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REPORT TO 

STATE EVALUATION COMMITTEE 
ON TEACHER EDUCATION 

on 

LIVINGSTONE COLLEGE 

by 

THE VISITATION COMMITTEE 
October 11-14, 1964 


Division Of Professional Services 
State Department Of Public Instruction 
Raleigh, North Carolina 







North Ca rolina State Library 
Raleigh 


N. d 
0 OC . 


Report to 


STATE EVALUATION COMMITTEE 
ON TEACHER EDUCATION 


ON 

LIVINGSTONE COLLEGE 


by 


THE VISITATION COMMITTEE 


October 11-14^ 1964 





TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Page 


Introduction . .... 1 

Committee Members. 2 

Programs . . . . 3 

Standard I—Overall Policies. . . . . 3 

Standard II—Student Personnel Programs and Services . 13 

Standard III—Faculty . 17 

Standard IV’—Curricula.24 

Standard V—Professional Laboratory Experiences . 46 


Standard VI—Facilities, Equipment, and Materials 


48 













































INTRODUCTION 


Livingstone College, Salisbury, North Carolina, was incorporated in 1879 
and chartered as a college in 1885. Founded by the African Methodist Episcopal 
Zion Church, the College remains under its auspices. The institution consists 
of two schools, the College of Arts and Sciences and Hood Theological Seminary, 
a professional school of religion. 

The academic administration of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is 
based on four major divisions, each having a chairman appointed by the President 
and Dean and having conjunctive responsibility with the Dean for administration 
of the division. Each division contains departments and, in some cases, areas 
designated only by courses. 

The institution has grown from three students and three teachers in 1882 to 
the 1964 enrollment of 704 with a faculty of 44 full and part-time members. One hundred 
and thirty-three of the 150 enrolled seniors of 1963-64 were in teacher education. 

The College offers and requests approval of its teacher education programs in 
elementary education, business education, English, foreign language (French), 
mathematics, science, social studies, and music. 

The objectives of the College include, in general, the provision of a well- 
rounded general education program, provision of specialized training in certain 
occupations and professional fields (including teaching), and provision of such 
services as can be rendered to the community, the region, and the Church. 

The College was visited on October 11-14, 1964, by the following committee, 
which herewith submits its report. 


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Dr. Walter Nau, Chairman 
Lenoir Rhyne College 

Dr. J. P. Freeman, Consultant 

State Department of Public Instruction 

Dr. Frank Weaver 

State Department of Public Instruction 


Mr. Thomas Blackburn 
Lenoir Rhyne College 

Dr. Orus Sutton 
Appalachian State Teachers College 

Dr. Roy Prince 

Appalachian State Teachers College 
Dr. Jerry A. Hall 

State Department of Public Instruction 

Dr. William H. Brown 
North Carolina College 

Dr. Walter M. Brown 
North Carolina College 


Dr. Darwin Turner 
A. & T. College 

Mr. Harold Webb 

State Department of Public Instruction 
Dr, Arnold Hoffmann 

State Department of Public Instruction 
Dr. James Valsame 

State Department of Public Instruction 


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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2019 with funding from 
State Library of North Carolina 


https://archive.org/details/reporttostateeva00nort_11 


STANDARD I—OVERALL POLICIES 


A. PURPOSES AND OBJECTIVES 


1. General Objectives 

A comprehensive statement of the philosophy and objectives of Livingstone 
College was developed and adopted in 1958 and revised in 1961, These statements 
and a statement of the objectives of the teacher education program are included in 
the 1964-1965 catalog as follows: 

1. Sponsored by the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, as an 
expression of its faith in the purposes of higher education in a 
democracy, Livingstone College fosters a program of Christian education 
to fulfill its obligation to higher education in the interest of those 
served and for those preparing for service. In this relation the 
College accepts a share of the responsibility for the education of a 
rapidly increasing student population that must learn how to protect 
and promote the America that gives the Institution its reasons for 
being. 

2. The College seeks to provide a unified general education for its 
students and to create for faculty and students the opportunity for 
intelligent and creative participation in contemporary living with 
high intellectual, cultural, and moral standards. 

The College seeks to develop self-reliance as emphasized by the 
Founders in the charter. As interpreted in the life of the student, 
self-reliance means the development of initiative, the intelligent 
use of one's resources, and the experimental background for personal 
and social progress. In the Institution it involves the continuous 
discovery, the organization, and the effective utilization of its 
own human and other resources before seeking financial and other aid 
from various sources. 

Specific Objectives: 

I. To provide a well-rounded general education as basic to any 
occupation or professional interest. This involves providing 
students with educational opportunities designed to promote their 
developments in: 

A. The acquisition of skill and understanding in comprehensive 
reading and in clear and intelligent expression. 


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B. The understanding and appreciation of world culture, 
especially western civilization in its manifold aspects— 
scientific, aesthetic, social, religious, historical, etc. 

C. The ability to think critically on problems in an ever- 
changing social order, and a willingness to utilize methods, 
techniques, and approaches essential to the solution thereof. 

D. The cultivation of the total personality through personal, 
social, and religious experiences, 

E. The appreciation for and cultivation of good health-- 
mental, physical, spiritual, social, and emotional. 

F. The acquisition of a practical philosophy of life based 
on sound religious convictions and devotion to valid 
humanitarian interests, 

II. To provide specialized training in certain occupations and 

professional fields. 

A. The profession of teaching 

B. Pre-professional training and skills for the fields of: 


1 . 

Medicine 

4. 

Law 

2. 

Dentistry 

5. 

Social Work 

3. 

Pharmacy 

6. 

Music 


C. The Christian ministry 

D. Business occupations 

III. To offer the community and the Church such services as can be 

rendered through a vigorous and dynamic program designed to foster 
ideal community life, and to promote effective mutual relations 
between the Church, the community, and Livingstone College. 

2. Objectives of the Teacher Education Program 

The objectives of the teacher education program are described in the College's 

catalog as follows: 

The purpose of the teacher education program at Livingstone College is to 
provide professional training and preparation appropriate to the functions 


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of education in a democracy. Toward this end, it proposes to organize 
and function in such a way that the prospective teacher will be led to 
an understanding of the significance of guidance at all levels of 
education. It further proposes to construct continuously a program that 
will expose the prospective teacher to the newer devices and techniques 
of teaching; to provide aspects of subject matter necessary to the 
attainment of a general knowledge in all areas of learning; to provide 
laboratory experiences and a curriculum basic to a general education and 
to specialized training. 

Specifically, the Teacher Education Program aims toward achieving the 
following goals, 

1, To create professional interests and attitudes in the field of 
education 

2, To encourage creativity 

3, To enable the prospective teacher to qualify for state certification 
and entrance into graduate study 

4, To help the student further develop the personal qualities necessary 
for good teaching (honesty, allegiance, integrity, leadership, superior 
intellectual and professional responsibility, spirit of friendliness, 
respect for individualities, keen sense of social responsibility). 

a. Provisions for Carrying Out Objectives in Teacher Education 

The College demonstrates its commitment to teacher education and its resources 

to carry out this commitment by providing a professional education faculty 

and an academic faculty, appropriate student personnel programs and services, 

and physical facilities assigned to the different phases of the task. A 

program for teacher education is provided in general education, academic 

specialization, and professional education for each area in which teacher 

candidates are prepared, A Teacher Education Committee representing all 

academic and professional education areas has been established to act as a 

single coordinating agency to assure that the education of teachers is an 

institution-wide function and receives full cooperation, support, and 


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constructive participation from all involved parties. A projected 
building program, in existence and partially completed, includes facilities 
that will provide for and improve the teacher education program. 

b. Scope of the Teacher Education Program 

Livingstone College prepares persons at the undergraduate level in the 
following areas: elementary school and secondary school levels. On the 
secondary level, teachers are prepared in the fields of business education, 
English, foreign language (French), mathematics, science, social studies, 
and music. 

c. Future Plans 

The College proposes to re-examine the current program of teacher education 
to determine the validity of the program. Some consideration was reported 
for securing additional personnel in the Department of Education. 

The following improvements were listed as a result of a study of the publication 
on Standards and Guidelines : 

1. Inclusion of specific teacher education curricula in all concerned 
courses of instruction. 

2. Joint meeting with all people concerned with the teacher education 
program: principals, critic teachers, content teachers, methods 
teachers; etc. 

3. Formal application to teacher education program is being made by 
students. 

4. Faculty voted to maintain 1.5 average requirement for acceptance 
to the teacher education program. 

5. Forms concerning the student teacher have been formulated and left 
with critic teachers and visiting teachers. 

6. Each student teacher is visited not only by the Director of Teacher 
Education but where possible the content teacher. 


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7. Research in the coordination of Freshman English and Reading is 
planned for 1964-65. 

Elementary research is to be continued in admission requirements to the 
program, curriculum, student teaching, teaching methods, and what constitutes 
an effective teacher. 

B. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

By charter, the Board of Trustees is the final authority governing the operation 
of Livingstone College. In actual practice, the Board establishes major policy in 
broad outlines and delegates responsibility for the formulation of policy pertaining 
to the day-by-day operation of the institution to the President. 

In developing and carrying out policies, there is an attempt to provide for 
student and faculty participation in the formulation of policy pertaining to the 
general welfare of the College as well as to the instructional program. 

1. Administrative Organization for Teacher Education 

Chart I shows the administrative organization for the College as a whole, with 
the line of authority for teacher education being from the Board of Trustees to the 
President to the Dean to the Director of Teacher Education, who also serves as the 
Chairman of the Division of Education-Psychology and Head of the Department of 
Education. 

Chart II shows the organization in more detail. In this chart the role of the 
Curriculum Committee and the Teacher Education Committee is revealed. 

The development of policy for teacher education is shown in Chart III. Policy 
recommendations can develop from departments, divisions, instructors, and/or from 
the Teacher Education Committee. The recommended policy is first considered by the 
Teacher Education Committee. If the policy recommendation involves a change in 
curriculum, the matter goes next to the Curriculum Committee and then, with a 


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recommendation, to the faculty. Other policy matters go with a recommendation to 
the faculty. If recommendations, usually in the form of reports, are adopted or 
approved by the faculty, they become established policies of the institution, unless 
they conflict with policies established by the Board of Trustees, or with the 
purposes and objectives of the College, The Dean and the President are involved 
through their membership on most of the committees. The ultimate responsibility of 
formalizing and implementing college and instructional policies rests with the 
President by authority vested in him by the Trustees. 

The development of policies in the areas of instruction, scheduling, and 
instructional budget is channeled through the Office of the Dean, who has the 
responsibility for coordination of the total instructional prograin. 

2. Coordination of the Program 

The agency primarily responsible for coordinating the teacher education 
program is the Teacher Education Committee. This committee was appointed by the 
President to coordinate the development of the Self-Study Report. The chairman 
of the committee is the chairman of the Division of Education-Psychology. All 
full-time members of this Division are also members of the committee. The remaining 
membership is composed of the President, the Dean, the Registrar, and one or more 
persons from each of the other three divisions of the College, for a total membership 
of 16. By nature of the Committee’s composition, all areas involved in the teacher 
education program are represented. 

It is intended that this committee will continue to function as a coordinating 
agency. At the time of the visit, the only official function assigned was that of 
considering the applications of students desiring to enter the teacher education 


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ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 





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CHART II 


ORGANIZATION CHART OF COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS: INSTRUCTION 



Curriculum Committee 


General Education 
Freshman & Sophomore 


Coordinator of .Preprofessional 
Education Committee 


Pre-Professional 

Pre-Medical 

Pre-Dental 

Pre-Law 

Pre-Social Work 
Pre-Theology 


General Education 
Freshman & Sophomore 


Director of Teacher Education 


Professional Terminal 


- 


Pre-Professional 
Education Committee 


Teacher Education 
Elementary 

Primary Grade 
Grammar Grade 
Secondary 

Areas of Secondary Specializa¬ 
tion for Certification 
General Science 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Mathematics 
Business Education 
English (Communication Arts 

„ , and skills) 

French 

Social Studies 
Music 


Teacher Education Committee 


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TEACHER EDUCATION POLICY CHART 




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program. Its other functions have not been written down and officially adopted. 
Provisions for regular meetings, the basis for membership and terms of office, 
and official recording of minutes have not been made. Some minutes of past 
meetings are available. 

Subsequent to the visit, the College submitted an officially adopted statement 
of the structure and functions of the committee. This statement can be found in 
Appendix A. 

3. Administration of Teacher Education Policies 

Most policies will be carried out by the Chairman of the Division of Education- 
Psychology. The organizational chart for the institution implies that all policies 
will be so administered, with the Division Chairman responsible to the Dean and 
through the Dean to the President. In practice, some policies can be carried out 
by persons other than the Division Chairman. 

4. Recommendation for Certification 

The central agency vested with the authority for certifying to the State 
Department of Public Instruction that a candidate has completed an approved teacher 
education program and is recommended for certification is the Registrar of the College. 
Beginning with the class of 1967, the institutional recommendation will be endorsed 
and signed by the department head of the area in which certification is being sought 
and by the head of the Department of Education. 


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STANDARD II—STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 


A. PROVISIONS FOR INFORMATION ABOUT CARF.FRS IN TEACHING 

Students secure information concerning opportunities for careers in teaching 
during the orientation session held for all freshmen and from materials found in 
the following places: 

1. Guidance Office 

2. Registrar's Office 

3. The various departments 

4. Office of Department of Education 

5. Public Relations Office 

6. Office of Special Services 

7. Office of the Dean of Liberal Arts College 

B. ADMISSION POLICIES AND PRACTICES 
1. Admission to the College 

With few exceptions, freshmen admitted to the College must meet the general 
requirements, which include— 

a. Rank in the upper three-fifths of the graduating high school class. 

b. Credit for at least 15 high school units with eight in specified fields. 

c. The high school principal's recommendations. 

d. A score on the Scholastic Aptitude Test. 

As of the fall of 1964, the institution had not set an absolute cut-off score 
on the Scholastic Aptitude Test. Scores are being studied with a view of establishing 
a cut-off score. The 1963-64 freshman class mean on the Scholastic Aptitude Test was 
648. 


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The College had 275 applicants for the freshman class of 1964-65; 225 were 
accepted and 171 actually enrolled. 

2. Admission to Teacher Education 

Effective with the class of 1967, students will make formal application for 
admission to the teacher education program at the end of the third semester (sophomore 
year). Students transferring from other accredited institutions, with classification 
as juniors, may enter the program provided they meet the prescribed requirements and 
apply. Persons who have previously not planned a teaching career and who are beyond 
the sophomore year may apply and be accepted. 

Accompanying the application, when considered by the Teacher Education Committee, 
are forms showing the scholastic standing, character and personality record, health 
service report, instructor's evaluation, and departmental recommendation. 

A quality point average of 1.5 (C+) overall and in the major area is required 
for admission to teacher education. 

C. RETENTION POLICIES AND PRACTICES 
1. Retention in the College 

Retention in the College is dependent upon the achieved quality point average 
and other established policy: 

a. A student incurring 4 F's or more in any one semester will be permanently 
dropped, 

b. A student incurring as many as 2 F's but less than 4 F's in one semester 
will be placed on academic probation unless his cumulative record indicates 
otherwise. 

c. The cumulative grade point average must rise from .5 as freshman to 1.0 


as senior. 


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2. Retention in Teacher Education 


For a student to be retained in teacher education, his cumulative grade 
point average must not drop below the prescribed admissions average of 1.5. 

Readmission will be based on the Teacher Education Committee's evaluation 
of the individual applicant. 

D. RECORDS 

A complete file of records on students enrolled in the Teacher Education Program 
is in the office of the Department of Education. Information concerning grades is 
available in the Registrar's Office. Personal records are in the offices of the Dean 
of Men and Dean of Women. Records are available to advisers and those responsible 
persons needing a knowledge of the records for assistance to the student. 

E. GUIDANCE AND ADVISEMENT 

After the student's admission to the program, there is joint advisement by- 
persons in the academic department and in the Department of Education. All students, 
under the new program, have dual advisement. Personal guidance is through the offices 
of the Dean of Men and the Dean of Women. 

F. PLACEMENT 

The Registrar's Office is the designated Placement Office on the campus. 
Information is also available through the Public Relations Office and the Office of 
the Department of Education, When requests for teachers are received, an effort is 
made to find the graduates who best fit the situation. A form notice is sent to 
two or more persons indicating that the position is vacant and asking that they 
follow through. 


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G. FOLLOW-UP 


A follow-up program is being planned in an effort to determine the strengths 
and weaknesses of the graduates. The objectives of this program are to get the 
opinions of recent graduates as they pertain to— 

1. Competence in the area of specialization. 

2. Area or areas in which more training is desirable. 

3. Courses outside the prescribed curriculum which would have been helpful. 

Such a questionnaire was sent out in 1958, and the results were included in a 

study done in that year. Similar information was ascertained from an evaluation in 
a conference during the 1963-64 term. 

Other informal follow-up occurs through information received from principals and 
former students. 

H. TEST SCORES AND RATINGS 

Students in the teacher education program appear to have slightly higher scholastic 
grade point averages and higher scores on the Otis Psychological Test than do students 
not in teacher education. 

Scores achieved by 1964 graduates on the National Teacher Examinations ranged 
from 310 to 620, with an average between 451 and 460. Forty-six of 113, or 41 percent 
scored below 450, and 16 percent scored below 400. 


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STANDARD III—FACULTY 


A. PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FACULTY 
1. Preparation and Number 

Six teachers constitute the professional education faculty at this College. 

Two of these, ranked as professors, are employed part-time, each being responsible 
for one psychology course per semester. In 1963-64, this faculty of six persons 
offered all of the professional courses, except special subject methods, for 
approximately 253 teacher education students, or about 37 percent of the 692 
students enrolled in the College. Thus, the ratio of equated full-time faculty 
(4.4) to total teacher education students is 1 to 57. 

Three of the four full-time teachers shared unequally the responsibility for 
visiting 83 student teachers during the second semester of 1963-64. 

Primary interest in teaching was clearly evident in the wide variety of responsi¬ 
bilities for pre-service and in-service education taken by the full-time faculty in 
addition to their administrative and non-teaching duties. Although no written record 
of the faculty's effort to grow professionally was available at the time of the 
committee's visit, convincing verbal evidence of faculty participation in national, 
state, and local teacheis' conferences was offered. The College provides financial 
assistance for summer study through grants-in-aid for faculty members who are 
matriculating for advanced degrees. However, some faculty members have not been 
in position to undertake summer study during the past few years. 

The transcripts of the professional education faculty members clearly reveal 
that all were trained in the fields of their teaching responsibilities. Two full-time 
and two part-time teachers hold doctor's degrees in the fields of their teaching 


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assignments. The part-time teachers hold doctorates in Psychology while two full¬ 
time teachers hold their doctorates in education. One of the remaining two full¬ 
time teachers had three summers beyond the master's degree in elementary education. 

The other holds a master's degree in curriculum and instructional techniques. The 
full-time teachers of professional education courses have 2-11 years of experience 
in public schools and 6-20 years in college teaching. The visiting teachers are 
recent Ph.D. graduates who have had no previous teaching experience in public schools. 
The director of the teacher education program holds an earned Ph.D. in education. 

The wide variety of teaching and non-teaching responsibilities carried by the 
teacher education faculty gives further evidence of its interest in education and 
its versatility. However, heavy responsibilities in and outside professional education 
make demands on teacher time and energy that obviously limit their opportunities to 
render maximum service to students. Under the circumstances, the numerical adequacy 
of the professional education faculty is open to question. 

Selected teachers in subject-matter departments teach the methods courses as a 
part of their normal loads. Also they assist with the supervision of student teachers; 
but this is largely token assistance, since it is over and above their normal teaching 
responsibilities. 

The institution has a planned program for improvement of the professional 
competence of the faculty. The program includes extended pre-planning of conferences 
for the faculty, regular general faculty and division meetings, and financial support 
for advanced study. Under review by the president's advisory committee are the 
present tenure policies which provide an initial appointment of one year for all 
faculty members with longer subsequent appointments, one to four years, depending 

on the rank of the teacher. Thus, this policy is likely to be liberalized in 1965. 

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Under study also is the following salary scale. The goal here is to place 
the college in more favorable position to compete salarywise for competent faculty 


members. 


Minimum Maximum 


Professor 


$6,000 - $9,600 


Associate 


$5,500 - $8,500 


Assistant 


$5,000 - $6,000 


Instructor 


$4,500 - $5,000 


Individual faculty members expressed faith in the future of the college and a 
willingness to go beyond the call of duty to accelerate realization of the institution's 
full potential. 


2. Load 


The normal teaching load of a faculty member is 15 semester hours per semester 
with reductions for additional responsibilities. However, the institution has not 
yet developed a comprehensive policy on loads which assigns realistic weights to 
responsibilities other than classroom teaching. 

One of the four full-time faculty members teaches a three semester hour course 
each semester, directs the student teaching program, visits 69 student teachers at 
least once during the second semester, chairs the Division of Psychology and Education, 
and is listed for service on eight institutional committees. 

A full-time assistant professor teaches 12 semester hours per semester, visits 
two student teachers, coaches basketball in season, and serves on two committees. 

The assistant professor of elementary education teaches six different courses 
during the first semester, including methods courses in social studies, language 
arts, and professional courses including directed observation, principles and problems 


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of elementary education, plus children's literature and drawing and sketching. In 
the second semester, this teacher drops directed observation, replaces drawing with 
industrial arts, and visits 12 student teachers. In addition she is listed on eight 
committees. 

The second full-time professor teaches 12 hours per semester distributed between 
psychology, secondary school administration and curriculum plus Bible in the theological 
program. He is a member of six standing committees and takes his share of off-campus 
consultation of public school problems. 

The total professional load is distributed so that faculty members may teach in 
their separate areas of specialization—psychological and social foundations and 
curriculum and instructional techniques. However, the elementary education specialist 
has five different preparations. 

Load credit for administration is given the chairman of the Division of Education 
and Psychology. The time allotted for his administrative responsibilities is given 
in the self-study as 15 hours per week, while his supervision of 69 student teachers 
is given as 25 hours per week. This teacher's student teacher load (above) is more 
than three times the maximum supervisory load for a full-time supervisor. Under 
the guidelines, supervision of 69 students requires a minimum of 3.4 teachers. A 
defensible basis for equalizing loads of teachers has not yet been established as 
institutional policy. 

B. ACADEMIC FACULTY 

Business Education 

There is one full-time faculty member in economics and there are two full¬ 
time faculty members in business education. The economics teacher has the rank of 


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professor and holds the Ph.D. degree. She has had both university and public 
education experience. One member of the business education staff has the rank 
of associate professor and holds a M.A. degree and a professional diploma. This 
faculty member has 20 years of experience teaching at Livingstone in addition to 
some public school experience. The other faculty member holds a M.A. degree and 
has had 10 years of experience teaching at Livingstone. 

One teacher of business education has .13 credit hours with 17 clock hours as 
a work load. Another one has a 14 credit hour with 16 clock hour schedule. The 
other person was listed on the schedule as having five classes which meet three 
hours for class. It appears that the teaching load is not the same each semester. 

English 

Six teachers are employed full time to teach courses in English and in humanities. 

A seventh instructor teaches courses in reading. One instructor, trained in linguistics, 
is shared between the Departments of English and Modern Foreign Languages, 

One of the six teachers of English holds a doctorate in English. A second has 
completed all of the course requirements for a doctorate in English. Three others 
hold Master of Arts degrees and a fourth holds a Master of Arts from a school of 
education. Graduate transcripts for two of these four are not on file. Transcripts 
are not on file for the teacher of reading and the teacher of linguistics, who have 
joined the staff within the past month. 

In accord with institutional policy, the teaching load of the English Department 
faculty members is 15 hours per week. The Chairman of the Department, who is also 
Chairman of the Division of Humanities, teaches 15 hours per week. The teacher of 
the methods course for English majors teaches 15 hours per week and serves on three 
committees, 


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The teacher of the methods course for English majors holds a Master of Arts 
degree and has studied further in a program for "Professors of Teachers of Speech 
in Colleges and Teachers Colleges." Her most recent teaching experience in public 
schools was 1959. 

The members of the Department are teaching courses for which they have had 
preparation in graduate school. 

Foreign Language 

(French) 

There are three full-time teachers and two part-time (average of one-half time) 
teachers of foreign languages. Of the full-time faculty, none holds a doctorate. 

The two part-time faculty members hold the doctorate, one in French and the other 
in law. The latter does not teach French, so this has no bearing on the program. 

The teaching load of faculty members on full time is 15 hours per week. The 
Department chairman teaches 15 hours in addition to her departmental duties, but 
this is caused by a schedule program; otherwise she would teach 12 hours. One of 
the teachers has all of her classes on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. One has four 
on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and one on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, 

Mathematics 

There are one full-time, one three-fifths time, and one two-fifths time faculty 
members. The full-time teacher holds a master's degree in mathematics and is acting 
chairman of the Department. The three-fifths time teacher also holds a master's 
degree in mathematics and in addition to his mathematics teaching teaches a course 
in physics and an education course in teaching methods for mathematics. The other 
part-time mathematics teacher has a master's degree in biology but no degree in 
mathematics. 


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The teaching load of the full-time Mathematics Department faculty members is 


15 semester hours per week, in accord with institutional policy. 

Science 

There are five full-time and one part-time faculty members in the Science 
Department, each with a teaching load of 15 semester hours. One faculty member 
holds the Ph.D. degree, one holds the M.D. degree, and four hold the master's degree 

Social Studies 

The faculty in social studies contains six full-time persons and two part-time 
persons. Two of the full-time members and one of the part-time members possess the 
earned doctorate. The other members possess the master's degree. 

Music 

The faculty of the Department of Music consists of three full-time and three 
part-time instructors. In terms of highest degrees held, one holds the Ph.D. degree 
five the master's degree, and one a B.M. degree. 


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STANDARD IV—CURRICULA 


The total enrollment of the College for the first semester of 1964-65 is 704 
students. One hundred and thirty-one of these are seniors. 

Table 1 presents data on teacher education enrollment of the 1964-65 junior 
and senior classes and the 1963-64 teacher education graduates. 

TABLE 1 

ENROLLMENT OF 1964-65 JUNIORS AND SENIORS IN TEACHER EDUCATION 
PROGRAMS AND 1963-64 TEACHER EDUCATION GRADUATES 


Area of 

Concentration 

1963-64 

Graduates 

1964-65 

Juniors 

1964-65 

Seniors 

Biology 

20 

32 

14 

Business Education 

24 

20 

12 

Chemistry 

4 

12 

6 

Elementary Education 

15 

30 

41 

English 

4 

8 

11 

French 

3 

3 

4 

History 

0 

8 

9 

Mathematics 

1 

11 

12 

Music 

6 

3 

4 

Social Studies 

34 

40 

18 


Each program of teacher education includes work in general education, subject- 
matter preparation, and professional education. In this report, required courses 
are marked with an asterisk. 

A. GENERAL EDUCATION 

The courses required in general education amount to a minimum of 64 hours and a 
maxi m um of 76 hours, or approximately 53 to 63 percent of a basic four-year program. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should assure that all teachers are able to read , 
write, and speak the English language clearly and effectively . 

^'English 101-102 Freshman English 6 s.h. 


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•^-English 201 


Fundamentals of Speech 


3 s.h. 


^English 202 


Advanced English Composition 
Developmental Reading 


3 s.h. 


Entering freshmen who place in the upper four sections of Freshman English 
are required to take Developmental Reading, meeting three times weekly for two 
semesters. 

Entering freshmen who score below the cut-off level on the English placement 
test are assigned to a non-credit remedial program for one semester. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should develop a critical understanding of and a 
sensitiveness to the aesthetic, philosophical, ethical, and imaginative values 

expressed in literature, art, music, religion, and philosophy . 


■^Humanities 306-307 


^English 209-210 

^-Religion 101-102 

French 101-102 
or 

German 101-102 


Survey of Humanities 


World Literature 


Old and New Testament Bible 


Elementary French 


Elementary German 


6 s.h. 
6 s.h. 
6 s.h. 

6 s.h. 


French 121-122 
or 

German 121-122 


Intermediate French 


Intermediate German 


6 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should develop an understanding of the development of 
world civilization, an understanding of the basic concepts of the social studies and 

an understanding of democracy as a way of life . 

-*12 s.h. to be taken from the following courses: 


Sociology 101-102 
History 103-104 
Political Science 101 


Introduction to Social Science 


American History 


6 s.h, 


6 s.h, 


Introduction to Political Science 3 s.h. 


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Economics 201-202 Principles of Economics 6 s.h. 

History 203-204 English History 6 s.h. 

History 101-102 World History 6 s.h. 

History 201 Ancient History 3 s.h. 

Sociology 121 Principles of Sociology 3 s.h. 

History 202 Medieval History 3 s.h. 

Sociology 122 Social Disorganization 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should develop an appreciation and understanding of the 
structure of science, of scientific inquiry, and of the main scientific principles . 

-“-One of the following: 

Biology 101-102 General Biology 8 s.h. 

Chemistry 101-102 General Chemistry 8 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should develop an appreciation of the structure and 
applications of mathematics . 

-“-One of the following: 

Mathematics 101-102 Introduction to Mathematics 6 s.h. 

Mathematics 103-104 College Algebra 6 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should develop the knowledge, habits, and attitudes 
necessary to achieve and maintain sound physical and mental health . 

-“-Physical Education 101-102 Physical Education Practice 0 s.h. 

^-Physical Education 107-108 Physical Education Practice 0 s.h. 

-“"Physical Education 103 Principles of Health 2 s.h. 

The following deviations were reported for prospective music teachers: 

1. Prospective music teachers complete English Composition and Speech but 
do not take Advanced Composition. 


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2. Prospective music teachers complete 9 s.h. of humanities and world 
literature. Other areas pursue 12 s.h. 

The difference in hours is justified by the fact that music students 
study the music phase of the Humanities Course by taking 6 s.h. of 
music history. 

3. Prospective music teachers complete 3 s.h. of Introduction to Mathematics., 
other areas demand 6 s.h. 


B. SUBJECT-MATTER AREAS 

1. Elementary School Teachers 

The prospective elementary school teacher must complete 35 semester hours 
(29 s.h. in required courses and 6 s.h. in the area of concentration) in addition 
to the courses required for general education. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide an understanding of the process of 
learning to read, to speak and to write the English language clearly and effectively , 

and should develop sensitiveness to and love and enthusiasm for good literature . 


^English 101-102 

Freshman English 

6 s.h. 

^English 201-202 

Speech^ Advanced Composition 

6 s.h. 

-“-English 408-409 

Children's Literature 

2 s.h. 

-“-English 208-209 

World Literature 

6 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide a knowledge and understanding of the 
social, political, geographical, and economic forces which operate in society; an 

understanding of government organization and functions; and an appreciation of the 

conservation of our natural resources . 

-^History 103-104 American History 6 s.h. 


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-^Geography 101-102 Principles, Regional 6 s.h. 

-^Political Science 

201 or 202 Government 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide a knowledge of basic physical and 
biological science content, and ability to plan a logical sequence of science 

experiences for the several grade levels . 

■--Biology 101-102 General Biology 8 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should include study in mathematics which would 
involve consideration of the structure of the real number system and its subsystems 

and the basic concepts of algebra and informal geometry . 

^Mathematics 101-102 Introduction to Mathematics 6 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should develop a sound philosophy of art education , 
appreciation of color and form, and creative ability in several art media . 


^■Humanities 306-307 

Humanities 

6 s.h. 

■-'Art 301 

Drawing and Sketching 

3 s.h. 

■-'Art 302 

Industrial Arts 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 6: The program 

should provide a background of music 

fundamentals. 

■-■Music 101-102 

Elementary Musicianship 

6 s.h. 

■-■Music 111-112 

Piano 

2 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 7: The program 

should provide understanding of both 

the health and 

physical needs of children at various grade levels. 


■-■Physical Education 103 

Principles of Health 

2 s.h. 

■-Physical Education 304 

Practices and Procedures in 

Health and Physical Education 
in Elementary Schools 

4 s.h. 


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GUIDELINE 8: The program should provide an opportunity to develop a subject 


concentration . 

Prospective elementary teachers may secure a subject concentration of 6 s.h. 
in one of the following: 

Languages (Spanish or French) 

Psychology (Abnormal and Adolescent) 

Music (Band, Choir, Piano) 

2. Secondary School Teachers 

Business Education 

The preparation required for a prospective business education teacher consists 
of from 40 to 42 semester hours in addition to the general education and professional 
education programs. The subject-matter preparation comprises from 33 to 35 percent of 
a basic four-year program. 

Comprehensive Business 

Courses are- related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should assure job competency in secretarial and related 


office skills . 

-“'Business Education 201-202 Gregg Shorthand 6 s.h. 

-“'Business Education 205-206 Stenography and Transcription 6 s.h. 

'“'Business Education 101-102 Beginner's Typing (required only 

for those who have had no previous 
typewriting) 2 s.h. 

•“•Business Education 103 Intermediate Typing 2 s.h. 

-“-Business Education 104 Advanced Typing 2 s.h, 

-“-Business Education 402 Office Practice (includes machines 

and 40 hours of field work) 3 s.h. 

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GUIDELINE 2: The program should include study at the college level in the 


business areas identified as integral parts of the high school . 

-"-Business Education 209 Foundations of Business Education 3 s.h. 


•^Economics 101-102 Principles of Economics 6 s.h. 

^'Business Education 301-302 Principles of Accounting 6 s.h. 

^Business Education 401 Office Management 3 s.h. 

-"-Business Education 306-307 Retailing (with 9 hours of 

field work) 6 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide a culminating experience, bringing 
together theory, skills, and practice . 

-"-Business Education 402 Office Practice (with 40 hours 

of field work) 3 s.h. 

-"-Business Education 306-307 Retailing (with 9 hours of 

field work) 6 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide sufficient preparation for later pursuit 
of graduate study . 

The required courses provide a foundation for graduate study. 

Basic Business 

"The program in basic business is essentially the same as for comprehensive 
business." Under Guideline 1* for basic business, shorthand would be excluded, and 
under Guideline 2, greater emphasis placed upon business, economics, and accounting 
than in the program for comprehensive business. 

In order to meet the requirements of basic business 12 semester hours chosen 
from the courses below must be taken in lieu of the 12 semester hours of shorthand 
listed under Guideline 1 for comprehensive business. 

Business Education 303 Intermediate Accounting 3 s.h. 


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Business 

Education 

310 

Business Mathematics 

3 

s.h. 

Business 

312 


Business Law 

3 

s.h. 

Business 

Education 

405 

Principles of Insurance 

3 

s.h. 

Economics 

B4 


Statistics 

3 

s.h. 

Economics 

B7 


Comparative Economics 






Systems and Government 

3 

s.h. 

Economics 

301 


Money and Banking 

3 

s.h. 

Economics 

302 


Consumer Economics 

3 

s.h. 

Economics 

401 


Economic Theory 

3 

s.h. 

Economics 

402 


Labor Economics 

3 

s.h. 


English 

The subject-matter preparation program for a prospective teacher of English 
includes a total of 39 semester hours, approximately 33 percent of a basic four-year 
program. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide specialized study at the college 
level in the areas of the high school curriculum to be taught . 

Language 

--'English 403 Advanced Grammar 3 s.h. 

Each English major is required to take English 101 and 102, Freshman English, 

6 s.h,; English 201, Fundamentals of Speech, 3 s.h.; and English 202, Advanced 
Composition, 3 s.h. These, however, are not counted toward the major in English 
because they are required general education courses for all students. 

The course in Advanced Grammar includes a brief study of the history of the 


English language. 


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Literature 


■^'English 203-204 

English Literature 

6 s .h. 

■'English 301-302 

American Literature 

6 s.h. 

■“'English 303 

Introduction to Drama 

3 s.h. 

^'English 304 

Romantic Literature 

3 s.h. 

■“'English 401 

Shakespeare 

3 s.h. 

-“-English 404 

-“-Two of the following: 

Victorian Literature 

3 s.h. 

English 305 

Chaucer 

3 s.h. 

English 402 

Eighteenth Century Literature 

3 s.h. 

English 406 

The Novel. 

3 s.h. 

English 407 

Contemporary Literature 

3 s.h. 

The English major is 

required also to study Humanities 306 

-307, Survey of 

Humanities, 6 s.h., a course which emphasizes world literature. 

Because the course 

is required in the general education program for all students, 

part of the subject-matter concentration. 

Language and Literature Skills 

it is not counted as 

-“-English 405 

The Interpretation of Poetry 

2 s.h. 


All courses in literature require the student to prepare critical or research 


papers. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should lead to excellence in written and oral 
expression . 

All courses in literature require discussion by the students and require 
critical or research papers. The major must earn a minimum of "C" in each English 


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course which he is required to take. The major must take English 201, Fundamentals 
of Speech, and 202, Advanced Composition, as part of the general education program. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide study and training at the college 
level in the areas of reading . 

•^"English 405 Interpretation of Poetry 2 s.h. 

The 110 freshmen who score highest on the English placement test are required 
to take Developmental Reading, 6 s.h. Any interested major may serve as an 
assistant in the Reading Laboratory. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should lead to a knowledge of the importance of 
libraries. 

In English 101-102, Freshman English, 6 s.h., the student is assigned exercises 
and papers which require his using the library. Orientation 101, Orientation, 0 s.h., 
offers the freshman instruction in the use of the library. The research papers 
assigned in literature courses require the use of the library. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide sufficient preparation for later 
graduate work in English , 

Required courses plus electives form a base for later graduate study in English. 

Foreign Language 

(French) 

The preparation of a prospective teacher of French consists of 39 semester 
hours, or approximately 33 percent of a basic four-year program. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should include a thorough college level study of the 
various aspects of foreign language to be taught . 

■^French 101-102 Elementary French (or two years 

of high school French) 6 s.h. 


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-^French 201-202 


Intermediate French 

6 s.h. 

-"'French 203-204 


History of French Civilization 

6 s.h. 

-“-French 303 


French Composition and Grammar 

3 s.h. 

-“-French 301-302 


Introduction to French Literature 6 s.h. 

-“-French 305 


Intermediate Conversation 
and Oral Practice 

3 s.h. 

-“-French 403 


Advanced Composition 

3 s.h. 

-“-French 405 


Advanced Conversation 

3 s.h. 

-“-French 410 


French Literature Since 
the Revolution 

3 s.h. 

French 408 


French Literature of the 
Seventeenth Century 

3 s.h. 

French 409 


French Literature of the 
Eighteenth Century 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The 

program should develop competency in four 

skills—understanding 

speaking, reading, and writing. 



-“-French 201-202 


Intermediate French 

6 s.h. 

-“-French 303 


French Composition and Grammar 

3 s.h. 

-“-French 305 


Intermediate Conversation 
and Oral Practice 

3 s.h. 

-“-French 403 


Advanced Composition 

3 s.h. 

•^French 405 


Advanced Conversation 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The 

program 

should provide sufficient emphasis 

in language 

analysis. 




-“-French 201-202 


Intermediate French 

6 s.h. 

-“-French 303 


French Composition and Grammar 

3 s.h. 


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--Trench 305 

Intermediate Conversation 
and Oral Practice 

3 s.h. 

•^French 403 

Advanced Composition 

3 soh. 

---French 405 

Advanced Conversation 

3 s.h. 

-"-English 403 

Advanced Grammar 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The 

program should include a study of the literature, and 

civilization of the country concerned. 


---French 203-204 

History of French Civilization 

6 s.h. 

---French 301-302 

Introduction to French Literature 

6 s,h. 

•’"-French 410 

French Literature 

Since the Revolution 

3 s.h. 

French 408 

French Literature of the 
Seventeenth Century 

3 s.h. 

French 409 

French Literature of the 

Eighteenth Century 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The 

program should provide sufficient preparation for later 


pursuit of graduate work in the foreign language . 

For graduate study in French, the student should take the required 33 hours 
and French 408 and 409. A second foreign language is strongly recommended. 

Mathematics 

The subject-matter preparation for a prospective mathematics teacher includes 
a minimum requirement of 30 semester hours or 25 percent of a basic four-year program. 
Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should take into consideration the sequential nature 
of mathematics and should provide the prospective teacher an understanding of some 

of the aspects of mathematics which his students will meet in subsequent courses . 


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--Mathematics 

121-122 

College Algebra 

6 s.h. 

-^-Mathematics 

201 

Trigonometry 

3 s.h. 

-x-Mat hematics 

203 

Foundations of Mathematics 

3 s.h. 

-x-Mathematics 

202 

Analytic Geometry 

3 s.h. 

-x-Mathematics 

301-302 

Differential and Ingegral Calculus 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: 

The program 

of mathematics should include a 

thorough college- 

level studv of the subjects in 

mathematics included in the high school curriculum. 

-x-Mathematics 

303 

Linear Algebra 

3 s.h. 

-^Mathematics 

304 

Modern Algebra 

3 s.h. 

-x-Mathematics 

403 

Modern Geometry 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: 

The program 

should include additional upper- 

-level work in 

mathematics, with courses chosen for their relevance to the high school curriculum 

-x-Mathematics 

304 

Modern Algebra 

3 s.h. 

Mathematics 

205 

Elementary Statistics 

3 s.h. 

-x-Mathematics 

203 

Foundations of Mathematics 

3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 4: The program should include work in areas related to mathematics . 

Chemistry 101-102 General Chemistry 

-x- or 8 s.h. 

Physics 101-102 General Physics 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should include sufficient preparation for the later 

pursuit of graduate work in mathematics . 

Mathematics 401-402 Integral Calculus and 

Differential Equations 6 s.h. 

Science 

The subject-matter preparation program for a prospective science teacher includes 
79 semester hours for students concentrating in biology certification, and 73 semester 


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hours for students concentrating in chemistry certification. This includes 40 
semester hours of science listed under General Education. Subject-matter preparation 
includes 40-46 hours, or approximately 37 percent of a basic four-year program. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should take into account the necessity of having a 
broad foundation in biological and physical sciences and mathematics . 

Courses are related to Guideline 1 as follows: 


--Chemistry 101-102 

General Chemistry 

8 s .h. 

---Physics 101-102 

General Physics 

8 s .h. 

---Mathematics 103-104 

Mathematics-College Algebra 

6 s.h. 

---Mathematics 201 

Trigonometry 

3 s.h. 

---Physics 101-102 

Physics 


If biology is elected as 

the area of concentration, the following are required 

---Biology 204 

Botany 

4 s.h. 

--Mathematics 205 

Statistics 

3 s.h. 

If chemistry is elected 

as the area of concentration, the following is 

required: 



--Biology 101-102 

General Biology 

8 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should have depth in at least one area of science, 

with courses chosen for maximum relevance to the high school science 

curriculum. 

If biology is selected, 

the following courses are required for 

the program 

in depth: 



---Biology 202 

Comparative Anatomy 

8 s.h. 

---Biology 401 

Physiology 

4 s.h. 

---Biology 305 

Seminar in Biology 

1 s.h. 


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^-Biology 103 

General Biology 

4 s.h. 

In addition to the above. 

the student may elect from the following: 

Biology 304 

Micro-biology 

4 s.h. 

Biology 206 

Parasitology (Alternate years) 

4 s.h. 

Biology 301 

Histology (Alternate years) 

4 s.h. 

Biology 302 

Vertebrate Embryology 

4 s.h. 

Biology 303 

Genetics 

4 s.h. 

Biology 402 

Experimental Biology 

2 s.h. 

If chemistry is selected 

the following courses are required 

for the program 

depth: 



--‘Chemistry 301 

Organic Chemistry 

5 s.h. 

-^'-Chemistry 302 

Organic Chemistry 

5 s.h. 

-"-Chemistry 201 

Qualitative Analysis 

5 s.h. 

--Chemistry 202 

Quantitative Analysis 

5 s.h. 


In addition to the above the student may elect from the following: 

Chemistry 401-402 Physical Chemistry 8 s.h. 

Chemistry 404 Biological Chemistry 4 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should include a sufficient basis and preparation for 
later graduate study in a particular science area . 

The required courses and electives in both chemistry and biology form the 
basis for the pursuit of graduate courses. 

Social Studies 

Preparation in the teaching area of the social studies includes a total of 48 
semester hours, or approximately 40 percent of the prospective teacher's total 


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undergraduate program, developed in accordance with the following guidelines: 
GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide a study in depth, at the college 


level, of courses included in the high school curriculum. 



■--History 101-102 

World History 

6 

s .h. 

■-■History 103-104 

American History 

6 

s .h. 

---History 201 

Ancient History 

3 

s .h. 

■-■History 303-304 

European History 

6 

s .h. 

■-■History 202 

Medieval History 

3 

s .h. 

■-‘History 302 

Recent U. S. History 

3 

s .h. 

History 203-204 

English History 

6 

s .h. 

History 301 

U. S. Diplomatic History 

3 

s. h. 

History 401 

Peoples of Africa 

3 

s .h. 

History 490 

Honors Course 

3 

s .h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should take into account the 

necessity of having 

breadth in the social studies. 




i 

■-■Sociology 201 

Principles of Sociology 

3 

s .h. 

■-■Sociology 202 

Social Disorganization 

3 

s .h. 

■-■Sociology 210 

Anthropology 

3 

s .h. 

■-■Economics 201-202 

Principles of Economics 

6 

s .h. 

-■Geography 101 

Principles of Geography 

3 

s .h. 

■-■Geography 102 

Regional Geography 

3 

s .h. 

■-Political Science 201-202 

American Government 

6 

s .h. 

Electives vary according to 

the area of concentration. 



Sociology 201 

Social Statistics 

3 

s.h. 


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Sociology 

220 


Marriage and the Family 

3 

s .h. 

Sociology 

230 


American Minority Groups 

3 

s .h. 

Sociology 

301 


Social Welfare 

3 

s .h. 

Sociology 

310 


Urban Sociology 

3 

s .h. 

Sociology 

320 


Human Ecology 

3 

s .h. 

Sociology 

330 


Social Psychology 

3 

s .h. 

Sociology 

340 


Criminology 

3 

s .h. 

Sociology 

350-351 


Sociological Theory 

6 

s .h. 

Sociology 

360 


Social Research 

3 

s .h. 

Sociology 

490 


Honors Course 

3 

s .h. 

Political 

Science 

101 

Introduction to Political Science 

3 

s .h. 

Political 

Science 

301 

Comparative Government 

3 

s .h. 

Economics 

B4 


Statistics 

3 

s .h. 

Economics 

B7 


Comparative Economic Systems 
and Government 

3 

s .h. 

Economics 

301 


Money and Banking 

3 

s .h. 

Economics 

302 


Consumer Economics 

3 

s .h. 

Economics 

401 


Economic Theory 

3 

s .h. 

Economics 

402 


Labor Economics 

3 

s .h. 

GUIDELINE 

3: The 

oro£ram 

should enable the prospective social 

studies 


to pursue graduate studies in one or more areas in the field of social studies . 

The requirements for a concentration in history and sociology are considered 
adequate as a base for later graduate study in history. 


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The 24 semester hours required for a concentration in economics may need to 
be supplemented by additional work to have an adequate base for later graduate 
study in economics. 


Music 

The subject-matter preparation program for a prospective music teacher includes 
approximately 59 semester hours, or approximately 50 percent of a basic four-year 
program. 


GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide for a knowledge of the structural 


elements of music . 

-“-Music 103-104 
-“-Music 203-204 
-“-Music 303 
-“-Music 304 
-“Music 403 
-“-Music 404 


Elementary Musicianship 
Intermediate Musicianship 


Advaneed Musicianship 


Counterpoint 


Form and Analysis 


No credit 
6 s.h. 

3 s.h. 

3 s.h. 

3 s.h. 


Arranging (Vocal and Instrumental) 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide opportunities to acquire a sensitivity 
to and a critical awareness of the aesthetic elements of musical performance . 

“-Music 141-142 


*Music 131-132 


'-Music 121-122 


“‘Music 161-162 


Piano (Major subject) 
Piano (Minor subject) 

Voice (Major subject) 
Voice (Minor subject) 

String Class 

Wind and Percussion 
Instrument Class 


16 s.h. 
8 s.h. 

16 s.h. 
6 s.h. 

2 s.h. 


2 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide a comprehensive understanding of music 


history and literature covering the various eras of music . 


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The following is the relationship of the professional education courses to 
the guidelines: 

GUIDELINE 1: The professional education program should provide an under¬ 
standing of the normal sequences of human growth and development, with special 
emphasis on the pupils of the school age to be taught . 

GUIDELINE 2: The professional education program should provide an understanding 
of the nature of learning, the learning process, and the psychology of learning . 


Elementary Education 

-^Psychology 204 Educational Psychology 3 s.h. 

-''-Psychology 205 Child Psychology 3 s.h. 

High School 

---Psychology 204 Educational Psychology 3 s.h. 

•^-Psychology 301 Adolescent Psychology 3 s.h. 

Psychology 201 Introduction to Psychology 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The professional education program should provide an under ¬ 
standing of methods, special techniques, and materials appropriate to the specific 
levels or areas of the prospective teacher’s sub.Iect-matter concentration, and skill 

in applying them in a classroom situation . 

Elementary 

---Education 217 Arithmetic in Elementary School 2 s.h. 

---Education 209 or 210 Social Studies in Elementary School 2 s.h. 

---Education 216 Language Arts in Elementary School 2 s.h. 

---Music 307 Music Methods 3 s.h* 

---Physical Education 304 Health and Physical Education 4 s.h. 


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•--Education 211 Elementary Science 2 s.h. 

■-'Education 200 Tests and Measurements 3 s.h. 

High School 

One of the following courses is required, according to area: 

Education 217 Science Methods 3 s.h. 

Education 219 Mathematics Methods 3 s.h. 

Education 220 Teaching of Business Subjects 3 s.h. 

Education 215 English Methods 3 s.h. 

Education 216 Language Methods 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The professional education program should provide understanding 
of the purpose, organization, and administration of school systems, with special 

emphasis on the role of the school teacher in the total education program . 

Elementary 

■-■Education 204 School and Class Organization 3 s.h. 

■-■Library Science 301 Library Science 6 s.h. 

High School 

■-■Education 202 Principles of High 

School Teaching 3 s.h. 

■-■Education 203 Jr.-Sr. High School 

Administration and Organization 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The professional education program should provide a broad 

historical, philosophical, and sociological orientation to schools in our society 

and to the profession of teaching . 

Elementary 

■-■Education 205 Principles and Problems 3 s 0 h. 


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-''-Education 101 Introduction to Education 3 s.h. 

High School 

-^Education 201 Principles and Problems 

of Secondary Education 3 s.h, 

-''-Education 101 Introduction to Education 3 s.h. 

_ H- 

GUIDELINE 6: The professional education program should provide an extended 
period of continuous full-time student teaching experience in the grade levels or 

subjects to be taught . 

Elementary 


-''-Education 

300 

Directed Observation 

3 

s.h. 

-''-Education 

301 

Apprenticed Teaching 

3 

s.h. 



High School 



-''-Education 

400 

Directed Observation 

3 

s.h. 

-''-Education 

401 

Apprenticed Teaching 

3 

s.h. 


45 - 





















































































































STANDARD V--PROFESSTONAL LABORATORY EXPERIENCES 


The purposes and objectives of teacher education as stated in the college 
catalog are extended in the self-study to include purposes and objectives for 
professional laboratory experiences, 

A, LABORATORY EXPERIENCES PRIOR TO STUDENT TEACHING 

Prospective student teachers in elementary education engage in limited first¬ 
hand observational experiences at a nearby school. The controlled situations for 
prospective student teachers in secondary education are limited to simulated 
experiences in on-campus courses. 

B. ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF STUDENT TEACHING 

The Chairman of the Division of Education and Psychology also serves as Director 
of Student Teaching and as the general college supervisor of student teachers in 
secondary education. Another member of the division is primarily responsible for 
the supervision of student teachers in elementary education. There is considerable 
variation in the amount of supervision by methods teachers in secondary education. 

At present, the college requires a minimum average of "C" in the teaching area 
to qualify for admission to student teaching. Projected standards (applicable to 
entering freshmen, 1963-64) include a 1.50 overall average of a 3.00 scale in 
addition to the basal requirement in the teaching area. 

At present, the student teaching experience is of six weeks duration and yields 
three semester hours credit. 

Student teaching in elementary education is done in either semester of the 
senior year. Except for occasional irregular students, secondary student teachers 
do their work during the second semester. 


- 46 - 















































A total of 90 students did student teaching during the 1963-64 school year. 

Of this number, 16 were in elementary education and 74 were in secondary education. 

The college supervisor in elementary education visited 12 of the student teachers 
in that area at the reported rate of "at least" one visit per student teacher. The 
Director of Student Teaching visited 69 of the student teachers in secondary education 
at the reported rate of "at least" one visit per student teacher. 

Student teaching comes last in the sequence of professional education courses. 

All cooperating schools are accredited by the state in which students are assigned 
for student teaching. (Five of the 1963-64 student teachers were assigned to schools 
in border states.) 

Cooperating teachers must have a minimum of three years of teaching experience 
and hold a Class A or Graduate Certificate. 

Individual and group evaluation conferences involving student teachers, the 
Director of Student Teaching and methods teachers are held upon the completion of 
the student teaching experience. During the 1963-64 school year, the evaluation 
procedure was expanded to include a joint conference of college personnel in pro¬ 
fessional education and cooperating teachers and principals. 

The college envisions continued involvement of personnel in the cooperating 
schools in evaluation procedures and an increase in the length of the student teaching 
experience from six weeks to a minimum of eight weeks. 


- 47 - 










































’ 





STANDARD VI—FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND MATERIALS 
A. FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND MATERIALS FOR PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

The Division of Education-Psychology is presently housed in Ballard Hall. 

This building was constructed in 1887 and the general condition reflects its 
longevity. 

1. Offices and Related Facilities and Services 

Each of the four full-time faculty members of the division has a private 
office. The chairman of the division has a large office which also serves as a 
conference room for small committee meetings. One full-time secretary serves the 
chairman and will also serve as custodian for the Curriculum Laboratory. Each 
faculty member is assigned a student who is employed on a part-time basis for 
secretarial services. The academicians who teach the methods courses have offices 
in Ballard Hall, Price Memorial Hall, or Varick Auditorium. 

A mimeograph and a duplicator, located in the chairman's office, are available 
for use by faculty members in the division. 

2. Classrooms 

Four classrooms in Ballard Hall are devoted exclusively to the professional 
education program. Each classroom is equipped with student desks, chalkboard, 
bulletin board, and teacher's desk and chair. One classroom has several cabinets 
for storage use. The four classrooms seat 33, 35, 40, and 30 students. The methods 
courses are taught by academicians in classrooms located in Ballard Hall, Price 
Memorial Hall, or Varick Auditorium. 

3. Special Facilities 

In addition to s ma ll classrooms, 10 rooms located in various buildings on the 
campus are used for small groups and seminars. These rooms include such facilities 


■ 48 - 



































































as conference rooms, lounges, recreation rooms, audiovisual room, and small rooms 
located in the new auditorium, A study room is provided in each of two dormitories. 

A completely equipped language laboratory is maintained in Price Memorial Hall. 

The laboratory consists of 24 semi-soundproof booths and a master console and is 
available for use of the various departments of the College. 

A Cooperative English-Reading Laboratory Program was established and began 
operation at the beginning of the current academic year. This program is designed 
to raise the general reading levels of freshman students through a one-year period 
of intensive instruction in reading. In Price Hall, one room has been equipped with 
diagnostic material and instructional materials and devices. A second room is 
also used in the program. The diagnostic material includes various standardized 
tests, diagnostic tests, and inventories. Mechanical devices include five rateometers, 
one tachistoscope, one controlled reader, one tape recorder, and one automatic elapsed 
time indicator. Various worktexts are available and used in the program. 

4. Audiovisual Aids and Facilities 

Although some audiovisual aids are available in the division, most aids are 

kept in the main library. The following aids are available in the audiovisual room 

in the library: 

2 Record players 
2 Tape recorders 
1 Opaque projector 
1 Filmstrip projector 
1 Motion picture projector 
1 Microfilm reader 
5 Films (16mm) 

5 Filmstrips, including a Teacher Education Series 

Two other motion picture projectors are available in other locations. 


- 49 - 
















































In addition to the audiovisual room located in the library and the main 
auditorium in Varick Auditorium, there are seven other rooms which are equipped 
to some extent for audiovisual purposes, 

5, New Facilities 

The teacher education program, as well as the entire College program, is 
enhanced by a modern well--equipped auditorium and a new student center. The student 
center houses a cafeteria, a bookstore, a post office, and a student lounge, 

B. LIBRARY RESOURCES 

Library resources are housed in Carnegie Library. The resources include a 
total of 52,000 volumes, a photocopy machine, standard periodicals and reference 
books, a limited number of curriculum guides and North Carolina textbooks, and the 
majority of audiovisual aids equipment available for instructional purposes. 

1. Books and Materials in Professional Education and Subject-Matter Areas 

The following breakdown on the number of books in professional education and 
various disciplines was given in the Self-Study Report: 


Subject-Matter Area 


Number of Books 
Stack Material 


Professional Education 
Elementary Education 
Methods 

Secondary Education 
Psychology 
Social Science 
History 

Political Science 
Economics 

Business Education 
Natural Science 
Chemistry 
Physics 

Biological Sciences 


806 

327 

178 

132 

445 

493 

1254 

495 

683 

240 

134 

244 

95 

278 


- 50 - 



















































































Zoology 

134 

Botany 

86 

Geography 

98 

Mathematics 

198 

Earth Science 

15 

English and Humanities 

414 

Spanish 

88 

French 

513 

German 

171 

Music 

234 


The Self-Study Report also included the following summary of books and 
materials present in the library,. The first column shows the number of books 
listed in Classified List of References Books and Periodicals for College Libraries 
recommended by the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. The 
second column shows the number of reference books present. The other columns show 


the number of other materials present. 



No. of 

Reference 

Books on List 

Reference 

Books 

Present 

Curriculum 

Studies 

Books on 
Methods of 
Teaching 

Music 

46 

20 

- 

- 

English 

153 

77 

1 

4 

Elementary Education 

52 

14 

1 

143 

Social Science 

40 

12 

1 

4 

Business Education 

- 

14 

1 

9 

Chemistry 

50 

15 

1 Science 

1 

Biology 

- 

9 

- 

1 

Mathematics 

17 

12 

1 

9 

French 

32 

14 

1 Foreign 2 

Languages 

History 

86 

34 

- 

11 


- 51 - 
















































































There are one or more copies of 84 textbooks used in the public schools of 
North Carolina in the library. 

Periodicals present are as follows: 


Professional Education 

34 

Elementary Education 

7 

Psychology 

5 

Social Science 

5 

History 

24 

Political Science 

19 

Economics 

4 

Business Education 

15 

Chemistry 

2 

Science 

11 

English and Humanities 

42 

French 

5 

Music 

1 


The following 1 Foundation reports were listed: 

6 Professional Education reports 
5 Elementary Education reports 
5 Secondary Education reports 

Carnegie Library is also on the mailing list of the United States Superintendent 
of Documents and receives 27 documents and pamphlets in the area of professional 
education. 

2. Audiovisual Aids 


In addition to the audiovisual aids and equipment previously listed in this 

report for professional education, the following materials are available in the 

library in other subject areas for requisition by the various departments. 

Social Science—a monthly subscription to the filmstrip series, "Current 

Affairs" of the New York Times , with 90 filmstrips on hand. 

Life Series - 5 filmstrips 
Recordings - 2 

Political Science - 27 filmstrips 


- 52 - 







































Science - 12 filmstrips 
Humanities: 

Music - 150 recordings 

Religious Education - 12 filmstrips 

3. Library Budget for Teacher Education 

The library budget for teacher education is integrated with other departments. 

An allocation of library funds for purchase of new books is made each year. In the 

most recent allocation, the funds, out of a total budget of $4,500.00, were allotted 

by divisions as follows: 


Social Sciences 

$1,028,00 

Natural Sciences 

488.00 

Humanities 

1,396.00 

Education and Psychology 

1,208.00 


$4,120,00 


Of the $1,208.00 allotted to the Division of Education-Psychology, $344.00 
was designated for education. The remainder was designated for the other departments 
in the division. 

In practice, each department sends in a request for books desired in the 
library collection to the librarian, who actually determines books which are ordered 
and added to the collection. Funds allotted to each department are used by the 
librarian in securing additions to the basic collection, 

C. MATERIALS LABORATORY 

The College did not have a facility serving as a curriculum laboratory prior 
to the current school year. A materials center is being established in a room set 
aside and equipped for this purpose in Ballard Hall. At the present time the only 
materials which have been secured and placed in the materials center are the current 


- 53 - 






































































textbooks for the elementary and secondary schools in North Carolina. Plans call 
for a full-time person to be responsible for the operation of the center. It was 
reported, however, that the secretary to the Chairman of the Division of Education- 
Psychology would be the person responsible for the center. 

The long range plans are to equip the center in terms of the guidelines, but 
details of the plan including regulations and procedures for use of the center have 
not been developed. Financial support for securing books for the center will come 
largely from funds allocated to the library for education. 

D. DEPARTMENTAL BUDGET FOR EDUCATION 

The usual procedure is for the Chairman of the Division of Education-Psychology 
to file a requisition for needed materials and supplies to the Dean of the College, 
Although a specific allocation of funds is not made to the divisions, the Dean does 
receive a sum each year for instruction from which the remainder after salaries is 
allotted by departments and divisions to guide the Dean in considering requests 
for expenditures. 

Subsequent to the visit, the College submitted a summary of budgets of the 
various departments for 1964-65. This summary is given in Appendix B. 

E. CONTEMPLATED CHANGES 

A study of building needs was made in 1961 to establish projected needs for 
the 10 years, 1961-1970. The plans projected the need for a student union-dining 
hall, two dormitories for women, an auditorium-music building, a science building, 
a student health service center, a dormitory for men, an education-social science 
communications center, and a health-physical education building. The student union¬ 
dining hall, one dormitory for women, and the auditorium-music building have been 


- 54 - 









































































built and a,re in use. The science building is scheduled to be completed during 
1965-66, and plans are in the final stages for construction of the education-social 
science communication center, probably during 1966-67, 

F. FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND MATERIALS FOR ACADEMIC AREAS 

Business Education 

There are three classrooms used for business education, (Economics is housed 
in another building,) One faculty member is sharing an office with two other people 
on the floor above the three classrooms. Another member of the department does not 
have an office but is using part of a classroom at the present time. 

One classroom is equipped with new walnut finished desk and tables. The chairs 
match the tables and are adjustable in height. In this room there are 30 Selectric 
typewriters with key punch attachments. Three multiple listening stations are 
installed in this room. The manual typewriting room is equipped with adequate tables, 
a demonstration stand, and a storage cabinet. The lecture room is equipped in an 
average manner; three bookshelves, a storage cabinet, coat rack, and a lectern. 

There is at least one file cabinet in the department. 

Other machines used for instruction are as follows: 

IBM Classroom 

30 Selectric typewriters with key punch keyboard 
3 Executive typewriters 

15 Multiple listening stations with 3 possible speeds for two students at each station 
3 Teacher controls with dictating units that may be used also as transcribing units 
3 Transcribing units 

Workroom 

2 Dictaphone sets 
1 Dictating unit (belts) 

1 Transcribing unit (belt) 

-55- 



























. 











■ 




















1 Dictating unit (practice records and wax records) 
1 Dictaphone shaving machine 
1 Basket for records 
1 Burroughs posting machine 
15 NCR 10-key adding machines 
1 Burroughs calculator 
1 Mimeoscope 

1 Pair electric scales (Retailing) 

2 Ditto machines (liquid) 

1 Rex-Rotary (stencil) 

1 Postal card duplicator 
1 Paper cutter 


Manual Laboratory 

30 Manual typewriters 
4 Electric typewriters 
2 Demonstration tables 
1 Tape recorder 
1 Record player 

The members of the business education faculty report that they are informed 
of an allotted amount of funds for supplies, equipment, and travel for each year. 

English 

The department regularly uses four classrooms in Price Hall, one in Ballard 
Hall, and has a language laboratory and a reading laboratory in Price Hall. The 
department uses other classrooms as need arises. Three of the four rooms in Price 
Hall have electrical outlets, as do the laboratories and the room in Ballard Hall. 
All of the classrooms have desks, chalk boards, and bulletin boards. 

One member of the department has no office. Two share one office, and, at 
present, three share a second office in Price Hall. One of the three is to be moved 
to Hood Hall, The teacher of reading uses a room adjoining the laboratory as an 
office. 

The department owns a record player. Other audiovisual equipment and materials 
are kept in the Audiovisual Division of the library. 


- 56 - 






















































The department is not aware of a budget for equipment or the purchase of books 
for the library. Members of the department submit requests for any equipment desired. 

The library of the College lists 414 books in the area of English and humanities. 

It also records 77 of the 153 reference books in English specified in the Classified 
List of Reference Books and Periodicals for College Libraries and houses 42 periodicals 
in the area of English. 

French 

The Foreign Language Department uses three classrooms equipped with desks, 
chairs, blackboards and electrical outlets. These are located in Price Building. 

In this building is the language laboratory, which contains 24 booths, each 
equipped with a tape recorder, controlled from a central console. This laboratory 
is shared by other departments, including speech and English. 

The three full-time teachers who teach language classes are assigned to a small 
office which contains three small desks and an electric typewriter with an international 
keyboard. 

There is a limited supply of tapes owned by the Language Department. The library 
contains books on French literature and other related materials. Many of these are 
new. 

Mathematics 

Classrooms equipped with lecterns, desks, chalkboard, and electrical outlets 
are available in the Price Building for the Mathematics Department. Two teachers are 
assigned to each office occupied by any member of the departmental faculty. 

Some films are available in the department for use in teaching, and a projector 
is available for use with them. 


- 57 - 
















' 















The main library has a fairly good collection of books for reference by the 
students and faculty. The new materials center has some of the mathematics textbooks 
used in the public schools. 

Science 

The College is planning construction of a new science building to be completed 
in 1965-66. The present facilities include three lecture classrooms and six 
laboratories (two biology, three chemistry, and one physics). Each laboratory will 
accommodate approximately 25-30 students and is equipped with standard tables and 
utility facilities. Private office space is provided for four faculty members and 
two share an office. 

Audiovisual materials, i.e,, film, filmstrip, etc., are housed in the central 
library. Film slides and other visuals are housed in the Science Department, in 
addition to scientific periodicals and publications of five years past date. 

It was stated in the Self-Study that the central library houses the following 
number of science books: 


Natural Science 

134 

Chemistry 

244 

Physics 

95 

Biological Science 

278 

Zoology 

134 

Botany 

86 

Earth Science 

15 


Social Studies 

The Division of Social Studies uses five classrooms, two in Price Building and 
three in Ballard Building. Two faculty members in history share an office in Price 
Building, and the others have offices in Ballard Hall. The Division of Social 
Studies has maps, globes, overhead projectors and other equipment suited to the program 
to use. They plan to start using tape recordings and other related materials. 


- 58 - 









































. 



























Music 


The Music Department occupies new quarters located in the rear of the new 
auditorium. There are one large classroom, two smaller classrooms, several faculty 
teaching studios, four student practice studios and a space for library and listening 
studio which has not been equipped at this date. The main library contains a minimum 
number of reference books and recordings. Individual teachers place many of their 
own books on reserve for student use. 

There is no supply of State-adopted music texts for class use. Instruments for 
band class are provided by the College. Pianos and other equipment are in good 
repair. 

Student practice rooms need acoustical treatment. Sound transmission between 
practice rooms is quite extensive. 

An inventory of college-owned instruments was reported as follows: 

1 Grand piano - auditorium 

4 Pianos (1 grand, 3 upright) - studio-classrooms 

1 Upright piano - choir-band room 

5 Upright pianos - practice rooms 

1 Organ, electronic (Wurlitzer) 

1 Stereo hi-fi record player 

2 Table model record players 

1 Portable record player 

2 Violins 

1 Viola 

1 Violincello 

1 Bass violin 

3 Trumpets 

2 Trombones 

1 Alto saxophone 

1 Tenor saxophone 

1 Baritone saxophone 

3 Alto horns 

2 Baritone horns 

2 Field snare drums 

1 Scotch space drum 

1 Bell lyre 


- 59 - 







































. 

























1 25" tympani set (pedal) 

2 C-flutes 

7 B-flat clarinets 
1 B-flat clarinet (bass) 

1 Oboe 

1 Bassoon 

2 French horns 

2 BB-flat sousaphones 
1 Concert snare drum 
1 Concert bass drum 
1 Pr„ 15" cymbals 
1 28" tympani set (pedal) 




APPENDIX A 


THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF THE 
TEACHER EDUCATION COMMITTEE 
OF LIVINGSTONE COLLEGE 


The Teacher Education Committee that aids in the preparation of teachers 
at the various levels of the educational system has among its objectives the 
following. 

Major Objectives 

To assume the major responsibility for the formulation of the policy necessary 
for the improvement of the Teacher Education Program in accordance with standards 
set forth by the State Department of Education and the policy adopted by the college. 

Specific Objectives 

1. To formulate the criteria for the entrance of students to the 
Teacher Education Program and plan for their progress while in 
it. 

2. To review periodically the cases of persons who have been dropped 
from the program. 

3. To formulate criteria for the reentrance of students to the teacher 
education program and for the elimination of those who fail to meet 
the standards. 

4. To help establish plans to facilitate the change from one major 
emphasis to another within the teacher education program by a 
student in terms of his interest, aptitude, and other traits. 

5. To encourage qualified students to enter the teaching field. 

6. To aid in the cooperation and coordination of the emphases of the 
various departments for the improvement of the teacher education 
program. 

7. To aid in the interpretation of the program on and off campus. 

8. To aid in development of the criteria for student teaching program 

as it relates to selection of cooperating schools and critic teachers. 

9. To conduct such studies as may be necessary for the improvement of 
the teacher education program. 










■ 


’ 

. 





10. To recommend equipment, library books and supplementary materials for 
the improvement of the program. 

11. To recommend curricula changes to the curriculum committee to be 
considered for recommendation to faculty for action, if such involves 
more than the teacher education curriculum, 

12. To receive and consider recommendations from divisions, departments and 
faculty members concerning curricula changes in the teacher education 
program, 

13. To provide plans for the presentation of educators and other resource 
persons for the enhancement of the program. 

14. To assist the Director in the construction of a proposed budget for Teacher 
Education. 

15. To formulate plans for the evaluation of the progress of students and the 
effectiveness of the over-all program. 

16. To formulate plans for the follow-up of graduates in the field through 
conferences and correspondence. 

17. To cause the minutes of each meeting to be recorded and distributed to 
its members, Dean of Instruction and the President. 

Membership 

The membership of the committee consists of one or more representatives of 
each department that offers a major leading to a North Carolina Teachers Certificate, 
and others who may be appointed. 

Relation 


The committee submits its recommendations concerning changes in the teacher 
education curriculum to the curriculum committee when such changes effect other 
curricula and makes periodic reports to the faculty. 


The Director of the Teacher Education Program 

The Director serves as chairman of the Teacher Education Committee, and in 
this capacity executes the policies formulated by the committee. In this relationship 
he: 


(1) gives leadership to the program 

(2) serves as liaison between committee and the administration 





























































(3) aids in the organization of the committee for economy of time and 
effectiveness 

(4) assumes leadership role in the construction of proposed budget for 
teacher education 

(5) arranges placement for student teachers through the offices of 
superintendents and principals of cooperating schools 

(6) serves as one of the supervisors of student teachers 

(7) informs faculty, in cooperation with the Dean's office, of the names 
of student teachers and their places of assignment during the student 
teaching period 

(8) keeps up-to-date statistical reports on the student teaching program 

(9) serves as liaison between the Division of Education and Psychology and 
the Office of the Registrar in developing the institutional recommendation 
certifying to the State Department of Instruction that the candidate has 
completed the teacher education program and is recommended by the institution 
for certification 

(10) disseminates information pertaining to the teacher education program 

(11) provides guidance, in cooperation with major advisors, to students who 
have been admitted to the teacher education program. 












' 









APPENDIX B 


SUMMARY OF BUDGETS OF THE VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS 
LIVINGSTONE COLLEGE 
1964-65 


The following constitutes a division of the over-all instructional budget 
that has been supervised previously by the Dean of Instruction, and from which 
teachers' requests have been almost entirely granted. 

It is to be noted that capital expenditures have not been included and that 
large amounts allocated to Business and Teacher Education were from foundation 
grants in part. 

Obviously, the separate budgets under which the Public Relations Office, 
the Registrars Office and other administrative offices have operated in the past 
are not included below. The summaries include student labor, office supplies, 
office equipment, postage, program equipment, telephone, travel and laboratory 
supplies in the main. 


DEPARTMENT 

BUDGET 

Business Education (including laboratory) 

$14,500.00 

Modern Foreign Language 

557.50 

Mathematics 

303.00 

Chemistry 

5,152.80 

History, Political Science, Geography 

3,000.00 

Music (including festival) 

3,000.00 

Biology 

4,938.00 

Sociology 

530.00 

Division of Education - Elementary & Secondary 

(including curriculum laboratory, and Reading Program) 

18,500.00 

Dean's Office 

3,100.00 


Most of the budgets of the above departments might be added to the budget of the 
Education Division since these support the majors. 






S T A J1.!r! B . RARY 0F N0RTH CAROLINA 



llll I L. 

3 3091 00820 4968