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fc&ri’h Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 


REPORT TO 


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STATE EVALUATION COMMITTEE 
ON TEACHER EDUCATION 


on 


FAYETTEVILLE STATE COLLEGE 


by 


THE VISITATION COMMITTEE 


November 14-17,1965 


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Division Of Professional Services 
State Department Of Public Instruction 
Raleigh* North Carolina 







North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 


Report to 


STATE EVALUATION COMMITTEE 
ON TEACHER EDUCATION 


ON 

FAYETTEVILLE STATE COLLEGE 


by 


THE VISITATION COMMITTEE 


November 14-17, 1965 


Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2019 with funding from 
State Library of North Carolina 


https://archive.org/details/reporttostateeva00nort_6 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Page 


Introduction. 1 

Committee Members. 1 

Programs. 3 

Standard I—Overall Policies . 3 

Standard II—Student Personnel Programs and Services ... 12 

Standard III—Faculty. . 19 

Standard IV—Curricula . 25 

Standard V—Professional Laboratory Experiences.48 

Standard VI—Facilities, Equipment, and Materials.55 




















INTRODUCTION 


The program in teacher education at Fayetteville State College has been in a 
period of transition since 1959., when the State Board of Higher Education approved 
the institution to prepare secondary teachers. The institution was established in 
1877 as a State Normal School by an Act of the State Legislature. Throughout its 
history, its primary purpose has been that of preparing elementary school teachers. 

A Legislative Act of 1937 granted the institution authority to award the Bachelor 
of Science degree in elementary education. Two years later the name of the institution 
was changed to Fayetteville State Teachers College. In 1957, the Charter was revised 
to permit the preparation of teachers for both the elementary and the secondary 
levels. Two years later this expanded program was approved by the State Board of 
Higher Education. A 1963 Act of the Legislature changed the name of the College to 
Fayetteville State College. 

The College seeks approval of its programs in elementary education and the 
following secondary school and special subject areas: business education, English, 
mathematics, physical education and health, science (biology), and social studies 
(history and political science and sociology). 

The following visitation committee visited the College on November 14-17, 1965 

and herewith submits its report: 

Dr. Douglas Jones, Chairman 
East Carolina College 

Dr. J, P. Freeman, Consultant 

State Department of Public Instruction 

Dr. James E. Hillman Dr. James Valsame 

Formerly with State Bd, of Higher Education State Department of Public Instruction 


Dr. Joseph Jones 

St, Augustine's College 


- 1 - 


Dr. Charles Ray 
North Carolina College 






















' 


















Mr. Charles Spencer 

State Department of Public Instruction 


Dr. Lafayette Parker 
Winston-Salem State College 


Dr. Jerry A. Hall Dr. Herbert Paschal 

State Department of Public Instruction East Carolina College 


2 






















STANDARD I - OVERALL POLICIES 


A. PURPOSES AND OBJECTIVES 

Founded in 1867 as the Howard School, Fayetteville State College began 
through the initiative and philanthropy of several men. Ten years later a 
legislative act provided for a normal school and in 1937 the college was per¬ 
mitted to offer a four-year program for the preparation of elementary teachers. 
In 1957 the original purpose was expanded to include secondary programs. 

In view of the fact the college is concerned only with teacher education 
the objectives of the college and of teacher education are listed as one and 
the same. The objectives are as follows: 

1. Good citizenship 

2. Adequate specialization in one’s chosen field, 

3. Competence in teaching skills. 

4. Desirable professional attitudes. 

5. Development to the height of individual ability. 

6. An adequate understanding of children. 

7. Skill in the communication of ideas. 

8. An adequate knowledge of contemporary life. 

9. A sound understanding of the role of the teacher and school 
in society. 

10. A well developed and integrated sense of values. 

In the self study the idea is given that the objectives of teacher 
education were formulated by members of the administration, faculty and the 
faculty of Newbold Training School and that these were adopted in 1962 and 
again in 1965. There are rather sketchy minutes of committee sessions to show 
the process involved. The Teacher Education Committee is primarily concerned 
with student teaching and the overall policies of teacher education are adopted 
by the Educational Policies and Curriculum Committee, 


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The college is equipped to carry out its present teacher education 
objectives and programs by means of the following: 

1. A basic general education program. 

2. A specialized professional education program. 

3. Professionally directed learning experiences outside of the class¬ 
room. 

4. A total environment conducive to the development of moral responsi¬ 
bility, good health, self-reliance, emotional stability, knowledge, 
and aesthetic appreciation. 

5. A qualified, professionally trained faculty. 

6. A well-equipped library containing 40,000 volumes devoted to teacher 
education. 

7. A functional laboratory center with adequate modern teaching materials 
and equipment. 

8. A student-teaching program offering full-time experience in actual 
classroom teaching in the public schools, under the direction of a 
qualified, fully-certified public school teacher and the supervisor 
who is a member of the faculty of the Department of Education. 

Teacher education offerings and services at Fayetteville State College 
enable an individual in undergraduate programs to prepare for teaching at the 
elementary level and in secondary areas of business education, English, mathe¬ 
matics, physical education and health, science (biology) and social studies 
(history and political science, and sociology). 

B. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

1. Organizational And Administrative Structure 

The institution operates under the authority of a Board of Trustees 
consisting of twelve persons appointed by the Governor. The chief admin- 
ministrative officer of the College is the President. 


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Other administrative officers appointed by the President (with the approval 
of the Board of Trustees) and responsible to him are as follows: Dean of 
the College, Business Manager, Registrar, Director of Summer School, Dean 
of Students, Dean of Women, Director of Public Relations, Director of Alumni 
Relations, Librarian, and chairmen of subject area departments.^ 

The organizational structure as currently set up indicates the line of 
authority as extending from the State Board of Higher Education and the Board 
of Trustees to the President, to the Dean of the College, and from the Dean 
to the various departments. The description of the Dean's duties indicates 
that he is responsible for coordinating the instructional programs of the 
several departments and for providing professional leadership for the improve¬ 
ment of instruction. 

Each subject area department provides the academic courses for its 
teacher education major. In addition, each department provides service courses 
for majors in the other departments. The Chairman of the Division of Education 
has the responsibility for programs for students preparing to teach in the 
elementary schools. The program for the preparation of secondary teachers 
has not been completely delineated by areas of responsibility. However, it 
should be pointed out that an attempt is being made to have academic depart¬ 
ments, in cooperation with the Division of Education, direct the programming 
of students preparing to teach in the secondary areas. In line with the 
cooperative effort, each academic department is responsible for the methods 

-*-See Chart 


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FAYETTEVILLE STATE COLLEGE ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION CHART 



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course in its area and for sharing the supervisory responsibility for the 
student teachers involved. The academic supervisors are directly respon¬ 
sible to their department heads and to the Director of Student Teaching, who 
actually administers the student teaching program under the general super¬ 
vision of the Chairman of the Division of Education. 

2. Committee Structure 

There are five committees of the faculty, all appointed by the President 
for one year terms. By referring to Chart 2, it will be observed that the 
Division of Education is represented on all committees. The names and fun¬ 
ctions of the committees are described below. 

a. Teacher Education Committee 

This is a new committee and at the time the Visiting Committee was on the 
campus, the functions and responsibilities of the Committee were rather limited. 
From all evidence available it appears that the main responsibility thus far has 
been to develop policies and procedures relating to the student teaching pro¬ 
gram. Among the responsibilities outlined for the Committee are the following: 
(1) assignment of student teachers to cooperating schools, (2) selection of 
supervising teachers, (3) provision for transportation, (4) provision for a 
materials laboratory, and (5) provision of an academic instructor for each 
student teacher to assist the Director of Student Teaching in the supervision 
and counseling of student teachers in the field. Complete minutes of Com¬ 
mittee meetings were not available to the Visiting Committee. 

b. Educational Policies and Curriculum Committee 


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The Committee is composed of fourteen members and has as its major 
responsibility the development of policies on curricula and determination 
of academic standards. Minutes of the Committee indicate that curricular 
matters have claimed most of the Committee's time. 

c. Admission, Retention and Placement Committee 

This Committee recommends policies regarding admission, retention, and 
placement of graduates, and sets up procedures for the execution of such 
policies. In addition the Committee evaluates the credentials of all appli¬ 
cants who seek admission to the College. 

d. Testing and Research Committee 

This Committee administers tests to entering freshmen and transfer students 
for the purpose of obtaining information on the mental abilities and achievement 
levels of these students. 

e. Library Committee 

The Library Committee, an advisory committee, works with the Librarian 
in formulating library policies and in helping the faculty and students to 
make effective use of the library. The Librarian indicated to the Visiting 
Committee that the Library Committee was very effective on the campus. 

3. Procedures for Developing and Approving Policies Relating to 

Teacher Education 

The Dean of the College has the responsibility for coordinating all 
proposals concerning teacher education. At the present time he is chairman 
of the three committees that have the most influence on the teacher education 
program. These committees are the Educational Policies and Curriculum 


9 


























































Committee; the Admission, Retention, and Placement Committee, and the 
Teacher Education Committee. Recommendations from all three committees 
go to the Dean, who presents them to the President for action. 

The Visiting Committee was given the impression that all policies 
and practices regarding the teacher education program normally originate 
in the Division of Education. However, it was also pointed out that such 
policies and practices may originate in any of the subject departments or 
in the Teacher Education Committee in which case the recommendations must 
be formally submitted to the Division of Education before they may receive 
further consideration. If approved by the Division of Education, the pro¬ 
posals are referred to the Dean of the College or to some appropriate 
committee. When it is appropriate to channel a proposal directly from the 
Division of Education to the Dean, he reviews the proposal and refers it to 
the President for action. If a proposal is passed to some committee, this 
committee makes its recommendations to the Dean, who in turn makes a formal 
recommendation to the President for approval or rejection. 

4. Carrying Out Policies Relating to Teacher Education 

The Division of Education administers the program for teacher education. 
In the execution of the program, the Division functions through two depart¬ 
ments --elementary department and secondary education department. The 
position of Head of the Department of Secondary Education is a new position 
and at the present time no one is designated for the position other than 
the Student Teaching Director. 


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The faculty as a whole does not appear to have a clear conception as to the 
role of the department. There do not appear to be any formal policies or 
procedures regarding the relationship between the academic departments and 
the Division of Education. 


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STANDARD II - STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 


A. How Students Secure Information on the College Campus Concerning 

Opportunities for Careers in Teaching 

Students secure information about careers in teaching through assembly 
programs; through speakers who are outstanding in the educational world; 
through displays on the bulletin boards; through regular monthly meetings of 
the Student National Education Association; through attendance at State meetings 
sponsored by the North Carolina Teachers Association; and through the advisory 
system at the College whereby the students are counseled and informed of the 
problems and needs in their career fields. 

Once each month, all students meet in advisory groups with a faculty member 
of their major areas. Students in their freshman year are also given information 
in an orientation course taught throughout the year by the Dean of Students. 

B. Admission Policies and Practices 

1. Admission to College 

For admission to Fayetteville State College the student must: 

a. Be a graduate from high school and his record must show 
that the applicant has completed at least 15 units dis¬ 
tributed in the following manner: English 3; Mathematics 
1; Social Studies 2; Science 2; Health and Physical Edu¬ 
cation 1; and 6 electives. 

b. Make a preliminary application accompanied by a deposit of 

$ 20 . 

c. File a four page application for admission. 

d. Present a Scholastic Aptitude Test Score. 

e. Submit the results of a complete medical checking. 


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TABLE I 


Enrollment Data for September, 1965 


Number Applied (Fr.) 618 
Number Accepted (Fr.) 586 
Number Not Processed (Fr.) 18 
Number Rejected (Fr.) 16 
Number Transfers 34 
Number Former Students Returning 56 
Number Special Students 7 
Total Students Accepted 683 


TABLE II 

High School Rank of Freshman Class 
1965-66 


Class Rank 

Number 


Percent 

Top Third 

189 


41 

Middle Third 

169 


37 

Lower Third 

104 

TABLE III 


22 

SAT Scores 

of Freshman Class 

For Past 

Two Years 

Year 

Verbal 

Math. 

Total 

1964-65 

269 

305 

574 

1965-66 

288 

296 

584 


2. Admission of Transfer Students 

A student from another college is considered for admission according to 
to the following rules: 


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a, Must forward a complete transcript. 

b. A confidential form requesting information as to the 
character and ability of the applicant is sent to the 
college from which the student is applying. 

c„ The transfer student must be able to return to the college 
from whence he seeks to transfer. 

d. The College will accept no grade below that of a "C". 

Since virtually every student at Fayetteville State is in elementary 
or secondary education there is no basis of comparison with other students 
at the College in other areas. 

3. Admission and Retention in Teacher Education 

A student must formally apply for admission to the teacher education 
program nine weeks prior to the beginning of the junior year. This may be 
done only if the general education courses have been completed. Admission to 
the program is based upon a 1.0 or "C" average. Students are admitted to the 
elementary program by the Chairman of the Division of Education, who is also 
Head of the Department of Elementary Education, provided that no questionable 
circumstances are involved. In such cases, final decision rests with the 
President. Admission to the secondary education program is the responsibility 
of the Head of the subject matter field and the Department of Secondary Education, 
In either case, students may be admitted or denied admission, or have their 
applications deferred, pending removal of deficiencies. There was no definite 
information available upon the number of students denied admission. The Chair¬ 
man of the Division of Education indicated that one or two students each year 
were refused admission. 


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Criteria for admission to teacher education beginning with the 1964-65 
entering class are as follows: 

1. An overall 1.5 academic average 

2. Present evidence of physical fitness 

3. Recommendation by the Dean of Students on the basis of personality 
and citizenship traits 

4. Certification by the Head of the Department of English as to 
competency in English and speech. (At the time of the visit, 
the procedure by which the English faculty would certify com¬ 
petency in English and speech had not been determined). 

Students are currently retained in the program who maintain an overall 
1.0 average a.nd earn no grade less than "C" in any major course. Thus, up to 
the present there has been no difference between the grade-point average required 
for admission to the teacher education program and that required for retention in 
the program. 

Further screening is done when students apply for admission to student 
teaching. Admission to student teaching is the responsibility of the Teacher 
Education Committee. Currently, before students are admitted to student teaching, 
this committee reviews the records of those who have been admitted to the teacher 
education program and have successfully met requirements up to the last semester 
of their junior year. These include the minimum grade of "C" in all major courses 
and the completion of certain specified professional courses for both elementary 
and secondary students. 

Scores on NTE are rather low but show some improvement. Average scores 
on the common examinations were 457.5 in 1964 and 463.0 in 1965. 


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C. The System of Records 


All official records are kept in the Office of the Registrar. They are 
available to the faculty and administrative officers. The records include the 
following: 

1. Semester hours and quality points 

2. Permanent grade sheet for each student 

3. Class grade sheet from each instructor 

4. "Change of grade" slip 

5. Withdrawal record 

6. "Drop and Add" record 

7. S.A.T. Scores 

8. Applications 

9. Admission 

10. All correspondence 

11. Action by Disciplinary Committee 

12. Individual grade sheets for each student 

13. Placement Tests. 

Personnel records for men are kept in the offices of the Dean of Students 
and for women in the Dean of Women. Confidential information is kept in a sealed 
envelope which may be opened only by a member of the personnel staff. 

Personnel records include: 

1. Personal Data Sheet 3. Activity forms 

2. Action by Personnel Deans 4. Housing records 

Health records are kept in the College Infirmary and are available to staff 
and advisors when needed. 

D. System of Student Advising and Counseling 

The student personnel program seeks to assist each student in developing 
spiritually, intellectually and socially through (1) opportunities in which 
every student learns to know and be known, understood and accepted as an indi¬ 
vidual by staff personnel, and (2) by providing group living experiences in which 


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North Carolina Stale Library 
Raleigh 

the student may move toward mature concepts of responsibility and freedom within 
the context of the community. All members of the faculty and staff assist the 
Dean of Students and Dean of Women with personnel problems. 

At the beginning of the freshman year, each student is assigned an advisor. 
This advisor remains with the group until the beginning of the junior year. At 
this time, the student is assigned to the Department in which he plans to major. 
The department chairman or one or two other members serve as major advisors. 
Group advisory meetings are held once each month. Meanwhile, office hours for 
desired conferences are maintained regularly by all advisors. 

Each student and his or her advisor is given an evaluation sheet prepared 
by the Registrar. This sheet shows courses taken and courses needed to complete 
requirements for graduation. 

Every Tuesday night all freshmen and transfer students during their first 
year on campus attend an Orientation Class taught by the Dean of Students. 

E. Placement Services 

The Chairman of the Department of Education and the Dean of Students serve 
as placement officers. Unofficial help comes from the college president, 
department chairmen, and faculty. A folder containing full information of a 
biographical nature, college transcript, and recommendations is prepared and 
sent out to possible employees. These records are kept in the office of the 
Dean of Students. Of the 135 graduates in 1964, the following is an analysis 
of the careers into which they entered: 


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Elementary Teaching 81 
Secondary Teaching 37 
Housewife 3 
Graduate School 1 
Social Worker 4 
Industrial Worker 1 
Federal Employment 1 
Military Service 1 
Unknown 6 


F. Follow-Up Program 

The Dean ol Students has begun a limited follow-up program. He contacts 
employers of recent graduates and seeks to obtain information as to the type 
of success graduates are enjoying in their careers. Plans are being made to 
correlate this information. 


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STANDARD III—FACULTY 


A. PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FACULTY 

The professional education faculty consists of 18 members, nine full-time and 
nine part-time. The part-time teachers teach the methods courses in mathematics and 
science in the elementary school, special methods courses in the secondary school 
subject areas, audiovisual education, and the specific courses of Mental Hygiene and 
Principles of Guidance. 

Of the full-time professional education staff, four hold the earned doctorate, 
with the rank of professor. The preparation of no member of the teaching staff is 
less than a master’s degree. 

For the institution as a whole and outside of the professional education staff, 
there are 62 individual members, 52 full-time and 10 part-time. Of these individuals, 
11 have earned doctorates. There are three teachers with only the bachelor’s degree. 
All others have the master's degree. 

There are 837 students enrolled in professional education courses this semester. 
They are being taught by 12.59 full-time equated teachers, or 66.5 students for each 
full-time teacher. 

A maximum full-time teaching load is 15 credit hours; no teacher in professional 
education has more than that number of hours. Currently, only two of the full-time 
teachers have a load of 15 credit hours. Committee assignments and extra-curricular 
activities do not enter into the teaching load. 

This semester, 25 students are engaged in student teaching. They are supervised 
by three college supervisors, with six, nine, and ten students, respectively. 

Salaries for the professional education staff are in keeping with salaries of other 
teachers. The schedule for all follows: 


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RANK 


SALARY 


Professor $8,200—$11,500 

Associate Professor 6,400— 9,700 

Assistant Professor 5,800— 8,700 

Instructor 5,100— 6,800 

Faculty average salary--$7,600 

Professional Education 

Faculty average salary-$7,900 


Within the past five years, the College employed 14 new persons in the Department 
of Education. Some were to replace personnel and others to care for increased enroll¬ 
ment. All of the added personnel had either an earned doctorate or the master’s 
degree. 

Two present members of the faculty completed requirements for and received the 
doctor's degree within the past five years. 

The institution has no policy for granting sabbatical leaves to the faculty. 

No faculty member during the past year had leave for study with pay. 

The members of the professional education faculty participate in the improvement 
of education on the State and local levels. Most members belong to the National 
Education Association and to the North Carolina Teachers Association. During the 
past academic year, five members were consultants at seven elementary schools in the 
State which were involved in Comprehensive School Improvement Projects. 

The institution makes limited funds available to members of the faculty for 
travel to State, regional and national professional meetings. Many faculty members 
attend summer schools and institutes for professional growth. In the summers of 
1964 and 1965, twelve members attended summer schools and institutes in which 67 
semester hours of graduate credit were secured. 


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TABLE IV 


Degrees , Departments, and Teachers in Academic Departments 

at 

Fayetteville State College 
First Semester - 1965-66 


Departments 

or 

Areas 

Faculty Members 

Part and 

Degrees 

Full-time 

Part-time 

r UJ__L L-Line 

Equated 

Doc¬ 
tor' s 

Mas¬ 

ter's 

Bache¬ 

lor's 

Business Education 

4 

1 

4.75 


5 


English 

13 

2 

14.50 

1 

13 

1 

Fine Arts 

5 


5.0 


5 


Foreign Languages 

3 


3.0 

1 

2 


Mathematics 

3 

1 

3.58 

1 

3 


Physical Education 

4 

3 

5.50 

1 

5 

1 

Sciences 

6 

1 

6.58 

3 

4 


Social Sciences 

_ 

14 

2 

15.50 

7 

8 

1 


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B. ACADEMIC. FACULTY: By Areas 


Biology 

There are five full-time faculty members in the Biology Department, The faculty 

4 

is assisted in their work by nine part-time student laboratory assistants and six 
part-time student secretaries. Two persons on the biology faculty hold earned 
doctorates and three have the master's degree in biology. 

The regular full-time teaching load of biology faculty members is 12 semester 
hours. No reduction in teaching load is given for administrative or other institutional 
responsibilities. All biology faculty members are teaching courses in which they have 
had graduate preparation. At present, there is one physics professor and one chemistry 
professor. 

Business Education 

All four members of the business education faculty have master's degrees. One 
member is close to the doctorate. Teaching loads are heavy as one person taught 18 
semester hours and another taught 17 semester hours during the spring 1965 semester. 

All members have had graduate preparation in the subjects they teach. 

English 

There are 13 full-time faculty members in the Department of English. One member 
possesses the doctorate and the remainder hold master's degrees. 

Teaching assignments are in areas in which members have had some graduate 
preparation, but the amount of preparation appears minimal for one teaching remedial 
English and reading skills and for another who teaches only reading skills. 

Teaching loads are in line with policy and no English faculty member has had 
more than 12 semester hours per week during the past two semesters. 


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Mathematics 


There are lour full-time faculty members. Two members hold a master's degree in 
mathematics. One holds a master's degree in mathematics education. The fourth member 
holds a master’s degree and an Ed.D. degree in mathematics. All have attended summer 
institutes in recent years. 

The teaching load is 15 semester hours. The chairman's load is 12 semester hours 
with his administrative duties counting the equivalent of 3 semester hours. All 
members have had graduate preparation in subjects taught. 

The department supervises a non-credit remedial mathematics program taught by 
outstanding mathematics majors. 

Physical Education and Health 

The faculty includes one member with a bachelor's degree (head football and 
basketball coach), five members who have masters' degrees, and one who has a 
doctorate. One of the faculty members also teaches audiovisual education and is 
listed as a faculty member in professional education as well as physical education 
and health. All of the athletic coaching is carried on by the men faculty members. 

The regular full-time teaching load of physical education and health faculty 
members is, on the average, 15 clock hours per week. Coaching duties are in addition 
to the teaching load. 

Social Science 

There are fifteen full-time, one two-thirds-time, and one one-third-time faculty 
members in the Social Sciences Department, Of the social studies faculty, seven hold 
the doctorate while the remaining number hold the master's degree. Many of those with 
only the master's degree have done graduate work beyond this degree. One doctorate 
is held in philosophy. (The professor with the doctorate in philosophy also teaches 


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courses in logic, philosophy, and religion and culture which are a part of the 
curriculum in Social Sciences. Much of his teaching time is in this area although 
he also offers courses in history). One doctorate is in science or plant pathology. 
(The professor with a doctorate in science also holds a minor in economics and a 
LL.B, degree. He teaches a two-thirds load in economics and the other third of his 
load is in business law.) The professor teaching a one-third load in the department 
teaches economics and is a member of the Business Education Department. One professor 
teaching geography in the department has a master's degree in Industrial Arts. There 
are three professors whose sole task is to teach sociology; two teach only geography; 
one two-thirds person and one one-third person offer the economics courses; and the 
remainder teach the course work offered in history and political science. All but 
one of those who teach in these two areas has his degree in history. The other has 
an Ed.D. degree in the teaching of political science. 

The regular full-time teaching load of the Social Science Department is 15 
semester hours per week. Reductions in teaching loads except for administrative 
(department chairman) or institutional responsibilities are rare. 

The professor with a master's degree in Industrial Arts who is teaching geography 
has completed about eighteen hours toward an additional master's degree in geography. 
The professor with a doctorate in philosophy who offers work at times in history has 
had ten quarter hours in history. Both of the professors teaching economics have had 
only limited graduate training in that field. 


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STANDARD IV—CURRICULA 


The curricula for Fayetteville State College are limited to programs of 
preparation for teachers. The College offers four-year undergraduate programs 
of preparation for elementary school teachers; secondary school teachers of 
business education, English, mathematics, science, and social studies; and special 
subject teachers of physical education and health. All programs require work in 
general education, subject matter specialization, and professional education. 

As of November 1, 1965 the College had enrolled 1154 students in teacher 
education programs for 1965-66. The following table presents the enrollment data. 

TABLE V 




ENROLLMENT 

BY DEPARTMENT 




SECONDARY AREAS 

Freshmen 

Sophomores 

Juniors 

Seniors- 

Special 

GRAND 

TOTAL 

1 . 

Biology 

16 

11 

7 

2 

36 

2. 

Business Education 

105 

18 

13 

20 

156 

3. 

English 

39 

11 

15 

11 

76 

4. 

History 

31 

8 

10 

15 

64 

5. 

Mathematics 

37 

15 

13 

12 

77 

6. 

Physical Education & 

Health 83 

14 

16 

11 

124 

7. 

Social Studies 

96 

27 

17 

54 

194 


Subtotal 

407 

104 

91 

125 

727 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

263 

46 

64 

54 

427 

TOTAL 

670 

150 

155 

179 

1154 


In the following analyses of curricula, courses are presented under their 


related guideline and required courses are marked with an asterisk. 


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GENERAL EDUCATION 


The general education program includes two curricula. There is a curriculum 
for majors in elementary education and health and physical education and another 
curriculum for majors in biology, business education, English, health and physical 
education, history and political science, mathematics, and sociology. Both curricula 
consist of more than 40 percent of a basic 120 semester hour program required for 
graduation. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should assure that all teachers are able to read , 
write and speak the English language clearly and effectively . 

■--English 111-112 English Grammar and Composition 6 s.h. 

Entering freshmen students who do not score at the 10.4 grade level on the 
California Language Test are required to take Remedial English, English 99, 

Students whose scores on the Iowa Silent Reading Tests are below 13.0 grade 
level are required to take Developmental Reading, English 100, 


■-'English 221 

Introduction to Speech 

3 

s.h 

■-One of the following: 




French 111-112 

Elementary French 

6 

s.h 

Spanish 111-112 

Elementary Spanish 

6 

s.h 

GUIDELINE 2: The program 

should develop a critical understanding of 

and a 



sensitiveness to the aesthetic, philosophical, ethical, and imaginative values 
expressed in literature, art, music, religion, and philosophy . 


-x- Art 221 Art History and Appreciation 2 s.h. 

-x- Music 210 Music Appreciation 2 s.h, 

English 211-212 World Literature 6 s,h„ 

Philosophy 211 Logic or Ethics 2 s.h. 

(Required of Elementary Education Majors) 

Psychology 111 General Psychology 3 s.h. 

(Required of Elementary Education Majors) 


- 26 - 





































































































GUIDELINE 3: The program should develop an understanding of the development 
of world civilization, an understanding of the basic concepts of the social studies, 

and an understanding of democracy as a way of life. 


•"'History 111-112 

World History 

6 s.h„ 

-"-Economics 211 

Principles of Economics 

3 s,h. 

-''-Sociology 212 

Principles of Sociology 

3 s.ho 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should develop an appreciation and 

understanding of 

the structure of science, of 

scientific inquiry, and of the main 

scientific principle 

One of the following: 



Science 111B-112B 

General Biology 

6 s.h, 

Science 111C-112C 

General Chemistry 

6 soh. 

Science lllPhy-112Phy 

General Physics 

6 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should develop an appreciation of 

the structure and 

applications of mathematics. 



-"-Mathematics 111 

College Algebra 

3 s.h. 

Mathematics 112 

Trigonometry 

3 s,h. 


Mathematics 110 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 6: The program should develop the knowledge, habits, and attitudes 
necessary to achieve and maintain sound physical and mental health. 


-"-Physical Education HIM 

Physical Education (Men) 

1 s.h. 

-"-Physical Education 111W 

Physical Education (Women) 

1 s.h. 

Health Education 112 

Personal Hygiene 

1 s.h. 


A physical examination is required of all students. 




















































































































SUBJECT-MATTER PREPARATION 


ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

The program in elementary education consists of 74 semester hours or 65 
percent of the total program required for graduation. Thirty-eight semester 
hours of this program also apply to general education. 

Courses are related to guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide an understanding of the process of 
learning to read, to speak and to write the English language clearly and effectively, 

and should develop sensitiveness to and love and enthusiasm for good literature. 



-"-English 111-112 

English Grammar and Composition 

6 s.h. 


-"-English 211-212 

World Literature 

6 s,h. 


-"-English 221 

Introduction to Speech 

3 s.h. 


-"-English 330 

Children's Literature 

3 s.h. 


-"-Education 410 

Teaching Language Arts 

2 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2: The 

program should provide a knowledge and understanding of 

the 

social, political, 

geographical, and economic forces which operate in society; 

and 

understanding of government organization and functions; and an 

appreciation 

of 

the conservation of 

our natural resources. 



-"-Geography 211 

Principles of Geography 

3 s.h. 


-"-Geography 212 

Regional Geography 

3 s.h. 


-"-History 211-212 

United States History 

6 s.h. 


-"-Government 210 

American Government 

3 s.h. 


-"-Economics 211 

Principles of Economics 

3 s.h. 


-"-Sociology 212 

Principles of Sociology 

3 s.h. 


- 28 




























































































biological science content, and ability to plan a logical seauence 

of science 

experiences for the several grade levels. 


Science111B-112B 

General Biology 


or 



-"-Science H1C-112C 

General Chemistry 

6 s.h. 

or 



Science lllPhy-112Phy 

General Physics 


-"-Science 460 

Earth Science 

2 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 4: The program should include study in mathematics 

which would in- 

volve consideration of the structure of the real number system and 

its subsystems 

and the basic concepts of algebra and informal geometry. 


-"-Mathematics 110 

Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics 3 s.h. 

-^Mathematics 111 

College Algebra 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The program should develop a sound philosophy of art education, 

appreciation of color and form, and creative ability in several art 

; media. 

-"-Art 211 

Art History and Appreciation 

2 s.h. 

-"-Art 212 

Elementary Freehand Drawing 

2 s.h. 

-"-Art 311 

Arts and Crafts 

2 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 6: The nroeram should provide a backgound of music 

fundamentals, 

-"-Music 210 

Music Appreciation 

2 s.h. 

-"-Music 220 

Music Fundamentals 

2 s.h. 

-"-Music 340 

Music Education 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 7: The program should provide understanding of both health and 


physical needs of children at various grade levels^ 

-''-Health Education 112 Personal Hygiene 

-'^Health Education 421 


Principles, Practices, and Procedures 
in Health Education 


1 s .h. 


2 s.h. 


29 
































































































































Physical Education 432 Principles, Practices, and Procedures 

in Physical Education 2 s.h. 

^-Education 422 Mental Hygiene 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 8: The program should provide an opportunity to develop a subject 
concentration. 

Majors in elementary education may develop a concentration in English, science, 
mathematics, or history. A student may develop a concentration in English with a 
total of 36 hours, and develop concentrations in either history, mathematics, or 
science with a total of 27 hours. 


30 - 







































































BUSINESS EDUCATION 


The program in business education is Comprehensive Business and consists of 
57 semester hours or 43 percent of the total program required for graduation, 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should assure .job competency in secretarial and re¬ 
lated office skills. 

■"‘Secretarial Science 111-112 Elementary Typewriting 4 s.h. 

-"-Secretarial Science 211 Advanced Typewriting 2 s.h. 

-"-Secretarial Science 221-222 Elementary Shorthand 6 s.h. 

-"-Secretarial Science 311-312 Advanced Shorthand and 

Transcription 6 s.h, 

-"-Business Administration 431 Business Machines 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should include study at the college level in the 

business areas identified as integral parts of the business education curricu¬ 

lum of the high school. 

-"-Business Administration 212 Introduction to Business 3 s.h. 

-"-Business Administration 311- Elementary Accounting 6 s.h. 

312 

-"-Business Administration 411 Intermediate Accounting 3 s.h. 

-"-Business Administration 412 Principles of Business Education 3 s.h. 

-"-Business Administration 421 Business Law 3 s.h. 

-"-Economics 212 Principles of Economics 3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide a culminating experience, bringing 
together theory, skills, and practice. 

-“-Business Administration 322 Business Correspondence 3 s.h. 

-"-Business Administration 422 Office Management 3 s.h. 

-"-Secretarial Science 411-412 Secretarial Practice I and II 6 s.h. 


31 - 






































































































GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide sufficient preparation for later pur¬ 
suit of graduate study. 

-^Economics 411 Marketing 3 s.h. 

The program for prospective teachers of business education should enable them 
to pursue graduate studies in business education. 


32 - 





























































ENGLISH 


The subject matter program for the preparation of prospective teachers of 

English consists of 45 semester hours or 37 percent of the total program required 

for graduation. These 45 semester hours include four courses which are part of the 

general education program. 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide specialized studv at the college level 

in the areas of the high school 

curriculum to be taught. 


---English 111-112 


English Grammar and Composition 

6 s.h. 

---English 331 


Advanced Grammar and Composition 

3 s.h. 

---English 211-212 


World Literature 

6 s,h. 

---English 221 


Introduction to Speech 

3 s.h. 

--English 301 


Shakespeare 

3 s.h. 

---English 311-312 


English Literature 

6 s.h. 

--English 321-322 


American Literature 

6 s.h. 

---English 332 


History of English Language 

3 s.h. 

---English 411 or 421 


The Eighteenth Century or Romantic 
Poetry 

3 s.h. 

Six semester hours from the 

English 340 

English 350 

English 360 

following: 

Young People 1 s Literature 

Public Speaking 

Phonetics 

6 s.h. 

English 410 

English 430 

English 440 

English 450 

English 460 


Organization and Administration of 

The English Novel 

The American Novel 

Introduction to Literary Criticism 

Modern Drama 

School Libraries 


33 





















































































GUIDELINE 2: The program should lead to an excellence in written and oral 


expression. 


English 111-112 

English Grammar and Composition 

6 s.h. 

English 221 

Introduction to Speech 

3 s.h. 

English 331 

Advanced Grammar and Composition 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The 

program should provide study and training at the 

college 

level in the areas of : 

reading. 


English 100A-100B 

Developmental Reading 

0 s.h. 

English 111-112 

English Grammar and Composition 

6 s.h. 

-"-English 412 

The Teaching of Reading 

3 s.h. 

-"-Education 351 

Methods and Materials of Teaching 

3 s.h. 


English 


GUIDELINE 4: The 

program should lead to a knowledge of the importance of 

libraries. 



English 111-112 

English Grammar and Composition 

6 s.h. 

English 311-312 

English Literature 

6 s.h. 

English 321-322 

American Literature 

6 s.h. 

English 332 

History of English Language 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 5: The 

program should provide sufficient preparation for 

later 


graduate work in English. 

The courses prescribed in this curriculum should prepare the student for 


later graduate study. 

An English Comprehensive Examination is required in the senior year. 


34 - 

















. 
































































MATHEMATICS 


The subject-matter preparation program for a prospective mathematics teacher 
includes a total of 30 - 36 semester hours or approximately 25 - 30 percent of 
a basic four-year program. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should take into consideration the sequentail nature 
of mathematics and should provide the prospective teacher an understanding of some 

of the aspects of mathematics which his students will meet in subsequent courses. 


-"-Mathematics 

111 

College Algebra 

3 

s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 

112 

Trigonometry 

3 

s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 

211 

Analysis I 

3 

s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 

321 

Calculus I 

3 

s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 

322 

Calculus II 

3 

s.h. 


GUIDELINE 2: The program of mathematics should include a thorough college-level 
study of the subjects in mathematics included in the high school curriculum. 

-"-Mathematics 212 Modern Geometry 3 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 311 Modern Algebra 3 s.h. 

-"-Mathematics 312 Modern Algebra 3 s.h, 

GUIDELINE 3: The program should include additional upper-level work in 
mathematics, with courses chosen for their relevance to the high school curriculum. 

3 s.h. 


Mathematics 332 
or 

Mathematics 342 


Differential Equations 
Theory of Equations 


3 s.h. 


35 































































































































-"-9 s.h. elected from the following: 


Mathematics 

410 

Probability and Statistics 

4 

s.h. 

Mathematics 

420 

Solid Geometry 

3 

s.h. 

Mathematics 

440 

Reading and Honors in Mathematics 

3 

s.h. 

Mathematics 

450 

Statistics 

3 

s.h. 


GUIDELINE 4: The program should include work in areas related to mathematics» 
-"-6 s.h. in biology, chemistry, or physics. 

Through advisement,students take 15 additional s.h. in one of the sciences. 
GUIDELINE 5: The program should include sufficient preparation for the later 
pursuit of graduate work in mathematics. 

It is believed the courses required plus the required electives will prepare 
students for the later pursuit of graduate study in mathematics. 


36 - 



























































PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH 

The program for the prospective teacher of physical education and health 
consists of 59 semester hours or 45 percent of the total academic program required 
for graduation. Nine of these semester hours are also general college requirements. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should lead to the development of principles compatible 
with current educational philosophy. 


-''-Physical Education 311 

History and Principles of 
Physical Education 

3 

s ,ho 

GUIDELINE 2; The program 

should provide basic knowledge in the 

sciences, 


-"-Science 111B-112B 

General Biology 

6 

s „h. 

-"-Science 211Ap-212Ap 

Anatomy and Physiology 

6 

Soh„ 

-"-Physical Education 331 

Kinesiology 

3 

Soh, 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should provide for knowledge and competencies in 
regard to organizing, planning, administering, and evaluating the various aspects 

of the total program of physical education. 

-"-Physical Education 411 


'Physical Education 232 
-Physical Education 352 
'■Physical Education 422 


Organization and Administration 

of Physical Education and Health 3 s„h„ 

Group Games 3 s,h. 

Coaching and Officiating 2 s.h. 


Athletic Injuries and Instruction 
in Athletic Problems 


-"-Health Education 122 
-^Education 332 


2 s„h„ 

2 Soh, 

3 s<>h„ 


First Aid and Safety 
Test and Measurements 
GUIDELINE 4: The program should provide knowledge of and skill in a wide 
variety of activities; ability to analyze motor skills; and knowledge of methods and 


materials in teaching and coaching. 


37 


























. 

























































































^-Physical Education 121M or 121W Physical Activities 1 s.h. 

■'^Physical Education 211-212 Advanced Games and Sports 2 s.h. 

Physical Education 221 Fundamentals and Techniques 

or of Dance (Women) 2 s.h. 

Physical Education 342 Tumbling, Stunts, and Aparatus (Men) 

-"•Physical Education 232 Group Games 2 s.h. 

-"-Physical Education 312 Individual Sports 3 s.h. 

-x-Physical Education 321-322 Team Sports 4 s.h, 

-x-Physical Education 332 Individual and Adapted 

Physical Education 2 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 5: The program should develop knowledge and understanding in the 


various aspects of healthful living. 

-x-Health Education 112 Personal Hygiene 1 s.h. 

-x-Health Education 412 School Health Education 3 s.h, 

-x-Physical Education 412 Community Recreation 2 s.h. 

Six hours of electives from the following: 6 s.h. 

Health Education 411 Community and School Hygiene 2 s.h. 

Health Education 421 Principles, Practices, and 3 s.h. 

Procedures in Health Education 
(Required for elementary teachers) 

Physical Education 431 Camping and Counseling 2 s.h. 

Physical Education 432 Principles, Practices, and 3 s.h. 

Procedures in Physical Education 
(Required for elementary teachers.) 

Physical Education 441 Problems in Interscholastic 

Athletics 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 6: The program should develop competencies that will enable the 
teacher to plan or assist in planning and conducting programs of health s ervices 
healthful living, and health instruction, 


38 - 

























































































































-"-Physical Education 411 


Organization and Administration 3 s.h 

of Physical Education and Health 

-x-Physical Education 421 Curriculum in Physical Education 3 s.h 


39 - 





















SCIENCE 


(Biology) 

The subject-matter preparation program for a prospective teacher of science 
contains 66 semester hours in science, including 30 semester hours of biology. 
This constitutes 55 percent of a 120 semester hour basic four year program. Nine 
semester hours are also in general education. 

Courses are related to the guidelines as follows: 


GUIDELINE 1: The program should take into account the necessity of having 
a broad foundation in biological and physical sciences and mathematics. 


--Mathematics 111-112 


College Algebra and Trigonometry 

6 s.h. 

-"'Science 111C-112C 


General Chemistry 

6 s.h. 

-"-Science 211Z-212Z 


General Zoology 

6 s.h. 

-"-Twenty-one semester 

hours 

of electives in chemistry from the following: 

Science 211C-212C 


Analytical Chemistry 

8 s.h. 

Science 311C-312C 


Organic Chemistry 

6 s.h. 

Science 321C-322C 


Physical Chemistry 

8 s.h. 

Science 411C-412C 


Biochemistry 

8 s.h. 

-"-Nine semester hours 

of electives in physics from the following: 


Science lllPhy-112Phy 

General Physics 

6 s.h. 

Science 311Phy 


Heat 

3 s.h. 

Science 312Phy 


Electricity and Magnetism 

3 s.h. 

Science 411Phy 


Electronics 

3 s.h. 

Science 412Phy 


Biophysics 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The nroeram 

should have depth in at least one area 

of science 

with courses chosen for 

mayimum relevance to the high school science 

curriculum. 

-"-Science 212B 


General Botany 

3 s.h. 


- 40 - 























■ 






































































^-Science 311A-312A 

Comparative Anatomy 

6 s.h. 

■^'-Science 321P 

Vertebrate Physiology 

3 s,h» 

-''-Science 322B 

Bacteriology 

3 s.h. 

-''-Science 411G 

Principles of Genetics 

3 s.h. 

---Six Semester hours 

of electives from the following: 


Science 410HM 

Histology and Microtechniques 

3 s.h. 

Science 420E 

Vertebrate Embryology 

3 s.h. 

Science 440GE 

General Entomology 

3 s.h. 

Science 450 

Introduction to Parasitology 

3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The program should include a sufficient basis and preparation 
for later graduate study in a particular science area. 

The program should provide preparation for later graduate study in biology 

and possibly in chemistry. 


41 - 















































































SOCIAL STUDIES 


There are two separate degree programs in the Department of Social Sciences, 

the History Program and the Sociology Program, The History Program requires 72 

semester hours to complete (60 percent of a basic 120 semester hour program) and the 

Sociology Program requires 69 semester hours (59 percent of a basic academic program 

Total hours revjuired for graduation are 141 and 138 hours, Twelve semester hours in 

this program are also in general education. 

History Program 

GUIDELINE 1: The program should provide studv in depth, at the college level 

of courses included in the high 

school curriculum. 


-^'History 111-112 

World History 

6 s.h. 

-"-History 211-212 

United States History 

6 s.h. 

-"-History 311-312 

European History 

6 s.h. 

-"-History 321-322 

Constitutional History 

6 s.h. 

-"'History 332 

American Diplomatic History 

3 s.h. 

-^History 411 

Negro in American History 

3 s.h. 

-"-History 421 

Problems in American History 

3 s.h. 

History 412 

Survey of African History 

3 s.h. 

or 

History 422 

History of the South 

3 s.h. 

or 

History 222 

Ancient History 

3 s.h. 

or 

History 432 

Russian History 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2i The program 

should take into account the necessity of having 

breadth in the social studies. 



-"-Geography 211 

Principles of Geography 

3 s.h. 

-"-Geography 212 

Regional Geography 

3 s.h. 

-^-Government 210 

American Government 

3 s.h. 


- 42 - 








































■ 





















































































"-Government 311 

Comparative Government 

3 s.h. 

“-Government 411-412 

History of Political Theory 

6 s.h. 

-“Government 422 

International Relations 

3 s.h. 

•^Economics 211 

Principles of Economics 

3 s.h. 

-“-Economics 421 

Economic Problems 

3 s.h. 

-“Economics 432 

Money and Banking 

3 s.h. 

-“-Sociology 212 

Principles of Sociology 

3 s.h. 

-"-Sociology 311 

Culture and Personality 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program 

should enable the prospective social 

studies teacher 


to pursue graduate studies in one or more areas in the field of the social studies. 

The program for prospective teachers of social studies (history emphasis) 
should enable them to pursue graduate studies in history,, 

Sociology Program 

GUIDELINE 1 The program should provide a study in depth, at the college level, 
of courses in the high school curriculum. 

-^-History 111-112 World History 6 s.h, 


-“-History 211-212 

United States History 

6 s.h. 

-"-History 311-312 

European History 

6 s.h. 

-"-History 412 

Survey of African History 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 2: The program should 

take into account the necessity of having 

breadth in the social sciences. 



“-Economics 211 

Principles of Economics 

3 s.h. 

-“-Economics 411 

Economic Problems 

3 s.h. 

-“-Economic 432 

Money and Banking 

3 s.h. 

-“-Government 210 

American Government 

3 s.h. 


- 43 - 














































































































































-“-Government 412 

History of Political Theory 

3 s ,h. 

-“-Government 421 

Elements of International Law 

3 s,h. 

-"-Sociology 212 

Principles of Sociology 

3 s„h„ 

-"-Sociology 311 

Culture and Personality 

3 s.h. 

-“-Sociology 312 

Social Statistics 

3 s .h. 

-"-Sociology 321 

Principles of Social Work 

3 s.h. 

-"-Sociology 322 

Minorities 

3 s ,h. 

-“-Sociology 332 

Social Stratification 

3 s,h«, 

-"-Sociology 411 

Sociological Research Methods 

3 Soh, 

-"-Sociology 421 

Principles of Social Case Work 

3 s,h. 

-"-Sociology 431 

History of Sociological Thought 

3 s,h. 

Sociology 

Choice of Elective 

3 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 3: The program 

should enable the prospective social studies teacher 

pursue graduate study in one 

or more areas in the field of the social 

studies. 


The program for the prospective social studies teacher (sociology emphasis) 
should enable him to pursue graduate studies in sociology. 


- 44 




















































PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 


ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

The professional education sequence for Elementary Education majors includes 
36 semester hours or approximately 30 percent of the total academic program 
required for graduation. Two of these 36 are also counted in subject matter 
preparation, 

GUIDELINE 1o The professional education program should provide an under¬ 
standing of the normal sequences of human growth and development, with special 
emphasis on the pupils of the school age to be taught, 

--Education 342 Child Development 3 s„h. 

GUIDELINE 2i The professional education program should provide an under¬ 
standing of the nature of learning, the learning process, and the psychology of 
learning, 

---Education 331 Educational Psychology 3 s.h, 

---Education 422 Mental Hygiene 3 s.h. 


GUIDELINE 3: The professional education program should provide an under¬ 
standing of methods, special techniques, and materials appropriate to the specific 
levels or areas of the prospective teachers subject-matter concentration, and 


skill in applying them 

in a classroom situation. 


---Education 321-322 

1 - 

Teaching the Elem. School Subjects 

6 s.h. 

---Education 332 

Tests and Measurements 

3 s.h. 

---Education 410 

Teaching of Language Arts 

2 s.h. 

---Education 411 

Teaching of Reading 

3 s,h„ 

Education 491 

Audio-Visual Education 

2 s.h. 


- 45 







































' 













































































GUIDELINE 4: The professional education program should provide an under¬ 


standing of the purpose, organization, and administration of school systems , 
with special emphasis on the role of the school teacher in the total education 
program, 

--Education 481 Problems of the Teacher 1 s„h 

---Education 311-312 Foundations of Education 6 s.h 

GUIDELINE 5: The professional education program should provide a broad 
historical, philosophical, and sociological orientation to schools in our society 

and to the profession of teaching. 

---Education 311-312 Foundations of Education 6 s,h 

GUIDELINE 6: The professional education program should provide an extended 
period of continuous full-time student teaching experience in the grade levels 

or subjects to be taught, 

-"-Education 412 Student Teaching 6 s.h 

(9 weeks - full time) 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

The professional education sequence for majors in secondary fields consists 
of 27 semester hours, or approximately 22 percent of a basic 120 semester hour 
program. 

GUIDELINE 1: The professional education program should provide an under¬ 
standing of the normal sequences of human growth and development, with special 
emphasis on the pupils of the school age to be taught. 

-^Education 352 Adolescent Development 3 s.h 

GUIDELINE 2: The professional education program should provide an under¬ 
standing of the nature of learning, the learning process, an d the psychology ojf 
learning. 


- 46 - 
















































































■ 






























































-"-Education 331 Educational Psychology 3 s.h. 

-''-Education 332 Tests and Measurements 3 s.h, 

GUIDELINE 3: The professional education program should provide an understandin g 
of methods, special techniques, and materials approprate to the specific levels 
or areas of the prospective teacher ! s subject-matter concentration, and skill in 

applying them in a classroom situation. 

-"-Education 351 Methods and Materials in 

Secondary School Subjects 3 s.h. 

This is not a general methods course but is a group of specific methods 

courses taught in the academic area. 

GUIDELINE 4: The professional education program should provide an under¬ 
standing of the purpose, organization, and administration of school systems, with 
special emphasis on the role of the school teacher in the total education program. 

-"-Education 421 Principles of Secondary Education 3 s.h, 

GUIDELINE 5: The professional education program should provide a broad 
historical, philosophical, and sociological orientation to schools in our society 

and to the profession of teaching. 

-"-Education 311-312 Foundations of Education 6 s.h. 

GUIDELINE 6: The professional education program should provide an extended 
period of continuous full-time student teaching experience in the grade levels 
or subjects to be taught. 

--■Education 412 Student Teaching 6 s.h. 

(9 weeks - full time) 


- 47 - 





















































































































STANDARD V—PROFESSIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIENCES 


A. OBJECTIVES 

The institution’s objectives for professional laboratory experiences, developed 
by a special committee and accepted by the Teacher Education Committee, are as follows: 

1. To give the student an opportunity to interpret his ideas accurately and to 
put them into practice. 

2, To enable the student to see his needs clearly, 

3„ To provide an opportunity for the student to test his ability to meet 
particular situations and to acquire knowledge from first-hand contact 
with children and adults, 

4, To engage the student in direct contact with children and adults in school 
and community situations, 

B, LABORATORY EXPERIENCES PRIOR TO STUDENT TEACHING 

1. Elementary 

Arrangements between the College and the public schools, including the 
Newbold Elementary School on campus, provide majors in elementary education opportunity 
to observe school situations as an adjunct to the professional courses taken prior 
to the student-teaching experience. Observations are arranged chiefly by the teacher 
of the particular methods or professional course. Some examples of professional 
laboratory experiences include: making units of work in several areas; making lesson 
plans, charts, and creative teaching devices; examining methods and techniques; ob¬ 
serving students and preparing case studies; working with students m the gymnasium; 

and serving as laboratory assistants in public schools. 

Students are required to observe 18 to 30 clock hours in classes at Newbold 
School and are required to observe and participate a total of 40 additional hours 


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in other schools. Part of this time is during the hours for the particular classes 
and some is required to be during the students' free time. 

2. Secondary 

In Principles of Secondary Education , students visit classes in their area 
of specialization and concentration at the E. E. Smith Senior High School in Fayetteville, 
where they spend approximately 12 hours in observation. In Secondary Methods in Science 
each student observes five class hours and assists with laboratory work in one high 
school in the city and two in Cumberland County. In addition, secondary students 
observe a minimum of three hours in Educational Psychology . 

C. ORGANIZATION FOR ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF STUDENT TEACHING . 

1. College Staff 

The Director of Teacher Education, responsible for the overall program of 
student teaching and teacher education, is assisted in its organization and adminis¬ 
tration by the Director of Student Teaching, two supervisors, department heads of 
subject matter areas, and teachers of all subjects related to preparing teachers. 

The Director of Student Teaching is responsible for coordinating the 
activities of all personnel engaged in the student teaching program. This involves 
liaison relationships between campus personnel and the personnel of the cooperating 
school units and schools. All arrangements for placement and adjustment of student 
teachers are made through the Director of Student Teaching's office. 

The two supervisors of elementary school teaching and the Director of Studert 
Teaching are responsible for the supervision of all student teachers. 

2. Relation of College to Cooperating Schools 

The College has no control over the schools used for student teaching. The 
principals and teachers involved in the student teaching program are appointed by 


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the school boards of the cities and counties where the student teaching experiences 
occur. 

Regulations regarding the number of classes that may be used and the number 
of student teachers assigned to a particular school are established by the superin¬ 
tendent or local supervisors. 

3. Newbold Laboratory Elementary School 

The Newbold Laboratory School, located on the campus of the College, is a 
part of the Fayetteville City Schools. The principal and teachers are employed and 
paid by the Fayetteville City School Board. The College has no control over the 
school, however, the President of the College has the privilege of recommending 
teachers for the school. 

4. Orientation of Supervising Teachers . 

An at-school orientation conference for supervising teachers is held prior 
to each student-teaching session. At the conference, the supervising teacher is given 
a personal data sheet containing pertinent information about the student teacher assigned 
to him. The supervising teacher is also free to examine the records of the student 
teacher on file in the Office of the Supervisor of Student Teaching. 

One on-campus supervising teacher conference is also held during student 
teaching period, 

D, THE STUDENT TEACHING PROGRAM 

1. Criteria for Admission to and Retention in Student Teaching , 

Application for admission to a teacher education program must be submitted 
to the appropriate department head nine weeks prior to the time a student begins his 
junior year. 

Admission to teacher education programs is restricted to students whose 


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cumulative academic averages are not below 1.00 (C), who are in good health, and 
whose oral and written English, character, personality inventory, and citizenship 
are deemed adequate to the demands and responsibilities of teaching, as attested 
to by the department heads. 

Once admitted to a teacher education program, a student will not receive 
credit for and must repeat any major course in which he earns a grade less than 
"C". In addition, the student must maintain an overall grade average varying from 
,80 to .90 to remain in residence and remain in the program. 

The records of students who have been admitted to teacher education pro¬ 
grams are reviewed again after they submit an application for admission to observation 
and practice teaching and assignment to participating public schools. Generally, 
admission to teacher education is all that is required for admission to student 
teaching. 

2, Credit and Organization 

Student teaching is a six semester hour course and may be taken in any half 
of the two semesters of the senior year. 

Student teachers devote nine weeks, five days a week, and six hours per day 
to student teaching. This is exclusive of participation in community activities and 
school programs. Some students are able to begin teaching earlier than others; there¬ 
fore, they have additional time for observation in other rooms, examining new materials, 
and experimenting. Student teachers are expected and required to participate in all 
school activities, including attendance at Parent Teachers Association meetings, school 

parties, organizations and other activities. 

All student teachers must observe a minimum of 30 clock hours in the school 

and class to which assigned before beginning to teach. 


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Students engaged in student teaching are involved in the experience full-time 
and do not take concurrent college courses. 

All student teachers teach at least five days of full-duty experience plus 
progressive assumption of duties, 

3, Amount of Supervision by the College , 

Three College faculty members are directly involved in the supervision of 
student teaching. Other college personnel are also involved at the request of the 
college supervisor or as representatives of their departments. 

Each student teacher is visited a minimum of three times, and whenever 
conditions warrant the attention of the supervisors, more visitations are made. 

One afternoon per week all student teachers living in the City of Fayetteville 
are required to report to the Student Teaching Center to discuss problems encountered 
during the week. This seminar is conducted by the college supervisors. Students 
living outside Fayetteville do not participate in the seminar. 

Whenever it is observed by either the supervisor or supervising teacher 
that the student is not making satisfactory progress, or that his conduct is unbecoming 
to a teacher, the student is removed from student teaching. 

The ratio of student teachers supervised by each college supervisor is 
approximately 20 to 1, 

4, Student Teacher Assignment , 

In the county schools a student is assigned to a supervising teacher only 
once during the year. In the city schools, student teachers are assigned to super¬ 
vising teachers alternating nine-week periods. Therefore, during an academic year, 
city supervising teachers may work with two student teachers. 


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5„ Criteria for Selection of Off-Campus Laboratory Schools . 


Schools that participate in the student teaching program as Laboratory 
Centers usually meet the following standards: 

a. Each school is located as near as possible to the College campus. All 
elementary majors do student teaching in the Fayetteville City Schools 
and the Cumberland County Schools. Students majoring in secondary areas 
teach in schools in adjoining counties because of the limited number of 
secondary schools in Fayetteville and Cumberland County. 

b. All schools have been accredited by the State of North Carolina. 

c. The school faculty shows evidence of professional growth, professional 
planning, and professional cooperation. 

6. Supervising Teachers in Cooperating Schools . 

All supervising teachers volunteer to work with student teachers and their 
assignments are approved by the officials of the participating school systems. 

Supervising teachers must have the following qualifications: 

a. Baccalaureate degree in the field in which supervision is given. 

b. A minimum of three years of successful teaching. 

c. A sound educational point of view. 

d. An acceptable attitude regarding professional responsibilities. 

e. A recommendation from the principal and supervisor of the school in 
which they work, 

E. METHODS USED TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PROFESSIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIENCES 

The following methods are used to determine the effectiveness of professional 
laboratory experiences: 

1, Daily review of activities with student teachers who returned to the center. 


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2. Enthusiasm of student teachers and attitude of student teachers toward 


assignments. 

3. Evaluation of the student teacher’s performance by the principal and super¬ 
vising teacher, 

4. Evaluation of the College supervisors at the beginning and ending of the 
student teaching period. 

Fa CHANGES CONTEMPLATED IN THE PRESENT PROGRAM OF PROFESSIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIENCES . 

The Department of Teacher Education has very recently appointed a Director 
of Student Teaching, whose duties include the full direction of the student teaching 
program. 

An attempt has been made to reduce the semester hours required in the subject- 
matter and professional education courses. It is generally believed that the number 
of hours in these courses were too numerous and that some courses should be combined, 

G. FINANCE 

Student teachers pay a fee of $25 for student teaching. The College pays $30 
to each supervising teacher and pays the expenses of college supervisors. If avail¬ 
able, college-owned cars are furnished for travel by college supervisors. Otherwise, 
supervisors are paid 8$ per mile for travel by private auto. 

Student teachers not living at home live in the College dormitories while doing 

student teaching. 


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STANDARD VI— FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND MATERIALS 
Fayetteville State College has 23 buildings located on a campus of 92 acres. 

The Department of Education and Psychology is located in the Smith Administration 
Building which also houses the offices of the President, Dean, Business Manager, 
Registrar, Dean of Students, Director of Public Relations, Director of Alumni 
Affairs, Dean of Women, Department of Social Science, and Department of English, 

A, OFFICES AND CLASSROOMS 

An effort has been made to provide office space for an increasing professional 
faculty by diverting classroom space and a small auditorium to office space. Six 
offices are provided for the nine full-time faculty members of the Department of 
Education and Psychology, These offices are equipped with desk, typewriter, chairs, 
bookcases, steel files, and secretarial supplies and equipment. Telephones are 
accessible. 

Three of the six offices are each shared by two faculty members. One member 
shares an office with a faculty member of another department. One has a small private 
office and the other full-time person shares an office with the full-time departmental 
secretary. Three part-time members have private offices as follows: a small office 
for the Director of Research, a small office plus a larger record and secretarial 
room for the Dean of Women, and an office which also serves as the college audiovisual 
service room for a member of the Department of Physical Education and Health who teache 
the audiovisual courses. 

The Department of Education has one full-time secretary and seven student workers 

each of whom serve five hours per week. With one exception where two persons share 

one student, all faculty members have the equivalent of one student worker. The 

departmental secretary serves all full-time faculty members. The director of audio- 

- 55 - 































■ 









visual services has four student workers. Two student workers serve the Curriculum 
Center and two departmental faculty members are housed in an adjoining room. 

There are five classrooms in the Smith Administration Building, two on the ground 
floor and three on the third floor, normally used for education classes, none ex¬ 
clusively, The audiovisual classes are taught in a classroom located in the gymnasium. 
B. LIBRARY RESOURCES 

The library is currently housed in the Chesnutt Library Building. As of 
April, 1965 the holdings number approximately 50,127 books and bound periodicals. 

The library subscribes to 326 periodicals, including 18 newspapers. The total number 
of books classified 370-379 is 8,321 or 16.6 percent of the total collection, A 
collection of reference books is maintained which are based on those listed in The 
Classified List of Reference Books and Periodicals for College Libraries Recommended 

by the Southern Association of Secondary Schools . Approximately 100 periodicals and 
one newspaper are on microfilm. 

The library has a collection of approximately 4,000 juvenile books used primarily 
by classes in children's literature and by student teachers. In this collection 
are the major children’s classics. 

The library has two microfilm readers and approximately 350 recordings for 
teacher education. There are also 214 filmstrips and several tapes which can be used 
for recording purposes. 

The following audiovisual machines are available for student use in the library: 
tape recorder, filmstrip viewer, and record player with 4 headphones and an amplifier. 
Other audiovisual equipment and materials are in the several departments and available 
from their own storage spaces. Where there is no audiovisual center on the campus, 
the following equipment is available in various locations for general use: 


- 56 - 




































































































1 Tach-X Reading Machine 

1 Controlled Reader 

4 Tape Recorders 

1 Overhead Projector 

6 Motion Picture Projectors 

2 Opaque Projectors 

5 Filmstrip Projectors 

1 Diazo Processor Machine Developer 

1 Motion Picture Preview Machine 

3 Portable Screens 

1 Wall Screen 

2 Splicer Machines 

1 Record Player 

300 Filmstrips on various subjects for all school levels. 

A contract with the University of North Carolina provides for the use of films. 
Additional films are ordered from the State Board of Health and other universities 
and film libraries. 

Approximately $5,000 was spent during 1964-65 for professional books and 
periodicals. During 1965-66 the total library budget was $50,376 of which $11,000 
was for books. Approximately $3,000 is being spent for professional books during 
1965-66. The decrease is the result of a lower budget appropriation for the 1965-67 
biennium. Additional funds had been secured for 1963-65 to build up holdings in 
secondary subject areas as a result of teacher education programs starting in these 
areas. 

There is no departmental allocation of library funds for books although such is 
being considered for the future. Requests by faculty members submitted on a departmental 
basis are honored to the extent funds are available. The librarian supplements these 
requests, utilizing recommended resources of standard library lists. 

C, CURRICULUM CENTER 


The Curriculum Center is located on the ground floor of the Smith Administration 
Building in close proximity to two classrooms used for education classes. The Center 


- 57 













































is housed in a 22' by 28' room which formerly served as a classroom. It adjoins 
a large office which is occupied by the supervisors of student teaching. 

One of the two supervisors of student teaching located in the adjoining room 
has primary responsibility for the Center. She is assisted by two student workers 
who stay and work in the Center during the day to the extent and during the time 
their schedules will allow. The Center is normally serviced by one of the super¬ 
visors from about 3:30 - 5:00 p.m. daily. 

The Center is in its third year of operation. Except by special permission, 
students do not check out materials. Two tables, 5 chairs, and 25 student desks 
are provided for students using the Center, 

The Center serves as a place where students may use curricular materials without 
the time restrictions which are necessary in the college library. The informal 
situation also permits them to do work in the Center which requires tables and chairs 
which can be moved from place to place. While most of the material is permanent, 
many pamphlets, magazines, and newspapers are contributed which can be used. 

Teaching materials and equipment located in the Center are as follows: tape 
recorder, phonograph, 4 controlled readers, slide and filmstrip projector, movie 
projector, projector table, screen, television set, primary typewriter, papercutter, 
duplicator, Scott, Foresman Series (Reading), Ginn Series (Reading), Harcourt, Brace 
and World Series (Language), Allyn and Bacon Series (Reading), J. B. Lippincott 
(Reading), Seeing Through Arithmetic—Scott, Foresman, John C. Winston Series 
(Arithmetic), D, C. Heath Series (Science), and North Carolina Course of Study, 

A budget is not provided for the Center. Requests are submitted by one of the 
student teacher supervisors, the head of the department, and possibly others to the 
College business office. Such requests must be approved by the President. Plans 


- 58 - 














. 








































for the Center are based on an informal consensus of opinion of those mainly concerned* 

Sample tests are located in the central library rather than the Curriculum 
Center* 

D* SPECIAL FACILITIES 

The central repository for audiovisual materials is in a room in the gymnasium 
adjoining the room in which Audiovisual Education classes are held* Certain items 
needed by some classes are kept in the classrooms where the classes are held* Audio¬ 
visual equipment and materials can be brought into any classroom and used when needed. 
They are secured either from the audiovisual storeroom or from the particular 
department source. This service is under the supervision of a faculty member assisted 
by four student helpers* 

Textbooks and sample units of instruction are found in faculty offices and taken 
to classrooms when needed for use. 

Testing of freshmen takes place in regular classrooms* On the basis of the 
results, freshmen are placed in classes for developmental reading. The Reading 
Clinic is located on the first floor of Taylor Science Hall. Here are located 
the reading classrooms, the room for individual practice with tachistoscopes and 
controlled readers, storage space for equipment and materials, and offices* All 
except about six percent of the freshmen—those scoring above the twelfth grade on 
the test—use these facilities for one year. 

The Speech Clinic is also located on the first floor of the Science Hall* This 
clinic, designed for the improvement of speech, the correction of speech difficulties 
and the education of speech teachers for the public schools, consists of a center 
in which there are located a speech laboratory, an observation room equipped with 
a one-way glass window and seating twenty-five viewers, three individual recording 


59 



















1 







boothsj two offices and a storage room. 


Equipment located in the Center includes the following; 


1 Combination 2x2 slide and filmstrip 


4 Tape recorders 

1 Projection screen 

2 Projection stands 
6 Audiometers 


projector 

1 Opague projector 

2 Record players 

1 Amplification Unit 


2 Models (ear and throat) 


Auditory Training unit 
106 Filmstrips 
65 Disc recordings 
242 Tape recordings 


6 Exhibits 
Stop watches 
Breath charts 
Tuning forks 
Toys and games for 


1 Map 
1 Globe 


therapy pupils 


The Department of Foreign Languages has an electronic Language Laboratory which 
is equipped with thirty individual recording booths and a control system. Here 
students may listen to recordings of the language and make their own recordings 
and play them back for critical listening. 

An elementary school,, grades 1-6, built in 1930 is located on the campus. The 
school is a two-story building housing 23 classrooms plus related facilities. A 
cafeteria was added in 1958. In addition to the regular staff, a full-time librarian 
and one special education teacher are provided. Two music teachers from the Fayette¬ 
ville City Schools central office teach music classes. 

The school was started as a campus laboratory school, but is now a part of the 
public schools of Fayetteville. The College still uses the school for placement of 
some prospective elementary teachers and for observation purposes. 

The College owns one 37 passenger bus and three 9 passenger station wagons. 

E. CONTEMPLATED CHANGES 

A new building for Music, Art, and Social Sciences has been authorized by the 
North Carolina General Assembly, and is expected to be ready for occupancy by 


- 60 - 
























































September, 196b. Two dormitories, one for women and one for men 3 are in the process 
of being built. 

Some of the special features of the Music, Art and Social Sciences Building are: 

A combination library-listening room 
8 Practice rooms 
1 Art laboratory 

1 Choir room with seating capacity for 126 persons 
1 Band room with a seating capacity for 126 persons 
3 Studio offices 

The special features of a projected physical education building for which most 
of the funds are already available are: 

1 Swimming pool 

2 Bowling lanes 
1 Dance studio 

An appropriation of funds has been secured for the construction of a new library 
building, a student center, and a science building. The Curriculum Center will be 
moved to some other location so the present location can be converted to a student 
store. 

F. FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND MATERIALS: BY AREAS 

Biology 

The Biology Department is located on the second floor of the Taylor Science 
Building adjacent to classrooms and laboratories in which chemistry and physics are 
taught. The first floor of this building houses a reading laboratory and a listening 
center as well as classrooms used by the English faculty. The biology faculty has 
access to one lecture and two laboratory rooms. Some lectures are given in laboratory 
rooms. The lecture room is equipped with a desk, a chalk board, lectern, electrical, 
gas and water outlets. Laboratories contain work table with light, water, gas, and 
electrical outlets. Storage cabinets and various items of equipment occur in each 


- 61 - 









































































laboratory. 


The Biology Department has 600 textbooks and approximately 35 biological 
periodicals and journals in the library. In addition, there are 1,800 science books 
and 480 juvenile science books in the library. The curriculum center contains several 
elementary school science series including the Schneider series; the Heath Series; 
the Wonderworld of Science Series; Singer Series; Macmillan Series. In addition, a 
variety of high school textbooks, including BSCS, are located in the curriculum center. 

Business Education 

There are two classrooms used primarily by the Department, However, the De¬ 
partment also has use of other classrooms for instructional purposes in Smith Admin¬ 
istration Building and in the Physical Education Building. Three offices are available 
for faculty. These are located on the third floor of Smith Administration Building. 
Instructional equipment for this program includes 38 manual typewriters, seven electric 
typewriters, six pieces of dictation and transcription equipment, six duplicating-type 
machines, 19 computation machines, one bookkeeping machine, two complete sets of short¬ 
hand and typing tapes, 62 individual tapes, and 28 boxes of shorthand records. 

There is no departmental budget for the Department of Business Education, but 
there are maintenance contracts on equipment. 

English 

There are four classrooms used primarily by the English Department located in 
the Taylor Science building. 

There are also seven faculty offices for English faculty members. 

The library catalog, spot checked for Mark Twain, Herman Melville, and 
Nathaniel Hawthorne, did not show any of these authors! collected works and few 
basic materials although some biographical and critical material was available. 


62 





























































Mathematics 


Five classrooms are used for mathematics classes, two in the science building, 
two in the gymnasium, and one in the auditorium. One classroom in the science 
building is used exclusively. 

The four faculty members have offices in the science building. Each member 
shares an office. The chairman and one member share an office in a complex of 
partitioned office area. One other member shares a smaller office with a member 
of another department in the same complex. The fourth member shares a small office 
in an office which adjoins a science laboratory across the hall from the office 
complex. The department faculty receives secretarial service through two student 
helpers who work five hours per week. 

Audiovisual aids available include overhead projector, a 16mm projector, a 
filmstrip projector, several filmstrips, a record player and several records, graph 
charts for chalkboard, and chalkboard instruments, such as, protractor, compass, and 
device for paralled lines. 

The central library has a fair collection of books concerned with the teaching 
of mathematics. A start has been made to secure titles listed on the list recommended 
by the MAA. 

The Department has donated some materials to the Curriculum Center. Holdings 
there are much more adequate for elementary teachers than for secondary mathematics 
teachers. 

Physical Education and Health 

The physical education activity areas include: 

1. One small gymnasium with one basketball court and four other basketball goals 

2. One large field which is used for football and for physical education 


63 - 























































3. A baseball diamond 

4. A standard size track 

5. Four tennis courts 

The areas in the physical education building besides the floor space used for 
basketball and physical education activities include: 

1. Several classrooms some of which are used by other departments in the 
college 

2. Four offices 

3. Two first-aid rooms 

4. Dressing, shower, and toilet rooms for men and women with lockers and locks 

5. Storage rooms for athletic and for physical education equipment and supplies 

6. A small room for weight training (for athletes only). 

Equipment for physical education includes: horse, buck, parallel bars, 
horizontal bars, trampoline, ping-pong tables, archery equipment and supplies, bad¬ 
minton equipment, mats, track and field equipment, golf clubs, various supplies such 
as ball, rackets, standards, etc. Teaching materials and equipment include: record 
players, film strips, projectors, movie projectors, screens 2 by 2, slide projector, 
tape recorder, projection stand and film strips. The audio-visual center is located 
in the physical education building. 

Films from the State Board of Health are used in health teaching. 

Reference materials in health and physical education are located in the library 
except for those belonging to faculty members. It was reported that the materials 
were ordered upon request but that there was no special budget for equipment or 
reference materials. 

Social Science 

The social studies department has no specific classrooms assigned to it. About 
80 percent of its classes meet in various rooms in Smith Building, some meet in 
classrooms in the gymnasium, and some meet in small classrooms in Seabrook Audi¬ 
torium. The classrooms are equipped with lecterns, desks, chalkboards, and 


- 64 - 



■ 

' 




electrical outlets. Maps suitable for history, political science and geography 
are available in the rooms where these subjects are taught. There is no central 
map depository. There is a limited amount of material for geography. The depart¬ 
ment has a world globe and a few filmstrips and sound seminars. 

The college library has a limited book collection in the social studies area. 
There is a lack of many out-of-print standard works and the periodical holdings are 
limited. 


North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 


STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



3 3091 00820 4737