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North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 


REPORT TO 


STATE EVALUATION COMMITTEE 
ON TEACHER EDUCATION 


on 


ELON COLLEGE 

by 

THE VISITATION COMMITTEE 
December 5-8,1965 


n. a 

Doc 


Division Of Professional Services 
State Department Of Public Instruction 
Raleigh, North Carolina 





North Carolina Sfafe Library 
R&Jeigfi 


Report to 


STATE EVALUATION COMMITTEE ON 
TEACHER EDUCATION 


ON 


ELON COLLEGE 


by 


THE VISITATION COMMITTEE 


December 5-8, 1965 


Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2019 with funding from 
State Library of North Carolina 


https://archive.org/details/reporttostateeva00nort_5 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Introduction ............oao . o o . o o o 

Committee Members . .......... 

Programs ......o....000000.00000. 

Standard I—Overall Policies ........... 

Standard II—Student Personnel Programs and Services 
Standard III—Faculty ......... ..... . 

Standard IV—Curricula ......... « . . » . 

Standard V—Professional Laboratory Experiences . . 
Standard VI—Facilities, Equipment, and Materials . 























































INTRODUCTION 


Elon College is a four-year coeducational liberal arts college established 
for the purpose of giving young men and women the opportunity to obtain a college 
education in a moral and religious atmosphere. The College was chartered on 
March 11, 1889. Two schools were forerunners of Elon: The Graham Normal Insti¬ 
tute, established in 1865 at Graham, North Carolina, and the Suffolk Collegiate 
Institute, established in 1872 at Suffolk, Virginia. The Southern Christian Con¬ 
vention, in an extraordinary session in Graham, North Carolina in 1888, voted to 
establish a college. The name "Elon", the Hebrew word for oak, was selected for 
the institution, which opened its doors in 1890 with 108 students. The enrollment 
for the 1965 fall semester, including full-time and part-time students, is 1,211. 

Historically, the College has played an important role in teacher education. 

A program of instruction and experiences designed to prepare teachers for elementary 
and secondary schools has been and continues to be a major objective of the College. 
In addition to the preparation of teachers for elementary schools, the institution 
offers programs in secondary education in the following fields: business education, 
English, Foreign Language (French and Spanish), mathematics, music, physical edu¬ 
cation and health, science (biology, chemistry, and physics), and social science. 

The College was visited on December 5-8, 1965 by the following committee, which 

herewith submits its report: 

Dr. Elmer Puryear, Chairman 
Greensboro College 

Dr. J. P. Freeman, Consultant 

State Department of Public Instruction 


Dr, Eugenia Hunter 

University of North Carolina at Greensboro 


Dr. Mildred E, Hartsock 
Atlantic Christian College 




































, 


Dr. Neal Dow 

Duke University- 

Mr. Thomas Blackburn 

Lenoir Rhyne College 

Dr. J. 0. Manly 

Pfeiffer College 

Mr. George E. Melton 

Pfeiffer College 

Miss Doris Kimel 

Guilford County Schools 

Dr. James Valsame 

State Department of Public Instruction 

Mr. Charles Spencer 

State Department of Public Instruction 

Dr. Kenneth St. John 

Atlantic Christian College 

Dr. Jerry A, Hall 

State Department of Public Instruction 

Miss Louise Whitlock 

University of N. C. at Greensboro 


-2- 










STANDARD I—OVER-ALL POLICIES 


A. Purposes and Objectives 

The College was chartered on March 11, 1889, with the purpose being "to afford 
instruction in the liberal arts and sciences." In accordance with the provisions 
of the charter it is the aim of Elon College to help each student to acquire: 

1. A philosophy of life which is founded upon and motivated by the beliefs 
and spiritual values of the historic Christian Church, and which will be 
reflected throughout his life in terms of high ethical standards, wholesome 
attitudes, and significant religious insights and devotion. 

2. An understanding of his responsibilities and rights as a citizen in a 
democratic culture, a recognition of the intrinsic worth of other indivi¬ 
duals, and an intelligent awareness of world cultures, conditions, events, 
and issues. 

3. A love of learning sufficient to promote his continued intellectual and 
cultural growth which comes out of sharing in an invigorating intellectual 
and cultural climate during his college career. 

4. A basic knowledge in the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences, 
and an appreciation of the mutual relationships existing among these areas. 

5. An understanding of the content and an achievement of competence in the 
procedures of at least one field of knowledge as preparation sufficient 
for graduate or professional study. 

6. The ability to think critically, logically, and creatively, and to 
communicate effectively by means of the written and spoken language. 


“3- 






































7 . 


A sensibility to esthetic values through experience and study in the fine 
arts and through opportunity to develop competence and excellence in the 
performing arts. 

8. A knowledge of the principles of health and physical fitness, and skills 
useful for participation in wholesome recreational activities. 

9. A recognition of his abilities and aptitudes through counseling and guidance 
in the choice of an appropriate vocation. 

The College regards all of the above stated purposes to be applicable to the 
student preparing to teach. All of the itemized aims relate to knowledge, under¬ 
standing, and abilities which should be inherent in the education of teachers. 

Revealing its commitment to the education of teachers, the College publishes 
the following statement in its catalog: "Historically the College has played a 
significant role in teacher education. A program of instruction and experiences 
designed to prepare teachers for elementary and secondary schools continues to be 
a major objective of the College." The Teacher Education Committee, composed of 
representatives from the various departmental areas, has adopted as the major 
objectives of the teacher education program the following: 

1. It is incumbent upon the faculty and administration of the College to exert 
strong efforts toward encouraging students with excellent abilities and 
strong personality traits to consider seriously the teaching profession. 

2. The emphasis in the entire teacher education program should be qualitative 
as well as quantitative. 

3. Only those students who by their records, achievements, and personal 
attributes show promise of becoming competent teachers should be accepted 

into the teacher education program. 


4- 
































4. The preparation of teachers should include the three-fold objectives: 
breadth in general liberal arts education, depth of study in at least 
one of the subject matter areas, and study in professional education. 

5. The program of study designed for the teacher candidate should be planned 
so that he can subsequently pursue graduate study as an extension of the 
undergraduate program. 

6. It is an obligation of the College to study continually its teacher 
education program so that continued improvement of the program will be 
effected and the needs of the teacher candidates and of the public schools 
will be met. 

The teacher education program is limited to undergraduate study. In addition 
to the preparation of elementary teachers, the College offers programs in secondary 
education in the following teaching fields: Business Education, English, Foreign 
Language (French and Spanish), Mathematics, Music, Physical Education and Health, 
Science, and Social Studies. 

A. Organization and Administration 

1. Institution as a whole 

The organization of the College follows the typical small institution pattern 
except for the position of Dean of the Faculty which is honorary. The lines of 
authority move from the Board of Trustees, to the President, to the Dean of the 
College and thence to the chairmen of the various departments (See Chart I). The 
College organization includes twelve departments: Business (administration, 
education, and accounting), Economics, Education and Psychology, English, Home 
Economics, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Music and Fine Arts, Natural Sciences, 


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ELON COLLEGE 




5 






6 




































































































































































Philosophy and Religion, Physical Education and Health, and Social Sciences. The 
departments of instruction are divided, according to the College Catalogue, into 
four divisions as follows: Humanities, Mathematical and Natural Sciences, Social 
Sciences, and Physical Education, Health and Teacher Training. There are no 
divisional chairmen and these divisions are of no significance in the administrative 
structure. 

The responsibility for the supervision of duties is vested in the President of 
the Collegeo Some of this responsibility is delegated to the Dean of the College 
and heads of the various departments. 

In the administration of the affairs of the institution there are twelve major 
faculty committees: Academic Standing Committee, Administrative Committee, 
Admissions and Credits Committee, Athletic Committee, Curriculum Committee, Frater¬ 
nities and Sororities Committee, Honors Course Committee, Educational Policies 
Committee, Library Committee, Scholarships Committee, Student Affairs Committee, and 
Teacher Education Committee. It should be noted that none of these committees 
report to the Dean of the College (see Chart II) and that all of these are directly 
responsible to the President. All members of the committees are named by the 
President of the College and are appointed on an annual basis. The functions and 
responsibilities of individual faculty committees are not very clear. The faculty 
handbook carries the statement that the faculty "is given the responsibility of 
making decisions which involve the teaching program...Faculty committees are asked 
to make studies and report to the faculty..." 

After policies have been established, the administrative function is executed 
by the person with delegated responsibility. 


-7- 



























CHART II - POLICY-FORMING BODIES 


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Committee Committee 






































































































































































The College Catalog lists the following administrative officers: President, 

Dean of the College, Dean of the Faculty, Dean of Student Personnel Services, 

Dean of Women, Dean of Men, Campus Minister, Registrar, Admissions Counselor, 
Business Manager and Treasurer, Director of Development, Director of Church 
Relations, and Alumni Secretary. 

2. Organization for Teacher Education 

The Department of Education is one of the regular departments in the organi¬ 
zational framework of the institution. This department, as well as other depart¬ 
ments involved in Teacher Education, may make suggestions about various aspects 
of Teacher Education, but the Teacher Education Committee has the primary respon¬ 
sibility for the program's organization and for the development of policies. This 
committee, appointed by the President, is made up of representatives of several 
departments participating in Teacher Education and includes the Dean of the College 
and the Chairman of the Education Department. This committee has existed for a 
number of years, responsible for screening students for student teaching. The 
committee was given a greater scope of responsibility in September 1964, when it 
was given the responsibility to prepare the teacher education self study. Among 
the duties of the committee as listed in the self study are the following: 

a. Study and evaluate periodically the overall teacher education program 
and recommend to the faculty appropriate changes or actions. 

b. Review departmental recommendations for curricular changes that involve 
teacher candidates and make recommendations to the Curriculum Committee. 
Subject-matter courses are planned by the subject-matter departments; 
professional education courses are planned by the Department of Education 


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in consultation with the Teacher Education Committee; and methods courses 
are planned by the subject matter departments in consultation with the 
Teacher Education Committee and the Department of Education. Before 
acceptance into the curriculum, all courses involving teacher education 
must be considered by the Teacher Education Committee, the Curriculum 
Committee, and the faculty. 

c. Develop and supervise sound policies and procedures for the admission of 
students into the teacher education program, and make the final decisions 
in the screening of individual applicants. 

d» Develop and supervise policies and procedures for admission of students 
into the observation and student teaching phase of the program, and make 
decisions in the screening of individual applicants. 

e. Provide for the student and his adviser information pertinent to the proper 
scheduling of courses. 

f. Assist in the coordination of the various aspects of the teacher education 
program, including coordination among the departments involved in teacher 
education. 

g» Disseminate to the faculty and students all information pertinent to the 
teacher education program. 

The committee has kept minutes of its meetings since September, 1964. These 
indicate that the committee has played an active role in the admission of students 
into the Teacher Education Program. 

Suggestions related to Teacher Education may originate from any source in the 
administrative, faculty, or student areas of the College. 


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Such suggestions are referred to the Teacher Education Committee for study and 
consideration, Matters relating to courses in subject matter areas originate 
with the academic department involved and are presented to the Curriculum Committee, 
All recommendations of the Curriculum Committee are passed on to the faculty for 
action. 

It is anticipated that the registrar, under the general supervision of the Dean 
of the College, will have final responsibility for seeing that Teacher Education 
graduates are recommended to the state for certification purposes. The self study 
indicates that at the end of the program, each candidate for secondary teaching 
must have the approval of the chairman of the subject matter department and the 
chairman of the Department of Education, Elementary candidates require only the 
approval of the latter. 


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STANDARD II—STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 
A. College Admission 

The Admissions Counselor provides all students applying to Elon College with 
the College Catalog and necessary information about admission requirements and 
procedures. For admission., as a candidate for a degree 3 the applicant must be a 
graduate of an accredited four-year high school and satisfy the Committee on 
Admissions and Credits as to his intellectual, physical., emotional., social., and 
moral fitness to undertake academic work. 

Admission is based primarily on the high school record,, with recommendations 3 
test scores, and health certificate also required. There is no cut-off score required 
on any test. Predicted grade point averages are used as general guidelines in ad¬ 
mission. 

During freshman orientation week,, the College handbook is reviewed and freshmen 
are acquainted with the services provided through the Office of the Dean of Student 
Personnel Services, Also during the orientation program the various curricula are 
discussed and the students meet with faculty advisers from the various departments. 
Those planning to teach in high school meet with the major area advisers 3 ard those 
planning to enter elementary education meet with the advisers from the education 
department. 

It is planned that file cards will be filled out by students intending to enter 
the teacher education program at freshman registration. This procedure will give 
the Teacher Education Committee an immediate identification of these students and 
provide a mailing list which will be useful in keeping them informed of meetings 
and application deadlines. 

The Student National Education Association contacts prospective teacher candidates 


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during registration. During the freshman year, these students are invited to programs 
for teacher education majQrs and to meetings of the Student National Education 
Association, 

A Teacher Education Handbook, provided by the Teacher Education Committee, is 
planned to explain the policies, procedures, and curricula of the teacher education 
program. 

Department chairmen and advisers assist in identifying prospective teacher 
education majors through referral to the Teacher Education Committee. 

B, Data Considered by the Teacher Education Committee Regarding a Candidate's 

Admission to the Program 

1. Application form filled out by applicant. 

2. Summary sheet of college courses taken, grades from Registrar's Office, and 
cumulative average. 

3. Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores. 

4. Reference forms from student's faculty adviser, his department chairman, 
and one other faculty member or administrative officer. 

5. Evidence of physical and mental fitness, as determined by faculty members. 

In cases where physical or mental fitness is questionable, a recommendation 
form is required. 

C. Admission Policies and Practices in Teacher Education 

1. Policies 

For unconditional acceptance into the teacher education program, the student 
must have a 2.00 cumulative average (C=2.00) at the end of his sophomore year. 
Students whose cumulative average is below 2.00 may be conditionally accepted 
by vote of the Teacher Education Committee. 

Students may be continued in college on probation at the end of the sophomore 
year with a 1.5 cumulative grade point average. 


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During the spring semester,, 1965, the following actions on applications to the 
Teacher Education Program were taken: 


Accepted without condition 16 
Accepted conditionally 15 
Not accepted 9 
Decision delayed 1 

Total 41 


Table I presents a profile of the freshman class in the fall semester of 
1964-65o It will be noted that 22 percent of the students ranked in the upper fifth 
of their high school class and 55 percent ranked in the upper 40 percent. Table 2 
gives the average SAT scores for entering freshmen for five years, and shows an 
increasing average score each year since 1962. Table 3 gives the distribution of 
National Teacher Examination scores for the 1964 graduating class. The mean score 
for this group was 571. The mean for the 1965 class was 584, showing an increasing 
average score. 


TABLE I 

DISTRIBUTION OF HIGH SCHOOL CLASS RANK: 1964 FRESHMAN CLASS 


Fifth 

Number of 

Males 

Number of 

Females 

Total 

Percent 

Below 

1 

24 

53 

77 

77.55 

2 

56 

57 

113 

44.31 

3 

65 

32 

97 

16.33 

4 

34 

8 

42 

04.08 

5 

12 

2 

14 

00.00 

Totals 

191 

152 

343 



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TABLE II 


AVERAGE SAT SCORES: ENTERING FRESHMEN 


Year 

Verbal 

Female 

Math. 

Total 

Verbal 

Male 

Math. Total 

1961 

398 

389 

787 

378 

433 

811 

1962 

401 

400 

801 

380 

431 

811 

1963 

405 

408 

813 

392 

437 

829 

1964 

428 

429 

857 

402 

451 

853 

1965 

439 

441 

880 

418 

457 

875 



TABLE III 





NATIONAL TEACHERS 

EXAMINATION SCORES: 

1964 




Number 


Number 




Score 

Of Males 


Of Females 

Total 



700-749 



4 

4 



650-699 



2 

2 



600-649 

1 


6 

7 



550-599 

4 


9 

13 



500-549 

3 


7 

10 



450-499 

3 


3 

6 



TOTALS 

11 


31 

42 



Mean 




571 



1965 Mean 




584 



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The profile of the students who were accepted in 1963 as juniors to do 
student teaching in 1964—65 shows that 19 percent had M B n or better cumulative 
grade-point averages in their junior year. Thirty-four percent ranked in the 
upper fifth of their high school class. The areas of teaching of the graduating 
seniors in the program in 1964-65 are distributed as follows: 


Elementary Education 27 

Secondary Education 

Biology 1 

Commercial (Business Education) 5 

English 8 

French 2 

Mathematics 2 

Music 1 

Physical Education 8 

Social Studies 7_ 

Total 61 


The last group to finish the teacher education curricula, as this summary is being 
prepared, was the class of 1964. 

In a profile of 1963-64 graduates in the teacher education curricula, 56 percent 
came from the top fifth of their high school graduating class and 22 percent of them 
graduated from Elon College with a "B" or better cumulative average. Sixty-one 
percent scored at 550 or above on the National Teachers Examination. 


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North Carolina Stale Library 
2. Procedures Raleigh 

During the sophomore year, a meeting is held with prospective teacher 
candidates to explain application and evaluation for admission to the teacher 
education program. This is the first formal step made by the student in the pro¬ 
cedure for admission into the program. The student at this level, desiring 
admission into the program, obtains application and rating forms from the 
office of the Registrar and requests the Registrar to complete a summary sheet 
to be used in the evaluation of the student's application. The student com¬ 
pletes the application form and submits it to the chairman of the Teacher 
Education Committee by November 1 or March 1 of the semester immediately prior 

to the beginning of his junior year. 

The student also distributes rating forms to three faculty members or 
administrative officers who know him. One of these must be his department 
chairman. The persons completing these rating forms must submit them to the 
chairman of the Teacher Education Committee by November 1 or March 1 of the 
semester immediately prior to the student's junior year. The Teacher Edu¬ 
cation Committee then considers the application and the rating forms, inter¬ 
views the applicant, and determines his eligibility. Bases of determining 
the eligibility are as follows: 

a. Personal characteristics revealed in the evaluation forms and 
the interview between the committee and the applicant. 

b. Academic record of the applicant. 

(l) The summary sheet prepared by the Registrar must show 

that the student is making adequate progress in his chosen 
curriculum and in the general education requirements. 


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(2) The applicant must have by the end of his sophomore year 
a 2.00 cumulative average. 

(3) The applicant must have removed or made arrangements to remove 
any high school deficiencies (such as language or mathematics). 

The applicant, his adviser, and his department chairman are notified in 
writing about the results of the application. If the applicant is approved, 
any stipulations or conditions are noted in the communication. The applicant 
is provided with information regarding the remaining requirements of his pro¬ 
gram. (There are three types of notification: accepted without condition; 
accepted with condition; and not accepted.) Upon recommendation of the committee, 
those students not accepted may be advised to apply at a later date for admission 
into the program. 

Students who decide to become teacher candidates later than the usual time 
for admission to the program must follow the above steps. A transfer student 
at the junior level or above must apply during his first semester at Elon College 
and is limited to conditional acceptance until he has had two semesters of work 
at Elon. Further participation in the program will be dependent upon the satis¬ 
factory completion of the two semesters of work. A notice is included in the 
letter of acceptance from the college to any transfer student informing him 
of the necessity to file immediately a statement of intent to be in the teacher 

education program. 

A list of all students accepted into the teacher education program will be 
distributed to the faculty with the request that they observe the emotional, 


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moral, physical, and scholastic qualities of these students and report at 
any time to the Teacher Education Committee any questions or recommendations 
about these students. 

D, Scholarship Requirements and Qualifications for Retention in the Teacher 

Education Curricula 

Between the times of entering the program and student teaching and graduation, 
satisfactory academic progress must be maintained. The committee will review 
records at the end of each grading period. Notice will be taken of any action by 
the Academic Standing Committee. Students dropping below 2.00 will be dropped from 
the program and must reapply. Though a 2.00 cumulative average is required for a 
student's unconditional admission into the program, a 2.10 average in the teaching 
curriculum and a 2.10 cumulative average will be required for acceptance into 
student teaching for the 1966-67 class and thereafter. Before the beginning of the 
junior year, every student must complete six semester hours of B-quality work in 
the field he chooses for his major or have special permission from the head of the 
department before he is accepted as a major. An average grade of "C" (2.00) in 
the major field and a cumulative average of 2.00 are required for graduation, 
except that teacher candidates must have a 2.10 average in his major and 2.10 
cumulative average to be recommended for teacher certification. 

A student is admitted to the teacher education program with the understanding 
that his retention in the program will be allowed only if he maintains the required 
academic standings and demonstrates keen interest and professional attitude toward 
the field of teaching. 

Summary of the actions taken on applications for Student Teaching in 1964-1965 
on 1965-1966 seniors; 


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I»m i* in «ift .terua-J »d leum -.i. "uOutlcljuli 

































Accepted 


Elementary Education 18 
Physics 1 

Business Education 7 
English 6 
Home Economics 1 
Mathematics 2 
History and Social Studies 5 


Physical Education 

Girls 2 

Boys 8 

Spanish 2 

French 1 

Not accepted 2 

Postponed Decision 2 

Reapply (August, 1965) 6 

Total 63 


E. System of Records 

By the time the student is accepted or not accepted for student teaching, the 
student folder maintained by the Teacher Education Committee contains the following: 

1. Application to Teacher Education Program 

2. Summary sheet from registrar 

3. Rating forms from student's faculty adviser, his department chairman, 
and one other faculty member or administrative officer 

4. Evidence of physical and mental fitness 

5. Copies of correspondence to student from Teacher Education Committee 

6. Check list for student's major field 

7. All grades and cumulative averages 

8. Interview evaluation reports. 

9. Academic Standing Committee reports and Honor Court reports, if any 

10. Application for student teaching 

11. Student teaching evaluation sheets 


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The following records are kept in the student's folder in the Registrar's 
Office and are available to college officials only. 

1. Application for admission 

2. Temporary Grade Cards 

3. Statistical Cards 

4. Schedule Cards 

5. Individual Grade Cards 

6. Report on National Teacher Examination 

7. Permission for course work at other institutions 

8. Department Comprehensive Examination Report 

9. Official correspondence 

10. Graduate Record Examination Report 

11. Application for degree 

The student's permanent record card is kept in a locked file and is available 
to college officials only. Permission must be granted by the student for outsiders 
to see this record. 

The Dean of Student Personnel Services maintains a card file showing the 
student's photograph, the name of his adviser, date of entrance, College Entrance 
Examination Board scores, high school class rank, predicted grade point average, 
his present grade point average, date of withdrawal, and reason for withdrawal. 
These cards are tagged to show those who are on probation. A student folder is 
also kept in this office. It contains attendance reports, psychological tests 
taken, correspondence, and copies of any Student Government action. 


- 21 ' 































































In the office of the Dean of the College are kept the following: card file 
of academic standing, student folder containing all correspondence pertaining to 
any action regarding academic standing, Student Government action, Administrative 
Committee action, and Dean's List notification. This information is available only 
through permission of the Dean of the College. An Academic Standing List is provided 
for the faculty. 

F. Advisement and Counseling 

Freshmen students are assigned to advisers in their chosen areas. Teacher 
candidates are assigned to the Education Department if they are to be elementary 
education majors. Secondary education candidates are assigned to their major 
areas for advising. The Education Department is also informally in contact with 
these students. The advisers meet with their advisees by individual appointment 
several times during each semester and are present at registration time. The 
Registrar is available for assisting in academic advising. 

Counseling is also available for the students who desire help in choosing 
a vocation, or who have personal or social problems. The Dean of Student Personnel 
Services is in charge of the program of advisement and counseling and is assisted 
by the Dean of Men, Dean of Women, and the campus minister. 

The Dean of the College and the Registrar have special responsibilities for 
academic counseling. 

G. Placement Service 

The Placement Service is maintained in the office of the Dean of Student 
Personnel Services. Each senior is instructed early to distribute reference 
forms to three professors or administrative officers to be filed in this office. 


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Copies of these forms are sent to anyone upon request. Students are notified of 
job opportunities, and appointments are arranged for campus interviews. All students 
who file are processed for placement in this manner but all seniors are not required 
to file. Though it has not been determined how many students have been placed in 
teaching positions by the Placement Service, the office does assist many students in 
securing position. 

The survey of fall, 1964, indicated the follow-up of some of the 1964 graduates 
in Teacher Education as follows: 


Teaching 


Graduate School 

Elementary Education 

11 

1 

Secondary Education 

Commercial 

4 


English 

8 


Home Economics 

1 


Mathematics 

5 

1 

Physical Education 

6 


Social Studies 

1 


Total 

36 

2 

Follow-Up Program 

The College presently has 

a limited follow-up on its 

graduates. The Registrar 


contacts the teacher education graduates in the fall to see if they are teaching. 

In last year ! s graduating class, 68 students out of 156 (43.6 percent) had completed 
requirements for teacher certification. 

It is planned in the future to send out a survey questionnaire from the Teacher 


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Education Committee to the graduates as well as to their principals or supervisors. 

The National Teacher Examinations and Graduate Record Examination are both 
indicators of the success of the students and the program. The various departments 
are informed of these results to help them appraise their programs. 


- 24 - 








































STANDARD III—FACULTY 


A. PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FACULTY 

The professional education faculty (exclusive of those instructors in the 
subject matter areas who teach methods courses) are: 


TABLE 4 


PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FACULTY 


Full or 


Name 

Rank 

Degree 

Age 

Experience 

Part-time 

Arnold Strauch 

Prof. 

Chairman 

Ed. D. 

51 

Elem. level, 13 yrs. 
Second, level, 3 yrs. 

Full 

Virginia Epperson 

Assoc. 

Prof. 

M. Ed. 

47 

Elem. level, 3 yrs. 
Second, level, 7 yrs. 

Full 

Theo Strum 

Assoc. 

Prof. 

Ph. D. 

39 

Secondary teaching 
and admin., 16 yrs. 

2/5 

Howard Richardson 

Prof. 

Ed. D. 

61 

Elem. level, 8 yrs. 

Elem. Prin. 8 yrs. 

Second. Admin., 14 yrs. 

2/5 

J. C. Colley 

Prof. 

M. A. 

68 

Principal, 15 yrs. 

Supt., 8 yrs. 

1/5 

Allene Hassell 

Consul¬ 

tant 

M. Ed. 

63 

Elem. 14 yrs. 

Second., 20 yrs. 

2/5 


The teaching load in Table 4 is that portion of a normal teaching load devoted 
to professional education courses. Dr. Strum is also the Dean of Women; Dr. Richardson 
teaches English; and Professor Colley and Consultant Hassell are in partial retirement. 


Methods courses (2 semester hours each) are to be taught by the following in 
structors from the subject-matter areas: 


Name 

Rank 

Degree 

Subiect 

Secondary 

School Experience 

Betty Gerow 

Ass't. Prof. 

M. A. 

English 

10 yrs. 

Janie Council 

Ass't. Prof. 

M. A. 

Bus. Educ. 

10 yrs. 


25 - 
































. 








. 

. 

. 


































































(Continued) 


Frances Muldrow 

Prof. 

Ph. D. 

Languages 

5 yrs. 

Theo Strum 

Asso.Prof. 

Ph. D. 

Mathematics 

16 yrs. 

John Sanford 

Prof. 

Ph. D. 

Physical Educ. 

2 yrs. 

William Rich 

Ass'f.Prof. 

M. A. 

Science 

0 yrs. 

Alonzo Hook 

Prof. 

Sc. D. 

Science 

0 yrs. 

Charles Harper 

Ass't.Prof. 

Ed. D. 

History and 

3 yrs. 




Social Studies 


Malvin Artley 

Assoc.Prof. 

D.F.A. 

Music 

11 yrs. 

A full-time 

teaching load is 

considered 

to be 15 semester 

hours. The 

stated policy for the supervision 

of student 

teachers is that 

the supervision 

of four student 

teachers is the ei 

quivalent of three semester hours, and that i 


instructor may supervise more than 20 student teachers. The department chairman 
is now teaching 5 semester hours and supervising 9 student teachers. The other 
instructor teaching full time in professional education teaches 15 semester hours. 

There is no reduction in teaching load for committee assignments and other 
extra-curricular duties. 

At present class enrollments in professional education courses range from 
1 to 32. It appears that the education staff members have contact loads and 
student loads quite comparable to those of instructors in other academic areas. 

Within the past five years three instructors have been added to the professional 
education staff. These are Dr. Richardson, Dr. Strum, and Consultant Hassell. They 
total 80 years school experience. None of the three are full-time in professional 
education. Dr.Strum completed the Ph. D. while employed by the institution. 

No members of the professional education staff have been granted leaves for 
study or research during the past five years. The college does not have a policy 
of sabbatical leaves with pay. 


- 26 - 





























. 

















. . ' 




' . 







The College encourages travel to meetings of professional societies through 


financial support. 


The 

salary distribution 

of the total 

full-time teaching faculty for the 

academic 

year 1965-66: 




Rank 

No. 

Highest 

Lowest 

Average 

Professor 17 

$9,500.00 

$6,200.00 

$8,123.00 

Assoc. 

Prof. 

10 

$8,000.00 

$6,200.00 

$6,980.00 

Ass't. 
Prof. 

33 

$8,100.00 

$5,200.00 

$6,390.00 

Instr, 

2 

$5,600.00 

$5,200.00 

$5,400.00 


B. ACADEMIC FACULTY: BY AREAS 

Business Education 

Two full-time teachers and one half-time teacher teach only courses required 
of prospective Comprehensive Business or Basic Business, four teachers teach one 
course required of prospective business teachers, and two teachers teach two 
courses required of prospective teachers. 

The two teachers teaching required courses full-time hold the Master’s degree 
in business education; no teacher in the department holds the Doctorate; four who 
teach one or two required courses are currently working on doctorates. The part- 
time teacher holds a Master's degree. 

All teachers have had public school teaching experience and practical office 
experience. 

The part-time teacher carries a load of 10 hours; the two full-time teachers 
carry loads of 15 hours and 16 hours; and teachers teaching one or two required 
courses carry loads of 15 hours. 


— 27 — 






































































English 


There are 11 members of the English Department. Of these, four are part- 
time: one teaches two freshman sections and works also in the Department of 
Education; one teaches one course in Creative Writing; one teaches two English 
courses and acts as Dean of Men; one teaches Journalism, teaches also in History, 
and acts as Publicity Director for the College. Of the English faculty, one holds 
the doctoral degree. One holds the Ed.D. degree but has an M. A. in English also. 
One has only a graduate minor in English but has taken a total of 29.5 semester 
hours of graduate work in English and 6 semester hours in dramatic arts. One has 
no degree beyond the B. A. However, he is an artist-in-residence teaching only 
creative writing and is a published creative writer. Six hold the M.A. degree in 
English; one has the M.A. degree in Dramatic Arts. 

The regular full-time teaching load of English Department faculty members is 
15 semester hours per week, in accord with institutional policy. No load reduction 
is given to the English Methods teacher for her supervision of student teachers. 

Graduate transcripts are available for only one member of the English 
faculty. From inquiry, it would appear that one teacher is teaching three courses 
for which she has had less than 12 hours of graduate preparation. 

Modern Foreign Language 

The modern language faculty includes six full-time, one three-fifths time, 
and one two-fifth time members. Two hold the doctorate, two the master's degree 
of arts and one the Master of Education degree. One staff member has completed 
most of the course work for his Doctor's degree. 

The regular full-time teaching load is 15 semester hours. There is no 
reduction in load for administrative or institutional duties. 


28- 



















Mathematics 


There are two full-time, one four-fifths time and two two-fifths time 
faculty members in the Mathematics Department. In addition, there are two other 
people who teach sometimes in the department. Of the full-time teachers, one 
holds a master's degree in education and one has a master's degree in physics. 

Of the part-time teachers, one has a master's degree in mathematics, one has 
master's degree in education, and one has a bachelor's degree in mathematics. 

Of the two people who sometimes teach in the department, one has a master's degree 
in statistics and one has a doctorate in psychology and education with 21 semester 
hours of graduate mathematics. 

The regular full-time teaching load of the mathematics faculty is 15 
semester hours per week. 

Music 

There are six full-time faculty members in the Music Department including 
the chairman of the department, who is also Dean of the College. The chairman 
has limited teaching responsibilities within the Department. One faculty member 
holds the doctorate. Four hold the master's degree; one in education with music 
as the major area. 

The full-time teaching load of the Music Department faculty is within 
regional accreditation standards. All work with private students is either voice 
or instrumental. It appears that no faculty member is responsible for more than 
seven semester hours per week of regular class work. 

It was difficult to determine if all faculty members were teaching in their 
areas of preparation because transcripts were not available. It is possible that 
the professor who is responsible for the string program is teaching an elementary 
music methods class for which he has had limited preparation. 


-29- 














































- 















Physical Education and Health 


The faculty in the Department of Physical Education and Health includes one 
woman and five men. One man, the director of the department^ holds the doctorate 
and the other five hold master's degrees in physical education and health. The 
men members of the department, not including the director, are responsible for 
coaching the various intercollegiate sports. All of the staff members are full¬ 
time in physical education, health education, and athletics. During the season 
in which a staff member is coaching, his teaching load is somewhat reduced. 

The regular full-time teaching load is approximately 15 semester hours 
depending on the amount of other duties such as administration, directing intra¬ 
mural athletics, and coaching. 

Science 

There are nine full-time and two part-time faculty members who teach 
science courses that may be taken by prospective teachers. Of the nine full¬ 
time faculty members only six are full-time in the science departments, since 
one of them is the President, one the Dean of the Faculty, and one teaches 
part-time in mathematics. 

All science teachers, including the part-time instructors, have advanced 
degrees. Of the eleven science faculty members, three (all in chemistry) have 
earned doctorates and one an honorary Sc. D. Each of the others has a master's 
degree in the subject he teaches. 

Each science course is taught by an instructor who has appropriate graduate 
study for that course, except Geology 111-112. Geology is being taught by two 
very capable chemists, neither of whom has ever had formal instruction in 
Geology, even on the freshman level. 


-30- 
























































The normal teaching load for science faculty members ranges from 12 to 16 
semester hours, with some members regularly carrying 16. This means that the 
weekly contact load can be as much as 24 clock hours. The average number of 
contact hours per week is 20 clock hours. 

Social Studies 

There are eight full-time faculty members teaching in the area of social 
studies. Three faculty members from the Department of Economics teach Principles 
of Economics. Of the full-time social studies faculty, two hold the Ph. D., one 
holds the Ed.D., and five hold the M. A. degree. Of the members of the Department 
of Economics, one holds the M.B.A., one holds the M. A., and the other holds the 
M.A. with the course work completed for the Ph.D. in Economics. 

The regular full-time teaching load for teachers in the area of social studies 
is 15 semester hours per week, in accord with institutional policy. Reductions 
in teaching loads are given for administrative responsibilities and occasionally 
for academic undertakings such as study for the Ph.D. degree. 


-31- 







' 




























STANDARD IV—CURRICULA 


Elon College offers a four-year undergraduate program for the preparation 
of teachers in the area of elementary education and the following secondary 
school and special subject areas: business education, English, modern foreign 
languages (French and Spanish), mathematics, music, physical education ani health, 
science, and social studies. 

The total enrollment at the college for 1965-66 is 1,211 students, of whom 
211 are seniors; 70 seniors are preparing to teach. The following table gives 
data on enrollments in teacher education programs for the 1965-66 school year 
and the graduates meeting certification requirements for 1963-64 and 1964-65. 

TABLE 5 

Enrollment in Teacher Education 


Programs: 1965-66, 1964-65, 1963-64 



1965-66 

Seniors 

Juniors 

1964-65 

1963-64 

Elementary Education 

27 

23 

30 

13 

Secondary and Special 

Subject Areas 

Business Education 

8 

7 

6 

4 

English 

9 

23 

8 

8 

French 

1 

7 

2 

1 

Spanish 

2 

2 

0 

0 

Mathematics 

3 

3 

2 

6 

Music 

0 

6 

1 

0 

Physical Education 

12 

18 

9 

6 

and Health 

Science 

1 

4 

1 

0 

Social Studies 

7 

16 

9 

1 

TOTALS 

70 

109 

68 

39 

Each teacher education 

program requires a 

minimum of 

126 semester 

hours, in- 


-32- 
























































































































eluding general education, subject matter specialization, and professional education, 
A. GENERAL EDUCATION 

The program of general education comprises from approximately 50 percent to 
approximately 54 percent, or from 60 semester hours to 65 semester hours, of a 
basic four-year program. The variation depends upon the natural science courses 
included in the general education curriculum and additional requirements for 
prospective teachers. Prospective secondary teachers are required to have 63 
semester hours and prospective elementary teachers, 64 semester hours. Most of the 
general education program is completed during the first two years, but the program 
is not restricted to those two years. In some curricula there is some duplication of 
general education courses with individual major requirements. Each senior, except 
elementary education majors, is required to take a comprehensive examination in his 
major field, to make a required score on his advanced test of the Graduate Record 
Examination or, at the discretion of his major department, to write an essay. 

In all guidelines and analysis in this report, required courses are marked 
with an asterisk. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should assure that all teachers are able to read , 
write, and speak the English language clearly and effectively . 

In all departments of the college the faculty expects proficiency in use of 
the English language in oral reports and in written work. A laboratory course 
designed to increase reading speed and comprehension is offered without credit 


(English 15, Reading 

and Vocabulary Laboratory). 


■-■English 111 

Freshman English 

3 s.h. 

---English 112 

Freshman English 

3 s.h. 

■-'English 211 

English Literature 

3 s.h. 

-'English 212 

American Literature 

3 s.h. 


-33- 




















































GUIDELINE 2; The 

program should develop a critical understanding of and 

a 

sensitiveness to the aesthetic, philosophical, ethical, and imaginative values 

expressed in literature 

, art, music, religion, and philosophy. 


^-English 211 

English Literature 

3 s.h. 

--English 212 

American Literature 

3 s.h. 

-"-Fine Arts 211 

Introduction to Fine Arts 

3 s.h. 

-"-Six semester hours 

of religion from the following: 


Religion 111 

Survey of the Old Testament 

3 s.h. 

Religion 112 

Survey of the New Testament 

3 s.h. 

Religion 121 

Personal Religious Problems 

3 s.h. 

Religion 211 

Introduction to Literature of 



New Testament 

3 s.h. 

Religion 311 

The Development of Hebrew Thought 

3 s.h. 

Religion 321 

History of Religions 

3 s.h. 

Religion 331 

Philosophy of Religion 

3 s.h. 

Religion 351 

Between the Testaments 

3 s.h. 

Religion 361 

Contemporary Religious Life and Thought 

3 s.h. 

-"-Psychology 211 

General Psychology 

3 s.h. 


(Required only of teacher education 



candidates) 



-"-Twelve hours of foreign language from one of the following: 

French 211-212, Intermediate French ; French 311-312; Introduction to French 
Literature ; each course 3 s.h. 

German 211-212; Intermediate German; German 311-312; Advanced German each 
course 3 s.h, 

Latin 211-212, Intermediate Latin ; Latin 311-312; Introduction to Latin 
Literature ; each course 3 s.h. 

Spanish 211-212, Intermediate Spanish ; Spanish 311-312, Introduction ^ to 
Spanish Literature ; each course 3 s.h. 


-34- 














































































































The student who wishes to take the 12 semester hours in a language which 
he did not study in high school may fulfill the graduation requirement 
with 6 semester hours in the elementary course in that language, numbered 
111-112; followed by 211-212 in that language. 

The student entering without credit for two years of a foreign language 
in high school must take 18 semester hours, of which 12 must be in one 
language and 6 semester hours are non-credit. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should develop an understanding of the develop ¬ 
ment of world civilization, an understanding of the basic concepts of the social 
studies, and an understanding of democracy as a way of life . 

-“-All students must complete six semester hours of the following: 


History 111-112 


History of Western Civilization 

6 s.h. 

History 211-212 


American History 

6 s .h„ 

All students must 

choose 

six semester hours from the following: 


Economics 221,222 


Principles of Economics 

6 s.h. 

Geography 111 


Economic Geography 

3 s.h. 

Geography 211 


Principles of Geography 

3 s.h. 

Geography 221 


World Regional Geography 

3 s.h. 

Geography 311 


Geography of North America 

3 s.h. 

Geography 321--* 


Geography of Europe 

3 s.h. 

Political Science 

111 

Introduction to Modern Government 

3 s.h. 

Political Science 

311 

Parliamentary Procedure 

1 s.h. 

Political Science 

411 

Government in the United States 

3 s.h. 

Political Science 

421 

Political Parties 

3 s.h. 

Political Science 

431 

European Governments 

3 s.h. 

Political Science 

441--- 

International Relations 

3 s.h. 

Sociology 211 


Introductory Sociology 

3 s.h. 

Sociology 311' ::_;: ' 


Social Problems 

3 s.h. 


"-This course has a prerequisite. 


- 35 - 





















































































Sociology 321' ;; -“- 

Anthropology 

3 s.h. 

Sociology 411''*"“' 

Social Pathology 

3 s.h, 

Sociology 42l'“ _:; ' 

The Family 

3 s.h. 

Sociology 431'“ _ “- 

Educational Sociology 

3 s.h. 

Sociology 441'“-“' 

Industrial Sociology 

3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 4: The program should develop an appreciation and understanding 
of the structure of science, of scientific inquiry, and of the main scientific 

principles . 

The graduation requirements of the college include the completion by all 
students of one of the following: 12 semester hours in mathematics; two two- 
semester courses in natural science; one two-semester course in each of two 
natural sciences; one two-semester course in a natural science and 6 semester 
hours in mathematics; three semesters of science and one semester of mathematics; 
three semesters of mathematics and one semester of science. For the student in 
the teacher education program it is stipulated that this graduation requirement 
must be satisfied with mathematics and science courses and that laboratory work 


must be included in the science courses. 


'''Secondary teachers are required to take 8 semester hours chosen from the 


following: 


Biology 111-112 
Chemistry 111-112 
Geology 111 
Geology 112 


General Biology 
General Chemistry 
Physical Geology 
Historical Geology 


Physics 111-112 General Physics 

The elementary education program requires instead of the above 

“'Natural Science 171,172 A Survey of the Natural Sciences 

for Elementary Education Majors 


8 s.h, 
8 s.h. 
4 s.h. 
4 s.h. 
8 s.h. 


9 s.h. 


-36 



















































































GUIDELINE 5: The program should develop an appreciation of the structure and 


applications of mathematics . 

The students in the teacher education program are required to take mathematics: 

-^Mathematics 111 College Algebra 3 s.h, 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should develop the knowledge, habits, and attitudes 
necessary to achieve and maintain sound physical and mental health . 

---Physical Education 111,112 Physical Education 2 s.h. 

--Health 121 Personal Health 2 s.h. 

B. SUBJECT-MATTER PREPARATION 

Elementary Education 

The subject-matter preparation program for a prospective elementary school 
teacher includes approximately 40 percent of the basic four-year program. The 
program outlined below requires 65 semester hours of which 24 semester hours are 
included in the general education requirements. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide an understanding of the process of 
learning to read, to speak and to write the English language clearly and effectively, 
and should develop sensitiveness to and love and enthu siasm for good literature. 


-----English 211 

English Literature 

3 s.h. 

-----English 212 

American Literature 

3 s.h. 

--"English 371 

Children's Literature 

3 s.h. 


The required freshman English courses (English 111 and English 112) emphasize 
the use of oral and written language. Techniques in teaching reading are included 
in the professional education requirements, Education 473, Materials and Methods 
of Elementary Language Arts. Readi n g, and Social Sciences . 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide a k nowledge and understanding of 

-----Indicates courses included in general education requirements. 

-37- 


































































































































and eco nomic forces which operate in society; 
an under standing of government organization and functions: and an appreciation of 
the conservation of our natural resources. 


^-History 111-112 
'-"History 211-212 
-"Political Science 411 
-"-Geography 211 
-"-Geography 221 


History of Western Civilization 
American History 
Government in the United States 
Principles of Geography 
World Regional Geography 


6 Soh, 

6 s.h. 
3 s.h. 
3 Soh. 
3 Soho 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide a knowledge of basic physical and 
biological science content, and ability to plan a logical sequence of science 
experiences for the several grade levels o 


-"Science 171-172 


Survey of the Natural Sciences 
(Physical and Biological) for 
Elementary Education majors 


9 soh, 


GUIDELINE 4: The program should include study in mathematics which would 
involve consideration of the structure of the real number system and its subsystems 


and the basic concepts of algebra and informal geometry . 


-"-"Mathematics 111 


-"Mathematics 116 


College Algebra 


Basic Mathematics 


3 s.h. 


3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 5: The program should develop a sound philosophy of art education . 


appreciation of color and form, and creative ability in several art media . 


-"Art 271-272 


-"-"Fine Arts 211 


Art Education for Elementary Grades 


Introduction to Fine Arts 


6 s.h. 


3 s.h, 


GUIDELINE 6: The program should provide a background of music fundamentals . 
-"Music 271-272 Music in the Elementary School 6 s.h. 


- 38 - 










































































































































GUIDELINE 7: The program should provide understanding of both the 

health 


and physical needs of children at various grade levels. 



-^-Physical Education 371 

Methods and Materials of Teaching 
Games of Low Organization 

2 

s „h. 

-“-Physical Education 446 

Problems in Health Education 

3 

s .h. 

GUIDELINE 8: The program should provide an opportunity to develop 

a subject 

concentration,, 




English (15 semester hours) 




-“-“-English 111 

Freshman English 

3 

s »h. 

-“-“-English 112 

Freshman English 

3 

s .h. 

-“-“English 211 

English Literature 

3 

s .h. 

-“-“-English 212 

American Literature 

3 

s .h„ 

-"-English 371 

Children's Literature 

3 

s .h. 

History and Social Studies 

(21 semester hours) 



-“-“-History 111-112 

History of Western Civilization 

6 

s .h. 

-“-“-History 211-212 

American History 

6 

s .h. 

-“-Political Science 411 

Government in the United States 

3 

s .h. 

-“-Geography 211 

Principles of Geography 

3 

s .h. 

-“-Geography 221 

World Regional Geography 

3 

s .h. 


Foreign Language - 12 hours required 

Six semester hours of the 126 required for graduation may he devoted to further 


concentration in a subject-matter area. 

Secondary School and Special Sub.iect Areas 

Business Education 

The program of preparation for the prospective teacher in comprehensive 
business or basic business is approximately 38 percent of a basic four year 


- 39 - 



























































































program, consisting of 46 semester hours of course work. 

Comprehensive Business 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should assure job competency in secretarial and 
related office skills. 


-“-Business 

Education 113 

Shorthand 

3 

s.h 

-“-Business 

Education 114 

Shorthand 

3 

s.h 

-“'Business 

Education 312 

Advanced Dictation and Transcription 

3 

s.h 

-“-Business 

Education 117 

Typewriting 

2 

s.h 

-“-Business 

Education 118 

Typewriting 

2 

s.h 

“-Business 

Education 313 

Advanced Typewriting 

2 

s.h 

-“-Business 

Education 126 

Office Management 

3 

s.h 

-“-Business 

Education 131 

Office Machines 

1 

s.h 


GUIDELINE 2: The program should include study at the college level in the 
business areas identified as integral parts of the business education curriculum 


of the high school . 

-“-Business Administration 111 Mathematics of Finance 3 s.h 
^-Accounting 211-212 Principles of Accounting 6 s.h 
-“'Business Administration 311 Principles of Marketing 3 s.h 
-^Business Administration 316 Principles of Retailing 3 s.h 
-^'Business Administration 321 Business Law 3 s.h 
-“-Business Administration 326 Industrial Management 3 s.h 
-“-Economics 221-222 Principles of Economics 6 s.h 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide a culminating experience, bringing 
together theory, skills, and practice . 

Required are Business Education 312, Advanced Dictation and Transcription , 


- 40 - 


















, 




















































































and Business Education 313, Advanced Typewriting , in which methods for teaching 
these business subjects are studied and evaluated. In these terminal courses 
meaningful work is simulated, the future business teachers serving as instructors. 
It might be noted that in the professional education course Education 472a, 
Materials and Methods of Teaching High School and Business Education , training 
in this area is also given. Also required of the teacher candidate is partici¬ 
pation in on-the-job practice, in which local businesses cooperate in having the 
students spend a minimum of forty hours working in an office. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide sufficient preparation for later 
pursuit of graduate study . 

The course of study outlined under Guidelines 1, 2, and 3 gives a sound 
foundation for graduate study. 

A survey dated 1961 indicated that from five to ten percent of the teacher 
graduates were successfully carrying on graduate work. 

Basic Business 

Basic Business requirements would be satisfied by all the requirements for 
Comprehensive Business as given above with the following differences: 

1. Under Guideline 1 of Comprehensive Business the 9 semester hours of shorthand 
would be excluded. 

2. Nine semester hours of the Junior-Senior level would be required in business, 
economics, or accounting courses. 

NOTE A: All courses listed as meeting Guideline 1 would also be considered as 
meeting Guideline 2. 

NOTE B: Attention might be called to the requirement of Drama 221, Public 

Speaking , as an enrichment to the major in Business Education, although 
it is not required for graduation. 


-41 
































































NOTE C: The teacher program is strengthened by the requirement of participation 
in on-the-job practice. 


English 

The subject-matter preparation for a prospective teacher of English includes 
a total of 45 semester hours, or approximately 38 percent of a basic four-year 
program. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide specialized study at the college level 
in the areas of high school curriculum to be taught . 

Language: 

---English 111 Freshman English 3 s.h. 

Chiefly grammar and composition, with some introduction of structural linguistics. 
---English 112 Freshman English 3 s.h. 

Introduction to literature; a long paper; 
library skills. 


---English 331 

History of the language as 
^English 332 
Literature: 

--"■English 211 
--■English 212 
---English 321 
■-■English 326 
--■English 491 


Advanced Grammar 
well as principles of grammar. 
Advanced Composition 

English Literature 

American Literature 

Shakespeare 

World Literature 

Senior Seminar: Special Topics 


3 s.h. 

3 s.h. 

3 s.h, 
3 s ® h o 
3 s.h. 
3 s.h. 
3 s.h. 


-^Twelve hours from: 
English 311 


Studies in American Literature 3 s.h. 


- 42 - 















































































English 312 

Studies 

in American Literature 

3 

s.h. 

English 411 

Studies 

in English Lit. before 1660 

3 

s.h. 

English 412 

Studies 

in English Lit. 1660-1833 

3 

s.h. 

English 413 

Studies 

in English Lit. after 1833 

3 

s.h. 


-"-Three semester hours from: 

English 421 Studies in English & American Drama 3 s.h. 

English 426 Studies in English & American Novel 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should lead to an excellence in written and oral 

expression . 


---Drama 221 

Public Speaking 

3 s.h. 

English 331 

Advanced Grammar 

3 s.h. 

English 332 

Advanced Composition 

3 s.h. 


All advanced courses in literature do require acceptable writing, and the Senior 
Seminar may be a reading course, or it may involve a long research paper (senior essay). 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide study and training at the college level 
in the areas of reading . 

There is no course which specifically meets this guideline. The methods teacher 
indicates that a small amount of time is given to it in Education 472 (Methods course). 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should lead to a knowledge of the importance of 
libraries . 

English 112 includes training in use of the library for a research paper. 

English 491 Senior Seminar 3 s.h. 

Independent reading and library research 

Most of the advanced courses in literature require library work. 


- 43 - 






















































































GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide sufficient preparation for later 


graduate work in English . 

The aforementioned outlined program, in the 45 required hours, does provide a 
base for later graduate study in English. 

Modern Foreign Language 

The program of preparation for the prospective teacher in foreign language is 
approximately 25 percent of a basic four-year program, consisting of 30 semester 
hours of course work. The French and Spanish programs will be treated in turn as 
to the courses satisfying the various guidelines. 

French 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should include a thorough college-level study of 
the various aspects of the foreign language to be taught . 

-*The following courses are required in the indicated areas: 


Phonetics: 

French 

321-322 

Advanced French Conversation 
and Composition 

6 

s.h. 

Conversation: 

French 

211-212 

Intermediate French 

6 

s .h. 


French 

321-322 

Advanced French Conversation 
and Composition 

6 

s.h. 

Grammar and Composition: 





French 

211-212 

Intermediate French 

6 

s. h. 


French 

321-322 

Advanced French Conversation 
and Composition 

6 

s.h. 

Literature: 

French 

311-312 

Introduction to French Lit. 

6 

s.h. 


French 

411 

French Classicism 

3 

s.h. 


French 

491 

Senior Readings in French Lit 

3 

s.h. 


- 44 - 








































































. 


















- ;; -Six semester hours from: 


French 416 

French Literature of the 



Eighteenth Century 

3 s.bu 

French 421 

The French Novel 

3 s.h. 

French 426 

French Literature of the 



Twentieth Century 

3 s.h. 

French 331 

French Drama 

3 soh. 

GUIDELINE 2: 

The program should develop competency in the four skills 



understanding, speaking, reading, and writing . 

The following courses are required to afford the competericy called for by 
this guideline: 


-“-French 221-212 

Intermediate French 

6 s .h. 

-“-Frenth 321-322 

Advanced French Conversation 



and Composition 

6 s.h. 

^-French 311-312 

Introduction to French Literature 

6 s.h. 


The remaining 12 semester hours of literature courses required of the major 
increase the level of proficienty in the four skills which have been cultivated 
in these courses listed above. In the testing program use is made of nationally 
developed tests with standardized norms. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide for sufficient emphasis in language 
and analysis . 

The following courses are required of all majors with the purpose of fulfilling 
the requirements of this guideline: 

-“-French 321-322 Advanced French Conversation 

and Composition 6 s.h. 

It is possible for the prospective teacher to include study of a second 
foreign language in his program of electives. 


- 45 - 





























































































GUIDELINE 4: The program should include a study of the literature, history . 


and civilization of the country or countries concerned. 

^-Required of the prospective teacher is the following work in French literature: 


French 311-312 

Introduction to French Literature 

6 s.h. 

French 411 

French Classicism 

3 s.h. 

French 491 

Senior Readings in French 

Literature 

3 s.h. 

• ;: 'Six semester hours 

selected from the following: 


French 331 

French Drama 

3 s.h. 

French 416 

French Literature of the 

Eighteenth Century 

3 s.h. 

French 421 

The French Novel 

3 s.h. 

French 426 

French Literature of the 

Twentieth Century 

3 s.h. 


In the advanced course in French conversation and composition (French 321-322) 


a civilization reader is used as the basis of some of the oral work. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide sufficient preparation for the later 
pursuit of graduate work in the foreign language . 

\ 

As indicated under Guideline 4 , beyond the level of the survey course 12 
semester hours of course work of a more specialized nature are required since 
graduate study in a foreign language will deal to a large extent with literature. 
French 491, Senior Reading in French Literature , is designed to round out the 
preparation of the student for graduate study. 

Spanish 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should include a thorough college-level study of 
the various aspects of the foreign language to be taught . 


- 46 - 










































. 






















































































*-The following courses are required in the indicated areas: 


Phonetics: 


Spanish 321-322 

Advanced Spanish Conversation 
and Composition 

6 

s .h. 

Conversation: 

Spanish 211-212 

Intermediate Spanish 

6 

s.h. 

Spanish 321-322 

Advanced Spanish Conversation 
and Composition 

6 

s .h„ 

Grammar and Composition: 
Spanish 211-212 

Intermediate Spanish 

6 

s.h. 

Spanish 321-322 

Advanced Spanish Conversation 
and Composition 

6 

s. h. 

Literature: 

Spanish 311-312 

Introduction to Spanish 

Literature 

6 

Soho 

Spanish 411 

Golden Age Drama 

3 

s.h. 

Spanish 491 

Senior Readings in Spanish 
Literature 

3 

s.h. 

' x 'Six semester hours from the following: 



Spanish 331 

Modern Spanish Drama 

3 

Soho 

Spanish 416 

Cervantes 

3 

s.h. 

Spanish 421 

The Spanish Novel 

3 

s.h. 

Spanish 426 

Spanish-American Literature 

3 

s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program 

should develop competencv in four skills—i 



speaking, reading, and writing. 




The following courses are 

required in order to afford the competency 

called 

for by this guideline. 




-^Spanish 211-212 

Intermediate Spanish 

6 

s.h. 

-^Spanish 321-322 

Advanced Spanish Conversation 
and Composition 

6 

s.h. 


- 47 - 





































Introduction to Spanish 
Literature 


6 s .h 


^Spanish 311-312 

The remaining 12 semester hours of literature courses required of the major 
increase the level of proficiency in the four skills which have been cultivated 
in the courses listed above. In the testing program use is made of nationally 
developed tests with standardized norms. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide for sufficient emphasis in language 
analysis . 

The following courses required of all majors fulfill this guideline: 

■^Spanish 321-322 Advanced Spanish Conversation 

and Composition 6 s.h 

It is possible for the prospective teacher to include study of a second 
language in his program* 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should include a study of the literature, history . 
and civilization of the country or countries concerned . 

^Required of the prospective teacher are the following courses in Spanish 
literature: 

Spanish 311-312 Introduction to Spanish 

Literature 6 s.h 


Spanish 411 

Golden Age Drama 

3 s.h 

Spanish 491 

Senior Readings in Spanish 
Literature 

3 s.h 

'Six semester hours 

from the following: 


Spanish 331 

Modern Spanish Drama 

3 s.h 

Spanish 416 

Cervantes 

3 s.h 

Spanish 421 

The Spanish Novel 

3 s.h 


- 48 - 





























































































Spanish 426 


Spanish-American Literature 


3 Soho 


In the Spanish 321-322, Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition , a 
civilization reader is used as the basis of some of the oral work. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide sufficient preparation for the 
later purusit of graduate work in the foreign language . 

As indicated under Guideline 4, beyond the level of the survey course 12 
semester hours of course work of a more specialized nature are required since 
graduate study in a foreign language will deal to a large extent with literature, 
Spanish 491, Senior Readings in Spanish Literature , is designed to round out 
the preparation of the student for graduate study. 

Mathematics 

The subject-matter preparation program for a prospective teacher of mathematics 
at the secondary school level consists of a minimum of 30 semester hours, approximately 
25 percent of a basic four-year program. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should take into consideration the sequential nature 
of mathematics and should provide the prospective teacher an understanding of some 

of the aspects of mathematics which his students will meet in subsequent courses . 


■^Mathematics 

111 

College Algebra 

3 

s, h. 

"'Mathematics 

112 

Trigonometry 

3 

s .h. 

-"'Mathematics 

211 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry 

3 

s .h. 

-"'Mathematics 

212 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry 

3 

s „h. 

-"'Mathematics 

311 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry 

3 

s .h. 

■"'Mathematics 

312 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry 

3 

s .h. 










' 


























































GUIDELINE 2: The program of mathematics should include a thorough college - 
level study of the subjects in mathematics included in the high school curriculum . 


-“'Mathematics 

321 

Modern Algebra 

3 

s.h. 

-“'Mathematics 

326 

Linear Algebra 

3 

s.h. 

-“'Mathematics 

331 

Modern Geometry 

3 

s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should include additional upper-level work in 
mathematics, with courses chosen for their relevance to the high school curriculum , 

-^Mathematics 321 Modern Algebra 3 s.h. 

-“'Mathematics 411 Differential Equations 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should include work in areas related to mathematics , 

'“'Physics 111-112 General Physics 8 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should include sufficient preparation for later 
pursuit of graduate work in mathematics . 

The program outlined above is intended to fulfill this guideline. 

Required courses plus electives provide a base for subsequent graduate study 
in mathematics. 

Music 

The program preparation for the prospective music teacher includes 28 semester 
hours of course work plus 18 semester hours of applied music and 7 semester hours 
of choir and/or band. This represents a total of 53 semester hours or approximately 
44 percent of a basic four-year program. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide for a knowledge of the structural 
elements of music . 

'“"Music 111,112 The Materials of Music 8 s.h. 


-50- 




















































































--■Music 

211,212 

The Materials of Music 

8 

s.h. 

--Music 

311,312 

History of Musical Styles and 
Structures 

8 

s.ho 

--Music 

421 

Instrumental and Choral Arranging 

2 

s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide opportunities to acquire a sensitivity 
to and a critical awareness of aesthetic elements of musical performance . 

Music education majors are required to take a minimum of 18 semester hours of 
applied music and 7 semesters of choir and/or band. 

Each student must perform in his major area at least a half recital in public 
before graduation. 

Each student must perform for the music faculty four assigned selections which 
he has prepared independently, as well as demonstrate his proficiency in sight 
reading. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide a comprehensive understanding of music 
history and literature covering the various eras of mugic . 

---Music 311,312 History of Musical Styles and 

Structures 8 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide adequate training in teaching and 
conducting ensembles . 

---Music 321,322 Conducting 2 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should provide opportunities to acquire a functional 
command of the piano . 

Piano is required of all students unable to perform on this instrument. 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should provide a conception of comprehensive program 
of music based upon sound philosophy, and an under standing of what music to teach 
and how to teach it at any grade level . 


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“'Music 471,472 Music Education in Public 

Schools 6 s.h. 

Attention is given to teaching materials for the various instruments in 
woodwind, brass, string, and percussion classes. 

GUIDELINE 7: The program should provide sufficient preparation for the pursuit 
of graduate work in music . 

The requirements outlined above are intended to give this preparation. 

Physical Education and Health 

The program of preparation for the prospective teacher of physical education 
and health is approximately 40 percent of a basic four year program for men, con¬ 
sisting of 49 semester hours of course work, and approximately 40 percent for 


women, consisting of 47 or 48 semester hours of course work. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should lead to the development of principles 

compatible with current educational philosophy . 

• ;: 'Physical Education 211 Principles of Health and 

Physical Education 3 s.h. 

•“•Physical Education 421 Organization and Administration of 

Health and Physical Education 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should provide basic knowledge in the sciences . 

-“-Biology 111-112 General Biology 8 s.h. 

-“-Biology 221-222 Human Anatomy and Physiology 6 s.h. 

-“Physical Education 321 Kinesiology 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide for knowledge and competencies in 
regard to organizing, planning T administering, and evaluating the various aspects 

of the total program of physical education . 


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•^Physical Education 

421 

Organization and Administration of 
Health and Physical Education 

3 

tS o It o 

---Physical Education 

311 

Tests and Measurements in Health 
and Physical Education 

2 

s ©ho 

---Physical Education 

431 

Individual Physical Education 

2 

s oh* 

--Physical Education 

436 

Safety, First Aid, and Care of 
Athletic Injuries 

2 

Soho 


GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide knowledge of and skill in a wide 
variety of activities; ability to analyze motor skills; and knowledge of methods 

and materials in teaching and coaching . 

Required of both men and women is: 

---Physical Education 271 Methods and Materials in 

Teaching Games of High Organization 3 s.h. 

For men the following requirements are set up: 

---Two courses from the following, course 371 or 376 being required. 


Physical Education 

or 

371 

Methods and Materials in Teaching 
Games of Low Organization 

2 

s.h. 

Physical Education 

376 

Methods and Materials in Teaching 
Gymnastics, Tumbling and Stunts 

2 

s.h. 

Physical Education 

411 

Recreation Leadership 

3 

s.h. 

Physical Education 

471 

Methods and Materials of Rhythms 

3 

s.h. 

Two courses from the following (men only): 



Physical Education 

372 

Theory, Methods and Materials in 
Coaching Football 

2 

s.h. 

Physical Education 

373 

Theory, Methods and Materials in 
Coaching Basketball 

2 

s.h. 

Physical Education 

374 

Theory, Methods and Materials in 
Coaching Track and Wrestling 

2 

s.h. 

Physical Education 

375 

Theory, Methods and Materials in 
Coaching Baseball and Soccer 

2 

s.h. 


-53- 























. 

























































































For women are required the following: 
^Three courses from: 


Physical Education 

371 

Methods and Materials in Teaching 
Games of Low Organization 

2 

s.h. 

Physical Education 

376 

Methods and Materials in Teaching 
Gymnastics, Tumbling and Stunts 

2 

s.h. 

Physical Education 

411 

Recreation Leadership 

3 

s ,h. 

Physical Education 471 

Methods and Materials of Rhythms 

3 

s.h. 


In addition to the above specified course requirements, the major requires: 

(l) satisfactory completion of a motor skills test, (2) satisfactory parti¬ 
cipation in the intramural program, (3) participation in professional health and 
physical education activities to the satisfaction of the physical education faculty, 
and (4) for men, satisfactory participation in the intercollegiate athletic program. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should develop knowledge and understanding in the 
various aspects of healthful living . 

^Physical Education 121 Personal Health 2 s.h. 

-“-Physical Education 441 Personal and Community Hygiene 3 s.h. 

-“-Physical Education 436 Safety, First Aid, and Care of 

Athletic Injuries 2 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should develop competencies that will enable the 

teacher to plan or assist in planning and conducting programs of health services , 

healthful living, and health instruction . 

-“-Physical Education 421 Organization and Administration of 

Health and Physical Education 3 s.h. 

-“-Physical Education 436 Safety, First Aid, and Care of 

Atheltic Injuries 2 s.h. 

-“"Physical Education 446 Problems in Health Education 3 s.h. 


54 













































' 
















. 

























































GUIDELINE 7: The program should include sufficient preparation for later 


pursuit of graduate study in the area of physical education and health . 

The program outlined above is intended to fulfill this guideline. 

Science 

The program of preparation for the prospective science teacher includes a 
total of 48-57 s.h. or 40-48 percent of a basic four year program. A science 
teacher with a concentration in physics takes 48 s.h.; in chemistry, 55 s.h,; 
and in biology, 57 s.h. In each case the total is exclusive of the required 
mathematics. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should take into account the necessity of having 
a broad foundation in biological and physical sciences and mathematics . 


-“'Biology 111-112 

General Biology 

8 s.h 

■“'Chemistry 111-112 

General Chemistry 

8 s.h 

■“'Physics 111-112 

General Physics 

8 s.h 

-“'Mathematics 111 

College Algebra 

3 s.h 

-“■Mathematics 112 

Trigonometry 

3 s.h 


The following exceptions are made: 

The chemistry major preparing for certification in science may take 8 s.h. 
in either biology or geology. 

The physics major preparing for certification in science may take 8 s.h. in 
two of the following: biology, chemistry, or geology. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should have depth in at least one area of science , 
with courses chosen for maximum relevance to the high school scien ce curriculum. 


-55- 





























































































Biology Concentration 


---Biology 211-212 

•’'"Biology 326 
--Biology 491-492 
-Chemistry 311-312 
---Eleven semester hours 
Biology 311 
Biology 316 
Biology 321 
Biology 331 
Biology 336 
Biology 441 

---Chemistry 311-312 
--Chemistry 411 
---Chemistry 421-422 

--Chemistry 431-432 
---Chemistry 491-492 
---Mathematics 211 
---Mathematics 212 
---Mathematics 311 

--Physics 306 
-Physics 311-312 


Comparative Vertebrate 

Anatomy Embryology 

8 

s .h. 

General Botany 

4 

s.h. 

Seminar 

2 

s.h. 

Organic Chemistry 

8 

s.h. 

Biology selected from the following: 



Bacteriology 

4 

s oh. 

Physiology 

4 

s.h,. 

Invertebrate Zoology 

4 

s.h. 

Field Zoology 

4 

s . h. 

General Ecology 

4 

s.h. 

Genetics 

3 

s.h. 

Chemistry Concentration 



Organic Chemistry 

8 

s.h. 

Inorganic Chemistry 

3 

s.h. 

Fundamentals of 

5 

s.h. 

Analytical Chemistry 

each term 

Physical Chemistry 

8 

s.h. 

Senior Seminar in Chemistry 

1 

s.h. 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry 

3 

s.h. 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry 

3 

s.h. 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry 

3 

s.h. 

Physics Concentration 



Atomic Physics 

4 

s.h. 

Electricity and Magnetism 

8 

s. h. 


-56- 












































































































^Physics 411,412 

Mechanics 

6 s.h. 

^Physics 421 

Thermodynamics and 

Statistical. Physics 

3 s.h. 

-“-One additional course 

in Physics 

3-4 s.h. 

•^Mathematics 211 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry 

3 s.h. 

-“Mathematics 212 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry 

3 s. h. 


Suggested for those planning to attend graduate school and/or for those 


preparing to be certified are: 

Mathematics 311 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 3 s.h. 
Mathematics 312 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 3 s.h. 
Mathematics 321 Modern Algebra 3 s.h. 
Mathematics 326 Linear Algebra 3 s.h. 
Mathematics 331 Modern Geometry 3 s.h. 
Mathematics 411 Differential Equations 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should include a sufficient basis and preparation 
for later graduate study in a particular science area . 

The above program in science is intended to prepare the student for later 
graduate study in a particular science area. 

Social Studies 

The program of preparation for the prospective teacher in social studies is 

approximately 40 percent of a basic four-year program, consisting of 48 semester 

| 

hours of course work. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide a study in depth, at the college level , 
of courses included in the high school curriculum. 


-57- 


























































































-^-History 111-112 


History of Western Civilization 


6 s.h. 


-''-History 211-212 American History 6 s.h. 

*-An additional twelve hours of history courses 12 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should take into account the necessity of having 


breadth in the social studies . 

-^-Economics 221,222 Principles of Economics 6 s.h. 
-"-Geography electives 6 s.h. 
-"-Political Science electives 6 s.h. 
-"-Sociology electives 6 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should enable the prospective social studies teacher 
to pursue graduate study in one or more areas in the field of the social studies. 

The program is designed to provide adequately for later graduate work in 
history. 

C. PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

The pattern of professional courses for those preparing to teach in the 
elementary school is very similar to the pattern for those preparing to teach 
in the secondary school. 

For those preparing to teach in the elementary schools, the total identified 
as professional courses total 24 semester hours. This is approximately 20 percent 
of a basic four—year program. There are six courses carrying credit of 16 semester 
hours listed as content courses, yet include methods or/and materials in the course 
title or catalogue description. 

For those preparing to teach in the secondary schools, the total identified 
as professional courses total 22 hours. This is approximately 18 percent of a basic 
four—year program. Music majors are required to complete an additional 2 hours, 


-58- 




































' 















































but are then certified to teach music in grades 1 through 12. 


GUIDELINE 1: The professional education program should provide an understanding 
of the normal sequences of human growth and development, with special emphasis 
on the pupils of the school age to be taught . 

Elementary: 

--'Psychology 321 Psychology of Childhood 3 s.h. 

Secondary: 

---Psychology 331 Psychology of Adolescence 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The professional education program should provide an understanding 
of the nature of learning, the learning process, and the psychology of learning . 
Elementary: 

---Psychology 311 Educational Psychology 3 s.h. 

Secondary: 

---Psychology 311 Educational Psychology 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The professional education program should provide an understanding 
of methods, special techniques, and materials appropriate to the specific levels 

or areas of the prospective teachers subject-matter concentration, and skill in 
applying them in a classroom situation . 

Elementary: 

---Education 473 Materials and Methods of 

Language Arts, Reading and 

Social Studies 3 s.h. 

--'Education 474 Materials and Methods of 

Elementary Mathematics and 

Science 3 s.h. 

The following courses appear to contribute to Guideline 3 but are classified 
as subject matter preparation: 


-59- 







































































































-Art 271,272 Art Education for Elementary 

School 6 s.h. 

---Music 271,272 Music in the Elementary School 6 s.h. 

---Physical Education 371 Methods and Materials in Teaching 

Games of Low Organization 2 s.h. 

--Physical Education 446 Problems in Health Education 2 s.h. 

Secondary: 

---Education 471 Materials and Methods of 

High School Teaching 2 s.h. 

---Education 472 Materials and Methods of 

Teaching 'Secondary Major' 2 s.h, 

#Exception Music Majors Must take Music 471-472 

Music Education in the Public School 6 s.h, 

GUIDELINE 4: The professional education program should provide an understanding 

of the purpose, organization, and administration of school systems, with special 

emphasis on the role of the school teacher in the total education program . 

Elementary: 

Education 211 Introduction to Education 3 s.h. 

Secondary: 

Education 211 Introduction to Education 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The professional education program should provide a broad historical , 
philosophical, and sociological orientation to schools in our society and to the 

profession of teaching . 

Elementary: 

---Education 311 Foundations of Education 3 s.h. 

Secondary: 

-Education 311 Foundations of Education 3 s.h. 


- 60 - 















































' 











































































GUIDELINE 6: The professional education program should provide an extende d 


period of continuous full 

subjects to be taught . 

Elementary: 

---Education 481-482 

Secondary: 

--Education 481-482 


time student-teaching experience in the grade levels or 


Supervised Observation and 

Student Teaching 6 s.h. 


Supervised Observation anl 

Student Teaching 6 s.h* 


- 61 - 











































STANDARD V—PROFESSIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIENCES 


A. PURPOSES AND OBJECTIVES 

The avowed purposes of the program of professional laboratory experiences are 
(1) to give the prospective teacher the opportunity to perform the tasks of a teacher 
under the guidance of an experienced teacher, (2) to acquire under real conditions 
an understanding of the fundamental teaching-learning process, and (3) to develop 
skills in directing the learning experiences of boys and girls. 

B. LABORATORY EXPERIENCES PRIOR TO STUDENT TEACHING 

The College's programs of pre-stildent teaching experiences differ for students 
in elementary and secondary teacher education. 

In Physical Education 371, Methods and Materials in Teaching Games of Low 
Organization and in English 371, Children's Literature , elementary education 
majors go to the Elon College Elementary School and work with pupils. Each 
student plans, organizes, and teaches nine to 12 hours of physical education under 
the supervision of a teacher in the elementary school and the college staff member 
who teaches Physical Education 371. In Children's Literature , each student teaches 
eight to ten hours of prose and poetry under like cooperative supervision. 

The student preparing for high school teaching spends a minimum of two days 
at the school in which he will do student teaching, studying the community which 
the school serves, the school, the student body, the guidance program, and the 
school's extra-curricular activities. He also does directed observation in three 
classes and interviews three students he will teach. 

In the methods courses the student studies and prepares lesson plans, in¬ 
vestigates curriculum studies, testing materials, and various textbooks and 
materials used in his field. 


- 62 - 





























' 

. 

■ 


. 































At the beginning of the eight-week period of observation and student teaching, 
the student has from one to two weeks of full-day observation and contact with the 
students and the teaching environment before he begins to teach. 

C. ORGANIZATION FOR THE ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF STUDENT TEACHING 

The student teaching program is administered by the Director of Student 
Teaching, who is responsible for making arrangements with public school adminis¬ 
trative units to accept student teachers, assigning students to the several ad¬ 
ministrative units, assigning Department of Education members to supervise the 
students, and overseeing the functioning of the program. From one to four supervisors 
from the Department of Education are scheduled each semester to work with student 
teachers. 

Most of Elon's students preparing to be teachers do their student teaching in 
the Alamance County and Burlington City units. A few on occasion go to Hillsboro, 
Reidsville, and Guilford County. There is no contractual basis nor formal agreement 
with superintendents for the utilization of these units. 

The public school supervising teacher is oriented to the student teaching 
program and the student teacher is oriented to the school in three steps. First, 
the college supervisor gives the principal and teachers orientation material for 
study. Second, the college supervisor returns to the public school a few days later 
to discuss the student teaching program with the principal and the supervising 
teachers. And third, the college supervisor takes the student teachers to the 
school several days prior to the student teaching period for the purpose of their 
meeting the school personnel and the students they will teach and becoming acquainted 
with the school plant and the school program. 


- 63 - 






























































































D. STUDENT TEACHING PROGRAM 


1. Criteria for admission to and retention in student teaching 

During the last term of the student's junior year, after he has been admitted 
into the teacher education program, the student must complete an application form 
for student teaching and rating forms obtained from the Office of the Registrar 
or the chairman of the Teacher Education Committee. 

The application form must be submitted to the Teacher Education Committee 
by April 1 preceding the year of intended participation in the student teaching 
program. Three rating forms must be completed and submitted to the Teacher Education 
Committee by the same date. One rating form must be submitted by the student's 
department chairman and the others by faculty members and/or administrative officers. 

After notifying the applicant, the Teacher Education Committee interviews the 
applicant. Upon consideration of the applicant's scholastic record, the rating 
forms, and the results of the interview, the Teacher Education Committee determines 
whether the applicant will be approved for the observation and student teaching 
phase of the program. 

The following criteria must be met by the applicant before approval for 
student teaching can be granted: 

a. Senior classification (by time student teaching semester begins) 

b. An academic average of at least 2.10 (above "C") in the major 
field and a 2.10 cumulative average 

c. No high school deficiencies (foreign language and/or mathematics) 

d. Recommendation by the applicant's department 

e. Demonstration of appropriate professional attitudes and interest in 
teaching 

f. Physical and emotional fitness 


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After the student's application has been evaluated,, the Teacher Education 
Committee notifies him in writing of its action, A student is permitted to remain 
in the program as long as he maintains the above standards and demonstrates 
satisfactory progress. 

For 1964=65, 63 applied for student teaching, 53 were accepted, eight postponed, 
and two not accepted, 

2. Credit Involved and Finances 

The student receives six semester hours of credit for observation and student 
teaching. There is no student teaching fee even though supervising teachers are 
paid $25,00 for each student supervised, 

3, The number of weeks, number of days per week, and number of hours per day 
devoted to student teaching 

Observation and student teaching consists of eight weeks of full-day experiences. 
Students preparing for high school teaching may take these experiences during the 
last half of either the fall or spring semesters. The opportunity is limited to 
the spring for those preparing to become elementary teachers. 

In the beginning, the student teacher observes far one or two weeks; and, 
whenever possible, observes classes in addition to those of his supervising teacher. 
The student teacher and the supervising teacher then decide what the first teaching 
experience will be. When sufficient proficiency is recognized, a second teaching 
duty is added, then a third, and so on. Gradually, the student's load is increased 
until he is responsible for the full day. Supervising teachers are asked that the 
student be made responsible for full-time teaching duties for at least two weeks. 

Each student teaches a minimum of 90 hours over the eight-week period. 


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In addition to teaching, the student's activities include such responsibilities 
as keeping the register, doing bus duty, making out lunch room reports, and attending 
faculty and P. T. A. meetings. 

At the completion of the eight-veek period, the students meet on campus with 
the college supervisor for two days to reflect, clarify, and summarize the experiences, 

4, When student teaching is ,done 

Student teaching is done during the student's senior year. The student must 
be expected to graduate in May or August of a given year before he can be approved 
to do student teaching during that year. 

5. Amount of supervision by the college and ratio of college supervisory staff 
to number of student teachers 

Supervisory assignments in relation to full-time faculty duties are based on 
an approximate ratio of one college supervisor to 20 students. At the secondary 
level, additional supervision is given by the student's major department. 

Department of Education supervisors visit each student teacher at least four 
times and the major department supervisors visit at least twice. After each ob¬ 
servation the supervisor discusses the student's progress with the supervising 
teacher and consults with the student regarding the strengths and weaknesses of 
his teaching. These individual meetings may be supplemented by group meetings 
at the discretion of individual supervisors. 

6. Number of student teachers accepted to a supervisory teacher 

Only one student teacher is ever assigned to a supervisory teacher at a given 

time. 

7, Place of student teaching in professional education sequence 

Student teaching is normally the last requirement to be fulfilled in the 


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professional education sequences However, it is sometimes necessary for a student 
to take one professional education course during the summer session following his 
student teachings The methods courses always precede the student teaching phase,, 

E. CRITERIA FOR SELECTING OFF-CAMPUS COOPERATING SCHOOLS 

Students are assigned only to public schools accredited by the North Carolina 
State Department of Public Instructions Most of these schools are also accredited 
by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. 

F. SUPERVISORY PERSONNEL IN COOPERATING SCHOOLS 

In assigning student teachers, the Director of the program makes requests to 
the superintendents of their assigned aides, who work with the principals in finding 
teachers suitable as supervisors and willing to accept student teachers. Only teachers 
with a minimum of a North Carolina "A" certificate and with two or more years of 
successful teaching experience are selected. 

G. METHODS USED TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PROFESSIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIENCES 

The student teaching program is evaluated (1) by the college supervisor every 
time he visits the school, talks to school personnel concerning the student teachers, 
or consults with the public school students and/or the student teachers; (2) through 
a projective method of evaluation by the student teachers; (3) through evaluations 
of the student teachers made by the supervising teachers; and (4) through the follow¬ 
up study of teacher graduates. 

H. CHANGES CONTEMPLATED IN THE PRESENT PROGRAM OF PROFESSIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIENCES 

No definite changes are contemplated at the present time; however, the total 
program will continue to be under study. 


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STANDARD VI—FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND MATERIALS 
A. OFFICES AND CLASSROOMS FOR PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

Private offices are provided for five of the six faculty members of the 
Department of Education-Psychology. Two offices are located in the Carlton 
Library Building, one on the second floor and one on the third floor. Two 
offices are located in the South Building, a temporary frame building used since 
World War II. The fifth departmental faculty member has her office in Alamance 
Building, the administration building, where she is provided an office as Dean 
of Women. The sixth faculty member who is new and not teaching during the fall 
will be assigned an office for the spring. 

There are thirteen classrooms assigned for professional education classes, 
none exclusively. Eight of the classrooms are in Alamance Building, seven with a 
seating capacity of forty-two and one with a capacity of sixty-six. The Curriculum 
Laboratory and an adjacent classroom located on the third floor of the library are 
used for smaller groups. One classroom is located in Mooney Building, one in the 
Duke Science Building, and one in the gymnasium, each with a seating capacity of 
thirty to thirty-five. Most of the classrooms used outside of the Alamance Building 
are used for methods classes taught in various academic departments. 

One room on the second floor of the library is used for remedial and diagnostic 
work in reading. Two rooms on the third floor of the library are used for seminars 
and small groups. 

Rooms equipped for audiovisual materials are found in the Business Education 
Department, on each floor of the Science Building, in the Language Department, in 
the gymnasium classroom, and in Mooney Theatre. 


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Secretarial and duplicating services are provided through a campus-wide 
faculty secretary assisted by a student helper for fifteen hours per week, The 
secretary cuts stencils, duplicates materials, and takes dictation and types corre¬ 
spondence for department chairmen and other designated faculty members. Other 
faculty members may prepare stencils which they can have run. off on the duplicating 
and mimeograph machines in the secretary's office. In addition the Department of 
Education-Psychology has the services of one student for fifteen hours per week. 

The student serves the chairman, one member of the Department, and a member of the 
English Department, The Dean of Women has a student helper in her capacity as dean, 
B. LIBRARY RESOURCES 

The library resources are housed in the Carlton Library Building, The library 

has a staff of three full-time professionals, one full-time secretary, one full- 

s' 

time clerical helper, two part-time helpers, and an average of six student helpers 
for fifteen hours per week. One student is on a special scholarship, A large 
reading room serves as a combination reading-reference room. Special features 
include a microfilm reader, open stack privileges,, and a special Church History 
collection. The special collection is served by a full-time person. 

As of the spring of 1965 holdings include approximately 61/D00 volumes of which 
approximately 3,600 are professional education books. The professional collection 
does not include any of the holdings of the Curriculum Laboratory, 

The approximate breakdown of the professional education books is as follows: 


Psychology 


General Psychology 
Child Psychology 
Adolescent Psychology 
Personality Development 
Educational Psychology 


484 

125 

40 

45 

170 


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Education 


History, Philosophy, Theories 

Curriculum and Methods 

Elementary Education 

Adm,, Personnel and Teaching 

Secondary Education 

Adult Education 

Evaluation 

Guidance and Counseling 
Encyclopedias of Education 
Educational Sociology 
Legal Aspects of Education 


365 

740 

300 

275 

200 

80 

75 

no 


55 

195 


6 


In addition to the above listings, there are methods and evaluation books 
catalogued in each subject area, and yearbooks, conference reports, association 
proceedings, etc. 

The library regularly receives 325 periodicals and magazines. Of these 64 
are in or related to professional education. 

The library houses a number of audiovisual aids and materials which are used 
by all departments. These are as follows: 


1 ijenoyer-Geppert Cartocraft Physical-Political Globe (24 inches) 
1 Library Globe (12 inches) 1934 Replogle Globes, Inc., Chicago 
231 Maps (flat maps and maps on rollers) 

1785 Mounted pictures 

12 Framed pictures (art works) 

231 Filmstrips 

2394 Phonorecords: 1 religion, 2 government, 17 language, 1 typing, 

2347 music (classical and semi-classical), 2 musical plays, 

23 literature, 1 history 

443 Color slides (art and sculpture) 

180 Reels of microfilms 

1 3M Brand Dry Photo-Copier 


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1 Recordax, Microfilm Reader, Model MPE 196.1 

1 Overhead Projector (Projex 101.0, Serial No. D-4019), 1963 

1 Opaque Projector (Vu~Lyte, Charles Beseler Company, Serial No. 
G-2613) "Aged” 

1 Viewlex slide and filmstrip projector (manual change) 

Model V-220 "Aged" 

1 Graf lex, Model. 101, slide and filmstrip projector (auto¬ 
matic filmstrip changer), 1963 

1 Beaded screen (on tripod) 

In addition there are other audiovisual aids and materials housed in the 
Language Department, the Business Education Department, the Music Department, the 
Dramatics Department, the Health and Physical Education Department, the Science 
Department, the Mathematics Department, and the Art Department, 

The library expenditure for professional education during the 1964-65 
school year was $1,604 or approximately 11.5 percent of the total book budget. 

The expenditure represents $971 spent for education and psychology books and 
$633 for materials for the Curriculum Laboratory, The library budget for books 
has been increasing annually for several years. The expenditure for the Curriculum 
Laboratory is a new one which was made to secure materials to start the laboratory. 
Requests from departments for books and materials are supplemented by the 
library staff from a part of the book budget set aside for this purpose and for 
special needs resulting from revisions of the curriculum and the addition of new 
courses. Expenditures for methods books come largely from the departments of the 
academic subjects responsible for the methods courses, 

C. CURRICULUM LABORATORY 

The Curriculum Laboratory is located on the third floor of the library. The 
room contains approximately 400 square feet of space and is equipped with two filing 









































































































cabinets* shelving covering most of two sides of the room* four tables* twe.nty~.four 
chairs* desk and chair for attendant* typewriter* copying machine* catalog file* 
and bulletin board, Funds as needed are being spent from the library budget to 
start the laboratory. It is anticipated that an annual budget will be established 
in the future. 

The laboratory is served by two students who are under the supervision of a 
faculty member of the Department of Education-Psychology, The faculty member is 
also responsible for the purchasing and ordering of materials. The laboratory is 
kept open Monday through Friday three hours in the afternoon and two and one-half 
hours during the evening, with an additional morning hour on Wednesday and Friday, 
The most current methods books are catalogued by the main library staff and loaned 
to the Curriculum Laboratory, Laboratory holdings are catalogued alphabetically 
according to subject area on cards kept in a file in the laboratory. 

The Curriculum Laboratory houses 400 textbooks* 1.00 methods books* 76 teachers 
manuals, 129 curriculum guides* 56 parallel reading books* and 65 workbooks. In 
addition to these items there are a number of pamphlets on such subjects as pro¬ 
grammed materials, teacher certification requirements of several states* and 
other areas of interest to the student teacher. Provided also is a file listing 
free materials (printed matter* filmstrips* films* recordings* and tapes) indexed 
according to subject areas and grade levels. The laboratory contains current text¬ 
books adopted for use by the North Carolina public schools and additional books 
from the supplementary lists, Sampl© copies of specimen sets of the most commonly 
uses standardized tests are on file. These tests include interest inventories* 
aptitude and achievement tests* and group and individual intelligence tests. 

Curriculum study guides and courses of study are available in all of the areas 


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in which Elon College certifies teachers. Most of the guides prepared by the 
North Carolina Curriculum Committee are available. Also provided are leaflets, 
pamphlets, and sample units in most of the subject areas. 

Audiovisual aids and materials kept in the laboratory are an overhead 
projector, a transparency copy maker with film and master units, a 16 mm film 
projector, and 28 record albums, 

D, CONTEMPLATED CHANGES 

By the fall of 1966 the first floor of Mooney Building will be renovated to 
include the Curriculum Laboratory, an audiovisual equipment center, a projection 
room, a storage room, a viewing room with seating for approximately 100, a workroom* 
and a classroom for professional courses. 

By the same date the Duke Science Building will have been completely re- 
novated to include new furniture, a science library, a seminar room, and additional 
classrooms, 

Plans are presently underway for a new library building to seat 600 students 
and provide stack space for 150,000 volumes. Upon completion of the new student 
center scheduled also for the fall of 1966, additional seminar and listening rooms 
will be available. 

A renovation of the classrooms in the Alamance Building is planned. 

E. FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND MATERIALS: BY AREAS 

Business Education 

Three classrooms, equipped with desks, chalkboards; appropriate desks, tables, 
and chairs; electrical outlets, filing and storage space; bulletin boards and 
display media, are available in Alamance Building. 


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All staff members have private offices except one who teaches in only one room 


which serves as her classroom and her office» 

Equipment : 

Overhead projector 

a. Transparencies for statistics and accounting courses 
Wall charts 

a» Bookkeeping and accounting 
b„ Typewriting keyboard 
Co Parts of typewriter 

Flannel board 

a, Flannel graph materials for marketing, retailing, and management 
Record player 

a. Records for typewriting 
bo Records for shorthand 


Machines 


a. Mimeograph 
bo Ditto 

c, Papercutter 

d, Six dictation and transcribing machines 

e, Speed-o-scope 

fo Sixty typewriters—manual and electric 
g. Computing machines 
Seven Comptometers 
Ten full keyboard adding 
Five 10-key adding 


Materials 


a. High school texts 

bo Methods texts and aids 

Co Professional periodicals 

do Bulletin board materials 

e o Office equipment and suppliers brochures 

The library resources are available with supplementary text books, and 
supplementary resource material pertinent to this training= The newly established 


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Curriculum materials division of the library has a collection of high school 
business texts and pertinent methods materials. 

English 

English classes are held in four different buildings, all satisfactorily 
equipped. Seven faculty members have private offices. Two offices house the 
other four. 

Audio-visual materials particularly applicable to the English Department include 

1. A total of 23 recordings: 

a. Recordings of a number of Shakespeare's plays 

b. Recordings of poetry and prose 

2. There is no record player for the English Department. 

3. An overhead projector is available to the department. 

4. A few transparencies on language are in the Materials Laboratory. 

5. A record player for the Dramatics Department. 

6. Two tape recorders for the Dramatics Department. 

The central library contains a minimally adequate but growing collection of 
books and periodicals. There are very few bound periodicals in the area of English. 

Modern Foreign Language 

The classrooms and offices and the language laboratory of 28 booths are all 
located on the third floor of the Mooney Building. 

The department possesses a good collection of disk and tape recordings, slides 
and filmstrips. 

The central library contains a small collection of books in foreign languages 
including a considerable number of works in translation. The library subscribes to 
the principal professional language journals. 


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Mathematics 


Four classrooms 3 equipped with tables or desks, lecterns, chalkboards, 
and electrical outlets are used by the Mathematics Department jointly with the 
physics and other departments. These classrooms are located in the science 
building and in the Alamance Building, 

The acting departmental chairman has a private office. The other faculty 
members share offices, with two persons per office, in several buildings. 

The library contains an assortment of old and new mathematics books re¬ 
presenting material in all areas of study included in the course offerings. 

In the Curriculum Laboratory, which is housed in the main library, several 
sets of mathematics textbooks used in the public school are kept. Also in this 
laboratory are some materials and testing aids designed to evaluate learning in 
mathematics. 

Music 

All faculty members have studio-offices in Whitley Hall (Music Building). 

Practice rooms and auditorium are also in Whitley Hall. 

One classroom for all music classes is located on first floor of Alamance Hall. 

It is equipped with chairs, chalkboard, cabinets, piano, and a high-fidelity stereo 
sound system for listening to records. 

Band room is on third floor of Alamance Hall. 

Lecture room for Fine Arts class is on second floor of Alamance Hall. 

The auditorium has two 9 foot grand pianos and a pipe organ of 41 ranks. 

All studios have one or two pianos. There is also a practice organ in the 
studio. Three phonographs are available: one in a classroom, one in the listening 
room, and one in a lecture room. One autoharp and one set of tone bells are available 
in the music classroom. One tape recorder is shared within the department. 


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Band instruments are provided by college so that students may become familiar 
with other kinds of instruments than his own. 

The central library contains a collection of music methods books, books 
about music, etc,, and musical scores. There are 2,347 phonograph recordings kept 
in the central library. 

State-adopted music texts, accompanying recordings and instrumental method 
books, etc,, are located in the Curriculum Laboratory on the third floor of the 
library. 


Physical Education and Health 

Located in the physical education plant are the following: 

, One large indoor area with one standard basketball court with two cross 
courts with six basketball goals. The area is used for multi-purpose such 
as basketball, handball, volleyball, tumbling, apparatus, badminton, etc, 

o Dressing, locker, shower, and toilet facilities for physical education 
and athletics, 

. Seating space for about 4,500 spectators with toilet facilities and 
concession space, 

, Four offices for six faculty members, 

, One classroom (with 40 seats) in the physical education plant. Many 
classes are taught in other buildings on the campus. 

. Storage space for athletic equipment, physical education equipment, and 
supplies and a small storage area which is for weight training for athletes 

. Apparatus such as horizontal bar, parallel bars, horse, trampoline, balance 
beam, ropes, peg board, three sets of weights and about two dozen mats. 

, Equipment for carrying on such activities as softball, football, basketball 
volleyball, soccer, tennis, golf, and track. 

» Outdoor areas include three large areas suitable for football, soccer or 
softball and three hard-surfaced tennis courts. 

The library contains a good supply of health and physical education reference 
books, and periodicals. In the physical education director's office, there is a 


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card file of books on health., physical education, recreation, and athletics. 

Science 

The Cuke Science Building houses the three science departments. There are 
plans to renovate the building during the summer of 1966. All faculty members 
have satisfactory offices. 

In addition to the equipment for science laboratory instruction as listed 
in the Self-Study Report the Chemistry Department has a single-pan balance, an 
electro-analyser, a demonstration scaler, and a polarograph. 

The library facilities include, in addition to the journals listed in the 
Self-Study Report, the following important periodicals: 

Chemical Abstracts 

Biological Abstracts 

Chemical Reviews 

Journal of Organic Chemistry 

Journal of Physical Chemistry 

Analytical Chemistry 

Journal of the American Chemical Society 

Social Studies 

Five classrooms in Alamance Building are available for instruction in the 
area of social studies. There are sufficient maps, desks, chalkboards, lecterns, 

and electrical outlets, although one room has neither a lectern nor an electrical 

outlet. Seven of the faculty members have private offices, and the other shares 

an office with another person. 

Audiovisual materials particularly applicable to the social studies program 
are the New York Times filmstrip on current affairs and projectors. 

The Carlton Library contains volumes suitable for the social studies program 
and secures additional materials through the inter-library loan as needed. 


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SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND PERSONS CONTACTED 


IN GATHERING INFORMATION: ELON COLLEGE 


Elon College Self—Study Report 
Elon College Catalogue, 1966-67 

Elon College Self Study, Southern Association - 1961 

Personnel Handbook 

College Faculty Handbook 

Class Schedule 

Bulletin of Elon College 

Course Syllabi 

Minutes of Committee Meetings 

Records in the office of President, Dean of College, and Dean of Student Personnel 

Observation of classes 

Faculty Data provided by President 

Records in Departmental Offices 

Observation of Facilities, Equipment, and Materials 
Scheduled and Unscheduled Conferences with Faculty Members 
Luncheon with Students 

Meeting with Teacher Education Committee 
Meeting with Student Teachers 

Interviews with Individual Students Randomly Selected 

Individual Faculty, Administrators, and other College Personnel Contacted and Interviewed 
President James E. Danieley 
Dean Fletcher Moore 
Dean W. Jennings Berry 
Dean Alfred Hassell 
Dean A. L„ Hook 
Dean Theo Strum 
Mr, Wo E. Butler, Jr. 

Registrar Andrew Vo Beale 
Dr, Frances Muldrow 
Dr, Arnold Strauch 
Professor L 0 Tully Reed 
Professor J, Wesley Alexander 
Dr 0 Paul H, Cheek 
Dr„ Edmund A, Moore 
Dr. Theodore E, Perkins 
Dr. Ferris E. Reynolds 
Dr. John D, Sanford 
Professor Jeanne F„ Williams 
Professor J. Co Colley 
Dr, E, R. Epperson 
Professor Virginia Epperson 
Mrs, Jeanne Bridgewater 
Mrs, Allene B, Hassell 


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Dr. Howard Richardson 
Professor Voigt Morgan 
Professor Durward T. Stokes 
Dr. Eleanor Moffett 
Professor Paul So Reddish 
Professor Lewis Drumm 
Professor William Rich 
Professor John Gerlach 
Mrs. John Gerlach (Student) 

Professor Betty Gerow 
Professor Vincent Jo P. Lamphier 
Mr. Dewey Vo Andrew 
Dr. James Howell 
Professor Martha S. Smith 
Mr, Manley W, Wellman 
Professor Frances A. Berces 
Professor Edwin L„ Daniel 
Professor Jeanne Griffin 
Professor Betty Jane Brandon 
Professor Luther Byrd 
Professor Charles W. Harper, Jr. 

President's Secretary 

MrSo Lewis (Faculty Secretary) 

All Faculty Members Not Listed Above in Business Education, Modern Foreign 
Language, Music, and Social Studies 


North Carolina S/ a(e UbrBr> 


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