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North Carolina State Library 

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REPORT TO 

STATE EVALUATION COMMITTEE 
ON TEACHER EDUCATION 


THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
AT CHAPEL HILL 


by 


THE VISITATION COMMITTEE 
APRIL 21 - 24, 1963 


Division Of Professional Services 
State Department Of Public Instruction 
Raleigh, North Carolina 








North Carolina State Library 

Raleiqh 


Report to 


STATE EVALUATION COMMITTEE 
ON TEACHER EDUCATION 


ON 


THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
AT CHAPEL HILL 


THE VISITATION COMMITTEE 


April 21-24-5 


1963 


Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2019 with funding from 
State Library of North Carolina 


https://archive.org/details/reporttostateeva00nort_20 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Page 

Introduction .ooo»«».«o»o. ' ,,,o ‘ >o — 

Committee Members o..ooooooo.o. »»»».“. .'” 000 * bi¬ 
section One: Undergraduate Programs ................. 6 

Standard I—Over-All Policies ................. 6 

Standard II—Student Personnel Programs and Services., .0000 13 

Standard III——Faculty" 000000000 ..®..®..®°.® 25 

Standard IV——Curricula 00000 . 00 * 0 . 0 ®.°.....® 34 

Standard V—Professional Laboratory Experiences ........ 71 

Standard VI—Facilities 3 Equipment,, and Materials ....... 75 

Section Two: Graduate Programs. ................... 91 

Standard I—Over—All Policies ooo.©©ooo.o..©«o. 9 — 

Standard II—Student Personnel Programs and Services. ..... 94 

Standard III™—Faculty .©...©.©o.oo.oo®..©.. 9S 

Standard IV—Curricula. .................... 100 

Standard V—Professional Laboratory Experiences ........ 124 

Standard VI—Facilities 5 Equipment 5 and Materials ....... 125 


































INTRODUCTION 


The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has a long and distinguished 
history.. Authority for the establishment of the institution may be traced, to 
Section XLI of the North Carolina Constitution of 1776, which declared that 
"all useful learning shall be duly encouraged and promoted in one or more 
universities," The University was chartered by the General Assembly through 
an Act passed on December 11, 1789* and became the nation’s first State university 
when it opened its doors to students in 1795° 

Financial support* for current expenses until 1881, was through escheats, 
arrearages due the State, and private benefactions. Since 1881 the General 
Assembly has made regular appropriations for operation and maintenance of the 
institution and periodic special appropriations to provide new programs and 
enlarge the physical plant. The University has grown and increased its influence 
in the State and region, Foruy-eight states, the District of Columbia, and fifty- 
four foreign countries and United States possessions are represented in the 1962-63 
enrollment of 9,604 students. 

By an Act of the General Assembly of 1931, the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill, the North Carolina College for Women at Greensboro, and the North 
Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh were consolidated 
into the University of North Carolina, The 1963 General Assembly changed the names 
of the institutions to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Uni¬ 
versity of North Carolina at Greensboro, and North Carolina State of the University 
of North Carolina at Raleigh, Each institution has its own faculty and student 
body, and each is headed by a Chancellor as its chief administrative officer. 
Unified general policy and appropriate allocation of function are effected by a 
single board of trustees, and by the President and other administrative officers 
of the consolidated university. 


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The School of Education dates back to the University Normal School, which 
was established as a part of the University in 1877. This school is believed 
to have been the first such summer school in the nation. Although the school 
was temporarily discontinued at Chapel Hill in 1884 in favor of similar but 
smaller schools through the State, the ideas which fostered it have continued 
to exist. The original normal school led, in 1885, to the establishment of a 
Department of Pedagogy which became the School of Education in 1913» 

The University of North Carolina and its School of Education seek approval 
in the areas and levels of preparation indicated below: 

Bachelor’s degree programs for preparation of teachers in: elementary 
school, grades 1 through 8; junior high school, grades 7 through 9; special 
subject areas, grades 1 through 12, of art, physical education and health, 
health education, library science, and music; secondary school, grades 8 through 

! c ( 

12, of English, French, German, Latin, Spanish, mathematics, social studies, and 
science. 

Master’s degree programs for preparation of: elementary school teachers, 
teachers in the regular secondary academic areas; teachers of distributive edu¬ 
cation; teachers of special education; guidance counselors; school librarians; 
principals; school psychologists; and supervisors. The following degrees are 
awarded: Master of Arts (M.oA„); Master of Education (MoEd.); and Master of Arts 
in Teaching (M.A.T.). 

Sixth-year programs Two-year graduate programs for preparation of: principals, 
counselors, supervisors, and superintendents. These programs are designed to 
qualify students for a North Carolina Advanced Certificate. 

Doctor’s degree programs for: classroom teachers; school principals; super¬ 
visors; school counselors; superintendents; assistant superintendents; and other 
administrative personnel; specialists in elementary education, secondary education, 
guidance, educational psychology, reading, science education, physical education. 


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school administration, and supervision; and college personnel, including junior 
college teachers, college teachers of education, student personnel workers, 
college administrative personnel, and specialists in higher education, teacher 
education, and history and philosophy of education. The University awards two 
degrees as follows: Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), and Doctor of Education (Ed.D.). 

In addition to the preparation programs described above, the following 
educational services are provided to individuals and to the schools of the State 
and nation: (l) surveys and consulting services to schools and school systems 
in all areas of interest in which professional personnel are available, (2) off- 
campus courses in graduate centers and through extension work, (3) correspondence 
course work, (4) sponsorship, housing, and leadership of regional meetings and 
workshops of superintendents, supervisors, principals, and teachers, (5) placement 
of teachers and other professional personnel in schools and colleges, (6) leadership 
and participation in professional and lay organizations concerned with the study 
or improvement of public education, (7) consulting work with the State Board of 
Education, State Department of Public Instruction, and related agencies, (8) consulting 
services on educational problems to the legislative and executive branches of the 
State government, (9) staff preparation of articles in professional journals and of 
textbooks at the public school and college levels, (10) faculty membership on 
committees and boards within the University, (ll) assistance in the development 
of educational material over WUNC-TV, (12) research activities, (13) test scales 
and test scoring services for public schools, (14) vocational advisement services 
for public school and college students and others, (15) diagnostic reading service 
for public school students, and (16) operation of a Bureau of Audio-Visual Aids 
serving the institution and schools and other clients in the State. 

The visitation committee, listed on the following page, visited the institution 
on April 21-24, 1963, and herewith submits its observations of the institution and 
teacher education programs. 









































































































VISITATION COMMITTEE TO THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 


April 21-24, 1963 

Dr, A. Co Dawson, Chairman of Committee 
North Carolina Education Association 

Dr. Jo P. Freeman, Consultant to Committee 
Department of Public Instruction 


Dr. Qian Petty 
(Elementary Education) 

Education Department 
Duke University 

Dr. Ivey Gentry 
(Mathematics) 

Mathematics Department 
Wake Forest College 

Dr. Robert Holt 
(Administration) 

Dean 

East Carolina College 

Dr. Howard R. Boozer 
(Higher Education) 

State Board of Higher Education 

Dr. John Nowell 
(Science) 

Chemistry Department 
Wake Forest College 

Dr. W. B. Sugg 
(Curriculum) 

Super! nt e nde nt 
Gastonia City Schools 

Mr. Clifton Edwards 
(Elementary Education) 

Department of Public Instruction 

Dr. James Valsame 
(Mathematics Education) 
Department of Public Instruction 

Dr. Jerry Hall 
(Social Studies) 

Department of Public Instruction 


Dr. Frank Fuller 
(Guidance) 

East Carolina College 

Mr. Charles Spencer 
(Physical Education & Health) 
Department of Public Instruction 

Miss Cora Bomar 
(Library Science) 

Department of Public Instruction 

Dr. Francis Bowman 
(English) 

English Department 
Duke University 

Dr. Arnold Hoffman 
(Music) 

Department of Public Instruction 

Dr. Dolph Camp 
Specialist- 

Program Organization 
Health, Education, and Welfare 
U. S. Office of Education 
Washington 25, D. C. 

Dr. Maurice Cierley 
(Supervision and Administration) 
University of Kentucky 
Lexington, Kentucky 

Mr. Felix Barker 
(Special Education) 

Department of Public Instruction 

Miss Ella S. Barrett 
(Guidance) 

Department of Public Instruction 

















Dr. Dennis Cooke 
(Administration) 

Teacher Education 

High Point College 

Mr. T. Carl Brown 
(Distributive Education) 
Department of Public Instruction 

Dr. James E. Hillman 
(Curriculum) 

2311 Anderson Drive 

Raleigh 


Mrs. Tora Ladu 
(Foreign Language) 

Department of Public Instruction 



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UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 


STANDARD I—OVER-ALL POLICIES 
A. Purposes and Objectives 

The purposes or objectives of the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill are not published in its Catalog or in the institution's Graduate Bulletin,, 
However, the faculty of the School of Education has presented in the self-study 
report a statement of purpose drawn from the historical and current functions of 
the University. According to the statement, the original aim of the University 
was to furnish a liberal or general education to the youth of North Carolina. As 
the institution grew, various professional and semi-professional curricula were 
added to provide the present multipurpose University in which teacher education 
is but one of many programs. The North Carolina Constitution of 1868 charged the 
University with the responsibility of teacher education and thereby assured the 
program of a secure position at the institution. 

The "purposes and objectives" of the University's teacher education programs, 
included in the current issue of the School of Education Bulletin, are as follows: 

1. To play a leading role in the education of teachers and administrators 
for the schools of the State and the region 

2. To train college and university teachers who will participate in 
teacher education programs 

3. To assist in conducting research on public school problems 

4. To render service to the public schools of the State as a professional 
school and as a source of specialized technical assistance 

In carrying out these teacher education purposes and objectives, the School of 
Education has: 

1. Primary responsibility for preparing teachers and other school personnel 
and for performing research and other appropriate activities in the field 
of professional education. 

2. Adequate staff, properly prepared in professional education and in specific 
subject-matter areas, for preparing professional school personnel. 


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3. Adequate support from the subject-matter departments, and from faculties 
in special areas of concentration, to serve teacher-candidates. 

4. Ample basic facilities for carrying out the programs, including libraries, 
curriculum laboratory, supplementary resources in teaching materials and 
texts, and audiovisual aids. 

5. Adequate field facilities for student laboratory, teaching, and internship 
experiences for teacher-candidates and advanced professional personnel. 

6. Research resources, instruments, and techniques for diagnostic procedures 
in the selection and progressive retention of teacher-candidates; for 
evaluation of their success; and for experimentation and research in 
education. 

7. Undergraduate programs for a majority of teaching positions, grades 1 
through 12, and graduate work and degree programs based on these. 

8. Freedom, under joint planning with the supporting subject-matter departments, 
to carry on experimentation and research in teacher education. 

The University has promoted and encouraged several kinds of research and 
experimentation to improve teacher education. This has included graduate student 
projects, faculty team and individual research, and research involved in securing 
information for books and articles published by the faculty. 

B. Organization and Administration of Teacher Education 

To understand the organization for teacher education at the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, it is necessary to understand the organization of 
the Consolidated University of North Carolina, consisting of three component 
institutions—the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro, and North Carolina State of the University of North 
Carolina at Raleigh. 

The Consolidated University of North Carolina, consisting of the three 
institutions, has a single Board of Trustees numbering about 100 members appointed 
by the State legislature, with the Governor of the State as ex-officio Chairman 
of the Board. This Board elects a President of the Consolidated University. 

The President of the total University has a staff consisting of a Vice-President 
of Graduate Studies and Research.” a Business Manager; and the Secretary of the 


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Consolidated. University of North Carolina* plus assisting staff personnel. The 
organization is shown in Chart I. Upon the recommendation of the President, the 
Board of Trustees elects a Chancellor for each of the three component institutions* 
who is in turn responsible for local administration of the respective unit in line 
with adopted policies. Each of the three branches has its own set of officers and f 
staff. The organization of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is 
shown in Chart II. In the organizational framework there is a Division of Academic 
Affairs* a Division of Health Affairs* and. a Graduate School. The Division of 
Academic Affairs* is responsible for general education programs. The schools of 
Business Administration* Education* Journalism* Law* Library Science* and Social 
Work are responsible for the professional phase of programs for students specializing 
in the respective areas. Students are not eligible to enter a professional school 
until the general college requirements have been completed. 

Each of the professional schools* including the School of Education* is under 
the administrative responsibility of a Dean* nominated by the Chancellor to the 
President* and then appointed by the Beard of Trustees. 

The University faculty elects the members of a Faculty Council* composed of 
appropriate representatives of all divisions* by and from the voting members 
on the General Faculty of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Programs and courses are approved after careful review and consideration by 
various officials who serve on curriculum committees in different schools. 

Each school or college has an administrative board representative of its 
various interests with the members appointed by the Chancellor upon recommendation 
of the Dean or Director of the school or college concerned. Most members of each 
administrative board are appointed from the faculty of the particular school or 
college. The Chancellor is an ex-officio non-voting member of all administrative 
boards. The term of office for members of administrative boards is five years. 

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One-fifth of the membership* or an appi'opriate number nearest that figure* is 
replaced annually; and members may not succeed themselves immediately. Subject 
to the powers of the faculty of the School or college concerned and of the Faculty 
Council* administrative boards; 

1. Formulate educational policies for approval by the dean or director; 

2. Advise the dean or director in administrative matters; 

3. Review and approve for adoption and continuation new programs and curricula; 

4. Examine and pass on new courses for the particular school or college; 

3. Perform such other duties as may be delegated to them. 

The Administrative Board for the School of Education consists of five members 
from departments other than education* five members from the School of Education 
faculty* and the Dean of the School of Education. 

The School of Education is one of eight major divisions (schools and colleges) 

of the Division of Academic Affairs. At the undergraduate level* it enrolls only 

i 

junior and senior students who may come from the General College of the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill or who transfer from other institutions. Although 
the School of Education has the authority to determine admission requirements for 
all transfer students from other institutions* it must enroll all students from the 
General College at the University of North Carolina who are transferred to it. With 
this exception and within the administrative framework described above* the School 
of Education is responsible for determining and administering policies concerning 
the advising of students and the curricula for teacher education. Policies originate 
within the appropriate committee of the School of Education. If approved by the 
faculty* the new proposal is presented to the Administrative Board. 

The Dean of the School of Education* as chairman of the Administrative Board* 
has the authority and responsibility for recommending to the State Department of 
Public Instruction that a candidate has completed the teacher education program and 
Is eligible for certification. 


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CHART I. ORGANIZATION CHART OF THE CONSOLIDATED UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 


I 






























































































































CHART II. ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL 




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STANDARD II—STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 


A„ Admission Policies for All Undergraduates at the University 

Admission requirements at the University are aimed at the selection of students 
for the undergraduate curricula who are most likely to be successful. 

Completed admission forms are submitted to the Director of Admissions not 
later than the time stated in the instructions. Each candidate is judged on his 
merits, his secondary school record, the recommendation of his principal or 
adviser, and the results of the Scholastic Aptitude Tests of the College Entrance 
Examination Board. The Committee on Admissions also takes into consideration the 
candidate's physical and mental health, his maturity of character, his academic 
success, his potentials for education and for personal development, his possible 
contribution to the quality of the student body, and the likelihood of his becoming 
a graduate who will reflect credit on the University. 

The total enrollment in all divisions of the University for the fall semester 
of 1962 was 9*604. Undergraduate enrollment was about 7*000, including a freshman 
class composed of 1,500 men and 208 women (total 1,708). 

TABLE I 

PROFILE OF ENROLLED FRESHMEN; 1962 
Class Rank in Secondary School of Enrolled Freshmen ; 



Number 

Percentage 

Class Rank 

Enrolled 

Total 

Top Fourth 

948 

55.5 

Second Fourth 

605 

35.4 

Third Fourth 

140 

8.2 

Bottom Fourth 

15 

.9 

Total 

1,708 

100 


= 13 ~ 



































































































of Enrolled Freshmen; 1962 (where available) 


Mean Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores 


North Carolina Out-of-State 

Verbal 492 541 

Math 533 583 

Total 1,025 1,124 

Scholastic Aotitude Test Score Distribution of 

Composite 

505 

546 

1,051 

Enrolled Freshmen 

Score Range 

Verbal 

Mathematics 

700-800 

34 ( 2 $) 

68 ( 4 $) 

600-699 

229 (1350 

365 ( 21 $) 

500-599 

563 (3350 

709 (42$) 

400-499 

665 (40*) 

519 (30$) 

300-399 

217 ( 12 $) 

45 (3$) 

under 300 

None 

None 


B. Informing Students About Teaching 

New students are informed of the various kinds of degree programs, including 
teacher education., during orientation upon their arrival at the University. 

Further information is provided by the General College advisers during the first 
four semesters of college work. Students who express interest in teaching are 
referred to the School of Education advisers for further information concerning 
opportunities, programs., and plans. 

C. Admission and Retention Policies— Undergraduate Teacher Education 

University policy requires the admission of any student having a quality point 
average of 1.50, on a scale of 4 points for an "A* 8 ,, 3 for a ®*B !t , 2 for a t4 C ts and 
I for a M D 8S , to the school or department of his choice at the beginning of the 
junior year. Therefore, the quality point average is the only data collected and 
considered for initial admission into the School of Education. Students in other 
schools and colleges within the University, and from other institutions, may 
transfer to the School of Education at points beyond the fourth semester on the 
basis of quality point average, but a progressively higher average is required 































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for one to qualify to begin work in the School of Education at points beyond the 
fourth semester. A quality point average of 1„75 is required for one to begin in 
his seventh semester } and a quality point average of 1.90 is required for a student 
to begin work in the ninth semester. 

In order to remain in residence at the University of North Carolina^ under¬ 
graduate students in the Division of Academic Affairs are required to meet the 
following cumulative quality-point-hour ratio requirements at the beginning of 
the indicated semesters of college work; 

Semester Minimum Requirement 

3 1.25 

5 1.50 

7 1.75 

9 1.90 

To receive any bachelor's degree from the University a student is required 
to achieve a cumulative quality-point ratio of 2.00. Bachelor's degree candidates 
are not permitted to exceed 45 semester hours beyond the minimal graduation 
requirements for the major. 

Under exceptionally extenuating circumstances clearly beyond the control of 
the student and upon recommendation of the dean under whom the student was enrolled, 
an appeal from the foregoing requirements may be considered by the 'Readmissions 
Committee of the School of Education. 

A formal application to the Undergraduate Committee of the School of Education 
is required for admission to the block program (a full semester of work in education., 
including student teaching) at the beginning of the seventh or eighth semester of 
college work. 

The teacher-candidate is expected to consult an adviser in the School of 
Education before making formal application for the block program. The student 
is asked to respond to a list of pertinent questions. In addition, a staff member 


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is expected to call to the attention of the Undergraduate Committee any reason 
which he may have to question the admission of any student to the block program. 

Although some informal screening is done by the School of Education before 
admission, all formal screening for teacher education occurs after admission 
to the University and the School of Education. 

With the approval of his adviser, a student who has earned a total of 90 
semester hours, including Education 41 and Education 71 with a grade of "C" or 
above in each, will be allowed to enter the block program provided the following 
requirements have been mets 

1. The student has completed all General College requirements. 

2. The student has achieved a quality-point ratio of 2.00 or higher 
on all work taken at the University, except for physical education 
service courses which are not to be included in this calculation. 

3. The student has removed all "incompletes 11 , "absences", and "composition 
conditions." 

4. The student preparing to teach a secondary-school subject must have 
completed all but two or fewer courses in his academic major at the 
junior-senior level with not more than one course with a grade of "D." 

Students who receive a rating below "C" on any professional block course 
at mid-semester or who do not demonstrate personal and professional characteristics 
essential for successful teaching are not permitted to proceed with student teaching 
unless special permission is granted by the Undergraduate Committee. During the 
fall semester of 1962, among 86 students in the block program, two were withdrawn 
for lack of ability as prospective teachers. 

For the spring semester, 1963, all of the 150 applicants for the professional 
block of the teacher education program were admitted to the program. Some students 
not eligible for admission to the program did not apply. The School of Education 
keeps no records on the number who fail to apply because of ineligibility. Most 
of these students transfer to one of the other schools or colleges within the 
University either without giving a reason, or perhaps without giving the true reason. 


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It is not possible to ascertain the number of students who during the 
freshman and sophomore years drop their intentions to enter teacher education,, 
Records are not kept for the purpose. However, figures are kept for juniors and 
seniors in the School of Education, Table 2 shows the percentage of students 
who dropped out of various teacher education curricula from September* 1962* 
to February 22* 1963. Curricula not listed lost no students during the 
school year. 


TABLE 2 


PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS DROPPING OUT OF 
TEACHER EDUCATION—SEPTEMBER 1962 THROUGH FEBRUARY 1963 


Juniors 


Seniors 


Specials 


Elementary ,8 ,2 

English 2,0 ,8 

French .2 

Mathematics .2 

Science .2 ,2 

Social Studies .2 ,8 

Spanish — .2 


o 2 
.2 


.2 


The student who has completed a bachelor's degree program at an accredited 
institution will ordinarily be permitted to enter the professional block program 
provided; 


1. He has an undergraduate major which is compatible with the School of 
Education's current program of teacher education* i„e,* a major which 
is essentially the same as one of those recognized by the School of 
Education in its teacher-preparation programs. 

2. He has satisfactorily completed work in both a survey course in education 
and educational psychology* or the equivalent. 

Most undergraduate students in the School of Education transfer from the 
General College at the beginning of the junior year. Some transfer from other 
institutions* and a few transfer from another school or department on the campus 
during their junior or senior year or after receiving a degree. All students 
enrolling in the School of Education for undergraduate or graduate work are 
required to take the American Council on Education Cooperative English Test-Higher 



































































level,, and the Ohio State Psychological Examination at the time of their admission. 
However, no definite cut-off points are required. 

Information given in The Statistical Summary of the North Carolina Statewide 
Administrations of the National Teacher Examinations, April, i960 through April, 1962 , 

published in September of 1962 by Educational Testing Service, gives the following 
data for institution B (UNO) seniors for the three-year periods Number of Candidates; 
550; Mean Common Examination Scores 629; Standard Deviation 62.5= This indicates 
that seniors in the School of Education at the University of North Carolina comprised 
the second highest scoring group in the State on the National Teacher Examination. 

This is the only information available on students completing the teacher education 
program. 

C. Identification of Students in Teacher Education 

A student admitted to the School of Education can be identified through the 
adviser assigned upon admission to the School and the separate record folder 
transferred from the General College adviser. Thus, a student can be identified 
in teacher education only after admission to the School of Education. 

D. Records of Undergraduates Enrolled in the School of Education 

The Admissions Office, which has responsibility of evaluating all records 
and admitting all students, sets up the first official folder for the student and 
forwards it to the Office of Records and Registration. Copies of all evaluations 
and letters of admission are forwarded to the appropriate school or college; a 
copy of each is sent to the individual student. 

Each student entering the School of Education receives a personal letter from 
the Dean of the School of Education. Form letters concerning the appointment of 
advisers, the nature of the grading system, and the reporting of English proficiency 
scores are sent to each student. Copies are filed in the office of the Dean of the 
School of Education. 


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The student, records compiled by the School of Education are housed in the 
Office of the Dean of the School„ They are available at all times to the admin¬ 
istrative staff, counselors, and teachers. Other records for each student are 
kept in the Office of Records and Registration, Hanes Hallo 

The School of Education sets up a file for each student enrolling for the 
first time. This file, kept and maintained in the central office of the School 
of Education, contains the following informations 

1. Letter of admission. 

2. Official evaluation of all previous college work. 

3. Individual record card on which grades of all courses taken at the 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have been posted, and the 
cumulative grade point average. This card indicates the student’s 
major field and his adviser. 

4. Entrance and/or placement test scores. 

5. Projection sheet which indicates the courses completed and the courses 
yet required for that particular student in his chosen teaching field. 

6. Official grade reports. 

7. Copies of drop-add forms processed. 

8. Student's application form for admission to the professional block program. 

9« Anecdotal records from some adviser-student conferences. 

10. Copies of correspondence from or to the student. 

11. Rating sheets from each instructor of each course completed by the student 
in the School of Education. These rating sheets cover professional 
motivation, communication, leadership, social competency, effective 
intelligence, academic skills, stability, and self-control. 

E. Advisement and Counseling 

Advisement and counseling before enrollment in the School of Education are 
outside the area responsibility of the School of Education. For students entering 
from the General College comprising the first four semesters of college work, 
the responsibility is accepted by the General College, which sees that all students 
in their first two years are informed about all curricula offered by the University 


“19= 













































































of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The University has an effective testing service* 
administered to help every student to learn his potentials and his interests* and 
to give new direction to students who fail in their programs of work and who need 
redirection. 

The School of Education has its own counseling and orientation program for 
students admitted to its curricula. Students attend large group meetings* small 
group meetings, and individual meetings with counselors. Close coordination with 
the General College is maintained. 

All students in the introductory course in Education (Education 41) are given 
diagnostic reading tests. These are scored and interpreted to the students with 
the suggestion that the Reading Program is available for those students who 
need this help. 

Educational and personnel guidance in the School of Education is centered 
in a faculty advisement system. For the 1? advisers of undergraduate students the 
load varies from 2 to 59 students in the 1962-63 school year. The average load 
is 2students. During student teaching close supervision is given by staff members. 
Personal problems and professional problems are handled by the methods supervisors. 

Psychiatric and psychological counseling is centered in the University Health 
Center. Counseling in this area is under the supervision of a Professor of Psychiatry. 
Resident psychiatrists in the hospital serve as psychiatric counselors. 

Students in the School's Fifth-Year Program (explained under Standard IV of 
the Graduate Program discussion in this report) who must take prerequisite under¬ 
graduate work receive more counseling than other students in the School of Education. 
Two full-time staff members presently advise 48 students in the Fifth-Year Program* 

10 of whom are taking some undergraduate course work. 

F. Teacher Placement Service 

The School of Education maintains a teacher placement office in Room 103 of 
Peabody Hall* staffed with a director* a full-time secretary* and a part-time 


20- 






























’ 

























secretary- Complete placement folders are made up on every graduating senior in 
the School of Education and on most graduate students. Graduate registration 
in the placement service is voluntary. 

The teacher placement office has records on the 236 seniors who graduated 
during the 1961-62 school year,, which are summarized as follows; 


Teaching 

Otherwise 

Employed 

In Graduate 
Study 

In Military 
Service 

In Home¬ 
making 

No Infor¬ 
mation 

Total 

161 

4 

16 

2 

18 

33 

236 


G. Follow-Up 

The School of Education conducts a follow-up five years after graduation. 

An extensive questionnaire is sent to each graduate. By analyzing replies to the 
questionnaire, the School learns much about the strengths and weaknesses of its 
programs. This information is utilized in a continuing attempt to improve the 
teacher education curricula. 

H. Total Enrollment 

The total undergraduate and special enrollment in education during the 1962 
fall semester is shown in Table 3° 
















































. 














TABLE 3 


1962 (Fall Semester) Undergraduate Enrollment in Education 


Number Enrolled 503 

Number of Seniors 222 

Number Preparing to Teach 
by Teaching Fields: 


Secondary Education 


Undergraduate Fifth Year and Special# 


Art 4 
English 110 
French 18 
German 1 
Health Education 3 
Latin 2 
Library Science 0 
Mathematics 33 
Music 10 
Physical Education & Health 36 
Science 22 
Social Studies 69 
Spanish 10 


3 

10 

3 


2 

3 

3 

29 

1 


Totals 


318 


54 


185 


n 


f 


Total Secondary and Elementary 503 


61 


GRAND TOTAL 


564 


* Fifth Year and Special fall partly under undergraduate work and partly 
under graduate work,, 


-22- 










































































STANDARD III—UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY 


A. Number and Preparation 

The characteristics of the professional education faculty (full-time and 
part-time), including ages, years employed at the University, highest degrees, 
faculty rank, semester hours taught in the fall semester of 1962, teaching 
experience in public schools and colleges, and present employment of full-time 
or part-time, are shown in table 4° 

Of the 28 faculty listed in this table, the highest degrees held are; doctor 
of philosophy 10, doctor of education 10, master of arts 4 a master of science 2, 
master of education 1, and bachelor of arts 1. From the data available, it appears 
that all of the faculty had graduate preparation in their teaching assignment 
areas. The ratio of full-time faculty equivalents to full-time student equivalents 
is between eight and nine. 

Faculty member's ages range from 28 to 65. Three faculty members are in the 
60-and-above bracket (the oldest is 65)I six range between 50 and 59 inclusive; 

13 between 40 and 49; 5 between 30 and 39; and one is age 28. The median is 
approximately the middle of the 40-49 bracket. 

The 28 faculty members have been employed by the University for a median of 
approximately six years. The distribution is as follows; two between 36 and 
40 years inclusive; one between 26 and 30 ; 4 between 11 and 15; 8 between 6 and 
10; and 13 between 1 and 5* Six of the faculty members are in their first year, 
while nine others have served 10 or more years. 

The members of the faculty teach a median of nine semester hours (10 of them); 
six teach 12; seven teach 6; two teach 3; and 3 teach none. 


- 23 - 










‘ 
































































TABLE 4. PROFILE OF THE FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Age 

Years 

Highest 

Rank 

Sem. 

Techg. Exp. 

Full-Time 



Em- 

Degree 


Hrs. 

(total) 

Teaching 



ployec 


Taught 

Pub- 

Col- 

Unless 



Here 



Fall 

lie 

lege 

Otherwise 






1962 

Sch. 


Indicated a 

Ballew, H. 

31 

1 

M. Sci. 

Instructor 

12 

1 

4 


Briggs, Frances 

44 

1 

Ph.D. 

Lecturer 

9 

20 

3 


Brown, C. F. 

33 

13 

Ph.D. 

Professor 

9 

5 

20 


Chase, John 

36 

7 

Ed.D. 

Assoc. P. 

3 . 

4 

13 . 

2/3 b 

Ebert, Stacy K. 

30 

10 

M. A. 

Lecturer 

12 

13 

12 


Gwynn, J. Minor 

63 

39 . 

Ph.D. 

Professor 

9 

15 

39 c 


Harshman, H. W. 

48 

2 

Ph.D. 

Asst. P. 

9 

0 

14 


Hennis, Sterling 

33 

2 

Ph.D. 

Asst. P. 

12 

3 

4 


Holton, S. M. 

41 

15 

Ph.D. 

Professor 

9 

2 

13 


Jones, Annie Lee 

47 

5 

Ed.D. 

Assoc. P. 

6 

21 

7 


King, A. K. 

62 

38 

Ph.D. 

Professor 

6 

10 

38 

. 1/2 

Lane, Mary T. 

43 

10 

Ed.D. 

Asst. P. 

12 

4 

9 


Otts, John 

53 

1 

Ed.D. 

Professor 

9 

29 

2 


Perry, A. 

57 

15 

Ed.D. 

Professor 

0 & 

20 

17 


Perry, W. D. 

53 

26 

Ed.D. 

Professor 

6 

4 

26 

1/2 

Phillips, R. 

28 

1 

Ph.D. 

Asst. P. 

12 

3 

2 


Rosser, Neill 

46 

4 

Ed.D. 

Assoc. P. 

6 

11 

8 

l/2 

Scott, Neill 

41 

6 

Ed.D. 

Assoc. P. 

12 

0 

13 


Slattery, VI. G. 

60 

6 

M. S. 

Lecturer 

0 

14 

17 


Sommerfield, Roy E. 

47 

7 

Ph.D. 

Assoc. P. 

9 

4 

12 


Taff, Luther R. 

54 

7 

Ph.D. 

Assoc. P. 

9 

5 

20 


Tarbet, Donald 

46 

11 

Ed.D. 

Professor 

9 

9 

12 


Tracy, Neal H. 

44 

5 

Ed.D. 

Assoc. P. 

9 

ll 

... 5. 


Allen, Helen 

48 

8 

M. A. 

Instructor 

6 

6 

9 

Part 

Brockraann, M. 

33 

2 

B. A. 

T V Instr. 

6 

4 

2 

Part 

Congleton, J. W. 

34 

2 

M. A. 

Tchg.Fell. 

3 

6 

2 

Part 

Cortner, F. 

46 

1 

M. A. 

Ad. Asst. 

0 

”o1 

3 <1 

Part 3/4 

Godwin, Joseph 


1 

M. Ed. 

P.T.Instr. 

6 

0 

12 

Part 


a. Fraction (example 2/3), shows time devoted to administration. 

b. Assists in Two Year Graduate Program in Administration and/or 
the Fifth Year Program. 

c. Dual role for many years, including Superintendent of Chapel Hill 
public schools, 1932-37, while on faculty of the University. 

d. Was while in military service Assistant Professor of Naval Science 
and Tactics. 


- 24 - 






































































































































































































































































































Four of the faculty have had no public-school teaching experience. At 
the other end of the distribution, one has had 29 years; another 21; two others 
20; five between 11 and 15 inclusive; three between six and .10; and 12 between 
1 and 5. The entire faculty has had a median of slightly more than four years 
of public school experience. 

The members of the faculty have taught in college a median of approximately 
12 years. The distribution is as followsi one for 39 years; one for 38 years; 
one for 26 years; four between 16 and 20 years inclusive; eight between 11 and 
15; four between six and 10; and nine between one and five. 

All except five of the 28 faculty members are employed full time. One 
of these five devotes 3/4 time to administration. One of these is in his eighth 
year with the University, two are in their second years, and two are in their first 
years. 

The faculty ranks are as follows; Professor, 8; Associate Professor, 7; 

Assistant Professor, 4; Instructor, 4; Lecturer, 3; Graduate Teaching Fellow, 1; 
and Administrative Assistant, 1. 

B. Faculty Load 

The service load of each faculty member, full-time and part-time, is shown 
in abbreviated form in Table 4, and in more detail in Tables 5 and 6. The tables 
show teaching hours per week, percentage of time devoted to administration, 
committee assignments, extra-curricular activities, off-campus teaching, and 
reference to student teaching. It is shown in another part of the report that those 
faculty members spending full time in supervising student teaching usually supervise 
from 10 to 20 student teachers. Those faculty members working in the block program 
and the Fifth-Year Program are also designated in Table 5° 

Some of the faculty serve on all-University committees, boards, and/or divisions. 
Eleven of the total University faculty, including six from the School of Education, 


- 25 - 








































































are now serving on the Administrative Board of the School of Education; five of 
the education faculty are on the Faculty Council; and six are serving other 
University Divisions in similar capacities. Eight of the Education faculty are 
serving on other miscellaneous committee and boards of the University. 

In addition, the faculty members spend many hours on special ad hoc 
committee work of varying length. Extracurricular activities are numerous, 
varied, and many are very time consuming. 

The distribution of the regular standing committee assignments among the 
faculty in the School of Education is shown in Table 6. It will be noted that 
the number of members on twelve committees ranges from three (Personnel Committee) 
to 11 (Graduate Committee). The number of committees to which the faculty members 
are assigned ranges from one to four. It is evident from the table that work on 
standing committees constitutes an important part of the total service load of 
the faculty members in the School of Education. 

C. Special Projects Involving Professional Faculty 

One of the special projects of the School is the Fifth-Year Program, now 
leading to the Master of Arts in Teaching degree. Six faculty members are assigned 
specific duties and responsibilities on the committee for the Fifth-Year Program 
as shown in Table 6. For 1963-61, three full-time faculty members holding doctor's 
degrees and two half-time supervisors will be assigned to this program. 

Other special projects to which the faculty members devote time are special 
conferences of various types scheduled by the School, of which there are many; 
the additions and replacements of instructional materials; a special teacher- 
education project with Escuela Normal Superior of Mexico; and extension and 
off-campus courses over the State. 


26 ' 












































































TABLE 5 


STAFF ASSIGNMENTS TO COURSES AND PROGRAMS 1962-1963 



Education Course Number or Program 

FALL 

SPRJ 

:ng 

Ballew, H. 

89 u 

Block a 


91 

Block 


Briggs. Frances 

FYP b 



FYP b 



Brown, C. F. 

161 

41 

41 

. 165 

265 

41 

Chase, John B. 

291 

FYP b Director 

FYP Director 


Ebert, Stacy K. 

72a 

61 

Block-PT 

72s 

61 

Block-PT 

Gwynn, J. Minor 

160 

199 

375 

160 

..199 ... 

247 

Harshman, H. W. 

71 

180 

71 

71 

71 

172 

Hennis. Sterling 

81 

Block.. 


81 

Block 


Holton, S. M. 

41 

160 

347 

.95. 

Block 


Jones. Annie Lee 

..41. 

152 


.. 61 

72a 

Block-PT 

King, A. K. 

142 

110 


.. 143 



Lane, Mary T, 

72a 

61 

Block-PT 

61 . 

72a 

Block-PT 

Otts. John 

101. 

295 


295 

.. .41 . 

41 

Perrv. A.. 

Dean 


83s 

. -.84s. 


Perry. W. D. 

2Q6 

205 


.. 205 

207 

211 


85 

Block 


85 

B1 pck 


Rosser, Neill 

71 

Directo] 

p. Stu. Tchg. 72b 

196 

Dir. Stu. Tchg. 

Scott, Neill 

72b 

72b 

81-PT 

72b 

?2b 

81-PT 

Slatterv. W. G. 

Full Ti 

ae in Field 

Full Time in Field 


Sommerfield, Roy E. 

174 

. 203-.. ... 

.... -..271. 

71 J 

172 

272 

Taff, Luther R. 

171 

105 

126 

22A 

27.5... ... 

99 

Tarbet, Donald 

295 ... 

41 

292 

292 

135 

295 

Tracy. Neal H. 

41 

41 

294 

. 201 

294 

41 

Allen, Helen 

41 

41 . 


L 41 

_41 


Brockmann, M. 

TV 



83f 

84f 


Congleton. J. W. 

41 



.. 41 

41 


Cortner, F. 

Asst, to Dean 


Asst, to Dean 


Godwin^ Joseph 

~71 | 71 


71 ! 71 



a. Block program for students includes practice teachings 
normally in the senior year. 

b. Fifth-Year Program 


27 = 



































































. 

















































































































































































TABLE 6 


SCHOOL OF EDUCATION COMMITTEES, 1962-63 


Faculty 

O) 

-p 

ctf 

3 

"C 

Cti 

U 

tx 

f- 

Q) 

'C 

c 

ro 

Graduate 

Personnel 

Schedule 

Catalog 

Building 

School Work 
& Convocation 

a 

t 

T 

k 

K 

%- 

a 

V. 

'Z 

r~ 

a 

T 

Pt 

Plans and 

Projects 

c 

o 

•H 

(0 
•H 
> 
) <D 

i—i 
CD 

E-h 

In-Service 

Education 

Fifth-Year 

Program 

Faculty Recorder 


Chase 

X 

X 










X 


3 . 

Brawn 

X 

X 


X 










3 

Scott 

X 



X 


X 








3 

Rosser 

X 



X 







X 

X 


U 

Jamerson 

X 



X 










2 

Hennis 

X 




X 


X 





X 


U . 

King 


X 

X 









X 


3 

Gwynn 


X 









X 



. 2 

Holton 


X 

X 








X 



3 

Harshman 


X 





X 


X 

X 




L 

Perrv W. D. 


X 


X 


X 








3 

Slattery 


X 






X 






2 

Sommerfeld 


X 







X 





.2 

Peacock 


X 







X 





2 

Otts 


X 





X 

X 






3 

Perry, Arnolc 

[ 


X 









X 


2 - 

Tracy 





X 

X 


X 






3 

Jones 





X 


.... . 

w 


X 

X 



3 

Lane 





X 


X 



X 




3 

Ballew 





X 









1 

Ebert 






X 








1 

Tarbet 






X 


X 


X 




3 

Phillips 







X 


X 


X 


X 

U 

Taff 







X 


X 





. 2. . . 

Briggs 








X 




X 


2 

TOTAL 

6 

11 

3 

5 

5 

5 

6 

> 

5 

4 

5 

6 

1 

67 


- 28 - 

















































































































The following off-campus courses have been given during 1962-63 2 

TABLE 7 



OFF-CAMPUS 

COURSES, 1962-63 


Fall, 1962 


Spring, 

1963 

Charlotte Course No. 

Ed. 110 

Ed. 135 

Ed. 154 

Ed. 185 

Staff Member 

Holton 

Tarbet 

Jones 

Harshman 

Course No. 

Ed. 105 

Ed. 171 

Ed. 180 

Ed. 275 

Staff Member 

Taff 

Scott 

Harshman 

W. D. Perry 

Winston-Salem 


Ed. 303 

Tracy 

Woman's College 
Greensboro 


Ed. 196 

■*Aromi 

N. C. State College, 
Raleigh 


Ed. 204 

Otts 


^Member of the regular Woman’s College faculty and a member of the visiting 
faculty from the University. 

University policy considers off-campus teaching assignments as extra load 
if the teacher is already carrying a full load on the campus. All faculty members 
who carried the courses listed had a full load in residence, and were paid extra 
for this overload. The University usually holds each faculty member to one 
extra-load assignment during a school year. 

Courses in the Evening College and at Fort Bragg Extension Center, and 
consultant services for workshops in school administrative units also constitute 
additional work loads for faculty members. Extra work of these types must be 
approved by the Dean of the School. 

Supervision of student teaching in the block programs in the fall and spring 
semesters, and in the Associate-Teacher program throughout the year, is a part 
of the regular load of faculty members. 

The School has 17 advisers for undergraduate students, with student loads 
varying from 2 to 59. The average of approximately 28 per adviser certainly 


- 29 = 




































































adds to the total service loads of these advisers, but this is a very important 
service. 

D. Academic Faculty 

All subject matter in the general education program for all students, 
constituting about 40 per cent of undergraduate credit hours,, is taught by the 
personnel of the several schools and departments under the direction of the 
General College for the first and second years of college credit and the College 
of Arts and Sciences for the third and fourth years of credit. All of the courses 
in the subject-matter concentration and electives in these areas for all under¬ 
graduate students in all curriculum areas are taught by faculty of these same 
subject-matter departments. 

Table 8 indicates that the academic faculty members are qualified in terms 
of graduate degrees. Of the 348 regular faculty members, more than 43 per cent 
are full professors, and more than 18 per cent are in each of the ranks of associate 
professors, assistant professors, and instructors. Approximately 80 per cent of 
these regular faculty members hold appropriate earned doctor’s degrees, approximately 
16 per cent hold master’s degrees, and less than four per cent hold bachelor's 
degrees as the highest earned degrees. Well-qualified staff members in the 
Departments of Art, Music, and Physical Education teach the methods courses and 
supervise the student teachers in these areas. 


- 30 - 















































































TABLE 8 


PROFILE OF SUBJECT-MATTER FACULTY 


S.b.iect „ 




Nurnbe r 

in Each 
Asst. 
Prof. 

Rank 


N| 

Total 

Other 

Staff 

litter *- 

Cpt. 

Prof. 

Degrees 

Held 

Asso. 

Prof. 

Degrees 

Held 

Degrees 

Held 

Instr¬ 

uctor 

Degreed 

Held 

Aft 

- 3 

(1 D*) 

2 

(M**) 

2 

(1 D) 

1 

(B#**) 





(2 M) 




(1 M) 



- 8 

9 

litany 

- 5 

(D) 

2 

(0) 

1 

(D) 

1 

(D) 

- 9 

16 

Ciemistry 

- 9 

(D) 

3 

(D) 

4 

(D) 

2 

(1 D) 

(1 M) 

- 18 

53 

Classics 

- 5 

(4 D) 

2 

(D) 

2 

(D) 

3 

(1 D) 





(1 M) 






(2 B) 

- 12 

13 

Eionomics 

- 15 

(14 D) 

4 

(3 D) 

2 

(D) 

0 






(1 B) 


(1 M) 





- 21 

13 

English 

- 18 

(16 D) 

6 

(D) 

7 

(D) 

11 

(3 D) 





(2 M) 






(8 M) 

- 42 

45 

(bology and 











Geography 

- 3 

(D) 

5 

(D) 

3 

(1 D) 

0 










(2 M) 


, 

- 11 

20 

JL 

(ferman 

- 5 

(D) 

1 

(D) 

1 

(D) 

3 

(2 M) 











(1 B) 

- 10 

11 

llstory 

- 13 

(D) 

6 

(D) 

5 

(D) 

2 

(1 D) 











(1 M) 

- 26 

14 

library Science 

- 0 


2 

(M) 

1 

(M) 

0 


- 3 

0 

mthematics 

- 12 

(11 D) 

4 

(3 D) 

4 

(D) 

1 

(M) 

- 




(1 M) 


(1 M) 





- 21 

33 

Usic 

- 4 

(3 D) 

2 

(D) 

2 

(1 D) 

1 

(D) 





(1 M) 




(1 M) 



- 9 

17 

j.iysical Education- 4 

(3 D) 

5 

(2 D) 

3 

(M) 

9 

(M) 

- 




(1 M) 


(3 M) 





- 21 

16 

! bysics 

- 6 

(D) 

3 

(D) 

4 

(D) 

1 

(M) 

- 14 

23 

olitical Science 

- 9 

(D) 

4 

(D) 

3 

(D) 

2 

(M) 

- 18 

5 

Psychology 

- 9 

(D) 

5 

(D) 

12 

(D) 

4 

(1 D) 











(3 M) 

- 30 

30 

ornance Languages 

- 12 

(D) 

2 

(D) 

2 

(D) 

20 

(4 D) 

(ft 











(8 B) 

- 36 

13 

ociology 

- 13 

(D) 

7 

(D) 

7 

(D) 

1 

(M) 

- 28 

38 

oology 

- 7 

(D) 

0 


3 

(D) 

1 

(D) 

- 11 

31 

otals 

152 


65 


68 


63 


348 

400 


# D — Doctor's 
-ittt- M — Master's 
B — Bachelor's 

- 31 - 







































































E. Evidence of Faculty Improvement 


Evidences of Faculty improvement within the past five years are shown by 
several factors. Among these is the quality of faculty replacements which is 
shown in Table 9» 


TABLE 9. STAFF LOSSES AND REPLACEMENTS 
(not in order of replacement) (listed alphabetically) 


Staff Losses 

Staff Replacements 

Highest 

Experience, 

——— 

Years 


and Additions 

Earned Degree 

School 

College 

Name 

Name 




Beard, R. L. 

Ballew, H. 

M. Sci. 

1 

4 

*Bowers, N.D. (FYP) 

^Bowers, N.E. 

Ph.D. 

2 

5 

*Davis, O.L., Jr. (FYP) Biggs,, Frances 

Ph.B. 

20 

3 

Ellis, E.G. 

-*Davis, O.L., Jr. 

Ph.D. 

2 

1 

■^Fountain, Ben E., Jr 

■^Fountain, B.E., Jr, 

Ph.D. 

6 

0 

**Hill, Henry H. 

Harshman, H.W. 

Ph.D. 

0 

14 

^Hughes, R.B. 

Hennis, R.S. 

Ph.D. 

3 

4 

■SBHhJordan, A.M. 

■fr^Hill, Henry H. 

Ph.D. 

30 

15 

^Matthews, W.P. 

•^Hughes, R.B. 

Ph.D. 

0 

1 

^Merrill, E.C., Jr. 

Jones, Annie L. 

Ed.D. 

21 

7 

***Phillips, Guy B. 

Lane, Mary T. 

Ed.D. 

4 

9 

^Rogers, J.F. 

^Matthews, ¥.P. 

Ed. Do 

0 

7 

Rosenstengel (Died) 

^Merrill, E.C., Jr. 

Ph.D. 

2 

5 

***Ryan, W.C. 

Otts, J.C. 

Ed. Do 

29 

2 


Phillips, R.Co 

Ph.D. 

3 

2 


■^Rogers, J.F. 

Ph.D. 

5 

2 


Rosser, Neill 

Ed.D. 

11 

8 


Tracy, Neill 

Ed.D. 

11 

5 

^Replacement or addition who then left for 

another position 



■^‘One-Year Appointment 





Retired 






Three faculty members completed the doctor's degree while employed by the 
University within the past five years. One faculty member was given a leave of 
absence without salary for study in this period. 

Most of the faculty have been very active in professional activities during 
the last five years. Staff members have attended national, regional, and State 
meetings of almost all of the professional associations and their divisions and 
departments. Staff members have been in demand for consultant services to various 


■ 32 - 






































































































































































professional groups, both in~State and out, to the extent that the Dean has had 
to limit the amount of service to the time available to the staff for these 
activities. These activities include serving as special consultants to school 
boards, superintendents, individual schools; conducting workshops, and school 
or building surveys; and acting as special consultants in awarding research 
contracts under the control of the U. S. Office of Education. 

Each staff member is urged to be a dues-paying and active member of his 
own professional group on local (if any). State, regional, and national levels. 

The University has no Sabbatical leaves. A limited number of special leaves 
are available for research. Ordinarily, leaves of absence are without salary. 

The administration and the Dean encourage faculty members of the School to 
improve their competencies and broaden their knowledge by using part or all of 
the summer for writing, and by accepting offers to teach in Summer School in 
other colleges and universities. 

The Dean allocates the limited funds available for travel to staff members 
for attendance at scholarly and professional meetings and uses established 
criteria of significance in the allocation. 

For the last decade, the In-Service Education Committee of the School of 
Education has held a large number of seminars varying widely in scope. The faculty 
minutes identify the kinds of in-service programs and seminars that have been 
scheduled, including the biannual meetings of the combined Education staffs of 
the University at Chapel Hill, the Woman’s College, and North Carolina State 
College. 

The self-study report by the School of Education and the report of the National 
Council on Accreditation for Teacher Education provide other evidences of effort 
to improve professional competence among the School of Education faculty members. 


- 33 “ 




' 









































































STANDARD IV—UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 


The discussion of undergraduate curricula is in two main parts: Part One, 
Preparation of Elementary Teachers (Grades 1 through 8); and Part Two, Preparation 
of Secondary School Teachers (Grades 9 through 12) and Special Subject Teachers 
(Grades 1 through 12). Required courses are marked by an asterisk (*). 

PART ONE 

PREPARATION OF ELEMENTARY TEACHERS (GRADES 1 THROUGH 8) 

This part contains the following main paragraphs: A. General Education for 
Elementary Teachers; B. Subject-Matter Concentration for Elementary Teachers; 
and C. Professional Education for Elementary Teachers. 

There are 185 undergraduate students and six special students enrolled in the 
elementary education program. 

All undergraduates preparing to teach in elementary education (grades 1-8) 
are required to complete 60 semester hours in general education and 24 semester 
hours in professional education, leaving 36 semester hours for subject-matter 
preparation and concentration. All elementary education majors are required 
to have 4 semester hours in physical education, before receiving the bachelor's 
degree. 

A. General Education for Elementary Teachers 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should assure that all teachers are able to read . 
write, and speak the English language clearly and effectively . 

^English 1, 2 Composition and Rhetoric 6 s.h. 

^English 21 English Literature 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should develop a critical understanding of and a 
sensitiveness to the aesthetic, philosophical, ethical, and imaginative values 

expressed in literature, art, music, religion, and philosophy . 


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^English 21 
*Music 41 
^‘Philosophy 


^Foreign Language 


English Literature 3 s.h. 

Music Appreciation 3 s.h. 

Selected from electives in: 3 s.h. 

Anthropology 

Economics 

History 

Philosophy 

Sociology 

Political Science 

(dependent upon high school 

units) 9 - 15 s.h. 


^Mathematics, Logic, Greek, or Latin 6 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should develop an understanding of the development 
of world civilization, an understanding of the basic concepts of the social 

studies, and an understanding of democracy as a way of life . 


-^History 1-2 

Modern Civilization 

6 

s.h. 

-*History 71-72 

American Survey 

6 

s.h. 

•^Political Science 41 

Introduction to Government 
in the United States 

3 

s.h. 


' Electives from general college electives in Anthropology, Economics, History, 
Philosophy, Sociology, or Political Science. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should develop an appreciation and understanding 
of the structure of science, of scientific inquiry, and of the main scientific 
principles . 

Three laboratory science courses are required. 

^Geography 38 


Introduction to Physical 
Geography 


4 s.h. 


*Two other courses of laboratory science, of which 
one must be a biological science 6 to 8 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should develop an appreciation of the structure 
and applications of mathematics . 


Two courses in Logic are permitted instead of Mathematics, also Greek 1 2 
or 3-4, or Latin 1—2 or 3-4 may be substituted for Mathematics. Beginning in 


























































































' 








































September, 1963, two courses in Mathematics will be required of elementary 
education majors. These two courses in Mathematics will also meet the requirements 
of Guideline 4 under "Subject-Matter Areas of Concentration.'* 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should develop the knowledge, habits, and attitudes 
necessary to achieve and maintain sound physical and mental health . 

^Physical Education 1, 2, 3, and 4 4 s.h. 

Hygiene 12W (for women) Personal Hygiene 2 s.h. 

■Ur or 

Hygiene 11 (for men) Personal Hygiene 2 s.h. 

B. Subject-Matter Concentration for Elementary Teachers 

1. Faculty—Number and Preparation for the Elementary Program. 

With the exception of Education 6l (Methods and Materials in Elementary 
Teaching), the courses in the subject-matter areas are taught by faculty members 
outside the School of Education. Four professors in the School of Education are 
responsible for the teaching of Education 6l. Three of these professors hold 
doctor's degrees and the other one holds a master's degree. 

It is difficult to determine the number and qualifications of the professors 
who teach the courses taken by elementary education majors in the various subject- 
matter areas, because not all elementary education majors have the same professors 
in class sections of the same course. About 15 to 25 faculty members teach 
elementary education majors in the required subject-matter courses. Most hold 
a doctor's degree, and none holds lower than the master's degree. All teach 
in-field, in the School of Education and elsewhere. 

2. Guidelines and Programs 

GUIDELINE ll The program should provide an understanding of the process 
of learning to read, to speak, and to write the English language clearly and 

effectively, and should develop sensitiveness to and love and enthusiasm for 

good literature . 


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^English 1, 2 
•^English 21 
^Library Science 93 

^Education 6l 


Composition and Rhetoric 6 s.h. 

English Literature 3 s.h. 

Survey and Evaluation of 

Books and Related Materials 

for Children 3 s.h. 

Methods and Materials in 
Elementary Teaching 


English 1, 2, and 21 are part of the general education program. 
GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide a knowledge and understanding 
of the social, political, geographical, and economic forces which operate in 

society; an understanding of government organization and functions; and an 

appreciation of the conservation of our natural resources . 


*History 1-2 
^History 71-72 
•^Political Science 41 
-^Geography 38 


Modern Civilization 

American History 

U. S. Government 

Introduction to 
Physical Geography 


6 s.h. 
6 s.h. 
3 s.h. 


4 s.h. 

Many of these courses are part of the general education requirement. For 
elementary education majors who do not have three laboratory sciences. Geography 38 
(Introduction to Physical Geography) is required, meeting the geography requirement 
in the subject-matter area and one of the science requirements in general education. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide a knowledge of basic physical and 
biological science content, and ability to plan a logical sequence of science 

experiences for the several grade levels . 

Three laboratory sciences, one physical and one biological, are required, 
for a total of 9 to 12 s.h. As indicated in Guideline 2, elementary education 
majors may use Geography 38 (introduction to Physical Geography) as one of the 
three laboratory sciences. 


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GUIDELINE 4 ‘ The program should include study in mathematics which would 


involve consideration of the structure of the real number system and its 

subsystems and the basic concepts of algebra and informal geometry . 

Courses in Mathematics are not required for elementary education majors 
at present; however, many girls currently take Mathematics instead of the 
substitutes in Logic, Greek, and Latin as indicated in Guideline 5 under General 
Education. New courses in Mathematics have been requested and will be required 
of all elementary education majors entering the School of Education in the fall 
semester of 1963 . These courses are Mathematics 17 and Mathematics 18 and are 
designed for elementary education majors only. — 6 semester hours. 

GUIDELINE 5 - The program should develop a sound philosophy of art education , 
appreciation of color and form, and creative ability in several art media . 

Two art courses, including arts and crafts, are required, 6 semester hours. 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should provide a background of music fundamentals . 

The required credit in music is 6 semester hours. Two music courses are 

recommended for elementary education majors and a majority of the majors take 

these courses; 

Music 4 Fundamentals of Music for 

Elementary Teachers 3 s.h. 

*-Music 41 Music Appreciation 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 7: The program should provide understanding of both the health 
and physical needs of children at various grade levels . 

•"'Physical Education 83a Physical Education for 

the Elementary School 3 s.h. 

■^Physical Education 84 Health Education for 

the Elementary School 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 8; The program should provide an opportunity to develop a subject 
concentration. 


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Students preparing to become elementary teachers have a nearly-full schedule 
of mandatory courses and areas of study, with only a limited number of semester 
hours available for subject concentration. The number of hours available varies 
with the background of the student, especially the college credits earned before 
entering the School of Education. At least 6 semester hours beyond general 
education is possible and is recommended for a subject concentration. Students 
normally enter the School of Education at the beginning of the junior year, 
and have few electives left because of the specific requirements of the University 
for bachelor's degree graduates. The advisers of the elementary education 
program are very much aware of the difficulties of subject concentration for 
elementary teaching students. The advisers guide students as well as they can in 
this respect. 

C. Professional Education for Elementary Teachers 

1. Faculty—Number and Preparation 

Most of the professional courses taken by elementary education majors are 
conducted by nine faculty members of the School of Education. Eight of the nine 
faculty members hold doctor's degrees. The other faculty member holds the master's 
degree. These faculty members teach professional courses in which they have had 
considerable training and experience. 

2. Guidelines and Programs 

GUIDELINE 2; The professional education program should provide an understanding 
of the normal sequences of human growth and development, with special emphasis on 

the pupils of the school age to be taught . 

■^Education 72a Child Growth and Development 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2 i The professional education program should provide an under¬ 
standing of the nature of learning, the learning process, and the psychology of 
learning . 


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^Education 71 Educational Psychology 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3 • The professional education program should provide an under ¬ 
standing of methods, special techniques, and materials appropriate to the 
specific levels or areas of the prospective teacher's subject-matter concentration 

and skill in applying them in a classroom situation . 

^Education 52 Methods and Materials 

in Language Art 3 s.h. 

■^Education 6l Theory and Practice of 

Teaching in the 

Elementary School 6 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The professional education program should provide an under¬ 
standing of the purpose, organization, and administration of school systems, with 
special emphasis on the role of the school teacher in the total education program . 

^Education 41 Introduction to Education 

in American Society 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The professional education program should provide a broad 

historical, philosophical, and sociological orientation to schools in our society 

and to the profession of teaching . 

^Education 6l Theory and Practice 

of Teaching in the 

Elementary School 6 s.h. 

This course is part of the professional education "block" program. 

GUIDELINE 6: The professional education program should provide an extended 
period of continuous full-time student teaching experience in the grade levels 

or subjects to be taught . 

^Education 62 Student Teaching in the 

Elementary School 6 s.h. 

PART TWO 

PREPARATION OF SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS (GRADES 8 THROUGH 12) AND SPECIAL 

SUBJECT TEACHERS (GRADES 1 THROUGH 12) 

This part contains the followings A. General Education for Secondary Scnool 

Teachers (Grades 8—12) and Special Subject Teachers (Grades 1—12); B. Subject-Matter 

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Preparation for Secondary School Teachers (Grades 8-12); C. Subject-Matter 
Preparation for Junior High School Teachers (Grades 7-9); D. Subject-Matter 
Preparation for Special Subject Teachers (Grades 1-12); and E. Professional 
Education for Secondary School Teachers and Special Subject Teachers. Required 
courses are marked with an asterisk (*). 

A. General Education for Secondary School Teachers (Grades 8-12) and Special 

Subject Teachers (Grades 1-12) 

The general education requirements for bachelor’s degree candidates preparing 

for certification in the public schools normally are completed during the first 

two years of college enrollment in the General College of the University of 

North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Students enroll in the School of Education for 

their junior and senior years. The School of Education and the University assure 

that students complete these general requirements in qualifying for a bachelor's 

degree and recommendation for certification, 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should assure that all teachers are able to read , 

write, and speak the English language clearly and effectively . 

■^English 1 and 2 English Composition 

and Rhetoric 6 s.h. 

^English 21 English Literature 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2; The program should develop a critical understanding of and a 

sensitiveness to the aesthetic, philosophical, ethical, and imaginative values 

expressed in literature, art, music, religion, and philosophy . 

^-English 21 English Literature 3 s.h. 

^Foreign Language 9 - 15 s.h. 

(Depending upon high school units and/or advanced placement test.) 

Music 41 Music Appreciation 3 s.h. 

Psychology 26 General 4 s.h. 

(^-Required in health education preparation.) 


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Electives from anthropology, economics, history, philosophy, political 
science, and sociology. 

GUIDELINE 3 The program should develop an understanding of the development 
of world civilization, an understanding of the basic concepts of the social 

studies, and an understanding of democracy as a way of life . 

^History 1-2 Modern Civilization 6 s.h. 

Economics 30 Introduction 3 s.h. 

(^-Required in social studies preparation.) 

History 21-22 American History Survey 6 s.h. 

(--Required in social studies and in elementary 
education preparation.) 

Sociology 52 Social Problems 

Sociology 62 

Marriage and Family 6 s.h. 

(^Required in Health Education preparation.) 

Political Science 41 American Government 3 s.h. 

(---Required in Health Education preparation.) 

*A course in one of the following: 3 s.h. 

Anthropology 

Economics 

History 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Sociology 

GUIDELINE 4* The program should develop an appreciation and understanding 
of the structure of science, of scientific inquiry, and of the main scientific 

principles . 

- r Three laboratory courses in science, including one in physical science 
and one in biological science. 

Geography 38 Introduction to 

Physical Geography 4 s.h. 


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■ 






















Botany 11 

General Botany 

4 s.h. 

or 



Physics 20 
and 

Twentieth Century Physics 

4 s.h. 

Zoology 41 

Introductory Vertebrate 



Zoology 

4 s.h. 

Chemistry 11 and 12 

General Chemistry 

8 s.h. 

or 



Chemistry 11 

General Chemistry 

4 s.h. 

and 



Chemistry 21 

Descriptive Chemistry 

4 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program 

should develop an appreciation 

of the structure 


and applications of mathematics . 

Mathematics 6 and 7 Integrated Algebra 

and Trigonometry 6 s.h. 

* or 

Mathematics 15 Introduction to 

College Mathematics 3 s.h. 

and 

Mathematics 31 <> 32* or 33 3 or 4 s.h. 

Substitutions allowed for mathematics except for science majors: Greek 1 
and 2 or 3 and 4> or Latin 1 and 2 or 3 and l ri or two courses in logic may be 
substituted for mathematics by persons preparing to teach in secondary school or 
preparing to teach a special subject. 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should develop the knowledge, habits, and attitudes 
necessary to achieve and maintain sound physical and mental health . 


-^Physical Education 1* 2* 

3* and 4 


4 s.h. 

Hygiene 1QW (for women) 

Personal 

Hygiene 

2 s.h. 

* or 




Hygiene 11 (for men) 

Personal 

Hygiene 

2 s.h. 


B. Subject-Matter Preparation for Secondary School Teachers (Grades 8-12) 

This section describes the undergraduate subject-matter preparation for 
teachers of English* French* German* Latin* mathematics* science* social studies* 
and Spanish. 


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English 

The subject-matter preparation for a prospective English teacher includes 


36 semester hours or 30 per cent of the undergraduate preparation. 

GUIDELINE 1: The pr ogram should provide specialized study at the college 
level in the areas of the high school curriculum to be taught . 

Language : 


^English 1 and 2 


English Composition 



and Rhetoric 

6 

s.h. 

^English 30 

Advanced Composition: The 
Technique of Exposition 

3 

s.h. 

English 40 
* or 

Voice and Diction 

3 

s.h. 

English 41 

Oral Interpretation 
of Literature 

3 

s.h. 

^English 36 

English Grammar 

3 

s.h. 

Literature: 




^English 21 

English Literature-Chaucer, 
Shakespeare, Milton 

3 

s.h. 

^English 58 

Shakespeare (about 
twenty plays) 

3 

s.h. 

*-0ne of the 

following., before 1800 

3 

s.h. 

English 52 

Chaucer 



English 54 

English Literature of the 
Renaissance 



English 60 

English Literature * l6l6 - 1700 


English 64 

Milton 



English 66 

Prose and Poetry of the 
Classical Period 



*0ne of the 

following, after 1800 

3 

s.h. 

English 72 

The Chief Romantic Poets 



English 73 

Victorian Literature 



English 78 

English Literature, 1890-1920 




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*One of the following in American Literature 


3 s.h. 


English 81 


American Literature, 1800-1890 
American Literature, 1890-1950 


English 82 


Language and Literature Skills ; 

Courses in language and literature listed above. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should lead to an excellence in written and oral 
expression . 

The following courses were listed fully in Guideline 1. 

^English 1 and 2 

^English 30 

■^English 40 and 41 

GUIDELINE 3 • The program should provide study and training at the college 
level in the areas of reading . 

The undergraduate preparation for teachers of English is lacking in the 
comprehensive study of; historical background and development of the language, 
word attack skills for study and reading, comprehension techniques, and mechanics 
of reading. These areas are not required in general education or professional 
education, although students may choose to study in these areas in elective courses. 
No systematic encouragement of such study was found. 

GUIDELINE 4 ' The program should lead to a knowledge of the importance 
of libraries . 

All the required literature courses and Freshman Composition and Advanced 
Composition require use of the library for research papers. Most of the courses 
encourage general reading beyond the assignments. 

GUIDELINE 5; The program should provide sufficient preparation for later 
graduate work in English . 

Required courses plus electives are felt to be adequate as a base for later 


graduate work in English. 



















































































French 


The subject-matter preparation program for a prospective teacher of French 
includes a total of 30 semester hours above courses 1 and 2* or 25 per cent of a 
basic four-year program. 


GUIDELINE 1: The program should include a thorough college 

level study 

of the various aspects of 

the foreign language to be taught. 


’"•French 3 and 4 

Intermediate French 

6 s.h. 

■^French 21 

Advanced French 

3 s.h. 

■^French 50 

Advanced French 

3 s.h. 

■^French 51 

French Conversation 
and Composition 

3 s.h. 

-^French 52 

French Civilization I 
(Conversation) 

3 s.h. 

/^•French 145 

French Phonetics I 

3 s.h. 

--French 53 

French Civilization II 
(Conversation) 

3 s.h. 

•-'French 71 

Survey of French 

Literature I 

3 s.h. 

•-French 72 

Survey of French 

Literature II 

3 s.h. 

French 73 

Survey of French 

Literature III 

3 s.h. 

French 126 

History of French Language 

3 s.h. 

PJTTniRT.TWT?. ?• Thp nroeram should develop competency in four skills— 

understanding, speaking. 

reading, and writing. 


The following courses are taught in French* with lectures* 

readings* and 

examinations in French. 



’"French 3-4 

Intermediate French 

6 s.h. 

■^French 21 

Advanced French 

3 s.h. 

^French 50 

Advanced French 

3 s.h. 


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•^French 51 

French Conversation 
and Composition 

3 s.h. 

^French 52 

French Civilization I 

3 s.h. 

French 53 

French Civilization II 

3 s.h. 

French 73 

Survey of French 

Literature III 

3 S.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: 

The program should provide for sufficient emphasis 


language analysis . 

The following courses provide work in advanced grammar and composition, 
phonetics, historical development of the French language, and comparison of the 
sound patterns and grammar patterns of French with English. 

^French 50 Advanced French 3 s.h. 

^French 145 French Phonetics 3 s.h. 

French 126 History of the French Language 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4 ' The program should include a study of the literature, history 
and civilization of the country or countries concerned . 


^French 

21 

Advanced French 

3 

s.h. 

^'French 

52 

French Civilization I 

3 

s.h. 

French 

53 

French Civilization II 

3 

s.h. 

■^French 

71 

Survey of French 

Literature I 

3 

s.h. 

^French 72 

Survey of French 

Literature II 

3 

s.h. 

French 

73 

Survey of French 

Literature III 

3 

s.h. 


Any literature courses numbered above 100 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide sufficient preparation for the later 
pursuit of graduate work in the foreign languages . 

The required courses plus electives are felt to be adequate as a base for 
later graduate study in French. 


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German 


The subject matter preparation program for a prospective German teacher 


includes a total of 30 semester hours above courses 1 and 2, or 25 per cent < 

a basic four-year program. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should include a thorough coll era-level st.uriv 

of the various aspects of the : 

foreign language to be taught. 


^German 3-4 



Intermediate German 

6 s.h. 

^-German 21-22 


Advanced German 

6 s.h. 

-"-German 31 



Conversation 

3 s.h. 

German 32 



Conversation 

3 s.h. 

^"German 90 



Advanced German Grammar 

3 s.h. 

^-German 145 



German Phonetics 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: 

The 

program 

should develop competency in 

four skills— 

understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. 


-^German 3-4 



Intermediate German 

6 s.h. 

-^German 21-22 



Advanced German 

6 s.h. 

-"-German 90 



Advanced German Grammar 

3 s.h. 

^German 31 



Conversation 

3 s.h. 

German 32 



Conversation 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: 

The 

program 

should provide for sufficient 

emphasis in 


language analysis . 

■^German 90 Advanced German Grammar 3 s.h. 

^German 145 German Phonetics 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 4: The program should include a study of the literature, history , 
and civilization of the country or countries concerned . 


Three courses in German Literature are required. The three courses are 
selected with the help of an adviser and must form a unit in a particular area. 







































































































«* 





































Literature courses include: 


*-Three courses selected from the following: 


German 

109 

German Prose in the 

Twentieth Century 

3 

s.h. 

German 

111 

German Drama in the 

Nineteenth Century 

3 

s.h. 

German 

115 

The German Lyric from 
Holderlin to the Present 

3 

s.h. 

German 

121 

Goethe's Early Works 

3 

s.h. 

German 

122 

Goethe's Later Works 

3 

s.h. 

German 

131 

German Literature of the 
Eighteenth Century 

3 

s.h. 

German 

141 

Schiller 

3 

s.h. 

German 

152 

The German Novel Since 1890 

3 

s.h, 

German 

153 

The German Drama Since 1890 

3 

s.h. 

German 

171 

German Civilization 

3 

s.h. 


GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide sufficient preparation for the 
later pursuit of graduate work in the foreign languages . 

It is felt that the program fulfills this guideline 

Latin 

The subject-matter preparation program for a prospective Latin teacher 
includes a total of 27 semester hours above course 1-2. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should include a thorough college-level study 
of the various aspects of the foreign language to be taught . 

Preparation of the Latin teacher includes work in pronunciation, grammar, 
composition, and literature. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should develop competency in pronunciation and 
speaking (limited emphasis), grammar and composition, literature . 


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*Latin 3 $4 

Intermediate Latin 

6 s.h. 

*\Latin 21 

Advanced Latin (Livy) 

3 s.h. 

*Latin 71 

Course for Teachers 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: 

The program should provide for sufficient 

emphasis in language 

analysis. 



*Latin 71 

Course for Teachers 

3 s.h. 

Latin 107 

Latin Composition 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: 

The program should include a study of the 

literature, history 

and civilization 

of the country or countries concerned. 


These and other courses are offered: 


Latin 101 

Roman Historical Literature 

3 s.h. 

Latin 102 

Roman Dramatic Literature 

3 s.h. 

Latin 103 

Prose Writings of the Republic 3 s.h. 

Latin 105 

Juvenal 

3 s.h. 

Latin 106 

Lucretius 

3 s.h. 

Latin 108 

Martial 

3 s.h. 

Latin 113 

Livy 

3 s.h. 

Latin 117 

Virgil 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: 

The urogram should provide sufficient preparation for the 

later Dursuit of graduate work in the foreign languages. 


The program, 

as described, qualifies the student for later graduate 

work. 



Note: For Latin 

as an allied teaching field, a student would take 24 semester 

hours, including Latin 3-4* 21, and 5 other courses as recommended by 
the Department in light of the student's former preparation (based on 

two units 

of high school Latin, to be reduced by 3 semester hours for 


each additional high school unit of entrance credit.) 


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All Latin majors take a survey course in Latin and Greek Literature taught 
in English (with readings in English translation) and a course in ancient history. 


Mathematics 

The subject-matter preparation for a prospective mathematics teacher includes 
a total of 27 to 30 semester hours in mathematics or approximately 22 per cent 
to 25 per cent of a basic four-year program. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should take into consideration the sequential 
nature of mathematics and should provide the prospective teacher an understanding 

of some of the aspects of mathematics which his students will meet in subsequent 

courses. 


Mathematics 15 

Introduction to College 
Mathematics 

3 s.h. 

'it or 



Mathematics 6 and 7 

Integrated Algebra 
and Trigonometry 

6 s.h. 

^Mathematics 31 

Calculus with 

Analytic Geometry 

3 s.h. 

^Mathematics 32 

Calculus with 

Analytic Geometry 

3 s.h. 

-"•Mathematics 33 

Calculus with 

Analytic Geometry 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program 

of mathematics should include 

a thorough 


college-level study of the subjects in mathematics included in the high school 

curriculum. 


*Mathematics 

116 

Fundamental Concepts 
of Algebra 

3 

s.h. 

Mathematics 

135 

Linear Algebra 

3 

s.h. 

* or 

Mathematics 13 6 

Introduction to 

Modern Algebra I 

3 

s.h. 

^Mathematics 

137 

Introduction to 

Modern Algebra II 

3 

s.h. 

^Mathematics 

119 

Topics from Geometry and 
Elementary Topology 

3 

s.h. 


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GUIDELINE 3 • The program should include additional upper-level work 
in mathematics, with courses chosen for their relevance to the high school 
curriculum. 


Two courses selected from the following: 


6 s.h. 


Mathematics 

111 

Elementary Mathematical 
Statistics 

3 

s.h. 

Mathematics 

120 

Probability 

3 

s.h. 

Mathematics 

171 

Advanced Calculus I 

3 

s.h. 

Mathematics 

172 

Advanced Calculus II 

3 

s.h. 

Mathematics 

181 

Elementary Theory of 
Numbers I 

3 

s.h. 

Mathematics 

182 

Elementary Theory of 
Numbers II 

3 

s.h. 

Mathematics 

131 

Theory of Equations 

3 

s.h. 

Mathematics 

141 

Differential Equations 

3 

s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: 

The 

program should include work in areas 

related to 


mathematics . 

The self-study states that advisement regarding a second teaching field 
emphasizes science with preference for substantial work in physics. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should include sufficient preparation for the 
later pursuit of graduate work in mathematics . 

The self-study states that required courses plus electives are adequate 
as a base for later graduate study in mathematics. The findings indicate 
that the faculty members of the School of Education agree with this statement 
but the faculty members of the department of mathematics do not believe the 
undergraduate preparation is adequate for immediate enrollment in graduate 
degree programs in mathematics. 


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Science 


Credit of 8 semester hours of science and 6 semester hours of mathematics 
are used toward the general education requirement. The science work beyond 
general education is 45 to 49 semester hours, or approximately 40 per cent of 
the four-year program of preparation for a bachelor of science degree and cer¬ 
tification as a teacher in one of four areas of concentration: biology, chemistry, 
physics, or earth science. 


a 


GUIDELINE 1: The program should take into account the necessity of having 
broad foundation in biological and physical sciences and mathematics. 


*Botany 11 

General Botany 

4 s.h. 

^Chemistry 11-22 

General Chemistry and 
Qualitative Analysis 

8 s.h. 

^Geology 11 

Physical Geology 

4 s.h. 

Mathematics 6 and 7 

Integrated Algebra 
and Trigonometry 



or 

Mathematics 15 
and 

Mathematics 31 
^Physics 24-25 
*Z oology 11 


Introduction to College Mathematics 
Calculus with Analytic Geometry 6 s.h. ** 
General Physics 8 s.h. 

General Zoology 4 s.h. 


34 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should have depth in at least one area of science , 
with courses chosen for maximum relevance to the high school science curriculum . 

Concentrations in four areas of science are provided, 
a. Biology 

*Two Botany electives chosen from: 8 s.h. 

Botany 101 Fungi, Algae, and Bryophytes 

Botany 102 Structure of Seed Plants 

Botany 103 Field Botany 

**The General College requires 6 semester hours of mathematics which may be 
satisfied by these courses. 


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\ 
























■ 




























































































Botany 104 


Plant Dynamics 


*Two Zoology electives chosen from: 8 s.h. 


Zoology 41 

Introductory Vertebrate Zoology 

Zoology 104 

Vertebrate Embryology 

Zoology 106 

General Invertebrate Zoology 

Zoology 111 

Genetics 

Zoology 122 

Human Genetics 

■^Chemistry 6l 

Organic Chemistry 6 s.h. 

^Bacteriology 51 

Elementary 4 s.h. 

26 s.h. 


b. Chemistry 


^Chemistry 43 

Quantitative Analysis 5 s.h. 

^Chemistry 51 

Inorganic 4 s.h. 

^Chemistry 6l 

Organic 6 s.h. 


*Two Chemistry electives from: 8 s.h. 


Chemistry 44 

Quantitative Analysis 

Chemistry 62 
or 

Chemistry 64 

Organic 

Organic 

Chemistry 83 

Physical Chemistry for 

Premedical Students 

^Astronomy 31 
or 

Descriptive 


One Physics course elective 4 s.h. 

27 s.h. 

c. Physics 


■^Astronomy 31 

Descriptive 4 s.h. 

^Physics 54 

Modern Developments in Physics 3 s.h. 

^Physics 55 

Laboratory in Modern Physics 1 s.h. 

^Physics 6l 

Techniques of Physics 4 s.h. 

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*Physics 101 Introductory Electronics 4 s.h. 

*0ne Physics course elective in electricity or mechanics 4 s.h. 

^Mathematics 31-32-33 Calculus with 

Analytic Geometry 9 s.h. 


d. Earth Science 

■^Geology 42 

^Geology 101 

^Geology 110 
and 

Geology 111 
Geology 38 
Astronomy 31 
One Geology elective 


Historical Geology 4 s.h. 
Mineralogy 4 s.h. 
Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks 3 s.h. 
Sedimentary Rocks 2 s.h. 
Meteorology and Climatology 4 s.h. 
Descriptive Astronomy 4 s.h. 

4 s.h. 


25 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3 • The program should include a sufficient basis and preparation 
for later graduate study in a particular science area . 

The Chairman of each science department stated that there were available 
"sufficient 100-numbered courses to satisfy the needs of teachers who might 
be candidates for the M.A.T. or M.A. degree." In the University at Chapel 
Hill there is little distinction in courses for advanced undergraduates or 
graduates seeking the Master's degree. 

Social Studies 

The subject-matter preparation of a prospective social studies teacher 
includes a total of 48 semester hours of work in the social studies. This is 
approximately 40 per cent of a basic program. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide a study in depth, at the college 
level, of courses included in the high school curriculum . 

*History 1-2 Modern Civilization 6 s.h. 

*History 71-72 American History 6 s.h. 


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*Plus two courses in American History and two courses 
in World History numbered above 50. 12 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2: The program 

should take into account the necessitv 

having breadth in the social studies. 


^Political Science 41 

American Government 

3 s.h. 

■^Political Science 86 

International Relations 

• 

a 

• 

CO 

-^Sociology 51 

Introduction to Sociology 

3 s.h. 

^Anthropology 122 

Cultural Anthropology 

3 s.h. 

Sociology 70 

Industrial Sociology 

3 s.h. 

* or 



Sociology 75 

Community Organization 

3 s.h. 

^Economics 31 and 32 

General Economics 

6 s.h. 

Geography 152 

World Economics 


*- or 



Geography 153 

World Political 

• 

. 

CO 

*-0ne of the following: 



Geography 154 

American Historical 


Geography 157 

Regional Geography of 



North America 


Geography 158 

Regional Geography of Europe 


Geography 159 

Regional Geography of 



South America 


Geography 175 

Regional Geography of U.S.S. R. 

Geography 181 

Regional Geography of E. Asia 


Geography 182 

Regional Geography of S. Asia 



Approved alternatives (courses with same content but different numbers or 
titles) may be taken with adviser's content. 

GUIDELINE 3 • The program should enable the prospective social studies 
teacher to pursue graduate studies in one or more areas in the field of the 

social studies. 


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. 


_ 


















The institution assumes the above program fulfills this guideline; it 
encourages students to select two additional courses in the area in which they 
wish to pursue later graduate work. 

Spanish 

The subject-matter preparation for prospective teachers of Spanish includes 
a total of 30 semester hours above courses 1 and 2, or 25 per cent of a basic 
four-year program. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should include a thorough college-level study of 
the various aspects of the foreign language to be taught . 


^Spanish 

3-4 

Intemediate Spanish 

6 

s.h. 

^Spanish 

21 

Advanced Spanish 

3 

s.h. 

^Spanish 

50 

Advanced Composition, Syntax, 





and Theme Writing 

3 

s.h. 

^Spanish 

51 

Spanish Conversation 





and Composition 

3 

s.h. 

^Spanish 

52 

Spanish Civilization 





(Conversation) 

3 

s.h. 

Spanish 

53 

Spanish American Civilization 





(Conversation) 

3 

s.h. 

^Spanish 

71 

Survey of Spanish 





Literature to 1700 

3 

s.h. 

^'Spanish 

72 

Survey of Spanish 





Literature Since 1700 

3 

s.h. 

Spanish 

113 

Spanish American Literature 

3 

s.h. 

^Spanish 

145 

Spanish Phonetics 

3 

s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: 

The program should develop competency in four : 

skills 


understanding, speaking, reading, and writing . 

The following courses are taught in Spanish, with lectures, readings, and 
examinations in Spanish. 

^Spanish 3 and 4 Intermediate Spanish 6 s.h. 

-^Spanish 21 Advanced Spanish 3 s.h. 


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■>"-Spanish 50 

Advanced Composition, Syntox, 
and Theme Writing 

3 s.h. 

^Spanish 51 

Spanish Conversation 
and Composition 

3 s.h. 

^Spanish 52 

Spanish Civilization 
(Conversation) 

3 s.h. 

Spanish 53 

Spanish American 

Civilization (Conversation) 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The 

program should provide for sufficient emphasis in 

language analysis. 



The following courses provide work in advanced grammar and 

composition. 

phonetics, and comparison of the sound-patterns and grammar-patterns of Spanish 

with English. 



^Spanish 50 

Advanced Composition 

3 s.h. 

■^Spanish 145 

Spanish Phonetics 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The 

program should include a study of the literature, history 

and civilization of the 

! country or countries concerned. 


^Spanish 21 

Advanced Spanish 

3 s.h. 

^Spanish 52 

Spanish Civilization 

3 s.h. 

Spanish 53 

Latin American Civilization 

3 s.h. 

^Spanish 71-72 

Survey of Spanish Literature 

6 s.h. 

Spanish 113 

Spanish American Literature 

3 s.h. 


Any literature courses numbered above 100. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide sufficient preparation for the 
later pursuit of graduate work in the foreign languages . 

The required courses plus electives are felt by the institution to be 
adequate as a base for later graduate study in Spanish. 

G. Subject-Matter Preparation for Junior High School Teachers (Grades 7-9 ) 


The institution provides curricula for those preparing to teach in the 
junior high school, grades 7 through 9. These programs are designed to qualify 

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, 















































the teacher—candidate for certification in one of the following! (l) social 
studies, (2) language arts (3) mathematics, or (4) science. The programs also 
qualify candidates for block—of—time work either in social studies and language 
arts or in mathematics and science. 

D* Subject-Matter Preparation for Special Sub.iect Teachers (Grades 1-12 ) 

Preparation for teachers of special subjects, grades 1 through 12, is offered 
for the following subject areas: Art; Health and Physical Education; Health 
Education; Library Science; and Music. 

Art 

The subject-matter preparation program for a prospective art teacher 
includes a total of 30 semester hours of a basic four—year program. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide for the development of an under ¬ 
standing of several philosophies of art education . 

■^Education 77 Methods and Materials 

in Teaching Art 3 s.h, 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide for a thorough study at the college 
level of the aspects of art included in the curriculum of elementary and secondary 

schools. 


*Three courses 

from the following: 

9 

s.h. 

Art 49 

Design 

3 

s.h. 

Art 6l 

Advertising Art 

3 

s.h. 

Art 84 

Ceramic Design 

3 

s.h. 

Art 108 

Illustration and 




Pictorial Composition 

3 

s.h. 

*Three courses 

from the following: 



Art 44 

Basic Drawing and Composition 

3 

s.h. 

Art 63 

Beginning Painting 

3 

s.h. 

Art 82 

Intermediate Painting 

3 

s.h. 


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Art 105 

Advanced Painting 

3 

s.h. 

*Art 31 

History and Interpretation 
of Architecture 

3 

s.h. 

*Art 33 

History and Interpretation 
of Painting 

3 

s.h. 

*-0ne course from 

the following: 

3 

s.h. 

Art 53 

Nineteenth-Century Painting 

3 

s.h. 

Art 54 

Twentieth-Century Painting 

3 

s.h. 

Art 71 

American Art 

3 

s.h. 

Art 72 

Modern Architecture 

3 

s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The 

program should provide for an understanding of past and 

present world art with emphasis on the relationship of the art to 

the culture 

in which it was produced and its influence on subsequent cultures, 

i 

--'■Art 31 

History and Interpretation 
of Architecture 

3 

s.h. 

*Art 33 

History and Interpretation 
of Painting 

3 

s.h. 

*0ne course from the following: 



Art 53 

Nineteenth-Century Painting 

3 

s.h. 

Art 54 

Twentieth-Century Painting 

3 

s.h. 

Art 71 

American Art 

3 

s.h. 

Art 72 

Modern Architecture 

3 

s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The 

program should establish an awareness 

and knowledge 


of the general school program and the ability to conduct an art program to 

meet the specific needs of both elementary and secondary levels . 

^Education 77 Materials and Methods 

for Teaching Art 3 s,h. 

Education 80 Practice Teaching of Art 9 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should include sufficient preparation for the 


later pursuit of graduate work in one of the specialized areas of art . 

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Required courses, plus electives, are felt by the institution to be adequate 
as a base for later graduate study in Art. 

Physical Education and Health 

The subject-matter preparation for a prospective teacher of physical education 
and health includes a total of 36 semester hours or approximately 30 per cent of a 
basic four-year program. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should lead to the development of principles 


compatible with current educational philosophy . 

-^Physical Education 77 Principles of 

Physical Education 3 s.h. 

Physical Education 75 Anatomy 3 s.h. 

Physical Education 76 Physiology 3 s.h. 

Physical Education 86 Administration 3 s.h. 

Education 71 Educational Psychology 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide basic knowledge in the sciences . 

^Physical Education 75 Anatomy 3 s.h. 

'"'Physical Education 76 Physiology 3 s.h. 

^Physical Education 89 Applied Physiology 

of Exercise 3 s.h. 

*Eight semester hours in the following: 8 s.h. 


Biology 

Zoology 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Psychology 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide for knowledge and competencies 
in regard to organizing, planning, administering, and evaluating the various 

aspects of the total program of physical education . 


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■^Physical Education 79 Tests and Measurements in 

Physical Education 3 s.h. 

■^Physical Education 86 Administration of Health 

and Physical Education 3 s.h. 

■^-Physical Education 87 Adapted Physical Education 3 s.h. 

^Physical Education 88 Safety, First Aid, 

Athletic Injuries 3 s.h. 

Education 41 Intro to Education in 

American Society 3 s.h. 

Education 71 Educational Psychology 3 s.h. 

Education 99 The Secondary School 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide knowledge of and skill in a wide 

variety of activities; ability to analyze motor skills; and knowledge of methods 

and materials in teaching and coaching . 

^Physical Education 83a (Elementary) 3 s.h. 

■^Physical Education 83b (Junior High) 3 s.h. 

For Men Teachers 

^'Physical Education 65 Sports Theory 3 s.h. 

-^Physical Education 66 Sports Theory 3 s.h. 

^Physical Education 67 Sports Theory 3 s.h. 

For Women Teachers 

^-Physical Education 55 Sports Theory 3 s.h. 

^"Physical Education 56 Sports Theory 3 s.h. 

^Physical Education 57 Sports Theory 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should develop knowledge and understandings in 
the various aspects of healthful living . 

^Physical Education 75 Anatomy 3 s.h. 

■“■Physical Education 76 Physiology 3 s.h. 

■^"Physical Education 76 Health Education 3 s.h. 

^Physical Education 88 Safety, First Aid 3 s.h. 

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■ 
























































































^Physical Education 84 Elementary School 3 s.h. 

*Hygiene—Required of all Physical Education students 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 6 : The program should develop competencies that will enable the 
teacher to plan or assist in planning and conducting programs of health services , 

healthful living, and health instruction. 


^Physical Education 78 

^Physical Education 79 

■^-Physical Education 84 

^Physical Education 86 

■^Physical Education 87 
^Physical Education 88 


Personal and 
Community Hygiene 

Tests and Measurements 
in Physical Education 

Health Education for 
the Elementary School 

Administration of Health 
and Physical Education 

Adapted Physical Education 

Safety, First Aid, 

Athletic Injuries 


-^Physical Education 75 
-"-Physical Education 76 


3 s.h. 

2 s.h. 

3 s.h. 

3 s.h. 

4 s.h. 

3 s.h. 
3 s.h. 
3 s.h. 


Anatomy 
Physiology 

GUIDELINE 7: The program should include sufficient preparation for later 
pursuit of graduate study in the area of physical education and health . 

The above program adequately prepares the student for later graduate work 
in physical education and health. 

Health Education 

The subject-matter preparation program for the prospective teacher of 
health includes a minimum of 40 semester hours of subject matter and a maximum 
of 24 semester hours in professional education. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide basic knowledge and understandings 
in the biological, physical, and behavioral sciences . 

Hygiene lOw (Women) Personal Hygiene 2 s.h. 

* or 

Hygiene 11 (Men) Personal Hygiene 2 s.h. 






















































































































^Zoology 11 

Principles of Zoology 

4 s.h. 

Bacteriology 51 
■a- or 

Elementary Bacteriology 


Bacteriology 151 

General Bacteriology 

4 s.h. 

^Anthropology 41 

General Anthropology 

6 

X, 

« 

CO 

■^-Sociology 51 

Introduction to Sociology 

3 S.h. 

Sociology 52 
* or 

Social Problems 


Sociology 62 

Marriage and Family 

3 s.h. 

^-Psychology 26 

General Psychology 

4 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program 

should provide knowledge and competencies in 

regard to the planning, organizing, and conducting of a sound 

school health 

program. 



•^Public Health 19 

Organization of School 
and Community for 

Health Education 

l\. s • h» 

Education 176 
*- or 

Mental Hygiene 


Public Health 135 

Human Behavior 

3 s.h. 

■^Public Health 110a 

Principles of Public Health 


and 110b 


8 s.h. 

--Education 41 

Education in 

American Society 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program 

should provide basic knowledge and understanding 

of the various areas of health 

instruction, including an understanding of the 

levels of progression from grade to grade within the school. 


^Education 71 

Educational Psychology 

3 s.h. 

Education 72a 
* or 

Child Growth and Development 

3 s.h. 

Education 72b 

Adolescent Growth 
and Development 

3 s.h. 

■^Public Health 18 

Environmental Safety 
and First Aid 

2 s.h. 


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GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide for the development of skill and 


competencies in a variety of teaching methods and in the use of materials which 

will motivate the learners to practice desirable health behavior . 

♦Education 96 (Crosslisted as Public Health 14) Theory and Practice of 
Teaching Health Education. This includes: 3 s.h. materials and methods, 
3 s.h. elementary or secondary school, and 9 s.h. student teaching. This 
work is offered as a block program with time being devoted to study of 
school organization, appropriate methods and materials of teaching, and 
student teaching. 15 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should include experiences in physical education 
to enable the student to gain an appreciation of the contributions of physical 

e due ati on to the total health of the individual . 


♦Physical Education 1, 2, 3* 4 (Men) 1 s.h. each 

♦Physical Education 21W, 22W, 31W, 32W (Women) 1 s.h. each 

Note: Both men and women take these courses in General College. 
GUIDELINE 6: The program should include sufficient preparation for the 
later pursuit of graduate study in health . 

The recommended program prepares the student for later graduate work. 

Library Science 

The subject-matter preparation program in library science includes a 
total of 18 semester hours or approximately 15 per cent of the undergraduate 
program. 


GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide an extensive knowledge of books 
and other materials suitable for school purposes . 

Library Science 93 Survey and Evaluation of 

Books and Related Materials 

for Children 3 s.h. 

♦Library Science 110 Basic Reference Sources 

and Methods 3 s.h. 

♦Library Science 122 Selection of Books and Related 

Materials for Young People 3 s.h. 


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’"-Library Science 123 


Library Science 120 


Selection of Books 

and Related Materials 

for Children 3 s.h. 

Selection of Library Materials 3 s.h. 


and practices of organization 

and administration and their application to 

school libraries. 



^Library Science 150 

Acquiring and Organizing 
Library Materials 

CO 

• 

^Library Science 130 

Organization and Operation 
of Library Services 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide a concept of what 

constitutes 

a good school library program 

with its developmental and sequential aspects. 

■^Library Science 100 

The Library in Society 

3 s.h. 

■^Library Science 122 

Selection of Books 
and Related Materials 
for Young People 

3 s.h. 

^Library Science 123 

Selection of Books 
and Related Materials 
for Children 

3 s.h. 

-^Library Science 130 

Organization and Operation 
of Library Services 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE Li The program should provide an understanding of the services 

of libraries and their place 

in society. 


^Library Science 100 

The Library in Society 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide sufficient preparation for the 


pursuit of later graduate study in library science . 

Six courses of 3 semester hours each selected from the courses listed under 
Guidelines 1 through U will provide a student with the basic curriculum in the 
School of Library Science upon which further study may be based. 


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Music 


The subject-matter preparation program for a prospective teacher of music 
includes a total of 50 semester hours, or about 44 per cent of a basic four- 
year program. 


GUIDELINE 1: The program 

should provide for a knowledge 

of the structural 

elements of music. 



Music 11-12: 31-32 

Notation, Sight-Singing 
and Dictation 

9 s.h. 

Music 14-15: 44-45 

Harmony 

8 s.h. 

Music 6l 

Modal Counterpoint in 

16th Century Style 

• 

.a 

• 

CO 

0^ 

Music 64 

Tonal Counterpoint 

3 s.h. 

Music 71 

Orchestration and Conducting 

3 S.h. 

Music 74 

Analysis and Composition 
in The Smaller Forms 

3 s.h. 

Music 101 

Introduction to Musicology 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program 

should provide opportunities to 

acquire a 


sensitivity to and a critical awareness of the aesthetic elements of musical 

performance . 

Students must earn a minimum of 12 semester hours in applied music. 
GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide a comprehensive understanding 
of music history and literature covering the various eras of music . 

Music 47 and 4S History of Music 6 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide adequate training in teaching 
and conducting ensembles . 

Conducting is not offered as a separate course but is a part of the 
following courses: 

Music 71 Orchestration and Conducting 3 s.h. 


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J 






















-^-Education 75 


Materials and Methods 

in Teaching Instrumental Music 3 s.h. 


-"‘•Education 76 


Materials and Methods in 
Teaching Choral Music 


3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5 • The program should provide opportunities to acquire a 
functional command of the piano . 

Every student must pass a piano proficiency examination at some time during 
his undergraduate years. 

The piano proficiency examination includes: sight-reading of music 
literature appropriate for pupils in grade 3 of elementary school; playing of 
accompaniments of song material in the State-adopted music texts; and simple 
improvisation and transposition. 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should provide a conception of comprehensive 
program of music based upon sound philosophy, and an understanding of what 

music to teach and how to teach it at any grade level . 


■^Education 75 
or 

-^Education 76 


Methods and Materials in 

Teaching Instrumental Music 3 s.h. 


Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Choral Music 


3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 7: The program should provide sufficient preparation for later 
pursuit of graduate work in music . 

The institution states that the program as described is adequate for the 
later pursuit of graduate work in music. 

E. Professional Education for Secondary School Teachers and Special Subject Teachers 

At the undergraduate level, the professional education part of the preparation 
for secondary school and special subject teachers includes a total of 21 semester 
hours, or approximately 17 per cent of the basic four-year curriculum. 

GUIDELINE 1: The professional education program should provide an under ¬ 
standing of the normal sequences of human growth and development, with special 
emphasis on the pupils of the school age to be taught . 

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^Education 72b Adolescent Growth 

and Development 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The professional education program should provide an under ¬ 
standing of the nature of learning, the learning process, and the psychology of 
learning . 

^Education 71 Educational Psychology 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3• The professional education program should provide an under ¬ 
standing of methods, special techniques, and materials appropriate to the 
specific levels or areas of the prospective teacher's subject-matter concentration , 

and skill in applying them in a classroom situation . 

% appropriate methods and materials course in the 
subject-matter area to be taught. 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The professional education program should provide an under¬ 
standing of the purpose, organization and administration of school systems , 
with special emphasis on the role of the school teacher in the total education 

program . 

^Education 41 Education in American Society 3 s.h. 

'"'Education 99 The Secondary School 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5 s The professional education program should provide a broad 
historical, philosophical, and sociological orientation to schools in our society 

and to the profession of teaching . 

^Education 41 Education in American Society 3 s.h. 

-"-Education 99 The Secondary School 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 6: The professional education program should provide an extended 
period of continuous full-time student teaching experience in the grade levels or 

subjects to be taught . 

*Appropriate course in student teaching related to the 
area to be taught. 6 s.h. 


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Education 41 and 71 are taken before the senior year block semester. In 
general, half of the block semester is devoted to Education 72, 99, and the 
appropriate methods and materials course. The other half of this semester is 
devoted to the student teaching course. 

Student teaching experience is described in the following discussion under 
Standard V—Professional Laboratory Experiences. 


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STANDARD V—PROFESSIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIENCES 

A. Purposes and Objectives 

The main purpose of the program of undergraduate professional laboratory 
experiences, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is to provide 
further understanding of the learning process. Other purposes are to provide 
experiences leading to proficiency in the methods and techniques of teaching; 
understanding and use of the principles of motivation; appreciation for and 
provision for the differences in children; proficiency in organizing and 
provision for the differences in children; proficiency in organizing and presenting 
units of instruction to include use of appropriate aids; and functional familiarity 
with the evaluative and administrative aspects of teaching. 

B. Organization 

The organization at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for 
administration and supervision of student teaching is provided under the Director 
of Student Teaching, in the School of Education, who contacts the public schools, 
secures supervising teachers, keeps records, and maintains over-all supervision. 

Supervision of student teaching by the college is through the Director of 
Student Teaching and professional and academic faculty members who also teach 
methods in the professional block of instruction. 

C. Experiences Prior to Student Teaching 

A program of di rected observation and participation as a part of the 
professional sequence prior to student teaching occurs in the local public 
schools. Elementary teaching majors observe dononstration of teaching for several 
days in the college's denonstration classroom in Peabody Hall. 

Each student confers with his supervising teacher before actual student 
teaching. Each student teacher gradually acquires full-time responsibility. 

Student teaching is a gradual process, with the student, cooperating school 


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supervising teacher, and the college supervisor of the student teacher planning 
for the best experience. Students work with the college staff and with each 
other in preparing lesson plans, techniques, and teaching activities. 

D. Admission to Student Teaching 

Students are admitted (under the policy of the University) to the School 
of Education from the General College at the end of four successful semesters. 

At this point they must have no obvious physical handicaps that would prevent 
success in teaching, and must have a quality-point average of 1 . 50 , which is half 
way between letter grade C and D. 

Requirements for entering the professional education block of instruction 

are: 

1. Minimum of 90 semester hours credit. 

2. Removal by the student of any ‘‘incomplete,“ “absent from examination, “ 
or “composition condition 6 7 * * * 11 from his record at the institution. 

3° Average grade of C (quality-point ratio of 2.00). 

4. Completion of Education 41 (Education in American Society), and 
Education 71 (Education Psychology), with minimum grades of C. 

5. For students preparing to teach in secondary schools, not more than 
one unraised grade of D in the subject major, and completion of all 
but two or fewer courses in the major. 

6. Demonstrated personal and professional characteristics essential for 
successful teaching. 

7. Approval of the student's faculty advisor in the School of Education. 

Entrance into student teaching requires a grade of C or better in each 

professional education block course taken. 

E. Criteria for the Selection of Off-Campus Cooperating Schools 

Criteria for the selection of off-campus cooperating schools are the following; 

1. Secondary schools must be accredited by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools and by the N. C. State Department of Public 
Instruction. 


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2° Elementary Schools must be representative of the best in North Carolina. 

3* All selected schools must be democratically administered; have adequate 
guidance facilities and staff; provide proper physical facilities and 
use these effectively; and have a balanced educational program providing 
adequately for all pupils' levels of ability, interests and needs. 

F. Criteria for the Selection of Supervising Teachers in Cooperating Schools 

In the schools where student teaching is done a supervising teacher must 
have a North Carolina "A" Certificate, or higher certificate, be teaching in the 
subject area and level in which the student teaching will be supervised, have a 
minimum of 2 years of successful teaching experience, be recommended by the school 
principal and the administrative unit supervisor, be approved by the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and be assigned not more than one student teacher 
a semester. 

If and when possible the supervising teacher will have a Supervisor of Student 
Teachers Certificate. 

G. Provisions for the Orientation and Specialized Professional Education of 

Supervisory Personnel in Cooperating Schools 
Cooperating teachers are encouraged to take Education 276a (Workshop; Supervision 
of Student Teaching) in the summers. Orientation meetings are held, attended by 
student teachers, supervising teachers, principals and supervisors, and college 
supervisors. The college works closely with all cooperating school personnel 
during the student teaching period by providing frequent college supervision of 
the student teacher and assistance from the college for the supervising teacher 
and other local school personnel. 

H. Provision for Supervision of Student Teachers 

College supervisors of student teachers visit each student teacher not less 
than once each week, conferring with the student and the supervising teacher during 
each visit. Saturday seminars are held when possible. The normal supervisory 

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load is 15 student teachers per college supervisor per semester. No college 
supervisor supervises more than 20 student teachers per semester. 

I. Evaluation of Student Teaching 

The supervising teacher rates the student on all phases of the experience. 
The college supervisor does the same and is responsible for the final grade. 

College staff members are continually evaluating the student teaching 
program. Each student completes an evaluative questionnaire at the end of the 
student teaching, for use by the college in improving the student teaching 
experience. Public school supervising teachers are requested to make suggestions 
following each student teacher assignment. 


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STANDARD VI—FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND MATERIALS 
The School of Education of the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill is housed in Peabody Hall. A renovation and an addition to the building 
were completed in I960. The new Peabody Hall added 54*729 square feet to Old 
Peabody, which has 24,864 square feet. The renovation of Old Peabody Hall 
reclaimed several classrooms that had been subdivided for office space and 
other use. 

A. Office Space 

The first floor of Peabody Hall contains office suites for the Dean of 
the School of Education, the Director of the Summer School, and the Placement 
Bureau of the School. Office suites for faculty members are provided on the 
second and third floors. Additional office space is provided in the old part 
of the building, for a total of 28 offices for administrators and faculty in 
professional education. Offices are equipped with a desk, filing cabinets, 
and bookcases. Secretarial equipment is provided in each office suite in a 
separate area serving all offices in a given suite. Each secretary serves one 
or more staff members. Duplicating facilities and service are available for 
each staff member. 

B. Classrooms and Related Special Facilities 

1. The entire third floor of the new building has been designed to serve the 

elementary education group. Located on this floor are three general classrooms, 
a classroom with piano for music classes, a reading clinic, a demonstration 
classroom with adjoining observation room, an office suite, auxiliary work 
rooms, seminar rooms, and storage space. 

Two classrooms are large, each containing 1360 square feet. Each of these 
two large rooms has its own storage room for materials and texts relating 
to elementary education. Each of the two large classrooms has a work area 

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with counter-top, under-counter storage space, and a sink with running 
water; is furnished with tablet armchairs; table space as needed; and 
three reading tables with armless chairs to provide additional work space 
for laboratory experience. The third general classroom is smaller but 
similarly equipped and is used by graduate students. 

2. The second floor of the new part of the building is designed for the secondary 
education group. There are three general classrooms, a science laboratory 
classroom with storage rooms, an instructional photographic darkroom, and a 
large room which may be divided into two smaller rooms. This large room has 
two sound-proofed testing or interview rooms adjoining for demonstration and 
observation through one-way glass. Another classroom is set apart for 
graduate student reading. In the old part are six general classrooms. 

3. On the first floor of enlarged Peabody Hall are two classrooms, a large 
lecture room with ramped seating and a general classroom, and the curriculum 
laboratory or printed materials center. 

4. The ground (basement) floor has the audiovisual room, a photographic darkroom, 
a materials display room, a multipurpose room capable of seating 300 persons, 
a conference room, a kitchen, the University Testing Service, and offices, 
and conference rooms. 

5. Special Facilities 

1. Reading clinic s The reading clinic is equipped with files of mental tests, 
achievement tests, diagnostic tests, workbooks, basal readers, phonic charts. 
Science Research Associates materials. Educational Development Laboratory 
materials, and a growing collection of adopted classics and books appropriate 
for use with reading disability cases. These facilities are used by undergraduate 
and graduate students in reading instruction classes and in diagnostic and 
remedial work with children. 


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2. Demonstration classroom ; One-way viewing glass and microphone pick-up 
for the viewing room are provided at the demonstration classroom on the 
second floor. 

3- Science laboratory classroom ; Distinct types of science facilities are 

in the science laboratory on the second floor, including: (l) general use 
facilities for physics, chemistry, and general science; (2) a set of tables 
and desks with sinks for biology; (3) a set of counters with storage space, 
sinks, gas, electricity, and water for chemistry and physics; and ( 4 ) a group 
of table and chair combinations for general science classroom use. The room 
has a ventilating hood for chemistry demonstration use, aquaria, a number of 
mounted charts, and other items of science equipment. The equipment was 
selected, in collaboration with science firms, to set up a model science 
laboratory for facilitating instruction in science in grades 1 through 12. 

4. Darkroom : Adjoining the laboratory room also is a completely equipped 
darkroom for teaching of photographic processes. 

3 . Sound-proof testing rooms : Two sound-proof testing rooms are on the second 
floor. Each room has one-way vision glass and sound equipment. One room 

is completely equipped with an audiometric testing system. It is anticipated 
that in the near future it will be equipped also with speech testing materials 
and equipment. 

6. Audiovisual ; On the third floor specialized equipment available for classroom 
use includes a motion picture projector, filmstrip and slide projector, and 
tape recorder. Numerous pieces of audiovisual equipment are stored and used 
in the audiovisual room which seats about 40 persons at individual tables. 

This equipment is used throughout the building. Other equipment, and a large 
volume of films and other audiovisual materials are available from the Bureau 
of Audiovisual Education in a separate building. Electrical outlets, and 


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control of light* ventilation* and moise are ample in all classrooms in 
Peabody Hall. Facilities* equipment* and materials for audiovisual instruction 
are well maintained. 

The audiovisual room has built-in storage shelves and counter tops* and a 
mounted roll-type screen about 120 inches square. It is equipped for all 
classroom audiovisual instruction. Adjoining this room is a completely 
equipped photographic darkroom* an office occupied by a faculty member* 
and a work room used mainly by faculty members. 

Provisions are made for the use of audiovisual aids in instruction and 
opportunities are provided for teachers and future teachers to learn how 
to utilize these aids effectively in their own teaching situations. 

Teachers and students have access to several leading makes of 16 millimeter sound 
motion picture projectors* filmstrip and slide projectors* opaque projectors, 
overhead projectors* microscopic-projectors* public address and recording 
microphones* amplifiers and speakers* tape recorders* disc record players* 
still cameras 35 millimeter and larger* including Polaroid camera* and 
equipment for producing overhead transparencies. Basic equipment is provided 
on each floor of the building. Screens are permanently mounted in three 
large rooms and portable screens and carts are used in other rooms. 

The darkroom is provided for use by faculty members and students under supervision* 
including students in the audiovisual education course and other independent 
use by selected students who have had some experience in developing* printing* 
and enlarging pictures. 

Faculty members and students use the cameras of various sizes for the pre¬ 
paration of teaching material such as slides and pictures* recording class 
activities* and furnishing newspapers with pictures of events involving the 
School of Education. 


■= 78 - 








* 






























Provisions are made for students and staff to have opportunity to prepare 
materials,, such as transparencies for the overhead projector, drymounted 
pictures, filmstrips, recordings, felt board displays, and other instructional 
materials. 

Each area of instruction has its own special training devices, such as models, 
mock-ups, demonstration equipment, and the like. With the exception of 
motion picture films. The regularly-used materials are housed in Peabody 
Hall. Motion picture films are available through the Bureau of Audiovisual 
Education in the Extension Division of the University. 

7° Television : The studios of WUNC-TV are in Swain Hall, fronting Peabody 

Hall. Faculty members and students have opportunities for acquaintance with 
production and utilization of television instruction. 

Basic facilities are provided for the future installation of closed-circuit 
television. 

At present WUNC-TV, the educational television station of the Consolidated 
University of North Carolina, presents programs for elementary and secondary 
school pupils, and teacher in-service education programs. Students have an 
opportunity to observe these programs by means of a television set in the 
building. Faculty members and students have participated in the educational 
telecasts„ 

8 . Testing Service : Main purposes of the University Testing Service are described 
as: (l) vocational guidance for University students, veterans, and private 

individuals! (2) testing candidates for college entrance; and (3) testing 
children for diagnostic and remedial purposes. It works with other agencies 
and departments of the University in providing assistance in test administrations, 
test scoring, reporting, and research activities. 


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A cross-indexed occupational information library is maintained in the testing 
service area for the use of University students and other counselees who 
desire detailed information regarding job requirements, duties, rates of 
pay, training courses, and employment outlook in various fields. A librarian 
is available at scheduled times to assist students in finding the information 
they desire. 

The Remedial Reading Program of the service is operated during the spring, 
fall, and summer sessions. 

D° Other Campus Agencies 

Numerous agencies on the campus contribute to teacher education and research. 

Among those located in buildings immediately neighboring the School of Education 

building, Peabody Hall, are the following. 

1. The University Extension Division ; The Director is responsible to the Dean 
of the Faculty. This division includes the Bureau of Audiovisual Education 
serving the entire campus with audiovisual instructional equipment, materials, 
services, and consultation, and providing State-wide rentals of films and 
many related services; the Bureau of Class Instruction, providing live 
extension classes wherever demand arises and facilities exist anywhere in 

the State; Bureau of Community Adult Education; Bureau of Conferences and 
Short Courses; Bureau of Correspondence Instruction; Bureau of School Relations; 
and School Tests and Materials Office, which supplies standardized test materials 
on a nonprofit basis to educational agencies anywhere in the State. 

2. The Computation Center ; The Computation Center is in Phillips Hall, next to 
Peabody Building. The Director is responsible to the Chancellor of the 
University. The center has a data automation computer system, available to 
faculty members and advanced students for statistical processing of research 
data. 


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Elsewhere on the campus the Institute of Statistics and numerous other 
agencies serve the University and interests outside the University community, 
as described in the general catalog. 


E„ The University's General Library 

The general library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 
called the Louis E. Wilson Library, contains more than one million volumes. It 
grows at the rate of some 50,000 volumes a year. It has 6,,000 periodicals and 
other serial subscriptions. The number of volumes in professional education, 
including psychology, is 22,800. The number of received periodicals in professiona 
education is 191. The annual expenditure for books for professional education is 
approximately one per cent of the total library budget. 

The allocation of funds for professional education is as follows; 

First , a Serials Funds Committee makes allocations to the School of 

Education for periodicals and serials as requested by the School. 

Second , a Research Fund Committee considers requests for, and to date 
has mostly approved the requests, for additional out-of-date, and 
duplicate sets of materials. 

Third , each University department is allocated yearly a fund or budget 
for books. Acquisitions—books, monographs, special reports, and 
bulletins—-are now purchased through regular orders to the Acquisitions 
Department of the library on these departmental funds. The School of 
Education fund, by years, was $518 in 1954-55, rising annually to 
$750, $1200, $1680, and $2,000 in 1961-62 and is $1800 in the 1962-63 
school year. 

One School of Education faculty member is responsible for placing the order 
for books for the School. Suggestions are secured from other faculty members. 

Since 1950 the general library has centralized all funds for serials and 
subscriptions to periodicals. 

Research materials include 15-6 special publications, copyrighted within the 
past three years, listed as books purchased to update the existing research 


collections. 



























































































































The general library is well equipped and provides all types of reference 
materials and services„ Many special types of collections are available. An 
Inter-Library Loan agreement with Duke University greatly increased the library 
resources available. 

There is no coordination of services or official relationship between the 
general library and the Curriculum Laboratory of the School of Education. 

F. The Curriculum Laboratory 

The professional education library in Peabody Hall, called the Curriculum 
Laboratory^ is located on the first floor. It has a reading room of 1,640 square 
feet of floor space, which is ample to seat about 70 students. All available 
wall space has shelving for materials in education. Adjoining the reading room 
is a stack area, an office for the librarian, and a combination storage and work 
room. 

The Curriculum Laboratory has the following printed materials: 


6159 

730 

4968 

3969 

1160 

100 


1. Books 

2. Theses 

3. Periodicals, current and back issues 

4. Pamphlets 

5. Catalogues 

6. Free and inexpensive publications 



Main characteristics of this library in Peabody Hall ares 

1. Provides students and staff members with publications of current and 
immediate use that are not likely to be cataloged in Wilson Library. 

2. Is readily accessible to professional education students for experience 
in using resources, and for guidance in locating educational publications 
in individual research and. assigned studies. 

3. Provides information of other materials on the campus. 

4. Provides a workroom for use of current reference materials, curriculum 
studies, pamphlets, and other source materials in a physical atmosphere 
conducive to study and morale building. 


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5° Is a depository for elementary and high school textbooks. These are 
not stocked by the Wilson Library, 

6, Provides some consumable publications for retention by authorized 
students, 

The library is staffed by one professionally trained librarian and one 
assistant. It maintains a card catalog indexed in several ways. This library 
lacks a catalog of publications of professional interest in the general library 
on the campus ; this lack could be corrected easily by arrangement with the main 
library for duplicate cards. 

The Dean of the School of Education is responsible for the Curriculum 
Library 3 including selection and purchase of publications. The librarian lacks 
administrative responsibility^ but works rather from an established system of 
organization and operation, 

Mary published resources are available in the Curriculum Laboratory;, but 
the collections of professional books and curriculum bulletins as a whole are 
not up-to-date. The supply of curriculum publications from other states is 
negligible s which affects its usefulness to advanced students. It should be 
noted that every three years representative materials of this nature are ordered 
and catalogued in the main (Wilson) library. 

There are several special collections of professional books 5 some owned 
personally by faculty members and located in various places throughout the building,, 
available for loans to students, 

G, Facilities, Equipment, and Materials by Areas 

The English Department of the General College and the College of Arts and 
Sciences Is assigned 10 classrooms in Bingham Hall, It had 29 classes in other 
buildings during the spring semester of 1963° Five rooms in Bingham are each 

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equipped with an opaque projector. One classroom has large writing desks for 
use by groups of students during composition. One is equipped for motion 
picture projection but the projector must be brought in. A modest collection 
of disc records s mostly of Shakespeare s and a disc record player are also 


available. 


Single offices are provided for 20 of the full-time staff 



;n Languages 


All modern foreign language classes and activities are held in a large new 
building used only for foreign languages. It has adequate classrooms, lab¬ 
oratories 5 offices, and a spacious lounge,, with kitchen, for meetings and social, 
activities of language clubs and professional organizations. 

Audiolingual laboratory equipment in the building in April 1963, included 
100 listening positions with 14 program sources, and 20 listening-speaking-recording 
booths, 

Funds are on hand for installation of additional equipment expected within a 
few months. The new facilities will include 70 listening-speaking booths, each 
with its own program source. Later planned expansion will provide 60 or 70 
additional positions (no booths) that can dial in on any program source. 

Every classroom is equipped with an audio system connected to the control 
room for receiving any program desired, and a microphone, enabling the teacher 
to speak to the control room. Each classroom is wired for closed-circuit 
television. The building has a large tape recording library, and new programs 
are constantly being recorded. The building has ample projectors and screens for 
projection of motion pictures, filmstrips, and overhead transparencies, with a, 
variety of materials for each language. 

Collections of literature and texts are adequate for all levels of language 


learning in each of the modern foreign languages taught. 









































































The audiolingual laboratories in the new language building are well staffed 
with a director and assistant director who are regular full-time faculty members, 
a technician (not on the teaching staff), one native informant to record tapes for 
each language, and 10 student assistants. 

Mathematics 

Mathematics instruction is in Phillips Hall, occupying 16 classrooms, equipped 
with lecterns, tables, chalkboards, and electric outlets for projectors and recorder- 
players . 

Nineteen mathematics faculty members have private offices and two faculty 
members share one office. 

Collections of mathematics books for this program are in Phillips Hall and in 
the general library. 

North Carolina public school textbooks, and curricular materials for pro¬ 
fessional education in mathematics are adequate in the professional education 
library (Curriculum Laboratory), augmented by private faculty-owned collections. 

Science 

The prospective science teacher takes, entirely at the undergraduate level, 
courses which are also taken by other students, both scienee-and non-science-majors. 
The general science classroom and laboratory facilities of the campus are used 
for these courses. These are superior in their quantity and quality. 

The same facilities are used by master's program students in science. 

Social Studies 

For majors in social studies, the classrooms, equipment, and materials 
appeared adequate in history, economics, political science, and sociology. A 
new geography-geology building is under construction and should be available 
by September 1, 1963° 









































































































Art 


The physical .facilities which house the Art Department are adequate for the 
present small enrollment with the exception of space for Art 45 (Arts and Crafts.) 
The present building is not suited to the multiple activities carried on in this 
course offering. 

An. excellent Art Library Department with a full-time librarian is provided. 

Physical Education and Health 

Physical Education facilities include, in addition to the main gymnasium 
floor ( 250 ’ x 150’), classrooms for instruction in hygiene and other undergraduate 
and graduate subjects, lockers, showers, and drying rooms, a basket room, handball 
and squash courts, wrestling room, a treatment room (operated in connection with 
the Infirmary), Bowman Gray Swimming Pool (55* x 165 ! ) and offices on the main 
floor and the floor above. 

The Woman’s Gymnasium adjoins the main building and is located behind the 
Bowman Gray Pool. It has a main floor (60* x 80*), classrooms, locker, shower, 
and drying facilities. 

The following outdoor facilities are used for physical education" track 
and field stadium, baseball field, outdoor swimming pool, tennis courts, and 
several athletic fields. 


Equipment for sports participation is complete and up to date. 


Indoor facilities provide for the following sports activities by students: 


Badminton 

Basketball 

Boxing 

Fencing 

Gymnastics 

Handball 


Tennis 

Shuffleboard 
Squash 
Swimming 
Table Tennis 


Track 
Tumbling 
Volleyball 
Weight Training 
Wrestling 


■ 86 ' 














































Outdoor facilities provide for the following; 

Archery Field hockey Softball 

Baseball Horseshoes Swimming 

Football .Lacrosse Tennis 

Golf Soccer Track and Field 

Each student is furnished a complete physical education uniform with the 

exception of shoes. This equipment is the property of the University and must 

be regarded as such. Equipment is to be worn only for class instruction, intramural 

activities, or for recreation. It is not for personal wear on the campus. 

Physical education literature is ample in the main library, and rich resources 

are in the libraries of the Division cf Health Affairs, including the School of 

Public Health, and in the School of Education Curriculum Laboratory, The Department 

of Sociology maintains in the main library an extensive collection in recreation, 

which provides another source of readily available and closely related materials. 

Members of the faculty in the Department of Physical Education own extensive 

personal professional libraries which are available for student use. 

The Department of Physical Education has a laboratory of Applied Physiology, 

operated and administered as a unit of the Department, 

The department also possesses the usual laboratory equipment such as glassware, 

chemicals, supplies, and service facilities. 

Audiovisual materials used by the Department of Physical Education include % 

motion picture films, filmstrips, slides, still pictures, drawings, posters, 

recordings, charts, diagrams, models, magnetic boards, and a human skeleton. 

Equipment for presenting such materials is centrally stored in the gymnasium and 

consists of two sound projectors, one opaque projector, and four record players. 

When needed, additional equipment is borrowed from the Athletic Department or 

rented from the University Extension Division, 


” 87 - 




















































































Health Education 


The new School of Public Health building has the space and facilities for 
preparing many more teachers in the area of health than are now enrolled„ It 
contains the private office of each staff member and separate offices for 
secretaries^, two conference rooms, two large classrooms;, projection rooms, a 
work room s a large auditorium, and the following special-purpose rooms s 
Visual Production Center , completely equipped to provide opportunity for the 
student to develop and produce visual materials of all types. 

Health Education Techniques Room , completely equipped with audiovisual equipment 
to enable students to learn to operate and maintain the various pieces of equipment. 
Health Education Materials Laboratory , a very comprehensive collection of health 
education and related materials 5 including a microfilm reader. 

Research offices ., equipped with calculating equipment. 

Community Research Laboratory , housing detailed information of the North Carolina 
communities utilized as laboratories for student field activities. 

Group Rooms , open 24 hours per day as work rooms for group work by students. In 
this Complex is a one-way viewing room designed and equipped for observation and 
study of group process. 

Other Resources , many other classrooms and special purpose laboratories in the 
Public Health Building are available to health students as needed. 

Up-to-date printed materials on every phase of health education and related 
fields are readily available in the Reference Library of the School of Public Health, 
These include the latest publications 9 pamphlets^ curriculum bulletins and professional 
magazines. The director states that this is the most comprehensive collection of 
health education materials to be found anywhere in the world. 

Numerous other publications in public health are in the main library, the 
library of the Division of Health Affairs^ and the School of Education Curriculum 
Laboratory, 


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Audiovisual materials kept and used in the School of Public Health Building 
include motion pictures,, filmstrips, slides, still pictures, drawings, posters, 
recordings, charts, diagrams, magnetic boards, models, and skeletons. Equipment 
includes sound motion picture projectors, disc record players, tape recorder-players, 
slide projectors, filmstrip projectors, opaque projector, flannel graph boards, 
bulletin boards, silk screen frames and materials, lettering materials and guides, 
flip charts, poster materials, duplicating machine, illuminated ground-glass 
drawing boards, and microfilm reader„ 


Library Science 


The School of Library Science occupies the top floor of the west wing of the 
general library (the Louis Round Wilson Library). It has two classrooms, equipped 
with lecterns, desks, chalkboards, and electrical outlets ; a student discussion 
room; a room that houses a microfilm reader, and the microfilm collection; a 
storeroom for supplies; a reading room amply seating 40 students; and individual 
offices for all faculty and staff members. Other classroom and seminar spaces 
in the Wilson Library are available as needed. 

Students in the School have access to the general library's collections 
of books, periodicals, and other materials. In addition the library of the School 
includes a. professional collection of 17,500 volumes in which are incorporated 
special collections of materials for children and young people, which serve as 
laboratory collections for the students in the courses concerned with materials 
for school age youth. The School of Library Science also has a collection of 
professional journals and periodicals, reports and handbooks which supplements the 
book collection. 

In keeping with the trend in school library development of the concept of 
the library as a center for instructional materials of all kinds, the School is 


- 89 - 





































strengthening its materials collection in the area of audiovisual learning„ It 
is developing an audiovisual materials center for the use of students in the 
library science courses. 

Music 

The new addition to the Music Building provides adequate space for both 
students and teachers. Equipment and materials are adequate to carry on an 
effective music program. The Department maintains a Curriculum Library which is 
one of the best Libraries of original materials in the State. 

H. Significant Changes Contemplated 

Significant changes contemplated for the professional education facilities 
in Peabody Hall involve the following short-range and long-range plans: 

1. Short-range plans: 

a. Several of the present classrooms are being equipped with special 
materials and audiovisual aids related to a particular teacher- 
education curriculum. 

b. Plans are being developed for utilizing the facilities available 
for closed circuit television, probably during the 1963-64 school 
year. 

c. The supply of sound motion picture films will be increased, especially 
films on methods of teaching. 

2. Long-range plans: 

a. Plans have been made for developing the Curriculum Laboratory into 
a complete instructional materials center housing audiovisual 
materials and equipment besides the present library and curriculum 
publications resources. This may require expansion into at least 
one adjoining room, or relocation. 

b. The old part of the Peabody Building will be replaced eventually. 

Facilities of the Bureau of Audio-Visual Education, the television and radio 

studios, and other agencies serving teacher education and other activities are 
expanding generally. 


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GRADUATE PROGRAMS 


STANDARD I—OVER-ALL POLICIES 
A. Scope of the Graduate Program 

The School of Education, in cooperation with the Graduate School and other 
divisions of the University, prepares personnel at the graduate level for the 
following school positions: 

1. One-year , 30 semester-hour graduate credit programs for a master's degree 

and graduate-level certification by the State of North Carolina, for: teachers 
for elementary school (grades 1-8), junior high school (grades 7-9), for high 
school (grades 9-12) in subjects of English, French, German, Latin, Mathematics, 
Science, Social Studies, and Spanish; teachers of special subjects (grades 1-12) 
of Art, Music, Physical Education and Health, Library Science, and Special 
Education; teachers of Distributive Education; for principal, supervisor, and 
school counselor,, 

2» Two-year , 60-semester-hour graduate credit program for a master's degree and 
initial certification as school psychologist, 

3„ Two-year , 60-semester-hour graduate program leading to a master's degree at 
the end of the first year or 30 semester hours 9 credit with completion 
of another year for a total minimum of 60 semester hours of graduate credit, 
for certification as superintendent of schools, advanced principals, supervisors, 
and counselors, 

4. Doctor of Philosophy (Ph,D,) , three years 9 credit beyond the bachelor's degree 
in school administration and supervision . The University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill, through schools and departments other than the School of Education, 
offers doctor's degree programs in numerous fields—for which similar State 
approval is not sought—including most subject-matter fields of elementary and 
secondary school teachers, and in other fields. These programs enhance the value 
of the institution in its contributions to all levels of preparation of teachers 
and other professional school personnel. 


-=9I“ 












































































































5. Doctor of Education (Ed.D«) . three years’ credit beyond the bachelor’s degree 
in school administration and supervision . Requirements for foreign languages 
differ from the doctor of philosophy degree requirements. 

6. Certificate Renewal and Personal Improvement — undergraduate or graduate credit— 
in all areas for which degree programs are offered, and in related areas. The 
institution offers on-campus, correspondence, and extension credit to persons 
for certificate renewal credit and improvement in subject-matter and professional 
education and related fields, including credit for certification in an additional 
teaching field at the ’'A' 1 certificate level; and for residence credit only at 
graduate level. 

B. Organization and Administration 

The University has a unitary Graduate School organization, with all schools 
and colleges on the campus organized under a single Administrative Board of the 
Graduate School. This Administrative Board is composed of three members from the 
Division of Social Sciences, three members from the Division of the Humanities, 
three members from the Division of the Natural Sciences, and three members from the 
professional schools. The Administrative Board establishes regulations and principles 
governing all graduate work at the University and approves graduate courses, programs, 
and appointments to the Graduate Faculty. 

The Committee on Graduate Studies in the School of Education, composed of 
ten senior Education professors and the Dean of the School of Education, is responsible 
for all graduate regulations and policies of the School of Education, except as sub¬ 
ject to the ultimate approval of the Administrative Board of the Graduate School. 
Organization of the graduate program and lines of coordination are shown in Chart 
III, page 8. 

Procedures for authorizing a change in a degree program or adopting a new 
degree program follow this pattern; 

1. Discussion by faculty members of the School of Education in staff meeting. 

2. Consideration by the Graduate Committee of School of Education. 


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3o Approval by the School of Education faculty. 

4° Approval by the Administrative Board of School of Education. 

5. Approval by the Administrative Board of the Graduate School of the 
University. 

6. Referral through the Chancellor of the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill and the President of the Consolidated University of North 
Carolina to the Board of Higher Education and/or the Board of Trustees 
of the Consolidated University. 

Step six is not necessary if the new degree is in an area or at a level of 
previous degree-awarding authorization. 

The Graduate Committee of the School of Education has authorized two off- 
campus graduate centers for courses in education from which residence credit not 
exceeding six semester hoir s may be received. 

The University Extension Division operates from two to four centers each 
year in which some work in education is offered for course credit and certificate 
renewal but with no residence credit value. The School of Education never offers 
any of its undergraduate professional '’block*' courses off-campusj neither does it 
grant credit toward a degree for such courses when taken through correspondence or 
extension, or at some other institution, although such courses at undergraduate and 
graduate levels may be used to remove deficiencies. Undergraduate courses prerequisite 
to the professional block program may be taken for bachelor’s degree credit through 
any of these channels. 


93 ' 












































































STANDARD II--STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 


A. Admission Procedures 


Admission to graduate programs occurs upon recommendation from the Graduate 
Committee of the School of Education to the Graduate School of the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Applicants in Education for master's and doctor's 
degree programs take the Ohio State University Psychological Test and the Cooperative 
English Test (Form Y-Higher Level). Local norms are used, based upon results of 875 
applicants through 1961. 

The acceptance of new graduate students operates as follows: 

1. The Graduate Committee nakes rules and regulations, within the framework 
of the regulations of the Graduate School as set by the Administrative 
Board of the Graduate School of the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

2. Records of graduate applicants are assembled in the School of Education. 
These records are examined by: 

a. Professor Otts for candidates for degrees above the master's level. 

b. Professor Sommerfeld for the master's level. 

c. Professor Chase for the Fifth-Year Program. 

3. All marginal cases are referred to the Graduate Committee of the School 
of Education. The School of Education uses the Ohio State University 
Psychological Test and the Cooperative English Test in admitting new 
graduate students. The Graduate Record Examination is not required for 
admission to graduate study in the School of Education. 

4. The School of Education recommends applicants to the Graduate School 
for admission. 

Additional requirements for admission: 

1. To the Master of Education program; and to the Master of Arts in Teaching: 

A North Carolina "Class A" certificate or equivalent. Students in the 
Fifth-year pregram are admitted to take undergraduate work in Education 
as prerequisites. 

2. To a master's degree program in Guidance: The MMPI and an interview 
by the Graduate Committee of the School of Education. 

3. To the sixth-year programs: three years of successful teaching or 
administrative experience; rank above the median on the standardized 
tests administered by the School of Education. Provisional admission 
is possible in certain cases. 

4. To the doctor of education program: three years of successful teaching 


“ 94 ” 

































































* 

















or administrative experience, and an interview by members of the Graduate 
Committee of the School of Education. 

Students in good standing may transfer from one program to another with loss 
of credits that do not fit the pattern of the desired degree. 

B. Retention and Completion of Program Procedures 

To remain in a graduate program a student must earn no "F" (Failure) 
and fewer than three "L's" (Low). Other letter grades used are H (High) for 
’’work of outstanding quality,” and "P" (Passing) for "clearly satisfactory work." 
The requirements for degrees are presented in Table 10. 


TABLE 10. REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 


M.A. * 

MAT with Block 

MAT 

M.Ed. 

30 s. h. 

30 plus 18 undergraduate 

30 

30 

Written 

Written 

Written 

Written 

examination in the 




major subject 




One modern f.l. 

None 

None 

None 

Oral examination 

None 

None 

Optional** 

Thesis 

None 

None 

Optional** 


Ph.D. 


Semester hours dependent upon 
transfer credit 
Preliminary oral examination 
Written examination in major 
Two modern foreign languages 


Dissertation 
Final oral 


Ed.D. 


Same 

Same 

Same 

One language and a special research 
course plus a course in statistics 
or mastery of one other research 
technique 
Same 
Same 


* Master of Science degree is awarded to teachers of science. 

** In the M.Ed. program, submission of a thesis for three to six semester hours' 
credit is optional. If submitted, an oral examination is mandatory on the 
subject of the thesis. 

C. Advisement Procedures 

Advisement on graduate programs begins in undergraduate education courses 
for promising students, and in summer session, Saturday, and evening classes 
attended for certification credit. Upon graduate admission, all new students 
in the first three days of a new term are addressed by the Dean in explanation 


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of orientation procedures. Within ten days the student's adviser is designated. 

The adviser becomes chairman of the student's committee for thesis examination 
or preliminary and dissertation orals. In addition, the Chairman of the Graduate 
Committee advises post-master's students for the two-year program in administration 
and Professor Sommerfeld advises with beginning master's students. 

D. Number Completing Programs 

In the twelve months ending June 10, 1962, persons completing graduate curricula 
in education numbered 223. The number completing each curriculum is shown in Table 11. 

TABLE 11. GRADUATE CURRICULA COMPLETIONS, 1961-62 


Elementary 9 

Secondary 89 

Special Subjects 

Art 0 

Physical Education and Health 29 

Library Science 0 

Music 0 

Vocational 

Distributive Education 8 

Special Service Personnel Areas 

Administration and Supervision 43 

Educational Psychology 2 

Guidance and Personnel 19 

History of Education and Comparative Education 1 

Special Education 1 

Higher Education 0 

Fifth-Year Program and Special 22 


Total 223 


E. Records 

Cumulative folders are maintained in the office of the Dean of the School 
of Education for applicants admitted and rejected. Each folder contains the 
application with decision, examination scores, transcripts, designations of 
advisers and committees, results of degree examinations, correspondence, and 
placement. 

F. Residence for Degrees 

Requirements for residence credits for graduate degrees are as follows: 

1. For the master's: a minimum of two semesters. 

2. The sixth—year program: two years of graduate academic study, at least 


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* 









one quarter or one semester in full-time residential study. 

3. For the doctor’s: minimum of three years of study. One year must be 
in continuous study at Chapel Hill. 

G. Transfer Credit 

1. In the master's programs: not more than six semester hours from acciedited 
institutions. Transfer credit does not reduce the minimum residence period. 

2. In the sixth-year programs: a mister's degree or 30 semester hours of 
appropriate credit from accredited institutions. A minimum of 30 s.h. 
must be completed at the University. 

3. In the doctor's programs: up to 30 s.h. at an approved institution for 
credits that fit the pattern of degree requirements. 

H. Time Limits 


1. For the master's degrees: within five jears. 

2. For sixth-year programs: the last 30 s.h. must be completed within the 
10 year period immediately preceding certification. 

3. For doctor's degrees: up to eight years before the preliminary examination, 
and then eight years to completion. 

I. Student Load 

A full-time load for graduate students is 16 s.h., but graduate assistants 
and similar personnel are considered full-time with nine semester hours. Professional 
school employees can take only three s.h. per semester during full-time employment. 

J. Recommendation for Certification 

Candidates for graduate and undergraduate certification are recommended by 
the Dean of the School of Education. 

K. Recognition of Completion of Sixth-Year Programs 

No recognition is currently given by the institution for completion of 

sixth-year programs. 


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STANDARD III—FACULTY 


A. Graduate and Undergraduate Faculty Relationships 

Most of the information called for under the graduate standard on faculty 
has been submitted in some detail under discussion of the undergraduate programs. 

The composite profile of the entire education faculty, both undergraduate and 
graduate, is shown in Table 4. The full staff assignments, undergraduate and 
graduate, are shown in Table 5. Committee loads are shown in Table 6 for both 
groups. In the subject-matter fields the same departments and faculties, as 
shown in Table 8 for both groups, assist the faculty of the School of Education 
in advising students concerning their programs. In all subject-matter areas of 
concentration and in professional education no staff member teaches on the graduate 
level until and unless he has been approved as a member of the graduate faculty 
of the University. 

B. Salary 

Salary schedules are not hard and fast for the University as a whole, nor 
for the School of Education. The most recent salary data supplied to the visiting 
committee were for the entire University for the school year 1959-60. These were 
salaries actually paid during that year, including Kenan Professors and undergraduate 
and graduate teachers. 

TABLE 11„ SALARIES 



Instructor 

Assistant Professor 

Associate Professor 

Professor 

Minimum 

$4500 

$5500 

$6500 

$7700 

Median 

5100 

6600 

7850 

9800 

Maximum 
(by State) 

6200 

8200 

9500* 

nooo#* 

School of 
Median 

Education 

5600 

7000 

7650 

9512*** 


•fc $8500 + supplement from private sources. 

** Kenan Professors $12,500 and up. 

Median is $10,825 if professors holding administrative posts are included. 
The salaries of the Education faculty compare satisfactorily, and in many 
instances favorably with those for the entire University faculty. 


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’ 


































































C. Retirement 


The regulations of the Teachers' and State Employees' Retirement System are 
followed. Normal retirement age is 65 , but a person who is physically and mentally 
fit may be continued in full-time service to age 70 upon recommendation of the 
Dean of the School. 

D. Administrative Appraisal of Faculty 

Recommendations for promotion made by the Dean of the School are screened 
by the University Committee on Instructional Personnel, the Chancellor's Advisory 
Committee, and the Board of Trustees of the Consolidated University of North 
Carolina. 

The following criteria are used by the Dean of the School of Education and 

1 

the senior staff members in determining promotions: 

1. Effectiveness of teaching 

2. Research and writing 

3* Service to students outside class 

4. Service to the School of Education, the University, and the State 

5. Professional growth 

A self-appraisal by each staff member is included in the total appraisal. 


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STANDARD IV—GRADUATE CURRICULA 


The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill prepares personnel at the 
graduate levels for the following positions: 

1. Elementary Teacher - Master's 

2. Secondary Teacher - Master's 

a. English 

b. Modern Foreign Language (French, German, Spanish) 

c. Latin 

d. Mathematics 

e. Science 

f. Social Studies 

3. Special-Subject Area Teacher - Master's 

a. Art 

b. Physical Education and Health 

c. Library Science 

d. Music 

e. Distributive Education 

f. Special Education 

A. Special-Service Area Personnel - Master's, Sixth-year, Doctor's 

a. Principal 

b. Supervisor 

c. Superintend ent 

d. School Counselor 

e. School Psychologist 

The School of Education of the University offers the following degrees in 
the Graduate School: 

1. Master of Arts (M„A.) 

The Master of Arts degree requires completion of 30 semester hours, of which 
18 to 21 may be in the major department. A minor of nine to 12 semester hoqrs is 
required. The degree also requires a thesis which may count three to six semester 
hours on the major and a reading knowledge of one modern foreign language. 

The self-study pointed out that the M. A. could be secured with a major in 
education and a minor in a subject area. This arrangement patently will not sinfice 
when applied to the guidelines for secondary teachers' programs in subject-matter 
concentrations. 

2. Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) 

During the 1962-63 school year A8 students were enrolled in the fifth-year 


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program for preparation of teachers, leading to the master of arts in teaching 
degree (M.A.T.). 

The School of Education inaugurated the fifth-year program in September, 1959* 
Students may pursue graduate work in a major teaching field while working in a 
professional program for teaching. During the first phase of the program, students 
take graduate courses in their teaching field; participate in an education seminar; 
take an undergraduate course in philosophical and psychological concepts in American 
education; and take an undergraduate course devoted to the theory and practice of 
teaching. During the second phase of the program, each student is assigned to a 
cooperating school as an associate teacher of two or three classes daily; engages 
in directed observations; and directs some class and school activities for the 
full school year. 

During the third phase of the program, the student returns to the campus 
and completes twelve semester hours in his teaching field. 

The degree requires completion of 30 semester hours, 18 hours in a major, 
which must be in the teaching field or fields, and a minor of at least six semester 
hours. 

3. Master of Education (M.Ed.) 

The Master of Education degree requires the completion of 30 semester hours. 
The 18 to 24 semester hour major must be in Education and the minimum six to 12 
semester hour minor would be in the teaching area. 

4. Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

This degree requires: (l) A minimum of 3 years of graduate study; (2) a 
reading knowledge of two foreign languages; (3) a major covering the field of 
major interest; and (4) at least 18 semester hours in a minor. 

3, Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) 

The doctor of education degree is open only to candidates in administration 
and supervision. It requires: (1) Completion of at least three years of graduate 
study; (2) Three years of teaching or administrative experience; (3) A reading 
knowledge of one modern foreign language; and (4) Competence in the use of 


- 101 - 
































. 
































research instruments pertinent to the thesis. 

Requirements for both doctor’s degrees follow fairly closely the patterns 
found over the country. 

Information on guidelines in each curricular program and at which degree 
level each program is designed follows. Required courses are marked with an 
asterisk (-*). 

Elementary Teacher’s Program 

Any of the three master’s degiees (M.A., M.A.T., or M.Ed.) may be pursued 
by persons in elementary education. Thirty semester hours of appropriate graduate 
credit and a written examination in the major area are required for each degree. 

The M. A, degree also requires a reading knowledge of one foreign language, a thesis, 
and an oral examination. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should broaden the teacher's understanding of 
the purpose and role of the elementary school . 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should extend the teacher’s understanding of 
the nature of the learner and learning process . 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should assist the teacher in gaining greater 
insights and skills in the use of the techniques of research and in designing 

and carrying out research projects . 

GUIDELINE l+i The program should extend and deepen the teacher’s ability 
to work effectively with the content areas of the elementary school curriculum. 

Guidelines 1, 2, 3, and 4 are met by selecting four three-semester-hour 
courses from the following: 


Education 160 

The School Curriculum 

3 

s.h. 

Education 1?0 

Psychological Foundations 
of Education 



or 

Education 171 

Growth and Development of 
the School Child 

3 

s.h. 

Education 161 

Elementary Education in 
the U. S. 

3 

s.h. 

Education 165 

Improvement in Reading 

3 

s.h. 


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Education 152 

Language Arts in the 
Elementary School 

3 s.h. 

Education 154 

Social Studies in the 
Elementary School 

3 s.h. 

Education 155 

Natural Science in the 
Elementary School 

3 s.h. 

Education 156 

Arithmetic in the 
Elementary School 

3 s.h. 

Education 140 

Social Foundations of 
American Education 

3 s.h. 

Normally, the student 

will take Education 160, Education 170, 


and Education 165. These twelve semester hours would constitute the 40 per cent 
required for Guidelines 1, 2, 3> and 4. 

GUIDELINE 5* The program should provide for concentrated study in one 
or more of the instructional areas of the elementary school curriculum . 

The student takes at least 40 per cent (twelve semester hours) of his 
course work in his subject-matter field or fields, which fulfill the requirements 
of Guideline 5. 

In addition the student takes six semester hours (or 20 per cent of his total 
course program) in an acceptable choice of professional courses, his subject 
field, or another field. 


Secondary Teacher’s Programs 

Programs for secondary teachers are offered on the master’s level (M.A., 
M.Ed., and M.A.T.) and on the post-master’s and doctor’s degree levels. Special 
provisions for particular areas are noted in the discussion of the subject-matter 


area. * ~ 

The general guidelines (1-3) for all areas and degree programs are as follows 
GUIDELINE 1: The program should broaden the understanding of the learner 
and the learning process . 


■^Education 160 

Curriculum Construction 

3 s.h 

Education 140 

Social Foundations of 



American Education 

3 s.h 

* or 



Education 170 

Psychological Foundations 



of American Education 

3 s.h 


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. 















































































GUIDELINE 2: The program should assist the teacher in gaining greater 
insights and skills in the use of the techniques of research and in designing 
and carrying out research pro.1 eats . 


■’''‘■Education 160 

Curriculum Construction 

3 

s.h. 

Education 140 

Social Foundations of 
American Education 

3 

s.h. 

* or 




Education 170 

Psychological Foundations 
of American Education 

3 

s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should extend the teacher’s understanding of 
the basic educational philosophies and school curriculum patterns ,, 


■^Education 160 

Curriculum Construction 

3 

s.h 

Education 140 

Social Foundations of 
American Education 

3 

s.h 

-* or 




Education 170 

Psychological Foundations 
of American Education 

3 

s.h 


GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide for concentrated study in the 
teacher*s subject field or fields . 

Guideline 4 is discussed separately for each teaching subject or area, as 
follows: The programs for the M.Ed. and the M. A. with a major in Education 
are not intended for teachers in subject-matter areas. 

English 

A graduate program with major in English is provided leading to the M. A.; 
or to the M.A.T. with or without the undergraduate teaching block. 

The M. A. requires 30 s.h., of which 18 to 21 s.h. are in the major (60 
to 70 per cent). The thesis may count for three to six semester hours. The 
professional courses, as a minor, account for at least 20 per cent. 

The M.A.T. without the teaching block, for persons already qualified to hold 
a North Carolina "A" Certificate, requires 30 s.h. distributed as in the M. A. 
program, but without the thesis. The M.A.T. with the teaching block, to qualify 
for the 11 A" certificate, requires additionally 18 s.h. of professional courses 
which carry undergraduate credit, for a total of 48 s.h. 


104 = 































































































































A wide range of graduate-level courses in English is available, the minimum 
18 s.h. being distributed to supplement the student's undergraduate program,, 

Modem Foreign Languages: French 

^French 145 French Phonetics (required in 

undergraduate program) 3 s.h. 

The French language major choses an additional 15 to 21 s.h. of courses in 
his language major, with adviser's approval. Courses available have the depth 
and scope for developing understanding and command of the written and spoken 
language, and of the historical and cultural aspects of the language. The 
graduate programs are consistent with the needs of teachers of French as 
expressed in undergraduate guidelines. Programs for graduates supplement and 
complement undergraduate preparation. 

Modern foreign Languages: German 

Courses available are ample in depth and scope for developing the teacher's 
understanding and command of the written and spoken language and of the historical 
and cultural aspects of the language. The graduate programs are consistent with 
the needs of teachers of German as expressed in undergraduate guidelines. Courses 
for graduates build upon undergraduate preparation. 

Modem Foreign Languages; Spanish 

^Spanish 145 Spanish Phonetics (required 

in undergraduate program) 3 s.h. 

The Spanish major chooses 15 to 21 s.h. of courses in his language major, 
with adviser's approval. Courses available are ample in depth and scope for 
developing the teacher's understanding and ability in the written and spoken 
language, and of the historical and cultural aspects of the language. The graduate 
programs are consistent with the needs of teachers of Spanish as expressed in the 
undergraduate guidelines. Courses for graduates build upon undergraduate preparation. 

Latin 

The student may select 15 to 21 s.h. of courses in his language major, with 
adviser's approval. Courses available emphasize the written language. 


=- 105 ' 





































































. 
















































Graduate mathematics programs leading to the M.A. and M.A.T. degrees are 
offered for teachers. The M. A. requires a thesis, an oral examination, and a reading 
knowledge of a foreign language; the M. A. T. lacks these three requirements. 

As many as 24 s.h. of mathematics courses are required, depending on the 
undergraduate preparation of the student. Master's degree programs require the 
following courses: 


^Mathematics 116 

^Mathematics 118 
-^-Mathematics 119 

*Mathematics 120 
■^Mathematics 136 


Fundamental Concepts of 
Algebra 3 s.h, 

Some Concepts of Analysis 3 s.h, 

Topics from Geometry and 
Elementary Topology 3 s.h, 


Probability 

Introduction to Modern 
Algebra I 


3 s.h. 


*MathematL cs 181 
-“-Mathematics 182 


3 s.h. 

Elementary Theory of Numbers I 3 s.h. 
Elementally Theory of Numbers II 3 s.h. 

Some substitutions may be made from the other offerings of the mathematics 
department, depending on the mathematics background of the student. 

Science 


Graduate students in science may work toward the M. A. or M. A. T. degrees. 

The student takes a minimum of 18 s.h. in his subject field or fields. The 
offerings are available in each of the following fields, or the combinations, 
selected by the student with adviser's approval: biology; chemistry; physics; 
and earth science. Course offerings in each area are ample for development on 
undergraduate preparation and for continuation of graduate education. Needs of 
teachers of science are satisfied. 


Social Studies 


A master's degree in social studies requires a minimum of 18 s.h. in social 


studies. 

No prescribed subject matter courses are specified. Ample depth and scope 
are available in courses, supplementing undergraduate preparation. 


= 106 - 








































































Special Subject Areas 


All graduate students in special subject areas take a minimum of 18 semester 
hours in the subject or vocational speciality, comprising at least 60 per cent of 
the 30 semester hours of the graduate program for a master’s degree. Students 
with adequate undergraduate preparation may take an additional 6 s.h. in the 
speciality for a total of 24 s.h. and 80 per cent of graduate credit. A person 
desiring to become certified in two special subject fields (advancing under¬ 
graduate certification in both fields) would take 12 s.h. (40 per cent) in each. 

Six semester hours (20 per cent) is taken in professional education. 

Graduate programs for art, physical education and health, health education, 
library science, music, and distributive education, are discussed below as they 
relate to Guideline 4. ' 

Art 

* Graduate students with a teaching major in art take nonduplicating courses 
selected with adviser’s approval from offerings that are ample in depth and scope. 

Physical Education 

and Health 

Graduate students with a teaching major in physical education and health 
take nonduplicating courses, with adviser’s approval, selected from extensive 
and varied offerings of courses that expand depth and scope of the preparation 
described under the undergraduate programs. 

Library Science 

The School of Library Science offers a graduate program of 39 semester 
hours leading to the degree of Master of Science in Library Science. This program 
is designed to prepare personnel to hold graduate certificates for positions as 
school library supervisors and as librarians in elementary, junior high, and senior 
high schools. 

In addition, graduate students In the School of Education may elect a four- 
course minor in library science. This minor program is intended to complement 
graduate education courses in satisfying the other three guidelines for graduate 




























































































Graduate mathematics programs leading to the M.A. and M.A.T. degrees are 
offered for teachers,, The M. A, requires a thesis, an oral examination, and a reading 


knowledge of a foreign language; the M. A. T. lacks these three requirements. 

As many as 2A s.h. of mathematics courses are required, depending on the 
undergraduate preparation of the student. Master's degree programs require the 
following courses: 


■^Mathematics 116 

^Mathematics 118 
---Mathematics 119 

^Mathematics 120 
^Mathematics 136 

*MathematL cs 181 
---Mathematics 182 


Fundamental Concepts of 
Algebra 3 s.h. 

Some Concepts of Analysis 3 s.h, 

Topics from Geometry and 


Elementary Topology 

Probability 

Introduction to Modern 
Algebra I 


3 s.h, 
3 s.h, 


3 s.h. 

Elementary Theory of Numbers I 3 s.h. 
Elementary Theory of Numbers II 3 s.h. 


Some substitutions may be made from the other offerings of the mathematics 


department, depending on the mathematics background of the student. 

Science 

Graduate students in science may work toward the M. A. or M. A. T. degrees. 

The student takes a minimum of 18 s.h. in his subject field or fields. The 
offerings are available in each of the following fields, or the combinations, 
selected by the student with adviser's approval: biology; chemistry; physics; 
and earth science. Course offerings in each area are ample for development on 
undergraduate preparation and for continuation of graduate education. Needs of 


teachers of science are satisfied. 

Social Studies 

A master's degree in social studies requires a minimum of 18 s.h. in social 
studies. 

No prescribed subject matter courses are specified. Ample depth and scope 

are available in courses, supplementing undergraduate preparation. 

= 106 - 






























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Business Administration 160 Principles of Marketing 3 s.h. 

Business Administration 150 Personnel Relations 3 s.h, 

Business Administration 161 Administration 3 s.h. 

Business Administration 162 Salesmanship and Sales 

Promotion 3 s.h. 

Business Administration 165 Retailing 3 s.h. 

Business Administration 196 Human Relations 3 s.h. 

Economics 131 Economic Theory 3 s.h. 

Economics 195 Comparative Economic 

Systems 3 s.h. 

Economics 235 General Economic 

History 3 s.h. 


Persons whose business experience has been broad, but whose professional 
education has been limited are advised to take the major concentration in the 
secondary education field. In addition to the professional courses in 
Distributive Education, selection of elective courses are recommended from the 


following courses: 

Education 160 Curriculum Construction 3 s.h. 

Education 171 Growth and Development of 

School Child 3 s.h. 

Education 199 Secondary Education in 

the United States 3 s.h. 

Education 105 Guidance in the Schools 3 s.h. 

Education 135 Audiovisual Instruction 3 s.h. 

Education 211 Supervised Practicum in 

Guidance 3 s.h. 

Education 205 Techniques in Counseling 3 s.h. 

Special Education 


The special education program at the University of North Carolina is 
designed for graduate study leading to a master 1 s degree with emphasis in either 
teaching mentally retarded children or speech and hearing handicapped children. 

All students are required to take nine semester hours of basic course work 


in Special Education. 


■ 109 ' 














































































































Mental Retarded: In the area of mental retardation an additional nine hours 
specifically related to this area are required, making a total of 18 semester hours 
required of the thirty hours necessary for graduation. 

Speech and Hearing Handicapped: In the area of speech, twelve hours specifi¬ 
cally related to this area are required, making a total of twenty-one semester hours 
from the thirty hours necessary for graduation. 

Preparation for the teaching of mentally retarded has somewhat more emphasis 
in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

In the area of emotionally disturbed, a sequence of courses is being 
discussed. However, this phase of special education is in the developmental 
stage, and definite plans for implementation have not materialized. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should include an introduction to all areas of 
Special Education . 

The graduate program is based on undergraduate preparation for a North Carolina 


"A" Certificate. Basic courses 

required of all students in 

special education , 

^Education 170 

Psychological Foundations 

3 s.h. 

-^Education 176 

Mental Hygiene 

3 s.h. 

■^Education 180 

Introduction to 
Exceptional Children 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should require a depth in study sufficient to 

assure reasonable competence in 

the area of concentration. 


Mental Retardation, nine 

required hours. 


^Education 181 

Teaching the Mentally 
Handicapped Child 

3 s.h. 

’"-Education 185 

Psychology of Mental 
Retardation 

3 s.h. 

•^Education 370 

Seminar in Special 
Education 

3 s.h. 

Speech and Hearing Handicapped, twelve required hours 

• 

’"Education 183 

Principles of Speech 
Correction 

3 s.h. 

’"-Education 184 

Clinical Procedures in 
Speech Correction 

.3 s.h. 


•no- 



















































































































































•^Education 196 


Phonetics 


3 s.h. 


-"-Education 283 


Audiology 


3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3• The program should include work related to the areas of 
concentration . 

Mentally retarded: Those choosing mentally retarded as the area of con¬ 
centration will have 12 semester hours In allied fields of psychology, sociology, or 
public healtho 

Speech and Hearing Handicapped: Those choosing speech and hearing handicapped 
will have six hours in any of these disciplines. 

GUIDELINE A: The program should provide sufficient preparation for later 
pursuit of graduate study in the area of concentration . 

The institution feels that this program provides sufficient preparation 
for later graduate study in the area of mental retardation. 


Special Service Personnel 


Programs are offered at the master’s, "sixth year", and the doctorate 


for principals, superintendents, supervisors, counselors, and psychologists. 


Principal 


A. Program for the Fifth Year 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should place some emphasis on the basic 


foundation courses in education. 


*One course in Foundations of Education 


3 s.h 


GUIDELINE 2: The program should emphasize organization and administration . 


^Education 101 


Educational Administration 3 s.h. 


Education 292 


Organization, administration 
and Supervision of Elementary 
and Secondary Schools 6 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: "" ^ J ~ " dude the areas of curriculum, instruction . 



and supervision . 

■^Education 160 


Curriculum Construction 3 s.h 


GUIDELINE A: The program should include cognate disciplines which con - 


tribute to the administrative 


as needed by the individual . 

































































































' 
















































Six semester hours from Sociology, Political Science, Anthropology, History, 
Economics, and/or Psychology are required, 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should include internship-administrative field 
experience . 

An internship or approved alternative is required, (Min, 3 s.h.) 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should provide opportunity for electives to 
meet individual needs . 

6 semester hours of electives. 6 s.h. 

Total for Principal's fifth year program—30 semester hours 
B. Pr o gram for the Sixth Year (Optional) 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should place some emphasis on the foundation 
courses in education . 

^Education 341 Foundations of Education 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should emphasize the areas of organization and 
administration . 

•^Organization and Administration 6 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3* The program should include the areas of curriculum, instruction . 
and supervision . 

Three to six semester hours in these areas are required. 

GUIDELINE i+; The program should include cognate disciplines which contribute 
to the administrative competency as needed by the individual . 

Six semester hours in cognate disciplines are required. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should include internship-administrative field 
experience . 

Six semester hours of required credit in internship or field experience, 
three of which may have been earned in the first year of graduate work. 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should provide opportunity for electives to 
meet individual needs . 

Six to nine semester hours of electives are available. 

Total for Principal's sixth-year program—30 semester hours. 


•112“ 







































































































































Supervisor 


Ac Program for the fifth year 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide a thorough understanding of the 
nature of the learner and the psychology of learning . 


Education 170 


Psychological Foundations 
of Education 3 s.h. 


Education 174 Tests and Measurements 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide comprehensive study of the 
dynamics of human behavior . 

Same courses as under Guideline 1 above are required. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide an understanding of curriculum 
development, including the bases for decision in curriculum changes . 

Education 160 The School Curriculum 3 s.h. 

Education l6l Elementary Education 3 s.h. 

or 

Education 199 Secondary Education 

GUIDELINE 4.: The program should include a thorough grounding in the 
techniques of supervision . 

Education 298 Supervision and Instruction 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide acquaintance with the various 
phases of organization and administration involved in the operation of a school . 
Education 101 Educational Administration 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should provide opportunities for graduate work 
in related areas, including work in subject of specialization. 

Six semester hours are required 6 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 7: The program should include an emphasis on research and use 

of appropriate statistics . 

The same courses as under Guideline 1 above are required. 

General supporting vocational electives. 6 s. h. 

Total for Supervisor^ fifth year program 30 s. h. 

-113” 


















































































































B. Program for the sixth year (optional) 


GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide a thorough understanding of the 
nature of the learner and the psychology of learning . 

Education 271 Problems in Educational 

Psychology 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide comprehensive study of the 
dynamics of human behavior . 

Same course as listed under Guideline 1. 

GUIDELINE 3• The program should provide an understanding of curriculum 
development, including the bases for decisions in curriculum changes . 

Education 260—Curriculum Theory is required. 

Concepts are strengthened by requirement of at least three other semester 
hours selected from courses in curriculum and teaching methods in language arts, 
social studies, science, English, arithmetic, or reading according to needs 
of the individual. 

GUIDELINE 4* The program should include a thorough grounding in the 
techniques of supervision. 

Education 299 Problems in Supervision 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide acquaintance with the various 
phases of organization and administration involved in the operation of a school . 

No additional course required. 

GUIDELINE 6: • The program should provide opportunities for graduate work 
in related areas, including work in sub.ject of specialization . 

Students are required to take at least six semester hours in related 
areas in academic fields. 6 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 7: The program should include an emphasis on research and use 

of appropriate statistics . 

Education 201 Research Procedures 

Problems course—field study— in supervision 

Guided electives 


3 s.h. 
3 s.h. 
6 s.h. 


































































































Total for Supervisor's sixth year program 


30 s.h. 


Superintendent—Two-year Graduate Program 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should place some emphasis on the basic foundation 
courses in education . 

Six semester hours in foundations of education are required. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should emphasize the areas of organization and 
administration . 

Same courses listed under Guideline 3 below. 

GUIDELINE J>: The program should include the areas of curriculum, instruction , 
and supervision. 

•^Required for Guidelines 2 and 3° 24 semester hours including courses in 

administration (School Law, General Administration, finance, buildings, and the 
principalship), curriculum, supervision, and instruction, plus six hours of electives 
in these general areas. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should include cognate disciplines which relate 
directly to the administrative competency needed by the individual . 

^Twelve semester hours in cognate disciplines (political science, history, 
economics, psychology,sociology, or anthropology) are required. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should include internship-administrative field 
experiences . 

*An internship for inexperienced candidates is required. 

*A supervised field study for experienced candidates (Education 295), 
six semester hours, is required. 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should provide opportunity for electives to 
meet individual needs . 

*12 semester hours of electives, according to needs of student. 

Total for Superintendent’s two-year graduate program 60 semester hours 

School Counselor 

A. Fifth-Year Program 

After being admitted to the School of Education, enrollees may apply for 







































































































admission to the counselor preparation program. Candidates for admission to this 
program are required to take the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide a thorough understanding of the 


individual, including the dynamics of human behavior and group processes . 

♦Education 202 Introduction to Guidance 

and Personnel Work 3 s.h. 

(This course replaced Education 105, Guidance in the School, as the 
introductory course) 

♦Education 274 The Use of Tests in the 

Analysis of the Individual 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide professional competencies directly 
related to the practice of school counseling . 


♦Education 202 

Introduction to Guidance 

and Personnel Work 3 s.h. 

♦Education 205 

Techniques in Counseling 3 s.h. 

♦Education 206 

The Interpretation and Use 
of Educational and 

Occupational Materials 3 s.h. 

♦Education 274 

The Use of Tests in the 

Analysis of the Individual 3 s.h. 

♦Education 211 

Supervised Practicum 
in Guidance 3 s.h. 

Elective: None 


GUIDELINE 3: The 

program should extend the understanding of 


educational philosophies and school curriculum patterns . 

♦Education 202 Introduction to Guidance 

and Personnel Work 


3 s.h, 


GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide complete information regarding 

the philosophy, organization, and administrative relationships of guidance services . 

♦Education 202 Introduction to Guidance 

and Personnel Work 3 s.h. 

♦Education 206 The Interpretation and Use - 

of Educ ational and Occupational 
Materials 3 s.h. 


♦Education 275 


Administrative Aspects of the 
Guidance Program 3 s.h. 


































































































































GUIDELINE 5• The program should include a study of societal forces and 


cultural changes in the graduate areas of sociology, anthropology, economics, 

and international relations . 

No additional course is needed. Electives may be selected, with the following 


recommended, according to background of the students. 

Sociology 122 Cultural Anthropology 3 s.h. 

Psychology 133 Introduction to Social 

Psychology 3 s.h. 

Sociology 101 North Carolina: Economic 

and Social 3 s.h. 

Sociology 133 Introduction to 

Social Psychology 3 s.h. 

Sociology 228 Advanced Social 

Psychology 3 s.h. 

Economics 131 Economic Theory 3 s.h. 

Economics 133 Economic Development 

in the United States 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 6: The program should include an emphasis on research and 
statistics . 

♦Education 202 Introduction to Guidance 

and Personnel Work 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 7: The program should provide laboratory and practicum experiences 
in counseling . 

♦Education 205 Techniques in Counseling 3 s.h. 

♦Education 211 Supervised Practicum 

in Guidance 3 s.h. 

B. Sixth Year Program 

The sixth-year program for school counselors follows the guidelines stated 
under the fifth-year program. Greater breadth and depth are emphasized in the 

sixth year. 

Fall Semester 

♦Edic ation 203 Statistical Methods in 

Education 3 s.h. 

♦Education 273 Theory and Use of 

Indiv. Intelligence Tests 3 s.h. 


-117 



































































































■^Three of the following courses: 9 

Psychology 133 Introduction to Social 

Psychology 3 

Psychology 140 Personality 3 

Psychology 1R1 Introduction to 

Clinical Psychology 3 

Psychology 146 Behavior Disorders 3 

Psychology 188 Small Groups 3 

Psychology 251 Individual Psychometric 

Assessment 3 

Sociology 101 North Carolina: Economic 

& Social 3 

or 

Sociology 181 Regional Sociology of 

the South 3 

Sociology 122 Cultural Anthropology 3 

Sociology 125 The Negro 3 

Sociology 190 Diagnosis of Juvenile 

Delinquency 3 

Sociology 198 Treatment of Juvenile 

Delinquency 3 

Sociology 228 Advanced Social Psychology 3 

Economics 131 Economic Theory 3 

Economics 135 Economic Development in 

the United States 3 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


s.h. 


Spring Semester 

A unique part of preparation of school counselors is the spring semester 
portion of the program. 

The spring semester has been planned to meet the need for a better balanced, 
practical approach to modem guidance education. Therefore, it is given in more 
detail and follows fundamentally the guidelines for the fifth year in breadth 
and depth. The following courses will be taken: 

Block A - Education 212 (Advanced Techniques and Practices for Counselors, new 
course, six semester hours’ credit, seven weeks of Spring Semester.) 


-118' 



























































































































A refinement of techniques and practices for counselors through continued 
use of studies utilizing individual and group techniques of counseling, using data 
from measuring instruments and educational, occupational and personal-social 
information would be a major responsibility of Block A. 

A second area of emphasis would be the exploration of research studies in 
guidance and counseling and the study of methods and design of research. During 
this part of the Block, the research design for a project would be developed. 

The synthesis of guidance functions as they relate to effective administrative 
practice would be the third area of emphasis in this block of work. Special 
consideration would be given to three areas of administration: (1) Administrative 
Theory and Relationships, (2) Human Relations in Formal Organizations, (3) The 
Organization and Administration of Guidance Services. 

Block B - Education 213 (Internship—Field Experiences) (New Course) 

(Six semester hours' credit, eight weeks of Spring Semester.) 

In Block B. students would be serving as interns in counseling and other 
situations. These student interns would work closely with professional counselors, 
and would be under the close supervision of the University faculty members of 
Blocks A and B. Supervision of internship would involve one day each week spent 
with each student in his internship situation. Full-time guidance staff members 
would spend one day per week with each student, making that staff member's load 
five students. These students would also be his responsibility in Education 305. 

In addition to this internship training, there would be a series of seminars 
organized around related subjects. 

---Education 305 Problems in Guidance 3 s.h. 

This course would continue through Blocks A and B. The research design for 
the project and the completion of and report on the project, would be under the 
direction of the full-time faculty members supervising the interns. In addition 
there would be required reading from a professional library, report^ and group 
discussion. 

The work in this semester cuts across the boundaries of all seven guidelines 











































H . II | | ' '*■'***$: 






















for preparation of school counselors. The varied structure of this curriculum, 
as described above, is not compatible with course-by-course listing under guidelines, 
although the program is designed to cover the seven guidelines. 

School Psychologist 


Sixth-Year Program 

This is a new program being developed cooperatively by the School of 
Education and the Department of Psychology. Much thought and effort have been 
expended in developing a rationale for the program, cooperative course arrangements, 
and selection policies relating to students in both the School of Education and the 
Department of Psychology. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program of preparation for the school psychologist 
should provide a broad understanding of the learning difficulties of children 


and the psychology of learning . 

Education 170 

Education 171 

Education 180 
Psychology 141 


Psychological Foundations 
of Education 3 s.h. 

Growth and Development 

of the School Child 3 s.h. 

Introduction to the Study 
of Exceptional Children 3 s.h. 


Introduction to Clinical 
Psychology 


3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program of preparation for the school psychologist 
should provide a thorough training in the techniques of measurement and 

evaluation. 


Education 171 

Growth and Development 
of the School Child 

3 s.h 

Psychology 126 

Child Development 

3 s.h 

Education 172 

Problems of Maladjustment 
Among Children 

3 s.h 

Psychology 14 6 

Behavior Disorders 

3 s.h 

Education 174 

Use and Interpretation of 
Educational Tests and 



Measurements 

3 s.h 

or 



Psychology 148 

Tests and Measurements 

3 *s.h 


-120- 


























































\ 








































• 




































Education 273 

Psychology 251 

Psychology 254 
Education 279 


Theory and Use of Individual 


Intelligence Tests 3 s.h. 

Individual Psychometric 
Assessment 3 s.h. 

Objective PersonalilyTests 3 s.h. 

Practicum 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program of preparation for the school psychologist 
should provide a comprehensive understanding of personality development and the 

dynamics of human hehavior . 


Education 171 

Growth and Development of 
the School Child 

3 

s.h. 

Psychology 126 

Child Development 

3 

Soho 

Psychology 140 

Personality 

3 

s.h. 

Education 172 

Problems of Maladjustment 
Among Children 

3 

s.h. 

Psychology 141 

Introduction to Clinical 
Psychology 

3 

Soho 

Psychology 146 

Behaviour Disorders 

3 

s.h. 

Education 170 

Psychology cal Foundations 
of Education 

3 

s.h. 

Psychology 133 

Introduction to Social 
Psychology 

3 

s.h. 

Education 205 

Techniques of Counseling 

3 

s.h. 

Education 279 

Practicum 

3 

s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The 

program of preparation for the school 

psychologist 


should provide an emphasis on research and appropriate statistical techniques , 
Education 203 


Education 201 

Education 278 
Psychology 130 


Statistical Methods in 
Education 

Procedures in Educational 

Research 


3 s.h, 


3 s.h. 

Seminar in School Psychology 3 s.h. 

Elementary Psychological 
Statistics 


-121- 


3 s.h. 





















































































Psychology 131 


Design of Psychological 
Experiments 


3 s.h 


Thesis or Research Report 


GUIDELINE 5 • The program of preparation for the school psychologist 
should provide a basic understanding of the organization and operation of 

public schools along with appropriate knowledge of curriculum development . 


Education 1/+0 

-^Education 160 
Education 202 


Social Foundations of 
American Education 

The School Curriculum 


3 s.h. 
3 s.h. 


Introduction to Guidance and 
Personnel Work 3 s.h. 


Education 27S Seminar in School Psychology 3 s.h. 

Education 279 Practicum in School Psychology 3 s.h. 

The over-all requirements and electives for the program are as follows: 


A. Required Courses 
Education 170 
Education IRO 
Education 160 
Education 202 
Education 205 
Education 174 


Psychology 148 

Education 273 
or 

Psychology 251 

Education 171 
or 

Psychology 126 

Psychology 140 

Education 172 
or 

Psychology 14 6 

Psychology 133 


Psychological Foundations of Education 
Social Foundations of Education 
Curriculum Construction 

Introduction to Guidance and Personnel Work 
Techniques of Counseling 

Use and Interpretation of Educational Tests 
and Measurements 

Tests and Measurements 

Theory and Use of Individual Intelligence Tests 

Individual Psychometric Assessment 

Growth and Development of the School Child 

Child Development 

Personality 

Problems of Maladjustment Among Children 

Behavior Disorders 

Introduction to Social Psychology 


-122- 
























































Education 203 
Education 201 
Education 278 
Education 279 

B. Appropriate selections from 

Education 180 
Education 185 
Education 182 
Education 274 
Education 176 
Psychology 141 
Psychology 180 
Psychology 254 
Psychology 255 

C. Thesis or Research Report 

D. Comprehensive Examination 


Statistical Methods in Education 
Procedures in Educational Research 
Seminar in School Psychology 
Practicum in School Psychology 
the following : 


Introduction to the Study of Exceptional Children 

Psychology of Mental Retardation 

The Gifted Child in School and Society 

The Use of Tests in the Analysis of the Individual 

Mental Hygiene in Teaching 

Introduction to Clinical Psychology 

Introduction to the Study of Exceptional Children 

Objective Personality Tests 

Theory of Projective Techniques 










































STANDARD V—PROFESSIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIENCES 


Professional laboratory experiences for graduate students differ markedly 
from those for undergraduate students. 

A. Opportunities to Study and Observe Children in Learning Situations . 

The observation rooms in Peabody Hall are available for graduate students 
to observe children in learning situations and study different classroom teaching 
situations. 

Graduate students also participate in their special area laboratory courses 
in which they observe and work with children. Further description of this facet 
of experiences will be under "C". 

B. Opportunities to Study and Observe School Relationships in Actual School - 

Community Settings . 

There are several ‘'problems" and "field-study" courses for advanced graduate 
students. Frequently, in these courses,, students participate in school surveys and 
other school-community activities throughout the State. These courses primarily 
fit the interests and fields of study of the students. 

C. Opportunities to Participate in Activities Suitable to Students Own Area of 

Specialization . 

As noted under "A", almost all graduate students particpate in laboratory 
courses particularly related to their own area of specialization. Illustrative 
of these courses are such as: 

Education ISA Clinical Procedures in Speech Correction 

Education 266 Diagnosis and Treatment of Reading Difficulties 

Education 295 Advanced Seminar and Supervised Internship 

in Educational Administration 

Three new courses in this area not now in the catalog will be available after 
1962-63. They will provide graduate students in cours eling, guidance, and school 
psychology increased opportunities to work with students needing their efforts. 

Problem courses and seminars numbered above 300 have traditionally provided 
graduate students opportunities to participate in activities, beyond the campus, 
suitable to their area(s) of specialization. 


= 124 = 










































- 




















































STANDARD VI—FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND MATERIALS 


Much of the same facilities, equipment, and materials used in the graduate 
programs are also used in the undergraduate programs, 

A. Educational Resources 

Library books, periodicals, journals, curriculum guides, and other educational 
materials are circulated to students in each area of study in the graduate 
curriculum. These materials and books are housed in the main library of the 
University (Wilson Library) and in the Curriculum Laboratory in Peabody Hall, 

The number of books was discussed under the undergraduate program. A special 
collection of Testing Center books and materials is maintained in Peabody Hall and 
is used by appropriate graduate students. Private collections of valuable books 
and materials owned by various staff members are generously shared with students 
in advanced programs. In addition, the Duke University Library is available for 
full use by University of North Carolina students, particularly graduate-level 
students. 

The Curriculum Laboratory maintains many separately filed materials for 
special work in administration, curriculum, and guidance. A reserve section in 
the Peabody library facility is also set aside for graduate student use. 

B. Expenditures and Sources 

Approximately $1,400.00 per year is expended for the purchase of library 
books for graduate students. Of this total, $900.00 is budgeted by the University 
library and the remainder is spent by the School of Education for books housed in 
the Curriculum Laboratory. This does not include monies budgeted for periodicals, 
journals and related materials purchased through the Wilson Library. Many other 
volumes and materials are supplied to the Curriculum Laboratory through donations 
by private individuals, publishers, governmental agencies, and foundations. 

C. Facilities 

A detailed description of Peabody Hall, its offices, classrooms, and in¬ 
structional aids is presented in the undergraduate portion of the report for 


125 ' 



























































- 








































this guideline. Graduate staff office space is excellent. Each professor is 
housed in a private room with appropriate furniture and storage. Clerical help 
is shared. Classrooms for graduate use are plentiful in number and are not 
overcrowded. Both large and small instructional rooms are available, are 
provided with movable furniture and storage, and are equipped with blinds for 
audiovisual use. Seminar rooms, special observation rooms, and graduate study- 
rooms are available and used by students in the graduate program. 

Laboratory facilities are not located on the campus for graduate students 
in the internship phase of their program. Instead, the School of Education budgets 
$11,000.00 for the Chapel Hill City Schools in order that their facilities and 
services may be used. Interns of the University of North Carolina also use other 
public schools of the State when needed. 

There are Special observation and laboratory rooms provided for graduate 
students in Peabody Hall, There is one observation room used to show typical 
classroom situations and operational patterns. At times it has housed special 
education students and has been available for demonstration and laboratory use 
in reading. Laboratory facilities are provided for guidance, counseling, and 
testing and are used extensively by graduate students in the related programs. 

D, Equipment and Materials 

Instructional aids and materials meet the needs for the various phases of 
the graduate curriculum. Materials and instructional aids are supplied as needed 
for advance study in all subject matter areas of the public school curriculum, for 
administration and supervision, and for guidance and counseling. A survey of 
audiovisual facilities, equipment, and materials is presented in the undergraduate 
portion of this report. 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



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