in case any of the officers, so authorized to take 
care of the effects of such deceased. non-coim>iissioned oilicers and sol- 
diers, should, before they have accounted to their representatives for 
the same, have occasion to leave the regiment or post, by preferment 
or otherwise, tlicy shall, before they bo permitted to quit the same, de- 
posit in the hands of the commanding officer, or of the assistant mili- 
Uiry agent, all tiie effects of such deceased noncommissioned officers 
and soldiers, in order that the same may be eecured for,and paid to their 
respective representatives. 

Art. 90. All officers, conductors, gunners, matrosses, drivers, or 
other'persous whatsoever, receiving pay or hire in the service of the 
artillcrv, or corps of engineers of the Confederate States, shall be gov- 
erned by the nforesaul rules and articles, and shall be subject to be tried 
by co\irls-mHrlial, in like manner with the officers and soldiers of the 
oihor troops in tlie bcrvice of the Confederate Stales. , 



420 ARTICLES OP WAtt. 

Art. 07. The officers and poldicrs of nny troops, wliotlier militia or 
others, Icing mustered and in pny of the Confederate States, shall, at 
all times and in all places, when joined, or acting in cor.jil^tion with 
the regular forces of the Confederate States, be governed by these 
Rules and Articles of "War, and shall be subject to be tried by courts- 
martial, in like manner with oflicers and soldiers in the regular forces; 
save only that such courts-martial shall be composed entirely of militia 
otRcers. 

Art. 98. All officers serving by commission from the authority of 
any particular State, shall, on all detachments, courts-martial, or other 
duty, wherein they may be employed in conjunction with the regular 
forces of the Confederate States, take rank next after all officers of the 
like grade in said regular forces, notwithstanding the commissions of 
such militia or state officers may be older than the commissions of the 
oiiccra of the regular forces of the Confederate States. 

Art. 99. All crimes not capital, and all disorders and neglects, which 
officers and soldiers may be guilty of, to the prejudice of good order and 
military discipline, though not mentioned in the foregoing Articles o^ 
War, are to be taken cognizance of by a general or regimental court- 
martial, according to the nature and degree of the offence., and be pun- 
ished at their discretion. ' 

Art. 100. The President of the Confederate States shall have power 
to prescribe the uniform of the army. 

Art. lOl. The foregoing Articles are to be read and published, once 
in every six months, to every garrison, regiment, troop or company, 
mustered, or to be mustered, in the service of the Confederate States, 
and are co be duly observed and obeyed by all officers and soldiers who 
are, or shall be, in said service. 

Sec. 2. A?id be it further enacted. That in time of war, all persons 
not citizens of, or owing • allegiance to, the Confederate Stotes of 
Americ!., who s^all be found lurking as spies in and about the fortifi- 
cations or encampments of the armies of the Confederate Siates, or any 
of thfltn, shall suffer death, according to the law and usage of nations, 
by sentence of a general court martial. 



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