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REPORT TO 

STATE EVALUATION COMMITTEE 
ON TEACHER EDUCATION 

on 


NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE AT DURHAM 


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by 


THE VISITATION COMMITTEE 
April 25-28,1965 


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Division Of Professional Services 
State Department Of Public Instruction 


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Raleigh, North Carolina 







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Report to 


STATE EVALUATION COMMITTEE 
ON TEACHER EDUCATION 


ON 

NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE 
AT DURHAM 


by 


THE VISITATION COMMITTEE 


April 25-28, 1965 





TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Page 

Introduction. . . . 1 

Committee Members . ♦ 1 

Undergraduate Programs . , 3 

Standard I—Overall Policies . 3 

Standard II—Student Personnel Programs and Services . 12 

Standard III—Faculty. 23 

Standard IV—Curricula... . . . . . 31 

Standard V—Professional Laboratory Experiences . f . , f 69 

Standard VI—Facilities, Equipment, and Materials T , T . , . . . . 74 

Graduate Programs. 91 

Standard I—Overall Policies . .. 91 

Standard II—Student Personnel Programs and Services ....... 96 

Standard III—Faculty . 102 

Standard IV—Curricula. 106 

Standard V—Professional Laboratory Experiences . . 125 


Standard VI—Facilities, Equipment, and Materials . T 


129 




















' 













INTRODUCTION 


In 1925, the North Carolina College at Durham was created as a State-supported 
liberal arts college for Negroes, the only college of its kind in the United States. 

The College has had and is continuing the dual purposes of preparing teachers 
and of providing a liberal arts education. 

The degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Master of Arts, Master 
of Science, and Master of Education are now offered by the College to a fall 1964 
enrollment of 2,372 undergraduates and a large graduate enrollment. 

At the undergraduate level, programs are offered for the preparation of secondary 
school and special subject teachers of art, business education, English, health 
education, home economics, Latin, library science, mathematics, modern foreign 
languages (French, Spanish, and German), music, physical education and health, 
science, and social studies. 

Graduate programs are offered in elementary education; secondary and special 
subject areas of business education, English, health education, home economics, 

Latin, library science, mathematics, modern foreign languages (French, Spanish, and 
German), music, physical education and health, science, and social studies; and in 
the special service areas of counseling, supervision, and the principalship. 

The College was visited on April 25-28, 1965, by the following committee, which 
herewith submits its report. 


Dr. Ben Horton, Chairman 
Appalachian State Teachers College 


Dr. J. P. Freeman, Consultant 

State Department of Public Instruction 


Dr. Howard Boozer 

State Board of Higher Education 


Dr. Walter Daniel 
A. & T. College 


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Mr. Perry Kelly 

State Department of Public Instruction 
Miss Macil Via 

State Department of Public Instruction 
Mrs. Tora Ladu 

State Department of Public Instruction 

Dr. William Bell 
A. & T. College 

Dr. Catherine Dennis 

State Department of Public Instruction 

Dr. Olan Petty 
Duke University 

Dr. James Valsame 

State Department of Public Instruction 
Mrs. Pearl Ramos 

State Department of Public Instruction 


Dr. Richard Barnett 
Wake Forest College 

Mr. Garreth McDonald 
Greensboro College 

Mr. Harold Webb 

State Department of Public Instruction 
Miss Cora Paul Bomar 

State Department of Public Instruction 
Miss Ella S. Barrett 

State Department of Public Instruction 
Dr. Jerry A. Hall 

State Department of Public Instruction 
Dr. Voris Bailey 

State Department of Public Instruction 


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UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 


STANDARD I—OVERALL POLICIES 


A. PURPOSES AND OBJECTIVES 


North Carolina College at Durham was created as a private institution in 1910. 

By 1915 it was called the "National Training School." In 1923 it became a tax 
supported institution with the name "Durham State Normal School," indicating teacher 
training as its primary function. In 1925 it was re-created as the State's liberal 
arts college for Negroes, the first of its kind in the nation. 

In 1957, the North Carolina General Assembly re-stated the purposes of the 
institution as follows: 

The primary purpose of North Carolina College at Durham shall be the 
undergraduate instruction in the liberal arts and sciences, the training 
of teachers, supervisors and administrators of the public schools of the 
state, and such graduate and professional instruction as shall be approved 
by the Board of Higher Education, consistent with appropriations made therefor. 

This general statement was followed, in 1960, by additional objectives developed 

at the College and adopted by the Board of Trustees: 

1. To educate young men and women in the disciplines of the arts and sciences, 
taking into consideration the everchanging nature of content in these 
disciplines. 

2. To extend the frontier of knowledge through research and scholarship. 

3. To counsel students regarding vocational opportunities and to assist 
them in developing competence in selected vocations. 

4. To promote within the scholarly community experiences designed to assist 
these students in forming value judgements, in realizing moral purposes, 
in developing social competencies which will enable them to live intel¬ 
lectually, creatively, and abundantly in our democratic society. 

The above statements appear in the College catalog, and due note is also taken 

there of the "dual purpose" (mandate) of the institution (1) to provide instruction 

in the arts and sciences, and (2) to educate teachers and other personnel for the 

schools. 


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The present teacher education program has undergone considerable reconstruction 
during the past five years and has engaged the faculty and the Bureau of Educational 
Research in college-wide curriculum study and program reappraisal. The study and 
changes made in the teacher education program during these years were beneficial 
in preparing the College for a visitation from the National Council of Accreditation 
of Teacher Education, which accredited the College in 1963. 

The objectives of teacher education have developed over the years within the 
dual mandate of the institution. The basis purpose of the teacher education program 
is to prepare teachers for the secondary schools. The basic assumptions implicit 
in the formulation of teacher education objectives (and their implementation), as 
reported by the College ares 

1. A strong liberal arts curriculum should undergird the teacher education 
program at North Carolina College. 

2. A program of teacher education can be designed to foster the development 
of specific types of professional competence. 

3. The specific objectives for the experimental teacher education program 
should be stated in terms of types of competence to be developed by 
persons in the program. 

4. The program should be evaluated in terms of the extent to which 
opportunities for the development of each competence are provided 
and the extent to which students develop each type of competence. 

5. Responsibility for the planning and administration of teacher education 
should be clearly delegated to a Teacher Education Council which has 
authority to act within the framework of institutional policies. 

Many have shared in the formulation of the objectives of the teacher education 
program. The Curriculum Committee, with the Dean of the Undergraduate School as 
its chairman, is responsible for all undergraduate curricula except teacher education. 


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The Council on Teacher Education is the governing body for the undergraduate program 
in teacher education. This Council is composed of twelve members appointed by the 
President from various departments. Its chairman and executive officer is the 
Chairman of the Department of Education. 

The Council on Teacher Education is concerned with the continuous development 
and improvement of the undergraduate teacher education program. Its purpose is 
to assure consistent policies and practices so as to realize the stated objectives. 
Its responsibility reaches into the area of admissions, curricula, administration, 
standards, and evaluation (including experimental programs and innovations). 

The Committee on Teacher Education of the Department of Education is an 
important agency for developing and recommending proposed policies, plans, and 
procedures to the Council on Teacher Education, and carries out many policies 
established by the Council. 

The following contribute to the accomplishment of the stated teacher education 
objectives: the Council on Teacher Education, faculty, physical facilities, field 
facilities, and research resources. The basic facilities for carrying out the 
programs include adequate classrooms for instruction, a central library and 
audiovisual aids center, closed circuit television, and a curriculum materials 
center in the early stages of development. The Bureau of Educational Research 
provides services which assist in evaluating some facets of the teacher education 
program. 

B. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

The organizational structure and the lines of administrative responsibility 
for developing and implementing policies for the various programs of the College, 


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including policies for the programs of teacher education, are shown in Figures 1 
and 2. Figure 1 includes the Board of Trustees, administrative officers, adminis¬ 
trative units of the institution, and committees and councils which participate in 
the process of developing and/or carrying out institutional policy. Figure 2 shows 
in more detail how the institution is organized for developing and executing policies 
for the various aspects of teacher education. 

The Board of Trustees, composed of 12 members, appointed by the Governor, 
develops the overall policies of the institution. The Board selects the Presdient, 
who is the chief administrative officer. Assisting the President with the overall 
administration of the College are: the Deans of the Undergraduate School, the 
Graduate School, the Law School, the School of Library Science, and the Director 
of the Simmer School. Each of these is responsible to the President for the adminis¬ 
tration of instructional personnel and curricular programs in the schools or programs 
over which they preside. Assisted by departmental faculties and chairmen, the 
student personnel staff of the College, under the Dean of Students is responsible 
in the area of student affairs, and the Business Manager in the area of fiscal affairs. 

In addition, standing committees perform functions which are important to the 
administrative process. The President is advised on academic and other matters 
involving institutional policy by an Executive Committee, composed of members of the 
administrative and academic staff and appointed by the President. Other academic 
committees appointed by the President and responsible to him are: Academic Appeals, 
Admissions, Audiovisual Aids, Forum, Research, Scholarship, and Testing. 

The Undergraduate Instructional Council, the Teacher Education Council, and the 
Graduate Council are charged with the responsibility of developing policy governing 
curricula. The Undergraduate Instructional Council, with the Dean of the Under¬ 
graduate School as its chairman, is the governing body for all undergraduate curricula 



















except those in the field of teacher education,, Proposed major changes in policy- 
are subject to review by the President and his advisors. 

The Council on Teacher Education is responsible for the undergraduate program. 
It was organized in 1961 and is responsible for coordinating the various activities 
in teacher education. It is composed of twelve members appointed by the President 
from the departments and divisions which are involved in teacher education. 

The Council, reportedly" 

1. Assures consistent policies and practices with reference to the 
different segments of the undergraduate teacher education program. 

2. Facilitates the continuous development and improvement of the 
undergraduate teacher education program. 

3. Fixes responsibility for the administration of policies agreed upon. 

4. Plans and coordinates the undergraduate teacher education curricula. 

5. Develops policies that govern the admission of students to the 
undergraduate teacher education curricula. 

6. Develops policies and standards consistent with degree requirements 

of the College for the satisfactory completion of all teacher education 
curricula on the undergraduate level. 

7. Plans and implements a continuous evaluation of the effectiveness 
of curricula and procedures. 

8. Plans and implements policies and procedures by which new develop¬ 
ments in teaching may be identified, explored, and evaluated. 

9. Develops policy relating to the advisement of students. 

The Chairman of the Council, its executive officer, is also Chairman of the 
Department of Education. His duties are as follows: 

1. Calls Council meetings and presides at their deliberations. 

2. Appoints a secretary to keep the minutes and to see that they are 
properly recorded and preserved. 

3. Administers the policies that are approved by the Council. 


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4. Makes interim decisions concerning matters and problems relating to 
the program for undergraduate teacher education between meetings of 
the Council. 

5. Serves as liaison person between the Council on Teacher Education 
and the Graduate Council thereby effecting continuity between the 
undergraduate and graduate teacher education curricula. 

6. Develops, in cooperation with the Admissions and Academic Records officer, 
a system of registration and enrollment that includes all students who 
are preparing to teach. 

7. Transmits to the Undergraduate Dean recommendations for major policy 
changes or modifications in the program. 

The Committee on Teacher Education of the Department of Education develops 
and recommends policies, plans, and procedures relating to undergraduate teacher 
education. The committee studies problems relating to (1) admissions, (2) general 
education, (3) subject-matter specialization, (4) professional education, and 
(5) graduation, and makes recommendations to the Chairman of the Council on Teacher 
Education. 

The Dean of the Undergraduate School, within the scope of his authority, acts 
upon matters relating to the undergraduate program of teacher education coming 
to him for the Chairman of the Council on Teacher Education. Where policy changes 
are involved, and in other appropriate cases, the Dean of the Undergraduate School 
presents to the President, with his advice, the recommendations of the Council on 
Teacher Education submitted by the Chairman of the Council. The President, with 
the advise of the Executive Committee, acts on the recommendations and transmits 
his decisions on the recommendations to the Chairman of the Council on Teacher 
Education. 

The Registrar's Office is the central agency of the institution vested with 
the authority and responsibility for certifying to the State Department of Public 
Instruction that a candidate has completed sucessfully the teacher education 
program and is recommended by the institution for certification. Beicre developing 

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the institutional recommendation to be transmitted to the Department of Public 


Instruction, the Registrar secures the written approval or endorsement of the 
Department of Education, The recommendation of the academic department is given 
a student when it recommends him to the Department of Education for student 
teaching. 


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Figure 1 - Organization Chart 






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Figure 2: THE ORGANIZATION OF NORTH CAROLINA COLUEGE FOR UNDERGRADUATE TEACHER EDUCATION 



•II- 


languages, fine arts, natural sciences and mathematics, physical- 
education and health, and the social sciences. 









































































STANDARD II-—STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 


A. INFORMATION TO STUDENTS ABOUT TEACHING 

North Carolina College provides information about the teaching profession to 
high school students through the Committee on Undergraduate Recruitment, which 
informs students in secondary schools about teaching as a profession, teacher 
education programs, and requirements for admission to the program at North Carolina 
College through correspondence, printed and mimeographed brochures, the College's 
annual catalog, speakers and consultants, and formal and informal discussions with 
guidance counselors and high school students,, 

College students are informed about teacher education through the social 
activities and formal and informal discussions of the college chapter of the Student 
National Education Association. 

Freshmen are also acquainted with programs in teacher education, as well as 
with other academic programs as part of the required orientation week program. 

The basic education course, open to all sophomore students, helps students 
familiarize themselves with teacher education programs and certification requirements. 

The annual group guidance session in teacher education, sponsored by the Teacher 
Education Council during freshman orientation, acquaints students with the nature 
and scope of the teacher education program at the College and the requirements 
for admission to and retention in the program. 

There is also a regular seminar at the close of the full-time student teaching 
experience, to which all students and staff members from teacher education are 
invited. 

B. DATA COLLECTED ABOUT A PROSPECTIVE TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENT 

The following data are collected about prospective students for consideration 
by a committee on admission to teacher education. 








































1. Selected biographical information on the applicant. 

2. List of general education courses completed during the first two years 
of college and grades earned. 

3. Overall grade point average at end of the sophomore year. 

4. Recommendation by the advisor from the subject-matter department in which 
the applicant will seek certification. 

5. Grade point average in English. 

C. ADMISSION POLICIES AND PRACTICES 

1. Admission to the College 

Requirements for admission to the College as freshmen include graduation from 
an approved high school, rank in the upper two-thirds of the high school class, 
and presentation of a score on the SAT (no cut-off). In addition, qualities of 
leadership, personality, and character are sought and the ability to write an 
acceptable statement outlining the reason for seeking admission to North Carolina 
College is required. 

2. Admission to Teacher Education 

All persons who plan to teach are instructed to apply for admission to the 
teacher education program in the second semester of the sophomore year. Students 
who decide to apply for admission to the teacher education program after their 
sophomore year are required to file for application as early as practicable. 

Data collected by the Teacher Education Committee is examined to determine 
whether a candidate satisfies requirements for full admission, which include: 

a. An overall "C" average (1.0 grade point average) on two years 
of college work. 

b. An average of "C" or better in 13 semester hours of English, 
including speech. 


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c. Freedom from obvious physical and moral defects which would 
negatively affect performance of the teaching role. 

d. Recommendation by advisor. 

Each student receives a letter informing him of the decision of the Committee 
on Teacher Education. The student who is given approved status is assigned an 
advisor and invited to a conference with his advisor. A student who is assigned 
approval withheld status receives a letter in which he is informed of the decision 
and the reasons for the decision. The student is advised that he may not take more 
than nine semester hours of the professional education courses prerequisite to the 
senior semester in teacher education until final disposition of his application is 
made. At the same time a letter is sent to the student's advisor informing him 
that the student's record will be reviewed during the junior year, and that removal 
of the reasons for which approval was withheld should be reported to the Committee 
on Teacher Education with a request for change of status. Reasons for granting 
approval withheld status are: 

a. Academic deficiency in core curriculum. 

b. Insufficient number of courses for a definite decision. 

Applications for admission to the teacher education program are rejected for 

one or more of the following reasons: 

a. Less than 1.00 overall average. 

b. Academic deficiencies in the core curriculum. 

c. Less than 1.00 average in English. 

d. Failure to secure the recommendation of the advisor in the subject 
matter area in which applicant desires certification. 


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3. Numbers Admitted 


For the first semester of 1964-65, 146 juniors applied for admission to the 
teacher education program; 96 were accepted, and 15 were rejected. After admission, 
additional screening is done at the point of admission to the senior semester in 
teacher education and throughout the senior semester experience. 

D. PROFILES OF CLASSES 


During the freshman orientation week in September of each school year, a 


series of tests is given to freshmen. In the following table the results of 


some of these tests are shown to give a profile of the class that entered in 


September, 1963. 


TABLE 1 

PROFILE OF FRESHMEN ENTERING IN 1963 


Intelligence Quotient Profile 

Number taking I.Q. Test 

661 

Mean I.Q. 

91.77 

Median I.Q. 

91.22 

S.D. I.Q. 

9.72 

Grade Equivalent of Mean I.Q. 

9.4 

Language Test 

Number taking Language Test 

773 

Mean Score 

119.89 

Median Score 

121.82 

S.D. 

19.48 

Grade Equivalent of Mean Language Score 

11.0 

Mathematics Test 

Number taking Test 

699 

Mean Score 

79.44 

Median Score 

80.14 

S.D. 

23.15 

Grade Equivalent of Mean Mathematics Score 

9.5 

Reading Scores 

Number taking Test 

649 

Mean Score 

158.28 

Median Score 

158.69 

S.D. 

14.71 

Percentile Equivalent of Mean Reading Score 

10 

French Test 

Number taking Test 

310 

Mean Score 

49.05 

Median Score 

46.70 

S.D. 

19.29 


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Table 2 presents data on the high school ranks of the freshman class of 


1963-64. 


TABLE 2 

HIGH SCHOOL RANKS OF 1963 FRESHMEN 


Rank 

Number 

Percent 

First third 

455 

64 

Second third 

152 

22 

Third third 

58 

8 

Not given 

41 

6 

Total 

706 

100 


Table 3 presents data on the Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores of the 
freshmen class of 1964-65. 


TABLE 3 

CEEB-SAT SCORES FOR ENTERING FRESHMEN AT 
NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE IN SEPTEMBER, 1964 


Scores 

Verbal 


Mathematical 



Men 

Women 

Men 

Women 

550 

1 

3 

2 

1 

500 

4 

4 

14 

5 

450 

7 

25 

14 

13 

400 

17 

38 

28 

33 

350 

43 

69 

49 

99 

300 

67 

114 

69 

154 

250 

58 

142 

45 

145 

200 

34 

85 

10 

30 

Number 

231 

480 

231 

480 

Mean 

324 

318 

357 

327 

S.D. 

67 

74 

77 

61 


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Tables 4 and 5 present data on the 1964—65 junior class 


TABLE 4 

DISTRIBUTION OF INTELLIGENCE QUOTIENTS FOR JUNIOR LEVEL 
STUDENTS ADMITTED TO TEACHER EDUCATION IN 1964 AND 
JUNIOR LEVEL STUDENTS NOT IN TEACHER EDUCATION IN 1964 


I.Q.'s 

Juniors 

in Education 

Other 

Juniors 


Number 

Per Cent 

Number 

Per Cent 

120-124 



2 

0.79 

115-119 



2 

0.79 

110-114 

3 

3.33 

10 

3.97 

105-109 

9 

10.00 

12 

4.76 

100-104 

11 

12.22 

35 

13.89 

95- 99 

20 

22.22 

55 

21.83 

90- 94 

15 

16.67 

51 

20.24 

85- 89 

14 

15.56 

33 

13.10 

80- 84 

13 

14.44 

37 

14.67 

75- 79 

4 

4.44 

11 

4.37 

70- 74 

1 

1.11 

3 

1.19 

65- 69 

60- 64 

55- 59 



1 

.40 

Total 

90 

99.99 

252 

100.00 

Mean 

Median 

S.D. 

93.61 

93.83 

8.97 


93.31 

93.25 

9.18 



TABLE 5 


GRADE POINT AVERAGE FOR JUNIORS ADMITTED TO 
TEACHER EDUCATION, FALL SEMESTER, 
1964-1965 


GPA's 

Number 

Per Cent 

2.50-2.74 

2 

2.08 

2.25-2.49 

5 

5.21 

2.00-2.24 

20 

20.82 

1.75-1.99 

16 

16.67 

1.50-1.74 

23 

23.96 

1.25-1,49 

16 

16.67 

1.00-1.24 

14 

14.58 

Total 

96 

99.99 

Mean 

1.72 


Median 

1.70 


S.D. 

.39 



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A total of 123 students completed the teacher education curricula in 1964. 
Table 6 shows the intelligence quotients of this group when they entered in 1960. 
Since all students do not report for all examinations, and some students transfer 
to North Carolina College after completing the freshman year at other colleges, 
the total in the table is less than 123. 

Scores on the National Teacher Examinations (administered in February and 
April, 1964) are reported in Table 6. 


TABLE 6 

DISTRIBUTION OF INTELLIGENCE QUOTIENTS FOR STUDENTS 
COMPLETING THE TEACHER EDUCATION CURRICULUM IN 1964 


I.Q.'s 

Number 

Percent 

110-114 

3 

3.49 

105-109 

3 

3.49 

100-104 

19 

22.09 

95-99 

19 

22.09 

90-94 

17 

19.77 

85-89 

16 

18.60 

80-84 

4 

4.65 

75-79 

4 

4.65 

70-74 

1 

1.16 

Total 

86 

99.99 

Mean 

98.8 


Median 

94.8 


S.D. 

8.57 



TABLE 7 

DISTRIBUTION OF COMMON WEIGHTED TOTAL NATIONAL TEACHER EXAMINATIONS 
SCORES FOR STUDENTS COMPLETING THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM IN 1964 


Scores 

Number 

Percent 

600-649 

5 

4.90 

550-599 

21 

20.59 

500-549 

27 

26.47 

450-499 

26 

25.49 

400-449 

19 

18.63 

350-399 

4 

3.92 

Total 

102 

100.00 

Mean 

502.44 


Median 

503.20 


S.D. 

62.45 



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E. TRANSFER POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 


Upperclass transfer students must first make application for admission with 
advanced standing to the Committee on Admissions of the College. The applicant 
for advanced standing must present (1) a record of the high school and college 
work which was accepted by the last school attended; (2) a transcript of the college 
work done at the last school attended; and (3) a statement of honorable separation 
from the last school attended. Teacher education students must also present a 
statement from the last school attended that they were eligible for admission to 
the teacher education program at that institution. 

When the above steps have been taken and if the student is admitted to the 
College, the extent to which he meets the requirements for admission to the teacher 
education program will be determined by the Committee on Teacher Education. This 
same Committee will determine the remaining requirements to be met at the College and 
will advise the student relative to the courses to take without danger of duplication. 

F. IDENTIFICATION OF STUDENTS PREPARING TO TEACH 

Academic records for North Carolina College students are kept in the Registrar's 
office. For all students who are accepted in teacher education, information folders 
are set up in the Education Records Office. 

G. SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS FOR RETENTION IN AND COMPLETION OF TEACHER EDUCATION 

CURRICULA 

Teacher education students must maintain an overall grade-point average of "1.0" 
or above, with an average of "1.6" or above in a teaching field for admission to 
student teaching. No student may finish the approved teacher education curriculum 
without student teaching and/or with less than a 1.6 grade point average in 20 
semester hours of the subject matter field in which he applies for student teaching. 
All courses in the student's teaching area are included in determining eligibility 
for student teaching. Students must earn a grade of "C" or above in the senior 


-19- 




























' 




























semester of teacher education in order to be recommended by the College for 
certification. 

In general the number of dropouts is negligible. 

H. RECORDS FOR TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS 

A folder is established in the Education Records Office for each teacher education 
student. The folder contains the following: 

1. Processed application for admission to the teacher education program. 

2. Letter stating the decision of the Teacher Education Committee on the 
application. 

3. Record of grades for periods of study completed prior to application 
for admission to the teacher education program. 

4. Record of grades for each grading period after admission to the teacher 
education program. 

5. Miscellaneous items which may vary from student to student, e.g., reports 
on conferences, correspondence, etc. 

Reports of the results of the National Teacher Examinations are also filed in 
the Education Records Office. 

Students' folders are available for review from the records secretary to any 
member of the college staff upon request. 

I. ADVISEMENT AND COUNSELING PROCEDURES 

The College employs a coordinator of student personnel services, the Dean of 
Students, and a student personnel staff including trained persons in all areas 
concerned with student adjustment. Members of the student personnel staff are 
responsible for planning and implementing the initial orientation of freshmen 
students upon admission to the College and at weekly freshmen sessions dealing 
with topics related to personal, vocational, and academic guidance. 


-20- 














' 













































Academic advisors, appointed by department chairmen, are assigned each year 
a number of freshmen advisees. Teacher education students are assigned as advisees 
to those academic faculty members recommended by the departmental chairman and 
approved by the Teacher Education Council. Students who wish to meet certification 
requirements in two areas are assigned to advisors in their area of major concentration 
and also receive advisement from approved advisors in their area(s) of minor 
concentration. All students, including those officially enrolled in the teacher 
education program as well as those who aspire to enter the program, receive guidance 
from members of the Department of Education. 

J. TEACHER PLACEMENT SERVICE 

Responsibility for teacher placement rests with the Director of the Placement 
Bureau who is concerned with the placement of all North Carolina College under¬ 
graduate and graduate students who seek his assistance. Teachers placement policies 
have been developed by the Director of Placement in consultation with the Department 
of Education. The distribution of 1964 teacher education graduates is presented in 
Table 7 

K. FOLLOW-UP STUDIES 

Follow-up studies, designed to secure information on the adjustment of 
teacher education graduates to teaching, provide information on needed changes 
in the program. During the 1963-64 school year information was sought from 
teacher education graduates who were recommended for certification between 1959 
and 1963. Teachers indicated what they regarded as needs in both class activities 
and extraclass activities. The teachers' principals also were invited to evaluate 
their preparation. The results of this follow-up study are under consideration by 
the Teacher Education Committee with the intention of mahing modifications in the 
teacher education program. 


-21 


























I I ' »• 











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II 

FIELD OF 

PREPARATION 


Art 

Commerce 

English 

Foreign Language 

Home Economics 

Library Science 

Mathematics 

- •- - 

Music 

Physical Ed. 

General Science 

Biology 

Social Studies 

Health Education 

TOTAL 

Tt/f_ 


-22- 


Women 


























































































































































































































































STANDARD III—FACULTY 


A. THE GENERAL FACULTY 


The total teaching staff consists of 150 full-time and 55 part-time members. 
Fifty-eight of these persons have the earned doctor's degree. Twenty separate 
departments of instruction, including the Department of Education, are represented 
by this staff. 

B. THE PROFESSIONAL FACULTY 

Including the Dean of the undergraduate program and faculty members who teach 
methods courses in the academic areas, the professional faculty consists of 31 
persons. The Department of Education consists of 19 regular staff members and 
three visitors. 

1. Preparation and Rank of Professional Faculty 

Degrees held and rank of the faculty in the Department of Education compare 
favorably with the total faculty as shown below. 


TABLE 9 

DEGREES AND RANK OF FACULTY 


Degree 

Percent 

Education 

Percent Total 
Faculty 

Bachelor 

0 

0 

Master's 

37 

74 

Doctor 

63 

26 

Rank 

Instructor 

26.4 

36.0 

Assistant Professor 

15.8 

40.0 

Associate Professor 

15.8 

7.0 

Professor 

42.0 

17.0 


- 23 - 




















- 









































































Each faculty member in the Department of Education has at least a master's 
degree. Twelve, or 63 percent, hold the doctorate. In most instances their fields 
of preparation and teaching assignments coincide favorably and almost all have had 
extensive public school experience. Those who teach methods in the content areas 
seem to be well qualified in preparation and experience. Except in the areas of 
special education (graduate level) and statistics, the staff is quite adequate. 

2. Faculty Load 

The maximum teaching load for staff members not having administrative duties 
is 15 semester hours. Most frequently the teaching load is approximately 12 semester 
hours for each full-time faculty member. The chairman of the Department of Education 
carries a teaching load of six to nine hours while certain other chairmen (with 
smaller departments) carry nine to 12 hours. Due to his responsibility with the 
self-study the chairman of the Department of Education has not been charged with a 
full teaching assignment this year. 

Student teachers are assigned to college supervisors on the basis of four 
student teachers per three semester hours or 20 student teachers per 15 hour load. 

3. Faculty Improvement 

During 1964-65, 11 members of the Education Department have been engaged in 
writing and research. Extensive affiliation and participation in professional 
organizations are in evidence. A budget of $10,572 seems to have been adequate 
to meet certain in-service needs connected with travel. Staff members who played 
active roles in professional meetings received a more generous share of these funds. 

There are no sabbatical leaves. However, several faculty members in physical 
education and mathematics are currently engaged in completing their doctoral programs. 
During the past five years, seven members of the Education Department have completed 
their doctoral programs. 


- 24 - 




U art «^jj I ^ *» if oil J*<*> y* 

■ 




The administration (including departmental chairmen) display a high degree 
of interest in the self-improvement of staff. The exchange of faculty members 
with other institutions and the joint cooperative planning with other institutions 
recognizes the need for the value of such relationships. 

The same criteria for rank, tenure, salary, and promotion are applied to all 
staff members, graduate and undergraduate. 

C. ACADEMIC FACULTY: BY AREAS 

Art 

There are three full-time and two part-time faculty members in the Department 
of Art. All members have the master’s degree. 

Teaching loads are in accord with college policy. 

Business Education 

There are ten full-time and four part-time faculty members in the Business 
Education Department. The chairman of the department is on leave of absence. Of 
the regular faculty members, seven hold the master's degree, one holds a CPA degree, 
and two hold doctoral degrees. The chairman also holds the doctorate. Private 
offices are provided for regular staff and semi-private for part-time staff. 

The teaching load of the full-time business faculty is 12.6 hours. All regular 
faculty members are teaching courses in areas in which they have had graduate 
preparation. 

English 

There are 20 full-time and seven part-time members of the English faculty. Six 
of the full-time faculty members hold doctor's degrees. All others hold at least 
the master's degree, although all have pursued work beyond the requirements for the 
master's. No graduate assistants teach courses at the College. One Woodrow Wilson 


- 25 - 
















































































fellow, a doctoral candidate in English from Yale University, is currently working 
as a part-time member of the instructional staff. 

All department faculty members are teaching courses in areas in which they 
have had at least undergraduate preparation. Major courses are taught by department 
members who have doctor’s degrees or those pursuing work toward such degrees. 

Health Education 

There are three full-time and one part-time faculty members in the Health 
Education Department. They are aided by the physical education faculty which 
teaches a number of health courses that are a part of the required physical 
education curriculum. 

Of the health education faculty, one member holds the doctor's degree in 
school health and three hold the master's degree in public health. 

The teaching loads of the health education faculty average eight semester or 
15 clock hours per week. All members have had graduate preparation in areas in 
which they are teaching. 

Home Economics 

The faculty of the Department of Home Economics consists of six members. One 
has the doctorate and the remainder have the master's degree. 

Latin 

The head of the Department of German, Latin, and Philosophy, who has two 
classes in Latin, holds the doctorate. Another part-time faculty member, with two 
classes, holds the MA degree and is currently doing graduate work at the University 
of North Carolina. 

Library Science 

There are three full-time faculty members on the staff of the School of 
Library Science. All three hold master's degrees in library science from library 


- 26 - 






























schools accredited by the American Library Association. Two have the rank of assistant 
professor, one of which serves as Acting Dean. The third faculty member holds the 
rank of instructor. There is no evidence that any one of the three faculty members 
is working toward an advanced degree. 

A part-time secretary, one graduate assistant, and three 0E0 work-study students 
make up the supporting non-professional staff of the School. 

The teaching load of the School of Library Science faculty members averages 
10-12 semester hours per week, in accord with institutional policy. The Acting Dean 
carries a full teaching load. 

Mathematics 

There are seven full-time and four part-time faculty members. All full-time 
and two part-time members teach undergraduate courses only, three teach undergraduate 
and graduate courses, and two part-time members teach only graduate courses. One 
full-time and two part-time members hold Ph.D. degrees in mathematics and one member 
holds a D.Ed, degree in mathematics and education. One member holds a master’s 
degree in education but has had 15 graduate hours in mathematics. One member holds 
a MBA degree and has a background in electrical engineering. The other five members 
hold master's degrees in mathematics. 

The teaching load is 15 semester hours of undergraduate course work and 12 
semester hours of graduate work, with a reduction in load for administrative duties, 
computer work, and teaching remedial mathematics courses. 

All faculty members have graduate work in mathematics and their area of 
specialization. 

Modern Foreign Languages 

In French there are nine full-time faculty members; two of these hold the 
doctorate, the others the M.A. degree. In Spanish there are four full-time faculty 


- 27 - 





















































































members; three of these hold a doctorate, one the M.A. degree. There are three 
part-time faculty members, one in French, two in Spanish; all three have the 
M.A. degree, two of whom are doctoral candidates at the University of North Carolina. 
In German there are two full-time instructors with the M. A. degree. 

The teaching load of the full-time faculty members is 15 semester hours per week. 
The part-time faculty have two classes per week each. 

Music 

There are 11 full-time and two part-time faculty members in the Music Department. 
There is also one graduate assistant. 

Of the regular faculty, two hold the doctorate, and nine hold a master's degree 
in music. The two part-time faculty members also hold master's degrees in music. 

The teaching load of Music Department faculty members range from 12-15 hours 
per week. 

No Music Department faculty members are teaching courses in which they have had 
insufficient preparation. 

Physical Education and Health 

The faculty is exceptionally well prepared for a college of this type. There 
are 12 full-time and one part-time faculty members in the Department of Physical 
Education. Of this number, three regular faculty and the part-time faculty member 
hold the doctoral degrees in physical education. Eight hold the master's degree 
in physical education and one holds the master's degree in health. 

Of the faculty members holding the master's degree, two have completed all 
requirements, with the exception of the dissertation, and are candidates for the 
doctorate, a third has completed 30 hours beyond the master's degree and is at 
present on leave studying toward the doctorate, and a fourth has been admitted to 





























§! 



















the doctoral program in physical education at the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. Four of the remaining five have completed 30 or more hours beyond the 
master's degree. 

The teaching load of the physical education faculty is 12 semester hours per 
week in accord with institutional policy. Those male members who are coaches have 
their class loads equated with the coaching loads, or reduced by formula, and are 
comparable to the loads carried by those who do not coach. No faculty member is 
teaching in an area in which he has not had graduate preparation. 

Science 

Biology 

There are eight full-time faculty members. Four hold Ph.D. degrees and four 
hold the M.S. degree. There are five part-time faculty members, three of these have 
assignment in courses in the teacher education curriculum. 

Chemistry 

There are four full-time faculty members. Two hold the Ph.D. degree and two 
hold the M.S. degree. Funds have been appropriated for two additional faculty 
members with the Ph.D. degree. 

Physics 

There are two full-time faculty members. One holds the Ph. D. degree and one 
holds the M.S. degree in physics. There is one part-time instructor for three 
semester hours. 

Social Studies 

There are seven full-time and three part-time faculty members in the History 
Department. Of these, three hold the Ph.D. degree in history, and the remainder hold 
master's degrees in history, most having had additional graduate hours above the 
master's degree. 


- 29 - 


























































The normal teaching load is 15 semester hours per week. Most faculty members 
have at one time or another to teach in an area in which they have had less than 
12 semester hours of preparation. 

Geography 

There is one full-time faculty member and one part-time member in geography. 
One addition to the faculty has been secured for next year. The chairman holds 
the Ph.D. in geography and the instructor possesses the master's in geography. 

The chairman teaches 12 hours per week and the instructor also carries 12 
hours, while continuing his study at UNC. 


- 30 - 
































STANDARD IV—CURRICULA 


North Carolina College prepares secondary school teachers in business education, 
English, foreign language (French, German, Spanish, or Latin), mathematics, science 
(biology, chemistry, or physics), and social studies (geography or history) and 
special subject teachers in art, health education, home economics, library science, 
music, and physical education and health. A curriculum of 124 semester hours of 
general education, subject matter specialization, and professional education is 
required in each area. Satisfactory completion of the curriculum leads to the 
Bachelor of Arts degree for students who have subject majors in art, English, 
foreign language, music, or social studies or the Bachelor of Science degree for 
students who have subject majors in business education, health education, home 
economics, library science, mathematics, physical education and health, or science. 

Table 10 shows the part-time and full-time enrollment of undergraduate students 
for the 1964-65 fall semester and the number of advanced undergraduate students 
enrolled in teacher education by subject area. 

TABLE 10 


FALL SEMESTER 1964-65 

UNDERGRADUATE 

ENROLLMENT 



Part-Time 

Full-Time 

Total 

College of Arts and Sciences 

21 

2336 

2357 

School of Library Science 

14 

1 

15 

Secondary Education 




Art 


1 


Business Education 


75 


English 


43 


Foreign Language 




French 


39 


German 


0 


Latin 


0 


Spanish 


8 


Health Education 


11 



- 31 - 





















































* 

































TABLE 10 (Continued) 

Part-Time 

Full-Time 

Total 

Home Economics 

16 


Mathematics 

9 


Music 

11 


Physical Education - Health 

20 


Science 

Biology 

18 


Chemistry 

8 


Physics 

0 


Social Studies (General) 

8 


Geography 

2 


History 

25 


Total 

294 



A. GENERAL EDUCATION 


The general education program, designated as the core curriculum, consists of 
50 semester hours (comprising about 40 percent of the required 124 semester hours 
for the bachelor's degree). The general education requirements are as follows: 

Area Semester Hours Required 

English- 14 

Natural Science or Mathematics- 6 


One year Biology, Chemistry, Physics or combination of 
courses from Biology, Chemistry or Physics. 

Must be met by Mathematics 110 and 120 or 141 and 142. 

Social Science- 

Six hours of this requirement must be met by Social 
Science 110, 120. 

Foreign Language (same language)-- 

Students entering with 4 high school units in one foreign 
language may fulfill the language requirements by taking 
6 additional hours of the same language. 

General Psychology or Philosophy- 

Physical Education--- 

Hygiene-- 

Fine Arts- 

This requirement must be met by courses in appreciation from 
two of the areas of Art, Dramatic Art or Music. 


-32- 


50 













































































The courses are related to the guidelines as follows. Required courses are 
marked with an asterisk. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should assure that all teachers are able to read , 
write, and speak the English language clearly and effectively . 


^-English 110 and 120 

English Composition 

6 s.h. 

-"-English 210 

Fundamentals of Speech 

2 s.h. 

English 220 

Introduction to Public Speaking 

3 s.h. 

English 250 

Reading Fundamentals 

3 s.h. 

English 10 

English Grammar (Remedial) 

No credit 

Education 100 

Reading Skills 

No credit 


English 10 is required of students whose performance is unsatisfactory on the 
English placement test. Education 100, a course in developmental reading, is required 
of students who rank at or below the 48th percentile on the Iowa Silent Reading Test 
and is open to other freshman students who wish to improve their reading competencies. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should develop a critical understanding of and a 
sensitiveness to the aesthetic, philosophical, ethical and imaginative values 

expressed in literature, art, music, religion, and philosophy . 

-"-English 130 and 140 An Introduction to Literature 6 s.h. 

Foreign Language-—same language 6-9 s.h. 

Fine Arts 4 s.h. 

(Choice of two courses: 

Art 100 - Survey of Art History - 2 s.h. 

Dramatic Art 100 - Appreciation of Drama - 2 s.h. 

Music 100 - Survey of Music - 2 s.h.) 

General Psychology or Philosophy 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should develop an understanding of the development 


- 33 - 
















■ 




































. 





















































of world civilization, an understanding of the basic concepts of the social studies , 


and an understanding of democracy as a way of life . 


'“■Social Science 110 and 120 Foundations of Contemporary 

Western Civilization 


6 s.h. 


Elective 


3 s.h. 


(A course in economics, geography, history, philosophy, 
political science, or sociology) 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should develop an appreciation and understanding 
of the structure of science, of scientific inquiry, and of the main scientific 

principles . 

Science 

(One year of science chosen from: 

Biology 110 and 120 - General Biology - 3 s.h. each 
Biology 140 - Human Physiology - 3 s.h. 

Chemistry 110 and 120 - General Chemistry - 5 s.h. each 
Physics 111 and 112 - General Physics - 4 s.h. each) 

Six semester hours of science or mathematics are required. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should develop an appreciation of the structure 

and applications of mathematics . 

Mathematics 110 Plane Trigonometry 3 s.h. 

Mathematics 120 College Algebra 3 s.h. 

Mathematics 10 Remedial Mathematics No credit 


or 

Mathematics 101 


3 s.h. 


Fundamental Mathematics 


Students who fail to make a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement 
test must take Mathematics 10. Other students may take Mathematics 110 and 120 or 
one year in a natural science. Students in the teacher education program who do 
not take Mathematics 110 or 120 must take Mathematics 101. 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should develop the knowledge, habits and attitudes 
necessary to achieve and maintain sound physical and mental health.. 


-34 

















































































•^Physical Education 


110 and 120 

Fundamental Motor Skills 

2 

s.h. 

Physical Education elective 


1 

s.h. 

^-Health Education 110 

Personal Hygiene 

1 

s.h. 

^Health Education 210 

Personal Hygiene 

1 

s.h. 

SUBJECT MATTER PREPARATION 





Art. 

The subject matter preparation for a prospective teacher of art includes a 

i j 

total of 36 hours, or 30 percent of a basic four-year program. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide for the development of an understanding 
of several philosophies of art education , 

•'--Art 361 Philosophies of Art Education 3 s.h. 

-'■-Art 100 Survey of Art History 2 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide for a. thorough study at the college 
level of the aspects of art included in the curriculum of elementary and secondary 

schools , 


-"-Art 

110 

Drawing - Painting 

2 

s.h. 

-"-Art 

112 

Drawing - Painting 

2 

s.h. 

-"-Art 

231 

Basic Design - Two Dimensional 

2 

s.h. 

-'Art 

232 

Basic Design - Three Dimensional 

2 

s.h. 

-'Art 

311 

Life Drawing 

2 

s.h. 

-'Art 

312 

Life Drawing 

2 

s.h. 

-"Art 

461 

Methods and Materials in Art 

3 

s.h. 


Ceramics 

Crafts 


35 - 











































































Sculpture 


Designs Interior, Fashion, and Graphic 
School Art Curricula 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide for an understanding of past and 
present world art with emphasis on the relationship of the art to the culture in 

which it was produced and its influence on subsequent cultures . 


"-Art 

201 

Ancient Art 

2 

s.h. 

-*Art 

202 

Greek Art 

2 

s.h. 

-''-Art 

301 

Medieval Art 

2 

s.h. 

-"-Art 

302 

Renaissance Art 

2 

s.h. 

*Art 

402 

Modern Art 

2 

s.h. 


GUIDELINE 4; The program should establish an awareness and knowledge of the 
general school program and the ability to conduct an art program to meet the specific 

needs of both elementary and secondary levels . 

*Art 362 School Art Curricula 3 s.h. 

#Art 461 Materials and Methods in Art 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5 : The program should include sufficient preparation for the 
later pursuit of graduate work in one of the specialized areas of art . 

Beyond basic instruction in the various studios, the art major takes: 

Art 370 Senior Tear Studio 4 si. 

Business Education 


Comprehensive Business 

The course offerings in the comprehensive business curriculum include 45 
semester hours, or approximately 36 percent of a basic four-year program. Courses 
are related to the guidelines as follows: 


36 “ 



















' 

























. 









































GUIDELINE Is The program should assure job competency in secretarial and 
related skills . 

-"-Commerce 200 Typewriting (Beginning) 2 s.h. 

(May be omitted if students score high on placement test.) 

-"-Commerce 210 Typewriting (intermediate) 2 s.h. 

-"-Commerce 220 Typewriting (Advanced) 2 s.h. 

^Commerce 320 Elementary Shorthand 3 s.h. 

-"Commerce 330 Elementary Shorthand 3 s.h. 

-"-Commerce 400 Intermediate Shorthand 

and Transcription 3 s.h. 

^Commerce 410 Advanced Shorthand 

and Transcription 3 s.h. 

-"“Commerce 340 Business English 3 s.h. 

-"-Commerce 350 Business Machines 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should include study at the college level in the 

business areas identified as integral parts of the business education curriculum 

of the high school . 

-"-Commerce 240 and 250 Principles of Accounting I and II 6 s.h. 

-"'Commerce 300 Business Organization 

and Management 3 s.h. 

-"Commerce 222 Business Mathematics 3 s.h. 

-"-Commerce 332 Consumer Economics 3 s.h, 

-"Commerce 321 Marketing 3 s.h. 

-"'Commerce 340 Business English 3 s.h. 

-"-Commerce 440 Federal and State Income Taxes 3 s.h. 

-"Commerce 210 Principles of Economics 3 s.h, 

GUIDELINE 3s The program should provide a culminating experience, bringing 

together theory, skills, and practice . 


- 37 “ 






























' 






















































Secretarial Practices 
and Procedures 


3 s.h. 


^Commerce 420 

^Commerce 490 Business Internship 1-3 s.h. 

(Credit depends upon clock hours spent in internship activities.) 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide sufficient preparation for later 

pursuit of graduate study . 


t-Commerce 310 

Business Law 

3 s.h. 

•^Commerce 321 

Marketing 

3 s.h. 

-"-Economics 210 

Principles of Economics 

3 s.h. 

"-Education 460 

Work in Materials and 

Methods in Commerce 

15 s.h. 


Basic Business 



The subject matter preparation for a prospective business teacher following 
the basic business curriculum includes a total of 45 semester hours, or approximately 
36 percent of a basic four-year program. Courses are related to the guidelines as 
follows ° 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should assure .job competency in secretarial and 


related skills , 

"•Commerce 200 Typewriting (Beginning) 2 s.h, 

(Can be waived by students who score high on placement test.) 

-"-Commerce 210 Typewriting (Intermediate) 2 s.h, 

-"•Commerce 220 Typewriting (Advanced) 2 s.h. 

-"-Commerce 340 Business English 3 s.h. 

-"-Commerce 350 Business Machines 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2 2 The program should include study at the college level in the 
business areas identified as integral parts of the business education curriculu m 
of the high school . 


- 38 - 


























































































-^Commerce 

240 and 250 

Principles of Accounting I and II 

6 

s .h. 

-"-Commerce 

222 

Business Mathematics 

3 

s .h. 

--Commerce 

300 

Business Organization 





and Management 

3 

s .h. 

-"-Commerce 

332 

Consumer Economics 

3 

s.h. 

-"-Commerce 

321 

Marketing 

3 

s.h. 

--Commerce 

340 

Business English 

3 

s.h. 

-"-Commerce 

360 

Intermediate Accounting 

3 

s.h. 

-"-Commerce 

440 

Federal and State Income Taxes 

3 

s.h. 

-"-Commerce 

450 

Business Economics 

3 

s.h. 

-"-Commerce 

460 

Elementary Statistical Methods 

3 

s.h. 

--Commerce 

461 

Corporate Finance 

3 

s.h. 

-''-Economics 

i 210 and 212 

Principles of Economics 

6 

s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide a. culminating experience, bringing 

together theory, skills, and practice , 

-''-Commerce 420 Secretarial Practices 

and Procedures 3 s.h. 

-"-Commerce 490 Business Internship 1-3 s.h, 

(Credit depends upon clock hours spent in internship activities.) 

GUIDELINE 4; The program should provide sufficient preparation for later 

pursuit of graduate study . 


-"-Commerce 310 

Business Law 

3 s.h. 

-"'Commerce 321 

Marketing 

3 s.h. 

-"-Economics 210 

Principles of Economics 

3 s.h. 

-"-Education 460 

Work in Materials and 

Methods in Commerce 

15 s.h. 


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. 













































English 


The subject matter preparation of the prospective teacher of English consists 
of a minimum of 43 hours, or approximately 34 percent of the undergraduate studies. 
Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide specialized study at the college 


level in the areas of the high school curriculum to be taught. 


-"-English 

110 and 120 

English Composition 

6 

s ,h. 

-"-English 

130 and 140 

An Introduction to Literature 

6 

s .h. 

-"-English 

230 

Literary Criticism 

3 

s .h. 

-"-English 

231 and 232 

A Survey of English Literature 

6 

s .h. 

-"-English 

311 

Advanced English Grammar 

3 

s ,h. 

-^English 

312 

Advanced English Composition 

2 

s .h. 

-"-English 

331 and 332 

American Literature 

6 

s .h. 

-"-English 

400 

The History of the 

English Language 

3 

s .h. 

-"-English 

430 

Shakespeare 

3 

s .h. 

English 

or 

432 

English Drama 

3 

s .h. 

English 

442 

Contemporary British 
and American Drama 



English 

250 

Reading Fundamentals 

3 

s .h. 

English 

410 

Prose Fiction 

3 

s „h. 

English 

452 

English Literature of 
the Eighteenth Century 

3 

s .h. 

aiTTTiF.T.TMF 9* Thp nrom.m should lead to an excellence in 

written 

and oral 

expression. 





-"-English 110 and 120 

English Composition 

6 

s .h. 

-"-English 210 

Fundamentals of Speech 

2 

s .h. 





















' 






























































^English 311 


Advanced Grammar 


3 s.h. 


-^English 312 Advanced Composition 2 s.h. 

English 150 Introduction to Journalism 3 s.h. 

English 220 Introduction to Public Speaking 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3° The program should provide study and training at the college 
level in the areas of reading . 

^-English 110 and 120 English Composition 6 s.h. 

English 250 Reading Fundamentals 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4° The program should lead to a knowledge of the importance of 


libraries . 

--English 110 and 120 English Composition 6 s.h. 

-"-English 130 and 140 An Introduction to Literature 6 s.h. 

-"-English 210 Fundamentals of Speech 2 s.h. 

-"-English 231 and 232 English Literature 6 s.h. 

-"-English 331 and 332 American Literature 6 s.h. 

-"-English 430 Shakespeare 3 s.h. 

-"-English 432 English Drama. 3 s.h. 

English 442 Contemporary British 

and American Drama 3 s.h. 

English 410 Prose Fiction 3 s.h. 


The students in English 110, 120, 130, 140, and 210 participate in a supplementary 
reading program in which each student reads a minimum of three books, largely fiction 
or biography. In English 120, there is a special unit on using the library and 
writing the research paper. 

GUIDELINE 5 s The program should provide sufficient preparation for later 
graduate work in English . 


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. 













































^English 230 

Literary Criticism 

3 s.h. 

-'^English 231 and 232 

English Literature 

6 s.h. 

-"-English 331 and 332 

American Literature 

6 s.h. 

-"-English 430 

Shakespeare 

3 s.h. 

-"-English 432 

English Drama 

3 s.h. 

English 442 

Contemporary British and 
American Drama 

3 s.h. 

English 410 

Prose Fiction 

3 s.h. 

English 452 

English Literature of 
the Eighteenth Century 

3 s.h. 


Foreign Languages 



French, Spanish, German 



The subject matter preparation program for a prospective teacher of French, 
Spanish, or German consists of 30 semester hours, or approximately 25 percent of 
a basic four-year undergraduate program. However, the semester hour requirement 
varies with the level of college language at which the prospective teacher begins. 
This determination is based on the amount of high school credit in the foreign 
language and performance on a placement test. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows i 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should include a thorough college-level study of the 
various aspects of the foreign language to be taught . 


-"-French 110 and 120 
(Required of students with 

Elementary French 
no high school French) 

6 

s.h. 

-"'French 210 and 220 

Intermediate French 

6 

s.h. 

-"-French 310 

Oral Practice I 

3 

s.h. 

^French 321 and 322 

General Survey of 

French Literature 

6 

s.h. 


- 42 “ 






















' 

























































^-French 411 

Advanced Grammar and Composition 

4 

s .h 

-'^French 420 

Oral Practice II 

4 

s .h 

-x-x-French 430 

French Literature of the 




17th Century 

3 

s ,h 

-::-x-French 440 

French Literature of 




the 18th Century 

3 

s .h 

-x-x-French 442 

French Literature of 




the 19th Century 

3 

s .h 

-'^German 110 and 120 

Elementary German 

6 

s .h 

(Required of students with 

no high school German) 



^German 210 and 212 

Intermediate German 

6 

s.h 

-'-German 331 and 332 

German Conversation 




and Composition 

6 

s.h 

-''-German 421 

German Phonetics and 




Advanced Grammar 

3 

s .h 

German 342 

Introduction to German 




Literature I 

3 

s .h 

German 411 

German Literature II 

3 

s.h 

-x-Spanish 110 and 120 

Elementary Spanish 

6 

s .h 

(Required of students with 

no high school Spanish) 



-x-Spanish 210 and 220 

Intermediate Spanish 

6 

s.h 

-x-Spanish 311 

Conversation 

3 

s.h 

-x-Spanish 321 and 322 

Survey of Spanish Literature 

6 

s.h 

-x-Spanish 411 

Advanced Grammar 




and Composition 

3 

s.h 

-x-Spanish 420 

Advanced Composition 

3 

s.h 

-x-Spanish 421 and 422 

Survey of Spanish-American 




Literature 

6 

s.h 


Two of the three are required for a major. 


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. 
































GUIDELINE 2: The program should develop competency in four skills—understanding , 
speaking, reading, and writing . 

The courses listed under Guideline 1 develop these skills. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide for sufficient emphasis in language 


analysis . 

'"■French 411 Advanced Grammar 

and Composition 4 s.h. 

---French 310 Oral Practice I 3 s.h. 

-"'French 420 Oral Practice II 4 s.h. 

-"'German 331 and 332 German Conversation and 

Composition 6 s.h. 

-"'German 421 German Phonetics and 

Advanced Grammar 3 s.h. 

-"-Spanish 210 and 222 Intermediate 6 s.h. 

-"'Spanish 411 Advanced Grammar 

and Composition 3 s.h. 

■"'Spanish 420 Advanced Composition 3 s.h. 

-"'Education 460 Professional Semester 


(A unit in the study of language materials and methods introduces 
the student to descriptive and comparative linguistics.) 


GUIDELINE 4: The program should include a study of the literature, history 


and civilization of the country or countries concerned . 

•"'French 312 Survey of French History 

and Civilization 

-"-French 321 and 322 General Survey of 

French Literature 

French 430 French Literature of 

the 17th Century 

French 440 French Literature of 

the 18th Century 


3 s.h. 

6 s.h. 

3 s.h. 

3 s.h. 


- 44 - 





































































’ 





































French 442 


French Literature of 
the 19th Century 

3 

s .h. 

■^German. 321 


Introduction to 

German Civilization 

3 

s .h. 

-"-German 342 


Introduction to 

German Literature I 

3 

s.h. 

German 411 and 

412 

German Literature II and III 

6 

s .h. 

German 422 


German Literature IV 

3 

s.h. 

German 432 


German Fiction 

3 

s.h. 

^Spanish 312 


Survey of Spanish History 
and Civilization 

3 

s.h. 

-"-Spanish 321 and 

322 

Survey of Spanish Literature 

6 

s.h. 

-"-Spanish 421 and 

422 

Survey of Spanish-American 
Literature 

6 

s.h. 


GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide sufficient preparation for the later 
pursuit of graduate work in the foreign language . 

The required program and the recommendation of additional elective courses 
in French and German provide adequate preparation for graduate study. In Spanish 
there are no literature courses beyond the two survey courses but it is anticipated 
that two additional courses will be introduced in 1966, which will strengthen the 
program of preparation for later graduate study. These courses as planned are: 
Spanish 423 Literature of the Golden Age 

Spanish 424 Modern Spanish Literature 

Latin 

A sequence of courses comprising an academic minor of 21 semester hours and 
an additional 6 semester hours in elective courses is offered for the preparation 
of the prospective secondary school teacher of Latin, 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 


- 45 - 














































































GUIDELINE 1: The program should include a thorough college-level study of 


the various aspects of the foreign language to be taught . 

-''-Latin 110 and 120 Elementary Latin 6 s.h. 

-''-Latin 210 and 212 Intermediate Latin 6 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2° The program should develop competency in four skills—understanding , 
reading, speaking, and writing . 

The courses listed under Guideline 1 also fulfill Guideline 2. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide for sufficient emphasis in language 
analysis , 

-''-Latin 210 and 212 Intermediate 6 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should include a. study of the literature, history and 


civilization of the country or countries concerned . 

Latin 311 Selections from Caesar's 

Gallic Wars 3 s.h. 

Latin 312 Selections from Cicero 3 s.h. 

Latin 411 Selections from Virgil 3 s.h, 

Latin 412 Selections from Ovid 3 s.h, 

Latin 421 Selections from Roman Historians 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide sufficient preparation for the later 
pursuit of graduate work in the foreign language . 

The student who completes the courses listed under Guidelines 1-4 will have 
sufficient background to pursue additional study in Latin, 

Home Economics 

The home economics education program contains 38 semester hours in home 
economics courses in addition to 10 semester hours of related courses in chemistry, 
art, physics, and biology. Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 


46 































































































GUIDELINE 1: The program of homemaking instruction at the secondary level 
should provide for comprehensive knowledge in the several areas of home economics . 

Nutrition and Foods 

■''■Home Economics 220 General Nutrition 2 s.h. 

-"-Home Economics 230 Food Selection and Preparation 3 s.h„ 

*-Home Economics 300 Foods 3 s.h. 

Clothing and Textiles 

-"-Home Economics 231 Clothing Selection 2 s.h. 

-''-Home Economics 240 Clothing Construction 3 s.h. 

•"-Home Economics 330 Family Clothing 3 s.h. 

Housing, Home Equipment and House Furnishing 

-"-Home Economics 320 Economics of Housing 

and Furnishing 3 s.h. 

Family Relationships 

-"-Home Economics 100 Effective Personal and 

Family Living 1 s.h. 

"■Home Economics 310 Child Development 3 s.h. 

-"-Home Economics 420 Family and Social Relationships 3 s.h. 

Consumer Education 

-"-Home Economics 450 Economics Principles of 

Consumer Practices 2 s.h. 

Home Management Residence 

-"'Home Economics 400 Home Management 5 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide for emphasis upon broad related 

subject-matter areas . 

-"-Art 100 Survey of Art History 2 s.h, 

---Art 232B Basic Design 2 s.h. 


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-’''-Biology 140 

Human Physiology 

3 

s .h. 

^Biology 320 

General Microbiology 

4 

s .h. 

-"-Chemistry 110 and 120 

General Chemistry 

5 

s .h. 

-"-Physics 202 

Household Physics 

3 

s „h. 

---Social Science 110 and 120 

Foundations of Contemporary 
Western Civilization 

6 

s .h. 

One course chosen from the 
psychology, or sociology 

fields of economics, 

3 

s ,h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide sufficient preparation for the later 
pursuit of graduate work in home economics . 

The program appears consistent with requirements for graduate study in recognized 
graduate schools. 

Health Education 

The subject matter preparation program for prospective health education 
teachers includes a total of 36 semester hours, or approximately 30 percent of the 
undergraduate program. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows, 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide basic knowledge and understanding 
in the biological, physical and behavioral sciences . 


-"-Biology 110 and 120 

General Biology 

6 s.h. 

--"Biology 140 

Human Physiology 

3 s„h. 

-"-Physical Education 321 

Human Anatomy 

3 s.h. 

--Psychology 210 

General Psychology 

3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide knowledge and competencies in regard 

to the planning, organizing, and conducting of a sound school health program . 

--■Health 312 Organization and Administration 

of School and Community Health 3 s.h. 


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^Health 331 

Health of the School Child 

2 s.h. 

-"-Health 342 

School Health Problems 

3 s.h. 

-''-Education 460 
(Work in Materials and 

Professional Semester 

Methods in Health Education) 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide basic knowledge and understanding of 

the various areas of health 

instruction, including an understanding 

of the levels 

of progression from grade to grade within the school. 


-"-Health Education 110 

Personal Hygiene 

1 s.h. 

-"-Health Education 210 

Community Hygiene 

1 s.h. 

-''-Health Education 311 

Environmental Health 

3 s.h. 

-"-Health Education 312 

Organization and Administration 
of Community Health 

3 s.h. 

-"-Health Education 

321 and 322 

Principles of Public Health 

6 s.h. 

-"-Health Education 331 

Health of the School Child 

2 s.h. 

Health Education 322 

Health and Nutrition 

2 s.h. 

-“-Health Education 341 

Problems in Health Education 

3 s.h. 

Health Education 342 

School Health Problems 

3 s.h. 

-"-Health Education 411 

First Aid and Health 

3 Soho 

-^-Health Education 420 

Personal Health 

3 s.h. 

-''-Health Education 421 

Healthful Family Living 

3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide for the development of skill and 
competencies in a variety of teaching methods and in the use of materials which 


will motivate the learners to practice desirable health behavior. 


Health Education 

341 

Problems in Health Education 

3 

s.h. 

Health Education 

342 

School Health Problems 

3 

s.h. 

-Education 460 


Work in Materials and Methods 
in Health Education 

15 

s.h. 


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GUIDELINE 5 ° The program should include experiences in physical education to 


enable the student to gain an appreciation of the contributions of physical education 

to the total health of the individual . 

'^Physical Education 


110 and 120 


Fundamental Motor Skills 

2 

s .h. 

''-Health Education 

110 

Personal Hygiene 

1 

s ,h. 

-''-Health Education 

341 

Problems in Health Education 

3 

s .h. 

Health Education 

342 

School Health Problems 

3 

s .h. 


GUIDELINE 6: The program should include sufficient preparation for the later 
pursuit of graduate study in health . 

The required courses plus the available elective courses provide sufficient 
preparation for graduate-level study in health. 

Library Science 

The subject matter preparation program for a prospective elementary or 
secondary school librarian includes a total of 20 semester hours in library science, 
or approximately 16 percent of a basic four-year program. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows, 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide an extensive knowledge of books 
and other materials suitable for school libraries. 


-"-Library Science 

321 

Selection and Use of 

Reference Materials 

3 

s .h. 

-"'Library Science 

322 

Book and Related Materials 
for Children 

3 

s .h. 

-"-Library Science 

331 

Principles of Selection 
of Materials 

2 

s „h. 

-"-Library Science 

421 

Books and Related Materials 
for Young People 

3 

s ,h. 


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GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide a knowledge of the principles and 


practices of organization and administration and their application to school 

libraries. 


-"-Library Science 

340 

Library Techniques 

1 

s.h. 

-"-Library Science 

342 

Cataloguing and Classification 
for School Libraries 

3 

s.h. 

-"-Library Science 

411 

School Library Administration 

3 

s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3 ° The program should provide a concept of what constitutes a good 
school library program with its developmental and sequential aspects . 

-"-Library Science 411 School Library Administration 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4i The program should provide an understanding of the services 
of libraries and their place in society . 

-"-Library Science 200 Introduction to Library Science 2 s.h. 

-"-Library Science 331 Principles of Selection 

of Materials 2 s.h. 

-"-Library Science 411 School Library Administration 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide sufficient preparation for the pursuit 
of later graduate study in library science . 

Required courses provide a base for later graduate study in library science 
at North Carolina College. 

Mathematics 

The program of preparation for the prospective teacher of mathematics consists 
of 38 semester hours, or approximately 32 percent of a basic four-year program. 

Courses are related to guidelines as followss 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should take into consideration the sequential nature 
of mathematics and should provide the prospective teach er an understanding of some 
of the aspects of mathematics which his students will meet in subsequent courses. 


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1 


-"-Mathematics 141 and 142 Plane Trigonometry, College 

Algebra, Analytic Geometry 

(presented from modern viewpoint) 10 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 220 and 230 Calculus I and II 10 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program of mathematics should include a thorough college - 

level study of the subjects in mathematics included in the high school curriculum . 

-^Mathematics 411 Analytic Geometry of Space 3 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 441 Linear Algebra 3 s.h. 

-“-Mathematics 442 Abstract Algebra 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should include additional upper-level work in 
mathematics, with courses chosen for their relevance to the high school curriculum . 

-"-Mathematics 302 Differential Equations 3 s.h, 

-"-Mathematics 312 Theory of Equations 3 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 421 Introduction to the Theory of 

Probability and Statistics I 3 s.h. 

Mathematics 422 Introduction to the Theory of 

Probability and Statistics II 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should include work in areas related to mathematics . 

-"-Physics 111 and 112 General Physics 8 s.h. 

^'Philosophy 222 Logic 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5 2 The program should include sufficient preparation for the 

later pursuit of graduate work in mathematics , 

Mathematics 452 Intermediate Differential 

Equations 3 s.h. 

Mathematics 412 Vector Analysis 3 s.h. 

Mathematics 431 and 432 Advanced Calculus I and II 6 s.h. 


52 - 



































































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Music 


The subject matter preparation program for a prospective music teacher includes 
a total of 66 to 70 semester hours, or approximately 49 percent of a basic four- 
year program. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide for a knowledge of the structural 


elements of music . 

-"-Music 101 Fundamentals of Music 3 s.h. 

-"-Music 122 Introductory Harmony 3 s.h. 

-"-Music 221 and 222 Harmony 4 s.h. 

-"-Music 211 and 212 Ear Training and Sight Singing 4 s.h. 

-"-Music 311 and 312 Advanced Ear Training 

and Sight Singing 2 s.h. 

-"-Music 321 Counterpoint 2 s.h. 

-"-Music 322 Form and Analysis 2 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide opportunities to acquire a sensitivity 
to and a critical awareness of the aesthetic elements of musical performance . 

Applied music courses are required for each student throughout the entire 
undergraduate program. Jury examinations are given each semester to all students 
in all areas of applied study, and a public recital in the student's primary 


applied area is required for graduation. 

Instrumental majors pursue the following: 

-"-Major instrument 16 s.h. 

-"-Piano 4 s.h. 

-""Voice 2 s.h. 

-"-Strings 2 s.h. 

-"-Band and Orchestra Methods ~ Music 361-362 4 s.h. 

-^-Ensemble 3-4 s.h. 


3li s.h. 


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Piano majors pursue the following: 

* Piano 16 s.h. 

' x ' Voice 2 s.h. 

^Strings 2 s,h, 

-"-Band and Orchestra Methods - Music 361-362 4 s.h. 

-"-Ensemble 3 i s .h. 

s.h. 

Voice majors pursue the following: 

-"-Voice 16 s.h. 

-"-Piano 4 s.h. 

-"-Strings 2 s.h. 

-"-Band and Orchestra Methods - Music 361-362 4 s.h. 

-"•Ensemble 3^ s.h. 

29^ s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide a comprehensive understanding of 
music history and literature covering the various eras of music . 

---Music 100 Survey of Music 2 s.h. 

-"-Music 341-342 History of Music 6 s.h. 

-"-Music 440 Music Literature 2 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide adequate training in teaching and 
conducting ensembles . 

-"-Music 392 Conducting 2 s.h. 

It is possible for a student to choose either the choral conducting section 
of this class or the instrumental conducting section, 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide opportunities to acquire a functional 
command of the piano. 


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A piano proficiency examination is required of all music majors at the 
conclusion of their required piano study. If further training is indicated, the 
student is required to continue his study until he is able to pass the proficiency 
examination. 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should provide a conception of comprehensive program 
of music based upon sound philosophy, and an understanding of vhat music to teach 

and how to teach it at any grade level . 

-'^Music 351 Public School Music 2 s.h. 

-"-Music 410 Materials and Methods in Music 3 s.h, 

GUIDELINE 7 : The program should provide sufficient preparation for the pursuit 
of graduate work in music . 

In addition to the courses listed under the various guidelines, four semester 
hours of music electives are also required to be selected from: 


Music 

422 

Advanced Counterpoint and Canon 

2 

s.h. 

Music 

462 

Instrumentation 

2 

s.h. 

Music 

472 

Composition 

2 

s.h. 


Judging by the apparent success of music students in graduate programs, there 
is sufficient preparation for graduate study. 

Physical Education and Health 

The subject matter program for a prospective teacher of physical education and 
health includes a minimum of 36 semester hours, or approximately 29 percent of the 
undergraduate major program. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should lead to the development of principles compatible 
with current educational philosophy . 


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^Physical Education 400 Organization, Administration and 

Supervision of Health and 

Physical Education 3 s.h. 

■^'-Physical Education 421 Principles of Health and 

Physical Education 2 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide basic knowledge in the sciences . 

^Physical Education 321 Human Anatomy 3 s.h. 

^Physical Education 322 Human Physiology 3 s.h. 

^-Physical Education 402 Kinesiology 3 s.h. 


The above courses are in addition to science courses in the general education 


program. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide for knowledge and competencies in 
regard to organizing, planning, administering, and evaluating the various aspects 

of the total program of physical education . 


-"-Physical Education 310 
-"-Physical Education 320 


Individual Motor Skills in Games 

Methods and Materials in Group 
Games of Low Organization 


2 s.h. 


1 s.h. 


-"-Physical Education 330 


-Physical Education 340 


■-Physical Education 400 


-^-Physical Education 422 


Methods and Materials 

in Gymnastics 2 s.h, 

Methods and Materials in 

Individual and Dual Sports 2 s.h, 

Organization, Administration, and 

Supervision of Health and 

Physical Education 3 s.h, 

Curriculum, Supervision and 

Practicum in Physical Education 2 s.h, 


^'-Physical Education 430 


-"-Physical Education 440 


-'■-Physical Education 441 


First Aid, Safety Education, 
Athletic Injuries 

Analysis of Motion and 
Body Mechanics 

Evaluation and Measurement 


2 s.h. 

2 s.h. 

3 s.h. 


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■^Physical Education 450 


Individual Physical Education 


2 s.h. 


^Physical Education 470 Coaching and Officiating 2 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide knowledge of and skill in a wide variety 
of activities; ability to analyze motor skills; and knowledge of methods and materials 


in teaching and coaching . 

-'-Dance 450 

-"-Physical Education 460 

-"-Physical Education 110 
-"-Physical Education 120 
-''-Physical Education 210 
-"-Physical Education 280 

-"-Physical Education 290 

-"-Physical Education 310 
-"-Physical Education 320 

-"-Physical Education 332 

^•Physical Education 340 

-"-Physical Education 330 

-"Physical Education 402 
-"-Physical Education 440 
-•'-Physical Education 470 


Methods and Materials in 

Folk and Square Dancing in 

the Secondary School 1 s.h. 

Methods and Materials in Tap 
and Clog Dancing in the 

Secondary School 1 s.h. 

Fundamental Motor Skills 1 s.h. 

Fundamental Motor Skills 1 s.h. 


Techniques in Motor Skills 1 s.h. 

Methods and Materials 

in Elementary Swimming 1 s.h. 

Methods and Materials in 

Intermediate Swimming 1 s.h. 

Individual Motor Skills in Games 2 s.h. 

Methods, and Materials in Group 

Games of Low Organization 1 s.h. 


Intermediate and Advanced 
Methods a.nd Materials 

in Gymnastics 2 s.h. 

Methods and Materials in 

individual and Dual Sports 2 s.h. 

Methods and Materials 

in Gymnastics 2 s.h. 

Kinesiology 2 s.h. 

Anthropometry and Body Mechanics 2 s.h. 

Coaching and Officiating 2 s.h. 


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GUIDELINE 5: The program should develop knowledge and understandings in 


the various aspects of healthful living 


-"-Health Education 341 

Problems in Health Education 

3 s.h. 

^Health Education 342 

School Health Problems 

3 s.h. 

-"-Physical Education 420 

Personal Health 

3 s.h. 

-"-Physical Education 421 

Principles of Health 



and Physical Education 

2 s.h. 

-^-Physical Education 430 

First Aid, Safety Education, 



Athletic Injuries 

2 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 6: The program should develop competencies that will enable the 
teacher to plan or assist in planning and conducting; programs of health services , 
healthful living, and health instruction . 


-"-Health Education 341 
-"-Health Education 342 
-"-Physical Education 400 

-"-Physical Education 420 
-“-Physical Education 421 

-"-Physical Education 430 


Problems in Health Education 

School Health Problems 

Organization, Administration and 
Supervision of Health and 
Physical Education 

Personal Health 

Principles of Health 
and Physical Education 

First Aid, Safety Education, 
Athletic Injuries 


3 s.h. 
3 s.h. 


^Physical Education 441 
^Physical Education 450 


3 s.h. 
3 s.h. 

2 s.h. 

2 s.h. 

3 s.h. 
2 s.h. 


Evaluation and Measurement 
Individual Physical Education 
GUIDELINE 7: The program should include sufficient preparation for later 
pursuit of graduate study in the area of physical education and health . 


^-Physical Education 421 
; -Physical Education 422 


Principles of Health 

and Physical Education 2 s.h. 

Curriculum, Supervision and 

Practicum in Physical Education 2 s.h. 


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Required courses plus electives provide a base for later graduate study in 
physical education and health. 

Science 

The program of preparation for prospective science teachers includes preparation 
in four areas: 

a. Science - Biology Concentration - 56 semester hours, science and math 43 percent 

b. Science - Chemistry Concentration - 54 semester hours, science and math 43 percent 

c. Chemistry 58 semester hours, science and math 47 percent 

d. Physics 56 semester hours, science and math 43 percent 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should take into account the necessity of having a 

broad foundation in biological and physical sciences and mathematics . 

a. Science - Biology Concentration 


-"-Biology 240 

General Botany 

3 s.h. 

-"-Biology 110 

General Biology 

3 s.h. 

-"-Biology 210 

General Zoology 

4 s.h. 

-"-Biology 220 

General Zoology 

3 s.h. 

-''-Chemistry 110 

General Chemistry 

5 s.h. 

-"-Chemistry 120 

General Chemistry 

5 s.h. 

^Physics 111 

General Physics 

4 s.h. 

-"-Physics 112 

General Physics 

4 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 110 

Plane Trigonometry 

3 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 120 

College Algebra 

3 s.h. 

Science - Chemistry 

Concentration 


-"-Biology 110 

General Biology 

3 s.h. 

-"-Biology 120 

General Biology 

3 s.h. 

''-Chemistry 110 

General Chemistry 

5 s.h. 


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^Chemistry 120 

General Chemistry 

5 s.h. 

-^-Physics 111 

General Physics 

4 s.h. 

-^Physics 112 

General Physics 

4 s.h. 

-^Geography 210 

Principles of Geography 

3 s.h. 

---Geography 212 

Earth Science 

3 s.h. 

^Mathematics 110 

Plane Trigonometry 

3 s.h. 

-'■-Mathematics 120 

College Algebra 

3 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 130 

Plane Analytic Geometry 

3 s.h. 

Chemistry 



--Chemistry 110 

General Chemistry 

5 s.h. 

^-Chemistry 120 

General Chemistry 

5 s.h. 

-"-Physics 111 

General Physics 

4 s.h. 

---Physics 112 

General Physics 

4 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 141 

Plane Trigonometry and 

College Algebra I 

5 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 142 

College Algebra II 
and Analytic Geometry 

5 s.h. 

Physics 



-"-Mathematics 141 

Plane Trigonometry 
and Algebra I 

5 s.h. 

--Mathematics 142 

College Algebra II 
and Analytic Geometry 

5 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 220 

Calculus I 

5 s.h. 

-"-Physics 111 

General Physics 

4 s.h. 

---Physics 112 

General Physics 

4 s.h. 

-"-Physics 211 

Mechanics 

4 s.h. 

--■Physics 222 

Thermodynamics 

4 s.h. 


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GUIDELINE 2: The program 

should have depth in at least 

one area of science 

with courses chosen for maximum 

relevance to the hieh school 

science curriculum. 

a. Science - Biology Concentration 


^"-Biology 230 

Comparative Anatomy 

4 s.h. 

-"-Biology 310 

Genetics 

3 s.h. 

-''-Biology 320 

General Microbiology 

4 s.h. 

-"-Biology 420 

Embryology 

3 s.h. 

-"-Biology 430 

Vertebrate Physiology 

3 s.h. 

-"-Biology 432 

Cell Physiology 

3 s.h. 

Biology 242 

Plant Taxonomy 

3 s.h. 

Biology 411 

Histology and Microtechnique 

3 s.h. 

Biology 450 

Parasitology 

3 s.h. 

Chemistry 301 

Organic Chemistry 

5 s.h. 

Chemistry 302 

Organic Chemistry 

5 s.h. 

Mathematics 130 

Plane Analytic Geometry 

3 s.h. 

Biology 460 

Seminar (selected topics) 

1 s.h. 


Note: (Basic core of biology courses is the same for the biology major as for 

those in teacher education,) 


b. Science - Chemistry Concentration 

-''-Chemistry 200 Analytical Chemistry 5 s.h. 

-"-Chemistry 202 Analytical Chemistry 5 s.h. 

-"-Chemistry 301 Organic Chemistry 5 s.h. 

Note: (Attention is given to essential concepts in Physical Chemistry.) 

Additional course offerings may be elected from other selected courses. 
c„ Chemistry 

-"-Chemistry 200 Analytical Chemistry 5 s.h. 


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-'^Chemistry 202 

Analytical Chemistry 

5 s.h. 

-"-Chemistry 301 

Organic Chemistry 

5 s.h. 

-^Chemistry 401 

Physical Chemistry 

5 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 220 

Calculus I 

5 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 230 

Calculus II 

5 s.h. 

d. Physics 



-"-Physics 302 

Electricity 

4 s.h. 

-"-Physics 311 

Magnetism 

4 s.h. 

-"-Physics 411 

Optics 

3 s.h. 

-"-Physics 421 

Introduction to Modern Physics 

3 s.h. 

Physics 212 

Mechanics 

4 s.h. 

Physics 412 

Electronics 

3 s.h. 

Physics 422 

Introduction to Modern Physics 

3 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 302 

Differential Equations 

3 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 230 

Calculus II 

3 s.h. 

-^-Mathematics 431 

Advanced Calculus I 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should include a sufficient basis 

and preparation 

for later graduate study in 

. a particular science area. 


a. Science - Biology 

Concentration - This program provides 

sufficient preparation 


for graduate study, if students elect additional mathematics offerings. 

b. Science - Chemistry Concentration - This program provides sufficient 
preparation for graduate study if students elect additional mathematics. 

c. Chemistry - This program is designed for students who expect to attend 
graduate school and is quite adequate for this purpose. 

d. Physics This program is designed for students who expect to do graduate 
work in physics and mathematics. 


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Social Studies 


The subject matter preparation for a prospective social studies teacher 
includes a total of 42 semester hours, or approximately 34 percent of the total 
undergraduate prograjn. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide a study in depth, at the college 


level, of courses in the high school curriculum . 

■“‘Social Science 110 and 120 Foundations of Contemporary 

Western Civilization 6 s.h. 

•“History 211 and 212 Ancient and Medieval History 6 s.h. 

-“-History 211 and 222 United States History 6 s.h. 

American History electives 6 s.h. 

European History electives 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2: The program should take into account the necessity of having 


breadth in the social studies . 

-“-Economics 210 Principles of Economics 3 s.h. 

■^Geography 210 Principles of Geography 3 s.h. 

-“-Political Science 210 Introduction to American Government 3 s.h, 

-“-Electives in Political Science 3 s.h. 

-“-Sociology 210 Principles of Sociology 3 s,h„ 

-“-Electives chosen from economics, geography, political 
science and sociology 6 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should enable the prospective social studies teacher 
to pursue graduate studies in one or more areas in the field of the social studies . 

The completion of the programs described in Guidelines 1 and 2 qualifies the 
prospective teacher to enter a graduate program leading to the degree of Master of 
Social Science, or to enter some graduate programs in history. 


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Geography 


The subject matter preparation program for a prospective geography teacher 
includes 30 semester hours in geography, or approximately 25 percent of the 
undergraduate curriculum; the preparation in history consists of 21 semester hours, 
or approximately 17 percent of the total undergraduate program. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide a study in depth, at the college 

level, of courses in the high school curriculum , 

-"-Social Science 110 and 120 Foundations of Contemporary 

Western Civilization 6 s.h. 

-“History 221 and 222 United States History 6 s.h. 

-"-History 332 

-"-History 311 
-"-History 312 
-"-Geography 210 
-"-Geography 212 
-^-Geography 222 
^-Geography 312 
^Geography 331 
-"-Geography 431 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should take into account the necessity of having 
breadth in the social studies . 

'-'Political Science 210 Introduction to American Government 3 s.h. 

-"■Sociology 210 Principles of Sociology 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should enable the prospective social studies teacher 
to pursue graduate studies in one or more areas in the field of social studies . 


History of the Negro 
in the United States 

3 

s.h. 

Modern Europe, 1500-1815 

3 

s.h. 

Modern Europe, 1815-1914 

3 

s.h. 

Principles of Geography 

3 

s.h. 

Earth Science 

3 

s.h. 

Economic Geography 

3 

s.h. 

Geography of Anglo-American 

3 

s.h. 

Weather and Climate 

3 

s.h. 

Geography of Africa 

3 

s.h. 


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-"-Geography 322 

Geography of Hispanic America 

3 s.h. 

-"-Geography 411 

Geography of Europe 

\ 

3 s.h. 

-"-Geography 432 

World Resources and History 

3 s.h. 

Geography 311 

Political Geography 

3 s.h. 

Geography 332 

Map Making and Interpretation 

3 s.h. 


History with Social Studies Minor 


The subject matter preparation programs for a prospective history teacher 
consists of 36 semester hours (including the two three semester hour courses in 
the core curriculum in world civilization), or approximately 29 percent of the 
undergraduate curriculum; the preparation in the general social studies minor 
includes 21 semester hours distributed among economics, geography, political science, 
and sociology. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide a study in depth, at the college 


level, of courses in the high school curriculum . 

-"-Social Science 110 and 120 Foundations of Contemporary 

Western Civilization 6 s.h. 

--History 211 and 212 Ancient and Medieval History 6 s.h. 

-"-History 221 and 222 United States History 6 s.h. 

History 311 Modern Europe, 1500-1815 3 s.h. 

History 312 Modern Europe, 1815-1914 3 s.h. 

--“History 321 The Period of National 

Development in the United 

States, 1789-1865 3 s.h. 

» 

--“History 322 The Era of Industrial 

Development and Reform 3 s.h. 

-"-American History electives 3 s.h. 

---European History electives 3 s.h. 

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History 401 Europe Since 1914 3 s.h. 

History 411 European Diplomatic History 3 s.h. 

History 231 Russia Under the 

Monarchy, 1850-1917 3 s.h. 

History 232 Contemporary Russia 3 s.h. 

History 412 P’oreign Relations of 

U. S„ Since 1900 3 s.h. 

History 422 Emerging African 

Nationalism Since 1945 3 s.h. 

History 431 History of North Carolina 3 s.h. 

History 490 Seminar in History 

(Honors Course) 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2: The program should take into account the necessity of having 
breadth in the social studies . 

Four areas are studied (economics, geography, political science, and sociology). 


Three courses in one area 9 s.h. 
Two courses in one area 6 s.h. 
One course in one area 3 s.h. 
One course in one area 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should enable the prospective social studies teacher 
to pursue graduate studies in one or more areas in the field of the social studies . 

The requirement of 36 semester hours in history, with a balance between 
European and American history, enables the prospective teacher to pursue graduate 
study in history, 

C, PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

The Undergraduate program in professional education is designed for students 
preparing to teach in areas on the secondary level or in special subjects. The 


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requirements include 24 semester hours p or approximately 20 percent of the under¬ 
graduate curriculumo This work is distributed as follows in respect to the 
guidelines: 

GUIDELINE 1: The professional education program should provide an understanding 
of the normal sequences of human growth and development, with special emphasis on 

the pupils of the school age to be taught , 

^-Education 310 Pupil Development 3 s.h. 

Education 411 Human Growth and Development 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2 ° The professional education program should provide an understanding 

of the nature of learning, the learning process, and the psychology of learning , 

-'■-Education 460 The Senior Semester in 

Teacher Education 15 s.h, 

(Work in the psychology of learning and evaluation) 

GUIDELINE 3: The professional education program should provide an understanding 
of methods, special techniques, and materials appropriate to the specific levels or 

areas of the prospective teacher’s subject-matter concentration, and skill in applying 

them in a classroom situation , 

-"-Education 460 The Senior Semester in 

Teacher Education 15 s.h. 

(Work in materials and methods and teaching of reading) 

Other courses which support this guideline are available. 

GUIDELINE 4: The professional education program should provide an understanding 

of the purpose, organization, and administration of school systems, with special 

emphasis on the role of the school teacher in the total education program . 

-"-Education 200 Introduction to the 

Study of Education 3 s.h. 

-^Education 300 The Secondary School 3 s.h. 


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GUIDELINE 5: The professional education program should provide a broad 

historical, philosophical, and sociological orientation to schools in our society 

and to the profession of teaching . 

Education 200 Introduction to the 

Study of Education 3 s.h. 

Other elective courses contribute to this guideline. 

GUIDELINE 6: The professional education program should provide an extended 
period of continuous full-time student teaching experience in the grade levels or 

subjects to be taught . 

Education 460 Senior Semester 15 s.h. 

(Seven weeks of full-time student teaching) 


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STANDARD V—PROFESSIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIENCES 


A. PURPOSES AND OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of professional laboratory experiences were developed by 
the college staff involved in student teaching and state that the specific objectives 
are to further the professional development of students by: 

1. Relating acquired knowledge to observed school practices. 

2. Applying educational principles to actual teaching-learning situations. 

3. Assuming the full responsibilities of a professional person. 

4. Having the benefit of continuous and systematic evaluation by responsible 
supervisors. 

5. Making a continuous self-evaluation of his total fitness for teaching. 

B. ORGANIZATION OF STUDENT TEACHERS 

Student teaching is part of the "senior semester in teacher education," a full 
semester in the senior year when the prospective teacher is involved only with 
professional experiences. 

During the first part of this semester the student spends seven weeks in 
on-campus instruction and two weeks in off-campus observation and participation 
experience. 

During the last half of the semester the student does student teaching for 
eight weeks and has a one week post-student teaching seminar. The arrangement of 
student teaching includes progressive assumption of teaching until a full teaching 
load is carried, full time teaching ordinarily for at least four weeks, and the 
seminar of individual and group conferences. The schedule for student teaching 
is designed to provide a minimum of 115 clock hours of directed observation, 
conferences, and participation in areas other than actual teaching and a minimum 
of 115 clock hours of actual teaching. 


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The Director of Student Teaching, a member of the Department of Education, 
is a member of the Teacher Education Council and serves as chairman of the council's 
subcommittee on admission to teacher education. His office, the Office of Student 
Teaching, handles placement of student teachers from all areas except home economics 
and library science. For these two programs, he serves as a liaison person on 
placement. In general, the Director of Student Teaching administers the overall 
student teaching program. 

There is no campus laboratory school so all student teaching is done at off- 
campus schools. 

Co PRE-STUDENT TEACHING EXPERIENCES 

After four weeks during the first half of the professional semester, students 
engage in a two week observation experience at the school where they will later do 
student teaching. During this period the student completes a series of structured 
assignments designed to promote relation of theory to observed practices. In 
general, pre-student teaching experiences include (1) study of individual pupils, 

(2) development of lesson plans, (3) evaluation of procedures, (4) observation of 
library usage and audiovisual usage, and (5) observation and participation to 
become generally acquainted with the overall school program. 

D. ADMISSION TO STUDENT TEACHING 

Eligibility for student teaching is based on previous admission to the teacher 
education program and meeting the following requirementss 

1. Filing of an application for student teaching during the spring 
semester of the junior year or in September of the senior year. 

2. Attainment of a grade point average of at least 1,6 in the teaching area. 

3, Full attainment of approved status in teacher education. 

4, An overall 1.00 grade point average and a 1,00 average in English. 


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5. Must have the "approval" of the college supervisor in the particular 
area. 

6. The student must be able to complete the requirements in his teaching 
field by the end of the year in which he does student teaching. 

7. In addition to the application, the student must express a genuine 
interest in student teaching. 

E. COOPERATING SCHOOLS 

Cooperating schools are selected by the Director of Student Teaching. 
Criteria on which selection is made include: 

1. Accreditation by the North Carolina State Department of Public 
Instruction. 

2. Proximity of the school to the College, 

3. Presence in the school of exceptional programs or superior teachers. 

4. Agreement of school administrative officials with the principles of 
sound student teaching experiences. 

5. Special recommendation by faculty members. 

6. Students' requests for special schools on personal reasons. 

Students in library science are assigned only to schools recommended by the 
Dean of the School of Library Science and home economics students are placed only 
in schools approved by the State Home Economics Office, 

F. SUPERVISING TEACHERS 

Supervising teachers are selected by the Director of Student Teaching in 
consultation with the designated school official. The standards for selection as 
supervising teacher include: 

1. The teacher must have a Class "A" or higher certificate. 

2. The teacher must have had a minimum of two years teaching experience. 


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3„ The teacher must express a willingness to participate in the College's 
student teaching program, 

4. The teacher must be unqualifiedly recommended by authorized school 
personnel. 

5. The teacher's schedule must provide breadth in the student teacher's 
area of specialization. 

Only one student teacher is assigned to a supervising teacher during any 
semester. In a few areas, a supervising teacher may have two student teachers 
during the year, one each semester. 

G. ORIENTATION OF SUPERVISING TEACHERS 

An annual conference of supervising teachers and principals is held on the 
campus. At this conference all members of the senior semester staff participate, 
discussions on the student teaching program are held, and there are area meetings 
for teachers and administrators. 

The College also provides each supervising teacher with a comprehensive packet 
of material on the College's student teaching program. 

Supervising teachers are paid $50 for each student teacher supervised. These 
funds are secured through a student teaching fee of $50 charged by the College of 
the students. 

H. SUPERVISION BY THE COLLEGE 

The College has four general supervisors and 12-14 special supervisors, 
depending on the teaching areas of enrolled student teachers. Every student 
teacher is visited by a general supervisor and a special supervisor. 

Teaching loads of supervisors are reduced according to the number of students 
supervised, on the ratio of four students to three semester hours. This means that 
a full-time supervisory load is 20 student teachers. 


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College supervisors' expenses when supervising are paid by the College. 

I. PROGRAM OF EVALUATION 

All student teachers must submit a written evaluation of their total student 
teaching experience after completion. 

Supervising teachers and college supervisors also evaluate the effectiveness 
of the program and the performance of the student teacher. 

The College periodically evaluates the effectiveness of the student teaching 
program through follow-up studies. 

Students receive one letter grade for the entire senior professional semester 
of 15 credit hours. This grade represents a composite of the ratings given by the 
senior semester staff, college supervisors, and supervising teacher. 

No student who receives a failing rating on the directed teaching part of the 
senior semester will be recommended for certification nor will any student whose 
composite rating is below "C". 


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STANDARD VI—FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND MATERIALS 
A. BUILDING FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT 

The Department of Education is housed in a three-story brick building, 
constructed in 1955, containing 37,960 square feet of floor space. Also housed 
in the building are the Departments of Psychology and Geography. Other facilities 
located in the building include the Audiovisual Center, the Counselor Training 
Area, the Reading Center, the Data Processing Center, offices of the summer school, 
a large reception room, and an auditorium with a seating capacity of approximately 
170. Three other departments, English, Health Education, and Philosophy, hold 
several classes in the Education Building. 

1. Offices 

The general office of the Department of Education, located on the first floor, 
includes a suite of three connecting rooms. The outer office, assigned to the 
secretary of the Department, is equipped with a secretarial desk and chair, 
typewriter, two four-drawer files, a stencil drier, a large dictionary with stand, 
and four chairs for visitors. The inner office of the Chairman of the Department 
of Education is equipped with an executive desk, two bookcases, two tables, two 
four-drawer files, a folding work table and four chairs for visitors. The 
Educational Records Office, the third room in the suite, is equipped with three 
four-drawer files, a secretarial desk and chair, a bookcase, a metal storage 
cabinet, and six chairs for visitors. A Royal Scot Copymor Machine is also in this 
office. 

Secretarial service consists of two full-time secretaries located in the 
general office suite, one half-time person for the Director of Student Teaching, 
one half-time person for the Director of the Audiovisual Service, and several 
students made available through the work-study program of the commerce department 


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or through the Economic Opportunity Program, In addition, the Director of 
Educational Research has one person who serves as an administrative assistant. 

These persons render services of varying types for the Department of Education. 

Facilities for producing and duplicating materials are available. A mimeograph 
machine is available in the conference room; a second machine is located in the 
Educational Research Center; a duplicating machine is located in the Reading Center; 
and two photocopying machines are available. Some additional services are available 
through campus-wide facilities such as the Audiovisual Center. 

The private offices of all members of the education faculty are located in 
the Education Building, A total of 15 offices are available. Thirteen offices are 
occupied by one faculty member each. Three are equipped to accommodate two faculty 
members and one is reserved for the use of visiting instructors during the summer 
session and for special uses during the regular session. Each private office is 
provided with an executive desk, a desk chair, side chairs, a bookcase and a filing 
cabinet. In addition, storage cabinets and/or storage space in closets are available. 

2. Classrooms 

There are 18 classrooms in the Education Building. Two are seminar rooms 
equipped with tables, side chairs, bulletin boards and chalkboards. These rooms 
can accommodate 12 to 16 students each. Five classrooms are equipped with tables 
and side chairs to accommodate 25 to 40 students. Ten classrooms are equipped with 
tablet arm chairs. All have adequate chalkboard and bulletin board space. Two of 
the ten classrooms are large rooms, each of which can accommodate 70 students. 

Venetian blinds and fluorescent lights are standard equipment. Chairs and desks 
are movable. The large reception room can be used for social activities and for 
seminars and conferences. The a.uditorium is used for small gatherings, faculty 
meetings, and large group instruction. 


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B. LIBRARY RESOURCES 


The central library, the Jajnes E„ Shepard Memorial Library, houses approximately 
143,673 volumes. The library staff consists of 16 persons, of which eight are 
professionally trained. 

Additions to library holdings are based on recommendation of the faculty and 
library staff. Requests by individual faculty members are usually followed. It 
was reported in the College self-study that 18,278 books and 1,656 bound volumes 
have been added in areas concerned with teacher education within the past two years. 
Holdings reported as concerned with the broad subject areas concerned with preparing 
secondary school teachers, as of November 30, 1964, show a total of 69,480 books, 
8,437 bound periodicals, and 19,650 reference type volumes. Of the 69,480 books, 
8,404 books could be classified as professional education volumes. The titles of 
246 periodicals in subject areas were listed as periodicals regularl} r subscribed 
for by the library. 

A program of inter-library cooperation with the Duke University Library and 
the Louis R. Wilson Library of the University of North Carolina makes the total 
library resources of three institutions available to faculty and students. 

A budget for teacher education at North Carolina College is regularly provided. 
During the 1961-62 fiscal year, a total of $10,528 was spent for professional 
education and related subject area library books and a total of $975 was spent 
for subscriptions to educational periodicals. In 1963-64, the total library budget 
was $58,072. The total library appropriation for 1964-65 is $49,635. The 1964-65 
library budget for the Department of Education was approximately $2,000. In 
comparison the 1964-65 budgets for other departments were as follows: Art, $700; 
Biology, $1,100; Chemistry, $900; Commerce, $1,100; English, $1,700; and lesser 


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amounts for other departments. In addition, $790 was budgeted for the Curriculum 
Materials Center. The budgeted amounts do not include periodicals and binding. 

C. CURRICULUM MATERIALS CENTER 

The Curriculum Materials Center is located on the second floor of the 
James E, Shepard Memorial Library, Adjacent to the stacks, it is a large room 
equipped with shelves, tables, and chairs. The Center is directed by the Reference 
Librarian who now devotes only part time to general library circulation and reference 
work. She is assisted by one part-time clerk. 

The Center was established in 1964-65 as a cooperative arrangement between the 
Department of Education and the Library, Long range plans in terms of objectives, 
holdings, personnel, and financing the Center have not been officially adopted. 

The following materials are located in the Curriculum Materials Center: 

1. Textbooks on the approved list of instructional materials issued by 
the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction for secondary 
schools and some elementary school texts in special areas such as art, 
music, health and physical education, and library science, 

2. Supplementary text (elementary and secondary) for selected subjects. 

3. Vertical file material—pamphlets, clippings, pictures, charts, maps, 
posters and booklists. 

4. Courses of study and curriculum guides from departments of public 
education in various states, 

5. Selected units of learning arranged by subject areas, specific units 
and grade level, 

6. Multiple copies of some free and expensive materials. 

7. Catalogs of free and inexpensive materials. 

8. Bulletin board materials, 

9. Testing materials. 


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A larger collection of tests and inventories are presently located in the 
Bureau of Educational Research on the second floor of the Education Building. 

All students have access to these materials within the rules set up by the Bureau 
which limits the use of the tests by undergraduates to those recommended by 
instructors. The latest inventory reveals a wide variety of tests and testing aids. 

A depository for some materials of instruction is now located in a large 
conference room in the Education Building, These materials, for the most part, 
are professional periodicals and miscellaneous papers. Students may use the room 
any time that it is not being used for conferences or classes. 

D. SPECIAL FACILITIES 

The Audiovisual Center, located in the Education Building, is a centralized 
pool of teaching resources with four major functions (1) instruction, (2) A-V 
service to all college classes, (3) production of teaching materials, and 
(4) publication and research. 

Among the materials and equipments are motion pictures, filmstrips, slides, 
phonographs, charts, exhibits, demonstrations, closed-circuit television, recordings, 
and overhead projectors. 

Consultation services and technical assistance provided include selection, 
acquisition, production, and distribution of teaching materials and equipment. 

Screens are found in a large number of classrooms. One room has been partly 
reserved for projecting materials. An overhead projector and screen remain in 
Room 201, Education Building, and the Education Auditorium is equipped for use 
of projected materials, including slides, A screen remains in the Education 
Auditorium at all times. Other rooms of the AV Center include storage space, 
a listening room, a graphic arts room, and a maintenance room. The recording 
studio is equipped with two rank-mounted tape recorders, one radio, one disc- 
cutter, one record player, two professional microphones and one piano. These 


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facilities enable one to record live from microphones, radio, or from disc and 
to dub-in sound effects or music. The equipment in the recording studio is 
electronically connected and controlled. In addition, there is one photographic 
darkroom completely equipped with two enlargers. 

The closed-circuit television facilities are available and include a teaching 
studio, receiving stations in six buildings, a film chain, a control room, an 
office-conference area, a workroom, and storage rooms. 

The teaching studio consists of approximately 1200 square feet of space, 
contains no windows, and is air conditioned. It has high ceilings to provide 
for adequate lighting and lighting controls. It is equipped with classroom 
facilities essential to the accommodation of a variety of teaching situations. 

The studio contains a two-camera television chain. Student operators are trained 
to man these cameras. 

The control room houses the master controls and monitors. It is adjacent 
to the teaching studio and separated from it by a glass panel which permits 
full viewing of the studio. The film chain is in the control room. It consists 
of a pedestal-mounted console pick-up TV camera which flanks a multiplexer in 
a lazy susan fashion, along with slide and motion picture projectors. Additional 
facilities are available in the teaching studio for rear projection when necessary 
and desirable. 

The workroom is equipped for producing instructional aids and for preparing 
a variety of types of props. The office-conference room provides office space 
for the studio manager and for conferences with teachers. 

The studio facilities are located in the Commerce Building. The auditorium 
in that building has been converted into a television teaching studio, control 
room, office-conference room, workroom, and storage space. Receiving stations 


- 79 - 
















_ 




arc located in two rooms in the Education Building, two rooms in the Classroom 
Building, the Biology Building Lecture Hall, and two rooms in the Science Building. 

A television projector is located in the auditorium of the Education Building. 

An intercommunication system is incorporated in the facilities, so that students 
in the receiving rooms may direct questions to the television teacher. These 
questions and the answers given by the TV teacher can be heard by all students in 
each of the other receiving rooms. 

The Reading Skills Center is provided for use of freshmen and seniors enrolled 
in the teaching of reading in the secondary school. Materials and equipment 
available include books appropriate for developing reading skills, SRA reading 
laboratories, and numerous audiovisual aids such as film projectors, opaque 
projectors, filmstrips and filmstrip projectors, and controlled readers. 

While private offices provide space for personal conferences and small 
conferences of three to five persons, two seminar rooms are available for 
conferences of larger groups of ten or twelve persons. Two conference rooms 
are in the Guidance Center and another small conference room is available in the 
Special Education Center. A large conference room is located on the first floor 
of the Education Building, It is furnished appropriately and provides an informal 
setting for many meetings, social gatherings, as well as conferences of a group 
nature, 

One station wagon and one six-passenger automobile are owned by the College 
and are available to the Department of Education. They are used in connection 
with career and college days, visiting student-teacher centers, attending educational 
meetings and other official meetings. 

Exhibit space is provided in the James E, Shepard Memorial Library and in 
the corridor of the Education Building where two bulletin boards, enclosed with 


- 80 . 










1 







glass, are available. The large conference room on the first floor of the 
Education Building is often used for large exhibits. Exhibit space in each 
building concerned with teacher education is also available and is used by 
students and teachers for appropriate exhibits. 

E. CONTEMPLATED CHANGES 

The following changes were reported as contemplated, 

1. Use of the Curriculum Materials Center will be expanded to provide 
broader experience for teacher candidates in curriculum development. 

A larger supply of curriculum materials including curriculum studies 
and courses of study will be made available as resource materials. 

2. An observation room, located on the third floor of the Education 
Building, will be utilized more fully as a laboratory in which student 
teachers may gain pre-service observation experience. 

3. Plans are being made to explore the possibility of utilizing closed 
circuit television for more effective instruction in professional 
educational courses which are offered prior to the student teaching 
"block" as well as for instruction in the student teaching "block." 

4. New media other than closed circuit television will be evaluated 
with a view toward adapting it for the instructional program, 

5. Capital improvements approved by the 1963 General Assembly but in 
various stages of completion are as follows, completion of a language 
laboratory with 80 stations, air conditioning of the central library, 
establishment of the closed circuit television facilities, completion 

of a storage building, a dormitory for 300 men (scheduled for completion 
in the fall of 1965), a dormitory for 400 women (scheduled for completion 
in February, 1966), completion of a cafeteria (scheduled for September, 1966), 


“ 81 - 



























































a student center (scheduled for completion in February, 1967), renovation 
of the Administration Building, and an addition to the Science Building. 

6. Capital improvement recommendations to the North Carolina General Assembly 
for 1965-67 with implications for professional education include the 
following; air conditioning of the Education Building and five other 
facilities, renovations to the Fine Arts Building, addition to the 
Science Building, two dormitories to house 400 women each, dormitory 
for 200 men, fine arts building, addition to Home Economics Building, 
and President’s Residence, 

F. FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND MATERIALS; BY AREAS 

Art 

The Art Department is housed on the second and third floors of the Fine Arts 
Building. There are three studio rooms, a lecture room, and two offices. The 
rooms are not designed for art laboratory experiences ; and, except in the area 
of art history, equipment is badly needed for studio instruction. 

Business Education 

Eight general classrooms and four typing rooms are available for the business 
education and/or business administration department. 

Audiovisual equipment is available for business faculty use. Equipment of 
this kind has not been purchased specifically for use by the business department. 

Curriculum materials are partially housed in the main library. Faculty keep 
their personal books and materials in their own offices. 

The number of office machines available for teaching purposes is partially 
adequate, 

English 

Two classrooms, equipped with lecterns, desks, chalkboards, desk dictionaries 
and electrical outlets are available in the classroom building for the English 


- 82 - 































































Department. In addition, three classrooms in the Commerce Building, similarly 
equipped, are used by the Department on a part-time basis. Six faculty members, 
including the chairman, have private offices. Others are assigned to three 
offices which accommodate four of five persons. 

Audiovisual materials particularly applicable to the English program include 
the following: 

1. Selected albums of plays, poetry, and dramatic readings, 

2. Audiovisual machinery and operators available from the Audiovisual 
Center, which is unusually well equipped to assist the English 
Department in this respect, 

3. The library contains 17,641 books and 613 periodicals directly 
related to English and useful at both the undergraduate and graduate 
levels. 


Health Education 

Health education classes are taught in the education classroom building and in 
the classrooms of the men's gymnasium. All classrooms are adequately equipped. 

Each of the four faculty members is assigned to an adequately equipped private 
office. 

Audiovisual machines and materials, including films, filmstrips, recordings, 
tapes and transparencies, are available in adequate quantities and qualities to the 
faculty through the central audiovisual office. 

The Central Library contains a good collection of books in the area of health 
education. However, there is a need for additional volumes. Current professional 
journals and publications are available. The Department does not have a regular 
allotment for books. Requests are submitted to the librarian who orders the books 
as his budget permits. 


-83 






















. 






















The Department has materials in the Curriculum Materials Center. This, however, 
is a recent addition and its needs are still great. 

Home Economics 

The Department is housed in a building designed for this program. The 
building contains two full floors plus a large area in the basement designed for 
heavy work, such as furniture repair, upholstery work, painting and the like. 

On the first floor are the child development laboratories with kitchen; 
lecture room; offices for head of department and secretary; large reception room 
with kitchenette (used for dual purposes); three offices used by area supervisors 
and secretary (employees of the State Department of Public Instruction); maid 
facilities and faculty lounges. 

On the second floor are the clothing and foods laboratories; storage areas; 
student lounge; two classrooms; and three offices. 

Exhibit cases are located on both floors used for display purposes and the 
viewing public. 

The basement is soundproof. It was designed for use in home furnishing and 
management so that noise would not disturb other areas. Some laundry equipment is 
located in this laboratory. 

There is a small outdoor play space for the children enrolled in the nursery 
school. Storage for outdoor equipment is attached to building. The child development 
laboratory is adequate for the enrollment. There is a viewing area for unseen 
observation by students enrolled in the course. Simple, yet nutritious food is 
prepared in a small adjacent kitchen for the enrollees. The equipment is practical 
and fairly adequate. 

There is good storage throughout the building. The building is well maintained, 
the furnishings colorful and appropriate, and the facilities are used by the students. 


=84 



























































Much of the equipment is modern. In amounts and variety the furnishings appear 
to be fairly adequate. 

Each instructor has some storage space. Some teaching materials are supplied 
through the department budget, however instructors add to the collection annually 
through the addition of free or inexpensive publications. 

A separate house is used for group living, practicum purposes and laboratory 
experiences. The house, built for this purpose, was turned over temporarily to 
the president as a residence and this experience was returned to the old home 
management residence, which in turn, had become a faculty residential facility. 

A small budget is allotted to the department annually for consumable supplies 
and replacements, 

Some equipment for showing slides and films are in the department. However, 
the staff relies upon the Visual Aid Department for much of this type of equipment. 

The librarian has been cooperative in purchasing some new references in this 
area annually. The home economics education instructor relies largely upon free 
materials and textbooks for supplementing her courses. 

Latin 

One classroom, equipped with lectern, desks, chalkboards, and electrical 
outlets, is available in the Education Building for Latin, Office space is shared 
with members of the modern language departments. 

Materials are adequate for the present program. 

Library Science 

The School of Library Science is loated on the top floor of the Library. 
Facilities include three classrooms, equipped with lecterns, desks, chalkboards 
and electrical outlets; a student study room with study desks; a room that houses 


■ 85 - 
































the duplicating equipment; a storeroom for supplies; and individual offices for 
all faculty members. 

The library of the School includes a smattering of professional library 
materials, books for children and youth, and ephemeral materials. These resources 
are housed in the stacks, the study room, and in faculty offices. Cataloging and 
classification of the materials is incomplete. Many of the materials in this 
laboratory collection are old, out of date, or badly worn. There is no evidence 
that there are sufficient professional library materials to adequately support the 
library science courses offered by the School. 

Students in the School have access to the library’s collections of books, 
periodicals, and other materials; however, these materials are not a part of the 
School of Library Science laboratory collection. 

The School has done little to incorporate the concept of the library as a 
center for instructional materials. Students have access to the Audiovisual 
Center; however, there appears to be little planned cooperative instruction between 
the two media services. The School offers no courses in non-print media; nor are 
library science students required to take any audiovisual courses. 

Mathematics 

Eight classrooms equipped with a teacher’s desk, students’ desks, and chalk¬ 
boards in the Science Building are used by the Department of Mathematics. Three 
members have individual offices and two members share one office. One office has 
three desks with two regular members assigned one desk each and the third desk used 
by the four visiting members. 

Audiovisual aids and materials are not used to any appreciable extent. 








































































The central library contains a collection of books suitable for the mathematics 
program and additional materials are available through the inter-library cooperative 
program with Duke University and the University of North Carolina. 

A very significant facility is the data processing equipment possessed by the 
Department and used for instructional purposes and research. 

Modern Foreign Languages 

For the modern language departments, five classrooms equipped with lecterns, 
desks, chalkboards, and electrical outlets, are available in the Administration 
Building, six classrooms in the Commerce Building, and one in the Health Building, 

Four faculty members share an office suite in the Administration Building. There 
are two other office groupings in the same building, five faculty members in one 
large office, four in another. In the Commerce Building the six faculty members 
in Spanish share three desks. 

The language laboratory, located in the Commerce Building, has 80 student 
positions, 56 of these fully equipped with recording and play-back. It is a cartridge 
type laboratory with remote control of student positions. 

Audiovisual materials may be secured from the audiovisual center to be coordinated 
with the civilization courses. Taped materials for elementary courses are available. 
There are few materials available for intermediate and advanced courses. 

The central library contains a collection of books adequate for the programs 
in the three modern languages. 

Music 

The Music Department, housed in the Fine Arts Building, uses four classrooms, 
equipped with lecterns, chairs, chalkboards, and pianos. All members of the Music 
Department have private offices. Nine practice rooms are available for student use, 

1 


• 87 - 



















































. 

































two large rehearsal rooms are available for ensembles, and an auditorium containing 
an 18-rank Tellers organ is available for teaching purposes and practice use. The 
Department has a total of 26 pianos, one pipe organ, and an adequate number of 
brass instruments. 

The music library contains a relatively large collection of books on music, 
including a number of complete collections of works of important composers. However, 
the card catalog shows an insufficient number of texts and resource books in music 
education. Very few books published in the past ten years are found to be included 
in the collection. 

Neither the curriculum center nor the music library contain a sufficient 
number of public school music books. Neither collection contained copies of the 
State-adopted texts in music and only a few supplementary texts are available for 
student use. 

Physical Education and Health 

The Department of Physical Education is housed in two separate buildings, a 
gymnasium for men and another for women. There are three offices in the men's 
gymnasium and two in the gymnasium for women. In each case, with one exception, 
two staff members are assigned to an office. In the exception, there are three. 

All offices are adequate. Equipment such as files, typewriters, desks, tables and 
chairs is available in each. Adequate duplicating machines and materials are 
available for all staff members. 

Both gymnasiums are satisfactorily equipped and have good locker and shower 
facilities for the students and faculty. The swimming pool, satisfactory for 
instructional purposes, is located in the women's gymnasium, A splendid and 
well-equipped dance studio is located in the Fine Arts Building, 


88 - 


















































The men's gymnasium has three classrooms equipped with desks, chalkboards, 
and electrical outlets, and one experimental laboratory, which is partially equipped, 
but is in the process of being completely equipped. 

An adapted physical education classroom and a gymnastics room, both satisfactorily 
equipped, are also located in the men's gymnasium. 

Audiovisual machines with film, filmstrips, slides, recordings, transparencies 
and tapes are available through the central audiovisual office. 

Classroom supplies are poor for the size of the program. Great need was seen 
in each of the buildings in this respect. 

The central library contains a good collection of books in the areas of physical 
education, health education and recreation education. However, there is need for 
additional volumes, and especially for additional copies. Current professional 
journals and publications are available in satisfactory numbers. 

The Department has materials in the Curriculum Materials Center. This, however, 
is a recent addition and is still being developed. 

Science 

Biology 

Biology is taught in a modern building, devoted entirely to biology, which 
contains many well-equipped, all-purpose science rooms and a number of well-equipped 
research laboratories. Recent funds were made available to purchase equipment in 
the area of physiology. Each faculty member is provided with a private office with 
the exception of two, who share an office. 

Chemistry and Physics 

These subjects are taught in the chemistry-physics building which also has 
adequate well-equipped laboratories. 


- 89 - 











. 





















Social Studies 


Eight classrooms, equipped with lecterns, desks, chalkboards, and electrical 
outlets, are available in the classroom building. However, only four of the 
classrooms are equipped with maps. 

The two senior professors have private offices. One part-time member, serving 
also as Dean of the Graduate School, does not occupy a history office. Four faculty 
members share one office and two part-time teachers share another. All the offices 
are served by two telephones. A part-time secretary serves the Department. Four 
graduate assistants and a few undergraduates in the Economic Opportunity Program 
are also assigned to the Department. 

The library contains a basic collection which the Department considers adequate 
for instructional purposes. The proximity of Duke and UNC enlarges the potential 
range of library material available. 

The materials center is inadequate, containing only 21 items in the social 
studies area. 

Geography 

Two classrooms, assigned to the Geography Department, are adequately equipped 
for basic instruction in geography. Only minimal laboratory equipment is available. 
Each faculty member has an office. 

Since the Department is only three years old, the library holdings are very 
basic. The present appropriation for the Department is $300. 


90 - 



■ 


. 





GRADUATE PROGRAMS 


STANDARD I—OVERALL POLICIES 
A. PURPOSES AND OBJECTIVES 

The 1957 statute that defines the overall purposes of North Carolina College 
at Durham includes "such graduate and professional instruction as shall be approved 
by the North Carolina Board of Higher Education, consistent with appropriations made 
therefor". Until 1963 this included certain master's programs and a Doctor of 
Education program. The 1963 General Assembly defined the Consolidated University 
of North Carolina as the only tax-supported institution authorized to award the 
doctorate. 

The graduate program in teacher education has continuity with the guidelines 
that direct the teacher education program on the undergraduate level. The graduate 
program is aimed at expanding the instructional proficiencies which the student 
has previously gained and in providing qualified holders of the bachelor's degree 
with a more substantive command of their special fields. The broad general training 
on the undergraduate level in the study of the school and society and the growth 
and development of the child are foundational to the work that a student will take 
on the graduate level. 

The graduate program is designed to develop scholarship and cultivate interest 
and skill in research. It aims to develop analytical and hypothetical thinking, 
encourage independent study, and develop original and critical thinking as well as 
the application of scientific methods to immediate and concrete circumstances. The 
Graduate Faculty Handbook sets forth purposes and policies of the Graduate School. 

North Carolina College offers the! following curricula in teacher education 
at the graduate levels 


■ 91 - 














- 


. 



1. The Master of Education Degree in Elementary Education 


The student in this program may prepare for general elementary school teaching 
or may take the Master of Education Degree in Elementary Education with a concentration 
in Special Education. The latter program prepares the student for teaching in the 
area of the exceptional child on the elementary level. 

2. The Master of Arts Degree in Education 

The student may do his work for the Master of Arts degree in any one of the 
following programs: 

a. Elementary education 

b. Guidance and counseling 

c. School administration and supervision 

d. Secondary education 

e. Audiovisual directors program 

The areas in the Department of Education from which a minor may be selected 
by persons seeking graduate certification with a subject matter major area are: 

(a) administration and supervision, (b) guidance and personnel work, (c) secondary 
education, (d) history and philosophy of education, and (e) special education. 

The teaching areas in which a major may be taken are: art, biology, chemistry, 
commerce, economics, English, French, general science, health education, history, 
home economics, library science, mathematics, music, physical education, sociology, 
and Spanish. Graduate programs in teacher education are provided in all of these 
areas except art, general science, health, and Spanish. 

The graduate program in education also includes a one-year professional program 
for the training of school administrators and supervisors. 


-92- 




























































B. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 


All graduate study at North Carolina College is under the jurisdiction of the 
Graduate School. Figure 11 presents schematically the organizational structure for 
the development and execution of policies governing graduate programs in teacher 
education. The Graduate Council, whose chairman is the Dean of the Graduate 
School, formulates and implements policies governing graduate programs—such 
aspects of the program as admission requirements, advisement, and standards for 
completion of the degree programs. 

The Graduate Council, the regulatory body of the Graduate School, has the 
responsibility of formulating the basic academic policies and requirements of the 
Graduate School. This is done in conformity with the minimum standards prescribed 
by the Conference of Southern Graduate Deans and the basic philosophy of the 
institution. Special functions of the Council include the approval of thesis 
projects, the assignment of thesis advisors, the appointment of thesis committees, 
the admission of students to candidacy, and the adjudication of academic appeals 
and petitions. It is also the responsibility of the Graduate Council to review 
graduate policies, curricula, programs, and to recommend changes as needed. 

The Graduate Council is composed of one representative from each department 
offering graduate programs. The Department of Education is one of 13 departments 
offering graduate work and has the responsibility of implementing the several 
graduate curricula for teachers, administrators, and service personnel. This 
responsibility is fulfilled under the general regulations of the graduate school 
as adopted by the Graduate Council and administered by the Dean. 

The Chairman of the Department of Education, who is also Chairman of the Council 
on Teacher Education and responsible for administering the undergraduate teacher 


-93 








































































education program, is a member of the Graduate Council. This official assists 
the Dean in presenting the recommendations of the department to the Graduate Council 
and has the responsibility of administering its policies relating to graduate 
teacher education. 

The Dean of the Graduate School, within the scope of her authority, acts 
upon matters relating to the graduate program in the area of teacher education as 
presented to her by the Chairman of the Department of Education and the Graduate 
Council. Where policy is involved relative to graduate teacher education, and in 
other appropriate cases, the Graduate Dean presents, with her advice, the recommendations 
of the Graduate Council to the President. 


-94- 


















■ 






FIGURE 3: THE ORGANIZATION OF NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE FOR GRADUATE EDUCATION 



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95- 




































STANDARD II—STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 
A. ADMISSION TO GRADUATE SCHOOL 

A candidate is ordinarily admitted to a specific program when admitted to 
the Graduate School. The standards and procedures for admission includet 

1. The student*s application for admission and his official undergraduate 
transcript must be submitted to the Dean of the Graduate School at least 
30 days in advance of the registration date of the semester or summer 
session in which he proposes to begin his degree work. A student who 
applies late or whose application has not been evaluated before registration 
may be permitted to enroll as a temporary degree-seeking student in the 
appropriate graduate department but degree credit for graduate courses is 
not granted unless the student meets the requirements for admission to 

the Graduate School. 

2. The applicant's overall undergraduate average must be at least "C" and 
his record must show the completion, with an average of "B" or better, of 
an undergraduate major of at least 30 semester hours in the area of the 
proposed graduate major. 

3. An applicant for admission to the Graduate School may be required to 
take an English proficiency examination. 

4. A degree-seeking applicant may be required to take the Graduate Record 
Examination or other tests of their potential for graduate work, particularly 
in the area of their graduate major, and to submit official reports of his 
scores to the Graduate Office as a part of his admissions credentials. 

5. Applicants intending to pursue graduate teacher education curricula 
must submit official reports of their scores on the National Teacher 


-96- 

























Examination to the Graduate Office as a part of their admission 
credentials. A minimum score of 500 on the common examinations will 
be required as of 1965-66, 

In addition to the standards listed above, applicants for the graduate professional 
program for school administrators must have a cumulative college average of "B" or 
better and a recommendation from a State or local school official stating that 
the applicant possesses school leadership potential, 

B. TRANSFER POLICIES 

1. Program Transfers 

Students who have pursued graduate work at the College under one program and 
wish to transfer to another program may transfer contingent upon the approval of the 
student's advisor and upon the recommendation of the Department of Education. 

2. Admission of Transfer Students 

a. A maximum of six semester hours of transfer credit toward a 
graduate degree is allowable upon the recommendation of the 
department chairman and the approval by the Graduate Dean. The 
student must apply for the transfer credit and submit official 
transcripts showing the credit. The transfer credit, however, 
does not reduce the residence requirement, 

b. Credit for extension courses earned at other schools may not be 
transferred as degree credit but may be transferred as credit on 
deficiencies, upon the recommendation of the departmental chairman, 

C. RETENTION REQUIREMENTS 

The continued pursuit of courses in a graduate program is dependent upon: 

1. Completion of course work with a passing grade recognized by the 
College (H or P). 


-97- 





















2. Completion of course work within time limitations. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

1. Requirements for the Master of Arts and Master of Science Degrees 

a. Bachelor’s degree from an approved institution. 

b. The minimum score on the National Teacher Examination required by the 
State in which the candidate seeks certification. 

c. Candidate must hold or be qualified to hold the Class "A" Undergraduate 
Teaching Certificate. 

d. Completion of the specific requirements of the teaching certificate 
for which the candidate wishes the institution to recommend him. 

e. A reading knowledge of one modern foreign language. Successful 
completion of a course in statistics may be substituted for this 
requirement in physical education, home economics, commerce, and 
Education. This requirement must be satisfied prior to admission to 
candidacy. 

f. Admission to candidacy for the Master’s degree. 

g. Completion of 30 semester hours of course work, 18 to 21 of which must 
be in the department of the major and 9 to 12 in the department of the 
minor. 

h. A written examination in the field of the major, 

i. A thesis. 

j. An oral examination covering the thesis. 

2. Requirements for the Master of Education Degree 

a. A bachelor’s degree from a recognized institution, 

b. A North Carolina Primary or Grammar Grade "A" Certificate or the 


equivalent, 


- 98 - 











































- 













. 




















c. Admission to the Graduate School. 

d. Successful completion of the following: 

(1) Courses in the area of Elementary Education (15-21 semester hours). 
This includes Education 572 (Statistics) and the written project. 

(2) Courses in graduate subject matter (15-21 semester hours). 

(3) Total semester hours requirements (36 semester hours). 

e. Admission to candidacy. 

f. A comprehensive examination in the field of Elementary Education. 

g. A completed library or field project. 

E. STUDENT ADVISEMENT 

The advisement of students prior to the selection of curricula occurs through 
correspondence, printed material, conferences, and orientation meetings. 

After selection of a curriculum, students are advised by a person in the chosen 

area. 

F. NUMBER COMPLETING CURRICULA IN 1964 

Master of Arts 12 

Master of Education 52 

Minors by Academic Departments 


Biology 5 
Chemistry 0 
Commerce 4 
English 8 
History 3 
Home Economics 3 
Music 2 


- 99 - 















' 




























Physical Education 


9 


Psychology 2 

Sociology 1 

G. RECORDS SYSTEM 

The central system of records, including personal and professional information 
on all graduate students, is maintained by the Graduate Office. The Education 
Records Office also maintains a system of records for graduate students in education. 
A folder for each graduate student in the Education Records Office includes: 

1. Letter of admission 

2. Program of study showing grades for each course as completed 

3. Results of comprehensive, oral, and national examinations 

4. Progress through the program 

5. Miscellaneous items which may vary from student to student, e.g., 
correspondence, records of conferences. 

The Office of the Registrar has for each student: 

1. Transcript(s) of previous work 

2. Grades earned in courses pursued at North Carolina College 

3. A record of the application for admission to the graduate school. 

H. MINIMUM RESIDENCE AND TIME LIMIT REQUIREMENTS 

The minimum residence requirement is one academic year or two semesters or 

thirty-six weeks of summer attendance. 

Requirements for any program must be completed within a period of six 

years. 

I. STUDENT LOAD 

To be classified as a full-time student, the student's program must contain 
a minimum of nine semester hours. The maximum load for graduate students in the 


- 100 - 



































' 
































regular program is 12 semester hours and nine semester hours in summer school. 
In-service teachers are permitted to register for no more than one course in any¬ 
one semester. 

J. RECOMMENDATION FOR CERTIFICATION 

Recommendation of candidates for certification originates in the Department 
of Education, The Department of Education makes its recommendation to the Graduate 
School, which forwards the recommendation to the Office of the Registrar for 
transmittal to the State Department of Public Instruction. 


- 101 - 








STANDARD III—FACULTY 


A. TOTAL GRADUATE FACULTY 


The College's personnel policies governing the employment of new members of 
the faculty, promotions, tenure, salary scale, teaching load, qualifications for 
graduate teaching, and retirement are uniform for all schools and departments. 

The Graduate Faculty Handbook defines the responsibility of the graduate 
faculty in these words; 

The graduate faculty is composed of members of the regular 
institutional faculty who, by virtue of their training or interest 
or both, have been appointed to teach graduate courses and to supervise 
master’s theses. To be eligible for a continuing appointment, a faculty 
member must have the Ph.D. degree or the equivalent and must have had at 
least two years of experience as an outstanding teacher of advanced 
undergraduate courses. The members of the graduate faculty, within their 
respective departments, prescribe and plan the graduate courses to be 
taught with the approval of the Graduate Council. 

At times, in order to staff the graduate faculty with persons with high levels 
of competence or who possess some special or unique training, visiting teachers are 
employed, 

Table 11 provides summary data for the graduate faculty. 


- 102 - 

























' 



















TABLE 11 


SUMMARY DATA ON CHARACTERISTICS OF THE GRADUATE FACULTY 



Number 

Total 

A. Teachers handling graduate offerings, 1964-65 

64 

64 

B. Degrees 



Terminal degrees 

49 


Master*s degrees and work beyond 

14 


Law Degrees 

1 

64 

C. Departments 



Biology 

5 


Chemistry 

3 


Commerce 

8 


Education 

18 


English 

5 


French 

4 


History 

4 


Home Economics 

2 


Mathematics 

5 


Music 

2 


Physical Education 

4 


Psychology 

1 


Sociology 

3 

64 

D. Ranks 



Professor 

42 


Associate professor 

6 


Assistant professor 

9 


Instructor 

7 

64 

E„ Employment status 



Full-time 

48 


Visiting 

15 


Part-time 

1 

64 

F. Years employed 



0- 5 

40 


6-10 

5 


11-15 

11 


16-20 

6 


21-25 

1 

64 

G. Age distribution 



20-29 

5 


30-39 

10 


40-49 

24 


50-59 

23 


60-70 

2 



-103 






























































































B. FACULTY POLICIES 


1. Salary 

Salary scales for the various ranks are as follows: 

Instructors ............. . $5,000 - $ 7,000 

Assistant Professors, .............. 6,000 - 8,500 

Associate Professors, .............. 7,000 - 10,000 

Professor .................... 8,000 - 12,000 

2, Retirement 

Any member of the administration, faculty, or staff may retire voluntarily 
upon becoming 60 years of age. Retirement at the age of 65 is mandatory unless 
the employee is requested by the College to remain in service. 

3. Promotions 

At North Carolina College promotion is not considered as an automatic right 
based on length of service. A number of factors such as (a) educational qualification, 
(b) teaching experience, (c) demonstrated teaching ability, (d) ability to direct 
research in one’s field, and (e) evidence of continued growth are considered. 

4, Public Activities 

The graduate faculty is frequently called upon to render service to their 
scholarly associations of their academic disciplines. Papers are read before these 
associations and book reviews are made by the faculty. North Carolina College 
provides part payment for travel to the meetings of these associations and faculty 
member or members attend each year. 

The graduate faculty also renders local and state service on committees related 
to community and state problems. 

The Graduate School places a high premium on scholarly research as is evidenced 
by the large number of publications of scholarly research credited to members of the 
graduate faculty. 


- 104 - 















































wo'jd 4w^‘' *W. vi i ' *t . oc ^ 























5. Faculty Upgrading 


The College has upgraded the faculty, during the past three years, by employing 
nine persons with the earned doctorate, 

6. Visiting Professors 

The College maintains a visiting teacher’s budget for the purpose of securing, 
as the needs arise, qualified persons with special competencies. During the regular 
term, these selected persons come from Duke University and the University of North 
Carolina. The need for special instructional services for the increased enrollment 
of persons in the teacher education curricula in elementary education during the 
summer sessions is met, in part, through the employment of visiting teachers, 

7. Policy on Leaves 

North Carolina College permits leaves for academic study, research and Government 
employment. These leaves are usually granted for one year and subject to renewals. 

The College has no policy on granting leaves on full or part salary for further 
study. 

The College has a policy by which teaching loads may be reduced for research 
on campus with no reduction in pay. 

The College has no policy on sabbatical leaves. 


105 - 


















































STANDARD IV—CURRICULA 


The College is authorized to provide such graduate and professional instruction 
as may be approved by the State Board of Higher Education. Under this authorization, 
the College is providing and requests approval for its undergraduate programs for 
elementary school teachers; secondary school and special subject teachers of biology, 
business education, chemistry, English, French, history, home economics, librarian, 

_— r- \ 

mathematics, music, physical education, sociology, and special education; and for 
the special service positions of principal, supervisor, counselor, and audiovisual 
director. 

A. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 

The graduate program for elementary school teachers may be pursued under either 
of two graduate degree programs—the Master of Arts Program in Elementary Education 
or the Master of Education Program in Elementary Education. The Master of Arts 
Degree in Elementary Education requires 30 semester hours of course work, a thesis, 
and statistics or a foreign language examination. The Master of Education Degree 
in Elementary Education requires 36 semester hours of course work, with no specific 
requirement relative to thesis or a foreign language examination. 

There is no undergraduate program in elementary education. The graduate program 
has few people enrolled in it during the regular academic year but a sizeable number 
of persons during the summer sessions. 


The Master of Arts Program in Elementary Education 


GUIDELINE It The program should broaden the teacher’s understanding of the 
purpose and role of the elementary school . 


-''-Education 540 


Social Foundations of Education 3 s.h. 


-''“Education 510 


Psychological Foundations 
of Education 


3 s.h. 


- 106 - 















































































-^Education 520 Elementary Education in the U.S. 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should extend the teacher’s understanding of the 
nature of the learner and learning process , 

-"-Education 510 Psychological Foundations 

of Education 3 s.h. 

--Education 571 Thesis No credit 

Education 572 Introduction to 

Elementary Statistics 3 s.h. 

(Required for those persons who choose this course as the alternative to a 
foreign language examinations.) 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should assist the teacher in gaining greater insights 
and skills in the use of the techniques of research and in designing and carrying 

out research projects . 

The thesis requirement enables the student to gain many skills in research 
techniques, 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should extend and deepen the teacher's ability to 
work effectively with the content areas of the elementary school curriculum . 

-"-Education 521-522 Investigations and Trends in 

Teaching in the Elementary Schools 6 s.h, 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide for concentrated study in one or more 
of the instructional areas of the elementary school curriculum . 

The student is required to choose a total of 12-15 semester hours from two of 
the following subject areas (at least 9 semester hours in one area): 


History 

Sociology 

English 

Physical Education 

572 

510 

400 

511 

564S 

511 

503 

522 

580S 

531 

552 

531 




550 


-107 






























































' 


















































































Music 

Mathematics 

Biology 

Chemistry 


(Proposed) 

(Proposed) 

(Proposed) 

520 

401 

403-E 

Chemistry 405 ES 

521 

402 

404-E 

Chemistry 406 ES 

532 

403 

405-E 


540 

Master of Education Program in Elementarv Education 

GUIDELINE 

1: The program should 

broaden the 

teacher's understanding 


purpose and role of the elementary school . 


-^Education 

510 

Psychological Foundations 
of Education 

3 

s.h. 

-"-Education 

540 

Social Foundations 
of Education 

3 

s .h. 

Education 

507 

Curriculum 

3 

s.h. 

Education 

544 

Philosophy of Education 

3 

s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2: The program should extend the teachers understanding; of the 

nature of the learner and learning process , 

-^Education 510 Psychological Foundations 

of Education 3 s.h. 

-"-Education 572 Introduction to 

Elementary Statistics 3 a.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should assist the teacher in gaining greater insights 

and skills in the use of the techniques of research and in designing and carrying 

out research projects . 

Research reports and term papers and the Master of Education project required 

of all students are activities that contribute to this guideline, 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should extend and deepen the teacher's ability to 

work effectively with the content areas of the elementary school curriculum . 

-"-Education 521-522 Investigations and Trends in 

Teaching in the Elementary School 6 s.h. 


- 108 - 












































































































































-^Education 524 


Activities in Elementary Education 6 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide for concentrated study in one or 
more of the instructional areas of the elementary school curriculum . 

The student must select 15-21 semester hours from at least two subject areas 
with nine semester hours from one area, 

B. SECONDARY SCHOOL AND SPECIAL SUBJECT TEACHERS 

For secondary school and special subject teachers, 60 percent of the master's 
degree work (18 semester hours) is required to be taken in the subject field and 
30 percent of the work (9 semester hours) is required to be in professional 
education. This leaves 10 percent (3 semester hours) as elective work that may 
be taken in the subject field or in professional education. 

Subject field areas in which graduate concentrations are offered include 
biology, business education, chemistry, English, French, history, home economics, 
mathematics, music, physical education, and sociology. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows; 

GUIDELINE 1; The program should broaden the basic understanding of the learner 
and the learning process . 

Education 510 Psychological Foundations 

of Education 3 s.h. 

Education 511 Human Growth and Development 3 s.h, 

GUIDELINE 2; The program should assist the teacher in gaining greater insights 
and skills in the use of the techniques of research and in designing and carrying 
out research projects . 

Education 553 Investigation and Trends in 

Teaching in the Secondary School 

-X- or 3 s.h. 

Education 554 


- 109 - 

























































































Biology 


--Biology 570 

Seminar in Biology 

1 

s .h 

---Biology 580 

Research in Biology 

1-6 

s .h 

---Biology 590 

Thesis 

3 

s .h 


Business Education 



---Education 570 

Procedures in Educational 

Research 3 

s .h 

---Commerce 590 

Thesis 

3 

s .h 


Chemistry 



---Chemistry 560 

Seminar in Organic or 
Inorganic Chemistry 

1 

s „h 

---Chemistry 570 

Research in Chemistry 

1-6 

s .h 

---Chemistry 590 

Thesis 

3 

s .h 


English 



--English 500 

Literary Research and Bibliography 3 

s .h 

--English 590 

Thesis 

3 

s .h 


French 



---French 550 

Seminar- 

1 

s „h 

---French 590 

Thesis 

3 

s ,h 


History 



-"-History 501 

Historical Method and Bibliography 3 

s .h 

---History 590 

Thesis 

3 

s .h 


Home Economics 



Home Economics 520 

-x- or 

Education 570 

Research Techniques in Home Economics 

3 

Procedures in Educational Research 

s „h 

---Home Economics 590 

Thesis 

3 

s .h 


• 110 - 































■ 






















































Mathematics 


-^-Mathematics 590 Thesis 3 s .h. 

Music 

-"-Music 590 Thesis 3 s.h. 

Physical Education 

-''-Physical Education 530 Seminar 1 s.h. 

-“-Physical Education 590 Thesis 3 s.h. 

Sociology 

•^-Sociology 460 Sociological Statistics 3 s.h. 

-“-Sociology 470 Research Methodology 3 s.h. 

Sociology 590 Thesis 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should extend the teacher's understanding of the 

basic educational philosophies and school curriculum patterns . 

Education 540 Social Foundations of Education 

“- or 3 s.h. 

Education 544 Philosophy of Education 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide for concentrated study in the teacher's 
subject field or fields . 


-“-Biology 432 
-“-Biology 512 
Plus elective. 

-“-Commerce 541 
-“-Commerce 522 


Biology 

Cell Physiology 3 s.h. 

Genetics 3 s.h. 


Business Education 

Marketing 3 s.h. 

Improvement of Instruction in 

Social Business Subjects 3 s.h. 


-Ill- 









































































-"-Commerce 561 

Improvement of Instruction in 
Typewriting and Office Machines 

3 s.h. 

Plus electives. 

Chemistry 


No specifically required 

courses, however, a concentration in chemistry requires 

a minimum of 20 semester hours 

of work in chemistry. This work must 

be balanced 

between inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. 



English 


-"-English 501 

History of the English Language 

3 s.h. 

-"'English 503 

The Development of Modern English 

3 s.h. 

Plus electives. 

French 


-"-French 510 

The Development of Modern French 

3 s.h. 

-"-French 521 

The Nineteenth Century French Novel 

3 s.h. 

French 512 

Literature of the Renaissance 


or 


3 s.h. 

French 562 

Medieval French Literature 


-"-French 541 

Lyric Poetry in the 

Nineteenth Century 

3 s.h. 

French 511 

-"- or 

Explication De Textes 

3 s.h. 

French 532 

Contemporary French Literature 



History 


-"'History 541 

Modern Europe, 1815-1914 

3 s.h. 

-"'History 542 

Modern Europe Since 1914 

3 s.h. 

-''-History 562 

U. S. History, 1865-1900 

3 s.h. 

-"'History 572 

U. S. History Since 1900 

3 s.h. 


Plus electives. 


112 - 
































■ 











































































Home Economics 


-A-Home Economics 503 

Craft Design 

2 s.h. 

-"-Home Economics 570 

Evaluation in Home Economics 

3 s.h. 

-"-Home Economics 530 

Curriculum Planning in 

Home Economics 

3 s.h. 

Plus electives. 

Mathematics 


-"-Mathematics 421 

Introduction to the Theory of 
Probability and Statistics 

3 s.h. 

-^Mathematics 441 

Linear Algebra 

3 s.h. 

-"■Mathematics 504 

Introduction to Higher Geometry 

3 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 521 

The Theory of Numbers 

3 s.h. 

Plus electives. 

Music 


-"-Music 501 

Modern Harmony and Form 

3 s.h. 

-"-Music 541 

Music in the Tothic, Baroque, 
and Renaissance Periods 

3 s.h. 

-"-Music 542 

Music in the Classical, Romantic, 
and Modern Periods 

3 s.h. 

Music 550 

-"- or 

Band Arranging 

3 s.h. 

Music 560 

Choral Arranging 



Plus electives. 

Physical Education 

-"-Physical Education 500 Physiology and Muscular Activity 3 s.h. 

-"-Physical Education 501 Advanced Organization 

and Administration of 

Physical Education 3 s.h, 

-"-Physical Education 511 Adapted, Restrictive, and 

Corrective Physical Education 3 s.h. 


-= 113 - 


























' 



















































































^'-Physical Education 512 Tests and Measurements in 

Physical Education 

Plus electives. 

Sociology 

-"-Sociology 510 The Study of Society 

Plus electives. 

C. LIBRARY SCIENCE 


3 s.h. 


3 s.h. 


The graduate program in library science requires a person to hold a class "A" 
teaching certificate and have completed a minimum of 18 semester hours of basic 
studies in library science for admission to the graduate program. 

Sixty percent of the hours must be taken in library science; approximately 
20 percent of the graduate work is in education; and 20 percent is recommended in 
areas determined by the needs of the individual student based on the transcript 
presented. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should broaden the understanding of the learner and 
the learning process . 

Education 510 Psychological Foundations 

of Education 


Education 511 
or 

Education 512 
or 

Psychology 411 


3 s.h. 

Human Growth and Development 
Theories of Learning 
Psychology of Learning 


GUIDELINE 2: The program should assist the teacher in gaining greater insights 


and skills in the use of the techniques of research and in designing and carrying 


out research projects . 

Library Science 571 
-x- or 

Education 570 


Methods of Investigation 
Procedures in Educational Research 


114 - 






































































































GUIDELINE 3: The program should extend the teacher's understanding of the 


basic educational philosophies and school curriculum patterns . 

-^Education 507 The Curriculum 


Education 540 
or 

Education 545 
or 

Education 544 


Social Foundations of Education 
School and Society 
Philosophy of Education 


3 s.h. 


3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide for concentrated study in the teachers 
subject field or fields . 

A minimum of 20 semester hours of graduate work in library science is required 
in the program exclusive of a project, or 26 semester hours with a project. The 
courses which are required are listed below. The program of studies beyond the 
basic required courses are to be approved by the Dean of the Library School. 


-"-Library Science 521 
-"-Library Science 531 
-"-Library Science 541 


-"-Library Science 542 

Library Science 522 
-"- or 

Library Science 523 
or 

Library Science 524 
-"-Library Science 514 
-"-Education 451 


General Bibliography 3 s.h. 


Foundation 3 s.h. 


Technical Services in Libraries 3 s.h. 


Organization of Materials for Use 3 s.h. 


Literature of the Social Sciences 
Literature of the Humanities 
Literature of the Natural Sciences 
The Library in the School 


3 s.h. 


3 s.h. 


Selection and Evaluation of Audio- 
Visual Materials 3 s.h. 


Electives may be chosen from the following courses: 


Library Science 511 
Library Science 512 


History of Books and Libraries 

Library Organization and 
Administration 


2 s.h. 


3 s.h. 


115 “ 





































■ 






. 



























Library Science 

516 

The College Library 

3 

s.h. 

Library Science 

518 

The Public Library 

3 

s.h. 

Library Science 

522 

Literature of the Social Sciences 

3 

s.h. 

Library Science 

523 

Literature of the Humanities 

3 

s.h. 

Library Science 

524 

Literature of the Natural Sciences 

3 

s.h. 

Library Science 

533 

Reading in the Library 

3 

s.h. 


D. COUNSELOR 

The program for the preparation of counselors leads to a master’s degree in 
guidance and counseling. 

Courses are related to guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide a thorough understanding of the 
individual, including dynamics of human behavior and growth processes . 


-"-Education 533 The Dynamics of Personal Behavior 3 s.h. 

Education 510 Psychological Foundations 

of Education 3 s.h. 

Education 511 Human Growth and Development 3 s.h. 

Education 512 Theories of Learning 3 s.h. 

Education 514 Mental Hygiene in Teaching 3 s.h. 

Education 515 Problems of Mal-adjustment 

Among Children 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2s The program should provide professional competence directly 

related to the practice of school counseling . 

-"-Educational Psychology 531 Theory and Techniques 

of Counseling 3 s.h. 

■^Educational Psychology 534 Occupational Theory 

and Practice 3 s.h. 

-"-Educational Psychology 536 Analysis of the Individual - 

Methods and Techniques 3 s.h. 


- 116 - 
























































, 












































GUIDELINE 3: The program should extend the understanding of the basic 
educational philosophies and school curriculum patterns , 

---Education 530 Principles and Organization 

of Guidance Services 3 s.h. 

Education 540 Social Foundations of Education 3 s.h. 

(Recommended) 

GUIDELINE 4; The program should provide complete information regarding the 
philosophy, organization and administrative relationship of guidance services . 

--Education 530 Principles and Organization 

of Guidance Services 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5; The program should include a study of societal forces and 
cultural changes in the graduate areas of sociology, anthropology, economics, and 


international relations. 



•^Sociology 510 

The Study of Society 

3 s.h. 

Education 540 

Sociological Foundations 



of Education 

3 s.h. 

Economics 411 

Problems of Economic Development 

3 s.h. 

Sociology 402 

Cultural Anthropology 

3 s.h. 

Sociology 532 

Dynamics of American Culture 

3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 6? The program should include an emphasis on research and statistics . 

^Educational Psychology 572 Introduction to Statistical 

Methods in Education 3 s.h, 

-''-Educational Psychology 571 Seminar for Master’s Degree No credit 

GUIDELINE 7 % The program should provide laboratory and practicum experiences 

in counseling . 

-'^Educational Psychology 537 Supervised Practicum 

in Counseling 


3 s.h. 







































































































































E. SUPERVISORS 


GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide a thorough understanding of the 
nature of the learner and the psychology of learning . 

Education 510 Psychological Foundations of Education 

or 3 s.h. 

Education 511 Human Growth and Development 

-''-Education 536 Analysis of the Individual 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2. The program should provide comprehensive study of the dynamics 


of human behavior, 


-'^Education 514 


Mental Hygiene 


3 s.h. 


-^Education 533 


Dynamics of Human Behavior 


3 s.h. 


-'■-Sociology 522 


Sociology of Small Groups 


3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide an understanding of curriculum 
development, including the bases for decisions in curriculum changes . 


Education 510 
'- or 
Education 511 


Psychological Foundations of Education 

3 s.h. 

Human Growth and Development 


-"-Education 544 


-''-Education 507 


Philosophy of Education 


The Curriculum 


3 s.h, 
3 s.h, 


GUIDELINE 4; The program should include a thorough grounding in the techniques 


of supervision, 





-"-Education 

502 

Supervision of Instruction 

3 

s.h. 

-''-Education 

521 

Investigations and Trends in 
Teaching in the Elementary School 

3 

s.h. 

^Education 

522 

Investigations and Trends in 
Teaching in the Secondary School 

3 

s.h. 


GUIDELINE 5 s The program should provide acquaintance with the various phases 
of organization and administration involved in the operation of a school . 


- 118 - 



































■ 





























































































^Education 501 


-'-Education 503A 


-"-Education 503B 


Basic Principles of 

Educational Administration 3 s.h. 

Elementary School Organization 

and Administration 3 s.h. 

Secondary School Organization 

and Administration 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 6: The program should provide opportunities for graduate work 
in related areas, including work in subject, specializations . 

Students must complete a minimum of nine hours from related disciplines, such 
as sociology, history, psychology, English, science, etc. 

GUIDELINE 7: The program should include an emphasis on research and use of 
appropriate statistics . 

Procedures in Educational Research 3 s.h. 

Thesis Seminar No credit 


--Education 570 
-'■-Education 571 
-"-Education 572 


Introduction to Statistical 
Methods in Education 


3 s.h. 


PRINCIPALS 


GUIDELINE 

li The 

program should place some emphasis on the 

foundation 

Education 

510 

Psychological Foundations of Education 

or 



3 s.h. 

Education 

511 

Human Growth and Development 


Education 

540 

Social Foundations of Education 


or 



3 s .h„ 

Education 

544 

Philosophy of Education 


Education 

541 

European Foundations of 

Modern Education 

3 s.h. 

Education 

542 

History of Education in 
the United States 

3 s.h. 

Sociology 

510 

The Study of Society 

3 s.h. 

Sociology 

521 

Culture and Personality 

3 s.h. 


•= 119 “ 





















































































■ 














































GUIDELINE 2 i The program should emphasize the areas of organization and 


administration. 


-'^Education 501 

Basic Principles of 



Educational Administration 

3 s.h. 

---Education 503A 

Elementary School Organization 



and Administration 

3 s.h. 

---Education 503B 

Secondary School Organization 



and Administration 

3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3; The program should include the areas of curriculum, instruction 
and supervision . 

'--Education 502 Supervision of Instruction 3 s.h. 

•^Education 507 The Curriculum 3 s.h, 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should include cognate disciplines which contribute 
to the administrative competency as needed by the individual . 

A student selects, under advisement, a minimum of nine semester hours from such 
cognate disciplines as sociology, political science, anthropology, economics, history, 
etc. 

GUIDELINE 5 s The program should include internship-administrative field 
experience . 

Education 570 Procedures in Educational Research 3 s.h, 

^Education 571 Thesis Seminar No credit 

---Education 572 Introduction to Statistical 

Methods in Education 3 s.h. 

G. AUDIOVISUAL DIRECTOR 

GUIDELINE 1; The program should provide the professional competencies in the 

area of educational communication , 

-'-Education 517 Organization and Administration 

of Audiovisual Materials 3 s.h. 


-120-= 













































































. 







































































^Education 518 

Preparation and Use of New 



Media of Instruction 

3 s.h. 

(Education 517 and 518 offered only in the summer) 


One of the following: 



Education 581 

Radio and TV in Education 

3 s.h. 

Education 451 

Selection and Evaluation 



of AV Materials 

3 s.h. 

Education 452 

Photography for Teachers 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should place some emphasis on the basic foundation 

courses in education. 



Three semester hours required: 


Education 572 

Statistical Methods in Education 

3 s.h. 

(Normally not counted for 

course credit. Usually substituted 

for 

language requirement.) 



Education 510 

Psychological Foundations 



of Education 

3 s.h. 

Education 511 

Human Growth and Development 

3 s.h. 

Education 512 

Theories of Learning 

3 s.h. 

Education 540 

Social Foundations of Education 

3 s.h. 

Education 542 

History of Education in the U.S. 

3 s.h. 


Education 544 Philosophy of Education 3 s.h, 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should place emphasis on the areas of organization 
and administration , 

GUIDELINE 4; The program should include the areas of curriculum, instruction , 
and supervision . 

Two courses from the following z 

Education 501 Basic Principles of Administration 3 s.h. 


-121- 























































































■ 






























Education 

503A 

Elementary School Organization 
and Administration 

3 

s.h. 

Education 

503B 

Secondary School Organization 
and Administration 

3 

s .h. 

Education 

502 

Supervision of Instruction 

3 

s.h. 

Education 

507 

The Curriculum 

3 

s.h. 


GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide opportunity for electives to meet 
individual needs . 

The student pursuing certification as an AV Director can select graduate 
courses in any department to meet needs and complete a minor of nine semester hours. 
H. SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Speech and Hearing 

The graduate subject matter preparation for a prospective teacher of special 
education in the area of speech and hearing includes a total of 36 semester hours 


or approximately 60 percent of the master’s degree program. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1 ; The program should include an introduction to all areas of 


special education. 



--“Education 562 

Introduction to 

Exceptional Children 

3 s.h. 

-^-Education 572 

Introduction to Statistical 
Methods in Education 

3 s.h. 

^Education 514 

Mental Hygiene in Teaching 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The 

program should require a depth in study sufficient to 

reasonable competence 

in the area of concentration. 


-“Education 560 

Speech Pathology 

3 s.h. 

^Education 567 

Phonetics 

3 s.h. 


-122“ 






































' 



















































^Education 

566 

Problems in the Teaching 
of Speech Correction 

3 

s ,h. 

^'-Education 

568 

Principles of Speech Correction 

3 

s ,h. 

-''Education 

565 

Practicum in Special Education 

3 

s.h. 

-x-Education 

569 

Methods and Materials of 

Teaching Lip Reading to 
Hard-of-Hearing Children 

3 

s .h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program, should include work related to the areas of 


concentration o 

/ 

The student selects, under advisement, 12 hours to be taken in related studies 
such as human growth and development, psychology, mental hygiene, sociology, etc,, 
or in another subject area as English, biology, business education, history, etc, 
GUIDELINE 4; The program should provide sufficient preparation fo r the later 

pursuit of graduate study in the area of concentration . 

The institution states that the program described above provides depth and 

breadth sufficient for additional graduate study. 

Mental Retardation 

The graduate subject matter preparation for a prospective teacher of special 
education in the area of mental retardation includes a total of 24 semester hours or 
approximately 66 percent of the total graduate program. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows, 

GUID EL INE Is The program should include an introdu ction to a ll areas of special- 
education. 


"-Education 

o 

i—i 

Psychological Foundations 
of Education 

3 

s.h. 

^-Education 

514 

Mental Hygiene in Teaching 

3 

s.h. 

^-Education 

562 

Introduction to 

Exceptional Children 

3 

s.h. 


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GUIDELINE 2: The program should require a depth in study sufficient to assure 


reasonable competence in the area of concentration . 


-"-Education 561 


Problems, Materials, and 
Methods in Teaching 
Slow-Learning Children 


3 s.h. 


Education 564 


Tests and Measurements in 
Special Education 


3 s.h. 


-^Education 565 


Practicum in Special Education 3 s.h. 


-''-Education 563 


Psychology of Exceptional Children 3 s.h. 


-"-Education 511 


Human Growth and Development 


3 s.h. 


■Education 525 


Materials for Elementary 
School Teaching 


3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should include work related to the areas of 
concentration . 

The student selects, under advisement, 12 semester hours to be taken in related 
studies such as human growth and development, psychology, mental hygiene, sociology, 
or in other subject matter areas as English. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide sufficient preparation for the later 
pursuit of graduate study in the area of concentration . 

The institution feels that the program provides depth and breadth sufficient 
for additional graduate study. 


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STANDARD V—PROFESSIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIENCES 


A, GUIDANCE 

The Supervised Practicum in Guidance is designed to help counselors in training 
to combine theory with practice, and to afford opportunities to apply theoretical 
knowledge of guidance in practical situations. 

Seminar sessions are held in addition to specific individual and group guidance 
activities carried on by the student in the cooperating institution. The number and 
type of activities must be mutually acceptable to the practicum supervisor, trainee, 
and cooperating institution. Counseling receives the major emphasis and a suggested 
list of possible supplementary practicum activities is provided. 

Required report forms make it possible for the supervisor to be more helpful 
and reveal indications of the trainee’s achievement during the practicum. 

The practicum provides each student with intensively supervised counseling 
experiences and a chance to share the results of such experiences with his supervisor 
and peers. Major emphases are on the practical and applied aspects of counseling. 
Each student is required to demonstrate a knowledge of human behavior, as well as 
counseling theory and techniques, through familiarity with selected books and 
periodicals, 

The supervisor determines, within the limits of available time, the number of 
seminar sessions to be conducted each term. 

Each student receives a minimum number of regularly set, one-hour session 
appointments with his supervisor. The sessions are scheduled at least once per 
week and for additional periods of supervision as needed. 

Each student must have at least one hour of counseling contact time per week 
for each semester hour of credit, and as many additional contact hours as time and 
available clients permit, 

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The student maintains a log of practicum activities, including brief summaries 
of counseling interviews, and tape records each counseling session, provided he 
has the client's consent. 

B. SPECIAL EDUCATION 

The practicum in special education provides opportunities for graduate students 
to have observation and actual teaching experiences under competent supervision. 

The pupils involved in practicum activities are classified as mentally retarded 
children. 

Special attention is given to diagnostic testing, grouping, teaching procedures, 
selecting and constructing instructional materials for varying levels of ability, 
and record keeping. Appropriate measures are used for the evaluation of teaching 
materials and pupil progress. 

During the orientation period, selected intelligence and achievement tests are 
administered to pupils. Performance indices are analyzed and used as bases for 
grouping within classes. This procedure also forms a basis for selecting materials 
and planning experiences to meet individual needs, 

A post-test is administered at the end of the six weeks period to determine 
the degree and areas of progress of pupils. 

Demonstration classes consist of approximately 15 educable mentally retarded 
children whose ages range from 8 to 12 years, and whose intelligence quotients 
range from 50 to 70. The classes represent a cross-section of pupils enrolled in 
special education classes in the city and county schools of Durham. Pupils are 
recommended by teachers of special classes and must have parental consent to enroll 

in the classes. 


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Graduate students enrolled in the practicum are required to plan, prepare, and 
teach carefully designed lessons to the entire group of pupils. The supervisor 
arranges daily and weekly teaching schedules for each student. 

Each student is required to write and present a detailed case study of one 
pupil. No credit is given for the case study although it is a practicum requirement. 

Students are required to attend classes on the basis of one hour per day for 
each semester hour of credit. 

A practicum, similar in design, is conducted for graduate students concentrating 
in speech and hearing, 

E, ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Laboratory experiences in graduate elementary education are conducted as a 
practicum organized within the framework of a nine weeks course that provides 
opportunities for laboratory experiences involving the graduate student in (1) a 
study of learning theory, (2) observation, and (3) participation is supervised 
teaching. 

The practicum is held on the third floor of the Education Building, where 
there are special facilities for observation and teaching. Some 60 pupils, ranging 
in age 7=13 and grades 2=8, spend six weeks in the laboratory setting during which 
time they are grouped and taught basic and enrichment subjects by graduate students 
(in-service teachers) under the supervision of three faculty members. The graduate 
students spend the remaining three of the nine weeks period with faculty members 
in planning and/or evaluating their work, which culminates in a written bound report. 
D. LABORATORY EXPERIENCES FOR PRINCIPALS ( Fifth-Year Program ) 

Laboratory experiences for principals in the fifth-year preparation program 
are conducted within the framework of Education 571, Seminar for Master ’s Degree. 


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A student qualifies for admission to the seminar when he has successfully completed 
the following: (1) educational statistics requirement, (2) approval of thesis 
outline, (3) admission to candidacy, (4) master's written examination, and (5) course 
work. 

The purpose of the experience is to provide opportunity for the principal to 
plan and investigate an educational problem in educational administration. He may 
choose a problem from any one of eight critical task areas: (1) Instruction and 
Curriculum, (2) Pupil Personnel, (3) Staff Personnel, (4) Community Relations, 

(5) School Plant, (6) School Transportation, (7) Organization and Structure, and 
(8) School Finance and Business Management. 

In the thesis seminar, the principal develops a proposal for implementing the 
study during a, given semester. During a subsequent semester he implements the 
proposal in a local school situation under the supervision of his college advisor 
and his school superintendent or his designee. 

Upon completion of the study and the presentation and defense of the thesis 
before a thesis committee, the principal receives three semester hours credit. 


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STANDARD VI—FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND MATERIALS 
Ao LIBRARY RESOURCES 

The James E, Shepard Memorial Library serves the undergraduate and graduate 
instructional programs at North Carolina College. No attempt is made to divide 
its holdings, reference materials, and other aids used in the preparation of teachers 
into graduate and undergraduate classifications. The inter-library cooperative 
arrangement with Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill makes the total library resources of three campuses available to the North 
Carolina College faculty and graduate students. The library has 66 carrells for 
use by graduate students. 

The budget for the library is not allocated according to graduate and under¬ 
graduate budgets. Each department determines the amount that will be spent from 
its assigned portion of the library budget for graduate and/or undergraduate holdings. 
The total library budget for 1964-65 was $49,635. 

B. OFFICES AND CLASSROOMS 

There are two major offices that serve the academic advisement needs of the 
graduate students—the Graduate Office, located in the Administration Building, 
and the Education Office located on the first floor of the Education Building. 

Teachers involved in the graduate programs are provided offices on essentially 
the same basis as reported for the undergraduate program. Office hours are posted 
and teachers are available for advisement purposes to graduate students on the same 
basis as to the undergraduate students. 

The majority of the graduate courses offered at North Carolina College during 
the regular session are scheduled during the evenings and on Saturday mornings. 
Classroom space is provided for these courses. 


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Appropriate classrooms and laboratories are found in each of the buildings 
in which the graduate student’s major emphasis is located, 

C. FACILITIES FOR LABORATORY EXPERIENCES 

All professional laboratory experiences of graduate students at North Carolina 
College are not conducted at North Carolina College, Laboratory experiences for 
the fifth year students are conducted in selected public schools of North Carolina, 
Teachers enrolled in the Institute for the Culturally Disadvantaged have their 
laboratory experiences in the public schools. Both groups must obtain the approval 
of their respective school superintendents. The experiences are under the direction 
of the student’s area graduate professor who makes periodic visits. 

On the second floor of the Education Building there is a special education 
laboratory. This room is equipped with 12 individual desks and chairs and two 
elementary school tables, a toilet, sink, with running water, a work bench (approxi¬ 
mately 18 feet in length) individual open lockers, and a large compartment exhibit 
case. The laboratory also contains an observation room and a conference-testing- 
observation room with one-way view screens, 

A classroom on the third floor of the Education Building, designed to provide 
laboratory experiences for graduate elementary students, is equipped with counter- 
top work area and under-counter storage space. One end of the room is provided with 
an observation gallery and a one-way view screen. 

The audiovisual laboratory and the testing center are used by graduate students, 
D ° CONTEMPLATED CHANGES 

The improvements planned in facilities, equipment, and ma.terials apply to 

undergraduate as well as graduate programs. 


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STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROL NA 



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