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Library of the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta 


Ackroyd, A.O and Roberts, W.G. 

A study of the oost-school 
occunations of students who 
graduated with University matriculation 
from Alberta high schools in 1949 * 









(3x SUMS 




















Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2017 with funding from 
University of Alberta Libraries 


https ://arch i ve. org/detai Is/studyof postschooOOaoac 




THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 


A STUDY" OF 

THE POST-SCHOOL OCCUPATIONS OF STUDENTS WHO 
GRADUATED WITH UNIVERSITY MATBICULATION 
FROM ALBERTA HIGH SCHOOLS IN 


A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO 
THE COMMITTEE ON GRADUATE STUDIES 
IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF EDUCATION 


FACULTY OF EDUCATION 

BY 

A. 0. ACKROYD 
W. G. ROBERTS 


EDMONTON, ALBERTA 


SEPTEMBER, 1?52 



TVi e $ ^ 


■# 4f 



UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 
FACULTY OF EDUCATION 


The undersigned hereby certify that they have 
read and do recommend to the Committee on Graduate 
Studies for acceptance, a thesis entitled "A Study of 
the Post-School Occupations of Students who Graduated 
with University Matriculation from Alberta High Schools 
in 194?” submitted by A. 0. Ackroyd, B*Ed., and W. G. 
Roberts, B.Ed., in partial fulfilment of the require¬ 
ments for the degree of Master of Education* 


Professor 


Professor 


Professor 




ii 







ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 


The authors are indebted to those officials of the 
University of Alberta and the Provincial Department of Edu¬ 
cation who made available the records from which much of 
the essential data was procured* An expression of gratitude 
is directed to the members of the committee who rendered 
valuable advice and to all those 1949 matriculants who 
replied to the questionnaires directed to them. 


iii 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 


PAGE 

LIST OF TABLES . vi 

CHAPTER 

I REASONS FOR THE STUDY AND ITS SCOPE. I 

Scope of the Study. 2 

II POPULATION....... 4 

Selection and Limits... 4 

Procedure of Selection . 4 

University of Alberta Group . 3 

Questionnaire Group. 7 

The Questionnaire and Its Design. 7 

III ANALYSIS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 

POPULATION. 11 

University Programs Selected by 1949 

Matriculants . 13 

Grade XII Averages of Senior Matriculants 

Registered in the 13 Faculty Programs .. 16 

University Progress of Matriculants. 18 

Relationship Between Years Needed to 
Complete High School and Degree of 
Success in University of Alberta 
Programs. 24 

Analysis of 194 9 Matriculants Required 

to Change Programs .. 23 

Analysis of High School Record of 1949 
Matriculants Attending University 
of Alberta. 26 

Summary. 34 

iv 



























TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) 


CHAPTER PAGE 

IV ANALYSIS OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE GROUP. 36 

The Other University Group . 37 

The Nursing Group. 3? 

The Pharmaceutical Intern Group. 41 

The Secretarial Training Group . 42 

The Miscellaneous Training Group . 44 

The Employed Group . 46 

The Unclassified Group . 48 

Summary. 4? 

V CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS . 3^ 

BIBLIOGRAPHY.. 6l 

APPENDIX A. 63 

APPENDIX B . 66 


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LIST OF TABLES 


TABLE PAGE 

I Registration of Freshman Students in 
1949-50 Faculty Prqgrams Showing the 
Percentage of 1949 Matriculation 

Students in Each. 12 

II Faculty Programs Selected by the 422 

Matriculation Students . 14 

III Faculty Programs Selected by 254 

Male and 168 Female Matriculants . 15 

IV Grade XII Averages of Matriculants 

in the 15 Faculty Programs . 17 

V University Record of 422 Matriculants 

at Term Ending, 1950 . 19 

VI Analysis of University Success of 408 
Matriculants Who Completed a Full Year 
at the University of Alberta .. 20 

VII Comparison of University Progress Made 
by Matriculants with Progress made by 
the Entire First Year Students at the 
University of Alberta .. 21 

VIII Comparison of University Record of 412 
Matriculants Entered in Various Faculty 
Programs with Total First Year Students 
Entered in Same Programs, U of A, 1949-50 . 25 

IX University Progress of 422 Matriculants 
as Related to Length of Time to Complete 
Matriculation . 24 

X Number of 1949 Matriculants Required to 

Transfer at End of 1949-50 University Term .... 25 

XI University Record of 1949 Matriculants 

Required to Transfer at End of 1949-50 Term ... 26 

XII Number of Years Required to Complete 

High School ... 27 

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LIST 01’ TABLES (Continued) 


TABLE PAGE 

XIII Grade IX Rating of 422 Senior 

Matriculants . 27 

XIV Relationship Between Grade IX Standing 

and Time Required to Complete High School. 28 

XV Grade Xii Average of Matriculation 

Subjects for Male and Female Students. 29 

XVI Grade XII Average of Students Requiring 
Three, Four, and Five or More Years to 
Complete Matriculation... 30 

XVII Grade XII Averages of Students Obtaining 

H, A and B Ratings in Grade IX... 31 

XVIII Supplemental Exanination Record of the 

422 Senior Matriculants ... 31 

XIX Percentage of Students Repeating 

Grade XII Examinations . 32 

XX Record of Supplemental Examinations 
of Students Requiring Five or More 
Years to Complete High School .. 33 

XXI Population Analysis for Each Group Not 
Attending the University of Alberta 
(Excluding the Unclassified Group) . 50 

XXII Types of Assistance Desired by 78 Cases. 52 

XXIII Average of Grade XII Marks for Groups 

Not Attending University of Alberta. 53 


vii 












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SYNOPSIS 


The purpose of this study was to determine the post 
high school occupations of students graduating from Alberta 
high schools in 1<?4 9 with matriculation and to ascertain 
such factors as operated in influencing the individual’s 
activities in his chosen pursuit. 

The study has revealed that of 821 matriculants 
approximately .51.4% entered the University of Alberta, 

24.870 entered the work-a-day world, 7 * 97 « entered univer¬ 
sities other than the University of Alberta, J?.4% entered 
into nurse training, 4.1% entered miscellaneous training, 
5 .7% entered secretarial training, and 2.77® entered phar¬ 
maceutical internship. 

The matriculants who entered the University of 
Alberta enjoyed slightly greater success than the overall 
first year population at the University of Alberta for the 
1949-.5Q winter session. It was indicated that the Grade IX 
standing, the total time to complete high school, and the 
Grade XII examination average tended to forecast the suita¬ 
bility of the matriculant for university work. 

The results from the questionnaire distributed to 
all the matriculants who did not attend the University of 


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Alberta in 1?4 9 pointed out that more matriculants would 
have attended the University of Alberta had financial 
assistance been available. The questionnaire study also 
revealed that adequate information about the University of 
Alberta was not readily accessible. 


ix 



CHAPTER I 


REASONS FOR THE STUDY AND ITS SCOPE 

As students at the University of Albert a* the 
authors were impressed with the need for information about 
the post-school educational and occupational careers of 
high school graduates* 1 2 * 4 What proportion of the students 
apply for admission into the University of Alberta? What 
proportion are restrained from applying for admission be¬ 
cause of insufficient financial means? What percentage of 
students prefer to enter directly into the business- 
industrial world? Such questions were unanswerable be¬ 
cause of a dearth of accurate infomation. This deficiency 
seemed to justify serious study. 

Furthermore, a study of the post-school occupations 
appeared to promise an approach to evaluation of the over¬ 
all success of the high school program. 

A preliminary investigation revealed that previous 
2 

research regarding post-school occu pat ions was not entirely 
relevant to this study. Information obtained from the 
National Conference of Canadian Universities^ and the Cana¬ 
dian Education Association^ confirmed our belief that a 

1 See page 4. 

2 See Bibliography, page 6l. 

^ See correspondence included in Appendix A. 

4 Appendix A. 























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study of university matriculants would be unique in the 
field of Canadian educational research. 

SCOPE OP THE STUDY 


This study has been undertaken to provide Informa¬ 
tion pertaining to the occupations of those students gradu¬ 
ating from the high schools of the Province of Alberta in 
1949. The population selected consisted of students who 
had obtained their high school diploma with credits in such 
subjects as would allow them to proceed to the University 
of Alberta. More specifically, the study was designed to 
provide information about the following: 

!♦ The proportion of those students who entered the 
University of Alberta, and then to: 

(a) Record the faculties entered and whether any 
change in faculty was made during, or immediately following, 
the freshman year, 

(b) Determine the number of casualties at the Uni¬ 
versity of Alberta during the first year of study, 

(c) Compare the scholastic standings obtained in 
the Department of Education Grade XII examinations with the 
final first year results obtained while in attendance at 
the University of Alberta. 

2* The proportion of those students not entering imme¬ 
diately into the University of Alberta, and then to ascertain 


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(a) The number attending other accredited univer¬ 
sities and their reasons for attending universities outside 
of Alberta, 

(b) The number of individuals not attending any 
accredited university and their reason for nonattendance, 

(c) The number of persons who received, or were 
receiving, specialized training not associated with an 
accredited university, 

(d) The occupational status of those not attending 
a university, 

(e) The standings obtained in the Department of 
Education Grade XII examinations. 











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CHAPTER II 


POPULATION 

SELECTION AND LIMITS 

The population selected for this study was comprised 
of students who graduated from Alberta High Schools during 
the school year ending 1949, and who obtained a High School 
Diploma with at least a n B" standing in seven Grade XII 
subjects required for entrance into the University of Alber¬ 
ta. No limit was imposed as to restrictive minimum average 
as required by some faculties, nor as to length of time 
necessary to complete the Grade XII course. On this basis 
each of the students was a possible candidate for entrance 
into some faculty of the University for the winter session 
of 1949# Using the above criteria, 821 students were selec¬ 
ted as the total population. 

PROCEDURE OF SELECTION 

A complete list of students who had received a High 
School Diploma in 1949 was obtained from the Examinations 
Branch of the Department of Education. The file of each 
student was examined to ascertain whether subject require¬ 
ments had been met to qualify him for university entrance. 
The eligible students were listed alphabetically on a master 







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file and the following facts were recorded: 

1* Address. 

2. The highest mark obtained by the student in the 
following subjects: English III, Social Studies III, Algebra 

II, Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry I, Biology II, 
Physics II, Chemistry II, Latin III, French III and German 

III. 

3. Aggregate of Marks. 

4. Average of Marks. 

Grade IX standing if obtained in Alberta. 

6. Mental ability scores where available. 

7* Number of years required to complete Grades X, 

XI and XII. 

The students so selected were subdivided into two 
groups, the University of Alberta Group and the Question- 

5 

naire Group. 


UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA GROUP 


The University of Alberta Group consisted of those 
students from the total population who enrolled in the win¬ 
ter session at the University of Alberta, Mount Royal College 
(restricted to courses recognized by the University of Alber¬ 
ta), and students enrolled in the one year course in the 
Faculty of Education at the University of Alberta. A total 
of 422 students were selected by checking the master file 
of the total population against the list of the first year 
entrants into the University of Alberta and its affiliates 
as compiled by the Registrar of the University of Alberta. 

The names of the 422 students were recorded on a 

. - - “ ™ 

Questionnaire Group defined on page 7- 




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6 


master file in alphabetical order along with the marks ob¬ 
tained in Grade XII courses, number of years required to 
complete Grades X, XI and XII, the Grade IX rating, the 
number of subjects repeated in Grade XII, the Grade XII 
average, and the faculty in which the student enrolled. 

The file was then checked against the official First Year 
Reports as compiled by the Registrar of the University of 
Alberta at the end of the 1949-50 winter term. These re¬ 
ports provided a synopsis of each student's progress for 
the completed term. 

The information obtained by way of the master file 
of the University of Alberta group and the First Year Re¬ 
ports was condensed and placed on a card in the following 
manner for each student. 


File Number Degree Course Entered 

Sex 

Grade IX Rating 

Number of Years to Complete High School 
Grade XII average Number of Repeats 

U. of A. Average 

Progress at U. of A. (Promoted, Recommended to 

Category II or IY, Withdrew, 
Incomplete Results, ete.J 


The cards were separated as to faculty entered and 
by a simple procedure of grouping cards with a desired factor 




7 


facts were obtained which were transcribed to tables. The 
tables contained a complete analysis of the information 
sought in relation to the University of Alberta Group. 

QUEST IONNAIRE GROUP 

From the total population of 821 students, 422 en¬ 
rolled in the University of Alberta and affiliates leaving 
399 students on the master file for which no evidence of 
registration in the University of Alberta could be found. 

This latter group of 399 students formed the tentative 
Questionnaire Population. 

A questionnaire was constructed to obtain the de¬ 
sired information related to this group. A copy of the 
questionnaire with an enclosed business reply envelope was 
sent to the address of the student as was recorded on the 
master file. A total of 201 usable replies were received 
which was a return of slightly over j>0>. The complete data 
on the Questionnaire Group was collected from the 201 re¬ 
turned and usable questionnaires. 

THE QUESTIONNAIRE AND ITS DESIGN 

The general intent and design of the questionnaire^ 
was to obtain an accurate post-school history of each student 


6 


Refer to Appendix B for sample questionnaire form. 






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and to further determine why the student did not continue 
further education at the University of Alberta. Provisions 
were included whereby the student could express an opinion 
as to the suitability and general effectiveness of the high 
school program. 

When all the questionnaires were returned they were 
filed in alphabetical order of the surnames. Each was then 
given a file number, and a card^ was drawn up. The follow¬ 
ing information, taken from the master file, was placed on 
the card: sex, number of repeats of Grade XII examinations, 
average of the Grade XII marks, the Grade IX rating and the 
place where Grade IX was completed if outside the Province 
of Alberta, and the number of years taken to complete high 
school. The above Information was placed on similar cards 
for all of those students who did not reply to the question¬ 
naires. The persons who submitted replies were classified 
according to the activities undertaken since their gradua¬ 
tion. Six categories were established. They were: 

1. The gainfully employed. 

2. The individuals attending other accredited 
universities. 

3. The individuals attending, or who attended, 
secretarial training schools. 

4. The individuals who had entered the field of 


7 


See page ? 







9 


nursing exclusive of the degree course at the University of 
Alberta. 

5. The individuals undergoing pharmaceutical in¬ 
ternship. 

6. The individuals not undergoing further training 
and not included above. 

On the cards of those who replied the following 
additional Information was recorded: Post-high school ac¬ 
tivity engaged in, whether or not financial inability pre¬ 
vented attendance at the University of Alberta, whether 
the individual had planned to attend the University of 
Alberta within the two years as set by the questionnaire, 
whether the home of the individual was, at the time of high 
school completion, located in a rural area, a town or a 
city, and the occupation of the provider at the family. 


Pile Humber 

Activity Group 

Sex 

Condition of finances 

Humber of repeats 

Type of Assistance 

Grade XII average 

Plans to attend U of A 

Grade IX rating 
(where obtained) 

Rome location 

Years to complete 
high school 

Occupation of Provider 


Illustration of card design used 
for the Questionnaire Group 










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Such a card system permitted rapid scrutiny of essential 
data. Additional information, as was desired, was secured 
by referring back to the returned quest ionnaire. 



CHAPTER III 


ANALYSIS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA POPULATION 

An examination of the total first year registration 
at the University of Alberta and affiliates, obtained from 
the First Year Student List of 1949-50, showed a total of 
1157 freshman students enrolled in full or part time pro¬ 
grams . Of these 1157 registrants, 422 were matriculation 
graduates from Alberta high schools in 1949* 

In theory, at least, most people would expect that 
the students who graduated from high school with university 
matriculation would compose the greater percentage of 
freshman students in the following fall term at the Univer¬ 
sity of Alberta* However, in only two cases did the 1949 
matriculation graduates constitute 707 ® or more of the enrol¬ 
ment in the 15 faculty programs offered. 

The astounding fact revealed by Table I was that 

8 

only 57 » 17 » of the 1157 ' freshman registrants was composed 
of senior matriculation students who graduated from Alberta 
high schools in 1949* It is of interest to note that 40.27° 
of the first year enrollment was made up of individuals 
entering into the non degree Junior Elementary and Inter¬ 
mediate Certificate program. Of this 40.27*, only 82, or 

^ This figure obtained from the Office of the Registrar, 

University of Alberta, Edmonton. 






12 


TABLE I 


REGISTRATION OF FRESHMAN STUDENTS IN 1949-30 
FACULTY PROGRAMS SHOWING THE PERCENTAGE 
OF 1949 MATRICULATION STUDENTS IN EACH 


FACULTY PROGRAMS 

ENTERED 

TOTAL 
FIRST YEAR 
ENROLLMENT 

NUMBER 
1949 STS. 
ENROLLED 

% OF 1943 
STUDENTS 
IN TOTAL 

1. 

Junior Slanentary and 
Intermediate 

427 

82 

11.9 

2. 

B. Sc.-Engine ering 

144 

76 

32.8 

3. 

B.Sc.-Arts 

98 

60 

61.5 

4. 

B.Sc.-Medicine 

60 

42 

70.0 

3. 

B. Education 

106 

33 

33.0 

6. 

B.Arts 

63 

34 

54.0 

7. 

B.A. - Law 

33 

26 

72.2 

8. 

B.Sc.-Nursing 

33 

21 

60.0 

9. 

B.Sc.-Dentistry 

21 

13 

61.8 

10. 

B.Sc.-Household Economics 

24 

13 

54.1 

11. 

B.Commerce and B.A. ,B.Com. 

37 

10 

27.0 

12. 

B. Sc. -Agr ieultur e 

32 

7 

21.9 

13. 

B. Sc. -Pharmacy 

23 

3 

12.0 

TOTAL 

1137 

422 



17.9%> of the 437 persons involved, were senior matriculants 
of the 1948-49 school year. As the table indicates, 72.2% 
of the students entering pre-iaedical training and 70.0% of 















15 


those entering the pre-law program graduated with senior 
matriculation in June, 1949. In the faculties of Agricul¬ 
ture, Commerce, Pharmacy, and Education, less than of 
the students were senior matriculants who graduated in 
194 ?. 

The three 194? students who entered the School of 
Pharmacy presumably were able to enroll directly from high 
school because they completed the required internship while 
finishing their senior matriculation* This assumption was 
based on the fact that all thre§ had taken five or more 
years to complete high school* However, the low percen¬ 
tage of matriculants enrolled for the Junior Elementary and 
Intermediate Certificate program, the Bachelor of Education 
program, and the B*Sc. in Agriculture program must be at¬ 
tributed to less rigid entrance requirements which, there¬ 
fore, increased the proportion of students who did not have 
matriculation. 

UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS SELECTED BY 194? SENIOR MATRICULANT’S 

An investigation of the first year list of students 
attending full and part time in the 1949-j>Q session at the 
University of Alberta indicated the professional choice of 
the 422 matriculation students* The following table sum¬ 
marizes the results in order of choice. 


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TABLE II 


FACULTY PROGRAMS SELECTED 
BY THE 422 MATRICULATION STUDENTS 


FACULTY PROGRAMS 

ENTERED 

1949-50 SESSION 

NUMBER OF 194? 
MATRICULANTS 
ENROLLED 

PERCENT OF 422 
1949 MATRICU¬ 
LANTS ENROLLED 

Junior Elementary and 
Intermediate 

82 

1?.4 

B.Sc.-Engineering 

76 

18.1 

B.Sc.-Arts 

60 

14.2 

B.Sc.-Medicine & Pre-M.D. 

42 

10.0 

B.Education 

35 

8.3 

B.Arts 

34 

8.1 

B.A. y LL.B.) db Pre-LL.B. 

26 

6.1 

B.Sc.-Nursing 

21 

5.0 

B.Sc.-Household Economics 

13 

3.1 

B.Sc.,DD.S. y & Pre-DD.S. 

(.Dentistry) 

13 

3.1 

B.Commerce & B.A. ,B.Com. 

10 

2.3 

B.Sc. -Agric ulture 

7 

1.6 

B.Sc.-Pharmacy 

3 

0.7 

TOTAL 

422 

100.0 


The above table shows the probable percentage of 
matriculation graduates of Alberta high schools who will 











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13 


enter directly into the various faculty programs at the 
University of Alberta in future years on the basis of pro¬ 
fessional choice. 


TABLE III 

FACULTY PROGRAMS SELECTED BY 
254 MALE MD 168 FEMALE MAIRICULANTS 



MALES 

(234) 


FEMALES 

(168) 

FACULTY PROGRAMS 
ENTERED 

1949-50 SESSION 

NUMBER OF 
1949 MAT¬ 
RICULANTS 

% OF 
254 

MALES 

NUMBER OF 
1949 MAT¬ 
RICULANTS 

7 . OF 

168 

FEMALES 

Junior Elementary and 

Intermediate 

26 

10.2 

36 

33.3 

B.Sc•-Engineering 

76 

29-9 

0 

0.0 

B.Sc.-Arts 

38 

14.9 

22 

13.1 

B.Sc.,M.D. & Pre-M.D. 

36 

14.2 

6 

3.6 

B.Education 

? 

3-3 

26 

13.3 

B.Arts 

14 

3.3 

20 

11.9 

B.A. ,LL.B. &. Pro—LL.B. 

24 

9.3 

2 

1.2 

B.Sc-Nursing 

0 

0.0 

21 

12.3 

B.Sc.-Household Economics 

0 

0.0 

13 

7-7 

B.Sc.,DD.S. & Pre-DD.S. 

13 

3.1 

0 

0.0 

B.Commerce & B.A. ,B.Com. 

8 

3.2 

2 

1.2 

B.Sc. - Agriculture 

7 

2.8 

0 

0.0 

B.Sc.-Pharmacy 

3 

1.2 

0 

O 

. 

O 

TOTAL 

254 

100.0 

168 

100.0 











16 


The preceding table illustrates, in order of choice, 
the program selections of male and female students. 

Of the female matriculation students, 48,8% enrolled 
in either the Junior Elementary and Intermediate Certificate 
program or the degree course in the Faculty of Education. 

By comparison, 44.97<» of the male matriculants entered into 
the B.Sc,-Engineering and B.Sc.-Arts programs. The combined 
enrollment of male students in the certificate and degree 
courses in the Faculty of Education shows teaching fourth 
place as professional choice for males on the basis of 
University of Alberta enrollment. 

GRADE XII AVERAGES OF SENIOR MATRICULANTS 
REGISTERED IN THE 13 FACULTY PROGRAMS 

The average mark made by a student on the seven 
Grade XII subjects required for senior matriculation is 
probably roughly representative of his academic ability. 
However, one must consider that in arriving at the average 
mark of the student only the highest mark in each subject 

tr 

was recorded. No account was taken of the fact that one 
third of the 422 students repeated one or more of their 
Grade XII subjects.^ 

A 

The averages were calculated by using the raw scores 
obtained by each student. 

9 See Table XVII, page 21, regarding the number of students 
repeating Grade XII subjects. 







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TABUS IT 


GRADE HI AVERAGES OF MATRICULANT S 
IN THE 19 FACULTY PROGRAMS 


FACULTY PROGRAMS 

ENTERED 

1949-50 SESSION 

NUMBER OF 1949 
MATRICULANTS 
ENROLLED 

AVERAGE OF 
GRADE XII 
MARKS 

B.Sc .-Nursing 

21 

71.3 

B.Sc .-Engineering 

76 

71.1 

B.A. ,LL.B. & Pre-LL.B. 

26 

70.9 

B.Sc. - Agr icuLt ur e 

7 

70 .9 

B.Sc.-Household Economics 

13 

70.7 

B.Sc.-Arts 

60 

70.6 

B.Educati on 

35 

6?.l 

B.Arts 

34 

68.8 

B.Sc., M. D • & Pre-M.D. 

42 

67.1 

B.Sc•,DD.S. & Pre-DD.S. 

13 

66.8 

Junior Elementary and 
Intermediate 

82 

69.6 

B.Commerce & B.A.,B.Com. 

10 

69.1 

B.Sc.-Pharmacy 

3 

60.6 

TOTAL 

422 


AVERAGE OF TOTAL POPULATION 

69.1 


Although the majority of the averages in each 
faculty came near the mean of 69.1 f students enrolled in 













18 


medicine, dentistry, and pharmacy fell noticeably below the 
average for the total population. It is of interest to 
note that the matriculation students in these programs 
failed to achieve the same standard of success in the uni¬ 
versity term when compared with the entire first year class 
in each of the respective faculties. 10 It is also evident 
that on the basis of high school average the degree course 
in the Faculty of Education attracted students of higher 
academic ability than did the Junior Elementary and Inter¬ 
mediate Certificate program. 

UNIVERSITY PROGRESS OP MATRICULANTS 

A study of the achievement of the matriculant during 
his freshman year should give some indication of his suita¬ 
bility for university training of a chosen type. The follow¬ 
ing table indicates the progress, following the completion 
of one full term at the University of Alberta, of the 422 
students in this study. 

On the basis of the table it is evident that of the 
422 students beginning the first year, only 408 students 
wrote complete examinations in April. The results obtained 
by the 408 students are recorded in Table VI. 


10 


See Table VIII, page 23, where the record of senior matri¬ 
culants and entire First Year Population is compared. 




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TABLE V 

UNIVERSITY RECORD OF 422 MATRICULANTS 
AT TERM ENDING, 1950. 


DEGREE OF SUCCESS 

OR FAILURE 

NUMBER OF 
MATRICU¬ 
LANTS 

PERCENT OF 
TOTiL (422) 

Passed all 

279 

66.1 

Failed one - granted supplemental 

64 

19.2 

Failed two - granted supplementals 

29 

9-9 

Failed three - granted supplementals 

9 

0.7 

Recommended to Category II 11 

17 

4.0 

12 

Recommended to Category IV 

20 

4.9 

Withdrew 

7 

1.6 

Deferred Finals 

4 

0.9 

Partial Course 

9 

0.7 

TOTAL 

422 

100.0 


11,12 a student may be recommended to two major 

categories. They are: 1. Category II in which the 
student is recommended to withdraw; if he decides to 
return, he is permitted no summer session registration 
no supplementals; not promoted; is placed f on proba¬ 
tion 7 ; H 40 n courses taken as first year courses to 
remain first year courses. 

2. Category IT, in which the 
student is required to withdraw from the University 
and if later allowed to return to the University he 
is on probation, and is required to repeat the year 
including those courses in which the Departments 
reported him passing. 
















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20 


TABLE VI 


ANALYSIS OF UNIVERSITY SUCCESS OF 408 
MATRICULANTS WHO COMPLETED A FULL YEAR 
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA, 1949-50 


DEGREE OF SUCCESS 

OR FAILURE 

NUMBER OF 
MATRICU¬ 
LANTS 

EEROSEE OF 
TOTAL (408) 

13 

Passed all 

279 

68.4 

Failed one or more but granted 
supplement als 

92 

22.5 

Recommended to Category II 

17 

4.2 

Recommended to Categoiy IV 

20 

4.9 

TOTAL 

408 

100.0 


In the table on the following page the results of 
412 students who matriculated in 1949 are compared with the 
results obtained by 1310 individuals classified as first 
year students for the year 1949-50, The data recorded for 
the first year class were obtained by a summation of the 
results reported by the First Year Committee for each 
faculty program. The 1310 cases do not include the regis¬ 
tration at Mount Royal College. 

The table would seem to indicate that the students 
who matriculated in 1949 obtained a better record by com- 

Includes 9 students who were recommended to transfer 
from the faculties of Law, Medicine and Dentistry even 
though they failed no subjects. 








21 


TABLE VII 


COMPARISON OF UNIVERSITY PROGRESS MADE BY 
MATRICULANTS WITH PROGRESS MADE BY THE ENTIRE 
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA, 1949-30 


DEGREE OF SUCCESS 

AT 

UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 

PERCENTAGE OF 
1310 FIRST 
YEAR STUDENTS 
ENROLLED 

IN FACULTY 
PROGRAMS 

PERCENTAGE OF 
&412 SENIOR 
MATRICULANTS 
ATTENDING 
UNIVERSITY OF 
ALBERTA,1949-30 

14 

Promot ed 

57 

67 

Recommended to Category II 

4 

4 

Recommended to Category IV 

7 

5 

Failed to receive credit 
for a complete year on 
basis of final examina¬ 
tions^ 

32 

24 

TOTAL 

100 

100 


parison than the total group of students classified as 
first year students in faculty programs in 1949-30* It 
should be noted that the 1310 cases representing first year 
enrollment are not the group composed wholly of freshman 


& The 412 cases selected were those who attended complete 
programs for the entire year and does not include 7 cases 
who withdrew or 3 cases classified as partial courses. 

14 Does not include students required to transfer at the end 
of the term from the faculties of Law, Medicine, and Den¬ 
tistry for failure to meet minimum average. 

13 This group includes students failing one or more subjects 
for which supplementals were granted as well as students 
granted deferred finals, etc. 



























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students. The first year group represents not only the 
freshman students but students repeating the year and stu¬ 
dents who transferred programs from the previous year. 

Of the 1^10 cases, approximately one third were 
made up of the Junior Elementary and Intermediate Certifi¬ 
cate group. It is questionable whether the Junior E. & I. 
Certificate group is representative of the general univer¬ 
sity population due to the lower entrance requirements 
given it. However, the following table affords a more 
direct comparison of the matriculation group in each pro¬ 
gram with the first year group in each program. The first 
year group of Table VIII is based on the Reports of the 
Recommendations of the First Year Committee and does not 
include those students registered at Mount Royal College, 
Calgary. 

As the table indicates, the record of the entire 
first year group, in the faculties of Medicine, Dentistry, 
and Pharmacy, was better than the results obtained by the 
1?4? matriculation students in the same programs. The most 
noticeable difference occurred in the Pharmacy program but 
this was due to the fact that only three of the thirty-two 
students classed as first year Pharmacy came from the 
Alberta high schools in 1?4?. 

^ Freshman students is defined as those students enrolled 
in the University for the first time and in first year 
programs. The total of freshman students enrolled in 
the University of Alberta for l?4?-20 was 1127* See 
Table I. 














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ENTERED IN VARIOUS FACULTY PROGRAMS WITH TOTAL FIRST YEAR 
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24 


RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN YEARS NEEDED TO COMPLETE HIGH SCHOOL 
AND DEGREE OF SUCCESS IN UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA PROGRAMS 

Of the 422 matriculants attending the University of 
Alberta, 50% completed grades X, XI and XII in three years• 
Approximately 4 5% completed high school in four years and 
the remaining 5% required five or more years to graduate 
from high school with a matriculation* Whether or not the 
length of time required to complete high school operated as 
a factor in university success is demonstrated in the fol¬ 
lowing table* 

TABLE IX 

UNIVERSITY PROGRESS OF 422 MATRICULANTS 
AS RELATED TO LENGTH OF TIME TO COMPLETE MATRICULATION 


DEGREE OF UNIVERSITY 
SUCCESS 

1 

OF TIME IN ALBERTA HIGH SCHOOLS 

3 yrs. 

4 yrs. 

5+ yrs. 

Number 

of 

Cases 

1 of 

3 yr. 
Gases 

Number 

of 

Cases 

% of 

4 yr. 
Cases 

Number 

of 

Cases 

7. of 

5+yr. 

Cases 

Passed all 

143 

67.8 

127 

66.3 

9 

43.0 

Failed one or more 

48 

22.8 

38 

19.9 

6 

30.0 

but granted supps. 







Recommended to Cat.II 

9 


7 


1 




6.6 


9.9 


20.0 

Recommended to Cat.IV 

3 


12 


3 


Withdrew 

3 


3 


1 


Deferred Finals 

2 

2.8 

2 

3.7 

0 

3.0 

Partial Students 

1 


2 


0 


TOTAL 

211 

100*0 

191 

100.0 

20 

100.0 





























si . si ...» V 
















. 





23 


The obvious conclusion to be drawn from the prece¬ 
ding table is that students who complete high school in the 
minimum length of time show superior academic ability to 
those students requiring five or more years to complete 
matriculation. The difference between the students requi¬ 
ring three or four years to matriculate is not so marked 
but the trend is still obvious. 

ANALYSIS OF 1?49 MATRICULANTS 
REQUIRED TO CHANGE PROGRAMS 

The Faculties of Law, Medicine and Dentistry 
require that a student obtain a specific minimum average 
for promotion. Failure to meet this average results in a 
compulsory transfer to a B.A- or B.Sc. program. Of the 8l 
matriculation students enrolled in the three programs, ap¬ 
proximately 28 percent were required to transfer. TabLe X 
indicates the proportion of the matriculants required to 
transfer from each program. 


TABLE X 

NUMBER OF 1?49 MATRICULANTS REQUIRED 
TO TRANSFER AT END OF 1?4 9-50 UNIVERSITY TERM 


ORIGINAL PROGRAM 
ENTERED 

NO. OF 1949 
MATRICULANTS 
ENROLLED 

REQU f D TO 
TRANSFER 

PERCENT 

TRANSFERRED 

B.Sc.,DD.S.& Pre-DD.S. 

13 

5 

38.3 

B.Se.,M.D. & Pre-M.D. 

42 

13 

30.9 

B.A.,LL.B. & Pre—LL.B. 

26 

3 

19.2 













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26 


TABLE XI 

UNIVERSITY RECORD OF 1?49 MATRICULANTS 
REQUIRED TO TRANSFER AT END OF 194?-50 TERM 


ORIGINAL PROGRAM 
ENTERED 

NUMBER 

REQUIRED 

TO 

TRANSFER 

TERM RESULTS/1949-30 

PASSED 

ALL 

FAILED 

ONE 

FAILED 

TWO 

B.Sc.,DD.S. & Pre-DD.S. 

5 

2 

2 

i 

B.Sc.,M.D. & pre-M.D. 

13 

3 

7 

3 

B.A. ,LL.B. & Pre-LL.B. 

3 

4 

1 

0 

TOTAL 

23 

9 

10 

4 


At least one third of the matriculants choosing the 
medical and dental programs were required to transfer. The 
academic record of these students, though not encouraging, 
is presumably good enough for admittance to the straight 
arts or science program. Of the twenty-three students who 
were transferred, approximately 407. passed all of their 
first year courses. 

ANALYSIS OF HIGH SCHOOL RECORD OF 1949 MATRICULANTS 
ATTENDING UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 

The University of Alberta population used in this 
study consisted of 422 matriculants, made up of 2j>4 males 
and 16 8 females. The number of years required to complete 
high school is demonstrated in the following table. 















27 


TABLE XII 


NUMBER OE YEARS REQUIRED TO COMPLETE HIGH SCHOOL 


YEARS REQUIRED 
TO COMPLETE 
HIGH SCHOOL 

MALES 

FEMALES 

TOTAL 

PERCENT 

OF 

TOTAL 

3 

121 

90 

211 

30.0 

4 

115 

76 

151 

43.3 

3 

15 

2 

15 

3.6 

6 

4 

0 

4 

0.3 

7 

1 

0 

1 

0.2 

TOTALS 

2^4 

168 

422 

100.0 


The Grade IX ratings of the 422 students is shown 
by the following table, 

TABLE XIII 


GRADE IX RATING OF 422 SENIOR MATRICULANTS 


GRADE IX 
RATING 

NUMBER OF 
STUDENTS 

PERCENT OF 

422 

H 

121 

28.7 

A 

233 

61.4 

' B 

30 

7.1 

Other 18 

12 

2.8 

TOTAL 

422 

100.0 


18 


Includes those students who received their matriculation 
in the Province of Alberta but who did not attend Grade 
IX in Alberta. 

























28 


The greater percentage of the students received an 
M A" standing in Grade IX* It Is interesting to note, as 
shcwrn in the following table, that in all but four cases 
the W H U standings were made by three year students* 


TABLE XIV 

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GRADE IX STANDING 
AND TIME REQUIRED TO COMPLETE HIGH SCHOOL 


TIME REQUIRED 
TO COMPLETE 
HIGH SCHOOL 

GRADE IX RATINGS 

H 

A 

B 

OTHER 

TOTAL 

No. 

> 

. 

o 

jz; 

> 

No. 

% 

No. 

% 

No. 

7® 

3 

117 

33.3 

82 

38.? 

3 

1.4 

? 

4.2 

211 

100.0 

4 

4 

2.1 

164 

83.8 

20 

10.5 

3 

1.6 

131 

100.0 

5 plus 

0 

0.0 

13 

65.0 

7 

33.0 

0 

0.0 

20 

100.0 

TOTAL 

121 

28.7 

23? 

61.4 

30 

7.1 

12 

2.8 

422 

100.0 


The above table indicates that the student receiv¬ 
ing an l, H w standing completes his high school in the minimum 
time of three years and the majority of ^A* 1 students take 
four years* 

The average of marks for the seven grade XII sub¬ 
jects completed by each of the 422 matriculants was found 
to be 69 .197®. ^ This result was calculated from the total 


See Table IV, page 17. 






















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2? 


of the raw scores representing the Grade XII average of 
each student. The following results were obtained by 
grouping the high school averages in intervals of two and 
using a range from ^0 to 100. 


TABLE XV 

GRADE XEI AVERAGE OF MATRICULAT.ION 
SUBJECTS FOR MALE AND FEMALE STUDENTS 



NUMBER OF 

AVERAGE OF 


CASES 

MARKS 

MALES 

254 

70.05 

FEMALES 

168 

69.40 

TOTAL 

422 

69.79 


The factor of number of years to complete high 

school has been treated with relation to university pro- 

20 21 
gress, and with reference to Grade IX rating. The 

following table illustrates the Grade XII averages of 

students requiring three, four, and five or more years 

to complete high school. 


20 See Table IX, page 24. 

21 See Table XIV, page 28 








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30 


TABLE XVI 

GRADE XII AVERAGES OF STUDENTS REQUIRING 
THREE, FOUR, AND FIVE OR MORE YEARS TO 
COMPLETE MATRICULATION 


YEARS REQUIRED TO 
COMPLETE MATRICULATION 

NUMBER OF 
CASES 

GRADS XII 
AVERAGE 

3 

211 

71.7 

4 

131 

68.3 

3 plus 

20 

64.3 

TOTALS 

! 422 

69.8 


The table indicates that students requiring the 
minimum number of years to complete high school obtain a 
higher mark. 

One would assume that the student who obtained the 
highest Grade IX rating would similarly obtain the higher 
average in Grade XII subjects. The evidence to support the 
above assumption is found in the following table. 

Approximately two thirds of the 422 students com¬ 
pleted the required seven Grade XII subjects without a 
failure. However, in several instances as many as nine 
supplemental examinations were written by individual stu¬ 
dents in order to qualify for matriculation. Table XVIII 
illustrates the Grade XII record as related to supplemen¬ 


tal examinations 













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TABLE XVII 


GRADE XII AVERAGES OF STUD EM'S OBTAINING 
H, A, AND B RATINGS IN GRADE IX 


GRADE IX RATING 

NUMBER OF 
CASES 

GRADE XII 
AVERAGE 

H 

121 

73.6 

A 

259 

63.7 

B 

30 

61.8 

22 

Others 

12 

75.2 


TABLE XVIII 

SUPPLEMENTAL EXAMINATION RECORD 
OF THE 422 SENIOR MATRICULANTS 


NUMBER OF 
SOTHiEMENTALS 

NUMBER OF 
STUDENTS 

PERCENT OF 
STUDENTS 

NONE 

236 

67.8 

ONE 

44 

10.4 

TWO 

39 

9.2 

THREE 

16 

3.8 

FOUR 

26 

6.2 

FIVE 

3 

0.7 

SIX OR MORE 

8 

1.9 

TOTAL 

422 

100*0 


22 


Refer to footnote l8 on page 27 





















‘ 
















32 


The following table clearly illustrates the com¬ 
parison between years taken to complete high school and the 
number of subjects repeated. 

TABLE XIX 


PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS REPEATING GRADE XII EXAMINATIONS 


NUMBER OF 

SUPPLmiENTALS ■ 

TIME TAKEN 

TO COMPLETE 

HIGH SCHOOL 

3 YEARS 

4 YEARS 

3 YEARS 

211 CASES 

191 CASES 

20 CASES 

NONE 

91.3% 

48.77° 

0.0% 

ONE 

3.7% 

13.77° 

10.0% 

TWO 

2.4% 

16.27. 

13.0% 

THREE 

0.4% 

6.37° 

13.0% 

FOUR OR MORE 

0.0% 

13.17* 

60.0% 

TOTAL PERCENTAGE 

100.0 

100.0 

100.0 


The number of Grade XII examinations repeated by 
students requiring five or more years to complete high 
school is particularly striking, A further analysis of 
the high school record of these students is provided by 
Table XX. 

The Grade XII average of the group falls far below 
the average of 71.7% for students requiring three years to 
complete high school and the 68.3% for students requiring 










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23 


TABLE XX 


RECORD OE SUPPLEMENTAL EXAMINA1IONS OF STUDENTS 
REQUIRING FIVE OR MORE YEARS TO COMPLETE HIGH SCHOOL 


NUMBER OE 
SUPPLEMENT ALS 

STUDENT CLASSIFI CAT! ON AS TO TIME 
REQUIRED TO COMPLETE HIGH SCHOOL 

5 years 
(15 cases) 

6 years 
(4 cases) 

7 years 
(1 case) 

NONE 

0 

0 

0 

ONE 

2 

0 

0 

TWO 

2 

0 

1 

THREE 

2 

1 

0 

FOUR 

0 

1 

0 

FIVE 

2 

1 

0 

SIX 

2 

1 

0 

. SEVEN 

2 

0 

0 

EIGHT 

0 

0 

0 

NINE 

3 

0 

0 

GRADE XII AVERAGE 

64.57* 

65.57* 

60 . 6 °/o 


four years* The table further Indicates that students 
requiring more than four years to complete high school 
failed to complete Grade XII without repeating at least 
one Grade XII subject. 















34 


SUMMARY 

Of 821 students w.ho graduated from Alberta high 
schools in 194? with matriculation, 422, or 317®, enrolled 
in the 1949-30 session at the University and its affiliates. 
The investigation dealt with in this chapter sought to de¬ 
termine the activities and achievements of these 422 stu¬ 
dents in their freshman year and to investigate the factors 
which influenced their achievorients. The following points 
are a summary of the facts revealed by an analysis of the 
data. 

1. The 194 9 matriculants comprised only 377® of fresh¬ 
man registration at the University of Alberta. 

2. The Faculty of Education attracted 287* of the 422 
matriculants into the degree and certificate programs. With 
the exception of the Engineering, Arts and Science, and Medi¬ 
cal faculties, each of the other faculty programs attracted 
less than 107> of the matriculants. 

3. Of the female matriculants who entered the University 
of Alberta, 497® chose teacher training programs. Of the 234 
male matriculants entering the University of Alberta, 437® 
chose either Engineering or Science programs. 

4. The programs in Arts, Medicine, Dentistry, Commerce, 
Pharmacy, and the Junior Elementary and Intermediate Certi¬ 
fication program^ i n the Faculty of Education attracted 

& This program has been replaced by the Temporary License 
pro gran. 






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35 


matriculants whose group Grade XII averages were below the 
average of 65*17® for the 422 matriculants. 

5* As a group, the 422 students who matriculated in 
1945 obtained a better academic record than the total group 
of students who were classified as first-year students in 
1949-50* However, the 1949 matriculants registered in Medi¬ 
cine, Dentistry, and Pharmacy failed to achieve the same 
standard as the total first-year class in those programs. 

6. Students requiring the minimum of three years to 
complete Grades X, XI, and XII achieved a greater degree of 
success in their freshman year at the University than stu¬ 
dents requiring four or more years to complete high school. 

7. The academic record at high school of the 422 matri¬ 
culants was shown to have been influenced by the following 
fact ors: 

(a) Students requiring only three years to complete 
high school obtained a higher Grade XII average and repeated 
fewer subjects than students who completed high school in 
four or more years. 

(b) In 977® of the cases, students obtaining an "H" 
grading on the basis of Grade IX examinations, completed 
high school in the minimum time of three years and obtained 
a higher average in the seven Grade XII subjects than did 
students receiving an rt A” or n B” rating in Grade IX. 









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CHAPTER IY 


ANALYSIS OF THE QTJEST IONNAIRE GROUP 

The Questionnaire Group, consisting of 399 individu¬ 
als, was divided into seven groups for analytical purposes. 
The groups were: 

(1) The Other University Group, which contained all 
those cases who entered other accredited universities in 
Canada and the United States. 

(2) The Nursing Group, composed of those persons 
who entered the nursing profession as trainees but not in¬ 
cluding those persons who entered nursing at the University 
of Alberta as degree aspirants. 

( 3 ) The Pharmaceutical Intern Group, which was de¬ 
signed to contain all those cases serving pharmaceutical 
internship prior to entering the School of Pharmacy at the 
University of Alberta* 

(4) The Secretarial Training Group, which contained 
those persons who were undergoing, or who had completed, a 
secretarial course. 

{3) The Miscellaneous Training Group, which was in¬ 
stituted to contain all of those persons who were taking 
further training of some description but who did not fit 
into any of the previously mentioned groups. 




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27 


(6) The Employed Group, which provided a classifi¬ 
cation for those persons who entered directly into the 
work-a-day world. 

(7) The Unclassified Group, which was a category 
set up to contain all those persons not attending the 
University of Alberta and who did not reply to the ques¬ 
tionnaire. 

THE OTHER UNIVERSITY GROUP 

The common factor for this group was attendance at 
a university outside the Province of Alberta. 

The population consisted of nineteen males and 
fourteen females making a total of thirty-three. Six 
individuals came from rural homes, four from town homes, 
and the remaining twenty-three came from city homes. The 
occupations of the providers included stenography, farming, 
missionary work-, real estate, industrial chemist, shipping, 
and various other vocations. There was no indication of 
higher economic resources for this group. 

The top six universities selected by these students, 
in order of popularity of choice, were: 

1. The University of British Columbia - 7 cases. 

2. The University of Manitoba - j? cases. 

3. The Brigham Young University - 4 eases. 

4. The University of Oklahoma - 4 cases. 






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. 

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38 


5. The McMaster University - 2 cases, 

6* The University of Toronto - 2 cases. 

In all, fifteen different universities attracted students 
from our province. The courses selected were as varied as 
were the institutions. Architecture, home economics, com¬ 
merce, engineering, and business administration were but 
some of the courses chosen by the students. 

The reasons for attending universities other than 
the University of Alberta were many and varied. Some of 
the most prevalent reasons were: 

1. University of Alberta did not offer desired 
course. 

2. Family or individual religious affiliations. 

3. Family moved from the province. 

4. Financially advantageous. 

The motives most frequently indicated by this group for 
the completion of matriculation were the predilection to 
attend university and individual desire. These were indi¬ 
cated in 23 cases. 

Six individuals indicated that, to some degree, 
their decision to undertake further training at a univer¬ 
sity other than the University of Alberta was brought 
about by financial difficulties of varying degree. The 
possibility of cheaper accommodation, larger scholarships, 
and cheaper tuition were factors in their final decision. 








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39 


Twenty of the thirty-one persons who responded to 
the query regarding the adequacy of the information made 
available to them about the University of Alberta stated 
that they had received sufficient information whereas the 
remaining eleven felt that the information made available 
was inadequate. 

The Grade XII average mark for this group of nine¬ 
teen males and fourteen females was 70 . 27 ® which was the 
highest of the groups comprising the Questionnaire popula¬ 
tion. 

THE NURSING GROUP 

Selection of a career in the nursing field was the 
prevailing factor in the formation of this group. From the 
replies received there were twenty-two female matriculants 
who indicated that they had entered training in the nursing 
field exclusive of those who had entered the B.Sc. program 
in Nursing at the University of Alberta. 

Ten of the total number indicated why they did not 
enter into the degree course at the University of Alberta. 
Six signified that the location of the hospital they had 
chosen was more advantageous than the University Hospital. 
The remaining four cases did not enter the degree course 
because of the following reasons: 

1. The marks obtained in Grade XII were too low for 






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40 


admittance to University of Alberta. 

2. The desire to move from Edmonton. 

J>. A particular interest in a specialty hospital. 

4. The family religious affiliation. 

The top three hospitals selected for training, in 
order of popularity of choice, were: 

1. The University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton - 
8 cases. 

2. The Holy Gross Hospital, Calgary - 4 cases. 

2. The General Hospital, Calgary - 2 cases. 

Twenty-one persons revealed the location of the 

hospital they had selected, and, of this number, two selec¬ 
ted hospitals in other provinces of Canada and two chose 
hospitals located in the United States. 

Nineteen cases indicated factors influencing them 
to complete their matriculation. Ten stressed that it was 
their own preference to complete their matriculation while 
three cases felt that their desire to attend the University 
of Alberta was primary in motivating their completion of 
matriculation. 

Six eases pointed out that financial difficulties 
had deterred them from attending the University of Alberta. 
One person held hopes to attend the University of Alberta 
within two years of the time the survey was undertaken. 
Three other cases suggested that they were undecided as to 


. 

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, 

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• • . • 





41 


whether or not they would attend the University of Alberta 
within the two year period. 

Fifteen cases indicated an opinion about the ade¬ 
quacy of the information provided them about the University 
of Alberta. Twelve of this number suggested the informa¬ 
tion provided was adequate while three felt that more in¬ 
formation should be provided. 

In reply to the query as to home location, ten 
stated they came from city homes, seven from town areas, 
and the remaining two cases from rural areas. Three in¬ 
dividuals did not respond to this question. 

The family providers were engaged as farmers (five 
cases), a plumber, salesman, surgeon, minister, teacher, 
plasterer, etc. Based upon the occupations of the family 
providers, one would surmise that these individuals came 
from homes that were very representative of the middle 
class of society. 

The average of the Grade XII marks for this group 
was 66 . 57 ®. 

TEE PHARMACEUTI CAL INTERN GROUP 

The common element of this population was that all 
members were, at the time of the survey, undergoing phar¬ 
maceutical internship. Seven males and four females con¬ 
stituted the entire population. 













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42 


Six individuals indicated that the desire to attend 
university was the major factor motivating them to complete 
matriculation. The remaining two persons who answered this 
particular question stated that the decision to complete 
their matriculation was of their own choice. 

Two of the eleven students revealed that financial 
difficulties were factors influencing their future. All 
members of the group indicated that they planned to attend 
the University of Alberta within the two year time limit. 

Seven persons expressed the feeling that they had 
received insufficient information about the University of 
Alberta while they were attending high school. Three 
persons indicated that they had been provided with adequate 
information while the one remaining person in the popula¬ 
tion did not express an opinion on this particular point. 

Seven of the eleven students involved in this 
group came from city homes, two were from town homes and 
the remaining two persons came from rural areas. The in¬ 
dicated occupations of the providers of these individuals 
suggested that the economic level of the homes from which 
these persons came might be slightly above the economic 
level of the other groups. 

THE SECRETARIAL TRAINING GROUP 


To qualify for membership in this group a graduate 




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43 


must have completed, or be completing, secretarial training. 
If a person indicated that he had-undergone some type of 
secretarial training beyond that which he may have received 
while attending high school he was included in this group. 

.Fifteen persons, fourteen females and one male, were 
placed in this group. Twelve persons indicated that they 
were employed at the time the survey was conducted. All 
but one person selected one of the many commercial colleges 
for their training. The one exception selected a corres¬ 
pondence type of training. 

Ten members expressed the opinion that there was 
an advantage to be had in completing matriculation. Two 
cases felt that a high school diploma or a Grade XI stand¬ 
ing would have been sufficient. 

The entire population suggested that individual 
desire had much to do with their completing senior matricu¬ 
lation. In eight cases it was considered the most important 
factor. In only two cases was the desire to attend univer¬ 
sity considered primary. 

Ten of the fifteen cases pointed out that financial 
inadequacy prevented them from attending university. 

One person definitely Intended to attend the Univer¬ 
sity of Alberta whereas three persons indicated that their 
attendance at the University within the two year period was 
probable. Nine others indicated that they did not plan to 






4 ; „ 




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44 


attend the University of Alberta at any time. 

In respect to the question of sufficient information 
being provided, six cases suggested that it was adequate 
while the remaining nine cases felt that more information 
should have been made available. 

The occupations of the providers for the families 
to which these persons belonged were varied and indicated 
that the homes were of average middle-class society. 

Two rural, three town, and ten city was the dis¬ 
tribution of the home areas of the individuals that con¬ 
stituted this population. 

The average of the Grade XII marks of the indivi¬ 
duals in this group was 67 • 57>. 

THE MISCELLANEOUS TRAOTUG GROUP 

This group of seventeen individuals, comprising 
ten males and seven females, was devised to embrace all 
of those cases who proceeded to training in fields of 
endeavour not undertaken by a sufficient number of persons 
to warrant separate classification. The places to which 
these persons proceeded included religious institutions, 
agricultural schools, a military college, chiropratic 
schools, technical school, and so forth. 

All persons of this group disclosed that indivi¬ 
dual desire was the motivating factor so far as obtaining 




4S 


matriculation was concerned, Seven persons stated that this 
was the most important factor while six cases indicated that 
the desire to attend university was primary. 

Five persons declared that financial difficulties 
prevented them from fulfilling their desire to attend the 
University of Alberta. Other reasons given for not attend¬ 
ing the University of Alberta included religious affilia¬ 
tions, a desire for courses not available, and indecision 
as to future plans. 

Four persons of this group stated that they planned 
to attend the University of Alberta within the two year 
period as set in the questionnaire while three persons 
indicated that they were undecided as to Y/hether or not 
they would attend the University within that time. 

Nine individuals expressed satisfaction with the 
info mat ion supplied them about the University cf Alberta. 
Six persons expressed the feeling that sufficient infor¬ 
mation was lacking. 

Six members of this group were residents of rural 
areas, six were residents of towns, and the remaining four 
cases of those who indicated their home address stated that 
they Y/ere residents of cities. 

Occupations of the providers of the families of 
which these persons were members showed a great variance. 
Agriculture endeavors were indicated in seven cases. Other 




46 


occupations included a surgeon, a minister, a business 
manager, mechanics, etc. 

The average mark in the Grade XII examinations for 
this group was 67 . 47 *. 


THE EMPLOYED GROUP 

The one hundred and three individuals, sixty-nine 
males and thirty-four females, who entered into this class¬ 
ification constitute slightly more than fifty-one percent 
of the entire number of usable replies received. The com¬ 
mon factor for this population was that they must have 
entered, so far as could be ascertained from the question¬ 
naires, directly into the work-a-day world from high school 
without any further specialized training. Included were 
those individuals who entered into occupations where on- 
the-job training was provided. This included all trades 
where the individual must be registered as an apprentice. 

Ninety-nine indicated an opinion as to whether or 
not their matriculation was an advantage to them in their 
line of employment. lifty felt that the completion of 
matriculation was an advantage while the remaining forty- 
nine expressed the opposite opinion. 

Ninety-seven individuals pointed out that the 
completion of their matriculation was motivated, to some 
degree, by their own choice or desire. The desire to 



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47 


attend university was a factor to be considered in seventy- 
two of the cases. Parental influence was a factor in forty- 
seven cases and teacher influence was of importance in 
twenty-six of the cases. 

seventy of the individuals concerned, or 68 . 07 ®, did 
not attend university because of financial difficulties. 

In fifty-six of these cases financial handicap was consid¬ 
ered as the primary factor in non attendance. Fifteen of 
the eases suggested that the main reason for non attendance 
was the fact that a suitable job was available at the time 
of graduation. The other reasons for non attendance were 
mentioned so infrequently as to make classification impos¬ 
sible . 

Thirty-three intimated that they planned to attend 
the University of Alberta within the two year time set by 
the questionnaire. Fourteen indicated that they might 
attend the University in the future while the remaining 
fifty-four who answered this section of the questionnaire 
stated that they definitely did not plan to attend the 
University. 

Fifty-one of the one hundred and one persons who 
expressed an opinion about the amount of information pro¬ 
vided them about the University of Alberta indicated that 
they had not received sufficient information. 

Twenty-four members of this population were rural 








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48 


residents, thirty-six were town residents, and the remaining 
forty-three were residents of the city while attending high 
school. 

The occupations of the family providers were too 
spread out along the socio-economic scale to establish any 
obvious pattern. 

Ninety-eight individuals indicated the type of work 
they had become established in since the completion of 
their high school* Nifty-four were salaried workers in 
offices, stores, etc. Twenty-four were engaged in a trade 
where they were earning while learning. Nine persons were 
engaged in unskilled activity. Eleven persons were engaged 
in full-time farming activity. 

The average Grade XII mark for the entire employed 
population was 66 . 6 >. 

THE UNCLASSIFIED GROUP 

This group, consisting of those cases from whom no 
usable questionnaires were received, was made up of ninety- 
two males and one hundred and six females giving a total of 
one hundred and ninety-eight. 

The average of the Grade XII marks for this group 
was 6 ^. 870 . 




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49 


SUMMARY 

Those students who had received their matriculation 
in 1949 and who did not enter directly into the University 
of Alberta for further training were classified as the Ques¬ 
tionnaire population, ^even separate classifications were 
set up for these individuals and each case was entered into 
its proper grouping. The seven classifications devised 
were the: 

1# Other University Group. 

2. Nursing Group. 

Phanaaceutical Intern Group. 

4. Secretarial Training Group. 

5. Miscellaneous Training Group. 

6 . Tinployed Group. 

7. Unclassified Group. 

There were 399 senior matriculants who did not 
enter directly into the University of Alberta. Question¬ 
naires were sent to all of these persons and 201 were re¬ 
turned and usable. The following table contains the number 
of males and females entered Into each of the above classi¬ 
fications excluding the unclassified group. The total 
population for each group is listed in Column C and in 
Column D the percentage of the 201 cases who replied to 
the questionnaire is noted. Based on the assumption that 











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3Q 


the trends established by the 201 replies received would 
hold true for all 399 cases, the estimated number of indi¬ 
viduals who could be expected to be in each grouping out of 
the total Questionnaire population is listed in Column E. 
The figures are to the nearest whole number* 


TABLE XXI 


POPULATE ON ANALYSIS fOB EACH GROUP 
NOT ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY OP ALBERTA 
(EXCLUDING THE UNCLASSIFIED GROUP) 



A 

B 

c 

D 

E * 

GROUP 

Number of 
Males 

Number of 
Females 

Total 

Number 

Percent 
of 201 
cases 

Est imated 
Number of 
399 cases 

Other Univer¬ 
sity Group 

19 

14 

35 

16.4 

65 

“Nursing Group 

0 

22 

22 

10.9 

44 

Pharmaceutical 
Intern Group 

7 

4 

11 

5.5 

22 

Secretarial 
Training Group 

1 

14 

15 

7.5 

30 

Miscellaneous 
Training Group 

10 

7 

17 

8.5 

34 

Employed Group 

69 

34 

103 

51.2 

204 

TOTAL 

106 

95 

201 

ioo.07« 

399 


What motives were the most important in inducing 
these students to complete their matriculation? individual 














desire 11 or "own choice" was mentioned ninety-seven times. 
The "desire to continue on to university" was indicated 
seventy-two times. "Parental Influence" was mentioned in 
forty-seven cases, "teacher influence" twenty-six times, 

"no other choice available in the school program" and 
"other reasons" were indicated in five cases. 

In 46.3 percent of the cases it was indicated that 
financial difficulties prevented individuals from attending 
a university or college. Six additional cases pointed out 
that they selected universities or colleges outside the 
Province of Alberta because it was financially advantageous 
to do so. Scholarships, cheaper accommodation, and shorter 
courses were some of the reasons given for selecting post- 
high school training away from Alberta. In all, 99 persons 
deferred further training at the University of Alberta be¬ 
cause of some degree of financial burden. If this trend 
were to hold for the entire 399 senior matriculants in the 
Questionnaire population, it might be assumed that approxi¬ 
mately 1?7 persons of the total 1949 matriculants, or 49.47®, 
did not proceed to further study at the University of Al¬ 
berta because of financial handicap. 

Seventy-eight persons expressed an opinion as to 
the most desirable type of assistance. Some individuals 
indicated that one type of assistance was as desirable as 
another type and they therefore indicated more than one 


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choice* This equal preference for two or more types of 
assistance causes a final tally of 102: choices being indi¬ 
cated by the 78 persons. The results of the tally are 
indicated in Table XXII. 


TABLE XXII 


TYPES OF ASSISTANCE DESIRED BY 78 CASES 


TYPE OF .ASSISTANCE 

NUMBER OF TIMES 
INDICATED 

A scholarship of $200.00 

9 

Free tuition 

20 

Free room and board 

32 

An interest free loan 

17 

Part-time work 

21 

Other assistance 

3 

TOTAU 

102 


Fifty-two cases, or of the total number of 

replies received Indicated that the persons concerned defi¬ 
nitely plan to attend the University of Alb erta within the 
two year time limit set in the questionnaire. Twenty-four 
additional cases, or 11.97*, indicated that they might enrol 
in the University within the two year period. 

Eighty-six, or 42.8% of the total 201 cases involved, 
indicated that they did not receive sufficient information 

















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: 


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53 


about the University of Alberta while attending high school. 

One hundred and ninety-seven persons indicated their 
place of permanent residence at the time of graduation. Of 
this number 21.47* indicated rural residence, 2?.47* indicated 
town residence while the remaining 49.27* indicated city resi¬ 
dence. 

A summary of the average of the Grade XII marks for 
males, females, and the total population in each of the pre¬ 
viously mentioned classifications is given in Table XXIII. 


TABLE XIIII 

AVERAGE OF GRADE XII MARKS 
FOR GROUPS NOT ATTENDING UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 


GROUP 

AVERAGE OF GRADE XL I MARKS 


Male 

Female 

Tot al 
Population 

Other University Group 

Nursing Group 

70. 5% 

65.674 

66.3% 

70.27. 

66.3% 


Pharmaceutical Intern 
Group 

64.87. 

63.8% 

64.4% 

Secretarial Training 
Group 

71.07. 

67.3% 

67.57. 

Miscellaneous Training 
Group 

68.47. 

65.7% 

67.4% 

Employed Group 

66.57. 

66.6% 

6 6.67. 

Unclassified Group 

65.274 

66.4% 

65.8% 

Total Non U of A 

Population 

66.5% 

66.67® 

66. 






















. 















. • 














54 


It is of interest to note that the average of the 
Grade XII marks for the total Questionnaire population is 
66*5% which is 2.6% lower than the average of the Grade XII 
marks for the total University of Alberta population. The 
Grade XII average of the Phannaceutical Intern Group is 
3.8% higher than the Grade XII average of those students 
who enrolled In the School of Pharmacy directly from high 
school in 1?49* Worthy of comment is the fact that the . 
students who enrolled in the B.Sc* program of Nursing at 
the University of Alberta immediately following matricula¬ 
tion in 1949 had an average Grade XII standing of 71*3% as 
compared to 66.4% for the Nursing Group in the Questionnaire 
population. Finally, 123 cases out of the 399 cases involved 
in the total Questionnaire population had Individual Grade 
XII averages above the 6?.17» Grade XII average of the total 
University of Alberta population. 



CHAPTER V 


CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMMTATIQNS 

This study has shown that the 422 students who 
matriculated in 194 9 and who enrolled in the 1949-3 0 winter 
session at the University of Alberta comprised only 377> of 
the total freshman registration for that term. It follows 
that the remaining 713 freshmen must have obtained their 
matriculation in previous years, or in some other province, 
or entered the University without complete matriculation. 

The combined freshman enrollment in the degree 
course and the certification program in the Faculty of Edu¬ 
cation totalled 333 students. Only 117 of these students 
matriculated in 1949. The remaining 416 registrants may 
have entered the University of Alberta as graduates from 
Alberta high schools In 1949 with sufficient credits to meet 
the specific entrance requirements of the Faculty of Educa¬ 
tion, but without matriculation standing. Assuming that 
these 416 students were in attendance at Alberta high schools 
in 1949, it may be stated that 838 of the 1137 freshmen en¬ 
rolled in the 1949-30 winter session proceeded to training 
at the University of Alberta directly from Alberta high 
schools In 1949. There remains approximately 300 students 
who enrolled from other provinces, or who obtained matricula¬ 
tion in Alberta prior to 1949. However, in considering all 







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possibilities, one might safely assume that possibly 407<> of 
the freshmen enrolled in the 1?4?-.50 winter session at the 
University of Alberta were not matriculants from Alberta 
high schools in the same year. 

Since it is important that the officials of the 
University of Alberta be able to anticipate a certain 
freshman enrollment each year, it is recommended that 
records be maintained from which the source of freshmen 
registration may be classified and that these sources be 
investigated. 

It is of interest to note that 40% of the freshmen 
registered in the certificate program in the Faculty of 
Education. The factors of less rigid entrance requirements, 
financial assistance, and job availability may have attrac¬ 
ted those persons who did not have sufficient Grade XII 
credits to enroll in other faculties, or who did not have 
sufficient financial means to proceed to faculties where 
assistance is not so easily secured, or who wished to be 
able to secure a professional position at the end of one 
year of training. 

The university progress of the 422 students who 
matriculated in 1?4? was better by comparison than that of 
the total group of students classified as first year stu¬ 
dents in the l?49-j?0 faculty programs. Two factors were 
found to operate as indicators of the potential academic 








' 

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57 


success of the group in the freshman year. Students who 
completed high school in the minimum time of three years 
obtained the highest Grade XII averages, 31 ’ repeated fewer 
subjects in Grade XII,^ and enjoyed greater academic suc- 
cess at the University of Alberta. Students obtaining 
an W H M standing in Grade IX departmental examinations gene¬ 
rally completed high school in the minimum time of three 
years,obtained a higher Grade XII average than those 
students with an "A" or U B M standing in Grade ix,^ 3 ^ 
and presumably enjoyed a greater degree of success at the 
University of Alberta. 

It is recommended that the factors of Grade IX 
rating and the years required to complete high school be 
given due consideration in assessing the suitability of 
the matriculant for university training. 

The Faculties of Law and Medicine require that a 
restrictive minimum average for successful promotion be 
attained. In the case of the pre-medical and pre-dental 
registrants, approximately 357® of the 1J49 matriculants 
registered in these programs were required to transfer to 
other programs at the end of their first year of university 

4 See Table XVI, p.JO. 
xx See Table XIX, p.32. 
i*x& See Table IX, p.24. 

443131 See Table XV, p.2 
44244 See Table XVII, p.31. 







0 


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58 


training.* In view of the fact that the 1949 matriculants 
who registered in the above programs obtained relatively 

Tfrxr 

lower Grade XII averages than the total University of 
Alberta population, it is recommended that a thorough pro¬ 
gram of entrance selection be adopted to choose those ap¬ 
plicants most likely to meet successfully this barrier of 
the restrictive minimum average. 

Of those students obtaining matriculation each year, 
it can be expected that approximately 50% will register at 
the University of Alberta for the following winter session. 

It can be assumed that approximately 25% of the Alberta 
matriculants will proceed to a variety of training programs 
before becoming permanently employed. The remaining 25% of 
the matriculants will enter into the work-a-day world direct¬ 
ly from high school. On the basis of this trend, it is there¬ 
fore recommended that the University of Alberta and the De¬ 
partment of Education of Alberta promote some scheme of pub¬ 
lic relations which will encourage a greater percentage of 
those persons, who indicate some desire to proceed to uni¬ 
versity by completing their matriculation, to participate 
in the fields of higher learning offered by the University 
of Alberta and its affiliates. This, is essential if the 
University of Alberta is to attract more students in this 

& See Table X, p .25* 
m See Table IT, p.17. 








5 ? 


period when competition by industry and lesser institutions 
of learning is so keen. 

It has been established that appraxiimately 467* of 
the Questionnaire Population who replied to the question¬ 
naire indicated that financial difficulties played a part 
in their decisions not to attend the University of Alberta 
or any other university. It is, therefore, recommended 
that the University of Alberta and the Provincial Depart¬ 
ment of Education thoroughly investigate means by which the 
financially handicapped matriculants might be assisted in 
obtaining the means necessary to attend the University of 
Alberta. Some of the schemes felt worthy of investigation 
are: 

1. A scheme where the cost of room and board might 
be lessened fcr the individual by his working for the Uni¬ 
versity of Alberta during the term. 

2. A scheme of providing interest free loans to 
likely prospects. 

3. A scheme whereby more students could defray the 
cost of tuition by scholarship assistance of the type pres¬ 
ently being employed to encourage individuals to take part 
in teacher training. This scheme may prove of value in 
encouraging hid re students to participate in agricultural 
training and to ultimately serve the people of Alberta where 
agriculture is the primary industry. The authors feel that 


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greater effort should be made to extend assistance to 
matriculants than is being done at present, 

Since 42.87o of the Questionnaire Population who 
replied to the questionnaire indicated that insufficient 
information about the University of Alberta had been made 
available to them, it is recommended that a greater effort 
be made to bring to all matriculating students a complete 
picture of what the University of Alberta offers and what 
the freshman student can anticipate. 

In general, it is felt that the University of 
Alberta must adopt a more vigorous campaign to attract 
potential students if it is to successfully compete with 
industry, trade schools, business colleges, and other 
training institutions in the post high school development 
of our youth. 


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6l 


BIBLIOGRAPHY 


Ackroyd, A. 0., factors Contributing to Delay In Attending 
University # An unpublished survey conducted by the 
author while employed by the Department of Veterans 1 
Affairs, Edmonton, 1949. 

American federation of Teachers, Commission on Educational 
Reconstruction. Basic Principles of federal Aid to 
Education . Excerpts from the Testimony of Dr. Floyd 
Reeves before the Senate Committee on Labor and Edu¬ 
cation. Chicago, Ill., 52 pp. 

Barrett, Harry 0., ”Follow-up Study of a Group of Drop- 

Outs.” The School Guidance Worker , V, April-June, 
1948, pp. 7 - 12. 

Berry, John W., Secondary and Post Secondary Education Con¬ 
tinuation in a Rural County . Eureka College Book¬ 
store, Eureka, 19 47, 55 pp. 

Canadian Research Committee on Practical Education. Two 
Years After School . Toronto, March, 1951, 149 pp. 

Dillon, Harold J., ”Early School Leavers - Conclusions and 
Recommendations.” The School Guidance Worker . V, 
Februaiy, 1950, pp. 12 - 16. 

Dillon, Harold J., Why Students Leave School . A Study by 
the Rational Child Labor Committee. Hew York 16, 

New York. 

Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Survey of Higher Education 

1946-48 . Government of Canada, Bureau of Statistics, 
Education Division, Ottawa, 1950, 66 pp. 

Faculty of Education Committee. Report on ”The Report of 
the Committee on Articulation of High School and 

University Curricula . University of Alberta, 
Edmonton, 1949, unpublished. 

Rational Education Association of the United States. Com¬ 
mittee on Tax Education and Finance. Extent of 
Schooling of the American People . Bulletin, Rovem- 
' ber, 1944, Washington, D.C., 16pp. 





















< 









62 


United States Labor Department, “Why Boys and Girls Leave 
School." A summary of a study in The American 
Teacher , April, 194?, p.20. 

University of Alberta Committee on Scholarship and Prize 

Awards. Relation of Top-Ranking; Performance in the 
Matriculation Examinations of the Province of 

Alberta to Entrance to the University of Alberta , 

unpublished, University of Alberta, Edmonton, 1?4^. 








63 


APPENDIX A 

During the preliminary investigation concerning the 
availability of facts regarding the post-school occupational 
activities of high school graduates, the Research Division 
of the Americana Corporation of Canada was solicited for 
information. The following questions were directed to them. 

(1) What figures are available to show the relation¬ 
ship between attendance at accredited Canadian Universities 
and the financial standings of the individual or his family? 

(2) What studies have been conducted which would 
indicate the percentage of Canadian students starting high 
school and who finally enter any accredited university? 

(3) What studies have been made which would indi¬ 
cate the reasons why Canadian high school students who have 
obtained the requirements for university entrance fail to 
enter into further study? 

The above mentioned firm stated that they had no 
information which would be of assistance to us but they did 
refer our request to The Canadian Education Association and 
the National Conference of Canadian Universities. The in¬ 
formation obtained from these two sources was as follows: 

(1) Albert st-Jean, Assistant Secretary of the 
Canadian Education Association, 206 Huron Street, Toronto 
3, Ontario, stated: 


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n I regret to say that it was not possible to find a reply 
to question No. 1. 

"The percentage of Canadian students starting high school 
and entering any accredited University is approximately 4 
per cent for boys and 2 per cent for girls in Canada (sur¬ 
vey of Higher Education, 1946-48, Government of Canada). 

"As closest reference on that matter which might be useful 
to your subscriber, we recommend the following booklets: 

" Survey of Higher Education 1946-48 . Government of Canada, 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 

" Two Years After School , a report of the Canadian Research 
Committee on Practical Education, March 1951, published by 
the Canadian Education Association, ^0# per copy. 

(2) T. H. Matthews, Hon. Secretary, National Con¬ 
ference of Canadian Universities, McGill University, 

Montreal 2, P.Q. offered the following: 

"I am anxious to help you in answering your correspondent, 
but you will realize that to give anything but impressions 
and guesses in reply to your questions would require a vast 
piece of research covering the whole of this country and 
probably qualifying the investigator for a Ph.D. at least. 

It is a very tall order. My impressions, however, are as 
follows: 

"(1) Financial resources and geographical factors play an 
important part in determining who shall go to college. A 
boy with a home In Toronto can go to college for perhaps 
#500.00 a year - an amount he might earn in the summer. A 
boy in a northern mining town would require about three 
times as much money per annum. Even in the college towns, 
it is naturally the families with more money who can send 
their children to college. The extremely bright younsters 
can win a scholarship, but the number of scholarships and 
bursaries is certainly not enough to overcome the financial 
difficulties of the poor families. 

"(2) I have no figure on the percentage of high school boys 
smd girls who go to college. The Canadian Education Associ¬ 
ation, which is an association of the Department of Education, 
might be able to answer this particular question and I am 
sending your letter to Mr. F. K. Stewart, the Secretary of 














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63 


this association, at 206 Huron Street, Toronto, and asking 
him to give you any help he can. 

"(3) This, again, is a question Mr. Stewart can probably 
answer with more authority than I. .Among the reasons are 
undoubtedly lack of funds, lack of ambition and inclination, 
alternative ambitions, such as becoming a banker or C.A., 
which does not necessitate a college degree, lack of good 
vocational counselling, and finally, strong parental opini¬ 
ons. How to assess weights to these and other factors, 
frankly I do not know. 11 



APPENDIX B 



University of Alberta 
EDMONTON, Alberta. 


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How have you been occupied since graduation in 1949? (Check the appropriate 
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Indicate by "yes 1 ^ or "no" whioh of the following factors influenced you 
to complete your Senior Matriculation* 

(a) No other ohoico available in the school program. _ 

(b) Parontnl Influence._ 


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If financial difficulties were a reason for your not attending the University 
of Alberta, would you have attended if you could have received assistance in 
one of the following ways? (indicate which one with ft check mark). 


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