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ss 



U- 



3.134:2002 

Statistical Abstract 
^ the United State 



n>c^ 




USCENSUSBUREAU 



U.S. Depmmeni of Comr STiNFORn . jumrDV 
Economk:s and Siatisirtb adi- oi«(trUMU UNIVER^ 

J0N8SONL 



U.S. CENSUS BUKEAU 



7-\ ^ t' E i ^ 111 

,1, Cy, J^t": i si,! 




1 



Features 

Guide to tabular presentation p. ix 

Telephone and Internet contacts p. xi 

Guide to sources of statistics p, 885 

Guide to state statistical abstracts p, 902 

Guide to foreign statistical abstracts p, 906 

Metropolitan area concepts and components p. 908 

Index by subject p. 945 

Visit US on the Web at 
http://www.census.gov/statab/www/ 



62 TIM J 

3/03 31150-23 " W 




Issued December 2002 



^•hii_rf^ 



U.S. Department of Commerca 
Donald L. Evans, 

Secretary 



Economics and Statistics 

Administration 

Kathleen B. Cooper, 

Under Secretary for Economic Affairs 



U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 
Charles Louis Kincannon, 

DIreaor 



SUGGESTED CITATION 

U.S. Census Bureau, 

Statistical Abstract of the 

United States: 2002 

(122nd Edition) 

Washington. DC. 2001 

Library of Congress 
Card No. 4-18089 




BOONOMICS 



ANDSTAnsnCS 
ADMINISTKAnON 




U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 

Charles Louis Kincannon, 

Director 

Vacant. 

Deputy Director and 
Chief Operating Officer 

Nancy A. Potok, 

Principal Associate Director 
and Chief Financial Officer 

Ttd A. Johnson, Associate Director 
for Finance and Administration 

Wteltar C Odom, Chief. Administrative 
and Customer Services Division 



Ackiiowladomants 

Lars B. Johanson was responsible for the technical supervision 
and coordination of this volume under the general direction of 
Glenn W. King. Chief, Statistical Compendia Branch. Assisting in 
the research and analytical phases of assigned sections and in the 
developmental aspects of new tables were Rosemary E. Clark. 
David J. Fleck. Stacey M. Lowe* and Jean F. Maloney. 
Catherine Lavender provided primary editorial assistance. Other 
editorial assistance was rendered by Susan Antroinen. Deena 
Grover, Kristen iversen, Patricia S. Lancaster. Connie 
NadzadI, Barbara Shugart, and Daphanie Smallwood. 

Maps were designed and produced by Connie Beard and 
Scott Wilcox of the Cartographic Operations Branch within 
the Geography Division. 

Greg Carroll, Penny Helston, Gloria Davis, Shirley Clark, 
Jan Sweeney, Patricia Edwards, and Ariene C Butler of the 

Administrative and Customer Services Division, Walter C Odom, 
Chief, provided publications and printing management, graphics 
design and composition, and editorial review for print and elec- 
tronic media. General direction and production management were 
provided by Gary J. Laulfer, Chief, Publications Services Branch. 

The cooperation of many contributors to this volume is gratefully 
acknowledged. The source note below each table credits the vari- 
ous government and private agencies that have collaborated In 
furnishing information for the Statistical Abstract. In a few 
instances, contributors have requested that their data be desig- 
nated as subject to copyright restrictions, as indicated in the 
source notes to the tables affected. Permission to use copyright 
material should be obtained directly from the copyright owner. 

For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office 
Superintendent of Documents. Mail Stop: SSOP. Washington. DC 20402-9328 

ISBN 0-16-042817-3 



Preface 



The Statistical Abstract of the United 
States, published since 1 878, is the 
standard summary of statistics on the 
social, political, and economic organiza- 
tion of the United States. It is designed to 
serve as a convenient volume for statisti- 
cal reference and as a guide to other sta- 
tistical publications and sources. The lat- 
ter function is served by the introductory 
text to each section, the source note 
appearing below each table, and Appen- 
dix I, which comprises the Guide to 
Sources of Statistics, the Guide to State 
Statistical Abstracts, and the Guide to 
Foreign Statistical Abstracts. 

This volume includes a selection of data 
from many statistical publications, both 
government and private. Publications 
cited as sources usually contain additional 
statistical detail and more comprehensive 
discussions of definitions and concepts 
than can be presented here. Data not 
available in publications issued by the 
contributing agency but obtained from 
unpublished records are identified in the 
source notes as unpublished data. More 
information on the subjects covered in 
the tables so noted may generally be 
obtained from the source. 

Except as Indicated, figures are for the 
United States as presently constituted. 
Although emphasis in the Statistical 
Abstract is primarily given to national 
data, many tables present data for 
regions and individual states and a 
smaller number for metropolitan areas 
and cities. Appendix 11, Metropolitan Area 
Concepts and Components, presents 
explanatory text, a complete current list- 
ing and population data for metropolitan 
statistical areas (MSAs), the primary met- 
ropolitan statistical areas (PMSAs), and the 
consolidated metropolitan statistical areas 
(CMSAs) defined as of June 30, 1 999. 
Table 30, in Section 1 , presents popula- 
tion numbers for MSAs with population of 
2S0,000 or more. Statistics for the Com- 
monwealth of Puerto Rico and for outly- 
ing areas of the United States are included 
in many state tables and are supple- 
mented by information in Section 29. 



Additional information for states, cities, 
counties, metropolitan areas, and other 
small units, as well as more historical 
data are available in various supplements 
to the Abstract (see inside back cover). 

Statistics in this edition are generally for 
the most recent year or period available 
by summer 2002. Each year over 1 ,400 
tables and charts are reviewed and evalu- 
ated; new tables and charts of current 
interest are added, continuing series are 
updated, and less timely data are con- 
densed or eliminated. Text notes and 
appendices are revised as appropriate. 

USA Statistics in Brief, a pocket-size pam- 
phlet highlighting many statistical series 
in the Abstract is available and will be 
provided along with this edition. Addi- 
tional copies can be obtained free from 
U.S. Census Bureau, Customer Service, 
Call Center, Washington. DC 20233 (tele- 
phone 301-763-INFO(4636). We attempt 
to update the pamphlet several times dur- 
ing the year. The latest data can be found 
on our Web site: <http://www.census. 
gov/statab/www/brief.html>. 

Changes in this edition— This year we 
have added a new section which includes 
Census 2000 Sample Data. The 30 new 
tables in this section include data cover- 
ing the educational attainment, disability 
status, ancestry of and language spoken 
at home by the resident population, as 
well as household income, poverty and 
selected housing characteristics. The lay- 
out of Appendix 111 has been revised. In 
this edition, Appendix 111 has been orga- 
nized by the source agency and title of 
the survey rather than by section and 
table number in which the survey data 
appeared, as was the format in earlier 
editions. 

In addition to the above, we have intro- 
duced 49 new tables throughout our core 
sections. These cover a variety of topics 
including unmarried households, state 
children's health insurance programs, limi- 
tation of activity level caused by chronic 



U.a O&mm Buraau. StalMical Abstract of the United States: 2002 



conditions, characteristics of home- 
schooled students, computer use by chil- 
dren, firearm use offenders, home-based 
work and flexible schedules by workers, 
computer use in the workplace, employee 
benefits in private industry as well as 
computer and internet use. For a com- 
plete list of new tables see Appendix VI, 
p. 942. 

Statistical Abstract on other media— 

The Abstract is available on the Internet 
and on CD-ROM, an enhanced version 
(except for a few copyrighted tables 
deleted by the request of source organiza- 
tions). Our Internet site, <http://www. 
census.gov/statab/www>, contains this 
2002 edition and earlier editions of the 
book, as well as—- Statistics in Brief. 

The CD-ROM version of the Abstract is 
also available. Information for the 
CD-ROM is located in the inside back 
cover. 

Statistics for counties and cities — 

Extensive data for counties can be found 
in the County and City Data Book: 2000. It 
features 191 data items covering every- 
thing from age and agriculture to water 
use and wholesale trade for all states and 
counties with U.S. totals for comparison. 
Also included are 1 03 data items for cities 
with population of 25,000 or more. The 
primary sources are Census 2000 and the 
1 997 Economic Census. Two tables 
present 1 1 data items from Census 2000 
for all places and MCDs with a population 
of 2,500 or more. 

This publication, as well as selected rank- 
ings will be available on our Internet site 
at <http://www.census.gov/statab/ 
www/ccdb.html>. Some data items that 
appear in the book from private sources 
are not available on the Internet or 
CD-ROM versions because we did not 
receive copyright permission to release 
the data items in these formats. For a 



database with over 5,000 county items, 
check out USA Counties at <http://www. 
census.gov/statab/www/county.html>. 

Statistics for states and metropolitan 

areas— Extensive data for the states and 
metropolitan areas of the United States 
can be found in the State and Metropoli- 
tan Area Data Book: 1997-98. 

This publication minus some data items, 
as well as selected rankings of the states 
and metropolitan areas, is available on 
our Internet site at <http://www.census. 
gov/statab/www/smadb.html>. The 
CD-ROM version is also available. See the 
inside back cover for more information. 

Limiutions of the data— The contents 
of this volume were taken from many 
sources. All data from either censuses and 
surveys or from administrative records 
are subject to error arising from a number 
of factors: Sampling variability (for statis- 
tics based on samples), reporting errors in 
the data for individual units, incomplete 
coverage, nonresponse, imputations, and 
processing error. (See also Appendix III, 
pp. 903.) The Census Bureau cannot 
accept the responsibility for the accuracy 
or limitations of the data presented here, 
other than those for which it collects. The 
responsibility for selection of the material 
and for proper presentation, however, 
rests with the Census Bureau. 

For additional Information on data 
presented — Please consult the source 
publications available in local libraries or 
write to the agency indicated in the 
source notes. Write to the Census Bureau 
only if it is cited as the source. 

Suggestions and comments— Users of 

the Statistical Abstract and Its supple- 
ments (see inside back cover) are urged 
to make their data needs known for con- 
sideration in planning future editions. 
Suggestions and comments for improving 
coverage and presentation of data should 
be sent to the Director, U.S. Census 
Bureau, Washington, DC 20233. 



vj 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2002 



Contents 



[Numbers following subjects are page numbers] 

Page 

Guide to Tabular Presentation ix 

Telephone and Internet Contacts xi 



1 . Population aables 1 - 65) 1 

Immigration 10 Population profiles, foreign born 41 

Population characteristics 13 Marital status and households 47 

States, metro, areas, cities 22 Religion 55 



:. 2. Vital Sutlstlcs aables 66 - 1 1 1) 57 

Births 59 Deaths 74 

Life expeaancy 71 

Sec. 3. Health and Nutrition aables 112 197) 89 

Health expenditures, insurance 91 Health measures 118 

Health facilities, workforce 1 04 Food consumption, nutrition 127 



:. 4. Education Oables 1 98 - 282) 131 

Education projections 1 34 Internet access 155 

Educational attainment 1 39 Degrees conferred 175 

Sec. 5. Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons aables 283 - 334) 1 79 

Crime arrests, and victimizations ... 1 88 Juveniles, child abuse 201 

Courts 1 97 Prisoners and inmates 202 

Sec. 6. Geography and Environment aables 335 - 369) 207 

Land and water 210 Hazardous waste sites 222 

Air quality 218 Climate 226 



7. Elections aables 370 - 404) 233 

Vote results 235 Campaign finances 257 



8. Sute and Local Government Finances and Employment 

aables 405 - 448) 259 

Governmental units 260 Local government finances 286 

State government finances 279 Employment and payroll 296 

Sec 9. Federal Government Finances and Employment aables 449 - 483) 303 

Budget receipts, outlays, debt 305 Federal employment and payroll 319 

Sec. 10. National Defense and Veterans Affairs aables 484 - 509) 325 

National defense outlays 326 Military manpower 329 

Sec 1 1 . Social Insurance and Human Services aables 5 1 - 559) 337 

Government transfer payments 340 Public aid, federal food programs ... 353 

Social security 345 Child care, child support 355 

Sec. 12. Labor Force, Employment, and Earnings aables 560 - 630) 363 

Labor force status 367 Productivity 397 

Multiple jobholding 378 Minimum wage 405 

Projections 384 Union membership 411 

Sec 1 3. Income. Expenditures, and Wealth aables 63 1 - 679) 413 

Cross domestic product 417 Money income of families 436 

Consumer expenditures 430 Poverty status 44 1 



14. Prices aables 680 - 698) 447 

Purchasing power of the dollar 449 Cost of living index 454 

Sec 1 5. Business Enterprise Oables 699 -751) 469 

Tax returns by business 471 Patents, trademarks, copyrijphts 488 

Economic census 478 Investment, indicators, profits 490 

Bankruptcies 486 Multinationals 497 

Sec 16. Science and Technology Oables 752 - 780) 499 

R&D funds, outlays 501 Space program 512 



aa Cwwt BuTMu, BMtllte^MMtmtil iff the UnntdState§: 2002 



:. 1 7. Aariculturc aables 781 - 831) 515 

Farms and farmland 517 Foreign trade 526 

Farm balance sheet. Income 521 Crops, livestock 531 

Sec. 18. Natural Resources aables 832 - 874) 539 

Timber, lumber 543 Mineral industries 548 

Fishery 546 Petroleum, gas 555 

Sec. 19. Energy and Utilities aables 875 - 908) 561 

Energy consumption, expenditures . 565 Electric utilities, nuclear 572 

Crude oil 570 Gas utilities 578 

Sec. 20. Construction and Housing aables 909 - 953) 581 

Construction spending 585 Homeownership 600 

Home sales 592 Home remodeling 606 

Sec. 21. Manufactures Oables 954 - 998) 609 

Manufacturing summary 613 Machine tools 625 

Steel 624 Computer, electronics 627 

Sec. 22. Domestic TVade aables 999 - 1 02 7) 633 

Retail trade 636 Wholesale merchant 651 

Sec. 23. TVansporUtion aables 1 028 - 1 095) 653 

Transportation outlays 658 Highway mileage 669 

Air transportation 661 Motor vehicle registrations 675 

Sec. 24. Information and Communications aables 1 096 - 1 1 36) 693 

Information technologies 697 Telecommunications 708 

Newspapers 700 Internet access and use 713 

Book purchasing 704 



Sec. 25. Banicing. Finance, and Insurance Oables 1137-1 207) 715 

Flow of funds, financial assets 718 Debt, interest rates, money stock . . . 726 

Financial Institutions 72 1 Stocks and bonds 73 1 

Sec. 26. Arts, Enteruinment, and Recreation Oables 1 208 - 1 243) 745 

Performing arts 749 NCAA sports 759 

Leisure activities 753 Travel 762 

Sec. 27. Accommodation, Food Services, and Otiier Services 

Oables 1 244 - 1 261 ) 765 

Professional scientific and technical . 771 Administrative and support and 
Advertising 772 waste management 773 

Sec. 28. Foreign Commerce and Aid Oables 1 262 - 1 287) Ill 

International transactions 781 Foreign grants and credits 789 

Foreign investments 785 Exports and Imports 796 

Sec. 29. Outlying Areas Oables 1 288 - 1 304) 803 

Population 805 Economics 810 

Sec. 30. Comparative International Sutistics Oables 1305-1371) 813 

World maps 816 Economic measures 833 

World population; vital statistics 823 Finance 853 

Sec. 31. 2000 Census Dau Sampler Oables 1 372 - 1402) 861 

Appendix I. Guide to Sources of Statistics 885 

Guide to State Statistical Abstracts 902 

Guide to Foreign Statistical Abstracts 906 

Appendix li. Metropolitan Areas: Concepts, Components, and Population 908 

Metropolitan Areas and Their Components as of June 30, 1 999 910 

Appendix III. Limitations of the Data 917 

Appendix IV. Weights and Measures 938 

Appendix V. Tables Deleted From the 2001 Edition of the Statistical Abstract 939 

Appendix VI. New Tables 942 

Index 945 



viii 

U.S. CwwjB BuiMu. Statitlfoai Abttrad of tfw UnNtd SlatM: 2002 



Example of l^ble Structure 



No. 301. Immigration ami Naturalization Service Enforcement Activities: 
1990 to 2000 



[F* 



•ndkig In ytar shovvn. See text. Section 8. State and Local Qovemment Rnanoes and Employment] 



Item 



Unit 



1980 1984 1996 1996 1987 



2000 



Deportable aliens located. 

Border Patrol 

Soulhweetem t)order 



Oltier 



by 



Number of 

Border Patrol 
Vahje of seizures by Border Patrol. 



Aliens expelled: 
Formal removals V . k 
Volunlary departures ^ 



1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 



Number. 
Mil. dol. . 
Mil. dol. . 



1.000 
1.000 



1.169.9 
1.103.4 

1.064.8 

5.7 

42.8 



1.094.7 

1.031.7 

979.1 

999.9 

3.4 

28.4 



17.275 9.134 
843.6 1.622.0 
797.8 1.555.7 



1.394.6 
1.324.2 
1.271.4 
1.293.5 
3.5 
27.2 



9.327 
2.011.8 
1.965.3 



1.650.0 
1.549.9 
1.507.0 
1.523.1 
2.7 
24.0 



11.129 
1.256.0 
1.208.8 



1.538.5 
1.413.0 
1.368.7 
1.387.7 
2.9 
22.4 



11,792 
1.094.6 
1.046.3 



1.679.4 
1.555.8 
1.516.7 
1.522.9 
2.3 
30.5 



14.401 
1.405.0 
1.340.0 



30.0 45.7 45.2 69.7 114.4 173.0 
1.022.5 1.029.1 1,313.8 1.573.4 1.440.7 1.570.1 



1.714.0 
1.579.0 
1.537.0 
1.534.5 
2.7 
41.8 



16.803 
2.004.0 
1.919.0 



180.3 
1,574.5 



1,814.7 
1.676.4 
1,643.7 
1,636.9 
2.2 
37.3 



17.J 

1.945.0 

1.848.0 



184.8 
1.675.3 



NA Not available. ^ Include deportations, exclusions, and removals. ^ Includes aliens under docket control required to 
depart and votuntary departures not under docket control. 

Source: U.S. Inrvnigratkxi and Naturalizatk)n Sendee, Statistkral Yeart}ook. annual; and unpublished data. 



Headnotes immediately below table 
titles provide information important for 
correct interpretation or evaluation of 
the table as a whole or for a major seg- 
ment of it. 

footnotes below the bottom rule of 
tables give information relating to spe- 
cific items or figures within the table. 



Unit indicators show the specified quan- 
tities in which data items are presented. 
They are used for two primary reasons. 
Sometimes data are not available In 
absolute form and are estimates (as in 
the case of many surveys). In other 
cases we round the numbers in order to 
save space to show more data, as in the 
case above. 



EXAMPLES OF UNIT INDICATOR INTERPRETATION FROM TABLE 



Unit Indicator 



Number 



MuMpNer 



1990 
1990 



Depoftat>le aliens tocated Thousands. 

Value of seizures by Border Patrol . . $ Milltons . . 



1.169.9 
843.6 



1.000 
1.000.000 



To Determine the Figure It Is Necessary to Multiply the 
Number Shown by the Unit Indicator: 

Deportable aliens located • 1 .1 69.9 x 1 .000 » 1 .1 69,900 (over 1 million) 
Value of seizures by Border Patrol - 843.6 x SI ,000.000 • $843,600,000 (over $843 million). 



When a table presents data with more 
than one unit indicator, they are found 
in the headnotes and column headings 
(Tables 2 and 4), spanner (Table 40), 
stub (Table 27), or unit column (shown 
above). When the data in a table are 
shown in the same unit indicator, it is 
shown in boldface as the first part of 
the headnote (Table 2). If no unit indica- 
tor is shown, data presented are in 
absolute form (Table 1). 

Vertical rules are used to separate inde- 
pendent sections of a table, (Table 1), 
or in tables where the stub is continued 
into one or more additional columns 
(Table 2). 

Averages — An average is a single num- 
ber or value that is often used to repre- 
sent the "typical value" of a group of 
numbers. It is regarded as a measure of 
"location" or "central tendency" of a 
group of numbers. 



The arithmetic mean is the type of aver- 
age used most frequently. It is derived 
by summinq the individual item values 
of a particular group and dividing the 
total by the number of items. The arith- 
metic mean is often referred to as sim- 
ply the "mean" or "average." 

The median of a group of numbers is 
the middle number or value when each 
item in the group is arranged accordinq 
to size (lowest to highest or visa versa); 
it generally has the same number of 
items above it as well as below it. If 
there is an even number if items in the 
group, the median is taken to be the 
average of the two middle numbers. 

Per capita (or per person) quantities. A 
per capita figure represents an average 
computed for every person in a speci- 
fied group (or population). It is derived 
by talcing the total for an item (such as 
income, taxes, or retail sales) and divid- 
ing it by the number of persons in the 
specified population. 



Guide to Tabular Presentation vx 



BUTMU. 8laltitfnlAbttrBCtoftheUnNM^SlB«M;2002 



Index numbers — ^An index number is 
the measure of difference or chanae, 
usually expressed as a percent, relating 
one quantity (the variable) of a specified 
kind to another quantity of the same 
kind. Index numbers are widely used to 
express changes in prices over periods 
of time but may also be used to express 
differences between related subjects for 
a single point in time. 

To compute a price index, a base year 
or period is selected. The base year 
price (of the commodity or service) is 
then designated as the base or refer- 
ence price to which the prices for other 
years or periods are related. Many price 
indexes use the year 1 982 as the base 
year; in tables this Is shown as 
^*1 982=1 00." A method of expresslna 
the price relationship Is: The price of a 
set of one or more items for a related 
year (e.g. 1990) divided by the price 
of the same set of items for the base 
year (e.g. 1982). The result multiplied 
by 1 00 provides the index number. 
When 100 is subtracted from the index 
number, the result equals the percent 
change in price from the base year. 

Average annual percent change— 

Unless otherwise stated in the Abstract 
(as in Section 1 , Population), average 
annual percent change is computed by 
use of a compound interest formula. 
This formula assumes that tne rate of 
change is constant throughout a speci- 
fied compounding period (1 year for 
average annual rates of change). The 
formula is similar to that used to com- 
pute the balance of a savings account 
which receives compound interest. 
According to this formula, at the end of 
a compounding period the amount of 
accrued change (e.g. school enrollment 
or bank interest) is added to the 
amount which existed at the beginning 
the period. As a result, over time (e.g., 
with each year or quarter), the same 
rate of change is applied to a larger and 
larger figure. 

The exponential formula, which Is 
based on continuous compounding, Is 
often used to measure population 
change. It is preferred by population 
experts because they view population 
and population-related subjects as 
changing without interruption, ever 
ongoing. Both exponential and com- 
pound interest formulas assume a con- 
stant rate of change. The former, how- 
ever, applies the amount of change 
continuously to the base rather tnan at 
the end of each compounding period. 
When the average annual rates are small 
(e.g., less than S percent) both formulas 
give virtually the same results. For an 
explanation of these two formulas as 



they relate to population, see U.S. Cen- 
sus Bureau, The Methods and Materials 
of Demography, Vol. 2, 3d printing 
(rev.), 1975, pp. 372-381. 

Current and constant dollars— 

Statistics in some tables in a number of 
sections are expressed In both current 
and constant dollars (see, for example. 
Table 643 in Section 1 3, Income. Expen- 
ditures, and Wealth). Current dollar fig- 
ures reflect actual prices or costs pre- 
vailing durlna the specified year(s). 
Constant dollar figures are estimates 
representing an effort to remove the 
effects of price changes from statistical 
series reported in dollar terms. In gen- 
eral, constant dollar series are derived 
by dividing current dollar estimates by 
the appropriate price index for the 
appropriate period (for example, the 
Consumer Price Index). The result is a 
series as it would presumably exist if 
prices were the same throughout, as in 
the base year— in other words as if the 
dollar had constant purchasinq power. 
Any changes in this constant dollar 
series would reflect only changes in real 
volume of output, income, expendi- 
tures, or other measure. 

Explanation of Symbols 

The following symbols, used in the 
tables throughout this book, are 
explained in condensed form in foot- 
notes to the tables where they appear: 

- Represents zero or rounds to less than 
half the unit of measurement shown. 

B Base figure too small to meet statisti- 
cal standards for reliability of a 
derived figure. 

D Figure withheld to avoid disclosure 
pertainlnq to a specific organization 
or individual. 

NA Data not enumerated, tabulated, or 
otherwise available separately. 

NS Percent change Irrelevant or insig- 
nificant. 

S Figure does not meet publication 
standards for reasons other than that 
covered by symbol B, above. 

X Figure not applicable because column 
heading and stub line make entry 
impossible, absurd, or meaningless. 

Z Entry would amount to less than half 
the unit of measurement shown. 

In many tables, details will not add to 
the totals shown because of rounding. 



x Guide to Tabular Presentation 



U.8. Cmt&M Bureau, Statttttcal Abstract of the UnNad Slalaa: 2002 



Telephone and Internet Contacts 



To help Abstract users find more data and information about statistical publications, we 
are issuing this list of contacts for federal agencies with major statistical programs. The 
intent is to give a single, first-contact point-of-entry for users of statistics. These agencies 
will provide general information on their statistical programs and publications, as well as 
specific information on how to order their publications. We are also including the Internet 
(World Wide Web) addresses for many of these agencies. These URLs were current in 
August 2002. 



Executive Office of tlie President 

Office of Management and Budget 
Administrator 
Office of Information and Regulatory 

Affairs 

Office of Management and Budget 
725 1 7th Street. N.W. 
Washington. DC 20503 
Information: 202-395-3080 
Internet address: 

http://www. whitehouse.gov/omb 

Depertinent of Agriculture 

Economic Research Service 
Information Center 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
1 800 M St. N.W.. Rm. North 3050 
Washington, DC 20036-5831 
Information and Publications: 

202-694-5050 
Internet address: 

httpy/www.ers. usda.gov/ 

National Agricultural Statistics Service 
National Agricultural Statistics Service 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
1400 independence Ave.. S.W., Rm. 5829 
Washington. DC 20250 
Information hotline: 1-800-727-9540 
Internet address: 
http://www. usda.gov/nass/ 

Depertment of Commerce 

U.S. Census Bureau 

Customer Services Branch 
U.S. Census Bureau 
U.S. Department of Commerce 
Washington. DC 20233 
Information and Publications: 
301-763-4636 
Internet address: 
http://www.census.gov/ 

Bureau of Economic Analysis 
Bureau of Economic Analysis 
U.S. Department of Commerce 
Washington. DC 20230 
Information and Publications: 
202-606-9900 
Internet address: http://www.bea.gov/ 



Department of Commerce —Con. 

International Trade Administration 
Trade Statistics Division 
Office of Trade and Economic Analysis 
International Trade Administration 
Room 2814 B 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
Washington. DC 20230 
Information and Publications: 

202-482-2185 
Internet address: 

http://www.ita.doc.gov/tradestats/ 

National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration 

National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration Central Library 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

1315 East-West Highway 

2nd Floor 

Silver Spring MD 20910 

/./i^rflry: 301 -71 3-2600 

Internet address: 
h ttp://www. lib. noaa.gov/ 

Department of Defense 

Department of Defense 

Office of the Assistant Secretary of 

Defense (Public Affairs) 
Room 2E765 

Attention: Press Operations 
1 400 Defense Pentagon 
Washington. DC 20301-1400 
Information: 703-697-5 131/5132 
Internet address: 

http://www.defenselink.mil 

Department of Education 

National Library of Education 
U.S. Department of Education 
400 Maryland Avenue, S.W. 
Washington. DC 20202-5621 
Education Information and Statistics: 
1-800-424-1616 

Education Publications: ]-S77-433-7S27 
Internet address: http://www.ed.gov/ 



Telephone and Internet Contacts Ki 



ULaOMMtBuiMu. StatftUcai Abstract of the UnMad Sfotes; 2002 



DapaitmcKt of E»crgy 

tnergy Informal ion Admlniilralion 
Mational Energy Inlornnalion Cenier 
LLS. Depanment of Energy 
1 OOO Independence Ave., S.W. 
IE238-EI-30 
Washington. DC 2058S 
Information and Publlcationi: 

202-SS6-8S00 
Internet addrisi: 

A ttp://ww w.tio. doe.gov/ 

Dapartmem of Hoallh and Human 



Health Resources and Services 
Adminiitralion 

HRSA Office Of CommunJcalioFis 
S600 Fis-her^ Lane, Room 14-15 
Ro<:kvi)le.MD20S57 
Information Center 30\-**3-i37e 
Iniernel address: http://www.hrsa.gov/ 

Substance Abuse Mental Health Services 



LI S. Department of Health and Human 

5600 Fishers Lane. Room 12-105 
Rockvllle. MD 20SS7 
Information: JOl -443-4795 
Publlcationy 1-800-729-6686 

internemddress: 
http .//WW w.iamhsa.gov/ 

Ctnters for Disease Control and Prevention 

Office of Public Affairs 
600 Clifton Road N.E. 

Atlanta, CAJ033 J 

Public Inquiries: -800-311-3435 

Internet address: http://www.cdc.gov/ 
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services 

(CMS) 

Office of Public Affairs 
U.S. Department of Health and Human 

Room 303D, Humphrey Building 
200 Independence Ave.. S.W. 
Washington. DC 20201 

Wa^yiAJJe/fltionj, 202-690-61 45 
Internet addrea: http://www.cms.gov/ 

National Center for Health Statistics 
US. Department of Health and Human 

Servit* Centers for Disease Control 

and Prevennon 

National Center for Health Statistics 
Data Dissemnaiion Branch 
6525BelcrestRd.. Rm. 1064 
Hyatlsvllle MD20782 
Information: 30 458-4636 
Internet address: 

http://w ww.cdc. gov/nchs www 



U.S. DapartnMM of Houslnn ami Urban 



Office of the Assistant Secretary for 
Community Planning and Development 
451 7th St., S.W. 
Washington, DC 20410-0555 

Information and Publications: 

800 9989999 
Internet address: http://www.hud.gov/ 

Oopartment of iba intoHor 

Geological Survey 
Earth Science Informaiion Center 
Ceological Survey 
U.S. OepanmenI O'f the Interior 
507 National Center 
fieston.VA 20192 
Information and Publications: 

■888275-8747 
Internet address for minerals: 

h ttp ://minerols .usgs.gov/ 
Internet address for other materiah: 

A ttp ://as k.usgs.gov/ 

Department of Jnitka 

Bureau of Justice Statistics 
Stati:!tics Division 
8107th St., N.W.. 2nd Floor 
Washington. DC 20531 
Information and PubtleaHons: 
202-iO7-0765 
Internet address, 
hitp //www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/ 

National Criminal Justice Refererxe Service 
Box 6000 

Rocl(vllle, MO 20849-6000 
Information and Publications: 

30 -5 ^-5 OO 

Publication: -800-732-3277 
Internet address, http://www.ncjrs.org/ 
federal Bureau of investigation 
U.S. Department of jusltce 

Edgar Hociver f^Bl Butlding 
935 Pennsylvania Ave., N W. 
Washmgion, DC 2053S-O001 
202 -3 24. 3000 

National Press Office: 202-324-3691 
Research and Communications Unit: 
202-324-561 1 
Internet address: http://www.fbi.gov/ 

Immigration arid Naturalization Service 
Slalistits Division 

Immi^alion and Naturalization Service 
U.S. Department of Justice 
425ISt.. N.W.. ftm, 4034 
Washington. DC 20536 
Information and Publications: 

202-305-1613 
Internet address: 

http://www.lns.gov/graphics/ Index.htm 



M Telephone & Internet Contacts 



U.S. Ceraui BuTNu, { 



oTUbor 

Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Office of Publications and Special Studies 
Services 

Division of Information 
Bureau of Ubor Sutistics 
2 Mass. Ave.. N.E., Room 2850 
Washington. DC 20212 
Information and Publications: 
202-691-5200 
Internet address: http://wvm.bls,gov/ 

Employment and Training Administration 
Office of Public Affairs 
Employment and Training Administration 
U.S. Department of Labor 

200 Constitution Ave.. N.W., Room 
C4517 

Washington, DC 20210 
Information and Publications: 
202-693-3900 
Internet address: http://www.doleta.gov/ 

DttfMirtiiMiit of 'nvnsporution 

Federal Aviation Administration 
U.S. Department of Transportation 
800 Independence Ave., S.W. 
Washington, DC 20591 

Information and Publications: 
202-267-3484 

Internet address: http://www.faa.gov/ 

Bureau of Transportation Statistics 

400 7th St., S.W.. Room 3103 

Washington, DC 20590 

Produrts; 202-366-3282 

Sutisticat lnformation:800-853-l 351 

Internet address: http://www.bts.gov/ 

Federal Highway Administration 
Office of Public Affairs 
Federal Highway Administration 
U.S. Department of Transportation 
400 7th St., S.W. 
Washington. DC 20590 
Information: 202-366-0660 
Internet address: 
http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/ 

National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration 

Office of Public & Consumer Affairs 
National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration 

U.S. Department of Transportation 
400 7th St., S.W. 
Washington, DC 20590 
Information: 202-366-4000 
Publications: 202-366-8892 
Internet address: 
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/ 



DttiMitmeiit of the IVwisury 

Internal Revenue Service 
Statistics of Income Division 
Internal Revenue Service 
P.O. Box 2608 

Washington, DC 20013-2608 
Information and Publications: 
202-874-0410 
Internet address: 
http://www.irs.gov/tax^stats 

IHlMrtniciit of Veterans Affairs 

Office of Public Affairs 

Department of Veterans Affairs 
810 Vermont Ave., N.W. 
Washington, DC 20420 
Information: 202-273-5400 
Internet address: htXp://www.va.gov/ 

Independent Agencies 

Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts 

Statistics Division 

1 Columbus Circle, N.E. 

Washington, DC 20544 

Information: 202-502-1 455 

Internet address: 

http://www. uscourts.gov/ 

Environmental Protection Agency 

US EPA Headquarters Library, 
Room EPA 3340 

Environmental Protection Agency West 
1 200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. 
Mail Code 3404T 
Washington, DC 20460-0001 
Information: 202-566-0556 
Internet address: http://www.epa.gov/ 

Federal Reserve Board 

Division of Research and Statistics 
Federal Reserve Board 
Washington, DC 20551 
Information: 202-452-3301 
Publications: 202-452-3245 
Internet address: 
http://www.federalreserve.gov/ 

National Science Foundation 
Office of Legislation and Public Affairs 
National Science Foundation 
4201 Wilson Boulevard 
Arlington, Virginia 22230 
information: 703-292-8070 
Publications: 703-292-81 29 
internet address: http://www.nsf gov/ 



toitu. 8mtllkaiiAimlractofiheUnll9dSlatM:2002 



Telephone & Internet ConucXs x\\\ 



Independent Agencies —Con. 

Securities and Exchange Commission 
Office of Public Affairs 
Securities and Exchange Commission 
450 5th St.. N.W., Room 2500 
Mail Stop 0211 
Washington, DC 20549 
Information: 202-942-0020 
Publications: 202-942-4040 
Internet address: http://www.sec.gov/ 



ln«lependent Agencies —Con. 

Social Security Administration 

6400 Security Blvd 

Baltimore. MD 21235 

Information and Putflications: 
1-800-772-1213 

Internet Address: http://www.ssa.gov/ 



xiv Telephone & Internet Contacts 



U^. Ctrwut BurMu. Slitfttical AlMtnct of the UnNMl SMm: 2002 



Section 1 

Population 



This section presents statistics on the 
growth, distribution, and characteristics 
of the U.S. population. The principal 
source of these data is the U.S. Census 
Bureau, which conducts a decennial cen- 
sus of population, a monthly population 
survey, a program of population estimates 
and projections, and a number of other 
periodic surveys relating to population 
characteristics. For a list of relevant 
publications, see the Guide to Sources 
of Statistics in Appendix I. 

Decennial censuses— The U.S. Constitu- 
tion provides for a census of the popula- 
tion every 10 years, primarily to establish 
a basis for apportionment of members of 
the l-louse of Representatives among the 
states. For over a century after the first 
census in 1 790, the census organization 
was a temporary one, created only for 
each decennial census. In 1902, the Cen- 
sus Bureau was established as a perma- 
nent federal agency, responsible for enu- 
merating the population and also for 
compiling statistics on other population 
and housing characteristics. 

Historically, the enumeration of the popu- 
lation has been a complete count. That is. 
an attempt is made to account for every 
person, for each person's residence, and 
for other characteristics (sex. age. family 
relationships, etc.). Since the 1 940 cen- 
sus, in addition to the complete count 
information, some data have been 
obtained from representative samples 
of the population. In the 1 990 and 2000 
censuses, variable sampling rates were 
employed. For most of the country. 1 in 
every 6 households (about 1 7 percent) 
received the long form or sample ques- 
tionnaire; in governmental units esti- 
mated to have fewer than 2.500 inhabit- 
ants, every other household (50 percent) 
received the sample questionnaire to 
enhance the reliability of sample data for 
small areas. Exact agreement is not to be 
expected between sample data and the 
1 00-percent count. Sample data may be 



used with confidence where large num- 
bers are involved and assumed to indicate 
trends and relationships where small 
numbers are involved. 

Census Bureau data presented here 
have not been adjusted for underenu- 
meration. Results from the evaluation 
program for the 1 990 census indicate 
that the overall national undercount was 
between 1 and 2 percent. The estimate 
from the Post Enumeration Survey (PES) 
was 1 .6 percent, and the estimate from 
Demographic Analysis (DA) was 1 .8 per- 
cent. Both the PES and DA estimates show 
disproportionately high undercounts for 
some demographic groups. For example, 
the PES estimates of percent net under- 
count for Blacks (4.4 percent). Hispanics 
(5.0 percent), and American Indians 
(4.5 percent) were higher than the esti- 
mated undercount of non-Hispanic Whites 
(0.7 percent). Historical DA estimates 
demonstrate that the overall undercount 
rate in the census has declined signifi- 
cantly over the past 50 years (from an 
estimated 5.4 percent In 1 940 to 1 .8 per- 
cent in 1 990), yet the undercount of 
Blacks has remained disproportionately 
high. 

Current Population Survey (CPS)— This 
is a monthly nationwide survey of a scien- 
tifically selected sample representing the 
noninstitutional civilian population. The 
sample is located in 754 areas with cover- 
age in every state and the District of 
Columbia and is subject to sampling 
error. At the present time, about 60,000 
occupied households are eligible for inter- 
view every month; of these about 7.5 per- 
cent are, for various reasons, unavailable 
for interview. 

While the primary purpose of the CPS is to 
obtain monthly statistics on the labor 
force, it also serves as a vehicle for inquir- 
ies on other subjects. Using CPS data, the 
Bureau Issues a series of publications 



Population \ 



\3JLCmmmBurmt, Stitttttcal Abttrad of the Unlltd StatM: 20Q2 



under the general title of Current Popula- 
tion Reports, which cover population char- 
acteristics (P20), consumer income (P60), 
special studies (P23), and other topics. 

Estimates of population characteristics 
based on the CPS will not agree with the 
counts from the census because the CPS 
and the census use different procedures 
for collecting and processing the data for 
racial groups, the Hispanic population, 
and other topics. Caution should also be 
used when comparing estimates for vari- 
ous years because of the periodic intro- 
duction of changes into the CPS. Begin- 
ning in January 1 994, a number of 
changes were introduced into the CPS 
that effect all data comparisons with prior 
years. These changes include the results 
of a major redesign of the survey ques- 
tionnaire and collection methodology and 
the introduction of 1990 census popula- 
tion controls, adjusted for the estimated 
undercount. This change in population 
controls had relatively little impact on 
derived measures such as means, medi- 
ans, and percent distribution, but did 
have a significant impact on levels. 

Population estimates and projec- 
tions — National population estimates 
start with decennial census data as 
benchmarks and add annual population 
component of change data. Component of 
change data come from various agencies, 
as follows: National Center for Health Sta- 
tistics (births and deaths), Immigration 
and Naturalization Service (legal immi- 
grants), Office of Refugee Resettlement 
(refugees), U.S. Census Bureau's Interna- 
tional Programs Center (net movement 
between Puerto Rico and the U.S. main- 
land), Armed Forces, Department of 
Defense, and Office of Personnel Manage- 
ment (movement of military and civilian 
citizens abroad). Emigration and net 
undocumented immigration are projected 
based on research using census data. Esti- 
mates for states, counties, and smaller 
areas are based on the same component 
of change data and sources as the 
national estimates. School statistics from 
state departments of education and paro- 
chial school systems, federal income tax 
returns from the Internal Revenue Service, 
group quarters from the Federal-State 
Cooperative program and the Veterans 



Administration, and medicare data from 
the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid 
Services are also included. 

Data for the population by age for April 1 . 
1 990 (shown in Table 1 2) are modified 
counts. The review of detailed 1 990 Infor- 
mation indicated that respondents tended 
to provide their age as of the date of 
completion of the questionnaire, not their 
age as of April 1 , 1 990. In addition, there 
may have been a tendency for respon- 
dents to round-up their age if they were 
close to having a birthday. A detailed 
explanation of the age modification pro- 
cedure appears in 1 990 Census of Popula- 
tion and Housing Data Paper Listing (CPH- 
L-74). 

Population estimates and projections are 
published in the P25 Series of Current 
Population Reports and on the Census 
Bureau Internet site <http://www. 
census.gov>. These estimates and projec- 
tions are generally consistent with official 
decennial census figures and do not 
reflect the amount of estimated census 
underenumeration. However, these esti- 
mates and projections by race have been 
modified and are not comparable to the 
census race categories (see section below 
under "Race**). For details on methodol- 
ogy, see the sources cited below the indi- 
vidual tables. 

Immigration— The principal source of 
immigration data is the Statistical Year- 
book of the Immigration and Naturaliza- 
tion Service, published annually by the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 
(INS), a unit of the Department of Justice. 
Immigration statistics are prepared from 
entry visas and change of immigration 
status forms. Immigrants are aliens admit- 
ted for legal permanent residence in the 
United States. The procedures for admis- 
sion depend on whether the alien is resid- 
ing inside or outside the United States at 
the time of application for permanent 
residence. Eligible aliens residing outside 
the United States are issued immigrant 
visas by the U.S. Department of State. Eli- 
gible aliens residing in the United States 
are allowed to change their status from 
temporary to permanent residence at INS 
district offices. The category, immigrant, 
includes persons who may have entered 
the United States as nonimmigrants or 



'oulation 



U.a Cwmjs BuiMHi. SMMotf AlMlracloflheUnllMlSMM.20Qe 



refugees, but who subsequently changed 
their status to that of a permanent resi- 
dent. Nonresident aliens admitted to the 
United States for a temporary period are 
nonimmigrants (Table 1 243). Refugees are 
considered nonimmigrants when initially 
admitted into the United States but are 
not included in nonimmigrant admission 
data. A refugee is an alien outside the 
United States who is unable or unwilling 
to return to his or her county of national- 
ity because of persecution or a well- 
founded fear of persecution. 

U.S. immigration law gives preferential 
immigration status to persons with a 
close family relationship with a U.S. citi- 
zen or legal permanent resident, persons 
with needed job sicills, or persons who 
qualify as refugees, immigration to the 
United States can be divided into two gen- 
eral categories: (1) those subject to the 
annual worldwide limitation and (2) those 
exempt from it. The Immigration Act of 
1 990 established major revisions in the 
numerical limits and preference system 
regulating legal immigration. The numeri- 
cal limits are imposed on visas issued and 
not on admissions. The maximum num- 
ber of visas allowed to be issued under 
the preference categories In 2000 was 
436.900 - 294.601 for family-sponsored 
immigrants and 142.299 for employment- 
based immigrants. There are nine catego- 
ries among which the family-sponsored 
and employment-based immigrant visas 
are distributed, beginning in fiscal year 
1992. The himily-sponsored preferences 
are based on the alien% relationship with 
a U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident 
(see Table 6). The employment-based 
preferences are (1) priority worlcers (per- 
sons of extraordinary ability, outstanding 
professors and researchers, and certain 
multinational executives and managers); 
(2) professionals with advanced degrees 
or aliens with exceptional ability; (3) 
sicilled worlcers. professionals without 
advanced degrees, and needed unslcilled 
worlcers; (4) special immigrants; and (5) 
employment creation immigrants (inves- 
tors). Within the overall limitations the 
per-country limit for independent coun- 
tries is set to 7 percent of the total family- 
sponsored and employment-based limits, 
while dependent areas are limited to 2 
percent of the total. The 2000 limit 
allowed no more than 30,S83 preference 



visas for any independent country and 
8,738 for any dependency. Those exempt 
from the woridwide limitation include 
immediate relatives of U.S. citizens, refu- 
gees and asylees adjusting to permanent 
residence, and other various classes of 
special immigrants (see Table 6). 

The Refugee Act of 1 980, effective 
April 1 , 1 980, provides for a uniform 
admission procedure for refugees of all 
countries, based on the United Nations' 
definition of refugees. Authorized admis- 
sion ceilings are set annually by the Presi- 
dent in consultation with Congress. After 
1 year of residence in the United States, 
refugees are eligible for immigrant status. 
The Immigration Reform and Control Act 
of 1 986 (IRCA) allows two groups of ille- 
gal aliens to become temporary and then 
permanent residents of the United States: 
aliens who have been in the United States 
unlawfully since January 1, 1982 (legaliza- 
tion applicants), and aliens who were 
employed in seasonal agricultural work 
for a minimum period of time (Special 
Agricultural Worker (SAW) applicants). The 
application period for temporary resi- 
dency for legalization applicants began 
on May 5. 1 987. and ended on May 4. 

1 988. while the application period for 
SAW applicants began on June 1 , 1 987, 
and ended on November 30, 1 988. Legal- 
ization applicants became eligible for per- 
manent residence beginning In fiscal year 

1989. Beginning 1989 immigrant data 
include temporary residents who were 
granted permanent residence under the 
legalization program of IRCA. 

Metropolitan Areas (MAs)— The gen- 
eral concept of a metropolitan area is one 
of a core area containing a large popula- 
tion nucleus, together with adjacent com- 
munities that have a high degree of social 
and economic integration with that core. 
Metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), con- 
solidated metropolitan statistical areas 
(CMSAs). and primary metropolitan statis- 
tical areas (PMSAs) are defined by the 
Office of Management and Budget (0MB) 
as a standard for federal agencies in the 
preparation and publication of statistics 
relating to metropolitan areas. The entire 
territory of the United States is classified 
as metropolitan (inside MSAs or CMSAs— 
PMSAs are components of CMSAs) or non- 
metropolitan (outside MSAs or CMSAs). 



Population 3 



SMMIcal AtaHrad of ttw UnNMl SlaiM: 2002 



MSAs, CMSAs. and PMSAs are defined in 
terms of entire counties except in New 
Engiand, where tlie definitions are in 
terms of county subdivisions (primarily 
cities and towns). Tlie 0MB also defmes 
New England County Metropolitan Areas 
(NECMAs), which are county-based alter- 
natives to the MSAs and CMSAs in the six 
New England states. Over time, new MAs 
are created and the components of others 
change. The analysis of historical trends, 
therefore, must be made cautiously. For 
descriptive details and a listing of titles 
and components of MAs, see Appendix II. 

Urban and rural— For Census 2000, the 
Census Bureau classified as urban all terri- 
tory, population, and housing units 
located within urbanized areas (UAs) and 
urban clusters (UCs). A UA consists of 
densely settled territory that contains 
50,000 or more people, while a UC con- 
sists of densely settled territory with at 
least 2.500 people but fewer than 50,000 
people. (UCs are a new type of geo- 
graphic entity for Census 2000.) Prior to 
Census 2000— from the 1950 census 
through the 1 990 census— the urban 
population consisted of all people living 
in UAs and most places outside of UAs 
with a census population of 2,500 or 
more. 

UAs and UCs encompass territory that 
generally consists of: 

■ A cluster of one or more block goups or 
census blocks each of which has a 
population density of at least 1 ,000 
people per square mile at the time, 

■ Surrounding block groups and census 
blocks each of which has a population 
density of at least 500 people per 
square mile at the time, and 

■ Less densely settled blocks that form 
enclaves or indentations, or are used to 
connect discontiguous areas with quali- 
fying densities. 

They also may include an airport located 
adjacent to qualifying densely settled area 
if it has an annual enplanement (aircraft 
boarding) of at least 1 0,000 people. 

"Rurar for Census 2000 consists of all 
territory, population, and housing units 
located outside of UAs and UCs. Prior to 



Census 2000, rural consisted of all terri- 
tory, population, and housing outside of 
UAs and outside of other places desig- 
nated as "urban." For Census 2000, many 
more geographic entities, including met- 
ropolitan areas, counties, county subdivi- 
sions, and places, contain both urban and 
rural territory, population, and housing 
units. 

Residence— In determining residence, 
the Census Bureau counts each person as 
an inhabitant of a usual place of residence 
(i.e., the place where one usually lives 
and sleeps). While this place is not neces- 
sarily a person^ legal residence or voting 
residence, the use of these different bases 
of classification would produce the same 
results in the vast majority of cases. 

Race— For the 1 990 census, the Census 
Bureau collected and published racial sta- 
tistics as outlined in Statistical Policy 
Directive No. 1 5 issued by the U.S. Office 
of Management and Budget. This directive 
provided standards on ethnic and racial 
categories for statistical reporting to be 
used by all federal agencies. According to 
the directive, the basic racial categories 
were American Indian or Alaska Native, 
Asian or Pacific islander. Black, and White. 
(The directive identified Hispanic origin as 
an ethnicity.) The question on race for 
Census 2000 was different from the one 
for the 1 990 census in several ways. Most 
significantly, respondents were given the 
option of selecting one or more race cat- 
egories to indicate their racial identities. 
Because of these changes, the Census 
2000 data on race are not directly compa- 
rable with data from the 1 990 census or 
earlier censuses. Caution must be used 
when interpreting changes in the racial 
composition of the U.S. population over 
time. Census 2000 adheres to the federal 
standards for collecting and presenting 
data on race and Hispanic origin as estab- 
lished by the Office of Management and 
Budget (0MB) in October 1997. Starting 
with Census 2000. the 0MB requires fed- 
eral agencies to use a minimum of five 
race categories: White, Black or African 
American, American Indian or Alaska 
Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or 
Other Pacific Islander. For respondents 
unable to identify with any of these five 
race categories, 0MB approved and 
included a sixth category— "Some other 



4 Population 



U.S. Cwmjs BuiMHi. 8MiilioalAlMtfactoflheUnlltdSMM:2002 



race" — on the Census 2000 questionnaire. 
The Census 2000 question on race 
included 1 5 separate response categories 
and three areas where respondents could 
write in a more specific race group. The 
response categories and write-in answers 
can be combined to create the five mini- 
mum 0MB race categories plus "Some 
other race." People who responded to the 
question on race by indicating only one 
race are referred to as the race alone 
population, or the group that reported 
only one race category. Six categories 
make up this population: White alone; 
Black or African American alone; Ameri- 
can Indian and Alaska Native alone; Asian 
alone; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific 
Island alone; and Some other race alone. 
Individuals who chose more than one of 
the six race categories are referred to as 
the Two or more races population, or as 
the group that reported more than one 
race. 

The concept of race the Census Bureau 
uses reflects self-identification by respon- 
dents; that is the individuaPs perception 
of his/her racial identity. The concept is 
not intended to reflect any biological or 
anthropological definition. Furthermore, 
the Census Bureau recognizes that the 
categories of the race item include both 
racial and national origin or sociocultural 
groups. 

Data for the population by race for 
April 1 , 1 990 (shown in Table 1 0) are 
modified counts and are not comparable 
to the 1 990 census race categories. These 
numbers were computed using 1 990 cen- 
sus data by race which had been modified 
to be consistent with the guidelines in 
Federal Statistical Policy Directive No. 1 5 
issued by the Office of Management and 
Budget. A detailed explanation of the race 
modification procedure appears in 1 990 
Census of Population and Housing Data 
Paper Usting (CPH-L-74). 

In the CPS and other household sample 
surveys in which data are obtained 
through personal interview, respondents 
are asked to classify their race as: (1) 
White; (2) Black; (3) American Indian, 
Aleut, or Eskimo; or (4) Asian or Pacific 
Islander. The procedures for classifying 



persons of mixed races who could not 
provide a single response to the race 
question are generally similar to those 
used in the census. 

Hispanic population— The question on 
Hispanic origin for Census 2000 was simi- 
lar to the 1 990 census question, except 
for its placement on the questionnaire. 
For Census 2000, the question on His- 
panic origin was asked directly before the 
question on race. For the 1 990 census, 
the order was reversed— the question on 
race preceded questions on age and mari- 
tal status, which were followed by the 
question on Hispanic origin. In the 1990 
census, the Census Bureau collected data 
on the Hispanic origin population in the 
United States by using a self-identification 
question. Persons of Spanish/Hispanic 
origin are those who classified them- 
selves in one of the specific Hispanic 
origin categories listed on the question- 
naire — Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, as 
well as those who indicated that they 
were of Other Spanish/Hispanic origin. 
Persons of Other Spanish/Hispanic origin 
are those whose origins are from Spain, 
the Spanish-speaking countries of Central 
or South America, or the Dominican 
Republic. In 1 980, 1 990, and 2000, the 
Hispanic-origin question contained 
prelisted categories for the largest 
Hispanic-origin groups— Mexican, Puerto 
Rican, Cuban, and Other Spanish/ 
Hispanic. The 1990 Hispanic-origin ques- 
tion differed from the 1980 question in 
that it contained a write-in line for the 
Other Spanish/Hispanic category. This 
was coded only for sample data. Another 
difference between the 1 980 and 1 990 
Hispanic-origin question is that in 1980 
the wording of the Hispanic-origin ques- 
tion read: "Is this person of Spanish/ 
Hispanic origin or descent?" while in 1 990 
the word "descent" was dropped from the 
question. Persons of Hispanic origin may 
be of any race. 

In the CPS information on Hispanic 
persons is gathered by using a self- 
identification question. Persons classify 
themselves in one of the Hispanic catego- 
ries in response to the question: "What is 
the origin or descent of each person in 
this household?" Hispanic persons in the 
CPS are persons who report themselves as 



?opu\a\XoT\ ^ 



SMMiotf Abtiract or tfw (MMm/ SCMm: 20Q2 



Mexican-American, Chicano. Mexican, 
Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South 
Annerican (Spanish countries), or other 
Hispanic origin. 

Nativity— The native population consists 
of all persons born in the United States, 
Puerto Rico, or an outlying area of the 
United States. It also includes persons 
born in a foreign country who had at least 
one parent who was a U.S. citizen. Ail 
other persons are classified as "foreign 
born." 

Mobiiity status— The U.S. population is 
classified according to mobility status on 
the basis of a comparison between the 
place of residence of each individual at 
the time of the survey or census and the 
place of residence at a specified earlier 
date. Nonmovers are ail persons who 
were living in the same house or apart- 
ment at the end of the period as at the 
beginning of the period. Movers are all 
persons who were living in a different 
house or apartment at the end of the 
period than at the beginning of the 
period. Movers are further classified as to 
whether they were living in the same or 
different county, state, or region or were 
movers from abroad. Movers from abroad 
include all persons, either U.S. citizens or 
noncitizens, whose place of residence 
was outside the United States at the 
beginning of the period; that is. in Puerto 
Rico, an outlying area under the jurisdic- 
tion of the United States, or a foreign 
country. 

Living arrangements— Living arrange- 
ments refer to residency in households or 
in group quarters. A "household** com- 
prises all persons who occupy a "housing 
unit.** that is, a house, an apartment or 
other group of rooms, or a single room 
that constitutes "separate living quarters.** 
A household includes the related family 
members and all the unrelated persons, 
if any. such as lodgers, foster children, 
wards, or employees who share the hous- 
ing unit. A person living alone or a group 
of unrelated persons sharing the same 
housing unit is also counted as a house- 
hold. See text. Section 20, Construction 
and Housing, for definition of housing 
unit. 



All persons not living in housing units are 
classified as living in group quarters. 
These individuals may be institutional- 
ized, e.g.. under care or custody in juve- 
nile JFacilities, jails, correctional centers, 
hospitals, or nursing homes; or they may 
be residents in noninstitutional group 
quarters such as college dormitories, 
group homes, or military barracks. 

Householdei^-The householder is the 
first adult household member listed on 
the questionnaire. The instructions call 
for listing first the person (or one of the 
persons) in whose name the home is 
owned or rented. If a home is owned or 
rented jointly by a married couple, either 
the husband or the wife may be listed 
first. Prior to 1 980, the husband was 
always considered the household head 
(householder) in married-couple house- 
holds. 

Family— The term family refers to a 
group of two or more persons related by 
birth, marriage, or adoption and residing 
together in a household. A family includes 
among its members the householder. 

Subfamily— A subfamily consists of a 
married couple and their children, if any, 
or one parent with one or more never- 
married children under 1 8 years old living 
in a household. Subfamilies are divided 
into "related** and "unrelated** subfamilies. 
A related subfamily is related to, but does 
not include, the householder. Members of 
a related subfamily are also members of 
the family with whom they live. The num- 
ber of related subfamilies, therefore, is 
not included in the count of families. An 
unrelated subfamily may include persons 
such as guests, lodgers, or resident 
employees and their spouses and/or 
children; none of whom is related to the 
householder. 

Married couple— A married couple is 
defined as a husband and wife living 
together in the same household, with or 
without children and other relatives. 

Statistical reliability— For a discussion 
of statistical collection and estimation, 
sampling procedures, and measures of 
statistical reliability applicable to Census 
Bureau data, see Appendix III. 



Population 



U.S. Ctrwut BuTMu. Stitttttcal Abttrwl of the Unlltd SMM* 2002 



No. I . Population and Araa: 1 790 to 2000 




Unalnnoninwilauad. * Totd population count ha been rovMd i 

Hl^Miw origin, and mi havs t)M been corracWd. ' The April 1. 

--"'na pm e eiiefl throui^ December 1WT. and doee not Include adjueBnenta ta ce 

Source: U.S. Cenut Bureau. 1090 Canaua ol Popuhtioi 
Canua ol Population and HouUng Lleting (1090 CPhI-1 57); 
- ' ^'MrankairbytomlpopuiMtari}:2aOChuidunpubliihaddi 



No. 2. Population: I960 to 2001 



Poputa- Paiceiit popula- popula- 
Don cMnga' Hon tMn 







z 








































<W 


Jo" 








MB ; 


Nt 


2M 


























05S 







i.MI 181.143 



S.S78 163,420 



31.664 220.eeS 



266.276 264,927 

269.384 268.108 

272.647 271 .384 

275.854 Z74ja3 

279.040 2TTM1 

262,125 280,839 

264,797 263.624 



Source. U.S. Cerwjt Bureau. Curreiii PopulaNorr Rsporti. P2S-eo2 and P25-109S: 'Tebla CD-EST20O1-12-OO-Tir 
ol inanwual Slate Population EiSmatea: ApriM . 1 890 to April 1, 2000'; puWiehed 11 Apitl 2002. <ht«://eire.cenuis.ga 
data'coumlesnal>le»'CO-E5T200l-1Z;CO-EST200V1Z-00.plip>: Tabla NA-fWN - Monthly NaUonal Population Ei 
putMahad ■< Jiiy 2D02: <hItp:/lalra.cenBus.gov/pclpaM/dataMational')■bles/^4A-ES^2001-M pnp>: Bn<) unpubHshed daU 



U.S. CanauB Bwsau. SlaliRlcal Abend o( f 



No. 3. Resident Population Projections: 2002 to 2100 



[In Ihot— Kli (26IV306 twummtM 290,308,000). A» of July 1. The proiections are based on assunptons about future i 
mortattty. and miration. The level of chHdbearing among women for the middle series is assumed to remain dose to present lev- 
els, with dWeie n ces by race and Hispanic origin diminishing over time. Mortality is assumed to dedirw gradually with less varia- 
tion by race and Hispanic origin than at present. International migration is assumed to vary over time and decrease generaly relative 
to ttie size of the population. Assumptions for the lowest aixJ highest series are sixnmarized in "Methodology and Assumptions for 
the Population Projections of the United States: 1999 to 2100. Woridng Paper •36"] 



Year 



Middle series ^ 


Lowest series ^ 


Highest series ^ 


Zero intemationaJ 
migration series * 


280.306 


278.801 


282.087 


276.709 


282.798 


280.624 


285.422 


278,112 


285.266 


282.352 


288,841 


279,493 


287.716 


284.000 


292.339 


280.859 


290.153 


285.581 


295.911 


282.219 


292.583 


287.106 


299.557 


283.579 


295.009 


288,583 


303.274 


284.945 


297.436 


290,018 


307.060 


286.322 


299.862 


291,413 


310.910 


287,710 


302.300 


292.778 


314,846 


289.108 


304.764 


294.120 


318.893 


290.514 


307.250 


295.436 


323,044 


291.924 


309,753 


296.723 


327.293 


293.334 


312.268 


297,977 


331,636 


294,741 


314.793 


299.197 


336.069 


296.144 


317.325 


300.379 


340.589 


297.530 


319,860 


301.521 


345,192 


298.921 


322.395 


302.617 


349.877 


300.288 


324.927 


303.664 


354,842 


301.636 


337.815 


308.229 


380.397 


307.923 


351.070 


311.656 


409.604 


313.219 


364.319 


313.819 


441,618 


317,534 


377.350 


314.673 


475.949 


321,167 


390,398 


314.484 


512.904 


324.449 


403.687 


313.546 


552.757 


327,641 


480.504 


303.970 


809.243 


349.032 


570,954 


282.706 


1.182.390 


377.444 



2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2012 
2013 
2014 
2015 
2016 
2017 
2018 
2019 
2020 



2030 
2035 
2040 
2045 
2050 
2075 
2100 



^ Total ferlifity rate in 2050 = 2.21 9: life expectancy in 2050 = 83.9 years: and annual net immioration in 2050 = 984.000. These 
are middle level assumptions. For explanation of total fertility rate; see headnote. Table 71 . ^ Total fertility rate in 2050 « 1 .800; 
life expectancy in 2050 = 82^ years; and annual net immigration In 2050 s 1 69.000. These are lowest level assumptions. ^ Total 
fefiirty rate in 2050 = 2,647; life expectancy in 2050 » 86.1 years; and annual net immigration In 2050 s 2.812.000. These are 
highest level assumptions. Middle level assumptions for fertility and mortality; zero level assumption for intematiortal migration. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. "Arvnial Projections of the Total Resident Population as of July 1 : Middle. Lowest. Highest, and 
Zmo i m emational Migration Series, 2000 to 2100^; published: 14 Febnjary 2000; <httpy/Www.census.gov/population/praieclion8AiatiorV 
S(»ranary/np-t1 .b(t>. 

No. 4. Components of Population Change— Projections* 2005 to 2050 

286,549,000. Resident population. Based on middle series of assumptions. See footnote 1. Table 3] 



Ysar 







Calendar year 






Rate per 1.000 midyear population 


Popula- 


Net increase 






Net 










tion as- 










migr^ 
tion'^ 


Net 






Net 


of Jan. 1 


Total 


Per- 


Births 


Deaths 


growth 




Death 


,,*^^ 


(1.000) 


(1.000) 


cent^ 


(1.000) 


(1.000) 


(1.000) 


rate Birth rate 


rate 


286.549 


2.443 


0.9 


4,045 


2.480 


878 


8.5 


14.1 


8.6 


3.1 


298.710 


2,425 


0.8 


4.283 


2.578 


720 


8.1 


14.3 


8.6 


2.4 


311.069 


2.521 


0.8 


4.476 


2.695 


740 


8.1 


14.3 


8.6 


2.4 


323,724 


2,530 


0.8 


4.613 


2,840 


757 


7.8 


14.2 


8.7 


2.3 


336,566 


2.621 


0.8 


4.738 


3.033 


918 


7.8 


14.0 


9.0 


2.7 


349.789 


2.688 


0.8 


4.878 


3.257 


1.067 


7.7 


13.9 


9.3 


3.0 


376,123 


2.601 


0.7 


5.286 


3,702 


1.018 


6.9 


14.0 


9.8 


2.7 


402,420 


2.699 


0.7 


5.661 


3.952 


990 


6.7 


14.0 


9.8 


2.5 



2005 

2010 
2015 
2020 
2025 
2030 
2040 
2060 



Covers net international migration and movement of Armed Forces. 



^ Percent of population at beginnirtg of period. 
fedenly a ffii a led civilian citizens, and their dependents. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. "Population Protections of the Total Resident Population by Quarter: Middle Series. April 1, 
1990, to January 1 , 2101"; published 13 January 2000; <http://www.cen8us.gov/population/projections/nation/summary/np-tz.bft>; 
and "Components of Change for the Total Resident Population: Middle Series. 1999 to 2100"; published 13 January 2000; 
<hapy/Mww.oen8U8.gov^>opulation/prpiections/nation/sumrnary/np-t6-a.b(t> and <http7/www.census.gov/population/proieclions/ 
nalion^umnnary/np-t6-b.txt>. 



?opu\ax\oT\ ^ 



u& 



Bunau, SlaMktilAbttnctoflh0LMl9d3la^:2OO2 



Nil to 2000 



For cMnMon of immaavHi, 
• MofJi^llor-^— 
ortol960)] 



•MlBdOffflS 

popuMton f«ougM929 



SM tBRt. Ssclion 8, 







opulatioa Rale oompuied by dMdng turn of 
of "" 



St i imice/ YiBBitfook, vnutL 



1336 


6.1 


1327 


7.2 


974 


3.8 


904 


33 


804 


ai 


720 


2.7 


916 


a4 


796 


3.0 


664 


2.4 


647 


Z4 


860 


3.1 


tolals by aum of annual U.S. 



Naturaization 



mltted by aass of Admission: 1990 to 2000 

ir 80. For dafinitton of immig r ant a . aaa laxt of thia aedion] 



on 



1980 



1980 



1987 



1880 



)tal. 
U.S. 



ghtaraof 
idrsn .... 



total. 



unaldIM 



Inwnigraftfa 



frf 



;i of 1986 



skjents 



itraJ American Relief 
5-100) 



1,538,483 

435.729 

1.100.754 

272.742 
214350 



107.( 
26.751 
64.252 
58.192 



^ 



4.463 

26,r 
27.183 

231.680 
125.426 

46.065 
7.086 

60.189 

97.384 

92.427 

4,937 

880.372 

54.325 

29.161 

13.060 

2.410 

(X) 



9 



.695 



720,481 

380.291 
340.170 

323.458 
238.122 



788,378 

380.719 
417.659 

303.938 
213.331 



854^1 
367.037 
297.414 

268.997 
191,480 



401.775 
244.793 

273.700 
216.883 



15.861 15.182 22,536 17.717 22,382 



144.535 
20376 
57.529 
85.336 
17336 
10.475 

50.245 

6.737 

540 



113.681 
21.943 
55.171 
90.607 
21.610 
17.060 

42396 
7.781 
1,361 



88.488 
22.257 
63.018 
77317 
21.406 
14384 

34.317 

6.584 

824 



108.007 
24.040 
62.444 
56.817 
14.898 
8.581 

27,968 

5.086 

286 



220.360 
123338 

48.740 
9.384 

48.382 

114.864 

106.827 

7.837 

4.267 

57.712 
47.245 

939 
1.894 

277 

(X) 
7.357 



321.008 

170363 

76.631 

12.596 

74,114 

112.158 

102.052 

10.108 

2.548 

58.726 

49.374 

738 

1.432 

64 

7.118 



283.368 

151.172 

70.472 

14.867 

61.724 

52.193 

44.645 

7.548 

955 

48.938 

45.499 

346 

902 

21 

1 
2.169 



258.584 

127.988 

69.113 

16.037 

61.483 

42.852 

39.495 

3.357 

6 

71.424 

47.571 

239 

978 



11.267 
11.369 



848307 

407.402 
442.405 

342.304 
235380 

27,707 

124,595 
22.833 
60.145 

107.024 
27,706 
20.304 

49.736 

9.052 

226 



gH Si SI IS 83 



347.870 

197.525 

82.726 

18.120 

67.619 

65.941 

59.083 

6.858 

421 

93371 

50.945 

943 

1.009 

55 

23.641 
16.678 



^ Includes apouaes and children. ^ Category was eliminated in 1992 by the 

inter)ded to diversify immigration: 
are aliens bom In Vietnam between 
1976. who were fathered t>v U.S. citizens. ^ Spouses and children of persons granted 
rovlaions of the Immigration Reform aixJ Control Act of 1986. 

r4aturalization Service, Statistical Yeartxxyk. annual. 



ippHcable. 

joes categories of immigrants admitted under three laws 

.. 101-649. * Under Public Law 100-202. Amerasians ar 



U.S. Cenaus BurMu. StaUatical Abatnct of the Unllad Slalaa: 2008 



No. 7. Immigniiits by Country of Birth: 1981 to 2000 

Pn thouMMls (7,338.1 wpfMirti 7,338,100). for fiscal yMrs tncNng 8«pL 30. For definition of ImmigrantB, see text of this 
soclion] 



Country of bifth 



1981- 


1981- 




08, 


98, 




total 


total 


1889 


7,338.1 


7,5894) 


848.6 


706.6 


1,086.2 


92.7 


^ 


^21 .9 
21.8 


5.4 
2.2 


70.1 


54.9 


5.2 


29.1 


11.9 


0.7 


32.8 


56.8 


0.8 


32.9 


18.5 


1.5 


97.4 


150.7 


8.8 


40.0 


20.3 


1.1 


38.9 


,45.0 


5.7 


<Si 


298.6 
,95.5 


12.3 
5.1 


142.' 


^115.4 


10.1 


114.8 


7.7 


19.2 


21.2 


1.9 


2317.4 2,427.4 


198.4 


26.6 


15.5 


0.9 


15.2 


52.7 


6.0 


116.6 


15.0 


1.4 


^388.8 


346.7 


32.2 


63.0 


63.7 


4.9 


261.9 


311.0 


30.2 


14.3 


12.3 


1.2 


154.8 


96.9 


7.2 


19.6 


32.2 


3.4 


36.3 


27.3 


1.9 


43.2 


50.2 


4.2 


32.6 


32.5 


3.3 


338.8 


142.7 


12.8 


145.6 


41.4 


0.9 


41.6 


36.8 


3.0 


61.3 


96.5 


13.5 


495.3 


432.1 


31.0 


-^ 


21.7 


2.1 


90.6 


6.7 



2000 



Country of t)irth 



1981- 1981- 
90. 98, 

total total 



1888 2000 



AHcountrlee 



Bosnia and 
Herzegovina. . 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Poland 

Portugal 

Romania 

Russia ...... 

Soviet Union ^ . 

Ukraine 

United Kingdom 
Yi^joelaviaT . . 



Afghanistan 
Bangladesh 
Canuxxfia . 
China .... 
Hong Kong 
bidta 



Iraq . . 
Israel . 
Japan. 
tJordtfi 
Korea . 



LebarKm . . 
Pakislan . . 
Ptifllppines. 

Syria 

Taiwan . . . 



848.8 
132J 

11.8 
3.5 
7.6 
1.0 
1.3 
2.5 

10.1 
1.4 
6.9 

17.1 
3.3 

15.8 

13.4 
2.8 
286.4 
1.0 
7.2 
2.1 

45.7 
5.4 

42.0 
1.8 
8.5 
5.1 
2.8 
7.1 
3.9 

15.8 
1.4 
3.7 

14.5 

42.5 
2.4 
9.0 



Thallartd . . . 

Turkey . . . . 

Vietnam . . . 

Africa 

EmiopiiB' '. '. 
Ghana . . . , 
Nigeria . . . . 
South Afrtea. 



i 



\ 



Australia 
North America 
Canada. 
Mexkx) . 
Carit)t>een 

Cut>a 

Domintoan 
Reputriic. . . . 

Haiti 

Jamak» 

Trinidad and 
Tobago .... 
Central Amertea ^ 

El Salvador . . 

Guatemala . . . 

HorKluras. . . . 

Nicaragua . . . 

Panama 

South America ^ . . 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Cokxnt>ia 

Ecuador 

Guyana 

Peru 

Venezuela 



64.4 

20.9 

401.4 

192.3 

31.4 

27.2 

14.9 

35.3 

15.7 

(NAj 

13.9 

3,125.0 

119.2 

1.653.3 

892.7 

159.2 

251.8 
140.2 
213.8 

39.5 

458.7 

214.6 

87.9 

49.5 

44.1 

29.0 

455.9 

25.7 

23.7 

23.4 

124.4 

56.0 

95.4 

64.4 

17.9 



42.3 

21.5 

374.0 

301.6 

37.8 

41.0 

27.6 

52.7 

18.2 

38.2 

14.8 

3,301.2 

112.5 

1,929.9 

836.2 

145.9 

305.5 
142.9 
142.8 

52.3 

422.2 

180.2 

85.8 

56.0 

60.3 

20.5 

442.2 

20.6 

41.4 

14.1 

106.5 

59.8 

64.8 

87.7 

22.7 



2.4 

2.2 

20.4 

36.7 

4.4 

4.3 

3.7 

6.8 

1.6 

3.7 

1.1 

271.4 

8.9 

147.6 

71.7 

14.1 

17.9 
16.5 
14.7 

4.3 

43.2 

14.6 

7.3 

4.8 

13.4 

1.6 

41.6 

1.4 

3.9 

1.1 

10.0 

8.9 

3.3 

8.4 

2.5 



3.8 

2.6 

26.7 

44.7 

4.5 

4.1 

4.3 

7.9 

2.8 

S.1 

2.1 

344.8 

16.2 

173.9 

88.2 

20.8 

17.5 
22.4 

16.0 

6.7 

66.4 

22.6 

10.0 

5.9 

24.0 

1.8 

56.1 

2.3 

7.0 

1.7 

14.5 

7.7 

5.7 

9.6 

4.7 



NA Not avaiable. X Not appllcat>ie. Mnckjdes countries not shown separately. ^Covers years 1992-1998. ^Prtorto 
1 992. data incKide independent republkx: t)eginning in 1 992, data are for unknown reput)lk: only. * Data for Taiwan included with 

Source: U.S. Immigralkm and Naturalizatkxi Servtee. Statistfca/ Yeartxx)k, annual; and releases. 

No. 8. Immigrants Admitted as Permanent Residents Under Refugee Acts 
by Country of Birth: 1981 to 2000 

[For flecal years ending O ep tem be r 30] 



Country of birth 




Country of birth 



1981- 
90. 

total 



1981- 
98. 

total 



1888 2000 



Tol^^ 



AzertMilan 

Belarus 

Bosnia and 
Herzegovina . . . 

Bulgaria 

Czechostovakia ^. 



Hung^ . . 
Kazmstan 
Latvia . . . . 
MoWova . . 
Poland . . . 
Romania . . 



Soviet Unkxi^ 

UkiBirw 

Uzbekistan. . . 
Yugoslavia ^. . 



1,013,620 

156,512 

289 

151 

1.197 
8.204 

4.942 

<2 

33.888 
29.798 

72.306 



(X) 

324 

712,082 



912,473 
371,668 

3,145 
211.245 
^.588 

^.666 

1.621 

1,235 

*2.359 

1.269 

*3.587 

, 2.497 

*10,615 

7.407 

15.577 

53.577 

,83.696 

J97.041 

*17.815 

4.493 

328,706 



42,062 

21,801 

44 

372 

766 

5.296 

20 

12 

100 

7 

210 

126 

373 

36 

63 

2.842 

4.394 

4.956 

759 

625 

9,300 



06,841 
33.106 

66 

455 

1.227 

11.627 

38 

8 

134 

9 

472 

134 

729 

57 

68 

3.985 

2.443 

7.742 

965 

1.156 

13,342 



Afghanistan 

Cambodia . 

China^ . . . 

Iran 

Iraq 

Laos 

Syria 

Thaiiand . . 

Vietnam. . . 
Africa 

Ethtopia^. . 

Uberia 

Somalia. . . 

Sudan .... 
Oceania .... 



Cuba 

Haiti 

El Salvador . . 

Nicaragua . . . 

South America ^ 

Peru 



22.946 

114.064 

7.928 

46.773 

7.540 

142.964 

2.145 

30.259 

324.453 

22,149 

18.542 

109 

70 

739 

22 

121,840 

113.367 

(NAJ 

1.383 

5.590 

1,986 

251 



9.558 

6.313 

6,690 

22.327 

17.239 

36.174 

1.816 

21.569 

196.778 

46,100 

17.412 

3.442 

13,741 

4.828 

265 

161,014 

121.662 

8.920 

3.950 

22.234 

4,627 

2.112 



54 

39 

431 

1.030 

1,835 

383 

160 

380 

4.503 

2,184 

183 

124 

1.279 

153 

2 

9,086 

8.588 

122 

47 

103 

417 

117 



113 

36 

487 

OKA 

3.483 
708 
149 
810 

5.576 

3,365 
270 
273 

1.817 

210 

24 

16,233 

14.362 
322 
76 
149 
613 
278 



^ Includes other countries and unknown, not shown separately. ^ Covers vears 
eperKlent republics; beginning in 1 993. data are for unkr^wn republk: only. ^^Prtor 



NA Not mailable. X Not appHcable. 
1992-1998. 'Prior to 1993. data include independent I 

10 1992. data inckjde independent republics: beginning in 1992, data are for unknown republk: only. ^ Includes Taiwan. ° Prior 
to 1993. data inckjde Eritrea. 



Source: U.S. Immigratton and Naturalizatton Servtee, Statistical Yeart)ook. annual; and releases. 



?Opu\«X\Ot\ \\ 



UJL 



Buraau. SMUBeatAbalnetoflhaUn/Mdaiat98:2002 



4 hmmmt €■— mi mf Mftte 2000 



«W BZ 



tTH i*tt 



z.na 32X 






1.49« 464 



2.293 2.<XS 3.528 2.275 SM 2.BTT 







B68 


1,0*6 


1.465 


827 


3ze 




29 


ia!*sa 




l.OSB 


t.21B 


S78 


1.216 


39 


' B9 


8 


S73 


24 














3 




952 


290 














'2«a 




20 


18 












i.s5e 




54 


1.267 


11 


11 


1 






122 




12 


63 












I.S4B 




as 


6 


6 




21 






t.328 
















24 


"8 


1 


2 


23 


2 











No. 10. Resident Population— Selected Characteristics, 1950 to 1990, 
and Projections, 2005 to 2050 

[In ttMMiMiKte (75,187 reprMents 75.167.000)] 





Sex 


Race 












American 






Date 










Irxjian, 
Eskimo. 


Asian 
Pacific 


1 "2SSS 




Male 


Female 


White 


Black 


Aleut 


Islandei 


NUMBER 
















1950 (Apr. 1) 

1960 (Apr. IK 
1970 (Apr. 1) I . 
1980(Apr. 1 3* . 


75.187 


76,139 


135.150 


15.045 


(NA 


NA] 


1 jNAJ 


88.331 


90,992 


158.832 


18.872 


NA 


NA 


NA 


98.926 
110.053 


104.309 
116.493 


178.098 
194.713 


22.581 
26.683 


NA) 
1.420 


NA 
3.7M 


1 (NAJ 
1 14.609 


1990 (Apr. 1)f^ . . 


121.284 


127.507 


208.741 


30.517 


2.067 


7.467 


22.379 


2005 (July 1)! 


140.698 


147.018 


234,221 


37.619 


2.625 


13.251 


38.189 


2010 (July 1)« 


146.679 


153.183 


241.770 


39.982 


2.821 


15.28G 


I 43.688 


2015 (July 1)® 


152.744 


159.524 


249.468 


42.385 


3,016 


17.39fi 


I 49.255 


2020 (July 1)® 


158.856 


166.071 


257.394 


44.736 


3.207 


19.5« 


1 55.156 


2025 (July 1)* 

2050 (July 1)* 


165.009 


172.806 


265.306 


47.069 


3.399 


22.02C 


1 61.433 


197.047 


206.640 


302.453 


59.239 


4.405 


37.5« 


) 96.229 


PERCENT 
















DISTRIBUTION 
















1980 (Apr. 1)3 J. . . 


48.6 


51.4 


85.9 


11.8 


0.6 


i.e 


1 6.4 


1990 (Apr. 1)3*. . . 


48.7 


51.3 


83.9 


12.3 


0.8 


3.C 


) 9.0 


2025 (July 1)® 


48.8 


51.2 


78.5 


13.9 


1.0 


6.! 


; 18.2 


2050 (July D* 


48.8 


51.2 


74.9 


14.7 


1.1 


9.2 


1 24.3 



NA Not available. ^ Persons of Hispank: origin may be of any race. ^ The revised 1970 resktont populatkMi count is 
203.302.031 : whk:h incorporates changes due to errors found after tabulations were completed. The race and sex data shown here 
reflect tfie offk:ial 1970 cer^us count. ^ jj^ race data shown have t)een modified: see text of this sectton for explanatk)n. 
* See footnote 4. Table 1 . ^ The April 1 , 1990. estimates base (248,790.925) includes count resolutton correctkxis processed 
Ovcx^ August 1997. It ger>erally does not include adjustments for census coverage errors. However, it includes adjustments 
estvnated for the 1995 lest Census in various localities in California. New Jersey, and Louisiana; and the 1998 census dress 
rehearsals in kxraUties in California and Wisconsin. These adjustments amounted to a total of 81 .052 persons. ^ MkJdIe series 
projection: for assumptions, see Table 3. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. U.S. Census of Population, 1950. Vol. II. Part 1; 1960, Vol. I. Part 1; 1970. Vol. I. Part B; and 
Ojrrent Poptdation Reports. P25-1095: "Natk)nal Estimates. Annual Population Estimates by Sex. Race and Hispanic Origin, 
Selected Years from 1990 to 2000": published 26 May 2000; <http://www.census.gov/populatk>n/www/estimates/natk)n3.html>; 
and 't4ational Population Proiectk>ns-Summary Tables": published 13 January 2000: <httpy/www.census.gov/populatkNVwww/ 
projectk>ns/natsum-T3.html>. 



No 1 1 . Resident Population by Sex and Age Group: 1 990 to 2001 



[248,710 represents 246,710.000. As of April 1 except 2001 as of July 1. 1990 data are uncorrected counts. Minus sign (•) 
evUcates decrease] 



Characterlstx; 


Number 
(1.000) 


Percent 
distribution 


Percent 
change 




1990 2000 2001 


1990 2000 2001 


1990-2000 2000-2001 


Total population .... 
Male 


248.710 281,422 284,797 

121,239 138,054 139.813 
127.470 143.368 144.984 

18.354 19,176 19.369 
18.099 20.550 20.184 
17,114 20.528 20.881 
17.754 20.220 20.267 
19.020 18.964 19.681 
43.176 39.892 39,607 
37.579 45.149 45.019 
25.223 37.678 39.188 
10.532 13.469 14,190 
10.616 10.805 11.118 
18.107 18.391 18.313 
10.065 12.361 12.574 
3.080 4.240 4.404 

185.105 209.128 212.245 
88.655 100,994 102.650 
96.450 108.134 109.595 

31,242 34,992 35.291 
12.565 14,410 14.583 
18,677 20.582 20.708 


100.0 100.0 100.0 

48.7 49.1 49.1 

51.3 50.9 50.9 

7.4 6.8 6.8 
7.3 7.3 7.1 
6.9 7.3 7.3 

7.1 7.2 7.1 
7.6 6.7 6.9 

17.4 14.2 13.9 
15.1 16.0 15.8 
10.1 13.4 13.8 

4.2 4.8 5.0 

4.3 3.8 3.9 
7.3 6.5 6.4 

4.0 4.4 4.4 
1.2 1.5 1.5 

74.4 74.3 74.5 
35.6 35.9 36.0 

38.8 38.4 38.5 

12.6 12.4 12.4 

5.1 5.1 5.1 

7.5 7.3 7.3 


13^ 1^ 

13.9 1.3 


Female 


12.5 1.1 


Older 5 years 

5 to 9 yMrs 


4.5 1.0 
13.5 -1.8 


10 to 14 years 

15 to 19y€ars 

20 10 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 59 years 

60 to 64 years 

66 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

B5 years arKl over 

18 years and over 

Mate 


19.9 1.7 
13.9 0.2 
-0.3 3.8 
-7.6 -0.7 
20.1 -0.3 
49.4 4.0 
27.9 5.4 
1.8 2.9 
1.6 -0.4 
22.9 1.7 
37.6 3.9 

13.0 1.5 
13.9 1.6 


Female 


12.1 1.4 


65 years and over 

Mate 


12.0 0.9 
14.7 1.2 


Femate 


10.2 0.6 







Source: U.S. (Census Bureau, Tabte DP-1 Profite of General Demographic Characteristtes for the United States" 
15 May 2001: <http://www.cen8us.gov/Press-Release/www/2001/cb01cr)67.html>; and unpublished data. 



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No. 14. Resident Population by Race, Hispanic Origin, and Single Years 
of Age: 2001 

Pn thousands (284.797 rsprsssnts 284,797,000). As of July] 



Age 



Race 



Total 



White 



Black 



American 
Indian. 
Alaska 
Native 



Asian 



Native 

Hawaiian 

and Other 

Pacifk: 

Islander 



TVwor 
more 
races 



Hispanic 
origin^ 



Non- 

Hispenk: 

White 



Total 



Under 5 yrs. old . 
Under 1 yr. oM 

1 yr. old . . 

2 yrs. okj . 

3 yrs. old . 

4 yrs. old . 
5-9 yrs. oW. . 

5 yrs. okJ . 

6 yrs. okJ . 

7 yrs. oW . 

8 yrs. okJ . 

9 yrs. oM . 

10-14 yrs. old 

10 yrs. old 

11 yrs. okJ 

12 yrs. old 

13 yrs. old 

14 yrs. old 
15-19 yrs. old 

15 yrs. okJ 

16 yrs. oW 

17 yrs. oW 

18 yrs. okJ 

19 yrs. old 

20-24 yrs. okj 

20 yrs. okJ 

21 yrs. oW 

22 yrs. okj 

23 yrs. old 

24 yrs. old 
25-29 yrs. old 

25 yrs. old 

26 yrs. old 

27 yrs. old 

28 yrs. old 

29 yrs. old 

30-34 yrs. old 

30 yrs. old 

31 yrs. old 

32 yrs. okJ 

33 yrs. old 

34 yrs. okl 
35-39 yrs. okj 

35 yrs. okl 

36 yrs. oM 

37 yrs. oW 

38 yrs. old 

39 yrs. old 



40-44 yrs 

40 yrs. 

41 yrs. 

42 yrs. 

43 yrs. 

44 yrs. 
45-49 yrs 

45 yrs. 

46 yrs. 

47 yrs. 

48 yrs. 

49 yrs. 

50-54 yrs 

50 yrs. 

51 yrs. 

52 yrs. 

53 yrs. 

54 yrs. 
55-59 yrs 

55 yrs. 

56 yrs. 

57 yrs. 

58 yrs. 

59 yrs. 



old 
okl 
okl 
okl 
old 
okl 

okl 
old 
old 
okl 
old 
okl 

okl 
old 
okl 
okl 
old 
okl 
old 
okl 
okl 
okl 
okl 
old 



284.797 230,290 36,247 



2.726 10,083 



19.369 
4.034 
3.867 
3.814 
3.836 
3.819 

20.184 
3.922 
3.955 
4.026 
4.098 
4.186 

20.881 
4.261 
4.287 
4.184 
4.086 
4.064 

20.267 
4.053 
4.048 
4.017 
4.058 
4.092 

19.681 
4.129 
4.097 
3.920 
3.818 
3.720 

18.926 
3.700 
3.743 
3.715 
3.769 
3,999 

20.681 
4.194 
4.320 
4,109 
4.028 
4.028 

22.243 
4.178 
4,451 
4.534 
4.514 
4.565 

22.776 
4.584 
4.701 
4.518 
4.532 
4.437 

20.769 
4.338 
4.321 
4.156 
4.022 
3.932 

18.419 
3.782 
3.790 
3,641 
3,696 
3.529 

14.190 
3.096 
2.822 
2.829 
2.786 
2.655 



14.784 
3.076 
2.954 
2.911 
2.924 
2.918 

15.412 
3.002 
3.022 
3.070 
3.122 
3.198 

16.049 
3.258 
3.281 
3.213 
3.153 
3.145 

15.753 
3.145 
3.147 
3.123 
3.154 
3.184 

15.364 
3.210 
3.191 
3,060 
2.991 
2.913 

14.809 
2.899 
2.927 
2.904 
2.941 
3.138 

16.433 
3.311 
3.426 
3.267 
3.209 
3.219 

17.894 
3.334 
3.562 
3.645 
3.647 
3.707 

18.574 
3.732 
3.816 
3.685 
3.707 
3.634 

17.129 
3.557 
3.545 
3.430 
3.331 
3.266 

15.412 
3.116 
3.132 
3,036 
3,122 
3.007 

12.075 
2.625 
2.381 
2.411 
2.364 
2.273 



2.932 
606 
578 
578 
586 
584 

3.215 
602 
620 
646 
666 
681 

3.320 
689 
696 
669 
638 
627 

3.049 
621 
611 
605 
606 
607 

2.862 
616 
604 
573 
547 
522 

2.593 
513 
515 
504 
519 
541 

2.726 
558 
572 
535 
530 
531 

2.890 
558 
591 
588 
578 
574 

2.833 
575 
598 
561 
558 
540 

2.431 
525 
518 
485 
458 
445 

1.963 
430 
435 
401 
377 
340 

1.401 
309 
290 
279 
268 
255 



236 
49 
47 
47 
47 
46 

249 
47 
48 
50 
52 
53 

269 
55 
55 
54 
53 
52 

256 
52 
52 
51 
51 
50 

228 

49 
48 
45 
44 
42 
205 
42 
41 
40 
40 
42 

204 
42 
42 
40 
40 
40 

216 
41 
44 
44 
43 
43 

208 
43 
43 
41 
41 
40 

178 
38 
37 
36 
34 
32 

145 
31 
31 
29 
28 
26 

102 
23 
21 
20 
19 
18 



728 
150 
146 
141 
148 
145 
722 
147 
144 
143 
144 
144 

734 
149 
148 
146 
146 
146 
772 
144 
149 
151 
161 
167 

859 
171 
175 
169 
167 
177 
1.019 
183 
199 
207 
211 
219 

1.037 
222 

220 
211 
196 
187 
972 
192 
199 
202 
191 
188 

900 
181 
189 
179 
176 
174 
810 
170 
174 
160 
157 
149 

698 
147 
154 
140 
134 
123 
481 
109 
103 
93 
90 



476 

41 
9 
8 
8 
8 
8 

43 
8 
9 
9 
9 
9 

43 
9 
9 
9 
8 
8 

43 
8 
8 
9 
9 
9 

47 

10 

10 

9 

9 

9 

43 

9 

9 

9 

8 

8 

40 
9 
9 
8 
8 
7 

39 
8 
8 
8 
8 
7 

35 
7 
8 
7 
6 
6 

28 
6 
6 
6 
5 
5 

23 
5 
5 

4 
4 
4 
16 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 



4,076 36,972 196,219 



649 
144 
134 
129 
125 
118 
543 
116 
112 
106 
105 
103 

467 
101 
98 
93 
88 
86 
394 
83 
81 
78 
77 
75 

322 
73 
69 
84 
60 
57 

258 
54 
52 
51 
50 
51 

241 
52 
51 
48 
45 
44 

233 
45 
47 
47 
47 
46 

225 
46 
47 
45 
44 
43 

193 
42 
41 
39 
37 
35 

159 
33 
33 
32 
31 
29 

115 
26 
24 
23 
22 
20 



3.817 
817 
769 
753 
746 
732 

3.691 
743 
739 
738 
738 
733 

3.365 
723 
705 
669 
641 
627 

3.167 
615 
614 
617 
647 
675 

3.523 



710 
702 
705 
710 
3,553 
719 
721 
705 
700 
709 

3.309 
694 
704 
657 
639 
616 

2,979 
617 
626 
601 
579 
555 

2.473 
537 
533 
485 
472 
446 

1.921 
426 
414 
384 
357 
340 

1.477 
323 
322 
293 
279 
259 

1.053 
241 
224 
209 
196 
164 



11.329 
2.337 
2.258 
2230 
2.249 
2254 

12.055 
2.326 
2.360 
2.399 
2,451 
2,528 

12,984 
2,600 
2,639 
2,604 
2,568 
2,573 

12,850 
2,584 
2.585 
2.557 
2.560 
2.564 

12.117 
2.570 
2.537 
2.412 
2.340 
2.257 

11.509 
2.233 
2.256 
2.248 
2.290 
2,479 

13.361 
2.668 
2.773 
2.658 
2.616 
2.647 

15.131 
2.762 
2.981 
3.087 
3.109 
3.192 

16.283 
3.234 
3.321 
3.236 
3.270 
3.221 

15.352 
3.162 
3.162 
3.075 
3.001 
2.951 

14.042 
2.817 
2.834 
2.763 
2.862 
2.766 

11.092 
2.401 
2.172 
2,216 
2.202 
2,101 



See footnotes at end of table. 



1 6 Population 



U.S. Census Bureau, Slatialical AMract of the United SlMae: 2002 



No. 14. Resident Population by Race, Hispanic Origin, and Single Years 
of Age: 2001— Con. 

pn thomamU (284,797 raprM«nts 284.797.000). As of July] 



Age 



60-64 yrs. old . 
60yrs.oid . 
61 yrs. old 
62yrs. old . 
63yrs. old . 

64 yrs. Old . 
65-69 yrs. okJ. 

65 yrs. old 

66 yrs. old 

67 yrs. oW 

68 yrs. oW . 

69 yrs. old 

70-74 yrs. oW 

70 yrs. old . 

71 yrs. okJ 

72 yrs. oW . 

73 yrs. oW . 

74 yrs. old 
75-79 yrs. oW 

75 yrs. dd 

76 yrs. old . 

77 yrs. oW . 

78 yrs. oW . 

79 yrs. oW 

80-84 yrs. old 
80yrs. dd 

81 yrs. oW . 

82 yrs. old . 

83 yrs. oW 
84yr8. oW 

85^ yrs. old. 

90-94 yrs. old . 

96-99 yrs. old . 

100 yrs. old arxJ 

over 

Medum age (yr.) 



Race 



Total 



Whtte 



American 

Irvdian. 

Alaska 

Black Native 



Native 
Hawaiian 

arxJ Other Two or 

Padfk; more 

Asian Islander races 



Hispanic 
origin^ 



Non- 

Hispartk: 

White 



11.118 
2.388 
2.311 
2.214 
2.158 
2.050 
9.533 
2.010 
1.980 
1.870 
1,837 
1.837 



9.471 
2.031 
1.959 
1.889 
1.842 
1.750 
8.193 
1.719 
1.693 
1.606 
1.580 
1,596 



1.104 
237 
235 
218 
213 
202 
916 
197 
196 
180 
177 
166 



75 
17 
16 
15 
14 
13 
55 
13 
12 
11 
10 
10 



374 
82 
80 
74 
71 
68 

296 
65 
64 
58 
56 
53 



12 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
9 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 



83 
18 
18 
16 
16 
15 
63 
14 
13 
13 
12 
11 



5.149 
1.270 
1.110 
1.040 
914 
815 
2.888 

1.176 
292 

48 

35.6 



4.640 
1.145 
993 
935 
828 
738 
2.614 

1.061 
260 

39 

36.9 



365 
89 
83 
76 
62 
56 

202 

87 
26 



30.3 



17 
4 
4 
3 
3 
2 
9 

4 
1 



28.1 



101 
25 
24 
20 
17 
15 
49 

18 

4 

1 
33.0 



3 
1 
1 
1 



27.3 



24 
6 
5 
5 
4 
4 

13 

5 
1 

1 

19.8 



794 
171 
170 
157 
152 
143 
631 
140 
135 
124 
118 
114 



201 
52 
47 
39 
34 
29 

104 

42 
11 

3 

26.2 



8.728 
1.871 
1.800 
1.742 
1.700 
1.615 
7.600 
1,588 
1.566 
1.489 
1.469 
1.489 



8.781 


7.711 


735 


40 


236 


7 


50 


505 


7.234 


1,820 


1.592 


155 


9 


51 


2 


11 


111 


1.487 


1.815 


1.588 


156 


9 


52 




11 


110 


1.482 


1.744 


1.530 


148 


8 


47 




10 


101 


1.435 


1.730 


1.525 


141 


8 


45 




10 


95 


1.435 


1.674 


1.479 


136 


7 


42 




9 


88 


1.395 


7.425 


6.613 


570 


28 


172 


4 


38 


353 


6.279 


1.809 


1,424 


130 


7 


39 




8 


82 


1,346 


1.579 


1.402 


124 


6 


38 




8 


77 


1,329 


1.501 


1.339 


113 


6 


34 




8 


71 


1272 


1.392 


1,242 


105 


5 


32 




7 


64 


1.181 


1.345 


1.206 


96 


5 


28 




7 


58 


1.151 



4.449 
1.096 
949 
897 
796 
711 
2.516 

1.021 
249 

37 

39.0 



- Represents or rournte to zero. ^ Persons of Hispank: origin may be of any race. 
Source: U.S. Census Bureau. unput>li8hed data. 



Populax.Vot\ \1 



OSl 



Abtbid of tw UMUd SMM: 2002 



No. 5. Immigration: 1901 to 2000 

[In Itioiinnds, motpt rate (8,796 iipi mwti 6,796,000). for flacal 



•nding In ytar shown; see text. Section 8. State and 
Local Qovemment Rnanoes and EmpbymenL For definition of ImmiorantB. see text of this ssction. Data rspie ee nt immigranto admit- 
ted. Rates tMtsed on Census Bureau estlmatee as of July 1 for resMsnt population througfi 1929 and for total population ttieraaf- 
ter (excluding Alaska and Hawaii prior to 1959)] 



Period 



Number 



ruite 



Ysar 



Number 



Rate 



1 



1901 to 
1911 to 
1921 to 
1931 
1941 
1951 
1961 
1971 to 
1961 to 
1991 to 



1910 
1920 
1930 
1940 
1950 
1960 
1970 
1960 
1990 
2000 



8.795 
5.736 
4.107 
528 
1.035 
2.515 
3.322 
4.493 
7.338 
9.005 



10.4 
5.7 
3.5 
0.4 
0.7 
1.5 
1.7 
2.1 
3.1 
3.4 



1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 
1994 
1995 
1996 
1997 
1996 
1999 
2000 



1.536 
1.827 
974 
904 
804 
720 
916 
798 
654 
647 
650 



6.1 
7.2 
3.8 
3.5 

ai 

^7 
3.4 
3.0 
2.4 
2.4 
3.1 



^ Annual rete per 1 .000 U.S. population. Rate computed by dMding sum of annual immigiation totals by sum of annual U.S. 
population totals for same number of years. 

Source: U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. Statisfiba/ YlBartxx)K annual. 



No. 6. Immigrants Admitted by Class of Admission: 1990 to 2000 

[For fiscal year ending Sep t ember 90. For definition of immigranta. see text of this section] 



Class of admission 



1906 



1907 



1909 



2000 



Immigrants, total. 

New arrivals . . . 
Adjustments . . . 



Preference immigrants, total 

Family-sponsored immigranta. total 

Unmarried sons/dauwiters of U.S. 

citizens and their children 

Spouses, unmarried sons/daughtera of 
alten residenta. and their children .... 
Married sons/daughters of U.S. citizens ^ 
Brothers or sisters of U.S. citizens ... 



Employment-based immigranta. total. ... 

Priority wortcers ^ 

Professionals with advancsd degrees ^ 
Skilled workers, professkxiaJs. unskilled 
workers ' 



Special immigranta ^ 

Emptoyment creation ^ 

Professional or highly skilled immigrBrjta 
Needed skilled or unskilled workers ^ ^ 



Vi 



Immediate retatrves 

Spouses of U.S. citizens. 
CnlMrsn of U.S. citizens . 

Orphans 

Parenta of U.S. citizens . 



Refugees and asylees 

Refugee adjustmenta 

Asylee acflustmenta 

Immigration Reform arxJ Control Act of 1966 
legaJizatk>n adjustmenta 



Other immigmnta 

Diversity Programs *..... 

Amerasians (PL. 100-202) * 

Chiklren bom abroad to alien resktenta 

Legalizatton dependenta ' 

Nicaraouan Adjustment and Central American Relief 

Act. S(BC. 202 entranta (PL. 105-100) 

Other 



1.536.483 

435.729 

1.100.754 


720.461 

380.291 
340.170 


796.378 

380.719 
417.659 


664,461 

357,037 
297,414 


046.500 
401.775 
244.793 


840.807 

407,402 
442.405 


272.742 
214.550 


323.458 
238.122 


303.938 
213.331 


288.997 
191.480 


273,700 
216.883 


342,304 
235.280 


15,661 


15.182 


22.536 


17.717 


22.392 


27.707 


107.686 
26.751 
84.252 
58.192 


144.535 
20,876 
57.529 
85.336 
17.339 
10.475 


113.681 
21.943 
55.171 
90.607 
21.810 
17.069 


88.488 
22.257 
63.018 
77.517 
21.408 
14.364 


108.007 
24.040 
62.444 
56.817 
14,898 
8,581 


124.595 
22.833 
60.145 

107.024 
27.706 
20.304 


4.i§ 

26.546 
27.183 


50.245 

6,737 

540 


42,596 
7,781 
1.361 

W 
(X 


34.317 

6.584 

824 

X 

X) 


27,966 

5,086 

286 

(X 
X 


49,736 
9,052 
226 
(X 
X 


231.680 
125.426 

46.065 
7,088 

60.189 


220.360 
123.238 

48.740 
9,364 

48.382 


321.008 

170.263 

76.631 

12.596 

74.114 


283,368 

151,172 

70,472 

14.867 

61,724 


258.584 

127.988 

69,113 

16.037 

61.483 


347.870 

197.525 

82,726 

18,120 

67.619 


97.364 

92.427 

4.937 


114.664 

106.827 

7.837 


112.158 

102.052 

10.106 


52.193 

44.645 

7.548 


42.852 

39.495 

3.357 


65.941 

59,083 

6,858 


880.372 


4,267 


2.548 


955 


8 


421 


54.325 

29.161 

13.059 

2.410 

(X) 


57,712 
47,246 

930 
1,894 

277 


56,726 

49.374 

738 

1.432 

84 


48.938 

45.499 

346 

902 

21 


71.424 

47.571 

239 

978 


93.271 

50.945 

943 

1.009 

55 


..^ 


(X) 
7,357 


7,118 


1 
2,169 


11.267 
11.369 


23,641 
16,678 



Representa zero. X Not appHcabte. ^ Includes spouses and chNdrsn. ^ Category was eHmbiated in 1992 by the 




permanent resklent status under provistons of the Immigratton Reform and Control Act of 1986. 
Source: U.S. Immigration and Naturalizatton Servtee, SteCMtaa/ Yeartxxyk, annual. 



1 Population 



U.S. Cenaus Bureau. StattaOoal Abstract of the United Steftse: 2002 



No. 7. Immigmits by Country of Birth; 1981 to 2000 

(In thouMiMis (7,338^1 wpwunti 7,338,100}. for ftocal yaars tncNng 8«pL 30. For definition of Immigranls. see text of this 
section] 



Countiy of t)irtfi 



1081- 
08, 

total 



1901- 
08, 

total 



1000 2000 



Country of t)lf1ti 



1001- 1001- 
00. 00, 

total total 1 



000 2000 



oountrtee 



Bosnia and 
Herzegovina. . 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Poland 

Portugal 

Romania 

Russia ...... 

SovietUnion^ . 

Ukraine 

United Kingdom 
Yugoelavia^. . . 



Afghartistan 
Bangladesh 
Cambodtai . 
Ctma .... 
Hong Kong 

IndM 

Indonesia . 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Ja|>an. . . . 
Jordan . . . 
iCorea. . . . 

Laos 

Lebanon . . 
PalQStan . . 
PhHppiries. 

Syria 

Taiwan . . . 



7,338.1 
706.6 

70.1 
29.1 
32.8 
32.9 
97.4 
40.0 
38.9 

ei5 

19.2 
2317.4 

26.6 
15.2 

116.6 

^388.0 

63.0 

281.9 
14.3 

154.0 
19.6 
36.3 
43.2 
32.6 

338.8 

145.6 
41.6 
61.3 

495.3 
20 



7,500.0 
1.008.2 

^21 .9 
21.8 
54.9 
11.9 
56.8 
18.5 

150.7 
20.3 

^.6 
_ 95.5 
^115.4 

114.8 
21.2 
2.427.4 
15.5 
52.7 
15.0 

346.7 
63.7 

311.0 
12.3 
96.9 
32.2 
27.3 
50.2 
32.5 

142.7 
41.4 
36.8 
96.5 

432.1 
21.7 
90.6 



02.7 

5.4 
2.2 
5.2 
0.7 
0.8 
1.5 
8.8 
1.1 
5.7 

12.3 
5.1 

10.1 
7.7 
1.9 
100.4 
0.9 
6.0 
1.4 

32.2 
4.9 

30.2 
1.2 
7.2 
3.4 
1.9 
4.2 
3.3 

12.8 
0.9 
3.0 

13.5 

31.0 
2.1 
6.7 



040.8 
132J 

11.8 
3.5 
7.6 
1.0 
1.3 
2.5 

10.1 
1.4 
6.9 

17.1 
3.3 

15.8 

13.4 
2.8 
286.4 
1.0 
7.2 
2.1 

45.7 
5.4 

42.0 
1.8 
8.5 
5.1 
2.8 
7.1 
3.9 

15.8 
1.4 
3.7 

14.5 

42.5 
2.4 
9.0 



i 



Thailand . . . 

Turkey .... 

Vietnam . . . 

Africa 

EmiopiiB '. '. 
Ghana .... 

Nigeria 

South Africa. 

Oceania \ . . . 

Australia . . . 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico ....... 

Caribbean \ . . . 

Cuba 

Domintoan 
Republk;. . . . 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Trinklad and 
Tobago .... 
Central America ^ 

El Salvador . . 

Guatemala . . . 

Honduras. . . . 

Nicaragua . . . 

Panama. .... 
South America^ . . 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Cok)mt)ia 

Ecuador 

Guyana 

Peru 

Venezuela 



64.4 


42.3 


20.9 


21.5 


401.4 


374.0 


102.3 


301.8 


31.4 


37.8 


27.2 


41.0 


14.9 


27.6 


35.3 


52.7 


15.7 


18.2 


(NAj 

13.9 


30.2 


14.0 


3.125.0 


3.301.2 


119.2 


112.5 


1.653.3 


1,929.9 


892.7 


836.2 


159.2 


145.9 


251.8 


305.5 


140.2 


142.9 


213.8 


142.8 


39.5 


52.3 


458.7 


422.2 


214.6 


180.2 


87.9 


85.8 


49.5 


56.0 


44.1 


60.3 


29.0 


20.5 


455.0 


442.2 


25.7 


20.6 


23.7 


41.4 


23.4 


14.1 


124.4 


106.5 


56.0 


59.8 


95.4 


64.8 


64.4 


87.7 


17.9 


22.7 



2.4 

2.2 

20.4 

38.7 

4.4 

4.3 

3.7 

6.8 

1.6 

3.7 

1.1 

271.4 

8.9 

147.6 

71.7 

14.1 

17.9 
16.5 
14.7 

4.3 

43.2 

14.6 

7.3 

4.8 

13.4 

1.6 

41.8 

1.4 

3.9 

1.1 

10.0 

8.9 

3.3 

8.4 

2.5 



3.8 

2.6 

26.7 

44.7 

4.5 

4.1 

4.3 

7.9 

2.8 

S.1 

2.1 

344.8 

16.2 

173.9 

88.2 

20.8 

17.5 
22.4 

16.0 

6.7 

66.4 

22.6 

10.0 

5.9 

24.0 

1.8 

58.1 

2.3 

7.0 

1.7 

14.5 

7.7 

5.7 

9.6 

4.7 



NA Not avaMable. X Not appUcable. ^ Includes countnes not shown separately. ^ Covers years 1992-1998. ^ Prior to 
1992, data irtdude independent republtes; beginning in 1992. data are for unknown rspublic only. ^ Data for Taiwan Included with 
China. 

Source: U.S. Immigratk>n and ftaturalizatkxi Service. Statistical Yeartxx^, annual: and releases. 

No. 8. Immigrants Admitted as Permanent Residents Under Refugee Acts 
by Country of Birth: 1981 to 2000 



(For 



30] 



Country of birth 



1001- 
00. 

totai 



1001- 
00. 

total 



1000 2000 



Country of birth 



1001- 
00. 

total 



1001- 
00, 

total 



1000 2000 



Tol^^ 



AftMnia 

Azert)ai)an 

Belariis 

Bosnia and 
Herzegovina . . . 

Bulgaria 

CzectK)8k>vakla ^. 

Georgia 

Hungary 

Kazakhstan . . . . 

Latvia 

MoMova 

Poland 

Romania 

RiASia 

SovietUnkxi^ . . 

Ukraine 

Uzbekistan 

Yuffoctevia ^ 



1,013.820 

155,512 

289 



\^ 



(X) 
1.197 
8.204 

4.942 

33,889 
29.796 

72.306 

\^ 

324 
712,002 



012.473 
371.868 

3.145 
511.245 
^22,588 

^.666 

1.621 

1.235 

*2.359 

1.269 

^3.587 

, 2.497 

^1 0,61 5 

7.407 

15.577 

53,577 

,83.696 

J97.041 

*17.815 

4.493 

328,706 



42.862 

21.801 

44 

372 
766 



86.041 
33.108 

66 
455 

1,227 



Afghanistan 
Cambodia . 
China ' . . . 



5.298 


11.627 


20 


38 


12 


8 


100 


134 


7 


9 


210 


472 


126 


134 


373 


729 


36 


57 


63 


68 


2.842 


3.985 


4.394 


2,443 


4,956 


7.742 


759 


985 


625 


1.156 


0,300 


13.342 



Iran 

Iraq 

Laos 

Syria 

Thailand .... 

Vietnam 

Africa ^ . . 

Ethtopia • 

Uberta 

Somalia 

Sudan 

Ooeania_. .^. . . . 
North America 

Cuba 

Haiti 

El Salvador . . 

Nicaragua . . . 
South America ^ 

Peru 



22.946 

114.064 

7.928 

46.773 

7.540 

142.964 

2.145 

30.259 

324.453 

22.140 

10.542 

109 

70 

739 

22 

121,840 

113.367 

(NAJ 

1.383 

5.590 

1.008 

251 



9,558 

6.313 

6.690 

22.327 

17.239 

36.174 

1.816 

21.569 

196.778 

46,100 

17.412 

3.442 

13.741 

4.828 

266 

161,014 

121.662 

8.920 

3.950 

22.234 

4.827 

2.112 



54 

39 

431 

1,030 

1.835 

383 

160 

380 

4.503 

2,184 

183 

124 

1,279 

153 

2 

0.008 

8.588 

122 

47 

103 

417 

117 



113 

36 

487 

3.483 

708 

149 

810 

5.576 

3.365 

270 

273 

1.817 

210 

24 

15,233 

14.362 

322 

76 

149 

813 

278 



NA Not a^lat)le. X Not applicable. ^ Includes other countries and unknown, not shown separately. ^ Covers vears 
1 992- 1 998. ^ Prior to 1 993. data include independent republk»; beginning in 1 993, data are for unkrK>wn republic only, f Prior 
lo 1 992. data inckide independent reput>lics; beginning in 1 992. data are for unknown republk: only. ^ Includes Taiwan. ® Prior 
to 1993. data inckide Eritrea. 

Source: U.S. Immigratkxi and Naturalizatk)n Sen^tee. Statistical Yeartxx)k, annual; and releases. 



Popu\«XVox\ W 



UJL Oonwa Bureau. Slatialical Abttracr o/ the t/rMsd SftrtM: 2002 



No. 9. Immlgraiits Admitted by State and Laadlng Country of Birth: ZOOO 





mmigfinn 


•"««" 


1h««KK 


"1 








Slale and omsr arsa 


TolBl' 


Me,™ 


Ch,™ 


Phlllp- 


Jndia 


Vialnam 


gun 


El 
Salvador 


not 




MB.M7 

1.904 

ti'seo 

98:3S1 

3,052 
2:989 
V133 

11 

493 
2:001 

9:251 

,ii 

465 
',662 
63,640 
3710 

20.067 

'!i 

'248 
1.556 

2.64B 
1.326 


173.919 

6,301 

2,915 

39 
4,597 

1,083 

699 
1,794 

29 

i 

B36 
B34 
' 40 
700 

i;3B0 

345 

49 

191 

i;o3« 
,S 

952 
60 


45M2 

304 

503 
544 

1,119 
1,475 

22a 

176 
B1 

1 

394 
25 
68 

1.662 

597 
1.494 

187 

'1 

54 

aea 

t.058 
290 

M 

6S 


«,47« 

335 
151 
1.922 

2.738 
IZfl 

206 

39 
64 

'388 

288 
464 

165 

uie 

1,2flJ 

5 


42M8 
374 

288 

594 

1.438 
145 

70 

4,364 
785 

345 
201 
' 57 

13 


18.747 

464 

351 
ZOB 

35 
433 

350 

536 
46 

426 
352 

365 

■i 
"1 


34,029 

5,1 

31 

52 

475 
79 

431 

30 
39 


72.578 

69 
101 

544 

851 

135 
57 

1,460 
712 

■ 52 

1,7B4 
69 








Alaska. . . . 
AriHwa 


10 


CotofaOp 

DMaware ', 


i 












3 


















lutonrland 


164 




'■'z? 


























NMH(uiip«Nr> 


28 










flffl ass-: ::,:,:: 








fe;;:;::;;::- 








rssff ,: 


2 






























W»w*9 

QUB" 

NonhemMaHaru 

Wryin (starxfs. 
Amwd Sstveos posts 


24 



Sourc*: U.S. InyntgrMlon end Ntiurslluilon 3*nrlca, SEKWul Vc 



No. 1 0. Resident Population— Selected Characteristics, 1 950 to 1 990, 
and Projections, 2005 to 2050 

[In thomends (75,187 represents 75,187,000)] 





Sex 




Race 


















American 






Date 










Indian. 
Eskimo. 


Asian. 
Padfk: 


"Sp 




Male 


Female 


White 


Black 


Aleut 


Islander 


NUMBER 
















1950 (Apr. 1 


75.187 


76.139 


135.150 


15,045 


NA 


(NA) 


NA) 


1960 (Apr. 1 .^ 

1970 (Apr. 1 I . . 
1980 (Apr. 1 J*. 
1990 Apr. 1 l\ . . 


88.331 


90.992 


158.832 


18.872 


NA 


NA 


NA 


98.926 


104.309 


178.098 


22,581 


NA 


NA 


NA 


110.053 


116.493 


194.713 


26,683 


1.420 


3.729 


14.609 


121.284 


127,507 


208.741 


30.517 


2.067 


7.467 


22.379 


2005 July 1)5 

2010 July 1 ; 

2015 (July 1 ; 


140.698 


147.018 


234.221 


37,619 


2.625 


13.251 


38.188 


146.679 


153.183 


241.770 


39.982 


2.821 


15.289 


43.688 


152.744 


159,524 


249.468 


42.385 


3.016 


17.399 


49.255 


2020 (July 1)* 

2025 Jotyli;. ... 


158.856 


166.071 


257,394 


44.736 


3.207 


19.589 


55.156 


165.009 


172.806 


265.306 


47.089 


3.399 


22.020 


61,433 


2050 (July 1)« 


197.047 


206.640 


302,453 


59.239 


4.405 


37,569 


96.229 


PERCEffT 
















(DISTRIBUTION 
















19eO(Apr. 1p4 . 
1990 (Apr. 1) 3 5. . . 


48.6 


51.4 


85.9 


11.8 


0.6 


1.6 


6.4 


48.7 


51.3 


83.9 


12.3 


0.8 


3.0 


9.0 


2025 (July nj 

2050 (July 1)« 


48.8 


51.2 


78.5 


13.9 


1.0 


6.5 


18.2 


48.8 


51.2 


74.9 


14.7 


1.1 


9.3 


24.3 



NA Not available. ^ Persons of Hispank: origin may be of any race. ^ The revised 1970 reskjent populatkxi count is 
203.302.031 ; whk:h incorporates changes due to errors found after tabuiattons were completed. The race and sex data shown here 
reflect the official 1970 census count. ^ The race data shown have t)een modified; see text of this sectk)n for explanatk)n. 
* See footnote 4. Table 1 . ^ The April 1 . 1990. estimates base (248.790,925) includes count rssolutk)n oorrectk>ns processed 
through August 1997. It generally does not include adjustments for census coverage errors. However, it includes adjustments 
estimated for the 1995 lest Census in various k)calities in California. New Jersey, and Louisiana; and the 1998 census dress 
rehearsals in k)calities in California and Wisconsin. These adjustments amounted to a total of 81 ,052 persons. ^ Mkklle series 
prelection: for assumptkXM, see Table 3. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. U.S. Census of Population. 1950, Vol. II. Part 1; 1960, Vol. I. Part 1; 1970, Vol. I, Part B; and 
CunrBTtt Population Reports, P25-1095: "Natk>nai Estimates, Annual Population Estimates by Sex. Race and Hispank: Origin. 
Setoded Years from 1990 to 2(XXr; published 26 May 2(XX); <http7/www.census.gov/populatk>n/www/estimates/natk>n3.html>: 
and 'l^totonal PopulatkKi Prpjectk>ns-Summary Tables"; published 13 January 2000: <http://www.cen8us.gov/populatk)rVWww/ 
prp|ections/natsum-T3.html>. 

No 1 1 . Resident Population by Sex and Age Group: 1 990 to 2001 



{248,710 rsp r e se nts 246,710,000. As of April 1 except 2001 as of July 1. 1990 data are uncorrected counts. Minus sign (-) 
tncteates decrease] 



Characteristic 


Number 
(1.000) 


Percent 
distributton 


Percent 
change 




1990 2000 2001 


1990 2000 2001 


1990-2000 2000-2(K)1 


Male 


248,710 281,422 284,797 

121,239 138,054 139.813 
127.470 143.368 144,984 

18,354 19.176 19.369 
18.099 20.550 20.184 
17.114 20.528 20.881 
17.754 20.220 20.267 
19.020 18.964 19,681 
43,176 39,892 39.607 
37.579 45.149 45,019 
25,223 37,678 39,188 
10.532 13.469 14,190 
10.616 10.805 11.118 
18,107 18.391 18,313 
10.055 12.361 12.574 
3.080 4.240 4.404 

185.105 209.128 212.245 
88.655 100.994 102.650 
96.450 108.134 109.595 

31,242 34.992 35.291 
12.565 14.410 14.583 
18.677 20.582 20.708 


100.0 100.0 100.0 

48.7 49.1 49.1 

51.3 50.9 50.9 

7.4 6.8 6.8 
7.3 7.3 7.1 
6.9 7.3 7.3 

7.1 7.2 7.1 
7.6 6.7 6.9 

17.4 14.2 13.9 
15.1 16.0 15.8 
10.1 13.4 13.8 

4.2 4.8 5.0 

4.3 3.8 3.9 
7.3 6.5 6.4 

4.0 4.4 4.4 
1.2 1.5 1.5 

74.4 74.3 74.5 
35.6 35.9 36.0 

38.8 38.4 38.5 

12.6 12.4 12.4 

5.1 5.1 5.1 

7.5 7.3 7.3 


13^ 1^ 
13.9 1.3 


Female 


12.5 1.1 


Under5years 

5 to 9 years 


4.5 1.0 
13.5 -1.8 


10 to 14 years 

15 to 19years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

46 10 54 years 

56 to 59 years 

60 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

18 years and over 

Male 


19.9 1.7 
13.9 0.2 
-0.3 3.8 
-7.6 -0.7 
20.1 -0.3 
49.4 4.0 
27.9 5.4 
1.8 2.9 
1.6 -0.4 
22.9 1.7 
37.6 3.9 

13.0 1.5 
13.9 1.6 


Female 


12.1 1.4 


66 years and over 

Male 


12.0 0.9 
14.7 1.2 


Female 


10.2 0.6 







Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Table DP-1 Profile of General Demographic Characteristk^s for the United States"; published 
15 May 2O0^^, <httpy/www.census.gov/Press-Re1easeA¥ww/2(X)1/ct>01cn67.html>; and unpublished data. 



Population \^ 



MS.OmmmBuimu. Stadtttcal Abstract of the UnHed Stetos; 2002 



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Abtbid of the United StaUM: 20Q2 



No. 20. Resident Popuiation— Components of Change for States: 2000-2001 

[Covers period April 1, 2000. to July 1, 2001. Minus sign (-) indicates net decrease] 



State 



Numeric 

population 

change 



Births 



Deaths 



Net 

international 

migration 



Net internal 
migration 



Federal 

civilian 

movement 



Residual 



United States 

Alabama 

Alaslca 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 



Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 
Florida 



Georgia 
Hawaii . 
Idaho. . 
Illinois . 
Indiana. 



Iowa . . . 
Kansas. . 
Kentudcy 
Louisi€ma 
Maine. . . 



Maryland . . . . 
Massachusetts. 

Michigan 

Minnesota. . . . 
Mississippi . . . 



Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska .... 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey. . . 
New Mexkx) . . 

New York 

North Carolina . 
North Dakota. . 



Ohk) 

Oklahoma. . . 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . 
Rhode Island . 



South Carolina. 
South Dakota . 
Tennessee . . . 

Texas 

Utah 



Vermont . . . . 

Virginia 

Washington. . 
West Virginia . 
Wisconsin. . . 
Wyoming . . . 



3^74,981 S,042,426 2,989.064 1,339327 



17.256 

7.960 

176.699 

18.690 
629.482 

116.453 

19,509 

12.565 

-237 

414.137 

197,462 
12.861 
27.053 
63.006 
34.260 

-3,145 
6.223 
23.787 
-3.546 
11.747 

78,670 
30,207 
52,373 
52.815 
13.371 

34.496 

2.238 

1.972 

107.817 

23.395 

70,081 
10.100 
34,921 
136.955 
-7.752 

20.401 
9.443 

51.468 
6.096 

10.601 

50.999 

1.756 

50.738 

473,198 

36,620 

4.263 

109.219 

93.852 

-6.428 

38.231 

641 



80.131 
12.624 

104.781 
47.970 

660.126 

79.847 
53.343 
13,862 
10.181 
256.107 

168.353 

23,452 

24.583 

231,194 

107.126 

46.648 
48.712 
68,762 
87.433 
16.505 

94.603 

101,062 

169.278 

82.541 

56.970 

94.677 
13,320 
30.192 
37.234 
17.683 

138,856 

33,732 

323.772 

150.843 

9.452 

195.720 
60.327 
55.999 

180.121 
15.375 

71.330 
12,866 
99.246 
447.418 
57.516 

7.872 

124.540 

99.727 

25,477 

85,327 

7.610 



56.534 

3,628 

50.703 

34.843 

285.733 

34.144 

37,832 

8.592 

7.589 

204.172 

79.804 
10,357 
11.976 
134,303 
69.179 

35.033 
31.045 
49.431 
51.633 
15.512 

54.845 
70.785 
109.292 
47.363 
35.931 

68,762 
10.165 
18,878 
18.588 
12.137 

89.267 

16.862 

197.846 

89.957 

7.379 

136.432 
43.267 

JO.994 

163.050 

12.571 

46,194 

8.822 

68.953 

185.621 

15.429 

6.428 
70.495 
55.046 
26.372 
58,334 

4.956 



3.793 

1.709 

28.918 

3.618 

343.693 

19.660 

14.824 

2.077 

4.034 

122,430 

28.376 
6.493 
3.707 

75.160 
9.344 

4.606 
7.927 
3.803 
3.797 
888 

26,903 
25.710 
24.215 
11.876 
1.870 

8.151 

470 

3.975 

16.939 

1,694 

60.361 

5.935 

159.126 

21.191 

567 

12.563 

6.439 

13.797 

22.545 

3.655 

5.563 

643 

7.654 

134.547 

9.367 

836 
28.340 
27.301 

620 
7.627 

490 



-9.400 
-2,702 

92,892 
2.065 

-88.514 

50.139 

-9,628 

5.463 

-6.791 

236.764 

78.036 

-6.224 

10,424 

•110.286 

-12.522 

-18.790 

-19.306 

1,378 

-42.929 

10.133 

12.639 

-24.431 

-30.422 

5,653 

-9.428 

887 

-1,377 

-13,022 

70,483 

16.232 

-39.215 

-12.481 

-249.636 

55.683 

-10.389 

-49.578 

•13.616 

19.126 

-30.640 

4.512 

21.224 

•2,883 

13.179 

75.014 

-14.916 

2.145 
26.418 
22.420 
•5,853 

4.510 
•2.440 



•8,206 

-81 
-124 
-143 

-30 
•1.179 

•202 
-49 
•26 
-31 

-462 

-467 

•292 

-27 

•156 

•5 

•2 

•114 

•193 

•129 

•25 

•237 
•29 
-14 

•13 
•112 

•99 
•22 

•52 

-54 

-5 

-62 

-73 

-145 

-670 

-39 

-41 
•175 
-13 
-27 
•19 

-254 
-21 
•86 

-785 
•34 

•1 

•980 

•361 

-1 

-5 

-22 



•653 

81 

954 

-90 

1.089 

1.153 

-1.149 

-219 

-41 

3.470 

2.968 

-211 

342 

1.389 
-504 

-574 

49 

•532 

-85 

-242 

-393 

-1.320 

•1.382 

121 

2 

•358 

12 

-243 

1.803 

-72 

-592 

-151 

-350 

-135 

36 

•1.831 
-265 
-447 

-2.853 
-351 

-670 
-27 

-302 

2.625 

116 

-161 
1.396 
-189 
-299 
•894 
-41 



• Represents zero. ^ State estimates are constrained to sum to an independently derived estimate of the natk>nai populatkNi. 
The residual is \he difference between a state's population before arxJ after imposing this constraint. The residual is not a 
demographk: component of populatk>n change: rather, it is a statistical artifact of the procedures employed to produce the 
estimates. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. 'Table ST-2001 EST-02 • Estimated State Demooraphk: Components of Chanoe: April 1 . 2000. 
to July 1. 2001"; published 27 December 2001: <http://eire.census.gov/popest^ta/state8Aables/ST^EST2001^02.php>; and 
unpublished data. 



24 Population 



U.S. Ceneut Bureau. Slatitliciri AMract of the UmM SIMM: 2008 



No. 21. Resident Population by Age and State: 2000 

[In thommdi. •mipC paroMil (281,422 wpwMnH 281,422t000). As of April. Includes Armed Fbroes stationed in area] 



Stale 



Under 5 
TotaJ years 



5 to 17 
years 



Per- 
cent 
85 65 
18 to 25to 35to 45 to 55to 65to 75 to years years 
24 34 44 54 64 74 84 and and 

years years years years years years years over over 



U^ 



AL. 
AK. 
AZ. 

AR. 
CA. 

CO. 

CT 

DE. 

DC. 

FL. 

GA. 
HI . 
10 . 
IL. . 
M . 

lA . 

KS 

KY. 

LA. 

ME. 

MO. 
MA. 

Ml . 
MN. 
MS. 

MO 
MT. 
NE. 
NV. 
NH. 

NJ. 
NM. 
NY. 
NC. 
NO. 

OH. 
OK. 
OR. 
PA, 
Rl . 



SC 
SO. 

TN. 
TX. 
UT. 

VT. 
VA. 
WA 
WV 
Wf. 



281,422 19,176 53,118 27,143 39,802 45,149 37,678 24,275 18,391 12,361 4,240 12.4 



4.447 

627 

5.131 

2.673 

33.872 

4.301 

3.406 

784 

572 

15.962 

8.186 
1.212 
1.294 
12.419 
6.080 

2.926 
2.688 
4.042 
4.469 
1.275 

5.296 
6.349 
9.938 
4.919 
2.845 

5.595 
902 
1.711 
1 .998 
1.236 

8,414 

1.819 

18,976 

8.049 

642 

11.353 
3.451 
3,421 

12.281 
1.048 

4.012 

755 

5,689 

20.852 

2.233 

609 
7.079 
5.894 
1.808 
5.364 

494 



296 

48 

382 

182 

2.487 

296 
223 

52 

33 

946 

595 

78 

98 

877 

423 

188 
189 
266 
317 
71 

353 
397 
672 
330 
204 

370 

55 

117 

146 

76 

564 

131 

1,239 

540 

39 

755 
236 
223 
728 
64 

265 

51 

375 

1.625 

209 

34 
482 
394 
102 
342 

31 



827 
143 
985 
499 
6.763 

803 

618 

143 

82 

2.701 

1.574 
218 
271 

2.369 

1.151 

545 
524 
729 
902 
231 

1,003 

1,103 

1.924 

957 

571 

1.058 
175 
333 
366 
234 

1.524 

378 

3.451 

1.425 

121 

2,133 
656 
624 

2,194 
184 

745 

152 

1.024 

4,262 

509 

114 
1.276 
1,120 

301 

1.026 

96 



440 

57 

514 

262 

3.366 

430 

272 

75 

73 

1.331 

838 
115 
139 
1.211 
615 

298 

276 
402 
474 
104 

451 
579 
932 
470 
311 

536 
86 
174 
160 
103 

677 

178 

1.765 

807 

73 

1.057 
357 
328 

1,094 
107 

408 

78 

549 

2.199 

317 

57 
679 
559 
172 
521 

50 



603 

89 

743 

353 

5.229 

664 
452 
109 
102 
2.064 

1,299 
171 
169 

1.812 
831 

363 
349 
568 
601 
158 

749 
927 
1,362 
673 
382 

739 
103 
223 
307 
160 

1.189 

234 

2.757 

1,213 

77 

1,520 
452 
471 

1,560 
140 

561 

91 

816 

3.162 

327 

75 

1,037 

841 

229 

706 

60 



686 
114 
769 
396 
5.485 

737 

581 

128 

88 

2.485 

1.354 
191 
193 

1.984 
961 

445 
420 
643 
692 
213 

916 

1.063 

1,596 

824 

425 

888 
142 
264 
322 
221 

1.435 

282 

3,074 

1,287 

98 

1.805 
524 
527 

1.948 
170 

625 
115 
903 
3.322 
300 

102 
1.201 
975 
272 
876 
79 



600 

95 

628 

350 

4.332 

614 

481 

104 

75 

2.069 

1,060 
171 
170 

1,627 
817 

393 
354 
557 
586 
193 

755 

873 

1,368 

fititi 
OOO 

362 

742 
135 
226 
269 
184 

1,159 

246 

2.553 

1.085 

85 

1.566 
454 
507 

1,705 
142 

550 

98 

787 

2,611 

238 

94 
999 
846 
270 
732 

74 



416 

45 

442 

257 

2.614 

339 

309 

72 

50 

1.559 

661 
107 
108 
1.041 
530 

257 
220 
373 
379 
123 

470 
546 
863 
405 
246 

507 
85 
142 
190 
110 

754 

159 

1,688 

724 

53 

1.009 
316 
304 

1.132 
89 

373 

62 

533 

1.598 

143 

57 
632 
497 
185 
458 

45 



317 

23 

364 

196 

1.888 

226 
232 

56 

36 

1,452 

436 

85 

76 

772 

395 

212 
176 
274 
283 
96 

321 
428 
643 
296 
186 

393 

63 

116 

132 

78 

575 

118 

1.276 

534 

46 

790 
242 
219 
969 
74 

270 

53 

383 

1,143 

102 

41 
432 
337 
148 
355 

31 



196 

11 

235 

129 

1.282 

142 

174 

35 

25 

1,024 

262 

58 

52 

536 

266 

159 
129 
173 
175 
64 

211 
316 
434 
213 
115 

264 
43 
83 
70 
51 

402 

71 

861 

330 

34 

541 
156 
161 
712 
58 

165 

39 

239 

692 

67 

27 
273 
241 

97 
252 

20 



67 

3 

69 

46 

426 

48 
64 

11 

9 

331 

88 
18 
18 
192 
92 

65 
52 
58 
59 
23 

67 

117 

142 

86 

43 

99 
15 
34 
17 
18 

136 

23 

311 

105 

15 

177 
57 
57 

238 
21 

50 
16 
81 
238 
22 

10 
87 
84 
32 
96 
7 



13.0 
5.7 
13.0 
14.0 
10.6 

9.7 
13.8 
13.0 
12.2 
17.6 

9.6 
13.3 
11.3 
12.1 
12.4 

14.9 
13.3 
12.5 
11.6 

14.4 

11.3 
13.5 
12.3 
12.1 
12.1 

13.5 
13.4 
13.6 
11.0 
12.0 

13.2 
11.7 
12.9 
12.0 
14.7 

13.3 
13.2 
12.8 
15.6 

14.5 

12.1 

14.3 

12.4 

9.9 

8.5 

12.7 
11.2 
11.2 
15.3 
13.1 
11.7 



Source: U.S. Census Bureau. 
dBm o pfofi te .html>. 



'Demographic Profiles: Census 2000": <http-y/www.censu8.gov/Pre8S-Relea8e/www/2001/ 



Population IS 



lis. 



BtMSU, 8tMiatlcelAI)SlrMlo(tieUnM0dSIMSft2OQ2 



Ho. 22. 



».«» 


anMt 


Mjn 






I.I5S 


K7 




22 


SISl 
Zff73 


iS 


190 


S)<72 


20170 




4301 


3M> 


les 




2.7»0 


3t0 




MS 




sre 




343 


15.M2 


I2.MS 


2J3X 


a.iM 


sjer 


iXC 


iaiz 




a 


1.2W 




5 
1J77 


•'.IMO 


S320 




Z.VX 


2.740 


ta 



5,2M 
0J4S 
0,93a 

2!»4S 

s^ses 



e.ios 

1J14 
12.094 

s.eos 



Sm loainotos M end ol talM. 



No. 22. Resident Population by Usee and State: 200Q— Con. 

(See headnole on pg. 26) 





rWCWn GRSuiIXIIIOn 








One race 










State 


Whit© 


Black or 

African 

American 


American 
Indian. 
Alaska 
Native 


Asian 


Native 

Hawaiian 

and Other 

racmc 

Islander 


Some 

other 

race 


Tvwor 
mors 
races 


U.S 

AL 

AK 


75.1 

71.1 
69.3 
75.5 
80.0 
59.5 

82.8 
81.6 
74.6 
30.8 
78.0 

65.1 
24.3 
91.0 
73.5 
87.5 

93.9 
86.1 
90.1 
63.9 
96.9 

64.0 
84.5 
80.2 
89.4 
61.4 

84.9 
90.6 
89.6 
75.2 
96.0 

72.6 
66.8 
67.9 
72.1 
92.4 

85.0 
76.2 
86.6 
85.4 
85.0 

67.2 
88.7 
80.2 
71.0 
89.2 


12.3 

26.0 
3.5 
3.1 

15.7 
6.7 

3.8 

9.1 

19.2 

60.0 

14.6 

28.7 
1.8 
0.4 

15.1 
8.4 

2.1 
5.7 
7.3 
32.5 
0.5 

27.9 
5.4 

14.2 
3.5 

36.3 

11.2 
0.3 
4.0 
6.8 
0.7 

13.6 

1.9 

15.9 

21.6 

0.6 

11.5 
7.6 
1.6 

10.0 
4.5 

29.5 

0.6 

16.4 

11.5 

0.8 


0.9 

0.5 
15.6 
5.0 
0.7 
1.0 

1.0 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 

0.3 

0.3 
1.4 
0.2 
0.3 

0.3 
0.9 
0.2 
0.6 
0.6 

0.3 
0.2 
0.6 
1.1 
0.4 

0.4 
6.2 
0.9 
1.3 
0.2 

0.2 
9.5 
0.4 
1.2 
4.9 

0.2 
7.9 
1.3 
0.1 
0.5 

0.3 
8.3 
0.3 
0.6 
1.3 


3.6 

0.7 
4.0 
1.8 
0.8 
10.9 

2.2 

2.4 
2.1 
2.7 
1.7 

2.1 
41.6 
0.9 
3.4 
1.0 

1.3 
1.7 
0.7 
1.2 
0.7 

4.0 
3.8 
1.8 
2.9 
0.7 

1.1 
0.5 
1.3 
4.5 
1.3 

5.7 
1.1 
5.5 
1.4 
0.6 

1.2 
1.4 
3.0 
1.8 
2.3 

0.9 
0.6 
1.0 
2.7 
1.7 


ai 

0.1 
0.1 
0.3 

0.1 

if 

0.1 
0.1 

0.1 
9.4 
0.1 

in 

! 

Z 

z 

0.1 
0.1 
(Z) 
0.4 
(Z) 

? 

0.2 

a 
P 

0.1 
0.7 


5.5 

0.7 
1.6 

11.6 
1.5 

16.8 

7.2 
4.3 
2.0 
3.8 
3.0 

2.4 
1.3 
4.2 
5.8 
1.6 

1.3 
3.4 
0.6 
0.7 
0.2 

1.8 
3.7 
1.3 
1.3 
0.5 

0.8 
0.6 
2.8 
8.0 
0.6 

5.4 
17.0 
7.1 
2.3 
0.4 

0.8 
2.4 
4.2 
1.5 
5.0 

1.0 
0.5 
1.0 
11.7 
4.2 


2A 

1.0 
5.4 


AZ 

AR 


2.9 
1.3 


CA 

CO 


4.7 
2.8 


CT 


2.2 


DE 


1.7 


DC 


2.4 


FL 

QA 


2.4 

1.4 


HI 


21.4 


ID 


2.0 


IL 


1.9 


IN 

lA 


1.2 
1.1 


KS 


2.1 


KY 

LA 

ME 

MD 

MA 


1.1 
1.1 
1.0 

2.0 
2.3 


Ml 

MN 

MS 

MO 

MT 

ME 

NV 

NH 

NJ 

MM 


1.9 
1.7 
0.7 

1.5 
1.7 
1.4 
3.8 
1.1 

2.5 
3.6 


NY 

NC 

ND 

OH 

OK 

OR 

PA 


3.1 
1.3 
1.2 

1.4 
4.5 
3.1 

1.2 


Rl 

SC 

SO 

TN 


2.7 

1.0 
1.3 
1.1 


TX 

UT 


2.5 
2.1 



VT 


96.8 


0.5 


0.4 


0.9 


(Z) 


0.2 


1.2 


VA 


72.3 


19.6 


0.3 


3.7 


0.1 


2.0 


2.0 


WA 


81.8 


3.2 


1.6 


5.5 


0.4 


3.9 


3.6 


wv 


95.0 


3.2 


0.2 


0.5 


© 


0.2 


0.9 


Wl 


88.9 


5.7 


0.9 


1.7 


(Z 


1.6 


1.2 


WY 


92.1 


0.8 


2.3 


0.6 


O.i 


2.5 


1.8 







Z Less than 500 or 0.05 percent. 

Source. U.S. Cer^sus Bureau, "Demographic Profiles: Census 2000": <http7/www.cen8us.gov/Pr8ss*Release/Www/2001/ 
dsmoproMe.html>. 



oa 



AbMrad or the IMMsdAMM. 2002 



Population 17 



No. 23. Rcsidtnt PopMlatlon by H 





"" 


" 




HBpwKW 


ijuno 






Noit*wne 


«U8no 






IbMi 
























































Otwr 








Tow 








Pueno 




HMPW>C 




WNM 






NunMt 




Mexican 


Rcvi 


Cut»i 




Total 




UA 


211.422 


3S.Me 


I2.S 


2AM1 


a,4M 


1J42 


10iO17 


a4*.ii« 


i>«jsa 


M. 




78 




*S 






23 


4,371 


3,128 






26 














424 


AZ 




t.298 




1,008 








3,835 


3,274 


AB 


1.973 








J 






2.587 


2.100 


CA 


33,872 


10,987 


32* 


8.458 




72 


2,298 


22,908 


15,817 


CO 




















CT 


3!4oe 


320 






194 






sioes 


2.S3B 


□E 


T«4 


37 


4:8 


13 








748 


s«a 


DC 




45 










36 






R. 


is.se2 






364 


482 










OA 


B.iee 


435 


5.3 


275 


36 


13 


112 


7.7S1 


5,129 






88 


7,2 
















i»« 


















IL 
















loissa 


8424 




6:0B0 


215 


3^5 


■(53 


M 




39 


5,886 


5,219 






















KS 


zlesB 
















2>34 


KY 


*o« 


60 


rs 


31 








siBSS 


3.eoa 




4,Wfi 


108 










S9 


4,381 


2,794 


«k 












m 








UD 


5.;Ba 


228 




40 








5,089 


3287 


M 


e,349 


429 


e:8 


22 


199 




198 


5,920 


5,198 


Ml.. 




324 




2St 






89 






MN 




















US 


IMS 


40 


!> 


22 


3 




14 


2:805 


i:7Z8 


MO 


5,595 


















MT 


eo2 














804 


na 


NE 


















1,494 


m 


i.me 


3W 


ie:7 


286 


10 




86 


i:604 


1,303 


NH 


















i,ira 


HI 


















5,557 


NM. 


liei* 


'785 


42t 


330 








i:ow 


813 


N¥. 








281 






1,494 






NC 




















ND 


642 




1^2 






IZI 






589 


OH 


11,3S3 


217 


1.9 


S! 


G6 




6S 


• 1,138 


9538 






179 














2:558 


Of) 


















2,858 


M 


iziaai 


394 




55 








ii:887 


10,322 


ni 


i.o*a 


91 










58 


957 


SSB 


sc 
















3.917 


2,852 


80 








6 




IZI 






665 


TN 


s.ee9 


12* 


22 


77 


10 




32 


5,566 


4608 






















S 




















VT 


809 


330 


4? 


^i 


jI 


'1 


206 


603 


5«S 


wv 


liaos 


442 


07 


330 


'* 


i2> 


^fl 


irae 


4:652 

1,710 


Wl 


S.3W 


193 


38 


127 




2 


33 


5:171 


4.882 




4M 




84 






IS 




482 


43ft 



U.S. Caraia Buiaau, S 



No. 24. Resident Population, by Region, Race, and Hispanic Origin: 2000 

[As Of April (281,422 upwtmi 281,422.000). For composition of regions, see map. inside front cover] 



Race and Hispanic origin 



Population (1.000) 



United 
States 



North- 
east 



(Mid- 
west 



South West 



Percent distribution 



United 
States 



North- 
east 



Mid- 
west 



South 



West 



Total population 

One race 



Hack or African American . . 
American Indian and Alaska 

Native 

Asian 

Asian irxMan 

Chineee 

Fiipino 

Japanese 

Korean 

Vietnamese 

Other Asian ^ 

Native Hawaiian and Other 
Padfc IslarKJer 

Native Hawaiian 

Guamanian or Chamorro . 

Samoan . 

Other Padfk: Islander ^ . . 

Some other race 

Two or more races 



Kspanic or Lafino (of any race). 

Mexican 

Puerto Rk»n 

Cut»n 

Other Hispanic or Latino . . . . 
Not hfispcnk: or Latino 

While atone 



281,422 

274.596 

211.461 

34.658 

2.476 
10.243 
1.679 
2.433 
1.850 
797 
1.077 
1.123 
1.285 

399 

141 

58 

91 

109 

15.359 

6.826 

35.306 

20.641 

3.406 

1,242 

10.017 

246.116 



53,504 64,393 100,237 

52.366 63.370 98.390 

41.534 53.834 72.819 

6.100 6,500 18.982 



163 
2.119 
554 
692 
202 
76 
246 
115 
233 

21 
4 
5 
4 
8 
2,430 
1,228 

5.254 

479 

2,075 

169 

2.531 

48.340 



399 
1.198 
293 
212 
151 
63 
132 
107 
239 

22 
6 
5 
5 
7 
1.417 
1.022 

3.125 

2,200 

325 

45 

554 

61,268 



726 
1.922 
441 
343 
245 
77 
224 
336 
257 

51 

12 

15 

9 

15 

3.889 

1,847 

11.587 

6.548 

759 

921 

3.358 

88.650 



63,198 

60.470 

43,274 

3.077 

1.188 

5.004 

391 

1.186 

1.253 

580 

474 

564 

556 

304 

118 

34 

73 

79 

7.623 

2.728 

15,341 

11,413 

247 

106 

3,574 

47,857 



194.553 39,327 52,386 65.928 36,912 



100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 



19.0 

19.1 
19.6 
17.6 

6.6 
20.7 
33.0 
28.4 
10.9 

9.6 
22.9 
10.3 
18.2 

5.2 
3.2 
7.9 
4.2 
7.3 
15.8 
18.0 

14.9 
2.3 
60.9 
13.6 
25.3 
19.6 
20.2 



22.9 

23.1 
25.5 
18.8 

16.1 

11.7 

17.5 

8.7 

8.2 

7.9 

12.3 

9.5 

18.6 

5.6 
4.1 
7.9 
5.6 
6.4 
9.2 
15.0 

8.8 

10.7 

9.6 

3.6 

5.5 

24.9 

26.9 



35.6 

35.8 
34.4 
54.8 

29.3 
18.8 
26.3 
14.1 
13.2 
9.7 
20.8 
29.9 
20.0 

12.8 
8.9 
25.1 
9.7 
14.0 
25.3 
27.1 

32.8 
31.7 
22.3 

74.2 
33.5 
36.0 
33.9 



22.5 

22.0 

20.5 

8.9 

48.0 
48.8 
23.3 
48.8 
67.7 
72.8 
44.0 
50.3 
43.2 

76.3 
83.8 
59.1 
80.5 
72.2 
49.6 
40.0 

43.5 
55.3 
7.2 
8.5 
35.7 
19.4 
19.0 



^ Other Asian ak>r>e, or two or more Asian categories. ^ Other Pacific Islander alor>e or two or more Native Hawaiian and 
Other Pacifk: Islander categories. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. "Demographic Profiles: Census 2000"; <http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2001/ 
dsmopfX>file.htmt>. 

No. 25. Mobility SUtus of the Population by Selected Characteristics: 
1 980 to 2000 



(As of March (221 .641 iipteaawta 221 ,641 ,000). For persons 1 year old and over. Excludes members of the Armed Forces except 
tiose living off post or ¥vith their families on fxxslt. Based on Current Population Survey; see text of this section and Appendix III] 



Mot)ility period 
and characteristic 



Percent distribution 



Movers (different house in United States) 



Different county 



Total 
(1.000) 



Non- 
movers 



Total 



Same 
county 



Total 



Same 
state 



Different 
state 



Movers 

from 

abroad 



198&«l. 
1986-86. 
1960-91. 
1995-96. 



19M-2000. total 

1 to 4 years oW 

5 to 9 years oW 

10 to 14 years old. . . 
15 to 19 years old. . . 
20 to 24 years old . . . 
25 to 29 years old . . . 
3Dto44 years old. . . 
45to64 years old. . . 
65 to 74 years old . . . 
75 to 84 years old . . . 
85 years old and over 



Persons 16 years arKl over 
CMIm labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Armed Forces 

Not in labor force 



Tenure: 
Owner-occupied units . 
Renter-oocuf3ied units 



221.641 
232.998 
244.884 
260.406 

270.219 

15,740 
20.379 
20.328 
20.102 
18,441 
18.268 
64.323 
60.017 
17,796 
11.685 
3.140 

209.845 

140,454 

134,338 

6.116 

777 

88,613 

189.406 
80.811 



83 
82 
83 
84 

64 

77 
82 
86 
83 
65 
68 
83 
92 
95 
96 
95 

84 
83 
83 
75 
59 
89 

91 
68 



17 
18 
16 
16 

15 
22 

17 

13 

16 

34 

31 

16 

8 

4 

4 

5 

15 
17 
17 
24 
35 
11 

9 
31 



10 
11 
10 
10 

9 

14 

11 

8 

9 

20 

18 

10 

4 

2 

2 

2 

9 
10 
10 
14 
11 

6 

5 
19 



6 

7 
6 
6 

6 

8 
6 
6 

7 
13 
13 
7 
4 
2 
2 
2 

6 

7 

7 

10 

23 

5 

4 
12 



3 

4 
3 
3 

3 

4 
3 
3 
3 

7 
7 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 

3 
4 
4 
5 
4 
2 

2 
6 



3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

4 
3 
3 
3 
6 
6 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 

3 
3 
3 
5 
20 
3 

2 
6 



Z Less than 0.5 percent. 

Sottfoe: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Popufation Reports, P20-538. 



Population 29 



ULSl 



StirtMical AbtlrMi ofthe UnNed stales: 20Q2 



No. Ze. Mobility 

lAs of KtanHi iKRTII 



5^ fm i i^ o€ NossolMlds 



by Household Incomo: 1999-2000 

Table 25] 



Percent distribution 



Movers (dWerent house in United States) 



Hoi«M*H?iO income *» It 



Different county 



IS 



Less tfwi $5,000 
$5,000 to $9,999 
$10,000 to $14,999 
$15,000 to $24,999 
$25,000 to $34,999 
$35,000 to $49,999 
$sV).000 to $74,999 
$75,000 and over . 



Total 
(1.000) 



Non- 
movers 



Total 



Same 
county 



Same Different 
Total state state 



Movers 

from 

abroad 



104.711 

3.010 
6.646 
7.660 
14.720 
13.273 
16.539 
19.274 
23.589 



74 
81 
84 
82 
82 
85 
87 
89 



15 

24 
19 
16 
18 
17 
15 
13 
10 



(Z) 



13 

12 

10 

11 

11 

9 

7 

5 



11 

7 
6 
7 
6 
6 
6 
5 



5 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



6 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 



Z Less tttan 5 percent. 

Source. U.S. Census Bureau. Cumnt Poputotion Reports, P20-538. 

No. 27. Population In CoasUl Counties: 1970 to 2001 

(Enumerated population as of April 1, except as Indicated (3.536 rspreaents 3.536.000). Areas as defined by U.S. National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Agertcy. 1 992. Covers 673 counties and equivalent areas with at least 1 5 percent of their (and area either 
m a coastal watershed (drainage area) or in a coastal cataloging unit (a coastal area between watersheds)] 



Year 



Counties in coastal regions 



Total 



Total Atlantic 



Balance of 

Gulf of Great United 

Mexico Laltes Pacific States 



Land area, 1990 (1.000 sq. mi.) 
POPULATION 



3.536 



888 



148 



114 



115 



510 



2.649 



1970 
1980 
1990 
2000 
2001 



mil.) 

mil. 

mil.) 

mil.) 

[July 1)(mil.) 



1970 (percent) 

1980 (percent) 

1990 (percent) 

2000 (percent) 

2001 (July 1) (percent) 



203.3 


110.0 


51.1 


10.0 


26.0 


22.8 


93.3 


226.5 


119.8 


53.7 


13.1 


26.0 


27.0 


106.7 


248.7 


133.4 


59.0 


15.2 


25.9 


33.2 


115.3 


281.4 


148.3 


65.2 


18.0 


27.3 


37.8 


133.1 


284.8 


150.0 


65.9 


18.3 


27.4 


38.4 


134.8 


100 


54 


25 


5 


13 


11 


46 


100 


53 


24 


6 


11 


12 


47 


100 


54 


24 


6 


10 


13 


46 


100 


53 


23 


6 


10 


13 


47 


100 


53 


23 


6 


10 


13 


47 



Source: U.S. Census Bureau. U.S. Census of Population: 1970; 1980 Census of Population. Vol. 1. Chapter A (PC80-1-A-1), 
U.S. Summary: 1990 Census of PoptAatton and Hoi^ng (CPH1); and unpublished data. 

No. 28. Number and Population of Metropolitan Areas by Population Size of 
Area in 2000: 2000 



K 



As of April (226.0 repreeents 226,000,000). Data exclude Puerto Rico. CMSAsconsolidated metropolitan statistical area. 
^SA=metropolitan statistical area. PMSAspnmary metropolitan statistical area. Areas are as defined by U.S. Office of 
Management and Budget. June 30, 1999. For area definitions, see Apperxlix II] 





CMSAs and MSAs 


MSAs and PMSAs 


Population size of metropolitan 
area in 2000 


Population 


Population 


Percent in 
Number Total (mil.) each class 


Percent in 
Number Total (mH.) each class 


Total, all metropolitan areas . . . 

1 .000,000 or more 


276 226.0 100 

49 161.5 71 

19 117.4 52 
30 44.1 20 
95 45.1 20 
32 22.1 10 
63 22.9 10 

112 17.7 8 

20 1.7 1 


331 226.0 100 
61 146 7 65 


2.500.000 or more 


18 79.8 35 


1.000.000 to 2.499.999 


43 66.9 30 


250.000 to 999.999 


121 56 7 25 


500.000 to 999,999 


42 283 13 


250.000 to 499.999 


79 28 4 13 


100,000 to 249.999 


129 208 9 


Less than 100.000 


20 17 1 







Source: U.S. Census Bureau, unpublished data. 



'H>pulation 



U.S. Census Bureau. StatMical Abttrad of the UnAed SiMea: 2002 



No. 29. Metropoiitan and Noninctropoiitan Area Popuiatioii by Stata: 
1980 to 2000 



[At of April (177,506 rtprmnli 177,505,000). MotropoVtan retors to 258 metropoltan statistioal areas and 16 ooraoMatod met- 
ropoflan stanttcal areas as defined by U.S. Oflioe of Manaoemenl and Budget, June 30, 1999; nonmetropoMan is the area out- 
side metropolitan areas; see Appendix II. Minus sign (-) indicates decrease) 





Metropolitan population 


Nonmetropolitan population 


Slate 




Total 




Percent 


Percent of 




Total 




Percent 


Percent of 




(1.000) 




change, 

iODA. 


state 






(1.000) 




change, 
1990-- 
2000 


state 






1900 


1900 


2000 


IWV* 

2000 


1900 


2000 


1900 


1900 


2000 


1900 


2000 


U^ 


177,506 190,407 225,902 


13.9 


79J 


80.3 


48.037 


60,311 


66,440 


10.2 


20.2 


19.7 


AL 


2.636 


2.797 


3.109 


11.2 


69.2 


69.9 


1.258 


1.244 


1.338 


7.6 


30.8 


30.1 


AK 


174 


226 


260 


15.0 


41.1 


41.5 


227 


324 


367 


13.3 


58.9 


58.5 


AZ 


2.339 


3.202 


4,527 


41.4 


87.4 


882 


378 


463 


604 


30.4 


12.6 


11.8 


AR 


1.026 


1.109 


1.321 


19.1 


47.2 


49.4 


1.260 


1.242 


1.352 


8.9 


52.8 


50.6 


CA 


22.907 


28,797 


32,750 


13.7 


96.8 


96.7 


760 


961 


1.121 


16.6 


3.2 


3.3 


CO 


2.406 


2.779 


3.606 


29.8 


84.4 


83.9 


482 


515 


694 


34.7 


15.6 


16.1 


CT 


2.982 


3.148 


3.257 


3.5 


95.8 


95.6 


126 


140 


149 


6.5 


4.2 


4.4 


DE 


496 


553 


627 


13.4 


83.0 


80.0 


98 


113 


157 


38.3 


17.0 


20.0 


DC 


638 


607 


572 


-5.7 


100.0 


100.0 


708 


(X) 


(X) 


M 


^^ 


n 


FL 


9.039 


12,024 


14.837 


23.4 


92.9 


92.8 


915 


1.145 


GA 


3,507 


4.351 


5,667 


30.2 


67.2 


69.2 


1.956 


2.127 


2.520 


18.5 


32.8 


30.8 


m 


763 


836 


876 


4.8 


75.5 


72.3 


202 


272 


335 


23.3 


24.5 


27.7 


10 


322 


362 


506 


40.4 


35.9 


39.3 


622 


645 


786 


21.9 


64.1 


60.7 


IL 


9.461 


9.574 


10,542 


10.1 


83.8 


84.9 


1.967 


1.857 


1,878 


1.1 


16.2 


15.1 


M 


3.885 


3.962 


4,390 


10.8 


71.5 


72.2 


1.605 


1.582 


1.691 


6.9 


28.5 


27.8 


lA 


1,196 


1.200 


1,326 


10.5 


43.2 


45.3 


1.716 


1,577 


1.600 


1.5 


56.8 


54.7 


KS 


1.184 


1.333 


1.521 


14.1 


53.8 


566 


1.180 


1.145 


1.167 


2.0 


46.2 


43.4 


KY 


1.735 


1.780 


1.973 


10.9 


48.3 


48.8 


1.925 


1,907 


2.069 


6.5 


51.7 


51.2 


U^ 


3.125 


3.160 


3.370 


6.7 


74.9 


75.4 


1.082 


1.061 


1.099 


3.6 


25.1 


24.6 


ME 


405 


443 


467 


5.4 


36.1 


36.6 


721 


785 


808 


2.9 


63.9 


63.4 


MO 


3,920 


4.438 


4.911 


10.7 


92.8 


92.7 


297 


343 


385 


12.5 


7.2 


7.3 


MA 


5.530 


5.788 


6,101 


5.4 


96.2 


96.1 


207 


229 


248 


8.4 


3.8 


3.9 


Ml 


7.719 


7.698 


8.169 


6.1 


82.8 


82.2 


1.543 


1,598 


1,769 


10.7 


17.2 


17.8 


MN 


2.674 


3.011 


3.463 


15.0 


68.8 


70.4 


1.402 


1,364 


1.456 


6.7 


31.2 


29.6 


MS 


806 


874 


1.024 


17.1 


34.0 


36.0 


1.715 


1.701 


1.821 


7.1 


66.0 


64.0 


MO 


3,314 


3.491 


3.795 


8.7 


68.2 


6/8 


1.603 


1.626 


1.800 


10.7 


31.8 


32.2 


MT 


265 


270 


306 


13.2 


33.8 


33.9 


522 


529 


597 


12.7 


66.2 


86.1 


ME 


728 


787 


900 


14.3 


49.9 


52.6 


842 


791 


811 


2.6 


50.1 


47.4 


NV 


666 


1,014 


1.748 


72.4 


84.4 


87.5 


135 


188 


251 


33.4 


15.6 


12.5 


NH 


535 


659 


740 


12.3 


59.4 


59.9 


386 


450 


496 


10.1 


40.6 


40.1 


NJ 


7,365 


7.730 


8.414 


8.9 


100.0 


100.0 


628 


(X) 


(X) 


16.4 


<n 


^^ 


NM 


675 


842 


1.035 


23.0 


55.6 


56.9 


673 


784 


NY 


16.144 


16.516 


17.473 


5.8 


91.8 


92.1 


1.414 


1.475 


1.503 


1.9 


8.2 


7.9 


NC 


3.749 


4.380 


5.437 


24.2 


66.0 


67.5 


2.131 


2,253 


2.612 


15.9 


34.0 


32.5 


NO 


234 


257 


284 


10.3 


40.3 


44.2 


418 


381 


358 


-6.1 


59.7 


55.6 


OH 


8.791 


8.826 


9.214 


4.4 


81.4 


81.2 


2.007 


2,021 


2.139 


5.9 


18.6 


18.8 


OK 


1.724 


1.870 


2.098 


12.2 


59.4 


60.8 


1.301 


1,276 


1.352 


6.0 


40.6 


39.2 


OR 


1.867 


2.056 


2.502 


21.7 


72.3 


73.1 


766 


787 


919 


16.8 


27.7 


26.9 


RA 


10,067 


10.084 


10,392 


3.0 


84.9 


84.6 


1.798 


1.799 


1.890 


5.1 


15.1 


15.4 


Rl 


886 


938 


986 


5.1 


93.5 


94.1 


61 


65 


62 


-5.2 


6.5 


5.9 


SC 


2.114 


2.422 


2.807 


15.9 


69.5 


70.0 


1.006 


1.064 


1,205 


13.2 


30.5 


30.0 


SD 


194 


221 


261 


18.3 


31.7 


34.6 


497 


475 


494 


3.9 


68.3 


65.4 


TN 


3.058 


3.311 


3.862 


16.7 


67.9 


67.9 


1.533 


1.567 


1,827 


16.6 


32.1 


32.1 


TX 


11.539 


14.166 


17,692 


24.9 


83.4 


84.8 


2.686 


2.821 


3.160 


12.0 


16.6 


15.2 


UT 


1.132 


1.341 


1.708 


27.4 


77.8 


76.5 


329 


382 


525 


37.4 


22.2 


23.5 


VT 


133 


152 


169 


11.8 


26.9 


27.8 


378 


411 


439 


6.9 


73.1 


72.2 


VA 


3.966 


4,775 


5.528 


15.8 


77.2 


78.1 


1.381 


1.414 


1.550 


9.6 


22.8 


21.9 


WA 


3.366 


4.036 


4.899 


21.4 


82.9 


83.1 


766 


830 


995 


19.8 


17.1 


16.9 


wv 


796 


748 


766 


2.3 


41.7 


42.3 


1.155 


1.045 


1.043 


-0.2 


58.3 


57.7 


Wl 


3.176 


3.331 


3.640 


9.3 


68.1 


67.9 


1.530 


1.561 


1.723 


10.4 


31.9 


3?1 


WY 


141 


134 


148 


10.2 


29.6 


300 


329 


319 


346 


8.3 


70.4 


70.0 



X Not applicable. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1990 Census of Popdation and Housing. Population and Housing Unit Counts (CPI-i-2-1 ); and 
tfipublished data. 



Population l\ 



UA 



AbslrMi orthe United Statee; 2002 



No. 30. Large MctropoHtaa Am*— PopuhUkM: I ! 

rki mniMMi^. nopi pitaat (K> >ip«w«i BSJMMH. Aa at Apti t. Com 

(CMSAa), liMTSaoniponOTIpnmnniMinoHvMliMialHVMCPItGM). andMramMiM 12B 

_ Bil,lt,^t,yf,-US.Ofao(M « iMwnW«iMBubdM«a»JunB30. lafc. FOtdi*iMon»»^ 

u md papiMon of NECMta (N«iir &ibM CawXy fiinpciMi Aims), m* Appamb N. Mna iip (-) ird- 



AuguM-AMn, GA-5C MSA 
fuaOn-Stn Mwos. TX MSA 
BMMnAMd. CA MSA . . 
Batan Ftouga, LA MSA 
PwOTOntftinAiHim. TX Mi . . 
BikKi-Oullpail-Paicuiula. MS MSA. 
Binghwrnon. NV MSA. . . 
Dimiintfiwn. AL M' ~ 
Boi«C«jbMS> 




2333 Z.MO 



300 312 3M 



jl.TN-GAML 

ClKaeo^jvy-Kcnatha. IL-I^4■VVI CMSA . 

Oneo, IL PMSA 

Gary. IN PMSA _ 

KuiKam. IL PItlSA 

KanoMia, Wl PMSA 

Cnonnab-HwiriKin, OH-KV-M CMSA . . . 

Cinonnab.OH-KY-INPMSA._ 

OnvUnd-AKnin. OH CMSA 

AXmn, OH PMSA . 



ColoruiaSc 



OH PI 



a. CO MSA. . 



ia SpftH. CO 

dUgmBa. SC MSA 

Colun«ut. OA-AL MSA 

CdlumtiuB. OH MSA 

CWpu CnriM. TV MSA 

IMu-Fat Wdi«i. TX CMSA 

[Mai. TX PMSA 

Fon WarSt-Aitincikin. TX PMSA. . . 
Dtocnpon-Mofra-nock lUand. lA-ILM 

DaMDn-SpnrnMd, OH MSA 

DaylonaBMCh. FLMSA 

" aouldv-QneKy. CO CMSA . 

»t-Lon«nool. CO PMSA . . . 
w. CO PMSA 



WIS 


•s 


B 












































Z.2S1 






2.055 2.676 3, 



5.2B3 5,1B7 



N«. 30. Larg* Metropolitan Arau— Population: 1 980 to 2000— Con. 

it *aunnd*, moM awBMI (028 rapraMoM laSMO). A* ol Aprili . Covers ia cor 
P4&A*}, tft 73 oompaiHiI primwy •nMnpoWim saUHIal araaa (F>M3A5). and \he 'erne 
BSpuMMn tn 2000m iMned br MUS. Offlee ol PvlanuerrHWit and Budosl as d June 3C 
4 inbnKilln H«a* and populoBon irt NECMAi (NnEnglinl County WBltDDOIIan Araa 



, see Acpendix 1). Minus sign {-J 




Akmuao^atlleCreeH. 
Ifamu CNy. MO-KS MSA 
mMn-'ftnipla. TX MSA 
HnonM. ThMSA. 
MmM. la MSA . . 
UMM-Winlar Haven. FL MSA 

Uncina'EaM Unwno. Ml MSA. 

LHV^^NV-AZhfSA 

IMngiDn. KV MSA 

UnoEi. NE MSA 

Ua> nooK-NDnti urns Rock. AR M! 

bB Anaila l-RlvereiOe-OrangB Cou: 
Los AngAles-E-Dng Beach. CA PK' 
■"^-T» County. CA PMSA . 




J.ISe Z,539 2.969 



H MMtM of Vh UnlM SlMt; aXS 



No. 30. Large Mctropofitan Aff«as— rop«latioii: 1980 to 200a-Cd«. 



nn thoiwandt, cxcapt ptrcani (B2S 

(CMSAs). their 73 component prfmary melrapoitan 
population in 2000 at deMned by Iha U^. CMoa of .. ,.y.,.^, .^ w^ 
of metropolitan areas and popunon of NE(>/IAs (New Gngland County 
Gates decrease] 



126 MSAa wih 250u000 and 
Jmao, i960. For dsMtana and 

i), aaa Appendbc ■. Mnua sign (-) 



MetropoMan area 



Number 
(1.000) 



Rank 



chariQe 



19M>! mie. 



Vinetand-Midville-Bridaelon. NJ PMSA 

Wilmington-Newark, DE-MO PMSA 

Phoenix-Mesa. AZ MSA 

Pittsburgh. PA MSA 

Portland-Salem. OR-WA CMSA 

Portland-ViBncouver. OR-WAPMSA 

Salem. OR PMSA 

Providence-FaN River-Waiwick. Rt-MA MSA . . 

Provo-Orem. UT MSA 

Raleigh-DurtianvChapel H«. NC MSA 

Reaoing, PA MSA 

Reno. NV MSA 

Rk:hmond-Petersburg. VA MSA 

Rochester. NY MSA 

Rockford, IL MSA 

Sacramento- Yoto. CA CMSA 

Sacramento, CA PMSA 

Yoto, CA PMSA 

Saginaw-Bay City-Midtand. Ml MSA 

St.loois. MO-IL MSA 

Salinas, CA MSA 

8aH Lake Crty-Ogden. UT MSA 

San Antonto. TX MSA 

San Diego, CA MSA 

San Francisco-Oakland-San Joee. O CMSA . 

Oakland. CA PMSA 

San Francisco. CA PMSA 

San Jose. CA PMSA 

Santa Ouz-W^tsonviHe. CA PMSA 

Santa Rosa, CA PMSA 

Vallejo-FairfieW-Napa. CA PMSA 

Santa Barbara-Santa Mana-Lompoc. O MSA 

Sarasota-Bradenton. FL MSA 

Savannah. QA MSA 

Scranton— Wilies-Barr»— Hazlelon. PA MSA . 
Seattle-Taooma-Bremerton. WA CMSA 

Bremerton. WA PMSA 

Otympia. WA PMSA 

Seatte-BeNevue-Everett WA PMSA 

Tacoma. WA PMSA 

Shreveport-Bossier City. LA MSA 

South fiend. IN MSA 

Spokane, WA MSA 

Sprlngfieto, MO MSA 

SpringfieW. MA MSA 

Stockton-Lodi, CA MSA 

Syracuse. NY MSA 

Tallahassee, FL MSA 

Tampa-St. Pelersburg-Cleanivater. FL MSA. . . 

Toledo. OH MSA 

Tucson. AZ MSA 

Tulsa. OK MSA 

LMIca-Ron»e, NY MSA 

Visalia-Tulare-Porterviae. CA MSA 

Washington-Baltimore. DC-MD-VA-WV CMSA. 

Baltimore. MD PMSA 

Hagerstown. MD PMSA 

Washington. DC-MD-VA-WV PMSA 

West Palm Beact>-Boca Raton. FL MSA. .... 

Wtehlta. KS MSA 

York PA MSA 

YoungstowTvWarren. OH MSA 



133 

460 
1.600 
2,571 
1,564 
1,334 

250 
1.077 

218 



313 
194 
781 

1.031 
326 

1.100 



113 

422 

2.414 

290 

910 

1.069 

^J&B2 

5.388 

1.762 

1.469 

1,296 

186 

300 

334 

299 

361 

231 

OCA 

^409 
147 
124 

1.652 
468 
377 
242 
342 
228 
570 
347 
723 
190 

1.614 
617 
531 
667 
320 
246 

5.791 

2.199 
113 

3.478 
577 
442 
313 
645 



136 

513 
2;236 
2.395 
1.793 
1315 

278 
1.134 

264 



!^i 



337 

256 



1.062 

330 

1.481 

1,340 

141 



2,492 

366 

1.072 

1.325 

2.498 

6,250 

2.060 

1.604 

1.496 

230 

388 

450 

370 

469 

258 

639 

2,970 

190 

161 

2.033 

586 

376 

247 

361 

264 

588 

481 

742 

234 

2,066 

614 

667 

709 

317 

312 

6.726 

2.382 

121 

4.223 

864 

465 

340 

601 



3.252 
2.359 
2,265 
1,918 
347 
1.189 



666 869 1.188t 

374' 



339 

997 
1.096 

371 
1.797 
1.628 

169 

403 
2.604 

4021 
1.3341 
1.592! 
2314 
7.030 
2.303 
1.731 
1.683; 

256 

459! 

5191 



590 
293 
625 

3.556 
232 
207 

2.415 
7011 
3921 
266 
416 
326 
502 
564 
732 
286 

2.396 
616 
844 
803 
300 
368 

7.608 

2.553 
132 

4.923 

1.131 
545 
382 
595 



(X) 

(X) 

(X) 

96 

74 

132 

61 

12 

(X) 

(X) 

(X) 

(X) 

96 

137 

100 

128 

68 

76 

57 

140 

20 

62 

59 

56 

112 

116 

4 

(X) 

(Xf 

(X) 

48 

75 

107 

63 



14 

21 ! 

22! 

ISi 

38 
lllf 

401 
109i 

119: 

50' 
46 
1101 
24 
(X)r 

(X)| 

101 
16 i 

102 
36 
29 

17i 



1^1 

(X)! 
(X)! 

(X)i 
103. 

72 
133 

67 

13 

l^i 

(X) 

(X) 

104 

137 1 

122! 

59! 
1341 

20 

68 

57 

58 

130 

112 

4 

(X), 

(X) 

(X) 

44 

77 
107 

70 



ao 

11.9 

38.9 
-6.9 
133 
13.6 
113 
5.4 
20.9 
29.1 
7.7 
313 

ia7 
3.1 
1^ 

34.7 

363 
24.6 
-5.3 
3.2 
223 
173 
21.7 
34.2 
16.4 
18.1 
7.7 
15.6 

22.^ 

29.5 

34.6 

23.7 

39.6 

11.8 

-X2 

23.3 

28.9 

293 

23.1 

20.7 

-0.1 

2.2 

5.7 

15.9 

3.2 

38.4 

2.7 

22.7 

28.2 

-0.4 

25.5 

7.9 

-1.1 

26.9 

16.2 

6.3 

7.3 

21.4 

497 

9.7 

65 

-6.8 



6.11 
14ij 
463 i 

-13| 
263- 
2631 
24.9 1 

431 
30.6! 



11.01 
333 

15.1 

a4 

123 
213 
2131 
19.4 1 

03 

43' 
1331 
24.41 
2031 
1^6 
12.6 
15.0 

8.0 
12.4 
113 
18.1 
153 

8.0 
203 
136 
-23 
19.7 
223 
26.6 
18.8 
19.6 

43 

7.5 
15.7 
233 

0.7 
173 
-1.4 
213 
15.9 

0.7 
26.5 
133 
-53 
18.0 
13.1 

73 

8.7 
16.6 
31.0 
12.4 
12.4 
-1.0 



757 
223 

510 



180 

1.042 

184 

341 



54 



321 



363 



167 
227 
407 
121 
825 
479 
670 



1.642 

1.705 

1304 

574 

291 



146 
450 
216 



546 

417 
180 
561 
237 
178 



403 
236 
241 



453 

02 
160 
114 

76 
795 
979 



756 
573 
184 
422 
380 



(1) 
or 



X Not applicable. Reflects revistons to an area's 1990 census populatton count tttat may occur as the raauR 
post-1990 cer>8us corrections of political boundahes or geographto misaHocattons or documented unden 
overerujmerations and (2) geographic boundary updates made after the 1990 census, resufting from armexattons. 
new incorporations, aixl governmental mergers. Inctodes revistons processed ttvough January 1. 1996. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. 1990 Census of Population and Housing, Supptementary Raqoits, MMropoMvi Atam m 
Oalinad by the Otftcaoi Management snaBudoat, June 30. /993(CPH-S-1-1);"(MA-d9-1) Metropolitan Area PopuMionEstifiWtos 
for July 1. 1999. and Population Change for April 1. 1990. to July 1. 1999 (includes April 1. 1990 Population EstknalaaBMa)": 
published: 20 October 2000; <httoy/www.cerwus.gov/populatwnAwtimatas/inetrooty/nia99-01 .txt>: "Ranking Tablaa for Mlro- 
poNtan Areas: 1 990 and 2000 (PHC^T-S)": published: 2 April 2001 : <httpy/www.census.gov/populatkxVwvvw/ben200Q^pho-iahiml>. 
and American FactFinder. QCT-PH1. f^opulatton. Housing Units. Area, and Density: 2000. Census 2000 Summary Fla 1 (SF1) 
100-Percent Data. United Stales and Puerto Rtoo— Metropolitan Area. 



ttion 



U.S. Caniua Butmu. Stali8tte«l Abttrad of the UnNad 



No. 31. Incorporated Places by Population Size: 1970 to 2000 

[131 J ripri^tmi 131,900.000] 



Population size 


Number of 
irKXKporated places 


Population 
(mil.) 


Percent of total 




1970 1900 1900 2000 


1970 1900 1900 2000 


1970 1900 1900 2000 


Total 


. 18,666 19,007 19,262 19,482 

6 6 8 9 

20 16 15 20 

30 33 41 37 

97 114 131 172 

232 2S0 309 363 

455 526 567 644 

. 1.127 1.260 1.290 1.435 

. 16.699 16.892 16.901 16.772 


131.9 140.3 1S2.9 173.5 

16.8 17.5 20.0 22.9 
13.0 10.9 10.1 12.9 

10.5 11.8 14.2 13.3 

13.9 16.6 19.1 25.5 
16.2 17.6 21.2 24.9 
15.7 18.4 20.0 22.6 

17.6 19.8 20.3 22.6 
26.4 28.0 28.2 28.7 


100.0 100.0 100.0 100 


1.000.000 or more. . . 
500.000 to 999.999 . . 
250.000 to 499.999 . . 
100.000 to 249.999 . . 

50.000 to 99.900 

25.000 to 49.999 

10.000 to 24.999 

Under 10.000 


14.2 12.5 13.0 13.2 

9.8 7.8 6.6 7.4 

7.9 8.4 9.3 7.7 
10.5 11.8 12.5 14.7 

12.2 12.3 13.9 14.3 
11.9 13.1 13.0 13.0 

13.3 14.1 13.3 13.0 
20.0 20.0 18.4 16.6 



Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Census of Population: 1970 and 1960, Vol. I; 1990 Census of Population and Housing, 
Population and Housing Unit Counts (CPH-2-1); and County and City Data Book 2000. 



No. 32. Households— Cities with 350,000 or More Population: 2000 

[Aa of April (183.2 repre a enta 163,200). For definitJons of household and family, see text, this section] 



City 



Households 
(1.000) 



Family households 



Total ^ 



Total 



Total 



With own 

children 

under 16 

years 



Married couple 



Total 



With own 

children 

under 18 

years 



Nonfamily 
households 



Total 



House- 
holder Average 
living household 
alone size 



AlMjquerque. NM .... 

A]lanta.GA 

Austin, TX 

Baltimore. MD 

Boston. MA 

Chaitotta. NC 

Chicago, IL 

Qaveland. OH 

CoiOfadD Springs. CO. 

Cdumbus. OH 

Dtfas. TX 

Denver. CO 

Detroit. Ml 

B Paso. TX 

Fort WcMlh, TX 

Fraano. CA . 

HonoUu, HI ^ 

Houalon. TX ...... . 

b^rapoiis. IN ^ 

JacteonvWe, FL 

Kansas City. MO 

Las Vegas. NV 

Long Beach. CA . . . . 
Los Angeles. CA . . . . 

Mamphia. TN 

Ma8a.AZ 

lla«ni,FL 

lAwoukee. Wl 

linnaopolia. MN 

Waahv fli o Davidson. TN 
New Orleans. LA ... . 

New York. ISTY 

Oakland. CA 

Oklahoma City. OK. . . 

Omaha. NE 

Phiadelp hia. PA 

Phoenix. AZ 

Portland, OR 

Sacramento. CA. .... 

San Anionio. TX 

San Diego. CA. 

San Franciaoo. CA . . . 

San Jose. CA 

Seattle. WA 

Tucson, AZ 

TUka, OK 

Vligiraa Beach. VA 

fwaningion. uu 



1 



1 



183.2 
168.1 
265.6 
258.0 
239.5 
215.4 
,061.9 
190.6 
141.5 
301.5 
451.8 
239.2 
336.4 
182.1 
195.1 
140.1 
140.3 
717.9 
324.3 
284.5 
184.0 
176.8 
163.1 
.275.4 
250.7 
146.6 
134.2 
232.2 
162.4 
237.4 
168.3 
.021.6 
150.8 
204.4 
156.7 
590.1 
465.8 
223.7 
154.6 
405.5 
450.7 
329.7 
276.6 
258.5 
192.9 
165.7 
154.5 
248.3 



112.6 

83.2 
141.6 
147.2 
115.1 
132.4 
632.6 
112.0 

93.0 
165.4 
266.8 
119.3 
218.5 
141.1 
127.5 

97.9 

87.4 
457.5 
195.5 
190.5 
107.4 
117.5 

99.7 
798.7 
158.5 

99.9 

83.3 
135.2 

73.9 

138.1 

113.0 

1.853.2 

86.3 
129.4 

94.9 
352.3 
307.2 
118.4 

91.1 
280.8 
271.4 
145.2 
203.7 
113.4 
112.5 

99.1 
111.0 
114.2 



55.4 
37.7 
71.3 
65.8 
54.3 
66.0 

306.5 
57.1 
48.1 
84.5 

136.9 
55.6 

114.0 
77.2 
67.7 
56.6 
33.2 

237.7 
96.8 
96.4 
51.7 
56.4 
57.1 

427.3 
78.6 
48.9 
35.3 
70.9 
36.7 
63.3 
55.1 

897.9 
43.2 
63.0 
47.1 

162.9 

166.4 
54.7 
46.7 

145.6 

136.1 
54.7 

105.9 
46.3 
56.0 
47.3 
59.9 
49.1 



79.9 

41.2 

101.1 

68.8 

65.7 

94.0 

373.0 

54.2 

72.8 

108.7 

175.3 

83.0 

89.7 

99.4 

89.4 

64.6 

63.8 

310.1 

132.0 

132.8 

70.0 

85.4 

64.0 

535.0 

85.5 

77.3 

49.1 

74.8 

47.0 

94.8 

58.0 

1,124.3 

51.3 

93.6 

68.6 

189.3 

218.5 

85.3 

59.3 

194.9 

201.2 

104.3 

155.0 

84.6 

76.5 

71.4 

86.0 

56.6 



35.5 
15.5 
49.1 
25.7 
28.2 
44.3 

179>» 
23.2 
34.9 
49.8 
87.8 
35.9 
42.1 
54.1 
46.2 
35.5 
24.6 

159.3 
58.4 
61.8 
29.8 
38.1 
35.2 

288.8 
37.1 
35.2 
19.7 
33.3 
20.8 
39.2 
25.0 

532.4 
24.8 
41.3 
31.3 
79.9 

113.2 
36.2 
28.1 
97.7 
98.1 
40.3 
82.7 
32.3 
34.5 
30.4 
44.2 
20.7 



70.6 

85.0 

124.1 

110.8 

124.4 

83.1 

429.4 

78.6 

48.5 

136.2 

185.0 

119.9 

117.9 

41.0 

67.5 

42.2 

53.0 

260.4 

128.9 

94.0 

76.6 

59.3 

63.4 

476.7 

92.3 

46.8 

50.9 

97.0 

88.4 

99.3 

75.3 

1,168.4 

64.4 

75.1 

61.8 

237.7 

158.6 

105.3 

63.4 

124.6 

179.3 

184.5 

72.9 

145.1 

80.4 

66.6 

43.5 

134.2 



55.8 

64.7 

87.0 

90.1 

88.9 

63.6 

345.8 

67.2 

38.2 

102.9 

148.9 

94.0 

99.9 

35.0 

55.8 

32.6 

41.7 

212.7 

103.8 

74.5 

62.7 

44.3 

48.2 

363.5 

76.6 

35.5 

40.8 

77.8 

65.5 

79.2 

62.4 

962.6 

49.0 

62.8 

50.1 

199.5 

118.4 

77.3 

49.5 

101.6 

126.2 

127.4 

50.9 

105.5 

62.3 

56.2 

31.4 

108.7 



2.40 
2.30 
2.40 
2.42 
2.31 
2.45 
2.67 
2.44 
2.50 
2.30 
2.58 
2.27 
2.77 
3.07 
2.67 
2.99 
2.57 
2.67 
2.39 
2.53 
2.35 
2.66 
2.77 
2.83 
2.52 
2.68 
2.61 
2.50 
2.25 
2.30 
2.48 
2.59 
2.60 
2.41 
2.42 
2.48 
2.79 
2.30 
2.57 
2.77 
2.61 
2.30 
3.20 
2.08 
2.42 
2.31 
2.70 
2.16 



^ The population shown in this tat>le is for 
city that is not within or>e or more separately 



^ Includes family househokJers with no spouse present, not shown separately, 
tie census designated place (CDP). ^ Represents the portion of a consolidated 
inoorporaled places. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. 2000 Census of Population and Housing. Profiles of General Demographic Ctmracteristlcs. 



Population ES 



us. 



Atatrad of the UnHsd Stalas: 2002 



»■■« CA . 

. ^K«M. CA . 
1' •■»> TX . 



e 



ItM^O 



»rpai 
Population, 

IPopulrtDn A* m April 1 (90 npi 
Km 1970*10 — 



Places with 100.000 or Mora InhablUnts In 2 
970 to 2000, and Land Area, 2000— Con. 



1970, Ulsl 
(1.0001 



1«W^«N 



Hmton. VA 

)«yMid.CA! '.'.'.'.'. 
Hndmon. NV. . . . . 

tMiA, FL 

Haj^wood. F^ 

Houjlon/pt ..'.'... 

[^^w!al. . '. . . 

MtoMpcM, IN^ '. '. 
lng|MDOd.CA 

M^TX '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

jKMcin.MS. .!!!! 
JwnyCay, Ml 

JBIK.IL 

K«Ma CRy. Kg . . . , 
KnMCi^MO 

u a »twi ' . LA '.!!!! ! 

UnnMi. CA ! ! ' : ' 

l««),'tx ■■.!;■■ 

UiVBbkNV 

ljAigHn-Fa)«M, K¥ 

LinoCrNE 

UMHodLAR. 

Uwte. Ml. . 

LwigBMKh, CA 

Lia AngMB*. CA 

LoupA. KV 

lummtUA 

hliilyfi _ri '.".'.'.'. 

M^Um.JX. ..'.'.'.'. 

tltm.Al ..'.'.'.'.'.'. 

HknLFL . 

l>etma.CA ".'.'.'.'. 
Iknmanwy. AL . . . . 
Horano Wtof . CA . . 

M|wv«a. IL 

W M w a» ommen. T 
Nnt Hnwi. CT . . . . 
Mm Otawn. LA . . . 

NmwIlNJ. 
Mmmon Httn. VA . . 

Hsrfi*. VA 

MtiL i Wgn. NV 

OMM.CA '.'.'..' 

OoMnMd*. CA 

OUMoma City. OM . . 



laj 142 
1M M9 



»» i-i 



•.-m n 



9316 
3.7SS 
S.52S 

3204 



' Not mctwpvMM ' Tha anpuwun (Tiown n nt lade •> iw Vu cmut te»7^alea c-iotc (COPI 
N UJ Carwu* BwHv, l«)a C«1W nt PoaMiBn ml Houmlna, PeaMnn tnt Houmv Um Cauna. (CPH-2|; 
ji ENirwM* t«t Cnn <Mti PepulMsn* M lOMO ind Oiaatn (SoiUd Miki SUM by IMS Paptiuon SM). Jiiv I, 
liii<M*|>r«VltWinipuMinn l »linw»wBM»r;pM6*»«iacOanb»r;000:<tilfry^wiw ^ ^ 
M^ClMl-r3M», JOCDCwiw* oTftipuWItin «Kf M9Mm muOM of 0*>wal MmomvMc C^MMRiUbK «K| 
KM ^aotfi'idM, OCT-MI-n. PopiMMn, HouM UnM. ATM, and DMIy (gaoMihiM nn^ 

Mt0O0tun)fnartf<MI(S'IJ10a'P*K«niC>M.OMir>(WitcAiM UntM 9aiM-f>lKM and l*< ntocMcBMsl County 
"-' U. wooo 01 M«* Poptflaflon ■"() iDi Pmrto Rico 



■> 44«M<>). «■ a( *|vt. Dim m 



Id Otfwi Some Two w 



ColorMo Spnngi. CO 
Ci*Jn«ui,OH. . . . 
CoRU ChrW, TX . . 
Diidx 

B Pmo. -nC. '.'.'.'.'. 
Rut Wo rth. TX 

HdriMu. h' < ! ! ' ! ! 

MiHmMta. In ' ~ . ! 

jMlimmiH, FL 

KHHuCflyllia .. . 
iMj^U, NV 

1«BmIcIv CA ' . . 
liaingdm, CA . . . 
LoimU, KY 

Mna-AZ ..!!''!! 

Hvn. FL 

UmawolM. UH '.'.'. 
NrtikiE^DwiiMon. T1 
Nm> OrtMra. LA . . . 

Nwr-taUNY 

HmuKNJ. 
CWilw<d.CA . 
OdWiOini CiTr. OK 

pniMMpMs. m' 

Pfii>w«.AZ 

PnbirVi. PA . . . . 

PamJiCM 

fW*|^NC 

Hhr»t»ldB.CA 

tei AnKno'. n. .'. . 
SvOago. CA 
Sbi FivkMco. CA . 
SvJoM. CA 



G66 6 429 



5*0 8 315. 



K C«uut of Poi/i^aon v 



[«(COP). 

>ln0. Pmmm d QananI DsmoorapMc CiaiacMriMict. 



?QpU\%\\0(\ ■*!% 



I. SMW(MAHMi«s'MUilH>SEM*;2< 



No. 35. Cities With 250,000 or Mora inhabitants in 2000— Hispanic and 
Non-Hispanic Groups: 2000 



[In thousands, excspl psrosnt (448^6 



448.600). As of April. Daia refer to boundaries in effect on Januaiy 1. 20001 



City 



Hispanic or Latino 



Total 



Total 
popula- 
tion 



Numt>er 



Percent 
of total 
popula- 
tion 



Mexican 



Puerto 
Rican 



Cuban 



Other 
Hispanic 
or LatirK) 



Not Hispanic 
or Latino 



Total 



Whils 



AltHiquerque, NM 

Anaheim, CA 

Anchorage. AK 

Arlington. TX 

Atlanta. GA 

Aurora. CO 

Austin, TX 

Baltimore, MD 

Boston. MA 

Buffalo. NY 

Charlotte. NC 

Chicago, IL 

Cincinnati, OH 

Cleveland. OH 

Colorado Springs, CO . . 

Columbus. OH 

Corpus Christi. TX 

Dallas, TX 

Denver, CO 

Detroit. Ml 

El Paso, TX 

Fort Worth, TX 

Fresno, CA . 

Honolulu, Hr 

Houston, TX . . 

IrKlianapolis, IN ^ 

Jacksonville, FL 

Kansas City, MO 

Las Vegas. NV 

Lexington-Fayette, KY. . , 

Long Beach, CA 

Los Angeles, CA 

Louisville. KY 

Memphis, TN 

Mesa, AZ 

Miami. FL 

Milwaukee, Wl 

Minneapolis, MN ...... 

Nashville-Davidson, TN ^ . 

New Orleans. LA 

New York. NY 

Newark, NJ 

Oakland, CA 

Oklahoma City, OK 

Omaha. NE 

Philadelphia. PA 

Phoenix. AZ 

Pittsburgh. PA 

Poniand. OR 

Raleigh, NC 

Riverside, CA 

Sacramento, CA 

San Antonio, TX 

San Diego, CA 

San Francisco, CA 

San Jose. CA 

Santa Ana, CA 

Seattle, WA 

St. Louis. MO 

St. Paul, MN 

Tampa, FL 

Toledo. OH 

Tucson, AZ 

Tulsa, OK 

Virginia Beach, VA 

Washington, DC 

Wtehita. KS 



446.6 
328.0 
260.3 
333.0 
416.5 
276.4 
656.6 
651.2 
589.1 
292.6 
540.8 

2.896.0 
331.3 
478.4 
360.9 
711.5 
277.5 

1,188.6 
554.6 
951.3 
563.7 
534.7 
427.7 
371.7 

1,953.6 
781.9 
735.6 
441.5 
478.4 
260.5 
461.5 

3.694.8 
256.2 
650.1 
396.4 
362.5 
597.0 
382.6 
545.5 
484.7 

8,008.3 
273.5 
399.5 
506.1 
390.0 

1.517.6 

1,321.0 
334.6 
529.1 
276.1 
255.2 
407.0 

1.144.6 

1.223.4 
776.7 
894.9 
338.0 
563.4 
348.2 
287.2 
303.4 
313.6 
486.7 
393.0 
425.3 
572.1 
344.3 



179.1 

153.4 

14.8 

60.8 

18.7 

54.8 

200.6 

11.1 

85.1 

22.1 

39.8 

753.6 

4.2 

34.7 

43.3 

17.5 

150.7 

422.6 

175.7 

47.2 

431.9 

159.4 

170.5 

16.2 

730.9 

30.6 

30.6 

30.6 

113.0 

8.6 

165.1 

1.719.1 

4.8 

19.3 

78.3 

238.4 

71.6 

29.2 

25.8 

14.8 

2.160.6 

80.6 

87.5 

51.4 

29.4 

128.9 

450.0 

4.4 

36.1 

19.3 

97.3 

88.0 

671.4 

310.8 

109.5 

270.0 

257.1 

29.7 

7.0 

22.7 

58.5 

17.1 

173.9 

28.1 

17.8 

45.0 

33.1 



39.9 

46.8 

5.7 

18.3 

4.5 

19.8 

30.5 

1.7 

14.4 

7.5 

7.4 

26.0 

1.3 

7.3 

12.0 

2.5 

54.3 

35.6 

31.7 

5.0 

76.6 

29.8 

39.9 

4.4 

37.4 

3.9 

4.2 

6.9 

23.6 

3.3 

35.8 

46.5 

1.9 

3.0 

19.7 

65.8 

12.0 

7.6 

4.7 

3.1 

27.0 

29.5 

21.9 

10.1 

7.5 

8.5 

34.1 

1.3 

6.8 

7.0 

38.1 

21.6 

58.7 

25.4 

14.1 

30.2 

76.1 

5.3 

2.0 

7.9 

19.3 

5.5 

35.7 

7.2 

4.2 

7.9 

9.6 



68.5 

126.0 

7.2 

48.8 

12.7 

38.3 

153.9 

3.0 

4.1 

1.0 

22.2 

530.5 

1.5 

3.0 

23.0 

8.7 

98.1 

350.5 

120.7 

33.1 

359.7 

132.9 

144.8 

4.0 

527.4 

21.1 

6.1 

24.0 

83.5 

6.0 

127.1 

1,091.7 

1.6 

14.1 

63.5 

3.7 

43.3 

19.8 

16.1 

2.6 

186.9 

2.3 

65.1 

41.0 

23.3 

6.2 

375.1 

1.2 

25.1 

12.2 

79.0 

70.8 

473.4 

259.2 

48.9 

221.1 

222.7 

17.9 

4.1 

16.6 

6.3 

13.3 

145.2 

21.1 

4.9 

5.1 

27.0 



1.7 
1.3 
1.7 
2.1 
1.1 
1.6 
2.5 
2.2 

27.4 

17.3 

2.4 

113.1 

0.6 

25.4 
2.7 
2.8 
0.7 
2.4 
1.6 
6.6 
3.7 
1.9 
1.1 
4.6 
6.9 
1 

11 

2 

2 

13 
0.4 
0.7 
1.5 

10.3 

19.6 

1.2 

1.9 

1.0 

789.2 

39.7 
2.3 
1.2 
0.6 

91.5 
5.1 
0.8 
1.0 
1.3 
1.6 
2.1 
7.8 
5.9 
3.8 
4.1 
0.7 
1.5 
0.5 
1.0 

17.5 
0.7 
2.1 
1.1 
6.3 
2.3 
0.8 



1.7 
0.9 
0.3 
0.3 
0.9 
0.3 
1.4 
0.5 
2.2 
0.4 
1.1 
8.1 
0.2 
0.5 
0.3 
0.6 
0.3 
2.3 
0.7 
0.9 
0.5 
0.6 
0.3 
0.2 
5.0 
0.5 
3.2 
0.8 
3.4 
0.2 
1.1 

12.4 
1.5 
0.5 
0.4 
123.8 
0.6 
0.5 
0.8 
1.6 

41.1 
3.0 
0.6 
0.4 
0.3 
2.7 
2.0 
0.3 
1.3 
0.4 
0.6 
0.5 
1.5 
1.9 
1.6 
1.0 
0.6 
0.8 
0.4 
0.4 

14.7 
0.2 
0.6 
0.3 
0.6 
1.1 
0.3 



107.1 

25^ 

5.6 

11.6 

4.0 

14.6 

42.8 

5.3 

51.3 

3.4 

14.1 

102.0 

1.8 

5.9 

17.3 

5.4 

51.5 

67.4 

52.7 

6.5 

68.0 

24.0 

24.4 

7.4 

191.5 

7.2 

10.2 

5.0 

23.2 

1.8 

34.6 

601.5 

1.3 

4.0 

12.9 

100.7 

8.1 

7.6 

7.0 

9.6 

1.143.4 

35.7 

19.5 

8.8 

5.2 

28.5 

67.8 

2.1 

8.6 

5.4 

16.1 

14.7 

188.7 

43.7 

55.2 

43.8 

33.1 

9.6 

2.0 

4.8 

20.0 

2.9 

25.9 

5.5 

6.0 

36.4 

5.1 



269^ 
174.6 
245.5 
272.2 
307.8 
221.6 
456.0 
640.1 
504.1 
270.6 
501.0 

2.142.4 
327.1 
443.7 
317.6 
694.0 
126.7 
786.0 
378.9 
904.1 
131.8 
375.3 
257.1 
355.4 

1.222.8 
751.2 
705.0 
410.9 
365.5 
252.0 
296.4 

1.975.7 
251.5 
630.8 
318.1 
124.1 
525.3 
353.4 
519.8 
469.8 

5.847.7 
192.9 
312.0 
454.8 
360.6 

1.388.6 
871.1 
330.1 
493.1 
256.8 
157.9 
319.0 
473.3 
912.6 
667.2 
625.0 
80.9 
533.7 
341.2 
264.4 
244.9 
296.5 
312.8 
364.9 
407.5 
527.1 
311.2 



223.9 
117.6 
182.0 
198.6 
130.2 
163.6 
347.6 
201.6 
291.6 
151.5 
297.8 
907.2 
173.8 
185.6 
271.7 
475.9 
106.9 
410.8 
288.0 

99.9 
103.4 
245.0 
159.5 

68.5 
801.9 
527.7 
457.5 
254.5 
277.7 
206.2 
152.9 
1.099.2 
158.7 
216.2 
290.2 

42.9 
271.0 
230.1 
349.1 
128.9 
2.801.3 

30.0 

94.0 
327.2 
293.9 
644.4 
736.8 
224.0 
399.4 
166.4 
116.3 
165.0 
364.4 
603.9 
338.9 
322.5 

42.0 
382.5 
149.3 
183.9 
154.9 
212.7 
263.7 
263.8 
295.4 
158.2 
246.9 



^ The populatkKi shown in this table is for the census designated place (CDP). ^ Represents the portkK) of a conaoUdated 
city that is not within or>e or more separately iricorporated places. 

Source. U.S. Census Bureau. 2000 Census of Population and Housing. Profiles of General DemograpNc CftaracterisOcs. 



40 Population 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abttrad of the UnHad Smm: 8008 



No. 36. Demographic and Economic Profflias of Selected Racial and Hispanic 
Origin Populations 



nilvMI itpw nti 211.461,000. Hispanic pereons may be of any race. Population data baaed on 2000 Census of Population. 
Other items except tnisiness ownershij) based on Cuoent Population Sun/ey, see text, this section] 



Characteristic 



White 



Black 



Native 

Hawaiian 

and Other 

Pacific 

Asian lslar>der 



American 

IrKlian. 

Alaskan 

Native 



Hispanic 



POPULATION. 2000 



Total persons (1.000) 

Peroent of total population 

Under 5 years old 

S-14 veers okj 

15-44 years okl 

4S-64 years okJ 

65 years old and over 



211.461 
75.1 
12.860 
28.268 
89.850 
50,078 
30,406 



34.658 

12.3 

2.805 

6.327 

16,253 
6.451 
2.823 



Rve states with 
specified group 



numt>erof 



CA 
TX 
NY 
FL 
PA 



;20.2) 

14.8 

12.9) 

12.5) 

10.5) 



NY 
TX 
GA 
FL 
CA 



;3.o) 

2.4) 
2.4) 
2.3 
2.3 



Five states with largest percent of 
specified group 



EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT. 2000 
Persons 25 years okl and over (1 ,000) . . 

Perosot high school graduate or more . . . . 

Pwoent bachelor's decree or more 

Percent with advanced degree 



ME (97%) 

VT(97%) 

NH (96%) 

WV(95%) 

lA (94%) 



147.067 



CX:(60%) 
MS (36% 
LA (33%) 
SC(30%) 
GA(29% 



20.036 



VOTING PAFmCIPATION. 2000 

Percent reporting they registered 

Peroent reporting they voted 



FAMILY INCOME IN 2000 



Total fainiiies (1.000) 
Porceni dMribution — 
Less than $10,000. . . . 
$10,000 to $14,999. . . 
$15,000 to $24,999 . . . 
$25,000 to $34,999 . . . 
$35,000 to $49,999 . . . 
$50,000 to $74,999 . . . 
$75,000 or more 

Medtan income (dol.). . . . 



FamSies 
Persons 



POVERTY. 2000 

poverty level (percent) 
poverty level (percent) 



84.9 

26.1 

8.8 



65.6 
56.4 



60.222 

4.0 
4.0 
10.7 
11.8 
15.9 
22.2 
31.4 

53.256 



6.9 
9.4 



78.5 

16.5 

5.1 



63.6 
53.5 



8,814 

11.7 
8.3 
16.8 
14.1 
16.8 
16.7 
15.6 

34,192 



19.1 
22.1 



10,243 

3.6 

670 

1,365 

5.254 

2.153 

801 



CA (3.7) 
NY (1.0 
TX(.6 
HI (.5) 
NJ (.5) 

HI (42%) 

CA(11%) 

NJ(6%) 

NY (6%) 

WA (6%) 



^.667 

;85.7 
^43.9 
^15.3 



!30.7 
^25.4 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



Je.Q 

210.8 



399 
0.1 
33 
72 
206 
66 
21 



CA(.117) 
HI .114) 
WA (.024) 
UT .015 
TX (.014) 

HI (9.4%) 
UT 0.7% 
AK (0.5%) 
WA (0.4%) 
NV (0.4%) 



2.476 

0.9 

213 

485 

1,194 
445 
138 



CA (.333) 
OK (.273 
AZ(.256) 
NM (.173) 
TX(.118) 

AK (16%) 

NM (10%) 

SO (8% 

OK (8%) 

MT(6%) 



(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

NA 



Pi P 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



^ 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



(NA) 



BUSINESSES OWNED BY SPECIFIED GROUP. 

1997 

Al firms: 

Number (1.000) 

Sales and receipts (mil. dol.) 

Rrmswith pakl empkrfees: 

Number (1.000) 

Saies and receipts (mil. dol.) 

Emptoyees (1.000) 

Payroll, annual (mil. dol.) 




823 
71,215 

93 

56,378 

718 

14,322 



, ^13 
^306,933 

, 2290 

^278,294 

^2,203 

246,180 



197 

33 

29,226 

299 

6,624 



35.306 

12.5 

3.718 

6.787 

18.221 
4.847 
1.734 



CA(II.O) 

TX(6.7) 

NY (2.9) 

FL(2.7) 

IL(1-5) 

NM (42%) 
CA 32%) 
TX 32% 
AZ (25% 
NV (20% 



17,150 

57.0 

10.6 

3.3 



34.9 
27.5 



7,728 

8.4 
7.9 
18.3 
15.4 
18.1 
17.9 
14.1 

35.054 



18.5 
21.2 



1.200 
186.275 

212 

158.675 

1.389 

29.830 



NA Not available. ^ Numt)er in parenttieses in millkms. ^ Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander included in data for 
Ann pop(4atk)n. 

Soufx:e: U.S. Cwtsus Bureau, 2000 Census of PopUlatk>n, Summary File 1 , <http'y/www.census.aov/Press-Release/www/ 
2001/sumfiel .html>; Current Population Reports. P20-536, P20-542, P60-213. and P60-214; and "1997 Eoonomk: Census, 
linority- and WomervOwned Businesses, United States"; put)lished 24 May 2(X)1 ; <http://www.cer«us.gov/epcd/mwt>97/us/us.html>. 



Popu\^x.vox\ ^^ 



UJiCanwaaivnu. SlMMcal Abstract of the UnMsd Slatoe: 2002 



No. 37. Social and Economic 

Populations: 1 990 to 2000 



of th€ Whit€ and Black 



[As of March, •xoept labor forca atalua, anmnl avaraga (134,687 lapwaaiiti 134,687,000). Exdudas mamberB of Annad Foreaa 
except those living off post or with their families on post. DiaUa for 1990 are t>aaed on 1980 census population controls; 1995 and 
2000 data t>ased on 1990 census population controls. Based on Current Population Survey; see text, this section, artd Appendix 
III] 



Characteristic 



Number 
(1.000) 



White 



1900 1995 2000 



Black 



1990 1995 2000 



Percent distribution 



White 



1990 2000 



Black 



1990 2000 



EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years 
old and over 

Elementary: 

to 8 years 

High school: 

1 to 3 years 

4 years 

College: 

1 to 3 years 

4 years or more 

LABOR FORCE STATUS * 

Civilians 16 years 
old and over 

Civilian labor force 

Empk}yed 

Unempk>yed 

Unemployment rate ® . . . . 
Not in latKjr force 



FAMILY TYPE 

Total famillea . . 

With own children 
Married couple .... 
With own children ' 
Female householder, 
no spouse present . 
With own children ' 
Male householder, no 
spouse present . . . 
With own children ' 



'i 



FAMILY INCOME IN 

PREVIOUS YEAR IN 

CONSTANT (1999) CX)LLARS 

Total famillea * 

Less than $5.000 

$5,000 to $9.999 

$10,000 to $14.999 

$15,000 to $24.999 

$25,000 to $34.999 

$35,000 to $49.999 

$50,000 or more 

Median income (dol.) ^ 



POVERTY 



10 



Families below poverty level 
Persons below poverty level ^° 

HOUSING TENURE 



Total occupied units 

Owner-occupied 

Renter-occupied 

No cash rent 



134.687 

14.131 

14,080 
52.449 

24.350 
29,677 



160.625 

107.447 

102.261 

5,186 

4.8 

53.178 



141,113 

11.101 

112.882 
247.986 

^.321 
*33,824 



166,914 

111.950 

106.490 

5,459 

49 

54,965 



147.067 

10.035 

112,153 
^49.105 

^7.353 
*38.421 



174,428 

117.574 

113.475 

4.099 

3.5 

56.854 



56.590 56.437 60.251 

26.718 27.951 28.107 

46.981 47.899 48.790 

21.579 22.005 21,809 



7.306 
4.199 

2.303 
939 



8,031 
4.841 

2.507 
1.105 



8,380 
4.869 

3.081 
1.429 



56,590 

(NA) 
NA) 
NA 
NA) 
NA 
(NA 
(NA) 

48.334 



(NA) 
(NA 
NA 
(NA 
(NA 
(NA) 
(NA) 

45.960 



60.256 

1.083 
1.554 
2.514 
6.970 
7.090 
10.046 
30,998 

51.224 



4.409 5.312 4.377 
20.785 25.379 21.922 



80,163 

54.094 

24.685 

1.384 



83,737 

57.449 

24.793 

1,494 



87,671 

62.077 

24.253 

1,340 



16,751 

2.701 

2.969 
6.239 

2.952 
1.890 



21,477 

13.740 
12.175 

1.565 
11.4 

7.737 



7.470 

4.378 
3,750 
1.972 

3,275 
2.232 

446 
173 



7,470 

(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

27.152 



10,486 

4.445 

5.862 

178 



18,467 

1.800 

13.041 
26,686 

^4.486 
*2,444 



23,246 

14.817 
13.279 

1.538 
10.4 

8,429 



8,093 

4.682 
3.842 
1.926 

3.716 
2.489 

536 
267 



20,036 

1.417 

12,899 
27.050 

*3.303 



25,218 

16.603 
15.334 

1.269 
7.6 

8.615 



8,664 

4,782 
4.144 
2.093 

3.814 
2.409 

706 
280 



8,093 

(NA) 
NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
NA 
NA) 

(NA) 

27.764 



2.077 2,212 
9.302 10.196 



11.655 

4.888 

6.547 

220 



8,604 

543 

721 

793 

1,384 

1.176 

1.326 

2.723 

31,778 



1.898 
8.360 



12,849 

6.055 
6.563 

231 



100.0 

10.5 

10.5 
38.9 

18.1 
22.0 



100.0 

66.9 

63.7 

3.2 

33.1 



100.0 

47.2 
83.0 
38.1 

12.9 
7.4 

4.1 
1.7 



100.0 

1.8 
3.0 
4.6 
11.8 
12.6 
18.3 
47.9 

(X) 



7.8 
10.0 



100.0 

67.5 

30.8 

1.7 



100.0 

6.8 

.^8.3 
233.4 

^.4 

*26.1 



100.0 

67.4 

65.1 

2.3 



100.0 

46.6 
81.0 
36.2 

13.9 
8.1 

5.1 
2.4 



100.0 

1.8 
2.6 
4.2 
11.6 
11.8 
16.7 
51.4 

(X) 



7.3 
9.8 



100.0 

70.8 

27.7 

1.5 



100.0 

16.1 

17.7 
37.2 

17.6 
11.3 



100.0 

64.0 

56.7 

7.3 

(X) 



100.0 

58.6 
50.2 
26.4 

43.8 
29.9 

6.0 
2.3 



100.0 

7.2 
11.7 

9.7 
18.0 
13.3 
15.4 
24.6 

(X) 



27.8 
30.7 



100.0 

42.4 

55.9 

1.7 



1004) 

7.1 

114.5 
235.2 

^.8 
*16.5 



100.0 

65.8 

60.8 

5.0 

34i 



IOOjO 

55.2 
47.1 
24.2 

45.1 
27.8 

7.8 
3.2 



100.0 

6.3 

8.3 

9.1 

16.0 

13.6 

15.3 

31.4 

(X) 



21.9 
23.6 



100X) 

47.1 

51.1 

1.8 



NA Not available. X Not applk:iat>le. ^ Represents ttiose who completed 9th to 12th grade, but have qp high school 
diploma. 2 High school graduate. ^ Some college or associate degree. * Bachelor's or advanced decree. ' Source: U.S. 
Bureau of Labor Statistics. EmfAoyment and Earnings, January issues. See footnote 2. Table 560. ^ Total unempk>yment as 
percent of civilian labor force. C^hiklren under 1 8 years okl. ^ Includes families in group quarters. * For definition of noecNan. 
see Guide to Tabular Presentation. ^° For explanatk)n of poverty level, see text. SectkKi 13, Income. Expenditures, and Wealth. 

Source: Except as noted. U.S. Census Bureau. Black Populatk>n in the U.S.: March 2000, PPL-142; Curront PoptMion 
Reports. P60-209. P60-210. and eariier reports; and unpublished data. 



42 Population 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistteal Abstract oT the UnMad 



No. 38. Social and Economic Charactaristics of the Asian and Pacific Islander 
Population: 1990 and 2000 

[As of March (6,670 wprntiHi 6,670,000). Excludes members of Amied Forces except those living off post or with their fami- 
188 on poet Data for 1990 are baaed on 1980 census population controls: 2000 data are based on 1990 certsus population con- 
trols. Based on Current Population Survey: see text, this section, and Appendix III] 



Characteristic 



Number 
(1.000) 



1900 



2000 



Percent 
distribution 



1900 



2000 



Total pafsona 



LABOR FORCE STATUS ^ 



dvWana 18 years oW and over. 

Civlian tabor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Unemployment rate ^ 

Not in labor force 



FAI^ILY TYPE 



Total fanruUes 

Mvried couple 

Female householder, no spouse present 
Male householder, rto spouse present . . 



HOUSING TENURE 



Total occupied imits 
Owner-occupied .... 
ftanler-occupied .... 
No cash rent 



6,679 



10.025 



100.0 



100.0 



4340 

3.216 

3.079 

136 

4.2 

1634 


8,225 

5.458 

5.246 

212 

3.9 

2.767 


100.0 

66.3 

63.5 

2.8 

(X) 

33.7 


100.0 

66.4 

63.8 

2.6 

.?2 


1,531 

1.257 

188 

86 


2.506 

1.996 

331 

179 


100.0 

82.1 

12.3 

5.6 


100.0 

79.6 

13.2 

7.1 


1.988 

976 

982 

30 


3.337 

1.766 

1.526 

46 


100.0 
49.1 
49.4 

1.5 


100.0 

52.9 

45.7 

1.4 



X Not appttcable. ^ [Hita beoinning 1994 not directly comparable with earlier years. See text. Section 12. Labor Force. 
^ Total unernployment as percent of civilian latwr force. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current PopiHation I 
United States: March 2000 (Update)" (PPL-146). 



Reports. P20-459. and "The Asian and Pacific Islander Population in the 



No. 39. Persons 65 Years Old and Over— Cliaracteristics by Sex: 1980 to 2000 

[As Of March, axcapl as noted (24.2 rspfoaaiHa 24,200,000). Covers civilian noninstitutional population. Excludes members of 
Armed Forces exc^ those liviriq off post or with their families on post. Data for 1980 and 1990 are based on 1980 census 
population oontnols; 1 995 arxj 2000 data based on 1 990 census population controls. Based on Cunent Population Survey: see text, 
ilvs section, and Appendix III] 



Characteristic 



Total 



1980 1900 1995 2000 



Male 



1980 1980 1995 2000 



Ferrmle 



1980 1980 1905 2000 



Total (mllilon) 

PERCErfT DISTRIBUTION 

Maital status: 

Mevermarried 

lyianied 

Spouse present 

Spouse absent 

Widowed 

Divorced 



24JI 29.6 31.7 32.6 



9.9 12.3 13.2 13.9 



14JI 17JI 18^ 18.7 



Fsinly status: 

In fatfniies ^ 

Nonfamily householders . 
Secondary indMdtMis . . 



Uvirtg arrangements: 

U>nng in housefxM 

Living alorw 

Spouse present 

LMngwMth sorneone else 



Not in household 



Yiaars of schocN completed: 

8 years or less 

1 10 3 years of high school 
4 years of high school . . . 
1 10 3 years of college . . . 
4 years or more of college 

Libor force partidpation: ^ 



Bor force pai 
Employed . 



Uiemployed . . . 
Not in \aborioroe 



5.5 
55.4 
53.6 

1.8 
35.7 

3.5 

67.6 

31.2 

1.2 

99.8 
30.3 
53.6 
15.9 
0.2 

43.1 

16.2 

24.0 

8.2 

8.6 

12.2 

0.4 

87.5 



4.6 
56.1 
54.1 

2.0 
34.2 

5.0 

66.7 

31.9 

1.4 

99.7 
31.0 
54.1 
14.6 
0.3 

28.5 

16.1 
32.9 
10.9 
11.6 

11.5 

0.4 

88.1 



4.2 
56.9 
54.7 

2.2 
33.2 

5.7 

66.6 

32.4 

1.0 

99.9 
31.5 
54.7 
13.7 
0.1 



21.0 
^15.2 
*33.8 
*17.1 
®13.0 



11.7 

0.5 

87.9 



3.9 
57.2 
54.6 

2.6 
32.1 

6.7 

67.4 

31.1 

1.5 

100.0 

30.1 

54.6 

15.3 

0.1 



^13.8 
*35.9 
!l8.0 
®15.6 



12.4 

0.4 

87.2 



4.9 
78.0 
76.1 

1.9 
13.5 

3.6 

83.0 

15.7 

1.3 

99.9 

14.9 

76.1 

8.9 

0.1 

45.3 
15.5 
21.4 
7.5 
10.3 

18.4 

0.6 

81.0 



4.2 
76.5 
74.2 

2.3 
14.2 

5.0 

81.9 

16.6 

1.5 

99.9 

15.7 

74.3 

9.9 

0.1 



4.2 
77.0 
74.5 

2.5 
13.5 

5.2 

80.6 

18.4 

1.0 

100.0 

17.3 

74.5 

8.1 



4.2 
75.2 
72.6 

2.6 
14.4 

6.1 

79.7 

18.2 

2.1 

100.0 

17.0 

72.6 

10.4 

0.1 



5.9 
39.5 
37.9 

1.7 
51.2 

3.4 

56.8 

42.0 

1.1 

99.7 
41.0 
37.9 
20.8 
0.3 



4.9 
41.4 
39.7 

1.7 
48.6 

5.1 

55.8 

42.8 

1.4 

99.5 
42.0 
39.7 
17.8 
0.5 



30 


22.0 


17.8 


41.6 


2/5 


15.7 


^14.5 


■^12.7 


16.7 


16.4 


29.0 


*29.2 


*30.4 


25.8 


35.6 


10.8 


^17.1 


517.8 


8.6 


11.0 


14.5 


«17.2 


*21.4 


7.4 


9.5 



15.9 

0.5 

83.6 



16.1 

0.7 

83.2 



16.9 

0.6 

82.5 



7.8 8.4 

0.3 0.3 

91.9 91.3 



4.2 
42.5 
40.6 

1.9 
47.3 

6.0 

56.7 

42.4 

0.9 

99.9 
41.7 
40.6 
17.6 
0.1 



20.3 
^15.6 
*37.1 
517.0 

«9.9 



8.5 

0.3 
91.2 



Percent below poverty level * 



15.2 11.4 11.7 9.7 



11.1 7.8 7.2 6.9 



3.6 
43.8 
41.3 

2.5 
45.3 

7.2 

58.2 

40.7 

1.1 

100.0 

39.6 

41.3 

19.1 

0.1 



15.9 
^14.7 
*39.9 
*18.2 
®11.4 



9.1 

0.3 

90.6 



17.9 13.9 14.9 11.8 



- Represents zero. Excludes those Mng in unrelated subfamilies. ^ In group quarters other than inst^utions. 

' Repr es e n t s tnoee who completed 9th to 12th grade, but have no hioh school diploma. ^ High school oraduate. ^ Some 
ooleae or associate degree. * Bac^ielor's or advanced degree. ' Annual averages of mipnthly figures, source: U.S. Bureau 
dl Labor Statutes. Emphyment and Earnings, January issues. See footnote 2, Table 560. ° Poverty status based on income in 
prscedffig year. 

Source: Except as noted. U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports. P20-537. and earlier reports: P60-210; and 
unpubishod data. 



Popui^i\ox\ ^'^ 



UHL 



Abatract of the LMfttd SlitM: 2002 



No. 40. Social and Economic Characteristics of tlie Hispanic Population: 2000 

[As of March, except labor force statue, anmial average (32,804 reprse e nt s 32,804,000). Exdudss members of Ihe Armed Fbioee 
except those Irving off post or with their families on post. Based on Current Population Survey; see text of this section and 
Appendix III] 



Characteristic 



Number (1.000) 



Cen- 
tral 
and 
His- South Other 

panic. Mexi- Puerto Amen- His- 

total can Rican Cuban can panic 



Percent distribution 



Cen- 
tral 
arxj 
Mis- South Other 

panic, Mexi- Puerto Amert- His- 

total can Rican Cuban can panic 



Total persons 

Under 5 years old 

5 to 14 years old 

15 to 44 years old 

45 to 64 years old 

65 years old and over 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years old 

and over 

Hi^h school graduate or 

higher 

Bachelor's degree or higher . . 

LABOR FORCE STATUS ' 

Civilians 16 years old 
and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Unemptoynrtent rate ^ . . . 

Male 

Female 

Not in labor force 

FAMILY TYPE 

Total famlllee 

Married couple 

Female householder, 

no spouse present 

Male householder, 

no spouse present 

FAMILY INCOME IN 1999 

Total famniee ' 

Less than $5,000 

$5,000 to $9,999 

$10,000 to $14,999 

$15,000 to $24,999 

$25,000 to $34.999 

$35,000 to $49,999 

$50,000 or nf>ore 

Median Income (dot.) * 

Families below poverty level I . 
Persons below poverty level ^ . 

HOUSING TENURE 

Total occupied units . . . 

Owner-occupied 

Renter-occupied ® 



32,804 

3.665 
6.346 
16.277 
4.764 
1.752 



21,701 

2,701 

4,453 

10,842 

2,769 

936 



2,959 

278 
571 
1.414 
518 
178 



1,300 

67 
129 
526 
305 
273 



4,743 

404 
788 
2.534 
794 
222 



2,101 

215 
405 
960 
377 
143 



17.150 10,625 1,612 965 2,768 1,180 



9,783 5.416 1.037 
1,821 738 209 



705 1,781 
222 481 



845 
171 



22,303 14,386 2.025 1,104 3,466 1,422 



15.368 
14.492 
876 
5.7 
4.9 
6.7 
7.025 



9.955 

9.364 

591 

5.9 

5.1 

7.2 

4.430 



7,561 4.794 

5.133 3.352 

1.769 1.013 

658 428 



7,561 

323 
434 
674 
1.489 
1.202 
1,263 
2,177 



4,794 

187 
270 
425 

1,002 
775 
806 

1.330 



1.278 

1.196 

82 

6.4 

5.7 

7.1 

747 



770 

437 

275 
57 



770 

53 
66 
72 
144 
102 
134 
200 



680 
650 
30 
4.4 
4.1 
4.7 
424 



2.486 
2,365 
120 
4.8 
4.1 
5.8 
970 



385 1,100 
296 721 



70 
18 



272 
115 



385 1,100 

14 47 



18 
43 
52 
60 
46 
152 



49 
86 
206 
199 
189 
333 



969 

917 

53 

5.5 

4.8 

6.3 

454 



504 

326 

138 
40 



504 

21 
31 
48 
85 
67 
89 
163 



31.663 31.123 30,129 38.312 33.105 34.935 



1.525 
7.439 



1.018 
5.214 



9,319 5,733 

4.243 2.739 
5,075 2.993 



177 
760 



1,804 

352 
652 



58 
224 



523 

307 
216 



181 
789 



1,372 

515 
857 



91 
452 



667 

330 
357 



100.0 

11.2 
19.3 
49.6 
14.5 
5.3 



57.0 
10.6 



100.0 
67.9 

23.4 

8.7 



100.0 

4.3 
5.7 
8.9 
19.7 
15.9 
16.7 
28.8 

(X) 

20.2 
22.8 



100.0 

45.5 
54.5 



100.0 

12.4 
20.5 
50.0 
12.8 
4.3 



100.0 

9.4 

19.3 

47.8 

17.5 

6.0 



100.0 

5.1 

9.9 

40.5 

23.4 

21.0 



100.0 

8.5 

16.6 

53.4 

16.7 
4.7 



51.0 
6.9 



64.3 
13.0 



73.0 
23.0 



64.3 
17.4 



100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 
69.9 56.8 77.1 65.0 



21.1 
8.9 



100.0 

3.9 
5.6 
8.9 
20.9 
16.2 
16.8 
27.7 

(X) 

21.2 
24.1 



100.0 

47.8 
52.2 



35.8 18.3 
7.4 4.6 



100.0 100.0 

6.9 3.6 

8.6 4.6 

9.4 11.2 

18.7 13.4 
13.2 15.6 
17.4 12.0 
25.9 39.6 

(X) (X) 

23.0 15.0 

25.8 17.3 



24.6 
10.4 



100.0 

4.3 
4.5 
7.7 
18.6 
17.9 
17.0 
30.0 

(X) 

16.3 
16.7 



100.0 

35.0 
65.0 



100.0 

58.7 
41.3 



100X) 

10.2 
19.3 
45.7 
18.0 
6.8 



100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 



71.6 
14.5 




100^ 
84.7 

27.4 

7.9 



100.0 

4.2 
6.2 
9.5 
16.8 
13.3 
17.6 
32.4 

(X) 

18.1 
21.6 



109.0 1004) 

37.6 48.0 
62.4 52.0 



X Not applicable. ^ Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Employment and Earnings, January 2001 . 
unemployment as percent of civilian latXK force. ^ Includes families in group quarters. * For definition of median, 
to Tabular Presentation. ^ For explanation of poverty level, see text. Section 1 3. Income. Expenditures, and Wealth, 
no cash rent. 

Source: Except as noted. U.S. Census Bureau. Currant Population Ropotts, P20-535. 



^ Total 
Guide 
Includes 



44 Population 



U.S. Census Bureau. Stalisticai Abstract of the umied 



No. 41. Nativ€ and Foreign-Born Population by Place of Birth: 1950 to 2000 

nn ttMNiMUids, exoapc peroent (150,218 lepf a ii to 150,216,000). Data are based on a sample from the census; for details, see 
iBKt, INs section. See source for sarnpling variability] 





Native population 


Foreign bom 


Year 


Bom 

abroad 

or at sea 

Bom in of 

Total state of Bom in State of Bom in Ameri- 

popuia- resi- ottier birth not outlying can 

tkx) Total dence states reported areas ^ parents! 


Percent of 

total 

Number population 


1960 

1960 

1970 

1960 

1990 

2000 


150.216 139.869 102.788 35.284 1,370 330 96 
178.467 168.806 118.802 44.264 4.526 817 397 
203.194 193.454 131.296 51.659 8.882 873 744 
226.546 212.466 144.871 65.452 (NA 1.088 1.055 
248.710 228.943 153.685 72.011 NA 1.382 1.864 
281.422 250.314 168.729 78.057 (NA 1.607 1.921 


10.347 6.9 
9.661 5.4 
9.740 4.8 
14.080 6.2 
19.767 7.9 
31.108 11.1 



NA l^ot available. 



1950. includes Alaska and Hawaii. Includes Puerto Rico. 



Source: U.S. Census Bureau. 1970 Census of Populatiwt, Vol. II. PC(2)-2A: and 1990 Census oH Population U^ig 
(1990CPH-L-121) arxj 2000 Census of Population and Housing, ProfHes of General Demogmphic CharacterisUcs. 

No. 42. Foreign-Stocic Population by Nativity and Parentage: 1960 to 2000 



{34.1 repteeenti 34,100,000. Information on the birthplace of parents may be used to classify the native population by parentage: 
native of native parentage (both parents native), native of foreign parentage (both parents foreign t>om). arxJ native of mixed 
parentage (one parent native arxj one parent foreign bom). The term foreign stock includes the foreian-tx>m populatkHi and the 
naive population of foreign or mixed parentage. For 1960 and 1970, resident population. For 20O0. civilian noninstituttonal 
populatxx) plus Armed Forces living off post or with their families on post] 



Nativity and parentage 


Numt>er (mil.) 


Percent of 
total populatton 




1980 1970 2000 


1980 1970 2000 


Foralgn stock, total 


34.1 33.6 55.9 

24.3 24.0 27.5 

14.1 (NA) 14.8 

10.2 (NA) 12.7 
9.7 9.6 28.4 


19.0 16.5 20.4 


Native population of foreign or mixed parentage . . 
Foreign parentage 


13.6 11.8 10.0 
7.9 (NA) 5.4 
5.7 (NA) 4.6 
5.4 4.7 10.4 


Mbced parentage 


FofMon bom . . 







NA Not available. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, P23-206. 



No. 43. Foreign-Born Population by Country of Origin and Citizenship Status: 
2000 



(In ttioueande. except percent (28.379 repreeenta 28,379,000). See headnote. Table 44] 








Country of origin 


Foreign-bom. total 


Naturalized citizen 


Not U.S. citizen 


Number Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 




28,379 100.0 

7.841 27.6 
952 3.4 
692 2.4 
765 2.7 
613 2.2 

1.067 3.8 

1.007 3.5 
701 2.5 

1,222 4.3 

863 3.0 

12.655 44.6 


10,622 
1.592 
552 
234 
151 
273 
507 
362 
341 
774 
411 
5.424 


100.0 
15.0 
5.2 
2.2 
1.4 
2.6 
4.8 
3.4 
3.2 
7.3 
3.9 
51.1 


17,758 

6.249 
400 
458 
614 
341 
560 
644 
361 
448 
453 

7.230 


100.0 


MSJULU ■ J ' 


35.2 


Cuba 


2.3 


Oornnican RepubHc 


2.6 


B Safvador . .'^. . 


3.5 


Qreot Britain 


1.9 


China and HorKi Kono 


3.2 


hda 


3.6 


Korea 


2.0 


^tnhjdioos 


2.5 


Vigfnsni 


2.5 


QBOWOOrB 


40.7 







Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports, P20-534. 



a& OwMi BivMHf . Slalftlfcal Abstract of the UnAlK/SMea; 2002 



Popul^X\ox\ ^S 



No. 44. Native and Foralgn-Born Populations by Seiected Cliaractaristics: 2000 

[In thouMiKto (245,708 i«pf i ii to 245,700,000). As of March. The foreign-bom population indudas some undooumanlad immi> 
grants, refugees, and temporary rasidarYta such as students and temporary workers as weH as legaKy-admitM immigrBnis. Baaed 
on Current Population Sun/ey; see text, this section, and Appendix III] 



Characteristic 







Foreign-t)om population 










Year of entry 




Native 
population 


Total 


Before 
1970 


1970 to 
1979 


1990 to 
lOM 


1990 to 
2000 


245,708 


28,379 


4,547 


4.606 


8,022 


11,206 


19.319 
50.169 
23.384 
15.366 
16.284 
38.571 
53.108 
29.507 


289 
2,548 
3,148 
2,902 
3,233 
6.235 
6,910 
3.115 


i 

85 

626 

1,910 

1,926 


332 

407 
1.273 
2.065 

381 


891 

778 

1.224 

2.497 

1.640 

446 


289 

2.003 
2.110 
1.792 
1,517 
1.838 
1.295 
362 


119.733 
125.975 


14.200 
14.179 


2.079 
2.468 


2.243 
2.362 


4.186 
3.836 


5.692 
5.514 


205.545 

33.288 

2.656 

4.218 


19.261 

2.221 

191 

6.706 


3.874 

217 

26 

430 


3.052 

396 

36 

1,121 


4.838 

752 

55 

2.377 


7.496 
856 

75 
2.778 


19,962 


12.841 


1.446 


2.057 


3.809 


5.527 


152,836 
20.456 
93.312 
26.225 
12.843 


22.394 
7.397 
9.219 
3.615 
2,162 


4,547 

1.368 

2.087 

562 

530 


4.457 

1.445 

1.813 

778 

421 


6.586 

2.337 

2.733 

979 

538 


6.804 
2.247 
2.586 
1.297 
674 


187.401 
14.116 

173,285 
45,926 
36.876 
40.134 
22.749 
27.600 


26,372 
4,021 

22,351 
6,465 
6,097 
4,679 
2.150 
2,960 


4.547 

207 

4.340 

1,284 

1,020 

869 

394 

773 


4.605 
381 

4.224 
969 
938 
999 
548 
770 


7.777 
1.109 
6.668 
1,815 
1.877 
1.537 
693 
746 


9.443 
2.324 
7.119 
2.397 
2,263 
1.273 
514 
672 


27,507 
217,638 


4,751 
23,597 


379 
4,168 


528 
4.077 


1.222 
6.797 


2.623 
8.555 


177.393 
68,315 


14,224 
14.155 


3.568 
978 


3,053 
1,552 


4.128 
3.893 


3.475 
7.731 



Total 



Under 5 years okj . . . 
5 to 17 years old . . . 
18 to 24 years old. . . 
25 to 29 years old. . . 
30 to 34 years old. . . 
35 to 44 years old. . . 
45 to 64 years old. . . 
65 years old and over 

Male 

Female 



White 

Black 

American Indian/Eskimo/Aleut. 
Asian or Pacific Islander . . . . 



Hispank: origin ^ , 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMEf^T 



Persons 25 years old and over 

Not high school graduate 

High school gracvsome college . . 

Bachetor's degree 

Graduate or professtonal degree . 

INCOME IN 1999 

Persons 16 years old and over 

Without income 

With income 

$1 to $9,999 or k>ss 

$10,000 to $19,999 

$20,000 to $34.999 

$35,000 to $49.999 

$50,000 or more 



POVERTY STATUS ^ 



In poverty . . . 
Not in poverty 



HOMEOWNERSHIP 



In owner-occupied unit. 
In renter-occupied unit . 



X Not applk:able. ^ Persons of Hispanic origin may t>e of any race. 
Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Populatiof} Reports, P20-534. 



^ Persons for whom poverty status is determined. 



No. 45. Livina Arrangements of Persons 1 5 Years Oid and Over 
by Selected Characteristics: 2000 

[In thousands (213,773 repraaenta 213,773,000). Aa of March. Based on Current Populatkx) Sunrey whk:h includes memtwrs 
of Armed Forces living off post or with families on post. t)ut excludes other Armed Forces; see text, this 8ectk)n. and Appendix III] 



Living arrangement 



Total 


15 to 19 
years old 


20 to 24 
years old 


25 to 34 
years okl 


3510 44 
years okl 


45 to 54 
years old 


55 to 64 
years okJ 


6510 74 
years okl 


75yeare 

okjand 

over 


213,773 
26.724 

112,920 
74.129 


20,102 

127 

344 

19.631 


18,441 

1.016 

3,350 

14.075 


37,786 

3,848 
20.246 
13,692 


44,606 

4,109 
29,316 
11.380 


36,631 

4.304 

25.451 

6,876 


23.387 

3.538 

16.388 

3,461 


17,796 

4,091 

11.326 

2,379 


14,825 
5.692 
6.500 
2.633 


177,581 
22,307 
99.191 
56,083 


15,843 

91 

315 

15,437 


14.671 

770 

2.994 

10.907 


30,320 
2.959 

17.479 
9.882 


36.915 
3,291 

25,318 
8,306 


30,790 
3.500 

22.246 
5.044 


20,163 
2,942 

14,583 
2.638 


15.528 
3.542 

10.248 
1.738 


13.352 
5.212 
6.009 
2.131 


25,855 
3.605 
8,392 

13.858 


3.057 
25 
14 

3,018 


2.762 
176 
215 

2.371 


5.163 

628 

1.620 

2,915 


5.699 

680 

2,518 

2.501 


4.103 

691 

1.885 

1,527 


2,316 
526 

1,136 
654 


1,624 
481 
671 
492 


1.130 
418 
333 

379 


22.793 

1.296 

11.189 

10.308 


2,889 

12 

103 

2.774 


2.755 

73 

774 

1.908 


5,660 

246 

3.269 

2.145 


4.974 

215 

3.212 

1.547 


3.019 
207 

1,909 
903 


1,745 
184 

1.042 
519 


1.132 
211 
609 
312 


621 
147 
270 
204 



Total ^ 

Aione 

With spouse 

With other persons 

White 

Atone 

With spouse 

With other persons 

Black 

Alone 

With spouse 

With other persons 

Hispanic origin ^ 

Atone 

With spouse .... 
With other persons 



race. 



^ Includes other races and persons not of Hispank: origin, not shown separately. ^ Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any 

I. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population R^x>rts, P20-537; and unput)lished data. 



46 Population 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the UnMad StMaa: 20QB 



No. 46. Marital Status of the PoiNiiation liy Sex, Race* and Hispanic Origin: 
1980 to 2000 



(In mllona, WMpI pwoMit (150J w p rn tnt i 150300,0001. As of 
of Armed Forces exoepl Ihoss Uving off post or with their tamilies on post, 
tton. and Appandbc liq 



I. Persons 18 years old and over. Excludes memt)erB 
Based on Cuirent Population Survey, see text, this sec- 



Marital status, race, and 
I"fi8penic origin 



Total 



1000 1080 1005 2000 



Male 



1000 1000 1005 2000 



Female 



1000 1000 1005 2000 



ToM ^ 

Never mantod 
Manied 



Divorced 



Percent of total 
Never manied . . . . 

Manied 

Widowed 

Divwced 



White, total 

N ev e r marrted 
Manied 



Divorced 



Percent of total 
Never manied . . . . 

Manied 

Widowed 

Divorced 



Never married 

Manied 

Widowed. . . . 
Divorced. . . . 



Percent of total 
Nsver married .... 
Married 



Divorced 



'total. 

Never married . . . . 
Manied 



Divorced 



Percent of total 
Never married . . . . 



WIOOWOO. 

Divorced . 



1803 

32.3 

104.6 

12.7 

9.9 

100.0 

20.3 

65.5 

8.0 

6.2 

130.5 

26.4 

93.8 

10.9 

8.3 

100.0 

18.9 

67.2 

7.8 

6.0 

16.6 

5.1 
8.5 
1.6 
1.4 

100.0 

30.5 

51.4 

9.8 

8.4 

7.9 

1.9 
5.2 
0.4 
0.5 

100.0 

24.1 

65.6 

4.4 

5.8 



181.8 

40.4 

112.6 

13.8 

15.1 

100.0 

22.2 

61.9 

7.6 

8.3 

1563 

31.6 
99.5 
11.7 
12.6 

100.0 

20.3 

64.0 

7.5 

8.1 

20.3 

7.1 
93 
1.7 
2.1 

100.0 

35.1 

45.8 

8.5 

10.6 

13.6 

3.7 
8.4 
0.5 
1.0 

100.0 

27.2 

61.7 

4.0 

7.0 



191.6 

43.9 

116.7 

13.4 

17.6 

100.0 

22.9 

60.9 

7.0 

9.2 

181.3 

33.2 

102.0 

11.3 

14.8 

100.0 

20.6 

63.2 

7.0 

9.1 

22.1 
8.5 
9.6 
1.7 
2.4 

100.0 

38.4 

43.2 

7.6 

10.7 

17.6 

5.0 

10.4 

0.7 

1.4 

100.0 

28.6 

59.3 

4.2 

7.9 



2013 

48.2 

120.1 

13.7 

19.8 

100.0 

23.9 

59.5 

6.8 

9.8 

106.1 

36.0 

104.1 

11.5 

16.5 

100.0 

21.4 

62.0 

63 

9.8 

24.0 
9.5 

10.1 
1.7 
2.8 

100.0 

393 

42.1 

7.1 

11.7 

21.1 
5.9 

12.7 
0.9 
13 

100.0 

28.0 

60.2 

4.2 

73 



75.7 

18.0 

513 

2.0 

3.9 

100.0 

23.8 

68.4 

23 

5.2 

06.7 

15.0 

46.7 

13 

3.4 

100.0 

22.5 

70.0 

23 

5.0 

7.4 

23 
4.1 
0.3 
0.5 

100.0 

34.3 

54.6 

4.2 

7.0 

3.8 

1.0 
2.5 
0.1 
0.2 

100.0 

27.3 

67.1 

13 

4.0 



80.9 
22.4 

553 
2.3 
6.3 

100.0 

25.8 

64.3 

2.7 

7.2 

74.8 

18.0 

49.5 

1.9 

5.4 

1003 

24.1 

66.2 

2.6 

7.2 

9.1 

3.5 
4.5 
0.3 
0.8 

100.0 

38.4 

49.2 

3.7 

8.8 

6.7 

2.2 
4.1 
0.1 
0.4 

1003 

32.1 

60.9 

13 

53 



92.0 

24.6 

57.7 

2.3 

7.4 

1003 

26.8 

62.7 

2.5 

8.0 

78.1 

19.2 

503 

13 

6.3 

1003 

24.6 

64.9 

23 

8.1 

9.9 

4.1 
43 
0.3 
0.8 

1003 

41.7 

46.7 

3.1 

8.5 

8.8 

33 
5.1 
0.2 
0.6 

1003 

33.8 

57.9 

13 

63 



903 

26.1 

59.6 

2.6 

8.5 

1003 

27.0 

613 

2.7 

83 

813 

203 

51.8 

2.2 

7.2 

1003 

24.9 

633 

2.7 

83 

10.7 

43 
5.0 
0.3 
1.1 

1003 

40.2 

46.7 

23 

103 

10.4 

3.4 
6.2 
0.2 
0.7 

100.0 

32.7 

59.6 

13 

6.7 



833 

14,3 

52.8 

103 

6.0 

1003 

17.1 

63.0 

123 

7.1 

723 

11.4 

47.1 

9.3 

53 

1003 

15.7 

64.7 

123 

63 

9.2 
23 

43 
13 
0.9 

1003 

27.4 

48.7 

143 

9.5 

4.1 

0.9 
23 
0.3 
0.3 

1003 

21.1 

643 

7.1 

73 



953 

173 

56.7 

113 

83 

1003 

183 

59.7 

12.1 

93 

80.8 

133 

49.9 

9.8 

73 

1003 

163 

613 

12.2 

9.0 

11JI 
3.6 
4.8 
1.4 
13 

1003 
323 
43.0 
12.4 
12.0 

6.8 

13 
43 
0.4 
03 

1003 

22.5 

62.4 

63 

8.5 



193 
58.9 
11.1 
103 

1003 
19.4 
59.2 
11.1 
103 

83JI 

143 

513 

9.4 

8.4 

1003 
163 
61.7 
113 
10.1 

12.2 

4.4 
4.9 
1.4 
13 

1003 
35.8 
40.4 
113 
12.5 

83 

2.1 
53 
0.6 
0.8 

1003 

23.5 

60.7 

6.6 

9.2 



104.9 

22.1 
60.4 
11.1 
113 

1003 
21.1 
57.6 
103 
103 

06.6 

15.7 

52.2 

93 

9.3 

1003 
18.1 
60.2 
10.7 
10.7 

133 

5.1 
5.1 
1.4 
1.7 

1003 
38.3 
38.3 
103 
123 

10.7 
2.5 
6.5 
0.7 

13 

1003 

23.4 

60.7 

6.5 

9.3 



^ includes persorw of other races, not shown separately. ^ Hispanic persons may be of any race. 

Soufx:e: U.S. Census Burmiu, Current Population Reports, P20-537, and earlier reports; and unpublished data. 

No. 47. Married Couples of Same or Mixed Races and Origins: 1980 to 2000 



[bi tlMMManda (49,714 represents 49,714,000). As of March. Persons 1 5 years old and over. Persons of Hispanic origin may be 
of any race. Except as noted, based on Current Population Survey; see headnote. Table 51] 



Race and origin of spouses 



1980 



1900 



1095 



1999 



2000 



49.714 



53,256 



54,937 



55.849 



56,497 



RACE 



Whila/Wtvte. 



Btacfc/White 

Back husband/White wife. 

White husbend^Black wife. 

WMle/dlher race^ 

Btack/dther race \ 

Al other couples 



HISPANIC ORIGIN 



Htapanic/hKspanic 

Hkpanic/olher orioin (not Hispanic) . . . . 
Al other couples (not of Hispisnic origin). 



44,910 


47.202 


48.030 


48.455 


48.917 


3,354 


3.687 


3.703 


3.868 


3.989 


167 


211 


328 


364 


363 


122 


150 


206 


240 


268 


45 


61 


122 


124 


95 


450 


720 


988 


1.086 


1.051 


34 


33 


76 


31 


50 


799 


1.401 


1.811 


2.045 


2.127 


1.906 


3.085 


3.857 


4.480 


4.739 


891 


1.193 


1.434 


1.647 


1.743 


46,917 


48379 


49.646 


49.722 


50.015 



^ Excluding White and Black. 

Source: U.S. (Census Bursau, Current Population Reports, P20-537, and earlier reports; and unput>lished data. 



PopulaxVoxN M 



UHL 



BuMM, SMMlcal Abstract Of the UrMMfSlatos: 2002 



No. 48. Mariul Sutus of the PoiNilation by Sex and Age: 2000 

[As of March (96,900 lepf a ii to 96.900.000). Persoos 18 years old arxj over. Excludes mambors of Armsd Forces eMoapl 
living off post or witti ttieir families on post. Based on Current Population Survey, see tsxt this section, artd Appsrxfix III] 





Number of persor^ (1.000) 


rerceni auxnouoon 


Sex and age 


Never Wid- 
Total married Married owed Divorced 


Never WM- 
Total married Married owed Divorosd 


Male 


96.000 26.124 59.631 2.601 8.544 

4.082 4,011 70 1 
9.208 7.710 1.397 101 
8.943 4.625 3.967 9 342 
9.621 2.899 5.996 15 712 
11.032 2.241 7.440 42 1,308 

11.103 1.740 7.842 54 1.467 

17.889 1.697 13.680 157 2,377 

11.137 612 8.809 329 1.387 

8.051 348 6.411 667 625 

5.838 242 4.044 1.327 225 

104.863 22.009 60.436 11.064 11.284 
4.009 3.727 270 2 10 
9.232 6.720 2.333 11 168 
9.326 3.627 5.106 18 575 
9.897 2.172 6.758 63 904 
11.288 1.610 8.061 131 1.486 

11.382 1,341 8.163 172 1.706 

18.742 1.606 13.191 725 3,220 

12.251 606 8.333 1.441 1,871 

9.748 363 5.424 3.055 906 

8.988 317 2.799 5.435 438 


100,0 27,0 8U 2.7 8J 


18 to 19 years old 

20 to 24 years old 

25 to 29 years old 

30 to 34 years old 

35 to 39 years old 

40 to 44 years old 

45 to 54 years old 

55 to 64 years old 

65 to 74 years old 

75 years old and over . . . 

Female 


100.0 08.3 1.7 
100.0 83.7 15.2 1.1 
100.0 51.7 44.4 0.1 3^ 
100.0 30.0 62.3 0.2 7.4 
100.0 20.3 67.4 0.4 11.9 

100.0 15.7 70.6 0.5 13.2 
100.0 9.5 76.4 0.9 13.3 
100.0 5.5 79.1 3.0 12.5 
100.0 4.3 79.6 8.3 7.8 
100.0 4.1 69.3 22.7 3.9 

100,0 21.1 57.6 10.5 lOJ 


18 to 19 years okj 

20 to 24 years old 

25 to 29 years old 

30 to 34 years old 

35 to 39 years old 

40 to 44 years old 

45 to 54 years old 

55 to 64 years old 

65 to 74 years old 

75 years old and over . . . 


100.0 93.0 6.7 0.2 
100.0 72.8 25.3 0.1 1.8 
100.0 38.9 54.8 0.1 6.2 
100.0 21.9 68.3 0.6 9.1 
100.0 14.3 71.4 1.2 13.2 

100.0 11.8 71.7 1.5 15.0 
100.0 8.6 70.4 3.9 17.2 
100.0 4.9 68.0 11.8 15.3 
100.0 3.7 55.6 31.3 0.3 
100.0 3.5 31.1 60.5 4.0 



- Represents or rounds to zero. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Cunsnt Population Reports, P20-537 and earlier repods. 

No. 49. Unmarried-Partner Households by Sex of Partners: 2000 

[As of April] 



Item 



MimiliMi 

nutnOm 



Total households 

Unmarried-partner households 

Male householder and male partner . . . 

Male householder and female partner . . 

Female householder and fenrtaie partner 

Female householder and male partner. . 
All other households 



105,480,101 

5.475.768 

301.026 

2.615.119 

293.365 

2,266.258 

100.004.333 



Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American FactFinder, PCT14. Unmarried-Partner Households t>y Sex of Partners; Census 2000 
Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data. 

No. 50. Households, 1 980 to 2000, and Persons in Households, 2000, by Type 
of Household 

[As of March (80,776 rsprssents 80,776,000). Based on Cun«nt Population Sun/ey: see headnote. Table 51] 



Type of household 





HOM 


(eholds 






Persorts in 
households. 








Number 




Percent 






(1.000) 




distribution 


2000 




Persons 
per 


























Percent 


house- 












Number distribu- 


hold. 


1980 


1990 


2000 


1990 


2000 


(1.000) 


tion 


2000 


80,778 


93,347 


104,705 


100 


100 


273,801 


100 


2.62 


59.550 


66.090 


72.025 


71 


69 


233,115 


85 


3.24 


49.112 


52.317 


55.311 


56 


53 


180.224 


66 


3.26 


1.733 


2.884 


4,028 


3 


4 


12.734 


5 


3.16 


8.705 


10.890 


12.687 


12 


12 


40.156 


15 


3.17 


21.226 


27.257 


32.680 


29 


31 


40.787 


15 


1.25 


18.296 


22.999 


26.724 


25 


26 


26.724 


10 


1.00 


8.807 


11.606 


14.641 


12 


14 


19.674 


7 


1.34 


6.966 


9,049 


11.181 


10 


11 


11.181 


4 


1.00 


12.419 


15.651 


18.039 


17 


17 


21.112 


8 


1.17 


11.330 


13.950 


15.543 


15 


15 


15.543 


6 


1.00 



Total households , 

Family households 

Married couple family 

Male householder, no spouse present. . 
Female householder, no spouse present , 
Nonfamily households 

Living alone 

Male householder 

Living alone 

Female housetwWer 

Living alone 



Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, P20-537. and eariier reports; and unpublished data. 



48 Population 



U.S. Census Bureau. StatMtcU Abstract of the Unlled SMii: 8008 



No. 51. Households, Families* Subfamilies» and Married Couples: 
1980 to 2000 



pn ttiounnds, •MOtpl m Ind tel wl (80,776 i«pf i ii to 80,776,000). As of Mwch. Based on Current Population Survey: includes 
nwmber s of Armed Forces iiviria off post or with their famHiee on post, t>ut excludes aH other members of Aimed Forces; see text, 
this section, and Appendte III. R>r definition of terms, see text, this section. Minus sign (•) Indicates decrease] 



Type of unit 



Percent change 



1965 1980 1996 1997 1996 1969 2000 



1960- 
90 



1960- 
2000 



Average size 

Famity households .... 

Married couple 

Male householder ^ . 
Female hou8^K)lder ^ 

Nonfamiy households. . 
Male householder. . . 
Female householder . 



One person, 



size 



WHh own children ^ . . 
Without own cNldren ^ 



Married couple ....... 

With ovm children ^. . . 

Without own children ^ 
Male householder V,. ■ ■ 

With own children '. . . 

Without own children ^ 
Female householder ^ . . 

With ovm children *. . . 

Without own children ^ 



Urwelated subfamilies 

Mamed couple 

Mate refererice persons ^ .. 
Fsmate reference persorw V 

Rsialsd 



Married couote 
ramer-cnM 
Molher-child ^ . 



oouplea . . . . 
iwn fioiffiehold . 



WHh own 

Without own household. 

Percent without . . . . 



60,776 

2.76 

59.550 

49.112 

1.733 

8.705 

21226 

8.807 

12.419 



66,769 

2.69 

62,706 

50.350 

2.228 

10.129 

24.082 
10.114 
13.968 



93,347 

2.63 

66.090 

52.317 

2.884 

10.890 

27.257 
11.606 
15.651 



96.990 

2.65 

69.305 

53.858 

3,226 

12.220 

29.686 
13.190 
16.496 



101.016 
2.64 

70,241 

53.604 

3.847 

12.790 

30.777 
13.707 
17.070 



102.526 

2.62 

70.880 

54.317 

3.911 

12.652 

31.648 
14.133 
17.516 



103.674 

2.61 

71.535 

54.770 

3.976 

12.789 

32.339 
14.368 
17,971 



104.706 

2.62 

72.025 

55.311 

4.028 

12.687 

32.680 
14.641 
18.039 



18.296 20.602 22.999 24,732 25.402 26.327 26,606 26.724 



69.560 

3.29 

31.022 
28.528 

49.112 

24.961 

24.151 

1.733 

616 

1,117 

8.705 

5.445 

3.261 

360 
20 
36 

304 

1.150 

582 

54 

512 

49,714 

49.112 

602 

1.2 



62.706 

3.23 

31.112 
31,594 

50,350 
24.210 
26.140 

2.228 
896 

1.332 
10.129 

6.006 

4.123 

526 
46 
85 

395 

2.228 
719 
116 

1.392 

51,114 

50.350 

764 

1.5 



66.090 

3.17 

32,289 
33.801 

52.317 

24,537 

27.780 

2.884 

1.153 

1.731 

10.890 

6.599 

4.290 

534 
68 
45 

421 

2.403 
871 
153 

1.378 

53.256 

52.317 

939 

1.8 



69305 

3.19 

34.296 
35.009 

53.858 

25.241 

28.617 

3.226 

1.440 

1.786 

12.220 

7,615 

4,606 

674 
64 
59 

550 

2.878 

1.015 

195 

1.668 

54.937 

53.858 

1.079 

2.0 



70.241 

3.19 

34.665 
35.575 

53.604 

25.083 

28.521 

3.847 

1.709 

2.138 

12.790 

7.874 

4.916 

615 
50 
77 

487 

2.907 

1.012 

244 

1.651 

94,600 

53.604 

1.062 

1.9 



70,660 

3.18 

34.760 
36.120 

54.317 

25.269 

29.048 

3.911 

1.798 

2.113 

12.652 

7.693 

4.960 

575 
41 
72 

463 

2.870 
947 
250 

1,673 

55.306 

54.317 

988 

1.8 



71,535 

3.18 

34.613 
36.922 

54,770 

25.066 

29.703 

3.976 

1.706 

2.270 

12.789 

7.841 

4.948 

522 
50 
64 

408 

2,901 

1.029 

281 

1.591 

55.649 

54.770 

1.079 

1.9 



72,025 

3.17 

34.605 
37.420 

55.311 

25.248 

30.062 

4.028 

1.786 

2.242 

12.687 

7.571 

5.116 

571 
37 
57 

477 

2.984 

1.149 

201 

1.634 

56,497 

55.311 

1.186 

2.1 



16 

(X) 

11 

7 

66 

25 

28 
32 
26 

26 

11 

(X) 

4 
18 

7 
-2 
15 
66 
87 
55 
25 
21 
32 

48 
(B) 
(B) 

39 

109 
50 

169 

7 

7 

56 

(X) 



12 

(X) 

9 

6 

40 

17 

20 
26 
15 

16 

9 

(X) 

7 
11 

6 
3 
8 
40 
55 
30 
17 
15 
19 

7 

(B) 

(B) 

13 

24 
32 
31 
19 

6 

6 
26 

(X) 



B Not shown: base tess than 75.000. X Not applicable. 
Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current PopulaUon Reports, 



^ No spouse present. ^ Under 18 years okJ. 
P20-537, and earlier reports. 



No. 52. Households by Age of Householder and Size of Household: 
1980 to 2000 



[h 



(804 



80,800.000). As Of March. Based on Current Population Sun/ey: see headnote. Table 51] 



Age of housefx)lder and 
size of household 



2000 



1066 



1990 



His- 
White Black panic ^ 



1999 Total ^ 



ToM, 



60.6 



80.6 



93.3 



1.0 



103.9 



104.7 



67.7 



12.6 



Age of householder. 
15 to 24 years old. . . 
25 to 29 years okJ. . . 
X to 34 years old . . . 
3510 44 years old. . . 
45 10 54 years old. . . 
55 10 64 years old. . . 
66 to 74 years old. . . 
75 years old and over 

One person 



Femate 

Two persons 

Three persorts 

Four persons 

Five persons 

Sot persons 

Seven persons or more. 



9.3 



6.6 


5.4 


5.1 


5.4 


5.9 


5.9 


4.5 


1.0 


0.9 


9.3 


9.6 


9.4 


8.4 


8.5 


8.5 


6.7 


1.3 


1.1 


9.3 


10.4 


11.0 


11.1 


10.3 


10.1 


8.1 


1.4 


1.3 


14.0 


17.5 


20.6 


22.9 


24.0 


24.0 


19.8 


3.1 


2.5 


12.7 


12.6 


14.5 


17.6 


20.2 


20.9 


17.5 


2.6 


1.5 


12.5 


13.1 


12.5 


12.2 


13.6 


13.6 


11.6 


1.5 


0.9 


10.1 


10.9 


11.7 


11.8 


11.4 


11.3 


9.9 


1.1 


0.6 


6.4 


7.3 


8.4 


9.6 


10.2 


10.4 


9.5 


0.8 


0.4 


18.3 


20.6 


23.0 


24.7 


26.6 


26.7 


22.3 


3.6 


1.3 


7.0 


7.9 


9.0 


10.1 


11.0 


11.2 


9.2 


1.6 


0.7 


11.3 


12.7 


14.0 


14.6 


15.6 


15.5 


13.1 


2.0 


0.6 


25.3 


27.4 


30.1 


31.8 


34.3 


34.7 


30.1 


3.4 


1.9 


14.1 


15.5 


16.1 


16.8 


17.4 


17.2 


13.8 


2.5 


1.8 


12.7 


13.6 


14.5 


15.3 


15.0 


15.3 


12.8 


1.7 


1.9 


6.1 


6.1 


6.2 


6.6 


7.0 


7.0 


5.7 


0.9 


1.3 


2.5 


2.3 


2.1 


2.3 


2.4 


2.4 


1.8 


0.4 


0.6 


1.8 


1.3 


1.3 


1.4 


1.3 


1.4 


1.1 


0.2 


0.5 



^ Includes other races, not shown separately. ^ Hispanic persons may be of any race. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, P20-537. and earlier reports: and unpublished data. 



PopuVBlvoxx ^^ 



ULt. 



Bunmu Omufcal Abstract of the UrUlBd fiftrtas: 2002 



No. 53. HouMlioMs-4tateK2000 

|A* of «pri 4106.4a 









Hm 


tMrnlMKBt 












££:& 




S\Ml» 


-brt' 




sa 


Sf! 










WMvow 




wjri»n 




VWO»l 


















Mng 


.^ss 




Tow 


1W*I ywi 




»-» 






Tow okn 


ria 


U.S- 


\KMO 


Ti.Tar H5M 


MAn 


34m 


lajoB 


jjKa 


Mjn 17.230 


ua 


AL . 


1.737 


1.216 561 


907 


391 


248 


141 


521 454 


2.4a 




aa 


152 68 




S3 


24 




69 52 


Z.7* 


AZ 




1287 en 


968 


429 






614 472 




















n 


C* 


II.S03 


7,BB0 4.'17 


5.677 


2A90 


1.449 


636 


3.SKI 2.708 




CO 




1,064 M4 


659 


405 




102 


574 438 


2.S3 
















421 3U 


tsa 


DE 




20s 95 




66 










DC 


2« 


114 49 


S7 


21 




zs 


134 109 


2-18 


FL 




4211 1.780 






759 




2,127 1.887 


2.40 


OA 


3.006 


2.112 1.051 


l.»49 




435 


2se 




2.8S 




403 


287 129 


218 


97 


50 


24 


116 88 


2K 


ID. 








132 




27 


134 tOS 


ZM 




4Se2 








564 




1,486 1230 




IN 


2 336 


rfloa '768 


l]2S1 


556 




1B0 




2 S3 






770 381 






98 


64 


3S0 313 


248 


KV 


i'mi 




^ 


375 


188 




336 280 




LA 


IW 


Vise 572 


609 


37; 


275 


102 




2;«2 


ME 










49 


32 


178 140 


2.3S 


UO 




1.359 662 




461 










MA 


2:4« 


1.577 749 
2.576 1237 


1.198 


541 




164 
284 


867 684 
1210 994 


IS 


MN 


1696 








S 








MS 


I.D46 


747 363 


■53 1 


234 


181 


108 


299 258 


2^83 


MO 








497 


254 




718 800 


2.4B 




'359 












121 98 




NE 
















249 


NV 


751 


498 239 


373 


166 


83 






2.62 














27 


151 llfl 


253 




3.0BS 




1.638 


776 


387 






2 as 


NM 


678 


'467 235 


342 


156 


90 






283 












1.038 


573 


2,417 1.983 


261 


































SI 75 




OH 


*,44B 


2,993 1.410 


2.288 


996 


537 


323 


1,453 1.216 


240 


OK 












94 




















456 346 








3206 1.431 




1,043 


555 




1.569 1.321 




Rl 


408 


265 125 




86 


53 


32 










1,073 495 










461 383 




SO 


'390 
















TN 


!.aj3 


1,548 707 




499 


288 


166 




240 


IX 










938 


S64 


2,146 1,752 


274 


UT 














166 12S 




VI 


241 


158 76 


126 


56 


22 


15 


63 83 


244 




Z.699 


1,846 882 


1,438 




320 


187 


651 677 


254 


Bv 








tsT 










Wl 




1.367 885 














W¥ 


1W 




"» 


" 


" 


13 


63 51 


2:*0 



Souica: U.S. Cum 



No. 54. Family Groups with Chlldraii Undor 18 Years Old by Race and 
Hispanic Origin: 1980 tQ 2000 



Pd tfwuMndi. As of March (32,190 lepf e ii to 92,190,000). Family groups oompitse famtty households, rehrted subfamilies, and 
umolalDd aubfamiies. Exdudss msmbsr s of Amwd Fbross exoMt Ihoee }MnQ off post or witn their famMes on poet Based on Cur- 
rent Population Sun/ey: see text this section, arxj Appendix III] 



Race and Hispanic origin of 
householder or refererx» person 



2000 











Family 


Subfamilies 












house- — 








1990 


1990 


1995 


Total 


holds 


Total 


Related 


Unrelated 


32,190 


34,070 


37,106 


37,496 


34,006 


2390 


2,346 


544 


25.231 


24.921 


25.640 


25.771 


25.248 


523 


512 


11 


6.920 


9.749 


11.528 


11.725 


9.357 


2.368 


1.834 


534 


6.230 


8.308 


9.834 


9.681 


7.571 


2.110 


1.633 


477 


690 


1.351 


1.694 


2.044 


1.786 


258 


201 


57 


27,294 


29,294 


29,946 


30,079 


29,107 


1,973 


1,558 


415 


22.628 


21.905 


22.320 


22.241 


21,809 


433 


422 


11 


4.664 


6.389 


7.525 


7.838 


6.298 


1.540 


1,136 


404 


4.122 


5.310 


6.239 


6.216 


4,869 


1.347 


995 


352 


542 


1,079 


1.286 


1.622 


1.429 


193 


140 


53 


4,074 


5,007 


5,491 


5,530 


4,792 


749 


642 


106 


1.961 


2.006 


1.962 


2.135 


2,093 


41 


41 


- 


2.114 


3.081 


3,529 


3,396 


2.689 


706 


600 


106 


1,984 


2.860 


3.197 


3.060 


2,409 


651 


550 


101 


129 


221 


332 


335 


280 


55 


50 


5 


2,194 


3.429 


4,527 


5,903 


4,914 


699 


596 


92 


1,626 


2.289 


2.879 


3.625 


3.423 


203 


194 


9 


568 


1.140 


1.647 


1.877 


1.391 


486 


402 


84 


526 


1.003 


1,404 


1.565 


1.145 


420 


347 


73 


42 


138 


243 


313 


246 


66 


55 


11 



AN 



TteD-pananl tenHy groups 
One-parent family grou|3e 

Maintained by mother . 

Maintained by father. . 

ffflMie, IMM 

Two-peient family groups 
One-parent family groupe 

Maii'itflined by mother . 

Maintained by father. . 



Tao-parant famNy groups 
One pare n t family groups 

Maintained by mother . 

Maintained by father. . 

Htapanic total ' . . 

Two-parent famMy groups 
One^Mrent family groupe 

Maintained t>y mother. 

Maintavied by father. . 



• Represents or rourxis to zero. ^ Includes other races, not shown separately. ^ Hispanic persons may be of any race. 
Souoe: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports^ P20-537. and earlier reports; arxJ unputMished data. 

No. 55. Families by Numl>er of Own Children Under 18 Years Old: 
1 980 to 2000 



(As of March (59,990 



59,550,000) and based on Current Population Sun/ey: see headnote. Table 56] 





Number of families (1.000) 


Percent distribution 


Race. Hispanic origin, 
and year 


Three 

or 

No Two more 

chil- One chil- chil- 

Total dren child dren dren 


No TWO Ttwee 

chil- One chil- or more 

Total dren child dren children 


ALL FAMIUES ^ 

I960 


59.550 28.528 12.443 11,470 7.109 
66.090 33.801 13.530 12.263 6.496 
69.305 35.009 14.088 13,213 6,995 
72.025 37.420 14.311 13.215 7.060 
55.311 30.062 9.402 10.274 5.572 

4.028 2,242 1.131 483 171 
12.687 5.116 3.777 2,458 1.336 

52.243 25.769 10,727 9.977 5.769 
56.590 29.872 11.186 10.342 5.191 
58.437 30.486 11,491 10.983 5,478 
60.251 32.144 11.496 10.918 5.693 
48.790 26.961 8.023 8.970 4.816 
3.081 1.652 885 400 144 
8.380 3,511 2.588 1.548 732 

6.184 2.364 1.449 1.235 1.136 
7.470 3,093 1,894 1.433 1.049 
8.093 3.411 1.971 1,593 1.117 
8.664 3.882 2.101 1.624 1,058 
4.144 2.050 838 754 501 
706 427 196 62 21 
3.814 1.405 1.088 807 536 

3.029 946 680 698 706 
4.640 1.790 1,095 1.036 919 
6.200 2.216 1.408 1.406 1.171 
7.561 2.747 1,791 1.693 1.330 
5.133 1,710 1.139 1.276 1,008 

658 412 141 68 38 
1.760 625 511 350 284 


100 48 21 19 12 


1990 


100 51 20 19 10 


1966 


100 51 20 19 10 


2000 


100 52 20 18 10 


Mwried couple 

Mria householder ^ 


100 54 17 19 10 
100 56 28 12 4 


Female householder ^ 

WHITE FAMIUES 

1900 


100 40 30 19 11 
100 49 21 19 11 


1990 


100 53 20 18 9 


1995 


100 52 20 19 9 


20OO 


100 53 19 18 9 


Mamed couple 

Male householder ^ 


100 55 16 18 10 
100 54 29 13 5 


Female householder ^ 

BLACK FAMIUES 

1900 


100 42 31 18 9 
100 38 23 20 18 


1900 


100 41 25 19 14 


1995 


100 42 24 20 14 


2000 


100 45 24 19 12 


Male houeehoMer ^ 


100 49 20 18 12 
100 60 28 9 3 


Female householder * 

HISPANIC FAMILIES ^ 
1980 


100 37 28 21 14 
100 31 22 23 23 


1990 


100 37 23 21 19 


1996 


100 36 23 23 19 


2000 


100 36 24 22 18 


Married couple 

Mirie householder ^ 


100 33 22 25 20 
100 63 21 10 6 


Female houeehoMer ^ 


100 35 29 20 16 



' Includes other races, not shown separately. ^ No spouse present. ^ Hispanic persons may be of any race. 
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Popidation R^XHts, P20-537. arxJ eariier reports; and unpublished data. 



9opu\^X\OT\ S\ 



aaCanwsBMMU. Statmcak AbttlnA oH the UnHad Sttiee: 2002 



No. 56. Families by Size and Presence of Children: 1980 to 2000 

[In thouMfKte. Mcapt as Ind tel wl (69,560 wpfntiHi 58.8604)00). As of March. Excludes member s of Amned Forces eieoepl 
thoee living off poet or with their fom ilies on poet Based on Cunsnl Populaton Survey: see isxt tie section, end Afipsndbt Ml. For 
definition of families, see text, ttvs section] 



Characteristic 



Number 



Percent 



1900 1906 



1900 



2000, 1990 1905 1990 



Total. 



89.660 62,706 66.000 00.306 724B6 



Size of family: 

Two persons 

Three persons 

Four persons 

Five persons 

Six persons 

Seven or more persons 
Average per family . . . 



I 



Own children under age 18: 

Nor>e 

One 

Two 

Three 

Four or more 



Own children under age 6: 

None 

One 

Two or more 



23.461 

13.603 

12.372 

5.930 

2.461 

1.723 

329 



28.528 

12.443 

11.470 

4,674 

2.435 



46.063 
9.441 
4.047 



25.349 

14.804 

13.259 

5394 

2.175 

1.225 

323 



31.594 

13.106 

11.645 

4.486 

1.873 



48.505 
9.677 
4.525 



27.606 

15.353 

14.026 

5.938 

1.997 

1.170 

3.17 



33.801 

13.530 

12.263 

4.650 

1.846 



50.905 

10.304 

4,882 



29.176 

15.903 

14.624 

6.263 

2.106 

1.213 

3.19 



35.009 

14.068 

13.213 

5.044 

1.951 



53.695 

10.733 

4.876 



31.465 

16.073 

14.496 

6.526 

2.226 

1.249 

3.17 



37.420 

14.311 

13.215 

5.063 

2.017 



57.039 

10.454 

4.533 



100 



38 
23 
21 
10 

4 

3 

(X) 



48 

21 

19 

8 

4 



77 
16 

7 



100 



40 

24 

21 

9 

4 

2 

(X) 



50 
21 
19 

7 
3 



77 
15 

7 



100 



42 

23 

21 

9 

3 

2 

(X) 



51 

20 

19 

7 

3 



77 

16 

7 



100 



42 
23 

21 
9 
3 
2 

(X) 



51 
20 
19 

7 
3 



77 
15 

7 



100 



22 

20 
9 
3 
2 

(X) 



52 

20 
16 

7 
3 



79 

15 

6 



X Not applicable. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, P20-537, and earlier reports; and unpublished data. 

No. 57. Families by Type, Race, and Hispanic Origin: 2000 

[In thousands, except as Indicated (72.026 rsprssents 72.026,000). As of March. Excludes members of Amrted Forces except 
those living off post or with tfieir families on post. Based on Current Population Survey; see text of this section and Appandbc til. 
For definition of families, see text of Wa section] 



Characteristic 



Married couple families 



Ail 
families 



races 



f\ 



His- 
White Black panic ^ 



Female family housetiolder ^ 



family 



All 
races ^ White 



Hi^ holder.' 
Black pank:^ aH races 



All famlllee 



72.026 86.311 46.790 4,144 5.133 



12.687 6.380 3.614 1,769 4.Q26 



Age of householder 
Under 25 years okJ. . . 
25 to 34 years old . . . 
35 to 44 years okJ . . . 
45 to 54 years okJ . . . 
55 to 64 years okJ . . . 
65 to 74 years okl . . . 
75 years okl and over. 



Without own children under 18. 

With own chikjren under 18. . . 

One own chikJ under 18 . . . 

Two own children under 18 . 

Three or more own children 

under 18 

Average per family with 
own children under 18. . . . 



Marital status of householder: 
Mamed, spouse present . . 
Married, spouse absent. . . 

Separated 

Other 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Never married 



3.353 

13.007 

18.706 

15,803 

9,569 

7.025 

4.562 

37.420 
34.605 
14.311 
13.215 

7.060 

1.87 



55.311 
2,434 
1.757 
677 
2.797 
5.820 
5,665 



1,450 
9.390 
14.104 
12.792 
8.138 
5.929 
3.508 

30.062 

25.248 

9.402 

10.274 

5.572 

1.94 



55.311 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 

¥[ 
X 



1.298 
8.128 
12.271 
11,174 
7.269 
5.380 
3.270 

26.981 

21.809 

8,023 

8.970 

4.816 

1.93 



48.790 
(X) 



(X) 



93 

783 

1.194 

OOA 

554 

360 
175 

2.050 

2.093 

838 

754 

501 

1.99 



4,144 
(X) 
(X) 
(X 
(X 
(X 
(X 



315 
1.436 
1.534 
911 
509 
291 
136 

1,710 
3,423 
1,139 
1.276 

1,006 

2.14 



5.133 
(X) 
(X 



!x, 

i 

(X) 



1 



1.342 
2.732 
3.499 
2,299 
1,080 
894 
841 

5.116 
7.571 
3,777 
2,458 

1,336 

1.75 



(X) 
1.878 
1.426 
452 
2.371 
4.431 
4,007 



770 

1,586 

2.455 

1.555 

701 

632 

681 

3,511 
4.869 
2,588 
1,548 

732 

1.66 



1.210 
906 
302 
1.764 
3.431 
1.974 



502 
1.039 
918 
658 
323 
229 
146 

1,405 

2.409 

1.086 

807 

536 

1.91 



(X) 
567 
463 
104 
522 
874 
1,851 



213 
433 

512 
307 
158 
102 



625 

1.145 
511 
350 

284 

1.95 



301 
103 
252 
475 
639 



560 

886 
1.102 
713 
351 
203 
213 

2.242 

1.786 

1.131 

483 

171 

1.50 



1,: 
1.1 



331 
224 

426 



X Not applicable. ^ Includes other races not shown separately. ^ Persons of Hispank: origin may be of any race. ' No 
spouse present. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Poptdation Reports, P20-537. 



S2 Population 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistkal Abstract of the Unlled 



No. 58. Family Households With Own Chiidrttn Under Age 1 8 bv Type of 
Family, 1980 to 2000, and by Age of Householder, 2000 



(As or Mwd) (31,022 
ies on post. Based on 



31,022,000). Exdudes members of Amied Forces except thoee Hving off post or wNh their fami- 
irrent Population Survey: see text, this section, and Appendix III] 



Family type 



2000 









15 to 


25 to 


35 to 


45 to 


55 to 










24 


34 


44 


54 


64 


65 years 








years 


years 


years 


years 


years 


old and 


1980 


1990 


Total 


old 


old 


old 


old 


old 


over 


31,022 


32,280 


34,605 


2,000 


9,886 


15,104 


6,617 


865 


133 


24.961 


24.537 


25.248 


834 


6.830 


11.405 


5.401 


671 


107 


616 


1.153 


1.786 


123 


530 


737 


305 


74 


15 


5.445 


6.599 


7.571 


1.042 


2.525 


2.962 


911 


119 


11 



NUMBER (1.000) 



Fwnlly houeeholdis 

Married couple 

Male househoktef ^ , 
Female householder ^ 



HOUSEHCXDS WITH CHILDREN. 

AS A PERCENT OF ALL 
FAMILY HOUSEHOLDS BY TYPE 

Family h ou a e h o lde with cMkfren, 



Married couple . . . . 
Male householder V 
Female householder 



\ 



52 


49 


46 


60 


76 


81 


42 


9 


1 


51 


47 


46 


58 


73 


81 


42 


8 


1 


36 


40 


44 


22 


60 


67 


43 


21 


4 


63 


61 


60 


78 


92 


85 


40 


11 


1 



' No spouse preeenL 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, P20-537 and earlier reports. 

No. 59. Nonfamily Households by Sex and Age of Householder: 2000 

[In thousands (14,641 represents 14.841.000). As of March. See headnote. Table 56] 





Male householder 


Female householder 


Item 


65 yr. 

15 to 24 25 to 44 45 to 64 old and 

Total yr. old yr. old yr. old over 


65 yr. 

15 to 24 25 to 44 45 to 64 old and 

Total yr. old yr. old yr. old over 


ToM 


14.641 1,286 6.709 4,116 2.530 

11,181 556 4.848 3.422 2.355 
3.460 731 1.860 693 175 

7.274 1.246 4.465 1.188 374 
1.180 25 527 460 166 
1.684 36 269 1.380 
4.503 15 1.680 2.198 610 


18.039 1.221 4,161 5.031 7,626 


One person (living alone) . . 
NonrslBtives present 

Never inamed. 


15.543 588 3.108 4.420 7.427 
2.496 634 1.052 612 199 

5,671 1,169 2.910 1.119 472 


Iteiisd^ 


980 19 293 390 278 


TTruOWeu 


7.018 5 73 1,047 5.694 


Dworoed 


4.371 28 885 2.476 982 







- Represems or rounds to zero. ^ No spouse present. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, P20-537. 

No. 60. Persons Living Alone by Sex and Age: 1980 to 2000 

[As of March (18,296 represents 18.296,000). Based on Current Population Survey; see headnote. Tat)le 56] 



Sex arxjage 


Numt>er of persons (1 ,000) 


Percent distribution 


1900 1985 1990 1995 2000 


1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 


Both sexes 


18.296 20,602 22,999 24,732 26,724 

1.726 1.324 1.210 1.196 1.144 
'4.729 3.905 3,972 3.653 3.848 
O 2.322 3.138 3.663 4.109 
4.514 4.939 5.502 6.377 7.842 
3.851 4,130 4.350 4.374 4.091 
3,477 3.982 4.825 5.470 5,692 

6,966 7,922 9.040 10.140 11.181 

947 750 674 623 556 

'2.920 2.307 2,395 2.213 2.279 

C) 1.406 1.836 2.263 2.569 

1.613 1.845 2,203 2.787 3.422 

775 888 1.042 1.134 1,108 

711 746 901 1.120 1.247 

11,330 12,880 13,950 14,592 15.543 

779 573 536 572 588 

'1.809 1.598 1.578 1.440 1.568 

(') 916 1.303 1.399 1.540 

2,901 3.095 3.300 3.589 4.420 

3,076 3.262 3.309 3.240 2.983 

2.766 3,236 3.924 4.351 4.444 


100 100 100 100 100 


15 to 24 years old 

25to34 years old 

35 to 44 years old 

45to64 years old 

66to 74 years old 

75 years old and over 


9 6 5 5 4 
'26 19 17 15 14 
(') 11 14 15 15 
25 24 24 26 29 
21 20 19 18 15 
19 19 21 22 21 

38 39 39 41 42 


I5to 24 years old 

25to34 years old 

36to 44 years old 

46to64 years old 

66 to 74 years old 

75 years old and over 

Female .... 


5 4 3 3 2 
'16 11 10 9 9 
(') 7 8 9 10 
9 9 10 11 13 
4 4 5 5 4 
4 4 4 5 5 

62 62 61 59 56 


15to 24 years old 

2Sto 34 years old 

35 to 44 years old 

45 to 64 years old 

65 to 74 years old 

75 years old and over 


4 3 2 2 2 

'10 8 7 6 6 

(') 4 6 6 6 

16 15 14 15 17 

17 16 14 13 11 
15 16 17 18 17 



' Data (or persons 35 to 44 years old included with persons 25 to 34 years old. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Currwrt Population Reports, P20-537. and earlier reports; and unpul>lished data. 



?Opu\9X\OX\ S*^ 



UAOHHUiBuiMMi, 9milioaiAbitracfoftheUntMStal»B:2002 



No. 61. Population in Group Quartors by Sex, Ag€, and Group Quartors IVpo: 
2000 

(In thousands (7,779 re p resen ts 7,779,000). As of April. For definitions of group quaiters, see text tNs section] 





Male 


Fentale 


Group quarters type 


65 

Total Under 18 to years 

popuia- 18 64 and 

tion Total years years over 


Under 18 to 

18 64 65yeafs 
Total years years andover 


Total 


7,779 4,502 215 3,740 648 

4.059 2.534 122 1.968 444 
1,976 1.806 19 1.773 14 
1.721 488 - 88 401 

40 20 1 10 9 

79 50 7 37 6 
128 101 88 13 
115 68 8 47 14 
3.720 1.968 93 1.772 104 
2.064 958 5 952 
355 307 1 306 

1.300 703 86 513 104 


3,276 100 1.722 1,446 


Institutionalized population 

Correctional institutions 


1.525 36 292 1.197 
170 2 166 2 


Nursina homes 


1.232 75 1.157 


Hospitals/wards and hospices for 
chronicaliv ill 


20 1 6 14 


Mental (psychiatric) hospitals or 
wards 


29 4 18 7 


Juvenile institutions 


27 24 2 


Other institutions 


47 5 25 18 


Noninstitutionalized population 

Colleae dormitories 


1.751 72 1.431 249 
1.107 5 1.101 


Military Quarters 


48 1 47 


Other noninstitutional group 
quarters 


597 66 283 249 







- Represents or rounds to zero. ^ Includes college quarters off campus. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. American FactRnder. PCT17. Group Quarters Population t>y Sex t>y Age t>y Group QuaitafB 
Type, Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data. 

No. 62. Population in Group Quarters— States: 2000 

[As of April. For definitions of group quarters, see text, this section] 



State 



Group 
quarters 
popula 



Correc- 
tional Nursing 
tion ^ institutions homes 



College 

dormitC)- 

ries^ 



U.S.. 
total 



7,778,633 1.978,019 1,720,500 2,064,126 



AL. 
AK. 
AZ. 
AR. 
CA. 
CO. 
CT. 
DE. 

cx:. 

FL . 
GA. 
HI . 
ID . 
IL. . 
IN . 
lA . 
KS. 
KY. 
LA. 
ME. 
MD. 
MA. 
Ml . 
MN. 



114.720 

19.349 

109.850 

73.906 

819.754 

102.955 

107.939 

24.583 

35.562 

388.945 

233.822 

35.782 

31.496 

321,781 

178.154 

104.169 

81.950 

114.804 

135,965 

34.912 

134.056 

221.216 

249.889 

135,883 



33.542 

3.331 

45.783 

20.565 

248,516 

30.136 

20.023 

5.965 

2,838 

139.148 

81,773 

3.233 

7.401 

67.820 

34.676 

11,771 

16.703 

28.388 

49.854 

2.864 

35.698 

23,513 

65,330 

16.999 



26,697 

803 

13.607 

21.379 

120,724 

18,495 

32.223 

4,852 

3.759 

88.828 

34.812 

2,949 

5,735 

91,887 

48.745 

33.428 

25.248 

29.266 

31.521 

9.339 

26.716 

55,837 

50.113 

40,506 



31.086 

1.748 

17.340 

18.280 

126.715 

23.631 

38.051 

9.394 

19.322 

54.085 

47,910 

4,716 

8.006 

90.483 

69.147 

41.171 

24.492 

31.883 

26.959 

13.793 

35.371 

103.563 

69.854 

44,835 



State 



MS. 
MO 
MT. 
NE. 
NV. 
NH. 
NJ. 
NM. 
NY. 
NC. 
ND. 
OH. 
OK. 
OR. 
PA. 
Rl . 
SC. 
SD. 
TN. 
TX. 
UT. 
VT. 
VA. 
WA 
WV 
Wl . 
WY 



Group 

quarters Corrsc- 

popula- tional 

tion ^ institutions 



Colsge 

Nursing dormHch 

homes ries' 



95.414 
162.058 

24.762 

50.818 

33.675 

35.539 
194,821 

36.307 
580,461 
253.881 

23.631 
299.121 
112.375 

77.491 
433.301 

38.816 
135.037 

28.418 
147.948 
561.109 

40.480 

20.760 
231.398 
136,362 

43.147 
155.958 

14,083 



25.778 
35.206 

4,124 

6.060 
15.940 

3.468 

47.941 

10.940 

108,068 

46.614 

1.518 
68.873 
33.919 
19.523 
76.553 

3,576 
34,909 

4,479 

38.481 

244.363 

9.921 

1.219 
64.036 
28,871 
10.505 
31,068 

4.176 



18,382 
48,708 

6.470 
16.195 

4.895 

9.316 
51.493 

6.810 

123,852 

50.892 

7,254 

93.157 

28.021 

14.677 

114,113 

9.222 
20.867 

7.791 

36.994 

105.052 

6.853 

4.037 
38.865 
23.275 
11.601 
41.370 

2,869 



29,238 

44,567 

7.036 
18.378 

2.496 
17.574 
45,222 

7.921 
174.111 
76.018 
10.137 
91.713 
26.643 
18.831 
147.542 
20.551 
30.360 

8.998 
45.090 
92,246 

9.837 
12.863 
65.557 
30.858 
14.300 
51.397 

3.850 



Includes other group quarters types not shown separately. ^ Includes college quarters off campus. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Census of Population and Housing. Profiles of General Demographic Characteristics: and 
Census 2000 Summary File 1 . 



I Population 



U.S. Census Bursau. Statistical Abstract of the UnMed 



No. 63. Religious Bodies— Selected Data 



u 2,500 i«pf i ii to 2,500,000. InchJdee the seif-raported membership of religious bodies with 65,000 or more 
raported to the Yemtook of American mid CanmMtn Churches. Groups may be excluded if they do not supply informalion. The 
data are ntA starxJardteed so comparisons bet¥veen groups are dHKcutt. The definition of "church member" is determined by the 
body] 



iReligious body 



Year Churches Membership 
reported reported (1,000) 



Pastors 

serving 

parishes^ 



African M ethodi st Episcopal Church 

African Me t hodist Episcopal Zion Church 

American Baptist Association, The 

American Baptist Churches in the U.S.A 

AnttocNan Orthodox Ctwistian Archdiocese of North America, The. 

Amienian ApoetoNc Church of America 

Assemblies of God 

BefMist &bie Fellowship International 

Ba^ist General Conference 

Baptist Miseionary Association of America 

Christian and Missionary Alliance. The 

Christian BreChren (a.lca. Plymouth Brettven) 

Christian Church (Oisdples of Christ) 

Christian Churches aixi Churcfies of Christ 

Chriaflan Congregation, Inc.. The 

Chriaflan K4ethodtot Episcopal Church 

Owistian Reformed QHirch in North America 

Church Of God In Christ. The 

Church of God of Prophecy 



Church of God (Anderson, Indiana) 

Church of God (Cleveland, Tennessee) 

Ctwrch of Jeeus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The 

Church of the Brethren 

Church of the Nazarene 

Churches of Christ 

Comnmnity of Christ 

Conservat^ Baptist Association of America 

Coptic Orthodox Church 

Cumberland Presbyterian Church 

Episcopal Church 

Evangeical Covenant CtHjrch, The 

Evangeical Free Church of America, The 

Eva n os ica i Lutheran Church in America 

Fi4 <jospel Fellowship of Churches and Ministers Intemationai 

General Associ a t i o n of Regular Baptist Churches 

General Conference of Mertnonite Brethren Churches 

Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America 

imern aB o n al Church of the Foursquare Gospel 

imern aB o n al Council of Community Churches 

Mamatlonal Penteooetal Holiness Church 

Jehovah's Witneesee 



Lutheran Ctiurch— Miseouri Synod (LCMS). The 

Matwonha Church 

Nallonal Asaodation of Congregational Christian Churches 

Nallonal Aaeociation of Free Will Baptists 

Maional Baptist Convention of America. Inc 

Maional Baptist Convention USA, Inc 

Maional Missionary Baptist Convention of America 

Old Order Amish Church 

Orthodox CtHjrch in America, The 

Rsmeooetal Aaaemblies of the Worid. inc 

Rsmeoostal Church of God 

Prssbytarian Church in America 



Piesbytarian Church (U.SJK.) 

National Baptist Convention, Inc. 



n siormed Church in America 

nsigious Sodely of Friends (Conservative) 

Roman Catholic Church. The 

Salvalion Army, The 

SertMn Orthodm CtHjrch in the U.S.A. and Canada. 

Seventh-Day Adventist Church 

Southern Baptist Convention 

Unilarian Universalist Association of Congregations . 

umisd Church of Christ 

Urvisd Methodist Church, The 

Wsfileyan Church. The 

WlKo nai n Evangelical Luttieran Synod 



2000 
2000 
1996 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2001 
1999 
2000 
2000 
2000 
1988 
2000 
1999 
1999 
1991 
2000 
1998 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
1999 
1999 
1996 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
1995 
2000 
2000 
1999 
1996 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2001 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
(NAj 
1992 
1993 
2000 
1998 
2000 
2000 
2000 
1995 
2000 
1994 
2000 
1999 
1986 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 



6,200 
3,218 
1.780 
5,756 

227 

36 

12.064 

4,500 

(NA) 

1.334 

1.959 

1,125 

3,781 

5.579 

1,439 

3,069 

739 

15.300 

1,865 

2,353 

6,426 

11.562 

1,071 

5.070 

15.000 

1.236 

1,200 

100 

779 
7,359 

800 

1,224 

10.816 

896 
1.398 

368 

508 
1.793 

217 

1,868 

11,636 

(NAJ 

6.150 

1.063 

430 
2,472 



4.486 
41.588 
1,051 
5.923 
35.469 
1.602 
1.241 



2,500 

1,297 
275 

1,437 

70 

360 

2,578 

1,200 
143 
235 
365 
95 
820 

1,072 
119 
784 
197 

5,500 

73 

234 

896 

5.209 
136 
637 

1.500 

137 

200 

300 

87 

2,311 
101 
243 

5.126 

325 

92 

82 

1.500 
278 
200 
198 

6.150 
2.564 

120 
66 

199 
3.5^ 

2.500 

81 

1.000 

1.500 

102 

306 

3.485 

2.500 

289 

104 

63.683 

473 

67 

881 

15.960 

220 

1.377 

8.341 

123 

722 





NA Not available. ^ Does not include retired deroy or dergy not woriOno with congregations. ^ Source: American Jewish 
Committee. New Yortc. NY, American Jewish Year Book (copyright) . See Table 65. Xhurch reports 8,000 to 1 0,000 churches arxj 
4 to 6 miffion indusive members. 

Source: Except as noted, Natiortal Coundl of the Churches of Christ in the USA, New Yor1(. NY, 2002 Yeartxx)k of American 
and Canadton Ctujrcftes, annual (copyright). (For more Information, visit www.ncccusa.org). 



?o^\^\\ot\ ^^ 



oa 



BuPMU. SUtfUtkatAbatmct of the United Stalea: 2002 




<0 



ZaOMffl* 



and Attttiidaiica: 



Data rBpfwent avwagM of 
V sanding variabttly, see aoure^ 




ChuroW chufch/ 
mambeis Qogue 



a» 


40 


71 


42 


66 


40 


m 


43 


65 


38 


67 


40 


70 


40 


70 


43 



NANot 
did not 

Source. The firtur 
l3April2001.'<WID '' 



No. 65. 



k sfuch or synagogue in the last 7 days. ' Includes tfioee rsspondenl s «^ 




2001-1 



iChristian cfHl»c^ ed^*"* ••* ^ 
SSTpsmcipafW ^ n ^^i 

gSSunfces have Avnnn^e ,»i«r 



s^ ^egpon 



V). •Gifcy Pod Releases-Easter Season Rnds a 
piOi0413.asp>. 



AilMrafits, 2000, and Jewish Population, 



II members, including full members, their children and the estimatsd number of 
as communicam. confirmed or fuN members." The Jewish population includes 
as wei as those who define themselves as Jewish in cultural terms. Data on 
of vKlMduaJ estimates made by local Jewish federations. Addittonaly. most 
^ surveys from wf>ich the Jewish population can be determined] 






Jewish 
population. 2001 



State 



OS. 



AL 
AK 
AZ 
AR 
CA 
CO 
CT 
OE 
DC 

a 

OA 

HI 

10 

H. 

IN 

lA 

K$ 

KV 

LA 

Ml 

MO 

w^ 

Ml 

MN 

MS 



,' *\\v 

1 *V 
i?NI 

AW 
llwin MX) 



-iVwrev?! 



Number 
(1.000) 



Percent of 
population ^ 



47.4 
544, 

33.6 

37.9! 

56.7 

42.3 

373 

S3.7 

38.2 

57.8 

36.9 

43.1 

35.6 

48.3 

52.0 

42.4 

58.0 

48.6 

53.0 

58.2 

35.3 

38.0 

58.7 

39.9 

60.5 

54.5 



6,150 

9 

3 

82 

2 

99V 

73 

111 

14 

25 

620 

93 

7 

1 

270 

18 

6 

14 

11 

16 

9 

213 

275 

110 

42 

1 



2^ 

0.2 

0.5 

1.6 

0.1 

2.9 

1.7 

3.2 

1.7 

4.5 

3.9 

1.1 

0.6 

0.1 

2.2 

0.3 

0.2 

0.5 

0.3 

0.4 

0.7 

4.0 

4.3 

1.1 

0.9 

0.1 



State 



MO 

MT. 

NE. 

NV. 

NH. 

NJ. 

NM. 

NY. 

NO. 

ND. 

OH. 

OK. 

OR. 

PA. 

Ri . 

SO. 

SO. 

TN. 

TX. 

UT. 

VT. 

VA. 

WA 

WV 

Wl . 

WY 



Christian 
adherents, 2000 



Number 
(1.000) 



reroem of 
population ^ 



2.813 

401 

995 

604 

571 

4.262 

1.041 

9.569 

3.596 

468 

4.912 

2.079 

1.029 

6.751 

646 

1.874 

510 

2.867 

11,316 

1.659 

230 

2,807 

1.872 

646 

3.196 

229 



50.3 

44.4 

58.2 

30.2 

46.2 

50.7 

57.2 

50.4 

44.7 

72.9 

43.3 

60.3 

30.1 

55.0 

61.7 

46.7 

67.6 

50.4 

54.3 

74.3 

37.8 

39.7 

31.8 

35.7 

59.6 

46.4 



jewisn 
population, 



lumber Percent of 
(1.000) populatton^ 



62 

1 

7 

77 

10 

485 

11 

1,657 

26 

,S 

5 

32 

282 

16 

11 

% 

131 

4 

6 

66 

43 

2 

28 

(Z) 



1.1 
0.1 
0.4 
3.8 
0.8 
5.7 
0.6 

a7 

0.3 

0.1 

1.3 

0.1 

0.9 

2.3 

1.5 

0.3 

0.1 

0.3 

0.6 

0.2 

0.9 

0.9 

0.7 

0.1 

0.5 

0.1 



Based on U.S. Census Bureau data for resident population enumerated as of April 1, 2000, and 

HtHri\« rhUBimn church adherents — Dale E. Jones. Sherri Doty. Clifford Qrammich. James E. Horsch. Richard Houseal. John 
» Msn-«Mi( Ki»MiMlh M Sanchagrin, and Richard H. Taylor. Refigious Congregations and Membership in the United Statw: 2000, 
r '{Ti^diMiy Menattrch Center, Nashville, TN. <www/glenmary.org/gr 
j\«wiMtt#« N«w YtifH. NY. Amencan Jewish Year Booi(, 2002 (copfyright). 



iiXtf ilitfititMiy Mttiiettrch Center, Nashville, TN,jcwww/glenmary.org/grc> (copyright); Jewish populatior>— American Jewish 



U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abetrad of tw UnNad 



Section 2 

Vital Statistics 



This section presents vital statistics data 
on births, deaths, abortions, fetal deaths, 
fertility, life expectancy, marriages, and 
divorces. Vital statistics are compiled for 
the country as a whole by the National 
Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and 
published in its annual report. Vital Statis- 
tics of the United States, in certain reports 
of the Vital and Health Statistics series, 
and in the National Vital Statistics Reports 
(formerly Monthly Vital Statistics Report). 
Reports in this field are also issued by the 
various state bureaus of vital statistics. 
Data on fertility, on age of persons at first 
marriage, and on marital status and mari- 
tal history are compiled by the U.S. Cen- 
sus Bureau from its Current Population 
Survey (CPS; see text, Section 1 ) and pub- 
lished in Current Population Reports, P20 
Series. Data on abortions are published by 
the Alan Cuttmacher Institute, New York, 
NY, in selected issues of Family Planning 
Perspectives. 

Registration of vitai events— The reg- 
istration of births, deaths, fetal deaths, 
and other vital events in the United States 
is primarily a state and local function. 
The civil laws of every state provide for 
a continuous and permanent birth- and 
death-registration system. Many states 
also provide for marriage- and divorce- 
registration systems. Vitai events occur- 
ring to U.S. residents outside the United 
States are not included in the data. 

Birtlis and deatlis— The live-birth, 
death, and fetal-death statistics prepared 
by NCHS are based on vital records filed 
in the registration offices of all states, of 
New York City, and of the District of 
Columbia. The annual collection of death 
statistics on a national basis began in 
1900 with a national death-registration 
area of 1 states and the District of 
Columbia; a similar annual collection 
of birth statistics for a national birth- 
registration area began in 1915, also 
with 10 reporting states and the District 
of Columbia. Since 1933, the birth- and 
death-registration areas have comprised 



the entire United States, including Alaska 
(beginning 1 959) and Hawaii (beginning 
1 960). National statistics on fetal deaths 
were first compiled for 1918 and annually 
since 1922. 

Prior to 1951, birth statistics came from a 
complete count of records received in the 
Public Health Service (now received in 
NCHS). From 1951 through 1971, they 
were based on a 50-percent sample of all 
registered births (except for a complete 
count in 1 955 and a 20- to 50-percent 
sample in 1967). Beginning in 1972, they 
have been based on a complete count for 
states participating in the Vital Statistics 
Cooperative Program (VSCP) (for details, 
see the technical appendix in Vital Statis- 
tics of the United States) and on a 50- 
percent sample of all other areas. Begin- 
ning 1986, all reporting areas participated 
in the VSCP Mortality data have been 
based on a complete count of records for 
each area (except for a SOpercent sample 
in 1972). Beginning in 1970, births to and 
deaths of nonresident aliens of the United 
States and U.S. citizens outside the United 
States have been excluded from the data. 
Fetal deaths and deaths among Armed 
Forces abroad are excluded. Data based 
on samples are subject to sampling error; 
for details, see annual issues of Vital Sta- 
tistics of the United States. 

Mortality statistics by cause of death are 
compiled in accordance with World Health 
Organization regulations according to the 
International Classification of Diseases 
(ICD). The ICD is revised approximately 
every 1 years. The tenth revision of the 
ICD was employed beginning in 1 999. 
Deaths for prior years were classified 
according to the revision of the ICD in use 
at the time. Each revision of the ICD intro- 
duces a number of discontinuities in mor- 
tality statistics; for a discussion of those 
between the ninth and tenth revisions of 
the ICD, see National Vital Statistics 
Reports, Vol. 49, Nos. 2 and 8. Preliminary 
mortality data are based on a percentage 
of death records weighted up to the total 



Vital SUt\sX.Vci Vf 



u& 



Bumu. SlalMfcalAtetrBCt of tfwLMMSiMM; 2002 



number of deaths reported for the given 
year; for a discussion of preliminary data, 
see National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 
49, No. 3. Information on tests of statisti- 
cal significance, differences between 
death rates, and standard errors can also 
be found in the reports mentioned above. 

Some of the tables present age-adjusted 
death rates in addition to crude death 
rates. Age-adjusted death rates shown in 
this section were prepared using the 
direct method, in which age-specific 
death rates for a population of interest 
are applied to a standard population dis- 
tributed by age. Age adjustment elimi- 
nates the differences in observed rates 
between points in time or among com- 
pared population groups that result from 
age differences in population composi- 
tion. 

Fertility and life expectancy— The total 
fertility rate, defined as the number of 
births that 1 ,000 women would have in 
their lifetime if. at each year of age. they 
experienced the birth rates occurring in 
the specified year, is compiled and pub- 
lished by NCHS. Other data relating to 
social and medical factors which affect 
fertility rates, such as contraceptive use 
and birth expectations, are collected and 
made available by both NCHS and the 
Census Bureau. NCHS figures are based 
on information in birth and fetal death 
certificates and on the periodic National 
Surveys of Family Growth; Census Bureau 
data are based on decennial censuses and 
the CPS. 

Data on life expectancy, the average 
remaining lifetime in years for persons 
who attain a given age. are computed and 
published by NCHS. For details, see 
National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 50, 
No. 6. 

Marriage and divorce— The compilation 
of nationwide statistics on marriages and 
divorces in the United States began in 
1887-88 when the National Office of Vital 
Statistics prepared estimates for the years 
1 867-86. Although periodic updates took 
place after 1 888, marriage and divorce 
statistics were not collected and pub- 
lished annually until 1944 by that office. 
In 1957 and 1958, respectively, the same 



office established marriage- and divorce- 
registration areas. Beginning in 1957, the 
marriage-registration area comprised 30 
states, plus Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, 
and the Virgin Islands; it currently 
includes 42 states and the District of 
Columbia. The divorce-registration area, 
starting in 1958 with 14 states, Alaska, 
Hawaii, and the Virgin Islands, it currently 
includes a total of 31 states and the Vir- 
gin Islands. Procedures for estimating the 
number of marriages and divorces in the 
registration states are discussed in Vital 
Statistics of the United States, Vol. Ill- 
Marriage and Divorce. Total counts of 
events for registration and nonregistra- 
tion states are gathered by collecting 
already summarized data on marriages 
and divorces reported by state offices of 
vital statistics and by county offices of 
registration. 

Vital statistics rates— Except as noted, 
vital statistics rates computed by NCHS 
are based on decennial census population 
figures as of April 1 for 1940, 1950, 
1 960, 1 970, 1 980. and 1 990; and on mid- 
year population figures for other years, as 
estimated by the Census Bureau (see text. 
Section 1). 

Race— Data by race for births, deaths, 
marriages, and divorces from NCHS are 
based on information contained in the 
certificates of registration. The Census 
Bureau's Current Population Survey 
obtains information on race by asking 
respondents to classify their race as (1) 
White, (2) Black. (3) American Indian, 
Eskimo, or Aleut, or (4) Asian or Pacific 
Islander. 

Beginning with the 1 989 data year, NCHS 
is tabulating its birth data primarily by 
race of the mother. In 1 988 and prior 
years, births were tabulated by race of 
the child, which was determined from the 
race of the parents as entered on the birth 
certificate. 

Trend data by race shown in this section 
are by race of mother beginning with the 
1980 data. Hispanic origin of the mother 
is reported and tabulated independently 
of race. Thus persons of Hispanic origin 
maybe of any race. In 1994, 91 percent of 
women of Hispanic origin were reported 
as White. 



S8 Vital Statistics 



U.S. C«ntus BuTMUi. Stittttteal Abstract of the UnHad 



No. 66. Live Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Divorces: 1950 to 2001 

[3,632 w ptnt nU 3,632,000. Prior to 1960, excludes AlesKa end Heweii. Beginning 1970, excludes births to. end deelhs of non- 
residents of the United Ststes. See Appendix III] 



Veer 





Nurnber (1,000) 






Ratoper 


1.000 population 






Oesths 








Deaths 












Mer- Dl- 
risges^ voroes* 








Mar- 
riages^ 


vorces* 


Births^ 


TotsI 1 


Went 2 


Births^ 


Total 


Infant 2 


3.632 


1.452 


104 


1.667 


385 


24.1 


9.6 


29.2 


11.1 


2.6 


4.097 


1.529 


107 


1.531 


377 


25.0 


9.3 


26.4 


9.3 


2.3 


4.300 


1.633 


112 


1.518 


381 


25.3 


9.6 


26.3 


8.9 


2.2 


4.258 


1.712 


111 


1.523 


393 


23.7 


9.5 


26.0 


8.5 


2.2 


3.760 


1.828 


93 


1.800 


479 


19.4 


9.4 


24.7 


9.3 


2.5 


3.731 


1.921 


75 


2.159 


708 


18.4 


9.5 


20.0 


10.6 


3.5 


3.556 


1.928 


68 


2.190 


773 


17.2 


9.3 


19.1 


10.6 


3.7 


3.258 


1.964 


60 


2,282 


845 


15.6 


9.4 


18.5 


10.9 


4.0 


3.137 


1.973 


56 


2.284 


915 


14.8 


9.3 


17.7 


10.8 


4.3 


3.160 


1.934 


53 


2.230 


977 


14.8 


9.1 


16.7 


10.5 


4.6 


3.144 


1.883 


51 


2.153 1 


,036 


14.6 


8.8 


16.1 


10.0 


4.8 


3.168 


1.909 


48 


2.155 1 


,083 


14.6 


8.8 


15.2 


9.9 


5.0 


3.327 


1.900 


47 


2.178 1 


.091 


15.1 


8.6 


14.1 


9.9 


5.0 


3.333 


1.928 


46 


2.282 1 


.130 


15.0 


8.7 


13.8 


10.3 


5.1 


3.494 


1.914 


46 


2.331 1 


.181 


15.6 


8.5 


13.1 


10.4 


5.3 


3.612 


1.990 


46 


2,390 1 


.189 


15.9 


8.8 


12.6 


10.6 


5.2 


3.629 


1.978 


43 


2.422 1 


.213 


15.8 


8.6 


11.9 


10.6 


5.3 


3.681 


1.975 


42 


2,456 1 


.170 


15.9 


8.5 


11.5 


10.6 


5.1 


3.639 


2.019 


41 


2.446 1 


,158 


15.6 


8.6 


11.2 


10.5 


5.0 


3.669 


2.039 


40 


2.477 1 


.169 


15.6 


8.6 


10.8 


10.5 


5.0 


3.761 


2.086 


40 


2.413 1 


.190 


15.8 


8.8 


10.6 


10.1 


5.0 


3.757 


2.105 


39 


2.407 1 


.178 


15.6 


8.8 


10.4 


10.0 


4.9 


3.809 


2.123 


38 


2.403 1 


.166 


15.7 


8.8 


10.1 


9.9 


4.8 


3.910 


2.168 


39 


2.396 1 


.167 


16.0 


8.9 


10.0 


9.8 


4.8 


4.041 


2.150 


40 


2,403 1 


.157 


16.4 


8.7 


9.8 


9.7 


4.7 


4.158 


2.148 


38 


2.443 1 


.182 


16.7 


8.6 


9.2 


9.8 


4.7 


4.111 


2.170 


37 


2.371 1 


.187 


16.3 


8.6 


8.9 


9.4 


4.7 


4.065 


2.176 


35 


2.362 1 


,215 


15.9 


8.5 


8.5 


9.3 


4.8 


4.000 


2.269 


33 


2,334 1 


.187 


15.5 


8.8 


8.4 


9.0 


4.6 


3.953 


2.279 


31 


2.362 1 


.191 


15.2 


8.8 


8.0 


9.1 


4.6 


3.900 


2.312 


30 


2.336 1 


.169 


14.8 


8.8 


7.6 


8.9 


4.4 


3.891 


2.315 


28 


2.344 1 


.150 


14.7 


8.7 


7.3 


8.8 


4.3 


3.881 


2.314 


28 


2.384 1 


.163 


14.5 


8.6 


7.2 


8.9 


4.3 


3.942 


2.337 


28 


2,256 1 


.135 


14.6 


8.6 


7.2 


8.3 


4.3 


3.959 


2.391 


28 


2.358 1 


NA) 


14.5 


8.8 


7.1 


8.6 


4.1 


4.059 


2.403 


28 


2.329 1 


NA) 


14.7 


8.7 


6.9 


8.5 


4.2 


4.028 


2.419 


28 


2,327 ( 


NA) 


14.5 


8.7 


6.9 


8.4 


4.0 



19S0 

1956 

1957 

1960 

1965 

1970 

1971 

1972 

1973 

1974 

1975 

1976 

1977 

1978 

1979 

1960 

1961 

1982 

1963 

1964 

1985 

1966 

1967 

1988 

1989 

1990 

1991 

1992 

1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 

1997. 

1! 

2000; 

2001*. 



^ Prtor to 1960. data adjusted for underregistration. ^ Infants under 1 year, excluding fetal deaths: rates 
9 txrths. ^ Includes estimates tor some states through 1965 and also for 1976 and 1977 arKJ marriage 



NA Not available. 
per 1.000 registered live Dirtns. " inctuoes estimates tor some states tnrouon 1965 ano also tor 1876 and 1977 arKJ marriage 
ioenses for some states for all years except 1973 and 1975. Beoinning 1978. irK:lude8 nonlicensed marriages in California. 
* Includes reported arwxjlments arKJ some estimated state figures Tor all years. ' Divorce rates excludes data for California, 
Cotorado. Indana. arKi Louisiana; population tor this rate also exdudM these states. 

Sourer. U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, Vital Statistics of the United States, annual; and Natlonai Vital Statistics 
Reports (NVSR) (tormerty Monthly Vital Statistics Report): and unpublished data. 

No. 67. Live Births by Race and IVpe of Hispanic Origin— Selected 
Characteristics: 1 990 and 2000 



[4,158 lepteeenU 4,156,000. Represents registered births. Excludes births to nonresidents of the United Stetes. Date are based 
on hfispanic origin of mother and race of mother. Hispanic origin date are available from only 48 stetes and the District of Columbia 
in 1990] 



Race arKJ 
Hispenic origin 



Numt)er 
of births 
(1.000) 



1990 2000 



Birtfis to teen- 
age mothers, 
percent of 
totel 



1990 2000 



Births to 
unmarried 
mothers, per- 
cent of totel 



1900 2000 



Prenatal care 

t)eainning first 

trimester 



1990 2000 



Late or no 
prenatelcare 



1900 2000 



Percent of 
births with low 
birth weight ^ 



1990 2000 



Total 



4.158 4,059 



12.8 11.8 



26.6 33.2 



74.2 83.2 



6.0 3.9 



mwe 



American Irxfian, Esldmo. Aleut 
Asian arKJ Pacific IslarKJer ^ . . 



FApiTK). 
Chinese 



Hawaiian 

Hapanic origin ' 

Mexican 

Puerto Rico 

Cuben 

Central and South Americen 
Ottier arKJ unkTMwn l-fispanic 



3.290 

684 

39 

142 

26 

23 

9 

6 

595 

386 

59 

11 

83 

56 



3,194 

623 

42 

201 

32 

34 

9 

7 

816 

582 

58 

13 

113 

49 



10.9 

23.1 

19.5 

5.7 

6.1 

1.2 

2.9 

18.4 

16.8 

17.7 

21.7 

7.7 

9.0 

(NA) 



10.6 

19.7 

19.7 

4.5 

5.3 

0.9 

1.9 

17.4 

16.2 

17.0 

20.0 

7.5 

9.9 

18.8 



16.9 
66.7 
53.6 
(NA) 
15.9 
5.0 
9.6 
45.0 
36.7 
33.3 
55.9 
18.2 
41.2 
(NA) 



27.1 
68.5 
58.4 
14.8 
20.3 
7.6 
9.5 
50.0 
42.7 
40.7 
59.6 
27.3 
44.7 
46.2 



77.7 
60.7 
57.9 
(NA) 
77.1 
81.3 
87.0 
65.8 
60.2 
57.8 
63.5 
84.8 
61.5 
(NA) 



85.0 
74.3 
69.3 
84.0 
84.9 
87.6 
91.0 
79.9 
74.4 
72.9 
78.5 
91.7 
77.6 
75.8 



4.9 

10.9 

12.9 

(NA) 

4.5 

3.4 

2.9 

8.7 

12.0 

13.2 

10.6 

2.8 

10.9 

(NA) 



3.3 
6.7 
8.6 
3.3 
3.0 
2.2 
1.8 
4.2 
6.3 
6.9 
4.5 
1.4 
5.4 
5.9 



7.0 

5.7 

13.3 

6.1 

T^ 

4.7 
6.2 
7.2 
6.1 
5.5 
9.0 
5.7 
5.8 
(NA) 



7.6 

6.5 
13.0 
6.8 
7.3 
8.5 
5.1 
7.1 
6.8 
6.4 
6.0 
9.3 
6.5 
6.3 
7.8 



NA Not available. ^ Births less than 2.500 grams (5 lb.-8 oz.). ^ Includes other races not shown separately. ^ Hispanic 
psTMns may be of any race. Includes other types, not shown separately. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics; Vital Statistics of the United States, annual; National VHal Statistics Report 
(NVSR) (fbrmerty Monthly Vital Statistics Report^; and unpublished date. 



V\ta\ StaWsWes S% 



lU. 



BUMU. SMmoaiAttlnct of me Unflad Stales: 2002 



No. 68. Births and Birth Rates by Race, Sex, and Age: 1980 to 2000 

[Birlhs in thousands. (3^12 rsprsssnts 3,612,000). Births by racs of mothsr. Excludes births to nonresidents of the UnMsd 
States. For population bases used to derive these data, see text this section, and Appendix III] 



Item 



1900 1905 1990 1993 1994 1905 1990 1997 1996 1990 2000 



Uve births^ 



3,612 3.761 4.156 4.000 3.953 3,900 3,891 3^61 3,942 3,969 4,066 



White 

Black 

American Indian 

Asian or Pacific Islander 



2.936 3.038 3.290 3.150 3.121 3.099 3.093 3.073 3.119 3.134 

568582684659636603595800 610 607 

2934393938 37 383940 41 

74 105 142 153 158 180 166 170 173 182 



Male 

Female 

Males per 100 females. 



Age of mother. 
Under 20 years old 
20 to 24 years old. 
25 to 29 years old. 
30 to 34 years old. 
35 to 39 years old. 
40 to 44 years old. 
45 to 49 years old. 



1,853 1,928 

1.760 1.833 

105 105 



Birth rate per 1.000 population 

White 

Black 

American Indian 

Asian or Pacific Islander 



Plural birth ratio ^ 

White 

Black 



Fertility rate per 1.000 women '. 

White 5 

Black 3 

American Indian •* , 



Asian or Pacifk: Islander 



Age of mother: 
10 to 14 years old. 
15 to 19 years okj. 
20 to 24 years old. 
25 to 29 years oM. 
30 to 34 years oM. 
35 to 39 years oM. 
40 to 44 years oM. 
45 to 49 years old. 



562 

1.226 

1.108 

550 

141 

(Na! 

15.9 

15.1 
21.3 
20.7 
19.9 

19.3 
18.5 

24.1 

66.4 

65.6 
64.9 
82.7 
73.2 



1.1 

53.0 

115.1 

112.9 

61.9 

19.8 

3.9 



478 

1.141 

1.201 

696 

214 

P! 

15.6 

15.0 
20.4 
19.8 
18.7 

21.0 
20.4 
25.3 

66.2 

64.1 
78.8 
78.6 
68.4 



1.2 

51.0 

108.3 

111.0 

69.1 

24.0 

4.0 



2.129 

2.029 

105 



533 

1.094 

1.277 

886 

318 

Jna! 

16.7 

15.8 
22.4 
18.9 
19.0 

23.3 
22.9 
27.0 

70.9 
68.3 
86.8 
76.2 
69.6 



1.4 

59.9 

116.5 

120.2 

60.8 

31.7 

5.5 



2.049 

1.951 

105 



514 

1.038 

1.129 

901 

357 

q 

15.5 

14.7 
20.5 
17.8 
17.7 

25.2 
24.9 
28.7 

67.6 
65.4 
60.5 
73.4 
66.7 



1.4 

59.6 

112.6 

115.5 

60.8 

32.9 

6.1 



2.023 

1,930 

105 



518 

1.001 

1.089 

906 

372 

Pi 

15.2 

14.4 
19.5 
17.1 
17.5 

25.7 
25.5 
29.4 

66.7 

64.9 
76.9 
70.9 
66.8 



1.4 

58.9 

111.1 

113.9 

81.5 

33.7 

6.4 



1.996 

1.903 

105 



512 

90D 

1.064 
905 
384 

Pi 

14.6 

14.2 
18.2 
16.6 
17.3 

26.1 
26.0 
28.8 

66.6 

64.4 
72.3 
69.1 
66.4 



1.3 

56.8 

109.8 

111.2 

82.5 

34.3 

6.6 



1.990 

1.901 

105 



503 

945 

1.071 

898 

400 

72 

3 

14.7 

14.1 
17.8 
16.6 
17.0 

27.4 
27.5 
29.8 

66.3 

64.3 
70.7 
68.7 
65.9 



1.2 

54.4 

110.4 

113.1 

83.9 

35.3 

6.8 



0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 



1.906 

1.895 

105 



493 

942 

1.069 

887 

410 

76 

3 

14.5 

13.9 
17.7 
16.6 
16.9 

28.6 
28.7 
30.9 

66.0 
63.9 
70.7 
69.1 
66.3 



1.1 

52.3 

110.4 

113.8 

85.3 

36.1 

7.1 

0.4 



2.016 2.028 

1.925 1.934 

105 106 



494 

965 

1.063 

889 

425 

81 

4 

14.6 

14.0 
17.7 
17.1 
16.4 

30.0 
30.2 
32.0 

66.6 

64.6 
71.0 
70.7 
64.0 



1.0 

51.1 

111.2 

115.9 

87.4 

37.4 

7.3 



485 
962 

1,078 

892 

434 

83 

4 

14^ 

14.9 
18.4 
17.8 
17.7 

30.7 
30.9 
32.9 

66J 

65.1 
70.1 
70.7 
66.6 



1.9 

50.6 

112.0 

118.8 

90.6 

39.3 

8.4 



0.4 1.4 



3.194 

623 

42 

201 

2.077 

1.962 

106 



476 
1.016 
1.068 

929 

452 
90 

4 

14.7 

14.1 
17.6 
17.1 
17.6 

31.1 
31.2 
34.0 

67^ 

66.5 
71.7 
71.4 
70.7 



0.9 

48.5 

112.3 

121.4 

94.1 

40.4 

7.9 

0.5 



NA Not available. ^ Includes other races not shown separately. ^ Number of multiple births per 1 .000 Kve t)irths. ^ Per 
1 ,000 women, 15 to 44 years okJ in specified group. The rate for age of mother 45 to 49 years oM computed by relatir)g t)irtt)s to 
mothers 45 years okJ and over to women 45 to 49 years okJ. 

Source: U.S. Natk>nal Center for Health StatistKS. Vital Statistics of the United States, annual; National Vital Statistics Report 
(NVSR) (formeriy Monthly Vital Statistics Report^; and unpublished data. See also <ht^://www.odc.gov/nchs.htm>. 

No. 69. Teenagers— Births and Birth Rates by Race and Sex: 1990 to 2000 

[Birth rates per 1 ,000 women in specified group, see text, this section] 



Item 



1990 1992 



1993 



1994 



1995 



1997 



2000 



NUMBER OF BIRTHS 
Ail races, total ^ . . 



15-17 years. . 
18-19 years. . 

White 

15-17 years 
18-19 years 

Black 

15-17 years 
18-19 years 



BIRTH RATE 

All races, total ^ 

15-17 years 

18-19 years 

White 

15-17 years 

18-19 years 

Black 

15-17 years 

18-19 years 



521,826 

183.327 
338.499 

354,482 
114.934 
239.548 

151,613 
62.881 
88.732 



59.9 

37.5 
88.6 

50.8 
29.5 
78.0 

112.8 

82.3 

152.9 



506,415 

187.549 
317,866 

342,739 
118,786 
223.953 

146,800 
63,002 
83.798 



60.7 

37.8 
94.5 

51.8 
30.1 
83.8 

112.4 

81.3 

157.9 



501,093 

190.535 
310,558 

341.817 
121,309 
220.508 

143.153 
63.156 
79.997 



59.6 
37.8 
92.1 

51.1 
30.3 
82.1 

108.6 

79.8 

151.9 



506.486 

195.169 
310.319 

348,081 
126,388 
221.693 

140,968 
62,563 
78.405 



56.9 

37.6 
91.5 

51.1 
30.7 
82.1 

104.5 

76.3 

148.3 



499,873 

192.508 
307.365 



494,272 

186.762 
307.509 



349,635 346,509 

127.165 124,031 

222.470 222.477 

133,694 131,059 

59,112 56.218 

74,582 74.841 



56.8 

36.0 
89.1 

50.1 
30.0 
81.2 

96.1 

69.7 

137.1 



54.4 

33.8 
86.0 

48.1 
28.4 
78.4 

91.4 

64.7 

132.5 



469,211 
183.324 
305,886 

342.029 
121.664 
220,164 

130,401 
54,883 
75,518 



52.3 

32.1 
83.6 

46.3 
27.1 
75.9 

88.2 

60.8 

130.1 



484.975 476.050 

173.252 163.588 

311,724 312.462 

340.894 337.888 

116.699 111.624 

224.195 226,264 

126,865 121,166 

50,062 45.919 

76,803 75.247 



51.1 
30.4 
82.0 

45.4 
25.9 
74.6 

85.4 

56.8 

126.9 



49.6 

28.7 
80.3 

44.6 
24.8 
73.5 

81.0 

52.0 

122.8 



466,900 

157.209 
311.781 

333.013 
106.766 
226.227 

118.954 
44.618 
74.336 



48.5 

27.4 
79.2 

43.6 
23.6 
72.7 

79.4 

50.4 

121.3 



^ Includes races other than White and Black. 

Source: U.S. Natkxud Center for Health Statistics. Monthly Vital Statistics Report, Vol. 50, No. 5. Supplement. See also 
<http7/www.cdc.gov/nchs.htm>. 



60 Vital Statistics 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the United Stalae: 2002 



No. 70. Uv* Births by SUta: 2000 



Binq Fsmnj 



rr: 



^S*:: 



H.OOS 2.N2,9e8 



9,374 
37,763 



8a2,69» 


e(H.HS 


aiSMB 14 


7:96B 


sa'wi 


34,695 r 

2,343 r 


5,273 


4,W6 


6,472 r 


«5:^7 


4l2^ 


45,B5S r 


44.161 


"■Z 


13.383 1i 


34.317 
1,234 


34,079 
9,447 


38.313 1: 
2.135 la 


.IW^ 


2l:^ 


iS ii 


24,910 
I9;893 


24,676 
19:889 


'623 l! 


1 


1,355 


2,596 r 


498 


19,078 


22,457 1. 


B2 


' 79 


132 12 


zoW 


996 
20,227 


7:401 1 


19,734 


'104 


'223 li 


iiS 


22,3i9 


77^^ U 


778 


770 
6,442 


"■lo ? 



■/ me Udita 

0, No, 5). Sea aiic 



fi. BlrtM by HMpuiK: ortgm of 



Vital Sutjstlcs 6t 



No. 71. Total Fertility Rate of Natural Increase: 1970 to 2000 



[Based on race of child and registered births only, thru 1979. Beginning 1980. tMsed on race of mother. Beqinning 1970, mtckMlm 
births to nonresidents of United States. The total fertHity rafe is me numt>er of t)irths that 1 ,000 women woiJd have in their IWa tt me 
if. at each year of aoe, they experienced the birth rates occurring in the specified year. A total fertiHty rate of 2,110 repreaenH 
"replacement level" fertility for the total population under current mortality conditions (assuming no net immigration). The ihMnafc 
rate of natural increase Is the rate that would eventually prevail if a population were to experience, at each year of age, the birth 
rates and death rates occurring in the specified year and if those rates remained unchanged over a long period of time. Mkiua aign 
(-) indicates decrease. See also Appendix III] 



Annual average 
and year 


Total fertility rate 


Annual average 
and year 


Total fertility rate 


Black and 
Total White other^ 


Total White other^ 


1970 

1971 

1972 

1973 

1974 

1975 

1976 

1977 

1978 

1979 

1980 

1981 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 


2.480 2.385 3.067 
2.267 2.161 2.920 
2.010 1,907 2.628 
1.879 1.783 2.443 
1.835 1.749 2,339 
1.774 1,686 2,276 
1.738 1.652 2.223 
1.790 1.703 2.279 
1.760 1,668 2.265 
1,808 1.716 2,310 
1.840 1.773 2.177 
1.812 1.748 2.118 
1.828 1.767 2.107 
1.799 1.741 2.066 
1.807 1,749 2.071 
1.844 1.787 2.109 


1986 

1987 

1988 

1989 

1990 

1991 

1992 

1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 

1997 

1998 

1999 

2000 


1.838 1.776 2.136 
^,Bn 1.805 2.196 
1.934 1.857 2.296 
2.014 1.931 2.433 
2.081 2.003 2.480 
2.073 1.996 2.480 
2.065 1.994 2,442 
2.046 1.962 2.385 
2.036 1.985 2.300 
2.019 1.989 2.175 
2,040 2.006 2.144 
2.040 2.009 2.154 
2.058 2.041 2.171 
2.075 2.065 2.147 
2.130 2.114 2.193 



Data for 1964 and eariier includes races ottier than Black. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistk». Vital Statistica of the United States, annual; and unpublished data. 
<http'7/www.cdc.gov/nchs/>. 



No. 72. Projected Fertility Rates by Race, Origin, and Age Group: 
2000 and 2010 

[For definition of total fertility rate, see headnote. Table 71 . Birth rates represent live births per 1 .000 women in aoe group ir. 
Projections are based on mkJdIe fertility assun^txxis. For explanatk>ns of nf>ethodok)gy. see text. Sectk>n 1 . Population] 



Age group 




All races ^ 


White 


Black 


American Indian. 
Eskimo. Aleut 


Asian and Pacific 
Islanders 


Hispanic' 




2000 2010 


2000 


2010 


2000 


2010 


2000 


2010 


2000 


2010 


2000 2010 


Total fertlltty rate . . 


2,130 2.123 


2,114 


2,098 


2,193 


2.140 


2,101 


2,451 


2,073 


2,252 


3.108 2J1t 


Birth rates: 






















10 to 14 years old. . 




0.9 1.3 


0.6 


0.9 


2.4 


3.5 


1.3 


2.0 


0.3 


0.7 


1.9 2.3 


15 to 19 years okl. . 




48.5 43.6 


43.6 


54.3 


79.4 


95.6 


67.8 


93.6 


21.6 


29.6 


94.4 95.7 


20 to 24 years old. . 




112.3 107.9 


107.9 


112.6 


144.2 


137.1 


135.6 


159.6 


72.0 


83.7 


184.6 175.2 


25 to 29 years oM. . 




121.4 124.3 


124.3 


118.5 


105.3 


95.5 


106.9 


118.6 


125.8 


134.5 


170.8 146.7 


30 to 34 years old. . 




94.1 97.4 


97.4 


90.0 


67.5 


63.4 


68.3 


77.3 


120.8 


128.2 


109.0 91.6 


35 to 39 years okj. . 




40.4 40.7 


40.7 


36 6 


32.2 


28.9 


32.5 


33.7 


60.4 


59.0 


46.7 41.9 


40 to 44 years okJ. . 




7.9 7.8 


7.8 


7.1 


7.2 


6.0 


7.3 


7.4 


12.7 


13.8 


11.6 9.9 


45 to 49 years okJ. . 




0.5 0.4 


0.4 


0.3 


0.4 


0.3 


0.4 


0.3 


0.9 


0.9 


0.6 0.6 



^ Includes other races not shown separately. ^ Persons of Hispank: origin may be of arry race. 
Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Populatkm Division Working Paper No. 38. 

No. 73. Birth Rates by Live-Birth Order and Race: 1980 to 2000 

[Births per 1 .000 women 15 to 44 yeert old In specified racial group. Live-birth order refers to number of chikjren bom alive. 
Figures for births of order not stated are distributed. See also headnote. Table 68] 



Live-birth order 


All races' 


White 


Black 


1980 1990 1995 1999 2000 


1980 1990 1995 1999 2000 


1900 1990 1995 1989 2000 


Total 


68.4 70.9 65.6 65.9 67.5 

29.5 29.0 27.3 26.6 27.1 
21.8 22.8 21.1 21.5 21.9 
10.3 11.7 10.5 10.9 11.3 

3.9 4.5 4.0 4.2 4.3 
1.5 1.7 1.5 1.5 1.6 
1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 
0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 


65.6 66.3 64.4 65.1 68.5 

28.8 28.4 26.9 26.4 26.8 
21.3 22.4 21.1 21.6 21.9 
9.6 11.1 10.3 10.8 11.2 
3.4 4.0 3.8 4.0 4.1 
1.3 1.4 1.3 1.4 1.4 
0.8 0.8 0.7 0.8 0.8 
0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 


64.9 66.8 72.3 70.1 71.7 


First birth 


33.7 32.4 28.7 26.5 26.9 


Second Iwrth 


24.7 25.6 20.7 20.9 21.3 


Third birth 


14.0 15.6 12.0 12.4 12.8 


Fourth t>irth 


6.5 7.4 5.7 5.7 5.9 


Fifth birth 


2.9 3.2 2.6 2.5 2.6 


Sixth and seventh 

Eighth and over 


2.1 2.0 1.8 1.7 1.7 
0.9 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 



' Includes other races not shown separately. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistk», Vital Statistics of the United States, annual: and National VHal StafiMcs 
Reports (NVSR) (formerly Monthly Vital Statistics Report). 



62 Vital Statistics 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of me Unllad Stdaa: 8002 



No. 74. MrtlW to TMM, UnnianlMl MotlMrs, and PranaUl Cara: 1990 to 2000 

|l»p«»cw«.ifcpww«iwgiiw»dW»»t,*w<M*iMfcia*iWl 





W 


iw 


ItM 


1»B7 


ISM 


IBM 


20M 




1U 

|! 
S 
1 

a; 
'1 

X.7 
33.3 

807 

813 
B7.0 

63,S 

la 

J! 

1 

1 

i 


11.5 
23,1 

1 

23.S 

25 .3 
57i 

!i 

38,1 
U.I 

aa.e 

70.* 
68.7 

bo!b 

85.7 

i 

ss 

2,3 

IJ 
It 

7,8 


22:s 

Jl 

!8i 

32.4 

eB^e 
s.a 

37:8 

ea'a 

70.7 

ee 

25 

i 

8'5 
7:3 

92 


22^ 

1 

S 

H 

;s 

25.8 
69.2 

ll 

m!i 

389 
723 
72;1 

27 

e:? 

6B 

Is 


11 

11 

189 

Jl 

32.8 

26 3 

197 
3B:6 

82.8 

B4.S 
73 3 

88.5 

72:s 

2.1 

75 
80 


207 

0:9 

167 
17.4 

JS3 

26.8 

425 

40.1 

43.7 

S3J 

86. 1 

88.5 
73;i 

2:1 

7.9 
59 


I1J 






























































BacK 

Amercan Indian. Eskimo, i^laut ... 




SK^::;..:::. 




20.3 
































PninlolnMiMn 


•JJjnnfciB 


83.1 


2S^.™«n.E-*™ 


/^ 
















878 


























nnm ol Riotlwr* 

S!S^'l~nctan. EMmo 




8.8 




















, 




















PMtMIMbMM , 
















•niMictn imfcui, EwliBO 


,^ 






















lb— ilr«M.I 












<:««rai and Soutti AmstlCBn ".'. . 


6,3 



■i INVSftI (toimeny UaiMy Vital SaUOIca Rapoill. 



M UnMd SMM* 2002 



Vital Statistics 63 



No. 75. Births to Unmarriod Women by Race of Child and Age of Mother: 
1 990 to 2000 

[Excludes births to nonresidents of United States. Marital status is Inferred from a comparison of the child's and parents' surnames 
on the birth certificate for those States that do not report on marital status. No estimates included for misstatements on birth reoords 
or failures to register births. See also Appendix III] 



Race of child and age 
of mother 



NUMBER (1,000) 

Total live births ^ 

White 

Black 

Under 15 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 39 years 

40 years and over. . . . 



PERCENT 
DISTRIBUTION 



Total 

White . . . 
Black . . . 



1 



Under 15 years 
15 to 19 years . 
20 to 24 years . 
25 to 29 years . 



1990 1995 1098 1996 2000 



1.166 1,254 1,294 1,308 1.347 
647 785 821 840 866 
473 421 421 417 427 



11 
350 
404 
230 
118 



11 

376 
432 
229 
133 
60 
13 



100.0 100.0 
55.6 62.6 
40.6 33.6 



0.9 
30.0 
34.7 
19.7 



0.9 
30.0 
34.5 
18.2 



9 
381 
460 
243 
125 
61 
14 



100.0 

63.5 
32.6 

0.7 
29.4 
35.6 
18.8 



9 
374 



8 
369 



476 504 
247 255 



125 
63 
14 



130 
65 
16 



100.0 100.0 

64.1 64.3 

31.9 31.7 

0.7 0.6 

28.6 27.4 

36.4 37.4 

18.9 18.9 



Race of chiM and age 
of mother 



30 to 34 years . . . 
35 to 39 years . . . 
40 years and over. 



1990 1995 1996 1990 2000 



AS PERCENT OF ALL 

BIRTHS IN RACIAL 

GROUPS 



10.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 



10.6 

5.8 

(NA) 



9.6 
4.7 

1.1 



9.5 
5.9 
1.1 



9.7 

6.0 

(NA) 



Total 

White . . . 
Black . . . 



1 



Total 

White ' . 
Black 3 . 



BIRTH RATE ^ 
1^3 



15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 39 years (NA) 

40 to 44 years i (NA) 



26.6 
16.9 
66.7 



43.6 

31.8 
93.9 

42.5 
65.1 
56.0 
37.6 



32.2 

25.3 
69.9 



45.1 
37.5 
75.9 

44.4 
70.3 
56.1 
39.6 



32.8 
26.3 
69.1 



44.3 

37.5 
73.3 

41.5 
72.3 
58.4 
39.1 
19.0 
4.6 



33.0 

26.8 
68.9 



44.4 

38.1 
71.5 

40.4 
72.9 
60.2 
38.3 
19.3 
4.6 



27.1 
68.5 



46.2 
38.9 
72.5 

39.6 
74.5 
62.2 
40.7 
20.0 
5.0 



NA Not available. ^ Includes ottier races n(A shown separately. ^ Rate per 1.000 unmarried women (never-married, 
widowed, and divorced) estimated as of July 1 . ^ Covers women aged 15 to 44 years. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistks. Vital Statistics of the United States, annual; and Hatkxiai Vital StaHstica 
Reports (NVSR) (fomierly Monttiiy Vital Statistics Report). 

No. 76. Live Births by Plurality of Birth and Ratios and Race of Mother: 
1 995 to 2000 



Plurality and race of mother 



1995 



1997 



1990 



NUMBER 



Live births, total ^ 

White 

Black 



Live births in single deliveries ^ 

White 

Black 



Live births in twin deliveries ^ 

White 

Black 



Live births in higher-order multiple deliveries ^ 

White 

Black 



RATIO PER 1.000 LIVE BIRTHS 



All multiple births ^ 

White 

Black 



Twin births ^ 
White. . . 
Black. . . 



RATIO PER 100.000 LIVE BIRTHS 



Higher-order multiple births 

White 

Black 



3.899.589 

3.098.865 

603.139 


3.891.494 

3.093,057 

594.781 


3.880,894 

3.072.640 

599.913 


3,941,553 

3.118,727 

609,902 


3.959,417 

3,132,501 

605.970 


4.058.814 

3.194.005 

622.598 


3.797.880 

3.018.184 

585.787 


3.784,805 

3.007.997 

577.057 


3.770.020 

2.984,532 

581.394 


3,823.258 

3,024.693 

590,372 


3,837.789 

3.035.757 

586.027 


3.932.573 

3.094.219 

601.451 


96.736 
76.196 
17.000 


100.750 
79.677 
17.285 


104,137 
82.090 
1/.989 


110,670 
87,163 
19.001 


114.307 
90.191 
19.374 


118.916 
93,236 
20.626 


4.973 

4.505 

352 


5.939 

5.383 

439 


6.737 

6,018 

530 


7.625 

6.871 

529 


7.321 

6.553 

569 


7.325 

6.551 

521 


26.1 
26.0 
28.8 


27.4 
27.5 
29.8 


28.6 
28.7 
30.9 


30.0 
30.2 
32.0 


30.7 
30.9 
32.9 


31.1 
31.2 
34.0 


24.8 
24.6 
28.2 


25.9 
25.8 
29.1 


26.8 
26.7 
30.0 


28.1 
27.9 
31.2 


28.9 
28.8 
32.0 


29.3 
29.2 
33.1 


127.5 

145.4 

58.4 


152.6 

174.0 

73.8 


173.6 

195.9 

88.3 


193.5 

220.3 

86.7 


184.9 

209.2 

93.9 


180.5 

205.1 

83.7 



1 



Includes races other than White and Black. 



Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistks, Advance report of Final Natality Statistics, and National VTta/ Statistfct 
Reports (NVSR) (formeriy Monttiiy Vital Statistics Report). 



64 Vital Statistics 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the Unltad Stdat: aOQS 



-ta Dstnci ol ColumDiQ SeeA[ 



in 2.SD0 gnma (5 poundt-B aunc«). ' Deflnad u 



Vital Statistics 65 



No. 78. Live Births by Place of Dollvery, Modian and Low Birth Weight, and 
Prenaui Care: 1 990 to 2000 

[Represents registered births. Excludes births to nonresidents of the United States. For total number of bklhs, see Table 68. &•• 
Appendix III] 



Item 


1990 


1994 


1995 


1095 


1997 


1990 


1996 




Births attended (1,000): 
In hosoital 


4.110 

14 

21 

7 lb.-7 oz. 

7.0 

5.7 

13.3 

74.2 
6.0 


3,912 

7 

21 

6.1 

13.2 

60.2 
4.4 


3.861 

6 

21 

6.2 
13.1 

81.3 
4.2 


3.854 

6 

20 

7 lb.-7 oz. 

7.4 

6.3 

13.0 

81.9 
4.0 


3.681 

5 

20 

7 lb.-7 oz. 

7.5 

6.5 

13.0 

82.5 
3.9 


3.904 

6 

21 

7 lb.-7 oz. 

7.6 

6.5 

13.0 

82.8 
3.9 


3.923 

5 

21 

6.6 
13.1 

83.2 
3.8 


4,021 


By physician, not in hospital 

By midwife and o^er. not in hospital ^ . 
Median l)irth weioht 


5 

21 
7 to.-7 OZ. 


Percent of births with tow birth weight . . . 
White 


7.6 
6.5 


Blacl< 


lao 


Percent of births by period 
in which prer^atal care began: 
Ist trimester 


83.2 


3d trimester or no prer^atal care 


3.9 



NA Not available. ^ Includes all births in hospitals or institutions and in dinics. ' Includes births with attendant not 
specified. ^ Median birth weight based on race of nxrther, prior to 1990, based on race of child. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Statistics of the United States, annual; and National Wta/ Statfstfcs 
Reports (NVSR) (formerly Monthly Vital Statistics Report^, and unpublished data. See also <http://www.cdc.govAichs/l)ir1hs.hlm>. 

No. 79. IMethod of Delivery by iUce: 1 990 to 2000 

\\n thousands (4,111 represents 4,111,000), except rate. 1990 excludes data for Oidahoma, which did not report method ol 
delivery on the birth certificate] 



Item 



1990 1095 2000 



Item 



1990 1996 2000 



Births by method of delivery. 
Vaainal 

After previous cesarean 
Cesarean deliveries .... 

Primary 

Repeat 

Not stated 



White births by method of delivery 
N^oinal 

After previous cesarean .... 
Cesarean deliveries 

Primary 

Repeat 

Not stated 



Black births t}y method of delivery. 
Vaginal 

After previous cesarean . . . . 
Cesarean deliveries 

Primary 



4.111 

3.111 

84 

914 

575 

339 

85 

3.252 

2.454 

67 

733 

459 

274 

66 

679 
517 

13 
146 

93 



3.900 
3.064 
112 
807 
510 
297 
29 

3.099 

2.435 

91 

640 

401 

239 

24 

603 
469 

16 
130 

84 



4.059 

3.108 

90 

924 

578 

346 

27 

3.194 

2.449 

70 

723 

449 

274 

22 

623 
468 

14 

150 

95 



Repeat 

Not stated 

Hispanic births by method of 

delivery (1.000) 

Vaginal 

After previous cesarean 
Cesarean deliveries .... 

Primary 

Repeat 

Not stated 

Cesarean delivery rate 

White 

Black . . 

Primary ^ 

White 

Black 

Rate of vaginal birth 
after previous cesarean ^. 

White 

Black 



1 



53 


46 


56 


16 


4 


4 


595 


680 


816 


458 


540 


633 


10 


17 


17 


123 


137 


180 


76 


83 


105 


47 


54 


75 


14 


3 


3 


22./ 


20.8 


22.9 


23.0 


20.8 


22.8 


22.1 


21.8 


24.3 


16.0 


14.7 


16.1 


16.1 


14.6 


15.9 


15.7 


15.7 


17.3 


19.9 


27.5 


20.6 


19.7 


27.6 


20.4 


20.3 


26.1 


20.5 



^ Cesarean rates are the number of cesarean deliveries per 1 00 total deliveries for specified category. ^ Number of primify 
cesareans per 100 live births to women who have not had a prevkMJS cesarean. ^ Number of vaginal births after pravtous 
cesarean delivery per 100 live births to women with a prevtous cesarean delivery. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistk^. Vital Statistics of the United States, annual. 

No. 80. Women Who Have Had a Child in the Last Year by Age and Labor Force 
SUtus: 1980 to 2000 

[3.247 repreeenU 3.247,000. See headnote. Table 81] 





Total. 18 to 44 years oM 


18 to 29 years oM 


30 to 44 years okj 


Year 


In the labor force 


In the labor force 


In the labor force 




Number Number 
(1.000) (1.000) Percent 


Number Nunrber 
(1.000) (1.000) Percent 


Number Number 
(1.000) (1.000) Percent 


1980 


3.247 1.233 38 
3.381 1.411 42 
3.433 1.508 44 
3.625 1.563 43 
3.311 1.547 47 
3,497 1,691 48 
3.625 1.805 50 
3.701 1.881 51 
3.667 1.866 51 
3.913 2.068 53 
3.688 1.985 54 
3.890 2.066 53 
3.696 2.034 55 
3.671 2.155 59 
3.934 2.170 55 


2,476 947 38 
2.499 1,004 40 
2.445 1.040 43 
2.682 1.138 42 
2.375 1,058 45 
2.512 1,204 48 
2,452 1.185 48 
2.521 1.258 50 
2.384 1.177 49 
2.568 1.275 50 
2.346 1.182 50 
2.389 1.209 51 
2.252 1.150 51 
(NA) (NA) (NA) 
2.432 1.304 54 


770 287 37 


1981 


881 407 46 


1982 


988 469 46 


1983 


942 425 45 


1984 


936 469 52 


1985 


964 488 50 


1986 


1.174 620 53 


1987 


1.180 623 53 


1988 


1.283 688 64 


1990] 

1992 ^ 


1.346 793 56 
1 .342 802 60 


1994 ^ 


1.501 857 57 


1995 ^ 


1.444 884 61 


1998 ^ 


(NA) (NA) (NA) 
1.502 866 56 


2000' 



NA Not available. ' Lower age limit is 15 years okl. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census. Current Population Reports. P20-543. and unpublished data. 



66 Vital Statistics 



U.8. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the UnNad Olalu; aOQS 



No. 81. Women Who Have Had a Child In tho Last Year hy Ago: 1980 to 2000 

|3,a«7 wp w — f i t! 3^7,000. Exdudee births to nonrwidenti of the United Stales. Data are t>y piaoe of residence. Metropoiitan 

). opnsoldalBd melropoitan slatislical areas (CMSAs). and New England county metropoHwi areas (NECMAs) 

!■ definitions j 




Office of Management and Budget as of June 30, 1990. See Appendix II for 



) 
arKJ components] 



Age of mother 



Women who had a cfMd 
in last year (1.000) 



1990 



1990 



Total t>irtfis per 1 ,000 women 



1990 



2000 



Rrst births per 1.000 women 



1990 



1996 



Tolii 

15 to 29 yeare old ^ . 
15 to 19 yeare old 
20 to 24 yeare old 
2Sto29 yeare old 

30 to 44 yeare old . . 
30toS4 yeare old 
36to30 yeare old 
40to44 yeare old 



3^7 
2,476 

1306 
1.081 

770 

519 

192 

59 



6,913 


3,934 


2.566 


2.432 


338 


566 


1036 


850 


1.192 


996 



1.346 

692 

377 

77 



1.502 
871 
506 
125 



71.1 

103.7 
(NAJ 
96.6 

114.8 

35.4 

60.0 

26.9 

9.9 



674) 

90.8 
39.8 

113.4 
112.1 

44.7 

80.4 

37.3 

8.6 



64.6 

85.9 

59.7 

91.8 

107.9 

46.1 
87.9 
45.1 
10.9 



26.5 

46.6 

a 

6.3 
(NA) 
(NA 

NAi 



26.4 

43.2 
30.1 
51.8 
46.2 

10.6 

21.9 

6.5 

1.2 



26.7 

43.1 
36.7 
47.1 
43.7 

12.5 

27.5 

9.6 

2.3 



NA Not available. ^ For 1960-86. 18 to 29 yeare old. 

Soufce: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, P20-375. P20-454. P20-470, and P20-499. 

No. 82. Characteristics of Women Who Have Had a Child in the Last Year: 
1995 and 2000 

[Aa of June. Covers civilian nontncttlutlonai population. Since the number of women who had a birth during the 12-month 
period was tahiilwtert arKJ not the actual numbere of births, some small underestimation of fertility for this period may exist due to 
the omisaion of: (1) Multiple birttts. (2) Two or more Kve births spaced within the 12-month period (me woman is counted only orx»). 
(3) Wbmen who had birtfw in ttw period and who did not survive to the survey date. (4) Women who were in institutions and 
therefore not in ttie survey universe. These losses may be somewturt offset by the inclusion in tfie CPS of births to immigrants who 
dkJ not have their children bom in tfie United States arKi births to nonresident women. These births would not have been recorded 
in the vital registration system. Based on CunBnt Population Survey (CPS); see text, Section 1, and Appendix III] 



Characteristic 



Women who have had a 
child in ttie last year 



Number of 
women 
(1.000) 



Total births 

per 1,000 

women 



First births 

per 1,000 

women 



2000 



Women who have had a 
child in the last year 



Number of 
women 
(1.000) 



Total births 

per 1.000 

women 



First births 

per 1.000 

women 



Total 



Hispanic 



Cuneniy married 

Married, spouse present. 

Married, spouse al>sent ^ 
wiooweo or ONorceo .... 
Never married 



Educational attainment: 

Lees than high school 

Hifl|i scftool, 4 yeare 

Cowge: 1 or more yeare 

No degree 

Assocwte degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or praieasional degree 

Labor force status: 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 



Oocupatjon of employed women: 

Manaoerial-prof esslonal 

Technical, sales, admin, support 

Service woricere 

Fanning, forestry, arKi Rsfiing . . 
Precision prod, craft rspair. . . . 
Operatore. fabricatore. laborere . 

Famriy income: 

Under $10.000 

$10,000 to $19.909 

$2a000 to $24.999 

S2S.000 to $29.999 

$30,000 to $34.999 

$35,000 to $49.999 

$60,000 to $74.999 

$75,000 and over 



00.225 

48,603 
8.617 
6.632 

31.616 

29.202 

2,414 

5,762 

22.846 



12.629 

18.404 

29.192 

12.724 

4.663 

8.884 

2.921 



39,989 

3.287 

16.949 



11.059 

16.997 

7.612 

501 

813 

3.007 



6.957 
8.159 
4,542 
4.364 
4,076 
9.949 
9.720 
7.088 



61.4 

59.2 
70.6 
79.6 

85.5 
87.2 
64.5 
28.4 
36.3 



57.3 
67.4 
59.3 
56.1 
56.9 
65.3 
59.2 



46.5 
53.5 
98.1 



46.2 
48.6 
44.0 
41.0 
56.6 
39.5 



91.0 
64.3 
60.6 
57.0 
60.6 
59.1 
52.5 
53.1 



23^ 

22.6 
26.4 
25.0 

30.3 

31.4 

17.4 

4.1 

18.0 



19.6 
25.5 
23.2 
21.2 
19.2 
27.0 
26.8 



20.9 
22.8 
28.5 



22.3 
21.5 
16.6 
27.9 
37.5 
17.8 



32.8 
25.8 
20.3 
18.9 
24.3 
20.8 
23.3 
19.2 



60,873 

48.508 
8.939 
8.002 

30.497 

28.215 

2.282 

5.281 

25,095 



13.006 

17.205 

30.662 

12.603 

4.955 

9.926 

3,178 



41.369 

2.493 

17.011 



12.481 

16.561 

8.102 

473 

880 

2,872 



4.249 
6.203 
3,439 
3,761 
3.572 
8.864 
10.646 
12,506 



64.6 

65.4 
63.2 
95.1 

88.8 
90.8 
64.5 
31.0 
42.3 



70.7 
70.0 
59.0 
51.6 
60.6 
61.7 
77.7 



47.7 

79.4 

103.7 



52.2 
44.0 
51.0 
69.6 
42.3 
38.1 



86.8 
74.8 
76.2 
78.9 
62.4 
64.9 
61.2 
60.1 



26.7 

27.2 
21.9 
38.6 

35.5 
37.0 
16.6 
6.8 
20.2 



29.5 
29.5 
24.0 
19.2 
23.6 
27.7 
32.0 



20.7 
31.1 
40.6 



22.9 
20.3 
20.1 
71.8 
15.1 
17.2 



32.5 
25.3 
37.3 
34.0 
27.3 
25.3 
26.8 
24.3 



* Indudee women of other races arxJ women with family income not reported, not shown separately. ^ Persons of IHispanic 
origin may be of any race. ^ IndudM separated women. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, P20-375. P20-499. and unpublished date.. 



Vital Statistics 67 



U3. 



BUMU. SlidlsliQal Abstract of the United States: 2002 



No. 83. Number of Pregnancies, Live Birtlis, and Induced Aliortions by Age 
and Race of Woman: 1 980 to 1 996 

[Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals] 



Age and race of woman 



1900 1965 1990 1901 



1992 1903 



1904 



ALL PREGNANCIES 



Total ' 

Under 15 years . . 
15 to 19 years . . . 
20 to 24 years . . . 
25 to 29 years . . . 
30 to 34 years . . . 
35 to 39 years . . . 
40 years and over. 

Race: 

White 

All ottier 



5.912 


6.144 


6.778 


6.674 


6.596 


6.494 


6.373 


6^45 


8.240 


29 


30 


29 


29 


30 


30 


30 


28 


26 


1.146 


981 


1.013 


975 


939 


928 


923 


904 


893 


1.956 


1.891 


1.847 


1.843 


1.813 


1.762 


1.682 


1.602 


1.570 


1,626 


1.764 


1.908 


1.827 


1,771 


1.701 


1.637 


1.598 


1.817 


844 


1.045 


1.319 


1.313 


1.326 


1.332 


1.333 


1.322 


1.312 


258 


373 


562 


581 


603 


622 


642 


659 


883 


54 


60 


100 


106 


113 


119 


127 


132 


140 


4.585 


4.733 


5,117 


5.006 


4.924 


4.834 


4,755 


4.682 


(NAi 


1.328 


1.411 


1.660 


1.666 


1,671 


1.660 


1.618 


1.563 


M 



LIVE BIRTHS 



Total. 



Race: 
White . . 
All other. 



3.612 3.761 4.158 4.111 4.065 4.000 3.953 3.900 3.891 

2.936 3.038 3.290 3.241 3.202 3,150 3.121 3.099 3.093 
676 723 868 870 863 850 832 801 796 



INDUCED ABORTIONS 



Total 

Under 15 years . . 
15 to 19 years . . . 
20 to 24 years . . . 
25 to 29 years . . . 
30 to 34 years . . . 
35 to 39 years . . . 
40 years and over. 

Race: 

Whrte 

All other 



1.554 


1.589 


1.609 


1.557 


1.529 


1.500 


1,431 


1.364 


1.386 


15 


17 


13 


12 


13 


12 


12 


11 


10 


445 


399 


351 


314 


295 


289 


276 


264 


264 


549 


548 


532 


533 


526 


514 


478 


442 


434 


304 


336 


360 


348 


341 


332 


316 


306 


318 


153 


181 


216 


213 


213 


211 


205 


196 


195 


67 


87 


108 


107 


110 


111 


111 


110 


112 


21 


21 


29 


29 


31 


31 


32 


32 


33 


1.094 


1.076 


1.039 


982 


944 


911 


861 


820 


(NA) 

(naJ 


460 


513 


570 


574 


585 


589 


570 


544 



NA Not availat>le. Includes fetal losses not shown. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Wal and HealO) Statistics, Trends in Pregnancies and Pregnancy Ralas bf 
Outcome: 1976-96. Series 21. No. 56. 

No. 84. Contraceptive Use by Women, 1 5 to 44 Years of Age: 1 995 

[60.201 rapr — n U 60.201,000. Based on samples of the female population of the United States: see source for detaHs. See 
Appendix III] 





Age 


Race 


Martial Status 


Contraceptive status and method 


All 15-24 25-34 35-44 
women ^ years years years 


Non-Hispanic 


Cur- 
Never rently For- 




His- 
White Black panic 


mar- mar- meity 
ried rted married 


All women (1,000) 

PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 

Sterile 2 

Surgically sterile 

Nonsurgically sterile ^ 

Preonant. Dostoartum 


60,201 18.002 20,758 21,440 

29.7 2.6 25.0 57.0 

27.9 1.8 23.6 54.0 

1.7 0.7 1.3 2.8 

4.6 5.9 6.9 1.3 

4.0 2.1 6.2 3.5 

22.3 44.4 13.3 12.6 

10.9 30.8 3.4 1.4 

6.2 7.0 5.3 6.5 

5.2 6.6 4.6 4.7 

39.7 45.0 49.1 26.1 

17.3 23.1 ?3.7 6.3 

0.5 0.1 0.6 0.8 

1.2 0.2 1.2 2.0 

13.1 13.9 15.0 10.7 

1.5 0.5 1.8 2.0 

0.2 0.3 0.3 

2.0 1.6 2.3 1.9 

3.9 5.6 4.2 2.1 


42,522 8,210 6,702 

30.2 31.5 28.4 
28.5 29.7 26.3 

1.6 1.8 2.0 

4.3 4.5 6.3 

3.7 4.6 4.0 

21.1 23.1 26.3 
10.4 8.9 12.1 

5.7 7.2 8.6 

5.0 7.0 5.6 

41.2 36.1 35.1 
18.8 14.8 13.6 

0.5 0.5 0.9 

1.5 0.5 0.4 
13.0 12.5 12.1 

1.6 0.7 1.3 
0.3 - 0.1 

2.1 0.9 2.0 

3.4 6.2 4.7 


22,879 29,673 7448 

6.9 43.2 45.1 
5.7 41.1 42.5 
1.1 2.0 2^ 
3.1 6.4 1.9 


SeeKino oreonancv 


1.5 6.4 2.1 


Ottier nonusers 

Never had intercourse ....... 

No intercourse in last month ^ . . 

Had intercourse in last month . 
Nonsurgical contraceptors 

PHI 


46.8 4.7 18.4 
28.9 

11.5 0.5 12.7 

6.4 4.2 5.7 

41.8 39.7 32.4 

20.4 15.6 14.8 


lUD 


0.3 0.7 0.4 


Diaohraam 


0.5 1.8 0.9 


Condom 


13.9 13.3 10.1 


Periodic abstinence 


0.6 2.3 0.7 


Natural family planning 

Withdrawal. 

Other methods 


0.4 

1.5 2.3 1J 

4.6 3.3 3J 







- Represents or ipunds to zero. ^ Includes other races, not shown separately. \ Total sterile includes male sterNa for 
unknown reasons. ^ Persons sterile from illness, accklent. or congenital oorxlitions. * Data refer to no intercourse in ttw 3 
months prior to interview. ^ Includes implants. injectat>les. momir>g-after-pill. suppository, Today "^ sponge, and leas fraquantty 

used methods. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistws. special tabulatxxis from the 1995 Natkxial Sun/ey of Famity Growth. 



68 Vital Statistics 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the Unilad Siatoa: 2002 



No. 85. Live Births— Mothers Who Smokod During Pregnancy: 1999 

(Excludes CalTfomia. Indiana, New York State (but includes New York City), and South Dakota. whk:h dkl not require reporting of 
Icbecco use during pregnancy] 



Smoking measure and 
race of mother 


Age of mottier 


15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-54 
Total years years years years years years 


ANracM^ 


3.430,386 418.240 868,770 037;238 768,339 387,719 72,082 

2.702,289 289.581 644.752 758.986 641,761 304.505 58,810 
570.478 115.514 162.883 130,504 84.909 43.654 9.161 

100.0 100.0 100.0 100 100 100 100 


WTinB 


na(* 


PERCENT DISTRIBUTION 

AB races smoker 


10 daarettas or less 


70.1 78.7 72.2 66 9 65 1 62 8 60 7 


11-2( cigarettes 


26.5 19.4 24.8 29 3 30 5 318 33.2 


21 cigaretles or more 


3.5 1.8 3.0 3 9 4 5 5 4 5 9 


WNte smoker 


100.0 100.0 100.0 100 100 100 100 


10 doarettes or less 


67.7 77.1 70.0 644 623 59 2 569 


11-20 cigarettes 


28.6 21 .0 26.8 31 5 32 8 34 6 36 1 


21 cigaretles or more 


3.7 2.0 3.2 4 1 4 9 61 6 9 


Black smoker 


100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100 100.0 


10 cigarettes or less 


84.1 90.1 86.6 82.1 80.4 79.3 752 


11-20 cigarettes 


14.2 9.0 11.9 16.1 17.3 18.6 21.8 


21 cigaretles or more 


1 .6 0.9 13 17 2 2 18 2 







1 



Incfcjdes races ottier than White and Black. 



Source: 

n .1.1 1 1. ft 
MBpOftf, 



U.S. Natk)nal Center for Health Statistics. Natkxial Vital Statistk^s Reports (NVSR) (fonnerly h/lonthty Vital Statistical 



No. 86. Percent Low Birthweight by Smoicing Status, Age, and Race of 
Mother: 1999 

[Low t)inhweight is defined as weight of less than 2,500 grams (5 lb. 8 oz.). Excludes California, Indiana, New York State (txjt 
indudes New York City), and South Dakota, which dkj not require reporting of tobacco use during pregnancy] 



Smoking status arKJ race of mcrther 











Age of mother 












15-19 years 














Under - 


















15 




15-17 


18-19 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


ages 


years 


Total 


years 


years 


years 


years 


years 


years 


7.8 


13.4 


9.9 


10.8 


9.5 


7.8 


8.9 


7.1 


6.6 


12.1 


15.7 


11.6 


12.4 


11.3 


10.6 


11.5 


13.2 


16.7 


7.2 


13.2 


9.6 


10.5 


9.0 


7.3 


6.3 


6.6 


7.7 


6.7 


11.5 


8.4 


9.2 


8.1 


6.6 


6.0 


6.3 


7.5 


10.8 


15.1 


10.9 


11.6 


10.6 


9.8 


10.2 


11.4 


14.4 


6.1 


11.1 


7.7 


8.5 


7.2 


5.8 


5.4 


5.8 


6.7 


13.2 


15.5 


13.8 


14.3 


13.5 


12.3 


12.3 


13.6 


16.1 


21.0 


19.4 


17.3 


18.0 


17.0 


16.7 


21.5 


25.0 


29.2 


12.4 


15.4 


13.5 


14.1 


13.1 


11.8 


11.3 


12.3 


14.0 



An 

Smoker. . . 
Non&noker 
White . . 
Smoker. . . 
Nonamoker 



Smoker. . . 
Nonsmoker 



^ Inckjdes races other than White and Black. 

Source: U.S. Natk>nal Center for Health Statistk». National Vital Statistics Reports (NVSR) (formerly Monthly Vital Statistical 
R&fX)rt). 

No. 87. Live Births to Mothers With Seiected Compiications of l^iior and/or 
Deiivery and Rates by Age of Mother: 1 999 

[Raiss are rHjmber of live births with specified complk»tk)n per 1.000 live births in specified group] 



Compltoatk)n 



Number 






Age of mother 








plk»tk>n 




Under 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


40-54 


reported 


All ages 


20 years 


years 


years 


years 


years 


years 


59.904 


15.3 


18.5 


15.6 


15.9 


14.5 


12.3 


11.1 


213.698 


54.7 


59.7 


55.2 


53.5 


52.5 


55.1 


55.5 


100.130 


25.6 


26.7 


24.3 


25.1 


25.8 


27.3 


30.9 


21.999 


5.6 


5.4 


5.2 


5.3 


5.8 


7.0 


8.6 


12,492 


3.2 


1.1 


1.7 


2.8 


4.3 


6.5 


8.9 


21.930 


5.6 


5.2 


5.2 


5.5 


5.8 


6.4 


8.2 


1.331 


0.3 


0.7 


0.4 


0.3 


0.2 


0.3 


0.3 


77.848 


19.9 


14.3 


18.9 


19.8 


22.1 


23.6 


23.3 


30.683 


7.9 


8.4 


8.0 


7.8 


7.8 


7.3 


7.9 


105.795 


27.1 


26.5 


25.5 


27.4 


27.7 


28.2 


31.2 


152.084 


38.9 


29.2 


31.5 


39.1 


44.7 


50.4 


58.1 


71.804 


18.3 


17.4 


16.7 


19.2 


19.2 


18.6 


20.6 


7,773 


2.0 


1.6 


1.8 


1.9 


2.1 


2.5 


2.8 


2.299 


0.6 


0.4 


0.5 


0.7 


0.7 


0.8 


0.9 


140.756 


39.6 


43.7 


38.5 


38.0 


38.6 


41.7 


49.7 



Meconium, moderate/heavy . . . 
Pnsmatufe rupture of membrane 

Ab niption placenta 

Ptaoenta previa 

Oilwr exoeesrve bleedb)g 

Sciajres during labor 

labor 



Oysfancfionallabor 

DwiccfVMa^presentatton . . . 
C ophaio pelvic dtepropoftton. 

Cord Prolapse . . 

o»pp«eation * . . 



^ Includes races other than White and Black. ^ Texas does not report this complicatton. 

Source: U.S. Nattonal Center for Health Statistics, Vital Statistics of the United States, annual; and unpublished data. 

Vital Statistics 69 



uaCanauiBHrMHi. SlalMfcal Atetract of the United Slalse: 20Q2 



No. 88. Abortions— NumlHir, Rate* and Ratio by Race: 1975 to 1997 








All races 


White 


Black and Other 




Women 


Aboftions 




Women 


Abortions 




Women 


Abortions 




Year 






Ratio 






Ratio 






Ratio 




15^ 




Rate 


i.(So 

births^ 


15-44 




Rate 


1.(K 

live 

births^ 


15-44 




Rate 


Wrths^ 




years 
old 


Num- 
ber 


^,S5o 


years 
old 


Num- 
ber 


^,SSo 


years 
old 


Num- 
ber 


^,SSo 




(1.000) 


(1.000) 


women 


(1.000) 


(1.000) 


women 


(1.000) 


(1.000) 


women 


1975 . . 


47.606 


1.034 


21.7 


331 


40.857 


701 


17.2 


276 


6,749 


333 


49.3 


565 


1979 . . 


52.016 


1,496 


28.8 


420 


44,266 


1.062 


24.0 


373 


7.750 


435 


56.2 


625 


1980 . . 


53.048 


1.554 


29.3 


428 


44.942 


1.094 


24.3 


376 


8.106 


460 


56.5 


642 


1961 . . 


53.901 


1,577 


29.3 


430 


45.494 


1.108 


24.3 


377 


8.407 


470 


55.9 


645 


1982 . . 


54.679 


1.574 


28.8 


428 


46.049 


1.095 


23.8 


373 


8,630 


479 


55.5 


646 


1983^ . 


55.340 


1,575 


28.5 


436 


46.506 


1.064 


23.3 


376 


8.834 


491 


55.5 


670 


1984 . . 


56.061 


1.577 


28.1 


423 


47.023 


1.087 


23.1 


366 


9.038 


491 


54.3 


646 


1985. . 


56.754 


1,589 


28.0 


422 


47.512 


1.076 


22.6 


360 


9.242 


513 


55.5 


669 


1986^ . 


57.483 


1.574 


27.4 


416 


48.010 


1.045 


21.8 


350 


9.473 


529 


55.9 


661 


1987 . . 


57,964 


1,559 


27.1 


405 


48.288 


1.017 


21.1 


338 


9.676 


542 


56.0 


646 


1988 .. 
1989: . 


58.192 


1.591 


27.3 


401 


48.325 


1.026 


21.2 


333 


9.867 


565 


57.3 


638 


58,365 


1,567 


26.8 


380 


48.104 


1.006 


20.9 


309 


10.261 


561 


54.7 


650 


1990* . 


58,700 


1.609 


27.4 


389 


48,224 


1.039 


21.5 


318 


10.476 


570 


54.4 


655 


1991 . . 


59.080 


1.557 


26.3 


379 


48.406 


982 


20.3 


303 


10.674 


574 


53.8 


661 


1992 . . 

1993 ^ 


59,020 


1.529 


25.9 


380 


48.161 


943 


19.6 


298 


10859 


585 


53.9 


681 


59.143 


1.500 


25.4 


378 


48.137 


911 


18.9 


291 


11.007 


589 


53.5 


700 


1994 ^ 


59.284 


1,431 


24.1 


364 


46.121 


861 


17.9 


277 


11.163 


570 


51.1 


099 


1995 . . 


59,442 


1.364 


22.9 


351 


46.140 


820 


17.0 


265 


11.302 


544 


46.1 


686 


1996 . . 


59.606 


1,366 


22.9 


351 


48.120 


800 


16.6 


259 


11.486 


586 


49.2 


701 


1997 . . 


59,688 


1,328 


22.2 


340 


48.081 


773 


16.1 


250 


11.607 


555 


47.8 


680 



^ Live births are those which occurred from July 1 of year shown through June 30 of the fbliowing year (to match time of 
cor)ception with abortions). Births are classified by race of c^ild 1972-1988. and t)y race of mother after 1988. ' Total numbers 
of abortions in 1983 and 1986 have been estimated by interpolation; 1989. 1990. 1993. and 1994 have been estimated using 
trends in CDC data. 

No. 89. Abortions by Sciectod Characteristics: 1990 to 1997 

[Number of at>ortions from surveys cornjucted by source; characteristics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control's (CDC) annual 
at>ortion surveillance summaries, with adjustments for changes in states reporting data to the CDC each year. Total number of 
abortions in 1990 have been estimated using trerxte in CDC data] 



Characteristic 



Number (1.000) 



1900 



1095 



1997 



Percent distribution 



1900 



1995 



1997 



Abortion ratio 



1990 



1997 



Total abortions 



1,609 1,364 1,328 



Age of woman: 
Less than 15 years old 
15 to 19 years old . . . 
20 to 24 years old . . . 
25 to 29 years old . . . 
30 to 34 years old . . . 
35 to 39 years old . . . 
40 years old and over. 

Race of woman: 

White 

Biaci( and other 



Marital status of woman: 

Married 

Unmarried 



Number of prior live births: 

None 

One 

Two 

Three 

Four or more 



Number of prior induced atx)rtions: 

None 

One 

Two or more 



Weeks of gestation: ^ 
Less than 9 weeks . 
9 to 10 weeks ... 
11 to 12 weeks . . . 
13 weeks or more . 



13 
351 
532 
360 
216 
108 

29 

1.039 
570 

341 
1.268 

780 
396 
280 
102 
50 

891 
443 
275 



825 
416 
195 
173 



11 
264 
442 
308 
196 
110 

32 

820 
544 

269 
1.095 

614 

359 

248 

95 

48 

721 
383 
260 

728 
317 
153 
166 



10 
254 
420 
313 
189 
109 

34 

773 
555 

253 
1.074 

562 

367 

251 

97 

50 

680 
376 
271 

732 
292 
146 
157 



100 



1 
22 

33 
22 

13 

7 
2 

65 
35 

21 
79 

49 

25 

17 

6 

3 

55 
28 
17 

51 
26 
12 
11 



100 



1 
19 
32 
23 
14 
8 
2 

60 
40 

20 
80 

45 
26 
18 

7 
4 

53 
28 
19 

53 
23 
11 
12 



100 



1 
19 
32 
24 
14 
8 
3 

58 
42 

19 
81 

42 
28 

19 

7 
4 

51 
28 
20 

55 
22 

11 
12 



280 



515 
403 
328 
224 
196 
249 
354 

241 
396 

104 
516 

316 
230 
292 
279 
223 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
NA) 
NA 

(NA) 



200 



480 
348 
317 
225 
179 
220 
310 

210 
409 

93 
466 

277 
223 
285 
264 
228 

(NA) 
NA) 
NA) 




496 
345 
306 

225 
175 
207 
290 

200 
406 

87 
459 

262 
224 

262 
282 

236 

B 



B 

Jna 



NA Not available. ^ Number of atx)rtkxts per 1,000 at>ortions and live births. Live births are those which occurred from 
July 1 of year shown through June 30 of the fblkMving year (to match time of conceptk>n with abortior>s). ^ Separated women 
included with unmarried. ^ Data not exacby comparable with prior years because of a change in the nf>ethod of cateulation. 

Source of Tables 88 and 89: S.K. Henshaw and J. Vbn Voit. eds.. Abortion Factbook, 1992 Edition: Readings, Ttends. end 
State and Local Data to 1988, The Alan Quttmacher Institute, New York, NY, 1992 (copyright): S.K. Henshaw and J. Van Vort 
Abortion Senrices in the United States, 1991 and 1992. FafrOy Planning Perspectives, 26:100. 1994: S.K. Henshaw. Abortion 
Incidence and Senrices in the United StaHM, 1995-1996. Fanwy PIvining Pen^>ectives, 30:263, 1998. and unpublished data. 



70 Vital Statistics 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the United 



No. 90. Abortions— Number and Rate by Sutc: 1 992 and 1 996 



[Numtor of abortions from surveys of hospitals, dinics. and physicians identified as providers of abortion services conducted by 
The Alan Quttmacher Institute. Abortion rates are computed per 1 .000 women 15 to 44 years of age on July 1 of spedfled year] 



Stale 


Numt>er 
(1.000) 


Rate^ 


State 


Numt>er 
(1.000) 


Rate^ 




IMS 1996 


1992 


1996 


1992 


1996 


1992 


1996 


U A 


1,629 1.366 

17 15 
2 2 

21 19 

7 6 

304 238 

20 18 

20 16 

6 4 

21 21 
85 94 

40 37 

12 7 
2 2 

68 69 
16 15 

7 6 

13 11 
10 8 

14 15 
4 3 

31 31 

41 41 
56 49 
16 15 

8 4 


25.9 
18.2 
16.5 
24.1 
13.5 
42.1 
23.6 
26.2 
35.2 
138.4 
30.0 
24.0 
46.0 
7.2 
25.4 
12.0 
11.4 
22.4 
11.4 
13.4 
14.7 
26.4 
28.4 
25.2 
15.6 
12.4 


22J 

15.6 
14.6 
19.6 
11.4 
33.0 
20.9 
22.5 
24.1 
154.5 
32.0 
21.1 
27.3 

6.1 
26.1 
11.2 

9.4 
16.9 

9.6 
14.7 

9.7 
26.3 
29.3 
22.3 
13.9 

7.2 


MO 


14 

3 

6 
13 

4 
55 

6 

195 

36 

1 
50 

9 
16 
50 

7 
12 

1 
19 
97 

4 

3 
35 
33 

3 
15 


11 

3 

4 
15 

3 
63 

5 

168 

34 

1 
43 

8 
15 
40 

5 
10 

1 
18 
91 

4 

2 

30 
26 

3 
14 


11.6 
18.2 
15.7 
44.2 
14.6 
31.0 
17.7 
46.2 
22.4 
10.7 
19.5 
12.5 
23.9 
16.6 
30.0 
14.2 

6.8 
16.2 
23.1 

9.3 
21.2 
22.7 
27.7 

7.7 
13.6 

4.3 


9.1 


AL 


MT 


15.6 


AK 


NE 


12.3 


AZ 


NV 


44.6 


AR 


NH 


12.7 


CA 


NJ 

NM 


35.8 


CX) 


14.4 


CT 


NY 


41.1 


DE 


NC 

ND 

OH 


20.2 


DC 


9.4 


FL 


17.0 


GA 


OK 

OR 

PA 

Rl 

SC 


11.8 


HI 


21.6 


ID 


15.2 


IL 


24.4 


IN 


11.6 


lA 


SD 


6.5 


KS 


TN 


14.8 


KY 


TX 

UT 


20.7 


LA 


7.8 


ME 


VT 


17.1 


MD 


VA 


18.9 


MA 


WA 


20.9 


Ml 


wv 


6.6 


MN 


Wl 


12.3 


MS 


WY 


2.7 







Represents or rourKis to zero. ^ Rate per 1 .000 women. 15 to 44 years old. 



Source: S.K. Henshaw and J. Van Vort Abortion Service In the United Stetes. 1991 and 1992, Family Planning Perspectives. 
26: 1 00. 1 994; and S.K. Henshaw, Abortion lncider)ce and Services in the United States, 1 995- 1 996. Family banning Perspectives. 
30-.263. ir " 



No. 91. Expectation of Life at Birtli, 1970 to 2000, and Projections, 
2005 and 2010 



im 



Excludes deaths of nonresidents of the United States] 



Year 


Totai 


White 


Black and other 


Blade 


Total 


Male Female 


Totai 


Male Female 


Total 


Male Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


1970 


70.8 
72.6 
73.7 
74.5 
74.6 
74.7 
74.7 
74.7 
74.9 
74.9 
75.1 
75.4 
75.5 
75.8 
75.5 
75.7 
75.8 
76.1 
76.5 
76.7 
76.7 
76.9 

77.8 
78.5 


67.1 
68.8 
70.0 
70.8 
71.0 
71.1 
71.1 
71.2 
71.4 
71.4 
71.7 
71.8 
72.0 
72.3 
72.2 
72.3 
72.5 
73.0 
73.6 
73.8 
73.9 
74.1 

74.9 
75.6 


74.7 
76.6 
77.4 
78.1 
78.1 
78.2 
78.2 
78.2 
78.3 
78.3 
78.5 
78.8 
78.9 
79.1 
78.8 
79.0 
78.9 
79.0 
79.4 
79.5 
79.4 
79.5 

80.7 
81.4 


71.7 
73.4 
74.4 
75.1 
75.2 
75.3 
75.3 
75.4 
75.6 
75.6 
75.9 
76.1 
76.3 
76.5 
76.3 
76.4 
76.5 
76.8 
77.1 
77.3 
77.3 
77.4 

78.3 
79.0 


68.0 
69.5 
70.7 
71.5 
71.6 
71.8 
71.8 
71.9 
72.1 
72.2 
72.5 
72.7 
72.9 
73.2 
73.1 
73.2 
73.4 
73.8 
74.3 
74.5 
74.6 
74.8 

75.4 
76.1 


75.6 
77.3 
78.1 
78.7 
78.7 
78.7 
78.7 
78.8 
78.9 
78.9 
79.2 
79.4 
79.6 
79.8 
79.5 
79.6 
79.6 
79.6 
79.9 
80.0 
79.9 
80.0 

81.1 
81.8 


65.3 
68.0 
69.5 
70.9 
70.9 
71.1 
71.0 
70.9 
71.0 
70.8 
70.9 
71.2 
71.5 
71.8 
71.5 
71.7 
71.9 
72.6 
NA) 
NA 
(NA 
(NA 

NA) 
NA) 


61.3 
63.7 
65.3 
66.8 
67.0 
67.2 
67.0 
66.8 
66.9 
66.7 
66.7 
67.0 
67.3 
67.7 
67.3 
67.5 
67.9 
68.9 

KJ! 

NA) 
NA) 


69.4 

72.4 

73.6 

74.9 

74.7 

74.9 

74.8 

74.9 

75.0 

74.8 

74.9 

75.2 

75.5 

75.7 

75.5 

75.8 

75.7 

76.1 

(NA 

(NA 

(NA 

(NA 


64.1 
66.8 
68.1 
69.4 
69.4 
69.5 
69.3 
69.1 
69.1 
68.9 
68.8 
69.1 
69.3 
69.6 
69.2 
69.6 
69.6 
70.3 
71.1 
71.3 
71.4 
71.7 

73.5 
74.5 


60.0 
62.4 
63.8 
66.1 
65.2 
66.3 
66.0 
64.8 
64.7 
64.4 
64.3 
64.5 
64.6 
65.0 
64.6 
64.9 
65.2 
66.1 
67.2 
67.6 
67.8 
68.2 

69.9 
70.9 


68.3 


1975 


71.3 


igeo 


72.5 


1962 


73.6 


1963 


73.5 


1964 


73.6 


1966 


73.4 


1966 


73.4 


1987 


73.4 


1966 


73.2 


1969 


73.3 


1990 


73.6 


1991 


73.8 


1992 


73.9 


1903 


73.7 


1904 


74.1 


1995 


73.9 


1996 


74.2 


1997 


74.7 


1996 ^ 


74.8 


1900^ 


74.7 


■ vvr^ 

2000 ^ 


74.9 


2006 


76.8 


2010 


77.8 







NA Not avalable. ^ The 1998 life table values are based upon an 85 percent sample of deaths. ^ Based on middle 
mortofty assumptions: for details, see source. Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Population Division Workirtg Paper No. 38. 



Vtta/ SlitfstiQS 



IS noted, U.S. NatiorwU Center for Health Statistics, Vital Statistics of the United States, annual, and National 
Reports (NVSR) (fonnerty Monthly Vital Statistics Reports). 



Vital Statistics 7\ 



MS. 



amiiaWral Abstract of the UnHsd States: 2002 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

n 




I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

i 
I 
I 
I 
I 
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72 Vital Statistics 



No. 


93 


ExpMtaiion of Life and Expoetod Dnths by Rko. Sm, and Agw 1999 




E»[ieci8liwi di iHe in yaars 


Enpaciod fleams per i ,000 alive ai specif ad aga ' 


AgxysaiB) 


While 


Black 


WWia 


Black 




nui MM Far™* 


Male Femala 


Tolal Mais Female 


Male FemaW 


*[|jin 
3 - 

10 

19:: 

32 
33 
3« 

37 
38 

42 

ta '. 

49 

54 
5S - 

S7 
56 

59 

62 
64 . 








74:3 72:2 T. 
73.4 7 .2 76 
72,4 70,2 75 
71.4 69.2 74 
70.4 66.2 73 
BB.4 87.2 72 

66.4 66.2 71 

s: Si s 

66.5 63.3 66 

64.5 82.3 87 

11 11 1 
11 11 1 

569 m:? 51 

52.0 50:0 5; 

51.1 4B.0 K 

49^2 47^ 51 

48.2 48.2 50 

47.3 46.3 49 
48 3 44.3 49 

45.4 43 4 48 

44.4 42,5 47 

43.5 415 46 

42.6 40.6 45 

41.6 39.7 44 

40.7 38.7 43 

39.8 37.8 42 

38.8 38.9 41 

i i 1 

30.7 26^9 3: 

^:? »:3 » 

27S 25.4 2( 
23fl 221 2! 

ill isl I 


1 


6« 
6! 

6: 

4! 
4: 

31 

3; 

3; 

I 

21 

i| 

11 

i 


) 726 

1 6fi:5 

1 68,S 

2 66.C 

■ 62C 

5 56^ 
5 57.1 

} 54:2 

i 50:4 

i 465 
7 46.6 

2 42.g 

7 39!! 

8 38.3 

I |1 

) 32.1 

! 20:3 

1 23^1 
5 224 

1 |] 


053 0.49 C 
0:27 0:29 { 

016 0:i6 ( 

si i i 

0.84 1 08 C 

OM 1:25 < 

o!9S l!23 ( 

si ii 1 

l!02 1,27 ( 
1.06 1.32 ( 

1 33 1 59 ( 
1.42 1.66 
151 1.76 ( 

1:73 2.02 1 

2:17 2:50 1 
2.34 2.70 1 

274 a! 17 1 
2.99 3 45 1 
3.25 3.76 i 

3^81 4^40 2 
4.09 4.72 2 

4:73 5^45 : 

5.12 5.89 3 
557 643 : 

b:i6 953 : 

iS ills i 

15:09 1806 11 
3624 4682 3C 


2e 

2S 

>5 

40 

46 
45 

44 

43 
42 

44 

45 

i7 

'8 

17 

25 
35 
45 

i 

42 
65 

)2 
75 

65 

4! 

■5 


0:42 0.38 

0.36 o!25 
034 053 

si sa 

11 i 

is i 

2^33 o!7t> 
2,50 0.78 
2 56 0.61 

2^46 OW 
2 42 0.96 

2.66 1.19 

II if 

3.31 1.69 
3.46 2.06 
3.71 2.25 
4.01 2.46 
4.38 2.86 

4.78 2.92 

Ii: 111 
Ii :i 

9,27 4.66 
9.96 5,23 
10.63 5.80 

12.11 6!49 

il| 1 

18.96 10:50 
20.39 11.30 

23.36 12.99 

27:98 15:99 

29.33 17 19 
30.54 18.33 



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Vital Statistics 



U.S. Census Burasu. Statistical Abstract of the Unllad 



No. 95. Death Rates by Age: 1940 to 2000 

[RalM par 100,000 populallon] 



Sex. year, 
and race 



All Under 1 1-4 5-14 15-24 25-34 
year years years years years 



35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 
years years years years years 



85 years 

and 

older 



MALE 

1940 

1950 

1960. . . 

1970 

1980. . . 
1990. . . 
2000^ . 



White: 
1980. . 
1985. . 
1990. . 

1995. . 

1996. . 

1997. . 

1998. . 

1999. . 
2000* 



1980. . 
1985. . 
1990. . 
1995. . . 

1996. . . 

1997. . , 
1998. . 
1999. . . 
2000* 

Hispanic:^ 
1980. . . 
1985. . , 
1990. . . 

1995. . . 

1996. . 
1997. . 
1998. . . 
1999. . . 
2000* 



FEMALE 

1940 

1950 

1960 

1970 

1980 

1990 

2000* . . 



1980.. . 
1985. . . 
1990.. . 

1995. . . 

1996. . . 

1997. . . 

1998. . . 

1999. . . 
2000* . 

Btactc 
1980. . . 
1985. . . 
1990. . 

1995. . . 

1996. . . 

1997. . . 

1998. . . 

1999. . . 
2000* . 

Hispanic:^ 
1980. . . 
1985. . . 
1990 . 

1995. . 

1996. . 

1997. . 

1998. . 

1999. . . 
2O00* 



1.197.4 

1.106.1 

1,104.5 

1.090.3 

976.9 

918.4 

873.8 

983.3 
963.6 
930.9 
932.1 
918.1 
906.3 
904.4 
911.2 
907.0 

1.034.1 
989.3 

1.008.0 
980.7 
939.9 
893.9 
877.7 
880.0 
861.3 

(NA) 

(NA 

(NA 

(NA) 

(NA) 

360.5 

366.4 

367.9 

366.3 

954.6 
823.5 
809.2 
807.8 
785.3 
812.0 
873.3 

806.1 
840.1 
846.9 
891.3 
896.2 
897.8 
903.7 
924.1 
928.8 

733.3 
734.2 
747.9 
759.0 
753.5 
742.8 
746.4 
761.3 
756.0 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA 
(NAJ 

288.0 
283.6 
293.7 
290.4 



6.189.8 
3.728.0 
3.059.3 
2.410.0 
1.428.5 
1.082.8 
794.8 

1.230.3 
1.056.5 
896.1 
717.5 
683.3 
678.1 
673.8 
658.1 
662.9 

2.586.7 
2.219.9 
2.112.4 
1.590.8 
1.748.2 
1.671.6 
1.717.8 
1.694.0 
1.586.5 

(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

654.3 

678.5 

655.3 

663.4 

4.774.3 
2.854.6 
2,321.3 
1,863.7 
1.141.7 
855.7 
657.2 

962.5 
799.3 
690.0 
571.6 
558.0 
546.0 
563.6 
532.6 
544.4 

2.123.7 
1.821.4 
1.735.5 
1.342.0 
1.444.0 
1.383.9 
1.380.1 
1.403.3 
1.338.6 



311.5 
151.7 
119.5 
93.2 
72.6 
52.4 
36.3 

66.1 
52.8 
45.9 
38.8 
37.1 
35.1 
32.5 
33.9 
32.1 

110.5 
90.1 
85.8 
77.5 
71.4 
67.2 
69.2 
66.0 
62.3 

(NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
34.1 
33.1 
34.3 
32.3 

267.0 
126.7 
96.4 
75.4 
54.7 
41.0 
28.8 

49.3 
40.0 
36.1 
31.2 
28.5 
28.0 
27.5 
27.4 
25.1 

84.4 
71.1 
67.6 
62.9 
63.7 
51.0 
53.9 
51.5 
50.1 




117.8 
70.9 
55.7 
50.5 
36.7 
28.5 
21.6 

35.0 
30.1 
26.4 
24.5 
23.2 
22.1 
21.2 
20.3 
20.5 

47.4 
42.3 
41.2 
40.2 
38.1 
34.8 
35.6 
34.6 
29.3 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

(NA) 

18.7 

20.2 

19.4 

19.4 

89.1 
48.9 
37.3 
31.8 
24.2 
19.3 
15.3 

22.9 
19.5 
17.9 
16.6 
16.4 
15.6 
15.0 
14.9 
14.2 

30.5 
28.6 
27.5 
26.5 
25.9 
27.2 
23.1 
22.6 
21.2 

(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

15.6 

14.1 

14.4 

14.3 



228.9 
167.9 
152.1 
188.5 
172.3 
147.4 
116.2 

167.0 
134.2 
131.3 
122.3 
113.9 
109.0 
107.6 
104.9 
106.8 

209.1 
173.6 
252.2 
249.2 
233.0 
215.8 
194.6 
185.6 
177.6 

(NA) 
NA 

(na) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
129.1 
128.8 
124.9 
130.7 

181.1 
89.1 
61.3 
68.1 
57.5 
49.0 
43.5 

55.5 
48.1 
45.9 
44.3 
42.7 
43.8 
41.2 
42.2 
41.0 

70.5 
59.6 
68.7 
70.3 
66.8 
62.0 
58.0 
60.1 
59.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
38.3 
34.0 
36.4 
34.6 



338.4 
216.5 
187.9 
215.3 
196.1 
204.3 
148.4 

171.3 
158.8 
176.1 
177.7 
154.8 
140.3 
133.9 
134.5 
133.1 

407.3 
351.9 
430.8 
416.5 
361.0 
308.6 
282.0 
268.4 
267.2 

(NA) 

NA 

(NA 

(NA 

(NA 

154.5 

148.4 

151.6 

154.1 



274.3 

142.7 

106.6 

101.6 

75.9 

74.2 

66.0 

65.4 
59.4 
61.5 
64.3 
62.7 
60.0 
58.5 
58.4 
57.4 

150.0 
137.6 
159.5 
166.6 
153.8 
134.6 
130.0 
122.0 
124.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
54.6 
51.0 
51.8 
50.7 



588.1 
428.8 
372.8 
402.6 
299.2 
310.4 
254.0 

257.4 
243.1 
268.2 
287.7 
259.6 
235.3 
232.7 
231.5 
232.1 

689.8 
630.2 
699.6 
721.2 
629.2 
523.7 
483.1 
473.6 
449.9 

(NA) 

m 

(NA) 
(NA) 
235.7 
226.6 
226.0 
221.5 

452.2 
290.3 
229.4 
231.1 
159.3 
137.9 
142.1 

138.2 
121.9 
117.4 
125.8 
121.6 
120.9 
122.0 
123.3 
124.8 

323.9 
276.5 
298.6 
327.7 
316.4 
287.1 
284.9 
282.6 
268.7 

(NA) 

te 

(NA) 
(NA) 

101.1 
96.7 
99.9 

102.5 



1.248.8 
1.067.1 
992.2 
958.5 
767.3 
610.3 
545.8 

698.9 
611.7 
548.7 
534.6 
515.5 
495.8 
489.6 
494.2 
497.5 

1.479.9 
1.292.9 
1.261.0 
1.273.0 
1.190.6 
1.114.1 
1.082.6 
1.081.9 
1.039.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

IKSi 

456.1 
449.3 
456.3 
442.0 



860.7 
641.5 
526.7 
517.2 
412.9 
342.7 
314.0 

372.7 
341.7 
309.3 
294.4 
290.5 
285.0 
278.3 
281.8 
282.0 

768.2 
667.6 
639.4 
619.0 
610.1 
590.4 
582.0 
581.0 
588.6 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

(NA) 

228.3 

225.8 

226.7 

222.4 



2.612.0 
2.395.3 
2.309.5 
2,282.7 
1.815.1 
1,553.4 
1.250.5 

1.728.5 
1.625.8 
1.467.2 
1.330.8 
1.305.2 
1.252.4 
1.215.5 
1.200.2 
1.178.8 

2.873.0 
2.779.8 
2.618.4 
2.437.5 
2.395.1 
2,320.0 
2,269.3 
2.244.0 
2.137.0 

(NA) 

NA) 

NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

957.8 

966.3 

962.6 

940.5 

1,800.4 

1.404.8 

1,196.4 

1.098.9 

934.3 

878.8 

775.5 

876.2 
869.1 
822.7 
788.4 
779.5 
766.3 
740.6 
739.1 
735.2 

1.561.0 
1.532.5 
1,452.6 
1.350.3 
1.311.7 
1.307.3 
1.272.2 
1,255.7 
1.196.7 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

580.3 

5436 

536.0 

522.3 



5.462.3 
4.931.4 
4.914.4 
4.873.8 
4.105.2 
3.491.5 
3.020.0 

4.035.7 
3.770.7 
3,397.7 
3,199.0 
3.158.3 
3.122.7 
3.082.3 
3.043.2 
2.958.7 

5.131.1 
5.172.4 
4.946.1 
4.610.5 
4.431.5 
4.296.3 
4.186.0 
4,182.8 
4.027.8 

(NA) 

NA) 

NA 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2.251.7 

2.284.9 

2.219.4 

2.118.3 

4.222.2 
3.333.2 
2,871.8 
2.579.7 
2.144.7 
1.991.2 
1.948.6 

2.066.6 
2.027.1 
1.923.5 
1.924.5 
1.919.8 
1.900.5 
1.912.9 
1.916.2 
1.901.7 

3.067.4 
2.967.8 
2.865.7 
2.823.7 
2.787.0 
2.739.7 
2.724.6 
2.732.1 
2.629.8 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1.381.9 

1.384.3 

1.366.8 

1.326.5 



12.126.4 

10.426.0 

10.178.4 

10.010.2 

8.816.7 

7.888.6 

6.863.3 

8.829.8 
8.486.1 
7.844.9 
7.320.6 
7.206.5 
7.086.0 
6.988.5 
6.965.1 
6.838.8 

9.231.6 
9.262.3 
9,129.5 
8.778.8 
8.614.9 
8.296.8 
8.311.4 
8.352.6 
8.115.6 

(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

4.750.3 

4.564.6 

4.525.1 

4.437.6 

10.368.6 
8.399.6 
7.633.1 
6.677.6 
5.440.1 
4.883.1 
4.922.7 

5.401.7 
5.111.6 
4.839.1 
4.831.1 
4.826.5 
4.786.3 
4.792.7 
4.869.7 
4.893.6 

6.212.1 
6.078.0 
5.688.3 
5.840.3 
5.775.9 
5.669.3 
5.813.8 
6.002.7 
5.871.6 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

3.220.5 

3.140.1 

3.245.6 

3.166.4 



24.639.0 
21.636.0 
21.186.3 
17,821.5 
18.801.1 
18.056.6 
16.673.5 

19.097.3 
18.980.1 
18J268.3 
18,152.9 
17.870.5 
17.767.1 
17,048.3 
17,202.1 
16.991.0 

16.098.8 
15.774.2 
16.954.9 
16.728.7 
16.006.3 
16,083.5 
15.540.9 
16.047.8 
15.352.6 



(NA) 
(NA 

nV 

NA 

(NA 

10.487 

9.946.7 

9,842.3 

9,295.6 



i 



22.759.1 
19.194.7 
19.006.4 
15.518.0 
14.746.9 
14.274.3 
14.827.1 

14,979.6 
14,745.4 
14.400.6 
14.639.1 
14.642.9 
14,681.4 
14.620.4 
15.053.8 
15.028.7 

12.367.2 
12.703.0 
13.309.5 
13.472.2 
13.398.5 
13.701.7 
13.580.5 
14.262.9 
14,266.8 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

8.706.6 

8.336.3 

8.838.0 

8.327.0 



NA Not available Figures for age not stated are included in "AH ages" t>ut not dtstntxjted among age groups. 
* Prekminary data. ^ The death rates for Hispanic origin and specified races other than White and Black shoukftM interpreted 
wHh caiAion because of inconsistencies between reporting Hispanic origin and race on death certificates arxl censuses and 
surveys. 

Source: U.S. National Center for tHeaNh Statistics. Vital StafiMcs of the UnHed Stales, annual. 



Vital StaixsWcs IS 



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76 Vital Statistics 



U.S. Census Bursau, StatMical Abstract of the UnRMl 



No. 97. Deaths and DMth RaMs 

K1« MMnnti a.l4W(»-] By Btaa of >M 
Ion ttoM b* u*M In companio <tBiir> rai» 



by Sum: 1990 to 2000 

EidudM tiealhs ol nonresidents -d *w L 



a.14a 2^11 2,31 » 3.31 < 



Connccttcut. . . . 
OHwrara . . . . 
□ai. at ColunilH 

MM . !!!'!!! 

Kwcu. .!!'.!! 

Kvoucny . . . . 

ukns .!: :' ! 

UMtachuintn. '. 
Wehyn. . . 

liuitsippi 

Hnourl .. . 

yunwM 

HtmU . 
Nn Hafripsniie ! 

NmVoA . . : ! 

NonhDBkM . ' 

OMo 

OWdm 

fthatHHmta'.', '. 
Soumcarotna . 

SounDiiua . . 
TtnnMMt . . 



227 229 230 



153 1S3 155 158 



50 S3 53 53 53 65 



n MX 105 105 



(NAl (HA) iUA} 



s.e B.s a^ a.T 



S.8 8S 

5 101 to'fl 10,7 

'9 80 



■■ DBHd on snumeratM rssKMnl (jopul 
wr yean. ' PraHmlnary Oata. 
».VIIalSltll3llt3oltnaUml»(ISaios.ar 



9 4 9.4 9.fl (NA) 
10E 101 10.3 lO.* 



9.3 9.3 9 5 9.5 



4 3 3.9 3.9 (NA) 
[HA) gj ;.3 M 

ol Aptin lOf 1990 BXI 200ft 



wta.'i svattttto n 



No. 98. Infant, Maternal, and Neonaui Mortality Rates by Race: 1980 to 1999 



t 



OMrtlis per 1,000 live births, exoapt m nolwl. Exdudes deaths of nonreeidents of the United States. Beginning 1980. raoe for 
live births tabulated according to race of mother, for maternal mortality rates and mortality rates. See also Appendix IH] 



Item 


1980 


1960 


1994 


1996 


1996 


1997 


1996 


1909^ 


nlfflffli Clttfliinft >>>>.>^>>^>>a>BB<> 


12.6 

10.9 

20.2 

22.2 

9.2 

6.7 

19.8 

21.5 

8.5 

7.4 

13.2 

14.6 


9.2 

7.6 

15.5 

18.0 

6.2 

5.4 

19.1 

22.4 

5^ 

4.8 

9.9 

11.6 


8i> 

6.6 

13.5 

15.8 

8.3 

6.2 

16.2 

18.5 

5.1 

4.2 

8.6 

10.2 


7.6 

6.3 

12.6 

15.1 

7.1 

4.2 

18.5 

22.1 

4.9 

4.1 

8.1 

9.8 


7.3 

6.1 

12.2 

14.7 

7.6 

5.1 

16.9 

20.3 

4.8 

4.0 

7.9 

9.6 


7.2 

6.0 

11.8 

14.2 

8.4 

5.8 

18.3 

20.8 

4^ 

4.0 

7.7 

9.4 


7J2 

6.0 

11.9 

14.3 

7.1 

5.1 

14.9 

17.1 

4^ 

4.0 

7.9 

9.5 


7.1 


White 


5.8 


Blaci( ar>d other 


11.9 


Biack 


14.6 


Maternal deaths ' 


9.9 


White 


6.8 


Black and other 


21.4 


Black 


25.4 


Neonatal deeths* 


4.7 


White 


3.9 


Black arKl other 


7.9 


Black 


9.8 







under 1 



^ Beginnino 1 999, deaths are classified according to the Tenth Revision of the International Classifkxtkyi of Ois 
years dassified according to the revisk)n in use at the time, see text, this sectk)n. ^ Represents deattis of infants 
okJ, exclusive of fetal deaths. '' Per 100,000 live births from deliveries and conftt)licatk)n8 of pregnancy, chiht)irth, and the 
puerperium. * Represents deattis of infants under 28 days oM. exclusive of fetal deattts. 

No. 99. Infant Mortality Rates by Race— Sutes: 1980 to 1999 

[Deaths per 1,000 Ihre births, by place of raeidenoe. Repreeents deaths of infants under 1 year oM. exckjsive of fetal deslhs. 
Excludes deaths of nonresidents of the United States. See Apperxlix III] 



State 



Total 



1980 1980 1996 1999 



White 



1900 1996 1996 1999 



Black 



1900 1900 1996 1999 



U.S. 

Alabama . 
Alaska . . 
Arizona . . 
Arkansas. 
California. 



Cotorado 

Connectk:ut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 
Fk>rida 

Qeorqia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Irxjiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 



Maryland. . . . 
Massachusetts 
Mk^igan .... 
Minnesota . . . 
Mississippi. . . 



Missouri 

Montana 

FJebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey . . . 
New Mexico . . . 

New Yortt 

North Carolina . 
North Dakota . . 

Ohio 

Oklahoma .... 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . . 
Rhode Island . . 

South Carolina . 
South Dakota . . 
Tennessee. . . . 

Texas 

Utah 



Vemront . . . 
Virginia .... 
Washington . 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin . . 
Wyoming. . . 



12.6 

15.1 
12.3 
12.4 
12.7 
11.1 

10.1 
11.2 
13.9 
25.0 
14.6 

14.5 
10.3 
10.7 
14.8 
11.9 

11.8 
10.4 
12.9 
14.3 
9.2 

14.0 
10.5 
12.8 
10.0 
17.0 

12.4 
12.4 
11.5 
10.7 
9.9 

12.5 
11.5 
12.5 
14.5 
12.1 

12.8 
12.7 
12.2 
13.2 
11.0 

15.6 
10.9 
13.5 
12.2 
10.4 

10.7 
13.6 
11.8 
11.8 
10.3 
9.8 



9.2 

10.8 

10.5 

8.8 

9.2 

7.9 

8.8 

7.9 

10.1 

20.7 

9.6 

12.4 
6.7 
8.7 

10.7 
9.6 

8.1 
8.4 
8.5 
11.1 
6.2 

9.5 
7.0 

10.7 
7.3 

12.1 

9.4 
9.0 
8.3 
8.4 
7.1 

9.0 
9.0 
9.6 
10.6 
8.0 

9.8 
9.2 
8.3 
9.6 

8.1 

11.7 

10.1 

10.3 

8.1 

7.5 

6.4 
10.2 
7.8 
9.9 
8.2 
8.6 



7.6 

9.8 
7.7 
7.5 
8.8 
6.3 

6.5 
7.2 
7.5 
16.2 
7.5 

9.4 
5.8 
6.1 
9.4 
8.4 

8.2 
7.0 
7.6 
9.8 
6.5 

8.9 
5.2 
8.3 
6.7 
10.5 

7.4 
7.0 
7.4 
5.7 
5.5 

6.6 
6.2 
7.7 
9.2 
7.2 

8.7 
8.3 
6.1 
7.8 
7.2 

9.6 
9.5 
9.3 
6.5 
5.4 

6.0 
7.8 
5.9 
7.9 
7.3 
7.7 



7.1 

9.8 
5.7 
6.8 
8.0 
5.4 

6.7 
6.1 
7.4 
15.0 
7.4 

8.2 
7.0 
6.7 
8.5 
8.0 

5.7 
7.3 
7.6 
9.2 
4.8 

8.4 
5.2 
8.1 
6.2 
10.1 

7.8 
6.7 
6.8 
6.6 
5.8 

6.7 
6.9 
6.4 
9.1 
6.8 

8.2 
8.5 
5.8 
7.3 
5.7 

10.2 
8.9 
7.7 
6.2 
4.8 

5.8 
7.3 
5.0 
7.4 
6.7 
6.9 



10.9 

11.6 
9.4 
11.8 
10.3 
10.6 

9.8 
10.2 

9.8 
17.8 
11.8 

10.8 
11.6 
10.7 
11.7 
10.5 

11.5 

9.5 

12.0 

10.5 

9.4 

11.6 
10.1 
10.6 
9.6 
11.1 

11.1 
11.8 
10.7 
10.0 
9.9 

10.3 
11.3 
10.8 
12.1 
11.7 

11.2 
12.1 
12.2 
11.9 
10.9 

10.8 
9.0 
11.9 
11.2 
10.5 

10.7 
11.9 
11.5 
11.4 
9.7 
9.3 



7.6 

8.1 
7.6 
7.8 
8.4 
7.0 

7.8 
6.3 
9.7 
0.0 
6.7 

7.4 
6.1 
8.6 
7.9 
7.9 

7.9 
8.0 
8.2 
8.1 
6.7 

6.8 
6.1 
7.4 
6.7 
7.4 

7.9 
6.0 
6.9 
8.2 
6.0 

6.4 
7.6 
7.4 
8.0 
7.2 

7.8 
9.1 
7.0 
7.4 
7.0 

8.1 
8.0 
7.3 
6.7 
6.0 

5.9 
7.4 
7.3 
8.1 
7.7 
7.5 



6.3 

7.1 
6.1 
7.2 
7.2 
5.8 

6.0 
6.5 
6.0 
(B 



5.S 

6.9 
4.7 
6.2 
7.0 
5.0 

6.3 
5.7 
3.9 
B 



n i'l 



6.5 
(B 



n i'l 



5.4 

b: 



22.2 

21.6 
19.5 
18.4 
20.0 
18.0 

19.1 
19.1 
27.9 
26.7 
22.8 

21.0 



7.2 
7.3 

7.8 
6.2 
7.4 
6.2 
6.3 

6.0 
4.7 
6.2 
6.0 
7.0 

6.4 
7.0 
7.3 
5.5 
5.5 

5.3 
6.1 
6.2 
6.7 
6.7 

7.3 
8.0 
5.9 
6.2 
7.0 

6.7 
7.9 
6.8 
5.9 
5.3 

6.2 
5.7 
5.6 
7.6 
6.3 
6.8 



6.3 
7.0 

5.3 
6.8 
7.1 
5.9 
4.7 

5.1 
4.8 
6.0 
5.4 
6.8 

5.8 
5.9 
5.9 
6.1 
5.7 

5.2 
6.5 
5.5 
6.9 
5.8 

6.6 
8.0 
5.7 
5.8 
5.0 

6.7 
7.7 
5.7 
5.5 
4.8 

5.9 
5.6 
4.7 
7.3 
5.8 
6.8 




J 



23.4 

27.2 
20.6 
22.0 
20.6 
(B) 
20.4 
16.8 
24.2 
20.0 
23.7 

20.7 

20.6 
22.5 

21.9 
23.1 
20.0 
20.0 
27.5 

23.0 
21.8 
15.9 
23.1 
(B) 

22.9 

(NAj 
19.3 
18.8 
27.3 

19.8 
16.4 
21.5 
18.5 
25.9 



18.0 

16.0 

2^ 
13.9 
16.8 

19.4 
17.6 
20.1 
24.6 
16.8 

18.3 

11 

17.4 

21.9 
17.7 
14.3 
16.7 
(B) 

17.1 
11.9 
21.6 
23.7 
16.2 

18.2 

14.2 
(B) 



15.1 


14.6 


15.2 


16.0 


.n 


i« 


14.3 


12.0 


14.4 


12.9 


16.B 


16.2 


12.6 


10.6 


13.1 


18X> 


19.6 


19.0 


13.0 


13.6 


15.1 


13.6 



18.4 


13.3 


18.1 


lis 


16.5 


15.9 


(B) 


(B) 


19.5 


17.5 


14.3 


15.1 


2^^ 


.n 


(B) 


(B) 


17.3 


14.6 


M 


.n 


14.7 


11.7 


(B) 


(B) 


A'l 


1^^ 


20.6 


16.2 


(B) 

id.6 


ii^ 


(B 


(B) 



14.1 

iJS 

15.5 

(B) 

17.6 

15.6 

lis 

(B) 
16.9 

,S 

12.5 
(B) 

iS8 

15.0 
(B) 



B Base figure too small to meet statistk^al standards for reliability. NA Not availat>le. ^ Includes other races, not 
separately. 

Source: US. National Center for Health Statistics. VTfa/ Statistics of the United States, annual; and unpublished 



78 Vital Statistics 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistteai Abstract of the UnHid 



No. 1 00. Deaths by Miiior Causes: 1 960 to 2000 

[Afl f dM > itf dMAti ralM p0r 100,000 poputatton.] 



Ymv 



Heart 
disease 



Chronic 

lower 

Cerebro- respifB- 

vascUar tory 

Cancer (toeases (toeases 



Diabetes 

meilitus 

Influenza 

and 

Aod- pneumo- 

dents nia 



Influenza Inten* 

and tionai 

pr)eumo- self-harm 

nia (suicide) 



Chronic 
Nver 

disease 
and 

drrhosis 



Assault 
(homi- 
cide) 



1980 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 . 

1965 

1966 . 

1967 , 
1966 . 

1969 . 

1970 . 

1971 . 

1972 . 

1973 . 

1974 . 

1975 . 

1976 . 

1977 . 

1978 . 

1979 . 

1980 . 

1961 . 

1962 . 

1983 . 

1984 . 

1985 . 

1966 . 

1967 . 

1986 . 
1969 . 

1990 . 

1991 . 
1902 . 

1993 . 

1994 . 

1995 . 
1906 . 

1997 . 

1998 . 
1900. 
2000^ 



559.0 
545.3 
556.9 
563.4 
543.3 

542.5 
541.2 
524.7 
531.0 
516.8 

492.7 
492.9 
490.2 
482.0 
458.8 

431^ 
426.9 
413.7 
409.9 
401.6 

412.1 
397.0 
389.0 
388.9 
378.8 

375.0 
365.1 
355.9 
362.5 
332.0 

321.8 
313.8 
306.1 
309.9 
299.7 

296.3 
268.3 
280.4 
272.4 
267.8 
257.5 



193.9 
193.4 
193.3 
194.7 
193.6 

195.6 
196.5 
197.3 
198.8 
198.5 

198.6 
199.3 
200.3 
200.0 
201.5 

200.1 
202.5 
203.5 
204.9 
204.0 

207.9 
206.4 
208.3 
209.1 
210.8 

211.3 
211.5 
211.7 
212.5 
214.2 

216.0 
215.8 
214.3 
214.6 
213.1 

211.7 
208.7 
205.7 
202.4 
202.7 
200.5 



177.9 
173.1 
174.0 
173.9 
167.0 

166.4 
165.8 
159.3 
162.5 
155.4 

147.7 
147.6 
147.3 
145.2 
136.8 

123.5 
117.4 
110.4 
103.7 
97.1 

96.4 
89.5 
84.2 
81.2 
78.7 

76.6 
73.1 
71.6 
70.6 
66.9 

65.5 
63.2 
62.0 
63.1 
63.1 

63.9 
63.2 
61.8 
59.6 
61.8 
60.2 



12.5 
12.6 
14.2 
16.5 
16.3 

18.3 
19.2 
19.2 
20.7 
20.9 

21.3 
21.8 
22.8 
23.6 
23.2 

23.7 
24.9 
24.7 
26.3 
25.5 

28.3 
29.0 
29.1 
31.6 
32.4 

34.5 
34.8 
35.0 
36.5 
36.6 

37.2 
38.0 
37.9 
40.9 
40.6 

40.5 
41.0 
41.5 
42.0 
45.8 
44.9 



63.1 
60.6 
62.9 
64.0 
64.1 

65.8 
67.6 
66.2 
65.5 
64.9 

62.2 
60.3 
60^ 
59.3 
52.7 

50.8 
48.7 
48.8 
48.9 
46.5 

46.4 
43.4 
40.1 
39.1 
38.8 

38.5 
38.6 
38.2 
38.9 
37.7 

36.3 
34.9 
33.4 
34.5 
34.6 

34.9 
34.9 
34.8 
35.0 
35.9 
33.9 



22.5 
22.1 
22.6 
23.1 
22.5 

22.9 
23.6 
23.4 
25.3 
25.1 

24.3 
23.9 
23.7 
23.0 
22.1 

20.3 
19.5 
18.2 
18.3 
17.5 

18.1 
17.6 
17.2 
17.6 
17.2 

17.4 
17.2 
17.4 
18.0 
20.5 

20.7 
20.7 
20.8 
22.0 
22.7 

23.4 
24.0 
24.0 
24.2 
25.2 
24.9 



53.7 
43.4 
47.1 
55.6 
45.4 

46.8 
47.9 
42.2 
52.8 
47.9 

41.7 
38.4 
41.3 
41.2 
35.5 

34.9 
38.8 
31.0 
34.5 
26.1 

31.4 
30.0 
26.5 
29.8 
30.6 

34.5 
34.8 
33.8 
37.3 
35.9 

36.8 
34.9 
33.1 
35.2 
33.9 

33.8 
33.2 
33.6 
34.6 
23.6 
24.3 



12.5 
12.2 
12.8 
13.0 
12.7 

13.0 
12.7 
12.5 
12.4 
12.7 

13.1 
13.1 
13.3 
13.1 
13.2 

13.6 
13.2 
13.7 
12.9 
12.6 

12.2 
12.3 

12.5 
12.4 
12.6 

12.5 
13.0 
12.8 
12.5 
12.3 

12.5 
12.3 
12.1 
12.2 
12.1 

12.0 
11.7 
11.4 
11.3 
10.7 
10.3 



13.3 
13.3 
13.8 
14.0 
14.2 

14.9 
15.9 
16.3 
16.9 
17.1 

17.8 
17.8 
18.0 
18.1 
17.9 

16.7 
16.4 
15.8 
15.2 
14.8 

15.1 
14.2 
13.2 
12.8 
12.7 

12.3 
11.8 
11.7 
11.6 
11.6 

11.1 
10.7 
10.5 
10.3 
10.2 

10.0 
9.8 
9.6 
9.5 
9.7 
9.5 



5.2 
5.2 
5.4 
5.4 
5.7 

6.1 
6.5 
7.5 
8.1 
8.3 

9.0 

9.8 

10.0 

10.2 

10.5 

10.2 
9.2 
9.2 
9.2 
9.9 

10.5 

10.1 

9.4 

8.4 

8.1 

8.0 
8.6 
8.3 
8.5 
8.8 

9.5 
10.1 
9.6 
9.8 
9.4 

8.6 
7.8 
7.3 
6.7 
6.2 
5.8 



^Preiminary data. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Statistics of the United States, annual. 



Vital Suxv^Wc^ 1% 



U4l 



Abstract of fw l/nrftad Stetse: 2002 



No. 1 1 . Deaths, Death Rates by Selected Causes: 1 999 and 2000 






Z Lna muUi O.DS. 



(MVSni ((ormeriy Montfiy SlaliKs Riportf, sr 

SO Vital Statistics 





»™,- see also 


AppenO. nil' 
















isaa 




S0O0.pf*. 


CausB Di dsam 






■^ 






«3E 














rati 


All causes. 


2,391 .399 


B77.0 


B81.9 


2,404,624 


873.6 


S7Z.4 








350 




934,110 


339.3 


33a.B 


irseBSBS of hBan . . 


Tasjre 


2«se 


267 




709,894 


2S7,B 


2STJ 


















iheumBlictwan disease 


































3:327 








2:707 




vo 


Ischemic hearT-dJ5&a£e 






1% 










Olhe,i.eBn<te«a»s 


lesl^e 


60 S 






166:515 


90:5 


60:* 




16 96B 


82 


^ 




.7 964 


65 




































MBllgnanI neoplasms 


549.838 


2016 


20Z 


7 


551,833 


2005 


200 5 


Melignai^i naoplasms or he. oral cavity, 
andWia/yrw 




27 




s 






27 


araJanuB 


57,155 


2)0 


2T1 


57,344 


20.8 


20.6 


Malionant neoplasms o* Wdney and tsnal 














rs,»,»«„.™ »»-«-. ■ 


11,116 


41 


*' 


11,751 


4.3 


4.3 




66,318 


20.7 


2D.T 


56,262 


204 


20.4 


Lwliwnia . 








21,296 


7.7 
















33.0 


Molw .ehidfl accWwiis . 


«;401 


15:5 


15:5 


4i:804 


15:2 


ISi 


AcoOenlal dlBctiargB o« tlroaima 


824 






808 






AccHMntai drowning and suBniarMn . . 




























(lamas , . 


3,348 




1.2 


3,265 


1.2 


^2 






























0«iO' aculB lower rBsp-raioiy inloafflna 


540 














124,181 


«5 


45,8 


123,550 


448 


44J 


flroncnma, chronic and unapecllied . . . 








1,168 




0,4 


















4.657 






4:426 




10 




100,565 


369 


37:0 


100,999 


367 


3B.7 














243 


Innuenia .... 




























Tube^kSr ■ . .: 


930 


03 








OJ 


Soplkanila . . 












11.5 


Human immumxla'iciBnev ""us (HIV) 


14,802 


S4 


5.4 


14,370 


5.2 


S.2 








16 


4,450 


1.6 


i.e 


Kulniional deliciencies 


^:289 


^6 




68,662 


















0.3 


PaSnsOissase 


u,593 




54 


15,690 


57 


S.7 
















Cnronlclluerdise^seBndcirrtiosis . 
















"Ibbb 










4.3 


Otftor chronic li.erdUoate and curtiollB 




5^ 






53 


5.3 




35 525 




13 1 


37 672 






"FCTfaUu™ 


34>19 






36:904 




13:4 




35 


[Z) 


i 




?, 


a 
















•Ssrsrissr"-, 


10,393 


38 


38 


10,472 


3.9 


3J 


AbolhBrdiaoBseslRBsktuall 














InUntonalselt-nBrm (buickM) 












10.3 


Assaiiu (rwmKiOB) 


16:889 










5.B 




398 




0.2 


























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n 




IB) 


n 


CimplcMoiu ol rnedicBi and sutjleacBra 


2,823 


10 


2.886 


10 












10,2 


102 


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ilL 


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il 


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24 


67 



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SWtaScaf AMracf or fw UMM/ SMm: 20Q2 



No. 103. DMthsand 




(NVSR). 8(ia unpuDltsfBd 



82 Vital Statistics 



No. 104. Death Rattts for MiUor CauMS of Deatli— Sutcs: 1999 



100,000 



Idsnt pop u l rt lon anunwralMi m of April 1. By place of ro el d o noe. Exdudet nonrnklsnls of the UnNsd 
dasemed according to tenth revisions of International CiassiAcatlon of Diseases] 



Stale 


Total 


Heart 
disease 


( 
Cancer 


Derebfo- 
vascuiar 
dis- 
eases 


Acci- 
dents 


Motor 
vehicle 
acci- 
dents 


Chronic 
lower 

tory 
dis- 
eases 


Diabe- 
tes 
MeiNtus 


HIV^ 


Inten- 
tional 

seK- 
harm 

(sui- 
cide) 


Assault 
(homi- 
cide) 


IMIedSlalM. 

AL 


877.0 

1.025.3 
437.1 
838.2 

1.094.5 
692.0 

668.5 

897.2 

884.6 

1.170.7 

1.080.1 

796.4 
697.6 
765.3 
894.1 
930.6 

990.1 
922.1 
992.7 
943.2 
978.5 

833.2 
904.3 
884.4 
807.0 
1.018.0 

1.022.8 
920.7 
935.1 
833.6 
794.0 

906.5 
786.0 
878.9 
909.7 
963.1 

964.0 
1.033.3 

ea7J2 
1.066.2 

979.8 

927.8 
948.4 
960.5 
732.7 
566.1 

840.9 
804.9 
762.0 
1.164.9 
888.9 
842.8 

744.7 
550.9 
456.0 
385.7 
234.0 


266.9 

307.1 
90.9 
226.0 
325.9 
217.0 

158.3 
278.1 
266.9 
318.3 
340.4 

22S.9 
203.3 
202.3 
275.3 
280.4 

303.2 
262.8 
305.4 
274.6 
272.8 

233.6 
257.0 
280.8 
199.6 
337.2 

328.7 
232.1 
269.9 
233.9 
229.0 

288.5 
198.4 
324.2 
250.8 
289.3 

294.9 
335.4 
219.0 
347.7 
303.6 

256.9 
276.1 
296.9 
216.6 
130.8 

228.0 
223.0 
200.0 
3//.5 
263.3 
210.4 

165.7 

151.3 

129.6 

70.6 

43.3 


201.6 

217.5 
102.2 
188.5 
240.5 
160.1 

144.5 
214.9 
230.5 
258.2 
254.6 

169.8 
161.6 
172.7 
206.3 
217.0 

221.2 
201.0 
225.3 
215.3 
242.2 

198.1 
224.3 
2O0J2 
186.2 
221.9 

222.8 
210.0 
204.7 
196.5 
200.5 

223.2 
164.2 
206.7 
206.7 
215.6 

224.2 
217.7 
206.2 
262.7 
248.6 

206.2 
222.6 
217.8 
163.4 
112.4 

211.4 
194.5 
185.1 
263.5 
204.8 
187.4 

118.1 
97.8 
67.1 
56.4 
31.8 


614 

72.0 
27.6 
54.4 
88.4 
54.2 

45.2 
58.9 
48.4 
57.2 
69.9 

56.7 
64.3 
61.6 
63.6 
68.3 

80.7 
69.4 
68.4 
61.4 
70.1 

55.9 
57.5 
61.2 
62.8 
67.0 

72.2 
67.4 
70.6 
48.7 
55.7 

50.6 
47.0 
44.6 
73.5 
81.0 

64.3 
73.9 
84.4 
71.7 
63.9 

76.5 
74.6 
74.8 
52.0 
40.8 

57.9 
59.8 
64.6 
73.2 
73.7 
55.3 

46.6 
31.8 
43.4 

!i 


35.9 

52.9 
47.5 
46.3 
50.4 
27.8 

37.4 
31.5 
35.4 
31.0 
39.4 

39.5 
24.7 
47.7 
34.0 
38.9 

39.1 
42.4 
43.7 
44.4 
36.6 

25.1 
21.1 
32.3 
37.1 
59.3 

45.1 
52.2 
40.1 
39.2 
27.4 

27.3 
55.7 
26.4 
43.0 
42.1 

32.2 
47.9 
36.2 
38.5 
24.5 

48.9 
47.9 
48.8 
36.1 
30.5 

35.2 
32.2 
33.3 
44.2 
37.2 
53.8 

33.7 
34.3 
25.7 

31.8 


15J 

26.6 
14.0 
19.8 
25.4 
11.0 

15.3 
9.4 

13.0 
6.9 

19.0 

19.5 

7.6 

22.2 

12.7 
16.6 

18.4 
21.5 
20.6 
22.3 
15.9 

11.8 
7.1 
14.3 
13.5 
34.5 

19.4 
23.8 
17.7 
18.4 
10.7 

8.9 
23.9 

9.7 
20.9 
21.1 

12.7 
20.4 
13.1 
13.2 
9.0 

25.6 
23.7 
24.1 
18.3 
17.1 

14.0 
13.1 
12.7 
21.4 
14.8 
30.0 

12.4 

(B 
B 


4SJ 

49.9 
23.6 
53.4 
53.2 
39.7 

48.7 
43.7 
43.4 
32.0 
60.4 

39.2 
24.5 
45.4 
42.5 
51.4 

57.3 
52.2 
58.8 
36.8 
59.9 

37.6 
46.3 
43.8 
41.8 
45.8 

56.1 
64.1 
56.7 
56.9 
49.3 

38.4 
48.7 
38.9 
46.9 
43.1 

52.0 
52.1 
53.2 
51.2 
50.0 

45.1 
45.7 
50.1 
37.5 
26.2 

50.5 
39.3 
47.1 
68.4 
43.2 
70.5 

33.3 


25.1 

30.7 
10.8 
22^ 

27.1 
19.3 

15.8 
21.1 
23.8 
42.6 
28.8 

18.6 
17.8 
21.3 
24.8 
26.8 

23.8 
24.5 
28.6 
38.6 
27.8 

27.5 
21.9 
26.2 
26.2 
21.4 

28.4 
27.6 
22.3 
15.6 
24.5 

29.9 
29.7 
20.9 
26.8 
32.0 

32.6 
29.4 
25.9 
31.2 
23.8 

28.8 
26.7 
2B£ 
24.6 
22.2 

30.1 
21.6 
22.7 
40.6 
24.2 
28.1 

61.5 
33.4 
16.5 
34.5 
(B) 


5.4 

4.1 

?i 

2.6 
4.8 

2.6 
6.2 
8.6 

51.3 
11.0 

10.1 
2.4 

1.9 

0.7 
1.6 
1.9 
8.5 
(B) 

11.4 
4.2 
2.4 
1.5 
5.6 

2.7 

5.8 

(B) 

11.2 
1.7 

13.1 
6.1 
(B) 

2.2 
3.1 
2.3 
4.2 
3.5 

7.9 

?i 

5.3 
1.4 

1.9 

1.2 
1.2 
(B) 

17.6 

P 

(Bi 


10.7 

12.7 
15.5 
16.0 
13.2 
9.3 

14.2 
8.3 

11.4 
5.8 

13.4 

11.2 
11.5 
14.5 
8.4 
10.6 

10.6 
11.3 
11.9 
11.8 
14.0 

8.4 
7.0 
9.9 
9.2 
11.0 

12.8 
18.4 
10.6 
22.3 
11.4 

6.9 
18.3 

6.6 
11.6 
11.5 

9.8 
14.7 
14.4 
10.7 

9.7 

10.8 
14.0 
13.2 
10.0 
13.2 

10.6 
11.5 
14.2 
12.7 
11.3 
20.4 

7.4 

IE! 


6^ 

10.0 


AK 


6.2 


AZ 


9.8 


AR 


7.0 


CA 


6.2 


CO 


4.9 


CT 


3.7 


DE 


3.2 


X 

FL 


35.8 
6.4 


QA 


8.1 


Hi 


3.2 


ID 


2.5 


IL 


8.4 


IN 


6.5 


lA 


1.8 


KS 


5.2 


ICY 


5.3 


LA 


11.1 


ME 


2.0 


MD 


10.3 


MA 


2.2 


Mi 


7.7 


IM 


2.9 


MS 


11.3 


MO 


7.0 


m 


3.7 


NE 


3.7 


NV 


9.2 


NH 


1.7 


HI 


3.7 


NM 


9.6 


NY 


5.3 


NO 

NO 


8.5 
(B) 


OH 


4.0 


OK 


6.9 


OR 


3.2 


RA 


5.3 


Rl 


3.6 


SO 


8.1 


SO 


3.1 


TN 


7.7 


TX 


6.6 


UT 


2.4 


VT 


i'l 


VA 


WA 


3.3 


WV 


5.5 


Wl 


3.8 


WY 

PR 

VI 


(B) 

17.1 
22.6 


GU 


(B 


AS 


(B 


MP 


(B 



B Figure does not meet standards of reliability or precision. ^ Human immunodefiderwy virus. 
Source. U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics Report (NVSR). 



Vital StatisUc^ ^^ 



ua 



AbmmH of the UrMidSCataf; 2002 



No. 105. Death Rates From Heart Disease by Sex and Age: 1990 to 1999 

[Rates per 100,000 population. For explanation of age-adjustment, see text, this section] 



Ctuiracteristic 


Male 


Female 




























1990 


1996 


1996 


1997 


1996 


1999^ 


1990 


1995 


1996 


1997 


1989 


1989^ 


All ages, age 


























adjusted . . . 


412.4 


372.7 


360.7 


349.6 


336.6 


328.1 


257.0 


239.7 


234.1 


228.1 


223.1 


220.9 


All ages. 


























cnjde 


297.6 


282.7 


277.4 


272.2 


268.0 


263.8 


281.8 


278.8 


275.5 


271.1 


268.3 


268.0 


Under 1 year . 


21.9 


17.5 


17.4 


18.0 


16.2 


13.8 


18.3 


16.7 


15.7 


14.7 


16.1 


13.6 


1-14 years. . . 


1.9 


1.7 


1.4 


1.5 


1.5 


1.3 


1.9 


1.5 


1.4 


1.2 


1.3 


1.1 


5-14 years. . . 


0.9 


0.8 


0.9 


0.9 


1.0 


0.8 


0.8 


0.7 


0.8 


0.7 


0.7 


0.6 


1 5-24 years . . 


3.1 


3.6 


3.3 


3.6 


3.5 


3.4 


1.8 


2.2 


2.0 


2.4 


2.1 


Z2 


25-34 years . . 


10.3 


11.4 


11.0 


10.8 


10.8 


10.6 


5.0 


5.6 


5.6 


5.8 


5.8 


5.6 


35-44 years . . 


48.1 


47.2 


44.2 


43.7 


44.0 


43.3 


15.1 


17.1 


16.8 


16.5 


17.3 


17.6 


45-54 years . . 


183.0 


168.6 


161.8 


157.7 


152.2 


145.7 


61.0 


56.0 


56.9 


54.3 


52.8 


51.9 


55-64 years . . 


537.3 


465.4 


453.8 


434.6 


411.1 


391.6 


215.7 


193.9 


189.3 


182.1 


173.9 


167.6 


65-74 years . . 


1.250.0 


1.102.3 


1.065.0 


1.031.1 


997.3 


961.6 


616.8 


557.8 


543.8 


529.4 


522.6 


503.2 


75-84 years . . 
86 years and 
over 


2.968.2 


2.615.0 


2.529.4 


2,443.6 


2.377.2 


2.308.9 


1.893.8 


1.715.2 


1.674.7 


1.616.6 


1.579.5 


1,562^ 


7.418.4 


7.039.6 


6.834.0 


6.658.5 


6.330.6 


6.313.3 


6.478.1 


6.267.8 


6.106.0 


6.013.7 


5.876.6 


5.913.8 



^ Starting with 1999 data, cause of death is coded accordino to ICO-10. Discontinuity tMtween 1998 and 1999 due to l^>10 
codirtg and cuissification changes is nr>easured by the comparaoUity ratio. For eiqplanation. see text, this section. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics . Vital Statistics of the United States, annual; National Vital Statistics Reports 
(NVSR) (formerly h4onthly Statistics Report): and unput)iished data. 

No. 106. Death Rates From Cerebrovascular Diseases by Race, Sex, and Age: 
1 950 to 1 999 

[Rates per 100,000 population. For explanation of age-adjustment, see text, this section] 



Characteristic 



1980^ 1960 



1970 1960 1965 1960 1995 1996 1997 1999 1989 



All ages, age adjusted 

Under 1 year 

1-4 years 

1-14 years 

15-24 years 

25-34 years 

35-44 years 

45-54 years 

55-64 years 

65-74 years 

75-84 years 

86 years and over 



Male all ages, age 

adjusted 

Under 1 year 

1-4 years 

1-14 years 

15-24 years 

25-34 years 

35-44 years 

45-54 years 

55-64 years 

65-74 years 

75-84 years 

86 years and over . . 



Female all ages, age 

adjusted 

Urxjer 1 year 

1-4 years 

1-14 years 

15-24 years 

25-34 years 

35-44 years 

45-54 years 

55-64 years 

65-74 years 

75-84 years 

86 years and over .... 



White male age adjusted . 
Blaci< male age adjusted. . 
White female age adjusted 
Blaci< female age adjusted 



180.7 

5.1 

0.9 

0.5 

1.6 

4.2 

18.7 

70.4 

194.2 

554.7 

1,499.6 

2.990.1 



186.4 

6.4 

1.1 

0.5 

1.8 

4.2 

17.5 

67.9 

205.2 

589.6 

1.543.6 

3.048.6 



175.8 

3.7 

0.7 

0.4 

1.5 

4.3 

19.9 

72.9 

183.1 

522.1 

1.462.2 

2.949.4 

182.1 
228.8 
169.7 
238.4 



177.9 

4.1 

0.8 

0.7 

1.8 

4.7 

14.7 

49.2 

147.3 

469.2 

1.491.3 

3.680.5 



186.1 

5.0 

0.9 

0.7 

1.9 

4.5 

14.6 

52.2 

163.8 

530.7 

1.555.9 

3.643.1 



170.7 

3.2 

0.7 

0.6 

1.6 

4.9 

14.8 

46.3 

131.8 

415.7 

1.441.1 

3.704.4 

181.6 
238.5 
165.0 
232.5 



147.7 
5.0 

1.0 

0.7 

1.6 

4.5 

15.6 

41.6 

115.8 

384.1 

1.254.2 

3.014.3 



157.4 

5.8 

1.2 

0.8 

1.8 

4.4 

15.7 

44.4 

138.7 

449.5 

1.361.6 

2.895.2 



140.0 

4.0 

0.7 

0.6 

1.4 

4.7 

15.6 

39.0 

95.3 

333.3 

1.183.1 

3.081.0 

153.7 
206.4 
135.5 
189.3 



96.4 

4.4 

0.5 

0.3 

1.0 

2.6 

8.5 

25.2 

65.2 

219.5 

788.6 

2.288.9 



102.4 

5.0 

0.4 

0.3 

1.1 

2.6 

8.7 

27.3 

74.7 

259.2 

866.3 

2.199.2 



91.9 

3.8 

0.5 

0.3 

0.8 

2.6 

8.4 

23.3 

56.9 

189.0 

741.6 

2.328.2 

99.0 
142.1 

89.2 
119.8 



76.6 

3.7 

0.3 

0.2 

0.8 

2.2 

7.2 

21.3 

54.8 

172.8 

601.5 

1.865.1 



80.2 

4.6 

0.4 

0.2 

0.7 

2.2 

7.4 

23.2 

63.5 

201.4 

661.2 

1.730.1 



73.5 

2.7 

0.3 

0.3 

0.8 

2.1 

6.9 

19.4 

47.2 

150.7 

566.3 

1.918.9 

77.4 

112.7 

70.9 

99.4 



65.5 

3.8 

0.3 

0.2 

0.6 

2.2 

6.5 

18.7 

48.0 

144.4 

499.3 

1.833.9 



68.7 

4.4 

0.3 

0.2 

0.7 

2.1 

6.8 

20.5 

54.4 

166.8 

552.7 

1.533.2 



62.7 

3.1 

0.3 

0.2 

0.6 

2.2 

6.1 

17.0 

42.2 

126.9 

467.4 

1.672.7 

65.7 

102.5 

60.5 

84.0 



63.9 

5.8 

0.4 

0.2 

0.5 

1.8 

6.5 

17.6 

46.1 

137.2 

481.4 

1.636.5 



66.3 

6.3 

0.4 

0.2 

0.5 

1.9 

7.1 

19.8 

53.4 

155.9 

517.1 

1.537.7 



61.5 

5.2 

0.3 

0.2 

0.4 

1.7 

6.0 

15.5 

39.4 

122.2 

458.7 

1.675.0 

63.2 
96.7 
59.5 
81.0 



63.2 

6.2 

0.3 

0.2 

0.5 

1.8 

6.3 

17.9 

45.3 

135.5 

477.0 

1.612.7 



65.3 

6.5 

0.3 

0.2 

0.5 

1.7 

6.7 

20.0 

52.5 

154.7 

508.7 

1.512.7 



60.9 

5.9 

0.3 

0.2 

0.4 

1.8 

5.9 

15.9 

38.8 

120.1 

456.5 

1.652.4 

62.7 
93.2 
59.1 
79.0 



61.8 

7.0 

0.4 

0.2 

0.5 

1.7 

6.3 

16.9 

44.4 

134.8 

462.0 

1.584.6 



63.9 

7.6 

0.5 

0.2 

0.6 

1.7 

6.5 

19.2 

51.4 

153.1 

488.7 

1.500.7 



59.7 

6.3 

0.3 

0.2 

0.5 

1.7 

6.2 

14.8 

37.9 

120.1 

444.4 

1.618.4 

61.5 
88.5 
57.9 
76.1 



50.6 

7.8 

0.4 

0.2 

0.5 

1.7 

6.0 

16.5 

42.6 

130.0 

455.4 

1.500.0 



60.1 

9.0 

0.3 

0.2 

0.6 

1.7 

6.2 

18.5 

49.5 

145.7 

474.7 

1.347.2 



58.3 

6.6 

0.4 

0.2 

0.4 

1.8 

5.7 

14.6 

36.3 

117.2 

442.6 

1.563.3 

57.6 
86.3 
56.6 
75.3 



61J 
2.7 

0.3 

0.2 

0.5 

15 

5.7 

15.5 

41.2 

132.2 

472.8 

1.606.3 



62.4 

3.4 

0.3 

0.2 

0.5 

1.6 

5.9 

17.1 

47.8 

149.1 

494.4 

1.455.0 



60.5 

2.1 

0.3 

0.2 

0.5 

1.5 

5.6 

14.0 

35.5 

118.5 

458.3 

1.670.2 

60.1 
87.4 
58.8 
78.1 



^ Includes deaths of persons who were not residents of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. ^ Starting with 1 999 data. 
cause of death is coded according to iCD-10. Discontinuity t>etween 1998 and 1999 due to ICD-10 coding and classification 
changes is measured t^y the comparability ratio. For explanation, see text, this section. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Statistics of the United States, annual; National Vital Statistics f^eports 
(NVSR): and unpublished data. 



84 Vital Statistics 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the UnNed SHMa: 200t 



No. 107. Death Rates From Malignant Neoplasms by Race, Sex, and Age: 
1950 to 1999 

[IMm par 100,000 population. For explanation of age-adjustment, see text, ttiis section] 



Characteristic 
Total, age adfusted . . . 

Under 1 year , 

1-4 years 

5-14 years 

15-24 years 

25-34 years 

35-44 years 

45-54 years 

55-64 years 

65-74 years 

75-64 years 

85 years and over 

Male aN enes. age actusted. 
Female alTages, age 

at^usted 

While male all ages, age 

adfusted 

Back male all ages, age 

adjusted 

White female all ages, age 

adjusted 

Back female all ages, age 

actusted 

DEATH RATES FOR 

MALIGNAMT NEOPLASM 

OF BREASTS FOR 

FEMALES 

Al ages, age ac^u^ed . . . . 

An ages, crude 

Under 25 years 

25-34 years 

35-44 years 

45-54 years 

5564 years 

65-74 years 

75-84 years 

66 years and over 



1950^ 1980^ 1970 1980 1985 1996 1995 1996 1997 1996 1996 ' 



193.9 193.9 198.6 207.9 211.3 216.0 211.7 208.7 205.7 202.4 202.7 



8.7 

11.7 

6.7 

8.6 

20.0 

62.7 

175.1 

390.7 

698.8 

1.153.3 

1.451.0 

208.1 

182.3 

210.0 

178.9 

182.0 

174.1 



7.2 

10.9 

6.8 

8.3 

19.5 

59.7 

177.0 

396.8 

713.9 

1.127.4 

1,450.0 



4.7 

7.5 

6.0 

8.3 

16.5 

59.5 

182.5 

423.0 

754.2 

1.169.2 

1,320.7 



3.2 

4.5 

4.3 

6.3 

13.7 

46.6 

180.0 

436.1 

817.9 

1.232.3 

1.594.6 



225.1 247.6 271.2 

168.7 163.2 166.7 

224.7 244.8 265.1 

227.6 291.9 353.4 

167.7 162.5 165.2 
174.3 173.4 189.5 



3.1 

3.8 

3.5 

5.4 

13.2 

45.9 

170.1 

454.6 

845.5 

1.271.8 

1.615.4 

274.4 

171.2 

267.1 

373.9 

169.9 

195.5 



2.3 

3.5 

3.1 

4.9 

12.6 

43.3 

158.9 

449.6 

872.3 

1.348.5 

1.752.9 

280.4 

175.7 

272.2 

397.9 

174.0 

205.9 



1. 

3. 

2. 

4. 

11. 

40. 

142. 

416 

868. 

1,364.8 

1.823.8 



.8 
.1 
.7 
.6 
.9 
.3 
.2 
.0 
.2 



2. 

2. 

2. 

4. 

12. 

39. 

137. 

406. 

861. 

1.351. 

1.798. 



2.4 

2.9 

2.7 

4.5 

11.6 

38.9 

135.1 

395.7 

847.3 

1.335.2 

1,805.0 



2.1 

2.4 

2.6 

46 

11.3 

38.2 

132.3 

383.8 

841.3 

1,326.3 

1.749.4 



268.8 
175.4 
2616 
372.8 
173.7 
206.0 



263.2 258.0 252.4 
173.4 171.6 169.2 
256.8 251.9 246.9 

366.3 354.7 343.1 
172.1 170.0 167.7 
202.3 204.4 200.0 



1.8 

2.8 

2.6 

4.6 

10.5 

37.3 

130.4 

380.8 

836.2 

1.339.8 

1.796.2 

251.6 

169.9 

246.4 

340.5 

168.6 

200.0 



DEATH RATES FOR 
MALIGNANT NEOPLASM 

OF TRACHEA, 
BRONCHUS. AND LUNG 

Al ages, age adjusted . . . 

Al ages, crude 

Under 25 years 

25-34 years 

35-44 years 

45-54 years 

55-64 years 

86-74 years 

75-64 years 

85 years and over 



31.9 


31.7 


32.1 


31.9 


33.0 


33.3 


30.8 


29.8 


28.6 


27.9 


27.0 


24.7 


26.1 


28.4 


30.6 


32.8 


34.0 


32.6 


31.8 


30.7 


30.2 


29.5 


(B) 


(B) 


^^ 


i'l 


- 


n 


(B) 


- 


n 


(B) 


n 


3.8 


3.8 


3.0 


2.7 


2.7 


2.6 


20.8 


20.2 


204 


17.9 


17.5 


17.8 


15.0 


14.2 


14.0 


13.4 


12.1 


46.9 


51.4 


52.6 


48.1 


47.1 


45.4 


41.4 


386 


37.8 


35.8 


33.5 


69.9 


70.8 


77.6 


80.5 


84.2 


78.6 


69.8 


67.4 


64.4 


62.2 


59.9 


95.0 


90.0 


93.8 


101.1 


107.8 


111.7 


103.3 


99.1 


94.1 


93.3 


89.9 


139.8 


129.9 


127.4 


126.4 


136.2 


146.3 


142.0 


139.8 


132.2 


131.4 


131.3 


195.5 


191.9 


157.1 


169.3 


178.5 


196.8 


203.7 


204.9 


198.5 


194.7 


202.6 



15.0 


24.1 


37.1 


49.9 


546 


59.3 


58.9 


58.4 


58.1 


57.6 


56.0 


12.2 


20.3 


32.1 


45.8 


51.5 


56.8 


57.5 


57.3 


57.3 


57.2 


55.8 


0.1 


- 


0.1 


• 


. 


• 


- 


• 


. 


. 


. 


0.8 


1.0 


0.9 


06 


0.6 


0.7 


0.7 


0.7 


0.6 


0.6 


0.5 


4.5 


6.8 


11.0 


9.2 


7.8 


6.8 


6.0 


6.2 


6.2 


6.1 


6.1 


20.4 


29.6 


43.4 


54.1 


50.9 


46.8 


38.0 


36.8 


34.6 


33.3 


31.9 


48.7 


75.3 


109.1 


138.2 


153.8 


160.6 


142.9 


138.7 


134.3 


131.4 


125.5 


59.7 


108.1 


164.5 


233.3 


261.2 


288.4 


297.1 


296.1 


295.7 


296.7 


284.6 


55.8 


91.5 


163.2 


240.5 


282.0 


333.3 


361.4 


364.4 


368.5 


367.7 


364.4 


42.3 


65.6 


101.7 


176.0 


195.2 


242.5 


284.0 


280.9 


297.6 


289.9 


295.6 



- Represents zero or rounds to less than half the ur>it of measurement shown. B Base figure too small to meet statistical 
standards for reliability. Includes deaths of persons wfK) were not residents of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. 
^ Staitingwith 1999 data, cause of death Is coded according to ICD-10. Discontinuity between 1996 arxJ 1999 due to ICD- 10 coding 
and deification changes is measured by the comparability ratio. For explanation, see text, this section. 

Source U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, Vital Statistics of the United States, annual: National Vital Statistics Reports 
(NVSR); and ur)published data. 



Vital Siaxvsxve^ V^ 



UJS.OnwiBurMU. Stattedcal Abstract of the Unilfed StafiM; 2002 



No. 108. Death Rates From Suicide by Sex and Race: 1950 to 1999 

[Rata* p«r 100,000 population. For explanation of age-ad^jstm^nt. see text, this section] 



Characteristic 



1960^' 1960^ 1970 1960 198S 1990 198S 1990 1997 1990 1990* 



All 
All 



ageadjuatad 
cnida 



Under 1 year 
1-4 years. . . 
5-14 years . . 

15-24 years . 
25-44 years . 
25-34 years . 
35-44 years . 
45-64 years . 
45-54 years . 



55-64 years 

65 years and over 

65-74 years 

75-84 years 

86 years and over 

White male aH ages, age 

adjusted 

Black male all ages, age 

adjusted 

White female all ages, age 

adjusted 

Black female all ages, age 

adjusted 



22.3 
7.5 
6.0 
1.8 



21.1 
8.4 
5.9 
2.0 



20.8 

10.0 

7.9 

2.9 



20.9 

11.4 

6.1 

2.4 



22.4 

11.8 
5.7 
2.3 



22.6 

12.8 

5.2 

2.4 



21.9 

12.5 

4.7 

2.1 



21.3 

11.9 

4.7 

2.0 



20.6 

11.4 

4.6 

2.0 



20.6 

10.6 

4.7 

1.8 



19.4 

104 

4.4 

1.6 



X Not applk:able. ^ Includes deattis of persons who were not reskJents of the 50 States and the District of Columbia, nn 
1950 rate is for the age group 75 vears and over. ^Starting with 1999 data, cause of death is coded according to ICO-10. 

Source: U.S. National Center for IHealth Statistics. Vital Sfatfstfcs of the United States, annual; National Vital ^tfttfcs Raporta 
(NVSR) (formerly Monthly Statistics Report): and unput)lished data. 

No. 109. Death Rates From Human immunodeficiency Virus (HiV) Disease by 
Race, Sex, and Age: 1990 to 1999 

[Ratea par 100,000 population. For explanatk>n of age-adjustment, see text, this sectk>n] 



Charactehstk; 



1 



1992 



1 



1994 



198S 



1993 



1997 



All ages, age adjuatad. 

Under 1 year 

1 -4 years 

5-14 years 

15-24 years 

25-34 years 

35-44 years 

45-54 years 

55-64 years 

65-74 years 

75-84 years 

85 years and over . . . . 



Male all ages, age adjusted 

Under 1 year 

1-4 years 

5-14 years 

15-24 years 

25-34 years 

35-44 years 

45-54 years 

55-64 years 

65-74 years 

75-84 years 

85 years and over 

Female age adjusted .... 

Under 1 year 

1 -4 years 

5-14 years 

15-24 years 

25-34 years 

35-45 years 

45-54 years 

55-64 years 

65-74 years 

75-84 years 

85 years and over 



10.2 

2.7 

0.8 

0.2 

1.5 

19.7 

27.4 

15.2 

6.2 

2.0 

0.7 

(B) 

18.5 

2.4 

0.8 

0.3 

2.2 

34.5 

50.2 

29.1 

12.0 

3.7 

1.1 

(B) 



13^ 

2.5 

1.0 

0.3 

1.6 

24.6 

35.6 

20.3 

8.5 

2.8 

0.8 

(B) 

23.5 

2.3 

1.1 

0.4 

2.3 

42.2 

63.5 

38.1 

15.9 

5.3 

1.6 

(B) 



14^ 

2.2 

1.3 

0.4 

1.7 

27.0 

39.1 

22.6 

8.8 

2.9 

0.8 

(B) 

25.4 

2.1 

1.3 

0.4 

2.3 

46.0 

68.5 

41.7 

16.5 

5.4 

1.4 

(B) 



16^ 

2.5 

1.3 

0.5 

1.8 

29.3 

44.1 

25.6 

10.4 

3.1 

0.9 

(B) 

27.8 

2.1 

1.2 

0.5 

2.3 

48.5 

76.2 

46.3 

19.1 

5.8 

1.4 

(B) 



16.3 

1.5 

1.3 

0.5 

1.7 

29.1 

44.4 

26.3 

11.0 

3.6 

0.7 

(B) 

27.7 

1.7 

1.2 

0.5 

2.1 

47.1 

75.9 

46.9 

19.9 

6.4 

1.3 

(B) 



11.7 

1.1 

0.9 

0.5 

1.1 

19.9 

31.4 

19.3 

8.4 

2.7 

0.8 

(B) 

19.2 

1.1 

0.9 

0.5 

1.3 

31.4 

51.8 

33.6 

14.9 

5.1 

1.5 

(B) 



i'l fi 



6.1 

'^l 

0.3 

0.8 

10.1 

16.1 

10.4 

4.9 

1.8 

0.6 

(B) 

9.7 

(B) 

0.3 

0.3 

0.8 

15.1 

25.5 

17.4 

8.5 

3.4 

1.0 

(B) 



4.9 

B) 



0.1 
0.5 
7.5 
12.9 
9.0 
4.3 
1.6 
0.5 
(B) 

7.7 

(B) 

(B) 

0.1 

0.5 

10.7 

20.1 

15.2 

7.3 

2.9 

0.9 

(B) 



Race, age-adjusted 



White male . 
Black male . . 
White female 
Black female 



2.2 


3.2 


3.9 


4.9 


5.3 


4.3 


2.7 


2.3 


2J 


3.0 


2.7 


2.4 


2.9 


1.2 


n 


(B) 


B 


(B) 


0.8 


1.0 


1.3 


1.3 


1.5 


0.4 


B 


(Bf 


0.2 


0.2 


0.4 


0.5 


0.5 


0.4 


0.2 


6.2 


oA 


0.7 


0.9 


1.1 


1.3 


1.4 


1.0 


0.7 


0.6 


0.6 


4.9 


6.9 


8.0 


10.1 


11.1 


8.5 


5.1 


4.4 


4.3 


5.2 


8.2 


10.2 


12.5 


13.4 


11.3 


6.8 


5.8 


6.8 


1.9 


3.4 


4.4 


5.8 


6.7 


5.7 


3.8 


3.1 


4.2 


1.1 


1.9 


1.9 


2.6 


2.9 


2.5 


1.6 


1.6 


1.6 


0.8 


0.9 


1.0 


1.0 


1.4 


0.8 


0.5 


0.6 


OA 


0.4 


0.4 


0.4 


0.6 


0.3 


0.3 


0.4 


0.3 


0.3 


(B) 


(B) 


(B) 


(B) 


(B) 


(B) 


(B) 


(B) 


(B) 


15.7 


19.0 


20.0 


21.2 


20.7 


13.2 


6.0 


4.6 


5.0 


46.3 


65.5 


74.5 


87.2 


90.4 


71.5 


41.7 


34.0 


37.1 


1.1 


1.6 


1.9 


2.3 


2.5 


1.9 


1.0 


0.8 


1.0 


10.1 


14.8 


17.8 


22.6 


24.7 


21.1 


13.9 


12.2 


13.4 



B Base figure too small to meet statistk»l standards for reiiat)ility of a derived figure. ^ Starting with 1999 data, cauaa of 
death is coded according to ICD-10. Discontinuity between 1996 and 1999 due to luD-IO coding arid dassificatnn changaa li 
measured by the comparability ratk>. For explar>atk>n, see text, this sectk>n. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistk». Vital Statistk» of the United States, annual; Natk>nal Vital Statiatica Rapovts 
(NVSR); and unpublished data. 



Vital Statistics 



U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the UnNtd 



y Costs by Ags, Smx, and Cuisw 




Vital Sw,««ta %1 



No. 111. Marriages and Divorces— Number and Rate by State: 1990 to 2001 

;2443.0 represents 2,443,000. By place of occurrence] 



Marriages ^ 



State 



Number (1,000) 



1990 1995 2001 



Rate per 1.000 
population ^ 



1990 1995 2001 



Divorces^ 



Number (1.000) 



1990 1995 2001 



Rate per 1 .000 
population ^ 



1996 2001 



Alat>anr)a . . 
Alaska. . . . 
Arizona . . . 
Arkansas. . 
California ^. 



2.443.0 2.336.0 2,327.0 



Ck>lorado 

Ck>nnecticut . . . . 

Delaware 

Dtst. of Columbia. 
Florida 



Georgia. 
Hawaii. . 
Idaho . . 
Illinois . . 
Indiana . 



Iowa . . . . 
Kansas . . 
Kentucky . 
Louisiana . 
Maine . . . 



Maryland .... 
Massachusetts 
Michigan .... 
Minnesota . . . 
Mississippi . . . 



Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey . . 
New Mexico . . . 
New York .... 
North Carolina . 
North Dakota . . 

Ohio 

Oklahoma .... 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . . 
Rhode Island . . 

South Carolina . 
South Dakota . . 
Tennessee. . . . 

Texas 

Utah 



Vermont . . . 
Virginia .... 
Washington . 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming . . . 



43 

5, 

37. 

35. 

236 



31.5 

27.8 

5.6 

4.7 

142.3 

64.4 
18.1 
15.0 
97.1 
54.3 

24.8 
23.4 
51.3 
41.2 
11.8 

46.1 
47.8 
76.1 
33.7 
24.3 

49.3 

7.0 

12.5 

123.4 

10.6 

58.0 

13.2 

169.3 

52.1 

4.8 

95.8 
332 
25.2 
86.8 
8.1 

55.8 

7.7 

66.6 

182.8 

19.0 

6.1 
71.3 
48.6 
13.2 
41.2 

4.8 



42.0 

5.5 

38.9 

36.6 

199.6 

34.3 

22.6 

5.4 

3.5 

144.3 

61.5 
18.8 
15.5 
83.2 
50.4 

22.0 
22.1 
47.6 
40.8 
10.8 

42.8 
43.6 
71.0 
32.8 
21.5 

44.9 
6.6 

12.1 

134.8 

9.6 

52.4 

15.1 

147.4 

61.6 

4.6 

90.1 
28.5 
25.7 
75.8 
7.4 

44.6 

7.3 

82.3 

188.5 

21.6 

61 
67.9 
42.0 
11.2 
36.3 

5.2 



42.2 

5.1 

40.0 

38.4 

224.2 

36.5 

18.6 

5.2 

3.5 

151.3 

51.3 
24.0 
14.7 
89.8 
34.1 

20.9 
20.3 
36.6 
37.5 

11.4 

37.5 
40.0 
66.5 
33.0 
18.7 

42.2 

6.4 

13.6 

146.1 

10.6 

54.1 

13.9 

145.5 

61.1 

4.1 

82.3 
16.6 
26.0 
71.4 
8.6 

36.8 

67 

77.7 

194.9 

23.2 

6.0 
63.4 
42.2 
14.2 
34.9 

5.0 



9.8 

10.6 
10.2 
10.0 
15.3 
7.9 

9.8 
7.9 
8.4 
8.2 
10.9 

10.3 

16.4 

13.9 

8.8 

9.6 

9.0 
9.2 
13.5 
9.6 
9.7 

9.7 
7.9 
8.2 
7.7 
9.4 

9.6 
8.6 
8.0 
99.0 
9.5 

7.6 
8.8 
8.6 
7.8 
7.5 

9.0 
10.6 
8.9 
71 
8.1 

15.9 
11.1 
13.9 
10.5 
11.2 

10.9 

11.4 

9.5 

7.2 

7.9 

10.7 



&9 

9.9 
9.0 
9.2 
14.7 
6.3 

9.2 
6.7 
7.5 
6.4 
10.2 

8.5 

15.8 

13.3 

7.0 

8.7 

7.8 
8.6 
12.3 
9.4 
8.7 

8.5 
7.2 
7.4 
7.1 
8.0 

8.4 
7.6 
7.4 
86.1 
8.4 

6.7 
9.0 
8.1 
8.6 
7.2 

8.1 
8.7 
8.2 
6.3 
7.5 

12.1 
10.0 
15.7 
10.1 
11.1 

10.3 

10.3 

7.7 

61 

7.1 

10.7 



8.4 

9.6 
8.2 
8.0 
14.8 
6.6 

8.7 
5.6 
6.7 
68 
9.7 

6.3 

20.4 

11.4 

7.3 

5.7 

7.2 
7.6 
9.1 
66 
9.0 

7.1 
6.4 
6.7 
6.8 
67 

7.6 i 
7.2 
61 
75.0 
8.6 

6.6 
7.9 
7.9 
7.8 
6.6 

7.3 
4.9 
7.7 
6.0 
86 

9.3 

9.1 
13.9 

9.4 
10.6 

9.9 
9.0 

7.2! 
7.9 
6.5! 
10.3 



1.182.0 1.169.0 (NA) 



25.3 

2.9 

25.1 

16.8 

128.0 

18.4 

10.3 

3.0 

2.7 

81.7 

35.7 

5.2 

6.6 

44.3 

(NA) 

11.1 
12.6 
21.8 
(NA) 
5.3 

16.1 
16.8 
40.2 
15.4 
14.4 

26.4 
4.1 
6.5 

13.3 
5.3 

23.6 

7.7 

57.9 

34.0 

2.3 

51.0 
24.9 
15.9 
40.1 
3.8 

16.1 

2.6 

32.3 

94.0 

8.8 

2.6 
27.3 
28.8 

9.7 
17.8 

3.1 



26.0 
3.0 
27.6 
16.0 
(NA) 

(NA) 

10.6 

3.7 

1.9 

79.5 

37.2 

5.5 

6.8 

38.8 

(NA) 

10.5 
10.7 
22.9 
(NA) 
5.5 

15.0 
13.5 
39.9 
15.8 
13.1 

26.8 
4.2 
6.3 

12.4 
4.9 

24.3 
11.3 
56.0 
37.0 
2.2 

48.7 
21.8 
15.0 
39.4 
3.7 

14.8 

2.9 

33.1 

99.9 

8.9 

2.8 
28.9 
29.7 

9.4 
17.5 

3.2 



23.4 
2.6 
21.1 
17.1 
(NA) 

(NA) 
9.7 
3.1 
1.2 

84.6 

30.6 

4.5 

7.2 

39.7 

(NA) 

9.3 

8.7 

22.0 

(NA) 

4.9 

15.9 
14.8 
38.9 
16.0 
15.1 

23.8 
2.3 
6.2 

13.2 
6.1 

28.5 

9.0 

54.1 

34.9 

1.7 

45.6 
11.5 
16.5 
38.0 
3.3 

13.8 

2.5 

28.8 

85.4 

9.7 

2.4 
30.2: 
26 31 

9.3 
17.31 

2.91 



4.7 

6.1 
5.5 
6.9 
6.9 
4.3 

5.5 
3.2 
4.4 
4.5 
6.3 

5.5 
4.6 
6.5 
3.8 
(NA) 

3.9 
5.0 
5.8 
(NA) 
4.3 

3.4 
2.8 
4.3 
3.5 
5.5 

5.1 
5.1 
4.0 
11.4 
4.7 

3.0 
4.9 
3.2 
5.1 
3.6 

4.7 
7.7 
5.5 
3.3 
3.7 

4.5 
3.7 
6.5 
5.5 
5.1 

4.5 
4.4 
5.9 
5.3 
3.6 
66 



6.1 
5.0 
6.6 
6.5 
(NA) 

ti 

5.1 
3.4 
5.6 

5.2 
4.6 
5.8 
3.3 
(NA) 

3.7 

4.2 

5.9 

(NA) 

4.4 

3.0 
2.2 
4.2 
3.4 
4.8 

5.0 
4.6 
3.8 
8.1 

4.2 

3.1 
6.7 
3.1 
5.1 
3.4 

4.4 
6.7 
4.8 
3.3 

3.7 

4.0 
4.0 
6.3 
5.3 
4.6 

4.8 
4.4 
5.5 
5.1 
3.4 
6.7 



4M 

5.3 
4.1 
4.2 

6.6 
(NA) 

4.0 
2.3 

5.4 

3.8 
3JB 
5.6 
32 
(NA) 

3.2 
3.2 
5.5 



3.0 
2.4 
3J 
3.3 
5.4 

4.3 
2.6 
3.7 
6.6 
5.0 

3.5 
5.1 
3.0 
4.5 
2.7 

4.0 
3.4 
4.9 
32 
3.3 

3.5 
3.4 
52 

4.1 
4.4 

4.0 
4.3 
4.5 
52 
32 
6.1 



NA Not available. ^ Data are counts of marriages performed, except as noted. ^ Based on total population residing in i 
population enumerated as of Apnl 1 for 1990; estimated as of July 1 for all other years. Includes annulments. U.S. \ 
for the number of divorces is an estimate which includes states not reporting (CA. CO. IN. and LA). ^ Marriage data include 
nonlicensed marriages registered. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Statistics of the United States, annual: National Vital Statistics Reports 
(NVSR) (fonnerly Monthly Vital Statistical Report). 



8 Vital Statistics 



U.S. census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United 



Section 3 

Health and Nutrition 



This section presents statistics on health 
expenditures and insurance coverage, 
including medicare and medicaid, medical 
personnel, hospitals, nursing homes and 
other care facilities, injuries, diseases, dis- 
ability status, nutritional intake of the 
population, and food consumption. Sum- 
mary statistics showing recent trends on 
health care and discussions of selected 
health issues are published annually by 
the U.S. National Center for Health Statis- 
tics (NCHS) in Health, United States. Data 
on national health expenditures, medical 
costs, and insurance coverage are com- 
piled by the U.S. Centers for Medicare & 
Medicaid Services (CMS) (formerly Health 
Care Financing Administration), and 
appear in the quarterly Health Care 
Financing Review and in the annual Medi- 
care and Medicaid Statistical Supplement 
to the Health Care financing Review. Sta- 
tistics on health insurance are also col- 
leaed by NCHS and are published in 
Series 1 of Vital and Health Statistics. 
U.S. Census Bureau also publishes data on 
utilization of insurance coverage. Statis- 
tics on hospitals are published annually 
by the Health Forum, L.L.C., an American 
Hospital Association Company, in Hospital 
Statistics. Primary sources for data on 
nutrition are the quarterly National Food 
Review and the annual Food Consumption, 
Prices, and Expenditures, both issued by 
the U.S. Department of Agriculture. NCHS 
also conducts periodic surveys of nutrient 
levels in the population, including esti- 
mates of food and nutrient intake, over- 
weight and obesity, hypercholesterolemia, 
hypertension, and clinical signs of malnu- 
trition. 

National health expenditures— CMS 

compiles estimates of national health 
expenditures (NHE) to measure spending 
for health care in the United States. The 
NHE accounts are structured to show 
spending by type of expenditure (i.e., 
hospital care, physician and clinical care, 
dental care, and other professional care; 
home health care; retail sales of prescrip- 
tion drugs; other medical nondurables; 



vision products and other medical 
durables; nursing home care and other 
personal health expenditures; plus non- 
personal health expenditures for such 
items as public health, research, construc- 
tion of medical facilities, administration, 
and the net cost of private health insur- 
ance) and by source of funding (e.g., pri- 
vate health insurance, out-of-pocket pay- 
ments, and a range of public programs 
including medicare, medicaid, and those 
operated by the Department of Veterans 
Affairs (VA)). 

Data used to estimate health expenditures 
come from existing sources which are 
tabulated for other purposes. The type of 
expenditure estimates rely upon statistics 
produced by such groups as the American 
Hospital Association, the Census Bureau, 
and the Department of Health and Human 
Services (HHS). Source of funding esti- 
mates are constructed using administra- 
tive and statistical records from the medi- 
care and medicaid programs, the 
Department of Defense and VA medical 
programs, the Social Security Administra- 
tion, Census Bureau's Governmental 
Finances, state and local governments, 
other HHS agencies, and other nongov- 
ernment sources. More Information and 
detailed descriptions of sources and 
methods are available on the HCFA home 
page at <http://cms.hhs.gov/statistics/ 
nhe/default.asp >. 

Medicare and medicaid— Since July 
1 966, the federal medicare program has 
provided two coordinated plans for nearly 
all people age 65 and over: (1) A hospital 
insurance plan which covers hospital and 
related services and (2) a voluntary 
supplementary medical insurance plan, 
fmanced partially by monthly premiums 
paid by participants, which partly covers 
physicians' and related medical services. 
Such insurance also applies, since July 
1 973, to disabled beneficiaries of any age 
after 24 months of entitlement to cash 



Health at\d HuVc\WoT\ %% 



us. Caniui Buraau. Smtllkxi Abeitma of the United Statas: 2002 



benefits under the social security or rail- 
road retirement programs and to persons 
with end stage renal disease. 

Medicaid is a health insurance program 
for certain low-income people. These 
include: certain low-income families with 
children; aged, blind, or disabled people 
on Supplemental Security Income; certain 
low-income pregnant women and chil- 
dren; and people who have very high 
medical bills. Medicaid is funded and 
administered through a state-federal part- 
nership. Although there are broad federal 
requirements for medicaid, states have a 
wide degree of flexibility to design their 
program. States have authority to estab- 
lish eligibility standards, determine what 
benefits and services to cover, and set 
payment rates. All states, however, must 
cover these basic services: inpatient and 
outpatient hospital services, laboratory 
and X-ray services, skilled nursing and 
home health services, doctor's services, 
family planning, and periodic health 
checkups, diagnosis and treatment for 
children. 

Health resources — Hospital statistics 
based on data from the American Hospital 
Association's yearly survey are published 
annually in Hospital Statistics and cover 
all hospitals accepted for registration by 
the Association. To be accepted for regis- 
tration, a hospital must meet certain 
requirements relating to number of beds, 
construction, equipment, medical and 
nursing staff, patient care, clinical 
records, surgical and obstetrical facilities, 
diagnostic and treatment facilities, labora- 
tory services, etc. Data obtained from 
NCHS cover all U.S. hospitals which meet 
certain criteria for inclusion. The criteria 
are published in Vital and Health Statis- 
tics reports, Series 1 3. NCHS defines a 
hospital as a nonfederal short-term gen- 
eral or special facility with six or more 
inpatient beds with an average stay of 
less than 60 days. 

Statistics on the demographic characteris- 
tics of persons employed in the health 
occupations are compiled by the U.S. 
Bureau of Labor Statistics and reported in 
Employment and Earnings (monthly) (see 
Table 588, Section 12, Labor Force, 
Employment, and Earnings). Data based 



on surveys of health personnel and utili- 
zation of health facilities providing long- 
term care, ambulatory care, and hospital 
care are presented in NCHS Series 1 3 
Data on Health Resources Utilization and 
Advance Data from Vital and Health Sta- 
tistics. Statistics on patient visits to health 
care providers, as reported in health inter- 
views, appear in NCHS Series 1 0, National 
Health Interview Survey Data. 

The CMS's Health Care Financing Review 
and its annual Medicare and Medicaid Sta- 
tistical Supplement present data for hospi- 
tals and nursing homes as well as 
extended care facilities and home health 
agencies. These data are based on 
records of the medicare program and dif- 
fer from those of other sources because 
they are limited to facilities meeting fed- 
eral eligibility standards for participation 
in medicare. 

Disability and illness— General health 
statistics, including morbidity, disability, 
injuries, preventive care, and fmdings 
from physiological testing are collected 
by NCHS in its National Health Interview 
Survey and its National Health and Nutri- 
tion Examination Surveys and appear in 
Vital and Health Statistics, Series 1 and 
1 1 , respectively. The Department of Labor 
compiles statistics on occupational inju- 
ries (see Section 1 2, Labor Force, Employ- 
ment, and Wealth). Annual incidence data 
on notifiable diseases are compiled by the 
Public Health Service (PHS) at its Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention in 
Atlanta, Georgia, and are published as a 
supplement to its Morbidity and Mortality 
Weekly Report. The list of diseases is 
revised annually and includes those 
which, by mutual agreement of the states 
and PHS, are communicable diseases of 
national importance. 

Nutrition — Statistics on annual per 
capita consumption of food and its 
nutrient value are estimated by the 
U.S. Department of Agriculture and pub- 
lished quarterly in National Food Review. 
Historical data can be found in Food 
Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures, 
and online at <http://www.ers.gov/ 
data/consumption>. Statistics on food 
insufficiency and food and nutrient intake 
are collected by NCHS to estimate the diet 



90 Health and Nutrition 



U.8. C«ntu8 BufMu, Sttttstlcal Atetmct of the Umitd SIMM: 20tt 



of the nation^ population. NCHS also col- 
lects physical examination data to assess 
the population^ nutrttlonal status, includ- 
ing growth, overweight/obesity, nutri- 
tional deficiencies, and prevalence of 
nutrition-related conditions, such as 
hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, 
and diabetes. 



Suifstkal raffabillty— For discussion of 
statistical collection, estimation, and sam- 
pling procedures and measures of reliabil- 
ity applicable to data from NCHS and 
CMS. see Appendix III. 





■mPuwURkn 


•nd outlying 


arw] 










P-.v-.l- -:■! ..-r.Jilijr- ■ PliOllC OiponOltkjrBl 


H 


lannH 


rvicnan 


dupplwi 




>tar 




















Phyw 








Total 




Out-ol- 








s«» 




kispl- 


^5 


Preacflp- 


MursloO 




^Sf' 


Tow' 


pOCMI 




T«8l 






Total' Q 


oare 


Ma 


OruB« 


CM* 




27 
























mi : : : : : 


9B 
























wea 


31 


Z3 












29 












3* 


2S 






































34 










^9K .... . 


























18S6 


*5 






10 
















2 


HB7 






19 


















2 




























1M9 -^ 




40 






















1B7D . .. 


73 


45 






2S 








2B 




6 














31 


20 




76 


31 






S 


W3 ".'.'.'. 
















B4 










1»73 


























H7* 






3S 


26 


46 








45 












7S 


37 


30 


55 


36 


19 




52 


25 


8 


9 


i»7e '..'.'. 








37 


62 




















99 




45 


















ure : : : : 


189 


110 


48 








26 






36 




13 


1»7» 




124 


53 


80 


90 


61 


29 


203 


87 






IS 










68 


105 










































MK ..' '. 












92 


42 




135 




15 


23 


ura 


3S4 


208 


79 


104 


148 


102 


46 


336 


146 


88 


17 


2S 




390 


229 


as 








46 












laes . . .'.'. 


























1986 . . . , 


457 






139 






59 












MKT 


496 


289 


100 




209 


143 


86 




192 


112 


27 


38 






332 
















































\na . .' .'. 


G9G 






234 


















1991 , . . . 


762 




142 


!5* 


321 


2M 






280 


175 


45 


58 






469 






359 








302 




48 


62 


1993 "...'. 


























mt 


937 


aio 






















1996 .... 


990 


S3. 




330 


456 


3a 






344 






75 


tges 


1.040 








482 


344 


138 




356 








1987 . ... 


1.091 






359 


















19W 




029 




303 
















89 


1999 


lizie 


687 


184 


409 


549 


385 


1?; 


11258 


392 


270 
288 


!^ 


89 


2904! prs^. '. 


1.424 
















446 








1,546 


849 


227 


537 


697 


484 








336 




104 
















i:8oi 




381 


182 


10? 


























iODS.pni|. 




1.DS0 






















£006.^ 


a:o37 




294 




916 








SS9 


443 


253 


126 


2007. («3 


















832 


46B 




134 


200B. pmt . 


























^.:KI 








362 


l!l36 
















2:630 


i:417 








828 








559 


376 


157 


SOU. prej 






_^_ 


966 


tisiE 




J?_5 


3:72B_ 


^^ 






188 



linAccou[iu'.<litl))://cmt.hhs.gov/slBtlaltc9'nna'de<aLjli.up>. 



Health and Nutrition 91 



No. 1 1 3. National Health Expenditures by Type: 1 990 to 2000 

[In billions of dollars (696.0 r sprs — n t i $696,000,000,000), sxospt porosnt Includes Puofto Rico and outlying arMS] 



Type of expenditure 



1 



1904 



1995 



1996 



1997 



1990 



Total 

Annual percent change ^ 

Percent of gross domestic produtit 



Private expenditures . 

Health services and supplies 
Out-of-pocket payments . . 
Insurance premiums ^ . . . 
Other 

Medical research 

Medical facilities construction 



Public expenditures .... 
Percent federal of public 



Health servi<;»s and supplies 
Medicare ^ 



Public assistance medical payrnents * 

Temporary disability insurance ^ . . . . 

Workers' compensatkxi (medical) ^ . . 

Defense Oept. hospital, medical 

Maternal, child health programs 

Public health activities 

Veterans' hospital, medk^l care 

Medk^l vocatk>nal rehabilitation 

State and k>cal hospitals ® 

Other^ 

Medical research 

Medical facilities construction 



696.0 


937.2 


990.3 


1.040.0 


1,091.2 


1,149.6 


1,21 SJ 


1,29M 


11.8 


5.5 


5.7 


5.0 


4.9 


5.4 


5.7 


6.9 


12.0 


13.3 


13.4 


13.3 


13.1 


13.1 


13.1 


13.2 


413.5 


510.3 


534.1 


558.2 


588J 


628.8 


666^ 


712J 


401.9 


496.8 


521.6 


545.0 


573.9 


613.3 


651.1 


685.6 


137.3 


143.9 


146.5 


152.1 


162.3 


174.5 


184.4 


194.5 


233.5 


312.1 


330.1 


344.8 


359.4 


383.2 


409.4 


443.9 


31.1 


40.7 


44.9 


48.2 


52.1 


55.6 


57.3 


57.2 


1.0 


1.4 


1.4 


1.6 


1.6 


2.0 


2.2 


2.3 


10.7 


12.1 


11.1 


11.6 


13.3 


13.6 


13.3 


14.3 


282.5 


427.0 


456.2 


461.8 


502.4 


520.9 


549.0 


587.2 


68.2 


69.9 


70.6 


71.4 


71.4 


70.6 


70.1 


70.1 


267.7 


408.0 


436.1 


460.8 


480.1 


496.2 


524.0 


558.8 


110.2 


165.8 


182.7 


197.5 


208.2 


209.5 


212.6 


224.4 


78.7 


139.2 


149.5 


157.6 


164.8 


176.6 


191.8 


206.5 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


17.5 


22.2 


21.9 


21.9 


20.5 


20.8 


22.5 


23.3 


10.4 


11.8 


12.1 


12.0 


12.1 


12.2 


12.5 


13.0 


1.8 


2.2 


2.2 


2.3 


2.3 


2.4 


2.5 


2.6 


20.2 


30.0 


31.4 


33.0 


35.5 


37.9 


40.9 


44.2 


11.3 


15.1 


15.4 


16.3 


16.3 


16.9 


17.7 


18.9 


0.5 


0.7 


0.7 


0.7 


0.7 


0.8 


0.7 


0.8 


13.1 


15.3 


14.1 


13.6 


13.4 


14.2 


14.8 


15.6 


3.8 


5.6 


6.0 


6.0 


6.1 


6.9 


7.8 


a7 


11.7 


14.8 


15.7 


16.2 


17.1 


18.6 


20.9 


23.0 


3.1 


4.2 


4.4 


4.8 


5.2 


4.1 


4.2 


4.3 



Change from immediate phor year. For explanatkm of average annual percent change, see Guide to Tat>ular Presentation. 
^ Covers insurance benefits and amount retained by insurance companies for expense, additions to reserves, and profits (net cost 
of insurance). ^ Represents expenditures for t)enefrts and administrative cost from federal hospital and medk»l insurance toist 
funds under old-age. survivors, disability, and heaHh insurance programs; see text, of this section. ^ Payments made directly to 
suppliers of medical care (primarily medicaid). ^ Includes medical benefits paid under pujslk: law by private insurartce carrlera, 
state govemments. and self-insurers. ^ Expenditures not offset by other revenues. ^ Covers expenditures for Subst a nce 
Abuse and Mental Health Servk»s Administratk>n. Indian Health Servk»; school health and other programs. 

Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medk:akj Sendees, "Health Accounts": <http7/cms.hhs.gov/stati8tk»/nhe/defauit.a8p>. 

No. 114. National Health Expenditures by Object, 1990 to 2000, 
and Projections, 2001 

[in billions of dollars (696.0 r epre — n t a $696,000,000,000). Includes Puerto Rico and outlying areas] 



Object of expenditure 



















2001. 


1990 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 


1996 


1999 


2000 


proj. 


696.0 


937.2 


990.3 1,040.0 1,691.2 1,149.8 1,215.6 1,299.5 


1.423^ 


370.8 


456.1 


476.7 


496.8 


521.8 


557.7 


593.8 


638.4 


697.1 


137.3 


143.9 


146.5 


152.1 


162.3 


174.5 


184.4 


194.5 


210.4 


233.5 


312.1 


330.1 


344.8 


359.4 


383.2 


409.4 


443.9 


486.7 


282.5 


427.0 


456.2 


481.8 


502.4 


520.9 


549.0 


587.2 


648.1 


42.8 


54.2 


57.4 


61.4 


67.0 


71.1 


72.7 


73.8 


78.6 


669.6 


904.8 


957.7 


1.005.7 


1.053.9 


1.111.5 


1.175.0 


1.255.5 


1,377.3 


609.4 


816.5 


865.7 


911.9 


959.2 


1.009.9 


1.062.6 


1.130.4 


1.235.2 


253.9 


332.4 


343.6 


355.9 


367.5 


379.2 


3922 


412.1 


446.3 


157.5 


210.5 


220.5 


229.4 


241.0 


256.8 


270.2 


286.4 


310.6 


31.5 


41.4 


44.5 


46.8 


50.2 


53.2 


56.4 


60.0 


64.4 


18.2 


25.7 


28.5 


30.9 


33.4 


35.5 


36.7 


39.0 


42.7 


12.6 


26.1 


30.5 


33.6 


34.5 


33.6 


32.3 


32.4 


35.9 


40.3 


54.6 


60.8 


67.2 


75.7 


87.2 


103.9 


121.8 


141.8 


22.5 


24.3 


25.6 


27.1 


27.9 


28.6 


30.4 


31.2 


32.8 


10.6 


13.3 


14.2 


15.3 


16.2 


16.5 


17.6 


18.5 


19.9 


52.7 


68.3 


74.6 


79.9 


85.1 


89.1 


89.3 


92.2 


992 


9.6 


19.9 


22.9 


25.8 


27.8 


30.2 


33.7 


36.7 


41.5 


40.0 


58.3 


60.6 


60.9 


59.2 


63.7 


71.5 


80.9 


92.7 


20.2 


30.0 


31.4 


33.0 


35.5 


37.9 


40.9 


44.2 


49.5 


12.7 


16.3 


17.1 


17.8 


18.7 


20.6 


23.1 


25.3 


26.6 


13.7 


16.2 


15.5 


16.4 


18.5 


17.7 


17.5 


18.6 


19.8 



Total 

Spent by- 
Consumers 

Out-of-pocket . . . 

Private insurance. 

Government 

Other ' 



Spent for— 

Health services and supplies 

Personal health care expenses 

Hospital care 

Physk;ian and dinical services 

Dental services 

Other professk>nal servk:es ^ 

Home health care 

Prescription drugs 

Other nondurat}ie medical products . . 

Durable medica equipment ^ 

Nursing home care 

Other personal health care 

Govemment administration and net cost 

of private health insurance 

Govemment publk: health activities .... 



Medrcal research ^ 

Medical facilities constructkxi 



Includes nonpatient revenues, privately funded constructkxi, and industrial inplant. ^ Includes servwes of registered and 
practk^al nurses in private duty, podiatrists, optometrists, physk^l therapists. dink»l psyctK>logists. chiropractors, naturopaths, and 
Christian Science practitioners. ^ Includes expenditures for eyeglasses, hearing akis. orthopedk: appliances, artificial Hmba, 
crutches. wheek:hairs, etc. ^ Includes administrative expenses of federally financed health programs. ^ Research and 
devek)pment expenditures of drug companies and other manufacturers and provkjers of medcal equipment and suppliet art 
excluded from research expenditures, t>ut are included in the expenditure class in which the product falls. 

Source: U.S. Centers for Medk^re and Medteaid Sen/k»s, "Health Accounts": <http://cms.hhs.g0v/stat1stk:s/nhe/defautt.asp>. 



92 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistk»l Abstract of the United Slatae: 2002 



No. 1 1 5. Health Services and Supplies— Per Capita Consumer Expenditures 
by Object: 1 990 to 2000 



Hn doflar*, •xoapl pwoant Based on Social Security Administration estimates of total U.S. population as of July 1, including Armed 
horoes aixJ federal employees abroad and dvflian population of outlying areas. Excludes researcfi arxJ construction] 



Object of expenditure 



1990 1994 1995 1996 1997 1996 1969 



2000 



Total, national 



Annual percent change 



f 



Ho8p|ital care 

Ptiyskaan and dinicai services 

Drntai services 

Other pfofeasional services ^ 

Home health care 

Prwciiption drugs 

0«wf nondurable medteal products 

Durable medical equ^>ment ^ 

Nursing home care 

Other personal health care 

Gov e r n ment administration and net cost of 

prirate healtti irwurance 

Government putiOc health activities 

Total, prhrate oonaumer ' 

care 

Ptiysician and dinicai sen/ices 

Denial services 

O&m professional services ^ 

Home health care 

Prescription drugs 

Other noTKlurabfe medical products 

Durable medkal equipment ^ 

Nursing home care 

Net cost of private health insurance 



2.635 


3.411 


3,576 


3,723 


3,865 


4.038 


4.231 


4.481 


10.6 


4.6 


4.8 


4.1 


3.8 


4.5 


4.8 


5.9 


999 


1.253 


1.283 


1.317 


1.348 


1.378 


1.412 


1.471 


620 


794 


824 


849 


884 


933 


973 


1,022 


124 


156 


166 


173 


184 


193 


203 


214 


71 


97 


107 


114 


122 


129 


132 


139 


49 


98 


114 


124 


127 


122 


116 


116 


159 


206 


227 


249 


278 


317 


374 


435 


86 


91 


95 


100 


102 


104 


109 


112 


42 


50 


53 


57 


59 


60 


63 


66 


207 


258 


278 


296 


312 


324 


321 


329 


38 


75 


86 


96 


102 


110 


121 


131 


157 


220 


226 


225 


217 


231 


258 


289 


80 


113 


117 


122 


130 


138 


147 


158 


1.469 


1.720 


1,780 


1,839 


1.913 


2,026 


2.138 


2.278 


426 


459 


457 


458 


465 


489 


504 


524 


386 


490 


498 


510 


532 


556 


574 


606 


120 


149 


158 


165 


175 


184 


194 


204 


47 


62 


69 


75 


83 


88 


90 


95 


20 


32 


37 


43 


49 


53 


51 


50 


132 


165 


181 


197 


220 


250 


294 


340 


86 


88 


91 


96 


98 


100 


105 


107 


33 


37 


38 


41 


42 


43 


45 


47 


90 


86 


96 


100 


106 


117 


117 


115 


117 


152 


153 


153 


144 


147 


164 


190 



^ Change from immediate prior year. ^ See footnotes for corresponding objects in Table 114. 
payments and p>rivate health insurance. 



Represents out-of-poci(et 



No. 116. Government Expenditures for Healtli Services and Suppiies: 2000 

[In mllllona off dollars (559.940 represents $569,940,000,000). Indudes Puerto Rico and outlying areas. Excludes medical 
research and construction] 



Type of service 



Other health services 



Total ^ 



Federal 



State Medicare ^ 
and local (OASOHI) 



Public 
assist- 
ance ^ 



Veterans 



Worl<ers' 

Defense compensa- 

Dept. * tion * 



Total 



559,940 391,194 168,746 224.366 208,468 



Hospital care 

Physician and dinicai 

lervioes 

P re sc ripfion drugs . . . 
Nuraing home care . . . 
Go/t administration . . 
Pubic health activities. 



243.209 192.887 



50.322 125.734 



95.161 
26.500 
55.931 
26.694 
44.238 



79.168 
15.157 
37.768 
15.868 
4.892 



15.993 
11,343 
18.163 
10.825 
39,346 



59.550 
2,296 
9,518 
7.333 



72,117 

20.137 
22,882 
44.551 
14.526 



18.924 

14.287 

1.071 
30 

1.862 
79 



12,953 

9.032 

2.170 
541 

146 



23.272 

8.248 

7.449 
618 

4.303 



- Represents zero. ^ Includes other items not shown separately. ^ Covers hospital aruJ medical insurance payments and 
a ttr i ni stia t i ve costs under old-age. survivors. dlsat)<lity. and health insurance program. ^ Covers medicaid and other medical 
pubic asaistarxM. Exdudes funcfe paid into medicare trust fund by states to cover premiums for public assistance redpients and 
medlcafly irxJigent persons. Indudes care for retirees and military dependents. ^ Medical benefits. 



No. 117. Personal Heaitli Care— Third Party Payments and Private Consumer 
Expenditures, 1990 to 2000, and Projections, 2001 

[In MRIona of dollars (609^ represents $609,400,000,000), except percent See headnote. Table 118] 



Item 



















2001. 


1990 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 


1996 


1999 


2000 


proj 


609.4 


816.5 


865.7 


911.9 


959.2 


1.009.9 


1.062.6 


1.130.4 


1.235.2 


472.1 


672.5 


719.2 


759.8 


796.9 


835.4 


878.2 


935.9 


1,024.7 


77.5 


82.4 


83.1 


83.3 


83.1 


82.7 


82.6 


82.8 


83.0 


203.6 


271.8 


289.1 


303.3 


320.2 


342.7 


363.9 


390.7 


423.9 


237.9 


360.6 


385.8 


409.0 


425.3 


438.0 


458.0 


489.0 


541.1 


30.6 


40.1 


44.3 


47.5 


51.4 


54.7 


56.3 


56.1 


59.7 


340.9 


415.8 


435.7 


455.4 


482.5 


517.2 


548.3 


585.3 


634.4 


59.7 


65.4 


66.4 


66.6 


66.4 


66.3 


66.4 


66.8 


66.8 


108.4 


121.8 


122.4 


123.7 


126.9 


134.5 


140.0 


146.9 


156.5 


89.6 


90.9 


91.4 


91.4 


91.2 


91.2 


91.0 


91.1 


91.3 


98.1 


129.8 


133.4 


137.9 


145.0 


153.1 


159.4 


169.9 


183.6 


69.0 


78.4 


80.3 


80.5 


80.2 


80.0 


80.2 


80.4 


80.4 


33.6 


43.8 


48.5 


53.3 


60.0 


68.7 


81.7 


95.3 


111.2 


29.2 


40.0 


46.5 


50.3 


53.6 


55.8 


57.6 


59.1 


59.2 



Personal fiealth care expenditures. 



TMrd party payments, total 

Percent of^personaJ health care 
Private insurance payments .... 

Government expenditures 

0«w^ 



f*rt<ms consumer expenditures ^ . . 

Percent met by private insurartce 
Hospital care 

Percent met by private irwurartce 
Physician and dtnical services. . . . 

Peroent met by private Insurartce 
Pre sc ri p tion drugs 

Percent met by private insurance 



* IrKfcjdes nonpatient revenues and industrial inplant health services. ^ Includes expenditures not shown separately. 
Represents out-of-pod(et payments and private health insurance benefits. Excludes net cost of insurarx^. 

SouRXdTfit^to 115-117: U. a Cantors for Medk:are and Meclcaid Services. IHeeRh/Vxxxjnts^ <h^^^ 



Health and Nutrition 93 



US.CMM»Bura«i. SWitlical Abstract of the United States: 2002 



No. 118. Personal Health Care Expenditures by Object and Source of 
Payment: 2000 

nn millions of dollars (1,13CM14 ispnssntt $1,130^14.000.000). sxespl as Indtealsd. Indudss Pusrto Rioo and ouMu a 

Covers all expendttures for health services and supplies, except net cost of insurance and administrBtion, govammart puMe h 
activities, and expenditures of philanthropic agenoes for fund raising activities] 





Private payments 




Consumer 


Ot)ject of experKJJture 


Out of Private 
pocket health 
pay- insur- Qo¥snv party 
Total Total Total ments ance Other ^ mam ma 


Total 


1.130.414 641.406 506.278 194S43 390.736 66.120 480iM» OH 


IHosDttal care 


412.103 168.894 146.896 13.014 133.882 21.996 243.208 308 


Physician and clinical sendees 

Dental services > 

Other professional services ^ 

l-iome health care 


286.438 191.278 168.932 33.245 136.687 21,346 95.161 253 
59.958 57.193 57.041 26.903 30.136 152 2.765 38 
38,979 29.611 26.688 11,666 15.022 2.923 9.368 27 
32.426 15.510 13.994 6.355 7,638 1.516 16.916 26 


Prescriotion druos 


121.808 95.308 95.308 39,010 56.298 26.500 82 


Other nondurable medical products . . . 

Durat)le medical equipment 

Nursino home care 


31,189 29.842 29.842 29,842 1.347 1 
18.537 13.268 13,268 9,631 3.637 5.260 8 
92.247 36.316 32.309 24.877 7.432 4,007 56.931 67 


Other oersonal health care 


36.729 4.186 4.186 32.543 36 







Represents zero. ^ Includes nonpatient revenues and industrial piant. ^ Covers private health insurance, other pp 
payments, and government. ^ See footnotes for corresponding items on Table 114. 

Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. "IHealth Accounts"; <http://cms.hhs.gov/8tatislics/hhi/defauM 

No. 119. Hospital Care and Physician and Clinical Service Expenditures by 
Source of Payment: 1990 to 2000 



[In Mllkms of dollsrs (253.9 reprssents $253,000,000,000)] 




Source of payment 


Hospital care 


Physician and clinical servioss 


1990 1985 1990 1990 2000 


1990 1085 1805 1060 


Total 


253.9 343.6 379.2 302.2 412.1 

11.2 10.5 11.9 12.6 13.0 
242.7 333.0 367.3 379.6 399.1 

97.1 111.9 122.6 127.4 133.9 

10.3 14.7 19.5 20.6 22.0 
135.2 206.5 225.1 231.5 243.2 
102.7 166.2 179.9 183.9 192.9 

32.4 40.3 45.2 47.7 50.3 

67.8 107.0 119.9 120.4 125.7 
27.6 54.5 61.0 66.0 69.7 


157.5 220.5 256J 270.2 2 


Out-of-pocicet payments 

Third-Darty payments 


30.4 26.3 30.7 31.5 
127.1 194.3 226.1 238.7 2 


Private health insurance 

Other Drivate funds 


67.7 107.2 122.4 127.8 1 
11.3 17.6 22.1 22.4 


Government 


48.2 68.5 81.6 88.5 


Federal 


38.7 56.2 67.6 73.4 


State and local 


9.4 13.3 14.0 15.0 


Medicare ' 


30.2 41.7 51.3 55.3 


Medicaid 


7.0 14.8 16.7 17.6 







^ Medicare expenditures come from federal furKto. ^ Medicaid expenditures come from federal and state and local fu 
Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. "Health Accounts": <http7/cms.hhs.gov/stati8tiC8/nha/defaulU 

No. 120. Retail Prescription Drug Sales: 1995 to 2001 

[2.125 represents 2.125,000,000] 



Sales outlet 


Number of prescriptions (millions) 


Retail sales (bil. dd.) 


1996 1999 1999 2000 2001 


1995 1996 1900 2000 


Total 


2.125 2.481 2.707 2365 3,009 

914 1.129 1.246 1.344 1.415 
666 651 680 689 700 
238 272 289 293 314 
221 306 357 394 418 
86 123 134 146 161 


68.6 103.0 121.7 130.3 1 


Traditional chain 


27.4 43.1 51.6 58.5 


Independent 


20.0 24.8 26.1 29.9 


Mass merchant 


7.2 10.4 12.0 12.8 


Supermarkets 


7.0 11.4 13.4 16.6 


Mall order 


7.0 13.4 16.6 20.6 







Source: National Association of Chain Drug Storm. /Alexandria. VA. The Chain Pharmacy Industry Profile, 2002 (copyri 



94 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of ttie UnMad 



No. 121. PM'soiiai HMith Car« Expmditur«s by State, 1990 to 1998, and liy 
Selected Object, 1 998 



pn mnofw of dolm (912,246 wpw— ntt $61 2,24 6 ,000,000). This series of stale health expendHuree (SHE) uses the same defl- 
niiions and, to tie extent posslt>le. the same data souroes as does the national health expenditures seriee. For health sendees, 
Ms sUucture duslefs s pendhig aooordkig to the establishment provkflng those services. For retaH purchases of medteal products, 
I groups spendtog aooordtog to product dassMcatton. Thus. SHE is e8tabnshment-t>ased, grouping services together according 
to piBoe of eervioe or of product ssto rather than a cco r dhig to type of service. Esta b ish m ent - based expendRures are those in which 
ipsnfng Is tocatod in the stats of the provider rather than in the beneHdary's state of residence. Becauee people are able to cross 
state borders to receive health care services, health care sperxJing by provider location Is not necessarily an accurate reflection 
of spsndbig on behalf of persons rsekttng In that state] 



1993 















Physician 


















and other 


















profes- 
















Hospital 


sional 


Prescrip- 


Nursing 


1990 


1965 


1995 


1997 


Total' 


care 


services 


tion drugs 


home care 


612,246 


876,212 


920,9/0 


965.701 


1,016,383 


380,050 


299.102 


90,648 


87326 


9.163 


13.654 


14.537 


15,519 


16.056 


6,618 


4.609 


1.552 


1.064 


1.347 


1.921 


2.042 


2.133 


2.299 


OAA 


568 


133 


42 


6,562 


12,352 


13,146 


13.834 


14.782 


4.977 


5.135 


1,397 


839 


4,925 


7,149 


7,539 


8.033 


8.463 


3,324 


2.225 


903 


776 


74.369 


99,215 


102,378 


105.790 


110.057 


34.948 


44.239 


7,537 


5,626 


7,740 


11,395 


12,004 


12.776 


13.669 


4.850 


4,314 


970 


904 


10.013 


13,662 


13,952 


14.600 


15.221 


4.686 


4,292 


1,354 


2.264 


1,728 


2,619 


2,698 


2.915 


3.106 


1.166 


792 


300 


290 


3,564 


4,184 


4,223 


4,205 


4.258 


2,585 


781 


180 


245 


35.789 


51,328 


54,404 


56.754 


59.724 


19.742 


18.985 


6,204 


4.680 


15.303 


23.096 


24.489 


25.940 


27.219 


10,396 


8.510 


2.460 


1.545 


2.745 


4.168 


4.427 


4.452 


4.658 


1.775 


1.594 


311 


204 


1,697 


2.758 


2.994 


3.194 


3.397 


1.236 


935 


334 


264 


27.618 


39.000 


40.738 


42.267 


44.305 


17.996 


11.975 


3.964 


3.924 


12.692 


18.388 


18.727 


20.207 


21.259 


8,515 


5.613 


2.056 


2.337 


6.067 


8.513 


9.073 


9.498 


10.198 


4.084 


2.457 


945 


1.186 


5.540 


7.989 


8.417 


8.890 


9,394 


3.580 


2.538 


854 


920 


7.820 


11.790 


12.651 


13.592 


14.414 


5.731 


3.785 


1.564 


1.283 


9.975 


14.673 


15.272 


15.946 


16.500 


7,139 


4.249 


1.507 


1.248 


2.695 


3.908 


4.242 


4.554 


4.925 


1.846 


1.219 


456 


476 


11.755 


16.838 


17,624 


18.596 


19,646 


7,313 


5.978 


1.678 


1.695 


19.027 


25.997 


27.033 


28,471 


30.039 


11.306 


8.322 


2.172 


3.568 


22.133 


31.089 


32.888 


34.435 


35.647 


14,641 


9.186 


3.885 


2.459 


11.462 


16,826 


17.776 


18.858 


20,313 


6.540 


7.183 


1.491 


1.964 


4.729 


7.447 


7.997 


8,431 


8.882 


3,848 


2.212 


962 


687 


12.690 


18.024 


18.900 


19.783 


20.911 


8,828 


5,310 


1.814 


2.002 


1,628 


2.445 


2.496 


2.680 


2,838 


1,224 


695 


234 


222 


3.531 


5.091 


5.500 


5.721 


6.095 


2,597 


1.367 


626 


697 


2.806 


4.471 


4.795 


5,170 


5.606 


1.865 


1.918 


478 


164 


2,558 


3.779 


4.033 


4,333 


4,658 


1.559 


1.405 


391 


425 


20.169 


29.504 


30.865 


31.580 


32.695 


11.191 


9.506 


3.545 


3.233 


2.917 


4.430 


4.839 


5.075 


5.344 


2.317 


1.415 


402 


257 


53.926 


75.183 


78.503 


81.100 


85.785 


32.636 


20.103 


7.122 


10.586 


13.746 


21.966 


23.773 


25.584 


27.327 


10.987 


7.106 


2.566 


2.347 


1.639 


2.373 


2.461 


2.542 


2.680 


1.282 


612 


192 


287 


26.896 


37.246 


39.470 


40.552 


42,581 


16.763 


11.024 


3.698 


4.978 


6,357 


9.454 


10.095 


10.419 


10.988 


4.218 


2.978 


1.056 


954 


6.247 


9.182 


9.637 


10.259 


10.840 


3.545 


3.285 


918 


838 


32,635 


45.050 


46.398 


46.853 


51.322 


20.213 


13.434 


5.035 


5.883 


2.728 


3.783 


3.900 


4.149 


4.515 


1.702 


1.095 


400 


468 


6.806 


10.616 


11.199 


12.363 


13.204 


5.597 


3,254 


1.315 


907 


1.513 


2.301 


2.479 


2.635 


2.842 


1.257 


747 


201 


286 


12,213 


18.820 


20.026 


21.154 


22.021 


8.276 


6.719 


2,129 


2.001 


37.682 


56.504 


80.410 


64.245 


67.750 


25.322 


20.071 


6.023 


4.346 


3,233 


4.807 


5.229 


5.622 


5,944 


2.290 


1.648 


564 


300 


1.172 


1.762 


1.821 


1.933 


2.066 


712 


563 


183 


177 


13,252 


18.712 


19.899 


21.103 


22.261 


8.689 


6.265 


2.130 


1.546 


11,276 


16.810 


17.461 


18,214 


19,292 


6.362 


5.908 


1.603 


1,492 


3.930 


6.024 


6,314 


6.692 


7,037 


2.955 


1,793 


776 


515 


11.441 


16.739 


17.738 


18.738 


19,945 


7.252 


5.844 


1.745 


2,110 


793 


1.179 


1.260 


1.313 


1.407 


582 


343 


133 


113 



US. 

AL. .. 
AK. . . 
AZ. .. 
AR.. 
CA... 
CO .. 
CT. .. 
DE. .. 
X .. 
FL... 
GA .. 

HI 

10. .. 

IL 

IN 

lA 

KS. ... 

KY 

LA 

ME .. . 
MO ... 
MA . . 

Ml 

MN ... 
MS ... 
MO. .. 

m ... 

ME... 

NV 

NH .. . 
NJ... , 
NM . . . 

MY 

NC .. 
NO .. 
OH . . 
OK .. 
OR .. 
PA. . . 
W. . 

sc. .. 
so... 

TN. .. 
TX. .. 
UT. . . 
VT. . . 
VA. . . 
WA . . 
WV.. 
Wl.. . 
WY.. 



' Indudas other expenditures not shown separately. 

Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, "Health Accounts": <http-7/cms.hhs.gov/statisticsAihe/default.a8p>. 



Health and Nutrition 9S 



UACMmBivMu. SMtolicalAbatraci of the United states. 2002 



No. 122. Consumer Price Indexes of Medicai Care Prices: 1980 to 2001 

[1 962-1 984si 00. Indexes are annual aver 
sumers: for explanation, see text. Section 



[1 962-1 984si 00. Indexes are annual averages of monthly data t>ased on components of consumer price IrKJex for al urban oon- 

14, Prices! 





- 




Medical care services 




Medical care 
commodities 


Annual percent Change ' 


Year 




Professional sen/ices 






Prescrip- 
tion 












— 








Hospital 




drugs 






Moclirni 












Medical 










and 




and 


Medical 


Medical 


care 




care. 






Physi- 




related 




medical 


care, 


care 


cofn- 




total 


TotaM 


TotaM 


cians 


Dental 


services 


Total 2 


supplies 


total 


servKOS 


„ ntf II ■ 

iiKKHiiee 


1980 


74.9 


74.8 


77.9 


76.5 


78.9 


69.2 


75.4 


72.5 


11.0 


11.3 


9.3 


1985 


113.5 


113.2 


113.5 


113.3 


114.2 


116.1 


115.2 


120.1 


6.3 


6.1 


7.2 


1990 


162.8 


162.7 


156.1 


160.8 


155.8 


178.0 


163.4 


181.7 


9.0 


9.3 


8.4 


1994 


211.0 


213.4 


192.5 


199.8 


197.1 


245.6 


200.7 


230.6 


4.6 


5.2 


2.9 


1995 


220.5 


224.2 


201.0 


208.8 


206.8 


257.8 


204.5 


235.0 


4.5 


5.1 


1.9 


1996 


228^ 


232.4 


206.3 


216.4 


216.5 


269.5 


210.4 


242.9 


3.5 


3.7 


2.9 


1997 


234.6 


239.1 


215.4 


222.9 


226.6 


278.4 


215.3 


249.3 


2.8 


2.9 


2J3 


1998 


242.1 


246.8 


222.2 


229.5 


236.2 


287.5 


221.8 


258.6 


3.2 


3.2 


3.0 


1999 .... 


250.6 


255.1 


229.2 


236.0 


247.2 


299.5 


230.7 


273.4 


3.5 


3.4 


4.0 


2000 


260.8 


266.0 


237.7 


244.7 


256.5 


317.3 


238.1 


285.4 


4.1 


4.3 


3.2 


2001 


272.8 


278.8 


246.5 


253.6 


269.0 


338.3 


247.6 


300.9 


4.6 


4.6 


4X> 



^ Includes other services not shown separately. ^ Includes olt>er commodities not shown separately, 
from \he imnr)ediate prior year. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. CPI Detailed Report, January 2002. 



' Percent change 



No. 123. Average Annual Expenditures per Consumer Unit for Heaitli Care: 
1985 to 2000 

[In dollars, except percent See text. Section 13. Income. Expenditures, and Wealth, and headnote. Table 650. For composition 
of regions, see map. inside front cover] 



Item 



Health care, total 



Percent distribution 



Amount 



Percent 
of total 
expendi- 
tures 



Health 
insur- 
ance 



Medical 
services 



Drugs and 

medicaJ 

supplies ^ 



Health 
Insur- 
ance 



Medical 
services 



Drugs and 
medteal 

ir>r>linn • 



1985 

1990 

1995 

1997 

1998 

1999 

2000 

Age of reference person: 

Under 25 years old . . . 

25 to 34 years old ... . 

35 to 44 years old. . . . 

45 to 54 years old. . . . 

55 to 64 years old ... . 

65 to 74 years okJ. . . . 

75 years old and over . 

Race of reference person: 

White and other 

Blacit 



Origin of reference person: 

Hispanic 

Non-Hispanic 



Region of residence: 

Northeast 

Midwest 

South 

West 



Size of consumer unit: 

One person 

Two or more persons 

Two persons 

Three persons 

Four persons 

Five persons or more 

Income t)efore taxes: 
Comp>iete income reporters ^. . 
Ouintiles of income: 

Lowest 20 percent 

Second 20 percent 

Third 20 percent 

Fourth 20 percent 

Hiohest 20 percent 

Incomptete reporters of income 



1,108 
1.480 
1,732 
1.841 
1.903 
1.959 
2,066 

504 
1.256 
1.774 
2.200 
2.508 
3.163 
3,338 

2.198 
1.107 

1.243 
2.144 

1.862 
2.172 
2.147 
2.001 

1.488 
2,307 
2.596 
2,080 
2.143 
2.018 

2.120 

1.470 
1,968 
1.964 
2,312 
2.864 
1.919 



4.7 
5.2 
5.4 
5.3 
5.4 
5.3 
5.4 

2.2 
3.2 
3.9 
4.8 
6.4 
10.3 
15.2 

5.6 
3.9 

3.8 
5.6 

4.8 
5.5 
6.2 
4.8 

6.5 
5.2 
6.7 
4.6 
4.1 
4.1 

5.3 

8.2 
7.5 
5.7 
4.9 
3.8 
6.0 



375 
581 
860 
881 
913 
923 



211 

640 

850 

976 

1,132 

1.608 

1,631 

1,030 
639 

600 
1,019 

908 
1.047 
1.063 

853 

657 

1.119 
1.241 
1.031 
1.062 
970 

985 

690 
945 
943 
1,090 
1.254 
977 



496 
562 
512 
531 
542 
558 
568 

178 
367 
555 
699 
721 
686 
658 

620 
191 

364 
587 

504 
575 
533 
669 

418 
631 
663 
575 
651 
588 

583 

339 
424 
524 
659 
968 
524 



238 
337 
360 
428 
448 
479 
515 

115 
250 
369 
525 
655 
870 
1.049 

548 
276 

280 
538 

450 
550 
552 
479 

413 
557 
692 
474 
429 
460 

552 

441 
619 
497 
563 
642 
419 



33.8 
39.3 
49.7 
47.9 
48.0 
47.1 
47.6 

41.9 
51.0 
47.9 
44.4 
45.1 
50.8 
48.9 

46.9 
57.7 

48.3 

47.5 

48.8 
48.2 
49.5 
42.6 

44.2 
48.5 
47.8 
49.6 
49.6 
48.1 

46.5 

46.9 
47.5 
48.0 
47.1 
43.8 
50.9 



44.8 
38.0 
29.6 
28.8 
28.5 
28.5 
27.5 

35.3 
29.2 
31.3 
31.8 
28.7 
21.7 
19.7 

28.2 
17.3 

29.3 
27.4 

27.1 
26.5 
24.8 
33.4 

28.1 
27.4 
25.5 
27.6 
30.4 
29.1 

27.5 

23.1 
21.3 
26.7 
28.5 
33.8 
27.3 



21.5 
22.8 
20.8 
23.2 
23.5 
24^ 
24^ 

22.6 
19.9 
20.8 
23.9 
26.1 
27.5 
31.4 

24.9 
24.9 

22^ 

25.1 

24.2 

25.3 
25.7 
23.9 

27.8 
24.1 
26.7 
22.6 
20.0 
22.8 

26.0 

30.0 
31.1 
25.3 
24.4 
22.4 
21.8 



^ Includes prescnption and nonprescription drugs. ^ A complete reporter is a consumer unit providing values for at least one 
of \Ue rr^jor sources of income. 

Source. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Consumer Expenditure Survey, annual. 



96 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the UnNed Slatae: 2002 



Mo. 124. Midicarc Enroilccs: I9S0 to 2000 

H>—on» paa n p n iHi atMOJUtat- *« «t July 1- IncKida* Piiwlo Rleo wtH oudyWn an 
lAM mt unknown plan o( mitlBnc*! 



IWn 


IMO 


IMS 


IMO 


1«S« 


19B7 


IN* 


1M9 


ZOM 




1&5 

28,1 


S1.1 

30,e 

i 


34^ 

33,7 

i 


JT.5 

37.1 

33.7 

i 


3M 

3B,1 


3M 

3a.4 

i 


n.1 

52 
38,7 

37.0 













5.4 
















37,4 











Source; U,S. CanMri lor UMcara and Mwicalil ServlCM. ONic« of Iha Achiaiy. 'Metticars Enrotmenl Tr 



No. I2S. Modlcarc DIsburxEments by Type of Beneficiary: 1980 to 2000 

m {XfiU nprHwiti t3S,DZ5,0M,D0l)). For yMrm andlnB SapL 30, Diiuftiiitton ot twn«ms by type » 



MUnWM and siiitacl 


ocMngej 


















TVp* o( tMrwftcltvy 


ino 


two 


IMS 


IMS 


tM7 


1M8 


1«M 


MM 




3sja5 

Z,654 
497 

1,647 


H»,7M 

7>18 

II 


IKI,(W« 

11 

1.300 
54:330 


194.183 
1 4:529 
t,£29 
57:b07 


110.342 

'11 

1,614 


213.412 

134:321 
118,487 

::i 

75:7M 
65.118 

' 33 


I1I.8M 

113:321 
t:o5o 

1,978 

80.518 
7B,lSt 

i:486 

36 


aiBJTS 


g^..............,..,... 


110,142 




''^r 






■dkal muruice 


S:in 






10750 



















Booi'mlnj 1998 Iwrna lieWm •osney ifanstera , 
■nd indudwl in Total hoafrlal irtturanca diBbumemanli 
ogt Httm UMBM oMy. BensAti Ux hum kIici Iwve ESRD ChjI mouM M < 
dudad in «g*d and (taabled berwIitB, ^ IndudeacofltBof exparlmantsanddi 
u* tnud and aDuu control program. 

Soun:*: U.S. Cantam For Medlcars and Medicatd Sarvtcas. urpubllsned de 



•^c^ 



No. 126. Modicarc Benefits by Type of Provider. 1980 to 2000 

pt mMDM el doUn (23.778 raprannw tI3,7T8MO.OO0). Far yavs andbig SapL 30. DMAuIkin o( 



SdMnunMo Facility 



88,721 1I3.394 123.K« 138.00 

318 1554 i:»69 z:oe 

41.498 83.490 87.lflS 71.11 



1,437 1,338 1,41B 
8,253 b:353 9:8B3 



iMi «iaaa aamoaa li I 



laJoutpatlanlMpi 
•M rihabHJIellon 



lab laa actiodula partormed In b phyatolan'tofflca lab or an Indapandani 

HBtadWucoata.arnbulanca.anOaupplaa, ^Indudaa Iha noapKal l«Mly 

outpabant daparlmant, Tha phyildan rahnbwaamant awudafad 

W- ine, ' Lab tea urvtcu paid under ma lab lea schedule 

.. ESRD lrea->Unding diBtyan facflty paymenta and paymanla to njril 
•. psychlaWc nospltala. and ladarally quaMled heaMi cantan. 



Source; U.S. Camera for Madtcara and Medicaid Services, unpubHsbed de 



Health and Nutrition 97 



No. 127. Medicare Ttust Funds: 1980 to 2001 

[m blllkMW of dollars (23.9 roprvMnts $2330030030(1)] 



Type of trust fund 



1990 1990 196S 1995 



1997 



1995 1969 2000 



HOSPITAL INSURANCE (HI) 

Net contritMJtion income ^ 

Interest received ^. 

Benefit payments ^ 

Assets, end of year 



SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL 
INSURANCE (SMI) 



Net premium income 

Transfers from gcuperal revenue. 

Interest received ^. 

Benefit payments ^ 

Assets, end of year 



23.9 

1.1 

25.1 

13.7 


72? 

6.5 

66.2 

96.9 


103.3 

10.6 

116.4 

130.3 


115.9 

10.2 

128.6 

124.9 


119.5 

9.6 

137.8 

115.6 


130.7 

9.3 

134.0 

120.4 


140.3 

10.1 

128.8 

141.4 


154.5 

11.7 

128.5 

177.5 


1603 

14.0 

141.2 

208.7 


3.0 
7.5 
0.4 
10.6 
4.5 


11.3 
33.0 
1.6 
42.5 
15.5 


19.7 
38.0 
1.6 
65.0 
13.1 


18.8 
65.0 
1.6 
68.6 
28.3 


19.3 
60.2 
2.5 
723 
36.1 


*20.9 

*64.1 

2.7 

76.1 

46.2 


*19.0 

*50.1 

2.8 

80.7 

44.8 


20.6 
66.9 
3.5 
883 
44.0 


223 

723 

3.1 

99.7 

413 



mefrts beginning in 19^. Includes 
d from the trust fund. 'Beginning 
by PL 105-33. are Induded in HTI 



premiums from aged ineligi)les enrolsd in HL 
1998 monies transferred to the SMI trust fund for 



^ Includes income from taxation of benefits 
^ Includes recoveries of amounts reimbursed 

home health agency costs, as provided for by PL. 105-33, are induded in HT benefit payments but exduded from SMI benefll 
payments. ^Premiums withheld from cfteck and associated gsneral revenue contributions ttmt were to occur on Jan. 3, 1990. 
actually occurred on December 31 , 1998. These arrKXjnts are merefore excluded from 1999 data. 

Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Sen/ioes, Annual Report of tho Board of Tnjstaos of tha Federal Hoaptal 
Insurance Tmst Fund an6 Annual Report of the Board of Truatees of the Federal Suppfenmntary Medical Insurartoe Thtaif^/nd 

No. 1 28. Medicare— Summary by State and Other Areas: 1 995 and 2000 



[For fiscal year ending In year shown (37336 represents 37336300)] 






State and area 


Enrollment ^ 
(1,000) 


Payments* 
(mil. dol.) 


State and area 


Enrollment ^ 
(1,000) 


Payments* 
(rnH. dol.) 




1995 2000 


1965 2000 


1996 2000 


1995 2000 


All areas . 
U.S 


37335 39.140 
38.758 38386 

642 677 

34 40 

602 658 

423 436 

3,633 3.837 

421 458 

502 512 

101 110 

78 76 

2.628 2.771 
833 898 

149 162 

150 161 
1.617 1.629 

823 845 
474 476 
383 389 
586 615 
581 597 
201 213 
602 635 
933 954 
1.347 1.389 
631 648 
397 414 


176384 214368 
175.976 2133S5 

3.042 3.885 

133 189 

2.717 2.938 

1.638 2.063 

20.406 23.621 

1.835 2.338 

2.564 3.291 

445 430 

1,164 784 

14.828 19.221 

4.090 4.111 

580 622 

463 639 

7.276 7,309 

3,491 4.720 

1.527 1.453 

1.545 1.915 

2.401 3.153 

3.446 4.383 

707 793 

2.868 3.998 

5.496 5,468 

6.237 6.269 

2.378 3.109 

1,723 2.248 


MO 

MT 


833 854 
130 135 
249 252 
194 229 
156 167 

1.168 1.195 
211 229 

2.630 2.694 

1.027 1.111 
103 103 

1.666 1.692 
488 504 
469 484 

2.071 2.088 
168 170 
509 555 
117 119 
771 815 

2.080 2.223 
187 201 
83 88 
818 876 
688 725 
330 338 
762 777 
60 64 
477 525 
300 330 


3.821 4374 
480 575 




NE 


840 1325 


AL 


NV 


894 1.069 


AK 


NH 


597 629 


AZ 


NJ 


5.603 6.767 


AR 


NM 


710 854 


CA 


NY 


13.904 18.653 


CO 


NC 


4.276 5.942 


CT 


ND 


412 501 


DE 


OH 


7.262 9.310 


DC 


OK 


2.178 2.137 


FL 


OR 


1.685 1.853 


GA 


PA 


10.706 13357 


HI 


Rl 


772 1375 


ID 


SC 


1.926 2.947 


IL 

IN 


SD 

TN 


563 564 

4.083 4.907 


lA 


TX 


11.504 14.538 


KS 


UT 


708 918 


KY 


VT 


284 315 


LA 


VA 


2.979 4.03B 


ME 

MD 

MA 

Ml 


WA 

WV 

Wl 

WY 

PR 

Other areas . 


2.603 2343 

1308 1.666 

2.673 3.498 

180 247 


MN 

MS 


875 1324 
33 89 



^ Hospital and/or medical insurartce enrollment for 1995 as of July and for 2000 as of September. * Distribution of 
payments by state is t>ased on a methodology which considered actual payments to health maintenance organizations and 
estimated payments for other providers of medicare sen/ices. 

Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare arxl Medicaid Services. "Medicare Beneficiaries Enrolled as of July 1 of each year. Ytere 
1995-1998": published 29 July 1999; <http7/www.hcfajov/stats/histenrl.htm> and "Medicare Estimated Benefit Payments By 
State for Fiscal Year 2000"; <http7/www.hcfa.gov/stat8mENEPAY/bnpay00i.htm>. 



98 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bursau. 



Abstract of the UNM 



No. 1 29. Medicaid— McctMl Characteristics of Persons Covered: 2000 



pn Itw i— w h , wctfH p&remtt (2>,360 w p w n U 2a,36CMW0l. Rtpreiems number of peraons m of Maith of following y»ar who 
mn onroied at any tinte in year stwwn. Excludes unrelalad inoMduals under age 15. Person dkJ not have to receive meacaU care 
paid for by nr w dica w in order to be counted. See headnote. Table 514] 



Poverty status 



Total ^ Whtte Black 



Under 18 18-44 
Hispanic ^ years okJ years old 



45-64 
years old 



65 years 

old and 

over 



BelOMr poverty level 

Above poverty level 

Percent of population covered. 

BelOMr poverty level 

Above poverty level 



2t.360 

12,349 

16,011 

10.3 

39.8 

6.5 



19.290 

7.536 

11.754 

8.5 

35.5 

5.7 



7,164 

4.020 

3.144 

20.0 

51.1 

11.3 



2.871 

3,355 

18.5 

40.1 

12.6 



14.486 

6.750 

7.736 

20.1 

58.4 

12.8 



7,( 

3.207 

3.891 

6.5 

28.0 

4.0 



3.484 

1.495 
1.989 

5.6 
31.9 

3.5 



3.293 

897 

2.395 

10.0 

26.7 

8.1 



^ Indudee other races not shown separately. ^ Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Table 24. Health Insurance Coverage Status and Type of Coverage by Selected Characteristics 
for All People in Poverty Universe: 2000"; published 10 December 2001; <http://ferretbls.censu8.gov/macro/032001^pov/ 
new24001.hlm>. 

No. 130. Medicaid— Selected Utilization Measures: 1980 to 1998 

(In thoueands (2.2S6 r epre e e n t a 2.255,000). For year ending September 30. Includes Virgin Islands. See text, this section] 



Measure 



1990 



1990 



1994 



1995 



1995 



1997 



1996 



General hoaptala: 
Recipients dtocharged 
Total daye of care . . . 



Nuraina fadWee: ^ 

Total recipients 

Total days of care 

Irtermediale care fadlWes: ^ 

Total recip i e n ts 

Total daye of care 



2.255 
24.069 


2.390 
29.562 


3.261 
27.471 


3.890 
28.941 


3,743 
25.711 


3.300 
23.072 


3,135 
21.532 


2,793 
19.091 


1.395 
273.497 


1,375 
277,996 


1.461 
360.044 


1,639 
400.785 


1.667 
400,123 


1,594 
409.663 


1.497 
388.965 


1,555 
384,549 


121 
250.124 


147 
47.324 


146 
49.730 


159 
54.105 


151 
56.878 


140 
56.625 


146 
62,423 


124 
50,636 



^ Includes skMed nursing facilities and intermediato care facilities tor all other than the mentally retarded. ^ Mentally 



Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Sen^ices, Office of Information Systems. Stat^tical Report on Medical Cam: 
EUgbles, f^dpienls, Payments, and Servfoes. 

No. 131. Medicaid— Recipients and Payments: 1990 to 1998 

[Rir year endtoig September 30 (25.255 t e pr ea e n ta 25.255.000). Includes Puerto Rico and outlying areas. Medical yfendor 
payments are tttoee made directly to suppliers of medical care] 



Baato of eligibility and 
type of aervioe 





Recipients (1.000) 






Payments (mil. dol.) 




1990 


1995 


1996 


1997 


1996 


1990 


1995 


1996 


1907 


1096 


25.255 


36.282 


36.118 


34372 


40,649 


64.BS9 


120.141 


121.685 


124.430 


142.318 


3.202 

83 

3.635 

17.230 

1.105 


4,119 

92 

5,767 

24.767 

1,537 


4,285 

95 

6,126 

23.866 

1.746 


3.955 

22.594 
2.195 


3.964 

(NA) 

6.636 

26.872 

3.176 


21.506 

434 

23.969 

17.690 

1.257 


36.527 

848 

48,570 

31.487 

2.706 


36.947 

869 

51.196 

29.819 

2.853 


37.721 

(NAj 

54.130 

29.851 

2.727 


40.602 

(NA) 

60.375 

37,639 

3.702 


4.593 
92 


5.561 
84 


5.362 
93 


4.746 
87 


4,273 
135 


16,674 
1.714 


26,331 
2.511 


25.176 
2.040 


23.143 
2.009 


21.499 
2.801 


147 

1.461 

17.078 

4,552 

3,873 


151 

1,667 

23.^89 

6.383 

5.528 


140 

1.594 

22.861 

6.208 

5.343 


136 

1.603 

21.170 

5.935 

5.142 


126 

1.646 

18.555 

4.965 

4,342 


7.354 

17.693 

4,018 

593 

372 


10.383 

29.052 

7.360 

1.019 

986 


9.555 
29.630 
7.236 
1.028 
1,094 


9.798 

30.504 

7.041 

1.036 

979 


9.482 
31.892 

6,070 
901 
587 


12.370 
2.804 

719 

17.294 

1.752 

(NA) 


16.712 
5.322 

13,064 
1,639 

23.723 

2,501 

(NA) 


15,905 
5,070 

12,607 
1.727 

22.585 

2.368 

(NA) 


13.632 
4.713 

11.074 
1.861 

20.954 

2.091 

(NA) 


12.158 
5,285 
9.381 
1.225 

19,338 
2.011 

20.203 


3.324 

1,688 

721 

3.404 

4.420 

265 

(NA) 


6.627 
4.280 
1.180 
9.406 
9.791 
514 
(NA) 


6.504 

4.222 

1.208 

10.868 

10,697 

474 

(NA) 


6.169 

4.252 

1,033 

12,237 

11,972 

418 

(NA) 


5.759 

3.921 

939 

2.702 

13.522 

449 

19.296 



Total 



Aga65and0¥er . . 

OtoabM K . . . . . . 

AFDC'program . . 
Ottiar arid unknown 



Inpatient services irv— 

(Senecal hoepltal 

Mental hoapltal 

Iraanned h tfe care fadlties. 
menially retarded ...... 

Nursing fadHty services*. . 

PtiysiCMUiS 

Dental 

Other praclittoner 

Outpatient hoepital 



Latxxatory ^ . . . 
HomeheaRh'. . 
Prescribed drugs 
Family plarviing 
Prepaid health c 



care 



NA Not available. ^ Recipient data do not add due to small number of recipients that are reported in more than one category. 
Includes /ecipienta of. and payments for. other care not shown separately. ^ Permanently ancT totally. Beginning 1997, Includes 
bind. ^ Aid to famflies with dependent children includes children, adults, ar>d foster care. * Nursino facility services includes 
skSed nursing fadSty services and intennectote care facility services for all other than the mentally retarded. ^ Includes 
r ad tologica l services. * Data for 1996 not comparable with earlier years. 

Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Sen/ices, Office of Information Systems, Statistical Report on Medical Care: 
BgMse, Redpients, Payments, and Servtoss. 



Health and Nutrition 99 



(U& 



Bumu, 8lMal(calAbalrMloftheUnlled8ialee:20Q2 



No. 1 32. Medicaid— Summary by State and Other Area: 1995 and 1999 

[For yMr •nding S«|rtMnlMr 90 (36,282 r tpw — n t i 36,282,000). Data for 1 999 includes managed care 
payments] 



State 
and area 



Redptents ^ 
(1.000) 



1995 



1996 



Payments * 
(mil. dol.) 



1995 



1 



State 
and area 



Recipients ^ 
(1.000) 



Paymann' 
(mil. doL) 



1 



All 
U.S. 



AL. 
AK. 
AZ. 
AR. 
CA. 
CO. 
CT. 
DE. 

cx:. 

FL . 
GA. 
HI . 
ID . 
IL. . 
IN . 
lA . 
KS. 
KY. 
LA. 
ME. 
MD. 
MA. 
Ml . 
MN. 
MS. 



36,282 
36,210 

539 

68 

494 

353 

5.017 

294 

380 

79 

138 

1.735 

1.147 

52 

115 

1.552 
559 
304 
256 
641 
785 
153 
414 
728 

1.168 
473 
520 



40 



(NAj 
,844 



650 

99 

644 

483 

6.217 

352 

410 

113 

145 

2.116 

1.237 

(NA) 

94 

1.696 

668 

313 

260 

677 

775 

201 

628 

1,043 

1,335 

587 

545 



120,141 


152.629 


119.865 


1.455 


1.695 


252 


398 


218 


1.878 


1,376 


1.365 


10.521 


15.440 


1.063 


1.641 


2.125 


2.671 


324 


462 


532 


759 


4.802 


6.440 


3.076 


3.232 


258 
360 


"^ 


5.600 


6.339 


1.878 


2.750 


1.036 


1.364 


831 


1,096 


1.945 


2.598 


2,708 


2.534 


760 


1.206 


2.019 


3.044 


3.972 


4,953 


3,409 


4.707 


2.550 


3.038 


1.266 


1.600 



MO . 

MT. . 

NE. . 

NV. . 

NH. . 

HJ. . 

NM. . 

NY. . 

NC. . 

ND. . 

OH. . 

OK. . 

OR. . 

PA. . 

Ri . . 

SC. . 

SD. . 

TN. . 

TX. . 

UT. . 

VT. . 

VA. . 

WA . 

WV . 

Wl . . 

WY . 
PR 
VI. 



695 

99 

168 

105 

97 

790 

287 

3,035 

1.084 

61 

1.533 

394 

452 

1.230 

135 

496 

74 

1.466 

2.562 

160 

100 

681 

639 

389 

460 

51 

1.055 

17 



877 

96 

223 

153 

105 

841 

370 

3,327 

1.182 

62 

1,390 

525 

534 

1.773 

155 

725 

92 

1,533 

2.676 

198 

139 

691 

895 

377 

563 

52 

Pi 



2.039 

326 

606 

350 

473 

3.813 

714 

22.086 

3.175 

297 

5.585 

1.066 

1.327 

4.833 

673 

1.438 

306 

2,772 

6.565 

464 

320 

1.833 

1,461 

1.169 

1.894 

171 

244 

12 



4 
1 



6 
1 
1 
6 



3 
6 



2 
2 
1 

2 



NA Not available. ^ Persons wtio had payntents made on their behalf at any time during the fiscal year. ' Payrnan 
for fiscal year and reflect federal and state contribution payments. Data exclude dispropc^ionate hospital share payn 
Disproportionate share hospitals receive higher medicaid reirribursement than other hoepitais because they treat a d tep tqp c 
ate share of medicaid patients. 

Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Sendees, Office of Information Systems, 1995 data. Statistical Raa 
Medical Care: Eligibtos, Rec^Msnts, Payments, and Services; 1999 data. Medicaid Statistical Information System, unpubl 
data. 

No. 1 33. Medicaid Managed Care Enroilment by State and Otiier Area: 
1995 to 2000 

[For year ending June 30 (33.373 repreaents 33,373.000)] 



State and 
area 



Mar>agedcare 
enroilment 



Total 
medi- 
caid Number Percent 
(1,000) (1,000) of total 



State and 
area 



Managed care 
enrollment 



Total 
medi- 
caid Number Percent 
(1,000) (1,000) of total 



State and 
area 



Managed a 
enroimen 



Total 

medi-- 

caid Number Pw 

(1,000) (1,000) of 



1995 . . 
1999 . . 

2000, 

total 



33.373 
31.940 



9.800 
17.757 



29.4 
55.6 



33,690 18,786 55^ 



U.S. 

AL. . . 
AK .. . 
AZ. . . 
AR. . . 
CA. . . 
CO. . . 
CT. . . 
DE. . . 
DC. . . 
FL. . . 
GA. . . 
HI . . . 
ID . . . 



32.720 

543 

81 

479 

389 

5.037 

282 

321 

95 

119 

1.701 

842 

164 

108 



17.958 

325 

442 

222 

2.525 

254 

230 

76 

79 

1.017 

606 

122 

32 



54.9 

59.9 

92.4 
57.1 
50.1 
90.2 
71.7 
79.4 
66.2 
59.8 
95.7 
73.9 
29.9 



IL. . 
IN . 
lA . 
KS. 
KY. 
LA. 
ME. 
MD. 
MA. 
Ml . 
MN. 
MS. 
MO 
MT. 
NE. 
NV. 
NH. 
NJ. 
NM. 
NY. 



1.392 
563 
202 
192 
575 
772 
162 
479 
911 

1,064 

466 

559 

754 

69 

183 

96 

79 

628 

312 

2.751 



138 
376 
182 
108 
464 

49 

57 
386 
583 
1.064 
291 
218 
304 

42 
140 

38 

4 

372 

199 

691 



9.9 
66.8 
90.3 
56.3 
80.7 

6.3 
35.4 
80.5 
64.0 
100.0 
62.5 
39.1 
40.4 
61.1 
76.7 
39.5 

5.6 
59.2 
63.8 
25.1 



NC. . 

ND. . 

OH.. 

OK. . 

OR. . 

PA. . 

RI . . 

SC. . 

SD. . 

TN. . 

TX. . 

UT. . 

VT. . 

VA. . 

WA . 

WV . 

Wl . . 

WY . 
PR 
VI. 



876 
43 

1.121 
404 
376 

1.343 

151 

538 

73 

1.323 

1.789 
133 
119 
479 
800 
262 
479 
37 
951 
19 



599 

24 

239 

279 

312 

975 

104 

32 

68 

1.323 

606 

119 

56 

281 

800 

91 

210 

828 



- Represents zero. 

Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Sendees. "Medicaid Statistics and Data") <http7/www.hcfa.govAned 
mcaidsad.htm\>; (accessed 25 April 2002). 



1 00 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the UnNed 



No. 1 34. State Children's Health Insurance Program-Enrollment by State: 
1999 to 2001 

(In ItMMMWids (1*969 riprtMnts 1,969,000). For VMr widlng SaptwnlMr 90. Represents the number of children ever enrolled 
during the year. This program provides health t>enerits coverage to children living in families wtiose incomes exceed the eligit)jlity 
irnjls for medicaid. Atthough it is generally taroeted to families with inconf>es at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level, 
each state may set its own income eligibility linr>its, within certain guidelines. States have three options: tt)ey may expand their 
medicaid programs, develop a separate child health program ttiat functions independently of medicaid, or do a combination of both] 



State 


1999 


2000 2001 


State 


1999 


2000 


2001 


State 


1999 


2000 


2001 


U.S. .. . 


1.969 


3,334 4,601 


KS 


14 


26 


34 


ND 


(Z) 


3 


3 








KY 


19 


56 


67 


OH 


84 


111 


158 


AL 


39 


38 68 


UK 


22 


50 


70 


OK 


40 


58 


39 


AK 


8 


13 22 


ME 


14 


23 


27 


OR 


27 


37 


41 


AZ 


27 


61 87 


MD 


18 


93 


110 


PA 


82 


120 


141 


AR 


1 


2 3 


MA 


68 


113 


105 


Rl 


7 


12 


17 


CA 


222 


478 693 


Ml 


27 


37 


76 


SC 


46 


60 


66 


CO 


24 


35 46 


MN 


t^Q 


(Z) 


% 


SD 


3 


6 


9 


CT 


10 


19 19 


MS 


13 


20 


TN 


10 


15 


9 


DE 


2 


4 6 


MO 


50 


74 


107 


TX 


51 


131 


501 


DC 


3 


2 3 


MT 


1 


8 


14 


UT 


13 


25 


35 


FL 


155 


227 299 


NE 


10 


11 


14 


VT 


2 


4 


3 


QA 


48 


121 183 


NV 


8 


16 


28 


VA 


17 


38 


73 


HI 


- 


2 7 


NH 


5 


4 


6 


WA 


• 


3 


8 


ID 


8 


12 13 


NJ 


76 


89 


100 


WV 


8 


22 


33 


IL 


43 


63 84 


MM 


5 


6 


10 


Wl 


13 


47 


57 


IN 


31 


44 57 


NY 


521 


769 


873 


WY 


- 


3 


5 


lA 


10 


20 23 


NO 


57 


104 


99 










- Repress 


entszero. 


Z Less than 500 


. 

















Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Sen/ices. 77)e State Children's Health Insurance Program, Annual Enrollment 



Report. 



No. 135. Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs): 1980 to 2001 

(As of January 1, axcept 1980 as of June 30 (9.1 rspreeents 9,100,000). An HMO is a prepaid health plan delivering 
comprehensive care to memtMrs through designated providers, having a fixed periodic payment for health care services, and 
reqi^ring merrrtMrs to be in a plan for a specified period of time (usually 1 year). A group HMO delivers health services through a 
physician group tturt is controlled by Vhe HMO unit or contracts with one or more independent group practices to provide health 
sennoes. An individual practice association (IPA) HMO contracts directly with physicians in independent practice, and/or contracts 
wflh one or more associations of physicians in independent practice, and/or contracts with one or more muttispecialty group 
practices. Data are based on a census of HMOs] 



Model type 


Number of plans 






Enrollment 


' (mil.) 






1980 


1990 


1995 


1999 


2000 


2001 


1980 


1990 


1995 


1999 


2000 


2001 


Total 

IPA 

Group 

Mfawd 


23S 

97 

138 
(NA) 


572 

360 

212 

(NA) 


550 

323 
107 
120 


643 

309 
126 
208 


568 

278 
102 
188 


541 
257 
104 
180 


9.1 

1.7 

7.4 

(NA) 


33.0 

13.7 
19.3 
(NA) 


46.2 

17.4 
12.9 
15.9 


81.3 

32.8 
15.9 
32.6 


60.9 

33.4 
15.2 
32.3 


79.5 

33.1 
15.6 
30.8 



NA Not available, 
enrolment. 



1960-95 excludes enrollees participating in open-ended plans; beginnir>g 1999 includes open-ended 



No. 1 36. Persons Enrolled In Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) by 
SUte: 2000 and 2001 



[7M34 



79,534,000. 
of Jarmary 1] 



Data are based on a census of health maintenarice organizations. Pure and open-ended 



State 



Number 
2001 

(1.000) 



Percent of 
population 



2000 2001 



State 



Number 
2001 

(1.000) 



Percent of 
population 



2000 2001 



State 



Numt>er 
2001 

(1.000) 



Percent of 
population 



2000 2001 



U^ 



AL. 
AK. 
AZ. 
AR. 
CA. 
CO. 
CT. 
DE. 
DC. 
FL. 
GA. 
HI . 
ID . 
IL. . 
IN . 
lA . 



79,534 

288 

1.661 

261 

18.074 

1.566 

1.353 

178 

177 

4.757 

1.304 

386 

55 

2.387 

712 

191 



29.7 

7.2 

30.9 
10.4 
53.5 
39.5 
44.6 
22.0 
35.2 
31.4 
17.4 
30.0 

7.9 
21.0 
12.4 

7.4 



27.9 

6.5 

32.4 
10.5 
53.4 
36.4 
39.7 
22.8 
31.0 
29.6 
15.9 
31.8 

4.3 
19.2 
11.7 

6.5 



KS. 
KY. 

LA. 
ME. 
MD. 
MA. 
Ml . 
MN. 
MS. 
MO 
MT. 
NE. 
NV. 
NH. 
NJ. 
NM. 
NY. 
1^. 



432 

1.226 

696 

356 

2.032 

2.814 

2.653 

1.385 

25 

1.733 

70 

170 

408 

485 

2.664 

507 

6,637 

1.311 



17.9 
31.5 
17.0 
22.3 
43.9 
53.0 
27.1 
29.9 

1.1 
35.2 

7.0 
11.2 
23.5 
33.7 
30.9 
37.7 
35.8 
17.8 



16.1 
30.4 
15.6 
27.9 
38.4 
44.3 
26.7 
26.2 
0.9 
31.0 
7.7 
9.9 
20.4 
39.3 
31.7 
27.9 
35.0 
16.3 



ND. 
OH. 
OK. 
OR. 
PA. 
Rl . 
SC. 
SD. 
TN. 
TX. 
UT. 
VT. 
VA. 
WA 
WV 
Wl . 
WY 



8 

2.652 

480 

1.214 

4.100 

367 

383 

73 

1.880 

3.656 

793 

26 

1.144 

901 

197 

1.588 

9 



2.5 
25.1 
14.7 
41.1 
33.9 
38.1 

9.9 

6.7 
33.0 
18.5 
35.3 

4.6 
18.5 
15.2 
10.3 
30.2 

1.4 



1.3 
23.4 
13.9 
35.5 
33.4 
35.0 

9.5 

9.7 
33.0 
17.5 
35.5 

4.2 
16.2 
15.3 
10.9 
29.6 

1.7 



• Represents zero. ^ Includes Guam and Puerto Rico not shown separately. 

Source of Tables 135 and 136: InterStudy Publications, St. Paul, MN, The InterStudy Competitive Edge, annual (copyright). 



Health and Nutrition VQV 



HAOmmmBunmi, SMMical Abstract of the United States; 2002 



No. 1 37. Health Insurance Coverage Status by Selected Characteristics: 
1 990 to 2000 

[Parsons as of following ysar for covsrags In tha yaar shown ^48.9 r spra santi 2464M)0,000). Govammant haaNh insurmcs 
mdudes madicare, medicaJd, and miMary plans. Basad on Cunant Population Survay, saa taxt. Sadion 1, Populaflon. and Appsn- 
dix III] 



Charactehstic 



Numbar (mil.) 



Covarad by piivata or govammant 
haalth insuranoa 



Total 
per- 
sons Total 



Private 



1 



Total 



QrouD 
health^ 



Qovamment 



Medi- 
care 



Medi- 
caid^ 



cov- 
ered by 
health 
insur- 
ance 



Peroent 



Covered by private or 

government health 

insurance 



Total' Private 



MadI; 



Not 
oovarad 

haaSi 



total 



4ftk 



1990. . . 
1995*. . 
1999*. . 
1999** 

2000, 
Age: 

Under 18 years . . 
Under 6 years . 
6 to 11 years . . 
12 to 17 years . 

18 to 24 years. . . 

25 to 34 years. . . 

35 to 44 years. . . 

45 to 54 years . . . 

55 to 64 years. . . 

65 years and over 
Sex: Male 

Female 



Race: White 

Blacit 

Asian and Pacific 
Islander 

Hispanic origin ^ 

Household income: 

Less than $25.000 . 

$25.000-$49,999 . . 

$50.000-$74.999 . . , 

$75,000 or HDore . . 
Persons below poverty . 



248.9 
264.3 
274.1 
274.1 
276^ 

72.6 

23.7 

24.8 

24.1 

27.0 

37.4 

44.8 

38.0 

23.8 

33.0 

135.2 

141.3 

226.4 

35.9 

11.3 
33.9 

61.1 
75.4 
59.3 
80.8 
31.1 



214.2 
223.7 
231.5 
234.8 
237.9 

64.1 
21.0 
22.0 
21.1 
19.6 
29.5 
37.8 
33.5 
20.5 
32.7 

115.1 

122.8 

197.2 

29.3 

9.3 
23.0 

47.2 
62.6 
52.8 
75.3 
21.9 



162.1 
185.9 
194.6 
197.5 
200.2 

51.2 
15.9 
17.5 
17.8 
17.5 
27.0 
35.2 
31.1 
18.0 
20.3 
98.4 
101.8 
169.8 
21.2 

7.9 
16.3 

25.2 
52.9 
49.4 
72.8 
8.6 



150.2 
161.5 
172.0 
174.1 
177J 

48.1 
15.3 
16.6 
16.2 
14.4 
25.5 
33.3 
29.0 
15.9 
11.2 
88.3 
89.0 
149.3 
19.6 

7.1 
15.1 

16.9 
45.9 
45.9 
68.6 
5.8 



32.3 
34.7 
36.1 
36.1 
37.0 

0.5 

0.2 

0.1 

0.2 

0.2 

0.4 

0.8 

1.3 

2.1 

31.7 

16.2 

20.8 

32.0 

3.8 

0.9 
2.2 

17.6 

11.1 

4.2 

4.2 

4.6 



24.3 
31.9 
27.9 
28.2 
28.6 

14.7 

5.7 

5.1 

3.9 

2.3 

2.4 

2.4 

1.9 

1.6 

3.3 

12.7 

15.9 

19.4 

7.3 

1.3 
6.3 

16.9 
7.4 
2.5 
1.7 

12.3 



34.7 
40.6 
42.6 
39.3 
38.7 

8.4 

2.6 

2.8 

2.9 

7.4 

7.9 

6.9 

4.6 

3.2 

0.2 

20.1 

18.5 

29.2 

6.6 

2.0 
10.8 

13.9 

12.8 

6.5 

5.5 

9.2 



86.1 
84.6 
84.5 
85.7 
88.0 

88.4 
88.9 
86.5 
87.8 
72.7 
78.8 
84.5 
88.0 
86.3 
99.3 
85.1 
86.9 
87.1 
81.5 

62.0 
68.0 

77.3 
83.0 
89.0 
93.1 
70.4 



73,2 
70.3 
71.0 
72.1 
72.4 

70.6 
67.1 
70.5 
74.0 
64.8 
72.1 
78.6 
81.6 
75.8 
61.5 
72.8 
72.1 
75.0 
58.9 

69.9 
47.9 

41.2 
70.2 
83.3 
90.1 
27.8 



9.7 
12.1 
10.2 
10.3 
10.4 

20.3 

24.2 

20.6 

16.2 

8.7 

6.3 

5.4 

4.9 

6.8 

10.0 

9.4 

11.3 

6.6 

20.3 

11.3 
18.6 

27.7 
9.8 
4.3 
2.2 

39.8 



13.9 
15.4 
15.5 
14.3 
144) 

11.6 
11.1 
11.5 
12.2 
27.3 
21.2 
15.5 
12.0 
13.7 

a7 

14.9 
13.1 
1^9 
18.5 

1&0 
32.0 

22.7 
UJO 
11.0 
8.9 
29.8 



^ Includes other government insurar>ce. not shown separately. Persons with coverage counted only once in total, even though 
tt)ey may have been covered by more that one type of policy. ^ Related to employment of selt or other famMy membafs. 
^ Beginning 1 997 persons with no coverage other than access to Indian Health Sen/ice are no longer oonsidefed covarad by haaNh 
insurance; instead they are considered to be uninsured. The effect of this change on the overall estimates of health inaufanoa 
coverage is negligible; however, the decrease in the numt>er of pMole covered ty medicaid may be partially due to this dtanga. 



Data based on 1990 census adjusted population controls. ^ Estimates reflect results of follow-up verification quaationa. 
" Includes ott>er races not shown separately. ' d-'—^— *<.» Lj;-^-«i^ ^««j« -»-.. k^ ^« «.».. »-,^ 



Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. 



No. 1 38. Persons With and Without Health Insurance Coverage by State: 2000 

237.857 rapreaenta 237.85: 

'opulation, and Appendix III] 



[237.857 rapreaenta 237.857.000. Based on the Cun^nt Population Sunray and subject to sampling error, see text. Section 1 . 

Pc 



State 



Total 

persons 

covered 

(1.000) 



Total persons 
not covered 



Number 
(1.000) 



Percent 
of total 



Children 
not covered 



Number 
(1.000) 



Percent 
of total 



State 



Total 

persons 

covered 

(1.000) 



Total persons 
not covered 



Number Percent 
(1.000) of total 



ChHdren 
notoovarad 



Numbar Paioanl 
(1.000) of total 



U.S. 



AL. 

AK. 

AZ. 

AR. 

CA. 

CO. 

CT 

DE. 

DC. 

FL. 

GA. 

HI . 

ID . 

IL. . 

IN . 

lA . 

KS. 

KY. 

LA. 

ME 

MD. 

MA. 

Ml . 

MN. 

MS. 



237.857 38.683 



3.851 

522 

4.124 

2,261 

28.454 

3,665 

3.056 

705 

434 

12.537 
6.638 
1.039 
1.061 

10.627 
5.117 
2.615 
2.306 
3.462 
3.423 
1,121 
4.618 
5.661 
8.964 
4.354 
2,425 



600 
125 
793 
364 

6.281 

563 

263 

82 

73 

2.620 

1.135 
117 
196 

1.659 
701 
248 
301 
513 
810 
145 
501 
595 
982 
430 
364 



14.0 

13.5 

19.3 

16.1 

13.9 

18.1 

13.3 

7.9 

10.4 

14.4 

17.3 

14.6 

10.1 

15.6 

13.5 

12.1 

8.7 

11.5 

12.9 

19.1 

11.5 

9.8 

9.5 

9.9 

9.0 

13.1 



8.405 11.8 



38 

173 

82 

1.507 

154 

22 

15 

10 

570 

154 

23 

51 

371 

201 

46 

75 

73 

162 

22 

92 

124 

179 

117 

71 



8.5 
17.7 
12.8 
11.6 
15.4 
13.7 

2.6 

7.2 

9.9 
16.5 

8.1 

8.3 
14.7 
10.8 
13.9 

6.2 
11 

7 
15 

7 

7 



7.8 
6.7 
9.3 
9.2 



MO 
MT. 
NE. 
NV. 
NH. 
NJ. 
NM. 
NY. 
NC. 
ND. 
OH. 
OK. 
OR. 
PA. 
Rl . 
SC. 
SD. 
TN. 
TX. 
UT. 

VT. 
VA. 
WA 
WV 
Wl . 
WY 



4,930 
714 
1.494 
1,680 
1.155 
7.257 
1,366 

15.608 

6,541 

538 

10.284 
2,651 
2.935 

11,063 

881 

3.321 

615 

5.003 

16,167 
1,913 

564 
6.091 
5.075 
1,524 
5,032 

418 



586 
162 
164 
311 
85 

1,049 
427 

2.802 

980 

69 

1.255 
636 
465 
905 
55 
448 
82 
577 

4,425 
296 

67 
886 
780 
254 
386 

70 



10.6 
18.5 

9.9 
15.6 

6.8 
12.6 
23.6 
15.2 
13.0 
11.3 
10.9 
19.3 
13.7 

7.6 

5.9 
11.9 
11.8 
10.3 
21.5 
13.4 

10.7 
12.7 
13.3 
14.3 
7.1 
14.4 



124 

39 

40 

90 

23 

203 

105 

486 

187 

16 

309 

134 

111 

145 

5 

68 

20 

63 

1.273 

75 

15 
206 
126 
37 
56 
18 



8.5 

18.7 

8.6 

14.9 

7.0 

9.3 

20.2 

10.5 

10.1 

11.9 

9.5 

18.8 

12.9 

4.9 

2.5 

8.6 

11.6 

4.7 

21.5 

10.1 

8.5 
11.7 
8.1 
9.8 
3.7 
12.5 



Source of Tables 137 and 138: U.S. Census Bureau: Current Population Reports, P60-215; and unput)(ished data. 



1 02 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. StatiaHcal Abatraot of tha UnHad 



No. 139. PwcMit of Worfcors PaiticiiMting In Health Cara BoiMfIt Programs 
and Porcont of Participants Required to Contribute: 1999 



[Band on NaHonal C o w p w n tfon Survay. a aampla aufvay 
107 mMton wortcaia; aaa Appandix III. 8aa lOao Tabia 820] 



of 3,168 private Induaby aatablahmants of al aizaa, repc Da an tt ng over 





Pofoant of wortcara 
pctfaCipaDnQ— 


Single coverage medlcai care 


Family coverage medteal care 




Madi- 

cal Dantal Viaion 
caia care care 


Employee Employee Average 


Employee Employee Average 

contribu- oontnbu- monthly 

tiona not tiona oontribu- 

required required tion ^ 

(percent) (percent) (dol.) 




contnou- oontnou- monthly 

tiona not tiona contribu- 

required required tion ^ 

(percent) (percent) (dol.) 


Tnftil.,... 

Prolaaaionai, tadmical, 
and raialad amployaaa . 

Clahcai and aalaa 
empioyaaa 


83 32 18 

68 49 30 
51 30 14 

48 27 15 

64 39 22 

14 10 6 

73 52 39 
51 30 15 

54 35 21 
51 27 13 
54 32 17 
54 39 25 


33 87 48^ 

31 69 45.34 

29 71 47.70 

37 63 50.67 

52 48 48.65 

30 70 48.27 

34 66 47.81 
22 78 57.49 

27 73 54.18 
30 70 51.85 

32 68 42.33 
44 56 42.50 


19 81 188^ 

16 84 163.31 
15 85 174.18 


Blua<dilar and aarvioa 

empioyaaa 


24 76 171.12 


Fun lime ' 


46 54 129.08 


Parttima^ 


14 86 173 77 


Urrion ' 


19 81 168.68 


Nonunion^ 


15 85 19265 


Raglan:^ 
nvTinwT 1 


20 80 178.99 


Soutti 


12 88 187.46 


MMwaat 


23 77 144.99 


Weat 


26 74 156.11 







^ The avemga ie pr a aan to d for al covered vrartters and excludes wortcers without the plan provision. Averages are for plans 
sMina a flat monthly ooaL ' Ennployaes are daasifled as woridng either a full-time or part-time schedule based on the definition 
used by each aatabliahmanL ^ Union vraricers are those whose wages are determined through collective bargaining. * See 
map. i n s i d e front cover. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. News, USDL 01-473, December 19, 2001. 



No. 140. Medical Care Benefits of Worliers by Amount and IVpe of Employee 
Contribution: 1999 



Pn 



(38/)80 



38,000,000). See headnote. Table 139] 



Type and a mount of 
uuntytoi t lon 



Individual coverage 



Profes- 
sional, 
techni- 
cal. 
All am- and 
ployees related 



Blue- 
Clerical collar 
and and 
sales senHce 



Type and amount of 
contribution 



Family coverage 



All em- 
ployees 



Profes- 
sional. 

tecfmi- Blue- 

cal, Clerical coHar 

and and and 

related sales sen/ice 



Number with contrlbulory 
(1.000) 



38,060 10,495 11.333 16.233 



Total wRfi oontitxi* 
lory oo¥erBoe. . . 



Rat monMy amount. 
Laaa than $6.00 . , 



$5J0f)49J90 
$10.00414.99 . . 
$15.00419.99 . . 
$20.00429.99 . . 
$30.00-$30.99 . . 
$40.00448.99 . . 
$60.00460.99 . . 
$60.00489.99 . . 
$70.00479.99 . . 
$60.00438.99 . . 
$80.00489.99 . . 
$100.004124.99. 
$125.00 or more. 
Dolar amount 



ComDoaMB 
Otiar 



Paroant of aamirtgs 
Ensla, txjt unlcnown 



100 

66 

1 

2 

4 

4 

10 

10 

10 

7 

8 

4 

2 

2 

2 

3 

<^ 

10 

'^ 

1 
13 



100 

66 

(Z) 

1 

4 

4 

13 

10 

12 

6 

7 

2 

1 

1 

2 

2 



2 

9 

(Z) 

11 



100 

67 

1 

1 

5 

3 

10 

11 

11 

9 

7 

3 

3 

2 

1 

2 

'^ 

12 

1 
13 



100 

65 
1 
2 

4 

6 

9 

10 

a 

7 
5 
4 
1 
2 
2 
4 

(Z) 

4 
9 

'^ 

1 
14 



Numt)ef with contritxitory 
coverage (1 ,000) 

Total with contribu- 
tory coverage . 

Rat monthly amount 
Less ttian $40.00 
$40.00-$49.99 
$50.00-$59.99 
$60.00-$69.99 
$70.00-$79.99 
$60.00-$89.99 
$90.00-$99.99 
$100.00-$1 24.99 
$125.00-$149.99 
$150.00-$1 74.99 
$175.00-$1 99.99 
$200.00-$224.99 
$225.00-$249.99 
$250.00-$299.99 
$300 or more . . 

CompcMite rate ^ . . 

Viaries ^ 

Other 

Rexible benefits ^ . 
Percent of earnings 
Exists, but unknown 



45.994 12.882 13.489 19.623 



100 

69 
4 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
8 
8 
6 
5 
4 
4 
5 

10 

3 

10 

(Z) 

7 

1 
10 



100 

68 
3 
2 
2 

2 
6 

4 
3 
7 
10 
6 
6 
4 
3 
4 
8 

4 

9 
(Z) 
10 
(Z) 

9 



100 

69 

4 
3 
2 
3 
2 
2 
4 
8 
6 
5 
5 
4 
4 
5 
10 

2 

13 

(Z) 

5 

1 

10 



100 

69 
5 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
9 
7 
6 
4 
3 
4 
6 

11 



3 
9 

'^ 

1 
11 



Z Laaa than 0.5 percent. A composite rate is a set contribution covering more than one benefit area; 
for example, fieallh care and Ufa insurance. Coat data for Individual plans cannot be determined. ' Based on wori<er attritHJtes. 
For exarnple. amployaa contrfbuHona may vary baaed on earnings, length of senrice. or age. ^ Amount varies by options selected 
under a "caMena plan" or employer-sponaored reimtMrsement account. 

Source: U.& Bunmi of LUbor Statiatica, N9¥¥b, USDL 01-473. December 19. 2001. 



Health and Nutrit\ot\ \^^ 



UL& 



AbiMnt of ttw UnNad SMse. 2002 



No. 141. Health Care Firms— Establishments, Receipts, Payroll, and 
Employees by Kind of Business (NAICS Basis): 1997 



Kind of business 



TAXABLE FIRMS 

Ambulatory health care services 

Offices of physicians 

Offices of dentists 



Offices of other health practitioners ^. 

Offices of chiropractors 

Offices of optometrists 

Offices of PT/OT/speech therapy & 
audiology^ 



Outpatient care centers 

Medical & diagnostic laboratories . . . . 

Home health care services 

Other ambulatory health care services. 

Hospitals ^ 

General medical & surgical hospitals. . 



Nursing & residential care facilities ^ 

Nursing care facilities 

Community care facilities for the elderty. 

TAX-EXEMPT FIRMS 

Ambulatory health care services ^ 

Outpatient care centers 

Home health care services 



Hospitals 

General medical & surgical hospitals. . . 
Psychiatric & substance abuse hospitals 
Other specialty hospitals 



Nursing & residential care facilities ' 

Nursing care facilities 

Residential mental retardation/ 

health facilities 

Community care facilities for the elderly. 



NAICS 
code ^ 



AH firms 



Establish- 
ments 
(number) 



Receipts 
(mil. dol.) 



621 

6211 

6212 

6213 

62131 

62132 

62134 

6214 
6215 
6216 
6219 

622 
6221 

623 

6231 

6233 



621 

6214 

6216 

622 
6221 
6222 
6223 

623 

6231 

6232 
6233 



1.047,100 
348^83 
144.292 

304.658 
49.094 
28.077 

47.665 

15.863 

22.174 

78.641 

133.189 

(NA) 
(NA) 

67.331 

q 



(NA) 
(NA 
(NA 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

Pi 



Employer firms 



Establish- Annual 

ments Receipts payroll 

(number) (mil. dol.) (mil. dd.) 



334.762 

182.542 

50.027 

35.399 
7.431 
6.906 

9.718 

17.817 

16.960 

22,756 

9.259 

(NA) 
(NA) 

56.847 
(NA) 
(NA) 



NA) NA) 

(NA) (NA) 

(fslA) (NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

q 



440,200 
195,449 
114,178 

88.886 
30.487 
17.875 

14,277 

11.828 
9.076 

16,315 
4.468 

1,345 
792 

32,833 
12.517 
11.637 



15,181 
9.940 
3.375 

5.340 

4.695 

412 

233 

24.526 
3.088 

12.940 
3.951 



310.012 

171.629 

48.482 

28.282 
6.570 
6.362 

8.684 

17.306 

16,317 

21.474 

6.521 

40.146 
34.213 

55.844 

44.485 

7.088 



45.428 
31.561 
10.104 

339,032 

319.920 

10.689 

8.423 

37.235 
15.249 

7,973 
9.304 



137.979 
84.977 
18.227 

10.457 
1.686 
1.773 

4.377 

5.502 

5.402 

10.941 

2,475 

13.886 
11,570 

24,626 

20,193 

2.533 



17.884 

11.158 

5.426 

141,910 

131,054 

6.983 

3.874 

17.527 
7.396 

4.126 
3,742 



PaW 
employ^ 



(1.000) 



3.744.3 

1.571.1 

641.7 

406.6 
91.7 
79.5 

141.5 

173.6 
151.3 
681.5 
118.2 

511.6 
421.3 

1.484.8 

1.160.5 

196.1 



669.3 
346.5 
267.5 

4.421.5 

4,105.3 

201.0 

115.1 

985.9 
396.6 

246.1 
226.0 



NA Not available. North American Industry Classification System, see text. Section 15, Business Enterprise. ^For pay 
period including March 12. ^ Includes other kinos of business not shown separately. * Offices of physical, occupational and 
speech therapists, and audiologists. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. 1997 Economic Census. Health Care and Social Assistance. Series EC97562A-US. issued 
October 1999 and Nonemployer Statistics. 



No. 142. Annual Receipts/Revenue for Health Care Industries: 1998 to 2000 

[In millions of dollars (399,518 repraaents $399,518,000,000). Based on the North American Industry Classification System 
(NAICS). see text, Section 15. Business Enterprise. All firms in NAICS 6211, 6212. 6213. and 6215 are defined as taxable. 
Estimates for the nonemployer portion are derived from administrative records data provided by other federal agerx:ie8. Thaae data 
are available only at the total revenue level. Estimates for tax-exempt firms are derived only from a sample of emphayer firms] 



Kind of business 




Ambulatory health care services 

Offices of physicians 

Offices of dentists 

Offices of other health practitioners ^ 

Offices of chiropractors 

Offices of optometrists 

Offices of PT/OT/speech therapy & audiology ^. 

Outpatient care centers 

Medical & diagnostic laboratories 

Home health care services 

Other ambulatory health care services 

Hospitals 

General medical & surgical hospitals 

Psychiatric & substance abuse hospitals 

Other specialty hospitals 

Nursing and residential care facilities 

Nursing care facilities 

Residential mental retardation/heatth facilities ^ . . 

Residential mental retardation facilities 

Community care facilities for the elderty 



621 
6211 
6212 
6213 
62131 
62132 
62134 
6214 
6215 
16216 
16219 
622 
6221 
6222 
6223 
623 
6231 
6232 
62321 
6233 



Total, all firms ' 



1998 

399.518 

192.639 

53.156 

37.778 

7.907 

7.454 

10.173 

52.447 

19.236 

31.942 

12.321 

397.373 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

100.138 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



1999 



2000 



416.580 

201.386 

56.389 

39.224 

8.324 

7.932 

9.788 

55.943 

20.385 

30.649 

12.605 

413.035 

(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

102,336 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



443.040 

215.221 

60.774 

41.580 

8,661 

6.612 

9.807 

58,929 

23.196 

29.977 

13.363 

430,329 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

108.607 

(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

(NA) 



Employer firms. 2000 



Total 



Taxable 
firms 



414.722 

202.913 

58,812 

32.512 

7.576 

7.941 

8.531 

58.271 

22.215 

26.431 

11.568 

430.329 

402.578 

14.944 

12,807 

107.174 

65.774 

14.353 

9.301 

21.257 



364,834 

202.913 

58.812 

32.512 

7.576 

7.941 

8.531 

23.611 

22.215 

18.581 

6.191 

44.847 

37.256 

4,406 

3.185 

63.186 

48.182 

4.203 

2.834 

10.107 



Tax- 
exempt 

fiflllS 



49.888 



NA Not available. X Not applicabie. Ir>dudes taxable nonemployer firms, not shown separately. ^ irtdudes other Idnda 
of business not shown separately. -^ Offices of pfwsical. occupational and speech therapists, and audiologtsts. 
Source. U.S. Census Bureau. Sen/ice Annual Sun/ey. 2000. 



\ Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the Unilad Stttaa: 200t 



No. 143. Receipts for Selected Health Service Industries by Source of 
Revenue: 1 999 and 2000 



[lninetomofdol«w090.04Qi»prwititi$190X)4>.000,000).Basedon»eKk)^ 

aoB text. Section 15. BusinBss Enterprise. Based on a sample of employer firms only and does not include nonemployer revenue] 



Source of revenue 



Offices of 

physicians 

(NAICS6211) 



1999 



2000 



Offices of dentists 
(NA)CS6212) 



1999 



2000 



Hospitals 
(NAICS 622) 



1999 



2000 



Nursing and 

residential 

care facilities 

(NAICS 623) 



1999 



2000 



Total 

Medk:are 

MedKaid 

Other government ^ 

Worker's compertsation . . . . 

Private irwurance 

Patient (out-of-pocket) 

Other patient care sources, n. 
Nonpatient care revenue . . . 



e.c 



190.049 

44.934 

12.856 

1.842 

6.880 

90.466 

21.258 

6.928 

4.886 



202.913 

48,370 

13,896 

2,025 

7.419 

97.193 

22.865 

7.299 

3.846 



54.592 

1.209 

(S) 

(S) 

28.395 

23.638 

472 

(S) 




413.035 

134.311 

50.050 

21.648 

4.614 

143,402 
22.383 
13.237 
23.389 



430.329 

138.843 

52.305 

22.687 

4,720 

155.206 
22.928 
10.622 
23.019 



101.049 

11.670 

41.645 

5.988 

6.193 

^25,290 

3,095 

7.140 



107.174 

12.699 
43.834 

7,157 
(S) 

^27.01 9 
3.300 
6.910 



S Figure does not meet publication standards. Veterans, Natk>nal Institute of Health. Indian Affairs, etc. ^ Represents 
paynnent from patients and their families plus patients' assigned social security t)enefit8. ^ N.e.c. represents not elsewhere 
classified. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Service Annual $un/ey: 2000. 

No. 144. Employment in the Health Service Industries: 1980 to 2001 

[In tlMMisanda (5.278 repreeents 5.278.000). See headnote Table 603] 



Industry 



1987 SIC 
code ^ 



1980 



1990 



1995 



1999 



2000 



2001 



Offices and cfink» of MDs 

Offices and clinics of dentists 

Offices and cfinics of other practitkx)ers 
Nursing ar>d personal care facilities . . . 

Skiled nursing care facilities 

IrrtermedMte care fadfities 

Other, n.e.c. ' 



Hospitale 

Ger>eral medicai and surgical hospitals 

Psychiatric hospitals 

Specialty hospitals, exc. psychiatric. . . 



Medk:al and dental laboratories 
Home health care servtoes . . . 



00 

801 

802 

804 

805 

8051 

8052 

8059 

806 
8062 
8063 
8069 

807 
808 



5.278 

802 

(NA) 

96 

997 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

2,750 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

PI 



7.814 

1.338 
513 
277 

1.415 
989 
200 
227 

3,549 

3.268 

104 

176 

166 
291 



9.230 

1.609 
592 
397 
1.691 
1.253 
211 
227 

3.772 

3.474 

91 

208 

190 
629 



9,977 

1.875 
667 
441 
1.786 
1.364 
203 
219 

3.974 

3.674 

75 

224 

203 
636 



10.095 

1.924 
686 
439 
1,796 
1.366 
206 
224 

3.990 

3,689 

74 

228 

209 
643 



10A44 

1,979 
703 
451 
1,823 
1.386 
210 
227 

4.095 

3.776 

76 

242 

216 
650 



NA Not available. ^ Based on the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification code: see text, Sectton 15. Business Enterprise. 
^ Includes other industries not shown separately. ^ N.e.c. means not elsewhere classified. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistks. Emptoyment and Eamhgs, monthly. March and June issues. 

No. 145. Registered Nurses by Employment Status: 1996 and 2000 

[As d March (2.569 represents 2.559.000). Based on a sample and sut)iect to sampling variability: see source for details] 



Age, race, and 
Htopanic-origin status 



Tntnl - 


Employed i 


n nursing 


Not employed 


loiai 






m nuisiny 
(1.0001 


(1.000) 


Number (1,000) 


Percent distribution 


2.559 


2,116 


100.0 


443 


2.697 


2J202 


100.0 


495 


66 


65 


2.9 


2 


177 


166 


7.5 


11 


248 


225 


10.2 


24 


360 


316 


14.4 


44 


464 


409 


18.6 


55 


465 


406 


18.5 


58 


342 


288 


13.1 


55 


238 


180 


8.2 


58 


156 


87 


4.0 


69 


154 


41 


1.9 


113 


25 


19 


0.8 


6 


2,334 


1,891 


85.9 


443 


133 


113 


5.1 


20 


93 


83 


3.8 


11 


6 


6 


0.3 


1 


13 


11 


0.5 


2 


55 


48 


2.2 


7 


33 


27 


1.2 


6 


29 


23 


1.1 


6 



1996 



Less than 25 yecvs 
25 10 29 years . . . 
3010 34 years . . . 
35 to 39 years . . . 
40to44 years . . . 
45to49 years . . . 
50to54 years . . . 
S6to59 years . . . 
60to64 years . . . 
65 yeaiB and over. 
UfKnown age. . . . 



While non-Hispanic 

Btock non-Hispenic 

Asian non-Hispanic 

Naive Hawaiian/Pacific Islander 
American^ IndteVAIaska Native . 



Tmio or more races norvHispanic 
Unhnown raoa/elhnic 



^Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. 

Source: U.S. DepL of Health and Human Services. Health Resources and Sen/ices Administration. 77ie Registered Nurse 
Population. March 2000, Septernber 2001. 



Health and Nutritvotx \^S 



u& 



. SMMical Abstrad of the United Stales: 2002 



No. 1 46. Physicians by Selected Activity: 1 980 to 2000 



[In thousands (467.7 rtprMwits 467,700). As of Doc. 31, oxcopt 1990 •• of Jan. 1, and as noted. Includes Puerto Ho 
outlying areas] 



Activity 



1990 



1990 



1995 



1997 



Doctors of medicine, total. . . 

Professionally active 

Place of medical education: 
U.S. medical graduates ..... 
Foreign medical graduates . . 

Sex: Male 

Female 

Active nonfederal 

Patient care 

Office-t>ased practice 

General and family practice . 
Cardiovascular diseases . . . 

Dermatology 

Gastroenterology 

Internal medicirw 

Pediatrics 

Pulmonary diseases 

General surgery 

Obstetrics and gynecology . . 

Ophthalmology 

Orthopedic surgery 

Otolaryngology 

Plastic surgery 

Uroloaicat surgery 

Anesthesiology 

Diagnostic radioi09y 

Emergency medicine 

Neurology 

Pathok)^, anatomical/clinical 

Psychiatry 

Other specialty 

Hospital-t>ased practice . • • • • 

Residents and interns ^ . . . . 

Full-time hospital staff . .... 

Other professional activity ^ . . . . 

Not classified 

Federal 

Patient care -••••■ 

Other professional activity ^ . . . . 
Inactive/unknown address 



Doctors of otteofMrthy * 



467.7 


615.4 


720.3 


756.7 


777.9 


7V7J 


435.5 


560.0 


646.0 


684.6 


707.0 


720.9 


343.6 


437.2 


492.2 


519.7 


533.4 


542.2 


91.8 


122.8 


153.8 


164.9 


173.7 


178.7 


386.7 


463.9 


505.9 


527.0 


538.9 


544.1 


48.7 


96.1 


140.1 


157.7 


168.1 


176.7 


417.7 


539.5 


624.9 


665.2 


688.0 


702.8 


361.9 


487.8 


564.1 


603.7 


606.4 


610.7 


271.3 


359.9 


427.3 


458.2 


468.8 


473.2 


47.8 


57.6 


59.9 


62.0 


64.6 


66.2 


6.7 


10.7 


13.7 


15.0 


15.1 


15.6 


4.4 


6.0 


7.0 


7.4 


7.6 


7.8 


2.7 


5.2 


7.3 


7.9 


7.9 


8.2 


40.5 


57.8 


72.6 


81.4 


83.3 


84.6 


17.4 


26.5 


33.9 


36.8 


38.4 


40.5 


2.0 


3.7 


5.0 


5.0 


4.9 


5.7 


22.4 


24.5 


24.1 


27.9 


27.5 


26.6 


19.5 


25.5 


29.1 


30.1 


31.2 


31.1 


10.6 


13.1 


14.6 


15.1 


15.6 


15.2 


10.7 


14.2 


17.1 


18.5 


18.5 


17.0 


5.3 


6.4 


7.1 


7.4 


7.5 


7.3 


2.4 


3.8 


4.6 


5.3 


5.3 


5.1 


6.2 


7.4 


8.0 


8.4 


8.4 


8.2 


11.3 


17.8 


23.8 


25.6 


26.2 


26.6 


4.2 


9.8 


12.8 


14.1 


14.2 


14.3 


'^i 


8.4 


11.7 


12.5 


13.3 


13.9 


5.6 


7.6 


8.2 


8.5 


8.1 


6.0 


7.3 


9.0 


10.2 


10.0 


10.1 


15.9 


20.0 


23.3 


24.5 


25.0 


24.4 


31.9 


28.8 


35.0 


35.0 


35.9 


36.4 


90.6 


127.9 


136.8 


145.3 


137.6 


137.2 


59.6 


89.9 


93.7 


95.8 


92.3 


92.5 


31.0 


38.0 


43.1 


49.5 


45.3 


44.8 


35.2 


39.0 


40.3 


41.5 


41.6 


41.2 


20.6 


12.7 


20.6 


20.0 


40.0 


50.9 


17.8 


20.5 


21.1 


19.4 


19.0 


18.1 


14.6 


16.1 


18.1 


16.9 


15.3 


14.7 


3.2 


4.4 


3.0 


2.4 


3.7 


3.4 


32.1 


55.4 


74.3 


72.1 


70.8 


76.8 



18.8 



30.9 



35.7 



38.9 



40.8 



43.5 



^ Foreign medjcal graduates received their medical education in schools outside the United Stalst 
Ileal fellows. ^ Indudes medical teaching, administration, research, and other. * As of Jufy. Total 



NA Not available. 
Canada. ^ Includes clinical 
Data from American Osteopathic Association. Chicago. IL 

Source: Except as noted, American Medical AsMciation. Chicago. IL. Physician Characteristics and Distribution in fw 
annual (copyright). 



No. 147. Active Nonfederai Piiysicians, 2000, and Nurses, 1999 by State 

[As of December. Excludes doctors of osteopattry, federally-employed persons, and physicians with addresses unknown. Inc 
all physicians not classified according to activity status] 



State 



Pttysicians 



Total Rate 



Nurses 



Total Rate ^ 



State 



Physicians 



Total Rate ^ 



F4ui 



Total Ri 



United States. 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connectrcut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Ftonda 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . . . 

Mrchigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 



706,463 

8.929 

1.124 

10.060 

5.027 

84.361 

10.096 

11.974 

1.847 

3.857 

37.635 

16.950 

3.215 

2,004 

32.669 

12.076 

5.105 

5,565 

8.482 

11.173 

3,077 

19.798 

26.500 

22,747 

12.668 

4.685 



251 

201 
179 
195 
188 
248 
234 
351 
235 
675 
234 
206 
265 
154 
263 
198 
174 
207 
210 
250 
241 
373 
417 
229 
257 
164 



2,201310 

34.070 

4.910 

32,220 

18.750 

184.330 

31.700 

32.070 

7.340 

9.580 

125.440 

55.880 

8.520 

8.230 

101.660 

46.240 

31.020 

23.780 

33.660 

37.380 

13.070 

45.320 

75.800 

79.350 

47.100 

21.340 



789 

769 
786 
641 
707 
550 
750 
947 
947 

1.680 
796 
695 
704 
645 
823 
765 

1.063 
888 
838 
838 

1.032 
862 

1.200 
802 

QAA 
900 

754 



Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska .... 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 
New Jersey. . . 
New Mexkx) . . 

New York 

North Carolina . 
North Dakota . . 

OhK) 

Oklahoma. ... 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania. . 
Rhode Island. . 
South Carolina. 
South Dakota . 
Tennessee . . . 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington. . . 
West Virginia . . 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming .... 



12 
1 
3 
3 
2 

25 
3 

72 

18 
1 

27 
5 
7 

35 
3 
8 
1 

13 

42 
4 
1 

17 

14 
3 

12 



.849 
.814 
,815 
.480 
,945 
.121 
,830 
.181 
.634 
.412 
.125 
,653 
.796 
.631 
448 
.581 
.440 
.798 
.027 
.453 

.415 
.158 
.929 
.461 
847 



229 

201 
223 
172 
238 
298 
210 
380 
231 
220 
239 
164 
227 
290 
326 
213 
191 
242 
201 
199 
327 
245 
240 
217 
232 
171 



53.730 
7.330 
16.400 
10.380 
11.320 
67,280 
11.930 

160.010 

69.060 

7.040 

100.140 
21.910 
27.120 

124.000 

11.540 

29.230 

8.510 

49.630 

126.440 
13,230 
5.630 
50.360 
43.480 
15.520 
47.900 
3.850 



1 
1 



Per 100,000 reskjent populatk>n. Based on U.S. Census Bureau estimates as of July 1. 
Source: Physicians: Amehcan Medical AssociatkKi. Chk»go. IL, Physician Characteristics and DisMbution in the U.S., m 
(copyright): Nurses: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Sen/k^s, Health Resources and Sen/ices Administration, unpubliihed 



1 06 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statittkxl Abstract of the UnNid 



No. 148. Health Professions— PractitioiMrs and Schools: 1990 to 2000 



[(540 ri p i M i mi 540,000). Data on the number of school and total enroMment are reported as of the t>eginning of the academic 
year al other school data are reported as of the end of tfw academic year. Data are based on reporting by health professions schools] 



Year 



Registered nursing 



Medi- Oste- 
dne opirthy 



Bacca* 
Total laureate 



Associ- 
ate 
degree Diploma 



licensed 
practi- 
cal 
nureing 



Den- Optom- Phar- 
tistry ^ etry macy 



ACTIVE PERSONNEL (1.000) 

1990 

1995 

1^90 .......... 

1999 

NUMBER OF SCHOOLS * 

1990 

1995 

1998 

1999 

2000 



TOTAL ENROLLMENT 



1990 
1995 
1998 
1999 
2000 



1990 
1995 
1996 
1999 
2000 



GRADUATES 



540 
637 
707 
711 



126 
125 
125 
125 
125 



65.016 
67.072 
66.900 
66.517 
66.444 



15.398 
15,888 
16.314 
15.996 
15.704 



28 


1.790 


36 


2.116 


41 


2.180 


43 


2.202 


15 


1.470 


16 


1.516 


19 


(NA) 


19 


NAi 


19 


(NA) 



J682 Jl.107 
'881 ^1.235 

(na! 



P 




489 

521 

R 

NA 



829 
876 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA 



6.615 
8.146 
9.434 
9.882 
(NA) 



1.529 
1.843 
2.096 
2.169 
2.304 



201.458 
268.350 

(NA) 



66.068 
97.052 

(NA) 
NA) 

(NA) 




18.571 
31.254 
(NA) 
NA 
NA 



42.318 
58.749 
(NA) 
NA 
NA 



152 

119 

(NA) 

(NA 

NA 



20.418 
19.796 

(NA) 

fa 



5.199 

7.049 

(NA) 

fai 



(NA 
(NA) 
NA) 
(NA) 



1.154 

(NA) 

(NA) 

NA) 

(NA) 



46.720 
59.428 

(NA) 

NA) 

(NA) 



35.417 
44,234 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



148 
159 
163 
165 



56 
54 
55 
55 
55 



16.412 
16.353 
16.926 



4.233 
3,908 
4.041 
4,095 
(NA) 



26 
29 



17 
17 
17 
17 
17 



4,723 
5.201 

(NA) 
5.313 

(NA) 



1.115 
1,219 
1.237 

q 



162 
182 



74 
75 
81 
81 
82 



23.013 
27.667 
28.345 
28.646 
(NA) 



6.956 
7.837 
7,400 
7.141 
7.260 



NA Not avaMabte. ^ Persormel data exclude dentists in military service, U.S. Public Health Service, and U.S. Dept. of 
yiMarans AfMrs. ' includes nurses with advanced degrees. ^ Diploma nurses included with associate degree nurses. 
Some nursing scftoois offer nxxe than one type of program. Numt>ers shown for nursing are numt>er of nursing programs. 

Soufoe: U.S. Dept of Health and Human Sennces, Bureau of Health Professions, unpublished data: American Medical 
Association, Chicago. IL. Physician Charaderistics and DistrUxjtion in the U.S.. annuai: and American Association of CoHeges 61 
OriecpaMc MMana, Bockv»a. MD. Annual Statistical Report. 

No. 149. Percent Distribution of Number of Visits to Healtli Care 
Professionals by Selected Characteristics: 1 999 and 2000 

[Covers ambulatory visits to doctor's offices and emergency departn>ents, and home health care visits during a 12-nfK>nth period. 
Based on the redesigned National Health Interview Survey, a sample survey of the civilian noninstitutior\alized population] 



Cftaracterfstic 



None 



1996 



2000 



1-3 visits 



1999 



2000 



4-9 visits 



1999 



2000 



10 or nr>ore visits 



1999 



2000 



Age: 
Under6years. . . 

6-17 years 

18-44 years 

4S«4 years 

65-74 years .... 
75 years and over 

Sex:' 



Race; 



sr* 

only 

or African American 



or< 

only 

American Indian or 

Alaska Native only 

Asianonly 

TiMo Of more races . 



Race and Htapanic origin: ^ 
wme, noTrffinpBnic . . . . 
Black, norvHispanic . . . . 



17^ 

5.9 

15.5 

24.2 

16.9 

8.6 

7.2 

23.1 
12.0 

16.9 

18.4 

20.7 
23.1 
15.2 

15.5 
18.3 
26.2 



16.8 

6.3 

15.1 

23.2 

15.0 

9.0 

5.8 

21.5 
11.9 

16.0 

17.3 

21.2 
20.2 
12.1 

14.5 
17.2 
26.5 



45.8 

45.9 
58.5 
45.8 
42.4 
36.9 
31.1 

45.5 
46.1 

45.7 

46.1 

35.6 
47.3 
40.8 

45.9 
46.1 
44.3 



45.4 

44.3 
56.2 
45.3 
43.4 
34.5 
29.3 

46.0 
44.8 

45.1 

46.7 

42.9 
49.2 
41.6 

45.4 
46.9 
41.8 



23.3 

36.8 
19.4 
17.8 
25.0 
33.2 
35.1 

20.6 
25.9 

23.8 

22.1 

25.6 

19.4 
22.2 

24.5 

22.1 
19.2 



24.7 

38.3 
20.7 
19.2 
25.7 
34.4 
39.3 

22.4 
27.0 

25.3 

23.4 

20.0 
20.9 
28.3 

26.0 
23.4 
20.0 



13.4 

11.3 
6.7 
12.3 
15.7 
21.3 
26.6 

10.6 
15.9 

13.6 

13.5 

18.1 
10.2 
21.8 

14.1 
13.5 
10.3 



13.3 

11.2 
6.0 
12.2 
15.8 
22.1 
25.6 

10.1 
16.4 

13.7 

12.6 

15.8 

9.7 

17.9 

14.1 
12.6 
11.7 



^ E stiw a le t are age adljusted to the year 2000 standard using six age groups: Under 1 8 years, 1 8-44 years, 45-54 years, 55-64 
ysars, 05-74 years, and 75 years and over. ' Estimates by race and Hispanic origin are tabulated using the 1 997 Standards for 
psdersl data on race and ethnicity. Estimates for specific race groups are shown when they meet requirements for statisttoat 
miibity and confMendattty. The categories "White onty," "Black or African American only," "American Indian and Alaska Native 
(AVAN) only." and "Asian only" include persons who reported only one racial group: and the category Iwo or more races" includes 
persons who raporlad more man one of the five racial groups In the 1997 Standards or one of the five racial groups and "Some 
other race." 

Sowoe: U.8. NaUonal Center for Health Statistks. Heatth, United States, 2002. 



Health and NuXt\x\ot\ \^1 



a& 



MbUmaotnteUnHed stales: 2002 



No. 1 50. Medical Practice Characteristics by Selected Specialty: 1 985 to 

[Dollar figures In thouMnds (112^ rtprtMfits $112,200). Based on a sample telephone survey of nonfederal office mm 
pttal based patient care ptiysictans, excluding reskJents. For details, see source. For definition of mean, see Guide to Ikbuk 
sentation] 



Specialty 



1985 



1990 



1995 



1990 



1997 



MEAN PATIENT VISITS PER WEEK 

All physicians ^ 

General/Family practice 

Internal mediane 

Surgery 

Pediatrics 

Obstetrics/Qynecology 



MEAN HOURS IN PATIENT CARE 
PER WEEK 

All physicians ^ 

General/Family practice 

Internal medicine 

Suroery 

Pediatrics 

Obstetrics/Gynecology 



MEAN NET INCX)ME 

All physicians ' 

General/Family practice 

Internal medicine 

Surgery 

Pediatrics 

Obstetrics/Gynecology 



MEAN LIABILITY PREMIUM 

All physicians ^ 

General/Family practice 

Internal medicine 

Surgery 

Pediatrics 

Obstetrics/Gynecology 



117.1 


120.9 


107.6 


109.4 


110.6 


105.0 


138.1 


146.0 


133.7 


133.1 


130.1 


12S.0 


105.2 


112.0 


99.7 


104.7 


106.4 


102.8 


108.2 


107.6 


97.1 


95.1 


99.3 


93.5 


130.8 


134.0 


125.9 


121.1 


125.5 


110.9 


112.0 


120.0 


94.0 


104.2 


103.8 


99.3 


51.3 


53.3 


51.3 


53.4 


53.2 


51.7 


53.6 


55.0 


52.9 


53.5 


53.1 


51.3 


52.4 


55.7 


53.9 


57.2 


56.0 


54.3 


51.2 


53.1 


53.2 


54.2 


55.0 


51.7 


50.6 


52.4 


50.4 


51.0 


51.6 


48.6 


56.9 


60.4 


54.6 


60.5 


59.9 


59.9 


112.2 


164.3 


195.5 


199.0 


199.6 


194.4 


77.9 


102.7 


131.2 


139.1 


140.9 


142.5 


102.0 


152.5 


185.7 


185.7 


193.9 


182.1 


155.0 


236.4 


269.4 


275.2 


261.4 


268.2 


76.2 


106.5 


140.5 


140.6 


143.5 


139.6 


124.3 


207.3 


244.3 


231.0 


228.7 


214.4 


10.5 


14.5 


15.0 


14.1 


14.2 


16.8 


6.8 


7.8 


9.0 


8.4 


12.0 


10.9 


5.8 


9.2 


9.4 


8.9 


9.4 


16.5 


16.6 


22.8 


23.3 


21.7 


19.7 


22.8 


4.7 


7.8 


7.9 


8.3 


12.3 


9.0 


23.5 


34.3 


38.6 


35.2 


33.0 


35.8 



NA Not available. ^ Includes other specialties not shown separately. 

Source: American Medical Association, Chicago IL. Physician socioeconomic Statistics, 1999-2000 (copyright) and Ph^ 
Socioeconomic Statistics, 2000-2002 (copyright). 

No. 1 51. Ambulatory Care Visits to Physicians' Offices and HospiUl 
Outpatient and Emergency Departments: 2000 

[1,014.8 repreeenU 1,014,800,000. Based on the annual National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Kk 
Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and subject to sampling error; see source for details. For composition of regions, see map 

front cover) 



Characteristic 




Number of visits (mil.) 



Visits per 100 persons 



Total 



Physi- Outpa- 

dan tient 

offices depl. 



ToUl 



Age: 

Under 15 years old. . . 

15 to 24 years old . . . 

25 to 44 years old . . . 

45 to 64 years old . . . 

65 to 74 years old . . . 
75 years old and over. 

Sex: 

Male 

Female 



1,014^ 823.5 



Race: 

White 

Black/African-American 

Asian/Native Hawaiian/Other 

Pacific Islander 

American Indian/Alaska Native 
More than one race reported . 

Region: 

Northeast 

Midwest 

South 

West 



Primary source of payment: 

Private insurance 

Medicare 

Medicaid 

Worfter's compensation . . 

Self pay 

No charge 

Other 

Unknown 



184.1 
93.8 
250.0 
255.9 
116.5 
114.5 

419.9 
595.0 

856.9 

115.1 

37.7 
2.9 
2.2 

225.8 
257.5 
318.9 
212.7 

542.6 

192.8 

107.2 

18.6 

71.1 

7.2 

38.5 

36.9 



142.5 
67.2 
196.8 
216.8 
102.4 
97.8 

335.3 
488.2 

710.8 
76.0 

32.9 
2.0 
1.9 

183.0 
206.7 
251.3 
182.5 

467.0 
162.5 
70.8 
14.5 
44.7 
6.0 
30.0 
28.0 



83.3 

18.2 

9.0 

20.8 

20.8 

7.5 

7.0 

33.7 
49.6 

63.0 
17.2 

2.6 

'0.3 

C) 

23.1 
23.7 
25.2 
11.3 



32.1 
14.1 
18.4 

H.I 

'0.8 
5.7 
3.5 



106.0 

23.4 
17.7 
32.4 
18.3 
6.5 
9.7 

50.9 
57.1 

83.1 
21.9 

2.2 

0.6 

0) 

19.6 
27.1 
42.4 
18.9 

43.5 

16.2 

18.0 

3.0 

18.8 

^0.4 

2.8 

5.4 



370 

305 
244 
305 
422 
656 
766 

314 
424 

381 
324 

335 

118 
(NA) 

432 
381 
329 
371 



300 

236 
174 
240 
358 
577 
654 

251 
348 

316 
214 

292 
79 

(NA) 

351 
306 
259 
318 

(X) 
X) 

<X) 
(X) 
(Xi 
(X) 
(X 



90 

30 
23 
25 
34 
42 
47 

25 
35 

28 

48 

'13 
(NA) 



35 
26 
20 



NA Not available. X Not applk^able. ' Figures do not meet starKJard of reliat)ility or precision. 
Source: U.S. National Center for Health Stati8tk». Advance Data. Nos. 326. 327, and 328; April 22. 2002; Jur>e 4, 200! 
June 5, 2002. 



1 08 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Stati8tk»l Abstract of the Unltod Stttae: 



No. 1 52. Visits to Office-Based Physicians and Hospital Outpatient 
Departments by Diagnosis: 1995 and 2000 



[907^ 



307,000,900. See headnote. Table 151] 



Leading diagnoses ^ 



Number 
(mil.) 



1995 2000 



Rate per 

1.000 
persons' 



1995 2000 



l.eading diagnoses ^ 



Number 
(mil.) 



1995 2000 



Rate per 

1.000 
persons' 



1995 2000 



MAl^ 



An 



Under 15 years oM'' . . 

Routine infant or chHd 

health check 



307.0 

75.2 



369.0 

85.3 



10.4 17.9 



2.406 2,760 

2.471 2.765 

341 580 



FEMALE 
All ages..... .. 

Under 15 years old '^ . . 

Routine infant or child 

health checl( 



457.3 

71.4 



537.8 

75.4 



10.2 17.5 



3,404 3329 

2.457 2.556 

351 593 



Acute reepiiatory 

Irvtedions . . . 
Otitis media ^. . . 



Attention deficit disorder . 

Asthma 

15 to 44 years old ^ 

General medical examina- 
tion 

Acute respiratory 
infections 



7.7 
9.8 
1.3 
1.8 
90.6 



8.5 
7.1 
3.4 
3.1 
98.9 



252 

322 

41 

59 

1.540 



276 
231 
110 
101 
1,660 



Acute respiratory 

infections * . . . 

Otitis media *. . . 



4.5 3.9 



76 66 



Essential hypenension . . . 

Psychoses, excluding 
maior depressive disorder. 

Diabetes mellitus 

45 to 64 years old ^ 

Esaenttal hypertension . . . 

Diabelee mellitus 

Malignant neoplasnw . . . . 

General medical examina- 
tion 

Ischemic heart 
66 years old and over 

MaKgnant neoplasms . . 

Ess«itial hypertension . 

Ischemic heart disease . 

Diabetes meliitus 

Heart disease, excluding 
ischemic 



3.7 
1.8 

1.2 
1.0 
69.8 
4.3 
2.7 
2.2 

1.3 
2.3 
71.2 
4.8 
3.8 
3.3 
2.7 

31 



3.6 
2.7 

2.5 
2.0 
96.5 
6.8 
5.8 
2.7 

2.3 
2.2 
86.2 
7.1 
6.6 
4.9 
4.8 

4.1 



63 

31 

20 

17 

2.795 

172 

109 

86 



60 
46 

43 

34 

3.294 

233 

199 

93 



53 79 

93 77 

5.405 6.340 

365 507 

286 478 

252 349 

209 344 

237 296 



Acute pharyngitis 

Chronic sinusitis. 

15 to 44 years old ^ 

Normal pregnancy 

Gerieral medical examina- 
tion 

Complications of preg- 
nancy, childbirth, and \he 
puerperium 

Gynecological examination . 

Acute respiratory 

infections * 

45 to 64 years old ^ 

Essential hypertension 

Malignant neoplasms . . . . 

Diatotes mellitus 

Follow-up examination. . . . 

Gynecological examination . 
65 years old and over ^ . . . . 

Essential hypertension . . . 

Diabetes mellitus 

Malignant neoplasms . . . . 

Cataract 

Heart disease, excluding 
ischemic 



9.1 
8.5 
2.8 
1.5 
173.9 
22.2 



8.1 
6.6 
2.3 
2.2 
194.8 
24.5 



313 

293 

95 

52 

2.888 

369 



276 

222 

78 

74 

3.199 

402 



7.4 6.6 



123 108 



2.0 
2.6 

6.4 
104.6 
5.2 
3.2 
3.5 
1.2 
1.0 
107.5 
7.7 
3.8 
4.3 
4.6 



6.2 
6.1 

6.0 

141.0 

8.3 

5.7 

5.6 

3.4 

3.1 

126.6 

11.8 

6.0 

5.9 

4.0 



43 



107 

3.911 

193 

120 

131 

45 

36 

5.861 

421 

206 

234 

254 



102 
100 

98 
4.511 
264 
184 
181 
109 
100 
6,736 
628 
318 
312 
212 



4.2 3.6 



227 194 



Revision. Clinical Modification. (ICD-9-CM). ^ Based on U.S. 
^ Includes other first-listed diagnoses, not shown separately. 



^ Based on the International Classification of Diseases. 9th 
Census Bureau estimated civilian population as of July 1. 
Exdudvig pharyngitis. ' lr>cludes bustachian tube disorders. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Advance Data, Nos. 327 and 328. June 4, 2002 and June 5. 2002. 

No. 1 53. Visits to Hospital Emergency Departments by Diagnosis: 2000 

[S0387 raprMents 50,887,000. See headnote. Table 151] 



Leading diagnoses ^ 



MALE 



Rate 

per 

1.000 

Numt>er per- 

(1 .000) sons ^ 



Under 15 years oW^ 

Acute upper respiratory infections . . 

Otitis media * 

Open vvourxl of head 

Contusions with intact skin surfaces. . 

Pyrsda of unicncg|vn ortg^ 

15 to 44 years old ^ 

Contu^ons wtlh intact skin surfaces. . 

Open «vound. excluding head, 
hand, and fingers 

Strains and sprains of neck and back. 

Open wound of hand and fingers . . . 

Open wound of head 

45 to 64 years old ^ 

Chest pain 

Contusions with intact skin surfaces. . 

Abdominal pain 

Ischemk: lieart disease 

Open wound of hand and fingers . . . 
65 years old and over ^ 



Heart dtoease. excluding ischemk: . 

Chest pain 

Ischermc heart disease 

Abdominal pain 

Pneumonia 



50.887 

13.255 

1,272 

1.080 

964 

700 

471 

22.545 

1.200 

1.043 

1.006 
853 
694 

8,684 
583 
346 
249 
246 
242 

6.403 
471 
370 
255 
197 
187 



381 

429 
41 
35 
31 
23 
15 

378 
20 

18 
17 
14 
12 

296 

20 

12 

8 

8 

8 

460 
34 
27 
18 
14 
13 



Leading diagnoses ^ 



Rate 

per 

1.000 

Number per- 

(1.000) sons 2 



FEMALE 
All ages 

Under 15 years old "^ 

Acute respiratory infectk)ns 

Otitis media ^ 

Contusions with Intact skin surfaces. . 

Open wound of head 

Pyrexia of unknown origin 

1 5 to 44 years old ^ 

Contustons with intact skin surfaces. . 

Abdomir\al pain 

Complications of pregnancy, chikj- 
birth. and the puerperium 

Sprains and strains of neck and t>ack. 

Acute resplratorv infections 

45 to 64 years dd^ 

Chest pain 

Abdominal pain 

Contusions with intact skin surfaces. . 

Sprains and strains of neck and back. 

Chronic and unspecified bronchitis. . . 
65 years oW ar)d over ^ 

Heart disease, excluding Ischemic . . . 

Chest pain 

Contusions with intact skin surfaces. . 

Abdominal pain 

Cerebrovascular disease 



57,130 

10.135 
1.050 
909 
616 
378 
377 



407 

344 
36 
31 
21 
13 
13 



27.511 


452 


1.329 


22 


1.238 


20 


1.138 


19 


991 


16 


821 


13 


9.655 


309 


666 


21 


374 


12 


293 


9 


288 


9 


278 


9 


9.829 


523 


539 


29 


530 


28 


395 


21 


391 


21 


328 


17 



^ Based on the International Classificatk>n of Diseases. 9th Revision. Clink:al Modification, (ICD-9-CM). ^ Based on U.S. 
Census Bureau est i m ate d civilian populatXKi as of July 1. ^ Includes other first-listed diagnoses, not shown separately. 
ExckxSng pharyngitis. ^ Includes Eustachian tube disorders. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Advance Data. No. 326. April 22. 2002. 



Health and NuXtVWotn X^*^ 



UA 



Nstitna at the Unned &ales: 2002 



No. 1 54. Hospitals— Summary Characteristics: 1980 to 2000 

[For bods, 1,366 w pw atnti 1,366,000. Covere hospMite aooapled for regigliaUon tyy the American HoepM AsaoaMton; m 
this section. Short-tenn hospitals have an average patient stay of less than 30 days; lona-tefm, an average a^ of kmgtr 
tion. Spedai hospitals include obstetrics end oyneoology; eye, ear. noee. and throat; reha b ibtto n ; orthopedk:; and ctwonteMd 
speciaJ hospitals except psychiatric. tuberoAosis, aloohousm, and chemical dependency hospitals] 



Item 



1000 1066 1000 1005 



1007 1000 1000 



Number. 

All hospitals 

With 100 beds or more . 

Nonfederal ^ 

Comrmjnity hospitals ^ 

Nongovernmental nonprofit . 

For profit 

State and local government . 
Long-temi general and special . 

Psychiatric 

Tuberculosis 

Federal 



Beds (1.000): 

All hospitals ^ 

Rate per 1,000 population *. 

Beds per hospital 

Nonfederal ' 

Community hospitals ^ , . . 

Rate per 1,000 population * . . 
Nongoverrvnental nonprofit . . . . 

For profit 

State and local government . . . . 
Long-term general and spedai . . . . 

Psychiatric 

Tuberculosis 

Federal 



Average daily census (1,000): 

All hospitals 

Community hospitals ' 

Nongovernmental nonprofit . 

For profit 

State and local government . 



Expenses (bil. dd.): ^ 

All hospitals 

Nonfederal ^ 

Community hospttals ^ 

Nongovernmental rxKipfofit . 

For profit 

State and local government . 
Long-term general and spedai . 

Psychiatric 

Tuberculosis 

Federal 



Personnel (1.000):' 

All hospitals 

Nonfederal ^ 

Community hospitals ^ 

Nongovernmental nonprofit . 

For profit 

State and local government , 
Long-term general and special 

Psydiiatric 

Tuberculosis 

Federal 



CXi^tient visits (mil.) 
Emergency 



6,065 


6.872 


6.640 


6,291 


6.201 


6.007 


6.021 


5,800 


3,755 


3.805 


3.620 


3.376 


3.347 


3.267 


3.216 


3,140 


6,606 


6.529 


6.312 


5.992 


5.011 


5.812 


5,746 


6.026 


5,830 


5,732 


5.384 


5.194 


5.134 


5,057 


5.015 


4.066 


3.322 


3,349 


3.191 


3.092 


3,045 


3.000 


3.026 


3,012 


730 


805 


749 


752 


759 


707 


771 


747 


1.778 


1,578 


1.444 


1.360 


1.330 


1.260 


1.218 


1,107 


157 


128 


131 


112 


112 


125 


125 


128 


534 


610 


757 


657 


636 


601 


578 


516 


11 


7 


4 


3 


3 


4 


3 


4 


350 


343 


337 


299 


290 


285 


275 


264 


1,366 


1,318 


1.213 


1.061 


1,062 


1.036 


1,013 


004 


6.0 


5.5 


4.9 


4.1 


3.0 


3.8 


3.7 


3.6 


106 


190 


182 


172 


171 


170 


168 


160 


1.248 


1.197 


1.113 


1.004 


989 


973 


856 


030 


068 


1,001 


927 


873 


862 


853 


840 


830 


4.3 


4.2 


3.7 


3.3 


3.2 


3.1 


3.0 


3.0 


602 


707 


657 


610 


508 


501 


566 


667 


87 


104 


102 


106 


100 


115 


113 


107 


200 


189 


160 


157 


155 


146 


138 


136 


38 


31 


25 


10 


19 


17 


16 


20 


215 


169 


158 


110 


106 


100 


06 


87 


2 

117 


1 
112 


S 


<S 


^ 


<i 


§ 


§ 


1,060 


910 


844 


710 


685 


673 


662 


667 


747 


649 


610 


548 


531 


528 


525 


526 


542 


476 


456 


393 


379 


376 


377 


381 


57 


54 


54 


55 


56 


60 


60 


58 


140 


119 


111 


100 


96 


92 


87 


86 


81.8 


153.3 


234.9 


320.3 


330.5 


342.3 


355.5 


372.0 


84.0 


141.0 


219.6 


300.0 


306.3 


319.6 


332.0 


340.2 


76.9 


130.5 


203.7 


285.6 


203.8 


305.8 


318.6 


336.2 


55.8 


96.1 


150.7 


209.6 


216.0 


225.3 


238.0 


251.8 


5.8 


11.5 


16.8 


26.7 


28.4 


31.2 


31.7 


31.2 


15.2 


22.9 


34.2 


49.3 


49.4 


49.3 


40.1 


52.5 


1.2 


1.9 


2.7 


2.2 


2.3 


2.5 


2.6 


2.8 


5.8 


8.3 


12.9 


11.7 


12.( 


11.0 


11.2 


11.0 


0.1 
7.9 


0.1 
12.3 


0.1 
15.2 


0.4 
20.2 


rR 


0.1 
22.7 


^ 


S 


3,492 


3.625 


4.063 


4.273 


4,276 


4,333 


4.407 


4.360 


3,213 


3.326 


3.760 


3.971 


3,981 


4.036 


4.071 


4,074 


2.873 


2.997 


3,420 


3.714 


3.725 


3.790 


3.831 


3,838 


2,086 


2.216 


2.533 


2.702 


2.711 


2.765 


2.834 


2.662 


189 


221 


273 


343 


359 


385 


383 


362 


598 


561 


614 


670 


654 


640 


614 


614 


56 


58 


55 


38 


40 


37 


37 


42 


275 


263 


280 


215 


212 


204 


106 


101 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


279 


299 


303 


301 


295 


296 


336 


206 


263.0 


282.1 


368.2 


483.2 


505.5 


520.6 


545.5 


573.5 


82.0 


80.1 


92.8 


99.9 


97.6 


97.4 


00.0 


103J 



Z Less than 500 beds or $50 million . ^ Indudes hospital units of institutions. ^ Short term (average length of stay laai 
30 days) qeneral and spedai (e.g., obetetrics and gynecology; eye. ear, nose and throat; rehabilitation etc. except payoli 
tuberculosis, alcoholism and chemical dependency). Exdudes hospital units of institutions. ^ Beginning 1990, number ol 
at end of reportina period; prior years, averaoe number in 12 month period. * Based on Census Bureau estimalad m 
population as of July 1 . Estimates refled revisions t>ased on the 2000 Census of Population. ^ Exdudes new conalni 
^ Includes full-time equivalents of part-time personnel. 

Source: Health Forum, An American Hospital Association Company. Chicago. IL, Hospital Statistics 2002 EdUon, ant 

years (copyright). 



1 1 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bursau, Statistical Abstract of ttw UnHsd 



No. 1 55. Average Cost to Community Hospitals Per Patient: 1980 to 2000 



[bi doiara, «iea|iC paroanL Covars nonfadaral ahort-torm ganaial or apacial hoapitals (axduding pMchlatric or tubarculoaia hoe- 
pftilB and hoapllal unite of inattluttona). Total coat par patient twaed on total hoapital axpanaea (payroA, amployea t)anaftta, pro f a a 
aional faaa, auppNaa. ale.). Data have t>een adfuated for outpatient vialte] 



Type of expenaa and hoapital 



1980 1966 1990 1994 1995 1996 1997 1996 1960 2000 



ooat per day, to^. 



Annual percent chanoe 
Nongovemmental nonprofit . 

For profit 

Siaia and local government . 



Avefsge ooat per 
Nongovemment a Tnonproflt 

For profit 

Stete and local government 



245 

12.9 
246 
257 
239 

1,651 

1.902 
1.676 
1.750 



460 

11.9 
463 
501 
433 

3,245 

3,307 
3.033 
3.106 



667 

7.8 
692 
752 
635 

4,947 

5.001 
4.727 
4.838 



931 

5.7 
950 
924 
859 

6,230 

6.257 
5.529 
6.513 



4.0 

947 
878 

6,216 

6.279 
5.425 
6.445 



1,000 

4.0 

1.042 

946 

903 

6,225 

6.344 
5.207 
6.419 



1,033 
2.6 

1.074 
982 
914 

6,262 
6.393 

5.219 
6.475 



1,067 

3.3 
1,111 

QAA 

949 

6,366 

6.526 
5.262 
6,612 



1.103 
3.3 

1.140 
999 

1.007 

6,512 
6.608 
5.350 
6.923 



1.148 

4.2 
1.182 
1.057 
1,064 

6,649 

6.717 
5.642 
7.106 



^ Change from immediate prior year. 

Source: Health Forum. An American Hoapital Association Company. Chicago. IL. HospM Statistics 2002 Edition (copyright). 

No. 1 56. Community HospiUis— SUtes: 1 990 to 2000 

(For bade, 928.1 repreaanti 928,100. For definition of community hospitals see footnote 2, Table 154] 



State 


Number of hospitals 


Beds 

(1.000) 


Patients 

admitted 

(1,000) 


Average 

daily census ^ 

(1.000) 


Outpatient 
^sits 
(mil.) 




1990 


1995 


2000 


1990 


1995 


2000 


1995 


2000 


1995 


2000 


1995 


2000 


Unilad SlaAee ... 

Alabm 


120 

16 

61 

86 

445 

69 

35 

8 

11 

224 

163 

18 

43 

210 

113 

124 

138 

107 

140 

39 

52 

101 

176 

152 

103 

135 

55 

90 

21 

27 

95 

37 

236 

120 

50 

190 

111 

70 

238 

12 

89 

53 

134 

428 

42 

15 

97 

91 

59 

129 

27 


5,194 

115 

17 

61 

85 

424 

69 

34 

8 

12 

212 

180 

21 

41 

207 

115 

116 

132 

104 

130 

39 

50 

96 

167 

142 

97 

126 

55 

91 

20 

29 

92 

36 

230 

119 

43 

180 

110 

64 

225 

11 

86 

50 

126 

416 

42 

14 

96 

88 

59 

127 

25 


4,915 

108 

18 

61 

83 

389 

69 

35 

5 

11 

202 

151 

21 

42 

196 

109 

115 

129 

105 

123 

37 

49 

80 

146 

135 

95 

119 

52 

85 

22 

28 

80 

35 

215 

113 

42 

163 

108 

59 

207 

11 

63 

48 

121 

403 

42 

14 

88 

84 

57 

118 

24 


928.1 

18.6 

1.2 

9.9 

10.9 

80.5 

10.4 

9.6 

2.0 

4.5 

50.7 

25.7 

2.9 

3.2 

45.8 

21.8 

14.3 

11.8 

15.9 

19.1 

4.5 

13.6 

21.7 

33.9 

19.4 

12.9 

24.3 

4.6 

8.5 

3.4 

3.5 

28.9 

4.2 

74.7 

22.0 

4.4 

43.1 

12.4 

8.1 

52.6 

3.2 

11.3 

4.2 

23.6 

59.2 

4.4 

1.7 

20.0 

12.0 

8.4 

18.6 

2.2 


672.7 

18.3 

1.3 

9.9 

10.1 

75.0 

9.3 

7.5 

1.9 

3.8 

49.7 

26.1 

3.0 

3.4 

42.0 

19.4 

12.6 

10.8 

15.1 

19.1 

4.0 

12.6 

18.9 

29.6 

17.4 

12.6 

21.9 

4.2 

7.9 

3.6 

3.4 

29.9 

3.7 

73.9 

22.7 

4.2 

37.8 

11.5 

7.2 

48.5 

2.7 

11.3 

4.6 

20.9 

57.2 

4.2 

1.8 

18.6 

10.8 

8.1 

17.0 

2.0 


823.6 

16.4 

1.4 

10.9 

9.8 

72.7 

9.4 

7.7 

1.8 

3.3 

51.2 

23.9 

3.1 

3.5 

37.3 

19.2 

11.8 

10.8 

14.8 

17.5 

3.7 

11.2 

16.6 

26.1 

16.7 

13.6 

20.1 

4.3 

8.2 

3.8 

2.9 

25.3 

3.5 

66.4 

23.1 

3.9 

33.8 

11.1 

6.6 

42.3 

2.4 

11.5 

4.3 

20.6 

55.9 

4.3 

1.7 

16.9 

11.1 

8.0 

15.3 

1.9 


30.945 

642 

40 

427 

342 

3,029 

340 

338 

81 

154 

1.772 

859 

97 

104 

1.452 
699 
361 
291 
534 
622 
142 
574 
751 

1.120 
496 
386 
714 
96 
183 
149 
110 

1.088 
156 

2.398 

833 

89 

1.375 
368 
296 

1.810 

119 

410 

94 

740 

2.029 
171 
55 
699 
467 
271 
550 
43 


33,009 

680 

47 

539 

368 

3.315 

397 

349 

83 

129 

2.119 
863 
100 
123 

1.531 
700 
360 
310 
582 
654 
147 
587 
740 

1.106 
571 
425 
773 
99 
209 
199 
111 

1.074 
174 

2.416 

971 

89 

1.404 
429 
330 

1.796 

119 

495 

99 

737 

2.367 
194 
52 
727 
505 
288 
558 
48 


547.8 

10.7 
0.7 
5.6 
6.0 

45.0 
5.4 
5.5 
1.5 
2.7 

29.4 

15.8 
2.4 
1.8 

25.0 

11.3 
7.1 
5.8 
9.0 

10.6 
2.6 
8.8 

13.0 

19.3 

11.3 
7.6 

12.6 
2.7 
4.5 
2.2 
2.1 

21.4 
2.1 

59.1 

15.5 
2.7 

22.2 
6.1 
3.8 

33.8 
1.8 
7.2 
3.0 

12.5 

31.1 
2.2 
1.3 

11.5 
6.0 
4.9 

10.2 
1.1 


525.7 
9.8 
0.8 
6.8 

5.7 

47.8 

5.4 

5.8 

1.4 

2.5 

31.0 

15.0 

2.3 

1.8 

22.4 

10.8 

6.8 

5.7 

9.1 

9.8 

2.4 

8.2 

11.7 

16.9 

11.2 

8.0 

11.7 

2.9 

4.8 

2.7 

1.7 

17.3 

2.0 

52.1 

16.0 

2.3 

20.6 

6.2 

3.9 

28.8 

1.7 

8.0 

2.8 

11.5 

33.1 

2.4 

1.1 

11.4 

6.6 

4.8 

9.1 

1.1 


414.3 
6.4 
0.8 
4.0 
3.6 

39.5 
5.5 
5.7 
1.4 
1.2 

16.9 
9.6 
2.1 
1.7 

20.6 

11.8 
6.2 
4.0 
6.1 
8.0 
2.5 
4.9 

13.5 

19.2 
5.7 
3.2 
9.9 
1.3 
2.5 
1.4 
1.8 

12.8 
2.5 

38.9 
8.8 
1.3 

22.0 
3.8 
5.8 

26.9 
1.7 
4.7 
1.0 
7.4 

22.7 
3.2 
1.0 
7.2 
8.4 
4.0 
8.2 
0.7 


521.4 

80 


Naaka 


1.3 


Arizona. 


5 3 


Arttansas 

Califomia 

C(Axado 


4.4 

44.9 

6.7 


Oelawrare 

District of Columbia . 

rfQnQQ ^ 


6.7 

1.5 

1.3 

21.8 


Georgia 


11.2 


HmM 


2.5 


Idaho 


2.2 


Inote 


25.1 


Indtana 


14.1 


Iowa 


9.2 


Kansas 


53 


Kantudcy 

Louisiana 

lyUha 


8.7 

10.0 

3.2 


Maryland 

Maasacfmeette 

McniQBn. 


6.0 
16.7 
24.9 


Mnnesola 

!Ssr.::::::: 


7.3 

3.7 

148 


Montana 


2.6 


NenasKa 

Nevada 


3.4 
2.2 


new nampanuB .... 

NewJaraey 

New Mexico 

fWM Yonc 

North Carolina 

North Oai(Ota 

Ohio 


2.8 
16.3 

3.1 
46.4 
12.4 

1.7 
269 


OWahoma 


4.7 
7 3 


Pervwylvania 

nnoos Mand 

South Caroina 

South Dalcota 

Tcnnesaee 

Texas 


31.8 

2.1 

7.8 

1.7 

10.3 

29.4 


Utah 


4.5 




1.2 


Wgns 


9.5 


Waehinglon 

West Virginia 

Weoowln 

Wyoming 


9.6 

5.2 

10.9 

0.9 



^ Inpatients reoeivirig treatment each day; excludes newtx>m. 

Source: Health Forum. An American Hospital Association Company, Chicago. IL, Hospital Statistics 2002 EtMon, and prior 
years (copyright). 



Health and NuuVWoxx \\\ 



ita 



Abatrad of the Uniiod SIMM. 2002 



No. 1 57. HospiUl Use Rates by type of HospiUi: 1980 to 2000 



Type of hospital 



1995 1900 1996 1997 



1996 



1990 



Community hospitals: ^ 
Admissions per 1 ,000 population ^ . . . . 

Admissions per bed. . 

Average length of stay ^ (days) 

Outpatient visits per admission ...... 

Outpatient visits per 1 .000 population ^ . 

Surgical operations (million *) 

Number per admission 



Nonfederal psychiatric: 
Admissions per 1 ,000 population ■ . ^ 
Days in hospital per 1 ,000 population ^ . 



159 


141 


125 


116 


116 


115 


116 


117 


37 


33 


34 


35 


37 


38 


38 


40 


7.6 


7.1 


7.2 


6.5 


6.1 


6.0 


5.9 


5.6 


5.6 


6.5 


9.7 


13.4 


14.3 


14.9 


153 


15.8 


890 


919 


1,207 


1,556 


1.651 


1,719 


1.775 


1,846 


16.6 


20.1 


21.9 


23.2 


24.2 


25.3 


26.3 


26.1 


0.5 


0.6 


0.7 


0.7 


0.6 


0.6 


0.8 


0.6 


2.5 


2.5 


2.9 


2.7 


2.7 


2.7 


2.4 


^4 


295 


224 


190 


122 


107 


101 


94 


93 



For definition of community hospitals, see footnote 2. Table 154. ^ Based on U.S. Census Bureau ettimaled rMktom 
population as of July 1 . Estinrates reflect revisions based on the 2000 Census of Population. ^ Number of irpatient days dMded 
by number of admissions. * 18.8 represents 16,800,000. 

Source: Health Forum, An American Hospital Association Company, Chicago. IL. Hospital Statistics 2002 Edition, and prior 

years (copynght). 

No. 1 58. HospiUl Utilization Rates: 1980 to 2000 

[37,632 reprManU 37,632,000. Represents estimates of inpatients discharged from noninstitutional, short-stay hoapNais, 
exclusive of federal hospitals. Excludes newborn infants. Based on sample data collected from the National Hospital Diacnaiga 
Survey, a sample survey of hospital records of patients discharged in year shown; subject to sampling variability. Comparisons 
beginning 1990 with data for 1980 should be made with caution as estimates of change may reflect improvcNments in the survay 
design rather than true changes in hospital use] 



Item and sex 



Patients discharged (1.000) 

Patients discharged per 1 ,000 persons. 

total ^ 

Male 

Female 

Days of care per 1 ,000 persons, total ^ 

Male 

Female 



Average stay (days). 

Male 

Female 



1990 1990 1994 



1995 



1997 1996 1999 



37,632 30,768 30.843 30.722 30,545 30.914 31.827 32.132 31.706 



168 
139 
194 

1.217 
1.068 
1.356 

7.3 
7.7 
7.0 



122 
100 
143 

784 
694 
869 

6.4 
6.9 
6.1 



117 

96 

138 

674 
599 
745 

5.7 
6.2 
5.4 



116 

94 

136 

620 
551 
686 

5.4 
5.6 
5.0 



114 

92 

135 

597 
533 
667 

5.2 
5.6 
4.9 



114 

93 

135 

582 
508 
653 

5.1 
5.5 
4.6 



117 

93 

139 

589 
517 
658 

5.1 
5.5 
4.7 



117 

95 

136 

561 
510 
649 

5.0 
5.4 
4.7 



114 

92 

135 

560 

401 
627 

4.9 
5.3 
4.6 



^ Based on U.S. Census Bureau estimated civilian population as of July 1 . Estimates for 1960 do not reflect revisions baaad 
on the 1990 Census of Population. Beginning with 1997 data, rates are t>ased on \he U.S. Census Bureau estimates of ttw dvMan 
population that have been adjusted for net underenumeration in \he 1990 census. Since population estimates for the 2000 
were not available when this table was prepared, the 2000 population estimates were based on the 1990 census. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital and Hoalth Statistics. Sehes 13: and unpublished data. 

No. 1 59. Hospital Discharges and Days of Care: 1995 and 2000 

[30,722 represents 30,722,000. See headnote, Table 158. For composition of regions, see map. inside front cover] 





Discfuirges 


Days of care per 
1 .000 persons ^ 


Average stay 
(days) 


Age, race, and region 


Number 
(1.000) 


Per 1.000 persons ^ 




1995 2000 


1996 2000 


1995 2000 


1995 2000 


Total 


30,722 31,706 

790 782 
744 703 
672 898 
2,943 2.819 
4,201 3,717 
3,449 3.433 
6.168 6,958 
4.832 4.678 
6./24 7.718 

19,951 19.165 

3.667 3.572 

466 361 

107 142 

7.051 7,103 

6.994 7,207 

11.373 12,016 


116 114 

198 196 
46 45 
22 22 

80 72 
102 98 

81 76 
119 114 
260 260 
459 468 

91 84 

113 98 

51 33 

46 56 

136 136 

113 113 

122 122 

91 85 


620 560 

1.083 1,113 
153 145 
99 98 
271 241 
354 328 
381 327 

657 565 
1.685 1.469 
3.248 2.891 

491 414 

658 520 
278 187 

240 279 

858 770 
586 510 
643 595 
410 383 


5.4 4.9 


Age: 

Under 1 year old 

1 to 4 years old 

5 to 14 years old 

1 5 to 24 years old 

25 to 34 years old 

35 to 44 years old 

45 to 64 years old . . . . 

65 to 74 years old 

75 years old and over. . . 

Race: 

White 

Black 

Asian/Pacific Islander . . . 
American Indian/Eskimo/ 
Aleut 

Region: 

Northeast 

Midwest 

South 


5.5 5.7 

3.3 3.2 
4.5 4.5 

3.4 3.3 

3.5 3.4 
4.7 4.3 
5.5 5.0 

6.5 5.7 

7.1 a2 

5.4 4.9 

5.6 5.3 
5.4 BJ6 

5.2 5.0 

6.3 5.7 

5.2 4.5 

5.3 4 9 


West 


5.303 5.380 


4.5 4^ 



Based on Census Bureau estimated civilian population that, beginning in 1997. has been adjusted for the nal 
underenumeration in the 1990 Census of Population. Since population estimates for the 2000 census were not available when tfiis 
table was prepared, the 2000 population estimates were based on the 1990 census. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, Vital smd Health Statistics, Senes 13: and unpublished data. 



1 1 2 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bursau. Statisticat Abstract of the UnHsd 



No. 1 60. Hospital Discharges and Days of Care by Sex: 2000 



f12^14 f»pf wnti 12^14,000. Represents estimates of inpatients discharged from noninstitutional, short-stay hospftals, 
exclusive of federal hosjsitals. Oiagnostto cateoories are based on the International Classification of Diseases. Ninth Revision, 
CbnicaJ liAodiricalion. See headnote, Tat>le 158] 



Age and first-listed 



Discharges 



Num- 
t)er 



Per 
1.000 



Days 

of 

care 

per 

1,000 



per- per- 



(1,000) sons ^ sons 



Aver- 
age 
stay 
(days) 



Age and first-listed 
diagnosis 



Discharges 



Per 

Num- 1,000 

t>er per- 

(1.000) sons^ 



Days 
of 
care 
per 
1.000 
per- 
sons ^ 



Aver- 
age 
stay 

(days) 



4i^ 
4. = 



MALE 



FEMALE 



All 



12314 99.9 540 



UrKler 18 years ^ . . 

Pneumonia 

Injuries and poisoning 
Asthma 



18 to 44 years 



Ir^ries and poi8onir>g . . . 
Serious mental iiinsss * . . 

Alcohol and drug " 

Diseases of heart 

45 10 64 years ^ 

Diseases of heart 

Injuries and poisoning . . . 
Maigpiant neoptasms. . . . 
Serious mental illness . . 
Cerebrovascular diseases. 



65 to 74 years ^ . . 
Diseases of heart . . . 
Ir^uriee and poisoning 
Maignant neoplasms . 



75 years old and older ^ 

OisMaes of heart 

Pneumonia 

Ir^urfes arwj poisoning . . . 
Cerebrovascular diseases . 
Mabgnant neoplasms. . . . 



1.515 
199 
185 
129 

2.498 

.408 

*296 

224 

148 

3.424 
802 
266 
188 
*120 
116 
114 

2.199 
586 
149 
146 

2.878 
697 
229 
207 
186 
135 



40.8 
5.4 
5.0 
3.5 



195 

17 
21 

7 



5.4 

4.8 
3.2 
4.3 
2.1 



Ail 



19,192 129.8 502 4.6 



Under 18 years ^. . 

Pneumonia 

Injuries and poisoning 
Asthma 



45.5 


220 


4.8 


7.4 


34 


4.5 


*5.4 


544 


*8.2 


4.1 


19 


4.7 


2.7 


10 


3.5 


115.8 


586 


5.1 


27.1 


104 


3.8 


9.0 


51 


5.7 


6.3 


.^3 


6.8 


«4.1 


*36 


*8.8 


3.9 


20 


5.2 


3.8 


23 


6.0 


269.7 


1.517 


5.6 


71.9 


338 


4.7 


18.3 


108 


5.9 


17.9 


123 


6.9 



18 to 44 years ^ 

Delivery 

Serious mental illness * . . 
Injuries and poisoning . . . 

45 to 64 years ^ 

Diseases of heart 

Injuries and poisoning . . . 
Malignant neoplasms . . . . 
Serious mental illness . . 

65 to 74 years ^ 

Diseases of heart 

Injuries and poisoning . . . 
Malignant neoplasms . . . . 
Cerebrovascular diseases . 
Pneumonia 



461.5 
111.8 
36.7 
33.2 
29.9 
21.6 



2.852 
593 
230 
255 
169 
163 



6.2 
5.3 
6.3 
7.7 
5.7 
7.6 



75 years old and older ^ 

Diseases of heart 

Injuries and poisoning . . . 

Pneumonia 

Cerebrovascular diseases . 
Malignant neoplasms .... 



1.397 

168 

111 

85 

6.941 

3.588 

^300 

237 

3.534 
470 
248 
195 
146 

2.479 
525 
185 
142 
124 
117 

4.840 
1.045 
472 
322 
292 
186 



39.4 


161 


4.7 


17 


3.1 


*12 


2.4 


6 


125.7 


404 


65.0 
*5.4 


161 
*41 


4.3 


18 



112.6 

15.0 

7.9 

6.2 

4.7 

215.9 
53.3 
18.8 
14.4 
12.6 
11.9 

472.3 
102.0 
46.0 
31.4 
28.4 
18.1 



546 
61 
42 
36 



1.430 

262 

113 

103 

61 

75 

2.915 
539 
284 
216 
161 
129 



4.1 

3.6 

*3.8 

2.3 

3.2 

*7.6 
4.2 

4.8 
4.1 
5.3 
5.7 
9.4 

5.7 
4.9 
6.0 
7.2 
4.8 
6.3 

6.2 
5.3 
6.2 
6.9 
5.7 
7.1 



I on Census Bureau estimated civilian population as of July 1 . Population figures are adjusted for net underenumeration 
using the 1990 National Population Ac^ustment Matrix from the U.S. Census Bureau. ^ Average length of stay and rates per 
1,000 population are age-s^usted to the year 2000 standard using six age groups; Under 18 years, 18-44 years. 45-54 years, 
S5-64 years, 65-74 years, and 75 years and over. ^ Includes other first-listed diagnoses not shown separately. * Excludes 
(fisctiarges fnofn ottter types of fadlrties such as the Dept. of Veterans Affairs or long-term hospitals. ^ Estimates are considered 
i^trefiane. ^ Includes abuse, deperKlence. and withorawal. Excludes discharges from other types of fadlities such as the Dept 
of Veterans Affairs or day treatment programs. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Health. United States, 2002. 

No. 161. Organ Transplants and Grafts: 1990 to 2001 

[As of end of year. Based on reports of procurement programs and transplant centers in tt>e United States, except as noted] 



Proce d u r e 



Number of procedures 



1990 



1966 



1996 



1999 



2000 



2001 



Number of centers 



1990 



2001 



Number 

of 

people 

waiting. 

2001 



1-year 

patient 

survival 

rates, 2000 

(percent) 



Transplant ^ 

Heart 

Heart-lung 

Lung 

Uver 

Kidney 

lOdney-pancreas. 

Pancreas 

Mestine 

Multi-organ . . . . 
Comsagrifts^ . . . 

Bone grdts^. 

Sldngrafts^ 



2.095 

52 

203 

2.631 

9.358 

459 

60 

1 

71 

40.631 

350.000 

5.500 



2.342 

69 

869 

3.818 

10,957 

915 

103 

21 

124 

44,652 

450,000 

5.500 



2.308 

43 

862 

4.358 

12.245 

968 

230 

27 

162 

(NA) 

500.000 

9.000 



2.159 

49 

884 

4.594 

12.455 

933 

350 

37 

133 

45,765 

650.000 

10.000 



2.172 

47 

955 

4,616 

13.258 

910 

420 

29 

166 

46.949 

800.000 

15,000 



2.202 


148 


140 


4,148 


27 


79 


61 


212 


1.054 


70 


75 


3.821 


5.177 


85 


120 


17,546 


14,152 


232 


242 


52.216 


884 


(NA) 


(NAJ 
138 


2.540 


468 


84 


1.317 


112 


(NA) 


38 


192 


(NA) 


Inaj 


'^ 


(NA) 
(NA 


46.532 


^107 


875.000 


30 


(NA) 


(^ 


20,000 


25 


(NA) 


(x) 



85.5 
66.2 
76.5 
85.9 
(NA) 
95.2 
95.9 
74.7 
jNAj 
NA 
NA 
(NA) 



NA Not available. X Not applicable. ^ Kidney-pancreas and heart-lung transplants are each counted as one organ. All 
other mutt-ofgan transplants, exdudina kidney-pancreas and heart-lung, are included in the multi-organ row. The data and 
reported in the 2001 Annual Report of the U.S. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Networf( and the Scientific 



RsgiMry of TransptaiTt Recipients have been supplied by UNC^ under contract with HHS. The auti>ors alone are responsible for 
9« rep o rting arKJ interpretation of these data. ^ 1990, number of procedures and eye banlts include Canada. ^ Eye banks. 
Procedure data are shown in terms of square feet. 

Source: Transplants. 2001 Annual Report of the U.S. Oman Procurement and Tran^>lantation Network and the Scientific 
Registry for T/ans^)tanf Re^MerUa: Trartiplant Data: 1991-2000. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Health 
Reaouroes and Seivioee Administration. Office of Special Programs, Division of Transplantation, Rockville, MD; United Network for 
Organ Sharing, Richmond, VA; UniveffBtty Renal Research and Educatkxi Association, Ann Artxsr, Ml; American Association of 
Tissue Banks, IMcLean, VA; and Eye Bank Association of America, Washington, DC; and unpublished data. 



Health and t4uU\\\OT\ Wi 



u.a 



AlMlrBCf of the lAnMNf SIMM: 2002 



No. 162. Procedures for Inpatients Discharged From Short-Stay Hospitate 
1990 to 2000 

[23,051 repTMMits 23,051,000. Excludes newborn infants and discharges from federal hospitals. See headrwli, 1Uble 1 



Sex and type of procedure 


Number of procedures (1,000) 


Rats per 1.000 populrton 


1900 1995 1998 2000 


1990 1998 1080 


Surgical prooedurea, total ' 


23,051 22«530 23,833 23,244 

995 1.068 1.271 1.221 

285 434 1.069 1.025 
609 577 628 628 
392 573 571 519 

8,538 8,388 8,949 8,880 
620 660 758 732 
200 285 708 655 

286 423 389 371 

14,513 14,142 14,884 14,556 

795 964 1.116 1.136 
945 785 841 855 
591 563 616 633 

17,455 17.278 17,482 16,737 

1.735 1,834 2,034 2.005 
1.164 1.127 1.117 991 
1,608 1,181 1.022 886 
1,506 967 871 754 

7,378 7,261 7,421 8,985 

1,051 1,076 1.145 1.157 
586 572 560 507 
736 473 408 345 

10,077 10,016 10,081 9.772 

750 866 802 898 

1.377 935 756 750 

941 682 571 501 


92^ 08.2 003 


C€vdlac catheterization 


4.0 4.1 4.0 


Removal of coronary artery ototruction ^ 

Reduction of fracture 


1.2 1.7 3.9 
2.4 2.2 2.3 


Coronary arterv t>vDass oraft 


1.6 2.2 2.1 


Male, total * 


70J 85J 003 


Cardiac catheterization 

Removal of coronary artery obstruction ^ 

Coronary artery bvMss oraft 


5.1 5.2 5.0 
1.7 2.2 6.3 
2.4 3.3 2.9 


Female, total * 


113.0 105.3 1063 


Repair of current obstetric laceration 

Cesarean section 


6.2 7.2 7.9 
7.4 5.8 6.0 


Hysterectomy 


4.6 4.3 4.4 


Diagnostic arid other nonsurgical 
DTOcadurea 


70.0 80.1 033 


Angiocardiography and arteriography " 

Respiratory ttieraoy 


7.0 7.0 7.4 
4.7 4.3 4.1 


DiaarK>stic ultrasound 


6.4 4.5 3.7 


CAT scan ^ 


6.0 3.7 3.2 


Male, total ' 


81.0 57.1 86.1 


Angiocardiography and arteriography " 

Respiratory therapy 

CAT scan 


6.7 8.5 as 
4.9 4.5 4.2 
6.1 3.7 3.0 




783 74.6 71.4 


Manual assisted delivery 


5.9 6.5 5.7 


Fetal EKQ and fetal monitoring 


10.8 7.0 5.4 


Diagnostic ultrasound 


7.3 5.1 4.1 







^ Based on Census Bureau estimated civilian population as of July 1 . Beoinning 1999 population figures are ^^ 

underenumeration in the 1990 census using the 1990 Nationai Population Adjustment Matrix from the Census BtWMUi. 
population estimates for the 2(XX) census were not available when this table was prepared the 2000 oopulation esMm a li 
based on the 1990 census. ^ Includes other types of surgical procedures not shown separately. ^ Beginnina 1999 In 
separately codsd "insertion of stent." * Excluding skull, nose, and jaw. ' Includes other nonsurgical prooedures not 
separately. ® Using contrast material. ^ Computerized axial tomography. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital and Health Statistics, Series 13; and unpubliihed data. 



No. 163. Hosplul Utilization Measures for HIV Patients: 1985 to 2000 

[HIV represents human immunodefidency vinjs. See headnde. Table 158] 



Measure of utilization 




1990 



1995 



1998 



1900 



Number of patients discharged ^ 
Rate of patient discharges ^. . . 

Number of days of cqre 

Rate of days of care ^. 

Average length of stay ^ 



23 

1.0 

387 

16.3 

17.1 



146 

5.8 

2.188 

86.9 

14.9 



249 

9.4 

2.326 

87.6 

9.3 



189 

6.9 

1.503 

55.0 

8.0 



180 

6.5 

1.310 

47.5 

7.3 



^ Comparisons beginning 1990 with data for earlier years should be made with caution as estimates of change may 
improvements in the 1 988 sample design rather than true changes in hospital use. ^ Per 10,000 population. Based on C 
Bureau estimated civilian population as of July 1 . Population estimates for \he 1980's do not reflect revised estimates bai 
the 1990 Census of Population. Beginning 1998. rates are t>ased on civilian population estimates that have been adjuatsd 
underenumeration in the 1990 census. Since population estimates for the 2000 census were not available when this tab 
prepared, the 2000 population estimates were based on the 1990 census. ^ For similar data on all patients, see TabI 

Source: Nationai Center for Health Statistics, Vital and Health Statistics, Series 13; and unpublished data. 

No. 164. Skilled Nursing Facilities: 1980 to 1999 

[448 repreeenta 448.000. Covers facilities and beds certified for participation under medicare as of midyear. Indudea fl 
which have transfer agreenients with one or more participating hospitals, and are engaged primarily in providing skMad r 
care and related services for the rehabilitation of injured, disabled, or sick persons] 



Item 



1990 



1990 



1995 



1990 



1997 



1968 



Skilled nursing facilities 
Beds 



Per 1 ,000 medk^re enrollees 



Number . 


5,155 


9.006 


13.281 


14.177 


14,860 


15.037 


1.000. . . 


448 


512 


657 


672 


685 


723 


Rate . . . 


16.0 


15.2 


17.7 


17.8 


18.0 


183 



^ Based on total number of benefteiaries enrolled In ttie medk»re hoepital lnsurar)ce program as of July 1 of 

Source: U.S. Health Care Rnandng Administration, Medicare Participating Providers and Suppliers of Health Servlom 
and unpublished data. 



1 1 4 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of ttw UnOad 



No. 165. HoiiM Health and Hospica Care Agaiiclas by Salactcd 
Characteristics: 2000 



[In paroOTt. «ioipC m IndtaiMl (11.4 w pw atnti 11«400). Based on the National Home and Hoepioe Care Sunday. Home heaNh 
(sra IB pra^dad to MMdualB and tamJHee In their plaoe of residenoe. Hoapioe caie is available In both ^ 
tings. See aouroe for details. For compoeition of rsglons. see map. inside front oover] 





total 


Cunent patients 


1 


Discharges^ 


AQency characteristic 


Total 


Home 

health 

care 


Hoepice 
care 


Total 


Home 

health 

care 


Hoepios 
care 


ToW {tJOOSi 


11.4 

44.7 
42.5 
12.8 

15.9 
26.1 
42.7 
15.3 


1,480J 

33.2 

57.6 

9.0 

31.2 
20.6 
37.3 
10.9 


1,365.3 

34.1 

56.6 

9.3 

31.9 
20.7 
37.3 
10.1 


105.5 

22.3 

73.2 

4.4 

22.0 
19.5 
37.7 
20.8 


7,800.1 

24.2 

66.9 

8.9 

39.3 
18.4 
29.6 
12.5 


7,178.0 

25.0 

65.8 

9.3 

41.0 
17.8 
29.5 
11.7 


821.1 


PERCENT DISTRtBUTION 

OwTwrshipi 
Pfopftflteiy 


15.8 


VbiurMary iKXiprofIt 


60.0 


Qovemment and ottter 


4.2 


Rnioi'^. 
Ill iiii II ■ ■■ 
mnneflsi. 


20.1 


MMweeL 


25.7 


Souti 


33.7 


WiSt 


20.6 







^ Patients on the rolls of the agency as of midnight the day prior to the survey. ^ Patients removed from the rolls of the 
agency during the 12 morrths prior to the day of the survey. A patient could be induded more than once if the individuai had n>ore 
than one episode of care during the year. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, unpublished deta. 

No. 106. Home Health and Hospice Care Patients by Selected 
Characteristics: 2000 



[hi percent, emepl aa indicatad (1,480.8 repreeenta 1,480300). See headnote. Table 165] 








Current patients ^ 


Discharges^ 


Item 


Total 


1 ln»M II 

nome 

health 

care 


Hospice 
care 


Total 


Home 

health 

care 


Hoaptoe 
care 


Total ^^JOoo^, 


1,480.8 

13.2 

6.5 

8.9 

71.3 

7.1 

10.2 

17.1 

14.6 

22.3 

35.8 
64.2 

76.3 

14.6 

12.4 

9.0 

32.7 
34.9 

5.5 
17.4 

9.5 

6.6 

8.8 

2.3 

23.0 

6.8 

9.1 
9.6 


1,366.3 

13.9 

6.7 

6.9 

70.5 

7.1 

10.2 

16.6 

14.5 

21.9 

35.2 
64.8 

76.0 

14.6 

12.6 

9.4 

31.9 
34.6 

5.5 
18.0 

9.9 

5.1 

9.5 

2.4 

23.6 

6.8 

9.8 
10.2 


105.5 

4.5 

5.1 

6.9 

81.4 

7.3 

9.9 

20.9 

16.1 

27.2 

42.6 
57.4 

82.8 

12.3 

10.6 

5.0 

42.7 

36.7 

6.3 

9.2 

5.0 

52.6 

0.3 

0.4 

15.6 

6.5 

0.1 
0.9 


7,800.1 

13.7 
6.2 
10.2 
70.0 
9.4 
11.1 
15.5 
16.2 
17.8 

37.3 
62.7 

79.5 

12.2 

9.6 

8.3 

40.9 
29.9 

5.3 
14.7 

9.3 

9.7 

5.6 

0.7 

21.4 

9.2 

11.2 
11.3 


7,179.0 

14.5 
6.3 
10.0 
69.1 
9.4 
10.6 
15.6 
16.2 
17.0 

36.2 
63.8 

79.1 

12.4 

10.0 

6.5 

40.3 
29.6 

5.2 
15.3 

9.5 

5.5 

6.2 

0.7 

22.3 

9.4 

12.1 
12.3 


821.1 


PERCENT DISTRIBUnON 
Undsr 45 years old 


3.9 


45-54 years okJ 


5.0 


55-64 years old 


11.5 


66 years old and over 


79.6 


6&88 years old 


10.1 


70-74 years old 


14.5 


75-79 years old 


12.5 


80^ years old 


15.9 


65 years old and over 

Sex: 
Mais 


26.5 
49.8 


romrie 


50.2 


Race: 

iKnihl , 


84.1 


Btack and other ^ 


10.3 


Black 


6.1 


Unknown 


5.5 


Marital status: ' 
Marrisd 


47.2 


vvmuweo 


33.2 


Oivoroed or separated 


5.7 


Never married 


7.7 




6.2 


Primary admiaaton dtagnosis: 
Nsoplasms 


58.4 


Oiseasee of the nervous system and 
ssnae nmans . . 


0.3 
0.2 


Oiseasee of the drculalory system . . 
Oiseasee of the respiratory system. . 
Oiaeasae of the muacukMkeletal 
lyslsm and connective tissue .... 
nynes sfKi poieoning ^ > j > . • . > j . 


11.7 
6.9 

1.0 
0.5 







^ Pattsrrts on the rolls of the agency as of mklnight the day prior to the survey. ^ Patients removed from the rolts of the 
agency during the 12 morrlha prtor to the day of the survey. A patient could be included more than once If the individual had more 
than one epieode of care during the year. ^For current paoents, cunent age or marital status: for discharged patients, age or 
marital status at time of dtocharge. * Patients with multiple races are coded In the "other" category. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statfatks, Health. United States. 2002. 



Health and NuuWotn \\S 



us. 



AMnm of the UniKf SMse: 2002 



>^ TV7 ewHKT Mwtw **** >«««*"«»•• 2««> 






<^'^i^«^ fh^ oMK»r> popMbon 65 years old and over wtx> are home heallh care 
w^t'^www* Home rieallh care 18 provided to irKfvkJuals and (amiies 10*^-^-" 
•f«A 'H«ww Care Survey) 



X i|W^rt| 



V»A»> 



Per- 
cent 



Diecharges 



UiMitg ut^ t«iei>hiv)e 

»'N0^u»g UHM)* 

TuKtitg iinKkciittona 

Priv<«to iMMuidnce 



\My 100.0 



M4 

460 
106 

373 
269 

379 
17 

127 

31 

227 

216 



44 



52.3 

46.1 
15.9 

35.9 
27.8 

36.4 
1.6 

12.2 

3.0 

21.8 

20.7 



4.2 



Num- 
ber Per- 
(1.000) cent 



8.466 100^ 

2.172 39.8 

1.900 34.8 

537 9.9 



1.737 
1.092 



31.8 
20.0 



^•^ 1§ 



8.9 



261 

113 

549 

1,017 



251 



4.8 

2.1 

10.1 

18.6 



4.6 



Item 



Own iTKXxne 
Medicare . . 
Medicaid . . 



Services rendered: ' 
Nursing services . 
Social services . . 

Counseling 

Medications .... 
Physical therapy . 



Homemaker-household 
sen^ices 

Nutrition services 

Physician services. . . . 

Occupational thwapy . . 

Speech therapy/ 
audiology 



Current 
patients^ 



Num- 

t>er 

(1.000) 



Per- 
cent 



61 
705 
141 



782 
138 
37 
106 
285 



289 
53 
48 
83 

19 



5.9 
67.8 
13.5 



75.1 
13.3 
3.6 
10.2 
27.4 



27.8 
5.1 
4.6 
8.0 

1.8 



Ditchaigi 



Num- 
ber 
(1.000) 



4.867 
ISO 



4.672 
977 



2.216 



691 
204 
307 
543 

102 



' PfttMntM on the rolls of the agency as of midnight the day prior to the survey. ^ Patients removed from the role < 
4Ji»iK Y Uunng the 12 months prior to the day of the survey. A patient could be ir)duded more than once if tlM individual had 
tlvan v>m» opiMxto of care during the year. ^ Figure does not meet standard of |Biiat)ility or precision. ^ For current pal 
tikt* ttxp«»cteii source; for discharges the actual source for the entire eptsode. ^ For current patients, servioee currenOy 
piuvicleU. tor discharges services provided during the 30 days prior to discharge. 

Source U 8. National Center for Health Statistics, unpublished data. 

No. 168. Nursing Homes—Selected Characteristics: 1985 to 1999 

(Beds: 1,624 repieeen ta 1,624,000. Covers licensed and^or certified nursing homes in the conterminous United States the 
three or more beds. Based on the 1999 National Nursing Home Survey, a two-sta^e survey sample of nursing homee and 
rbHidents Sub|ect to sampling variability. For composition of regions, see map. inside front cover] 





Beds 


Current 
residents 


Full-time equivalent employmen 


Characteristic 


Per 

Nursing Number nursing 

homes (1.000) honw 


Occu- 

Numtwr pancy 

(1.000) rate^ 


Administrative. 

medical. arnJ 

therapeutic 


Nursing 




Rate per 

Number 100 

(1.000) beds 


Number Rat 
(1.000) 100 


1085 


19.100 1.624 85 
16.700 1.771 106 
17.000 1.821 107 

18,000 1,965 100 

12.000 1.291 106 
4.800 523 109 
1.200 151 126 

14.700 1.698 116 

^600 49 82 

^100 177 89 

^500 40 80 

2.000 72 36 
7.000 503 72 
7.500 998 133 
1.400 392 280 

3.200 443 138 
6.000 619 103 
6.000 652 109 
2.800 251 90 

10.800 1.179 109 
7^200 781 108 


1.491 91.8 
1.549 87.4 
1.609 88.4 

1,627 82.8 

1.048 81.2 
446 85.3 
133 88.1 

1.414 83.3 

37 75.5 

143 80.8 

33 82.5 

59 81.9 
414 82.3 
826 82.8 
328 83.7 

382 86.2 
498 80.4 
531 81.6 
215 85.7 

977 82.9 
646 82.7 


89.4 5.5 

90.5 5.1 
100.0 5.5 

96.6 4.9 

60.2 4.6 

29.1 5.6 
7.4 4.7 

83.2 4.9 
2.8 5.7 

9.0 5.1 
1.6 4.0 

7.1 9.9 
28.8 5.7 

45.0 4.5 

15.7 4.0 

21.7 4.9 

28.3 4.6 
30.5 4.7 

16.1 6.4 

58.7 5.0 
37.7 4.8 


704 


1995 


916 


1997 


950 


1999. total 


961 


Ownership: 

Proorietarv 


597 


Voluntary nonprofit 

Government and other. . . . 

Certification: 
Medicare and medicaid 
certified 


280 
84 

842 


Medicare onlv 


26 


Medicaid only 


75 


Not certified 


18 


Bed size: 

L^ss than 50 beds 

50-99 beds 


43 
252 


100-199 beds 


476 


200 beds or more 

Region: 
Northeast 


190 
244 


Midwest 


272 


South 


311 


West 


133 


Affiliation: ^ 
Chain 


Sfifi 


Indeoendent 


404 







^ Number of residents divided by number of available beds multiplied by 100. ^ Figure does not meet standards of refa 
or precision. ^ Excludes a small number of homes, beds, and residents with unlcnown affiliation. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, Vital and Health Statistics, Series 13. No. 152. 



1 1 6 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the Unllad 



No. 169. Nursing Home Residents 65 Years Old and Over by Selected 
Characteristics: 1999 

[1,470 represents 1,470,000. Covers licensed and/or certified nursing homes in the conterminous United States that had three or 
more beds. Based on the Natior^ Nursing Home Survey, a two-stage sample survey of nursing homes and their residertts. Sub- 
ject to sampling variability] 



Characteristic ^ 


Percent 

Number distri- 

(1,000) bution 


Item 


Percent 
of 
ekjeriy 
resi- 
dents 


Functional status 


Percent 
of elderly 
residents 
receiving 
assis- 
tance 


Total * 


1,470 100.0 

378 25.7 
1.092 74.3 

195 13.3 
518 35.2 
757 51.5 

447 30.4 
23 1.6 

81 5.5 
164 11.1 
679 46.2 

76 5.2 


Type of aids used: 

Wheelchair 

Walker 

Vision impaired 

Hearing impaired 

Primary source 
of payment: ^ 
Private sources * . . . . 

Medicare 

Medicaid 

Other^ 


62.6 
26.1 

28.5 
22.8 

26.3 

32.8 

37.5 

3.4 


ADLs:« 
Bathing, showering. . . 

Dressing 

Eating 




Male 


94.7 
875 


Female 


47.1 


65 to 74 years 

^ to 84 years 

85 years aixl over 

Living quarters before 
admission: 

Private residenoe 

Retirement home 


Transterrino in or 
out of beds or chair . 
Using toilet room .... 

lADLs: ' 
Care of personal 

possessions 

Manaaing money .... 
Secunng personal 

items 

Using telephone .... 


30.2 
57.6 

74.3 


Board and care, 
assisted living, and/or 
restdeotial facility 

Nursing home 


70.7 

72.9 
62.2 


Hospital 

Other health facility 





At time of survey. ^ Includes other and/or unkrK>wn. not shown separately. . ^ At admission. * Includes private 
insurance own irKX>me, family support, social security benefits, and retirement funds. ^ Includes supplemental security income. 
other government assistance or welfare, religious organizations, foundations, agerx:ies. Veterans Administration contract, 
pensions, or ottier compensation, payment source not yet determined, and other and untcnown sources. ^ Activities of daily 
kving. ' Instrumental activities of daily living. 

Source: U.S. fMational Center for Health Statistics. Vital and Health Statistics. Series 13. No. 152. 



No. 1 70. Mental Healtli Facilities— Summary by Type of Facility: 1 998 

[Beds: 261.9 represents 261,900. Facilities, beds and inpatients as of year-end: Excludes private psychiatric office practice and 
psychiatric service modes of all types in hospitals or outpatient clinics of federal agencies other than U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs. 
Excludes data from Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands. Guam, and other territories] 





Inpatient beds 


Inpatients 


Inpatient 

care 

episodes^ 


Type of facility 


Number of Total 
facilities (1.000) Rate ^ 


Total 
(1.000) Rate^ 


Total 


3,729 261.9 97.3 

??9 63.5 23.6 
809 67.1 24.9 
1.593 54.3 20.2 
123 13.3 4.9 
975 63.7 23.7 


215.9 80.3 

57.0 21.2 
51.9 19.3 

37.0 13.8 
10.9 4.0 

59.1 22.0 


2.099 

186 


Menial hoepitats: 
State and county 


Private ^ 

General hospitals^ 


527 

1.137 

128 


Veterans Adrrar>istration ^ 


Olher^ 


121 



Rate per 100,000 population. Based on Census Bureau estimated civilian population as of July 1. ^ "Inpatient aire 
episodes'* is defined as the number of residents in Inpatient facilities at the beginnino of the year plus the total additions to inpatient 
^ciMies during the year. ^ Includes residential treatment centers for eniotionally disturbed children. * Nonfederal hospitals with 
separate psydiiatnc services. ^ Includes U.S. Departnoent of Veterans Affairs (VA) neuropsychiatric hospitals, VA general 
'xjspitais with separate psychiatric settings and VA freestanding psychiatric outpatient clinics. ^ Includes free-standing 
psydiiatric outpatient facilities that provide only psychiatric outpatient services and other multiservice mental health facilities with 
two or more settings, which are not elsewhere classified, as well as freestandino partial care facilities which only provide psychiatric 
partial care services. Number of facilities data also include freestanding psychiatric partial care facilities. 

Source: U.S. SubstarKe Abuse and Mental Health Sendees Administration, Center for Mental Health Services, unpublished 

data. 



Health and NuU\t\ox\ \\1 



U.8. Csnwt BUTMU. SMislical Abstract of the UnMed Sttttes. 2002 



No. 1 71. Injury and Poisoning Episodes and Conditions by Age and Sex: 1999 

[314»8 rtpreMftts 314»8,000. Covers all mecteally attended injuries and poisonings occurring during the 3-month pecfod prtor 
to the sun^ey inten^iew. There may be more than one condition per episode. Based on the rsdesigneaNatiorMl Healm imtraew 
Survey, a sample survey of the dvHian noninstitutiorwiized population; see Appendx III] 



External cause and nature of injury 



Both sexes 



Total 



Total. 

age- 

ad- 

justed^ 



Under 


12 to 


22 to 


45 to 


12 


21 


44 


64 


years 


years 


years 


years 


old 


old 


old 


old 


4.890 


6.462 


10.738 


5,602 


101.1 


165.9 


115.1 


95.6 


36.2 


37.4 


22.4 


31.5 


22.0 


47.8 


16.6 


11.6 


11.3 
*2.2 


28.3 


22.3 


12.1 


14.9 


19.4 


17.2 


6.9 


10.6 
*3.0 


10.1 


6.6 


9.7 


4.6 


*1.8 



65 

years 

old and 

over 



Male, Female, 
loni vm 



EPISODES 



Numlwr (1.000) . 

Annual rate per 1 .000 population, total ^ . . . 

Fall 

Struck t)y or against a person or an ot^ect 

Transportation*^ 

Overexertion 

Cutting, piercing instruments 

Poisoning 

CONDITIONS 5 

Annual rate per 1 ,000 population, total ^ . . . 

Sprains/strains 

Open wounds 

Fractures 

Contusions 



31.268 

115.1 

33.8 

19.8 

17.8 

14.1 

8.2 

4.6 



137.2 
33.8 
24.5 
20.8 
13.9 



111 
34.0 
19.6 
17.7 
14.1 
8.2 
4.6 



137.4 
33.8 
24.3 
21.0 
14.1 



102.3 

9.6 

38.7 

17.3 

8.1 



199.1 
53.6 
32.0 
34.9 
19.9 



139.4 
42.3 
23.0 
14.1 
11.1 



118.0 
33.2 
15.7 
17.8 
12.0 



3,576 

110.1 

62.6 

6.6 

12.3 

9.9 

*4.4 



143.4 
22.7 
14.4 
33.7 
27.0 



17,370 


13J07 


131.1 


99.8 


29.7 


37.7 


27.0 


12.8 


20.5 


15J 


16.2 


12.1 


11.6 


4J 


3.8 


5.5 



155.7 
36.3 
33.2 

22.4 
13.4 



119J 
31.4 
16.1 
19J 
14.5 



\ Data were age-adjusted t>y the direct method to the 2000 projected population. 
^ Includes the oiteoories "Motor vehicle traffic"; "Pedal cyde, other"; ''Pedestrian, 



^ Indudet olherNm 
other"; and Tranepoit, 



X Not applicable, 
not shown separately. 

other." * Figure does not meet standard of reliability or precision. ^ Poi8or)ing episodes are assumed to have a single oondHon 
resulting from the episode. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital and Haatth Statistics. Series 10. No. 202. and unpublished date. 

No. 172. injuries Associated Witli Consumer Products: 1999 

[For products associated with more than 40.000 injuries in 1999. Estimates calculated from a representative sample of hoe p H i l s 
with emergency treatment departments in the United States. Data are estimates of the number of emergency room trealad cases 
nationwide associated with various products. Product involvement does not necessarily mean tf)e product caused the a ocidenL 
Products were selected from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury SurveManoe OyHem] 



Product 



Home wortcshop equipment: 
Saws (hand or power) . . 
Hammers 



Number 



Household packaging and containers: 
Household containers and pacltaging 
Bottles and jars 

Housewares: 

Knives 

Tableware and flatware 



Home furnishing: 

Beds 

Tables 

Chairs 

Bathtubs and showers 

Ladders 

Sofas, couches, davenports, etc. 

Carpets, rugs 

Toilets 

Home structures, construction: ^ 

Stairs or steps 

Floors or flooring materials . . . . 
Other doors (excl. garage) . . . . 



96.658 
40.015 

196.111 
75.581 

446.225 
112,665 

455,027 
304,758 
292.406 
195.324 
163.138 
120.653 
117,156 
56.424 

1.029.418 

1.024.522 

331.344 



Product 



Ceilings and walls 

Household cabinets, racks, and shelves 

Nails, screws, tacks, or bolts 

Windows 

Porches, bakxxiies, open-side floors . . . 
Ferx:es or fence posts 



Home entertainment equipment: 
Televisions 



Personal use items: 

Footwear 

Jewelry 



Yard and garden equipment: 
Lawn mowers 



Sports and recreation equipment: 

Bicydes 

Trampolines 

Swings or swing sets 

Playground climbing equipment 

Swimming pools 

All-terrain vehicles 

Skatetx>ard8 

Slides or sikling boards 



Number 



259,301 
240.629 
162.507 
129J276 
130,105 
117.175 

40.634 

94,170 
65.127 

70.640 

595.679 
96.880 
79.803 
78.576 
61.809 
84.800 
59.964 
51.423 



^ Includes accessories. ^ Includes materials. 

No. 1 73. Costs of Unintentionai injuries: 2000 

[512.4 represents $512,400,000,000. Covers costs of deaths or disabling injuries together with vehicle accidents and firse] 





Amount (bil. dol.) 


Percent distributton 


Cost 


Motor 
Total ^ vehicle Work Home Ottier 


Motor 
Total ^ vehicle Wortc Home Other 


Total 


512.4 201.5 131.2 111.9 82.6 

259.8 71.5 67.6 70.9 53.6 

93.5 24.6 24.2 26.4 19.6 

72.6 48.0 22.3 4.9 4.5 
55.5 55.5 2.2 (NA) (NA) 
20.9 1.9 11.5 4.4 3.5 
10.1 (NA) 3.4 5.3 1.4 


100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 IOOjO 


Wage and productivity losses ^ . . . . 

Medical expense 

Administrative expenses ^ 

Motor vehicle damage 

Employer cost * 

Fire toss 


50.7 35.5 51.5 63.4 04.0 
18.2 12.2 18.4 23.6 23.7 
14.2 23.8 17.0 4.4 5.4 

10.8 27.5 1.7 (f4A) (NA) 
4.1 0.9 8.8 3.9 42 
2.0 (NA) 2.6 4.7 1.7 





NA Not available. Excludes duplk»tk>n between wort( and nwtor vehk^le ($14.8 billton in 2000). ^ Actual loes of wagee 
and household productton. and the present value of future eamirigs tost. ^ Home and other costs may indude ooeta of 
administering medical treatment claims for some motor-vehtole injuries filed through health insurance plans. * Estimate of the 
uninsured costs incurred t)y emptoyers. representing tfie money value of time tost t)y noniniured wortters. 

Source of Tables 172 and 173: Nattonal Safety Council, Itasca. IL. Injury Facts. 2001 tdition (copyright). 



1 1 8 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the Unllad 



I. Specified Repoitabie Diseases— Cases Reported: 1M0 to 2000 



190^900. Figures should be interpreied vvtth caution. Although reporting of some of these d toeaae s Is inoomplelB, 
ii« of value in Indicating trends of disease inddenoe. Includes cases Imponed from outside the United States] 



1M0 



1M0 



1985 1996 



1997 



1996 



1999 



(undulanl fever) 
t* (1,000) 



C0H0157:M7. . 
■ Mluenza ... 
ease (Leprosy) . 

(aarum) (1.000) 
ous)(1.000)... 
,non-e (1.000)^ 
is 



.000 ) .^ ^ 
3oai Infections. 



idxki 



s. acute 



ntain spotted fever 



iB^(i.dob) 

'"^(1.000) . 



layndrome. 
a'^*(*1.'obbj 



■lamitt ed diseases: 

M (1.000) 

:i.OOO) 

la (1.000) 

d (1.000) 



1.163 

3.904 

33.7 

19.0 

131 

27.7 

510 

1.004 



n 



911 
2.1 



71.547 

97 

98 

120.6 

23 

(NA) 

2.139 

1,180 

144 

10.8 

31.6 

4.6 

1.241 

11.700 

1,419 

0.3 

3.243 

0.9 

5.1 

9 

7 

64 

7.811 

5 

590 

128 

46.0 

32.1 

41 

191 

29 

22.9 

369 



690 


393 


134 


69 


(') 


478 


4.2 


0.6 



66.885 

119 

112 

83.5 

(na] 

2.741 

1.170 

112 

10.6 

31.0 

3.7 

1.198 

16.455 

1.800 

0.5 

3,437 

0.8 

7.8 

5 

5 

42 

6.982 

3 

831 

238 

45.5 

26.0 

36 

145 

11 

21.3 

396 

326 

53 

499 

0.4 



58.492 

132 

98 

98.7 

6 

2.566 

4 

2.555 

1.162 

122 

10.4 

30.0 

3.8 

1,163 

12.801 

2.001 

0.1 

3.308 

0.7 

6.6 

4 

5 

33 

8.105 

2 

409 

181 

41.9 

23.1 

50 

157 

13 

19.9 

365 

325 

47 

527 

0.2 



46.521 

116 

79 

82.5 

17 

3.793 

1 

3.161 

1,194 

106 

10.3 

23.2 

3.5 

1,355 

16,801 

1,611 

0.1 

2,725 

0.7 

7.4 

9 

1 

47 

7.259 

1 

365 

364 

43.7 

23.6 

41 

138 

19 

18.4 

375 

356 

38 

604 

0.2 



45,104 

154 

82 

46.0 

6 

2,361 

1 

4.513 

1,309 

106 

7.7 

17.0 

3.1 

1,108 

16,273 

1.666 

0.1 

2.501 

0.4 

7.3 

9 

16 
6,730 

579 

267 

40.6 

17.5 

40 

113 

12 

17.5 

346 

360 

36 

657 

0.1 



40,758 

138 

87 

27.4 

5 

3,128 

1 

4.528 

1,398 

91 

8.0 

13.4 

3.2 

1,127 

17,730 

1,560 

0.1 

2.256 

0.3 

7.9 

6 

17 

6,934 

4 

495 

176 

39.6 

22.9 

35 

135 

16 

16.4 

377 

359 

32 

702 

0.1 



laants zero. NA ^4ot availat>le. ^ Acquired immunodeficiency syrxlrome was not a notifiabie disease until 1984. 
shown for years in which cases were reported to the CDC. Begirviing 1995, based on revised classification system and 
urveillance case definition. ^ Disease was not notifiable. ^ Includes foodix>me, infant, wound, and unspecified 
CNokenpox was taken off the nationally notifiable list in 1991 but many states continue to report. ^ Indudee some 
rittve for antit>ody to hepatitis C virus who do not have hepatitis. " Whoooira cough. ' fievised. Data subject to 
aioM. " German measles. Excludes rubella, congenital 8yr>drome. " Excludes typhoid fever. ^° Badllary 
^^ f>4ewty reported active cases. 

c U.S. Centere for Disease Control arnJ Prevention, Atlanta, GA, Summary of N<MtMe Diseases. United States. 2000, 
nd Mortality Weekly Report. Vol. 49. No. 53. June 14, 2002. 



i. Cliildren immunized Against Specified Diseases: 1995 to 2000 

:. Covers civiHan noninstitutionalized population ages 19 months to 35 months. Based on estimates from the National 
an Survey. The health care providers of the children are contacted to verify and/or complete vaccination information, 
on race/ettmic status of the childl 





1995, 

total 








2000 








Vaccination 


1999. 

total 


Total 


White 
non- 
Hispanic 


Hispanic 


Black 
non- 
Hispanic 


Ameri- 
can 

Indian/ 
Alaskan 
Native^ 


Asian/ 

Pacific 

Islander^ 


Istanus-pertussis (DTP)/ 
a-tetanus: 


95 
79 
88 
92 
90 
68 
(NA) 
76 
74 


96 
83 
90 
94 
92 
88 
58 
80 
78 


94 
82 
90 
93 
91 
90 
68 
78 
76 


95 
84 
91 
95 
92 
91 
66 
80 
79 


93 
79 
88 
91 
90 
88 
70 
75 
73 




92 
76 
87 
93 
88 
89 
67 
72 
71 


91 
75 
90 
90 
87 
91 
62 
70 
69 


95 


MS 


85 


oaaa 


93 


oaas 


92 


Mimps. njbella vaccine 

: 34- donoo 


90 
91 




77 


pdkof'u iy#cv * 

polont- MCV/3+ hlB * 


79 
75 



I available. ^ Kkxi-Hispanic. ^ Haemophilus B. ^ Data collection for varicella (chicken pox) began in July 1996. 
astos containing vaccine. 

K U.8. Centers for Disease Control and Preventkm, AUanta, GA, MortMlty and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 49. No. 26. 
0; and "immunizatton Coverage in the U.S."; <http://vvww.cdc.gov/nip/ooverege/default.htm>. 



Health and Nutrition \ \^ 



Abstract of the United States; 2002 



No. 1 76. AIDS Cases Reported by Patient Characteristic: 1981 to 2001 

[Provisional. For cases reported in the year shown. Includes Puerto Rico. Virgin Islands. Guam, and U.S. Pacific Islands. Acquired 
immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a specific group of diseases or conditions which are indicative of severe immwKMuppres- 
sion related to infection with the human immunooefictency virus (HIV)- Data are subject to retrospective changes and may 
from those data in Table 174] 



Characteristic 



1981- 
2001, 

total 



2001 



Total ^ 



Age: 
Under 5 years old . . . 
5 to 12 years old. . . . 
13 to 19 years old . . . 
20 to 29 years old . . . 
30 to 39 years old . . . 
40 to 49 years old . . . 
50 to 59 years old . . . 
60 years old and over 

Sex: 

Male 

Female 



Race/ethnic group: 
Non-Hispanic White . . 
Non-Hispanic Black . . 

Hispanic 

Asian/Pacrfic Islander . 



American Indian/Alaska Native. : 



816.149 



6.975 

2.099 

4,428 

133,725 

362,021 

216,387 

66.060 

24.453 

670.687 
145.461 

343.889 

313.180 

149.752 

6.157 

2.537 



43,158 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

31.994 
11.164 

13.237 

21,031 

8.209 

430 

194 



Characteristic 



Transmission category: 

Males, 13 years and over . . . . 
Men wtx> have sex with men. . . . 

Injecting drug use 

Men who have sex with men and 

injectino drug use 

HemophHia/coagulation disorder . 

Heterosexual contact ^ 

Heterosexual contact with 

injecting drug user 

Transfusion "* 

Undetemiined * 

Females. 13 years and over . . 

Injecting drug use 

Hemophilia/coagulatk)n disorder . 

Heterosexual contact ^ 

Heterosexual contact with 

injectino drug user 

TransfuflJon "* . 

Undetemiined * 



1981- 

2001. 

total 


2001 


666.026 
368.971 
146.750 


31.901 

13.266 

5.261 


51.293 

5.000 

22.914 


1.502 

97 

2.213 


9.821 

5.057 

57.220 


549 

105 

8.909 


141.048 

55.576 

292 

35.660 


11.002 

2.212 

9 

3.205 


21.736 

3.914 

23.870 


837 

113 

4.006 



NA Not available. ^ Includes persons with characteristics unknown. ^ Includes persons wtK> have had het a f n a axu al 
contact with a bisexual male, a person with hemophilia, a transfusion recipient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) inltclion. 
or an HIV-infected person, risk not specified. ^ Receipt of bk)od transfusk>n, blood components, or tissue. * Indudes pWBons 
for whom risk informatk>n is incomplete (because of death, refusal to be interviewed, or loss to folk>wup), persons sti undsr 
investigation, men reported only to have had heterosexual contact with prostitutes, and interviewed persons for wtiom no spscMc 
risk is identified. 

Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, QA, HIV/AIDS Surveiltance Report, Volume 13, No. 2. 

No. 1 77, Estimated Persons Living With Acquired Immunodeficiency 
Syndrome (AiDS) by Selected Characteristics: 1995 to 2000 

[These numbers do not represent actual cases of persons living with AIDS. Rather, these numbers are point estimates of persons 
living with AIDS derived by subtracting the estimated cumulative number of deaths in persons with AIDS from the estimalsd 
cumulative number of persons with AIDS diagnosed. Estimated AIDS incidence and estimated deaths are ad|justed for reporting 
delays, but not for incomplete reporting] 



Charactenstic 



1995 



1996 



1997 



1998 



1999 



Total 



214.674 237,687 265,494 289.568 312.673 



337,731 



RACE/ETHNICITY 



White, not Hispanic 

Black, not Hispanic 

Hispanic 

Asian/Pacific Islander 

American Indian/Alaska Native 



MALE ADULT/ADOLESCENT 
EXPOSURE CATEGORY 



Male total 

Men who have sex with men 

Injecting drug use 

Men who have sex with men and inject drugs . . 

Hemophilia/coagulation disorder 

Heterosexual contact 

Receipt of blood transfusion, blood components, 

or tissue 

Risk not reported or identified 



FEMALE ADULT/ADOLESCENT 
EXPOSURE CATEGORY 



Female total 

Injecting drug use 

Hemophilia/coagulation disorder 

Heterosexual contact 

Receipt of blood transfusion, blood components, 

or tissue 

Risk not reported or identified 

Pediatric ^ exposure category 



90,878 

80,868 

40,369 

1.617 

724 


97.677 

91,772 

45,332 

1.856 

805 


106.365 

104.768 

51,111 

2.086 

894 


113.606 

116,339 

56,054 

2.306 

969 


120.541 

127.393 

60,801 

2.563 

1,054 


127.838 

139.522 

65.091 

2,841 

1.100 


173,115 

100,135 

43,795 

15,882 

1,725 

9.739 


189,856 

109.321 

47.984 

16,741 

1.733 

12.145 


210.666 

120.969 

52.885 

18,053 

1,786 

14.908 


228,568 

131.093 

56,784 

19,061 

1,816 

17.592 


245.915 

140,977 

60.493 

19.879 

1,845 

20,348 


284.140 

151.325 
64.522 
20.5^ 

23.333 


937 
902 


1.002 
930 


1,094 
972 


1.202 
1.018 


1.308 
1.065 


u.S\ 


38,136 

18,308 

132 

18.464 


44,327 

20.277 

158 

22.537 


51.221 

22,582 

193 

26,952 


57.290 

24,321 

221 

31,115 


62.090 

25.777 

235 

35.206 


00.778 
27.475 

400^7 


862 
371 


952 
403 


1.044 
450 


1,145 
488 


1.247 
525 


^2.24^ 


3.423 


3.504 


3,606 


3,711 


3.768 


3.806 



^ Statistical estimates for AIDS prevalence in 2000 among persons exposed to HIV through henoophilia/ooagulation disorder 
or receipt of blood transfusion. t>lood components, or tissue are not presented, but are included in the exposure category "other." 
The relatively small number of AIDS cases in these categories in recent years does not provide information that results In reliable 
annual estimates of prevalence. ^ Less than 13 years okJ. 

Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Atianta. GA, unpuMshed data. 



1 20 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statisttoal Abstract of the Untied 



No. 1 78. AIDS, Syphilis, and Tuberculosis Cases Reported by State: 2000 



stats 



Tuber- 
AIOS SyphiKs culoeis 



State 



Tuber* 
AIDS SyphiKs cutosis 



State 



Tuber- 
AIDS SypNHs culoeis 



U^ ... 



^40,758 31^5 16,377 



AL. 
AK. 
AZ. 

AR. 
CA. 
CO. 
CT. 
OE. 
DC. 
FL. 
GA. 
HI . 
ID . 
IL. . 
IN . 
lA . 



483 
22 

460 
194 

4,737 
313 
620 
221 
875 

4.976 

1.237 

115 

22 

1.761 

389 

94 



752 

6 

847 

367 

3.354 

63 

151 

45 

516 

2,768 

1.636 

22 

11 

1.646 

747 

55 



310 
108 
261 
199 
3.297 

97 
105 

28 

85 

1.171 

703 

136 

16 
743 
145 

40 



KS. 
KY. 
LA. 
ME. 
MD. 
MA. 
Ml . 
MN. 
MS. 
MO 
MT. 
NE. 
NV. 
NH. 
NJ. 
NM. 
NY. 
NC. 



128 

212 

679 

40 

1.465 

1.197 

767 

185 

431 

459 

16 

79 

286 

31 

1.929 

144 

6,204 

696 



67 
253 
973 
7 
1,172 
447 
984 

77 
685 
299 

7 

52 

19 

801 

98 

2.945 

1,494 



77 

147 

331 

24 

282 

285 

287 

178 

173 

211 

21 

24 

96 

22 

565 

46 

1.744 

447 



ND. 
OH. 
OK. 
OR. 
PA. 
Rl . 
SC. 
SD. 
TN. 
TX. 
UT. 
VT. 
VA. 
WA 
WV 
Wl . 
WY 



3 

599 

352 

210 

1.692 

102 

810 

8 

863 

2.667 

151 

38 

891 

515 

63 

218 

11 



1 

262 

327 

49 

685 

38 

853 

1 

1.708 

3.297 

59 

537 

171 

13 

184 

5 



5 

340 

154 

119 

383 

49 

286 

16 

383 

1.506 

49 

4 

292 

258 

33 

92 

4 



- Represents zero. ^ includes 98 cases among persons with unknown state of residence. 

Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Atlanta. QA, Summary ofNotifiabto Diseases. United States. 2000, 
Morttdity and Mortality WMdy Report. Vol. 49, No. 53, June 14. 2002. 

No. 1 79. Persons With Limitation of Activity Caused by Chronic Conditions: 
1997 and 1999 



(bi p er c en l Limttation of activity is assessed by asking respondents a series of questtons about limitations in their at)inty to perform 
activilies usual for their age group because of a physical, mental, or emottonal prot>lem. Respondents are asked about limitations 
in activilies ol daily liv^, or instrumental activities of daily living, play, school, work, diffk^ulty walking or remembering, and any 
other activity limftatk)ns. For reported limitations, the causal health conditk>ns are determined and resporvdents are corwidered 
imiled if one or more of these oonditk>ns is chronk:. Based on the Natkxial Health Inten^iew Sun^ey, a sample sun/ey of the civilian 
noninstitutkMialized populatkxi; see Appendix ill] 



Characteristic 



1997 



1 



ToM ^ * 

Under 18 years . . 
18 to 44 years. . . 
45 to 54 years. . . 
55 to 64 years. . . 
65 to 74 years. . . 
75 years arxi over 



13.3 


12.2 


6.6 


6.0 


7.0 


6.3 


14.2 


13.1 


22.2 


21.1 


30.0 


27.5 


50.2 


45.6 



Characteristk: 



Male 2. 
Female ^ 



i 



1997 



1 



White, r>orvHi8panic ^ . 
Black, non-Hispanic ^ . 

Hispank: ^\. 

Mexican ^ ^ 



13.1 
13.4 



12.1 
12.2 



13.2 


12.3 


17.0 


15.3 


12.8 


10.4 


12.5 


9.6 



Includes all other races not shown separately. ^ Estimates for all persons are age actuated to the year 2000 standard usirtg 
SK age groups: Under 18 years. 18-44 years. 45-54 years. 55-64 years. 65-74 years, and 75 years and over. ^ Persons (M 
ifspanic origin may be of any race. 

Mo. 180. Persons 65 Years Old and Over With Limiution of Activity Caused by 
Chronic Conditions: 1 997 to 1 999 

[ki percent Covers rwninstitutkxialized persons 65 years okJ arnJ over. To determine activities of daily livino (ADL) llmitattons 
reipondenls were asked "Because of a physical, mental, or emotional prot>lem. does (this person) need the heto of other persons 
Ml) personal care needs, such as eatirig. bathing, dressirtg. or getting around inskle this home?" Instrumental activities of daily 
iving (lADL) were determined by asking respondents "Because of a physk»l. mental, or emottonal problem, does (this person) 
need the help of other persons in handling routine needs, such as everyday househokJ chores, doing necessary business. 
choppmg. or gett^ around for other purposes?" See also headnote. Table 179] 



Characteristk: 


Percent with ADL limitation 


Percent with lADL limitatkxi 


1987 


1996 


1999 


1997 


1998 


1999 


Tom ^ » 


6.7 

3.4 
10.4 

5.2 
7.7 

6.1 
11.7 
10.8 
11.4 


6.3 

3.3 
9.6 

5.1 
7.1 

5.6 
11.1 

9.9 
12.3 


6.3 

3.1 
9.9 

4.9 
7.2 

5.7 

11.9 

8.6 

8.9 


13.7 

6.9 
21.2 

9.1 
16.9 

13.0 
21.2 
16.3 
18.8 


13.5 

7.1 
20.5 

9.2 
16.4 

12.4 
21.8 
19.3 
24.7 


12.4 


66 to 74 years 


6.2 


75 years and over 


19.1 


Male^ 


8.4 


Female^ 


15.1 


While. norvHisoanic ^ 


11.5 


Black. non-HiSDank: ^ 


20.8 


Spartc^^T^. ...:.::.: 


14.1 


MexK»i23 


15.6 







^ InckxJes other races not shown scnarately. ^ Estimates are age adjusted to the year 2000 standard using two age groups: 
65-74 years and 75 years and over. ^ Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. 

Source of Tables 179 and 180: U.S. Natk)nal Center for Health Statisttos, Health, United States, 2001. 



Health and UuXT\x\ox\ \^\ 



u& 



Bumu. StaMtealMMilnaciUheUrmad States: 2002 



No. 181. Subsunce Abuse IVeatmMit Facilities and Cilenu: 1995 to 2000 

[At cH Octoter 1. Based on the Uniform Facility Data Set (UFDS) sufvey. a census of all known fadWias that piovidt 
atxjse treatment in the United States and associated jurisoictlons. Selected missing data for responding faoNnss war 



Primary focus 


Number 


Primary focus 


Number 


lype of care and 
type of problem 


Number 


FACILITIES 
1995 


10,746 
10,841 
10.860 
13.455 
15.239 
13.428 

8.147 

1.260 

381 

3.303 
337 


CLIENTS 
1995 


1.009.127 
940.141 
929.086 

1.038.378 

1.000.906 

668.835 
54,936 
32.273 

226.326 
18.526 


Total dlenta 

Outpatient rehab 

Outpatient detoxification . 

24-hour rehab 

24-hour detoxNicalion. . . 

Drug only 


Af77 9QII 


1996 


1996 


14J248 


1997 


1997 


94.710 


1998 


1998 


14639 


1999 •••••■■•••«■•■ 


2000. total 

Sut)8tanoe abuse 

treatment services .... 
Mental health services . . 
Qeneral health care. . . . 
Both substance abuse 

and mental health .... 
Other 




2000, total 


287.006 


Sut)8tance atxjse 


Alcohol ofily 


222.193 


treatment services .... 
Mental health services. . . 
General health care .... 
Both substance abuse 


Both alcohol & drug .... 

Total with a dnjg 
pfoblem 


475.006 
762,104 


and mental health 

Other 


lotalwithan 
alcohol problem ' . . . . 


097^60 









^ Includes clients at fadHties that did not provide data on type of substance abuse problem treated. ^ThesumofcBenta 
a drug problem and dients with both diagnoses. ^ The sum of dients with an alcohd problem and cUents wHh both 



Source: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Uniform FadOty Data Set (UFDS): Annual aurvam 
lor 1995, 1996, 1997, 1996, and 1999 and National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS) 2000. 

No. 182. Drug Use by lype of Drug and Age Group: 1999 and 2000 

[In percent Current users are those who used drugs at least once within month prior to tMs study. Based on a repr»semaii>i 
sample of the U.S. population age 12 and older, including persons living in households and in some group quartaia such m 
dormitories and homeless shelters. Estimates are based on computer-assisted interviews of about 72.000 respondents. Subjed 
to sampling variak)ility; see source] 



Age and type of drug 



Ever used 



Current user 



1998 2000 



Age and type of drug 



Ever used 



Current user 



12 YEARS OLD AND OVER 

Any illicit drug 

Marijuana and hashish . . . 

Cocaine 

Crack 

Heroin 

Halludnogens 

LSD 

PCP 

Inhalants 

Any psychotherapeutic ^ . . 

Pain relievers ^ 

Tranquilizers ^ 

Stimulants ^ 

Methamphetamine ^ . 

Sedatives ^ 

Alcohol K • • • • 

"Binge" alcohd use ^ ... . 

Cigarettes 

SnDokeless tot>acco 

Cigars 

Pipes 

12 to 17 YEARS OLD 

Any lllidt drug 

Marijuana arxj hashish . . . 

Cocaine 

Halludnogens 

Inhalants 

Any psychotherapeutic ^ . . 
Alcohol V • . • • 

"Binge" alcohol use ^ . . . . 

Cigarettes 

SnK>keless tobacco 

Cigars 



18 TO 25 YEARS OLD 



39.7 

34.6 

11.5 

2.7 

1.4 

11.3 

8.7 

2.6 

7.8 

15.4 

9.0 

6.3 

7.2 

4.3 

3.5 

81.3 

(NA) 

68.2 

19.1 

35.6 

17.7 



27.6 

18.7 

2.4 

5.7 

9.1 

10.9 

42.9 

(NA) 

37.1 

9.8 

19.6 



38.9 

34.2 

11.2 

2.4 

1.2 

11.7 

8.8 

2.6 

7.5 

14.5 

8.6 

5.8 

6.6 

4.0 

3.2 

81.0 

(NAJ 

66.5 

18.5 

34.2 

16.4 



26.9 

18.3 

2.4 

5.8 

8.9 

10.9 

41.7 

(NAJ 

34.6 

8.6 

17.1 



6.3 
4.7 
0.7 
0.2 
0.1 
0.4 
0.2 

0.3 

1.8 

1.2 

0.5 

0.4 

0.2 

0.1 

46.4 

20.2 

25.8 

3.4 

5.5 

1.1 



9.8 

7.2 

0.5 

1.1 

1.1 

2.9 

16.5 

10.1 

14.9 

2.3 

5.4 



6.3 
4.8 
0.5 
0.1 
0.1 
0.4 
0.2 

0.3 

1.7 

1.2 

0.4 

0.4 

0.2 

0.1 

46.6 

20.6 

24.9 

3.4 

4.8 

1.0 



9.7 

7.2 

0.6 

1.2 

1,0 

3.0 

16.4 

10.4 

13.4 

2.1 

4.5 



Any ilHdt dnig 

Marijuana arnJ hashish . 

C^ocairw 

Hidludnogens 

Inhalants 

Any psychotherapeutic ^ 
Alcohd . . 

"Binge" alcohd use ^ . . 

Cigarettes 

Smokeless tobacco 

Cigars 

26 TO 34 YEARS OLD 



52.6 


51.2 


46.8 


45.7 


11.9 


10.9 


19.3 


19.3 


14.1 


12.8 


20.9 


19.5 


83.1 


84.0 


(NAj 
68.9 


(NA 
67.3 


25.8 


23.6 


43.9 


42.3 



Any illicit drug 

Marijuana and hashish . . . 

Cocaine 

Halludnogens 

Inhalants . 

Any psychotherapeutk: . . 

26 YEARS OLD AND OVER 

Ak»hd K •• • • 

"Binge" alcohd use ^ . . . . 

Cigarettes 

SnrK)keless tobacco 

Cigars 

35 YEARS OLD AND OVER 

Any lllk;it drug 

Marijuana and hashish . . . 

Cocaine 

Hallucinogens 

Inhalants 



Any psychotherapeutk: 



^ 



53.2 
47.7 
17.8 
16.4 
11.4 
18.6 



86.1 
(NA) 
72.3 
19.2 
36.3 



35.7 
31.5 
11.4 
9.4 
5.3 
14.2 



50.9 
46.0 
15.1 
15.8 
11.0 
16.9 



85.8 
(NA) 
70.7 
19.1 
35.2 



35.5 
31.6 
11.8 
10.1 
5.3 
13.5 



16.4 

14.2 

1.7 

1.9 

0.6 

3.7 

57.2 

37.9 

38.7 

5.7 

11.5 



6.8 
5.4 
1.2 
0.1 
0.2 
1.5 



48.7 

18.6 

24.9 

3.2 

4.5 



3.4 
2.2 
0.4 
0.1 
0.1 
1.3 



15J 

lao 

1.4 

1.8 

0.8 

3.6 

56J 

37.8 

38.3 

5.0 

10.4 



7J 
5.9 
0.8 
0.4 
0.2 
2.1 



49.0 

19.1 

24.2 

3.3 

3.9 



3^ 

2^ 

0.3 

0.1 
1.0 



• Represents or rounds to zero. NA Not available. Nonrned»al use of any prescriptk>n-type pain reliever, trarxjuillzer. 
stimulant, or sedative; does not indude over-ttie-oounter drugs. ' Binge use is defined as drinking five or nKxe drinks on the 
same occasion on at least one day in the past 30 days. 

Source: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health SarAoaa Administratkm. Summary of Findings from tha 2000 National 
Household Sun/ey on Dmg Abuse. <http-y/www.samhsa.gov/oas/nhsda.htm>. 



1 22 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statisttoal Abttrad of the Unilad 



No. 1 83. Estimated Use of Selected Dnigs by SUte: 1 999 



riS,199 wpwitwli 1S,m,000. Currant uaare are thoaa pareona 12 yaara oU and ovar wtw uaad drnga at laest onoa witNn montt) 
prior to thia aludy. Baaad on nationai aampla of reapondanta (aaa alao haadnola, Tabia 182). Tha atata aadmataa ware produoad 
by ovnbining tha prevalanoa rele t)a8ad on the atata sampto data and tha prevalanoa rata t)a8ad on a natnnai regreaai^ 
a ppi o d to local-area county and oanatia block group/trect-4eval aatlmataa from tha atata. Tha paramatare of tha ragraaaion modal 
are aaHmalad from tha anttre nationai aampla. For oompariaon pwpoaaa. tha data shown hare dteplay aatlmataa for aH 50 Stataa 
and tha District of Columbia utilizing tha modalad aatimataa for alSl araaa] 



Stata 




Eatimatad currant uaara (1.000) 



Current uaara as percent of population 



Any Illicit 
dnig^ 



Mart- 
fuana 



Any Illicit 
drug 
other 
than 
mari- 
juana ^ 



Ciga- Binoe 
rettiM atoohoT 



A 
« 



U.S. 

AL. . . 
AK. . . 
AZ. . . 
AR. . . 
CA. . . 
CO . . 
CT. .. 
DE. . . 
DC .. 

a. . . 

GA . . 
HI . . . 
ID. . . 
IL . . . 

IN 

lA 

KS. . . 

KY 

LA. . . 
ME . . 
MD .. 
MA . . 

Ml 

MN .. 
MS .. 
MO. . 
MT . . 
NE. .. 
NV. . . 

NH . . 

NJ... 

NM . . 

NY... 

NO .. 

NO .. 

OH .. 

OK .. 

OR .. 

PA... 

Rl... 

SC. .. 

SO... 

TN... 

TX. .. 
UT. .. 
VT... 
VA. .. 

m.. 

WV . 
W .. 
WY.. 



15,193 

184 

S2 

267 

106 

2.110 

310 

208 

53 

32 

843 

363 



670 
369 
131 
127 
198 
202 

74 
226 
514 
628 
263 
131 
297 

59 

76 
143 

69 

511 

130 

1.030 

392 

29 
606 
140 
214 
707 

71 
166 

37 
254 
850 
104 

35 
264 
398 

80 
306 

30 



11,478 

129 

35 

203 

80 

1.598 

273 

139 

43 

31 

696 

267 

59 

48 

514 

259 

83 

88 

128 

132 

65 

215 

399 

454 

233 

85 

229 

48 

58 

86 

62 

338 

106 

738 

315 

23 

436 

98 

187 

493 

63 

128 

27 

186 

594 

82 

29 

231 

328 

60 

255 

24 



6,646 
95 

18 

130 

55 

887 

113 

96 

21 

14 

360 

172 

22 

29 

283 

144 

57 

59 

103 

101 

35 

103 

199 

260 

106 

56 

117 

22 

36 

59 

26 

208 

57 

463 

169 

13 

256 

83 

97 

299 

26 

78 

15 

117 

447 

59 

15 

131 

158 

45 

119 

13 



57,296 

1.013 

127 

919 

614 

5.247 

821 

625 

180 

106 

3.146 

1.649 

217 

259 

2.847 

1,425 

648 

532 

1.080 

976 

269 

939 

1.289 

2.299 

1.137 

648 

1.374 

193 

336 

430 

256 

1.582 

394 

3.768 

1.876 

151 

2.832 

821 

716 

2.682 

223 

802 

153 

1.319 

3.868 

322 

119 

1.297 

1.202 

479 

1,177 

103 



44,466 

621 
105 
725 
399 

4.692 

738 

558 

142 

74 

2.181 

1.132 
201 
197 

2.122 
988 
582 
471 
612 
768 
209 
649 

1.244 

1.709 
946 
413 

1.026 
170 
344 
331 
208 

1.328 
315 

3.062 

1.038 
153 

2.074 
500 
525 

2,160 
175 
539 
155 
788 

3.373 
258 
107 

1.021 
839 
271 

1.141 
101 



8.9 

5.1 
10.7 
7.1 
5.0 
8.3 
9.3 
7.7 
8.5 
7.6 
6.8 
5.8 
7.1 
6.4 
6.9 
7.5 
5.5 
5.9 
6.0 
5.7 
7.1 
5.3 
10.1 
8.0 
6.7 
5.8 
6.6 
7.7 
5.6 
9.6 
7.0 
7.7 
8.9 
7.0 
6.3 
5.4 
6.5 
5.1 
7.7 
7.0 
8.7 
5.4 
6.0 
5.5 
5.4 
6.2 
6.8 
4.7 
8.4 
5.1 
7.0 
7.3 



5.2 

3.6 
7.2 
5.4 
3.7 
6.3 
8.1 
5.2 
6.9 
7.4 
5.6 
4.3 
6.0 
4.5 
5.3 
5.3 
3.5 
4.1 
3.9 
3.7 
6.2 
5.1 
7.8 
5.7 
5.9 
3.8 
5.1 
6.2 
4.2 
5.8 
6.3 
5.1 
7.2 
5.0 
5.0 
4.3 
4.7 
3.6 
6.7 
4.9 
7.7 
4.1 
4.4 
4.0 
3.8 
4.9 
5.7 
4.1 
7.0 
3.8 
5.9 
5.8 



3.0 

2.6 
3.7 
3.4 
2.6 
3.5 
3.4 
3.6 
3.4 
3.4 
2.9 
2.7 
2.2 
2.8 
2.9 
2.9 
2.4 
2.7 
3.1 
2.8 
3.4 
2.4 
3.9 
3.3 
2.7 
2.5 
2.6 
2.9 
2.6 
4.0 
2.6 
3.1 
3.9 
3.1 
2.7 
2.4 
2.8 
3.0 
3.5 
3.0 
3.1 
2.5 
2.4 
2.5 
2.8 
3.5 
3.0 
2.4 
3.4 
2.9 
2.7 
3.2 



2S.9 

28.0 
26.4 
24.4 
28.8 
20.6 
24.6 
23.2 
28.9 
24.9 
25.2 
26.4 
22.4 
24.5 
27.2 
29.0 
27.2 
24.9 
33.1 
27.5 
25.8 
22.1 
25.3 
29.1 
29.0 
28.8 
30.6 
25.3 
24.7 
28.9 
25.7 
23.7 
27.0 
25.5 
30.0 
28.3 
30.6 
30.2 
25.7 
26.6 
27.2 
25.9 
25.0 
28.7 
24.5 
19.2 
23.6 
23.2 
25.5 
30.9 
27.1 
24.7 



20.1 

17.2 
21.8 
19.2 
18.7 
18.4 
22.1 
20.7 
22.8 
17.5 
17.5 
18.1 
20.8 
18.7 
21.8 
20.1 
24.4 
22.1 
18.7 
21.7 
20.0 
15.3 
24.4 
21.7 
24.2 
18.3 
22.8 
22.3 
25.3 
22.2 
20.9 
19.9 
21.6 
20.7 
16.6 
28.7 
22.4 
18.4 
18.9 
21.4 
21.4 
17.4 
25.3 
17.1 
21.3 
15.4 
21.2 
18.3 
17.8 
17.4 
26.3 
24.2 



Any Midt drug mdicates use at least once of marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including cradt), inhalants, halludnooens (including 
PCP and LSD), herom. or any prescription-type psychotherapeutic used nonmedically. Any illicit drug other than marijuana 
■idcalss use at least once of any of these listed dru;^. regardless of marijuana/hashish use; marijuana/Raahiah users who alao 
^VM used sny of the other listed dnjgs are included. ^ Binge use is defined as drinking five or more drinks on the same occaston 
on A least 1 day in tha paat 30 days. By "occaskxi" is means at the same time or wimin a couple hours of each other. 

Source: U.S. Subatanoe Abuae and Mental Health Sen/ices Administration. National Household Survey on Dwg Abuse. 1999. 



Health and MutrVWoxN X*!."^ 



UJL 



Abairecf or the IfrMft/ SfMaa: 2002 



No. 184. Current Cigarette Smoking: 1985 to 2000 

Pn percent Prior to 1995. a current smoker is a person wtx> has smoked at least 100 ctoarettes and wtx> now tmokaa. D aoinni nu 
1 995. definition includes persons who smoke only "some days." Excludes unknown smcwng status. Based on the htattonal HaOTi 
Interview Survey; for details, see Appendix III] 



Sex, age. and race 



1965 1M0 1995 2000 



Sex, age. and race 



1995 1990 1996 SOOO 



Total smokers, 
adlueted \ . . 



29.9 25.3 24.5 23.1 



Male 

Female . . . 

White male. 
Black male . 



White female 
Black female. 



32.2 
27.9 

31.3 
40.2 

27.9 
30.9 



28.0 
22.9 

27.6 
32.8 

23.5 
20.8 



26.5 
22.7 

26.2 
29.4 

23.4 
23.5 



25.2 
21.1 

25.5 
25.7 

22.0 
20.7 



Total smokers . 



30.1 25.5 24.7 23.3 



Black, total 

18 to 24 years . . . 
25 to 34 years . . . 
35 to 44 years . . . 
45 to 64 years . . . 
65 years and over. 

Female, total 

18 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

65 years and over . . 



Male, total 

18 to 24 years. . . 
25 to 34 years . . . 
35 to 44 years . . . 
45 to 64 years . . . 
65 years and over 



White, total 

18 to 24 years . . . 
25 to 34 years . . . 
35 to 44 years . . . 
45 to 64 years . . . 
65 years and over. 



32.6 
28.0 
38.2 
37.6 
33.4 
19.6 

31.7 
28.4 
37.3 
36.6 
32.1 
18.9 



28.4 
26.6 
31.6 
34.5 
29.3 
14.6 

28.0 
27.4 
31.6 
33.5 
28.7 
13.7 



27.0 
27.8 
29.5 
31.5 
27.1 
14.9 

26.6 
28.4 
29.9 
31.2 
26.3 
14.1 



25.7 
28.5 
29.0 
30.2 
26.4 
10.2 

25.8 
30.9 
29.9 
30.6 
25.8 
9.8 



White, total 

18 to 24 years . . . 
25 to 34 years . . . 
35 to 44 years . . . 
45 to 64 years . . . 
65 years and over. 

Black, total 

18 to 24 years . . . 
25 to 34 years . . . 
35 to 44 years . . . 
45 to 64 years . . . 
65 years and over. 



39.9 
27.2 
45.6 
45.0 
46.1 
27.7 

27.9 
30.4 
32.0 
31.5 
29.9 
13.5 

27.7 
31.8 
32.0 
31.0 
29.7 
13.3 

31.0 
23.7 
36.2 
40.2 
33.4 
14.5 



32.5 
21.3 
33.8 
42.0 
36.7 
21.5 

22.8 
22.5 
28.2 
24.8 
24.8 
11.5 

23.4 
25.4 
28.5 
25.0 
25.4 
11.5 

21.2 
10.0 
29.1 
25.5 
22.6 
11.1 



,28.5 

^14.6 
25.1 
36.3 
33.9 
28.5 

22.6 
21.8 
26.4 
27.1 
24.0 
11.5 

23.1 
24.9 
27.3 
27.0 
24.3 
11.7 

23.5 
^8 
26.7 
31.9 
27.5 
13.3 



26.1 
20.8 
23.3 
30.8 
32.2 
14.2 

21.0 
25.1 
22.5 
26.2 
21.6 
9.3 

21J 
28.7 
25.1 
26.6 
21.4 
9.1 

20.8 
14.2 
15.5 
302 
25.6 
10.2 



^ Estimates are age adjusted to the year 2000 standard using five age groups: 18-24 years, 25-34 years. 35-44 years. 45^ 
years, 65 years and over. ^ Data have a relative standard error of 20-30 percent. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistk», Health, United States, annual. 

No. 185. Current Cigarette Smoicing by Sex and State: 2000 

[in percent. Current cigarette smoking is defirted as persons wtx) reported having smoked 100 or more cigarettes during ttwir 
lifetime and who currently smoke every day or some days. Based on the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance system, a t o l o pho n s 
sun/ey of health (behaviors of the civilian, noninstitutiorialized U.S. populatk>n. 18 years okJ and over, for details, see source] 



State 


Total 


Male 


Female 


State 


Total 


Male 


Female 


State 


Total 


Male 


Female 


U.S. ^ . . 


23.3 


24.4 


21.2 


KS 


21.1 


24.2 


18.2 


ND 


23.3 


25.9 


20.7 










KY 


30.5 


33.4 


27.9 


OH 


26.3 


26.7 


26.0 


AL 


25.3 


29.0 


22.0 


LA 


24.1 


26.7 


21.8 


OK 


23.3 


23.7 


23.0 


AK 


25.0 


26.8 


23.1 


ME 


23.8 


24.6 


23.1 


OR 


20.8 


22.3 


19.3 


AZ 


18.6 


18.4 


18.8 


MD 


20.6 


22.0 


19.2 


PA 


24.3 


25.4 


23.3 


AR 


25.2 


26.2 


24.2 


MA 


20.0 


20.2 


19.8 


Rl 


23.5 


23.8 


23.2 


CA 


17.2 


20.1 


14.4 


Ml 


24.2 


26.0 


22.5 


SC 


24.7 


28.5 


21.3 


CO 


20.1 


19.5 


20.6 


MN 


19.8 


20.7 


18.9 


SD 


22.0 


22.6 


21.4 


CT 


20.0 


20.5 


19.5 


MS 


23.5 


25.3 


21.9 


TN 


25.7 


27.7 


23.8 


DE 


23.0 


25.8 


20.3 


MO 


27.2 


30.1 


24.6 


TX 


22.0 


25.3 


18.8 


DC 


20.9 


22.1 


19.9 


MI 


18.9 


18.0 


19.7 


UT 


12.9 


14.5 


11.4 


FL 


23.2 


24.5 


22.1 


NE 


21.4 


22.1 


20.7 


VT 


21.5 


21.8 


21.2 


GA 


23.6 


26.5 


21.0 


NV 


29.1 


28.7 


29.5 


VA 


21.5 


24.4 


18.8 


HI 


19.7 


22.9 


16.5 


NH 


25.4 


26.9 


23.9 


WA 


20.7 


21.7 


19.7 


ID 


22.4 


22.9 


21.9 


NJ 


21.0 


23.5 


18.6 


WV 


26.1 


27.8 


24.7 


IL 


22.3 


24.9 


20.0 


NM 


23.6 


26.2 


21.2 


Wl 


24.1 


24.4 


23.9 


IN 


27.0 


28.5 


25.5 


NY 


21.6 


22.5 


20.9 










lA 


23.3 


25.9 


20.9 


NC 


26.1 

1 — . . 


28.4 


24.1 


WY 


23.8 


23.2 


24.3 



^ Represents median value among the states and DC. For definitton of median, see Guide to Tabular PresentatkHi. 

Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control arnJ Preventk>n. Atlanta. QA. Mort)idity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 50. No. 49. 
December 14, 2001. 

No. 1 86. Use of Mammography for Women 40 Years Old and Over by Patient 
Characteristics: 1 990 to 2000 



Hi 



Percent of women having a mammogram within the past 2 years. Covers civilian noninstitutional populatkxi. Based on National 
'ealth Interview Survey; see Appendix III] 



Characteristic 



Total 



1 



40 to 49 years old ... . 
50 years okl and over. . 

SO to 64 years old . . 

65 years okj and over 
White. non-Hispanw . . . 
Black, non-Hispanic . . . 
Hispanic origin ^ 



1990 1994 2000 



51.4 00.9 70.3 



55.1 
49.7 
56.0 
43.4 
52.7 
46.0 
45.2 



61.3 
60.6 
66.5 
55.0 
61.3 
64.4 
51.9 



64.2 
73.6 
78.6 
68.0 
72.1 
67.9 
61.4 



Characteristic 



t 



Years of school completed: 

Less than 12 years 36.4 

12 years 52.7 

13 years or more 62.8 



Poverty status: ^ 
Below poverty .... 
At or above poverty 



28.7 
54.8 



1990 1994 2000 



48.2 
61.0 
69.7 



44.4 
64.8 



57.7 
69.6 
76.1 



55.2 
72.2 



Includes all other races not shown separately and unkrK)wn education level and poverty status. ^ Persons of 
origin may be of any race. ^ For explanation of poverty level, see text. Section 13. Income. Expenditures, and Wealth 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Health United States, annual. 



1 24 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. StatlsUcal Abstract of the Untted 



No. 187. Cancer— Estimated New Cases, 2002, and Survival Rates, 
1 980-82 to 1 992-98 



(i;as rtprM«nts 1,286,000. The 5-y8ar reialive sunnval rate, which is derived t)y adfusting the observed suivivai rate for expected 
moftafilyL represents the laceHhood that a person will not die from causes directly related to their cancer within 5 years. Sunm^ data 
shown are baaed on those patients dteignosed while residents of an area listed below during the time periods shown. Data are based 
on iniwrr tal io n collected as part of the National Cancer Institute's Sun/eillance. Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program, 
a co l ection of populatiorvDased registries in Connecticut New Mexico. Utah. Iowa, Hawaii, Atlanta, Detroit, Seattie-Puget Sound, 
and San FrandsoyOaldand] 





Estimated new 
cases, ^2002 

(1.000) 


5'year relative survival rates (percent) 


Site 


White 


Black 




Total Male Female 


1900^ 1986-88 1069-91 1902-08 


1900-62 1986-88 1000-01 1002-00 


AnaNaa' 


1,285 638 647 

169 90 79 

205 2 204 

148 73 76 

107 50 57 

41 23 18 

189 189 (X) 

57 42 15 

39 (X) 39 

54 28 26 

29 19 10 

31 18 13 
54 30 24 

30 15 16 

32 19 13 

22 13 8 

23 (X) 23 
13 (X) 13 


52.1 56.7 60.3 63.8 

13.5 13.5 14.3 15.0 
77.1 83.9 86.1 87.6 
54.9 60.8 62.3 62.6 

55.7 61.6 63.1 62.7 

53.1 59.1 60.5 62.4 

74.5 82.7 91.8 97.8 
78.9 80.7 82.1 82.3 

82.8 84.4 85.6 86.0 

51.9 52.9 51.9 56.1 

55.6 55.2 55.4 58.8 
39.5 44.2 45.8 47.3 

83.2 87.9 88.7 89.3 
2.8 3.1 4.1 4.3 

51.1 57.5 60.7 62.4 
16.5 19.1 18.4 20.9 

38.7 41.9 49.6 52.5 

68.2 71.7 72.3 72.1 


30.7 42.0 46.2 52.0 


Luno , , , 


12.1 11.9 10.7 12.3 




65.7 69.2 71.1 72.5 


Colon arxJ rectum 

Colon 


46.5 52.5 54.0 52.8 
49.3 52.9 53.9 52.8 


Rectum 


37.9 51.1 54.3 52.7 


rfosiaie 


64.7 69.3 80.6 92.6 


Bladder 


58.3 62.3 61.9 64.5 


Coipus uleri 


55.1 57.1 57.5 60.5 


Non-HodgMn's lymphoma ^. 

Oral caivity^and pharynx . . . 
Leukemia^ 


50.2 50.2 43.7 46.1 

31.0 34.7 32.6 34.9 
32.9 38.0 34.1 38.4 


Metanoma ol sidn 

Pancreas 


60.9 69.0 79.1 65.5 
4.5 6.2 3.8 3.9 


Kidney 


55 8 53.3 58.0 60.0 


QfQfT)3cn • 


19.4 19.3 24.8 20.0 


Cervn uteri *^ ,.,....... 


39.1 38.6 41.6 52.5 
61.3 55.5 62.6 59.9 







X Not applcable. ^ Estimates provided by American Cancer Soc^ksty are based on rates from the National Cancc 
SEER program. ^ Includes other sites not shown separately. ^ survival rates for female only. * All types 
^ Invasive cancer only. 

Source: U.S. Natk>nal Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Cancer Statistics Review, annual. 



Cancer Institute's 
combined. 



No. 188. Cancer— Estimated New Cases and Deatlis by State: 2002 



im 



urinary bladder] 



(1,284.0 repreeents 1,204,000). Excludes basal arnJ squamous cellskin cancers and in situ carcinomas except 





New cases 


1 


Deaths 


State 


New cases 


1 


Deaths 


Stale 






Female 




1 


Female 






Female 




1 


Female 




Total 2 


Lung 


breast 


Total 2 


Lung 


breast 




Total 2 


Lung 


breast 


Total 2 


Lung 


breast 


U.S... 


1,204J 


100.4 


203.5 


555.5 


154.0 


40.0 






























MO 


28.6 


4.2 


4.0 


12.3 


3.8 


0.8 


AL .... 


22.6 


3.2 


3.1 


9.8 


2.9 


0.6 


MT 


4.4 


0.6 


0.6 


1.9 


0.5 


0.1 


AK.... 


1.6 


0.2 


0.3 


0.7 


0.2 


0.1 


NE 


7.7 


1.0 


1.2 


3.3 


0.9 


0.2 


AZ .... 


22.1 


2.9 


3.5 


9.6 


2.7 


0.7 


NV 


9.5 


1.4 


1.3 


4.1 


1.3 


0.3 


AR.... 


14.2 


2.2 


2.0 


6.2 


2.0 


0.4 


NH 


5.8 


0.8 


0.8 


2.5 


0.7 


0.2 


CA.... 


119.9 


14.3 


19.9 


51.8 


13.1 


3.9 






























NJ 


41.1 


4.9 


6.9 


17.8 


4.5 


1.4 


(X).... 


14.5 


1.6 


2.4 


6.3 


1.5 


0.5 


NM 


7.1 


0.8 


1.2 


3.0 


0.7 


0.2 


CT.... 


16.1 


2.0 


2.6 


7.0 


1.8 


0.5 


NY 


83.7 


10.0 


14.7 


36.2 


9.1 


2.9 


DE.... 


4.1 


0.6 


0.6 


1.8 


0.5 


0.1 


NC 


38.2 


5.5 


5.9 


16.5 


5.0 


1.2 


DC.... 


2.7 


0.3 


0.6 


1.2 


0.3 


0.1 


ND 


3.1 


0.3 


0.5 


1.3 


0.3 


0.1 


R. 


92.2 


13.0 


13.1 


39.9 


11.9 


2.6 






























OH. ... 


58.7 


7.9 


9.5 


25.4 


7.3 


1.9 


QA.... 


31.6 


4.4 


5.2 


13.7 


4.0 


1.0 


OK 


16.9 


2.5 


2.7 


7.3 


2.3 


0.5 


HI 


4.7 


0.6 


0.7 


2.0 


0.5 


0.1 


OR 


16.8 


2.2 


2.6 


7.3 


2.0 


0.5 


ID 


5.2 


0.6 


0.9 


2.3 


0.6 


0.2 


PA 


68.9 


8.7 


11.0 


29.8 


8.0 


2.2 


IL 


57.4 


7.4 


9.7 


24.8 


6.7 


1.9 


Rl 


5.6 


0.8 


0.8 


2.4 


0.7 


0.2 


IN 


30.0 


4.3 


4.6 


13.0 


4.0 


0.9 






























SC 


19.5 


2.6 


3.1 


8.4 


2.4 


0.6 


lA 


14.8 


1.9 


2.4 


6.4 


1.7 


0.5 


SD 


3.7 


0.4 


0.5 


1.6 


0.4 


0.1 


KS .... 


12.3 


1.7 


1.8 


5.3 


1.5 


0.4 


TN 


29.1 


4.4 


4.4 


12.6 


4.0 


0.9 


KY .... 


21.1 


3.4 


3.1 


9.1 


3.1 


0.6 


TX 


79.7 


10.8 


13.1 


34.5 


9.9 


2.6 


LA ... . 


21.9 


2.9 


3.5 


9.5 


2.7 


0.7 


UT 


5.9 


0.5 


1.1 


2.5 


0.4 


0.2 


ME. ... 


7.0 


1.0 


1.0 


3.0 


0.9 


0.2 






























VT 


2.9 


0.4 


0.4 


1.3 


0.4 


0.1 


MO... 


23.5 


3.2 


4.1 


10.2 


2.9 


0.8 


VA 


31.3 


4.2 


5.0 


13.5 


3.8 


1.0 


MA.... 


31.7 


4.0 


4.7 


13.7 


3.6 


0.9 


WA 


25.6 


3.4 


3.7 


11.1 


3.1 


0.7 


Ml 


45.8 


6.1 


7.3 


19.8 


5.5 


1.4 


WV 


11.0 


1.7 


1.5 


4.7 


1.5 


0.3 


MN... 


20.8 


2.5 


3.2 


9.0 


2.3 


0.6 


Wl 


25.3 


3.0 


3.9 


11.0 


2.8 


0.8 


MS.... 


14.4 


2.1 


2.2 


6.2 


1.9 


0.4 


WY 


2.3 


0.3 


0.3 


1.0 


0.2 


0.1 



Estimates are offered as a 
distrtwiion of estimated 2002 cancer 



rough guide and should be interpreted with oiution. They are calculated according to the 
er deaths by state. ^ Includes other types of cancer, not shown separately. 



Source: American Carx^r Society, Inc.. Atlanta. Georgia. Cancer Facts and Figures— 2002 (copyright). 



Health and Nutrition MS 



^S.CmmmmMmu, Slitfaticai Atalract of the UrMed ScafM: 20(32 



No. 1 89. Cumulative Percent Distribution of Population 
by Height and Sex: 1 988-94 

[Height was measured without shoes. Based on sample and subject to sanH)ling variability; see source] 





Males 


Females 


Height 


20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70-79 
years years years years years years 


20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 eO^ 70-79 
years years years years years years 


Percent under— 

4*8" 

4'9" 

4'10" 

4'11" 

5* 

5'1" 

5'2" 

5'3" 

5*4" 

5"5" 

5'6" 

57" 

5'8'' 

5'9'' 

5'10" 

5"ir 

6' 

6'1" 

6*2" 

6'3" 


0.1 

0.1 0.1 
0.1 - 0.2 0.4 0.1 

0.1 - 0.4 0.1 0.5 0.6 
0.5 0.8 0.7 0.2 0.7 1.9 

1.3 1.4 0.9 1.0 2.2 2.7 

3.4 2.2 1.7 2.5 5.8 7.8 
6.9 5.1 5.6 6.0 9.4 16.5 

11.7 10.1 12.1 11.7 15.8 27.3 

20.8 18.9 19.6 20.5 27.4 39.5 

32.0 28.3 28.0 32.6 38.6 53.4 

46.3 44.3 42.1 43.9 55.1 68.7 
58.7 58.0 58.1 60.6 68.8 79.5 

70.1 70.4 71.1 75.2 81.4 89.2 

81.2 79.7 81.5 85.4 90.0 94.1 

87.4 86.2 89.0 92.4 95.2 97.2 
94.7 92.4 94.4 96.4 98.2 99.3 

97.9 98.1 97.2 98.2 99.5 99.9 


0.6 0.1 - 0.2 1.7 
0.7 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.7 3.3 
1.2 0.7 0.7 1.9 1.7 4.9 
3.1 2.6 1.7 3.1 4.4 9.8 
6.0 5.5 5.3 6.6 9.9 15.4 

11.5 10.4 9.9 11.9 19.0 28.9 

21.8 18.5 18.8 24.4 34.3 45.6 

34.3 30.7 31.9 38.6 48.3 61.2 

48.9 42.9 49.2 52.6 66.5 74.5 
62.7 59.1 64.3 69.9 76.5 85.9 
74.0 71.8 77.0 81.6 87.8 93.9 

84.7 84.1 87.0 89.3 92.5 97.3 

92.4 91.6 94.5 95.6 96.7 09.2 
96.2 95.6 97.3 99.0 90.3 09.0 

98.6 98.1 98.9 99.6 90.8 100.0 

99.5 99.5 99.4 100.0 100.0 100.0 
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 



- Represents or rounds to zero. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, unpublished data. 

No. 190. Percent of U.S. Adults Who Were Overweight and Percent Who 
Were Obese: 1999 

[Percent who are oveoMwight includes those who are obese and represent those who have a body mass index (BMI) equal to or 
above 25. Percent who are obese represent those who have a BMI equal to or above 30. BMI is a measure that adjusts body weigh t 
for height. It is calculated as weight in kilogranw divided by height in meters squared. These estimates are based on defln i ttor w 

Erovided in the Dietary Guidelines tor Americans, published by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture and the U.S. DepL of Health and 
luman Services. Based on the National Health Interview Survey; for details, see A;^>endix III] 



Characteristic 


Both sexes 


Males 


Females 


Overweight Obese 


Overweight Ot>ese 


OveoMwight Obeee 


All ages (age-adjusted) ^ 

All ages (unadjusted) ^ 

18-24 years old 


56.5 21.1 

56.4 21.1 

37.6 13.4 

56.2 21.2 

65.5 26.1 

55.7 18.3 

63.8 24.1 

55.0 20.1 
65.7 28.8 

29.5 6.1 

63.1 24.9 

59.3 24.7 
63.3 27.2 

58.3 23.4 
57.5 22.5 
57.0 20.6 

56.2 19.3 

51.4 15.7 

47.5 14.0 


65.0 21.6 
65.0 21.7 

41.7 13.5 

67.7 ??.2 

73.0 26.7 
61.9 17.5 

68.8 23.0 

65.1 21.4 

65.2 23.1 

36.6 8.2 

65.5 22.2 
63.8 26.3 
68.8 27.3 

66.7 24.0 
65.4 23.4 
65.0 18.8 
70.4 20.7 

63.4 16.7 

56.5 13.3 


48.3 20.6 
48.3 20.6 

33.5 13.2 


25-44 vears old 


44.7 20.2 


45-64 vears old 


58.1 2S.5 


65 vears old and over 


51 .0 18J 


Hispanic 


58.6 24.9 


White. Non-Hisoanic 


45.0 18.7 


Black. Non-Hisoanic 


65.8 33.2 


Asian/Other Pacific Islander. 
Non-Hisoanic 


23.9 4 5 


Educational attainment: 
Fewer than 9 grades 


60.7 27.4 


Grades 9-11 


55.0 23.5 


General equivalency degree .... 
Hiah school oraduate 


56.4 27.3 
50 6 22.8 


Some college - no degree 

Associate of Arts • Technical .... 
Associate of Arts - Academic .... 

Bachelor of Arts or Science 

Graduate degree 


50.3 21.7 

49.2 22.0 

45.3 18.4 
38.9 14.8 
367 144 







^ Age-specific rates are unadjusted; all other estimates were adjusted to the 2000 projected population. 
Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, unpublished data. 



1 26 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the UnNed 



No. 191. Percentage of Adults Engaging In Leisure-Time 
Physical Activity: 2000 

[In parMfit Covers persons 18 years old and over. Based on responses to questions about physical activity In prior month from 
the Behavioral Rislc Factor Sun/eAlanoe System. Estimates are age-adjusted to the year 2000 standard population. Based on a 
survey sample of approximately 180.000 persons In SO states and the District of Columt>ia in 2000] 



Characteristic 



Persons 








Persons 






who meet 


Persons 


Persons 




wtx>meet 


Persons 


Persons 


reoom- 


withinsuf- 


who are 


Characteristic 


recom- 


withlnsuf- 


who are 


merKJed 
activity^ 


fldern physically 
activity^ Inactive^ 




mended 
activity^ 


fidertt physically 
activity ^ Inactive ' 


26^ 


46^ 


27.6 


30 to 44 years old . . . 


24.7 


47.1 


28.2 








45 to 64 years old . . . 


25.7 


44.9 


29.4 


27.1 


47.5 


25.3 


65 to 74 years old . . . 


24.6 


40.9 


34.4 


25.5 


44.8 


29.7 


75 years old and 










48.3 


24.2 


over 


28.4 


27.8 


43.8 


27.5 






21.9 


43.3 


34.8 


School years completed: 








21.1 


37.9 


41.0 


Less than 12 years . . 


14.5 


36.2 


49.3 


27.3 


42.9 


29.8 


12 years 


21.9 


44.7 


33.4 








Some college (13-15 














years) 


28.3 


48.2 


23.5 


26.9 


54.6 


18.5 


dollege (16 or more 








23.7 


52.2 


24.2 


years) 


34.2 


50.0 


15.8 


26.0 


45.5 


28.5 


7"*"'"/ 








33.7 


38.7 


27.6 


Household Income: 














Less than $10,000. . . 


18.9 


36.7 


44.5 


35.9 


29.2 


34.9 


$10,000 to $19,999. . 


18.9 


40.2 


40.9 








$20,000 to $34,999 . . 


23.3 


44.3 


32.4 








$35,000 to $49,999 . . 


27.8 


47.8 


24.5 


25.4 


49.3 


25.3 


$50,000 and over . . . 


33.5 


50.3 


16.3 



Total. 



Male. . 
Female 



While. nofvHispanic 
BiBCk. non-HlBpanic. 



Other 



18 to 29 years Old 
30 to 44 years old 
45 to 64 years Old 
66 to 74 years old 
75 years old and 
over 



18 to 29 years old 



at least 5 timesAweek x 30 minutes/time or vigorous physical activity for 20 minutes 
■^^ reported physical activity does not meet recommended level. ^ Persons with 



^ Reoonwnended activity is physical 
at a time at least 3 times/week. ' Persons 
no reported physical activity. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Chronic Dtoease Prevention and Health Promotion. "Nutrition and Physical Activity"; 
<ti«^-yAivww.cdcgov/nccdphp/dnpa>; (accessed: 21 June 2002) and unpublished data. 

No. 1 92. Households and Persons Having Problems With Access to Food: 
1 995 to 2000 



[100,445 latweeams 100,446,000. Food secure means that a household had access at all times to enough food for an active 

heolihy lie. with no need for recourse to emergency food sources or other extraordinary coping t)ehaviors to meet their basic food 

needs. A food I ns e cu re household did not have this same access to enough food to fully meet t>asic needs at all times. Food 

fftsecure households with hur>ger were those with one or more household memt)ers who were hungry at least sometime during the 

period due to inade^jate resources for food. The omission of homeless persons may be a cause ol ur>derreportir>g. The Federal 

food secur^ meesure was developed through a collaborative process between private non-government e»perts. academic 

researahers. and a Federal interagency working oroup. with leadership from the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture and tne U.S. Dept. of 

Health and Human Services. The severity of food insecurity arnJ hunger in households is nr>easured through a series of questions 

about experiences and kM^viors ioiown to characterize households that are having difficulty meeting t>asic food needs. These 

experiences and behaviors generally occur in an ordered sequerx^ as tf)e severity of food insecurity irtcreases. As resources 

become nK>re constrained, adults in typical households first worry atxxjt having enough food, then they stretch household 

resources and iugs^ other necessities, ttwn decrease the quality and variety of household members' diets, then decrease ttie 

Iraquency and qtumttty of adults' food intai<e, and finally decrease me frequency and quantity of children's food intai<e. All questions 

refer to me prmious 12 months arnJ include a qualHying phrase reminding resporidents to report only those occurrences ttiat 

reeuRed from inadequate financial reeources. Restrictions to food intalte due to aieting or busy schedules are excluded. Data are 

trom the Food Security Supplement to the Current Population Survey (CPS); for details about the CPS. see text, Section 1. 

Population, and Appendte III] 



Ai 



Household food 
security level 





Number (1,000) 






Percent distribution 




1985 


1909^ 


1998' 


2000 


1995 


1998^ 


1996' 


2000 


100,445 


103,480 


103.309 


106.043 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


90.097 


92.972 


91,121 


94.942 


89.7 


89.8 


88.2 


89.5 


10.348 


10.509 


12.188 


11.101 


10.3 


10.2 


11.8 


10.5 


6.402 


6.820 


8.353 


7.786 


6.4 


6.6 


8.1 


7.3 


3.946 


3,689 


3,835 


3,315 


3.9 


3.6 


3.7 


3.1 


(NA) 


(NA) 


331 


255 


(NA) 


(NA) 


0.9 


0.7 


191.063 


197.423 


197,084 


201,922 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


172.862 


178,631 


174.964 


181.586 


90.5 


90.5 


88.8 


89.9 


18,200 


18.792 


22.120 


20.336 


9.5 


9.5 


11.2 


10.1 


11.611 


12.657 


15.632 


14.763 


6.1 


6.4 


7.9 


7.3 


6.589 


6,135 


6,488 


5.573 


3.4 


3.1 


3.3 


2.8 


70,279 


71.463 


71.282 


71.763 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


58,048 


59.090 


57.256 


58,868 


82.6 


82.7 


80.3 


82.0 


12,231 


12.373 


14.027 


12.895 


17.4 


17.3 


19.7 


18.0 


8.131 


9.114 


10.658 


9,945 


11.6 


12.8 


15.0 


13.9 


4.100 


3.259 


3.369 


2.950 


5.8 


4.6 


4.7 


4.1 


(NA) 


(NA) 


716 


562 


(NA) 


(NA) 


1.0 


0.8 



Food secure 

Food insecure 

Without hunger 

With hunger , 

WKh hurtger among children ^ . 



Adult members 

Food secure 

Food insecure .... 

Without hunger. . 

With hunger. . . . 



Child members 

Food secure 

Food Insecure 

Without hunger 

With hungerT 

With hunger among children ^ , 



NA Not avaHable. ^ AdBusted dctfa. These data are comparable to those of eariier years. ^ Data as collected. These data 
are comparable to tfiose for 2000. ^ One or more children in these households was hungry t>ecause of the fH>usehold's food 
insecurity. Percent distritxition of households with hunger among children excludes households with no child from the 
denomin a tor. * Most of thMe cfiildren did not. themselves, face hunger, but adults or older children in the household did. 

Source: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, EoorKxnic Research Sendee, Household Food Security in the United States. 1999, Food 
Assistance and Nutrition Research Re^x)rt #0; Fall 2000 and Household Food Security in the United States. 2000. Food Assistance 
and NutriHon Research Report No. 21; Febnjary 2002. 



/ 



Health and MutT\t\ox\ \n 



us. 



BiMMu, aMMlGelAbairictoltfie(/nMft/SlSBlss:2002 



No. 193. Nutrition— Nutrients in Foods Available for Civilian Consumption 
Capita Per Day: 1970 to 1999 

[Computed by the Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion (CNPP). Based on Economic Rmearch Senoce (ERS) estimatae of 
per capita quantities of food available for consumption from "Food Consumption. Prices, and, ExperTditurBS," on impiM con8ump> 
tion data for foods no longer reported by ERS, and on CNPP estimates of quantities of produce from home garaens. Food sup- 
ply estimates do not reflect loss of food or nutrients from further marketing or home processing. Enrichment and fb r tlfkailio n levels 
of Iron, zinc, thiamin, ritx>flavtn, niacin, vitamin A, vitamin Bg. vitamin B12. and ascorbic add are Included] 



Nutrient 



Unit 



1970-79 



1960-89 



1990-99 



1909 



Food energy 

Cartx)hydrate 

Dietary fiber . . . . 

Protein 

Total fat ^ 

Saturated 

Monounsaturated 

Polyunsaturated . 
Cholesterol 

Vitamin A 

Carotenes 

Vitamin E 

Vitamin C 

Thiamin 

Rltx)flavin 

Niacin 

Vitamin Be 

Folate 

Vitamin B,2 

Calcium 

Phosphorus 

Magnesium 

Iron 

ZIrK: 

Copper 

Potassium 

Selenium 

Sodium * 



Calories 

Grams 

Grams 

Grams 

Grams 

Grams 

Grams 

Grams 

Milligrams 

Micrograms RE I . 
Mlcrogranra RE \. 
Milligrams a-TE ^. 

Mllllgranfw 

Milligrams 

Milligrams 

Milligrams 

Milligrams 

Mlcrogranra 

MIcrogranfw 

Milligrams 

Milligrams 

Mllligranfw 

MJiligranfw 

Milligrams 

Milligrams 

Milligrams 

Milligrams 

Milligrams 



3.200 

387 

19 

95 

149 

51 

60 

28 

440 

1.540 
550 

13.9 
110 
2.2 
2.5 

24.0 

2.0 

310 

8.9 

910 

1.470 

330 

16.1 

12.9 

1.6 

3,490 

130 

1,360 



3.400 

411 

20 

98 

156 

52 

63 

31 

420 

1.560 

590 

15.5 

117 

2.5 

2.7 

28.0 

2.2 

343 

8.1 

910 

1.520 

340 

19.4 

13.9 

1.8 

3,530 

139 

1.350 



3,700 

478 

23 

108 

159 

51 

67 

33 

410 

1.710 
730 
17.3 
127 

2.9 

2.9 
32.0 

2.4 
432 

8.0 

970 

1,660 

380 

23.1 

15.2 

1.9 

3.790 

162 

1.370 



3,700 

481 

23 

106 

158 

51 

67 

33 

410 

1,720 
730 
17.1 
127 

2.9 

2.9 
32.0 

2.5 
384 

8.1 

970 

1.650 

380 

23.1 

15.3 

1.9 

3,760 

158 

1,370 



3.800 

500 

24 

111 

164 

52 

70 

34 

430 

1.780 

800 

17.8 

132 

3.0 

2.9 
33.0 

2.5 
641 

8.1 

990 

1.690 

300 

23.6 

15.5 

2.0 

3.890 

178 

1.360 



^ Includes other types of fat not shown separately. ^ Retinol equivalents. ^ Alpha-Tocopherd equivalents. * Does not 
include amount from processed foods; underestimates actual availability. 

Source: U.S. Dept. of Aoriculture. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. Nutrient Content of the U.S. Food Suppiy, 
1909-99, 2001 . Data also puolished by Economic Research Service in Food Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures, annual. 

No. 194. Sources of Calcium, iron, and Cholesterol in the U.S. Food Supply: 
1970 and 1999 

[In percent. See headnote. Table 193] 



ComnfKKJity group 


Caldum 


ComnrK)dlty group 


Iron 


Comnwdlty group 


CtK)lealerol 


1970 1999 


1970 1999 


1970 1906 


Total 


100 100 

35 11 

11 21 
11 25 
19 15 
6 7 
18 21 


Total 


100 100 

35 53 

32 23 
4 2 

14 10 
3 3 
2 2 

10 7 


Total 


100 100 


Whole milk 

Low-fat and skim 
milk 


Grains and breakfast 
cereals 

Meat, poultry, fish ^ . 

Eggs 

Vegetables 

Fruits 

Dairy products .... 
Other foods 


Meat, poultry, fish ^ . 
Eggs 


39 43 

40 36 


Cheese 


Whole milk 

Low-fat and skim milk. 

Cheese 

Other dairy 

Other foods 


8 3 


Other dairy 

Vegetables 

Other foods 


1 2 
3 7 
3 4 
6 6 



^ Includes meat alternatives. 

Source: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. Nutrient Content of the U.S. Food Supply. 
1909-99. 2O0^. 



1 28 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the United 



No. 195. Per Capiu Consumption of Mi^or Food Commodities: 1980 to 2000 



(bi pounds, ratal wil gtH, woapl as hidlc a lid. Consumption rBprwenls the residual after exports, nonfood use and endhg stoda 
are subtracted from the sum of beginning stodu, domestic proouction, and imports. Based on Census Bureau estimated popula- 
tion] 



Commodity 



Red meat, total (boneless, trimmed weight) ^ 

LJUUI 



Unit 



1M0 1985 1M0 1995 1998 



Veal 

Lamb and mutton 

Pork 

Poultry (boneless, trimmed weight) ^ 

Chicken 

Turkey 

Fish and shellfish (boneless, trimmed weight) 

Eggs 

Shell 

Processed 

OaHv products, total ^ 

FtUd milk products * 

Beverage mMks 

Plain whole milk 

Plain reduced-fat mMk (2%) 

Plan light arxl skim mtfks 

Flavored wtiole milk 

Flavored milks other than whole .... 

Buttermilk 

Yogurt (exd. frozen) 

RukJ cream products ' 

Cream ' 

Sour cream and dips 

Condensed and evaporated milks 

Whole mUk 



Skimnnflk. , 

Cheese \ . . 

American' 

Cheddar 

It^lan'. . 



MozzareUa 
Other V . . . 



Swiss 

Cream and Neufchatel . . . 
Cottage cheese, total 

Lowfat 

Frozen dairy products 

Ice cream 

I.x>wfat k» cream 

ShortNrt 

Frozen yogurt 

Fats and oils: 
Total, fat content only 

Butler (product weight) 

Maroaiine (product weight) . . 

LardT (diract use) 

Edble beef taltow (diract use) 



Salad and oooMng oils 

Other edtt)le fats and oils . 

Rour and cereal products ' . . . 

Wheatftour 

Rice, mated 

Comproducts 

Oet products 

Caloric sweeteners, total ^° . . . 
Sogar. refined cm and beet 



Com 

liigh-f ructose com syrup . 
Olher 

Cocoa beans 

Coffee (green becms) 

Peanuts (shelled) 

Tree rujts (shelled) 



Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
PourKis . 
PourKJs . 
PourKJs . 
Number. 
Number. 
Number . 
Pounds . 
Gallons . 
Galtons . 
Qaltons . 
Galtons . 
Giallons . 
Galtons . 
Galkxis . 
Galtons . 
1/2 pints 
1/2 pints 
1/2 pints 
1/2 pints 
Pounds . 
PourKJs . 
Pounds . 
PourKJs . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
PourKJs . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
PourKis . 
Pounds . 

Pounds . 
Pounds . 
PourKJs . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds. 
Pounds . 
Pounds. 
Pounds. 
Pounds . 
PourKJs . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 

Pounds . 
Pounds . 
Pounds . 
PourKJs . 



126.4 

72.1 

1.3 

1.0 

52.1 

40.8 

32.7 

8.1 

12.4 

271 

236 

35 

543.2 

27.9 

27.6 

16.5 

6.3 

3.1 

0.6 

0.6 

0.5 

4.6 

10.5 

6.3 

3.4 

7.0 

3.8 

3.3 

17.5 

9.6 

6.9 

4.4 

3.0 

3.4 

1.3 

1.0 

4.5 

0.8 

26.4 

17.5 

7.1 

1.2 

(NA) 

56.9 

4.5 

11.3 

2.3 

1.1 

18.2 

21.2 

1.5 

144.7 

116.9 

9.4 

12.9 

3.9 

123.0 

83.6 

38.2 

19.0 

3.4 

10.3 

4.8 

1.8 



124.9 

74.6 

1.5 

1.1 

47.7 

45.5 

36.4 

9.1 

15.0 

255 

217 

39 

593.7 

27.1 

26.7 

13.9 

7.9 

3.2 

0.4 

0.7 

0.5 

7.3 

13.5 

8.2 

4.3 

7.5 

3.6 

3.8 

22.5 

12.2 

9.8 

6.5 

4.6 

3.9 

1,3 

1.2 

4.1 

1.0 

27.9 

18.1 

6.9 

1.3 

(NA) 

64.1 

4.9 

10.8 

1.6 

2.0 

22.9 

23.5 

1.6 

156.5 

124.6 

9.1 

17.2 

4.0 

128.8 

62.7 

64.8 

45.2 

4.6 

10.5 

6.3 

2.5 



112.3 

63.9 

0.9 

1.0 

46.4 

56.3 

42.4 

13.8 

15.0 

234 

186 

48 

568.3 

26.2 

25.7 

10.2 

9.1 

4.9 

0.3 

0.8 

0.4 

7.4 

14.3 

8.7 

4.7 

7.9 

3.2 

4.8 

24.6 

11.1 

9.0 

9.0 

6.9 

4.5 

1.4 

1.7 

3.4 

1.2 

28.4 

15.8 

7.7 

1.2 

2.8 

63.0 

4.4 

10.9 

1.6 

0.6 

22.2 

25.2 

1.2 

181.0 

136.0 

15.8 

21.4 

6.5 

136.8 

64.4 

71.1 

49.6 

5.4 

10.3 

6.0 

2.4 



113.6 

63.6 

0.8 

0.9 

48.4 

62.1 

48.2 

13.9 

14.8 

232 

172 

59 

576.6 

24.6 

24.0 

8.4 

8.1 

6.2 

0.3 

0.8 

0.3 

9.3 

15.7 

9.4 

5.4 

6.8 

2.3 

4.5 

26.9 

11.7 

9.1 

10.4 

8.1 

5.0 

1.1 

2.1 

2.7 

1.2 

29.1 

15.5 

7.4 

1.3 

3.4 

65.4 

4.5 

9.1 

1.6 

2.7 

22.2 

26.5 

1.6 

190.3 

140.1 

18.7 

24.9 

5.4 

148.0 

64.7 

82.0 

57.6 

4.5 

7.9 
5.6 
1.9 



113.3 

63.6 

0.7 

0.9 

48.2 

63.7 

49.8 

13.9 

14.5 

239 

173 

66 

572.8 

23.8 

23.2 

7.8 

7.4 

6.5 

0.3 

1.0 

0.3 

9.2 

17.0 

10.6 

5.6 

6.1 

2.0 

4.1 

27.8 

11.9 

9.6 

11.3 

8.8 

4.8 

1.1 

2.3 

2.7 

1.3 

29.0 

16.4 

8.1 

1.3 

2.1 

64.3 

4.4 

8.2 

2.0 

3.1 

20.5 

27.3 

1.3 

196.1 

144.9 

18.3 

27.2 

4.4 

152.6 

65.0 

86.3 

62.9 

5.4 
9.3 
5.8 
2.2 



115.1 

64.4 

0.6 

0.8 

49.4 

66.8 

52.9 

13.8 

14.9 

249 

177 

72 

564.9 

23.7 

23.1 

7.9 

7.3 

6.3 

0.4 

1.0 

0.3 

9.0 

17.9 

11.4 

6.7 

6.5 

2.1 

4.4 

29.0 

12.6 

10.1 

11.8 

9.2 

5.0 

1.1 

2.4 

2.6 

1.3 

28.6 

16.7 

7.5 

1.3 

1.9 

67.0 

4.7 

7.9 

2.0 

3.6 

21.1 

28.8 

1.5 

196.9 

144.0 

19.5 

27.8 

4.4 

155.0 

66.4 

87.2 

64.8 

5.6 
9.8 
6.0 
2.5 



113.5 

84.4 

0.5 

0.8 

47.7 

66.5 

52.9 

13.6 

15.2 

250 

177 

73 

593.0 

23.2 

22.6 

7.8 

7.1 

6.1 

0.4 

1.0 

0.3 

9.9 

18.6 

11.8 

6.2 

5.8 

1.8 

3.8 

29.8 

12.7 

(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

2.6 

1.3 

27.8 

16.5 

7.3 

1.2 

1.8 

74.5 

4.6 

8.2 

1.9 

4.0 

23.1 

33.7 

1.5 

199.9 

146.3 

19.7 

28.4 

4.3 

152.4 

85.6 

85.3 

63.8 

5.9 

10.3 

5.7 

2.5 



3 NA Not available. Excludes edible offals. ^ Excludes shipments to Puerto Rtoo and the other U.S. possessk>ns. 
Mik-equivaient. miOdat basis. Includes butter. * Ruid milk figures are aggregates of commercial sales and milk produced and 
consumed on famts. ^ Includes eggnog. not shown separately. ° Heavy cream, light cream, and half and half. 'Exctodes 
^jB-skim American, cottage, pot, and baker's cheese. " Includes other cheeses not shown separately. ' Includes rye ftour and 
Dartey products not shown separately. Excludes quantities used In akx>holk: beverages. ^ Dry weight. Includes edible syrups 
("^. molasses, etc.) and honey not shown separately. ^^ Includes glucose and dextrose not shown separately. 

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture. Economto Research Servtoe, Food Consumption, Prices, and Expendlturas, 
1970-2000: AgricultunU Outiook, morithly; and online at <http-y/www.ers.usda.gov/data/consumptton>. 



Health and Nutrition \1^ 



US.CinwiBunMu. SMiattcal Atalract of the Untted SCafM: 2002 



No. 196. Per Capiu Utilization of Commercialiy Produced Frulu and 
Vegeubles: 1 980 to 2000 

[In pounds, tarm wight Domesttc food use of frssh fruits and vegetabies reflects the fresh-marfcet share of oonvnodRy produo- 
tk)n plus imports and minus exports] 



Commodity 



1986 1986 



1990 



1986 1987 1986 



Fruits and vegetables, total V 

Fruits, total 

Fresh fruits 

Nondtrus 

Apples 

Bananas 

CantakHipee 

Grapes 

Peacfies and nectarines 

Pears 

Pineapples 

Plums and prunes .... 

Strawt>erries 



Watermelons 
Other 2 



Fresh citrus 

Oranges 

Grapefruit 

Other 3 

Processed fruits 

Frozen fruits * 

Dried fruits * 

Canned fruite ^ 

Fruit juices ^ 

Vegetables, total 

Fresh vegetables 

Asparagus (all uses) 

Broccoli 

Cabbage 

Carrots 

Cauliflower 

Celery (all uses) 

Com 

Cucumbers 

Head lettuce 

Mushrooms 

Onions 

Snap beans 

Bell peppers (all uses) 

Potatoes 

Sweetpotatoes (all uses) 

Tomatoes 

Other fresh vegetables " 

Processed vegetables 

Selected vegetables for freezing. 

Selected vegetables for carining. 

Vegetables for dehydrating ' . . . 

Potatoes for chips 

Pulses ^ 



608.0 


629.3 


669.6 


600.5 


696.1 


706.0 


699.2 


706.4 


707.7 


270.5 


270.0 


272.2 


282.0 


279.0 


289.6 


284.1 


289.8 


279.4 


104.8 


110.6 


116.3 


122.6 


126.1 


129.5 


128.9 


129.5 


126.8 


78.7 


89.1 


94.9 


98.8 


101.5 


103.0 


102.3 


100.2 


103.3 


19.2 


17.3 


19.6 


18.7 


18.6 


18.1 


19.0 


16.5 


17.4 


20.8 


23.5 


24.4 


27.1 


27.6 


27.2 


28.0 


30.7 


26.4 


5.8 


8.5 


9.2 


9.0 


10.3 


10.5 


10.7 


11.5 


10.6 


4.0 


6.8 


7.9 


7.4 


6.8 


7.9 


7.1 


8.0 


7.3 


7.1 


5.5 


5.5 


5.3 


4.4 


5.5 


4.8 


5.4 


5.4 


2.6 


2.8 


3.2 


3.4 


3.0 


3.4 


3.3 


3.3 


3.2 


1.5 


1.5 


2.0 


1.9 


1.9 


2.3 


2.8 


3.0 


3.2 


1.5 


1.4 


1.5 


0.9 


1.4 


1.5 


1.2 


1.3 


1.2 


2.0 


3.0 


3.2 


4.1 


4.3 


4.1 


3.9 


4.4 


4.7 


10.7 


13.5 


13.3 


15.2 


16.6 


15.5 


14.3 


15.4 


13.7 


3.5 


5.3 


5.1 


5.8 


6.6 


7.0 


7.3 


7.7 


B2 


26.1 


21.5 


21.4 


23.8 


24.6 


26.5 


26.6 


20.3 


23.4 


14.3 


11.6 


12.4 


11.8 


12.6 


13.9 


14.6 


8.4 


11.7 


7.3 


5.5 


4.4 


6.0 


5.8 


6.2 


5.9 


5.8 


5.1 


4.5 


4.4 


4.6 


6.0 


6.2 


6.4 


6.1 


6.2 


6£ 


165.7 


159.5 


155.9 


150.4 


152.9 


160.2 


155.2 


100.3 


152.7 


3.1 


3.3 


3.8 


4.2 


3.9 


3.6 


4.1 


3.7 


3.7 


11.2 


12.8 


12.1 


12.7 


11.1 


10.6 


12.1 


10.2 


105 


24.6 


20.9 


21.0 


17.3 


18.4 


20.1 


17.0 


19.2 


17.4 


126.1 


122.2 


118.8 


125.0 


119.2 


125.2 


121.6 


126.8 


120J 


337.6 


359.2 


387.3 


406.5 


419.1 


418.4 


415.1 


415.6 


42BJ3 


150.4 


157.4 


170.9 


180.9 


186.0 


190.2 


186.4 


191.9 


201.7 


0.3 


0.5 


0.6 


0.6 


0.6 


0.7 


0.7 


0.9 


1.0 


1.4 


2.6 


3.4 


4.3 


4.5 


5.0 


5.1 


6.5 


5.5 


8.1 


8.8 


8.8 


8.2 


8.4 


9.2 


8.5 


7.6 


9.2 


6.2 


6.5 


8.3 


11.2 


12.4 


14.1 


12.7 


11.3 


11.1 


1.1 


1.8 


2.2 


1.6 


1.7 


1.8 


1.5 


1.9 


2.0 


7.4 


6.9 


7.2 


6.9 


7.0 


6.6 


6.5 


6.6 


6.2 


6.5 


6.4 


6.7 


7.8 


8.3 


8.3 


9.3 


9.1 


9.0 


3.9 


4.4 


4.7 


5.6 


5.9 


6.4 


6.5 


6.8 


6.6 


25.6 


23.7 


27.8 


22.2 


21.6 


23.9 


21.6 


23.9 


24.3 


1.2 


1.8 


2.0 


2.1 


2.1 


2.3 


2.5 


2.5 


^6 


11.4 


13.6 


15.1 


17.8 


18.4 


18.8 


18.3 


18.4 


18.4 


1.3 


1.3 


1.1 


1.6 


1.5 


1.4 


1.7 


1.9 


^o 


2.9 


3.8 


4.5 


6.2 


7.1 


6.4 


6.4 


6.7 


7.9 


51.1 


46.3 


46.8 


49.3 


SO.O 


48.5 


47.0 


48.0 


47.2 


4.4 


5.4 


4.6 


4.4 


4.5 


4.5 


4.1 


4.0 


4.3 


12.8 


14.9 


15.5 


16.9 


17.4 


16.8 


17.6 


17.8 


17.3 


4.8 


8.7 


11.6 


14.2 


14.6 


15.6 


16.5 


18.0 


27.1 


187.1 


201.8 


216.5 


227.5 


233.0 


228.2 


228.8 


223.7 


226.6 


51.5 


64.5 


66.8 


78.9 


83.4 


81.6 


80.5 


81.0 


79.7 


102.8 


99.2 


111.5 


109.4 


107.8 


106.0 


107.1 


103.3 


104.7 


10.5 


12.8 


14.6 


14.6 


17.5 


16.8 


17.7 


14.7 


17.7 


16.5 


17.6 


16.4 


16.4 


16.4 


15.9 


14.8 


15.9 


16.0 


5.8 


7.6 


7.1 


8.3 


7.9 


7.9 


8.7 


8.8 


8.6 



Excludes wine grapes. ^ Aprioote. avocados, cherries, cranberries. Idwifnjit, mangoes, papayas, and honeydew melons. 
^ Lemons, limes, tangerines, and tartgeloe. * Apples, apricots, bladcberries, blueberries, boysenbenies, cherries, loganberrlet. 
oeaches. plums, prunes, raspberries, and strawberries. ' Apples, apricots, dates, figs, peaches, pears, prunes, and raiaina. 
" Apples, apricots, cherries, olives, peaches, pears, pineapples, plums, and prunes. ' Apple, cranberry, grape. grapiefruH, lemon. 
lime, orange, pineapple, and prunes. " Articholces, brussels sprouts, eggplant escaroie. endive, gariic, romaine. leaf Mluoe. 
radishes, ^iruich. and squash. Beginning 2000. includes cdlard greens, kaie. mustard greens, oicra. pumpkin, and turnip 
greens. ^ Onions and potatoes. ^° Dry peas, lentils, and dry ediole beans. 

No. 197. Per Capita Consumption of Selected Beverages by IVpe: 
1980 to 2000 

[In gallona. See headnote. Table 195] 



Commodity 



1985 1999 1995 1998 1997 1998 



Nonalcoholic 

Milk (plain and flavored) 

Whole 

Reduced-fat. light, and skim . 

Tea 

Coffee 

Bottled water 

Cart>onated soft drinks 

Diet 

Regular 

Fruit jutees 

Fruit drinks, cocktails, and ades. 

Canned iced tea 

Vegetable juk:e8 

Akx)holk: 

Beer 

Wine ' 

Distilled spirits 



^i 


128.3 


128.6 


130.3 


131.5 


136.2 


141.8 


m 


25.7 


24.0 


24.0 


23.6 


23.2 


23.1 


14.3 


10.5 


8.6 


8.5 


8.3 


8.2 


8.2 


8.1 


12.3 


15.2 


15.4 


15.4 


15.3 


15.1 


14.9 


14.5 


7.1 


6.9 


7.9 


7.6 


7.3 


8.3 


8.2 


7J 


27.4 


26.9 


20.3 


22.1 


23.3 


23.9 


25.1 


26.3 


4.5 


8.0 


11.5 


12.3 


12.9 


15.7 


17.7 1 


Sl3 


35.7 


46.2 


47.5 


46.7 


46.8 


47.9 


49.7 


7.1 


10.7 


10.9 


10.6 


10.6 


11.0 


11.5 


11J 


28.7 


35.6 


36.5 


36.0 


36.2 


36.8 


38.2 


37.7 


7.8 


7.9 


8.7 


8.7 


8.7 


8.5 


9.3 


8.4 


(NA 


6.3 


7.7 


7.9 


8.2 


7.7 


7.7 { 


[f^ 


r^ 


0.1 


0.7 


0.7 


0.8 


0.7 


0.7 ( 


NA 


NA 


0.3 


0.3 


0.3 


0.3 


0.3 


0.3 1 


NA 


28.0 


27.5 


24.7 


24.8 


24.7 


24.8 


25.0 


£4.1 


23.8 


23.9 


21.8 


21.7 


21.6 


21.7 


21.8 


21.7 


2.4 


2.0 


1.7 


1.9 


1.9 


1.9 


2.0 


2.0 


1.8 


1.5 


1.2 


1.2 


1.2 


1.2 


1.2 


1.3 



NA Not available. ^ Beginnirig 1985, includes wine coolers. 

Source of Tables 196 and 197: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Eoonomk: Research Sen/k:e, Food Consumption, Pricm, and 
Exp&nditurBS. annual; AgriaMinU Ouftoofc. rrxmihly; and online at <http://www.ers.usda.gov/data/oonsumptkxi>. 



1 30 Health and Nutrition 



U.S. Census Bureau, Statisttoai Abstract of the Unllad 



Section 4 

Education 



This section presents data primarily con- 
cerning formal education as a whole, at 
various levels, and for public and private 
schools. Data shown relate to the school- 
age population and school enrollment, 
educational attainment, education person- 
nel, and financial aspects of education. 
In addition, data are shown for charter 
schools, computer usage in schools, dis- 
tance education, and adult education. The 
chief sources are the decennial census of 
population and the Current Population 
Survey (CPS), both conducted by the U.S. 
Census Bureau (see text. Section 1 , Popu- 
lation); annual, biennial, and other peri- 
odic surveys conducted by the National 
Center for Education Statistics (NCES), a 
part of the U.S. Department of Education; 
and surveys conducted by the National 
Education Association. 

The censuses of population have included 
data on school enrollment since 1 840 and 
on educational attainment since 1 940. 
The CPS has reported on school enroll- 
ment annually since 1 945 and on educa- 
tional attainment periodically since 1 947. 

The NCES is continuing the pattern of sta- 
tistical studies and surveys conducted by 
the U.S. Office of Education since 1 870. 
The annual Digest of Education Statistics 
provides summary data on pupils, staff, 
finances, including government expendi- 
tures, and organization at the elementary, 
secondary, and higher education levels. It 
is also a primary source for detailed infor- 
mation on federal funds for education, 
projections of enrollment, graduates, and 
teachers. The Condition of Education, 
issued annually, presents a summary of 
information on education of particular 
interest to policymakers. NCES also con- 
duas special studies periodically. 

The census of governments, conducted 
by the Census Bureau every 5 years (for 
the years ending In "2" and "7"), provides 
data on school district finances and state 
and local government expenditures for 
education. Reports published by the 



Bureau of Labor Statistics contain data 
relating civilian labor force experience to 
educational attainment (see also Tables 
564, 590, and 598 in Section 12, Labor 
Force, Employment, and Earnings). 

Types and sources of data— The statis- 
tics in this section are of two general 
types. One type, exemplified by data from 
the Census Bureau, is based on direct 
interviews with individuals to obtain 
information about their own and their 
family members' education. Data of this 
type relate to school enrollment and level 
of education attained, classified by age, 
sex, and other characteristics of the popu- 
lation. The school enrollment statistics 
reflect attendance or enrollment in any 
regular school within a given period; edu- 
cational attainment statistics reflect the 
highest grade completed by an individual, 
or beginning 1992, the highest diploma 
or degree received. 

Starting in October 1 994, the CPS used 
1 990 census population controls plus 
adjustment for undercount. Also the sur- 
vey changed from paper to computer 
assisted technology. For years 1981 
through 1993, 1980 census population 
controls were used; 1971 through 1980, 
1 970 census population controls had 
been used. These changes had little 
impact on summary measures (e.g., medi- 
ans) and proportional measures (e.g., 
enrollment rates); however, use of the 
controls may have significant impact on 
absolute numbers. 

The second type, generally exemplified 
by data from the NCES and the National 
Education Association, is based on reports 
from administrators of educational insti- 
tutions and of state and local agencies 
having jurisdiction over education. Data 
of this type relate to enrollment, atten- 
dance, staff, and finances for the nation, 
individual states, and local areas. 

Unlike the NCES, the Census Bureau does 
not regularly include specialized voca- 
tional, trade, business, or correspondence 



EducaUoTX \'^\ 



u& 



Abttrad or tfw UrMtd SMw: 2002 



schools in its surveys. The NCES Includes 
nursery schools and kindergartens that 
are part of regular grade schools in their 
enrollment figures. The Census Bureau 
includes all nursery schools and kinder- 
gartens. At the higher education level, the 
statistics of both agencies are concerned 
with institutions granting degrees or 
offering work acceptable for degree- 
credit, such as junior colleges. 

School attendance— All states require 
that children attend school. While state 
laws vary as to the ages and circum- 
stances of compulsory attendance, gener- 
ally they require that formal schooling 
begin by age 6 and continue to age 1 6. 

Schools— The NCES defines a school as 
"a division of the school system consist- 
ing of students composing one or more 
grade groups or other identifiable groups, 
organized as one unit with one or more 
teachers to give instruction of a defined 
type, and housed in a school plant of one 
or more buildings. More than one school 
may be housed in one school plant, as is 
the case when the elementary and sec- 
ondary programs are housed in the same 
school plant.'* 

Regular schools are those which advance 
a person toward a diploma or degree. 
They include public and private nursery 
schools, kindergartens, graded schools, 
colleges, universities, and professional 
schools. 

Public schools are schools controlled and 
supported by local, state, or federal gov- 
ernmental agencies; private schools are 



those controlled and supported mainly by 
religious organizations or by private per- 
sons or organizations. 

The Census Bureau defines elementary 
schools as including grades 1 through 8; 
high schools as including grades 9 
through 12; and colleges as including Jun- 
ior or community colleges, regular 4-year 
colleges, and universities and graduate or 
professional schools. Statistics reported 
by the NCES and the National Education 
Association by type of organization, such 
as elementary level and secondary level, 
may not be strictly comparable with those 
from the Census Bureau because the 
grades included at the two levels vary, 
depending on the level assigned to the 
middle or junior high school by the local 
school systems. 

School year— Except as otherwise indi- 
cated in the tables, data refer to the 
school year which, for elementary and 
secondary schools, generally begins in 
September of the preceding year and 
ends in June of the year stated. For the 
most part, statistics concerning school 
finances are for a 1 2-month period, usu- 
ally July 1 to June 30. Enrollment data 
generally refer to a specific point in time, 
such as fall, as indicated in the tables. 

Statistical reliability— For a discussion 
of statistical collection, estimation, and 
sampling procedures and measures of sta- 
tistical reliability applicable to the Census 
Bureau and the NCES data, see Appendix 



132 Education 



U.S. Census Bur«au. Statistical Abstract of th« UniM 



No. 198. School Enrollment: 1965 to 201 1 

[In thousands (54,394 rspcs s snt s 54,394,000). As of fsiq 



Year 



All levels 



Total 



Public Private 



K through grade 8 



Put)(ic Private 



Grades 9 through 12 



Public 



Private 



College ^ 



Public 



Private 



1965 
1970 
1975 
1980 

1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 

1965 

1986 
1987 
1988 
1969 
1990 

1991 
1992 
1983 
1994 
1995 



1996 

1997 

1998 

1999 . . . . 

2000. proj. 

2001. proj. 

2002. — ' 
2003. 
2004, 
2005. 

2006, 

2007. 
2008, 
2009. 

2010. pCQj. 

2011. pro}.. 



54.394 
59.838 
61.004 
58.305 

57.916 
57.591 
57.432 
57.150 
57.226 

57,709 
58.254 
58.485 
59.436 
60.267 

61.605 
62.686 
63.241 
63.986 
64.764 

66.743 
66.470 
66.983 
67.667 
68.146 

68.457 
68.837 
69.198 
69.523 
69.787 

69,998 
70.127 
70.224 
70.358 
70.526 
70.810 



46,143 
52.322 
53.654 
50.335 

49.691 
49.262 
48.935 
48.686 
48.901 

49.467 
49.982 
50.349 
51.120 
52.061 

53.356 
54.208 
54.654 
55.245 
55.933 

56.732 
57,323 
57.677 
58.166 
58.758 

58.988 
59,305 
59.593 
59.854 
60.063 

60.222 
60.302 
60.349 
60.424 
60.532 
60.743 



8,251 
7,516 
7,350 
7,971 

8.225 
8,330 
8.497 
8.465 
8,325 

8.242 
8.272 
8,136 
8.316 
8.206 

8.248 
8,478 
8.587 
8.741 
8.831 

9.011 
9.147 
9,306 
9.501 
9.388 

9.469 
9.532 
9.605 
9.668 
9,723 

9,777 
9,824 
9.876 
9,933 
9,993 
10.067 



30,563 
32,558 
30.515 
27.647 

27.280 
27.161 
26.981 
26.905 
27,034 

27.420 
27,933 
28,501 
29.152 
29.878 

30.506 
31.088 
31.504 
31.898 
32,341 

32,764 
33,073 
33,346 
33,488 
33,709 

33,587 
33.574 
33.475 
33.276 
33,091 

32.947 
32.868 
32.860 
32.913 
33.034 
33,179 



4.900 
4.052 
3,700 
3.992 

4,100 
4,200 
4,315 
4,300 
4.195 

4.116 
4.232 
4.036 
4.162 
4.095 

4.074 
4.212 
4,280 
4,360 
4.465 

4.551 
4.623 
4.702 
4.765 
4,678 

4,668 
4,660 
4,644 
4.620 
4,603 

4.592 
4,588 
4,592 
4.604 
4,625 
4,649 



11.610 
13.336 
14.304 
13.231 

12.764 
12.405 
12.271 
12.304 
12.388 

12,333 
12,076 
11.687 
11,390 
11,338 

11.541 
11.735 
11.961 
12,213 
12.500 

12.847 
13,054 
13.193 
13,369 
13,514 

13,626 
13,784 
13,957 
14,218 
14.445 

14,569 
14.562 
14.426 
14,265 
14,096 
13,991 



1.400 
1.311 
1,300 
1.339 

1.400 
1.400 
1.400 
1.400 
1.362 

1,336 
1.247 
1,206 
1.193 
1.137 

1.125 
1.163 
1.191 
1.236 
1.197 

1.213 
1.218 
1.235 
1.254 
1.266 

1.276 
1.292 
1,310 
1.334 
1,351 

1.358 
1.355 
1.341 
1.327 
1.313 
1.303 



3.970 
6.428 
8,835 
9.457 

9.647 
9.696 
9,683 
9.477 
9,479 

9.714 

9.973 

10.161 

10.578 

10.845 

11.310 
11.385 
11,189 
11.134 
11,092 

11.120 
11,196 
11.138 
11,309 
11.535 

11.775 
11.947 
12.161 
12.360 
12.527 

12.706 
12,872 
13.063 
13.246 
13,402 
13.573 



1.951 
2.153 
2.350 
2.640 

2.725 
2.730 
2,782 
2.765 
2.768 

2,790 
2,793 
2.894 

2.961 
2,974 

3.049 
3.103 
3.116 
3.145 
3.169 

3.247 
3.306 
3.369 
3.482 
3.444 

3.525 
3.580 
3.651 
3.714 
3.769 

3.827 
3,881 
3,943 
4,002 
4,055 
4,115 



' Data beginning 1996 based on new classification system. See footnote 1 , Table 257. 

Source: U.S. Natkxial Center for Education Statistics. Digest of Education Statistics, annual, and Projections of Education 
Statistics, annual. 

No. 199. School Expenditures by IVpe of Control and Level of instruction in 
Consunt (2000-2001) Dollars: 1960 to 2001 

[In bRHons of dollars (142^ fspcs s s nts $142,200,000,000). For school yssrs ending In yssr shown. Total expenditures for 
pubic elementary and secondary schools include current expenditures, interest on school debt and capital outlay. Data deflated 
by ff« Consumer Price Index, wage earriers. arxi clerical workers through 1 975; thereafter, all urban consumers, on a s(^k)oI year 
bfldi (supplied by the National Center for Education Statistics). See also Appendix III] 



Year 


Elementary and secondary schools 


Colleges arK 


1 universities ^ 




Total 


Total 


Public 


Private ^ 


Total 


Public 


Private 


I960 


142.2 
317.3 
367.4 
373.6 
410.0 

433.6 
459.6 
473.7 
501.2 
526.1 

539.5 
548.5 
560.3 
571.5 
566.6 

600.2 
619.6 
646.2 
674.1 
691.9 
699.7 


99.6 
200.2 
232.7 
232.7 
247.3 

260.3 
275.8 
284.2 
302.5 
318.5 

325.5 
331.0 
337.0 
344.3 
352.0 

360.7 
373.7 
391.2 
408.7 
418.2 
422.7 


93.0 
188.6 
219.2 
216.4 
226.8 

239.1 
253.3 
261.0 
278.8 
293.4 

300.0 
305.4 
310.7 
317.7 
324.8 

332.8 
345.0 
361.9 
378.7 
387.8 
392.2 


6.6 

11.6 
13.5 
16.2 
20.5 

21.2 
22.5 
23.1 
23.7 
25.1 

25.5 
25.6 
26.3 
26.6 
27.2 

27.9 
28.6 
29.3 
30.0 
30.3 
30.5 


42.6 

117.2 
134.6 
140.9 
162.7 

173.3 
183.8 
189.5 
198.7 
207.6 

214.1 
217.6 
223.3 
227.2 
234.6 

239.5 
246.0 
254.9 
265.4 
273.8 
277.0 


23.3 
75.2 
91.2 
93.4 
105.5 

112.7 
117.4 
120.7 
125.8 
132.9 

136.5 
137.7 
141.5 
143.2 
148.5 

150.4 
153.8 
158.8 
163.9 
168.8 
171.0 


19.3 


1970 


41.9 


1975 


43.4 


1990 


47.4 


1965 


57.2 


1986 


60.5 


1987 . 


66.5 


1988 


68.8 


1989 


72.8 


1990 . 


74.7 


1991 . 


77.5 


1992 , 


79.9 


1993 


81.8 


1994 


84.0 


1995 


86.1 


1996 


89.1 


1997 , 


92.1 


1998^ 


96.1 


1999* 


101.5 


2000' 


105.0 


2001 ' 


106.0 







Estimated. ^ Data beginning 1 996 based on new classification system. See footnote 1 . Table 257. ^ Data for college and 
('^versities are estimated. * Pr«iminary data for public elementary and secondary schools and estimates for colleges and 

universities. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. Digest Education Statistics, annual. 



EducatvoTX X*^"^ 



U.&OviMiBimau. 8Wis«cal Abstract of the UnMstf Statss: 2002 



i, and Finances With 



QiBOesS Itiiough 12. . . 
J^indflT^BTlfln rhrough j}t 

KkndeFQaTlan IhrDugh gr. 
GiaOm a inraugh fl . 

Enrollmani isle 

7 to 13 war do* 

CIBUrDonl leBchsrs, lolal ' 



HttflKhi 



Khwl gfadLMies. lo 



Average dolty anendanca (ADA) . 



Coneleni (1999-3000) doilai|; 



HiQHen EDUCATION 







TWo-vewinwHuiions 








"a-::: 

PHvMW 




DoctOTBie's . 





3253 


38, 




33! 






i25* 


l! 



,571 33.475 33,278 33, 



88 3 NA) 



JNA) JNA) 



.5S0 3376 



,568 2.632 2, 



314.3 334.5 353.5 367.S 387.2 406.4 
^^^ 

11.626 41,062 41,342 41,815 42,109 
324.8 338.3 344.2 356.3 367.0 
_ ._ jjjj 



,540 3.648 3,711 

11,535 11,775 

,339 5!479 5!573 

3.444 3,525 

253 254 '260 

,661 12.894 13,182 

,807 1,787 I. BIB 



565 562 

467 428 



,706 


6,780 6, 


94? 

:a4T 


11 1; 


580 


3.651 3. 


263 


268 


B44 
305 


'309 


454 
1990 


8^633 B. 
3,049 3, 



9J74 

3!eeQ 

12,527 
5>93 

3.789 

,440 3,491 



SouFcs US National CwiIeilorEaucanonSlatiinci, Dit^IofEOucHIMn Slaraua 



1 34 Education 



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Education 135 



UA 



AkmntH or »mUniled States: 2002 



No. 202. School Enrollment by Age: 1970 to 2000 

I As of OctotMT (60,357 n pm m nt t 60,357,000). Covers dviitan nonire 
Based on Current Population Survey, see text. Section 1. Population] 



[As of October (60,357 rspresewti 60,357,000). Covers dviitan noninstilutional popiiation enroled in nursery school and 

lation Surve^ 



Age 



ENROLLMENT (1,000) 

Total 3 to 34 years old 

;« NiKl 4 years old . 
5 Ni>d years old . 
; Ki 13 years old. . 
14 NiHl ^5 years old 
itt NiKi 17 years old 
\» NiHi 19 years old 
;H^Ntid 21 years old 
;V H) iA years old . 
4.'^ \o '^9 years old . 
,M) Ht M years old . 

.19 years old and over 

I NHOLLMENT RATE 

Total 3 to 34 years old 



,1 nihI 4 years old . 
n ami ft years old . 
> Ht Ki years old. 
14 Mini 1(\ years old. 
in and 1/ years old. 
Ill ami 1U years old. 
^t ami ;m years old. 
i( K* «>'4 years old . . 
4h Kt ^•'U years old . . 
IV) Kt :«4 yaars Old ■ . 



,in yiMirs old and over. 



1970 



1960 



1900 1095 1005 1007 



60,367 57,340 58^13 60,588 66,030 67,317 60,041 00,277 00,001 00300 



1.461 
7.000 
28.943 
7.869 
6.927 
3.322 
1.049 
1.410 
1,011 
466 

(NA) 



56.4 

20.5 
88.5 
99.2 
98.1 
90.0 
47.7 
31.9 
14.9 
7.5 
4.2 

(NA) 



2.280 
5.853 
23,751 
7.282 
7,129 
3.788 
2.515 
1,931 
1.714 
1.105 

1.290 



40.7 

36.7 
95.7 
99.3 
96.2 
89.0 
46.4 
31.0 
16.3 
9.3 
6.4 

1.4 



2.801 
6.697 
22.849 
7.362 
6.654 
3.716 
2.708 
2.068 
1.942 
1.218 



3.292 

7.207 
25.016 
6.555 
6.096 
4.044 
2.852 
2.231 
^01 3 
1.281 



4.042 
7.901 
27.003 
7.651 
6.997 
4,274 
3.025 
2.546 
2.216 
1.284 



3.959 
7.893 
26.936 
7.598 
7.220 
4.539 
3.017 
2,605 
2.265 
1.286 



4.194 
7.964 
27,616 
7.744 
7.538 
4.618 
3.231 
2.754 
2.223 
1.159 



1.766 2.439 2.830 2.979 2.969 



48.3 

38.9 
96.1 
99.2 
98.1 
91.7 
51.6 
35.3 
16.9 
9.2 
6.1 

1.6 



50.2 

44.4 
96.5 
99.6 
99.0 
92.5 
57.3 
39.7 
21.0 
9.7 
5.8 

2.1 



53.7 

48.7 
96.0 
96.9 
98.9 
93.6 
59.4 
44.9 
23.2 
11.6 
6.0 

2.2 



54.1 

48.3 
94.0 
97.7 
96.0 
92.8 
61.5 
44.4 
24.8 
11.9 
6.1 

2.3 



55.6 

52.6 
96.6 
99.1 
96.9 
94.3 
61.5 
45.9 
26.4 
11.8 
5.7 

2.3 



4.164 
7.902 
27.846 
7.653 
7.456 
4.914 
3,107 
2.607 
2.216 
1.322 

2.831 



56.8 

52.1 
95.6 
98.9 
9a4 
93.9 
62.2 
44.8 
24.9 
11.9 
6.6 

2.1 



4.007 
7,648 



4.273 
7.774 
28200 
7.741 
7,611 
4340 

2.664 
2.018 
1,215 

2.794 2.653 



7.341 
4326 
3314 
2.731 
^030 
1. 



503 

54.2 
06.0 
98.7 
98.2 
933 
603 
453 
243 
11.1 
6.2 

13 



563 

52.1 
963 
96.2 
98.7 
923 
61.2 
44.1 
243 
11.4 
6.7 

13 



NA Not available. 

Mouroe US. Census Bureau. Current PopiMation Reports, PPL-148; and earlier PPL anti P-20 reports. 

No. 203. School Enrollment by Race. Hispanic Origin, and Age: 1980 to 2000 

|(4f3f) represents 47,673,000). See headnote. Table 202.] 



Age 


White 


B\ack 


Hispanic origin ^ 


1000 1000 2000 


1000 1000 2000 


1000 1000 aooo 


1- NHOLLMENT (1.000) 

Total 3 to 34 years old 

1 Mild 4 wears old 


47,673 48300 54357 

1.844 2.700 3.091 
4.781 5.750 5.959 
19.585 20.076 22.061 
6,038 5,265 6.176 
5.937 4,858 5.845 
3.199 3.271 3,924 
2.206 2.402 2.688 
1.669 1.781 2.101 
1.473 1.708 1.473 
942 1.090 939 

1.104 2.096 2.087 

48.9 49.5 55.1 

36.3 44.9 50.2 

95.8 96.5 95.3 

99.2 99.6 98.2 

98.3 99.1 98.4 
88.6 92.5 92.8 

46.3 57.1 61.3 

31.9 41.0 44.9 

16.4 20.2 23.7 

9.2 9.9 10.4 

6.3 5.9 6.0 

1.3 2.1 13 


8351 8354 11.115 

371 452 725 

904 1.129 1.219 

3,596 3,832 4.675 

1.088 1,023 1.260 

1.047 962 1.106 

494 596 716 

242 305 416 

196 274 393 

187 162 353 

124 119 252 

186 238 387 

533 51.9 593 

38.2 41.6 59.9 
95.4 96.3 96.3 
99.4 99.8 98.0 
97.9 99.2 99.6 
903 91.7 91.4 
45.7 55.2 57.2 
23.4 28.4 36.6 
13.6 20.0 24.2 
8.8 6.1 14.3 
6.8 4.4 93 

13 2.1 23 


4363 6,073 0330 

172 240 518 


h Miui A waars old 


491 835 1.390 


/ i(i 13 vears old 


2.009 2.704 4.373 


14 ami IS years old 

in Mild 17 years old 

lliMnd 10 years old 

ijo Nfu) 21 ysars old 

^^ Id 24 vears old 


568 730 1.003 
454 592 950 
226 320 617 
111 213 311 
93 121 300 


i'h i(j 20 vears old 


84 130 108 


Ki Id 34 vears old 


54 72 160 


ift years old and over 

ENROLLMENT RATE 

Total 3 to 34 years old 

'1 dnd 4 vears okJ 


(NA) 145 236 

403 47.4 513 
28 5 29 8 35 


h ttnd 6 vears old 


945 948 943 


/ 10 13 years old 

14 and 15 years old 

10 and 17 years old 

IB and 19 years old 

^0 and 21 years old 

22 to 24 vears okJ 


99.2 99.4 973 

94.3 993 963 
81.8 85.4 87.0 
373 44.1 493 
19.5 273 2ai 
11 7 99 18l2 


2ft to 29 vears old 


69 63 74 


30 to 34 vears old 


5 1 3 6 5.6 


35 years old and over 


(NA) 2.1 2.0 



NA Not available. ^ Persons of IHispanic origin may be of any race. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, PPL-148: and earlier PPL and P-20 reports. 



1 36 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the UniHd 



No. 204. Enrollment in Public and Private Schools: 1 960 to 2000 

(In milNons (39.0 w p w t nU 90,000,000), •xotpC ptrotnt As of Octobtr. For civilian noninstitirtional population. For 1960, 
5 to 34 years old; for 1970 to 1965. 3 to 34 years old; beginning 1986. for 3 years old and over] 





Put)1ic 


Private 


Year 




Nur- 


Kinder- 


Ele- 


High 






Nur- 


Kinder- 


Ele- 


High 






Total 


sery 


garten mentary 


School 


College 


Total 


sery 


garten mentary 


School 


College 


1960 


39.0 


(NA) 


ii 


27.5 


9.2 


2.3 


7.2 


T^ 


0.5 


4.9 


1.0 


1.3 


1970 


52.2 


0.3 


30.0 


13.5 


5.7 


8.1 


3.9 


1.2 


1.7 


1975 


52.8 


0.6 


2.9 


27.2 


14.5 


7.7 


8.2 


1.2 


0.5 


3.3 


1.2 


2.0 


1980 


(NAj 
49i 


0.6 


2.7 


24.4 


(NAJ 
13.0 


(NA) 


(NA) 


1.4 


0.5 


3.1 


Tl 


"tl 


1982 


0.7 


2.7 


24.4 


8.4 


8.2 


1.4 


0.6 


3.0 


1983 


48.7 


0.8 


2.7 


24.2 


12.8 


8.2 


9.0 


1.5 


0.7 


3.0 


1.2 


2.6 


1984 


49.0 


0.8 


3.0 


24.1 


12.7 


8.5 


8.3 


1.6 


0.5 


2.7 


1.1 


2.4 


1985 , 


49.0 


0.9 


3.2 


23.8 


12.8 


8.4 


9.0 


1.6 


0.6 


3.1 


1.2 


2.5 


1986^ 


51.2 


0.8 


3.4 


24.2 


13.0 


9.8 


9.4 


1.7 


0.6 


3.0 


1.2 


2.9 


19872 


51.7 


0.8 


3.4 


24.8 


12.7 


10.0 


8.9 


1.7 


0.6 


2.8 


1.1 


2.8 


19882 


52.2 


0.9 


3.4 


25.5 


12.2 


10.3 


8.9 


1.8 


0.5 


2.8 


1.0 


2.8 


1989^ 


52.5 


0.9 


3.3 


25.9 


12.1 


10.3 


8.9 


1.9 


0.6 


2.7 


0.8 


2.9 


1990 ! 


53.8 


1.2 


3.3 


26.6 


11.9 


10.7 


9.2 


2.2 


0.6 


2.7 


0.9 


2.9 


1991 I 


54.5 


1.1 


3.5 


26.6 


12.2 


11.1 


9.4 


1.8 


0.6 


3.0 


1.0 


3.0 


1992^ 


55.0 


1.1 


3.5 


27.1 


12.3 


11.1 


9.4 


1.8 


0.6 


3.1 


1.0 


3.0 


1993^ 


56.0 


1.2 


3.5 


27.7 


12.6 


10.9 


9.4 


1.8 


0.7 


2.9 


1.0 


3.0 


1994 2 


58.6 


1.9 


3.3 


28.1 


13.5 


11.7 


10.7 


2.3 


0.6 


3.4 


1.1 


3.3 


19952 


58.7 


2.0 


3.2 


28.4 


13.7 


11.4 


11.1 


2.4 


0.7 


3.4 


1.2 


3.3 


1996 


59.5 


1.9 


3.4 


28.1 


14.1 


12.0 


10.8 


2.3 


0.7 


3.4 


1.2 


3.2 


19972 


61.6 


2.3 


3.3 


29.3 


14.6 


12.1 


10.5 


2.2 


0.7 


3.1 


1.2 


3.3 


1996? 


60.8 


2.3 


3.1 


29.1 


14.3 


12.0 


11.3 


2.3 


0.7 


3.4 


1.2 


3.6 


19992 


60.8 


2.3 


3.2 


29.2 


14.4 


11.7 


11.4 


2.3 


0.7 


3.6 


1.3 


3.5 


20002 


61.2 


2.2 


3.2 


29.4 


14.4 


12.0 


11.0 


2.2 


0.7 


3.5 


1.3 


3.3 


Pefoent White: 


























1960 


85.7 


(NA) 


(') 


84.3 


88.2 


92.2 


95.7 


(NA) 


C) 


95.3 


96.7 


96.3 


1970 


84.5 


59.5 


84.4 


83.1 


85.6 


90.7 


93.4 


91.1 


88.2 


94.1 


96.1 


92.8 


1980 


(NA) 


68.2 


80.7 


80.9 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


89.0 


87.0 


90.7 


(NA) 


(NA) 


1990 


79.8 


71.7 


78.3 


78.9 


79.2 


84.1 


87.4 


89.6 


83.2 


88.2 


89.4 


85.0 


1995 


78.0 


71.3 


76.9 


77.5 


76.9 


81.9 


85.0 


88.7 


84.1 


86.1 


86.0 


81.1 


1999 


77.2 


69.2 


76.5 


77.1 


77.7 


78.8 


84.3 


87.4 


81.2 


85.2 


87.0 


80.9 


2000 


77.0 


69.4 


77.3 


76.7 


78.0 


78.0 


83.5 


84.9 


82.8 


85.9 


84.6 


79.8 



NA Not available. ^ Included in elementary school. 2 s^e Table 268 for college enrollment 35 years old and over. Also 
data t)eginning 1986 based on a revised edit ar)d tabulation package. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, PPL-148; and earlier PPL and P-20 reports. 

No. 205. School Enrollment by Sex and Level: 1960 to 2000 

[bi milHone (46^ repreaents 46,300.000). Aa of Oct For the civilian noninstitutional population. For 1 960. persona 5 to 34 years 
old; 1970-1979, 3 to 34 years old; beginnina 1980, 3 years old and over. Elementary includes Kindergarten and grades 1-8; high 
tchool. grades 9-12; and college. 2-year and 4-year colleges, universities, and graduate and professional schools. Data for college 
represent degree-credit enrollment] 



Year 


Ail levels^ 


Elementary 


High 


school 




College 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male Female 


Total 


Male Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


1960 


46.3 


24.2 


22.0 


32.4 


16.7 


15.7 


10.2 


5.2 


5.1 


3.6 


2.3 


1.2 


1970 


60.4 


31.4 


28.9 


37.1 


19.0 


18.1 


14.7 


7.4 


7.3 


7.4 


4.4 


3.0 


1975 


61.0 


31.6 


29.4 


33.8 


17.3 


16.5 


15.7 


8.0 


7.7 


9.7 


5.3 


4.4 


1980 


58.6 


29.6 


29.1 


30.6 


15.8 


14.9 


14.6 


7.3 


7.3 


11.4 


5.4 


6.0 


1981 


59.9 


30.3 


29.6 


31.0 


15.9 


15.0 


14.7 


7.5 


7.3 


12.1 


5.8 


6.3 


1982 


59.4 


30.0 


29.4 


30.7 


15.8 


14.9 


14.2 


7.2 


7.0 


12.3 


5.9 


6.4 


1983 


59.3 


30.1 


29.2 


30.6 


15.7 


14.8 


14.1 


7.1 


7.0 


12.4 


6.0 


6.3 


1984 


58.9 


29.9 


29.0 


30.3 


15.6 


14.7 


13.9 


7.1 


6.8 


12.3 


6.0 


6.3 


IJK, 


59.8 


30.0 


29.7 


30.7 


15.7 


15.0 


14.1 


7.2 


6.9 


12.5 


5.9 


6.6 


1986* 


60.5 


30.6 


30.0 


31.1 


16.1 


15.0 


14.2 


7.2 


7.0 


12.7 


6.0 


6.7 


1987 


60.6 


30.7 


29.9 


31.6 


16.3 


15.3 


13.8 


7.0 


6.8 


12.7 


6.0 


6.7 


1988 


61.1 


30.7 


30.5 


32.2 


16.6 


15.6 


13.2 


6.7 


6.4 


13.1 


5.9 


7.2 


1989 


61.5 


30.8 


30.7 


32.5 


16.7 


15.8 


12.9 


6.6 


6.3 


13.2 


6.0 


72 


1990 


63.0 


31.5 


31.5 


33.2 


17.1 


16.0 


12.8 


6.5 


6.4 


13.6 


6.2 


7.4 


1991 


63.9 


32.1 


31.8 


33.8 


17.3 


16.4 


13.1 


6.8 


6.4 


14.1 


6.4 


7.6 


1992 


64.6 


32.2 


32.3 


34.3 


17.7 


16.6 


13.3 


6.8 


6.5 


14.0 


6.2 


7.8 


1993 


65.4 


32.9 


32.5 


34.8 


17.9 


16.9 


13.6 


7.0 


6.6 


13.9 


6.3 


7.6 


1994 


69.3 


34.6 


34.6 


35.4 


18.2 


17.2 


14.6 


7.4 


7.2 


15.0 


6.8 


8.2 


1995 


69.8 


35.0 


34.8 


35.7 


18.3 


17.4 


15.0 


7.7 


7.3 


14.7 


6.7 


8.0 


1996 


70.3 


35.1 


35.2 


35.5 


18.3 


17.3 


15.3 


7.9 


7.4 


15.2 


6.8 


8.4 


1997 


72.0 


35.9 


36.2 


36.3 


18.7 


17.6 


15.8 


8.0 


7.7 


15.4 


6.8 


8.6 


1998 


72.1 


36.0 


36.1 


36.4 


18.7 


17.7 


15.6 


7.9 


7.6 


15.5 


6.9 


8.6 


1999 


72.4 


36.3 


36.1 


36.7 


18.8 


17.9 


15.9 


8.2 


7.7 


15.2 


7.0 


8.2 


2000 


72.2 


35.8 


36.4 


36.7 


18.9 


17.9 


15.8 


8.1 


7.7 


15.3 


6.7 


8.6 



and 



' Beoirining 1 970. indudM nursery schools, not shown separately. 2 Revised. Data beginning 1 986, based on a revised edit 
tabubrtion package. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Popt^tion Reports. PPL-148; and earlier PPL and P-20 reports. 



E^UCdX\OT\ XY! 



u& 



AbtltnAoHhaUnliBd states: 2002 



No. 206. School Enrollment by Control and Level: 1980 to 1999 

[In thoueand> (58,306 wpwe nti 68,306,000). Am^WL Daia ar» far feoulaf day aohoolg and eacdude lndap6ndBnt 

and kinderaartens. residential schools for exceptional cNldren. subcoNegnte departments of ooHegee. Federal acfi 
and federally operated schools on Federal installations. College data include degree-credH and nondeg r ee cr a dtt 
projections, see Table 198] 



echool a lbf Indhna, 
erwoMmant. For 



Control of school 
and level 



1900 



1900 1902 



1996 1997 



Total. 



58,306 60,267 62,688 63,241 63,996 64,764 66,743 66,470 68,983 87,887 



Public. 
Private 



Kindergarten through 8 

Public 

Private 



50.335 52.061 54.208 54.654 55.245 55.933 56.731 
7.971 8.206 8.476 6.587 8,741 8,831 9.011 



Grades 9 through 12. 

Public 

Private 



College ^ 
Public. 
Private 



31.639 

27.647 

3.992 

14.570 

13,231 

1.339 

12,097 
9.457 
2,640 



33.973 

29.878 

4.095 

12.475 

11.338 

1,137 

13.819 

10.845 

2.974 



35.300 

31,068 

4.212 

12.898 

11.735 

1.163 

14.487 

11.385 

3.103 



35.784 

31.504 

4,280 

13.152 

11.961 

1.191 

14.305 

11.189 

3.116 



36258 

31.898 

4.360 

13.449 

12.213 

1.236 

14.279 

11.134 

3.145 



36.806 

32.341 

4.465 

13,697 

12.500 

1.197 

14.262 

11.092 

3.169 



37.315 

32,764 

4.551 

14.080 

12.847 

1.213 

14.368 

11,120 

3,247 



57.323 
9.147 

37,886 

33.073 

4.623 

14,272 

13,064 

1.218 

14.502 

11.196 

3.306 



57,677 
9,306 

38.048 

33.346 

4.702 

14,428 

13.193 

1,235 

14.507 

11,138 

3.5 



S8.166 
9,501 



33.488 
4,786 

14.623 

i; 

1. 



14.791 

11.309 

3.482 



^ Data beginning 1996 reflects new classification system. See footnote 1, Table 257. 
Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics, Dige^ of Education Statistics, armual. 

No. 207. Students Who Are Foreign Bom or Who Have Foreign-Born 
Parents: 2000 

[In thoueanda (46,668 represents 48,668,000), except percent Aa of October. Covers civilian noninstitutional populalion 
enrolled in elementary school and above. Based on Current Population Sun^, see text. Section 1. Population arKJ Appandbc IHl 



Characteristic 



Students with at least one fbreign-bom parent 



All 
students 



Total 



Number Percent 



Foreign-bom student 



Numt>er Percent 



Native student 



Number 



ELEMENTARY AND HIGH SCHOOL 



Total ^ 

White 

White, non-Hispanic. . . 

Black 

Asian and Pacific Islander 

Hispanic ^ 



COLLEGE. 1 TO 4 YEARS 



Total ^ 

White 

White. non-Hispanic. . . 

Black 

Asian and Pacific Islander 



Hispanic 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



37,955 

30.824 

7.983 

2,018 

7.477 



12.401 

9.688 

8.523 

1,841 

787 

1.228 



9,544 
6,883 
2,161 
887 
1,664 

4,931 



2,518 

1,508 
755 
295 
702 

788 



19.6 

18.1 

7.0 

11.1 

82.5 

66.0 



20.3 

15.6 

8.9 

16.0 

69.2 

64.1 



2.808 

1.787 
418 
246 
544 

1.440 



1.257 

605 
291 
179 
466 

326 



5.4 

4.7 

1.4 

3.1 

27.0 

19.3 



10.1 
6.2 
3.4 
9.7 

59.2 

26.5 



6,938 

5,096 

1,743 

641 

1,120 

3,491 



1,281 
903 
484 
118 
236 

462 



143 

13.4 

5.7 

8.0 

56.5 

48.7 



10.2 
9.3 
5.4 
6.3 

30.0 

37.6 



Total ^ 

White 

White, non-Hispanic. . . 

Black 

Asian and Pacific Islander 

Hispanic ^ 



2.913 


746 


25.7 


509 


17^ 


239 


8J 


2.311 


458 


19.8 


242 


10.5 


216 


9.3 


2.113 


344 


16.3 


185 


8.7 


159 


7.5 


323 


38 


11.9 


31 


9.6 


7 


2.2 


262 


252 


96.3 


236 


90.0 


16 


8.1 



198 



114 



57.7 



58 



29.1 



56 



26.3 



^ Includes other races, not shown separately. ^ Persons of Hispank: origin may be of any race. 
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports. PPL-148; and eariier PPL and P-20 reports. 



1 38 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. StatMloal Abstract of the Unlied 



No. 208. EducatioiMil Attainm«nt by Race and Hlsiianlc Origin: 1960 to 2000 

(ki ptrotHL For ptfsoiw 28 yaars oW and ovar. 1960, 1970. and 1960 aa of April 1 and baaed on sampla data from tha oan- 
of poputadion. Olhar yaaia aa of Mawh and baaed on the Currant Population Survey; aae text. Section 1. Population, and 
xllL See Table 209 tor di 



Appendbc 



data by sex] 





Year 


Iblal^ 


White 


Black 


Allan and- 

Padfic 

Wander 




Hispanic^ 






Total 3 


Puerto 
Mexican Rican 


Cuban 


HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE 
ORMORE^ 

1960 


41.1 
52.3 
66.5 
73.9 
77.6 

81.7 
81.7 
82.1 
82.8 
83.4 
84.1 

7.7 
10.7 
16.2 
19.4 
21.3 

23.0 
23.6 
23.9 
24.4 
25.2 
25.6 


43.2 
54.5 
68.8 
75.5 
79.1 

83.0 
82.8 
83.0 
83.7 
84.3 
84.9 

8.1 
11.3 
17.1 
20.0 
22.0 

24.0 
24.3 
24.6 
25.0 
25.9 
26.1 


20.1 
31.4 
51.2 
59.8 
66.2 

73.8 
74.3 
74.9 
76.0 
77.0 
78.5 

3.1 

4.4 

8.4 

11.1 

11.3 

13.2 
13.6 
13.3 
14.7 
15.4 
16.5 


(NA 

(NA 
80.4 

(NAj 
83.2 
84.9 

r) 

85.7 

NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
39.9 

(NA) 
41.7 
42.2 
(NA) 
42.4 
43.9 


(NA) 
32.1 
44.0 
47.9 
50.8 

53.4 
53.1 
54.7 
55.5 
56.1 
57.0 

^71 

7.6 
8.5 
9.2 

9.3 
9.3 
10.3 
11.0 
10.9 
10.6 


37.6 40.1 
41.9 46.3 
44.1 55.5 

46.5 61.3 
46.9 60.4 

48.6 61.1 
48.3 63.8 

49.7 63.9 
51.0 64.3 

4.9 5.6 
5.5 7.0 

5.4 9.7 

6.5 10.7 
6.5 11.0 
7.5 10.7 
7.5 11.9 
7.1 11.1 
6.9 13.0 


(NAj 
43.9 


1970 




1960 




55.3 


1966 




51.1 


1990 




63.5 


1995 




64.7 


1996 




63.8 


1907 




65.2 


1906 




67.8 


1999 




70.3 


2000 




73.0 


1960 


COLLEGE GRADUATE 
OR MORE ^ 


(NA) 


1970 




11.1 


1960 




16.2 


1985 




13.7 


1990 




20.2 


1905 




19.4 


1996 




18.8 


1997 




19.7 


1998 




22.2 


1999 




24.8 


2000 




23.0 









NA Not avalable. ^ Includes other races, not shown separately. ^ Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. 
' mdudee persons of other Hispanic ort(^, not shown separately. * Through 1990. completed 4 years of high school or more 
arxl 4 years of college or more. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Census of Population, U.S. Summary. PC80-1-C1 and Current Population Report, 
P2Q-536. eartter reports, arvj unpubltehed data. Internet site <http7/www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/educ-attn.htmi>. 

No. 209. Educational Attainment by Race. Hispanic Origin, and Sex: 
1900 to 2000 



[in paroenL See Table 208 for headnote arxl totals for both sexes] 
















Year 


All races ^ 


White 


Blaci( 


Asian and 
Pacific Islander 


Hispanic^ 




Male 


Female 


Male Female 


Male 


Female 


Male Female 


Male 


Female 


HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE 
OR MORE' 

I960 


39.5 
51.9 
67.3 
74.4 
77.7 

81.7 
81.9 
82.0 
82.8 
83.4 
84.2 

9.7 
13.5 
20.1 
23.1 
24.4 

26.0 
26.0 
26.2 
26.5 
27.6 
27.8 


42.5 
52.8 
66.8 
73.5 
77.5 

81.6 
81.6 
82.2 
82.9 
83.4 
64.0 

5.8 

8.1 

12.8 

16.0 

18.4 

20.2 
21.4 
21.7 
22.4 
23.1 
23.6 


41.6 
54.0 
69.6 
76.0 
79.1 

63.0 
82.7 
82.9 
83.6 
84.2 
84.8 

10.3 
14.4 
21.3 
24.0 
25.3 

27.2 
26.9 
27.0 
27.3 
28.5 
28.5 


44.7 
55.0 
68.1 
75.1 
79.0 

83.0 
82.8 
83.2 
83.8 
84.3 
85.0 

6.0 

8.4 

13.3 

16.3 

19.0 

21.0 
21.8 
22.3 
22.8 
23.5 
23.9 


18.2 
30.1 
50.8 
58.4 
65.8 

73.4 
74.3 
73.5 
75.2 
76.7 
78.7 

2.8 

4.2 

8.4 

11.2 

11.9 

13.6 
12.4 
12.5 
13.9 
14.2 
16.3 


21.8 
32.5 
51.5 
60.8 
66.5 

74.1 
74.2 
76.0 
76.7 
77.2 
78.3 

3.3 

4.6 

8.3 

11.0 

10.8 

12.9 
14.6 
13.9 
15.4 
16.4 
16.7 


(NA) 
NA 

NA) 1 
(NAJ 
84.0 

n 

(NA) 1 
^A) I 

68!2 

^ 1 

NA 

NAJ 

44.9 

(NA) 
46.4 
(NA) 
(NAJ 
46.2 
47.6 


NA) 
NA 
NA 
NA) 

[NAj 

80.7 

NA 

NA) 

62.8 

83.4 

NA) 

NA 

NA 

NA 

35.4 

[NAj 
37.3 
NA) 
NA) 
39.0 
40.7 


67.3 
48.5 
50.3 

52.9 
53.0 
54.9 
55.7 
56.0 
56.6 

'fl 

9.4 
9.7 
9.8 

10.1 
10.3 
10.6 
11.1 
10.7 
10.7 


(NAj 
34.2 


1970 


1960 


65.8 


1966 


47.4 


1990 


51.3 


1995 


53.8 


1996 


53.3 


1997 


54.6 


1996 


55.3 


1999 


56.3 


2000 


57.5 


COLLEGE GRADUATE 
ORMORE^ 

1960 


(NAj 
4.3 


1970 


1960 


6.0 


1966 


7.3 


1990 


8.7 


1995 


8.4 


1996 


8.3 


1997 


10.1 


1998 


10.9 


1999 


11.0 


2000 


10.6 







NA Not available. ^ Includes other races, not shown separately. ^ Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. 
' Through 1990. completed 4 years of high school or more and 4 years of college or more. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Census of Population, 1960, 1970, and 1960, Vol. 1; and Current Population Reports 
P2Q-536: eartter reports, and unpiMished data, imemet site <http-y/www.census.gov/population/www/socderno/educ-attn.html>. 



Edut^X\OT\ X*^^ 



a& 



Abatrad of tha (JMKisd SMM: 2002 



No. 210. Educational Attainment by Selected Characteristic: 2000 

[For ptrsont 25 yMrs old tnd ovw (175,230 w pt—tii li 175,230,000). As of Itareh. Based on ths Currant Poputalion 
see text, Section 1, Population, and Appendix III. For composition of regions, see map inside front cover] 





Percent of population— highest level 


Characteristic 


Some 
Not a high IHigh college, Assod- 
Population school school but no ate's Bachelor's Advanced 
(1.000) graduate graduate degree degree ^ degree degree 


Total persons 


175,230 15^ 33.1 17.6 7.8 17.0 8.6 


Age: 
25 to 34 years old 


37.786 11.8 30.6 19.5 8.8 22.7 6.6 


35 to 44 years old 


44,805 11.4 33.7 18.4 9.5 18.4 8^ 


45 to 54 years old 


36.630 11.1 31.0 18.7 9.0 18.7 11.5 


55 to 64 years old 


23.387 18.3 35.7 16.3 6.2 13.1 10.4 


65 to 74 years old 


17,796 26.4 37.4 14.2 4.5 10.4 7.1 


75 years old or over 


14.825 35.4 34.1 13.2 3.9 8.7 4.7 


Sex: 
Male 


83.611 15.8 31.9 17.4 7.1 17.8 10.0 


Female 


91.620 16.0 34.3 17.7 8.4 16.3 7.3 


Race: 

White 


147.067 15.1 33.4 17.4 8.0 17.3 8.8 


Black 


20.036 21.5 35.2 20.0 6.8 11.4 5.1 


Other 


8.127 16.6 23.8 14.0 7.3 25.2 13.2 


Hispanic origin: 
IHisoanic 


17.150 43.0 27.9 13.5 5.0 7.3 33 


Non-l-lisDanic 


158.080 13.0 33.7 18.0 8.1 18.1 9.1 


Region: 
Northeast 


34.145 15.0 35.3 13.5 7.7 18.0 10.5 


Midwest 


40.079 13.1 35.5 18.2 8.3 16.8 8.0 


South 


62.292 18.3 34.0 17.1 7.0 15.7 7.8 


West 


38.713 15.7 27.4 21.1 8.6 18.6 8.6 


Marital status: 
Never married 


26.045 14.9 29.9 17.8 7.5 21.5 8.4 


Married soouse present 


109.296 13.4 33.0 17.4 8.2 18.3 9.8 


Married spouse absent ^ 

Separated 


2.560 28.0 32.8 14.6 5.5 11.6 7.3 
4.141 24.6 38.0 17.8 6.3 10.1 3.2 


Widowfed 

Divorced 


13.641 35.8 36.1 13.1 4.9 6.8 3.2 
19.549 13.8 35.4 21.6 8.8 13.3 7.0 


Civilian labor force status: 

Employed 

Unemployed 


114.600 9.7 31.8 18.8 9.0 20.4 10.4 

3.908 23.5 36.0 18.7 7.0 10.2 4.7 

56.095 28.3 35.9 14.8 5.4 10.7 5.0 







^ Includes vocational degrees. ^ Excludes those separated. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Popi^tlon Reports, P20-536; and unpublished data. 



No. 211. Mean Earnings by Highest Degree Earned: 1999 

nn dollars. For persons 18 years old arid over with earnings. Persons ■• of March the foUowIng year. Based on Currant 
Population Survey; see text. Section 1, Population, and Appendix III. For definition of mean, see Guide to Tabular Presentationj 



Characteristic 



Level of highest degree 



Total 
persons 



Note 
high 

SCfKXH 

graduate 



High 

school 

graduate 

only 



Some 

college. 

no 

degree 



Asso- 
ciate's 



Bache- 
lor's 



Master's 



Profes- 
sional 



Doctorate 



All persons ^ 



32.356 16,121 24,572 26,968 32,152 45.678 55.641 100,967 86333 



Age: 
25 to 34 years old. . . 
35 to 44 years old. . . 
45 to 54 years old. . . 
55 to 64 years old . . . 
65 years old and over 



Sex: 

Male. . . 
Female . 

White. . . . 

Male. . . 

Female . 
Blaci( ... 

Male. . . 

Female . 

Hispanic ^ . 
Male. . . 
Female . 



29,901 
36,900 
41.465 
38,577 
24.263 



40.257 
23.551 

33,326 
41.598 
23,756 
24.979 
28.821 
21,694 

22,096 
24.970 
18.187 



16,916 
18.984 
19.707 
22,212 
12.121 



18.855 
12,145 

16,623 
19,320 
12.405 
13.569 
16,391 
10.734 

16.106 
18.020 
12.684 



24.040 
27.444 
28.883 
27.558 
18.704 



30.414 
18.092 

25.270 
31.279 
18,381 
20,991 
25,849 
16.508 

20.704 
23.736 
16.653 



26.914 
34.219 
36.935 
34.240 
19.052 



33.614 
20.241 

27,674 
34,825 
20,188 
24,101 
27,538 
21,355 

23.115 
27.288 
18.782 



28,088 
35.370 
37.508 
35,703 
17.609 



40.047 
25,079 

32.686 
41.010 
24.928 
28,772 
31.885 
26.787 

29,329 
36,740 
22.695 



39.768 
50.153 
54.922 
50.141 
30.624 



57,706 
32.546 

46.894 
59.606 
32.507 
37.422 
42,530 
33.184 

36,212 
42,733 
29,249 



46.768 
56.816 
62.158 
57,580 
35,639 

68.367 
42.378 

55.622 
68,831 
41.845 
48,777 
54,642 
44.761 

50.576 
60.013 
41.118 



58,043 
100,240 
116,327 
132.326 
104,055 

120.352 
59.792 

103.450 

123.066 

57.314 

75.509 

(B) 

(B) 

64.029 



60.852 
94.936 
87.660 
97.214 
78.333 

97.357 
61.136 



(B) 
(B) 




B Base figure too small to meet statistical standards for reliability of a derived figure, 
separately. ' Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, P20-536. 



Includes ott)er races, not shown 



1 40 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau, StaUetical Abatract of the United 



No. 212. Educational Attainment by SUt« 1990 and 

[lapwcant Aiol March 2000 jnd April 1990 For personE 25 wmoW and over, s 



fX as mdUMd Bawd on IM teeo C«v 






U.S. Caniut Bureau, i9iK! Ctntua ol PoiMaeon. CPH-L-96, ai 



01 conctoMd th« 1 Ztn grade 



I Cumm Pofxiiaaan Regaita. P£0-S3e. 



Educa&otv \^\ 



No. 213. Nonfatal Crimes Against StudmU: 1998 and 1999 

or studonts agod 12 through 18 (2,715.8 roproMnts 2,715,600) 

ised on the National Crime Victimization Survey, see Appendix III] 



[For students sged 12 through 18 (2,715.8 represents 2,715,600). For crimes oocunfng at school or going to or fiwii sohooL 
Bai 





1900 


1900 


Student characteristic 


Violent 


VkNsnt 




Total Theft Total Serious^ 


Total Theft Total Sartous^ 


Total (1.000) 


2,715.6 1,562.3 1,153.2 282.7 

101 56 43 9 

111 59 52 10 
91 58 33 8 

125 65 60 14 
83 53 30 6 

105 60 45 9 

111 64 48 12 
82 48 34 11 
88 57 32 ^4 

117 68 49 13 
97 56 40 7 
93 50 43 11 

110 56 53 Jl7 
97 38 59 ^12 

126 64 62 10 

102 50 52 15 
86 57 29 '6 

110 68 42 10 

112 75 37 'e 


2,400.7 \MSJS 004.1 106.0 


RATE PER 1.000 STUDENTS 
Total * 


02 80 33 7 


Sex: 

Male 


98 62 37 


Female 


85 57 28 6 


Age: 
12 to 14 veers old 


120 74 46 11 


15 to 18 years old 

Race/ethnicity: 

Whrte. non-Hispanic 

Blacit, non-Hispanic 

Hispanic 


70 48 23 4 

98 64 34 6 

106 63 43 14 

62 40 21 6 


Ottier, non-Hispanic 

Urt)anlcity: * 

Urt)an 

Suburt>an 


77 52 28 ^ 

93 63 29 9 

94 58 36 a 


Rural 

Household income: 
Less than $7.500 


86 58 26 ^2 

86 36 48 '15 
70 42 29 '4 


$7,500 to $14.999 


$15,000 to $24,999 


90 58 32 *9 


$25,000 to $34,999 


77 51 28 'a 


$35,000 to $49,999 


108 66 42 M 


$50,000 to $74,999 


100 61 38 12 
108 85 23 % 


$75,000 and over 



^ Includes rape, sexual assault, robbery arxi aggravated assault. ^ Includes thoee whose raoe/ethnlcity or Inooma s mm 
unknown. ** Estimate based on fewer than 10 cases. Urt>an: The largest city (or groupings of cities) of sn MSA; subuitMn: 
those portions of metro areas outside central cities: mral: places outside MSAs. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics and U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, ImMcaton of School Crimm and 
Safety 2001. October 2001 . NCES 2002-1 13; and earlier issues. 

No. 214. Public Sciioois Reporting Criminai incidents to the Poiice: 1996-97 

[In percent. For crimes that took place in school buiklinas, on school buses or grounds. ar>d places hokUng schoot-sponaorad 
events. Based on the National Center for Education Statistks' Fast Response Survey System; see source for detals] 





Any inckJents 


SerkMJS vk>lent incklents ' 


School characteristk: 


Total City ^ fringe ^ Town ' Rural ' 


Total City^ fringe^ Town ^ Rural ^ 


Total 


56.7 59.3 56.4 63.2 46.9 

45.1 46.9 47.0 52.6 34.2 
74.1 86.7 78.8 70.0 62.0 
76.9 88.8 84.0 84.2 64.1 

37.8 (B) (B) 44.9 38.0 

59.6 54.2 59.2 67.3 56.8 
89.1 93.1 86.7 86.5 (B) 

46.7 (B) 47.2 53.9 40.8 

57.7 52.0 62.9 64.0 45.0 

58.1 54.7 58.5 66.7 53.3 

68.3 64.8 62.3 81.5 74.9 

54.4 50.6 57.3 84.2 41.2 

53.2 56.0 65.5 57.2 39.5 
59.4 76.1 53.3 63.1 52.5 

58.8 60.8 54.7 66.6 52.0 
59.2 58.5 (B) (B) (B) 


10.1 1641 11.2 5A 7M 


Instructional level: 
Elementary school 


4.2 6.1 3.3 2.0 5.1 


Middle school 


18.7 35.8 21.7 7.0 15.0 


High school 


20.6 48.0 33.0 12.7 8.4 


School enrollment: 
Less than 300 


3.9 (B) (B) 8.6 2.5 
9.3 12.5 8.0 3.2 13.8 


300 to 999 


1 .000 or more 


32.9 44.2 29.8 15.8 <B) 

5.8 (B) 5.9 3.3 7.3 
10.9 14.5 11.3 10.6 6.8 


Minority enrollment: 
Less than 5 percent 


5 to 19 percent 


20 to 49 percent 


11.1 19.1 10.1 5.0 8.0 


50 percent or more 

Free/reduced price lunch 
eligibility: 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 34 percent 


14.7 17.6 17.8 4.4 11.6 

8.6 12.2 9.9 7.1 5.0 
11.7 18.4 13.3 7.1 11.6 


35 to 49 percent 


11.6 34.2 8.6 3.0 8.0 


50 to 74 percent 


8.9 22.9 10.3 2.0 2.3 


75 percent or more 


10.2 8.4 (B) (B) (B) 





B Base figure too small to meet statistk^l standards for reliability of a derived figure. ^ City: central dty of an MSA; urban 
frinoe: a place within an MSA but not Its central city; town: a place outskJe an MSA, witti a population greater than or equal to 2,500 
and defined as orban by the U.S. Census Bureau: mral: a place with a population under 2,500 and defined as urt)an by the U.S. 
Census Bureau. ^ Includes murder, rape or other sexual battery, suicide, physteal attack or fight with a weapon, or robhtfy. 

Source: U S. National Center for EducatkKi Statistks and U.S. Bureau of Justice Statisttes, Indicators of School Otma and 
Safety 1999. September 1999. NCES 1999-057. 



142 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Stattsttoal Abstrsct of the UnHad 



No. 21 5. Chlldran Whose Paranu Ar« Involved in School Activities: 1999 

ptiosnl 

(Mails] 



Cpmcmt, mao&tit §m IndlciiscI (23,366 iipimiHi 23,366,000>. Based on the National Household Education Survey; see soures 



Parental involvement 



Students in grades K to 5 



Two- 
parent 
Total families 



One-parent families 



Total Mother Father 



Students in grades 6 to 8 



Two- 
parent 
Total families 



One-parent families 
Total Mother Father 



Total studenta, 1968 (1.000) 

Anv adult atterxJing a meeting . . . 

only mother attended 

Only father attended 

Both attended 



23.355 15.841 7.514 8,834 



11,252 7,747 3,508 3,010 



Anv adult atterKfir)g a conference . 

unly mother attended 

Ordy father attended 

Both attended 



Aiw adult atterxJing a class event. 

only mother attended 

Only father attended 

Both attended 



Any adult acted as a volunteer 

Only mother attended 

Only fattier attended 

Both attended 



Number of acttvttles at least 
one parent participated in: 

None 

One 

Two 

Three 

Four 



Number of acUvfties t>otti 
parents participeted in: 

None 

One 

Two 

Three 

Four 



84.9 

39.4 

5.7 

39.8 

87.7 

S2.0 

6.4 

29.4 

70.8 

31.5 

5.1 

34.2 

48.9 

37.0 

3.2 

8.6 



3.5 

7.4 

19.7 

32.0 

37.4 



24.0 
21.7 
26.0 
21.5 
6.7 



88.6 

25.7 

4.1 

58.7 

89.4 

41.0 

5.1 

43.3 

74.0 

20.0 

3.6 

50.4 

55.5 

39.3 

3.4 

12.7 



2.2 

5.7 

17.6 

31.7 

42.9 



24.0 
21.7 
26.0 
21.5 
6.7 



77.1 

68.2 

8.9 

(X) 

84.1 

75.1 

9.0 

(X) 

64.1 

55.7 

8.3 

(X) 

34.8 

32.1 

2.7 

(X) 



6.5 
11.0 
24.3 
32.5 
25.7 



77.3 
77.3 

Txi 

85.1 

85.1 

(X 



63.1 
63.1 

\^ 

36.3 
36.3 



6.2 
11.1 
24.2 
31.7 
26.8 



75.7 

(X) 
76.7 

76.7 
(X) 

71.2 

(X) 
23.1 

23.1 
(X) 



8.3 
10.3 
25.0 
39.0 
17.4 



(X) 
(X) 
X 
(X) 
(X 



81.1 

38.7 

6.9 

35.6 

71.1 

41.0 

7.1 

23.0 

67.8 

24.6 

5.3 

37.9 

31.7 

21.8 

3.1 

6.8 



7.3 
11.7 
25.8 
32.2 
23.0 



27.0 
24.8 
24.2 
19.5 
4.5 



85.3 

28.5 

5.1 

51.7 

72.3 

33.1 

5.8 

33.4 

72.6 

14.1 

3.5 

55.0 

36.1 

23.0 

3.1 

9.9 



4.4 
11.0 
24.8 
33.5 
26.2 



27.0 
24.8 
24.2 
19.5 
4.5 



72.0 

81.2 

10.9 

(X) 

68.5 

58.8 

10.0 

(X) 

57.3 

48.0 

9.3 

(X) 

21.9 

19.0 

2.9 

(X) 



13.7 
13.4 
27.9 
29.2 
15.7 



71.2 
71.2 

68.1 
68.1 

55.9 
55.9 

22.1 
22.1 



488 

77.0 

(X) 

70.8 
(X) 



14.1 
13.9 
28.0 
28.5 

15.5 



(X) 
X) 



(X) 
66.1 

6i^ 
(X) 

20.6 
(X) 



11.2 
10.8 
27.3 
33.5 
17.2 



X Not applicable. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. National Hous^hM Education Sun^y, 1999. 

No. 216. Children's Involvement In Home Literacy Activities: 1993 and 1999 

[in percent, except number of children (8,579 repreeents 8,579,000). For children 3 to 5 years old not yet enrolled In 
kindergarten who participated in activities with a family member. Based on the National Education Household Survey: see source. 
See atoo Table 219] 



Characteristic 



Children 
(1.000) 



1093 



Read to 



1093 



Told a story 



1003 



Taught letters, 
words, or 
numbers ^ 



1003 1900 



Vislteda 
library^ 



1003 



Total 



8.579 8,549 



Age: 

3year8 old 

4 years old 

Syearsoid 

Race/ettvHcity: 
WNte. norvhHspanic 
Black. norvHispanic 

H'spanic 

Other 



Mother's home language: 

English 

Not EngKsh 



Mother's highest education: ^ 

Less ttian high school 

High school 

Vxattonal ed or some college 



Graduate/professional training or 



Faniiy type: 

Two parents 

None or one parent 

Poverty status: 
Above threshold . . 
Below threshold. . . 



3.869 

3,713 

976 

5,902 

1.271 

1.026 

381 

7.805 
603 

1.036 

3,268 

2,624 

912 

569 



6.226 
2,353 

6.323 
2.256 



3,827 
3,722 
1,001 

5.296 

1,258 

1.421 

574 

7.599 
683 

952 
2.556 
2,586 

1,455 

734 

5.997 
2,553 

6,575 
1.975 



78 

79 
78 
76 

85 
66 
58 
73 

81 
42 

60 
76 
83 
90 

90 

81 
71 

82 
68 



81 

81 
81 
79 

89 
71 
61 
81 

84 
48 

61 
76 
85 
91 

93 

85 
72 

85 
69 



43 

46 
41 
36 

44 
39 
38 
50 

44 
36 

37 
41 
45 
48 

50 

44 
41 

44 
39 



50 

52 
49 
44 

53 
45 
40 
53 

52 
31 

36 
48 
52 
55 

54 

52 
44 

52 
42 



58 

57 
58 
58 

58 
63 
54 
59 

58 
52 

56 
56 
60 
56 

60 

57 
59 

57 
59 



64 

65 
63 
64 

65 
68 
55 
69 

66 
45 

60 
63 
67 
65 

62 

64 
65 

66 
58 



38 

34 

41 
38 

42 
29 
26 
43 

39 

26 

22 

31 
44 
55 

59 

41 
30 

41 
28 



36 

33 
39 

41 

39 

35 
25 
43 

39 
19 

18 
30 
40 
50 

48 

40 
29 

40 
24 



^ Three or more times in the past weeic. ^ At least once In the past month. ^ Excludes children with no nr>other in the 
household and no female guardian. 

Source: U.S. rotational Center for BJucation Statistics, Statistical Brief. NCES 2000-026, November 1999. 



Education 1 43 



UA 



BuTMu, statistical Abstract of the United Stales: 2002 



No. 217. Children Who Speak a Language Other Than English At Home: 
1979 to 1999 

[In percent, •xcept total (3JI n m re — nt» 3,800,000). For chHdrsn 5 to 17 years old. For children reported to speak 
than "verv well." Based on the Current Population Survey: see text Section 1. Pooulation. and Aooendix 1111 



Characteristic 



1070 



1989 



Children who speak another language at home (mil) 

Percent of children 5 to 17 years okJ 



Race ar)d Hispanic origin: 
White, non-Hispanic . . 
Black, non-Hispank: . . 

Hispanic ^ ^ . 

Other. non-Hispanic ^ . 



Region: * 

Northeast 

Midwest 

South 

West 

Children who apeak another language at home 
and have difflculty speaking English fmll) . . . 
en 5 to 17 years okj 



Percent of children 

Race and Hispanic origin: 
White. non-Hispanic . . 
Black. non-Hispanic . . 

Hispanic ^ . 

Other. non-Hispanic ^ . 



Region: * 
Northeast 
Midwest . 
South. . . 
West . . . 



3.8 

8.5 



3.2 

1.3 

75.1 

44.1 



10.5 
3.7 
6.8 

17.0 

1.3 
2.8 



0.5 

0.3 

28.7 

19.8 



2.9 
1.1 
2.2 
6.5 



5.3 

12.6 



3.5 

2.4 

71.2 

53.4 



13.5 

4.9 

10.7 

24.2 

1.9 

4.4 



0.8 

0.5 

27.4 

20.4 



4.8 
1.3 
3.8 
8.8 



6.4 

14.2 



3.7 

4.2 

76.6 

58.3 



16.2 

5.6 

11.1 

27.2 

2.2 

4.9 



0.6 

1.3 

29.9 

21.0 



5.3 

1.6 

3.5 

10.4 



6.7 

14.1 



3.6 

3.0 

73.9 

45.5 



15.1 

5.9 

11.7 

26.4 

2.4 

5.1 



0.7 

0.9 

31.0 

14.1 



5.0 

2.3 

3.4 

11.4 



16.7 



3.9 

4.5 

70.9 

51.0 



17.7 

7.5 

14.3 

2BM 

2S 

5.0 



1.0 
1.0 

2a4 

11.7 



4.4 

2.0 

3.6 

10.5 



^ Reflects revised interviewing technk^ues and/or change in population controls to the 1990 Censua-baaod miimHn. 
^ Persons of Hispanic origin may be of arty race. ** Includes nx>stly Asian/Pacifk: Islanders, but also Amertaan Indian^AkMlca 



Native chikJren. * For composition of regkms. see map. inskie front cover. 

Source: Federal Interagency Forum on ChikJ and Family Statistk:s. America's Children: Key National ln<^cator8 of ¥VelhBelna 
2001. 

No. 218. Preprimary School Enrollment— Summary: 1970 to 2000 

[As of OctotMr. (10,949 repreeents 10,048,000). Civilian noninstitutk>nal populatk>n. Includes put>(k: and nonpubNc nursery 
school and kindergarten programs. Excludes 5 year okJs enrolled in elementary school. Based on Current Population Survey. 
text, Section 1. Population, and Appendix III] 



Item 



1970 1975 



1900 1065 1900 1995 



1 



NUMBER OF CHILDREN (1,000) 

Population, 3 to 5 years okJ 

Total enrolled ^ 



Nursery . 
Publk: . 
Private 



Kindergarten 
Public. . . 
Pnvate . . 



White 
Black 



10,949 

4,104 

1,094 
332 
762 

3,010 

2.498 

511 



10,183 

4,954 

1.745 
570 

1.174 

3,211 

2.682 

528 



9,284 

4,678 

1.981 

628 

1.353 

2,897 

2.438 

459 



10,733 

5,865 

2.477 

846 

1.631 

3.388 
2.847 

541 



11,207 

6,659 

3,378 
1.202 
2.177 

3.281 

2,767 

513 



12,518 

7,739 

4.331 
1,950 
2.381 

3.408 

2.799 

608 



12.078 

7,788 

4.512 
2,212 
2,300 

3.276 

2.674 

602 



11.1 
7,044 

4.506 
2,209 
2.298 

3.338 

2.777 

560 



11, 
7.692 

4,326 
2.146 
2.180 

3266 

2.701 

565 



Hispanic 



3 years okJ 

4 years old 

5 years old 



ENROLLMENT RATE 
Total enrolled ^ 



3.443 
586 


4,105 
731 


3,994 
725 


4.757 
919 


5.389 
964 


6.144 
1.236 


5,985 
1.346 


6.093 
1.264 


5.861 
1265 


(NA) 


(NA) 


370 


496 


642 


1.040 


1.170 


1.189 


1.155 


454 
1,007 
2.643 


683 
1,418 
2.852 


857 
1,423 
2,598 


1.035 
1.765 
3.065 


1.205 
2.088 
3.367 


1.489 
2.553 
3.697 


1.496 
2.666 
3.624 


1.505 
2.768 
3.571 


1340 
2.566 

3.496 



White. 
Black 



Hispanic 



3 years okJ 

4 years okJ 

5 years old 



37.5 

37.8 
34.9 



48.6 

48.6 
48.1 



52.5 

52.7 
51.8 



54.6 

54.7 
55.8 



(NA) (NA) 43.3 43.3 



12.9 
27.8 
69.3 



21.5 
40.5 
81.3 



27.3 
46.3 
84.7 



28.8 
49.1 
86.5 



59.4 

59.7 
57.8 

49.0 

32.6 
56.0 
88.8 



61.8 

63.0 
58.9 

51.1 

35.9 
61.6 
87.5 



64.5 

63.6 
68.6 

54.0 

37.6 
66.6 
88.7 



65.8 

65.3 
67.9 

53.2 

39.0 
68.8 
88.5 



632 

60.5 

52.6 

302 
64.9 
87.6 



NA Not available. Includes races not shown separately. ^ Persorrs of Hispanic orioin may be of any race. The 
of identifying Hispank: chikJren was changed in 1980 from aUocatkxi based on status of momer to status reported for 
The number of Hispank: children using tt>e new method is larger. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports, PPL-148; and earfier PPL and P-20 reports. 



method 
child. 



1 44 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statictk»l Atntract of the UnHad 



No. 219. Children's School Roadlnoss Skills: 1993 and 1999 

(In ptrccnL For chMren 3 to 5 years old not yet enrolled in Idndergarden. Based on the National Education Household Survey: 
see source for detals. See also Table 216] 



Characteristic 



Recognizes all 
letters 



1903 1909 



Counts to 20 or 
higher 



1993 



WritMname 



1993 1999 



Reads or 

pretends to read 

storyt>ooks 



1993 



Has3-4sldns 



1993 1999 



Tom 



Age: 
3yearsold. 
4yearsold. 
5yearsold. 

Sex: 

Male 

Female . . 



Race/ethnidty: 
WNta. norvHispanic 
Black. nort-Hispanic 

Hispanic 

Other 



Mother's home language: 

EngHsh 

Not English 



Mother's highest education: 

Less than high school 

Hi^ school 

Vbcationai education or some 



Cofiege degree 

GraduatBi/lprofessional training 
orde^^ee 



Mather's employment status: 

Employed 

L^temployed 

Not in the latxx force . . . 

FtfTvly type: 

Two parents 

None or one parent .... 

Poverty status: 

Above threshold 

Below threshold 



21 

11 
28 
36 

19 
23 

23 
18 
10 
22 

22 
9 

8 
17 

23 
31 

39 

23 
17 
18 

22 
18 

24 

12 



24 

15 
28 
44 

21 
27 

25 
25 
14 
30 

25 
8 

7 
17 

25 
35 

40 

24 
15 
24 



26 
19 

28 
10 



52 

37 
62 
78 

49 
56 

56 

53 
32 
49 

55 
24 

30 
48 

59 
68 

68 

57 
41 
49 

54 
49 

57 
41 



S7 

41 
67 
81 

54 

60 

60 
60 
41 
59 

60 
25 

36 
48 

60 
73 

73 

59 
53 
54 

58 
54 

62 
39 



50 

22 

70 
84 

47 
53 

52 
45 
42 
52 

51 
38 

40 
48 

51 
58 

59 

52 
46 
47 

51 
47 

53 
41 



51 

24 
70 
87 

47 
56 

54 
49 
43 
57 

53 
34 

32 
49 

52 
61 

64 

53 
39 
50 

53 
48 

56 
37 



72 

66 
75 
81 

68 
76 

76 
63 
59 
70 

73 
52 

55 
70 

79 
84 

83 

75 
67 
68 

74 
65 

74 
64 



74 

70 
76 
77 

70 
77 

79 
66 
57 
79 

76 
45 

53 
69 

79 
84 

83 

75 
64 
73 

75 
69 

77 
63 



36 

15 
49 
65 

32 
39 

39 
31 
22 
36 

37 
17 

19 
30 

39 
52 

55 

39 
29 
32 

37 
31 

40 
23 



20 
50 
69 

35 
43 

42 
35 
25 
48 

41 
14 

15 
31 

42 
54 

57 

40 
32 

38 

41 
33 

45 
19 



Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. Home Uteracy Activities and S^gns of Children's Emerghg Uteracy. 
1993 and 1999, NCES 2000-026. November 1999. 

No. 220. Public Charter Schools— Selected Characteristics: 1999-2000 

(A pubic charter school is a public school that, in accordance with an enabiing state statue, has been granted a charter exempting 
4 from selected state and local rules and regulations. All schools open as public charter schools during 1998-99 and still open in 
tie 1999-2000 scliool year were surveyed. Based in the School and Staffing Survey; see source for details] 



Characteristic 



Schools 



Principals 



Teachers 



Students 



Tom. 



1,010 



17,477 



266.721 



Region:^ 
Northeast 

MI0W66I . 

South. . . 
weei . . . 



School level: 
Qementary 
S econ dary 
Combined. 



Enrollment 
Fewer thm 100 
10010 199 . . . 
20010 349 . . . 
360 to 499 ... 
500 or more . . 



School origin: 



_ public school. 
Pr»-extotir)g private school 



108 
231 
253 
418 


106 
226 
248 
407 


2.113 
3,437 
4.785 
7.142 


24.608 

52.081 

67.432 

122.600 


586 
235 
190 


574 

219 
195 


10.604 
3.546 
3.327 


158.801 
58.218 
49.702 


293 

289 

196 

85 

147 


280 

296 

191 

80 

141 


2.162 
3.451 
3.714 
2.110 
6.040 


17.359 
41.937 
50.545 
34.693 
122.187 


744 

166 
100 


710 
170 
108 


11.127 
4.919 
1.430 


166.080 
83.811 
16.849 



^ For composition of regions, see map inside front cover. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. NCES 2002-313. May 2002. 



Educatiotr\ \AS 



\}S.OmmmBunmi, SMsOcal Abstract of the UnMsd Sistes. 2002 



No. 221. Public Elementary and Secondary Schools— Summary: 1980 to 2001 

[For achool yaar •nding In ytar thowm, •xotpl m tndlMlMI (48,041 r i p r — n H 48,041,000y. Data art aa U malB al 



Item 



Unit 



1900 



1906 



1900 



1906 



1900 



School dlatrlcts, total 



ENROLLMENT 

Population 5*17 years old ^ . . . , 
Percent of resident population 
Fall enroUnftent ^ 



Percent of population 5-17 

years old^ 

Elementary^ 

Secondary * 



Average daily attendance (ADA) 
High school graduates 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 

Total * 

Classroom teachers 

Average salaries: 

Instructional staff 

Classroom teachers 



REVENUES 



Revenue receipts 

Federal 

State 

Local 



Percent of total: 
Federal .... 

State 

Local 



EXPENDITURES 



Total 

Current expenditures 

(day schools) 

Other current expenditures ° . 

Capital outlay 

Interest on school det>t ... 



Percent of total: 
Current expenditures 

(day schools) , 

Other current expenditures ° , 

Capital outlay 

Interest on school det>t ... 



In current dollars: 
Revenue receipts per pupil 
enrolled 



Current expenditures per pupil 
enrolled 



In constant (2001) dollars: ^ 
Revenue receipts per pupil 
enrolled 



Current expenditures per pupil 
enrolled 



Number. 



1.000.. 
Percent 
1.000. . 

Percent 
1.000.. 
1.000. . 

1.000. . 
1.000. . 



1.000. 
1,000. 

Dollar 
Dollar 



MU. dol. 
Mil. dol. 
MM. dol. 
MU. dol. 



Percent 
Percent 
Percent 



Mil. dol. 

Mil. dol. 
Mil. dol. 
Mil. dol. 
Mil. dol. 



Percent 
Percent 
Percent 
Percent 



Dollar 
Dollar 

Dollar 
Dollar 



16X»44 16312 15,562 14,947 14,903 14,990 154M» 



48.041 

21.4 

41.778 

87.0 
24.397 
17.381 

38.411 
2.762 



2,521 
2,211 

16.715 
15.970 



97,635 

9.020 

47.929 

40.686 



9.2 
49.1 
41.7 



85.661 
1.859 
6.504 
2,081 



89.1 
1.9 
6.8 
2.2 



44,787 

19.0 

39.354 

87.9 
23,830 
15,524 

36.530 
2.424 



2,473 
2.175 

24,666 
23.600 



141.013 

9.533 

69.107 

62.373 



6.8 
49.0 
44.2 



44.949 

18.2 

40.527 

90.2 
26.253 
14.274 

37.573 
2.327 



2,685 
2.362 

32.638 
31.367 



208.656 
13.164 

100.787 
94.685 



6.3 
48.3 
45.4 



48.854 

18.6 

43.898 

89.9 
28.148 
15.750 

40.702 
2.282 



2.924 
2,565 

38.339 
36,675 



273.255 

18,764 

129.958 

124.533 



6.9 
47.6 
45.6 



52.283 

19.0 

46.308 

90.9 
29.198 
17.110 

43.032 
2.478 



3.176 
2.799 

42.308 
40.534 



345.095 

24.363 

169.851 

150.881 



7.0 
49.7 
43.3 



52311 

18.9 

46325 

903 
29337 

17.288 

43.493 
2328 



3,258 
2371 

43379 
41.754 



364.056 

26.024 

182.760 

155,272 



6.9 
50.7 
42.4 



96.105 139.382 209,698 276.584 351.559 371313 



127.230 
2.109 
7.529 
2.514 



91.3 
1.5 
5.4 
13 



186,583 

3,341 

16.012 

3,762 



89.0 
13 
7.6 
13 



242.995 

5.584 

21,646 

6,379 



87.9 
2.0 
7.8 
2.3 



302.278 

6388 

34.373 

8,520 



85.7 
1.9 
9.9 
2.4 



318.184 

6,857 

36.904 

9.660 



85.6 
13 
9.9 
2.5 



53,118 

183 

46.972 

88.4 
29.480 
17,473 

44325 



3317 
2.019 

46334 



384/426 



193.028 
163,443 



73 
50J2 
42.4 



392.001 

336351 



38.404 
10300 



853 

13 
93 
2.5 



2.337 3.583 5.149 6.225 7.452 7.800 8.184 



2.050 3.233 4.604 5.535 6.528 6.824 7.161 



5.279 5,937 7.107 7.255 7.941 8.085 8.184 



4.632 5,357 6,355 6,452 6.956 7.066 7.161 



^ Estimated resident population as of July 1 of the previous year, except 1980. 199Q. and 2000 population enumerated aa of 

1. Estimates reflect revisions based on the 2000 C>»nsus of Population. ^ Fall enrollment of the prevtoua yw. 

Kleraarten through grade 6. Grades 7 through 12. ^ Full-tinr>e equivalent. ® Current expenses for summer acrtooia. 



^Kindergarten through grade 



adult education, post-hiah school vocatiorud education, personnel retrainino, etc., wt)en operated by local school dMricla and not 
part of regular public elementary and secondary day-school program. ^Cornpiled by U.S. Census Bureau. Deflated by Ow 
Consumer Price Index, all urt>an consumers (for school year) supplied by U.S. fslational Center for Education StatMca. 

Source: Except as noted, Natiorwl Education Association, Washington, DC. Estimates of School StatMIca 
(copyright). 



1 46 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abetract of Ow Unltad 



No. 222. PuMk Etementary and Sacondary Schools liy IVpo and SIza of School: 
1999-2000 

[EnroHiiMnt In thom m di (46,888 wprt— trti 46,888,000). Data reported by schools, rather thar) school districts] 



EnroHinent size off 
scnucN 


Nufnt)er of schools 


Enrollment^ 


Elemerv- Seoond- Corn- 
Total taiy* ary* Wned* Other* 


Elemerv- Second- Com- 
Toial tary' ary' bined* Other* 


Total 


82,012 64,131 22,366 4,042 1.474 

100.0 loao 100.0 1004) 100.0 

10.4 6.3 15.8 42.7 66.1 
9.6 8.7 10.7 16.8 13.9 
11.3 12.4 8.3 9.4 8.8 
13.3 15.5 7.7 7.2 5.8 
13.2 15.9 6.6 5.4 2.4 

11.2 13.3 6.4 4.7 0.9 
8.4 9.7 5.6 4.1 0.8 
6.1 6.6 5.2 2.1 
7.0 6.8 8.4 3.5 0.8 

6.0 4.0 12.7 2.7 0.2 

2.1 0.5 7.0 0.7 0.2 

1.2 0.1 4.7 0.4 0.2 
0.2 (Z) 0.9 0.3 

(X) (X) (X) (X) (X) 


48,688 30,480 15,112 1,062 66 
100.0 100.0 1004) 100.0 1004) 


PERCENT 
Total 


Under 100 students 

100 to 199 students 

200 to 299 students 

300 to 399 students 

400 to 499 students 

500 to 599 students 

600 to 699 students 

700 to 799 students 

800 to 999 students 

1.000 to 1.499 students. . . 

1.500 to 1.999 students. . . 
^000 to ^999 students . . . 
3.000 or more students . . . 

AveraQe enrollment 


0.9 0.6 1.0 6.3 21.0 
2.7 2.8 2.2 8.6 15.3 

5.4 6.6 2.9 8.2 17.2 
8.9 11.4 3.8 9.0 16.1 

11.4 15.0 4.2 8.5 8.7 

11.8 15.3 5.0 9.1 4.1 

10.5 13.2 5.2 9.3 4.0 

8.7 10.4 5.5 5.7 

12.0 12.7 10.7 11.1 5.3 
13.8 9.9 22.1 11.3 2.1 

6.8 1.8 17.1 4.4 3.0 

5.5 0.4 15.7 3.7 3.4 
1.7 0.1 4.7 4.9 

521 477 706 282 123 



- Repreeents zero. X Not applical)le. Z Less than 0.05 percent. ^ Data for those schools reporting enrollment 
^ Indudee schools beoinnir)g with grade 6 or t)ek>w and with no grade higher than 8. ^ Includes schools with no grade lower 
tfnn 7. ^ Includes schools with tx>lh elementary and secondary grades. * Includes spedai education, altemative, and other 
schools not classified tiy grade span. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. DIgeat of Education Statistics, annual. 

No. 223. Students Who Are Homeschooled by Selected Characteristics: 1 999 



[Aaof spring. (50,188 reprsee n t a 50,166,000). For students 5 to 17 with a grade equivalent of K-12. Homescftoolers are students 
whose parents repo r te d them to t>e schooled at home instead off a put)lic or private school. Excludes students who were enrolled 
in school for more than 25 hours a week or were homeschooled due to a temporary HIness. Based on the Parent Survey of the 
Nofional Houeehold Education Surveys Program; see source for details] 





Number of students 
(1.000) 


Percent distribution 


Characteristic 


Percent 
Home- home- 
Total schooled schooled 


Norv 
All stu- Home- home- 
dents schooled schooled 


Total 


50.188 850 1.7 

24.428 428 1.8 
3.790 92 2.4 

12.692 199 1.6 
7.946 136 1.7 

11.768 186 1.6 

13.954 235 1.7 

25.515 417 1.6 
24.673 434 1.8 

32.474 640 2.0 
8.047 64 1.0 
7.043 77 1.1 
2.623 49 1.9 

8.226 120 1.5 
19,883 207 1.0 
22.078 523 2.4 

33.007 883 2.1 

15.454 142 0.9 

1.727 25 1.4 

9.628 444 4.6 
22.880 237 1.0 
13.907 96 0.7 

3.773 71 1.9 

16.776 262 1.6 

15.220 278 1.8 

8.576 162 1.9 

9.615 148 1.5 

18.334 160 0.9 

15.177 287 1.9 

8.269 213 2.6 

8.407 190 2.3 


100.0 ^OOJO 100.0 


Grade equivalent ^ 

K-5 


48.7 50.4 48.7 


Kinder uaiten 


7.6 10.8 7.5 


Grades 1 to3 


25.3 23.5 25.3 


Gradee 4to5 


15.8 16.0 15.8 


(^adee6to8 


23.5 21.9 23 5 


Grades 9 to 12 


27.8 27.7 27.6 


Ser. 
Male 


50.8 49.0 50.9 


Femsle 


49.2 51.0 49.1 


While. non-Hispanic 


64.7 75.3 64.5 


Blacic, rK)rv4-lispv)ic 


16.0 9.9 16.1 


hiapflhlc 


14.0 9.1 14.1 


Other 


5.2 5.8 5.2 


Number of chldren in the household: 
OneoNU 


16.4 14.1 16.4 


Two CTiHRen I 1 . L ■ . . i . , . . . . i 1 1 . 1 , ■ . i . 


39.6 24.4 39.9 


Thfve or more chldren 


44.0 61.6 43.7 


Number of parents In the household: 
T\*o parems 


65.8 80.4 65.5 


One parent 


30.8 16.7 31.0 


Nonpanntal guanflans 


3.4 2.9 3.5 


Parents' participation in the labor force: 
Two Darants-one in labor force 


19.2 52.2 18.6 


TWo oarents-both in labor force 


45.6 27.9 45 9 


One oarent In labor force 


27.7 11.6 28.0 


No parent in labor force 


7.5 8.3 7.5 


Household income: 

S25.000 or less 


33.4 30.9 33.5 


25.001 to 50.000 


30.3 32.7 30.3 


50.001 to 75.000 


17.1 19.1 17.1 


75.001 or more 


19.2 17.4 19.2 


Parents' Mghect educational attainment 
Kfigh school diploma or less 


36.5 18.9 36.8 


vdc/tech dsgree or some college 


30.2 33.7 30.2 


Bachelor'ft degree * 


16.5 25.1 16.3 


Qraduats^professionai school 


16.8 22.3 16.7 







^ Excludes those ungraded. 

Source: U.S. Natfonai Center for Education Statistics. HonwachooUng In tha umtad States: 1999. NCES 2001 -033. July 2001 . 



Education \M 



U.8. 



AbilrMi Of the UnMed Slates: 2002 



No. 224. Public Elementary and Secondary School Enrollment by State: 
1 980 to 2000 

[In thousands (27,647 rsprsssn ts 27,647,000), sxospt rats. As of fan. Includes undassMed students] 



State 



Enrollment 



K through grade 8 ^ 



1060 1060 1006 



2000, 

prel. 



Grades 9 through 12 



1060 1060 



2000, 

1009 pre!. 



Enrollment rals ' 



1060 1060 1906 



2000, 

piel. 



United Statee 



Alatmma. 
Alaska . . 
Arizona. . 
Arkansas 
California 



27.647 29.878 33488 33.709 

528 527 539 539 

60 85 96 94 

357 479 624 641 

310 314 318 318 

2.730 3.615 4.337 4.409 



13,231 11.338 13,360 13.514 



66^ 01.2 91.4 



Colorado 

Connectkxit 

Delaware 

District of Columt>ia 
Rorida 



Georgia 
Hawaii . 
Idaho. . 
Illinois . 
IrKliana. 



Iowa . . . 
Kansas. . 
Kentucky 
Louisiana 
Maine. . . 



MarylarKl . . . . 
Massachusetts. 

Mk^igan 

Minnesota. . . . 
Mississippi . . . 



Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska .... 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 



New Jersey. . 
New Mexico . 

New Yori( 

North Carolina 
North Dakota. 



Ohk) 

Oklahoma. . . 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania. 
Rhode Island. 



South Carolina. 
South Dakota . 
Tennessee . . . 

Texas 

Utah 



Vermont . . . . 

Virginia 

Washington. . 
West Virginia . 
Wisconsin. . . 
Wyoming . . . 



374 

364 

62 

71 

1.042 

742 
110 
144 
1.335 
708 

351 
283 
464 
544 
153 

493 
676 
1.227 
482 
330 

567 
106 
189 
101 
112 

820 

186 

1,838 

786 

77 

1.312 
399 
319 

1.231 
98 

426 

86 

602 

2.049 

250 

66 
703 
515 
270 
528 

70 



420 

347 

73 

61 

1.370 

849 
123 
160 
1.310 
676 

345 
320 
459 
586 
155 

527 
604 
1.145 
546 
372 

588 
111 
198 
150 
126 

784 

208 

1.828 

783 

85 

1.258 
425 
340 

1.172 
102 

452 

95 

598 

2,511 
325 

71 
728 
613 
224 
566 

71 



507 

404 

80 

80 

1.725 

1.044 
133 
169 

1.462 
699 

336 
326 
459 
548 
149 

607 
706 
1.245 
580 
365 

649 
107 
197 
240 
147 

954 
229 

2.034 

935 

75 

1.296 
447 
378 

1.262 
114 

484 

90 

664 

2,896 

329 

72 
817 
695 
203 
596 

62 



517 

406 

81 

54 

1.760 

1,060 
132 
170 

1.474 
703 

334 
323 
472 
547 
146 

609 
703 
1.256 
578 
364 

645 
105 
195 
251 
147 

953 

225 

2,029 

945 

72 

1.294 
445 
379 

1.258 
114 

493 

88 

666 

2.943 

333 

70 
816 
694 
201 
595 

60 



231 

26 

157 

138 

1,347 

172 

168 

37 

29 

468 

327 

55 

59 

649 

347 

183 
133 
206 
234 
70 

258 
346 
570 
272 

147 

277 
50 
91 
49 
55 

426 

85 

1,033 

343 
40 

645 
179 
145 
678 
51 

193 

42 

252 

851 

93 

29 
307 
242 
113 
303 

28 



195 

29 

161 

123 

1.336 

154 

122 

27 

19 

492 

303 

49 

61 

512 

279 

139 
117 
177 
199 
60 

188 
230 
440 
211 
131 

228 
42 
76 
51 
46 

306 

94 

770 

304 

33 

514 
154 
132 
496 
37 

170 

34 

226 

872 

122 

25 
270 
227 

98 
232 

27 



202 

39 

229 

133 

1,702 

202 

150 

33 

17 

656 

379 

53 

76 

565 

289 

161 
146 
189 
209 
60 

239 
265 
481 
274 
135 

265 
50 
91 
86 
60 

335 

96 

854 

341 

38 

540 
180 
167 
555 
43 

183 

41 

252 

1.096 

151 

32 
317 
309 

88 
281 

30 



201 

39 

237 

132 

1.733 

208 

156 

34 

15 

675 

385 

52 

75 

575 

286 

161 
147 
194 
197 
61 

244 
273 
488 
277 
134 

268 
50 
91 
90 
61 

355 

95 

853 

348 

37 

541 
178 
167 
556 
44 

184 

41 

241 

1.117 

148 

32 
329 
310 

85 
285 

30 



87.6 
94.0 
88.9 
90.3 
87.1 

92.2 
83.3 
79.5 
91.8 
84.4 

86.8 
83.4 
95.4 
82.6 
88.0 

88.4 
88.7 
83.7 
80.2 
91.6 

83.9 
88.6 
86.9 
87.2 
79.6 

83.8 
92.9 
86.6 
93.4 
85.3 

81.5 
89.5 
80.8 
90.1 
85.9 

84.8 
92.9 
88.5 
80.4 
80.1 

86.1 
87.4 
87.8 
92.4 
98.2 

87.9 
90.7 
91.7 
92.6 
82.1 
97.3 



93.2 
97.4 
93.3 
95.8 
92.6 

94.6 
90.2 
87.2 
100.6 
92.6 

93.7 
87.4 
96.9 
86.9 
90.4 

92.1 
92.5 
90.5 
88.1 
96.5 

89.1 
8&8 
90.3 
91.3 
91.3 

86.5 
94.1 
88.7 
96.6 
89.1 

85.9 
94.4 
86.6 
94.8 
92.6 

88.0 
95.1 
90.6 
83.5 
87.5 

93.9 
89.9 
93.5 
98.4 
97.8 

94.3 
94.2 
94.1 
95.7 
86.1 
97.7 



95.5 
91.4 
80.0 
93.5 
94.0 

91.1 
90.8 
85.3 
113.5 
91.0 

98.3 
88.9 
95.2 
88.0 
86.6 

82.6 
91.8 
91.8 
86.4 
93.7 

87.9 
90.3 
90JS 
89.9 
91 X> 

88.2 
92.3 
87.6 
93.4 
89.7 

88.3 
89.1 
89.5 
90.7 
93.3 

87.3 
96.5 
89.7 
84.9 
87.3 

94.9 
88.4 
94.1 
97.8 
96.6 

97.4 
93.4 
91.5 
98.4 
86.4 
955 



80J 
932 
80.1 
90.2 
90J 

902 
90J 
80.2 
83.6 
90.2 

9\A 
84.7 
903 
66.5 
85.9 

90J 
89.6 
91.3 
823 
89.6 



.1 
88.4 
90.6 



872 

86.3 
88.4 
85.9 
93.1 
».1 



85.8 
84.7 
83.5 
90.8 
89.9 

86.0 
95.0 
87.6 
82.7 
85.5 

8ao 

84.8 
88J 



94.6 

89.0 
89.7 
89.7 
96.3 
65.7 
91.8 



* Data include a small numt)er of prekindergarten students. ^ Percent of persons 5-17 years okJ. Based on enumecrted 
resident population as of April 1 . 1980. 1990. and 2000. and estimated resident population as of July 1 for oltier yean. Data not 
adjusted for revisk>ns based on the 1990 Census of Population. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Educatk)n Statisttes. Digest of EducaVon Statistics, annual. 



1 48 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistteal Abstiact d the Umiad 



No. 225. Public Elementary and Secondary School Enrollment by Grade: 
1 980 to 2000 

(b) tfKMisandt (40,877 ripr— nti 40,877,000). As of tall of ytar. Kindergarten includes nursery schools] 



Grade 



1080 1985 1080 1902 1993 1994 1995 1998 1997 1998 1999 



2000, 

proj. 



Pupils enrolled 

Kindergarten and 
grvles 1 toB 

Kindergarten . . . . 

First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Rflh 

Sixth 

Seventh 

BgWh 

Unclassified V . . . 



40,877 39.422 41,217 42,823 43,485 44,111 44,840 45,611 46,127 46,539 46357 47,223 



12 



GfsdseSto 
Mnth .... 
Tenth .... 
Eleventh . . 
Tvveiflh . . . 
Undassifled 



27.647 
2.689 
2.894 
2,600 
2,893 
3.107 
3.130 
3.038 
3.085 
3.086 
924 

13.231 
3.377 
3.368 
3,195 
2.925 
368 



27.034 
3.192 
3,239 
2,941 
2.895 
2,771 
2.776 
2.789 
2,938 
2.982 
511 

12.388 
3,439 
3,230 
2.866 
2,550 
303 



29,878 
3.610 
3.499 
3.327 
3,297 
3,248 
3,197 
3.110 
3.067 
2.979 
543 

11,338 
3,169 
2.896 
2,612 
2,381 
282 



31.088 
3,817 
3,542 
3,431 
3,361 
3.342 
3,325 
3.303 
3.299 
3.129 
539 

11.735 
3.352 
3,027 
2.656 
2.431 
269 



31.504 
3.922 
3.529 
3.429 
3.437 
3.361 
3.350 
3.356 
3.355 
3,249 
515 

11.961 
3.487 
3,050 
2,751 
2,424 
248 



31,898 
4,047 
3.593 
3.440 
3.439 
3.426 
3.372 
3.381 
3.404 
3.302 
494 

12.213 
3,604 
3.131 
2.748 
2,488 
242 



32.341 
4.173 
3.671 
3.507 
3.445 
3.431 
3.438 
3.395 
3,422 
3,356 
502 

12,500 
3.704 
3.237 
2.826 
2,487 
245 



32.764 
4.202 
3.770 
3,600 
3,524 
3,454 
3,453 
3,494 
3,464 
3,403 
401 

12,847 
3.801 
3,323 
2,930 
2,586 
206 



33,073 
4.198 
3,755 
3.689 
3.597 
3,507 
3.458 
3.492 
3.520 
3.415 
442 

13.054 
3.819 
3.376 
2.972 
2.673 
214 



33.346 
4.172 
3.727 
3.681 
3.696 
3.592 
3.520 
3,497 
3.530 
3.480 
451 

13.193 
3.856 
3.382 
3.021 
2.722 
212 



33.488 
4.146 
3.684 
3.666 
3.691 
3.686 
3.604 
3,564 
3,541 
3.497 
417 

13,369 
3.935 
3.415 
3,034 
2,782 
203 



33.709 
4,178 
3.835 
3,633 
3.673 
3.708 
3.703 
3.658 
3.624 
3,532 

OCA 

13.514 
3.958 
3.487 
3,060 
2.799 
189 



^ Includes ungraded an6 special education. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. Digest of Educatton StatistKS, annual. 

No. 226. School Enrollment Below Postseconday— Summary by Sex, Race, and 
Hispanic Origin: 2000 

[In ttKMieandt (58,900 r ep r eee n t s 58,900,000). except percent and rate. As of October. Covers civilian noninstitutional 
population enrolled in nursery school through high school. Based on Current Population Survey, see text. Section 1 , Population. 
wJApperxix III] 



Characteristic 




Race and Hispanic origin 



Non- 
Total Hispanic 



Asian and 

Pacific 

Black IslarxJer 



Hispanic 



AHatudents . 

Nursery . . . 

FuSday . 

Part day . 
Kindergarten 
Elementary. 
High school. 



Students in put>lic scIkx)Is 

Nursery 

Full day 

Part day 

Kindergarten 

Elementary 

High school 



Population 15 to 17 years old: 
Percent helow rrxxJal grade ^ 

Students. lOlh to 12th grade: 
Annual (fropout rate 



58,900 

4.401 
2,102 
2,299 
3,832 
32.898 
15.770 

49.198 
2.217 
1,124 
1.093 
3.173 
29.378 
14.431 



30 



29.158 

2.212 
1,071 
1,141 
1,983 
16,884 
8.077 

25.157 

1.123 

584 

539 

1.633 

15,014 

7,387 



34 



27,745 
2.189 
1,032 
1.158 
1,849 

16,014 
7.693 

24.041 

1.094 

540 

554 

1,540 

14.364 

7.044 



26 



44,345 

3,392 
1,462 
1,930 
2,998 
25,562 
12.392 

37.789 

1.539 

724 

814 

2.453 

22.538 

11.259 



30 



38.024 
2,854 
1,170 
1,684 
2,346 
20.574 
10.250 

29,963 

1.149 

513 

636 

1,846 

17,747 

9.222 



29 



9,339 
726 
499 
228 
629 
5.481 
2.502 

8.562 
531 
331 
201 
547 
5.133 
2.350 



35 



2,393 
222 

102 
120 
152 
1.350 
668 

2.094 

91 

31 

60 

124 

1.257 

622 



22 



8.737 

574 
306 
268 
687 
5,224 
2.253 

8.214 
419 
222 
197 
639 
5,012 
2,144 



34 



6 



Poputation 18 to 24 years old 

Dropouts 

High school graduates . . . 
uiroHed in college .... 



26,658 


13.338 


13.319 


21.257 


17,327 


4,013 


1.143 


4.134 


3.315 


1.837 


1.478 


2.598 


1.316 


615 


52 


1,335 


21.822 


10.622 


11.200 


17.512 


16.187 


3.090 


1.038 


2,462 


9,452 


4,343 


5,109 


7.566 


6,709 


1.216 


639 


899 



^ Irwkides ottter races, not shown separately. ^ Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race, 
grade most common for a given age. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current PoputaHw) Reports. PPL-148. 



The modal grade is the 



EducaX\OT\ \^^ 



us. C«aui Bumsi. SiMiillcal Abetract of the UnNisd SttilM: 2002 



No. 227. Employed Students by Selected Characteristic: 1998-99 

[In percent For students 15 to 17 years okJ at the beginning of the 1998-99 school year who held a job with an employer during 
the school year or followina summer. Excludes freelance work, such as bat^sitting or mowing lawns. Based on Ihe Mafcnal Lon- 
gitudinal Survey of Youth 1 997; see source for details] 



Characteristic 



Total, 

Male 

Female. . . 



15 



White. non-Hispanic 
Black. non-Hispanic 
Hispanic origin .... 



Enrolled in grade 9 . 
Enrolled in grade 10 

Total, age 16 ' 

Male 

Female 



White. non-Hispanic 
Black. non-Hispanic 
Hispanic origin .... 



Enrolled in grade 10 
Enrolled in grade 11 

Total, age 17 ' 

Male 

Female 



White. non-Hispanic 
Black. non-Hispanic 
Hispanic origin .... 



Enrolled in grade 11 
Enrolled in grade 12 



Students 

with an 

empk>yer job 



Students who worked during the school year ^ 



50.4 

61.7 
57.0 

67.4 
45.0 
45.4 

46.5 
64.7 

77.4 
78.5 
76.2 

82.5 
86.1 
67.6 

72.5 
80.3 

68.6 
88.4 
84.7 

90.1 
79.3 
77.4 

81.3 
89.2 



Total 


School year 
ar)d summer 


School year 
only 


44.1 

47.1 
41.0 


38.5 

41.5 
35.3 


S.6 

5.6 
5.6 


50.9 
28.2 
35.8 


45.2 
22.3 
29.3 


5.7 
6.0 
6.5 


33.8 
47.8 


25.8 

43.0 


8.0 
4.8 


V7J0 

67.0 
67.0 


58.2 

59.8 
56.4 


8J 

7.3 
10.6 


73.1 
52.7 
57.9 


64.8 
44.0 
45.7 


8.3 

8.8 

12.2 


58.7 
71.0 


50.0 
63.4 


8.7 
7.6 


77.7 

78.3 
77.1 


67.4 
67.8 
67.1 


1(U 

10.5 
10.0 


82.6 
66.1 
69.2 


74.0 
52.3 
57.2 


8.6 
13.9 
12.0 


71.9 
78.7 


63.0 
69.8 


8.9 
8.9 



SunwiMf 
only* 



1SJ 
14.6 
16.1 

16.5 

16.8 

9.7 

12.6 
17.0 

10.4 

11.5 
0.3 

0.4 

13.3 

0.7 

13J 
0.2 

10.2 
7.6 

7.5 

13.2 

8.2 

9.4 
10.5 



^ September 1 998 through May 1 999, excluding last week of December and first week of January. ^ June. July, and August 
1999. ^ Includes other races, not shown separately. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistk». Employment Experience of Youtt^: Results from a LongftixSn^ Survey. USOL 
01-479. December 20. 2001. 

No. 228. Eiemenury and Secondary Schools— Teachers, Enrollment, and 
Pupil-Teacher Ratio: 1 960 to 2000 

[In ttwusands (1.600 r ep r eee n t s 1,600,000), except ratloe. As of fkll. Data are for full-time equivalent teacfiers] 



Item 





Teachers 




1 


Enrollment 




PuplMeacher ratto 




Total 


Public 


Private 


Total 


Public 


Private 


Total 


PubMc 


Privala 


1.600 


1.408 


192 


42.181 


36.281 


5.900 


26.4 


25.8 


30.7 


1.933 


1.710 


223 


48.473 


42.173 


6.300 


25.1 


24.7 


20.3 


2.292 


2,059 


233 


51,257 


45.894 


5.363 


22.4 


22.3 


23.0 


2.453 


2,198 


255 


49.819 


44.819 


5.000 


20.3 


20.4 


19.6 


2.467 


2.189 


268 


49.478 


44.311 


6.167 


20.1 


20.2 


19.3 


2.488 


2,209 


279 


48.717 


43.577 


5.140 


19.6 


19.7 


18.4 


2.479 


2.207 


272 


47.635 


42,550 


5,065 


19.2 


19.3 


18.7 


2.461 


2.185 


276 


46.651 


41,651 


5.000 


19.0 


19.1 


18.1 


2.485 


2.184 


301 


46.206 


40.877 


5.331 


18.6 


18.7 


17.7 


2,440 


2.127 


313 


45.544 


40.044 


5.500 


18.7 


18.8 


17.6 


2,458 


2,133 


325 


45.165 


39.566 


5.600 


18.4 


18.6 


17.2 


2.476 


2.139 


337 


44.967 


39.252 


5.715 


18.2 


18.4 


17.0 


2.508 


2,168 


340 


44.908 


39.208 


5.700 


17.9 


18.1 


18.8 


2.549 


2,206 


343 


44,979 


39.422 


6.567 


17.6 


17.9 


18.2 


2.592 


2,244 


348 


45.205 


39.753 


5.452 


17.4 


17.7 


15.7 


2,631 


2.279 


352 


45.487 


40.008 


5.479 


17.3 


17.6 


15.8 


2.668 


2.323 


345 


45.430 


40.189 


5.242 


17.0 


17.3 


15.2 


2.734 


2,357 


377 


45.741 


40.543 


5.198 


16.7 


17.2 


13.8 


2.753 


2.398 


355 


46,451 


41.217 


5.234 


16.9 


17.2 


14.7 


2.787 


2,432 


355 


47.322 


42.047 


5.275 


17.0 


17.3 


14.0 


2.822 


2.459 


363 


48.145 


42.823 


5.322 


17.1 


17.4 


14.7 


2.870 


2,504 


366 


48.813 


43.465 


5.348 


17.0 


17.4 


14.8 


2.926 


2.652 


374 


49.609 


44.111 


5,498 


17.0 


17.3 


14.7 


2.978 


2,698 


380 


50.502 


44,840 


5.662 


17.0 


17.3 


14.9 


3.054 


2.667 


387 


51.375 


45.611 


6.764 


16.8 


17.1 


14.9 


3.134 


2.746 


388 


51.968 


46.127 


5.841 


16.6 


16.8 


15.1 


3.221 


2.830 


391 


52,476 


46.539 


5.937 


16.3 


16.4 


^5J^ 


3.304 


2.907 


397 


52.876 


46.867 


6,018 


16.0 


16.1 


15.2 


3.381 


2,953 


428 


53.104 


47.160 


5.944 


15.7 


16.0 


13.9 



1960 
1965 
1970 
1975 

1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 

1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 
1985 

1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 

1991 
1992 
1993 
1994 
1995 



1996 . . . 

1997 . . . 

1998 . . . 

1999 . . . 
2000. est. 



Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, annual. 



1 50 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abctract of the Unlled 



No. 229. PuMic Etementary and Secondary School Taachors— Soloctod 
Characteristics: 1999-2000 



[For school year (800 lei i f M e ms 808,000y. Based on School and StafHng Survey and subject to sampling em>n for details, see 
9oufos Wsb site at <http7/nces.ed.gov/surveys/sasa/>. Excludes preklndergaiten teachers. See Table 243 for similar data on pri- 
vate school teachers] 





Unit 


Age 


Sex 


Race/ethnicity 


Ctaraderistic 


Under 30 to 40 to Over 
30 39 49 50 

years years years years 
old old old old 


Fe- 
Maie male 


His- 
White^ Black^ panic 


Total laochara ' 

Hnhest degree held: 
Badwlors 


1,000 . . 

Percent. 
Percent. 
Percent . 
Percent. 

Percent. 
Percent . 
Percent. 
Percent. 

1.000 . . 
Dol. . . . 
Dol. . . . 


500 081 953 879 

78.3 57.2 47.2 39.5 

20.6 39.1 48.2 53.5 

0.6 2.8 3.2 4.7 

(Z) 0.4 0.7 1.5 

64.0 17.3 8.3 2.9 

36.0 45.7 16.9 6.8 

X) 37.0 41.4 24.5 

X) (X) 33.4 65.7 

475 600 883 805 
33.583 38.468 44.375 50.278 
30.386 35,502 41,407 47.138 


754 2^48 

49.9 53.3 

44.0 42.8 

3.2 3.1 

1.4 0.5 

18.4 18.1 
22.7 23.8 
23.4 30.2 
35.6 27.9 

700 2.042 
46.891 41.596 
41.104 39,475 


2,532 228 109 

51.6 51.5 65.8 


Master's 


44.2 42.0 29.3 


Education specialist 

Doctorate 


3.0 4.0 3.0 
0.6 1.6 1.2 


FuH-time teaching experience: 

Less than 3 years 

3to 9 years 


17.1 20.8 28.4 

23.2 22.0 29.3 


10 to 20 years 


29.1 24.5 24.6 


20 years or more 

Ful-tvne teachers 


30.6 32.7 17.7 
2303 214 157 


Earned income 


43,032 43.150 41.241 


Salary 


40.022 39.377 38,488 


^^■^^^ / 





^ Nor>-Hl8panic. ^ Includes teachers with no degrees and associates 
Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics, unpublished data. 



X Not applicable. Z \joas than 0.05 percent 
degrses. not shown separately. 



No. 230. Public Elementary and Secondary Schools — Number and Average 
Salary of Classroom Teachers, 1980 to 2001. and by Sute, 2001 



[Cadiiiales tor aehool veer ending In June of year ahowm (2^11 
organization rather than by grade-group; elementary includes kindergarten 



rspreaents 



2.211,000). Schools classified by type of 



Year ar)d 
state 



Teachers ^ (1.000) 



Total 



Ele- 
men- 
tary 



ond- 
ary 



Avg. salary ($1 .000) 



All Ele- Sec- 

teach- men- ond- 

ers tary ary 



Year and 
state 



Teachers ^ (1 .000) 



Total 



Ele- 
men- 
tary 



wtVV 

ond- 
ary 



Avg. salary ($1,000) 



All Ele- Sec- 

teach- men- ond- 

ers tary ary 



1980 

1985 

1990 

1992 

1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 

1997 

1996 

Ijftro 

2000 

2001. U3. 

AL 

AK 

AZ 

AR 

CA. 

CX> 

CT 

DE. 

DC 

FL 

GA 

HI 

ID 

IL 

IN 

lA 

KS 

KY 

LA 



2^11 

2.175 

2.362 

2.429 

2.466 

2.512 

2.565 

2,605 

2.671 

2.729 

2.799 

2.871 

2,919 

48.6 

7.9 

45.8 

30.6 

292.8 

42.0 

41.1 

7.5 

4.4 

134.5 

91.1 

11.0 

13.8 

130.0 

59.2 

34.4 

32.7 

37.9 

49.3 



1.206 

1.212 

1.390 

1,466 

1.496 

1.517 

1.517 

1,543 

1.586 

1.626 

1.671 

1,718 

1,746 

28.1 

5.1 

35.3 

15.0 

215.4 

21.0 

29.4 

3.8 

3.1 

68.4 

53.0 

5.9 

7.1 

92.0 

31.8 

16.3 

16.4 

26.8 

34.6 



1.005 
963 
972 
963 
970 

1.048 

1.062 

1.086 

1.103 

1,128 

1.153 

1,173 

20.5 

2.8 

10.5 

15.6 

77.3 

21.0 

11.7 

3.7 

1.3 

66.1 

38.2 

6.1 

6.8 

38.0 

27.4 

18.2 

16.3 

11.1 

14.7 



16.0 
23.6 
31.4 
34.1 
35.0 
35.7 
36.7 
37.6 
38.5 
39.4 
40.5 
41.8 
43.3 
38.0 
48.1 
36.3 
34.6 
52.5 
39.2 
52.7 
47.0 
48.7 
38.2 
42.2 
40.1 
36.4 
47.8 
43.3 
36.5 
35.9 
36.6 
33.6 



16.6 
23.2 
30.8 
33.5 
34.4 
35.2 
36.1 
37.1 
38.0 
39.0 
40.3 
41.4 
43.1 
38.0 
48.1 
36.3 
35.2 
52.1 
39.2 
52.1 
46.9 
47.1 
38.2 
41.6 
40.1 
36.4 
45.9 
43.4 
35.5 
35.9 
36.3 
33.6 



16.5 
24.2 
32.0 
34.8 
35.9 
36.6 
37.5 
38.4 
39.2 
39.9 
41.0 
42.3 
43.7 
38.0 
48.1 
36.3 
37.2 
54.8 
39.2 
54.0 
47.2 
50.8 
38.2 
43.0 
40.1 
36.3 
52.5 
43.3 
37.3 
35.9 
37.3 
33.6 



ME 
MD 
MA 
Ml. 
MN 
MS 
MO 
MT 
NE. 
NV. 
NH 
NJ. 
NM 
NY. 
NC 
ND 
OH 
OK 
OR 
PA. 
Rl . 
SC. 
SD. 
TN. 
TX. 
UT. 
VT. 
VA. 
WA 
WV 
Wl. 
WY 



15.7 
52.6 
54.3 
97.6 
55.6 
31.0 
64.8 
10.4 
20.7 
18.2 
14.4 
96.7 
20.3 

205.7 

82.2 

8.1 

115.5 
41.3 
28.9 

117.0 

12.5 

44.0 

9.2 

56.6 

274.8 
22.0 
8.7 
89.9 
50.9 
20.8 
58.5 
6.7 



10.8 
31.4 
26.3 
50.7 
28.5 
17.2 
33.9 

7.1 
13.7 
11.0 
10.0 
60.3 
14.3 
103.1 
51.8 

5.2 
77.4 
21.6 
19.8 
61.4 

7.4 
30.8 

6.4 

41.0 

140.1 

11.9 

4.4 
54.2 
28.6 
14.3 
40.3 

3.3 



4.9 
21.0 
27.9 
46.9 
27.0 
13.8 
30.9 

3.3 

7.1 

7.2 

4.4 
35.5 

6.1 

102.6 

30.3 

2.9 
38.1 
19.7 

9.1 
55.6 

5.1 
13.2 

2.8 

15.6 

134.8 

10.1 

4.3 
35.6 
22.3 

6.5 
18.2 

3.5 



36.4 
46.0 
47.8 
50.7 
42.2 
32.0 
36.7 
33.2 
34.2 
40.4 
38.3 
53.3 
33.8 
52.0 
41.2 
30.9 
42.8 
34.5 
41.7 
49.5 
48.5 
37.9 
30.3 
37.4 
38.4 
36.4 
38.3 
40.2 
42.1 
35.9 
42.1 
34.7 



36.2 
45.1 
47.8 
50.7 
42.7 
31.5 
35.9 
32.5 
34.2 
40.4 
38.3 
53.3 
33.5 
49.8 
41.2 
31.1 
42.4 
34.3 
41.7 
49.4 
48.5 
37.9 
30.2 
37.1 
38.0 
36.4 
38.1 
40.2 
42.2 
35.7 
41.9 
34.7 



36.9 
46.8 
47.8 
50.7 
41.6 
32.6 
37.6 
33.8 
34.2 
40.4 
38.3 
53.3 
34.4 
52.8 
41.2 
30.5 
43.4 
34.7 
42.0 
49.7 
48.5 
37.9 
30.4 
38.3 
38.8 
37.0 
38.5 
40.2 
42.0 
36.4 
42.7 
34.6 



^ FuO-time equivalent. 

Source: National Education Association, Washington. DC, Estimates of School Statistics Database (copyright). 



Educat\o«\ \^\ 



U.8.C«auiBiii«Ki. SWMical AbaUact of the Unrted SlatM. 2002 



No. 231 . Average Salary and Wages Paid in Public School Systems: 
1980 to 2001 

[In dollars. For school year endina in year shown. Data reported by a stratified sample of school systems erHoling 300 or 
pupils. Data represent unweighted means of average salaries paid school personnel reported by each school syMem] 



Position 



1986 1900 1906 1007 1008 1000 



ANNUAL SALARY 

Central office administrators: 
Superintendent (contract salary) 
Deputy/assoc. superintendent . . 

Assistant superintendent 

Administrators for — 

Finance and business 

Instructional services 

Public relations/information . . 

Staff personnel services . . . . 
Subject area supen^sors 



School building administrators: 
Principals: 

Elementary 

Junior hi^h/middle 

Senior hi^h 

Assistant pnndpals: 

Elementary 

Junior hi^h/middle 

Senior high 



37.440 
33.452 

27.147 
29.790 
24,021 
29.623 
23.974 



25.165 
27.625 
29.207 

20.708 
23.507 
24.816 



56.954 
52.877 
48.003 

40.344 
43.452 
35.287 
44.182 
34.422 



75.425 
69,623 
62,698 

52.354 
56,359 
44.926 

45.929 



36.452 48.431 

39.650 52,163 

42.094 55,722 

30.496 40,916 

33.793 44,570 

35,491 46,486 



90,198 
81,266 
75,236 

61.323 
66.767 
53.263 
65.819 



58.589 
62.311 
86.596 

48,491 
52.942 
55,556 



98.106 101.519 
88.564 90,228 
80.176 82,339 



65,797 
70,788 
55.928 
70,088 
58,776 



62.903 
66.859 
72.410 

52.284 
56,451 
59,739 



67,724 
73,058 
57.224 
71,073 
60.359 



64,653 
68.740 
74.380 

53.206 
57.768 
60,999 



106.122 
92.936 
86.005 

71,387 
75.680 
59.214 
73,850 
61.083 



112.158 
97.251 
88.013 

73.400 
79.023 
60.655 
76,608 
63.103 



118.408 

104.048 

04,137 

77,788 



67.348 60.407 

71.499 73.877 

76.768 70.839 

54.306 56.419 

59.238 80.842 

62.691 64,811 



86.506 
80,000 
64,650 



72,587 
77,382 
83,367 

59.000 
63,700 
67,503 



Classroom teachers. 



15,913 23.587 31,278 37.264 39.580 40,133 41.351 42,213 43.668 



Auxiliary professional personnel: 

Counselors 

Librarians 

School nurses 



Secretarial/clerical personnel: 
Central office: 

Secretaries 

Accounting^yroll clerics. 

Typists/data entry clerics . 
School building level: 

Secretaries 

Library clerics 



18.847 
16.764 
13.788 



10.331 

10.479 

8.359 

8.348 
6.778 



27,593 35.979 
24.981 33.469 
19.944 26.090 



15.343 20.238 

15,421 20.088 

12.481 16.125 

12.504 16.184 

9.911 12.152 



42.486 45.365 46.162 47.287 48.195 
40.418 43.315 44.310 45.680 46.732 
31,066 33.720 34.619 35.520 35.540 



23.935 25.709 26.316 27.540 28.405 

24,042 25.881 26.249 27.630 28,498 

18.674 20,726 21.633 22.474 22.863 

19.170 20.709 21.215 21.831 22.630 

14.381 15,349 15.742 16.033 16.509 



50.003 
49.007 
37.188 



29,514 
20.806 
24,232 

23.630 
17.052 



HOURLY WAGE RATE 

Other support personnel: 
Teacher aides: 

Instructional 

Noninstrucnional 

Custodians 

Cafeteria woricers 

Bus drivers 



4.06 
3.89 
4.88 
3.78 
5.21 



5.89 
5.60 
6.90 
5.42 
7.27 



7.43 
7.08 
8.54 
6.77 
9.21 



8.77 
8.29 

10.05 
7.89 

10.69 



9.25 
8.88 

10.65 
8.30 

11.50 



9.46 
8.82 

10.79 
8.56 

11.55 



9.80 
9.31 

11.22 
8.82 

12.04 



10.00 
9.77 

11.35 
9.02 

12.48 



10.41 
10.15 
11.85 
9.41 
12.99 



Source: Educational Research Sen/ice. Ariington. VA. National Survey of Salaries and Wages in Public Schools, annual. 
Vols. 2 and 3. (All rights reserved. Copyright.) 

No. 232. Public School Employment: 1982 and 1998 

[In thousands (3,082 repreeents 3,082,000). Covers full-time employment. Excludes Hawaii. 1982 also excludes District of 
Columbia and New Jersey. 1982 based on sample sun^ of school districts with 250 or more students. 1998 based on sample 
survey of schcx)! districts with 100 or more employees: see source for sampling variability] 



Occupation 


1962 


1996 


Total Male Female White ^ Black ^ 


Total Male Female White ^ Black ^ 


All occu|>atlons 

Officials, administrators 

Principals and assistant 
principals 


3,082 1,063 2,019 2,408 432 

41 31 10 36 3 

90 72 19 76 11 

1.680 534 1,146 1.435 186 

798 129 669 667 98 

708 363 343 619 67 

235 91 144 193 35 

215 14 200 146 45 
210 4 206 177 19 
611 316 295 434 132 


3.890 1,040 2,850 3,028 616 

50 27 23 42 5 

105 53 52 81 16 


Classroom teachers ^ 

Elementary schools 

Secondary schools 

Other professional staff 

Teachers aides ^ 

Clerical, secretarial staff 

Service woricers * 


2.157 544 1.613 1.805 208 

1.079 151 928 895 103 

795 331 464 677 73 

277 61 216 228 32 

389 43 346 257 78 
266 11 255 203 29 

646 301 345 411 147 



^ Excludes individuals of Hispanic origin. ^ IrKhJdes other classroom teachers, r>ot shown separately. 
technicians. Includes craftworkers and laborers. 



Indudss 



Source: U.S. Equal Empksyment Opportunity Commission. Elementary-Secondary Staff Information (EEO-S), biennial. 



1 52 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statisttoal Abetrad of the Unllad 



No. 233. Public ElemenUry and Secondary School Price Indexes: 1975 to 1998 



[1983b100. For ywws MMiinQ Juiw 30. Reflects prices paid by public elementary-secondary schools. For explanation of average 
annual percent dhange, see Guide to Tabular Presentation] 





— 


Personnel compensation 


Contracted services, supplies and equipment 
















Sup- 




Ubrary 
materi- 






Year 
















plies 


Equip. 












Profes- 


Nonpro- 








and 


ment 


als ar)d 








Index, 




sional 


fessional 


Frinoe 
benefits 




Ser- 


materi- 


replace- 


text- 




Fixed 




total 


Total 


salaries 


salaries 


Total 


vices 


als 


ment 


books 


Utitities 


costs 


1975 . . 


52.7 


53.4 


56.0 


55.6 


40.9 


50.4 


55.7 


58.0 


53.7 


53.8 


34.5 


45.2 


1960 . . 


76.6 


75.9 


76.7 


77.8 


71.0 


79^ 


77.4 


85.9 


79.6 


82.1 


71.1 


77.9 


1984 . . 


105.1 


106.0 


105.7 


104.5 


108.3 


101.7 


105.6 


99.6 


103.4 


107.8 


94.3 


105.4 


1965 .. 


112.1 


113.7 


113.4 


111.3 


117.1 


106.0 


112.4 


103.2 


107.2 


111.0 


96.1 


110.8 


1966 . . 


118.5 


121.1 


121.4 


117.6 


123.3 


108.3 


117.4 


103.0 


109.3 


120.8 


93.7 


116.2 


1987 . . 


123.3 


127.4 


128.4 


121.9 


128.8 


107.5 


123.7 


101.5 


112.9 


126.5 


75.3 


122.7 


1966 . . 


129.8 


134.5 


135.5 


127.5 


137.0 


111.7 


126.1 


105.9 


113.4 


140.0 


78.1 


128.4 


1989 . . 


136.3 


141.6 


142.2 


133.3 


147.0 


116.1 


131.8 


112.0 


116.0 


149.4 


75.1 


134.6 


1990 . . 


144.5 


150.0 


150.1 


139.4 


159.3 


123.5 


137.7 


119.2 


121.2 


171.7 


82.1 


140.3 


1991 . . 


152.3 


158.3 


158.1 


146.5 


169.8 


129.6 


142.5 


122.7 


125.7 


169.5 


92.6 


144.9 


1992 . . 


158.5 


165.5 


165.9 


152.4 


175.8 


131.9 


148.0 


122.5 


128.5 


199.8 


90.8 


148.9 


1993 .. 


162.2 


169.6 


169.3 


155.1 


184.5 


133.9 


151.5 


121.9 


131.8 


205.6 


90.4 


153.8 


1994 . . 


167.1 


175.2 


175.1 


159.3 


190.2 


136.5 


154.0 


122.7 


135.4 


218.6 


90.6 


158.8 


1995 . . 


170.9 


179.2 


178.9 


163.7 


194.9 


139.3 


157.2 


124.4 


138.7 


230.4 


89.7 


163.9 


1996 . . 


177.5 


185.6 


185.7 


169.2 


200.3 


146.6 


161.8 


138.1 


143.2 


243.0 


91.0 


168.1 


1997 .. 


182.0 


190.2 


190.2 


174.5 


204.2 


150.8 


165.2 


137.2 


145.2 


263.7 


100.1 


172.9 


1998 . . 


189.5 


199.2 


199.1 


184.5 


213.4 


152.3 


172.1 


135.2 


145.6 


295.8 


87.5 


178.3 



Source: 
(oopyrig^). 



Research Associates of Washington, Arlington. VA, Inflation Measures for Schools, Colleges, and Libraries, periodic 



No. 234. Finances of Public Elementary and Secondary School Systems by 
Enrollment-Size Group: 1 999-2000 

(In mMkms of dollare (373,961 repreeenta $373,961,000,000), except as indicated. Data are estimates, subject to samplir^g 
vart^Rty. For details, see source, see also Appendix III] 



Item 



School systems with enrollment of— 



All 25,000 15.000 

school 50.000 to to 7.500 to 5,000 to 3,000 to Under 

systems or more 49,999 24,999 14,999 7.499 4,999 3,000 



FaM enrollment (1,000) 

Ger>eral revernje 

From federal sources 

Through state 

Compensatory programs 

Handcapped programs . 

ChHd nutrition programs . 

Direct 



46,857 9.447 5,441 4,640 6.793 4.362 5,511 10.664 



From ^ate sources ^ 

(aeneral formula as8istar>oe . . 

Ktandlnpped programs 

From local sources 

Taxes 

Contributions from parent 
government 

From other local governments. 

Current charges 

School lunch 

Other 



General expenditure 

Current spending 

Byfun^ion: 

Irtstruction 

Support sendees 

Other current spending. . . 
Byobiect: 
Total salaries and waoes . 
Total employee benefns . . 

Other 

Capital outlay 

Interest on del>t 

Payments to other governments 

Debt outstanding 

Long-term 

Shoct-tenn 

Long-term debt issued 

Long-tenn debt retired 



373,961 

26.672 

24,147 

3.271 

10.192 

6,440 

2.525 

186.191 
127.261 
10.192 
161,098 
106.495 

27,412 
3,833 
9.663 
5,429 

13.695 

380.416 
325,661 

198,352 

109.339 

17,969 

210.849 

53,826 

60.987 

44,654 

8.727 

1,373 

178.366 

173.145 

5.222 

24,965 

12.714 



75.640 
6,683 
6,189 

456 
2,162 
1,758 

494 

36,330 
22,385 
2.162 
32,626 
16.750 

11.518 
579 

1,459 
763 

2,320 

76,990 
65.577 

40.295 

21.248 

4.033 

42,730 

10,833 

12.014 

9.530 

1.809 

74 

35.010 

34.451 

559 

3.011 

1,557 



41.430 

3.027 

2,801 

613 

1.254 

837 

225 

21.707 
14,314 
1.254 
16.695 
11,156 

2,417 
398 

1.027 
577 

1.697 

41.619 
35,442 

21,418 

11,960 

2,064 

23,506 

5.830 

6.106 

5,077 

988 

112 

18,962 

18,531 

431 

2,763 

1,189 



34.085 
2.204 
2.048 
437 
892 
619 
156 

18.610 

13,090 

892 

13,271 

8.889 

1,772 
341 
919 
548 

1.350 

34,677 
29,492 

18,126 
9.694 
1,671 

19,555 

4,974 

4,962 

4,316 

797 

72 

15,931 

15,680 

251 

2,103 

1.064 



53.289 

3.453 

3.056 

547 

1,414 

844 

397 

26,886 
18,696 
1,414 
22.950 
16.081 

3,188 
314 

1.429 
866 

1,958 

54.169 
46,445 

28.565 

15.364 

2.516 

30.493 
8,050 
7.903 
6,264 
1,225 
234 

25,714 

25,036 

678 

3.556 

1,770 



35.346 
1,968 
1,800 
307 
807 
511 
168 

16,524 
11,584 
807 
16.854 
12.306 

2.005 
257 
929 
583 

1,356 

36.197 
30,806 

18.998 

10.278 

1.530 

20.152 

6.253 

5.400 

4.285 

891 

215 

18.833 

18.307 

526 

2,789 

1,212 



44.531 

2.594 

2.353 

310 

1.099 

648 

241 

20,936 
14,818 
1.099 
20.999 
14,753 

3.052 

521 
1.186 

741 
1.487 

45.034 
38,672 

23.814 

12.881 

1.976 

26,127 
6,464 
7.080 
5.024 
1.155 
183 

24.186 

23.504 

682 

3.638 

1,926 



89.641 
6.744 
5.900 

602 
2.564 
1.223 

844 

45,196 
32,373 
2,564 
37,701 
26.578 

3.460 
1,423 
2,713 
1,353 
3,527 

91,731 
79,227 

47,136 

27,914 

4.178 

49,285 
12,421 
17,521 
10,159 
1.863 
482 

39,730 

37.635 

2.095 

7.105 

3.996 



^ Includes other sources, not shown separately. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Internet site <http7/www.census.gov/gov8/www/school.html> 



Educat\OT\ \S'\ 



us. Ommm Bumau. StalMical Abstract of the United States: 2002 



d FlnancM, 1980 to 2001, 



(kimMamgfiMnfiOI.72 


™p™-n 


a I1 (n ,724.000^100), asiq* ■■ H 


ML 


For 


•dm 


y««i 


KtaaMAM 


MVWMM 


N 




n»«pla 










fWvanin 


ntlpti 








-£ 






■».«»» 






SOUITM 




^*«nJQJ^^ 


M 
















rota 


Toial 


Fede* 


Slate 


Local oeipli' 


r„,. 


3;^*^ ^ 
























1S85 .... 








eg: 107 














483 




1900 . . . 


218,128 


208:658 


n:i8i 


00.787 


94:685 ! 


469 




698 






966 


J 


1994 


275,121 




18,434 










4B5 








1996 . . . : 


306 J8B 


2M6M 




37488 


ae'rai 1( 


iSB 


I« 




1098 


264M3 i 


?37 


J 


1997 . . 
199B . . . . 


325,007 


303:400 


19:985 
21,608 


48:i84 


43: 164 2! 


te9 


la 


)5l 


;'^^ 


^f,l ! 


166 


J 


























J 


























WOMottl 


408,282 


354.428 


27.955 


83.028 


•3.443 23,858 


392.091 


1.3S3 


13CJ51 7A40 


? 


AlaUama 












986 






3.683 5312 


AMka 


5;*18 


4,894 


3M 


2.588 


2.002 


149 


; 


529 


2:186 


1,255 II 
4,450 ! 


MB 


u 


Man/it: :::::: 




2,74S 


22S 


1.708 


812 












9B6 




CMtomta 


4b!937 




















837 






5.7S0 






2.198 












4,668 6 




31 


co««s<»cui'::: 


8,494 


8:484 


32* 


2,691 


3.469 






494 


i:907 


5,776 11 


258 


! 


DBCBwire 










287 


















WO 


























19.165 




















388 




O^ '■'■' 


12,501 


12:263 
1.682 


14? 


rs" 


5:646 


238 


'i 


4^0 


i:606 


'?lu \ 


Me 


[; 






















1:393 1 




i; 




























InduinB ..'.'.'.'.'.'. 


9214 


a'gag 


468 


.'eaa 


g'aoB 


275 


g 


M9 


1>95 


7^481 f 


zoo 


„ 




aisss 
































2:201 




288 










355 


s: 


KanMM,". 


4:m8 


4:939 


380 


3,108 


i:4si 






823 


1:103 


4:316 7 


516 


2. 








580 






398 








4,396 8 




40 


Maine . . 


1.819 
















1,427 








Maiyland . . 








2,640 




228 










934 


21 


IntassachijMlts . 






S29 


4,468 


4:874 










9:oia ! 


B27 




MichioBn . 












i48 






1,'*87 








MinnMOla 


























maUaipc 


3.193 


2,B70 


420 


1.639 




223 




«0 




2,818 ! 


524 




MhHoun.. 






498 


















II 


Montana 
rMbfBska 


1923 


l'9C^ 


105 


?76 


482 


?8 


, 


044 


1:194 


1^ f 


905 


2S 


Nev»da 


2742 






683 


1:472 


478 






1.316 


i:B08 5 


983 




Nn> Hsmpsn™ , . 




1,684 














1.262 




528 




t»«Mney 










8.128 












892 




NawMexK^. 


2:388 


2:249 


298 










224 






979 


m 


NewVork 


32,680 


31,860 


2.152 




14,979 1 


)30 


3: 


139 


i:783 


29,809 11 


m 




tofin Cardint . , . 






687 


















X 


NormOakoU. . 








296 


385 












459 


50 


Ohm 


17.750 


15,950 


SSO 


8,900 


8.100 1 


BOO 




'00 


1.295 


12,600 ; 


839 


2 


OWahoma 


4.288 


4,039 








247 










;B7 


Ij 


OnWin 


















1:347 










ifligoe 






















i 


RhoOt Wand 


1.339 


1,139 






783 






487 


1,390 


1,403 1 




1 


aouin CaraUnt . . 


5.448 






2,484 














M4 




South DaKoU. . . 










■444 














1: 




5.958 




















029 


43 


T««a«. 


34,810 


3/170 


2,835 


13:838 


14:897 3,640 


33 


415 


1,602 


26:793 6 


979 


2S 


























4« 




l!038 




















355 


S 


Vt-BiniB...". 


10,409 


9:783 


555 


4.281 


4,9*7 


627 








7,309 f 


485 


31 




8,415 










523 






i:436 


6,752 7 




> 


WM VlrB-rla , , . 


























Wscwisin 






















G05 






839 


qio 


." 


J00_ 


■351 


_20 


7M 


1:549 


'eas 8 


223 


r 



X Not apptlcable. Amount racetvt 



I Dy local *auc( 



1 54 Education 



U.S. Canau* Buraau, StaMUcal M 



X 

.3. 
Jf 

X 

o; 

45 



No. 236. PuMk Schools With Internot Access: 1995 to 2000 

[In percent Ae of taH. Excludes special education, vocational education, and alternative schools. Based on sample and subject 
to samping error; see souroe for dslals] 



School charaderlstic 



Total 



Instructional level: 
Elementary . . . 
Secondary . . . 



Size of ervoHment 
Less than 300 . 

30010 999 

1,000 or 



Percent mirK)rfty enrollment! 
Less than 6 percent . . . . 

6 to 20 percent 

21 to 49 percent 

SO percent or mote 



Percent of sluderiteeKgtole tor 
free or reducet ^ pdce lunch: 

Lees than 36 percent 

36 to 48 percent 

50 to 74 percent 

75 percent or more 



Percent of schools with 
Internet 



1985 1009 1000 2000 



50 



Percent of instructional 
classrooms with Internet access 



Students 
per in- 
structional 
- computer 
with 
Internet 



Schools 
¥vHh 



1006 1006 1000 2000 



2000 



available to 

students 

outside of 

regular 

hours. 
2000 



51 



04 



77 



46 


88 


94 


97 


8 


51 


62 


76 


65 


94 


98 


100 


8 


52 


67 


79 


39 


87 


96 


96 


9 


54 


71 


B3 


52 


89 


94 


98 


8 


53 


64 


78 


69 


95 


96 


99 


4 


45 


58 


70 


52 


91 


95 


98 


9 


57 


74 


as 


58 


93 


97 


100 


10 


59 


78 


83 


56 


91 


96 


98 


9 


52 


64 


79 


39 


82 


92 


96 


3 


37 


43 


64 


60 


92 


95 


99 


9 


57 


73 


82 


48 


93 


96 


99 


6 


60 


69 


81 


41 


86 


96 


97 


6 


41 


61 


77 


31 


79 


89 


94 


3 


38 


38 


60 



8 
5 



4 
7 
7 



6 
6 

7 
8 



6 
6 

7 
9 



^ Irwiudee combated schools. 

Souroe: U.S. Natiorial Center for Education Statistics, Internet Access in U.S. 
NCES 2001-071. May 2001. 



04 



46 
80 



49 
53 
79 



46 
60 
54 

61 



58 
47 
52 
56 



Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994-2000, 



No. 237. Advanced Telecommunications in Private Schools: 1995 and 1999 

[For tan 1006 and adiool year 1000-00. Based on tt>e Fast Response Survey System; for details, see source] 



Characteristic 


Number of 

students per 

computer 




Internet access (percent) 


Percent of 

schools 

without 

access 

that plan 

tohave 

access in 

tt>e future, 

1000 




Schools \with 
access 


Instructional 

rooms with 

access 


Students 

enrolled 

in schools 

with access 


Percent of 
teachers 
using 
compu- 
ters for 


1006 1000 


1006 


1000 


1006 1000 


1006 1006 


teaching. 
1000^ 


iUI prIvaAe aciMola. 

Affiiatton: 
Cathoic 




10 
9 
6 

9 

7 
8 

7 
9 
9 

9 

7 

8 

11 


6 

7 
7 
4 

7 
5 

5 

5 

7 
6 

7 
6 
6 
8 


25 

35 
16 
32 

23 
57 
19 

13 
27 
50 

24 
29 
29 
18 


67 

83 
54 
66 

64 
90 
64 

48 
77 
85 

59 
75 
76 
5? 


5 25 

4 27 

2 18 
13 41 

3 21 

6 32 
8 28 

2 16 

3 17 

8 34 

3 28 

9 27 
3 32 
2 10 


41 81 

43 86 
30 72 
59 84 

32 77 
70 97 
41 80 

16 60 
28 77 
56 87 

38 83 
51 86 

44 85 
24 59 


46 

74 
41 
38 

46 

31 
46 

38 
60 
77 

13 
71 
59 
59 


45 

48 


Other religious 

Noneectanan 

Instnjdional level: 

Elemenlary 

Secondary 


41 
49 

45 
47 


Combined 


44 


Size of enrollment: 

Lesa than 150 

150 to 290 


41 
43 


300 or more 

Mtaiority enrolment: 
Lese than 6 percent . . 

6 to 20 percent 

21 to 49 percent 

SO percent or rrxxe . . . 


47 

41 
46 
45 
47 



Percent of te e c h er s U8lr>g computers or advanced telecommunications (e.g. networked computers and interactive television) 



lor teacrung. 



U.S. National Center for Education Statistics, Advanced Telecommunications in U.S. Private Schools. Fall 199S and 
1996-99, NCES 97-394 and 2001-037. 



Educal\ox\ \SS 



U.& 



AbatoMl of the IfriMed StafM: 2002 



No. 238. Computers for Student Instruction In Elementary and Secondary 
Schools: 2000-2001 and 2001-2002 



[53,006 repnatonH 53,006,000. Martcet Data Retrieval ooMeds student use computer infomurtion in elementary and e eoondwy achooli 
nationwide through a comprehensive annual technology sun^ey that utilizes tx>th mail, telephone, and Internet data method^ 



Level 



Total Number 

enroll- of com- 

Total ment puters ^ 

schools (1.000) (1,000) 



Schools 

Stu- with a 

dents local area 

per network 

com- (LAN) 

puter (percent) 



Schools, bv location of 
computer^ (percent) 



Schools with 
high 



Class- Corn- 
rooms puter lab 



Library/ 
media 
center (peroent) 



U.S. total, 2000-01 . . 
U.S. total. 2001-02.. 



Public schools, total 
Elementary 



111,134 53,066 12,169 
111.444 53,406 13,629 



Middle/junior high. 

Senior High 

K-12/other 



Catholic schools, total 

Elementary 

Secondary 

K-12/other 



Other private schools, total 

Elementary 

Secondary 

K-12/other 



89,958 
52.691 
13,842 
16,324 
7,101 

8.112 

6,732 

1,209 

171 

13.374 
6.608 
1.052 
5.714 



48.162 
23.836 

9.034 
12.916 

2.375 

2.647 

1.954 

631 

62 

2,600 

1,089 

234 

1.277 



12.663 

6.738 

2,429 

3,816 

681 

455 

314 

129 

12 

510 

187 

65 

258 



4.4 

3.9 

3.8 
4.2 
3.7 
3.4 
3.5 

5.8 
6.2 
4.9 
5.1 

5.1 
5.8 
3.6 
5.0 



64.8 

64.7 

89.9 
88.8 
92.4 
92.3 
87.2 

79.7 
77.0 
94.6 
83.3 

52.2 
51.9 
69.0 
49.5 



82.3 

64.5 

90.1 
89.1 
91.6 
92.3 
89.9 

61.6 
59.0 
75.1 
65.2 

59.5 
63.7 
64.0 
51.8 



75.2 

78.0 

79.8 
74.4 
91.5 
88.2 
78.2 

79.9 
77.6 
92.4 
78.8 

58.6 
53.7 
79.2 
62.0 



77.7 

77.2 

83.0 
83.3 
91.9 
83.1 
62.1 

61.7 
56.3 
88.4 
77.3 

42.6 
37.7 
84.5 
45.7 



67.4 

702 

76.1 
71.2 
83.7 
84.7 
75.4 

52.8 
48.6 
73.7 
58.9 

40.1 
38.7 
63.1 
36.9 



^ Includes estimates for schools not reporting number of computers. ^ Statistics based on responses off thoee indteaHng 
location of Internet access computers. ^ High speed includes Internet connection types: T1 , T3, cable modem, digital s ot el H e. 

Source: Market Data Retrieval. Shetton. CT. unpublished data (copyright). 

No. 239. Public School Teachers Using Computers or the Internet for 
Classroom Instruction During Class Time: 1999 

[In percent. Based on the Fast Survey Response System conducted in the spring of 1999 ar>d subject to sampling enor. 
source] 



Characteristic 



Teachers 
using 
computers 
or Internet 
for class- 
room inr 
struction 



Teacher assigns to a moderate or large extent 



1 



CkHn- 

puter 

applk^^ 

tlons^ 



Practk:e 
drills 



Research 

using the 

Internet 



Solve 

prot>lems 

and 

analyze 

data 





Produce 


Graphi- 






multi- 


cal 


Demon- 


Research 


media 


presen- 


stratior^ 


using 
CD-ROM 


reports/ 


tation of 


simu- 


projects 


materiato 


iations 



Teachers with access 
to computers or the 
Internet at schools. . 

School Instructional level: 
Elementary school . . 
Secondary school . . . 

Percent of students in 
school eligible for free 
or reduced-phce school 
lunch: 

Less than 11 percent. 

11 to 30 percent .... 

31 to 49 percent .... 

50 to 70 percent .... 

71 percent or more . . 

Hours of professional 
development: 

hours 

1 -8 hours 

9-32 hours 

More than 32 hours . . 



53 



41 



31 



30 



27 



27 



24 



19 



17 



56 


41 


39 


25 


31 


27 


22 


17 


15 


44 


42 


12 


41 


20 


27 


27 


23 


21 



61 


55 


26 


39 


25 


32 


29 


26 


22 


52 


46 


29 


35 


29 


27 


23 


18 


16 


53 


39 


33 


29 


26 


30 


23 


16 


17 


47 


33 


33 


25 


27 


24 


25 


19 


13 


50 


31 


35 


18 


27 


19 


22 


19 


16 


30 


21 


19 


20 


14 


16 


16 


10 


6 


46 


36 


26 


28 


24 


24 


20 


16 


13 


61 


47 


35 


32 


30 


31 


26 


21 


19 


71 


55 


43 


42 


41 


34 


37 


31 


29 



^ Includes corresponding with ottiers (e.g. authors, experts) via e-mail or Internet, not shown separately. ^ For example, 
word processing or spreadsheets. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistk». Fast Response Survey System, Teacher Use of Computers and iha 
Internet in Public Schoois. NCES 2000-090. April 2000. 



1 56 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the Unllad 



No. 240. Children's Access to Home Computer and Use of the Internet at 
Home: 2000 

Based on the Current Population Suvey and sub- 



[As or August (60,835 tipreeente 80,636,000). For children 3 to 1 7 years old. 
ject to sampling error, see source for details] 



Characteristic 





Home computer 


access 


Use of the Internet 
at home 


Children 
(1.000) 


Numt>er 
(1.000) 


Percent 


Numt)er 
(1.000) 


Percent 


80,835 


39,430 


85.0 


18,437 


30.4 


11.915 
24.837 
23.884 


6.905 
15.924 
16.600 


58.0 
64.1 
69.5 


864 

6.135 

11,430 


7.3 
24.7 
47.9 


31.055 
29.580 


20,273 
19.156 


65.3 
64.8 


9.392 
9.045 


30.2 
30.6 


47.433 

38.436 

9.779 

2.581 

9.568 


33.062 

29,731 

4.161 

1,855 

3.546 


69.7 
77.3 
42.5 
71.9 
37.1 


15,940 
14,773 

1,441 
909 

1,229 


33.6 
38.4 
14.7 
35.2 
12.8 


10.159 
18.915 
16.994 
14.567 


3.060 
10.559 
12.712 
13.098 


30.1 
55.8 
74.8 
89.9 


1.126 
4.600 
5.926 
6,786 


11.1 
24.3 
34.9 
46.6 


60.012 

42.936 

3.092 

13.984 

620 


39,119 

31.593 

1,508 

6.017 

310 


65.2 
73.6 
48.8 
43.0 
50.0 


18,284 

15.050 

740 

2.493 

154 


30.5 
35.1 
23.9 
17.8 
24.8 


59.288 
7,480 
2.896 
3.596 
6,967 
8.463 
10.374 
12.115 
7.395 


38.729 
2,041 
1.044 
1.507 
3.755 
6.044 
8.574 

11,294 
4.470 


65.3 
27.3 
36.0 
41.9 
53.9 
71.4 
82.6 
93.2 
60.4 


18.139 

578 

373 

547 

1.463 

2.694 

4.142 

6.263 

2.079 


30.6 
7.7 
12.9 
15.2 
21.0 
31.8 
39.9 
51.7 
28.1 



Total. 



Age: 
StoSyears. . 
6to 11 years . 
12to 17yeers 

Sex: 

Male 

Female 



Race and Hispanic origin: 

White 

While non-Hiepanic . 



Asian and Pacific Islander 
Hispanic^ 



Householder's educational attainment 
Less than high school diploma . . . 
~1D 



High school diploma/QE 
Some college. . . 
Iter's degree 



or more 



Household type: 

Family households 

Married-oouple household 

Male householder 

Female householder ... 

Nonfamily household 



Family income: 

Total chiidrsn in families 

Under $15.000 

15.000 to 19.999 

20.000 to 24,999 

25,000 to 34,999 

36,000 to 49.999 

50.000 to 74.999 

75,000 aiKl over 

Not reported 



^ Persons of Hispanic origin may t>e of any race. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of tt>e Census, Current Population Roporte, Series P23-107. 

No. 241. Children and Youth With Disabilities Served by Selected Programs: 
1991 to 2000 

[For sctiool year ending in year shown (4,361.8 repr ea e n t a 4,361300). Excludes outtying areas. Through 1994. Includes 
chldren with disabilities sensed under Chapter 1 of of ESEA (Elementary and Secondary Education Act). SOP (State Operated 
Programs): beginning 1995, Individuals with Disabilities ACT (IDEA), Parts B and C] 



Item 



1991 



1994 



1006 



1997 



1009 



2000 



NUMBER (1,000) 



Total 

Specific learning disabilities. 

S pe oc h impairments 

Mental retard^ion 

Emotional dtoturt>ance . . . . 

Multiple disabilities 

Hearing impairments 

Orttwpedteally impairments. 



Offwr health impairments 

Visualy impaired 

Aufcm 

Deal-blind 

Traixnalfc bra^ injury. . . 
Developmental delay . . 



4,361.8 

2,144.0 

987.8 

551.5 

390.8 

97.6 

59.2 

49.3 

56.3 
23.7 
(NA) 

\i\ 



4J79A 

2,427.7 

1.018.0 

553.8 

415.0 

109.7 

64.7 

56.9 

83.1 
24.8 
19.1 
1.4 
5.4 
(NA) 



4.907.5 

2,510.2 

1,020.3 

570.5 

428.0 

89.6 

65.2 

60.5 

107.1 

24.7 

22.7 

1.3 

7.3 

(NA) 



5.079.0 

2,601.9 

1,026.9 

585.6 

439.2 

94.5 

68.0 

63.2 

134.2 

25.5 

29.1 

1.4 

9.6 

(NA) 



5,230.6 

2,674.4 

1,048.7 

593.6 

446.3 

99.4 

68.8 

66.3 

161.4 
25.8 
34.4 
1.2 
10.5 
(NA) 



5.397.0 

2,754.5 

1,063.6 

603.3 

454.4 

107.3 

69.7 

67.4 

191.1 

26.0 

42.5 

1.4 

11.9 

3.8 



5.530.9 

2.815.7 

1.074.2 

610.7 

462.8 

107.8 

70.9 

69.4 

221.8 
26.1 
54.1 
1.6 
13.0 
11.9 



5,883.7 

2.872.0 

1,090.0 

614.4 

470.1 

113.0 

71.7 

71.4 

254.1 
26.6 
65.4 
1.8 
13.9 
19.3 



NA Not available. ^ For children 3 to 9 years old. 

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, Data Analysis System (DANS). 



Education \S7 



UACmuaBuMMi. SMMicalAbalract of the United SIMM: 2002 



No. 242. Private Schools: 1999-2000 

[5.163 rsprMents 5,163,000. Based on the Private School Survey, conducted every 2 years; see source for delais. For compo- 
sition of regions, see niap, inside front cover] 



Characteristic 



Schools 



Num- Ele> Sec- Com- 
ber mentary orxlary t>ined 



Students (1.000) 



Nunv Ele- Sec- Com- 
bw mentary ondary bined 



Teachers ^ (1,000) 



Num- Ele- See- Com- 
ber mentary ondary binsd 



Total 

School type: 

Catholic 

Parochial .... 
Diocesan .... 

Private 

Other religious . . 
Conservative 
Christian . . . 

Affiliated 

Unaffiliated . . . 
Nonsectarian . . . 

Regular 

Special 
emphasis . . . 
Special 
education . . . 

Program emphasis: 
Regular elenVsec 

Montessori 

Special program 

emphasis 

Special education 
Vocational/tech. . 

Alternative 

Eariy childhood. . 

Size: 
Lessttian 150 . . 

150 to 299 

300 to 499 

500 to 749 

750 or more. . . . 



27,223 16,630 2,538 8,156 



6,163 2,831 807 1.525 



68 145 



Region: 
Northeast 
Midwest . 
South . . . 
West 



8.102 

4.607 

2.598 

897 

13.232 

4.989 
3.531 
4.712 
5.889 
2,494 

2.131 

1.264 

22.263 
1.190 

606 
1,409 

(B) 
1.617 

133 



15,303 

6.571 

3.219 

1.352 

778 



6.452 
6.991 
8.240 
5.540 



6.707 
4.352 
2.053 
302 
6.843 

1.789 
2.200 
2.853 
2,981 
1.396 

1.387 

198 



14.278 
1.045 

280 
232 

579 
116 



8.961 

4.811 

2.019 

629 

110 



4,049 
5.001 
4.131 
3.349 



1.114 282 

193 63 

481 64 

440 155 

718 5.672 

225 2.975 

287 1.044 

206 1.653 

707 2.201 

262 837 

257 487 

188 878 



1,963 6.021 
(B) 139 



111 

202 

(B) 

254 



216 
975 

7'a 

(B) 



2.511 

1.307 

635 

368 

1344 

773 
554 

517 
808 
547 

175 

86 



4.752 
77 

111 
95 



1.815 
1.209 

543 
63 

750 

230 
275 
245 
267 
163 

92 

11 



2.674 
63 

36 
13 



608 
80 
274 
254 
112 

29 
52 
31 
87 
56 

22 

9 



751 
(B) 

21 
10 



® ® ^^1 
120 39 23 



1.103 5.240 

429 1.332 

419 782 

285 440 

305 362 



776 1.628 

622 1.367 

594 3.515 

546 1.645 



6 



912 

1.424 

1.229 

805 

792 



1.295 

1.345 

1.576 

947 



557 

1.042 

768 

366 

99 



750 
892 
652 
537 



63 
94 

164 
173 
314 



264 
244 
159 
140 



89 

18 

19 

52 

981 

514 
226 
240 
455 
328 

61 

66 



1.327 

13 

54 
72 
(g 

(B) 



293 
288 
297 
267 
380 



281 
210 
764 
269 



150 
72 
49 
28 

153 

60 
47 
45 
93 
56 

20 

15 



346 
8 

11 
16 



98 
102 
84 
54 
57 



104 
91 

131 
69 



101 

66 

30 

5 

58 

17 
23 
18 
29 
16 

11 



41 
6 
18 
18 
11 

2 

5 

3 

11 

7 



8 
1 
1 
5 
84 

41 
19 
23 
53 
36 



11 



170 

7 



4 


2 


2 


2 


(B) 

4 


<^ 


(B) 


• 


53 


8 


67 


9 


45 


13 


18 


12 


5 


20 


49 


22 


55 


17 


49 


13 


35 


10 



57 119 
(B) 1 

5 

12 

(B) 



37 
Z7 
26 
24 
32 



32 

19 
TO 
2-* 



- Represents zero. B Does not meet standard of reliabiHty or precision. ^ Full-time equivalents. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. Office of Educational Research and Improvement. Private Sctnof 
Universe Survey. NCES 2001-330. August 2001. 

No. 243. Private Elemenury and Secondary School Teachers- 
Selected Characteristics: 1 999-2000 

[For achooi year (87 repreeents 87,000). Based on ScfKX>l and Staffing Survey and subject to sampling error, for 
source web site at <http://noes.ed.gov/survey8/sass/>. See Table 229 for similar data on public school teacliers) 



Characteristic 



Unit 



Age 



Under 30 to 39 40 to 49 Over 50 

30 years years years years 

old old old old 



Sex 



Male 



Fe- 
nruile 



Raca/elhrticlly 



White ^ Black ^ panic 



Total teachers ^ 

Highest deoree field 
elors .... 



Bachelor 

Master's 

Education specialist 
Doctorate 



Full-time teaching 
experience: 
Less than 3 years 
3 to 9 years . . . 
10 to 20 years. . 
20 years or more 

Full-time teacfiers . 

Earned income . 

Salary 



1.000.. 

Percent 
Percent 
Percent 
Percent 



Percent 
Percent 
Percent 
Percent 

1.000. . 
Dol. . . . 
Dd. . . . 



87 

76.9 

14.0 

0.2 

0.3 



72.5 

27.2 

0.3 

(Z) 

76 
25.289 
22.299 



101 

59.6 
28.4 

1.2 
1.6 



31.4 

39.4 

29.2 

(Z) 

81 
29,841 
26.828 



131 

56.3 

33.4 

2.0 

1.3 



21.4 
26.5 
36.7 
15.4 

104 
29.638 
27.229 



131 

46.7 

42.1 

3.1 

3.4 



9.2 
11.2 
34.0 
46.7 

105 
33.278 
31.063 



107 

48.8 

39.0 

2.6 

4.9 



30.9 
22.6 
22.7 
23.8 

86 
36.524 
31.438 



342 

60.9 

28.6 

1.6 

0.8 



29.6 
25.8 
28.6 

15.9 

280 
27.771 
25.922 



402 

58.3 

31.8 

1.7 

1.8 



29.1 
25.0 
27.4 
18.5 



17 

59.1 

18.7 

2.1 

0.7 



37.6 
24.8 
22.5 

15.1 



327 14 

29.942 27.503 
27.340 24.374 



21 

55.4 

26.7 
2^ 
1.5 



36.6 

26.1 

26.7 

8.7 

17 
29,506 

27.162 



Z Less than 0.05 percent. ^ Non-Hispanic. ^ Includes teachers with no degrees and associates degrees, not ahown 
separately. 

Source. U.S. Natiorval Center for Education Statistics, unpublished data. 



1 58 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abetrad of the Unlad 



idiolastic Assessment Test (SAT) Scores and Characteristics of 
jOllege-Bound Seniors: 1967 to 2001 

V tndkio hi ytm ttwmn. Data are for the SAT I: Raaaonina Tests. SAT I: Reasoning Test reptaosd the SAT in March 
< wsa n ma two tssls hatve been equated to the same 200-000 scale and aie thus comparabia. Scores tor 1906 and 
I baan recan te rsd ar)d revised] 



if taat and 



Unit 



1997 1970 1975 1900 1985 1000 1906 1000 2000 2001 



EST SCORES^ 
I 



ICIPANTS 



ad area of study: 



I 



Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 
Point 



1.000. . 
Percent 
Percent 
Percent 



Percent 
Percent 

Percent 
Percent 



Percent 
Percent 
Percent 
Percent 



543 
540 
545 

516 
536 
495 



(NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA 



537 
536 
538 
512 
531 
493 




512 
515 
509 
496 
518 
479 



998 

49.9 

86.0 

7.9 



502 
506 
496 
492 

515 
473 



922 

48.2 

82.1 

9.1 



509 
514 
503 
500 
522 
480 



977 

48.3 

81.0 

7.5 



(NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) 
(NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 

NA 

(NA) 

NA) 



P 



(NA{ 



(NA) (na; 



(NAj 




11.5 
6.7 
7.7 
9.1 



18.6 

11.1 

7.8 

6.1 



(NA) 



21.0 

11.7 

7.5 

4.7 



500 
505 
496 
501 
521 
483 



1.026 
47.8 
73.0 
10.0 



20.3 
20.4 

17.3 
15.8 

20.9 

10.2 

12.6 

7.5 



504 
505 
502 
506 
525 
490 



1.068 
46.4 
69.2 
10.7 



21.9 
23.4 

16.4 
16.0 

13.3 
8.8 

11.6 
8.1 



506 

509 
502 
511 
531 
495 



1,220 
46.1 
66.9 
11.1 



21.2 
23.7 

16.1 
15.7 

13.8 
8.5 

10.5 
8.9 



505 
507 
504 
514 
533 
498 



1.260 
46.2 

66.4 
11.2 



21.1 
24.2 

15.9 
14.7 

13.6 
8.5 

10.6 
8.8 



506 

509 
502 
514 
533 
496 



1.276 
46.4 
66.0 
11.3 



21.3 
24.5 

15.8 
14.7 



13.7 
8.6 

10.2 
8.7 



J Minimum score 200; maximum score. 800. ^ 1967 and 1970 are estimates based on total number of 

SAT. ^ 996 represents 996.000. 

•age EntrarK^e Exantination Board. New York. NY. National CoUegaSound Sanior, annual (copyright). 



^CT Program Scores and Characteristics of College-Bound Students: 
1970 to 2001 



war 
(Mat 



ending In year ahown. Except as indicated, test scores and characteristics of college-bound students, 
based on 10 percent sample; tt>ereafter. based on all ACT tested graduating seniors] 



isatand 
lansDC 


Unit 


1970 


1975 


1000 


1985 1000^ 


1006^ 


1006^ 


1000^ 


2000^ 


2001 ^ 


ORES 2 


Point . 
Point . 
Point . 

Point . 
Point . 
Point . 
Point . 
Polrrt . 
Point . 
Point . 
Point . 
Point . 
Point . 
Point . 
Point . 

1.000. 
Percent 
Percent 
Percent 

Percent 
Percent 

Percent 
Percent 
Percent 
Percent 


19.9 
20.3 
19.4 

18.5 
17.6 
19.4 
20.0 
21.1 
18.8 
19.7 
20.3 
19.0 
20.8 
21.6 
20.0 

788 
52 

. (NA) 
4 

14 
21 

18 

8 

10 

16 


18.6 
19.5 
17.8 

17.7 
17.1 
18.3 
17.6 
19.3 
16.2 
17.4 
18.7 
16.4 
21.1 
22.4 
20.0 

714 
46 
77 

7 

14 
33 

21 
6 
9 

12 


18.5 
19.3 
17.9 

17.9 
17.3 
18.3 
17.4 
18.9 
16.2 
17.2 
18.2 
16.4 
21.1 
??.4 
20.0 

fl?? 

45 

83 

8 

13 
33 

20 
8 
6 
9 


18.6 
19.4 
17.9 

18.1 
17.6 
18.6 
17.2 
18.6 
16.0 

17.4 ( 
18.3 1 
16.6 I 
21.2 1 
22.6 1 
20.0 ( 

739 

46 

82 

8 

14 
32 

21 
9 

7 
6 


20.6 
21.0 
20.3 

20.5 
20.1 
20.9 
19.9 
20.7 
19.3 

r^) 

;na 

NA 

817 

46 

79 

9 

12 
35 

20 
9 

10 
8 


20.8 
21.0 
20.7 

20.2 
19.8 
20.6 
20.2 
20.9 
19.7 
21.3 
21.1 
21.4 
21.0 
21.6 
20.5 

945 
44 
75 
10 

13 
34 

14 
9 
9 
9 


21.0 
21.2 
20.9 

20.4 
19.9 
20.8 
20.8 
21.5 
20.2 
21.4 
21.1 
21.6 
21.1 
21.8 
20.6 

985 
43 

76 
11 

14 
33 

12 

7 

9 

10 


21.0 
21.1 
20.9 

20.5 
20.0 
20.9 
20.7 
21.4 
20.2 
21.4 
21.1 
21.6 
21.0 
21.5 
20.6 

1.019 
43 
76 
11 

14 
33 

11 
7 
9 

10 


21.0 
21.2 
20.9 

20.5 
20.0 
20.9 
20.7 
21.4 
20.2 
21.4 
21.2 
21.5 
21.0 
21.6 
20.6 

1.065 
43 
76 
11 

14 
32 

11 
6 
8 
9 


21.0 
21.1 




20.9 




20.5 




20.0 




20.8 




20.7 




21.4 




20.2 




21.3 




21.1 


^^•:::::: 


21.5 
21.0 
21.6 




20.6 


lANTS* 


1,070 




43 




75 




11 


oaileacores 


14 




33 


lonalmaKK: 


11 


a*:::::::: 


6 
9 
9 








I ACT was introduced. 
na conrnosite scores tor pnor years: 19B9, 20.6; 1988. 1987. ana 1966. zo.8. ' Minimum score, 1; maximum 
nor Id 1 990. social studies; data not comparable with previous years. * Prior to 1 990. natural sciences: data not 
1 previous years. ^ Beginning 1 985, data are for seniors who graduated in year shown and had taken tha ACT 
senior years. Data by race are for those responding to the race question. ^ 788 represents 788.000. ^ Prior 
above arxJ 15 or below. " Includes political and persuasive (e.o. sales) fields through 1975; 1980 and 1965 
tmnmrca; thereafter, business and management and business and office. * Includes religion through 1975. 

T. Inc.. Iowa City, lA, High S<^}oc^ Profiie Report, annual. 



Education \S<^ 



Abstract of the Vnnad Stataa: 2002 



No. 246. Proficiency Test Scores for Seiected Subjects liy Characteristia 
1977 to 2001 

[Based on The ^4ational Assessment of Educational Prooress Tests whk^ are administered to a representative sample of rtudanli 
in public and private scfiools. Test scores can range from to 500. except as indicated. For details, see source] 



Test and year 



Race 



Parental education 



White 



Black 



Less 
His- than 
panic high High 
origin school school 



More than Ngh school 

Colege 

Some gradu- 

Total college ale 



READING 



9 year olds: 

1979-80. . 

1987-88. . 

1998-99. . 
13year olds: 

1979-80. . 

1987-88. . 

1998-99. . 
17 year olds: 

1979-80. . 

1987-88. . 

1998-99. . 



WRITING 

4th graders: 

1983-84 

1987-88 

1995-96. . . . 

8th graders: 

1983-84 

1987-88 

1995-96. . . . 

11th graders: 

1983-84 

1987-88 

1995-96 



MATHEMATICS 

9 year oi6s: 

1977-78 

1985-86 

1998-99 

13 year olds: 

1977-78 

1985-86 

1998-99 

17 year olds: 

1977-78 

1985-86 

1998-99 



SCIENCE 

9 year olds: 

1976-77 

1985-86 

1998-99 

13 year olds: 

1976-77 

1985-86 

1998-99 

17 year olds: 

1976-77 

1985-86 

1998-99 



HISTORY, 2001 

4th graders 

8th graders 

12th graders 

GEOGRAPHY. 2001 

4th graders 

8th graders 

12th graders 

CIVICS. 1997-98 ^ 

4th graders 

8th graders 

12th graders 



221 
218 
221 

264 
261 
267 

293 
295 
295 



211 
215 
216 

272 
269 
271 

297 
296 
289 



224 
227 
239 

272 
274 
283 

306 
308 
315 



230 
232 
240 

256 
259 
266 

298 
298 
306 



220 
271 
292 



222 
273 
291 



159 
159 
158 



189 
189 
186 

233 
243 
238 

243 
274 
264 



182 
173 
182 

247 
246 
242 

270 
275 
267 



192 
202 
211 

230 
249 
251 

268 
279 
283 



175 
196 
199 

208 
222 
227 

240 
253 
254 



188 
243 
269 



181 
234 
260 



190 
194 
193 

237 
240 
244 

261 
271 
271 



189 
190 
191 

247 
250 
246 

259 
274 
269 



203 
205 
213 

238 
254 
259 

276 
283 
293 



192 
199 
206 

213 
226 
227 

262 
259 
276 



186 
243 
274 



184 
240 
270 



132 126 

133 127 
131 130 



194 
193 
199 

239 
247 
238 

262 
267 
265 



179 
194 
190 

258 
254 
245 

274 
276 
260 



200 
201 
214 

245 
252 
256 

280 
279 
289 



199 
204 
213 

224 
229 
229 

265 
258 
264 



177 
241 
263 



186 
238 
263 



124 
123 
124 



213 
211 
206 

254 
253 
251 

278 
282 
274 



192 
199 
203 

261 
256 
258 

284 
285 
275 



219 
218 
224 

263 
263 
264 

294 
293 
299 



223 
220 
218 

245 
245 
243 

284 
277 
281 



197 
251 
276 



197 
250 
274 



153 
144 
140 



226 
220 
220 

271 
265 
270 

299 
300 
298 



217 

212 

(NA) 

276 

271 

(NA) 

299 
298 

(NA) 



231 

231 

(NA) 

280 

278 

(NA) 

313 

310 

(NA) 



233 

235 

(NA) 

264 

262 

(NA) 

304 

300 

(NA) 



(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
NA 
NA 





206 
211 
205 

271 
275 
270 

296 

296 
287 



230 
229 
237 

273 
274 
279 

305 
305 

306 



237 
236 
234 

260 
258 
261 

296 
295 
297 



214 
264 
287 



216 
265 
286 



150 
143 
145 



B 



218 
212 
214 

278 
271 
274 

300 
299 

291 



231 
231 
240 

284 
280 



317 
314 
317 



232 

235 
237 



264 

268 

308 

304 
307 



216 
270 



216 
272 
294 



153 
160 
160 



NA Not availat>le. ^ fton-Hispanic. 
on a to 400 rather than to 500 scale. 



^Writing scores revised from previous years; previous writing scores wera raoorded 
^ Civics uses a scale of to 300. 



Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. Digest of Education Statistics, annual, and NAEP 19^ Civics Raport 
Card for the Natior) ; and NAEP 2001 Geography ar)d History Report Card for the Nation. 



1 60 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the UnlM 



No. 247. Advanced Placement Program— Summary: 2000 and 2001 

(Includes exams taken by candUales abroad, in 2001. this represents 34.241 examinailons taken by 23361 students in 720 schools 
abroad] 



Item 



Program total 



Schools 
repre- 
sented. 
2001 



Exams tal(en 



2000 



aooi 



Percent 
change. 
2000-01 



aooi 



Grade level of test taker 



10th 
grade 



11th 
grade 



12th 
grade 



Sex of test tatof 



Male Female 



Exams taken, toCal ^ 

By sub^area: 

Art History 

Aft Onmna 

Art General 

Biology 

Calculus AB 

Cak:ukJsBC 

Chemistry 

Computer Science— A . 
Compt^er Sderwe— AB 

Ecorwmics-Micro 

^onomice-Macro . . . . 
English Language/ 

Compoeitkyi 

Engish Literature/ 

Composition 

Environmental Science . 

European Kfistory 

French l.anguage 

French Ulefature 

German Language. . . . 
Government and 

Politics— U.S 

Government and 

PolitKS— Comparative . 
hhffnan Geo^aphy. . . . 
Intematk)rwl ErigNsh 

l.anguage 

I.atir>— Vergil 

Latin — Literature 

Music Theory 

Ptiysics— B 

Physics— Mechanics. . . 
llectricity and 



(X) 1,272,317 1.414,387 



903 
1.498 
2.006 
6.674 
10.007 
3.319 
5.099 
2.188 
1.360 
1.484 
1.777 



9.721 

4.675 

9.172 

86.826 

137,276 

34.142 

52.786 

13.646 

6.876 

17.464 

23.761 



11.047 

5,660 

9.696 

92,254 

146.771 

38.134 

55.406 

15.827 

7.595 

18.696 

28.200 



5.788 114.049 135,428 



10.334 
1.198 
3.572 
2.978 
379 
1.161 



190.643 

13,698 

59,708 

15.493 

1,655 

3.784 



201.288 

18.880 

65.776 

16.533 

1.668 

4.116 



4.234 66.370 77.467 




Spanish Language 
Spanish Literature 

Statistics 

U.S. History .... 



843 
305 

83 

599 

409 

1.427 

3.127 

2.067 

1.262 
2.242 
5.125 
1.128 
2.659 
8.535 



8.246 

(X) 

5.844 
3.439 
2.343 
5.304 
30.967 
15.634 

7.465 
34.035 
64.380 

8.829 

34.118 

189.968 



9.188 
3.272 

7.636 
3,767 
2.419 
6.135 
34.001 
17.397 

8.362 
42.978 
70.949 

9.992 

41.609 

206.241 



Candklates taking exams ^ 



(X) 768.586 844.741 



11 



14 

21 

6 

6 

7 
12 

5 
16 
10 

7 
19 

19 

6 
38 
10 

7 
1 
9 

17 

11 
(X) 

31 
10 
3 
16 
10 
11 

12 
26 
10 
13 
22 
9 

10 



79,707 490,412 800,824 



660,549 763330 



994 

65 

134 

7,528 

1.393 

672 

2.736 

1.894 

722 

332 

340 



2.859 

1.068 

1.504 

33.823 

20.064 

6.984 

27.980 

6.013 

2.786 

2.302 

3.004 



6,906 

4.348 

7.755 

48,149 

121,955 

29,650 

23.427 

7.433 

3.846 

15.535 

24.160 



3.880 

2.199 

3.264 

38.212 

77.334 

23.432 

30.815 

13.127 

6,764 

10.977 

15.900 



7.167 

3.461 

6.432 

54.042 

69.437 

14.702 

24.591 

2.700 

831 

7.719 

12.300 



1,452 98.176 32.755 



50.294 85.134 



133 
605 
31.731 
716 
67 
238 



12,606 

5.847 

10.175 

4.427 

385 

925 



184.232 

11,833 

22,187 

10.731 

1,151 

2.747 



73.422 
8.225 

31.435 

4.825 

487 

2.003 



127,866 

10.655 

34.341 

11.708 

1.181 

2.113 



2,329 7,345 66.036 



37,443 40.024 



786 
923 

14 
345 

88 
464 
680 
108 

59 

857 

6.791 

543 

1.425 

12.543 



1.274 
771 

74 

1.697 

958 

1.821 

11.561 

1,828 

768 

11,919 

24,516 

2.965 

8.123 

173.862 



6.927 
1.202 

93 

1.621 

1.322 

3.689 

20.958 

15.117 

7.354 
29,157 
36.137 

6.093 
31.123 
15.193 



4.978 
1.685 

3.033 
1.876 
1.139 
3.163 
22.163 
12.764 

6.495 
14.647 
25.183 

3.122 
20.842 
95.421 



4.210 
1.587 

4.602 
1.891 
1.280 
2.972 
11.838 
4.633 

1.867 
28.331 
45.766 

6.870 

20.767 

110.820 



71.689 323.203 417.744 



374.478 470.263 



X Not applicable. ^ Includes candklates and exams taken in other grades not shown separately. 

Source: The CoHege Board. New York, NY, Advanced Placement Program. National Summary Reporf. 2001 (copyright). 

No. 248. Foreign Language Enrollment in Public High Schools: 1970 to 2000 

[In thou a a n de (13,301.9 re p reaei rt s 13,301,900), except percent. As of fail, for grades 9 through 12] 



Language 


1970 


1974 


1978 


1962 


1966 


1990 


1994 


2000 


I OtBl ffftl^OvHVt^VlT ■■■■•■■•■■••■•• 


13,301.9 

3.779.3 
28.4 

3.514.1 

1.810.8 

1.230.7 

410.5 

27.3 

STi 

26.4 
13.6 
9.3 
3.1 
0.2 
(NA) 
0.2 


13,648.9 

3.294.5 
24.1 

3.127.3 

1.678.1 

977.9 

393.0 

40.2 

(NA) 

15.1 

22.9 
12.3 
7.2 
2.9 
0.3 
(NA) 
0.1 


13,941.4 

3.200.1 
23.0 

3,048.3 

1,631.4 

856.0 

330.6 

45.5 

21.9 
11.7 
6.1 
2.4 
0.3 
(NA) 
0.1 


12,879.3 

2.909.8 
22.6 

2.740.2 

1,562.8 

858.0 

266.9 

44.1 

6.2 

5.7 

21.3 
12.1 
6.7 
2.1 
0.3 
0.1 
(Z) 


12,466.5 

4.028.9 
32.3 

3.852.0 

2.334.4 

1.133.7 

312.2 

47.3 

8.6 

6.4 

30.9 
18.7 
9.1 
2.5 
0.4 
0.1 
0.1 


11,099.6 

4.256.9 

38.4 

4,093.0 

2.611.4 

1.089.4 

295.4 

40.4 

25.1 

16.5 

36.9 
23.5 
9.8 
2.7 
0.4 
0.2 
0.2 


11,847.5 

5.001.9 
42.2 

4.813.0 

3.219.8 

1.105.9 

326.0 

43.8 

42.3 

16.4 

40.6 
27.2 
9.3 
2.8 
0.4 
0.4 
0.1 


13,457 J 


EnroOed in all foreign languages 

Percent of aN students 


5.898.1 
43.8 


Enrolled in modem foreign languages ^ . . 
Spanish 


5.720.7 
4.057.6 


French 


1.075.4 


German 


283.3 


Italian 


64.1 


Japwwstt 


50.9 


Russian , , 


10.6 


Percent of all studwits ^ 


42.5 


Soanish 


30.2 


French 


8.0 


German 


2.1 


ttaliivf 


0.5 


Japanese 


0.4 


Russian 


0.1 







NA Not avaHatile. Z Less than 0.05 percent. ^ Includes other foreign languages, not shown separately. 

Source: The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Yonkers, NY. Foreign Language EnroHments h Public 
Secondary Schools. faB 1994 an6 fall 2000. 



Education \6l 



us. 



BWMU. SMMicelAbelract of the United StiSt6s;20Q2 



No. 249. Public High Scliooi GraiiiNitcs by SUt«: 1980 to 2000 

[In thouMMKto (2«747.7 re p w M i rt i 2,747,700). For tdiool ywr ending In ywr ttioiMi] 



State 



1060 



1000 



2000. 

est. 



State 



1060 1060 



United 

Alat)ama . 
AJaska . . 
Arizona. . 
Arlcansas. 
CaUfomia. 



Colorado 

Connecticut 

Oelavmre 

Distrtct of Columbia. 
Florida 



Qeorgia 
Hav^i . 
Idaho. . 
Illinois. . 
Indiana. 



Iowa. . . . 
Kansas. . 
Kentucky. 
Louisiana 
Maine. . . 



Maryland. . . . 
Massachusetts 
Mk:hioan .... 
Minnesota ... 
Mississippi 



2.747.7 2420.3 2J73.5 2,546.1 



45.2 

5.2 

28.6 

20.1 

249.2 

36.8 

37.7 

7.6 

5.0 

87.3 

61.6 
11.5 
13.2 
135.6 
73.1 

43.4 
30.9 
41.2 
46.3 
15.4 

54.3 
73.8 
124.3 
64.9 
27.6 



40.5 

5.4 

32.1 

26.5 

236.3 

33.0 

27.9 

5.6 

3.6 

88.9 

56.6 
10.3 
12.0 
106.1 
60.0 

31.8 
25.4 
38.0 
36.1 
13.8 

41.6 
56.9 
93.8 
49.1 
25.2 



36.3 

5.8 

31.0 

24.6 

255.2 

32.4 

26.4 

5.2 

3.0 

89.8 



37.6 

6.6 

38.3 

27.3 

309.9 

38.9 

31.6 

6.1 

2.7 

106.7 



56.7 


62.6 


9.4 


10.4 


14.2 


16.2 


105.2 


111.8 


56.1 


57.0 


31.3 


33.9 


26.1 


29.1 


37.6 


36.8 


36.5 


38.4 


11.5 


12.1 


41.4 


47.8 


47.7 


53.0 


84.6 


90.0 


49.4 


57.4 


23.8 


24.2 



Missouri 

Montana 

H^biaakB .... 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 



New Jersey . . 
New Mexico. . 
New Yortc . . . 
North Carolina 
North Dakota. 



Ohto 

Oklahoma . . 
Oregon .... 
Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 



South Carolina 
South Dakota. 
Tennessee. . . 

Texas 

Utah 



Vermont . . . 
Virginia .... 
Washington . 
West Viroinia 
Wisconsin . . 
Wyoming. . . 



62.3 
12.1 
22.4 

6.5 
11.7 

94.6 

18.4 

204.1 

70.9 

9.9 

144.2 
39.3 
29.9 

146.5 
10.9 

38.7 
10.7 
49.8 
171.4 
20.0 

6.7 
66.6 
50.4 
23.4 
69.3 

6.1 



49.0 
9.4 

17.7 
9.5 

10.6 

69.8 

14.9 

143.3 

64.8 

7.7 

114.5 
35.6 
25.5 

110.5 
7.6 

32.5 

7.7 

46.1 

172.5 

21.2 

6.1 
60.6 
45.9 
21.9 
52.0 

5.6 



46.9 
10.1 
18X> 
10.0 
10.1 

67.4 

14.9 

132.4 

50.5 

7.8 

109.4 
33.3 
26.7 

104.1 
7.8 

30.7 

6.4 

43.6 

170.3 

27.7 

5.9 
5a3 
49.3 
20.1 
51.7 

5.9 



1 
1 



Source: U.S. Nattonal Center for Educatkm Statistics. Digest of Education Statistics, annual. 



No. 250. Higli Scliool Dropouts by Race and Hispanic Origin: 1975 to 2000 

[In percent As of Odober] 



Hem 



1975 1060 1006 1060^ 1903 1994 1906 1006 1907 1906 1006 



EVENT DROPOUTS * 



Total* 

White. . . 
Male. . 
Female 



Black 

Male. . 

Female. 

Hispank: * . 
Male. . . 
Female. 



STATUS DROPOUTS * 

Total » 

Whfte 

Male 

Female 



Black 

Male. . . 
Female . 

Hispanic * . 
Male. . . 
Female. 



5J 

5.4 
5.0 
5.8 

8.7 
8.3 
9.0 

10.9 
10.1 
11.6 



15.6 

13.9 
13.5 
14.2 

27.3 
27.8 
26.9 

34.9 
32.6 
36.8 



6.0 

5.6 
6.4 
4.9 

8.3 
8.0 
8.5 

11.5 

16.9 

6.9 



15.6 

14.4 
15.7 
13.2 

23.5 
26.0 
21.5 

40.3 
42.6 
38.1 



5.2 

4.8 
4.9 
4.7 

7.7 
8.3 
7.2 

9.7 
9.3 
9.8 



13.9 

13.5 
14.7 
12.3 

17.6 
18.8 
16.6 

31.5 
35.8 
27.0 



44) 

3.8 
4.1 
3.5 

5.1 
4.1 
6.0 

8.0 
8.7 
7.2 



13.6 
13.5 
14.2 
12.8 

15.1 
13.6 
16.2 

37.3 
39.8 
34.5 



4.2 

4.1 
4.1 
4.1 

5.4 
5.7 
5.0 

5.4 
5.7 
5.0 



12,7 

12.2 
13.0 
11.5 

16.4 
15.6 
17.2 

32.7 
34.7 
31.0 



5.0 

4.7 
4.6 
4.9 

6.2 
6.5 
5.7 

9.2 

8.4 

10.1 



13.3 

12.7 
13.6 
11.7 

15.5 
17.5 
13.7 

34.7 
36.1 
33.1 



5.4 

5.1 
5.4 
4.8 

6.1 
7.9 
4.4 

11.6 
10.9 
12.5 



13.9 

13.6 
14.3 
13.0 

14.4 
14.2 
14.6 

34.7 
34.2 
35.4 



4.7 

4.5 
4.8 

4.1 

6.3 
4.6 
7.8 

8.4 
9.2 
7.6 



12.8 

12.5 
12.9 
12.1 

16.0 
17.4 
14.7 

34.5 
36.2 
32.7 



4.3 

4.2 
4.9 
3.5 

4.8 
4.1 
5.7 

8.6 

10.4 

6.7 



13.0 

12.4 
13.8 
10.9 

16.7 
17.5 
16.1 

30.6 
33.2 
27.6 



4.4 
4.4 
4.4 

5.0 
4.6 
5.5 

8.4 
&6 
8.2 



13.9 

13.7 
15.7 
11.7 

17.1 
20.5 
14.3 

34.4 
39.7 
28.6 



4.7 

4.4 
4.1 
4.7 

6.0 
5.2 
6.8 

7.1 
6.9 
7.3 



13.1 
12.8 
13.9 
11.8 

16.0 
16.3 
15.7 

33.9 
36.4 
31.1 



Beginning 1990 reflects new editing procedures for cases with missing data on school enrollment. ^ Percent of Hw 
who drop out m a single year wittiout completing high school. For grades 10 to 12. ^ Includes other raoee, rral tl 
separately. * Persons of Hispank: origin may be (X any race. ^ Percent of \he populatk>n wtK> have not completed hi0h m 
and are not enrolled, regardless of when they dropped out. For persons 18 to 24 years okj. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Reports, PPL-148. 



1 62 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau, Slaiietteal AbetrKi of Hie Uniid J 



No. 251. High School Dropouts by Ago* Raco* and Hispanic Origin: 
1970 to 2000 

(As off Odotar (4^70 wpwt nte 4,870,000). For persons 14 to 24 yssrs oW. Ss« IhUs 2S3 tor dsflnltton of dropouts] 



Ags and rsoo 



Number of dropouts (1 .000) 



1070 



1060 1000 1006 



2000 



Percent of populatton 



1070 



1 



2000 



Tolal dropouli ^ *. 

16 to 17 years 

18 to 21 years 

22 to 24 years 

While* 

16 to 17 years 

18 to 21 years 

22 to 24 years 

Black* 

16 to 17 years 

18 to 21 years 

22 to 24 years 

Hispanic * ' 

16 to 17 years 

I6to21 years 

22to24 years 




12^ 

8.0 
16.4 
18.7 

10.8 

7.3 

14.3 

16.3 

22.2 

12.8 
30.5 
37.8 

(NA) 
NA 
NA) 
NA 



12i) 

8.6 
15.6 
15.2 

11.3 

9.2 

14.7 

14.0 

16.0 

6.9 

23.0 

24.0 

29.5 
16.6 
40.3 
40.6 



10.1 

6.3 

13.4 

13.8 

10.1 

6.4 

13.1 

14.0 

10.9 

6.9 

16.0 

13.5 

26.8 
12.9 
32.9 
42.6 



9J 

5.4 
14.2 
13.6 

9.7 

5.4 

13.8 

13.4 

10.0 

5.6 

15.8 

12.5 

24.7 
10.7 
29.9 
37.4 



10J 

5.6 
12.9 
11.8 

10.6 

5.8 

12.6 

11.7 

13.4 

7.0 

16.0 

14.3 

27.8 
11.0 
30.0 
36.5 



NA Not Mlable. ^ Includes other groups not shown separately. 
' Persona of Hispanic origin may t)e of any race. 

Souros: U.S. Census Bureau. Cumnt Population Reports, PPL-148; and earlier years 



Includes penont 14 to 15 years, not shown 



No. 252. Enroiiment SUtus by Race, Hispanic Origin, and Sex: 1975 and 2000 



[Ai of October (15,003 r epresen ta 15403,000). For persons 1 8 to 21 years old. For the civilian noninstitutional population. Baaed 
on the Current Population Sun^; see text. Section 1 . Population, and Appendix III] 



Characteristic 











Percent distritxjtion 








Total p( 


monft 




































18 to 21 years old 
(1.000) 


EnroNei 
highsd 


jin 


High school graduates 




Not high { 
gradua 


(chod 


K)0l 


Total 




In college 


tes 


1975 


2000 


1975 


2000 


1975 


2000 


1975 


2000 


1975 


2000 


15,003 


15.563 


5.7 


9.4 


78.0 


77.6 


33.5 


43.5 


16.3 


12.9 


13.448 


12.383 


4.7 


8.9 


80.6 


78.5 


34.6 


44.4 


14.7 


12.6 


1.997 


2.389 


12.5 


12.6 


60.4 


71.3 


24.9 


34.7 


27.0 


16.0 


899 


2.439 


12.0 


12.5 


57.2 


57.2 


24.4 


25.3 


30.8 


30.0 


7.584 


7.814 


7.4 


11.0 


76.6 


74.7 


35.4 


38.9 


15.9 


14.3 


6.545 


6.313 


6.2 


10.6 


79.7 


75.7 


36.9 


39.8 


14.1 


13.7 


911 


1.096 


15.9 


14.9 


55.0 


66.0 


23.9 


27.4 


29.0 


19.1 


416 


1.269 


17.3 


14.4 


54.6 


51.8 


25.2 


21.9 


27.9 


33.7 


8.109 


7.739 


4.2 


7.9 


79.2 


80.6 


31.8 


48.1 


16.6 


11.5 


6.903 


6.070 


3.2 


7.1 


81.4 


81.3 


32.4 


49.3 


15.3 


11.4 


1.065 


1.293 


9.7 


10.7 


65.0 


75.9 


25.8 


40.9 


25.4 


13.5 


484 


1.169 


7.6 


10.6 


59.3 


63.1 


23.6 


28.9 


33.1 


26.1 



\ 



TotH^ 

White... 

rtspsnic^ 

Male 

White 

BiKk..,.. 
Hitpmlc^.. 

Female 

White 

Btedt 
HUpe*:^.. 



^ Includes other races not shown separately. ^ Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. 
Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Current Popidation Reports, PPL-148; and earlier reports. 

No. 253. Employment Status of Higli Scliooi Graduates and Scliool Dropouts: 
1980 to 2001 

[hi thousande (11,622 r epreeen ta 11.622,000), except percent As of October. For dvlHan noninstltutional population 16 to 24 
yssrs old. Based on Currant Population Sun^ey. see text. Section 1, Population, and Appendix III] 



Emptoyment status, 
sex. arKi race 





Graduates ^ 






Dropouts^ 




1990 


1990 


1905' 


2001' 


1990 


1990 


1995' 


2001' 


11,622 


8,370 


6.627 


7,395 


5.254 


3300 


3.676 


3,774 


9.795 


7.107 


5.530 


6.037 


3,549 


2,506 


2.443 


2.754 


84.3 


84.9 


83.4 


81.6 


67.5 


66.0 


63.0 


73.0 


8.567 


6.279 


4.863 


5.297 


2.651 


1.993 


1.894 


2.195 


87.5 


88.3 


87.9 


87.7 


74.7 


79.5 


77.5 


79.7 


1.228 


828 


667 


740 


898 


513 


549 


559 


12.5 


11.7 


12.1 


12.3 


25.3 


20.5 


22.5 


20.3 


13.5 


11.1 


11.7 


12.3 


23.5 


18.8 


19.2 


18.3 


11.5 


12.3 


12.5 


12.2 


28.7 


23.5 


28.8 


23.9 


10.8 


9.0 


10.5 


10.3 


21.6 


17.0 


19.1 


16.4 


26.1 


26.0 


20.3 


21.5 


43.9 


43.3 


48.0 


40.9 


1.827 


1.262 


1.097 


1.358 


1.705 


1.294 


1.433 


1.020 


15.7 


15.1 


16.6 


18.4 


32.5 


34.1 


37.0 


27.0 



ChrWan popuialt on . . . . 

htebo rterce. 

Perosnt of population . . , 

Empioysd 

Percent of labor force . . 

Unemployed 

Unsmployment rate, total * . 

Male 

Female 

White 

^ Black 

Not in latxx toroe 

Pwcsnt of population 



For persons not enrolled in college who have completed 4 years of high school only. ' See footnote 2. Tat>le 560. ^ For 
pemrtt not in rsgular school and who have not completed the 1 2th grade nor received a general equivalency degree. * Includes 
othsr races not shown separately. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 2307; News, USOL 02-228. May 14. 2002; and unpublished data. 



Education \SZ 



UJL 



SMMcai Abstract of the United SMee; 2002 



No. 254. General Educational Development (GED) Credentials Issueds 
1974 to 2000 

[GEDt Issued In thousands (295 rsprsssnts 295,000). Includes outlying areas] 



Year 



Percent dl8trit)utlon by age of test taker 



QEDs issued 



19 years old 
or under 



20 to 24 
years old 



25 to 29 
years old 



30 to 34 
years old 



36yMn 



1974 
1975 
1980 
1985 
1990 

1995 
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 
2000 



295 
342 
488 
427 
419 

513 
514 
471 
496 
517 
501 



35 
33 
37 
33 
35 

37 
40 
41 
43 
43 
42 



27 
26 
27 
26 
25 

25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
26 



13 
14 
13 
15 
14 

13 
13 
12 
11 
11 
11 



9 

9 

8 

10 

10 

10 
9 
8 
8 
8 
8 



Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. Digest of Education Statistics. 2001. 

No. 255. College Enrollment of Recent High School Graduates: 1960 to 200(1 

[High school graduates in thousands (1,879 rs p rssei rt s 1,879,000). For persons 16 to 24 who graduated from high ache 
the preceeding 12 months. Includes persons receiving GEOs. Based on surveys and subject to sampling enor] 



Year 


Numt)er of high school graduates 


Percent enrolled in college ^ 


Total ^ Male Female White Black 


TotaM Male Female White C 


1960 

1965 

1970 

1975 

1980 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 

1987 

1988 

1989 

1990 

1991 

1992 

1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 

1997 

1998 

1999 

2000 


1.679 756 923 1.565 NA) 

2.659 1.254 1.405 2.417 NA 
2.757 1.343 1.414 2.461 (NA 
3.166 1.513 1.673 2,825 (NA 

3.089 1.500 1,589 2.682 361 
2.964 1.390 1,574 2.496 392 
3.012 1.429 1.583 2.514 438 

2.666 1.286 1.380 2.241 333 
2.786 1,331 1.455 2.307 386 
2.647 1.278 1.369 2.207 337 
2.673 1,334 1.339 2,187 382 
2,454 1.208 1.245 2.051 337 

2,355 1.169 1.185 1.921 341 
2.276 1,139 1.137 1.867 320 
2.398 1,216 1.182 1.900 353 
2,338 1,118 1.219 1.910 302 
2.517 1.244 1.273 2.065 318 

2.599 1,238 1.361 2.088 356 

2.660 1.297 1.363 2.092 416 
2.769 1.354 1.415 2.228 394 
2.810 1,452 1.358 2.227 393 
2.897 1.474 1.423 2.287 453 
2.756 1.251 1,505 2.219 404 


45.1 54.0 37.9 45.8 
50.9 57.3 45.3 51.7 
51.8 55.2 48.5 52.0 
50.7 52.6 49.0 51.2 

49.3 46.7 51.8 49.9 
52.7 51.9 53.4 56.0 

55.2 56.0 54.5 57.9 

57.7 58.6 56.9 59.4 

53.8 55.9 51.9 56.0 

56.8 58.4 55.3 56.6 

58.9 57.0 60.8 60.7 

59.6 57.6 61.6 60.4 

59.9 57.8 62.0 61.5 

62.4 57.6 67.1 64.6 

61.7 59.6 63.8 63.4 
62.6 59.7 65.4 62.8 
61.9 60.6 63.2 63.6 

61.9 62.6 61.4 62.6 
65.0 60.1 69.7 65.8 
67.0 63.5 70.3 67.5 
65.6 62.4 69.1 65.8 
62.9 61.4 64.4 62.8 

63.3 59.9 66.2 64.0 



NA Not available. ^ Includes other races, not shown separately. ^ As of Octot>er. 
Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, annual. 

No. 256. College Enrollment by Sex and Attendance Status: 1983 to 1999 

[As Of fall. In thousands (12.465 represents 12,465,000)] 



Sex and age 



1963 



Total 



Part 
time 



1988 



Total 



Part 
time 



1993 



Total 



Part 
time 



1996^ 



Total 



Part 
time 



Total 



Total 

Male 

14 to 17 years old. . . 
18 to 19 years old. . . 
20 to 21 years old. . . 
22 to 24 years old. . . 
25 to 29 years old. . . 
30 to 34 years old . . . 
35 years old and over 

Female 

14 to 17 years old. . . 
18 to 19 years old. . . 
20 to 21 years old. . . 
22 to 24 years old. . . 
25 to 29 years old. . . 
30 to 34 years ok). . . 
35 years old and over 



12.465 

6.024 

102 

1.256 

1,241 

1.158 

1.115 

570 

583 

6.441 
142 

1,496 

1.125 
884 
947 
721 

1.126 



5.204 

2.264 
16 
158 
205 
382 
624 
384 
494 

2.940 
16 
179 
204 
378 
658 
553 
953 



13,055 

6.002 

55 

1.290 

1.243 

1.106 

875 

617 

816 

7.053 
115 

1.536 

1.278 
932 
932 
698 

1.563 



5.619 

2.340 
5 
132 
216 
378 
485 
456 
668 

3.278 
17 
195 
218 
403 
633 
499 

1,313 



14.305 

6.427 

83 

1.224 

1,294 

1,260 

950 

661 

955 

7.877 
93 
1.416 
1.414 
1.263 
1,058 
811 
1.824 



6,177 

2.537 
10 
138 
209 
392 
564 
484 
739 

3.640 
6 
172 
279 
493 
689 
575 

1.427 



14.507 

6.369 

45 

1.535 

1.374 

1.127 

908 

463 

917 

8.138 
74 
1.847 
1.437 
1.250 
1.083 
732 
1.715 



5.944 

2.436 
5 
296 
245 
350 
485 
322 
733 

3.508 
21 
292 
295 
463 
617 
506 

1.315 



14,791 

6.491 

72 

1.541 

1,392 

1.090 

874 

517 

1.005 

8,301 
72 

1,874 
1,597 
1,344 
995 
627 
1,791 



6 
2 



^ In this table, data beginning in 1998 reflect the new classification of institutions. See footnote 1, Table 257. 
Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. Digest of Education Statistics, annual. 

1 64 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the Unied 



it 



No. 257. Higher Education— Summary: 1970 to 1999 



QMlttiJllora, flMf , mkI cnroHnMnt m off IWI (474 rapivMnlB 474«000). FlranoM fof ftooil ysMr widbiQ In ttw foHowvliiB 

Covers universilies, ooflegos. profession^ achooto, Junior and teachers ooHegee. both publicly and privately co ntio il e d. regular' 
sion. Includes estimates lor Institutions not reporting. See also Appendix III] 



Item 



Unit 



1970 1960 1996 1990 1996 1996 1997 1990 



ALL INSnTUnONS 

Number off Instttullons ^ 

4-year 

2-year 



(Lecturer or above) ' 

Percent full-time . . . 



Malo 

Fsmale 

4-year institutions 
2-year institutions 

Ful-time 

Part-time 

Public 

Private 



Undergraduate^ . . . . 

Men 

Women 

First-time freshmen. 
First profesaional . . . . 

Men 



Qraduale^ 

Men 

Wbmen 

Currant funds revemiee '. 

Tuition and fees 

Federal government. . . . 

Stale government 

Auxiiary enterprises. . . . 



Cunent funds expendlturaa ' . 

Educational and general ^. . 

Auxliafy enterprises 

Endowment (marltet value) ... 

2-YEAR INSrrrUTIONS 

Number of Inefltutiona ^ ^ .. 

Public 

Private 



InMnictional , 

(Leetwer or above) ' 



Enroimant'^. 

Pubic 

Prtvale . . . . 

M^ 

Femele . . . . 



Current funds revenue ' 

Tujdon and fees 

State government . . . . 
Ijocal govenwnent .... 



Current funds expenditures 

Education and general °. . 
Instruction 



Number. 

Numt)er . 
Number . 



1.000.. 
Percent 

1,000.. 

1.000. . 
1.000. . 
1.000. . 
1.000. . 
1.000. . 
1,000. . 
1,000. . 
1.000. . 

1.000. . 
1.000. . 
1.000. . 
1.000. . 
1.000. . 
1.000. . 
1.000. . 
1.000. . 
1.000. . 
1.000. . 

MIL dol 

Mil. dol. 
Mil. dol. 
Mil. dol. 
Mil. doi. 

MIL dol 

Mil. dol. 
Mil. doi. 
Mil. dol. 



Number. 

Numt)er . 
Numt)er . 



1,000.. 

1,009. . 

1,000. . 
1.000. . 
1.000. . 
1.000. . 

MIL dol 

Mil. dol. 
Mil. dol. 
Mil. dol. 

MIL dol 

Mil. dol. 
Mil. doi. 



2.556 

1.665 
891 



474 

78 

8.581 

5.044 
3,537 
6.262 
2.319 
5.816 
2.765 
6,428 
2.153 

7.376 

4.254 

3.122 

2.063 

173 

159 

15 

1.031 

630 

400 

23,879 

5.021 
4,190 
6.503 
3,125 

23,375 

17,616 

2.988 

13.714 



891 

654 
237 



92 

2,319 

2,195 
124 

1.375 
945 

2,504 

413 
926 
701 

2.327 

2.073 
1,205 



3.231 
1.957 
1,274 



66 

12.097 

5,874 
6.223 
7,571 
4,526 
7,098 
4,999 
9.457 
2.640 

10,475 

5.000 

5.475 

2,588 

278 

199 

78 

1.343 

675 

670 

65.585 

13.773 
9.748 

20.106 
7,287 



3.340 

2.029 
1.311 



715 
64 

12.247 

5.818 
6,429 
7,716 
4.531 
7.075 
5.172 
9,479 
2.768 

10.597 

4.962 

5.635 

2.292 

274 

180 

94 

1.376 

677 

700 

100,438 

23.117 
12.705 
29.912 
10.674 



3,559 

2.141 
1.418 



817 

61 

13319 
6.284 
7,535 
8.579 
5.240 
7.821 

10,845 
2.974 

11.959 

5,380 

6.579 

2.257 

273 

167 

107 

1,586 

737 

849 

140,766 

37.434 
18.236 
39,481 
14,903 



3.706 

2.244 
1.462 



932 

59 

14.262 

6,343 
7.919 
8,769 
5,493 
8.129 
6,133 
11.092 
3.169 

12.232 

5.401 

6.831 

2.169 

298 

174 

124 

1.732 

768 

965 

107,073 

55.260 
23.939 
45,693 
18.868 



84.053 97,536 146,088 190,476 

50.074 76.128 114,140 151.446 

7,288 10.528 14.272 17.599 

23.465 50.281 72.049 128,837 



1,274 

945 
329 



192 

4,526 

4.329 

198 

2.047 

2,479 

8.506 

1.618 
3,961 
1,623 

8.212 
7.606 
3,764 



1.311 

932 
379 



211 

4,531 

4,270 

261 

2.002 

2.529 

12.293 

2,618 
5.659 
2.027 

11.978 

11,118 
5,398 



1,418 

972 
446 



(NA) 

5.240 

4.996 

244 

2.233 

3.007 

18,021 

4,029 
8.001 
3.044 



1.462 

1.047 
415 



285 

5.493 

5,278 

215 

2,329 

3,164 

24,614 
6,323 
9,848 
4.324 



17.494 23.522 

16,270 22.053 
7.903 10.312 



4,009 

2,267 
1,742 



59 

14468 

6,353 
8.015 
8,804 
5.563 
8.303 
6,065 
11.120 
3,247 

12,327 

5.421 

6.906 

2,274 

298 

173 

126 

1,742 

750 

983 



1,742 

1,088 
654 



5.563 

5.314 

249 

2,359 

3.204 




4,084 

2.309 
1.755 



990 

57 

14,502 
6.396 
8.106 
8.897 
5.606 
8.438 
6.064 

11,196 
3.306 

12.451 

5.469 

6,982 

2,219 

298 

170 

129 

1.753 

758 

9(fD 

iNA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA 
NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
NA 
NA 



1,755 

1,092 
663 



5,606 

5,361 

245 

2.390 

3.216 




4.048 

2.335 
1,713 



099 

(NA) 

14.507 

6,369 
8.138 
9,018 
5.489 
8.563 

11.138 
3,369 

12,437 

5.446 

6,991 

2,213 

302 

169 

134 

1,768 

754 

1.013 

iNA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA 
NA 






A) 

NA) 

NA 

NA 



1.713 

1.069 
644 



285 307 (NA) 



5,489 

5.246 

243 

2.333 

3.156 




4.084 
2.363 

1.721 



1.028 
57J 

14.791 

6,491 
8,301 
9.199 
5.593 
8.786 
6.005 
11.300 
3.482 

12.681 

5,559 

7.122 

2.352 

303 

165 

138 

1.807 

766 

1.041 



1,721 

1.066 
653 



314 

5.593 

5.339 

253 

2,387 

3.205 




NA Not avaAaUe. ^ Beoinning 1980. number of institutions includes count of branch campuses. Due to revised sun^ 
procedures, data beqNming 1990 are not comparable with previous years. Beginning 1996 data reflect a new classiftoation of 
■ntlllutions: this classification includes some additional, primariiy 2-year, colleges than before and excludes a few institutions that 
dU not award degrees. Includes institutions tturt were eligible to participate in Titte IV Federal financial aid programs. ^ Due to 
wised sunrey mettxxte. data beginning 1 990 not comparable with previous years. ^ Beginnino 1 980. branch campuses counted 
according to actual status, e.g., 2-year branch in 2-year category; previously a 2-year branch included in university category. 

InOlmj^ unclassified *^*'^"*^ ICfii/4An#a tolrin/« #«miraAa f#\r r imrllt kii* arm riA* /^an/tiWntAa f/\r HAnrAAs \ 5 Inr^.iHAA ItAma mm< 



studensi. 



.) ^Includes items not 



s. (Students taking courses for crsdit, but ars not candidates for degrees. 
ilKMn separalsly. " Data for 1 970 are not strictly oomparabie with later years. ' Beginning 1 98€. includes schools accredited 
by the National Association of Trade and Technical Schools. See footnote 1 for information pertaining to data beginning 1996. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. Digest of Echjcation Statistics, annual; Projections of EducaUon 
StaHsbcs, annual; and unpublished data. 



Education \6S 



us. 



BuPMRi. SMl8liC8lAbelractoftheUnMidSliBlM.20Q2 



No. 258. Collese Enrotlmcnt If 



Characteristics: 



1990 to 1999 



K] among iaaei«Ht<nK gm»a] 



5.8451 
Z,J73'4 



,3«7.5 14.60!^ 



4,499.4 
5,879,4 



3,641,3 

a,703.e 



al Cwnw lor Education SUMKe, Ogasl of EducaOon SuBslics, arnui 



166 Education 



U,5.C«iiii*eurMu. Stollgbctf AbMfKtodhtlMMM 



No. 259. Dagree-Cranting Insttlutlons, NumlMr 

[14,TS1 nf****"!! 14,791,000. hkimCnr oHnstilulJone tie^inrvng \o 
dU.S. iMttUbonQ operalfld in h>feign counlHoK. Sm Appendix JIT] 



mmI EnrollmaRt by State: 1999 

Openjno tail enrolknsiii of rasWanl Bnd Bilmv 



• FsiTiBia Public PrtvstB Hme V< 



I 14.TSI S,4S1 8,301 ItSOS 3.*»2 «,7M )0.3S3 4,013 1,(41 1J1T 



359 *33 !37 105 107 



534 200 390 *95 



1.0J1 433 587 see 456 



2SS eOS 273 333 337 268 



352 454 

101 145 
427 497 



991 445 548 



S "3 






Hi Cantar l» Education SBIisttcs. Ogea ol Eaucaton SlBlisDcs. ai 



Education \&1 



No. 260. College Enrollment by Sex, Age, Race, and Hispanic 
1980 to 2000 

[In thotisamte (11^7 repriMirti 11^7.000). As of Octotor for the civilian noninstitutionai populalion. 14 ystit oM and < 

Based on the Cunent Population Sun/ey; see text, Section 1 . Population, and Appendix III] 



Characteristic 



1990 1966 1990^ 1993 1994 1995 1990 1997 1996 1966 



J 



Total 



11,367 12.524 13.621 13.896 15,022 14.715 15.226 15,436 15,646 15,209 16 



Male 3 

18 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 years old and over 

Female ^ 

18 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 years old and over 

White ^ 

18 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 years old and over 

Male 

Female 



Black 3 

18 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 years old and over 

Male 

Female 



Hispanic origin ^^ 

18 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 years old and over 

Male 

Female 



5,430 

3,604 

1.325 

405 

5.957 

3.625 

1.378 

802 

9,925 
6.334 
2,328 
1.051 
4,804 
5,121 

1.163 
688 
289 
156 
476 
686 

443 
315 
118 

222 

221 



5.906 

3.749 

1,464 

561 

6,618 
3.788 
1.599 
1.100 

10.781 
6.500 
2.604 
1.448 
5.103 
5.679 

1.263 
734 
295 
213 
552 
712 

580 
375 
189 
(NA) 
279 
299 



6,192 

3.922 

1.412 

772 

7.429 
4.042 
1.749 
1.548 

11.488 
6.635 
2,698 
2.023 
5.235 
6.253 

1,393 
894 
258 
207 
587 
807 

748 
435 
168 
130 
384 
384 



6.324 

3.994 

1.406 

873 

7.574 
4.199 
1,668 
1,616 

11.434 
6,763 
2.505 
2,068 
5.222 
6.212 

1.545 
861 
386 
284 
636 
909 

995 
602 
249 
129 
442 
553 



6.764 

4,152 

1.589 

958 

8.258 
4.576 
1,830 
1.766 

12,222 
7,118 
2,735 
2,267 
5,524 
6,698 

1,800 

1,001 

440 

323 

745 

1.054 

1.187 
662 
312 
205 
529 
659 



6.703 

4.089 

1.561 

985 

8.013 
4.452 
1.786 
1,664 

12.021 
7,011 
2.668 
2.206 
5.535 
6.486 

1.772 

426 
334 

710 
1.062 

1.207 
745 
250 
193 
568 
639 



6.820 
4.187 
1.523 
1.013 

8.408 
4,582 
1,920 
1,765 

12.189 
7,123 
2,644 
2,254 
5,453 
6,735 

1,901 
983 
519 
354 
764 

1,136 

1.223 
706 
310 
184 
529 
693 



6.643 
4.374 
1.509 



8.593 
4,629 
1.760 
1.892 

12.442 
7.495 
2,522 
2.297 
5.552 
6.890 

1.903 

1.065 

423 

372 

723 

1,180 

1.260 
806 
254 
151 
555 
704 



6.906 

4.403 

1.500 

953 

8.641 
4.919 
1.915 
1.732 

12.401 
7.541 
2.566 
2.199 
5.602 
6.799 

2.016 

1.115 

530 

340 

770 

1.247 

1.363 
820 
336 
196 
550 
814 



6.956 
4.307 
1.458 
1.024 

8,247 
4.863 
1,637 
1.675 

12.053 
7.446 
2.345 
2,174 
5,562 
6.491 



1.« 

1.146 
453 
354 
633 

1.164 

1,307 
740 
334 
226 
568 
730 



6 

4 
1 

i 
i 
1 
1 

11 
7 
2 
1 
6 
6 

2 

1 



1 
1 



NA Not available. ^ Beginnino 1990, t>ased on a revised edit and tabulation package. ^ Includes other races not il 
separately. ^ Includes persoru 14 to 17 years old, not shown separately. Persons of Hispank: origin may be of any i 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports, PPL- 148; and eartier years 

No. 261. Foreign (Nonimmigrant) Student Enrollment In College: 1976 to 20 

[For fall of the previous year. (179 repressnts 179.000)] 





Enrollment (1.000) 


Percent enrolled In- 


Regk>n of origin 


1976 


1960 


1965 


1990 


1995 


1996 


1999 


2000 


2001 


Engineering 


Science^ 


Busins 




1980 


1996 


1980 


1996 


1900 1 


All regions . . . 


179 


265 


342 


367 


453 


461 


491 


515 


546 


25 


16 


8 


8 


16 


Afnca 


25 


36 


40 


25 


21 


23 


26 


30 


34 


20 


14 


9 


8 


19 


Nigeria 


11 


16 


18 


4 


2 


2 


3 


4 


4 


19 


14 


9 


8 


22 


Asia ^ 


97 


165 


200 


245 


292 


308 


308 


315 


339 


32 


18 


8 


8 


16 


China: Taiwan . . . 


11 


18 


23 


31 


36 


31 


31 


29 


29 


17 


15 


15 


6 


17 


Hor>g Kong 


12 


10 


10 


11 


13 


10 


9 


8 


8 


22 


15 


9 


5 


26 


India 


10 


9 


15 


26 


34 


34 


37 


42 


55 


31 


35 


16 


6 


21 


Indonesia 


1 


2 


7 


9 


12 


13 


12 


11 


12 


27 


21 


7 


2 


21 


Iran 


20 


51 


17 


7 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


45 


30 


7 


16 


11 


Japan 


7 


12 


13 


30 


45 


47 


46 


47 


46 


7 


4 


5 


4 


19 


Malaysia 

Saudi Arabia .... 


2 


4 


22 


14 


14 


15 


12 


9 


8 


13 


34 


14 


3 


22 


3 


10 


8 


4 


4 


5 


5 


5 


5 


30 


31 


4 


4 


14 


South Korea .... 


3 


5 


16 


22 


34 


43 


39 


41 


46 


17 


11 


11 


6 


15 


Thailand 


7 


7 


7 


7 


11 


15 


12 


11 


11 


17 


16 


6 


4 


26 


Europe , •• • • 


14 


23 


33 


46 


65 


72 


74 


78 


81 


15 


9 


9 


9 


14 


Latin Amenca ^ . . . . 


30 


42 


49 


48 


47 


51 


55 


62 


64 


20 


13 


8 


6 


14 


Mexkx) 


5 


6 


6 


7 


9 


10 


10 


11 


11 


16 


16 


7 


5 


11 


Venezuela 


5 


10 


10 


3 


4 


5 


5 


5 


5 


30 


14 


8 


5 


11 


North America 


10 


16 


16 


19 


23 


23 


23 


24 


26 


8 


6 


6 


8 


13 


Canada 


10 


15 


15 


18 


23 


22 


23 


24 


25 


8 


6 


6 


8 


12 


Oceania 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


5 


5 


5 


5 


7 


6 


16 







^ Physical and life sciences. ^ Includes countries not shown separately. "^ Includes Central America. Caribbean, and S 
America. 

Source: Institute of International Educatk>n. New Yorit, NY, Open Doors, annual (copyright). 



1 68 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistk^l Abstract of tits UnlM 



No. 262. Collage Enrollmeiit— SumiiMiry by Sox, Raco and Hispanic 
Origin: 2000 



[In Ihouaancte (15f313 ii p iwiii ti 15413i000y, txoapt ptroanL As of OdolMr. Covers dvflian noninstltutional population 15 years 
old and over ervoHed in coUeges and graduate schools. Based on Current Population Survey, see text. Section 1 . Population and 
Appendix tiq 



^a 



Characteristic 



Sex 



Total 



Male Female 



Race and Hispanic origin 



White 



Non- 
Total Hispanic 



Asian and 

Pacific 

Black Islander 



Hispanic 



'-C^ I 



«*■- 



»« 



t? 



1? 

-3 



Total anfoament 

15to17yMfBOld 

18to19yMfBold 

20 to 21 years Oh) 

22 to 24 years old 

25 to 29 years oh) 

30 to 34 years ohl 

35 years ohl and over . . 

Type of school: 

2-year 

1510 19 years ohl . . . 
20 to 24 years ohl . . . 
25 years oh) and over 

♦irear 

15 to 19 years oh) . . . 
20 to 24 years old . . . 
25 years old and over 

Graduate school 

15 to 24 years ok) . . . 
25 to 34 years ohl . . . 
36 years old and over 

Public 

2-yaar 

4-year 

Graduate 



Percent of students: 
Employed fuR-time. 
Emisloyed part-time 



15^13 

149 
3.599 
3.169 
2.683 
1.962 
1.244 
2.507 

3.881 
1.232 
1.234 
1.415 

6.520 
2,478 
3.970 
2.071 

2.913 

685 

1.218 

1,009 

12,008 
3,591 
6.453 

1,964 



34.1 
30.3 



6,682 

61 

1.571 

1,472 

1,300 

644 

517 

919 



1,655 
610 
525 
519 

3,865 

VHO 

1.998 
873 

1.162 
276 
498 
389 

5,192 

1,511 

2,935 

747 



35.3 
28.8 



6.632 

87 
2.028 
1,697 
1,383 
1.118 
728 
1.588 

2,226 
622 
710 
896 

4.654 
1,483 
1.974 
1,200 

1.750 
409 
721 
620 

6,816 
2,079 
3,519 
1.218 



33.2 
31.5 



12,000 

116 
2,915 
2,590 
2.061 
1.432 

906 
1.978 

3,035 
993 
969 

1.072 

6,653 
2,010 
3,172 
1.471 

2,311 
538 
944 
830 

9.363 
2,826 
5,019 
1.520 



34.5 
32.1 



10.636 
92 
2.580 
2,333 
1,796 
1.274 
770 
1.790 

2.544 
820 
801 
923 

5,979 
1.834 
2.870 
1,277 

2.113 
476 
869 
766 

8.201 
2,365 
4,463 
1,374 



33.9 
32.1 



2.165 

19 
455 
375 
387 
326 
242 
361 



603 
170 
173 
259 

1,238 
293 
515 
427 

324 
82 

143 
99 

1.721 
541 
939 

241 



38.0 
21.5 



1.049 

12 
212 
200 
227 
188 

81 
129 



214 
64 
84 
65 

572 
160 
277 
136 

262 
66 

126 
70 

831 
198 
443 
189 



23.3 
29.1 



1.426 
25 
349 
268 
283 
166 
142 
194 



506 
180 
169 
156 

722 
183 
329 
206 

198 
60 
75 
63 

1,219 
474 
598 
146 



39.5 
31.1 



^ Indudes other races, not shown separately. ^ Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. 
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Repwts, PPL- 148 

No. 263. Higher Education Registrations in Foreign Languages: 1970 to 1998 



(A« of fall (1.111^ 



1,111.500)] 



Item 



Ragistrallofia ^ (1,000) 

lndei(1960«100) 

Byseledsd language (1.000): 

Spaniah 

FfSTKh 

German 

Mu\ 

Japanese 

Chinese 



Latin 

Russian 

Ancient Greeh 

Hebrew 

Afneriotfi Sign Language 

Portuguese 

Arabic 



1970 1974 



1977 



1980 1963 



1986 



1990 



1905 



1996 



1.111.5 946.6 933.5 924.8 

171.8 146.3 144.3 142.9 



966.0 1,003.2 1,184.1 1,138.8 1,193J 

149.3 155.0 183.0 176.0 184.5 



389.2 

359.3 

202.6 

34.2 

6.6 

6.2 

27.6 

36.2 

16.7 

16.6 

(X) 

5.1 

1.3 



362.2 
253.1 
152.1 

33.0 
9.6 

10.7 

25.2 

32.5 

24.4 

22.4 

(X) 

5.1 

2.0 



376.7 

246.1 

135.4 

33.3 

10.7 

9.8 

24.4 

27.8 

25.8 

19.4 

(X) 

5.0 

3.1 



379.4 

248.4 

126.9 

34.8 

11.5 

11.4 

25.0 

24.0 

22.1 

19.4 

(X) 

4.9 

3.5 



386.2 

270.1 

128.2 

38.7 

16.1 

13.2 

24.2 

30.4 

19.4 

18.2 

(X) 

4.4 

3.4 



411.3 

275.3 

121.0 

40.9 

23.5 

16.9 

25.0 

34.0 

17.6 

15.6 

(X) 

5.1 

3.4 



533.9 

272.5 

133.3 

49.7 

45.7 

19.5 

28.2 

44.6 

16.4 

13.0 

1.6 

6.2 

3.5 



606.3 
205.4 
96.3 
43.8 
44.7 
26.5 

25.9 

24.7 

16.3 

13.1 

4.3 

6.5 

4.4 



656.6 
199.1 
89.0 
49.3 
43.1 
28.5 

26.1 
23.8 
16.4 
15.8 
11.4 
6.9 
5.5 



X Not appftcable. ^ Includes otfter foreign languages, not shown separately. 

Source: Association of Departments of Foreign Languages, New Yorlt. NY, ADFL Bulletin, Vol. 31 , No. 2, and earlier issues 
(oopyright). 






U.& 



aMMcri AMnd or tfie IMIM Seatot: 2002 



Ediuc^X\oT\ \^^ 



No. 264. Collage Frttshmon— Summary Charactarlstics: 1970 to 2001 



[In ptrcent. •xotpl m ktdlealKl (12^ wprmnte $12300). As of taH for first-time fuNtone freshmsn in 
versities. Based on sample survey and subject to sampling error, see source] 



Characteristic 



ItTO 1060 1006 1060 1006 1060 1066 



Sex: Male 

Female 

Applied to three or more ooUeges 

Average grade in high school: 

A- to A-i- 

B-to&f 

CtoO 

D 



Political orientation: 

LJt>eral 

Middle of the road. . 

Consen/ative 

Probable field of study: 

Arts and humanities 

Biological sciences . 

Business 

Education 

Engineering 

Physical soence . . . 

Social science . . . . 

Professioruil 

Technical 



Data processing/computer programming 
Other^ 



Communications . 
Computer science 



Personal objectives— very important or essential: 

Being very well off firtancially 

Developing a meaningful philosophy of life . . 
Keeping up to date with political afnirs 



Attitudes— agree or strongly agrse: 

Capital punishment should bs abolished . . 

Legalize marijuana 

There is too much concern for the rights of 
criminals 

Abortion should be legalized 

Median family income ($1 ,000) 



52.1 


46.8 


48.9 


48.9 


45.6 


45.5 


45^ 


46.2 


47.9 


51.2 


51.1 


53.1 


54.4 


54^ 


64.7 


54J 


(NA) 


31.5 


35.4 


42.9 


44.4 


48.2 


47.7 


S0.5 


19.6 


26.6 


28.7 


29.4 


36.1 


39.8 


42.7 


42.9 


62.5 


58.2 


57.1 


57.0 


54.2 


52.3 


50.7 


50.5 


17.7 


14.9 


14.0 


13.4 


9.6 


7.7 


6.5 


6.5 


0.3 


0.2 


0.2 


0.2 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


35.7 


21.0 


22.4 


24.6 


22.9 


23.3 


23.6 


24J 


43.4 


57.0 


53.1 


51.7 


51.3 


53.1 


53.4 


SIS 


17.3 


19.0 


21.3 


20.6 


21.8 


19.9 


19.3 


18J 


(NA) 


10.5 


10.1 


10.5 


11.2 


11.8 


11.3 


1^1 


NA) 


4.5 


4.5 


4.9 


8.3 


7.0 


7.2 


6.6 


NA) 


21.2 


24.6 


21.1 


15.4 


16.4 


16.4 


16.7 


NA 


6.4 


6.9 


10.3 


10.1 


11.1 


10.6 


11.0 


NA 


11.2 


11.0 


9.7 


8.1 


8.2 


9.0 


6.7 


NA 


3.2 


3.2 


2.8 


3.1 


2.4 


2.3 


2J 


NA 


8.2 


9.4 


11.0 


9.9 


9.5 


9.7 


lao 


(NA 


15.5 


13.1 


13.0 


16.5 


14.5 


13.1 


11.6 


NA 


3.1 


2.4 


1.1 


1.2 


1.8 


1.9 


2.1 


/na 


1.7 


1.7 


0.7 


0.8 


1.2 


1.4 


1.5 


(NA 


14.0 


15.1 


15.8 


16.0 


17.3 


18.0 


17.9 


(NA) 


2.4 


2.8 


2.9 


1.8 


2.2 


2.4 


2.7 


(NAJ 


2.6 


2.4 


1.7 


2.2 


3.4 


3.7 


3.7 


36.2 


62.5 


69.2 


72.3 


72.8 


72.9 


72.1 


73.4 


79.1 


62.5 


46.9 


45.9 


45.4 


44.1 


43.0 


42.4 


57.2 


45.2 


(NA) 


46.6 


32.3 


30.2 


28.6 


2B.1 


59.4 


34.8 


27.6 


23.1 


22.0 


24.1 


26.7 


31.2 


40.6 


37.1 


21.4 


18.8 


33.4 


32.7 


32.4 


34.2 


50.7 


65.0 


ri 


65.1 


73.2 


72.3 


71.2 


66.5 


85.7 


53.7 


65.5 


59.9 


54.3 


53.2 


53.0 


12.8 


24.5 


37.3 


46.6 


54.6 


58.9 


61.6 


64.4 



NA Not available. ^ Includes other fields, not shown separately. 

Source: The Higher Education Research Institute, University of California. Los Angeles. CA. The American Fiml 
National Norms, annual. 



No. 265. Undergraduates in Postsecondary Institutions Owning Credit Can 
and Balance Due: 1999-2000 

[(16,539 rsprseents 16,530,000). Based on the 1999-2000 Poetsecondaiy Student Aid Study and subject to samping em 
for details, see source] 



Characteristic 



Total 
under- 
graduates 
(1.000) 



Numt)er of credit cards in own 
name (percent) ^ 



None 



One 



Two or 
more 



Percent B«l«nce 

with 

balance 
due^ Average 



M 



Total 

Age:* 

18 years or younger 

19 to 23 years . . . . 
24 to 29 years . . . . 
30 to 39 years .... 
40 years or older. . . 



Sex: 

Male 

Female 

Race: 

One race: White 

Black or African American 

Asian 

American Indian/Alaska Native 

Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander. 

Other race 

More than one race 

Hispanic or Latino (any race): 

Not Hispanic or Latino 

Hispanic or Latino 

Class level: 

Graduating senior 

All other undergraduates 



16.539 

1.567 
7.895 
2.806 
2.300 
1.971 

7,231 
9.308 

11.975 
2.129 
927 
177 
142 
905 
284 

14.555 

1,984 

1.510 
15.029 



29.4 

49.5 
31.6 
24.9 
22.8 
18.4 

31.6 
27.8 

28.5 
35.3 
22.8 
38.2 
27.6 
31.7 
29.7 

29.0 
32.7 

14.5 
31.0 



42.5 

37.5 
43.2 
42.7 
42.5 
43.3 

43.9 
41.3 

43.7 
36.8 
46.6 
37.1 
41.9 
38.4 
43.2 

42.9 
39.0 

48.1 
41.9 



28.1 

13.0 
25.2 
32.5 
34.8 
38.2 

24.5 
30.9 

27.8 
28.0 
30.6 
24.7 
30.5 
29.9 
27.1 

28.1 
28.3 

37.5 
27.1 



44.7 

30.1 
42.2 
54.8 
50.3 
41.3 

41.6 
47.0 

43.2 
56.3 
31.4 
49.1 
42.5 
49.9 
49.3 

43.9 
51.6 

43.6 
44.9 



3.066 

1.011 
2.103 
3.337 
4.429 
4.924 



3.166 
3.002 

3,250 
2.480 
2,642 
3.345 
2.619 
2.646 
3.062 

3.096 
2,854 

3.578 
3.002 



^ Percent of undergraduates with credit cards who typically carry a 
to Tatxjiar Presentation. * As of December 31 , 1999. 



^ Credit cards are t)iiled to the student, 
definition of n)ean and median, see GukJe 

Source: U.S. NatKxml Center for Education Statistk». Profile of Undergraduates in U.S. Postsecondary Bducaition 
1999-2000. NCES 2002-168. July 2002. 



1 70 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the UNM < 



Ho. 266. UndMignMluatcs Reported Disability SUtus by Sofoctod 
Cluinicteristic: 1999-2000 



[hi 



Based on 1h« 1999-2000 National Poalsecondary Student Aid Sun^: see source for details] 



OiaraclerlsHc 



Any disability 

or dHficulty 

reported^ 



Norw rsportsd 



Cor^sidsr self 
witfi disability 



Ooni consider 
selfwmi 
disability 



TolaL 



PERCEKT DISTRIBUTION 



Total 

18 years or younger 

19 to 23 years old . 
24 to 29 years old . 
Xto39yearsold . 
40 years or older . . 



9^ 



100.0 



90.7 



100.0 



3.6 



100.0 



1004) 



American Indtan/Alasfca Native 

Native HawalmOlher PacMc lelander 

Ottwrraoe 

More itian one race 



fvenis niQ n e si eouc au on levei. 

Hlg^ school or less 

Some poelseoondaiy education 
Bachelor's dsgree or equivalent 



5.8 


9.9 


3.1 


9.8 


36.3 


49.3 


24.5 


49.1 


15.5 


16.1 


15.3 


16.1 


19.2 


13.5 


23.7 


13.7 


23.3 


11.1 


33.4 


11.5 


39.6 


42.4 


46.2 


42.0 


60.4 


57.6 


53.8 


58.0 


70.8 


66.7 


70.8 


67.1 


10.9 


11.8 


13.0 


11.7 


9.9 


11.6 


8.0 


11.4 


2.1 


4.9 


1.1 


4.8 


1.9 


0.7 


2.5 


0.8 


0.8 


0.8 


1.4 


0.7 


1.4 


1.5 


0.8 


1.6 


2.3 


1.9 


2.5 


1.0 


40.7 


36.4 


45.1 


36.4 


24.1 


22.8 


21.6 


23.0 


35.2 


40.9 


33.3 


40.7 



^ Thoee wtK> indtoatod they fiad a long lastirtg condition, such as blindness or deafness; or a condition sulwtantially tim(t|ng 
Hie phMical activity, such as vwaHdng or lifting: or a physical, emotlonai. or mental condition lastirtg six monttw or more vvhicn 
tneds it dmcuR to do any one of the foiowing: get to school, get around campus, learn, dress, or worit at a job. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. Profile of Undergraduates in U.S. Postsecondary Education Irwtltutions. 
^m■2000. NCES 2002-168. July 2002. 

No. 267. Undergraduates in Postsecondary institutions Talcing Distance 
Education Courses: 1 999-2000 

[iBiStt miiiaema 16,539,000. Distance education courses are courses taken for credit and exclude correspondence courses. 
Msad on the 1999-2000 Poetseoondary Student Aid Sun^ and subject to sampling error see source for details] 



Characteristic 







Mode of delivery of courM(s) 




Total under- 
graduates 
(1.000) 


Percent - 

taidng 
courses 




\pai\<viii; 




Live 
interactive 


Internet Pre-recorded 


16,590 


0.4 


37.0 


M.0 


39.1 


1.567 
7.895 
2.806 
2.300 
1.971 


4.3 

6.9 

10.1 

12.5 

10.2 


41.2 
40.2 
35.2 
32.6 
36.1 


65.1 
56.9 
56.1 
63.0 
60.9 


32.3 
41.8 
42.7 
35.7 
34.2 


7.231 
9.308 


7.3 
9.2 


34.5 
38.6 


60.8 
57.9 


40.1 
38.5 


11.975 
2,129 
927 
177 
142 
906 
284 


6.6 
8.3 
6.8 
10.9 
9.7 
6.2 
9.3 


34.6 
46.9 

40.4 
52.2 

*n 

27.7 


58.2 
60.8 
69.7 
44.9 

63.6 


37.6 
37.1 
36.3 
41.1 

46.9 


14.565 
1.984 


8.6 
6.8 


36.6 
41.3 


59.2 
56.8 


38.1 
50.0 


12.258 

2,447 

809 

1.025 


8.6 

6.6 

4.5 

12.3 


38.1 
28.2 
27.9 
40.9 


57.4 
69.3 
69.8 
57.2 


39.2 
37.1 
25.4 
44.5 



Ttei 

18 vssrs or younger 

19 to 23 years old. . 
24to29 years dd. . 
30to39ys«aold. . 
40 yesrs or older . . 

IMS 

Nmsis 

Ract: 
0ns race: 



BIsck or African American 

Aaisn 

Amsrican IndUvVAIasfca Native 

Nillve HawaHan^Olher PacMc Islander 
Other race 



Htaptnic or Latino (any race): 

Not Hhpamc or Latino 

^fipsnic or LaHno 

inrtUontype: 

Pubic., r 

Privali not-tor-proAt 

Prtvaii for-profh 

Mors than one mstltutton . . 



B Base too smal to nwet statistical standards for reliabirity of a derived figure. ^ As of December 31. 1999. 

Sourer U.S. National Center fbr Education Statistics. ProAto of Lfr)dlef9ra<*iafes /n as. Poet^^ 
1999^000. NCES 2002-168. July 2002. 



Education \7\ 



08. 



SMMical AbeMd of the UnMid SfifriM: 2002 



No. 268. Higher Education Price Indexes: 1970 to 1999 

[1983slOG. For years •nding June 30. Reflects prices paid by colleges and universities] 





— 


Personnel compensation 




Contracted : 


senrices.su 


pplies, and equipniant 


Year 




Profes- 


Nonpro- 








Supplies 




Ubrwy 
aoQuiah 




Index. 




sional 


fessional 


Fringe 
bertents 




Sen/- 


and 


EouiD- 




total 


Total 


salaries 


salaries 


Total 


ices 


materials 


ment 


ttoS 


1970 . . 


39.5 


42.1 


47.7 


38.8 


24.7 


31.9 


42.8 


37.6 


41.9 


25.7 


1974 . . 


49.9 


52.8 


57.2 


50.6 


38.6 


41.4 


52.2 


46.5 


49.4 


41.6 


1975 . . 


54.3 


56.3 


60.3 


54.6 


42.9 


48.5 


56.8 


58.0 


58.3 


46.7 


1976 . . 


57.8 


60.0 


63.5 


59.0 


47.8 


51.3 


59.1 


60.7 


61.7 


52.1 


1977 . . 


61.5 


63.5 


66.4 


63.1 


52.8 


55.7 


62.6 


63.8 


64.8 


56J 


1978 . . 


65.7 


67.6 


69.9 


68.1 


58.4 


60.2 


66.6 


66.6 


69.3 


e3J2 


1979 . . 


70.5 


72.4 


74.1 


73.4 


64.5 


65.1 


71.2 


71.7 


74.7 


70.0 


1980 . . 


77.5 


78.4 


79.4 


80.2 


72.6 


75.0 


77.0 


84.6 


81.6 


77.8 


1981 . . 


85.8 


85.8 


86.3 


87.7 


81.8 


85.9 


85.2 


95.6 


89.6 


85.9 


1982 . . 


93.9 


93.5 


93.7 


94.6 


91.5 


94.9 


94.2 


100.4 


96.4 


93.5 


1983 . . 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


1984 . . 


104.8 


105.4 


104.7 


105.1 


108.3 


103.0 


104.9 


99.7 


102.3 


105.3 


1985 . . 


110.8 


112.0 


111.4 


109.2 


117.7 


107.1 


110.8 


103.0 


104.8 


111.3 


1986 . . 


116.3 


118.8 


118.2 


112.8 


127.7 


109.0 


115.1 


102.6 


107.2 


121.2 


1987 . . 


120.9 


125.4 


125.0 


116.3 


137.4 


107.4 


119.7 


99.0 


108.9 


132.9 


1988 . . 


126.2 


131.7 


130.9 


120.6 


147.2 


109.8 


123.0 


101.1 


120.5 


140.5 


1989 . . 


132.8 


139.6 


138.8 


125.3 


158.8 


112.8 


128.8 


108.3 


115.1 


153.5 


1990 . . 


140.8 


148.3 


147.6 


130.3 


171.4 


118.7 


134.0 


114.3 


119.6 


167.0 


1991 . . 


148.2 


156.5 


155.6 


135.4 


184.3 


123.3 


139.8 


116.4 


123.3 


179J 


1992 . . 


153.5 


162.4 


160.8 


140.2 


194.3 


126.9 


145.7 


115.2 


126.3 


193.9 


1993 . . 


158.0 


167.6 


165.0 


144.2 


204.3 


129.4 


149.5 


113.2 


128.6 


203.4 


1994 . . 


163.3 


173.3 


170.3 


148.2 


213.6 


133.6 


154.8 


114.3 


130.8 


213.6 


1995 . . 


168.1 


179.1 


176.1 


152.5 


221.4 


135.3 


158.0 


115.7 


133.5 


220.2 


1996 . . 


173.0 


184.1 


181.7 


157.3 


224.5 


139.9 


163.8 


130.1 


137.0 


230.9 


1997 . . 


178.4 


189.0 


187.2 


162.1 


226.7 


147.2 


167.3 


128.6 


139.3 


253.4 


1998 . . 


184.7 


195.8 


193.5 


168.0 


236.7 


151.6 


172.8 


126.2 


141.3 


266.5 


1999 . . 


189.1 


202.0 


200.7 


174.1 


239.2 


150.8 


177.0 


123.2 


143.3 


282.1 



Source: 
(copyright). 



Research Associates of Washington. Ariington, VA, Inflation Measures tor Schools. Colleges, and Ubnriaa^ 



No. 269. Federal Student Financial Assisunce: 1 995 to 2002 

[For award years July 1 of year shown to the following June 30 (35,460 represents ($35,460,000,009). Funds utiHzec 
operating costs, etc.. and represent funds given to students] 



Award year impact data 



1997 



1999 



2000 



aooi > 



FUNDS UTILIZED (mil. dol.) 

Total 

Federal Pell Grants 

Federal Supplemental Educational 

Opportunity Grant 

Federal Worit-Study 

Federal Peritins Loan 

Federal Direct Student Loan (FDSL) 
Federal Family Education Loans 

(FFEL) 

NUMBER OF AWARDS (1.000) 

Total 

Federal Pell Grants 

Federal Supplemental Educational 

Opportunity Grant 

Federal Wori<-Study 

Federal Perkins Loan 

Federal Direct Student Loan (FDSL) 
Federal Family Education Loans 

(FFEL) 

AVERAGE AWARD (dol.) 

Total 

Federal Pell Grants 

Federal Supplemental Educational 

Opporiunity Grant 

Federal Work-Study 

Federal Perkins Loan 

Federal Direct Student Loan (FDSL) 
Federal Family Education Loans 

(FFEL) 

COHORT DEFAULT RATE ^ 

Federal Pericins Loan 

FFEL/FDSL Combined Rates 



35,450 

5.445 


40,074 

6.331 


43,072 

7.233 


40,162 

7,209 


44,027 

7,976 


48,465 

9.851 


764 

764 

1.029 

8.296 


811 

906 

1.062 

9.873 


855 

913 

1.070 

10.933 


875 

917 

1.101 

9.953 


907 

939 

1.144 

10.348 


875 

1,215 

1.195 

10.635 


19.152 


21.091 


22.068 


20.107 


22.712 


24.694 


13.667 

3.612 


14,652 

3.733 


15,187 
3.855 


14,566 

3.764 


15,056 

3.912 


16,282 
4,284 


1.083 
702 
688 

2.339 


1,116 
746 
679 

2.775 


1,163 
744 
669 

3.017 


1.170 
733 
655 

2.891 


1.175 
713 
639 

2.739 


1.169 
970 
711 

2.763 


5.243 


5.603 


5,739 


5,354 


5.878 


6.355 


2.594 

1.507 


2,735 
1.696 


2,836 

1.876 


2,757 

1,915 


2,924 

2.039 


2.962 

2,299 


706 
1.087 
1.497 
3.548 


727 
1.215 
1.564 
3.558 


735 
1,1>J>8 
1,600 
3.624 


748 
1.252 
1.681 
3.443 


772 
1.318 
1.790 
3.778 


748 
1,252 
1.681 
3.649 


3.653 


3.764 


3,845 


3,756 


3.864 


3.886 


12.6 
10.4 


12.5 
8.8 


11.5 
6.9 


10.61 
5.6 


(NA) 
(X) 


•'^ 



NA Not available. X Not applk^able. ^ As of June 30. Represents the percent of borrowers entering repayment 
year shown wfK> defaulted in ttre following year. 

Source: U.S. Dept. of Education. Offk:e of Postsecondary Education, unpublished data. 



1 72 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the United 



io. 270. Institutions of Higlier Education— Cliarges: 1985 to 2001 



n dotars. EsUmaled. Fdr the entlra academic year ending In year ahown. Rgures are average charges per full-time equiva- 
mt aludent Room and board are based on full-time students] 



Acadenyc 
control anc 


Tuition and rsquired fees ^ 


Board rates ^ 


Dormitory charges 


All 


2-yr. 


4-yr. 


Other 


All 


2-yr. 


4-yr. 


Other 


All 


2.yr. 


4-yr. 


Other 


year 


institu- 


col- 


col- 


4-yr. 


institu- 


col- 


col- 


4-yr. 


institu- 


col- 


col- 


4-yr. 




tions 


leges 


leges 


schools 


tions 


leges 


leges 


schools 


tions 


leges 


leges 


schools 


NMc: 
1966. .. 


971 


584 


1.386 


1,117 


1.241 


1.302 


1.276 


1.201 


1,196 


921 


1,237 


1,200 


1990. . . 


1.356 


756 


2.035 


1.606 


1.635 


1.581 


1.728 


1.561 


1.513 


962 


1,561 


1.554 


1996. . . 


2.057 


1.192 


2.977 


2.499 


1,949 


1.712 


2.108 


1,866 


1.959 


1.232 


1,992 


2,044 


1996. . . 


2.179 


1.239 


3.151 


2.660 


2.020 


1.681 


2.192 


1.937 


2.057 


1.297 


2.104 


2.133 


1997. . . 


2,271 


1.276 


3.323 


2,778 


2.111 


1.789 


2,282 


2,025 


2.148 


1,339 


2.187 


2.232 


1998. .. 


2.360 


1.314 


3.486 


2,877 


2,228 


1,795 


2,438 


2.130 


2.225 


1,401 


2,285 


2.312 


1999. .. 


2.430 


1,327 


3.640 


2.974 


2.347 


1.828 


2.576 


2,247 


2.330 


1,450 


2.408 


2.410 


2000. . . 


2.506 


1.338 


3.768 


3.091 


2.364 


1,834 


2.628 


2,239 


2.440 


1.549 


2.516 


2.521 


2001. pre! 


2.600 


1.359 


3.983 


3.212 


2.454 


1.900 


2,687 


2.355 


2.566 


1.603 


2.656 


2,647 


'rivaie: 
1985... 


5.315 


3.485 


6.843 


5.135 


1.462 


1.294 


1.647 


1.405 


1.426 


1,424 


1.753 


1.309 


1990.. . 


8.174 


5,196 


10.348 


7.778 


1.948 


1.811 


2.339 


1.823 


1.923 


1.663 


2.411 


1.774 


1905.. . 


11,111 


6,914 


14.537 


10.653 


2.509 


2.023 


3.035 


2.362 


2.587 


2.233 


3.469 


2.347 


1996.. . 


. 11.864 


7.094 


15.605 


11.297 


2.606 


2.098 


3,218 


2.429 


2.738 


2,371 


3.680 


2.473 


1997. . . 


. 12.496 


7.236 


16.552 


11.871 


2,663 


2.181 


3.142 


2.520 


2.878 


2.537 


3.826 


2.602 


1996.. . 


. 12.801 


7.464 


17.229 


12.338 


2.762 


2.785 


3.132 


2.648 


2,954 


2.672 


3.756 


2.731 


1999. . . 


. 13.428 


7,854 


18,340 


12.815 


2.865 


2.884 


3.188 


2.765 


3,075 


2,581 


3.914 


2.850 


2000. . . 


. 14,081 


8.235 


19.307 


13.361 


2.882 


2,922 


3.157 


2.790 


3,224 


2.808 


4.070 


2,976 


2001. prel 


. . 15.064 


8.961 


20,143 


14.281 


2.989 


2.962 


3,303 


2.886 


3,370 


2,768 


4,265 


3,114 



^ For in-state students. ^ Begir>ning 1990, rates reflect 20 meals per week, rather than meals sen/ed 7 days a weeic. 
Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, annual. 

Mo. 271. Voiunury Financial Support of Higher Education: 1990 to 2001 

For school yeara ending In years shown (9,800 represents $9,800,000,000); enrollment as of fall of preceding year. 

Aoiuntary support, as defir>ed in Gift Reporting standards, excludes income from endowment and other invested funds as well as 
■■ support received from federal, state, and local governments and their agencies and contract research] 



Item 



Unit 



1990 



1 



1996 



1997 



1996 



1999 



2000 



2001 



ssHmated etipport, total . . 

Inttviduais 

Alumni 

Business corporations . . . 

Foundations 

Fundraising consortia ar>d 

other organizatior^ .... 

Religious organizations . . 

Current operations 

Capital purposes 



Enrollment, higher education V 
Support per student 

In 2000-2001 dollars 

Expenditures, higher education 
ExpendHures per student .... 

In 200(V-2001 dollars 

insHbHions reporting support . . . 

ToW support rsporled 

Private 4-year institutions .... 

Pubic 4-v«ar institutions 

2-year colleges 



Mil. dol. 

Mil. dol . 
Mil. dol . 
Mil. dol . 
Mil. dol . 

Mil. dol . 
Mil. dol . 
Mil. dol . 
Mil. dol . 

1,000 . . 
Dollars . 
Dollars . 
Bil. dol . 
Dollars . 
Dollars . 

Number. 

Mil. dol. 

Mil. dol . 
Mil. dol . 
Mil. dol . 



9,800 

4.770 
2.540 
2.170 
1,920 

700 

240 

5,440 

4.360 

12.835 
764 
1.035 
150.56 
11,730 
15,895 

1,056 

8,214 

5.072 

3,056 

85 



12,750 
6.540 
3.600 
2,560 
2,460 

940 

250 

7.230 

5.520 

14.078 
906 
1.052 
201.53 
14,315 
16.635 

1.086 

10,992 

6.500 

4,382 

110 



14,250 

7.440 
4,040 
2,800 
2,815 

940 

255 

7,850 

6,400 

14.044 
1,015 
1.145 
211.35 
15.049 
16.987 

1.104 

12,251 

7,163 

4.943 

145 



16.000 

8.500 
4.650 
3.050 
3.200 

1.000 

250 

8.500 

7.500 

14.022 
1.141 
1.259 
223.30 
15.925 
17.572 

1.061 

13,801 

8.023 

5.654 

124 



18,400 

10.000 
5.500 
3.250 
3.800 

1.050 

300 

9.000 

9.400 

14.098 
1.305 
1,418 
234.80 
16,654 
18,095 

1,034 

15,771 

9,118 

6,556 

96 



20,400 

10,740 
5.930 
3.610 
4.530 

1,190 

330 

9,900 

10,500 

14.264 
1.430 
1,520 
246.30 
17,267 
18,355 

938 

17,229 

9,848 

7,252 

129 



23,200 

12,220 
6,800 
4.150 
5,080 

1.380 

370 

11.270 

11,930 

14,311 
1.621 
1,667 
257.80 
18.014 
18,527 

945 

19.419 

11,047 

8,254 

117 



24,200 

12.030 
6,830 
4,350 
6.000 

1.450 

370 

12.200 

12.000 

14.623 
1,655 
1,655 
270.00 
18,464 
18,464 

960 

20,569 

11,391 

9.026 

152 



^ Excludes proprietary schools. 

Source: Council for Aid to Education, New York, NY, Votuntary Support of Education, annual. 

No. 272. Average Salaries for College Faculty Members: 1999 to 2001 

thousands of dollars (55.9 repreaenta $%,900). For academic year ending in year shown. Figures are for 9 months 
Miina for fuH-time faculty members in 4*year institutions. Fringe benefits averaged in 1999. $13,200 in public institutions and 
116.600 in private ir^titutions. in 2000. $14,200 in public institutions and $17,200 in private institutions; and in 2001. $14,300 in 
public institutions and $18,000 in private institutions 



Type of control and 
academic rartk 


1999 2000 2001 


Type of control and 
academic rank 


1999 2000 2001 


PuUc All ranks 


55.9 57.7 58.8 

71.3 74.4 76.1 

53.4 55.3 57.1 
44.1 45.8 47.2 
33.3 34.4 35.0 


Private: ' All ranks 


63.5 66.3 69.9 


Proiessor 


Professor 


83.9 88.4 93.2 


Associate professor 

Assistant professor 


Associate professor 

Assistant professor 


56.3 59.0 62.2 
46.8 48.8 51.7 


Instructor". 


instructor 


36.1 37.5 39.3 









* Excludes church-related colleges and uriiversities. 

Souroe: American Association of University Professors, Washington. DC, AAUP Annual Report on the Economic Status of the 
AoHMBibn. 



Educaxiotv M*^ 



UJL 



. Slatialk^al Abstract of the Un/fed Sfafias: 2002 



No. 273. Employees In Higher Education Institutions by Sex and O cc up tk 
1976 to 1999 

[In thousands (1.863.8 rs p rsssn t s 1.863.800). As of fall. Based on sun^ and subject to sampling soor SM soura^ 





Professional staff 


Year and status 


Executive, 
administrative, 
and managerial 


Faculty ^ 


Research/ 
mstruCuon 
assistants 


OlhM^ 1 

ti 




Total Total Mate Female 


Male Female 


Male Female 


Mais Fomiria 


1976. total 

Full time 

Part time 

1991. total 

Full time 

Part time 

1999. total ^ 

Full time 

Part time 


1.863J 1.073.1 74.6 26.6 

1.339.9 709.4 72.0 25.0 

523.9 363.7 2.6 1.7 

2.545.2 1.595.5 85.4 59.3 

1.812.9 1.031.8 82.9 56.2 
732.3 563.7 2.5 3.1 

2.883.2 1.950.9 83.9 76.0 

1.918.7 1.180.2 81.3 72.5 
964.5 770.7 2.6 3.5 


460.6 172.7 

326.8 107.2 

133.7 65.4 

525.6 309.7 

366.2 169.4 

159.4 131.2 

602.5 425.4 

371.0 219.9 
231.4 205.5 


106.5 53.6 
18.6 9.4 
87.9 44.2 

119.1 78.6 

132.6 107.1 

0.0 0.0 
132.6 107.1 


674 OIU) 

76.2 74.1 

11.3 16.9 

166.4 261.3 

142.2 214.8 

23.2 46.4 

207J 31SJ 

175J 2S6.7 

32.2 56.7 



NA Not available. ^ Instruction and research. ^ Data for 1 999 reflect the new classification of in s lH u Mons. Sas too 
Teto\e 257. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. FaB Staff h Posttaoondary Institutiofm, 1995 March 1996. anc 
of Education Statistics, 2001 . 

No. 274. Faculty in Institutions of Higher Education: 1970 to 1999 

[In thotisands (474 rsprsssnts 474,009), excapt parcant. As of fall. Based on sun^ and 8ut>iect to sampHng aoor, aaa 



Year 


Employment status 


Control 


Level 


Paroant 


Total Fulltime Part time 


Put)lic Private 


4-year 2-year 


Part time Public 


1970 

1975 

1980 

1985 

1989^ 

1991 

1993 

1995 > 

1997^ 

1999^ 


474 369 104 
628 440 188 
686 450 236 
715 459 256 

824 524 300 
826 536 291 
915 546 370 
932 551 381 
990 569 421 
1.028 591 437 


314 160 
443 185 
495 191 
503 212 

577 247 
581 245 
650 265 
657 275 
695 295 
713 315 


382 92 
467 161 
494 192 
504 211 

584 241 
591 235 
626 289 
647 285 
683 307 
714 314 


22 66 

30 71 

34 72 
36 70 

36 70 

35 70 

40 71 

41 70 
43 70 
43 69 



^ Data beginning 1969 not comparable to prior years. ^ In this table, data beginning in 1997 reflect the new 
of institutions. See footnote 1 . Table 257. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics, Faa Staff in Postsecondary Institutions, 7995 and 1997, Match It 
January 2000 and Dtgast of Education Statistics. 2001. 

No. 275. Salary Offers to Candidates for Degrees: 1999 to 2001 

[In dollars. Data are average beginning salaries based on offers made by tHisiness. industrial, govenvnent, 
educational employers to graduating students. Data from representative colleges throughout the United States] 



Field of study 



Bachelor's 



2000 



2001 



Master's ^ 



1999 



2000 



2001 



Doctor's 



Accounting 

Business administration/ 

management ^ 

Marketing 

Engineering: 

Civil 

Chemical 

Computer 

Electrical 



34,644 36.710 39.720 



Mechanical 
Nuclear * . 



Petroleum 

Engineering technology. 

Chemistry 

Mathematics 

Physics 



Humanities 

Social sciences ^. 
Computer science 



33.310 
31,901 

36.076 
46.929 
45.666 
45.180 

,43.275 

^42.988 

50,440 

38,182 

34,111 
37.253 
40.025 

27.861 
28,606 
44,649 



36.357 
33.373 

37.932 
48.890 
50,182 
48.613 

45.952 

^47.070 

50,367 

40.110 

35.942 
41.761 
42.455 

33.117 
30.933 
49.055 



37,844 
35,194 

40.979 
51.255 
53.653 
52,092 

,48,588 

^47,914 

54.761 

45,458 

38,744 
44.277 
48,458 

30.653 
31.634 
52.473 



38.152 39,839 43.196 

,50,095 ,50,276 50,679 
^54.530 ^45.593 ^48.833 



(NA) (NA) 

(NA) ^.866 
(NA) (NA) 



,42.265 

^52.068 

58.673 

57.162 

,51,879 
J54.000 
^55.375 

(NA) 

J38.779 
!4 1,964 
^50,552 

(NA) 

(NA) 

51,438 



,44.587 

J54.473 

^57.087 

60.828 

,53.581 

J64,986 

^.369 

(NA) 

J46.389 
J46.453 
^,722 

(NA) 

(NA) 

61.377 



44,234 
57,317 
60.974 
64,188 

,56.565 

;55.496 

^58.500 

(NA) 

J51.467 
^55,482 
^1,000 

J32.650 

^1,508 

62,312 



^58.571 
67,333 

*57.471 
70.848 

64.283 

M 

,56.885 
^.917 
^.288 



^.588 

M.161 
*77,700 

74.423 

^.830 




,62.901 
%0,237 
^46.500 




NA Not availat}le. ^ Candidates with 1 year or less of full-time nonmilitary employment. ^ For master's 
after nontechnical undergraduate degree. ^ Fewer tfian 50 offers reported. * Includes er>gineering physics 
economics. 



..of 



Source: National Association of Colleges and Employers. Bethlehem. PA. Salary Survey A Study of Baghning Olfmm, 

(copyright). 



1 74 Education 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the UnilMl 



No. 276. EariMd Dm§rmm% Confemd by Lavei and Sex: 1960 to 2000 

(In t h o m i n di (477 re p w M i rt i 477,000), •xotfit parewit. Includes Alaska and Hawaii] 



Yearendhig 


All degrees 


Assodals's 


Bachelor's 


Master's 


Rrst 
professional 


Doctor's 


Percent 
Total male 


Male Female 


Male Female 


Male Female 


Male Female 


Male Female 


1960 ^ 

1965 

1970 

1975 

1960 

1963 

1984 

1965 

1966 

1967 

1966 

1969 

1990 

1991 

1992 

1993 

1994 

1995. 

1996* 

1997^ 

19982 

1999* 

2€002 


477 65.8 

660 61.5 

1.271 59.2 

1.666 56.0 

1.731 51.1 
1.815 49.6 
1.819 49.6 

1.828 49.3 
1.830 49.0 
1.823 48.4 
1.835 48.0 
1,873 47.3 

1.940 46.6 
2.025 45.8 
2.108 45.6 
2.167 45.5 
2.206 45.1 

2.218 44.9 
2.248 44.2 
2.288 43.6 
2.296 43.2 
2.323 42.7 
2.385 42.6 


(NA (NA 
NA (NA 
117 89 
191 169 

184 217 
204 246 
203 250 

203 252 
196 250 
191 245 

190 245 
186 250 

191 264 
199 283 
207 297 
212 303 
215 315 

218 321 
220 336 

224 347 
218 341 
218 342 

225 340 


254 138 
282 212 
451 341 
505 418 

474 456 
479 490 

482 492 

483 497 
486 502 
481 510 
477 518 
483 535 

492 560 
504 590 

521 616 
533 632 
532 637 

526 634 

522 642 
521 652 
520 664 
519 682 
530 708 


51 24 

81 40 

126 83 

162 131 

151 147 
145 145 
144 141 

143 143 

144 145 
141 146 

145 154 
149 161 

154 171 
156 181 
162 191 
169 200 
176 211 

179 219 
179 227 
181 238 
184 246 
186 254 
192 265 


(NAj (NA^ 

33 2 

49 7 

53 17 
51 22 
51 23 

50 25 
49 25 
47 25 
45 25 
45 26 

44 27 

44 26 

45 29 
45 30 
45 31 

45 31 

45 32 

46 33 
45 34 
44 34 
44 36 


9 1 
15 2 

26 4 

27 7 

23 10 
22 11 
22 11 

22 11 
22 12 

22 12 

23 12 

23 13 

24 14 

25 15 

26 15 

26 16 

27 17 

27 18 
27 18 
27 19 
27 19 
25 19 
25 20 



NA Not available. ^ First-professional degrees are Included vvith bachelor's degrees. ^ Data beginning in 1996 reflect the 
r>sw d a s si ficat i on of institutions. See footriote 1 , Table 257. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, annual. 

Mo. 277. Degrees Earned by Level and Race/Ethnicity: 1981 to 2000 

r^or Mfiool year ending In year ahown. Data through 1 995 exclude some institutions not reporting field of study and are slight 
utidercounts of defuses awarded] 



Level of degree and 
race/ethnicity 




Percent 
distribution 



»'s 

WNls. non-Hispanic 

Blacfc. non-Hispanic 

Hispsnic 

Asisn or Pacific Islander 

American IndUm/Alaskan Native 
Nonrssident alien 



dagraea, 

in-HiBpani( 



non-Hispanic 
Blsck, non-Hispanic 



Asisn or Pacific IslarKJer 

American IndUvVAlaskan Native 



While, non-hUspanic 

Blacli, rKX>-Hispanic 

Hispsnic 

Asisn or Padflc Islander 

American IndiarVAIaskan Native 
Nonrssident aSen 



Doclor'a dagraaa, total. 

WhUs. norvHispanic . . 
Blsdc. nor>-Hispanic . . 



Asian or PacNic Islarxier 

Amsrfcan IndtarVAIaskan Native 
Nonr ssi dsn t alien 



ftHnroiaaalonai 

km. 



<too 



WNie, non-Hispanic 

Blaci;, non-Hispanic 

Hapsnic 

Asian or Pacific IslarKJer 

American IndtarVAtaskan Native 
Nonresident 



410,174 

339,167 

35,330 

17.800 

8.650 

2.584 

6.643 

934,800 

807.319 
60.673 
21.832 
18.794 
3.593 
22.589 

294,183 

241.216 

17.133 

6.461 

6,282 

1.034 

22.057 

32.839 

25,908 

1,265 

456 

877 

130 

4,203 



71,340 

64,551 

2.931 

1,541 

1.456 

192 

669 



429315 

355,343 

35,791 

19.407 

9,914 

2.953 

6.407 

963,311 

826.106 
57.473 
25.874 
25.395 
4,246 
29,217 

280,421 

223,628 

13.939 

6.664 

7.782 

1,256 

26.952 

32,307 
23.934 

1.154 
677 

1.106 
119 

5,317 



71,057 

63,219 

3.029 

1.884 

1,816 

246 

861 



460,263 

369,580 

35.327 

22,195 

13,482 

3.530 

6.149 

1,048.631 

884,376 
61.063 
32.844 
39.248 
4,392 
26,708 

322,465 

251,690 

15,446 

7.950 

10,577 

1.101 

35,701 

38,113 

25,880 

1,153 

788 

1,235 

99 

8.958 



70,744 

60,240 
3,410 
2,427 
3,362 
257 
1.048 



538,546 

419.323 

47,142 

36.013 

20,717 

5.492 

9,858 

1.158,788 

913.377 
87.203 
54.201 
60.478 
6,606 
36.923 

397,052 

292.784 
24.171 
12,907 
16,842 
1.621 
48.727 

44,427 

27.826 

1,667 

984 

2.690 

130 

11.130 



75,800 

59,402 
4,747 
3.231 
6.397 
412 
1.611 



559.964 

408,844 
57.405 
48,643 
27,566 
6.417 
11.079 

1,200,303 

906.305 

102,106 

70.008 

74,102 

8,418 

39,364 

439,966 

311,299 
32.344 
17,708 
21,803 
2,004 
54,828 

44,077 

27.492 

2,116 

1,284 

2,262 

192 

10,731 



78,439 

58,688 
5,332 
3.863 
8,147 
612 
1,797 



564,933 

408.508 
60,181 
51.541 
27.764 
6.494 
10,445 

1,237,875 

928.013 

107,891 

74.963 

77.793 

8,711 

40,504 

457,056 

317,999 
35.625 
19.093 
22,899 
2.232 
59,208 

44,808 

27.520 
2.220 

1,291 

2.380 

159 

11.238 



90,057 

59,601 
5.552 
3,865 
8,576 
564 
1,899 



100.0 

82.7 
8.6 
4.3 
2.1 
0.6 
1.6 

100.0 

86.4 
6.5 
2.3 
2.0 
0.4 
2.4 

100.0 
82.0 
5.8 
2.2 
2.1 
0.4 
7.5 

100.0 

78.9 
3.9 
1.4 
2.7 
0.4 

12.8 



100.0 

90.5 
4.1 
2.2 
2.0 
0.3 
0.9 



100.0 

72.3 
10.7 
9.1 
4.9 
1.1 
1.8 

100.0 

75.0 
8.7 
6.1 
6.3 
0.7 
3.3 

100.0 
69.6 
7.8 
4.2 
5.0 
0.5 
13.0 

100.0 

61.4 
5.0 
2.9 
5.3 
0.4 

25.1 



100.0 

74.4 
6.9 
4.8 

10.7 
0.7 
2.4 



in this table, data beginning in 1999 reflect the new classification of institutions. See footnote 1, Table 257. 
Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics, Digast of Education Statistics, annual. 



Education \7S 



UA 



Abstract of the Unttad Sttrtss: 2002 



No. 278. Degrees and Awards Earned Below Bachelor's liy Field: 2000 

[Covers associate degrees and other awards based on poetsecondary cunrfculums of less than 4 years in inalllultoni of Mghi 

cation] 



Field of study 



Less than 
1-year awards 



Total 



Women 



1- to less than 
4-year awards 



Total Wbmen 






Total 



V 



Total 

Agncutture and natural resources 

Architecture and related programs 

Area, ethnic, and cultural studies 

Biotogical/life sciences 

Busir^ss management and admirtlstrative 

services ^ 

Communications and communications 

techrH)k>gies 

Computer and infonmation sciences 

Construction trades 

Consumer and personal services 

Education 

Engineering and engineering techrtologies. 
English language and literature/letters . . . 

Foreion languages and literatures 

Health professions and related sciences . . 
Home ecorK)mics and vocational home 



economics 

Law and legal studies 

Ut>eral/general studies and humanities . . . . 

Library science 

Mathematics 

Mechanics and repairers 

Multi/interdisciplinary studies 

Parks, recreation, leisure, and fitness 

Physical sciences 

Precision production trades 

Protective services 

Psychology 

Public administration and services 

R.O.T.C. and military technologies 

Social sciences and history 

Theological studies, religion and philoeophy 

Transportation and material moving 

Visual and performing arts 

Undistributed and unclassified 



119.488 

1.526 

21 

227 

21 

21.898 

544 

8i9o4 

2.656 

4.353 

2.014 

4,798 

341 

291 

31.945 

6.770 

794 

339 

124 

7 

6.703 

192 

121 

163 

4.283 

9,633 

60 

392 

40 

82 

102 

8.560 

1.210 

304 



63.682 

328 

18 

165 

7 

15.266 

250 

3.221 

160 

3.246 

1.458 

901 

187 

206 

25.100 

4.981 

647 

231 

114 

1 

730 

140 

67 

54 

724 

2.087 

54 

328 

7 

35 

67 

2.171 

566 

163 



140.903 

1.918 
83 
87 
36 

24.588 

706 

9.177 

4.701 

7.055 

582 

6.618 

28 

18 

41,857 

4.243 

1.293 

1.999 

47 

7 

18.270 

188 

121 

128 

8.691 

3.220 

23 

386 

58 

565 

741 

3.118 

349 



78.483 

563 

70 

74 

18 

19.128 

301 

3.425 

224 

5.315 

539 

878 

16 

13 

36.040 

3.656 

1.092 

1.213 

41 

2 

911 

145 

62 

44 

1,327 

725 

19 

314 

39 
247 

66 

1,553 

223 



6.667 



250 

1.434 

97331 

4463 

20.450 

2.337 

9.570 

8226 

37.147 

947 

501 

84.081 

8.381 

7.265 

187,454 

96 

675 

11.614 

11.784 

855 

2.460 

11314 

16.298 

1.455 

3.656 

65 

5,136 

699 

1.021 

17.100 

2.796 



- Represents zero. ^ Includes mariteting. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Education Statistics. Digest of Education Statistics. 2001. 



No. 279. Bachelor's Degrees Earned by Field: 1971 to 2000 



Field of study 



Peroent fofiM 



1971 


1980 


1990 


1995 


2000^ 


1971 


839.730 


929.417 


1,051,344 


1,160,134 


1.237,875 


43.4 


12.672 


22.802 


12.900 


19.841 


24.247 


42 


5.570 


9.132 


9.364 


8.756 


8.462 


11.9 


2.582 


2.840 


4.613 


5.706 


6.381 


52.4 


35.743 


46.370 


37.204 


55.984 


63.532 


29.1 


114.729 


184.867 


248.698 


234,323 


257.709 


9.1 


10.802 


28.616 


51.308 


48.803 


56.910 


35.3 


2.388 


11.154 


27.257 


24.404 


36.195 


13.6 


176.307 


118.038 


105.112 


106.079 


108.168 


74.5 


50.046 


68.893 


81.322 


78.154 


72.555 


03 


64.342 


32.541 


47.519 


51.901 


50.920 


66.6 


20.536 


12.089 


12.386 


13.775 


14.968 


74.0 


25.226 


63.920 


58.302 


79.855 


78,458 


77.1 


11.167 


18,411 


14.491 


15.345 


17,779 


97.3 


545 


683 


1.592 


2.032 


1.925 


5.0 


7.481 


23.196 


27.985 


33.356 


36.104 


33.6 


1.013 


398 


77 


50 


154 


92X> 


24.937 


11.872 


15.176 


13.723 


12,070 


37.9 


6.286 


11.277 


16.267 


26.033 


27.460 


22.8 


1.621 


5.753 


4.582 


12.889 


19.111 


34.7 


11.890 


13.276 


12.068 


12.854 


15.175 


25.5 


21.412 


23.410 


16.066 


19.177 


18.385 


13.8 


2.045 


15.015 


15.354 


24.157 


24.877 


9.2 


38.187 


42.093 


53.952 


72.083 


74,060 


44.4 


5.466 


16.644 


13.908 


18.586 


20,185 


68.4 


357 


38 


196 


27 


7 


0.3 


155.324 


103.662 


118.083 


128.154 


127.101 


36.8 


30.394 


40.892 


39,934 


48.690 


58,791 


59.7 


662 


1.535 


5.628 


5.397 


6,186 


0.9 



Total 

Agriculture and natural resources .... 
Architecture and environmental design . 

Area, ethnic and cultural studies 

Biological sciences/life sciences 

Business and management 

Communications ^ 

Computer and information scier>ces . . . 

Education . 

Engineering ' 

English language and literature/letters . 

Foreign languages and literatures .... 

Health sciences 

Home economics 

Law and legal studies 

Liberal/general studies 



Library and archival scienoes . . . . 

Mathematics 

Multi/interdisciplinary studies . . . . 

Parks and recreation 

PhikMophy, religk>n. and theology . 

Physical sciences ^ 

Protective servk»s 

Psychology 

PudIk: administration and services. 

R.O.T.C. ar>d miUtary technologies. 
Social sciences ^ 



Visual and performing arts 
Unclassified * 



Z Lfss than 0.05 peroent. ^ In this table, data for 2000 reflect the new classifk:atk>n of institutkxis. See footnole 
257. ^ Includes technok>gies. ^ Includes history. * Includes preciskx> productkxi trades and transportatton and ' 
moving. 

Source: U.S. Nattonal Center for Education Statistk». Digest of Education Statistics, annual. 



1. 



//^6 Education 



U.S. Census BufMu. S\aVa«c8\MMK(w:^<A««VMhiA 



No. 280. MastCf's and Doctorate's Degrees Earned by FieW: 1971 to 2000 



M.OSI 324,301 3eT.8S 



BuUiMs managernent or 



CempuieF aniS mlorr 
fii^lsh language ar 



MrtiKM 



Pinr samnlnraKm ana marvlon . . 

n ore. and nlliaiv lecnnofdalM 
Sum w3tK»p . . 

*^M and partorming arts . . 

Vnuaam^ ..... 

DOCTORATFS DEGREES 

Tow 

tatnoin and reietM preorame . . 
Bengal Ktancavwa ulencM 



FMiai lafigul 

l*»ar»J*(|al 
UnraiHUan 



PitiMoBw 

'vtcmSrHittVian V 






2.646 

5J74 
2,306 
5,126 



K 2000 redocl Iho now dasMttcaUon o1 Insiiftniiyis. See <aatno(e 1,TaBl9 257. 

udKXi tradM and transparuuon and malsnalB movMg. 

V EOmMon StaWics, Digeal ol Edixalton SMDsMs. annual. 



t4ut46ox\ \1T 



»isvr'»r^ 



rmnnit In S«l«ctMl ProfustoH: 



I IZ.447 14,Me 1 





84 


13.1 


■Hi 


JOJ 


34! 


38,8 


'4M 


«I.B 


■4M 




3.7 IB 
OS 


sz 

3,1 


sa 


58 


S? 


53 


52 

3,784 


38.2 


£3 




1*5 
■5.4 


29.296 


41 


aa.s 


»a 


42.6 


184 


185 


IBB 
30,187 3 




2.3 


'f. 


S!S 


SI 


€i 


€ 


26.2 


26.1 


'S 



-«.,...« US N<IKHMUC«il*'toEOuc*ihxiSIMiitia. Q|pMMEdU:<ttDnSIMMIi3.avwM. 

No. 282. Participation In Adult Education: I994-9S and 1998-99 

llii IMtiHnM 1IH.543 npnHnt* IH.543.OaO). H»plp*re«M. 



:rKla%|lit 









- 




Pan 


icvannHiad 










NurnM. 




R«u«< 










Adun 


•sS 










Con 












Penwil 








^ 








(1.000> 


'f^Sm 


CFllOMi 


»ocWI 01 


tne((* o» 


-K* 










78 jet 


40 












■1: imS: : : : : 




1M.4M 


BBxn 


4« 


43 


32 


20 




^'^If 










Mll^^Sd 












56 








4, Mr* CM . 




4S!25S 


23:047 


















37,153 




51 






B 






A^M 












56 


7 




V,f* 


ft '*! WIO 0«t 




27.559 


5:328 


19 


76 








^^* 






92,946 


40 20* 


43 


34 


59 


„ 




rwu 






101.488 


4e:eie 








W 
























Hon-MWWM: 




143,879 


65.547 


46 


45 


56 






B-K> 








7:961 








IS 




Oir*. 


>*xi-HiKiwwa 


i»». !!''!' ! 


81135 


4.478 


49 


35 


49 


M 
































20.773 


















iisisas 


55,808 












os;;? 


. ' 




34:337 


12:070 


35 


45 


ss 


" 




">.■**■ 


iinWiBinnouMnold: 
















E«x.«v 






63.3« 


43.060 

4a749 


!f 


^ 


^ 


" 




Upu 


ijisssr*" 




11.078 


1,527 












ail 10 


IZ«i(MO* 






5,578 








IS 














37 


39 


52 


12 




iS!i 














S7 






JsS 


scMiM 




35:1*7 


18:220 












Jmoc 






11,377 


6.735 


59 


36 








SMMioriornlvw 










45 


83 


8 


























132.227 


70.849 


54 


















43 


38 




32 






me UDw lores 












u 







U S Ninonal Cwnv for EiluciDor SUtttHC*. 1905 ir 



1 78 Education 



Section 5 

Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons 



This section presents data on crimes com- 
mitted, victims of crimes, arrests, and 
data related to criminal violations and the 
criminal justice system. The major 
sources of these data are the Bureau of 
Justice Statistics (BjS), the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation (FBI), and the Administra- 
tive Office of the U.S. Courts. BjS issues 
several reports, including Sourcebook of 
Criminal Justice Statistics, Criminal Vic- 
timization in the United States, Prisoners 
in State and Federal Institutions, Children 
in Custody, Census of State Correctional 
facilities and Survey of Prison Inmates, 
Census of Jails and Survey of Jail Inmates, 
Parole in the United States, Capital Pun- 
isliment, and the annual Expenditure and 
Employment Data for the Criminal Justice 
System. The Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tion's major annual reports are Crime in 
the United States, Law Enforcement Offic- 
ers Killed and Assaulted, annual, and Hate 
Crimes, annual, which presents data on 
reported crimes as gathered from state 
and local law enforcement agencies. 

Legal jurisdiction and law enforce- 
ment—Law enforcement is, for the most 
part, a function of state and local officers 
and agencies. The U.S. Constitution 
reserves general police powers to the 
states. By act of Congress, federal 
offenses include only offenses against the 
US. government and against or by its 
employees while engaged in their official 
duties and offenses which involve the 
crossing of state lines or an interference 
with interstate commerce. Excluding the 
military, there are 52 separate criminal 
law jurisdictions in the United States: 1 in 
each of the SO states, 1 in the District of 
Columbia, and the federal jurisdiction. 
Each of these has its own criminal law 
and procedure and its own law enforce- 
ment agencies. While the systems of law 
enforcement are quite similar among the 
states, there are often substantial differ- 
ences in the penalties for like offenses. 

taw enforcement can be divided Into 
three parts: Investigation of crimes and 



arrests of persons suspected of commit- 
ting them; prosecution of those charged 
with crime; and the punishment or treat- 
ment of persons convicted of crime. 

Crime— There are two major approaches 
taken in determining the extent of crime. 
One perspective is provided by the FBI 
through its Uniform Crime Reporting Pro- 
gram (UCR). The FBI receives monthly and 
annual reports from law enforcement 
agencies throughout the country, cur- 
rently representing 94 percent of the 
national population. Each month, city 
police, sheriffs, and state police file 
reports on the number of index offenses, 
hate crimes and law enforcement assaults 
that become known to them. Additionally, 
data are collected for officers killed in the 
line of duty. 

The FBI Crime Index offenses are as fol- 
lows: Murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter is based on police investiga- 
tions, as opposed to the determination of 
a medical examiner or judicial body, 
includes willful felonious homicides and 
excludes attempts and assaults to kill, 
suicides, accidental deaths, justifiable 
homicides, and deaths caused by negli- 
gence; forcible rape includes forcible 
rapes and attempts; ro^^er/ includes 
stealing or taking anything of value by 
force or violence or threat of force or vio- 
lence and includes attempted robbery; 
aggravated assault includes assault with 
intent to kill; burglary includes any 
unlawful entry to commit a felony or a 
theft and includes attempted burglary and 
burglary followed by larceny; larceny 
Includes theft of property or articles of 
value without use of force and violence or 
fraud and excludes embezzlement, "con 
games," forgery, etc.; motor vehicle theft 
includes all cases where vehicles are 
driven away and abandoned but excludes 
vehicles taken for temporary use and 
returned by the taker. Arson was added as 
the eighth Index offense in April 1979 fol- 
lowing a Congressional mandate. Arson 
includes any willful or malicious burning 



081 



Law Enforcement. Courts, and Prisons \1^ 

SWMoil AbtHid or ttw UnllBd Stalm: 2002 



or attempt to burn, with or without intent 
to defraud, a dwelling house, public 
building, motor vehicle or aircraft, per- 
sonal property of another, etc. 

The monthly Uniform Crime Reports also 
contain data on crimes cleared by arrest 
and on characteristics of persons arrested 
for all criminal offenses. In summarizing 
and publishing crime data, the FBI 
depends primarily on the adherence to 
the established standards of reporting for 
statistical accuracy, presenting the data as 
information useful to persons concerned 
with the problem of crime and criminal 
law enforcement. 

National Crime Victimization Survey 
(NCVS>— A second perspective on crime 
is provided by this survey of the Bureau 
of Justice Statistics. Details about the 
crimes come directly from the victims. No 
attempt is made to validate the informa- 
tion against police records or any other 
source. 

The NCVS measures rape, robbery, 
assault, household and personal larceny, 
burglary, and motor vehicle theft. The 
NCVS includes offenses reported to the 
police, as well as those not reported. 

Police reporting rates (percent of victim- 
izations) varied by type of crime. In 1 994, 
for instance, 32 percent of the rapes/ 
sexual assaults were reported; 55 percent 
of the robberies; 40 percent of assaults; 
33 percent of personal thefts; 51 percent 
of the household burglaries; and 78 per- 
cent of motor vehicle thefts. 

Murder and kidnaping are not covered. 
Commercial burglary and robbery were 
dropped from the program during 1977. 
The so-called victimless crimes, such as 
drunkenness, drug abuse, and prostitu- 
tion, also are excluded, as are crimes for 
which it is difficult to identify knowledge- 
able respondents or to locate data 
records. 

Crimes of which the victim may not be 
aware also cannot be measured effec- 
tively. Buying stolen property may fall 
into this category, as may some instances 
of embezzlement. Attempted crimes of 
many types probably are under recorded 



for this reason. Events in which the victir 
has shown a willingness to participate In 
illegal activity also are excluded. 

In any encounter involving a personal 
crime, more than one criminal act can be 
committed against an individual. For 
example, a rape may be associated with 
robbery or a household offense, such as 
burglary, can escalate into something 
more serious in the event of a personal 
confrontation. In classifying the survey- 
measured crimes, each criminal incident 
has been counted only once-by the mos 
serious act that took place during the ln< 
dent and ranked in accordance with the 
seriousness classification system used b 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The 
order of seriousness for crimes against 
persons is as follows: Rape, robbery, 
assault, and larceny. Personal crimes tak 
precedence over household offenses. 

A victimization, basic measure of the 
occurrence of crime, is a specific crimlni 
act as it affects a single victim. The num 
ber of victimizations is determined by t( 
number of victims of such acts. Victimlz 
tion counts serve as key elements in cor 
puting rates of victimization. For crimes 
against persons, the rates are based on 
the total number of individuals age 1 2 
and over or on a portion of that popula- 
tion sharing a particular characteristic oi 
set of traits. As general indicators of the 
danger of having been victimized during 
the reference period, the rates are not si 
ficiently refmed to represent true mea- 
sures of risk for specific individuals or 
households. 

An incident is a specific criminal act 
involving one or more victims; therefore 
the number of incidents of personal 
crimes is lower than that of victimiza- 
tions. 

Courts— Statistics on criminal offenses 
and the outcome of prosecutions are 
incomplete for the country as a whole, 
although data are available for many 
states individually. The only national coi 
pilations of such statistics were made b^ 
the Census Bureau for 1932 to 1945 cox 
ering a maximum of 32 states and by th 
Bureau of Justice Statistics for 1986, 
1 988, 1 990, and 1 992 based on a natioi 
ally representative sample survey. 



1 80 Law Enforcement. Courts, and Prisons 

U.S. C«nsus BurMu. Statistical AbtHad of the Unllad 



The bulk of civil and criminal litigation in 
the country is commenced and deter- 
mined in the various state courts. Only 
when the U.S. Constitution and acts of 
Congress specifically confer jurisdiction 
upon the federal courts may civil or crimi- 
nal litigation be heard and decided by 
them. Generally, the federal courts have 
jurisdiction over the following types of 
cases: Suits or proceedings by or against 
the United States; civil actions between 
private parties arising under the Constitu- 
tion, laws, or treaties of the United States; 
civil actions between private litigants who 
are citizens of different states; civil cases 
involving admiralty, maritime, or prize 
jurisdiction; and all matters in bank- 
ruptcy. The Administrative Office of the 
United States Courts has compiled statis- 
tics on the caseload of the federal courts 
annually since 1 940. 

There are several types of courts with 
varying degrees of legal jurisdiction. 
These jurisdictions include original, appel- 
late, general, and limited or special. A 
court of original jurisdiction is one having 
the authority initially to try a case and 
pass judgment on the law and the facts; a 
court of appellate jurisdiaion is one with 
the legal authority to review cases and 
hear appeals; a court of general jurisdic- 
tion is a trial court of unlimited original 
jurisdiaion in civil and/or criminal cases, 
also called a "major trial court"; a court of 
limited or special jurisdiction is a trial 
court with legal authority over only a par- 
ticular class of cases, such as probate, 
juvenile, or traffic cases. 

The 94 federal courts of original jurisdic- 
tion are known as the U.S. district courts. 
One or more of these courts is estab- 
lished in every state and one each in the 
Distria of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Vir- 
gin Islands, the Northern Mariana Islands, 
and Guam. Appeals from the district 
courts are taken to intermediate appellate 



courts of which there are 1 3, known as 
U.S. courts of appeals and the United 
States Court of Appeals for the Federal 
Circuit. The Supreme Court of the United 
States is the final and highest appellate 
court in the federal system of courts. 

Juvenile offenders— For statistical pur- 
poses, the FBI and most states classify as 
juvenile offenders persons under the age 
of 1 8 years who have committed a crime 
or crimes. 

Delinquency cases are all cases of youths 
referred to a juvenile court for violation of 
a law or ordinance or for seriously "anti- 
social" conduct. Several types of facilities 
are available for those adjudicated delin- 
quent, ranging from the short-term physi- 
cally unrestricted environment to the 
long-term very restrictive atmosphere. 

Prisoners— Data on prisoners in federal 
and state prisons and reformatories were 
collected annually by the Census Bureau 
until 1 950, by the Federal Bureau of Pris- 
ons until 1 971 , transferred then to the 
Law Enforcement Assistance Administra- 
tion, and, in 1979, to the Bureau of justice 
Statistics. Adults convicted of criminal 
activity may be given a prison or jail sen- 
tence. A prison is a confinement facility 
having custodial authority over adults 
sentenced to confinement of more than 
1 year. A Jail is a facility, usually operated 
by a local law enforcement agency, hold- 
ing persons detained pending adjudica- 
tion and/or persons committed after adju- 
dication to 1 year or less. Nearly every 
state publishes annual data either for its 
whole prison system or for each separate 
state institution. 

SUtisticai reiiabiiity— For discussion of 
statistical collection, estimation and sam- 
pling procedures, and measures of statis- 
tical reliability pertaining to the National 
Crime Victimization Survey and Uniform 
Crime Reporting Program, see Appendix 



us 



Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons \%\ 

Buiwu. Slatistlcat Abstract of the United States: 2002 




1 82 Law Enforcement, Couns, and Prisons 



CriiiMS and Crime Rates liy IVpa of Offansa: 1 980 to 2000 



13^406,000. Data rotor to offenses known to the polioe. Raise are based on Census Bureau eeHmated 
}n as of July 1: 1900. 1900 and 2000, enumeraled as of April 1. See souree tor details. For definitions of 
section] 







Violent crime 








Property crime 














Aggra- 








Motor 






Mur- 


Forcible 


Rob- 


vated 






Larceny/ 


vehide 


Total 


Total 


der^ 


rape 


bery 


assault 


Total 


Burglary 


theft 


theft 


13.408 


1.345 


23.0 


83.0 


566 


673 


12.064 


3,795 


7,137 


1.132 


12.430 


1.328 


19.0 


87.7 


496 


723 


11.103 


3.073 


6.926 


1.103 


13.212 


1,489 


20.6 


91.5 


543 


834 


11.723 


3,241 


7.257 


1.224 


13.509 


1.484 


20.1 


91.1 


518 


855 


12.025 


3.236 


7,500 


1.289 


13,923 


1.566 


20.7 


92.5 


543 


910 


12.357 


3,218 


7.706 


1.433 


14.251 


1.646 


21.5 


94.5 


578 


952 


12.605 


3.168 


7.872 


1.566 


14,476 


1.820 


23.4 


102.6 


639 


1.055 


12.655 


3.074 


7,946 


1.636 


14,873 


1.912 


24.7 


106.6 


688 


1,093 


12.961 


3,157 


8,142 


1,662 


14.438 


1.932 


23.8 


109.1 


672 


1.127 


12.506 


2.980 


7.915 


1.611 


14,145 


1.926 


24.5 


106.0 


660 


1.136 


12.219 


2.835 


7.821 


1.563 


13.990 


1358 


23.3 


102.2 


619 


1.113 


12.132 


2.713 


7,880 


1.538 


13.863 


1.799 


21.6 


97.5 


581 


1.099 


12.064 


2.594 


7,996 


1.472 


13.494 


1.689 


19.6 


96.3 


536 


1.037 


11.805 


2.506 


7.905 


1.394 


13.195 


1.636 


18.2 


96.2 


489 


1.023 


11.558 


2.461 


7.744 


1,354 


12.486 


1.534 


17.0 


93.1 


447 


977 


10.952 


2.333 


7.376 


1.243 


11.634 


1.426 


15.5 


89.4 


409 


912 


10.208 


2.101 


6.956 


1.152 


11.606 


1.424 


15.5 


90.2 


406 


911 


10.181 


2.050 


6.966 


1.166 


5.960.0 


596.6 


10.2 


36.8 


251.1 


298.5 


5.353.3 


1.684.1 


3.167.0 


502.2 


5.224.5 


558.1 


8.0 


36.8 


209.3 


304.0 


4.666.4 


1.291.7 


2.911.2 


463.5 


5.501.9 


620.1 


8.6 


38.1 


226.0 


347.4 


4.881.8 


1.349.8 


3.022.1 


509.8 


5.675.5 


612.5 


8.3 


37.6 


213.7 


352.9 


4.963.0 


1.335.7 


3,095.4 


531.9 


5.694.5 


640.6 


8.5 


37.8 


222.1 


372.2 


5.054.0 


1.316.2 


3.151.7 


586.1 


5.774.0 


666.9 


8.7 


38.3 


234.3 


385.6 


5.107.1 


1,283.6 


3,189.6 


634.0 


5.802.7 


729.6 


9.4 


41.1 


256.3 


422.9 


5.073.1 


1,232.2 


3,185.1 


655.8 


5.896.4 


758.2 


9.8 


42.3 


272.7 


433.4 


5.140.2 


1.252.1 


3,229.1 


659.0 


5.661.4 


757.7 


9.3 


42.8 


263.7 


441.9 


4.903.7 


1.168.4 


3.103.6 


631.6 


5.487.1 


747.1 


9.5 


41.1 


256.0 


440.5 


4,740.0 


1.099.7 


3.033.9 


606.3 


5.373.8 


713.6 


9.0 


39.3 


237.8 


427.6 


4.660.2 


1.042.1 


3.026.9 


591.3 


5.274.9 


684.5 


8.2 


37.1 


220.9 


418.3 


4.590.5 


987.0 


3.043.2 


560.3 


5,087.6 


636.6 


7.4 


36.3 


201.9 


391.0 


4,451.0 


945.0 


2.980.3 


525.7 


4.927.3 


611.0 


6.8 


35.9 


186.2 


382.1 


4.316.3 


918.8 


2,891.8 


505.7 


4.620.1 


567.6 


6.3 


34.5 


165.5 


361.4 


4.052.5 


863.2 


2.729.5 


459.9 


4.266.5 


523.0 


5.7 


32.8 


150.1 


334.3 


3.743.6 


770.4 


2.550.7 


422.5 


4.124.0 


506.1 


5.5 


32.0 


144.9 


323.6 


3.617.9 


728.4 


2,475.3 


414.2 



(1.000): 



000 population: 



i nonnegligent manslaughter. 

J.S. Federal Bureau of investigation, 
(released 15 October 2001). 



Crime in the United Sfafes. annual. See also <http://wrww.fbi.govAicr/du800/ 



Crimes and Crime Rates by IVpe and Area: 2000 

a (11,606 r epteeen ts 11,606,000), except rete. Rate per 100.000 population; see headnote. Table 283. Estimated 
on reports from dty and rural law enforcement agencies representing 96 percent of the national population. For 
crfmee. see text, this section] 



B of crime 


United States 


Metropolitan 


areas ^ 


Other cities 


Rural 


areas 


Total 


Rate 


Total 


Rate 


Total Rate 


Total 


Rate 




11.606 

1.424 

16 

90 

408 

911 

10.181 
2.050 
6.966 
1.166 


4.124 
506 

6 

32 

145 

324 

3.618 
728 

2.475 
414 


9.954 

1,262 

13 

75 

389 

785 

8,693 
1.697 
5.917 
1.079 


4.428 

561 

6 

33 

173 

349 

3.867 
755 

2.632 
480 


1.020 4.485 
91 401 

1 4 

8 35 

14 60 

69 302 

929 4.084 

173 759 

711 3.125 

45 199 


631 

71 

1 

8 

5 

57 

560 

180 

339 

41 


1,864 




210 


j nonnegligent 
Mer 


4 


pe 


22 


prv i I - J ... J - - . 


16 


1 asisult 

% 


168 

1.654 




532 


•ft 


1.000 


cto theft 


122 



Appendix II. 

U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, annual. See also <http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/ciu800/ 
(released 15 October 2001). 



Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons V%^ 

statistical Abstract of the United Stafes: 2002 



No. 28S. Crime Rates I 

tOnwilM Known la Itw poHea par 
tooo (nunMrMM) a* o( July 1. For 



»y Slate, 1 998 to 2000, a 

100.000 PC 



il by lypa, 2000 

iceau Mtknatea raaUant popuMlon ■■ al M| 



Kanlui:ky . 



SaUti Caroina , . 



WuNnglon .. . 
WMVirpinfa . . 



Tolal del ' rape bery ai 



*X7 4,134 »« S,S 32.0 14S 314 



2 199 563 



.953 2, 
!875 Z 



.9 103 2T[ 



296 4 J 39 3 



,890 707 T2 JB4 



3.Sia 720 2.475 



.908 612 2.1 



567 ^208 

eeo 2.510 

BTS 2.380 

5S8 2^25 



.555 702 2.292 



,495 749 3, 
79 632 2, 



,736 907 3,23S 
470 2!Z30 



' Indudn nonnmllgert manslau 
Program admnisTered Dy FtiQ Detav'a 



iHiwortnopj 

aflJCngjM 



ien<a.pd(> (reMaaed I S Octoba< 2 



Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons 



nBuraau. StaiimcaJ Atwtixi ol *<• Uniid ShM: I 




annual. Sae also <ntip^'www tbl.BOv/ucr'cluaOIV 



Law Enforcement, Courts, and PtV%oi\v \%.^ 



No. 287. Murder Victims— Circumstances and Weapons Used or Cause of 
Deatli: 1 990 to 2000 

[Based solely on police investigation. For definition of murder, see text, this section] 



Characteristic 



1960 190S lOeO 2000 



Characteristic 



1990 199S 1 



Murders, total (1.000). 

Percent distribution 

CIRCUMSTANCES 

Felonies, total 

Robbery 

Narcotics 

Sex offenses 

Ott>er felonies 

Suspected felonies 

Argument, total 

Property or money 

Romantic triangle 

Other arguments 



20.273 20.232 13,011 12.943 

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 



Other motives. 
Unknown . . . . 



20.8 
9.2 
6.7 
1.1 
3.7 
0.7 

34.4 
2.5 
2.0 

20.8 



17.7 
9.3 
5.1 
0.2 
3.2 
0.6 

31.2 
1.7 
1.4 

28.2 



17.0 
8.1 
4.5 
0.6 
3.0 
0.5 

31.0 
1.6 
1.1 

29.2 



21.6 

10.5 
5.7 
0.7 
4.6 
0.6 

40.8 
2.1 
1.2 

37.5 



TYPE OF WEAPON 
OR CAUSE OF DEATH 

Guns 

Handguns 

Cutting or stabbing 

Blunt ot>jects ^ 

Persoruu weapons ^ 

Strangulations, 

asphyxiations 

Rre. 

All other ' 



19.4 
24.8 



64.3 

49.8 

17.4 

5.4 

5.5 

2.0 
1.4 
4.0 



21.8 
28.9 



68.2 

56.8 

12.6 

4.5 

5.9 

1.8 
0.8 
6.1 



21.0 
29.6 



21 

41 



06.2 6 

51.2 a 

13.2 i: 

5.6 I 

6.6 I 

2.3 i 

1.0 1 

5.6 < 



Refers to club, hammer, etc. ^ Hands, fists, feet. etc. ^ Includes poison, drowning, explostvee. naroolics. and unkno 
Source: U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Chime in the United States, annual. See also <ht|p://Www.fbi.govAjCf;feiui 
contents.pdf> (released 15 October 2001). 

No. 288. Murder Victims by Age* Sex, and Race: 2000 



Age 


Sex 


Race 


Total Male Female Unknown 


White Black Other Unkno 


Total 


13.230 10.032 3,160 29 

100.0 75.8 24.0 0.2 

1.342 002 430 1 
11.618 8.050 2.657 2 

226 125 100 1 

286 158 128 
89 47 42 
63 34 29 

378 284 94 
1.220 1.030 190 
2.433 2.077 356 
1.881 1.557 324 
1.522 1.176 345 1 
1.275 000 375 
1.160 825 335 

765 547 218 

507 379 128 

345 255 90 

217 153 64 

157 88 69 

162 98 64 

274 128 145 1 

270 171 73 26 


6,417 6.303 339 1 


Percent distritxjtion 

Under 18 yrs. old 


48.5 47.6 2.6 
686 604 35 


18 vrs. old and over 


5.615 5.607 301 


Infant (under 1 vr. old) 


127 89 3 


1 to 4 vrs. old 


151 126 7 


5 to 8 vrs. old 


53 30 5 


9 to 12 yrs. old 


38 23 2 


13 to 16 yrs. old 


179 186 9 


17 to 19 yrs. old 


546 633 31 


20 to 24 yrs. old 


946 1.427 47 


25 to 29 yrs. old 


748 1.065 52 


30 to 34 yrs. old 


704 773 37 


35 to 39 vrs. old 


634 593 31 


40 to 44 yrs. old 


642 475 33 


45 to 49 yrs. old 


430 303 26 


50 to 54 yrs. old 


311 174 17 


55 to 59 yrs. old 


213 114 13 


60 to 64 yrs. old 


147 58 8 


65 to 69 vrs. old 


101 49 5 


70 to 74 vrs. old 


118 41 3 


75 vrs old arKJ over 


213 52 7 


Age unknown 


116 92 3 



- Represents zero. 

Source. U.S. Federal Bureau of InvestigatkMi. Crime in the United States, annual. See also <http://www.fbl.govAjcr;ltiuil 
contents.pdf> (released 15 October 2001). 



No. 289. Homicide Victims by Race and Sex: 1 980 to 1 999 

[Rates per 100,000 resident population In specified group. Excludes deaths to nonresidents of United States. Deaths dstrf 
according to the tenth reviston of \he International Classu^cation o1 Diseases as of 1999; see text. Sectkxi 2, Vital Statislfc^ 





Homk:kJe victims 


Homk:tde rate ^ 


Year 


White 


Black 


White 


Black 




Total ^ Male Female 


Male Female 


Total ^ Male Female 


Male Fair 


1980 


24.278 10.381 3.177 
19.893 8.122 3.041 
24.932 9,147 3.006 
25.488 9.456 3.012 
26.009 9,054 3.232 
24.926 9.055 2.921 
22.895 8.336 3,028 
20.971 7.570 2.747 
19.846 7.343 2.570 
18.272 6,707 2.534 
16.889 6.162 2.466 


8.385 1.898 

6.616 1.666 

9.981 2.163 

10.131 2.187 

10.640 2.297 

10.083 2.124 

8.847 1.936 

8.183 1.800 

7.601 1.652 

6.873 1.547 

6.214 1.434 


10.7 10.9 3.2 

8.3 8.2 2.9 
10.0 9.0 2.8 

10.0 9.1 2.8 

10.1 8.6 3.0 

9.6 8.5 2.6 

8.7 7.8 2.7 
7.9 7.0 2.5 

7.4 6.7 2.3 

6.8 6.1 2.2 
6.2 5.6 2.2 


66.6 1 


1985 


48.4 ^ 


1990 


69.2 1 


1992 


67.5 1 


1993 

1994 


60.7 1 
66.1 


1995 


56.3 


1996 


51.5 


1997 


47.1 


1998 . 


42.1 


1999^ 


37.5 



separately. ^ Rate based on enumerated population figures as of April 1 for 1960 and 1! 
^ Effective with data for 1 999, causes of death are dassi^ned by The Tenth Revisk)n IntsmatI 



Includes races not sfiown 
July 1 estimates for other years. 

Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). replaong the Ninth Revision (ICD-9) used for 1979-98 data. Breaks in the conraparaUV 
some cause of death statistics result from chanoes in category titles, changes in the structure and content of \he dassnicstkx). 
changes In coding rules used to select the un<wrtying cause of death. In ICD-9, the category Homicide also includes dsMh 
result of legal intervention. ICD-10 has two separate categories for these two causes of death. Some caution should be usi 
comparing data betvraen 1998 and 1999. 

Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistk», Vital Statistics of the United States, annual: and National Vital Stat 
Reports (NVSR) (formerly Monthly Vital Statistics Report^, and unpublished data. 



1 86 Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons 

U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of itw Unllad 



. Forcible Rape— Numbttr and Rate: 1980 to 2000 

I of rape, see text, this section] 



ilBRI 


1960 


1960 


1983 


1094 


1995 


1993 


1087 


1088 


1995 


2000 


n^^MBcH 
























82,990 102,560 106.010 102;a0 
63.599 86.541 92.360 89.297 
19,391 16.019 la.SSO 12.023 


97,460 

85.249 
12^11 


96,250 

84.053 
12.197 


96,153 

84.931 

11 2?9 


93,144 
82.823 
10,321 


00^11 

79.697 

9.714 


00,198 




81.111 




9.075 


RATE 






















CaSI". ::::;::: 


36.8 
71.6 

86.3 


41.1 
80.5 

96.6 


41.1 
80.3 

96.4 


39.3 
76.7 

92.0 


37.1 
72.5 

87.1 


36.3 
71.0 

85.3 


36.9 
70.4 

84.4 


34.5 
67.4 

80.7 


32.8 
63.9 

76.5 


32.0 
62.9 


females 12 years 

r 


60.8 


ANNUAL PERCENT 
IQ£ IN RATE ^ 




population 


6.1 


8.1 


-4.0 


-4.4 


-5.6 


-2.2 


-1.0 


-4.1 


-5.2 


-2.4 


r 


6.0 


8.2 


-4.1 


-4.6 


-5.3 


-2.1 


-1.0 


-4.5 


-5.3 


-1.8 







•nis annual average from prior year shown except for 1980, from 1979 and for 1990, from 1969. 
LI.S. Federal Bureau of Inve^igation, PofHMatiorhat-Risk Rates and Selected Crime Indicators, arviual. 



. Robbery and Property Crimes by IVpe and Selected Characteristic: 
1990 to 2000 

I of crime, see text, this section] 



rfalic of offenses 



Number of offenses (1,000) 



1990 1906 1999 2000 



Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



1980 1966 1999 2000 



Average value 
lost(dol.) 



1999 2000 



lohway 
Hhouse. 

1 

oe store. 



I: 



lling instrument. 
lOfDus weapon . 



dble entry 



log the night, 
log the day . 



«hlcles 



erated machines . 



839 



359 
73 
18 
39 
62 
9 

234 
76 
61 

268 



2,150 
678 
245 

2.033 
1.041 

1,135 
1.151 



81 

82 

1,291 

1.744 

1.185 

443 

1.118 

63 

1.940 



1,304 
238 



581 



315 
71 
13 
30 
63 
9 

238 
53 
53 

236 



409 



198 
56 

9 
25 
50 

8 

163 
35 
41 

171 



1.737 
657 
201 

1.736 
859 

905 
1,000 



1,350 
605 
145 

1,394 
706 

699 
798 



51 

51 

1,205 

1,940 

964 

501 

1.004 

50 

2.235 



43 

40 

1.003 

1,789 

724 

326 

947 

46 

2.039 



1,154 
240 



856 

215 



406 



188 
57 
12 
26 
50 
9 

161 
36 
53 

159 



3.074 2.594 2.101 2,060 



1.297 
615 
138 

1,335 
715 

699 
836 



7,946 7,996 6.956 6,966 



36 

37 

959 

1,754 

677 

312 

914 

46 

2,232 



1,636 1,472 1.152 1,166 



877 
209 



256.3 220.9 150.1 144.9 



144.2 
29.5 

7.1 
15.6 
25.1 

3.8 

94.1 

30.7 

24.5 

107.7 



120.0 
27.2 

5.1 
11.4 
24.0 

3.5 

90.6 
20.1 
20.2 
90.0 



72.6 

20.2 

3.2 

9.1 

18.3 

2.9 

59.9 
12.7 
14.9 
62.3 



66.7 

20.1 

4.1 

9.3 

17.7 

3.1 

57.0 
12.8 
18.9 
56.4 



1,232.2 907.0 770.4 728.4 



864.5 

272.8 

98.7 

817.4 
418.5 

456.4 
462.8 



661.2 

250.1 

76.4 

660.6 
327.0 

344.4 
360.5 



495.0 

221.8 

53.2 

511.3 
258.7 

256.2 
292.7 



460.7 

218.7 

49.0 

474.3 
254.1 

248.3 
297.2 



3.185.1 3,043.2 2.550.7 2.475.3 



32.4 
32.8 
519.1 
701.3 
476.3 
178.2 
449.4 
25.4 
780.0 



19.4 
19.5 
458.4 
738.5 
367.0 
190.5 
382.1 
18.9 
850.5 



15.8 
14.8 
367.8 
656.1 
265.5 
119.5 
347.2 
17.0 
747.8 



12.7 
13.2 
340.7 
623.3 
240.6 
110.9 
324.6 
16.2 
793.0 



665.8 560.3 422.5 414.2 



524.3 
95.5 



439.2 
91.2 



314.1 
78.8 



311.5 
74.1 



1,131 1.127 



5 

1,441 
1,490 

P 

678 

451 
392 
165 
693 
451 
338 
1,015 
376 
912 

6,104 



858 

1.685 

679 

566 

1.243 
4.379 



856 

1.549 

627 

620 

1,231 

4.552 

(NA) 
NA) 
NA) 

(NA) 



1.458 1.458 




(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

1.378 
1.610 

P! 

727 

437 
387 
185 
692 
451 
273 
1,184 
272 
957 

6.581 



^ includes other crimes not shown separately. ^ Indudee other types of motor vehicles not shown 
J.8. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Population-at-Risk Rates and Selected Crime ln<^cators, annual. 



Law Enforcement, Courts, and Pr\soT\s Wi 

Abstract of trie United States: 2002 



No. 292. Hate Crimes— Number of Incidents, Offenses, Victims, and Known 
Offenders by Bias Motivation: 2000 



rrhe FBI collected statistics on hate crimes from 11,720 law enforcement agencies representing over 238 mlSon inhabitants m 2000. 
Hate crime offenses cover incidents motivated l>y race, religion, sexual orientation, etfinicity/national origin, and disabiity] 



Bias motivation 



Incidents 




reported 


Offenses 


84224 


9.638 


4.433 


5.300 


910 


1.093 


2.937 


3.482 


59 


64 


282 


322 


245 


339 


921 


1,180 


566 


749 


355 


431 


1.493 


1.581 


1,121 


1.177 


57 


62 


59 


62 


29 


34 


174 


189 


49 


51 


4 


6 


1.332 


1.524 


905 


1,033 


192 


227 


188 


217 


26 


26 


21 


21 


38 


38 


20 


20 


18 


18 



Victims 



Krvwn 



Total bias motivations 



Race, total 

Anti-White 

Anti-Black 

Anti-American Indian/Aleiskan native. 

Anti-Asian/Pacific IslarnJer 

Anti-multiracial group 



EthnlcltyMational origin, total . . . 

Anti-Hispanic 

Anti-ott>er ethnicity/national origin. 

Religion, total 

Anti-Jewish 

Anti-Catholic 

Anti-Protestant 

Anti-Islamic 

Anti-other reli9ious group 

Anti-multireliaious group 

Anti-atheism/agnosticism/etc . . . . 

Sexual orientation, total 

Anti-male homosexual 

Anti-female homosexual 

Anti-homosexual 

Anti-heterosexual 

Anti-bisexual 



Disability, total 

Anti-physical 
Anti-mental . 

Multiple bias . . 



15 



10.140 

5.532 

1,125 

3.609 

66 

347 

365 

1.232 
777 
455 

1.726 

1.285 

64 

62 

37 

212 

59 

7 

1.596 

1.070 

244 

233 

28 

21 

38 

20 
18 

16 



7.70S 

4.589 

1,202 

2je6 

00 
275 
157 

711 
319 

9n 

419 
33 
23 
21 
79 
22 
1 

1.474 
1.098 
177 
159 



-•4 

I 



^ The term "victim" may refer to a person, tnjsiness. institution, or a society as a whole. ^ The term "known offender" _ 
not imply that the kjentity of the suspect is known, but only that an attribute of the suspect is identified whk:h distinguishes him/V*^ 
from an unknown offender. 

Source: U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Hafa Crime Statistics, annual; and <httpy/www.ft)i.gov/ua/ciusOQ/hal84M^^ 
released 15 October 2001, and subsequent updates because of late data submissk>ns. 



No. 293. Hate Crimes Reported by SUte: 2000 

[See headnote, Table 292] 



State 



Number 
of partici- 
pating 
agencies 



Popula- 

tk>n 

covered 

(1.000) 



Agencies 
sub- 
mitting 
incklents 



Incklents 
reported 



11.720 

C) 
1 

88 

4 

722 

234 

97 

52 

2 

491 

80 

C) 

114 

46 

167 

220 

24 

315 

173 

181 

146 

341 

620 

311 

78 



237.663 

C) 


1.929 

n 


261 


1 


4.607 


22 


77 


3 


33.964 


259 


4.299 


34 


3.316 


58 


784 


9 


572 


2 


15.955 


107 


1.077 


4 


C) 


(') 


1.274 


26 


4.463 


45 


4,416 


31 


2.807 


15 


794 


24 


3.287 


38 


3.828 


8 


1.270 


9 


5.294 


33 


6.278 


100 


9,819 


156 


4,914 


55 


1.220 


1 



BJ22A 

C) 

4 

281 

3 

1.943 

102 

152 

34 

6 

240 

C) 

46 

183 

106 

34 

75 

77 

12 

28 

218 

470 

425 

169 

2 



State 



Number 
I of partk:i- 
I pating 
agencies 



Missoun 

Morrtana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire. 
New Jersey . . . 
New Mexkx) . . . 

New Yort< 

North Carolina. . 
r^rth Dakota . . 

Ohio 

Oklahoma . . . . 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . . 
Rhode Island . . 
South Carolina . 
South Dakota . . 
Tennessee . . . . 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington . . . 
West Virginia . . 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Popula- 
tion 
covered 
(1.000) 



Agencies 
sub- 
mitting li 
incktontB 



United States . 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Cok>rado 

Connectrcut .... 

Delaware 

Dist. of Columbia . 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts . . 

Mk:higan , 

Minnesota ! 

Mississippi 

^ Did not report. 

Source: U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, Hate Crime Stat^tics, annual: and <http-7/www.ft)i.gov/ucr/ciua00/hals004Xf> 
(released: 15 October 2(X)1) and subsequent updates t)ecause of late data submissk>ns. 



186 


3.843 


26 


7C^ 


102 


901 


8 


1^ 


202 


1.361 


6 


ir- 


36 


1.997 


8 


8£r 


110 


658 


20 


3Z 


564 


8.414 


241 


65? 


44 


1.084 


3 


15 


540 


18.983 


36 


606 


223 


4.794 


15 


39 


80 


580 


5 


5 


347 


7.471 


50 


255 


297 


3.444 


24 


80 


171 


3.411 


29 


142 


933 


11.449 


32 


141 


48 


1.048 


10 


48 


352 


4.009 


19 


36 


120 


752 


4 


8 


421 


5.676 


73 


237 


941 


20.609 


72 


287 


127 


2.226 


29 


75 


43 


508 


14 


19 


384 


6,981 


59 


336 


236 


5.352 


57 


242 


271 


1,679 


25 


75 


368 


5,361 


22 


47 


67 


493 


2 


9 



1 88 Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons 

U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the Unlltd 



» Crimliuil Victimizations and Victimization Ratas: 1 995 to 2000 

illor«l Crime VIctimtzalion Survey: see text, this section, and Appendix III] 



Type or crime 


Number of victimizations (1 .000) 


Victimization rates ^ 


1906 1999 1999 2000 


1995 1903 1909 2000 


«s.toW 


39.928 31.307 28,730 25.803 

10.438 8,412 7.585 8407 

10.022 8,116 7.357 6,323 

2.960 2.564 2.278 2.044 

7.061 5.553 5.079 4.279 

363 333 383 261 
252 200 201 147 
153 110 141 92 
99 89 60 55 
112 133 182 114 

1,171 886 810 732 
753 610 530 520 
224 170 189 160 
529 439 341 360 
418 277 280 212 
84 70 78 66 
335 207 202 146 

8.487 6.897 6,164 5,330 
2.050 1.674 1.503 1,293 

533 547 449 346 
1.517 1,126 1,054 946 
6.437 5.224 4,660 4.038 
1.426 1.175 996 989 
5.012 4.048 3.662 3.048 

414 296 206 274 

29.400 22.805 21.215 19.297 

5.004 4,054 3,652 3,444 

4.232 3.360 3.064 2.909 

773 674 587 534 

1.717 1.138 1.068 937 

1.163 822 806 642 

554 316 260 295 

22,769 17,703 16,495 14,916 

21.857 17.074 15,964 14,300 

911 629 532 616 


4^ 3?2 ag? jg? 


JJlJ^^^T ■ 


iMioe 


44.5 36.6 32 8 27.9 


•dvtoienoe 


12.9 11.6 10.1 9.0 


MMhreatened violence .... 
ii assault 


31.6 25.0 22.6 18.9 
1.6 1.5 17 1J2 


Ismpfed rape 


1.1 0.9 0.9 0.6 




07 05 06 04 


plsdrBpe 


0.4 0.4 0.3 0.2 


laaault . 


0.5 0.6 0.8 0.5 




5.3 4.0 3 6 3.2 


•d/jproperty taiten 

nhjry 


3.5 2.7 2.4 2.3 
1.0 0.8 0.8 7 


utk^ 


2.4 2.0 1.5 16 


rilury 


1.8 1.2 1.2 0.9 
0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 


utMury 


1.4 0.9 0.9 0.6 




37.6 31.1 27.4 23 5 


lad 


8.8 7.5 6.7 5 7 


nhjry 


2.4 2.5 2.0 1 5 


Isnad witli weapon 


6.4 5.1 4.7 4.2 
28 9 23 5 20 8 17 8 


ninor ir^ry 


6.0 5.3 4.4 4.4 


lit irriury 


22.9 18.2 16 3 13 4 


SnT^: :::::: ::::::: 


1.7 1.3 0,9 1.2 




279^ 217^ 100^ 178.1 




47.4 38.5 34.1 31 8 


^i^^f 


40.0 32.1 28 6 26 9 


torctole entry 


7.4 6 4 5 5 4 9 


1 theft 


16.2 10.8 10 8 6 




10.8 7 8 7 5 5 9 




55 30 24 27 




2159 1681 1539 1377 


4 


207 6 1621 149 132 




84 60 50 57 







picable. Per 1 .000 persons age 1 2 or older or per 1 .000 households. ^ The victimization survey cannot measure 
use of the inability to question the victim. ' Includes poclcet picking, purse snatching, and attempted purse 
* Includes thefts in whicn tfw amount taicen was not ascertained. 

LI.8. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Criminal Victimization, annual; and Criminal VIctknization 1999, Changes 1998-99 
^993-99, Series NCJ-1 62734. See also <http'yAwww.ojp.usdoj.gov/l>js/i)ub/pdf/cvOO.pdf>. 

. Victimization Rates by Type of Violent Crime and Cliaracteristic of 
the Victim: 2000 

12 years or older. Based on National Crime Victimization Survey: see text, this section, and 









Crimes of vioienoe 


















Assault 










Rape/ 
























AH 


Afl crimes 


sexual 






Aggra- 




Personal 


crime 


of violence 


assault 


Robbery 


Total 


vated 


Simple 


theft 


29.1 


27.9 


1.2 


3^ 


23.5 


5.7 


17.8 


1^ 


33.9 


32.9 


^0.1 


4.5 


28.3 


8.3 


19.9 


1.0 


24.6 


23.2 


2.1 


2.0 


19.0 


3.2 


15.8 


1.4 


61.9 


80.1 


2.1 


4.2 


53.8 


9.9 


43.9 


1.8 


67.3 


64.3 


4.3 


7.3 


52.7 


14.3 


38.3 


3.0 


50.5 


49.4 


2.1 


6.2 


41.2 


10.9 


30.3 


M.I 


36.3 


34.8 


1.3 


3.9 


29.5 


6.8 


22.7 


1.5 


22.7 


21.8 


0.8 


2.7 


18.4 


4.7 


13.7 


0.9 


14.2 


13.7 


0.4 


i2'' 


11.1 


2.8 


8.4 


'0.5 


4.9 


3.7 


^0.1 


^0.7 


2.9 


0.9 


2.0 


1.2 


28.2 


27.1 


1.1 


2.7 


23.3 


5.4 


17.9 


1.1 


353 


35.3 


1^-2 


7.2 


26.9 


7.7 


19.2 


1.9 


29.1 


20.7 


M.I 


2.8 


16.7 


5.2 


11.5 


M.8 


30.8 


28.4 


^0.5 


5.0 


23.0 


5.6 


17.4 


2.4 


28.8 


27.7 


1.2 


3.0 


23.5 


5.7 


17.8 


1.1 


62.6 


60.3 


5.2 


7.1 


48.1 


14.7 


33.4 


'2.3 


39.9 


37.8 


1.7 


4.7 


31.3 


9.5 


21.8 


2.1 


33.0 


31.8 


1.4 


3.2 


27.2 


6.1 


21.2 


1.2 


31.2 


29.8 


1.9 


4.2 


23.7 


6.2 


17.5 


J-* 


29.1 


28.5 


0.8 


2.3 


25.3 


6.2 


19.2 


'0.6 


24.7 


23.7 


JO 


3.6 


19.1 


3.8 


15.3 


1.0 


23.5 


22.3 


^0.2 


2.0 


20.2 


4.4 


15.7 


1.2 



dd.. 
dd. . 
dd.. 
dd. . 
dd.. 
dd.. 
Id over 



17.500. 
l.wNr . ■ 
S4.909. 
14.909 . 
19.909. 
^4.909. 



on 10 or fewer sample cases. 

J.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Criminal Victimization, annual; and Criminal Victimization 1999, Changes 1990-99 

993-99, series r4CJ-1 82734. See also <http7Awww.ojp.usdoj.gov/b^pub/pdf/cv00.pdf>. 



Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisofvs \%^ 

Stalistfcal Abstract of the Vrmd States: 2002 



No. 296. Victim-Offender Relationship in Crimes of Violence 
by Clianicteristics of tlie Criminal Incident: 2000 

[In percent Covers only crimes of violence. Based on National Crime Victimization Sunwy: see text, lliit 
Appendix III] 



Characteristics of incident 



Total 



Rape/ 
sexual 
assault 



Assault 



Robbery 



Total 



umImHI 



Total 



Victim/offender relationship: ^ 

Relatives 

Well-lcnown 

Casual acquaintance 

Stranger . 

Time of day: ' 

6 a.m. to 6 p.m 

6 p.m. to midnight 

Midnight to 6 a.m 

l.ocation of crime: 

At or near victim's home or lodging. 

Friend'8/relative's/neight)or'8 heme . 

Commercial places 

Paridng lots/garages 

ocnooi 



Streets other than rtear victim's home 
Other* 



Victim's activity: 

At wori( or traveling to or from work 

School 

Activities at home 

Shopping/erraunds 

Leisure activities away from home . 

Traveling 

Other 

Distance from victim's home: 

Inside home or lodging 

Near victim's home 

1 mile or lees 

5 miles or less 

50 miles or less 

More than 50 miles 

Weapons: 

No weapons present 

Weapons present 

Firearm 

Other type of weapon ^ 



100 



11 
26 
16 
47 

51 
36 
10 

29 
8 

14 
7 
13 
19 
10 

21 
12 
24 

4 

23 

9 

7 

16 
16 
18 
24 
21 
3 

73 

27 

8 

19 



100 



7 
31 
24 
38 

31 
42 
22 

39 

24 

4 
3 
4 

7 
19 

4 

3 
35 

1 
38 

8 
11 

39 

12 
11 
22 
11 
3 

94 
6 
3 
4 



100 



4 
14 

6 
76 

41 
44 
13 

26 
2 
8 

13 
5 

36 

11 

18 
4 
18 
10 
25 
20 
5 

14 
15 
25 
28 
15 
3 

42 
58 
25 
33 



100 



12 
27 
17 
44 

S3 

35 
9 

29 

9 
15 

7 
14 
17 
10 

22 

13 

24 

3 

22 

8 

7 

15 
17 
18 
24 
23 
3 

77 

23 

6 

18 



100 



8 
22 

11 
00 

48 

41 
10 

29 
9 

13 

8 

7 

24 

11 

22 

7 
24 

3 
25 
11 

8 

11 
21 
22 

18 

23 

5 

5 
95 
24 
71 



- Represents zero. ^ An aggravated assault is any assault in which an offender possesses or uses a weapon 
serious injury. ^ Excludes "don't Icnow" relationships. ^Excludes "not known and not available'' time of day. *\t\du 
on public transpoftation or inside station, in apartment yard, pari(, fiekl. playground, or ottwr areas. ' Includes knivee. ol 
objects, blunt objects, and other types of weapons. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistx». Criminal Wdimization, annual: and Criminal Victimization 1999, Changm 
with Trends 1993-99, Series NCJ-182734. See also <http7Awww.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/cv00.pdf>. 

No. 297. Property Victimization Rates by Selected Houseliold 
Cliaracterlstic: 2000 

[Victimliatlons per 1,000 houeehdds. Based on National Crime Victimization Sun^ey: see text, this sectxxi and Api 



Characteristic 



Total 



glary M 


otor vehicle theft 


31.8 


8.6 


29.4 
47.6 
32.4 


7.9 
13.2 
10.4 


41.7 
31.0 


19.7 
7.6 


61.7 
41.1 
39.3 
33.3 
32.0 
24.0 
27.7 


7.9 
9.1 
9.9 
9.5 
9.6 
10.0 
7.0 


40.9 
27.2 
29.5 


13.1 
8.1 
4.4 


26.2 
43.2 


6.7 
12.6 



Total 

Race: 

White . . 

Black . . 

Other . . 



Ethnicity: 

Hispanic 

Non-Hispanic . . . 

Household income: 
Less than $7,500 
$7,500-$ 14.999 . 
$15,000-$24.999. 
$25.000-$34.999. 
$35.000-$49.999. 
$50.000-$74.999. 
$75,000 or more . 

Residence: 

UrtMin 

Suburt>an 

Rural 



Form of tenure: 
Home owned 
Home rented 



178.1 

173.3 
212.2 
171.3 

227.0 
173.4 

220.9 
167.1 
193.1 
192.2 
192.9 
181.9 
197.2 

222.1 
163.7 
152.6 

153.4 
228.3 



Source: U.S. Bureau of Justk» Statistrcs. Criminal Victimization, annual; and Criminal Victimization 2000. Ctmngm 
Witt) Trends 1993-00, Series NCJ-182734. See also <http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/cvOO.pdf>. 



1 90 Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons 

U.S. Cerwus Bureau. Statistical Abstract of the UnHtd 



L VIolMictt by Intimate Partners by Sax, 1993 to 1998, 
and by type of Crima, 1 998 



> 00 ¥ iigd Indude muRler. rape, s«xuai assault, robbery, and 
■■e, former spouses, current boy/girlfriends, and former 
tSBCt IMS section and Appendix III Homicide data were 




and simple assault. Intimals partners involve 
Based on the National Criminal Victimization 
from the Federal Bureau of Investigation] 



wid type of crime 



AH persons 



Number 



Rate per 
100.000^ 



Females 



Number 



Rate per 
100,000^ 



Number 



Rate par 
100.000^ 



1,235.660 
1.179.360 
1.069.190 
1.030.020 
956.330 

1,033,660 

1.830 

63.490 

103.940 

187.970 

676.440 



584.2 
551.8 
495.7 
472.6 
433.8 

466.9 

0.8 

28.6 

46.8 

84.7 

304.9 



1.072.000 

1.003.180 

953.700 

879.290 

848.480 

876,340 

1.320 

63.490 

101.830 

140.050 

569.650 



962.0 
906.9 
855.8 
781.7 
747.3 

706.8 

1.2 

55.6 

89.1 

122.5 

498.4 



163.570 
176.180 
115.490 
150.730 
107.850 

157,330 



159.8 
170.4 
110.8 
142.9 
100.9 

146.2 




igura too small to meet stattsHcal standards for rsNabUity of derived figure. In this case. 10 or fewer sample 
the number of victimizations per 100.000 persons. 

; DJS. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Intlmale Partner Victimization. Series NCJ 178247, May 2000. 



I. Parsons Arrastad by Charga and Salactad Charactarlstlcs: 2000 



9,117,000. Represents arrests (not charges) reported by approximately 9,017 agencies with a total 2000 
if approximately 182 million as estimated by FBI. Age and Sex data is mandatory, while race data is optional and not 
ftad with arrest data; hence, two different total number of arrests. 





Persons anested (1.000) 


OUsnse charged 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


White 


Bladt 


Ameri- 
can 
Indian 
or 
Alaskan 
Native 


Asian 

or 

Pacific 

Islander 




9,117.0 

8.7 

17.9 

72.3 

316.6 

189.3 

782.1 

96.7 

10.7 

858.4 
71.3 

213.8 
12.6 

78.7 
184.5 
105.3 

61.4 

61.2 

1.042.3 

7.2 

91.3 

915.9 

435.7 

423.3 

421.5 

22.0 

3.7 

105.7 

93.6 

2.411.2 


7.006.2 

7.8 

17.7 

65.0 

252.9 

164.2 

501.1 

83.1 

9.1 

661.2 

43.5 

117.9 

6.3 

65.0 

155.9 

96.8 

23.2 

56.7 

858.6 

6.4 

70.9 

765.7 

335.6 

367.8 

325.5 

17.4 

3.0 

72.6 

38.6 

1.906.8 


2,020J 

0.9 

0.2 

7.3 

63.7 

25^ 

281.0 

15.5 

1.6 

197.2 

27.8 

95.9 

6.3 

13.7 

28.6 

8.5 

38.1 

4.5 

183.7 

0.8 

20.4 

150.3 

100.1 

55.5 

96.1 

4.6 

0.7 

33.1 

55.0 

504.4 


9,068.0 

7.7 

17.9 

72.1 

315.7 

188.7 

779.2 

98.3 

10.6 

856.5 
70.8 

212.0 
12.5 

78.4 
184.0 
105.0 

61.3 

60.9 

1.039.1 

7.1 

90.5 

900.1 

433.6 

421.9 

419.4 

22.0 

3.7 

105.6 

93.3 

2.400.9 


8324.0 

4.2 

11.4 

31.9 

200.6 

131.0 

519.7 

54.5 

8.1 

564.6 

48.2 

142.7 

8.0 

46.2 

139.7 

64.4 

35.6 

45.3 

667.5 

2.2 

61.2 

793.7 

371.2 

357.3 

273.9 

11.8 

2.5 

76.2 

71.2 

1.579.2 


2,528.4 

4.2 

6.1 

38.9 

107.5 

53.6 

236.8 

40.9 

2.3 

269.7 

21.2 

66.7 

4.3 

30.7 
39.8 
38.6 
24.2 

14.1 

358.6 

4.6 

26.8 

86.2 

46.1 

57.8 

136.6 

9.5 

1.1 

26.1 

16.7 

758.7 


112.2 

0.1 
0.2 
0.4 
3.5 
1.8 
9.9 
1.1 
0.1 

11.7 
0.4 
1.2 
0.1 

0.6 
2.6 
0.8 
0.5 

0.7 
5.5 

0.9 
11.9 
13.1 
4.6 
6.0 
0.6 

1.2 

1.3 

31.4 


104.4 


nd normegligent 

kMst 


0.1 


TF^—* 


0.2 




0.9 


Bdassault 


4.1 




2.3 


hefl 


12.8 


Me theft 


1.8 




0.1 


neertous crimes: 

tauHs 


9.5 


tno oountoffBitioQ 


1.0 




1.5 


IfYKOt 


0.2 


operty-buying. 
a. Dossesmna 


0.9 


n 


2.0 


: carrying, possess ing etc. . . 
)n and commercialized vice . . 
•ee (except forcible 
i prostitution) 


1.2 
1.0 

0.8 


se vfolirtiorts 


7.5 


1 


0.3 


against family ar>d children . . 
Mer tfie influence 

MS 


1.6 
8.3 
3.3 




2.1 


f conduct 


2.9 




0.1 


1 




nd loilenng law violations . . . 

B 


2.1 
4.1 


oUsnees (except traffic) 


31.6 



zero or rounds to zero. 



Includes arson. 



U.S. Fedsral Bureau of Investigation. Crinw in the United States, ennuai. See also <httpy/Www.1bi.govAx:r/CiusO(MOOcr1me1 .pdf>. 



Law Enforcement, Courts, and PrVsotvs \^\ 

Abstract of the United Statee: 2002 



No. 300. Juvenile Arrests for Selected Offenses: 1980 to 2000 

[169,439 r»prtMnts 169,439,000. Juveniles are persons under 16 years of age] 



Offense 



1060 1990 1993 1994 1996 1996 1997 1996 1996 



Number of contributing 

agencies 

Population covered (1.000) 

NUMBER 

Violent crinr>e. total 

Murder 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault . . . . 

Weapon law violations. . . . 



Drug abuse, total 

Sale and manufacturing . . 

Heroin/cocaine 

Mariiuana 

Synthetic narcotics. . . . 
Dangerous nonnarcotic 
drugs 



Possession 

Heroin/cocaine 

Mariiuana 

Synmetic narcotics. . . . 
Dangerous nonnarcotic 
drugs 



8,178 
189.439 



10,765 
204.543 



10,277 10.893 
213.705 208.035 



10.037 10.026 9.472 9.589 9,502 
206,782 195,805 194.925 194.612 195.324 



77,220 97.103 

1,475 2.681 

3.868 4.971 

38.529 34.944 

33.548 54.527 

21.203 33.123 



88.685 

13.004 

1.318 

8.878 

465 

2.345 

73.681 
2.614 

84.465 
1.524 



68.300 

24.575 

17.511 

4.372 

346 

2.346 

41.725 

15.194 

20.940 

1,155 



122,434 

3.473 

5.490 

44.598 

68.873 

54.414 

90.618 

27.635 

18.716 

6.144 

455 

2.320 

62.983 

17.726 

37.915 

1.008 



125.141 

3.114 

4.873 

47X)48 

70,106 

52.278 

124.931 

32.746 

20.327 

8,812 

485 

3.142 

92.185 

21.004 

61,003 

1,227 



123,131 

2.812 

4.558 

47.240 

88.523 

46.508 

140.236 

34.077 

19.187 

10.682 

701 

3,507 

115.150 

21.253 

82.015 

2.047 



104.455 

2.184 

4.228 

39,788 

58,255 

40,145 

148,783 

32,558 

17,465 

11,489 

614 

2,990 

116,225 

17.560 

87.712 

1,713 



100.273 

1.887 

4.127 

36.419 

57.840 

39.358 

155.444 

30.761 

15.855 

11.208 

671 

3.027 

124,683 

18.328 

94.048 

1,987 



90,201 

1,587 

3,968 

29,989 

54.837 

34.122 

148.086 

29.312 

15.094 

10,808 

813 



2,597 1,966 2,896 

118,754 112.640 12ai6S 

16,278 13,445 12.961 

91.407 89.523 96,9K 

1,916 1,581 2jaSi 



81.715 

1.131 

3,544 

26.125 

50.915 

31,307 

138,774 

26,134 

12.686 

10,770 

722 



9,904 
204J86 



78.400 

^Jm 

3,408 
24,201 
49315 

28314 

146394 
26M 
11300 

ii.r 



5.078 4.436 6.334 8.951 9.844 9.240 10.322 9.003 8.091 938 



Source: U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation. 
Cius_00/O0crime\.pdf>. 



Crtnm In the Untied States, annual. See also Wp-JNnmMLQanhBri 



No. 301. immigration and Naturalization Service Enforcement Activities: 
1990 to 2000 

[For fiscal years ending In year shown. See text. Section 8, State and Local Government Rnances aiKl Emptoymsnt ] 



Item 




1990 1994 



1996 1907 1996 1999 2000 



Deportable aliens located. 

Border Patrol 

Southwestern border 

Mexican 

Canadian 

Ottwr 



1.169.9 
1.103.4 

(NA) 

1.054.8 

5.7 

42.8 



1.094.7 

1.031.7 

979.1 

999.9 

3.4 

28.4 



Number of seizures by 

Border Patrol 

Value of seizures by Border Patrol. 
Narcotics 

Aliens expelled: 

Formal removals \ . 

Voluntary departures ^ 



17.275 9.134 
843.6 1.622.0 
797.8 1.555.7 



30.0 45.7 
1.022.5 1.029.1 



1.394.6 
1.324.2 
1.271.4 
1.293.5 
3.5 
27.2 



9.327 
2.011.8 
1.965.3 



1.650.0 
1.549.9 
1.507.0 
1.523.1 
2.7 
24.0 



11.129 
1.258.0 
1.208.8 



1.536.5 
1.413.0 
1.368.7 
1.387.7 
2.9 
22.4 



11.792 
1.094.6 
1.046.3 



1.679.4 
1.555.8 
1.516.7 
1.522.9 
2.3 
30.5 



14.401 
1.405.0 
1.340.0 



45.2 89.7 114.4 173.0 
1,313.8 1.573.4 1.440.7 1.570.1 



1.714.0 
1,579.0 
1.537.0 
1.534.5 
Z7 
41.8 



16.803 
2.004.0 
1.919.0 



180.3 
1.574.5 



1314.7 
1.676.4 
1.643.7 

1.636.fl 
2J2. 

37.3 



17 
1. 

V 






1.1 



II 



NA Not available. ^ Include deportations, exclusions, and removals. ^ Includes aliens under docket control requirid 
depart and voluntary departures not under docket control. 

Source: U.S. Immigration and Naturalizatkm Sendee. Statistk»l Yeart)ook. annual: and unpublished data. 



1 92 Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons 

U.S. Census Bureau. Statistkal AbstFSCt of the UnMsd 



No. 302. Drug \3%m by Arrestees in Mi^or U.S. Cities by IVpe of Drug 
and Sex: 2000 

[PMcanI tMlifig pocNIvv. Based on data from the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program] 



City 



Maie 



Any drug ^ Marijuana Cocaine Opiates 



Female 



Any drug ^ Marijuana Cocaine Opiates 



AJbuquerque, NM. . 

Allwita,QA 

CMcaao. IL 

Ctove&NtOH 

IMaa.TX 

Denver. CO 

Debvft. Ml 

Houston, TX 

IndtenapoHs. IN . . . 
Las Vegas. NV . . . 
Loa Angelee. CA . . 

Mtaml. FL 

New Orleans. LA . . 

New YoiK NY 

Oklahoma City. OK. 
PtdKJelphia. RA. . . 

Phoenix.AZ 

roraana, uri 

Qacnunenh), CA. . . 

Ssn Antonio. TX. . . 

San Diego. CA. . . . 

SanJoee. CA . . . . 

SsotHe, WA. 

Tucson, AZ 

VtaiNnglon, DC. . . 




57.5 
71.7 
79.5 
68.2 
38.8 
70.8 
70.6 
51.7 
72.3 
60.8 
64.6 

oo.t 
74.9 
67.2 
59.3 
65.9 
69.4 

66.4 
66.7 
(NA) 
70.7 
(NA) 



18.4 
26.3 
26.4 
24.0 
20.9 
33.8 
24.2 
26.7 
38.3 
25.3 
31.5 
(NA) 
28.0 
28.2 
44.7 
22.2 
23.1 
26.2 

(NA) 
27.2 
29.4 
(NA) 
28.5 
(NA) 



41.4 
57.6 
59.2 
52.0 
23.9 
46.9 
42.4 
31.7 
45.4 
27.4 
33.1 
(NA) 
41.1 
53.0 
27.2 
40.7 
35.0 
29.9 

(NA) 
26.1 
7.8 
(NA) 
49.6 
(NA) 




NA Not avaiiat)le. ^ Includes other drugs not shown separately. 

Source: U.S. Nalionai Institute of Justice. 2000 Annual Report on Drug Use Among Adult and Juvenile Anestees. June 2001 . 

No. 303. Drug Arrest Rates for Drug Abuse Violations, 1990 to 2000, 
and oy Region, 2000 

[Mi per 100,000 Inhabitants. Based on Census Bureau estimated resident population as of July 1. except 1980, enumerated 
Mof AprH 1. For composition of rsgions. see map, inside front cover] 





2000 


Offenee 


Region 




North- 
1990 1905 1900 Total east Midwest South West 


Drug arraat rata, total 


435.3 564.7 583.7 587.1 751.2 397.0 542.3 638.4 


^iH andrOr manufacture l ^ < . i 


139.0 140.7 126.4 122.7 2017 97 8 97 5 106 5 


Haroin or cocaine ^ 


93.7 83.7 70.1 60.8 1391 18 4 49 5 42 4 


Mariuana 


26.4 32.7 33.8 34.2 48.0 34 3 29 29 7 


SynOielic or manufactured drugs .... 
CMwr dangerous nonnarcotic drugs . . 

Poasassion 


2.7 3.9 6.3 6.4 3.5 2.4 11.4 5.4 
16.2 20.3 16.1 21.3 11.0 42.7 7.6 31.1 

296.3 423.9 457.3 464.4 549.6 299.2 444 8 529 9 


Heroin or cocaine ^ 


144.4 157.4 142.4 138.7 196.1 50.7 123.5 170.0 


kterfjuana 


104.9 192.7 237.0 244.4 322.3 192.7 276.0 182,5 


SynOietlc or manufactured dnjgs .... 
Oher dangerous nonnarootK drugs . . 


6.6 8.5 10.4 12.0 6.8 6.4 16.3 14.4 
40.4 65.4 67.6 69.4 24.4 49.3 28.9 163.0 



Indudee otl>er derivatives such as morphine, heroin, and codeine. 



Source: U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
cius.0OftX)crime1.pdf> (released 15 Octotwr 2001). 



Crime in the United States, annual. See also <http7/www.fl>i.gov/ucr/ 



No. 304. Federai Drug Seizures by Type of Drug: 1990 to 2001 

Ibi pounds. For fiscal years ending In year shown. Reflects the combined drug seizure effort of the Drug Enforcement 
Administration, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the U.S. Customs Sen/ices. and t>eginning Octotwr 1993 the U.S. Border 
Fatrol within the jurisdction of ttie United States as well as maritime seizures t>y the U.S. Coast Guard. Based on reports to the 
fsderal-wide Drug Seizure System, which eliminates duplicate reporting of a seizure involving more than one federalagency] 



Drug 



1900 



1994 



1995 



1997 



1900 



1999 



2000 



2001 



Total ., 

^^fnk\. , . . . 

Cocaine. . . 

Camabia.. , 
Mariuana 
HaafSi., 



745.002 

1.515 

211.828 

531,660 

514.723 

16.937 



1.336.561 

2.830 

285.230 

1.048.502 

1.047.284 

1.218 



1.662.562 

3.407 

244.888 

1.414.267 

1,382.366 

31.902 



1,737,647 

3.014 

283,490 

1,451,142 

1,397,976 

53,167 



1.762.806 

3.592 

221.375 

1.537,839 

1,536,170 

1,669 



2,084482 

3.214 

259,895 

1,821,773 

1,821,241 

532 



2,665,709 

2,538 

291,144 

2.372,027 

2,370,269 

1,758 



2,906,772 

3,694 

234.982 

2.748,096 

2,724,204 

23.892 



2,920.326 

5,530 

245.793 

2,669,003 

2,668,656 

347 



Source: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, unput)iished data from federal-wide Drug Seizure System. 



U& 



Law Enforcement, Courts, and PHsoas \9^ 

SlBlMical Abstract of the United States: 2002 



No. 305. Authorized Intercepts of Communication— Summary: 1980 to 2001 

[Data for jurisdictions with statutes authorizing or approving interoeption of wire or oraJ communication] 



Item 



1990 1905 1990 1993 1994 1905 1906 1907 1990 1990 2000 2001 



Jurisdictions: ^ 

With wiretap statutes 

Reporting interceptions 

Intercept applications authorized 
Intercept installations 

Federal 

State 

Intercepted communications, 

average * 

Incriminating 

Persons arrested ^ 

Convictions ^ 



28 32 40 41 41 41 46 45 45 45 45 

22 22 25 23 18 10 24 24 26 20 20 

564 784 872 976 1.154 1.058 1.140 1.186 1.329 1,350 1,100 

524 722 812 936 1.100 1.024 1.035 1.094 1,245 1.277 1.130 

79 235 321 444 549 527 574 563 562 596 472 

445 487 491 494 551 497 461 531 683 662 067 

1.058 1.320 1.487 1.801 2.139 2,028 1.969 2.081 1.858 1.921 1.709 

315 275 321 364 373 459 422 418 350 390 402 

1.871 2.469 2.057 2.428 2.852 2.577 2.464 3.086 3.450 4.372 3,411 

259 660 420 413 772 494 502 542 911 054 730 



46 

25 

1.401 

1.406 

481 

924 



Major offense specified: 

(jumbling 

Drugs 

Homicide and assault 
Other 



199 

282 

13 

70 



206 

434 

25 

119 



116 

520 

21 

215 



96 
679 

28 
173 



86 
876 

19 
173 



95 
732 

30 
201 



114 

821 

41 

173 



98 
870 

31 
187 



93 
955 

55 
228 



60 
978 

62 
250 



49 
894 

72 
175 



3.003 
732 

82 

1.107 

52 

100 



^ Jurisdictions include federal government, states, and District of Columbia. ^ Average per authorized inrtaMrtion. 
^ Based on information received from intercepts installed in year shown; additional arrests/convictions wM occur in m J b u &q j m it 
years t)ut are not shown here. 

Source: Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts. Report on Applications tor Orders Authorizing or Approving the tMeroepHon 
of Wire, Oral or Electronic Communications (}N\reliap Report), annual. See also <httpy/www.uscourts.gov/wirstap01/2001wttxt.pdl>. 
(issued April 2002). 

No. 306. Background Checlcs for Firearm Transfers: 1994 to 2000 

[In thousarKta (29.963 repre — t H » 29,963.000), exo^pt ralM. For "Interim period" of 1994 to November 29. 1996. camrnd 
handgun purchases from licensed firearm dealers; beginning November 29. 1998 (effective date for the Brady Handgur> Violenoe 
Prevention Act. P.L. 103-159.1993) covers the transfer of both handguns and long guns from a federal firearms K 
as purchases from pawrishops and retaH gun shops] 



Inquiries and rejections 


1994- 
2000.— 

period ^ 




Interim period 






Pemnanenl Brady 


1994 


1995 


1990 


1997 


1990* 


1990 2000 


Applications and rejections: 
AoDlications received 


29.953 

689 

2.3 


2.483 

62 

2.5 


2,706 
41 
1.5 


2.593 

70 

2.7 


2.574 

69 

2.7 


3.277 

90 

2.9 


6.621 7.600 


Abislications rejected 


204 153 


Rejection rate 


2.4 2.0 







^ Represents from the Inception of the Bradv Act on March 1 . 1994 to 2000. ^ For period January 1 to November 29. 1990. 
Counts are from the National Instant Criminal uacicground Check System and may include multiple transactions for the same 
application. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Bad(ground Checks for Firearm Transfers, 1999. Series NCJ 180082. June 2000. 



No. 307. Firearm Use by Offenders: 1997 

[In percent Based on the Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctiorwi Facilities] 



Characteristic 


Percent 
of prison 
inmates 


Characteristic 


Percent 
of prison 
inmates 


Characteristic 


Peroent 
of prison 
inmates 




Fed- 
State era! 


Fed- 
State oral 


Fed- 
State eral 


TYPE OF FIREARM ^ 


18.4 14.8 
15.3 12.8 

1.3 1.3 

2.4 2.0 

30.2 35.4 
3.1 2.9 


Dnjg 

Public order 

Gender 
Male 


8.1 8.7 
19.1 27.3 

19.1 15.5 
7.3 6.2 

29.4 19.1 

16.5 15.5 
14.8 13.6 

22.3 9.5 


Recidivist 


17.2 18.4 


Total 

Handgun 


Use of firearm ^ 

Fired 


100 100 
40.1 12.8 


Rifle 


Killed/injured victim . . 
Other 




Shotgun 


Female 

Age 

24 or younger 

25-34 


22.8 5.0 
26.3 7.8 


CHARACTERISTIC OF 
INMATES WHO 


Brandished to 

Scare sonf>eone . . . 
Defend self 


73.2 46.2 
48.6 29.3 
41.1 24.9 


CARRIED FIREARMS 

Offense 

Violent 

Property 


35 or older 

Criminal history 
First-time offender . . . 





^ Percents of subtotals may not add to totals because inmates may have had more ttuin one firearm. ^ Peroents of 
may not add to totals because inmates may have used a firearm in more ttian one way. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Fiream^ Use by Offenders. Series NCJ 189369. November 2001. 
<http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/t>is/pub/pd(/fuo.pdf>. 



1 94 Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons 

U.S. Census Bureau. Statistical AbstFMt of the UnMtd 



No. 3M. General Purpose Law Enforcement Agencies— Number and 
Employment: 2000 

[Includea botti fcdMkna and pafMima amployaaa. Slala poioa data are baaad on tha 40 prinwy law anioioaniani 
ttiat pafform prtmafiy oourt-folatod duliaa. 





Number of- 
agencies 






Number of empkyyeee 






Type of agency 




Fun time 




Part time 




Total 


Sworn 


QvUian 


Total 


Sworn 


avMan 


TbW 


15,801 

12,674 

3.078 

49 


565.881 

295.636 

87.028 


OT0,8S0 

440.888 

163.423 

56.348 


287.886 

124.993 

132.212 

30.680 


86,030 

62.197 

23.025 

817 


37,872 

27.361 

10.426 

95 


48,174 


Local poRoe 


34.863 


onGfHi ..••••*••••••••• 


12.509 


Stale polfoe 


722 







The number of agendes reported here is the result of a weighted sample and not an exact enumeration. 
Source: U.S. Bureau of Justwe Statistics. Lbw Enforcement Management and AdmkUstntive Statistics. 2000, Series NCJ 
184481. November 2001. 

No. 309. U.S. Population Who Had Conua With Police by Age and Reason for 
Conua: 1999 



(43,706 leiiieeeim 43,706,000. Persons having multiple contacts or more than one reason for any single contact appear in table 
more than once; therefore, number of contacts may not add to total. Covers persons 16 years oio arxl over, based on the 
Poice-Pubic Contact Survey of 94,717 persons: data subject to sampling variat)(lity] 



Reason for contact 



Number 
having 
contact 
(1.000) 



f^umber of persoro who had contact with police per 1.000 residents 

16 to 18 to 20 to 25 to 30 to 40 to 
All per* 17 19 24 29 39 49 50 years 

sons yeare yeare yeare years yeare yeare andover 



Cofil a ct wMi DoHee far anv reason 

Respondent contacted pdioe: 

Report a crime 

Witness to a crime 

Ask for aaaistanoe 

ftoport a nelghborfiood problem . . 

Witness to an accident 

Ottier reaeons 



Poice contacted raapor)dent: 

Motor vehicle slop 

Involved in an accident. . . 
Witness to an aoddent . . . 

Victim of crime 

WHnees to a crime 

Suspect in a crime 

Serve warrant 

Crime prevention 

Other 



43,706 

8.373 
1.383 
5.227 
4,001 
1.674 
4.031 

22.732 

3.355 

766 

921 

1.368 

1.314 

345 

615 

5.289 



40 
7 

25 

19 
8 

19 

109 
16 

4 
4 
7 
6 
2 
3 
25 



24 

7 

14 

5 

5 

10 



343 

51 
9 

19 
9 

13 

18 



30 


225 


29 
^3 


29 

7 


4 


9 


10 


8 


22 


1 


4 


'2 


39 


39 



313 

56 

9 

28 

15 
10 
18 

203 

21 

5 

9 

11 

16 

6 

2 

29 



263 

52 
9 
33 
22 
11 
20 

155 
18 

4 
4 
7 
6 
2 
3 
27 



50 

9 

34 

27 
10 
21 

121 
14 
4 
5 
7 
5 
2 
4 
29 



222 

48 
8 

29 

25 
9 

27 

102 
15 
4 
4 
8 
5 
1 
3 
30 



131 

23 
3 

17 

14 
5 

15 

54 

13 
2 
2 

4 

? 

2 

16 



• Repreaents zero. ^ Based on a sample of 10 or fewer cases. 

Soiffoe: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Contacts betwew Potice and the Public FUxSngs from the 1999 National Survey, 
Series NCJ 184957. Febnjary 2001. 



No. 310. Drivers Stopped by Police by Sex, Race, and Ethnicity by Age and 
Cause: 1999 

[19,277 is|iieaaiHs 19,277,000. Covers drivers 16 years old and over. Persoro having multiple contacts or more tttan one reason 
lor «iy based on the Police-Public Contact Sunrey of 94.71 7 persons; data subject to sampling variat)ility] 





Orivere stopped at 
least once 


Reason police gave for traffic stop— percent distribution 


Charactsristic of driver 


Percent of 
Number aH drfvers 


Roadside 

dt^eck for Driver sus* OVher 

Vehicle drinidng Record pectedof traffic 

Speeding defect drivers check something offense 


Aldrfveia, total .... 

Male 


19,277 10.3 

11.722 12.5 
7,555 8.2 

14.846 10.4 

2.232 12.3 

1.615 8.8 

584 8.7 

2.032 18.2 
5.560 16.8 
4.526 11.3 
3.764 9.4 
2.094 7.7 
1.302 3.8 


61.2 11.4 2.3 9.2 2.3 22.7 

49.3 12.5 2.5 8.3 3.0 23.6 


Female 


54.1 9.6 1.9 10.6 1.4 21.3 


While 


53.7 10.4 2.5 9.1 2.3 21.0 


aad(.... . 


43.4 13.4 H.4 11.0 2.4 28.1 


Hopanic 


42.1 15.4 M.3 9.7 3.0 27.9 


oKr^.:..:.... ... 


45.6 15.9 M.2 U.O 2.3 ^30.7 


i;tol9yeareold 

Sto29yeareold 

30to39yeareold 

J0to49yeareold 

Sio58yearsold 

w years old arKJ over. . . 


52.3 12.1 0.7 4.4 6.1 23.6 
53.5 13.5 2.0 7.2 2.3 20.8 

51.4 11.5 2.1 10.2 1.8 22.2 

51.0 10.4 2.6 9.8 1.6 23.4 
48.8 8.8 3.8 13.4 1.8 22.6 

43.1 7.6 3.3 13.2 M.4 29.9 



Based on a sample of 10 or fewer cases. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, Contacts t)etween Police and the Public Findings from the 1999 National Survey, 
Seriee NCJ 184967. Febnjary 2001 . 



US 



Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisoas \^S 

Abatrad of «ie UrMid SttMee: 2002 



No. 31 1. Justifiable Homicide by Poiice and Poiice Officers Murdered 
by Feions: 1 980 to 1 998 

[The killing of a felon is considered justified when it is done to prevent the Imminent detth or serious txxfly injury to ttw 
another person. Excludes negligent homicides, justifiable homicides by private citizens, and murders in which ttw vteim ii 
one other than an ofTicer slain in the line of duty] 





Felons killed by poiKe in justifiable homk:kJes 


Polkse offkMTB kWed by falom 


Year 


Num- 


— 




Percent of killed fetons 




Num- 


— 


Percent of nwRlsfid 
ollioera 












Other 






Ottior 




ber 


Rate^ 


IMale 


Female 


Whtte 


Black 


race 


ber 


Rate^ 


White 


pftfH 


race 


1980 


457 


2.49 


97.8 


2.2 


51 


48 


1 


104 


26.44 


86.5 


13.5 


_ 


1981 


381 


2.06 


99.2 


0.8 


54 


45 


1 


91 


22.86 


84.6 


14^ 


1.1 


1982 


376 


2.00 


98.1 


1.9 


52 


46 


2 


92 


22.81 


83.7 


15^ 


1,1 


1983 


406 


2.14 


99.0 


1.0 


54 


44 


2 


80 


17.80 


83.0 


12.5 


3.6 


1984 


332 


1.73 


97.9 


2.1 


58 


41 


1 


72 


15.41 


84.7 


13.9 


1.4 


1985 


321 


1.65 


97.8 


2.2 


61 


35 


4 


78 


16.57 


89.0 


10.3 


1.3 


1986 


298 


1.52 


98.7 


1.3 


58 


40 


2 


66 


13.87 


89.4 


10.6 


- 


1987 


296 


1.50 


98.0 


2.0 


64 


34 


2 


74 


15.40 


90.4 


9.6 


• 


1988 


339 


1.70 


98.2 


1.8 


59 


39 


2 


78 


16.06 


91.0 


9.0 


• 


1989 


362 


1.80 


95.9 


4.1 


60 


38 


2 


66 


13.30 


89.4 


10.6 


- 


1990 


379 


1.88 


96.6 


3.4 


62 


36 


2 


66 


12.61 


80.0 


18.5 


1.5 


1991 


359 


1.76 


95.8 


4.2 


54 


43 


3 


71 


13.26 


87.3 


1i7 


oja 


1992 


414 


2.01 


97.8 


2.2 


60 


38 


2 


64 


11.76 


82.3 


16.1 


1.6 


1993 


453 


2.17 


96.9 


3.1 


55 


42 


3 


70 


12.64 


85.7 


14.3 


« 


1994 


459 


2.18 


95.9 


4.1 


57 


40 


3 


79 


14.07 


84.2 


15.0 


1.3 


1995 


382 


1.80 


98.7 


1.3 


59 


38 


3 


74 


12.61 


83.8 


12J2 


4.1 


1996 


355 


1.65 


97.7 


2.3 


61 


37 


2 


61 


10^ 


80.0 


14.5 


5.5 


1997 


361 


1.66 


96.7 


3.3 


63 


35 


2 


70 


11.32 


80.0 


16.9 


ai 


1998 


367 


1.67 


97.5 


2.5 


62 


35 


3 


61 


9.51 


86.9 


11.5 


1.6 


- Represents 


zero. ^ 


Rate per 1,000.000 persons. 


2 Rate per 100,000 » 


vompolkx 


> officers. 









Source: U.S. Bureau of Ju8tk:e Statisttes, Policing and Homicide, 1976-98: JustHiable Homicide by RoMoe, PoUoe 
Murdered by Felons, Series I^CJ 180987, March 2001 . 



No. 312. Law Enforcement Officers Kiiied and Assauited: 1990 to 2000 

[Covers offwers killed fek>nk>usly and aockientally in line of duty; includes federal officers. For composition of regkma, 
inside front cover] 



Item 



1990 



1993 



1994 



1995 



1 



1997 



1 



OFFICERS KILLED 



Total killed 

l^rtheast 

Mktwest 

South 

West 



Puerto Rico 

Outlying areas, foreign 
countries 



Feloniously killed . . . 
Firearms 

l-iandgun 

Rifle 

Shotgun 

Knife 

Bomb 

Personal weapons 

Other 

AcckJentally kiiied . . . 



133 

13 
20 
69 
23 

8 



66 

57 

48 

8 

1 

3 

2 

4 
67 



ASSAULTS 
Population (1.000) ^ . 



Nunf^t>er of— 
Agencies represented 
Polk» offrcers 



Total assaulted . . . 

Firearm 

Knife or cutting instrument 
Otfier dangerous weapon 
Hands, fists, feet, etc . . . 



72,091 

3.651 

1.647 

7.423 

59,370 



129 

12 
27 
57 
22 

11 



70 
67 
51 
13 
3 



3 
59 



141 

17 
30 
54 
31 

9 



79 

78 

66 

8 

4 



1 
62 



133 

16 
19 
63 
32 



1 

74 

62 

43 

14 

5 

2 

8 

2 

59 



112 

17 
21 
46 
18 

10 



61 

57 

50 

6 

1 

1 

1 

2 

51 



132 
14 
25 
55 
31 



70 
67 
49 
12 
6 
2 

1 

62 



142 

6 

19 

70 

36 

9 



61 

58 

40 

17 

1 

1 

1 

1 
81 



107 
11 
17 
56 
22 

1 



42 
41 
25 
11 
5 



1 
65 



i; 



13 
33 

67 
10 



51 
47 
33 

10 

4 
1 



3 
84 



197,426 197,551 215.501 191.759 165.264 184.825 193.098 196.315 204,509 



9.343 8.814 10,246 8.503 7.803 8.120 8.153 8.174 
410.131 424,054 469,426 428.379 371.964 411,015 452,361 470.145 



8.940 
452331 



62.933 

3,880 

1,486 

7,155 

50.412 



64,967 

3.174 

1.510 

7.197 

53,086 



57.762 

2.354 

1.356 

6.414 

47.638 



46,608 

1.878 

871 

5,069 

38.790 



52.149 

2,110 

971 

5.800 

43.268 



60,673 

2.126 

1,098 

7,415 

50.034 



55.026 

1,783 

990 

7.302 

44.861 



1.740 

1.015 

6.132 

47.502 



• Represents zero. ^ Represents the number of persons covered by agencies shown. 

Source: U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted, annual. 



1 96 Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons 

U.S. Census Bureau. Statistk^ Abstract of the UfriM 



^k^. 313. U.S. Supreme Couit-<ases Filed and Disposition; 1980 to 2000 

(SMutory tonii off court boglns first Mondiy In OctolMr] 



Action 



1980 1980 1994 1965 1986 1997 



1996 



2000 



Total 




ondockot 
ondockot. . 



From prior toim 

Oockolod during present term .... 

Cssss acted upon ^ 

Granted review 

Denied, dtemissed. or withdrawn 
Summarily dsddsd 

Cases not acted upon 

PMJper caeee on docket 

Cases acted itfxxi 

Granted review 

Denied, dismisssd, or withdrawn 
Summarfly decided 

Cases not adad upon 

Ork^ CMSon docket 

Cases dtaposed of during term . . . 

Total caMaavattaMe 

for apQumaiit •..••••..«■• 

Cases dtaposed of 

Cases argued 

Cases dismisssd or remsndsd 
without aigument 

Cases remaining 

Cases deckled oy signed opinton . . . 
Cases deckled ty per curiam opinton. 
hkjmber of signed opkntom 



5,144 


6^16 


8.100 


7.565 


7,602 


7,692 


8.063 


8.446 


8.985 


2.749 


2.351 


2,515 


2.456 


2.430 


2.432 


2.387 


2.413 


2.305 


527 


365 


377 


361 


375 


347 


326 


321 


351 


?,??? 


1.966 


2,138 


2.095 


2.055 


2.085 


2.061 


2.092 


1.954 


2.324 


2.042 


2.185 


2.130 


2.124 


2.142 


2.092 


2.096 


2.024 


167 


114 


83 


92 


74 


75 


72 


78 


85 


1,999 


1.802 


2.016 


1.945 


1.955 


1.990 


1.940 


1.958 


1.842 


90 


81 


52 


62 


66 


36 


44 


34 


63 


425 


309 


330 


326 


306 


290 


295 


317 


281 


2.371 


3.951 


5.574 


5.098 


5.165 


5.253 


5.689 


6.024 


6.651 


2.027 


3.436 


4.963 


4.514 


4,613 


4.616 


4.951 


5,273 


5,736 


17 


27 


10 


13 


13 


14 


9 


14 


14 


1,968 


3.368 


4,955 


4.439 


4.582 


4.581 


4.926 


5,239 


5.658 


32 


28 


14 


55 


15 


14 


11 


16 


61 


344 


515 


591 


564 


552 


637 


738 


751 


915 


24 


14 


11 


11 


7 


7 


7 


8 


8 


7 


3 


2 


5 


2 


1 


2 


- 


2 


264 


201 


136 


146 


140 


138 


124 


124 


136 


162 


131 


97 


93 


92 


97 


94 


87 


89 


154 


125 


94 


90 


90 


96 


90 


83 


86 


8 


6 


3 


3 


2 


1 


4 


4 


3 


102 


70 


39 


52 


48 


41 


30 


37 


49 


144 


121 


91 


87 


87 


93 


84 


79 


83 


8 


4 


3 


3 


3 


1 


4 


2 


4 


123 


112 


82 


75 


80 


91 


75 


74 


77 



- neprseenta zero. ^ Includes esses granted review end carried over to next term, not shown separately. 
Souroo: Office of the Cleric. Supreme Court of the Unitod Statss. unput)lished data. 



No. 314. U.S. District Courts— Civii Cases Commenced and Pending: 
1998 to 2001 



[Fbr 



andtog June 30] 



Type of case 



Cases commenced 



1996 



2000 



2001 



Cases pending 



1990 



1990 



2000 



2001 



Contract acttons ^ ., 

Recovery of overpayments ^ 

Real property acttons 

Tort acttons 



Ksonalinfury 

ParaonsTlrvury product 
Isbllty^ 



Othsr personal injury . . . 
Personal property damage . 

Acttons under statutes ^ . . . . 

Civi rights 

Emptoyment 

Bankruptcy suits 

Commsrce (ICC rates, stc.) 
Environments! matters. . . . 

Prisoner pedttons 

ForfeHure sthJ penalty . . . . 

Labor laws ^ . 

P i ot e ctad property rights ' . 
Sacurftiss commodities snd 



Social security laws. . . 

Tax tuils 

Freedom of information 



261.262 

44,205 
15.188 

5.655 
52.218 
48.356 

28,325 
9,718 

20.031 
3.862 

159.172 
42.750 
23.804 

3.906 
528 

1.007 
55.120 

2.431 
15.039 

7.660 

2.166 

13.955 

1.733 

436 



251.911 

46.721 
18.822 

5.787 
39.785 
35.962 

17.196 
7.413 

18.766 
3.823 

159.205 

41,453 

22.948 

3,875 

650 

882 

56,037 

2.207 

14.325 

8.082 

2.684 

14.511 

1.280 

350 



263.049 253.354 



54.494 
25.636 

6,481 
40,877 
36,867 

15,349 
7,893 

21,518 
4.010 

161.187 
41.226 
21.404 

3.378 

1,007 

894 

57,706 

2.246 
14,229 

8.745 

2,500 

14.365 

938 

335 



45.438 

16.116 

7.296 
34.071 
30.194 

12.569 
5.656 

17,625 
3.877 

166.535 
40.979 
21,121 

3,012 
554 

1.794 
59.159 

2,143 
14.880 

8,143 

3,152 

17.530 

961 

350 



269.119 

32.403 
6.129 

3,971 
84.073 
80.114 

50.838 
1,576 

29.276 
3.959 

148.630 
46.718 
27.097 

2,921 
510 

1.602 
44,905 

1.959 
11,807 

7.037 

2,998 

14.844 

1.507 

416 



246,920 249.602 



35.415 
9.733 

3.931 
63.683 
59.899 

31,927 
1.686 

27,972 
3.784 

158.163 
45.348 
26.043 

2.597 
486 

1.406 
42.302 

1.787 
11.265 

7.344 

3.538 

14.407 

1,254 

386 



38,262 
12,107 

4.249 
63.116 
59.232 

31,772 
4.949 

27,460 
3.884 

144.053 

44.259 

24,456 

2.555 



1.355 
43.560 

1.772 
11.267 

7,858 

3.578 

13,667 

1.068 

380 



252.522 

35,773 
8.833 

5,471 
60.392 
56.500 

29.857 
6.074 

26,643 
3.892 

150.876 
43.921 
23.908 

2.267 
463 

2.268 
46.520 

1.715 
11.569 

7.570 

4.250 

16.191 

984 

377 



^ InckJdes oltwr types not shown sepsrately. ^ Includes enforcement of judgments in student loan cases, and overpayments 
of vot e rans beneflts. ' Includes copyright, potent, snd trademart( rights. 



Source: Admki i st ra tlve Office of the U.S. Courts, Stat^tiaU TiMes for the Federal Judiciary, annual. 



UL& 



Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons \^1 

AMrad of «ie UrMBd Sliaiss: 2002 



SIS. U.S. DIsiHa Courts— Offfmdcrs Convicted and 
and Length of Scntance: 2000 



SantONCsod to Pffson 



Most tenousoffenM 
of convicUon 



Total* 

P'lCAtfuXi olf«ntM . . . . . 
Pr jujdulent offenses ^ 



Embeutement 
Frsud^ 



Forgery .... 
Omer offenses ' 



Larceny . 

Drug offenses ' 

Possession 

Trafficking and 

manufacturing 

Public-order offenses . . 
Regulatory offenses. . 

Other offenses 

Weapons 

Immigration . . . . . 

Tax law violations * 

Misdemeanors 



Offenders corwicted 



vX)nviciea onerKiers 
sentenced to prison 



68,196 
2.557 

12.454 

10.386 

917 

8.177 

86 

2.058 

1.394 

24.206 
1.931 

22.275 
19.908 

1.376 
18.530 

4.196 

11.125 

655 

8.961 



50^1 

2.360 
7.462 
6.272 

506 

5.006 

41 

1.190 

689 

22.352 

1.719 

20.633 

16,896 

847 

16.249 

3.834 

10.073 

356 

1.356 



(mo.) 



16.7 
815 

24.2 
22.5 

14.8 
23.5 
19.1 
33.2 
27.3 
75.5 
80.8 

75.1 
45.8 

26.4 

465 
91.4 



18.5 
104 



^ Total nuiy include offenders for iwfKHn offense category could not be detemiined. ' Indudee olliimi not shoen 
irately. ^ bxdudes tax fraud. * Includes tax fraud. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Compendium of Federal Justice Statistics. 1999, Series NCJ 186179. AprI 2001. 



No. 316. Faderai Prosecutions of Public Corruption: 1980 to 2000 

[As of Dec. 31. Prosecution of persons wtK> tiave corrupted public office in violation of Federal Criminal Sistulee] 



Prosecution status 



1980 1985 1998 1992 1993 1994 1998 1998 1907 1998 1908 2000 



TotaJ: ^ 
indicted . . . . 
Convicted . . 
Awaiting trial. 



Federal officials: 
Indicted .... 
Convicted . . 
Awaiting trial. 



State officials: 
Indicted . . . . 
Convicted . . 
Awaiting trial. 

Local officials: 
Indicted . . . . 
Convicted . . 
Awaiting trial. 



727 
602 
213 


1,157 
997 
256 


1.176 

1.084 

300 


1.169 

1.061 

360 


1.371 

1.362 

403 


1.165 
969 
332 


1.051 
878 
323 


984 
902 
244 


1.057 
853 
327 


1.174 

1.014 

340 


1.134 

1.066 

329 


1.000 
930 
3Z7 


123 

131 

16 


563 

470 

90 


615 
583 
103 


624 
532 
139 


627 
595 
133 


571 
488 

124 


527 
438 
120 


456 

459 

64 


459 

392 

83 


442 

414 

85 


480 
480 
101 


441 

422 

02 


72 
51 
28 


79 
66 
20 


96 
79 
28 


81 
92 
24 


113 

133 

39 


99 
97 
17 


61 
61 
23 


109 
83 
40 


51 
49 
20 


91 
58 

37 


115 
80 
44 


g2 

91 
37 


247 

168 

82 


248 

221 

49 


?57 

225 

98 


232 

211 
91 


309 
272 

132 


248 

202 

96 


236 

191 

89 


219 

190 

60 


255 

169 
118 


277 

264 

90 


237 

219 
95 


211 
183 

00 



Includes individuals wtK) are neither public officials nor employees but wtio were Involved with put)lic officials or 
in violating the law, not shown separately. 

Source: U.S. Department of Justice. Federal Prosecutions of Corrupt Putylic Officials. 1970- 1960 and Report to 
the Activities and Operations of ttw PiMc Intefyity Section, annual. 



1 98 Law Enforcement, Couits, and Prisons 

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the IMltd 



Eipandtlu'e per cspna (cmIbisI 



Bysl«m piolKtuin 



■■d on Conut BuBUi, Currant Populatton Repots, Serlea P-25. No. 1045. at ol MarcTi 1i 



Law Enforcement, Courts, and PilsoR". \^ 



No. 318. Delinquency Cases Disposed by Juveniie Courts by Reeson for 
Referrai: 1 989 to 1 999 

[In thousands (1.220 r sprsss n ts 1.220,000), exo^pt rals. A delinquency offense is an act oommMod by a juvenile for wMoh 
adult could be prosecuted in a criminal court. Di8p(»rtion of a case involves taking a definite action such as waiving •>• ctM 
criminal court, dismissing ttie case, placing the youth on probation, placing the youth in a facHlty for deWnquentt. or auoh 
as fines, restitution, and convmurdty service] 



Reason for referral 



1980 1090 1991 1992 1993 1994 1985 1996 1907 1908 



All delinquency offenses 

Case rate 



1.220 1.317 1.413 1.483 1.522 1.688 1.788 1^28 1^14 1,70 

48.3 51.4 54.1 55.5 55.7 60.0 62.5 64.0 62 J 60^ 



57^ 



Violent offenses 

Criminal homicide. . 

Fordbie rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault , 



Property offenses. . . 

Burglary 

Larceny 

Motor vehicle theft 
Arson 



Delinquency offenses . . 

Sirnple assault 

Vandalism 

Drug law violations . . 
ObirtriKnion of justice. 
Other 2 



78 


94 


106 


114 


118 


132 


137 


132 


111 


103 


88 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


5 


5 


6 


6 


7 


7 


7 


7 


6 


8 


4 


23 


28 


32 


33 


35 


38 


40 


38 


34 


29 


25 


48 


59 


66 


72 


73 


84 


87 


85 


89 


86 


56 


535 


564 


616 


620 


594 


609 


830 


639 


610 


560 


488 


134 


145 


155 


160 


151 


146 


142 


146 


139 


129 


115 


327 


341 


382 


382 


372 


392 


424 


433 


412 


388 


323 


67 


71 


71 


70 


62 


62 


54 


52 


50 


44 


30 


7 


7 


7 


8 


8 


10 


11 


9 


9 


8 


9 


606 


659 


692 


749 


810 


926 


9oo 


1.058 


1.093 


1.100 


1.110 


115 


132 


143 


182 


177 


198 


218 


232 


258 


262 


257 


85 


99 


113 


119 


119 


130 


127 


127 


119 


118 


112 


78 


71 


65 


73 


92 


131 


166 


184 


190 


102 


103 


75 


80 


74 


78 


94 


111 


121 


139 


150 


150 


173 


255 


278 


297 


317 


328 


356 


367 


375 


379 


377 


378 



^ Number of cases disposed per 1,000 youth (aoes 10 to 17) at risk. ^ Includes such offenses as stolen property 
trespassing, weapons offensee. other sex offenses, ikjuor law violatwns, disorderly conduct, and miscellaneous oftoni 

Source: National Center for Juvenile Justk:e. Pittsburgh. PA. JwerUle Court Statistics, annual. 

No. 319. Deiinquency Cases and Case Rates by Sex and Race: 1992 to 1999 



[A delinquency offense is an act committed by a juvenile for which an adult couW be prosecuted in a criminal court DiapoaMten of 
a case involves taking a definite actk>n such as waiving the case to criminal court, dismissing tf>e case, pladng^tfw youlh on 
probatk>n. placing the youth in a facility for delinquents, or such actk)ns as fines, restitutk>n. and community service, 
not add to total sex and race categories due to rounding] 



Sex. race, and offense 



Number of cases disposed 



1992 



Case rate 



1992 



1998 



Rflale, total 

Person 

Property 

Dnjgs 

PutJic order. . . 



Female, total 

Person 

Property 

Dnjgs 

PutMk: order 



White, total 

Person 

Property 

Drugs 

Public order. . . . 



Black, total 

Person 

Property 

Drubs 

PubiJC order. . . . 



Other 

Person . . . 
Property . . 
Drubs. . . . 
PubTk; order 



total 



1.195,100 

243.500 

692.900 

63.600 

195.100 


1.330.700 

292.200 
606.000 
162.000 
270.500 


1.283.500 

284.600 
541.900 
162.100 
295.000 


288.806 

65.000 

167,200 

8.700 

45.900 


422.700 

111.200 

192.500 

30.500 

86.500 


399.900 

104.600 

168.800 

30.800 

96.000 


974.800 

177,200 

804.400 

37.300 

155,900 


1.182,000 

249.900 
559.100 
131.500 
241.400 


1.148.900 

244.100 
496.300 
136.900 
269.600 


452.900 

121.400 

221.000 

33.400 

77,100 


508,100 

141.600 

205.500 

56.000 

105.100 


477,400 

133.600 

183.000 

51.200 

109.500 


54.200 
9,900 

34.800 
1.700 
7.900 


63,300 

11.900 

33.900 

4.900 

12.500 


57.200 

11.500 

29.300 

4.500 

11.900 



87.1 

17.8 

50.5 

4.6 

14.2 

22.0 

5.0 

12.9 

0.7 

3.5 

45.5 

8.3 

28.2 

1.7 

7.3 

112.8 

30.2 

55.1 

8.3 

19.2 

41.8 
7.6 

26.7 
1.3 
6.0 



89^ 

19.6 
40.6 
10.9 
18.1 

29.9 
7.9 

13.6 
2.2 
6.3 

51^ 
10.8 
24.2 
5.7 
10.5 

115^ 

32.1 
46.6 
12.7 
23.8 

39.9 

7.5 

21.4 

3.1 

7.9 



^ Cases per 1.000 youth at (ages 10 to 17) risk. 

Source: National Center for Juvenile Justk». Pittsburgh. PA. Juvenile Court Statistics, annual. 



200 Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons 

U.S. Census Buieau, SlM!t«tea]kMMKncxd^«»>MhiA 



No. 320. Child Abuse and Neglect Cases Substantiated and Indicated— 
Vlaim Characteristics: 1 990 to 2000 

[Based on reports alleging cNkJ abuse and neglect that were referred for investigation/assessment t>y the respective child protec- 
tive services agency in each state. The rsporthig period may be eittier calendar or fiscal year. ChHdren are counted each tlnr>e they 
were subjects of an investigation report. In 2000. the data are from 49 states. Victims are children whose alleged maltreatments 
have been substantiate, Inoicated. or assessed as maltreatments. A substantiated case represents a type of investigation dispo- 
silion that determines that there to sufficient evidence under state law to coridude that maltreatment occun^ or that the child is 
at risk of maltreatment. An indtoated case represents a type of disposition that concludes that there was a reason to suspect mai- 
t i eatme nt had occurred. An aNerruitive response-victim case represents a type of disposition that identifies child as a victim within 
the crftemative response system.] 



Item 



1990 



Number Percent 



1996 



Number Percent 



1990 



Number Percent 



2000 



Number Percent 



TYPES OF SUBSTANTIATED 
MALTREATMENT 

Victims, total ^ 

Neglect 

Physical abuse 

Sexual abuse 

Emotional maltreatment 

Medk»l neglect 

SEX OF VICTIM 

Victims, total 

F«nale 

AGE OF VICTIM 

Vldima. total 

1 year and younger 

2 to 5 years old. 

6to9year8 0ld 

1010 13 years old 

I4tol7yeai8 0ld 

18 and over 

NA Not available. X Not applicable 
item adds up to more than 100 percent. 



990,658 

338.770 

186.801 

119.506 

45.621 

(NA) 



742,919 
323.339 
369.919 



731,282 

97.101 
172.791 
157.681 
135.130 
103.383 
4.880 



4§? 

27.0 

17.3 

6.6 

(NA) 



100.0 

43.5 
49.8 



100.0 

13.3 
23.6 
21.6 
18.5 
14.1 
0.7 



961,602 

461.274 

195.891 

99.278 

51.618 

20.338 



760,438 

359,568 
388.187 



767,749 

105.097 
187,522 
193.316 
151.126 
111.894 
4.210 



22.7 

11.5 

6.0 

2.4 



100.0 

47.3 
51.0 



100.0 

13.7 
24.4 
25.2 
19.7 
14.6 
0.5 



783,632 

439.094 

167.703 

88.801 

59.842 

18,809 



779,787 

371.588 
402.051 



780,145 

109.597 
186.178 
196.639 
157.879 
117.436 
4.101 



21.4 

11.3 

7.6 

2.4 



100.0 

47.7 
51.6 



100.0 

14.1 
23.9 
25.2 
20.2 
15.1 
0.5 



862,455 

515.792 

166.232 

87.480 

66293 

25.450 



862.455 

412.074 
444.793 



862.455 

132.267 
204.367 
210,483 
174.854 
125.370 
995 



19.3 

10.1 

7.7 

3.0 



loao 

47.8 
51.6 



100.0 

15.3 
23.7 
24.4 
20.3 
14.5 
0.1 



^ A child may be a victim of more than one maltreatment. Therefore, the total for this 



No. 321. Child Abusa and Neglect Cases Reported and Investigated 
by Sute: 2000 

(See headnote, Table 320] 



State 



U.S. 



Population 
under 18 
years old 



Number of 
reports ^ 



Number of 
children 
subject of 
an investi- 
gation^ 



Number 

of 

child 

victims' 



72.299,812 1.732,076 2,915,312 062,455 



AL 1.123,422 

AK i 190.717 

AZ ! 1.366,947 

AR I 680.369 

CA. 9,249.829 

W 1.100,795 

CT 841.688 

DE I 194.587 

DC I 114,992 

PL 1 3,646.340 

GA I 2.169,234 

HI 295.767 

P , 369.030 

i. I 3.245.451 

S" 1.574.396 

^, 733.638 

JS ' 712.993 

^ ! 994.818 

[i ' 1.219.799 

ME I 301,238 

MD I 1,366.172 



MA 

Ml. 
MN 
MS 



1.500,064 

2.595.767 

1,286.894 

775.187 



21.965 

12.304 

32.321 

16.822 

243.312 

30.663 

29.850 

5.566 

3.555 

117.523 

52,176 

3.298 

9.063 

60.547 

(NA) 

21.276 

19.736 

41.731 

22.291 

5.226 

30.985 

36.804 
64,794 
16.565 
18.041 



32,655 

8.431 

51.811 

23.335 

486.127 

35,483 

45.111 

8,683 

7.578 

205.179 

92,254 

6.184 

14,158 

146.791 

(NA) 

31.317 

30.627 

63.967 

36.355 

9.687 

(NA) 

61.226 

164,369 

24.840 

30.670 



9,990 

6,957 

7,460 

7,479 

129,678 

7.467 

14.462 

1.813 

2.911 

95.849 

30,806 

3.533 

3,171 
31.446 
21.890 
10.822 

8.356 
18.600 
10.618 

4.779 
(NA) 

32,334 

26.680 

11.824 

6.389 



Numt>er of 

children 

Population subject of 

under 18 Number of an investi- 

years old reports gation ^ 



1.427.692 
230.062 
450.242 
511.799 
309,562 

2.087.558 

506.574 
4.690.107 
1.964.047 

160.849 
2.888.339 

892.360 

846.526 
2.922.221 

247.822 
1.009.641 

202.649 
1.398.521 
5.886.759 

718.698 

147.523 
1,738.262 
1.513.843 

402.393 
1.368,756 

128.873 



47,881 
10.092 

6,186 
12.797 

5.736 
38,330 

12.485 

140.446 

61.167 

4,054 
73.798 
34.791 
17.728 
22.694 

7.573 
19.084 

7.699 

51.917 

119,013 

15.680 

2.948 
22.511 
24,406 
16.525 
37.455 

2.666 



74.412 
21.127 

9.940 
20,437 

8,138 
69.305 

20,956 

230.449 

123,043 

6.985 

120.712 

59,955 

27.616 

22.694 

11.531 

38.844 

10.403 

51.917 

193,966 

25.102 

3.609 
40.799 
38.070 
27,145 
37.455 

3.864 



Number 

of 

child 

victims' 



7.658 
3.347 
3.701 
5.775 
842 
8.727 

6.288 
74.065 
36.186 

54,084 
13.861 
11.381 
5.002 
3.361 
11,246 

3.081 

16.572 

45.800 

8.729 

1.347 

7.416 

7.095 

8.244 

12.001 

1.332 



- Represents zero. NA Not available. ^ The number of investigations Includes a^ssments. The number of investigations 
^ o^sed on the total numt>er of investigations that received a disposition in 2000. ^ The number of Children Subject of an 
'"^'ssti^tion of Assessment is based on the total numt>er of children for whom an alleged maltreatment was sut)stantiated. 
""^ted, or assessed to have occurred or ttie child was at risk of occurrence. ' Victims are defined as children subject of a 
^^^'stantiated, indicated, or alternative response-victim maltreatment. Includes estimates for states that did r>ot report. 

Source of Tables 320 and 321: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Administration on Children. Youth and 
^a'nilies. ChUd Maltreatment 2000 {V^ashingiton, DC: U. S. Government Printing Office, 2001). 



t/S 



Law Enforcement, Courts, and ?t\sot\s 1 

f, StattaHeai Abstract of the United States: 2002 



No. 322. Jail Inmates by S«x, Race, and Hispanic Origin: 1 990 to 2001 

[A* of Jun* 30. Exdudes federal and state prisons or ottier oorrectional institutions; institutions exdusjvetytof juwenloe; HilK 
jails in Alaska. Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, and Vemiont; and other facilities which retain pecaont for h 
48 hours. Data based on the Annual Sun/ey of Jails, which is a sample survey and sut)ject to sampling variabilis 



Characteristic 



1996 



1996 



1907 



1996 



Total InmatM. 



Male 

Female 

White non-Hispanic. 
Black non-Hispank:. 

Hisparik: 

Other ^ 



405,320 


507,044 


518,402 


567.079 


892,462 


606,943 


«21,148 


365,821 
37.198 


448,000 
51.300 


454.700 
55.700 


496.678 
59.296 


520.581 
63.791 


528.998 
67.487 


543.120 
70.414 


169.600 

172.300 

58.100 

5.400 


203.300 

220.600 

74.400 

8.800 


215.700 

213.100 

80.900 

8.800 


230.300 

237,900 

88,900 

10,000 


244.900 

244.000 

91.800 

11.800 


249.900 

251.800 

93,800 

10,400 


260.500 

256,300 

94.100 

10.200 



^ Includes American Indians. Alaska Natives. Asians, and Padfk: Islanders. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Justtoe StatistKS. through 1994. JaU Inmates, annual; t>eginning 1995. Prison and JaMIrm 
Mkiyear, armuai. 

No. 323. State and Fedaral Correctional Facilities— Inmates and Staff: 
1 990 to 2000 

[Covers all state and federal correctk>nal institutkyis or places of confinement such as prisorts. prison farms. IxxiC cur 
community based halfway houses and work release centers. Excludes iails and other regional detontk)n oemers, prMe f 
facilities for the military, Immigratkxi aiKl Naturalizatk>n Service. Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Marshall Service, and oon 
hospltai wards not operated 1^ correctkxial authorities] 



Characteristk: 



1690 



2000 



Characteristk: 



1990 



1 



FACILITIES 
Total 



Type of facility: 
Confinement. 
Community. . 



Federal 
State. . 



Size of facility: 
Fewer than 500. 

500-999 

1.000-2.499 . . . 
2,500 or more. . 



Age of facility: 
Less than 10 years 
10-19 years old. . . 
20-49 years old. . . 
50-99 years okl. . . 
100 years oM or 

more 

Not reported 



1,287 

1.037 
250 

80 

1.207 

816 

260 

185 

26 

314 
163 
373 
379 

58 



1.500 

1.196 
304 

125 
1.375 

854 
286 
306 

54 

497 
273 
366 
310 

45 
9 



1,068 

1.280 
388 

84 

1.584 

861 

305 

437 

65 



INMATES 

Total 

Male 

Female 

Type of facility: 

Confinement 

Community 

Federal 

State 

Custody level: 
Maximum/ck)se/high. 

Medium 

Minimum/low 

Not classified 



715,640 1,023,572 1^ 



398 
380 
290 

81 
75 



STAFF 



Total 

Federal. . 
State . . . 



675.624 
40.025 

696.570 
17.079 

56.821 
658.828 

150.205 

292.372 

219.907 

53.165 



264,201 

18.451 
245.750 



961.210 
62.362 

992.333 

31.239 

81.930 
941.642 

202.174 

415.688 

366.227 

39.483 



347,320 

25.379 

321.941 



1,2 



1.2 

1 
1.1' 

2 
S 

4 



• Represents zero. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Justne Statistics, Census of State and Federal Correctional FadKties, 2000, 

No. 324. Federal and Sute Prisoners by Sex: 1 980 to 2000 

[Prisoners, as of December 31. Includes all persons under jurisdk:tion of federal and state auttx>ritles rather tfian thoa 
custody of such authorities. Represents inmates sentenced to maximum term of more than a year] 



Year 


Total 


Rate ^ 
139 


State 
295.363 


Male 


Female 


Year 


Total 
739.980 


Rate ^ 


State 


Male F 


1980. . . 


315.974 


303.643 


12,331 


1990. . . 


297 


689,577 


699.416 • 


1981 .. . 


353.673 


154 


331.504 


339.375 


14.298 


1991 . . . 


789.610 


313 


732.914 


745.808 • 


1982 . . . 


395.516 


171 


371.864 


379,075 


16.441 


1992. . . 


846.277 


332 


780.571 


799.776 « 


1983. . . 


419.346 


179 


393.015 


401.870 


17.476 


1993 . . . 


932,074 


359 


857,675 


878.037 ! 


1984. . . 


443.398 


188 


415.796 


424.193 


19,205 


1994. . . 

1995 . . . 


1.016.691 
1.085.022 


389 
411 


936,896 

1.001.359 


956.566 ( 
1.021.059 1 


1985 . . . 


480.568 


202 


447.873 


459,223 


21.345 


1996 . . . 


1.137,722 


427 


1.048,907 


1.068.123 < 


1986. . . 


522.084 


217 


485.553 


497.540 


24.544 


1997 . . . 


1.195,498 


445 


1.100.511 


1.121.663 


1987 . . . 


560.812 


231 


521,289 


533.990 


26.822 


1998. . . 


1.245.402 


461 


1.141.720 


1.167.802 


1988 . . . 


603.732 


247 


560.994 


573,587 


30.145 


1999. . . 


1.304.074 


477 


1.189.799 


1.221.611 1 


1989 . . . 


680,907 


276 


633,739 


643,643 


37,264 


2000. . . 


1,321.137 


478 


1.196.093 


1.237.469 1 



^ Rate per 100.000 estimated populatkm. Based on U.S. Census Bureau estimated resklent populatkxi. 
Source: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistk». Prisoners in State and Federal Institutions on December 31, annual. 



202 Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons 

U.S. Census Bureau. S\A\i«tea\ NMftrac;^<A^k>AVMhiAl 



Ho. 325. State Prisons Exprniditures by Stat«: 1996 

ItamWoiw off doiara (22,033^2 rsp w nU $22,033,200,000), Moopt at indlc f d. For fiscal ytar wKlIng In yaar tndl ca tad] 



sue 



Total 

expendl- 

turas 



Opefat- 

axpendi- 
turas 



Capital 

axpandl- 

tures 



Oparating 

experKfitures 

per inmate 

(ctol.) 



Per year Per day 



State 



Operat- 
Total irra 

experxfi- expendi- 
tures tures 



Capital 
expendi- 



Operattng 

expenditures 

per Inmate 

(ctol.) 



tures Per year Per day 



AL ... 
AK... 
AZ ... 
AR... 
CA... 
CO... 
CT ... 
DE ... 
DC... 
FL. ... 
GA ... 
m. ... 
ID ... . 
IL . . . . 
IN.... 
lA. ... 
KS . 
KY .. 
LA ... 
ME... 

lyio ... 

MA... 

Ml. ... 
MN ... 
MS... 



22,033.2 

109.0 
116.7 
418.1 
133.7 
3.031.0 
249.8 
497.8 

88.0 

213.7 

1.224.9 

560.4 

87.4 

57.0 
740.4 
338.2 
146.1 
170.8 
208.7 
316.2 

51.7 
S20.3 
309.7 
1.167.6 
186.0 
148.9 



20,737^ 
165.8 
112.4 
409.2 
124.5 
2.918.8 
234.5 
475.4 

87.3 

212.1 

1.100.7 

547.5 

83.9 

55.0 
732.8 
325.7 
143.8 
158.5 
198.8 
313.5 

48.2 
480.9 
304.5 
1.161.1 
184.4 
143.9 



1,296^ 

3.2 
4.3 
8.9 
9.2 
112.2 

15.3 

22.5 

0.7 

1.6 

124.3 

12.9 
3.5 
1.9 
7.6 

12.5 
2.3 

12.4 
9.9 
2.8 
3.5 

39.4 
5.2 
6.5 
1.6 
4.9 



20.142 
7.987 
32.415 
19.091 
13.341 
21,385 
21.020 
31.912 
17.987 
21.296 
17.327 
15.933 
23.318 
16.277 
19.361 
20.188 
24.286 
22.242 
16.320 
12.304 
33.711 
22.247 
26.002 
28.067 
37,825 
11.156 



56.18 

21.88 
88.81 
52.30 
36.55 
58.59 
57.59 
87.43 
49.28 
58.34 
47.47 
43.65 
63.88 
44.60 
53.02 
55.31 
66.54 
60.94 
44.71 
33.71 
92.36 
80.95 
71.24 
76.89 
103.63 
30.56 



MO 

MT 

NE 

NV 

NH 

NJ. 

NM 

NY 

NC 

NO 

OH 

OK 

OR 

PA 

Rl. 

SC 

SD 

TN 

TX 

UT 

VT 

VA 

WA 

WV 

Wl. 

WY 



262.8 

42.4 

69.9 
122.0 

43.0 

839.3 

125.6 

2.220.6 

756.8 

10.7 
1.014.9 
198.3 
254.3 
978.8 
109.6 
315.5 

34.2 

350.6 

1.713.9 

113.4 

33.5 
476.7 
357.9 

46.9 
360.4 

29.0 



249.4 

41.9 

67.9 
119.0 

42.4 

827.1 

123.9 

1.948.8 

733.8 

10.6 
873.6 
193.6 
253.4 
902.2 
108.7 
277.9 

33.6 

349.2 

1.565.2 

111.8 

33.4 
452.4 
311.1 

43.7 
313.4 

27.0 



13.4 
0.6 
2.0 
2.9 
0.5 

12.2 

1.7 

271.8 

23.1 

0.2 

141.3 

4.7 

0.9 

76.5 
0.9 

37.7 
0.6 
1.4 
148.7 
1.6 
0.1 

24.4 

48.7 
3.2 

47.1 
2.0 



12.832 
20.782 
22.271 
15.370 
20.839 
30.773 
29.491 
28.426 
25.303 
17.154 
19.613 
10.601 
31.837 
28.063 
35.739 
13.977 
17,787 
22.904 
12.215 
32.361 
31.094 
16.306 
26.662 
17.245 
27.771 
19.456 



35.16 
56.94 
61.02 
42.11 
57.09 
84.31 
80.80 
77.88 
69.32 
47.00 
53.74 
29.04 
87.22 
76.88 
97.92 
38.29 
48.73 
62.75 
33.47 
68.66 
85.19 
44.67 
73.05 
47.25 
76.08 
53.30 



Source: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, State Prison Expenditures. 1996. Series NCJ 172211. August 1999. 



No. 326. Prisonors Under Jurisdiction of State and Federal Correctional 
Authorities— Summary by State: 1 980 to 2000 



[For 



31] 



State 



2000, advance 



1900 1690 



1990 



Per- 
cent 
change. 
1909- 
Total 2000 



State 



1980 1990 



1990 



2000, advance 

Per- 

cent 

change, 

190^ 

Total 2000 



U,8. 



1 



AK^. 
AZV. 

AR... 
CA... 
CO... 
CT2.. 
OE^.. 
DC/.. 

GA^. 

ID . . 

!'... 

IN ... 

IA3.. 

KS... 

KY... 

LA... 

ME... 

MO.,.. 

MA'* 

M|3V 

MN. 

MS 



329,821 773,919 1,363,701 1.381,892 



1.3 



6.543 

822 

4.372 

2.911 

24.560 
2.629 
4.306 
1.474 
3,145 

20.735 

12.178 
985 
817 

11.899 
6.683 
2.481 
2.494 
3.588 
8.889 
814 
7.731 
3.186 

15.124 
2.001 
3.902 



15.665 
2.622 

14.261 
7.322 

97.309 
7.671 

10.500 
3.471 
9.947 

44,387 

22.411 
2.533 
1,961 

27.516 

12.736 
3.967 
5.775 
9,023 

18.599 
1.523 

17.848 
8.345 

34.267 
3.176 
8.375 



24,658 

3.949 
25,986 
11.415 
163.067 
15.670 
18.639 
5e.983 

8.652 
69.596 
42.091 

4.903 
*4.842 
44.660 
19.309 

7.232 

8.567 
15.317 
34,066 

1.716 
23.095 
11.356 
46.617 

5.969 
18.247 



26.225 


NA 


4.173 


5.7 


26.510 


2.0 


11.915 


4.4 


163.001 


- 


16.833 


7.4 


18.365 


-1.5 


6.921 


-0.9 


7.456 


-13.8 


71.319 


2.5 


44.232 


5.1 


5.053 


3.1 


5,526 


14.1 


45.281 


1.4 


20.125 


4.2 


7.955 


10.0 


8.344 


-2.6 


14.919 


-2.6 


35.047 


2.9 


1,679 


-2.2 


23,538 


1.9 


10,722 


-5.6 


47,718 


2.4 


6.238 


4.5 


20,241 


10.9 



MO . 
MT. . 
NE. . 
NV. . 
NH. . 
NJ. . 
NM. . 
NY. . 
NC. . 
NO. . 
OH.. 
OK*. 
OR. . 
PA,. 
Rl^. 
SC. . 
SD. . 
TN. . 
TX. . 

VT^ 
VA. . 
WA . 
WV . 
Wl. . 
WY . 



5.726 

739 
1.446 
1.839 

326 

5.884 

1.279 

21.815 

15.513 

253 

13.489 

4.796 

3.177 

8.171 

813 
7.862 

635 

7.022 

29,692 

932 

480 
8.920 
4.399 
1.257 
3.980 

534 



14.943 
1.425 
2.403 
5.322 
1.342 

21.128 
3.187 

54.895 

18.411 
483 

31,822 

12.285 
6.492 

22.290 
2.392 

17.319 
1.341 

10.388 

50.042 
2.496 
1.049 

17.593 
7.995 
1.565 
7.465 
1.110 



26.155 
2.951 
3.688 
9.494 
2.257 

31.493 

*72.899 

31.123 

943 

46.842 

22.393 

9.860 

36.525 

3.003 

22.008 

. 2.506 

.®22.502 

®163.190 

*5.322 

1,536 

29.789 

14,590 

3.532 

20.415 

1.713 



27.323 

3.105 

3.895 
10.012 

2.257 
29.784 

5.342 
70.198 
31.266 

1.076 
45,833 
23.181 
10.630 
36.847 

3.286 
21.778 

2.616 

22.166 

157.997 

5.630 

1.697 
30.168 
14.915 

3.856 
20.612 

1.660 



4.5 
5.2 
5.6 
5.5 

-5.4 

4.3 

-3.7 

0.5 

14.1 

•2.2 

3.5 

7.8 

0.9 

9.4 

-1.0 

4.4 

-1.5 

-3.2 

5.8 

10.5 

1.3 

2.2 

9.2 

1.0 

-1.9 



1 



Sterte-tevel data excludes federal inmates. ^ includes both jail ar>d 
^ Numt>ers are for custody rather than jurisdiction counts. * 1 980 

in 1999 



^- Represems or rounds to zero. NA Not availat>le. 

P|^ inmates (state has combined jail and prison system) , 

^J[^990. data are for custody counts; thereafter, jurisdiction counts are reported. ^ Reporting criteria were expanded i 
l^j*]!^ heme confi ne ment dients in supervised custody facilities. Comparable counts for 1 998 were not available. ® Re 
°^^ changed in 1999; percent calculated based on counts adjusted for comparable reporting. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisoners in 2000. Series NCJ 183476; and eariier reports 



Reporting 



US 



Law Enforcement, Courts, at\A ?t\sot\ 1^*^ 

amUeHeBfAbetrectofthe United Stafas: 2002 



No. 327. Adults on Probation, in Jail or Prison, or on Parole: 1980 to 2000 

[A* of Dscwnber 31, •xo^pt Jail counts at of Juna 30] 



Year 



TotaJ 



Percent of 

adult 

population 



Probation 



Jail 



Prison 



Parole 



Mala 



1980. 
1981. 
1982. 
1983. 
1984. 

1985. 
1986. 
1987. 
1988. 
1989. 

1990. 
1991. 
1992. 
1993. 
1994. 



1996 

1996 

1997 

1998 

1999 

2000. advance 



1.840.400 
2.006.600 
2.192.600 
2.475.100 
2.689.200 

3.011.400 
3.239.400 
3.459.600 
3.714,100 
4.055,600 

4.348.000 
4.535.600 
4.762.600 
4,944.000 
5,141.300 

5.335.100 
5.482,700 
5,725.800 
6,175.700 
6,378,000 
6,488.300 



(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1.7 
1.8 
1.9 
2.0 
2.2 

2.3 
2.4 
2.5 
2.6 
2.7 

2.8 
2.8 
2.9 
3.1 
3.1 
3.1 



1,118.097 
1.225.934 
1.357,264 
1.582,947 
1,740.948 

1.968.712 
2.114,621 
2.247,158 
2,356.483 
2.522.125 

2.670,234 
2,728.472 
2,811,611 
2,903.061 
2.981,022 

3.077.861 
3.164,996 
3.296.513 
3.670.441 
3.779.922 
3.839.532 



^82.268 

2195.085 

207,853 

221,815 

233.018 

254,986 
272.735 
294.092 
341,893 
393,303 

403.019 
424,129 
441,781 
455.500 
479.800 

499,300 
510,400 
557.974 
584.372 
596.485 
613.534 



319.598 
360,029 
402,914 
423.898 
448.264 

487.593 
526.436 
562,814 
607,766 
683,367 

743,382 
792.535 
850.566 
909,381 
990.147 

1,078,542 
1,127,528 
1.176.564 
1.224.469 
1,287.172 
1.309.661 



220.438 
225.539 
224.604 
246.440 
266,992 

300.203 
325.638 
355.505 
407,977 
456.803 

531.407 
590,442 
658.601 
676.100 
690.371 

679,421 
679,733 
694.787 
696.385 
714,457 
725.527 



(NAj 
NA 
NA 
NA) 
NA) 

2.606.000 
2.829.100 
3.021,000 
3.223.000 
3.501.600 

3.746.300 
3.913,000 
4,050.300 
4.215.800 
4,377,400 

4.513.000 

4.629.900 

4.825.300 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 




405.500 
410.300 
438.600 
491.100 
554.000 

601.700 
622.000 
712.300 
728200 
763.900 

822.100 
852.800 
900.500 




NA Not available. ^ Totals may not add due to individuals having multiple correctional statuses. 
Source: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, Correctional Populations in the United States, annual. 



2 Estimated. 



No. 328. Prisoners Under Sentence of Death by Characteristic: 1 980 to 2000 

[As of Dacambar 31. Excludes prisoners under sentence of death who remained within local correctional systems perKing 
exhaustion of appellate process or who had not been committed to prison] 



Characteristic 



1980 1909 1991 1992 1993 1994 1905 1996 1007 1000 1000 2000 



Total 



1 



White 

Black and other 



Under 20 years. . . 
20 to 24 years . . . 
25 to 34 years . . . 
35 to 54 years . . . 
55 years and over. 



Years of school completed: 

7 years or less 

8 years 

9 to 1 1 years 

12 years 

More than 12 years . . . 
Unknown 



Marital status: 
Never married . 
Married . . . . . 
Divorced ^ . . , 



Time elapsed since 
sentencing: 
Less than 12 months 
12 to 47 HDonths . . . 
48 to 71 months . . . 
72 months and over . 



Legal status at arrest: 
Not under sentence . 
Parole or protwtion ^ 
Prison or escaped . . 
Unknown 



666 2,346 2.466 2,575 2,727 2,005 3.084 3,242 3,326 3.465 3^27 3,893 



418 1,368 1.450 1.508 1.575 1.653 1,732 1,833 1.864 1.917 1.948 
270 978 1.016 1.067 1.152 1.252 1.332 1.409 1.464 1.548 1.579 



11 8 

173 168 

334 1.110 

186 1.006 

10 64 



68 

74 

204 

162 

43 

163 



268 
229 
217 



185 

389 

102 

38 



178 
186 
775 
729 
209 
279 



14 

179 

1.087 

1.129 

73 



173 
181 
810 
783 
222 
313 



998 1.071 
632 663 
726 746 



12 

188 

1.078 

1.212 

85 



181 
180 
836 
831 
232 
315 



1.132 
663 
780 



13 

211 

1.066 

1.330 

96 



185 
183 
885 
887 
244 
332 



1.222 
671 
823 



19 

231 

1,088 

1,449 

103 



186 
198 
930 
939 
255 
382 



1.320 
707 
863 



20 

264 

1.068 

1.583 

119 



191 
195 
979 
995 
272 
422 



1.412 
718 
924 



17 

288 

1.088 

1.711 

138 



196 
201 
1,040 
1.037 
282 
486 



1.507 
739 
996 



16 

275 

1.077 

1.809 

151 



205 
206 
1,069 
1.084 
288 
476 



1.555 

740 

1.033 



16 

273 

1.108 

1.897 

171 



208 
218 
1.122 
1.128 
301 
488 



1.645 

752 

1.068 



16 

251 

1.108 

1.958 

194 



201 
221 
1,142 
1,157 
307 
499 



1,689 

731 

1,107 



1.990 
1.603 

11 
237 

1.103 

2.019 

223 



214 
233 
1.157 
1.164 
315 
490 



1.749 

739 

1.105 



231 252 265 262 280 287 306 262 293 259 206 

753 718 720 716 755 784 816 844 816 800 786 

438 441 444 422 379 423 447 456 482 499 507 

934 1,071 1.146 1,316 1.476 1.560 1.673 1,766 1,874 1,969 2.092 



384 1,345 1,415 1.476 1,562 1.662 1.764 1.881 1.957 2.036 2.088 2,202 

115 578 615 702 754 800 866 894 880 879 886 921 

45 128 102 101 102 103 110 112 116 127 125 126 

170 305 321 296 298 325 314 355 375 423 428 344 



^ Revisions to the total number of prisoners were not carried to the characteristics except for race. ^ Irxdudes parsons 
married but separated, widows, wtdowers, and unknown. ^ Includes prisoners on mandatory corxlitional release, work ralaasa. 
leave. AWOL. or bail. Covers 28 prisoners in 1990. and 29 in 1991 and 1992, 33 in 1993 and 1995. 31 in 1994 and 1996. 30 in 
1997. 26 in 1998. and 21 in 1999 and 2000. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistk». Capital Pun^vnent, annual. See also <httpy/www.oip.usdoi.gov/bis/pub/pd(/bpOO.pdf> 
(released December 2001). 



A Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons 

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of tha Unilad 



No. 329. Movement of Prisoners Under Sentence of Death: 1 980 to 2000 

[Prisoners rsportad under sentence of death t>y dvil authorities. The term "under senterx^e of death" begins when the court 
pronounces the first sentence of death for a capital offense] 



Status 



1980 1980 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1996 1999 2000 



Under sentence of death, 

Jan. 1 . . 

Received death sentence ^ '. 



Dtapoeiaons otherthan 
exeoutlora 



595 2.243 2.346 2.465 2,580 2.727 2.905 

203 244 266 265 282 306 310 

125 147 163 147 146 162 168 

77 94 101 114 130 136 138 



3.064 3.242 

299 256 

174 146 

119 106 



3.328 3.465 3.540 

285 272 214 

145 157 122 

132 104 86 



101 



106 
23 



Under serttonce of death. 

Dec. 31 ^^ 

White 



688 2.346 
425 1.368 
268 940 



116 
14 

2.466 
1.450 
1.016 



124 
31 

2.575 
1.506 
1.029 



108 
38 

2.727 
1.575 
1.111 



112 
31 



105 
56 



99 
45 



89 
74 



93 
68 



112 
98 



76 
85 



2.890 3,054 
1.645 1.730 
1,197 1.275 



3^42 3.335 
1.833 1.876 
1,358 1.406 



3.452 3.527 3.593 
1.906 1.948 1.990 
1,486 1.514 1,535 



- Represents zero. ^ Includes races other than White or Black. 
se n t en c e not canted to ttiis category. 



^ Revisions to total numt>er of prisoners under death 



Source: U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Capital Punishment, annual. 

No. 330. Prisoners Executed Under Civil Autliority by Sex and Race: 
1930 to 2001 

[Excludes executions t>y military authorities. The Army (ir>cludir>g the Air Force) carried out 160 (148 between 1942 and 1950; 3 
each in 1954, 1966. arxl 1957; and 1 each in 1958, 1959, and 1961). Of the total. 106 were executed for murder (Including 21 
involving rape). 53 for rape, and 1 for desertion. The Navy carried out no executions during the period] 



Year or period 



Executed for murder 



TotaJ ' 



Male 



ile 


White 


Black 


Total ^ 


White 


Biack 


37 


2,173 


2.315 


3.892 


1,884 


1,770 


11 


827 


816 


1.514 


803 


687 


12 


490 


781 


1.064 


458 


595 


8 


336 


376 


601 


316 


280 


1 


98 


93 


155 


87 


68 


5 


422 


249 


683 


422 


254 




11 


7 


18 


11 


7 




11 


7 


18 


11 


7 




13 


12 


25 


13 


12 




6 


5 


11 


6 


5 




8 


8 


16 


8 


8 




16 


7 


23 


16 


7 




7 


7 


14 


7 


7 




19 


11 


31 


19 


11 




23 


14 


38 


23 


14 




20 


11 


31 


20 


11 




33 


22 


56 


33 


22 




31 


14 


45 


31 


14 




45 


27 


74 


45 


27 


2 


48 


18 


68 


48 


18 


• 


61 


33 


96 


61 


33 


2 


48 


36 


85 


48 


36 


3 


48 


17 


66 


48 


17 



AH 

1930 to 1939... 
1940 to 1949 1. 
1950 to 1959^. 
1960 to 1967. . 
1968 to 1976. . 
1977 to 2000. . 



193O-2000, 



4,542 



4,484 



1965 
1966 
1967 
1968 
1989 

1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 
1994 

1995 
1996 
1997 
1996 
1909 
2000 
2001 



1.667 


1.656 


1.284 


1.272 


717 


709 


191 


190 


663 


657 


18 


. 


18 


18 


25 


25 


11 


11 


16 


16 


23 


23 


14 


14 


31 


31 


38 


38 


31 


31 


56 


56 


45 


45 


74 


74 


68 


66 


98 


98 


85 


83 


66 


63 



• Represents zero. ^ Includes races other than White or Blade. 
8 espionage (6 in 1942 and 2 in 1953), and 6 aggravated assault. 



^ includes 25 armed robbery, 20 Iddnapping. 11 burglary, 



Source: Through 1978. U.S. Law Enforcenvent Assistance Administration; thereafter, U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, 
CorrBctfono/ Populatkyis in the United States, annual; and Capital Punishment, annual. 

No. 331. Prisoners Under Sentence of Deatii and Executed Under Civil 
Authority by SUte: 1977 to 2001 

[Maska. Dtstrtct of Columbia, l-iawaii. Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts. Michigan, Minnesota, New Yor((, North Daltota, Rhode Island, 
West Virginia, and Wisconsin are jurisdictions without a death penalty] 





1977 




1977 






1977 




SMS 


to 


State 


to 




State 


to 






2001 1996 1999 2000 2001 




2001 


1996 1999 2000 2001 




2001 


1998 1999 2000 2001 


U.8. 


749 68 96 85 96 


IL. . . 


12 


1 1 - - 


OK. . 


48 


4 6 11 18 






IN9. . 


9 


11-2 


OR. . 


2 


... 


AL... 


23 1 2 4 • 


KY . . 


2 


1 


PA . . 


3 


1 


«... 


22 4 7 3 - 


LA . . 


26 


1 1 


SC. . 


25 


7 4 1- 


AR... 


24 14 2 1 


MD. . 


3 


1 - - - 


TN . . 


1 


1 


CA... 


9 12 11 


MS. . 


4 


. 


TX . . 


256 


20 35 40 17 


DE... 


13 - 2 1 2 


MO. . 


53 


3 9 5 7 


UT. . 


6 


1 


PL... 


51 4 16 1 


NE. . 


3 


.... 


VA . . 


83 


13 14 8 2 


GA... 


27 1 - 4 


NV. . 


9 


11-1 


WA. . 


4 


1 - - 1 


•0. ... 


1 . . . . 


NC. 


21 


3 4 15 


WY. . 


1 


• • • • 


•Re 


prooents zero. 















Soufoe: Through 1978. U.S. Law Enforcement Assistance Administration; thereafter. U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Capital 
nnt^iment annual. 



U& 



Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prlsot\s l^S 

BkVMU. SMMical Abstract of the United States: 2002 



No. 332. Fire Losses^ToUi and Percent Change: 1980 to 2000 



[Includes allowance for uninsured and unreported losses but excludes losses to government property and foiwts. 

incurred losses] 



Year 


Total Per 
(mil. dol.) capita ^ 


Year 


Total Per 
(mil. dol.) capita ^ 


Year 


ToM P9f 
(mH. dol.) ca^ 


1980 

1981 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


5.579 24.56 
5.625 24.53 
5.894 25.61 
6.320 27.20 
7.602 32.35 
7.753 32.70 
8,488 35.21 


1987 

1988 

1989 

1990 

1991 

1992 

1993 


8.504 34.96 

9.626 39.11 

9.514 38.33 

9.495 38.07 

11.302 44.82 

13.588 53.28 

11.331 43.96 


1994 

1995 

1996 

1997 

1998 

1999 

2000 


12.778 49.06 
11387 45.23 
12.544 47.29 
12.940 48.32 
11310 45.50 
12.428 45.56 
12.869 45.66 



^ Based on U.S. Census Bureau resident population as of July 1. 

Source: Insurance Information Institute. IMew York. NY. The Fact Book, Property/CMualty Insurance Facta, annual (copyright). 



No. 333. Fires— Number and Loss by lype and Property Use: 1997 to 2000 

(Number of 1.795 repreaenta 1,795,000 and proparty loaa of 8325 r ap ra a e n ta $8325,000,000. Baaad on annual aampla 

survey of fire departments. No adjustments were made for unreported fires and losses. Property toss indudas cfirect proparty f 



onlyl 






Type and property use 


Number (1.000) 


Property toss (mil. dol.) 


1997 1998 1999 2000 


1997 1998 1909 2006 


FIraa. total 


1.795 1.755 1323 1,708 

552 517 523 506 
57 62 64 69 
662 653 724 670 
397 381 369 349 
127 142 143 114 

15 16 16 15 

8 8 8 7 

8 9 8 7 

27 25 29 24 

407 381 383 380 

303 283 283 284 

93 86 88 85 

11 12 12 11 

36 36 36 33 

17 16 18 15 

34 26 25 25 


8,525 8,829 10.024 Ml307 

7.087 6.717 8.490 8.501 
99 497 123 214 

1.269 1.337 1324 1361 
70 78 87 111 

327 354 412 366 

58 84 71 106 

25 23 23 20 

612 462 669 587 

4.585 4.391 5.092 5.674 

3.735 3.642 4.123 4336 

718 631 842 866 

132 118 . 127 146 

577 687 '1.375 894 

723 496 671 778 

180 220 187 275 


Structure ^ 

Outside of structure ^ 

Brush and rubbish 

Vehicle 

Other 

Structure by property use: 

Public assembly 

Educational 

Instrtutional 

Stores and offices 

Residential 

1-2 family units •* 

Apartments. 

Other residential 

Storage * 

Industry, utility, defense ^ . . 
Special structures 



- Represents zero. ^ Includes $1 billion in property damage in the Cerro Grande. New Mexico WikJIand Rre. Property loaa 
by specific property type was not available. '^ Includes outside storage, cro^, timber, etc. 19M property toss data inouda $390 
million loss in timber from Flonda wildfires. ^ Includes mobile homes. Includes hotels and motels, college dormitoriae. 
boarding houses, etc. ^ Data underreported as some incidents were handled by private fire brioades or fixed suppresaion 
systems which do not report. ® Includes estimated losses of $515 million due to two power plant fires. 

Source: National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, MA. "2000 U.S. Fire Loss." NFPA Journal, September 2001. arxl prior 
issues (copyright 2001). 

No. 334. Fires and Property Loss for incendiary and Suspicious Fires and 
Civilian Fire Deatlis and Injuries by Selected Property lype: 
1997 to 2000 



[Based on sample survey of fire departments] 

1998 1999 2000 



Characteristic 



I 



i-. 



NUMBER 
(1.000) 

Structure firaa, total . 

Structure fires of incendiary 
or suspicious ongin . ... 

Fires of incendiary origin . 
Fires of suspicious origm . ' 

PROPERTY LOSS ' 
(mil. dol.) 

Structure firaa, total . 

Structure fires of incendiary 
or suspicious origin 



Fires of incendiary origin 
Fires of suspicious ongin . 



1997 

552 

78 

52 
26 

7,087 

1.309 

802 
507 



517 

76 

47 
29 



6.717 

1.249 

816 
433 



523 

72 

44 
28 



828 
453 



506 

75 

46 
29 



8,490 8,501 

1.281 1.340 



792 
548 



Characteristic 



CIVILIAN FIRE DEATHS 

Daatha, total ' 4,050 



1997 



Residential property I 3,390 

One- and two-family 
dwellings 

Apartments 

Vehicles 



CIVILIAN FIRE INJURIES 



2.700 
660 
480 



4,035 3,570 4,048 

3.250 2.920 3.445 

2.775 2.375 2.920 

445 520 500 

575 470 485 



Injuriea, total ^ ' 23,750 23,100 21,878 

Residential property 17.775 17.175 16.425 17,400 

One- and two-family 

dwellings 12.300 11.800 11.550 12.575 



Apartments 
Vehicles ... 



5,000 5.000 4.500 4.400 
2,125 2.225 1.850 1.600 



' Direct property loss only. ^ Includes other not shown separately. 

Source; National Fire Protection Association, Quincy. MA. "2000 U.S. Fire Loss," NFPA Journal. September 2001, and prior 
issues (copynght 2001). 



206 Law Enforcement, Courts, and Prisons 

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the UnNad 



Section 6 

Geography and Environment 



This section presents a variety of informa- 
tion on the physical environment of the 
United States, starting with basic area 
measurement data and ending with cli- 
matic data for selected weather stations 
around the country. The subjects covered 
between those points are mostly con- 
cerned with environmental trends but 
include related subjects such as land use, 
water consumption, air pollutant emis- 
sions, toxic releases, oil spills, hazardous 
waste sites, municipal waste and recy- 
cling, threatened and endangered wildlife, 
and the environmental industry. 

The information in this section is selected 
from a wide range of federal agencies 
that compile the data for various adminis- 
trative or regulatory purposes, such as 
the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. 
Geological Survey, National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 
Natural Resources Conservation Service, 
and General Services Administration. 



the 2000 census, area mea- 
surements were calculated by computer 
based on the information contained in a 
single, consistent geographic database, 
the TIGER* database, rather than relying 
on historical, local, and manually calcu- 
lated information. New information from 
the 2000 census may be found in Table 
335. 

Geograiihy— The U.S. Geological Survey 
conducts investigations, surveys, and 
research in the fields of geography, geol- 
ogy, topography, geographic information 
systems, mineralogy, hydrology, and geo- 
thermal energy resources as well as natu- 
ral hazards. The U.S. Geological Survey 
provides United States cartographic data 
through the Earth Sciences Information 
Center, water resources data through the 
National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX), 
and a variety of research and Open-File 
reports which are announced monthly in 
^ew Publications of the U.S. Geological 
Survey. 



In a joint project with the U.S. Census 
Bureau, during the 1980s, the U.S. Geo- 
logical Survey provided the basic informa- 
tion on geographic features for input into 
a national geographic and cartographic 
database prepared by the Census Bureau, 
called the TIGER* (Topologicaliy inte- 
grated Geographic Encoding and Refer- 
encing) database. Since then, using a vari- 
ety of sources, the Census Bureau has 
updated these features and their related 
attributes (names, descriptions, etc.) and 
inserted current information on the 
boundaries, names, and codes of legal 
and statistical geographic entities; very 
few of these updates added aerial water 
features, however. Maps prepared by the 
Census Bureau using the TIGER database 
show the names and boundaries of ent- 
ites and are available on a current basis. 

The Census Bureau maintains a current 
inventory of governmental units and their 
legal boundaries primary through its 
Boundary and Annexation Survey. The 
information is available to the public in 
the several files, all available on line: 
TICER/Line*, there are also several series 
of maps for Census 2000: RL County 
Blocic Maps, Census Tract Outline Maps, 
and Voting District/ State Legislative Dis- 
trict Outline Maps. These maps can be 
obtained online via the American Fact- 
Finder. 

An inventory of the nation's land 
resources by type of use/cover was con- 
ducted by the National Resource Recovery 
Conservation Service (formerly the Soil 
Conservation Service) every S years 
beginning in 1 982. The most recent sur- 
vey results, which were published in the 
1 997 National Resources Inventory, cover 
all nonfederal land in Puerto Rico, the Vir- 
gin Islands, and the United States except 
Alaska. Tables 337 and 338 provide 
results from the survey. 

Environment— The principal federal 
agency responsible for pollution abate- 
ment and control activities is the Environ- 
mental Protection Agency (EPA). It is 



UA 



Geography and Environment 207 



Abttncl of Ihe United States: 2002 



responsible for establishing and monitor- 
ing national air quality standards, water 
quality activities, solid and hazardous 
waste disposal, and control of toxic sub- 
stances. Many of these series now appear 
on the EPA Web site at the Center for Envi- 
ronmental Information and Statistics and 
can be accessed at <http://www.epa. 
gov/ceis/>. 

National Ambient Air Quality Standards 
(NAAQS) for suspended particulate matter, 
sulfur dioxide, photochemical oxidants, 
carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide 
were originally set by the EPA in April 
1971. Every S years, each of the NAAQS is 
reviewed and revised if new health or wel- 
fare data indicates that a change is neces- 
sary. The standard for photochemical oxi- 
dants, now called ozone, was revised in 
February 1 979. Also, a new NAAQS for 
lead was promulgated in October 1 978 
and for suspended particulate matter in 
1987. Table 347 gives some of the health- 
related standards for the six air pollutants 
having NAAQS. Data gathered from state 
networks are periodically submitted to 
EPA's National Aerometric Information 
Retrieval System (AIRS) for summarization 
in annual reports on the nationwide sta- 
tus and trends in air quality; for details, 
see National Air Quality and Emissions 
Trends Report. More current information 
on emissions may be found on the EPA 
Web site at <http://www.epa.gov/ 
ttn/chief/trends>. 

The Toxics Release inventory (TRI), pub- 
lished by the U.S. EPA, is a valuable 
source of information regarding toxic 
chemicals that are being used, manufac- 
tured, treated, transported, or released 
into the environment. Two rules. Section 
313 of the Emergency Planning and Com- 
munity Right-To-Know Act (EPCRA) and 
Section 6607 of the Pollution Prevention 
Act (PPA), mandate that a publicly acces- 
sible toxic chemical database be devel- 
oped and maintained by U.S. EPA. This 
database, known as the TRI, contains 



information concerning waste manage- 
ment activities and the release of toxic 
chemicals by facilities that manufacture, 
process, or otherwise use said materials. 

Data on the release of these chemicals are 
collected from manufacturing facilities 
and facilities added in 1 998 that have the 
equivalent of 1 or more full-time 
employees and meet the established 
thresholds for manufacturing, processing, 
or "otherwise use" of listed chemicals. 
Facilities must report their releases and 
other waste management quantities. Fed- 
eral facilities have been required to report 
since 1 994, regardless of industry classifi- 
cation. In May 1997, EPA added seven 
new industry sectors that reported to the 
TRI for the first time in July 1 999 for the 
1 998 reporting year. 

Climate— NOAA, through the National 
Weather Service and the National Environ- 
mental Satellite, Data, and Information 
Service, is responsible for data on climate. 
NOAA maintains about 1 1 ,600 weather 
stations, of which over 3,000 produce 
autographic precipitation records, about 
600 take hourly readings of a series of 
weather elements, and the remainder 
record data once a day. These data are 
reported monthly in the Climatological 
Data and Storm Data, published monthly, 
and annually in the Local Climatological 
Data (published by location for major 
cities). 

The normal climatological temperatures, 
precipitation, and degree days listed in 
this publication are derived for compara- 
tive purposes and are averages for the 
30-year period, 1971-2000. For stations 
that did not have continuous records for 
the entire 30 years from the same instru- 
ment site, the normals have been 
adjusted to provide representative values 
for the current location. The information 
in all other tables is based on data from 
the beginning of the record at that loca- 
tion through 2000, except as noted. 



208 Geography and Environment 



U.S. Census BufBWj. Statistical AtMlnct of the UnRsd 



Rgure 6.1 

Municipal Solid Wuu — 

Ptrcwit of Matwiais Rtcovircd: 1980 to 2000 



Pap«r and paperboard 
Ferrous metals 




Soma: Chin prfparcd by U. 



Toik Owmlaii RbImsu by Industry; 2000 

(In millions of pounds) 




Chemical and allied products 



prtpaicd bv U.S. Ccntut Butuu. Far d 



Geography and Enviroi\nv%m. 1^ 



No. 335. UMd and MteMr Araa of SUtes and ftthor EntHtes: 2000 



DMria at Coiur 
Georgia! ' 

Hnak 

llnob '.'.''.'.'. 

Kvuckyi .!' 

Muv^nd. .. . 

MGKiBWi 

Mknuoli . .. 

SSST;:: 

Mnmn ... 
Mbraska . 

Nnaila 

Mw Hwnpmira 

NnvMnKO. . 

NMi'ftm 

North Carolina 
NunhCMkoU. 

OWo 

OWjJionia ... 
Pannaytvana 
South Carolina 
SoutnOakcta. 

VXglnla .... 
MtaihHJgton .. 
WaM\nwnia . 



xmjaa •.s43,b87 

1,71 B4M M31,*ia 



3,941.447 S, 
3M7.4S 0, 



,I73,34« 
,l8t,S23 



iaiMT 



TSMa 41,241 

7B,7a7 n2» 



H.0S3 2ee,eo 

5.S43 14,35. 

6,206 



Amflncan Samoa . 
Guam . , , , 

Mo Mariana Iduxk 



Sense PHC-1, am) ur 



W Camus at PopulMOar} mnd Houelng, Summary Populallon bix> HouMing CTianc* 
XI Amencan FaclFinoer 



Geography and Environment 



No. 336. Toui and Federally Owned Land by SUte: 2000 



[As Of tnd of flaeal year; see text. Section 8, State and Local Qovemnf>ent Finanoee and Employment Total land area flgurss are 
not comparable with thoee in Table 335] 



Total 
(1.000 
acres) 



Not 
owned try 
federal 
govern- 
ment 
(1.000 



Owned by 
federal 
government 



Acres Per- 
acres) (1.000) cent 



State 



Total 
(1.000 
acres) 



Not 
owned t>y 
federal 
govern- 
ment 
(1.000 



Owned by 
federal 
government 



Acree Par- 
acres) (1.000) cent 



UnNsd 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Ailtansas 

Califomia 

Cdotdxto 

ConnecticiJt 

Oeiawafe 

District of Columbia. 

honoa 

Georgia 



kkho 

Indana .... 

Iowa 

Kansas .... 
Kentudcy . . . 
Louisiana . . . 

Mane 

Maiyland 

Massachusetts 
Michigan . . . 
Minnmota . . 



2.271,343 
32.678 
365.482 
72.668 
33,599 
100.207 
66.486 
3.136 
1.266 
39 
34.721 
37.295 
4.106 
52.933 
35.795 
23.158 
35.860 
52.511 
25.512 
26.868 
19.848 
6.319 
5.035 
36.492 
51.206 
30.223 



31.353 

144.630 

40.309 

30,190 

52.318 

42.377 

3.121 

1.250 

30 

30.122 

35.268 

3.467 

19.827 

35.205 

22.648 

35.631 

51.837 

24,066 

27.669 

19.675 

6.153 

4.964 

32.417 

46.989 

28.551 



636.395 

1.326 

220.852 

32.379 

3.410 

47,689 

24.108 

14 

16 

9 

4.599 

2.027 

639 

33.106 

590 

510 

230 

674 

1.447 

1.199 

173 

166 

71 

4.076 

4.217 

1.672 



28.0 

4.1 

80.4 

44.5 

10.1 

47.8 

36.3 

0.5 

^2 

23.2 

13.2 

5.4 

15.6 

62.5 

1.6 

2.2 

0.6 

1.3 

5.7 

4.2 

0.9 

2.6 

1.4 

11.2 

6.2 

5.5 



Missouri 

Montana .... 
Nebraska .... 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 
New Jersey . . . 
New Mexico . . 

New York 

North Carolina . 
North Dakota . 

Ohk) 

Oklahoma .... 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . . 
Rhode Island . 
South Carolina 
South Dakota . 
Tennessee . . . 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Wtohington . . 
West Virginia . 
Wisconsin . . . . 
Wyoming .... 



44.248 
93.271 
49.032 
70.264 
5.769 
4.813 
77.766 
30.681 
31.403 
44.452 
26.222 
44.088 
61.599 
28.804 
677 
19.374 
48.882 
26.728 
168.218 
52.697 
5.937 
25,496 
42.694 
15.411 
35.011 
62.343 



39.450 
65.843 
48.381 
11.945 
5.010 
4.690 
51.194 
30.459 
29,414 
42.137 
25.781 
42.422 
29.243 
28.088 
674 
18.265 
45.762 
24.613 
165.910 
18.696 
5.562 
23.217 
30.516 
14.168 
33,192 
31.273 



4.798 

27.428 

651 

58.319 

759 

124 

26.572 

222 

1.989 

2.316 

441 

1.666 

32.356 

717 

4 

1.110 

3.120 

2.115 

2.307 

34.001 

375 

2.280 

12.176 

1.222 

1.819 

31.070 



10.8 

29.4 
1.3 

83.0 

13.2 
2.6 

34.2 
0.7 
6.3 
5.2 
1.7 
3.8 

52.5 
2.5 
0.5 
5.7 
6.4 
7.9 
1.4 

84.5 
6.3 
8.9 

28.5 
7.9 
5.2 

49.8 



Excludes trust properties. 

Source: U.S. General Servtoes Administratk>n, Summary Report on Real Property Omwd by the Ur)ited States Throughout the 
Woikt, annual. See also <http-y/www.gsa.gov/attachments/QSAPUBLICATIONS/extput)/OwnedReport0613.pdf>. 

No. 337. Nonfederal Developed Land Use by SUte and Other Area: 1997 

[Inthousanda of aeraa (1.944,130 rapreaenta 1.944.130,000). exoapl percent Excludes Alaska and District of Columbia] 



Stale and other 
area 



Total 

surface 

area 



Devek>ped land 



Total 



Percent 
of total 



Change. 
1902-97 



State and other 
area 



Total 

surface 

area 



Devek>ped larvd 



Percent Change. 
Total of total 1992-07 



Total. 

UnlM 
Aiabsfna . . . . 

Arizona 

Arttansas 

Caffomia 

Colofado 

Connodcut . . 
[)slai(vare. . . . 
Rorida. 

SS"::::: 

W*o 

■noa 

Indana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kemudty. . . . 
Louisiana. . . . 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Mchigan 

Mmnota . . . 
Mteissippi. . . 
iSourT... 



1.944.130 98.252 



5.0 11.217 



1.941.823 

33.424 

72.964 

34,037 

101.510 

66.625 

3.195 

1.534 

37,534 

37.741 

4.158 

53.488 

36.059 

23.158 

36.017 

52.661 

25.863 

31.377 

20.966 

7.870 

5.339 

37.349 

54,010 

30,527 

44.614 



97.745 

2.252 

1.491 

1.409 

5.456 

1.652 

874 

226 

5.185 

3.957 

180 

755 

3.181 

2.260 

1.702 

1.940 

1,738 

1,624 

712 

1.236 

1,479 

3.546 

2.186 

1.474 

2.517 



5.0 

6.8 

2.1 

4.2 

5.4 

2.5 

27.4 

14.8 

13.9 

10.5 

4.4 

1.5 

8.9 

9.8 

4.8 

3.7 

6.8 

5.2 

3.4 

15.8 

27.8 

9.5 

4.1 

4.9 

5.7 



11,106 

315 

114 

169 

553 

113 

39 

23 

825 

852 

7 

92 

247 

195 

69 

97 

237 

134 

111 

178 

212 

364 

232 

206 

224 



Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

F4ew Hampshire 
r^ew Jersey . . . 
New Mexkx) . . . 

New York 

North Carolina . 
North Dakota . . 

Ohk) 

Oklahoma .... 

Oregon 

Pennaytvania . . 
Rhode Island . . 
South Carolina . 
South Dakota . . 
Tennessee. . . . 

Texas 

Utah 

Vemiont 

Virginia 

Washington . . . 
West Virginia . . 
Wisconsin .... 
Wyoming 



Caribbean 



94.110 
49,510 
70.763 
5.941 
5,216 
77,823 
31,361 
33,709 
45,251 
26.445 
44,738 
62.161 
28.995 
813 
19,939 
49.358 
26.974 
171.052 
54.339 
6.154 
27.087 
44.035 
15.508 
35.920 
62.603 

2.307 



1.032 
1.206 

381 

589 
1.778 
1.153 
3.184 
3.856 

992 
3.611 
1.926 
1,222 
3.983 

201 
2.097 

960 
2.371 
8.567 

662 

316 
2.626 
2.065 

874 
2.418 

644 

507 



1.1 

2.5 

0.6 

10.0 

34.1 

1.5 

10.2 

11.5 

2.2 

13.7 

4.4 

2.0 

13.8 

24.7 

10.6 

2.0 

6.8 

5.1 

1.3 

5.2 

9.7 

4.7 

5.7 

6.8 

1.1 

22.0 



76 
55 

27 

63 
214 
217 
318 
507 

33 
365 
177 
104 
545 
7 
362 

58 
402 
894 

61 

12 
344 
241 
177 
188 

34 

112 



Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture. Natior^ Resource ar>d Consen/ation Sen/rce, and Iowa State University, Statistk:al 
Laboratory. Surrvnary f^port, 1997 National Resources Inventory, revised December 2000. See also <http7/www.nhq.nrcs.usda. 
gov/NRl/1 997/summaryrepon/report.pdf> . 



Geography and Environment Z\ \ 



u& 



Abalraci of the United Statea: 2002 



No. 338. Land Covcr/Usc by Slate: 1997 

(In UiouundsolacrM (1 .9*4,130 jiprHHin 1.644.130,000). •» 



Crop- CRP 



Range- Fotol 



Cilininw . . . . 

CoMrada 

ConnecBcul. . . 

JRcMa.. '.'.'.'. 
GMtgU 

Hanll 

Idaho. 

nmoia 

Ion .'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Kanbdiy' '.'.'.'. 

MlM. ..'.'..'. 
Mvytond 

McMgui 

iSaouil ■ '. '. 

Nebruka'!! 

NwKia 

MwHvmwhHi 

Nmfvti..'.'. 
Nonli CanHtna . 
NwftDakMa. . 
Ohia 

OUahana... . 

Pamayhonta. . 
niocH Eslvid. . 

South Canillna. 

gnuffiDa Kaa . 

Ikm 

UM 

VIMi* - - . . 

WMvlmMa' ' 
WUconlrr. . . 



1,>44.130 1 

iMi^ezi 1 



3e.059 

36'017 

52,661 
2S.B63 

31.377 
ZO.BBS 
7.870 






405,077 4DU65 



1.049 1 8.209 13.93£ 



33.673 93 5 



&SS 2.865 



72B 2,502 



321 2.032 



1.009 1.635 



30.527 28.429 86.6 5.352 799 3.679 



<7,ie7 95 3 19,«9 

10,079 142 701 

4,353 73,3 134 



1,801 23.089 826 



31.361 
45)251 

44,738 

62,181 28.856 46.4 

813 
10.839 

40,358 
Ze.B74 
171.052 
S4,339 
e.154 

27.087 

15I5O8 

62!603 

2.307 



1.129 t0,669 



1.136 7,963 



26.938 3.906 



9.286 12.643 



21,876 518 



?7.302 1.004 



SscuntyAciat laas <o aaalU privaM 

UOoraiory. SummaiY Repon. TMfNa»on*Besi>uic«/ni«ntoiy, 
aov'WRI/1997'8unimaryreporKro[jon pO(> 



landowners id Donvan highfy orodlble cioptand I0 ife^lafr 
December 2000! Sm an 



2 1 2 Geography and Environment 



J* Buraau. StaliHicaJ Abatiact at ■■• UnMd SI 



n EicvMlons by Sute and Other Araa 



Backbons Mounwn . . 



Frwadm Twp., Wayne C 
S«^2i,T1IXIM, H^tW, 
OmmM Counlv '. . , 



Jotinson Tiip., KJmbBK Co 

Bounlay PMk 

MouNMohlnVon. .. 

WllMlWPNk . . . 
Mninl Mwcy. . . . 
UoumMMIwU . . 
While Bune. Slope Co 
Campbell HW 






*3X 
3.1(0 



«ef(»ort» nive^ 

AttwiOcOoeBn '. 

AMnilcOcBsn . 

GuKof MuKxi 
SI Fi«ncn FlivBr 

Mlssoun nivB' . 

Ananlic Ocean . 

Anantig Ocean . 



Ohio nivsr 
LITila River 

Delaware Hive' 



Lake Micnigan 



867 5700 1.739 



eSO 2S9 

3^300 1,00/ 



' Sea IBval. ' AI DE-PA slat* Uns. 



"Sec .' denotes section; "T, " KmnWiip: "I 



Sojrce: U.S. Geological Survey, tor NghesI and kn 



St points. Bevatfoni and OolonoBS in ffwuntsd SUM. 1990; tor mt 



Geography and Env\toi\m«r«. "i.N'i 



No. 340. U.S. Wetland Resources and Deepwater Habitats by lype: 
1 986 and 1 997 

pn thousands of acrss (144,673.3 r sprsssnt s 144,677,300). Wetlands and deepwater habitirts are defined separaMy because 
d does not ndude perm a nent water bodtos. Deepwater habitats are p erm a nendy Hooded land Mng benw the dee|nwHui 



the term wetland 

boundary of wetlands. Deepwater habitats include environments wt)ere surface water is permanent and ciften deep, so ttial < 

rather than air. is the principal medium within which the dominant organisms live, whether or not they are attached to the 

As in wetlands, the dominant plants are hydrophytes; however, the substrates are In gerieral terms, wetlands are larKlB wtwre 

ration with water is the dominant factor determining the nature of soil development and ttie types of plant and animal communi- 
ties living in the soil and on its surface. The single feature that most wetlands share is soil or substrate that is at least pe ri od taal y 
saturated with or covered by water. WetlarKls are lands transitional between terrestnal and aquatic systems where the 
is usually at or near the surface or the land is covered by shallow vvater] 



Wetland or deepwater category 



Charat, 
1907 1909 10 1W 



All wetlands and deep wat e r habitats, total 

All deepwater habitats, total 

Lacustrine ' 



Riverine 

Estuarine subtidal ^. 



All wetlands, total 

Intertidal wetlands * 

Marine intertidal 

Estuarine intertidal nonvegetated 
Estuarine intertidal vegetated. . . 

Freshwater wetlands 

Freshwater nonvegetated 

Freshwater vegetated. 

Freshwater emergent ^ 

Freshwater forestmj ® 



Freshwater shrub 



144,673.3 

38,537.6 

14.608.9 

6.291.1 

17.637.6 

108,135.7 

5,336.6 
133.1 
580.4 

4,623.1 

100,799.1 
5.251.0 
95,548.1 
26,383.3 
51,929.6 
17.235.2 



144,130J 

38.645.1 

14.725.3 

6,255.9 

17.683.9 

106.491.7 

5.326.2 
130.9 
580.1 

4,615.2 

100.165.5 
5,914.3 
94.251.2 
25,157.1 
50.726.5 
18,365.6 



107.5 

11M 

-3&2 

26J 

-644 

-10.4 
•22 
•OS 
-7J9 



-1.296J 

-1226.2 

-1.201.1 

1,13a4 



^ The lacustrine system includes deepwater habitats with all of the following characteristics: (1) situated in a topographic 
depression 




than 30 percent coverage; (3) total area exceeds 20 acres. ' The riverine ^stem includes deepwater habitat 
a channel, with the exception of habitats with \water containing ocean derived salts in excess of 0.5 parts per thousand. " The 
estuarine system consists of deepwater tidal habitats and adiacent tidal wetland that are usually semi-endoeed t>y land tMM have 
open, partly obstructed, or sporadic access to the open ocean, and in which ocean vvater is at least occasionally dHulad by 
freshwater runoff from the land. Subtidal is wtiere the sut>8trate is continuously sut>merged t>y marine or estuarine walsis. 
* Intertidal is where the substrate is exposed and flooded by tides. Intertidal includes the splash zone of coastal waters. 
^ Emergent wetlands are characterized by erect, rooted, hert>aceous hydrophytes, excluding mosses and Hcfiens. This yeoe ta Bon 
is present for most of the growing season in nx>st years. These wetlands are ysuallv dominated by perennial plants. * F orested 
wetlands are characterized by woody vegetation that is 20 feet tall or taller. ' Shrub wetlands indude areas dominated t>y woody 
vegetation less than 20 feet tall. The species include true shrutw. young trees, and trees or shrubs that are small or stuniM 
because of environmental conditions. 

Source: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Status and Trends of Wetlands in ttw Contenninous Ur^ted States, 1966 to 1997. 
January 2001. See also <ftp7/wetlands.fws.gov/status-trends/SandT2000Reportlowres.pdf>. 

No. 341. Water Areas for Selected Major Bodies of Water: 1990 

(Includes only that portion of body of water under tt)e jurisdiction of the United States, excluding Hawaii. One square mfle=2^ 
square kilometers] 



Body of water and state 


Area 


Body of water and state 


Area 


Sq. mi. Sq. km. 


Sq. mi. Sq. km. 


Atlantic Coast water tKxJies: 


2.747 7.115 
1.6?? 4.200 
914 2.368 
614 1.591 
598 1.548 
492 1.274 
218 565 
215 558 
172 445 
116 301 
111 286 
105 272 

813 2.105 
733 1.897 
631 1.635 
616 1.596 
511 1.323 
310 802 
271 702 
253 656 
245 635 
236 611 
212 549 


San Francisco Bay (CA) 


264 684 


Chesapealce Bay (MD-VA) 

Pamlico Sound (NC) 

Long Island Sound (CT-NY) 

Delaware Bay (DE-NJ) 

Cape Cod Bay (MA) 


Wlllapa Bay (WA 


125 325 


HoodCanal (WA 

Interior water bodies: 

Uke Michigan (IL-IN-MI-WI) 

Lake Superior (MI-MN-WI) ^ 

Lake Huron (Ml) ^ 


117 303 

22.342 57,806 
20.557 53243 


Alt>emarle Sound (f^C) 


8.800 22,792 


Biscayrie Bav (FL) 


Lake Erie (MI-NY-OH-PA) ' 

Uke Ontario (NY) ' 

Great Salt Lake (UT) 


5,033 13.036 


Buzzards Bay (MA) 


3,446 8.926 


Tangier Sound (MD-VA) 

Currituclt Sound (NC) 


1.836 4.756 


Green Bay (MI-WI) 


1 .396 3.617 


Pocomoke Sound (MD-VA) 

Chincoteague Bay (MD-VA) 

Gulf Coast water bodies: 

Mississippi Sound (AL-LA-MS) 

Laguna Madre (TX) 


Lake Okeechobee (FL) 


663 1,717 


Lake Sakakawea IND) 


563 1,459 


1 Rke Oahe (ND-SD) 

Lake of the Woods (MN) ^ 

Uke Champlain (NY-VT) ' 

Alaska water bodies: 
Chatham Strait 


538 1.394 
462 1.196 
414 1.072 


Lake Pontchartrain (LA) 






1 .559 4,039 


Ftorida Bay (FL) 


Prince William Sound 






1 ,382 3.579 


Breton Sound (LA) 


Clarence Strait 






1.199 3.107 


Mobile Bay (AL) 


Iliamna Uke 






1.022 2.646 


Lake Borgne (LA-MS) 


Frederick Sound 






792 2 051 


Mataoorda Bay (TX) 


Sumner Strait 






791 2.048 


Atchafalaya Bay (LA) 


Steohens Passaoe 






702 1 819 


Galveston Bay (TX) 

Tampa Bay (FL) 


Kvtchak Bay 


640 1.659 


Montaaue otrait 






463 1.190 


Pacific Coast water txxJies: 


Becharof Uke 


447 1.150 


Puget Sound (WA) floa 2 092 


Icy Strait 


436 1.130 











^ Area measurements for Uke Champlain. Uke Erie, Uke Huron, Uke Ontario. Uke St. Clair, Uke Superior, and Lake of 
the Woods include only those portions under the jurisdiction of the United States. 

Source: U. S. Census Bureau, unpublished data from the Census TIGER ^^ database. 



2 1 4 Geography and Environment 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statisticai Abstract of the IMNed 



No. 342. Flows of Largest U.S« River»— Longth* Dischargo* and Drainage Area 



River 



Location of mouth 



Source stream 
(name and location) 





Average 






discharge 






at mouth 


Drainage 




(1.000 


area 


Lengtti 
(miles) ^ 


cubic ft. 


(1.000 


per second) 


sq. mi.) 


2.540 


^93 


,.*529 


^.340 


"V50 


1.980 


225 


!328 


1.900 


348 


^396 


1,900 


• 


336 


1.460 


41 


161 


1.450 


- 


246 


1.420 


58 


95.1 


1.310 


281 


203 


1.290 


56 


93.2 


1.280 


- 


45.6 


1,240 


265 


*258 


1.040 


56.9 


108 


990 


- 


84.9 


926 


- 


44.3 


906 


• 


46.9 


886 


68 


40.9 


862 


• 


42.3 


800 


• 


17.6 


774 


67.2 


44.6 


743 


. 


59.5 


724 


67 


48 


692 


• 


70 


659 


41 


44.5 


649 


- 


58.2 



Yyinn 

Sl Lawrence 

Rio Grande 

Arkansas 

Ctiomtio. . 

Atchafalaya " 

Ohio 

FM 

Brazos 

Columbia 

Snaiie 

naiiB 

Psoot 

Canadtan 

Temsaee 

(kiiorado (of Texas) 
North Canadtan . . . 

Mobis 

Kansas 

KuaiGOlcwim 

YUowstone 

Tanana 

Gia 



Missouri 

Louisiana 

Alasica 

Canada 

Mexico-Texas 

Arkansas 

Mexico 

Louisiana 

IIHnois-Kentucky . . . 

Louisiana 

Texas 

OregorvWashington . 

Washington 

Nebrastca 

Texas 

Oklahoma 

ICentucfcy 

Texas 

Oklahoma 

Alabama 

Kansas 

Alaska 

North Dakota 

Alaska 

Arizona 



Red Rock Creek. MT 

Misstasippl River, MN 

Mcf^ River. Canada 

Kkxth River. MN 

Rio Grande. CO 

East Fork Arkansas River. CO . . . 

Cotorado River. CO 

Tierra Blanca Creek, NM 

Allegheny River. PA 

Tierra Blary» Creek. NM 

Blackwater Draw. NM 

Cohjmbia River. (Canada 

Snake River. WY 

Grizzly Creek. CO 

Pecos River. NM 

Canacton River. CO 

CourttxHJse Creek, NC 

Cotorado River, TX 

Corrumpa Creek, NM 

Tickanettey Creek. GA 

Arikaree River. CO 

South Fork Kuskokwim River, AK . 
North Folk Yellowstone River. WY. 

Nabesna River. AK 

MkMIe Fork Gila River. NM 



i zero. ^ From source to mouth. ^ Drainage area includes both the United States and Canada. ^ Tiw length 
from the source of the Missouri River to the Mississippi River and thence to the Gulf of Mexkx) is about 3.710 miles. * Includes 
about 1^,0(X) cubic ft. per second diverted from the Mississippi into the Atehafalaya River but excludes tt>e ftow of the Red 
Ffiver. ' Exdudes the drainage areas of tt>e Red and Atchafalaya Rivers. ° in east-central Louisiarui, the Red River flows into 
thaAfchafalaya River, a dtotrfbutary of the Mississippi River. Data on average discharge, length, and drainage area include the Red 
Kvar. but exclude aH wafer diverted into the Atchafalaya from the Mississippi River. 

Source: U.S. Geotogteal Sun^. Largest Rivers in the United States, Open RIe Report 87-242, May 1990. 

No. 343. U.S. Miter Withdrawals and Consumptive Use Per Day 
by End Use: 1 940 to 1 995 

[Indudss Puerto Rkx>. Withdrawal signifies water physk^ally withdrawn from a source. Includes fresh and saline water, excludes 
«atef ussd for hy d r o el e c tr i c power] 





Total 
(Wl. gal.) 


Pe^ 
capita 

(Oal.) 


Inigation 
(birgal.) 


Public supply ^ 


Rural* 
(bil. gal.) 


Industrial 

and 

misc.* 

(bil. gal.) 


Steam 

electric 

utilities 

(bil. gal.) 


Ytar 


Total 
(bil. gal.) 


capita'^ 
(gal.) 


WITHDRAWALS 

1940 


140 
180 
240 
270 
310 
370 
420 
440 
399 
408 
402 

61 
77 
87 
96 

100 
92 
94 

100 


1.027 
1.185 
1.454 
1.500 
1,602 
1.815 
1.972 
1,953 
1.650 
1,620 
1,500 

339 
403 
427 
451 
440 
380 
370 
374 


71 
89 
110 
110 
120 
130 
140 
150 
137 
137 
134 

52 
66 
73 
80 
83 
74 
76 
81 


10 
14 
17 
21 
24 
27 
29 
34 
38 
41 
40 

3.5 
5.2 
5.9 
6.7 
71 


75 
145 
148 
151 
155 
166 
168 
183 
189 
195 
192 

25 
34 
36 
38 

1 


3.1 
3.6 
3.6 
3.6 
4.0 
4.5 
4.9 
5.6 
7.8 
7.9 
8.9 

2.8 
3.2 
3.4 
3.4 
3.9 
9.2 
6.9 
9.9 


29 
37 
39 
38 
46 
47 
45 
45 
31 
30 
29 

3.0 
3.4 
4.1 
4.2 
5.0 
6.1 
6.7 
4.8 


23 


1950 


40 


1955 


72 


1980 


100 


1965 


130 


1970 


170 


1975 


200 


1960 


210 


1985 


187 


1990 


195 


1995 


190 


CONSUMPTIVE USE 
1960 


0.2 


1965 


0.4 


197D 


0.6 


1975 


1.9 


1960 


3.2 


1965 


6.2 


1990 


4.0 


1966 


3.7 







on U.S. Census Bureau resident population as of July 1. ' Includes commercial water withdravvals. 

: Bassd on population served. * Rural farm and nonfarm household and garden use. and water for farm stock and dairies. 
For 1940 to 1960. Includes manufacturino and mineral industries, rural commercial industries, air-conditioning, resorts, hotels. 
moMs. mOtary and o<lher state and Federal agencies, and rpisceilaneous; thereafter, includes manufacturing, mining and mineral 
pwcs sai ng, ordnance, construction, and miscellaneous. ^ Public supply consumptive use included in end-use categories. 

Source: 1940-1960. U.S. Bureau of Domestic Business Development, based principally on committee prints, Water Resources 
AcMOea in the LhUed States, tor the Seriate Committee on National Water Resources. U.S. Senate, thereafter, U.S. Geological 
Survey, EsSm a tad Use of Water in the United States in 1995, circular 1200. and previous quinquennial issues. Next update 
expected in 2003 «vill include data for 2000. 



Geography and Envvronm^tw. 7.\^ 



US. 



Abttmaoiihe United States: 2002 



nn mllltoni ol g 



: 1995 

IV <4O1M0 



Consumptiv* U$«-^Uit« and 

401.500.000,000). VKVpl M noMd. ngur** may I 



nuaddduaiat 



Oround Suitice 



[nioaiion supply Ifial 



Source: U.S. OaolO0lcal Sun 



U.NM »,»» 



IBO 1,950 



S9e 1.400 



1.700 1,800 



1.320 asa 

'860 8!830 



1.300 8,780 M,800 



753 5.200 



5,740 BQI 



677 2,580 



9.450 3,4:ro 2, OS 



826 358 7,900 30 911 622 

2:530 '146 4!470' 217 1.330 

U700 335 6>20 6.590 100 118 

bale reuse 'i^uOoi Pueno Rico ar« Viroii talantte. 

I. Eslmaled Ute ot Waur nt me unma Slates ■n f99£, circular 1200. N 



2 1 6 Geography and Environment 



U.S. Water Quality Conditions by lypo of Waterbody: 1998 

)) of tw Clean Water Act requirea states and other jurisdictions to assess the health of their waters and the extent 
watofs support vvater quality standards. Section 30Mb) requires tttat states sut)mit reports describing water quaRty 
he Environmental Protection Agency every 2 years, water quality standards have three etoments (deiignated uses. 
pad to protect each use, and an antidegradation policy. For information on survey methodology and a seoss ment cri- 
xtj 



(tern 



Rivers and 

streams 

(miles) 



Lakes, 
reservoirs, 
and ponds 

(acres) 



Esturaries 
(sq. miles) 



Great Lakes 

shoreline 

(miles) 



Ocean 

shoreline 

(miles) 



kHaisize 



veateried 



weotened 



red t>y leading sources 
cdeposjtion 



iacfwrges^int sources. 

)p production 

Hi of wastes 

oim sources 



J crop productkm . . 

ixiractkxi 

If and storm sewers 



3,662,256 

842,426 
23 



463.441 

85.544 

291.264 

55 
10 
35 



170.750 
(NA) 
20.020 
18.451 
57.763 
13.795 
31.156 
19,928 
29.087 
33.004 
46.484 
25.231 
32.310 



41,593.748 

1730,370 
42 



7.927.486 
1.565.175 
7.897.110 

46 

9 
45 



2.417.801 

616.701 

(NAj 

417.662 

1,179.344 
502,760 
410.204 
381.073 
666.116 
654.812 
553.064 
(NA) 
931.567 



90,465 

28.687 

32 



13.439 

2.766 

12.482 

47 
10 
44 



1.827 
2.922 

P! 

531 
1.926 

(NAj 
1.508 
3.528 
5.223 

(NA) 

585 
3.482 



5,521 

4,060 

90 



85 

103 

4.762 

2 

2 

96 



66,646 

3.130 

5 



2.496 
257 
377 

80 
8 

12 




^ Includes watertxxJies accessed as not attainable for one or more uses. Most states do not assess ail 
during the 2-year reporting cyde. but use a "rotating basin approach" whereby all waters are monitored over a 
^ Based on accessment of available data, water quality supports all designated uses. Water quality meets 
or numberic criteria adopted to protect and support a designated use. ^ Although all assessed uses are cunBntty 
w a declining trend in water quality. Projections based on this trend indicate water quality will be impaired in the future. 
IB taken to prevent further degradatk>n. ^ Impaired or not attainable. The reporting state or iurisdk:tion has 
jse^attainability analysis" and demonstrated that support of one or more designated bencmcial uses is not attainable 
: bMotftcaA. cfiemica). physical, or ecorwmic/sodal concMons. ' Excludes unkrtown and natural sources. 
J.S. Environmental Protection Agency. National Water Quality Invwttory: 1996 Report to Congress, June 2000. 

Oil Spills in U.S. Water— Number and Volume: 1997 to 2000 

orted discharges into U.S. navigable waters, inckjding territorial waters (extencfing 3 to 12 miles from the coastl^). 
I contiguous zor)e. onto shoreline, or into other waters that threaten the marine environment. Data found in Marine 
wnent System] 



araderistx: 


Number of spills 


Spill volume (gaik)ns) 


1907 1098 1098 2000 


1907 1900 1900 2000 




8,624 8,315 8,530 8,354 

8.299 7.962 8.212 8.058 

243 259 240 219 

40 54 42 37 

14 15 18 12 

15 15 10 16 
11 8 12 6 

1-44 
12 12 

87 109 148 150 

505 644 758 623 

2.341 2.190 1.756 1.838 

156 119 129 96 

29 25 31 32 

1.821 1.944 1.924 1,816 

811 891 1,299 1,248 

858 790 907 801 

2.016 1.603 1.587 1.750 

124 104 92 111 

252 220 227 229 
4.971 4.848 5.361 5.220 

838 937 1.019 1.054 
32 45 25 25 

486 571 571 566 
1.921 1.590 1.244 1.149 


942,574 885,303 1,172.448 1.431,370 


yritons): 


39.082 38.093 39,119 39.355 




81.895 86,606 86.530 78.779 


) 


78.117 96.743 74,582 67,529 


) 


58.016 64.609 73.798 45.512 


X) 


109.288 108,148 66.274 112.415 


XX) 


282.176 216.335 301.510 108,400 


.000 

X)0.000 

ind over 

lan 


84.000 245.406 266,380 
210,000 274.769 285.230 713.000 

40.857 6.674 29,440 135.010 


em 


32.841 192,775 150,694 36,301 


000 


105.462 181,372 45.786 112.069 


s 


4.311 3,006 906 4.535 


canals 

ounds 


210.270 63 624 349 

182.676 280.651 504.264 663,404 

46.450 24,234 136,650 49.783 

45,932 97.223 105,213 273.095 




273.775 99.305 198,872 156.624 




22.429 56.673 8,414 606.176 




165,649 248.089 158.977 133,540 


seals 


192.801 316.473 409.084 291.927 
204.935 166.269 367.537 311.604 




224.122 47.863 36.140 17.021 


nvessels 


72.208 32.584 147,704 45.136 
60.430 17.352 44.593 23,966 







irtts or rounds to zero. 

I.S. Coast Guard. <http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/nmc/response/stats/Summary.htm> (accessed (^ December 2001). 



Geography and Env\TOt\XT\^x\X 1M 



Abstract of the United States: 2002 



No. 347. National Ambient Air PoiluUnt Concentrations: 1990 to 1999 

[Data represent annual composite averages of pollutant twsed on daily 24-hour averages of monitoring stationa, eMoapl cartxin 

daily mndmum 




Pollutant 




Monitor- 
ing 
stations, 
number 



Air 
quality 
stan- 
dard^ 



1M9 



1994 



1 



1997 



Cart)on monoxide 

Ozone 

Ozone 

Sulfur dioxide . . . 
Particulates 

(PM-10) 

Nitrogen dioxide . 
Lead 



ppm. . 
ppm. 
ppm. . 
ppm. . 

pg/m^. 



388 
703 
705 
480 

954 
230 
175 



^.12 

*0.08 

0.03 

*50 

0.053 

*1.5 



5.8 

0.112 

0.085 

0.0081 

29.2 

0.020 

0.1 



5.1 

0.107 

0.084 

0.0069 

26.0 

0.020 

0.05 



4.6 

0.112 

0.087 

0.0056 

24.8 

0.019 

0.05 



4.3 

0.105 

0.083 

0.0056 

23.9 

0.018 

0.04 



3.9 

0.105 

0.062 

0.0054 

23.8 

0.018 
0.04 



3^ 

0.110 

0.066 

0.0053 

23.6 

0.018 

0.04 



3.7 

0.107 

OJO&S 

0.00S2 

23.9 
0.018 



^ Refers to the primary National Amt)ient Air Quality Standard that protects the pnjblic health. ^ Based on 8'hour standard 
of 9 ppm. ^ Based on 1-hour standard of .12 ppm. * Based on 6-hour starnJard of .08 ppm. ^The partlculales (PM-lffl 
standard replaced the previous standard for total suspended particulates in 1987. ° Based on 3-month standard ol1.5 \iq/nr. 

Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. National Air Quality and Emissions Trends Report. anrHjal. 



No. 348. National Air Pollutant Emissions: 1970 to 2000 

[In thouaaiKla of tons, except aa IridlcatMl. PM-lO=Particulate matter of less than 10 microns. Methodologies to 

for 1970 to 1980 period and 1985 to present emissions differ. Beginning with 1985. the methodology for more recent yearn is 

descrit>ed in the document available at <http7/www.epa.govAtn/chiefArerKls/trends99/neiproc99.pdf>. 



Year 



PM-10, 

fugitive Sulfur 

PM-10 dust^ dioxide 



Volatile 
Nitrogen organic Carbon 

dioxides compounds morwxide 



dons) 



1970 
1975 
1980 
1985 

1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 
1994 

1995 
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 
2000 



13.042 
7.671 
7,119 
4.831 

5.068 
4.727 
4,615 
4,533 
4.753 

4.585 
4,676 
4.828 
4.452 
4.815 
5.555 



(NA) 
(NA 
(NA) 
36.567 

22.813 
22,759 
22,634 
22,969 
24,003 

21,346 
18.563 
19.259 
19.261 
19.213 
19.309 



31.161 
28.011 
25,905 
23.658 

23.679 
23.044 
22.813 
22,474 
21.875 

19.189 
19.433 
19.925 
20.045 
19.335 
18.187 



20.928 
22.632 
24.384 
23.198 

24.170 
24.338 
24.732 
25.116 
25.474 

25.051 
25,658 
25.910 
25.572 
24.970 
24.442 



30,982 
26.079 
26,336 
24,428 

21,053 
21,249 
20.862 
21.099 
21.683 

20,918 
19.906 
20,305 
19.256 
19.421 
20,366 



129,444 
116.757 
117.434 
117.013 

99.119 

101,797 

99.007 

99.791 

103.713 

94,058 
104.600 
105.466 
101,246 
102.356 
109.300 



220.868 

158.669 

74.153 

22.890 

4.975 
4.169 
3.810 
3,916 
4,047 

3.929 
4.077 
4.137 
4,057 
4,199 
4,228 



NA Not available, 
and wind erosion. 



Sources such as agricultural tilling, construction, mining and quarrying, paved roads, unpaved roads. 



No. 349. Air Pollutant Emissions by Pollutant and Source: 2000 

[In thouaanda of tons, except aa indicated. See headnote. Table 348] 



Source 



Particu- 
lates ^ 



Sulfur Nitrogen 
dioxide oxides 



Volatile 
organic 

com- Carbon 
pounds monoxide 



(tons) 



Total emiaaiona 

Fuel combustion, stationary sources 

Electnc utilities 

Industrial 

Other fuel combustion 

Residential 

industrial processes 

Chemical and allied product manufacturing 

Metals processina 

Petroleum and related industries 

Other 

Solvent utilization 

Storage and transport 

Waste disposal and recycling 

Highway vehicles 

Light-duty gas vehtcies and motorcycles . . 

Light-duty trucks 

Heavy-duty gas vehicles 

Diesels 

Off highway ^ . 

Miscellaneous •* 



24,866 

997 

270 

244 

483 

363 

605 

67 

153 

30 

355 

7 

87 

544 

273 

59 

36 

11 

168 

425 

21.927 



18,187 

14.876 

11.389 

2.894 

593 

124 

1.457 

268 

411 

346 

432 

1 

5 

35 

314 

108 

75 

13 

118 

1.478 

21 



24.442 

9.649 

5.266 

3.222 

1.161 

746 

858 

134 

91 

146 

487 

3 

17 

89 

8.150 

2.790 

1.608 

439 

3.312 

5.101 

576 



20.366 

1,206 

64 

185 

957 

929 

1.399 

407 

79 

433 

480 

4.827 

1.225 

582 

5,035 

2.798 

1,655 

323 

260 

3,382 

2.710 



109.300 

4,590 

445 

1.221 

2.924 

2.772 

3.836 

1.112 

1.735 

369 

620 

2 

74 

3.609 

48.469 

26.718 

15.837 

3.680 

2.234 

27.914 

20.806 



NA Not available. Represents both PM-10 and PM-10 fugitive dust; see Table 348. ^ Includes emissions from fwm 
tractors and other farm machinery, constnjctlon equipment, industnal machinery, recreational marine vessels, and smal ganeial 
utility engines such as lawn mowers. Includes emissions such as from forest fires and other kinds of burning, vartoui 
agricultural activities, fugitive dust from paved and unpaved roads, and other constructk}n and mining activities, and nahjiil 
sources. 

Source of Tables 348 and 349: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Air Quality and Emissions Tnnda Report. 
1999. EPA-454/R-01-004: and Intemet site at <www.epa.gov/ainrends/> and <http://www.epa.gov/oar/aqtmdOQ/bcochuiW 
00brochure.pdf> (released September 2001). 



2 1 8 Geography and Environment 



U.S. Census Bureau, Statistk^ Abetract of the IMNed 



No. 350. Emissions of Grooniiouso Gasos by lVp€ and Source: 1990 to 2000 

[Eminion estimates were mandated t>y Congress through Section 1605(a) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Title XVI). (aaees that 
oonlain cartxin can be measured either in terms of the full moiecuiar weight of the gas or just in terms of their cartxxi oonlsnt. Both 
are utilized below] 



Type and source 



Unit 



1999 



1995 



1999 



1997 



1996 



1999 



CARBON EQUIVALEIfT 



Total emissions . . 
Cartwn dkixide, total. . 

Energy sources . . . 

C02 m natural gas. . 

Cement production . 

Gas flaring 

Other industrial. . . . 

Waste combustion. . 

Other, adiustments . 

Methane 

Nttrous oxide 

MFCs. PFCs. and SFj. 

GAS 

Cartxxi dkMdde 

Methane, total 

Energy sources . . . 

Wfeote maruigement 

Agricultural sources. 

Industrial sources . . 

moua oxide, total ^ . . 

Agriculture 

Energy sources . . . 
Wsste management 
Industrial sources . . 



Hjfdrofluorocaftxjns (MFCs): 

HFC-23 

HFC-125 

HFC-134a 

HFC-143a 



Peffluorocartxxis (PFCs): 
CFi 



a 



Solfurlwxaliuoride(SFB) 



Mil. 
Mil. 
Mil. 
Mil. 
Mil. 
Mil. 
Mil. 
Mil. 
Mil. 
Mil. 
Mil. 
Mil. 



Mil. 
Mil. 
MU. 
Mil. 
Mil. 

My. 



metric tons 
metric tons 
metric tons 
metric tons 
metric toris 
metric tons 
metric tons 
metric tons 
metric tons 
metric tons 
metric tons 
metric tons 



metric tons 
metric tons 
metric tons 
metric tons 
metric tons 
metnc tons 



1 ,000 metric tons 
1 .000 nf>etric tons 
1 .000 metric tons 
1 ,000 metric torts 
1 .000 metric tons 

1 .000 metric tons 
1 .000 metric tons 
1 .000 metric torts 
1 ,000 metric tons 

1 ,000 metric tons 
1 ,000 metric tons 
1,000 metric torvs 
1 ,000 metric tons 



1.678.3 

1,355.3 

1,351.6 

3.8 

9.1 

2.5 

7.3 

4.8 

-23.6 

199 

94 

30 



4,969.4 

31.67 

11.90 

11.36 

6.29 

0.12 

1,169 

846 

210 

17 

96 

3.0 

(Z) 
0.6 

(Z) 

5 

1 



1.769.2 

1.438.2 

1.421.1 

4.6 

10.1 

4.7 

7.6 

6.3 

-16.1 

195 

101 

35 



5.273.5 

31.08 

11.58 

10.33 

9.04 

0.13 

1,257 

861 

268 

18 

111 

2.3 

0.5 

14.4 

0.1 



4 

1 

(Z) 

1 



1.815.7 

1.487.7 

1.471.7 

4.8 

10.1 

4.5 

7.9 

6.5 

-17.9 

188 

101 

39 



5.454.8 

29.94 

11.17 

9.81 

8.83 

0.13 

1,245 

847 

264 

18 

116 

2.7 

0.7 

19.0 

0.2 



5 

1 

(Z) 

1 



1.838.0 

1.509.0 

1 .493.4 

4.9 

10.5 

4.2 

8.0 

7.0 

-19.0 

186 

99 

42 



5.533.0 

29.64 

11.18 

9.35 

8.98 

0.13 

1.226 

866 

268 

18 

74 

2.6 

0.9 

23.5 

0.3 



4 

1 

(Z) 

1 



1.836.9 

1.510.9 

1.495.4 

4.9 

10.7 

3.9 

8.1 

6.9 

-19.0 

181 

99 

46 



5.540.0 

28.88 

10.88 

8.86 

9.00 

0.13 

1.222 

875 

270 

18 

58 

3.4 

1.1 

26.9 

0.5 

4 

1 

(Z) 

1 



1,860.7 

1,535.7 

1.5175 

4.9 

10.9 

4.0 

7.9 

7.1 

-16.4 

180 

100 

45 



5.630.7 

28.66 

10.94 

8.59 

9.00 

0.13 

1,239 

870 

293 

19 

57 

2.6 

1.3 

30.4 

0.7 



4 

1 

(Z) 

1 



1,906.3 

1.583.3 

1.561.7 

5.0 

11.3 

4.5 

8.1 

7.1 

-14.3 

177 

99 

47 



5,805.5 
28.2 
11.01 
7.99 
9.06 
0.14 

1,231 

870 

285 

19 

56 

2.6 

1.6 

33.7 

0.9 



4 

1 

(Z) 

1 



Z Less ttian 50 or 500 metric tons. ^ Includes minor sources not shown separately. 

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States. Series DOE/EIA- 
0573(2000). annual. See also <http://www.eia.doe.gov/put)/oiaf/1605/cdrorTv'pdf/ggrpt/057300.pdf> (issued Novemt)er 2001). 



No. 351. Munidpai Soiid Waste Generation, Recovery, and 
1 980 to 2000 



(kt mWlona of tone (151.6 repre a e nts 151,600,000), except as Indicated. Covers post-consumer residential and commercial 
solid wastes wttich comprise the major portion of typical municipal collections. Excludes mining, agricultural and industrial 
prooassing. demofition and constmction wastes, sewage sludge, and junked autos and obsolete equipment wastes. Based on 
maleriaMlows estimating procedure and wet weight as generated] 



Item and material 



1900 1990 



1994 



1995 



1 



1997 



1 



1999 



2000 



Mtete generated 

Per person per day (lb.) .... 

Materials recovered 

Pw person per day (lb.) ... 

Comtxjstion tor energy recovery 
Psr person per day (lb.) .... 



Combustion without energy recovery 
^ person per day {Vb) 

LarxM. other dtepoeal 

Psr person per day (lb.) 



Perosnt distribution of generation: 

Papsr and papertx>ard 

Glass 

Mstals 



Rubber and leather 

Textiles 

^^' — ■ 

WOOG 

Food 
Yard 
Other wastes 



151.6 


205.2 


214.2 


211.4 


209.2 


219.1 


223.4 


231.0 


231.9 


3.7 


4.5 


4.5 


4.4 


4.3 


4.4 


4.5 


4.6 


4.5 


14.5 


33.2 


50.6 


54.9 


57.3 


59.4 


61.1 


64.8 


69.9 


0.35 


0.7 


1.1 


1.1 


1.2 


1.2 


1.2 


1.3 


1.4 


2.7 


31.9 


32.5 


35.5 


36.1 


36.7 


34.4 


34.0 


33.7 


0.06 


0.7 


0.7 


0.7 


0.7 


0.8 


0.7 


0.7 


0.7 


11.0 
0.27 


l'! 


:; 


!=! 


i:i 


l^i 


l^! 


f!} 


R 


123.4 


140.1 


131.1 


120.9 


115.8 


123.1 


127.1 


132.1 


128.3 


3.0 


3.1 


2.8 


2.5 


2.4 


2.5 


2.6 


2.7 


2.5 


36.4 


35.4 


37.7 


38.6 


38.1 


38.5 


37.7 


38.2 


37.4 


10.0 


6.4 


6.2 


6.1 


5.9 


5.5 


5.7 


5.6 


5.5 


10.2 


8.1 


7.6 


7.5 


7.7 


7.7 


7.5 


7.7 


7.8 


4.5 


83 


9.0 


8.9 


9.4 


9.9 


10.0 


10.4 


10.7 


2.8 


2.8 


2.9 


2.9 


3.0 


3.0 


3.1 


2.7 


2.7 


1.7 


2.8 


3.4 


3.5 


3.7 


3.8 


3.9 


3.9 


4.0 


4.6 


6.0 


5.3 


4.9 


5.2 


5.3 


5.4 


5.4 


5.5 


8.6 


10.1 


10.0 


10.3 


10.4 


10.1 


11.2 


10.9 


11.2 


18.1 


17.1 


14.7 


14.0 


13.3 


12.8 


12.4 


12.0 


12.0 


3.2 


3.0 


3.2 


3.3 


3.3 


3.4 


3.2 


3.2 


3.2 



^ Combustion without energy recovery is no longer available separately. 

Source: Franidin Associates. Ltd.. Prairie Village, KS. Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste in the United States: 2000. 
P rspa i ed for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 



Geography and Envlroam^tw. 1\^ 



UA 



Abstract of the United States: 2002 



No. 352. Generation and Recovery of Selected Materials in MuniciiMil 
Solid Waste: 1980 to 2000 

[In millions of tons ^151.6 r s p i ] sssn t i 151,600,000), SNOspl as Indic a ted. Covers post-consumer lesidentiai and oommaiGiil 
wastes which compnse the major portion of typical municipal coliections. Excludes mining, agricultural and IrKkMlrial 
demolition and construction wastes, sewage sludge, and junked autos and obsolete equipment wastes. Based on ~ 
estinuiting procedure and wet weight as ger>erated] 



Item and material 



1960 1990 1994 1995 



1997 



Waste generated, total 

Paper and papertx)ard . . . 

Ferrous nietals 

Aluminum 

Other nonferrous metals. . 

Glass 

Plastics 

Yard waste 

Other wastes 



151.8 205J2 214J2 211.4 209J2 2^7J0 223.4 230J0 



Materials recovered, total 



Paper and papert>oard . . 

Ferrous metals 

Aluminum 

Ottier nonferrous metals. 

Glass 

Plastics 

Yard waste 

Ott^er wastes 



Percent of generation recovered, 
total 



Paper and papert>oard . . 

Ferrous metals 

Aluminum 

Other nonferrous metals. 

Glass 

Plastics 

Yard waste 

Ottrer wastes 



55.2 

12.6 

1.7 

1.2 

15.1 

6.8 

27.5 

31.5 

14.5 

11.9 
0.4 
0.3 
0.5 

0.8 



0.6 



9.6 

21.6 

3.2 

17.6 

41.7 

5.3 



1.9 



72.7 

12.6 

2.8 

1.1 

13.1 
17.1 
35.0 
50.7 

33 J2 

20.2 
2.2 
1.0 
0.7 

2.6 
0.4 
4.2 
1.8 



16.2 

27.8 
17.5 
35.7 
63.6 

19.8 
2.3 

12.0 
3.6 



80.8 

11.8 
3.0 
1.3 

13.4 
19.3 
31.5 
53.1 

50.6 

29.5 
4.0 
1.0 
1.0 

3.1 
0.9 
8.0 

3.1 



23.6 

36.5 
33.9 
33.3 
76.9 

23.1 
4.7 

25.4 
5.8 



81.7 

11.6 

3.0 

1.3 

12.8 
18.9 
29.7 
52.4 

54.9 

32.7 
4.1 
0.9 
0.8 

3.1 
1.0 
9.0 
3.2 



26.0 

40.0 
35.3 
30.0 
61.5 

24.2 
5.3 

30.3 
6.1 



79.7 

11.8 

3.0 

1.3 

12.3 
19.8 
27.9 
53.5 

57.3 

32.6 
4.4 
0.9 
0.8 

3.2 

1.1 

10.4 

3.9 



27.4 

40.9 
37.3 
30.0 

61.5 

26.0 
5.6 

37.3 
7.3 



83.3 

12.3 

3.0 

1.3 

12.0 
21.5 
27.7 
55.9 

59.4 

33.6 
4.7 
1.0 
0.8 

2.9 

1.1 

11.5 

3.8 



27.4 

40.3 
38.2 
33.3 
61.5 

24.2 
5.1 

41.5 
6.8 



84.2 

12.4 

3.1 

1.4 

12.6 
22.4 
27.7 
59.6 

61.1 

34.4 
4.3 
0.9 
0.9 

2.9 

1.2 

12.6 

3.9 



27.4 

40.9 
34.7 
29.0 
64.3 

23.0 
5.4 

45.5 
6.5 



88^ 

13.3 

3.1 

1.4 

12.9 
24.1 
27.7 
60.1 

84.8 

36.1 
4.5 
0.9 
0.9 

3.0 

1.3 

14.2 

3.9 



28.1 

40.9 
33.8 
29.0 
64.3 

23.3 
5.4 

51.3 
6.5 



231J 

86.7 

133 

3.2 

1.4 

12.6 
24.7 
27.7 
61J 



30.4 
4.6 
OJ 
0.9 

2.9 

1.3 

1S.S 

4.1 



30.1 

45.4 
34.1 
28.1 
64.3 

22.7 
$J3 

57.0 
64 



- Represents zero. 

Source: Franklin Associates, Ltd.. Prairie Village. KS. Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste in the United Stales: 2000. 
Prepared for the U.S. Environmental Protectx>n Agericy. 



No. 353. Curbside Recycling Programs— Number and Population Served 
by Region: 1995 to 2000 

[For composition of regions, see map. insMe front cover] 



Region 


Number of programs 


Populatk>n served ^ 
(1.000) 




1995 1996 1997 1999 2000 


1995 1996 1997 1999 2000 


Total 


7.375 8,817 8,969 9,349 9,247 

2.210 3.427 3.406 3.414 3.459 

1.281 1.318 1.344 1.581 1.427 

2.985 3.198 3,357 3.477 3.582 

899 874 862 877 779 


121,335 134.630 136,229 139,826 133,101 

37.256 43,052 43.200 43.162 43.482 
31.521 32,798 36,952 37.914 37310 
25.487 27.454 26.970 30.106 22.618 
27.071 31,326 29.107 28.644 29.556 


Northeast 

South 

Midwest 

West 



^ Calculated using population of states reporting data. 

Source: Franklin Associates. Ltd.. Praine Village, KS, Charactenzation of Municipal S(^id Waste in the United States: 2000. 
Prepared for the U S. Environmental Protection Agency. Also in Biocyde Magazine. 



220 Geography and Environment 



U.S. Census Bureau. Statistk^l Abstract of the Uniiad 



No. 354. Toxic Chomical Releases and TVansfers by Media: 198S to 2000 



1,211.6 wpr ww t i 3,211,600,600), •xMptm indlcatMl. Based on reports filed as required by Section 
and Commux 



[In mUions of pounds 

313 of the EmergerK^ Ptannina and Community Riglit-to-Krk)w Act (EPCRA, or Title ill of the Superfund Amendrnents and Reau- 
it io i iM li un Act of 1966). Public Law 99-499. Owners and operators of fadlMes that are classified within Standard Classiflcation Code 
groups 20 through 39. have 10 or more full-time employees, and that manufacture, process, or otherwise uses any listed tcwic chemi- 
cal in quanttHes greater than the established thrwhold in the course of a caierKtar year are covered and required to report] 



Meoia 







Core chemicals ^ 






1966 


1996 


1997 


1996 


1999 


2000 


19.824 


20.173 


19.608 


19.400 


18.913 


18.680 


3,211.6 


1,941.3 


1.943.2 


1326.0 


1,739.6 


1,661^ 


2.790.2 


1.646.9 


1.496.9 


1.401.5 


1,311.4 


1.212.3 


2,180.5 


1.205.2 


993.1 


928.9 


862.6 


800.8 


41.9 


17.1 


18.2 


17.4 


14.4 


14.6 


161.9 


154.7 


131.4 


114.7 


109.3 


111.3 


405.8 


269.9 


354.3 


340.4 


325.0 


285.6 


421.4 


294.5 


446.2 


424.6 


428.2 


449.0 


601.1 


3,043.6 


2.971.5 


2,795.7 


2.890.2 


2.839.3 


n 


2.206.7 


2,137.4 


1.995.6 


2.078.9 


2.009.3 


489.8 


469.4 


440.1 


471.5 


484.9 


325.9 


198.3 


212.7 


211.7 


195.7 


189.0 


231.6 


146.7 


152.0 


147.7 


144.0 


145.7 


43.6 


2.2 


0.0 


0.7 


0.1 


10.4 


NA 


17.684.9 


17.814.7 


18.080.5 


18.605.9 


26.960.5 


NA 


5.869.9 


6.184.2 


6.553.9 


6.388.8 


8.827.3 


NA 


2.286.1 


2.150.8 


2.061.6 


2.135.6 


2.109.0 


NA 


2.591.3 


2.543.0 


2.504.0 


2.577.1 


2.438.7 


NA 


477.7 


484.0 


447.8 


468.9 


489.8 


NA 


4.181.9 


4.217.9 


4.347.0 


4.989.2 


11.141.6 


NA 


394.8 


371.8 


387.5 


348.3 


350.3 


(NA 


1.881.2 


1.863.0 


1.778.7 


1.698.0 


1,603.8 



Total (adilfes reporting . . . 

Total tslsasis 

On-sits releases 

Air emissions 

Surface water 

Underground injection 

Releases to land. . . . 
Off-site releases 



lotal transfers off-site for 
further wnsle manaoement . . . 

Transfers to recycling 

Transfers to energy recovery. 
TrarKfers to treatment 



Transfers to POTWs 
Ottwr off-sNs transfsrs 



Total production-ralated waste managed . 

I^scyded orvsJte 

Rscyded off-site 

Energy recovery orv-slte 

Energy recovery off-slts 

Treated orvsite 

Treated off-tite 

Quantity released on- and off-site . . . 



NA Not avaiiable. Chemicals covered for all reporting years. Excludes chemicals removed from the list, those added in 
1990. 1994. and 1995, and aluminum oxide. amrTK>nla. hydrochloric ackJ. PBT chemicals, sulfuric add. var^dium and vanadium 
compounds. ^ POTW (Publicly Owned Treatment Work) is a wastewater treatment facility that is owned by a state or municipality. 

No. 355. Toxic Ciiemicai Releases by industry: 2000 

(In mHlons of pounds (7,1004) rspresents 7,100,600,000), sxcept m Indlcstsd. "Original Industries" include owners and 
operators of facuitiee tfiat are classified within Standard Classification Code groups 20 through 39. have 10 or more full-time 
«(nployees. and that manufacture, process, or otherwise uses any listed toxic chemical in quantities greater than the estat)lished 
9ireshold in tfie course of a calendar year are covered and requirsd to report. Beginning In 1 998. additional industries (listed below 
as "Hem Industries'^ were required to report] 



Industry 



1967 

SIC' 
code 



Total 

facilities 

(numt)er) 



Total 

on ar>d 

off-site 

releases 



On-site release 



Air 
Total emissions 



Surface 
water dis- 
charges 



Other 2 



Off-site 

releases/ 

transfers 

off-site to 

disposal 



Total 

ORIGINAL INDUSTRIES 
Total ' 

Food and kindrsd products 

Tot>aocD products 

Tntie mi products 

Appvei and oltier textile products . 

tunbsr and vraod products 

Fumlurs and fbcturss 

Papsr and aHed products 

Pnnflng and publishing 

Chamical and alfied products 

F^Biroiaum and coal products 

Rubbar and misc. plastic products . 

Laathar and Isather products 

Slone. day. glass products 

Primary metal industries 

Fabricatsd metals products 

industrial machinsry and equipment 
Electronic electric equipment . . . . 

Transportation equipment 

irtstnxnents and related products . . 
kiscsflaneous 

NEW INDUSTRIES 

Total 

Metal iTMning 

Coalmining 

Bectric uUifbes 

Chsmical wtwlesalers 

Petroleum bulk terminals 

RCRA^oivent recovery 



(X) 



(X) 

20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 



(X) 

10 

12 

49 

5169 

5171 

4953/ 

7369 



23,484 7,100.6 6,575.7 1.904.4 



21,352 2,264.4 1.674.4 1.106.6 



260.9 4,410.4 



1.710 

27 

292 

15 

857 

324 

496 

202 

3.745 

550 

1.888 

75 

757 

1.948 

2.893 

1,109 

1.197 

1.302 

257 

302 



126.9 

3.1 

8.5 

0.5 

34.5 

12.3 

227.4 

19.0 

648.0 

72.8 

105.2 

3.7 

42.8 

606.8 

76.0 

19.2 

33.5 

96.2 

9.1 

8.2 



121.8 

2.9 

7.8 

0.5 

33.1 

12.2 

220.0 

18.8 

584.9 

68.2 

89.5 

2.0 

37.2 

381.3 

51.5 

12.7 

21.7 

83.6 

8.7 

7.2 



2.132 4,616.4 4.701.3 



97 

81 

706 

467 

215 



3.357.8 

16.0 

1.152.2 

1.6 

3.9 

285.0 



3.357.1 

16.0 

1.080.9 

1.4 

3.4 

242.4 



59.8 

2.4 

7.3 

0.5 

32.9 

12.2 

184.6 

18.8 

277.5 

46.7 

88.6 

1.9 

32.3 

94.1 

48.8 

10.1 

15.5 

83.0 

7.6 

7.2 



797.6 

3.1 
1.2 
787.8 
1.4 
3.4 

0.9 



255.4 

55.6 
0.6 

0.2 

0.1 

0.0 

20.1 

68.7 
18.0 
(Z) 
0.1 
0.2 
68.5 
1.9 
0.1 
4.2 
0.2 
1.1 

(Z) 



512.5 
6.4 

0.3 

0.2 

238.6 
3.5 
0.8 

n 

218.7 
0.8 
2.4 
2.0 
0.4 

1§ 



5.5 3396.0 



0.5 
0.7 
4.2 



(Z) 



3,353.5 

14.0 

288.9 

0.1 

(Z) 

241.4 



525.1 



410.0 

5.1 
0.2 
0.7 
0.1 
1.4 
0.1 
7.4 
0.2 

63.1 
4.6 

15.8 

1.6 

5.6 

225.5 

24.5 
6.6 

11.8 

12.6 
0.4 
1.0 



115.1 

0.6 
(Z) 
71.3 
0.2 
0.5 

42.5 



Represents or rounds to zero. X Not applicable. Z Less than 50.000 pounds. ^ Standard Industrial Classification, see 
text Section 12. Labor Force. Employment, and Eaminos. ^ Includes underground injection for Class I and Class II to V wells 
•«rf i»w4 ».i<>^«. 3 indixjes industries with no specific industry Identified, not shown separately. 



and land releases 

Source of Tables 354 and 355 



U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2000 Toxics Release Inventory, annual. 



Geography and Environment 221 



UA. 



Abstract of the United States: 2002 



No. 356. Toxk ReiMses by State: 1988 to 2000 

of pounds (3.211J wp w ii m 3.211.600.0001. Excludes delistsd chemicals, chemicals added In 1900. 1904. and 

ynk, hydrochloric add, PBT chemicals, sulfuric acid, vanadium, and vanadhan compoundiL Sss 



1995, and aluminum oxide, ammoni 
Table354] 



Stale and 


Core Chemicals 


State and 
outtyingarea 


Core chemicals 


outtyingarea 


1988 1996 1999 1986 2000 


1988 1986 1908 19M 2000 


toIm • • • • 


3.211J 1.941.3 1.826.0 1.730J 1.661.3 

3.196.1 1.931.2 1.818^ 1.733.2 1.655.2 

110.9 100.8 66.8 63.0 56.8 
3.7 2.2 0.3 0.2 0.2 

66.3 38.3 53.5 50.2 38.8 

41.0 26.5 40.3 40.5 47.2 
110.1 37.7 27.8 24.7 24.6 

15.7 3.3 3.3 3.1 2.8 
38.5 9.3 6.1 4.5 4.5 

8.7 5.7 5.9 5.3 5.6 

33.1 28.5 30.7 29.8 31.1 

85.8 42.9 47.1 46.0 44.0 
0.8 0.6 0.3 0.3 0.4 
7.3 12.0 12.8 14.8 13.0 

140.6 86.7 84.5 81.4 79.1 
184.4 94.4 107.3 114.4 107.7 

42.9 22.7 25.2 25.8 25.6 

30.4 17.8 17.7 20.4 16.9 
65.7 34.3 31.2 31.1 28.0 

129.4 104.6 93.5 79.2 80.5 

15.5 7.0 6.6 5.9 6.3 

20.2 11.9 8.8 9.1 10.6 
32.2 8.9 6.7 5.1 4.9 

141.1 90.4 73.6 64.6 52.3 
55.9 185 15.1 14.7 14.7 
59.7 48.6 40.9 40.1 41.8 
91.1 50.6 48.7 47.8 51.6 


MT 


35.6 42.6 50.4 48.9 512 




NE 


17.1 11.3 10.2 9i) 11.7 


U.S. total. . . 


NV 


2.4 3.4 3.7 5.4 4.1 


AL 


NH 


14.0 2.3 2.3 23 2.3 


AK 


NJ 


48.3 14.7 11.8 11.8 11.6 


AZ 


NM 


30.4 43.5 23.8 20X> 0.5 


AR 


NY 


100.8 31.6 22.5 224 18.0 


CA 


NC 


124.1 63.7 48.9 46.3 40J 


CO 


ND 


1.2 1.2 1.1 1.0 OJ 


CT 


OH 


205.7 124.9 128.7 118.7 111.0 


DE 


OK 


30.5 16.4 14.3 13.8 13.7 


DC 


OR 


21.6 22.3 28.1 2S.7 2S.2 


FL 


PA 


136.2 97.5 80.4 82J 80.5 


QA 


Rl 


7.8 3.2 1.6 1.2 1.1 


HI 


sc 


66.0 49.9 51.3 56.8 512 


ID 


SD 


2.4 1.9 1.4 1.1 12 


IL 


TN 


126.8 99.8 86.3 88.9 81J 


IN 


TX 


321.6 209.4 173.5 100.1 153.4 


lA 


UT 


123.8 69.4 99.6 82.7 103J 


KS 


VT 


1.7 0.6 02 02 02 


KY 


VA 


112.4 40.8 40.0 30.0 362 


LA 


WA 

WV 

Wl 


30.6 22.7 24.4 17.3 16J 


ME 


39.7 19.9 16.3 11.8 102 


MD 


62.3 34.8 33.9 31.9 28.9 


MA 


WY 

Guam 

Puerto Rico . . . 
Virgin Islands.. 


2.0 12 1.3 1.6 1.5 


Ml 




MN 




MS 


12.9 8.9 6.6 5.9 56 


MO 


2.6 12 0.9 0.5 0.5 



• Represents zero. Z Less than 50.000. 

Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 2000 Toxics Release Inventory. See also <tittpyAivww.epa.go^lri/lriO(Ypdn' 
2000pdr.pdf> (released May 2002). 

No. 357. Hazardous W^sto Sites on the National Priority List by State: 2001 



[Aa of OecemtMr 31. Includes tx>th proposed and final sites listed on the National Priorities List for ttw Superfund program ai 
authorized by the Comprehensive knvrronmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 and the Superftjnd 
Amendments and Reauthorization Ad of 1986] 



State and 
outlying area 



Total, 



United 

Alabama 

Alaslca 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

f^lorida 

Georqia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . . . 

Mk:higan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missoun 



Per- 
cent 
Total distri- 

sites Rank butk>n 



Norv- 
Fed- fed- 
eral eral 



1.297 (X) (X) 166 1,131 



.1.. 



15 

7 
10 
12 
99 
17 
16 
16 

1 
52 
15 

3 
10 
45 
29 
14 
12 
14 
15 
13 
19 
32 
69 
24 

4 
23 



44 
40 
34 
2 
22 
23 
23 

25 
46 
41 

8 
14 
29 
34 
29 
25 
31 
20 
12 

5 
17 
45 
18 



100.0 

12 
0.5 
0.8 
0.9 
7.7 
1.3 
12 
12 
0.1 
4.0 
12 
0.2 
0.8 
3.5 
2.3 
1.1 
0.9 
1.1 
12 
1.0 
1.5 
2.5 
5.4 
1.9 
0.3 
1.8 



165 
3 
6 
3 

24 
3 
1 
1 
1 
6 
2 
2 
2 
5 

1 
2 
1 
1 
3 
9 
7 
1 
2 



1.120 

12 
1 
7 
12 
75 
14 
15 
15 

46 

13 
1 
8 
40 
29 
13 
10 
13 
14 
10 
10 
25 
68 
22 
4 
20 



State and 
outlying area 



Montana 

Net>ra8ka 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 
New Jersey . . . 
New Mexico . . 

New York 

North Carolina . 
North Dakota . . 

Ohk) 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania. . 
Rhode Island. . 
South Carolina. 
South Dakota . 
Tennessee . . . 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington. . . 
West Virginia . . 
Wisconsin. . . . 
Wyoming .... 



Guam 

Puerto Rico. . 
Virgin Islands. 



Total 
sites 



15 

11 

1 

19 
116 
13 
91 
27 

33 
12 
12 
97 
12 
25 

2 
13 
41 
21 

9 
30 
48 

9 
40 

2 

2 
8 
2 



Per- 
cent 
distrr- 
Rank button 



25 
39 
49 
20 

1 
31 

4 
15 
50 
11 
34 
34 

3 
34 
16 
47 
31 

9 
19 
42 
13 

7 
42 
10 
48 



(X) (X) 



Non- 
Fed- fed- 
eral anl 



12 


. 


0.9 


1 


0.1 


. 


1.5 


1 


9.0 


8 


1.0 


1 


7.1 


4 


2.1 


2 


0.0 


■ 


2.6 


5 


0.9 


1 


0.9 


2 


7.5 


6 


0.9 


2 


1.9 


2 


0.2 


1 


1.0 


4 


32 


4 


1.6 


4 


0.7 


. 


2.3 


11 


3.7 


14 


0.7 


2 


3.1 


- 


02 


1 



- Represents zero. X Not applicable. 



15 

10 

1 

18 

lOfi 
12 
87 
2S 



11 
10 
01 
10 
23 
1 
9 
37 
17 
9 
10 
34 
7 
40 
1 

1 
$ 
2 



2001. 



Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Supplementary Materials: National Priorities List. Proposed /TuHa. Decstnbtr 



222 Geography and Environment 



U.S. Census Bureau, Statistcal Abstract of the iMM 



lo. 358. Environmental Industiy— Revenues end Empioyment 
by Industry Segment: 1990 to 2001 

$148,200,000,600. Covers approximately 59.000 prh^e and public companies engaged In environmental 



I 

cttvWoo] 



Incfcistiy sogmont 


Revenue QM. dd.) 


Employment (1.000) 


1999 1986 2000 2001 


1999 1996 2000 2001 


■ — *- - * — ^— ■*■— ■ 


148^ 179^ 204.9 210.7 

1.5 1.2 1.2 1.2 
18.3 23.1 28.4 29.4 
26.1 32.5 39.0 40.0 

6.3 6.2 5.1 4.9 
11.1 11.1 11.2 11.1 
12.5 15.5 17.4 18.1 

13.5 16.5 19.8 20.3 

2.0 3.0 3.6 3.8 

13.1 14.8 17.6 18.1 

8.7 9.9 9.9 10.1 
0.4 0.8 1.2 1.3 

19.8 25.3 30.3 31.3 
13.1 16.9 16.0 16.4 

1.8 2.4 4.2 4.8 


1.174J 1,327^ 1,414J 1,431^ 

20.2 14.1 14.0 13.7 

95.0 101.5 117.4 120.5 

209.5 243.4 263.5 266.8 

56.9 52.5 41.8 40.1 

107.2 98.1 110.7 106.5 

144.2 180.2 186.0 191.2 


malytical sefvloes ^ 

Mwlewater treatment woffcs ^ 

ioU wrasle management ^ . 

lazardous waste management ^ 

lamectatiorVindustrial sen/ioes 

(OnBUiwiu tt wiUHiounny 


VMar equipment & chemicals 

latniment manufacturing 


97.9 110.2 130.5 132.0 
18.8 26.2 29.4 29.8 




82.7 107.2 119.7 122.0 

88.8 93.8 74.6 75.1 
8.9 19.5 29.0 28.6 

104.7 118.2 131.7 134.8 
118.4 136.0 127.2 128.3 


ik poflution control equipment 

Vaste management equipment " 

Process & prevention technology 

Wilsr udMee ^ . . 

lasouire reoovery 


Envlronmenlal energy sources 


21.1 26.1 39.3 43.1 



^ Covere environmental laboratory testing ar)d services. ^ Mostly revenues collected by munidpai entities. ^ Covers such 
icMvities as oolection, transportation, transfer stations, disposal, laridfill ownership and manaoement for solid waste. 
' TranspOflationarKJdisiMeal of hazardous, meofical and nuclear waste. ' Includes stationery and mcoile sources. "Includes 
leMdes, containers, Iners, processing and remediation equipment. ' Revenues generated from the sale of water. * Revenues 
j sne ra led from ttw sale of recovered metals, paper, plastic, etc. ® Includes solar, wind, geotttermal and conservation devicee. 

Source: Environmental Business International, Inc.. San Diego, CA. Environmentat Bushess Joumai, monthly (copyright). 

No. 359. Threatened end Endangered Wildlife and Plant Species- 
Number: 2002 

[As of ApHI. Ertdwigered species: One in danger of becoming extinct throughout all or a significant part of its natural range, 
species: One lilcely to become endangered in the foreseeat)le future] 



Item 



Mam- Rep- Amphit>- Crusta- Arach- 

mais Birds tiles ians Fishes Snails Clams ceans Insects nids Plants 



Total Hstlngs 



342 



273 



115 



United States 
Foreign .... 



316 2S3 78 

65 78 14 

251 175 64 



total 

United States 
Foreign. ... 



26 

9 
17 



20 

14 
6 



37 
22 

15 



26 

19 

11 
8 

9 

8 

1 



126 

82 

71 
11 



44 



33 

22 

21 
1 

11 

11 



72 

64 

62 

2 

8 

8 



21 

18 
18 



3 

3 



48 

39 

35 
4 

9 

9 



12 

12 

12 



746 

507 

596 
1 

148 

147 
2 



• Ftepresents zero. 

Source: U.S. Fish and WHdMe Sen/ice. Endangersd Species BUSeHn, bimonthly; and <fittp://eoos.fws.govAe6s/htmMx>xscore.html> 
(aocMsed 06 June 2002). 

No. 360. Tornadoes, Floods, Tropical Storms, and Lightning: 1991 to 2001 



Wtelher type 



1991 1992 1993 1994 1996 1996 1997 1986 1999 2000 2001 



Tornadoes, number ^ 

Lwes lost, total 

Most in a single tornado 

FioodB and flash floods: 
Lives lost 



1.132 1.297 1.173 1.082 1.235 1.170 1.148 1,424 1,343 1.071 1.104 
39 39 33 69 30 25 67 130 94 40 39 
17 12 7 22 6 5 27 32 7 (NA) (NA) 



North Mlantic troDical storms 
•Id hurricanes ^ 



61 



8 



62 103 



8 



91 



80 131 118 136 



19 



13 



14 



68 



12 



38 (NA) 



Mumber of hurricanes reachirtg 

U.S. mainland 

Direct deaths on U.S. mainland 
Property toes in U.S. (mil. dd.) 

iJljJning: 

Osatfis 

bijuries 



15 



15 



1 

17 
1.500 


1 

26 

26.500 


1 

9 

57 


38 
973 


2 

29 

3.723 


2 

33 

3,600 


1 

4 

100 


3 

23 

7.299 


3 

70 

5.862 


5 
27 


44 
5.250 


73 
432 


41 
292 


43 
295 


69 
577 


85 
510 


53 
309 


42 
306 


44 
570 


46 
243 


51 
364 


P 



- Ftopresents zero. h4A Not available. Source: U.S. National Weather Sen/ice, Internet site <http://www.spc.noaa.gov/ 
dbnoAorrVmonthlytomstats.html> (accessed 06 June 2002). A violent, rotating column of air descending from a cumuloninxHJS 
doud in the form of a tubular- or funnel-shaped doud, usually characterized by movements alorra a narrow path and wind speeds 
fiom 100 to over 300 miles per hour. Also krK>wn as a "twister" or "waterspout." ^ Source: National Hurricane Center (NMC). 
Choral Gables. FL. unpublished data. For data on individual hurricanes, see the NHC web site at <http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/>. 
Tropical slomw have maximum winds of 39 to 73 miles per hour; hurricanes have maximum winds of 74 miles per hour or higher. 

Source: Except as noted. U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Storm Data, monthly. See also 
NOAA web site at <http7/www.nws.noaa.gov/om/haz8tat8.8html>. 



Geography and Environment Zl^ 



us. 



AbtHact of the umited Statea: 2002 



No. 361. Miuor U.S. Weather Disasters: 1980 to 2001 

[5.0 reprMants $5,000,000,600. Covers only weather related disasters costir>g $1 billion or more] 



Event 



Description 



008t 

Time period (bil. doL) I 



Tropical Storm Allison . . 

Midwest and Ohio Valley 
hail and tornadoes . . . 

Southern drought/heat 
wave 

Western fire season . . . 

Hurricane Floyd 



Drouaht/heat wave 
OK-KS tornadoes . 
AR-TN torna