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ANNEX 

LIBRARY 

D 


013643 


ALBERT R. MANN 
LIBRARY 


New York State Colleges 

OF 

Agriculture and Home Economics 



AT 


Cornell University 













Date Due 





i AMT ^ 7 

1992 



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Pennsylvania 


Farming in 

«.....■ -rTVT^^« , W 


Grind 0 fid Mix Yoiir 0wn Feed 
Vending Machines Boost Milk Seies 
OE What's Your Foultry Score? 

Hew to Breed the Dairy Cow of the Future 3 
























































says Walter M. Reed, Jr., manager of Walter M. Reed & Sons Farms, 

Fort Fairfield, Maine ^ f ^ 

' When superior traction means getting extra rounds ot work 

done each day, it’s no wonder Firestone Champion Ground 
Grip® tires make a tremendous hit with New England farmers. 
Better traction is only one of many reasons why Walter Reed, 
Jr., goes for Firestones in a big way. As manager of one of 
Maine’s leading seed potato producing concerns, he’s found 
that, on his 10 tractors and 10 trucks, nothing can match 
Firestones for sheer toughness—to ward off cuts and bruises, 
and stay on the job longer. 

“In our clay soil. Firestones run cleaner so we get more trac¬ 
tion,” says Walter Reed, Jr., “and on our rolling ground the 
extra traction Firestones deliver means getting more work done 
each day. For us. Firestones wear longer. And when it comes 
to service, our dealer really takes care of us.” 

See your Firestone Dealer or Store soon. If you have any tire 
trouble he will loan you new Firestone tires to use while yours 
are repaired or retreaded. 



BETTER RUBBER FROM START TO FINISH 


Copyright 1958, 

The Firestone Tire & Rubber Company 


Enjoy the Voice of Firestone on ABC television every Monday evening. 


Formula for Success in 
Dairy Farming 

We are thinking of buying a dairy 
farm in New York and would like to 
know what it costs to produce milk 
and also what it sells for. How many 
cows should we have to pay off a 
$10,000 mortgage? j. n. 

The cost of producing milk varies 
greatly. Some recent figures indicate 
it ranges from $3.22 to $7.47 per hun¬ 
dredweight, with an average of $4.32. 
These figures include feed purchased, 
farm value of hay, silage and pasture, 
machinery and equipment costs, tax¬ 
es, insurance, and paid and unpaid 
labor. The average cost of providing 
hundred pounds of milk has been 
higher than the average return. Aver¬ 
ages, however, are deceiving in that 
the efficient dairymen are averaged 
in with the less efficient. 

There are several factors that are 
essential for success in dairy farm¬ 
ing: (1) a genuine liking for dairy 
cows and an acceptance of the time 
needed to do a good job managing 
and feeding them; (2) a farm with a 
high proportion of good tillable soil; 
(3) adequate, well-kept buildings and 
a comfortable home; (4) good cows 
capable of producing at least 350 
pounds of fat per year; (5) enough 
cows to have the volume of milk sold 
per worker approach 200,000 pounds 
if Holsteins are the choice, and 140,- 
000 pounds if you choose Jerseys; 
this means at least 20 good cows; 
(6) be assured of a reliable market 
for all your milk; (7) such equip¬ 
ment as will enable you to do the 
various jobs reasonably on time but 
to avoid heavy expenditures for 
equipment that can be satisfactorily 
rented or hired. 

The county agricultural agent 
should be consulted before purchas¬ 
ing a farm. He will be glad to discuss 
your problems with you. Good farms 
cost quite a bit, but they are cheaper 
in the long run compared to farms 
which are priced low due to poor 
soils and buildings. r. a. 


Coming Meetings and 
Shows 

Jan. 6-9 — Annual meeting Ameri¬ 
can Pomological Society and Massa¬ 
chusetts Fruit Growers Assn., Ban¬ 
croft Hotel, Worcester, Mass. 

Jan. 7-9 — Union Agricultural 
Meeting, Municipal Auditorium, Wor¬ 
cester, Mass. 

Jan. 8-10 — Northeastern Weed 
Control Conference, Hotel New 
Yoi’ker, New York, N. Y. 

Jan. 13-17 — Pennsylvania Farm 
Show, Farm Show Bldg., Harrisburg, 
Penna. 

Jan. 16 — 12th annual meeting of 
N. Y. Canning Crop Growers Co¬ 
operative, Inc., First Presbyterian 
Church, Batavia, N. Y. 

Jan. 20-24 — Short Course, Dairy 
Cattle Breeding, Univ. of Connecti¬ 
cut, Storrs. 

Jan. 21-24—N. Y. State Horticult¬ 
ural Society Annual Meeting 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Jan. 22-23 — Massachusetts Dairy 
Farmers’ Seminar, Univ. of Mass., 
Amherst. 

Jan. 27-30—Artificial Insemination 
Short Course, Univ. of Connecticut, 
Storrs. 

Jan. 27-31—Beef Herdsman’s Short 
Course, Cornell University, Ithaca, 
N. Y. 


The 

Rural New Yorker 

Vol. CVIII No. 5899 

Published Semi-Monthly by The Rural 
Publishing Co., 333 W. 30th St., New York 
1, N. Y. Price 50c a Year. Re-entered as 
Second Class Matter September 6, 1945, 
at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., 
under the Ac^of March_3,_1879._ 

Cover Pictures by: John A. Smith, Dickin¬ 
son, Pa., and H. Armstrong Roberts, 
New York, N. Y. 


THE RURAL NEW YORKEf 


3 
























Alcartra Bessie Ormsby Korndyke 


best, the improvement of dairy 
cattle comes rather slowly. 
There are several reasons for 
this. For one, in no other class 
of livestock must selection be 
based upon so many individual 
and transmissable characters. 
Moreover, too few cows are on test, and many 
of those actually enrolled in one or more of 
the testing programs are handled in such a 
manner that their inherited ability is never 
truly measured. Improvement of any breed 
of dairy cattle depends greatly upon our 
ability to locate the best germ plasm. This 
calls for a strong testing program, one under 
which is provided an environment that will 
permit the cows’ genetic inheritance to ex¬ 
press itself. Another reason for the relatively 
slow progress in dairy cattle improvement is 
that there are few truly great cattle breeders. 
Mere ownership of registered cattle by a man 
does not make him a breeder. 

We are all guilty of singling out individuals 
as proof of rapid and great progress in the 
improvement of productive ability of our 
breeds. New class leaders are dethroning the 
old champions with increasing frequency, it 
is true, and herd averages only dreamed of a 
few years ago are now being reported. Un¬ 
fortunately, however, individual cows and 
herds do not reflect the true state of the 
breeds; as a matter of fact, no dairy breed as 
a whole has shown any substantial increase in 
average production. This is a little alarming 
when we realize that pasture improvement 
programs and modern haying equipment have 
brought great improvement in the nutritional 
level provided our dairy cows. This improve¬ 
ment in itself should bring a definite increase 
in production. Where is any improvement in 
the inherited productive ability of the cows 
themselves? We need to reappraise our breed- 
ing programs of the past so that we may chart 
better ones for the future. 

Disease-Control Plan Backfired 

Thirty years ago, disease was a major prob¬ 
lem in the industry. Not only did we lack 
knowledge of dairy cattle diseases, but we 
had only few weapons with which to fight them. 
Infection of the udder was most common; few 
cows escaped. Many herds had to be destroyed 
while the productive efficiency of others was 
seriously lowered. The problem was, of course, 
a real one, and as a means of coping with it, 
breeders began selecting out of those families 
that matured rapidly with high production in 
heifer form. Whenever selection is based upon 
a single character, however, sacrifices must 

January 4, 1958 



Harden Farms Dutchess Acacia 


usually be made in other often equally im¬ 
portant characters. The price of this genetic 
fight against mastitis was high: with early 
maturity came the oversized udder that pre¬ 
sented both a management and feeding prob¬ 
lem. The productive efficiency of many early- 
maturing heifers declined rapidly as they grew 
older and, all too frequently, their mature 
production failed even to equal that which 
they made as heifers. These cows left our herds 
young in years but old in wear. 

Proved Sire Program Not Perfect 

At about this time, the proved sire program 
had its birth. Designed to single out and direct 
attention to those bulls capable of siring daugh¬ 
ters with high production in heifer form, the 
program ignored type completely. Moreover, 
it sent many great bulls to the* butcher because 
their two-year-old daughters failed to give 
them a plus proving. How often have I heard 
breeders cry about the bulls that would have 
put them in business had not they sent them 
to the butcher too early! Their two-year-old 
daughters failed to meet an arbitrary produc¬ 
tion standard. Two-year-old daughters of a bull 
should not starve their owner, to be sure; high 
producing heifers are both necessary and de¬ 
sirable. But they should be heifers that possess 
those characters their owner has come to asso¬ 
ciate with what it takes to make great aged 
cows, too. When production of two-year-old 
daughters of a bull seems disappointing, the 
owner should be sure to have a very careful 
look at them before deciding the fate of their 
sire. If, with their low production, the daugh¬ 
ters are lacking in general dairy character, 
that is, if they are thick in the thighs, tight- 
ribbed and short-necked, there is little hope 



Ednachester Mary. Man-o-War 

A 



Jane of Vernon 


they will do much better. But if they are sharp, 
angular, and possess those strong milk 
characteristics associated with the making of 
great aged cows, the bull is worth saving, 
though perhaps retiring him for a time from 
service. Conversely, regardless of the produc¬ 
tive level of a bull’s daughters, if there are 
major type defects in them that spell out a 
short productive life, he should be eliminated 
quickly. 

Unfortunately, many owners of registered 
dairy cattle even today seem to think that the 
proving of a bull is a major accomplishment. 
They sometimes appear to be more concerned 
about this than with the quality of the cows 
standing in their barns. The proved sire pro¬ 
gram has been so completely sold to breeders 
and owners of dairy cattle that it has blinded 
some to the realities of breeding great- 
producing, long-lasting dairy cows. 

There are two ways of proving a bull—one 
real, the other unreal. In the first,__a_bp^eder 
samples a bull with nothing else in mindliut 
to measure the animal’s ability to improve the 
standard of the herd. In the second, one starts 
out with the idea of proving a bull, many times 
with the hope of peddling him; to obtain a 
desirable proving, the daughters not measur¬ 
ing up to the required standard are quickly 
eliminated. This practice is all too common. 
I have watched men develop gold medal bulls 
while their herds went skidding downhill. The 
problem confronting the breeder of dairy cattle 
is not proving a bull but rather raising the 
standard of his herd. Good bulls are, of course, 
essential to this, but only as they affect end 
results. No matter how' favorable a proving 
one gets on a bull, the final measure is, “Did 
he improve the herd”? 

Selection of a herd sire is a challenging re¬ 
sponsibility. It requires complete knowledge 
( Continued on Page 22 ) 


GREAT COWS 


Three things make a cow great, says the 
author: 1. individual excellence, 2. great 
productive performance year after year, and 
3. ability to transmit greatness. The cows he 
most admires are Jane of Vernon, a Brown 
Swiss, and Alcartra Bessie Ormsby Korndyke 
and Ednachester Mary Man-o-War, both Hol- 
stein-Friesians. Jane was a national grand 
champion for five years, she made several 
fine records, tw'O over 1,000 pounds of butter- 
fat, and she passed on superb qualities to 
and through six daughters and two sons. 
Bessie had five records in excess of 900 
pounds of butterfat and at 14 years produced 
30,097 pounds of milk and 1,153 pounds of 
fat. Typical of her descendants is her daugh¬ 
ter, Harden Farms Dutchess Acacia, national 


senior two-year-old Holstein champion for fat 
with 773 pounds from 20,493 pounds of milk 
in 305 days, and New York State leader for 
both milk and fat with 23,786 and 913 pounds 
in 365 days. Bessie herself is Excellent in 
type. Mary had five records over 1,000 pounds 
of butterfat after she was seven and a half 
years old, and she averaged 27,120 pounds 
for each of those five lactations. At 11 years, 
she produced 1,246 pounds of butterfat. One 
of her daughters. Harden Farms Deen Jerry, 
is New York State four-year-old Holstein 
champion with 20,862 pounds of milk and 906 
pounds of fat in 305 days. Mary is Excellent, 
too. This is the type and kind of cow that 
can truly be termed great. It is they who 
are the kind to breed and breed from. 


3 


Wkafs Wrong with 

Dairy Cattle Breeding? 

Despite proved bulls^ Gold Medcd sires^ champion two- 
year-olds^ and AB rings^ it^s brought less production 
improvement than feeding and management. Why? 

By E. S. HARRISON 



















217207 


J 



HARPER HYBRID MUSKMELON 
First Generation Hybrid 


41ARRIS SECDS 

Harper Hybrid Muskmelon 

Just What You’ve Been Waiting For 

A muskmelon that has: 

SWEET TANGY FLAVOR — THICK SOLID FLESH 
Attractive Appearance — Size Easy to Refrigerate 
VIGOROUS VINES — HEAVY YIELDS 
Harper is a first generation hybrid 
that combines all these qualities. 

Give it a trial in your garden this year. 
SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG 
(Ask for our Market Gardeners’ and Florists’ 
Catalog, if you grow for market.) 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., Inc. 

10 Moreton Farm, Rochester 11, N. Y. 

195 S CATALOG lim/imdii 





SUPER** SAW 


only 

$2^75 ppd 


Be sure to get our price list before 
you buy ANY farm seeds. Features 
and describes all standard farm seeds, 
including newest varieties of Corn, 
Oats, Alfalfa, Barley, etc., at reason¬ 
able prices. Dibble’s has supplied high¬ 
est yielding seeds to Northeastern 
farmers since 1891! Join 
the thousands who con¬ 
sistently get bigger 
corps with D i b b I e's 
seeds. 

Write Today 
for 

Price List. 



I 


EDW. F. DIBBLE Seedgrower 
Box B Honeoye FailS/ N. Y. 


r 








• • 

3 to 5 yr. healthy, selected trees, 6" 
to 16 ” tall. 5 each oi; Colorado' Blue 
Spruce—Norway Spruce—Austrian 
Pine — Scotch Pine — Douglas Fir. 

Postpaid at planting time 
Vi'rite for Free Evergreen Catalog 


Box 20-A 


Indiana, Pa. 


I^DWARF FRUIT TREES 

Ideal for home garden, require little 
space, full size fruit, bear ear y, 
2nd or 3rd year. DWARF PEACH. 
APPLE, PEAR: New North Star 
Dwarf CHERRY. Also new grapes, 
nut trees, berries. Guaranteed 
stock. Catalog Free. 

J. E. MILLER NURSERIES 




At last the ideal saw for pruning fruit trees and 
shrubbery, cleaning out brush, taking off limbs of 
pine trees. Also excellent for cutting frozen meat. 
Finest materials—takes lots of punishment—teeth cut 
(not stamped) and ground. Will last long time if 
you can keep it away from your wife. To order, at¬ 
tach this ad to your name and address with your 
check for $2.75. (Price includes extra blade). 

WHEELER SAW COMPANY, Belchertown, Moss. 


/higbieN 

VSEEDSy 


FAMOUS FOR 80 YEARS 

FARMERS 

EARN EXTRA MONEY. 
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Take orders now, right in your community, 
for our Northern Grown, Proven Farm 
and Grass Seeds. Complete line. Exclusive 
texTitory. Liberal Commission paid weekly. 
Men with us for years. Satisfied customers 
order year after year. 

Write for 1958 Price List and Agency. 
GEO. K. HIGBIE & COMPANY, INC. 

2 LAKE AVE., ROCHESTER 6, N. Y. 
Sow Higbie Seeds for A-1 Crops. 


^loveliest of ali.Toget^H^H^Hy 
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Pink, and Yellow— 

75c value forlOc. Send DimeToday! 

Burpee’s Seed Catalop FREE. 

V. ATLEE BURPEE CO. 

519 Burpee Bldg., Philadelphia 32, Pa. 



912 WEST LAKE ROAD, 


CANANDAIGUA, N. Y. 


STRAWBERRIES 


Plant Superfectlon for berries this 
year. Allen’s 1958 Berry Book 
describes best varieties—best 
methods. Free copy. Write today. 

W. F. ALLEN COfAPANY 
72 Evdrgrdon Ave., SalUbury, Maryland 


Evergreen Planting Stock 

For Christmas Trees-Ornamentals 

SEEDLINGS and TRANSPLANTS — many va¬ 
rieties of Pine, Spruce, Fir, etc. direct from 
growers. Excellent money-crop for idle acres. 
Price List and Planting Guide—FREE. Write: 

SUNCREST NURSERIES 


BOX 305-B, 


HOMER CITY, PENNA. 


STRAWBERRY PLANTS 

BLUEBERRY, RASPBERRY and ASPARAGUS 
IN ALL POPULAR VARIETIES 
A Free Catalogue Full of Facts. No Fakes. 

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WILLARDS. BOX 8, MARYLAND 


STRAWBERRYS: RED. BLACK. PURPLE RASP¬ 
BERRY PLANTS. GUARANTEED TO GROW. 
EUREKA PLANT FARM, HASTINGS, NEW YORK 


Big push in the corn field (1850) 



Some of grandfather’s brightest 
ideas—like this “automatic” corn 
planter—are fit only for museums 
today. But the principles he lived 
by still endure. 

One of the most important of 
these is thrift. 

That’s why so many farmers 
buy U.S. Savings Bonds, day in 
and day out. They’ve found that 
there is no better way to save. Es¬ 
pecially today! For now your 
money grows faster than ever 
with the new higher interest rate 
of 3 1/4%. 

For the big things in your life, 
be ready with 

U.S. Savings Bonds 


The U.S. Government does not pay for this advertising. The Treasury Department thanks, 
for their patriotic donations, the Advertising Council and 



The Rural New Yorker 



I SHOPPING FOR A NEW SIL0?| Box 217 R Weedsport, N. Y. 



You’ll save with a 


CONCRETE SILO 


1 

I Please send folder without obligation. | 

I Name^_ 


EARLY ORDER DISCOUNT! 

Free folder. Mail coupon today. 


I 

I Address. 

I 


'City. 


A ^^Cinch 


95 


/ 


or 


Grape Growers 

Fred Willits, grape grower of North 
East, Pennsylvania, has invented a 
new clamp which eases the task of 
tightening grape wires — a device 
which quickens the normally dull 
and time-consuming tasks of tighten¬ 
ing grape wires. Farmers from the 
Western New York and Pennsylvania 
ten’ific boon to the grape grower. 

Mr. Willits says the numerous ad 
vantages of the “Cinch” are that 
there is no more tedious twisting of 
wire, no more winding wire around 
posts, and no more breaking and 
piercing wire. The device is expectedl 
to save grape growers hours in labor, 
time and money by its use, since 
under the old system the grower has 
to employ help and pay them by the 
hour. 

Basically, the “Cinch” works as 
follows: A small bar is undergrooved 
and has two oval rings. This bar has 
a groove on the bottom side, while 
two notches are found on the top 
area of the bar. The bar will slide 
into the two oval rings, which are 
found resting on the notches just 
mentioned. From^ this point, the 
grape wire fits into the grooved slot, 
as well as the two rings. 

Then a regular wire stretcher, 
equipped with two clamps, and found 
on most grape farms, pulls all the 
slack out of the wire. Next, the wire 
is cut and both ends are fitted in 
the groove under the rings. After 


Why is the Deer a 
''Sacred Cow"? 

Thousands of people who farm and 
garden in Pennsylvania are plagued 
with both deer and rabbits, and little 
is being done about it. The deer prob¬ 
lem began some years back when a 
buck law was passed; soon the doe 
became Pennsylvania’s sacred cow. 
Since that time, an oversized deer 
herd has done much damage to our 
forests. Yet thousands of these ani¬ 
mals die from starvation in Pennsyl¬ 
vania’s woods during hard Winters. 
In their struggle to live, hungry deer 
destroy everything edible within 
their reach. It would be futile to 
undertake to reforest the over¬ 
browsed sections of our forest while 
deer are there. They would destroy 
the transplants almost as quickly as 
set out. Deer depredation on crops 
is no joking matter to rural folks 
who depend upon the land for their 
living. The Game Commisssion pays 
for damage that bears do to farm 
property, but it will not pay for 
the more serious deer damage. 

Hoodlum hunters are other pests 
of the farmer. But if he posts his 
land, he helps protect the animals 
that destroy his crops. “Hunting-ism” 
is growing on us. By virtue of their 
being more numerous, the hunters 
are taking over. There is only one 
way to check hunting-ism; land own¬ 
ers must organize, and fight for pro¬ 
tective laws. Under current law it is 
the Game Commission which domin¬ 
ates and exploits the countryside. 

Thomas G. Fulcomer 

Pennsylvania 



I want to add my bit about the 
deer who eat up our cabbage, beans, 
buckwheat and apples. The State 
owns the wild game, but the farmer 
feeds it. The city sportsman comes and 
shoots it; some even carry pliers and 
cut barbed-wire fences. We pay taxes 
on the land, and what do we get?; 
a band of hunters overrunning the 
place regardless of posting. In deer 
season the deer disappear; afterward 
they are back again to plague farm¬ 
ers. J. H. Hanyen 

Pennsylvania 


Fred Willits of North East, Erie Co., 
Pa., has developed this clamp that 
so much eases the task of tightening 
vineyard trellis wires. 

this step, the stretchers are removed. 
Tension in the wire tightens the 
clamps. 

A good example of how this meth¬ 
od works can be seen by examining 
Mr. Willits’ own farm. He has 30 
acres of grapes which gives him a 
total of 270 rows and, with two wires 
to each row, a total of 540 wires are 
used on his farm. After the fall 
grape harvest, it becomes necessary 
for all grape farmers to tighten wires 
at each end. This means unwinding, 
pulling tight and rewinding around 
end posts a total of 1,080 wires. In 
addition to the great amount of time 
this method takes, the constant twist¬ 
ing weakens the wire and eventually, 
after a number of twistings, it be¬ 
comes brittle and breaks. 

Willits’ device eliminates this, 
since it is only necessary for the 
grower to go through the middle of 
rows, tighten his wires and readjust 
the clamp. The wire is never twisted 
or damaged, and the time used for 
this method is but a fraction of the 
time involved in the old method. 

Robert Dyment 


Controlled Atmosphere: 
90 Doys ot Five Per Cent 

In New York State, any apple, or 
other fruit or vegetable, represented 
as having been exposed to controlled 
atmosphere, i. e., “air” in which there 
is an artificially increased amount of 
carbon dioxide, must have been kept 
in it for not less than 90 days. There 
can be no more than five per cent 
oxygen in the atmosphere for that 
period, and a record of storage must 
be kept. A daily log of room tem¬ 
perature, carbon dixoide, oxygen, CO- 
scrubbing, and added air is being 
recommended to all apple men who 
expect to market CA fruit in New 
York. The method of storage main¬ 
tains quality extremely well late into 
the market season, and it usually 
results in higher prices for fruit 
which otherwise might have to be 
sold at, or soon after, harvest. Under 
New York State’s regulations, not 
many true—and legal—CA apples 
can appear at the markets prior to 
the middle of January. 

At the horticulture department of 
Ohio State University, it has recent¬ 
ly been figured that a shade tree 20 
inches in diameter at breast height 
may be worth anywhere from $565 
to $1,570. 


Books for Home 
Gardeners 

The Gardener’s Bug Book, 

Cynthia Westcott.$7.50 

Botany — Plant Science, 

W. W. Robbins & T. E. Weir... 6.95 
Propagation of Plants, 

Kains and McQuestion.6.00 

The Vegetable Growing Business, 

R. L. & G. S. Walts. 6.00 

10,000 Garden Questions Answered 

F. F. Rockwell. 4.95 

Greenhouse Gardening for Every¬ 
one, 

Ernest Chabot. 4.75 

Mushroom Growing Today, 

F. C. Atkins.4.50 

For sale by The Rural New 
Yorker, 333 West 30th St, New York 
1, N. Y. (New York City residents, 
add 3% Sales Tax.) 

THE RURAL NEW YORKER 






















































































Enjoy greater “Pickup”.. more “Go” 

with a John Deere Tractor and 


Universal 3-Point Hitch 



It’S an exclusive feature of John Deere '‘520,” "620,” and “720” Series 
Tractors—the Universal 3-Point Hitch. This versatile hitch not only- 
works with a wide variety of fast-working, big-capacity John Deere equip¬ 
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also is fully adaptable to 3-point equipment of any other make. 

It’s easy to attach or “drop” equipment from the Universal 3-Point 
» Hitch. You’ll be able to handle many different jobsi in a single day; your 
tractor is never tied up for more than the few moments required to 
change tools. On the road, you’ll travel at top speeds to and from the job 
with the implement lifted high and clear of obstructions. A touch of the 
control lever and you’re ready to go to work. The hitch links tractor and 
implement into a single working unit that is second to none in maneuver¬ 
ability. You can work closer to fences, borders, and levees; eliminate 
broad headlands for turning, and utilize more of your land. Ample hitch 
adjustments help insure better work; in most cases, these adjustments 
can be made without leaving the tractor seat. In addition, you can attach 
or detach the hitch from the tractor without the use of tools, without 
heavy lifting. 

See your John Deere dealer soon and arrange to field-test a John Deere 
“520,” “620,” or “720” Tractor equipped with the Universal 3-Point 
Hitch. This is the hitch that makes modern “pick up and go” farming 
more practical than ever. 


JOHN DEERE 

Wherever Crops Grow, There's a Growing 
Demand for John Deere Farm Equipment 



EXCLUSIVE LOAD-AND-DEPTH CONTROL 

Exclusive Load-and-Depth Control automatically 
transfers weight to the drive wheels to provide in-- 
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change in soil consistency and density, and keeps the 
implement working at a constant depth in rises and 
depressions. With Load-and-Depth Control, you work 
at a steadier pace and cover more acres. More efficient 
use is made of tractor power, thus practically elimi¬ 
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down-shifting. It’s entirely automatic; you merely set 
implement working depth; Load-and-Depth Control 
takes over from there. 


This colorful booklet points 
out the many advantages of 
the John Deere Universal 3* 
Point Hitch. See your John 
Deere dealer or write John 
Deere, Moline, Illinois, for your 
free copy. 




SEND FOR FREE LITERATURE 


JOHN DEERE • Moline, III. • Dept. B-3T 

Please send me the literature I have 
checked below: 

□ "520," "620," and "720" Tractors 

□ Universal 3-Point Hitch 

Name _ 


□ Student 


R.R.. 


JBox_ 


Town_ 

Stale^ 































See the many famona 
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America’s favorite 
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BURPEE 

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GIANT 

HVBRIDI 

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Big:grest Smooth, Round, Red 
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f They win prizes at shows, bring highest 
pricesonthe market and roadside stands. 
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The Plants Bear Heavier, Longer 
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SPECIAL— for you to try Big Boy, send stamp 
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W. ATLEE BURPEE CO. 

520 Burpee Building. Philadelphia 32, Pa< 



19t8 GUtOlN 






I^EI I V’C COLOR 
IVELLI 3 CATALOG 

of DWARF FRUIT TREES 

Peachy Cherry, Apple, Pear 

blue Shrubs, Shade 

TlUo Trees, Perennials, etc. 


Dwarf Peach, Cherrj', Apple, Pear trees, 
give huge crops from small land area... 
and they’re so EASY to care for and 
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plants, flowering shrubs, perennials, 
fast-grow'ing shade trees, etc. SAVE by 
buying DIRECT from nursery in busi¬ 
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coupon now. 

_KELLY BROS_ 

78 YEARS AS NURSERYMEN 
I Dept. RI-4 Dansville, N. Y. 

I * Rush me FREE the new Spring Color Cata¬ 
log of guaranteed, hardy Dwarf Fruit Trees, 
Shrubs, Berry Plants, etc. (Regular Cus¬ 
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I Name. 


Address. 

City .State. 

Enclose 50( West of the Mississippi 




RAWBERRIES 


FREE CATALOG describes our new 
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- Also blueberries, grapes, raspberries, 

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RAYNER BROTHERS. SALISBURY 5, MARYLAND 


FRUIT TREES, STRAWBERRY, RASPBERRY 
AND BLUEBERRY PLANTS 


Dwarf apple trees on Mailing I, 2, 
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prices reasonable. 60-page illus- 

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sent free. Write: BOUNTIFUL RIDGE NURSERIES 

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ERGREENS 


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Seedlings andTransplantS'direct from grow¬ 
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Box 305 • B Homer City, Pa. |J|^ 




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Write now for big FREE 
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CHRISTMAS TREES 


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HAV WA/MTEO 



STRAWBERRIES 


Allen’s 1958 Berry Book tells 
best varieties for home and 
market, and how to grow them. 
Free copy. Write today. 


W. F. ALLEN COMPANY 
72 West Evergreen Ave., Salisbury, Maryland 


300 ton of alfalfa, U. S. No. 1 or 
No. 2 leafy. 

Also, 200 ton of top quality 
mixed hay. Write — 
GARELICK BROS. FARMS, Inc. 
Franklin, Massachusetts 



HARRIS’ NORTH STAR CORN 


HARRIS SUDS 

NORTH STAR CORN 

MAKING NEW FRIENDS — KEEPING THE OLD 
Because this early hybrid sweet corn, developed and 
sold only by Harris, is now universally recognized 
as the finest early hybrid and the most profitable 
kind to grow for the higher priced early markets. 

Makes rapid vigorous growth under tough, cold 
weather conditions. 

Kernels are deep creamy gold, tender and sweet 
and the ears and husks very attractive, 

SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG 
If you grow for market, ask for oar Market 
Gardeners' and Florists’ Catalog. 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., INC. 

9 Moreton Farm, Rochester 11, New York 

1958 CATALOG imvAmdij 


6 


1 


Warming pans^ witches and 
wayfarers were all popular 

In the Pioneer Days 


Y grandmother first saw the 
light of day in 1816, the 
year without any Summer. 
“1816, and froze to death,” 
was the usual description 
for that memorable year. 
It is hard to imagine 
New York State at that early time. 
There was pioneering aplenty to be 
done. There were no stores to run to 
for a pound of this or that; every¬ 
thing possible had to be made on the 
farm. There was, my grandmother 
said, a life of complete independence 
on a large farm. 

Animals were raised and butch¬ 
ered. Hides cured in the home tan¬ 
nery were eventually made up into 
leather goods and footwear for the 
family. The shoemaker would come 
and remain until the whole family 
was shod. For a supply of sugar, the 
maple sugar bush was common as the 
source. White sugar from the store 
was considered a great treat. 

Tin cans were unknown; fruits 
were either dried or preserved with 
the maple .sugar, A barrel of apple 
butter and also pies and cakes made 
by the dozen in the Fall and frozen 
for storage in the food room were a 
guarantee against dessertless meals 
during long hard Winters, 

When the family was going to 
meeting (as it was said in those 
days), it would drive right over fence 
tops in the snow. A tuning fork 
pitched the tunes for congregational 
singing. As the meetings lasted all 
day, dinners were brought along. 

In these days of jet planes, it is 
hard to conceive of it once taking two 
weeks to reach New York City from 
Central New York. But it did. Great¬ 
grandfather actually took his cattle 
all the way to the New York market. 
He went on horseback, putting up at 
taverns on the way. A large group cf 
men drove the cattle. 

It Was a Self-Sufficient Life 

The big wheels for spinning yarn 
and the smaller ones for fiax were al¬ 
ways busy, as was also the loom 
which was a part of every household. 
From the sheep in the pasture to the 
flax growing in the field, it was not 
far to clothing for the family. There 
were no drones in the family’s bee¬ 
hive of activity; a slogan for genera¬ 
tions was, “Satan finds some mischief 
still for idle hands to do.” 

Beds were heated by the warming 
pans which usually hung by the big 
fireplace—two frying pans with elon¬ 
gated handles hinged together. Coals 
from the fire were placed in the pans, 
which were run through the beds 
just before occupancy. When some¬ 
one had forgotten to fill the inter¬ 
box and the bellows could not revive 
a spark from the fireplace, there was 
nothing to do but to borrow coals 
from a neighbor. The distance be¬ 
tween homes was so great that the 
coals would often expire in transit. 
Then the journey would have to be 
repeated. Great was the excitement 
when matches were first invented; 
there was rejoicing, too. Called 
“Lucifers” and coated with brimstone, 
they gave off strangling fumes when 
ignited. But they were a remarkably 
convenient source of fire. 

Great-grandfather was a Congress¬ 
man and disdained wearing home- 
spun apparel when serving his coun¬ 
try. So he would buy broadcloth in 
New York City for tailoring by grand¬ 
mother. She was the seamstress of 
the family. When I rebelled against 
learning to sew, I would be reminded 
that great-grandpa would go over the 
suit, inch by inch and, if he found 
one imperfect stitch, it had to come 
out. It could seem that life was noth¬ 
ing but a “demnition grind,” but with 
bees, sewing circles and parties there 


were many occasions for community 
enjoyment. 

There Was Faith, but Witches, Too 

The Bible was an integral part of 
the family life. Implicit faith was 
placed in whatever creed was fol¬ 
lowed. We scoff at witchcraft today, 
but in those days it was no scoffing 
matter. Did not the Bible forbid peo¬ 
ple to have anything to do with 
witches and wizards that peeped and 
muttered, and had familiar spirits? 
How about the witch of Endor? Did 
you dare to say the Bible lied? In the 
bailiwick of grandmother’s youth 
there was an accredited witch— 
Granny Smith by name. She lived 
with a big black cat on a little prop¬ 
erty of her own, subsisting mostly 
through neighborhood charity and 
hospitality. To make a witch the re¬ 
cipient of one’s favor was all right, 
but it was a popular belief that under 
no circumstances should anything be 
accepted from her. One would come 
under her spell. Granny was not 
vicious, just mildly annoying. If any¬ 
one caused her displeasure, she 
would retaliate in small ways like 
turning pies upside down as they 
came from the oven, or souring milk 
brought in at milking time — the 
petty aggravations which had to be 
accepted with no thought of reproof. 

As time went on, Granny became 
really malicious. It finally reached a 
climax when a farmer against whom 
she had a grievance was driving his 
load of winter wood past her place. 
Just as he reached her boundary¬ 
line, all the wood fell off. Granny 
stood in her doorway, smiling. He 
tried to reload with no success what¬ 
ever, and the affair ended by his 
driving the oxen almost to the end 
of her boundary-line and carrying 
the wood to the sled. There was no 
other route by which he could get 
the wood, and he determined to 
fasten it so firmly it could not be 
dislodged. So he chained it. Chained 
or not, the wood fell off as before, 
and the oxen had to be driven com¬ 
pletely past her place. Every bit of 
wood had to be toted by manpower 
to the sled. 

The farmer came with his trouble 
to great-grandfather who, realizing 
that something must be done, called 
a meeting of the church deacons to 
discuss the matter. There was no 
doubt about Granny’s cat being the 
familiar spirit told of in Scriptures, 
and with the cat out of the way. 
Granny would be shorn of her power. 
But tradition said that no ordinary 
bullet would kill a witch’s cat; it 
must be a silver bullet. So great¬ 
grandfather had a bullet made of a 
shilling piece, and utmost secrecy 
was kept concerning plans for the 
cat. 

The Cat—and Granny—Confronted 

The cat had often been seen prowl¬ 
ing around an old abandoned shed in 
search of provender, so it was de- 



1. Where did the first Biblical 
mountaineer live? 

2. How many years was he there? 

3. How long was his entire life span? 

4. Who was his grandfather? 

5. Who was his father? 

6. How many sons did he have? 

7. Who were they? 

8. What was his occupation before 
he became a mountaineer? 

9. What was his occupation as a 
mountaineer? 

10. Who was he? 

(Answers on Page 28) 

THE RURAL NEW YORKER 











































































This is the main building at the new Miner Agricultural Research Institute 
in Clinton Co,, N. Y. Instruction to resident students and to area farmers 
will carry out the ivill of W. H. Miner. 


New Farm School 


cided to wait for it there. Accord¬ 
ingly, the watchers secreted them¬ 
selves and, after a long wait, the cat 
umped upon the window sill. Great¬ 
grandfather had just aimed, ready to 
ire when Granny, her eyes blazing, 
appeared in the doorway. She gath¬ 
ered up her apron, put the cat in it 
and departed with the animal un- 
larmed. The episode evidently fright¬ 
ened her, though, as she ceased her 
annoyances completely. It was her 
custom after a meal to read the tea 
eaves in her cup and at great-grand- 
lather’s one day she announced 
mournfully, “There’s my grave, and 
it’s near at hand.” It really was; in 
a few hours she was dead. Supersti- 
;ions of all kinds were absolutely 
;aboo in our home, but grandmother 
lad unshakeable faith that Granny 
Smith was indeed a real witch. 

With homes so scattered, wayfar¬ 
ing people were always fed and put 
up for the night as a matter of 
course. There was no thought of re¬ 
compense. Some felt an obligation, 
however, like one lone traveler who 


More dairy cattle than ever be¬ 
fore in the 41-year history of the 
Pennsylvania Farm Show are going 
:o be shown Jan. 13-17 at the Farm 
Show Building in Harrisburg. Num¬ 
bering 690—all from Pennsylvania— 
they represent the six leading 
breeds. In the entire livestock show 
are about 2,000 entries: 400 beef 
cattle, plus 130 4-H baby beeves, 371 
sheep, 294 pigs and 114 horses. All 
signs point to one of the biggest and 
best farm shows yet; exhibition space 
was all taken by the first of last 
month, and 243 compnnies will be 
on hand in the 14-acre building with 
their agricultural aids and services. 
Mechanical equipment and means of 
saving labor will be featured ex¬ 
hibits; the theme of the show is 
“better farming for better service to 
consumers.” Many annual meetings 
of Pennsylvania farm organizations 
will be held during the week of 
Farm Show. 


Last month’s trade in Christmas 
trees could hardly have made a dent 
in Pennsylvania’s good supply. More 
than 60 million Christmas trees are 
growing on some 2,000 plantations in 
the State. Because the grading pro¬ 
gram got such a late start this past 
year, it did not go into wide-spread 
effect. Another year Penn’s Christ¬ 
mas woods are expected to be graded 
in large volume. 


Last year’s drought had at least 
one desirable result: it reduced the 
number of corn borers. According to 
T. L. Guyton of the bureau of plant 
industry, almost 44 per cent fewer 
infested stalks have been found this 
year than last in 34 corn-growing 


said, “I’d like to pay you but I have 
no money. I’d give you my vest, but 
it’s my uncle’s.” 

Although great-grandfather sent 
his sons to college, he frowned upon 
learning for women. He said it was 
necessary for them only to read and 
write and know enough of mathe¬ 
matics so that they would not be 
cheated in business. 

Such was one way of life at the 
turn of the nineteenth century when 
the virgin forest echoed to the call 
of the wolf and the wildcat. And who 
is to say it was not a good one? As 
the poet said, “Cover the embers and 
put out the light; toil comes with the 
morrow and rest with the night.” 
Plenty was the toil in the fresh, un¬ 
tainted air, and the rest was that 
which only such endeavor can know. 
There can be no comparison between 
the sybaritic life of today, and the 
simple one of long ago. If one knows 
only primitive living and simple en¬ 
joyments, he can truly say, “Where 
ignorance is bliss, ’tis folly to be 
wise.” Irene E. Bassett 


counties. Pennsylvania farms’ annual 
loss due to the borer have been esti¬ 
mated as high as $4.6 million. 


Maine seed potatoes have been 
planted to such an extent in Penn¬ 
sylvania recently that growers are 
getting concerned about it. In 1958, 
all the Pennsylvania potatoes grown 
for seed—mostly in Potter County— 
will be sample tested in Fall and 
Winter on Florida farms to check on 
their freedom from disease. Penn¬ 
sylvania’s seed potatoes have been 
proven to be fully as good and often 
better than seed potatoes from other 
States. So growers are also giving 
consideration to an advertising pro¬ 
gram to tell the tablestock and chip 
producers all about them. 


Pennsylvania’s hay and silage 
crops were the smallest in 20 years. 
Due to drought, the tonnage was 12 
per cent below a year ago and 13 
per cent below average. In south¬ 
eastern counties, where conditions 
were most severe, the crop was only 
63 per cent of normal. Because much 
of the hay and silage was fed out 
during Summer and early Fall to eke 
out burned-up pastures, the supply 
on hand in barns and silos November 
1 was 33 per cent under a year ago. 
The average price for baled alfalfa 
has gone up continuoussly since 
June; recently it was $42 per ton, 
highest on record. Other hay has 
averaged $31.50 for the State, up 
$6.00 from June. In northern coun¬ 
ties where rainfall was almost ade¬ 
quate, the supply of silage and hay 
approaches that of so-called normal 
years. 


A new college opened its doors in 
New York this past September. The 
William H. Miner Agricultural Re¬ 
search Institute, located between 
Chazy and Sciota on the 14,000-acre 
Heart’s Delight Farm, has finally be¬ 
come the realization of a dream of 
a man who died 27 years ago. W. H. 
Miner earned millions of dollars 
through his railway-car coupling in¬ 
vention, and he sought to have much 
of his wealth go to the “betterment 
of mankind.” The Miner Foundation 
in New York’s North Country ful¬ 
fills his desires. Miner lived in Clin¬ 
ton County both as boy and as man, 
and he loved it. 

In this area, where farming is the 
principal industry, founding of the 
institution opens a new era for both 
present and future farmers. The 
curriculum will cover many fields: 
field-crop production, forage prob¬ 
lems, soil conservation, soils and fer¬ 
tilizers, animal production, dairy 


According to the Connecticut Ex¬ 
periment Station in New Haven, the 
hemlock tree is particularly suited 
for improvement of northeast wood¬ 
lands. Because of its shade tolerance, 
it is one of the few species that can 
be introduced successfully into exist¬ 
ing stands. Thus it offers a means of 
increasing the acre yield of merchant¬ 
able products. Hemlock also has 
great esthetic value, and it is im¬ 
portant to wildlife conservation. 

As long as high quality spruce, 
chestnut and pine were readily 
available, hemlock boards and timber 
were considered of little value. Writ¬ 
ing in 1915, USDA’s E. H. Frothing- 
ham said: “As late as 1880, hemlock 
lumber of the first quality had so 
little market value in New York and 
Pennsylvania that it could be shipped 
only at a loss and was often sold at 
the mill for as little as $4.50 per 
thousand board feet.” 

At one time, hemlock was used 
extensively for tanbark, but this mar¬ 
ket disappeared long ago. By 1924, 


cattle breeds and breeding, feeds and 
feeding, food and health, marketing 
livestock products, chemistry and 
zoology. The purpose of the college 
is to bring new methods and findings, 
and means for their application, to 
the attention of farmers. 

Students of the Institute are to 
be provided, without cost, all facili¬ 
ties during the nine and one-half 
months of the school year. Included 
are housing in completely furnished 
apartments with heat, lights, stoves 
and laundry equipment. Students 
must attend at least 70 per cent of 
scheduled classes. Medical service 
for minor illnesses will be provided. 

A grateful North Country already 
points with pride to its William H. 
Miner Agricultural Research Insti¬ 
tute. Indeed, in memory of its found¬ 
er, it should work forever for the 
betterment of all humanity. 

New York G. E. Rowe 


hemlock dimension stock in Connec¬ 
ticut brought from $35 to $45 per 
thousand. Railway ties and boxboards 
were outlets for the limited amount 
of hemlock then being cut. 

The value of hemlock a generation 
hence cannot be computed. But when 
we match its known characteristics 
against our need for productive 
woodlands, extensive recreation areas 
and watershed protection, hemlcw*k 
becomes worth careful study. The 
great enemies of hemlock trees have 
been fire and clear cutting. With 
present fire control measures, how¬ 
ever, and a better understanding of 
how the species can be established, 
we shall be able to use much more 
hemlock in our woodlands. 


The gallon milk jug is finally in 
use in New York State. The Borden 
Company is supplying the A & P 
super market at Fuller Road Shop¬ 
ping Center outside of Albany with 
milk in gallon jugs selling at 92 
cents per jug. 


pEmsn VANIA FAKM Nms 


Hemlock a Forest Improver 


FINCE FUNNIES BY BETH 



January 4, 1958 


7 


































































Harris’ Famous Moreton Hybrid 


41ARRIS SCCDS 

YOU AKE MISSING A GOOD BET 

If you aren’t growing Moreton Hybrid Tomatoes. 
From New England to Louisiana and throughout the 
Mid-West, our customers tell us it’s a real profit 
maker. 

Finest Early Tomato — Large Uniform Fruit 
With Solid Mealy Flesh — Wonderful Flavor 
Vines with Hybrid Vigor — Heavy Early 
and Continuous Yields. 

This is only one of the many money makers you 
will find in our new Catalog of vegetables and flowers. 
SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG 
If you grow for market, ask for oar Market 
Gardeners' and Florists’ Catalog. 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., INC. 

8 Moreton Farm, Rochester 11, New York 

195 8 CATALOG nmvAmdij 


NEW CARPATHIAN 



Prodiices large delicious 
thin-shelled English Wal¬ 
nuts. Perfectiy adapted 
for cold winters; will 
stand 25 below without 
injury. Makes a beauti¬ 
ful, fast-growing shade 
tree. Plant for shade 
and nuts. Details in Miller’s FREE CATA¬ 
LOG. Also New Interlaken Seedless Grape, 
new Berries, Dwarf Fruit Trees, shade 
and flowering trees, fruit trees of all kmds. 
Guaranteed to grow. 


J. E. MILLER NURSERIES 


912 W. LAKE RD., CANANDAIGUA, N. Y. 



tall—only $l postpaid; IS only $2 
postpaid! Another Baroain: 20 
Evergreens, all transplanted 4 to 
10 in. tali. Five each: Balsam 
Fir, Douglas Fir, Rod Pine, 
White Spruce, all 20 for only $3 
postpaid. (West of Miss. River 
add 25c). FREE illustrated 
FOLDER of small evergreen trees. 
ALL TREES GUARANTEED TO 
LIVE. 


6 Colorado Blue Spruce 4 
yr. transplanted, 4 to 8 In. 


WESTERN MAINE FOREST NURSERY CO. 

Dept. RN-118, Pryeburg. Maine 


EVERGREEN HEDGE 

AMERICAN ARBORVITAE 
Sturdy 3-yr. seedlings 6 to 
8 in. high. Makes 100 ft. 

Beautiful Hedge. Postpaid, 

Write for free Evergreen Catalog 





BOX 

20-A 


INDIANA, PA. 



Tells the plain truth about 
the best seeds that grow 
■ your favorite flowers 
and vegetables, including 
Hybrids. 450 pic¬ 
tures. FREE. IVrifc Today! 

! W. ATLEE BURPEE CO. | 

518 Burpee Bldg., Philadelphia 32, Pa. | 

Send new Burpee Seed Catalog FREE. j 


Name • 


St. or R. D. 


P. O.Zone - ■. - State 


BURPEE SEEDS GROW 



PEACH T* D t IT O l-OW AS 

1 ticito 20c 

Cherries, peart, plums, nut trees, strawberries, blua. 
berries, dwarf fruit trees. Grapevines lOe. Shrubs, 
evergreens, shade trees, roses 25c up. Quality stock 
can’t be sold lower. Write for FREE color catalog and 
$2 FREE bonus information. TENNESSEE NUR¬ 
SERY CO.. BOX 16. CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 



TKAWBERRV PLANTS 

Write for catalog, fully describing all 
varieties, with best methods of growing 
them. Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

J.H. SHIVERS, Box R-58, Allen, Md. 


TREES & SHRUBS 

Raise your own trees and shrubs from SEEDS. Beauti¬ 
ful Evergreens, lovely trees and shrubs for shade, 
windbreaks, snow fence, erosion control, ornament, 
etc. For FREE planting guide and price list write: 
WOODLOT SEED CO., NORWAY 37, MICHIGAN 


- CHRISTMAS TREE - 

SEEDLINGS AND TRANSPLANTS 
PINES, SPRUCES, FIRS—Quality stock at reason¬ 
able prices. Place your order now for Spring planting 
while popular species and sizes are available. 

Write for price list and shearing bulletin. 
ECCLES Nurseries, Box 65, Dept. Y, Rimersburg, Pa. 


SENSATIONAL DURHAM HEAVY BEARING RED 
RASPBERRY PLANTS: Only $8.00-100. Free price 
list of other outstanding Strawberry and Raspberry 
Plants. MAC DOWELL BERRY FARM, 

BALLSTON LAKE, N. Y. PHONE: UP 7-5515 


- INCREASE PRESENT INCOME - 

Build growing sideline, full time business. No in¬ 
vestment. Farmers, Agents, Dealers. Take orders for 
Campbell’s Gro-Green Liquid Fertilizer Concentrates. 
Free sample, sales kit. Campbell Co., Rochelle 315, III. 



are idea! fr(?'3y income projects. One- 
tenth acre yields 660 — 900 quarts. 
Allen's Berry Book tells best varieties 
»nd How to Grow Them. Free copy. 
Write today. 

W. F. ALLEN COMPANY 


72 Vtfest Evergreen Ave., Salisbury, Maryland 


NEW JET TORCH destroys weeds, stumps, rocks. 
Get Free Bulletin. SINE. RN-2, QUAKERTOWN, PA. 


- CHRISTMAS TREE PLANTER - 

For tractors with hydraulic lift. Only $245. Plant 
1,000 per hour. Write — ROOTSPRED, 

ST. PETERSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA 


VIRUS FREE STRAWBERRY PLANTS. Catalog 
Free. M. S. PRYOR, R. F. D. SALISBU RY, MD. 


When you write advertisers mention 
The Rural New-Yorker and you’ll get 
a quick reply and a “square deal.” See 
guarantee editorial page. : : : 


- EVERGREEN SEEDLINGS - 

For Christmas Trees, etc. Quality Seedlings at 
Reasonable Prices. Write for information. 

PINE GROVE NURSERY, 

R. D. 3, CLEARFIELD, PENNA. 


STRAWBERRY and RASPBERRY PLANTS. FREE 
Catalog. REX SPROUT. WAVERLY, NEW YORK 


Change of Address: 

The Post Office Department no longer 
forwards magazine* or newspapers which 
are incorrectly addressed. We reauest 
that you report any change of address 
directly to us at least three weeks in 
advance. In any reauest for change of 
address, or in any communication regard¬ 
ing your subscription, kindly clip the 
name-and-address label from your latest 
issue of THE RURAL NEW-YORKER; 
the key numbers on this stamp enable 
us to locate your subscription quickly 
and to give you better service. 

THE RURAL NEW-YORKER 
333 W. 30th St.. N. Y.. 1. N. Y. 


Opportunity tor Middle-Aged Man 

We need a few reliable men to act as our sales 
representative in their neighborhood and take sub¬ 
scriptions to The Rural New-Yorker. We allow a 
liberal commission on both new and renewal orders 
and any man who enjoys meeting people will find 
the work both pleasant and profitable. 

The men selected will be given an exclusive 
territory near their home and will have an oppor¬ 
tunity to develop a permanent business and a 
steady income. No experience or investment of any 
kind is required but must have a car and be able 
to furnish satisfactory references. For further 
details write — 

CIRCULATION MANAGER, 

THE RURAL NEW-YORKER, 

^33 West 30th Street New York 1, N. Y. 


Battle for the Chestnut 


OR the many Americans who 
I’emember with a sense of 
real loss the nearly-extinct 
forest chestnut, there is 
goo(i news from a little 
known scientific battle- 
front. Steady progress is 
reported by a small band of dedi¬ 
cated men — botanists, forest¬ 
ers and horticulturalists — who for 
decades have kept up an un¬ 
remitting, often bitterly disappoint¬ 
ing, fight to restore that native 
tree. Chief centers of experimental 
work are the U. S. Forest Service 
Station at Laurel, Del.; the USDA 
Plant Industry Station at Beltsville, 
Md., and the State agricultural ex¬ 
periment stations of Connecticut and 
West Virginia. 

Efforts to bring back the forest 
chestnut fall into three categories: 
planting and testing of certain blight- 
resistant exotic strains, mostly Chin¬ 
ese, a few of which show desirable 
forest characteristics; the crossing 
and back-crossing of such Oriental 
strains with the dwindling American 
stock; the never-ending search for 
“escapes” — native trees still living, 
though long afflicted with blight— 
with the hope of discovering a 
naturally resistant strain. 

Perhaps the best Chinese import 
of the forest type, not to be confused 
with Chinese orchard types, is strain 
58602. This strain originated from 
200 pounds of seed nuts sent from the 
Nanking area in 1924. It is measuring 
up well in test plots. Several hybrid 
strains developed by the USDA and 
the Connecticut Experiment Station 
also show great promise. 

Living American chestnut trees 
with trunks eight or more inches in 
diameter should be reported to the 
Chief, Forest Service, USDA, Wash-- 
ington 25, D. C., or to the Horticult¬ 
ural Crops Research Branch, USDA, 
Beltsville, Md., or the Connecticut 
Agricultural Experiment Station in 
New Haven. 

If chestnut workers have been te¬ 
nacious in the face of discourage¬ 
ment, the tree has proved their 
equal. It will not give up. Stumps of 
long dead trees continue to send up 
shoots. Often these grow to 12 feet 
or more before they too are struck 
down by blight. Wild seedlings are 
still numerous. Most die early, but 
seedlings 40 feet tall and a foot in 
diameter have been reported. It is 
from such exceptional individuals, 
whether old survivors, shoots or seed¬ 
lings, that hope springs for a “15th 
round” comeback by the American 
chestnut. Not even the most optim¬ 
istic, however, envision a return of 
a forest chestnut to its full former 
estate. Nature has not waited. Other 
trees, especially oak and hickory, 
have taken up most of the vacated 
space. The future of a forest chest¬ 
nut, whether import, hybrid or re¬ 
sistant native strain, will lie in man¬ 
aged areas: farm woodlots and con¬ 
servation projects, from which a 
slow spread into the woodlands can 
be expected. 


If three individuals, currently ac¬ 
tive, can be singled out from the 
group working for restoration of the 
chestnut, they might be Pathologists 
Arthur H. Graves of Connecticut; 
Jesse D. Diller, U. S. Forest Service 
and G. F. Gravatt, Plant Industry Sta¬ 
tion, 

In the attic study of his century- 
old house in Wallingford, Conn., 
Arthur Graves told me the story of 
his love of and work for the chest¬ 
nut. He first became interested in 
the plight of the American chestnut 
while a student of forestry botany 
at Yale. In 1909, he joined the path¬ 
ology department of the USDA and 
since then his work has never stop¬ 
ped. For many years, he has been 
experimenting with hybrids. His 
greatest contribution has been the 
hybrid JA x C. This strain, from first 
crossing a blight-resistant Japanese 
with an American chestnut, possessed 
every desirable characteristic but 
one — it was highly susceptible to 
blight. This hybrid was next crossed 
with a highly resistant but low and 
crooked growing Chinese chestnut. 
The result is a strain that shows ex¬ 
ceptional possibilities. 

Another dedicated worker is Jesse 
D. Diller, 57, a rugged veteran of 
years of fielci work, who has been 
concentrating on the chestnut prob¬ 
lem since 1934. We met at the annu¬ 
al banquet of the Isaak Walton 
League in Frederick, Md. Next day, 
I joined him at his Forest Service 
Station deep in a forest preserve 
near Beltsville. We visited a new 
plot in the woods nearby where there 
are promising hybrids interspersed 
with type 58602. In these test plots, 
trees are evaluated for blight resis¬ 
tance, rate of growth, climatic suit¬ 
ability, possibilities for timber and 
nut production. When the right 
strain is found, it will be propagated 
by grafting. Set out in woodlots, it 
is hoped it will come true from its 
seed. 

An outstanding worker from the 
start of the restoration effort is G. 
Flippo Gravatt. As a small boy in 
Roanoke, Va., he went each year in¬ 
to the mountains to gather chestnuts 
to sell. He has been associated with 
the chestnut ever since. Gravatt will 
soon retire, but his work will be 
carried on by another Virginian, 
Frederick H. Berry who, though too 
young to remember much of the na¬ 
tive chestnut, has enthusiasm to 
match that of his senior associates. 

The work of such men is comple¬ 
mented by that of many dedicated 
amateurs. One day in early Spring, 
I drove into the country with C. 
Wayne Smyth, Bradford County Dis¬ 
trict Attorney of Troy, Penna., a 
operator. One day recently, we drove 
to Ridgebury Township where we lo¬ 
cated the largest “escape” yet re¬ 
ported in that area. The tree proved 
to be at least 25 feet high and mea¬ 
sured seven inches through at brest 
height. Though blighted, the tree 
was very much alive. Ed. Van Dyne 

Pennsylvania 




Arthur H. Graves’ great contribution to the renaissance of the American 
chestnut is the hybrid JAxC; it holds exceptional promise. 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


8 


































































Chevrolet Nomad — J^-door 6-passenger 

NEW WAGONS WITH WONDERFUL WAYS- 
THESE NEW ’58 CHEVROLETS! There’s new lilt in the 
way they look. New verve in their way with roads and loads. And'you have five 
to choose from. Pick a two-door model or four , six-passenger or nine , you can 
be sure of this: You’ll move in the smartest station wagon set there is! 


You never had handsomer or more prac¬ 
tical reasons to move into a new station 
wagon. These 1958 Chevrolets are dra¬ 
matically lower and wider—and nine 
crisp inches longer. 

Notice that the larger liftgate curves 
clear around at the corners. It’s hinged 
into the roof and raises completely out of 
the way for easier loading and maximum- 
size loads. The tailgate is bigger, too, so 
you can tote longer loads. 


Chevrolet’s new standard Full Coil sus¬ 
pension puts an extra-soft cushioning of 
deep coil springs at every wheel. Or, as 
optional choice at extra cost, you can 
have the ultimate of a real air ride— 
Level Air suspension. Bumps get swal¬ 
lowed up in cushions of air. And your 
wagon automatically keeps its normal 
level, regardless of how heavy the load. 

There’s still more to like. More steam 
in Chevy’s budget-minded Blue-Flame 6. 


More really potent performance with 
the new 250-h.p. Turbo-Thrust V8,* an 
ideal running mate for honey-smooth 
Turboglide* drive. Better see your Chev¬ 
rolet dealer soon. . . . Chevrolet Division 
of General Motors, Detroit 2, Michigan. 

*Optional at extra cost. 


CHEVROLET 



h 


Chevrolet Brookwood-lt-door 6-passenger 
























































STOP SHOVELING SNOW! 



SN0-002f R T?! 

^ Sove? Time—Saves/ 

Your Heart and 
Back! 

■*' • > # 

Push it like a vacuum cleaner! No lifting, 
no stoop! Clears snow in minutes instead 
of hours from any surface—even gravel 
, or dirt. Slides on sleigh run- 
J|||h ners. Handles heaviest snow, 16" 
steel blade. 54" no-stoop handle. 
Weighs less than 5 lbs. Only 
$4.95. Postage paid. Same price 
in Canada. No COD’s at this 
low price, please. Satisfaction 
guaranteed or money back. 

BOYAL-T PRODUCTS CO. 

Dept. BY-18 
811 Wyandotte 
Kansas City, Mo. 


PERFECT GIFT! 



$495 

postpaid 





DIRECT TO YOU... EASY TERMS 

Genuine Rockdale Mon¬ 
uments and Markers 

Full Price $14.95 and up. 

Satisfaction or MONEY 
BACK. We pay freight. 

Compare our low prices. I 
WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG^ 

ROCKDALE MONUMENT CO. 

DEPT. 680, JOLIET, ILL. 


CATCH ’EM CJUjQC 

AND UNHURT! -- 


AMAZING 
HAVAHART TRAP 
CATCHES MORE 
Rats, Coons, 

Squirrels, etc. 

CAN’T HARM 
Children t Pets 

Humane HAVAHART Trap captures animals alive—* 
without any damage to them, to you, to your children!. 

I Takes raiding rats, rabbits, sauirrels, skunks, weasels, 
mink, coons, etc. Straying pets and poultry released 
unhurt. Fully guaranteed. Easy to set—open ends giver 1;^ 
animal confidence. No jaws or springs to break. Bust- 
proof. Sizes for all needs. Send today for valuable FRED 
36-page booklet on trapping secrets (price list included). 

I HAVAHART, 105—S Water St.. Ossining. N. YJ 

— DEPRESSION PRICES, WE SELL CHEAP — 
SAVE 75% off-new and used tractor parts, crawlers 
and wheel tractors. 190 makes and models. 1958 
catalog ready. Send 25 cents refundable. 

SURPLUS TRACTOR PARTS CORPORATION. 
FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA 



When you write advertisers mention 
The Rural New- Yorker and you ’ll get 
a quick reply and a ’’square deal.” See 
guarantee editorial page. 


fARNl WOnK SHOP 


BY B. K. SOMMSPS 


If Ruptured 
Try This Out 

Modern Broteetlou Provides Great 
Comfort and Holding: Security 

Wittiont Torturoas Trass Wearing 

An “eye-opening” revelation in sensible 
and comfortable reducible rupture protec¬ 
tion may be yours for the asking, without 
cost or obligation. Full details of the new 
and different Rice Method will be sent 
you Free. Without hard flesh-gouging pads 
or tormenting pressure, here’s a Support 
that has brought joy and comfort to 
thousands — by releasing them from Trusses 
with springs and straps that bind and cut. 
Designed to securely hold a rupture up and 
in where it belongs and yet give freedom 
of body and genuine comfort. For full 
information — write today! 

WILLIAM S. RICE, Inc. 
Dept. 64-G, Adams, N.Y. 

LOW COST Ventilation 

For dairy and 
poultry barns. 

Complete 
packaged unit. 
Ready to install. 
_ Write for Catalog and Price List 

Debler Milking Machine Co., Inc. 

VERNON, NEW YORK 


V V \ '’ll' , 

monuments 


Sowdusf- Concref'e 

Some time ago in one issue of 
The Rural New Yorker there was 
an article on the use of sawdust to 
replace sand and gravel in certain 
types of cement work. 

I am contemplating two jobs and, 
as ready cash is slow in reaching me, 
would be glad if sawdust could be 
found practical. There is a great 
difference between $1.00 per truck- 
load of sawdust and the cost of sand 
and gravel. First, there is a retain¬ 
ing wall around the lawn, to be filled 
in behind this wall with dirt so as 
to level the lawn, said wall to be 
about two feet thick and from one 
to seven feet high; second, a founda¬ 
tion and floor for a new one-story 
henhouse three feet wide, 60 feet 
long and eight feet to the eaves with 
a hip roof. r. w. 

It would be inadvisable to use saw¬ 
dust for jobs exposed to the elements 
unless you can completely cover the 
sawdust aggregate with concrete or 
topping that contains no sawdust. 

Are there good ground banks in 
your area where you can purchase 
“bank-run” ground? Frequently the 
purchaser can do his own trucking 
and loading and thus reduce the cost 
of the material delivered to the job. 
It should be noted, however, that a 
common fault of bank-run gravel is 
the lack of stone in the material. In 
other words the ratio of sand to stone 
is too high. If this is the case, you 
must use more cement. 

If you used washed sand and 
crushed stone, you would use the 
proportions of one part cement, two 
parts sand and four parts stone. 
Therefore, when using bank-run ma¬ 
terial in which the percentage of 
sand may be high, increase the ce¬ 
ment portion, possibly to one and a 
half parts. 


about 400 square feet coverage per 
gallon for the first coat and about 
550 square feet for the second coat. 
Unless the drying conditions are ex¬ 
ceptionally good, allow four to six 
days between coats. 


plishment) and they must be laid bj 
an experienced mechanic. Only thor 
oughly cured blocks must be used t( 
avoid shrinking cracks. The exterioi 
surfaces should be protected wit 
two coats of water-cement paint. 

The need for maintenance of thi, 
kind of structure is confined to peri 
odic paniting of wood windows ani 
door frames and the cornice. 


To Waterproof Roll Roofing 

I have a long poultry house which 
I covered with roofing paper two 
years ago which leaks badly, caused, 
I think, by some of the heads being 
driven too hard so they cut into the 
paper. I understand there are con¬ 
cerns that offer some kind of pre¬ 
pared strips to cover the seams. Can 
you tell me what they are like and 
where I can procure them? r. p. 

We are not familiar with the use 
of stidps that are manufactured to 
cover leaky joints in roll roofing. 
You might ti'y troweling on a roof¬ 
ing mastic with an asphalt base. It 
never hardens completely and is 
therefore less subject to cracking 
when the roofing material moves be¬ 
cause of expansion and contrac¬ 
tion. 


Spray Paint or Brush Paint? 

Would you recommend the use o. 
a paint sprayer for painting the ou 
side of my house? g. t. e. 

The nature of exterior paint is 
such that it is meant to be brushec 
on, whereas interior coatings such as 
enamels, varnishes, lacquers, etc., are 
merely “laid on” the surface. Mos: 
authorities are of the opinion tha 
the spraying of exterior paint is no 
a suitable method to achieve the bes 
results except on porous surfaces or 
areas where it is difficult, or ini' 
possible to use a brush. In any even 
successful paint spraying requires 
considerable experience and skill. 


Beuen to oe safb 


To Clean Cisfern Walls 

My cistern has a pump, and the oil 
leaked into the cistern and the walls 
are all oily. How can I get the oil 
off the walls of the cistern? e. e. 

If the cistern has a fairly smooth 
surface, such as bricks or concrete 
blocks, you can give it a good scrub¬ 
bing with strong soap or detergent. 
Then follow with two coats of water- 
cement paint, a waterproofing ma¬ 
terial that is available at building 
supply or farm supply stores. 


How 


to Build Reinforced 
Concrete Floor 

Please send information as to 
proper method of building a rein¬ 
forced concrete garage floor over a 
full concrete block basement 14 feet 
by 20 feet. The information needed is 
thickness of floor, size of reinforcing 
rods, size of I-beams and spacing. 

c. A. B. 

Install a 10-inch wide flange steel 
I-beam across the 14-foot span and 
centered in the 20-foot dimension. 
The beam should have at least four 
inches bearing at the ends. No post 
or column is necessary. 

The slab is made of 1-2-4 concrete. 
Use only clean, sharp sand and %- 
inch crushed stone. A five-inch thick¬ 
ness should be adequate. The rein¬ 
forcement ought to be half-inch rods 
spaced six inches apart and placed 
parallel to the long dimension of the 
slab. There should be at least three- 
quarters of an inch of concrete under 
the reinforcing steel except where 
the slab rests on the I-beam. For a 
distance of about 16 inches each side 
of the beam the reinforcing steel is 
bent upwards so as to rest about 
three-quarters of an inch below the 
surface of the slab. 


Maf’eriol for Garage 

In your opinion, what is the most 
economical and best value material 
(longest lasting) for a two-car 
garage? h. a. m. 

Considering only the question of 
desirability and maintenance, a struc¬ 
ture built of concrete blocks is su¬ 
perior to a wood frame building. 
However, the blocks must be sup¬ 
ported on a proper footing to avoid 
settlement cracks (no easy accom- 



If the basement stairs 
Had better light, 

Mom might not now 
Be poised in flight. 

Beth Wilcoxson 


Snow Tires or Chains? 

According to the National Safety 
Council, good snow tires are a big 
help in loose snow and slush, but 
they are not much better than regu¬ 
lar tires on ice and hard-packed snow. 
So-called winterized treads, the 
Council believes, while providing 
only a small tractive advantage on 
icy surfaces, could mean the differ¬ 
ence between moving or not. Tire 
chains, reinforced with teeth or 
cleats, cut braking distances in half 
on both snow and ice, and they in¬ 
crease traction seven times on hills. 
On packed snow, reinforced chains 
quadruple the pull of tires. Regular 
chains, it is observed, provide good 


stop-and-go traction on ice and snow, 
but their skid resistance is low' com¬ 
pared to that of reinforced chains 
On glai'e ice, snow tires were founc 
28 per cent better than ordinary 
tires, regular chains 231 per cent 
better, and reinforced chains 409 per 
cent moi’e effective. In loose snov/, 
snow tires were 51 per cent more 
tractive than I'egular tires, and rein¬ 
forced chains 313 per cent. At 20 
miles per hour, it took ordinary tires 
60 feet to stop in snow, snow tires 
52 feet, regular chains 46 feet and 
reinforced chains 38 feet. On ice, the 
figures were: ordinary tires 195 feet, 
snow tires 174 feet, regular chains 
99 feet, and reinforced chains 77 
feet. 


Home-Mixed House Paint 

I would like to mix my own out¬ 
side white house paint. Would you 
know the right amounts of oil, white 
lead, etc.? l, p. c. 

For a two-coat job over a well- 
chalked surface, mix as follows: First 
coat—100 lbs. soft paste white lead, 
two gallons raw' linseed oil, 1% gal¬ 
lons turpentine and one pint drier; 
second coat —100 pounds soft white 
lead paste, three gallons raw linseed 
oil and one pint drier. The first coat 
mixture will produce about seven 
gallons of paint; the second mixture 
produces about 6 V 2 gallons. Estimate 





Take Along Chains 





Pump Your Brakes on Ice 

NATIONAL SAFITY COUNCIL 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


10 

































































































YeSf just one thimblefuf of amazing chemical dis~ 
cover/ has enough power to run your present car 
battery for the next JO years! Actually makes 
**Dead Batteries'^ spring to life instantly and new 
batteries trouble-free for the life of your car. See 
U. S. Gov't Proof and Readers Digest Report. 

At last it’s here! . . . Cleared by the U. S. Government 
itself for release to the public . . . the incredible dream- 
discovery that at this very moment is being used on U. S. 
Navy battery-driven submarines, on National Airline planes, 
even on such power-burning giants of the sea as the S.S. 
Queen Mary and S.S. Queen Elizabeth . . . and that in just 


60 seconds converts poitr present 
car battery into a 10-YEAR 
POWER PLANT ... a lifetime 
car battery that does away with 
battery failure FOREVER! Yes, 
this is the exact same type won¬ 
der-formula featured by Reader’s 
Digest in a 6-page spread. The 
exact same formula that was test¬ 
ed and retested in Gov’t labora¬ 
tories . . . An amazing chemical 
discovery that is so powerful that 
no matter how old your battery 
is ... no matter how run-down it 
may be ... no matter how many 
times you’ve been forced to charge 
and recharge it . . . JUST ONE 
OUNCE of this wonder-chemical 
will send a surge of never-failing 
power through your battery FOR 
THE LIFE OF YOUR CAR! Your 
car will ALWAYS START IN¬ 
STANTLY even in steaming 130- 
degree summer heat or 40-below 
zero paralyzing winter cold. 

Yet, with all this super-charg¬ 
ing power, all this flash-starting 
action this brilliant new discovery 
is so safe it’s been insured by the 
world's largest insurance company 
. . . and is so easy to use that by 
doing nothing more than pouring a 
thimbleful into each cell of your 
battery you convert your battery 
into a lifetime Power Plant! 

Now! Your Present Car Battery 
Can Deliver More Power Than 
When It Was Brand Newt 

Just think what this sensational 
discovery means to you if you are a 
car-owner who is sick and tired of 
throwing away good money every 
time your battery needs recharg¬ 
ing, OR shelling out ?15 to $35 
every time you need a new battery. 
It means that now for the first 
time you will never again invest 
another penny in your battery be¬ 
cause it will be be just impossible 
for your battery to ever fail again! 
It means that even in bumper-to- 
bumper traffic, even after months 
of idleness, even in drenching 
rains, why even if your car is com¬ 
pletely buried in snow ... all you’ll 
have to do is step on the starter 
button and your car will respond 
with a roar of power INSTANT¬ 
LY! No more “dead battery’’ stops 
on crowded highways ... no more 
coaxing your engine to start in 
bad weather... no more fear about 


using the heater, defroster or 
radio in cold weather because 
you’re afraid your battery may 
“conk Out.’’ Why, the discovery 
described on this page contains 
so much power, so much FLASH¬ 
STARTING POWER, that even if 
you go away on a 2-month trip and 
not a soul touches your car in all 
that time ... when you return your 
car will still start the instant you 
turn on the ignition. No coughing, 
no wheezing, no sickening groan... 
but a flash-action start in one sec¬ 
ond flat! Yes, it’s the most signifi¬ 
cant automotive discovery since 
automatic drive. A super-powerful 
chemical that you simply pour into 
each cell of your battery . . . and 
presto! you’ve super-charged that 
battery for up to 10 full years! 

Science Discovers a New Force 
.. . Liquid Electricity! 

Strange as this may seem to you, 
even though you feed your car gas 
and oil, the basic source of your 
car’s power comes from WATER! 
Not ordinary water of course, but 
water that carries an electric 
charge ... in other words, the 
water inside your car’s battery. 
But when this battery-water 
grows “weak” ... when lead-flakes 
fall off the walls of your battery 
and muddy up this battery water 
and dilute its streng^th ... it is no 
longer able to deliver its powerful 
electric charge. The result: your 
battery starts to discharge. It 
grows weaker and weaker until it 
finally dies. That’s why when you 
recharge a car-battery, what you 
are really doing is nothing more 
than shooting high-voltage elec¬ 
tricity into the water and dissolv¬ 
ing those power-sapping flakes. 

But suppose that you could pour 
into your car battery a new kind of 
liquid .. . one that simply refused 
to allow this lead-flaking to take 
place. Yes, a liquid that dissolved 
those harmful flakes of lead the 
moment they formed! 

Do you realize what this would 
mean? It would mean that there 
would always be a constant source 
of LIVE ELECTRIC POWER in¬ 
side your battery ... your battery 
would always be charging itself 
... never discharging, never wear- 


READER’S DIGEST 

tells the astonishing story! 

Yes, the Reader’s Digest re¬ 
leased the exciting story of how 
a battery can last longer than the 
life of a car! It tells how the 
battery is every motorist's great¬ 
est headache. If left unattended, 
it dies. If it gets low in sub-zero 
weather it is likely to crack. It 
usually has to he replaced every 
year! Yet now, without spending 
$50 for an expensive nickel-cad¬ 
mium battery you can have a bat¬ 
tery that runs 10 years or more hy 
simply pouring a little Volt ex 

into each cell! _ 

* — — 


i -mi. t.~. »' beadeb-9 digest 

\ EUROPE HAS HAD ^THEM 


ing itself down . . . why it ivould 
actually OUTLAST YOUR CAR 
ITSELF! In short, your battery 
would be a storehouse of liquid 
electricity that would last a life¬ 
time and you’d never again suffer 
the inconvenience of battery fail¬ 
ure. 


Even "Dead Batteries" 
Spring Back To Life 
In Just 60 Seconds! 

Now the name of the amazing 
chemical discovery that creates 
and stores up this lifetime source 
of electric power inside your car’s 
battery is VOLTEX Liqui-lectric 
. . . the exact same battery “ener¬ 
gizer” that has been tested and 
used in torpedo propulsion sys¬ 
tems, by diesel locomotives, by 
truck and taxicab fleet owners . . . 
yes, even tested, i*ecognized and ac¬ 
cepted by the United States Gov¬ 
ernment Bureau of Standards.. . 
the toughest testing laboratory in 
the world. 

In other words, every statement 
you have read on this page is not 
just a dream, or a hope, or mere 
theory . . . but scientific fact that 
has been proven over and over 
again before this great new prod¬ 
uct was released to the public. So 
if you would like to turn your pres¬ 
ent battery into a lifetime battery 
in just 60 seconds time ... if you 
are determined to once and for all 
put an end to battery failure ... if 
you can spare the one minute it 
takes to pour this brilliant new 
discovery into your car’s battery, 
then take advantage of the free- 
trial offer you see on this page. 
Remember ... all you risk is the 
few minutes it takes to fill out 
the coupon, and you have a lifetime 
of driving pleasure, convenience to 
gain. So act NOW! 


ELECTRIC BULB LIGHTS UP 
IN WATER ! 

Here’s one of the most un¬ 
usual and dramatic labora¬ 
tory tests ever made. To 
prove just how much super¬ 
charged electrical power this 
new Voltex discovery con¬ 
tains, scientists emptied the 
liquid from a Voltex-treated 
car battery into a glass tum¬ 
bler. Then they put an elec¬ 
tric bulb into that glass of 
Voltex and for 11 seconds 

the bulb actually lighted 

UPj Dytiamic living proof of' 
how this new “liquid elee- 
trie” discovery sends a con¬ 
stant charge of power cours¬ 
ing through your car battery 
Vear In, yeor out for up to 
To full years! 






10 YEAR GUARANTEE 


UEOVIUli ^LONDON 


The most famous Insurance Company in 
the World, Lloyds of London—has insured 
"VOLTEX” to be 100% Safe and Effec¬ 
tive on all batteries regardless of years in 
use. “Voltex” is also tested and approved 
by the “Public Service Testing Labora¬ 
tories.” Tested under the most “extreme” 
conditions . .. assuring you that Voltex is 
of vital importance to every car and truck 
owner. No new product ever released to 
the public was ever backed by such careful 
testing . . . was endorsed by so many 
Giants of Industry. 


•k 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 





LOOK HOW EASY IT 

pour this amazing chemicol discovery into the cells of your battery.. . . 
and in just 60 seconds you've converted your present car-battery into a 
LIFETIME SOURCE OF POWER ... a lifetime battery that will never fail again! 


FREE TRIAL SUPPLY 
NOW AVAILABLE 


Naturally, the best proof of 
VOLTEX’s super-charging power 
is on your own car. And because 
we’re so positive you’ll be thrilled 
from the very first day you use it 
. .. because we’re so sure that your 
friends and neighbors will want 
to know “how come your battery 
just never wears out” . . . and be¬ 
cause we know you’ll be only too 
happy to tell them about VOLTEX 
Liqui-lectric . . we invite you to 
try it on a completely FREE 
TRIAL BASIS. Here is all you do! 

Simply send the free-trial cou¬ 
pon below. When your VOLTEX 
arrives, simply pour one vial-full 
into each cell of your battery. 
That’s all there is to it. Then take 
this battery-torture test. After 
you have driven your car for 60 
miles, do this. Pull the coil wire. 
Turn on the radio, lights, all the 
electric equipment. Run the bat¬ 
tery until it is completely dead. 

Turn off all the electric equip¬ 
ment and leave the battery rest for 
3 minutes. Then, with the stafter 
only—start your car! 

Now—run the battery down a 
second time. Do not let up on the 
starter until it is completely dead! 

Be sure all the electric equip¬ 
ment is turned off. Replace the coil. 
Let the dead battery sit for 30 
minutes. 

WE GUARANTEE YOU CAN 


NOW START YOUR MOTOR 
IMMEDIATELY because for the 
first time in your life you will be 
driving a car with a battery that 
is completely and fully charged 
each and every second. 

Act Now I Have A Lifetime 

Car Battery Just 60 Seconds 

After Your Voltex Arrives 

Now the price of Voltex is only 
$2.98. Why you save double that 
figure in “towing or recllarge 
money” alone—not to mention the 
huge savings on the new battery 
you’d be forced to purchase within 
the next few years if it weren’t 
for this sensational discovery. And 
remember, the supply of Voltex we 
send you is enough to completely 
treat either a 6-volt or 12-volt bat¬ 
tery for lifetime service! 

However, due to the demands of 
Trucking Companies, Airline Com¬ 
panies and other large users of 
Voltex, only a limited amount can 
be released this year for public 
use. Therefore, all orders will be 
filled on a first come, first serve 
basis. Once our limited supply is 
exhausted, we will be forced to 
withdraw this offer. So to take ad¬ 
vantage of this FREE-TRIAL 
OPPORTUNITY, send the no-risk 
coupon today. Campbell-Smith Co., 
31 West 47th Street, New York 


since defense plant orders must be given 
first priority we strongly suggest you 
rush this free-trial coupon immediately! 


.MAIL FREE-TRIAL COUPON TODAY. 

CAMPBELL-SMITH Inc., Dept. OS l * 

31 West 47 St., New York 36, N. Y. : 

Please rush VOLTEX to me right away with this understanding. • 
If VOLTEX Liqui-lectric does not do all you claim... if it doesn t 
add more power to my battery than I ever imagined possible ... if it 
doesn’t give me the lifetime trouble-free battery service you claim ... 
then you will refund my money immediately. In other words, I can 
try it entirely at your risk and 1 do not risk a single penny. 

□ I enclose $2.9» tosh, check or money □ SPECIAL OFFER: I enclose $5.00 cosh, 

order (I sove S6c in postoge, handling check or money order lor 2 units of 

and C.O.D. charjis.) VOLTEX (one for myself one for a friend) 

and I save $1.00. 


name___ 

address_■ _ 

city.-state—__ 

O C.O.D, ORDERS ACCEPTED I Ple&se ship Voltex C.O.D. I will pay post¬ 
man prices indicated above, plus C.O.D. and postage. Same money-back 
guarantee of course. 


































Get MORE 


for your 
silo dollars! 
MORE VALUE 

Just compare this husky 
Craine beauty with ordinary 
concrete silos — -you’ll see dif¬ 
ferences worth many dollars 
•— for which you don’t pay a 
penny extra! 

MORE STAVE 

The Craine Concrete Stave 
is nearly 4" thick—has 5 in¬ 
sulating air cells that give 
you extra thermal protection 
against frost — a better, 
warmer silo for better feeding 
all year round. 

MORE STRENGTH 

Staves are tongue and groov¬ 
ed on all four sides to form a 
solid wall that will stand any 
test of time or climate. Non- 
pourous — resists acids — 
made from finest aggregates. 
Get the facts before you buy. 

... get a 




Free 

silo book 

I CRAINE, INC., Norwich, N.Y. Dept. R-118 


Send free illustrated booklet on Craine 
Concrete Silos and name of my dealer. 


Name 


Address, 


I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 


L_. 


-OUR 56TH YEAR- 



CHAMPION-BERGER 
ROTARY SNOW PLOW 


Distributor for New York 
and New England: 

EASTERN MACHINERY CO., INC. 

P. O. Box 162, Eastwood Station 
Syracuse, New York. 


Throws Snow 


50 to 70 Feet 

Will clear roads in minutes . . . eliminates 
snow banks for redrifting. Anybody 
with a snow problem write today for 
complete details. 

Valley Implement, Inc. 
Warsaw, New York 




“I’M MAKING 
MORE THAN 

^lOOOa Month 

HAVEN'T TOUCHED BOTTOM YET!'’ 

—reports Charles Kama, Texas, one of 
many who are “cleaning up’’ with orders 
for PRESTO. Science’s New Midget Mir* 
acle Fire Extinguisher. So can YOU! 

Amazing new kind of fire extinguisher. Tiny 
"Presto” does job of bulky extinguishers that 
cost 4 times as much, are 8 times as heavy. 
Ends fires fast as 2 seconds. Never corrodes. 
Guaranteed for 20 yearsl Over 2 million 
sold! Sells for only $4.95. 

Show it to civil defense workers, owners of 
homes, cars, boats, farms, etc., and to stores 
for re-sale—make good income. H. J. Kerr reports $20 a day. 
Wm. Wydallis $15.20 an hour. FREE Sales Kit. No obligation. 


MERLITE INDUSTRIES, Dept. P-17E 
PRESTO DIV., 114 East 32 St., New York 16, rT.Y. 
Canada: Mopa Co., Ltd., 371 Dowd St., Montreal 1, P.Q. 


SAVE 30^ 


ON GUARANTEED 
ROTARY TRACTORS 



Mows lawn * Hauls 
Scythes * Roller 
Sulky • Sprays 
Mulches 

AC Fower Generator 
Flows Snow 
Cuts Wood 


Direct factery>to*you price, towestj 
in the held. High quality machino.! 
Alt steel construction. Models tromj 
2'/3 to 3'/} HP. Engines used:' 
Origgs & Stratton. Clinton and 
Kohler. Extra big Goodyear tires. 
Reverse and full differential. Auto* 
matic clutch. Power take>off. Na«' 
tionwide acclaim. Act now. 10 day 
free trial. Absolutely no risk. 


CULTILLER MFC. CO., 

162-C CHURCH ST.. 
NEW BRUNSWICK. N. J. 



Congress 


rW 


V' 


inners 


Martin Brasted, Hornell, Steuben Co., 
N. Y., National 4-H Garden Program 
winner is shown with W. L. Voegeli, 
Allis-Chalmers Mjg. Co., sponsor of 
Garden Program. 

Eight winners in the 1957 4-H Soil 
and Water conservation contest, spon¬ 
sored by Firestone Tire & Rubber 
Co., 1. to r.\ Ellis Anderson, Ponca 
City, Okla.; James Cooper, Westfield, 
Mass.; Ernest Copeland, New Mexico; 
James Hunt, Leesville, La.; Raymond 
C. Firestone; Peter Fehlen, Hamp¬ 
ton, Minn.; Don Simpson, Houston, 
Miss.; James Bomar, Palmetto, Ga.; 
and D. E. White, Jr., Statesville, 
North Carolina. 


America’s 4-H Dairy Program win¬ 
ners, who won college scholarships 
donated by The Oliver Corp., 1. to r.: 
Johnny Manning, Godley, Tex.; Don¬ 
ald Dyke, Salisbury, Mass.; Ronald 
Kasper, Pine City, N. Y.; Lyle 
Schmidt, Greenleaf, Wis.; Malcolm 
Niles, Loleta, Cal.; and Alfred Ham¬ 
mond Jr., Orlando, Fla., with Alva 
W. Phelps, Oliver president, in back¬ 
ground. 

Chester Baker of Palmyra, Va., the 
National 4-H Sheep Shearing Cham¬ 
pion, won over 28 other 4-H’ers from 
21 States competing for college 
scholarships and U. S. Savings Bonds 
donated by Sunbeam Corp. His score: 

92.95 out of a possible 100. 

At bottom: Eight State winners in 
4-H Electric Program sponsored by 
Westinghouse Educational Founda¬ 
tion (seated is Florence B. Thomas, 
Fremont, N. H.), 1. to r.: Vincent K. 
Harrington, Greenwich, R. I.; Peter 
Franke, Hicksville, N. Y.; William 
Jewett, Johnson, Vt.; Douglas Ben¬ 
son, Middleboro, Mass.; Keith Front, 
Farmington, Me.; Robert Wieden- 
mann, Hamden, Conn.; and Burton 
L. Fleming, W. Sunbury, Pa. 



The Garden Winner 



Soil and Water Winners 



Tops in Dairy Program 





Sheep Shearing Champion 



1957 Electric Program Winners 


Grape Pie in Western 
New York 

A new product has been developed 
from the famous Concord grape: pie 
filling. A Chautauqua Co., N. Y., 
food handler has developed a pro¬ 
cess which retains all the fine flavor, 
gets rid of the seeds, and eliminates 
any necessity for starch. According 
to the company, the grape pie filling 
should lead to enlargement of the 


fine markets that Concord grape 
growers in the Lake Erie grape belt 
already enjoy. No artificial preserva¬ 
tive, coloring or flavor is found in the 
new product; it is pure as grape pie. 
Freezing and refreezing do not 
alter its character a bit. The ques¬ 
tion now is: Will the Concord grape 
become pre-eminent for pies just as 
it has for any wine, jelly, preserve or 
juice into which it has been made? 
Apple has not yet given its answer. 

Robert Dyment 


Qualificat'ions for Socio! 
Security Benefits 

Many farmers are probably asking 
themselves or others: “How long 
must I work to qualify for social 
security benefits?” 

With social security figuring as it 
does in the future planning of many 
people, the question is a legitimate 
one. Actually, for those farmers who 
reach their 65 th birthday before 
April 1, 1958, they are “insured” 
under social security if they have as 
much as two and one-quarter years 
of credit during 1955, 1956 and 1957. 
Every farm operator, whose net 
earnings amount to $400 or more in 
a year, must report his earnings and 
pay the social security tax. For this 
he gets a full year’s social security 
credit. If, on the other hand, his 
net earnings from his farm self- 
employment are less than $400, he 
neither pays the tax nor does he 
get credit. However, if the farm 
operator has earnings fi’om any other 
business, these earnings may be 
added to his earnings from his farm 
operation. 

For those farmers who will not 
have reached their 65th birthdav be¬ 
fore the April 1 date mentioned 
above, and for those who have not 
had as many as two and one-quarter 
years of covered earnings in 1955, 
1956 and 1957, additional periods of 
credit will be required. The 
amount of time required is roughly 
half the time after 1950 or all but 
one year of the time after 1954, and 
before attaining the age of 65. For 
example, a farmer attaining age 65 
in the first half of 1959 would re¬ 
quire at least three and one-quarter 
years of credit. 

The social security program for 
farm operators is not voluntary. 
Every such farm operator with net 
earnings of $400 or more must re¬ 
port to get credits. If he fails to file 
his returns and pay his tax, the 
eventual social security benefits will 
be lower than they should be, or 
may even result in no benefits being 
paid. 

Information concerning a farmer’s 
tax liability should be obtained from 
the District Director of Inteimal 
Revenue. The nearest office of the 
Social Security Administration will 
have information available concern¬ 
ing benefits under the program to 
self-employed farmers. 


Why Bitter Butter? 

Some time ago, a New Jersey man 
asked The Rural New Yorker what 
made his butter bitter, and the reply 
was that it was probably because the 
milk or cream was not pasteurized. 
There was a great deal of reader 
rebuttal to this argument against raw 
milk or cream, and many constructive 
suggestions were then published. But 
a New York woman replied by saying 
that you cannot store milk or cream 
in a refrigerator and expect to make 
good butter from it. 

I make and sell butter—good but¬ 
ter, and I store all the cream in the 
refrigerator prior to churning. I could 
not keep the cream sweet enough in 
any other way. One customer uses 
two or more pounds every week, and 
he never complains; he has been buy¬ 
ing for more than four years. I some¬ 
times store milk in the refrigerator 
prior to separating, too, but it is first 
allowed to cool quickly in cold water. 
That New Jersey man must have 
some other reason for having bitter 
butter than storing cream in the 
cooler. Maybe the trouble is in what 
his cows are eating. a. m. h. 

Maryland 


Shetland ponies are again in the 
limelight in Western Pennsylvania. 
At the recent annual Sheltand pony 
sale held at the Greenville livestock 
auction grounds, a Missouri pony 
buyer paid a record $30,000 for a 
single mare at this all-pony sale. Ac¬ 
cording to reports, this price was the 
highest ever received anywhere for 
a mare. 


12 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


































i 






Serving the needs of telephone users in New 
York’s rural areas is anything but a “fair- 
weather” job. For telephone men are just as 
busy in the dead of winter—in fair weather or 
foul—as on balmy summer days. They have to 
be in order to keep abreast of the continuing 
demand for telephone service. In 1957, for ex¬ 
ample, they installed some 12,500 phones in 
the rural areas we serve. As a result, 86% of 
the rural establishments within our territory 
now have phones. And most of those still with¬ 
out service are within easy reach of our lines. 

What about quality? Rural telephone serv¬ 
ice is good and getting better all the time. It’s 
fast, clear, dependable. The average phone now 
goes nearly six years without interruption in 
service. 

During 1958 we plan a construction and 
improvement program for rural areas totaling 
$14 million. This is part of our state-wide pro¬ 
gram. Only a company with sound earnings 
over the long pull can continue to provide the 
newest and best in telephone service and still 


NEW YORK TELEPHONE COMPANY 

—working always to serve the community better 


Farm Automation: ^ 

A Feed Grinder and Mixer 


In an effort to meet the high cost 
of production with declining man¬ 
power, demand for electrically- 
powered, materials-handling equip¬ 
ment on the farm is increasing at a 
fast rate. Silo unloaders, barn clean¬ 
ers, water systems, pipeline and bulk- 
tank milking, and barn ventilating 
systems are examples of automatic 
equipment ali’eady in widespread use. 
Other equipment has passed the ex¬ 
perimental stages of development 
and may be on the market in the 
near future. An automatic feed 
grinding and mixing unit, recently 
developed at the Pennsylvania State 
University, is an example of this. 

The unit is an outgrowth of many 
tests to correlate the feeding of ear 
corn, small grains and concentrates 
into a small hammer mill. With one 
continuous operation, it is designed 
to do away with those chores normal¬ 
ly associated with on-the-farm feed 
processing. A five-horsepower elec¬ 
tric motor powers the entire unit 
through belts, chains and speed re¬ 
ducers. There is continuous propor- 


mounted directly in front of those 
already present. Three ingredients 
would be metered on top of three, 
which would be quite all right. In 
such cases, the unit would process 
a ration containing six grains and 
concentrates in addition to ear corn. 

For Swine and Poultry Rations 

This unit is not limited to the pro¬ 
cessing of dairy and beef cattle 
rations; swine and poulUy rations 
can also be blended and ground. Only 
two adjustments are required when 
switching from cattle to swine or 
poultry rations. These are made by 
disconnecting the ci’ushed corn 
metering auger and re-setting the 
metering pipes to obtain the desired 
proportion of ingredients. 

The unit incorporates the neces¬ 
sary controls to make it reliable and 
automatic. A timer stops it at the 
end of the pre-set grinding time. 
Provision is also made to interrupt 
its operation with the absence of just 


one ingredient. This protection is 
provided through the action of low- 
capacity micro-switches mounted on 
the metering pipes and on the 
crushed corn metering auger. For 
safety, too, four small horseshoe-type 
permanent magnets attract and hold 
tramp iron that might otherwise be 
eaten by livestock. These magnets 
are mounted so as to catch the metal 
before it enters the hammer mill. 
Progress Report 164 of the Penn- 
syvania Agricultural Experiment Sta¬ 
tion describes the work in detail and 
is available on request to Agricult¬ 
ural Engineering Office, Pennsyl¬ 
vania State University, University 
Park, Pa. 

Because one business firm has ex¬ 
pressed a definite interest in manu¬ 
facturing this machine and because 
of the amount of machining required 
for its construction, perhaps only 
farmers with well equipped machine 
shops should attempt to build it. 

R. P. Prince and E. F. Oliver 


To most people nothing is more 
troublesome than the effort of think¬ 
ing.— James Bryce, Studies in His¬ 
tory and Jurisprudence, Vol. 2, P.7. 


Books Worfh Having 


Federal Farm Law Manual, 

A. E. Korpela.$7.50 

Farm Management, 

Black, Clawson, etc. 7.50 

The Old Country Store, 

Gerald Carson. 5.75 

Living on a Little Land, 

George P. Deyoe. 4.95 

All About African Violets, 

Montague Free . 3.50 

Out of the Earth, 

Louis Bromfield . 4.00 

Farm Records and Accounts, 

John Norman Efferson. 4.00 

Farm Management, 

R. R. Hudelson. 4.72 

Successful Trapping Methods, 

Walter Chansler . 3.95 

Animal Control, 

W. Robert Eadie... 3.75 


Christmas Trees for Pleasure 
and Profit 

A. G. Chapman — R. D. Wray.. 3.75 
Financing the Farm Business, 

I. W. Duggan & R. U. Battles.. 3.50 
For sale by The Rural New 
Yorker, 333 West 30th St, New York 
1, N. Y. (New York City residents, 
add 3% Sales Tax.) 




On the Davidson Farm in Central 
Pennsylvania, the automatic feed 
grinder-mixer operated to feed 40 
dairy cows each day. 


tioning of each ingredient, and the 
hammer mill does a thorough job of 
mixing as it grinds. 

The rate of grind ranges from 800 
to 1,500 pounds of feed per hour de¬ 
pending on the size of screen and on 
the ingredients. In processing a dairy 
ration of ear corn, oats, barley and 
a concentrate through a three- 
eighths-inch-mesh screen, the ca¬ 
pacity is about 800 pounds per hour. 
For a beef ration of ear corn, oats 
and a concentrate going through a 
one-inch-mesh screen, the rate of 
grind is 1,500 pounds per hour. 


Ear Corn Is Metered 


Uniformity in the flow of ear corn 
is obtained by a specially shaped bin, 
a corn crusher and a crushed corn 
metering auger. The bin has two ad¬ 
jacent vertical sides and two sides 
that slope at a 45-degree angle. In 
one of the sloping sides is a hinged 
plate that oscillates slowly, thus pre¬ 
venting ear corn from bridging 
across the bottom of the bin. The 
crusher granulates each ear so to 
obtain a uniform product and to 
facilitate measurements. Crushed 
corn is proportioned to the ration by 
a metering auger. Different amounts 
of corn can be obtained simply by 
changing the speed of the auger. 
The separate pieces of equipment 
unite to make the feeding of corn 
to a hammer mill a relatively easy 
task. 

Grains and concentrates are mea¬ 
sured onto a flat-belt conveyor, or 
blending table, through metering 
pipes. Each ingredient is indepen- i 
dently measured. The ratio of one 
ingredient to another is set up by 
the proper adjustment of the height 
of the metering pipe from the belt. 
Since the belt travels at a uniform 
rate, the desired proportion is main¬ 
tained throughout the grinding pro¬ 
cess. The table is not limited to three 
separate ingredients. Three or more 
can be added by providing additional 
metering pipes w’hich would be 




January 4, 1958 


1 





































Published Semi-Monthly By 

Kural Publishlnir Co., Inc. 333 West 30th St., New York 1, N. Y. 
John J. Dillon, Publisher, 1899-1950 

EDITORIAL AND EXECUTIVE STAFF 
WiixiAM F. Berghold, Editor and Publisher 
James N. Bodurtha, Managing Editor 
Wii.LlAM A. O’Brien, Business Manager 
H, G. Hardwick. Circul. Mgr. M. G. Keyes. Publisher’s Desk 

Pbter S. Lepera. Production Mgr, Persis Smith, Woman and Home 
H. B. Tuket B. K. Sommers 

C. S. Platt B. L. Pollack 

George L. Slate L. d. Tuket 

Donald F. Jones r. albbectskn 


SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

Fifty Cents a Year—Three Years for One Dollar 
Single Copy FiTe Cents. 

Foreign countries in the Universal Postal Union, $9.00. 


Entered at New York Post Office as Second Class Hatter. 

"A SQUARE DEAL” 

We believe that every advertisement in this paper is backed by a respon¬ 
sible person. We use every possible precaution and admit the advertising ot 
reliable houses only. But to make doubly sure, we will make good any Toss 
to paid subscribers sustained by trusting any deliberate swindler, irrespon¬ 
sible advertisers or misleading advertisements in our columns, and any 
such swindler will be publicly exposed. We are also often called upon 
to adjust differences or mistakes between our subscribers and honest, 
responsible houses, whether advertisers or not. We willingly use our good 
offices to this end, but such cases should not be confused with dishonest 
transactions. We protect subscribers against rogues, but we will not be 
responsible for the debts of honest bankrupts sanctioned by the courts. 
Notice of the complaint must be sent to us within one month of the time of 
the transaction, and to identify it. you should mention The Rural New- 
Yorker when writing the advertiser. 


A Time of Beginning 

T he New Year is a time of beginning. Most 
of the Winter still lies before us, it is 
true. It is also true that, “as the days get 
longer, the cold gets stronger.” Still it is now 
when our thoughts turn to the future. Garden, 
nursery and chick catalogs will soon be in the 
mail box, and a man’s mind dreams anew of 
produce, fruits and flocks. Thus, does the 
change in calendar quickly change our frame 
of mind. 

The New Year is also a time of ending. The 
past is done, and happy is the man who can 
convince himself there is no turning back. 
Never was there a person who did not have 
memories he would change if he could; nor 
anyone who has not known failure, disappoint¬ 
ment and loss. These are the experiences in a 
lifetime. But we cannot permit the shadows of 
the past to becloud our thinking of the present 
and our hopes for the future. It is wise never 
to let fear clip the wings of bold initiative or 
prevent the fulflllment of our potential. 

He soon grows old who would carry the bur¬ 
dens of yesteryears through a lifetime. Only 
by faith can one meet each day unburdened by 
the anxieties of the day before. With this 
strength, man can join with nature in be- 
_gipning the new, chastened, not chained, by 
the old. 


Fallacy in Lower Price Supports 

nr HE possibility of a further drop in the price 
A supports for dairy products again faces 
dairy farmers. The present levels are 83 per 
cent of parity for manufacturing milk and 80 
per cent for butterfat. Now he proposes 
that the prices be set at 75 per cent. Current 
dollar levels are $3.25 for manufacturing 
milk and 58.6 cents for butterfat and, 
as of the November 15 parity level, the lower 
support prices, effective April 1, 1958, would 
drop them to $2.99 and 56.1 cents, respectively. 
There is yet no indication that Mr. Benson 
plans similar reductions in price supports on 
other crops. 

It is estimated that this action by the Secre¬ 
tary would cost dairymen $250,000,000; in New 
York alone, the loss would be about $11,000,000. 

That there will be a concerted fight against 
this, or any, reduction in the support levels is 
already clear. The reaction to Mr. Benson’s 
pronouncement has been swift and violent. 
Legislation is presently being readied to bar 
any such action by the Secretary. 

The chances that the opposition will be 
successful are good because the basis for the 
price-support drop is a peculiar combination 
of faulty economics and selfish politics. The 
Secretary argues that he is following the law 
which requires him to act so as to assure only 
an adequate supply for the market. Lower 
prices, he argues, will provide less incentive 
for excessive production. 

Here, again, is the same old fallacy that, if 

14 


prices are dropped, less will be produced. It 
has not worked that way, nor will .it ever work 
that way. The lower the price, the greater the 
production in order to insure as near average 
a gross income as possible. New York milkshed 
statistics prove this to be the inexorable trend. 
Yet officialdom, with no cows to milk and no 
bills to meet, refuses to budge from its arbi¬ 
trary position. 

Without doubt, this economic theory is in¬ 
fluenced to a large extent by political consider¬ 
ations. Four years ago. Secretary Benson an¬ 
nounced publicly that dairy products were 
“one of the cheapest foods we have,” Evidently 
he intends to keep them so, notwithstanding 
the constant rise in consumer purchasing 
power. Washington operates on the premise 
that consumer support must be kept at all 
costs, and already Mr. Benson promises cheaper 
milk and milk products. Contrariwise, the dairy 
farm vote is too small and too scattered to be 
considered a potent political force. 

The fact that government stocks of dairy 
products are again on the rise — costing the 
government, it is said, $329,000,000 in the past 
year — does not necessarily mean that farmers 
are producing in excess of demand. It most 
certainly means that the large milk processors 
and dealers can turn a quicker profit by sell¬ 
ing their products to the government than by 
trying to market them through regular trade 
channels. People forget that it is not the 
farmer, but the dealer, who receives the sup¬ 
port price. If the support price is lowered, 
however, the dealer will drop the price he pays 
to the farmer who in turn will make more 
milk to keep up the size of his milk check. 
Meanwhile, as experience proves, a corre¬ 
spondingly lower price to the consumer does 
not necessarily follow. 

More efficient marketing, not lower price 
supports, is the only answer to an adequate 
supply with fair prices both to producers and 
consumers. Time and time again, Mr, Benson 
has stated he believes the price spread on dairy 
products could be narrowed with a resultant 
increase in consumer demand. That is why, Mr. 
Benson said, “we are placing increased em¬ 
phasis on marketing.” That statement was 
made in March 1954. What has anyone done 
since about streamlining our marketing? 


Pennsylvania Farm Show —1958 

ENNSYLVANIA has no state fair in the 
Fall, but it does have a Farm Show every 
Winter. The timing of this agricultural ex¬ 
position provides real opportunity to demon¬ 
strate samples of all the farm crops and pro¬ 
ducts of the previous year, and it also allows 
agriculture and business to show what will, 
should and may be used to create even better 
farm products in the forthcoming year. While 
taking justifiable pride in the past, the 
Pennsylvania Farm Show very definitely looks 
to the future. 

The agricultural past of Pennsylvania is 
great. Farming preceded by far the great coal, 
oil and steel industries. It grew as the economy 
grew, and farming and land still comprise the 
chief strength of the State. Each year, Penn¬ 
sylvania farmers produce some $600 million 
worth of food and fibre. Dairy cows account for 
about $267 million of this, chickens and turkeys 
$190 million, fruit $22 million, beef cattle $69 
million, grains $40 million, tobacco $13 million 
and vegetables $20 million (all pictured on this 
issue’s cover page). 

•This year, the Farm Show promises to be 
more attractive than ever before in its 41-year 
history. Several records have been broken in 
number of entries, and in no other year has 
there apparently been so much activity on the 
part of commercial people to secure exhibition 
space; many had to be turned away. The Penn¬ 
sylvania Farm Show in the Farm Show Building 
at Harrisburg, January 13-17, is an event to 
which the initiated never need another invita¬ 
tion; the annual return becomes a custom. To 
those who have not yet experienced all that 
is to be learned and enjoyed at the Farm Show, 
let this be said: all ye who pass its gates will 
surely come again. 

The Pennsylvania Farm Show should not 
be missed. 


New Year . . . New Moon 

TD EACHING for the moon has always, until 
now, constituted the ultimate in man¬ 
kind’s wishful thinking. Long the heart’s de¬ 
sire, it was never within the hand’s grasp. To¬ 
day it is no fantasy to consider reaching the 
moon itself, and actually to set foot upon it. 

In a sense, there is nothing new about man’s 
inner urge for outer space. It is the age-old 
extension of dreams: new fields to conquer. 
But this present pioneering into the unknown 
is of drastically different character, and, liter¬ 
ally, like nothing on earth. Every dream, and 
its fulfillment, has been accomplished at a 
price. The question is: Dare we risk the price, 
and will that price destroy us? 

An artificial moon has already raced around 
our planet. Though seen by only a few, its 
sound has been heard by many thousands, its 
psychological tones impressed upon all the 
earth’s millions. If the beep of Sputnick 
heralded beneficence for humanity, then it 
struck a marvelous note. If it was warning of 
calamity, that note was monstrous. The war of 
nerves is nothing compared with what a future 
war could mean in annihilation. 

From the Battle of Jericho to the Battle of 
the Marne, combats took on the names of cer¬ 
tain sectors. With World War II, entire 
countries fell, almost at a blow. If, however, 
a power-mad nation, capable of man-made 
satellites and missiles, should suddenly trigger 
a World War III, it is not lunacy to picture 
Battles of the Continents. 

Flight into outer space, with all that is mani¬ 
fest in it for destruction, is a peril we face in 
this twentieth century. Man may reach the 
moon, but the walls of Earth may come tumb¬ 
ling down — not with a ram’s horn, but with 
a rocket. Only the good will of man, and the 
grace of God, can transform this latest handi¬ 
work of science into an instrument of peace. 


Whose Free Market? 

44T ’VE often wondered whether some of the 
A loudest advocates of ‘free markets’ for 
agriculture would be quite so vocal if it was 
a seller’s market, instead of a buyer’s market 
—if the farm producer had the upper hand in 
bargaining power, instead of the buyer of farm 
products. I am afraid if that was the case, 
these same people would be appealing for 
government regulation instead of insisting 
upon free markets.” — Hon. Hubert H. 
Humphrey, U. S. Senator, Minnesota, at con¬ 
vention of National Milk Producers Federation, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, Nov. 3-7. 


What Farmers Say 

In behalf of the New York State Grange I want 
to thank you very much for The Rural New 
Yorker’s excellent report of the 85th Annual Ses¬ 
sion of the New York State Grange recently held 
in Corning. I am sure that all of our thousands of 
members appreciate this fine publicity given to 
their organization and the thinking that was ex¬ 
pressed by them in this meeting. 

I was particularly impressed by the editorial in 
the same December 7 issue which gave consider¬ 
able credit to the National Grange for its stand 
taken in the 91st Annual Session. I was with the 
National Master yesterday and called his atten¬ 
tion to this editorial. 

H. M. Stanley, Secretary 
New York State Grange 


Brevities 

“Oh give thanks unto the Lord, for He is good: 
for His mercy endureth forever.” — Psa. 107:1. 

Under sawdust mulch, with irrigation, and 
planted twice as thickly as normal, Moreton Hy¬ 
brid tomatoes this past year yielded 74 tons per 
acre in experimental plots at Cornell University. 

“Spud sundaes” are becoming popular refresh¬ 
ment at Maine farm gatherings. They’re baked 
potatoes in aluminum foil served with a generous 
pat of butter, salt, grated cheese, if you wish, and 
a plastic spoon. Delicious! 

The Congressional bill to amend the 1918 day¬ 
light-saving act by providing that “the standard 
time of each zone shall be the measure of time 
for all purposes” was considered in committee 
last May. But it still remains pending for Congress 
when it re-convenes this month. H. R. 369 would 
in effect, put an end to daylight-saving time. 

THE RURAL NEW YORKER 




















Success with Milk 


Vending Machines 


Fluid Milk Sales 


Rise in Pennsylvania 


ITH so many people in industry, in 
government, even in producer ranks 
—sitting on their hands and doing 
nothing but making a lot of ineffect- 
al noise about the plight of the dairy 
farmer, it is certainly good to see 
one positive program already in ac¬ 
tion and showing exceptionally good results. 

Under the direction of Governor George M. 
Leader, the Pennsylvania Milk Control Com¬ 
mission has been encouraging further use of 
milk vending machines. The program began in 
the State Capitol at Harrisburg, was put into 
effect at Pennsylvania State University, and 
then in some 13 state teachers colleges. Schools 
have installed several machines, and accep¬ 
tance of the idea by large industrial plants has 
been widespread. Half-pints are the standard 
units. 

In the State Capitol, 27 machines have sold 
$9,600 worth of milk in the past six months. 
At Millersville State Teachers College, sales 
through four machines came to $1,567 in three 
months. Equal success is reported at the 78- 
pupil Blue Ball Elementary School: one ma¬ 
chine sold 6,126 units in six months. At 
Donegal High School, the 800 students who 
had been drinking 12,000 units a month 
through the school lunch program, increased 
their consumption to 17,000 units when a ven¬ 
dor was installed; a second installation boosted 
sales to 21,000 units. 

Perhaps the most gratifying results have 
been in Pennsylvania’s industrial plants where 
sales run something like this; 

RCA in Lancaster — $600 per month; Arm¬ 
strong Linoleum, also in Lancaster — $1,500- 
$3,000 per month; Birdsboro Foundry, Reading 
—1,000 pints per day among 1,500 workers; 
Spang Well Drilling Co., Butler — 16,556 units 
per month; Dravo Corp., Pittsburgh —16,714 
units per month; Mushroom Mine, Valencia — 
920 units per month; Pittsburgh Brewing Co., 
Pittsburgh — 3,140 units monthly. U. S. Steel 
had such good results with five machines in¬ 
stalled at its Ellwood City Plant that it has now 
ordered 20 for its McKeesport plant. 

Other concerns that have recently installed 
these automatic vendors are: in Pottstown ■— 
Firestone and National Lead; in Erie—General 
Electric, Hammermill Bond, Bucyrus-Erie, Zurn 
Manufacturing Co., and Louis Marx Toy Co.; 
in York — Metropolitan Edison and York Re¬ 
frigeration; in Pittsburgh — Copperweld, Cru¬ 
cible Steel and Universal Cyclops; and in 
Lancaster — Alcoa. 

During the past two years, fluid milk con¬ 
sumption in Pennsylvania has exceeded the 
previous year’s by more than four per cent 
each year while the annual increase in the 
State’s population has been only one per cent. 
Milk Control Commissioner John A. Smith be¬ 
lieves that this substantial increase in Class I 
sales is due in large part to vending machines. 

Another program, also under the direction 
of the Milk Control Commission, is likewise 
bearing fruit. Because farmers themselves have 
participated in price hearings to so small a 
degree, the Commission is conducting a train¬ 
ing program whereby farmers compute their 
own cost figures. Reverend R. L. Cocklin of 
Shippensburg and Charles D. Armstrong of 
Susquehanna County are in charge. These men, 
working with county agents, contact farmers 
with cost-of-production records from which 
figures may be applied prior to hearings in 
support of equitable farm prices. 

The fact that Pennsylvania has been unique¬ 
ly successful with its state milk control pro¬ 
gram is due to the forward-looking attitude of 
its officials and their awareness of the advan¬ 
tages of aggressive milk merchandising—as in 
the case of the vending machines. w. f. b. 

January 4, 1958 








Gov. Leader opens ^campaign by sampling one of 
the vending machines in the State Capitol building. 



Every one of the five machines at Millersville 
State Teachers College is popular. 



“Refreshment Time” at the elementary school 
in Blue Ball. 



Dean Jackson, Penn State University, and Milk 
Control Commissioner Simon K. Uhl patronize 
milk vending machine on the campus. 



At the Birdsboro Foundry 1,500 workmen buy 


1,000 pints of milk a day. 



Two machines, side by each, at Hammermill Bond 
plant in Erie, do not compete with each other. 



Time out for a container of milk at the Bucyrus- 


Erie plant in Erie. 



Milk vending machines, recently installed at the 
General Electric plant in Erie, find favor with 
all the ivorkers. 


15 























The Farm Year in Review 


JANUARY 

OW fell the first day of 
1957. In Jamestown, N. Y., 
where almost a toot was 
already on the ground, it 
amounted to close to five 
inches. The inch at Mill- 
brook added to an inch al¬ 
ready there. Much of Pennsylvania 
had a trace or more, too; in Mont¬ 
rose an inch and a half drifted down 
atop the previous eight-inch pack. In 
Aurora, N. Y., the temperature went 
up to 37 degrees before the day was 
out, but turned-out cows soon went 
back to warmth of barns. Chickens 
scratched away as usual; the price 
for their eggs at the Brockton, Mass., 
Poultry Cooperative was only 38 cents 
a wholesale dozen. Broilers were 
down to 18 cents all over, and fowl 
fetched no more than 15. On the 10th, 
there was a big snowstorm—Cherry 
Valley, N. Y., had 11 inches—fol¬ 
lowed by fearful cold. Boonville, N. 
Y., recorded 55 degrees below zero, 
and Massena plunged officially to 44 
below; electric wires snapped off, and 
a main gas line to Syracuse broke. 
January's thaw came the 21st and 
22nd; from its warmth arose minor 
flooding. 

FEBRUARY 

February was quite warm and, in 
Pennsylvania, quite wet. Snow fell 
on the first, but by the fourth the 
temperature was up to 57 in Runyon, 
N. J.; only traces were left on the 
ground. High-moisture corn in Penn¬ 
sylvania cribs started to spoil, yet 
there were 23 inches of ice on a 
Greenville, Me., pond. Orchard men 
were out pruning their fruit trees. 


and poultrymen were in starting their 
chicks. As Pennsylvania earth alter¬ 
nately froze and then thawed, to the 
eventual damage of some winter 
grains, farmers in South Jersey were 
out plowing. Hotbeds were put into 
shape, and seed for early plants was 
sown; some onions were set. Choice 
beef steers brought $20 at Buffalo, 
and Western New York hogs topped 
at $19; good lambs did just the same. 
Ready-to-cook Long Island ducklings 
brought 45 cents the wholesale pound, 

MARCH 

March was warmer than usual. 
There was no snow on the ground 
in Burlington, Vt., on the fifth, and 
the temperature at Patchogue, N. Y., 
rose to 41. The snowstorm of the 
eighth covered all of New York; New 
Jersey soon had high winds. Tapping 
of maple trees became fairly general 
in the Northeast; production of sap 
was low as temperatures remained 
too stable. Some New York farmers 
planted oats, and there was the at¬ 
tack on spring plowing. Grains be¬ 
gan to green; there was spreading 
of manure, fertilizer and lime. On 
the 14th at Belvidere, N. J., the 
temperature reached 78 degrees. 
Broccoli rabe was on the markets 
from New Jersey by the 20th; seed 
potatoes were moving in bulk on 
Long Island. Regular McIntosh apples 
from Hudson Valley storage brought 
up to $3.50 the wholesale bushel on 
the New York market, while CA 
Macs went to $5.00. New Jersey 
carrots were still worth $1.00 per 
bushel. Farmers around Buffalo could 
buy molasses at 33 cents a gallon, 
while soybean oil meal was $63 per 
ton. 


APRIL 

With the fruit buds well-swollen, 
and early sprays applied, April got 
started, after the first, with a solid 
week of rain. Tobacco seed was pretty 
much planted in Hartford Co., Conn., 
by the 8th, however, and maple mak¬ 
ing continued over the entire region. 
The temperature at Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., went to 72 on the 13th; out¬ 
side work was speeding up, and 
planting of potatoes became intense 
on Long Island. Snow storms, how¬ 
ever, were not infrequent; Pennsyl¬ 
vania had nine inches on the 8th and 
the 9th. Forage seedings were being 
made in Rhode Island by the 15th 
while in New England generally it 
began to get dry. Forest fires broke 
out in Massachusetts, New Hampshire 
and Maine. Onion planting in Orange 
County, N. Y., proceeded with speed; 
oil sprays were applied to Hudson 
Valley apple trees. Most of the 
peaches around Lake Ontario were 
revealed to have been killed by cold 
January weather, but apples came to 
nice green-tip stage. New Jersey as¬ 
paragus moved to market in volume; 
in New York it brought $5.00 for the 
best 12-bunch crates. New Jersey 
peach trees were past bloom in the 
south and in full bloom in the north 
by the 30th; sweet corn and potatoes 
were up. 

MAY 

It was dry as May began; Connecti¬ 
cut closed its woods. Frosts caused 
some damage to upland berries and 
tomatoes, and in Massachusetts they 
used water to protect cranberries. 
Yet the temperature at Carlisle, Pa., 
went to 88 on the first. Spittlebug 
and alfalfa weevil sprays were put 
onto forage fields. Irrigation of early- 
planted vegetables was on in New 
Jersey, while in New York oats were 


somewhat slow in getting in. Pasture 
was not good, and barley headed 
early on short stems. Lake Ontario 
apples had trouble pollinating in the 
high winds and wet weather, but in 
New York’s Hudson Valley fruit 
trees did fine; apples reached their 
peak of bloom there early in May. 
The middle of the month at Buffalo, 
dairy type cattle for slaughtering 
brought $15.50 at auction; Good 
steers were around $22. Topped 
carrots from New Jersey and Orange 
County, N. Y., went up to $1.25 the 
bushel crate on the New York mar¬ 
ket. An eastern crate of Jersey 
lettuce averaged only $1.00. The best 
half-peck baskets of Pennsylvania 
mushrooms brought $1.50, but Large 
white eggs sank to a low of 31 cents 
the wholesale dozen. The tempera¬ 
ture dropped to 21 at Cavendish, Vt., 
on the 17th, and there was some dam¬ 
age to apples. Aroostook County po¬ 
tatoes went into the ground in vol¬ 
ume by the 20th; New Jersey field 
corn plantings were about complete. 

JUNE 

At Peru, N. Y., on the first day of 
June the thermometer read 90. Straw¬ 
berry picking was well under way 
by the 10th; the berries were worth 
35 cents per wholesale pint. Local 
lettuce and cabbage were off to mar¬ 
ket, too, and haying began in south¬ 
ern Pennsylvania and most of New 
Jersey. The middle of the month it 
grew hot; the temperature in south¬ 
east Pennsylvania hit 100 on the 16th. 
Haying was in high gear; the pea 
harvest slacked off. Barley was com¬ 
bined by the 17th in New Jersey. 
Snap beans were off to market; $5.00 
was the New York price for best 
wholesale bushels of Valentines, 
Blueberries were picked mid-month 
in New Jersey. Connecticut Valley 
onions had trouble from drought, and 




Hike 


farming 


•••it’s a 


good life!’ 


16 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 
















sweet corn was critically dry. Hay- 
harvest weather continued almost 
ideal while the prospect for second 
cutting grew dim. On the 19th, 
severe thunderstorms, a tornado and 
a waterspout occurred in New Eng¬ 
land; 70 acres of shade tobacco were 
destroyed by hail and wind in 
Glastonbury, Conn. Cherries and bar¬ 
ley harvests began in Pennsylvania, 
and wheat ripened rapidly as buck¬ 
wheat planting started. Hurricane 
Audrey dumped a lot of rain on west¬ 
ern New York the last few days of 
the month, 

JULY 

Pennsylvania dairymen went on a 
winter feeding schedule during July, 
and prospects for crops over the en¬ 
tire Northeast faded. They began to 
harvest shade tobacco in Connecticut 
by the 8th, and New Jersey began 
to take its wheat. Supplies of early 
peaches were light, but Western New 
York had rain, and crops were doing 
well. The temperature went to 105 
on the 21st in Burlington, N. J., and 
it was hot over the entire Northeast. 
Massachusetts onion crop turned out 
fine. Tomatoes started to ripen, and 
Pennsylvania’s sour cherries were 
red. Oats were almost all combined 
in New Jersey by the 22nd, and 
cauliflower shipments began in Dela¬ 
ware County, N. Y. Long Island was 
digging in for its annual crop of 
potatoes; unwashed, they brought 
about $1.00 the 50-pound sack. The 
wheat harvest was nearly done in 
northern Pennsylvania, and oats just 
starting in southern. Hogs went up 
to $23 a hundredweight at the Buffa¬ 
lo market; eggs in New York climbed 
to 50 cents for Large. Everything in 
New Jersey was affected by drought; 
dairymen were lugging water. 


AUGUST 

Rainfall relieved the drought some¬ 
what early in August, and the out¬ 
look for both vegetable and fruit har¬ 
vests improved. Tomatoes generally 
cracked a lot, however, and forage 
crop damage was irreparable. Pota¬ 
toes without irrigation had just about 
failed in New Jersey, and the blue¬ 
berry crop was cut by drought. Sweet 
corn came to market small in Penn¬ 
sylvania; grain and silage corn 
turned brown in the fields, and some 
fruit failed to size. It was cool the 
middle of the month, with a frost at 
Saranac Lake, N. Y. Grapes were 
doing well in the Finger Lakes area, 
and Aroostook County Me., potatoes 
were rapidly becoming a delight. 
The Hudson Valley’s pear harvest 
was at a peak on the 19th; Massa¬ 
chusetts started its cranberry har¬ 
vest the 20th. New York eggs were 
up to 56 cents; broilers bounced back 
to 22. Molasses at Buffalo dropped 
to 29 cents per gallon as livestock 
feed. New Jersey bushel baskets of 
peas sold at $4.00. Milk for the 
month at Rochester was $5.07. 

SEPTEMBER 

The rush of corn ensiling was on 
in New York early in September, and 
in Maine they started to kill pota¬ 
to vines. Pennsylvania dairymen gave 
up expecting a good grain-corn crop, 
and put some of the forage into their 
silos. They started to pick McIntosh 
apples in Orange Co., N. Y., around 
the first; pear picking was completed 
in Hudson Valley. Tobacco Valley’s 
harvest was finished by the 20th, 
and in Western New York they be¬ 
gan the dry-bean harvest. Grape 
gathering was under way in both 
New York and Pennsylvania. Fair 
attendance was frequent during the 
month, and farmers lost much good 


help with the re-opening of the 
country’s schools. Frosts destroyed 
some of Rhode Island’s cranberry 
crop; no water was available for 
flooding. The forest-fire danger in¬ 
creased in New England. New Jer¬ 
sey’s freeze of the 27th killed toma¬ 
toes, peppers and sweet potatoes 
vines. Western New York was busy 
with kraut and table cabbage, 

OCTOBER 

Maine was still combining oats 
early in October; its Katahdin po¬ 
tatoes were all dug and safely into 
storage. Winter wheat was sown in 
central and western New York. What¬ 
ever tender vegetables of the Em¬ 
pire State that survived the previous 
week of cold were quite killed by 
that of October 1. They were still en¬ 
siling corn in New York and, with 
pastures poor, cows went onto win¬ 
ter feeding schedules. Pennsylvania 
cribbed grain corn while harvesting 
fall potatoes. Large Orange County 
onions were worth $2.00 the 50-pound 
sack. New Jersey’s sweet potato har¬ 
vest got under way; Yellow Jerseys 
brought $4.00 the bushel. Most of the 
pullets were into the laying houses, 
and turkeys were gradually shifted 
to finishing rations. Fall plowing pro¬ 
ceeded in New York; York apples 
were picked in Pennsylvania. 

NOVEMBER 

Farm work wasn’t all done by No¬ 
vember, but harvests were pretty 
much in and stored or in use. Wood 
cutting began in earnest, and it took 
a lot of time just to tend the dairy 
herds, the stock and chickens. Not 
a few farmers had a day or two off 
for hunting, and most had daily or 
periodical stints in spreading ma¬ 
nure. Plowing was on, too, and there 


was liming and fertilizing. The ma¬ 
chines had to be stored, the corn 
had to be shelled, there was white¬ 
washing and painting. Greenhouse 
beets from New Jersey greenhouses 
were worth $3.00 the half bushel on 
the New York wholesale market, and 
50-pound sacks of Western New York 
carrots $1.75. The temperature went 
down to 15 degrees in Connecticut 
and to 10 in Emporium, Pa., on the 
11th. Snowfall was frequent and 
general. The price of Thanksgiving 
turkeys at 35-40 cents was much too 
low. 

DECEMBER 

New York had heavy snow the first 
two days of December; a foot fell in 
the Adirondacks. Winds blew strong 
in Rhode Island, and in Sterling, 
Mass., they knocked down a barn, 
killed five head of cattle and sent 40 
tons of hay flying. An occasional 
dairy herd could still be seen rogus- 
ing the corn fields, or nibbling wisps 
of pasture. While the ponds of New 
England were filling up again, Penn¬ 
sylvania farmers got busy digging 
wells. Farmers graded and packed 
potatoes and others stored vegeta¬ 
bles, and fruitmen were still busy 
with their ’57 crops. Yet, the farm¬ 
ing year slacked off — except for 
turkeymen — and, for many, activity 
soon came chiefly from chores. The 
air grew brisk, yet the weather was 
unusually cloudy, snowy and wet. 
Smoke stood up from chimneys, and 
it was shortly time for the year’s 
final accounting. There were some 
events, some records, some remi¬ 
niscences and some moments that 
could not be set down as facts and 
figures. For on farms, 1957 was a 
year, an experience, and an im- 
portant slice in the loaf that is life. 

James N. Bodurtha 


To me there’s something clean and solid about farming. Maybe it’s 
because I approach my work as a way of life. I know it’s right for me 
because it fills my needs—the kind you feel inside. And it gives me 
plenty of the other good things a family should have today. 

"Ho/sfer helps me make it a prosperous iUeg too*” 

I’ve found it pays to keep up with improved farming methods. 
That’s especially true with fertilizer. I learn what my soil and crops 
need through regular contacts with my Experiment Station and 
County Agent. Then I see my Royster Agent ... I make it a point to 
try different methods, materials and equipment, so I’ve tried lots of 
fertilizers ... I proved that pound for pound, dollar for dollar^ 
nothing beats Royster Quality for yielding higher profits at harvest 
time. I’ve found that—considering my varying soil conditions and 
crop needs—Royster is the most widely adaptable fertilizer I can use. 

Royster VIM ontains Fery /mportant Minerals that assure you 
bumper yields from all crops on a wide variety of soils. Here’s 
dependable quality in scientifically formulated fertilizer, with 6 
essential plant foods \n guaranteed chemically controlled amounts. 
These are the 6 plant foods needed by all crops in large amounts— 
nitrogen for rapid growth, phosphoric acid for maturity and yield, 
potash for health and quality, calcium for sturdy plants, sulfur for 
vigor and tone, and magnesium for color and snap. 

Royster ARROW available in higher analysis granular grades. 
It supplies chemically controlled amounts of the highest quality 
nitrogen, phosphoric acid and potash. 

F. S. ROYSTER CUANO CO., Norfolk, Vo. 







IT r 

^ SfNCE I88S?\ 

I ..'V- '*■''' ' V- kc \^ "" 




' - CO. 4 

'-nohpoi.k, VA.^ 



23 factories and 16 sales offices to serve you. In this area: 
Lyons, N.Y. • Baltimore, Md. • Toledo, Piqua, Ohio 


SEE YOUR AGENT NOW 


January 4, 1958 


17 











“Our DARI-KOOL 
Is Doing A 
Marvelous Job Of 
Milk Cooling!” 

Writes MR. HOWARD G. SLEIGHTER 
Manager JUDD’S BRIDGE FARMS 
New Milford, Connecticut 

About a year ago we changed to a bulk cooler. After 
giving the various makes serious consideration we decided 
on a 500 gallon Dari-Kool tank. 

We feel that this was a wise decision, as not only has 
the maintenance been nil, our bacteria counts have been 
low, which I attribute in good part to the marvelous cool¬ 
ing job your tank does. The milk is cooled to 38° within 
V 2 hour and the milk does not rise above 42° on the second 
and subsequent milkings regardless of the weather. 




Your best 
buy is a 


Model shown DKS-200 
(200 gallon capacity) 

Available in 100 to 
1000 gallon capacities. ^ 

Send today for your FREE 
MILKHOUSE PLAN KIT 

Dairy Equipment Co., Dept. 1> Madison, Wisconsin 

Please send, without obligation your new Milkhouse Plan Kit. 


Nome._ 

Address. 


Post Office.—--- 

Q I om a Dairy Farmer 


__...State..~.„ 

□ I om a Student 


Plan your milkhouse 
with this easy-to-use 
kit. Includes graph 
sheets and scale model 
cutouts of milk coolers, 
water heaters, etc. 
Arrange to best fit 
your milkhouse plans. 


The ICE-BANK Cooler that Outperforms 

and Outsells them all 


L 


—»FREE DELIVERY — 

FIRESTONE-TOWN & COUNTRY 

WINTER TIRE 

Can Also Be 
Used Year Ftound 
ALL OTHER 
LEADING 
BRANDS 

TIRES 

WHOLESALE PRICES 

TO FARMERS 
All First Quality 

NO SECONDS 

We are wholesale tire dealers and cater 
to farm trade. Save money on car, truck 
and tractor tires. Write for prices. 
SPECIFY SIZE, PLY & TREAD DESIGN 
Sold on a MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 

EMPIRE TIRE CO. 

2564 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn 26, N.Y. 



NO HORNS! 


One application of Dr, 
Naylor’s Dehorning 
Paste on horn button of 
calves, kids. Iambs—and 
no horns xvili grow. No 
cutting, no bleeding. 4oz. 
jar—$ 1.00 at your deal¬ 
er’s, or mailed postpaid. 

H. W. NAYLOR CO. 

Morris, 12, N.Y. 



DnNatjlot's 

oeHORNing 

PASTE 



HEARINe BAD? 

. . . then you'll be 

happy to know how 

I vre have improved 
the hearing and re¬ 
lieved those miserable 
ear noises, caused by 
catarrh of the head, 
for thousands of peo¬ 
ple (many past 70) 
who have used our 
simple Elmo Palli¬ 
ative HOME TREAT¬ 
MENT. This may be 

the answer to your _ 

prayer. NOTHING TO WEAR, Here 
are SOME of the symptoms that may 
likely be causing your catarrhal deaf^ 
ness and ear noises: Head feels stoppM 
up from mucus. Dropping of mucus in 
throat. Hawking and spitting. Mucus 
in nose or throat every day. Hearing 
worse with a cold. Hear — but don’t 
understand words. Hear better on clear 
days. Worse on rainy days. Ear noises 
like crickets, bells, whistles, clicking, 
escaping steam or others. If your con¬ 
dition is caused by catarrh of the head, 
you, too, may enjoy wonderful relief 
such as others have reported during our 
past 20 vears. WRITE TODAY FOR 
PROOF OF RELIEF AND 30 DAY 
TRIAL OFFER. THE ELMO COMPANY 
>EPT. 8RN-1 DAVENPORT. IOWA 

STEWART CATTLE CLIPPERS REPAIR PARTS 
and service, write: L. P. ORTH, CALLICOON, N. Y. 


When you write advertisers mention 
The Rural New-Yorker and you’ll get 
a Quick reply and a “square deal. ” See 
guarantee editorial page. 


With Livestock in Maine 


Milk goes with potatoes ... potato pulp 
goes with milk*..building better beef... 
protein for pigs ... lambing the sheep. 

BY RUSSELL W. DUCK 


O study the value of sideline 
dairying on potato farms, 
a comprehensive survey 
was made not long ago on 
20 such farms by Econo¬ 
mist Allen W. Manchester, 
Field Agent Harry I. Bell, 
and Clement S. Dunning, asst, agent 
in Southern Aroostook County. On 
the average, the farms earned $111 
per cow from dairying. In figuring 
this, no charge was made for unpaid 
family labor, unpaid interest, or man¬ 
agement. Of the farms, eight lost 
money on potatoes, while the other 
12 made from $6.00 to $111 per acre. 
The average net from potatoes for all 
of the fai'ms was only $11 per acre; 
average earnings per farm were only 
$283 for the year. On the other hand, 
with dairying added to potato grow¬ 
ing, the year’s earnings were in¬ 
creased to $1,818. In other words, 
farm families had $1,536 more to live 
on because they kept cows. 

One farmer who came close to the 
average is a good illustration. He 
raised 20 acres of potatoes and 
milked 12 cows. His total potato sales 



The Maine Station’s suggestions on 
sheep husbandry show wonderfully 
good results at the Grant Farm in 
Sherman Mills, Aroostook Co., Me. 

amounted to $5,242; with expenses at 
$4,868, net return from potatoes was 
only $374. However, milk sales came 
to $1,288 more than his outlays. His 
family, therefore, had $1,662 to live 
on instead of the $374 they would 
have had without the dairy. It was a 
bad enough year anyway, but not 
nearly as bad as it would have been 
without the cows. 

Dried Potato Pulp for Cows 

Maine farmers find that dried pota¬ 
to pulp makes a satisfactory feed for 
dairy cows. The dried residue of po¬ 
tatoes after extraction of starch, it is 
a valuable by-product of Maine’s po¬ 
tato industry. Professor Ralph A. 
Corbett gives its digestible nutrients 
as follows: protein 5,98 per cent; 
fat, 0.23; fiber, 3.91; and nitrogen-free 
extract, 68.85 per cent. 

Tests show that dried potato pulp 
is approximately equal in feeding 
value to yellow hominy when fed at 
levels of from 20 to 25 per cent of 
dairy cows’ grain mixture. The pulp 
is very palatable to dairy cows. They 
eat it readily either alone or in a 
grain mixture; it is high in sugar. 
Fairly bulky, it is not excessively 
dusty. But it is low in vitamins and, 


if liberal amounts of good quality 
hay and silage are not being fed, com¬ 
mercial forms of A and D should be 
added to the grain. With good quali¬ 
ty hay and silage, no vitamin supple¬ 
mentation is needed. Because potato 
pulp is low in fat, it should be used 
only with grain mixtures containing 
about six per cent fat. 

Because of its low moisture and fat 
content, the pulp can be stored for 
at least a year under normal farm 
conditions. Some grain mixtures con¬ 
taining about 16 per cent protein are 
as follows: (1) dried potato pulp 500 
pounds, ground oats 1,000, and 32-per¬ 
cent-protein supplement feed 500; 
(2) potato pulp 400, ground oats 800, 
32-per-cent-protein supplement 600, 
molasses 200; (3) potato pulp 400, 
ground oats 900, 36-per-cent-protein 
supplement 500, and molasses 200. 

Beef Cattle Improvement Program 

In Maine, attention is being called 
to the fact that beef cattle are hardy 
and do not need fancy or expensive 
buildings. Available buildings can 
often be untilized. If new construc¬ 
tion is needed, a simple three-sided 
shed without stanchions or stalls but 
facing south is adequate. Loose hous¬ 
ing is, of course, cheap and it re¬ 
duces labor requirements. The re¬ 
sult of beef cattle breeding and 
production practices is seen on the 
butcher block, and cattlemen con¬ 
stantly strive to market more pounds 
of economical beef of superior quali¬ 
ty that appeals to the housewife. 
Professor John C. Goater, Jr., em¬ 
phasizes that the recently established 
Maine Beef Cattle Improvement Pro¬ 
gram will assist beef breeders in ac¬ 
complishing their objectives. This 
voluntary program necessitating no 
great change in present breeding 
practices measures production per¬ 
formance by comparing weights and 
grades of cattle. This is what the 
breeders will do: (1) keep records 
of birth dates, identify each calf, and 
keep records of the sire and dam of 
each calf; (2) provide facilities for 
grading; (3) as farm conditions per¬ 
mit, provide comparable environ¬ 
ment for the entire herd; (4) furnish 
a record of the feeding program and 
rations used; (5) furnish help to 
handle the cattle when weighing and 
grading are done; and (6) keep cows 
and sire records up to date. 

The daily gain of the calves will 
be figured from date of birth, and 
their weights will be adjusted accord¬ 
ing to the age of the dam and the 
sex of the calf. Bull calves normally 
make greater gains than steer 
calves, and steers gain faster than 
heifers; heifers do not usually wean 
such heavy calves as mature cows do. 
Gains in weight in beef cattle are 
influenced very much by heredity. 
When a breeder has used more than 
one bull in his herd, he can check 

(Continued on Page 24) 




Beef cattle do not need expensive or fancy buildings. But access to a loell- 
fenced and dry lot with feed bunkers, as here shown in Maine, is certainly 
desirable in Winter. Simple buildings are quite satisfactory for beef. 


18 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 



































































Concref'e Blocks as 
Cattle Guard 

A publication of a midwest tractor 
maker has recently printed news that 
a Missouri farmer has constructed an 
effective cattle guard out of concrete 
blocks. Placed in a dug-out area be¬ 
tween the opposite end-posts of 
fences, they prevent the passage of 
cattle. Animals are apparently so 



This cattle guard on the Evans Farm 
in Chemung Co., N. Y., is typical of 
the northeast design. Always open to 
vehicles, it is ever closed to stock. 
Two-inch pipes are set three inches 


apart. 

fearful of getting their hooves caught 
in the openings in the blocks that 
they simply avoid passage on them. 
In a single layer, with holes running 
vertically, 35 blocks were placed 
seven long between the fence posts 
and five wide in the direction in 
which the animals might want to 
pass. The blocks are priced at 16 
cents apiece, so the cost of the per¬ 
petual barrier is only $5.60. Trucks, 
wagons, trailers and automobiles 
cross over the guard without diffi¬ 
culty and without slowing down. In 
the Northeast, piping has been to 
date more generally used to effect 
the principle of this type of cattle- 
guard gate. 

New York's 1957 Cham- 
pion Livestock 4-H'ers 

The 14 4-H boys and girls recog¬ 
nized for outstanding achievement 
in New York State’s 1957 4-H dairy, 
beef, sheep and swine programs, ac¬ 
cording to H. A. Willman, Cornell 
livestock specialist, are: Phyllis 
Hotaling, Cato, Cayuga Co., cham¬ 
pion Ayrshire girl; James Ellis, East 
Otto, Cattaraugus Co., winning Brown 


Swiss boy; Carole Kubran, Ft. John¬ 
son, Montgomery Co., Brown Swiss 
girl; Richard Baright, Poughkeepsie, 
Dutchess Co., Guernsey boy; Ronald 
Kasper, Pine City, Chemung Co., 
champion Holstein boy; Patricia 
Smith, Manlius, Onondaga Co., Hol¬ 
stein girl; Marion Archer, Afton, 
Chenango Co., winning Jersey girl; 
William Roese, Schoharie, Schoharie 
Co., Jersey boy; Rodney Jones, 
Churchville, Monroe Co., Milking 
Shorthorn boy; James Leachman, 
Rhinebeck, Dutchess Co., Aberdeen- 
Angus boy; Henry Lanford, Castle- 
ton, Rensselaer Co., Hereford boy; 
Richard Drye, Avon, Livingston Co., 
winner in swine; Judith Carnes, 
Ithaca, Tompkins Co., sheep winner; 
and Gayle Kent, Jordan, Onondaga 
Co., light horse champion. 

The young people received certifi¬ 
cates from the department of animal 
husbandry at Cornell, and the dairy 
winners have awards from the breed 
associations. Most also received $25 
savings bonds. 


November Milk Prices 

The prices paid for 3.5 per cent 
milk by co-operatives and dealers 
reporting for the month of Decem¬ 
ber 1957 are as follows: 


Per 100 Lbs. Per Qt. 

Erie Co. Co-op.$5.61 $.1193 

Hillsdale Prod. Co-op_ 5.53 .1176 

*Lehigh Valley Co-op... 5.47 .1163 

Sullivan Co. Co-op. 5.40 .1146 

Crowley’s Milk Co. 5.33 .1133 

Monroe Co. Producers... 5.25 .1117 
Mt. Joy Farmers’ Co-op.. 5.25 .1117 

Bovina Center Co-op_ 5.244 .1115 

Rock Royal Co-op. 5.244 .1115 

Delaware Co. Co-op. 5.23 .1112 

Conesus Milk Co-op.5.16 .1097 

Chateaugay Co-op.5.16 .1097 

Fly Creek Valley Co-op.. 5.16 .1097 

Grandview Dairy . 5.16 .1097 

No. Blenheim Co-op. 5.16 .1097 

Rose Lake Dairies. 5.16 .1097 

Sealtest Sheffield Farms. 5.16 .1097 
Dairymen’s League .... 5.06 .1076 


Fat, freight, bonuses and other differentials 
and charges vary, and the actual return is 
more to some and less to others, especially 
in the case of dealers and co-operatives own¬ 
ing more than one plant. The Market Ad¬ 
ministrators’ prices are: New York $5.16; 
Buffalo $5.46; Rochester $5.43. 

The average cost of production for Novem¬ 
ber 1957 was $5.92 per cwt. of 3.5 per cent 
milk. This is in accordance with an analysis 
made by D. L. Cunningham, N. Y. State 
College of Agriculture, Cornell University. 

Price to farmers per quart: blend (3.5 per 
cent milk 201-210 mile zone) — 10.98 cents; 
Class I-A (fluid) — 13.23 cents. Consumer 
retail price per quart, N. Y. metropolitan 
area, approved milk, doorstep in glass, 2914 
cents; at stores, in paper, 2614 cents. 

"Lehigh Valley is withholding 14 cents of 
its $5.47 November price for 3.5 per cent 
milk, pending outcome of court proceedings. 


Latest report on: 

Cooperative Farm Credit 


The Federal Land Bank of Spring- 
field, Mass,, serving New York, New 
Jersey and New England, made 2,245 
farm-purchase loans totalling $18,- 
147,000 during the 1956-57 business 
year. Providing long-term mortgage 
money for farm real estate, the bank 
makes its loans through the 46 
national farm loan associations 
which own all its capital stock and 
which in turn are entirely owned 
by member-borrowers. The volume of 
the bank’s business was 14 per cent 
greater than in the previous year and 
greatest in the bank’s 40-year history. 
The 22,945 outstanding loans total¬ 
ling $87,859,000 were also greatest 
on record. The bank paid a six-per¬ 
cent dividend to the regional national 
farm loan associations during the 
year, and they in turn paid member- 
borrowers dividends of $228,703. 

The Federal Intermediate Credit 
Bank, also located in Springfield, 
likewise had a bigger year than the 
one before; its loans totalled $107,- 
268,000. This bank, a wholesaler of 
short- and intermediate-term farm 
credit, uses funds acquired from sale 
of debentures to purchase farm loans 
made by production credit associa¬ 
tions, credit corporations, commer¬ 
cial banks and other credit institu¬ 


tions, and the Bank for Cooperatives. 
It also supervisses and assists the 
production credit associations in mak¬ 
ing loans directly to farmers. These 
asssociations in the eight-state re¬ 
gion extended $84,686,000 in short- 
and intermediate-term credit last 
year, a record for the 33-year-old 
system. Of the 33 production credit 
associations in the region, 28 have 
now fully repaid the capital original¬ 
ly provided by the U. S. Government 
for their organization; they are 
owned entirely by farmer-members. 
In New York State last year, pro¬ 
duction credit associations made 
loans totalling $48,818,000; Vermont 
ranked second in volume with $9,- 
764,000. 

The Bank for Cooperatives at 
Springfield makes loans to farm co¬ 
operatives for construction and im¬ 
provement of physical facilities and 
for operating purposes including fi¬ 
nancing of inventories. It obtains its 
lending funds by borrowing from 
the Central Bank for Cooperatives; 
by borrowing from the Intermediate 
Credit Bank and commercial banks; 
by participating in sale of debentures 
of the 13 banks for cooperatives; and 
by use of its own capital. 


SIR WILLIAM FARM 

Hillsdale, Columbia County New York State 

ANNOUNCES ITS 

FIFTH INTERNATIONAL 
BRED GILT and BOAR SALE 

February 1,1958-1:00 P.M. at the Farm 

We will be selling approximately 60 bred Yorkshire and Berkshire Gilts and 10 
Yorkshire and Berkshire Fall Boars which by sale time should be Lean Meat 
Certified and tested for Feed Conversion. 

For the first time in the U. S. A. straight Irish imported Gilts will be offered for sale. 
HERE IS YOUR CHANCE TO BUY IMPORTED CHAMPION BLOODLINES AT A 
BARGAIN PRICE COMPARED TO WHAT IT WOULD COST YOU TO IMPORT. 

offered will be from PR litters and others from certified matings, 
all Gilts are carefully selected for individuality. 

We are featuring the breeding of the following outstanding boars: 




YORKSHIRES 


BERKSHIRES 


Donaghanie Crusader 13th 205554, Triple Irish Grand Champion; 
Inniscarra Field Marshall 5th 185802, proven Double Irish Grand 
Champion. 

SW Primroses’ King David 44L 189470, straight Scotch. 

High Regard 793731, National Champion Boar of 1957 and full brother 
to the 1956 International Grand Champion Barrow: 

Cookham British Baron 24th 792090, Imported English 
Whipling Valiant 7th 800918 
Prestegemere 1021st CMS 739226 
Quality Donn's Superb 3rd CMS 749437 

We are providing special arrangements for low cost deliveries of all animals pur¬ 
chased at the sale. 

Try to attend our free Supper Party on January 31, 1958 at 7:00 P. M., E. S. T. at 
the Mount Washington House in Hillsdale, where we are providing special 
entertainment. 


Write for reservations and catalog: 

P. O. BOX 266, HILLSDALE, COLUMBIA CO., NEW YORK STATE 


Telephone: Fairview 5 7700 
Manager: RUDY G. OSWALD 


DOGS 


Guaranteed border Collies with parents im¬ 
ported from Scotland. Stock dogs. Males J 
months $25; females $15. Lassie Collies S 
months, males $25; females $20. Fully trained 
cattle dogs either Breeder, Border Collie or 
the old Shepherd strain, trained to go along 
distance for cattle, easy drivers, low heelers. 
Males year old $50; females $40. Pleasure to 
show these dogs drive cattle and convince 
yourself. 1 have shipped my most intelligent 
Collies all over U. S. A. for the past 20 years. 
1 guarantee if you buy, delivery anywhere 
in the U. S. A. 

WILFRED ZERON, 
MORRISBURG, ONTARIO, CANADA 

rrrnM Uimtowd f^^^D a monthly 

LUUN nunters! magazine de¬ 

voted TO COONHOUNDS, training, NEWS, 
STORIES. 12 Issues $2.50. Sample 25c. 
AMERICAN COONER , Box 2115, SESSER, ILL. 


Worlds Largest Kennels offers 500 Bird Dogs, 
Straight Cooners, Combination Hounds, Beagle Hounds, 
Rabbit Hounds, Small Squirrel Dogs, Fox and Deer 
Hounds. Catalogue free. SMOKEY MOUNTAIN 

KENNELS, CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 

Ped. Smooth Fox Terrier Pups cb"I pLn"" 

MINIATURE COLLIES: Puppies and Grown Dogs 
MELODYLANE KENNELS, Chestertown, N.Y. (3068) 

- SPRINGER SPANIEL PUPPIES - 

THE BEST COST LESS 

A. LUETTGENS, R. 0. 1, FREEHOLD, N. J. 

- REGISTERED ST. BERNARD PUPPIES - 

READY, ALSO IDEAL FOR CHRISTMAS 

W. E. YODER, MEYERSDALE, PA. Phone:4-7664 

ESKIMO SPITZ PUPPIES: Pure White, Fine Pets. 
Males $25: Females $20. ALBERT LASHER, 

136 E. STATE ST., GLOVERSVILLE. N. Y. 

- A. K. C. ST. BERNARD PUPPIES 

J.E. THOMAS, Cambridge Springs, Pa. Phone: 2725 

BEEF CATTLE 

Reg. Polled Herefords 

BULLS READY FOR SERVICE 

OPEN AND BRED HEIFERS 

Modern Bloodlines. T. B. and Bangs Accraditad Herd 
BATTLEGROUND FARMS 

FREEHOLD. NEW JERSEY PHONE: 8-2224 


Performance tested, big, fast growing type of pure 
Scotch breeding. Request folder and data. 
WYE PLANTATION. QUEENSTOWN, MARYLAND 

For Sale: PUREBRED POLLED BEEF SHORT¬ 
HORNS. STEWART DUDLEY, FREDONIA, N. Y. 

SHEEP 

Bon5.sla.lr OSS 

Championship Breeding Stock From Production Tested 
Sows. Certified Meat Type. 

HEDGEFIELD FARM, SALEM, NEW JERSEY 


Let SUFFOLK SHEEP Increase Your Farm Income. 

BOOKLET and BREEDERS’ LIST FREE. 
Write NATIONAL SUFFOLK SHEEP ASSOCIATION 
BOX 324-NY, COLUMBIA. MISSOURI 


Will You Have 
The Right 

Herd Breeding Program 
In 1958? 

Are you planning the kind of herd 
breeding program which you can com¬ 
bine with good feeding and management 
practices to give you the future herd 
income you need? 

_ Thousands of dairymen are finding that 
100% NYABC breeding through regular 
or new, low-cost Planned Mating Service, 
can give them the type and production 
they want. For the latest facts, call your 
nearby NYABC technic.an or write: 

New York Artificial 
Breeders’ Cooperative 

BOX Ithaca, 

528 R ^ aTAuk/ N. Y. 

Serving Dairy Herds in New York 
and Western Vermont Since 1940. 


SWINE 


—SPOTTED POLAND CHINA SERVICE BOARS— 

BRED GILTS and BABY PIGS 

C. W. HILLMAN, _ VINCENTOWN, N. J. 

- REGISTERED CHESTER WHITE GILTS - 

BRED TO FARROW IN APRIL. BACON TYPE. 
WADE JOHNSON. FRANKFORT. NEW YORK 

WESTERN PENNa! BERKSHIRE BREEDERS 

— ASSOCIATION BRED GILT SALE — 

SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 22, 1958 

NEW WILMINGTON LIVESTOCK PAVILION 
NEW WILMINGTON, PENNA. 

Also FALL BOARS, GILTS. Catalofl. 
GEORGE BOLINGER, Secy, R. I, EDINBURG. PA. 

- FOR SALE - 

Entire Herd of BROOD SOWS, 4 GILTS, 
1 year old September 14, 1957. Bred to farrow 
in February and March. Also the Dam of 
the New York 1-2-3 Boars farrowed May 1, 
1957 Gilt 1-2-4. These three gets placed 1st 
and 3rd. Reserve Champion Sow at Harris¬ 
burg National Stock Show, November 12-16, 
1957. We have the 2 Boars farrowed May 1st 
sired by the Topper. The Dam placed 1st at 
New York this year. Come and see this great 
herd of brood Sows bred to Reserve Cham¬ 
pion Boar at New York this year. He is a 
grandson of Pell Diamond, the only sow to 
take the grand championship 3 years straight. 
EDGAR ANGLE, AFTON, NEW YORK 

— loth ANNUAL WINTER SALE — 

New York State Hampshire Swine Breeders Co-op., Inc. 
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1958 

SHOW 10:00 A. M. • SALE 1:30 P.M. 
EMPIRE LIVESTOCK PAVILION, CALEDONIA, N.Y. 
Offering wide variety of bloodlines in Bred Gilts, 
Open Gilts and Boars, For catalogs write — 
WAYNE TOAL, Sales Manager 
R. D. I, BOX 416-B, BATAVIA. N. Y. 

HARRIS WILCOX, Aucffoneer _ 

HAMPSHIRES: MEAT TYPE BOARS and GILTS 

Slaughter and Production Records Available 
CEDAR POINT FARMS, BOX 718, EASTON, MD. 


HORSES AND PONIES 


WANT TO BUY 


25 registered or unregistered Shetland Pony Mares. 
Prefer sorrels with white manes and tails, also one 
small registered or unregistered Shetland Palomino 
pony stallion or sorrel with white mane and tail. 
JOHN V. MCCORMICK. 

64 WEST BROAD ST., SOUDERTON, PENNA. 


GOATS 


You’ll Like Goat MilkI Profit and health with dairy 
goats. Booklet plus year’s subscription monthly maga¬ 
zine; Spe. $1. Dairy Goat Journal, A-21, Columbia, Mo. 


CHINCHILLAS 


PEDIGREED HERD — QUALITY BREEDERS With 
Equipment and Literature. — DUDLEY. 

130 SHERIDAN ST.. NO. EASTON, MASS. 


iTinr i.c.n u no I uunuuo: «prn Doars &. uilts. rail 
Pigs. Either Sex. R. F. Pattington, Scipio Center, N.Y, 

FREE CIRCULAR: REG. HAMPSHIRE SWINE 
Since 1934. C. LUTZ. Middletown I. Maryland 

RABBITS 

RAFSE RABBITS 

A FULL TIME BUSINESS 
OR WELL PAID HOBBY 

Thonsands of Raisers Needed To Meet The 
Tremendous Demand for MEAT—FUR— 
LABORATORY-BREEDING STOCK. 

Know the Facts 

describing: 26 

Breeds, Breeding and Care, Markets, Etc. 
Plus Bulletin, 26 Cents We Are Association 
of Breeders who want to see you start rtpAt/ 

AMERICAN RABBIT ASS'N.38. ARBA Bldg. Pittsburgh, Penna. 





SELL YOUR SURPLUS STOCK 

M any breeders have found that a little advertisement on this page is a sure way of 
finding customers for any stock they have for sale. You can tell 300,000 farmers and 
breeders about your stock with an advertisement on this page. Tell these 300,000 
reaedrs about the stock you want to sell and you will find that many of them are looking for 
just what you have for sale. Write for our SPECIAL LIVE STOCK ADVERTISING RATE. 

The RURAL NEW-YORKER, 333 West 30th St., New York City 



January 4, 1958 


















































































if youWe feeling very luell 




or if you're feeling queerly 



if 



it's living you ivant most 


have a checkup yearly 


Many cancers can be cured if 
detected in time. That’s why 
it’s important for you to have 
a thorough checkup, including 
a chest x-ray for men and 
a pelvic examination for 
women, each and every 
I year ... no matter how 
well you may feel. 



AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY 


PumLLPflS 

ffi(7 nTT'i iiji ij —d 

FREE-GOLDEN ANNIV. CATALOG 
New selections 1957-58 patterns. 
SmarV new colors & designs—83 pat¬ 
terns—complete instructions for mea¬ 
suring & hanging wallpaper. Whole¬ 
sale prices — ‘,3 to '/a lower than 
retail stores and WE PAY POSTAGE. 
Write Now — 51st Year 
PENN WALL PAPER MILLS 
DEPT. 98 PHILA. 5. PA. 




CHURCHES, WOMEN’S CLUBS, SOCIETIES, ETC. 

Earn JlOO to $500 Cash, plus 24 card * 
tables simply by selling advertising 
space on the table tops to local 
merchants who gladly cooperate. 5 
ditferent proven plans to pick from. 
No risk, nothing to pay. not even 
freight charges. Write for details. 


earn 

5500 

cash 


F.W. MATHERS. Dept.Hr,Mt.Epliraim.N.I. 




- KODACHROME PROCESSING - 

8 mm roll or 35 mm 20 exp. $1.25. Prompt Service. 
Write for mailer and prices. COLOR PIX. 
DEPT. Y, CPO BOX 30. KINGSTON. N. Y. 




Rhode Island Johnny Cake—The Real Thing 


Yes, that’s Rhode Island. You 
know that some people get Johnny 
Cake and Corn Bread confused in 
their minds, but your stomach will 
know the diiTerence, though both are 
delicious. 

When as a child I visited my great¬ 
grandfather in the farmhouse where 
his family had lived since it was built 
in 1732 (the year George Washington 
was born), I could be sure of two 
things: a happy time and Johnny 
Cakes. 

Great-grandfather’s three un¬ 
married daughters, my great-aunts, 
never bought “store bread”, of 
course, mor did they even bake bread 
very often. Their father preferred 
“soda biscuit”, but it was Rhode 
Island Johny Cake that he demanded 
at every meal! The corn for them he 
raised in his own fields, and the 


New Rose Cross-SHfch 
For Lovely Linens 



2507. Make these new linens for the guest 
room or your own bedroom with this charm¬ 
ing rose design, embroidered in easy-to-do 
cross stitch. Pretty pick-up work for novice 
or expert. 

No. 2507 — just 25 cents — mailed to The 
Rural New Yorker. 333 West 30th St., New 
York 1, New York. 

Include an extra 25 cents for our Needle¬ 
work ALBUM — a treasure chest of lovely 
handwork designs. 


white meal was ground at a nearby 
mill, stone-gi’ound by water power. 

I still make Johnny Cake by that 
old recipe, even though I now live 
in Massachusetts and the meal comes 
from across the state line in Connec¬ 
ticut. I always cook them on top of 
my old wood burning stove, in prefer¬ 
ence to the modern range in my 
kitchen. 

This is the recipe. Put two cups of 
white corn meal into a large sauce¬ 
pan; add a little salt; pour boiling 
water onto the meal, stirring all the 
while. Do this a bit at a time: it takes 
a good deal of water but the mix¬ 
ture should be rather thick when it’s 
right. (Meals differ, and I cannot 
give you the exact proportions of 
water to meal.) 

Cook the mixture a few minutes 
until the meal is thoroughly scalded. 


Forsythia and Your 
Christmas Tree 

This is the time to go out into the 
bleak garden, bring in forsythia 
twigs, and put them in water for in¬ 
door blooming. I always do this on 
the day after Christmas. Usually by 
January 7th, or even the day before 
(Twelfth Night), they show a tiny 
bit of yellow at the tips. 

By that time the Christmas tree is 
out on the lawn (so sad to dismantle 
it). Then, as the forsythia gets more 
golden in the house, I take off a small 
branch of the tree now and then, 
and put the evergreen sprays in with 
the forsythia. The combination is so 
nice and stirs up the bright hope of 
Spring in these dreary January days. 

By the way, I never throw the 
Christmas tree away. I keep gather¬ 
ing forsythia for the house every 10 
days, and with it more of the ever¬ 
green branches. Finally the tree is 
cut up for fireplace wood and we 
burn it, piece by piece, until it is 
gone. It’s never safe to burn up a lot 
of evergreen branches all at once in 
the fireplace: the blaze gets out of 
hand. Even the wood lengths make 
too hot a blaze if an entire fire is made 
of them. Lucille W. Capwell 

Connecticut 


Add a little milk after removing pan 
from heat. 

Have ready two iron griddles (one 
will do), and heat to moderate hot¬ 
ness; grease well with bacon fat if 
you have it. Then drop the mixture 
onto the griddle in large spoonfuls, 
and flatten each with a knife for a 
neat look; keep each cake separate 
from the other. This is all for the 
top of stove, not the oven. 

Try a single cake first, for proper 
heat, size of cake, etc. 

Cook cakes slowly (keeping grid¬ 
dle moderately hot) on both sides 
until they are a golden brown. It 
takes about 20 minutes. You may 
need to add more fat during the pro¬ 
cess. 

My great-aunts always spread 
plenty of butter on their Johnny 
Cakes, and poured cream on too! I 
still like that way best, but my 
family prefers butter and maple 
syrup. 

For a hearty winter night meal, 
serve sausages, cream gravy, Johnny 
Cakes and apple sauce. It’s out of this 
world. . .and out of a world long 
gone by. t. r. 

Massachusetts 


There's Nothing Like 
A Crocheted Afghan 



2402. A handsome crocheted afghan, 
worked in vibrant colors and simple stitches. 
For a ‘granny’ effect, use scraps of left¬ 
over wool. 

No. 2042 contains crochet directions, ma¬ 
terials requirements, stitch illustrations. 

No. 2402 — just 25 cents — mailed to The 
Rural New Yorker, 333 West 30th St., New 
York 1, New York. 

Send another 25 cents for your cop.v of 
our needlework ALBUM — it contains 
dozens of lovely designs to knit, crochet 
and embroider. 



To a Kitten in My Lap 

Taking a cat nap on my knee, here is the lesson you teach to me: 

How to enjoy a transient bliss, fearing no harm may follow this; 

Having no dread that out in the night danger may lurk at the heels of fright; 
And one thing more, as you take your nap warm in the safety of my lap. 
Teach me to trust — this most I need as I strive to follow my living creed. 
New York State — Lalia Mitchell Thornton 



20 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 

































































































8189. Bright buttons 
trim this fine classic. 
Sizes: 12, 14 to 20; 
40 and 42. Size 14, 
34 bust, 4% yards, 35- 
inch. 25 cents. 



As Welcome as Spring 

8171 & 8172. Flower-fresh frocks, mother and 
daughter! 8171, in sizes; 10, 12 to 20. Size 12, 
32 bust, 5% yards, 35-inch. 8172, in sizes: 3, 4, 
5, 6, 7, 8 years. Size 
4, 2 V 2 yards, 35-inch. 

Two patterns, 25 cents 
each. 



,8169 

34-48 


8169. Lovely, womanly 
go-everywhere dress. 
Sizes: 34, 36 to 48. Size 
36, 38 bust, 5 yards, 35- 
inch. 25 cents. 


!8148 

34-48 


8148. Pretty lingerie 
under pretty frocks. 
Sizes: 34, 36 to 48. 
Size 36, 38 bust, slip, 
2% yards, 35 - inch; 
lace 3 V 4 yards; panties, 
1% yards. 25 cents. 


8173. Shoulder buttons, 
becoming yoke, all a 
‘•cinch” to sew! Sizes: 
121 / 2 , 141 / 2 , to * 241 / 2 . 
Size 141 / 2 , 35 bust, 5 
yards. 35-inch. 25 cents. 


Send 25 cents more for Fall-Winter Catalog, 
Basic FASHION. 

Please print, right on your order, your name, 
full address, pattern number and size. Send to 
The Rural New Yorker, 333 West 30th Street, 
New York 1, N. Y. 



12H-24’A 


Our Handcraft — Garden Exchange 

1 Ed.: H. & G. mail is very heavy and we welcome it. But we cannot forward your 
replies unless all directions are carefully followed. When you write to a woman listed 
below, just stamp the envelope and, in its upper left corner, put her initials and State, 
also date of R. N. Y. issue. Then enclose such mail in another stamped envelope addressed 
to H. & G. Exchange, THE RURAL NEW YORKER, 333 West 30th St., New York 1, N. Y. 

It is best to write before sending an 
here. — P. S.] 


Have needelework magazines and some 
fancywork to swap for quilt pieces, rem¬ 
nants, new yarns or crochet cottons. — Mrs. 
F. L., New Hampshire. 


Do you have any leftover rolls, or part 
rolls, of wallpaper No. 38x563, “mountain 
vine’’ design, for sidewall, made by Robin¬ 
son’s V'allpaper Co., Titusville, Pa.? What 
■would you like in return? — A. J. W., 
New York. 


Please don’t throw away your Santa Claus 
cards, until you read this: I have hundreds 
of old postcard views, foreign and American. 
I collect Santa Claus postcards; will give 
five of my views for one Santa card. — 
M. O. G., Rhode Island. 


Has anyone a pattern for crochet over-the- 
knee baby boot es? What would you like in 
exchange? — M. M. C., New Jersey. 


I have two years complete, 1951 and ’52, 
of “Flower Grower’’ (magazine) to exchange 
for plain or print feed bags. (Front covers 
on a few of above copies are off.) — Mrs. 
J. D. E., New Jersey. 


Will exchange pepper and salt shakers, or 
send potholders, for your souvenirs. — Mrs. 
J. G., Jr., Tennessee. 

January 4, 1958 


exchange. Please send no packages to us 


Some old folks I know love to sew through 
the long winter. How would you like to 
send yard material, print feed sacks, threads, 
odds and ends of trimming, quilt patches, 
etc., to keep them busy and happy? I can 
send salts and peppers or trinkets while they 
last. I like pen friends too. — Mrs. R. K., 
Pennsylvania. 


I work with a class of retarded children. 
I’ll gladly pay postage for any knitting wool 
yarn, any color, or ends of yarn you may 
have. It’s voluntary work on my part. — 
Mrs. P. K., New Jersey. 


For your old buttons I’ll send amaryllis 
bulbs. — Mrs. H. L. O., Pennsylvania. 


For jmur yard goods or colored feed bags 
I’ll send balls of crochet cotton or balls of 
mercerized tatting cotton in pretty colors. — 
M. F., Pennsylvania. 


Will send stamps from my nice collection 
for your miniatures, or Union Oil or state 
map postcards. — Miss R., Pennsylvania. 


What can I send you for your salt and 
peppers? I’m collecting one from each State. 
— A. B., New York. 



-HARRIS SUDS 

MAYTIME PETUNIA 

19.18 ALL-AMERICA SELECTION 
Maytime is a first generation hybrid ruffled and 
fringed giant petunia with blooms Sli to 4 inches 
in diameter. Blooms are light salmon-pink with 
white throats touched with yellow. “Exquisite” is 
the word most often used to describe it. 

The plants make vigorous, compact, base branching 
growth uniformly 12 inches tall and produce a’oun- 
dant bloom from early Summer until Fall 
SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG 
Ask for OUT Market Gardeners’ and Florists’ 
Catalog if you grow for market. 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., Inc. 

7 Moreton Farm, Rochester 11, New York 

1958 CATALOG iww AmcLj 


No Nagging 
Backache Means a 
Good Night's Sleep 

Nagging backache, headache, or muscular 
aches and pains may come on with over-exex-- 
tion, emotional upsets or day to day stress and 
strain. And folks who eat and drink unwisely 
sometimes suffer mild bladder irritation . , . 
with that restless, uncomfortable feeling. 

If you are miserable and wom out because of 
these discomforts, Doan’s Pills often help by 
their pain relieving action, by their soothing ef¬ 
fect to ease bladder initation, and by their mild 
diuretic action through the kidneys —tending to 
increase the output of the 15 miles of kidney tubes. 

So if nagging backache makes you feel dragged- 
out, miserable ... with restless, sleepless nights 
...don’t wait...try Doan’s Pills...get the same 
happy relief millions have enjoyed for over 60 
years. Ask for new, large, economy size and save 
money. Get Doan’s Pills today ! 


FREE FOR 

ASTHMA 

If you suffer asthma attacks, choke and wheeze, find 
sleep Impossible because of the struggle to breathe. . . 
try FRONTIER ASTHMA MEDICINE now! Get Im¬ 
mediate blessed relief from the dreaded symptoms of 
bronichial asthma. Over 1,000,000 bottles sold. 
FREE TRIAL bottle by return mail. You pay 
nothing. Send name and address now to: FRONTIER 
ASTHMA CO., 7S3-A Frontier Bldg., 462 Niagara 
Street. Buffalo I, N. Y. 


BOOK MANUSCRIPTS 

CONSIDERED 

by cooperative publisher who offers authors 
early publication, higher royalty, national 
distribution, and beautifully designed books. 
All subjects welcomed. Write, or send 
your MS directly. 

GREENWICH BOOK PUBLISHERS, INC. 
Atten.: MR. WITHERS, 489 FIFTH AVE. 
NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 


-SELL LARKIN PRODUCTS. EARN CASH - 

Famous toiletries, household supplies, etc. 
WRITE FOR CATALOG. 

LARKIN CO., DEPT. RN, BUFFALO 10, N. Y. 
LEFT HANDED? Send for free list of articles made 
specially for left hand use. LEFT HAND PRODUCTS, 
BOX 402, WARREN, OHIO 



NATURAL 

LIGHTWEIGHT 



DENTAL PLATE 

Made from '/our old one ... 
returned Air Mail same day 


New Process Saves 
Money t 

Priced 
Low As 

Now Professiona I 
Method makes beautiful per¬ 
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cracked loose plates WITHOUT IMPRESSION. 


30 DAY MONEY-BACK TRIAL 

YOU can have grorgeous, natural-looking, perfect- 
fitting false plates that are comfortable, healthful 
and prideful. From your old plate we will make a 
brand new denture — upper, lower or partial — per¬ 
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QCMfl Mfl imnyiTV send name and ad- 
OjCliU HU IVIUIIlI dress for interesting de¬ 
tails of wonderful guarantee that enables you to try 
your new plate for 30 whole days to be sure they're 
EXACTLY v/hat you want. If not delighted. Clinical 
returns every cent you’ve paid. Write immediately. 

CLINICAL DENTAL LABORATORY, Dept. X-691 

335 W. Madison Street. Chicago 6^ Illinois 


FREE ■ PURE SILK PRINT 

FREE — A blouse length of exclusive imported 
pure dye silk printed fabric with your member¬ 
ship in the "Fabrics 'Round the World Club." 
Members are offered each month, over 100 
swatches of exotic, fabulous fabrics, gathered 
from all' over the world, and may order at our 
amazing direct-to-you low, low prices. Each offer 
includes free Gift Bonus Opportunity, ^[erabc^- 
ship cost only .‘f2, refunded on first order and 
you get your fabulous pure silk blouse length 
worth dollars more FREE. No obligation to 
buy anything. Send your $2 today to — 

FABRICS ’ROUND THE WORLD 

Dept. EU-24, 114 E. 32 St., N. Y. 16 


CHAIR CANE 

BASKETRY REED MATERIALS 
Genuine Chair Cane. Fiber Rush. Cane Web¬ 
bing for Seats w.th Groove. Cane Instructions 
35c. Complete Seat Weaving Book $1 15 
Basketry Reeds. Raffia. Basket Instruction 
Book 75c. New Upholstering Book 65c. 
FOGARTY 205 River St. TROY, N. Y. 


Shrinks Hemorrhoids 
New Way Without Surgery 


Science Finds Healing Substance That Does Both— 
Relieves Pain—Shrinks Hemorrhoids 


New York, N. Y. (Special) - For the 
first time science has found a new 
healing substance with the astonish¬ 
ing ability to shrink hemorrhoids 
and to relieve pain—without surgery. 

In case after case, while gently 
relieving pain, actual reduction 
(shrinkage) took place. 

Most amazing of all —results were 
so thorough that sufferers made 


astonishing statements like “Piles 
have ceased to be a problem!” 

The secret is a new healing sub¬ 
stance (Bio-Dyne*) —discovery of a 
world-famous research institute. 

This substance is now available in 
suppository or ointment form under 
the name Preparation H,* At your 
druggist. Money back guarantee. 

'Beg. U. 8. Pat. Oil. 


SEND A FRIEND A TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION 
TO THE RURAL NEW YORKER 

Yotir Gift Includes Our 3 SPECIAL ISSUES for 1958: 
POULTRY. . .HORTICULTURE. . .LIVESTOCK and DAIRY! 


9 


months 



for 25c 


Friend’s Name 


R. T.D..Box .Street . 

Post Office.State . . 


Your Name. 

Address.... 

(We will send a gift card bearing your name.) 
THE RURAL NEW YORKER, NEW YORK 1, N. Y. 


21 






























































Articles of Interest 

In Coining Issues 

• Vegetable Lessons of 1957 — 

A Regional Report 

• The Future of Bulk-Tank 

Farming 
By I. E. Parkin 

• Mechanical Orchard Pruning 
By F. R. Dreiling 

• Insect Oddities 

By James E. Lawrence 

• Make Candy As Sweet As 

Honey 

By Patricia Roth 

• Self-Cure for Mastitis 
By J. H. Winter 

• My York-State Forest Farm 
By Henry S. Kernan 

• Internal Parasites of Live¬ 

stock 

By John H. Whitlock 

• 1958 Farm Tractor Parade 

• Extra Service from Tractor 

Tires 

By M. E. Long 

• Bears in New York 
By Willet Randall 

• Electricity Lightens the 

Dairy Load 
By L. H. Hammond 

• High Roughage Rations for 

Heifers 

By J. H. Hibbs 

• Cows Without Tails 
By L. O. Gilmore 

• Can We Eradicate Pullorum 

Disease? 

By H. Van Roekel 


New Test for Ketosis 

Because early treatment can pre¬ 
vent losses from ketosis or ace¬ 
tonemia, a simple test has been de¬ 
veloped by which herdsmen can de¬ 
tect cows in the early stages of 
the malady before they show definite 
illness. The veterinarian can then be¬ 
gin treatment early in the course of 
the disease. 

Two drops of urine from each of 
the cows in the herd are placed on 
a little mound of a white chemical. 
Urine from animals with ketosis 
changes the powder to lavender in 
about three minutes; samples from 
severe cases color the powder dark 
purple. 

By conducting their own tests, 
herdsmen will be able to identify 
cows with ketosis and call the veterin¬ 
arian at the first lavender reaction. 
This would facilitate early treatment 
before the animals stop eating, drop 
in their milk production, or have an 
odor of acetone on their breath. 

In cases of ketosis, treatment with 
stimulants may prove dangerous, the 
American Veterinary Medical Assn, 
suggests. Acetonemia is a concentra¬ 
tion of a fat-solvent chemical in the 
system. Affected animals show signs 
of digestive disturbance, loss of appe¬ 
tite, depression and loss of weight. 
Occasionally they continue to eat, but 
lose weight. 

To counteract the depression, hor¬ 
mone stimulants are frequently ad¬ 
ministered. However, they could 
cause overstimulation and worsen 
the condition, it is felt. Prompt vet¬ 
erinary diagnosis is necessary to 
differentiate this condition from milk 
fever and several types of poisoning, 
the Association says. Complete re¬ 
covery from acetonemia may not oc¬ 
cur until the animal has a complete 
modification of her nutritional intake 
and daily routine by going out to 
pasture. 


Empire Livestock Marketing Co¬ 
operative, Ithaca, N. Y., recently 
sold the 2,000,000th animal it has 
handled in sales for farmers since it 
was established in January, 1947. It 
was a grade Holstein in the 54-head 
herd of Joseph Triumpho, St. Johns- 
ville, Montgomery Co., N. Y., which 
was dispersed at an average of $260. 
The cow herself brought $480. 


Dairy Cattle Breeding 


(Continued from Page 3) 

of the job to be done in a particular 
herd, and also knowledge of the 
breed. After critical study of his 
herd, the successful breeder searches 
out those bloodlines that should cor¬ 
rect faults and at the same time pre¬ 
serve the desirable characteristics he 
has established. There is no mathe¬ 
matical formula that guarantees suc¬ 
cess; selection of the sire is usually 
accompanied by some disappoint¬ 
ments. This in itself has made own¬ 
ers of dairy cattle eager for some 
simple solution to a complex prob¬ 
lem, a solution that would relieve 
them of responsibility. So, with the 
development of artificial insemin¬ 
ation and consequent birth of the 
bull rings, some owners of dairy 
cattle accepted a new breeding pro¬ 
gram almost without question. Co¬ 
operative artificial breeding based 
upon proven sires was, and is, aimed 
at mass improvement. The individu¬ 
al was forgotten, and matings were 
left to chance. By the laws of prob¬ 
ability, there was always a fair 
chance that the best cow in the herd 
would be mated to the poorest bull, 
or the cow with the poor legs to the 
bull known to sire bad feet, or the 
cow with an oversized udder to the 
bull siring a pendulous one. While the 
program held possibility for improv¬ 
ing common cows, it also seriously 
adulterated some of the top germ 
plasm of the breeds. Breeding pro¬ 
grams that ignore the individual are 
not sound. Only as we improve the in¬ 
dividual can we hope to improve the 
herd and finally the breed. Top cows 
of a breed are priceless; we cannot 
afford to leave their mating to chance. 
It is breeders’ responsibility to make 
sure that their superior animals are 
mated to the bulls that offer the best 
possibility for further improvement. 
It is from these extraordinary cows 
and cow families that we must se¬ 
lect seed stock as the backbone of 
our future breeding programs. 

I believe that the management of 
most of the artificial breeding ma¬ 
tings is becoming increasingly aware 
of the need for selective matings, 
especially as it relates to the better 
cows. Fortunately, frozen semen 
greatly simplifies the problem. By 
its use, service to a particular bull 
is possible any day in the year any¬ 
where in the country. This is a real¬ 
ly progressive step in breeding, and 
it should have far-reaching influence. 
In any breeding program based upon 
selective matings, however, the in¬ 
dividual owner cannot dodge his or 
her responsibility. He must be a 
critic of his own herd and a student 
of the breed; he should never tire 
in his search for the best. 

In short, this is the breeder’s prob¬ 
lem: he must search out those su 
perior individuals and combine their 
blood to produce a more useful and 
a more beautiful cow. He must do it 


step by step, and he must never lose 
sight of the fact that the fundamental 
purpose of the dairy cow is the pro¬ 
duction of milk and butterfat. 

Elements of Dairy Cow Excellence 

Productive inheritance is a “must.” 
No feeding or management practice 
can overcome a lack of it. Selection, 
however, based upon production 
alone is almost certain to fail: there 
are a number of type defects that, if 
serious, can eventually destroy the 
apparent productive usefulness. The 
real relationship of type to produc- 
tipn has frequently been questioned. 
But studies have been based largely 
upon heifer performance; and the 
only true measure of the relationship 
betwen type and production is on 
lifetime performance. In my experi¬ 
ence, without exception, the cows 
that have been able to maintain their 
productive efficiency to 10 and more 
years of age have been free of major 
type defects. 

There has been misunderstanding 
of daii'y type, too. Frequently the 
smooth, but tight-ribbed, thick¬ 
thighed and short-necked cow is 
pointed out as a show cow even 
though a failure at the pail. To the 
experienced dairy judge, such a cow 



The udder ranks second to only pro¬ 
ductive ability as a goal of dairy 
breeding. In it, quality is crucial. 

is not a show animal; she lacks the 
dairy character that distinguishes 
the milk cow from the beef cow. We 
can, of course, have great and useful 
dairy cows who are not show cows, 
but they all have true dairy character. 

Next to inherited productive abili¬ 
ty, the udder ranks second as the 
basic dairy requirement. If many of 
the dairymen who have come to asso¬ 
ciate a large udder with a lot of milk 
would just take time to draw upon 
their own experiences, they would 
quickly realize that there is very 
little relationship between udder size 
and milk yield. This same experience 
would tell them that the large udder 
usually milks out slowly, requires 
prolonged stripping, is subject to ex¬ 
cessive congestion at calving time, is 
more frequently injured, has a high 
rate of infection, and seldom lasts 
very long. 

We should revise our thinking on 
what we strive for in the udder. A 
lady gave me the best answer that I 
have ever heard on this when she 


told me she wanted “a bull from a 
cow that gave a heck of a lot of milk 
from a little bit of an udder”; she 
“didn’t have time to sit down and 
squeeze the milk out of those great 
big meaty udders.” Hers was the 
voice of experience; we should defi¬ 
nitely select for a small udder of 
medium length in fi'ont, firm in both 
fore and rear attachments, held up 
close to the body and with extreme 
quality. Such udders usually milk 
out quickly and completely. They 
will endure regardless of the amount 
of milk produced. 

The Problem of Teat Length 

In the days of hand milking, short 
teats, especially on two-year-olds, 
were serious faults. To avoid the 
necessity of milking them with 
thumb and finger, we bred for 
length of teat that would permit use 
of the full hand. Thereupon, frequent¬ 
ly, as the cow matured these teats 
became too large. As the milking 
machine replaced the hand milker, 
the problem was completely reversed; 
a large, long teat just does not milk 
out well with a machine. A teat of 
medium length set neatly onto the 
udder floor with no funneling of the 
quarter is what is desired. Funnei- 
ing of the quarter into the teat fre¬ 
quently produces a pocket that does 
not milk out. When this occurs, it 
becomes necessary to massage the 
quarter upward to dump the milk 
out. This is a time-consuming task 
which, if not done, is almost certain 
to produce udder trouble. 

Legs and feet come next in impor¬ 
tance of dairy cattle attributes and 
anatomy. A sore-footed or crippled- 
leg cow cannot produce at top efficien¬ 
cy; leg defects also greatly increase 
labor. Most of us think of crooked 
legs when poor ones are mentioned. 
In recent years, however, I have come 
to rank the very straight, or post, leg 
as just as serious a fault as the 
crooked leg. The cow with very 
straight legs cannot withstand con¬ 
finement. Frequently there is swell¬ 
ing of the joints, followed by lame¬ 
ness. A severe trembling of the 
muscles in the hind quarters is com¬ 
mon as she gets up. As we view the 
leg from the side, there should be 
enough set to provide a spring-like 
action to the joint. When viewed 
from the rear, the legs should be set 
well apart to provide room for the 
udder, and they should be lined up 
in a plane with the body. A common 
fault is for the feet to turn outward 
and the hocks inward. When this oc¬ 
curs, the cow cannot move with a 
straight easy stride. The udder will 
be pushed first in one direction and 
then in the other as she walks. You 
can imagine and probably recall what 
happens when the cow runs. The 
foot itself is important, too. It should 
be of at least medium size with good 
depth at the heel. Spread toes are a 
serious fault and are transmitted 
from generation to generation. I 
would hesitate to use any bull from 
a family kown to carry this defect 
regardless of the productive level. 



Hamaret Queen Prospector (1.) is an Excellent Holstein with high productive capacity and the ability to pass 
it on. The only cow in America with three 2x records over 30,000 pounds of milk, she has among her offspring 
a son Lyon Brook Wallie Queen (r.), whose first daughter has produced 15,865 pounds of 3.5-per-cent milk 
with 553 pounds of butterfat to become N. Y. State jr. two-year-old Holstein champion. Both are on Archie 

Meek’s farm in Norwich, N. Y. 


22 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 









Next comes constitutional strength. 
The production of large quantities 
of milk represents hard work, and 
those weak-headed, narrow-chested 
cows tire easily and wear out rapidly. 
Size is also important, but it can 
be overemphasized. Size at the ex¬ 
pense of quality is undesirable. Other 
things being equal, however, the 
large cow will excell. 

Breeding and Feeding 

In addition to type, we must pay 
much greater attention in the future 
to breeding efficiency than we have 
in the past. There is increasing evi¬ 
dence that much of our breeding 
trouble may be the result of inheri¬ 
tance .This is particularly important 
in the selection of our breeding bulls. 

Good cows require a feeding and 
management opportunity that is as 
good or better than their inherited 
ability. A 600-pound fat cow will pro¬ 
duce 600 pounds only where given an 
opportunity. In many herds, the cows 


are better than the opportunity pro¬ 
vided them. 

Many dairymen are so busy taking 
care of their daily tasks that they 
cannot or will not take time to work 
out a planned breeding program. To 
meet this need, some of the artificial 
breeding rings might well consider 
the use of field men. With a knowl¬ 
edge of the bulls in service—their 
faults as well as their strong points 
—they could study the herds of pa¬ 
trons and lay out breeding programs 
that hold the best chances of produc¬ 
ing results. I am talking about true 
counsellors, not just some other men 
on the road trying to sell semen. 
With frozen semen, there is no 
longer any excuse for a herd with its 
20 heifers sired by 18 different bulls. 
Improvement in our dairy breeds can 
come only from continued attention 
to individuals. It is out of them that 
great herds, great breeds, great dairy 
cattle have been developed. And it 
is out of them they can be now and 
in the future. 


Pelleted Hay for Steers 


Is feeding loose hay to cattle in¬ 
efficient? 

Some scientists believe that feed¬ 
ing it pelleted would be much better. 
And, judging from a recent 151-day 
experiment with beef calves at the 
N. Y. State College of Agriculture in 
Ithaca, cattle might also like the 
idea. J. I. Miller, animal husband¬ 
man, actually expects that hay pel¬ 
lets, hay cakes, or hay bricquets, with 
a complete ration built in. may be 
the main course when cattle of the 



J. I. Miller of Cornell University has 
found much promise in roughage 
pellets for steers. 


future go to their mangers. But 
Professor Miller, who refuses to take 
anything for granted, says: “Our ex¬ 
periment turned out more favorable 
than expected”, he says; “I want to 
get in another year's work before I 
start waving the flag.” 

Miller divided calves into four lots 
and fed each differently. Calves 
which received regular hay plus 
alfalfa pellets gained more weight 
than the calves fed only the hay. 


These animals on pellets actually ate 
a little more hay than the others, 
too, consequently taking in more nu¬ 
trients. Tests show that more nu¬ 
trients are retained in pelletized hay 
than in loose or baled. 

Miller thinks that pelletized hay 
might make good for practical farm¬ 
ers if they can obtain an economical 
machine. It takes about 4,000 pounds 
of pressure per square inch to pro¬ 
duce hay pellets weighing 35 to 40 
pounds per cubic foot. One such ma¬ 
chine— now on the drawing board 
and perhaps to be manufactured soon 
—would streamline farm operations 
by reducing the need for hay storage 
and by completely mechanizing 
feeding and handling. Farmers 
would pelletize their hay in the 
fields or at a centi’al location; the 
operation would not be stopped by 
bad weather. The pellets, or cakes, 
one and a half or two inches in di¬ 
ameter, would be transported in 
wagons to barns where dumping de¬ 
vices might unload them onto eleva¬ 
tors. The feed would then move into 
storage on a conveyor. 

Professor Miller says that an ani¬ 
mal’s complete ration of hay, grains 
and supplements may all be com¬ 
pressed into an easy-to-eat cake or 
pellet. The only problem is obtain¬ 
ing “the right kind of equipment.” 
Some experiments with dairy cattle 
have shown that too finely ground 
roughage leads to a lowering of the 
butterfat content of their milk. 
Ruminants apparently must have 
roughage. It is nevertheless believed 
that the pelleting has now reached 
practical feeding perfection, and all 
that remains is development and 
economization of the pelleting ma¬ 
chine. 



Protein for Dairy Calves 


According to the dairy science de¬ 
partment at the University of Wis¬ 
consin, mixtures used to replace 
milk for dairy calves should contain 
at least 20 per c6nt protein and 80 
per cent digestible nutrients. They 
should be fortified with 10,000 units 
of vitamin A and 400 units of vita¬ 
min D per pound, but they should 
not include more than three per cent 
fiber. Addition of iron, cobalt, copper 
and iodine is helpful and, for the 
first two months, antibiotics are bene¬ 
ficial, too. 

Dry calf starters fed from 10 days 
on through three or four months 
should also contain 20 per cent pro¬ 
tein, but fiber may go up to as high 

January 4, 1958 


as six per cent. The basic ingredients 
of such starters are crushed or 
cracked corn, oats and soybean oil 
meal, but steamed bone meal, trace- 
mineral salt and vitamin D supple¬ 
ment are also necessary components. 

From four months on, calves and 
heifers need less protein, so it may 
be reduced to 14 or 15 per cent in 
growing rations, Wisconsin dairy re¬ 
searchers say. A milking cow ration 
of that content is quite suitable. 
Growing dairy cattle should have 
high quality hay early in life to pro¬ 
vide calcium, vitamins, protein and 
carotene, the scientists strongly em¬ 
phasize. 



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23 
































































SORE TEATS 
SCAB TEATS 
BRUISED TEATS 
OBSTRUCTIONS 

The easy, modern way to 
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healing. Keep it milking 


Dr. Naylor's Medicated Teat Dilators act 2 
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gentle, non-irritating support to delicate lining 
of teat canal. Keep end of teat open in its 
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CONTAINS SULFATHIAZOLE 


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24 


The Farm Income Tax 

By GEORGE A. STEVENS 


Part II 

Depreciation and How Figured 

Depreciation is an operating ex¬ 
pense and is subtracted directly from 
income. Many farmers fail to claim 
their allowable depreciation either 
because they are not aware of the 
amount allowable or are not willing 
to take the time to set up a depre¬ 
ciation schedule (record of depre¬ 
ciable items and amount of deprecia¬ 
tion allowable). Failure to claim al¬ 
lowable depreciation leads to two 
serious errors in your income tax re¬ 
porting. It will very likely result in 
paying more Federal income tax than 
is necessary and also mean that your 
self-employment income v/ill be in¬ 
correct. The social security law re¬ 
quires that all allowable depreciation 
be deducted when calculating self- 
employment income for social securi¬ 
ty coverage. 


traded plus the cash difference paid. 
For example, a farmer trades a trac¬ 
tor which has an unrecovered cost of 
$200 for another tractor and pays 
$1,500 cash difference. The cost basis 
of the new tractor for figuring depre¬ 
ciation will be $1,700 ($1,500 plus 
$200). 

After the basis for depreciation 
has been determined the next step is 
to determine the useful life of each 
item in the depreciation record. 
There are no set rules for determin¬ 
ing useful life. It depends on the 
circumstances on each farm and the 
type of farm operation. The main re¬ 
quirement is that it must be reason¬ 
able. Bulletin F, published by the 
Internal Revenue Service, wdll be 
very helpful in estimating the useful 
life of items used in farming. This 
bulletin may be purchased for 30 
cents from the Superintendent of 


Documents, U. S. Government Print¬ 
ing Office, Washington 25, D. C. 

The final step is to divide the cost 
basis of the item (minus a reasonable 
salvage value) by the length of life. 
The result will be the annual amount 
of allowable depreciation. This meth¬ 
od, known as straight-line, is the one 
most frequently used by farmers and 
in most cases is very satisfactory. 

Here is a simple example of figur¬ 
ing depreciation by the straight-line 
method. A farmer purchased a trac¬ 
tor at a cost of $2,100 and decided 
that its useful life would be 10 years. 
He also decided that the tractor 
would have a salvage value of $100 
at the end of its useful life. He there¬ 
fore subtracts $100 from the cost, 
leaving $2,000 as the basis for de¬ 
preciation. Then he divides 10 (the 
life of the tractor into $2,000 the 
cost of the tractor), and the result 
is an annual depreciation charge of 
$200 for a period of 10 years. He de¬ 
ducts this $200 on page 3 of Sched¬ 
ule F under depreciation. 

(To be Continued) 


On many farms the annual deduc¬ 
tion of allowable depreciation, when 
figured properly, will probably be 
larger than the fertilizer bill. The 
time spent in preparing a deprecia¬ 
tion record and charging off the prop¬ 
er amount on your income tax re¬ 
turns may be highly profitable: and it 
is not difficult. Most farm record books 
have pages for the depreciation 
record and a sample form is shown 
in the Farmers’ Tax Guide. 

What Is Depreciable Property? 

The only legal way a farmer can 
recover the cost of machinery, equip¬ 
ment, farm buildings and other 
property used to produce income and 
which has a useful life of more than 
one year is through the process of 
depreciation. The cost of these items 
cannot be charged off entirely with¬ 
in one year. 

Almost all property or assets used 
to produce income are depreciable 
provided they have a cost basis from 
which to figure depreciation. Some 
examples of depreciable items used 
in farming are: (1) buildings (other 
than dwelling occupied by owner); 
(2) machinery and equipment; (3) 
livestock used for work, dairy or 
breeding purposes, providing such 
animals were purchased and not in¬ 
cluded in inventory in case of the 
accrual method; (4) fences and tile 
drains; (5) orchards, groves and 
vineyards upon reaching producing 
age; (6) trucks used in business and 
automobiles (business portion only); 
and (7) tanks, vats, water wells and 
loading pens. There are, of course, 
other items which may be depreci¬ 
able. 

One very important exception is 
land. Land is never depreciable. Tim¬ 
ber, held as an investment and not 
as part of a business, is not depre¬ 
ciable from year to year, but a deple¬ 
tion charge may be deducted when 
the timber is sold. It is also impor¬ 
tant to remember that a farmer can 
never claim depreciation on any ani¬ 
mals raised by him. 

How to Figure Depreciation 

The first step in figuring deprecia¬ 
tion is to determine the cost basis 
of the depreciable items. In most 
cases, the cost of the property will 
be its basis. There are exceptions to 
this general rule which are discussed 
in Chapters 9 and 11 of the Farmers’ 
Tax Guide. The cost basis of proper¬ 
ty acquired by inheritance or 
through a bequest or a devise under 
a will will generally be the fair mar¬ 
ket value of the property at the time 
of death of the owner. If property 
was acquired by gift after 1920, the 
basis for figuring depreciation will 
be the cost or other basis to the 
donor. 

In the case of a trade, the basis 
of the newly acquired property is usu¬ 
ally the unrecovered cost (original 
cost minus depreciation) of the item 



Livestock In Maine 


(Continued from Page 18) 

the records to compare sires as well 
as cows. 

A livestock enterprise is most 
profitable when feed is grown on the 
farm. Professor H. H. Brugman 
states that the number of hogs which 
can be raised with the greatest profit 
depends to a large extent on the 
amount that can be grown. He sug¬ 
gests that most farmers will find it 
profitable to fatten at least one or 
more hogs to make use of table re¬ 
fuse and waste feed. In areas where 
milk is processed, excellent use can 
be made of skimmilk, buttermilk, or 
whey as part of swine rations. Po¬ 
tatoes should be cooked for best re¬ 
sults, but they can be used to good 
advantage when they are properly 
supplemented with other feeds. 

It is a common belief that hogs can 
be raised successfully only if suffi¬ 
cient corn is available. Actually, if 
barley, oats, and good pasture can 
be grown, or if there is access to milk 
by-products, they can grow and fat¬ 
ten hogs successfully. Protein re¬ 
quirements vary with weights of hogs 
and also with whether or not they are 
being fed on pasture or in dry lot. 
On the average, the following per¬ 
centages of protein are needed on 
pasture: pigs under 60 pounds, 18: 
60 to 120 pounds, 'J4; 120 to 220 and 
over, 12; pregnant females and sows 
nursing litters, 12. In dry lot, small 
pigs need 21 per cent; 60 to 120 
pounds, 17; 120 to 220 and over, 15; 
brood sows, 14. Some grain mixtures 
using barley and oats for hogs in dry 
lot are: breeding hogs—barley 65 
pounds, oats 10, tankage three, soy¬ 
bean oilmeal seven, alfalfa meal 15; 
pigs—barley 50, oats 15, tankage 10, 
soybean oilmeal 15, alfalfa meal 10; 
up to 120 pounds—barley 58, oats 15, 


tankage six, soybean oilmeal 11, 
alfalfa meal 10; up to 220 and over— 
barley 69, oats 10, tankage three, soy¬ 
bean oilmeal eight, alfalfa meal 10. 
On pasture, the high-protein supple¬ 
ments such as tankage and oilmeal 
may be reduced by a third to a half, 
depending on the kind and quality of 
pasture. 

When the Lambs Come 

The goal of sheep husbandry 
should be to save every lamb that is 
born, and Professor Goater empha¬ 
sizes that no detail of management is 
too small to overlook. Three weeks 
before the ewes are due to lamb the 
wool should be clipped from the 
udder, flank, and around the dock 
and twist. This will prevent the lamb 
from eating wool, a habit which 
often results in death due to forma¬ 
tion of wool balls in the digestive 
system. Other details he suggests are 
to have all equipment in readiness 
and lambing pens well-bedded and 
dry. One of the most important 
pieces of equipment at lambing time 
is a 10-foot hurdle, hinged in the 
middle. By using two hooked togeth¬ 
er, partially folded in the middle, a 
five-foot individual lambing pen is 
obtained. A few days before lambing 
time, put the ewe in one of these 
pens and keep her and the new-born 
lamb there for a few days. If the 
lambs come during cold weather, dry 
them promptly with burlap or coarse 
cloth. Be sure the lamb soon gets 
some of its mother’s milk; this will 
result in less chilling. Apply tincture 
of iodine to the navel of the lamb. 
During lambing time the flock should 
be visited frequently, day and night. 
No other chore pays oft’ so well with 
sheep as close attention to them dur¬ 
ing lambing time.. 



Discussing Pennsylvania’s Milk Problems 


At the Executive Mansion in Harrisburg last month Governor George M. 
Leader reviewed Pennsylvania’s milk vending machine program loith (1. to 
r.): Guy A. Leader, his father, William F. Berghold, Editor of The Rural 
New Yorker, and Charles D. Armstrong, administrative assistant to Penn¬ 
sylvania Milk Control Commission. 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 







































Northeast at the International 


Performance of northeast farm 
animals at the International Live¬ 
stock Show in Chicago last month 
may not have been as impressive as 
a year ago when beef cattle from 
Pennsylvania took three grand cham¬ 
pionships, but it was again, com¬ 
paratively, quite excellent. Aberdeen- 
Angus from the Northeast’s farms 
were preeminent as prizewinners, and 
northeast sheep did well, too. Penn¬ 
sylvania State University showed the 
grand champion three-head herd of 
steers—they were Aberdeen-Angus— 
and its and Big Brook Farm’s sum¬ 
mer yearling Hereford steer, stand¬ 
ing just below the animal which 
eventually became grand champion 
steer of the show, was reserve cham¬ 
pion Hereford steer. Penn State’s 
prize Angus summer yearling car¬ 
cass steer on hoof became breed 
champion, and its junior yearling 
Angus steer placed fifth. 

In the Angus breeding cattle class¬ 
es, the Penn State two-year-old heifer 
was second, the jr. yearling 10th. In 
addition to its reserve Hereford 
steer, Penn State also had second- 
prize group of Heerford steers, an- 



These New York 4-H judges placed 
sixth as a team in judging livestock 
at the International. 


other well-placed summer yearling, 
and a jr. yearling nicely \ip in the 
final lineup. Its junior bull calf was 
first and its sr. heifer calf high in 
the Hereford breeding cattle classes. 
The University showed two nicely 
placed jr. yearling Shorthorn steers— 
one was fourth, and two sr. Short- 
hoi'n calves did well; three Short¬ 
horn steers stood fourth. In the 
bre(eding Shorthorn competition, 
Penn State had three second-prize 
winners: two-year-old bull, summer 
yearling bull—in co-ownership with 
Cyrus Eaton, Northfield, Ohio—and 
sr. yearling heifer. 

The University exhibited the top 
pen of three Hampshire wethers, its 
106/125-pound wether lambs stood 
third and fourth, and its under-105- 
pound Hampshire wether was near 
the top. It had second place pens 
of three Hampshire ewe and ram 
lambs and the Shropshire wether 
lamb and the pen of them placed in 
the midst of high-quality classes. In 
Southdown wether classes, Penn 
State animals placed third, fifth and 
ninth. Three Penn State University 
faculty members were judges at the 
International: Herman Purdy, Polled 
Shorthorn cattle; Ben Morgan, South- 
down breeding sheep; and Carroll 
Shaffner, breeding Dorsets. 

Both the grand champion Aber¬ 
deen-Angus breeding cattle again 
were exhibited by northeast farms. 
Moles Hill Farm of ,Sharon, Conn., 
and Millerton, N. Y., showed the top 
bull, its first-place senior yearling, 
and Millardeen Farms, Annville, Pa., 
had the purple female with first-place 
senior yearling. Moles Hill also had, 
with Del Bairn Farm and Katidid 
Farm, Pine Plains, N. Y., the top 
senior bull calf dropped since No¬ 
vember 1956, and it exhibited sever¬ 
al other highly ranked animals in 
Angus classes. Millarden Farms also 
showed its summer yearling bull to 
top position, its junior yearling to 
second place, and many other in¬ 


dividuals to respectable rank. C. V. 
Whitney Farms, Old Westbury, N. 
Y., showed its first-place junior year¬ 
ling Angus bull to reserve junior 
championship, had fourth-place junior 
yearling heifer and placed others 
high in the money. Ankony Farm, 
Rheinbeck, N. Y., showed first-place 
senior heifer calf, its senior bull 
calves were second and third, and its 
senior and junior gets, post-Novem¬ 
ber senior heifer calf and two-year- 
old bull were all second. Heckmere 
Highlands, Valencia, Pa., showed 
first- and second-place summer yeai'- 
ling Angus heifers, third-place senior 
yearling heifer, plus many other well- 
placed animals. The junior yearling 
Angus heifer shown by Meadow Lane 
Farm, No. Salem, N. Y., and Old 
Home Manor, Homer City, Pa., stood 
second. Other northeast breeders 
with animals toward the top of 
Angus classes were: Eugene K. Den¬ 
ton, Flanders, N. J.; Hockhockson 
Farm, Eatontown, N. J.; Mahrapo 
Farms, Mahwah, N. J.; Graystones 
Co. Farm, Cornwall Bridge, Conn.; 
Kent Hollow Farms, New Preston, 
Conn.; and Rachel Speiden, West 
Cornwall, Conn. 

Zora Hereford Farm, Fairfield, Pa., 
showed seventh-place junior yearling 
Hereford bull. 

F. H. Vahlsing, Easton, Maine, ex¬ 
hibited the top pen of Shropshire 
lambs, his ram lamb was second, and 
he had highly placed individuals in 
many other Shropshire classes. Mrs. 
David McDowell, Mercer, Pa., was a 
strong competitor in the Cheviot 
breeding classes, her second-place 
ewe lamb being reserve champion, 
three yearling ewes and flock second, 
and other good Cheviots toward the 
top. Mrs. Eloise Spraker, Bath, N. 
Y., judged the Cheviot classes. James 
L. Westhoven, Bellefonte, Pa., did 
very well with Dorsets. His first-place 
yearling ram was champion, his first- 
prize yearling ewe reserve, and a ewe 
lamb and three ewe lambs fourth. 
Green Meadow Farms, Bareville, 
Pa., dominated the Hamsphire show 
with these firsts: flock, pen of three 
ewe lambs, the ram lamb who be¬ 
came breed champion, pen of three 
lambs, yearling ewe who became 
champion, and three yearling ewes; 
David McDowell, Mercer, Pa., was a 
chief contender in many of the 
classes. Mrs. Ford Cooper, Reynolds- 
ville, Pa., showed her sheep to high 
positions in the Suffolk classes. 

At the International, the New York 
4-H boys pictured on this page placed 
sixth nationally in judging livestock. 
Members of the team were (1. to r.); 
Thomas Slaight and Joel Kemp, Dans- 
ville, Livingston Co.; Lawrence Risse, 
Middleburg, Schoharie Co.; George 
Zeltner, Bergen, Genesee Co. H. A. 
Willman (r.) Cornell University, 
was coach. 


Good Livestock Books 


Feeds and Feeding, 

F, B. Morrisson.9.50 

Breeding Better Livestock, 

Rice and Andrews.. 7.00 

Bovine Mastitis, 

Little and Plastridge.$9.00 

The Stockman’s Handbook, 

M. E, Ensminger.8.50 

Beef Cattle, 

Roscoe Snapp . 6.50 

Introductory Animal Science, 

W. P. Garrigus. 6.50 

Sheep Science, 

Wm. G. Kammlade. 6.50 

Dairy Cattle and Milk Production 

Anthony and Eckles. 6.25 

Raising Swine, 

Deyoe and Krider. 6 25 

Elements of Dairying, 

T. M. Olson. 6.00 


Artificial Insemination of Farm 
Animals, 

Perry and Bartlett. 5.00 

For sale by The Rural New 
Yorker, 333 West 30th St., New York 
1, N. Y. (New York City residents, 
add 3% Sales Tax.) 




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SALESMAN 

WANTED 

We have an opening for a 
capable salesman who has had 
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Must have car and be willing to 
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STATE AGE, EXPERIENCE 
AND REFERENCE. Address 

Circulation Manager 

THE RURAL NEW YORKER 
— -'353 West 30th Street, 

New York 1, N. Y. 


Useful Poultry Books 


Turkey Management, 

Martin and Marsden.$7.00 

Poultry Handbook of Health and 

Management, (an encyclopedia) 

Rudolph Seiden . 6.95 

Successful Poultry Management, 
Morley A. Jull.6.25 

Poultry Production, 

Leslie E. Card.5.00 

Commercial Poultry Farming, 

Prof. T. B. Charles and H. D. 
Stuart . 4.50 

Domestic Geese and Ducks, 

Paul Ives . 4.00 


Making Pigeons Pay, 

Wendell S. Levi.3.50 

Successful Broiler Growing, 

Hofiman and Johnson.3.50 

How to Select the Laying Hen, 
Lamon & Kinghorne. 2.50 


For sale by The Rural New 
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1, N. Y. (New York City residents, 
add 3% Sales Tax.) 


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Hatching Eggs and Cooperation 


The high point of N. H. Poultry 
Growers Assn.’s annual meeting last 
month in Manchester was the dis¬ 
cussion on “What’s Happening in the 
Hatching Egg Business?’’. G. E. 
Coleman, Jr., of Nichols, Inc., Exeter, 
suggested that the new areas pro¬ 
ducing at lower costs than New Eng¬ 
land are doing so because they are 
making a new start. They have new 
houses, new equipment and new 
ideas, he said; broiler houses are 
located near processing plants and 
hatching egg flocks near the hatch¬ 
eries. Predicting closer ties between 
egg producers and hatcheries, he 
thought there would be little future 
relationship between hatching- and 
market-egg prices. While the hatch¬ 
ing-egg producer must have higher 
prices, Coleman warned, he must 
earn them through modernized 
methods, 

H. D. Weber of Arbor Acres Farm, 
Glastonbury, Conn,, agreed that there 
will be less future relationship be¬ 
tween hatching- and market-egg 
prices. With the exception of Del- 
marva, he told, every major broiler 
producing area is hatching its own 
chicks. Advantages include smaller 
transportation costs, better hatches 
and closer control of production. Any 
northeast expansion in hatching-egg 
production, he warned, will come 
only through supplying possibly in¬ 
creased local needs. While New 
England may not gain new markets, 
it was his opinion, nevertheless, that 
it will certainly continue in the 
hatching-egg business. Some produc¬ 
ers make a good living producing 
broiler hatching eggs for 70 to 75 
cents a dozen, Weber observed; 
others simply cannot. Austin Hub¬ 
bard of Hubbard Farms, Walpole, 
said that, regardless of the many 
methods used to figure hatching-egg 
prices, hatching-egg production must 
be kept more profitable than mar¬ 
ket-egg production or producers will 
shift to table eggs. 

The Squeeze Is Handed On 

Robert Cobb Jr. of Cobb’s Pedi¬ 
greed Chicks, Concord, Mass., re¬ 
ported that integration has squeezed 
broiler growers, growers have 
squeezed hatcheries, and hatcheries 
have squeezed hatching-egg produc¬ 
ers. While birds have been bred for 
low broiler cost, he observed, they 
have not been for low chick cost. 
Hatcheries’ extension of credit has 
insured them a supply of eggs, he 
declared, but it has also resulted in 
loss of bargaining power for pro¬ 
ducers. The latter have lost their 
choice of markets, he said. Hatchery- 
men have never gone to the poor- 
house in any attempts to honor con¬ 
tracts with producers, he acknowl¬ 
edged. A guarantee of price is not 
the solution, he stated, nor is one 
to take all eggs. To be of value, 
Cobb concluded, a guarantee must 
include size of eggs, price and length 
of market. 

Dr. Fred Smith of Charles Van- 
tress, Inc., Duluth, Ga., told that 
more and more southern hatcheries 
are producing their own eggs. They 
are building close to production 
centers so as to collect and set eggs 
twice a week. The pricing system 
was based on market-egg prices, he 
reported, but now it generally de¬ 
pends on the price of broiler chicks. 
One method is a 60-cent-a-dozen base 
price when chicks are 12 cents, with 
a five-cent-per-dozen increase for 
each cent increase in chick prices. 
There is usually a premium or de¬ 
duction of a half cent a dozen for 
each per cent increase or increase in 
hatchability over or under 70 or 75 
per cent, Smith told. Another plan 
is for the hatchery to pay all cash 
costs and give the producer 10 to 12 
cents per dozen. The producer 
furnishes the houses, equipment and 
labor. Any profit over the hatcheries’ 
costs is given back to the producer 


after the flock is sold, but last year, 
Smith said, there was not much re¬ 
turn of profit. There will always be 
a shortage of good hatching eggs, he 
believed, and New England should 
for a long time be able to outproduce 
the Southeast, at least in Summer, 
The speakers were bombarded 
with questions; all was not harmony. 
Questions had to do with prices of 
hatching eggs, production levels of 
broiler hatching-egg birds, hatch¬ 
eries owning the males, and the Oc¬ 
tober 1957 report which showed a 
20 per cent increase in placement of 
chicks for broiler-egg production 
over October 1956. According to G. 
E. Coleman, however, the increase 



These breeders - businessmen dis¬ 
cussed the hatching-egg business: (1. 
to r.) Fred Smith, Robert Cobb Jr., 
Austin Hubbard, H. D. Weber, and 
G. E. Coleman Jr. 

will not result in overproduction: 
placement in earlier months was 
lower. 

Cooperative Marketing on Self-Help 
Plan 

J. K. Samuels, director of the 
marketing division of Farmers Co¬ 
op. Service, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, said that the battle of 
food brands has become very intense 
in this supermarket era. To succeed, 
he said, any brand must justify it¬ 
self by profit for the store owner. 
Experience of the many large co¬ 
operatives marketing under con¬ 
sumer brands, he said, has shown that 
a successful program must have these 
essentials: (1) A standardized quali¬ 
ty product. To survive and grow, a 
product must be of uniformly high 
quality. Poultry producers of central 
California, with the country’s larg¬ 
est egg cooperative, pack 75 per cent 
of their production under their own 
brand. Picking up eggs twice a week, 
they cool on the farm, use refriger¬ 
ated trucks, and grade and candle 
centrally. Their carton brand, 
“Nulaid”, Samuels said, has for years 
commanded market preference. (2) 
Adequate volume, for efficient and 


A Poultry Score 

Chicks hatched for eventual egg 
production during the first 11 months 
of 1957 totalled 537,108,000, 18 per 
cent fewer than for the same period 
of 1956. But there were three per 
cent more laying-breed eggs in U. S. 
incubators early in December than 
there were the year before. Broiler 
chicks produced during the first 11 
months of 1957 came to 1,416,847,000, 
an increase of five per cent. As of 
December 1, moreover, 11 per cent 
more broiler eggs were being incu¬ 
bated than a year earlier. Turkey 
poult production during November 
was 14 per cent beneath 1956, and 
the number of turkey eggs in in¬ 
cubators during December was off 
greatly: down 22 per cent for heavy 
whites, 47 per cent for other heavies, 
and 50 per cent for the so-called 
light breeds. 

In New England last month, one 
per cent fewer broiler eggs and 12 
per cent fewer layer eggs were being 
incubated than a year earlier. In 
New York, Pennsylvania and New 


continual supply. (3) An appealing 
brand name. This should be distinc¬ 
tive, easy to remember, it should de¬ 
note quality, be adaptable to differ¬ 
ent forms of advertising, and have 
trade identity like Elsie the Cow or 
Betty Crocker. (4) Distinctive pack¬ 
aging. (5) Adequate advertising and 
promotion. Food businesses spend be¬ 
tween one and seven per cent of 
their total sales in advertising. (6) 
Effective salesmanship. It takes a 
different type of person to advertise 
than produce. A cooperative must 
spend as much for sales management 
as a corporation does. (7) Develop¬ 
ment of a long-range plan; it takes 
time to develop a brand name. One 
meat-packaging cooperative made no 
profit on its branded program for 
four years, but in its sixth year it 
had a net of 4.5 per cent and it is 
now 18 per cent. (8) Grower inter¬ 
est and support. A brand program 
is a long-term program; the payoff 
may not come for five or more years. 
Producer interest must be main¬ 
tained during this period. 

The cost of a brand-selling pro¬ 
gram by cooperatives varies greatly, 
Samuels said, but the average is 
about three per cent of sales. It is 
hard to break in with a brand pro¬ 
gram, he declared, because large 
chains already have their own brands. 
Many local chains and independent 
makets will use a cooperative brand, 
however, he believed, if it is backed 
with good merchandising and promo¬ 
tion. In New England, egg coopera¬ 
tives have not developed their own 
brands, Samuels observed, hut about 
a third of the eggs sold by 10 of 
them are packed in buyers’ cartons. 
These cooperatives do about $15 
million worth of egg business each 
year, he stated, and, if it were com¬ 
bined, it would be sufficient to 
launch an effective marketing pro¬ 
gram. At its inception, Samuels ad¬ 
vised, it would be best to begin only 
a modest brand program, continuing 
to sell most eggs in buyers’ cartons. 
The program must be of quality, he 
concluded, and producers must be 
willing to defer present profits for 
long-time gains. 

Fred Hazlewood III, poultry and 
egg reporter, said that the egg prices 
the USD A reports in Boston are 
those to the first receiver and not 
to the producer. One learns through 
experience what a legitimate sale is, 
he remarked, and only those go into 
the market quotations. 

Robert Horsburgh, Fremont, chair¬ 
man of the committee on coopera¬ 
tive marketing of branded eggs under 
Joseph Fletcher’s self-help plan, re¬ 
ported that, as a result of committee 
activities, studies on consolidation 
of poultry and egg cooperatives are 
underway in New England and the 
Northeast. Richard Warren 


Jersey, however, broiler eggs in in¬ 
cubators were up six er cent and 
laying-breed eggs 13 per cent over 
December, 1956. In both areas, there 
was a great decline in the number 
of turkey eggs set. 


Fat's Role in Poultry 
Production 

The body fat of poultry can be in¬ 
fluenced by the content of their diet, 
according to the American Veterin¬ 
ary Medical Assn. The fat content of 
a duckling grown on a 16 per cent 
protein ration chiefly of corn was 33 
per cent. It was only 24 per cent for 
a duckling whose ration was reduced 
in starch and fat, but whose protein 
level was increased to 28 per cent. 
Ducks are susceptible to fattening in 
excess of the desirable market finish. 

All fats are not equal in poultry 
rations, the Association says. Animal 
fats of relatively low melting points 
seem superior to other types in di¬ 
gestibility and utilization. 

THE RURAL NEW YORKER 



26 



































Is It in the Skr^^? 


“Fletcher Plan is Pie in the Sky!” 
So screams the headline report of 
a recent poultry meeting. 

The statement is attributed to one 
of our top leaders, a high-salaried 
employee of one segment of the in¬ 
dustry. While we could brush it off 
on the premise that “every knock is 
a boost”, perhaps it might be better 
to try to evaluate this unexpected 
recognition. 

Could it be that the speaker is feel¬ 
ing the “pinch” somewhere and is 
resorting to “name - calling” — the 
course usually followed by politicians 
when they realize they are being 
licked on the merits of a campaign? 
Or, is the speaker, in effect, trying 
to say that the Self-Control Plan 
is too idealistic? I have the greatest 
admiration and respect for this par¬ 
ticular gentleman, therefore I prefer 
to accept this latter conclusion. 


particular pie, can generate the 
power necessary to bring it down to 
earth and set it to work in their 
interests. 

I wonder if the speaker realizes 
just how much he has allowed his 
resistance to change, and his person¬ 
al prejudice against mergers to dis¬ 
tort his vision? He states that the 
number of poultry farms will be 
whittled down to 100,000. If this be 
true, our 650 cooperatives and some 
6,000 private egg receivers will have 
about 16 suppliers each. Such small 
volume would boost the cost of egg¬ 
handling to fantastic proportions. 
Maybe this is what the “status quo” 
boys had in mind when they told 
us we must learn to live with 35-cent 
eggs. It seems simpler to merge our 
cooperatives so that we can afford 
to hire the brains capable of doing 


the whole job on a national scale. 

Let the Producers Decide What 
They Want 

Why don’t some of our s6-called 
leaders stop fooling with our money 
and leave us entirely alone to make 
our own decisions? As leaders they 
must accept a share of the responsi¬ 
bility for our past years of losses, 
our shrinking markets and the 
dangerous confusion ahead of us. I 
feel confident that we, as producers, 
could bring about a sound solution 
to our own problems if we could 
somehow get rid of this constant 
interference from industry people. 
Anyway, we should be allowed to try. 
Surely, we can do no worse than 
the “experts.” 

Significantly enough, the Self- 
Control Plan has been reviewed by 
well over a hundred outstanding 
lawyers, bankers, industrialists, busi¬ 
ness men, economists and market¬ 


ing specialists, and I have yet to re¬ 
ceive an adverse report. However, 
many of these men pointed out the 
hurdle of reactionary thinking that 
must be overcome. 

It is difficult to find a bona fide 
producer, free of industry ties, who 
is against the provisions of the Plan. 
The only important opponents seem 
to be a tight little group of opinion¬ 
ated men who prefer to drift along 
with the tide and see in this Plan a 
challenge to their own positions of 
power, previously undisputed. Do 
they dare let me, and anybody else 
with whom they may disagree, come 
into their bailiwicks, talk to their 
people, then take the shackles off 
those people so that they may vote 
directly and freely on whatever they 
may want? 

The producers have a right to 
make their own decisions! 

Joseph H, Fletcher 

Wentworth, N. H. 


Ours Is a Way of Life — and a 
Business Too 

I am ready to plead guilty that the 
Self-Control Plan may appear to be 
somewhat idealistic—for agriculture. 
The interests that make money “off” 
us, as farmers, have been all too 
successful in selling us a bill of 
goods that “farming is a way of 
life.” I have no argument with this 
philosophy except for the fact I am 
surrounded with the pressing and 
practical need to meet my bills. If 
I could just ignore these bills, this 
“way of life” would be most satis¬ 
factory. But the people who supply 
my feed, chicks, supplies, etc., refuse 
to go along with the idea. They want 
money—hard, cold cash. They are 
business men. While they compete 
with others in their respective fields, 
they invariably set their own prices 
based on the old reliable formula of 
cost plus profit. 

Is it “pie in the sky” for us to 
attemj)t to make a business out of 
our “way of life”? Can the speaker 
who so describes the Self-Control 
Plan offer any better way to put us 
on a business footing? True, I might 
wish to continue my “way of life” in 
preference to assuming the realistic, 
hard-boiled role of a practical busi¬ 
ness man, but I must still live with 
the everyday necessity to earn a 
living. 

I note that the speaker made no 
effort to defend our present fantastic 
system of marketing. How could he 
even though he has been part of 
it for years? The deplorable record 
of failure is so dark that even the 
most naive among us is ^aware of 
impending disaster. Our friend may 
be trying to hold on to his own job 
and protect his friends, but he cer¬ 
tainly doesn’t dare tell us our pres¬ 
ent system is sensible and profitable 
for the producer. 


N£W!o ver 2 Years of Testing PROVES 



WIRTHMORE 

with 

MAZOFERM 

Improves Poultry Performance 




At the Wirthmore Research Farms 
at Waverly, New York, and Berkley, 
Massachusetts, extensive research 
involving many thousands of broilers 
has proved that Mazoferm, when 
added to modern high energy, high 
efficiency rations, shows substantial 
improvements. 


BETTER GROWTH 

Up to 5% heavier birds at market age. 


BETTER RETURNS 

As much as $26.30 higher return over feed cost 
per 1,000 birds by actual test. 


Better Under Adverse Conditions 

During a severe outbreak of CRD, Wirthmore with 
Mazoferm showed a substantial advantage over 
conventional feeds. 

THIS IS MAZOFERM 

On your Wirthmore feed tag you will see Mazoferm 
as Corn Fermentation Solubles. It is a primary 
fermentation product made especially for feed use. 

THIS IS WHAT IT DOES 

Mazoferm (Corn Fermentation Solubles) supplies 
a concentrated source of unidentified growth factors 
and known nutrients. It makes possible greater re¬ 
turns over feed cost. 


A Big Job Needs Big Men 

Admittedly, a national cooperative 
would face varying problems from 
area to area. But would these prob¬ 
lems be so very different from those 
regularly taken in stride by com¬ 
merce and industry? Industry han¬ 
dles this contingency by hiring men 
big enough to fill the jobs. A large 
cooperative, national in scope, under 
one banner, with regional offices, 
would surely be preferable to our 
present weird system; or a defeatist 
government-control program; or inte¬ 
gration of our industry by chain 
stores. (You will notice I said “chain 
stores,” Just keep your eye on this 
latest development.) 

I hadn’t realized our “pie” had 
been filched out of the oven and 
blown into the sky by the hot air 
of the“big guns.” If a few well-placed 
men, who get their pay regularly 
whether egg prices are good or bad, 
can muster up enough of their re¬ 
maining strength to blow our “pie” 
into the sky, surely the thousands of 
producers, who happen to like this 


BETTER BALANCE 

A proper balance of amino acids, energy, vitamins 
and minerals, PLUS MAZOFERM supports supe¬ 
rior performance efficiency. Straight run broiler 
weights of 3.50 lbs. with feed conversion of 2.11 
have been produced at 8 weeks and 6 days in large 
pens. 


PLUS THESE ADDED 
ADVANTAGES! 

Better Appearance & Palatabiiity 

With Mazoferm in the feed, pellets are harder and 
of better quality. Birds show a definite preference 
for Wirthmore with Mazoferm. 


THIS IS THE FORECAST 


Right now, Mazoferm 
is also improving the 
performance of Wirth¬ 
more breeder, laying, 
and turkey feeds . . . 
And more, Wirthmore 
Research has in store 
for you extra improve¬ 
ments now in the testing 
pens at Berkley and 
Waverly research farms. 



Look to Wirthmore for sound application of new 
developments in the field of animal feeding and 
management. 



WIRTHMORE FEEDS DIVISION 
177 Milk St., Boston 9, Mass. 


ORDER TODAY FROM YOUR WIRTHMORE DISTRIBUTOR* 

You’ll find helpful, experienced Wirthmore Feed distributors in 17 states 
from Maine to Michigan and south to South Carolina. They are your 
most reliable source for farm feeds and supplies. 

* Or wrife us for name of distributor nearest you. 



January 4, 1958 


Z1 
















STARTED PULLETS 

Do you want eggs now 
and in the spring and 
summer? If so, you 
want some of those 
famous Sunnybrook 
Started Pullets. We 
have thousands of them 
—can ship 25 to 25,000 
if you wish in White 
Leghorns or Red Rock 
Crosses (black pullets) 
and the other popular 
breeds, 4-6-8-12 weeks 
of age up to ready-to- 
lay. All terrific layers 
of large eggs from the greatest egg layers in 
America. No fuss — no brooder needed. They ma¬ 
ture rapidly — lay big eggs— maintain 250 to 300 
or more egg production well over a year, with 
less than 5% mortality. We can vaccinate accord¬ 
ing to your requirements. We are the largest 
producers of Started Pullets in America. As such, 
we believe we can sell them to you at a price 
lower than it would cost you to raise them your¬ 
self. You see—we have the facilities—a staff of 
experienced poultrymen who devote 24 hours a 
day 7 days a week throughout the whole year. 
Write, wire or phone us TODAY. Be sure to tell 
us the breed, age, quantity and date of delivery 
you are interested in. 

BABY CHICKS 

Sunnybrook Baby 
Chicks are as 
healthy chicks as 
you can buy. They 
co’me from the great¬ 
est egg layers in 
America. A produc¬ 
tion of 250 to over 
300 eggs a year, is 
born into every 
Baby Chick honored 
with the name Sunny¬ 
brook. They mature 
rapidly into layers 
of large eggs early 
and maintain high 
production well over 
a year or more and 
a very low mortality—less than 5%. These Baby 
Chicks are not the ordinary every day variety — 
they are the finest Baby Chicks on the market 
today — regardless of price 1 Every week in the 
year, we hatch thousands and thousands of them 
— in all the leading breeds — White Ix'ghorns — 
Bed Rock Crosses — White Rocks — New Ilamp- 
shires — Rhode Island Reds for example. Write, 
wire or phone us TODAY. Be sure to tell us the 
breed — sex — quantity and date of delivery you 
are interested in. You'll be amazed at the low 
prices we charge^ _ 

FROM U.S. APPROVEO-PULLORUM TYPHOID 
CLEAN BREEDERS — OF COURSE 

Wherever you live — you are a neighbor of Sunny¬ 
brook. By parcel Post, Railway Express, by Air or 
by our own fleet of trucks, we get them to you safe 
and sound IOO% alive, wo guarantee. 

LET US SEND YOU OUR PICTURE STORY 
OF SUNNYBROOK — WRITE US TODAY. 

SUNNYBROOK 

POULTRY FARMS, Inc. 

A. HOWARD FINGAR 

Box 2 Phone 8-1611 HUDSON, N.Y. 

You can order in confidence — we've been in this 
business, exclusively, for over 37 years. 





R I REDS • SEX-LINK CROSS • 
SILVER CROSS • BUFF CROSS • 


leghorn-red cross ♦ WHITE ROCKS 


NOW! 
for those 
who have 
been looking for 
THE IDEAL WHITE HEN 

THE NEW PARMENTER 
MASSACHUSETTS WHITES 

We can now offer these superior white- 
feathered birds which combine the fam¬ 
ous Parmenter Rhode Island Reds with 
Parmenter Dominant Whites to give you 
ALL the wanted characteristics of both. 
Lay large quantities of big, brown eggs! 
Early and consistent production even in 
hot weather. Economical feed ratio! Aver¬ 
age less than 6 pounds! Dress off white for 
the most discriminating market. Start a 
flock of these remarkable birds today and 
prove to yourself that they are unbeat¬ 
able for economical egg and meat pro¬ 
duction. 

FREE ILLUSTRATED FOLDER and PRICES 
SENT ON REQUEST 

PARMENTER REDS, INC. 

484 KING STREET, FRANKLIN, MASS. 


HELP WANTED 

Woman with car to sell subscriptons to 
The Rural New Yorker on liberal com¬ 
mission basis. Full or part time. Experi¬ 
ence helpful, but not necessary. Some 
territory open in New York, Pennsyl¬ 
vania, and New England. For further 
details, write Circulation Manager, The 
Rural New Yorker, 333 West 30th St., 
New York 1, N. Y. 


MILLIONS 
of Baby Chicks Wanted 

During the next few weeks, the 300,000 readers of The Rural New 
Yorker will purchase millions of Baby Chicks. They will also buy 
large quantities of Poults, Ducklings, etc. 

Any breeder or hatchery, who has a good supply of birds to sell, 
will find a demand for their stock among this large group of buyers. 
Country people prefer to buy from concerns that advertise in The 
Rural New Yorker because they know that only reliable business 
houses are permitted to advertise in the publication. 

Annual Poultry Issue 

FEBRUARY 1st 

The big Annual Poultry Issue of The Rural New Yorker will 
afford business concerns an excellent opportunity to place their sales 
message before more than 300,000 of the best farmers and poultrymen 
in the Northeast at just the time when they are ready to place their 
orders. There is no other way in which a business concern can reach 
such a fine group of country people so effectively and at so 
small a cost. 

SALES AT LOW COST 

Dozens of breeders and hatchery-operators have learned from ex¬ 
perience that advertisements in The Rural New Yorker produce sales 
at a low cost. Many have advertised in the publication each season for 
25 years or more. This is the best proof that they find advertising in 
The Rural New Yorker brings them new customers at a low cost. 

The big Annual Poultry Issue will go to press Friday, January 
17 It will be filled with valuable and timely information and will 
therefore be carefully read and saved for future reference. Advertise¬ 
ments that appear in this issue will have a long life. 

Any business concern that is seeking more business this season 
will find it profitable to have an advertisement in this big 
popular issue. It will be necessary, however, to send your reservation 
promptly so as to be assured of proper classification. 

THE RURAL NEW YORKER 

333 WEST 30th STREET NEW YORK 1, N. Y. 


TH€ HEMYARD 

sr e. s. nATT . 


Is Incubator Too Hot? 

How can I set my incubator so it 
will hatch out more eggs? I set it 
at 103 degrees the last time, and 
only 11 out of 60 eggs hatched. Most 
of the eggs were fertile; they had 
embryos in them. What do you think 
the trouble is? d. k. 

New Jersey 

It is difficult to explain just why 
you have had such poor results with 
your incubator without knowing the 
type of machine as well as its oper¬ 
ation, moisture controls, etc. We also 
should know the source of the hatch¬ 
ing eggs. As a partial explanation, 
however, I offer one or two ideas. 
If the incubator is supplied with a 
fan so that the air can be moved 
throughout the machine, the tem¬ 
perature should be 99.5 to 100 de¬ 
grees rather than 103. On the other 
hand, even if there is no fan, a 
temperature of 103 may be a little 
too high unless it is taken at a point 
level with the top of the eggs. Pre¬ 
sumably you have some instructions 
for the machine and have been 
operating it according to the rules. 

The fact that so many embryos 
seem to die in the latter part of the 
hatch suggests that your humidity 
control or ventilation may be at fault. 
I would check into these factors 
quite carefully. 


Heat for Hatching 

Some time ago we found a 50-egg 
oil incubator in the attic; now we 
want to convert it to electricity. 
Would just one bulb in the middle 
make it warm enough? Please tell us 
at what temperature we should run 
it and how big a bulb it will take. 

Lewis Co., N. Y. mrs. l. s. 

An electric light bulb may be used 
to furnish heat in a small incubator. 
But you will have to do considerable 
manipulation of the ventilators to 
get an even distribution of tempera¬ 
ture. You should plan to have a ther¬ 
mometer reading of 103 degrees F. at 
a level with the top of the eggs. A 
much higher temperature will be re¬ 
corded near the bulb unless you can 
find some way to force a distribution 
of the heat. In addition to the bulb, 
you will need some sort of thermos¬ 
tat that will shut off the current 
whenever the machine gets too hot; 
otherwise it will heat up entirely too 
much. If you should get the tempera¬ 
ture up to 109 degrees, the embryos 
will all be killed within a few hours. 

A few years ago I hatched some 
eggs in an ordinary cardboard box 
with a light bulb in it. But I had to 
punch many, many holes in the top 
of the box to get rid of the surplus 
heat. I used a 15-watt bulb. 


Depluming Mites on 
Chickens 

Can you tell me hov^ to control 
depluming mites on chickens? They 
are eating the feathers right off our 
flock. I have sprayed and also painted 
with various solutions, but they seem 
ineffective. Can I fumigate? I would 
appreciate any advice you can give. 

Pennsylvania w. h. 

The treatment you have given the 
birds for mite control should have 
corrected the condition. However, 
even though the mites may be under 
control, nothing is going to change 
the broken feather condition until 
the birds molt. New feathers will not 
grow out automatically and replace 
those that have broken. 

There is a question as to whether 
the birds were really affected with 
the depluming mite. To be sure of 
that, it would be a good idea to take 
some of the birds to one of the state 
diagnostic laboratories where they 
can be examined. 


First- Colds, Now Small Eggs 

Several weeks ago my 1,500 year 
ling Leghorns suffered severe colds 
and went way down in egg produc¬ 
tion. Now some are molting, but 
others are coming back into lay. Be¬ 
fore their illness, they laid mostly 
jumbo eggs, but now we have many 
small eggs, even some smaller than 
peewees, and without yolks. Does this 
mean the beginning or the end of 
their laying of eggs? J. m. 

Sullivan Co., N. Y. 

The fact that you are getting so 
many abnormal eggs from your flock 
after what you term a severe cold 
makes me believe the birds suffered 
from an attack of bronchitis, one of 
the most severe respiratory diseases 
of chickens. If so, there is every rea¬ 
son to believe that egg production 
will never came back to its full ca¬ 
pacity. Eggs will remain abnormal 
in size and shape for months. New¬ 
castle disease has somewhat the same 
after-effects for a short period of 
time, so you might keep the birds 
for another month or six weeks to 
find out. If they still seem abnormal 
in many respects then, I would 
recommend you dispose of the flock. 


Is It Newcastle? 

One of my hens has something 
wrong with its head. She puts it 
back just as far as possible, then 
shakes it back and foi'th. I thought 
something was caught in its throat, 
but I could not remove anything 
with a feather soaked in cod-liver 
oil. What on earth can make her 
do it? H. L. s. 

Rensselaer Co., N. Y. 

The condition noted in one of your 
hens could be the after-effects of 
Newcastle or one of the other res- 
piratoi’y diseases. Occasionally these 
diseases leave an infection in the 
middle ear which causes the bird to 
lose control of its head movement. 
There is nothing that can be done. 
The bird would be perfectly all right 
for human consumption, however. 


Snow Dozer to Stir Litter 

I saw a small snow dozer advertised 
for $4.95 that is supposed to work 
well in cleaning out poultry houses. 
Do you think it would be practical 
to stir up litter, too? a. m. l. 

Pennsylvania 

The snow dozer would be quite 
useful in moving litter unless it were 
packed tightly to the floor or was 
very coarse. Litter that has been 
worked over for a year or so could 
be moved to one side without much 
difficulty with this piece of equip¬ 
ment. 


Lumpy Egg Yolks 

What causes egg yolks to get 
lumpy when beat up? I feed my hens 
wheat, oats, buckwheat and laying 
mash. They look healthy and are 
laying good. I gather the eggs twice 
a day and keep them in a cool place. 

Pennsylvania w. t. 

Egg yolks will not beat up proper¬ 
ly unless the beating is done soon 
after the egg has been broken. Ex¬ 
posure of the yolk to air will cause 
that lumpy condition when the yolks 
are beaten. 










(Answers to Questions on Page 6) 

1. In the Ararat Mountains — 

Gen. 8:4 


2. 350 years — 

3. 950 years — 

4. Methuselah — 

5. Lamech — 

6 . Three — 


Gen. 9:28 
Gen. 9:29 
Gen. 5:25 
Gen. 5:28-9 
Gen. 5:32 


7. Shem, Ham and Japhet 




8 . Carpenter and builder — 

Gen. 6:14-22 

9. A vineyard planter — Gen. 9:20 

10. Noah — Gen. 8:1-4 


28 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 































Whafs Your 
Poultry 
Score? 


Have you ever wished your fore¬ 
sight in the poultry business was as 
good as your hindsight? Too many 
times we get into trouble because 
we barge into things without really 
using our heads. How about taking 
inventory of methods and make a 
list of all the things you do not do 
right because of carelessness, poor 
judgment or lack of information? 

Let’s start before the arrival of 
the baby chicks. Do you thoroughly 
clean and disinfect before each new 
lot arrives? Recently I visited the 
houses of a young fellow who had 
just gone in for raising chickens in 
a big way. He said, “We can raise 
about three batches in here without 
cleaning out or disinfecting.” Short¬ 
ly afterwards, he got such a bad dose 
of coccidiosis that he was in a heap 
of trouble. He failed to get a mar¬ 
ket for the birds he did raise, and 
he was soon bankrupt. 

Mite Control and Clean Litter 

Do you wait until you find mites 
and then wish you had sprayed with 
carbolineum? 1 did that once, but 
never again. Just one spraying a 
year in brooder and hen houses does 
the trick. We dilute the carbolineum 
with a little kerosene to make it go 
through the spi'ayer. It is wise to 
wear a mask, a long-sleeved shirt 
and gloves. You can get burned; be 
careful. When our sprayer plugged 
and backfired once, my husband, who 
was not properly protected, got a 
bad burn on his face and eyes. 

It is impossible to clean thorough¬ 
ly and to keep old litter at the same 
time. Throw it out. Why keep a mess 
of germs and filth to contaminate 
your new birds? 

Cheap Chicks Are a Waste of Money 

Are you pinching pennies and buy¬ 
ing cheap chicks? If you are, you 
are only throwing money down a rat 
hole. Buy from a reliable hatchery- 
man and find out whether the chicks 
are from a strain of good livability 
with high records. I have friends who 
were forced out of the poultry busi¬ 
ness by a poor flock of birds. A 
hundred chicks were dead in the 
boxes when they came, and 500 more 
soon died. The disease was diagnosed 
as a nervous disorder which was the 
result of being hatched in dirty 
brooders. The ones that did manage 
to live never amounted to anything. 

How does your production schedule 
compare with the time of year when 
egg and poultry prices are highest? 
Perhaps by shifting the time of year 
you raise your chicks, you could 
benefit from higher prices. 

It is better to use plenty of small 
fountains at first for chicks and then 
gradually change to the larges ones. 
This doesn’t seem believable, but 
it actually happened. A man’s chicks 
dehydrated because he used big 
poultry fountains suitable for hens 
and the chicks could not even reach 
them. 

I think some people wait too long 
to feed their young chicks. Delay in 
feeding is an old-fashioned idea. Feed 
and water them as soon as you take 
them out of the boxes. Never put 
full trays of grit in for young chicks. 
They are attracted by the glitter of 
it, and they eat too much. Sprinkle 
it lightly on top of their mash. 

I had only one session with rickets, 
but that was enough. My husband 
shovelled the dirt out before he drew 
the brooder house into position to 
hook it up with the electricity. He 
thought it would not be so drafty 
that way. The result, however, was 
that the floor got damp, and the 
chicks went down. The feed man 

January 4, 1958 



Success in the early stages of the 
annual poultry game—with the chicks 

—favors a desirable final score. 

thought the cod liver oil in their 
mash had lost its potency. But I think 
it was a combination of dampness 
and vitamin D deficiency. Anyway, 
he brought me fresh mash with extra 
vitamin D oil mixed in, and we drew 
the house out of the hole. The chicks 
recovered. But I do not want to go 
through that again. 

Don’t ever think you can get ahead 
by buying cheap feed from an un¬ 
reliable dealer. Buy from one who 
has the reputation for doing the right 
thing. He usually can be a lot of 
help to you. 

Some people do not like to bother 
to provide low cost perches for the 
chicks to learn to roost on. I believe 
that it pays. At the age of three 
weeks, they like to begin to get on 
the roosts. The sooner they learn, 
the less chance there is for huddling. 

Are you neglecting a systematic 
and sound program of vaccination? 
If you are, you are heading for dis¬ 
aster. Back in the old days when the 
country did not have so many chick¬ 
ens, you could get away with it, but 
that day has gone. I know a farm 
where for more than 20 years there 
had been no vaccinating, and there 
had been no contagious diseases. 
Then, all of a sudden, disease struck. 
After the birds recovered from the 
disease, they were no longer profit¬ 
able to keep as layers. The whole 
flock had to be sold for meat. 

Artificial Lights and Water Supply 

What has been your practice in 
the use of artificial lights? If you use 
them on birds from eight weeks to 
maturity, you will get a lot of false 
layers. Pullets raised under the in¬ 
fluence of light often partially de¬ 
velop yolks in their ovaries. One 
mistake I made on lights was to 
wait until the birds had reached their 
highest production and began to 
taper off. I thought that was the time 
to begin lights on them. But that was 
wrong. Every year I would have some 
begin to neck molt; and that meant 
lowered production. I learned the 
hard way to put lights on as soon 
as the birds start to lay. We used 
to think a 13-hour day was sufficient 
but now birds are bred to stand 
higher production and 15 or 16 hours 
are being advocated. 

Are you falling down on giving 
your flock an adequate water supply? 
There should not only be an ade¬ 
quate supply of water, the fountains 
or troughs ought to be in various 
parts of the pen and no more than 
three or four feet from the mash 
hoppers. Do you let the water con¬ 
tainers get slimy? If so, you are 
only asking for trouble. The birds 
will be saying, “No clean water, no 
nice eggs.” 

I used to think that you just went 
out and threw some grain at hens 
and then picked up the eggs. That, I 
believed, was all there was to it! It 
was not long before I learned. 

Ten pounds of scratch grain for 
Leghorns are sufficient most of the 
year. It can be varied a little accord¬ 
ing to whether it is hot or cold. I 
did not have good luck with the 
heavies. I was always too generous 
and got them too fat. 

Well, what is your score? I hope 
it is your good fortune to find out 
all the correct answers before you 
make any mistakes. Learning by ex¬ 
perience without sufficient fore¬ 
knowledge can be a rough and ex¬ 
pensive way to learn. 

New York Leona M. Sherman 


NEW! ^ qw&at ScUfCAy! 
HUBBARD’S 496 PULLET 

Ian 




shells 

• aigher livability 

• cross-fei-ed yi 


TH€ HUBBARD #496 PULLET: 

(el«r - red • sixe - 5V4 lbs. ot Ist #99 

4V4 lbs. 0t end ef Ist year 

THE #496 PULLET is an entirely new 
cross, especially developed by Hubbard 
Research for producers of eggs for the 
brown egg market. The #496 matures 
early, flocks peak at 80 to 90%. Eggs are 
remarkably uniform in size and color. 
SHELLS EXTREMELY STRONG, INTERIOR 
EGG QUALITY EXCELLENT. Breakage just 
about ceases to be a problem. Superior 
shell quality holds through 12 months’ 
production. Based on 1,000 birds, this 
one inherited characteristic alone can 
mean an extra $250.00 per year income! 
In addition to Hubbard’s #496, we 
offer you the following breeds, each a 
leader in its field. 

HUBBARD LEGHORN CROSS— Heavy pro¬ 
ducer of large, strong-shelled eggs with 




superior internal quality. Some creams 
and tints. 

HUBBARD NEW HAMPSHIRE - Favored 
large brown egg producer for more 
than 30 years. Holds all time contest 
record for breed. 

HUBBARD KIMBERCHIK K.137 - Better 
than 250 pure white eggs a year, large 
size early. Proven in Random Tests and 
on the farms, floor and cage, all over 
the United States. 


For new literature on the 
Hubbard #496 Pullet, also 
on Hubbard K-137 Kimber- 
chik Leghorns. Address 
Dept. 12. 


H 



UBBARD FARMS 


WALPOLE, 


* N. H. 


LANCASTER, PA. • STATESVILLE. N. C. 


HUBBARD FARMS>PROFIT-BRED EGG STRAINS 


Babcock’s New Advance Order Dis¬ 
count is now in etfect. Please write 
and tell us how many chicks you 
want and when you want them. 

We II book your order to take ad¬ 
vantage of this new money saving 
advance order discount. Also, we’ll 
mail you our new catalog. 

Sincerely, MONROE C. BABCOCK 
BABCOCK POULTRY FARM, INC., 
BOX 286-R, _ ITHACA, NEW YORK 

NEW BOOK 

Free! 

Read all about my 
Big - New Improved 

ANGONAS 

1958 white egg 
machines. Lots of I 
large white eggs 
at less cost per | 
dozen. Write to — 

RAYMOND S. THOMAS. Route 2, SALTILLO.' PA. 




PARKS ROCKS & CROSSES 

Big “eatin’ size” chickens that 
are terrific layers. 

WORLD’S OLDEST STRAIN ol 
Barred Rocks and two 
wonderful crosses made 
from them. Try our 
sensational new BOB’S 
WHITES and our ever ^ 
popular BLACK 
BEAUTIES. 

Write for Free Catalog 
_BOB PARKS, ALTOONA 10, PA. 

Braadbreast (ORNISH 

Big block-busters. Make heavy weights in less 
time on lower feed cost. Deliciously flavored 
tender white meat. Unusually profitable. Write 
STANDARD HATCHERIES, BDX926A DECATUR, ILLINDIS 




Hi-PRQ WHITE LEGHORNS 


puuEn 

STARTED 

13" 

Putins 

26i 


cox 

I JO 
100 . 


America’s No. 1 Strain Crosses, 

Hybrids, Cage-Lines. Guaranteed 

Livability. More Top grade eggs on _ 

less feed. F<ill information in FREE CATALOG. 

ORTNER FARMS BOX J CLINTON. MO, 

TURKEYS With Extreme Breast Width. Best Strains 
Bronze, White, Beltsville. Clean Guaranteed Poults. 
PAWLING HATCHERY, Box R. Middle Creek. Pa. 

ANCONA CHICKS ^"*1 ^e^ 

Large White Eggs on Less Feed. Cat. Free. Ph.:43ll 
SHRAWDER’S ANCONA FARM, Richfield 9, Pa. 

30 DAY SPECIAL — Blood-tested Chicks. All 
Heavies, Rocks, Reds, Cresses: $6.50-100; $12-200. 
Heavy Leghorn Broiler cockerels $2.00-100. Ship at 
once C.O.D. Klines Poultry Farm, Strausstown, P a. 

BABY CHICK BARGAINS — $5.95-100 C.O.D. 
WH. ROCKS, WH. CROSS. NEW HAMPSHIRES 
and WH. LEGHORNS. Price at Hatchery. 
BELLEFONTE POULTRY FARM, Bellefonte I, Pa. 

PEAFOWL: BLUE, WHITE. BLACK SHOULDERED 
1957 Pairs $25; 1956 Pairs $35; 1955 Pairs $45. 

A. H. CHAMBERS. Maple Lane Farms, Kingston. N.Y. 

1080 EGGS IN EVERY HEN. Why not learn the big 
secret and keep LAYERS nearly 5 years? Get free 
bulletin. SINE, RN-7. aUAKERTOWN. PA. 


From tKe 



Ready to prove their exceptional profit¬ 
abilities to you, as they have to so many 
others during the past 47 years! There’s 
a breed or cross exactly r'oi-t for you — 
whether you specialize in Market £gg^ 
Broilers, Caponettes or Hatching Eggs. 

WHITE LEGHORNS, RED-ROCKS (Black 
Sex-Link Pullets), GOLDEN CROSSES 
and R. I. REDS for egg production. 
WHITE ROCKS for broilers (or for pro¬ 
ducing hatching eggs for broiler chicks). 
GOLDEN CROSS COCKERELS for broil¬ 
ers. 

You can’t go wrong when you order 
from Clements—Maine's leading hatchery. 

Maine-U.S. Approved—Pullorum Clean 
Write or phone (Wmterport: Baldwin 
3-4292) for information and prices. 



ROUTE 25, 


WINTERPORT, MAINE 



PROFIT-MAKING 

LEGHORNS 


Only N. Y. S. Leghorn 
Breeder to Plate in 
TOP aUARTILE 
3 Yr. Average 
N. Y.-U. S. Certified Central New York 

Pullorum, Typhoid Clean Random Sample Test 

Bulkley’s birds consistent leaders at this 
important test where chicks are exposed 
to leucosis. Bulkley's had average yearly 
income $2,188 per net chick started for 
last three years. Owner-supervised breed¬ 
ing program gives you birds that live, 
lay and pay with low feed consumption. 
Before you buy, get free price list and 
folder from — 

BULKLEY’S LEGHORNS 

130 Leghorn La., Tel. 30-M, Odessa, N. Y. 


Mes O'D 


AY 


GET YOUR CHICKS 
THIS SEASON FROM 
The World’s Champion Leghorn 

FREE CATALOG! 

STERN BROS.’ HATCHERY 


WANTED ALIVE: Guinea Fowl, Rabbits, Pigeons, 
Squab, etc. KRAKAUR POULTRY COMPANY, 
Est. I883. DEPT. 20. LONG ISLAND CITY I, N. Y. 


29 












































m 


Haw Oehl Blower 


PUSLISHSR'S 


We Wish All Our Good Friends 

A HAPPY NEW YEAR 


2-S|wmI n0,‘9-iiicli pipe,2 tnugh sins 





Here’s a new blower that does more for you! TVo speeds: Direct 
drive PTO at 540 RPM and optional step-up drive at 760 RPM 
let you reach the tallest silo or any corner of your barn. Choice of 
two trough sizes: 10-foot for use with any side or rear-unloading 
box, and 3-foot trough for side-unloading box. Combination apron 
and auger feed barrels through as much as 45 tons of corn silage 
per hour. Nine inch blower pipe 
adjusts to many angles. En¬ 
closed trough prevents spillage. 

Moves anywhere on permanent 
transport. See the new Gehl 
before you buy any other 
blower. There’s a Gehl dealer 
near you. 

Send coupon now—get the full story. 


GEHI; 



SINCE 1859 
2JJNC1. a 


You can’t beat 
Cehl’s lower price 



GEHL BROS. MFG. CO. Dept. BA-206 West Bend. Wis. 

Send information on new Gehl Blowers and on full forage handling line I I 

I'd like to see the new Gehl movie on "Modern Forage Handling" □ 
Check here, if this b for school use □ 


Name (Print) 
Address_ 


. Acres Farmed. 
.State_ 


Revolutionary RUPTURE 

RELIEF 

with the NEW 




GOLDEN CROWN TRUSS 

A spectacular victory In the fight 
against reducible Inguinal her¬ 
nia' A new concept In truss 
design ... a new miracle in 
comfort! For the first time, a 
truss built entirely of soft, resll- 
■ lent foam rubber covered with a 
cool, skln-soothlng Inner cloth lining and a 
durable pre-shrunk fabric outer covering. Can t 
wrinkle, curl, bind no matter how you move. 
Flat foam rubber groin pad holds rupture 
anugly vet gently. Completely ,adju8table--no 
fitting. Ventilated for cool comfort. Wash^le. 
The truss you’ve prayed for. Order now. Give 
meastire around lowest part of abdomen— 
Indicate right, left or d(^le. 30-day money 
back trial. Single side $9.95, double $10.95. 
Postpaid except C.O.D.’s. 

Piper Brace Cempany 
Dept. RY-t8G 811 WyandotfP 

Kansas City 5. Mo. 


. . a good, profitable side line . 
■■ a fascinating interesting hobby. 

Easy, requires little time, and 
^^Byou can produce all the delicious 
Km lim honey your family can use. 

U. S. D. A. recognizes bees as the 
most important pollinating agent for 60 farm crops. 
Ce #1 <tl “First Lessons in Beekeep- 

w6nU ^■•W”ing” and 6 months subscription to 
leading bee magazine. Free literature. 

AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL Box R, Hamilton, III. 


10.000 6 A L L 0 N 8 
BATTLESHIP GRAY 
Exterior Paint, suitabie for mttai sr wood, derfeet 
canditiM. paexed io nve-galloii stool eaaa. Caneolla- 
tloo on largo Marina order. Prieo $6.00 par 5 gal. Ma. 
Cheek with order. F.O.B. RAHWAY. NEW JERSEY. 
COMMERCIAL CHEMICAL CO., RAHWAY. N. J. 


Give Your Gun 
Hoppe’s No. 9 
Protection 

Use Hoppe’s to remove all primer, 
powder, lead and metal fouling and 
to safeguard your guns from 
moisture and rust. Your gun 
dealer has Hoppe's, or send 
us 15c for sample. Instructive 
"Gun Cleaning Guide’’ FREE 
upon post card request. 

FRANK A. HOPPE, INC, 

2332 No. 8th St., Phila. 33, Pa. 




( RHODODENDROH 
nd 6 AZALEASI 

trong 2-yr. transplants 4 to 8" tall, 
lass of roots, large leaves. Rhodo- 
cndron, from red flowering stock. 

Lzalca. mixed colors. — 

’ostpaid at planting time, free Catalog. 



MUSSER FORESTS, 


Box 20-A 


NEW*’TREEW«NT‘eR 


^TorestS/ieui TANDEM PLANTER 

Ea$y« Low Cost Plonting of Liners, 
fott^ Stock, etc. Rugged—3 point 
hitch« for ony terrain. No plont 
•domage—better survivol. 
p, .3 FREE Literature. Dealers Invited. 
^ Dept. RN, GERMANIA. PENNA, 

FORESTVIEW EVERGREEN NURSERY 



The Editor of Publisher’s Desk 


Would you find out if this outfit 
is reliable and safe? n. l, s. 

New York 

The firm in question is First 
Thrift & Loan Assn., Albuquerque, 
N. M. We are advised that it is not 
recognized by the banking depart¬ 
ment in its own State, nor is it 
authorized as a savings and loan 
association in accordance with New 
Mexico laws. It has been the object 
of legal action because the concern 
was transacting a banking business. 
The present literature indicates that 
it is now selling 9-month thrift 
notes, which, it is claimed, can be 
redeemed as quickly as you can take 
money from a bank. However, the 
concern also states that it needs 30 
days to retui’n the cash. We assume 
this means that they must find an¬ 
other buyer for the notes. 

Our advice is to put savings into 
institutions that you know. Their 
interest may not be as high, but your 
savings will be insured. Your bank 
will advertise insurance if they have 
it, and the money will be readily 
available. 

Do you have any information on 
this real estate brokerage firm— 
Trans-Continental Clearing House of 
Chicago, Ill.? We are to pay $1,200 
now and they must sell the property 
within one year or our money will 
me refunded. On the other hand, if 
we change our minds for any reason, 
we forfeit the $1,200. a. h. d. 

New Jersey 

The plan mentioned above is simi¬ 
lar to many about which we have 
received complaints. Do not pay in 
advance unless you know that the 
money will be spent for actual adver¬ 
tising. We believe these plans are 
too expensive and of little help in 
disposing of real estate. The money 
spent in local city or county papers, 
advertising your property, affords 
better opportunities for a bona-fide 
sale than large amounts paid to a 
concern at a distance. Their main 
interest is not in you or your proper¬ 
ty, but in that advance payment. 

In February, 1957, I ordered a 
“Pony Express" revolver from 
Chicago Gun Exchange. I have not 
received my gun. I wrote to the 
company several times, also to the 
Chamber of Commerce. The reply 
stated that the company was en¬ 
larging and that I would receive my 
gun in about three weeks. A month 
has gone by and still no gun. The 
gun cost $49.95 and I sent a check 
which has been cashed. Would you 
please advise me what to do next? 

Delaware b. a. p. 

We fear nothing can be done at 
this time, as the Post Office reports 
that a fraud order was issued on 
February 7, 1957 by the Post Office 
Department barring the concern from 
use of the mails. Further investiga¬ 
tion is being made. We regret to say 
that the px’ospect for a refund seems 
improbable. 

A few States, including New York 
and Massachusetts, have compulsory 
automobile insurance laws. They call 
for at least minimum protection 
against injury caused by a car in an 
accident. Legislators are being asked 
to increase the minimum coverage re¬ 
quired. Insurance executives warn 
that the owner of a vehicle causing 
property or personal injury is re¬ 
sponsible for the full amount of a 
judgment. If a court orders payment 
of a $50,000 judgment and the in¬ 
surance covers only $10,000, the bal¬ 
ance could cause serious financial 
embarrassment. 


There has been a complaint in 
regard to the methods of the “Toys 
of the World Club.” The business 
began in 1954. Parents were offered 
a plan whereby their children would 
receive toys monthly or bi-monthly 
from ' foreign countries 'at certain 
subscription rates. It was a toy-selling 
scheme and many, buyers dW not 
receive the toys they ordered and 
paid for. It is estimated that custom¬ 
ers were defrauded of an estimated 
$385,000. The two men in the scheme 
were Alastair Kyle, president, and 
Clinton Gardner, secretary-treasurer. 
Kyle was sentenced to a year and a 
day in jail on seven counts of using 
the mails to defraud. Gardner re¬ 
ceived a six months’ sentence for 
conspiracy to use the mails to de¬ 
fraud. It is estimated that subscrip¬ 
tions were received from 35,000 per¬ 
sons, the subscription rates running 
from $7.00 to $22 a month, but few 
toys were ever sent. 

An Initial Decision has been issued 
by a Federal Trade Commission 
hearing examiner prohibiting Chicago 
School of Nursing, 25 E. Jackson 
Blvd., Chicago, Ill. from claiming 
that graduates of their mail order 
course in auxiliary nursing are eligi¬ 
ble for employment as practical 
nurses in every State. Most States 
have laws providing for the licensing 
of registered professional nurses, and 
practical nurses. Auxiliary nursing 
covers such fields as nursing aides, 
hospital attendants, doctor’s office 
nurses, baby nurses, nurse-compan¬ 
ions, etc. The mail order course is 
a complete one, and graduates may 
be able to obtain employment in 
many places. New York and Rhode 
Island, Louisiana, Nevada and Arkan¬ 
sas require licensing of all nurses. 
Before investing in mail order 
courses in this field, it is well to ask 
a doctor or hospital if the training 
will qualify a graduate for work in 
that field in her area. 

Arthur T. Lelies and Cultured 
Mushroom Industries, Inc., were 
found guilty by a Federal Court 
jury of shipping, in interstate com¬ 
merce, mushroom salt containing in¬ 
sect filth. The attorney moved to set 
aside the conviction as to the corpo¬ 
ration since the shipments were actu¬ 
ally made by Washington Mushroom 
Industries, Inc., a separate corpo¬ 
ration controlled by Lelies. Last 
March Judge Lindberg granted this 
motion but sentenced Lelies to 18 
months in prison and a fine of $1,000 
on each of two counts. On appeal, 
the verdict was affirmed. The defen¬ 
dant had been previously convicted 
on a similar charge and served six 
months in prison. 

A reader has inquired as to the 
standing of a chinchilla ranch. We 
advise caution in all chinchilla propo¬ 
sitions. We understand chinchillas 
are not selling well at this time. This 
may be because of a desire for other 
furs. One season everyone has mink 
or beaver and other furs are not so 
popular. Whether this is true now 
we do not know, but chinchilla breed¬ 
ing is technical and at the present 
time we are told chinchilla is not 
the most popular fur. Another point 
to remember if you go into breed¬ 
ing is that many concerns will not 
buy from independent suppliers, but 
prefer to purchase from large or¬ 
ganizations. 


[All letters to Publisher’s Desk 
Department must be signed with 
writer’s full name and address 
given.] 


30 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 
















































Quality Egg Control Plan 


The time may be near at hand 
when many Maine egg producers and 
several egg buying firms in Boston 
reach an agreement on a quality egg 
control plan. For several months, 
members of the Independent Egg 

Producers Association of Maine have 
been busy working out the details 
of such a plan. 

The object of this quality plan is 
not so much to increase individual 
income as to meet competition which 
is constantly increasing from the 

Midwest, Canada and other points 
outside of the New England area. 
Members of the Association are 

hoping that eventually independent 
egg producers throughout the New 
England area will join in this move¬ 
ment which is designed to put only 
the highest possible quality eggs in 
the hands of consumers. 

At the present time, Maine egg 

producers do not bow to any other 
section of the country when it comes 
to quality but, far from being self- 
satisfied, their belief is that quality 
control will be a valuable asset in 
competitive selling. Several mem¬ 
bers of the Association, including the 
president, Carl B. Erickson of Warren, 
already have individual quality pro¬ 
grams in effect, but all are eager to 
join in an organized plan. 

Plans for a quality program 
moved out of the talking stage early 
last Fall when Herbert Alexander 
of Rockport, chairman of the mar¬ 
keting committee, arranged a meet¬ 
ing between his committee and the 
three major Boston egg buyers. These 
buyers met later with the Associa¬ 
tion at a general meeting and de¬ 
clared they would be ready at any 
time to discuss a quality control plan 
with Maine egg producers. 


Last month the members invitee 
Frank Reed to their meeting in 
Warren to discuss details. Mr. Reec 
said that it would probably be neces 
sary to form a business organization 
with a paid secretary to handle the 
detailed work. He enumerated nu 
merous technical details that would 
be pax’t of such a plan including egg 
cleaning, proper egg room condi¬ 
tions, twice-a-week pickup at the 
farm and length of lay. He also spoke 
of the possibilities of selecting 
strains that laid the best eggs over 
the longest period, although he said 
there was a lot of work still to be 
done in this area. He thought that 
length of lay probably should be 
limited to 12 months. President 
Erickson called for a vote and the 
members were unanimously in favor 
of the formation of a quality egg 
control plan. 

From now on, work will progress 
steadily with meetings of the mar¬ 
keting committee and directors 
several times a month. Just as soon 
as a plan is in order, it will be pre¬ 
sented to the three above-mentioned 
Boston egg buyers for approval and 
arbitration. 

Joseph Fletcher of Wentworth, N. 
H., author of the Fletcher Self- 
Control Plan, has attended several 
Association meetings recently and 
has expressed himself as highly in 
favor of the work that the association 
is doing on quality control which is 
the basis of his plan. Mr. Reed spoke 
of the Fletcher Plan in connection 
with the Association plan and re¬ 
marked that hardly a day goes by 
but what he reads where another 
poultry association has voted to back 
the Fletcher plan. 

Maine Henry D. Teague 


Subscribers' Exchange 

Rate of advertising in this department 
20 cents per word, including name 
and address, each insertion, payable 
in advance. When box number Is 
used, add one dollar to total cost. 

Dates of Issue: 

Jan. 18 closes Jan. 3 
February 1 closes January 17 

COPY MUST REACH US FRIDAY, 
10 A. M. 15 DAYS in ADVANCE OF 
DATE OF ISSUE. 

This department is for the accommo¬ 
dation of subscribers, but no display 
advertising or advertising of a com¬ 
mercial nature (seeds, plants, live¬ 
stock, etc.) is admitted. 


HELP WANTED 


EXPERIENCED single man on small modern 
poultry-breeding farm in central New York. 
Good home with room and board. References 
requested. BOX 1012, Rural New Yorker. 


MARRIED man to work with high producing 

registered Holstein herd. Must be fully ex¬ 
perienced and like cows. Modern living ac¬ 
commodations. Hilltop Farm, Sufiield, Conn. 
Telephone Windsor Locks NOrth 8-2352. Ask 
for Mr. Stroh. 


WANTED: Middleaged woman companion; 

light housework on farm. Two adults. All 
modern. Good home to high wages, $5.00 week. 
Dorothy Stannard, West Rindge, N. H. _ 

COUPLE to act as custodian and cook one 
meal daily for 100 children. Live in pleasant 
apartment in school. Call The Emerson School. 
12 East 96th St., New York 28, N. Y. Phone- 
AT 9-6771 or AT 9-6778. 


SITUATION WANTED 


FARM and dairy help for machme and hand 

milkers. Tractor men. yard men. also poul¬ 
try and all kinds of labors. Quinn Employment 
Agency, 70 Warren St.. New York 7, N. Y 
COrtland 7-7865. ’ ’ ' 


HELP Wanted: Attendants, male and female. 

Salary $3,002 per year. Staff nurses. $3,832 
per year. Annual salary increases, less main¬ 
tenance (board, room, laundry $9.79 per week). 
Five day, eight hour work week. Annual vaca¬ 
tion with pay Paid sick leave. Life, accident 
and health insurance and Social Security avail¬ 
able. Recreation: bowling, tennis, swimming, 
golf. Opportunities for advancement with 
eventual retirement pension. For information 
write Director, Wassaic State School, Wassaic, 
New York. _ 

CASEWORKER: Congregate institution for 40 

school age children wants mature, experi¬ 
enced caseworker with M. S. degree to de¬ 
velop program now carried by two child¬ 
placing agencies. Salary $4,000 to $5,000. Write 
Ruth M. Bonsteel, executive director, Wiley 
House, 1650 Broadway, Bethlehem, Penna, 

WANTED: Young man or boy for general farm 

work. No smoking. Russell Peters, Callicoon, 
New York. 


SALESMEN Wanted: Want to get into real 

estate? We're looking for folks who are 
plain, honest and hard working and willing 
to follow our methods. Free advertising, 
supplies and the benefit of our 26 years of 
selling to those who qualify. Write for test 
questions. Strictly commission; New York and 
New England only. Four Effs Realty. Box 
264-RNY, Manchester, N. H. 


MAN to take care of horses, also farming; 

work available for wife. Attractive cottage 
Ipr.two adults in Morris County, New Jersey. 
BOX 1000, Rural New Yorker. 


HOUSEKEEPER-Cook; For two adults, two 

children. Private room, bath, TV. Lovely 
home; 40 miles from New York. Salary $45-$55 
depending on experience. BOX 1001, Rural 
New Yorker. 


WANTED for professional farm managment 

consulting and accounting work: intelligent 
and personable young man, having college 
training and residing in greater New York 
area. Please mail details about yourself. 
Burlingame, Field, Pierce and Browne, Inc., 
45 West 45th Street, New York 36, N. Y. 

experienced dairy farmer extra help pre¬ 

ferred, barn cleaner, nice house, top wages. 
Kurt Simon, R. D. 4, Dolsontown Rd., Middle- 
town . New York. Phone; 5156. 

WANTED: Young single man for general 
farm work, prefer no drinking or smoking, 
Sydney Peters, Callicoon, New York. 

WANTED: Single, sober, reliable helper on 
chicken farm (3,000). Good board, room, 
salary. Lindaform, R. F. D. 3, New Brunswick, 
New Jersey. 

WANTED: Single man to work on dairy farm. 

Room and board. George O. Fitzgerald, Jr., 
R- D. 3. Fort Plain, New York. 

FAMILY Man: Poultry experience unnecessary 
but must be farmer; $200 per month. P. O. 
Box 82. North Branch, New York. 

January 4, 1958 


WE are suppliers for dairy farms, first class 

milkers, poultrymen, general farm workers. 
Ellinger s Employment Agency, 271 Bowery. 
New York 2, N. Y. Phone: GRamercy 3-8168-9. 

FARM Help: NuWay Placement Bureau, 1749 

Y. 29, N. Y. Telephone 
TRafalgar 6-9819. Farm help specialty. Will¬ 
ing. sober, reliable men from Puerto Rico 
available. _ 

CARPENTER maintenance man: Age 50, own 

tools. Experienced. Wage reasonable. Give 
details. BOX 1003, Rural New Yorker. _ 

GENTLEMAN above 65, limited means, wants 
modest lodgings, work in season: kitchen- 
garden, other plantings, grounds: may vary, 
congeniality. No dogs. Write Room 115, King’s 
Hotel, Main St., Bennington, Vermont. _ 

YOUNG man, 25 seeks position as dairy farm 
manager: farm background, majored dairy 
farm management New Mexico A. & M., 
trained in artificial insemination. Fully quali¬ 
fied to handle ranch operations, also fluid milk 
and/or processing plant. Opportunity for 
future most important consideration. BOX 3311, 
Rural New Yorker. ’ 

FARMS FOR SALE, TO RENT, ETC. 

WANTED: All types bare and stocked farms, 

villages and rural dwellings, stores and 
other types businesses; phone or write Werts 
Neal Estate. Johnson City. N. Y. _ 

SOUTHERN New Jersey: Country homes. 

farms, acreage for agriculture or industry. 
Free list sent. LeGore. realtor. Vineland. 
New Jersey _ 

FARM wanted within 80 miles N. Y. C. De¬ 
tails, price. Larsen, 152 Second Ave., Brook¬ 
lyn, N. Y. 


paved 240 ACRES: Eastern Pennsylvania. 100 acres 
Fredericksburg. Seven fertile farm land fully limed, 100 acres 

oak and hemlock forest, three streams with 
pond sites, very picturesque setting. Excellent 
^room house, new siding, all new plumbing. 
Barn, corn crib and grain storage all new. 

equipment and truck: $33,000. BOX 
1002, Rural New Yorker. 


room home. Milking parlor, loafing shed, bulk 
tank, milking equipment, growing crops; 
$27,500. With herd and farm machinery $37,500. 
Waugh Real Estate Agency, Culpeper, Virginia. 


FLORIDA: ^,'4 acre homesites $300. Also trailer 

sites $10 month. Near town and good fishing. 
John Roscow, Farm Broker, Inverness. Fla. 


FREE Catalog. Designed to appeal to those 
who like facts plainly stated, no “bargain” 
claims. Almost everything, in a wide range of 
prices. New England and New York only. 
Four Effs, Box 264-RNY. Manchester. N. H. 


FOR Sale: Farm. 80 acres. Will sell 8-room 
house separate, cash or terms; near Green 
County. BOX 1004, Rural New Yorker. 


WANTED: Dairy farm (bare) good soil, (all 
cash) 200 acres and up. Give all particulars 
in first letter. BOX 1005, Rural New Yorker. 


143 ACRES, 9-room house, completely furn¬ 

ished; excellent view. Outskirts Cooperstown, 
N. Y. On hard top road. Stream through 
property. Large barn, other buildings. $11,000. 
BOX 1006, Rural New Yorker. 


FOR Sale; In Orange County, 65-acre dairy 
farm, stock and equipment; near village, 70 
miles to N. Y. C. Write BOX 1007, Rural 
New Yorker. 


FARM for sale: Seven acres, six rooms and 
bath, double garage: $4,000 cash. Fred 
Donaldson, Mays Landing, N. J. 


SMALL village home furnished: Vz acre; 

garage: utilities; stores. Reasonable priced. 
BOX 98, Charlotteville, N. Y. 


TWO outstanding dairy farms, finest in the 
State. Terrific layouts, also commercial and 
industrial values. Must be seen to be appre¬ 
ciated. Will sell separately or jointly. I. 
Greenberg & Son, Mount Holly, New Jersey. 
Telephone AMherst 7-1101. 


FOR Sale: Service station and 6-room home 
with bath, near Seneca Lake; $6,900 cash. 
Lena Chambers, Himrods, New York^. 




AS LOW AS 
1« SQ. FT. 



UP TO 40 FEET WIDE 

Pure Polyethylene Sheeting. Meets FHA Specs., in Clear 
or Black. 3 thicknesses—Regular, Heavy or Extra Heavy 
gauge. Very Durable, Inexpensive. Sold by Hardware, 
Lumber, Implement and Feed Dealers. Free Saimles on 
Request from Wa^ Bros., Chicago 51—Pioneers in Plastics. 

The Best Polyethylene Sheeting Money Can Buy 
Be Sure You See “Warp’s” Branded On The Edge 



VAPOR 

(ARRIiR 


SEE YOUR LOCAL DEALER 


FLORIDA'S finest trailer sites beautifully 
wooded. 80 by 100 feet. Payable $20 cash and 
$20 monthly. Famous Panama City Gulf Re¬ 
sort Area. Excellent hunting, fishing, all 
sports. Also lovely wooded homesites low 
prices, easy terms. Booklet free. Howard 
Wood. Fountain, Florida. 


115 ACRES: Practically level farm in southern 
Columbia County, 90 miles from N.Y.C. 
Four miles Taconic Parkway. Valuable road 
frontage, churches, school nearby; 7-room 
house, barns, silos, garage and other out¬ 
buildings. R. M. Deane, Elizaville, Columbia 
County, New York. 


ONE of Monroe County’s finest farms for sale: 

300 acres, 250 acres tillable, all tile drained, 
200 acres outstanding alfalfa land, 28 acres 
planted to wheat, 25 acres planted winter 
barley, 20 acres planted to winter oats, the 
balance of the farm completely seeded to 
alfalfa-brome grass mixture. Fully equipped 
for zero-pasture program, 85 stanchions, five 
silos, bulk tank, gutter cleaner, ventilation 
system, Rochester milk market, bull barn, 
heifer barn, calf barn with individual pens, 
adequate machinery storage sheds, nice house 
with three apartments in excellent condition 
with all conveniences. This farm has been 
operated on a profitable basis for many years, 
owner wishes to sell and would consider allow¬ 
ing the right man, who had accumulated a 
large dairy herd and adequate farm machin¬ 
ery free and clear of debt to purchase the 
farm with no money down. Price $90,000. 
Listed exclusively. Broker participaion invited. 
For further information write: Harris Wilcox, 
Realtor, Bergen, New York. Telephone 146. 


FOR Sale: Six room house, all modem con¬ 
veniences: 2-car garage and enclosed patio 
with outbuildings. Three acres, corner site in 
small eastern shore of Virginia town. Suitable 
for retirement, chicken or antique business. 
Price very reasonable. Barton, Abbott Drive, 
R. F. D. 5, Salisbury, Maryland. 


BECAUSE of age and health, we are selling 
as a unit, two apple orchards with complete 
equipment. Home orchard 40 acres in village 
20 in apples. House eight rooms, oil heat, 
artesian water, storage barn, machinery shed, 
etc. Also 60 acres, 40 in apples. 7-room house, 
oil heat, artesian water. Buildings and equip¬ 
ment in good condition. Woodbury Orchards, 
Woodstock, Connecticut. 


Need help... 

want to buy 
or sell a farm 

or get a job? 


FRUITS AND FOODS 


AVERY’S Golden Wildflower honey: five 

pounds $2.20; 10 pounds $3.95 prepaid: 60 

pounds $12.50, not prepaid. H. J. Avery, 
Katonah, N .Y. _ 

Clover Honey: 5-lb. pail (liquid) $1.95; 

10-lb. pail (fine granulated) $3.95 postpaid to 
third zone. 60-lb. can (fine granulated) $10.80; 
6p-lb. can liquid $11.20. (All OO's F. O. B.). 
George Hand, R. D. 2, Cazenovia, New Y ork. 

CLOVER cut comb honey:- You get a whole 

frame of new very light, delicious, comb. 
Five pounds $2.25. Extracted $2.00. Prepaid. 
Charles Peet, Gouverneur, New York. _ 

I HAVE a few gallons of pure Vermont maple 
syri^ for sale at $5.00 per gallon plus post¬ 
age. Two quarts $2.75. H. J. Tebbetts. Cabot, 
Vermont. _ 

PECANS in shell: Stuarts, five pounds $3.00; 

Small mixed, eight pounds, $3.00. Postpaid. 
Joy Acres. Windsor, Virginia. 

■TREE-RIPENED oranges and grapefruit. ^ 
color added. Express prepaid. Delivery 
Bushel oranges $6.00; grapefruit 
$5.50, mixed $5.75. Half-bushels $4.25. Add 50 
Mississippi and Wisconsin. 
Dillingham Grove, Largo, Florida. _ 

WORLD famous Indian River fruit: Packers 

and shippers of the area’s finest quality, 
tree-ripened, hand-picked fruit. We ship best 
varieties in season. Also delicious Orange 
Bioss 9 m honey; tropical candies, marmalades 
and jellies. Shipping season ends June 15th. 
Write now for brochure. Indian River Fruit 
Compmiy, Post Office Box 166-R. Indian River 
City, Florida. 


QUALITY nut meats, prepaid: Black walnuts 
one pound $2.10; two pounds $4.00; five 
pounds $9.45. Mommoth pecan pieces one 
two pounds $4.55; five pounds 
$10,80. Hickorynuts: one pound $3.00; two 
pounds $5.70; five pounds $13.60. Quantity dis¬ 
counts Write: T. J. Harman, 212 Front St.. 
York. Pennsylvania. _v_ 

GREEN Thumb Organic Gardens. Brookfield^ 
Ohio. Choice dried pears,, peaches, plums, 
cherries. Shelled hazlenuts, hickory, black wal- 
nuts, popcorn. Reasonable prices. 


TREE ripened organically grown oranges, $6.00 
bushel express prepaid. Clarence McConnell, 
Box 1176, Wmter Park, Florida. 


honey: 60 pounds $10.80; more 
$10.25 each. Lavern Depew, Auburn, N. Y. 


COUNTRY BOARD 


WANTED; Old folks, pensioners, to board in 

a country home. BOX 1010, Rural New 
Yorker. 


LARGE furnished room at country home, 

Ledgewood, New Jersey for retired gentle¬ 
man or couple. Housekeeping privileges, all 
modern conveniences, very reasonable rental. 
References essential. BOX 1009, Rural New 


WOMAN in fifties seeks comfortable home 

cooking preferably where 
possible keep dog and near village or small 
town. BOX 3307, Rural New Yorker. 


MISCELLANEOUS 


fire engine'1900- 
1920. BOX 1008, Rural New Yorker. _ 

model 60-passenger 
school buses. Write BOX 1011, Rural New 
Yorker. 


WANTED: Model A roadster or touring, run- 
ning condition. Lester Wismer, Souderton, 
Henna. ’ 


Beautiful colors, I'i lbs. $1.00; 
.,0 ®2.00. Satisfaction guaranteed. Ward. 

42-R, Manchester, Springfield 8, Mass 


PIPE smoking or natural leaf chewing tobacco- 

Five pounds $3.00 postpaid. Guaranteed. Star- 
Farms, Ralston, Tennessee. 


COMPLETE maple sugar evaporator. Can be 
seen by appointrnent or details by mail. John 
H. Romig, Mertztown. Pa., Berks County. 
Telephone Topton, Pa. OV 2-7532. 


WANTED; Second cut alfalfa and other kinds 
1 quality hay. Important for quickest 

reply. Please state your telephone number, 
bale weight, quality and price. Have for sale 
two long wheelbase trucks, one a 10-wheeler 
with special hay body. Can finance to__re- 
sponsible p^ty Pay for them by ha-ulitlih^ 
^®®sting, Jutland, New* Jersey. 
Telephone Clinton 430-J-3. uciacy. 


• u 1®25-1930 Lincodn touring. Castle 
Hill, Neshamc, New Jersey. 


choice Hay; All grades. Mohawk Valley. 

Trmler load deliveries. When writing give 
telephone number. Snyder Petroleum Co 
Fort Plain, N. Y. Telephone 4-5111. 


WAN'TED: Old automobile from 1890 to 1912 
Karl Pautler, East Amherst, N. Y. 


Advertise Here for Quick Results! 

For the low, low cost of 20c 

PLEASE PUBLISH THE FOLLOWING: 

per word your message will 
be read in more than 300,- 

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these columns consistently. 

You’ll find, as they have, . 

that a small ad brings 

immediate response. . 

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31 



















































































































































BIGGER 

PROFITS! 

GREATER 

SUCCESS! 


Virus-free Strawberry Plants give bigger yield and better quality. 
Rayner's cooperate closely with State and Federal Agencies in 
the production of top-quality plants. Buy directly from the pro¬ 
ducer and save. Rayner's plants are guaranteed. You can pay 
more but you cannot buy better plants than Rayner's. 

Rayner's top quality stock is sure to produce those sturdy, 
healthy plants that will yield the biggest and best crops you 
have ever seen. Our new varieties of Strawberries and Blue¬ 
berries will give amazing results. Buy Rayner's plants and you 
buy the best. Satisfaction guaranteed. 







See Our Booths 537-533 at Penna* Farm Show 

RAYNER BROTHERS, INC. 

SALISBURY 15, MARYLAND 

Please send at once your FREE 1958 Catalog. 

Name . 

Address . 


SEND TODAY FOR FREE CATALOC 




P. O. BOX 
OB ZONE 


City . 

State . 

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RAYNER’S 

VIGOROUS 

PLANTS 

AND HEALTHY FIELDS 
ARE SURE TO GIVE 
OUTSTANDING 
YIELDS 


'^'h 7'j 


H. JACK W. RAYNEB 


-S. H. (BOB) BAYNER 


U. S. D. A. VARIETIES 

STRAWBERRIES 

EARLIDAWN, REDGLOW, SURECROP 

BLUEBERRIES 

BLUECROP, COVILLE. EARLIGLUE 
BLUERAY, BERKELEY, HERBERT 

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'Fully 
Described 
in this 
CATALOG 

Tells How to 
Grow Better 
V Berries 


This is our 32nd year in a nursery 
business that is based on honest, 
efficient dealings with our customers. 
Our plants are priced right. We are 
so sure you will like them that we 
give you a money-back guarantee. 


REPORTS FROM SOME OF OUR READERS 

NORRISTOWN, PENNA. JANUARY 28, 1957 

“We would like to thank you for taking your time to show us your 
nursery stock last Spring. Everything seemed to be so well taken care of 
that we are entering another order for 2,000 Strawberry Plants.” — 
JOS. B. EAKE. 

MINERVA, OHIO SEPTEMBER 24, 1957 

“Your plants arrived in fine shape and they are really growing.. As far as 
I am concerned your plants are tops. All plants received from you in the 
past have made me money.” — H. F. WEAVER. 


VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON JUNE 3, 1957 

“We are certainly pleased with the plants obtained from Rayner Bros. It 
takes about 8 berries to fill a pound basket. We have been commercial 
growers for 20 years but this beats them all.” — MRS. P. J. SHAVER. 




































/ 



A 




FOR 


FA IS/1 I L.Y 




JANUARY 18, 1958 



FEATURED 
IN THIS ISSUE 


1958 Farm Tractor Parade 11 

Lower the Cost of Raising Calves 12 
The Chick Always Comes First 20 
What Did Truck Farmers Learn From the '57 Drought? 2 


i 

i 


































































1957 was a most unusual 
growing season. There 
were many lessons from 

The Northeasts 
Vegetable Year 



Whether the production year is good or bad, markets want the same high 
volume and quality of vegetables. One area’s ill weather can create es¬ 
pecially healthy markets for regions more blessed by the skies. 


New York 


RY weather hurt some in western 
New York and the Hudson 
Valley who had crops on shal¬ 
low soils and were unable to 
irrigate, and early fall frosts 
cut the canning tomato crop 
and reduced late marketings of 
other warm season vegetables, but the 1957 
season was a fairly successful one for New 
York vegetable growers. 



Due to reduced supplies in New Jersey and 
other states south, our fresh market was very 
strong. The severe drought in those states re¬ 
duced mid-summer snap beans, sweet corn, 
tomatoes and other crops, and it benefitted 
New York growers in demand and price. This 
re-emphasizes an old lesson: growers should 
always plant a reasonably high acreage in order 
to cash in when supplies become inadequate 
from other areas. In years of generally favor¬ 
able weather, it is true, supply is likely to be 
above demand; prices, therefore, are depressed, 
and only the most efficient have a good profit. 
But this may have to be expected as part of 
the farming game. Only by such a plan can 
favored areas have sufficient volume to cash 
in on at hot markets in a generally poor year. 

1957 again emphasized the value of irrigation 
for many vegetable crops. There were good 
and poor jobs of irrigating, however, and con¬ 
ditions showed where irrigation will and will 
not pay. If a crop had sufficient water available 
from moisture stored in the soil, then irrigation 
did not pay. Some deep-rooted crops like to¬ 
matoes on deep soils highly retentive of mois¬ 
ture made excellent yields without irrigation. 
On the other hand, the same crops grown on 
shallow and droughty soils suffered and did 
benefit, or would have, from timely irrigation. 
Too many growers put more acres under irri¬ 
gation than their equipment is designed for or 
their water supply adequate for. Irrigation 
schedules could not be maintained, and crops 
ran critically short of moisture late in Sum¬ 
mer. This early irrigation may be better than 
nothing, but frequently it ends up in irrigation 
or crop failure. Best results come from an ade¬ 
quate supply of moisture maintained through¬ 
out the entire crop season. Only the acreage 
that can be covered adequately should be put 
under irrigation. Where water is adequate and 
land fairly level, growers might advantageously 
try furrow irrigation whenever their sprinkler 
systems are limited. 


Poor irrigating jobs sometimes occur even 
when sufficient water is applied through sprink¬ 
lers. To benefit crops, water must percolate in¬ 
to the soil where the roots can absorb it; water 
that runs off does no good. So it is important 
to maintain good soil structure, especially in 
the surface layer, so that water will penetrate 
the soil as fast as it is applied. Maintaining a 
high percentage of organic matter and culti¬ 
vating at appropriate times—but not overtilling 
—favor desirable soil structure and rapid water 
percolation. 


The importance of soil selection was em¬ 
phasized by experiences last Summer. Growers 
able to plant their crops on fairly deep, well- 
managed and good-drained soils had better 


yields and quality and fev/er troubles than 
growers who grew on marginal land. Deep- 
rooted crops like tomatoes, melons, and aspara¬ 
gus will explore soils for moisture and nutri¬ 
ents to a depth of five feet and more. So, on 
deep, well-drained soils with good structure, 
more water and nutrients are available to them; 
there is less likelihood of shortages during the 
season. Onions, lettuce and potato growers well 
know that even with their relatively shallow- 
rooted crops, mucks going down four feet or 
more are much better than shallow ones. A 
lesson of 1957, though not a new one, was; 
maintain the soil in good tilth by rotations, 
cover crops and proper tillage so that water, 
air and roots can penetrate deeply. 

In New York State, earliness is often essen¬ 
tial to obtaining profit from vegetables, and 
condition of transplants, plant spacing and 
frost protection all affected it in 1957. Over¬ 
ageing or over-hardening transplants of cab¬ 
bage, tomatoes and other crops often delayed 
the first harvest or lowered early yields. Five- 
week cabbage plants appeared better than 
those seeded earlier and transplanted at six to 
eight weeks. Over-hardening and -ageing of to¬ 
mato plants, especially some of the early va¬ 
rieties like Fireball, was quite undesirable. 
Closer spacing of tomatoes, cucumbers and other 
fruit-type vegetables tended to give larger early 
yields without seiously affecting fruit size or 
quality. For Fireball and other early varieties 
a plant spacing of 10 to 15 inches in the row 
appeared well worth trying; rows should be as 
close as they can be without interfering with 
picking operations. Because canning tomatoes 
follow the same pattern of giving higher early 
yields with closer spacing, growers might well 
test seven to 10 square feet per plant. 

Some early market growers spend a lot of 
money on frost protectors and heat-trapping 
devices like hot caps and plastic tents. While 
many get their dollars’ worth, others do not; 
their cultural operations tend to nullify the ad¬ 
vantages of the protectors. For example, black 
plastic mulch may improve yields, but if put 
on too early it results in greater frost damage 
in late Spring. Clean ground, i. e., no weeds, 
and firm, moist soil are important to the pro¬ 
tection of early spring vegetables from frost. 


New Jersey 

\l^HAT did New Jersey vegetable growers 

W learn from the 1957 season? One learned 
how to irrigate correctly; another that he could 
get good tomato yields without irrigation; stillj 
another learned that cheap, uncertified south-i 
ern plants can be expensive. A grower inj 
Monmouth County saw the value of crop ro-! 
tation to reduce disease. Burlington County i 
sweet corn growers learned that even the • 
European corn borer suffered from the dry 
heat. 

Should we irrigate? Many growers would say! 
definitely, “Yes”, after the record drought off 
1957. Yet 51 of the 236 growers who last year 
became members of the Ten-Ton Tomato Club 
did not irrigate; they grew 10 or more tons of 
tomatoes per acre without extra water. Why 
do some get good yields without irrigation? 
Soil condition is one reason. Several of the 
growers used land that had most recently been 
in asparagus, and it became very well aerated^ 
when plowed out. Drainage was good early in* 
the season, and the tomato roots could go down | 
to reach moisture. High water tables on farms | 
near rivers helped some growers, too. Others!'^ 
benefitted from plowing under deep-rooted k 
cover crops and so maintained the high or-C' 
ganic matter content that holds much moisture. 

Many new ponds were dug and on one farm! 
where two new ones were placed 100 yards S 
apart, water from one burned tomato plants.! 
In checking, we found its pH was 3.2, com-fl 
pared to 6.5 for the other. The water remained I 
cloudy in this too acid pond until lime was^ 
added. Growers should have irrigation water ^ 
tested for pH, iron content, and salt concern 
tration; tidewater areas may have particular ; 
trouble with salty or brackish water. 

Any other poor results from irrigation gener- i 
ally resulted from faulty application. Poor 
coverage was responsible for uneven growth, : 
lines were set too far apart, there was an in-r 
sufficient number of sprinklers, often pressure j ; 
was too low, and changes in wind caused un- ' 
equal coverage. A chief reason for some poor 
results was failing to allow water to penetrate. |! 
Growers would water for one or two hours j' 
and feel they had done a good job; but they' 
had not. Wiser growers checked penetration! 


P. A. Minges 


(Continued on Page 5) 



IMew lessons are learned every year in controlling vegetable insects and diseases. 1957 was no excep¬ 
tion, yet pest control seemed less of a problem than weather. Sprays and dusts protected well the 

crops that somehow obtained enough water. 


1 

! 1 
1 

i > 




1 


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1 


2 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


















Weather Prediction: 

A Cold Winter 

In comparison with hard winters 
experienced by us older folk, the 
last few years of comparatively light 
fall of snow have been really mild. 
Many of us recall snow so deep that 
roads were obstructed for weeks. On¬ 
ly by traveling over the fields by 
horse and sleigh could we reach our 
destinations; drifts bore us over the 
tops of fences. That great covering 
of snow protected mother earth, and 
maybe we were healthier, too, but 
how tiresome the snow and cold be¬ 
came before Spring. How long Spring 
tarried! 

I don’t predict snow of such volume 
this Winter but, if nature s indica¬ 
tions are right, severe cold lies ahead. 
Nature always prepares for the cold 
she sends. As early as the middle 
of October, the hair on cows and 
horses began to grow beyond its 
usual thickness. Squirrels went into 
Winter with surplus fat, and both 
they and raccoons have extra heavy 
fur. Our dog seems better insulated 
this Winter than last. 

As a rule, when birds make their 
exodus south each Fall, a robin or 
two remains a while after the others 
are gone. But this year, all took off 
weeks ahead of the customary sched¬ 
ule; overnight they were gone. As far 
as I can determine, not one has lagged 
behind. Nature somehow warned 
them of the exti’emely cold weather 
ahead. 

These are signs of nature for a cold, 
hard Winter. Will a late spring 
follow? Mrs. C. E. Bruce 

Pennsylvania 


Oats^ Tooth-Protecting 
Substance Identified 

The chemical in oat hulls that 
Wisconsin researchers earlier found 
I capable of reducing tooth decay in 
laboratory animals by as much as 
50 per cent (The Rural New Yorker, 
Feb. 16, 1957) has now been iden¬ 
tified as one or more of a group of 
10 phenol type compounds and fatty 
j acids. Incorporation of finely ground 
I oat hulls in an amount up to 10 per 
I cent of research rats’ rations was 
! determined to cut decay of their teeth 
I by more than half. Later work with 
I purified oat-hull extracts has revealed 
that as little as a half of one per 
cent in the ration can achieve the 
same results. Scientists at the Uni¬ 
versity of Wisconsin are now seeking 
precise identification of the tooth- 
protecting compound. Following suc- 
i cess in this, they will work toward 
i learning the levels of maximum ef- 
! fectiveness and safety. 

The expectation is that the oat-hull 
derivative can be incorporated into 
candy and chewing gum for the pre¬ 
servation of the teeth of children and 
adolescents particularly. The sub¬ 
stance is believed to prevent decay of 
teeth by destruction of bacteria in 
the mouth ordinarily harmful to them. 
If . the promises of this research are 
realized, the nation’s teeth, it is felt, 
could be quite easily and effectively 
protected. Moreover, the market for 
oat hulls, and possibly husks and 
straw, might be greatly enlarged. 
Except for some being made into 
furfural, a basic ingredient of nylon, 
resins, solvents, and bactericides, 
most of the supply now goes into 
livestock feed. 


The 

Rural New Yorker 

Vol. CVIII No. 5900 

Pubrished Semi-Monthly by The Rural 
Publishing Co., 333 W. 30th St., New York 
1, N. Y. Price 50c a Year. Re-entered as 
Second Class Matter September 6, 1945, 
at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., 
under the Act of March 3, 1879. 


Cover Picture by — Grant Heilman, 
Lititz, Pa. 


January 18, 1958 



Discover for yourself what this 
completely new concept in tractor 
design can mean on your 
farm—now and in the future 

You have never known power 
like this before! 

The Big D-17 has an all-new Power- 
Crater engine—or a new 6-cylinder diesel 
—both in the 50-hp class. You shift on-the- 
go in two ranges with the exclusive new 
Power Director , . . the “Big Stick.” Eight 
speeds . . . and live PTO! 

All this . .. plus more working weight with 
the automatic hydraulic Traction Booster 
system and big implements. With the fully 
mounted, 4-bottom plow, or the 5-bottom 
plow with remote ram and transport wheel, 
you get earth-gripping traction equal to 
that of tractors weighing up to 7,500 pounds. 

In the 35-hp class, the 3-plow 0-14 Tractor 
has aU of the new features and Low-Line, 
High-Crop design found in the larger D-17. 


HiVi FROM ALUS^CHAlMm 


i 


.3 

•A 





NEW Traction booster system 
with simplified control. 


NEW Power Director 
shift to high or low 
range... on-the-go. 


NEW easy-ride seat, adjust* 
able for operator weight and 
height. Reduces fatigue. 


NEW Roll-Shift 
front axle. 


PIUS Snap-Coupler hitch and Power-Shift 
rear wheels. Power Steering if you want it. 


With any of the new, matched, big-capac¬ 
ity AUis-Chalmers implements, you can 
cover extra acres each day . . . and save 
time, fuel and dollars. Make today your 
“D” day. See your AUis-Chalmers dealer 
for a demonstration drive. 


AUIS-CHALMERS, FARM EQUIPMENT DIVISION, MILWAUKEE 1, WISCONSIN 

AUIS-CHALMERS 

Engineering in Action 



TRACTION BOOSTER, 
SNAP-COUPLER and POWER-CRATER 
are AlUs-Chalmers trademarks. 


Disc up to 75 acres a day with the D-17 Tractor and this big 15-ft. tandem 
disc harrow. End gangs fold for less than 10 ft. transport width. 










































Fm! 


FARM FACTS NOTEBOOK AND NEW SEED GUIDE 

...a reaJ helpful pocket notebook every former Nvill oppreciate. 
Contains helpful hints on planting, fertilizing, grass silage, etc., 
plus blank pages for your notes. Also get our latest seed catalog. 
Write today I Address Dept. 31. 

A. H. HOFFMAN SEEDS, INC. 

LANDISVILLE (Lancaster County), PENN A. 

WANT TO EARN EXTRA MONEY? A few lelect territories ere still open for 
the oppo'mtmenl of Hoffmon former-ogents to toke orders for Hoffman form 
seeds ond Funk G Com. No investment required. For details write to Dept. B. 


Alfalfa Comes of Age 


Althong.'i the early history and 
origin of alfalfa, America’s leading 
forage plant, are veiled in antiquity, 
we do know that it was cultivated 
by early man. It is mentioned in the 
history of Babylon in 700 B.C., and 
we are certain it was used as a culti¬ 
vated plant in ancient Greece, Caesar’s 
legions spread alfalfa throughout the 
far-flung Roman empire as a basis of 
forage for cavalry; and alfalfa, or 
lucerne as it is known in Europe, 
became an important part of feeding. 

Alfalfa was introduced to America 
by Spaniards during the conquests of 
Mexico, Chile and Peru. But it did 
not come to the United States until 
advent of the British, German and 
French settlers who followed the 


early explorers. There are records of 
alfalfa being grown in the Northeast 
during those early days but, due to 
lack of suitable varieties, it did not 
truly come into its own until intro¬ 
duced into the warm fertile valleys 
of California. Then and there did its 
full potential become apparent. From 
California, alfalfa spread eastward. 
Due its non-hardiness, however, it did 
not move east of the Mississippi 
River. Where adapted to the climate, 
it soon became an important forage 
item. 

The Personal Introduction of Grimm 

During the middle of the last cen¬ 
tury a settler named Wendelin Grimm 
introduced a variegated alfalfa to 


Minnesota from his native Germany. 
This introduction was noted for its 
hardiness and longevity in Germany, 
and it is supposed to be the origin of 
the once famous Grimm variety. 

Shortly after this, the U. S. De¬ 
partment of Agriculture and various 
state departments began programs of 
plant introductions and improve¬ 
ments. Alfalfa was subjected to many 
trials and attempts to improve its 
forage yield, winter hardiness, disease 
resistance and seed-setting ability. 
This period saw the start of such 
varieties as Cossack, Canadian Varie¬ 
gated, Ladak and Hardistan, 

These varieties pushed alfalfa 
farther eastward; they were com¬ 
monly grown in our noi’theastern 
states. But due to imperfect per¬ 
formance, limited adaptation, and re¬ 
sultant poor reception by farmers, 
they were found to not wholly fit the 


area’s needs. 

The second great step in alfalfa 
progress came with development ol 
present-day certified improved vari 
eties. Ranger paved the way and was 
followed by Buffalo, Atlantic, Nar- 
ragansett and Vernal. The impact o: 
these, coupled with vastly improvec 
seed production, resulted in the 
greatest upsurge in alfalfa’s history. 
For the first time, farmers were able 
to purchase pedigreed seed, sealec 
and certified as to genetic purity, anc 
with quality and performance of 
known potentials. These varieties 
were mechanized in an orderly man¬ 
ner and at prices that greatly encour¬ 
aged their use. Three cuttings of hay 
became commonplace; yields on high¬ 
ly fertile soils climbed. But even up 
to this point, all alfalfa varieties be¬ 
longed primarily to a single class and 
were characterized by many similar 
habits. All were slow starters in 
Spring, and they had long periods of 
fall dormancy. Their growth habit 
was spreading, and regrowth was re¬ 
latively slow after cutting. In general, 
they were not too different from the 
old non-certified hardy types devel¬ 
oped in the last century. 


DuPuits the Alfalfa Story’s Climax? 


Now we have DuPuits alfalfa, a 
new type with quite different charac¬ 
teristics and growth habit. This new 
variety has been eagerly accepted by 
northeastern farmers, and it has now- 
been proved as our top yielding vari¬ 
ety on suitable soils. Very vigorous 
in seedling establishment and ex¬ 
tremely rapid in spring growth, Du¬ 
Puits has practically no fall dorman¬ 
cy; its growth continues until freeze- 
up. An erect plant differing from all 
previous varieties of northern oi’igin, 
it still maintains good winter hardi¬ 
ness. This new variety again has in¬ 
creased alfalfa yields up to and in 
excess of six tons of dry hay per 
acre. It has also prolonged the harvest 
season. 

The advantages of DuPuits for the 
Northeast are so numerous that it is 
recommended for seeding in all fertile 
areas where maximum yields are de¬ 
sired. Due to its vigor and growth 
habit, DuPuits produces an excellent 
hay crop during the seedling year 
after removal of the nurse crop. Due 
to its tremendous vigor, stands are 
possible to establish under adverse 
conditions. 

Although the limits of DuPuits’ 
adaptation are still not known, the 
variety is rapidly expanding north¬ 
ward into the cold areas of the 
Northeast. Perfect stands have been 
maintained for three years in an 
area of Quebec 100 miles north of 
the Vermont border. Large areas are 
now in production throughout sec¬ 
tions of Ontario, Can., with phenome¬ 
nally good results. 

The acceptance of DuPuits alfalfa 
and its utilization by our farmers 
have been so favorable as compared 
to the old so-called Grimm, Common 
and Variegated varieties that within 
a very short period DuPuits will be 
one of our leading alfalfa varieties 
throughout all of Northeast America. 

E. Me William 


Sunflower Seeds for 
Birds 

I have grown sunflowers since I 
was eight years old, both as a hobby 
and as a means to supply wild birds 
with seed for food in Winter. I have 
used all these years the Russian 
Mammoth seed which is so excellent 
for poultry feed. This year, however, 
I used both the Russian seed and the 
new Early Advance. I planted the 
new sunflower variety several w-eeks 
after the Russian Mammoth and, lo 
and behold, the Early Advance 
bloomed first. It also grows on a 
shorter stalk and makes a better 
quality seed for wild birds. 

Massachusetts Ross Rajotte 


YOU'LL GET BETTER CROPS 

when you plant 

^offman FARM SEEDS 

Don’t gamble with next Fall’s harvest when you plant this Spring! 
Fine crops start with fine seed. Second-rate seed is third-rate economy. 

SOUND, CLEAN, HARDY, TESTED! No shipment leaves the Hoffman 
warehouse until proved to be sound, clean, fast to germinate, healthy 
and hardy. Every pound is backed by Hoffman’s 59-year reputation 
for fair dealing and honest value. 

HELP TAKE THE RISK OUT OF FARMING! Insist on genuine Hoffman 
Quality seeds and follow approved farming methods for your local¬ 
ity. Hoffman seeds will “speak for themselves” at harvest time with 
fields you’ll be proud of. 

ALL THE NEW VARIETIES AT HOFFMAN. Write today for latest copy 
Hoffman Seed Catalog — get all the facts about the new varieties 
you’ve been hearing about, such as “Pennscott” Clover, “DuPuits” 
Alfalfa, “Garry” Oats, “Viking TrefoU”, “S-37” Orchard Grass, 
“Piper” Sudan, etc., plus complete stocks of the tried-and-true pro¬ 
ducers we’ve offered for years. 


And 


FOR MORE CORN PER ACRE! 


Pisnf ¥UHK G HYBRBDS 


Make all your corn acres work harder! Plant the Funk G Hybrid tested 
and proved by Hoffman to be the most outstanding producer in your 
area, on your soil! Every Hoffman Funk G Hybrid is field-tested on 
Hoffman proving grounds in every important corn growing section of 
Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware and Virginia. 
All are bred to grow fast, develop deep roots and strong stalks, to resist 
drouth and insects. See your local Hoffman agent, or write our com men 
here, for “G” number best suited for husking or silage in your locality. 


4 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 




















The Northeast^s 

(Continued from Page 2) 

and made sure the soil was wet to 
a depth. 

South Jersey growers learned it 
pays to buy only certified southern 
plants. Some Georgia Red sweet po¬ 
tato plants carried yellow dwarf dis¬ 
ease, or sweet potato mosaic; coming 
in on uncertified plants, it reduced 
yields drastically. Bacterial spot of 
peppers was brought in by plants, 
too. 

A Monmouth County grower had 
raspberries on one-third of a field in 
1956 and the other two-thirds were 
planted to tomatoes. The part with 
tomatoes had shown some fusarium 
wilt. Last year the raspberries were 
removed and the whole field planted 
to tomatoes. No fusarium showed up 
where the berries had been, but the 
rest of the field was badly affected. 
Growers bothered by this disease 
should rotate or try a wilt-resistant 
variety such as Kokomo or the KC 
146 mainly available for processing. 

Reports of blossoms falling off 
tomatoes and other crops were num¬ 
erous. The reason was blasting of 
pollen as a result of excessively hot 
and dry weather, especially around 



Good soil structure ivas shown to be 
especially important to vegetable 
success in New York, last year. Cab¬ 
bage and beets did well on R. V. 

Call's Batavia, N. Y., farm. 

July 20. When pollen is damaged, fer¬ 
tilization cannot occur; unpollinated 
blossoms drop. This was less bother¬ 
some in northern New Jersey where 
temperatures were somewhat lower. 

W. B. Johnson 


Pennsylvania 

Overall, in Pennsylvania the 1957 
vegetable picture was not good. Grow¬ 
ers had many difficulties. Poor grow¬ 
ing conditions held commercial pro¬ 
duction far below average, and only 
farmers in northern counties experi¬ 
enced even average crops. Southeast¬ 
ern Pennsylvania, which normally 
produces a high percentage of the 
State’s vegetables, was hardest hit 
by dry weather. Growers with only 
one or two crops suffered more than 
diversified growers. 

Growers with irrigation systems 
and adequate supplies of water were 
able to get satisfactory yields. Almost 
any growing season has periods of 
rain deficiency, of course, and many 
vegetable men find it profitable to 
irrigate during short droughts, par¬ 
ticularly during critical stages of 
crop growth. But 1957’s growing sea¬ 
son was so hot and dry that irriga¬ 
tion became a steady need. Costs 
were very high; and because of rela¬ 
tively low income farmers will be 
extremely cost-conscious in 1958. 
Growers with good yields in 1957, 
however, capitalized on a good market 
situation. 

Pennsylvania vegetable growers 
find themselves operating in a more 
complex and competitive market. Im¬ 
proved transportation makes it pos¬ 
sible to grow vegetables great distan¬ 
ces from market. Years ago, nearness 
to market was important; today, local 
produce competes with fresh vege¬ 
tables shipped in from the entire 
nation. In Pennsylvania, there has 
been a gradual shifting of vegetable 
acreage from southern and south- 


Vegetable Year 

eastern parts of the State to east 
central, north central and western 
areas. 

Pennsylvania growers must pay 
increased attention to nationwide 
acreages, supplies and trends in crop 
styles, keeping up-to-date on the 
thinking and techniques of their com¬ 
petitors. Grower programs should be 
directed toward increasing per acre 
production of only the highest quali¬ 
ty vegetables. 

Pennsylvania’s 1957 processing 
vegetable crop was substantially be¬ 
low that of 1956. Important vegeta¬ 
bles for commercial processing were 
down moderately from a year earlier, 
and yields were lower, too. Produc¬ 
tion was lower for green lima beans, 
snap beans, beets, sweet corn and 
tomatoes. There were 2,000 fewer 
acres of green peas for processing. 

Only three growers hai'vested 20 
or more tons of tomatoes per acre 
in 1957 to qualify for the Pennsyl¬ 
vania Master Tomato Growers’ Club. 
In 1956, 66 growers qualified. Only 
126 growers reported yields of 10 
to 20 tons: in 1956, 650 did. The 
state average yield for tomatoes was 
estimated at only 6.1. tons per acre in 
1957 as compared to 9.2 tons a year 
earlier. R. F. Fletcher 


New England 

For both commercial growers and 
home gardeners, insect and disease 
control in New England was not dif¬ 
ficult. Diseases such as late blight 
ruined a tomato planting here and 
there, but, because of dry weather, 
disease losses were less than usual. 
Except for widespread and severe 
damage from cutworms, and a few 
isolated cases where other insects 
caused damage, usual measures kept 
most other insects well under con¬ 
trol. 

The growing season had hardly 
started when many vegetable grow¬ 
ers had their fkst real lesson. In 
May and June, there was a most 
serious problem with cutworms. 
Plant populations were reduced as 
much as 50 per cent; many fields had 
to be replanted. Lesson number one 
in 1957 could properly be called 
“Soil Insects; Get Them or They’ll 
Get You.” A few pounds of chlordane, 
heptachlor or aldrin per acre mixed 
into the top soil before planting 
gives adequate control. Sprays or 
dusts directed at the base of the 
plants, not hitting the foliage, and 
poison baits applied to the soil sur¬ 
face are recommended in emergency. 
These insecticides are on top rather 
than in the soil, however, where they 
should really be. Many growers in- 
jui’ed plant foliage by directed sprays 
and dusts, too. 

The next serious problem to come 
along was drought. The second les¬ 
son might, therefore, be labeled 
“Irrigation; Make It Available.” Many 
new water holes and reservoir’s ap¬ 
peared on vegetable farms. More and 
more growers are learning that ir¬ 
rigation facilities are insurance 
I gainst reduced yields and crop losses. 
High yields are necessary every year 
to meet today’s competition success¬ 
fully. Efficiency is required, of course, 
but during some part of most every 
season irrigation is advantageous. In 
the exceptionally dry season of 1957, 
it played a major role. 

1957 had several lessons in “Labor- 
Management”. A clear-cut one was 
experienced by cucumber growers. 
Above-average yields were obtained 
from vine crops, and growers were 
not prepared with sufficient harvest 
labor. With less frequent pickings, 
pickles grew too large and were 
consequently downgraded. The tardy 
harvest accounts for some of the in¬ 
crease in yield, but not for all. Vine 
growth early in the season suggested 
that a larger harvesting crew would 
be required. Earlier plans should be 
made to secure help. J. T. Kitchin. 



FULL 


LINE 


OF 


FELD 


VEGETABLE SEEDS 
Write For Prices 


OATS 


OUR YEAR 


OUR 

RECISTERED( Garry, RodneyJ 

CERTIFIED ] Beaver And 
SELECTED ^ Swedish Star. 

• Representatives Wanted In Unassigned Territories 


LP.GUNS0N& CO. 


3 Ambrose St., ROCHESTER 1,. N.Y. | 



FRUIT 

TREES 


Yours 


\ Write now for big FREE 

Color Catalog — supply 
/ limited. Great values in 

Fruit Trees, Berries, 
Grapes, Shrubs, Roses, 
Perennials, E V e rg r e e ns. 
Sturdy, strong-rooted 
stock. Northen grown on 
600 acres In Dansville, and priced right! 
Guaranteed to grow and true to name. Free 
stock for early orders. Our 74th Year, 


(958 CACOtN 


MALONEY BROS. NURSERY CO 

15 Circle Road, Dansville, Y. N. 


JUNG’S WAYAHEAD 

BIG RED FRUITS RIPEN EARLY AS 
JULY 4lh, Segular price 15c per 
pkt., but to introduce Jung’s Quality 
Seeds we will send you a trial pkt. 
BBr of Wayohead Tomato and also a 

pkt. of GIANT HYBRID ZINNIAS 
which bloom from early summer un- 
til frost and rival chrysanthemums 

Beautiful 51st Year Catalog, in full ‘ 

color, of the better things to be hod 

in Seeds, Bulbs, Plants and Shrubs is 

free. A Premium Coupon in catalog. .'jli 


Dwarf Peach, Cherry, Apple, Pear trees, 
give huge crops from small land area... 
and they’re so EASIT to care for and 
harvest! Over a dozen varieties guaran¬ 
teed to bear large juicy fruit within 2 
years. Also standard trees, grapes, berry 
plants, flowering shrubs, perennials, 
fast-growing shade trees, etc. SAVE by 
buying DIRECT from nursery in busi¬ 
ness over 78 years. No obligation. Send 
coupon now. 

_KELLY BROS.-.^. 

78 YEARS AS NURSERYMEN 
Dept. R1.18, Dansville, N. Y. 

Rush me FREE the new Spring Color Cata¬ 
log of guaranteed, hardy Dwarf Fruit T^es, 
Shrubs, Berry Plants, etc. (Regular Cus¬ 
tomers: your ’58 catalog is on the way.) 


Station 21 — Randolph, Wisconsin 


Name 


’ .State. 

Enclose 50tf West of the Mississippi 


6 Colorado Blue Spruce 4 
yr. transplanted, 4 to 8 in. 
tail—only $1 postpaid; 15 only $2 ^ 

postpaid! Another Bargain: 20 
Evergreens, all transplanted 4 to 
10 in. tall. Five each: Balsam juJ ft 

Fir, Douglas Fir, Red Pine, 

White Spruce, all 20 for only $3 

postpaid. (West of Miss. River 

add 25c). FREE illustrated 

FOLDER of small evergreen trees. -ISSSiS 

AIX^TREES GUARANTEED TO 


;■ Tells the plain truth about 

best seeds that grow 
—your favorite flowers 
and vegetables, including 
H^^SBI^^^^Burpee Hybrids. 450 pic- 

tures. FREE. Write Today! 

—- 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO. 

518 Burpee Bldg., Philadelphia 32, Pa. 

Send new Burpee Seed Catalog FREE. 


WESTERN MAINE FOREST NURSERY CO. 

Dept. RN-138. Prycburg, Maine 


Name 


Zone.. • .State 


Ideal for home garden, require little 
space, full size fruit, bear eariy, 
2nd or 3rd year. DWARF PEACH, 
APPLE, PEAR: New North Star 
Wl 1 / Dwarf CHERRY. Also new grapes, 
t*'* trees, berries. Guaranteed 
stock. Catalog Free. 

J. E. MILLER NURSERIES 

917 W. LAKE RD., CANANDAIGUA, N. Y. 


Evergreen Planting Stock 

For Christmas Trees-Ornamentals 


SEEDLINGS and TRANSPLANTS — many Va¬ 
rieties of Pine, Spruce, Fir, etc. direct from 
growers. Excellent money-crop for idle acres. 
Price List and Planting Guide—FREE. Write: 

SUNCREST NURSERIES 

BOX 305-B, HOMER CITY. PENNA. 


EVERGREEN HEDGE 


American Arborvitae, 4 yr. trans-lHH||B 
plants 8" to 10". Beautiful ever-^^|3 
green hedge. Shear to any shape 
or height. Postpaid planting time. Hhlil 
Write for Free Evergreen Catalog 


Allen’s 1958 Berry Book tells 
best varieties for home and 
market, and how to grow them. 
Free copy. Write today. 

W. F. ALLEN COMPANY 


I V’C COLOR 
IVCLLT D CATALOG 

of DWARF FRUIT TREES 

Peach, Cherry, Apple, Pear 

DllIC Ornamental Shrubs, Shade 
I IU5 Trees, Perennials, etc. 


BLUE 

SPRUIE 


CATALOG 


I WANT EVERY READER 

this Paper to have my big red 

S . EARLIAIMA TOMATO 


72 Evergreen Ave., Salisbury, Maryland 

STRAWBERRY PLANTS 

BLUEBERRY, RASPBERRY and ASPARAGUS 
IN ALL POPULAR VARIETIES 
A Free Catalogue Full of Facts. No Fakes. 

H. D. RICHARDSON & COMPANY 
WILLARDS,_ BOX 8,_MARYLAND 


LOW AS 

25c 


2-YEAR 
FIELD- 
GROWN 

Flowering shrubs, evergreens, shade trees. 25e up. 
Fruit trees low as 20c. Nuts, blueberries, strawberries. 
Grapes lOc. Dwarf fruit trees. Quality stock can’t be 
sold tower. Write for FREE color catalog and $2.00 
FREE bonus information. TENNESSEE NURSERY 
COMPANY, BOX 125, CLEVELAND. TENNESSEE 



NEW SUGAR BABY WATERMELON 


HARRIS SECDS 

You Can Grow Sugar Baby 
If You Have 85 Growing Days 

Best of the New “Icebox” Watermelons for 
Northern areas. 

Only 7 inches in diameter with red flesh and 
black rind. 

High quality flesh is crisp, solid, juicy and fine 
textured. Seeds are small and relatively few. 

One of the many new things in our new catalog. 
SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., INC. 

12 Moreton |Farm, Rochester 11 , New York 

1958 CATALOC 7w\v Amclif 























































EET SPANISH ONION PLANTS 


•HARRIS SUDS 

You Need FRESH Plants— 

In order to grow large, mild, Sweet Spanish Onions 
that often weigh a pound or more. Keep for 
months if stored dry and cool. 

^ Our plants are fresh because they are shipped, the 
day they are pulled, by overnight refrigerated 
plane, from our Texas grower. 

We ship the plants east of the Mississippi and North 
of Virginia between early April and May 201h only. 

SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., Inc. 

11 Moreton Farm, Rochester 11, N. Y. 

1958 CATALOG nm/imdij 



NEW CARPATHIAN 

WALN UT 


Produces large delxious 
thin-shelled English Wal¬ 
nuts. Perfectly adapted 
for cold winters; will 
stand 25 below without 
injury. Makes a beauti¬ 
ful, fast-growing shade 
tree. Plant for shade 
and nuts. Details in Miller’s FREE CATA¬ 
LOG. Also New Interlaken Seedless Grape, 
new Berries, Dwarf Fruit Trees, shade 
and flowering trees, fruit trees of all kinds. 
Guaranteed to grow. 

J. E. MILLER NURSERIES 

S17VA LAKE RD.^_CANANDAIGUA, N. Y. 


^^STRAWBERRIES 


iFREE catalog describes our new 
Ivirus-tree strawberry plants. Foun- 
Idation stock supplied by the U. S. 
Dept, of Agriculture for the pro¬ 
duction of better strawberry plants 
for the American farmer and gardener. 

- Also blueberries, grapes, raspberries, 

•hrubs, siiaae trees, fruit and nut trees. All stock cer¬ 
tified and guaranteed. Write Now for Your Free Copy. 
BAYNER BROTHERS, SALISBURY 5. MARYLAND 



SENSATIONAL DURHAM HEAVY BEARING RED 
RASPBERRY PLANTS: Only $8.00-100. Free price 
list of other outstanding Strawberry and Raspberry 
Plants. MAC DOWELL BERRY FARM, 

BALLSTON LAKE, N. Y. PHONE; UP 7-5515 


INCREASE PRESENT INCOME 


Build growing sideline, full time business. No in¬ 
vestment. Farmers, Agents, Dealers. Take orders for 
Campbell’s Gro-Green Liquid Fertilizer Concentrates. 
Free sample, sales ki t. Campbell Co., Rochelle 315, III. 

--- E V ERGREEN SEEDLINGS - 

For Christmas Trees, etc. Quality Seedlings at 
Reasonable Prices. Write for information. 

PINE GROVE NURSERY. 


R. D. 3, 


CLEARFIELD, PENNA. 


STRAWBERRY and RASPBERRY PLANTS. FREE 

Catalog. REX SPROUT. WAVERLY, NEW YORK 

NEW JET TORCH destroys weeds, stumps, rocks. 

Get Free Bulletin. SINE, RN-2. QUAKERTOWN. PA. 


CHRISTMAS TREE PLANTER 


hydraulic lift. Only $245. Plant 
1,000 per hour. Write — ROOTSPRED. 

__ ST. PETERSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA _ 

VIRUS FREE STRAWBERRY PLANTS. Catalog 

Free. M. S. P RYOR. R. F. D. SALISBURY, MO. 


TRY NEW POTAGOLD 


About Finest LATE STRAWBERRY We Ever Had. 

Yield. Circular. 

WRIGHT FARM, _ PLYMPTON, MASS. 

EVERGREENS: Christmas Tree Planting Stock. 

...... Catalog and Planting Guide. 

FLICKINGERS’ NURSERY, SAGAMORE, PENNA. 

black. PURPLE RASP- 

PLANTS. GUARANTEED TO GROW. 
EUREKA PLANT FARM, HASTINGS, NEW YORK 


CHRISTMAS TREES 
and ORNAMENTALS 

Seedlings andTransplants-dlrect from grow* 

♦rs at planting time. Many varieties of Pine, 

Spruce. Fir. etc. Quality stock at low prices. 

SUNCREST EVERGREEN NURSERIES 

Box 30S- B Homer Ci ty, Pa. ) _||| 


Free 
CATALOGUE 
and 

PLANTING 

GUIDE 


FRUIT TREES, STRAWBERRY, RASPBERRY 
AND BLUEBERRY PLANTS 


Dwarf apple trees on Mailing I, 2, 
7, 9 stock. Nut and Shade Trees, 
Grape Vines, Flowering Shrubs, 
Evergreens. Over 80 years experi¬ 
ence growing and supplying com¬ 
plete line of nursery stock direct 
to planters. Satisfaction assured — 
prices reasonable. 60-page illus- 

_ _ trated catalog and planting guide 

sent free. Write: BOUNTIFUL RIDGE NURSERIES 

BOX R-128, PRINCESS ANNE, MARYLAND 



6 

Plant 

1595 


4 Hardy American Holly, pyra.midal 
tree-type, red berries. 2 Jap. Holly, 
evergreen shrub-type. All plants 4 " Plants 
10 6 " with mass of roots from 2i4" Jj 

pots. Postpaid at planting time. _ 

for FREE Evergreen Catalog PCsrPAtO 


MUSSER FORESTS 


BOX 20-A 




STRAWBERRIES 


are ideal family Income projects. One- 
tenth acre yields 650 ~ 900 quarts. 
Allen’s Berry Book tells best varieties 
end How to Grow Them. Free copy. 
Write today. 

W. F. ALLEN COMPANY 
72 Evergreen Ave., Salisbury, Maryland 

PEACH 
and 
APPLE 

Cherries, pears, plums, nut trees, strawberries, blue¬ 
berries, dwarf fruit trees. Grapevines iOe. Shrubs, 
evergreens, shade trees, roses 25e up. Quality stock 
ean’t be sold lower. Write for FREE color catalog and 
$2 FREE bonus Information. TENNESSEE NUR¬ 
SERY CO.. BOX 16. CLEVELAND. TENNESSEE 


TREES 


LOW AS 

20c 



TKAWBERRY PLANTS 

Write for catalog, fully describing all 
varieties, with best methods of growing 
them. Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

J.H. SHIVERS, Box R-58, Allen, Md. 


FREE 


Vegetable Plant Catalogue With Bargain Offers. 
Have earlier crops with our strong field-grown Cabbage, 
Onion, Lettuce, Broccoli, Cau.iflowcr, Tomato, 
Eggplant, Pepper, and Potato Plants. 

PIEDMONT PLANT COMPANY, 

P. 0. BOX 684, GREENVILLE. S. C. 


CHRISTMAS TREE 

SEEDLINGS AND TRANSPLANTS 


PINES, SPRUCES. FIRS—Quality stock at reason¬ 
able prices. Place your order now for Spring planting 
while popular species and sizes are available. 

Write for price list and shearing bulletin. 
ECCLES Nurseries, Box 65, Dept. Y, Rimersburg, Pa. 


Books for Home 
Gardeners 

The Gardener’s Bug Book, 

Cynthia Westcott.$7.50 

Botany — Plant Science, 

W. W. Ptobbins & T. E. Weir... 6.95 
Propagation of Plants, 

Kains and McQuestion.6.00 

The Vegetable Growing Business, 

R. L. & G. S. Watts. 6.00 

10,000 Garden Questions Answered 

F. F. Rockwell. 4.95 

Greenhouse Gardening for Every¬ 
one, 

Ernest Chabot. 4.75 

Mushroom Growing Today, 

F. C. Atkins. 4.50 

The Hive and the Honey Bee, 

Roy A. Grout. 4.00 

Modern Gardening, 

Dr. P. P. Pirone. 3,50 

All About African Violets, 

Montague Free .$3.50 

How to Have a Green Thumb With¬ 
out an Aching Back, . 2.75 


Books on Fruif Growing 

Fruit Nutrition, 

Norman F. Childers.$10.00 

A History of Horticulture, 

U. P. Hedrick. 7.50 

Modern Fruit Production, 

Gourley & Howlett. 6.90 

Small Fruit Culture, 

James A. Shoemaker. 6.50 

Fruit Science, 

Norman F. Childers. 6.50 

Plant Regulators in Agriculture, 

H. B. Tukey. 6.00 

General Horticulture, 

Thos, J, Talbert. 4.00 

A Living from Bees, 

F. C. Pellett . 4.00 

The Care and Feeding of Plants 
Norman F. Childers, James M. 

Beattie et al. 3.00 

For sale by The Rural New 
Yorker, 333 West 30th St., New York 
1, N. Y. (New York City residents, 
add 3% Sales Tax.) 


Get MORE OATS per Acre I 


GARRYor RODNEY OATS 


Plant DIBBLE'S 
CERTIFIED 



(Stiff-strawed, early varieties. Yields up to 100 bushels per acre.) 
ALSO OFFERING THESE OTHER PROFITABLE VARIETIES: 

CRAIG, AJAX (certified), DIBBLE’S HEAVYWEIGHT 

ALL TREATED AND READY TO SOW. 

Write today for our latest price list — describes our complete line of 
tested farm seeds at reasonable prices. 

EDWARD F. DIBBLE, Seedgrower 

Box B, HONEOYE FALLS, N. Y. 


On the Fruit and Garden Front 

in New Jersey 

Fungicides for ’58. . .Bulk Apple Boxes. . .Nematode Control 
. . . Asparagus Strains . . . Greater Tomato Yields 

Fruit 


At the 83rd annual meeting of 
the New Jersey state Horticultural 
Society in Atlantic City last month. 
Spencer Davis, Rutgers University 
pathologist, predicted that three 
1958 apple fungicides would be sul- 
fur-captan, captan alone, and glyodin- 
captan. B. F. Driggers of Rutgers 
observed additionally that glyodin- 
ryania controlled most mites last 
year. From his reduced 1957 apple 
spray schedule, H. B. Specht report¬ 
ed plum curculio to be the most 
destructive insect. Using glyodin as 
the fungicide and lead arsenate, sy- 
stox and ryania as insecticides, the 
average injury he found in harvested 
McIntosh and Stayman apples was 
four per cent by plum curculio, only 
2.8 per cent by codling moth and 
2.2 per cent by leaf rollers. 

Dr. J. W. Heuberger of Delaware 
said that the botryosphaeria rot on 
apple wood and fruit beginning as 
early as April resembles black rot 
and that only cultures can distinguish 
them. Rome and Lodi have been 
most seriously affected in Delaware, 
he said. Drought or anything reduc¬ 
ing tree vigor increases it. Rot is 
also present in New Jersey, accord- 
to R. H. Daines, Rutgers pathologist, 
who suggested a pound each of captan 
and zineb every two weeks from the 
fourth cover spray until harvest as 
control. Daines advised when select¬ 
ing fungicides to consider their ac¬ 
tual disease control, their effect on 
finish and cracking, and what they 
do to tree vigor, yield and fruit 
maturity. Captan, lead arsenate and 
DDT give best finish on Golden De¬ 
licious, he said. On Stayman, the best 
came from captan, lead arsenate and 
ryania, and captan, dieldrin and 
ryania. 

It was revealed at the meeting that 
bulk apple boxes enable four men 
to move five times as many apples 
per hour — 500 bushels — as field 
crates do, Bruising has been found 
no greater in the big boxes in Vir¬ 
ginia, Pennsylvania and New Jersey, 
it was shown, and they cost only 
about half as much. Investment in 


equipment is a little higher and an 
appropriate place must be made to 
store the bulk boxes, it was neverthe¬ 
less cautioned. The cold storage must 
be the proper size to accept them, too. 

At the peach meeting, L. A. Mit- 
terling of Rutgers reported that the 
best combination to thin Redhaven 
and Sunrise peaches without reduc¬ 
ing yield is a halp pint of elgetol 
in 100 gallons of water. M. T, Hutch¬ 
inson of Rutgers reported three types 
of nematodes to be present in peach 
soils: meadow — the most common, 
dagger and ring. Fumigating certain 
orchard sites seemed advisable, he 
thought. The cost of producing 
peaches, as determined by J. W. 
Carncross of Rutgers last year in .32 
orchards involving 783 acres, was 
$262 per acre up to harvest, and $643 
total. Variation in yield ranged from 
100 to 400 bushels, per acre, he re¬ 
ported, with 259 bushels the average. 
The cost to grow a bushel in above- 
average yields was $2.30, in below- 
average $2.92. With a 400-bushel 
yield, costs came to only $1.50 per 
bushel, he said. Harvest costs per 
bushel were about the same. The 
most destructive peach disease, cank¬ 
er, still has no practical control, Dr, 
Daines reported, but it is known to 
infect through leaf scars in the Fall. 

N. F. Childers of Rutgers report¬ 
ed that irrigation of Golden Jubilee, 
Newday and Elberta peach orchards 
last year increased yields from 24 
to 35 per cent. About 75 per cent of 
the unirrigated Elberta crop was be¬ 
low 2.5 inches, he said; on irrigated 
trees, only 40 per cent. There was 
a 13-inch deficiency of rainfall from 
May through Elberta harvest in Sept¬ 
ember, he told. Do not apply less 
than an inch of irrigation water at 
a time, he advised; so as to avoid 
frequent movement of pipes, two in¬ 
ches is even better. Application of 
water should begin six weeks ahead 
of ripening, he stated, so this may 
mean three applications during pro¬ 
longed drought. Last year, the water 
was put on June 1, July 3, and 
August 2, E. G. Christ 


Vegetables 


At the vegetable sessions, R. F. 
Stevens of the University of Dela¬ 
ware reported that Delaware aspar¬ 
agus acreage increased for the past 
eight years to total 3,000 acres 
for 1957. Tomatoes have shown a 
decrease, and lima beans had a big 
drop this past year, he remarked. 
But peas are a bright spot in Delaware 
vegetable production, he said; with 
acreage tripled, their yield per acre 
has also gone up twofold. Stevens 
predicted that processing crops will 
maintain their overall present sta¬ 
tus, but with some shift in individual 
crops; market crops, especially pota¬ 
toes, will increase slightly, while can¬ 
taloupes and watermelons should in¬ 
crease as marketing conditions im¬ 
prove. 

J. H. Ellison of Rutgers Univer¬ 
sity’s vegetable department declared 
that the commercial asparagus strains 
most resistant to rust generally are 
too low-yielding. New strains like 
New Jersey 28 and others from U. S. 
and Holland experiment stations are 
much more productive. Indicating 
that asparagus seed performs better 
on fumigated land than on untreated 
land, he said there is a real problem, 
neverthless, with new crowns planted 
on old asparagus land. Research is 
now under way at Rutgers. Charles 
Moran of Campbell Soup Co. indica¬ 
ted that asparagus more closely plant¬ 
ed than now being generally practiced 
increases yields greatly. To counter¬ 
act California tomato competition. 


Francis Stark of the University of 
Maryland declared that eastern grow¬ 
ers must use only the improved vari- 
ties, that they can increase yields 
on sandy soils as much as 25 pef 
cent where fertilizer is applied to 
the winter cover crop, and that they 
must set only the best southern grown 
plants they can obtain. J. W. Carn¬ 
cross, Rutgers economist, thought it 
now seemed possible to raise tomatoes 
with less irrigation than heretofore 
believed. Costs can be cut, too, and 
the whole watering operation carried 
on with increased efficiency through 
planning. W. O. Drinkwater of Rut¬ 
gers’ vegetable department observed 
that there are certain times when 
irrigation is most beneficial. But we 
need more information on how much 
water should be used, he said, and 
especially on the time it should be 
applied to growing crops. 

Robert Hanna, Rutgers soils spe¬ 
cialist, showed that by proper land 
management growers can retain deep¬ 
er top soil, have greater organic 
matter in it, and obtain much higher 
yields. H. S. Warmflash of Rocka- 
way, N. J., described and demonstra¬ 
ted the development and testing of 
wire-bound crates for vegetables. 

Officers elected for 1958 were: 
Charles Maier, Pine Brook vegetable 
grower, pres.; C. H. Steelman, Jr., 
Princeton fruit- and nursery-man 
vice-pres.; Ernest Christ, Rutgers Uni¬ 
versity, secy.; and A. J. Farley, Rut¬ 
gers, treas. W. B. Johnson 


I 

I 

I 
































































































Agriculture Secretary Benson has 
virtually conceded he does not have 
a chance to get his program of lower 
price supports in return for greater 
acreages through Congress this year. 
His high-price-support opponents in 
Congress have just about conceded 
they will have little more luck. 

Thus the pre-election dying ses¬ 
sion of the 85th Congress might ap¬ 
pear already to have died insofar as 
farm legislation is concerned. Actual 
results, however, might be greatly 
influenced by the course of farm 
prices and farm programs during 
this year. 

The Senate Agriculture Committee 
wasted no time in calling Benson be¬ 
fore it for a rough going-over ainied 
mostly at his recent decision cutting 


dairy price supports to 75 per cent 
of parity, the present legal minimum, 
as well as his forthcoming request 
for authority to cut price supports 
still farther not only on dairy pro¬ 
ducts but also on the basic commodi¬ 
ties. 

Attempts to reverse Benson on the 
dairy price support cut were sched¬ 
uled to provide the first agricultural 
fireworks of the session, with chances 
for getting any bill through Congress 
and signed by the President some¬ 
thing worse than slim. 

Early in the session, corn price 
supports are due to take the center 
of the stage. Last year, Benson 
sought to have corn removed from 
the list of basic commodities guaran¬ 
teed a minimum price support of at 
least 75 per cent of parity. This split 
the farm bloc so badly that no corn 
law was passed at all, and the prob¬ 
lem remains. It is indeed a difficult 
problem to control corn production, 
to have farmers disregard corn 


acreage allotments and thereby for¬ 
feit all price-support help, plus a 
number of other factors causing all 
sides to agree that something should 
be done about the crop—though dis¬ 
agreeing as to what. 

In contrast, the actual legislative 
wrangle over general farm legislation 
is apt to be unexciting because of the 
likelihood that nothing will be done. 

* -i: S: 

The short-term acreage reserve 
part of the soil bank program—al¬ 
most certain to be dropped in any 
case after this year’s crops—is fur¬ 
ther harrassed by a law suit testing 
the legality of Benson’s administra¬ 
tion. 

Rep. Henry Reuss (D., Wis.), who 
was one of the legislators authoring 
an amendment limiting payments to 
$3,000, claims in court that the limi¬ 
tation should be applied to each in¬ 
dividual or corporation, rather than 
to each farm as Benson has inter¬ 
preted the law. Benson permits pay¬ 


ments up to $3,000 for each farm 
under one ownership. Reuss has not 
asked yet for an injunction against 
payments under the program pend¬ 
ing decision on the legal question. 
Until he asks for such an injunction, 
and until the court grants one—if it 
does, the suit will only have nuisance 
value. 

Court battles take a long time, and 
the acreage reserve program will 
probably be history before a final 
decision can be reached. 

* * * 

Prices of farm acreages will not 
drop and may rise some more in 1958, 
according to a survey conducted by 
the National Association of Real Es¬ 
tate Boards among its members. 
Some areas reported that they ex¬ 
pect further price increases up to 20 
per cent, but there were a few pre¬ 
dictions that farm land prices might 
drop moderately. 

Harry L.ando 


First 200-Bu5}iel 
New York Corn Crop 

The 205 bushels of dry shelled 
corn Max Shaul harvested to the 
acre of his Schoharie County, N. Y., 
cropland last Fall are believed to 
represent the highest yield ever made 
in New York. No other crop of 200 
bushels has been found recorded of¬ 
ficially. Two more Schoharie County 
growers made high yields, too; their 
and Shaul’s average came to 172 
bushels, a state contest’s champion¬ 
ship total. 

The 1957 corn contest was spon¬ 
sored by the Cayuga County Exten¬ 
sion Service. Once a hay- and grain 
•producing ai'ea with few dairies, 
Cayuga County is still the leading 
corn-for-grain producer of the State. 
Since inaugurating its own corn con¬ 
test in 1955, 73 farmers have quali¬ 
fied for the “100-Bushel Club”. To 
stimulate interest and competition 
in corn production, according to F. 
P. Schwencke, Cayuga’s associate 
agricultural agent, the corn contest 
was opened to the State last year. 
Seven other counties made entries, 
and 101 crops were measured. The 
average yield of all was 121 bushels 
per acre. Cayuga County tied w’ith 
Ontario for second-place honors to 
Schoharie; their average yields were 
151 bushels per acre. 


! Coyni Your Seeds, 
Count- Your Blessings 

This is a beautiful day in Korea. 
The rice paddies are turning brown 
in the bright sunshine, and Papa-San 
is harvesting soybeans, red peppers, 
milo-maize and the rest of his crops. 
The red chili peppers are spread on 
the thatched roofs to dry, and it 
makes the villages very colorful. 

I wondered why the Koreans grow 
I maize instead of corn; now I know. 

I They build their houses of lattice- 
work frames plastered with mud. As 
wood is very scarce, the sturdy maize 
stalks are used instead. Dry, it is like 
bamboo; in fact, they make fans from 
splints of maize-stalk. 

One of the “Katusas” (Korean 
soldiers) explained about the rice 
crop. Rice is classed in three cate¬ 
gories, The best rice, such as is 
grown around Seoul, has a maximum 
of 107 grains per stalk; that is the 
maximum ever found. Second class, 
such as is grown in this area, has 
90 or 91 grains per plant or stalk. 
The poorest rice has 70 to 80. 

Number one red peppers have 40 
seeds each. These people count every 
seed of every crop, for their gardens 
are so tiny that every ounce of food 
must be utilized. 

Sp/3 Alfred S. Campbell, Jr, 


For age and want save while you may, 
No morning sun lasts a whole day. — 
Benjamin Franklin, The Way to 
Wealth. 



(the near-perfect forage feed) 


(WILT TO 40-60*/o MOISTURE) 




FEED MECHANICALLY 
from tlie bottom 




WHY MAKE HAY? 


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— and Harvestore gives you a better 
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haylage. Made possible only by sealed, 
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Other advantages . .. leaves saved, less 
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You save labor too . .. both in putting 
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you chore-saving at its best. 

For more information on how you can 
take advantage of all Harvestore feed 
processing benefits, mail the coupon. 


Through research 






A. O. SMITH CORP. 

Dept. FIN-T8, Kankakee, Illinois 

Please send me the “Why Make Hay” and “Farm 
Profit Plan” booklet. I’m interested in increasing 

V^^rtinAl Fnrmine^. 




CORPORATION 


Name 


Town 


..RFD 


HARVESTORE PRODUCTS 

Kankakee, Illinois 


County 


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January 18, 1958 


7 















































































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rednces accidents 


You keep your dairy barn cleaner and more sanitary 
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Barn Calcite helps prevent profit-wrecking animal 
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See your local dealer for 

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keeps teat OPEN 
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2. ACT MEDICALLY —Sulfathiazole 
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antiseptic action—directly 
at site of trouble. 

At drug and farm stores 
or wri te: 

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Morris 7, N.Y. 
Large pkg.(45) $ 1.00 
Trial pkg. (16)50^ 


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No 

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MLLPflk^ 


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Our famous Christmas Tree 
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BATTLESHIP GRAY 
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The Farm Income Tax 


By GEORGE 

Part III 

The Importance of Schedule D 

It is on Schedule D that farmers 
should always report income from 
the sale of capital or business assets 
such as dairy cows, breeding animals, 
machinery, equipment, standing tim- 
! her and all other assets whether or 
not used in the farm business. These 
; types of income should never be re- 
I ported on Schedule F. By reporting 
j them on Schedule D, only one-half 
of the net long-term gain is included 
in taxable income, and all of the net 
loss may be fully deductible. 

Schedule D is a single page form, 
but, before filling it out, one should 
read the instructions on its back. 

In a general way, farm assets will 
fall into two broad groups. In one 
will be pi’operty owned by the farmer 
but not used in the farm business to 
produce income. Some examples are 
standing timber held as an invest¬ 
ment, dwelling occupied by farmer, 
and personal automobile not used 
in the business. Another example is 
stocks and bonds held by a farmer as 
an investment. If any of these assets 
are held for less than six months, 


One Came 

“Just let me know what I can do”, 
Some said, and left the stricken 
room. 

One came who did not ask anew, 
“Just let me know what I can do”, 

Who cooked the meal, washed dishes, 
too, 

Made beds, and wielded mop and 
broom, 

“Just let me know what I can do”, 
Some said, and left the stricken 
room, 

—Russell Pettis Askue 


the gain or loss from their sale is 
reported at the top of Schedule D 
under “short-term capital gains and 
losses”. If held more than six mon¬ 
ths, the gains or losses are to be 
reported on line 5 of Schedule D 
under “long-term capital gains and 
lossess”. 

The other group of assets includes 
items which are used in the farm 
business or are used to produce in¬ 
come. Examples are machinery, equip¬ 
ment, buildings, land and livestock 
held for dairy, breeding or work pui*- 
poses. The gain or loss from the sale 
of these items is sometimes reported 
on line 5 of Schedule D and also 
at the bottom of Schedule D under 
“property other than capital assets”, 
depending on whether or not the 
gains exceed the losses. The taxpayer 
would also include in the group gains 
and losses from involuntary conver¬ 
sions (as by fire, theft, condemnation 
or threat thereof) of depreciable 
property or real estate used in the 
business and held more than six 
months, or 12 months in the case of 
livestock. 

Generally, most farmers do not 
have many entries on Schedule D 
in any one year. Dairymen have en¬ 
tries from the sale of dairy cattle, 
and livestock raisers may have some 
entries pertaining to the sale of 
breeding animals. If we add to this 
list the sale of standing timber, 
we would include most of the situa¬ 
tions encountered in any single year. 
When farmers have several compli¬ 
cated problems dealing with the sale 
or exchange or involuntary conver¬ 
sion of capital or business assets, 
they would be well advised to seek 
advice from competent tax advisors. 


A. STEVENS 

How to Figure Gains and Losses 

To illustrate the steps for Sched¬ 
ule D, let us assume that a farmer 
sold, at a gain of $100, a dairy cow 
which he purchased and held for 
more than 12 months; two dairy 
cows, raised, sold at a gain of $200; 
purchased one dairy cow, killed by 
lightning—loss $100; and sold stand¬ 
ing timber held for more than six 
months at a gain of $300. First, com¬ 
pare the gains and losses from the 
sale of the cows, including the casual¬ 
ty loss. In this case, the total gains 
add to $300, and the loss is $100. 
Since the gains exceed the losses, 
the items pertaining to the cows 
would be recorded on line five of 
Schedule D under “long-term capital 
gains and losses”. If the losses were 
greater than the gains, then the trans¬ 
actions pertaining to the cows would 
be recorded at the bottom of Sched¬ 
ule D under “property other than 
capital assets”. Regardless of hov/ 
the gains or losses of the cows were 
handled, the transaction concerning 
the sale of the timber would always 
be recorded on line 5 of Schedule D. 

In this example, all of the items 
would be recorded on line 5 of Sched¬ 
ule D, and the net long-term gain 
would be $500 ($600 total gain minus 
$100 loss). Only $250 of the long¬ 
term gain would be transferred to 
Form 1040 and included in taxable 
income (see line 10, Schedule D). 

Prepare Now for 1958 Tax Return 

Now is the best time to start pre¬ 
paring the 1958 farm income tax 
return. Most farmers have pi’obably 
filed their 1957 farm returns and 
wmnt to forget about this business 
for a while. But this procedure is not 
recommended. The secret to doing 
a good job and making the task easier 
is to start now by keeping a good 
set of records of all transactions 
during the year. By good records 
we do not mean they must be elab- 
oi'ate. The primary requirement is 
that they accurately show your in¬ 
come and expenses and all other 
transactions which affect your tax 
liability. Record-keeping is primarily 
based on habit. A suggestion for de¬ 
veloping the habit is to keep the 
farm record book in a location that 
is visited at least once a day. Placing 
the record book on the kitchen or 
dining room table, a place which is 
visited three times a day, helps to 
develop the habit of keeping ade¬ 
quate, complete records. There are 
several record books suitable for 
farm accounting. The county agricul¬ 
tural agent can give you sound advice 
on this matter. 

Here are some specific suggestions 
that will help to prepare for 1958 
tax reporting: 

1. Record all income and expenses 
as they take place; keep receipts, 
bills or other documents as proof of 
transactions. 

2. If it has not already been done, 
prepai'e a depreciation schedule list¬ 
ing all depreciable assets and the 
amount of depreciatiodn allowed. 

3. Record dates, cost and descrip¬ 
tion of all types of depreciable prop¬ 
erty purchased during the year; this 
includes livestock purchased for 
dairy, breeding or work purposes. 

4. Record dates and cost of any 
purchased property whether or not 
used in the farm business. 

5. Be sure to separate in the rec 
ords the income from the sale of 
capital or business assets; it is very 
important to keep this type of income 
separate from other income because 
it may be entitled to special treat¬ 
ment in income tax reporting. 

6 . If one plans to sell his farm 
or any part of it, he is urged to in¬ 
vestigate the different methods of 
sale before completing the transac¬ 
tion. The method of sale may affect 
tax liability. Investigate the possi- 


8 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 































































bility of an installment sale where 
the initial payments do not exceed 
30 per cent of the selling price. This 
method may reduce overall tax lia¬ 
bility. 

7 . If one has just purchased a 
farm, he should immediately allocate 
the total cost of the farm to the 
various types of property purchased 
with it- For example, a farmer pur¬ 
chased a farm at a total price of 
$ 30 , 000 , which included land, farm 
buildings, dwelling house, timber and 
some machinery and equipment. He 
immediately assigned a portion of 
the total purchase price to each of 
these types of property. In the case 
of the depreciable property, this al¬ 
location served as the basis for start 
ing his depreciation allov/ance. It is 
extremely important to do this for 
all farms and make a permanent 
record of the allocation. 

8 . Although the farm dwelling is 
not depreciable, it is very important 
that one keep a complete and per¬ 
manent record of the cost of all im¬ 
provements and alterations. This in¬ 
formation could be very important 
from the standpoint of tax liability 
if and when the property is sold. 

Wire Size for llO-Volt 
Line 

I was very much interested in a 
question in your Farm Workshop 
about the size of wire to use on a 
110 -volt electric line 1,000 feet long 
to operate a one-fourth hp. pump. 

A one-fourth hp. motor, operating 
on 110 to 120 volts, draws between 
five and six amperes when running 
at full load. It is true that No. 14 or 
No. 12 wire will carry this amount 
of current without overheating and 
damaging the insulation. However, 
in a distance of 1,000 feet a current 
of five amperes on No. 12 wire would 
produce a voltage drop of about 10 
per cent. Assuming that the supply 
voltage were 120 volts and not 110, 
a loss of 10 per cent might not be 
serious if the motor could be started. 
However, most motors will draw 
three to four times as much current 
for a few seconds on starting as they 
will once they get up to normal speed. 

If this motor were of a type that 
could be reconnected to operate on 
220 to 240 volts, it might be possi¬ 
ble to use No. 12 wire and still 
supply sufficient voltage to start the 
pump. On the other hand, the 
Code specifies No. 10 as the minimum 
size for use in overhead spans, up 
to 50 ft. between supports. No. 
8 for longer spans. If No. 8 
wire were used for this motor on 
110 -volt circuit, the voltage drop 
under running conditions would be 
about five per cent, and on starting 
we might expect a drop of about 19 
volts. A five per cent voltage drop 
under running conditions is not 
severe, but on this long circuit the 
19-volt drop might be excessive anc 
cause difficulty in starting. I would 
be inclined to recommend either No 
6 wire if the motor is to be operatec 
at 110 volts, or connection for 220 
volts and No. 10 wire. M. H. Lloyd 


Lovely Is Vermont- 

I read with much interest the arti¬ 
cle, “Reading, Then and Now” by 
Vermont’s Merton Sage in the Octo¬ 
ber 5 issue of The Rural New 
Yorker. I agree with him 100 per 
cent on the pleasure and value of 
good reading, but I thing that, if I 
lived in the southwestern part of 
Vermont, I should have but little or 
no time for it. I have never seen a 
more beautiful section of the country 
than around the Green Mountains of 
Vermont. I should not have time for 
anything but looking at scenery. 
Governor Joseph Johnson invited me 
to come next Summer, too, and I do 
hope to visit his magnificent State 
again. But read in Vermont? Not me; 
I’ll take its outdoor looks, the loveli¬ 
est that Nature offers. 

New Jersey J. H. Channell 

Of the 265,000 tons of charcoal 
annually made in the United States, 
about half is burned for the cooking 
of food. Between 35 and 40 per cent 
is used in the chemical and metal in¬ 
dustries and much of the balance is 
utilized in curing tobacco, in poul¬ 
try feed, and in purification of water. 



SHOPPING FOR A NEW SILO? 

You’ll save with a 


CONCRETE SILO 

EARLY ORDER DISCOUNT! ^ 

Free folder. Mail coupon today. 


universaT steel siTo ToT "i 

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Please sand folder without obligation. • 

Name 


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IlF YOU SELL FARMERS... 


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200 E. Ontario Street, Chicaeo 11, Illinois 


Select 3 yr., 8-12" plants. Grov/ 
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Postpaid planting time. 


MUSSER FORESTS 


BOX 



— DEPRESSION PRICES, WE SELL CHEAP — 
SAVE 75% off-new and used tractor parts, crawlers 
and wheel tractors, 190 makes and models. 1958 
catalog ready. Send 25 cents refundable. 
SURPLUS TRACTOR PARTS CORPORATION, 
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REPLACEMENT OF “OLD-STYLE” PLUGS WITH SPARK-0-MATIC’S CAN GIVE YOU UP TO 

28 More Horsepower 

6 Extra Miles Per Gallon... 

Peppier Acceleration! 

FRiE! 


Books Worth Having 

Federal Farm Law Manual, 

A. E. Korpela.$7.50 

Farm Management, 

Black, Clawson, etc. 7.50 

The Old Country Store, 

Gerald Carson. 5.75 

Living on a Little Land, 

George P. Deyoe-'. 4,95 

Farm Management, 

R. R. Hudelson. 4.72 

Out of the Earth, 

Louis Bromfield . 4,0 ' 

Country Flavor Cookbook, 

Haydn S. Pearson.$3.50 

Farm Records and Accounts, 

John Norman Efferson. 4.00 

Successful Trapping Methods, 

Walter Chansler . 3.95 

For sale by The Rural New 
Yorker, 333 West 30th St., New York 
1, N. Y. (New York City residents, 
add 3% Sales Tax.) 



Prove It in Your Car 


as 



Did you know that your present spark plugs may be "stealing' 
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pnoowi... 

Read What Users Sayi 

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10.2O/O ACCELERATION GAIN .. . 

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AFTER “SPARK-O-MATIC” Spark Plugs 
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(LETTER IN FILE) 

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[, World's ONLY Plug with SIX 
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It's simple arithmetic—SIX Electrodes 
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life and over 600% More Spark Ac¬ 
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Now, instead of ordinary single elec¬ 
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in rapid 360° ROTATION. Normal heat erosion is 
spread around the entire circle and reduced because 
HUNDREDS of firing points share the load. The SIX 
sharp-pointed slotted electrodes deliver 600% more 
spark action than most ordinary plugs. Tested at 
60,000 volts, the spark is so hot it fires in oil & 
under HIGHEST COMPRESSION. 

2* ONLY Plug with AUTOMATIC 
Heat & Gap Control 

Only SPARK-O-MATIC will continue to deliver exact¬ 
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runs hot at low speeds to avoid fouling and cool at 
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3«D0UBLE self-cleaning Action 

Special hi-compression slotted electrodes design 
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This $2 value FREE. 
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Magnesium Catalyst de¬ 
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TRIAL 1N„ 
YOURCAR! 



114 E. 32 St,, New York 16, N. Y. 


NEWl-mmtr 

HI COMPRESSION BOOSTERS 

New Invention you get only with 
SPARK-O-MATICS-Special Hi-de- 
lectric Shields permit steady firing 
under HKJHER Compression—STOPS 
"flash-over," engine missing and 
humid weather voltage loss. "Keeps 
the electricity IN the plugs whero 
3t belongs." 



fPat. Pend.) 


ALMOUIST ENGINEERING,“TJopt. SP-3501 
114 E. 32 St., N. Y. 16, N.'V; 

RUSH postpaid^;_registered eels ATTK-IS^ 

MATIC Power-Plugs at $1.25 per plug (Set of 6, 
$7.50; Set of 8, $9.95). (Or send $1, balance 
C.O.D.) I v/ill test them for 10 days on FREE 
TRIAL. If not delighted. I’ll return them for 
full refund of my money! 

My Car is_Year-Model- 

TYPE OF DRIVING: OAVERAGE DSLOW DFAST 

«■ ^ 
NAME---- 

ADDF.ESS—- 

CITY. 


«Stale_ 


enclose □ Check □ Cash □ Money Order g 

'DCArERS V AGfNTs" WANfED “ " * " 


January 18, 1958 


9 










































































Published Semi-Monthly By 

Rural Publishing Co., Inc. 333 West 30th St., New York 1, N. Y. 
John J. Dillon. Publisher, 1899-1950 

EDITORIAL AND EXECUTIVE STAFF 
William F. Berohold, Editor and Publisher 
Jambs N. Bodurtha, Managing Editor 
William A. O’Brien, Business Manager 
H; 0. HARnwicK, Circul. Mgr. M. G. Kktks, Publisher's Desk 

Peter S. Lbpbra, Production Mgr; Persis Smith, Woman and Home 
H. B. Tcket B. K. Sommers 

C. 8. Platt B. L. Pollack 

Georoe L. Slate L. D. Tuket 

Donald F. Jones r. albrectsen 


SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

Fifty Cents a Year—Three Years for One Dollar 
Single Copy Fl-re Cents. 

. Foreign countries in the Universal Postal Union, tZ.OA. 


Entered at New York Post Office as Second Class Matter. 

“A SQUARE DEAL” 

We believe that every advertisement in this paper is backed by a respon- 
slble person. We use every possible precaution and admit the advertising ot 
reliable houses only. But to make doubly sure, we will make good any Toss 
to paid subraribers sustained by trusting any deliberate swindler, irrespon¬ 
sible advertisers or mislesuling advertisements in our columns, and any 
such swindler will be publicly exposed. We are also often called upon 
to adjust differences or mistakes between our subscribers and honest, 
responsible houses, whether advertisers or not. We willingly use our good 
offices to this end, but such cases should not be confused with dishonest 
transactions. We protect subscribers against rogues, but we will not be 
responsible for the debts of honest bankrupts sanctioned by the courts. 
Notice of the complaint must be sent to us within one month of the time ot 
the transaction, and to identify it, you should mention The Rural New- 
Yorker when writing the advertiser. 


Meats of the Future 

ECENT discoveries and developments in 
the preservation and improvement of 
quality in meats, through the use of extremely 
small amounts of certain of the antibiotics, are 
profound. The findings carry great potentia¬ 
lities and will probably revolutionize present 
methods of livestock production, processing and 
merchandising. They represent the greatest 
improvement in meat processing since the ad¬ 
vent of the refrigerator car, of canning, and 
more recently of quick-freezing. 

The initial research on the use of antibiotics 
for food preservation was conducted at the 
Canadian Government’s fisheries laboratory in 
Vancouver. By 1950 it had been found that the 
antibiotics — terramycin, Chloromycetin and 
aureomycin—were highly effective in increasing 
the keeping quality of fish. This was especially 
true with aureomycin. When used in dilutions 
as low as one part per million, the results were 
dramatic. The antibiotic was administered by 
mixing this small amount with flaked ice in 
which the fish were then packed. The treated 
fish carried so little of the antibiotic after 
cooking that 10 tons contained only an amount 
comparable to an average one day’s medical 
dose. 

Soon after these discoveries, investigators at 
Ohio State University began tests with the 
same antibiotics to observe their effect on pre¬ 
venting spoilage in meat. The method used 
was to infuse trace amounts of the antibiotic 
directly through the blood vessels of slaught¬ 
ered cattle while the carcass was still warm. 
Again the results were dramatic. The usual 
method of processing beef is to cool the meat 
quickly. The Ohio scientists kept the anti¬ 
biotic-treated beef at temperatures of from 75 
to 85 degrees F. for several days. At the end 
of this time, not only was the meat fresh and 
in good condition but, still more significant, 
when followed by cooling in the usual man¬ 
ner after being held at these high tempera¬ 
tures for two days, the meat was tender and 
palatable. A tough old cow was slaughtered, 
and one-half of her carcasss was treated with 
aureomycin; the other half was untreated. The 
treated cuts were tender and highly palatable, 
the untreated tough and of poor quality. 

Scientists employed by a pharmaceutical 
concern have conducted tests with terramycin 
in tropical countries. The antibiotic was in¬ 
jected into the cattle before slaughter. The 
carcass from the treated animals remained 
in excellent condition after being kept at 
temperatures up to 95 degrees F. for 48 hours. 
When used with ice on dressed poultry, 
aureomycin has kept meat fresh and tasty for 
six weeks under ordinary refrigeration. Used 
in volume, the cost is less than a fraction of 
a cent per pound. 

Commercial use of aureomycin-treated birds 
is now putting chicken on the dinner table 
tasting like fresh-killed poultry. Tests con¬ 
ducted by both government scientists and 
commercial firms show that the amount of 
aureomycin in the poultry meat is so small 


that it is completely lost in cooking. When 
the treated poultry meat was fed to people 
known to be allergic to aureomycin, no ad¬ 
verse effects were obtained. Similar tests are 
now being processed to ascertain the com¬ 
plete safety for other meats and foods. When 
approved and applied, the effect on the meat 
industry could be far-reaching. This, coupled 
with the use of tenderizing enzymes on range 
cattle and old dairy cows, may result in con¬ 
siderable reductions in grain growing with 
consequent increases in grassland farming. 

Farm Bureau Looks Into Eggs 

T was recently reported on this page that 
the Massachusetts Farm Bureau had en¬ 
dorsed the Fletcher Self-Control Plan for the 
pricing, merchandising and marketing of eggs. 
This was incorrect. Mr. Carlton I. Pickett, 
executive secretary, advises that the Massa¬ 
chusetts group recommended that, in view of 
the apparent merit of the Fletcher Plan, the 
American Farm Bureau Federation “examine, 
analyze and report on so-called ‘self-help’ pro¬ 
grams to the end that commodity groups may 
be given assistance in perfecting those which 
are practical.” 

As a result of this favorable action by the 
Massachusetts Farm Bureau, the American 
Farm Bureau Federation has authorized a 
study of all self-help poultry and egg programs. 

It is also good to report that NEPPCO is 
encouraging interest and discussion along the 
same lines. At the Boston Poultry Show, Janu¬ 
ary 22-25, NEPPCO is sponsoring a poultry get- 
together, the highlight of which will be a panel 
discussion on proposals for a sales program 
that will tie together all of New England’s poul¬ 
try and egg marketing organizations. 

These are all steps in the right direction for 
the salvation and ultimate prosperity of the 
poultryman. Only by frank and open dis¬ 
cussion can an adequate, fair-to-all plan be 
finally hammered out. 


“Ml/ Child Is Being Kidnapped^’ 

ONGRESSMAN Henry Reuss of Wisconsin 
^ was one of the sponsors of last year’s 
amendment limiting soil bank payments to 
$3,000 to any one farmer. Secretary Benson 
has construed this amendment to apply, not 
to each farmer, but to each farm, so that any 
farmer owning more than one farm could, by 
complying, receive $3,000 for each one of his 
farms. 

This does not agree with Mr. Reuss’ interpre¬ 
tation of his own amendment. The Wisconsin 
legislator insists that no farmer should receive 
more than the $3,000 maximum, regardless of 
the number of farms he owms. 

Suit has therefore been filed by Mr, Reuss 
against the Secretary to restrain any additional 
payments. There is serious legal question as 
to whether he, as the plaintiff, will sustain any 
direct injury from the operation of the soil 
bank law. Mr. Reuss believes that, as a tax- 
paper, he has a right to complain of the drain 
on taxpayers’ money. He also argues that, since 
he was a sponsor of the $3,000-ceiling amend¬ 
ment, “my child is being kidnapped.” 

The Congressman certainly has political 
courage. Let us hope he has enough of that 
virtue to carry his lawsuit through to the 
finish. 


Happiness Noiv! 

We often say, “Those were the happy days!” 
And these familiar words make it appear 
That happiness is distant, never near. 

And focused only by a backward gaze. 

Thorns thus are softened in the outer haze 
Of halos framing rosebuds bright and clear; 
Past troubles fade, and so do pain and fear— 
Past pleasures seem enlarged in memory’s 
rays. 

Why don’t we train our eyes so they will see 
Our wealth of joy while still the joy 
abounds, 

While all our present senses know delight? 
Let’s say, “Right now—this minute—I shall be 
Aware of pleasant feelings, sights and 
sounds, 

While adding to their sum with all my 
might!” 

— Russell Pettis Askue 


Farmers and Their Wells 

HAT all water wells and deep pits should 
be covered over to prevent the downfall 
of either man or animal has been almost 
axiomatic on the well-kept farmstead for years. 
But with abandonment of some farms and the 
transformation of others into residential areas, 
less attention seems to be paid to proper pre¬ 
cautions. All wells should be capped. The ex¬ 
perience of young Benjamin Hooper early last 
year down a dug well on Long Island should 
have been adequate warning to many. But re¬ 
ports of open wells are still regularly made. 
Just last month a Steuben County farmer lost 
a good heifer when it fell into a neighbor’s 
open well. Attention to keeping holes in the 
ground covered over and impenetrable is well 
worthwhile. It can save an animal, human 
limb — or life. 


There’s a Revolution in the 
Milk Business 

Enclosed is a check to renew my subscription 
to your magazine. I would like to take this oppor¬ 
tunity to thank you for the realistic attitude The 
Rural New Yorker is taking and has taken of 
the milk situation in the New York milkshed and 
in New York State. You seem to be the only farm 
publication which is either not intimidated or con¬ 
trolled by the dealers and co-ops. As dairy farm¬ 
ers, we wish to thank you and sincerely hope you 
continue your good work. 

When the whole truth on the milk situation is 
uncovered, I believe the farmers, who have felt 
that Hoffa is so bad, will then find out that the 
milk industry smells just as bad. Hoffa has been 
critized for demanding money from his members, 
but the Dairymen’s League is also demanding 
money from its members and is collecting it from 
every pound of milk they produce, and for what? 
To have capital to fight farmers. 

A lot of farmers are scared of the so-called sur¬ 
plus. Why? Because they have been told about 
it so often they think they have to believe it. 
Just what is called “surplus”? Every pound of 
milk they do not label for fluid milk is called 
“surplus” and they will admit they make the most 
money on milk that goes into manufactured pro¬ 
ducts. Why, then, is it “surplus”? Just another 
device to fleece the farmers. Actually there is a 
serious shortage of milk and there will continue 
to be until we are paid at least the cost of pro¬ 
duction. 

Another thing farmers are afraid of is that 
dealers can ship milk into this market from other 
markets. Where from? Every other market is 
paying more for their milk than we are getting— 
Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Washington and 
Boston, plus the “New York State cities. Yes, they 
might be able to secure a few tanks by paying 
higher prices, but not enough to help them much. 
In other words, every market where the Dairy¬ 
men’s League is not the controlling factor, farm¬ 
ers are getting more for their milk. 

Still another club held over farmers’ heads is 
that, if they do not stick with the co-ops, they 
will lose their market. Just try inkling to another 
milk company that you are planning to change 
markets and see how fast their fieldman will be 
there to convince you they would be a better 
market than the one you have. Does that sound 
as if you would lose your market? 

There’s a revolution going on in the milk busi¬ 
ness. It is and will be slow because it is difficult 
to admit even to oneself that something that 
stai'ted out to be for the farmer has failed so 
dismally, but once the blinders are ofi:, the truth 
is startling. A dream dies hard but fear and the 
truth will kill it. n. f. 

Cattaraugus Co., N. Y. 

Amen. — Ed. 


Brevities 

“God be merciful unto us, and bless us; and 
cause his face to shine upon us.” — Psa. 67:1. 

The national count of frozen-food locker plants 
early this year came to 9,894. New York Stale had 
209, Pennsylvania 262, New Jersey 51 and New 
England 154. 

Last year’s crop of certified seed potatoes w’^as 
11 per cent greater than in 1956, 29 per cent 
larger than average and the biggest crop on 
record. Some 42 per cent of the potatoes raised 
were Katahdins. 

At the start of 1957, total U. S. population was 
169.8 million; at end of year, 172.8 million — a gain 
of three million; with a birth every 7 I /2 seconds 
and one death every 20 seconds. It is presently 
estimated that the nation’s population will sur¬ 
pass the 200-million mark in the next nine years. 




10 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 





















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caterpillar’s D-4 crawler tractor is truly earth-moving. It also 
provides plenty of power to till, fertilize and harvest. 



The new 400 Super Diesel four-plow tractor of J. I. CASE has eight 
forward speeds, independent pto and pressure cooling. 


j5hN DEERE’S 1958 420 Row-Crop Utility tractor is especially easy to 
mount and operate. With Mower No. 9, it quickly lays alfalfa down. 









Efficient haymaking is just one job MlNNEAPOLIS-MOLlNE’s new 
445 tractor has particular capacity for on northeast farms. 



INTERNATIONAL’S new 330 Utility tractor provides two/three-plow 
power for most any farm task. There are 35 attachments foi it. 





^ow^owii yet'high clSiring is ALLIES ALMAS’'powerful new five- 
plow D-17. Gasoline or Diesel, it creates continous hydraulic pressure. 



The new 65 four-plow model of MASSEY-FERGUSON brings to large 
farms all the advantages of the weil-kuown Ferguson system. 


ford’s newly styled and more powerful tractors are in two/three- 
and four-plow classes. Powermaster 851 has five-speed transmission. 


January 18, 1958 


11 





















Latest research shows that 
high roughage feeding means 

Low Cost in Raising Calves 


By J. W. HIBBS, H. R. CONRAD and W. D. POCNDEN 


TifE of the major expense 
items in dairy production 
is the high cost of raising 
heifers for herd replace¬ 
ments. A large proportion 
of the total cost for such 
placements comes during 
six months, when most 


the first 

calves are being fed milk or milk 
products and liberal amounts of 
supplemented grain concentrates with 
limited amounts of roughage. 

In recent years research in calf 
nutrition at the Ohio Station in 
Wooster has been based on a study 
of factors involved in the develop¬ 
ment of early rumen (paunch) 
function. These studies have re¬ 
sulted in a high roughage consumption 
and a consequent low-cost system of 
raising dairy calves. 

In developing this system, nearly 
400 heifers and about as many male 
calves have been raised on different 
variations of high roughage feeding. 
It is now possible to make practical 
recommendations to dairymen for 
high roughage calf feeding which 
will materially reduce the costs of 
raising good, growthy, herd replace¬ 
ments using mostly home grown 
feeds. 


If desired, the hay can be chop¬ 
ped or coarsely ground through a 
three-fourths or one-inch screen, 
mixed with the grain (two parts hay 
to one part grain by weight) and 
the mixture fed free choice. This usu¬ 
ally results in a dusty mixture which 
can be made palatable by mixing 
with an equal weight of water and 
allowing the wet mix to soak be¬ 
tween feedings. 


High Roughage Consumption by 
Pellet Feeding 

Experiments now in progress are 
aimed at finding ways of making 
hay more readily eaten by young 
calves. The palatability or accepta¬ 
bility of hay for cattle and especial¬ 
ly young calves is closely associated 
with its physical characteristics. 
Coarse stemmy hay and harsh, over- 
dried hay can be rendered more 
palatable by chopping or grinding 


duvaniages must oe balanced against 


the added c.pst of grinding antj 
pelleting the hay and grain. The 
ultimate practical application of the 
already demonstrated advantages of 
pelleting roughage for certain classes 
of livestock (calves, lambs, etc.) 
must await the development of im¬ 
proved roughage pelleting equip-i 
ment. 


Provide Water, Minerals, Vitamins 


Fresh water should be provided 
at all times. It is especially im¬ 
portant that calves on high roughage 
diets be encouraged to drink water 
at the time milk feeding is stopped. 
In cold weather warm water offered 
after milk feeding will help. Salt 
and bone meal should be available 
in separate containers so that the 
calves are not forced to eat salt in 
order to get bone meal and vice 
versa. 


High roughage feeding for calves and 
heifers is not only less costly, it may 
result in eventual higher milk pro¬ 
duction, This Holstein weighed 335 
pounds at six months. 


Ten-thousand units of supplemen¬ 
tal vitamin A per day should be fed 
in the milk during late winter and 
early spring months to assure ade¬ 
quate intake of this important 
vitamin. 


Why High Roughage Feeding 


Rumen (Cud) Inoculations 


Two factors, other than lower cost, 
point to the advisability of high 
roughage feeding for dairy heifer 
calves; (1) Improved methods of pro¬ 
ducing, harvesting and storing high 
quality roughage on the farm; and 
(2) The evidence that is accumulat¬ 
ing from studies at Cornell Univer¬ 
sity, the University of Tennessee and 
other research institutions in this 
country and in Europe that heavy 
grain feeding of heifers may im¬ 
pair their future milk production. 

The high roughage . system in 
general involves limited milk feed¬ 
ing for about seven weeks, free- 
choice feeding of good quality, most¬ 
ly legume hay after three days of 
age and the use of a simple grain 
mixture limited to about one-half 
the poundage of hay being consumed. 
This encourages early development 
of the rumen, including both ca¬ 
pacity for adequate hay consump¬ 
tion and microorganisms needed for 
its digestion. In this system the re¬ 
quirements for high quality protein 
and vitamins of the B complex 
group are provided by the synthetic 
processes of the rumen microorgan¬ 
isms; this makes it possible for the 
calves to develop normally on a 
simplified ration. 


In most of our experimental work 
cud inoculations, using fresh, warm 
cuds from older cattle in the herd, 
were given each calf at approxi¬ 
mately two, three, four, five and six 
weeks of age. The inoculations were 
used and have been recommended 
on the basis that many of the kinds 
of rumen microorganisms, including 
both bacteria and protozoa, usually 
seen in the rumen of dairy cows can 
be established by no other known 
method during the first few months. 
Also, greater cellulose and protein 
digestibility of the feed. Changes in 
proportion of rumen volatile fatty 
acids and increased thiamin synthesis 
in the rumen of inoculated calves 
suggested that there may be ad¬ 
vantages in inoculating young calves 
on high roughage diets. 


coarsely through a %- or one-inch 
screen. 

Various experiments have shown 
that the free choice feeding of high 
roughage pellets made from coarsely 
ground alfalfa hay (Vs-inch screen) 
and a simple grain mixture (two 
parts hay: one part grain—pellets 
y4-inch diameter) increased growth 
and feed consumption, especially dur¬ 
ing the early weeks. Although cer¬ 
tain typical rumen microorganisms 
did not become established when 
high roughage pellets were fed, earli¬ 
er rumen function was obtained 
than when loose hay and grain were 
fed. 


Other advantages observed in high 
roughage pellet feeding during the 
first three or four months were: (I) 
Prevention of selective eating. (2) 
Simplification of feeding hay and 
grain in the desired proportions. 
(3) Reduction In labor. (4) Elimin¬ 
ation of waste. (5) Ease of adding 
microingredients such as vitamin 
supplements and antibiotics. These 


In the high rougnage pellet feed-i 
ing experiments we have carried out,; 
the milk feeding schedule indicated! 
in Table I was used. The high rough! 
age pellets were fed free choice to I 
four months of age. Loose hay and 
grain were fed after four months at 
a 2:1 hay to grain ratio, with a four- 
pound-per-day grain limit for Hol- 
steins and a three-pound-per-day 
grain limit for Jerseys. Holstein 
calves fed in this way consumed an! 
average of 427 pounds of high rough-: 
age pellets, 646 pounds of alfalfa hay, 
and 272 pounds of a simple grain 
mixture during the first six months. 
Total feed cost to six months in¬ 
cluding 466 pounds of milk was: 
$50.58 (16 cents per pound of grain). 
Final average body weight at six 
months was 410 pounds. Correspond 
ing feed cost for Jerseys was $33.65 
to six months with a final average 
body weight of 262 pounds. (Feed 
costs used were: Milk $4.50 per 100 
pounds, high roughage pellets $2.50 
per 100 pounds, hay $30 per ton, 
grain $3.40 per 100 pounds.) 

It is suggested that in practice high 
roughage pellets be fed free choice 
for only about eight weeks. At this 
age the ration can gradually be 
changed to loose hay and grain using 
the suggested grain feeding sched¬ 
ule to approximate a 2:1 hay to grain 
ratio. When this is done, hay should 
be offered free choice after six weeks 
of age. Early pellet consumption can 
be encouraged by placing a handful 
of pellets in the milk buckets after 
milk feeding. 


Variations in Feed Costs 


Considerable variation in feed cost 
to six months for calves raised on 
different systems results from differ¬ 
ent amounts of milk used and the 


Milk Feeding; Hay and Grain Feeding 


A suggested milk feeding schedule 
is indicated in Table I. In this 
schedule extra milk is provided dur¬ 
ing the first two weeks to help meet 
the high nutritive requirements dur¬ 
ing this period and thus allow the 
calf to get off to a vigorous start in 
life. 

Good quality hay, preferably soft 
textured second or third cutting, con¬ 
taining at least three-fourths le¬ 
gumes should be offered free choice 
after the third day. Always feed 10 
to 15 per cent more than the calf 
will clean up and change each day 
after the calf is eating about one- 
half pound daily. The refuse need 
not be wasted but can be fed to older 
cattle. Weigh or estimate frequently 
the amount of hay being eaten to 
help in the adjustment of grain feed¬ 
ing to a 2:1 hay to grain ratio. A 
suggested grain feeding schedule 
which will help in maintaining a 2:1 
hay to grain ratio is shown in Table 
II . 


Our data thus far indicate that cud 
inoculations do not result in in¬ 
creased growth or better perform¬ 
ance when good quality hay is fed 
in a 2:1 ratio with a simple grain 
mixture. Therefore, when good 
quality hay is available, cud inocu¬ 
lations can be omitted in the high 
roughage system as it has been out¬ 
lined. Research has indicated, how¬ 
ever, that inoculations may be bene¬ 
ficial when feeding poorer quality 
rouhage, when changing from high 
grain feeding to high roughage feed¬ 
ing, or when discontinuing prolonged 
antibiotic feeding. Dried rumen - 
preparations have been found to be 
of no value in establishing rumen 
microorganisms or in improving 
calf performance. 


Pushbutton 


Calf Performance 


Holstein calves fed on the high 
roughage system at the Ohio Sta¬ 
tion consumed an average of 350 
pounds of whole milk, 820 pounds of 
good hay and 350 pounds of a sim¬ 
ple grain mixture. Total feed cost 
was $39.75 to six months of age, or 
15 cents per pound of gain using 
current prices. Average body weight 
at six months was 369 pounds. Aver¬ 
age feed cost for Jerseys was $28.34 
and their body weight at six months 
was 237 pounds. 


About 40 per cent of the feed cost 
to six months was for whole milk. 
The use of a good milk replacer 
would further reduce the cost. 


12 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 






















cost and amount of starter used. 
Average cost for Holstein calves 
raised on the di’y starter system was 
$56.47 at the Ohio Station (23 cents 
per pound of gain) where 350 pounds 
of whole milk, 680 pounds of calf 
starter and grain and 380 pounds of 
hay were fed. 

Research on development of early 
rumen function and high roughage 
i feeding of calves is being continued. 
Sufficient evidence is now available 


to show that satisfactory herd re¬ 
placements or feeders for dairy beef 
production can be raised at lower 
cost using the high roughage system 
than with other available feeding 
methods. This is accomplished by de¬ 
veloping and taking fullest advantage 
of the calf’s inherent capacity to 
consume and digest large amounts 
of roughage and produce high quali¬ 
ty protein and B complex vitamins 
in the rumen. 



Table I — Whole Milk 

Feeding Schedule 


Large breeds 

Small breeds 


Days of 

(Holsteins) 

(Jerseys) 


age 

Ib./day 

Ib./day 


0— 3 

Nurse Dam 

Nurse Dam 


4— 7 

16 

10 

Feed one-half the daily amount at 

8—14 

12 

8 

each of two feedings (A. M. and 

15—21 

10 

6 

P.M.). Milk feeding should be 

22—28 

10 

6 

extended beyond 7 weeks if calves 

29—35 

10 

6 

are slow in starting to eat dry feed. 

36—42 

10 

6 

A good milk replacer can be substi- 

43—45 

8 

4 

tuted for all or part of the whole 

46—49 

4 

2 

milk after the second week. 

50— 

0 

0 



The Art of Making Butter 


If art is but attention to small de¬ 
tails, then making good butter is an 
art. Much of my life has been spent 
on farmlands where farm butter¬ 
making is common practice. That 
their small, well-kept herds make 
excellent butter is a matter of pride 
with the farmers and farm women 
here. 

When, soon after our marriage, we 
moved to our own farm, tied to the 
back of a farm wagon loaded with 
furniture a cow went with us. After 
we bought more cows, we marketed 
some fluid milk, but we have always 
made butter on the farm for the past 
45 years. 

At first, milk was set in pans 
placed on racks, and then cream was 
skimmed into stone jars to be kept 
in a cool place until enough was col¬ 
lected for churning. Later, an innova¬ 
tion was introduced in the form of a 
tin tank called a Cooley Creamer. 
Milk in this was diluted with a small 


amount of water, and, when the 
cream had risen to the top of the 
milk, the latter was drawn off by a 
spigot at the bottom. A long inset 
of glass in the side of the tarJt 
showed when only cream remained. 

It is a far cry from our old primi¬ 
tive methods to today’s mass pro¬ 
duction of butter, but the same essen¬ 
tial care must still be used to pro¬ 
duce the fine fresh flavor of country 
butter. Absolute cleanliness, careful 
timing, healthy cows, and sanitary 
surroundings are chief requisites. 
Off-flayors can result from delayed 
churning — especially in Winter, ill¬ 
ness in the herd, and cows grazing in 
pastures where leeks and other strong 
weeds grow. 

For me there is ever satisfaction in 
warm fresh milk, thick cream, new 
buttermilk, fragrance of clover, 
friendly animals—the farmlands and 
their golden butter. 

Potter Co., Pa. Mae C. Smiih 



Table II — Grain Feeding Schedule 


Age 

(Weeks) 

Large breeds 
(Holsteins) 
Ib./day 

Small breeds 
(Jerseys) 

Ib./day 


0—4 

0.0 

0.0 


5 

0.5 

0,3 


6 

0.7 

0.5 


7 

0.9 

0.7 

Suggested Grain Mix* 

8 

1.2 

0.9 

Ground or cracked shelled corn — 

9 & 10 

1.6 

1.2 

500 lb. 

11 & 12 

2.0 

1.5 

Ground or crimped oats—365 lb. 

13 & 14 

2.4 

1.8 

Soybean oil meal—125 lb. 

15 & 16 

2.8 

2.0 

Iodized salt—10 lb. 

17 & 18 

3.2 

2.2 


19 & 20 

3.6 

2.4 


21 & 22 

4.0 

2.6 

*In some cases the regular 

23 & 24 

4.0 

2.8 

dairy herd mix would be satis- 

25 & 26 

4.0 

3.0 

factory. 


The above amounts of grain fed during the week indicated will approximate a 2:1 hay 
to grain ratio based on the average calf of each breed, when loose hay is fed free choice. 
Adjustments should be made for extra large and small calves so that a 2:1 hay to grain 
ratio IS maintained, with a 4 lb,/day grain limit for large breeds (Holsteins) and a 
3 Ib./day grain limit for small breeds (Jerseys). 


Research on Tranquilizers 


It has long been recognized that 
both direct and indirect effects of 
stress on livestock result in mone¬ 
tary losses every year. Among the 
more common causes of these up¬ 
sets are such conditions as loading, 
shipping and unloading; improper 
handling while in transit; getting 
used to new feed lot or grazing en¬ 
vironment; the weaning period; cas¬ 
tration and dehorning; and mixing 
strange groups of animals. 

At a recent meeting of scientists 
and veterinarians in Kansas City, at¬ 
tention was focused on methods of 
correcting livestock stress effects by 
the use of tranquilizers. In demon¬ 
strations held at the sponsor’s labora¬ 
tory farm, a tranquilizer drug was 
injected into the livestock by using 
a special syringe propelled by a modi¬ 
fied air rifle. Unruly and excited 


animals soon became quiet from the 
effects of the drug, with no apparent 
adverse after-effects. 

It is emphasized that treatment 
of this kind should be administered 
only by a veterinarian. The use of 
tranquilizer drugs in feeds is still 
in the process of experimentation and 
study. Its general use will require the 
approval of the USDA, as well as 
that of the U. S. Food and Drug Ad¬ 
ministration, in order to make sure 
there is no residual carry-over of the 
drug when such animal products are 
consumed as food. 

Most of the large pharmaceutical 
firms in the United States are now 
producing tranquilizers for human 
use. Some of the drugs in more com¬ 
mon use include Diquel, Serpasil, 
-Atarax, Paxital, .Miltown, Thorazine, 
Equanil and Raudixin. h. w. d. 





MILE^of walking and washes clean aatomaticallh 


LET THE SURGE EARN ITS OWN 
WAY—24 MONTHS TO PAY 

Planning help for your Surge Siphon Parlor or Stan¬ 
chion pipe line is FREE. Ask your Surge Dealer. 
Get latest information on the SURGE EASY PAY¬ 
MENT PLAN. 

Only $5 down installs a Surge Bucket Milker. 
FREE demonstration on jmur farm. 


Touch the ELECTROBRAIN pushbutton dial and 
mur Surge pipe line washes shining clean — by 
tself—inside its entire length. At the same time, 
t washes the teat cups, too! 

Mother and the kids and YOU are happier when 
he old scrub brush and milk-lugging chores are 
[one ancl forgotten. The steps it saves count up to 
nany miles a year. 

Transparent breaker cups let you see genuine 
•urge Tug & Pull ... milking faster, holding teat 
ups safely down, stripping clean, saving lots of 
une and stoop work. Tug & Pull goes after that 
xtra profit pint per cow! 

Your SURGE SERVICE DEALER is a factory- 
ained SERVICE SPECIALIST. His special 
•URGE SERVICE TRUCK is equipped to handle 
ny service problem. He has a planning kit to help 
[OU lay out your new Pipe Line Milker. And he 
^lls on every Surge owner regularly to be sure the 
urge keeps on milking cows faithfully 730 or more 
'uies a year. 

Copyright 1958, Bobson Bros. Co. 


Th e Mi 


iABSON BROS. Co. off New York 

842 W. BELDEN AVENUE, SYRACUSE 1, N. Y. 


January 18, 1958 



















































BADGER NORTHLAND INC. 

BOX 31, DEPT. R KAUKAUNA, WiS. 


, Less 
Blade 


BLADE TILTS, 

TABLE REMAINS LEVEL 

All cast iron and steel construction, 
precision ground cast iron table. 
Price includes massive cast iron and 
mitre gauge and patented motor 
drive that fits any motor. Cross cuts, 
rips, bevels, mitres, dadoes, cuts 
compound angles — everything^ ex¬ 
pected of saws costing four times 
as much. 

Send check, or M.O. C.O.D.'s ac¬ 
cepted with $1 deposit. Act Now — 
while supply of 1957 model lasts. 

SPECIAL BARGAIN 
DURING MODEL CHANGEOVER 

We start soon on 1958 models. Dur¬ 
ing model changeover you can have 
this 1957 model at a saving of $15. 
Send check or M.O., or sent C.O.D. 

Free IQ-Day Trial Money-Back Guar. 

Try this famous saw 10 days. If 
you ore not satisfied that it does 
the work of any tilt arbor saw re¬ 
gardless of price return for imme¬ 
diate money back guarantee. 

SENT EXPRESS COLLECT 
We reserve right to refund money if 
stock is exhausted 

AMERICAN MACHINE t TOOL CO. 

ROYERSFORD 5, PA. 


Protect yo«r farm and family against power 
failure NOW with a Tractor-Driven Gener¬ 
ator. No extra engine to buy. Operates 
from tractor or gas engine. Supplies power 
for lights, heating system, water pump, 
milk«r. brooder, milk cooler, etc. 

20 YEAR WARRANTY 


LOWEST IN COST 


kr 






fon 


fOLDCR 


Z’ooaa 


newton, IOWA 


TRSATtNe 

MASTITIS 

SPECIFY 




Now by direct Mail 
12cc disposable Syringe 
Containing: 100,000 
I Units Penicillin, 250 mg 
' Dlhydrostreptomycin, 

60 mg. Neomycin 
As low as 


$3.50 pen pozcN 


Purchasing Mastitis Ointments 
at wholesale. _ .. „ „ 

CARLART PHARMACAL CO. 
BOX 97, NEW CITY, N. Y. 


COWPOX* 

Ringworm 

Blu-Kote dries up cowpox le¬ 
sions, controls secondary infec¬ 
tion*. Promotes clean, rapid 
healing of teat sores, skin 
sores, abrasions. Is Germicidal 
and Fungicidal. It stays on. 
SI at drug and farm stores or write: 
H. W. NAYLOR CO. • MORRIS, N.Y. 


When you write advertisers mention 
The Rural New-Yorker and you’ll get 
a Quick reply and a “square deal.” See 
guarantee editorial page. ; : : 


Shrinks Hemorrhoids 
New Way Without Surgery 

Science Finds Healing Substance That Does Both-— 
Relieves Pain—Shrinks Hemorrhoids 


New York, N. Y. (Special) - For the 
first time science has found a new 
healing substance with the astonish¬ 
ing ability to shrink hemorrhoids 
and to relieve pain—without surgery. 

In case after case, while gently 
relieving pain, actual reduction 
(shrinkage) took place. 

Most amazing of all —results were 
so thorough that sufferers made 


astonishing statements like “Piles 
have ceased to be a problem!” 

The secret is a new healing sub¬ 
stance (Bio-Dyne*) —discovery of a 
world-famous research institute. 

This substance is now available in 
suppository or ointment form under 
the name Preparation H.* At your 
druggist. Money back guarantee, 

•Keg. U. S. Pat. Off. 


. 

This electrically-operated, portable 
crop dryer on the Wilcox Farm, 
Horseheads, Chemung Co., N. Y., 
drives moisture from corn in the crib 
and next Summer is moved to dry 
hay in the mow. 

services. Now they need as much as 
300. A dairy-barn may need 200-am¬ 
pere service. 

The buildings on the Wilcox farm 
were wired years ago when electri¬ 
city was used only for lighting, and 
the wires used were adequate for 
that. But farm help became scarce 
and electrical equipment was install¬ 
ed to take the place of hired hands. 
Every time a new piece of electrical 
equipment was installed, Mr. Wilcox 
had to string more wires to the build¬ 
ing that housed it, or run the risk 
of overloading the circuits already 
installed. Overloaded circuits were 
dangerous and uneconomical. 

He wanted to increase the size of 
his dairy and farm business. He real¬ 
ized the work that electrically opera¬ 
ted equipment could do for him and 
the time that it would save, if he 
could rely on electricity for power. 
So he decided to modernize his farm 
electrical system. He knew that it 
would be a substantial investment 
and that it should be well planned. 
So he turned to a farm service rep¬ 
resentative of the local public utility 
company to help him. 

Mr. Wilcox used the “power pole” 
system. The wires come from the 
company’s transformers to a central 
pole located about half-way between 
the barn and the farm house. The 
meter is located on this pole. From 
it, wires of the right size for the 
load they are to carry go to the dif¬ 
ferent farm buildings. The system is 
grounded at the pole by three 10- 


All the electric current for the Wil¬ 
cox Farm comes into and goes out 
of this central power pole. The farm- 
rate meter is at its base, and the 
system is grounded here. 

the mow over the cows. Then he 
moved it to the crib and dried sev¬ 
eral hundred bushels of not-too-ma- 
ture corn with it. Outlets conveniently 
placed make this possible. His dairy 
feed is custom ground. A feed dealer 
brings the grinder to the farm and 
grinds the home-grown grain and 
mixes it with high protein supple¬ 
ment. There are several outlets where 
he may “plug in.” 

The new system is safe. Mr. Wil¬ 
cox knows that the wires are ade¬ 
quate. The circuits are properly fused. 
No wires are getting hot because of 
overloads. And it is economical. Large 
-sized wires carry electricity effi¬ 
ciently. Motors work to capacity. He 
is getting the use of all the electricity 
he pays for. 

The new system is expandable. 
Wires from the pole to the buildings 
are large enough to carry all the 
electricity that will be needed to oper¬ 
ate the equipment that will be used 
there. While additional circuits may 
be needed within the buildings, these 
can be connected at the panel. 

Most of Mr. Wilcox’s wiring prob¬ 
lems have been solved. 


New York 


E, C. Grant 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


MODEL CHANGEOVER SALE! 


Please send the following literature 
Barn Cleaners Q Silo Unloaders Q 
Bunk Feeders □ Student □ 


Name 


Address 


City 


State 


Here is a dairyman who has 
solved many a problem with 

A Modern Electrical System 


Stanley Wilcox, dairyman of Horse- 
heads, New York, is pleased with the 
modern electrical system he has in¬ 
stalled in his farm buildings. His 
lights are bright. His motors start 
easily and work to capacity. He has 
convenient outlets for large and small 
appliances operated by electricity. 
Electricity is doing more work for 
him than ever before. The work is 
done efficiently and economically. 
Electricity helps him milk his cows, 
unload his silo, pump his water, ele¬ 
vate his hay and dry it in the mow. 
It heats the water in the milk house, 
and cools the milk. It grinds his 
feed. Best of all, he is getting the 
use of all the electricity that he is 
paying for. None is used up or wasted 
by inadequate wires. 

Farmers are using more electricity 
today than ever before. The consump¬ 
tion on farms has more than doubled 
in the past 10 years. Larger ampere 
capacities are needed when many 
electrical appliances are used. Years 
ago, homes might use 20-30 ampere 


foot metal rods driven their length 
into the soil. The wires are large 
enough to carry all the electricity 
used now or all that will be needed 
in the future. Within each building 
they lead to a main switch and to 
a panel. The sv/itch can shut off all 
the electricity going into the build¬ 
ing. From the panel the required 
number of circuits leads to the various 
pieces of equipment. Each circuit, 
of course, has its own switch and 
fuse box and is wired according to 
its needs with the right size of wire. 
New circuits may be installed by con¬ 
nections made at the panel. 

There are several circuits in the 
dairy barn already. The milk house 
with its lights, hot water heater, and 
milk cooler are on one. The silo 
unloader has a circuit by itself. An¬ 
other circuit provides for some of 
the lights in the stable and for the 
milker. Another provides lights in 
the mow and outlets for the hay 
drier and hay elevator. 

It is the same in other buildings. 
The circuits in the house provide 
for lights and the numerous electri¬ 
cal appliances used there. Circuits 
in the garage provide for lights, a 
welder, and outlets for “plugging in” 
a crop drier to dry corn in the crib 
attached. 

Last year Mr. Wilcox used his 
portable drier to dry bales of hay in 


INTRODUCES THE 

WORLD’S STRONGEST 


BARN CLEANER CHAIN 


YOU CAN SEE THE DIFFERENCE 
Bigger, heavier and 50% stronger this 
nevr BADGER Chain has 50% more Nvear- 
ing surface at wearing points than the 
present popular Badger chain. Full center 
webb design eliminates any stretch. 
Pioneers in 4-way flex chain, Badger now 
has made the greatest advance barn 
cleaner chain design. 

BADGER HAS: 

• The largest pins 

• The heaviest forgings 

• The biggest flat bar 

• New positive paddle location 

• Forged paddle link 50% 
stronger 

• Rivets double swedge for 
larger heads 

• Smooth construction for clean¬ 
liness 

• Designed for the largest barns 

Manufacturers olso of the fomous 
Badger Silo-Unloader, Bunk Feeder 


14 
































































This yearling of Green Meadow 
Farms, Bareville, Lancaster Co., Pa., 
was grand champion Hampshire ewe 
at the International Livestock Show 
in Chicago last month. 

Beef Cattle Course At 
Cornell Jon. 27-31 

Feeding, marketing, new develop¬ 
ments in cattle breeding, a slaughter- 
cattle grading clinic, fitting, showing, 
appraising, commercial production, 
and meetings with national breed 
association representatives will high¬ 
light the seventh annual Beef Cattle¬ 
men’s Short Course to be held at 
Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y., 
the week of Jan 27. 

A cattle clinic will give opportuni¬ 
ty to class cattle both on foot and 
in carcass. Students will not only 
grade cattle but also estimate dress¬ 
ing percentages and loin-eye areas. 
The last two days of the course will 
feature discussions, demonstrations 
and practice on getting cattle ready 
for shows and sales, plus special ses¬ 
sions for commercial producers. 

All beef producers—experienced or 
beginner, purebred or commercial — 
should find the program worthwhile; 
ladies are welcome. The course is 
sponsored by the Department of Ani¬ 
mal Husbandry at Cornell in coopera¬ 
tion with state beef associations. In¬ 
struction will be by more than 30 
persons from the N. Y. State College 
of Agi’iculture, breeders, association 
representatives and livestock market¬ 
ing personnel. For application forms, 
programs or other details, get in 
touch with your county agricultural 
agent or write to M. D. Lacy, De¬ 
partment of Animal Husbandry, Wing 
Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 


Raynek’s Berry Book — Every 
berry grower and gardener will find 
this illustrated catalog interesting 
and helpful. It gives reliable infer 
mation on all leading varieties of 
strawberry plants and tells which 
varieties are best suited for particu¬ 
lar areas. It covers a wide variety of 
nursery stock, including blueberries, 
asparagus, fruit trees, ornamentals, 
nut treet, etc. It’s free. Write Rayner 
Bros., Inc. Salisbury 15, Maryland. 

Dibble’s Seed Catalog — If you 
grow farm crops, you will want a 
copy of this free farm seed catalog. 
It is beautifully illustrated and shows 
many varieties in natural coloix It 
gives an accurate description of all 
popular varieties of corn, oats, po¬ 
tatoes, grass seed, etc. recom¬ 
mended for the Northeast. This book 
contains the kind of information 
practical farmers want and need. It 
will be mailed without charge. Ad¬ 
dress Edward F. Dibble, Seedgrower, 
Box B, Honeoye Falls, N. Y. 


“What, Shovel Silage?” — There’s 
little question that getting down si¬ 
lage is one of dairy farming’s most 
time- and energy-consuming opera¬ 
tions.There is satisfaction in handling 
good feed produced on the farm—the 
cattle relish it— but it’s work merely 
to climb the ladder, and then there’s 
the toil and sweat of forking the 
stuff out and down. Frozen silage, 
poor light and the ever-present hazard 
of poking the tines of the fork into 
the foot complicate the task. The 
automatic silo loader, either at top 
or bottom, is one of the truly valuable 
new pieces of dairy farm equipment. 
Many claims about mechanical pro¬ 
gress on American farms may be 
plenty exaggerated—you’d think there 
was no work to farming—but silage 
unloaders certainly do cut down on 
back-bending labor. Badger Northland 
Inc. has published a complete book¬ 
let on silo unloaders and bunk feed¬ 
ers. Sample layouts are shown, and 
there are many valuable equipment 
suggestions. Copies are available 
from Badger Northland Inc., Kaukau- 
na, Wis. upon request. Its contents 
are applicable to both dairy and beef 
operations. 




SIR WILLIAM FARM 

Hillsdale, Columbia County New Ifork State k 

ANNOUNCES ITS 

FIFTH INTERNATIONAL 
BRED GUT and BOAR SALE 

Februaryl,1958-1:00 P.M. aHI)eFarm_ 

We wijl be selling approximately 60 bred Yorkshire and ^rkshire Gilts ard to 
Yorkshire and Berkshire Fall Boars which by sale time should be L*arMe 3 t 
Certified and tested for Feed Conversion. 

For the first time in the U. S. A. straight Irish imported Gilts will be offered tor sale 

SI^Ia'Pn 

We are featuring the breeding of the following outstanding boars: 

YORKSHIRES ponag^anie crusader 13th 205554, Triple Irish Grand Charr^t on- 

Marshall 5th 185802, proven Doub^ S Grand 

onampton. 

SW Primroses’ King David 44L 189470, straight Scotch. 

High Regard 793731 National Champion Boar of 1957 and full brclher 
I International Grand Champion Barrow: 

Cookham BriUsh Baron 24th 792090, Imported English 
Whipling Valiant 7th 800918 
Prestegemere 1021st CMS 739226 
Quality Donn’s Superb 3rd CMS 749437 

^lsld®at''thl‘^sa®e.®'’®‘'‘^' cost deliveries of all animals pur- 

Vi Supper Party on January 31, 1958 at 7:00 P. M.. E T at 

rntertainment.^^®'”"®'°" "vhere we are providins 

Write for reservations and catalog: 

P. O. BOX 266, HILLSDALE, COLUMBIA CO., NEW YORK STATE 

Telephone: Fairview 5 7700 
Manager: RUDY G. OSWALD 


BERKSHIRES 


DOGS 


REGISTERED 

Border Collie Pups 

Pure bred Border Collie* 
make work easier for the 
farmer. They gather and 
drive eattle, sheep, hogs 
and pen poultry. 

MALYDA FARM 

ROUTE I. BOX 224 

LIBERTYVILLE, ILL. 



BEEF CATTLE 




5\\©^ REGISTERED HEREFORDS 


Accredited Herd 




BREEDING STOCK AT ALL TIMES 
tewf* Breeding Lorry Dow. Broedins 


SPORTSMEN 


Worlds Largest Kennels offers 500 Bird Dogs 
Straight Cooners, Combination Hounds, Beagle Hounds, 
Rabbit Hounds, Small Squirrel Dogs, Fox and Deer 
Hounds. Catalogue free. SMOKEY MOUNTAIN 
KENNELS, CLEVELAND, TENNESSEE 


* * F A R IVI L A N D S ” 

COOPERSTOWN, N. Y. 

'*'7 Websfet Tilton 




Pad. Smooth Fox Terrier Pups “to"ecu".' 


MINIATURE COLLIES: Puppies and Grown Dogs 
MELODYLANE KENNELS, Chestertown, N. Y. (3068) 


- SPRINGER SPANIEL PUPPIES - 

THE BEST COST LESS 
A. LUETTGENS, R. D. I, FREEHOLD, N. J 


- REGISTERED ST. BERNARD PUPPIES - 

READY, ALSO IDEAL FOR CHRISTMAS 
W. E. YODER, MEYERSDALE, PA. Phone: 4-7664 


- A. K. C. ST. BERNARD PUPPIES - 

J. E. THOMAS, Cambridge Springs, Pa. Phone: 2725 


BEAGLES 15 months $15: Toy Manchesters $30 & $38 
A.K.C. Mrs. Kimpel, R. D. I, Seneca Falls, N. Y, 


ENGLISH SHEPHERD PUPS: From good heel 

driving parents. Males $15.00 and females $12.00. 
SYDNEY PETERS, CALLICOON, N. Y. 53-W-t 


Coming Meetings and 
Shows 

Jan. 20-24 — Short Course, Dairy 
Cattle Breeding, Univ. of Connecti- 
cut Storrs 

Jan. 21-24—N. Y. State Horticult¬ 
ural Society Annual Meeting 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Jan. 22-23 — Massachusetts Dairy 
Farmers’ Seminar, Univ. of Mass., 
Amherst. 

Jan. 26-Feb. 1 — New Jersey Farm¬ 
ers Week, Hotel Stacy-Trent, Tren¬ 
ton, N. J. 

Jan. 27-30—Artificial Insemination 
Short Course, Univ. of Connecticut, 
Storrs. 

Jan. 27-31—Beef Herdsman’s Short 
Course, Cornell University, Ithaca, 
N. Y. 

Jan. 28-29 — 26th annual Long 
Island Potato Growers’ Convention, 
Riverhead, L. I., N. Y. 

Feb. 6-7 — New Hampshire Poul¬ 
try Health Conference, University of 
New Hampshire, Durham. 

Feb. 6-7 — Livestock Conservation 
Short Course, University of Connec¬ 
ticut, Storrs. 


N. Y. City Health Department 
studies indicate that milk cooled and 
stored on the farm in refrigerated 
bulk tanks can be collected every 
other day without impairing its 
quality. In view of these facts, the 
Department is raising no objection 
to the every-other-day collection of 
bulk tank milk. 

January 18, 1958 


Angus Assn. Approves 
Herd Type Ciossificofion 

The board of directors of the 
American Angus Assn., St. Joseph, 
Mo., voted recently to set up a 
national herd classification some¬ 
what like that which has been in 
effect for beef cattle in New York 
State for almost a decade. During 
1958, Angus breeders are expected 
to be able to participate in the volun¬ 
tary program. The Aberdeen-Angus 
breed of beef cattle thus becomes the 
first to classify for type; the dairy 
breeds have been doing it for some 
years. Each animal chosen for classi¬ 
fication by its owner will be evalu¬ 
ated according to a score-card simi¬ 
lar to that which illustrated Prof. 
J. I. Miller’s article on the subject in 
the Sept. 7, 1957 issue of The Rural 
New Yorker. An Angus herd will 
have a uniform, unbiased rating 
which may be used to measure pro¬ 
gress over the years. The ratings can 
be compared among individuals, 
families, descendants and thus serve 
as a basis for both selection and cull¬ 
ing. 

P S Troubador, the Shorthorn 
steer who was shown by Pennsylvania 
State University to grand champion¬ 
ship at the 1956 International Live¬ 
stock Show, has been invited to ap¬ 
pear at the 1958 Russian All-Union 
Agricultural Exhibition in Moscow. 
He and other Shorthorns from Cyrus 
Eaton’s Acadia Farms, Northfield, 
Ohio, where Troubador was bred, will 
take off by air next May. 


GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES: AKC Reg. Pure 
white. Also colored, pedigreed. Reasonable. ROBERT 
H.H. SNYDER, R. D. 2, NAZARETH. PENNA. 


A.K.C. PUPPIES WELSH TERRIER, DACHSHUND 
Vets. Certificate Temporary Inoculation 
OAKCREST KENNELS, HUNLOCK CREEK, PA. 


BEAUTIFUL REGISTERED ENGLISH SHEPHERD 
PUPS from real heel driving parents; born low heel 
strikers. Males $15.00; Females $12.00 

$1.00 Extra for Registration Papers. 
JOSEPH WINKLER, HANKINS, NEW YORK 


HORSES AND PONIES 


— SPRING STALLION SHOW — 
AND 

DRAFT HORSE AUCTION 
AT THE 

INDIANA STATE FAIR GROUNDS 
SELLING 85 HEAD OF 
PERCHERONS and BELGIANS 
MARCH 4th and 5th 1958 
For Catalog Write — 

C. O. HOUSE, ARCADIA, INDIANA 


THINK ABERDEEN ANGDS” 


WHEN YOU THINK OF BEEF CATTLE — 
For more information on Angus contact- 
„ PROFESSOR JOHN I. MILLER, 

York Angus Association 

WING HALL, Cornell University, ITHACA, N. Y. 


Reg. Polled Herefords 

BULLS READY FOR - SERVICE 
^ “PEN AND BRED HEIFERS 

Modern Bloodllnat. T. 8. and Bangs Accrsditsd Herd 

__BATTLEGROUND FARMS 

FREEHOLD, NEW JERSEY PHONE: 8-2224 


ANGUS 


Performance tested, big. fast growing typo of gurt 
R^duest folder and data. 

WYE PLANTATION. OUEENSTOW N. MARYL AND 

FOR SALE: Eight Bred Young ABERDEEW- ANGUS 
COWS, good families and top blocdliner.. Bred to 
top Bulls. Also, 10 ANGUS HEIFERS ready to 
breed. Contact — EDWARD O’BOYLE, or 

DALE FLETCHER, PINE PLAINS, MEW YORK 

SWINE 

HAMPSHIRES: MEAT TYPE BOARS and GILTS 

Slaughter and Production Records Available 
CEDAR POINT FARMS. BOX 718. EAST ON, M D. 

MAPLEHURST DU ROCS: April Boars & Gilts. Fall 
Pigs. Either Sex. R. F. Pattington, Seipio Center. N.Y. 

fRYE~j57RculAF! reg. Hampshire swine 

Since 1934. C. LUTZ, Middletown 1. Maryland 


REGISTERED BERKSHIRE HOGS 


SALESMAN 

WANTED 

We have an opening for a 
capable salesman who has had 
experience selling to farmers. 
Must have car and be willing to 
work steadily. The man selected 
will be given an exclusive terri¬ 
tory and liberal commission that 
will allow him to earn an 
attractive income on a year- 
round basis. 


STATE AGE, EXPERIENCE 
AND REFERENCE. Address 

Circulation Manager 

THE RURAL NEW YORKER 
333 West 30th Street, 
New York 1, N. Y. 


The Lean Meat Hog. Our Certified Meat Sire. Flight- 
master. Pigs and Mature Breeders for rale. Vaccin¬ 
ated, Healthy and Sound. Write for Free Literature 
SHENANDOAH FA RMS. MIDDLETOWN. VA. 
— A COMPLETE DISPERSAL SALE — 

50-Head of Chester White Hogs-50 

From the farm of a World War Veteran No. I, 
who served in foreign country. Bred Gilts, Herd Sows 
Herd Boars, Fall Boars and Gilts. All top individuals! 
The meat type of the Pennsylvania Tep Show and 
Breeding Herd of Registered Hogs on FRIDAY 
'=99 P. M. Four miles East 
of Middleburg, Penna at the Middleburg Auction 
Sales, Inc., on Route 522 between Selinsgiove and 
Middleburg, Penna., Snyder County. 

Visitors Always Welcome. Come One Come Alt 
Meet Me at the 1958 Farm Show. 
GROVER C. DORMAN 

P- P- U _ MIDDLEBUIRiG. FENNA, 

RABBITS 



-i H i <--1 


FULL TIME BUSINESS 
OR WELL. PAID HOBBY 

.Thousands of RaisersNeededto Meet the 
I Tremendous Demand for MEAT—FUH— 
^LABORATORY- BREEDING STOCK 

jKnow the Facts 

endCare.Markcta.Ete. 
M ■ tU? [ Plus Bollstm. 26 Cints. Wo Are AsscK-iaiioa 

AMERICAN RASaiT 

SHEEP 

Let SUFFOLK SH EEP Increase Your Farm Income. 

BOOKLET and BREEDERS’ LIST FREE 

Write NATIONAL SUFFOLK SHEEP ASSOCIATION 
BOX 324-NY._COLUMBIA. MISSOURI 

Corriedale Shee§t/ 

Are highly productive of both mutton and wool. Buy 
a CORRIEDALE ram. You will be surprised and 
delighted with results. Breeder’s list on request: 

AMERICAN CORRIEDALE ASSOCSATION, 

BOX 108-V. COLUMBIA. MISSOURI 

AUCTIONEERS 


LEARN AUCTIONEERING, Term Soon. Free Catalog. 
REISCH AUCTION SCHOOL, MASON CITV., IOWA 


EYE GLASSES by MAIL As low as ^1- 


WRITE for FREE 
CATAIOG with 14 1 
UNS SAMPU CARPI 

Thouionds of 
Coftomers 
Est. 1939 


QUALITY READING—MAGNIFYING OR ‘ 
BIFOCAL GLASSES FOR FAR AND NEAR 

ADVANCE SPECTACLE COMPANY, Inc. 

537 S. Dearborn St., Dept.BTn Chicago 5, Illinois 


“BACKWOODS JOURNAL” 

$1 YEAR, SAMPLE lOt). OLD FORGE 2, N. Y. 

15 








































































































WHEN . . . 

ORDINARY CORSETS 
WILL NOT DO! 


FOR THE SMALL, MEDIUM, 
LARGE OR HEAVY FIGURE HERE 
ARE SOME IMPORTANT FACTS. 


SPRI 


i n 

' w 





Some women realize—other do not—that there 1 b 
a vast difference in the purpose and design, be¬ 
tween "an ordinary corset" and a Protective 
Supporting Garment with "built In" figure control. 
Many women FEEL that their particular "figure 
problem" Is so difficult, that in order to obtain 
proper protection—they must necessarily sacrifice 
style. II you are one who believes in this fallacy, 
may I suggest that you write me at once at 
W. S. Rice, Inc., Womens Division, Dept. 1003 O, 
Adams. N. Y.. for revealing descriptive literature, 
showing also our Corsets and Bras on live models. 



Model 351, shown above, with special front de¬ 
velopment and corset back, trims your figure by 
gentle "uplifting” pressure that "holds up” ex¬ 
cessive fat or heavy, sagging abdominal muscles, 
that "ordinary corsets" can hardly be expected to 
control. Request for illustrations and full infor¬ 
mation on this and the other Garments plus full 
details of our new Installment plan will be sent 
you free. Write W. S. Rice, Inc., Womens Division, 
Dept. 1003 G, Adams, N. T., without delay. 


Agnes S. Rice, 

(DIRECTOR OF DESIGN) 



f UKE 

noss 

SERVED wnw 
sausage/ 


America’s 

No.1 

Sauerkraut 


SEND FOR . 

FREE Recipe Booklet 

Write: Empire State. Pickling Co. 

Dept. N, Phelps, N,Y, . 





Fresh as a daisy side-buttoning frock with pointed collar, the merest of sleeves. 
Sizes: 12, 14, 16, 18, 20; 40, 42. Size 14, 34-in. bust, 3% yds. of 35-in.; Vz yd. contrast. 25c. 


8484 & 8485. Dainty puffed sleeve frocks in big ’n little sizes. 8484 is in sizes 10, 12, 
14, 16, 18, 20. Size 12, 32-in bust, with sleeve, 5% yards of 35-inch. 8485 is in sizes 3, 
4, 5, 6, 7, 8 years. Size 4, with sleeve, 2% yards of 35-inch. Two patterns, 25 cents each. 


8178. A softly round¬ 
ed yoke is flattering 
to the not-so-tall wo¬ 
man. Use contrast if 
you like. Sizes: 12V 2 , 
141/2, I61/2, 18y2, 2OV2, 
221 / 2 , 241 / 2 , 261/2. Size 
141/2, 35 bust, short 
sleeve monotone, 3% 
yds. of 35-in. 25 cents 




8178 

1 2 '/a- 26/2 \ 

8184. This slimming sheath is topped 
with a clever button-trimmed bolero. 
Sizes: 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20. Size 12, 
32-in. bust, dress, 3y4 yards of 35-in.; 
bolero, 1% yds.; 2 yds. contrast. 25c. 


8485 

3-8 yrs. 


8181. Wear this attractive twosome 
through the Summer! Sizes: 34, 36, 38, 40, 
42 44, 46, 48. Size 36, 38-in. bust, dress, 4”8 
yards of 35-inch; % yard contrast; bolero, 
2^8 yards. 25 cents. 


8187. A well fitting all occasion style that 
pares the inches for the mature figure. Sizes: 
« 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48. Size 36, 38-in. 

bust, 5 yards of 39-inch. 25 cents. 


WAKE UP 
RARIN’ TO GO 

Without Nagging Backache 

Now! You can get the fast relief you need from 
nagging backache, headache and muscular aches 
and pains that often cause restless nights and 
miserable tired-out feelings. When these discom¬ 
forts come on with over-exertion or stress and 
strain — you want relief — want it fast! Another 
disturbance may be mild bladder irritation fol¬ 
lowing wrong food and drink — often setting up 
a restless uncomfortable feeling. 

For quick relief get Doan’s Pills. They work 
fast in 3 separate ways: 1. by speedy pain-reliev¬ 
ing action to ease torment of nagging backache, 
headaches, muscular aches and pains. 2. by their 
soothing effect on bladder irritation. 3. by their 
mild diuretic action tending to increase output 
of the 15 miles of kidney tubes. 

Find out how quickly this 8-way medicine goes to 
work. Enjoy a good night’s sleep and the same happy 
relief millions have for over 60 years. Ask for new, 
large size and save money. Get Doan’s Pills today I 


_SELL LARKIN PRODUCTS. EARN CASH - 

Famous toiletries, household supplies, etc, 
WRITE FOR CATALOG. 

LARKIN CO., DEPT, RN, BUFFALO 10, N. Y. 


8184 

10-20 


cctAJ J CA\#C make your OWN DRESS, 

SEW ond SAVE blouse, suit. Etc. 

Write for free samples of fine woven and printed rayons, 
cottons, etc. Satisfaction guaranteed Unusual values. 
ALEX RODKIN, 179 Linden Blvd., Brooklyn, N. Y. 


,8151 

- 3 yrs. 


8151. Tiny little clothes for infants 
are fun and sew-easy. Sizes: 6 
months, 1, 2, 3 years. Size 1, dress, 
1% yards of 35-inch; slip, % yard; 
romper, % yard. 25 cents. 


8128. Nothing like a smart new 
classic to herald the new season. 
This one is a half-size special. 
Sizes: 12 V2, 14 V2, 16 V2, 18 V2, 20y2, 
221 / 2 , 241 / 2 , 261/2. Size 141 / 2 , 35-in. 
bust, 5 yards of 35-inch. 25 cents. 


Please print your name, full ad¬ 
dress, pattern number and size 
desired. Send orders to The Rural 
New Yorker, 333 West 30th St., 
New York 1, N. Y. 



16 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 







































































































January Changes 

HuiTying to do her chores, she left a row 
Of dripping garments hanging in the gloom, 

Too tired to heed the threat of coming snow, 

Glad to be through and in a lighted room. 

That night it rained, and as it rained, it froze. 

Till every twig was cased in ice. She found 
Her clothesline sagging, and the grotesque clothes 
A row of scarecrows dragging to the ground; 

She wrenched them free and brought them from the rain, 

A crackling horde to turn to clothes again. 

Arkansas — Mary Thro Rauth 


Timely Dishes 

Now that there is more space in 
the freezer, due to much that came 
out for the holidays, here are dishes 
for quick meals that I put down for 
freezing at this time of year. 

Steamed Chocolate Pudding 

Use 2 sq. (2 oz.) unsweetened 
chocolate; 1 egg; 1/2 cup sugar; 1 
tablespoon melted shortening; 1 tea¬ 
spoon vanilla extract; 1 cup sifted all 
purpose flour; 1 teaspoon baking 
powder; Vs teaspoon salt; 1/2 cup 
milk. 

Melt chocolate over hot water. Beat 
egg until frothy, add sugar gradually 
and keep beating until smooth. Add 
melted chocolate, cool melted short¬ 
ening and then add the vanilla 
extract. Sift dry ingredients together. 
Add alternately with milk to batter. 
Beat smooth after each addition. 

Pour into a greased 1-qt. mold or 
pudding pan, cover tightly, place in 
large kettle, add boiling water up to 
the two-thirds mark. Cover kettle 
tightly and steam over a low heat 
for 11/2 hours. Add more boiling 
water if necessary. Unmold and serve 
hot or freeze. Serve with whipped 
cream, ice cream or hard sauce. 
Serves four. 

To defrost: Let pudding stand at 
room temperature 4 to 6 hours. Re¬ 
heat over boiling water for 45 
minutes. 

Chili Pizza 

Use 2 tablespoons salad oil; 1 small 
onion, chopped or diced; Vs lb. lean 
hamburger; Vz clove garlic, crushed; 
% teaspoon salt; 1/2 cup canned red 
kidney beans; 1 package pizza mix; 
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese; 1 teaspoon 
chili powder (2 teaspoons if you like 
it “hot"). 

Heat salad oil in frying pan. Add 
onion, cook 2 minutes, then add ham¬ 
burger and garlic. Cook until meat is 


A Lacy Centerpiece 



for the Freezer 

lightly browned and crumbly, stir¬ 
ring often with a fork. Add season¬ 
ings, beans and pizza sauce, plus 1/2 
can water using the sauce can as 
measure. Simmer slowly over low 
heat for 5 minutes and set aside. 

If you are going to use it right 
away, prepare the pizza dough. 
Spread in pizza pan and cover with 
chili mixture. Sprinkle with cheese. 
Bake at 425 degrees F. for 20-25 
minutes until crust is brown and fill¬ 
ing bubbly. Beans may be omitted 
if preferred. 

If sauce is to be frozen, partially 
cook and pack into freeze containers 
and freeze. To defrost, let stand in 
room temperature from 3 to 4 hours, 
then use as usual. 

Those Wonderful Cook¬ 
ing Calendars! 

In no other year, says one Connec¬ 
ticut lady, has The Rural New 
Yorker s engagement calendar been 
more useful and attractive. It is the 
Calendar of American Cooking with 
fine recipes presented for each week 
of the year opposite generous space 
to note engagements and other plans 
or events. Photographs of historic and 
scenic American sites make most ap¬ 
propriate decorations. The recipes 
are truly taste-tempting and practical; 
they are all worth a try. Presented 
in accord with the seasons, they have 
special appeal; thus, corn bread and 
pecan stuffing for turkeys are given 
for the week of Thanksgiving, and 
Iris Morey’s wedding cake is for the 
first spring week of June. We still 
have a few of these fine booklets for 
sale. We feel sure they will be used 
and enjoyed all year long. They are 
in the best of American taste. 

For sale by The Rural New 
Yorker, 333 West 30th Street, New 
York 1, N. Y., at $1.50 per copy. (N. 
Y. City residents add five cents sales 
tax.) 



Loves to dance and to win cooking contests 

Teen-age Cook from New Jersey 
•W^ins Three Prizes at County Fair 


Those pretty ribbons make little 
friend Kathryn Ensminger want 
to grow up to be a prize-winning 
cook, too! All three ribbons belong 
to Barbara Mundy — her first 
awards! She won them last year 
at the Middlesex County Fair. 

Barbara, who lives in MiUtown, 
New Jersey, says that dancing is 
her hobby. And she’s certainly on 
her toes when it comes to cooking, 
too. Of course, Barbara gives good 
ingredients some of the credit for 
her cooking success . . . and she 
always uses Fleischmann’s Active 
Dry Yeast- “It’s fast and easy,” 
she says. “And keeps right in 
mother’s cupboard.” 


Start the New Year right—vou 
women who bake at home—and get 
Fleischmann’s Active Dry Yeast. 
It keeps for months you know, right 
on your shelf. And it’s fast rising, 
easy to use. You’ll enjoy serving 
the new “Yeast-Riz” dishes, too- 
made with Fleischmann’s Active 
Dry Yeast. There’s a recipe on 
every “Thrifty Three.” When you 
buy Fleischmann’s you’re buying 
the yeast prize-winning cooks de- 



Another Fine Product of Standard Brands Inc. 



NEW PETITE MARIGOLDS 


■HARRIS SUDS 

1958 All American Selection 


-- new awari, ClOUDie 

French Mangolds. The mound-shaped plants are 
cP ^ spread of 10" and as manv as 

50 flowers open at one time on a single plant. 
The mixture contains yellow, gold, orange and a 
Harmony type — yellow centers edged with single 
overlapping petals of mahogany-red. The separate 
colors are available also. 


SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG 

W JOSEPH HARRIS CO., Inc. 

14 Moreton Farm, Rochester 11, New York 

1958 CATALOG JWW Amdif 



2594. Simple crochet stitches radiati 
irom a center design give the effect of 
^heel lor a handsome doily for hall 
dining room table. Complete crochet diri 
tions. 

2594 — just 25 cents — mailed 
Yorker, 333 West 30th Stre 
■New York 1, N. Y. 


January 18, 1958 


How to Cherish a 
Jerusalem Cherry 

Next to the poinsettia the Jeru- 
selem cherry, perhaps, comes second 
in popularity during the holidays. It 
is also an ideal decoration when we 
celebrate the birthday of the father 
of our country, and is ever a cheerful 
winter plant. 

When I was a child, it was a favo¬ 
rite in our home until the youngest 
decided to have a taste with un¬ 
pleasant results. After that Mother 
eliminated cherries at our house, but 
they still retain a soft spot in my 
heart. 

If you are one who enjoys the 
Jerusalem cherry, be careful to save 
the precious red berries. Then when 
springtime comes, plant the seeds in 
your garden and later transplant to 
gaily painted pots. 

When next Christmas comes 
around, you will have many lovely 
potted cherries, heavy with fruit, to 
share with your neighbors and 
friends, or to sell from your home. 

North Carolina Eulah Taylor 


Roads in winter mornings often 
look dry and people go without 
rubbers. By noon, the roads can be 
mud. That’s the way colds follow in 
the heels of wet feet. 

17 



HOW TO HAVE 


IONS BEAUTIFUL NAILS 


IN 9 MINUTES! 


AI LAST! New scientific natural nail compound duplicates and 
BUjlDS OUT ugly short nails. Not a polish. Not artificial paste-on’s, 
but a miracle home treatment to lengthen and strengthen your nails. 
^**^*^^ broken nails quickly... SMOOTHS jagged ends easily. 


...... L . . Now it's easy 

to transform broken, split or bitten nails into the long 

.m'a'I.J you've always longed for. 

OLAMA nail is not a polish, not artificial nails to 
paste on. but a scientific formula of liquid plastic that 
duplicates and builds out your regular nail so well it 
cannot be detected. Apply directly to fingernails easy 
as nail polish. Discovered by modern medical science. 
It hardens to a clear hard surface ... and looks and 


Complete 

$ 2.98 


Kit. 


ONLY 



even feels like your own nail. What's more. CLAMA 
NAIL Ifrows together with your regular nail like one 
You can cut. clip, file and apply polish-and it makes 
nails so wonderfully strong, they won't break or tear, 
irnagine—SO strong it can't break or tear even washing 
dishes in hot soapy water, cleaning house, doing laun¬ 
dry, playing piano. typing. And these nails are so 
sturdy, nail biters can't chew them or bile them off. 

I SPECIAL DISCOUNT COUPON—SAVE S2 

I GLAMA NAIL, Dept. RNY-2 

II PARK AVE., NEW YORK 


16. N. V. 


Not a fatso nail • • • but a **treatntont’* 
that builds up short or broken nails fast! 


, .complete 512.98. CLAM.k N.VIL kU* 

I YT ' at reduced price of Jl.oo plus lOf tax for 

■ ¥! ■J' Money-back guarantee. Include 

I Liquid. Nail Forms, Applicator Brush, etc. 

I 
I 


Name. 


Address. 


Town.Zone... .SUte. 


J 


















































A 


SHREDS 

FINER 


CDDCAhC 






That’s why more farmers buy 
BIl2£ l££^ spreaders 

SHRED FINER SPREAD WIDER LAST LONGER 

. , . because they have . . . because they have strong, sci- ...built to rigid 
blade-like U-teeth, entifically designed, replaceable standards after tor- 
triple staggered to paddles to slice manure and deliv- ture-track and on-farm 
give finer shredding. er a wider, more uniform pattern, testing. 


125-ibHj). PTO 


95-bu. PTO 


95-bo. 


70-bu. 


75-bu. 4-wheel 


See a New Idea spreader at your New Idea dealer’s 
Or tvrite for free literature 

farm equipment CO. division DISTRIBUTING CORP. 

Dept. 399, Coldwater, Ohio 


CHAMPION-BERGER 
ROTARY SNOW PLOW 


Throws Snow 
50 to 70 Feet 

Will clear reads in minutes . . . eliminates 
snow banks for redrifting. Anybody 
with a snow problem write today for 
complete details. Manufactured by: 

Volley Implement, Inc. 
Worscaw^_ New York 

Distributor for New York 
and New England: 

EASTERN MACHINERY CO., INC. 

P. O. Box 162. Eastwood Station 
Syracuse, New York. 


/<ffi 


STEEL AND ALUMINUM BLDGS 
I -poR ALL PURPOSES 

SEaiONAL UTILITY SLOOS. 
AND GARAGES 

I Easily iricteil •Oaick Diliviry 
SAvDBd MywiMn*Saa< tv FoMv 

JOHN COOPER CO. 

304 2nd St., Hackensack, N. J. 
(DEALERS WANTED • 


CEN-PE-CO scientificially correct 
lubricants and Motor Klenz, the 
modern fuel improver, guarantee 
safe, economical operation for 
heavy duty trucks and tractors. 


SOLD DIRECT TO YOU BY i 
YOUR LOCAL REPRESENTATIVE. \ 


Cientral Petroleum Cp. 

C|evelan4^phi6 • Walcott, Iowa , 


MAPLE PRODUCT 
PRODUCERS 

Send for information on Lambs l^est 
closed tubing sap gathering system. Fjve 
years in use. Equipment less expensive 
than any other system. Cuts sap gather¬ 
ing labor to most nothing. 

Many Dealer Openings Available. 

A. C. LAMB & SONS 
LIVERPOOL, NEW YORK 


Farmers Week at Tren¬ 
ton^ N. J./ Jan. 26-Feb. 1 

Annual meetings and discussions 
of New Jersey Farmers Week get un¬ 
der way this year in the Hotel Stacy- 
Trent in Trenton at 11 a.m. on Sun¬ 
day, Jan. 26, when the N.J. Fur 
Breeders Assn, will have its annual 
meeting. On Monday, United Milk 
Producers of New Jersey will meet, 
and so will the State Board of Agri¬ 
culture, New Jersey Florists, Farm 
Bureau, and the Fair Assn. On Tues¬ 
day, the Market Masters will assem¬ 
ble, and G. L. F., Christmas Tree 
Growers, N. J. Cooperatives, and Co¬ 
operative Farm Credit will also meet. 
The State Board of Agriculture will 
have its annual convention. On Wed¬ 
nesday, the Vegetable Growers con¬ 
vene and so does the N. J. Soil 
Conservation Society; there’s the 
Grange’s spelling bee and executive 
committee meeting, the Homemakers’ 
meeting, the Field Crop Improvement 
program during the day, and Farm 
Equipment Dealers’ and Golden Egg 
dinners at night. On Thursday, the 
30th, the turkey growers of New Jer¬ 
sey, and the Potato Assn, will both 
meet and eat. Livestock and Dairy Day 
will be Thursday, and N. J. Nursery¬ 
men will also convene. There’s a 
horse and pony dinner, and the Bank¬ 
ers Assn, meeting, too. On Friday, 
the State Horticultural Society sits 
in both vegetable and fruit sessions; 
FHA will gather and so will the 
Farm Electrification Council. The 
15th annual convention of Eastern 
Farmers Union is on Friday, when 
sheep breeders also meet. On Satur¬ 
day, rabbit and cavy breeders con¬ 
vene, and so do Jersey Goat Assn, 
members. Special attractions of the 
week include featured talks by spe¬ 
cialists in various agricultural fields. 
Detailed programs for Farmers Week 
are obtainable from Mr. Fred Jack- 
son, Division of Infomation, Depart¬ 
ment of Agriculture, State of New 
ersey, Trenton. 

New Milk Solids Testing 
Kit 

The U. S. Department of Agricul¬ 
ture has developed a portable kit to 
test the percentage of solids in fluid 
milk. Used in conjunction with the 
Babcock test for butterfat, it em¬ 
ploys a lactometer which deter- 


Eesulxr Butternut 
Butternut 


— Baby 


HARRIS SCEDS 

The Gardner - The Cook - The Family 
AIL "GO FOR” BABY BUTTERNUT 

Remarkably productive, earlier than the regular, 
resistant to borers, good keeper. . , 

■Rflkp cut SCOOP ovit the few seeds in, 
end, add butter and salt and serve, whole family 

will appreciate the delicious sweet taste, the meaty 
texture, and the ‘‘ease of handling. 

SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., INC. 

13 Moreton Farm, Rochester 11, New York 

1958 CATALOG nowAeaclif 


'' i 1—— W i twmmi-' w 

This is the portable kit the USDA 
has developed to test milk for its 
percentage of solids. 

mines specific gravity and which re¬ 
quires only about four ounces of 
milk at a 102-degree temperature. 
While another more complicated test 
for solids has been perfected at the 
University of Wisconsin, the simple 
new USDA test is believed to be suit¬ 
ably precise; it is of the same de¬ 
gree of accuracy as the Babcock test. 

Because consumer and industrial 
interest has been increasing in the 
solids-not-fat portions of milk, the 
new test may impose changes on 
milk pricing and production. Among 
the compounds included in the non¬ 
fat portion of cow’s milk are lactose, 
casein, albumin, sugar and calcium, 
phosphorus and other minerals. 


highly | 
effective » 
against 

MASTITIS 


HANFORD'S 


Selecta^ 

Conforming with latest 
government regulations. 


Separately packaged tips 
to prevent cross infection. 

Accurately metered 6cc 
doses in each syringe. 

Now, a faster, easier method of treat¬ 
ing mastitis! The 4-shot SELECTA 
syringe contains 24cc of a high-potency 
antibiotic formula that is a medically 
proved specific for the usual mastitis- 
causing bacteria. Snap-off plastic tabs 
accurately measure four 6cc doses. 

Each 24ce contains Each 6 cc contains 

400,000 units... Procaino Penicillin G... 100.000 units 

400 mo..Dihydrostreptomycin base as sulfate. 100 mg. 

200 mg.Neomycin base as sulfate.50 mg. 

400 mg.Sulfathiazole. 100 mg. 

400 mg.Sulfanilamide. 100 mg. 

See and try SELECTA at your dealer's or write 

ANFORD'S 

»U.S. Pat. No. 2,76‘l.981. 

G. C. HANFORD MFG. CO. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 


If you wish to be anybody nowa¬ 
days, you must dare some crime that 
merits banishment or imprisonment. 
— Juvenal, Satires, Sat. I, L. 73. 

18 


Some of 
the reasons 
why-UNADILLA 

1. Wood has 10 times the insu¬ 
lation value of masonry. 2. Wood 
is not affected by silage acids. 3. 
Wood seals—holds in valuable juices. 

4. Unadilla’s selected, full thickness 
wood staves are knitted into one sturdy 
unit by patented steel lock dowels. 5, 
Unadilla has extra heavy front lugs for 
heavier silage loads. 6. All adjustments 
made from safe built-in “Sure-Grip, 
Sure-Step” ladder. 7. Pitching is easier 
—opening is always at silage level due 
to Unadilla’s time proven, continuous- 
opening doorfront. 8. Factory Creosote 
Treating adds years to the life of your 
Silo. 9. Unadilla erects quicker and 
easier, and at lower cost! 

SEND FOR FREE CATALOG 

UNADILLA SILO COMPANY 

BOX C-118, UNADILLA, N.Y. 


UNADILLA SILOS 


ADD YEARS of LIFE 

To your Masonry or Steel Silo 

UNA-LINER 

(Dowelled; Factory-Creosote Treated) 

For far greater insulation and acid resistance 
Writs lor Free folder Unadilla Silo, Box C-118, Unadilla, N.Y. 


PKOnCT YOUK CROPS 


SPRAY Low-Co*t Mogic Orel® 
Repetlenl. Creoles barricade 
ogoinsi Doer Also Beavers, V/ood- 
chucks, Sheep, Skunks ond Roccoons 
in some cases. 

Odor no! offensive (o humons. 

BUY NOW! Locally, or order direct frorr> 
State College Laborotories, Stole College, Pa 


Novr 

Repellent 
Available, 
Write for info. 


PRODUCT OF STATE COLLEGE LABORATORIES * P.O.Box 492, State College, Po. 

- FACTOR^ PRICES 

ON THE NATION’S MOST COMPLETE LINE OF 
WATER BOWLS. STALLS, PENS. FEED TRUCKS, 
FARM COOLING TANKS. GIRTON MFG., 

COMPANY, MILLVILLE. PENNA. 

THE RURAL NEW YORKER 




























































































CuH Beans for Cows 

I am thinking of feeding cull beans 
that I can buy for $20 per ton to my 
dairy cows. I can cook 600 pounds for 
about 30 cents plus a half-hour’s 
labor. The beans are about 20 per 
cent protein and four per cent fat. 
Would it be advisable to feed grain, 
too? What kind? I am feeding good 
corn silage and clover hay that got 
wet once. w. e. 

Livingston Co., N. Y. 

Cull field beans may be fed to 
dairy cows with good results if 
cooked and properly supplemented. 
You could feed four to 10 pounds per 
day on a dry basis. After cooking, 
this quantity would weigh at least 
50 per cent more. Adding hominy, 
corn and cob meal, ground barley or 
ground oats pound for pound of dry- 
bean weight would give a 17 per cent 
total protein grain mixture. This is 
plenty high enough for feeding with 
clover hay and corn silage. Adding 
two pounds of hominy for each 
pound of beans would make a concen¬ 
trate mixture of about 15 per cent 
protein and 3.5 per cent fat. This 
would also be adequate for use with 
the roughage you have. Either grain 
mixture is economical; it is palatable 
as the cows become accustomed to 
it. 

Cull field or kidney beans actually 
have an average analysis of 23 per 
cent total protein, 1.4 per cent fat 
and 78 pounds of T.D.N. per hundred 
pounds. 


Pig Records 

Will you please furnish us with 
information as to where we can ob¬ 
tain printed forms for keeping rec¬ 
ords on hog production, viz., feed 
consumption, number of litter, 
weights, and so on? h. f. b. 

Pennsylvania 

I have not been able to find any 
source of forms for keeping records 
on swine production. It does seem 
that feed companies would have 
them, however, and it is suggested 
you write to some large midwest 
ones after inquiring locally. Sow 
testing, of course, calls for getting 
the number and weight of newborn 
pigs and their weight at weaning 
time. You can add the information 
on feed consumed and rate of gain up 
to marketing weights. Most pig men 
make up their own set of forms to 
suit their own particular situation. 


Why Does Sheep Shed? 

Can you tell me why one of my 
sheep is shedding? She is losing it in 
large quantities. Is it natural for 
them to shed like this? j. h. 

New York 

If the wool is not clipped off or 
shorn each Spring, it will tend to 
break off, or shed. This is probably 
what is causing the problem. If you 
can get someone to shear your sheep 
each Spring, it will not occur. Should 
there be a skin h'ritation or sores 
where the wool comes off, the prob¬ 
lem is serious and would warrant 
calling the veterinarian. 


Horse Hos Scrotches 

My daughter’s Palomino horse has 
what is known as scratches; its heels 
are cracked. The horse has had the 
condition for about two years. Even 
though I have tried just about every 
recommended treatment, the cracks 
and^scabs persist. He has had enough 
penicillin to cure an elephant, but 
it’s done no good at all. While his 
appetite is excellent, he has lost 
weight and is a mere shadow of his 
former self. I treat him every day 
now with grease, oil and medicine 
in the form of a liniment. If he seems 
better for a few days, the trouble al¬ 
ways soon comes back. Do you or 
any of your readers know what I can 

January 18, 1958 


do to really help this horse? We 
would like to cure him. b. s. m. 

You are doing about all that can 
be done. Try to keep the heels dry, 
and cover them with an ointment, 
such as zinc oxide; it may be neces¬ 
sary to bandage the heels. Once a 
week wash the area with a mild soap; 
then dry thoroughly and apply more 
ointment and bandages. 


Molasses Too Sticky for 
Hammer Mill 

I would like to mix stock molasses 
into my feeds as I grind them in the 
hammer mill. Can you tell me where 
I should make the entry and also how 
large the pump would need to be? 

Pennsylvania w. j. r. 

I doubt the feasibility of introduc¬ 
ing molasses into the hammer mill. 
Molasses is added to ground grains in 


mixing bins, or it is sprayed on the 
feed as it drops past molasses jets. 
There is the possibility of adding 
dried molasses to your grist, but it 
is more costly; the entire bag must 
be used because molasses powder 
picks up moisture very readily. 

Unless your operation is quite 
large, you probably cannot justify 
the expense of a feed mixer that has 
a means of adding molasses to a feed 
mix. 


Worts on Cottle 

Can you tell me what to do for 
warts on our steer? He has some on 
the top of his neck and he rubs 
against them until they bleed, w.k.t. 

Warts on young cattle usually dis¬ 
appear of their own accord even 
though they are caused by a virus. 
They are infectious. A vaccine has 
been developed that will help to con¬ 
trol them where many animals are 
infected. You might try tincture of 
iodine or daily application of sweet 
oil or castor oil on the individual 


steer. Collodion containing salicylic 
acid has been beneficial in some 
cases. Your veterinarian has other 
appropriate preparations that could 
also be helpful if the wart is particu¬ 
larly annoying to the steer. If the 
latter is true, it would, of course, cut 
down on his growth and gains. 

R. Albrectsen 


Good Livestock Books 


Feeds and Feeding, 

F. B. Morrison .$9.50 

Bovine Mastitis, 

Little and Plastridge .9.00 

The Stockman’s Handbook, 

M. E. Ensminger .8.50 

Breeding Better Livestock, 

Rice and Andrews .. 7.00 

Beef Cattle, 

Roscoe Snapp . 6.50 

Introductory Animal Science, 

W. P. Garrigus .6.50 

For sale by The Rural New 


Yorker, 333 West 30th St., New York 


J.) x« xuxjx \p/Aty ri^siciculSt 

add 3% Sales Tax.) 



How would you feed a BEST OF BREED? 


The modern Holstein Friesian is the result 
of improvement through years of selective breed¬ 
ing. Bloodlines, of course, are important but prop¬ 
er diet has helped in breed improvements. Modern 
feeding programs provide more nutrition than 
the ancient pastures of Prussia where this 
breed had its origin. These modern economical 
feeding programs are possible because new feed 
ingredients are available. Dairymen no longer 
must depend on local crops for complete feeding 
programs. 

Florida Citrus Pulp is a modern dairy feed 
made from the peel and pulp of fresh citrus 
fruit. The pulp is pressed and dried to produce 
a palatable feed. A recent experiment with 58 
cows showed that Pulp, stored over a period 
of months, was still palatable and accepted by 
the cows. It is fed as a bulky carbohydrate con¬ 
centrate and can replace as much as fifty per 
cent of the g rain requirements. 


Recent tests at the New Hampshire Station 
in Durham showed that when two separate 
groups of milking cows were taken off twice-a- 
day grain feeding and put on a one-feeding-of- 
citrus-pulp and one-of-concentrates schedule, they 
showed no decline in milk yield. Florida Citrus 
Pulp contains trace elements and proven milk 
stimulating factors. It is high in digestible Nu¬ 
trients [T.D.N.]. Morrison’s latest total digestible 
Nutrients for Florida Citrus Pulp at 74.9 per cent, 
are greater than the 68.5 per cent found in 
ground oats. Feeding tests prove that Citrus Pulp 
contributes to good skeletal development and a 
glossy hair coat. 

Whether you feed a Best of Breed or a high 
production grade herd, you can feed Florida 
Citrus Pulp with confidence on a year around 
feeding program. Investigate Florida Citrus Pulp 
—make your feeding program modern! 


Write for your copy of the booklet 
about Florido Citrus Pulp — gives 
complete analysis and feeding in-;] 
structions. Write to: 




P.O. BOX 1459 • WINTER HAVEN • FLORIDA • DEPT. A 

SUNSHINE FEED FOR 

Reproduction of animal illustration, suitable for framing, available on request at no charge. 


1 


19 










































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supply of pellets and man-sized silhouette target. 

Try 10 Day Free Trial 
Try it for 10 days free. If you are not com¬ 
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Kush order now. Simply send $1.9S plus 25 cents 
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BARGAIN (GUN) CO., Dept. RNY-1 

ONE PARK AVE., NEW YORK CITY 16 


natural 

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Made from your old one... 



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MAGNIFYING GLASSES 



foa FOLKS OVER 40 


NOW.—magnifying lenses for elderly folks who 
don't wear glasses regularly, who do not have 
astigmatism or diseases of the eye, and who have 
difficulty reading newspapers, the Bible and doing 
fancy work. It’s no longer necessary to struggle and 
aquint with an old-fashioned magnifying glass which 
has only one lens, because Precision Magnifying 
glasses bring you a magnifying lens for each eye and 
help stop eye-strain and discomfort. Permit restful 
reading hour after hour like you never did before. 
Try them at home on a five day trial plan that leaves 
no room for doubt. 

PRECISION MAGNIFYING GLASSES 
A Blessing for Elderly Folks. 

Lenses are scientifically (not Rx) ground and 
polished, then fitted Into a frame of simulated zylonite. 
Truly they add to your looks, and. for reading pur¬ 
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anteed. Best order a pair today. 

SEND NO MONEY 

Just mall name, address and age. On arrival pay 
postman only $4.00 plus C.0.0. postage. Wear them 5 
days, then. If you aren’t more than satisfied return for 
refund of purchase price. If you remit with your order, 
we ship prepaid, same guarantee. Order from: J 

PRECISION OPTICAL, Inc. 

Dept. 449-A Rochelle, III. 


-DAY OLD and STARTED CHICKS- 

Mt. Hope and H. & N. Stock foundation. Blood- 
tested. AH our own breeders. No eggs bought. 
WRITE FOR LOWEST PRICES. 
PELLMAN’S POULTRY FARM 
W. S. PELLMAN, Prop., Box 53. Richfiald, Pa. 
Telephone; Richfield 4351 


PEAFOWL; BLUE, WHITE. BLACK SHOULDERED 
1957 Pairs $25: 1956 Pairs $35; 1955 Pairs 
A. H. CHAMBERS. Maple Lane Farms. Kingston. N.Y. 


1080 EGGS 
secret and 
bulletin. 


EVERY HEN. Why not learn the bio 
j LAYERS nearly 5 years? Get free 
IE. RN-7. QUAKERTOWN. PA. 


RACING HOMER 
Chickens $5.00 Pair. 
BEDFORD ROAD. 


PIGEONS: $2.00 
WILLIAM 
CUMBERLAND, 


Pair. Game 
MEDERS. 
MARYLAND 


20 


The Chick Comes First 


Make selection of replacement stock the 
thorough-going business it must be for 
success with next Fall’s laying flock. 


By D. R. MARBLE 


lERE can I best buy my 
chicks? Commercial poultry- 
men and small flock owners 
ask this question of them 
selves, their county agents, 
feed dealers, neighbors, 
even their wives. The prob¬ 
lem is important to small hatchery- 
men, too; they are interested in 
locating best reproduction stock for 
their customers. This question of 
locating good chicks is in many re¬ 
spects more difficult today than it 
was five or 10 years ago. But in one 
respect, at least, it is simpler; ran¬ 
dom sample egg-laying tests now sup¬ 
ply a great amount of information 
about the different strains. This was 
not available 10 years ago. 

Many folks cannot resist high-pres¬ 
sure selling. A decade ago, poultry- 
men ordered their chicks either 
through a catalog or printed adver¬ 
tising. Today, they are being con¬ 
fronted and sold chicks directly. 



Is there a perfect strain, a perfect 
chick? Not for an area, but perhaps 
for a poultry farm. The modern chick 

is bred for particular purposes. 

Every chick salesman is anxious to 
book your order; it is his “bread and 
butter”. Unfortunately, the sales talk 
often bears little relation to the qual¬ 
ity of the chicks. Signing the order 
blank in order to get rid of a sales¬ 
man is never wise business. Buy your 
chicks; do not allow yourself to be 
sold. 

There Are Several Good Strains 

Every breeder is attempting to 
develop the perfect strain. To date 
few, if any, have succeeded. There 
are a number of good strains of 
chicks, but all of them do not fit every 
farm. A strain that does well on one 
farm may not be most profitable on 
another. The farms may even be ad¬ 
jacent and the chicks reared on op¬ 
posite sides of the line fence. Why 
should not the strain fit the needs 
of these two places equally well? 

The reasons are simple; one may 
wholesale eggs and the other may 
retail; one poultry man may start his 
chicks close to the old flock, the 
other may start his well isolated 
from the old birds; one may crowd 
and expose the pullets to every factor 
of stress there is, the other may give 
ample room and take every precau¬ 


tion to avoid stress. It must be said, 
nevertheless, that the man who pro¬ 
vides the best conditions in both the 
rearing and laying periods has a much 
larger choice in source of chicks. The 
man who treats chicks rough in hopes 
that they can take it necessarily 
limits the proportion of strains that 
can do well for him. 

The perfect strain for a poultry 
farm must be adapted to the climatic 
conditions of the area, have resistance 
to the diseases prevalent in the area, 
be efficient in the use of feed, lay the 
best size of egg to fit the marketing 
program of the farm, and fit into 
the farm’s management program. 
This is a big order; in fact, too big 
to be filled by every strain. No two 
farms have the same exposure to 
disease, the same market outlets, 
the same management programs. The 
perfect strain does not exist for a 
large area; it exists only for the 
individual poultryman. 

Beware of feed efficiency figures; 
they are truly comparable only when 
they are for the same random sam¬ 
ple test during the same testing 
period. Examine closely any feed effi¬ 
ciency figures quoted or compared. 
Feed efficiency depends on egg pro¬ 
duction, egg size, body size, ration, 
and possibly on an actual inherited 
difference of efficiency. With data 
from one entry, one can calculate 
feed efficiency anywhere from four 
pounds per dozen of eggs to five or 
more pounds. All the figures can be 
called accurate. Which one is right? 
A four-pound figure is obtained by 
using about three months during the 
peak production period. The five- 
pound figure comes from computing 
the efficiency over a 12-month period, 
starting with housing off range and 
continuing for a full laying year. 
Feed efficiency figures should be 
studied very carefully. 

Disease Resistance Is Important 

“Purchase as much disease resis¬ 
tance as you need for your system of 
rearing” is sound advice. If you rear 
in isolation, you can get by with less 
resistance to leucosis; your exposure 
will be lower. If you have to rear 
close to old birds, however, you have 
no alternative but to purchase a 
strain which stands up under heavy 
exposure. The same is possibly true 
about chronic respiratory disease and 
coccidiosis. Yet we really do not know 
enough about the inherited resistance 
of the different strains to these dis¬ 
eases to make firm recommendations 
on that score yet. 

If you have been using one strain 
on your farm for a number of years 
with good satisfaction, you really 
should stick with it. Results under 
your own farm conditions are what 
count. If you want comparison, order 
a few hundred chicks of a second 
strain for delivery at the same time. 
Run your own random sample test 




he laying houses at Central New York Random Sample Test in tiorseneaas, 
hemung Co., provide much information of unique value in selecting a 

source of chicks. 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


Pi 


DO YOU KNOW 





Qluchi 


PRODUCE MORE? 


Let's forget all the "big promises" and the 
talk about "super profits" and get down to 
some basic facts. Hall Brothers Chicks DO 
produce more because- they have been BRED 
to produce more. What does that mean? It 
means this — nearly fifty years of supervised 
breeding are behind every Hall Brothers Chick. 
They are all first-generation, breeder-quality 
chicks — all bred to produce more eggs or 
more meat. 


HALL BROTHERS 


STRAIN CROSS 
WHITE 
LEGHORNS 

Produce 
MORE 
White Eggs 



If yours is a white egg market, you want the 
best producers and this newly developed high 
production strain EXCLUSIVE WITH HALL 
BROTHERS is the answer. Healthy, disease- 
resistant, reach maturity early and continue on 
a bigger than average production with lower 
than average feed-egg ratio. Particularly 
suited to cage production. 



HALL BROTHERS 

SEX-LINKED 

PULLETS 


Produce 
MORE 
Brown Eggs 


When we first introduced this cross-breed com¬ 
mercially in 1931, we knew we had a sensational 
producer. Others recognized the fact and tried 
to imitate but there is only one original. If 
yours is a brown egg market, you'll get an 
abundance of eggs from these strong healthy 
birds on an economical feed conversion. Estab¬ 
lish high records in egg laying tests, year 
after year. 

HALL BROTHERS 

SILVER / 

HALLCROSS ( 

Produce ^ 

MORE \ 

Aleof & Eggs 

If you have a dual market and want a dual 
profit, you can't go wrong on this popular 
cross-breed. First, you get large quantities of 
high quality brown eggs and then a fancy 
dress-off for the best markets. Strong, early 
maturing and consistent producers. 

There's a Hall Brothers Flock Owt)er in 
Your vicinifY- Ask him about Hall 
Brothers Chicks, then , . . 

ORDER YOUR HALL BROTHERS 
CHICKS TODAY! 

Started Pullets Availoble in Some Areos 

Send for Full Color Folder showing all Hall 
Brothers Breeds and Crossbreeds. IT'S FREEI 

HAIL BROTHERS HATCHERY, INC. 

BOX 60, WALLINGFORD, CONN. 




TRAOCMARK 


RIGHT NOW is the time to order 
your Babcock Bessies . . . the White 
Leghorn that is bred to make money 
for you. Phone us collect (Ithaca 
4-6384) and we’ll book you today for 
any hatch you choose. 

BABCOCK POULTRY FARM, INC# 
Box 286-R, Ithaca, N.Y. 


Mer O'D 


AY 


GET YOUR GHIGKS 
THIS SEASON FROM 
The World’s Champion Leghorn 

FREE CATALOG! 

STERN BROS.’ HATCHERY 


p 








































under your own farm conditions. 
Keep careful records on different 
traits; without them comparison is 
worthless. 

The Lessons of the Egg-Lay Tests 

Results at random sample tests 
are useful to compare different 
strains; properly used, they can be 
invaluable. They help locate the 
strains which are worthy of a test 
under your farm conditions. These 
test results should not be used, how¬ 
ever, as the final basis for a decision 
to purchase one strain and only one. 

The following ideas and observa¬ 
tions may aid in wisest use of random 
sample test results: not all good 
strains are entered in the random 
sample tests; a single year of testing 
is not conclusive; few strains can 
repeat their winnings year after year; 
every random sample test establishes 
its own conditions — amount of 
disease exposure, a basis for pricing 
eggs, feed, chicks, management sched¬ 
ule which includes ration, method of 
feeding, lighting and vaccination; a 
random sample test does not measure 
the service given by a breeder or 
hatcheryman, nor does it reveal his 
business ethics; consider those strains 
which rank in the top third or half 
of the test; look beyond the dollars 


and cents figures and investigate the 
different strains for traits which 
help to make up the income figure; 
unless the strains are definitely ex¬ 
posed to leucosis, mortality figures 
may reveal very little about inherited 
resistance to this disease; test results 
do not measure tendency toward 
cannibalism or ability to continue in 
production for 15 to 18 month; the 
record made by a test entry applies 
only to the particular cross or number 
entered — it in no way reflects the 
potential performance of any other 
cross or number produced and sold 
by the breeder or hatchery. 

Some good chicks are sold at rea¬ 
sonable prices, and some come pretty 
high. Similarly, some poor chicks 
can be purchased at moderate cost, 
while others carry a high price tag. 
Performance is what you pay for; it 
is the only thing that will keep the 
feed bill paid and leave money in 
the bank. Very few top quality chicks 
are purchased at fire-sale prices, and 
poor chicks are expensive regardless 
of the price. Never quibble over price 
if you are sure that quality is there. 
Good chicks can make up the differ¬ 
ence in a short time, but poor ones 
can lose you money in a few weeks. 
If you are going to bargain, do it 
on quality. Be sure it is at the top. 



Mites in the Brooder House 


One year when my chickens were 
only a few weeks old I began to 
notice they were not acting right. 
Standing around with their wings 
up, they acted dopey. I knew it was 
not too warm for them, but I could 
not see any other possible trouble. 
So I went to a poultryman of many 
years’ experience and he called the 
poultry department at Cornell. The 
people there suggested that he come 
and examine them for poultry mites; 
that was what the trouble sounded 
like to them. This he did and found 
out they had diagnosed it right. 



Red mites can get in brooder houses, 
too. Carbolineum is the answer to 
their control. 


Mites, of course, are different from 
lice. They are tiny red insects; at 
least they look red after they have 
sucked blood. They live in the crevices 
of wood. 

I had never been bothered before 
with mites on baby chicks and, be¬ 
fore I got through with them, I nev¬ 
er wanted to be again. The only cure 
for the mites was an application of 
carbolineum to the brooder house. 
We always thoroughly clean and dis¬ 
infect the house, but we had never 
used carbolineum in it before. 


I had no other place to put the 
chicks while the work was being done. 
Fortunately, a neighbor had a brood¬ 
er house I could borrow for a time, 
and it was loaded on to a truck and 
brought to our place. We could not 
take time to prepare this house prop¬ 
erly so the next best thing was to put 
down building paper and trust to 
luck the chicks would pick up no 
disease. 

We did not dare to put carbolineum 
on full strength for fear it would 
burn such young chickens. We mixed 
it half with gasoline and sprayed it 
on. Gasoline was used to evaporate 
and dry out quickly. It turned out 
all right. 

We were actually able to keep the 
borrowed brooder house until it was 
time to put the birds on range, so 
we did not put them back in their 
ovm house until then. There is enough 
work involved in the raising of baby 
chicks without having a lot of extra 
work like this. But there was no 
further trouble anyway from the 
mites after the carbolineum treat¬ 
ment of the brooder house. 

My lesson learned from this ex¬ 
perience was to avoid trouble in the 
future. Now, the brooder house is 
given a thorough and full-strength 
application of carbolineum every two 
years at leasf. The best time to do it 
is in the Fall, of course, after the 
house is cleaned and made ready for 
the Spring. By shutting the door and 
windows and leaving them that way 
until it is time to use it, the fumes 
stay in the house a long time. It 
certainly should be done before the 
chicks are started. If the job is done 
well, no mites will live to make 
either the poultryman or the chicks 
unhappy. L. M. Sherman 



What Profits in Poultry? 

What is the profit on chicks raised 
until market age? How old should 
they be? Is there any money in rais¬ 
ing ducks? How old should they be 
when marketed? f. d. h. 

New Jersey 

The margin of profit in raising 
either chickens or ducks for meat is 
very low. This explains why at pres¬ 
ent the industry is based entirely on 
large-scale operations. To produce a 
three-pound broiler, a bird must be 
grown for two months; it requires 
about eight pounds of feed. A five- 

January 18, 1958 


pound lightweight roaster must be 
grown to four months of age, and it 
takes 18 pounds of feed. 

Ducklings may be raised to a 
weight of five pounds in three 
months; they grow somewhat faster 
and more efficiently than chickens. 
But they will also eat about 18 
pounds of feed. With local feed 
prices you can readily estimate the 
cost of rearing these different types 
of meat stock. Add to that total the 
original cost of the chick or duckling 
and put on about 10 cents more per 
bird to cover brooding and mortality. 

21 


NEW! ^ CaueA,! 

■ __ __ 


HUBBARD’S 



THE HUftBARD #494 PUllETt 
<»U* • r*4 • iize •> 574 b* 1** «9f 

474 At tnd •! Itf year 

THE #496 PULLET is an entirely new 
cross, especially developed by Hubbard 
Research for producers of eggs for the 
brown egg market. The #496 matures 
early, flocks peak at 80 to 90%. Eggs are 
remarkably uniform in size and color. 
SHELLS EXTREMELY STRONG, INTERIOR 
EGG QUALITY EXCELLENT. Breakage just 
about ceases to be a problem. Superior 
shell quality holds through 12 months’ 
production. Based on 1,000 birds, this 
one inherited characteristic alone can 
mean an extra $250.00 per year income! 
In addition to Hubbard’s #496, we 
offer you the following breeds, each a 
leader in its field. 

HUBBARD LEGHORN CROSS -Heavy pro¬ 
ducer of large, strong-shelled eggs with 


•^wjefcrowtteggs earl.- 

• M. steady B 

•^ronger shells 

• «igher livabilifu 

• ^ross-bred 




1'? 


superior internal quality. Some creams 
and tints. 

HUBBARD NEW HAMPSHIRE - Favored 
large brown egg producer for more 
than 30 years. Holds all time contest 
record for breed. 

HUBBARD KIMBERCHIK K.T37 - Better 
than 250 pure white eggs a year, large 
size early. Proven in Random Tests and 
on the farms, floor and cage, all over 
the United States. 


H 


/ 


MM 


For new llteroture on the 
Hubbard #496 Pullet, olso 
on Hubbard K-137 Kimber- 
chik Legborns. Address 
Dept. 12. 


WALPOLE, 




LANCASTER, PA. • STATESVILLE, N. C. 


HUBBARD FARMS PRQFIT-BRED EGG STRAINS 


— GARRISON’S NEW 

GORNiSH KINGS 

More Weight! More Meat! 

Cornish Kings are the new addition to the 
Garrison line of specialized crosses for 
meat production—and what a marvel they 
are when it comes to satisfying demand for 
real premium quality in Rock Cornish 
Hens, broilers, caponettes and roasters. 
Cornish Kings pack plenty of wallop in 
growth and feed conversion—for they are 
three-quarter pure Cornish, right out of 
our selection pressure breeding pens. Write 
for free catalog. SPECIAL: Send 106 for 
new book “How to Run a One-Man 
Broiler Business.” 

EARL W. GARRISON 

BRIDGETON 13, NEW JERSEY 



PULLORUM TYPHOID CLEAH 


Why pay up to 256 more per Pullet from Franchise 
Hatcheries when you can buy good performance pullets 
that Average 70<>/i or better production for less. Mt. 
Hope White Leghorns, New Hampshire Reds, Arbor 
Acres White Rocks. Sex Link cross-or Red Rock Cross. 
Also Started Chicks. Write for further information and 
Prices. Telephone 126 R II. 

C. P. LEISTER Hatchery, Box N. McAllsterville, Pa. 


LARGE ENGLISH WHITE LEGHORNS OR 
MINORCA CROSS PULLETS — $18.00 Per 100. 
BARRED OR WHITE ROCKS, REDS 
CORNISH CROSSES — $8.00 Per 100. 
Livability anj Sex Guaranteed 

QUAKER BRAND BABY CHICKS 

103-105 COHANSEY STREET 

BRIDGETON, N. J. BR 9-2164 


PARKS ROCKS & CROSSES 

Big “eatin’ size” chickens that 
are terrific layers. 

WORLD’S OLDEST STRAIN of 
Barred Rocks and two 
wonderful crosses made 
from them. Try our 
sensational new BOB’S 
WHITES and our ever 
popular BLACK 
BEAUTIES. 

Write for Free Catalog 
BOB PARKS, ALTOONA 10, PA. 




Bioadbreast (ORNISH 

Big block-busters. Make heavy weights in less 
time on lower feed cost. Deliciously flavored 
tender white meat. Unusually profitable. Write 
5TAHDARD HATCHERIES. BQX926A DECATUR. IlLIHOIS 




From tlto 
Olimoto o£ 



Ready to prove their exceptional profit¬ 
abilities to you, as they have to so many 
others during the past 47 years! There’s 
a breed or cross exactly right for you — 
whether you specialize in Market Eggs, 
Broilers, Caponettes or Hatching Eggs. 

WHITE LEGHORNS, RED-ROCKS IBlack 
Sex-Link Pullets), GOLDEN CROSSES 
and R. I. REDS for egg production. 
WHITE ROCKS for broilers (ox for pro¬ 
ducing hatching eggs for broiler chicks). 
GOLDEN CROSS COCKERELS for broil¬ 
ers. 

You can't go wrong when you order 
from Clements—Maine’s leading hatchery. 

Maine-U.S. Approved—Pullorum Clean 
Write or phone (Winterport: Baldwin 
3-4292) for information and prices. 


CLEMENTS CHICKS, Inc. 


ROUTE 25, 


WINTERPORT, MAINE 



Hi-PRQ WHITE LEGHORNS 



America’s No. 1 Strain Crosses, 

Hybrids, Cage-Lines. Guaranteed 

Livability. More Top grade eggs on_ 

less feed. Full information in FREE CATALOG. 

ORTNER FARMS BOX J CLINTON. MO. 

TURKEYS With Extreme Breast Width. Best Strains 
Bronze, White, Beltsville. Clean Guaranteed Poults. 
PAWLING HATCHERY. Box R, Middle Creek, Pa. 

ANCONA CHICKS 

Large White Eggs on Less Feed. Cat. Free. Ph.:43ll 
SHRAWDER’S ANCONA FARM, Richfield 9, Pa. 
30 DAY SPECIAL — Blood-tested Chicks. All 
Heavies, Rocks, Reds, Cresses: $8.50-100; $12-200. 
Heavy Leghorn Broiler cockerels $2.00-100. Ship at 
once C.O.D. Klines Poultry Farmr Strausstown, Pa. 
BABY CHICK BARGAINS — $5.95-100 C.O.D. 
WH. ROCKS, WH. CROSS, NEW HAMPSHIRES 
and WH. LEGHORNS. Price at Hatchery. 
BELLEFONTE POULTRY FARM. Bellefonte I. Pa. 


PROFIT- 
MAKING 
LEGHORNS 

Only N. Y. S, Leg¬ 
horn Breeder to 
Place in 

TOP QUARTILE 

3 Yr. Average Cen¬ 
tral New York Ran¬ 
dom Sample Test. 

Bulkley’s birds consistent 
leaders at this important 
test where chicks are ex- 
N. Y.-U. S. Certified posed to leucosis. Bulk- 
Pullorum, Typhoid ley’s had average yearly 
Clean. income $2,188 per net 

chick started for last three 
years. Owner - supervised 
breeding program gives 
you birds that live, lay and pay with lov* 
feed consumption. Before you buy, get 
free price list and folder from — 

BULKLEY’S LEGHORNS 

130 Leghorn Lane Phone 30-M, Odessa, N. Y. 



OSI 

I 



Giant Emden and TculOdSe 
developed by New England’s 
largest breeder. Gig, fast¬ 
growing, best for meat on 
weeding. Hatches weekly Aoril « 
June. Write RFO 1C tor roiGEB 


GOLDEN EGG GOOSE FARM • Hampton, Conn. 


















































: 

if- 

, 

Yes Sir, I Finally 

Retired ! 

. . . and it's as nice as I figured 
it would be. One reason is that 
1 have enough money for the 
extras that make retirement fun. 

I’ve been saving for it — a little 
each year through my Farmers 
and Traders Retirement Income 
Plan. 

You too can take this easy 
road to a secure retirement. If 
anything should happen to you 
before you reach retirement age, 
this same Farmers and Traders 
plan will provide an income for 
your family. If you deperid on 
your earnings for your living, 
you’ll want to get the full de¬ 
tails. Send the coupon today. 

■—FARMERS AND TRADERS' — ^ 
LIFE INSURANCE CO. i 
Syracuse I, N. Y. ■ 

Gentlemen: J 

Please send, without cost or obligation, f 
complete information about your Retire- | 
ment and Family Income Plans. | 

Name.Age. f 

i 

St. or RD. p 

City.State.. 

R-63 ^ 


Get MORE 

for your 
silo dollars! 
MORE VALUE 

Just compare this husky 
Craine beauty with ordinary 
concrete silos—you’ll see dif¬ 
ferences worth many dollars 
—for which you don’t pay a 
penny extra! 

MORE STAVE 

The Craine Concrete Stave 
is nearly 4" thick—has 5 in- 
suJating air cells that give 
you extra thermal protection 
against frost — a better, 
warmer silo for better feeding 
all year round. 

MORE STRENGTH 

Staves are tongue and groov¬ 
ed on all four sides to form a 
solid wall that will stand any 
test of time or climate. Non- 
pourous — resists acids — 
made from finest aggregates. 
Get the facts before you buy. 

... get a 



Free 
silo book 


What is the difference between a 
warranty and a guarantee? f. j. r. 

Webster’s dictionary states that in 
law a warranty is an agreement that 
a certain fact regarding the subject 
of a contract is, or shall be, as it is 
declared or promised to be. A 
guarantee is to undertake answer for 
the debt, default or miscarriage of 
another to give security. These are 
the general meanings. They may be 
applied in other forms under some 
circumstances. 

Here is a clipping from our weekly 
newspaper concerning a chimney re¬ 
pair racket. Y'ou may wish to alert 
your readers. M. S. C. 

New York 

The clipping refers to a new 
racket. Salesmen are going around 
the country telling the woman of the 
house that her chimney is unsafe. 
They attempted to convince two 
elderly ladies that their chimney 
needed an $800 repair job. They are 
said to have started a flash fire in 
the cellar. The salesman remarked 
this particular section was proving 
very profitable to them. The men are 
said to have one local telephone num¬ 
ber but their car did not have New 
York State license plates. They are 
also said to have selected homes 
where there were no men folk. In 
one case where the men reported 
serious danger of fire, the chimney 
was found to be in excellent con¬ 
dition. The job they proposed would 
cost considerable and they requested 
a $200 deposit. The ladies did not ac¬ 
cept their proposition and saved 
their money. The moral is to be on 
your guard, and do not accept the 
word of unauthorized agents or work¬ 
men whom you do not know. Always 
take time to check their statements 
with responsible people. 


As far back as one can remember, 
swindlers were taking advantage of 
the public. The Spanish prisoner was 
one of the most fertile schemes. It 
was an attempt to get a valise, said 
to contain vast sums of money which 
had been deposited in a bank in 
England. Considerable cash was 
needed to secure its release. There 
was no validity in the scheme, but 
many lost a great deal of money by 
falling for it. The work-at-home 
swindle was rampant and requests 
for amounts from $1.00 to $5.00 re¬ 
quested in advance for material, etc. 
Then there was the “I trust you” 
fake. Razors and other items were 
sent out requesting the party re¬ 
ceiving same to try them and if not 
satisfactory return them. If not re¬ 
turned promptly, dunning letters 
were sent demanding payment. One 
farmer wrote to one of these con¬ 
cerns to send him $2.00 for packing 
and he would return the 25-cent 


We have been avid readers of your 
column in The Rural New Yorker 
and now we need help. Our complaint 
is with Skylark Originals. We have 
written many times, and get no sensi¬ 
ble answers. Can you help us ob¬ 
tain a refund of $9.00? j. r. b. 

Ohio 

Skylark Originals, Inc., of Asbury 
Park, N. J., went into receivership 
on November 18, 1957. Any refunds 
owing on merchandise returned be¬ 
fore that date may only be obtained 
through the regular bankruptcy 
channels. These customers are gener¬ 
al creditors and should file their 
claims with Hon. Charles H. Weelans, 
Referee in Banki'uptcy, at Trenton, 
New Jersey. 

New York’s Attorney General has 
received permission from the Su¬ 
preme Court for the dissolution of 
the Marjay Sales Corporation, of 1178 
Broadway, New York, on the ground 
of fraud and illegality. The company 
is charged with victimizing hundreds 
of housewives by selling them knit¬ 
ting machines. The concern promised 
purchasers could make at least $40 
a week with a few hours of home 
work. The machines are said to have 
cost $349.95, plus a $10 tax, and a 
credit charge of $90. The company is 
also said to have promised to buy all 
articles made on the machines. Those 
who purchased the machines found 
that they were hard to use, and 
only a few articles could be knit. 
There was no possibility of making 
the money promised. The company 
refused to accept the articles, claim¬ 
ing they were not properly made, and 
not made in sufficient quantities. 
Complaint was made by those who 
took up the work that the instruc¬ 
tions given were insufficient. We 
have had other reports that the ma¬ 
chines were not at all satisfactory, 
and that the money paid for them 
was money thrown away. The ven¬ 
ture proved to be a serious loss to 
many women. 



HEARING BAD? 

. . . then you'll be 

happy to know how 
we have improved 
the hearing and re¬ 
lieved those miserable 
ear noises, caused by 
catarrh of the head, 
for thousands of peo¬ 
ple (many post 70) 
who have used our 
simple Elmo Palli¬ 
ative HOME TREAT¬ 
MENT. This may be 
the answer to your 
prayer. NOTHING TO WEAR. Here 
are SOME of the symptoms that may 
likely be causing your catarrhal deaf¬ 
ness and ear noises: Head feels stopp^ 
up from mucus. Dropping of mucus in 
throat. Hawking and spitting. Mucus 
in nose or throat every day. Hearing 
worse with a cold. Hear — but don’t 
understand words. Hear better on clear 
days. Worse on rainy days. Ear noises 
like crickets, bells, whistles, clicking, 
escaping steam or others. If your con¬ 
dition is caused by catarrh of the head, 
you. too. may enjoy wonderful relief 
such as others have reported during our 
past 20 vears. WRITE TODAY FOR 
PROOF OF RELIEF AND 30 DAY 
TRIAL OFFER. THE ElMO COMPANY 
DEPT 8RN-2 DAVENPORT, IOWA 



You Filter, Remove Iron SloA Soften 
with just one revolutionary Diamond 
3T Unit. Completely automatic. You 
simply check the salt supply penod- 
ically. Completely guaranteed. Four 
sizes. Eight capacities. Write 

OSHKOSH FILTER & SOFTENER CO. 

Oshkosh, Wisconsin 


REFILLS 13 for *1 

TO FIT EVERY RETRACTABLE 
PEN MADE INCLUDING: 

“Scripto” “Eversharp” 

“Paper Mate” “Sheaffer” 
“Waterman” “Wearever” 

All these and over 200 
other (except Parker 
Jotter). 

One make per $1 or* 
der. Two ink col¬ 
ors per $1 order. 

Choice of Red, 

Blue, Black, 

Green or 
Brown 
Ink. 

Money back 
guarantee. 


VALUE 49c. 
EACH 


($1.79 

Value 

Each) 



RETRACTABLE 

PENS 
6 for $1 

100 (or $16.50 
Choice of Red, Blue, 
Black or Green Ink! 
Quantity and imprint 
prices on request. 
Iiaranifl. Add lOc Shipping charge. 

BARCLAY distributors. Dept 80-A18 
66-24 PARSONS BLVD., JAMAICA, N. Y. 


I CRAINE, INC., Norwich, N.Y. Dept. R-128 
Send free illustrated booklet on Craine 
Concrete Silos and name of my dealer. 


Name.... 

Address. 


! 


-DUR 5GTH Y£AR- 


razor. 

The tricks are possibly more refined 
now but, looking over the records, 
we find many schemes based on the 
same general plan. Therefore we 
urge readers to stop, look and listen 
—also reflect, before parting with 
money. It takes a little time to in¬ 
vestigate, but it pays in the end. 

A letter with considerable ma¬ 
terial in reference to various chari¬ 
ties has been received. There is no 
name or address given. We would 
like to supply our reader with this 
information if he will give his name 
and address. We cannot ansiver 
letters without the full-name and ad¬ 
dress. All letters are considered con¬ 
fidential when requested. 


Complaints against Universal Inter¬ 
change, Inc., of Los Angeles, Chicago, 
New York and Washington have been 
filed by the Federal Trade Com¬ 
mission. It is charged that salesmen 
advise people with property for sale 
that the asking price is too low. By 
increasing it, the fee charged for 
advertising is larger. Also, the seller 
is often told that the fee will be 
returned if the property is not sold. 
The complaint also charges that the 
firms try to collect the full amount 
of the contract even if the property 
is not sold; that the firm’s activities 
and publications are not endorsed by 
State or other officials; and that the 
payment of these advertising charges 
does not avoid payment of real estate 
broker’s commissions when the 
property is sold. A hearing is sched¬ 
uled for January 28 in Los Angeles 
before an FTC hearing examiner. 




CORONA 


PROTECT THE ALL-IMPORTANT UDDER , 

with the dally help of Corona 
—the Woolfat'Heh ealve with ^ 
^ll •«*<>»■*•** antiseptic. Stay; on. 

'-f- ll_ y^^ in. a o*. can $2AO at 

*' ■ I t ^ ^ rtm .nnmt.nnui . 


-•jT. Il ' evQDb id • 9 OZ . vu”* • xv »*•' 

o. po.tpa.4. _ 

‘CorodJ'Box A 1 23 Ksnton.O " 


UDDER-TEAT 

OINTMENT 

FOR ALL MINOR 
WOUNDS, CHAPS, 
CRACKED SKIN 



[All letters to Publisher’s Desk 
Department must be signed with 
writer’s full name and address 
given.] 


Can you tell me tlie value of North 
American Trust shares and where 
they can be disposed of if they are 
saleable? w. g. 

New York 

This Trust was terminated as of 
July 1, 1956. Final distribution be¬ 
came available December 20, 1956. 
W. G. completed the forms supplied 
and received payment for the shares. 

The Federal Trade Commission has 
approved a consent order that pro¬ 
hibits Cimier Watch Corp. and Swiss 
Time Company, both located at 1 
East 33rd Street, New York City, 
from misrepresenting that the 
“Cimier” watch is a jeweled gold 
watch carrying a one-year uncon¬ 
ditional guarantee. 


BOOK MANUSCRIPTS 

CONSIDERED 

by cooperative publisher who offers authors 
early publication, higher royalty, national 
distribution, and beautifully designed books. 
All subjects welcomed. Write, or send 

^GREE^NwIch'bOOK publishers, INC. 
Atten.: MR. WITHERS. 489 FIFTH AVE. 
NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



IMPORTID SWIDISH STAINLESS 
STEEL RAZOR BLADES 

New bUde Geotatlofi that will chaa^e 
Anierica'a ahave habita. Edgea COLD 
HARDENED by apeclal proceaa . .. acay 
ttnootb, abarp up €o tO ahavea from 
each blade. No nicka. oo acratch, 
Barbecc Stalnleaa Bladea do not ruat! 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. » 
double-adge bladea IN DISPENSERS 
only $1.00 ppd. 


1 


SHARP ^ IMP O«T$. »»« t*« 0 ^. 4, tutl^nd. 


I, vt.*) 





Plant Superleotlon for berries this 
kyear. Allen’s 1968 Berry Book 
'describes best varieties—best 
I methods.-Free copy. Write today, 

W. F. ALLEN COMPANY 
72 EvBrsroBn Avb., Salisbury, Maryland 


Write for Informatloo 
what steps an Inventsr sbsNM 
take to steura ■ BRtsat. 


PATENTS 

PATRICK D. BEAVERS 

942 Columbian Bldg.. Washington 1. D. C. 


- KODACHROME PROCESSING -- 

8 mm roll or 35 mm 20 exp. $1.25. Prompt Service. 
Write lor mailer and prices. COLOR PIX, 
DEPT. Y, CPO BOX 30. KINGSTON, N. Y. 


Change of Address: 

The Post Office Department no longer 
forwards magazines or newspapers which 
are incorrectly addressed. We request 
that you report any change of address 
directly to us at least three weeks In 
advance. In any request for change of 
address, or in any communicatiorr regard¬ 
ing your subscription, kindly clip the 
name-and-address label from your latest 
issue of THE RURAL NEW-YORKER; 
the key numbers on this stamp enable 
us to locate your subscription quickly 
and to give you better service. 

THE RURAL NEW-YORKER 
833 W. 80th St., N. Y.. 1. N. Y. 


22 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 
































































Articles of Interest 

In Coming Issues 

• The New in Poultry Nu¬ 

trition 

By E. 1. Robertson 

• CageSj Slats and Corncobs 

By G. T. Klein 

• Breeding the Birds 

By Thomas W. Fox 

• Housing the Flock 

By H. W. Hickish 

• Eat More Poultry and Eggs! 

By M. L. Scott 

• Crossbreeding for Turkeys 

By M. G. McCartney 

• Air-Conditioned Poultry 

Houses 

By Walter Kemnitz 

• Can We Eradicate 

PULLORUM? 

By H. Van Roekel 

• 1957 Egg Laying Tests 
By C. S. Platt 

• The Future of Bulk-Tank 

Farming 

By I. E. Parkin 

• Mechanical Orchard Pruning 

By F. R. Dreiling 

• Self-Cure for Mastitis 

By J. H. Winter 

• My York-State Forest Farm 

By Henry S. Kernan 

• Internal Parasites of Live¬ 

stock 

By John H. Whitlock 

• Extra Service from Tractor 

Tires 

By M. E. Long 

• Bears in New York 

By Willet Randall 

• Electricity Lightens the 

Dairy Load 

By L. H. Hammond 

• The Gypsy Moth, and Why 

We Fight It 

By E. D. Burgess 

All these articles are scheduled to 
appear in the ANNUAL POULTRY 
issue of February 1, 1958. 


Suggestions for the 
Farm and Home 

Here are some ideas that many 
people may find interesting and 
helpful in and around the farm¬ 
stead; 

Paint handles of tools a bright 
color, so they will be easy to find 
in field or barn. 

To oil machine parts hard to reach 
with the oil can, make an extension 
by slipping a drinking straw over 
the spout. 

Use a large cork to help remove 
the base of a light bulb broken off 
in the socket. Push the cork in 
against the broken part and unscrew 
it. 

To wedge the handle of a hammer 
or hatchet, use the shank of a small 
discarded file. 

Axe handles wear out very quickly 
when splitting wood. To protect them 
wrap the handles tightly with fine 
wire for about three inches from the 



A New Broom Sweeps Snow 


This new plastic-fibered broom re¬ 
tailing at $4.98 resists xoater, salt and 
oil, so is quite useful for walks and 
driveways in Winter. The steel blade 
makes it a snoio scoop and ice 
breaker. 

January 18, 1958 


point where they enter the heads. 

If you have a tractor, there is no 
sense breaking your back pulling 
fence posts. Hook a chain around the 
bottom of the post over a short 
length of steel rail and to the trac¬ 
tor drawbar; then pull away and thus 
lift it out. Place a heavy plank under 
the steel rail so it will not sink. Use 
enough chain so the top of the post 
will not hit the tractor. 

Paint manure spreader chain that 
I’uns the apron with old worn-out 
car oil. This prevents rust, and your 
spreader will run more easily. 

D not throw away old leaky 
water pails. Just melt some paraffin 
run it along the seams inside the 
pail, and allow it to harden. It stops 
leaks instantly. 

When applying powder on cows 
for lice, use an insecticide duster. 
This makes it convenient to apply 
powder in hard-to-reach places such 
as udder and around front legs, 
which are hard to treat with the 
sprinkler can that louse powder 
usually comes in. 

Why not fasten an extra saw blade 
to your hack saw frame with Scotch 
tape? When one blade breaks, you 
will still have one handy. This saves 
time. 

To make a good substitute for a 
rubber mallet, place a crutch tip 
over the head of a hammer. If you 
must force the tip to get it on, lubri¬ 
cate with a little water. mrs. l. m. 


Subscribers' Exchange 

Rate of advertiaine in this department 
20 cents per word, includina name 
and address, each insertion, payable 
in advance. When box number la 
used, add one dollar to total coat. 

Dates of Issue: 

February 1 closes January 17 
February 15 closes January 31 

COPY MUST REACH US FRIDAY, 
10 A. N.. 15 DAYS in ADVANCE OF 
DATE OF ISSUE. 

This department is for the accommo¬ 
dation of subscribers, but no display 
advertising or advertising of a com¬ 
mercial nature (seeds, plants, live¬ 
stock, etc.) is admitted. 


HELP WANTED 


HELP Wanted: Attendants, male and female. 

Salary $3,002 per year. Staff nurses, $3,832 
per year. Annu^ salary increases, less main¬ 
tenance (board, room, laundry $9.79 per week). 
Five day, eight hour work week. Annual vaca¬ 
tion with pay Paid sick leave. Life, accident 
and health insurance and Social Security avail¬ 
able. Recreation: bowling, tennis, swimming, 
golf. Opportunities for advancement with 
eventual retirement pension. For information 
write Director, Wassaic State School, Wassaic, 
New York. _ 

WANTED: Young man or boy for general farm 
work. No smoking. Russell Peters, Callicoon, 
New York. _ 

MAN to take care of horses, also farming: 

work available for wife. Attractive cottage 
for two adults in Morris County, New Jersey. 
BOX 1000, Rural New Yorker. _ 

DAIRY farm worker, not manager. One-man 
farm. Married. References. $300, dwelling, 
milk, near Poughkeepsie. BOX 1200, Rural New 
Yorker._ 

YOUNG man to drive and further assist, 
later to go to Florida. Live in and with or 
without military training. BOX 1201, Rural 
New Yorker. 

EXPERIENCED reliable man for beef cattle 
farm. State age, salary expected, details. 
BOX 1202, Rural New Yorker. _ 

FARMER, working manager, vicinity Long 
Island, New York, to take care of small 
Hereford herd and farming. Salary, com¬ 
mission, 7-room house with all improvements 
close to village, schools, churches. Write 
BOX 1203, Rural New Yorker._ 

FEMALE: Mother desires help; new ranch 
house in country. Mother with one child 
would be considered. V. Truman, Box 565, 
Allentown, Penna._ 

NURSEMAID, general, live in. Own room and 
bath. All modern conveniences. Good salary, 
liberal time off. Two ehildren. References. 
Mrs. Chai'les Wascher, 274 Pearl Hill Road, 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts._ 

WOMAN: Live in; child care, housework. 

Roland Van Loan, Columbia Turnpike, East 
Greenbush, N. Y, Phone: Albany 779430. 

WOMAN: Young girl for housework. Likes 
children. Own room, modern home, all con¬ 
veniences: $35 weekly. Include references. L. 
Saul, 27 Maiden Lane, Port Jervis, N. Y. 
Phone: Port Jervis 4 5061._ 

HOUSEKEEPER: Motherless home, four 

children 7 to 14. Maj. McKlveen, stationed 
at Eatontown, N. J. Write or telephone: 
William Johnson, Dayton 8-0400, 9 to 5 P. M. 
or BOX 1210, Rural New Yor ker. 
EXPERIENCED vegetable farmer; capable of 
supervising very large truck farm; excellent 
opportunity. Write Malibu, Milford, Pe nna. 
HOMEMAKER, Protestant, with some income, 
for suburban builder’s home. Foods, uti.ities, 
transportation furnished. Outline work, experi¬ 
ences, family and medical problems. BOX 1211, 
Rural New Yorker._ 

WANTED: Capable experienced man to take 
over young orchard on eastern Long Island 
estate. Excellent opportunity. Address replies 
to Hilly Close Farm, Box 5, Amagansett, L. 1., 


RESPONSIBLE, experienced orchard man 
wanted on quality fruit and beef farm. Good 
wages plus incentive and house. Jospeh Gatto, 
Manager, Indian Ladder Farms, Altamont, 
New York._ 

SINGLE, dependable man for poultry work. 

Good home and board. Give age, experience, 
wages, references. Coventry Poultry Farm, 
Route 2, Coventry, Conn._ 

YOUNG man interested in nursery and garden 
center greenhouse work. One with ambition 
and ability to be own boss. Excellent future. 
Chestnut Grove, New City, New York. 


SITUATION WANTED 

FARM and dairy help for machine and hand 

milkers. Tractor men. yard men. also poul¬ 
try and all kinds of labors. Quinn Employment 
Agency, 70 Warren St., New York 7. N. Y, 
COrtland 7-7865. _ 

WE are suppliers for dairy farms, first class 

milkers, poultrymen, general farm workers. 
Ellinger’s Employment Agency. 271 Bowery, 
New York 2, N. Y. Phone: GRamercy 3-8168-9. 


sires job; single, 38, White, experienced. 
BOX 1204, Rural New Yorker. 


WIDOW, 58, refined, agreeable, desires po¬ 

sition as housekeeper, one person, modern 
country home. BOX 1208, Rural New Yorker. 


DAIRY farm manager: Lifetime experience 

showing and feeding and breeding of pure¬ 
bred cattle. Also field work. Best of refer¬ 
ences. John Ingalls. R. D. 2, Seneca Falls, 
New York. 


TWO middleaged ladies would like a job in 

a lumber camp. BOX 1209, Rural New 
Yorker. 


KENNEL man wishes position, also experi¬ 

enced with greenhouse work. Excellent 
references. BOX 1212, Rural New Yorker. 


FARMS FOR SALE, TO RENT, ETC. 

WANTED: All types bare and stocked farms. 

villages and rural dwellings, stores and 
other types businesses; phone or write Wens 
Real Estate. Johnson City. N. Y, _ 

SOUTHERN New Jersey: Country homes. 

farms, acreage for agriculture or industry. 
Free list sent. LeGore. realtor, Vineland. 
New Jersey 


CLOVER cut comb honey: You get a whole 
frame of new very light, delicious, comb. 
Five pounds $2.25. Extracted $2.00. Prepaid 
Charles Peet, Gouverneur, New York. 


color added. Express prepaid. Delivery 
guaranteed. Bushel oranges $6.00; grapefruit 
$5.50, mixed $5.75. Half-bushels $4.25. Add 50 
Mnts west of Mississippi and Wisconsin. 
Dillingham Grove. Largo, Florida. 


WORLD famous Indian River fruit: Packers 

and shippers of the area’s finest quality, 
tree-ripened, hand-picked fruit. We ship best 
varieties in season. Also delicious Orange 
Blossom honey; tropical candies, marmaiades 
and jellies. Shipping season ends June 15th. 
Write now for brochure. Indian River Fruit 
Company, Post Office Box 166-R, Indian River 
City, Florida. 


LIGHT clover honey: 60 pounds $10.80; more 

$10.25 each. Lavern Depew, Auburn, N. Y. 
OLD fashioned dried apples: Two pounds $1 70- 
four pounds $3.30 postpaid. L. W. Denlinger, 
Clayton, Ohio. 


LIGHT Clover Honey: Five pound pail liquid 

$1.95; 10 pound pail fine granulated $3.75; 

6- 5’s liquid $9.00. Above prepaid. Sixty pound 
can fine granulated clover $10.80; 60 pound can 
liquid $11.20; 60 pound can Fall Flower $10.20. 
Five or more $9.60 @. All 60’s F. O. B. George 
Hand, Route 2, Cazenovia, New York. 


COUNTRY BOARD 


$50 MONTH: Pensioners. Quiet village home. 
Florence McCarthy. Schenevus, New York. 


couple. Rose, Wayne County, New York. 
BOX 1213, Rural New Yorker. 


FLORIDA: acre homesites $300. Also trailer 

sites $10 month. Near town and good fishing. 
John Roscow, Farm Broker, Inverness. Fla. 

FOR Sale: Farm, 80 acres. Will sell 8-room 
house separate, cash or terms: near Green 
County. BOX 1004, Rural New Yorker. _ 

TWO outstanding dairy farms, finest in the 
State. Terrific layouts, also commercial and 
industrial values. Must be seen to be appre¬ 
ciated. Will sell separately or jointly. I. 
Greenberg & Son, Mount Holly, New Jersey. 
Telephone AMherst 7-1101. _ 

FLORIDA’S finest trailer sites beautifully 
wooded, 80 by 100 feet. Payable $20 cash and 
$20 monthly. Famous Panama City Gulf Re¬ 
sort Area. Excellent hunting, fishing, all 
sports. Also lovely wooded homesites low 
prices, easy terms. Booklet free. Howard 
Wood, Fountain, Florida. _ 

WOULD like to rent broiler farm in New 
York or New Jersey. Please state details in 
first letter. BOX 1205, Rural New Yorker. 

175 ACRE dairy farm, 70 acres tillable, 85 
acres birdsfoot trefoil. Large barn stables 
40 cows. Two silos, new milk house with 
equipment, tool shed and garage. Good 10- 
room house including bath, oil fired hot water 
heat in every room, modern kitchen with dish¬ 
washer, 120 gallon hot water heater with 210 
current. Price reasonable. BOX 1206, Rural 
New Yorker. _ 

FOR building or blueberries: 10 acres on 
main highway to shore, two minutes out of 
Browns Mills, three miles from Fort Dix; 
town water and electricity at road, 1,000 ft. 
frontage. $8,000, terms. Oliver Foulks, Browns 
Mills, New Jersey._ 

VIRGINIA farm, 160 acres level land. Six room 
house. Electricity, plenty of water. 300,000 
board feet of timber, good road. Excellent 
community $10,250. A bargain. Other farms of 
various sizes. K. A. Spencer, Broker, Box 52, 

Scottsville, Virginia. _ 

RETIREMENT home in Florida. Suitable for 
Winter home or year around. Now being 
built. For sale by builder. John W. Bottcher. 
224 Lucerne Circle, Orlando, Florida._ 

FOR Sale; 75-acre farm, 90 ft. chicken house, 
2-story barn and cow stable built of stones 
and bricks; garage for cars and trucks, work shop 
and tool shed, heated two 2-story 7-room houses 
partly furnished, built of stucco and stones 
with fireplaces; two 1-room bungalows, used 
to keep boarders, good for childrens’ camp, 
must sacrifice. Price cash $16,000, Louis Kaifler, 
Box 45, Cairo, N. Y. _ 

WANTED: Small farm, all conveniences. South 
Jersey or Delaware City Bay area. Cash 
terms. Must be reasonable. Box 161, Leonia, 
New Jersey._ 

SULLIVAN County real estate: All types of 
property, all price ranges. Write your re¬ 
quirements. Bernard Heller, Broker, Swan 
Lake, New York._ 

WANTED: Small farm in Otsego or Chenango 
Counties. Stanley Zygmunt, 17 Willow Ave., 
Wallington, New Jersey._ 

ADIRONDACK Resort Hotel: 30 guest rooms 
fully equipped. Situated directly on Schroon 
Lake. Private beach. Plenty of parking space. 
Same owners 26 years. Excellent opportunity. 
BOX 1214, Rural New Yorker._ 

DAIRY: 6.71 cwt. 3.6 ifiilk bulk tank all con¬ 
veniences. Particulars write or call. F. 
Schroeder, U. S. 17. Church View, Virginia. 
Phone: Saluda 8-4190. _ 

UPSTATE: Farrns, retirement homes, income 
properties, businesses, etc. State your needs. 
Prompt reply. Andersens’ Real Estate. E. B. 
Granger, Salesman. Cambridge, New York. 


FRUITS AND FOODS 


AVERY’S Golden Wildflower honey: five 
pounds $2.20; 10 pounds $3.95 prepaid; 60 

pounds $12.50, not prepaid. H. J. Avery, 
Katonah, N .Y. 


MISCELLANEOUS 

PIPE smoking or natural leaf chewing tobacco: 

Five pounds $3.00 postpaid. Guaranteed. Star 
Farms. Ralston, Tennessee. _ 

WANTED; Old automobile from 1890 to 1912. 

Karl Pautler, East Amherst, N. Y. _ 

WILL buy old furniture, glass, china, etc. 

BOX 1207, Rural New Yorker. _ 

OLD automobile, any age or condition. Write 

description and price to Hoffmeister. P. O. 
Box 7, Point of Rocks, Maryland. _ 

STAMPLESS and old letters wanted. A. C. 

Horn, West Haven, Connecticut. _ 

EARLY cut alfalfa and timothy mixed hay, 

$25 a ton. Paul J. Hosney. Box 348, 
Herkimer, New York. _ 

DAIRY hay and timothy, wheat straw, e^ 

corn. Truck delivery. James Kelly, 137 East 
Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse, N. Y. Telephone 
HO 9-2885. _ 

SAWDUST and shavings, loose trailer load 
deliveries. Also dry baled shavings to any 
point New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island. J. F. Danielski, 
Townshend, Vermont. Telephone Forest 5-7755. 

WANTED: Old guns, hunting rifles, war guns, 

any year. Please describe. Sidney Stein. 10 
Meacham Ave., E lmont. L. I., N. Y. 

WANTED: Model "A”. Vance, 116 East 25th 
St., Huntington S tation, New York. 

WANTED for cash: Old letters and books 
about the West. Civil War books and col¬ 
lections, old interesting military or frontier 
experiences. Coins or anything early American 
for my private collection. T. A. Merkt, Mont- 
ville. New Jerse y. 

APRONS, percale, bib $3,00; band $2.00, cash. 
Small, medium, large. Postpaid. Mary Welser, 
Greendale Road. Kane, Penna. _ 

WANTED: Post cards, advertisements and 

postal cards before 1920. Bronson Taylor. 
Middle Grove, New York. 

FOR Sale: About 4.000 bales of good quality 
hay. Wm. Ostrowski, Bridgeport. New Y ork. 

WANTED: Bower or Shenandoah hot water 

brooder system. Also feed-mixer. L. Kalmoe, 
Montevideo, Min n. 

quality hay for sale: First cutting alfalf^ 
broome and alfalfa-clover-broome hay, new 
seeding, early cut, dried on wagon hay drier. 
Legume-broome mixture and straight broome 
hay. Also straw. At barn Hall Farm, North 
Bennington, Vermont. Telephone 4509. 



UP TO 40 FEET WIDE 


Pure Polyethylene Sheeting. Meets FHA Specs., in Clear 
or Black. 3 thicknesses—Regular, Heavy or Extra Heavy 
gauge. Very Durable, Inexpensive. Sold by Hardware, 
Lumber, Implement and Feed Dealers. Free Samples on 
Request from Warp Bros., Chicago-Sl—Pioneers in Plastics. 


The Best Polyethylene Sheeting Money Con Buy 
Be Sure You See “Warp’s” Branded On The Edge 



SEE YOUR LOCAL DEALER 


SEND A FRIEND A TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION 
TO THE RURAL NEW YORKER 

Your Gift Includes Our 3 SPECIAL ISSUES for 1958; 
POULTRY. . .HORTICULTURE. . .LIVESTOCK and DAIRY! 



months 



for 25 c 


Friend* s Name. 

R. F. D.Box .Street . . . 

Post Office.State 


Your Name. 

Address.. .. 

(We will send a gift card bearing your name.) 
THE RURAL NEW YORKER, NEW YORK 1, N. 


23 


















































































































































PROOF! 


(In our files we have over 57,600 
grateful letters like these) 

THANKS FROM HAPPY MOTHER 

am dropping you a few lines to let you 
know how much your Appliance has helped my 
baby. He was very sickly and had been in the 
hospital twice before I heard of your wonder¬ 
ful Brooks Appliance. I am indeed very grate¬ 
ful for what you have done for him.” Mrs. 
Aibie Rucker, 1128 Parker St., Portsmouth, Va. 

SOFT BALL PLAYER A BROOKS BOOSTER 

“I ordered an Appliance some time back and 
it really does the job. I’m 38 years old, weight 
200 lbs. Play 3rd base on our Soft Ball team. 
I really give the belt a real test. Thought I 
would have to give up my ball playing but not 
now with your rupture belt. Most people won't 
belie<e I have a rupture.” Wilbur Moritz, Gen¬ 
eral Mdse., Jacob, Ill. 

NONE BUT BROOKS WOULD HOLD 

“I tried several types of supports but none 
would retain my recurrent rupture. About a 
year ago I ordered one of your improved Ap- 
ipliances and wore it day and night without 
any discomfort. I do heavy work but your 
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8 months I took it off and my rupture has 
never bothered me since. I wish all sufferers 
from rupture would learn about your Appli¬ 
ance and try one. Will gladly answer any 
correspondence recommending your Appli¬ 
ance.” Leo Hentges, Rte. #1, Centertown, Mo. 

CAN RELY UPON AND TRUST ONLY BROOKS 

“I have worn many types of trusses, belts, and 
other supports, but allow me to say truthfully 
that the only one I can rely upon and trust on 
all circumstances is definitely “Brooks.” I 
never have to be afraid of slipping, getting 
out of adjustment, and sore gouge marks 
caused by many other trusses. I can wear 
“Brooks” with confidence.” C. C. Palmer, 572 
W, Grand Blvd., Detroit 16, Mich. 


/^/rs£/ps... 

TH ROW AWAY 
THAT TRUSS! 

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sate whether fer Man □ Woman □ or Child D | Bfooks Appllatice Co., 447-R Stato St., MarsHall, Mich. 



r 


JUNE 




















-r^"' ' * 



■ 






FEBRUARY 1, 1958 


*+■ 








1958 

POULTRY 

ISSUE 

Eggs ond Poultry 


What's Ahead for Poultry? 

Extro Service from Tractor Tires 
Breeding, Feeding — and Worms 
Now It's Power Pruning 
Low-Calorie, Protein-Rich Foods 3 






11 

13 

18 

4 






















































Cops’rilfht 1958, The Firestone Tire & Rubber Company 


More and more farmers throughout the country are 
becoming 100% Firestone users. Like Norman Allen, 
who farms 700 acres in up-state New York, they’ve 
found no other farm tire measm-es up to Firestone for 
superior traction and extra long wear. 

Mr. Allen uses Firestone tractor tires on his five 
tractors and specifies Firestone Guide Grips on the 
front. For his two trucks it’s Firestone Super All 
Traction tires, and besides Firestones on his car he 
can count 50 Firestones on farm implements. 

Here’s what Mr. Allen says about his 100% use of 


Firestones: "I farm with Firestones exclusively. They 
give me better traction under any condition which 
saves on fuel. And you don’t have a lot of tire trouble 
or downtime when you farm with Firestones. I think 
they’re the soundest investment a farmer can make.” 

You’ll think Firestones are a sound investment, too, 
once you’ve put them into action on your farm. See 
yoin: Firestone Dealer or Store soon. He’s ready to 
handle all tire and service needs. If you have tire 
trouble, he will loan you new Firestone tires to use 
while yours are being repaired or retreaded. 


Enjoy the Voice of Firestone on ABC television every Monday evening 

ALWAYS A YEAR TO PAY 



BETTER RUBBER FROM START TO FINISH 





The Parson has been appointed to 
aid a neighboring church in finding a 
new minister. At a meeting in which 
the problem was being discussed, the 
consensus seemed to be that the 
church needed a young minister “be¬ 
cause we must have one interested 
in young people.” 


Meanwhile, in his own community, 
the Parson has gotten himself into 
a new project. He endeavored to or¬ 
ganize a young people’s gi'oup when 
he first came into this field, but with 
no success. He recalls asking himself 
at the time whether he had lost his 
touch with young people. But appar¬ 
ently it was only that the time was 
not ripe for it and the prospective 
membei's not ready. Last Fall the 
group came into being with such en¬ 
thusiasm as to promise real success. 
The activities of the group augur well 
to keep the Parson busy. At Christ¬ 
mas time they planned to go carol¬ 
ling. Miserable weather on that night 
did not stop them and, of course, Mr. 
Herbert Stewart and the Parson had 
to go along. Later, good freezing 
weather having settled in, ice skating 
became the main activity. The Parson 
went along with mental reservations 
to content himself with tending the 
bonfire and watching the skaters. 
He had no great desire to attempt to 
skate since 15 years had passed since 
last he had tried it. His alibi was per¬ 
fect; he had no skates. But, from the 
conversation among the group, it de¬ 
veloped that Douglas Fromm had a 
pair of skates, “just the right size” 
and not being used. So the Parson 
must yield to the pressure. 


Duncan’s Pond is a fine place for 
skating, well sheltered from the 
strong winds. The local fire company, 
with true community spirit, floods 
the ice whenever it becomes rough, 
thus assuring a smooth new surface 
after one night of freezing weather. 
The day when the Parson had noth¬ 
ing to do but tend the bonfire, he 
had a very good chance to observe 
the skating crowd. Most of the cars 
that pulled in brought whole fam¬ 
ilies. Parents guided little children 
equipped with sled skates. The high 
school crowd “cracked the whip” 
with the usual results. Even grand¬ 
parents were there, some just watch¬ 
ing, a few skating. 


To the Parson, this seemed to be 
the perfect answer to the problem 
posed at that committee meeting. 
These skaters were mainly from his 
own congregation. If they were all 
ages, they were still one great happy 
unity. Parents unbending enough to 
go with their children for a few 
hours of recreation; whole families 
sharing the afternoon’s fun as a unit. 
Somehow it seemed that more of this 
sort of thing would solve many social 
problems even before they arose to 
plague a community, a church or a 
family. We cannot solve such prob¬ 
lems by passing them over to any one 
person, or group of persons. 

The one great solution is that fam¬ 
ilies share their duties and their 
pleasures, worship together, work to¬ 
gether and play together. No amount 
of material provision for our children 
can pay such high dividends in char¬ 
acter. Rev. a. a. Burkhardt 

New Jersey 


f. 


'■I 


The 


Rural New Yorker 


Vol. CVIII 


No. 5901 


Published Semi-Monthly by The Rural 
Publishing Co., 333 W. 30th St., New York 
1, N. Y. Price 50c a Year. Re-entered as 
Second Class Matter September 6, 1945, 
at the Post Office at New York, N. Y.» 
under the Act of March 3, 1879. 


Cover Picture by — Grant Heilman 
Lititz, Penna. 



2 


THE RURAL NEW YORKB 



























Hail to Poultry and Eggs! 

Northeast poultrymen can be proud of their record in pro¬ 
viding fine, healthful food—and plenty of it all the time. 


TYPICAL invitation to Sunday 
dinner for many, many years 
has been, “Come to our house, 
we’ll celebrate and have chick¬ 
en — or turkey.” Everyone 
agrees that chicken and turkey 
are delicious foods, the kind 
anybody wants to serve to company. But chick¬ 
en and turkey are no longer reserved just for 
special occasions. People have learned that the 
birds can be roasted, broiled, stewed, barbe¬ 
cued or rotobroiled. The meat makes delicious 
soups, salads, sandwiches, croquettes, and other 
special dishes such as chicken a la king, chick¬ 
en cacciatore and tetrazzini, turkey chop suey 
and chow mein, turkey pies, and TV dinners. 
Almost every family in America has chicken 
or turkey at least once and often two or three 
times each week. 

Eggs are even more versatile. In addition to 
our daily fried, scrambled, soft boiled, hard 
boiled, poached eggs and omelets for break¬ 
fast, we may have them in waffles, popovers, 
Yorkshire pudding, cakes. Western sand¬ 
wiches, and crepes suzette. 

Acceptance of poultry meats and eggs by 
the American people has been responsible for 
the tremendous growth that has occurred in 
our broiler, turkey and egg industries. In a 
few years, the broiler industry doubled and 
then tripled, and the turkey industry increased 
by leaps and bounds. The production of eggs 
has kept abreast of the needs of the country. 
Due to scientific advances in breeding, feeding 
and management of poultry, the cost of eggs 
and chicken and turkey meat has remained 
fairly constant. Almost every other kind of 
food has been going up. 

It is a tribute to the poultry, turkey and egg 
producers of this country that their adoption 
of scientific methods of breeding, feeding and 
management has succeeded in supplying the 
people of this nation with plentiful foods of 
the highest nutritional value, and at prices so 
low that even lowest income families need not 
go without them. The high nutritional value of 
eggs and poultry meats are so generally recog¬ 
nized, however, that they have been too much 
taken for granted. 

Poultry and Protein 

Our muscles, organs, enzymes and most 
other vital tissues of the body except bones 
are made up chiefly of proteins. Protein is ab¬ 
solutely essentia^l for growth, repair of worn 
tissues and for life itself. Not only do we need 
a sufficient amount in our diet, we need it of 
a proper quality. Protein must supply the cor¬ 
rect amounts and proportions of all essential 
amino acids needed by the body for growth 
and repair of its muscles and vital tissues. 

Eggs have for years been recognized as one 
of our best sources of high quality protein. 
The composition of eggs is so well suited to the 
needs of the human diet for proper amino acid 
balance that, in assessing nutritional value, egg 
protein is used as the standard of comparison 
for other food proteins. 

Recent research at Cornell University has 
shown that turkey meat is higher in protein 
than any other of the common meats. Chicken 
meat is a very close runner-up. One turkey or 
chicken sandwich containing a quarter-pound 
of meat will supply over one-half the daily pro¬ 
tein requirement for an adult man or woman. 
When the turkey or chicken sandwich follows 
a good breakfast of two eggs, toast, orange 
juice and a glass of milk, the daily protein re¬ 
quirement of an adult man or woman has been 
satisfied; three-quarters of the teen-ager’s pro¬ 
tein requirement has been met. Not only do 
these poultry products supply a large portion 
of the daily protein requirement, but they also 

February 1, 1958 


By M. L. SCOTT 

provide a well-balanced protein of high bio¬ 
logical value. A quarter-pound of chicken or 
turkey meat and two eggs provide over half 
of each of the essential amino acids estimated 
to be needed by a growing teen-ager each day. 

Eggs and poultry meat are low in calories. 
Since calories are usually consumed in excess, 
it is important to note that turkey, chicken, 
tuna, veal and round steak all provide protein 
with a minimum of them. Research with labora¬ 
tory animals has shown that a diet containing 
a low ratio of calories to protein is less fatten¬ 
ing than one containing a high. Ounce for 
ounce, eggs contain only about 60 per cent of 
the calories of bread and less than half of 
breakfast cereals. 

Eggs and poultry meats are rich in vitamins. 
Two eggs will provide 1,300 units of vitamin A 
and 100 of vitamin D, approximately one- 
quarter of a person’s daily requirements. A 
quarter-pound serving of turkey or chicken 
meat will provide about 25 per cent of the 
riboflavin and niacin requirements of young 
and adult humans. Proteins, vitamins and 
minerals in eggs and poultry meats fit together 
excellently with other foods to provide a bal¬ 
anced human diet that is satisfying, non¬ 
fattening, yet adequate for work and play. 

Fats, Fatty Acids and Cholesterol 

Much recent medical research has dealt with 
the effects of dietary fats, fatty acids and 
cholesterol upon human health. The reason for 
this is that a high blood level of cholesterol is 
usually found in patients suffering from a form 
of heart disease known as atherosclerosis. 
Turkey and chicken meats are very low in 
cholesterol. Since eggs are rich in cholesterol, 
however, many people have thought that con¬ 
sumption of them would increase cholesterol 
levels in the blood. This conclusion was ar¬ 
rived at without benefit of any research to 
show whether or not eating eggs actually 
causes an increase. It represents a good ex¬ 
ample of the fallacy of drawing conclusions 
without the benefit of research. At present, 
medical researchers are in agreement that, 
within the limits of a normal diet, food choles¬ 
terol has little influence upon blood cholesterol. 
Cholesterol is synthesized and metabolized 
daily in our bodies in amounts far greater than 
usually consumed in the diet. When dietary 
intake of cholesterol is increased, the amount 
synthesized by the body is decreased. Eggs have 
never been shown to cause an elevated 
cholesterol level in man. 

Numerous medical research groups have re¬ 
cently presented evidence that the type of fat 
present in the diet is important in determining 
the fat level in the body. These studies indi¬ 
cate that ingestion of a high proportion of 
saturated fatty acids causes an increase in 
blood cholestrol, but that the addition of an 
unsaturated fat causes a decrease in it. Signifi¬ 
cantly, chicken and turkey meats are high in 
unsaturated fatty acids, and particularly the 
essential ones. The degree of unsaturation in 
the fats of eggs and poultry meats actually 
resembles that of cottonseed oil. Therefore, the 
fats of eggs and poultry meats should be con¬ 
sidered along with vegetable fats as relatively 
unsaturated. It is this type of fat that has been 
shown to be beneficial in reducing, or maintain¬ 
ing at a low level, plasma lipids, especially 
cholesterol, in the human body. 

It is not only necessary to have enough pro¬ 
tein in our diet but also that this protein con¬ 
tain the proper proportions of all essential 
amino acids. The ratio of calories to protein is 
important, too, in order to direct the calories 
toward useful energy purposes in growth, re¬ 
pair of worn tissues, work and play. We do 
not want them stored as excessive fat around 


the waistline. The fats in our diet should con¬ 
tain a balance of saturated and unsaturated 
fatty acids and a plentiful supply of essential 
fatty acids. We also need plenty of calcium and 
other minerals for the formation of strong 
bones and teeth and for important body func¬ 
tions. Vitamins are needed to spark all of the 
many metabolic reactions that must take place. 

Eggs and poultry meats are among the foods 
best suited for fulfilling all of these require¬ 
ments. They are excellent supplements to all 
other foods. Eggs and poultry meats can play 
a very important role in furnishing from 20 
to 50 per cent of most of the necessary nutri¬ 
ents required by humans. Equally important, 
they supplement the weak points in other 
foods, thereby aiding very effectively in pro¬ 
ducing a well-balanced diet. The egg producer, 
the broiler grower and the turkey raiser can 
feel proud of their parts in furnishing the 
people of this country with plentiful supplies 
of the poultry products which contribute so 
much to our national health. 



By fulfilling in a most satisfying way the protein 
needs of people, eggs are standards of comparison. 



Hoioever cooked, broilers and chickens provide 
most delicious and economical nourishment. 




Turkey is pre-eminent for protein, and it is low 
in fat. Its taste and texture are truly fine. 



3 

















Now It’s Power Pruning 

Mechanized orchard pruning not only saves 
time and labor; it does a better job. 

By FRED R. DREILING 


S a fruit grower, you are un¬ 
doubtedly facing today’s gener¬ 
ally high production costs, and 
one of the most effective means 
to reduce them is through 
mechanization of the pruning 
operation. With adequate prun¬ 
ing so vital to the production of quality fruit, 
mechanizing the task in many cases makes the 
difference between profit and loss. Experience 
shows that savings in labor range from 25 to 
50 per cent. One large Virginia grower insists 
that “our expenses for pruning have been cut 
in half through the use of power pruning 
equipment.” During the last decade, power 
pruning has come into its own. Today it is a 
standard practice of many orchardists in every 
fruit producing area. It is estimated there are 
now 800 power-operated cutter tools being 
used in New York. 

Power pruning utilizes tools which cut by 
means of compressed air. A portable air com¬ 
pressor is powered by a gasoline motor or by 
a tractor’s power take-off; lines of rubber hose 
run from the compressor to the tools. Between 
one and eight lines can be operated, depend¬ 
ing on the size of compressor. For pneumatic 
pruning, some growers have a preference for 
power take-off compressor units. In quite a few 
instances, growers use a sliding clutch arrange¬ 
ment on their engine-driven compressor units 
so as to provide quick starting on cold morn¬ 
ings. 

Improved Pruning 

With the use of power tools, there has defi¬ 
nitely been an improvement in pruning. Trees 
are opened up better from the outside to give 
more thorough spray coverage and uniform 
light penetration. This is particularly true when 
the pruning is done from a platform. The 
“mule-tail” pruning done in many orchards 
that removes all side branches from main limbs 
on the inside of the trees, leaving the outside 
wood thick, is avoided with a power tool. You 
can usually reach up 10 to 12 feet from the 
ground to thin out the outer lower half of 
mature apple trees. This opening up of a tree 
from the outside gives better distribution of 
bearing surfaces back into the trees. It can pre¬ 
vent much limb breakage; there is better dis¬ 
tribution of fruit. 

Another advantage of pruning with power 
tools is that in most cases you work at some 
distance from the cuts. You are in a far better 
position to judge the cuts as they are related 
to the entire tree. When pruning with hand 
tools, we are inclined to make a few heavy cuts 
and go on to the next tree. With power, we 
make more and smaller cuts. This type of 
pruning reduces sucker growth and retains a 
maximum, yet uniform, bearing surface. In 
turn, this produces fruit of good size and color. 

While it usually takes the average workman 
three or four days to learn to handle power 
tools, less time is required by workmen who 
are especially mechanical. Some operators 
using long power tools tend to leave stubs, but 
this can be overcome to a great degree by plac¬ 
ing the hand out on the barrel and bracing 
the longer tools when making the cuts. Opera¬ 
tors of power tools must be alert and able to 
decide quickly what branches to remove. With 
such ease in cutting, it is easy to become 
“trigger happy” and prune too heavily. Watch 
your fingers, too, and make sure the rubber 
hose is sound. 

Handling of Power Tools 

When working in a large tree, it is well to 
pull up eight or 10 feet of hose and drape it 
over a nearby limb. This relieves the operator 
of the entire weight of the hose. In the top 
of a large tree after pruning is completed, it 

4 


is wise to disconnect the tool from the hose 
and descend to the ground with it in hand. 
Once on the ground, the hose can be pulled 
from the tree and recoupled to the tool. If the 
air hose becomes snarled while working from 
the ground, the coupling can be disconnected 
and the line pulled clear from the compressor. 
In the tree, the tools can be effective in hook¬ 
ing out brush to a point where it can be pushed 
through the tree and onto the ground. 

Quick and Economic 

Growers report that the constant running 
of the compressor engine tends to encourage 
men to work more steadily than they might 
with hand tools. An orchard foreman says, “it 
takes us just half a day to do what would re¬ 
quire a whole day, as compared with the hand 
operation, and we are not as tired when we 
get through.” 

The initial cost of power pruners seems 
somewhat high, but growers report that main¬ 
tenance on the better kinds is quite low. On 
many farms the compressor works the year 
around in blowing up tires, powering grease 
guns, and supplying air for spraying. There are 
many advantages to power pruners. With hand 
operations, many acres just do not get pruned. 
Power tools enable one to get completely over 
the orchard so as to start the season with a 
clean production slate. 

Pruning Platforms 

Platforms will usually bring additional sav¬ 
ings in time and labor when used with power 
pruners. Experience has shown, however, that 
on the initial pruning of bearing trees there 
is usually no saving from a platform. It is 
necessary to do more pruning in opening up 
the trees from the outside the first time. When 
trees are pruned from a platform, power tools 
are easier to handle; and operators are kept 
off the soft, wet ground, too. Working from 
a platform, you see the tree in the direction 
from which spray materials and sunshine ap¬ 
proach. In pruning the tree from a platform, 
one is able to keep fruiting wood evenly dis¬ 
tributed throughout the tree. 

Platforms usually must be built to suit the 
orchards in which they are to be used. Their 
design will be influenced by general tree size, 
distance of planting, slope of orchard and 
equipment used. Platforms have been built, 
nevertheless, which incorporate a leveling de¬ 
vice for sloping orchards. The platform should 
be high enough so that the operator can reach 
the top cuts when using an average power tool. 
The height of platforms is generally seven to 
10 feet above ground levels. Some are adjust¬ 
able. Slip-boards are integrated onto most 
of them to get the operator right into the tree. 

Disposal of Brush 

We have found rotary brush shredders most 
desirable for brush disposal in orchards where 
tree rows are long and land is relatively level. 
These machines operate from the power take¬ 
off of a tractor and shred brush by means of 
large blades rotating at high speed. Prunings 
must first be wind-rowed between the trees. 
This method combines the advantages of speed 
and economy, and it returns organic matter 
to the soil. One large eastern apple grower 
states, “one man can cut up 50 acres of brush 
in less than a day with the rotary brush 
shredder.” His problem is to keep enough 
brush wind-rowed ahead of the shredder. The 
shredder can also be used for orchard mowing 
and for clearing waste land. 

Adaptation of power and pneumatic pres¬ 
sure to the orchard’s annual pruning can save 
much time, labor and, over the years, expense. 
Moreover, it results in improved and more 
complete cutting and care of the trees. 



The power pruner enables an orchardman to reach 
farther, cut more quickly, and use less energy. 



Power pruners and platforms go especially well 
together for quick, complete work of pruning. 



After prunings are wind-rowed between trees, d 
rotary brush shredder effectively breaks them up. 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 















Name any job—plowing, planting, cultivating, baling, 
hauling! You can do it faster, easier, at lower cost with 
IH Torque Amplifier drive on a new Farmall® or Inter¬ 
national® tractor. 

TA is the big difference that puts IH tractors in a class 
by themselves! Ten speeds forward—two in each gear— 
match every job, shorten every task. TA gives you instant 
pull-power increase of up to 45% that keeps you going 
non-stop when others must shift-down. TA gives you 
better speed control, too. Just pull the TA lever to slow 
down 30% for full power turns. Or slow travel in heavy 
going while pto machines hold crop-saving full rpm. 

From winter chores through fall harvest. Torque 
Amplifier puts IH tractor power to better use. By helping 
you do up to 10 hours’ work in an easier 8J4, it makes you 
a BIGGER man than ever before! 


See Your 


See why youVe a BIGGER man 
on a new IH TRACTOR! 

Your IH dealer will gladly demonstrate how Torque- 
Amplifier, Traction-Control Fast-Hitch, unequalled 
hydraulics, and all the other IH farm-easy features 
can put you far ahead in ’58. Try these big IH 
differences that can make you a BIGGER man! 


INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER 

Dealer 

Infernalional Harvester Products pay for themselves in use—Farm Tractors and Equipment. . . Twine . . . Com¬ 
mercial Wheel Tractors .., Motor Trucks .., Construction Equipment—General Office, Chicago 1, Illinois. 


You'll save minutes and movements on every turn when you cultivate 
with TA. There’s no fuel waste or sluggish hydraulic action from throttling down. 
Just pull the TA lever to slow down 30% for safer, full-power turns. When you’re 
back on the row, merely release the TA lever to resume top cultivating speed. 


Just pull the TA lever to take bunchy windrows In stride. TA reduces 
forward travel instantly, yet keeps pto machines at full-rated rpm to handle sudden 
overloads. There’s no clutch slipping, no loss of efficiency, no fuel waste. 


with 


Every day ... in all these ways ... 

speed thru more work 


February 1, 1958 


5 























SEND FOR 
THIS 

FREE 

SEED GUIDE 


irS FILLED WITH 
IMPORTANT FACTS 
ON ALL NEWEST 
SEED VARIETIES 


ALFALFA • CLOVERS 
OATS • HAY • BARLEY 
FORAGE CROPS 
^PASTURE GRASSES 
HYBRID CORN 


For FREE Copy of Seed Guide Address Dept, 32R 


A. H. HOFFMAN SEEDS, INC • LANDISYILLE, PENNA. 

Serving farmers with finest quality seeds since 1899 



19i8 GAtDlN 


I^CI I V>C COLOR 
IVELLT O CATALOG 

of DWARF FRUIT TREES 

Peach, Cherry, Apple, Pbar 

DllIC ornamental Shrubs, Shade 
riUo Trees, Perennials, etc. 


Dwarf Peach, Cherry, Apple, Pear trees, 
give huge crops from small land area... 
and they’re so EASY to care for and 
harvest! Over a dozen varieties guaran¬ 
teed to bear large juicy fruit within 2 
years. Also standard trees, grapes, berry 
plants, flowering shrubs, perennials, 
fast-growing shade trees, etc. SAVE by 
buying DIRECT from nursery in busi¬ 
ness over 78 years. No obligation. Send 
coupon now. 

_KELLY BROS.. 

78 YEARS AS NURSERYMEN 
Dept. R 2-1, Dansville, N. Y. I 

Rush me FREE the new Spring Color Cata- | 
log of guaranteed, hardy Dwarf Fruit Trees, 
Shrubs, Berry Plants, etc. (Regular Cus¬ 
tomers: your ’58 catalog is on the way.) 

Name... 

Address. 

City 


.State. 

Enclose 50# West of the Mississippi 


FRUIT TREES, STRAWBERRY, RASPBERRY 
AND BLUEBERRY PLANTS 


Dwarf apple trees on Mailing I, 2, 
7. 9 stock. Nut and Shade Trees, 
Grape Vines, Flowering Shrubs, 
Evergreens. Over 80 years experi¬ 
ence growing and supplying com¬ 
plete line of nursery stock direct 
to planters. Satisfaction assured — 
prices reasonable. 60-page illus- 
trated catalog and planting guide 
sTStffSTwr’it^BOUNTIFUL RIDGE NURSERIES 
BOX R-218, PRINCESS ANNE, MARYLAND 




STRAWBERRIES 


Allen’s 1958 Berry Book tells 
best varieties for home and 
market, and how to grow them. 
Free copy. Write today. 


W. F. ALLEN COMPANY 
rergreen Ave., Salisbury, Maryland 


\ LA/l«t4A 



FRUIT 

TREES 


Write now for big FREE 
Color Catalog — supply 
limited. Great values in 
Fruit Trees, Berries, 
Grapes, Shrubs, Roses, 
Perennials, Evergreens. 
Sturdy, strong-rooted 
stock. Northen grown on 
600 acres in Dansville, and priced right! 
Guaranteed to grow and true to name. Free 
stock for early orders. Our 74th 'Year. 

MALONEY BROS. NURSERY CO. 

16 Circle Rood, Dansville, N. Y. 



lOMATO 


JUNG’S WAYAHEAD 

BIG RED FRUITS RIPEN EARLY AS 
JULY 4IK. Regular price 1 5c per 
pkt., but to fntroduce Jung's Quality 
Seeds we will send you a trial pkt. 
of Wayahead Tomato ond also a 
pkt. of GIANT HYBRID ZINNIAS 
which bloom from early summer un¬ 
til frost and rival chrysanthemums 
, in size ond beauty, 

Both pkts. for 10c. 

Beautiful 51st Year Catalog, in full 
color, of the better things to be hod 
in Seeds, Bulbs, Plants and Shrubs is 
free. A Premium Coupon in catalog. 


J. W. JUNG SEED CO. 


Station 21 Randolph, Wisconsin 

Evergreen Planting Stock 

For Christmas Trees Ornamentals 

SEEDLINGS and TRANSPLANTS — many va¬ 
rieties of Pine, Spruce, Fir, etc. direct from 
growers. Excellent money-crop for idle acres. 
Price List and Planting Guide—FREE. Write: 

SUNCREST NURSERtES 



BOX 305-B, 


HOMER CITY. PENNA. 


FOUNDATION PLANTIN G f 

10 Plants: 6 Piitzer Juniper, 
spreader, blue-green. For sunny 
spots- 4 Japanese Yew, upright, 
compact, deep green. Sun or 
shade. All 2 and 3 times trans¬ 
planted, 10" to 16". Strong roots. 

Postpaid at planting time. ’ FREE CATALOG 


10 for 
$ 12.95 


MUSSER FORESTS, 


BOX 20-B 


Indiana.. Pa. 


TREES & SHRUBS 

Raise your own trees and shrubs from SEEDS. BMUti- 
ful Evergreens, lovely trees and shrubs for shadOr 
windbreaks, snow fence, erosion control, ornament, 
etc. For FR^EE planting guide and Prite list write: 
WOODLOT SEED CO., NORWAY 37, MICHIGAN 



-HARRIS SECDS 

For seed sowing, use 

MILLED SPHAGNUM MOSS 

Safest, Surest Medium for Best Germination 
A boon to commercial and home gardeners for it 
provides highest germination, holds moisture but 
checks damping-Off disease. Use it alone or in ‘i inch 
layer on top of soil. Packed in 10 oz. or in 2 cu. ft. 
bags. For complete information 

SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG 
If you grow for market, ask for our Market 
Gardeners and Florists Catalog. 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., Inc, 

16 Moreton Farm, Rochester 11, New York 

958 CfiJkLOC mwAmciif 


Time to Start Seeds in Flats 


To get a jump on the season, slow- 
germinating seeds should be sown in 
flats in the house in February; faster 
growing varieties can wait until 
March. 

Assuming that you laid in a supply 
of good garden loam last Fall for this 
occasion, combine two parts of it 
with one part peat moss and two 
parts coarse sand, the whole sifted 
through a quarter-inch sieve. This 
will provide a good friable planting 
soil, one which will not pack or cake 
on top. Save the coarse material 
which fails to pass through the sieve 
(large stones or sticks discarded) for 
placing in the bottom of the flats for 
drainage. And it is important to 
treat seeds or soil, or both, to pre¬ 
vent damping-off, a rot disease 
caused by fungus parasites in the 
soil. 

There are two methods of preven¬ 
tion, both simple and practical. One 
is to sterilize small quantities of soil 
—at the same time making it weed- 
free—in the kitchen oven. Place soil 
in a large flat pan in a quick oven, 
with temperature held at 400 degrees 
for about two hours. Allow soil to 
cool completely before planting the 
seed. The other and quicker method 
of disinfecting both seed and soil is 
to mix the seed, before planting, 
with Semesan, obtainable at seed 
stores; follow directions on the pack¬ 
age. 

The standard garden flat, a wooden 
box about three inches deep, 18 
inches long and 12 inches wide, is 
the most practical container in which 
to sow seeds because it is easy to 
handle. Place drainage material 
mentioned above in the bottom of 
the flat to a depth of about one inch, 
then fill to the top with the soil mix¬ 
ture, pressing it down to about three- 
eighths of an inch below top of flat. 

It is almost impossible to lay down 
any hard and fast rule as to the 
depth to plant seeds. However, a gen¬ 
eral rule is to cover with soil equal 
in depth to the diameter of the seed 
—a bit deeper in loose sandy soil. 

Fine seeds, such as those of the 
petunia and geranium, may be mixed 
with 10 times as much fine sand; 
otherwise it is almost impossible not 
to plant them tco thickly. And fine 
seeds do not need to be covered with 
soil. Pressing them firmly into the 


soil surface with a flat board (such 
as a piece of lath) is sufficient. After 
the seeds have been planted, set the 
flat in a large pan or tub containing 
about an inch of water which will 
.slowly soak up through the soil. 

Care after planting the flat is im¬ 
portant. First of all, do not permit 
the seeded soil to dry out. When¬ 
ever the surface of the soil seems 
dry, water with a fine spray from a 
sprinkler. A pane of ordinary win¬ 
dow glass placed over the top of the 
flat will aid in preventing dryness. 

When the seedlings have formed 
their first rough leaf, allow much 
more light. Weeds in the flat will be 
easily detected if the seeds were 
planted in rows and the rows marked 
with name stakes. Flats should be 
weeded regularly, otherwise weeds 
will deprive the seedlings of needed 
light, water and food. 

Thinning of the seedlings should 
begin promptly if, as is generally the 
case, they make their appearance in 
a crowded condition. At first, prob¬ 
ably only every other plant will need 
to be removed. If not properly thin¬ 
ned, the crowded plants will become 
spindly, with poor root systems and 
weak stems. 

When the true leaves appear, it is 
time for their first transplanting. The 
true leaves are the second pair of 
leaves to appear. Water the flat sev¬ 
eral hours before the seedlings are 
to be lifted, so that the soil will more 
readily cling to their roots. Use the 
pointed end of a wooden marker to 
lift the seedlings, taking care not to 
loosen the ball of earth. Transplant 
to other flats with slightly richer soil, 
making the holes large enough so 
that the roots will not be crowded. 
Plant to the depth of the first leaves. 
Press the soil gently but firmly 
around each plant. Space the plants 
two inches apart each way. Water 
thoroughly and protect from the sun 
for at least a week. The second trans¬ 
planting can be into two-inch pots or 
into another flat, spacing the plants 
four inches apart each way. 

Seeds of the following plants 
should be planted in February, since 
they are slow to germinate: petunia, 
geranium, lobelia, pansy, annual 
canterbury bells and begonia, espe¬ 
cially the gracilis varieties. 

Maine Ethel M. Eaton 


Plastic Greenhouse Pioneer 


Arvid Johnson operates a retail 
and wholesale nursery in Chautau¬ 
qua, County, N. Y., and he has pion¬ 
eered with one of the few plastic 
greenhouses yet to be built in West¬ 
ern New York. 

Since he built the 25x66-foot struc¬ 
ture in the Fall of 1956, he has found 
that it holds up well against not only 
heavy snow, but against all the ele¬ 
ments of weather. It cost between 
$500 and .$600. A typical glass green¬ 
house the same size would have been 
approximately $4,000. “Of course” 
says Johnson, “the price can vary, de¬ 
pending on size and particular needs.” 

The 28-inch-wide opaque four-mill- 
weight plastic gives adequate support 
for the heavy snow which may build 
up on sides and top during Winter. 
In climates where there is no snow, 
according to Johnson, it should be 
all right to purchase wider stripping. 



.Arvid Johnson’s plastic greenhouse 
keeps heat in, cold out, light in and 
his plants growing well all year. 


Johnson’s structure is one of five 
greenhouses at his nursery; the 
others are of conventional glass. The 
frame of the plastic house is con¬ 
structed from rough lumber, but 
pipe suppoi'ts are used for added 
strength. The plastic stripping is 
stapled and also held by wood strip¬ 
ping running up and down the roof. 
The plastic has ample play for the 
expansion and contraction that oc¬ 
curs during changes in temperature. 

Johnson has found many advanta¬ 
ges besides low cost for the plastic 
greenhouse. A major one is its simpli¬ 
fication of repair. Should a section 
become worn or punctured, it is quite 
simple to patch it with plastic. No 
glass needs be cut, and there is no 
puttying. Even if a complete recov¬ 
ering job becomes necessary, it would 
cost only about $125. Although it 
took Johnson two months of spare 
time to build the greenhouse, he 
estimates it could be recovered in 
three or four full days. Through ex¬ 
perimentation, he has found that the 
plastic greenhouse seems to retain 
heat better then the glass houses 
and also to resist outer cold. More 
moisture is held within the plastic 
greenhouse, too, he believes. Plastic 
greenhouses may become a great 
boon for farmers who grow some 
of their plants. At least Western New 
York Nurseryman Arvid Johnson 
thinks so. It has for him. 

Robert Dyment 


\ 


/ 















































fAHM WORK SHOP 

BY a. K. SOMMBRS 


Applying Siding Shingles 

I want to install siding shingles on 
my frame house. Please advise as to 
method, also what kind of wood, and 
should the shingles be painted or 
stained. s. d. 

Wood shingles come 16, 18 and 24 
inches long. If you apply them ac¬ 
cording to the single course method 
—one layer of shingles at each course, 
use the following formula to deter¬ 
mine the exposure: subtract one inch 
from the length of the shingle and 
divide by two. For example, if the 
shingles are 16 inches long, then 16 
minus one is 15, divided by two is 
seven and a half inches, or seven and 
a half inches to the weather. Eigh¬ 
teen-inch shingles have an exposure 
of eight and a half inches; 24-inch 
shingles an exposure of 11 and a half 
inches. The first course is doubled to 
prevent leakage at the joint between 
the surface shingles. 

Sidewall shingles are also applied 
double thickness, two layers each 
course. The exposure may be con¬ 
siderably more— 10 to 12 inches to 
the weather for 16 inches of shingles, 
14 inches exposure for 18-inch 
shingles, and 16 inches for 24-inch 
shingles. Because of the unusual ex¬ 
posure in double coursing, the face 
shingles must be face nailed about 
two inches from the butts. The under 
course is placed about half an inch 
above the but line of face course to 
accent the shadow of the butt line. 
Low grade shingles are used for the 
under courses. 

The most durable wood shingles 
are made of western red cedar, cy¬ 
press and redwood. Any well-estab¬ 
lished lumber yard can furnish the 
top grades. Shingles are marketed in 
a variety of color stains as well as 
plain. Shingle stain is made of a thin 
oil stain usually containing a high 
percentage of linseed oil. The darker 
shades of stain contain creosote oil 
as a preservative. Paint may be used 


on sidewall shingles but never on 
roof shingles. Vertical wall surfaces 
completely drain off water before it 
can penetrate beneath. On the other 
hand, rain can be blown under roof 
shingles. If painted, the pores of the 
wood ai’e sealed and moisture is re¬ 
tained to promote rotting and peel¬ 
ing of the paint. Side wall shingles 
will last indefinitely if the stain or 
paint is renewed about every five 
years. 


Requirements For Concrete 
Septic Tank 

What would be the specifications 
for a concrete septic tank for ap¬ 
proximately 500 gallons? I am in¬ 
terested in the thickness for sides 
and baffles. How many baffles and 
what mixture cement should be used? 

Maine m. d. 

A 500-gallon capacity tank should 
be about three feet wide, seven feet 
long and three feet six inches deep 
below the outlet pipe (inside dimen¬ 
sions). The walls are four inches 
thick, the partitions three inches 
thick. Since the tank is divided into 
three compartments, you require two 
partition walls. When you build the 
forms for the partitions, provide for 
a hole in each partition 16 inches 
long, six inches high, and about 12 
inches from the bottom of the tank. 
Instead of baffles at the inlet and 
outlet pipes, install tees. At the low¬ 
er end of the tees, attach a length of 
pipe to within 12 inches of the bot¬ 
tom of the tank. 

The top slab is five to six inches 
thick and fitted with a manhole over 


each compartment. A discarded dish- 
pan makes an excellent form for the 
manhole covers. Install the outside 
manholer so as to provide access to 
the tees at the inlet and outlet pipes. 

The concrete mix is one part ce¬ 
ment, two parts building sand, and 
lour parts crushed stone or gravel. 
To make a cubic yard of concrete, 
you need six sacks of cement, one- 
half yard of sand, and one yard of 
stone. 


To Remove Water Point 

Your paper has given us some very 
helpful advice since we started tak¬ 
ing The Rural New Yorker a year 
ago. I now have a painting problem 
on which I need help. In the past 
seven years I have given the walls 
of my kitchen two coats of water 
paint, a dry powder that I mixed 
with cold water, and now both coats 
are flaking off down to the plaster. 
I would like to remove all the paint 
I put on, but with water it would be 
a never-ending job. Can you give me 
some advice about how to remove 
the water paint by an easier method 
so that I can apply an oil-base paint 
that will last? 

Our house is 80 years old, perhaps 
older, but most of the plaster is in 
good shape. The underneath is just 
lime and sand, but the surface is 
smooth and slick as though a skim 
coat of some other material had been 
applied to the rough undercoating. 

Pennsylvania mrs. j. n. 

Add ammonia to hot water and 
thoroughly wash the areas where the 
paint is loose or flaking. Then brush 
on a coat of ready-mixed primer 


sealer before applying oil paint. It 
is not necessary to remove all of the 
cold water paint before applying oil 
paint. Use two coats of paint over 
the sealer. 


Acid fo Remove Rust in 
Water Line? No! 

The pipe from a well has become 
nearly half full of red rust and sedi¬ 
ment from the hard water. I have 
head of an acid that could be put in 
the pipe that would dissolve the rust 
without injury to the pipe. Could you 
advise me about this? The length to 
be treated would be 500 ft. of iy 4 -in. 
pipe. The pipe slopes down-grade to 
the well most of the distance. 

New York w. b. c. 

The use of acid to remove rusty 
sediment is most likely to cause 
leaks, particularly at threaded joints. 
Some of the commercial drain line 
cleaners might give some temporary 
improvement but it would be a diffi 
cult operation to avoid too much ac¬ 
cumulation of the cleaner at the low¬ 
er end of the line, and insufficient at 
the upper end. And, of course, the 
line should be disconnected at the 
point where it enters the house and 
thoroughly flushed before reconnect¬ 
ing. On the whole it would seem in¬ 
advisable to introduce any corroding 
material into the water line. The best 
solution is to replace the rusted 
water pipe. Have you considered 
plastic tubing? 


There’s a new aerosol de-icer on 
the market that is said to melt away 
ice off car windshieds in three min¬ 
utes. Price; $1.39 for 6-oz. container. 
A postcard inquiry to O. S., Care 
of The Rural New Yorker, 333 West 
30th St., New York 1, N. Y., will 
furnish you with name and address 
where this bush-botton spray can 
be purchased. 


i 






You cati'f beat 
Gehl’’5 lower price 


6EHL 


PRONOUNCE ‘T 


GEHL BROS. MFG. CO. I 

Dept. SB-205 West Bend, Wis. 

Send information on the Shred-All Cutter, 
and on complete Gehl forage line | [ 

I'd like to see the new Gehl -color movie QJ 
Check here, if this is for school use 


Acres Farmed 


Name 


Address 


State 


Here’s another great new Gehl forage tool for faster, low-cost 
green-feeding! Shred-All earns its way cleaning up weeds and 
pastures, cutting brush, shredding cornstalks and beet tops 
or chopping straw and windrowed hay. Shred-All has the 
same rugged-built quality that has made Gehl the leading 
chopper among all independent makes. Available as basic 
unit or with choice of two deflectors for rear or side-loading. 
Handy tractor-seat control. See the Shred-All Cutter at one 
of Gehl’s 2500 dealers near you. 

Send coupon now—get the full story. 


New Shfed'AII Cutter... 

another 6ehl-quality forage tool 


Basic 

Shred-All Unit 


February 1, 1958 


7 





















Harris’ Harvest Queen Muskmelon 


HARRIS SCCDS 

Leading Market and Shipping Melon 

Bred for Resistance to Fusarium Wilt. 

FLESH — Extra thick, firm, fine-textured, rich 

orange color with wonderful sweet¬ 
ness and flavor. 

SIZE — Medium with oval shape; excellent 

for crating. 

RIND — Tough with heavy netting; holds 

well after picking. 

ADAPTATION — Major melon growing sections of 
East and Central states. 

SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG TODAY 

If you grow for market, ask for our Market 
Gardeners and Florists Catalog. 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., INC. 

15 Moreton Farm, Rochester 11, New York 

1958 CATALOC 'itm Amdij 




FARM 



to 

■ ^ SfND FOR 


COMPLETE LINE 

SINCE 1895 


AGtNTS WANTCD IN OPEN mRITORIlS 


GARDNER 


45 SPENCER ST., ROCHESTER 3, N.Y. 


SEED 

CO., INC, 


BETTER, FASTER PRUNING 



Manufacturers of a complete line of com¬ 
pound lever-action, side-cutting Trimmers. 
Pole lengths 4 to 16 ft. From $14.35 to 
$28.90 del. in U.S.A. Write for new cata¬ 
log illustrating full line of tree surgery 
tools and supplies. 

BARTLETT MFG. CO. 

3022 E. Grand Blvd., Detroit 2, Mich. 


T R A W B E R RIE S 


FREE CATALOG describes our new 
I virus-free strawberry plants. Foun- 
' dation stock supplied by the U. S. 
Dept, of Agriculture for the pro- 
, duction of better strawberry plants 
for the American farmer and gardener. 
Also blueberries, grapes, raspberries, 
shrubs, snade trees, fruit and nut trees. All stock cer¬ 
tified and guaranteed. Write Now for Your Free Copy. 
RAYNER BROTHERS. SALISBURY 5. MARYLAND 

Blueberry Plants 

WHOLESALE & RETAIL 

CERTIFIED • ALL POPULAR VARIETIES 

SPECIAL $6.98 RETAIL OFFER 

Onedozen large assorted 2 year plants 
Early Midseason & Late Varieties 

GALLETTA BROS.—BLUEBERRY FARMS 

475 S. Chew Read Hammentan, N J. 


5^42=^ S T R A W BERRIES 


Plant Superfectlon for berries this 
year, Allen’s 1958 Berry Book 
describes best varieties—best 
methods. Free copy. Write today, 

W. F. ALLEN COMPANY 
Evergreen Ave., Salisbury, Maryland 

FRUIT GROWERS! 

We Specialize in all leading commer¬ 
cial varieties of Standard and Dwarf 
FRUIT TREES. It will pay you to get 
our circular and prices before you 
make this spring’s planting. 

MAYO BROS. NURSERIES, Dept. R, Fairport, N.Y. 



NEW CARPATHIAN 

WALNUT 



Produces large delicious 
thin shelled English 
walnuts. Perfectly adap¬ 
ted for cold winters; 
will stand 25 below 
without injury. Makes 
a beautiful, fast-grow¬ 
ing shade tree. Plant 

for shade and nuts. Details in Miller’s FREE 
CATALOG, plus valuable information about 
our fruits for home gardens: New Interlaken 
Seedless grape, New berries. Dwarf Fruit 
trees, shade and flowering trees, fruit trees 
of all kinds, and other garden fruits. High 
quality stock. Free Insurance on your plant¬ 
ing. We replace free any plant that fails to 
grow. Get MILLER’S CATALOG before 
you buy. 

J. E. MILLER NURSERIES 


917 W. Lake Road, 


Canandaigua, N. Y. 



BIUE 

SPRUCE 


6 Colorado Blue Sprues 4 
yr. transplanted, 4 to 8 In. 


tall—only $1 postpaid; 15 only $2 
postpaid! Another Bargain: 20 
Evergreens, all transplanted 4 to 
10 in. tall. Five each: Balsam 
Fir, Douglas Fir, Red Pine, 
White Spruce, all 20 for only $3 
postpaid. (West of Miss. River 
add 25c). FREE illustrated 
FOLDER of small evergreen trees. 
ALL TREES GUARANTEED TO 
LIVE. 


WESTERN MAINE FOREST NURSERY CO. 

Dept. RN-218, Pryeburg, Maine 





519 


Huge,graceful,fiuffy,l 
Jloveliestof all.’l'ogetl 
Sacquainted we’ll send J 
jSPkts.of Seeds—fled, I 
‘Pink, and Yellow—' 

75c value forlOc. Send DimeToday] 
Burnee’s Seed Catalog FREE. 
W. ATLEE BURPEE CO. 
Burpee Bldg., Philadelphia 32, Pa. 


• • 

3 to 5 yr. healthy, selected trees, 6" 
to 16" tall. 5 each of: Colorado Blue 
Spruce— Norway Spruce — Austrian 
Pine—’Scotch Pine— Douglas Fir. 

Postpaid at planting time 
Write for Free Evergreen Catalog 



Bex 20-B 


Indiana, Pa. 


I WANT EVERY READER 

of this Paper to ho've my big red 

EARLIANA TOMATO 


“KING OF THE EARLiES” 

Big solid, scarlet fruit, disease 
resistant, heavy yielder. Ideal for 
table or canning. Send 125 SEED 
postal today for 125 seed jCDpir 
and copy of Seed and Nursery Catalog. ■ 11 

.LH.SHUMWAY SEEDSMAN, Dept 399 RDckford, ILL 




HAV WANTED 

300 ton of alfalfa, U. S. No. 1 or 
No. 2 leafy. 

Also, 200 ton of top quality 
mixed hay. Write — 
GARELICK BROS. FARMS, Inc. 
Franklin, Massachusetts 


EVERGREENS 


CHRISTMAS TREES 
and ORNAMENTALS 

Seedlings and Transplant$>direct from grow* 
ers at planting time. Many varieties of Pine, 
Spruce, Fir, etc. Quality stock at low prices. 


Free 

CATALOGUE 

and 

PLANTING 

GUIDE 


SUNCREST EVERGREEN NURSERIES 

Box 305 • B Homer Ci ty, Pa. I _ jUj 




THg best in 
EJABM SEEDS-^ 
since 1391 


HAY and PASTURE MIXTURES 
ALFALFA SEED 

CLOVER. TIMOTRY, BROlUE GR4$$. BIRDSFOOT TREFOIL 

Latest price list describes complete line of best quality tested farm 
seeds at reasonable prices. Write for your free copy! 

Edward F. Dibble, Seedgrower, Box B, Honeoye Falls, N. Y. 


Scab-Resistant Apples? 


No commercial fruit grower or 
home orchardist has any need of 
being told the importance of apple 
scab, the disease which causes dark, 
scabby spots on fruit and leaves. 
Scab on the fruit lowers the grade 
and, when very severe, it may de¬ 
foliate the trees. To control it, fruit 
growers may put on as many as 10 
sprays a season. If resistant varie¬ 
ties could be found, there would be 
a great saving in the cost of spray 
materials, labor and machinery. Scab- 
resistant apples, of course, would 
probably require some spraying for 
control of other diseases and insects. 

Fruit breeders in many states and 
countries have been working dili¬ 
gently on this scab problem. It is, 
however, long, slow labor: resistant 
parents in the breeding programs ai’e 
mostly small, low-quality crab apples 
which require at least two gener¬ 
ations of breeding to get up to de¬ 
sired size and quality and yet main¬ 
tain resistance to scab. Apples re¬ 
quire five to 10 years to fi’uit, too, 
and only then can further crosses be 
made. Even when an apple with good 
fruit characteristics and resistance to 
scab is selected, it must be widely 
tested before it can be named and 
introduced to the trade. Because 
apples take so long to fruit, no or¬ 
chardist wants to risk growing trees 
of an untried variety; he might find 
they are of no value when when they 
begin to fruit. 

In any breeding program like this, 
two things are necessary: first, a 
source of the characteristic desired, 
in this case resistance to apple scab, 
in the genus or its close relatives; 
and second, a means of testing seed¬ 
lings so that only resistant ones can 
be saved. 

Most species of apple have been 
tested for their reaction to apple 
scab. L. F. Hough at the University 
of Illinois and J. R. Shay of Purdue 
University found a number of resis¬ 
tant kinds, most of which are small, 
otherwise worthless crabs. Notable 
among them was Malus floribunda, 
the Japanese flowering crab, now the 
source of resistance used in many 
breeding programs. Several other re¬ 
sistant species have been used to a 
lesser extent. M, Schmidt, working 
in Germany, found considerable re¬ 
sistance in a Russian variety, 
Antonovka, so he used it as the re¬ 
sistant parent. 

Fortunately, apple seedlings from 
scab-resistant crosses can be tested 
for reaction to scab when very young. 
Susceptible seedlings can be dis¬ 
carded before much effort and ex¬ 
pense have been spent in growing 
them. The testing is done by spray¬ 
ing spores of the apple-scab fungus 
on seedlings when they have three 
or four leaves. The seedlings are then 
kept at high humidity for two days 
to promote growth of the scab fun¬ 
gus. About three weeks after the in¬ 
oculation, large scab spots can be 
seen only on the susceptible seed¬ 
lings. Because apples are particularly 
susceptible at this age, it is rela¬ 
tively easy to distinguish those which 


acquire the disease from those which 
are resistant. There is hardly any pos¬ 
sibility that susceptible seedlings will 
escape the disease; in comparison to 
growing the seedlings in the field 
and permitting natural infection, the 
greenhouse inoculation is a very 
severe test. Any seedling which 
stands up under it is quite certain to 
be resistant when planted in the or¬ 
chard. Moreover, the greenhouse in¬ 
oculation is repeated at least once 
more to make sure that all the se¬ 
lected seedlings are truly resistant. 
These are then planted out in the 
orchard for eventual fruiting. They 
are not sprayed with a fungicide but 
are examined for scab each year to 
assure further that they are resistant 
to scab. Trees of very susceptible va¬ 
rieties like McIntosh are planted 
with the test seedlings not only for 
comparison but also for a source of 
scab spores. 

At the N. Y. State Agricultural Ex¬ 
periment Station in Geneva, a resis¬ 
tant-apple breeding project was 
started in 1949. Crosses were made 
between high-quality, large-fruited, 
but scab-susceptible, varieties and 
small, low-quality, resistant crabs. 
Many of these trees have since fruit¬ 
ed, but on most of them the fruit 
is small and of poor quality. A few, 
however, are two and three-fourths 
inches in diameter and have quite 
acceptable quality. It will probably 
be necessary to cross the best of 
these seedlings again with large- 
fruited, high-quality varieties before 
individuals suitable for naming will 
be found. Crosses such as this have 
been made for two years, and up to 
40 per cent of the seconcl-generation 
seedlings retain the resistance of the 
resistant parent. Because it is ex¬ 
pected that the size and quality of 
the fruit will be much improved in 
these crosses over the original ones, 
this is very encouraging. 

Yet, encouraging as the results are 
to date, they are not the whole story. 
We still do not know why these ap¬ 
ples are resistant. Will the fungus 
causing the disease change so that 
resistant individuals may in time be¬ 
come susceptible? This has been the 
case for rust-resistant wheats. But, 
with wheat, fortunately, plant breed¬ 
ers have been able to breed new resis¬ 
tant varieties as fast as new races of 
rust appear. For apples, however, the 
time between generations is so long 
and an orchard such a relatively per¬ 
manent planting that if the scab fung¬ 
us should prove to be as changeable 
as wheat rust, truly resistant apples 
will be found only a long way in the 
future. There are races of scab fun¬ 
gus now known; fortunately, though 
some apples are resistant to all of 
them. It is hoped that the sources of 
resistance being used in the breeding 
programs will be resistant to all 
possible races of fungus. Before 
apple varieties resistant to scab are 
available to the public, solutions to 
many questions can be found. We do 
hope for, nevertheless, and work to¬ 
ward scab-resistant apple varieties 
Robert C. Lamb 



It takes a lot of poiver, spray, time and expense to control scab in apple 
orchards. This speed sprayer moves 72,000 cubic feet of air per minute 
at 100 mph velocity. Scab-resistant varieties would greatly simplify and 
economize pest-control programs in apple orchards. 


8 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 





























































WASHINGTON OUTLOOK 


BY HAR^y LANDO 


President Eisenhower sent the 
Benson farm program to Congress, 
asking for a cut in minimum price 
supports on the basic farm commod¬ 
ities and dairy products from the 
present floor of 75 per cent of parity 
down to 60 per cent, requesting that 
the Agricultural Conservation Pro¬ 
gram of payments to farmers be 
halved so as to aid only with the 
permanent practices and not with 
such “good farming” practices as 
liming and fertilizing, and asking that 
Department of Agriculture loan funds 
be cut so as to permit private money 
to be loaned to farmers. 

The administration also asked an 
end to the requirement that price 
supports be raised when surpluses 
drop, renewed last year’s request that 
corn be taken off the list of 
basic commodities presently en¬ 
titled to price supports between 
75 and 90 per cent of parity 
in return for an end to acreage 
allotments, permission to in¬ 
crease acreages on other crops 
up to 50 per cent when support 
levels are dropped. 

An end of the short-term 
acreage reserve program was 
called for, with greater empha¬ 
sis on the long-range conserva¬ 
tion reserve, extension of the 
Public Law 480 program of 
trading U. S. surpluses for for¬ 
eign money, extension of the 
National Wool Act program 
permitting wool to be sold for 
whatever it will Lring with the 
government making up in direct 
payments to producers the dif¬ 
ference between the average 
market price and the support 
price, plus continuation of the 
special school milk program. 

When Secretary Benson ap¬ 
peared before the Senate Agri¬ 
culture Committee to testify in 
favor of the program, he was 
made the object of the most 
violent attack ever leveled at 
a secretary since Henry 
Wallace. The Senators question¬ 
ed the honesty of the figures 
he brought along with him and 
attempted to cast doubt on his 
sincerity—a quality on which 
both friends and foes had pre¬ 
viously seemed to agree. 

His only active defender was 
Sen. Spessard Holland, Demo¬ 
crat, of Florida. On the other 
hand, incensed at the recent 
cut in dairy price supports due 
to become effective on April 1, 
as well as at the request for 
an end of payments for annual 
practices under the Agricultural 
Conservation Program, plus the 
requested drop in government 
lending under rural ’phone and 
elecU’ification and Farmers 
Home Administration programs, 

. his old friend on the Commit¬ 
tee, Sen. George Aiken (R., Vt.), 
sat back silent while Benson 
was under attack and even in¬ 
serted a few critical questions. 

Two other Republicans, Sen. 
Milton Young of North Dakota 
and Sen. Edwai’d Thye of Min¬ 
nesota, joined with the Demo; 
crats in assailing the wisdom of 
the over-all administration pro¬ 
gram. It was Committee Chair¬ 
man Allen Ellender (D., La.) 
who accused Benson of provid¬ 
ing dishonest figures to exag¬ 
gerate the costs of price-support 
programs. This happened be¬ 
cause Benson lumped price- 
support losses of $1,299 million 
along with the costs of food 
supplied for foreign aid and 
barter for strategic materials, 
for school lunch and charity 
programs, the giant program of 
barter for foreign currency and 
even the Federal crop insur- 

February 1, 1958 


ance program to get a total cost of 
$3,250 million for price and income 
support. 

Sen. Stuart Symington (D., Mo.) 
and Sen. Hubert Humphrey (D., 
Minn.) accused Benson of looking 
out for processors instead of farm¬ 
ers and of deliberately trying to get 
rid of small farmers. Humphrey join¬ 
ed with Thye to assail the dairy 
price-support cuts. They contended 
that consumers did not get lower 
prices after the last dairy price-sup¬ 
port cut and alleged that the entire 
cut was eventually taken out of the 
farmers’ milk checks. They said the 
same thing would happen again. On 
the previous day, Aiken had charged 
that the Benson move to cut govern¬ 
ment lending to farmers in favor of 


government insuring of private 
loans was a move to put farmers 
into the clutches of Wall Street. 

Several Senators asked how Ben¬ 
son hoped to cure the surplus prob¬ 
lem by raising acreages. 

It appeared impossible for Benson 
to get his program through the Sen¬ 
ate Agriculture Committee, except 
for those things on which the Sena¬ 
tors agree, and the House Agriculture 
Committee is even more opposed. 
And, since the Benson opponents 
have not been able to get together on 
a farm program of their own, there 
is at least a temporary stalemate 
which, if it isn’t not broken, will 
block any new farm legislation. 

Extension of the National Wool 
Act, dropping of the acreage re¬ 
serve, extension of the special milk 
program and extension of the Public 
Law 480 program all seem set to 
pass. Benson’s lower price supports 
and greater acreages seem to be 
out the window. 



1. Who was known as “a voice cry¬ 
ing in the wilderness”? 

2. How many special disciples did 
Jesus have? 

3. Why did Jesus go to Cana? 

4. Why did Paul go to Philippi? 

5. Of what was John the Baptist’s 
clothing made? 

6. In what river was Jesus bap¬ 
tized? 

7. Who said, “Freely you have re¬ 
ceived, freely give”? 

8. Who wrote the Book of The Acts 
of the Apostles? 

9. Which of the four Gospels was 
written by a physician (a doctor)? 

10. Which Book of the New Testa¬ 
ment tells the story of a runaway 
slace named Onesimus? 

(Answers on Page 23) 


inter 

BVJLLET'N 

NO.l 


Feeding News & Service 

INTERNATIONAL SALT CO., INC. • SCRANTON, PENNA 


* 


Hints on giving faii-born 
heifers best growth opportunity 


STERLING BLUSALT ' 


High rr,ilk production in your mature 
cows depends in large part on how 
and what you feed them during their 
first year. Here are two feeding prac¬ 
tices found to be effective with fall- 
and winter-born heifers . . . 

1. Every day—along with a balanced 
ration of mixed feed—feed each heifer 
3 lbs. of corn or grass silage for every 
100 lbs. of body weight, plus all the 
hay she’ll eat. This prepares for high 
milk production by helping your heifers 
develop into cows with a large capac¬ 
ity for feed. 

2. Take care not to overfeed calf 
rations. Feed 4 lbs. daily with good- 
quality hay, 5 to 6 lbs. with poor- 
quality hay. Overfeeding the grain 
ration will reduce roughage consump¬ 
tion and add to the cost of raising 
heifers. And excess body fat can spoil 
later udder development. 

Want more information on effective 
livestock feeding? You can get it 

from International Salt Company’s 
Animal Nutrition Department in Wat¬ 
kins Glen, New York. Just drop us a 
line, and we’ll help you in any way 
we can. 


GROWTH STANDARDS FDR DAIRY HEIFERS 

^Morrison Standards) 


Age 

Months 

Holstein 

Lbs. 

Ayrshire 

Lbs. 

Guernsey 

Lbs. 

Jersey 

Lbs. 

Birth 

91 

71 

65 

54 

1 

113 

86 

79 

68 

2 

150 

114 

105 

92 

4 

250 

190 

177 

164 

6 

365 

281 

267 

250 

12 

653 

518 

490 

462 

18 

861 

690 

663 

615 

24 

1075 

845 

818 

750 


WIN $10 for your “Salt Idea”! 

We’ll pay $10.00 each for the winning 
“Salt Ideas” used in this series of ad¬ 
vertisements. A “Salt Idea” should be a 
helpful and original suggestion on the 
use of salt around the farm. Send your 
ideas to the Farm and Feed Salt Depart¬ 
ment of International Salt Company, 
Inc., Scranton 2, Pennsylvania. 

Every idea that wins a prize wilt be published in 
this ‘*SaIt Idea’* column. All entries become the 
property of International Salt Company. None 
wilt be returned, and we are the sole judge of 
winners. In case of duplicate entries, winner 
will be decided on basis of earliest postmark* 



trace-mineral salt 
for free-choice 
feeding and for 
your custom 
grist mixes. . 




“Blusalt and bone meal 
put my herd back in shape!“ 


. .. says Russell Hackman, dairy¬ 
man from Stockton, New Jersey. 
Three years ago, Hackman was 
having breeding troubles in his 
herd of Holsteins. His veterinarian 
diagnosed a principal cause of the 
troubles as being the serious cal¬ 
cium, phosphorus and trace-min¬ 
eral deficiency in the home-grown 
feeds grown on the red-shale soil 


around Stockton, New Jersey. 

To counteract this deficiency, the 

veterinarian recommended feeding 
bone meal and Sterling Blusalt 
free choice. After 2 years on bone 
meal and this increased amount of 
Blusalt, Russell Hackman’s herd 
is back in shape. Health and milk 
production are good. Breeding 
problems have disappeared. 


'rrrm. 

4-LB. UK 


Blusalt contains high-quality salt 
plus cobalt, copper, iron, iodine, 
manganese, zinc and sulfate sulfur. 
Blusalt is available in 50- and 100- 
lb. bags, 4-lb. Liks, and 50-lb. blocks. 

Also available from your feed dealer... 

STERLING GREEN’SALT . . . salt, plus 
trace minerals, plus 10% phenothia- 
zine for control of certain internal 
parasites. In 100- and 25-lb. bags. 
STERLING GRANULATED SALT... high- 
quality white salt for both feed mixing 
and free-choice feeding. In 25- and 
100-lb. bags. Also pressed into 50-lb. 
blocks and 4-lb. Liks—plain, iodized, 
and sulfurized. 


Blusalt Liks in 
stanchion holders ... 

Supply your animals with 
needed salt, trace minerals 

This winter, make sure your animals 
have all the free-choice salt and trace 
minerals they need. Give them access 
to Sterling Blusalt Liks—4-lb. com¬ 
pressed Liks of high-quality salt plus 
the seven trace minerals needed for 
good growth and reproduction (cobalt, 
copper, iron, iodine, manganese, zinc 
and sulfate sulfur). 

Blusalt Liks are grooved in the sides 
—can be placed conveniently in the 
new, improved Sterling Salt-Lik Hold¬ 
ers. Thus, they’re ideal for feeding 
salt and trace minerals free choice in 
both stalls and stanchions. 


^Service and Research are the EXTRAS in... 

STERLIlMG/p^SALT 


9 




































Buntings^ 



NEW & BETTER 

STRAWBERRIES 

Earlidawn, Surecrop, Redglow, Stelemaster, 
Pocahontas, Dixieland (U.S.D.A. develop¬ 
ments just recently named and released 
for distribution), Empire, Armore, Ver¬ 
milion, Albriton. Grown in chemically- 
treated soil; followed by a complete 
spraying and fertilization program. DIS¬ 
EASE FREE. Huge crops of larger berries 
easily produced from Buntings’ plants. 

Write for information 

Our New Catalog lists a number of other 
popular varieties of Strawberries, also a 
complete line of Roses, Flowering Shrubs, 
Shade Trees, Evergreens, Fruit Trees, 
Garden Roots, etc., with most varieties 
illustrated in natural four-color. A valu¬ 
able reference and planting guide. 

Write today for your FREE COPY 

BUNTINGS’ NURSERIES, INC. 

BOX 28, SELBYVILLE. DELAWARE 


CHRISTMAS TREE PLANTATION STOCK 


SCOTCH PINE — Pinus sylvestris 

2-yr. Sdlgs. 2 to 4 ins . $18.50 

2-yr. Sdlgs. 3 to 6 ins. 22.00 

2-yr. Sdlgs. 4 to 8 ins. 25.00 

4-yr. Trans. 6 to 10 ins. 50.00 

4-yr. Trans. 8 to 14 ins. 60.00 

AUSTRIAN PINE—PINUS Nigra 

2-yr. Sdlgs. 2 to 4 ins. 20.00 

2-yr. Sldgs. 3 to 6 ins. 25.00 

4-yr. Trans. 5 to 10 ins . 70.00 

WHITE SPRUCE —Picea alba (Excellent 
blue-gray color) 

2- yr. Sdlgs. 3 to 6 ins. 25.00 

3- yr. Sdlgs. 4 to 8 ins. 30.00 

3-yr. Sdlgs. 6 to 12 ins . 40.00 

NORWAY SPRUCE — Picea excelsa 

2-yr. Sldgs. 2 to 3 ins. 18.00 

2- yr. Sdlgs. 3 to 5 ins. 22.00 

3- yr. Trans. 5 to 10 ins. 50.00 

4- yr. Trans. 6 to 12 ins. 60.00 

4-yr. Trans. 8 to 14 ins . 90.00 


Discount: Less 5% on quantities of 5,000 or 
more of a kind. No order accepted for less 
than 500 of a kind. Cash with order. No 
C.O.D.’s. Penna. orders add 3',o Sales Tax. 
Write for Our Free Illustrated Catalogue. 

PALLACK BROS. NURSERIES, INC. 

BOX 1074, R. D. 1, HARMONY, PENNA. 


CHRISTMAS TREES 


Turn wasteland into profit. 
Our famous Christmas Tree 
Growers’ Guide tells you 
how. Write for free copy. 


MUSSER FORESTS, 


Box 20-B 


OR FORESt 
TREES 




Indiana. Pa. 




Strawberries 

RASPBERRIES. BLUEBER¬ 
RIES, ASPARAGUS. The latest 
and best in small fruit va¬ 
rieties including: Blaze, 

Merrimack, .Earlidawn, .Sure¬ 
crop Strawbereries. 

Write for Free Catalog, 
and Planting Guide. 


WALTER K. MORSS AND SON 
BRADFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 


PEACH V D P E* AS 

APPLE T R E15> 20c 

Cherries, pears, plums, nut trees, strawberries, blu*. 
berries, dwarf fruit trees. Grapevines lOc. Shrubs, 
evergreens, shade trees, roses 25c up. Quality stock 
can’t ba sold lower. Write tor FREE color catalog and 
$2 FREE bonus Information. TENNESSEE NUR¬ 
SERY CO.. BOX 16. CLEVELAND. TENNESSEE 


TRAWBERRV PLANTS 

Write for catalog, fully describing all 
varieties, with best methods of growing 
them. Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

J.H. SHIVERS, Box R-581, Allen, Md. 


—- FREE - 

Vegetable Plant Catalogue With Bargain Offers. 
Have earlier crops with our strong field-grown Cabbage, 
Onion, Lettuce, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Tomato, 
Eggplant. Pepper, and Potato Plants. 

PIEDMONT PLANT COMPANY, 

P. 0. BOX 684, GREENVILLE, S. C. 


- CHRISTMAS TREE -- 

SEEDLINGS AND TRANSPLANTS 
PINES. SPRUCES. FIRS —Quality stock at reason¬ 
able prices. Place your order now for Spring planting 
while popular species and sizes are available. 

Write for price list and shearing bulletin. 
ECCLES Nurseries, Box 65, Dept. Y, Rimersburg, Pa. 


STRAWBERRY PLANTS 

BLUEBERRY, RASPBERRY and ASPARAGUS 
IN ALL POPULAR VARIETIES 
A Free Catalogue Full of Facts. No Fakes. 

H. D. RICHARDSON &. COMPANY 
WILLARDS. BOX 8. MARYLAND 


CHRISTMAS TREE SEEDLINGS 

Growing Christmas Trees Beautify Idle Land, Earn 
Satisfaction and Profits. We offer a wide variety 
of quality seedlings and transplants. 

Write Today tor Price List and Planting Guide. 

PAINT CREEK NURSERIES, 

R. D. I, _ SHIPPENVILLE. PA. 

NEW JET TORCH destroys weeds, stumps, rocks. 
Get Free Bulletin. SINE. RN-2. QUAKERTOWN, PA. 




Despite the recent popularity of 
depressed views on farming, the out¬ 
look is really very encouraging. Our 
national population is increasing at 
the rate of 8,000 a day, and nearly 
all of the increase is in the cities. 
Farm population, moreover, has de¬ 
creased from 26 to 18 million in the 
past decade. Cities are expanding so 
rapidly that thousands of acres of 
land go out of farm production every 
year to become residential areas. The 
rapid adoption of air transportation 
has resulted in even small cities 
providing airports; the smallest of 
these requires a square mile or more, 
and the larger ones consume thous¬ 
ands of acres. With our one-lane roads 
fast becoming four-lane divided high¬ 
ways, still more acres go out of pro¬ 
duction. Actually, it is only a matter 
of time when the demand for food will 
equal or surpass the local supply. 
That means higher prices for farm 
products. 

From the time formal education 
began until the opening of this cen- 
tui’y, most of the emphasis in educa¬ 
tion was placed on the so-called lib¬ 
eral arts. About 1910, and during the 
period of World War I, the public 
began to demand more utility in ed¬ 
ucation. Gradually, high schools ad¬ 
ded business courses, domestic sci¬ 
ence and manual training. Still later, 
some offered courses in machine shop 
and carpentry. Until recently, the 
colleges would not accept credits 
obtained in these courses, so the 
schools divided the student body into 
those who would enter college and 
the “stay-at-homes”. The “stay-at- 
homes” took the utility courses, and 
the college-bound took the liberal 
arts. This was all very good until 
we were shocked by sputniks. We 
had been led to believe that the 
Russian people were far behind us 
in science and technology. Now we 
realize that Russian scientists are at 
least five years ahead of us in some 
areas and that Russian public educa¬ 
tion may be far better than ours. The 
American people now demand that 
our schools stop placing so much 
emphasis upon watered-down social¬ 
izing and guidance courses and place 
more emphasis on mathematics and 


science. It is probably time all of 
us took a good look at our schools 
and helped them to develop the kinds 
of programs needed. W’e should stop 
burdening them with a hundred and 
one duties and responsibilities that 
should be handled in the home and 
church. However, I see a possible 
danger: we may reach the point where 
we place so much emphasis upon the 
pi'actical and the material that we 
lose sight of the mental and the 
spiritual and thus become but slaves 
to the machines. 

We ar? rapidly approaching that 
point now on farms; it is a question 
whether we own the machines or the 
machines own us. Many of those who 
live on small farms cannot afford to 
invest thousands of dollars in new 
improved machinery. They have to do 
the work the hard way; they cannot 
compete with the big farms. In Indi¬ 
ana in the past five years, 1,800 farms 
have vanished. This may be the price 
of progress, hut all is not a bed of 
roses for the small farmer. 

The radio brings tales of bombs 
that can fly half way around the 
world to destroy whole cities and 
about crooked labor racketeers and 
international squabbles. Then I go 
outdoors into God’s clean air. The 
sparrows have a gay time tormenting 
the red squirrel in the big elm, and 
the blue jays stir the leaves under 
the hazelnut bushes. The missiles, the 
racketeers, the international prob¬ 
lems seem a little less important. 
The other day our rooster decided 
to take a bath in a pile of sawdust 
in front of the sawbuck. I placed a 
small log on the buck and started 
sawing. Suddenly a piece of wood 
dropped on his tail. He gave a loud 
yell and made a big jump. Then he 
proceeded to tell me that it was 
highly impolite to drop a block of 
wood on a rooster’s tail. These are 
things of little consequence, of course, 
but they do make up much of the 
sum total of life. The farm is a 
wonderful place to live, away from 
the noise, confusion and meanness of 
the cities. 

Carry on, and may the good Lord 
be with you and yours. 

Michigan L.^ B. Reber 



Keepers of the Bee Lore 

The Hewitt Collection of Apicul¬ 
ture, established in 1953 at Litch¬ 
field Historical Museum in Litchfield, 
Conn., now has over 300 items of 
old-time beekeeping tools and equip¬ 
ment. There is also a library where 
several fine photographs and pictures 
are on display. A complete catalog 
has been compiled by P. J. Hewitt, 
Jr., and it is available without charge 
upon request to him or to the Con¬ 
necticut Beekeepers Assn., Inc., which 
publishes it. Included in the collec¬ 
tion, which is for public viewing, are 
such items as skeps, hives, honey 
crates, frames, separators, feeders, 
escape boards, a queen excluder, cov¬ 
ers, weights, a swarm catcher, a bee 
veil, wax fasteners, embedders, bee 
paddles, wax presses, queen nucleus 
box, queen nursery cages, funnels, 
shipping boxes, queen introducers, 
smokers, bee-hunting boxes, trays, 
jars, candy molds, and candles. The 
variety of hives on display is exten¬ 
sive; items in the collection date from 
1624. 

A trust fund has been established 
for the Hewitt Collection of Apicul¬ 
ture, and donations to it are wel¬ 
comed. Gifts of old beekeeping equip¬ 


ment are invited, too; they are great¬ 
ly appreciated. Correspondence rela¬ 
tive to the collection should he ad¬ 
dressed to Philemon J. Hewitt, Ji”. 
Litchfield, Conn. Beekeeping collec¬ 
tions are not at all numerous in the 
United States; the Hewitt one at 
Litchfield is one of only a few. 
Others are at Cornell University in 
Ithaca, N. Y., and at the University 
of Massachusetts in Amherst. 



“I WOULDN’T TAKE 
n.OOO.OO for IT” 



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how Earnest Grimes of Waynesburg, 
Pennsylvania, feels about his Wood’s 
80-inch cut ROTARY MOWER 
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anything equal it in cutting brush— 
cut Locust, Hickory and Wild Cherry 
in diameter—walks right 
through it. Use it for stalk shredding, 
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mounted for larger Fast-Hitch Farm- 
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60", 61", 80" and 114" draw-bar pull- 
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tractors and Jeeps. 80" offset model 
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trees. All have free-swinging blades. 

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2564 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn 26, N.Y, 



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Catalog. REX SPROUT, WAVERLY, NEW YORK 

THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


10 



















































































/ 


* 1 ’ ’ 



Whafs Ahead for Poultry? 


The broiler grower, egg producer 
and turkey grower are all faced with 
a new trend which I feel is not best 
for the poultry industry and surely 
not good for the small family poultry 
farm. In the past the farm family 
was the backbone of the counti’y, but 
with the present trend farms are 
getting bigger and poultry operations 
are likewise increasing their opera¬ 
tions for economic reasons. Poultry 
and turkey meat and market eggs are 
being produced at such a small mar¬ 
gin of profit that you must have a 
large operation requiring a great deal 
of capital in order to be able to expect 
a reasonable income. This naturally 
increases the hazards of the business 
and accounts for an increasing num¬ 
ber of financial failures. 

Good advice as to what the future 
has in store for the poultryman is 
very hard to give but, if you are the 
owner of a poultry farm, you will 
have to put the best management 
practices possible into use in order 
to survive. 

On the other hand, if you have 
some hard-earned dollars in the bank 
and are trying to decide whether you 
should invest them in the poultry 
business, I w'ould advise you to be 
sure that you love the work because 
there will be plenty of it. 

George M. Anthony 
Strausstown, Pa. 


to reimburse the egg producer com- 
mensurately for the quality of his 
product, it is a step in the right 
direction. 

Good luck in the poultry year 
ahead! John and Allen Bulkley 
Odessa, N. Y. 


Farming today is a real business- 
small, individual business, to be 
sure, but definitely business. We 
have a purchasing department, an 
operations department and a sales 
department, just as other businesses 
do. And each is important, even 
though, like other businesses, one 
man, with some help from his family, 
often does all the work in all three 
departments. 

In my own enterprise, 11,000 hens 
and the pullets I raise to replace them 
would eat a little over 600 tons of 


feed a year. I think the average cost 
is $75.00 a ton so, if my quick arith¬ 
metic is right, I spent $45,000 for 
feed alone last year, about half my 
total expenses. 

How did the sales department fare? 
Again doing some fast arithmetic, 
I think my hens averaged 200 eggs 
apiece last year. These 200 eggs 
brought me just about $7.00. That 
means my egg sales totaled around 
$88,000. But that would be $2,000 less 
than my expenses. Could that be 
right? I think so. In fact, it would 
be a little less than $88,000 from 
egg sales because I hatch some of 
the eggs and sell baby chicks. I sold 
off a lot of hens, too which brought 
in some money. I made something 
for wages in the past year—not very 
much. The past 12 months have been 
pretty lean for egg producers. But, 
just the same, I feel better now 
that we have all the sales rung up 
on the cash register. 

Now, here’s the way I’m doing my 


own thinking and planning for 1958. 
We have about five per cent fewer 
hens in the United States now than > 
year ago. Also, a larger percentage 
of them are second-year layers whic’n 
do not lay as many eggs as pullet 
layers. This means that fewer eggs 
will go to market in the first six to 
nine months of 1958 than in the same 
months of this year. And this means 
better egg prices for that period. 

Because of these more favorable 
egg prices, more chicks will be started 
and more pullets grown to lay more 
eggs beginning sometime next fall. 
Then “the honeymoon will be over” 
and poultrymen wdll be in for another 
tough year. Is that right? I hope 
not. As a matter of fact, I don’t 
think I can see that far ahead. 

What I really believe—and maybe 
it’s wishful thinking—is this: hens 
are mostly in larger flocks now and 
their owners are businessmen farm¬ 
ers. They definitely know that over- 

(Continued on following page) 


Which feeding program is best for you: 


I once knew a man who speculated 
on the grain market. Sometimes he 
made a lot of money and, when he 
did, he did not brag. Other times 
he lost a lot of money, and he didn’t 
cry. It seems to me we are in the 
same situation in the egg-producing 
business. You and I are speculating 
on the future price of eggs. About 
the only insurance we have is always 
to buy top quality chicks that are 
bred to lay well for 15 months. It 
is awfully hard to predict exactly 
the future egg market. Yet it looks 
to me to be smart to keep all the 
henhouses full of top-quality, heavy¬ 
laying birds and figure that some¬ 
time during their 15 months of lay 
the price of eggs will be profitable 
and you will make some money. 

Even when the price of eggs is 
low, a really good bird will probably 
break even. If she loses money, it 
won’t be much. She will make you 
a little money in spite of the price 
of eggs- 

My guess on the future is no better 
than yours, but since The Rural 
New' Yorker has asked me to again 
make a prediction, I would say that 
the price of eggs will be at a profit¬ 
able level until September or early 
October. After that I don’t know 
just what will happen. Anyway, here’s 
wishing you the very best of suc¬ 
cess and happiness in ’58. 

Monroe C. Babcock 
Ithaca, N. Y. 


After avoiding an outright predic¬ 
tion for the past two yeax's, we are 
changing our outlook by going out 
on this limb: 1958 will be a good 
year for the egg producer. The na¬ 
tional laying flock is down at least 
six per cent, and the northeast flock 
is down even more. Naturally, egg 
production is reduced; and the fall 
hatch of chicks was not what people 
anticipated either. Feed costs should 
be lower. It all adds up to a far better 
year than 1957. 

Management is nevertheless still 
the golden key to poultry success. 
Buy chicks from a topnotch breeder, 
feed good feed, and follow effective 
vaccination procedures. They can 
mean the difference between plus or 
minus at the end of the year. 

There will be more buying of eggs 
on a quality basis in 1958. Now being 
done on fairly small scale, it is al¬ 
most sure to spread. The first attempt 


call in your 

Beacon 

Advisor 


The most profitable program for your farm will vary 
with your equipment, labor, size and type of operation. 
Your Beacon Advisor can often show you how to make 
a better return or profit on your poultry or dairy dollar. 

Remember that The Beacon Milling Company sells 
satisfaction. Not only are Beacon-trolled feeds formu¬ 
lated to help you “feed out” inherited poultry or dairy 
production capacity, but the carefully selected Beacon 
sales-service organization can show you how best to put 
these modern top-quality feeds to work for you. 

So make sure your farm—no matter how profitable—is 
operating at the maximum profit level for your size of 
business, available labor and equipment. Let Beacon 
Feeds and your Beacon Advisor work for you. 

Your Beacon Advisor, along with your Beacon Feed 
Dealer, is well qualified through training and experience 
to help you select the feeding program best suited for 
your needs. Invite him to visit your farm. Get to know 
him better. 

Free Management Guides 

Your Beacon Advisor or Beacon Feed Dealer will give 
you a free copy of “Profitable Poultry Management” or 
“Profitable Dairy Management” (New Tenth Edition). 
These valuable guides are among the most comprehen¬ 
sive management manuals printed — often used as agri¬ 
cultural textbooks. 


From the Virginias to Maine 

BEACONffiFEEDS 


UNIFORMLY BETTER 


BECAUSE THEY’RE BEACON-TROLLEO 


THE BEACON MILLING COMPANY Headquarters: Cayuga. N. Y. • Mills: Cayuga. N. Y.; York. Pa.; Laurel. Del.; Eastport, N. Y.; Broadway, Va. 


February 1, 1958 


U 
















































































NEWi 


Coated with marble for 
lasting protection 



INTERIORS 


MARBLECOTE is a new exclusive 
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•Copyright—1957 Grange Silo, Red Creek, N. Y. 


WRITE NOW 


for 2-Way Plan 
Early Order Discount 




GRANGE Silo Co., Red Creek, N.Y. 


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Name.. 

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WILLIAM S. RICE, Inc. 
Dept. 64-G, Adams, N.Y. 


NEW MEYER HAY CONDITIONERS 



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MORTON, ILLINOIS 


Makers of Famous Meyer Elevators 


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Flemington, N. J. 


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Write for complete specifications 
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J.W. HANCE MFG.CO. 

WESTBiRVILLE, OHIO 


SUPER" SAW 


$2.75 



At last the ideal saw for pruning fruit trees and 
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Finest materials—takes lots of punishment—teeth cut 
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PRESSED STEEL 

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5812 R. R. AVE., NO. BERWICK, MAINE 


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FORESTVIEW EVERGREEN NURSERY 



production “kills the hen that lays Poultrynien will never reach their 
the golden eggs”. They are still place in the marketing field as long 
smarting from the financial setbacks as every little group tries to go it 
of the recent past. I think they’ll alone nor as long as a few dissidents 
use judgment and not expand the lay- keep breaking away from the parent 
ing flock too much. I hope I’m right, organization and forming another, 

For the last 27 years in which I 
ugt,ed individualists and are admired associated with the egg 

for it. We d like to see them stay marketing business, producers have 
reasonably prosperous. continued to growl about prices re- 

Andrew E. Danish ceived at certain times, yet, with the 
iroy, J\. Y. selfishness of Scrooge, they continue 

_ to play about, either by themselves 

Efficiency of production is un- with some unscrupulous egg buyer 
questionably the key to poultry sue- (there are some) or some organi- 
cess. More eggs from each bird—and zation that works for itself alone. 1 
less feed per dozen eggs—are required doubt if they will ever be in a posi- 
to stay competitive. One needs a bird tion to do something about prices, 
that lays at a higher rate a longer Don’t expect better broiler prices 
o"® that utilizes feed most 1958. If they could be produced 
efficiently. Quality of eggs is increas- in 1957 for 14, 15 and 16 cents with- 
ingly important, too; consumers and oni- someone going bankrupt, it will 
maiketeis aie (lemanding improve- jjg done again in 1958. 
ment. Uniformly large size, good shell 
texture and strength and interior 
quality are essential to sales success. 

An egg producer must have a top- - 

most strain for efficient production These three factors will make 1958 
of superior eggs. Nutritional know- a good year for the broiler industry: 
ledge has advanced greatly, too, and (1) we have reached a new low in 
feeding must utilize everything up- cost of production and a new high in 
to-date. Know-how and well planned quality of production; (2) the 
management are vital for profits. The National Broiler Council, with the 
result will be a large volume of top aid of the Poultry and Egg National 
quality eggs as lowest possible cost. Board, is doing far more to point 
For success in poultry meat pro- this out to the consumer; and (3) at 
duction, we cannot use yesterday’s least a million fewer breeding birds 
chicken, yesterday’s nutrition, yes- will have been tested for meat-pro- 
terday’s management. We must use duction purposes. A relative short- 
the chickens of today—and tomorrow age of hatching eggs will tend to 
—and utilize new knowledge of nu- insure a superior market based on 
trition and management. No Indus- supply and demand, 
try has ever moved faster or changed Turkeys will have a better year 
more quickly than our poultry Indus- than last year, too, despite some 
try, and the changes seem geared to disturbing reports as to grower in- 
new merchandising methods and new tentions. The industry has been hurt 
c(3nsumer preferences. Uniformly badly enough so that brakes will be 
high quality and top efficiency of put on credit. Many operators will 
production are essential to make be unable to finance. In spite of 

profits in today’s markets. To those heaviest turkey holdings we have had 

who can meet these requirements, for many years, I believe 1958 will 
the poultry meat and egg industries be a better year by a considerable 

continue to offer splendid opportun- margin for turkeymen. The Turkey 

ity. Leslie S. Hubbard Federation has a most aggressive 

Lancaster, Pa. merchandising program, and turkey 

_’ ' will provide prudent anil tasty eating 

c, , in what will probably not be a boom 

Sometime m the very near future-. , overall national economy, 

and it may be and should be 1958 „ , 

—the egg producer is going to have . fewer birds produc- 

to decide that it does not pay to eggs in 1958, but they 

produce inferior eggs. He is going to will ^ach lay more eggs. Newer types 
be forced to purchase strains of birds breeding are solving many cost 
bred to produce an egg with strength Probl®nis of the egg industry. The 
enough in the white to maintain ^ 1958 should be consider- 

quality longer than most of them do superior to the year past for 

now. By this time, the egg producer ®SSs, but later maybe some- 

should have seen the results of inte- 1®®^ Oyerall, the coming egg 

gration in the broiler industry. 1958 similar to 1957. All in 

egg prices will probably not be too ^ §ood year 

much better than 1957, and every egg segments of (mr poultry in¬ 
producer who does not retail his eggs “ustry. G. E. Coleman. Jr. 

should join and help to strengthen Exeter, N. H. 

his local cooperative. Small cooper- —-- 

atives should have vision enough to Hubbard Farms of Walpole, N. H., 
make some working arrangements one of the country’s largest hatch- 
with a large organization, even if eries, has opened a new hatchery at 
it means the dissolution of their Statesville, No. Carolina. A branch is 
own. also maintained at Lancaster, Pa. 


FENCE FUNNIES BY BETH 



12 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 































































































Here are a few pointers 
how farmers can get 

Extra Service from Tractor Tires 

By MELVIN E. LONG 


Probably no event has increased 
the usefulness of the farm tractor 
more than the advent of rubber tires. 
At first viewed with suspicion, they 
are now standard equipment for all 
makes of wheel tractors. 

Tires have not turned out to be 
the short-lived creatures that the eariy 
prophets of doom predicted. Since 
they do have to be replaced either 
because of wear or injury, however 



Cuts like this should he repaired at 
once. Water and dirt work into them 
to cause additional damage to the 
tire. 

here are some ways to help extend 
the life of your tires. 

1. Proper inflation — is the most 
important single item in tire life. 
It pays to invest a few dollars in a 
good low-pressure tire gauge with 
one-pound graduations. Once a week, 
make use of the gauge to keep tires 
at pressure recommended in the oper¬ 
ator’s manual. You can pump the nec¬ 
essary air in one of several ways; for 




Excessive use of the tractor on paved 
roads causes this kind of wear. In¬ 
creasing the inflation pressure helps, 
but does not elimmate, this condition. 

only a few pounds, a hand pump 
can be used; if more is needed, you’ll 
probably want to get a spark plug or 
PTO driven pump. 

What about inflation pressure when 
plowing? For side-hill, or back-and- 
forth, plowing, increase the pressure 
in both tires by four pounds. For 
regular plowing, the furrow wheel 
should have an extra four pounds of 
air. Do not decrease the pressure in 
the land wheel in an effort to get 
extra traction. This only causes buck¬ 
ling of the sidewalls with no appreci¬ 
able increase in pulling ability. 

2. Wheel weighting — The proper 
way to increase traction is to add 
weight up to the limit recommended 
by the tire or tractor manufacturer. 
Your tractor dealer or tire service 
store should be able to advise you. 
Every 100 pounds added to the wheels 
gives about 66 pounds more pull on 
dry concrete, 50 pounds more on 
sandy loam soil, 30 pounds more on 
dry sand. Thus, under some condi¬ 
tions, you will need to add all the 
weight allowable in order to get the 

February 1, 1958 


necessary traction. This weight can 
be made up of liquid in the tires, plus 
cast-iron weights. 

3. Oversizing — Quite frequently, 
when a farmer purchases a new trac¬ 
tor, he will buy optional oversize 
tires. This means that the optional 
tires have the regular rim diameter, 
but are one or two inches greater 
in section diameter. For instance, 
regular 11-28 tires are replaced by 
12-28’s. The widespread belief that 
this increases traction is not borne 
out by actual tests. The only benefit 
is the additional weighting that can 
be imposed upon the oversize tire. 
Oversizing produces one result that 
is quite the opposite of what the user 
intends. The oversize tire has a larg¬ 
er rolling radius, thereby increasing 
speed and actually reducing available 
drawbar pull in any given gear. Just 
because oversize tires make a tractor 
“look bigger” does not mean that they 
will cause the tractor to do any more 
work. 

4. Wheel spinning — Lack of suf¬ 
ficient weighting or overinflation will 
cause the tread bars to wear rough. 
Sudden clutch engagement also caus¬ 
es this type of wear. 

5. Repair of cuts — Cuts in treads 
and sidewalls should be repaired at 
once, even though they are not deep 
enough to cause a flat tire. Otherwise, 
water and dirt work into the cut and 
cause deterioration and separation 
of the tread plies. 

6 . Valve damage — Generally, this 
is caused by the tire slipping in the 
rim. This slipping can be attributed 
to low inflation pressure, improper 
seating of the tire bead on the rim, 
or to excessive use of soap solution 
when the tire is mounted. You 
can correct the first condition your¬ 
self. Caution your tire repairman 
about the other causes when he 
mounts the tire on the rim after 
repairing the valve stem. 

7. Grease, oil, and chemicals — If 
you get grease or oil on your tires, 
wipe them off immediately. After 
spraying operations, thoroughly wash 
the tires to remove all chemicals. 

8 . Belt work — Belt work generally 
develops static electricity. A rubber- 
tired tractor should be well grounded 
to prevent dangerous sparks. This 
grounding can be done by connecting 
the metal of the tractor to the ground 
by a chain, wire or rod. 

Tii'es are generally among the 
least cared for parts of the tractor. 
Every farmer will be well repaid 
in increased tire life for the small 
amount of time necessary to properly 
maintain his tractor tires. 



This wear was caused by excessive 
slippage. Added weight from a solu¬ 
tion in the tires or from loheel 
weights is the preventative. 

13 





sms 


US 








INTRODUCES THE 

WORLD’S 
STRONGEST 
BARN CLEANER 

CHAIN 

YOU CAN SEE 


Bigger, heavier and 50% stronger this 
new BADGER Chain has 50% more wear¬ 
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present popular Badger chain. Full center 
webb design eliminates any stretch. 
Pioneers in 4-wa'/ flex chain, Badger now 
has made the greatest advance barn 
cleaner chain design. 

BADGER HAS: 

• The largest pins 
The heaviest forgings 
The biggest flat bar 
New positive paddle location 
Forged paddle link 50% 
stronger 

Rivets double swedge for 
larger heads 

Smooth construction for clean¬ 
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DESIGNED FOR THE 
LARGEST BARNS 


Your Badger specialists are 
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the . standard sizes in Barn 
Cleaners and Silo Unloaders are 
in stock at your dealer. DON'T 
WAIT — DO IT NOW. 


A BADGER SILO UNLOADER will get 
your silage down for you with the 
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Standard sizes from 10 to 24 foot. 


A BADGER BUNK FEEDER will feed 
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See Your Badger Dealer Today! 


Albion 

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Coyugo 

Chittenongo 

Cloyton 

Clinton 

East Bloomfield 
Ellenburg Depot 
Elmira 


NEW YORK 
Ken Landis 
Ferguson Hardware 
Elton Glor 
C. F. Adams 

Cumminghom Farm Supply 
Howard Grastorf 
Frank Kester 
Abbey Bros. Farm Equip. 

Shaw Brothers 
Henry Engert 
Horold Northrop 
Clyde Wesseldine 
P. Cavataio 
Ralph Fuller 
Hiram Thurston 
Horry Parker 
Floyd Emryiory 
Clinton Form Supply 
Bob's borage 
Chilton Bros. 

Jay Beardslec 
Winnies Garogc (x Impl. Co. Fly Creek 

Kenneth Conory Gloversville 

Richord Billings Form Equip. Gouverncur 

Roy Schepler Hamlin 

P. J. Wotkins & Son Herkimer 

H. M. Friot Heuvelton 

Maurice Boker Holland Patent 

Thocher Bros. Hornell 

Harold McCroy Jomestown 

Kinderhook Form Equip. Kinderhook 

Earl Kenyon Lisle 

Corl Long Little Valley 

Frank Rupert Soles Cr Service Lowville 
DIST. Howard Van Derlike Macedon 
Colvin Von Derlike Macedon 

Beomer Brothers Mochios Jet. 

Norman Wright Middleport 

DIST. Bellows and May Inc. Middletown 
Scoland Farm Equipment Co. Millerton 
Kilborne Bros. Moravia 

John Spongier N. Collins 

Wilson Farm Supipy North Collins 


Jovo Form Supply 

J. A. Wilbur £r Son 

DIST. Joseph Swantok 

C. A. Pornell 

MoLady's Machinery Co^ 

Foote Troctor b Implement 

Butler Brothers 

Farm & Home Store 

M. C. M. Form Supply 

Russell French 

Oscar Brown 

Ralph Smith 

A. W. Demorest b Son 

Cecil Harrad 

H. S. Crone 

Holder Form Equipment 

Millard Russell 

Carlton J. Bartlett 

Fronk Cornelius 

C. K. Chopmon b Son 

NEW JERSEY 
M. Williom Fronzen 
John Van Wogoner 
Stanton b Wood 
William A. Cromer b Son 


N. Jova 

N. Lowrence 

Oneonto 

Pifford 

Plottsburg 

Portviile 

Pulaski 

Randolph 

North Chilli 

Schenevus 

Schuylerville 

So. Dayton 

Stomford 

Von Hornesville 

Oneida 

Verono 

Walton 

Watertown 

Woterville 

Whitney Point 


Salem 

Titusville 

Newton 

Vincenton 


Please send the following literature 
Barn Cleaners Q Silo Unloaders O 
Bunk Feeders Q Student □ 


Name 


Address 


City 


State 


BADGER NORTHLAND INC. 

BOX 31, DEPT. R KAUKAUNA, WIS. 


NOW 


V * * 
































Established 1850 



Published Semi-Monthly By 

Rural Publishing Co.. Inc. 333 West 30th St., New York 1, N. Y. 
John J. Dillon. Publisher. 1899-1950 

EDITORIAL AND EXECUTIVE STAFF 
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Single Copy Five Cents. 

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Entered at New York Post Ofllce as Second Class Matter. 


"A SQUARE DEAL” 

We believe tnat every advertisement in this paper is backed by a respon¬ 
sible pei-son. We use every possible precaution and admit the advertising ol 
reliable houses only. But to make doubly sure, we will make good any Toss 
to paid subscribei-8 sustained by trusting any deliberate swindler, irrespon¬ 
sible advertisers or misleading advertisements in our columns, and any 
such swindler will be publicly exposed. We are also often called upon 
to adjust differences or mistakes between our subscribers and honest, 
responsible houses, whether advertisers or not. We willingly use our good 
ofHees to this end, but such cases should not be confused with dishonest 
transactions. We protect subscribers against rogues, but we will not be 
responsible for the debts of honest bankrupts sanctioned by the courts. 
Notice of the complaint must be sent to us within one month of the time of 
the transaction, and to identify it, you should mention The Rural New- 
Yorrer when writing the advertiser. 


Poultry Outlook for 1958 

T he situation looks better for the egg farm¬ 
er in 1958 than in 1957 or 1956. The num¬ 
ber of laying hens is under that of a year ago 
and will not catch up until the 1958 pullet 
crop is grown. The size of that crop will, of 
course, be the crux of the situation insofar as 
concerns the outlook for next Winter. If poul- 
trymen go all out for chicks as they did in 
the Spring of 1956 after the good prices late 
in 1955, then next Winter will see a return to 
low prices. In the light of lower per capita con¬ 
sumption — 362 to 340, the egg supply in the 
country is just about right at present to main¬ 
tain a price satisfactory to both producers and 
consumers. The margin of safety for the pro¬ 
ducer is still a narrow one and a few more 
eggs can break a favorable situation. If farm¬ 
ers do not increase their production as soon 
as things begin to pick up, they will be able to 
stay in a better balance from year to year. 
However, if history repeats itself, we will find 
many poultrymen saying, “Let the other fellow 
cut back.” So, if there is expansion and prices 
do collapse, be prepared to operate at low cost. 

There are two slight clouds on the egg hori¬ 
zon. The first is the tendency toward integra¬ 
tion. New poultry enterprises are being fi¬ 
nanced and set up in various sections of the 
country; and this, regardless of the price situ¬ 
ation. Another factor is the decreasing con¬ 
sumption of eggs. Good promotion and pub¬ 
licity could well reverse this trend, but we need 
to recognize the facts, and not ignore them 
or be critical. Feed prices may be lower, but 
this is only a palliative. A few cents a dozen 
on eggs is more important than $10 a ton on 
feed. 

As to eggs, therefore, it would be prudent 
to follow one’s usual pattern of chick buying 
if some money is being made. If a larger enter¬ 
prise is needed in order to cover overhead 
costs, than expand to the most efficient level. 
The long-range outlook is decidedly competitive 
— like the broiler business, and one may as 
well figure closely now or look into some other 
type of enterprise. 

Broiler production v*^ill go along its “merry” 
way with no prospect for any drastic change. 
Really high prices are a thing of the past. The 
producer has become a cog in the machine. If 
a strong labor movement developed in the agri¬ 
cultural picture, a different story could be told 
— whether for good or evil is anyone’s guess. 
An organization that could control their con¬ 
tracts could certainly increase their return — 
labor movement or no. 

Turkey production is tending toward con¬ 
tract operations similar to those in the broiler 
industry and may well end up in the same 
general pattern. The 1958 outlook is not too 
bad, however, since there seems to be a ten¬ 
dency to cut back on the number of birds being 
kept over for breeding purposes. This means 
that breeders do not expect a heavy demand 
for poults this coming Spring. Prices in 1957 
were not too good, so late 1958 should be bet¬ 


ter. As with the egg situation, the number of 
turkeys being reared and available to the 
consumer is so close to the demand that ex¬ 
ceptionally good prices cannot be anticipated. 
It would take a drastic cut-back to really ad¬ 
vance turkeys eight or 10 cents a pound, and 
that does not seem to be in the picture. Ex¬ 
pansion of turkey production at this time is 
not advisable unless one has a very favorable 
local market. 


A *^SteaV\ if There Ever Was One 

S KULLDUGGERY seems to be a part and 
parcel of the milk business — at least in 
the New York milkshed, whether it be at the 
dealer level or at the so-called producer level. 

Take, for example, fluid milk advertising. 
Never proven conclusively to have increased 
fluid sales in the New York metropolitan area 
— either under state supervision or Milk for 
Health, it now makes its reappearance under 
the guise of a three-year “research and testing” 
program. 

This latest proposal is not a research and 
testing program. It is nothing new. The three- 
year limitation is illusory. It is nothing more 
or less than a compulsory “Milk for Health” 
program, to be incorporated into the Federal 
Milk Order. 

A few months ago, it was suggested that, 
before any fluid milk advertising plan be ap¬ 
proved and deductions authorized from pro¬ 
ducers’ milk checks, a study should be under¬ 
taken by impartial experts to determine whe¬ 
ther such advertising could be effective and 
competitive and, if so, the kind of advertising 
to be used and how much it would cost. That 
sounded like good horse sense to us, and we 
said so. 

Somewhere along the line, however, this idea 
has been shelved and a phony monstrosity sub¬ 
stituted in its place. Now, the Dairymen’s 
League, Eastern Milk Producers and the Bar¬ 
gaining Agency have joined hands in a plan 
to amend the Federal Order so as to provide 
that, for the next three years, from half a cent 
to two cents per cwt. be deducted from produc¬ 
ers’ checks for the same kind of milk adver¬ 
tising as has been sponsored by Milk for 
Health; with the right given to producers to 
withdraw from the plan only by giving notar¬ 
ized notice within 15 days after the effective 
date of the Order amendment. The research 
part of the program would be under the super¬ 
vision of the New York, Pennsylvania and New 
Jersey Colleges of Agriculture. These three 
groups — the League, Eastern and the Agency 
— have been meeting with Washington officials 
to discuss the terms of such an amendment. 

Mutual Federation has refused to participate 
on the grounds that unorganized producers 
would not be represented and that no producer 
should be so restricted in his right to withdraw 
if he did not approve. 

It is likely that any provision in the Order 
for compulsory milk advertising deductions 
would be ruled illegal as not being within the 
purview of the original statute under which the 
Order was issued. But, whether it is legal or 
illegal, is presently beside the point. Let the 
phrasemakers and skullduggers call it what 
they may — promotion, or research, or testing; 
it is nothing more than an out-and-out steal on 
dairy farmers that cannot and must not be 
tolerated. 


New York’s 1958 Century Farms 

F our more farm families have been in¬ 
ducted into the Order of Century Farm¬ 
ers. The ceremony took place at the 126th 
meeting of the New York State Agricultural 
Society in Albany on January 15. Century 
Farms must have been owned by the same 
family for more than 100 years, they must be 
well farmed, and the family must have a his¬ 
tory of service to the local community. So far, 
78 New York farms have been honored as 
Century Farms. 

The 1958 Century Farmers are: Elihu Button 
of Melrose, Rensselaer County; J. Merton Col¬ 
by of Spencerport, Niagara County; Mrs. Harold 
(Burns) Lounsbury of Bovina Center, Dela¬ 
ware County; and Isaac B. Mitchell of LaFarge- 
ville, Jefferson County. 


The Button farm has been owned by the 
family since 1784; Elihu, who with his son, 
Chester, now produces milk and eggs, took over 
in 1892. Colby’s 550-acre dairy and cash-crop 
farm has been in the family snce 1826; the 
Colbys came to America from England in 1632. 
Mrs. Lounsbury represents the Burns lineage 
which has been actively farming in Bovina 
Center since 1801; Harold and Mrs. Lounsbury 
make milk for the New York market. It is said 
that men and boys of the Burns family picked 
so many stones from the 2,300-foot-high farm 
over a century and a half that it now plows 
“like valley land.” The Mitchell family has 
been operating its 400-acre dairy farm in 
LaFargeville since 1806, having migrated from 
Connecticut. 


Poultry, Eggs and People 

'T' HE enthusiasm Dr. M. L. Scott conveys for 
the nutritiveness of poultry and eggs in 
his feature article on page 3 of this issue should 
be a source of inspiration to poultrymen. More¬ 
over, both his facts and his ideas should be 
useful to them in promoting sales of their pro¬ 
ducts, particularly at retail. Dr. Scott is pro¬ 
fessor of animal nutrition at Cornell Univer¬ 
sity. 

Although only of some recency, the time 
has nevertheless been too long that the poultry 
industry — milk, too — has been under attack 
by food faddists and even professional men 
eager to find a scapegoat for America’s alleged 
disposition to heart disease. At last, the poul¬ 
try world has not only solid ammunition for 
counterattack, but also for sure advance at the 
frontier of improved human nutrition. The 
nation will benefit by this, and Professor Scott’s 
work in this field is a real contribution. Others, 
of course, are, and have been, working in the 
same direction, and we expect — and hope — 
to see more research and more reports. It is a 
most important subject. 


Every Ground-Hog Has His Day 

'T^RADITION has it that the coming weather 
A depends on what Mr. Ground-hog finds 
when he comes out of his hole on February 2: 
a sunny or a sullen day. If the ground-hog casts 
a shadow, back he goes into his home to curl 
up for six more weeks of Winter. On the other 
hand, if he casts no shadow, he foretells an 
early Spring. 

Though the ground-hog eats the farmer’s 
food, many a farmer or trapper eats the ground¬ 
hog. By those who believe in poetic justice, 
the meat of the nibbler of tender growth is 
regarded as tasty when properly cooked. The 
most interesting recipe we have heard came to 
us recently from New Hampshire. Short and 
simple, it goes thus: “Build an outdoor fire. 
Over it place a great iron kettle. Fill it with 
water. When the water boils, drop into it the 
ground-hog, skinned and cleaned. Drop in also 
a few stones. Let the kettle and contents sim¬ 
mer all day. At twilight, take out the ground¬ 
hog, toss it over the nearest wall, eat the 
stones, and call it a day.” Ground-hog Day. 


Approval from Pennsylvania 

May I extend commendation and my sincere 
appreciation for the excellent Pennsylvania fea¬ 
tures in the January 4, 1958 issue of The Rural 
New Yorker. 

The cover page illustrating some of the more 
important Pennsylvania farm products, the fine 
editorial on the 1958 Pennsylvania Farm Show 
and your report on our program to increase milk 
consumption through vending machines in schools, 
colleges, government buildings and in industrial 
plants comprise a fine tribute to Pennsylvania 
agriculture. 

Certainly the material in this issue will be of 
great interest to all Pennsylvania farmers and 
more particularly our dairymen whose herds rank 
the Commonwealth as the fifth dairy State in the 
Nation. George M. Leader, Governor 

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 


“Mercy and truth are met together; righteous¬ 
ness and peace have kissed each other.” Psa. 85:10. 

FLOCK-replacement chicks hatched in December 
numbered 12 per cent more than December, 1956; 
the January egg set was some 10 per cent greater 
than a year ago. 


14 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


















For Your 
Farm. Hauls! 


There*s greater durability, increased 
horsepower in Chevrolet's new engine 
lineup for ’58! There’s more hustle 
under the hood, more savings and stamina! 

Toting in the fields or heading into town, 
these handy, handsome ’58 Chevy trucks 
make their own brand of country music . . . 
fast time. There’s pep aplenty in any engine 
you pick—high-compression V8 or thrifty 6 
—with output ranging all the way to 230 
h.p, A whole crop of new models are ready 
to short-cut tedious chores—including 4- 
wheel-drive pickups, panels and stakes that 
haul where even the wagon trails leave off. 
Drop into your Chevrolet dealer’s next time 
you’re over his way. . . . Chevrolet Division 
of General Motors, Detroit 2, Michigan. 




NEW CHEVROLET 


TASK-FORCE 58 


Latest editions of the 
''Big Wheel’' in trucks! 


February 1, 1958 


15 























How to Solve the Farm Problem 


OUGH agriculture is the 
very foundation of all hu¬ 
man activtity, it constitutes 
only one part of man's 
economic life. It should 
thus be bought into con¬ 
formity with the general 
economic system. Nowhere in the 
free world is current agricultural 
policy in line with the fundamental 
principle of capitalism—competition. 

The farmer demands protection by 
subsidies, claiming that many manu¬ 
facturers and traders, protected by 
tariffs and combines, employ these 
expedients to evade competition, 
thus injuring his interests and those 
of the consumer in general. 

Subsidies paid to the farmer do 
three grave disservices to the con¬ 
sumer: they maintain unsuitable 
soils under cultivation; they enable 
inefficient farmers to remain inef¬ 
ficient; and they ensure excessive 
prices to efficient farmers cultivat¬ 
ing suitable soils. Yet, in spite of 
heavy subsidies, farmers eyery- 
where are dissatisfied and far from 
prosperous. 

Tariffs and Cartels Strifle Free Trade 

Tariffs and combines, by maintain¬ 
ing both the inefficient and the high- 
cost manufacturer and trader in 
business, raise prices and thereby 
lower the standard of living of the 
consumer. However, as long as 
tariffs and combines prevail, agri¬ 
cultural subsidies also must prevail. 

In spite of all these abuses, the 
immediate economic prospects are 
decidedly hopeful; yet the continu¬ 
ance of the farmers’ worldwide 
plight may ultimately result in a 
general depression. This disquiet¬ 
ing outlook prompts me to submit, 
in all modesty, the following pro¬ 
posals: 


By PAUL de HEVESY 

1— The farmer and the manufac¬ 
turer have not only to sell but also 
to buy. Neither of them can be ex¬ 
pected to sell his few products cheap 
in the open market and to buy his 
numerous requirements, both pro¬ 
fessional and personal, dear in the 
protected market. Agricultural sub¬ 
sidies and customs duties should 
therefore be gradually diminished 
and finally abolished. Industrial and 
commercial conspiracies against the 
consumer, such as trusts and cartels, 
are, thanks to the Sherman Act, less 
prevalent in the United States than 
elsewhere. They should be broken 
up everywhere by means of coun¬ 
tervailing legislation. If all these 
measures were taken, the prices of 
all goods would be bought into their 
proper relations and parity prices 
would prevail without subsidization. 

2— Prices are far too serious a 
matter to be left to the whims of 
sectional interests or even of na¬ 
tional governments. They should de¬ 
pend on the combined decisions of 
all consumers and all producers of 
all commodities throughout the 
world. Then the varying pressure of 
supply and demand would effect the 
reciprocal adjustment of all prices. 
Price-fixing, whether by public au¬ 
thority or by private decision, pre¬ 
vents this adjustment. The conse¬ 
quence is that capital resources are 
often misapplied. 

3— Markets cannot be freed and 
national and international competi¬ 
tion cannot be initiated without the 
prior withdrawal of duplicating farm 
products in the main food-exporting 
countries; otherwise, farm prices 
would collapse. By concerted inter¬ 
national action, these unsalable sur¬ 
pluses should therefore be withdrawn 
from the market and held every¬ 
where as security stocks against any 


emergency. These stocks should not 
be put on sale without the consent 
of the Food and Agriculture Organi¬ 
zation of the United Nations. 

4— These measures having been 
put into effect, competitive farming 
should take the place of subsidized 
farming, and national and interna¬ 
tional trade in farm products—and 
later in all other products—should 
be set free from state control. Prices 
must cease to be political issues. 

5— The State should abstain from 
all commercial activities, which 
should be exclusively entrusted to 
independent merchants, whose ex¬ 
perience and competence present a 
reassuring contrast to the ineptitude 
of public functionaries unwisely 
vested with mercantile powers. 

Free Trade Can Eliminate Farm 
Surpluses 

6— One of the principal functions 
of trade is to clear the market of 
duplicating stocks before they be¬ 
come burdensome. 

7— In accordance with the law of 
large numbers, the average yield per 
acre of plants grown throughout the 
world shows little variation from one 
year to another. The larger the ter¬ 
ritory investigated, the smaller the 
yearly variation in yield; the smaller 
the territory investigated, the larger 
the yearly variation in yield. If the 
world is regarded as one single es¬ 
tate, the variation in yield per acre 
is insignificant; for a lower yield in 
some parts of the world is always 
compensated for by a proportionately 
higher yield elsewhere. The world 
crop of such widely cultivated plants 
depends almost exclusively on their 
sown area which, in turn, depends 
mainly on price. Since the prices 
that the farmers receive for their 


(Ed. — Mr. de Hevesy, an economist 
with a diplomatic background, was a 
member of the diplomatic service of the 
former Austro-Hungarian Monarchy un¬ 
der the Emperor Francis Joseph I, and 
later Hungarian Minister in Paris and 
Madrid. He. was also Permanent Delegate 
to the League of Nations and the Inter¬ 
national Labour Office, member of the 
Wheat Advisory Committee, London, and 
of the Committee for Post-War Recon¬ 
struction at the Royal Institute of Inter¬ 
national Affairs, London. He is the au¬ 
thor of "World Wheat Planning", and of 
"Le Probleme Mondial Du Bie”, which 
won the Gold Medal of the French Aca¬ 
demy of Agriculture. Now a British citi¬ 
zen, Mr. de Hevesy has resided in Lon¬ 
don for the last 25 years.] 


crops are arbitrary, the planted area, 
and therefore the harvested amount 
of single crops throughout the 
world, become also arbitrary and do 
not correspond to world demand. It 
is in fact the granting of arbitrary 
prices that has caused the over¬ 
production in various foodstuffs dur¬ 
ing the last few years. 

8— Hence the problem of wheat, 
and indeed of all major world crops, 
can be solved only on an interna¬ 
tional basis: in fact, only on the 
basis of world-wide free trade. 

9— When freedom of trade prevails, 
neither over-production nor under¬ 
production of single commodities is 
likely to occur in the world, or, if 
it does, to last any length of time. 
And, without excess or scarcity, 
prices are unlikely to be either too 
low or to high. 

10— Should, contrary to all excep¬ 
tion, inordinately low farm prices 
occur, their full impact should not 
be allowed to fall on farmers alone, 
but should be spread over the entire 
economy. In such an emergency, 
the farmers should be prudently as¬ 
sisted, not by subsidies, but by m.od- 
erate monetary grants, analagous to 
the payments made to the unem¬ 
ployed. Such grants to hard-hit 
farmers would neither influence the 
prices of farm products nor violate 
man’s inalienable right to trade free¬ 
ly. On the other hand, should farm 
prices become inordinately high, this 
would stimulate production which. 




’’Leave 
the farm? 
Not me. 
Never!” 


16 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


















r 

|i turn, would result in lower prices. 
^ 11—Something must be wrong with 
an economic system responsible for 
juge unsalable surpluses. The fault 
es in the method of marketing 
hich is unprincipled and disorder- 
Many people are unaware that 
3ie most orderly method of market- 
iiig is free trade. Today, when the 
ieans of production and of transport 
(ave immensely improved, this is 
ue more so than ever before. 

12 — Free trade, which made the 
jnglish-speaking peoples prosperous 

d happy, should be gradually but 
thusiastically resumed. Small pal- 
llitives by well-meaning but ill-in- 
rmed politicians will not save the 
ee world from sinking into an eco- 
ni)mic morass. 

13— If free trade were to be sup¬ 
plemented with an ever freer move¬ 
ment of men, capital and knowledge, 
unemployment would decrease, pro¬ 
duction would increase, and less po- 
t^itial wealth would remain unex¬ 
ploited throughout the world than 
at present. 


^ Which System—Competition or 
Regimentation? 

—Behind the Iron Curtain prices 
of all commodities in relation to 
wages are much higher than any 
whei'e else. This is mainly due tc 
c^tral planning and price-fixing, 
which exclude true competition, the 
oAy system by which goods of the 
IhMest qualities can be produced at 
tlffi lowest costs and sold at the 
lowest prices. 

15—As time passes and education 
spreads throughout Russia, the Rus¬ 
sian people may begin to think for 
thfemselves and to imbibe liberal 
ideas. Since competition was in 
v^ted not by man but by nature, it 
canot be perpetually suppressed. It 
isjtherefore by no means impossible 
that, having withdrawn behind their 
o^Jn frontiers, they may adopt the 


competitive system as the foundation 
of their economy which could then 
be integrated with that of the rest 
of the world. The open market would 
then embrace the whole world and 
an era of peace freedom and pros¬ 
perity would ensue. 

lb’—The be.st incentive for the 
Russians to adopt the competitive 
economic system in their agriculture, 
industry and trade would be the 
example of constant prosperity in 
the free world. This prosperity can¬ 
not be achieved and maintained with¬ 
out effecting the reforms briefly out¬ 
lined in this article. 

17— In the last resort, competition 
itself will decide which of the two 
systems shall triumph: competitive 
enterprise or dictatorial regimenta¬ 
tion. 

18— The United States and Canada 
are continually extolling the merits 
of competitive enterprise; but, at 
least for trade in farm products, they 
do not practice what they preach. 
Yet man cannot attain the highest 


degree both of freedom and of pros¬ 
perity unless markets are free. In¬ 
terference with the activities of free 
men and with the functions of free 
niarkets imperceptibly leads to so¬ 
cialism—a good system for a be¬ 
sieged fortress, but a bad system for 
a free country. 

19—The confusion thaat prevails in 
the American farm economy is a 
warning that, without open markets, 
capitalism in general and the Ameri¬ 
can way of life in particular cannot 
survive, let alone triumph. 


[Ed. — Because of the controver¬ 
sial nature of the farm problem, 
there will, we know, be mixed re¬ 
actions to Mr. de Hevesy’s thought- 
provoking article. While The Rural 
New Yorker is not in complete ac¬ 
cord with all the views he expresses, 
we believe that it merits careful 
reading and analysis. Constructive 
comment from readers is therefore 
invited.] 



Forest Fertilization? 


“Fertilizing forest trees to speed 
up wood production and improve 
timber resources may have a bright 
future in America, if forest fertiliza¬ 
tion research now under way in 
Europe is a reliable indicator.” 

This is the opinion of E. T. York 
of the American Potash Institute who 
recently toured European forest re¬ 
search centers. 

The use of fertilizers with forestry 
is more complex than it is with most 
agricultural crops. But, according to 
Dr. York, “Problems are by no means 
insurmountable; in fact, answers to 
many of them are already being de¬ 
veloped. Research on how to use fer¬ 


tilizers properly under conditions 
that insure economic response must 
precede the use of fertilizer on a large 
scale in practical forest manage¬ 
ment.” Recent U. S. experiments have 
indicated that, under certain condi¬ 
tions, American forest trees, too, like 
agricultural crops, will respond favor¬ 
ably to fertilization. 

Since 1945, there has been an in¬ 
crease of interest in forest tree fer¬ 
tilization in Europe as a means of 
replenishing timber resources severe¬ 
ly damaged and drained by World 
War II. Many countries now conduct 
excellent research programs in for¬ 
est tree nutrition. Observing condi¬ 


tions under which best fertilizer re¬ 
sponses occur, York was struck by 
the problem of determining specific 
nutrient needs of different tree 
species growing under widely differ¬ 
ent environmental conditions. “Al¬ 
though soil tests help”, he says, 
“foliar analyses now seem the best 
means of determining the nutrient 
status and needs of growing trees. 
Nutrient levels in soils and foliage 
must be carefully correlated with the 
trees’ response to fertilizers. We 
must find not only the ratio, forms 
and amounts of nutrients needed, 
but also how best they can be 
added.” 

The problem of placing fertilizer 
so that trees can utilize it most 
efficiently is a big one. In new plant¬ 
ings or young stands, fertilizer not 
properly used may stimulate compe¬ 
tition from weeds and undesirable 
tree species. Natural limitation to the 
use of mechanical application equip¬ 
ment in established forest areas also 
presents difficulties; the airplane may 
help. Finally, the long-term nature 
of an investment in fertilizers for 
forestry emphasizes the need for 
careful economic evaluation of re¬ 
turns. 



New England Has No Monopoly 
This sound old covered bridge tra¬ 
verses the Bearverkill at the Beaver- 
kill Campsite near Roscoe, N, Y, 




«ao resTfe 
siNce 




fulo muB 

SINCE 




y iQt of the friends I had in school have left farming and gone to work 
jithe city. Not me. I know what I want and I’ve got it. Of course the farm 
Jn’t all mine. My dad and I work it together. It gives us a deep*down 
IBrjonal satisfaction . . . plus good crops anc/ good profits. When you 
pdlup all the benefits, it’s easy to see that the grass is really greener on 
p«|side of the fence! 

Ojpe important reason we regularly get high yields at a low unit cost is 
loj^ter. My folks have been Roysterizmg owr land for almost 50 years. 

that Royster pays off in higher profits at harvest time . . . that 
f Joyfter is the best crop insurance you can buy. 

i I 

U^day’s profitable crop production requires a fertilizer as modern as 
OTatest model farm machine. That’s why we use Royster’s scientifically 
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tOYSTER VIM is a top quality, scientifically formulated fertilizer 
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Breeding, Feeding and—Worms 

It takes more than medication to control 
parasites of livestock's digestive tracts. 

By J. H. WHITLOCK 



herever on earth moisture 
and organic matter are 
combined, and the temper¬ 
ature, requirements ai'e sat¬ 
isfactory, one can usually 
find a worm. The waters 
teem, as do soil, livestock 
and some human beings. The diges¬ 
tive tract of our farm animals is 
just one more place where worms 
can live and grow. 

Parasitology is not a popular sci¬ 
ence, so it has never attracted the 
money or the personnel that its 
complexities demand. Gaps in our 
knowledge have been turned to use 
by modern hucksters who devote 
latest techniques to persuade that 
a worm is a nasty, evil thing, or that 
it costs farmers a lot of money. So 
successful have promoters been that 
it is almost impossible to discuss 
worms sensibly. Yet the human being 
himself essentially starts life as an 
internal parasite, and he continues as 
an ectoparasite of his mother or the 
cow. The fact is that a parasite, an 
animal which lives at the expense of 
a lai’ger animal called the host, is 
just another expression of living mat¬ 
ter. When parasitologists start talk¬ 
ing economics, they are usually short 
of facts; and almost everyone knows 
that even the economists certainly 
do not have all the answers to north¬ 
east farmers’ problems. But no reput¬ 
able economist could accept for a 
moment many of the premises behind 
current methods of estimating animal 
losses from parasites. The ox warble, 
or common grub, is referred to as a 
multi-million dollar problem. But 
consider the way that this estimate 
is computed: v/arble-free hides are 
rare and bring a premium, and war¬ 
ble-damaged hides are common; so, 
a large part of this alleged multi¬ 
million dollar loss is derived by mul¬ 
tiplying the number of damaged 
hides by the price differential! Does 
anyone believe that, if we were to 
wipe out the ox warble overnight, 
the price of beef would promptly rise 
and the farmer would pocket the 
difference? When sound hides are 
common, they will be cheap. The ox 
warble does result in real loss, of 
course, but it cannot be calculated 
on any reasonable basis that will not 
produce a “baloney” dollar. 

Not All Parasites’ Food Could Be 
Used by Animals. 

The mixing of morals, economics 
and parasitology has created in the 
public mind an idea that any para¬ 
site found in any animal must be 
stealing food and therefore cause the 
farmer serious loss. Calculators have 
built up thousands of dollar signs 
and millions of zeroes into what is 
most literally hogwash. Just because 
feed is in the digestive tract does 
not mean it can always be used by the 
animal. A parasite may not be taking 


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food from the host; it may be living 
on by-products or waste or unused 
food. With few exceptions, we do not 
actually know what parasites live on; 
under even many experimental con¬ 
ditions, it is impossible to demon¬ 
strate so-called economic loss. Many 
common animal parasites can become 
harmful provided conditions are 
right, but most have lived so many 
millions of years with their hosts that 
they have built up a definite rela¬ 
tionship. If a farmer practices good 
husbandry, he will keep out of troub¬ 
le; at least he will reduce the prob¬ 
ability of getting into difficulty with 
the parasites. 

There is no medicine or manage¬ 
ment that can guarantee absolute 
freedom from loss; there is too much 
variability in stock, farming condi¬ 
tions, geography, climate, manage¬ 
ment, feed stuffs and all the various 
factors which combine to prevent 
or produce disease. Effective pre¬ 
vention of parasitic disease rests bas¬ 
ically upon a competent veterinarian 
who knows the farm and locality. 
His advice can compensate for vari¬ 
ability. 

Purchase and Promotion of Parasites 

Most farmers who get into serious 
difficulty with parasites bring the 
trouble on themselves. They purchase 
an animal from an unknown source 
and promptly turn it into an already 
established and relatively healthy 
herd. The sensible procedure is to 
quarantine all new purchases and 
have them examined carefully by a 
veterinarian. Preventive medication 
should be administered to make sure 
the animal will not transmit a para¬ 
site or a disease to the flock or herd. 
Many farmers permit visitors access 
to their herds. One of the worst out¬ 
breaks of sheep scab I ever saw was 
unquestionably touched off by the 
visit of a butcher to the flock. The 
efforts of veterinarians who change 
coveralls and boots between farms 
may be largely nullified by owners 
who allow anybody and everybody 
to see and handle their stock. 

A farmer can bring bring in trouble 
by the purchase of the wrong kind 
of animal, too. There are sparsely 
grassed upland areas in New York 
that will adequately support light 
breeds of sheep, but they will almost 
guarantee malnutrition for the very 
heavy mutton breeds. Research at 
Cornell University and elsewhere has 
demonstrated time and again that one 
of the quickest ways to produce para¬ 
sitic disease is to keep the host ani¬ 
mal malnourished. Dairy farmers who 
turn young stock onto poor pastures 
near the barn not only guarantee 
malnutrition but also provide opti¬ 
mum environment for the growth of 
internal parasites. A farmer should 
purchase healthy stock only. The ani- 



Good-gvowing, wcll-nouTishcd hsifevs like these on ct Genesee County, N. 
fuTm cLve seldom in need of medication fov intevnal pavasites. Planned bveed 
ing, feeding and management are important factors of dairy health. 

THE RURAL NEW YORKER 



































































































1 


mal should come from the same type 
of farm he is operating and be of 
a type that has made money for that 
kind of farm. It is worth it to pay a 
little extra money for animals well 
adapted to local conditions of climate 
and husbandry. New purchases should 
be quarantined, then inspected by 
a competent vetrinarian. Above all, 
animals should be well fed. 

The Value of Scales and Records 

Fundamental to a successful para¬ 
site control program is the use of 
scales to weigh young animals. In 
former days, the master farmer had 
a more leisurely existence and more 
time for fence-hanging and watching. 
On a modern farm, he rarely has the 
time for this, and the only substitute 
is a scale backed up by production 
records. These need not be elaborate, 
but they should be complete enough 
to enable the farmer to discard un¬ 
economic animals and to warn him 
quickly if young stock stops growing. 
In most outbreaks of parasitic dis¬ 
eases, interruption of growth pre¬ 
cedes full development of the malady. 
The farmer should carefully study 
animals in poor condition and, if in 
doubt as to the cause, call in veteri- 
nai’y assistance. The farmer who waits 
for malnourished animals to be over¬ 
whelmed by parasites is in danger 
of serious loss . 

Observation of abnormal slowing 
of growth of the young, however, is 
not the time for blind medication. 
There is actually some evidence that 
phenothiazine in small doses may 
stimulate immature worms to grow 
faster and become more invasive. Yet, 
this is the time at which many farm¬ 
ers use phenothiazine in salt and 
feed. This is just the time that good 
professional advice is most useful; 
the competent veterinarian will ex¬ 
amine the environment, the stock, 
and take fecal and blood samples for 
laboratoi’y examination. His recom¬ 
mendations will probably include 
changes in management and feed, 
and perhaps some medication. Illness 
usually requires more than medicine 
for cure. 

.Another reason for keeping ade¬ 
quate production records is that 
there are heriditary factors for resis¬ 


tance to parasitic disease. This may 
seem like an old story to crop people, 
but because livestock breeds so slow¬ 
ly we cannot create resistant strains 
so effectively. Yet, the sheep’s gene¬ 
tic resistance to stomach-worm dis¬ 
ease seems to be widely enough dis¬ 
tributed to allow a farmer to increase 
his flock’s resistance by discarding 
certain susceptible strains and breed¬ 
ing to resistant ones. Adequate breed¬ 
ing and production records are a 
necessity for this. Inherited resis¬ 
tance is important wherever manage¬ 
ment favors the animal rather than 
the parasite. 

The Value of Vigor 

Anything that aids the production 
of healthy, fast-growing young stock 
is a fundamental asset in a parasite 
control program. Any program which 
provides inadequate nutrition, debil¬ 
itation or excessive contact betw’een 
young and old animals is very likely 
to result in serious loss. At the pres¬ 
ent time, there is no evidence that a 
farmer can buy a drug store system 
of complete parasite control. It is 
only the farmer who maintains ade¬ 
quate production records, who knows 
his strain, and has knowledge of how 
his stock should do who is really 
equipped to try new preparations 
on a small scale to see if they actually 
help. The farmer without records 
will never know whether the material 
causes an increase or decrease in 
productivity. Specialists in the field 
of animal health are very hesistant 
to disturb any system of management 
that is producing well. 

Even though' most of the medicines 
currently recommended have some 
merit, the producer who indiscrimin¬ 
ately adds them to his feeding pro¬ 
gram may be wasting money. It is 
easy to tell the man suffering disas¬ 
ter that the compounds on the shelves 
did him no good; it is difficult to 
advise the successful producer that 
the stuff may be a waste of money. 
As a result, the latter often carries 
a substantial burden of unnecessary 
expense. There is no medicine now, 
and it is unlikely that there will ever 
be one in the future, that will elimin¬ 
ate the necessity for planned breed¬ 
ing, feeding and management. 


U. S. and Connecticut at 
Odds On Milk Order 

The preliminary draft by Conn^- 
ticut daii'y farmers for a federal milk 
order in Connecticut has been turned 
down by U. S. milk marketing offi¬ 
cials. 

Local farmers have proposed a 
federal order designating Connecticut 
as a marketing area. The federal 
experts object to the provision in 
the order that those dealers whose 
purchases include milk produced 
outside the State will be subject to 
the federal order, while other deal¬ 
ers will continue to be subject to 
the pi'esent state order. Connecticut 
dairymen claim that this safeguard 
is needed because otherwise unreg¬ 
ulated milk from New York would 
represent unfair competition to Con¬ 
necticut dealers. 


Commg Meetings and 
Shows 

. Feb. 6 — Vegetable Growers’ Meet¬ 
ing, Connecticut Agriculture Experi- 
nient Station, New Haven. 

Feb. 6-7 — New Hampshire Poultry 
Health Conference, University of New 
Hampshire, Durham. 

Feb. 6-7 — Livestock Conservation 
Short Course, University of Connec¬ 
ticut, Storrs. 

Apr. 8 — Spring Meeting, New 
Hampshire Poultry Growers Assn., 
University of New Hampshire, Dur¬ 
ham. 

May 10 — New England Angus 
Farmers Sale, Brandon, Vt. 

Oct. 26 — New England Aberdeen- 
Angus Breeders’ Sale, Bull Hill Farm, 
1 ^ 0 . Amherst, Mass. 

February 1, 1958 


December Milk Prices 

The prices paid for 3.5 per cent 
milk by co-operatives and dealers re¬ 
porting for the month of December 
1957 are as follow's: 

Per 100 Lbs. Per Qt. 

*Lehigh Valley Co-op_$5.40 $.1144 

Hillsdale Prod. Co-op_5.34 .1135 

Monroe Co. Producers.. .5.25 .1117 

Sullivan Co. Co-op. 5.17 .11 

Delaware Co. Co-op_ 5.10 .1091 

Crowley’s Milk Co. Inc... 5.05 .1074 
Mt. Joy Farmers Co-op.. 5.04 .1072 

Rock Royal Co-op. 4.93 .1049 

Conesus Milk Co-op. 4.93 .1049 

Bovina Center Co-op.... 4.93 .1049 

Chateaugay Co-op. 4.93 .1049 

Fly Creek Valley Co-op.. 4.93 .1049 

Grandview Dairy. 4.93 .1049 

No. Blenheim Co-op.... 4.93 .1049 

Rose Lake Dairies. 4.93 .1049 

Sealtest Sheffield Farms. .4.93 .1049 

Erie Co. Co-op. 4.92 .1047 

Dairymen’s League. 4.83 .1027 

Fat. freight, bonuses and other differ¬ 
entials and charges vary, and the actual 
return is more to some and less to others, 
especially in the case of dealers and co¬ 
operatives owning more than one plant. 
The Market Administrators’ prices are: New 
York $4.93; Buffalo $4.77; Rochester $4.92. 

The average cost of production for d” 
cember 1957 was $5.92 per cwt. of 3.5 per 
cent milk. This is in accordance with an 
analysis made by D. L. Cunningham, N. Y. 
State College of Agriculture, Cornell Univer¬ 
sity. 

Prices to farmers per quart; blend (3.5 
per cent milk 201-210 mile zone) — 10.49 
cents; Class I-A (fluid) — 12.96 cents. Con¬ 
sumer retail price per quart, N. Y. metro¬ 
politan area, approved milk, doorstep in 
glass, 29*2 cents; at stores, in paper, 26*/2 
cents. 

*Lehigh Valley is withholding 10 cents of 
its .$5.40 December price for 3.5 per cent 
milk, pending outcome of court proceedings. 


Webster J. Birdsall, No. Chatham, 
Columbia Co., has been elected presi¬ 
dent of the N. Y. State Agriculture 
Society. He succeeds Warren J. 
Hawley, Jr., of Batavia. 


SWINE 


PENNSYLVANIA YORKSHIRE CLUB 

STATE SHOW AND SALE 

OFFERS AT PUBLIC AUCTION 

40 BRED GILTS—10 FALL BOARS 

With Bloodlines that Make Farm Show 
CHAMPIONS 

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 15th, 1958 

SHOW—10:00 A. M. • SALE—1:00 P. M. 
Consigned by Breeders of Farm Show 
CHAMPIONS 

ELIGIBLE TO SHIP ANYWHERE 
AT GARDEN SPOT SALES BARN 
WILLOW STREET, Lancaster Co., PA. 
Four miles south of Lancaster off Rt. 72 
Judge, WILBUR L. PLAGER — 
Auctioneer. MC CONAHY BROS. 
For Cataloge Write — 

RENO H. THOMAS, President, 
BEAVERTOWN, SNYDER CO., PA. 
OR 

GEORGE E. COGLEY, Secy-Treas. 

R. 1, RONKS, LANCASTER CO., PA. 


Registered Herefords 

GILTS BRED FOR MARCH and APRIL LITTERS 
Open Gilts from August and September Litters. 
CARRENE FARM, STEWARTSTOWN, PENNA. 

HAMPSHIRES: MEAT TYPE BOARS and GILTS 

Slaughter and Production Records Available 
CEDAR POINT FARM S._ BOX 718, EASTON. MO. 

MAPLEHURST DUROCS: April Boars & Gilts. Fall 
Pigs. Either Sex. R. F. Pattington, Scipio Center, N.Y. 

FREE CIRCULAR: REG. HAMPSHIRE SWINE 
Since 1934. C. L UTZ. Middletown i. Maryland 

BorlsLsliiros 

Championship Breeding Stock From Production Tested 
Sows. Certified Meat Type. 
HEDGEFIELD FARM. SALEM, NEW JERSEY 

—SPOTTED POLAND CHINA SERVICE BOARS— 
BRED GILTS and BABY PIGS 
C. W. HILLMAN. VINCENTOWN, N. J. 

Quincy Quality Yorkshires: Registered Breeding Stock, 
selected for herd improvement; service boars, fall boars, 
bred gilts. Alfred Fauver, Rumney, New Hampshire. 


HORSES AND PONIES 


10 - PONY BROOO MARES - 10 

All bred to our small registered Palomino 
Shetland pony stallion, your choice at $800, 
or any 2 for $1,500, any 4 for $2,750, or the 
10 mares and 1 Palomino pony stallion for 
$6,500. Six registered yearling Shetland fillies 
$1,000 each, or all 6 for $5,000. Three un¬ 
registered yearling Shetland fillies $400 each 
or ail 3 for $1,000, Will breed them to our 
small Palomino pony stallion free. Gay Lady 
Porter, 25173, born April 10, 1947, gentle 

black and white spotted Shetland mare bred 
to our small registered Palomino Shetland 
pony stallion, Larigo’s Supreme Gold 30132, 
at $1,000. Raise ponies for profit and pleasure. 
The demand is greater than the supply. 
Terms arranged. Positively no Sunday busi¬ 
ness. For additional information call — 
Keystone 6-5648. 

P. K. FISHER, 
QUAKERTOWN, PENNA. 

GOATS 

MONEY IN DAIRY GOATS! Produce Healthful Milk. 
Monthly Magazine $1.00 Yearly. DAIRY GOAT 
JOURNAL Dept. B-21, COLUMBIA. MISSOURI 


PILES 

If you suffer the miseries of itching’, 
bleeding or protruding piles, read 
this report from Mr. John D. Bushee: 

“I Trill never forget 
|| the Page Company as 
|| long as I live. I am 
68 years old this year. 
:i| Good luck to every- 
|i body that nses Page 
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PAGE CO., Depf.48 B-2 Marshall, Mich. 



BEEF CATTLE 


Reg. Polled Herefords 

BULLS READY FOR SERVICE 
OPEN AND BRED HEIFERS 
Modern Bloodlines. T. B. and Bangs Aecrtditad Htrd 
BATTLEGROUND FARMS 
FREEHOLD. NEW JERSEY PHONE: 8-2224 


ANGUS 


Performance tested, big, fast growing type of pure 
R'buest folder and data. 

plantation. _ QUEEJ^STOWN. MARYLAND 

Young ABERDEEN-ANGUS 
COWS, good families and top bloodlines. Bred to 
top Bulls. Also, 10 ANGUS HEIFERS ready to 
breed. Contact — EDWARD O’BOYLE, or 

DALE FLETCHER. PINE PLAINS. NEW YORK 

_ DAIRY CATTLE 


How to Succeed in Modern Dairying 
I . . ^ Start a GUERNSEY HERD 


Send for FREE handbook on how to 
start a successful Guernsey Herd. 
Also includes information on the prof¬ 
itable business of producing and 
selling Golden Guernsey Milk. 
AMERICAN GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB 
831 Main St., Peterborough, N. H, 



DOGS 


Ped. Smooth Fox Terrier Pups "“cl";'!'?:..?."" 

MINIATURE COLLIES: Puppies and Grown Dogs 

MELODYLANE KENNELS, Chestertown, N. yt (3068) 

- REGISTERED ST. BERNARD PUPPIES - 

READY, ALSO IDEAL FOR CHRISTMAS 
W. E. YODER, MEYERSDALE, PA. Phone;4-7664 

TINY LIVELY CHIHUAHUA REG. PUPPIES 
MRS. M. W. WELLS, CONESUS, NEW YORK 


FOR SALE — HIGH QUALITY 


CHINCHILLA BREEDER MALE $75 
JOHN HUMPHREYS, PENNSVILLE, NEW JERSEY 

-PUREBRED ENGLISH SHEPHERD PUPS- 

MALES $10.00 • FEMALES $7.00 

J. WARE, SHEPHERDSTOWN. W. VA. 


-- IRISH SETTER PUPPIES - 

AKC Registered. Champion Sired. Good Hunting and 
Show Stock. JOHN MCGOVERN, 

BOX 147, PURDYS STATION, NEW YORK 


Guaranteed border Collies with parents im¬ 
ported from Scotland. Stock dogs. Males 3 
months $25; females $15. Lassie Collies 3 
months, males $25; females $20. Fully trained 
cattle dogs either Breeder, Border Collie or 
the old Shepherd strain, trained to go along 
distance for cattle, easy drivers, low heelers. 
Males year old $50; females $40. Pleasure to 
show these dogs drive cattle and convince 
yourself. I have shipped my most intelligent 
Collies all over U. S. A. for the past 20 years. 
I guarantee if you buy, delivery anywhere 
m the U. S. A. 

WILFRED 2ERON, 
MORRISBURG, ONTARIO, CANADA 

—— SHELTIE (Miniature Collie) PUPPIES _ 

Champion pedigree. A.K.C. registered, wormed. In¬ 
oculated. ASTOLAT KENNELS, Kunkletown 3, Pa. 

RABBITS 


AISE 



nxi-n 


FULL TIME BUSINESS 
OR WELL PAID HOBBY 

■ Thousands of RaisersNeededto Meet the 
Tremendous Demand forMEAT—FUK— 
[LABORATORY- BREEDING STOCK. 

jKnow the Facts 

/Breeds.Breedii^andCare.Markets.Etc. 

I Bulletin, 26 Cents, Wo Are Associatioa 
aasrpirnu DAOBt* to see you eXorf WaAi/ 

AWICnIvAN RABBIT AS5*N,v $8 ^HBA Blcls.p Pittsi^ffitiw Pdiiia* 

ANGORA RABBITS: Melros® Strain Foundation 
Stock. America's Oldest Breeder. MAURICE SIXBY. 
92 MELROSE STREET, BUFFALO 20, N. Y. 

SHEEP 

Let SUFFOLK SHEEP Increase Your Farm Income. 

BOOKLET and BREEDERS’ LIST FREE. 
Write NATIONAL SUFFOLK SHEEP ASSOCIATION 
BOX 324.NY. COLUMBIA. MISSOURI 


AUCTIONEERS 


LEARN AUCTIONEERING, Term Soon. Free Catalog 
REISCH AUCTION SCHOOL, MASON CITY, IOWA 


When you write advertisers mention 
The Rural New- Yorker and you’ll get 
a quick reply and a “square deal. ” See 
guarantee editorial page. : .* 


FOR QUICK, PROFITABLE SALES... 


Many breeders and farmers 
have found an advertisement 
on this page a sure way to 
sell stonk quickly and profit¬ 
ably. 

For the special low-rate of 
$1.00 per line (about 7 words), 
your message will be read in 
over 300,000 of the finest farm 
homes in the Northeastern 
area. Simply fill-in and mail 
the attached blank. 

References required from new 
advertisers. 

OUR NEXT ISSUE 
FEBRUARY 15 th 

GOES TO PRESS 
JANUARY 31st 


PLEASE INSERT THE FOLLOWING AD: 


The Rural New Yorker 

333 W. 30th Street 
New York I, N.Y. 


NAME . 

ADDRESS . 

. 55 


19 












































































































r 


REDUCING SPECIALIST SAYS: 



Slarle Ilammel, New 
York, N. Y.. says: "I 
used to wear a size 20 
dress, now I wear size 
14, thanks to the Spot rnne# 
Reducer, It was fun 
and I enjoyed it.” 


LOSE 

WEIGHT 

where it 
shows most 

REDUCE 


any part of 
body with 


SPOT REDUCER 

SPOT REDUCER FIRMS 
FLABBY TISSUE — TONES 
SAGGING SKIN — REDUCES 
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WHERE : 


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Like a magic wand, the '"Spot Reducer" obeys 

your every wish. Jlost any part of your body 

where it it loose and flabby, wherever you have 
extra weight and inches, the "Spot Reducer” can 

aid you in acquiring a youthful, slender and grace¬ 
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auty of this 
'scientifically design¬ 
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the method is so 
simple and easy, 
the results quick, 
sure and harmless. No e.xcr- 
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Thousands have lost weight 
this way — in hips, abdomen, 
MiAIIT TA •milAn legs. arms. neck, buttocks, 
*** AUMHrt, etc. The same method used by 
stage, screen and radio per¬ 
sonalities and leading reduc¬ 
ing salons. The ''Spot Re¬ 
ducer” can be used in your 
spare time, in the priiacy 
of your own room. It breaks 
ciown fatty tissues, tones the 
muscles and flesh, and the 
increased, awakened blood 
circulation carries away waste 
fat. Two weeks after using 
the "Spot Reducer”. look 
in the mirror and see a 
more glamorous, better, firm¬ 
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the "Spot Re¬ 
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you want to lose it 
most, if you’re not 100% 
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"Thanks to the Spot 
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inches around the hips 
and three Inches a- 
round the waistline. 
It's amazing.” Mary 
Jlartln, Long Island 
City, New York. 


A large size jar of Special 
Formula Body Massage 
Cream will be included 
FREE with your order for 
the “Spot Reducer.” 

MAIL COUPON NOW! 


BODY MASSAGERS, Dept. A-G06 
4 o 5 Market St., Newark, New Jersey 

S»od me at once, for $2.98 cash, check or money 
order, the DeLuxe Model "Spot Reducer” and 
your famous Special Formula Body Massage 
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money will be refunded. 

Name.. 


Address 


City. Ctato 



Why “Good-Time 
Charlie" Suffers 
Uneasy Bladder 

Such a common thing as unwise eating or 
drinking may be a source of mild, but annoying 
bladder irritations — making you feel restless, 
tense, and uncomfortable. And if restless nights, 
with nagging backache, headache or muscular 
aches and pains due to over-exertion, strain or 
emotional upset, are adding to your misery — 
don’t wait —try Doan’s Pills. 

Doan's Pills have three outstanding advantages 
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on bladder irritations. 2 — A fast pain-relieving 
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action thni the kidneys, tending to increase the 
output of the 15 miles of kidney tubes. So. get 
the same happy relief millions have enjoyed for 
over 60 years. Ask for new, large, economy size 
and save money. Get Doan’s Pills today! 




STRAWBERRIES 


are ideal family income projects. Oaa« 
tenth acre yields 650 — 900 quarts. 
Allen's Berry Book tells best varieties 
end How to Grow Them. Free copy. 
Write today. 

W. F. ALLEN COMPANY 
72 Evorgreon Avo., Salisbury, Maryland 



Their Winter of Life 

In new three-room simplicity, she often lives what used to be: 

Their fertile acres in the sun, the firelit hearth when day was done; 

Her husband’s axe with shining blade for pine logs on the fire laid; 
Preserves and jellies on the shelves for them and others than themselves; 
The fresh sweet smell of country air, the yellow cat just dreaming where 
She baked brown-crusted loaves of bread and where the fulsome meals 
were spread. 

Today in doll-like destiny, they’re cosy as old folks can be; 

They really love to live like this . . . but, bless her, she will reminisce. 
Pennsylvania — Ida M. Forrest 


Poultry Pie for the Freezer 


The stewing ingredients are: 5 
pounds stewing fowl, 2 carrots, 2 
stalks celery, few sprigs parsley, 2 
small onions, 1 lemon, 2 teaspoons 
salt, 5 peppercorns, 1 bay leaf. 

The pie ingredients are: Pastry for 
topping (about 1 cup), 6-7 carrots, 
10 -oz. package frozen peas, 6-oz. can 
mushrooms, 2 cups chicken stock, 
% cup light cream, 4 tablespoons 
cornstarch, ho teaspoon salt, dash 
pepper, ¥4 teaspoon celery salt, V 4 
teaspoon monosodium glutamate. 

Put whole chicken in a large kettle. 
Add enough water to half cover it; 
toss in carrots, celery, parsley, onions, 
lemon slices (peel and all) salt, pep¬ 
percorns, bay leaf. Cook to boiling 
point, cover and cook slowly until 
fowl is very tender. Cool in stock. 
Meanwhile make up the pastry and 
chill in the refrigerator until needed. 
Remove skin and strip meat from 
chicken bones in large chunks. Strain 
vegetables from broth. Scrape carrots. 


cut in large pieces and cook in V 2 
cup of chicken broth and V 2 tea¬ 
spoon salt for 10 minutes. Thaw frozen 
peas until they separate. Drain 
mushrooms. Divide chicken and vege¬ 
tables into 2 9-inch piepans. 

To make the sauce: Mix 2 cups 
chicken stock with cream. Cook to 
boiling point and stir in cornstarch 
mixed smooth with a little chicken 
stock. 

Cook until sauce is slightly thick, 
add salt, pepper, celery salt, mono¬ 
sodium glutamate. Pour over chicken 
mixture. Cover with pastry. Cool, 
wrap for freezing. To defrost and 
serve, put pies in a 300 degree F. 
oven for 30 minutes, then increase 
heat to 425 degrees F. or hot and 
bake 30 minutes longer. These pies 
can be made and baked without 
freezing. If so, put pies in a 425 de¬ 
gree F. oven and bake 20-25 minutes. 
(Turkey may be used instead of 
chicken.) 


Old-Time Sausage 

Farm families which do their own 
butchering and then store meat in 
modern deep freezes might still rel¬ 
ish some good old-fashioned sausage. 
Very tasty, this old recipe has been 
in our family for years. 

Use two pounds of lean pork, two 
pounds of lean veal, two pounds of 
beef suet, the peel of half a lemon, 
one tablespoonful of nutmeg, one 
teaspoonful black pepper, one tea¬ 
spoonful cayenne pepper, five teas- 
spoonful of salt, three teaspoonsful 
mixed sweet marjoram, and thyme, 
two teaspoonsful of sage, and the 
juice of one lemon. Grind the meats 
and thoroughly mix in the other in¬ 
gredients. Then stuff the mixture 
into cases. 

Another fine recipe was for cooked 
bologna. Five pounds of chopped 
beef and one and a quarter pounds 
of pork were cooked until very ten¬ 
der. Grandmother actually boiled this 
meat for 12 hours on the back of her 
wood stove. Then she chopped it 
finely. Two teaspoonsful of ground 
cloves, one teaspoon of mace, 1.5 
ounces of black pepper, and salt to 
suit the taste—about five teaspoonsful 
—were mixed well. Stuffed into mus¬ 
lin bags eight or 12 inches long and 
three inches in diameter, it was then 
put in a crock of ham pickle for 
five days. After removal from the 
pickle, it was smoked a week. It was 
really quite delicious. 

’The ham pickle recipe was as fol¬ 
lows: stir one quart of fine salt, a 
quarter pound of salt petre and one 


pint of dark molasses into a gallon 
on scalding hot water. Let cool, and 
place the bologna in. Turn the pieces 
once or twice during the five days 
of pickling. Fern Berry 


It's Here! 



T he 1958 Needlework ALBUM is now 
available! It contains 56 pages of 
lovely designs In crochet, knit, em¬ 
broidery and sew from which to choose 
more patterns at your leisure. It also 
has directions for making 3 crochet 
items and 1 knit, plus basic stitch 
illustrations in crochet and knit. 

Price—only 25c a copy! 

Rural New Yorker, 333 Weist 30th St., New 
York 1, N. Y, 


HEARING 

. . . then you'll be 

happy to know how 
■we have improved 
the hearing and re¬ 
lieved those miserable 
ear noises, caused by 
catarrh of the head, 
for thousands of peo¬ 
ple (many past 70) 
who have used our 
simple Elmo Palli¬ 
ative HOME TREAT¬ 
MENT. This may be 
the answer to your 
prayer. NOTHING TO WEAR. Here 
are SOME of the symptoms that may 
likely to causing your catarrhal deaf¬ 
ness and ear noises: Head feels stopped 
up from mucus. Dropping of mucus in 
throat. Hawking and spitting. Mucus 
in nose or throat every day. Hearing 
worse with a cold. Hear — but don’t 
understand words. Hear better on clear 
i days. Worse on rainy days. Ear noises 
like crickets, bells, whistles, clicking, 
escaping steam or others. If your con¬ 
dition is caused ’oy catarrh of the head, 
you. too, may enjoy wonderful relief 
such as others have reported during our 
past 20 years. WRITE TODAY FOR 
PROOF OF RELIEF AND 30 DAY 
TRIAT. OFFER. THE ELMO COMPANY 
dept. 8RN3 davenport, IOWA 




SEND FOR 

FREE Recipe Booklet -- 
V/rite: Empire State Picklipg Co, 
Dept. N, Phelps, N.Y. ■* 


I UKE S/IVS^ ^ 

WITH WIENEHS 
COUNTRY STVLE/ 


America’s 

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DIRECT TO YOU...EASY TERMS 



Genuine Rockdale Mon 
uments and Markers 

Full Price $14.95 and up. 
Satisfaction or MONEY 
BACK. We pay freight. 
Compare our low prices. 
WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG 
ROCKDAIF MONUMENT CO. 
DEPT. 681 JOLIET. ILL. 


UIALL PAM 


FREE-GOLDEN ANNIV. CATALOG 
New selections 1957-58 patterns. 
Smart new colors & designs--83 pat¬ 
terns—complete instructions for mea¬ 
suring & hanging wallpaper. Whole¬ 
sale prices — Vs to 'A lower than 
retail stores and WE PAY POSTAGE. 

Write Now — 51st Year 
PENN WALL PAPER MILLS 
DEPT. 98 PHILA. 5. PA. 




■ss^^ 


HSW WIHTSn WOOLLENS 


BUY DIRECT from MILL and SAVE MANY 
DOLLARS on the newest novelty weaves, 
beautiful plaids and rich solid colors. Make 
the finest coats, suits, dresses, skirts, slacks, 
sport shirts at amazingly LOW MILL PRICES. 
Write Today for FREE SWATCHES of this 
WINTER’S smartest all wool and part wool 
materials. 

HOMESTEAD WOOLEN MILLS, INC. 


Dept. R-30, West Swanzey, New Hampshire 



NEW! PROTEIN OIL SHAMPOO 
CURLS AND WAVES HAIR 


FLORESS, new discovery oil pro¬ 
tein shampoo, ends need for liuiue 
permanents, sprays, lacquers, wave 
sets. Rejuvenates and reconciitions 
hair as completely as any liot oil 
treatment. Each shampoo and set 
puts in "stay-in” curls and naves. 
r Spark- 

fa WHOM E ling lustre that permanents have 

TRIAL taken out all these years. Glam¬ 

ourizes, makes hair shine with cleanliness. Send only 
25c for demonstration size of regular $1.63 FLORK.S3 
tax paid. Results will delight you. Write noff. 

MARLENE’S. Dept. 449-6 
10249 S, CALUMET AVE., CHICAGO 28, ILLINOIS 


. . a good, profitable side line . . 
HH HI a fascinating interesting hobby. 

Easy, requires little time, and 
^^^you can produce all the delicious 
Hm honey your family can use. 

U. S. D. A. recognizes bees as the 
most important pollinating agent for 60 farm crops. 
Co fl "First Lessons in Beekeep- 

OBnu ^l•UUing" and 6 months subscription to 
leading bee magazine. Free literature. 

AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL Box R, Hamilton, III- 


CLARINETS AND TRUMPETS FROM FACTORY. 
SAVE 50%. FREE INFORMATION. 

LIBRO MUSIC CENTER. 

591 CHAPEL ST., NEW HAVEN. CONN- 


SENIOR CITIZENS: Write for Details in New 
Magazine Published for You, THE AGE OUTLOOK. 
1015 LIBERTY ST., ROME, NEW YORK 

THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


20 


































































































Just Out! Spring-Summer Pattern Book 



It’s sheer delight for the home 
dressmaker — a fascinating catalog 
filled with the most up-to-the-minute 
styles that are sew-simple. 

As special features for you, we’ve 
highlighted fashion’s darling, the 
Chemise Dress. . .our exciting new 
New York Fashion Original frock 
. . .more of the winning designs 
from the contest at U. C. L. A. 

Don’t miss this inspiring Spring 
pattern book. Just 35 cents — send 
today for your copy to The Rural 
New Yorker, 333 West 30th Street, 
New York 1, N. Y. 


BECOMING 


8167. Flower-fresh for half-size figure. Sizes 12%, 
141/2 to 241 / 2 . Size 141 / 2 ,35 bust, 41/3 yds., 35-in. 25c. 



8196. Newest blouse trio for Spring; only 1 yd. 
89-in. fabric, each. Sizes 10, 12 to 20. Only 25c. 

Our new Spring-Summer 
book, 35 cents. 

Please print your name, full address, pattern 
number and size desired. Send orders to The 
Rural New Yorker, 333 West 30th Street, 
New York 1, N. Y. 

February 1, 1958 



JACKET 

8191 

36-52 


91 HIT PARADE SONDS — 


RECORD BARGAINS! 


□ 12 SQUARE DANCES & BOOK — $2.98 
You get 12 Square Dance Songs by Hap 
Williams and others plus Gift Book “Square 
Dancing for $2.98. 

1. Mockin’ Bird 

2. Flop.Eared 
Mule 

3. Buffalo Gal 

4. Oh, Susanna 

5. Soldier’s Joy 

6. Devil’s Dream 

7. Chicken Reel 



8. Golden Slipper 

9. Red River Valiey 

10. Arkansas 
Traveler 

11. Little Brown 
Jug 

12. Turkey in the 

- -.. Straw 

PLUS BOOK OZBRPM □ 45 RPM 
“Square Dancing for Young and Old” 


□ 18 ROCK 



& ROLL RECORD 

1. Jail. House Rock 

2. Diana 

. 3. Rooster Walk 
I 4. Two Point Eight 
s 5. Mr. Lee 
1 6. Happy, Happy 
; Birthday, Baby 
’3 7. Keep a Knockin’ 

’ 8. Black Slacks 
i 9. Whole Lot of 
Shakin Going 
On 


SONGS — $2.98 

10. That’ll be the 
Day 

11. Honeycomb 

12. Silhouettes 

13. Rock-Cry 

14. Daddy Call 

15. What-cha 
Gotta Lose 

16. Man LikeWow 

17. I Love You 
Baby 

18. Tammy 


□ 91 HIT PARADE SONGS < 

18 on Records — 

Plus 73 Lyrics) By Top T.V., Radio, Stage 

and Screen Stars — Only 

$2.98. 


1. Raunchy 

10. Oh Boy 


2. At the Hop 

II. The Stroll 


3. Peggy Sue 

12. Kisses Sweeter 


4. Gt. Balls of Fire 

Than Wine 

f {)< l4 . 

5. April Love 

13. All the Way 

> fill 

6. You Send Me 

14. Jail H'se Rock 


7. Why Don’t They 

15. Stood-Up 

1 lOlSlU b 

Inderstand 

l6.Waitin'in School 


8. Jo-Ann 

17. Sail Along 


9. Liechtensteiner 

Silvery :\Ioon 


Polka 

18.Hey School Girl 


□ 118 HILLBILLY (18 Hillbilly Hits — Plus 
Lyrics to 100 Songs). By Top T.V., Radio 
and Stage Stars — Only $2.98. Here Are the 
18 Record Songs: 

1. Please Don’t 
Blame Me 

2. My Shoes Keep 
Walking Back To 
You 

3. Geisha Girl 

4. Home of the 
Blues 

5. I Heard the 
Bluebird Sing 

6. Fraulein 

7. Whole Lot of 
Shakin’ Going On 

8. Bye Bye Love 



9. Teddy Bear 

10. Four Walls 

11. Tangled Mind 

12. Fallen Star 

13. Mister Love 

14. My Arms Are 
a House 

15. Love Me To 
Pieces 

16. Is It Wrong 

17. Gonna Find Me 
a Blue Bird 

18. I Wish You 
Knew 


□ 18 ROCK & ROLL SONGS SET No. 2 — $2.98 



1. Empty Arms 

2. Just Because 

3. All Shook Up 

4. Little Darling 

5. School Days 

6. Lucille 

7. Bacon Fat 

8. I’m Sticking 
With You 

9. Knee Deep in 
the Blues 


10. Party Doll 

11. Lucky Lips 

12. Shirley 

13. Jim Dandy 

14. Feeling Happy 

15. Love Me 

16. Love Is 
Strange 

17. Blue Monday 

18. The Girl Can’t 
Help It 



The top stars of Radio, 
TV, Stage and Screen 
bring you your favorito 
records at amazing sav¬ 
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name the stars on 
these records w e won hi 
have to charge you $16 
instead of $2.98. 


□ 46 CHILDREN’S SONGS — $2.98 

Includes Booklet of Picture-illustra¬ 
tions and Words to the Music! Twink¬ 
le, Twinkle Little Star; Old King 
Cole; Little Tommy Tucker; Jack and 
Jill; Pease Porridge Hot; Where Has 
My Little Dog Gone; Humpty Dump- 
ty; London Bridge; Lazy Mary; A 
Tisket Tasket; Old MacDonald; Farm¬ 
er in Dell; Baa Baa Black Sheep; 
Pop Goes Weasel; 3 Blind Mice; Mary Had a Little 
Lamb; Skip to My Lou; Row Your Boat; Tom Tom 
the Piper’s Son; I Been Working on the Railroad; 
Arkansas Traveler; I Saw a Ship A-Sailing; Oeedle, 
Deedle Dumpling; Hi Diddle Diddle; Three Little 
Kittens; Patty Cake, Patty Cake; Git Along Little 
Dogie; Old Chisolm Trail; Rock-A-Bye Baby; Plus 
7 others. 



-MAIL NO RISK COUPON TODAY- 

BEST VALUES CO., Dept. 133 g 

403 Market St., Newark, New Jersey 

□ I enclose $2.98. Send the 18 Hit Parade Songs, 
Plus Lyrics to 73 Hit Parade Songs. 

□ I enclose $2.98. Send the 18 Rock & Roll Songs. 

□ I enclose $2.98. Send the 18 Hillbilly Songs. 

□ I enclose $2.98. Send the 18 Rock & Roll Set 
No. 2 

□ I enclose $2.98. Send the Square Dance Records. 

□ I enclose $2.98. Send the 46 Children's Songs. 


Name. 


Address. 


City. Zone_ State. 

-MONEY BACK GUARANTEE- 


EAT ANYTHING 
WITH FALSE TEETH! 



Trouble with loose plates that slip, rock or 
cause sore gums ? Try Brimms Plasti-Liner. 
One application makes plates fit snugly with¬ 
out powder, paste or cushions. Brimms Plasti- 
Liner adheres permanently to your plate; 
ends the bother of temporary applications. 
With plates held firmly by Plasti-Liner, YOU 
CAN EAT ANYTHING ! Simply lay soft strip 
of Plasti-Liner on troublesome upper or lower. 
Bite and it molds perfectly. Easy to use, taste¬ 
less, odorless, harmless to you and your 
plates. Removable as directed. Money-back 
guarantee. At your drug counter. $1.50 re¬ 
liner for one plate; $2.50, two plates. 

Special Offer! Free 35^ package of Tri- 
Dent Brushless Denture Cleaner. Send only 
10^ for postage and handling. Offer expires 
Mar. 31, 1958. Plasti-Liner, Inc., Dept., BB 
1075 Main St., Buffalo 9, N. Y. 


BRIMMS PLASTI-LINER 

THE PERMANENT DENTURE RELINER 



CHURCHES, WOMEN'S CLUBS, SOCIETIES, ETC. 


Earn $100 to $500 Cash, plus 24 card' 
tables simply by selling advertising 
space on the table tops to local 
merchants who gladly cooperate. 5 
different proven plans to pick from. 
No risk, nothing to pay, not even 
freight charges. Write for details. 


F.W. MATHERS, DepLKY,Mt.Ephraiin.NJ. 




BOOK MANUSCRIPTS 


CONSIDERED 


by cooperative publisher who offers authors 
early publication, higher royalty, national 
distribution, and beautifully designed books. 
All subjects welcomed. Write, or send 
your MS directly. 

GREENWICH BOOK PUBLISHERS, INC. 
Atten.: MR. WITHERS, 489 FIFTH AVE. 
NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 


CHAIR CANE 

BASKETRY REED MATERIALS 
Genuine Chair Cane. Fiber Rush. Cane Web¬ 
bing for Seats with Groove. Cane Instructions 
35c. Complete Seat Weaving Book $1.15. 
Basketry Reeds. Raffia. Basket Instruction 
Book 75c. New Upholstering Book 65c. 
FOGARTY 205 River St. TROY, N. Y. 



GENTLY MOLDS YOU TO NEW LOVELINESS 

Picture yourself in this comfortable, action free 
feminine figure shaper. Designed to gently uplift 
your buttocks and round you to new loveliness, it 
enables you to wear all the newest slim figure 
fashions. There's no more unattractive sag with 
this girdle — your as proportionate and feminine 
as can be. Firm, youthfulness gives you complete 
freedom of movement in slacks or dresses. Deep- 
down front panels lift and'shape you. In washable 
nylon. White only. 

Sizes 24-30 only $3.98 
32-38 only $4.98 

10 Day Free Trial 

Order today! If not 100% delighted, yout full 
purchase price wilt be refunded. Simply send your 
name, address and waist size with payment-or 
order C.0.0. from: 

Guaranteed Dist. Dept. BK-13 
Lynbrook, New York 


I New FEMININE 
FIGURE SHAPER 


-SELL LARKIN PRODUCTS. EARN CASH __ 

Famous toiletries, household supplies, etc 
WRITE FOR CATALOG. 

LARKIN CO., DEPT. RN, BUFFALO 10, N. Y. 


KODACHROME Processing by KODAK. 8 mm roll 
or 35 mm, 20 exposures $1.35. Prompt service. Write 
for mailers and prices. COLOR PIX 

DEPT. Y, CPO BOX 30, KINGSTON.’N. Y. 


Shrinks Hemorrhoids 


New Way Without Surgery 

Science Finds Healing Substance That Does Both— 
Relieves Pain—Shrinks Hemorrhoids 


New York, N. Y. (Special) - For the 
first time science has found a new 
healing substance with the astonish¬ 
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In case after case, while gently 
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Most amazing of all —results were 
so thorough that sufferers made 


astonishing statements like “Piles 
have ceased to be a problem!” 

The secret is a new healing sub¬ 
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world-famous research institute. 

This substance is now available in 
suppository or ointment form under 
the name Preparation H.* At your 
druggist. Money back guarantee. 

•Beg. U, 8. Pat Ott. 


21 































































































































I was ashamed to 
always be so tired! 


I always felt “run-down” and didn’t 
know why until my doctor ex¬ 
plained why I felt “tired” — why 
my youthful vigor was slipping 
away—and suggested that a pep- 
building vitamin-mineral formula 
could help. I sent for a 30-day 


FREE supply of high-potency 
Vitasafe Capsules, and after tak¬ 
ing one Capsule each day for a 
short time, I began to feel new 
zest for living! Today I feel great 
—and you may too! Accept this no- 
risk offer as I did! 


FREE—30 days supply High-Potency Capsules 

Lipotropic Factors, Vitamins and Minerals 

You pay only 25f to help cover postage and shipping expense 

Safe nutritional formula containing 27 proven ingredients: Glutamic Acid, 
Choline, Inositol, Methionine, Citrus Bioflavonoid, II Vitamins plus 11 Minerals 



Order this FREE 30-day supply of 
capsules to discover how much more 
peppier you may feel! With your 
vitamins you will also receive details 
regarding benefits of amazing Plan 
that provides you regularly with all 
the vitamins and minerals you need. 
You are under no obligation to buy 
anything! If after taking your free 
Capsules for 21 days you are not 
satisfied, simply return the postcard 
that comes with your free supply 
and that will end the matter. Other¬ 
wise it’s up to us—you don’t have to 
do a thing—and we will see that you 
get your monthly supplies of vita¬ 
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-at the low price of only $2.78 per 


month (a 45% saving). To get your 
free 30-day supply and a guaranteed 
opportunity of savings on vitamins, 
mail coupon today! 

01957 V!u»afc Corp., 43 W. 61St., N.Y., N.Y. 


MEW, HIGHER 

nticipated DIVIDEND 


VITASAFE CORP. 285 

43 West 61st Street, New York 23, N. Y. 

Yes, I accept your generous no-risk offer 
under the Vitasafe Plan as advertised in 
Rural New Yorker. , ., , 

Send me my F tiiiili, 30-day supply of high- 
potency Vitasafe Capsules as checked below: 
n Man’s Formula Q Woman’s Formula 
I ENCLOSE 25( PER PACKAGE for packing and postage. 

Name. 

Address. 

City.Zone.State. 

Only one trial supply per person. 

IN CANADA: 394 Symington Ave., Toronto 9, Ont. 
(Canadian Formula adjusted to local conditions.) 




Credited March 31 

3yo Regular 

•/,% EXTRA 



Bonus Dividend Days EVERY Month 


.S’. 


_ ave more, make more by mail at 100- 
year-old City & County Savings Bank. 
Assets over $85,000,000. Open your ac¬ 
count TODAY. Mail coupon with deposit 
of $5 or more. We'll send passbook and 
postage-paid banking by mail envelopes 
by return mail. 

Member Federal Oeposit Inturattce Corporation 

MAIL THIS COUPON _ 

CITY a COUNTY SAVINGS BANK 

100 State Street, Albany 1, N. Y. 

Enclosed is $..Please open a 

savings account for me ond moil passbook 
to address below. 

Q Send Banking by Mail Information 


Name. 


Address. 


City. 


.State. 


.25 


MAPLE PRODUCT 
PRODUCERS 

Send for information on Lambs latest 
closed tubing sap gathering system. Five 
years in use. Equipment less expensive 
than any other system. Cuts sap gather¬ 
ing labor to most nothing. 

Many Dealer Openings Available. 

A, c. Lamb & sons 

LIVERPOOL, NEW YORK 


NEW PORT&BIE GARDEN HOSE REEL 

Prevents soiled clothes and wet, dirty water hose. 
Just unreel — then reel up exact amount of hose. 
FREE CIRCULAR 
^ENTERPRISE NURSERY. 

B-5-R. LOONEYVILLE, WEST VIRGINIA 





BEST 

for GRASS 
or CORN 


WOOD SILOS 

Tests prove the wood 
Unadilla unexcelled for 
grass silage. Factory-creo-i 
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staves are lock-doweled for 
maximum stress-resistance. 
Holds heavier grass loads; 
defies the years. Acid-proof 
wood protects valuable juices, 
curbs drying and loss of valu¬ 
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costs less to erect, less to main¬ 
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with built-in “Sure-Grip, 
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best silo buy is wood; your best 
wood buy is Unadilla. 

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UNADILLA SILO COMPANY 
Box C-218, UNADILLA. N.Y. 


UNADILLA SILOS 


ADD YEARS of LIFE 

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UNA-LINER 

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For far greater insulation and acid resistance 
Write tor Free folder Unadilla Silo, Box C-218, Uiadilla, N.Y. 


BROWER M1%R 



Let HARSH HYDRAULIC HOISTS 
do YOUR unloading... 


On the shores of Lake Ontario 
in Orleans County^ New York^ 


re 


Guernseys Go Good 




El Moore Farm, within sight of 
Lake Ontario in Kent, Orleans Co., 
N. Y., has indeed an outstanding 
herd of dairy cows. Its 30 milking 
Guernseys finished their last DHIA 
test year with an average of 10,400 
pounds of milk and 535 pounds of 
butter fat. In all there are 55 head 
of fine Guernsey cattle on this 150- 
acre farm owned and operated by 
Mr. and Mrs. Maynard Moore. 

The herd was started seven years 
ago when Moore’s father’s herd was 
dispersed to settle his estate. Six 
animals were purchased for El Moore 
and, of the half-dozen cow families 
making up the present herd, two come 
from this foundation stock. Five of 
the original animals are still in the 
herd, and each has produced over 
700 pounds of butterfat in twice-a- 
day-milking, 365-day lactations. 

The Moores’ production in 1952, 
when there were only 14 cows in 



El Moore’s Gxiernseys have the size 
and scale to make good use of rough- 
age. They are fed plenty of grain, 
too; 42 per cent of their TDN comes 
from concentrates. 

milk, was only 8,514 pounds of milk 
and 431 pounds of fat. Since then, 
the herd has averaged over 500 
pounds every year except 1953, when 
the El Moore barn burned down and 
production fell to 493 pounds of fat. 
Presently the impressive herd aver¬ 
age is being maintained while nearly 
a third of the milking herd is com¬ 
posed of first-calf heifers. During the 
past year, six of these produced 
over 500 pounds of fat in 305 days; 
not a single animal made less than 
450 pounds. Awarded a trophy as 
high New York DHIA Guernsey herd 
of 15 cows four years ago with a 515- 
pound average, the El Moore herd 
more recently earned a similar award 
as high DHIA 15/30-cow herd with 
519 of fat. El Moore Pete’s Ann’s 
class-leading senior three-year-old 
305-day record is of 13,954 pounds of 
milk and 672 of fat. She was runner- 
up for the whole State of New York 
in 1956. A foundation cow, Primrose 
of Allor Farms, has won a similar 
state production award as a 10-year- 
old. Another foundation animal, Cal¬ 
culator Sonora, finished a 365-day 
test with 13,289 pounds of milk and 
786 of fat. 

El Moore’s Guernseys have been 
entirely artificially bred for the past 
seven years. While two-year-olds’ 
calves are not generally raised, the 
whole herd is farm-raised except the 


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on Harsh I^ydraulic Hoists. 

Name . 

St. or .. 

City . State. 




five foundation head and three other 
animals brought specially in for 
breeding. New York Artificial Breed-! 
ers’ Cooperative recently purchased 
a young El Moore bull for use as an 
analyzed sire. He is a son of the 
Pete’s Ann class leader and of Mc-| 
Donald Farms Pre Leader. 

The herd’s feeding level is kept! 
high; during the past testing year, 
42 per cent of its digestible nutrients 
came from grain. An 11-per-cent- 
protein ration composed of home¬ 
grown grains is fed at a 1 grain: 2.4 
milk ratio. Sudan grass supplements 
mid-summer legume pasture, and they 
start feeding grass silage in August. 
The Moores usually add corn silage 
as a supplement to fall pasture, too, 
and the silo is also refilled. They 
feed corn silage at a rate of about 
40 pounds per head per day during 
Winter. Good quality clover-alfalfa | 
hay is also fed liberally. 

The healthy young calves are grain¬ 
ed heavily to about three and a half! 
months of age, then lightly until they 
reach pasture age. Heifers are bred 
to freshen at a little over two years, 
being grained with the milking cows| 
for three months prior to calving. 

The official state program has been I 
used to eliminate mastitis, and the 
herd is presently free of trouble. 
With veterinarian checks made fre¬ 
quently, the herd has no breeding! 
problems either. 

Maynard Moore consigns two or I 
three animals a year to Western New 
York Guernsey sales. At the NY ABC 
cattle show in 1956, he exhibited the 
top two-year-old Guernsey heifer, 
second-place iunior yearling, and 
runnerup senior yearling. He has| 
served as director of Orleans County 
Artificial Breeders’ Cooperative fori 
the past six years, and he has been 
president for two years. He is county 
representative for the state NYABC] 
Guernsey sire-selection committee. 

This fine herd of Guernseys is an! 
outstanding example of the results 
that can be attained through careful 
management, good feeding, useful 
records and artificial breeding. El I 
Moore’s Guernseys are fine and pro¬ 
ductive dairy cattle. 

H. A. Smith, Jr. 

1957 W. N. Y. Livestock! 
Prices Higher 

Top prices paid for farm livestock! 
at the East Buffalo, N. Y., market 
were higher in almost every month 
for every class of animal last year. 
Average prices were presumably | 
higher too; only in January and Feb¬ 
ruary for dairy bulls, August-Novem- 
her for steers and heifei’s, May, June, 
August and December for dairy 
calves, and February, May and July 
for sheep and Iambs, were 1956’3 
top prices better. Peak monthly prices 
per hundredweight in 1957 were: 
steers and heifers—August. $26.50, 
dairy cows—May-July, $17; dairy heif¬ 
ers—December, $19; dairy bulls—-1 
December, $21.25; calves—January, 
$38; hogs—August, $23.50; and sheep 
and lambs—April, $27. 



The Guernsey herd of Mr. and Mrs. Maynard Moore, Kent, N. Y., has main¬ 
tained an almost-yearly production average above 500 pounds of fat 










































































LIVESTOCK G OAIKV 


Is It the Boor—or the Sows? 

When my eight-month-old boar re¬ 
fused to take any interest in two 
sows of the same age who were in 
heat, I thought he was too young to 
breed. But even when he served a 
never-befpre-bred two-year-old sow 
four months later, he would still 
have nothing to do with the year¬ 
lings. Thereafter the sow he served 
kept coming into heat, and he was 
mated to her repeatedly. Finally we 
gave up on the possibility of her ever 
conceiving and we butchered her. We 
could find nothing wrong with her 
internal organs. When the younger 
sows were about 15 months old, the 
boar did serve one, and she did not 
soon come into heat again. At her 
due date five months later she 
swelled and her bag filled, but no 
milk came; she did not give birth to 
pigs and was back in heat three 
weeks later. What I would like to 
know is whether or not the seller of 
this boar could have known he was 
sterile when he sold him to me at the 
age of six weeks. Or do you think 
that the trouble lay with the sows? 

Albany Co., N. Y. r. p. 

If you are quite sure you purchased 
an uncastrated boar pig, then the in¬ 
ability of the boar to settle the sows 
is just a matter of bad luck. It is not 
likely that the seller had any knowl¬ 
edge of the boar’s sterility at so 
young an age. Most uncastrated male 
farm animals are fertile, but a few 
are born or become sterile due to a 
variety of physiological reasons. Be¬ 
cause the boar served two of the 
sows but with no litters resulting, it 
is probably he who is infertile. There 
is no practical solution to the prob¬ 
lem, so you had better butcher or 
sell him. 


Prospect- for Profit- with 
Sheep 

I am thinking of buying a farm in 
New York State and I wonder if you 
could give me an idea of the profit¬ 
ability of a -sheep enterprise. How 
many would I need to make a living? 

New York a. w. f. 

Reports on costs and returns of 
sheep enterprises on 60 Central New 
York farms show that in general a 
large flock of 60 to 80 ewes is most 
profitable. Only about 10 per cent of 
their feed is purchased, and all the 
other feed is produced on the farm. 
Owners of the most profitable flocks 
made $7.04 per ewe per year, where¬ 
as poor producers actually lost $13.12. 
Return per hour of labor for the most 
successful flocks was $2.53; the un¬ 
successful flocks actually cost the 
farmer 39 cents per hour to work 
with them. 

As with all business, profits with 
sheep depend on good management, 
efiicient output and keeping costs at 
a minimum. 


and ointments, there has been no 
cure. Iodine has helped to control it 
but not prevent it. l. o. 

Connecticut 

A five per cent phenolated calo- 
mine lotion applied to the infected 
teats results in a rapid cure of the 
lesions. You can get it from the drug¬ 
gist. Cowpox is caused by a virus 
and is passed from cow to cow 
through the milking process. If a cow 
is infected by cowpox once, she usu¬ 
ally is not troubled again. The in¬ 
fection seems most rapidly spread 
by hand milking. So wash your 
hands in a disinfectant solution be¬ 
tween cows, or milk the infected ani¬ 
mals last. 


Goat Moot—Chevon 

In several articles in The Rural 
New Yorker in the past, there was 
mentioned the name given to the 


flesh or meat of the goat. But I can¬ 
not recall what it was, and I should 
like to know. I have inquired of 
farmers, Greeks, butchers and college 
professors, but none has been able 
to help. Can you tell me what goat 
meat is called? g. h. 

Goat meat is called chevon. 

Raymond Albrectsen 


Turpentine for Worts 

A few years ago I had a heifer de¬ 
velop so many warts that one cattle¬ 
man said the only thing to do was 
to beef her. But she was a registered 
Guernsey, and I did not want to do 
that. A neighbor had shown me an 
old-time book on doctoring animals 
which suggested the use of turpen¬ 
tine to cure warts. So I tried it, put¬ 
ting a little on each day. It was not 
long before the warts completely dis¬ 
appeared. The turpentine actually 
saved a good heifer. You have to be 
somewhat careful with its use, of 
course, and not be too free with it; 
it can be an irritant. a. h. s. 

Maine 


The Latest on Multi- 
Milking 

For years it has been known that 
a cow produces more when milked 
three or four times a day than she 
does once or twice. But there has 
not always been general agreement 
on the increase. Now a Kansas State 
College dairyman says enough evi¬ 
dence has been accumulated to make 
the figures quite precise. Here is 
what he says: on three-time milking 
a two-year-old will produce 20 per 
cent more than on two-time, a three- 
year-old 17 per cent more, and four- 
year-old and older 15 per cent. On 
four-time milking the increases are: 
for a two-year-old 35 per cent, three- 
year-old 30 per cent, and four-year- 
old and older 26 per cent. Despite 
these significant increases, the trend 
is definitely away from four-time 
milking and toward two. Three-time 
milking is featured almost exclusive¬ 
ly in foundation dairy herds on offi¬ 
cial test. 


Another CHAMPION 
Raised on WIRTHMORE 


Cure for Cowpox 

Can you tell us what causes and 
cures cowpox? Our cows have had it 
for some time and, although the 
veterinarian has used several salves 


00 You Know 

VOUn BIBLE 



(Answers to Questions on Page 9) 


1. John the Baptist — Mark 1:3 

2. 12 — Matt. 10:2-4 

3. Jesus went in answer to an invi¬ 
tation to attend a wedding — 

John 2:1-2 

4. In answer to the plea, “Come 
over into Macedonia and help 
us.” — The Acts 16:9 and 12 

5. Camel’s hair, and a girdle of 

skin — Mark 1:6 

6. The Jordan River — Matt. 3:13 

7. Jesus — Matt. 10:8 

8. Saint Luke. 

9. Saint Luke. 

10. The Book of Philemon — 

Written by Paul 


Ask your Wirthmore distributor about the Wirthmore Hog Feeding Program. 
And get your copy of Wirthmore booklet — “HOGS, Care and Feeding.” 



If you do not know who 
the Wirthmore distributor is 
in your locality, write to the 
Wirthmore Mill nearest you. 


WIRTHMORE MILLS^ TOLEDO, OHIO 
WIRTHMORE FEED CO., OLEAN, N. Y. 
WIRTHMORE MILLS, WAVERLY, N. Y. 



Not just a feed — but a proven feeding 
program spelled the difference. Plan now to 
build your 1958 hog feeding program around 
the WIRTHMORE Family of New Effi¬ 
ciency Feeds. 

• PIG ZIP 

(with hygromycin and antibiotics) 

• HOG GROWER 

• 35% PIG ’N sow 

CONCENTRATE (with hygromycin) 

• 40% HOG SUPPLEMENT 

(with arsanilic acid) 

• HOG WORMER 


Milo Collins’ Grand Cham¬ 
pion Yorkshire Sow was winner 
over 321 other entries at the 
Indiana State Fair. She also took 
the honors as First Place Sow for 
the Indiana State Fair and Sec¬ 
ond Place at Ohio State Fair. 
Following two weeks of show ap¬ 
pearances she returned home just 
in time to deliver a lively, healthy 
litter of nine. 

Mr. Collins, who depends on 
Wirthmore Feeds for top condi¬ 
tion of his show stock, also 
brought home the Indiana State 
Fair Second Aged Boar, Third 
Jr. Yearling Sow and Fifth Sen¬ 
ior Sow Pig. 


February 1, 1958 


23 


























McKEE 


The ONE-MAN 
HARVESTER 


brings your hay in 
at Vs the cost 


of the baler method! 


Actual figures prove the McKee 
Shredder-Harvester takes hay from 
windrow to barn at a cost of 97 cents 
per ton — as against S2.54 per ton 
for baler method. (Labor at $1.00 
per hr. for both methods). 


John P. Halpin & Sons, 
West Henrietta Rd., 
Henrietta New York 


Handle hay, straw, grass silage and 
corn silage EASILY by yourself! 
SAVE the high cost of extra help. 
Go right ahead when the time is right 
and put in as many as 20 tons per 
day! That's what other farmers are 
doing with the new McKee Shredder- 
Harvester! Get ALL the money-saving 
facts NOW! 




I SORE TEATS 
* SCAB TEATS 
BRUISED TEATS 
OBSTRUCTIONS 


Saves extra labor—does 
more work than 2 hired hands! Loads 75 bales 
in 15 minutes. Picks them up just as dropped, 
straightens them automatically. Saves baler,too 
-no strain or breakage pulling skids or wagons. 
Ground driven, light draft, easily hitched. 
Two models - bale deck heights 6' 9''and 10' 9". 

for descriptive literature 
' * ' and prices Today! 

MEYER MFC. CO., BOX 1362,m0RT0N, ILLINOIS 


The easy, modern way to 
Keep teat open, Keep it 
healing. Keep it milking 

Dr. Naylor’s Medicated Teat Dilators act 2 
ways—Medically and Mechanically — to pro¬ 
vide antiseptic protection, reduce inflamma¬ 
tion and maintain free milk flow through the 
canal of hard milking teats. They provide 
gentle, non-irritating support to delicate lining 
of teat canal. Keep end of teat open in its 
natural shape to promote normal healing — 
natural milking. 

CONTAINS SULFATHIAZOLE 

This built-in medication is released slowly in 
the teat for prolonged antiseptic action direct¬ 
ly at site of trouble. 

EASY TO USE. Simply keep a Dr. Naylor Di¬ 
lator in teat between milkings until teat milks 
free by hand. Fit either large or small teats. 

At drug and farm stores or write 

H.W. NAYLOR CO. 
Morris9, N. Y. 

Large pkg. $ T .00 
'"I cA Dilators) 

ii 

kiffiK. 1'.^ Dilators) 


No investment, no experience 
needed. Just show magic cushion 3 1 

comfort to friends, neighbors, co- R, % ^ 

workers. Advance commissions to , 

$4.00 a pair, plus Cash Bonus, 

Paid Vocation, $25.00 Reward . 

Offer Outstonding values for men, jS 

women, children. Money bock 
guarantee. Shoe samples supplied T 

without cost. Write TODAY for FREE 
new84poge catalog and full details, I 

TANNERS SHOE CO., 648 BROCKTON, MASS, 


IP Two- 
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Hit With 
Cushioned 
Comfort 


EVERGREEN HEDGE 


American Arborvitae, 4yr. trans- 
Beautiful ever- 


plants 8 _ 

green hedge. Shear to any shape 
or height. Postpaid planting time. ■■■ 
Write for Free Evergreen Catahg 


An amazing Air-Cushion I I 

Invention allows body I I 

freedom at work or play. I I 

Light, neat.cool,sanitary. E ll • 

Durable, cheap. Day and night protection helps 
Nature support weakened muscles gently but surely. 
No risk. Sent on Trial! Write NOW for free Booklet and 
Proof of Rosults. All correspondence confidential. 

Brooks Company, 447-T State SL, Marshall, Mich. 


Take BELSAW Portable Sawmill right 
to the trees—turn out valuable lumber 
for local yards—do “custom sawing” 

for neighbors. BELSAW lasts a lifetime. 

No crew needed. Power with old aato enicine. 
Beginners get excellent results. Send post- 
card for Free Book,' 

BELSAW machinery CO 


MEYER Saie LOADER 


MAKERS OF FAMOUS MEYER ELEVATORS 


Won/ors 

T^ht&lafo'-L 


HUSSIR FCRESTS.I 

BOX 20-B 1 

Indiana. Pa. 

RUPTURE! 



SEND A FRIEND A TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION 
TO THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


Yotir Gift Includes the ANNUAL HORTICULTURE ISSUE 
And the ANNUAL LIVESTOCK and DAIRY ISSUE for 1958 


9 months 



for 25c 


Friend's Name 


R. F. D.Box 

Post Office. 


Street ... 
.State 


Your Name. 

Address..... 

(We will send a gift card bearing your name.) 
THE RURAL NEW YORKER, NEW YORK 1, N. Y. 


Portable 
Hoof- Trimming 
Stanchion 



Trimming and shaping the cows’ 
hooves is an important dairying job. 
A restraining and supporting stock 
makes it easier, safer, and better. 


Proper care of hooves is a very 
important part of dairy management. 
When they are neglected, it shows 
up quickly in reduced milk produc¬ 
tion. Cows go down on their pasterns, 
with hoof rot resulting, and this 
often shortens their useful life in the 
herd. 

The Franklin County, Pa., Hol¬ 
stein Club decided to do something 
about this by building a portable 
stanchion for use by club members 
and other dairymen at a small fee. 
Built of two-inch welded steel pipe, 
the rig can be set up and be ready 
for service in less than three minutes. 
A sling is used not to lift the animal 
off her feet, but merely to give her 
support. With one hoof at a time tied 
through a hole in the trimming rail, 
the operator can use both hands to 
do the actual work. Adjustable 
stanchions prevent animals from mov¬ 
ing too far forward or back. Wheels 
on the portable stanchion, are re¬ 
moved by jacking up the front, re¬ 
moving two pins and pulling them 
off along with their axles. 

When the rig was first demonstra¬ 
ted last Spring, some dairymen 
were disappointed with its perform¬ 
ance. Many animals cooperated very 
well, but others put the stanchion 
through a rigorous test. But at the 
farm operated by Richard Myers, 
president of the club, and his father. 
Nelson Myers, big improvements 
have recently been made. When 
placed in the stanchion now, the 
animals do not put their legs through 
the front or over the side trimming 
rails, nor are they able to pull back 
or move forward. Holstein Club mem¬ 
bers had boarded up the front and 
raised the trimming rails four inches 
to prevent animals from lifting their 
legs out onto the ground. They add¬ 
ed four U-bolts to tie down hooves 
not being worked on—necessary only 
for stubborn animals, and they added 
a second stanchion. This was con¬ 
structed so that the distance between 
it and the first stanchion can be 
quickly adjusted for different-sized 


animals. These changes made a big 
improvement in the rig’s perform¬ 
ance, 

Some animals are gentle enough to 
be ti'immed without the rig, of course. 
Yet, when it is used, technique in 
making adjustments is very impor¬ 
tant. They are a little different for 
each animal. Do not expect to be 
an expert with a hoof-trimming stan¬ 
chion the first time using it, however; 
it takes an experienced operator to 
do a good job. If you are determined 
and can experiment a little, it never¬ 
theless will not be long before you 
too can do a good job quite easily. 
Any farmer interested in building 
this type of hoof-trimming stanchion 
may obtain the original plan by 
writing to the Agricultural Engin¬ 
eering Extension, Pennsylvania State 
University, University Park, Pa. Ask 
for the plan, “Portable Cattle Stock”, 
No. 770-5792. Construction and use of 
the stock can certainly make the 
job of keeping cows’ hooves in shape 
much simpler and faster, and they 
can lead to less foot and leg trouble 
with consequent higher milk pro¬ 
duction. J. H. Gross 


Care of New-Born 
Lambs 

Lambs kept in a dry, draft-free, 
well-bedded pen and getting started 
well will remain thrifty. Lambs born 
early in the year should have access 
to a creep where they can eat grain 
without interference from ewes. 
Creep-fed lambs make fast gains and 
attain a superior finish; consequently 
they can be marketed early at a high¬ 
er price. A good home-mixed feed 
suitable for using in the creep feeder 
is one consisting of two parts oats, 
two parts corn, and one part soybean- 
oil meal. All lambs should be docked 
when they are about a week old, and 
the ram lambs should be castrated 
when about two weeks. Docked lambs 
keep clean; castrated lambs gain 
better and sell higher. 



These new plastic “Lamcoats” keep lambs warm and dry. Slipped simply 
on the lambs, the coats self-shed lohen snagged and ivhen the animals 
1 reach weights of 18 pounds. 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


24 











































The 1957 Egg Laying Tests 


The egg laying tests being operated 
under the so-called standard plan are 
gradually decreasing in number. Only 
eight were conducted in 1957. They 
still provide the only means, never¬ 
theless, whereby the real poultry 
bi’eeder can demonstrate his ability 
to produce stock of the vei'y highest 
caliber. This is not simply a random 
sample of his commercial-grade 
chicks. 

The standard tests permit the 
breeder to select birds in any way 
he sees fit; naturally under such a 
system he will try to breed and select 
his best. In random sample tests, the 
pullets must be reared from the 
general run of chicks being sold. 
Some years they are good, other years 
relatively poor. It is difficult to main¬ 
tain uniform breeding year after 
year with any large volume of com¬ 
mercial chicks. With the smaller 
sample allowed in a standard plan 
test, and with the owner allowed full 
leeway in selecting his stock, there 
is no reason why he should not make 
a satisfactory showing year after year 
if he is following good breeding 
techniques and is successful in his 
brooding and rearing program. 

That such is the case is clearly 
demonstrated by looking over the 
list of names on this page showing 
the 10 highest pens in all U. S. 
Standard tests for the year ending 
Sept. 15, 1957. J. A. Hanson & Son, 
Corvallis, Ore., owners of the highest 
pen in all tests, are not new to poul- 
trymen by any means, nor is Darby 
Leghorn Farm, Somerville, N. J., 
which had second highest entry. Ac¬ 
tually, it is a shame to call them 
first- and second-place entries; the 
difference between the two pens in 
point scores was equivalent to only 
one egg. Harvey E. Taylor, Cedar 
Lake, Ind., held third place and the 
Foreman Poultry Farm, Lowell, Mich., 
was fourth. Look at the table and see 
if you do not recall names among the 
group that were also high in previ¬ 
ous years. These leading breeders 
have the foundation stock which will 
be sadly needed in the not too dis¬ 
tant future. From such farms come 
the pedigreed cockerels to use in 
strain crossing, a highly desirable 
commercial practice. 

Individual Bird Records 

The highest individual record for 
the year was a production of 347 
eggs in 350 days, with a point score 
of 372.15. A two-ounce egg is worth 
one point, with each one-twelfth 
I ounce above or below adding or sub¬ 
tracting five hundreths of a point. 
This bird, owned by Stern Brothers 
of South Vineland, N. J., made quite 
a name for herself as Meg O’Day by 
producing 284 eggs in 284 days, an 
i egg every day from Nov. 3, 1956, to 
Aug. 13, 1957. This was the longest 
known official record for continuous 
egg production. Her record for the 
I year did not quite equal one made 
! several years ago by a Hanson bird, 

I but at that time the tests operated 
I on a 51-week basis and this was an 
advantage hard to overcome. The 
Hanson bird laid 353 eggs in 357 days, 
scoring 381.35 points. When the 
Stern bird was held over for the full 
365 days at the Hunterdon County, 
N. J., test, she totalled 362 eggs, a 
U. S. record for annual egg produc¬ 
tion. 

Random Sample Tests 

Random Sample Tests were con¬ 
ducted in New York, California, Flor¬ 
ida, Missouri, Texas, Arizona, Tenn¬ 
essee; New Jersey operated a Flock 
Mating Test. Because these tests were 
based on returns from the sale of 
eggs and poultry meat after deduc¬ 
ting feed cost, an accurate compari¬ 
son of data is impossible. A few 
observations on the results in New 
Vork State and New Jersey are of 
interest, however. In the Central 


New York Test conducted at Horse- 
heads, the incrossbred entry of the 
Hy-Line Hatchery. Des Moines, Iowa, 
proved to be the most profitable 
with a net return of $4.14 per pullet 
chick started. The average entry re¬ 
turned $2.20 per chick and the pooi*- 
est 78 cents; there was a great dif¬ 
ference between the good and the 
poor. However, along with the best 
there were several very good entries, 
and in line with the classification 
used by the test management, the 
following entries were graded into 
the first quartile, or the top fourth: 
Hy-Line, Roselawn, Kimber, Taylor, 
Brender, Parks, DeKalb, Bulkley and 
Harco. Here again, no doubt, you 
recognize names that have appeared 
before in the list of leaders in egg- 
laying tests. Repitition is a good sign 
in laying-tests. In the Western New 
York State test held at Stafford, the 


following entries were in the top 
quarter; Brender, Vancrest, West¬ 
line, Sandhill, Kickasola, Jacobs, 
Reuter and Babcock. 

In the New Jersey Flock Mating 
Test, the pullets were reared at home 
from a sample of commercial chicks 
banded officially. The most profit¬ 
able entry came from the Babcock 
Poultry Farm, Ithaca, N. Y., with 
a return of $4.77 per pullet entered. 
The test average was $3.12 over cost 
of feed per pullet entered. This was 
the poorest year since 1950. One ad¬ 


vantage 0 ^ laying tests conducted on 
a margin-of-profit basis rather than 
just number and size of eggs is that 
the records provide accurate data 
on basic costs and returns over a 
series of years, furnishing a guide 
as to trends and perhaps permitting 
some predictions. At the New Jersey 
Flock Mating Test, the gross value 
of eggs has been higher in the past 
five years than it was during the 
first five years of the test from 1942 
to 1946. But the net return has been 
(Continued on following page) 


Ten High Pens in 1957 Standard Tests 


Owner 


Harco Orchards, South Easton, Mass.. 


Breed 

Points 

Eggs 

... W. Leg. 

4096.75 

3865 

... W. Leg. 

4095.60 

3817 


4084.30 

3869 

... W. Leg. 

4083.15 

3872 

... W. Leg. 

4037.80 

3757 

... W. Leg. 

4000.10 

3750 

... W. Leg. 

3961.55 

3838 


3960.95 

3687 

... W. Leg. 

3957.65 

3732 

... R. I. Red 

3896.80 

3623 






'->1^ 






WAYNE! 

TAIL 
CURLER 
FEEDS 




Bi 




M 


\ 


m 


V 




tARLY MARKETING 

Headstart Your Pigs on 

Wayne Tail Curlers. New 
Syncro-Zymic nutrient 
action in all Wayne Pig 
Feeds keeps pigs growing 
and gaining fast. 


HYGROMYCIN 

... now in Wayne 
Tail Curler to 
control worms.. 
plus ARSANILIC 
ACID with Anti¬ 
biotic for fast 
starts and top 
' feed conversion. 


"itl 


iLY MIIK PRODUCTION 

Headstart Your Calves 

on Wayne Calfnip Milk Re¬ 
placer. Leading dairymen 
say, "Calfnip costs less to 
feed than milk 
and helps reduce 

with antibiotic- 
fortified Wayne 
Calf Starter for 
faster growth on 
less feed. Or, get 
economical 
growth on Wayne 
Calf Supplement 
and grain. 












[WAYNE 

CALF 
I STARTER 


EARLY EGG PRODUCTION 

Headstart Your Chicks 

with only 3 lbs. of Wayne 
Chick Starter, then switch 
to Wayne Growing Mash or 
Wayne Concen¬ 
trates and grain. 

Or, for single 
feed conven¬ 
ience, go all the 
way with Wayne 
Starter and 
Grower. All have 
Syncro-Zymic 
nutrient action 
for faster starts 
on less feed! 


Get New Headstart Feeding Information From Your Wayne Feed Dealer Today! 

WAYNEgFEEDS 

ALLIED MILLS, INC. Builders of Tomorrow’s Feeds. . .TODAY! 

Executive Offices: Chicago 4, Illinois • Service Offices: Fort Wayne 1, Indiana 


I February 1, 1958 


25 



































re 


All baby Chicks are cute 


99 


Highest quality chicks — medium quality chicks — ordinary every 
day variety of chicks — all look alike in their cuteness to many, poul- 
trymen — in fact to too many! And therein lies one of the sad ele¬ 
ments in the poultry business. Some poultrymen fail where they could 
have succeeded. They spent the money — devoted time and patience — 
but — there was no high egg production in the “cute” baby chicks 
they bought. 

Then again — some of these cute baby chicks had high egg pro¬ 
duction blood in them but were not grown right. Something wrong 
was done in their brooding period between their arrival from the 
hatchery and the time for egg laying. Here again —many poultrymen 
have failed where they could have succeeded. Every successful poul- 
tryman acknowledges there is a great knack in growing baby chicks — 
getting the highest egg production they are capable of producing. 

“Well” — you say — “this sounds like very good reasons for buy¬ 
ing only started pullets”, you’re right — it is intended to be. It is getting 
increasingly difficult to try to understand why every poultryman does 
not buy started pullets. There is no fussing with brooders (as they are 
all feathered out) — they are beyond the disease age — no fear of elec¬ 
tricity going off — and — most important of all — they are raised by 
expert poultrymen who have the facilities — the knack — men who 
devote 24 hours a day to just started pullets — 7 days a week every 
day in the year. We’ve been doing that for over 20 years. We pioneered 
the idea. 

Today - We Are The Largest Producers 
Of Started Pullets In America! ! I 

We have thousands and thousands of the finest white leghorns 
and Red Rock Sex Links (black pullets) you’ve ever seen. They all 
come from the best egg laying strains in America — strains famous 
for 250 and 300. egg production per year — also famous for long time 
production of large eggs — no broodiness — high livability and rapid 
development. Our prices are so low, we honestly believe we can sell 
any quantity to you at a price lower than it would cost you to raise 
them. We have them 4-6-8-12 weeks of age up to ready-to-lay. Write, 
wire or telephone us TODAY. 

Sunnybrook Poultry Farms Inc. 

A. Howard Fingar 

Phone 8-1611 Hudson, New York 



u s PULLORUM — TYPHOID CLEAN 


IF YOU WANT PROFITS 

IN ’58 

HERE ARE SOME FACTS 

TO INVESTIGATE! 


start a flock that has been proven pro¬ 
ducers of eggs in sufficient quantity to 
show a profit. When you start with chicks 
that have the necessary bred-in produc¬ 
tion potential — PARMENTER CHICKS — 
you can’t help but make a nice profit. 
Ask any Parmenter Flock Owner his 
opinion of Parmenter Chicks and he’ll tell 
you—“Choose any of these three produc¬ 
tion-proven breeds or cross-breeds for 
real profit.’’ 

PARMENTER REDS 

The world's greatest strain of egg laying 
fowl —the product of sixty years of 
scientific, selective breeding. 

PARMENTER SEX LINK CROSS 

The only Sex Link with guaranteed Par¬ 
menter Red ancestry. Prolific producers of 
big brown eggs on an economical feed 
conversion ratio. 

PARMENTER MASS. WHITES 
Bred to meet the demand for high white 
egg production plus white dress-off for 
the most discriminating markets. Try at 
least a test flock this year. 

Place your order today for immediate 
or later delivery. 

Write for Free Illustrated Folder 

PARMENTER REDS, INC. 

474 KING STREET, FRANKLIN, MASS. 


PARKS ROCKS & CROSSES 



Big “eatin’ size” chickens that 
are terrific layers. 

WORLD’S OLDEST STRAIN of 
Barred Rocks and two 
wonderful crosses made 
from them. Try our 
sensational new BOB’S 
WHITES and our ever 
popular BLACK 
BEAUTIES. 

Write for Free Catalog 
BOB PARKS, ALTOONA 10, PA, 



GET THAT 
PROFIT! 

with Hail Brothers 



SILVER 
HALLCROSS 

First a substantial egg profit! 
Then a meat profit, for these 
well known egg producers 
dress off for prime meat at 
end of laying season. Dual 
profits for you! 

SEND FOR FREE DESCRIP- 
TIVE BOOKLET TODAT 

HALL BROTHERS HATCHERY. INC. 

Box 60. Wallinoford. Conn. 



TAAOCMAeK 


RIGHT NOW is the time to order 
your Babcock Bessies . . . the White 
Leghorn that is bred to make money 
for you. Phone us collect (Ithaca 
4-6384) and we’ll book you today for 
any hatch you choose. 

BABCOCK POULTRY FARM, INC. 

Box 286«R/ Ithaca, N.Y. 


NEW BOOK 
Free! 

Read all about tny 
Big - New Improved 

ANCONAS 

1958 white egg 
machines. Lots of 
large white eggs 
at less cost per 
dozen. Write to — 



RAYMOND S. THOMAS, Route 2, SALTILLO, PA. 


When you write advertisers mention 
The Rural New-Yorker and you’ll get 
a quick reply and a “square deal.” See 
guarantee editorial page. 



SHOPPING FOR A NEW SIIO? 

You'll save with a 


I UNIVERSAL STEEL SlToTcT 
I 60x217 R WeedsDort, N. Y. 

I Please send folder without obligatioi 



EARLY ORDER DISCOUNT! 

Free folder. Mail coupon today. 


I Name_ 

CONCRETE $110 

► !“>» — 


lower despite higher egg production. 

An increase in cost of feed has 
been the main difficulty for poultry- 
men. One other factor of importance 
—related to feed cost also—has been 
the loss in value of fowl in recent 
years. Returns from the sale of hens 
at the end of the tests have not been 


sufficient to cover the cost of the 
feed used to rear them, a situation 
in reverse of when the test started. 
The laying test can be credited 
with providing data of economic im¬ 
portance in addition to information 
on sources of stock and breeding 
programs. C. S. Platt 



At the seventh annual Central New York Random Sample test in Horse- 
heads, White Leghorns from Brender’s Poultry Farm, Ferndale, N. Y., had 
a $2.74 income per bird over feed and chick costs. They averaged 201 

eggs apiece. 



Birds like these 934-C’s of Hy-Line Poultry Farms, Des Moines, la., topped 
the seventh annual Central Neio York Random Sample Test loith a $4.41 
income per bird over feed and chick costs. 



The Childhood Goose 
Is Evergreen 

I inherited a strange pet when my 
Father died—a goose, but he left 
memories that will be evergreen. 
Gandy was 40 yeai’s old when he be¬ 
came mine. I had known him for a 
long lime before, however, and where 
I worked or played he was always on 
hand. As I got old enough to go 
to outside work, Gandy had to be 
locked up. Otherwise, he followed 
the car, fanning his large wings and 
squawking loudly enough to be heard 
for miles. When the piano was played 
in the house, Gandy sat quietly on the 
porch wagging his head from side 
to side in apparent time and enjoy¬ 
ment of the music. Each morning he 
came to the same porch to knock 
his bill on the door as a signal of 
breakfast time. Gandy later became a 
pet for my own children and followed 
them around like a dog. Like a good 
dog, too, at the first sign of a car 
or stranger he would set up an alarm 
like a six-engine fire. 

One day we decided that Gandy 
should have a mate, so we sent for 
two started female geese from Wis¬ 
consin. About two months old, they 
were shipped express to Pennsylva¬ 
nia, and the crate weighed more than 
they. The express charges were great¬ 
er than the cost of the birds. To our 
surprise and regret, moreover, Gandy 
ignored these lovely young creatures 
entirely. He continued on only as 
playmate for the children and as 
watchdog for the entire family. It 
was not until a year thereafter that 
we learned our “started female geese” 
were really ganders! 

Gandy was eventually killed by a 
tractor at the ripe old age of 60 years. 
Sixty is not an unusual age for a 
goose, and there are many records of 
older ones. But no other could have 
served his master better than this 
pal who paraded our grounds and 


walked into the hearts of three gen¬ 
erations of family. I bought goose 
after goose later, but found none 
other ever to replace Gandy. Be¬ 
cause of him I’ll always love the 
goose. H, R. Waddell 



Memories of Gandy, the Goose, are 
golden for Pennsylvania’s Waddell 
Family. Morning conferences with 
H. R. ivere almost daily. 


Useful Poultry Books 

Turkey Management, 

Martin and Marsden.$7.00 

Poultry Handbook of Health and 
Management, (an encyclopedia) 

Rudolph Seiden . 6,95 

Successful Poultry Management, 

Morley A. Jull. 6.25 

Poultry Production, 

Leslie E. Card. 5.00 

Commercial Poultry Farming, 

Prof. T. B. Charles and H. D. 

Stuart . 4.50 

Domestic Geese and Ducks, 

Paul Ives . 4.00 

Making Pigeons Pay, 

Wendell S. Levi. 3.50 

For sale by The Rural New 
Yorker, 333 West 30th St, New York 
1, N. Y. (New York City residents, 
add 3% Sales Tax.) 


26 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 





















































GtiARAHIIm^FIIPS 


V TAMBA, EEA. . iANEORft, «,C. • CHA««BUE, fiA, 


Do Extremes Mate Best? 

The future of turkey hybrids will 
depend largely upon the availability 
of pure strains and varieties that com¬ 
bine well for improved growth and 
vigor. The mating of quite different 
pure varieties, such as Broad Breast¬ 
ed Bronze males on Large-type White 
females, might be expected to com¬ 
bine best. This would then necessitate 
making reciprocal crosses among sev¬ 
eral strains of the two varieties to 
determine which are tops for growth, 
conformation, livability and poult pro¬ 
duction. Another approach would be 
to use strain crosses. 

What advantages might a turkey 
breeder expect from crossbreeding? 
Since very little was known concern¬ 
ing the value of crossing turkeys, 
research was undertaken at the Ohio 
Agricultural Experiment Station to 
explore it and evaluate its possibili¬ 
ties for commercial application. The 
first year, two strains each of bronze 
Large White, and Small Whites were 
mated in all possible combinations 
to produce a pure strain cross, and 
a variety cross. The two strains of 
each breed were: Bronze—Nicholas 
and Lovelace; Large White—Empire 
and Thompson; and Small White— 
Reltsville and Wahkeen. The primary 
objective was to compare the three 
progeny for growth, conformation 
and livability. In the second year, 


for growth to 24 weeks of age. Strain- 
cross males were 7.5 per cent larger 
than pure-strain males, while vari¬ 
ety-cross males were five per cent 
larger. The differences between pure¬ 
bred and crossbred females were 
smaller; only the strain-cross females 
birds were superior to the pure-strain 
birds. Since at 24 weeks the strain 
crosses of both sexes were larger 
than variety crosses and the strain 
ci’osses were consistently larger than 
pure strains, strain crossing would 
probably be best to employ in tur¬ 
key hybridization. However, all sWain 
crosses may not grow better than all 
variety crosses: the Bronze x Large 
White variety cross performed almost 
as well as the best strain Bronze x 
Bronze cross. Turkey breeders must 
make experimental crosses to test the 
combining ability of one strain or 
variety with another. 

Live market quality at 24 weeks 
was really not affected at all by 
crossing. Breast width was slightly 
improved, but there was no difference 
in any other measurements. 


Variety Crosses Survive Better 

Liveability during the brooding 
period to eight weeks was best for the 
variety cross progeny—96.1 per cent, 
and poorest for the strain cross pro¬ 
geny—90.3 per cent. During the 8- 
to 24-week growing period on range, 
there was no difference in livability, 
All the strain crosses were not char¬ 
acterized by high brooder-house mor¬ 
tality; the livability was 97.8 per 
cent for Bronze x Bronze strain cross 
progeny. In general, nevertheless, 
variety crosses may be somewhat 
moi'e vigorous and tend to have bet¬ 
ter livability during the bi’ooding 
period than either pure-strain or 
strain-cross poults. 

The reproductive performance of 
variety-cross females was superior in 
every respect to that of pure-strain 
females. Crossbred females pi'oduced 
six per cent more eggs, 11 per cent 
more fertile eggs, and 22 per cent 
more poults than the purebred fe¬ 
males. This greater poult production 
was the cumulative effect of better 
egg production, fertility, hatchability 
and less broodiness. There was no 


Turkey breeders should take a 
look at what the chicken men have 
been doing with broiler chicks the 
past few years. Chicken breeders are 
miles ahead in the adaption of the 
science of genetics. The broiler in¬ 
dustry was founded on the Barred 
Plymouth Rock x New Hampshire 
or Rhode Island Red cross. Now out 
of date, crosses since involve so-call¬ 
ed dominant white plumage. New 
Hampshire, White Plymouth Rocks 
and crossbred females are mated to 
Dominant White males to produce 
white crosses. Meat qualities and 
growth are emphasized on the male 
side, egg production on the female 
side. Hatchability, growth, feed con¬ 
version and yield of high quality 
meat are generally enhanced. Crosses 
play a most important part in the 
broiler business. Will crossbreeding 
become the rule in developing the 
turkeys of the future? 


Strain crosses: 7.5 per cent better growth; 
Variety crosses: 6 per cent more poults — 

Success from Crossing Turkeys 


By M. G. McCartney 


“ "I’ossbreeding has for years 
been recognized as an ef- 
fective method of improv- 
ing the economy of farm 
M animals. Recently, there 
have been many notable 
; . advances in breeding chick¬ 

ens for meat and eggs, and cross¬ 
breeding to take advantage of hybrid 
vigor or heterosis is common. Rela¬ 
tively few turkey breeders, however, 
have acknowledged the full value of 
hybi’idization for improvement of 
growth, reproduction and vigor. In 
the future, it is expected that more 
and more turkey breeders will be¬ 
come interested in crossbreeding. 

In its broadest meaning, a hybrid 
is the result of a cross of different 
strains, varieties, breeds and even 
species. Turkey hybrids generally 
are of some combination of strain.s 
and varieties. Whether a variety cross 
—Bronze x Large White—or a strain 
cross—A Bronze x B Bronze—the 
objective is the same: to obtain in¬ 
creased growth, vigor and reproduc¬ 
tion in resulting progeny. While 
hybrid vigor is not understood com¬ 
pletely, crossbreeding can bring about 
desired characters not found in any 
pure strain and at the same time 
improve productivity and vigor. Not 
all crossbreds, however, are superior 
to purebreds. 


pure strain, strain cross, back cross 
and three-way matings were made 
by mating pure-strain Nicholas Bronze 
male to pure-strain and variety-cross 
females. The pure-strain females were 
Thompson, Nicholas and Lovelace, 
while the variety-cross females were 
Bronze x Large White crosses, i. e., 
Nicholas x Thompson and Lovelace 
X Thompson. The primary objective 
was to obtain comparative data be¬ 
tween pure breed and crossbred fe¬ 
males for reproduction, as well as 
for growth, conformation, and liva¬ 
bility of their offspring. 

Strain Crosses Seem Best for Growth 

There was a general combining 
ability among the strains and varieties 


Starter Feeds 


The Money 


is in the GOLDEN EGGS 


A good flock can average 300 eggs/hen per year. Through care¬ 
ful, management, the pouhryman can break even when his flock 
is only producing at 50%. But the Golden Eggs , . . the eggs 
you get OVER 50%, are the ones that mean money in the bank 
. . . the Golden Eggs are the profits in farming. Flocks raised 
and fed on Red Rose Poultry Feeds produce at high rates 
.,. plan now to get those Golden Eggs with Red Rose feeds. 

Feed required per doz. at different rates of production 
based on studies at Red Rose Research Center. 

Increased Income 

Extra Dozen 
Eggs You Get 


Percentage of 
Flock Lay 

50% 

60% 

70% 

80% 


Pounds Feed Extra Dozen Per Ton of Feed From 
Per Dozen Eggs Eggs You Get The "Golden Eggs" 

5.52 0 0 

4.77 57 $28.50 

4.43 89 $44.50 

3.81 163 $81.50 


Start now 
for tomorrow’s 

GOLDEN EGGS 


IS>hftibufors from Maine to Florida; 

Ohio to the Atlantic 


Today’s improved chick strains deserve 
feeds that will develop their full egg- 
laying potential. Red Rose Chick 
Starter or Starter and Grower contains 
more protein and calories—plus 
all the antibiotics required to produce 
the hens that can and will lay 
tomorrow’s Golden Eggs. Start with 
Red Rose and feed Red Rose 
to get those profit-producing eggs. 


February 1, 1958 


27 













We.mM4e(i 
b(j 0/ u>luAlie;o 

Last season was within a “whisker” 
of our biggest year . . . and the rea¬ 
son is . . . poultrymen are telling 


difference of fertility and hatchabil- 
ity in the two-way, back-cross and 
three-way crossbred matings. Since 
poults are the second largest cost 
item in producing turkeys, improve¬ 
ment in the reproductive perform¬ 
ance of breeding flocks will help tre¬ 
mendously in reducing overall pro¬ 
duction costs. Growth can be im¬ 
proved by crossing strains and vari¬ 
eties of turkeys, and, reproductive 
performance can be, too. Variety- 
cross females are superior to pure- 


strain females, especially in hatch- 
ability. 

Our results so far support hybrid¬ 
ization for the improvement of re¬ 
production and growth in turkeys. 
While their practicality for the tur¬ 
key industry has yet to be shown by 
the commercial breeder, there is an 
excellent possibility that the next 
step in turkey breeding will be in 
the direction of hybridization through 
strain and variety crossing. 





Now any flock owner can afford a modem auto¬ 
matic E(ig Grader. A marvel of simplicity 
and accuracy. 

• Grades 4 to 5 coses per hour — consistently 

• Adjustable to any of four different grades 

• Simple to operate—no difficult adjustments 

• Cannot get out ot order 

• Sponge Rubber Mat 

• Completely aluminized 

Quickly pays for itself. Graded Eggs bring 
better prices. Send for FREE 1933 Catalog. 

NATIONAL FARM EQUIPMENT CO., INC. 
142 GREENE STREET, NEW YORK 12, N. Y. 


PROFIT- 
MAKING 
LEGHORNS 

Only N. Y. S. Leg¬ 
horn Breeder to 
Place in 

TOP QUARTILE 

3 Yr. Average Cen¬ 
tral New York Ran¬ 
dom Sample Test. 

Bulkley’s birds consistent 
leaders at this important 
test where chicks are ex¬ 
posed to leucosis. Bulk- 
ley’s had average yearly 
income $2,188 per net 
chick started for last three 
years. Owner - supervised 
breeding program gives 
you birds that live, lay and pay with low 
feed consumption. Before you buy, get 
free price list and folder from — 


N. Y.-U. S Certified 
Pullarum, f y p h o I d 
Clean. 


NEPPCO Favors PENB 
For Egg Promotion 

A revitalized Poultry and Egg Na¬ 
tional Board has been recommended 
by Northeast Poultry Producers 
Council as the means to improve egg 
promotion. NEPPCO is urging that 
the study committee established last 
December at an industry-wide meet¬ 
ing give PENB primary considera¬ 
tion. Made up of representatives of 
American Poultry and Hatchery Fed¬ 
eration, American Feed Manufactur¬ 
ers Assn., Institute of American 
Poultry Industries, and PENB, the 
committee will make a preliminary 
report next month. 

“NEPPCO has . . . been critical of 
. . . PENB ... ”, declares Alfred 
Van Wagenen, managing director, 
“but . . . we do not feel that the 
answer to . . . promotion problems 
is to throw away the results of years 
of coordinated industry etfort and 
achievement simply because we do 
not agree upon details. Let’s not des¬ 
troy all this in a search for something 
new and better”. The Council’s Di¬ 


This is believed to be the lowest 
expenditure for feed ever recorded. 
The 18-per-cent-fat feed does not 
flow very well in self-feeders, how 
ever, so it may not be immediately 
practical. The 10-per-cent-fat ration 
moves all right. On it, 1,600 birds 
weighed an average of 2.78 pounds 
at eight weeks after eating 2.01 
pounds of feed—9.18 cents worth— 
for each pound of weight they gained 

Book Note 

The Golden Egg, An Autobio 
graphy — By Arthur D. Goldhaft. It 
isn’t often that a man who has really 
contributed something to agriculture 
writes a book, and it is rare when the 
book is absorbing. This volume by 
Dr. Goldhaft, founder and director 
of Vineland Poultry Laboratories, 
constitutes an unusual event. For the 
man has contributed notably to the 
poultry industry by his pioneering 
work in vaccination, and his story 
is truly human and warm. Many 
great and good names of the poultry 
world appear in the pages, and their 
and the author’s work write a his¬ 


their neighbors, “Leader has a better 
bird.” It’s that extra 2 or 3 doz. 
eggs per bird that count today. 

YET Leader chicks cost no more. 
Write for price list and catalog. 


GUY A. LEADER & SONS, INC. 
YORK 2, PENNSYLVANIA 


The pure-strain, strain-cross and variety-cross turkeys reared intermingled 
at the Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station voere fed all-mash rations. 


BULKLEY’S LEGHORNS 

130 Leghorn Lane Phone 30-M, Odessa, N. Y. 


GHOSTLEY’S STRAIN CROSS 

— RATES HIGH AS LAYERS — 

Ghostley's Strain Cross will give you more 
eggs, larger eggs earlier and over a longer 
period than the average good layer, with 
excellent shell texture and very high interior 
quality, 250 eggs per year on a hen-housed 
basis and livability of 90% or better may 
be 6Xp@C^6Cl. 

More than a third of a million measure¬ 
ments, including a complex blood-grouping 
project, are tabulated each year on IBM 
machines^ from 20,000 trapnested birds to 
give you as fine a leghorn as any in the 
United States. 

Write today for further information about 
these outstanding birds and the service 
Owlkill Farm renders its customers. 


OWLKILL FARM, IIVC. 

EAGLE BRIDGE, NEW YORK 
Telephone: Cambridge, N. Y. 2660 
An Associate Ghostley Hatchery 


tmnmi/SMin 


PENNA. • U.,S 
APPROVED 
PULLORUM- 
TYPHOID 
CLEAN 

FREE 
CATALOG 



For Greater Profits 

BROADER 
BREASTED 
POULTS, BROAD 
WHITES, B. B. 
BRONZE, 
BELTSVILLE 
WHITES. FROM 
OUR OWN 
BREEDERS. 


Linesville Hatchery 

BOX 14. LINESVILLE, PENNA. 


B B BRONZE 

Of Double Breasted with five-inch breasts In width. 
Poults of top strains of U. S. Dave Cooper and Loren 
Johnson of Ore. Won 1-2-3 in young toms first 
youngs 1958 Penna. Farm Show. Pullorum clean poults. 
WILA TURKEY RANCH. WILA, PENNA. 


- GOSLINGS - 

Massive Market Type White Emden. Our Pure Bred 
Strain Is One of the Largest in the Country. Three- 
Year and Older Breeding Stock Assures You of Larger. 
Huskier Goslings. It Costs Less to Own the Best. 
Ehlers Goose Farm & Hatchery. Chenango Forks. N. Y. 


vision of Cooperatives and its board 
of directors have recently sought 
changes in PENB’s structure, its 
fund-raising policies, and in some of 
its promotion practices. Nationally, 
there has been some sentiment for 
the creation of an egg council quite 
apart from PENB. Presently PENB 
is engaged in a fundamental survey 
of what motivates housewives to buy 
or not buy eggs. Only when consumer 
attitudes are definitely known, it 
feels, can sound long-range programs 
be instituted for stepping up per- 
capita egg consumption. 


Lowest Broiler Feed Cost: 
$.09 Worth per Pound 

Poultry specialists at the Univer- 
sitey of Maryland’s substation in 
Salisbury recently raised 6,400 broil¬ 
ers on about nine cents worth of feed 
for each pound of gain they made. 
By incorporating 18 per cent of fat 
in one ration, they provided extreme¬ 
ly high energy. A calorie-protein 
ratio of 42:1 was maintained for the 
first six weeks; increasing the amount 
of corn raised it to 50:1 for a final 
two-week finishing period. Only 8.52 
cents worth of the 18-per-cent-fat 
feed was needed to produce a pound 
of meat. The 1,600 white crossbred 
birds receiving it weighed 2.74 pounds 
at eight weeks; they consumed 1.89 
pounds of feed per pound of gain. 


tory of the fight to control diseases 
in American flocks. But the story is 
intensely personal, too, and its por¬ 
trayal of Jewish life and culture in 
American agriculture is unique. 
From the book one gets an historical 
sense of the aspirations, the successes 
and failures of American Jews to get 
back to the soil. 

For sale by The Rural New 
Yorker, 333 West 30th St., New York 
1, N. Y. at $5.00 the copy. (N. Y. City 
residents add 15 cents city sales 
tax.) 



Rollaway egg nests are achieving 
much popularity because of the fa¬ 
cility they allow in collecting eggs. 
Only clean eggs can be quality eggs, 
and these nests contribute to 
cleanliness, too. 


WHITE SILKIE BANTAMS: Pairs or Trio. Good op 
Lajors. WADE JOHNSON, FRANKFORT, N. Y. 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


SCH AUMAM - Wall - Ceiling 

Flooring - Building 

Has no comparison for lining chicken 
houses and hundreds of building jobs 
around farm, house, barn and out¬ 
buildings. Ideal to cover old rough 
house floors, with or without lino¬ 
leum overlay. So hard, strong and 
glass smooth that it is damp-proof, 
shatter-proof, washable and impossi¬ 
ble for hens to peck or chip. 

Also all kinds of 

HARDWOOD 

As wholesale Northeast distributors 
for this most useful farm building 
board we wish to invite our fellow 
farmers to try it, at prices you can 
afford, $1.85 per 4x8 ft. sheet. 

PLYWOOD 

Sheathing Grades for exterior Walls, 
Sub-Floors and Roofs, helps you put 
up strong, air tight buildings quickly 
and economically the prefabricated 
way. 


While we specialize in beautiful 
Select Birch plywood for interior 
decoration and cabinets, also have 
all exotic woods like Walnut, Ma¬ 
hogany, Oak, Ash and knotty pine. 
All thickness in plain and new 
grooved panelling. At real savings 
of rock bottom wholesale prices. 
Best thing would be to get in your 
farm truck or family car and come 
over to see us anytime. Second 
best call me person-to -person 
reverse charge LU 2-6340. 


A. J. VIOLETTE, 

NORTHFIELD ROAD, LUNENBURG, MASS. 

Ryptured Men 
Get S3.50 Truss 


|No Charge For It 
Now or Ever 


Kansas City, Mo. — A doctor’s in¬ 
vention for reducible rupture is prov¬ 
ing so successful, an offer is now 
being made to give everyone who will 
test it a $3.50 truss at no cost. This 
invention has no leg straps, no elastic 
belts, or leather bands. It holds 
rupture up and in. Is comfortable and 
easy to wear. After using it many 
report entire satisfaction. Any reader 
of this paper may test the doctor’s 
invention for 30 days and receive the 
separate $3.50 truss at no cost. If you 
are not entirely satisfied with the 
invention — return it, but be sure to 
keep the $3.50 truss for your trouble. 
If you are ruptured just write the 
Physician’s Appliance Co., 9552 Koch 
Bldg., 2906 Main St., Kansas City, 
Mo., for their trial offer. 




( Would YOU Uke to Make 

iflHIOAMONTH? 

'That’s What Stanley Hyman 
^ made selling the amazing new 
PRESTO Eire Extinguisher! 

Tiny "Presto” does job of 
bulky extinguishers that 
cost 4 times as much, are 8 
times as heavy. Ends fires 
fast as 2 seconds. Fits in 
palm of hand. Never cor¬ 
rodes. Guaranteed for 20 
years! Sells for only $4.95! Over Three 
Million Sold! Show it to civil defense 
workers, owners of homes, cars, boats, 
farms, etc., and to stores for resale—make 
good income. H. J. Kerr reported $20 a day. C. Kama, 
$1,000 a month. Write for free Sales Kit. No obligation. 
MERLITE INDUSTRIES, Dept. P-ITF 
114 EAST 32nd STREET • NEW YORK 16, N. Y. 
In Canada : Mopa Co., Ltd., 371 Dowd St., Montreal l.PQ. 


-DAY OID and STARTED CHICKS- 

Mt. Hone and H. & N. Stock foundation. Blood- 
tested. All our own breeders. No eggs bought. 
WRITE FOR LOWEST PRICES. 
PELLMAN’S POULTRY FARM 
W. S. PELLMAN, Prop.. Box 53, Richfield, Pa. 
Telephone: Richfield 4351 


POULTRY RAISERS: Bargain rates for America’s 
leading poultry magazine. 48 months only $1.00. Trial 
offer 9 months 25c. Every issue packed with raising 
helps. Problems answered. Subscribe TODAY! 
POULTRY TRIBUNE. Dept. C28, Mount Morris, III. 


WANTED ALIVE: Guinea Fowl, Rabbits, Pigeons, 
Squab, etc. KRAKAUR POULTRY COMPANY. 
Est. 1883, DEPT. 20, LONG ISLAND CITY I. N. Y. 

- FACTORY PRICES -- 

ON THE NATION’S MOST COMPLETE LINE OF 
WATER BOWLS. STALLS. PLNS, FEED TRUCKS, 
FARM COOLING TANKS. GIRTON MFG., 

COMPANY, _ MILLVILLE. PENNA. 

ROCKS, HAMPSHIRES. AUSTR A W HITES, L^ 

HORNS: $6.99; Pullets. $14.99; Surplus Pullets, 
$11.99; Heavies, $6.49; Tableuse. $5.99: Surplus. 
$1.49. C.0.0. BUSH HATCHERY. CLINTON. MO^ 

NOW BOOKING ORDERS for River Rest Large 

Whites. B. B. Bronze, and Small White poults ana 
eggs. Write for free literature & prices. BARTLETT 5 
TURKEY HATCHERY, R. 6, LOCKPORT, N. Y. 























































Rearing the Pullet Chicks 

There^s a method in management^ and 
well there should be: Springes chickens 

are FaWs flock. 

By L. S. SHERMAN 


f you are an old hand at 
the poultry business you 
know there is a lot that 
intervenes between little 
fuzzy chicks and the full 
egg basket: careful plan¬ 
ning, hard work, and cons¬ 
tant attention to details. It is the 
total picture of consistent, good every¬ 
day practices and management that 
writes the story of success. 

You must plan ahead and buy 
good stock from a reliable hatchery. 
You will pay more, but experience 
teaches that it is worth it. Every¬ 
thing must be in readiness before the 
chicks arrive. This means (1) brooder 
houses and equipment scrubbed, 
cleaned and disinfected, (2) brooders 
ovei’hauled and heat regulated two 
or three days ahead of time, (3) 
a supply of feed, grit, etc., on hand 
the minute the chicks arrive, (4) 



Plastic tents used with infra-red 
brooding lamps keep in heat and 
prevent drafts on baby chicks. They 
allow full view of the growing young 
birds. 

papei'S down over the litter, and (5) 
water fountains in place. 

Is the floor space ample? Allow 
at least a half square foot for each 
baby chick to be transferred to range 
or other quarters at six weeks. If 
to be confined, each bird should have 
one foot to six weeks, two feet from 
six to 12 weeks, and three or four 
after 12 weeks. 

Because electric brooders are so 
easy to run, we prefer them. My 
neighbors, however, use the infra-red 
heat-lamp type and like them vei’y 
well. Each unit broods up to 500 
chicks, there is no hover, and chicks 
are in plain view. Small as well as 
large installations can be controlled 
automatically. The cost of infra-red 
brooding is higher than for electric 
hover brooding, however, and sup¬ 
plemental heat may be needed in 
cold weather. 

Litter for the Chicks 

Shavings, sugar-cane fiber, ground 
corncorbs, peanut hulls and oat hulls 
can be used as litter. It depends on 
what is available in your locality. 
Peat moss is nice and dry, but it is 
dusty. I like the so-called Staz-dry 
that comes in bales. Litter should 
at first be two or three inches deep, 
then increased up to four or five. 

Temperature at the adge of the 
hover two inches above the litter 
should be 95 to 90 degrees the first 
week. Lower it three to five degrees 
each week thereafter. The time heat 
is required depends on the season; 
but never take it off too soon. Yet 
too high a temperature may cause 
dehydration. 

The general recommendation is 


for two one-quart water fountains 
for each 100 chicks. But I have always 
used more, and I think it pays. 
Chickens drink about one quart of 
water for each pound of feed they 
eat. While in permanent brooder 
houses automatic water with drain¬ 
age is most convenient, small foun¬ 
tains ought to be used for two weeks 
until the chicks become accustomed 
to it. One thousand birds need 40 
feet of automatic watering trough. 
Keep the water from freezing in 
cold weather, and provide additional 
v/aterers in hot. 

Clean the fountains or troughs 
every day. Chickens may drink out 
of a mud puddle, but water in a 
fountain with mash decaying and 
fermenting is entirely different. It 
leads to sick chicks. 

The Need for Fresh, but Warm, Air 

In colony-type brooder houses, ven¬ 
tilation is comparatively simple. Usu¬ 
ally the windows just slide up and 
down. A good practice is to have 
two one-inch slots near the floor as 
intake openings. Incoming air is heat¬ 
ed some as it passes up between 
inside and outside boarding and 
enters the room at the sill. Win¬ 
dows are opened at the top a little 
to act as outlets. Always have screen¬ 
ing over such openings. 

In a house with double-hung win¬ 
dows, the lower section can be raised' 
a little if a baffle boai'd is placed 
along the bottom to keep air from 
blowing directly on the chicks. 

In large, permanent brooder 
houses, ventilation is accomplished 
with fans. They exhaust stale air 
from the building and intake open¬ 
ings admit fresh air. The latter have 
to be designed so as not to create a 
draft on the floor. Before a system 
of this kind is installed, an engineer 
ought to be consulted, 

Preventing Disease 

As to immunization, figui’e out a 
program and stick to it. Most all 
flocks should be inoculated against 
infectious bronchitis and Newcastle 
disease regardless of location or past 
incidence of disease in the area. Vac¬ 
cinate against fowl pox wherever this 
disease has recurred persistently. 
Genei’ally, you need to vaccinate 
against infectious larygotracheitis 
only if birds that have recovered 
from the disease are still on the farm. 
Keep detailed records on vaccina¬ 
tion; include the date of administra¬ 
tion, the manufacturer, type of vac¬ 
cine, serial number and expiration 
date. Be sure to repeat vaccinations 
whenever required, and immunize 
only healthy birds. Vaccination of 
birds with active infections such as 
coccidiosis should be postponed un¬ 
til the condition is arrested. 

Buy chicks resistant to coccidiosis, 
and then allow them to develop more 
natural immunity. If a preventive is 
always in the mash, they develop 
no immunity at all and are apt to 
come down with the malady when 
they are ready to lay. Losses can be 
heavy. If the chicks get it, adminis¬ 
ter a sulfa drug in water for three 
days, and it will clear up. Provide 
plenty of room, proper heat and 
early roosting—all of them helpful 
conti’ol measures. 

If you want the thrill of a beau¬ 
tiful flock of pullets this Fall, it is 
most important to give strict atten¬ 
tion to good management now. Only 
by so doing can you cash in on those 
baskets of eggs, hopefully ever full. 




THE HUBBARD #496 PULLET: 

cel«r > red • 5tfe - SVe lbs. at 1st tqq 

6V« lbs. ot end of Itf year 


E w I ScufeA^t 


r 


HUBBARD’S 


*496 


PULLET 


THE #496 PUILET is an entirely new 
cross, especially developed by Hubbard 
Research for producers of eggs for the 
brown egg market. The #496 matures 
early, flocks peak at 80 to 90%. Eggs are 
remarkably uniform in size and color. 


superior internal quality. Some creams 
and tints. 

HUBBARD NEW HAMPSHIRE — Favored 
large brown egg producer f^r more 
than 30 years. Holds all time contest 
record for breed. 


SHELLS EXTREMELY STRONG, INTERIOR 
EGG QUALITY EXCELLENT. Breakage just 
about ceases to be a problem. Superior 
shell quality holds through 12 months’ 
production. Based on 1,000 birds, this 
one inherited characteristic alone can 
mean an extra $250.00 per year income! 
In addition to Hubbard’s #496, we 
offer you the following breeds, each a 
leader in its field. 

HUBBARD LEGHORN CROSS— Heavy pro¬ 
ducer of large, strong-shelled eggs with 


HUBBARD KIMBERCHIK K-137 - Better 
than 250 pure white eggs a year, large 
size early. Proven in Random Tests and 
on the farms, floor and cage, all over 
the United States. 

For new literature on the 
Hubbard #496 Pullet, also 
on Hubbard K-137 Kimber- 
chik Leghorns. Address 
Dept. 12. 




HUBBARD FARMS PROFIT-BRED EGG STRAINS 


i-.GARRISON’S NEW_ 
CORNISH KINGS 

More Weight! More Meat! 

Cornish Kings are the new addition to the 
Garrison line of specialized crosses for 
meat production—and what a marvel they 
arc when it comes to satisfying demand for 
real premium quality in Rock Cornish 
Hens, broilers, caponettes and roasters. 
Cornish King^ pack plenty of wallop in 
growth and feed conversion—for they are 
three-quarter pure Cornish, right out of 
our selection pressure breeding pens. Write 
for free catalog. SPECIAL: Send 10<* for 
new book "How to Run a One-Man 
Broiler Business.” 

EARL W. GARRISON 


BRIDGETO.N 13, NEW JERSEY 



Why pay up to 25<‘ more per Pullet from Franchise 
Hatcheries when you can buy good performance pullets 
that Average 70% or better production for less. Mt. 
Hope White Leghorns, New Hampshire Reds, Arbor 
Acres White Rocks. Sex Link cross-or Red Rock Cross. 
Also Started Chicks. Write for further information and 
Prices. Telephone 126 R II. 

C. P. LEISTER Hatchery, Box N, McAlisterville, Pa. 


LARGE ENGLISH WHITE LEGHORNS OR 
MINORCA CROSS PU LLETS — $18.00 Per 100. 
BARRED OR WHITE ROCKS, REDS 
CORNISH CROSSES — $8.00 Per 100. 
Livability and Sex Guaranteed 

QUAKER BRAND BABY CHICKS 

103-105 COHANSEY STREET 

BRIDGETON, N. J. BR 9-2164 


Bioadbreast (ORNISH 

Big block-busters. Make heavy weights in less 
time on lower feed cost. Deliciously flavored 
tender white meat. Unusually profitable. Write 
STANDARD HATCHERIES. B0X926A DECATUR, ILLINOIS 



Hi-PRQ WHITE LEGHORNS 

puiins 

STARTED 

Fuuns 

cox 

4 SO 

America's No. 1 Strain Crosses, 
Hybrids, Cage-Lines. Guaranteed 
Livability. More Top grade eggs on 

13 " 

OH. 95 

fcOioo 

lioo 


leas feed. Full information in FREE CATALOG. 

ORTNEW FARMS BOX B CLINTON. MO . 

TURKEYS With Extreme Breast Width. Best Strains 
Bronze, White, Beltsville. Clean Guaranteed Poults. 
PAWLING HATCHERY. Box R. Middle Creek. Pa. 

ANCONA CHICKS \”|?"s“m“JrV 

Large White Eggs on Less Feed. Cat. Free. Ph.:43ll 
SHRAWDER S ANCONA FARM. Richfield 9, Pa. 
30 DAY SPECIAL — Blood-tested Chicks. All 
Heavies. Rocks. Reds, Crosses: $6.50-100; $12-200. 
Heavy Leghorn Broiler cockerels $2.00-100. Ship at 
once C.O.D. Klines Poultry Farm- Strausstown. Pa. 


BABY CHICK BARGAINS — $5.95vl00 C.O.D. 
WH. ROCKS, WH. CROSS, NEW HAMPSHIRES 
and WH. LEGHORNS. Price at Hatchery. 
BELLEFONTE POULTRY FARM. Bellefonte I, Pa. 


PEAFOWL: BLUE, WHITE. BLACK SHOULDERED 
1957 Pairs $25; 1956 Pairs $35: 1955 Pairs $45. 

A. H. CHAMBERS. Maple Lane Farms, Kingston, N.Y. 


1080 EGGS IN EVERY HEN. Why not learn the big 
secret and keep LAYERS nearly 5 years? Get free 
bulletin. SINE. RN-7. QUAKERTOWN. PA. 


POULTRY RANGE SHELTERS. Free Literature. 

BOOHER EQUIPMENT COMPANY, 

3627 DEVON DRIVE, S. E., WARREN, OHIO 


From tKe Rugged 
Oliznate of DAmne 



Ready to prove their exceptional profit- 
abiiit es to you, as they have to so many 
others durrng the past 47 years! There's 
a breed or cross exactly right for you — 
whether you specialize in Market Eggs, 
Broilers, Caponettes or Hatching Eggs. 

WHITE LEGHORNS, RED-ROCKS (Black 
Sex-Link Pullets), GOLDEN CROSSES 
and R. I. REDS for egg production. 
WHITE ROCKS for broilers (or for pro¬ 
ducing hatching eggs for broiler chicks). 
GOLDEN CROSS COCKERELS for broil¬ 
ers. 

You can’t go wrong when you order 
from Clements—Maine’s leading hatchery. 

Maine-U.S. Approved—Pullorum Clean 
Write or phone (Winterport: Baldwin 
3-4292) for information and prices. 


CLEMENTS CHICKS, Inc. 


ROUTE 25, WINTERPORT, MAINE 


Meg O’D 


AY 


GET YOUR CHICKS 
THIS SEASON FROM 
The World’s Champion Leghorn 

FREE CATALOG! 

STERN BROS.’ HATCHERY 


STARTED 
SURGICAL 
SUPERIOR 
Investigate capon profit possibilities 
in your area. Plan now to enjoy this 
“Meat that’s a treat!” W’rite for free 
Capon Facts ’n Figures. Alan Rhodes, 
Kingsley. Pennsylvania. 



- TURKEYS - 

Broad Breast Bronze — Broad Whites — Beltsville 
Leading Strains. High livability, rapid growth, su¬ 
perior market quality. Clean flocks. Car delivery in 
quantity lots. Telephone Frenchtown 29-J. 

HILLPOT TURKEY FARM. 

BOX I, ROUTE 12, FRENCHTOWN, N. J. 


GUINEAS 

— PURE WHITE AFRICAN BREEDERS — 

3 HENS. I COCK, $8.00. WILL LAY SPRING. 
OREXEL, EDGEMONl, PENNA. 


February 1, 1958 


29 


















































^ ssaxi y o. -- 

farmer aW ^^loV 

f'aP frr luiflr a gar©^ ^ -from 

ToirW l*^/Tae'a^g^°“^srP6^'^^^%“ay^ casV. - 

- SS; 

s». V.i.';‘f»%.s»s.' “ *” 

rirstal a e^-s 

^rcfa^ deaUrS ^feir 

too, ffgfved f/J^xilce 

^Xey’^ re »y4°^’'' 

^belseivee- the»^^ 

Xt ma.e^rorcrearf - ^ 

VOM ^ ^ , s 

^ _ ..J(j 


«-tONG TERM<» 


FEDERAL LAND BANK 
LOW COST 
MORTGAGE LOANS 

thru your local National 
Farm loon Association 


THRIFTY 
LOW-COST 
OPERATING 
LOANS thru X' ' 

your local 
Production Credit 
Association 


for full information go to your 
local associotion or wrifot 

Dept. R-103, 310 State Street 
Springfield, Mass. 



Federal Land Bank and Production Credit Loans 


CASTRATE AND DOCK; 

this modern BLOODLESS way 


Elastic ring: method. One man, any 
V'oather. For castrating: or docking 
LAMBS, castrating CALVES, dehorn¬ 
ing. Tlme-tested* original 



rec. 


At Dealers or $12.50 postpaid. RINGS 
extra: 50, $1; 100, $1.80; 500, S7, 
Use only genuine Elastrator rings 
with yellow mark. 



CALIFORNIA STOCKMEN’S SUPPLY CO. 

Dept. F-7 , 151 Mission St.. San Francisco, Calif. 



IMPOBTEO SWEDISH STAINLESS 
STEEL BAZOB BLADES 

Nctt blade Mnudon (hti will chaote 
Amnlca', .hare habit.. Edgn COLD 
HARDENED by Bpecial proceM . . . ttay 
Brnooch, sharp up to 10 abaTe* from 
each blade. No nicks, no scratch, 
Barbett Stainless Blades do not rust! 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. M 
double-edge blades IN DISPENSERS 
only tt.OO ppd. 


I 


box Sbb Dept. 4, tLftiGAd. 


f 

I, vt.J 


— DEPRESSION PRICES, WE SELL CHEAP — 
SAVE 75% off-new and used tractor parts, crawlers 
and wheel tractors, 190 makes and models. 1958 
catalog ready. Send 25 cents refundable. 
SURPLUS TRACTOR PARTS CORPORATION, 
FARGO. NORTH DAKOTA 





Cuts your plowing costs! 


Big passageways for trash—beneath 
beams, between bottoms and a high 
lift—permit you to plow faster, 
deeper, and cleaner. Trip-spring 
beams avoid unhitching, and un¬ 
coupling, prevent costly damage, 
save time. Long-life, original Oliver 
Raydex bottoms, with throw-away 
shares, save upkeep dollars. Mount¬ 


ed, semi-mounted, pull-type in a size 
to match your needs. Convertible to 
fit your power and plowing condi¬ 
tions. The OLIVER Corporation, 
400 W. Madison St., Chicago 6, Ill. 


OLIVER 


* ' I 




OLIVE 



•'FINEST IN FARM MACHINERY” 

Also iTianufacturer of the Famous Oliver Outboard Motors 


Publisher's Desk 


I am writing to advise you of an 
experience I have had with a firm 
advertising under the name of Blue 
Steel Tool Co. They advertised a 
133-piece surplus power tool set as 
brand new government surplus, 
guaranteed value of $11 and offered 
for sale at $2.00. They sent me a 
small package, weighing about two 
ounces, that contained a collection 
of small discs and sandpaper, and a 
lot of felt washers that were of no 
use to me. I returned the package 
immediately by insured parcel post 
and they have not refunded my 
money. g. k. 

New York 

We received this letter about a 
year ago. All letters to the company 
have thus far remained unanswered. 
Our efforts will continue, but we 
print this as a warning that the name 
used by a company may not indicate 
the material sold. Certainly sand¬ 
paper discs, apparently designed for 
a small drill set, are not “blue steel.” 


In April 1956, I bought a “Life 
Long” battery and I have used it in 
a 1957 Ford car. On Sept. 7, 1957 it 
was dead. The battery carried a 10- 
year guarantee, but I cannot obtain 
any adjustment. I would like to have 
the battery replaced. g. k. 

New York 

Life Long Battery Manufacturing 
Corp. is a California concern. It is 
owned by Jack Morgan Watt. We 
presented this complaint to the dis¬ 
tributor in Harrison, New Jersey, the 
agent in Valley Stream, New York, 
and to the home office in Los Angeles. 
All have thus far remained unan¬ 
swered. Inasmuch as the firm was in¬ 
vestigated for misleading advertising, 
we believed they would be anxious 
to take care of the complaint. No 
response, however, would seem to in¬ 
dicate a lack of interest. We will con¬ 
tinue our efforts to help G. K. obtain 
an adjustment. If the concern fails 
to respond, our subscriber should re¬ 
port the case to the Federal Trade 
Commission. 


New York Attorney General Lef- 
kowitz advises that he wdll carry his 
drive on fraudulent stock promotions 
to the 1958 session of the Legislature. 
He will also urge passage of a bill 
to empower his office to bar persons 
from the securities business when 
they have previously been convicted 
of a felony or misdemeanor in con¬ 
nection with any security transac¬ 
tion. The bill will aim to protect the 
public from get-rich-quick schemes. 
Promoters of such schemes are said 
to have mulcted New York residents 
of over $250,000,000 a year. This is a 
much needed measure. We are glad 
the Attorney General is giving it at¬ 
tention and suggesting a rigid inves¬ 
tigation of any proposed plans to 
solicit money for get-rich schemes. 


I am interested in investing with 
The Backers Discount and Finance 
Co., Inc., Clifton, N. J. I would ap¬ 
preciate your judgment of this 
company and the desirability of an 
investment of the type they offer. 
Thank you. w. n. l. 

Maryland 

The records show that this busi¬ 
ness was started in 1955 by a group 
of builders and promoters who plan¬ 
ned a shopping center. Judge William 
F. Smith, U. S. District Court, Dis¬ 
trict of New Jersey, has signed a 
temporary restraining order on a 
motion made by the Securities and 
Exchange Commission. The commis¬ 
sion alleged that the defendant and 
James Sorce, Jr., its president, were 
offering and selling “guarantee sav¬ 
ings certificates” without having on 
file or in effect a registration state¬ 
ment as required by the Securities | 
Act of 1933. 


Get MORE 

for your 
silo dollars! 
MORE VALUE 

Just compare this husky 
Craine beauty with ordinary 
concrete silos—you’ll see dif¬ 
ferences worth many dollars 
—for which you don’t pay a 
penny extra! 

MORE STAVE 

The Craine Concrete Stave 
is nearly 4" thick—has 5 in¬ 
sulating air cells that give 
you extra thermal protection 
against frost — a better, 
warmer silo for better feeding 
all year round. 

MORE STRENGTH 

Staves are tongue and groov¬ 
ed on all four sides to form a 
solid wall that will stand any 
test of time or climate. Non- 
pourous •—• resists acids — 
made from finest aggregates. 
Get the facts before you buy. 

... get a 




Free 
silo book 



I CRAINE, INC., Norwich, N.Y. Dept. R-218 | 
j Send free illustrated booklet on Craine i 
j Concrete Silos and name of my dealer, j 

I Name. ! 

I ■■ ! 

I Address. > 

I - 1 

I . 1 

^- -OUR 56TH YEAR-5 



Stony ground 


shale 


DIGS 
DOWN FAST, 
through 


/sseven coral rock'.^!^ 

VO 10 Yr. Goaranlee 

on all gears -- 

1 Yr. Guarantee 
on entire unit 

• Shear Pin-—Above 
Ground 

• Choice 6" to 24" Auger 
Digs to 48" Deep 


FREE 

CATTLE 

WEIGHT 

TAPE! 


ROPER nufg. co. 

ZANESVILLE, OHIO 


DISTRIBUTED BY 


GATH & HERMS, Inc. 


BUFFALO, 
NEW YORK 


LOW COST Ventilation 


For dairy and ,j 

poultry barns. 

Complete ; 

packaged unit. < 

Ready to install. ^ 

Write for Catalog and Price List J 

Uebler Milking Machine Co., Inc. j 

VERNON, NEW YORK 



f dItCL Anu ALUminUM ULUUS. 
I FOR ALL PURPOSES 

SECTIONAL UTILITT IL»fiS 
AND GARAGES 

I Ea>il)riricted*Q«ickDtlivtnr 
Skipind MiMlHra*SMd hrFiMir 

:OOPER CO. 
Hackensack, N. J. 
DEALERS WANTED . . 



30 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 
































































Articles of Interest 

in Coming Issues 

• Electricity Lightens the 

Dairy Load 
By L. H. Hammond 

• The New in Poultry Nu¬ 

trition 

By E. 1. Robertson 

• Cages, Slats and Corncobs 
By G. T. Klein 

• Breeding the Birds 
By Thomas W. Fox 

• Housing the Flock 
By H. W. Hickish 

• Air-Conditioned Poultry 

Houses 

By Walter Kemnitz 

• Can We Eradicate 

PULLORUM? 

By H. Van Roekel 

• The Future of Bulk-Tank 

Farming 
By 1. E. Parkin 

• Self-Cure for Mastitis 
By J. H. Winter 

• My York-State Forest Farm 
By Henry S. Kernan 

• Bears in New York 
By Willet Randall 

• The Gypsy Moth, and Why 

We Fight It 
By E. D. Burgess 

• On Farm Preparing of 

Poultry 

By Paul Margolf 


Subscribers' Exchange 

Rate of advertising in this department 
20 cents per word, including name 
and address, each insertion, payable 
in advance. When box number is 
used, add one dollar to total cost. 

Dates of Issue: 

February 15 closes January 31 
March 1 closes February 14 

COPY MUST REACH US FRIDAY, 
10 A. N.. 15 DAYS in ADVANCE OF 
DATE OF ISSUE. 

This department is for the accommo¬ 
dation of subscribers, but no display 
advertising or advertising of a com¬ 
mercial nature (seeds, plants, live¬ 
stock, etc.) IS admitted. 


HELP WANTED 


HELP Wanted; Attendants, male and female. 

Salary $3,002 per year. Staff nurses, $3,832 
per year. Annual salary increases, less main¬ 
tenance (board, room, laundry $9.79 per week). 
Five day, eight hour work week. Annual vaca¬ 
tion with pay Paid sick leave. Life, accident 
and health insurance and Social Security avail¬ 
able. Recreation: bowling, tennis, swimming, 
golf. Opportunities for advancement with 
eventual retirement pension. For information 
write Director, Wassaic State School, Wassaic, 
New York. __ 

WANTED; Young man or boy for general farm 
work. No smoking. Russell Peters, Callicoon, 
New York. _ 

FARMER, working manager, vicinity Long 
Island, New York, to take care of small 
Hereford herd and farming. Salary, com¬ 
mission, 7-room house with all improvements 
close to village, schools, churches. Write 
BOX 1203, Rural New Yorker. _ 

NURSEMAID, general, live in. Own room and 
bath. All modern conveniences. Good salary, 
liberal time off. Two children. References. 
Mrs. Charles Wascher, 274 Pearl Hill Road, 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts. _ 

EXPERIENCED vegetable farmer; capable of 
supervising very large truck farm; excellent 
opportunity. Write Malibu, Milford. Penna. 

HOMEMAKER, Protestant, with some income, 
for suburban builder’s home. Foods, utilities, 
transportation furnished. Outline work, experi¬ 
ences, family and medical problems. BOX 1211, 
Rural New Yorker. _ 

RESPONSIBLE, experienced orchard man 
wanted on quality fruit and beef farm. Good 
wages plus incentive and house. Jospeh Gatto, 
Manager, Indian Ladder Farms, Altamont, 
New York. _ 

SINGLE, dependable man for poultry work. 

Good home and board. Give age, experience, 
wages, refex'ences. Coventry Poultry Farm, 
Route 2, Coventry, Conn. __ 

CARETAKER: Full time; permanent excellent 

job for right couple; man must be farpiliar 
with farm machinery, gardening, maintenance, 
landscaping; suitable living quarters, good 
salary. Vicinity, Port Jervis, N. Y. Write giv¬ 
ing details, age, experience, responsibility. 

BOX _ 1300 , Rural New Yorker. _ 

EXPERIENCED, middleaged landscape garden¬ 
er needed for small nursery in Pennsylvania. 
Good working conditions. Position open April 
1 to November 1. Write stating experience and 
salary expected. Address BOX 1301, Rural New 
Yorker. _ 

reliable neat housekeeper in fifties wishing 

. home instead of high wages with one adult 
ip country. BOX 1302, Rural New Yorker. 

WORKING farm manager married, 35. 40 pure¬ 

bred Holsteins. Put harvest crops. Care of 
Stock, machinery building and outbuildings, 
etc. Very clean. Sanitary, honest. No drunkard 
or roamer. Late references. BOX 1303, Rural 
New Yorker. _ 

GENERAL houseworker to live in. Must be 

fond of young children. Personal references. 
Starting salary $140 per month. Bedford vi¬ 
cinity, one hour from New York. BOX 1304, 
Rural New Yorker. __ 

*^AREER job for young lady with mature 
judgment, good typist, good personality and 
aptitude for figures to assist top executive 
of manufacturing company in rural com¬ 

munity one hour from Philadelphia. BOX 1305, 
Rural New Yorker. _ 

bee man. Single. Young. Commercial honey 

production. Season: April-December. Lavern 
Bepew, Auburn, N. Y. 

February 1 , 1958 


WANTED by March 15th: Married dairy farm¬ 
er preferable with extra help to operate 
high producing dairy, barn cleaner, pipeline 
milker, bulktank, new house: Orange County. 
Give particulars and references. BOX 1306, 
Rural N ew Yorker. 

MEN and women attendants in state institu¬ 
tion for mental defectives; good physical 
condition. Must be U. S. citizen, but need not 
be resident of New York State. Age 18-60. 
$2,850.00 per year, $510.96 deducted for mainte¬ 
nance (room, board and laundry). 40 hour 
week. Write Director, Letchworth Village, 
Thiells, New York. _ 

POULTRYMAN and wife: Farm experience is 
essential. Excellent opportunity. Apartment 
supplied. Sam Schreibman, Box 457, R. D. 1, 
Monticello, N. Y. _ 

GENERAL maid or mother’s helper wanted. 

Permanent position caring for three small 
girls. Write Mrs. Freeman Boynton, Duxbury, 
Massachusetts. Telephone Duxbury 781. _ 

EXPERIENCED couple for poultry farm. 

Furnished bungalow, good salary. State age, 
details, salary expected. P. O. Box 253, Mill- 
ville. New Jersey. _ 

WANTED: Experienced machine milker and 

general farming. Married. Usual farm privi¬ 
leges. References. I. Katz, Holtsville, L. I., 
N. Y. Phone: Grover 5-3969. _ 

NURSES: Licensed practical, male and female. 

Westchester County home infirmary. For 
modern Geriatric program. Including rehabili¬ 
tation services. Start $3,410, increments to 
$4,070. Differentials: evenings and nights. Re¬ 
tirement and Social Security. 40-hour week, 
maintenance available. Country surroundings, 
modern building. Within easy access New York 
City. Write Westchester County Home, Haw- 
thorne, N. Y. or call LYric 2-8300. _ 

COUPLE: Man, experienced farmer-gardener 

and handy with tools. Wife, experienced 
housekeeper. Fine living quarters provided 
plus $250 monthly. State age, experience and 
references. BOX 1321, Rural New Yorker. 

EUROPEAN woman or girl; Italian, Irish or 

Scandinavian. Housework help with three 
children. References. $35 per week to start. 
Near Albany, N. Y. International community. 
BOX 1316, Rural New Yorker. 


WANTED: Housekeeper not over 50 for doc¬ 

tors family: two school age children 7 and 
11. Good references required. Cooking. Nice 
private room, board: $150 a month. Write Dr. 
D. Wainapel, Ellenville, N. Y. or telephone 710. 

WANTED: Sober, experienced man on dairy 

farm. Reference required. Warren Blowers, 
Geneva, New York. 


HOUSEKEEPER; To care for one adult and 

two children on a farm. BOX 75, Centre- 
ville, Maryland. _ 

HOUSEKEEPER: Protestant, no objection to 

children. BOX 66, Moravia, N. Y. 


SITUATION WANTED 

FARM and dairy help for machine and hand 

milkers. Tractor men, yard men. also poul¬ 
try and all kinds of labors. Quinn Employment 
Agency, 70 Warren St., New York 7, N. Y. 
Cortland 7-7865. 


WE are suppliers for dairy farms, first class 

milkers, poultrymen, general farm workers. 
Ellinger’s Employment Agency, 271 Bowery, 
New York 2 , N. Y. Phone; GRamercy 3-8168-9. 

MARRIED man wants to manage dairy w 

beef cattle or will take a caretaker’s job. 
One daughter, 18 years old. BOX 1307, Rural 
New Yorker. 


MILKTESTER wants employment. BOX 1308, 

Rural New Yorker. 


EXPERIENCED milker: De Laval or Surge. 

Expert on feeding cows. Test milker for 
years. Married. No family. References. BOX 
1309, Rural New Yorker. 


SITUATION Wanted: Cook housekeeper. Ex¬ 

perienced. References. Small adult family in 
country. BOX 1310, Rural New Yorker. _ 

POULTRYMAN 49, married, children six and 

nine wishes steady position; good working 
conditions. Full details please. BOX 1318, 
Rural New Yorker. 


SINGLE man, 35, experienced, wants job on 

poultry or dairy farm in New York. William 
Dorin, R. R. 1, Cortland, N. Y. _ 

EXPERIENCED poultry and sheep farming 

manager seeks permanent employment. 27 
years old. Salomon, 287 Brighton Beach Ave., 
Brooklyn, New York. 


AGRICULTURIST: Desiring position in feed, 
fertilizer or food. Age 26, college graduate. 
References. E. Essner, 150 Clinton Street, 
Brooklyn 1, N. Y. 


FARMS FOR SALE, TO RENT, ETC. 

WANTED: All types bare and stocked farms. 

villages and rural dwellings, stores tmd 
other types businesses; phone or write Werts 
Real Estate. Johnson City. N. Y. 


SOUTEffiRN New Jersey; Country homes. 

farms, acreage for agriculture or industry. 
Free list sent. LeGore. realtor. Vineland, 
New Jersey. 


FLORIDA: 3,4 acre homesites $300. Also trailer 
sites $10 month. Near town and good fishing. 
John Roscow, Farm Broker. Inverness. Fla. 

FOR Sale; Farm, 80 acres. Will sell 8-rooni 
house separate, cash or terms: near Green 
County. BOX 1004, Rural New Yorker. _ 

TWO outstanding dairy farms, finest in the 
State. Terrific layouts, also commercial and 
industrial values. Must be seen to be appre¬ 
ciated. Will sell separately or jointly. I. 
Greenberg & Son, Mount Holly, New Jersey. 
Telephone AMherst 7-1101. _ 

175 ACRE dairy farm, 70 acres tillable, 85 
acres birdsfoot trefoil. Large barn stables 
40 cows. Two silos, new milk house with 
equipment, tool shed and garage. Good 10- 
room house including bath, oil fired hot water 
heat in every room, modern kitchen with dish¬ 
washer, 120 gallon hot water heater with 210 
current. Price reasonable. BOX 1206, Rural 
New Yorker. _ 

FOR Sale: 75-acre farm, 90 ft. chicken house, 
2-story barn and cow stable built of stones 
and bricks: garage for cars and trucks, work shop 
and tool shed, heated two 2-story 7-room houses 
partly furnished, built of stucco and stones 
with fireplaces: two 1-room bungalows, used 
to keep boarders, good for childrens’ camp, 
must sacrifice. Price cash $16,000. Louis Kaifler, 
Box 45, Cairo, N. Y. __ 

SULLIVAN County real estate: All types of 
property, all price ranges. Write your re¬ 
quirements. Bernard Heller, Broker, Swan 
Lake, New York. _ 

DAIRY: 6.71 cwt. 3.6 milk bulk tank all con¬ 
veniences. Particulars write or call. F. 
Schroeder, U. S. 17, Church View, Virginia. 
Phone: Saluda 8-4190, __ 

WANTED to buy: Within 70 miles N. Y. City. 

Old house, or foundation, some land, well 
or springwater on property. BOX 1311, Rural 
New_Y o rker. _ 

WANTED: Good dairy farm, 100 tillable acres. 

Equipped or bare, on contract or will rent 
with option. Give complete details first letter. 
BOX 1312, Rural New Yorker. _ 

MODERN 115 acre stocked and equipped dairy 
farm. Excellent house and buildings. Pond. 
Milk income $15,000 from 28 Holsteins. Two 
tractors, baler, etc. On hard road convenient 
to schools and town. Beautifully situated: 3'A 
hours from New York and northeastern Penn¬ 
sylvania. $28,000. BOX 1313, Rural New Yorker. 

30 ACRE farm, 6-room house, 2-bedroom ex¬ 
tension, attic, bath, electricity, good barn, 
school bus, mail route by door; three lakes 
near; trout strean through farm. $5,000 terms, 
$4,500 cash. Beatrice Jones, R. 3, Oxford, N. Y. 

BUNGALOW: Country village, automatic oil 
heat, oak floors, combination storms and 
screens, five rooms; also two unfinished up¬ 
stairs. garden, bus and train service. Price 
$10,700. Kenneth Crewell, Altamont, N. Y. 


DUTCHESS County; 300 acres. Three houses, 
three streams, pond, barns, two silos. Main 
house modernized Colonial nine rooms. 2*2 
baths. Hot water oil heat, three fireplaces. 
Connecticut milk market. Annual milk check 
$27,500. Price $75,000 or stocked and equipped 
$112,500. Phone Dorothy Kistinger, C. Boos., 
Inc., Stanfordville, N. Y., Volunteer 8-7457. 

COUPLE seeks frankfurter, hamburger con¬ 
cession. Resort or amusement area: New 
York or New England. Charudy Restaurant, 
R. D. 2, Lake Wales, Florida. 

RIVER flat farm: 130 acres, high state culti¬ 
vation. Two barns. Excellent 10-room home. 
Stanley Miller, Greene, N. Y. 

132 ACRE dairy farm, big cow barn, modern 
home, good land and water supply, sold 
with or without stock and machinery. Contact 
John Cukrovany, Jr., R. D. 2, Schaghticoke, 
New York. 

FIVE rooms, bath, garage, unfinished: imme¬ 

diate occupation; six acres, three controlled 
depth ponds; walk store: bus commute N.Y.C. 
$6,500. C. Page, Rt. 1, Easton, Pa. 

COMFORTABLE retirement homes, nothing 

down. List, pictures. Perry, Brier Hill 2, 
Pennsylvania. 

MUST sacrifice eight room home, bath, all 

improvements, double garage, about one 
acre. Write Box 342, Newton, New Jersey. 

323 ACRES, northwestern Pennsylvania, 20 

miles from Olean, N. Y. Two houses, new 
barn, silo, milk house, 20x25 block work shop, 
and machinery shed; 22 head cattle and farm 
machinery for $19,000. If interested write 
Paul Korzon, R. D. 1, Shinglehouse, Penna. 

EIGHT room, two apartment bungalow. Patio, 

porch, cellar, fireplaces, swimming, less than 
acre: 68 miles N. Y. C. $6,000 terms. Pine Bush 
4-1050 or Rainbow Ranch, Pine Bush, N. Y. 

WILL sell 100 cow dairy herd and equipment 

and lease 400 acre farm 2,500-lb. base averag¬ 
ing $4,000 per month. Box 202, Rt. 2, Holly 
Hill, South Carolina. 

FARMS; Bare and equipped. Many fine list- 

ings, 50 to 600 acres. Central New York 
State. Engle, Broker, Oriskany Falls 2798. 
Milton C. Engle, Box 302, Oriskany Falls, 
New York. 

GROCERY, beer license, new developing, 
Geneva location, worth price asked. Poultry 
farm, hatchery 20,000 capacity, 2,000 capacity 
breeding coop. Two acres. Modern home. 
Keuka Lake area. Also farms. Write Perry. 
Broker, Dundee, N. Y. I. Webb, Salesman. 

GENEVA, N. Y.; 256 acre cattle or dairy 

farm. Under scientific cultivation for five 
generations. On U. S. highway between two 
historic Finger Lakes towns. Continual water 
supply. Fine buildings. Realistic price. One 
of most productive Ontario County farms. 
Mac Queen Realty Co., Rochester 18, N. Y. 
Phone: GR 3-0670. 

FOR Sale: Best equipped chicken farm on 

Long Island. Owner is retiring. Write R. P. 
Silleck Agency, Cutchogue, New York. Phone: 
PEconic 4-6786. 

934 ACRE farm, five acres suited to blue¬ 

berries; two acres in blueberries. House 
with thre apartments, also 5-room bungalow. 
Rented now. Near U. S. Rt. 30. $17,000. Edward 
Fieri, Chesilhurst, New Jersey. 

FARM 288 acres, 138 tillable. In sassafras 
sandy loam; balance in good timber, large 
new building, 105 x46 ft. 8-room house, modern 
convenience: $27,500, Harry W. Bartsch, 

Smyrna, Delaware. Phone: 7275. 

FLORIDA’S finest trailer sites; Beautifully 

wooded, 80 by 100 feet. Payable $20 cash 
and $20 monthly. In famous Panama City Gulf 
Resort Area. Excellent hunting, fishing, all 
sports. Also lovely Lake Center homesites, low 
prices, easy terms. Booklet free. Howard 
Wood, Fountain, Florida. 

GROCERY and meat market for sale. Fully 

equipped and stocked. Beer license. Excellent 
location. Retiring. Make offer. BOX 52, Man- 
hasset, L. I., N. Y. 

MAINE dairy farm, 650 acres, 75 registered 
Ayrshires, fully equipped, centrally located. 
Asking $45,000. Hawes Agency, Benton Sta¬ 
tion, Maine. 

WANTED; Florida lot or acreage (unre- 

stricted): cash, time payment or exchange 
for land near Lake Chautauqua. Russell 
Richards, Chautanqua, New York. 

VIRGINIA dairy farm; Approximately 398 
acres, about 250 open. Four stall milking 
parlor for Washington, D, C. market. Loafing 
sheds, three silos, tenant house. Real nice 4- 
bedroom home, central heat, two baths. Ex¬ 
ceptional value for $42,000. Waugh Real Estate 
Agency, Culpeper, 'Virginia. 


T v. '-'JunLxj, Biocery store ana mar- 

located in South Jersey-Delaware 
Valley area; a growing and prosperous com- 
*’^?iP?ty, intersection of five roads located 
within 500 yards of a large park and lake 
with cottages and within two miles of two 
lakes with cottages, one owned by 
the State of New Jersey. Building in good 
store_ air-conditioned, no opposition 
within four miles. Two gas pumps out in 
front; a real money maker. Owned and oper¬ 
ated by one person for the last 52 years; now 
retiring. BOX 1317, Rural New Yorker. 

HENDERSON, Maryland: Five room house on 
28 acres, good ground; $5,900. BOX 1319. 
Rural New Yorker. _ 

CHESTERTOWN, Maryland: New brick dwell¬ 
ing on 30 acres, cost $12,000 to construct. 
Basement base board oil heat. Price $13,500. 
BOX 1320, R ural New Yorker. 

WANTED: Wooded acreage, allweather road. 

electricity and telephone available; central 
or southern N. Y. State. W. E. Gardner, 
Long Branch Road, Liverpool, New York. 


FOR Sale; Eight room modernized house, ex¬ 

cellent condition, five minutes walk from 
town. Large lawn, garage. W. A. Defendorf, 
Moravia. New York. _ 

LAKE frontage, pine grove 36 acres. Large 
colonial (brick) house; five cottages: garage; 
utility buildings: paved road; $22,000, Mary 
Cummings, Salesman, Putnam Station, N. Y. 
Blanche Mosler, Realtor. Telephone 2343. 


I 6 V 2 ACRES, five room house, water, elec- 
tricity. Ideal for dog kennel, chicken farm. 
A. K. Brennan, Route 1, Crewe, Virginia. 


FRUITS AND FOODS 


AVERY’S Golden Wildflower honey: five 
pounds $2.20; 10 pounds $3.95 prepaid; 60 

pounds $12.50, not prepaid. H. J. Avery. 
Katonah, N .Y. ___ 

CLOVER cut comb honey: You get a whole 

frame of new very light, delicious, comb. 
Five pounds $2.25. Extracted $2.00. Prepaid. 
Charles Peet, Gouverneur, New York. _ 

TREE-RIPENED oranges and grapefruit. No 

color added. Express prepaid. Delivery 
guaranteed. Bushel oranges $6.00; grapefruit 
$5.50, mixed $5.75. Half-bushels $4.25. Add 50 
cents west of Mississippi and Wisconsin. 
Dillingham Grove. Largo, Florida. 


WORLD famous Indian River fruit: Packers 
and shippers of the area’s finest quality, 
tree-ripened, hand-picked fruit. We ship best 
varieties in season. Also delicious Orange 
Blossom honey: tropical candies, marmalades 
and jellies. Shipping season ends June 15th. 
Write now for brochure. Indian River Fruit 
Company, Post Office Box 166-R, Indian River 
City, Florida. 


LIGHT clover honey; 60 pounds $10.80; more 
$10.25 each. Lavern Depew, Auburn, N. Y. 

OLD fashioned dried apples: Two pounds $1.70; 

four pounds $3.30 postpaid. L. W. Denlinger, 
Clayton, Ohio. 


LIGHT Clover Honey: Five pound pail liquid 
$1.95; 10 pound pail fine granulated $3.75; 

6 - 5's liquid $9.00. Above prep.aid. Sixty pound 
can fine granulated clover $10.80; 60 pound can 
liquid $11.20; 60 pound can Fall Flower $10.20. 
Five or more $9.60 @. All 60’s F. O. B. George 
Hand, Route 2 , Cazenovia, New York. 


SOMETHING New; Gordon’s hcr.-.cmadc 
stretched peanut brittle. Thin with p.cnty 
of peanuts. With that old fashioned molasses 
taste. $ 1.00 per pound prepaid available to 
April 15. Delicious. Try it. Send money orders 
to: Gordon’s Candy Company, Route 1, Green- 
wich. New York (Washington County). 


COUNTRY BOARD 


ELDERLY gentleman seeks country 

BOX 1314, Rural New Yorker. 


board. 


COUPLE, elderly, likes to share home, 

country atmosphere welcome, can render 
light work, cooking. BOX 1315, Rural New 
Yorker. 


LEADER House, 118 Pleasant, Bennington, 

Ver mont. Privile g es, Warm ._$3q_ monthly. 

WE'LL care for elderly people in my hom.e. 

Have all equipment. In the sunny 
state. 214 North Third, Leesburg. Florida. 


MISCELLANEOUS 


PIPE smoking or natural leaf chewing tobacco: 

Five pounds $3.00 postpaid. Guaranteed. Star 
Farms. Ralston, Tennessee. _ 

OLD automobile, any age or condition. Write 

description and price to Hoffmeister, P. O. 
Box 7, Point of Rocks, Maryland. _ 

DAIRY hay and timothy, wheat straw, ear 

corn. Truck delivery. James Kelly, 137 East 
Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse. N. Y. Telephone 
HO 9-2885. _ _ 

SAWDUST and shavings, loose trailer load 

deliveries. Also dry baled shavings to any 
point New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, 
Massachusetts. Rhode Island. J. F. Danielski, 
Townshend, Vermont. Telephone Forest 5-7755. 

WANTED: Old guns, hunting rifles, war guns, 

any year. Please describe. Sidney Stein, 10 
Meacham Ave., Elmont, L. I., N. Y. _ 

WANTED for cash: Old letters and books 

about the West. Civil War books and col¬ 
lections, old interesting military or frontier 
experiences. Coins or anything early American 
for my private collection. T. A. Merkt, Mont- 
ville. New Jersey. _ 

QUALITY hay for sale: First cutting alfalfa- 

broome and alfalfa-clover-broome hay, new 
seeding, early cut, dried on wagon hay drier. 
Legume-broome mixture and straight broome 
hay. Also straw. At barn Hall Farm, North 
Bennington, Vermont. Telephone 4509. _ 

CHOICE Hay; All grades, Mohawk Valley. 

Trailer load deliveries. When writing give 
telepohne number. Snyder Petroleum Co., 
Fort Plain, N. Y. Telephone 4-5111. _ 

WANTED: One to four wagon wheels. Write 
Hazen Ross, Sea Cliff, New York, _ 

FOR Sale: 100 tons good baled hay. $20 per 

ton. Kenneth Anderson, Hinsdale, N. Y. 

COLLECTOR pays top prices for stamps, old 

envelopes, your stamps held intact await¬ 
ing acceptance of our high cash offer. Collec¬ 
tions, odd lots anything in stamps. Edward 
F. Galvin, 22 Forest Ave., Hastings-On-Hi:dson, 
New York. _ 

FOR Sale: 60 tons good early cut hay, alfalfa 

clover and timothy. Evergreen Farm, 
Cazenovia, N. Y. Telephone Old 5-2091. _ 

FOR Sale: 4,000 bales, good quality, early 

cut mixed hay. Oliver Cleghorn, Cuba, N. 
Y. Telephone Cuba 592-Ml. _ 

“AIDS for Martha’’ Cook Book “from the 

Maids of Merrimac, Massachusetts'', 206 

pages, heavy paper, nicely bound. Sponsored 
by the Women of the First Baptist Church. 
$1.00 postpaid. Rev. Ernest Allan, 42 Church 
St., Merrimac, Mass. _ 

FOR Sale: Iron Colonial type electric street 

lights. Ideal for farms. Charles G. Ort, 245 
Main St., Hackettstown, New Jersey. _ 

CHOICE hay for sale, all grades. Forrest H. 

Nourse, Electrical and Plumbing Company, 
Smethport, Penna. _ 

Milk tank 300 gallons. Cherry -Burrell, used only 

five months. Write Percival, Stockbridge, 
Mass. 


VAN DALE silo unloader: New machine, never 

used. Complete with motors and booster 
unit. Fits 14-ft. or 16-ft. silo. Quit farming, 
will sacrifice. $750. Nelson Maginnis, Allen- 
town. New Jersey . 

WANTED: Hay. Write kind, and price. Sol. 

Schultz, Honesdale, Penna. _ 

QUILT Pieces: Beautiful colors, lbs. $1.00; 

ZVi lbs. $2.00. Satisfaction guaranteed. Ward, 
42-R, Manchester, Springfield 8 , Mass. 


tor sale. Harry Snarpe, 
N. Y. Telephone 772-R-2. 


vjouverneur. 


WANTED: Strange freaks such as: calves. 

pigs, poultry; also Albinoes. Fays .Animal 
Farm, Madrid, N. Y. 


WANTED: Model A Ford, two doer louring, 
roadster pickup, parts or bodies. K. W. 
Powers, 330 Lincoln Road, Walpole. Mass. 

FOR Sale: Pump organ. Louis Kupris, Sher¬ 

burne, New York. 


FOR Sale: Two complete maple syrup evapo¬ 
rators, gathering and storage tanks, 500 
buckets, 900 bales good hay, 40c a bale, 
David Akeley, Sinclairville, N. 'Y. Phone: 



UP TO 40 FEET WIDE 


Pure Polyethylene Sheeting. Meets FH.\ Spec?., in Clear 
or Black. 3 thicknesses—Regular, Heavy 01 Eirtra Heax^y 
gauge. Very Durable, Inexpensive. Sold by Hardware, 
Lumber, Implement and Feed Dealers. Free Samples on 
Request from Warp Bros., Chicago 51-^Pioneers ui Plastics. 

The Best Polyethylene Sheeting Money Con Bvy 
Be Sore You See “Warp’s” Branded On The Edge 




IpH^ 



v/ '' ■ 

'S 

* VAfOR 
•ARRIfR 

OVER RIOO. 
MATIS. 

iioo. 

MSUIATION 

HAY 

COVERS 

SlLAOt 

COVERS 

MAC$4IWt 

COVERS 


SEE YOUR LOCAL. DEALER 


Change of Address: 

The Post Office Department no longer 
forwards magazines or newspapers which 
are incorrectly addressed. We request 
that you report any change of address 
directly to us at least three weeks in 
advance. In any request for change of 
address, or in any communication regard¬ 
ing your subscription, kindly clip the 
name-and-address label from your latest 
issue of THE RURAL NEW-YORKER; 
the key numbers on this stamp enable 
us to locate your subscription quickly 
and to give you better service. 

THE RURAL NEW-YORKER 
333 W. SOth St., N. Y., 1, N. 'Y. 


When you write advertisers mention 
The Rural New- Yorker and you’ll get 
a quick reply and a “square deal. ” See 
guarantee editorial page. 


31 























































































































































































It Works for You the Year Around 



Unexcelled for logging and woods work, the powerful and 
widely useful John Deere "420" Crawler (5-roller model) is 
shown piling logs with a 62 Dozer. 


JOHN DEERE 420 CRAWLER 

A Money-Maker for Farming, 
Logging, and Many Other Jobs 


pASY-HANDLlNG, powerful, and economical—the John Deere “420” 
^ Crawler puts year-around money-making power into your hands. It’s an 
all-weather worker that goes where wheel tractors “fear to tread,” gets into 
fields earlier in the spring, and combines big daily work output with low 
costs. No wonder it’s America’s No. 1 Crawler in the 3-4 plow class. 


Big-capacity tillage tools are easily handled by the powerful "420" Crawler. 
It's pictured with a 66 4-bottom plow. Such an outfit works big acreage 
daily, without compacting soil. 


Widely Useful 

On rough, hilly ground, ice, slippery sod, hard soil, mud—on the farm 
and in the woods . . , the “420” Crawler stays on the job with sure-footed 
stability and tremendous lugging power. It handles a wide variety of hy¬ 
draulically controlled drawn, integral, PTO, and belt equipment. It’s ideal 
for orchard and vineyard work, logging, constructing dams, terraces, and 
trench silos, land clearing, road maintenance, etc. It pulls a 4-bottom plow 
in most soils, and other big-capacity tillage tools. 

Speed Is Increased 

A brand-new feature is the stepped-up first-gear speed of 1-1/8 mph, 
with top speed of 7-1/4 mph. Strength of certain vital parts has been in¬ 
creased for long life and better performance. To help you work even faster, 
you can have a heavy-duty 3-point hitch . . . direction reverser . . , 5-speed 
transmission . . . speed-boosting auxiliary foot throttle. With a separate 
clutch-brake unit for each track, you can turn the compact, agile “420” 
Crawler with 4-roIler tracks in a six-foot radius. 

Economy—All the Way 

The first cost is low, compared with other track-type tractors. Fuel econ¬ 
omy is exceptional. And you’ll get years of dependable service with low up¬ 
keep. A full line of low-cost working equipment is available. Ask your dealer 
to demonstrate. 



JOHN DEERE 

Wherever Crops Grow, There's a Growing 
Demand for John Deere Farm Equipment" 



420 UTILITY 


The low-built, 
easy-handling 2-3 
plow John Deere 
“420” Utility Trac¬ 
tor is ideal for vine¬ 
yard, orchard, haul¬ 
ing, haying, and 
other field work. It’s 
economical, too, with 
low first cost, low 
fuel cost, and low upkeep cost. The “420” Utility is pictured in 
a vineyard with a Gyramor rotary cutter. Power steering is 
among the many modern features available. 


The John Deere 
Credit Plan makes it 
easy for you to pay 
for a tractor as it earns 
money for you. 



n 


SEND FOR FREE LITERATURE 


I 

JOHN DEERE • Moline, III. • Dept. C37 j 


L 


Please send free information on: 
□ John Deere "420" Crawler 
r~l "420" Utility Tractor 


Name ___ 

□ Student 

R.R. _ 

Town _ 

Pro vince ___ 



I 


(i B 
































IN THIS ISSUE 


FEBRUARY 15. 1958 


The Sap Will Soon Be Flowing 


Nw III Nttifi'y Feeils 
Why Ftglit The Gypsy Moth? 
Northepst Dairy Bloc Formed 





Electricity - One of The Best Doiry Hoiids Available 2 




M’- 






















































An effective ventilating system is not at all One proof of the value of electricity on dairy farms Once the silage is brought down by the tin- 

difficult to install and it pays for itself soon comes when cows are fed mow-dried hay. High in protein loader, it is easily distributed to the herd by 
in healthier, more comfortable cows. and carotene, it is most palatable to the herd. an electrically powered feed auger-conveyor. 


SITUATION WANTED: 


^^Steady Dairy Hand Seeks Work.”—£'/ectHcity 


By L. H. HAMMOND 


HE electric line is the lifeline of 
profitable dairy farms today. 
The whole electrical system, 
including the water system, is 
the main current so vital to 
today’s agricultural operations. 
Water and electricity, as a 
matter of fact, are handmaidens one to the 
other. 

If they are to be effective, however, both the 
electric and the water systems must be able 
to deliver all the power and water the farmer 
wants. This is basic and cannot be neglected. 
The water system cannot do the job intended 
for it if its capacity is too small; neither will 
the electric system be delivering truly full 
barnpower if it does not satisfy the needs of 
present operations and also contribute to 
growth. Longe-range planning is important. 
Once the source is provided, an electric pump 
can be employed to take water under pressure 
to any area toward more efficient operation 
of the farm. 

When considering a water system for the 
farm, we think first usually of the stock. Clean, 
palatable water is essential to their lives and 
to the production of quality milk. Whether the 
cattle are in a stable or in a loafing shed, auto¬ 
matic drinking cups best provide for their 
needs. In the loafing shed where water is usu¬ 
ally exposed to freezing temperatures, electric 
heating cable and other types of heating de¬ 
vices can with great benefit keep cups from 
freezing. They also can maintain the water at 
just the right temperature for maximum con¬ 
sumption. 

Heat and Light for the Farm 

Meeting health requirements, improving the 
quality of milk, and increasing productivity of 
operations have all created an ever-growing 
need for hot water on dairy farms. It is in 
meeting these challenges that the partner¬ 
ship of water and electricity is best realized. 



A well-equipped farm shop can save plenty of 
time and expense. It is virtually a necessity on 
today’s mechanized farms. Electrically operated 
tools turn “mountains into molehills.” 


The electric water heater has, almost without 
doubt, created the greatest savings in man¬ 
hours that have been achieved on the dairy 
farm. 

Health requirements call for ample use of 
both cold and hot water, of course. Stables, 
milking parlors and milk houses must be hosed 
down regularly; animals must be kept clean. 
Hot water facilitates and accelerates operations 
as much as anything else on the dairy farm. 
It is virtually indispensable today in feeding 
and management. It is a great help in breed¬ 
ing, too, for both the inseminator and the 
veterinarian. A great change has been made 
in milking practices in recent years. Faster 
milking has come to the fore, and there has 
been improvement in the care and cooling of 
milk. In the whole operation, therefore, hot 
water is vital. Milking machines today are, of 
course, commonplace, but now they can be 
integrated with pipeline milking, electrically 
refrigerated tank coolers and other new prac¬ 
tices and tools that have been tailored to meet 
individual dairy farm needs. 

Another basic need for today’s dairying 
is light. It should be adequate for “all seeing 
tasks.” Yet lighting is often taken for granted 
to such an extent that good lighting is often 
overlooked. Proper illumination assures sani¬ 
tary practices, creates safe working conditions 
and brings a great measure of satisfaction at 
low cost. Both outside and inside, carefully 
planned lighting really pays off. Outside it 
gives light for both early morning and evening 
chores; inside it provides the best working con¬ 
ditions. Yard lighting keeps prowlers away, is 
a cheerful invitation to friends and neighbors, 
and gives the farm a warmth and friendliness 
at all times. 

How Best to Fill the Need for More 

Manpower 

Literally for pennies an hour, electrical ener¬ 
gy furnishes light, heat and power for a multi¬ 
tude of tasks that formerly consumed untold 
man-hours. But what about costs for all this 
electrification? Let’s talk a little shirtsleeve 
economics. No one wants the dairy farmer to 
be in the position of the householder who 
bought so many economical labor-saving de¬ 
vices that he had to limit his food and rent 
budget to pay for them. You are not going to 
gain much unless every major electrical ex¬ 
penditure is the result of sound planning. The 
economic challenge here is that only through 
increased output per man-hour can today’s 
dairy farmer meet the demands of the competi¬ 
tive market. How well he achieves increased 
output per man-hour in large measure deter¬ 
mines the success of his operation; in large 
measure, too, this depends upon the profit¬ 
able use of electrical equipment. It has been 
said that labor efficiency is the farmer’s No. 1 
problem, that he needs more power per man. In 



the future, it will probably be necessary to 
use more power equipment. 

Although there are fluctuations in the labor 
market, very few persons today will argue 
against the long-term prediction that the farm¬ 
er will use less and less hired help and more 
and more automation as time goes on. Auto¬ 
matic operations will attract good hired help. 
The modern barn cleaner, for example, is evi¬ 
dence of a desirable place of employment to 
many hired hands. The trend to more mechan¬ 
ized and probably larger farms does not mean 
the family farm is on the way out, however. 
Rather, the family farm is adjusting itself to 
modern technology and mechanization. 


I: 


Value of Equipment in Terms of Return| 
ON Investment 


Even now the dairy farmer must compete in 
the local industrial market, and he can hardly - 
any longer afford to have a man operating a 
pitchfork. In upstate New York there is a say-‘: 
ing that “in this competitive market you can't 
make hay on Saturday.” Today’s dairy farmer 
is a businessman; his farm is a complex busi¬ 
ness enterprise calling for a high order of 
agricultural and mechanical skills, executive 
ability, and a concentration of capital equip- i 
ment. He has, to be sure, able services to guide ; 
him in his operations and planning. The county 
agent, neighbors who exchange experiences • 
through such organizations as the Grange and 
Farm Bureau, and farm service representatives 
all stand ready to help him get the most for ; 
his invested dollar. All have a keen interest in | 
trying to make dairy operation truly profitable. | 
Thousands of case histories show that the in- 1 
stallation of electrical equipment substantially • 
increases production and cuts labor costs. The ’ 
farmer, of course, cannot get all of his equip: 
ment at once, so it is important that he acquire t 
it in the order of greatest return for the . 

(Continued on Page 12) 



James Mfg. Co. 

A flip of the switch can replace the twice-a-dayi 
climb of the silo and the many hours of laborious* 
shovelling. Electrically powered silage imloaders{ 
are real time and labor savers on dairy farms.^ 

THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


i 


2 




























Renovate the Poultry House 


By H. W. HICKISH 


MPROVEMENT and expansion of poul¬ 
try housing may spell the difference 
between profitable and sub-marginal 
operation. Large farms secure the 
best efficiency of production and ulti¬ 
mately show the greatest profits, 
'during poor years, the larger places show least 
loss. The poultry farm must have substantial 
size if it is to survive in this era of high effi¬ 
ciency and intense competition. 

Because this year will be more profitable 
than some others, perhaps it will be a good 
year in which to improve plant size and efficien¬ 
cy. 1958 should be a time to renovate, modern¬ 
ize, and enlarge, with prudence, of course. 

Many farms still possess good frame poultry 
houses standing on footings crumbling because 
they were originally constructed of poor con¬ 
crete or were not placed beneath the frost line. 
When the functional building is still service¬ 
able, why not jack it up and brace it so that 
the old footing and foundation may be re¬ 
moved and new ones constructed? The mix for 




For both remodelling and new construction, the 
solar system of housing is worth considering. It 
utilizes large double-pane windows facing south 
and an overhang for summer shade. 


a concrete footing is one part cement, two and 
three-fourths parts sand, and four parts stone. 
The footings for nearly all poultry houses 
should be about 16 inches wide. If houses are 
more than two stories high or are built on 
sand, however, the footings may need to be 
slightly thicker and deeper. They should be 
placed below the frost line. One would not like¬ 
ly encounter any serious difficulty if the foot¬ 
ings were placed at a depth of three feet. 

When replacing these underpinings, the new 
footing is usually of poured concrete and the 
foundation concrete block. The depth of the 
footing needs to be enough to leave space for 
a specific number of courses of block, each 
course occupying eight inches when set. Any 
slight variation when the wall is dropped into 
position by removal of the jack or braces may 
be take care of with shims. 

Where old sills are rotted or damaged, they 
should be replaced. A new sill is often con¬ 
structed of two 2 X 4’s with staggered joints. 
When the wall is in place, set anchor bolts in 
the blocks at six- to eight-foot intervals by first 
drilling a hole in the sill over a core in the 
block. Then place a bolt upward loosely in the 
sill with the head allowed to remain a few 
inches down in the core. Thereafter fill the 
core with cement. 

It is often desirable to waterproof founda¬ 
tions. This is done before dirt is pushed in to 
grade level, and about the best method is to 
spread hot asphalt or tar over the entire foot¬ 
ing and foundation. 

Many otherwise good poultry buildings have 
poor first floors. If they are dirt, it is desirable 
to cover them with concrete. The floor needs 
first a bed of stone four to six inches thick to 
provide drainage and to insulate from the cold 
earth. A good mix for such floors is one part 
cement, two and one-fourth sand, and three 
parts stone. Spread it to a depth of four inches. 
In houses with old floors crumbling, it is sug¬ 
gested that they be capped. This includes lay¬ 
ing down 30-pound felt and sealing the laps 



It is important that footings be placed beneath 
the frost line. Thereafter concrete blocks can be 
anchored to them and laid up in economical 
construction. 

with asphalt. Over this is poured one to one 
and one-half inches of a 1- 1%- 2 con¬ 
crete mix. The stone size should be less than 
three-fourths inch. Finish all concrete floors 
with a steel trowel. It prevents litter sticking, 
thus making cleaning operations easier. 

Older buildings usually have walls without 
insulation. These provide problems of wet 
litter, frozen combs, frozen water pipes, and 
dirty eggs. It is not difficult to insulate frame 
poultry houses; but block houses are some¬ 
what of a problem. Several types of insulation 
may be used: fill, batts and blankets, rigid 
boards, and reflective insulators. In houses that 
have not been insulated before, it is usually 
wise to use batts and blankets or fill. Batts and 
blankets are best used in houses which have 
studs either 16 or 24 inches apart. Only the 
full-thick materials should be purchased. Near¬ 
ly all have a vapor barrier, thus eliminating 
problems of moisture condensation within the 
wall. Where studs do not conform, use fill- 
type materials like mica or rock-wool pellets. 
These are poured between the inside and out¬ 
side finishes. Make certain that spaces in the 
wall are completely filled bottom to top as well 
as over and under windows. To provide some 
vapor barrier, paint the inside finish with a 
metallic paint. 

Experience generally indicates that the re¬ 
flective insulators are excellent during hot 
weather but less so during cold. Since the poul- 
tryman’s problem really arises during cold 
weather, reflective insulators should not be 
used alone but rather in combination with 

( Continued on Page 29 ) 



Whafs New iu Poultry Feeds? 


By E. I. ROBERTSON 


OMPLETE poultry rations are gaining 
more popularity because of increased 
use of mechanical feeders, mass 
medication through feed, and better 
understanding of nutrient needs of 
today’s better-bred flocks. The com- 
tions now available permit far better 
performance than the all-mash feeds of a dec¬ 
ade ago. The use of these is largely responsible 
for realization of the bred-in potential of mod¬ 
ern broiler, layer and turkey strains. Mash and 
grain feeding for layers, of course, has given 
good results for many years. It permits the use 
of home-grown and locally produced grains and 
provides the variety needed for maximum feed 
intake. The chief limitation of mash and grain 
feeding is in the proportion of mash to grain. 
Too frequently a fixed ratio is followed regard¬ 
less of the season, age of the flock and produc¬ 
tion level. Also, many pullet flocks are forced 
to produce eggs at the expense of body weight 
because too little grain is fed during the early 
part of their productive life. A complete ration 
is more certain to provide adequate and com¬ 
plete nutrition throughout the egg production 
period. Today’s complete high-energy rations 
do not require grain, but they do provide a 
margin of safety that permits feeding two to 
four pounds of grain daily per 100 birds to 
keep the litter stirred. 

For starting chicks and for broiler produc¬ 
tion, complete feeds are almost universally 
used. Most broiler flocks receive preventive 
medication throughout their entire growing 
period in complete rations. These are frequent¬ 
ly fed as crumbles or pellets, making it im¬ 
practical to feed grain as a supplement. The in- 

February 15, 1958 


creasing trend to pelleted feed has increased 
the changeover to complete rations. The ad¬ 
vantages of pellets over mash were greater 
with low energy, fibrous feeds than they are 
today with concentrated high-energy rations. 
Because birds can consume their daily feed re¬ 
quirements in a shorter period of time, pellets 
usually increase cannibalism. This can be 
avoided by debeaking broiler chicks and by 
using anti-picking sprays and pastes. The main 
advantage of pellets is in their maintenance of 
maximum feed intake in large flocks during 
extreme weather conditions. 

Preventive medication became practical with 
the availability of anti-coccidial drugs a decade 
ago. By continuously feeding a low level of 
specific drugs, in-feed protection can be in¬ 
sured against coccidiosis. By preventing severe 
outbreaks, high loss is eliminated. Because few 
people ever treat this disease effectively after 
symptoms appear—and effectiveness is depen¬ 
dent upon prompt treatment—continuous feed¬ 
ing of a low-level drug provides ideal cocci¬ 
diosis insurance without interfering with de¬ 
velopment of the immunity. 

Widespread use of built-up litter and the 
use of antibiotics in poultry feeding have 
caused intestinal worms to increase in impor¬ 
tance. One corrective, phenothiazine, was un¬ 
palatable and often caused a decrease in feed 
intake and occasionally a slump in egg produc¬ 
tion. The availability of piperazine now per¬ 
mits a flock to be wormed without interfering 
with feed intake. It immobilizes worms, permit¬ 
ting their explosion. The gentle action of piper¬ 
azine is believed to prevent or retard migra¬ 
tion of worms, too. A one-day feeding with a 




Nutrition during illness can be assured by a rein¬ 
forced feed ivith special antibiotics and vitamins. 
It bridges the period of stress. 


piperazine wormer eliminates large round- 
worms in poultry flocks. The treatment is re¬ 
peated at monthly intervals by many poultry- 
men. 

Fats and oils are excellent sources of energy 
for poultry, furnishing about two and a half 
times the amount of corn. Large quantities of 
animal fat became available when detergents 
were developed and when suitable antioxidants 
to prevent rancidity became available. When 
one per cent fat is added to poultry feeds it 
increases the energy level of them without add¬ 
ing appreciably to their cost. At present prices, 
however, more than four or five per cent in 
broiler rations is not justified. Higher levels 
greatly improve feed performance, but they 
reduce pigmentation and may increase costs of 
( Continued on Page 29) 


3 

















Sensation Hybrid Cucumbers 


•HARRIS SCCDS 

FINE QUALITY-- - DISEASE RESISTANCE 
HEAVY YIELDS 

From early Summer until Fall frosts, the sturdy 
disease resistant vines of this outstanding hybrid 
produce heavy yields of attractive, eight inch, medi¬ 
um daik green cylindrical cucumbers. The firm, white 
flesh is crisp and mild. We recommend Sensation 
Hybrid Cucumbers highly for both home and 
market gardeners. 

SEND FOR OUR FREE CATALOG 
If you grow for market, ask for our Market Gardeners 
and Florists Catalog. 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO.. Inc. 

17 Moreton Farm, Rochester 11, N. Y. 

195S CATALOG wm/imdij 



Yours 


GAPDIN 6U' 


^.HuneriM, 


I^CI i V’C COLOR 
■VCLLI ^ CATALOG 

of DWARF FRUIT TREES 

Peach, Cherry, Apple, Pear 

Dliic Q^'namenta! Shrubs, Shade 
riUo Trees, Perennials, etc. 


Dwarf Peach, Cherry, Apple, Pear trees, 
give huge crops from small land area... 
and they’re so EASY to care for and 
harvest! Over a dozen varieties guaran¬ 
teed to bear large juicy fruit within 2 
years. Also standard trees, grapes, berry 
plants, flowering shrubs, perennials, 
fast-growing shade trees, etc. SAVE by 
buying DIRECT from nursery in busi¬ 
ness over 78 years. No obligation. Send 
coupon now. 

KELLY BROS_ 

78 YEARS AS NURSERYMEN 
Dept. R 2-15, Dansville, N. Y. I 

Rush me FREE the new Spring Color Cata- | 
log of guaranteed, hardy Dwarf Fruit Trees. . 
Shrubs, Berry Plants, etc. (Regular Cus- I 
tomers: your '58 catalog is on the way.) | 

Name. I 

Address. 

City ..'State. | 

Enclose 50^ West of the Mississippi • 



tall—only $1 postpaid; 15 only $2 
postpaid! Another Bargain: 20 
Evergreens, all transplanted 4 to 
10 in. tall. Five each: Balsam 
Fir, Douglas Fir, Red Pine, 
White Spruce, all 20 for only $3 
postpaid. (West of Miss. River 
add 25c). FREE iilustrated 
FOLDER of small evergreen trees. 
ALL TREES GUARANTEED TO 
LIVE. 


6 Colorado Blue Spruce 4 
yr. transplanted, 4 to 8 In. 



WESTERN MAINE FOREST NURSERY CO. 

Dept. HX-23S, Pr>’eburg, Maine 



FRUIT 

TREES 


Write now for big FREE 
Color Catalog — supply 
limited. Great values in 
Fruit Trees, Berries, 
Grapes, Shrubs, Roses, 
Perennials, Evergree ns. 
Sturdy, strong-rooted 
stock. Northen grown on 
600 acres in Dansville, and priced right! 
Guaranteed to grow and true to name. Free 
stock for early orders. Our 74th Year. 


MALONEY BROS. NURSERY CO. 

17 Circle Road, Dansville, N. Y. 


FRUIT TREES, STRAWBERRY, RASPBERRY 
^ AND BLUEBERRY PLANTS - 


Dwarf apple trees on Mailing I, 2. 
7. 9 stock. Nut and Shade Trees, 
Grape Vines, Flowering Shrubs, 
Evergreens. Over 80 years experi¬ 
ence growing and supplying com¬ 
plete line of nursery stock direct 
to planters. Satisfaction assured — 
prices reasonable. 60-page illus- 

_ trated catalog and planting guide 

sent free. WriteT'BOUNTIFUL RIDGE NURSERIES 

BOX R-228, PRINCESS ANNE, MARYLAND 



STRAWBERRIES 

- - 


Allen’s 1958 Berry Book tells 
best varieties for home and 
market, and how to grow them. 
Free copy. Write today. 

W. F. ALLEN COMPANY 
72 Evergreen Ave., Salisbury, Maryland 





WILL AMAZE YOU WITH THEIR 
SIZE AND BEAUTY. Spikes 3 to 
4 ft. tall. Guaranteed to bloom. 
THE CHARMING, NEW 
AMERICAN SHAMROCK 
Wonderful for hanging boskets, 
pots, window boxes, borders, 
flower beds. Gorgeous rose- 
pink blooms with foliage like 
o four leaf dover. Blossoms in 
5 or 6 weeks. 

49c VALUE FOR ONLY 25c 
As A Special Inducement for you to 
plant Jung’s famous seeds, bulbs, plants we 
will send you 6 of these grand Gladioli, 

3 American Shamrock Bulbs plus o pkt. of 
the Brilliant Blaze Zinnia, the "All America" 

Winner, ALL FOR 25c. Also beautiful catalog 
of seed, nursery bargains. Includes premium 
coupon. Catalog only on request. 

J.W.JUNG SEED CO., Dept. 63 



Randolph, Wis. 


DWARF 
FRUIT 
TREES 



Ideal for home gardens, require little space, full 
sized fruit, begin fruiting 2nd or 3rd year. Enjoy 
delicious fruit from your own trees. We have dwarf 
peach, apple, pear and new North Star cherry. 
Also new grapes, berries, nut trees fruit trees, 
blueberries, strawbereries, shade and ornamental trees. 
Miller’s color catalog FREE. 


J. E. MILLER NURSERIES 


917 W. LAKE RD., CANANDAIGUA, N. Y. 



“KING OF THE EARLIES” 

Big solid, scarlet fruit, disease 
resistant, heavy yielder. Ideal for 
table or canning. Send 125 SEED 
postal today for 123 seed CpCIT' 
and copy of Seed and Nursery Catalog, r l» 11 

R.H.SHUMWAY SEEDSMAN, Dept. 399 Rockford. ILL 


Blueberry Plants 

WHOLESALE & RETAIL 


CERTIFIED • ALL POPULAR VARIETIES 

SPECIAL $6.98 RETAIL OFFER 

Onedozen large ameorted 2 year planta 
Early Midteaaon <& Late Varieties 

GALLETTA BROS.—BIOEBERRY FARMS 

475 S. Chew Road Hammontsii, N J. 


Evergreen Planting Stock 

For Christmas Trees Ornamentals 

SEEDLINGS and TRANSPLANTS — many va¬ 
rieties of Pine, Spruce, Fir, etc. direct from 
growers. Excellent money-crop for idle acres. 
Price List and Planting Guide—FREE. Write: 

SUIUCREST IMURSERBES 

BOX 305-B, HOMER CITY, PENNA. 

6 

Plant 

5.” 


4 Hardy American Holly, pyramidal 
tree-type, red berries. 2 Jop. Holly, 
evergreen shrub-type. All plants 4" 
to 6" with mass of roots from 2Vl' 
pots. Postpaid at planting time. 


POSTPAID 


1 

MUSSER FORESTS 

1 BOX 20-B j 




ur 



Huge.graceful,fluffy,I 
^loveliest of all.Toget f 
--_,.-^-i ;acquainted we’ll send 
b&^5S3Pkt9.of Seeds—fled, I 
Pink, and Yellow—* 

75c value forlOc. Send DimeToday! 
Bvrnee’s Seed Cataloq FREE. 

_ ATLEE BURPEE CO. 

519 Burpee Bldg., Philadelphia 32, Pa. 


LOW AS 

25c 


2-YEAR 
FIELD- 
GROWN 

Flowering shrubs, evergreens, shade trees, 25e up. 
Fruit trees low as 20c. Nuts, blueberries, strawberries. 
Grapes lOc. Dwarf fruit trees. Quality stock can’t be 
sold lower. Write for FREE color catalog and $2.00 
FREE bonus information. TENNESSEE NURSERY 
COMPANY, BOX 125, CLEVELAND. TENNESSEE 


No More Tar-Baby” Pruning 


Repairing tree wounds and prun¬ 
ing cuts need no longer leave the 
gardener looking like a tar baby 
if he uses a new aerosol tree wound 
dressing being introduced this year. 
Said to be so neat the user can “safely 
wear a white shirt and not even roll 
up his sleeves,” the material sets 
quickly to form a smooth black seal 


against moisture, disease and decay 
while natural healing is taking place. 
The product is designed for rapid 
treatment of trees and ornamental 
shrubs damaged by lawn-mower col¬ 
lisions and close bull-dozing and for 
pruning and grafting use. The step- 
by-step procedure is shown in these 
two illustrations. 



1. Make cuts flush against the tree. 2. This is the open kind of wound that 
can be protected with. 3. Tree-wound dressing neatly and quickly applied 

from an aerosol container. 



4. Injuries to trunks of trees should be repaired. 5. Cut away loose bark, and 
smooth the edges with a sharp knife; leave a channel for drainage of water. 
6. Cover the wound ivith icound dressing; the aerosol container makes it 

convenient and effective. 



Wonted: 

Potato-like Rocks, 
Boulder-like Potatoes 

While the New Hampshire Depart¬ 
ment of Agriculture is scouting for 
a big rock that looks like a potato, 
The National Potato Chip Institute is 
searching for the world’s largest po¬ 
tato. New Hampshire would set the 
rock up at the memorial it is plan-, 
ning for what it says is the birthplace 
of the potato industry—Derry, N. H., 
and the Chip Institute would display 
file giant spud at its annual confer¬ 
ence. Anybody who has a potato-like 
rock and wants it considered tor the 
potato memorial should get in touch 
with Perley Fitts, Commissioner, De¬ 
partment of Agriculture, State of New 
Hampshire, Concord. Anybody who 
thinks his potato is biggest should 
let The National Potato Chip Insti¬ 
tute, 946 Hanna Bldg., Cleveland, 
Ohio, know about it. The Institute is 
going to present a $100 U. S. savings 
bond to the person who presents the 
“spudnik”. The largest potato report¬ 
ed during The Rural New Yorker’s 
1956 search was a three-and-a-halt- 
pound, eight-inch Chippewa grown in 
Rhode Island. A Kennebec of two 
pounds, 10 ounces was claimed for 
Franklin Co., Mass., and a Wayne 
County, Pa., farmer said he grew a 
red potato longer than his forearm. 
The great potato reported at the 
time for the State of Washington 
might or might not be taken with a 
grain of salt. It was alleged to have 
weighed eight pounds, four ounces. 

Central New York Bean 
Growers Organize 

Twenty-five large growers of snap 
beans in Oneida, Madison and Chen 
ango Counties of Central New York 
recently organized the Tri-County 
Growers’ Cooperative, Inc., to insure 
high quality and steady supply to 
buyers. With 12,000 acres in produc¬ 
tion, they expect both membership 


and participating acreage to increase 
by Spring. The new co-op’s interest is 
in both fresh-market and canning 
snap beans, which will be graded and 
packed at a central packing house. 
Only high, uniform quality packs will 
be offered. The plan is to inspect all 
the beans so that purchasers can buy 
with assurance. The trade has for 
many years been troubled by lack of 
uniformity in beans. The cooperative 
will employ a sales manager well ac¬ 
quainted with the bean business, and 
it is anticipated that the packing 
house will become a central market¬ 
ing point for snap bean from July 
through September. The cooperative 
has behind it one of the largest, if 
not the largest, acreages of snap beans 
in America. Fred Zweifel, and Stuart 
Allen, both Waterville, are president 
and vice-president, respectively, Ar¬ 
thur Simmons, Cassville, is treasur¬ 
er, and H. J. Evans, Georgetown, is 
secretary. Directors are: Claude Hin- 
man, Deansboro; Merk Wester, Clin¬ 
ton; Earl Clark, No. Norwich; Fred 
Eaton, Hubbardsville; Edward Koury, 
Utica; Sam Saly, Waterville; and 
Raymond Barnes, No. Brookfield. 


Annual potato consumption has in¬ 
creased from 105 to 118 pounds per 
person, reversing a 25-year down¬ 
ward trend. Reasons ascribed for this 
rise in consumption are the larger 
families, a higher quality potato, and 
the more intensive marketing of pro¬ 
cessed potatoes in the form of chips 
and dehydrated potatoes. 

The 

Rural New Yorker 

IVol. CVIII No. 5^ 

Published Semi-Monthly by The Rural 
Publishing Co., 333 W. 30th St., New York 
1, N. Y. Price 50c a Year. Re-entered as 
Second Class Matter September 6, 1945, 
at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., 
under the Act of March 3, 1879. 


Cover Picture by — Eric M. Sanford 
Manchester, New Hampshire 


4 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 
















































































































In the Woodlot: 


Cuttings or a Crop? 


I am an insistent subscriber to 
The Rural New Yorker because 
assured not only in its articles but 
also its advertising. During past is¬ 
sues, the series by Ralph Chambers 
on our valuable, often-overlooked 
woodland resources was of special 
interest. Mr. Chambers did an ex¬ 
cellent job of covering specific and 
variable matters in a general way. 

What I care to and must take issue 
with, however, is that part of his 
article, dealing with size of timber 
and selective harvest. 

The reputation of many timber 
operators has been and still is in 
doubt. However, it is not a point 
to dwell ^ on too heavily since the 
great majority of cases are inspu’ed 
by the ignorance of the timber sel¬ 
ler, or the refusal of the seller to 
accept impai’tial advice from compe¬ 
tent sources. No good businessman 
will sell corn by the bushel without 
first measuring the quantity on hand. 
How can he sell timber without 
knowing exactly the trees and ap¬ 
proximate volume available for sale? 
Don’t ask me why, but it is the gen¬ 
eral rule especially with those who 
can least afford to lose. 

No one is at present worried about 
wood extinction, but we are concerned 
about more efficient utilization of 
trees for wood products as they 
mature and more emphasis on prop¬ 
er woodland management. The at¬ 
titude expressed in Mr. Chambers’ 
article is that, because all is well, 
progressive practices, well accepted 
by all who have tried them, are not 
necessary. The gentleman is obvious¬ 
ly unaware of the revolution in wood 
utilization which is opening avenues 
of income to the farmer who accepts 
tree farming, but refusing it to the 
pastured woodlot owner, hy-grader, 
and unadvised woodland holders. We 
are now to the stage of inviting new 
and significant wood-using industries 
to areas where timber management 
has advanced. 

The following points should be 
emphasized. 

1. A woodland is a community of 
trees, etc., and should not be treated 
by individual species. Today’s opera¬ 
tors are prepared to market all 
species. Every lot is different and 
usually requires different manage¬ 
ment. 

2. Never sell timber stumpage 
without indicating each tree to be 
cut. A contract cannot be enforced 
that does not specify exactly what is 
being sold. 

3. Timber is a renewal resource 
that is in demand and whose future 
relative value is assured. 

4. Competent, unbiased advice and 
service are available to all woodland 
owners through extension, state con¬ 
servation agencies, consulting and 
industrial foresters. No red tape is 
required and prompt service may be 
obtained in any northeastern state. 

Charles S. Merroth 
Pennsylvania District Forester 

I am sorry I have to be in complete 
disagreement with the first of my 
friend’s statements regarding the too 
cheap sale of timber by farmers to 
unscrupulous operators through ig¬ 
norance of prices and quantities. I 
dwell on the point because the sole 
mission of my timber articles was 
to alert and educate farmers against 
neglect and unawareness to the per¬ 
petual wealth of their timber. I 
sought to give impartial advice. 

I contend that a sale of corn or 
timber will be much more satisfac¬ 
tory to all concerned (doubly so if 
there is any question of the amount 
available) when the corn is sold strict¬ 
ly by the bushel or the timber by 
the measured thousand; nobody can 
question honest weight. I will quick¬ 
ly cruise a timber lot for a farmer for 

February 15, 1958 


a few dollars and give him my ten¬ 
tative bpinion of the amount of salable 
timber therein, but he and I will feel 
much better satisfied if I spend much 
more time and count the species tree 
by tree. I’ll go even farther: the wood- 
lot owner’s satisfaction should be 
complete if he eliminates me entirely, 
buys himself a log rule, lets me show 
him how to use it, and scales his own 
logs on the skidway. 

All is not well in the timber indus¬ 
try, and here I am going to touch a 
very sore spot—this utilization pro¬ 
gram. 

If you perfect a pulping or chipping 
method for making building boards 
and you use it to grind up under¬ 
sized timber too small for any saw¬ 
mill to use at a profit, while the 
tops, edgings and slabs from every 


lumbering operation around you can¬ 
not find a market place, what have 
you utilized except easier workabili¬ 
ty in your own raw material? Why 
must a mill man practically give away 
his shavings and dust for stock bed¬ 
ding or erect costly furnaces to burn 
them when whole stands of timber 
are being killed on the stump for 
pulp? 

I know of no states more efficient 
or more serious in their concern for 
their great hardwood forests than 
Pennsylvania, yet there are ready 
markets there for little maple and 
cherry bolts of furniture dimension. 
Those little maple and cherry trees 
saw straight and clear on a bolting 
machine; too small for sawmills, the 
sawing time eats up the profit. 

The gentleman seems to have got¬ 
ten the impression that, because I 
have been associated with the sawmill 
industry, I am bent on luring all 
farmers away from timber conser¬ 
vation methods and eschewing all 
efforts by government toward pre 
serving forests and water levels. I 


deplore this because nothing could 
be farther from my mind. The only 
place where my views differ from the 
state foresters’ is in my belief that 
timber should be harvested as a 
crop, the young unripe to be care¬ 
fully spared until the next harvest. 
You cannot select a few trees this 
year, a few next, always, you might 
say, eating the rotten apples from the 
top of the barrel and waiting for 
more to rot. It isn’t worth an opera¬ 
tor’s time to go into a timber lot to 
take out just the excessively big 
trees or the dying, defective ones. 
If the forester doesn’t mark the 
whole ci’op down to a wise minimum 
stumpage, what but the aforemen¬ 
tioned is left? Did you ever try to 
work in a woods cluttered with tons 
left from a previous cutting? 

Ralph R. Chambers 
Allegany County, N. Y. 


An inability to stay quiet is one of 
the most conspicuous failings of man¬ 
kind. — Walter Bagehot, Physics and 
Politics, p. 186. 



PROVE to YOURSELF THAT 

X FUNK G hybrids 





give you 

MORE CORN 

per acre 








• You don’t have to take our word for it that in most 
cases Funk G Hybrids out-produce other hybrids. 
You can prove it, to your own satisfaction, right in 
your own fields. 

Here's all you do: Just mail the coupon below and 
we’ll send you, absolutely Free, a 4-lb. sample of 
Funk G Hybrid seed corn—enough for about a half¬ 
acre. Plant this alongside the hybrid you’ve been 
growing. Then at harvest time, weigh and compare. 

All you are asked to do is to make an impartial 
check and tell us next harvest about your experience, 
without any obligation to buy. Most folks will find that pound for pound, 
bushel for bushel. Funk G Hybrids out-yield other hybrids by as much as 6 
to 8 bushels or more per acre. 

There’s no mystery about the reason for this. First, Funk G Hybrids are 
the result of many years of intensive breeding by men who really know corn 
and how to make it produce. Second, for 2 2 years, Hoffman has test-grown 
Funk G Hybrids in every kind of weather, season and soil on proving grounds 
located in every important corn-growing area of Pennsylvania, New York, 
New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware and Virginia. 

But don’t take our word for it. Make the half-acre test yourself... and 
without risking one cent. Once you see the outstanding results you get from 
Funk G Hybrids, you will become a Funk G-Hoffman booster for life. Fill in 
and mail the coupon today. 


4-lb. SAMPLE OF FUNK G HYBRID CORN 


Enough seed corn lo plant 
about a hak-acre plot. Fill in 
and mail coupon today for 
your 4-lb. sample. Plant it 
and compare the results with 
any other hybrid. Prove to 
yourself that Funk G Hybrids 
out-produce all others. 

Offer limited to Pennsyl¬ 
vania, New York, New Jersey, 
Maryland and Delaware. 


A. H. HOFFMAN, INC, Box 32A 

Landisville (Lancaster Co.), Pa. 

Please send me Free 4-lb. sample of Funk G Hybrid seed corn, as per your offer. 

I want this corn for Q husking, Q for ensilage. My soil is Q limestone, Q sandy, Q clay, 

n heavy loam. My ground is Q good, Q medium, Q poor. 1 plant corn {d.:.tc). 

Fall frosts usual (date).My corn season is.< 'ays. Must harvest 

in time for WHEAT □ Yes □ No. htame _ 

Elevation.ft. above sea level. 

The variety of corn I hove been planting 

is (Brand).No. County _ %iate^ 


Address^ 


WANT TO EARN EXTRA MONEY? A few select territories are still open for the appointment of Hoffman farmer- 
agents to take orders for Hoffman farm seeds and Funk G corn. No investment required. For details write to Dept. B 




















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BOX 28, SELBYVILLE. DELAWARE 



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I I I I I I I t 


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1958 CATALOG imvmmUj 


Here^s the other side of the 
Operation Spray story — 


The Gypsy Moth, and Why 
We Fight It 



By E. D. 

ERMITTED to go its way un¬ 
checked, the leaf-feeding 
gypsy moth could chew its 
way through America’s 
hardwood forests and tree- 
shaded communities. For 
90 years the pest has re¬ 
peatedly demonstrated not only great 
localized destructiveness but also a 
remarkable ability to spread through 
forests in ever-widening areas across 
the nation. Many summers since the 
gypsy moth’s arrival in this country 
in 1869, thousands of acres of wood¬ 
lands in New England and adjacent 
states have been leafless. 


A vivid description of the ravages 
of uncontrolled gypsy moths was re¬ 
corded in the 1880’s by citizens of 
Medford and Malden, Mass., who 
were first victims of outbreaks. A 
battle raged between individual 
householders and gypsy moth cater¬ 
pillars; nearly always, the caterpil¬ 
lars won. In Forbush and Fernald’s 
book, “The Gypsy Moth”, is written: 

“My sister cried out one day, 
‘They are marching up the 
street.’. . . sure enough, the 
street was black with them. . . 
so thick on the trees that they 
were stuck together like cold 
macaroni. . .1 used to find them 
in the beds when I turned down 
the blankets. . .crushed under¬ 
foot on the sidewalks, they gave 
the streets a filthy and unclean 
appearance. . .a sickening odor 
arose. . .the foliage was com¬ 
pletely stripped from all the 
the trees. . . Little was spared 
but the horse chestnut and the 
grass in the fields. . .vegetables 
were ruined. ...” 

The Fight Against the Moth 

Except for those first few years, 
the gypsy moth has been a target of 
continuing and organized control 
efforts. Since Massachusetts took the 
first action in 1890, communities, 
.States and the U. S. Dept, of Agri¬ 
culture have spent some $91 million 
to prevent the moth’s spread and to 
reduce timber losses. Infestations 
have been confined mainly to New 
England and eastern New York; 
periodic small flare-ups at other 
places were quickly cleaned up. Dam¬ 
age, though occurring over pro¬ 
gressively greater areas, has not since 
caused the concern it did in Med¬ 
ford and Malden in the 1880’s, and 
this has been due principally to the 
persistence of States, counties and 
towns in protecting their shade trees. 
Moreover, by expending $44 million 
from 1933 to 1952, the States and the 
Federal Government kept timber 
losses to an estimated $6.5 million. 

The indirect losses, which include 
damage to watersheds, destruction of 
wildlife habitats, increased costs of 
protecting denuded forests from fire, 
and depreciation of recreation areas, 
however, were incalculable. In view 
of them, and of the great direct ex¬ 
penditures and quite serious losses, 
too, the problem had to be reconsid¬ 
ered. Many competent scientists 
down through the years had urged 
eradication of infestations, and its 
feasibility was demonstrated in many 
areas. In 1894, crews completely 
eliminated the moth from 10 com¬ 
munities in Massachusetts. Using 
lead arsenate, a Federal-State pro¬ 
gram eradicated the moth from 1,450 
square miles of New Jersey between 
1920 and 1955. An infestation dis¬ 
covered in Pennsylvania in 1932 was 
eradicated in 1949 with DDT. An iso¬ 
lated infestation in Michigan involv¬ 
ing about 100,000 acres was virtually 
eliminated with the spraying of 
19,000 acres last season. 


BURGESS 

In spite of these successes and in 
spite of stringent regulatory action, 
gypsy moth infestations encompass 
more than 40 million acres today. 
The natural barriers presented by 
the Green Mountains and the Berk¬ 
shire Hills in western New England 
failed to contain the pest very long, 
and an attempt to establish a moth- 
free zone east of the Hudson River 
turned out unsuccessfully, too. Out¬ 
breaks in 1953 and 1954 set the stage 
for scattering populations of the 
moth into new territory. Infestations 
became quite general throughout 
New England and eastern New York, 
and isolated areas were affected in 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The 
moth spread northward to Canada. 
The same as in Europe, native and 
imported parasites and predators did 
not assist much in halting the moth’s 
spread. 

A Threat to All the United States 

With the breach of the natural 
barriers in New England and the 
water frontier at the Hudson River, 
few natural “Maginot Lines” now 
exist between northeastern forests 
and susceptible timber of the South 
and West. Unfortunately, most high¬ 
ly susceptible trees increase in abun¬ 
dance westward from the Appala¬ 
chian Mountains; maximum suscepti¬ 
bility to gypsy moth damage is be¬ 
lieved to occur in the Ohio Valley, in 
central Tennessee, and in the Ozark 
Mountains. Climate is no deterrent to 
the moths’ thriving anywhere in the 
United States; they do particularly 
well in warm regions, too. Without 
an aggressive attempt to roll back 

-§009.1 SBAV siqx 'pspsdxa aq p^noo 

S89.m u.i9;s9Av pue ujomnos iBoiipjo 
o;ui peajds s,q;oui am ‘:jSB9q;joM 
ui UOT§0.T p0;s0juT 0m JO 0§p0 oqj 
nized as early as 1955 when the 
National Plant Board, representing 
the plant protection officials of the 
48 States, adopted this resolution: 

(Continued on Page 10) 


Articles of Interest 

In Coming Issues 

• Sputnik and the Fruit 

Grower 

Dr. H. B. Tukey 

• Pest Control in the Orchard 
Dr. Philip Carman 

• Fertilization for Fruit Trees 
By Elwood Fisher 

• New Systems of Pruning 
By Leif Verner 

• Vegetable Varieties for 1958 
By B. L. Pollack 

• Systemic Insecticides 
By C. R. Outright 

• The Strawberry Story 
By John Tomkins 

• Grapes for Short Seasons 
By John Einset 

• Feed for the Cows in 1965 
By Dr, L. S. Mix 

• The Future of Bulk-Tank 

Farming 
By I. E. Parkin 

• Self-Cure for Mastitis 
By J. H. Winter 

• Cages, Slats and Corncobs 
By G. T. Klein 

• Can We Eradicate 

Pullorum? 

By H. Van Roekel 

All these articles are scheduled to 
appear in The Rural New Yorker’s 
Annual Horticulture Issue of March 1, 
1958. 


6 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


































































Just One Ounce Gives You 
A Lifetime Car Battery. • 


Ends Battery Failure FOREVER! 


YeSf just one thimbleful of amazing chemical dis¬ 
covery has enough power to run your present car 
battery for the next 10 years! Actually makes 
“Dead Batteries” spring to life instantly and new 
batteries trouble-free for the life of your car. See 
U. S. Gov’t Proof and Readers Digest Report. 

At last it’s here! . . . Cleared by the U. S. Government 
itself for. release to the public . . . the incredible dream- 
discovery that at this very moment is being used on U. S. 
Navy battery-driven submarines, on National Airline planes, 
even on such power-burning giants of the sea as the S.S. 
Queen Mary and S.S. Queen Elizabeth . . . and that in just 
60 seconds converts your present _ 


car battery into a 10-YEAR 
POWER PLANT ... a lifetime 
car battery that does away with 
battery failure FOREVER! Yes, 
this is the exact same type won¬ 
der-formula featured by Reader’s 
Digest in a 6-page spread. The 
exact same formula that was test¬ 
ed and retested in Gov’t labora¬ 
tories . . . An amazing chemical 
discovery that is so powerful that 
no matter how old your battery 
is ... no matter how run-down it 
may be . . . no matter how many 
times you’ve been forced to charge 
and recharge it . . . JUST ONE 
OUNCE of this wonder-chemical 
will send a surge of never-failing 
power through your battery FOR 
THE LIFE OF YOUR CAR! Your 
car will ALWAYS START IN¬ 
STANTLY even in steaming 130- 
degree summer heat or 40-below 
zero paralyzing winter cold. 

Yet, with all this super-charg¬ 
ing power, all this flash-starting 
action this brilliant new discovery 
is so safe it’s been insured by the 
world’s largest insurance company 
. . . and is so easy to use that by 
•doing nothing more than pouring a 
thimbleful into each cell of your 
battery you convert your battery 
into a lifetime Power Plant I 

Nowl Your Present Car Battery 
Can Deliver More Power Than 
When it Was Brand New! 

Just think what this sensational 
discovery means to you if you are a 
car-owner who is sick and tired of 
throwing away good money every 
time your battery needs recharg¬ 
ing, OR shelling out $16 to $35 
every time you need a new battery. 
It means that now for the first 
time you will never again invest 
another penny in your battery be¬ 
cause it will be be just impossible 
for your battery to ever fail again! 
It means that even in bumper-to- 
bumper traffic, even after months 
of idleness, even in drenching 
rains, why even if your car is com¬ 
pletely buried in snow ... all you’ll 
have to do is step on the starter 
button and your car will respond 
with a roar of power INSTANT¬ 
LY! No more “dead battery” stops 
on crowded highways ... no more 
coaxing your engine to start in 
bad weather... no more fear about 


using the heater, defroster or 
radio in cold weather because 
you’re afraid your battery may 
“conk out.” Why, the discovery 
described on this page contains 
so much power, so much FLASH¬ 
STARTING POWER, that even if 
you go away on a 2-month trip and 
not a soul touches your car in all 
that time ... when you return your 
car will still start the instant you 
turn on the ignition. No coughing, 
no wheezing, no sickening groan... 
but a flash-action start in one sec¬ 
ond flat! Yes, it’s the most signifi¬ 
cant automotive discovery since 
automatic drive. A super-powerful 
chemical that you simply pour into 
each cell of your battery . . . and 
presto! 2 /OM’ve super-charged that 
battery for up to 10 full years! 

Science Discovers a New Force 
. . . Liquid Electricity! 

Strange as this may seem to you, 
even though you feed your car gas 
and oil, the basic source of your 
car’s power comes from WATER', 
Not ordinary water of course, but 
water that carries an electric 
charge ... in other words, the 
water inside your car’s battery. 
But when this battery-water 
grows “weak”,., when lead-flakes 
fall off the walls of your battery 
and muddy up this battery water 
and dilute its strength ... it is no 
longer able to deliver its powerful 
electric charge. The result: your 
battery starts to discharge. It 
grows weaker and weaker until it 
finally dies. That’s why when you 
recharge a car-battery, what you 
are really doing is nothing more 
than shooting high-voltage elec¬ 
tricity into the water and dissolv¬ 
ing those power-sapping flakes. 

But suppose that you could pour 
into your car battery a new kind of 
liquid . . . one that simply refused 
to allow this lead-flaking to take 
place. Yes, a liquid that dissolved 
those harmful flakes of lead the 
moment they formed! 

Do you realize what this would 
mean? It would mean that there 
would always be a constant source 
of LIVE ELECTRIC POWER in¬ 
side your battery , . . your battery 
would always be charging itself 
... never discharging, never wear¬ 


READER'S DIGEST 
Reports 

A BATTERY WHICH LASTS 
LONGER THAN YOUR CAR! 
EUROPE HAS HAD THEM 
FOR 40 YEARS. 

READER'S DIGEST 

tells the astonishing story! 

Yes, the Reader’s Digest re¬ 
leased the exciting story of 
how a battery can last longer 
than the life of a car! It tells 
how the battery is every 
motorist's greatest headache. If 
left unattended, it dies. If it 
gets low in sub-zero weather 
it is likely to crack. It usually 
has to be replaced every year! 

Now, without spending $50 
for an expensive nickel-cad¬ 
mium battery you can have 
a battery that runs 10 years 
or more by simply pouring a 
little fluid into each cell! 


ing itself down . . . why it would 
actually OUTLAST YOUR CAR 
ITSELF! In short, your battery 
would be a storehouse of liquid 
electricity that would last a life¬ 
time and you’d never again suffer 
the inconvenience of battery fail¬ 
ure. 

Even "Dead Batteries" 
Spring Back To Life 
In Just 60 Seconds! 

Now the name of the amazing 
chemical discovery that creates 
and stores up this lifetime source 
of electric power inside your car’s 
battery is VOLTEX Liqui-lectric 
. . . the exact same battery “ener¬ 
gizer” that has been tested and 
used in torpedo propulsion sys¬ 
tems, by diesel locomotives, by 
truck and taxicab fleet owners .. 
yes, even tested, recognized and ac¬ 
cepted by the United States Gov¬ 
ernment Bureau of Standards . . . 
the toughest testing laboratory in 
the world. 

In other words, every statement 
you have read on this page is not 
just a dream, or a hope, or mere 
theory . . . but scientific fact that 
has been proven over and over 
again before this great new prod¬ 
uct was released to the public. So 
if you would like to turn your pres¬ 
ent battery into a lifetime battery 
in just 60 seconds time ... if you 
are determined to once and for all 
put an end to battery failure ... if 
you can spare the one minute it 
takes to pour this brilliant new 
discovery into your car’s battery, 
then take advantage of the free- 
trial offer you see on this page. 
Remember ... all you risk is the 
few minutes it takes to fill out 
the coupon, and you have a lifetime 
of driving pleasure, convenience to 
gain. So act NOW! 


ELECTR!C BULB LIGHTS UP 
IN WATER ! 

Here’s one of the most un¬ 
usual and dramatic labora- 
tory tests ever made. To 
prove just how much super¬ 
charged electrical power this 
new Voltex discovery con- 
fains, scientists emptied the 
liquid from a Voltex-treated 
car battery into a glass tum¬ 
bler. Then they put an elec- 
♦fic bulb Into that glass of 
Voltex and for 11 seconds 
the bulb ACTUALLY LIGHTED 
UP! Dynamic living proof of 
bow this new “liquid elec- 
bic” discovery sends a con- 
stant charge of power cours¬ 
ing through your car bottery 
yoor In, year out for up to 
TP full yeors! 



10 YEAR OUAKAIVTEE 






LEOYIIS 




LONDON 


The most famous Insurance Company in 
the World, Lloyds of London—has insured 
‘‘VOLTEX” to be 100% Safe and Effec¬ 
tive on all batteries regardless of years in 
use. “Voltex” is also tested and approved 
by the “Public Service Testing Labora¬ 
tories.” Tested under the most “extreme” 
conditions . .. assuring you that Voltex is 
of vital importance to every car and truck 
owner. No new product ever released to 
the public was ever backed by such careful 
testing . . . was endorsed by so many 
Giants of Industry, 


★ 

★ 

★ 

5 

J 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

t 

I 

! 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 



LOOK HOW EASY IT IS !-a.i you do u 

pour this amazing chemical discovery into the cells of your battery.. . . 
and in just 60 seconds you've converted your present car-battery into a 
LIFETIME SOURCE OF POWER ... a lifetime battery that will never fail again! 

FREE TRIAL SUPPLY 
NOW AVAILABLE 


Naturally, the best proof of 
VOLTEX’s super-charging power 
is on your own car. And because 
we’re so positive you’ll be thrilled 
from the very first day you use it 
... because we’re so sure that your 
friends and neighbors will want 
to know “how come your battery 
just never wears out” . . . and be¬ 
cause we know you’ll be only too 
happy to tell them about VOLTEX 
Liqui-lectric . . we invite you to 
try it on a completely FREE 
TRIAL BASIS. Here is all you do! 

Simply send the free-trial cou¬ 
pon below. When your VOLTEX 
arrives, simply pour one vial-full 
into each cell of your battery. 
That’s all there is to it. Then take 
this battery-torture test. After 
you have driven your car for 50 
miles, do this. Pull the coil wire. 
Turn on the radio, lights, all the 
electric equipment. Run the bate 
tery until it is completely dead. 

Turn off all the electric equip¬ 
ment and leave the battery rest for 
3 minutes. Then, with the staffer 
only—start your car! 

Now—-run the battery down a 
second time. Do not let up on the 
starter until it is completely dead! 

Be sure all the electric equip¬ 
ment is turned off. Replace the coil. 
Let the dead battery sit for 30 
minutes. 

WE GUARANTEE YOU CAN 




NOW START YOUR MOTOR 
IMMEDIATELY because for the 
first time in your life you will be 
driving a car with a battery that 
is completely and fully chai’ged 
each and every second. 

Act Now! Have A Lifetime 

Car Battery Just 60 Seconds 

After Your Vo!tex Arrives 

Now the price of Voltex is only 
$2.98, Why you save double that 
figure in “towing or recharge 
money” alone—not to mention the 
huge savings on the new battery 
you’d be forced to purchase within 
the next few years if it weren’t 
for this sensational discovery. And 
remember, the supply of Voltex we 
send you is enough to completely 
treat either a 6-volt or 12-volt bat¬ 
tery for lifetime service! 

However, due to the demands of 
Trucking Companies, Airline Com¬ 
panies and other large users of 
Voltex, only a limited amount can 
be released this year for public 
use. Therefore, all orders will be 
filled on a first come, first serve 
basis. Once our limited supply is 
exhausted, we will be forced to 
withdraw this offer. So to take ad- 
vantage of this FREE-TRIAL 
OPPORTUNITY, send the no-risk 
coupon today. Campbell-Smith Co., 
31 West 47th Street, New York 
36, N. Y. 


since defense plant orders must be given 
first priority we strongly suggest you 
rush this free-trial coupon immediately! 


.MAIL FREE-TRIAL COUPON TODAY*. 

CAMPBELL SMITH Inc., Dept. OS-2 

31 West 47 St., New York 36, N. Y. 

Please rush VOLTEX to me right away with this understanding. 
•If VOLTEX Liqui-lectric does not do all you claim... if it doesn't 
add more power to rny battery than I ever imagined possible... if it 
doesn’t give me the lifetime trouble-free battery service you claim... 
then you will refund my money immediately. In other words, I can 
try it entirely at your risk and I do not risk a single penny. 


Q I enclose $2.9S cosh, check er money 
order (I save S6c in postoge, handling 
«nd C.O.D. chgrgii.) 


single penny. 

Q SPECIAL OFFER: I enclose $5.00 cosh, 
check or money order for 2 units of 
VOLTEX (one for myself one for a friend) 
and I sove $1.00. 


name. 


address, 
city- 


.state. 


L3 C.O.D. ORDERS ACCEPTED: Please ship Voltex C.O.D, I will pay post¬ 
man prices indicated above, plus C.O.D. and postage. Same money-back 
guarantee of coarse. 


































For BIGGER and BETTER CROPS 


DIBBLE’S 

NE-310, 

OHIO K-62, 


CORN 


CORNELL M.4 
MICHIGAN 250 



This year’s outstanding hybrids for grain and silage — produce more 
bushels per acre. We also have 6 other varieties of hybrid and open- 
pollinated corn and a complete line of other farm seeds. All tested and 
proven in Northeastern farms. All backed by our 67-year reputation. 

Write for Price List! 

EDWARD F. DIBBLE SEEDGROWER 
Box B, Honeoye Falls, N. Y. 




CHRISTMAS TREE PLANTATION STOCK 

SCOTCH PINE — Pinus sylvestris Per 1000 

2-yr. Sdlgs. 2 to 4 ins. $18.50 

2-yr. Sdlgs. 3 to 6 ins. 22.00 

2-yr. Sdlgs. 4 to 8 ins. 25.00 

4-yr. Trans. 6 to 10 ins. 50.00 

4-yr. Trans. 8 to 14 ins. 60.00 

AUSTRIAN PINE — PINUS Nigra 

2-yr. Sdlgs. 2 to 4 ins. 20.00 

2-yr. Sldgs. 3 to 6 ins. 25.00 

4-yr. Trans. 5 to 10 ins. 70.00 

WHITE SPRUCE —Picea alba (Excellent 
blue-gray color) 

2- yr. Sdlgs. 3 to 6 ins. 25.00 

3- yr. Sdlgs. 4 to 8 ins. 30.00 

3-yr. Sdlgs. 6 to 12 ins. 40.00 

NORWAY SPRUCE — Picea excelsa 

2-yr. Sldgs. 2 to 3 ins. 18.00 

2- yr. Sdlgs. 3 to 5 ins. 22.00 

3- yr. Trans. 5 to 10 ins. 50.00 

4- yr. Trans. 6 to 12 ins. 60.00 

4-yr. Trans. 8 to 14 ins. 90.00 

Discount: Less 5% on quantities of 5,000 or 
more of a kind. No order accepted for less 
than 500 of a kind. Cash with order. No 
C.O.D.’s. Penna. orders add 3% Sales Tax. 
Write for Our Free Illustrated Catalogue. 

PAllACK BROS. NURSERIES, INC. 

BOX 1074, R. D. 1, HARMONY. PENNA. 



STRAWBERRIES! 


Raspberries, Blueberries, 
Asparagus. The latest and 
best in small fruit varie¬ 
ties including: Blaze, Merri¬ 
mack, Earlidawn, Surecrop, Strawberries. 
Write for Free Catalog and Planting Guide. 
WALTER K. MORSS & SON, 

BRADFORD, MASS. _ 

COLORADO BLUE SPRUCE 

Select 3 yr., 8-12" plants. Grow 
into outstanding trees as bound¬ 
ary markers, windbreakers, etc. 

Densely pyramidal—from bluish- 
green to shining blue. Prefers sun. 

Postpaid planting time. 



MUSSER fORISTS 


BOX 20-B 


Indiana, Pa* 


CHRISTMAS TREES 
and ORNAMENTALS 

Seedlings andTransplants-dIrect from grow- 
ers at planting lime. Many varieties of Pine, 
Spruce, Fir, etc. Quality slock at low prices. 


Free 
CATALOGUE 
and 

PLANTING 

GUIDE 


SUNCREST EVERGREEN NURSERIES 

__Box 305-B Homer Ci ty, Pa. I \M 





STRAWBERRIES 


Plant Superfectlon for berries this 
year. Allen’s 1958 Berry Book 
describes best varieties—best 
methods. Free copy. Write today. 

W. F. ALLEN COMPANY 
Evargroon Ava., Salisbury/ Maryland 


Sweet Corn Seed 

Improved high quality strains of leading ' 
varieties. Years of experience producing ' 
fine seed for the market and home grower. 
Write NOW for FREE descriptive list. ' 

Huntington Brothers 

BOX R _ WINDSOR, CONN. ' 

FOR THE PRICE OF ONE CHRISTMAS TREE $5.00 
WE will ship PREPAID — 2 year Seedlings — 50 
BLUE and 50 NORWAY SPRUCE; 50 AUSTRIAN 
and 50 SCOTCH PINE. Also Special Offer 100 BLUE 
SPRUCE or 100 CANADA HEMLOCKS 3 yr. 3-5-in. 
only $5.00 Prepaid. UNADILLA NURSERY, 
_ JOHNSON CITY, NEW YORK _ 

STRAWBERRIES: Exciting New Sport Variety and 
Othere. BULBS, SEEDS, Etc. Catalog Free. 
SUNNYSIDE NURSERY, R..D. 2, . BANGOR, PA. 


TREES Toc 

Cherrlet, peart, plums, nut trees, strawberries, blus- 
berriet. dwarf fruit tress. Grapevines lOe. Shrubs 
evergreens, shads trees, roses 25e up. Quality stock 
'***'■• *“'■ i’REE color catalog and 

$2 FREE bonus information. TENNESSEE NUB- 
SERY CO., BOX 16, CLEVELAN D. TENNESSEE 

TRAWBERRY PLANTS 

Write for catalog, fully describing all 
varieties, with best methods of growing 
them. Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

J.H. SHIVERS, Box R-581, Allen, Md. 



FREE 


Vegetable Plant Catalogue With Bargain Offers. 
Have earlier crops with our strong field-grown Cabbage. 
Onion, Lettuce, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Tomato, 
Eggplant, Pepper, and Potato Plants. 

PIEDMONT PLANT COMPANY, 

P. 0. BOX 684, GREENVILLE, S. C. 


CHRISTMAS TREE 


^JF.FP.LINGS AND TRANSPLANTS 
pines, spruces, firs — Quality stock at reason¬ 
able prices. Place your order now for Spring planting 
while popular species and sizes are available. 

^®'' P*"*®® I'®* PP*! shearing bulletin. 
ECCLES Nurseries, Box 65, Dept. Y, Rimersburg, Pa. 

STRAWBERRY PLANTS 

BLUEBERRY, RASPBERRY and ASPARAGUS 
IN ALL POPULAR VARIETIES 
A Free Catalogue Full of Facts. No Fakes. 

D* RICHARDSON & COMPANY 
WILLARDS. _ BOX 8, _ MARYLAND 

FINEST QUALITY ★ FRUIT TREES 

Best Varieties: Peach, Apple, Pear, Plum, Cherry, 
Apricot and Nectarine Trees. Jumbo size, give quick¬ 
est best fruiting. Let us send you FREE Catalog. Write 
today. Largest grower TRUE NAME trees for 74 years. 
HARRISONS’ NURSERIES , BERLIN, MARYLAND 

20 Quality BLUE SPRUCE $1.00 Prepared 

CHRISTMAS TREE FARMING PAYS WELL 
FREE_ SURPLUS LIST — 48th Year Specials. 
Christmas Trees, Baby-Landscape Evergreens. 
LOW PRICED TREES AND SHRUBS 
UNADILLA NURSERY, JOHNSON CITY, N. Y. 


INCREASE PRESENT INCOME 


Build growing sideline, full time business. No in¬ 
vestment. Farmers, Agents, Dealers. Take orders for 
Campbell’s Gro-Green Liquid Fertilizer Concentrates. 
Free sa mp le, sales kit. C ampbell Co., Rochelle 315, III. 

SENSATIONAL DURHAM”H eXvV^SEArTnC 'RED 
RASPBERRY PLANTS: Only $8.00-100. Free price 
list of other outstanding STRAWBERRY and RASP¬ 
BERRY PLANTS. MAC DOWELL BERRY FARM, 
BALLST O N LAKE, N, Y. _P hone: U P 7-5515 

- EVERGREEN SEEOLIN G~S 

For Christmas Trees, etc. Quality Seedlings at 
Reasonable Prices. Write for information. 

PINE GROVE NURSERY, 

R. D. 3, _CLEA^IELO,_^ENNj^. 

STRAWBERRYS: RED, BLACK. PURPLE RASP¬ 
BERRY PLANTS. GUARANTEED TO GROW. 
EUREKA PLANT FARM, HASTINGS. NEW YORK 


CHRISTMAS TREE PLANTER 


For tractors with hydraulic lift. Only $245. Plant 
1,000 per hour. Write — ROOTSPREO, 

ST. PETERSBURG. PENNSYLVANIA _ 

SCOTCH PINE 

1000 Seedlings $8. 


R. I, 


GRADED 2-4" 

DENTON NURSERY, 

CONNEAUT, OHIO 


OUT OF THE SOIL, NATIONALLY ADVERTISED 
PRODUCTS. Build Your Own Business. No Invest¬ 
ment. Open Territory. VLASTA MITTON, 

LONG HILL ROAD, GREAT NOTCH, N. J. 


TRY NEW POTAGOLO 


LARGEST LATE STRAWBERRY GROWN 
Handsome, Excellent Quality and Yield. Circular. 
WRIGHT FARM, PLYMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
EVERGREENS: Christmas Tree Planting Stock. 

Free Catalog and Planting Guide. 
FLICKINGERS’ NURSERY, SAGAMORE, PENNA. 
STRAWBERRY and RASPBERRY PLANTS. FREE 
Catalog. REX SPROUT. WAVERLY, NEW YORK 

VIRUS FREE STRAWBERRY PLANTS. Catalog 
Free, M. S. PRYOR, R. F. 0. SALISBURY, MO. 

NEW JET TORCH destroys weeds, stumps, rocks. 
Get Free Bulletin. SINE. RN-2. QUAKERTOWN, PA. 


Opportunity for Middle-Aged Man 

We need a few reliable men to act as our sales 
representative in their neighborhood and take sub¬ 
scriptions to The Rural New-Yorker. We allow a 
liberal commission on both new and renewal orders 
and any man who enjoys meeting people will find 
the work both pleasant and profitable. 

The men selected will be given an exclusive 
territory near their home and will have an oppor¬ 
tunity to develop a permanent business and a 
steady income. No experience or investment of any 
kind is required but must have a car and be able 
to furnish satisfactory references. For further 
details write — 

CIRCULATION MANAGER, 

THE RURAL NEW-YORKER, 

333 West 30th Street New York 1, N. Y. 




Countryman’s Journal 


These modern, supersonic, radar- 
operated kitchen stoves are all right. 
Gas, oil and electricity save farm 
boys the monotonous job of keeping 
woodboxes filled. Here at Sunny 
Acres we have an electric stove with 
bells, sirens, gongs, self-timers and 
multi-colorecl stop-and-go lights. I 
am glad that Blanche is more me¬ 
chanically-minded than I am. All I 
want to say is that, when a young 
man is thinking of choosing a life 
partner these days, he should first 
make certain that his beloved has an 
engineering degree. When civiliza¬ 
tion has reached the point that a 
woman can put a roast in the oven at 
one p. m., go to a Woman’s Club 
meeting and know that the meat will 
start cooking at 2:10 p.m. and auto¬ 
matically shut the heat off at 5.22 
p. m., I say that life is getting com¬ 
plicated enough to satisfy Jules 
Verne. 

Forty years ago on the farm it was 
different. The big, gleaming black 
kitchen range was the heart of the 
kitchen, and the kitchen was the 
heart of home. I think it was about 
the Fall of 1912, after our first big 
apple crop from the 800 Baldwin 
tree orchard, that Father decided 
Mother could order a new kitchen 
stove. It was a dream come true for 
her. The Acme Royal Steel Range 
was a beauty. It was a six-holer with 
a porcelain-lined reservoir at the 
rear and a big warming closet with 
a slide-down door. At either side of 
the smoke pipe was a small shelf on 
which she could set a dish to keep 
warm. 

The mail catalog description was 
exuberant and definite. “This is the 
greatest value and our special leader. 
Highly nickel plated and ornamented 
throughout. Nickle plated bands, 
shields, doors, and trimmings. Highly 
burnished and polished. Contains 
every good feature of every high 
grade range made, with the defects 
of none. More economical and far 
more handsome than any range on 


the market.’’ It cost a stupendous 
$26.55. It weighed 515 pounds. When 
it arrived at the depot in Hancock, 
we rolled it from the freight car 
onto the farm wagon. We put planks 
from the wagon to the kitchen door 
and rolled it into position in the 
kitchen. It was a handsome, shining 
stove, and over the years it served us 
well. Years later, when a modern 
stove came to Glenrose Farm, Mother 
used to say she could never get quite 
the same results in baking that she 
did with the wood-burning stove. 

The farm kitchen was the heart of 
home in the long ago days. On a 
Winter’s evening, it was cozy, snug 
and warm. The three sisters and I sat 
around the eating table. I liked to 
sit at the back with the Lazy Susan 
between me and observers. With a 
large, dog-eared geography tome, I 
could frequently hide a small-sized 
book with more interesting material, 
although the three sisters kept a 
sharp eye on me. I wasn’t very studi¬ 
ous in those days, and my report 
card was not in the same category 
with their monotonous rows of A’s. 
The fact that eventually I was given 
a Phi Beta Kappa key is something I 
occasionally mention to the sisters 
when they discuss my wasted years 
in the village school. 

But looking back, those Winter’s 
evenings in the warmth of the big, 
shining kitchen stove, with the fire 
crackling and the kettle singing, 
meant something important in my 
life. I read widely; vistas opened 
that meant a challenge for the future. 
A kitchen stove is a humble thing, 
but humble things are the basic 
things in life. Millions of farm boys 
and girls have read and studied in 
the farm kitchens of our ntaion. And 
in the warmth and security of the 
kitchen, they have dreamed stirring 
dreams of the time when they would 
go forth on the great adventure of 
life. H. S. Pearson 

New Hampshire 


Oak O. K. for Chemicoi 
Debarking 

I wish to commend John F. Preston 
for his article, “Pulpwood in the 
Northeast”, in The Rural New 
Yorker late last Fall. It shows the 
part that pulpwood can play in good 
woodlot management. 

However, I must disagree with Mr. 
Preston’s inclusion of oak as among 
those trees species which cannot be 
successfully treated by debarking 
chemicals. Here at our Lock Haven, 
Pa., mill, we use 20-25,000 cords of 
peeled oak each year for pulp. Most 
is chemically treated by the process 
explained by Mr. Preston. Oaks is con¬ 
sidered by our producers as, first, 
rather easy to girdle for brushing 
— it is done by bumping off the 
bark with the back of a single-bit 
axe head, and, second, one of the 
species best responding to chemical 
treatment. If we were to disregard 
chemical treatment of oak, we would 
fail to secure enough peeled pulpwood 
to meet our mill’s requirements. The 
successful response of oak to chemical 
debarking treatment is an established 
fact in ^ Central Pennsylvania. 

We commend The Rural New 
Yorker for publishing this fine arti¬ 
cle, and we hope that more like it 
will appear in the future. 

Harold C. Best 

Chemicals No Cure for 
Septic Tank Troubles 

When things go wrong with a farm 
septic tank, treating with a disinfec¬ 
tant or chemical is probably not the 
solution, according to a University 
of Maryland agricultural engineer. 
Poor functioning, he believes, is in 
most cases due to improper design of 
the disposal system or to clogging with 
roots and trash. He does not comment 


on the efficacy of so-called enzy¬ 
matic and bacterial stimulators. 

So-called cleaners are not only in¬ 
effective, he says, but may actually 
be harmful. Even though they may 
make temporary improvement, some 
contain chemicals which so interfere 
with bacterial action that they even¬ 
tually make the problem worse. 

On the other hand, according to 
this engineer, the harmful effects of 
ordinary household chemicals are 
often overemphasized. As a matter 
of fact, small amounts of chlorine 
bleaches may be used to control odors 
without harm, and soaps, detergents 
and drain cleaners normally used in 
the household should have no bad 
effect on a properly designed system. 

Roof drains, foundation sumps and 
drainage from other sources should 
never be piped into or toward the 
septic tank. Large volumes of water 
stir up its contents and carry solids 
out, he warns. The disposal system 
will become clogged and flooded, and 
it may fail. Drainage from garage 
floors and other places where there 
is oily waste should also be excluded. 



1958 Maine Apple Queen 
Terry Tripp, 17, of Lewiston, repre- 
sented Thorne’s Corner Grange. 




































































































75 Years of Manufacturing 
Progress for the 
Nation's Farmers 


In 1883 the Farmer 


In 1958 the Farmer 


SINCE 


1883 







Lets the cow water 
herself any time of the 
day or night. 


Hand pumped water for 
the cows. 




Lets the cow bring 
the milk to him in a 
sanitary elevated stall 
for machine milking. 


Hand milked the cows and 
toted the buckets. 


Runs electric powered un- 
loaders and feeders that 


Chopped loose, threw down 
and fed silage by hand. 


do the job in minutes. 




Spent untold hours and labor 
shoveling manure. 


Flips a switch and cleans 
the barn automatically. B 


And got only 45 lbs. of 
milk per hour worked. 


And gets over 101 lbs. 
of milk per hour worked 




STEEL 
WINDOWS 
& FRAMES 


$110 

UNtOADERS 


ROOF VENTILATORS 


door hangers 


.STALLS ^ 
STANCHIONS 
WATER BOWLS 


MILK HOUSE EQUIPMENT 


Progress Through Working Shoulder-to-$houlder with the Farmer 


HARVARD^ ILLINOIS 



' Copyright HW Stsritne* Inc. 




February 15, 1958 



























































































New Idea treatment assures longer, rot-free life. At left, water stands on water 
repellent, Penta-treated board. At right, untreated board absorbs moisture. 


That’s why experienced farmers 
prefer spreaders 



125.bu. PTO 95-bu. PTO 95-bu. 70-bu. 75-bu. 4-wheeI 

See a New Idea spreader at your New Idea dealer's 
Or write for FREE literature 



.^FARM EQUIPMENT COrDivisiON->lKCO'DiSTRiBUTiNG CORP,] 
Dept. 404, Coldwater, Ohio 


MAGNIFYING GLASGES 


FOR FOLKS OVBR 40 



NOW.—magnifying lanaes for elderly folks who 
don’t wear glasses regularly, who do not have 
astigmatism or diseases of the eye, and who have 
difficulty reading newspapers, the Bible and doing 
fancy work. It’s no longer necessary to struggle and 
squint with an old-fashioned magnifying glass which 
has only one lens, because Precision Magnifying 
glasses bring you a magnifying lens for each eye and 
help stop eye-strain and discomfort. Permit restful 
reading hour after hour like you never did before. 
Try them at home on a five day trial plan that leaves 
no room for doubt. 

PRECISION MAGNIFYING GLASSES 
A Blessing for Elderly Folks. 

Lenses are scientifically (not Rx) ground and 
polished, then fitted Into a frame of simulated xylonite. 
Truly they add to your looks, and, for reading pur¬ 
poses they’re wonderful. Complete satisfaction guar¬ 
anteed. Best order a pair today. 

SEND NO MONEY 

Just mall name, address and age. On arrival pay 
postman only $4.00 plus C.O.D. postage. Wear them 5 
days, then. If you aren’t more than satisfied return for 
refund of purchase price. If you remit with your order, 
we ship prepaid, same guarantee. Order from: j 

PRECISION OPTICAL, Inc. 

Dept. 449-B Rochelle, III. 



PROTECT YOUR CROPS 


New 


Repellent 


Availoble 


Write for info. 


SPRAY Low-Cost Magic Circle 
Repellent Creotes barr 
cgoirtst Deer Also Beovers, Wood- 
cbucLs, Sheep. Skunks and Roccoons 
in some coses. 

Odor not offensive to hu/nons. 

BUY NOW! locolly, or order direct from 
Stote College Laboratories, Stote College, Po. 

PRODUCT OF STATE COLLEGE LABORATORIES • P.O.Box 492. Stote College. Po. 


mew 


NATURAL 

LIGHTWEIGHT 


DENTAL PLATE 

Made from your old one... 
returned Air Moil someday 


New Process Saves 
Money ^ 




Priced 
Low As 

New Profetsiona I _ 

Method makes beautiful per¬ 
fect-fitting plastic plate from old. 
cracked loose plates WITHOUT IMPRESSION. 

30 DAY MONEY-BACK TRIAL 

YOU can have gorgeous, natural-looking, perfect- 
fitting false plates that are comfortable, healthful 
and prideful. From your old plate we will make a 
brand new denture —upper, lower or partial — per¬ 
fectly matched, perfectly natural. Amazing savings 
with new scientific Clinical method. New plates re¬ 
turned to you Air Mail usually within eight hours. 
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Why Fight the Gypsy Moth? 


(Continued from Page 6) 

“Be It Resolved. . . that the 
gypsy moth control project be 
considered henceforth ... as 
within the eradication category, 
rather than . . . containment 
classification; that definite plans 
be initiated immediately to be¬ 
gin an accelerated program in 
1957 fiscal year, and that. . . 
all agencies . . . interest ap¬ 
propriating authorities in the 
procurement of funds required 
to translate this proposal into 
reality.” 

It based the resolution on these 
grounds: (1) The gypsy moth had 
convincingly demonstrated its ca¬ 
pacity to desti’oy a wide variety of 
plants over vast acreages and posed 
a potential threat over “unpredict¬ 
able thousands” of square miles of 
many States not now infested; (2) 
the “many millions of dollars” spent 
at national, state, and local levels in 
attempts at eradication or suppres¬ 
sion of the pest had been only par¬ 
tially successful; and (3) an “effec¬ 
tively demonstrated method of sup¬ 
pression or possibly eradication” was 
available. 

Representatives 15 state com 
missioners of agriculture concluded 
that steps should be taken imme¬ 
diately to eliminate the moth from 
Michigan, New Jersey and Pennsyl- 


Sugaring Off 

The woodsmoke fills the hillside 
And fragrant breezes blow 
The sweetness from the sugar house 
Hid deep in glistening snow. 

And silvery hanging branches 
All crackling in the breeze 
Look down on wooden buckets 
Strapped full to running trees. 

I’ve come to know the pleasures 
Lost in foolish childhood scoff, 
And long now for New England 
When it’s time to sugar off! 

— Patricia D. Bachand 


vania, and from infested areas west 
of New England’s Berkshire and 
Green Mountains. So Congress made 
funds available early in 1956 to co¬ 
operate with the States in initiating 
the eradication program. The Ameri¬ 
can Farm Bureau Federation, nur¬ 
serymen’s organizations, and other 
farm and forest groups were in sup¬ 
port of this. Work was begun imme¬ 
diately, and 686,000 acres were DDT 
sprayed at the fringe of the generally 
infested northeast area with gratify¬ 
ing success. In September 1956, the 
38th Annual Convention of the 
National Association of Commission¬ 
ers, Secretaries and Directors of Agri¬ 
culture resolved as follows: 

“That the Congress of the 
United States be commended for 
increasing the financial support 
of the gypsy moth program of 
the U. S. Dept, of Agriculture. . . 
which can result in the complete 
eradication of the pest. . .” 

1957’s “Operation Spray” 

Congress appropriated about $2.7 
million as the Federal Government’s 
share for the 1957 season. Plans were 
laid by State and federal representa¬ 
tives to eliminate infestations in 
Michigan, Pennsylvania and New 
Jersey and to eradicate those at the 
outer edge of the infested areas of 
New York in the southern Catskills, 
the lower Hudson Valley, and on 
Long Island. Contracts were awarded 
to three companies to apply an oil 
spray of one pound of DDT per acre 
from aircraft. Within the generally 
infested areas of New York and New 


England, plans called for concurrent 
suppression work to keep populations 
at a low level and thus reduce the 
danger of spread into areas being 
sprayed for complete eradication. 

The results of the state-federal pro¬ 
gram carried out from -4pril 23 to 
June 14 were about as anticipated. 
In traps placed in eradication areas 
of Michigan, no moths have since 
been recovered; it appears , that the 
gypsy moth has now been eliminated 
from its most western outpost. Like¬ 
wise, intensive trapping in the three- 
million-acre eradication ai’ea of New 
York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey 
has resulted in recovery of moths in 
only a few scattered areas. 

The success of the eradication cam¬ 
paign resulted from its careful plan¬ 
ning and execution. Aircraft were 
under constant surveillance from the 
ground and air, and communication 
was maintained constantly by radio. 
All pilots had to meet regulations of 
the Civil Aeronautics Administration, 
and a CAA supervisor was assigned 
to each unit during operations. The 
spray equipment of each airplane 
met and passed rigid USDA specifi¬ 
cations inspection. 

The procedures were satisfactory 
in other ways, too. There was no 
known widespread destruction of 
birds, fish or other living natural re¬ 
sources, and none is expected to de¬ 
velop. There was an occasional loss 
of fish in some shallow ponds, but 
the overall effect of the gypsy moth 
spray on the natural environment 
was not detrimental. Any losses at¬ 
tendant on the program are con¬ 
sidered negligible in comparison with 
the protection gained for wildlife 
habitats and with the preservation 
effected in watersheds. Recommenda¬ 
tions of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service as to dosage of DDT were 
strictly followed. With two pounds of 
DDT per acre as the maximum 
amount it states can be safely applied 
to forested areas without serious 
damage to wildlife, the one pound 
actual dosage gave, and gives, a wide 
margin for safe operation. DDT was 
used because of its effectiveness 
against the gypsy moth and because 
of its history of safety over a long 
period of time. 

With safe, cheap, and effective 
eradication now possible, is it either 
good business or in the national in¬ 
terest to spend increasing amounts of 
money just to live with the gypsy 
moth? Why let it spread to more 
territory involving more and more 
of our timber resources in new 
States? The gypsy moth should not 
continue to make annual raids on our 
timber and shade trees and also on 
our local, state and federal treas¬ 
uries. Why let inaction now require 
frequent insecticide applications la¬ 
ter? A single aerial spray with limit¬ 
ed follow-up operations can success¬ 
fully eliminate the gypsy moth, and 
this course has now been adopted in 
place of any suppressive program on 
a continuing annual basis. 

Long-range plans call for re¬ 
establishing natural barriers at the 
Berkshire Hills and Green Mountains 
in New England and eventually to 
eliminating the moth from the 
United States competely. The job is 
not an overnight one, but, with infes¬ 
tations at a low ebb, now is a most 
appropriate time to conduct the 
eradication program. 

With the knowledge we have of 
the potential destructiveness of the 
gypsy moth, we cannot in conscience 
permit it to spread over the forests 
of America. We must make a genuine, 
all-out effort to stop it. We fight the 
gypsy moth—and we must— with all 
the tools and chemicals we have 
available. 


[Mr. Burgess is director of the 
Plant Pest Control Division, Agri¬ 
cultural Research Service, U. S. De¬ 
partment of Agriculture. — Ed.l 


10 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 












































MOWING 


BALING 


UNLOADING 


cinnHiW'Vi’iQH 

mvim'inn 


New York^s Corn Champions 


Edward Withey and son, Richard, 
Skaneateles, Onondaga Co., were re¬ 
cently crowned “19.57 Corn Kings of 
New York’' for their five-acre meas¬ 
ured yield of 181 bushels of shelled 
corn per acre. The coronation was not 
novel, for they also won DeKalb 
Agricultural Assn’s 1956 contest with 
a yield of 157 bushels. In 1957, they 
were out to “see just how much corn 
could be produced on their farm. 
In all, they had 38 acres. The seed 
went in fairly early—May 14—and 
350 pounds of 5-10-10 fertilizer were 
put alongside as starter. Previously, 
eight loads of cow manure had been 
applied per acre during the Winter, 
With rows 32 inches apart and spac¬ 
ing in the rows an average of about 
nine inches at harvest, the plant pop¬ 
ulation was hign; 20,780 per acre. 
They cultivated twice and sprayed 
once for weeds. Richard Withey as 
ci'ibes good seed—it was DeKalb 58, 
favorable weather, and thick planting 
to the success of the crop; a bushel 
of the medium-flat seed planted about 
four acres. The corn crop went chief¬ 
ly into feed for the Witheys’ 37- 
head herd of Holstein dairy cattle. 
On their 259-acre farm along the 
shores of Skaneateles Lake, they also 
grew 50 acres of oats and almost 200 
of pasture, sifage and hay. Their 
1957 yield of corn was the highest 
yet made in DeKalb’s New York con 
test. 

Max Shaul, Middleburg, Schoharie 
Co., actually surpassed the Witheys 
in yield per aci’e. Perhaps he, with 
the State’s first official yield in ex¬ 
cess of 200 bushels per acre, should 
be designated corn king, too; or may¬ 
be the Witheys are the princes of 
Empire corn production. The reason 
Shaul was not specifically honored 
by DeKalb, however, is that he is a 


pounds of nitrate side-dressed. There 
is a regular spraying of weeds with 
2, 4-D. According to Shaul, “the corn 
has got to be in there thick’’. He 
also grows cabbage, beets, peas, water¬ 
melons, squash for both fresh and 
cannery markets. His yield of corn 
last year at 205 bushels was higher 
than that for the DeKalb national 
champion, Henry Penning, Decatur, 
Mich., who raised 203 bushels per 
acre. 

The “favorable weather” experi¬ 
enced by the Witheys last year was 
not general, and the corn yields in 
many New York Counties were re¬ 
duced. Yet all the county champions 
had good and valuable yields 
despite the drought. New York 
winners are listed separately on 
this page. Winners in other DeKalb 


state contests in 1957 were: Pennsyl¬ 
vania Lynn Wagner, Jersey Shore; 
Vermont—Hall Farms, Bennington; 
Appleton Farms, Ipswich; and New 
Jersey—Joseph Pratchler, just over 
the line from Port Jervis, N. Y. 


Best Temperature to 
Churn Cream 

Please tell me the best tempera¬ 
ture at which to churn cream for 
butter? H. w. g. 

Pennsylvania 

Keep cream at about 40 degrees F. 
until you churn it. If you must add 
cream to the stored supply, be sure 
to cool it first. Adding warm cream 
to cold cream causes undesirable 
flavors in the butter. k. a. 


Good Livestock Books 

Feeds and Feeding, 

F. B. Morrison.$9.50 

Bovine Mastitis, 

Little and Plastridge. 9.00 

The Stockman’s Handbook, 

M. E. Ensminger. 8.50 

Breeding Better Livestock, 

Rice and Andrews. 7.00 

Beef Cattle, 

Roscoe Snapp . 6.50 

Introductory Animal Science, 

W. P. Garrigus. 6.50 

Sheep Science, 

Wm. G. Kammlade. 6.50 

Dairy Cattle and Milk Production 

Anthony and Eckles. 6.25 

Raising Swine, 

Deyoe and Krider. 6.25 

For sale by The Rural New 
Yorker, 333 West 30th St., New York 
1, N. Y. “(New York City residents, 
add 3% Sales Tax.) 


N. Y. Corn Winners 

County Name and Address 

Cattaraugus. .Gerald Scutt, Portvillc 

Cayuga . Chas. H. Riley & Co., Sennett 

Chautauqua. .E. G. Smith & Son, Silver Creek 
Chemung.... Ralph Tanner, Elmira 
Chenango. .. .J. R. Cunningham, Sherburne 
Columbia .... Wesley W'erner, Jr., Germantown 

Cortland . Webter Bros., lloiner 

Dutchess . Gilbert Bros., Hyde Park 

Erie. Henry Mueller, Sardinia 

Genesee . George Schneider, Alexander 

Herkimer.... Frank P. Guido, Frankfort 
Livingston.. .John Hammond & Sons, Dansville 

Madison. Warner L. Durfee, Chittenango 

Monroe. Mrs. E. Hall & Son, Henrietta 

Montgomery. Donald Bradt, Fonda 

Onondaga. . .Ed w. Withey & Son, Skaneateles 

Oneida . Craig Sholtz & Son, Verona 

Ontario . Ted Minns, Geneva 

Oswego . G. A. Hardcastlc, Constantia 

Rensselaer. ..Taylor Bros., Johusonville 
Schoharie. . .J. Roger Barber, Middleburg 

Seneca . Stanley VanVlect, Ovid 

Tioga . Fred Hanford, Nichols 

Washington.Edward J. Mead, Johnsonville 
Wyoming. .. .Francis Gebcl, North Java 
Yates . Frank W. Voak, Penn Yan 


DeKalb dealer; dealers are not elig¬ 
ible for competition. As reported in 
the Jan. 18 issue of The Rural 
New Yorker, Shaul was winner of 
the statewide contest sponsored by 
Cayuga County Extension Service. He 
attributes the success of his corn¬ 
growing operations on some 450 acres 
of Schoharie Valley bottomland to 
the depth of the soil, to rye-grass 
green manure crops, to virtually weed 
-free culture, and to heavy fertiliza¬ 
tion. He sows 12 pounds of rye grass 
by tractor-mounted electric seeders 
at the last-third-cultivation and ap¬ 
plies 100 pounds of ammonium ni¬ 
trate to it in the Spring prior to turn¬ 
ing under. The corn gets 700 pounds 
of fertilizer per acre—it goes a couple 
inches below and to the side of the 
seed—at planting and another 200 




Harvestore® haylage 
costs you less in men^ 
minutes and machines 

Now the Harvestore quick-way of putting up 
forage gives you a superior feed ... saves labor 
and handling expense at the same time. Field- 
wilt a forage crop to 40-60% moisture, process 
it through a Harvestore and you have hay- 
lage — a nutritious, palatable feed that’s a 
nearly complete ration in itself. 

Fewer operations in the field save labor 
and reduce weather risk. Exclusive bottom 
unloading combines with your mechanical 
feeding system to give you the most conveni¬ 
ent way to feed livestock. 

All these benefits are possible only with 
Harvestore* oxygen-free processing. For more 
information, fill in the coupon below. 


1. CUT AND 
WINDROW 


to 


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MECHANICALI 


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No. 2,754,222 and other patents pending. 


'%7(ro^gh research 


...a better way 


AXlSmilli 


HARVESTORE PRODUCTS 

Konkokee, Illinois 


I 

\ A. O. SMITH CORP. 

I Dept. RN- 28 , Konkakee, Illinois 

Please send me more information on how 
Harvestore can help me increase my profits. 

NAME 

TOWN ....R.F.D. ... 


.....^.....STATE .... 


February 15, 1958 


11 




























































































Irrigation Pumps- Air or water cooled 
Capacities to 1800 gallons per minute 


Steady Dairy Hand — Electricity 


Whether portable (1.) or permanent, gutter cleaners are iisually powered 
by electric motors. The economical and flexible rig on the left can be in¬ 
stalled for use in almost any gutter; it is transferred from one to another. 
The conventional installation at the right ivas put in by the farmer himself. 


A dependable 
quiet Myers Ejecto 
Pump delivers plenty 
of water with plenty of 
pressure for all the daily 
needs of a busy family. 


"HN” Ejecto Pump 
H to 2 horsepower sizes 


Submersible 
Pump for 4" 
and 6" wells 
H to 15 
horsepower 


For many maintenance and operational jobs, there's no 
substitute for lots of water at peak pressure. And there’s 
no substitute for the Myers Submersible when it comes 
to delivering the most water per horsepower. Up to 
3000 gallons per hour. 


You can have 
higher-profit, 
higher quality 
yields with sprinkler 
irrigation powered by 
a Myers Pressure-Rain Pump. 
Write today for information. 

Myers 


THE F. E. MYERS & BRO. CO., 3802 Orange Street, Ashland, Ohio 

Kitchener, Canada 


(Continued fi’om'Page 2) 

investment. Yet, farmers who think 
ahead recognize that major changes 
are now taking place. Some actually 
say that it is not longer a question of 
what they can afford, but rather a 
question of whether they can afford 
to be without equipment that will 
I give them advantage in today’s com¬ 
petitive markets. 

We have mentioned the real part¬ 
nership of the electrical and water 
systems. But the ever-increasing need 
for hot water means that electric 
water heaters should be sized right. 
Do not purchase one too small, and 
do not let faulty wiring provide its 
current. Take care whether the in¬ 
stallation can be for “off-peak” oper¬ 
ation or direct recovery or a combi¬ 
nation of the two. The trend toward 
bulk milk handling and pipelines 
means greatly increased use of hot 
water. 

Bulk Tanks, Hay Dryers and Barn 
Cleaners 

The farmer should look carefully 
at his bulk tank capacity, too. The 
New York City Board of Health has 
now approved every other day pick¬ 
up of milk, and this makes tank size 
more important than heretofore. 
Planned and used properly, bulk 
tanks have many attractive advan¬ 
tages for most farmers: premiums 
because of better quality milk; elim¬ 
ination of can costs; no stickage and 
spillage loss; less hauling costs; and 
fewer man-hours of labor. It is like 
selling milk “F.O.B. the milk house”, 
and the investment will bring a 
better net return. One farmer with 
a bulk milk tank says: “I have had 
salesmen tell me a certain piece of 
equipment will pay for itself, but this 
is the first time I have demonstrated 
it to be positively true.” 

Perhaps one of the most important 
pieces of electrical equipment on the 
dairy farm is the hay dryer. Barn-' 
dried, early-cut top quality forage 
can mean savings up to $50 per cow 
a year in feeding costs. High-protein 
I'oughage produced in this way is an 
important part of any progressive 
dairying program. The electric hay 
dryer was a slow starter, but proven 
results have brought an increasing 


number of installations each year. 

When it is really wanted to redvice 
chore-time labor, electric motors can 
replace shovels and forks. Barn clean¬ 
ers, cattle feeders and silo unloaders 
do a real job. Pitching manure and 
throwing down silage and feeding it 
are among the hardest, most hazard¬ 
ous and dirtiest jobs on a dairy farm. 
One farmer tells us that his invest¬ 
ment in a silo unloader in combina¬ 
tion with a barn cleaner replaced a 
full-time hired man. This brought 
savings of $185 a month. 

With bulk feed coming into the 
picture it is desirable to make feed¬ 
ing automatic all the way. Electrical 
equipment is extremely flexible for 
this, and can be installed to meet al¬ 
most any plan for both storing and 
feeding. For those growing their own 
grains for feeding, there are auto¬ 
matic devices to grind, mix, add con¬ 
centrates and deliver to the storage 
bins. 

Advantages of Farm Work Shop 

With acceleration in mechaniza¬ 
tion, it is important, of course, not to 
forget the farm workshop. Electric- 
powered tools are essential to the 
smooth-running success of any farm. 
It does not take many trips to town 
for emergency repairs during the 
busy seasons to offset the cost of a 
well-equipped shop. 

A quick review of some of the uses 
of electric light, heat and power on 
the modern dairy farm can serve as 
a starting point for further thought 
on making electricity a real partner 
on the farm. Farmers who are con¬ 
cerned about how well they are doing 
today and where they will be 10 
years from now must keep an eye 
on efficient production and on most 
profitable herd size. The right elec¬ 
trical equipment may be the key to 
more profitable dairy farming. 

Electric power is replacing muscle 
power on the farm at an accelerated 
pace. Each year more dairy farmers 
are realizing that a one-horsepower 
motor can accomplish in one hour at 
a cost of two to three cents what it 
takes a man 10 hours to do. To¬ 
day’s successful dairymen are farm¬ 
ing electrically and living electrical¬ 
ly, and they are doing each better. 


CRYSTOL 



Use now to prevent growth of summer algae. 
Also destroys odors and slime-forming bac¬ 
teria. Keeps water sanitary and sparkling 
clear for clean, healthy swimming. Harmless 
to crops and non-toxic to some game fish 
when used as directed. This odorless liquid 
is economical too — 1 gal. treats a 50,000 gal. 
pond and a single application is effective 
for weeks. 

Try Crystol once and see 
results! Send coupon today 
for trial offer. 


I I GAU. only 
$6.95 ppd. 


READING TESTING LABORATORIES, INC. 
READING, PENNA. 


Reading Testing Laboratories, Inc. 

Dept. R, 658 S. 7th St., Reading, Penna. 

Yes! Send me, postpaid, 1 gal. trial supply 
of Crystol. I enclose check or money order 
for $6.95. 

NAME. 

ADDRESS. 

P. O. STATE. 


Revolutionary RUPTURE 

RELIEF 


with the NEW 





GOLDEN CROWN TRUSS 

^ A spectacular rictory In the fight 
against reducible inguinal her¬ 
nia' A new concept in truss 
design ... a new miracle In 
comfort I For the first time, a 
truss built entirely of soft, resil- 
___i tent foam rubber covered with a 
, skin-soothing inner cloth lining and a 
ible pre-shrunk fabric outer covering. Can t 
ikle, curl, bind no matter how you move, 
t foam rubber groin pad holds nipturt 
jly vet gently. Completely adjustable—no 
Ing. Ventilated for cool comfort. Wash^le, 
thiss you've prayed for. Order now. Give 
isur© around lowest part of abdomen 
Icate right, left or di^le. 30-day ^oney 
t trial. Single side $9.95. double $10.95. 
tpald except C.O.D.’s. 

Piper Brace Company 
t. RY-28G Wyandoftd 

Kansas City 5, Mo. 



One of the good farm utilizations of electricity is in moving bales of hay. 
Electric motors provide the power to get them into the barn and into proper 

storage places. 


IZ 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 



































































Sugaring off 


For Fun and For Profit 


Down Troy way in New Hampshire’s 
Monadnock region there is a family 
who owns, and successfully operates, 
a small farm and inn. Usually, the 
late Winter and early Spring seasons 
are pretty quiet for East Hill Farm, 
as their inn is called, is off the beat¬ 
en track and most of their guests 
come by reservation in the Summer¬ 
time. 

The Whitcombs, who run the 
inn, make their own maple syrup and 
have popularized “Maple Syruping 
Weeks”, from the time the sap be¬ 
gins to run until it stops, the inn is 
well crowded and Mr. Whitcomb plays 


host to “sugaring off on the snow” 
parties. He takes the guests through 
the entire process, inviting photo¬ 
graphers’ groups to shoot to their 
hearts’ content. This is a great at¬ 
traction and people travel for many 
miles, from as far away as New York 
and New Jersey, to enjoy this once- 
a-year treat and see how maple syrup 
is made. 

Thus Parker Whitcomb succeeds 
in making extra income from his 
guests while he is sugaring off his 
income-producing grove of sugar 
maples. e. m. s 


Photos by Eric M, Sanford 



1. Parker Whitcomb and his daugh¬ 
ters start collecting the sap. 



2. The full sap tank is hacked up 
to the trough. 



3. Tank is hooked to trough and the 
sap goes to the sugar house. 



4. Down in the sugar house, the sap 
is boiled down in the vat. 



5. Watchful waiting, as the syrup is 
drawn off. 



6. The best part of sugaring off — 
maple sugar on snow. 


Money-Making Goat 

Edward Mitchell, Horseheads, Che¬ 
mung Co., N. Y., has a goat that is 
a real money-maker. Primarily a 
sheep raiser, Mitchell keeps a few 
does for milk and some bucks to 
protect his sheep from dogs. One five- 
year-old doe has each year so far 
produced triplet kids. Just before 
Easter and the Passover, when there 
is a good price for kids six to 10 
weeks old, Mitchell takes them to 
market. Usually receiving $8.00 to 
$10 apiece for them, one year he re¬ 
ceived $36 for the three. 

After her kids are gone, the 
mother doe raises two orphan lambs. 
Mitchell keeps the lambs in a nearby 
pen and turns them loose at milking 
time. They get their fill, and the 
doe objects not at all. The goat’s 
milk not used by the lambs Mitchell 
takes home to use. 

When the sale of three kids and 
two market lambs and the value of 
iT^ilk produced for home use are con¬ 
sidered, the doe’s yearly production 
is as great as that of some dairy 

February 15, 1958 


cows. A goat can be a mightly profit¬ 
able animal to own, especially when 
mixed with sheep, the way Ed 
Mitchell does it. E. C. Grant 


Books on Soils and Crops 

Forage and Pasture Crops, 

W. A. Wheeler.$10.00 

Diseases of Field Crops, 

James G. Dickson. 8.50 

Grassland Farming in the Humid 
Northeast, 

Ford S. Prince. 6.00 

Fundamentals of Soil Science, 

Millar and Turk. 5.75 

Tree Crops, A Permanent 
Agriculture, 

J. Russell Smith. 6.00 

Soils and Fertilizers, 

Firman Bear . 6.50 

Field Crops and Land Use, 

Cox and Jackson. 5.50 

Farm Wood Crops, 

John Preston. 5.50 

For sale by The Rural New 
Yorker, 333 West 30th St., New York 
1, N. Y. (New York City residents, 
add 3% Sales Tax.) 



Model 5207-ETR2 
7 gallons per minute 
400 pounds pressure 
100- or 200-gallon tank 
Engine drive or PTO 


SPRAY6R 


. • 




Plenty of pressure for effective ap¬ 
plication of pesticides to trees with 
Myers high pressure gun. 


Fitted with Myers 2U Du-All boom, 
the GP is ideal for low-pressure 
spraying of weed killers on pastures 
and field crops. 




The GP is a handy emergency fire¬ 
fighting unit. Produces effective fog 
for smothering flames or shoots a 
long-distance stream. 


In coops, barns and other buildings 
the GP comes in handy for fly and 
other pest control. Can also be used 
to apply whitewash. 



The GP delivers plenty of pressure 
for removing mud and grime from 
equipment for easier, faster and 
better year-around maintenance. 


Keep livestock free of profit-robbing 
parasites. The Myers GP delivers 
the pressure necessary for effective 
pesticide penetration. 



WRITE TODAY FOR THE NAME OF YOUR NEAREST MYERS SPRAYER DEALER.) 



Myers 


THE F. E. MYERS & BRO. CO., 3802 Orange St., Ashland, Ohio 

Kitchener, Canada 




No investment, no experience 
needed. Just show magic cushion 
comfort to friends, neighbors, co¬ 
workers. Advance commissions to 
$4.00 a pair, plus Cash Bonus, 
Paid Vocation, $25.00 Reward 
Offer Outstanding values for men, 
women, children. Money back 
guarantee. Shoe samples supplied 
without cost. Write TODAY for FREE 
new84page catalog and full details. 


TANNERS SHOE CO., 649 BROCKTON, MASS. 


Two- 
Eyelet' 
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PATENTS 


Writ# for Information on 
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13 






























































Published Semi-Monthly By 

Rural Publishing Co., Inc. 333 West 30th St., New York 1, N. Y. 
John J. Dillon, Publisher, 1899-1950 

EDITORIAL AND EXECUTIVE STAFF 
William F. Bkrohold, Editor and Publisher 
James N. Bodurtha, Managing Editor 
William a. O’Brien, Business Manager 
H; G. Hardwick, Circul. Mgr. M. Q. Kktks, Publisher’s Desk 

Peter 8. Lefera, Production Mgr, Persis Smith, Woman and Home 
H. B. Tcket B. K, Sommers 

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Donald F. Jones R. Albrectsen 


SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

Fifty Cents a Year—Three Years for One Dollar 
Single Copy Five Cents. 

Foreign countries in the Universal Postal Union, $8.0t. 


Entered at Sew York Post Oftlce as Second Class Matter. 


‘•A SQUARE DEAL” 

We believe that every advertisement in this paper is backed by a respon¬ 
sible person. We use every possible precaution and admit the advertising of 
reliable houses only. But to make doubly sure, we will make good any lose 
to paid subscribers sustained by trusting any deliberate swindler, irrc.spon- 
sible advertisers or misleading advertisements in our columns, and any 
such swindler will be publicly exposed. We are also often called upon 
to adjust differences or mistakes between our subscribers and honest, 
responsible houses, whether advertisers or not. We willingly use our good 
ofllces to this end, but such cases should not be confused with dishonest 
transactions. AVe protect subscribers against rogues, but we will not be 
responsible for the debts of honest bankrupts sanctioned by the courts. 
Notice of the complaint must be sent to us within one month of the time of 
the transaction, and to identify it. you should mention The Rural New- 
Yorker when writing the advertiser. 


A $3,2 Billion Question 

C AN American farmers produce enough 
more livestock and poultry to eat up the 
annual surplus of feed and food crops with¬ 
out it resulting in such reduced animal and 
fowl prices that their overall income would be 
cut? 

This is a multi-billion-dollar question not 
only for American agriculture but for the en¬ 
tire nation. An affirmative answer to the ques¬ 
tion would mean successful termination of cost¬ 
ly price-support programs; it would mean re¬ 
newed demand for farmers and farm labor; and 
it would also mean a more well-nourished, and 
therefore probably stronger, American people. 
Animals could be the answer to our agricultural 
problem, allegedly costing $3.2 billion a year. 

But agricultural economists at Pennsylvania 
State University are not too optimistic that the 
answer can be “Yes.” They believe that the 
level to which farm prices for livestock and 
poultry would have to be lowered to induce 
American consumers to buy such a volume that 
would shrink the feed and food surplus would 
be more than farmers could stand. Generally, 
it takes a 1.4 per cent decline in the farm price 
of beef to increase consumption just one per 
cent; for pork, poultry and eggs, and dairy pro¬ 
ducts, the figures are 1.8, 1.2, 2.4 and 2.6 per 
cent. Farmers’ cash receipts would decrease as 
their marketings might increase, the farm 
economists conclude. 

Cornell’s Professor Herrell DeGraaf is some¬ 
what more optimistic. Realizing that just a two 
per cent increase in livestock and poultry pro¬ 
duction in the United States would consume 
all our extra feed and food, he hopes that the 
consumer demand for this increase could be 
stimulated enough by “promotion of protein” 
that there would be little or no decline in farm 
prices. Although annual per-capita consump¬ 
tion of food — about 1,550 pounds — has varied 
little, if at all, in quantity over the past 
century, it has in quality. In the last 
20 years, while the population was increasing 
only 30 per cent, consumption of poultry went 
up 90 per cent. Unfortunately, while red meat 
did hold its own, eggs and milk fell off. Today, 
too, improved efficiency of animal production 
seems to be fully matching population in¬ 
creases; animals produce more on the same 
amount of feed. Nevertheless, DeGraaf is of 
the belief that consumption of animal products 
can be increased by promotion of animal pro¬ 
tein—as products, not brands. 

Probably this $3.2 billion question can be 
answered only by trial and experience. But 
it is worth noting that consideration on it so 
far seems to have been concerned chiefly with 
the cause or effect of lowered farm prices. 
While this is proper enough, and natural—for 
it is farm prices that suffer most from any over¬ 
supply, should not more attention be given 
to the effects of lower retail prices for animal 
products? Instead of asking farmers to produce 
more animals and seeing if the public will buy 
them—if not, the farmer to suffer—why not 

14 


see to it that retail margins and middlemen’s 
profits are lowered so as to create the neces¬ 
sary greater demand? 

It is no secret that the running mates of 
post-war farm problems have been high profits 
for food-handling firms. Let these outfits now 
join in solving what has been called the nation’s 
No. 1 domestic problem. Let them realize the 
basic cause of the farm problem is spread. 
Reduction of it would go a long way to in¬ 
creasing consumption of those animal products 
which could take up all our feed and food sur¬ 
pluses. Not without basis is the observation that 
the answer to the $3.2 billion agricultural ques¬ 
tion may lie less with the Department of Agri¬ 
culture than with the Department of Justice. 


Against Price-Support Slash 

Your January 4 editorial, “Fallacy in Lower 
Price Supports”, is an excellent description of 
the harm that Secretary Benson has perpetrated 
against dairy farmers. 

There is a move in the present session of 
Congress to increase the milk minimum to 83 
per cent from the present 75 per cent. Dairy¬ 
men who v;ant to see this done should write to 
their Congressmen, reminding them that the 
Farm Bureau did not speak for the dairy farmer 
when it praised Secretary Benson for lowering 
milk prices. By letting his position be known 
now, the dairy farmer can protect himself against 
the loss of $1.00 a hundredweight after April 1st. 

The defense of a reasonable standard of living 
ultimately requires the election of Congressmen 
who will work for consideration ot the dairy 
farmer rather than ally themselves with the dis¬ 
tributor against the farmer. 

While the dairymen’s vote is comparatively 
small, still it can be a potent political force if 
farmers express political independence. In Brad¬ 
ford County (Pa.) last November, due to support 
for a third candidate, the judgeship was won by 
only two votes. This shows that, if a group speaks 
out forcefully, it can have effect. 

In the 17th Congressional District (Pa.), there 
is interest in the possibilities of a Farmers Com¬ 
mittee for Full Representation. The purpose would 
be to urge adequate commitments from the candi¬ 
dates for Congress on agricultural issues, especial¬ 
ly the raising of milk parity. If that fails, an 
independent Congressional candidate might be 
the only means to get representation for all the 
people in the district. Edward Rogg 

Pennsylvania 

Your editorial in the January 4 issue, entitled 
“Fallacy in Lower Price Supports”, is to be 
highly commended for its correct attitude toward 
Mr. Benson’s ideas on lower price supports. 

Always when prices are lower, the farmer— 
and especially the one with heavy payments to 
meet each month—tries to increase his output 
of milk to meet these payments and also to live. 
Living nowadays is expensive, whether you are 
a farmer or one of the great multitude of town 
01 city dwellers. 

I am a new reader of your paper but so far 
I have found it good with a lot of meaty material 
for the farmer to read and digest. More power 
to you and your fight for a better living for the 
farmer. F. J. Phelps 

Vermont 

If these two letters, typical of the many we 
have received, represent the majority senti¬ 
ment of dairymen on price supports — and we 
think they do, the steps taken to set up a North¬ 
east Dairy Bloc, as reported on page 26, should 
be welcome news. 

Price supports are not the long-range an¬ 
swer, of course, to the farm problem. And 
dairy price supports, offering as they do a 
guaranteed price to manufacturing milk deal¬ 
ers, will never solve the dairy farmer’s basic 
problem. But to take away at the present time 
even this artificial prop at a time when dairy¬ 
men can ill afford to risk the loss of even one 
dollar of milk income would be equivalent to 
the lowering of labor’s minimum wages or in¬ 
dustry’s protective tariffs. The proposed slash 
of dairy price supports on April 1 must there¬ 
fore be vigorously opposed. 

Thus there is need for a forceful reliable 
spokesman for the dairy farmer. There is equal 
need to “sell” the dairy problem to Mr. and 
Mrs, Housewife who are exposed only to the 
dealer-slanted urban press. Whether the North¬ 
east Dairy Bloc can help to fulfill this two¬ 
fold function is too early to say. But that it is 
a step in the right direction cannot be denied. 


Words of Wisdom 

S OME really sound counsel was offered at 
last month’s Boston Poultry Show during 
the panel discussion on self-help plans for the 
poultry industry. The words of wisdom were 
spoken by Henry Bradford of the USDA’s 
Farmer Cooperative Service. 

There were three facets to Mr. Bradford’s 
advice. First, he stressed the great advantages 
to be attained from a merger of existing poul¬ 
try co-operatives — greater efficiency in oper¬ 
ation, greater marketing effectiveness, and 
production tailored to meet demand. At the 
same time he recognized the “human nature” 
obstacles in taking such a major step — lack 
of grower understanding, unwillingness to re¬ 
linquish present positions of local importance, 
adequate representation and equalization of 
equities. Third and last, Mr. Bradford em¬ 
phasized the responsibility of cooperative 
leadership to present all the facts to their 
memberships and, with their support, to work 
out the problems. 

These panel discussions should go a long 
way toward producing the desired result. In 
addition to the one at the Boston Poultry 
Show, there was a panel on the same subject 
at the Central New York Poultry Exposition, 
in Syracuse two weeks ago, and still a third is 
scheduled at Cornell’s Farm and Home Week 
next month. 

It is obvious, of course, that at some point 
there must be an end to panel discussions. Let 
them serve their rightful purpose of stimu¬ 
lating inquiry and interest. And then, without 
too much delay, let there be a decision. 


What Farmers Say 

MILK ADVERTISING AND BULK TANKS 

I have just read the February 1 issue of The 
Rural New Yorker and am very upset about the 
latest trick the milk dealers are going to puU on 
this milk advertising business. What can we do? 
Will we be informed of the effective date of the 
Order amendment? I believe we are no better 
off than the European peasant of 100 years ago. 

Last Fall quite a few farmers around here 
changed to bulk tanks — mostly on the promise 
of high premiums. First, we were not informed 
that we would have every-other-day pick-up 
which would mean that many of our tanks would 
be too small. We had one one-day pick-up, and 
every-other-day since. The farmers in this neigh¬ 
borhood wanted to send their milk to the best 
market and contacted different milk companies. 
The following day the Sheffield men came around 
and gave us a talk, and one by one the former 
interested dealers became disinterested and one 
told us frankly that Sheffield stopped him. We now 
hope again to get a better price from another milk 
company if Sheffield and Dairy League don’t stop 
it again. What can we do? We only get a 10-cent 
pi’emium over can shipments, but we had about 
$5,000 of expenses, including new milkhouse, etc., 
etc., also our electric bill went from $18 to $45 
a month. j. f, 

Otsego County, N. Y. 

[Ed. — A bulk tank shipper can protect himself 
against premium reductions or changes in pick-up 
only by obtaining the dealer’s signature on the 
dotted line of a one-year (minimum) contract.] 


Enclosed please find check for $2.00 for continu¬ 
ation of my subscription to The Rural New 
Yorker. 

Please keep up your editorials that bring to 
light the wrong-doings and graft of our so-called 
farmer-owned and operated milk cooperatives. 

Keep encouraging the dairy farmer to organize 
and take part in a good organization. I fully real¬ 
ize it is hard to know which one is good. 

Why farmers never learn to try to control and 
sell their own products. I’ll never know. What 
would the automotive industry do if they let 
someone else control the sale of their cars and 
price they get for them? Keith S. Nichols 

Pennsylvania 


Brevities 

“Yea, the Lord shall give that which is good; 
and our land shall yield her increase.”—Psa. 85:12. 

The 41st International Flower Show will be pre¬ 
sented March 9-15 at the Coliseum in New York 
City. Its theme is “The World Is Your Garden.” 

On February 1 Delmarva reported a 4-cent in¬ 
crease in the broiler price — up to 23.9 cents per 
pound. This is good news in view of the previous¬ 
ly predicted continued decline in broiler prices. 

THE RURAL NEW YORKER 


















"You Moke Your Own 
Luck" 

I wish to express my appreciation 
of the spirit in which you carry on 
the work for which The Rural New 
Yorker has always been respected 
so highly. It is because of that inter¬ 
est in the good of the farmer that 
I venture the following suggestions: 

I .believe that the farmers’ future 
and prosperity depend on the farm¬ 
ers themselves. In a recent issue of 
U. S. News and World Report, Mr. 
David Lawrence eloquently expresses 
this thought for our nation. His ed¬ 
itorial reminded me of a book 1 read 
many years ago (a young girl’s 
story) entitled, I believe, "You Make 
Your Own Luck”. 

True, the farmer has little control 
of the weather, but even that problem 
may be solved by insurance. Under 
wise, honest and competent leader¬ 
ship, the farmers, substantially united, 
may make their own luck through 
control of the amount of produce 
they market, and the time of their 
marketing. In the ordinary case this 
will require marketing agreements 
between farmers’ unions in the pro¬ 
ducing States. A majority of the pro¬ 
ducers in each State would bind all 
producers in that area. Legislation 
would be necessary to authorize such 
agreements. 

In the Northeast, at least, farmers 
resent the large subsidies—direct and 
indirect—afforded to the large grow¬ 
ers of corn, wheat, cotton, etc. Their 
plight will remain the same, how¬ 
ever, unless they unite. They make 
money, perhaps, one year in three 
or five. Control of marketing of 
citrus fruit works for Florida; con¬ 
trol of oil production in Texas, too. 

Price supports and the soil bank 
only encourage overproduction, make 
difficult our relations with other 
countries when we ship our surpluses 
abroad, and tax the national treasury 
to the tune of billions of dollars a 
year. 

Certainly the country is willing to 
pay. the farmer a fair price for his 
labor. Certainly, also, a union of the 
farmers is now as necessary as was 
the union of labor in the days of 
the financial barons. w. h. k. 

Suffolk Co., N. Y. 

What Is "Gross Farm 
Income"? 

In connection with the recent 

“Farm Income Tax” series of art¬ 

icles in The Rural New Yorker, I 
am wondering what the proper def- 
intion of "gross income” is. Can you 
tell me? j. l. n. 

Columbia Co., N. Y. 

"Gross income” for the purpose of 
calculating the maximum annual de¬ 
duction—25 per cent of gross—for 
soil and water conservation expenses 
is the amount on line 5, page 1, 
Schedule F, when reporting on the 
cash basis, or the amount on line 5, 
page 2, Schedule F, when reporting 
on the accrual basis, plus gains from 
the sale of livestock held for draft, 
dairy or breeding purposes. Gains 
from the sale of other assets, such 
as farm machinery and equipment, 
and from the disposition of land are 
not included in gross income for this 
purpose. G. A. s. 



“That bale didn’t hit you, did it, 
Fred?” 


February 15, 1958 



POWER CHORiHO 

Hydraulic system powers 
quick-mounted front-end 
loader, farm crane, easy- 
angled reversible scraper 
or fork-lift carrier. 


Action 

Engineered 


2-PLOW 


TRACTOR 

FARMING 


FOR 

COMPLETE 


C4 engine power does every job 

from field to feedlot 


Think of all your tractor jobs—and you’ll choose the two-plow CA. It’s long on work .. . lean on 
costs . . . designed, built and matched with mounted tools for profitable farming—for years to come! 

Toughness! Long engine life! Economy! Convenience! Versatility! Implements! Measure its value 
every way. Then ask your Allis-Chalmers dealer to show you how the CA can start working for you ... 
right now ... on winter chores. 


AlllS-CHALMERS, FARM EQUIPMENT DIVISION. MILWAUKEE 1, WISCONSIN 


FITS ROW CROPS 

Power-Shift rear wheels are moved in or out by 
engine power to fit row spacings. Offset final 
drive design gives 221^ inches of crop clearance 
under the rear axle. 

FARTH-ORIP POWFR 

With rear-mounted implements, the Traction 
Booster system automatically shifts weight to 
the rear wheels. You keep moving in stubborn soils. 


QUICK SOB CHAMCF 

Snap-Coupler hitch lets you change nunute- 
quick from one rear-mounted implement to 
another—or to drawbar jobs. 

uve pro 

Two-clutch power control: Hand clutch starts or 
stops tractor without affecting PTO operation. 
Foot clutch stops all power outlets for safety. 



traction booster and 
SNAP-COUPLER are 
AUis-Chalmera trademarks. 


ALLIS-CHALMERS 

iEngineering in Action 


15 


































Ask for a FREE DEMONSTRATION 
on your own farm. You may be sur¬ 
prised at how little vacuum you 
have ... how much more air... and 
milk .,. you can move with a new 


as little as 


DOWN 


Puts a New Pump 
in Your Barn 


with too little vacuum in the line, 
you’ll never milk cows properly. 


A snappy new Surge Pump can 
put new life in your milker . . . 
make it possible to add more units 
and more cows ... milk in less time 
•.. and get more milk. 


Surge Pump. Just call your Surge 


Dealer, or write 
in care of — 



to Jonah Babson, 


Copyright 1958, Babson Bros, Co. 

BABSON BROS. 

OF NEW YORK 


842 W. BELDEN AVENUE 
SYRACUSE 1, NEW YORK 




Protect your farm and family against power 
failure NOW with a Tractor-Driven Gener¬ 


ator. N*;* extra engine to buy. Operates 
from tractor or gas engine. Supplies power 
for lights, heating system, water pump, 
milk«r, brooder, milk cooler, etc. 


LOWEST IN COST 20 YEAR WARRANTY 



rinrr OUTFIT STARTS YOU IN 

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Runyourown prof liable‘shoe store* 
business from borne! Represent 
fast growing million dollar firm in 
spare or full time. We give you— 
FREE— complete Starting Outfit 
that makes you $217.00 EXTRA 
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fast-selling dress, spurt, work shoe styles for men and 
women. Air-cushion shoes, many other special features! 
Sizes2'/2-15-widthsAAAAtoEEEE. Draw on 200,000 pair 
stock. Also horsehide jackets. Start now selling to friends, 
folks where you work. Rush postcard for FREE Outfit I 
MASON SHOE, Dept A-74. CHIPPEWA FAUS, Wl$. 



HANDY CLEANING HOOK 

AT LAST an ideal tool for cut¬ 
ting wrappef twine and manure 
from your spreader; forged from 
heat treated steel 3" x Id'A" long; 
tempered cutting edges; initial 
offer $1.98 plus .06 tax in Ohio. 
Send check or M. 0. to — 
ORLO R. BOUGHMAN. 

R. 2,NAVARRE, OHIO 



Extra-rich in Lanolin. Contalna odorless 
anOseptie. For all minorfarm healingjobs. 

1 10 at Trial Six* A Moslilit Booklal—Smd 10c 
or PPd. THE eORONA MF6rC0.,B0X 7 R 23 , KENTON. 0. 


16 



NEW—the ONLY soft, plastic-coated 
DENTAL CUSHIONS AVAILABLE! 


RELIEF IF YOUR FALSE TEETH 
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just place pad on plate! 
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Send $1.25for Suppers—SI.25for 10 lowers 

TRU-AID PRODUCTS COMPANY, DEPT. 430 
BOX 9398, PHILADELPHIA 39, PA. 


COWPOX* 

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Blu-Kole dries up cowpox le¬ 
sions, controls secondary infec¬ 
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healing of teat sores, skin 
sores, abrasions. Is Germicidal 
and Fungicidal. It stays on. 
$1 at drug and farm stores or write: 
H. W. NAYLOR CO. • MORRIS, N.Y. 



When you write advertisers mention 
The Rural New-Yorker and you’ll get 
a quick reply and a “square deal. ” See 
guarantee editorial page. : ; : 



There are several kinds of farming in New England for which beef cattle 
are especially well suited as supplementary enterprises. Here, interested 
farmers inspect good Angus in a New England breeding herd. 


Animal Science in Bay State 


Grain for cows . . . hay equivalents . . . livestock and crops 
that nick . . . fall lambs for the Easter feast. 

BY RUSSELL W. DUCK 


tudies conducted by Profes¬ 
sor Stanley N. Gaunt at the 
Massachusetts Station in 
Amherst show that on most 
New England dairy farms 
feed represents about 50 
per cent of the cost of pro¬ 
ducing milk. Some 26 per cent is 
pasture, hay and silage, 25 per cent 
concentrates; 29 per cent is for labor, 
and 20 per cent for overhead, 
interest and equipment. Except 
for feed, most of these charges 
are more or less fixed; it is 
often difficult, if not impossible, to 
reduce them. Yet, the feed bill 
can often be lowei’ed by proper 
management. In Massachusetts, it has 
been found worthwhile to feed all 
the good quality, home-grown hay, 
silage and pasture the cows can con¬ 
sume. 

It is good dairy husbandy to feed 
a suitable grain mixture only to the 
extent that additional milk more 
than pays for its cost. This means 
weighing the grain and the milk. 
Cows seldom have exactly the same 
feed requirement. Individual differ¬ 
ences in size, weight, production, but- 
terfat test, stage of pregnancy, age, 
condition, health and temperament 
affect it. Thei’e are differences be¬ 
tween cows in their ability to con¬ 
vert either grain or roughage into 
milk, too. Feeding by the commonly 
used rules-of-thumb, a pound of grain 
to each two or three pounds of high- 
test milk, or one pound for each 
four pounds of 3.5 per cent milk, 
plus roughage, is better than feeding 
all of the cows the same amounts of 
feed. But these rules do not take 
into consideration the quality, kind 
or amount of roughage consumed. 
Furthermore, they are liable to over¬ 
feed low producers and underfeed 
high ones. If cows are being allowed 
all the hay and silage or pasture 
they want, the low producers, except 
those less than three months from 
calving and those in poor condition, 
will need little or no grain. 

Grain Feeding Schedules 

Most commercial feed companies 
have free grain-feeding tables suit¬ 
able for Winter and Summer, These 
list the amount of grain to feed on 


three types of roughage, and they 
relate it to breed differentials, the 
amount of milk and butterfat test. 
Professor Gaunt says that in the win¬ 
ter tables the first column is usually 
headed, “Liberal feeding of excell¬ 
ent roughage”. This means that the 
cows eat about two and one-half 
pounds daily for each 100 pounds 
of weight. The second column is head¬ 
ed, “Usual feeding of good rough- 
age”. This means two pounds of good 
hay or its equivalent. The third col¬ 
umn is for cows fed a scanty allow¬ 
ance of good roughage or a generous 
amount of poor roughage. Where 
scales are not available, cow weights 
can be estimated by measuring the 
heart girth and applying the result 
to a table which most ham-supply 
and feed houses furnish without cost. 
Morrison’s late editions of Feeds and 
Feeding also have these tables. 

The amounts of some common hay 
substitutes equal to 10 pounds of good 
hay are: citrus and beet pulps, 5.6 
pounds; fair quality hay, 12; wet 
brewer’s grains, 30; potatoes, 30; 
grass or corn silage, 30. An example 
cited is for a 1,200-pound Holstein 
cow, giving 40 pounds of 3.5 per cent 
milk daily. With silage plentiful and 
hay scarce, she is fed daily seven 
pounds of excellent hay and 70 pounds 
of good grass silage. How many 
pounds of hay equivalent are being 
fed? Since the grass silage is equal 
to 23 pounds of the hay, the other 
seven pounds of hay give a total of 
30 pounds of hay equivalent. Because 
the cow weighs 1,200 pounds, she 
is receiving 2.5 pounds of hay equiv¬ 
alent per day. Referring to the gram 
table under the proper breed and 
checking against her production, we 
find that this cow needs only eight 
pounds of grain each day to meet 
her body and production needs. 

When using the pasture feeding 
tables, only luxuriant pastures should 
be classified as excellent. Compara¬ 
tively few pastures rate this except 
late in Spring. The second column 
in the feeding tables is for use with 
pastui'es considered good, as well as 
abundant. On such pasture, cows 
must be able to obtain somewhat 

(Continued on Page 22) 




Following the ewes on summer pasture, lambs can be brought into drylot 
and quickly fattened in Fall for early winter markets. Self-fed, they should 

finish off nicely at about 90 pounds. 


THE RURAL NEW YORKER 











































Legislation to Curb Deer 


From time to time we have noted 
references in The Rural New York¬ 
er to the steadily growing problems 
related to wildlife management. The 
January 4, issue carried another arti¬ 
cle—“Why Is the Deer a Sacred 
Cow?”. 

In our opinion, the time has come 
for pressures to be exerted unrelent¬ 
ingly upon our representatives in 
government in all seriously affected 
States to take steps to alleviate the 
problems. We consider ourselves con¬ 
servationists, in the broadest sense 
of the term. The need to conserve 
young forest growth in America is 
probably one of our most pressing 
conservation problems today and is 
obviously of greater national conse¬ 
quence than is the existence of brows¬ 
ing herds of deer upon which our 
game commissions depend to fill their 
coffers. Predators of the deer no 
longer roam our hills. Further, the 
overwhelming numbers of does in any 
herd assure the over-perpetuation of 
the species. 

Some of us have waged an apparent¬ 
ly futile battle for years in an effort 
to protect the interests of farmers 
whose crops are literally demolished 
by these deer, and homeowners in 
country areas whose costly landscap¬ 
ing materials and gardens are ruined. 
The motorists who use roadways 
through some of the heavily grazed 
areas are menaced unceasingly by 
wandering animals. 

The deer problem over perhaps a 


10-year period has grown in magni¬ 
tude in many areas. Herds have grown 
and hundreds of acres formerly in 
woods and fields are now built up 
with homes. We should ask our rep¬ 
resentatives in government: 

1. Isn't it time for government to 
re-acknowledge a right which we in 
America have considered fundamental 
—the right to own and protect pri¬ 
vate property? (We as citizens ac¬ 
knowledge responsibility and pay 
taxes on that property.) 

2. Isn’t some long-range planning 
overdue in the area of state develop¬ 
ment? Shall we encourage industry 
and provide adequate facilities, en¬ 
courage agriculture and offer mini¬ 
mum safeguards, or advertise a sports¬ 
man’s paradise and make it a real 
vacationland? 

3. If the deer herds are, in fact. 
State-owned, should not the State 
provide securely enclosed grazing 
land for them which would be less 
detrimental to the agronomy of the 
land than is the use by the herds of 
much of the present privately owned 
areas on which they feed? 

4. Should any State Game Com¬ 
mission be permitted to exploit the 
countryside for partisan gain, ignor¬ 
ing the obligation to provide the 
greatest good for all the people gov- 
eimed? 

I urge that this pressing conserva¬ 
tion problem be brought to the at¬ 
tention of legislators for early and 
effective action. P. H. Schmidt 


lowed by 1,054 Jerseys, 488 Brown 
Swiss, 216 Milking Shorthorns, and 
171 Ayrshires. There have been some 
small shipments of beef animals, too. 
Thousands of cattle now being ex¬ 
ported commercially to Venezuela 
are said to be the results of success¬ 
ful introduction of 58 head of cattle 
there by Heifer Project in 1949. 

The idea of sending living cattle to 
help farmers in war-ruined and other 
needful countries is not easily ac¬ 
cepted by all people, of course. The 
usual concern is for how much the 
cow is worth and how much it costs 
to ship her. But after a person gives 
some thought to the program, he 
readily understands it. The cow is a 
food factory. She is more than just 
a cow to a desperate farmer; she is 
a future. As evidence of American 
good will, cattle are of inestimable 
value. Just recently a foreign diplo¬ 
mat said, “So much good will has 
been built up that it is hard to ex¬ 
press in words the moral value of this 
simple down-to-earth idea of Heifer 
Project”. As dairy and beef animals 
comprise some reason for the basic 
strength of America, so do they also 
through Heifer Project comprise the 
means to greater international amity 
and respect. 


BEEF CATTLE 


REGISTERED HEREFORDS 

Accredited Herd ^ 






BREEDING STOCK AT ALL TIMES 
Lewis Brccdiitg Lorry Dorn. Breeding 

“rARMLANDS»» 

COOPERSTOWN, N. Y. 

^17 WefcrtCT TilloB 


Reg. Polled Herefords 

BULLS READY FOR SERVICE 
.. .. BRED HEIFERS 

Modern Bloodlines. T. B. end Bangs AccridltMl Herd 

__BATTLEGROUND FARMS 

FREEHO LD. NEW JERSEY PHONE! B-2224 


ANGUS 


Performance tested, big, fast growing tyog of purg 
Scotch breeding. Request folder ana data 
WYE_^ANTATI0N. QUEENSTOWN . MARYLAND 

36 ABERDEEIV-AIVGIS COWS 36 

Purebred and Registered. Bred to a fine herd sire, 
will calve this Spring. Can be purchased as a unit 
for $166 per head, SKY TOP FARM. 

EAST HILL ROAD, _ F R AN KH N V8LLE, N. Y. 




TflINK ABERDEEN ANGUS 




W ant a Purebred Dairy Calf? 


The Purebred Dairy Cattle Associa¬ 
tion is again cooperating with state 
dairy breed associations to provide 
six calves, one of each breed, to boys 
and girls who show promise as future 
purebred breeders. Breeding certifi¬ 
cates are offered by the New York 
Artificial Breeders’ Cooperative, In¬ 
corporated, too. Since this program 
was started, 24 New York State boys 
and girls have received purebred 
calves. 


If you are from 10 to 20 years of 
age and live on a New York farm, 
all you need to do to be considered 
as a recipient is to fill out an applica¬ 
tion form available from 4-H agents, 
4-H leaders, and vo-ag teachers, and 
return it to H. A. Willman Wing 
Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, New 
York, before May 1. A committee of 
breeders and extension workers will 
choose the winners. 



Milk Vending Bill 
Introduced in Albany 

A bill to exempt automatic milk 
vending machines from the regular 
dealer license I’equirements is being 
sponsored at this session of the New 
York Legislature by Senator William 
Wise and Assemblyman Orin Wilcox, 
both of Jefferson County. 

A similar bill was passed by the 
1957 Legislature but was vetoed by 
Governor Harriman. The chance of 
full approval of the measure this 
year is reported as much better in 
view of the greater public demand 
and support of vending machines. 

Average N. Y. State 
Dairy Farm: $40,000 
Plus. 

“There’s more behind the milk 
bottle than the dairy cow”, according 
to Cornell University, and much 
of it is land, buildings, machinery 
and equipment. A recent study re¬ 
veals that of the more than $40,000 
invested in an average New York 
dairy farm, about half is in real 
estate and a fourth in machinery and 
equipment. The investment per cow 
runs around $1,200; per worker it 
is $22,500, almost double that in 
many industries. 


WHEN YOU THINK OF BEEF CATTLE — 
For more information on Angus contact: 

PROFESSOR JOHN I. MILLER, 

York Angus Association 

WING HALL, Cornell University, ITHACA. N. Y. 

WELL BRED OPEN HEIFERS AT 

FARMERS PRICES. ROBT. MORROW. 

R. D. 3, NEWTON. N. J. PHQJjlE: I3I9-W 

DAIRY CATTLE 


Most Profitable Cows 




B 13 Milkers • • Hardy Rustle r$ 
Good Grazers - Perfect Udders 

Wf.f* Id Booktfftg 

AyrsKire Breeders'Association 

9(3 Center St., B'dndon, Vt 


SWINE 


Registered Herefords 

GILTS BRED FOR MARCH and APRIL LITTERS 
Open Gilts from August and September Litters. 
CARRENE FARM. STEWARTSTOWM, PENNA. 


HAMPSHIRES: MEAT TYPE BOARS and GILTS 
Slaughter and Production Records Available 
CE DAR POINT FARMS. BOX 718. EASTO N. MD. 

MAPLEHURST DUROCS: April Boars & Gilts. Fall 
Pigs. Either Sex. R. F. Pattington, Scipio Center. N.Y. 

FREE CIRCULAR: REG. HAMPSHIRE SWINE 
Since 1934. C. LUTZ. Middletown I, Maryland 


B or 

Championship Breeding Stock From Production Tested 
Sows. Certified Meat Typo. 
HEDGEFIELD FARM. SALEM. NEW JERSEY 

ANDY’S KOLLViEW YORKSHIRES 

CHOICE IRISH and SCOTTISH, FALL BOARS 
and GILTS FROM LARGE LITTERS 
E. W. ANDRESS, R. D. I. WILLIAMSON, N. Y. 

LANDRACE BOARS 

September litters. Sired by Imported Landpace boar 
and out of sows by imported Swedish boar. Eligible 
for registration in U. S. A. Write for prices. 
LYMBURN FARM, 

HUDSON_ HEIGHTS, QUEBEC, CANADA 

SPOTTED POLAND CHINA SERVICE BOARS 
BRED GILTS, BABY PIGS. FAST GROWERS r 
C. W. HILLMAN, VINCENTOWN. HEW JERSEY 


Quincy Quality Yorkshires: Registered Breeding Stock, 
selected for herd improvement: service boars, fall boars, 
bred gilts. Alfred Fauver, Rumney, New Hampshire. 

DOGS 


Ped. Smooth Fox Terrier Pups 

MINIATURE COLLIES: Puppies and Grown bogs 

M ELODYLANE KENNELS , Chestertown, N. Y. (30G8) 

- REGISTERED ST. BERNARD PUPPIES 

READY, ALSO IDEAL FOR GIFTS 
W. E. YODER , MEYERSDAj^E, PA. Phone: 4-76G4 
IRISH SETTER PUPPIES 


Here ivere winners of the N. Y. Purebred Dairy Cattle Club calves in 1957: 
il to r.) Ayrshire—Harry Goosen, Montour Falls, Schuyler Co.; Brown Swiss 
—John Green, Alpine, Schuyler Co.; Holstein—James Thorp, Cochocton, 
Steuben Co.; Guernsey — Alfred Walker, Leroy, Livingston Co.; Jersey — 
Roger Livermore, Bouckville, Madison Co.; and Milking Shorthorn—Carolyn 

West, Kinderhook, Cohimbia Co. 


Good-Will American Heifers 


RABBITS 



TTITrTTT iV-HI 


FULL TIME BUSINESS 
OR WELL PAID HOBBY 

.Thousands of RaiaersNeeded to Meet the 
'TremendousDemand forMEAT—FUR- 
LABORATORY- BREEDING STOCK. 

. . Know the Facts 

V/Breads,Breeding andCare.Markets.Etc. 

I BulletiD, ^ Cents. We Are Association 
AMPRIOAM BAoagv riokif 

AMERICAN RABBIT ASS*N.g 38 ARBA Bldg.* Pittsbursh* Pennaa 


SHEEP 


Heifer Project Inc., of New Wind¬ 
sor Md., has now shipped 10,000 
American cattle to 34 different coun¬ 
tries to build better lives. Farmers, 
ciiurch groups, service clubs, and 
even city folks have given heifers 
or donated money for these gifts of 
good will. This kind of foreign aid 
oiost Americans can believe in; it 
^akes sense because it meets current 
food needs while providing for the 
future, too. 

A total of 10,046 head of cattle 
uave been shipped to countries prac- 
lirally all over the world. Most ship¬ 
ments have been made in associa¬ 
tion with the International Coopera- 
tion Administration, often called 

February 15, 1958 


Point IV; experienced livestock men 
take the cattle across. Breeding of 
American bulls has also been suc¬ 
cessful. In Iran, Brown Sv/iss bulls 
have sired animals outproducing 
their native dams by almost double. 

These American cattle have un¬ 
usual qualities as gifts of good will. 
They are visible and con.stant re¬ 
minders of their origin and of the 
people who gave them. People who 
receive the gift heifers often pass 
on the first-born heifer calf to an¬ 
other needy family; the first recipi¬ 
ent, after receiving, shares. Most of 
the cattle have been of the major 
dairy breeds. Holsteins lead at 3,981, 
Guernseys are next with 2,520, fol- 

17 


Let SUFFOLK SHEEP Increase Your Farm Income. 

BOOKLET and BREEDERS’ LIST FREE 

Write NATIONAL SUFFOLK SHEEP ASSOCIATION 
BOX 324.NY. _ COLUMBIA, MISSOURI 

Corriedale Sheep 

Are highly productive of both mutton and wool. Buy 
a CORRIEDALE ram. You will be surprised and 
delighted with results. Breeder’s list on request: 

AMERICAN CORRIEDALE ASSOCIATION, 

BOX 108-V, COLUMBIA. MISSOURI 


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