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THE CANNED FOOD AUTHORITY OF THE WORLD 


g BALTIMORE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1914 g 

O'C<H>0hXWCm:mK»O<K»<XhX>O 0OOOCK>'^OCMXB5CHKHX^OO<XHXHXH3bO<KH» XHXkK8XHXmXK<vmi^!Xh^^ 


AMERICAN CANS 

“Good cans and when you need them”. That is our slogan. 
Our every effort is directed to the making of the very best cans 
possible to make and then shipping them when you need them 
—not the day after, but if possible to reach you the day before 
they are needed. 

Our manufacturing plants are located at points convenient to 
the great packing fields and orchards giving the opportunity cf 
prompt service and low freight charges. 

All our resources are at the back of “Good cans and when 
you need them. 


American Can Company 

Chicago San Francisco 

Portland, Ore. INEW YORK Hamilton, Ont. 

Baltimore, Md. 










THE Canning TRADE 



The Crane shown is entirrly of iron and steel put tofcether in the strongest 
pi'sible manner. Steam used as en impellirg force is very sn all Cne n-un 
can o -erate it. having control hy treans of tbe shifter handle. Irweiing or 
stopping the gt^s at a^v d'sired point. Hand power can be attached at a s»*’all 
additional cost, thus adding another desirah'e feature, h’o belts to get injured 
bv steam. All that’s needed is a steam pipe and an exhaust pipe. 

GEO. W. ZASTROW, Mechanical Engineer 

(404-I4I0 THAMES STREET BALTIMORE. MD. 


K. Kobins Co., 
Kaltimore DIsLrlcL 


Burden & Blakeslee, Mfgrs. 

Cazenovia, N. Y. 


WHEELING CANS 


WHEELING CANS 
are made from Prime 
Tin Plates throughout 
and are strictly outside 
soldered. 


WHEELING CANS 
represent the very high¬ 
est type of fruit can in 
workmanship and ma¬ 
terial. 


Johnson-Morse Gan Co. 


Oliver J. Johnson, President 


A. A. Morse, Vice-President 


Wheeling, NV. Va. 


SUCCESSORS T< 

Wheeling Can Co. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

La Crosse Can Co. 
La Crosse, Wis. 


rM ITz 
ttl Ef itf Ei 
ti-r iiKEcra 


ZASTROW S PATENT HYDRAULIC CRANE 

STEAM IMPELLED 4 


Why Do You Hesitate About 
Buying A Blakeslee Simplicity 
Can Righting Machine 


when it will save 
its cost in one 
season and will 
never wear out? 
It never gets 
tired and never 
makes a mis¬ 
take. Ask us 
about it. 









SANITARY CANS 


It should be remembered that the development of Sanitary 
Cans from a splendid theory to a definite and practical 
principle was brought about by the Sanitary Can Company. 

The Sanitary Can Company did this pioneer work practi¬ 
cally alone and unaided, but it gained a knowledge and 
intimacy of Sanitary Can principles which are naturally 
pre-eminent and exclusive. It is reasonable to assume there¬ 
fore that buyers of Sanitary Can Company cans are secur¬ 
ing the most up-to-date can of the kind in the world; a can 
on which more time and money has been spent than on all 
other combined makes. 

It would be strange indeed, if Sanitary Can Company cans 
were not of exceptional merit and value. 


SANITARY CAN COMPANY 


Chicago 

Rochester, N. Y. 


New York 
Baltimore 










































Canning TRADE 


YOU Should Have a Copy ^ | 


THE READY REFERENCE LIBRARY 

For Canning - Preserving - Pickling 
all Food Products 

3rd EDITION, REVISED UP TO DATE (1914) 


I 

NEW FORMULAE—SANITARY REGULATIONS, 
PURE FOOD REQUIREMENTS, ETC. 

THE REQUIRED WEIGHTS FOR LABELS 


It is an insurance policy against mistakes and losses. No 
need to hesitate or go wrong—refresh your memory 
or learn how. The book is a compilation 
of the industry’s best thought 
and accomplishments. 

THE ONLY ONE OF ITS KIND 


Complete Course 

in 

Canning 


Prio* SS.OO. 


CA.SH WITH THB ORDER 


now TO 

SELL 

CANNED FOODS 


liV j. A. LCK 


LEARN HOW TO SELL THEM 

Learn how to talk the selling points of 
your goods. Possibly more than any¬ 
thing else the individual canner needs 
to learn how to sell his output. 

Here is the first practical book on the 
buying and selling of canned foods, 
written by the man who, above all others, 
is best able to speak from the side of 
the buyer and from the side of the 
seller— 

J. A. LEE 

(“Wrangler”, the Chicago Correspondent of The 
Canning Trade.) 

Indispensable to every Canner, Broker, Buyer, 
Wholesale Grocer or large dealer 
in canned foods 

Price $2.15 with the order. ' 

Off the press—June 1914. 


BOTH PUBLISHED AND 
FOR SALE BY 


THE CAININIINQ TRADE 


state Bank of Maryland Building. 
BALTIMORE. MD. 












Canning TRAK 


ALL VARIETIES 


CANNERS’ SEEDS can be obtained from 


LAN DRETHS 

No Establishment knows more about 
Seeds. Open communication now with 
Landreth, for Seeds of Crop 1915 of such 
varieties as are used by 

CANNERS 


D. LANDRETH SEED COMPANY 


Bloomsdale Seed Farms 


FOUNDED 1784 


BRISTOL, PENNSYLVANIA 


STEVENSON S’ CO’S 

LATEST IMPROVED LOCK SEAM 

BODY FORMING MACHINE 


STEVENSON & CO., Inc. f 

601-7 S. Caroline St. BALTIMORE, MD. V 

No. I. 


For forming and locking the bodies of 
round, square or irregular shaped tin cans 


Pat. Nov. 19th. 1901. Ouna 30th. 1908. July 4th. 1911 


The cut illustrates our latest improved lock 
seam body forming machine; this machine 
has a capacity of not less than 60,000 per¬ 
fectly formed and locked bodies per day 
of ten hours. The machine is the latest 
improved, up-to-date and is superior to any 
on the market. It is simple in operation, 
constructed of the best material and work¬ 
manship, fully guaranteed and has a host 
of satisfied users. 

The cut shows machine without soldering 
attachment, we furnish it with or without 
soldering attachment as desired. Prices 
and references (from users) on application. 


MANUFACTURED BY 
















THE Canning TRADE 



CBRRUTI SVRURBR 


■When Such Canners As 

California Fruit Canners’ Association Libby, McNeill & Libby 

Thomas Canning Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. Hawaiian Pineapple Co. 

Houser Canning Co., Fort Valley, Ga. 

and hosts of others, recognize them as the best, isn’t it time for you 
to order and save syrup and labor? 

E. J. JUDGE 

SAUES AQEINT 

Alarket 3t. Oalifornia St. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAU. 






THE Canning TRADE 



SLAYSMAN’S 


SANITARY LOCKER 


SUAYSMAN & C 

801-5 E. Pratt St. 

BA.LTIMORB, MD. 


This machine is built with nutchiug device for the 
lock and lap seam for sanitary cans, and also for pack¬ 
ers' regular soldered cans, and with^soldering device 
for either. 

It is made from entirely new designs and has 
many new features. 

It is very compact and carefully constructed, easy 
running, and works with great rapidity. All move¬ 
ments are made from eccentrics. Iso cams. 


The notchers are simple and work positively. 

The punches and dies have separate adjustments to 
take up wear and can be quickly replaced. 

^Ve call especial attention to the horn of this 
machine. This has a solid backing, making it impos¬ 
sible fur the horn to spring. 

The solder attachment is very efficient. The liquid 
solder is applied in a positive manner to the can, from 
underneath, by means of a roller. The can is then 
passed over the wiper and the cooling pipe. 

The change from one size to another can be made 
▼ery quickly. 

The machine is guaranteed to run freely and easily, without 
any vibration whatever, at a speed of 185 bodies per minute. 

Full details and specifications will be sent on request. 


Business Success is Dependent 
Upon Pubiic Confidence 


The Public is awakening to the importance of sanitation in the manufacturing of food products. The Canner 
must meet this demand by exercising constant care in the preparation of his products for foods of the highest quality 
may be rendered unfit for consumption by the use of unclean canning machines and utensil equipment. 

The peculiar needs of the canner for a means to provide the proper sanitation to insure clean healthful products 
has not been overlooked for in the remarkably efficient and sanitary cleanser 






the canner has all that is needed, excepting a liberal supply of clean wash water, to make things positively germ- 
free, sweet smelling and wholesome. 

At first thought the canner may assume that all cleaning agents are practically alike. But how untrue this be¬ 
lief is can easily be appreciated in a single trial of Wyandotte Sanitary Cleaner and Cleanser for it makes no suds, 
it contains no soapy grease, it has no soapy odors nor does it leave any harmful residues to contaminate or to injure 
INDIAN IN CIRCLE the surface cleaned. It is positively guaranteed “different” and it proves this to the delight -of 
every canner who gives it a trial. v 

f Why not. investigate further? Order from your supply dealer or write us. 


Sold by A. K. Robins & Co., Baltimore, Md. Brown, Boggs Co., Ltd. Hamilton, Ont., Canada. 

Besaire & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 


IN EVERY PACKAGE 


THE J. B. FORD CO.. Sole Mnfrs., WYANDOTTE, MICH. 

THIS CLEANER HAS BEEN AWARDED THE HIGHEST PRIZE WHEREVER EXHIBITED. 






THE Canning .TRADE 


> Are You Familtar With 

THE KNAPP WAY 

OFf 

Labeling, Wrapping and 
Boxing Cans? 

You cannot afford to pass up our proposition 
for labeling and boxing cans. These Machines 
are automatic and never have been equaled. 

Our Wrapping Machine makes a unique and 
handsome fold which cannot be imitated by 
hand. 

Let us give you more information regarding our selling, leasing and ex¬ 
change proposition. 



THE FRED. H. KNAPP 

■Westminster, iVId. 

. . - the' brown, BOGGS CO., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont., CANADIAN DEALERS 

BERGER & CARTER CO., San Francisco, Cal., PACIFIC COAST DEALERS 


CO. 


FIRE INSURANCE 

■ r- ’ ^ 

Ganners’ Exchange Subscribers 


Warner Inter-Insurance Bureau 

RESULTS 

, . 7 Cash Saving, approximately.$ 450,000.00 

. . Losses paid since organization. 653,279.66 

Insurance in force, June 30th, 1914. 19,783,256.98 

“CashT"Assets, June 30th, 1914.:. 305,575.57 

. Placing your Fire Insurance through this Bureau means 
- \ your Insurance at ACTUAL COST. 

'' Eeduce your overhead expense by placing your insurance 

-Tod cans, cases, LABELS and other supplies through 
„ , the Exchange. 

LANSING B. WARNER, INC., Attorney, 111 W. Monroe St. CHICAGO 


ADVISORY OOMMITTEK 


PRANK VAN CAMP. CMnan, IndlMMpolto, led. 
WM. R. ROACH. H«t. MIckISBii' 

L A. SEARS, CliMlootbe. Ohio 


OBO. O. BAILEY, TrMuerw, R«m, |N«w York 
T. HERBERT SHRIVBR, WestmliMtM’, Md. 
LANSINO B. WARNER, Socretarr, Chicago. U. 

















THE Canning TRADE 



'iW|ilfll<H<|U 


No Cracked Flanges 

Bliss Automatic Flanger No. 15-K 

100 to 150 Bodies a Minute 


An entirely automatic machine of the four clutch type, 
continuous in operation and positive in action. Both 
ends of bodies are flanged simultaneously. Movement 
of the chucks is comparatively slow and the bodies are 
flanged without danger of cracking the tin. It handles 
can bodies from 2 to 6^4 inches in diameter by 2 to 7 
inches in height. A friction clutch with which the 
machine is provided gives instant control. 


Builders of the Complete Sanitary Line 

Can Machinery Catalogue 14 7', on request 


25 ADAMS STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y 


RepreaeatatiTei for Chicafo ud vicinity: STlLES*M<NtSE CO^ 545 Went Waibinfton Street, Chicafo, Dl, 


LEWIS STRING BEAN CUTTER 


CANS 


HIGHEST 

QUALITY 


nt above axusmnoN unEscNTs oint improved strino bean cutter 

IMPROVBlVflBNTS CONSIST OP 
Iroa drum, hemTicr frume, all nar drlTC aad shaft drive for vibratioK 
feetliuK hopper and screen. Knives held down by springs, allowing 
sti> ks, stones, nails or any foreign substance to pass under the knives 
without breaking any of the parts. 

Beans are scattered into vibrating hopper, fed antonuttloally into 
Po< keta of dmat, carried to the knives, cut and dumped oats the mbrat- 
ibr .screen, taking out the short pieces that may come from cnttiag close 
to Che end of bean. Capacity abmt so.ooe two pound cans in ten hours. 

This machine la also used for cutting rhnharb. okra and celery. 

Built by B. J. UBWIS, Mlddleport, N. Y. 

Mari.tadm<aa*rsalaalsMay 14, INI. MacUam aUag tMs irladsal an lafrlafiaf 
iA ^3 • 

Alas Maaaladan Snail Peoar Caa TsMar sad Plaaasals Pnllai MacBlaas. 






















10 


THE Canning TRADE 


LEONARD SEED COMPANY 

S26-228-280 WEST KINZIE STREET 

CHICAGO 

Growers of Safe Seed 

Leonard’s New Type Narrow Grain Evergreen Sweet Corn 
is universally admitted by Canners to be the best type there 
is of high grade canners stock. We are now booking 
orders for present and future delivery of this, as well as 
for Peas, Tomato, Cucumber and other canners requirements 
in seeds—^all of the Leonard Standard . . . ' . 

PUAINT 

Leonard’s Seeds 


QUALITY FIRST 

TOMATO PULP 
DEPBINDABLE 

We do not can tomatoes 
but manufacture our 
whole crop of whole to¬ 
matoes into pulp. 


Write for Prices and Samples 

TOMATO PRODUCTS COMPANY 

Paoli - Indiana 


0 H AMILTON 0 

StMtm Uciolc«t*cI I 

I Regulation Copper Kettle | 

I 

^ Recognized as the standard for quality and arepar oonatniotlon in the g 
oldest and proKressive oanningr plants thronghout the country. Built in M 
any size up to SOO gallons capacity, either tin coated or ^ inch block B 
tin lined. Write for discriptive folders. I 

Hamilton Copper & Brass Works | 

I ^0*109 Springdale Pike s HemiHon, Ohi^^ 



BOXES or BOX SHOOKS 



Buy Direct Front The Manufacturers 

H. 0. DREYER & CO.. Inc. 

aliceanna and sprino streets 

BALTIMORE 



LOCK CORNER BOXES 







THE Canning TKADE 


11 




TIN PLATES 
OF CHARACTER 

“QUALITY COKES” 

MANUFACTURED BY 

WASHINGTON TIN PLATE CO. 


WASHINGTON, PA. 



















12 


THE Canning TRADE 


Ayars Machine Company, New 



CORN SHAKER 


FOR SHAKING CANS OF 
CORN BEFORE SHIPPING TO 
GIVE THE CONTENTS A RICH 
CREAMY APPEARANCE. 


Ayars Machine Company, New'Sey 

BROWN, BOGGS CO., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont., Sole Agent for Canada. 








BALTIMORE. MONDAY. NOVEMBER 16. 1914. 


SOUTHERN CAN CO. 


WEEKLY, REVIEW. 

Of th* Canned Foods Situation. Market Reports. 
Conditions and Chaufes. Outiook. 


BALTiMORE 


MARYLAND 


PACKERS’ CANS 

Sanitary and Cap Hole 


Closing Machines Combining Speed and 
Simplicity, on Rental Basis 
ALSO 

A Diversified Line for Many Purposes 
INCLUDING 

Friction Top and Wax Top Cans and 
Lard Pails 

Five Gallon Pulp Cans 

Lithographing and Lacquering Equipment 
AND 

Our Own Box Making Plant 

Metal Advertising Signs 
ON TWO RAILROADS AND THE WATER FRONT 


The Largest 

Independent Source of Supply 


The reports from various sections and from local 
sources all seem to indicate pretty much the same thing 
this week, namely, that buyers and speculators alike have 
prety well filled their warehouses with such goods as 
they will need for immediate requirements and are not 
disposed to gamble extensively. This statement is borne 
out by the fact that “off” or poor grade goods are not in 
demand, either in corn, peas, tomatoes, large or small 
fruits; but on the other hand the standard of medium 
grade goods are better bought up quickly whenever the 
price is shaded the slightest, and the high-grade goods 
are being sotight by the. jobbers, but are not obtainable. 
In other words, it looks very much like the jobbers have 
supplied their actual needs, but that they can use more 
of the higher grade goods and are willing to take some 
little chance when it comes to the standard grades. 

It is reported that the demand for good peas is steady 
at advancing prices, and that the sales are in small lots for 
immediate shipment to retail grocers. But this demand 
extends only to the better grades, and as the quality de¬ 
clines the interest fades, and hardly any inducement will 
make the jobber place his order for poor grade stock at 
this time. They claim they are well supplied and in po¬ 
sition to fill any wants they may experience within the 
near future. Brokers and holders of good peas predict 
that the market is about cleaned up, and that the increased 
demand which will most surely be experienced during 
December and the latter part of this month will bring 
about the reaction and cause both advances in price and 
a quickening of orders. Those financially able to await 
developments claim they do not feel uneasy or dissatis¬ 
fied, but instead are hopeful. Some slight changes are 
noted, but these appear to be due to a personal side, or 
the conditions of the sale, as we note one packer accepting 







14 


THE Canning TRADfi 

j i 


orders at 254 c. below last week’s quotations, while others 
have sold at 5c. above, so that we are making no changes 
in the prices this week, and feel that they are a safe guide 
to use. 

As regards corn, we might say about the same as to 
peas, but the fact is corn has strengthened more than any 
other article in the list, if we can judge by the reports 
coming in this past week^ and especially in the past twen¬ 
ty-four hours. There is undoubtedly more than the usual 
interest being displayed by the jobbers in corn, but when 
you speak to them and ask their opinion they say the 
situation is hopeless and that the price will not advance. 
But it is a fact that the jobbers have most of the corn 
themselves; the packers apparently have not a great deal 
to offer, so that the jobbers really have the market in their 
own hands, and will likely be responsible for its decline or 
advance. In such a case it will surely advance, as none 
of the jobbers will let pass an opportunity to make a profit 
on their surplus holdings, and they can be trusted to 
bring about the condition necessary to produce them a 
l)rofit. Some of them have practically admitted that they 
now expect an advance and are playing their cards ac¬ 
cordingly. Local advice indicates a stronger market, with 
inquiries and orders more plentiful than last week. 

Tomatoes, the barometer of the vegetable market, 
are in a class by themselves. Prices are about as low as 
they ever have been in the past, and no one knows just 
how cheap tomatoes have been sold during the past few 
weeks. Many sales have been made at such ridiculously 
low figures that it is hard to believe; of course, financial 
and personal circumstances have brought this about, 
and not the belief that the market is overstocked or be¬ 
cause of any off quality goods. As a matter of fact, no 
one has even a good idea of what the pack has been, and 
all are waiting patiently for the annual report of the 
Secretary; this report may confirm the dire forebodings 
of the pessimistic jobber, or it may bear out those who 
have claimed that the pack is short. In speaking to a 
grower in Maryland just a day ago he volunteered the 
information that the packers in his section were anxious 
and willing to take all the raw material he could de¬ 
liver them, and further complained that he had not de¬ 
livered to them all the tomatoes that he grew; intimat¬ 
ing that the grower had sold some of the contracted to¬ 
matoes to hucksters and market men. We were under 
the impression that canners would be glad if they could 
close down and let the grower sell his tomatoes else¬ 
where. but the above incident looks like the crop has 
really been short, or else that particular packer has more 
money than brains. We can say that innocently, for the 
grower did not mention the packer’s name, and we have 
no idea who he is. Then, too, he might figure it is best 
to fill the empty cans on hand, take a chance on the mar¬ 
ket improving, rather than have the cans become rusty 
in his warehouse, and for which he would have to pay 
just the same. 

Other articles in the vegetable line are showing an 
increase in sales and prices generally are satisfactory. 
There are no important changes in prices as yet, but 


local parties expect an advance all along the line before 
long. In fact, a very much better feeling is being ex¬ 
pressed in all lines of business all over the country, and 
trade is beginning to pick up a bit. Salesmen that have 
been instructed to save their train fare and hotel hills 
have again been given instructions to go out, as retail 
merchants are mailing their inquiries to the factories. 
This improvement, and the convalescence of those con¬ 
cerns which were almost crippled because of war condi¬ 
tions, is going to help canned foods immensely. Already 
inquiries are coming from houses in the warring coun¬ 
tries asking for prices, and stating they cannot now 
handle the goods that formerly came from the enemy’s 
country. 

For instance, Germany formerly bought consider¬ 
able canned foods from France, but no German dealer 
will have the goods in his store now, and even if the war 
should stop the prejudice would still exist. The same 
applies to France, England, Russia and other countries 
which bought from Germany, and the great increase in 
export trade is proof that this condition exists, for the 
port of Baltimore has far exceeded its record of any pre¬ 
vious time, and is increasing its export trade to such an 
extent that it may be the second, or even the first, port 
of export in this country very shortly. This is not a 
dream or a hope, but a fact w'hich we are forced to be¬ 
lieve because of the figures at hand or available, and 
foods are the leading article. Canned foods will un¬ 
doubtedly be exported to a greater extent than ever be¬ 
fore, and that means better business for reputable can¬ 
ners. 


NKW CANNED HAEMON RATES. 


Permission was granted the transcontinental railroads by 
the Interstate Commerce Commission to charge rates on canned 
salmon from Pacific Coast shipping points to eastern destina¬ 
tions without regard to the limitations placed on these rates by 
the long-and-short haul section of the Interstate Commerce 
Act. This permission applies to shipments from the western 
points of origin on canned salmon and canned shad In carloads, 
minimum weight 70,000 pounds, to destinations in territories 
designated as Groups B, C, D and E. Group B includes North¬ 
ern Kentucky, Eastern Ohio, Western New York and Western 
Pennsylvania. Group C includes the balance of Kentucky, Ala¬ 
bama, the balance of Ohio, Eastern Indiana, Georgia, Tennes¬ 
see and Southern Michigan. Group D includes the balance of 
Michigan, Illinois, Western Indiana, Minnesota, the piers of 
New York City and parts of Wisconsin. Group E includes Ar¬ 
kansas, Iowa, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Texas. 

COLBERT MACHINERY CO. MOVES. 


The Colbert Canning Machinery Co. has recently removed 
its office and plant from Baltimore to Buffalo, N. Y., where 
they are now nicely' located at 2 and 4 Lock street. There 
they have larger and better quarters and will be able to 
handle their growing trade to better advantage. The Colbert 
line of canning machinery is making a name for itself, though 
this name has long been familiar in the canning industry. 
The line includes an automatic exhaust of improved pattern,* 
a rotary filler of large capacity, automatic syruper, etc., and 
all made to meet the most modern demand in speed and 
adaptability. 



THE Canning TRADE 1ft 

ON THiE GATHBRING OP STATlSTiCS. SPECLALTY MANUPACTTUAEtlS’ CONVENTION. 

l r> 


To the Editor of The Canning Trade: 

Sir—There is now an effort being made by the Tri-State 
Packers’ Association, through its valued secretary, C. M. 
Dashiell, to gather reports of the tomato pack of 1914 in 
Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey, with the view of an¬ 
nouncing this information at an early date, without waiting 
for the national report, which will not be issued before Jan¬ 
uary; provided that Mr. Dashiell finds a general response to 
his effort, indicating that the report will be fairly complete, 
and worthy of confidence, otherwise, I understand, no report 
will he issued by him. 

At the same time Secretary Frank E. Gorrell, of the Na¬ 
tional Canners’ Association, is hard at work gathering similar 
reports from this section, and from all parts of the country, 
which plan is in no manner in conflict with the efforts of Mr. 
Dashiell, as the two reports work hand in hand, each serving 
Its purpose. 

I have heard some rumors that certain packers have ex¬ 
pressed themselves as opposed to the gathering and issuing of 
these reports of pack, which I regret very much should be 
the case. 

It has been said that whenever a report is issued the 
market drops. Surely the blame for this should not be laid at 
the door of the issuing of a report. Is it not rather the case 
that the market drops because the buyers discover there has 
been either an over-production, or at least plenty to go round, 
with no likelihood of scarcity? Now suppose with this fact 
existing, we succeed in keeping the buyers in ignorance of the 
fact. The market drifts along with perhaps a fair amount 
of buying, and perhaps with a slight advance of Sc. per case 
or 10c. per case, that will not remove the fact that over¬ 
production does really exist, but is simply postponing the evil 
day, and its discovery sooner or later. The packers must 
curtail that production to bring the supply somewhere near 
the demand, because at the bottom of it all, the law of supply 
and demand controls, and always will. 

Keeping the other fellow in ignorance of the facts, which 
some few may think they are shrewd enough to guess at, will 
never defeat the law of supply and demand, although for a 
short time it might fool some people, and help to pull the wool 
over the eyes of a few buyers. In the end it must always come 
back to first causes, rather than to what may appear on the 
surface only. 

Does the publishing of reports of the pack always ac¬ 
count for the depressed market? For the past six weeks, to¬ 
mato prices have been the lowest known for many years, and 
yet no reports of the pack were gathered or published. 

The evils of our business are numerous and serious, but 
we w'ill never overcome them by trying to keep the trade in 
ignorance of the truth, or by a few packers taking a narrow 
view of business life, and refusing to contribute to the general 
good by co-operating with each other in every possible way. 
There are men packing tomatoes that undoubtedly should be 
in other occupations, but we will never reduce this evil by 
withholding from each other the most important information, 
and ground work for sound business calculations. 

This subject opens up some of the most important prob¬ 
lems in our business, which certainly can be solved or par¬ 
tially solved if we go at them in the right spirit of co-opera¬ 
tion and common sense. 

Meanwhile I would urge every packer in this section to 
respond to the request of Mr. Dashiell and also to the request 
of Mr. Qorrell and send in freely and frankly the true and 
exact figures as to the tomato pack. F. A. TORSCH. 

Baltimore, Md., November 12, 1914. 


The official program for the annual convention of the 
American Specialty Manufacturers’ Association at Philadelphia 
has Just been issued by Secretary Thunhort and indicates that 
the sessions, which are to be held at the Bellevue-Stratford 
on November 19, 20 and 21, will be full of interesting pro¬ 
ceedings. 

Preceding the formal sessions, the board of directors and 
executive committee will meet at the Poor Richard Club on 
Wednesday, November 18, at 3 o’clock to complete prelimi¬ 
naries and arrange one or two matters for action by the con¬ 
vention. 

The details of the program are as follows: 

Thursday, 10 A. M.—Open Session—Convention called to 
order, by Louis Runkel, president. Invocation, Rev. W. H. 
Roberts, D. D., LL. D. Address of welcome, Hon Rudolph 
Blankenburg, Mayor of Philadelphia. Response on behalf of 
the association, W. W. Frazier, Jr., Franklin Sugar Refining 
Company. Address, Louis Runkel, president. Roll call. 
Reading of minutes of last meeting. Reading of minutes 
special meeting, October 6. Report of board of directors. 
Reports of officers, president, treasurer, secretary. Reports of 
publicity committee, A. M. Alexander, chairman; legislative 
committee, A. C. Monagle, chairman. Appointment of special 
committees, on resolutions; on nominations. Address, Hon. 
James Foust, Dairy and Food Commissioner of Pennsylvania. 
Address, A. J. Porter, president Shredded Wheat Company. 
Subject, “Factory Sanitation and Welfare.’’ 

Thursday, 2 P. M.—Open Session.—Convention called to 
order. Address, Fred R. Drake, ex-president National Whole¬ 
sale Grocers’ Association. Address, Dr. Carl L. Alsberg, Chief 
of the Bureau of Chemistry, United States Department of 
Agriculture. Address, Hon. John Barrett, Director General 
Pan-American Union. Subject, “South America.’’ Address, 
C. T. Lee, salesmanager Kellogg Toasted Corn Flake Com¬ 
pany. Subject, “Introducing Grocery Specialties.” Reception, 
6 to 7.30 P. M. 7.30 P. M., banquet as guests pf the Asso¬ 
ciation of Manufacturers’ Representatives, Philadelphia 

Friday, 10 A. M.—Open Session.—Convention called to 
order. Address, Albert Kaiser ,trade relations committee. The 
National Association of Retail Grocers. Address, Charles 
Wesley Dunn,, counsel American Specialty Manufacturers’ As¬ 
sociation. ^ Address, Miss Helen Louise Johnson, chairman 
Home Economics Department, General Federation of Women’s 
Clubs. Address, S. J. Crumbine, M. D., president of the As¬ 
sociation of American Dairy Food and Drug Officials and sec¬ 
retary State Board of Health of Kansas. Address, F. B. 
Reeves, Jr., president Wholesale Grocers’ Association of Penn¬ 
sylvania, New Jersey and Delaware'. Address, T. B. Wagner, 
Ph. D., of Corn Products Refining Company. Subjetct, “Some 
Problems Under the Pure Food and Drug Law.” Address, 
Russell R. Whitman, managing director Audit Bureau of Cir¬ 
culation. Subject, “Circulation of Trade Papers, Newspapers 
and Magazines.” 

Friday, 2 P. M.—Executive Session.—Convention called 
to order. Report of nominating committee; report of presi¬ 
dents of different auxiliaries. Discussion led by J. E. Linihan, 
United Cereal Mills. Address, members auxiliaries and Phila¬ 
delphia, New York and Boston Association of Manufacturers’ 
Representatives. 

Saturday, 10 A. M.—Open Session.—Convention called to 
order. Reports, chairman trade sections—Lye, S. W. Eckman; 
mince meat, Craig Atmore; soap. Geo. Nowland; cereal, J. E. 
Linihan; spice, W. M. McCormick; tobacco, J. A. Bloch; 
niacaroni, C F. Mueller, Jr.; chocolate and cocoa, C. L. Raynor. 
Address, William Beverly Winslow, of Alart & McGuire Com¬ 
pany. Subject, “Workmen’s Compensation Laws.” Reports, 
special committees; nominating committee; resolution com- 


16 


THE Canning TRADE 1 


mittee. Election of officers. Induction of officers and direc¬ 
tors. 

Saturday, 2 P. M.—Meeting of new board of directors. 
Meeting of trade sections—Lye S. W. Eckman, chairman; 
mince meat, Craig Atmore, chairman; soap, Geo. Nowland, 
chairman; cereal, J. E. Linihan, chairman; spice, W. M. Mc¬ 
Cormick, chairman; tobacco, J. A. Bloch, chairman; macaroni, 
C. F. Mueller, Jr., chairman; chocolate and cocoa, C. L. Ray¬ 
nor, chairman. 


THE PRESIDENT’S THANKSGIVING DAY PROCLAMATION. 


By the President of the United States of America. 


“A proclamation: 

“It has long been the honored custom of our people to 
turn in the fruitful autumn of the year in praise and thanks¬ 
giving to Almighty God for his many blessings and mercies to 
us a nation. The year that is now drawing to a close since we 
last observed our day of national thanksgiving nas been, while 
a year of discipline, because of the mighty forces of war and 
of change which have disturbed the world, also a year of 
special blessings for us. 

It has vouchsafed to us to remain at peace, with honor, 
and in some part to succor the suffering and supply the needs 
of those who are in want. We have been privileged by our 
own peace and self-control in some degree to steady the coun¬ 
sels and shape the hopes and purposes of a day of fear and 
distress. Our people have looked upon their own life as a 
nation with a deeper comprehension, a fuller realization of 
their responsibilities as well as of their blessings, and a keener 
sense of the moral and practical significance of what their 
part among the nations of the world may come to be. 

“The hurtful effects of foreign war in their own indus¬ 
trial and commercial affairs have made them feel the more 
fully and see the more clearly their mutual interdependence 
upon one another and has stirred them to a helpful co-opera¬ 
tion such as they have seldom practiced before. They have 
quickened by a great moral stimulation. Their unmistakable 
ardor for peace, their earnest pity and disinterested sympathy 
for those who are suffering, their readiness to help and to 
think of the needs of others has revealed them to themselves 
as well as to the world. Our crops will feed all who need food, 
the self-possession of our people amidst the most serious 
anxieties and difficulties and the steadiness and resourceful¬ 
ness of our business men will serve other nations as well as 
our own. 

“The business of the country has been supplied with new 
instrumentalities and the commerce of the world with 
new channels of trade and intercourse. The Panama Canal 
has been opened to the commerce of the nations. The two 
continents of America have been bound in closer ties of friend¬ 
ship. New instrumentalities of international trade have been 
created which will be also new instrumentalities of acquaint¬ 
ance, intercourse and mutual service. Never before have the 
people of the United States been so situated for their own 
advantage or the advantage of their neighbors or so equipped 
to serve themselves and mankind. 

“Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the 
United States of America, do hereby designate Thursday, the 
26th of November, next, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, 
and invite the people throughout the land to cease from their 
wonted occupations and* in their several homes and places 
of worship render thanks to Almighty God. In witness where¬ 
of, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the 
United States to be affixed. 

“Done at the city of Washington this 28th day of October 
in the year of our Lord, 1914, and of the independence of the 
United States of America the 139th. WOODROW WILSON. 

“By the President, Robert Lansing, acting secretary of 
state.” 


NATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE FOR UNIFORM 
FOOD LAWS. 


The Chamber of Commerce of the United States, a body 
made up of representatives of about 600 local boards of trade, 
chambers of commerce and trade associations in all parts ol 
the country, has taken up the study of uniform food and drug 
regulation, in an earnest effort to secure the adoption of some 
means whereby the food laws of th^e various states can be 
brought to conform with the Federal law on this subject. 

A committee was named last July to take up this matter, 
but the first meeting was held just recently at the headquarters 
of the Chamber in Washington. The committee is composed 
of Willoughby M. McCormick, of Baltimore; A. J. Porter, ol 
Niagara Fails; John A. Green, of Cleveland; B. L. Murray, ol 
New Ifork, and Theodore F. Whitmarsh, ol New York. 

Mr. McCormick, the chairman, is a member ol the board 
of directors of the Chamber of Commerce of the United States 
and the head of the firm of McCormick & Co., Baltimore, manu- 
lacturefs of extracts and drugs and importers of spices and 
teas; Mr. Porter is president ol the Shredded Wheat Co.; Mr. 
Green is secretary of the National Association of Retail Gro¬ 
cers; Mr. Murray is chemist to Merck & Co., and Mr. Whit¬ 
marsh is vice-president of Francis H. Leggitt & Co. 

The first meeting of the committee was devoted to organi¬ 
zation and the preparation of a program for me committee's 
future work. 

The following resolution commending the eorts of the 
Department of Agriculture tending toward co-operation and 
uniformity was also adopted. 

“Resolved, That this committee hereby earnestly and 
heartily endorses the establishment of the bureau in the United 
States Department of Agriculture, particularly concerned with 
Federal and State co-operation in the enforcement of the food 
and drug control laws, thereby promoting an equal and uni¬ 
form enforcement of such laws, believing that this work is 
distinctly in the public interest.” 

The position taken by the committee on the meaning of 
uniformity is interesting and will repay close examination. 
Its views are not confined to a limited horizon, but are intended 
to grasp the broader and wider fields. Its efforts will be con¬ 
fined to no organization or class of people. It hopes to 
cover in its endeavors the position of the wholesaler, the re¬ 
tailer, the consumer, the manufacturer, the official, and all 
others concerned in the production, handling and consumption 
of food and drugs. But only the broad, general questions of 
national character will be considered. After a lenghty discus¬ 
sion the committee at its meeting, by a unanimous vote of all 
present, adopted the following regarding uniiormity. 

“Uniformity as the committee would define it involves 
the highest degree of efficiency in food and drug control which 
it is possible to have prevail universally and equally in every 
part of the nation. The Federal, State and municipal laws and 
their regulations would, if perfect uniformity were attainable, 
reach the level of full and complete efficiency—and thereby 
afford equal protection and uniform standard of living for all 
the people. 

“Uniformity accomplished places merit and the general 
public interest ov^r local political or geographical divisions. 
This committee will, therefore, direct its efforts and considera¬ 
tion toward the accomplishment of uniformity. The commit¬ 
tee cannot but feel impressed with the magnitude, the import¬ 
ance ,and the seriousness of its work. It cannot but feel the 
need for the closest study of the subject. And again the com¬ 
mittee cannot but feel the necessity for the fullest and most 
cordial co-operation between itself and the officials and all 
others concerned. The committee will, of necessity, act de¬ 
liberately and slowly, making certain of each step, considering 
only the important problems of national character.” 


CANNING ITEM NEWS AND NOTES 


FUTURE MEETINGS OP CANNERS. 


DeB Moines, la.—The Iowa Board of Control is seriously 
considering canning as an industry at the state institutions. 
This would in reality teach the convicts three occupations— 
farming, can-making and canning—and would prepare them for 
a useful vocation at the expiration of their terms. 

Grand Rapids, Mich.—The Thomas Cannery, with capacity 
for 72,000 cans of pork and beans daily, is installing the neces¬ 
sary equipment to double the output. Owing to the European 
war, a large number of orders have been placed for canned 
pork and beans in anticipation of the war demand, and the 
Thomas Cannery came in for a goodly share. About 350 wom¬ 
en and 175 men are now employed at the plant, which will be 
in operation until the first of the year. 

San Antonio, Tex.—Secretary John L. Strohm of the Real 
Estate Exchange, states that a canning factory is needed in or 
near San Antonio and that it would be so profitable that many 
others would soon be established. The soil is rich and fertile 
and the crops are large and of good quality. Most of the sur¬ 
plus crop goes to waste now, but if this industry could be built 
up in this section it would mean a profitable and beneficial 
enterprise for all concerned. 

St. Helens, Ore.—Louis Rosasco and associates are erect¬ 
ing a cannery here for fruit and vegetable canning. 

Lehi, Utah.—A modern sanitary cannery will be estab¬ 
lished at Lehi, and the building will be erected and the ma¬ 
chinery installed in time to take care of next season’s tomato 
and fruit crops. The plant will cost about |10,000 and will 
have a capacity of about 20,000 cans daily. 

Hoopeston, 111.—It is reported that five carloads of packed 
corn are being shipped daily out of Hoopeston, mostly to Texas 
and Califovnia. 

Abbeville, La.—The Anderson Canning Company is busy 
Ailing large orders for sweet potatoes, its output of this class of 
goods being in demand. 

Pernandina, Fla.—The Fernandina Packing Company, a 
branch factory of Dunbars, Lopez & Dukate, the largest shrimp 
canning company in the United States, has started operations 
and about 100 people are employed in the canning department. 
This is a new industry to Fernandina and one that will add to 
the business interests of the city. 

San Pedro, Cal.—A tuna cannery in San Pedro is making 
an experiment of catching the fish with a big net. This is the 
Arst time this has been attempted, and if successful, may revo¬ 
lutionize the tuna canning industry. The line has always been 
used in catching the fish, but if the net gives satisfactory re¬ 
sults and a steady supply of fish should be assured, the can¬ 
neries will operate full time during the season from May to 
December. 

Baton Rouge, La.—Thirty-seven suits have been filed 
against farmers and merchants of East Baton Rouge by the 
American National Bank of Lebanon, Tenn., on notes given by 
farmers for stock in a canning plant organized some time ago 
with the oral understanding that they were to pay the notes in 
vegetables brought to the factory. They never bad an oppor¬ 
tunity to pay in vegetables, as the canning plant was never 
operated by the builders and now learn the notes say nothing 
about paying in vegetables. 

Eastport, Me.—There are only two weeks of the sardine 
canning industry remaining, and it is reported that veteran 
canners predict a shortage of over 500,000 cases of sardines. 

Port Beauclerc, Kuiu Island, Can.—The salmon cannery 
and warehouse owned by the Kuiu Island Packing Company 
were destroyed by fire on October 26th and between 5,000 and 
7,000 cases of salmon were ruined. The total loss is estimated 
at $80,000, partly covered by insurance. 

Sales of California canned fruits to Great Britain last year 
numbered 1,250,000 cases, not counting Hawaiian pineapples. 


The following is a list of meetings we have been ad¬ 
vised of. If there are any meetings scheduled which are not 
mentioned above, we will appreciate a postal card giving the 
particulars, so that we can mention same next week. Secre¬ 
tary’s office is gfiven in each case, for the convenience of 
those who may wish to write for some special information 
before the meeting. 

November ITth—18th—At Hotel La Salle, Chicago. Meet¬ 
ing of the Executive Committee of the National Canners’ As¬ 
sociation. Secretary’s office, Washington, D. C. 

November 19th—20th—At Sherman House, Chicago. An¬ 
nual meeting of the Western Canners’ Association. All can¬ 
ners in the Western States are requested to be present. Sec¬ 
retary’s office, Circleville, Ohio. 

December 1st—2nd—3rd—At Republican Hotel, Milwau¬ 
kee, Wis. Annual meeting of the Wisconsin Canners’ Associa¬ 
tion. Every packer in Wisconsin should be present and other 
pea packers will gain much by attending. Secretary’s office. 
Fort Atkinson, Wis. 

Decembm* Ist—At Harrisburg, Pa. Meeting of the Penn¬ 
sylvania Canners’ Association. Secretary’s office, Biglersville, 
Pa. 

December 8th—At Southern Hotel, Columbus, Ohio. Meet¬ 
ing of the Ohio Canners’ Association. Secretary’s Office, Ur- 
bana, Ohio. 

January 26th—27th—At Princess Anne Hotel, Fredericks¬ 
burg, Va. Semi-annual meeting of the Virginia Canners’ As¬ 
sociation. Secretary’s office, Troutville, Va. Big meeting and 
enjoyable time promised all who attend. Everybody welcome. 

February 8th to 13th—At New York City. Annual meet¬ 
ing of the National Canners’ Association, the Canning Ma¬ 
chinery and Supplies Association, the Brokers’ Association, the 
Milk Packers’ Association. Special meeting rooms and the 
biggest machinery exhibit ever made is predicted. 


DATA ON “SWELLS.” 


Uder a ruling of the New York board of health swells can¬ 
not be shipped back to canners for examination. Because of 
this leading wholesale grocers have secured the co-operation 
of the Natioal Canners’ Association through its secretary, 
Frank E. Gorrell ,and the information secured is to be sub¬ 
mitted to the board of health in a brief. The return of swells 
to canners is desired only for the identification of the goods 
and for the use of the canners in making claims against the 
can makers for faulty tin. 

Losses to canners through false claims are reported heavy 
since the enforcement of the New York ruling. No other city 
in the country refuses to allow the goods to be shipped back. 


CANNED BU'TTER THE LATEST. 


Mrs. J. J. McGraw, wife of one of the best and most 
practical farmers of Yazoo County, Miss., having been suc¬ 
cessful in canning all kinds of fruits and vegetables, two 
years ago conceived the idea that butter could be canned and 
kept fresh for any period of time. So she made a trial of 
canning butter, and as was the case with the vegetables and 
fruits, is reported to have made a success of it. On all the 
sandwiches served at a recent luncheon there was spread a 
^ good layer of this two-year-old hutter ,and it was pronounced 
excellent. 


The New York Market 

Tendency is towards higher prices in all articles — Holders appear more confident—Tomatoes 
of good grades are in better demand at slightly increased prices—Jobbers have the 
bulk of good peas—Fancy corn is very scarce and price advancing—Off grade and 
ordinary standard is steady—Other articles reported in detail—Some notes of New 
York town. 

Reported by Telegraph 


. New York, November 13. 1914. 

The Market,—The market for canned foods opened with 
a better undertone on staple products, but there was little 
important buyin to record. In the vegetable list fancy corn 

I is strong and stock in Maine packing is less easily obtainable 

at ll.lu f. o. b. Portland. The steamer St Helena now un¬ 
loading salmon in Hoboken, New Jersey, was due to leave 
this week for Portland to take on 80,000 cases of Maine corn. 
It is expected that it will start the first of the week for the 
Pacific Coast points via the Panama Canal. New York job¬ 
bers have not pushed the Canned Food Week movement owing 
to the exigencies of the time, and so far as this market is 
I concerned no effort has been made to urge patronage of the 

i various articles in wholesale and retail circles outside the reg- 

F uiar volume. The selection of this particular period for push- 

I ing canned food sales is regarded by some jobbers as unfortu¬ 
nate, since it is the time that canned foods may expect to meet 
some competition from the fresh food products in many lines. 
The principal feature was the stronger tone noted in good 
y grades of peas. Standard early Junes were also firmer. A 
/ jobber seeking to fill a government contract lor 2,000 cases 
I was unable to secure a line of 1,000 cases under one brand, 

I and this condition, it is said, exists in other grades above 

|l I standards. Fancy grades in State and Western peas are 

\ more firmly held up to outside figures. The general tendency 

I' \ on corn seems to be firmer. There is no pressure to sell 

L V Western stock. Common stock from-all sections is easy and 

. the tone is weak. Full standard tomatoes are more firmly held, 

but buyers are careful of quality, and all samples are sub¬ 
mitted to a rigid examination. There is still a good deal of 
urgency to sell direct from packers, and the market is rated 
no more than steady. Buying is on a moderate scale. Some 
holders appear willing to shade prices on stock held in excess 

I of prospective wants in order to reduce holdings. Coast offer¬ 
ings, however, do not seem to be pressing for sale at the 
present. 

Tomatoes—Although buying was on the hand to mouth 
order for the most part, the market for Maryland tomatoes 
was firm, and, while car or two might still have been had at 
65c for No. 3s and 54c for No. 2s of standard quality, most 
holders were disposed to turn down orders at less than 67 ^c 
and 47%c for standards Nos. 3 and 2 respectively, f. o. b. 
factory. Southern packers seemed to have sold enough to 
have covered their needs for money at low prices of the past 
I several weeks, and those who were not inclined to sacrifice 

their stock for ready money appear to have been able to make 
such financial arrangements as will make it possible to carry 
‘ the goods until a better market offers. Meanwhile buyers at 

this end are making few offers and placing few orders. The 
tone seems to be firmer on spot tomatoes and while there has 
been no important increase in buying the feeling seems to be 
more confident. At the close No. 10 full standard grade were 
selling for $2.15 f. o. b. factory. There is a little gain in the 
tone on fair standards, but buyers are neglecting all stock 
not up to grade. Some neglected lots are offered at concessions. 

Peas.—There is a free offering of cheap peas mostly carry¬ 
over lots from various packers in different sections of the coun- 
’ try. In a good many cases standard second grades show or¬ 
dinary quality. Some unattractive lots in No. 4 and 5 grade 
I show the presence of hard peas, and oerings are made at from 
55 @ 65c f. o. b. factory. It is considered difficult to buy any 
really acceptable goods in standard western or early June 
I peas at less than 70 @ 75c here. Some lots of No. 2 Alaskas 
were offered f. o. b. Western factory at $1.50. Bids of 5c 
under this figure were refused on 2,000 cases. There is a 
j marked scarcity of No. 1 Alaska and Admiral peas on spot, 
\ and holdings are said to be mainly in the hands of jobbers. 

The situation, so far as good grades are concerned, seems to 
1 be fair. Stocks of cheap peas have been well absorbed by the 
quiet, but steady, demand of consumption during the past few 
'• weeks, causing the market to close firmer, though not notably 
higher than last quoted. Fancy stock is not plentiful and the 
trend of prices on such goods is upward. 


Com.—For spot corn there is not much demand, as buy¬ 
ers are being supplied tnrougn ueiiveries on contract. The 
market is steady on standards, but firm on fancy, the supply 
of both being limited especially in the last named variety. 
Maryland Maine style standard nas sold within the past few 
uays at 62Vic f. o. b. county tacioiy, but it is doubted if bet¬ 
ter than 65c f. o. b. can be done. State corn is in close com¬ 
pass, and 85 90c seems to be the best that can be done, 

standard State corn is available at 7 be laid down here, though 
some holders demand 2^c more. A sale of 500 cases fancy 
corn for immediate delivery was reported as having been 
made here early in the week at $1.07 Vk delivered. There is a 
firm and advancing market on fancy stock. Good standards 
and extra standards are not pressed lor sale to any extent, but 
It IS easy to find sellers of ordinary grades at irregular and 
lower figures. Southern Maine style is held at 65(i;p70c f. o. b. 
factory. \Vestern corn is offered more freely. Much interest 
IS centered in the report that the St. Helena now discharging 
cargo at this port ,is to take 80,000 cases of corn from Port¬ 
land, for f'acific coast buyers. Practically all of this corn 
goes on contract deliveries to buyers. 

String Beans.—Spot No. 1 and No. 2 Refugee string beans 
are in small compass and a good deal of stock is wanted. 
Quotations are nominal, and in most cases represent business 
fiom second bands in a small way. No. 3 and 4 grades are 
firmly held. Southern green No. 10s meet a steady outlet 
based on figures as quoted. Fancy stock is not plentiful and 
the finer grades are scare and firm. On the average stock 
the market is firm and steady. 

Asparagus.—Spot asparagus is dull and nominal. Mam¬ 
moth whites are soiling for $2.40@>2.40^, and Medium whites 
$2.22^ @2.25; tips for $2.00; tips in white are selling for 
$ 2 . 10 . 

Succotash.—The market is steady, with a little gain in 
tone on fair standards, with Maine stock available for 90c@ 
$1.10. State, 87 u2@95c; Southern, 87^@92^c. 

Pompkinu—The market is a little easier with sales quiet. 

Beets.—The tone of the market is firm. Seconds are dull, 
but in good grades there seems to be considerable interest. 

Peaches.—There is a seasonable movement from jobbers 
for retail account, but the demand from first hands is con¬ 
fined to small lots. Coast offerings are offered at $1.15 f. o. b. 
steamer on No. 2^ standard lemon clings. It is easy to find 
sellers on the spot for $1.30 @$1.35. Southern peaches are 
offered freely and siock is neglected here. There seems to 
be an effort on the part of some holders to rduce stocks at 
primary points. 

Pears.—The market Is lightly stocked with California 
Bartletts. New Jersey Keiffers in No. 3 cans are held with 
confidence. Southern is steady. 

Apples.—^No. 10 State, Maine and Western apples are 
urged for sale and the market is easy. Buyers are looking for 
somewhat lower prices. Offerings are freely made from up¬ 
state points at $2.10 @2.15 here on fancy. Standard No. 10s 
are available at around $1.95. 

Pineapple.—Hawaiian pineapple is easy and freely offered. 
Current business in Southern and Singapore is chiefly con¬ 
fined to deliveries on contracts. The spot market is steady, as 
there is little carry-over in any line. 

Cherries.—CherHes are not freely offered, but there is 
enough stock to go around. 

Blueberries.—Are held with confidence and stocks are 
scarce. 

Salmon.—There is a liberal supply of salmon of all de¬ 
scriptions, and some holders appear willing to shade prices on 
stock held in excess of prospective wants in order to reduce 
holdings. Coast offerings do not seem to be pressing for sale 
at the moment. The steamer Cricket is now reported through 
the Panama Canal with 900 tons of canned salmon destined 



19 


THE Canning TRADE 


(or Philadelpiila bu^'^rs. The fit. Helena is practically dis- 
cnargea at nobokeu. rhe market has a lull working supply, 
ana unaer siow traae conaitions the teeiing is easy, some 
parcels oi No. i rea lalis oner at here, but as a rule 

noiueis are asking spot pinks are Urm at y5(0)!17^c. 

mere seems to oe no pressure to sen cnums. A tew lots ol 
socKeye aie to be had at mere is no demand* out ot 

the ordinary. 

saruiues—Domestic sardines are held with confidence, and 
the reports irom Maine indicate a iigfit run ot fish ail along 
me coast, 'there are tew seneis at inside figures, 'the pack¬ 
ing season only has a tew weeks to run. imported sardines 
are held about as quoted. Some holders are firmer on Portu¬ 
guese Dingley quai'ters at $8(^10. 

Shrimp.—Offerings are made little more freely, but there 
seems to be little more demand for the general offerings. 

Tuna PTsh—Demand is regulated by present smail needs 
of consumption, but as buyers are not trying to force busi¬ 
ness, a steady, to firm, feeling prevails in all lines. 

Crab Meat.—There is no unusual feature, but it is in fair 
request. 

Oysters.—A fair demand is noted and a good deal of stock 
is offered here, and they are getting a little more attention 
than when last recorded. 

PIOKKD UP liN PASSING. 

N. J. Boice, ot W. T. Reynolds & Co., Poughkeepsie, N. 
Y., was a buyer in the West fime markets this week. He said 
that business in his vicinity is not as good as merchants would 
like to see it, but is improving anu they hope tor a more 
active movement when tne holiday season opens. 

Joseph M. Keane, the New York reprsntativ of Richard¬ 
son & Robbins, the well-known packers ot plum pudding, says 
that traae thus lar tnis season nas exceeded that ol last year 
by a considerable percentage. He thinks that in this variety 
>01 canned foods, at least. New Workers and others have no 
intention of stinting themselves. 

A well known fiouthern commission house, writing to us 
New York agents, says that the demand tor No. 3 tomatoes 
at 65c and No. 2s at 45 exceeded the available supply last 
week. It seems to be certain that every packer in Maryland 
had oportuniCy to sell at those figures last week, and had 
they desired to do so it would have been possible. But all are 
now asking 47 Vic for No. 2s and 67 Vic lor No. 3s. These 
ligures are not destined to last long, it is believed, because 
tew want to dispose of their holdings at losing prices. 

The mortgage on the Canadian Sardine Company’s plant 
at St. Andrews, N. B., by the bank of Nova Scotia finishes the 
career of a short-lived company. It was organized by one who 
had successfully organized and conducted a similar plant in 
the United States. It was located where fish were plentiful 
and cheap, but so far as can be determined it has never pros¬ 
pered. The bank bought the plant in at $270,000. 

Coast offerings quote No. 2 Vi standard lemon cling 
peaches at $1.15 f. o. b. steamer. Sellers on the spot are ask¬ 
ing $1.30. Cherries are not freely offered and some say stock 
is barely sufficient for needs. 

Letters from the Coast tell of the cleanup of mammoth 
white, large white, mammoth green and large green asparagus, 
with other varieties in rather contracted compass. Some 
jobbers are looking for fresh supplies to make up deficiencies 
in certain grades. 

W. H. Marvin, of the W. H. Marvin Company, Ohio, packers 
of mince meat, has been in New York this week, making his 
headquarters with Strachan & Higgins. He did a satisfactory 
business while here and reported trade good with him almost 
everywhere. 

Seven million eggs of the humpbacked and pink salmon 
have been brought from the Pacific coast by government of¬ 
ficials and will be hatched in Maine hatcheries and when the 
fish are fingerlings they will be placed in a number of selected 
Majne streams. The work is a continuation of the efforts 
of the government to establish one of the most valuable of the 
Pacific salmons in New England waters. 

A lot of No. 2 standard green string beans was offered for 
prompt delivery at 52Vic f. o. b. factory. 

Business covering 600 cases of medium red salmon. No. 
V6s was reported for Jobbing accounts at 80c here. 

Advices from the South report advances of 2V4@5c on 
No. 2 and No. 3 tomatoes. Canners in most instances decline 
to part with their goods under full outside figures and are 
holding back waiting for the advance which they are certain 
is almost here. 

George L. Ide, of Johnson & Co., .Milwaukee, Wls., spent 
a part of a day in the West Side canned goods and grocery 
trade during the week. He reports a much better feeling in 
the grocery markets visited by him in the Middle West and 
looks for a great increse in business shortly. 

The market for domestic sardines is steady and lightly 
supplies with stock. The tone is firm, but is somewhat irregu¬ 


lar because ot the tree offering of fish by outside Concerns be- 
luw me leguiai market rate. Quotations are down to $2.75 
ou quaitei-oiis i. o. b. Hasipori. in outside figuie is given 
as me packing season will end by legal limitation on 

iNOvember 30. 

An importer ot sardines says that Norway reports a very- 
poor eaten and bignei prices, rrance reports tnat the fish 
nave ceased to run on tne coast, ino reports come trom Bel¬ 
gium. mnee tne ciosmg ui me i\urtn sea to navigation the out¬ 
look IS gloomy. Borne snippers are arranging to do business by 
way ot Iceland, 'i ne inui wegian-American Line has bought 
two new steamers and win take this nortnern route to avoid 
the mines. > 

William A. Jensen of Jensen & Dorr, Milwaukee, Wis., 
spent a part of a day this week in the West Bide canned foods 
and grocery trade. 

At least two steamers are to load Maine corn at Portland 
and go to the Pacific coast througn me Panama Canal. Others 
may do the same. 

h'rank Onion, of Luddington & Co., Baltimore, was one 
of the week’s notable visitors in the canned foods trade. 

The Corby Commission Company says it is now delivering 
salmon on contracts. New buying is inactive in some sections 
and active in others. The company goes on to say tnat it leeis 
sure buyers do not realize that pakeis are cleaning up and 
that in the not far distant future some grades of saimon will 
be hard to get. 

B. G. Temple, of Temple & Co., Buffalo, was a visitor in 
the canned foods and grocery trades this week. He reports 
trade in the grocery trade there as good and improving. 

A wire from Portland, Me., reported fancy Maine corn as 
stronger at $1.10 f. o. b. A good deal of stock is reported 
t ohave been picked up here and there for New York account 
at $1.05^ 1.07 V^ f. o. b. factory. 

R. S. Robb, of Rosenberg Bros. Co., San Francisco, has 
been in New York this week making headquarters with W. M. 
Houck & Bro. He stopped in a number of the interior mar¬ 
kets en route and found business improving in all of them. 

Sales of 2,000 cases of full standard No. 3 tomatoes were 
reported at 65c f. o. b. factory. A good many No. 2s have been 
offered during the week at 42V^c and some No. 3s at 62V^c. 
Buyers say, however that upon cutting the stock is not up to 
standard. 

"Canned Foods Week,” November 2 to November 7, re¬ 
ceived little or no consideration in New York. No retailer of 
importance exploited it and no wholesaler devoted any atten¬ 
tion to its observance. A number of leading interests in the 
New York trade have expressed the opinion that more can be 
accomplished by moving the date to sometime in the spring. 
Others say that every week is "canned foods week” now and 
that a speial seven days for exploiting canned foods seems 
hardly necessary, though they do not object to it. 

L. A. Farnum, of Perkins & Co., Sndusky, Ohio, was a 
visitor in the canned foods and grocery trade during the week. 

A block of 2,000 cases of No. 2^ unpeeled pie peaches 
was offered at 67^c f. o. b. Georgia factory. 

G. D. Reynolds, of L. A. Watson & Co., Chicago, was a 
visitor in the West Side canned foods and grocery trade dur¬ 
ing the week. 

One sale of 500 cases fancy Maine corn was reported at 
$1.07^ delivered for New York account. It is said that noth¬ 
ing is now available in Portland under $1.10 f. o. b. there. 

One Souther broker quoted offerings of 60,000 cases from 
different localities, grading from No. 2 to No. 5 sieve standard 
to fancy. The lowest figure was 55c f. o. b. Wisconsin factory. 
Included is one lot of 4,000 cases of No. 3 sieve fancy Alaskas 
at $1.10 and 3,100 cases No. 2 Alaskas at $1.50 f. o. b. Wis¬ 
consin factory. A block of 5,000 cases No. 4 sieve Alaskas 
offered at 70c f. o. b. Michigan factory. 

Mrs. J. J. McGraw, wife of a farmer of Yazoo, Miss., two 
years ago canned a quantity of butter. Recently she invited 
some friends to luncheon and used this butter. It is said that 
it could not be told from that freshly made. 

Two thousad glass cans of salmon put up at the Hecla 
Alaskan plant of the Swift-Arthur-Crosby Company, are on 
their way to Eastern markets. It is the first commercial 
venture of this character and canners are much interested in 
the result. 

E. Natio, representing Nozaki Bros., of San Francisco, 
Yokohama and Kobe, has been visiting A. C. Hermann & Co., 
New York agents of the firm, during the week, booking orders 
for crab meat. He says that his firm’s business is* increasing 
very rapidly. 

S. A. Gregor of Roberts Bros. Company, Birmingham, 
Ala., bought canned foods in New York this week. 

Gustave Porgis, of the Strohmeyer & Arpi Company, says 
that they have received no word from their shippers abroad 
that the Monte Sen is closed to shipping, declaring that goods 
are coming forward as usual. HUDSON. 


The Chicago Market 

Canned Foods Week was a big success—Tomatoes quiet—Good cheap peas are hard to 
find—Meat packers are much oversold—A booster from Pittsburg is boosted—Some 
interesting news notes picked up in the Chicago market. 

Reported by Telegrraph 


November 13, 1914. 

The Weather—A change to cold weather from the Indian 
summer weather which has been prevailing has slightly stimu¬ 
lated the market for canned foods and everybody nearly has 
braced up a little. 

Canned Foods Week 1014.—I saw today a lot of photo¬ 
graphs of canned foods displays, which had been put on by 
retail grocers and which had been submitted in the prize com¬ 
petition, some of the displays were very fine and they are 
coming in from widely scattered localities. The effort was in¬ 
itiated by one publisher of grocery papers, and its success shows 
how hungry retail grocers and wholesale grocers were to 
participate in an effort of the kind. Wholesale grocery houses 
in 24 states and the District of Columbia participated in the 
distribution of the literature and the promotion of the displays. 

Canned Tomatoes.—There is no change in the situation 
from last week, and the demand is very apathetic and indif¬ 
ferent; the jobbers seem to all be well supplied and unin¬ 
terested. 

Canned Cmn.—The market for this article remains in 
an uneventful position. Several large buyers were in the 
market last week for peas, but were unable to secure just what 
they wanted at low prices. 

Canned Salmon.—The market for this article is steady and 
strong and heavy orders are being received for expert account. 
The market is well maintained at about opening prices for the 
season. Nothing makes a better army ration than canned sal¬ 
mon. 

Canned Meats.—Our meat canners seem to have all the 
business in canned foods just now they can handle, and I am 
told that they have on hand enough orders to keep them busy 
for twelve months. 

CANNING NEWS. 

The Puyallup & Sumner Fruit Growers’ Association at 
Puyallup, Washington, is shipping out its output for the sea¬ 
son, on advance sales, and will probably be about cleaned up 
by November 20, 1914. This concern has been shipping at the 
rate of about five cars daily since October 15, 1914. 

Some man representing “The Associated Canneries of 
Pittsburg, Pa.,’’ is out on the Pacific Coast leiiing the news¬ 
papers that “All the large canneries have run full blast, and 
we are all shipping vast quantities of canned foods to England, 
Spain and Portugal and will be to Germany as soon as that 
country can find a way to get shipments safely through. The 
shipments, he says, consist largely of canned meats, soups, and 
beans.’’ The name of this blessed optimist is Peery, and it is a 
pleasure to hear him in the Sacramento Record-Union say: 
“From present indications, the coming year will be one of the 
most profitable in the history of the country.” Go to it, Peery! 

I am with you and yours is the kind of talk we are badly need¬ 
ing just now. There seems to be some basis for your talk, for 
I know that meat canners are all oversold. But who are “The 
Associated Canners of Pittsburg, Pa.?” I never heard of them 
and they are not down in the lists. I did not know they canned 
anything in Pittsburg but smoke and a few of Heinz’s 57 vari¬ 
eties. But it don’t matter! You are all right, Peery! Keep 
on making a noise like that! It is the proper treatment for 
what ails us. 

The Wayne Canning Co., of Wayne, Micnigan, has been 
incorporated, with a capital of six thousand dollars. 

The Lange Canning Co., of San Claire, Wis., is now in¬ 
corporated and capitalized for. one hundred thousand dollars, 
and has factories or canning plants at Reedsburg, Stanley and 
Chetch, Wis., and at Oakdale, Cal., in addition to the parent 
plant at San Claire, Wis. The capacity of the plant at San 
Claire, Wis., is from one hundred and fifty to two hundred car¬ 
loads of canned foods per annum. 

Mankato, Minn., wants a cannery and the North Mankato 
Commercial Club has taken the matter up actviely for con¬ 
sideration 'and promotion. 

General Manager A. E. Slessman, of the Fremont (Ohio) 
Kraut Company, says that the company expects to cut up about 
five thousand tons of kraut this season, about half of which 
will be canned, the rest being packed and sold in wood. He 
does not anticipate the usual competition from Europe on 
kraut this year. This company sells and ships kraut to remote 


parts of the world. South Africa, Alaska, China, etc. 

The Mclnnis Canning Co., Hattiesburg, Miss., is now busy 
running on sweet potatoes and expects to be until the first of 
the year. 

Itnica, N. Y., is hoping to have a canning factory and 
the subject is being investigated by Paul Work, of the New 
Xork State Agricultural College. 

'the Newton (Miss.) Cannery is operating on sweet pota¬ 
toes and expects to can about forty or fifty carloads this season. 

Shirely, Ark., wants a cannery. The town is located on 
the North Arkansas Railway, and has a population of 600, and 
the Business Men’s Club has the matter of the cannery in 
charge. 

'ihe advisory board of the National Association of Canned 
Food and Dried Fruit Brokers’ Association has formulated 
and promulgated its “ten commandments,” which appear prob¬ 
ably elsewhere in this paper. 

They are good; excellent in fact, and show evidence of 
investigation and some good thought along ethical lines. 

It is the only thing worth while that has emanated from 
the association for some time, and it is pleasing to know that 
we now have an ethical platform upon which to stand and at 
least pose. 

’Ih difference between these ten ethical commandments 
and those written upon Mount Sinai is that these (the brokers) 
have no enacting clause. 

When the Lord wrote his commandments he said, “Thou 
Shalt not steal” etc. 

That advisory committee of the Brokers’ Association 
frames it more politely and says: “A broker should respect 
the rights of competitors.” “Brokers doing so and so are act¬ 
ing decidedly against good brokerage ethics,” etc. 

We are thankful for that much and the spirit of universal 
brotherhood and patriotic peace in which the brokers’ ethical 
decalogue is written. 1 would not be amazed to discover that 
every broker in the organization has shattered most of these 
commandments repeatedly in the past, but 1 am positive that 
they will now do it no more. 

Wouldn’t it have been well to have added an eleventh 
commandment reading abouFlike this: 

No. 11_Any member of the National Dried Fruit and 

Canned Foods Brokers’ Association who is proven guilty of 
wilful violations of these rules of ethical behavior will be 
taken by the scruff of the neck and the slack of the pants, 
figuratively speaking, and thrown out of the organization, and 
not permitted to re-enter for an indeterminate term of five 
years.” 

1 am confident that many of us would be in danger of 
the operation of this last eleventh commandment, but laws 
or rules are not retrovactive and 1 feel safe and don’t pro¬ 
pose to get into a position where any 42 centimeter petrol 
shell will hit me ,and will keep well down in the trenches. 

Maybe I am a little too critical, and that the politeness 
embodied in the ten ethical rules is in diplomatic defense to 
the anti-trust laws, and that I should read that eleventh com¬ 
mandment in between the lines of the other ten. If so I 
apologize. 

However, those concerned will please consider that I am not 
disposed to carp but to poke a little fun at the committee. 

It is good work and looks like we have waked up to con¬ 
ditions and taken courage and are disposed to assert our¬ 
selves. The “Code of Ethics” is well written and carefully 
considered and will have a splendid effect upon the moral tone 
of the brokerage business. 

I have just lost a good agency to a broker outside the 
association who employed unethical tactics. What can I do 
to him? Get him to'join the association and come up to the 
mourners bench and be prayed for by the congregation, I sup¬ 
pose? 

But say! What can we do to a canner who gives you 
his agency and then ships into town and cuts the price on you 
and makes direct sales and refuses to report them or allow 
the brokerage? . 

What about giving such “snippers” a little publicity? f 
am a great believer in talking about such people publicly as 
well as privately. WRANGLER. 





Seattle Salmon Market 

pink salmon is becoming scarce—Chums are still being packed and the demand is fair— 
No export statistics while the war lasts—Small fruits in the Northwest are being 
canned extensively—Lumber camps have closed and local demand is light. 

Reported by Telegfraph 


Seattle, November 13, 1914. 

Salmon. — The canned salmon market rules firm on 
nearly all items. There is sufficient business on hand to 
keep pretty nearly everybody busy for the present. Prob¬ 
ably the feature of the market is the improved demand for 
the pink grade, and the reports that sales have been made 
at 95 cents, 5 cents above opening quotations. For the 
most part pinks are scarce and most brokers are insisting 
that orders for pinks contain a clause permitting some 
chums and other lower grades to be shipped. In other 
words, it is getting difficult to find a packer who wants to 
ship a straight car of pinks. 

Chums are still being packed. The weather is getting 
bad, however. The pack during November cannot be very 
large, for November is about the stormiest month of the 
year, so that fishing operations will be seriously interfered 
with. The pack of pinks, however, will be heavy; it may 
break records. It is too early to say. There is only a 
fair demand for Chums, and in some quarters the market 
is termed “rather weak.” The market, nevertheless, is 
around 85 cents. Ordinarily chums are packed in one- 
pound tails, but some packers are offering this low-g^ade 
fish in halves and flats, hoping to obtain a premium for 
such stock. There is still a lot of canned salmon with¬ 
drawn from the market, and which probably will not come 
out before spring, or at least until pinks bring $1. 

In view of the ruling of the government that figures 
showing the shipments of merchandise must not be given 
out by the customs office during the war, it will be impos¬ 
sible to obtain a line on the movement of canned salmon 
to foreign countries. This information would be particu¬ 
larly valuable just at this time, but the packers, brokers and 
shippers will have to get along without it. It seems almost 
certain, however, that there will be a big movement of 
canned salmon to England during the winter. English in¬ 
quiries are still floating around. 

Medium red salmon is steady at $1.15 for tails, $1.30 
for flats, and 80 cents for halves. Medium reds are still 
being packed in some quantity. There is a limited supply 
of Alaska red salmon offered at $1.45 for tails. Flats are 
scarce. Some halves are still available. 

Sockeyes are available at $1.95 for the tails; $2.10 to 
$2.15 for the flats and $1.0 to $1.35 for the halves. 

One Seattle broker in his latest circular sums up the 
canned salmon situation as follows: “The European war 
and the world’s financial condition is temporarily having a 
sobering effect on business generally, though on food prod¬ 
ucts general advances can be expected. No doubt, banks 
of rediscount will give relief to the cotton factors, and 
sooner or later the foreign demand will set in that may 
cause even a runaway market in America. The trade has 


bought heavily. Not much more domestic business is ex¬ 
pected before spring. A thirty-cent water rate has been 
established to New York, as well as very low rates to 
Charleston. There is a possibility of a steamer loading di¬ 
rect for Gulf of Mexico ports in November or December 
if sufficient cargo can be obtained.” 

Fruits.—In view of the growing demand and output 
of Western Washington canned raspberries and blackber¬ 
ries the following statement by W. H. Paulhamus, presi¬ 
dent and manager of the Sumner & Puyallup Fruit Grow¬ 
ers’ Association, the largest fruit and vegetable concern in 
the Pacific Northwest, is of interest. Mr. Paulhamus 
says: “We are shipping from three to five carloads of 
canned foods daily. The prices which we obtained this 
year were fully equal to those obtained in the past.” 

Mr. Paulhamus gives an idea of the methods used in han¬ 
dling berries in his plants, as follows: “Every pound of 
Cuthbert red raspberries delivered to the cannery that is 
used for 60-degree syrup costs the association between 12 
and 13 cents to get ready for the market. On all the red 
berries that are put in gallon cans in water, which is the 
cheapest possible manner the fruit can be handled, it costs 
the association three or four cents per pound to get them 
ready for the market, too which must be added two cents 
per pound, the sum advanced to the grower for harvesting 
purposes, so that the total cost of the berries in this in¬ 
stance is between five and six cents per pound. The ber¬ 
ries packed in barrels cost the association a total of between 
eight and nine cents per pound.” 

The demand for canned foods locally is none too brisk, 
owing to the fact that lumbering operations are at a stand¬ 
still. More than half of the lumber camps in the State are 
closed. Lumber camps are normally heavy consiuners of 
canned fruits and vegetables, but this demand is just about 
as quiet as it could be at present. Thousands of cases of 
pie fruits go to the camps, as well as large quantities of 
tomatoes and peas and corn. Not much revival is ex¬ 
pected until after the first of the year. 

“SALMON.” 

SINN AND HELL FIGURE IN DIVORCE COURT. 

St. Louis, Mo.—Mrs. Albert Sinn obtained a divorce in 
the Circuit Court yesterday and Judge Grimm grimly decreed 
that hereafter the wages of Sinn shall be divided. Sinn, who 
is a barber, must give Mrs. Sinn |4 per week. 

When Mrs. Sinn left the stand Mrs. Alfred B. Hell as¬ 
cended. She, too, wanted freedom. She was married to Hell 
in July, and had enough of Hell in a month. She will have 
Hell no more, her maiden name of Hemmetmann being re¬ 
stored. 



The California Market 





Important laws voted on in this State—A new school teaches rudiments of 
the exporting business—Canners are interested—Tomato packing has 
practically ended—Shipments are heavy—Decision in important growers 
contract—Interesting news notes of the Pacific Coast. 

Reported by Telegfraph 


Saa Francisco, Cal., Nov. 13, 1914. 

Election the Principal Topic—The market for canned 
foods has been dull during the past week, interest having been 
largely centered upon the State election. Besides the election 
of State and county officers voters passed upon forty-eight 
amendments to the Constitution, making the election one of 
the most important ever held and bringing out a record vote. 
Many measures of direct interest to the canning and manu¬ 
facturing trades in general were acted upon and some that 
promised to be a positive detriment to business interests were 
voted down. Employers generally were opposed to the passage 
of the universal eight-hour law and this was defeated by a 
large majority. An extremely drastic Prohibition measure 
was also voted down, largely because of the fact that it would 
at once destroy the wine-making industry, without com¬ 
pensation for losses to growers ana liidnuidotaieis. A local 
taxation law', which was in reality a s.ugie i.ia. lueasuie,' was 
also defeated. According ... jin ii seems that 

the minimum wage law for women and minors has been 
passed. There is nothing of a drastic nature in this measure, 
it being merely providing for the establishment of a minimum 
wage by the Legislature at some future date. Other measures 
of interest that were carried, include an act providing for 
the exemption of vessels from local taxation, legislative con¬ 
trol of irrigation and reclamation districts, and bonding, meas¬ 
ures fo rthe improvement of the San Francisco waterfront 
and the erection of State Buildings at San Francisco, Los 
Angeles, Sacramento and Berkeley. 

The Exporting Class in School—A school for teaching the 
rudiments of eporting has been opened at San Francisco in 
the Y. M. C. A. Building and already a large class has been 
enrolled. This school is believed to be the first of its kind 
to be established in this country and the course promises to 
be a very popular one especially with such splendid opportu¬ 
nities for trade expansion opening in South America. The 
curriculum will embrace all subjects pertaining to foreign 
trade and the course of study will be open to any man who 
desires to enter exporting in any capacity. Many of the local 
firms engaged in exporting have installed exhibits of their 
goods at the school and are assisting in the work in every 
possible manner. Prominent among those who are rendering 
valuable aid in making the school a sucess are C. P. Con¬ 
verse, secretary of the foreign trade department of the Cham¬ 
ber of Commerce, and C. H. Bentley, of the California Fruit 
Canners’ Association. The importance of San Francisco as an 
export center has been greatly augmented by the opening 
of the Panama Canal and this city now ranks second among 
the ports of the United States. During September the exports 
from here were $14,467,467, as compared with $8,662,094 for 
the corresponding month a year ago. Goods are being moved 
out of San Francisco as fast as vessels can be secured to 
take them, and the October and November records are ex¬ 
pected to show further gains. 

Tomatoes About Done—The rains experienced throughout 
California late in October promised to put an end to tomato 
packing, but warm weather has followed and growers are 
again able to make deliveries of stock of fair quality. Many of 
the large plants have packed up to contract requirements and 
have closed for the season, but a few smaller ones are still 
operating and are now offering goods at reductions from open¬ 


ing rates. The market for this article is quiet, in sympathy 
with conditions elsewhere, and but limited sales are being 
made at any price. The California pack will prove to be a 
fairly heavy one and definite figures of its size will not be 
available for some time as operations may be carried on for 
several weeks, if weather conditions continue favorable. The 
warmest weather of the year is now being experienced in 
Southern California and nowhere have there been killing 
frosts. 

Some InducemenUi to Buy—Shipments of canned fruit 
and vegetables out of San Francisco continue to be heavy but 
new business is light. Some packers are making special efforts 
to move Iheir surplus pack of peaches by offering discounts, 
and apricots are also being offered more freely. There is an 
increased demand for canned pears, but stocks of these are 
light, as far as first hands are concerned. 

All Canners Itead Ihis—The famous “olive case” of Grln- 
nell Burt, of Palermo, Cal., against the Los Angeles Olive 
Growers’ Association, for $21,387, has been decided by Judge 
Barber, of Redding, Cal., in favor of the plaintiff. The de¬ 
cision has been awaited with deep interest throughout the 
State by growers and packers, involving as it does the se¬ 
curity of a contract in writing for the sale and purchase ol a 
growing crop. The action was brought a contract in 
writing entered into for the purchase of the olives grown on 
the Burt orchard during the season of 1913. The contract 
was made in July, 1913, the Los Angeles company agreeing 
to pay $140 a ton for all olives grown on the orchard that 
year, excepting olives unfit for pickling which were picked 
and off the trees prior to December 7. Thus in effect pro¬ 
viding that all olives on the trees unpicked on December 7, 
should be $140 a ton. There were 285,711 pounds of olives 
on the trees at that date. The Los Angeles company admitted 
that it signed the contract, but alleged that it did not under¬ 
stand it, and that it thought that it contained a frost risk 
which it did not contain, that it was made by mistake, and 
asked the court to reform the writing so that it would provide 
that Burt would assume the frost risk up to December 7, and 
that it would assume it after that date. The judge refused 
to change the contract, and held that since it was in writing 
there was nothing more to decide, there being no dispute as 
to the quantity of olives delivered. 

Coast News Notes—The California Fruit Canners’ Asso¬ 
ciation is making a number of improvements at its property 
on North Beach, including the erection of a retaining wall. 

The Gisco Company has been incorporated at San Fran¬ 
cisco w'ith a capital stock of $250,000 to conduct a business 
in canned foods. The incorporators are J. E. Stafford, F. 
R. Maloney and G. L. Ropert. 

J. Blumlein, of Sussman, Wormser & Co., wholesale 
grocers, has returned from a visit to the Eastern trade. 

Frank Rothenberg, of Rothenberg Bros., of this city, is 
visiting the Eastern trade. 

The third series of motion pictures given by the California 
Development Board at the Ferry Building, San Francisco, 
showed the packing of peas and asparagus at the plant of the 
California Fruit Canners’ Association. 

John B. Meyenberg, founder of the Alpine Evaporated 
Cream Company, and one of the first to pack evaporated milk, 
passed away recently at his home at San Jose, Cal. 

The American Can Company will shortly establish a can 
making plant at Haiku, Maui, T. H. 

The total pack of pineapple at the plant of the Kauai 
Fruit and Land Co., Hawaii, amounted to 66,000 cases during 
the past season. Of the lot, 36,000 cases have already been 
shipped. BERKELEY. 






The Canning TRADE 


23 



pirBi.uBn> xvuT mondat bt 


THE TRADE COMPANY, 

A. I. J0DOK,.Manager and Bditor. 

Baltimore and Holliday Sta., Baltimore, Md. 

Telephone St. Paul 2698 


Tni Canning Tkadb is the only paper published czclnslTely 
in the interest of the Canned Food Packers of the United States and 
Canada. Now in its 38th Year. 

TSnifS OV SUBSCKimOM. 

Payable in advance, on receipt of bill. Sample copy free. 


One year,.$2.00 

Canada, ... $3.00 

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Bztra copies, when on hand, 5 Cents each. 

Advbktisino RaTKS.— According to space and location. 

Make all Drafts or Money Orders payable to Tbs Tbadb Co. 
Address all communications to Tbb Tbadb Co., Baltimore, Md. 


Packers are invited and rcBuested to use the columns of Tbb 
C anning Tkaob for inquiries and discussions among themselves on 
all matters pertaining to their business. 


Business commnnlcatlona from all sections are desired, bntanony. 
mens letters will be ignored. A. I. JUDGE, Bditor. 


Entered at the Postoffice, Baltimore, Md.. as second-class mail mailer. 


BALTIMORE. MONDAY, NOVEMBER t«, 1914 . 


EDITORIAL JOTTINGS. 

Have you sent your letter to the National Association, 
givitiij your experiences in the matter of “Swells”? 


l^ast week, we urged you to supply the Association with 
such a letter, stating your experiences in having goods 
returned as “swells” or “spoils” when, in fact, they were 
merely soiled through the bursting of one can. 


'Phis matter is coming up for decision in New York 
City at a very early date, and the industry must show its 
right to ask for the return of all such goods as are made 
the ])asis of claims, or the decision will go against the 
canncrs. This does not apply merely to New York City, 
but to the entire country, for the question is being seri- 
ouslv considered in all States. So help defend yourself by 
sending in a concise statement of your exf)eriences. 


The National Association is to file a brief within the 
^’ev. York fJ^alth Bureau, and your letter will be at¬ 


tached to it as evidence substantiating the claim. It means 
much to every canner, and all should respond. Unless you 
act at once you may be too late. ' 


The report of the meeting of the Indiana Canners’ As¬ 
sociation at Indianapolis on the 12th will appear in our 
next week’s issue, as time would not permit a full report 
of it in this. 


The week following there will be two important meet¬ 
ings in Chicago, and these will be given our readers in 
order. .Verily, the convention season is on, and our read¬ 
ers may expect a plentiful flow of wisdom, in words and 
deeds. 


Recently Pittsburgh was reported as rejoicing over the 
Republican victory in that section and others, because it 
gave promise of a reopening of their factories, with the con¬ 
sequent revival of demand for canned foods from the work¬ 
ers. We now learn that Pittsburgh steel plants are busy 
making shells and scrapnal for the_ armies of Europe, to 
say nothing of guns and other firearms, all of which will be 
used to help kill more thousands of the enemy. This also 
will make more work, and so will increase demand for 
canned foods, but should it cause rejoicing in Pittsburgh? 


Something of the task the world h^ before it is be¬ 
ginning to be seen in the demands from Europe for all 
kinds of goods and supplies; and in this case “the world” 
largely means the United States. All the warring nations 
are seeking our goods and' getting them. They will get 
such quantities of foods that America will have nothing 
left but canned foods to eat, a consummation predicted at 
the outbreak of war, but laughed at by many as impossi¬ 
ble. We cannot continue shipping wheat and meat, jxjta- 
toes and beans and other such foods without missing them, 
and when they are missed other things must take their 
place—and that is the .same as saying canned foods. 


A writer pointed out that the warring nations do not 
cat canned foods, but in this he is not altogether correct, 
(iermany is feeding its army out of tin cans, its canneries 
having been taken over by the goyernment, and are now 
running night and day to keep up the supply of canned 
rations. It is just another evidence of Germany’s splendid 
preparation that it had these factories ready to act as the 
commissary department of the army. Emperor William 
was too far-sighted to neglect so excellent a means of 
keeping his troops healthy as feeding them fresh foods out 
of a can. 


Nor is France a stranger to the benefits and conven¬ 
iences of canned foods, for the French people are huge con¬ 
sumers of this class of goods. England is not so well ac¬ 
quainted with them, but knows and uses canned meats, milk, 
salmon and fruit in immense quantities. The goods are 
not unknown among the great bulk of the fighters, and it 
would not be surprising to see immense ordeTT come to 
hand from all of them. 





24 


THE Canning TRADE 


We do not need these direct orders; the industry will 
feel the effect of the war indirectly through the scarcity of 
other foods; but it can be seen that good results are not 
wholly dependent upon this, but may also be looked for 
direct. 

This country is going to be more busy than it ever was 
before, and canners, supply men and the entire industry 
should be prepared to get a full share of the prosperity. 
The depression has passed, and it is now time to look up. 


BROKERS' CX)DE OP ETHICS. 


1. —The broker is the connecting link between buyer and 
seller, and should always maintain the dignity of his position. 

2. —Absolute fairness and honesty to both buyer and 
seller is the best capital a broker can have. 

3. —A broker should respect the rights of his competitors 
and never attempt by unfair means to interfere with their 
business. 

4. —The canner and packer represented by any broker, 
constitute his stock in trade, and any deliberate attempt on 
the part of another broker to unfairly interfere, with a view 
to securing such representation, is decidedly against good 
brokerage ethics. 

5. —Co-operation among brokers is the best way to 
strengthen their position in the business world, and anything 
that tends to add strength to the broker’s position should be 
encouraged. 

6. —The division of brokerage on the part of the broker 
with either buyer or seller, is the poorest way of building up 
a brokerage business and indicates that the broker puts a low 
value on his services. Reputable buyers and sellers deprecate 
such action as being most unfair competition and is an in¬ 
dication of weakness on the part of the broker. 

7. —Brokers should always be careful that all terms and 

conditions of sale go to both buyer and seller and should ex¬ 
ercise due care to see that all sales, contracts and copies 
thereof should be exactly alike and state plainly all conditions 
and terms of said sale and that both buyer and seller are 
furnished with same promptly. r 

8. —The broker is a responsible agent between buyer and 
seller, and should at all times realize that fact and assume 
fairly that responsibility, standing firmly for a fair deal be¬ 
tween buyer and seller. , 

9. —The question of arbitration is a very important one 
in transactions at the present time, and permanent arbitra¬ 
tion boards having been established for the handling of such 
matters, it is deemed advisable that all contracts between 
buyer and seller should contain a clause providing for arbitra¬ 
tion in case of dispute arising in the fulfillment of that con¬ 
tract. 

1.—The National Canned Foods and Dried Fruit Brokers’ 
Association is composed of the best brokerage talent in the 
country; as in union there is strength, all reputable brokers 
should become members of this association, thus enabling them 
to present a united front to protect the Interests of the broker¬ 
age fraternity in any case of need. 

Published by request of the Advisory Board of National 
Canned Foods and Dried Fruit Brokers’ Association. 


Columbus, O.—The Ohio Sanitary Packing Co., recently 
incorporated, with a capital of $300,000, will erect a factory in 
Zanesville in the near future. The officers are J. T. Lang, F. J. 
Albert and R. J. Christ, 


Canned Food Markets 

Prices Given are for Wholesale Lots at Usual Terms, f. o. b. ship, 
ping station, and Subject to the Usual Discount for Cash. Balti¬ 
more Prices Corrected by Brokers; New York and Chicago by 
Special Correspondents. 

CANNED VEGETABLES 


BBANSt—Refugee Size i Whole No. 


String, 


"a 

.. J .< 

^ Cl 

“ 4 Cut 
Standard Green 


a...~ 

a. 

a. 


•• Cut White 

C 11 Cl 

SUnd. White Wax 


*' Limas Bxtra No. a 
" “ Stand. " a. 

“ " Soaked " a. 

'* Red Kidney, Stand. 
BBBTSt-Small, Whole 
“ Medium “ 

" Large “ 

“ Cut 

CORNt— 

" No. a Bvergreen Stand 

” “ a Shoepeg “ 

“a •• Bxtra “ 

• “ a “ Bx. Faucy 

“ "a Maine Style Standan 

•• " a “ Bxtra SUnd 

" " a " Fancy. 

•• " a “ SUndard.... 

“ “ a Western Fancy. 

“ " a " Bxtra Stand 

“ “ a “ SUndard.... 

HOMINYt—Inside Bnameled No. 3 
“ SUndard “ 3, 

MIXBD VBGBTA-\No. a—la Kinds 
BLBS FOR SOUPJ / "10 

OKRA AND \No. a SUndard. 

TOMATOBS.U " 3 “ . 

PBAS»-No. I Bx. Sifted B. J.. 


a.... 

10.. .. 

a.... 

10.. .. 

10.... 


SO 

as 


55 

a as 


a Bx. Stand. Barly Junes. 


a Bxtra SifUd. i ao 

a Bxtra Flue Sifted. i 60 

a Petit Pois.. i 95 

a Barly June Seconds. 75 


a Sift^ •' . 

a Bxtra Sifted, " . 

a Bx. SUnd. MarrowfaU... 

a Marrowfat. 

a “ Sifted. 

a " Bxtra Sifted. 

t “ Seconds. 

80AKBD, No. a. 


85 

... I 00 


00 

as 

6S 

90 

70 

90 

as 


4»fi 


I eo 

1 15 
75 

50 


ASPARAGUSa—(CalifornU) 

■tlllMn 

■nr TMk 

CkiMit 

“ White Mammoth No. aJC.... 

•la 75 

a 45 

a 75 

" “ Peeled, “ “ aJC.... 

3 so 

• Green “ “ aj<.... 

.. a so 

a as 

a so 

White, Large “ aji.... 

a 40 

a as 

a 15 

Peeled, “ “ aj<.... 

. 

“ “ aj4.... 

a 30 

a 00 

a os 

White, Medium “ aj<.... 

a 05 

a 00 

Green, " “ aj<.... 

a 00 

I 70 


" White, Small “ a )4 . 

...... 

I 90 

1 85 

“ Green, “ “ iji.... 

.... 

I Is 

I 8c 

" Tips l^ite. Square 1 .... 

" “ Round “ I .... 

a as 

a 30 

a ao 



“ “ Green, Square “ i .... 

a 00 

a 00 

a 10 

“ " “ Round “ I .... 

I ao 


* *5 

BAKBD BBANSt-No. I, Plain.. 

33 


" “ “ I, In Sauce. 

• 35 



“ “ “ a. Plain.. 

“ “ “ a. In Sauce. 



“ " 3, Plain. 

75 



“ “ 3, In Sauce. 

80 

I le 



80 

SO 

30 

00 

80 

60 

«5 

00 

67X 

65 


t 75 
I 65 
I 40 
I 05 
80 

85 
a 75 
60 
3 00 

85 
a 75 



. I *5 

I ao 

I raX 

I 30 

I iaj< 



65 

65 • 

No a. 

. 6 aji 

65 

60 

3. 

. I 15 

I ao 

* 35 

“ 3. 


I 15 

I as 

" 3. 


I 05 

I 10 

“ 3. 

. 8s 

90 

85 


65 

87% 

63 

65 

70 


70 

75 


80 

80 


65 

75 


75 

77 




I IS 

90 





75 

65 


80 

57« 

57 )i 

55 


70 


85 

3 00 



70 



90 

9a 


80 

85 


80 

85 

85 

85 

90 

85 


00 

77 H 


70 

55 


Continued lon^'Next Page 


S 


















































































































25 


THE Canning IHADE 

As Brokers View The Market vegetables pric^oh^ 


Latest information from many sections of the country 
as viewed by the leading Brokers—The canned food 
situation as IT IS—Reports mainly by wire. 


BAI/riMORB, MD. 

November 14, 1914. 

There were no developments of more than ordinary in¬ 
terest in the Baltimore canned foods market this week. The 
character of the buying was much the same as it was in the 
week previous, with the exception of a material increase in the 
buying of tomatoes, the orders for them coming from nearly 
all sections. The increase in the orders was in numbers rather 
than in point of quantity, and therein lies the key to the to¬ 
mato situation, apparently, for it is reasonably sure that the 
same markets will be steady buyers in lots of one to three 
carloads at a time, until next summer, and it is the constant 
dripping that wears away the stone. 

The improvement in the market prices for tomatoes, 
which started last week, continued this week, and there seemed 
to be a general tightening-up on the part of canners. Those 
who were the most urgent sellers in October are the least 
anxious now, while those who held aloof then are now accept¬ 
ing the orders at higher prices. Just how far this reaction in 
the prices will go remains to be seen, but it has been long 
overdue, and, ordinarily, it ought to reach, at least, the cost 
of producing the goods. There is further talk about a demand 
for tomatoes coming from abroad shortly which may or may 
not come to pass, but do not base your purchases upon that 
expectation alone. The consumption in our own country will 
take care of all the tomatoes canned this season. 

Two or three articles in the line of canned vegetbles at¬ 
tracted attention this week. Spinach, string beans and sweet 
potatoes, because of lower prices for each of them, and they are 
worth attention, whether wanted now or for shipments later on. 
The market was dull enough for the remainder of the list of 
vegetables. Outside of the usual small orders coming in each 
day there was nothing doing, and straight car lot orders were 
scarce. A higher market for corn was confidently expected, 
but, in common with the other items, it is dull and the prices 
are easier. 

Pears, pie peaches and blackberries were the only fruits 
called for this week, and they were fairly active in a small way 
with no changes in the prices. The stocks of fruits left in 
Baltimore are so light that they won’t bother the owners to 
carry them along through the winter. There are some good 
trades in canned apples to be had in this market. 

The season for the fall pack of Cove oysters is now on 
and the lower prices made this week are attracting some 
orders to this market. 

THOMAS J. MEEHAN & CO. 

ABERDEEN, HARFORD COUNTY, MD. 

Aberdeen, Md., November 12, 1914. 

Tomatoes—In spite of the light demand for tomatoes the 
market has advanced 2% cents per dozen, indicating that the 
quantity obtainable at the lower prices was not as large as 
many buyers anticipated. We think we are safe in saying 
that we have seen the lowest prices on 1914 packed tomatoes, 
and that any change will be in an upward direction. Business 
conditions seem to be improving in all lines, and confidence is 
being restored. In view of the fact that there was a light 
sale of future tomatoes, the general impression is that we will 
have a steady demand throughout the winter months. 

For prompt shipment we can offer a limited quantity of 
tomatoes, strictly standard quality at 67He for No. S's, and 


I 


PDMPKINt-SUndard No. 3 . 

•• “ " 10. 

70 

85 

7 aX 


a as 

a as 

•• Squash “ 3. 

80 

90 

80 

•• •• 10. 


a 30 

a 30 

SAUBREK. AUTt-Bxtra Quality N0.3. 

90 

9 aX 

77 X 

“ SUndard “ 3. 

60 

70 

7 aX 

SPINACHt-Standard '* 3 ~. 

83 J 4 

90 

I 00 

'it ** 4 

75 

7 aX 


“ ** “ 10. . 

a 90 

3 ao 

3 50 

SnCCOTASHt-Green Beans No. 3. 

85 

87X 

90 

" Dry Beana *' t .. 

80 

85 

85 

•• Maine " 1 . 


9 aX 

1 ao 

SWBBT POTATOBSt-Jeraey No. 3 . 

85 


1 00 

•' Standard “ 3 . 

80 

85 

8j 

“ “ Jersey “ 10 . 

a so 

a 80 


*• “ Southern “ 10 . 


a 90 


TOMATOBSI Bxtra Stand. 3 . 



75 

" Standard " 3 . . 

67 )i 

7 aX 

70 

" Seconds “ 3. . 

6a J4 

62H 

6aX 

“ Standard " a. 

47 X 

SaX 

50 

•• Fancy " 10. 

» 75 

a 60 

a 75 

** Standard “ 10. 

a 10 

a 40 

a 4 « 

" No. a Stand. Md. f.o.b. Co. 




14 41 ^ 44 44 44 

65 



•• “ 3 " N. J. “ ... 

90 



*• “ 10, Maryland " 

a 15 



•• •• 10. Jersey " ... 

a so 

a 40 

a so 

" Fancy San. Cana 5^ inch.,, i 15 

CANNED FRUITS 

1 ao 

I lO 

APPIvBS—New York No. 3. 

87 X 

85 

95 

•• •• •• “ 10. 


a 10 

a ae 

*' Michigan “ 3. 


85 

85 

“ “ “ 10. 


a 50 

a 10 

APPLBSt-Maryland, " 10. 

18 0 

a os 


“ “ " 3 . 

“ Maine, “ 10. 

60 

65 

a 30 

I 6s 


44 44 44 ^ 

APRICOTS—Cala. SUnd. 3 J 4 «. 


I 70 

BLACEBBRRIBSi-Stand. No. a. 


75 

75 * 

*' Standard " 8. 

4 as 

4 5 * 

4 50 

«• “ " 3. 

90 

1 00 


•* Preserved “ a. 

I os 

I 30 


" In Symp “ a. 


1 10 

BLUBBBRRIBSf-Stand. * " a. 

I 00 

I 10 

1 as 

“ Maine, ” a 


I 80 

1 80 

•• New Jersey " 10. 




" Sonthern . 


6 00 


BLUBBBRRIBS—Maine “ 8. 


6 00 

6 00 

CHBRRIBSi-No. a Seconds, Red. 

60 


75 

“ “ a " White. 

67X 

67X 

90 

** Red '* a Stand. Water... 

8S 

85 

80 

“White “ a “ Symp. 

I os 

* as 

1 as 

“ “ a Bx. Preserve. 

I IS 


“ “ a Red Pitted. 


I so 

“ Red “ 10 Sonr 



7 50 

OOOSBBBRRIXSf-Stand. No. a . 

60 

6aX 

85 

“ “ “ 10 . 


3 60 

3 60 

PBACHBS*-Cala. Stand. No. a> 4 , L. C. 
•’ “ Bx.Stand. “ aj 4 , " 

I SS 

I 70 

1 70 

I 80 

I 90 

1 8s 

PBACHBS t-Sonthern Stpnd. 3s .. 

I as 

I 40 

I 40 

“ No. I Bx. Sliced Yellow. ... 

75 

85 

90 

“ ’’ a Standard White........ 

80 

80 

•• ” a " Yellow . 

85 

83 

I 00 

•• ” a Bx. •’ Yellow . 


•’ ’’ a Seconds, White .. 

70 

7 »}i 


“ ” a *• Yellow . 

75 

75 


” '* 3 Standards, White .. 

1 ao 

I as 

sees* • 

*• 3 ’• Yellow . 

I as 

1 30 

x so 

• ’’ 3 Bx. ’’ White . 

* 45 

I so 

, ^ <. .. Yellow .. 

I so 

I S 5 



Continued on Next Page 

















































































































26 


THE Canning TRADE 


47%c for No. 2 ’ b . We have a few cars of hand packed toma¬ 
toes in sanitary cans at 70c for No. 3’s and 60c for No. 2’s. 
The market on lO’s is $2.00 in carload lots and $2.10(3)2.16 
for small lots. 

('. W. BAKER & SONS. 

WAUKESHA, WIS. 

November 13, 1914. 

The Canning Trade: Prices on spot peas of all grades 
continue to be very low, but buyers in all sections of the country 
insist that they are able to cover their needs at the figures 
reported and are not inclined to speculate. But ^he repeat 
orders being received from some large eastern houses would 
undoubtedly indicate that the present consumption of canned 
peas is heavy in spite of the mild weather so far experienced 
this fall. CRARY BROKERAGE CO. 

PITTSBURG, PA. 

November 13, 1914. 

The Canning Trade: While we have not experienced any 
lively trading or made any large sales during the past week, 
the general feeling among the trade is better and brighter, 
especially during the past few days. Jobbers are now advising 
that orders are coming in from the retailers more freely and 
that collections are just a little bit better; notwithstanding 
that fact there is still some room for improvement before we 
will have reached normal again. No inquiry or interest is dis¬ 
played in any line of canned foods in a large way or for ship¬ 
ment. The entire trading is confined to “pick up” lots and 
is on a strictly hand to mouth basis. Seventy-five cents is 
asked for spinach, sixty cents for Wisconsin peas, sixty-five 
cents for Ohio corn and sixty-five cents for tomatoes; but 
these prices do not seem to attract buyers. Spot dried fruits 
are moving fairly well in a small way at present market prices. 

BUSE & CALDWELL. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

November 13, 1914. 

. The Canning Trade: Some renewed interest is being 
displayed in salmon and dried fruits with the result that pack¬ 
ers have again begun to trade among themselves and are 
endeavoring to fill the orders as they come in. Salmon pack¬ 
ers are closely cleaned up and many grades of fish are ex¬ 
tremely hard to secure. Mr. C. H. Bentley, the well-known 
sales manager for the California Fruit Canners’ Association, 
is making a visit to the Eastern markets, and Mr. Thomas G. 
Cranwell, the popular president of the Continental ('an Com¬ 
pany is visiting in the California markets. 

FRISCO. 


THE ITALIAN MARKET FOR MACHINERY. 


_The Canned foods industry in Italy is progressing daily. 

riitherto the greater part of the machinery was imported from 
Germany. The war has paralyzed the trade between Italy and 
Germany, and besides the feeling of the Italians towards the 
German is not as it used to be. Most likely by the time the 
war is over there will be a general commercial rupture be¬ 
tween the two countries, hence there is a golden opportunity 
for our machine manufacturers. We give them the advice 
to take advantage of this opportunity and to avail themselves 
of the Giornale delle Conserve Via Duomo, 306 Naples, our 
Italian contemporary, as the best means for our manufacturers 
to advertise their machines to the Italian packers. 


Columbia, Pa.—Representatives of big canning concerns 
are endeavoring to interest farmers in the vicinity of Columbia 
in growing 600 acres of tomatoes next year under contract with 
the idea of makinf; that town shipping center. 


CANNED FRUIT PRICES—Continued. 


■alllMn 

PEACHESI-No. 3 Selected, Yellow. I 6o 

” ” 3 Seconds, White. 86-95 

” ” 3 “ Yellow.90-100 

” ” 3 Pies, Unpeeled. 65-70 

” ” 3 ’* Peeled. i co 

" ” 10 ” DnpMled........2 oo-a 25 

" ”10 *' Peeled. 3 10 

PHARSf-No. 2 Seconds in Water. 

” ” 2 Standards ” . 75 

*’ " a Bx. ” in Symp. 

’ ” 3 Seconds in Water. 60-70 

” ” 3 Standards in Water.. 70-80 

" ” 3 “ Symp.8<-i 00 

” ” 3 Ex. ” ” . 1 25 

PINE- Bahama Sliced Extra No. 2 . i 60 


NeTtife 

I 60 
91 % 
97 % 
70 

1 00 

2 so 

3 as 
55 
8S 
8s 


niitw 


APPLE* ” Grated 

’• ” Sliced ” Std. ” 2 . 

•’ ” Grated ” ” ” 2 . 

” Hawaii Sliced Extra ’’ 7 % . 

” ” ” Stand. ” 7 % . 

" " Extra " 2 . 

” ” " SUnd. •’ a . 

” ” Grated Extra ” a . 

Stand ” a . 

" ” Shredded Symp ” 10 . 

” ” Crushed Water ” 10 . 

” Eastern Pie Water ” a _ 

" ” ” ’’ ” to . 

PLUMSt—Water •• a^ 

” Syrup •• 2 ^-... 

” Water •’ 10 „... 

” No. I Black Water. 

” ” I ” Symp. 

” •• I Red ’• . 


I 6 e 

I 30 
I 30 
1 80 
I 65 

I 50 

I 35 
I 50 

* 35 
5 as 
4 IS 


STRAW- 


Red •• *’ 2 . 

Black Symp ” 2 . 

Red ” •* 2 . 

Black Water ” 10. 

Ex. Stan. Symp No. a. 


BERRIESI— Preserved 

Extra Preserved ” a. 

Standard ” a., 

Extra Preserved " i. 

Preserved ” i., 

Standard Water ” 10. 


No 


CANNED FISH. 

HERRING ROE*-SUn. No. a. 

LOBSTER*-Flata, lb. 

” Plats, I lb. 

OYSTBPS|- 3 Un. 5 oz. 

” ” 4 oz. 

” ” 10 oz. 

” ” 8 oz. 

*’ Selects 6 oz. 

” ” 12 oz. 

SALMON—Sockeye Tall 
” ” Plat 


Red Alaska Tall 
“ Plat 

•4 >• 

Cohoe Tall 
’• Plat 

>1 M 

Pink Tall 


” Colombia tails, i-lb 
” ” flats, i-lb., 

” ” flats, ^-Ib 

“ Cbnms, Tails.. 

” Medium Red, Tails.. 

3 HRIMPt-Wet or Dry No'. 1% 
” Wet or Dry No. 1... 


I. 

1 . 

2 . 

a. 

a. 

I. 

I. 

% . 

1. 

I. 

% . 

I. 

I. 

% . 

1. 

% . 


(Baltliiisre Shrimp prices f. o b. Mlaalaslppl.) 


» 7 % 


85 

90 

15 

90 

30 


95 


70 

67% 

40 

40 

05 

70 

70 

SO 

60 

40 

25 

75 


X 75 
I 75 


* »5 
I 85 
I 70 
I 60 
I 60 
I 55 

5 *5 
4 75 
95 
3 ao 

90 

I 00 
a 50 


90 

95 

I 10 

9 ^% 

95 

I as 


t 20 

I 40 



I 60 


6 00 

6 50 


I 50 

1 55 

I 40 

I 40 

I 45 

I 50 

I 65 

I 6s 


I 20 

I 20 

90 


92^1 

80 

90 

90 


6 as 

7 00 

I 45 

1 5» 

1 55 


3 00 

3 00 


6 as 

6 25 

7 »% 

77 % 

77 Y 

67% 

70 

75 

1 40 

I K 7 % 

I 55 

I 30 

» 17 % 

1 45 

I 25 

t as 

J 35 

2 40 

a 82^ 


a 20 

* 85 

I 80 


2 40 

2 20 


* 17 % 

I iiy 


I 15 

155 



165 


I 15 

105 



125 



75 


I 00 

100 



65 


2 25 

a 25 


a 40 

a 55 


* 45 

I ,^o 


95 

8e 


I 20 

I 10 


2 20 

a 20 


I 10 

I 45 


(t) laltlMri qmillsii ctrricM sack «Nk ky Tim. J. iiskM A Cs., Irikirt 

(t) “ " ” •• •• T. 8. Cru«M A Cs., miart 

(S). L e. IkrtaMT A CSh Irilari 

(*) " “ « « .. k H. Tsjlir A Ssm, Irikm 

New Ttrk SIS CkleaiB pricts CorricM ki tpicM Csfr u ptsSi s c t . 
































































































































THE Canning TRADE 


27 


Regular and Sanitary Can Prices 

P. O. B. Shipping Point. 

Season 1914. Prices in effect Jannery i. Car load lota only. 
Regular or Cap Hole Cana. 


... Brokers... 

Favorably Known to the Canning Industry 


The American Can Company, Continental Can Company, 
Jobnson-Morse Can Company, and the Sonthern Can Company, 
quote the following prices for Cap Hole Cans:— 


Size Opening Season 

No. 1 1 % in. . • 9 as per M. 

“ 2 iH . ** *5 " 

“ 2 1-16 in. . 16 50 “ 

“3a i-x6 in. . 17 00 " 

‘‘35 in. 2 1-16 in. 18 00 “ 

" 3 sHin. a7-i6in. ao 50 “ 

“ 10 2 1-16 in. . 43 50 “ 

Solder Hemmed Caps, per thoosand, ij{ inch,|i.io; 21-16 inch, 
|i.6o; aX inch, I1.85; 2 7-16 inch, |a.oo. 


OYSTBR CAMS Per M. 

3 ounce a-ii-i6 inch diameter a-X inch high I 8.50 

4 ” a-ii-i6 “ 3-H " *.75 

6 “ 3-H “ 3-5-*6 “ ** oo 

8 “ 3-H “ “ ”.*5 


Sanitary or Opan Tap Cana 


The American Can Company, Continental Can Company, 
Johnson-Iforse Can Company, Sanitary Can Company, Sonthern 
Can Company, quote the following prices for Sanitary or Open 
Top Cans:— 

Size Season 


No. i 
“ 2 
•• aX 
3 

" 3 
“ 3 


4X inch. 


5 

SX 


If 

If 


‘ 10 


$10 75 per M. 

14 50 “ 

19 00 “ 

19 50 “ 

ao 00 “ 

as 00 “ 

44 00 " 


The J. M. Paver Company 

326 RIVER STREET. CHICAGO. ILL. 

CANNED FOOD BROKERS 

■ ■ ■ 

A ainoare endeavor to provide an unuaual quality 
of aerviee in keeping with the ideaa of thoae who 
know and appreeiate the true value of aaleamanehip. 


CRARY BROKERAGE COMPANY 

PACKBRS* SA.L.BS AOBIVT 

WISOOISSIIV OANIVED RBA.8 

WAUKESHA. WIS. 


JOHN A. I,KB 


JOHN a. HBNDHK80N 


OFFICIAL STANDARD SIZES OF CANS. 


No. 

H01.B and Cap CXans 

1 size. 

Diamkthk. 

Hxioht. 

4 

No. 


.3-H 

4-9-16 

No. 

aX.—• 

.4 

4X 

No. 

3-4X'. 


4-X 

No. 

3-5*. 

.4-X 

S' 

No. 

s-sX'. 

.4-X 

5-X' 

No. 


.6.x 

6-X 

No. 

Sanitahy Cans 

I size.... 


4 

No. 


.~3-7 -i 6 

4-9-16 

No. 

2-X. 

..4-1-16 

4-X 

No. 

3-4X'. 

.4-X 

4-X 

No. 

3-5'. 

.4-X 

5' 

No. 

3-5X'. 

...v4-X 

5-X' 

No. 



7 


CANNERS’ METALS. 

S to 10 tons I to 4 tons 


PIG TIN—Straits . 

3* 37 

31 71 



“ Malacca.. 

3* 37 

3* 75 



PIG i.BAD—Omaha or Federal 

3 90 

4 10 





XxX 

9x10 

8x10 

S0LI>BR—Drop and Bar. 


9S 

• »r 

20 

'• Wire Coil. 


22 

21 

20 

Wire Segment!. 


22 

21 

• 20 

TINPLATES. 



F. 0. B. 

. MILL 

i 4Z2<., 107 lha. Bate Beaaomer Steel. 

. 


3 55 

i4Ka(. 100 lha. ** Beaaemer Steel. 



3 40 

14x20. 95 ibc. " Beaeemer Steel. 



3 35 

14XK , yolbe. " Bceeomcr Stool. 



3 3« 


LEE BROKERAGE COMPANY 

(not xNCoapoaATSo) 

657 West Randolph St. Chicago. 

PnOHB. HATMAaKKT 37<6 

We sell every responsible wholesale grocery house 
in Chicago and specialize in Canned Foods. We refer 
to any wholesale grocery house in Chicago, or to 
Mercantile City National Bank, Chicago, as to onr 
reliability. 

HARRY C. GILBERT CO. 

OANNEID FOOD BROKERS 

INDIANA TOMATOES A SPECIALTY 


305 Majestic Bulldlnc 


INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 


















































THE Canning TRADE 




THE CANNED GOODS EXCHANGE 

OF BALTIMORE, MD. 

President, P. A. Tomcb Vice-President, Gbo. N. Nuiisbm 

Treasurer, Lbakckb Lakgbauc, Secretary, W. P. Assau 
OOMMITTEESt 

Executive: John S. Gibbs, Jb. B. C. White Albert T. Myeb 
Arbitration: Jno. &. Blines Hampton Steele C. J. Scheneel 
PRA.NK A. Cubby Chas. G. Summers, Jb. 
Commerce: D. H. Stevenson Rufus M. Gibbs A. J. Hubbard 
B. P. Thomas William Silver 
Legislation: Gbo. N. Numsen Preston Webster John Schall 
Leroy M. Langball W. B. Robinson 
Claims: Benj. Hambubgbr Wm. A. Wagneb Jas. B. PlaTT 
B. H. Millbb Clement P. Buttbbpield 
Hospitality: T. J. Meehan H. W. 'Cbebs B. A. Kebr 

Brokers: H. A. Waidneb Wm. Gbecht H. Plbming 

Counsel: Gorman H. Bmory Chemisl: Chas. Glaser 


CANTON BOX COMPANY 

2501 to 2515 Boston St., Baltimore, Md. 

PACKING BOXES 



.. SMNEY 
SYRUPING MACHINE ' 
$ 125.00 

Instantly adjustable while run 
ning. Will handle one, two or 
three pound cans, and do per¬ 
fect work. 

CONOENSED MILK 
FILLER 

Standard machine of its cIsm, 
In use by all the largest 


SPECIAL FILLING MA¬ 
CHINES for any purpose or 
capacity. EVAPORATED 
CREAM. BAKED BEANS, 
FATS, OILS, MUSTARDS, 
etc., in round or square cans 
or glass jars. 


Made np or in Shooks. 


Cargo or Carload. 


HENRY R. STICKNEY, 

SpNill Apit SPRA6UE CANNINI MACHINERY COMPANY, 

—FOR— 

NEW ENGLAND STATES. 


AMS Sanitary Can Body=Maker 

With Notcher, Edger and Soldering Attachments 


THE SEAL OF SAFETY 


Ama No. 88A 
Body Maker 




THE SEAL OF SAFETY 



THIS SEAMER will 
make Automatically 
120 or more can 
bodies per minute. 



The Best Can Body 
Maker on the Market. 
We can Prove iL 

SIDE SEAM LOCKED and 
SOLDERED 


Every Machine Sold Fully Covered by Ams’ Guarantee 

WE BUILD COMPLETE LINE OF SANITARY CAN MAKING MACHINERY 


WRITE FOR PARTICULARS AND PRICES 


MAX AMS MACHINE COMPANY 


Mount Vernon, N. Y. 


CHAS. M. AMS, Pres. 
















TH£ Canning TRADfe 




THE 1914 DIREOTORV OF CANNERS 

A list of the cannere of the United States, compiled by the National Cannera’ 

Association, from Statistical Reports and such other reliable data. 6th Edition. 

Carefully prepared and up-to-date; lists corrected by canners themselyes; yerified by com¬ 
petent authorities. The yarious articles packed and other yaluable imformation is giyen. 

Distributed free to members of the National Canners* Association. Sold to all others at 
$3.00 per copy, postage prepaid. The book that is needed by all wholesale grocers, brokers, 
machinery and supply men, salesmen and practically eyerybody interested in the canning 
industry. Qet your order in early. 

ISBW 191-4 BDITIOIV UUST RBADY 

NATIONAL CANNERS’ ASSOCIATION, Woodward Bldg., Washiagtoa, D. C. 

PBRSONAL, CHBGKS ACCBPITBO 


lEO. E. LOCKWOOD CO. 

CANNING MACHINERY 

AND SUPPLIES 

308 Chestnut St. /. Phila. 




Box Shooks & Crating, 
Climax Flux, etc. 
Condensed Milk Machinery. 
(Fillers, Sterilizers, etc.) 


WB ARB SOUB CANADIAN AOBNTS BOR 


THE AYAR8 MACHINE CO. 
THE FRED. H. KNAPP CO. 

S. M. RYDER & SON 
WM. 8. KERN 
CHI8HOLM-8COTT CO, 

W. A. TRE8COTT CO. 

C. J. TAGLIABUE MFG. CO.-^ 


HUNTLEY MFG. CO. 
BOUTELL MFG. CO. 
BURDEN & BLAKESLEE 
MORRAL BROS. 
SINCLAIR SCOTT CO 
C. M. KEMP MFG. CO. 

J. B. FORD CO. 


WE ALSO MANUFACTURE UNDER ROYALTY FOR CANADA 

THOMAS TOMATO 8CALDER, THOMAS CONVEYORS, 
FRANK HAMACHEK PEA VINER FEEDERS, W. A. TRESCOTT 
FRUIT & VEGETABLE GRADERS, MORRAL 
GREEN CORN HU8KER8 
BAKER-8HIPPEE AGITATING COOKER 

WE SUPPLY COMPLETE MODERN INSTALUTIONS FOR 
CANMNO FACTORIES 


CANNING MACHINERY 

WRITE FOR CATALOO 


-A. K. ROBINS . CO., 


BAL,TIMORE, MD. 


FOR RUSTY CANS 

AI«o, colored lacquers for all 
cans new or old. Better pro¬ 
tect cans before they rust and 
save on “swells, rustles’’, 
clau.se. 

JOHNG.MAIERS’SONS 

BALTIMORE. MO. 


THE CANADIAN CANNING and EVAPORATING HEADQUARTERS ARE AT 


The BROWN, BOGGS GO., Ltd., ST 











THE Canning 




CAVC TUC MniMPYt t NOTTHESURPLUSSEEDOR 
OAVt inc. raVjniE.1 ! ! discarded machinery. 


TO A 


THE RUST PROOF CAN 

WHITE U8 for a SAMPLE and we will mail you a s, QUERED RUST PROOF CAN. 

HANDSOME LACQUERED RUST PROOF CAN. The MACHINE ILLUSTRATED below is the one that 

RUST PROOF because it will resist all of the ordinary effects this COMBINATION. The POPULAR MACHINE 

conditions that CAUSE RUST IN CANNED FOODS. that MAKES LACQUERING EASY. The MACHINE that 

HANDSOME because it is of a BRILLIANT GOLDEN is used by many of the most prominent canners in the U. S. 

COLORand immediately ATTRACTS the eyeofaCUSTOMER. The BENEFITS of this process are worth ten times its 

THIS is the COMBINATION that the trade APPROVES TRIFLING COST. Write us to-day for the SAMPLE CAN 

and is what the trade WANTS. A BRILLIANT LAC- ii and full particulars of the machine.. 

The Hughlett Can Lacquering Machine in Operation 


SHOWIISa MOW TMB WORK IS OOMB 

S M E LY BROS* Sole Manufacturers Blsifie, WASh., U.S.A* 


WE HAVE PROOF 

that 

20tli CENTURY 
GAS MACHINES 

save from 30 to 50% of Gas Consumption 
and give greater efficiency and better 
results than other systems. 

Canners now using 20th Century Gas 
Machines will prove to your complete 
satisfaction their absolute superiority. 

Write us for proof. 


Baltimore, md. 

Canadian Agents for the 80th Century Gas Machine 
Brown, Boggs & Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont., Can. 





























31 


THE Canning TRADE 

EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGE. situations wANTED-co«ti«ua-. 


NOTICB VO ADVBRTISBES.—Paid tnbacribera can nsc this 
colnmn Free for Mcnring either poaitiona or handa. To all othera 
the charge ia |3.oo per inch, per inaertion I 5.00 monthly; caah 
with order. Where the addreaa ia care of ItaX Canning Txads, 
stamps should be sent to be need in forwarding answers, as the 
P. O. requires renewed postage on snch. 

AdTertiaements will be carried for one month from date re- 
ceired, nnlesa notified to the contrary at the end of one month. 
Adrertisers should drop us a postal if the ad ia wished oontinned. 


SITUATIONS WANTED. 


Man with eipert mechanical training, well known in all 
sections of the canning industry, is open for position with re¬ 
liable machinery or supply house. Served for 16 years as Su¬ 
perintendent of one of the leading canning machinery firms, 
and has traveled the entire territory. Best of references, 
strictly sober, still young. Address, BOX B-133, 

Care The Canning Trade. 


Wanted—Position as salesman, five years experience on 
both “packers” and the general line; large personal acquaint¬ 
anceship with trade in Southwest. Address 

BOX B 132, care The Canning Trade. 


AU-Aroimd Bnstoees Man. sixteen years' experience in the 
canning business, desires to make new connection; well posted 
on accountancy, auditing and credits, and knows the line from 
the ground up. Have formulas and processes for full line of 
canned products, preserves, pickles and catsup, and could take 
full charge of the executive end of a business. 

Address BOX B 123, care of The Canning Trade. 


WANTED—Energetic married man under 40 years of age, 
with hustling ability and over 16 years’ field to consumer ex¬ 
perience, as manager of some of largest full line New York 
State canneries, and highest reference as to character and 
ability will consider any good money-making proposition, pre¬ 
ferably canned foods lines; object, part or eventually full own¬ 
ership of business. Can invest reasonable amount in business 
to show good faith. At present bolding and can hold indefi¬ 
nitely fine managing position paying large salary and deliver¬ 
ing the goods to present employers. Address “Progressive New 
Yorker,” care The Canning Trade. 


Wanted—Position of responsibility with good concern. 
Long experience with Merchants and Miners' Transportation 
Co. Good shipping clerk, billing clerk or ofQce man. Address 
BOX B-120. care The Canning Trade. 


Wanted—Position as Sanitary Can Maker by man of prac¬ 
tical experience with sanitary cans and can making machinery. 
Address BOX B 118, care The Canning Trade. 


Position wanted by an expert superintendent and pro¬ 
cessor on peas, corn, tomatoes, tomatoes and okra, string 
beans, hominy, sauer kraut, pumpkin, apples, red kidney 
beans and pork and beans. I am a married man, strictly tem¬ 
perate and can furnish the very best of references. Now at 
liberty. HARRY C. NORTON, Kirk. Ky. 


WANTED—Position by an expert superintendent-pro¬ 
cessor and engineer, on peaches, apples, tomatoes, sweet po¬ 
tatoes and ribbon cane syrup. Understands different makes of 
double seamers for sanitary cans, and all makes of solder 
capping machines. Twenty years’ experience; sober and steady 
and can furnish the best of reference. At liberty now and 
can start on short notice. Address GARTMAN, 612 E. Grand 
River St., Clinton, Mo. 


WANTED—Position as can salesman, have had several 
years’ experience in twenty odd States on “Canners’ Cans” and 
the “general line.” Address Box 128, care the Canning Trade. 


WANTED—Position by an expert cook on catsup, chili 
sauce, tomato puree, salad dressing, pork and beans with toma¬ 
to sauce and other lines. I have the practical experience with 
tomatoes from growing the plants until the finished goods is in 
the bottle. Can give best of reference. Apply Box B 136, care 
The Canning Trade. 


Position Wanted by Superintendent and processor having 
had over 20 years’ experience on all lines of canned fruits and 
vegetables, also oysters, clams, etc. Can direct building of 
plants and install machinery. Can furnish best of references. 
Address, BOX B-138, 

Care The Canning Trade. 


WANTED.—A position as superintendent-processor in a 
factory canning corn, peas, beans .tomatoes, peaches, apples 
and pumpkins, by an experienced man for this or next season. 
Or any kind of a position in a factory this winter. Can give* 
best of references. Now at liberty. Address Box B 136, care 
The Canning Trade. 


HELP WANTED. 


Wanted. An experienced and practical man, in an es¬ 
tablished salt fish packing and fish and vegetable canning 
plant, situated in one of the most desirable locations on the 
Atlantic Coast; an attrctive offer to the right man. 

Address, BOX B-131, 

care The Canning Trade. 


WANTED—A thorough and competent man of middle age 
who has had experience operating Clam and Oyster canneries. 
Must have first-class recommendations and be willing to carry 
out instructions to the letter. Good opportunity for the right 
man who is competent and capable of delivering the “goods.” 
Location, Pacific Coast. SEA BEACH PACKING WORKS. 
Aberdeen, Wash. 


WANTED.—A man of middle age, good habits and ex¬ 
perienced as superintendent, salesman and all around canning 
factory man. desires to make change for 1916. References 
furnished. Address Box B-137, care The Canning Trade. 


IF YOU WANT 

A New Formula 
Special Information 
Factory Advice 
Process Times and Data 
The Services of an Expert 

Consult 

W. L. HINCHMAN 


1 W. Main Street 


HADDONFIELD - - N. J. 







Pricei 


It IVIakes No OcldM 


Some cans must be capped by hand, but this one and many other odd-shaped 
stud-hole cans can be handled on the same' machine that caps the standard No. 1, 
No. 2, No. 3, No. 8 and No. 10 cans. Oyster cans,, crab flake, shrimp, olive, 
pulp, syrup and many other cans of special size and shape are being capped at 
the rate of 500 per hour on the HANDY Capping Machine. 

Food packers in nearly every state in the Union are using this handy HANDY 
Capper. We have shipped to million dollar concerns, as well as the smallest. 
Ask us if the HANDY will lessen your troubles—we guarantee our claims. 

Don’t “guess” at what it will do, but write the Handy Capper Mfg. Co., 
Baltimore and Holliday Streets, Baltimore, for a list of users—and facts. 


$100.00 


I complete 


How Odd Can 


THE Canning TRADE 


Oyster Steam Box 


=!! CANNING HOUSE MACHINERY & SUPPLIES 


We have a 
larfe and 
fine equip* 
meat of 
machinery; 
therefore, 
can {ive 
prompt and 
satisfactory 
service 


Quoted on 

Special 

Machinery 


Specific a 


With Improved Hinged Door; Making the 
Work Lighter and Quicker. 


PerfocUon’' Power Crane 


Pulp PiiiisliiRg; 

Maebifles 

Coatinuous 

Steam 
Eibanst Boxes 
Piaeapple 
Maehieenr 


Pea Graders 


Pea Fillers 


Edw. Renneburg & Sons Co. 


Machine and Boiler Works 


WORKSi 


OPRICBi 


ATLANTIC WHARF 2639 BOSTON ST 


"CYCLONE” PULP MACHINE 


THE SINCLAIR-SCOTT CO. BALTIMORE, MD. 


DOAton dk L»alc«woocl Av»* Md. 









Cai 


Wanted and For Sale. 

Thia 1b a page that must be read eTery week to be appreciated. Tou are unlikely to be Interested every week, In. 
what la offered here, but it Is possible you will be a dozen times in the year. If you fall to see and accept 
your opportunity your time is lost, together with money. Rates upon application. 


Machinery For Sale. 

For Sale—Two 225, two 100, two 50, two 40, one 30, 
two 20 and two 10 gal. copper steam jacketed kettles, 
complete. All of the above kettles are entirely new, are 
well constructed of heavy copper, thoroughly tested and 
guaranteed to.stand 100 ponds steam pressure. These 
kettles are ready for immediate shipment and we offer 
them subject to previous sale at a bargain for cash. 
Write for prices. Address HAMILTON COPPER & 
BRASS WORKS, Hamilton, O. 

For Sale.—One Star Capper, in excellent condition, 
with conveyor table. 

Also want first-class second hand Bean Grader and 
Bean Cutter. Address, 

KENTWOOD CANNING CO., 
Kentwood, La. 


Seed Peas For Sale. 

For Sale.—Seed Peas. Very choice stock of Ad¬ 
mirals, Advancers and Horsefords. All Wisconsin 
grown. For prices and samples address, 

BOX A-134, Care The Canning Trade. 


Manager Wanted. 


Wanted.—A Manager. A new Packing Company, 
with a growing pork and beans business, desires a Mana¬ 
ger who knows the business and will put in some capital, 
$2,000 or $3,000. Location in a county town with good 
railroad facilities, and plenty of good and cheap labor. 
An excellent opportunity for a young man who is willing 
to live on a moderate salary and have a share in a grow¬ 
ing business. BOX A-139, 

Care The Canning Trade. 

Agency Wanted. 

War!!—Wanted at once, sole European agency for 
American Canned, Preserved and Prepared Foods and 
Fruits, All offers, full particulars and terms to 

JOHN KELLY & CO., 

23 Castle St., East, London, W. England. 


TURN IT INTO CASH! 

That surplus machinery, etc., by adrertising 
it here now. Don’t store it away until ruity and 
ruined. THE Canning TRADE. 


This Concerns Your Business 

Does tha public recognise your good* by a trade^nark? 

U your trade>meik imitatodT 

Have you a deed for your trada-mark? 

The United States registers valid trade-marks to the real 
owners and issues a Certificate of ownership. 

Have you such a certificateT 

Congress enacted a new law relating to trade-mark registra¬ 
tions on February 20,1906. 

If your trade-mark Is not registered under this Act it should 
be at once. 

If It was registered In the Post Oflloe before the new law went 
into effect it should be registered. The repealed law was 
defective and Certificates Issued under It do not give full 
protection. 

The expense is small. Write for Information. 

EDWARD DUVALL, Jr. 

Bond Biulding WASHINGTON, D. C. 


BUSINESS-GETTING PUBLICITY 

for canners and packera is the kind that brings them 
orders, creates a name and a reputation for their 
brands and goods, and keeps the retail grocer “boost¬ 
ing” all canned foods to his customers and friends. 
The best way to reach and educate the retail grocers 
is through 

The RETAILERS’ JOURNAL 

The Magazine of the Oroeery Trade 
Published Monthly at 

86 La Salle Street CHICAGO, ILL. 





MERICAN Coke Tin Plates 


Highett quality Tin Platbs— specially adapted to the re^lrementi of the canainS and packing Indnatrlea. 
We alto manufacture Black Sheets, Galvaniaed Sheets, Teme Plates, Formed Metal Roofing and Siding 
Producta, imexcelled for the conttniction of sheda, betoriea, warehouaea, etc. Write for lull informatioD. 


tcklng induatriea. 


I AMEWICAN SHE E T AND TIN PUTE COMPANY, General O ffloee , Friok Bldg., Plttsbiirgh. Pa. 


























34 


CANNERS’ READY REMINDER OF 


MACHMERT ft SUPPLIES USED M CMWEMES ft ft 
UST OF RELUBLE HOUSES THAT SEU THEM 


Air Pnmpa. 

American Compressor & Pump Co., 

Baltimore. 

Max Ams Machine Co.. Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

J. S. Hall MIk. Co., Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co., Chicago. 

Books on Canning, Preserving, Etc. 

“A Complete Course in Canning,” $.5.00 Post¬ 
paid. Address The Cunning Trade, Balti¬ 
more, Md. 

How to Buy and Sell Canned Foods, $2.00. 
Address The Canning Trade, Baltimore, Md. 


Bottle Capping, Corking, Filling Machines. 
Max Ams Machine Co., New York City. 
Sprague Canning Machinery Co.. Chicago. 


Boxes and Box Shooks. 

Canton Box Co., Baltimore. 

H. D. Dreyer & Co., Baltimore, Md. 

Boxing Machines. 

Fred H. Knapp Co., Westminster, Md. 


Brokers. 

Crary Brokerage Co., Waukesha, Wis. 
Harry C. Gilbert Co.. Indianapolis, Ind. 
Lee Brokerage Co.. Chicago. 

J. M. Paver Co., Chicago. 


Cans and Solder Hemmed Caps. 

American Can Co., New York, Baltimore, 
Chicago, San Francisco. 

Atlantic Can Co., Baltimore. 

Continental Can Co., Syracuse, Chicago, Bal¬ 
timore. 

Johnson-Morse Can Co.. Wheeling, W. Va. 
Sanitary Can Co., Falrport, N. Y. 

Southern Can Co., Baltimore. 


Can Making Machinery, Dies, Presses A Tools. 
(Crimpers, Testers. Seamers, etc.) 
Ayars Machine Co.. Salem, N. J. 

E. W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Max Ams Machine Co., Mt. Vernon, N. V. 
John R. Mitchell Co., Baltimore. 

Slaysman & Co., Baltimore. 

Stevenson & Co., Baltimore. 

L. & J. A. Steward, Rutland, Vt. 

Torris, Wold & Co., Chicago, 111. 

Canners’ Supplies. 

Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 
Brown-Boggs Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

E. J. Judge. San Francisco. 

A. K. Robins & Co., Baltimore. 

Geo. E. Lockwood Co., Philadelphia. 
Sinclair Scott Co.. Baltimore. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co.. Chicago. 
Henry R. Stlckney, Portland. 

Can Righting Machine. 

Burden & Blakeslee, Cazonovia, N. Y. 


Can Straighteners. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co.. Chicago. 

Capping Machines, Power and Hand. 

Ayars Machine Co.. Salem, N. J. 

Handy Capper Mfg Co., Baltimore. 

Max Ams Machine Co., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
A. K. Robins & Co., Baltimore, Md. 

L. & J. A. Steward, Rutland, Vt. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co.. Chicago. 


Capping Steels. 

Gm. E. Lockwood Co., Philadelphia. 
Handy Cayper Mfg. Co.. Baltimore. 

Max Ams Machine Co.. Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
E. Renneburg & Sons, Baltimore. 

A. K. Robins & Co., Baltimore. Md. 
Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore, Md. 
Slaysman & Co., Baltimore, 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co.. Chicago. 
Stevenson & Co., Baltimore. 

H. R. Stickney, Portland, Maine. 

Geo. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 


Catsup Machines. 

Brown-Boggs Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore, Md. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co.. Chicago. 

Cleaner and Cleanser.' 

J. B. Ford Co.’s “Wyandotte,” Wyandotte, 
Mich 


Consulting Experts. 

W. L. Hincbman, Haddonfleld, N. J. 


Cora Cookers, Fillers and Mixers. 

Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 

Morral Bros., Morral, O. 

A. K. Robins & Go., Baltimore, Md. 
Sprague Canning Machinery Co.. Chicago 


Corn Huskers, Cutters and Bilkers. 
Fred H Knapp, Westminster, Md. 
Morral Bros., Morral, O. 


Copper Coils, Kettles, Etc. 

Hamilton Copper & Brass Works. Hamil¬ 
ton, O 


Cranes and Carrying Machines. 

A. K. Robins & Co., Baltimore, Md. 
Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore, Md. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co,.'Chicago. 
Weller Mfg. Co., Chicago. 

Geo. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 


Directory of Canners. 

National Canners Assn., Washington, D. C. 


Crates, Iron Presses. 

Morral Bros., Morral. O. 

E. Renneburg & Sons. Baltimore. 
Sprague Canning Machinery Co.. Chicago. 
Geo. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 


Electric Machinery. 

General Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 

Engines, Boilers, Fittings, etc. 

E. Renneburg & Sons, Baltimore. 
Slaysman & Co., Baltimore. 


Exhaust Boxes (Steam, Continuous). 

Ayars Machine Co.. Salem, N. .T. 

Colbert Cang. Mchy. Co., Baltimore. 
Sprague Canning Machinery Co.. Chicago. 


Filling Machines—All Kinds. 

Ayars Machine Co.. Salem, N. J. 

A. K. Robins & Co., Baltimore. Md. 
Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore, Md. 

Sprague Cunning Machinery Co . Chicago. 
Henry R. Stlckney, Portland, Me. 


Fire Pots. 

-\yar8 Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 

J. S. Hull Mfg. Co., Baltimore. 

C. M. Kemp Mfg. Co., Baltimore. 

R. Renneburg & Sons, Baltimore, Md. 

A. K. Robins & Co., Baltimore, Md. 

H. R. Stlckney, Portland, Me. 

Gas Machines. 

C. M. Kemp Mfg. Co., Baltimore. 
Insurance. 

Canners* Exchange. Chicago. 

(Lansing B. Warner, Manager.) 


Kerosene Oil Systems. 

J. S. Hull Mfg. Co., Baltimore. 


Kettles, Process and Jacketed. 

Hamilton Copper & Brass Works, Hamil¬ 
ton, Ohio. 

Geo. E. Lockwood Co.. Philadelphia. 

Edw. Renneburg & Sons, Baltimore. 

A. K. Robins & Co., Baltimore, Md. 
Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore, Md. 

Geo. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 


Labels. 

R. J. Kittredge & Co.. Chicago. 

LabelUng Machines. 

Brown-Boggs Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Fred H. Knapp Co., Westminster. Md. 
Morral Bros., Morral, O. 


Lacquer. 

John G. Maters' Sons, Baltimore. 
Seely Bros., Blaine. Wash. 


I.acquering Machines. 

Seely Bros., Blaine. Wash. 


Hailing Machine. 

B. J. Judge, San Francisco, Cal. 


Oyster Machinery. 

Edw. Renneburg & Son, Baltimore. 
Sprague Canning Machinery Co.. Chicago. 
Geo. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 


I*aring Machines, Apple, etc. 
Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore, Md. 


Paste. 

Fred H. Knapp Co.. Westminster, Md. 

E. J. Judge, San Francisco. 

Patent Attorneys. 

Edw. S. Duvall, Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Pea Separators or Graders. 

Brown-Boggs Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Edw. Renn^urg & Son. Baltimore. 

A. K. Robins & Co., Baltimore, Md. 
Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore, Md. 


Pea Vine Feeders. 

Brown-Boggs Co., Hamilton. Ont. 


Peeling Tables—Tomatoes. 

Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 


Pineapple Machinery. 

E. J. Judge, San Francisco. 

E. J. Lewis, Middleport N. Y. 

The John R Mitchell Co., Baltimore. 
Sinclair Scott Co.. Baltimore. 
Stevenson & Co., Baltimore. 

Geo. W. Zastrow, Baltimore. 


Pulp Machines. 

Brown-Boggs Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 


Sanitary Cans. 

American Can Co., New York, Baltimore. 

Chicago, San Francisco. 

Continental Can Co., Syracuse, Chicago, Bal¬ 
timore. 

Sanitary Can Co., New York City. 

(Indianapolis, Bridgeton.) 
Southern Can Co, Baltimore. 

L. & J. A. Steward, Rutland, Vt. 


Sanitary Can .Making Machinery. 

E. W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

E. J. Judge, San Francisco. 

Max Ams Machine Co.. Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
L. & J. A. Steward, Rutland, Vt. 

Torris, Wold & Co., Chicago. 


Seeds. 

D. Landreth Seed Co., Bristol, Pa. 
Leonard Seed Co., Chicago, Ill. 


Sieves and Screens. 

Sinclair Scott Co., Baltimore. 

Sprague Cunning Machinery Co.. Chicago. 


Scalders, Tomato, etc. 

Ayars Machine Co., Salem, N. J. 

Morral Bros., Morral, O. 

Edw. Renneburg & Son. Baltimore. 

A. K. 'Robins & Co., Baltimore, Md. 
Sprague Canning Machinery Co.. Chicago. 


Solder Cap Hemming Machines. 

E. W. Bliss Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Torris, Wold Co., Chicago. 

string Bean Machinery. 

, E. J. Lewis, Middleport, N. Y. 


Syrupers (Automatic) 

E. J. Judge, San Francisco. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co.. Chicago. 

Tin Plate. 

Washington Tin Plate Co., Washington, Pa. 
Wipers. Can. 

Ayars Machine Co.. Salem, N. J. 

Morral Bros., Morral, O. 

Sprague Canning Machinery Co.. Chicago. 



THE Canning TRADE 



SALES OFFICE FACTORY 

CHICAGO ILL. NOOPESTON ILL. 

We have the following machinery 
to show yon at our 

BALTIMORE OFFICE 
44-46 Market Place 

Sprague-Lowe Sanitary Hand Tomato Filler 

Sprague-Lowe Ketchup Finisher 

Sprague-Lowe Pulp Machine 

Sprague-Lowe Flash Coll 

Sprague Sanitary Scalder 

Colbert Tomato Filler 

Sprague Roller Conveyor 

Triumph Peeling Table 

Sprague No. 5 Corn Cutter 

Cuykendall Corn Mixer 

Sprague No. 7 Corn Silker 

Sprague Universal Syruper 

Sprague Rotary Capper 

Our New Sprague Roller Exhaust 

Hawkins Universal Capper 

Sprague Sanitary Can Washer 

Jones Stud Hole Can Washer 

The nc.xt time you are in the neighhoi hood 
stop in and look them over 

SPRAGUE CANNING MACHINERY CO. 


The John R. Mitchell Co. 

Canning and Canmaklng Machinery 
Foot of Washington St., Baltimore, Md., U. S. A. 


PINEAPPLE GRATER 

There are 75 saws in base of hopper, dirided on two shafts and 
interlacing and running into one anollier. The hopper is 
made of white pine wood and the discharging chute 
is also lined with wood. Capacity, the 
pack of any ordinary house. 


SH0WIH6 SAWS 
WITH 

HOPPER REMOVED. 


What Some Users Say: 

“We run for weeks and did not lose a can.” 

“No need for poor cans unless you want them.*’ 

“We have the seamer running fine, have not lost a can in two 
weeks.” 

“We run hundreds of cases and not a can lost.” 

The can stands still. No slop, no waste. 

This machine is designed for sealing open top cans after being filled. 

The operator places the filled can, with the cover in position, on 
the conveyor on the left as shown. The can is taken under a header, 
where the cover is pressed into position and fastened there ; it is then 
taken into a dial which moves it around into the seaming head, where 
the can stands still during the seaming operation. 

These machines are regularly built for one size can and have a 
capacity of from 25 to 30 cans per minute, according to size. 

Steward Patent Lock and Lap Side Seam Sanitary Cans 


THE CAN 
STANDS STILL 


A Great Success. 


Why Not Use Them. 


The Improved Lock and Lap Side Seam for Open Top Double 
Seam cans was ORIGINATED, DEVELOPED AND PATENTED 
by us. 


L. & J. A. STEWARD, 


Rutland, Vt. 


Pitnii 

“STEWAI*D” DOUBLE SBAMBB, N*. « 
With Aatoin*tle F«*d For K.oan4 Cabs 

We are the sole owners of this patent. 

All persons are warned against infringing this 
patent by making or using sanitary cans with 
lock and lap side seam.