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Full text of "Strawinski's guitar instructor : containing the rudiments of music, arranged in an easy style, together with a number of popular airs, duetts & songs"

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HAROLD B. LEt= UBRARY 
BRIGHAM YOUNG Uf^»VEiRSITV 
PROVO, UTAH 















Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2019 with funding from 
Brigham Young University 


https://archive.org/details/strawinskisguitaOOstra 


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3 



At the request of my mimerous friends I have the honour to present to the I^adies and 
(ientl<‘iiuMi of the United States this small and easy Instructor. 

It dot s not contain long and tedious Exercises which tend to discourage the I’upil, hut, 
a gradual explnnation of all the rules which are necessary to acquire a perfect k now ledge 
of the Instrument . 

After many years experience of teaching the Guitar, the Author will be sufficiently com¬ 
pensated if this work will meet with the same success, which has attended him as a Teacher, 



877 
















The Music, or Notes are written upon five parallel lines and in their four spaces. 

T H F. L I N F S AND S P A C K S . 


L I > E 8 . 


S PACES. 



Method of reading and disting^uishing the Notes which are written upon the Tive lines and their four spaces. 


N O T F S UPON T H F L 1 N F S . 




^ onthe foui'tli. 

^ on tm> 11 [ 



. ^ on t tie t lit rd . 





QjitPG spond.r 



—# 

on trip tli’st imp. ^ 1 




NOTES IN THE SPACES. 
F. A. c. 





m In tho toil rtli. 




« In the third. 



d 

In the second . 



^ 

in fpp tirst spneo,_ 




The se five lines and four spaces are called the ST AV F ,but as the Stave is not of Mifficient extent to ex¬ 
press al 1 tlie sounds in music, additional, or ledger lines are used below and above the Stave, as follows. 


A D 1) F D OR LEDGER LINKS. 


BELOW THE STAVE. 


F. 


F. 


G. 


A . 


B 


C 


D . 




below the tliird added line, on the third. 


belowthe second, on the second 


below the first. f” **- 


below the Stave , 


ABOVE THI<: STAVE. 


aboT« 

‘the Stave, on the first added line. above t 

0 -f- 1 

ho first, onthe 

f. 

. _onttiethird added line. 

above the second. 

second. _ 

e^i 



-1 









G. A. B. C. D. F. 


977 

























































6 



T H K C li h: F. 

The Treble or G, Clef, is placed at the commencement of each Stave, and is used for the (iuitar and 
Vocal music, and is marked thus 


The musical Alphabet consist of Seven Characters called Notes, and fortlie Guitar the fo 1 lowing: let¬ 
ters are applied E, F, G, A, B, C, D. 

Some call them Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Si, Do, Ro. 

When a melody exceeds these seven letters, the same series of letters is repeated . 




SIX DIFFERENT KINDS OF NOTES, 
are commonly used. vi/. 


Semibreve. Minim. Crotchet. (Quaver. Semiquaver. Demi semiquaver. 



* M E A S t R E o K B A R . 

The lines which are drawn perpendicularly through the Stave and evei y 
division between them, is called a BAR. 

Bar. Bar. Bar. 

Each Bar contains a certain quantity of notes accoiding to the signature 
placed at the beginning of every piece of music. 


877 








































































K X A >I I> L f; . 


Coiiiirion Time is marked thus. 


Three Four Time or three Crotchets in a Bar. 


i 




Tv\o Four Time or two Crotcliets in a Bar. 


i 




3 


P 


Three Eight Tijne or three ti(,uavei s in a ttar. 

. . - 



Six Eight Time or six H'lavers in a Bar. 



The leugtli of a Semibreve in Common Time, has four beats in a bar, and should be regulardy spoken; 

()ne_ Two_ Three_ Four; touching the sti ing or note with the first word and holding the same 

sound to the Jast. Tlie Rests, of a Semibreve, or the other notes to be counted ecpial to their length, viy,: 
Semibreve Rest as four beats, One_ Two_Three_Four; Minim as Two; Crotclnt as One; Two (Qua¬ 

vers for one word; Four Semicjuavers for One; Eight Oemisemiquavers for One ; in some instances, oi- 
in difficult music, the Semibreve may be counted as Eight beats _ Minim as Four _ Crotchet as Two &.c. 
in eac h B ar. 

C OMMO N TIM E, 

The following Stave, presents one Bar in Common Time. 



One . 


'fw o . 

Th ree. 

h’o u r-. 


1 2 

3 4 



• 



* 


- r 




« 

• 

a 



1 2 

1 

)0 ■[ 







1 

f 

f 

f 


f ' 

'• 4 




s . '--1 


> 

_ i 

- dr - 


# ■■ ■ 

J 

a 



-4^— 

— f 


hi- 

-..d < 

■■ •- 

^ - 9 - 

0 

« 

1 .. 

1 

4 

1 

y 

y M 

^ 4 = 





*00 

0 

1 

8 



T H E T R I P E T AN D S K X T U PL E T. 


The Triplet is a gr oup of notes, over which the figure 3. is [riaced; these thr ee notes ar e playr'd in the 
same time that two of the same duration would be played without the figure, thus —^ ^aIlio 



When a 6 . is p lacecl over si v notes ^'I’ouped toget lier,.tliey are on ly equal to four of tlie sa me d ii i at i on. 



S77 














































































































































8 


I) () T T E X O T E S AND R E STS. 

Any Note or Rest followed by a dot becomes half as lonj^ a<jain . 


N O T K S . 



is equal to a Scinil)i eve and a Minim 


to a Minim and a Crotchet 


to a Crotchet and a ^,naver . 


to a Huayer and a Semiquaver. . 


to a Semicjuaver and a Demisemiquaver . 


K K S T S . 


1 




1 



r 1 



I ^ 





Sometimes two dots are p I aced after the Note or Rest, then its d uration bee omes three fourths 
lons?er. 


fHE RESTS OE THE BARS. 


2 3 4 5 6 7 « 


M arked thus 


1 

■ 

1 

1 “ 

11 

■ I " 

11 



1 

1 

t 


11 


M A NX E R O E H () 1.1) 1 XG T H E G C I T A R 
and the position of the Hands. 

Sit gracefully on a chair of moderate height, the Guitar should be brought gently nearthe l)ody, 
laying the rim or side of it upon the lap in siiclia manner, tliat at one sight may be seen all the strings 
The Xeck must be raised no higher than the Pupils left shoulder, and supported by the first jo ints 
of the thumb and fore finger of the l.eft Hand, whilst the other fingers should be bent to a cir¬ 
cular position and kept ready to press the Strings which are retiuii ed to be close to the Frets. 

The Right Hand should be placed over the body of the Instrument, with the wrist a little rai- 
sed, nearthe Bridge. The Thumb, and the first three fingers being freely bent and at liberty 
just in readilies, touch the Strings according to the following lesson. 


877 










































































The Guitar has six strings, the three first of which are gut, aiul the three others of silk, covered 
with silvered wire; on the latter are played most frequently what are called B ass notes with the thumb, 
and the three other strings with the 1st. 2nd. & 3rd. fingers of the Right Hand. 

The fingers of the Right Hand are indicated by + for thethuml)_ 1. first finger_ 2 . second finger, 
and 3. for the third finger, vi/: 


SIX OPEN STRINGS. 



NATURAIi GAMUT OR SCALE. 

'I he open strings are indicated by o. and the figures placed over the notes indicate the fingers of the 
Left Hand, and tlie Frets on which they are to be placed 

The double bar across the Stave, marks the change of Strings. 


O. 1. 3. O. 2. 3. O. 2. 3. O. 2. o. 1. 3. 0. 1. 3. '*• 


^ 1 


Fd J i 


J M -f- &C. 

1— F —^—T—h- 

^ j 

^ ^ t 

: + + + 

i bII* string. 

+ + + 
5th string. 

4^^ String. 

1 1 

3rd string. 

Fr ri 

2 2 2 

2fd string. 

U--- li hi pF 

3 3 3 3 

Itt String. 


N91 


EX E R C I S ES. 

To learn to read- count and play the Natural notes in the first Position. 
Count 1. 2.3.4. 


+ - - -- --- 








P 


-1++ +114-12,1 ,22, 






m 


2 . . . 


3 2 ... 3 - 2 3 








i 




12 3 4 


R77 ^ 






/ 



























































































































































































































































































N. B. The I’upil should learn to play the above exercises slow, andthen fast,before proceeding any farther. 


FOURTH PART _ ON SHARPS AND FT. ATS. 

A Sharp, marked thus ^ placed after the Clef or before a note in the l)ar, raises the note a semitone or 
halftone. A Double Shaip, marked thus X pi aced before a note, raises it a whole tone . A Flat, marked 
thus b [)laced before a note, lowers it a semitone. A Double Flat, thus bt? placed befoie a note, lowers it 
a whole tone. A Natural, marked thus [| takes away the affect of Sharp or Flat. 

GAxMUT OR SCALE WITH SHARPS AND FLATS. 


The figures placed over the notes indicate the frets. 


?tti 


String. 


1 r 


String. 


4 th string. 


3 d String. 


2*? String. 


String. 



K X K R C 1 S K . 




877 




































































































































































































































































































































































11 


METHOD OK TUNING THE GUITAR. 

Before tlie Pupils Ear becomes accustomed to the dif¬ 
ferent Eeys of music, the nearest way to put the (JII itar in 
tune is this: Tune the first string E , to the E of the 

I or if no Piano is at hand i as near 


Piano horte 




the sound as possible_then put the finger on tlie fifth fret 

of the second string B, and tune it in unison or till they 
sound alike with the first string open_thenputthe fin¬ 

ger on the fourth fret of the third string G, and tune it to 
the second string open__ Tune the fourth string D, with 

the finger on the fifth fret, to the third string open_ 

The fifth string A, with the finger on the fifth fret, to 

the fourth string open_ The sixth strinjf E, with the 

finger on the fifth fret.tothefifth string open. 


P U A V. 


U I! 






I 


^—T 


5=^ 


r 


The figures indicate the Strings 


SIX O P E x\ STRINGS. 

4 th sr*! 1st 

E. A. D. G. B. E. 


6 Ait D^ Gj^ Ci 


ill 


11 


o 


■7^ I 


IL 


Li L 


o 

I 


o 


A 


JL 


o 


I 


h' 

G 

Gtf 

A 

B 

C 

C# 

1) 

D5 



877 


































































12 


D O U H li K BAH. 



Some peices of music are composed of several parts, ami each of them are separated by a Doii- 
ble Bar. 

It must be observed that if the dots are placed before any of these bars, tht' same part is to be 
repeated. 


T H K. ST G X OK 


Indicates, that the music, from the first written Sign should be repeated, and finished on that 

o /r\ 


part where tlie Double Bar is marked thus J or at the word, Fine. J 


Fine. 


I' H K B A R R E . 

The Barre is to press with one finger of the left hand, two or more strings at the same time 
and on tlie same fret, as the following example. 


K X A M P L K. 



CHORDS A X D A R H E G G I O S . 


\1 hen two or more notes are struck together it is called a Chord 


i 


ami if the same 


Choi'd should be written thus 



then play 




and it is called Ar|)eggio. 


8T7 


















































13 


S I. U R S A S C K X D T X (i. 

X. B. The first note only to be struck . 



S L L R S D K S C K X I) I X G . 



THE S I. I D E . 

The Slide is performed by onefint^er of the l>eft hand which slides aloiif? the neck, from the 
first to the second note upon tlie same string. The Slide pro<hices a'good affect on the Guitar, be¬ 
cause it imitates the sweet sound of a Eady’s voice. It is indicate<i by the same sign as the Slur. 


S M A 1/ 1j or G R a C E X O T E S 


^ —irf#-^^-i*-IT 

-f 

——T 7 f»—r- 





- r y 

;tr—^^-— 

H- 

-—- ^ 

- 0- - 


to-* r u *r 


- 4 '- 


^^i-U. 

r H E 

S H A E 

.1 

E. 

SiA-J. 


\4ritten. i 


Played, 


\\ r i 11 e n . 


P 1 a y e d . 


/ ^ “J 

l-YT--U 

1 ^ -j_ 

- # .- 


^ B 

900M0M -U 





877 












































































































































14 


A DICTIONARY OF ITALIAN AND OTHER WORDS USED IN MUSIC. 


A, in, for. A Tempo, in strict time. 

A 1) no, for two Voi cos, A Trio, for three Voices. 

Adagio, a Aery slow and expressive movement. 

A d libitum, or the time is left at the Performers plea¬ 
sure 

Affettuoso, witli tenderness. 

Agitato, with passion and fire. 

Allegro? a lively movement. 

Allegretto, not as quick as Allegro. 

A I Segno, pla 3 'over again from this mark _S and end 

at the double bar, 

Andantino, a slow and distinct movement. 

Aiulailte, a liule faster than Andantino. 

Arioso, in the style of an Air. 

Assai, mucli. Allegro assai, very brisk. 

Biss, pla^- tile passage twice over. 

Brio, or Con brio, with spirit and brilliancy- 
Calando, diminishing gradually the sounds, and 

slackening the time. 

Coda, a phrase added to the end of a Piece by way 

of conclusion. 

Con, with. 

Con anima, with feeling. ** 

Crescend o, or _—- a gradual rise of the sounds . 

Da Capo, begin the Air again and end on mark /Ov 

or word. Fine. 

Decrescend o, or Diminuendo a gradual fall of 

tile sounds. 

Dolce, sweetly. —^ 

Duo, Duetto, a piece for two Voices, or Instruments. 
Fispressivo, with expression and effect. 

Forte, loud. Fortissimo, veiyloud. 

Fine, theendofa piece, or over the Double bar 
Fuoco, spirit. Confuoco, with spirit. 


Furioso, Confuria, with fire and energy. 
Grave, a slow and solemn Movement. 
Gra/.ioso, in a graceful manner. 

Gustoso, Con gusto, with taste, 
liargo, a slow Movement, 
liarglietto, not quite so slow as Largo. 
Iiegato, a smooth and connected touch . 

Ma, but. Ma non troppo, but not too much. 
Men, less. Men forte, less loud. 

Me//, o, half. 

Molt, much. Allegro molto, very brisk. 
Moderto, moderately quick. 

Morendo, let the sounds die away. 

Moto, or Con moto, very brisk. 

Non, not. Non troppo, nottoomuch. 
Presto , quick. Prestissimo, very quick. 
Piano, soft. Pianissimo, as soft as possible. 
Pin, more. Pin presto, faster. 

Poco, a little. Poco lento, a little slow. 

R allentando, 

slacken the time by degrees. 

Ritardando, 

Resolute, in a bold style. 

Sotto voce, with a low voice- 
Spiritoso, with spirit. 

Staccato, play the notes short and distinct. 
SmorzandO , smothering the sou nds . 

Sen/a, without. 

Sostenuto, support the sounds. 

Solo, one Instrument only. 

Tenuto, hold tlie note its full length. 

Trio, a piece for three Voices or Instruments. 
Volti, turn over leaf . Subito, quickly. 



ABBEVIATIONS EXPLAINED. 


Adb 

A dagio. 

Dol : 

Dolce. 

Smor/ : 

Smor/ando. 

Ad lib; 

d libitum. 

F. 

Fo rt e . 

Stac: 

Staccato- 

A1I9 

A 1 legro. 

FF. 

Fortissi m o. 

S ejn : 

Sem pre. 

Arp9 

Arpeggio. 

F/. 

For/, an do. 

Seller/ ; 

Scher/ando 

Cal 9 

Calando, 

P. 

Piano. 

T. 

Tiitti. 

Cres: 

C rescendo. 

PP. 

Pianissimo. 

Ten ; 

Tenuto. 

1). C. 

Da Ca po. 

Sos ; 

S ostenuto. 

Var ; 

Varia/.ione . 

Dim; 

Diminuendo. 

Seg : 

Segue. 

V.S. 

Volti Subito 


877 














15 


N O T F. S OF ABB K F: V 1 A T J O N S . 


Written . 


I’l ay e <1 


A T A B li E O 1-' A I. li T H F K F Y S , 


Major keys with Sharps at the sinature. 




C 

G 

I) 

4t l I 

A 

■1 

E 


B 

11^ A ti 

F# 

-n 



?- U — 

IS— B 

- 

H g 

— 1 

- 


J 



i .n 

Major keys w 
V 

-. 

ith Flats at the sinature. 

B[? F> 

^4, -—-—-- 

■—l^-U— 

Alt 

M —U-b- 

l)[t 


Gb 


bo- 




- 1 

■>Vl— 





Minor keys wit 

A 

-■ 

li Sluu’ps 

at the sinature. 

5 . 

1 

1 

F? 

—« 

1 ^ 

- 

1 

C# 

- fl 

1 


^ 11 



r “ 1 


^ \ 

1 


^ 1 


0 H 

ii 

Minor k('ys with Flats at the sinature. 

I) 1. c 

L 1 

V 

l.L 

!- . 


it 

Fit 


,- ^ -1 




iM- 

■ 

——- 1 


:o — •;. g 


=1 

r o 1 


^=4 

' 1 


^=1 

1 ; 


A II tlie different Keys of Music can be played on the (luitar, but as some of them are difficult and 
not often used, the Author writes only Fxercises of those Keys which are more easy to execute. 

K F Y OF C . MAJOR. 

The figures are for the fingers of the Left liand . 



Gamut 



K X h: r c 1 s f s . 
















































































































































































































Gamut. 



K K Y O F 



G. MAJOR. 




877 




































































































































































































































































































































































































































































2. Po s. 


f: X E R C I S K s. 


N? 1. 





f 


K K Y OF A. MAJOR 


•■—7 

F me. 



fl77 


































































































































































































































































































































































































k K Y OF F. M A J O R. 


Gamut. 



ij 3 l 

2 4 

rfr 




El n 

- 

— 

“3 


1 24 1 

1 




J' 0 




K X F R C I S F S . 
















































































































































































































































































































































































KEY O V E. MAJOR. 


19 


Gamut. 



NA? 2 , 




p^f 44 U - 

tl^JCZZZZ 

■ - I 3 ? - 



T rrT 5 > f T r 




f T r 


rr f r r r 


r 


r r I f f r r ^ r r 9 i > 


'T r 


■f] *n I ^ j*] I ji j~ 


r r r r r p ^ 


f r 



j > I ^ ^ 


r r r 


Gamut. 


KF:y OF' A. MINOR. 


- l- 




■- ■#■# 



J -J-'T 

-I 1 1 , 11 

^- 








^-J J. - —“ 

-W z± 

















































































































































































































































































































































































20 


K K Y () F K . M 1 N O R . 






•> j 1- F 


II 





"*•'• ' ■ r—: 





F X R c T s s . 



k' K Y (> F D. M r NOR. 






































































































































































































































































































21 


K X E R C I S E S 

ON THE Slur, Staccato and the different Positions. 

The jnaik of the Sliir has been shown on the i3^pag;e. 

Staccato or notes dotted aljove or below are to be played in a short and distinct manner. 
N.R . The figures are written for the fingers of the lieft Hand . 


l^t Position. 




Position. Harre. 





■ J.-J 


ffgjy 

fT^f 


h 

1 M 

B 


f=*=J 


^ ^11 n t 


^ — 


w 







































































































































































































































































































22 


LUCY Waltz. 




S 1. I D E . 

slide. slide. 




, —.2 2 

~'2 2 

0 # - 0 

t: 

rf - 

—0 

— »H^h f 

»- 

s 

s 

1^4 1 ^ * 




Jv--.1 



0 

Fi n e . ■■S* 

- 0 

o 

LJ 

o 

- J 




1 - 

lO 'tt ^ ’ 


^ 1 - 4 - 


1 



P 

* 

TT’ ^ 

■f 





3 


4 


JJ M 




J 

1 







— m-r.. 0 — m. 





II 

/k 







2 











1H5 





















- —W 

-V—^- 

0 

0 

=:e 

I'k 


877 













































































































































































































































































23 


HARMONICS- 


Harmonics which are most in use and which produce the most pleasing sound, are played upon theGnitar, 
b(‘Jow the 3!^ over the 4tll Till and 12lil Frets. The finger of the left hand must be laid straiglit 

and very lightly over the String which is to be struck with the finger or the thumb of the right haiul 
with sufficient force near the Bridge. 





_Krc t. 


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26 


R O X I) (). 


P R I M A QUIT A R . 






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R O X DO. 


27 


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28 





All tliats dear to me is wanting-, 

TjOne and cheerless here I roam; 

The stranger’s joys howe’er enchanting;, 
To me can never he like home, 

To me can never he like home. 


Give me those, I ask no other, 

Those that hl< ss the humhle dome, 
Where dwell my Kather and my Mother 
Give, oh! g;ive me back my home, 

IVly own, my own dear native home. 


877 






















































































































































































































29 


HI]PS msiLssP i^s 


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When tliro’ life un-blestwe rove, liOsin^ all tlvat made life dear; Shoii Id some notes we 


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us'd to love In days of boy-h(j)o<l meet our ear._ Oh! how welcome breathes the strain, 


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Vt'ak in;^ thong;hts that lonjj have slept; Kindling^former smiles a.gain. In faded eyes, that 


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liike the gale that sighs along, 

Heds of oriental flow’rs, 

In the gratefid breath of song, 

That once was heard in happier hours; 
Kind with balm the gale sighs on, 

Tho’ the flow’rs have sunk in death; 

So when pleasures dream is gone. 

Its memory lives in music’s breath. 


877 


Music! oh how faint, how weak, 
lianguage fades before thy spell; 
Why should feeling ever speak, 

W hen thou canst breathe her soul so we 

Kriendslii[)'s balmy words may feign_ 

lioves are e’en more false than they; 
Oh! ’tis only music’s strain, 

Can sweetly soothe and not betray. 











































































































































































































































































30 



Andante cantahile. //z'/z/zv'//^W/////z//y' 


V O I C K. 


GUITAR. 



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\Mien other lips and o _ thei-lieaitsTlieirtales of love sliall tell, 


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And deem it hut a faded littht 
V^hi(•h beams w ithin your eyeS) 


When howl low hearts shall wear a mask 
’Twill break your own to see, 

In such a moment I but ask 
That you’ll remem be me, 

That you’ll remember, you 11 remember me, 
877 
































































































































































































































































































31 


M o derate, 


IPz/lf7ii‘7ted 7z i JT.TD. Jie/ztc ’ezz ^aTTzz/z/?? -e. 


Y o I c jh: . 


GUITAR. 



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We have Jiv’d and lov’d to 




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gether, Through many a changing year: We have sliar’d eachothers pleasures. And mingleij many a 

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tear; I have ne - ver known a sorrow, Thatwas Jong misooth’d by thee, That was 





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long nnsooth’d by thee, For thy smile can make a summer, Where darkness else would 









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Are the traitor smiles that darken, 

\Mien th e cloud of sorrow lours; 

And though many such we have known, love, 
Too prone alas, to range. 

We both can speak of one, love, 
tVhom time could never change . 


We have shared each others pleasures. 
And mingled many a tear; 

And let us hope the future, 

As the past has been, will be_ 

I will share with thee thy sorrows, 
And tliou thy joys with me. 


877 


















































































































































































































































































































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BJIM AfiWAYS OjK U,1]\D AiV EXTEA'SITE ASSORT,1lEn!T OF 


TOGETHER WITH A LARGE ASSORTHEIAT OF 


FROM THE CELEBRATED FACTORIES OF 

CHICEERING, Boston, NUNNS & CLARE, N, York, and ROSENERANTZ, Germany, 

I MARTIN & COUPA’S 

C^CE>S3r^‘CP^S3“^I2a^ 

WO'“ Alili ORDERS will be promptly and faithfully executed. »f Jjiheral 
MJUscount to Schools and Seminaries', 

^ MUSIC BOUND TO ORDER. 




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