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THE CANNED GOODS AUTHORITY OF THE WORLD. 


Off ICE; ROOMS, 304-S MARYL/IIIO SAVINGS BARR 1100. 
BALTIRRORE. Md. 


VOL. XXXI 


BALTIMORE. FRIDAY, JANUARY 15,1909 


1909 


For the season of 1909 we have 
made preparation to take care of all 
orders which you may place with 
us. We have installed new and 
improved machinery, have built and 
equipped new factories and our pre¬ 
viously complete facilities are now 
larger and better than ever. We 
want your orders for the coming 
season. 


AMERICAN CAN COMPANY 


NSW YORK CHICAGO BALTIMORE SAN FRANCISCO MONTREAL 























































THE CANS stand STILL 


STEWARD SANITARY CAN SYSTEM 


If you have not thoroughly—definitely—investigated 
the merits of these machines, you owe it to your¬ 
self to do 80 —now. . . 

Every packer who aims for something good, should 
use the best, that is ours. Our cans and machines 
are having grand success, and they have a record. 
The Cans Stand Still. . . . . 

We expect to have a factory in Western New York 
so that our friends can get cans at reasonable freight 
rates. . . . 


THE CANS STAND STILL 


Vor doing Irregular Work, Square Cans. Etc. 


SOME CANNKRS are usings several of 
our Double-Seamers—ONE 28; 
ANOTHER 50 Machines. 

Three Concerns in Maine will have a capacity of 
nearly a million cans a day the 
comingf season. 

“ENOUGH SAID.” 


THE CANS STAND STILL 


PARTICULARS FOR THE ASKING. 


L & J. A. STEWARD, 
MANUFACTURERS OF CANS AND MACHINERY, 
RUTLAND, VERMONT. 


PATCNTCO. 

THE CANS STAND STILL 

AUTOMATIC FEED. 













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THE TRADE. 



Filler 


nous 


g 

Tomato 

Filler 


Electric 
Process Clock. 




.. £'■ ... 




Universal 


Con tin 


^JL 


X-1 


-L^ 


SEND FOR FULL LINE OF CIRCULARS. 


Salenij 
New Jersey 


Ayars Machine Company^ 


BROWN, BOGGS CO., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont., Sole Agents for Canada. 


Ayars Machine Company, NewllSey 




sSt; 












ar*' 


’tmn 




IN WRITING ADVERTISERS. KINDLY MENTION THE TRADE 
























THE TRADE. 











FOK 


Robinson's Blank Feeding Attachment 

PATENT PENDING. 


THE TRADE. 


MASTFACTrRED By STEVENSON & COMPANY, 

106-7 S. CAROLINE STREET, BALTIMORE, MD 

IN WRITING ADVSRTIgERS. KINDLY MENTION THE TRADE 


For feefling blanks to a die to he 
cut into caps or lids; also humping 
blanks into caps or lids. The attach¬ 
ment can he applied to any press. 


Capacity 60,000 per day of 10 hours. 
Prices quoted on application. 


AUTOMATiC CAN MAKING MACHINERY 


COMPLETE EQUIPMENTS 


PATENTED CAN HEADER. 


SANITARY CANS 


PACKERS CANS 


The Automatic Double Can Heading Machine shown 
in illustration handles CANS FROM i % inch blA. x i ^ 
inch LONG to 4 inch DIA. x 7 inch LONG, heads one 
or both ends of cans at the RATEOF 140 PER MINUTE. 
The machine is simple and strong in construction with 
no springs or small parts to give trouble, the cams are 
designed to give the machine a smooth continuous mot¬ 
ion without any jerk or jar. Write for further details of 
this or any other Automatic can making machines. We 
build the complete line. 


F. W. BLISS COMPANY, 


25 ADAMS STREET, 


BROOKL YN, N. V. 



6 


THE TRADE 




ECONOMY 


CORER AND CARRIER. 


in Labor, Time and 
Space, as weil as 
Quality, makes the 
installation of these 
Machines 


Baltimore, Md. 

747 and 749 EQUITABLE BUILDING 


San Francisco, CaL 

7th AND HARRISON STREETS 


N WRITING ADVERTISERS. KINDLY MENTION THE TRADE 


SPINACH WASHER. 


PEACH PEELER. 

JUDGE MACHINE CO. 


DESIRABLE 

as well as 

NECESSARY. 






STANDARD OIL CD’S 


DEODORIZED GASOLINE Ousod by 95 p«r e«ntof th* CANN. 

ING TRADE. Why 7 Baeauao It la baat and ehaapaat, and la far 
aala avarywhara by Tank Wagen, In Barrals ar Iren Drums 


Address Our Nearest Tank Station or BALTIMORE OFFICE. 



BALTIMORE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 1909. 


Communicate with the Southern 
Can Company of Baltimore before 
placing Packers^ Can Contracts for 
1909. In addition to the regular 
sizes, they are equipped for the 
number two and one half, and all 
heights of the number three Jerseys. 
Their number ten Cans are made 
out of extra heavy material and 
their Solder Hemmed Caps are 
inferior to none. 

Write for samples. 


t 


Weekly Eteview 

Of the Canned Goods Situation. Market Reports. 
Conditions and Changes. Outlook. 


The week has been marked by no special feature of inter¬ 
est, for as yet the annual inventories have not been completed, 
but are now in the course of reckoning. This much has been 
found, however, that the showing on almost every line of food 
products—and canned goods are no exception—is lighter than 
possibly ever before. The reason for this is obvious: Jobbers 
have been buying as lightly as possible of all lines, and during 
the past months have drawn on their stocks without adding to 
them. There could be but the one result to such action; and 
that is shown in the necessity to buy at an early date. It has 
surprised many of these men to find their holdings reduced to 
such low figures. The jobbers are taking advantage of the 
occasion to get their warehouses straightened out; to root out 
all old lots that have been overlooked or neglected; to clean up 
the corners and repile their goods, and to get a clear grasp on 
just what is in hand. 

We have had jobbers tell us that they were surprised them¬ 
selves when they compared the small piles of canned goods with 
the solid blocks of goods usually carried at this time. A hun¬ 
dred cases of any goods made a big pile this year, where they 
usually had thousands. This is the condition that makes the 
future look bright for the holders of canned goods of good qual¬ 
ity. These jobbing houses must soon add to their stocks, and 
every demand of this kind on the market will cut down the 
supply, and unless these orders are placed in very small amounts, 
the market should soon react to better figures. 

We have been told by a well-posted man in this line that 
out of a dozen large jobbing houses he had recently seen but 
one had any quantity of canned goods, and that house had ouly 
a part of a certain brand which they bought rather heavily as 
futures and had no other goods, thoughj they said they sold 
several thousand cases of the same kind of goods, but of other 
brands. Of course, no one can say whether these houses will 
buy in large lots, as formerly; or whether they will buy in the 
present hand-to-mouth style. If this latter course is followed, 













8 


THE TRADE. 


the effect upon the market will be slow; but the jobbers know 
the position of all articles in cans, and realize that the market 
may advance sharply at any time, and they will not get caught 
if they can help it. 

Another matter this inventory time has brought to the surf¬ 
ace is that when comparisons of the past year’s business with 
former years are made, only a very slight difference in the totals 
is found. We have heard so much of dull business during the 
past year; all more or less e xpected the showing to reveal a de 
cided falling-off for 1908. It has not; the business has heen 
done on a smaller scale, individually, but when total sales are 
counted up, the year shows up very creditably. One thing is 
certain in this consideration, and that is that nearly everyone 
takes the high-water mark of business for comparison, and in 
doing this a mistake is made, for we set a standard much higher 
than the normal. 

A change has come over the method or buying canned 
goods, which might be put in few words by saying “let the 
canner carry the goods,” and this sudden determination on the 
part of the part of the buyers has caught the canners unpre¬ 
pared. This is what makes the situation seem dull. 

From all sections and all lines come reports of increasing 
business, a return to good orders and more of them, a reopening 
of mills long closed, slowly, it is true, but, nevertheless, placing 
more and more men in the position where they can buy, and 
soon the effect of this will be felt in the demand for canned 
goods. The host of salesmen again on the road indicates the 
presence of orders; and orders mean business and employment, 
and with the return of work there comes a return of good 
demand for canned goods. 

In the canned goods market there is nothing particularly 
worthy of mention to record. Prices have held the even tenor 
of their way; orders have come in for the usual small quanti¬ 
ties and have been possibly a little more plentiful than for a 
month or more. But prices do not reflect this. With every 
passing day the holders of goods realize that if there are higher 
prices in store and a demand for more goods’ the time must be 
near at hand. Until inventory time is passed, however, no 
considerable revival in demand or any advance in price may be 
looked for. And the near approach of the Annual Convention 
is exerting its influence also and causing a delay in orders that 
might otherwise be placed. 

One strong feature in favor of the market is that the pub¬ 
lication of the year’s statistics had no effect upon prices. In 
view of the fact that all packs showed up heavier than was gen¬ 
erally expected, it might have been supposed prices would 
suffer for a time; and that they did not serve as good evidence that 
the holders have faith in the goods, or that jobbers cannot be 
tempted to take interest by any condition. Different parties 
will take the different view’s of this, but we consider it an indi¬ 
cation of strength. 

Canners’ metals show no changes or activity at this time. 
Very few canners are coming into the market now and those 
who do are packing winter goods. 

Baltimore, Md.—Mr. J. C. Talliaferro, of the Continental 
Can Co. and Mr. Wm. G. Tyler, of Kimball, Tyler & Co., are 
among those interested in the establishing of a savings bank in 
Highlandtown, Md. 


New York Market 


Reported by Special Correspondent. Market Conditions, 
Chan!(tes and Outlook. 


New York, Jan. 13.—The most that can be said about 
trade in canned goods is that a quiet, general interest prevails 
in nearly all departments and that business has shown some 
improvement since the last report, not exactly in the way of 
advance in prices, but in the larger inquiry and in the feeling 
that business will be better in the near future. There is, how¬ 
ever, a lack of activity which has created conditions not wholly 
satisfactory, and the outlook doesn’t favor much change from 
this situation at present. Nevertheless, the fact that business 
has improved ever so slightly is considered a good omen and the 
trade in general is expecting further changes in this direction 
shortly. The spring demand will begin soon and that will mean 
a fair increase in trade at first anyhow, though whether it will 
continue or not is in no wise clear. But there are those who 
are optimistic enough to believe that the long-continued inact¬ 
ivity will speedily give way to something better and that busi¬ 
ness will from now forward be something like what it should be. 
It is pointed out that inventory is practically over and that 
purchases made now will not show on the books as carryover 
stock, consequently the situation may develop something worth 
while in the near future. 

Corn.—Purchasers are looking for cheap lots of corn, but 
their ideas of cheap do not coincide with those of holders. For 
instance, they are looking for standard corn in Southern Maine 
style at 60c. regular terms f. o. b. factory. A fair offering of 
stock is noted at the figure named, but it is principally in ordi¬ 
nary grades and does not come up to standard in quality. Up 
to 70c. is paid for fancy grades. State stock is oflered a bit 
more freely in the low grades, but fancy are not pressed for 
sale in any quarter. Ordinary quality is moderately plentiful 
at 67J4 c. to 70c. delivered here. Fancy Maine corn is not 
freely offered in any quarter. Up to $1.05 is asked for it, but 
$1.00 will buy all the purchaser may want. 

Tomatoes.—Spot goods have shown a trifle easiness in the 
range of 67j^c. to 70c. for full standard Maryland 3s regular 
terms f. o. b. factory. Buyers are asking for no more stock 
than is required to cover requirements under present circum¬ 
stances. Ordinary standards are held at 65c. to 67j^c. regular 
terms f. o. b. factory. No. 2s are attracting practically no at¬ 
tention, excepting now and then a sale at 52j^c. regular terms 
f. o. b. factory. Gallons are quiet, but the market is steady and 
holders insist upon full figures, which range up to $2.10 for 
Marylands and $2.50 for New Jerseys. 

Peas.—Not much buying of futures is recorded and much 
irregularity is noted in spot goods. Holders are quoting sec¬ 
onds at 65c. to 70c. delivered and standards at from 75c. to 80c. 
in a small way. Sifted grades are not wanted in any quantity 
and the market is dull. Sales have been made in small lots 
only and some reductions in quotations have been made during 
the week. Considerable stock has been picked up in odd lots 
during the past few weeks and the movement now is in small 


Visit Our Exhibit 

Maebinery Hall 

at the nnnTi 

11#^ no no Louisville, Ky. 

Canners’ Convention K| II I I I 

irnuADn orrn on Uww 1 1 

15 bo-ba pmriVn" 

LlONARD seed CD. 

CHICAGO. 






THE TRADE. 


9 


lots only. Holders would let their goods go at inside figures if 
buyers evinced any interest. 

Beans.—A little interest is noted in State strings at $1.55 
for No. I Refugees. Other grades are unchanged and move¬ 
ment is limited to small lots. Holders are not anxious sellers, 
but they do not hold their stock if they receive a suitable price. 

Asparagus.—The market is a bit firmer, as quoted, and a 
good jobbing movement has begun. Buying is in both green 
and white in medium grades. Mammoth California white is 
held at $4.25 and mammoth green at $4.00. 

Succotash.—The market is firmer and Southern stock has 
advanced to 82j^c. regular terms f. o. b. factory. Demand has 
increased somewhat of late and the improvement shows in the 
advanced quotations. 

Spinach.—A fair demand is reported and the market is a 
shade firmer. For standard 2s the quotation is 67j4c. to 70c.; 
3St 77J^c. to 82}6c., and gallons, $2.80 to $2.90, all regular 
terms, f. o. b. factory. 

Apples.—State gallons are firmly held at from $2.25 to $2.40 
f. o. b. factory. A little business has been done in fancy around 
$2.50 laid down here. Maryland gallons are easy at $2.10 here. 
Maine gallons are held at $2.30. 

Peaches.—The market is easy on seconds, but is firm on 
standards in Californias and fancy stock. Movement is re¬ 
stricted because of the impossibility of securing concessions 
from holders. Southern peaches are quiet, but firmly held. 

Apricots.—Standards and seconds are easy, with fancy held 
firmly up to quotations. At a slight concession from quota¬ 
tions considerable business bould be done, but holders refuse to 
grant any reduction and movement is restricted in consequence. 
A good deal of both peaches and apricots are being consigned to 
various markets by packers. 

Cherries.—The market is quiet and dull on free offerings. 
Not much business is done, excepting in relatively small lots. 
Extra standards are held at $1.30 and extra 3s at $3.30. 

Strawberries.—A moderate jobbing demand is noted at 
quotations, but movement is somewhat restricted. The supply 
is ample for requirements. 

Salmon.—Red Alaska is held a bit more firmly within the 
range quoted. No pressure to sell stocks is reported in any 
quarter. Medium red has sold at full outside figures. Spot 
holdings are light. Not much stock is offered from the Coast. 
Spot pinks are freely offered and the market is easier. A free 
offering for shipment from the Coast is noted at 65c. f. o. b. 
there for No. i tails. Some holders are quoting 675^0. 
Chinook and sockeye are both firmly held at quotations. Stock 
here is largely in the hands of jobbers. 

Sardines.—The situation in domestic grades is unchanged. 
Most holders are firm, but business is limited to requirements. 
Imported grades are moving fairly well, even though high prices 
have a tendency to restrict movement. 

Oysters.—Demand is moderate at quotations. There has 
been no channge in prices for the past week. 

Shrimp.—The market is steady, with sales made in a small 
way to gratify the demand from retailers who want stock to 
fill in. Hudson. 


FOR SALE. 

One SPRAGUE CORN CUTTER. 

One SPRAGUE-KELLOGG CORN SILKER. 

One AVARS PEA FILLER AND BRINER. 

Two IRON PEA HULLERS. 

All in good condition; only slightly used. 

Address 

EQUITABLE, 

Care The Trade. 


Ohicago Market. 

Spbciai. Corrbspondbncb to “Thb Tradb." 

Chicago, January 14, 1909. 

Weather Conditions. —This locality has been in the grasp 
of the Ice King for a week, and the thermometer has vacilated 
between 10 degrees below and 20 above during that time. 

Dropped the Jobbers. —I learn that a big Illinois cannery 
has dropped the jobbers, and has concluded to put out a sales 
force and sell, ship and bill direct to the retail trade. I am not 
at liberty to state the name of the cannery, but I know from 
themselves that the policy described has been determined upon 
and that their force is now at work. 

Bad Feeling. —This rather bad state of feeling between 
jobbers and canned goods packers seems to be growing apace 
and is unfortunate. It has been formented by the announced 
policy on the part of the jobbers to stop buying fucures in 
canned goods to the extent they had heretofore bought, and the 
very exasperating hand-to-mouth policy they have practiced in 
their spot purchases for 1908. Then the holding down of prices 
by the jobbers through purchasing unlabelled goods and putting 
them under their own labels, allowing the canned goods packers 
no control over the price of their own products, and compelling 
them to meet the prices of the lowest of the low and the cheap¬ 
est of the cheap has also had a discouraging tendency for the 
packer who desired to get more than health and exercise out of 
his business. 

Canned Tomatoes. —A block of Michigan packed No. 3 
was sold this week at 75c. cannery, freight loc. per hundred 
weight to Chicago. Some off standards, eastern, were sold in 
Chicago spot this week at 72j^c. per dozen. 

Full standard Indiana pack No. 3 are held at 77J^c. to 80c. 
f. o. b. cannery. Extra coreless No. 3 can be bought at $1.00 
Chicago. No. 2 size is not handled here to any extent ; No. 10 
(gallons) are held at $2.25 to $2.35 spot for eastern standard 
goods. 

Canned Corn. —This article is quiet and inactive. I heard 
a well posted and wise canned goods broker today say that he 
thought that corn was largely purchased by the poorer class as 
well as tomatoes, but that tomatoes appeared to be more economi¬ 
cal, and as many people are still out of employment the chance 
for a heavy sale of canned corn this spring is not good. 

Good standard corn is held at 67^40. and 70c. f. o. b. Illi¬ 
nois and Iowa canneries. Off standard grades can be bought at 
60c. f. o. b. canneries. Country Gentlemen corn for standard 
grade can be had at 80c. cannery, Indiana, Illinois or Iowa. 

Canned Peas. —The demand is very tame and the finer 
grades very dull. Some cheaper grades at low prices are mov¬ 
ing. Futures are offered by a few canneries but not generally. 

Canned Apples. —The price of $2.40 to $2.60 spot for 
gallon apples in lots is being firmly maintained, but the move¬ 
ment is very small; bakers are still using barrelled fresh apptes 
and have not yet taken up the canned article. 

California Canned Fruits.—Only a very small movement 
is noted, except in gallon pie fruits. Bakers are taking hold of 
gallon peeled peaches and gallon pie apricots pretty finely, real¬ 
izing that they are very cheap, and that they are likely to go 
higher. 

Canned Pumpkin. —Since the holidays the demand for 
this article and for canned squash also has to a degree subsided. 
Standard No. 3 pumpkin is held by packers at 45c. cannery, 
and No. 10 is held at $1.65 t. o. b. cannery, with a small 
movement. 

Canned Salmon. —The advance in freight rates from the 
Pacific Coast January ist inst. was “discounted” by rail ship¬ 
ments of salmon only to a small extent. Packers and big buy¬ 
ers have found that they can ship by water and the Isthmus 


10 


THE TRADE. 


railway, connecting with another line of steamers on the Gulf 
of Mexico for Atlantic Coast points at a much lower rate, and 
that the ships actually make quicker time. It is therefore very 
doubtful about the advance in freight being maintained. 

General Market. —I heard a big broker say today'that he 
had only made one small sale of canned goods since January i, 
and that order was declined by the packer because the goods 
had been sold and shipped elsewhere. 

Wrangler. 


The Canning Business a Great Help to Hawaii. 


(From Geo. N. Moran, New York.) 


This article has been edited by Mr. Newell in Washing¬ 
ton, D. C. 

Washington, Jan. 9. —Frederick H. Newell, Director of 
the Reclamation Service of the Department of the Interior, who 
has just returned from an inspection tour of the Hawaiian 
Islands, is planning extensive government investigations for 
that distant part of the United States. He was assisted in his 
investigations by Gov. Frear of Hawaii, who accompanied him 
home, and is working wdth him in his plans which embrace the 
reclamation of tracts of government land on the islands for 
agriculture, a general iriigation system and ultimately the 
improvement of the waterways and harbor facilities for com¬ 
mercial purposes. 

The chief industries of Haw’aii are the raising of sugar, 
the raising and canning of pineapples and the cultivation of 
rice, bananas and a little coffee. Sugar is raised in the low¬ 
lands and pineapples are raised on the higher land where the 
climate is better and more suitable for the employment of white 
labor, and it is a part of the plan of the government to foster 
the employment of white labor wherever possible on the islands. 
The first work planned i^s said to be the reclamation of many 
thousands of acres of the high land of the islands, and this 
decision was reached after a careful study of the possibilities as 
disclosed by a recent inspection of the large acreage under pine¬ 
apple cultivation in the higher sections. It is said not to be the 
intention to suggest the increase of pineapple cultivation, be¬ 
cause that field is already largely covered and filled, but it is 
believed that the land wdll admit of the introduction of other 
agricultural industries which will afford equally good opportun¬ 
ities for the employment of white labor. 

The influence of American brains, ingenuity, inventions 
and practical scientific methods upon the pineapple cultivation 
and canning industry had a great effect in reaching this de¬ 
cision. Only a few years ago an inferior quality and unimport¬ 
ant quantity of Hawaiian pineapples w'ere crudely produced 
without an established market. There are to-day thousands of 
acres under .scientific pineapple cultivation, and not only is the 
quantity produced marvellously increased but the Hawaiian 
pineapple of to-day is the best in quality on the American 
market. It w’as found that where the pineapples were orig¬ 
inally either picked green for shipment to distant points the 
fruit is to-day permitted to ripen absolutely on the plant, and is 
then either sliced, crushed or grated entirely by machinery and 
packed by machinery under the best sanitary conditions, so that 
American brains and methods have raised the Hawaiian pine¬ 
apple from a neglected conditiotf in the fruit markets of the 
United States to a position at the head of the pineapple product 
of the w'orld. Mr. Newell believes that if such great strides 
can be made in Hawaii in one agricultural industry it is pos¬ 
sible, with the help of the Federal Government, to raise the 
standard of other Hawaiian products in like manner and so 
make Hawaii a more important possession of the United States 
and a greater factor in the commercial markets of the world. 


Canning Items. 

^ New Firms, Changes, Ineorporation.s. Fires, Improve¬ 
ments, Items of Interest. 

Lubec, Me.—It is reported that the Lubec Sardine Co. will 
build one of the largest and best equipped factories in the 
country on its property here. The improvements will include 
an electric light plant and a mill for making the cases. 


Dickson, Tenn.—The Dickson Canning Co. is contracting 
with the truck growers of the surrounding country for its 
supply of raw material for next season, and the producers are 
reported to be responding liberally. 

Victoria, Tex.—Mr. J. R. Pope, of Bedford, Ind., is here 
with a view to establishing a canuery on the co-operative plan 
and will meet the Progressive League in regard to it. 

Friday Harbor, Wash.—It is reported a company is nego¬ 
tiating for the purchase of the salmon cannery here, and if suffi¬ 
cient water supply can be secured an expenditure of $10,000 
will be made on the plant. 

In our issue of the 13th November we said the North¬ 
western Fisheries Company of Seattle, Wash., had made a 
pack amounting to 200,000 cases; we wish to correct this state¬ 
ment, as we are advised the pack of this concern was, approxi¬ 
mately, 357,000 cases. 


Peru, Neb.—The Peru Canning Company placed on exhibi¬ 
tion at a pure food show recently considerable of their canned 
goods and received word that they stood the severe tests to the 
entire satisfaction of all. This is certainly the best kind of 
advertising ; keep an eye on the shows about you and see if you 
can’t make as good a record. There is no reason why you 
should not. 


Peru, Neb.—Mr. H. W. Lowe, manager of the Peru Can¬ 
ning Company, says he has devised and patented a means of 
canning tomatoes whole, and that with his method you can can 
75 per cent, of all tomatoes received, as “extra fancy.’’ 


Philadelphia, Pa.—It is reported many canners are ship¬ 
ping their unsold pack here for storage during the winter, or 
until sold, believing that sales can be made better while in stor¬ 
age here. 


Palmyra, N. Y.—A fire doing only a very slight damage 
occurred at the Palmyra Packing Company’s plant recently, but 
was extinguished by the employees. 

Indianapolis, Ind. —The Indiana Canners’ Association 
succeeded in establishing a standard, to a certain extent, for No. 
3 tomatoes. The standard as decided is 37 ounces gross weight, 
can and all, and 18 ounces of “meat’’; the meat must be reason¬ 
ably ripe and firm. 


James Methven Son & Co. Ltd. 

St. George’s House, Eastcheap, Iwondon, E. C. 
and 15 Victoria Street, Liverpool. 

Merchants and Commission Agents, and Manufacturers of Candied 
Peels, Jams, Curers of Pineapple, Ginger, and Dealers in Canned Goods, 
Dried Fruits, Etc. 

We can do with one or two first-class Agencies. A packing House 
for Ox and Lunch Tongues especially wanted, but anything specially 
suitable for Great Britain we can handle to advantage. We are the 
British Agents for Henry Heide, of New York, and we, therefore, cannot 
handle other American Confectionery. 











Exhibits of "NATURAL PROCESS" Vignette 


The United States Printing Company 

iViANUFACTURtRS OF 

‘“’ILfSLjbels tllhail Sellfl Groodls’’" 


CINCINNATI, O 


BROOKLYN, N. Y 








LABELS 

FOLDINO BOXES 
POSTERS 

INFORMATION 

A.ND 

PRICES 

concerning anything in colored printing may be 
obtained at any of the following sales offices of 

The United States 
Printing Company- 

BALTIMORE, MD. . . Cay and Water Sts 

Phone C. &■ P. St. Paul 2698 
BOSTON, MASS. . ' . . . 131 State St. 

Phone Main 52 

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Phone Seneca 695 

CHICAGO, ILL. Cor. Wabash Ave. and Randolph St. 

Phones Central 5203-Auto 7004 
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i| Phone Kearney 476 

■ ST. LOUIS. MO. . . 413 Frisco Building 

!! Phones Central 6396 Bell-Main 2621 

!j , 

|| ADVERTISING SIGNS 
i[ CUT-0»JTS 

! TRANSPARENT WINDOW SIGNS 


NOTE This ir.sert is printed 
on our ref.uiar hij’h glazed Trisn 
paper—*hich y ju will observe, 
not only possesse: excellent printinr 
qualities but is strong and d;.rab'.e 
for eT.bossinp 
















THE TRADE. 


II 




WHEELING CANS AND 
SOLDER HEMMED CAPS 


WheeliD^ Can Company, 

OLIVES j. JOHNSON, Presiaem. Wheeling, W. Va. 

WILLIAM DUGDALE, Sales Agent for Indiana and Kentucky, 301 Majestic Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 


If you are going to pack 
Hominy, Kraut, Beans 
or other Winter Goods, 
better let us send you a 
sample car of our Spec¬ 
ial'* Strong Cans made 
from selected heavy Tin 
Plate. 


Our Solder Hemmed Caps, 
which we are now prepared 
to furnish with all cans are 
the best in the market. The 
Solder is in the right place 
and Plenty of it. 


Df WSZTDia ADVBSTXtBIt, KOIDLT MBNTIOM TKB TIAO& 
















12 


THB TRADE, 


Clalifornia Market. 

Market Conditions—Outlook on Spot and Future*Goods—News 
Interests of the Wests. 

San Francisco, Cal., Jan. 6, 1909. 

At a meeting of the Shippers’ Executive Committee held in 
San Francisco on January 6 and presided over by C. H. Bent¬ 
ley, of the California Fruit Canners Association, it was decided 
to delay filing a complaint against the new overland freight 
rates placed into effect the first of the year with the Interstate 
Commerce Commission until a protest could be filed with the 
Transcontinental Freight Bureau, which meets in Chicago the 
first of next week. Accordingly, Secretary George J. Bradley, 
of the committee, was instructed to forward protests to the Chi¬ 
cago meeting without further delay. When protests were re¬ 
cently lodged with the local ofl&cials of the Southern Pacific and 
Santa Fe Railroads, the latter stated that they would have to 
consult their Eastern connections before an definite reply could 
be made. On this account, and with the idea of fostering a 
reply of some kind to the protests, the committee thought it 
proper to communicate with the Transcontinental Freight Bu¬ 
reau, which represents many roads besides the local lines. If 
the latter acts favorably on the protests, there will be no need of 
proceedings before the commission. If it does not, the commit¬ 
tee will be prepaid to go ahead with its fight. Resolutions 
supporting the committee were received from over thirty Cali¬ 
fornia cities, and the fact that more than one-half these resolu¬ 
tions contained the names of canners and persons interested in 
the canning industry illustrates how the local packers are inter¬ 
ested in the new rate case and how they are fighting its enforce¬ 
ment. A summary of these resolutions is to be made into a 


HOW ARE YOU 


circular letter and copies sent to members of the Legislature and 
to the California Congressional delegation at Washington. The 
announcement has just been made here that Mr. Wm. R. 
Wheeler, the man selected to act as manager of the Traffic 
Bureau here, is to make a trip to the Isthmus of Panama at the 
instance of President Roosevelt to inve.stigate conditions in con¬ 
nection with the Government line across the Isthmus. This 
is taken as an indication that the President is injecting himself 
into the fight and that it is possible that a Government steam¬ 
ship line may be maintained, as proposed. 

Now that the holiday season is at an end, the demand for 
canned salmon is improving materially, especially for Alaska 
reds. W. E. Louks, of the J. K. Armsby Company, states that 
his firm are all out of this grade of fish, with the exception of a 
quantity of the Argo brand put up by the Alaska Packers Asso¬ 
ciation. Even this brand is in limited supply, and the general 
belief here is that it will be but a short time before a material 
advance in price is made. Orders are coming in to the J. K. 
Armsby Company with regularity calling for the different grades 
of Alaska fish that is usually in stock, but customers are com¬ 
pelled to take either the Argo brand, pink fish or do without 
supplies. The market for pink fish is rather quiet, from the 
reason that jobbers all took on fair-sized stocks of this variety 
early in the season and will not load up again until their sup¬ 
plies are at low ebb, as there are no prospects of an advance in 
the price of this fish in the immediate future. 

If the recommendations of the Federal Grand Jury, which 
met recently at Valdez, Alaska, are carried out, there will be a 
decided change in the laws of that territory in regard to the 
taxing of the output of the canneries. According to the pres¬ 
ent ruling, there is a tax of four cents on each case of canned 
salmon packed there. The law also provides that there will be 
a rebate made to canning concerns which will operate hatcher¬ 
ies and liberate fry in the different streams. The law provides 


in regard to Canned Goods Boxes? Have yon had satis¬ 
factory deliveries and good stock? 

If you believe money could be saved or your out-put 
bettered, write us stating how many boxes you can use 
and your grievance. We shall take pleasure in offering 
suggestions and quoting prices and if our proposition 
does not show a way to 

IMPROVE YOUR PRESENT CONOiTION 

you can at least be assured you have the best that can be 
bad. Let us hear from you now, while Ws fresh in your 
mind. 

For SLACK COOPERAGE, EGG CASES, BOX 
SHOOKS AND CANNED GOODS BOXES, write 


HOLLEY-MATTHEWS 

Mills at 

Sikeston, Mo. and 
Greenville, Miss. 


MFG. CO. 

MAIN OFFICE: 

SIKESTON, MO. 


IN WRITING ADVERTISERS. KINDLY MENTION THE TRADE. 


3 



M'f 


The best way to know about a proposition is to Investigate. 

Do you know about Knapp Labeling Machines and Boxers? 

Are you aware that you can save from 50 to 75 per cent., by 
using these labor-saving Machines, besides getting neat and uni¬ 
form work? 


Do you know that you can get Machines to use for the sea¬ 
son by paying a rental? 

Are you willing to write us for terms and prices ? Once you 
try Knapp Machines, you will be a satisfied customer. 


State daily output, size of can or cans, and we will do the 
You will thank us. 


THE FRED H. KNAPP CO 


324 WASHINGTON BLVD., CHICAGO. 


No Agents, 



































14 


THE TRADE. 


a rebate at the rate of forty cents for each thousand fry libe¬ 
rated, and the figures of the canning companies are accepted 
without question. In 1907 the Alaska Packers Association put 
up a pack upon which a tax of $32,272.32 should have been 
paid. During this same year this concern claims to have libe¬ 
rated 80,680,000 salmon fry, thereby securing a rebate of 
$32,272. Thus they paid 32 cents for the privilege of taking 
over 800,000 cases of salmon from Alaskan waters. 

The Alaska Packers Association is building some new ware- 
hou.ses at its extensive shipping .station at Alameda, across the 
bay from San Francisco, and most of the canned product will be 
stored here in the future. 

The salmon situation on the Columbia River is regarded as 
being acute, and Fish Warden McAllister, of Oregon, sizes up 
the situation as follows: “ From personal observations made 
during the short time I have been in office, I am thoroughly 
convinced that the situation on the Columbia River will never 
be relieved nor the salmon given proper protection until the 
warring interests on the upper and lower river are subdued and 
the two States can get together and frame laws that will be of 
material benefit to the salmon. I am firmly of the opinion that 
the river is being overfished, and that all gear should be regu¬ 
lated. Shorter fishing seasons must be established, so as to 
allow the fish to ascend the river to the hatcheries and their 
natural spawning beds without being molested. I have given 
the closed-season question a great deal of thought and have con¬ 
sulted canners and fishermen on the subject, but at this time 
have not fully made up my mind just what dates would be best.” 

The American bark, Erskine M. Phelps cleared from Port 
Townsend, Wash., on January 5 with 3,148 tons of canned 
salmon. This is said to be the largest shipment of salmon ever * 
taken from the Sound, there being 105,000 cases in all. 

• Canning operations are expected to be very active in the 
vicinity of Juneau during the coming season. Captain Gal¬ 


lagher, formerly with the George T. Myers Company, has plans 
well under way for the erection of a new cannery to handle the 
fish from a number of traps he has had driven in during the 
past season. Capt. W. H. Robinson is putting up a cannery at 
Hawks Inlet and will commence active operations at the com¬ 
mencement of the season. 

C. W. Dorr, vice-president of the Alaska Packers Associ¬ 
ation, is now in Seattle on business and the announcement is 
made that he will make his headquarters there in the future. 

During the past season several of the pineapple canneries 
operating in Hawaii have experimented on some of the native 
fruits of the islands, and it is expected that within a short time 
they will be making guava jelly and fruit preserves on a com¬ 
mercial scale. A small shipment of guava jelly was sent here 
this season and the quality was declared to have been excellent. 
The guava fruit grows wild and the sole expense would be the 
gathering and preparing of it. The idea is to find something on 
which the plants can operate when pineapples are not in season. 

Berkeley. 

Mr. Gorrell To Become A Benedict. 


Mr. Frank E. Gorrell, Secretary of the National Canners Association, 
and as such known to every canner in the country, will shortly abandon 
the joyful bliss of bachelorhood and join Hymen’s happy throng. On 
January 26, 1909, at Brown Memorial Church, in Baltimore, he will be 
married to Miss Ida May Harvey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Eugene Harvey, the ceremony taking place at 7 o’cock in the evening. 

We heartily congratulate Mr. Gorrell on this happy event, and as 
every canner in the business feels indebted to him because of his hard, 
persistent efforts in their behalf, the entire industry will share with us 
these sentiments of good wishes and join with us in the hope that he and 
his bride may have a long life and a happy one. 

Error Insurance. —Have A copy of a Complete Course in Canning 
always at hand. Price $5.00. 




DO YOU CONDUCT YOUR BUSINESS FOR PROFIT? 


Then whj’ not let us reduce your gas or gasoline bills 
to Xess Than Half, and add so much to your profits? 
Not only can we make this heav}^ saving by 
furnishing a cheap gas, but can save you as 
much more by keeping your steels properly 
heated, ne matter how fast you run your cap¬ 
per. You will never stop to let steels heat, 

—will not burn the tin from the steels one 
quarter as often as you now do—steels will al¬ 
ways be clean. The 20th Century Gas 
Machine has enabled many Packers to 
increase their Capacity 20 per cent, to 
30 per cent. The 20th Century is the 
best, therefore the cheapest. Only ma¬ 
chine using distillate Successfully. Fur¬ 
nished on trial under ^ 
guarantee to be satisfac¬ 
tory. Can be installed in 
your factory building 
without effecting insur¬ 
ance. Does not require 
an out building. If you 
want cheapest and most 
efficient service. 

Write for Pamphlet and ^ 

Proposition. 




C. M. KEMPMFG. CO. 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND. 


IN WRITING ADVERTISERS, KINDLY MENTION THE TRADE. 










DEPARTMENT C 

MOUNT VERNON, NEW YORK 


Are you using this can ? It’s the best 
that there is to be had. We cannot sfty 
more, yet much may be said of its merits. 
SEALED without heat, SOLDER or 
objectionable Fluxes. 


NO CAPS ENTIRE TOP OPEN 


THE TRADE. 


Max Ams Machine Company 


ATTENTION CANNERS! 


If we could, by any possible chance, in a few words convince 
the trade of the importance of owning one of these No. ii6 Dating 
Machines for marking round, square or irregular shape covers, we 
had indeed accomplished something worth considering. 

Our DATING MACHINE will make any combination of num¬ 
bers, days, months and years. You can put your serial number on 
your tin can product; Jobbers’ label product or anything else to 
identify your product. That is worth knowing and something worth 
looking into. We guarantee this machine to give satisfaction. 
We’ll mail you a tin cover if you say so; it won’t cost anything. 
Write for full particulars. Send for our Catalog of the new Ams 
Inclinable Power Presses. 




We furnish complete outfits for making 

these cans. ROUND, SQUARE or A new machine for dating SANITARY CAN COVERS and STUDHOLE CAPS 
IRREGULAR shape. Write for full Easily handled. Easily adjusted. Will date, mark, register private or secret 

particulars. It will pay. characters for identification against future contingencies. 

-- • European Agency South American Agency 

■yi ^ tvi r\a ri%# G.Guelpadi L., Corsodel.Valentino 13 La Cromo Hojolateria Argentina 

lYlaCnirlc wOlTipany Torino, italy buenos aires, Argentina 


Max Ams Machine Company 


Of WBlTDia AOVBBTUBSa, SXNDLT MENTION TEN TEAM 


No. 116 DATING MACHINE 


WE MANUFACTURE ALL KINDS OF MACHINERY 


MOUNT VERNON, NEW YORK 


Capacity, 10,000,000 Cubic Feet. 

Delaware Avenue Stores, Nos. i, 2, 
3—Delaware Avenue, Water and 
Pine Streets. 

Pennsylvania Stores—Front, Pine 
and Water Streets. 

Pennsylvania Tobacco Stores , 
Bonded — Front, Water and 
Pine Streets. 

Sixteenth Street Stores—Sixteenth 
and Callowbill Streets. 

Moro Phillips Stores—Delaware 
Avenue, Swanson and Fitzwater 
Streets. 

West India Stores, Bonded—Dela¬ 
ware Avenue, north side of 
Catharine and Swanson Streets. 

Atlantic Stores, Bonded — Dela¬ 
ware Avenue, north side of 
Catharine and Swanson Streets. 

Port Richmond Stores—Richmond 
and Cambria Streets. 

Twenty-third Street Stores — 
Twenty-third and Race Streets. 

Twentyrthird Street Grain Ele¬ 
vator—Race and Bonsai 1 Streets. 

Warehouses for storage of Haz¬ 
ardous Merchandise. 


PEN NSYLVANIA 
WAREHOUSING 

and Safe Deposit Co. 


Warehousing and Banking. 


Capital and Surplus, $1,100,000 


Banking House and Main Office, 113 and 115 South Third Street 

PHILADELPHIA 

Warehousing and Banking 
Storage 

Labeling 

Shipping 

Distributing 

Advances Made 


BEST WAREHOUSES 


BEST SERVICE 


MODERATE CHARGES 


Direct Track Connection 













} 


i6 THB TRADE. 


Canned Goods In The United Kingdom. 


(BY OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) 

Liverpool, England, December 29, 1908. 

The trade in canned goods in the United Kingdom over the festive 
periods of Christmas and the New Year has fully confirmed the forecast of 
my last letter. The big, retail stores which stock canned goods and 
grocers and other traders who hold them in large or small quantities have, 
generally, had a satisfactory demand for such goods. Tongues are stead¬ 
ily increasing in favor as a delicacy of festive periods and have had a good 
sale at stores and shops for home use. To judge by the consumption at the 
last three Christmas seasons, tongues are attaining a very favorable position 
in the esteem of the public. They have a delicacy and a tastiness which 
the other tinned meats do not possess, and can be served up so conveni¬ 
ently and daintily that they have now a foremost place among the meats 
provided for festive seasons. All of this has been seen again by the large 
use of tongues and by the gratifying sale which they have had through the 
festive time of the past Christmas and the New Year, as far as this last- 
named period has gone. In England the festive time of the New Year 
extends through the first three weeks of the year. This New Year period 
is the great winter house-party season, when most families have their 
" parties.” At these parties the catering is usually on a liberal scale. 
At very many of such parties tongue is one of the principal items of the 
menu, and as this New-Year party season is just now in full swing, tongues 
are in good demand and will continue to be so for another three weeks at 
least. Tinned meat of first-rank brands has bad a good sale and is still in 
fair consumption, but this meat is not yet free from the cloud which rolled 
up and overeshadowed everything of the kind a couple of years ago. The 
cloud has nearly gone and things are much brighter for tinned meats gen¬ 
erally. The truth is, that the agitation of a couple of years ago is now, at 
this advanced time, proving a good thing for the trade. People know of 
the steps which were taken by the Health Department and by the Board 
of Trade to insure that all tinned meat passing into consumption should be 
wholesome, and that nothing unwholesome should be allowed to slip 


through. They know of the special order which was issued in September 
part of which came into operation in October and part of which, relating to 
boneless and scrap meats, came into operation on January i, 1909; making 
imported meat of all kinds subject to inspection at the ports of arrival, and 
liable to condemnation if found to be at all unfit for consumption. This 
increased stringency of inspection has already proved favorable to the 
canned meat trade, and in a short time now will prove an excellent thing 
for the trade and will enable it to expand again to its old proportions or to 
greater proportions still. For people are now reasoning; ‘‘With all this 
inspection the meat must be good, so we may buy it and use it without 
hesitation.” The new regulations and the closer inspection to which they 
have given rise have, in short, practically restored confidence in the 
meats and will shortly make the restoration complete. This is very favor¬ 
able. The regulations have made it necessary that all meat, canned and 
in the carcass or piece, shall reach the points of importation in tb^ 
United Kingdom in condition to pass the inspectors, and the public are 
aware of this and feel that they can now use imported meats safely. In 
the United Kingdom the new year has opened with brighter prospects for 
such meats. 

The sales of canned fruits in the retail branch have quite fulfilled my 
prediction. These fruits have once more proved their suitability and con¬ 
venience for use through the festive time of Christmas and the New Year. 
They have been well distributed among the retail dealers of the United 
Kingdom; they have been labeled splendidly; their bright and highly 
colored labels making the tins so attractive as to arrest the eye and pro¬ 
duce a favorable impression, and, most important of all, the prices of the 
tins have been so moderate that the great working-class population has 
been able to buy the fruits and has done so and used them freel}’. These 
fruits also bad a good time, and for them, as for meats, the new year opens 
with much promise. So long as the fruits turn out satisfactorily and look 
well and taste well, they will have ready and increasing sale in the United 
Kingdom. 

The condition of business in the wholesale branch of the trade has 
been such and continues such as agrees fully with these remarks concern¬ 
ing the household consumption and the state of affairs in the retail branch 
of the trade. 


JEROME B. RICE SEED COMPANY 

We can supply for present delivery at lowest prices, or will make growing contract prices for 1909 crop. 


Beans, 

Beets, 

Oniens, 

Peas, 

Squash, 

Tematoes, 

Sweet Corn, 

Cucumbers. 

Correspondence 

Invited 


Cambridge Valley Seed Gardens, - CAMBRIDGE, N. Y, 



IN WRITING ADVERTISERS, KINDLY MENTION THE TRADE. 














THE TRADE. 


SANITARY CANS 

With 

IMPROVED LOCK SIDE SEAM 


We are pleased to announce that we are 
equipped to manufacture all regular sizes of Sani¬ 
tary Cans with our Improved Lock Side Seam. 
This style of Side Seam has been thoroughly 
tried out and perfected during the past season; 
it has given universal satisfaction and is regarded 
as a decided improvement over the Lap Side 
Seam. Our adoption of the Improved Lock Seam 
marks another step forward in the development 
of the Sanitary Can. The old style Lap Seam 
served us well, as indeed it did all Can making 
systems in their embryotic stages. In thus aban¬ 
doning it, we are removing the only obsolete 
feature of the Sanitary Can. 

Sanitary Cans have been originated, devel¬ 
oped and perfected by us. Our many years* ex¬ 
perience is worth much to the paeker. 

We manufacture ONLY this type of Can, 
and devote our entire attention to it. We have 
no experiments to try out on any one. 

SAMPLES UPON REQUEST. 


SANITARY CAN COMPANY 

Factories: 

' Fair port, N. Y., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Bridgeton, N. J. 

General Offices: FAIRPORT, N. Y. Sanitary Can Company, Ltd., 

New York Ofhce: 447 W. FOURTEENTH ST, Niagara Falls, Ontatio. 

Cans manufactured under Max Ams Patents. 


Of wuniia ADVBKTUBSI. KZMDLT MSMTIOH TU TBAOB. 






THE TRADE. 


Continental Can Company. 


At London, Liverpool, Manchester and Cardiff a good business has 
been done in tongues and meats, and at the first two ports named stocks 
are now light and the probable extent of arrivals is being considered with 
some eagerness. The conditions make for firmness in values and the 
market is very firm at the time of writing. 

Salmon has sold freely and is still in good demand. The overland 
consignments passed quickly into dealers’ hands. Stocks of Fraser River 
and Skeena River are small. At Liverpool Alaska, especially, has had an 
active sale. Prices are firm generally. 

Lobsters have had a quiet-to-medium sale, the demand varying in 
different markets. The recent reduction in prices has not stimulated sales, 
as was expected. Business in lobsters is now quiet at the reduced values. 

Sardines have been in improved demand and prime qualities are now 
scarce. There is a good inquiry for such qualities and any such coming to 
hand at an early date will find a favorable market. 

Californian Fruits have sold steadily at recent prices. Apricots 
continue to sell freely and some concern is felt as to the extent of the sup¬ 
plies which will be coming forward. This fruit continues to be one of the 
most popular of the canned fruits now being imported to the United 
Kingdom. 

Pines have again been neglected and have now a slow sale, though 
prices are very low. These are spoken of as being unremunerative and as 
likely to influence future importations of this fruit. 

Tomatoes have sold well and continue to bring full prices. This 
article has increased in popularity with the British public of late, and 
promises to be one of the mire successful of the table fruits. It must, 
however, be noted that tomatoes are now grown to a fair extent in the 
United Kingdom. Latterly, fruit growers who have much “ glass ” have 
gone in for growing tomatoes for the market, so that some quantity of this 
fruit, home grown, is now available. Apricots, peaches and pines are not 
grown for market to a large extent in the United Kingdom, which explains 
the considerable demand for these last-named fruits which has sprung up. 
Through the importation of these fruits, which has gone on for some time, 
the English working-class family can now use a fruit which is still re¬ 
garded as a “fancy,” or “ special ” kind, and which is grown very spar¬ 
ingly by those who possess fruit gardens for private table use only. 

Britisher. 

Dodson, La.—The Dodson Canning and Manufacturing Co., wants 
prices on complete equipments for canning vegetables, fruits, syrups, etc. 
Wants 30 or 40 h. p. engine and boiler. Capacity about 15,000 cans daily. 


To The Trade. 

We are pleased to announce that arrangements have been made with 
Mr. E. C. Shriner, of E. C. Shriner & Co., to manage the Sales Depsrt- 
ment of our Baltimore factory. Mr. Shriner needs no introduction to the 
canning trade, with whom he enjoys a large personal acquaintance. His 
thorough knowledge of their requirements, and our unsurpassed facilities 
for handling their business, particularly during the rush period, when 
promptness and close attention to details means something to every canner, 
insures his old patrons and the canning trade at large the best services that 
facilities and experience can render. Yours truly. 

Continental Can Co. 

In thanking my friends for their past favors and expressing the hope 
that 1909 will be a year of prosperity to all, I wish to express also the hope 
that I may continue to enjoy their confidence and good-will and to receive 
their patronage, which I shall continue to merit by close attention to their 
wants and due regard of their interests. Yours truly, 

E. C. Shriner. 

Baltimore, Md., January 8 , 1909. 


Canners and Wholesale Grocers. 

As promoting a closer relation between the wholesale grocery and can¬ 
ning trade. Secretary Beckmann of the National Wholesale Grocers’ Asso¬ 
ciation has issued the following circular to all its members: 

New York, Dec. 15, 1908. 

To Members : 

This is to advise you that the National Canners’ Association will meet 
in convention in the city of Louisville, Kentucky, February 1-6, 1909. The 
above Association has courteously extended an invitation to all members 
of the National Wholesale Grocers’ Association to attend the convention. 

Inasmuch as the canner and wholesale grocer have interests in com¬ 
mon, our members will no doubt avail themselves of the invitation. 

Yours very truly, 

Alfred H. Beckmann, 

Secretary. 


Delhi, La.—Delhi Canning Company, organized with 1 10,000 capital 
with E. Mitchener, president, and R. C. Wollack, sec’y and treas. 


Patents and Trade Marks 


Food and Drugs Act Opinions. 


JOSEPH M. BOWYER 


Attorney-cif-Law and 5oIicitor of Patents 
I I 10 F STREET, N. W. 

WASniNOTON, D. C. 


FOR SALE. 

Formulas for putting up tomato catsup, chili sauce, 
salad dressing, sweet pickles, sweet relishes, apple butter, 
etc., without sterilizing or using preservatives of any kind 
Goods guaranteed to keep for months in open packages. 
References given. Address Patrick Gallagher, Tacoma, 
Wasn., care N. W. Conserving Co. 


FOR SALE. 

750 BUSHELS FIRST CLASS, “ FIRST AND BEST” 
‘ SEED PEAS. 

I C. N. MYERS, 

I 12-18-08-1 m Hanover, Pa. 



“The quickest way to 
the mind is thro’ the eye" 

Therefore appieal to the eye by dressing your 
goods with attractive and stylish labels. The use 
of bright, handsome, up-to-date labels is indispens¬ 
able to the wide-awake, progressive canner. He 
knows they are a good investment—because they 
often secure a better price per case for his goods. 

There is that subtle “somethingness” about our 
labels that appeals to the eye of the jobber, broker, 
wholesaler and consumer alike. 

The experienced packer knows and no longer 
experiments, but places his contract for quality 
labels with 

cbe United States Piintind €o. 

Sixth and Lock Ste., CINCINNATI, O. 

91 North Third St., BROOKLYN, N.Y. 


IN WRITING ADVERTISERS. KINDLY MENTION THE TRADE. 
















THB TRADE. 


19 


Canning Machinery of all Kinds 

Including the Celebrated 

Queen Anne Cooker. 



SIMPLE • Light Running—Easy to Clean—None Better. 

Send For Description, Terms, Etc. 

I have some great bargains to offer in 
machinery of every description—little used — 
practically as good as new, 

H. Cottingham, 

BALTIMORE, - - MARYLAND. 


DO YOU NEED US? 

WE BUILD 

COMPLETE CANNING FACTORIES 

In Any Part of the United States and Canada. 

{Either the SANITARY CAN SYSTEM 
or the HERMETICAL SEAL SYSTEM.) 

0. PRESSPRICH & COMPANY 

ESTABLISHED 1895 

103 PARK AVE^UE 
NEW YORK, - - - NY. 

Agents wanted in unoccupied territory, write or cail for particulars. 


JOHN H. ERSKINE 

262 Randolph Bldg. - MEMPHIS, TENN. 

Merchandise Rroker and Manufacturers’ Agent 

Accounts Solicited of Manufacturers, Brokers, Dealers 
and Producers of Canned Goods and all Goods 
Handled by Wholesale Grocers 

REFERENCES: ALL MEMPHIS JOBBERS 


CANTON BOX COMPANY, 

2501 to 2515 Boston St, 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Packing Boxes. 

Made up or in Shooks Cargo or Carload. 



THE MORRALL CAN WIPING MACHINE. 
The simplest Can-wiping mschine on the market. 
Will wipe cans from No 1 up togallan size cans. The 
price is low and just the thing for small canners. 


MORRAL BROTHERS 

Manufacturers of 

THE MORRAL CORN SILK BRUSHING MACHINE, 
THE MORRAL SINGLE CUT CORN CUTTER, 

THE MORRAL DOUBLE CUT CORN CUTTER, 

THE MORRAL CORN COOKER-FILLER, 

THE MORRAL CAN WIPING MACHINE and 
THE MORRAL LABELING MACHINE. Also dealers 
in Capping Machines, Retorts, Etc., and can furnish full 
line of Corn Machinery. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICES. 

Address: 

Mortal Brothers, - Mortal, Ohio. 


IN WRITING ADVBRTUBRB. KINDLY MENTION THK TRADE 






20 


THE TRADE. 


THE TRADE. 


PXTBLISHKD EVERY FRIDA.V BY 

THE TRADE COMPANY. 

INCORPORATED. 

B. S. Judge, ..... President and Managing Editor. 

A. F. Judge, .Secty.-Treas., Asst. Editor. 

304.5 Maryland Savings Bank Building, Baltimore, Md. 

The Trade is the »nly paper published exclusively in the interest 
ot the Canned Goods Packers of the United States and Canada. 
Established in 1878. 

TERMS OP SUBSCRIPTION. 

Payable in advance on receipt of bill. 


One year, - - .... J2.00 

Six months, ........ |i.oo 

Foreign, - - .... .... $4.00 

Canada, - .... .... l3-oo 


Advertising Rates.—A ccording to space and location. 

Make all Drafts or Money Orders payable to The Trade Co. 

Address all communications to The Trade Co., Baltimore, Md. 

Notices of Hands Wanted or Situations Wanted will be inserted 
free for paid annual subscribers; other parties will be charged |2.oo 
per inch per insertion, (5.00 per month. 


Packers are invited and requested to use the columns of The Trade 
for inquiries and discussions on all matters among themselves pertainlzg to 
their business. 

Business communications from all sections are desired, but anon3rmous 
letters will be ignored. B. S. JUDGE, Managing Editor. 


Entered at the Postoffice, Baltimore, Md., as second-class mail matter. 


BALTIMORE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 1909. 


EDITORIAL JOTTINGS. 

The Interstate Commerce Commission has found that the 
railroads did quite a good business during the dull times and 
made sufficient profit, and that it is not at all necessary to either 
advance rates or cut wages. 


Canners will welcome the news that higher freight rates are 
not necessary, and California canners at least will readily believe 
that the railroads are acting in a very arbitrary manner, as if 
they “ needed the money,” and that was sufficient. 


The world at large and the business men of this nation in 
particular must be very much edified and satisfied at the way 
Congress and Senate are dev'oting their time to finding fault 
with Roosevelt or others instead of “ doing something.” That 
there is plenty to do needs no mentioning, and it would seem to 
us about time to make an investigation into how these repre¬ 
sentatives of the people spend their time and the people’s money 
forming a neighborhood club of gossips. 

Of course, we are told the work of revising the tariff is 
going steadily on, and we are lead to believe this disturbing 
question will soon be laid to rest by some wise action on the 
part of these great bodies; but all will agree that here, as in 
everything, actions speak louder than words. 


We may be able to profit in the future through the investi¬ 
gations being made into the misuses some of these officeholders 
have made of their positions; but it would be immensely more 
beneficial if some good actions were taken looking to the removal 


of the cause of the depression, or the doubt in business men’s 
minds, that now prevents a full return of that prosperity every¬ 
one wants to see. We ask for action and they give us words; 
we ask for relief and they point us out scandals. 


What the canned goods packer needs is to see the smoke 
rolling out of all chimneys and the horde of workingmen going 
each morning to work and returning at eve to their families, 
with money in their pockets to buy: canned goods, among 
other things. If the question of tariff changes is holding that 
day back, bring up the question, and while we do not want 
hasty, unthoughtful action, we do want to see the disturbance 
removed by settlement. Certainly a raking up of all the unsav¬ 
ory actions or criminal negligences of the past will not help 
matters. 


Canned goods packers will soon have their own Congress in 
session at Louisville, and there are some questions that should 
come up there and be settled and that, we hope, will be done. No 
one knows better than we that the canners have their rights, 
and that if they do not look after them, no one else will. But 
the jobbers and others also have theirs, and as there is certain 
to be a conflict between the two, we hope that both parties will 
see the path of wisdom in mutually conceding something, so 
that a start may be made towards these advances. 


Last year the wholesale grocery representatives—the job¬ 
bers—took offense because the Canners’ Association would not 
accept as a body the form of future contract pre.sented by them. 
We are not going to criticize either party in this, but simply 
say that this is not the way to arrive at the solution of so grave 
a question. A middle point between the two contentions should 
be sought for, and each side conceding something, make the 
effort for a year, and experience will be gained and the best 
method ultimately found. 

Most jobbers are honest about taking their purchases, as 
most canners are honest about delivering their contracts, so that 
all question in the matters pertains to the dishonest parties on 
both sides. As these are in the minority by great odds, why 
cannot an arbitration committee, composed of honest canners 
and honest jobbers be appointed to decide the point of justice. 
No canner can honestly sell his whole pack as ” futures,” when 
his crops and pack are dependent upon the caprices of Nature, 
and he cannot honestly sign a contract to deliver every case so 
sold, for the same reason; they are not his to sell or to promise 
to deliver. Neither has any jobber the right to seU futures 
bought in this way to the full extent of his purchases. With 
such a committee as we suggest, the canner would be con¬ 
demned for selling beyond his capacity, just as quickly as for 
failure to deliver to the full extent of his pack. 


There must be some action taken to continue as important 
a branch of the business as the selling and delivery of ” futures.” 
Between houses that have been dealing with each other for years 
there are no questions, when the canner falls short in his deliver¬ 
ies or the house gets caught in a falling market. And if some 
houses can do this, why cannot all ? Or, if all cannot do so, 
why should the entire industry be blamed and put in a false 
light because of the few ? 


Jobbers are opposed to the movement that every case of 
goods should go out under the label of the man who packed it. 
But until such a condition exists there can be no certainty in 
the dealing of ” futures.” To us, as we have preached for the 
past twenty years and more, this is the whole salvation of the 
business. In the face of the keenest oppo.sition. The Trade 
advocated years ago tbe practice of placing the canner’s name 














THB TRADE. 


21 


on every can of goods sent out; and until this is done, we will 
not be freed of the serious charges the industry is now sub¬ 
jected to. 


When a man has to indorse every can he sends out; when 
every can stands for the good name or the disgrace of the packer; 
when every can means a messenger to sell more cases, or a 
warning to keep away from that kind, then we will not see 
slack-filled goods, poor, sloppy-packed goods; we will not see a 
crop stretched into twice as many cans as it should have filled, 
and the pump will go out of use. There will be no room for 
question of quality, nor excuse for rejection on that score; but 
when that day of “every can must bear my name” arrives, 
there will be such a demand for canned goods of all kinds that 
it will be difficult to supply it. 

It has taken years for some of this good seed to bear fruit, 
but, once commenced, it cannot be stopped, and it has com¬ 
menced and it will go on. The progressive canner is the early 
fruit; the laggard will eventually come around. 

A New Detinning' Company. 

The Goldschmidt Detinning Company, New York, has been incorpo¬ 
rated with a capital stock of I3,000,000, to detin scrap under the process of 
Dr. Carl Goldschmidt, of Germany. It is understood that the American 
Can Company is interested in the new enterprise. The management of the 
company is at present in the hands of P. H. Hirschland, 60 Wall street, 
New York, who is the representative in this country of Dr. Goldschmidt.— 
Ameriian Metal Market. 


London, Eng.—According to a report recently submitted 
the profits of the British Columbia Canning Company for the 
year, amounted to 6,371 pound Sterling. A dividend of 2 }4 
per cent has been declared and an extra 2^4 recommended. 


Current Trade-Mark Data. 


The following trade-marks have been favorably acted upon by the 
United States Patent Office. Any person who believes he would be dam¬ 
aged by the registration of a mark may oppose it. All inquiries should be 
addressed to Joseph M. Bowyer, Patent and Trade-Mark Lawyer, liio 
F St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Serial No. 

January 7, 1909. 

35.224 The words. Gold Bar, printed on a gold panel with orange 
edges and two blue bands crossing the panel. Owner, Griffin 
& Skelly Co., San Francisco, Cal. Used on dried and evapo¬ 
rated fruits and canned fruits. 

35.225 The words. Silver Bar, printed on a silver panel crossed by 
two blue bands. Owner, same as No. 35,224. Used on canned 
and evaporated fruits. 

36,130 The words. The Target Brand, The Redwood Co., New 
York, written on a white circular band enclosing six circles, 
being printed alternately in pellow and blue. Owner, The 
Redwood Co., New York, N, Y. Used on jams and mar¬ 
malades. 

33,654 The word. Defiance. Design, a rooster. Owner, W'estern 
Grocer Co., Marshalltown, Iowa. Used on canned fruits, 
vegetables, etc. 

36,746 The words. Oval Brand. Owner, A. Booth & Co., Chicago, 
Ill. Used on canned salmon and canned oysters. 

36,576 The words. Fishing Girl Brand. Owner, Strohmeyer & 
Arpe Co., New York. Used on canned fruits. 

36,589 The word, Leonora. Owner, The Southern Cotton Oil Co., 
Jersey City, N. J. Used on cotton-seed oils. 

36,604 The words. High Up Design, a man gripping. Owner 
The Guymon-Petro Mercantile Co., Hutchinson, Kan. Used 
on canned fruits and vegetables. 

37,126 The word, Morron. Owner and use, same as No. 36,576. 

37.223 The word, Bebe. Owner, the same as No. 36,576. Used on 
preserved fruits. 

37.224 The word LeMarquis. Owner, the same as No. 36,576. 
Used on canned and dried fruits. 

37,230 The word, Prezioso. Owner, the same as No. 36,576. Used 
on canned fruits and vegetables. 


WHY DO IT? 


You pay from 40% to 60% too much for labeling if you 
employ ‘hand work’— 

And take about double the time really necessary to fill 
orders— 

Neither are your cans as attractive as they ought to be! 

Thus you throw away money unnecessarily—don’t convert 
your goods into cash as quick as you might—nor do your cans 
make as good an impression as they ought to, because the labels 
are not applied uniform and neat. DOES THIS PAY ? 


Think it over then write for particulars of the 

BURT LABELING machines. They are the biggest Time and 
Money-Savers ever put into a plant and you are losing money evei v 
day you label without one. Immediate investigation will pay. 


BURT MACHINE COMPANY, 


Baltimore. 


Of WUTDia ADVSKTltBKA. KINDLY MXNTION THB TKADB. 



22 


THE TRADE. 


37i 273 The word, Geysha. Owner and use, the same as No. 
37.223. 

37,274 The word, LaGrisette. Owner, the same as No. 37,223. 
Used on preserved fruits and vegetables. 

37.276 The words. Jockey Club. Owner, the same as No. 37,223. 
Used on canned fruits and canned vegetables. 

37.277 The word L’Aiglon. Owner and use, the same as No. 

37.276. 

37,279 The word, Skaal. Owner, the same as No. 37,276. Used 
on vegetables. 

38.262 The words. Silver Bar. Owner, Griffin & Skelley Co., San 
Francisco, Cal. Used on canned vegetables. 

38.263 The words. Gold Bar. Owner and use, the same as No. 
38,262. 

38,368 The words. Bumble Bee Brand. Design, bumble bee. 

Owner, Columbia River Packers Association, Astoria, Ore. 
Osed on canned salmon. 

38.371 The words. Holly Brand. Owner and use, the same as 
No. 38,368 

38.372 The word. Magnolia. Design, a magnolia. Owner and 
use, the same as No. 38,368. 

38.373 The word. Palm. Design, a palm. Owner and use, the 
same as No. 38,368. 

38,375 The words. Pine Burr Brand. Design, a pine burr. Owner 
and use, the same as No. 38,368. 

38.380 The words. The Golden Age. Owner and use, the same as 
No. 38,368. 

38.381 The words. Blue Bird Brand. Design, blue bird. Owner 
and use, the same as No. 38,368. 

38,383 The word, Kinneys. Design, Water Scene Owner and 
use, the same as No. 38,368. 

38,399 The words. Empire State. Owner, Stittville Canning Co., 
Stittville, N. Y. Used on canned vegetables. 

It is reported that the sardine fishing on the coast of France 
has been a failure because so many of the fish have deserted 
their usual haunts, and those that have been caught are too 
small. 


Benzoate of Soda. 


Frequent inquiries have been received by the Department 
in regard to the use of benzoate of soda in foods. The follow¬ 
ing is typical of this class of inquiries: 

In F. I. D. 89, the position of the National authorities in regard to the 
use of benzoate of soda is to allow its use in food, pending the report of the 
Referee Board of Consulting Scientific Experts. Based upon Bulletin 84, 
Part IV, of the Bureau of Chemistry, issued subsequent to F. I. D. 89, 
certain manufacturers of food products are representing to the officials of 
the States charged wth the enforcement of the food laws and to the con¬ 
suming public generally, that the United States Government has con¬ 
demned the use of benzoate in foods. We write to ask the position of the 
Department on this subject. 

The Department has not changed the position outlined in Food 
Inspection Decision 89. Pending the determination by the Referee Board 
of the wholesomeness or unwholesomeness of benzoate of soda, its use will 
be allowed under the following restrictions: 

Benzoate of soda, in quantities not exceeding one-tenth of 1%, may be 
added to those foods in which generally heretofore it has been used. 

The addition of benzoate of soda shall be plainly stated upon the label 
of each p 'ckage of such food, 

F. L. Dunlap, 

Gko. P. McCabe, 

Hoard of Food and Drug Inspeclion, 

Approved: 

James Wilson, 

Secretary of Agriculture. 

[We are in receipt of the two above notices under date of December 
26, 1908.] 

The Louisville papers are booming the Convention and all 
say the hotels are busy engaging rooms for that waek. We had 
this fact brought home to us strong a few weeks ago; we had 
written the Selbach hotel to reserve us accommodations but they 
replied that the house was already overcrowded. Although this 
is disappointing, at the same time it is the best evidence that the 
Convention this year will be a large one. Have you engaged 
yourself a room ? 


The Metallic 
Decorating ^ 




...TIN PLATE DECORATING... 

IN ALL IT’S BRANCHES 


GOLD LACQUERING AND PRINTING 
OF PLATES TO STAND PROCESSING 
A SPECIALTY. 


AMPLE FACILITIES TO EXECUTE ORDERS QUICKLY 


194 CHAMBERS STREET 

NEW YORK, - - - N. Y. 

WORKS WITH R. R. SIDETRACK : 
BROOKLYN, - - - N. Y. 


Fire Insurance 
at Canners Exchange 

LAMSIMO B. WAR,MER„ 

Attorney and Menajter. 

5 Wabash Avenue, CtllCAQO. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE. 

FRANK VAN CAMP, Chairman. CHAS. S. CRARY, Treasurer. 
Indianapolis, Ind. Hoopeslon, Ill. 

GEORGE G. bailey, WM. R. ROACH, 

Rome, N. Y. Hart, Mich. 

L. J. RISSER, OnarKa, III. 

Officially Endorsed by the National Canners’ Association. 

Canners Exchange Polices Give 

ABSOLUTE SECURITY 

If you doubt this investigate and we will prove it 
to you. 

Why longer allow prejudice to stand in the way 
of your saving money ? 

Canners Exchange has now reached the point 
where its success is assured. 

EIGHTY PER CENT has been SAVED by SUB¬ 
SCRIBERS up to the present time. 

It is worth your while to consider this. Do it now. 

For full information, address 

LANSING B. WARNER, 

Attorney and Manag.er, 

5 WABASH AVENUE, CHICAGO, 


IN WKITINQ AOVEKTIUEKt, KINDLY MENTION THE TKAOB. 
















THB TRADE. 


23 


{TENNESSEE 

{can company 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 

FRUIT anJ VEGETABLE CANS 

Our large output and good shipping 
facilities enables us to make prompt ship¬ 
ment of all orders. 

Chattanooga is the Best distributing 
point in the South. 

Write us for prices on Cans and Solder 
Hemmed Caps. 

Our traveling men are subject to your 
call. 



Avoidjtrouble and prevent goods 
from becoming mixed in the 
warehouse by marking 
your cans with— 


TIN GAN INK 


This INK Will Stand 
Processing 

WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES 


A. E. MACNEAL, 

107 S. FREDERICK STRFBT, BALTIMORE, MD. 


ESTABLISHED 1870. 

Have your cans become rusty or soiled 
from leaks, &c., if so, use 

Maier^s Silver Eacquer 

It will make them look bright same as 
original, at very little cost. 

JOHN G. MAIER’S SONS 

MANUFACTURERS LacquBPS, All Colops. 

FOR CANNERS USE. 

' BALTIMORE. MD. 


SPRINGFIELD VAPORIZING FUEL GAS MACHINE, 

SOMETHING NEW AND INTERESTING TO PACKERS. GAS 


AT ONE-HALF COST OF YOVR PRESENT SYSTEM. 



This Machine is designed to produce fuel gas from common stove 
gasoline which can be had from tank wagon and corner grocery stores, 
5 gallons of which is equal in heat units to 6 gallons of the high grade 
used in the old underground systems. The difference in the prices 
of these two grades of gasoline is exactly the saving effected, saying 
nothing about the trouble, annoyance and loss by evaporation of obtaining 
the higher grades for your present systems. 

This Machine produces any mixture of gas and air required and will 
retain the same constantly until the last drop of gasoline is gone regardless 
of variable consumption or atmospheric changes. 

These mixtures are determined by adjusting the little pointer between 
the spectacles on front of machine and can be adjusted as desired. 
The best results are obtained from i gallon of gasoline to the 1,000 feet of 
air which produces a fuel gas of intense heat, and when using Welsbach 
mantels produces an illumination almost equal to an electric arc light. Let 
us know the amount of gasoline you are now using in your present system 
per day, and we will be glad to make a price for machine.*! of equal capacity 
which are guaranteed to give you better results. 


GEO. E. LOCKWOOD CO., j 

308 Chestnut Street, - - PHIEADELPHJA. 


IN WRITING ADVERTISERS. KINDLY MENTION THE TRADE 








24 


THE TRADE. 


MEET US AT THE LOUISVILLE CONVENTION 

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO MAKE OUR EXHIBIT YOUR 
HEADQUARTERS DURING YOUR STAY AT THE CONVENTION. 



TtlE MONITOK CAN FILLER. 


The John Boyle Company. 


Baltimore, Md., Nov, 14, 1908. 

THE HUNTLEY MEG. CO. 

Silver Creek, N. Y. 

Gentlemen: —Referring to the Monitor Can Filling MaQhine 
which we installed in our Baltimore factory, would state that it has 
worked very satisfactorily, in fact, more than satisfactory, as we 
worked the machine to quite an advantage during the past summer, 
particularly during the few days of rush. 

The one we are using at our Berrien Springs, Mich, plant is 
indispensable, as we could not get along without it, owing to the 
absence of sufficient help for packing purposes. 

Your friends, 

C. J. B. THE JOHN BOYLE COMPANY. 


HUNTLEY MFG. CO., Silver Creek, N. Y. 


AT THE THEATRES. WEEK OF JANUARY 18. 


FORD'S 


“THE RED MILL.” 


Usual Matinee. 


MARYLAND 

“KEITH STAR VAUDEVILLE.’ 


Matinee Dailv. 


AUDITORIUM 

ANNA EVA FAY. 

Matinees, Monday, Tuesday, Fridaj’ and Saturday. 


HOLLIDAY ST. 

“THE ANGLE AND THE OX.” 

Matinee Daily. 


GAYFTY 

“ THE JERSEY LILIES.” 

Matinee Daily. 


PINEAPPLE GRATER. 

There are 75 saws in ba.se of hopper, divided on two shafts and interlaciiii' 
and running into one another. The hopper is made of white pine 
wood and the discharging schiite is also lined with wood. 

Capacity, the pack of any ordinary house. 



SHOWING SAWS WITH HOrPER REMOVED. 


The John R. Mitchell Company 

Canning and Canmaking 
Machinery, 

Foot of Washington St., Baltimore, Md. U* S. A. 


IN WRITING ADVERTISERS. KINDLY MENTION THE TRADE. 





















THE TRADE 


*5 



U«(^t , WSi 


C. F. HARWARD 


STICKNEY 

SYRUPING MACHINE 
$ 125.00 


ContrsLctor and Builder of 


CANNING FACTORIES 


Instantly adjustable while running. 
Will handle one, two or three pound 
cans, and do perfect work. . . . 


Twenty years practical experience. Beware of 
$8000.00 Canning Factories. Fifteen years practical 
experience in State of Maryland. If you are going to 
build a canning factory let me figure with you on your 
plant. I can build you a plant to pack 24,000 cans in 
10 hours for $4500.00, turn key job. 

For further information write me, 

C. F. HARWARD, 

Brownsville, Tennesse. 


CONDENSED MILK 
FILLER 


standard machine of its class, in use 
by all the largest concerns. 


SPECIAL FILLING MACHINES for 
any purpose or capacity. EVAPOR- 
ATED CREAM, BAKED BEANS, 
FATS, OILS, MUSTARDS, etc., in 
round or square cans or glass jars 


HENRY R. STICKNEY 

PORTLAND, MAINE, U. S. A. 


We manufacture a full line of Fine Silvered and Plain Screw 
Caps for Catsup Bottles, Whiskey Flasks, Pepper and Salt 
Seller Tops, Mason Jar Caps and Jelly Jar Covers. Samples 
and prices on application. 

BERNARDIN BOTTLE CAP CO. 
Evanaville, . ... . fnd. 


SPECIAL AGENT 

SPRAGUE CANNING MACHINERY COMPANY 

FOR 

NEW ENGLAND STATES. 


Lewis Power Can Tester 


can furnish everything required for a Modern, 
Up-to-Date, High Speed, Eeononiical Plant for 
Packers^ cans. 

If you contemplate making improvements 
in your present equipment or erecting a new 
plant, be sure to get their proposition. 

Their ** STEWART** Machinery, which 
produces cans without solder or flux on the 
inside of the can, will interest you. 


CAPACITY, 12,000 NO. 2 OR NO. 3 CANS 10 HOURS. GALLONS, 6,000 

ALSO MANUFACTURER OF 

Pineapple Peelers and String Bean Cutters. Second-hand Machinery 
for sale; Power Presses, Steward Sanitary Can Double Seamer and 
Lineing Machine for No. 3 and No. lo cans. Also lot of Can Dies, all 
sizes, with Cap Dies for same. Very cheap. 

E. T. LEWIS. 






















26 


THB TRADE. 



Packer's Cans 


POPE 

'Clean & Bright” 

PLATES 


Pope Tin Plate Co. 


GENERAL OFFICES, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 


NEW YORK OFFICES, 
29 BROADWAY. 


TRADE 



MARK 


tandard 

ald&T^iriQ 

Cy 


^ Ctanc 


(Formerly manufactured by the Marlou Chemical Works, Jersey City, N. J.) 


Manufactured only by 

The Grasselli Chemical Co 


Registered U. S. Patent Office. 

When you are ready to buy Soldering Flux, order either of these well known brands and 

GET THB BEST 

BEST —Because made by skillful chemists from the very best materials obtainable. 

BEST —Because our formulas are the result of years of experience and because no Flux is shipped that does not pass a rigid 
inspection. 

BEST —Because by their use you will have a smaller percentage of "leaks” and a smaller consumption of solder than when 
any other Flux is used. 

Both brands carried In stock by The GfasselU Chemical Company. 


Cleveland, 0.,(Maln office) New York, Sixty Wall Street, Chicago, 117 Michigan St 

Cincinnati, O. Birmingham, Ala. New Orleans, La. 

St. Louis, Mo. Datralt, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

S. O. RANDALL, Baltimore, Md.-Also by-C. W. PIKE CO., San Francisco, Cal. 

Samples and Prices Promptly Furnished. Corrsspsndsnee Invited, 


Chicago, 117 Michigan St. 
New Orleans, La. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 


Of WKITINS ADVBBTllBU, K1ND1.T mWTlON THB TBADB. 



















Canned Goods Brokers 


J. D. Blakemore 


Sam W. Bookah Jr, 


J. D. BLAKEMORE & COMPANY, 


508 Poydraa Stteat, 


New Orleans, La. 


Zastrow’s 
7_7 _ Box. 


FOR SALE. 


Improved Square Oyster Steam Box. 


FOR SALE. 


FOR SALE. 

200 Bushels very choice Connecticut grown STOWELL’S 
EVERGREEN SUGAR CORN on the ear. 

Address, Winters & Prophet Canning Co. 
i- 8 -tf. Mount Morris, N. Y. 


FOR SALE. 

MINCE MEAT CHOPPER—Good as new, low price. 
Also CUTTER, for cutting vegetables fine, and also good 
HORSE RADISH GRATER. Address 

JOHN E. SMITH’S SONS CO., 
i-i-im Buffalo, N. Y. 


These Boxes are made square, so that when the square cars filled with 
oysters are run into them, they fill the Box as full as practical, thereby 
leaving very little unused space for the live steam to fill up. They are 
made of inch plate steel, riveted together with % inch rivets, all seams 
and joints are fitted and caulked carefully, the frames are filled with pack¬ 
ing and fitted with two swinging doors, the tracks are securely fastened to 
the heavy angles forming the corners of the Box. Every Box is furnished 
with steam pipes fitted to Box, safety-valve, steam gauge and all valves 
necessary. They are generally made 25 feet long, 30 inches wide by 31 inches 
high inside, to hold three 8 ft. cars easily, but are made to any desired length. 


GEO. W. ZASTROW, 

Mechanical Engineer, 

1404-1410 THAMES ST., BALTIMORE, MD. 


TWO HAWKINS CAPPERS and TWO PLUMMER 
PEA P'lLLERS, in good order. 

Address 

WISCONSIN PEA CANNER. 
11-27-08-tf Care The Trade. 


Hawkins’ Capper, just been refitted in shop. Price low for 
quick sale. Address 

“TOMATO,” 

ii-13-tf Care The Trade. 


THE TRADE. 


I CANNING MACHINERY. I 


f KING TOMATO FILLERS. HAMMONO LABELERS. | 

© - J 

I A. K. ROBINS & CO. f 

S BALTIMORE, MD. ® 

CANNING FACTORY FOR SALE. 

Bids will be received by the undersigned, for 
the sale of a canning factory located and com¬ 
pletely equipped, situated at Gutfirie, Oklahoma. 
Capacity Afteen thousand cans per day 
of syrup goods; forty-five thousand on tomatoes. 
Surrounded by good farming country. Time for 
receiving bids limited to January 25, 1909. 

Each bid must be accompanied by a forfeit of 
a certified check for five per cent, of the amount of 
the bid. The right is reserved to reject any and 
all bids. For further particulars see or write 
D. M. TIBBETTS, Assignee, 

GUTHRIE, OKLAHOMA. 


I a can. I 

1 ^ I ^HE great commanding feature about | 
\ our cans is that those who use g 
them have never had occasion to | 
to send in a claim. Our cans have been | 
used for years by the best packers in § 
Maryland, Delaware and Virginia, and | 
their continuous use of them is a tribute 8 
5 to the good of the can. We manufacture § 

||i a clean, bright can which we guarantee 8 
to please. g 

Our Solder Hemmed Caps are also on | 
the front line. Our machines turn out a | 
cap hemmed with a solid ring of solder, | 
differing from the clamped ring in so far g 
that it cannot possibly come off. The 8 
solder is uniformly distributed. These | 
are points of importance to every canner, | 
and make our cap worthy of consideration. | 
We carry a large supply constantly on | 
hand, and so can give prompt and efficient | 
service. | 

The Boyle Can Co. | 

BALTIMOliE, MD. | 


IN WRITING ADVSRTIgBRS, KINDLY MENTION THE TRADE. 







28 


THE trade. 


Canners^ Ready Reminder 

Of Machinery and Supplies 

and Those who Sell Them 


AIR PUMPS. 

Clark Novelty Co., Rocheater 

Max Ams Machine Co., New York City. 

J. S. Hull Mfg. Co., Baltimore. 

Sprague Mfg. Co., Chicago. 


APPLE FILLERS. 


See String Bean Fillers. 

AUTOMATIC CANMAKINQ MACHINERY. 


Ayars Machine Co., 
E. W. Bliss Co., 
Slaysman & Co., 
Stevenson & Co., 
Stiles-Morse Co., 


Salem, N. T. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Chicago and Baltimore. 


AUTOMATIC CANNING SYSTEMS. 

Judge Machine Co. Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

AUTOMOBILES. 

Sinclair-Scott Co., Baltimore. 

BELTING. 


Burt Machine Co.. Baltimore. 

BOOKS FOR CANNERS. 

A Complete Course in Canning and others. 

The Trade. 

Solder, A. Schultz & Co., Baltimore. 

BOTTLE CAPPING, CORKING, FILLING 
MACHINES. 

Ma*x Ams Machine Co., New York City. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

BOXES AND BOX SHOOKS. 

Canton Box Co., Baltimore. 

Holley-Matthews Mf’g Co. Sikeston, Mo. 

BOXING MACHINES. 

Burt Machine Co., Baltimore. 

Fred. H. Knapp Co., Chicago. 

BROKERS. 

Baker & Morgan, Aberdeen, Md. 

J. D. Blakemore & Co., New Orleans, La. 

Jno. H. Erskine, Memphis, Tenn. 

CANS. 

American Can Co., New York, Baltimore, 
Chicago, San Francisco. 


Continental Can Co., Syracuse, N. Y., Chicago. 


Old Dominion Can Co., 
Sanitary Can Co., 
Southern Can Co. 
Wheeling Can Co., 
Tennessee Can Co., 


Troutsville, Va. 
Fairport, N. Y. 
Baltimore. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 


CAN MAKING MACHINERY. 

(Crimpera, Testers, Seamers, etc.) 

Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 

Max Ams Machine Co., New York. 

E. W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

John R. Mitchell Co., Baltimore. 

Slaysman & Co., Baltimore. 

Stevenson & Co., Baltimore. 

L. & J. A. Steward, ‘ Rutland, Vt 

Stiles-Morse Co., Chicago and Baltimore. 

CANNERS’ SUPPLIES. 


Ayars Machine Co., 

Clark Novelty Co., 

Judge Machine Co., 

Geo. £. lK>ckwood, 

Sinclair Scott Co., 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., 
Henry R. Stickney, 


Salem, N. J. 
Rochester. 
Baltimore. 
Philadelphia. 
Baltimore. 
Chicago. 
Portland. 


CANNING nOU5E.S BUILT. 

O. Pressprich & Co., New York. 

C. F. Harward, Brownsville. Tenn. 

Can Marking Ink. 

A. E. Macneal, Baltimore. 

CAN STRAIGHTENERS. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

CAPPING MACHINES, Power. 

Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 

Max Ams Machine Co., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
L. & J. A. Steward, Rutland, VL 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 


CAPPING MACHINES, Hand. 

Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 

H. Cottingham, Baltimore. 

E. Renneburg & Sons, Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

CAP PLACING MACHINES. 

E. M. Lang Co. Portland, Me. 


CAPPING STEELS. 


'Clark Novelty Co., 

Geo. E. Lockwood, 

Max Ams Machine Co., 

E. Renneburg & Sons, 

Sinclair Scott Co., 

Slaysman & Co., 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., 
Stevenson & Co., 

H. R. Stickney, 

Geo. W. Zastrow. 


Rochester. 
Philadelphia. 
Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 

Chicago. 
Baltimore. 
Portland. 
Baltimore. 


CATSUP MACHINES. 

H. Cottingham, Baltimore. 

S. Howes Co., Silver Creek, N. Y. 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

CHEMICAL EXPERTS. 

W. L. Hinchman, Baltimore. 


CHLORIDE OF CALCIUM. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

CLUTCH PULLEYS, ETC. 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 


COATED CANS. 

Sanitary Can Co., Fairport, N. Y. 

Southern Can Co. Baltimore. 

CONDENSED MILK FILLERS. 

Henry R. Stickney, Portland. 

CONTINUOUS LINE. 

Judge Machine Co., Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

CONVEYING AND ELEVATING MACHIN' 

ERY. 

Bethlehem Foundry & Mach. Co., 

S. Betniehem, Pa. 
C. S. Harris Co., Rome, N. Y. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 


COPPERS, Soldering. 

See Canners’ Supplies. 

COPPER JACKETED KETTLES. 

Geo. E. Lockwood, Philadelphia. 

E. Renneburg & Sons, Baltimore 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago 

Geo. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 


CORN COOKERS AND FILLERS. 


Ayars Machine Co., 

H. Cottingham, 

Morral Bros., 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., 


Salem. N. J. 
Baltimore. 
Morral, O. 
Chicago. 


CORN CUTTERS. 

Morral Bros., Morral, O. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

CORN nU5KER5. 

Huntley Manufacturing Co. Silver Creek, N. Y. 
Sprague Canning Mach. Co. Chicago. 


CORN MIXERS. 
Sprague Canning Machinery Co., 

CORN SILKERS. 

Sinclair Scott Co., 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., 

CRANES. 

Burt Machine Co., 

H. Cottingham, 

Sinclair Scott Co., 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., 
Geo. W. Zastrow, 


Chicaga 


Baltimore 

Chicago. 


Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Chicago. 

Baltimore. 


CRATES, Iron Process. 


Morral Bros., 

E. Renneburg & Sons, 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., 
Geo. W. Zastrow, 


Morral, O. 
Baltimore. 

Chicago. 

Baltimore. 


Decorated Tin. 
Metallic Decorating Co. 


New York. 


DIES, PRESSES AND TOOLS. 


Ayars Machine Co., 
Max Ams Machine Co., 
E. W. Bliss Co., 

Jno. R. Mitchell Co., 
Slaysman & Co., 
Stevenson & Co., 

L. & J. A. Steward, 
Stiles-Morse Co., 


Salem, N. J. 
Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore 
Baltimore. 
Rutland, Vt 
Chicago and Baltimore. 


Enameled Lined Cans. 

Sanitary Can Co., Fairport, N. Y., Etc. 

Southern Can Co., Baltimore. 


ENGINES, BOILERS, FITTINGS, ETC. 

E. Renneburg & Sons, Baltimore. 

Slaysman & Co., Baltimore. 

FACTORY TRUCKS. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 


FILLING MACniNE5. 


Ayars Machine Co., 
H. Cottingham, 

S. Howes Co., 
Huntley Mfg. Co.. 
Henry R. Stickney, 


Salem, N. J 
Baltimore 
Silver Creek, N. Y. 
Silver Creek. N. V 

Portland. 


» WKITINO ADVBSTllBSl, KINDLY MXNTION TME TKAOl 




THE TRAt)E. 




FIRE POTS. 

E. W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Clark Novelty Co., Rochester. 

Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 

J. S. Hull Mfg. Co., Baltimore. 

E. Renneburg & Sons, Baltimore. 

H. R. Stickney. Portland. 

C. M. Kemp Mfg. Co., Baltimore. 

QAS AND GASOLINE ENGINES. 
Slaysman & Co., Baltimore. 

Gasolene. 

Standard Oil Co., Nearest Tank Station. 

GAS MACHINES. 

C. M. Kemp Mfg. Co., Baltimore. 

Geo. B. Lockwood Co. Philadelphia. 

GRATES, Furnace. 

See Canners’ Supplies. 

HOIST AND CARRYING MACHINES. 

Bethlehem Foundry & Machine Co., 

South Bethlehem, Pa. 
C. S. Harris Co., Rome, N. Y. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

INSURANCE 

Canners* Exchange, Chicago. 

JACKET KETTLES. Steam. 

Edw. Renneburg & Son, Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

Geo. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 

KEROSENE OIL SYSTEMS. 

Clark Novelty Co., Rochester. 

J. S. Hull Mfg. Co., Baltimore. 

KETTLES. Process. 

Edw. Renneburg Ic Son, Baltimore. 

H. Cottingbam, Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

Gee. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 

LABEL5. 

U. S. Printing Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Stecher Litho. Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

LABELING MACHINES. 

Burt Machine Co., Baltimore. 

Fred H. Knapp Co., Chicago. 

Morral Bros., Morral, O. 

LACQUER. 

Burt Machine Co., Baltimore. 

John G. Maiers’ Sons, Baltimore. 

LACQUERING MACHINES. 

Burt Machine Co., Baltimore. 

LOCKERS, CAMS. 

E. W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Slaysman & Co., Baltimore. 

Stevenson & Co., Baltimore. 

Stiles-Morse Co., Chicago and Baltimore. 

METALS. 

E. M. Lang Co., Porltand. 

A. Schultz & Co., Baltimore. 

Metal Bottle Caps. 

Bernardin Bottle Cap Co., Evansville, Ind. 

METALS, Perforated. 

Huntley Mfg. Co., Silver Creek, N. Y. 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 

MIXERS, Corn, Mincemeat, etc. 

H. Cottingham, Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

OY5TER CAB5 

Edw. Renneburg & Son, Baltimore. 

Geo. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 

OYSTER MEASURERS. 

Edw. Renneburg & Son, Baltimore. 

Geo. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 

OYSTER, STEAM BOXES. 

Edw. Renneburg & Son, Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

G^. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 

OVERHEAD TRACKING. 

Bethlehem Foundry & Machine Co., 

South Bethlehem, Pa. 
Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 


PACKING, Asbestos. 

See Canners’ Supplies. 

PAILS, TUBS, BOWLS AND PANS. 

See Canners’ Supplies. 

PARING KNIVES. 

See Canners’ Supplies. 

PARING MACHINES, Apple, Etc. 
Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 

PASTE. 

Burt Machine Co., Baltimore. 

Fred. H. Knapp Co. Chicago. 

Patent Attorney. 

Joseph M. Bowyer, Washington, D. C. 

PAY CHECKS. 

See Canners’ Supplies. 

PEA BLANCHING BASKETS. 

See Canners’ Supplies. 

PEA BLANCHERS. 

Huntley Mfg. Co., Silver Creek, N. Y. 

PEA CLEANERS. 

S. Howes & Co., Silver C’ "lek, N. Y. 

Huntley Mfg. Co., Silver C ■rek, N. Y. 

PEA FILLERS. 

Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 

H. Cottingham, Baltimore. 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

PEA SEPARATORS or GR,ADERS. 

S. Howes Co., Silver Creek, N. Y. 

Huntley Mfg. Co., Silver Creek, N. Y. 

E. Renneburg & Sons, Baltimore. 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 

PEACH PITTER. 

Judge Machine Co. Baltimore. 

PEELING MACHINES. 

Judge Machine Co. Baltimore-San Prancisco. 

PIG LEAD AND TIN. 

E. M. Lang & Co., Portland. 

A. Schultz & Co., Baltimore. 

PRESSES, DIES, ETC. 

E. W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

John R. Mitchell Co., Baltimore. 

Slaysman & Co., Baltimore. 

Stevenson & Co., Baltimore. 

Stiles-Morse Co., Chicago and Baltimore. 

PINEAPPLE MACHINERY. 

E. J. Lewis, Middleport, N. Y. 

I'he John R. Mitchell Co., Baltimore. 

Sinclair Scott Co. Baltimore. 

Stevenson & Co., Baltimore. 

Geo. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 

PROCESS KETTLES. 

See Kettles, process. 

PULP MACHINES. 

S. Howes Co., Silver Creek, N. Y. 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 

RETORTS. 

See Kettles, process. 

REVOLVING SCREENS. 

H. Cottingham, Baltimore. 

Huntley Mfg. Co., Silver Creek, N. Y. 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 

SANITARY CANS. 

American Can Co., New York-Baltimore-Chicago. 
Sanitary Can Co., Fairport, N. Y. 

Indianapolis-Bridgeton 
L. & J. A. Steward, Rutland, Vt 

Sanitary Can Making Machinery. 

E. W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Max Ams Machine Co., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
L. & J. A. Steward, Rutland, Vt 

SCRAP TIN. 

Ammidon & Co., Baltimore. 

SEEDS. 

Leonard Seed Co., Chicago, Ill. 

J. B. Rice Seed Co., Cambridge, N. Y. 

SIEVES AND SCREENS. 

S. Howes Co., Silver Creek, N. Y. 

Huntley Mfg. Co., Silver Creek, N. Y. 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

Scalders, Tomato, Etc. 

Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 


Judge Machine Co. Baltimore-San Prancisco. 
Morral Bros., Morral, O. 

Edw. Renneburg & Son, Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 
SOLDER. 

E. M. Lang & Co., Portland. 

A. Schultz & Co.. Baltimore. 

SOLDERING FLUX. 

The Grasselli Chemical Co., Cleveland. 

Geo. E. Lockwood, Philadelphia. 

Solder Applied Caps and Machines. 

A. Schultz & Co., Baltimore. 

E. W. Bliss Co.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Solder Hemmed Caps. 

American Can Co., New York, Chicago, 

Baltimore, San Francisco. 
Continental Can Co., Syracuse, Chicago. 
E. M. Lang Co. Portland, Me. 

Southern Can Co., Baltimore. 

SOLDERING FURNACES. 

J. S. Hull Mfg. Co., Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

STEAM COILS. 

Edw. Renneburg & Sons, Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

Geo. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 

STEELS, Capping. 

See Capping Steels. 

STENCILS. 

See Canners’ Supplies. 

5TORAGE. 

Penna. Warehousing & S. D. Co., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

STRING BEAN MACHINERY. 

S. Howes Co., Silver Creek, N, Y. 

Huntley Mfg. Co., Silver Creek, N. Y. 

E. J. Lewis, Middleport, N. Y. 

SYRUPING MACHINES. 

Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

Henry R. Stickney, Portland 

TANKS, Iron. 

See Kettles, process. 

TIME CHECKS. 

See Canners’ Supplies. 

TIN PLATE. 

Pope Tin Plate Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

TOMATO FILLING MACHINES. 

Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 

H. Cottingham, Baltimore. 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago 

TO BUY OR SELL MACHINERY, ETC. 
For Sale ad in The Trade. Baltimore 

TOPPING AND WIPING MACHINES. 
Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore 

Sprague Canning Machine Co., Chicago. 

TRUCKS. 

See Factory Trucks. 

TUBS, PAILS AND PANS. 

See Canners’ Supplies. 

WIPERS, Can. 

Morral Bros., Morral, O. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 

WIRE BASKETS. 

See Canners’ Supplies. 

WIRE CLOTH, Canners. 

See Pea Separators and Graders. 

WRAPPING MACHINES. 

Burt Machine Co., Baltiawe 

ZINC, Parfaraiad. 

See Caaoera’ Sappliee 


ADVUnaUB. KXMDLT MBMTIOII TMM TMADE. 





30 


THE TRADE. 


EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGE. 


Paid subscribers can use this column Free for securing either positions 
or hands. To all others the charge is 20c. per line, one time, or 50c. per 
line, monthly; cash with order. Where the address is care of The Trade, 
stamps should be sent for answers, as the P. O. requires renewed postage 
on such. 


HELP WANTED. 


Wanted —Competent Man, to Sell Canning Machinery and Complete 
Canning Factories. Address O. Pressprich & Co., 103 Park Ave., 
New York. 


Help Wanted —Experienced Canned Fruit Salesman; require man 
capable of assisting Sales Manager and taking charge of crew work out of 
Chicago. Address, PRODUCTS, care The Trade. 

Wanted —Competent Canning Factory Help, all kinds; good posi¬ 
tions. THE DWIGHT CO., Ludington, Mich. 

Wanted —Man familiar with can business, to Assist in Sales Depart¬ 
ment; excellent opportunity. Address, with particulars, “CHARLES,” 
care The Trade. 


SITUATIONS WANTED. 


Notice to packers and canners—Your attention is called to the fact 
that the Superintendent Processors’ Association furnishes you with first-claas 
expert processors and superintendents free of charge, therefore, when yon ' 
desire to make a change or are in need of a good superintendent or pro- j 
cessor, kindly drop the Secretary a card or send stamps and he will furnish j 
full puliculars, so you can be placed in communication with several, and 
thereby select your own choice and make your own terms with them. For | 
full particulars, address Wm. Smith, Secretary, Superintendent Processors’ 
Association, care The Trade, Baltimore, Md. 1 

I Am Open For An Engagement For Next Season, or longer; 
have had several years experience packing all kinds of fruits and vege¬ 
tables, and have been employed for the past two years as superintendent | 
(of one of the factories) of one of the largest and best concerns in the 
country; can furnish the best of reference from present employers; will be 
open for engagement from January i, 1909. For further information, 
please address A. W., care The Trade. 

Wanted —By a reliable superintendent and processor, a position with 
a reliable canning concern in the north for the season of 1909. At present 
employed, but will be at liberty to accept new position by December ist. 
Address ALBERT, care The Trade. 

Wanted —Position as superintendent for 1909. A man who can build 
and equip canning factory, have years of practical 'experience packing 
fruits'and vegetables of all kinds in cans and glass. Best of reference from 
present employers. As to character and ability address, “SHELBY” care 
The Trade. _ 

Position Wanted —As Foreman or Practical Man, in Wholesale 
Grocery, Pickle or Preserve House; up to date on all products, as blueing, 
ammonia, carbonated beverages, catsup, pickles, sauces, relishes, jellies, 
jams, syrups, mincemeats, extracts, baking powder, etc.; no return goods. 
Address PRACTICAL, care The Trade. 


Wanted at Once —Position by an expert Fruit Preserver. Special¬ 
ties—Bottled fruits, glace fruits, jams and jellies: long experience in Eng¬ 
land, France and Canada; highest references. Apply ALFRED M. 
COCKS, Winona, Ont. 


Wanted —Position as Processor or Superintendent for 1909, by young 
man with 14 years experience in the canning business. Can pack a variety 
of fruits and vegetables, and can furnish good references. Address DEAR¬ 
BORN, care The Trade. 


A Position Wanted —As Superintendent-Processor for a new or old 
established canning factory; have over 25 years’ experience manufacturing 
all kinds fruit, jams, jelly, butters, etc., also packs of up-to-date canned 
fruits and vegetables, and have established market for same; open for 
engagement for the season, with privilege, if satisfactory to both parties 
for following season. Address “ B,” c/oThb Trade. 

Wanted. —Position by sober young man. 12 years experience in Can¬ 
ning business, to run capping machines or do processing with factory 
operating in Baltimore or the South. Will send references. 

Address, DOUBLEYOU, care The Trade. 

Wanted— A Position as Superintendent-Processor b^ an Expert Pro¬ 
cessor and Engineer; years of experience; can pack all kinds of fruits and 
vegetables according to the National Pure Food Law; understand all 
up-to-date machinery; can build a new plant or remodel an old one to the 
best of advantage; am a good manager of help, sober and willing to hustle; 
can furnish good reference. Address G. G. W., 612 East Grand River 
street, Clinton, Mo. 

Situation Wanted —By an expert Canner, Pickier and Preserver; 
over 25 years of experience on fine fruits, vegetables, catsup, sauces, rel¬ 
ishes, pickles, dressings and mustard; know how to put up fine green 
peeled Chili peppers, crystalized citrons, lemon and orange peel; know how 
to put up all goods so they give universal satisfaction, keep in any climate 
and comply with the Pure Food Laws; can furnish the very best references 
and know how to handle help successfully. Address EXPERT, c/o The 
Trade. 


MY WIFE SAYS 

“Any one can clean house, but it takes a good 
housekeeper to keep it clean.” 

DONT AGREE WITH HER!!! 

when applied to Canning and Preserving establish¬ 
ments wishing to comply with the certain requirements 
of the National Food Commissioners for the coming 
year. It requires an expert to clean out the cracks, 
corners and crevices so that they may be kept clean by 
ordinary labor. Can I help you ? 

W. L. HINCHMAN. Ph. G. 

No. 1 W. MAIN STREET, 

HADDONFIELD. N. J. 

FOR SALE. 


A Canning Factory in perfect working order. Situated in 
centre of farming section of Atlantic Co., New Jersey. Price 
low for quick sale. Death cause of sale. 

For particulars address, 

i-8-im “C. K” care of The Trade. 


THE OLD DOMINION CAN CO. 

TROUTVILLE, VA. 

Manufacturers of Fruit and Vegetable Cans. 

NO BETTER CANS MADE. 


Our location gives us advantageous freight rates to most points. 


Of W M T Uf Airwmmamma. kwdlt mbmtioh 










^ ^ A z:^ A /X A/?^A 

•S^^r^'S^^r ■S’^^r'v’^^r * •S''^r •v'^^r '5'^^r 


THE TRADE, 


I SPECIAL PROGRAM ISSUE 

I JANUARY 22, 1909 

I Pull Information on the Louisville Convention 


A S in the past, THE TRADE will issue a Pre-Convention 
Program and Souvenir Number on January 22, U)09. 

THE OBJECT of this is to inform the canners on what 
they may expect at the Convention; to give the full Pro¬ 
gram of the daily meetings; the subjects of special lectures, 
time and place; the entertainments and amusements; the 
names of hotels; railroads and fares, and points of interest in 
the Convention City, with photographs. 

AND IN PARTICULAR 

to assist the packer in a selection of the machinery and 
supplies he contemplates buying for the coming season. 

Nothing is more important than that 3"Ou shoidd buj" to the 
best advantage, the liest machine or the best supply. 

THEREFORE this issue will not only contain in “The 
Canners’ Ready Reminder of Machinery and Supplies and 
Those Who Sell Them’’ (see pages 28-29)—a list of the prom- 
iment firms and supply houses, but in addition a descrip¬ 
tion of all machinery offered—the new and the old—of sup¬ 
ply houses and their ability to serve you, forming an invalu¬ 
able buyer’s guide. 

As many are considering improvements in their fac¬ 
tories to meet the requirements of the National and the State 
Food laws, there will be a special article on the “Sanitary 
Tomato Cannery,’’ giving expert advice along this line. 

Posting you thus BEFORE you buy may save you 
thousands of dollars, and certainly make }'ou contented. 

SO DON’T MISS 

THE PROGRAM AND SOUVENIR ISSUE 

OF THE TRADE janoaby 22, 1909 


DON’T MISS IT 









32 


THE TRADE. 


BALTIMORE CANNED GOODS MARKET. 


REPORTED BY BROKERS. 


F. O. B. Baltimore. 


Country Goods, F. O. B. Cannery. 


DNLABELED GOODS ABOUT 2}ic. LESS. 


APPLES. 

Standard 28. $ 

“ 38 Regular 30s. 

•• Gallon8. 


Caah. 


BAKED BEANS. 

Number I8. $ . 


28. 

3 ».. 


BEANS. 

Green String 28. $ . 

“ “ 3 «. 

“ “ 108. 

^hite Wax 28. 

“ “ 3 S. 

“ “ lOS. 

Refugee 2s. 

“ Extras, 28. 

Green Lima 28. 

“ “ small 28. 

BERRIES. 

T. G. CRANWELL & CO., Brokers, Baltimore. 

No. 2 Standard Strawberries,. $ . 

“ Extra Fancy Preserved Strawberries. 

No. I Ex. Pres. Strawberries. 

“ 2 Standard Raspberries. 

“ Ex. Pres. Rea Raspberries. 

“ Standard Blackberries. 

“ 3 “ “ . 

‘ 2 Extra Blackberries. 

“ “ Fancy “ . 

‘ Standard G<x>8eberries. 

“ “ Blueberries. 

T. J. MEEHAN & CO., Brokers, Baltimore. 

Blackberries, 2s.|. 

“ " Pres. 

Blueberries, 2s. 

Strawberries, 2s. 

“ Preserved is. 


“ Gallons. 

Gooseberries, 28. 

Raspberries, Red 2s. 

“ “ “ Preserved. 

“ Black 2s. 

“ “ “ Preserved. 

CORN. 

T. J. MEEHAN & CO., Brokers, Baltimore. 

No. 2 Full Standard, Shoepeg. $ . 

“ New York or Maine Style.. 

“ Harford County Sugar Corn. 

*‘ Standard, Evergreen. 

T. G. CRANWELL & CO., Brokers, Baltimore. 

No. 2 Standard Sugar Corn, Harford Co...|.. 

“ “ “ Dry Packed.. 

“ Ex. Sugar Com, fine qual., dry pk’d. 


H. H. TAYLOR Sc SON, Brokers, Baltimore. 

No. 2 Full Standard, Moist. $ . 

“ New York or Maine Style Dry Pack . 

“ Seconds “ “ “ . 

E. C. SHRINER & Co., Brokers, Baltimore. 

2s Stowell’s Evergreen Cora Standard. $ . 

2s Standard Shoe Peg Corn. 

28 Extra Standard Corn, Maine Style. 

OKRA AND TOMATOES. 

No. a. $ . 

No. 3. 

OYSTERS. 

E. C. SHRINER & CO., Brokers, Baltimore. 

(s Lunch, Selects, Oval (^ns. $ . 

IS, 6 Ounce Selects. 

as, 12 “ “ . 

IS, 4 Ounce. $ . 

as, 8 “ . 

t«. 5 “ . 

as, 10 “ . 

(8, Light Weight. 

No. I Extra Lunch. $ . 


Regnlar. 
40 50 
70 75 


2 00 

2 25 

38 

39 

47)4 

50 

70 

72>4 

50 

52 ,*^ 

65 

70 

2 20 

2 25 

.SO 

52 J 4 

65 

70 

2 20 

2 25 

I 00 

I 10 

I '5 

I 20 


85 

I 30 

I 40 


85 

40 

8 S 


55 

85 

I 00 
95 

85 


55 

90 

90 

75 

80 


65 

62^ 


62^4 


60 
I 20 
65 
I 30 


90 


60 
I 00 

95 

80 

85 
I 30 
4 50 
80 

95 
I 30 
I 00 

I 30 


60 62}4 

62 70 

57 ;^ 60 

60 62f4 


60 

65 

80 


70 

65 


62^ 

60 

65 


70 

90 


00 

25 

40 

65 

30 

70 

40 

37)4 


OYSTERS.—Continued. 

Cash. 

T. G. CRANWELL & CO., Brokers, Baltimore. 

5 02. No. I Standards. 

10 “ “ . 

5 02. Standards, tall cans. 

lo “ “ “ . 

4 02. No. I Cove. 

8 “ 2 " . 

No. I Light Weights. 

“ 2 “ " . 

PEARS. 

Standard 28.| 85 

„ “ 38. I 15 

Extra Standard 2s. 

“ “ 38. 

PEACHES. 

H. H. TAYLOR Sc SON, Brokers, Baltimore. 

No. 3 Standard, Yellow. f . 

“ Seconds, “ 

“ Pie Unpeeled. 

T. J. MEEHAN & CO., Brokers, Baltimore. 

No. 3 Extra Standard Yellow Peaches. $ . 

No. 3 “ Selected “ “ . 

No. 3 Standard, Yellow,. 

“ Seconds, Yellow. 

" 3 " White. 

No. 2 “ Peaches.. 

No. 2 Standard, Yellow. 

“ “ White. 

Gallons, Pie. 

No. 3 Pie. 

T. G. CRANWELL Sc CO., Brokers, Baltimore. 

No. 3 Pies, Unpeeled. I 77)4 .... 

" “ Peeled. q*: 

Gallon Pies, Unpeeled. 2 75 

“ “ Peeled..-.. 

No. 2 Seconds, White. 70 .... 

“ “ Yellow. 75 

No. 3 Seconds, White. i 00 

“ “ Yellow. I 05 

No. 2 Standards, White. i 00 

“ “ Yellow. 1 05 

No. 3 Standards, White. i 30 .... 

“ “ Yellow. I 35 ...., 

“ Ex. Selected. Yellow. i 75 .... 

E. C. SHRINER Sc CO.. Brokers. Baltimore. 

No. IS Extras, Sliced for Cream. 

“ 3 Standard, White. 

“ *• Yellow. 

“ 3 “ Extra Yellow. 

“ 3s Selected, Yellow,. 

“ 3s Country Standards, Yellow. 

No. 2 Standard White. 

“ Extra Standard, Yellow. 

“ Seconds, White. 

" “ Yellow. 

“ 3 Seconds, White. 

“ “ Yellow. 

“ 3s Peeled Pie, Yellow. 

" Pie, Unpeeled. 

Gallons, Pie, Unpeeled. 

•• “ Peeled. 

PEAS. 

H. H. TAYLOR & SON, Brokers, Baltimore. 

No. 2 Early June, Pull Standard.|. 

“ “ “ Sifted. 

‘ Extra Sifted. 

“ Petit Pois. 

“ Soaks. 

" Seconds. 

“ Marrowfat, Pull Standard. 

T. G. CRANWELL Sc Co., Brokers, Baltimore 



. 85 


Second Early June. 

Standard “ 


65 


80 

Extra “ . 


85 

Sifted “ . 

Ex. Sifted “ . 

.... I 35 

100 

Ex. Fan Sf’d “ Petit Pois.... 


160 


E. C. SHRINER Sc CO., Brokers, Baltimore. 
I Extra Sifted Early Junes. 

1 Finest Sifted, Petit Pois. 

2 Early June Standard. 

2 “ Sifted. 

2 “ Extra Sifted. 

2 “ Extra Fine Sifted. 

2 “ Petit Pois. 

2 Early June Seconds. 

2 “ “ Sifted. 

2 “ “ Extra Sifted. 

2 Extra Standard Early Junes. 

2 Extra Standard Marrowflats. 

2 Marrowfat. 

2 " Sifted. 

2 “ Extra Sifted. 

2 Seconds... 


Regular. 


70 

35 

70 

40 

65 

30 

40 


I 40 
I 05 
77)4 

I 40 
I 50 
I 30 

I 05 

1 00 

70 

95 

90 

2 60 
77)4 


80 

95 
I 10 
I 40 


67X 


75 


65 


I 50 
I 10 
80 

I 50 

I 60 
^ 35 
I 10 

I 05 
75 

1 00 
95 

2 75 
80 


90 

I 30 


35 

50 

70 

25 

95 

00 

67)4 

7^)4 

95 

00 

90 

75 

50 

50 


85 

I 00 
I 20 

I 50 
70 

85 


75 

90 

80 

90 

10 

*5 

40 

70 

75 

80 

85 

80 

75 

80 

90 

85 














































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE TRADE. 


33 


PINEAPPLE. 

B. C. SHRINBR & CO., Brokers, Baltimore. 


31 Seconds in Water, B. & C. 

as Standards in Symp, Not B. & C. 

as “ “ “ B. & C. 

as “ Orated, in Syrup. 

as Bxtra Standard, Whole Circles, B. & C. 

as Selected, Whole Circles, Heavy Syrup. 

as “ Grated, Heavy Syrup. 

as Fancy Bxtra Selected, Preserved Sliced. 

as Fancy Bxtra Selected Grated, Preserved... 

IS Standard Grated, Good Syrup, B. & C. 

IS Fancy Grated, Preserved. 

IS Cocktail, Heavy Syrup. 

as Pie Grated. Solid Packed... 50 in Syrup 
3s Pie Grated, Solid Packed... 65 in Syrup 
Gallon Pie Grated, Solid Packed i 90 in Syrup 
T. G. CRANWBLL & CO.. Brokers. 

No. 3 Seconds, Not Byeless.4 

“ " Byeless and Coreless. 

'* Standards, Not Byeleas. 

" “ Eyeless and Coreleaa. 

“ Ex. “ “ •* . 

No. I Bx. Fancy Sliced, Byel’s & Corl’s 

“ “ Grated. 

“ “ Cocktail. 

No. 3 Bxtra Fancy Grated. 

No. 3 Pie Grated, in Water. 

•• " in Syrup. 

Gsdlon “ in Water. 

“ " in Syrup. 

TOMATOES. 

T. J. MBBHAN 8l CO., Brokers, Baltimore. 


Caah. 


Regular. 

75 


90 

00 

10 

30 

50 

50 

75 

75 

80 

85 

85 

52ji 
3 00 


“ Seconds. 

No. 3 Pull Standards.. 
" Seconds. 


85 

90 

00 

00 

35 

90 

90 

90 

80 

65 

70 

90 

00 


No. 3 Sweet Potatoes. 

H. H. TAYLOR & SON, Brokers, Baltimore. 

No. 3 Full Standard..'.. 

“ Seconds, Labeled Standards. 

No. 3 Pull Standards. 

“ Seconds, Labeled Standards. 

T. G. CR AN WELL & CO.. Brokers. Baltimore. 

No. 3 Standard Tomatoes. 

** 3 ** ** 

“ 3 Bx. Select Tomatoes, Tall Cans. 

“ 3 Second Tomatoes. 

“ 3 " . 

Gallon Standard Tomatoes. 3 3o 

No. 3 Sweet Potatoes. 

C. SHRINBR & CO., Brokers, Baltimore. 

No. 3 Standard. 

“ “ £. o. b. County. 

“ “ Extras. 

“ " Fair. 

No. 3 Standard. 

“ " f. o. b. County. 

" Second. 

" 3 “ . 

No. 10, Standard. 


Caah. 

Regular. 

67>i 

70 

65 

67)4 

50. 

55 

45 

47X 

2 do 

2 15 

75 

80 


55 

75 

65 

i7}i 

Bo 


70 

65 

50 

45 


75 

67 >4 

55 

50 


B 


I 85 


70 

67K 

72>i 

65 
50 
47^^ 
45 
62yi 
I 90 


NEW YORK CANNED GOODS MARKET. 

(Reported by Special Coneepondence.) 

APPLES—Gallon New York State. 3 50 ® . 

“ Maryland gallons. 

“ Mains gallons. 

*' No. 3 Standards. 

APRICOTS—California Standards 3^s. 


BEANS—No. 3 Lima.... 

•* Baked. No. X ... 

CORN—No. 3 New York State. 

“ Maine. 


LOBSTER* 


‘‘ Southern. 

* Western, 3s. 

-Picnic tails. 

“ flats, i-lb. 4 

OYSTERS—4 Ounce Standards. 

“ 10 Ounce. 1 

PEACHES —2 a Standard, California. i 

" 2)4 Extra Standard, California. 3 

“ Southern Standard 3s. i 

PEARS—California 2^ . i 

PEAS—No. 3 Early June Extra Sifted. i 

" “ •• “ Sifted. 

“ " •* " Standard. 

** Seconds 

PINEAPPLES—No. 2, Pie Grated.’.'.’.'.'.'.'.’.’."!.".’.'.*.’.’.’.’.’.’.’.’.'.’ 

No. 3, Pie Grated. 

Gallon, Pie Grated. i 

3s Standard, Grated. 

3s Select, Grated. i 

3s P’C’D, Grated. i 

as Standard B. & C. 


2 10 

2 20 


2 30 

55 

60 

3 50 

3 75 

3 00 

3 2,5 

80 

85 

70 

85 

70 

75 

85 

90 

I 00 

I 05 

62)4 

75 


67}i 


7i% 

25 


4 00 

4 50 

65 

67)4 

- I 45 

I 50 

- I 90 

2 00 

- 2 35 

2 40 

- t 35 

t 45 

- I 50 

I 70 

- I 05 

I 10 

92J4 

95 

75 

80 

65 

67)4 

55 

65 

67H 

72)4 

- t 95 

2 25 


I 10 

I 40 

I 45 

I 80 

I 90 

95 

I 00 


NEW YORK CANNED GOODS MARKET—Continued. 

PINEAPPLES—Continued. 

PINEAPPLES—2s Extra Selected. i 35 

“ Singapore, Preserved— 

“ ^-Cubes.. 70 

“ iJi-Chunks. 

“ I ^-Sliced. 

“ 2-Whole. 

“ 2>4-Whole. 

PUMPKIN—No. 3. 

Gallon. 


“ “ “ Ji-lb. 

Alaska Red, tails, i-lb. 


Chums, tails, i-lb. 


flats, J^-lb. 


Cohoes, tails, i-lb.... 
Cohoes, flats, i-lb.... 

STRAWBERRIES—Gallons. 

“ Standard 2s. 

SUCCOTASH—Maine pack, 2s... 
“ State pack, 2s. 


No. 3 
No. 3 

Gallons, Maryla 
Gallons, Jersey. 


New Jersey. 


Drop and Bar 
Wire Coil 
Wire Segments 


No. I Standard 


F. O. B. BAI.TIMORB, Mn. 

Solder. 

" . I 21 

“ . 21 

CANS. 

AMERICAN CAN CO. 

SEASON’S PRICES GO IN EFFECT JUNE ist. 



I I2>^ 


I 30 


1 50 

65 

70 

2 10 

2 40 

I 80 

1 85 

2 00 

2 10 

I 12)4 

1 15 


t 32>^ 

1 15 

I 20 

75 


1 85 

1 95 

1 75 



I 12)4 

75 

80 


1 25 

4 50 

4 75 

72)4 

75 

82)4 

85 

52)4 

55 


75 

80 

90 

2 00 

2 10 


2 25 

4ZS. 


9x10 

8x10 

20 

19 

20 

19 


1)4 inch opening.I10.20 per thousand. 

" 2 “ 1)4 “ . 14.00 

“ 3 “ 2 1-16 “ 18.40 

“3 “ Jersey 2 1-16 “ 19.40 “ 

‘ 3 Jersey Tall 2 7-16 “ 21.90 “ 

“ 10 Standard 2 1-16 “ 45.00 “ 

THE PRICES OF SOLDER HEMMED CAPS ARE AS FOLLOWS: 
in., 75C-: 2 1-16, fi 10; 2 7-16, $1.40 per Thousand. 

SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. 

WHEELING CAN CO. 

No. I .|io.20 per thousand 

“ 2 . .. 14.00 “ 

“ 2}4 . 17.80 “ 

“ 3 18.40 •• 

“ 10 . 45.00 “ 

CONTINENTAL CAN CO. 

No. I Iinch opening. |io.20 per thousand. 

“2 1)4 “ 14.00 “ 

“3 2 1-16 “ 18.40 “ 

'• 3 Jersey 2 1-16 “ 19.40 “ 

“ 10 2 1-16 “• 45.00 “ 

Solder Hemmed Caps, i)4 inch, 75c.; 2 1-16, li.io; 2 7-16, I1.40. 

SOUTHERN CAN CO. 

BUYER’S OPTION. 

No. I IK inch opening. #10.20 per M 

“ 2 1)4 “ 14.00 

“ 2)4 2 1-16 “ 17.80 

“3 2 1-16 “ 18.40 

" 3 Jersey 2 1-16 “ 19.40 

“ 10 2 1-16 “ 45.00 

“ Southern ” Inside Coated Cans at #2.50, I3.50 and I4.50 per M addi¬ 
tional for the IS, 2s and 3s, respectively. ^Ider Hemmed Caps, i)4 inch, 

75c.; I 2-16 inch, |i.io, and 2 7-16 inch, #1.40. 

INDEPENDENT PRICES. 

No. I. 2 S. H. 2 L. H. 3 Stand. No. 10. 

I9.00 I12.50 #13-00 #i 6-75 #44-00 per thousand 

SANITARY CANS. 

SANITARY CAN CO. 


plain. 

No. I . #11.50 

No. 2 15.7s 

No. 2)4 . 20.25 

No. 3, 4)4 inch. 21.00 

No. 3, 5>4 inch. 24.0c 

No. 10 . 46.00 

A. SCHULTZ & CO. 

Solder Applied Caps, #1.00; #1.25; #1.50. 

TIN PLAT^. F. O. B. MILL. 

I. C., 14x20, 107 lbs. Bessemer Steel. 3 80 . 

I. C., 14x20, 100 lbs. Bessemer Steel. 3 65 . 

I. C., 22X27X, 90 lbs. Bessemer Steel. 7 80 . 

I. C , I9>4x 27, 95 lbs. Bessemer Steel. 6 96 . 

PIG TIN. 

S to I* tou I to 4 teas 

Straits. #29 79 30 29 . 

Malacca. 29 79 30 29 . 

PIG LEAD. 

Omaha. #4 5° 4 75 . 


ENAMEL. 

#14.50 

19-25 

24.25 

25-50 


56.00 

















































































































































































































































































































































SOLDER 


34 


THB TRADE. 


A. SCHULTZ & CO. 



BALTIMORE. MARYLAND. 


Slaysman 
Combination 
Wiring 
and Horn 
Press 

No. 39 





SLAYSMAN A COMPANY, 


Factory: 125-127 Fast Falls Avenue. 


nae. Office and Salesrooms; 

M a M M tmm ■& M Ayont for Middio Woot* H* H • 1«YTH E 

RiX I I I IVIOR t| IVI Da Teutonic Bldg., Chicago, lit. 


IN WRITING ADVERTISERS, KINDLY MENTION THE TRADE 


SOLDER 













The Clark Kerosene Oil System 


THE CANNED GOODS EXCHANGE 

OF BALTIMORE, MD. 

BANNON BUILDING, St, Paul and Baltimore Sts. 
President, Geo. T. Phillips. 

Vice-President, Tresenrcr, 

John S. Gibbs, Jr LSander Lahoraxx. 

Secretary, W. F, Assau. 

Executive Committee: 

Geo. T. Phillips E. C. White E. H. Miller 

Arbitration Committee: 

Wm. a. Wagner, L. L. Lord, 

Wm. F. Assad, C. J. Schenkbl, Wm. Grbcht 

Committee on Commerce: 

Rufus M. Gibbs. John Schall, 

B. Hamberger, Chas. J. Broors Louis Grbbb, 

Committee on Legislation : 

H. S. Orem, F. A. Torsch, 

H. P. Strasbaugh, John Schall, B. J. Mbbhan, 

Hospitality Committee: 

T. J. Meehan, E. C. Shrinbr H. W. Krebbs. 

Counsel, John C. Rose. Chemist, Charles Glasxr. 


must force you to look for something cheaper. We have it for you. You 
will be taking no chances, but will save money by adopting it, ask for 
Catalogue. 


THE CLARK NOVELTY CO 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 


W. E, MORGAN 




The **Bureka** Can Filler 
has no equal. 

Thorougly efficient, great 
capacity. 

Every can well filled. 
Automatic in operation. 
Guaranteed satisfactory. 
Prompt delivery. 

The S. Howes Co, 

**Eureka” Works, 
Silver Creek, - N. Y. 




Edw. Renneburg &. Sons Co. 

Machine c& Boiler Works. 

Oyster Steam Box 



With Improved Hinged Door; Making the 
Work Lighter and Quicker. 


1917 AND 1919 ALICEANNA STREET. 
Baltimore, Md. 


BAKER A MORGAN 

Canned Goods Brokers 

ABERDEEN, MARYLAND 

CORN AND TOMATOES A SPECIALTY 


TIN STRIPS AND CIRCLES 


BOUGHT BY 


AMMIDON & CO. 

31 South Frederick St., Baltimore, Md. 

rS.HULLIIIIFG.CO. 

125-127 EAST FALLS AVENUE, 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Manafactnrera of 

HULL’S 

PATENT GASOLINE BURNERS, 

FIRE POTS AND HEATERS 

Repairs Promptly Attended to. 
CANNING HOUSE SUNDRIES. 


IN WRITING ADVERTISERS. KINDLY MENTION THE TRADE. 
























Continental Can Co. 


•■RECTORS 

T. G. CRANWELL, PRCST. 

A. \M. NORTON, VICE-PREST. 

F. P. ASSMANN, SEC. & TREAS 
J. C. TALIAFERRO. % 

m. H. LARKIN. 


C. A. SUYDAM, SALES aqent 


FACTORIES 

CHICAGO 

SYRACUSE 

BALTIMORE 


TO THE CANNING TRADE: 

We want to thank you most heartily for the liberal patronage extended to us during the 
Canning Season of 1908. Our volume of business was much larger than ever before and this talks 
pretty loud in praise of the CONTINENTAL CAN, when you consider how short the crops have been 
all over the Country. Not only did our sales increase, but we produced the best Can ever turned out 
anj^where by anybody. This is a prettv strong statement, but if you used the CONTINENTAL 
CAN, you know how true it is. If you did not use the CONTINENTAL CAN, just ask your neigh¬ 
bor who did. We will always maintain this standard. 

Again thanking you for your many favors, we are, with best wishes. 

Yours very truly, 

CONTINENTAL CAN COMPANY, 


T. G. Cranwell, President.