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* UM ASS/ AMHERST * 








GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS 
COLLECTION 

JUN 91988 

University of Massachusetts 
Depository Copy 





DRAFT 



FALL RIVER RISK AREA 



• WHO WILL BE EVACUATED 



• WHERE YOU WILL BE RELOCATED 



• HOW TO GET THERE 



• WHAT TO TAKE 



• WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU ARRIVE 



• FACTS ABOUT A NUCLEAR EXPLOSION 



• HOW TO PROTECT YOU fir YOUR FAMILY 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



This information is being published at the request of government officials of 
the State of Massachusetts because a serious international crisis exists. If 
the situation becomes more serious, it may be necessary for the citizens of 
the Fall River, Massachusetts, metropolitan area to move to a safer location. 

The decision to evacuate the area will be carefully considered. Evacuation 
will be directed only if there appears to be a real possibility of a nuclear 
attack. In such a case, evacuation may be the key to survival for you and 
your family. 

You will be officially notified by radio and TV if evacuation is directed. 
Stay tuned to your local stations . In the meantime , you are urged to prepare 
for the possibility that you may have to leave the area for a safer location. 

It is important for you to read the following information very carefully. 
It contains instructions and directions that you will need during this 
crisis period. Make sure that you and ycur family understand all these in- 
structions . 

This information is your key to survival 
READ IT. KEEP IT 



1 



WHY YOU SHOULD EVACUATE 



The greater Fall River metropolitan area could be 
a potential target if the United States is attack- 
ed. The area where the greatest danger may exist 
is shown on the map below. To protect the people 
living in this area, plans have been made to relo- 
cate them to nearby areas which are considered to 
be safer from direct attack. 



Those living in this risk area who do not leave ac- 
cordingly to instructions will be subject to strict- 
ly enforced curfews. Movement within the risk area 
will be severely restricted to protect the property 
of those who have evacuated. In addition, most fa- 
cilities or services cannot be provided in the risk 
area during the evacuation period. In general, food 
and goods will be used to supply the evacuated pop- 
ulation in the reception areas. 

Should an attack occur, the best existing shelter 
within the risk area will be reserved for key work- 
ers who will be working in essential industries, 
and for hospitalized or institutionalized people 
who cannot be evacuated. 



WHO WILL GO 

When OFFICIAL NOTIFICATION is given, all those 
living in the vicinity of metropolitan Fall River 
who are in the risk area shown on the map below, 
will be directed to evacuate* to reception areas 
in nearby counties — that is, from a place of 
possible danger to a place of safety. 

You can determine whether you should evacuate by lo- 
cating where you live on the map. If it is within 
the risk area, you should be prepared to leave if 
notification is given. Two days or possibly more 
should be available to complete the evacuation. How- 
ever, you should prepare now so that you can get 
ready to leave in an orderly manner, if notification 
of evacuation is given. 



* Shift workers may be told to stay on their job 
until the end of their shift. 

IF YOU ARE IN A HOSPITAL... 

Most hospital patients will be evacuated. However, 
if it is impossible for you to be moved because of 
special care requirements, you will be cared for 
during the evacuation period. Similar considera- 
tion will be given to those residing in other in- 
stitutions. Shelter and care will be provided in 
case of an imminent attack. 



RISK AREA MAP 

CHECK TO SEE IF YOU LIVE IN RISK AREA 





IF YOU LIVE IN THIS AREA 

SEE ROUTE AMD DESTINATION CHART 



2 



WHERE TO GO 



If You Have A Vacation Cabin, Relatives, Friends . . . 

as the crisis intensifies and evacuation appears im- 
minent, if you have a vacation cabin or friends or 
relatives outside the risk area, but within a rea- 
sonable distance, GO THERE as soon as possible to 
get to the location of your choice. 



• // You Do Not Have A Definite Location To Go To . . . 



You should proceed to the nearest reception area in- 
dicated for you on the route and destination chart. 
These assignments are based on the city or town in 
which you reside. 



• If You Are A Key Worker . . . 

If you have been designated by your employer as a 
key worker in an essential industry, you will be ex- 
pected to evacuate with your family in a reserved 
nearby reception area. You will not be expected to 
stay in the Fall River metropolitan area, but will 
commute daily to work from your assigned reception 
area. Protection will be provided for you while in 
the Fall River metropolitan area, and you will be 
able to join your family after work. 



WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU ARRIVE 



Your assignment to a host reception community is ex- 
plained in detail on section entitled "How to Deter- 
mine Your Assigned Route and Destination." When you 
reach your assigned or host reception community, fol- 
low your signs at off-ramps or along the routes which 
will direct you to the temporary reception or congre- 
gate care centers. 



At the centers, you will register yourself and your 
family. Local officials will assign temporary lodging 
and you will be given further instructions. 



Lodging in Public Buildings • 



If you are assigned to a public buildings, such as, 
a school, church, or other temporary lodging center, 
do everything you can to help maintain order and san- 
itary living conditions. Elect a leader and form 
working groups to help local officials and volunteers 
with such tasks as: 

* Cooking and feeding services 

* Providing water supply 

* Cleaning up trash and garbage 

* Maintaining order 

* Assuring quiet during sleeping hours 

* Organizing recreation and religious activities 

* Arranging medical care for the sick and assist- 

ing the handicapped 



Lodging in a Private Home 



If you are invited into a private home, be' consid- 
erate and do your share to help your host. Remem- 
ber. that you are a guest and that your host has 
volunteered to share his home with you. You will 
be expected to treat his home and property with 
respect. 



Use of Private Cars . . • 



Do not count on using your car in the host recep- 
tion area except for storing your belongings. E- 
vacuees' cars may be held in parking areas by local 
authorities, and gasoline will be scarce in any case 



HOW TO KEEP INFORMED 



Listen to the radio for information and advice from 
national, State, and local officials. You will be 
told when you should return home. DO NOT RETURN 
HOME BEFORE YOU ARE ADVISED TO DO SO. It is im- 
possible to predict how long you will have to stay 
in the host reception area. It could be only a 
few days or could last for a week or more. 



If a nuclear attack should occur and the Emergency 
Broadcasting System ( EBS ) is in operation, a number 
of radio broadcast stations will remain on the air 
to provide emergency information. All other radio 
stations will stop broadcasting. Those emergency 
stations remaining on the air will provide you with 
information and instructions that you will need. 



WHAT TO TAKE 



You should prepare to take only those things which 
are deemed necessary for a stay of a week or more. 
See "Survival Supplies." This check list includes 
items you will need for your stay in the host re- 
ception area. Do not take all your favorite be- 
longings . 

All items on the checklist should be taken if you 
are going to use your own car for transportation. 
If you do not have a car and will be using another 
form of transportation, take only those items 
which can be carried in a suitcase such as those 
marked with an asterisk on the checklist. 



PETS 

No arrangements have been made to house pets in 
the reception area. Therefore, if you take your 
pet with you, it will probably be confined to 
your car and you will be responsible for its 
care. If you elect to leave your pets behind, 
be sure they are confined in a sheltered area 
with an adequate supply of food and water. 
Above all, do not turn your pet loose to fend 
for itself while you are gone. 



3 



PREPARE! 



Here are some things you can do right now that will 
better prepare you and your family to survive and 
recover if a nuclear attack should occur. 

1. Check to see if you live in the risk area. 

2. Look up your host reception area assignment 
and familiarize yourself with the highway 
route assigned to you. 

3. Go over the checklist of things to take with 
you. If you will need a prescription medi- 
cine or special food, check to see if you have 
an ample supply. 

4. Collect all of your valuable papers and put 
them in one place, preferably wrapped in plas- 
tic in a metal container (tool box, fishing 
tackle box, etc . ) . 



5. Check your home for security. See that all 
locks are secure. Store valuables in a safe 
place . 



6. If you will use your car, be sure you have 
enough gas . 

7. Be sure to take tools — especially SHOVELS, 
PICKS, HAMMERS . These will be essential in 
improvising a fallout shelter. 

8. Stay tuned to your local TV radio station 
for instructions. They will broadcast the 
notice to evacuate, if directed by govern- 
ment officials. 

9. Read this supplement carefully and discuss 
it with your family. If you do not under- 
stand any of these directions, CALL 

Fall River - 679-1502 

Somerset - 672-7958 

Swansea - 674-6402 

Westport - 636-8023 



SURVIVAL SUPPLIES 



CLOTHING AND BEDDING 

□ ★ work gloves 



PERSONAL, SAFETY, 
SANITATION, AND MEDICAL 
SUPPLIES 



TOOLS FOR CONSTRUCTING A 
FALLOUT SHELTER 



□ 


* work clothes 


□ 


* battery operated (transistor) 


□ 


★ extra underclothing 


□ 


★ radios, extra batteries 


□ 


★ outerwear (depending 


□ 


★ flashlight, extra batteries 




on season) 




□ 


★ rain garment 


□ 


* soap 


□ 


★ extra pair of shoes 


□ 


★ toothbrush & toothpaste 


□ 


★ extra socks or 


□ 


★ shaving articles 




stockings 


□ 


★ sanitary napkins 


□ 


sleeping bags and/or 








□ 


★ detergent 


□ 


blankets and sheets 










□ 


* towels and washcloths 






□ 


toilet paper 


FOOD AND UTENSILS 


□ 


emergency toilet 


□ 




□ 


carbage can 


Take all the food you can 








carry (particularly canned 


□ 


newspapers 




or dried food requiring 








little preparation 


□ 


first aid kit 


□ 


water 


□ 


★ special medication 




thermos jug or plastic bottles 




(insulin, heart tablets, or other) 


□ 




□ 


bottle and can opener 






□ 


eating utensils 






□ 


plastic or paper plates, 


DO NOT TAKE 


cups, and napkins 




pan 






□ 


plastic and paper 


□ FIREARMS (Guns of any kind) 




bags 






□ 


★ candles and matches 


O NARCOTICS 


□ 


plastic drop cloth 


□ ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 



□ 


pick ax 


□ 


shovel 


□ 


saw 


□ 


hammer 


□ 


ax 


□ 


crowbar 


□ 


nails and screws 


□ 


screw driver 


□ 


wrench 



IMPORTANT PAPERS 



'/ferns to take if you use Public Transportation 



□ 


★ 


Social Security card 


□ 


★ 


deeds 


□ 


★ 


insurance policies 


□ 


★ 


stocks and bonds 


□ 


★ 


will 


□ 


★ 


savings account books 


□ 




credit cards, checks, 




and currency 


BABY SUPPLIES 


□ 


★ 


diapers 


□ 


★ 


bottles and nipples 


□ 




milk or formula 


□ 


★ 


powder 


□ 




rubber sheeting, etc. 



4 



FACTS ABOUT A NUCLEAR EXPLOSION 



M you are in an unprotected area near where a nuclear weapon ex- 
plodes, you could not survive the ellects ol the blast and heal 
generated by the explosion Alter the explosion, the maior danger is 
Irom radiation sickness caused by radioactive lallout This fallout 



can endanger the lite and health ol people outside the high risk area 
However, protective measures can be taken to saleguard you and 
your family from the effecls of nuclear fallout. 

This section describes what lallout is and how to protect yourself 
against its effects 



WHAT CAUSES FALLOUT. . . 



When a nuclear weapon explodes, great quantities ol earth and 
other debris are sucked up into a nuclear cloud The bits and par 
tides ot earth are mixed with the radioactive materials produced by 
the explosion and become "radioactive " 

Within a short lime these lallout particles drift back to earth Car 
ned by the wind they can spread over a large area lar Irom the ex 
plosion site 




HOW TO PROTECT AGAINST FALLOUT 



Radiation loses its strength 

• With the passaged time 

• As it passes through materials 

• As the distance Irom the particle is increased 

The best protection is to surround yourself with heavy materials A 
fallout shelter will give you this kind ol protection. 

A lallout shelter does not need to be a special type ol 
building Any building will provide some level ol protection. II the 
walls and root are thick or heavy enough to absorb many ot the rays 
given off by the particles outside, then better protection can be ob- 
tained Even caves and mines can provide protection 

The key fact to remember is the farther you are from radioactive 
fallout particles, the safer you are from radiation. For example, you 
have more protection in a basement than on the top floor of a 
building. Likewise, there is more protection in an mnpr corridor ol 
an above-grade structure than near an outside wall. 



WHY FALLOUT IS DANGEROUS. . . 



The gamma rays given oft by radioactive fallout particles can cause 
physical and chemical changes in the cells ol the body, causing radia- 
tion sickness No special clothing can protect you Irom the rays and 
there is no known drug or chemical that can prevent radiation trom 
damaging the cells of the body Large doses ol radiation will cause 
death But it you receive small or medium doses, the body will repair 
ilsell and you will get well 

The amount of gamma radiation that you can tolerate depends on a 
number ot factors. The effecls of radiation are more severe in very 
young or very old persons and those not in good health. Also, a 
single large dose received in a short period ol time is more damaging 
than the same dose received over a longer period. People exposed 
to radiation 00 NOT BECOME RAOIOACTIVE and consequently are 
not dangerous to other people Radiation sickness is NOT con- 
tagious and one person cannot inlect another 



The particles may look like line grains ol sand, but the gamma rays 
they give oil cannot be seen (Special instruments are required to 
detect the rays and measure their intensity ) The particles can be 
swept, brushed, or washed oft. 



The gamma rays can pass fhrough light materials. A considerable 
thickness of heavy material is required to stop the penetration ol 
these rays. 




The important points to remember about the danger ot lallout are 

• You cannot see the gamma rays given off by lallout particles 

• Gamma radiation can penetrate light materials, therefore, 
heavy clothing alone will not protect you from these rays II lallout 
particles should get on your skin, they should be brushed off to 
avoid skm burns. 

• Radiation is more dangerous to very young, very old or sick 
people than to those in good health. 

• A large dose of radiation received in a short period is more 
damaging than smaller doses received over a longer period 

• Radiation sickness is not contagious and cannot be passed 
from one person to another 



WHO WILL NEED FALLOUT 
PROTECTION 



There is no way of predicting in advance where or how soon fallout 
will settle to the ground. This depends on the weather and on the 
direction and speed ol the winds. 

Areas close to a nuclear explosion might receive fallout within 20 or 
30 minutes. Depending on the winds, it may take 5 to 10 hours for 
particles to drift down on communities 100 miles or more trom the 
explosion. 

The heavier panicles giving oil the most intense radiation will (all 
first. The lighter particles (ailing later will have lost much of the 
radiation high in the atmosphere. The (irst 24 hours after the fallout 
begins to settle are the most dangerous. The radiation Irom the par- 
ticles loses its strength over time. The longer you are in a shelter, 
the lower the outside radiation levels will be when you emerge. 




Alter a nuclear attack, dangerous levels ol lallout COULD occur any 
place in the United States Everyone, therefore, must have protec- 
tion in case lallout occurs in his community. 



HOW TO PROVIDE FALLOUT SHELTER 



Many larger buildings have been 
designated as public fallout shelters. 
They are marked by signs like this: 

However, most public shelters are in 
larger cities and may be needed by essen- 
tial workers or those who cannot be 
relocated Those counties which serve as 
hosting areas usually do not have enough 




shelters for their own residents. Conse- 
quently, it will be necessary tor many residents of host counties— 
AND FOR MOST CITY EVACUEES-to upgrade the protection in the 
building they are to stay in or to improvise their own lallout protec- 
tion 

Both the residents ol the host areas and the city evacuees will have 
to WORK HARD FOR A DAY OR MORE to construct im 
provised shelters to protect against lallout. In this case, radiation 
protection would be "cheap as dirt." Upgrading existing structures 
by piling earth outside them can be done by adding an average of 
one cubic yard of earth (or each 10 square feet ol shelter space to be 
developed (more (or some buildings, less (or others). Moving a cubic 
yard ol earth is not easy— it's about 80 to 100 buckets lull— but can 
be done il everyone works lor Iheir survival. 



Shelter in host areas can be lounri in the following: 

• Buildings which have been identified in the National Shelter 
Survey and marked with a shelter sign. 

• Home basements. 

• Other buildings which can be upgraded to improve the fallout 
protection by placing earth overhead and against the walls 

• Caves, mines, and tunnels. 

• Expedient fallout shelters involving digging of trenches, move- 
ment ol earth, or use ol materials at hand, such as tables, doors, 
bricks, or books. 



5 



HOW TO GET THERE 



IF YOU ARE DISABLED 



If you have a car, truck, camper" or recreation vehi- 
cle, drive it to your designated host reception area, 
using the route shown for your community on the Route 
and Destination Chart below. Remember that several 
days should be available for evacuating all those 
living in the risk area. Take the time you need to 
prepare and pack . 

An evacuation route is assigned for each community 
in the risk area. Routes have been designated to as- 
sure that Fall River metropolitan area residents will 
be equally distributed among the host reception areas 
so that there will be adequate food and lodging for 
you and your family. If you use a route not assigned 
to you, you may find the host reception area you have 
chosen is filled and there is no room for accommoda- 
tions for you. Follow the evacuation route to the 
host reception area as indicated for your city or 
town. Wherever possible, police officers will be on 
duty to advise you and direct you. Obey all instruc- 
tions by law enforcement officers. 

If you get caught in a traffic jam, turn off your 
engine, remain in your car, listen for official in- 
structions, and be patient. Do not get out of line 
to find an alternate route. All routes will be crowd- 
ed. If traffic is stopped for an hour or more, do 
not leave your car for any reason. 

Be sure you have adequate gasoline when you start 
out. DO NOT BUY MORE GAS THAN YOU WILL NEED. Gaso- 
line will be in short supply and will be needed to 
provide you with food and other essential supplies. 
But, if you run out of gas or have other mechanical 
difficulties, move your car to the side of the road 
out of the traffic lanes to allow traffic to continue. 
Service to stalled autos will be available during the 
evacuation period. Leave your hood up as a sign that 
you are stalled, and you will be assisted as soon as 
possible . 

IF YOU HAVE NO MEANS 
OF TRANSPORTATION 

If you have no private means of transportation, go to 
the nearest neighborhhod between the hours of 9 a.m. 
and 5 p.m. Government authorities will provide trans- 
portation to move you to your host reception area. 



If you are physically unable to get to the schools 
for transportation, you can make arrangements to be 
picked up and be transported to your host reception 
area. Call your local Civil Defense Office. 

HOW TO DETERMINE YOUR 
ROUTE AND DESTINATION 

A separate map for each designated route is given on 
the following pages. Each of these maps have been 
highlighted to show only the assigned highways and 
host reception areas. 

Some of the host communities closest to the risk 
areas have been reserved for key workers. These 
people will commute to and from these host recep- 
tion areas to maintain vital services during the 
crisis 1 period. If you are in an essential industry 
and your employer has designated you a key worker, 
you will evacuate your family to one of the reserv- 
ed host areas. 

If you community appeared on the Risk Map on Page 

look up your community on the following Route 
and Destination Chart to locate your designated 
host community and route. Read across to find the 
host reception center(s) and route assigned to 
your city or town. 

You will notice that some routes have several host 
reception areas listed. This is because the near- 
est host areas will fill up first as evacuation 
gets underway. Therefore, if the first host recep- 
tion area is full, you will proceed on to the next 
area until you arrive at a location that can ac- 
commodate you. You will be notified that the host 
reception area is already filled either by signs 
along the highway or by local officials directing 
traffic onward. When you register at the first 
available host reception area, you will be as- 
signed to a place to stay. 



ROUTE AND DESTINATION CHART 



COMMUNITIES AT RISK 



HOST COMMUNITIES 



ROUTE DESCRIPTION 



ROUTE 
MAP/PAGE 



Fall River 
(South of Route 195) 

Fall River. 
(North of Route 195) 

Somerset 



Yarmouth 



Harwich 



Orleans 



Swansea 



Wellfleet 



Westport 



Orleans 



Follow Route 195 to Route 
25 to Route 6 over Bourne 
Bridge to Route 28 to Route 
151 to Route 28 to South 
Yarmouth . 

Follow Route 195 to Route 
25 to Route 6 over Bourne 
Bridge to Route 28 to Route 
151 to Route 28 to Route 39 
to Harwich. 

Follow Route 138 to Route 
195 to Route 25 over Bourne 
Bridge to Route 28 to Route 
39 to Route 28 to Orleans. 



Follow Route 195 to Route 
25 to Route 6 over Sagamore 
Bridge to Route 6 to Well- 
fleet. 



Follow Route 6 to Bourne 
Bridge to Route 28 to 
Orleans . 



6 



RELOCATION ROUTE MAPS 



FALL RIVER 

(North of Route 195) 

Follow Route 195 to Route 
25 to Route 6 over Bourne 
Bridge to Route 28 to Route 
151 to Route 28 to Route 39 
to Harwich. 



mi 



HOST AREA 
RISK AREA 




Bourn* Bridg* 



FALL RIVER 

(South of Route 195) 

Follow Route 195 to Route 
25 to Route 6 over Bourne 
Bridge to Route 28 to Route 
151 to Route 28 to South 
Yarmouth . 




SOMERSET 




7 



RELOCATION ROUTE MAPS 



SWANSEA □ HOST AREA 

Follow Route 195 to Route 
25 to Route 6 over Sagamore 
Bridge "to Route 6 to Well- 
fleet. 



RISK AREA 




WESTPORT 

Follow Route 6 to Bourne 




0 



8 



HOST AREA RESIDENTS ONLY 

If you plan to use your own home for shelter-Study the 
following on how to Improve your 

HOME SHELTER 



If you take shelter in the best protected part of your home, you can add ad- 
ditional protection. Although this might.be possible at the time you receive 
warning to take shelter, a certain amount of preplanning is necessary if satis- 
factory results are to be expected. NOW IS THE TIME TO DECIDE WHAT 
YOU WILL DO AND HOW YOU WILL DO IT. 

If your home has a basement, pick out the corner of your basement where the 

ground level outside is highest. This is the safest place in the basement. 

If your home does NOT have a basement, some protection can be obtained in 

the central part of the house, at ground level farthest away from the roof and 

walls. 

TO MAKE THESE AREAS SAFER: 

BASEMENT: Place boxes or drawers on top of a sturdy table or workbench and 



fill with heavy material, such as dirt or sand or bricks. If the sides of the base- 
ment, away from the shelter area, have more than two feet of outside wall ex- 
posure, materials should also be placed around the open sides of the table. Be 
very careful not to overload the table to the point of collapse. 

FIRST FLOOR OF HOUSE WITHOUT A BASEMENT: Place boxes or drawers 
on top AND around the sides of.a sturdy table or workbench and fill them with 
heavy materials. Often a makeshift table can be made by using doors supported 
by cabinets or other pieces of furniture. 

Further information about improving your home shelter can be found in the 
Civil Defense Booklet "IN TIME OF EMERGENCY" or from your local Civil 
Defense Chairman at your local town or city Civil Defense office. 



GROUND FLOOR SHELTER 




Place boxes or drawers on top and around the 
sides of a sturdy table or workbench and fill them 
with heavy materials. Often a makeshift table can 
be made by using doors supported by cabinets or 
other pieces of furniture. 



WHAT TO DO NOW 



(1) Study the sketches and decide which is ap- 
plicable to your situation and select a shelter 
location. 

(2) Take note of available shielding materials 
such as bricks, concrete blocks, sand or loose 
earth which could be moved quickly. 

Other things could also be used as shielding ma- 
terial, such as: 

• House doors that have been taken off their hinges 
(especially heavy outside doors). 

• Dressers and chests (especially if the drawers are 
filled with sand or earth). 

• Tables and bookcases. 

• Large appliances (such as washers, dryers, TV and 
hi-fi sets). 

• Trunks, boxes and cartons (if filled with earth, sand 
or other heavy material). 

• Books, magazines, and stacks of firewood or lumber. 

• Flagstones from outside walks and patios. 

(3) If no shielding materials are presently avail- 
ble, obtain and store some in a convenient loca- 
tion. 

(4) Take note of nonperishable foods normally 
kept in the home. If these are not sufficient to 
maintain your family for two weeks, increase 
the supply. 



BASEMENT SHELTER 




SELECT THE CORNER OF YOUR BASEMENT 
WHERE THE GROUND LEVEL OUTSIDE IS 
HIGHEST. THIS IS THE SAFEST PLACE IN THE 
BASEMENT. 

Place boxes or drawers on top of a sturdy table 
or workbench and fill with heavy material, such 
as dirt or sand. If the sides of the basement away 
from the shelter area have more than two feet of 
outside wall exposure, materials should also K ~ 
placed around the open sides of the table. Be very 
careful not to overload the table to the point of 
collapse. 



CALL NOW TO SHARE YOUR BASEMENT 



Harwich - 432-1212 



Yarmouth - 398-8383 



Orleans - 255-0594 



Wellfleet - 349-3707 



This is the most serious crisis our country has ever faced. As a resident of 
the Host Area you can help save the lives of your neighbors from the Fall River 
Risk Area who have left their homes to seek safety here. 

WILL YOU SHARE WITH ANOTHER FAMILY? 

Your neighbors who have evacuated their homes need your help, particularly those 
families with little children. Volunteer now to bring a family to live with you 
and to help improve your fallout protection. You may be saving their lives. 
They will either bring food with them or help you buy enough. Call the number 
listed for your town now! 

IF YOU HAVE NO BASEMENT: Follow the instructions for expedient shelters, or as 
a last resort, seek fallout protection, if necessary, at the nearest public 
shelter. 

IF YOU WORK IN THE HOST AREA: If you work in a needed industry in the Host Area 
(food, health service or others as designated) report to work as usual - you will 
be needed. 

FOLLOW ALL OFFICIAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR HOST AREA RESIDENTS - KEEP YOUR RADIO AND 
TV ON. 



9 




These are 
PLANS FOR EXPEDIENT 

FALLOUT SHELTERS 

SAVE THESE PLANS-THEY MAY SAVE YOUR LIFE 

• GENERAL INFORMATION 



WITHOUT PROTECTION. UNTOLD NUMBERS OF AMERICANS WOULD DIE IN THE 
EVENT OF A NUCLEAR ATTACK. THE EXPEDIENT SHELTERS ILLUSTRATED IN 
THE FOLLOWING PAGES PROVIDE PROTECTION TO OCCUPANTS FROM THE 
DEADLY RADIATION OF RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT GENERATED BY A NUCLEAR 
DETONATION-THEIR USE CAN SAVE THE LIVES OF MILLIONS OF AMERICANS. 

EVEN THOUGH THE ILLUSTRATED SHELTERS ARE VERY AUSTERE. THERE ARE 
A NUMBER OF THINGS THAT CAN BE DONE TO IMPROVE THEIR HABITA8ILITY 
AFTER THEY HAVE BEEN BUILT. WITH THE USE OF A LITTLE INGENUITY AND 
EFFORT. THE SHELTERS CAN BE MADE MORE COMFORTABLE. SOME OF THE 
THINGS THAT CAN BE DONE ARE: 

• CONSTRUCT SEATS. HAMMOCKS. OR BUNKS. 

• COVER THE FLOOR WITH BOARDS OR LOGS AND DRAPE SHEETS OR 
MATERIAL OVER THE EARTH WALLS. 

• PROVIDE SAFE, DEPENDABLE LIGHT. 

HUMANS MUST HAVE WATER AND FOOD TO LIVE. WHEN PEOPLE ARE TO LIVE 
IN A SHELTER FOR A WEEK OR TWO. SUFFICIENT FOOD AND SUPPLIES MUST 
BE PROVIDED FOR THE OCCUPANTS. THE MINIMUM NECESSITIES ARE: 

• WATER-MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS (DEPENDENT UPON TEMPERATURE- 
LESS IN COLD WEATHER. MORE IN WARMER) WILL BE FROM ONE QUART TO 
ONE GALLON PER PERSON PER DAY. STORAGE CAN BE ACCOMPLISHED BY 
USING DISINFECTED METAL OR PLASTIC TRASH CANS OR BOXES LINED WITH 
STRONG POLYETHYLENE FILM OR STRONG PLASTIC 8AGS. FOR PURITY 



EIGHT DROPS (ONE TEASPOON) OF A5-Vi% CHLORINE SOLUTION (e.g.. CLOROX) 
SHOULD BE MIXED INTO EACH 5 GALLONS OF WATER. 

• FOOD-ALL FOOD SHOULD REQUIRE NO REFRIGERATION AND SHOULD 
BE BROUGHT TO THE SHELTER IN AIRTIGHT TINS OR BOTTLES. UNDER 
SHELTER CONDITIONS. PEOPLE WILL REQUIRE ABOUT HALF AS MUCH FOOD 
AS USUAL. FOODS SHOULD HAVE A HIGH NUTRITIONAL VALUE AND A MINI 
MAL AMOUNT OF BULK (i.e.. CANNED MEATS - FRUITS - VEGETABLES. DRIED 
CEREALS, HARD CANDY. ETC.) 

• SANITATION— A METAL CONTAINER WITH A TIGHT-FITTING LID FOR USE 
AS A TO!LET WITH WHICH PLASTIC BAGS CAN BE USED. TOILET PAPER. SOAP. 
TOWELS. SANITARY ITEMS AND A QUANTITY OF STRONG PLASTIC BAGS WILL 
BE NEEDED. 

• MEDICAL SUPPLIES-A WELL-STOCKED FIRST-AID KIT COMPARABLE TO 
WHAT IS USUALLY KEPT AT HOME. TAKE SPECIAL MEDICINES FOR INFANTS 
AND OTHERS AND A GOOD FIRST-AID HANOBOOK. 

• CLOTHING AND BEDDING— SEVERAL CHANGES OF CLEAN CLOTHING, 
ESPECIALLY SOCKS AND UNDERCLOTHING-DEPENDENT UPON THE WEATHER, 
BLANKETS, PILLOWS AND SLEEPING BAGS MAY ALSO BE NEEDED. 

• PORTABLE RADIO-LASTLY. BUT HARDLY LEAST IMPORTANT, A PORT- 
ABLE RADIO WITH FRESH AND EXTRA BATTERIES, RADIO STATION BROAD- 
CASTS WILL ADVISE YOU WHEN IT IS SAFE TO ABANDON THE SHELTER AND 
ALSO PROVIDE YOU WITH OTHER IMPORTANT EMERGENCY INFORMATION. 



fallout protection for homes with basements 

(partially belowground) 




STEP ONE - PROVIDE OVERHEAD 
BARRIER BY PLACING 12" OF EARTH 
ON ROOF OR ON FLOOR OVER 
BASEMENT. 





V, 1 










-51 









HOMES WITH BASEMENTS PARTIALLY BELOWGROUND ALSO 
HAVE POTENTIAL FOR PROVIDING FALLOUT PROTECTION 
BUT NOT AS MUCH AS THOSE WITH BASEMENTS COMPLETELY 
BELOWGROUND. 

TO IMPROVE THE FALLOUT PROTECTION IN THE BASEMENT 
AREA, TWO THINGS MUST BE DONE; (1) PROVIDE AN 
OVERHEAD BARRIER AND, (2) INCREASE THE BARRIER 
(THICKNESS) OF THE EXPOSED BASEMENT WALLS. THIS 
CAN BE ACCOMPLISHED AS SHOWN IN SKETCHES. BOTH 
STEPS MUST BE TAKEN TO OBTAIN THE FALLOUT 
PROTECTION. DOING ONLY ONE STEP IS NOT ENOUGH. 



STEP TWO - IMPROVE VERTICAL BARRIER BY 
PLACING EARTH AGAINST ALL EXPOSED 
BASEMENT WALLS. COVER WINDOWS IN BASEMENT 
WALLS WITH WOOD TO PREVENT GLASS BREAKAGE 
DUE TO EARTH PRESSURE. 



VENTILATION 
OPENING 



EARTH PILED 
AGAINST EXPOSED 
BSMT WALLS 




EARTH ON A 
45 DEGREE SLOPE 
PLACED AGAINST 
ALL EXPOSED 
BASEMENT WALLS 



10 



fallout protection in typical downtown 
row-type buildings 




TWO-STORY BUILDINGS IN A ROW GROUPING (NO SEPARA- 
TION BETWEEN BUILDINGS) CAN HAVE THE EXISTING 
FALLOUT PROTECTION IMPROVED CONSIDERABLY IN 
THE "INTERIOR" SECTIONS BY PLACING EARTH AT THE 
FRONT AND REAR OF THE BUILDINGS AS WELL AS ON 
THE FLOOR OVER THE FIRST STORY AND/OR THE ROOF 
AS SHOWN IN THE SKETCHES. THE TWO BUILDINGS AT 
EITHER END OF THE ROW SHOULD NOT BE USED FOR 
SHELTER PURPOSES SINCE THEY PROVIDE SHIELDING 
FOR THE "INTERIOR" SECTIONS. GLASS FRONTS 
SHOULD BE PROTECTED FROM BREAKAGE WITH WOOD 
OR PLYWOOD PANELS. 



12" OF SOIL ADDED ON SECONO F LOOR OR ROOF 




12" OF SOIL ADDED ON SECONO FLOOR OR ROOF 




EXPEDIENT UPGRADING FALLOUT PROTECTION 

typical one story elementary school without basement 
- upgraded to obtain a protection factor of 40 



TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN 




2T MINIMUM ENTRY WIDTH 



OPEN WEB JOIST SUPPORT OETAIL 
FOR CLASSROOM AREAS. 



11 



fallout protection in churches 




NOTE 

ADDITIONAL VENTILATION 

WILL BE REQUIRED. 

SEE DESIGN OF AIR VENTILATION 

PUMP 



EXISTING CHURCH BUILDINGS CAN SERVE AS 
CONGREGATE CARE FACILITIES FOR RISK AREA 
EVACUEES. BEST PROTECTION CAN BE FOUND 
IN THOSE BUILDINGS THAT HAVE MASONRY EXTERIOR 
WALLS AND BASEMENTS. SHELTER IN THE BASEMENT 
AREAS CAN BE IMPROVED BY PLACING 12 INCHES OF 
EARTH ON THE FLOOR OVER THE BASEMENT AND 
BY MOUNDING EARTH AGAINST THE EXPOSED 
BASEMENT WALLS. EARTH CAN ALSO BE ADDED 
TO THE ROOF PROVIDED THE SLOPE IS NOT 
TOO STEEP. 



IF SLOPE NOT 
TOO STEEP 
PLACE EARTH 
ON ROOF 




EARTH PLACED AGAINST 
SIDES OF EXPOSED 
BASEMENT WALLS 



EARTH PLACED 
AGAINST EXPOSED 
8ASEMENT WALLS 



fallout protection in school buildings 




EXISTING SCHOOL BUILDINGS CAN SERVE AS 
CONGREGATE CARE FACILITIES FOR RISK AREA 
EVACUEES. BEST FALLOUT PROTECTION CAN 
BE FOUND IN INTERIOR CORRIDORS AND ROOMS 
ON THE LOWEST FLOOR, ESPECIALLY IF THE 
SCHOOL HAS TWO OR MORE STORIES AND THE 
EXTERIOR WALLS ARE OF CONCRETE OR MAS- 
ONRY CONSTRUCTION. FALLOUT PROTECTION 
CAN BE IMPROVED BY PROVIDING ADDITIONAL 
VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL BARRIERS OF 
EARTH AS SHOWN IN SKETCHES. WINDOWS IN 
EXTERIOR WALLS THAT ARE TO BE COVERED 
WITH EARTH SHOULD BE PROTECTED WITH 
LUMBER OR PLYWOOD SHEETS SO THAT THEY 
WILL NOT BREAK UNDER THE EARTH FILL. 



EARTH 










12" OF 


it 

EARTH AOOEO -v 


to 4 lt 4 a 



EARTH FILL 




NOTE: 

ADDITIONAL VENTILATION WILL BE REQUIRED SEE DESIGN OF AIR VENTILATION PUMP 



12 



EXPEDIENT FALLOUT SHELTER 



LOG-COVERED TRENCH SHELTER 



STEP 1 

CLEAR AREA OF BRUSH AND TALL GRASS. 
LAYOUT SHELTER AS SHOWN BELOW. 




> - xxjo o* tern. m*M 





STEP 4 

PLACE LOGS OVER TRENCH. POSITION 
TIES FOR BED SHEET CHAIRS OR 
HAMMOCKS. PLACE NEWSPAPER OR 
OTHER MATERIAL AS INDICATED OVER 
LOGS. PLACE EARTH FILL AND 
BURIED ROOF. 



SECTION A-A 



TOOLS AND MATERIALS 

SAW AND/OR AXE. 
PICK OR MATTOCK. 
LONG -HANDLED SHOVELS. 
RAINPROOFING MATERIAL (PLASTIC OR 
POLYETHYLENE) 25 SQUARE YARDS. FOR 
EACH PERSON ABOVE 4, ADD 2 SO YDS. 
50 FEET OF STRONG STRING OR CORD 
AND A KNIFE. 

TAPE MEASURE OR YARD STICK. 
AT LEAST 8 PILLOW CASES AND/OR 
SANDBAGS. 
WORK GLOVES. 

BED SHEETS FOR USE AS "CHAIRS" OR 
"HAMMOCKS" - 1 PER PERSON PLUS AT 
LEAST 16 FEET OF STRONG ROPE OR 
CORD PER BED SHEET. 
16 POUNDS OF NEWSPAPERS TO PLACE 
OVER ROOF LOGS TO KEEP EARTH FROM 
FALLING THROUGH CRACKS BETWEEN 
LOGS. 

tmu MM 1M 

r urr 3>tu£ 
lit* Hit S»u»«i 



STEP 2 

BEGIN EXCAVATING THE TRENCH. PLACE EXCAVATED EARTH 
AT LEAST 3 FEET BEYOND THE EDGE OF TRENCH SO THAT THE 
ROOF LOGS CAN LATER BE PLACED OVER THE TRENCH. 

STEP 3 

AS THE TRENCH EXCAVATION PROGRESSES. SOME WORKERS SHOULO 
BEGIN CUTTING LOGS TO THE LENGTH AND SIZE AS SHOWN ON THE 
ILLUSTRATIONS. 



aC **© >4AU. DCS 

0? loos to *Z£P rve** sr*A.OiT 




OTP o/nrr 

6 .HBi OA/-" UM5 

- To «**»> OUT 



EVCNaXr cur t4n 

• rr »-, woe 



NOTOBB AX) <<Z-H>LB 




CONSTRUCT CANOPIES OVER THE 
OPENINGS. 



PICTORIAL VIEW OF LOG COVERED TRENCH SHELTER 
WITH PART OF THE ROOF CUT AWAY TO SHOW THE 
RAINPROOF BURIED ROOF.' 



auartiiiM mill do 



PLAN VIEW OF TOP OF SHELTER - SHOWING PLACEMENT 
OF LOGS FOR ROOF-EARTH FILL NOT SHOWN 



GENERAL INFORMATION 
THIS SHELTER IS DESIGNED FOR AREAS WHERE THE DEPTH BELOW THE GROUND SURFACE 
TO HARD ROCK OR GROUNDWATER IS BELOW THE BOTTOM OF THE TRENCH. ALSO. THE 
EARTH MUST BE SUFFICIENTLY FIRM AND STABLE SO THAT THE TRENCH SIOEWALLS WILL 
NOT CAVE IN. IN ADDITION. ADEQUATE SMALL TREES THAT CAN BE CUT FOR LOGS MUST 
BE AVAILABLE IN THE IMMEDIATE AREA. THE SHELTER (4-PERSON CAPACITY) CAN BE BUILT 
BY 4 PEOPLE WORKING A TOTAL OF 18 HOURS EACH. AFTER INITIAL COMPLETION. THE 
SHELTER CAN BE ENLARGED TO A WIDTH OF 5 FT.-6 IN. AND DEEPENED TO 6 FT. HOWEVER. 
9-FT LOGS MUST BE USED IN PLACE OF 7-FT LOGS AND THE BURIED ROOF MUST BE LARGE 
ENOUGH TO COVER THE WIOENEO SHELTER DURING THE INITIAL CONSTRUCTION 



EXPEDIENT FALLOUT SHELTER 

DOOR COVERED TRENCH SHELTER 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

THIS SHELTER IS OESIGNEO FOR AREAS WHERE THERE 
IS A SHORTAGE OF SMALL TREES AND/OR BUILOING 
MATERIALS. THE DEPTH TO GROUND WATER ANO ROCK 
MUST ALSO BE BELOW THE BOTTOM OF THE TRENCH. 
IN ADDITION. THE EARTH MUST BE SUFFICIENTLY FIRM 
ANO STABLE SO THAT THE TRENCH WALLS WILL NOT 
COLLAPSE. THE SHELTER (3-PERSON CAPACITY! CAN 
BE CONSTRUCTED BY 3 PEOPLE WORKING AN APPROXI- 
MATE TOTAL OF 12 HOURS EACH. READ ANO STUDY ALL 
INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE BEGINNING TO BUILO. 

STEP 1 

SELECT A REASONABLY LEVEL SITE. LAY OUT THE SHELTER AS 
ILLUSTRATED BY LAYING DOORS SIOE BY SIDE TO OETERMINE 
THE SHELTER LENGTH. DOOR KNOBS SHOULO BE REMOVEO. 



^"„>';. a ^[ "la- Moot o. ii< 

: : ■ ! jy ™ 



STEP 3 ,F THERE ARE ADEQUATE SHEETS OR FABRIC 

AVAILABLE. LINE THE TRENCH WALLS WITH 
THEM. THEN PLACE DOORS OVER THE TRENCH. 







• MuT 




tow 






USCO 




10- 






QMAmMA CHIC" 
CM 111 P*\ 


Ill' 










r— - 





LAYOUT FOR 3-PERSON CAPACITY 

STEP 2 EXCAVATE THE SHELTER TRENCH. ENTRYWAY 

AND VENTILATION TRENCH AS SHOWN, PILE THE 
EXCAVATEO EARTH AT LEAST 3 FEET BEYOND THE TRENCH 
LIMITS SO THAT IT WILL NOT INTERFERE WITH THE LATER 
PLACEMENT OF 000RS OVER THE TRENCH. 



StCUON t-t 

STEP 4 IN 0 R DER TO HOLD IN PLACE AN AOEQUATE 
AMOUNT OF EARTH ON TOP OF THE DOORS. 
CONSTRUCT EARTH "ROLLS" AROUND THE ENTRY- 
WAY AS SHOWN. THE "ROLLS" WILL KEEP THE EARTH 
FILL IN PLACE. SEE HOW TO MAKE AN EARTH ROLL. 



STEP 5 PLACE E ARTH FILL ANO THE WATERPROOFING 

MATERIAL OVER THE DOORS. PLACE SANDBAGS 
AS SHOWN ON THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



STEP 6 CONSTRUCT SHALLOW DRAINAGE OITCHES 

ON ALL SIDES AND PLACE CANOPIES OVER THE 
OPENINGS. 




TOOLS AND MATERIALS 

I. DOORS (INTERIOR SOLID OR HOLLOW-CORE) - 1 FULL SIZE 
(32" MINIMUM WIDTH) FOR EACH PERSON. IF DOORS MEASURE 
LESS THAN 32" IN WIDTH. USE A COMBINATION OF DOORS TO 
PROVIDE THE MINIMUM WIDTH PER PERSON. 
IF DOORS ARE HOLLOW CORE-USE TWO LAYERS. 

Z PICK AND/OR MATTOCK. _ 
1 LONG-HANDLED SHOVELS ANO SQUARE BLADED SHOVEL 
4. RAINPROOFING MATERIAL - U.». PLASTIC SHEETING. CANVAS 
PLASTIC TABLE COVERS. ETC.I AT LEAST 26 SOUARE FEET PER 
PERSON PLUS 2 PIECES ABOUT 6 FT. by 6 FT. FOR USE AS 
CANOPIES. 

6 ONE BEDSHEET OR THE EQUIVALENT OF 50 SO. FT. OF CLOTH 
OR PLASTIC PER PERSON TO LINE TRENCH AND MAKE EARTH- 
FILLED ROLLS. 

6. TWO PILLOWCASES PER PERSON TO USE AS SANDBAGS. 

7. STRING OR CORD TO TIE CANOPIES AND SANDBAGS. 

8. KNIFE. 

9. SEVERAL BOARDS ABOUT 3 FEET LONG. 
10. MEASURING TAPE AND/OR RULER. 

II. WORK GLOVES FOR EACH WORKER. 
12. HAMMER AND HAND SAW. 

HOW TO MAKE AN EARTH ROLL 
1 . SELECT A PIECE OF CLOTH OR PLASTIC AT LEAST 

AS STRONG AS A NEW BED SHEET. 2 FT. WIOER 

THAN THE SIDE OF THE OPENING TO BE 

PROTECTED. AND 6 FT. IN LENGTH. 

2. PLACE 2 FT. OF THE LENGTH 
OF THE CLOTH ON THE 
GROUND. AS ILLUSTRATED. 

3. WHILE USING BOTH HANDS TO HOLD 
UP 3 FT. OF THE LENGTH OF THE 
CLOTH AND WHILE 
PRESSING AGAINST THE CLO"* 
WITH YOUR BODY. HAVE 
ANOTHER PERSON SHOVEL 
EARTH ONTO AND AGAINST 
THE CLOTH. 



4. WHILE STILL PULLING ON THE CLOTH. PLACE 
THE UPPER PART OVER THE EARTH THAT IS 
ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CLOTH. 

6. COVER THE UPPER EDGE OF THE CLOTH. 
FORMING AN EARTH FILC*EO "HOOK" IN 
THIS EDGE. 



| . ^ ' >S «QICIH«ii»I,l.i,.n. IU..UI 





• IAATm ■fell 



13 



COMPLETE THIS QUESTIONAIRE IN DUPLICATE BEFORE ARRIVING IN HOST AREA 



rarniiy IMame 

St. Address 


DO YOU 
IF NO, 
HOME OF 


NEED TEMPORARY 
WHERE WILL YOU 
FRIEND 


HOUSIN 
STAY F 
HOME 


fi? YF.S NO 

OR THE DURATION OF THIS EMERGENCY? 
OF RFI.ATTVF. OTHF.R 








City/ Town Zip 


WHERE CAN YOU BE REACHED? 


FOR USF. BY RECEPTION OFFICIALS 


ADDRESS 


PHONE , 




Shelter Assignmeni 

Shelter Name 

Address - 
=#= Assigned 


IF YES, HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE EVACUATING WITH YOU? 
CHILDREN ADULTS (PLEASE LIST BELOW) 


List all family memb 


;rs traveling together, last name first, first name, age, sex, and occupation. 


Last Name 


First Name 


Middle 


Age 


M 


F 


Soc.Sec.# 


Occupation 


































































List all other Dersons traveling with you. Use space for additional family members if necessary. 



















































































Family Name 
St. Address 


DO YOU 
IF NO, 
HOME OF 


NEED TEMPORARY 
WHERE WILL YOU 

FRTFNn 


HOUSIIv 
STAY F 
HOME 


G? YES NO 

OR THE DURATION OF THIS EMERGENCY? 
OF RFI.ATTVF. OTHF.R 








City/Town Zip 


WHERE CAN YOU BE REACHED? 


FOR USE BY RECEPTION OFFICIALS 


ADDRESS 


PHONE 




Shelter Assignment 

Shelter Name 
Address 

# Assigned 


IF YES, HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE EVACUATING WITH YOU? 
CHILDREN ADULTS (PLEASE LIST BELOW) 


List all family memb 


;rs traveling together, last name first, first name, age, sex, and occupation. 


Last Name 


First Name 


Middle 


Age 


M 


F 


Soc.Sec.# 


Occupation 


































































List all other persons traveling with you. Use space for additional family members if necessary. 



































































14 



FALL RIVER 



(South of Route 195) 

Follow Route 195 to Route 
255 to Route 6 over Bourne 
Bridge to Route 28 to Route 
151 to Route 28 to South 
Yarmouth. 



FALL RIVER 



(North of Route 195) 

Follow Route 195 to Route 
25 to Route 6 over Bourne 
Bridge to Route 28 to Route 
151 to Route 28 to Route 39 
to Harwich. 



Gut out the marker 
designating your 

destination and 
attach it to your 

windshield with 
tape or glue. 



Cut out the marker 
designating your 

destination and 
attach it to your 

windshield with 

tape or glue. 



SWANSEA 



Follow Route 195 to Route 
25 to Route 6 over Sagamore 
Bridge to Route 6 to Well- 
fleet. 



SOMERSET 



Follow Route 138 to Route 
195 to Route 255 over Bourne 
Bridge to Route 28 to Route 
39 to Route 28 to Orleans. 



WESTPORT 



Follow Route 6 to Bourne 
Bridge to Route 28 to 
Orleans . 



EXPEDIENT FALLOUT SHELTER 

ABOVE - GROUND RIDGE - POLE 



STEP 1 

CONSTRUCT RIDGE POLE FRAME 
wn ri*Miow mtmm to» 

— OMRM" 



STEP 2 

DIG 4~ DEEP "V" TRENCH IN EARTH AND PLACE 
V ROOF POLES IN TRENCH AND ON RIDGE-POLE 
FRAME AS SHOWN. 



TOOLS AND MATERIALS 



Po* ft ro tms T»© 

r uiu neaeeet 




1 SHOVEL (OS« SHOVEL 'OX EACH TWO WORKERS). 
larse buckets, cams, or ►on with mil nan&les 
to carry earth. 
«. knife. 

s three ooublc-se o sheets por the illust r ateo 

(flMON Shelte R OR AN EQUIVALENT AB1> or 



_ jau> l 
shectfor. each aooItiona 

a vai LABLE, UK STICKS ANO 

ACROSS THf. i-PT SIC* POLES Af© CO 

LEAVES TO FICL IN THE SPACES • 

4 HAUHCR AND AT LEAST 10 NAILS 
AT LI AST IOO FT. OF R< " ~ 
AOOITIONAL MO SHE E 

STRONQi for each hi 

MAKE INTO I OOT-WIOf 
WHEN TWISTED 
' AT LEAST 1 SQUARE YARDS KB PERSON OF BAIN- 
PROOFING MATE RIAL (SXOwEfl CUR TAINS, PLASTIC 
TABLE CLOTHS, PLASTIC M AT R ESS COVERS. fTCI - 
ESSENTIA L IN RAINY COLO WEATHER, 
i. CI LOVES TO PREVENT INJURY AND BUSTERS TO HANOI 



JUIVALENT AREA OF 
i FABRIC OR PLASTIC ONE AOOTTIONAl 

----- L 1 OCCUPANTS. IF MOT 

SMALL POLES PLACED 

COVER WITH GRASS Ol 
ETWEEN THE POLES. 
_ IS IN. OR LONOIftL OR 
AT LEAST tOO FT. OP ROFE OR STRONO WIRE, OR TWO 

~D SHEETS (OR OTHER FABRIC EQUALLY 
' ~RSON TO BE SHELTERED TO 
IVE AS -EOF** 



SIOC VIEW SMOW1NO CROSS-BRACES OF COLUMN-POSTS (IP 
LARCH NAILS ARE AVAILABLE. SIMPLY NAIL TWO SIMILAR 
SLOPING CROSS-BRACES ON oR>OSITE SIOES Of THE COLUI 



STEP 4 



LARLV 

COLUMN- 
■ --STB 



POSTS.) FOR SHELTERS WITH THREE OR MORE couumnjo 
USE only one brace BETWEEN EACH PAIR OF POSTS AND 
SLOPE BRACES ALTERNATELY IN OIPPE RENT DIRECTION 



PLACE LIMBS OR STICKS AND BEDSHEETS ACROSS ROOF 
POLES. PLACE EARTH FILL AND WATERPROOFING 
MATERIALS AS ILLUSTRATED. 



AVOID CARRYING POLES 
— ORAO THEM 



MRIRSON SHELTER IS ILLUSTRATED - 
FOR EACH PERSON ABOVE S. MAKE 
RIDOE POLE 1 FT. LONOERi FOR • TO 



STEP 3 

CONSTRUCT ENTRYWAYS 




VIEW LOOKING DOWN ON SHELTER WITH ALL POLES IN PLACE 
EXCEPT THE ROOF POLES OF THE TWO ENTRYWAYS. 



SECTION THRU COMPLETED SHELTER 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



THIS SHELTER IS OCSIONEO POR AREAS WHERE THERE IS 
AN ABUNDANCE OP SMALL TREES ANO BCUTwOROUNO 
SHELTERS ARE IMPRACTICAL THE SHELTER (S- PERSON 
CAPACITYI CAN BE BUILT BY J PEOPLE WORKINO A TOTAL 
IP 14 HOURS EACH. READ ANO STUOY ALL INSTRUCTIONS 
"EPORE SCOINNINQ. 



15 




Cut out the marker 
designating your 

destination and 
attach it to your 

windshield with 
tape or glue. 




HARWICH 




ORLEANS 



YARMOUTH 




WELLFLEET 



i 



These are preliminary instructions 
only. Detailed plans and instruc- 
tions will be made at a later date. 
Until then, you should know your 
hosting community; That is, the 
community to which you may be re- 
located should the Crisis Reloca- 
tion Option be activated. 

This plan has been prepared by the 
Massachusetts Civil Defense Agency 
in accordance with a contract fun- 
ded by the Federal Emergency Man- 
agement Agency. 



EXPEDIENT FALLOUT SHELTER 



ABOVE-GROUND DOOR-COVERED SHELTER 



TOOLS AND MATERIALS 



oooki in- wioc) i <-f « nnw 
•LUS 1 »€■ EXIT/CNTMV. 



II "KM OPPM1 




STEP 2 

SET UP DOORS AS FO 
AROUND WHICH EARTH-FILLED 
ROLLS WILL BE PLACED. NAIL ONLY 
TOP BRACES. NAILS MUST BE REMOVED 
LATER. BRACE ALL CORNERS. CENTER. 
TOP AND BOTTOM OF EACH DOOR. 



STEP 6 

REMOVE DOOR FORMS FROM 
ENDWALLS. POSITION ROOF 
DOORS IN THEIR FINAL 
POSITION. PLACE ENTRY 
FRAME FOR DOOR OVER 
ENTRY/EXIT. PLACE 
WATERPROOFING 
MATERIAL ON 
DOORS. 



STEP 7 

DIO 14" OEEP, 34T" WIDE TRENCH #T LmiM 

INSIDE SHELTER, EARTH CAN BE V4&A^//&*//& 
PLACED DIRECTLY ONTO ROOF 
DOORS. TRENCH CAN BE MADE 
UP TO 3 FEET DEEP IF CONDITIONS 
PERMIT. 



CUT-Ol/T SECTION 
TC SHOW IN1IOE 
OP EARTH ROLLS 



STEP 3 



STEP 1 

SELECT A SHELTER LOCATION WHERE 
THERE IS LITTLE OR NO CHANCE OF 
RAINWATER PONDING ON THE GROUND 
SURFACE. STAKE OUT SHELTER. REMOVE 
DOOR KNOBS. ALLOW 1 DOOR FOR EACH 
PERSON PLUS 1 DOOR FOR EACH ENTRY/ 
EXIT AT BOTH ENDS. LIMIT IS 8 PERSONS 
PER SHELTER. 



STEP 6 

KEEP HEIGHT OF EARTH ABOUT EQUAL 
ON BOTH SIOEWALLS AS ROLLS ARE 
FORMEO. AFTER SIOEWALLS HAVE 
REACHEO PLANNEO HEIGHT. REMOVE 
BRACES AND DOOR FORMS. USE SAME 
OOOR FORMS TO CONSTRUCT ENDWALLS 
WITH EARTH FILLED ROLLS. PROVIDE _ 
EXIT/ENTRY AT BOTH ENDS AS SHOWN 



9. 

10. 



Pick o» Mmxk ond ShoaaL 
Two BuckaTj or L«tjd Cant to Carry ErrBV 
Tip* Mum, Yirdxtk* or Ruttr. 
Saw. Am or Hanrtat 
Hammar and at ban 30 Nati - JH~ Ion*. 
At Uaxt 4 Doubt* Bad than lor Ea* Ptnon to ba 
SMtmd 

•Woman mi RWnaroofina Mawrlali ax* at 
Plarlte or Potyathy Wm*. 
WorE Oiorai for Eeofl Workar. 
Lumbal for uai m Tamporary Braon aad far 

Entry /Earl F 




l«Alt EARTH ON 
TO* OP ROLL WALLS 
TO '0«» SMOOTH 
BCARINO SURFACE 
FOR OOO" i 




BEGIN TO PLACE EARTH-FILLED ROLLS 
AGAINST OOOR FORMS. TO FORM EARTH 
ROLLS. SEE EARTH-FILLED ROLL DETAIL 
BOTTOM OF PAGE. 

POLO WATERPROOPINO MATERIAL UNOIA HIOHCM KOOt 

op ocon to hccp it prom slipping. 
STEP 4 

MOUND EARTH AGAINST THE EARTH 
FILLEO ROLLS AS SHOWN. 
CONTINUE PLACING EARTH 
AND SHEETS TO FORM 
EARTH FILLED ROLLS. 
CONTINUE PLACING 
EARTH AND SHEETS 
TO FORM EARTH- 
FILLED ROLLS. 




STEP 8 

PLACE 15 INCHES OF EARTH ON TOP OF SHELTER. 
IN HOT WEATHER CONSTRUCT A SHELTER 
VENTILATION AIR PUMP. SEE AIR PUMP DETAILS 
ON LAST PAGE. 



PLAN VIEW OF SHELTER 
(LOOKING DOWN) 



PILLOWCASE 
IANOBAOS TO 

IMPaOVI 
RAOIATIOH 
SHIELOINO AT 
INTRVWAV 



NOTE: IF TRENCHING IS IMPRACTICAL 
HEIGHTEN WALLS BY USING 
ADDITIONAL EARTH ROLLS. 



ENTRY/EXIT FRAME 
TWO REQUIRED 



NARROW 
TRENCH <w 

VI/ V 



EARTH-FILLED ROLL DETAIL 





_A0OUT II INCHES 
^/ WIOETOFIT 

use i- tt *•■ aoAaos. sin 

TO PIT ENTRVWAV U1K( 
ANO INSTALL AFTER INTAV 
IS COMFLETEO 




EARTH-PILLEO 
ROLL 
E NO-WALLS 



eoot or uounoeo 



V PLACE 3 FT OF SHEET ON GROUND ANO TEMPORARILY DRAPE REMAINDER OF SHEET ON DOOR. 

3. PLACE EARTH ON SHEET - SHAPE AS SHOWN. 
X FOLD SHEET OVER SHAPED EARTH. 

4. PLACE EARTH ONTO SHEET AT NARROW TRENCH. 

6. FOLD SHEET TO FORM EARTH HOOK. HOOK WILL ANCHOR SHEET. 
8. REPEAT TO FORM NEXT EARTH-FILLED ROLL. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



THE ABOVE-GROUND DOOR-COVERED SHELTER IS DESIGNEO FOR 
AREAS WHERE BELOW -GROUND SHELTERS ARE IMPRACTICAL 
BECAUSE THE GROUNDWATER TABLE OR BEDROCK IS CLOSE TO 
THE GROUND SURFACE. THIS SHELTER CAN BE BUILT BY FOUR 
PERSONS WORKING A TOTAL OF 13 HOURS EACH. 

READ AND STUOY ALL INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE STARTING TO BUILO. 
IF DOOR WIDTHS MEASURE LESS THAN 33 INCHES. USE A COMBINATION 
OF DOORS TO PROVIDE A MINIMUM OF 33 INCHES OF OOOR WIDTH PER 
PERSON 



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