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MC-8 

roComposer 



INSTRUCTION MANUAL 



C 



^Roland 



v^. 



i 



v„. 



Copyright ^ 1979 by ROLAND CORPORATION 

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior 
written permission of ROLAND CORPORATION. 



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CONTENTS 

1. Introduction ,,,.... ....,- 1 

2. What is the Roland MicroComposer? .,.,-,...- , , 3 

3. Connections ...,,...-.. , . . , 5 

Outputs ..,..,......, ,-...,..,, 6 

The DIN Plugs , 8 

4. Writing the Program - . . , ^ 11 

Pitch, - ...-.....-.-,..... 11 

Time Values ,.,..,.. , - 15 

Gate Times and Rests ......,, 19 

Embelishments. ,,,,,.. 26 

Dynamics , , , - - 28 

Tone Color ,,...... - 32 

Chords , ,,,..... - - 33 

Multichannel Programs, .,.....,. 36 

Sustained Arpeggios, - - - ■ 40 

5. Loading the MicroComposer from the Program Sheet - 45 

Introduction *....,. 45 

OPERATION 1: Establishing the ADDRESS ,.,. 46 

OPERATION 2: Memory Selection , .... - 49 

OPERATION 3: Writing 50 

The TIME BASE/TEMPO Set Operation ,,.... ._...,,...,........ 51 

Sample Programs , , , ,,..<.. - 54 

Producing the Sequence - 58 

Summary 63 

6. Loading from an External Source - 65 

Inputs - 65 

Loading from an External Source. ....,..,.,,,,......... *...,,*.. 66 

Loading CV and Gate Data 67 

Loading CV Only . . , , .,.,.... 68 

Editing ....*..*..,...... .........*.-..- 68 

Tuning the External Source .*.....,. 69 

Portamento. * \ 69 

7. The RUN Function. 71 

Repeat RUN Function - ■ - 71 

Running the Program * * 73 

Tuning ......,,.. , ............* 73 

The Display .... 74 

/[Z] , _ , , . 75 



Remote 



8. Program Revisions , 77 

Key Punching Mistakes. ....... , - ,77 

Button 77 



The 



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Data Revision • - - - 78 

Revision of [^. ....-- 81 

The INSERT and DELETE Functions , 84 

The MEMORY CLEAR Function. , 88 

9. Repetition 93 

Repeated Notes - • • 93 

COPY Function - - • ' 93 

Canceling the COPY Function 105 

10. Synchronous Recording 107 

Recording the Sync Signal , . , . * 1 07 



Recording the Programs 1 08 

"False" Starts 108 

11, IVlultiplex . , . 109 

RhythmiQ Patterns ... * 110 

Switching Functions , . - 1 19 

Portamento. 121 

The MPX Display Mode. . . 122 

12, External Tape Memory ................... . . - 123 

Recording the Tape Memory. 123 

Verification of the Tape Memory 124 

Retrieving the Tape Memory, 124 

Data Errors 125 

Data Tapes 125 

Cassette Recorders 126 

13, The Timer, 127 



The '^ Button 127 



14. Variable Tempo ,.,,.._._ ..«.....•. 129 

TIME BASE^EMPO. 129 

Manually Controlled Tempo 130 

Varying STEP and GATE times 130 

Programmed Variable Tempo , 133 

Fixed/Variable TEMPO Selection Logic ._..._..... 134 

Altering Overall Tempo. 1 38 

15. Miscelaneous MicroComposer Applications, 139 

Two or More MicroComposers in Parallel .......... 139 

Two or More MicroComposers in Series . , 139 

Automated Mixing ,,,,...,,,, 140 

Overdubbing "Live" Music 140 

Other Scale Systems , . .... 140 

Timing in Music ...,.,,,. , , , . , 142 

16. The Memories , - 145 

Memory Capacity 145 

Available Memory , - 145 

Memory Protect 146 

Memory Search Delay , 146 

Measure and Step Capacity 148 

17. The ERROR Function 149 

WRONG DATA ERROR. 149 

WRONG OPERATION ERROR 150 

NON-EXISTENT ADDRESS ERROR. 150 

NO DATA ERROR. 151 

CV MEMORY IN USE ERROR 151 

COPY ERROR , , . . 151 

NON-DISPLAY MODE ERROR , - . 1B2 

MEMORY OVERLOAD ERROR 152 

TAPE MEMORY ERROR 152 

18. Calibration 153 

The TIMER/DISPLAY Board Adjustments 157 

The CPU Board Adjustments . 159 

The Interface Board Adjustments 161 

19. Specifications 163 

20. Instant Index - - * - • ,....- following p. 166 



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1. Introduction 



If you are in a hurry to begin experimenting, read Section 3 (Connections, p. 5) and then 
try the experlnnental programs in Section 5 beginning on page 54. 



The logic used In the operation of the MicroComposer is consistent. You will find that once you 
start using the MicroComposer, it is not anywhere near as difficult to use as a cursory glance 
through this manual might seem to Indicate, 

The material In this manual is arranged more or less in the order it would be needed to encode 
the score, program the MicroComposer, edit the program, and produce the finished music. A 
certain amount of repetition and cross referencing has been used so that this order may be 
varied if desired, and to make review easier. 

One thing you should know before you begin experimenting: If all of the display LED's start 
flashing on and off, this indicates that the ERROR function has been activated This is discussed 
in Section 17, but it can often be corrected by re-punching the correct button sequence; otherwise, 
for the time being, you can start all over from the beginning by turning off the POWER switch 
for a second or so to clear all the memories. 



V. 






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2. What is the ROLAND MC-8 MicroComposer? 



What every electronic music studio needs is a device that can he programmed to control the 
production of sound for recording each voice line. The ideal device would have the following: 

1 . a method of storing information for all of the variables in a sound. 

2. a synchronous function for multi-channel recording. 

3. a high capacity for recording full compositions without breal<, 

4. provisions for changing and editing any of the information during and after loading. 

5. the load mode must have some form of monitoring provision to help in the programming, 

6. quick access time during the recording process so the device will play passages faster 
than humanly possible. 

7. the device must be able to add all emotional qualities to the music as desired by the 
musician. 

The answer 

The ROLAND MC-8 MicroComposer is the answer to all the above. And more. 

In the simplest terms, you might say that the MicroComposer is a sofisticated digital sequencer; 
it is controlled by a microprocessor (the 8080A). To say digital sequencer^ though, is tike trying 
to compare an abacus to a programmable pocket calculator. 

The MicroComposer is designed to operate in conjunction with a professional studio type synthe- 
sizer such as the ROLAND System 700. It is also compatible with the ROLAND System 100 
synthesizer. And, of course, it is compatible with other makes of synthesizer, too. 

The MicroComposer is not limited to the production of music in the studio. It can be used in 
live performance, too. It can be used in any situation where you need a set of preprogrammed, 
timed pulses, and/or preprogrammed, timed voltage levels, as for example, in stage lighting. 

Once the MicroComposer is programmed to your satisfaction, it will produce a perfect recording 
the first time through without mistake. Programming is as simple as adding a column of figures 
with a calculator. Or, if you can tap out a melody with one finger, no matter how slowly, you 
can use the synthesiser keyboard controller to load pitch information. If you prefer, you can 
load gate information also, so that the MicroComposer will play back any sequence exactly as 
you play it on the keyboard controller. Editing and correcting mistakes can be done simply at 
any time during the loading process. 



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And more . , 

Using the eight channel output feature, all the voice lines in an average popular song can be 



stored in the memory; when the ^^ button is pushed, the finished composition is produced in 
its entirety and can be recorded in one operation on the final master tape without the need for a 
multichannel tape recorder, In a multichannel recording system, using a one or two channel 
output from the MicroComposer will give enough memory capacity for recording music such 
as major symphonic works. Using the multichannel output of the IVlicroComposer, you can 
increase the number of first generation voices it is possible to record on the multichannel master 
tape. 

The digital information in the memories can be loaded intact directly onto tape for permanent 
storage by using a cassette tape recorder, and reloaded back into the MicroComposer memories 
for later use or editing, ^ 

The TIMER displays the elapsed time for the music, In commercial work such as for radio and 
television where timing is essential, setting the TEMPO control while checking the TIMER 
display allows you to adjust the playing time of the composition to within one tenth of a 
second of the desired time length. 

And more. Read on ......... . 



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3. Connections 



The MicroComposer and the Interface are connected as shown below. 



HEAT SINK 



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Allow space for air to circtifate 
around heat sink 



Place on hard surface 
so that air can pass 
througii ventilating lioles 
in bmtom. 



DATA 

BUS 

CORD 



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Usfi of the jacks on the rear panel is explained on 
the following peges: 

REMOTE START/STOP Page 75 

SYNC OUT/IN SactionlO 

TAPE MEMORY DUMP/LOAD. . , , Section 12 



caution: 

Always turn off POWER switch before 
connecting or disconnecting data bus 
cord. 



Be sure to set the NOR/INV switch correctly. 
NOR (normal) plus gate 

IIMV (invert) inverted (minus) gate 

The Interface contains the D/A (digitai-to-anaiog) converters which convert the digital output of 
the MicroComposer to control voltages that the synthesizer can use. 



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v. 



Outputs 

The MicroComposer provides eight control voltage outputs and eight gate outputs, as well as a 
six bit multiplex output with a special seventh bit set aside for portamento control (multiplex 
is explained fully in Section 11). 

The gate outputs are completely independent of each other and are referred to as channels* Each 
of the CV outputs may be assigned to any desired channeL Generally, the MicroComposer 
Program Sheets will clearly designate channel assignments for the CV outputs. An example Is 
shown below: 



CHAHNEL 


/v Hoi>.t/ 


»?. FLuTES 


3. BAss^ 


HEASUfiE 


STEP 


cvt 


s 


« 


VCA 






vco 
CV3 


cvfc 


s 


^ 


cvt 






CVS 


^ 


^ 








1 


/ 


/ 













































2 




































































































































^.. 



l: 



^- 



6 



The 
Connections: 



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Channel 1 
HORN 



to ADSR for FLUTES 

- FLUTE 1 pitch 
" FLUTE 2 pitch 
FLUTE loudness 



to BASS ADSR 
BASS pitch 



Channel 2 
FLUTES 



Channel 3 
BASS 



INTERFACE 



C 



V. 



Each channel must contain one "S" (STEP TIME for note time valves) column as shown. In this 
example, the synthesizer is to produce four voices divided into three channels. Channel 2 contains 
two flutes of different pitches but controlled by the same gate pulse train. Note that two of the 
CV outputs are to be connected to VCA's for control of foudness. Control of the loudness of 
Channel 3 (in this example) is either not necessary, or it is to be controlled by one of the other 
CV outputs. 

The DIN plugs 

The DIN plugs are provided for the convenience of owners of ROLAND synthesizers 
equipped with DIN plugs for CV/GATE output The drawing below shows the pin assignment 
if you would like to use the DIN plugs with other synthesizers. 



CV 1 and GATE 1 appear here 



Outputs here are determined by. 
the SELECTOR SWITCHES 



V_. 




External Inputs are discussed In 
Section 6 f p. 65). 



SELECTOR 
SWITCHES 



U 



Portamento is 
discussed on p. 121* 



v_ 



8 



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g 



c 



10 



a. 




O 



^^> — y 



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4. Writing the Program 



The music must be translated into a language (numbers) that the MicroComposer can understand. 
These numbers are then written onto the program sheets, then loaded Into the MicroComposer 
memories. 



Pitch 



If we let middle C equal "0", then 



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i iii J )lj 






lj il tfj p r 



1 23 456 789 10 11 12 



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"0" can be made to equal any pitch, but there are distinct advantages to setting up and using 
only one standard. In this manual we use a standard based on a five octave keyboard controller 
as shown on the opposite page. With constant use of the same standard, you will begin to 
memorize the numbers and can soon do away with having to constantly refer to a keyboard 
diagram. Also, with the same standard, all VCO's may be tuned to unison except when pitches 
below "0" are required, or when programming transposing parts. 

Each of the eight CV memories will accept values from to 127 for a total range of over ten 
octaves (from to slightly over +10 volts). (This wide range is not necessary for efficient pitch 
control but will prove useful for control of other synthesizer functions). 



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11 



Generally, when encoding music, each note in each measure is numbered consecutively: 



PROGRAM 1: 



MEASURE 



ISTEPJ ! 



1, 

1234 56 78 9. 



) ^' ri ^ J 



2. 

1234 56789 1011 



I ^.j y^ ^ """T T — N" i *" <" " ii*< " '~ — 0- - 



PITCH 



WT-^ JL ' if ^ — ^^ d * — ^f-d 



24 26 28 33 24 26 28 31 24 26 28 33 24 26 28 31 28 26 24 21 



A rest or rests occuring between the bar line and the first note in a measure should be considered 
as one step; all other rests may be disregarded: 



PROGRAM 2: 



V. 



DISREGARD 



iMEASURgf t t 



STEP: 



12345\ "6789 



? 



iPITCHh 



24 28 33 36 



DISREGARD 



12 3 4 5 



- 26 29 33 38 



6 7 8 



j?^r '^j^'^r i?//^r ^^JJ'^r 



- 23 26 31 35 - 24 28 31 36 



L, 



^.. 



12 



PROGRAM 1: 



PROGRAM 2: 



C 



C 



MM 


i-I^O 








TIME BASE 


J. 


CHANNEL 


A 


MEASURf 


STEP 




^ 


^ 






/ 


/' 


:i.(4. 


<^ 


X 








' 2 


Xi 


<^ 


2 








o" 


JJ? 


«■ 


2. 








^ 


33 


f 


7 








^ 


:i^ 


3 


Z 








6 


^^ 


f 


7 








7 


i? 


J 


Z 








9 


.?/. 


f 


7 








? 


^¥- 


J 


2 






2 


/ 


^ 


*^ 


a 








Jt 


iS* 


*^ 


2 








3 


^^ 


a 


2. 








^ 


•2X 


? 


? 








^ 


U 


3 


2 








6 


1^ 


« 












7 


d/ 
















^ 


J?S^ 
















9 


a6 
















fo 


pj^ 
















// 


;i/' 


^ 


a 



































































/Z 



MM J ^ ZtC>9 



TIME 



BASE J = 32. 



Pitch of first 
note which will 
soundx 



Data from 
previous step is 
repeated here 
(see p. 21 K 



CHANNEL 


/ 


MEASUI^ 


STEP 


vct> 


S' 


-^ 






/ 


/ ^ 


J?^ 


d' 


<? 








'^ 


z^ 






/ 








,^ 


a? 






if 








¥ 


o»<? 


^ 


<$ 








4- 


36 


^a 


J^ 








(> 


26 


S^ 


^r 








7 


^? 


? 


^ 








5» 


33 


S" 


^ 








f 


3» 


J2. 


J^ 






^ 


/., 


55 


8' 











■^ 


jj^ 


1 


^ 






^' 


^ 


^^ 


( 


4 








^ 


3/ 


? 


6 








t 


3^ 


^ 


30 








i 


Ml 


^ 


i 








7 


^ 


^ 


C 








5> 


3/ 


S* 


i> 








^ 


J6 


^i 


io 





























































































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13 



V. 



Tied notes may be considered as one. Ties across bar lines should be considered as separate notes. 



PROGRAMS: 



MEASURE 



fsfJPl ; 



2 3 



4 5 



No step for 
this tied note 



2 3 



/ 



4 B e 



3. 



IPITCHJ ; 



te 



31 



i5 



0^-0 



m 



28 28 26 31 31 28 28 - 28 26 31 31 28 



^_. 



MM 


J= /2^ 




TIME BASE J =. 


32. 




CHANNEL 


/ 


MEASUftE 


STEP 


f/CO 

cv/ 


s 


^ 










/ 


/ 


3/ 


^3^ 


^i 












2 


-i? 


/^ 


/#i 












3 


JJ? 


Ji 


2^ 












4C 


i^ 


/-^ 


/4<^ 












^ 


^/ 


/^ 


a 










2 


/ 


«:?/ 


J2 


iO 












^ 


2S- 


/^ 


/^ 












c? 


1^ 


J2 


36 












^ 


J2S» 


/<? 


t<A 












^ 


Ji^ 


/^ 


f¥- 












- ^ 


^/ 


/^ 


fS 


..- 








^ 


/ 


3/ 


J2 


30 














:i^ 


3Z 


30 

































































L. 



v_ 



14 



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Time Values 

The STEP TIME and GATE TIME memories are used for storing note time value data and for 
programming rests, and together they produce the gate pulse train for control of the synthesizer 
envelope generator. 

STEP TIME determines the total time duration for each step in the program. The STEP TIME 
memory has a capacity of 256 increments for each step in the program which are numbered from 
1 to 256. If Vtfe let a quarter note equal 32 increments, then: 



TIME BASE J » 32 



O =128 • -16 



J. 



64 #• -24 



c 



^16 + 8 = 24y 



J =32 ** =8 

J ) 

S* «48 • "4 
\32 + 16 = 48/ 



15 



TiME BASE J = 32 



J J J J 



32-^ 



J 



-•"32 



32-^-*-32"»- 



J 



^ 64 ^ 



•* 64" ^ 



128 



V- 



The actual length of time required for each increment will depend on the programmed tempo 
(see Section 14), (n the above example, since a whole note equals 128, the smallest time 
increment we couid program (a "1") would be equal to a 1/128 note. Also, the longest time value 
we could program into one step would be equal to two whole notes (128 + 128 = 256). For longer 
duration (such as tied notes) more than one step would have to be used as explained later in this 
section. 



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16 



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Compound rhythms can be handled In one of two different ways. If, as above, TIME BASE 
J " 32, then: 



TIME BASE j "32 



j> o, /n .^. 



3 "■9' 



Since the memories are not designed to handle fraotions, two of the notes could be assigned the 
value of 1 1 and the remaining note 10 for a total of 32, 



TIME BASE J =32 

if} 



10+11 + 11«32 

Or all of the notes could be assigned the value of 1 1 for a total of 33 for that beat 
timebaseJ »32 



m 



11 + 11 + 11=33 



17 



The continual addition of an extra increment for a series of triplets will soon throw the count 
off. To be safe, the extra increments should be "stolen" from a nearby note (even if that note 
is not in the same measure): 



TIME BASE J =32 



bar ilne 



J 



J73 



m 



31 111111 



n 



11 11 11 15 16 



For more precise division, the increment value assigned to a quarter note (TIME BASE) would 
have to be divisible by 3. 



TIME BASE 



J «36 



v.. 



rn 



12 + 12+12=^36 



For exact precision in music with both triplets and ordinary eighth notes, the TIME BASE would 
have to be divisible by both 2 and 3. 



if TIME' BASE J =24, then 



w 



= 8 +8 +8 and 



n 



- 12 + 12 



^; 



or: 



IfTiMEBASeJ -36,then | 1 [ ^ 12+12 + 12and F"! = 18 + 



18 



18 



V.' 



c 



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The same process works for other compounds: 

IfTlMEBASE J»20,thaR j T J J J *= 8 + 8 + 8 + 8 + 8^= 40 

and: 

O .» 80 d == 40 J « 20 J' =» 10 etc. 



Gate Times and Rests 

The information in the GATE TIME memory determines the gate time (equivalent to the length 
of time the key is depressed) for each step. Like STEP TIME, the GATE TIME memory has 256 
increments for each step, but these are numbered from to 255, The Inclusion of the allows 
programming of rests {no gate pulse), but makes the total number of increments one less than 
STEP TIME, 

STEP TIME; 1 to 256 

GATE TIME: to 255 

Loading a in GATE TIME for a given step will produce no gate pulse for that step. The result 
will be a rest or group of rests whose total time value equals the value stored in the STEP TIME 
memory for that step. 



If TIME BASE j" 32, then: 



^ 1 ? 



[STEPTJMEh 128 64 32 16 8 



[GATE TiMEh fitC. 



19 



PROGRAfVI 4: 

TIME BASE J ^32 




2. 
1 


^ 


3. 
1 




4. 

1 




1 measure!: 1. 




[STEP I: 1 




V 








/L ■" 


■1 


■1 


1^ ~ ' 


TM 








vy 








tT 


128 





128 





128 







1 STEP TIME 1: 
1 GATE TIME 1: 


128 




MM J = /£?0 



TIME BASE J = J^ 



V... 



CHANNEL 


/. 


MEASURE 


STEP 


vco 

C{// 


(S) 


^ 









==^ — 








/ 


/ 





/-2» 


o 
































.,„-^ 


/ 


4^ 


\ 


f 


\ 


f 










<^ 


/ 





/3.% 

















i 


\ 
















































1 











Any number may be entered 
here, but some number 
must be entered. 



STEPTiME 
GATE TIME 



U 



20 



V_. 



^. 



All steps in the program must contain CV data, inciuding rests. Since rests usually produce no 
sound, any value may be used. The following, however^ may prove to be good rules to follow. 

If the first step in the program is a rest, use the CV value for the first pitch which will sound. 
For all others, use the same data as was used for the previous step. This latter practice will 
prevent an unwanted pitch change due to long envelope release times which extend into the 
following step. 



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PROGRAM 5: 

TIME BASE J -32 



IMEASUREI ; 
[STSP] i 




IPITCHI : 

tSTEPj ; 

t GATE I ; 

GATE : 

ENVELOPE 



32 





c 



33 

32 
2 



L 



32 







36 

32 
2 



n 



Using ''33'* here will save a Httle 
time when it comes to loading the 
program. If the program Is to ba 
run in the CYCLE (repeating) 
mode, use the same value here as 
was used In the last step in the 
program. 



J- 2/6 



TIME BASE J - 32 




CHANNEL 


/. / 


MEASURE 


STEP 


CV/ 


/s 


^ 










/ 


/ 


> 


32 















2. 


^^ 


1 


2 










2 


/ 


^5 


^ 


c 












2 , 


h6 


32 


2 












/ 
















y 


/ 
















y 



















Since the VCA \% still "OPEN" at this 
pointy there would be an unwanted 
change in pitch if "0" were used for 
the rest in the CV memory. 



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21 



Normally, rests are programmed with the notes they follow: 



TIME BASE J =32 



96 



'32- 



32- 



32 



J ^ I 

TIME VALUE: 32 + 32 4- 32 

[STEP TIME I ; 98 
fGATETIMEJ: 32 



= 96 



PROGRAM 6: 

TIME BASE j =32 



MEASURE 



STEP 



J # ; vJ>|J J J J iJ ^ J 



TIME VALUE: 32 32 32 16 16 32 32 32 32 



jSTEPTIMEh 
IgATETIMEI: 



32 •*• 32 + 32 + 16-112 




16 


32 


32 


32 


32 


(14 


30 


30 


30 


30) 






4 







32 + 32 = 64 



These values wifl depend on ADSR 
settings and the particular phrasing 
desired. 



22 



If you try.this program 
remennber that some pitch 
values must be loaded 

here* 



32 32 32 32 



64 
32 




MM 



J= 2^^ 



1 2 

32 64 



32 64 
64 



V... 



TIMeSASE J = 32, 



CHANNEL 


/ 


MEASURE 


STEP 


i/co 
cv/ 


Q 


^ 










/ 


/ 




/a 


^2 






. 




z 




/6 


^^ 










2 


/ 




^2 


30 












^ 




1 
















s 




1 
















u. 




^2 


30 










3 


/ 




^ 


32 












2 




i^ 


32 










V 


/ 




^2 















X 


1 


^^ 


ifC 














/ 

































L. 



v^ 



c 



Loading GATE TIME with the same value (or more) as STEP TIME for a given step will result 
in a gate pulse which is continuous with the gate pulse In the next step. This can be used for 
notes longer than the 255 increments available or for legatissimo passages. 



PROGRAM 7: 

TIME BASE J « 32 



MEASURE ; 



STEP 



c 



33l 



ISTEPTIMEI; 128 
I GATE time! ; 128 



3X 



128 
128 



3s: 



128 
128 



m: 



128 
128 



128 
128 



c 



MM 



J. :2oo 



TIMS 



BASE J m S2, 



CHANNEL 


_A^ 


MEASURE 


STEP 


vco 

CAf/ 


s 


±. 










/ 


/ 


/2 


/2» 


/29 










2 


/ 




















3 


/ 
















■ 






^ 


/ 




->-~' 


















.f 


/ 


V 


/ 


> 


/ 


\ 


^ 







































































c 



23 



PROGRAM 8: 

TIME BASE J -32 



MEASURE 



STEP: 



I 



te 



IpitchI 



[STEP TIMEJ! 
[GATE trME] ; 



P 



36 

64 
64 



^m 



33 

48 
48 



34 

16 
16 



36 

64 
64 



32 



29 

64 
® 



v.. 



Being the end of the phrase, thfs value should be 
shorter than 64 so the phrase Is separated from 
the next one. 



MM 



J= 2O0 



TIME BASE J = 3Z 



CHANNEL 



MEASURE 



/ 



STEP 



/ 



A 



A 



Vco 
cvt 



^6 



33 



3<4 



36 



^ 



4fi 



^ 



/^ 



M^ 



4K 



^ 






m\ 



M. 



in this case it is much simpler 
, to load 64 in these steps of the 
GATE TIME memory rather 
thart going to the trouble of 
writing in the different values. 
The result Is the same: one gate 
pulse for the whole passage. 



V^ 



v^. 



24 



V, 



Other values loaded Into the GATE TIME memory will usually depend on personal interpretation 
of phrasing and articulation and can be determined by experimentation. 



C 



C 



PROGRAM 9: 

TIME BASE j «32 



IivieasureI 



2 3 4 



2 3 4 



r'T^'j J If ^^ 



STEP 



^^ 32 16 16 32 32 32 1616 32 32 

[gate] : 28 14 14 8 8 28 1414 8. 8 



MEASURE : 



STEP 



3- 4. 

12345678 1 345 




r-xcr LLiT I cor 



jSTEPh 
JGATEj : 



1616161616161616 16161616 32 
14 14141414141414 14 141414 20 



Timing for measure 1 : 
1- 



2 3 4 



J rj J J 



TJIViE VALUE; 

Desired 
gate pulse 
for trumpet 

GATE TIME: 



32 



^""28" 



^16^ 



14 



^16^ 



-32- 



14 



32- 



m 



---{key on) 
-^- {key off) 



MM 


J= 24rc 








riME BASE 


J. 


3Z 


CHANNEL 


/. TKuMpBT 


MEASUAE 


STEP 


yco 
cvi 


s 


^ 








/ 


/ 


^A 


^2 


29 










2 


4^ 


/6 


f<l 










3 


36 


/& 


/iA 










¥- 


3/ 


32 


S" 










^ 


3/ 


31 


8" 






1 
j 


-? 


/ 


36 


3Z 


28 










2 


iU> 


y£ 


x«i 










3 


36 


/6 


/«: 










¥• 


3/ 


32 


B 










^ 


4^ 


32 


8- 








a 


/ 


(A/ 


/6 


ti/L 










2 


<<& 


















s 


3^ 


















« 


36 


















J- 


3t 


















6 


36 


















7 


3i- 


















d- 


36 
















iA 


/ 


3S- 


















J. 


36 


















3 


SS- 


\ 


f 


\ 


( 










^ 


33 


/6 


iV- 










.t- 


3/ 


32 


20 





























































c 



25 



V. 



Embelishments 

Grace notes and other embelishments must be treated as notes with real time, and the values 
must be subtracted from the value of the previous note or rest. 



PROGRAM 10; 



TIME BASE J = 32 



Since the B falls on the first beat 
of the measure, the grace notes 
should be programmed m being in 
the previous measure. 



Timing for measure 1: 

1. 

1 2 3 4 



iMEASURgj 

[steE^ 



1 234 



[a._ 



^)' Hf^'^ A 



6 €ll 



^ 



[PITCH]: 

[STEP TIMS 1 : 
[GATE TJMeI ; 




1923 26 

25)2 2@ 
1 1 32 




16 19|23 

I 

2 2 [64 
1 1132 



I =32 

If we assign the value 
of 2 to each grace note, 
then: 

^-2-1-2-4 
32-4^=@ 




TIME 
VALUES 

GATE 




— —> 



^. 



MM j . ^X 



Measure 1 programmed as; 

16 + 8 + 4* 2 2 28 
28 



TIME BASE J = ^?2L 



CHANNEL 


A 


MSASUHE 


STEP 




s 


€r 










/ 


/ 


/^ 


ip 















1 


f? 


z 


/ 












^ 


^3 


2. 


/ 












^ 


:z6 


io 


sz 












^ 


/(> 


2 


/ 












4 


/f 


7. 


/ 










1. 


/ 


U3 


^ 


32. 

































































<^. 



v^ 



26 



Program 1 1 shows a sample program for a trill. 



PROGRAM 11 
1. 






Programmed as approxiftiateiy: 



c 




c 



MM 


J=?^ 








FfME BASE J = 


32 




CHANNEL 


L 


WeASURE 


STEP 


Cl/I 


s 


<^ 










/ 


/ 


^ 


31 


32 








, 




J. 


u./ 


rf\ 


9 












s 


^$ 


7 


9 












Ji 


<i/ 


<JL 


^ 












^ 


«s^ 


3 


3 












(, 


Jf/ 




-^ 














;> 


<Ay^ 


















? 


<c/ 


•^jd^ 


<f 












9 


<A0 


J2 


2? 




' ■' 































































Since the triH is to last the 
duration of a quarter note 
{32) r these values nriust 
total 32. 



c 



27 



v_.' 



Dynamics 

With a capacity of 128 increments (numbered to 127), the output voltage range of each CV 
memory is from to slightly over +1 volts. 



cv 

memory 
data 




cv 

output 





= 


0.00 volts 


12 


z= 


+1.00 


24 


ss 


+2.00 


36 


sz 


+3.00 


48 


= 


+4.00 


60 


ss 


+5.00 


72 


s 


+6.00 


84 


Si 


+7.00 


96 


sz 


+8.00 


108 


ss 


+9.00 


120 


±s 


+10.00 


127 


sst 


+10.58 



v.- 



When used to control a VCA for dynamics, the following values may be used: 



L. 





For 


For 


Loudness 


exponetial 


linear 




VGA 


VCA 




100 


127 


ff 


90 


64 


f 


80 


32 


mf 


70 


16 


tnp 


60 


8 


P 


50 


4 


FP 


40 


2 


m> 


30 


1 



The correct value here 
is 128 which IS not 
available; 127 is close 
enough. 



Use numbers between tho59 
shown for more delicate 
shading of dynamics. 



^ 



28 



V 



The VCA used for the control of dynamics can be patched at the output of the envelope generator 
so as to control the level of the envelope, as shown below: 



c 




OUT 



CV for control 
of dynamics 



The VCA initial gain control can be set so that 
relative dynamic levels are as desired. 



The CV input level can be set 
so the dynamic range is as wide 
or as narrow as desired. 



The drawing below shows an alternate method of controlting dynamics {which can be used If 
your VGA's can't pass dc voltages), but the method above will produce a better S/N in the output 
sound, especially during long rests. 



The VCA initial gain control can be set so that 
relative dynamic levels are as desired. 



c 




^OUT 



The CV input level can be 
set so the dynamic range is 
as wide or as parrow as desired. 



Since VCA controls can be used to control the relative levels and dynamic range, the values 
loaded into the CV memory are not critical. 



c 



29 



^^^- 



PROGRAM 12. 

TIME 8ASE J ^ 32 



Yesterday 



Note the differences fn GATE T[ME for these 
groups of sixteenth notes due to the phrasing. 



FLUTE 



Beatles 




L. 



MM 


J= /32 








TIME BASE j - 


32 






CHANNSL 


A VLOTE 


WEASURE 


STEP 


\)C0 
CVl 


s 


<7 


a/2 










/ 


/ 


$/ 


/$ 


8 


70 












2 


2? 


/i 


S' 


60 












3 


3f 


96 


?.? 


^ 










2 


/ 


^9 


32 





^0 




















2 


3^ 


/6 


t(A 


no 












^ 


^ 










30 












U. 


.^7 










60 












^ 


3^ 










>^ 












(> 


^0 










?t 












7 


«:/ 


/(> 


fV. 


»o 










3 


/ 


vo 


^ 


%■ 


70 












2 


U.f 


V- 


^ 


6S- 















^ 


^ 


<i 


60 












^ 


i^ 


H 


/2 


io 












^ 


3^ 


?6 


^8 


U 




















i 


i 

































Use data from previous 
step in the same way ats 
outlined in Program 5, p, 21 



U 



Dynamics 

{for exponential VGA) 



^ 



30 



c 



T-iaetfAM /3 



Su/^LL 



C 



c 



C 



MM 


J. /20 




TIME BAS! 


E J = 


S3. 










^cvi 
















CHANNSL 


^^.^-^-^ 


MEASURE 


STEP 




S 


<T 






-^ 






* 
























/ 


/ 


i5 


? 


2 


^ 




































a 










^v? 




































J 










^7 




































^ 








: 


60 




































t 








-f- 


6t 






Set Interface PORTAMENTO control at 












(> 










70 






dtJOUt 4 \rUH 1 AEviCi\J i U $WIICn at nflMlNUML-/. 

1 1 1 i 1 ! 1 1 












7 










7t 










• 


























? 










U 





































f 










71 




































/O 










70 




































// 










f>7 




































/I 










^d 




































/3 










io 




































/^ 










^7 




































/i- 








y 


^3 





































/(> 


^3 


S* 


i 


i-0 






1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


























r^=^ 




= / 


. — . ^ 


-p 




































































































































. 







































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































31 



V. 



Tone Color 

The CV outputs may, of course, be used to control any device or function which will accept 
external control voltage inputs. 

It should be remembered that the tone coloring of different instruments may change radically 
with the dynamic levels and, therefore, using a CV output to control the cutoff point of a 
VCF can be very useful, even in the most conventional of music styles* Owners of the ROLAND 
System 700 Synthesizer which are equipped with the 703E, F, or G VCF also have the option of 
voltage controlled resonance. 



e. 



C 



L. 



32 






Chords 



Chords may be produced simply by assigning more CV memories to the related channeU The 
patch for Program 14 (next page) is shown below. 



PATCH for PROGRAM 14; 



c 



c 




OUT 



From MicroComposer 



C 



33 



PROGRAM 14: 



TIME BASE j =. 16 



w 



m 



-•-*- 



XT 



mp 



±'^ i; 



mf =r=:^ 



■CV1 

■.CV2 
•CV3 



Note that a different time base was used 



/ 



Upper voice 
Middle voice 
Lower voice 



_) 



J 



L 



V 



MM 


i- /2tA 




TIME BASE J = 


/t 








CHANNEL 


/. NOtUfS 


MEASURE 


STEP 




en 


CV3 


S 


^ 


cw. 








/ 


/ 


3B 


3/ 


:l(> 


2<^ 


20 


6o 










2 


3? 


30: 


a? 


-2^ 


20 


6ir 










3 


^f 


36 


^/ 


2^ 


20 


72 










^ 


<43 


^8 


^3 


/6 


2- 


%o 








2 


/ 


«:/ 


3£ 


3f 


^ 


lo 


70 










2 


U-V- 


iU. 


27 


2^ 


20 


79 










3 


<a6 


J2 


2t 


2iC 


20 


»i- 










¥• 


<^9 


31 


2^ 


M 


/z 


/oo 











































































K^ 



Dynamics 



»^. 



34 



PROGRAM 15: 



1. 




C 




C 



MM 


J= 76 




TIME BASE 


J = 


2f^ 




CHANNEL 


/ ^(>(Tf^ 


MEASUf^ 


STEP 


/ 


2 


s 


^ 








/ 


/ 


i? 


S3 


i 


Z 










Ji 


^0 


3t 


6 












^ 


S3 


37 


6 












^ 


J4 


37 


/I 












J^ 


^S 


37 


6 












^ 


30 


3t 


6 












;> 


2B 


33 


6 












p 


33 


37 


/2 












— * — ' 


30 


Si- 


6 












/a 


29 


33 


6 












// 


33 


37 


/X 












/^ 


30 


3it 


6 












/3 


22 


3^ 


6 










2 


/ 


2g 


S3 


6 












2. 


SO 


3t 


6 












3 


30 


^7 


6 












iJL 


33 


37 


/z 












^ 


SS 


37 


4. 












6 


30 


s^ 


6 












7 


:tS 


33 


i, 












» 


33 


37 


/Z 












f 


SO 


St- 


6 












/e> 


2? 


S3 


6 












// 


ss 


UO 


^ 












/z 


^i- 


SS 


tA 


i 










/■i 


S^ 


36 


^ 


1 










/¥> 


33 


S3 


/2 


2 




























Repeat measures 1 & 2 as desired 
















































1 


1 











c 



35 



v_. 



Multichannel Programs 

The MicroComposer has an eight channel gate pulse output. In other words, it produces eight 
completely independent gate pulse trains at the same time. 

Program 1 6 shows the addition of a second voice to Program 12. 



PROGRAM 16; 



YESTERDAY (DUET) 
2. 



3. 



Beatles 



FLUTE 
(CHI) 



OBOE 
{CH2) 



m 



t=±d 



mf- 



m 



tm 



m-0- 



mp^^.=^^f 




0mA ^m 



mf:=^=^.^^mp 



3ii i. i'^ 

mp mf 



L. 



c 



36 



L- 



c 



Pko^AH/6 



Yr^mRPAYiPi^'^T^ 



MM 


J» /3Z 








TIME BASE 


J- 


^-2 


































CHANNEL 


/. Fut-m 


2, oboi^ 1 


MEASUI^ 


STEP 


VC0 


s 


<% 


CV3. 






VCXt 


£ 


* 


VCA. 






















/ 


/ 


J/ 


/6 


* 


70 






^^ 


i'A 






























X 


x9 


/6 


>^ 


4» 






,J^ 


? 


? 


to 
























3 


^9 


96 


n 


^0 






5f^ 


^ 


^ 


-to 
























<A 














A5 


¥> 


2 


U 
























<^ 














31 


/i 


/a 


60 
























6 














A? 




/« 


6t 
























7 














^^ 




tV- 


90 






















JL 


/ 


19 


32 


6 


^0 






33 


/(> 


/2 


^i- 
























2 


Si 


/6 


l<A 


<co 






2» 


f 


ii 


^0 
























3 


ii- 










30 






26 


» 


2 




























4C 


^7 










io 






ii- 


32 


30 




























^ 


3K' 


~~ 








70 






22 


<LB 


^ 


Js. 
























4 


UjO 










7J- 






2t 


/6 


fV. 


is- 
























7 


w 


/^ 


/<A 


?0 
































^ 


/ 


^o 


» 


8- 


7o 






3/ 


» 


8' 


70 
























2 


^/ 


V- 


iA 


^ 






33 


^ 


tf. 


4t 






















>3 


<^ 


4A 


^ 


io 






3/ 


¥- 


2 


4t 
























^ 


at 


a 


/I 


(>6 






^9 


/(> 


f2 


4r 






















^ 


3? 


H 


n 


AT 






2f 


u» 


^ 


70 






















A 














29 


S' 


6 


60 
























7 












■ 


29 










io 
























J? 














24, 










it 
























f 














2S- 










4S- 
























/o 














26 










70 








. 
















// 














-i^ 


^ 


I 


7i- 


























J 


































v^ 






lis portion of the program 
actly ths $ame as Program 


s — 
12. 







































































































































































































































































































































' 













37 



PROGRAM 17 



V. 



VIOLIN 

1 
(CH 1) 



VtOUN 

2 
(CH2) 



VIOLA 
{CH2) 



Andante cantabile 

con sordino 
1. 2. 

V 



CELLO 

(CHS) 




^^ 



^ 



CJ^ ^ 






vi J ^ r 



L 



i^. 



38 



c 



pi>o0fiyin 



s^tewApe- 



This data represents variable tempo 
and Is expleined In Section 14. 



MM 


J= (00 






TIME BASE J • 


i2 






























\ 




CHANNEL 


/ VIOLll^ \ 


2. 


I//OLJS/2A/OWPI22 3.CBLL0 PIZZ 


4-.-n 


im 


riSASUI^ 


STEP 


VC6 
t 


S 


<f 


VCA 

2 


H/'X 






3 


<£ 


S 


(S, 






6 


S 


^, 


7 




T 


s 


/ 


/ 


i/LO 


2<ii 


^4<: 


60 


, 






Jl& 


^9 


31 


c 






2^ 


32 





O 




BO 


2tA 




i 


ic/ 


? 


6 


tJ- 


















. 












90 


9 


^ 


/ 


4^ 


/6 


/6 


^s- 








iS 


i9 


/6 


X 






M 


6i^ 


2 


6o 




/oo 


/2J 




> 


#d> 


/6 


/2 


^2 








S/ 


2» 














/Z 


6i< 


2 


^i- 










5 


3S 


6iC 


6d 


4(J^ 








2? 


/f 






























« 


i^ 


/(> 


/6 


<«" 








3/ 


2» 






























^ ^0 


/£> 


/2 


<ft? 








XS 


ff 






1 — 
























i 
















3/ 


2S 
















, 














7 
















:iy 


/f 






























? 
















^/ 


O^ 


/6 


2 








- 












V? 


/ ^ 


/(> 


/6 


^ 








^f 


24£ 


' 








2<4. 


6i^ 


2 


-^B 




fto 


96 




i ^/ 


/i 


/UL 


is 








33 


2.9 








1 




yl 


^!i 


2 




99- 


/i> 




^ 36 


i^ 


6o 


«;f 








^f 


2<i 








i 














TO 


/6 




^\ 


W 


/(> 


/6 


io 








i3 


19 




m^ 


S,^ ■ 


















^1 


4it 


d 


/o 


^t 








^f 


2i^ 








-^ 


^ 












^i 
















33 


29 




These indicate the use of the MicroComposer COPY 






7l 
















^f 


2iA 




If you try thfs program use COPY 3x instead of 31 


X 






»i 
















3^ 


^? 




since i 


:his sar 


nple 


nJy gw 


JStOfT 


leasure 


5. 








If. 


/ 1 


«£• 


/(. 


/& 


^s 








2% 


f? 










i^ 


6(d 


X 






/O0 


/l'^ 




i 


as 






/I 


^j 








3/ 


2^ 










/f 


did 


X 












^\ 


4C/ 






/iC 


/■S' 








i? 


^9 


























¥. 


<n> 






/4f 


J'S- 








i/ 


i? 


























^ 


^0 






d 


t? 








i« 


/f 


























(, 


J? 






/2 


^2 








^f 


26 


























7 


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39 



SUSTAINED ARPEGGIOS 



PROGRAM 18: 



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The program was written as tf the music were written: 



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ETC. 



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C == COPY function (Section 9) 



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1 



PROGRAM 20: 

Adegretto 

i: 



Sing 



J. Raposo 



FtUTES 



GLOCK. 



c 



TRUMPET 




v.- 




(SRoIand MicroComposer MC-8 



LOAD 



7 ? 


ls\ 


]q 


'4^ 




\^\ 


1 i 


2; 


^3- 


; 


^" j 




JlOfF. 



TUWHO, 






InH^l-- 



PLAY 



• ciCix ' • *'n«* 



•«*^». 1^ *ia» 







ENTER Key 

In the following pages this is 
shown by 



V.„.. 



C 



NOTE: None of the front panel controls operate 
when the MEMORY PROTECT switch is 
depressed (LED on). 



L. 



44 



G 



5. Loading the MicroComposer from the Program Sheet 

Introduction 

The following explains the theory of loading the MicroComposer. If you are in a hurry to try 
the MicroComposer, jump to page 54 and begin there. 

The MicroComposer is designed so that it can control ali of the variables in a sound. For this 
reason, at least three of the memories must be loaded with data before the MicroComposer will 
cause the synthesizer to produce sound: 

1. OneCV memory (pitch) 

2. One STEP TIME memory (note time value} 

3. One GATE TIME memory (length of time key would remain depressed if played on the 

keyboard controller) 

2 and 3 above combine to produce the gate pulse output for the synthesizer. In addition to the 
above, it is also necessary to load TIME BASE and TEMPO data. 

Loading data into a memory requires three operations: 

OPERATION 1: 

Establishing the ADDRESS (location in the memory) 
OPERATION 2: 

Memory selection and channel assignment 
OPERATIONS: 

Writing (loading) the data into the memory 

I n actual practice, it is not necessary to stick to the above order. For example, Operations 1 and 
O, 2 may be reversed with Operation 2 coming first 



c 



45 



OPERATION 1: Establishing the ADDRESS 



v_ 



ADDRESS refers to a specific location within a given memory. A memory may be divided into 
up to 999 measures, each measure of which may be divided Into up to 100 steps (or notes). 
Note that the STEP display uses only two digits. To indicate Step 100, the display will show 



jtp.t, « 







NOTE: In this manual, memory addresses will be written 



M28-4 (Measure 28, Step 4) 



EXAMPLE: Set ADDRESS M28-4. 



L^-J 



BUTTON 
SEQUENCE; 



ESTABLISHES 
MEASURE 



ESTABLISHES 
STEP 



1 



ME AS 
SET 




2 




8 




ENTER 


4 




ENTER 







DISPLAY 




MEASURE: 


STEP: 


MEM DATA: 


CV# CH# 

f / 


E 






/ ) 


i8 






/ - / 


5B 






/ - / 


SB 


H 




/ - / 


E8 


H 


Data at 


/ - / 






VI28-4 



L 



NOTE: Figures shown in half tone represent a hypothetical display 
resulting fronn some previous MIcroComposer operation. 



*ln actual practice, it is possible to load as mariy as 256 steps Into any one measure, (see p. 148) 



L.. 



46 



r 



c 



c 



c 



Exceptions to the above are as follows; 



When setting Step 1 of any given measure. 



EXAMPLE: Set ADDRESS M14-1. 



BUTTON 
SEQUENCE: 



DISPLAY 

„A 



ESTABLISHES 
MEASURE 



ESTABLISHES 
STEP 



{ 



MEAS 
SET 




1 




4 




ENTER 


ENTER 



/ ' ^ 

MEASURE: STEP: MEM DATA: CV# CH# 



I 

N 



3^ 

Data at Ml 4-1 



Thejj^key may be used, but is not needed 



47 



When loading data from the beginning of a program. 



EXAMPLE: Set ADDRESS Measure 0. 



v^- 



ESTABLISHES 

MEASURE 

ZERO 



BUTTON 






DISPLAY 

A 






SEQUENCE: 


MEASURE: 


STEP: 



MEM DATA: 


cv# 

/ - 

/ 

t 


CH# 




MEAS 
SET 




/ 




r 




*- {Optional) [] 


/ 




ENl 


rER 





/ 

f 



L.J 



c 



48 



L- 



OPERATION 2: Memory Selection 

The memories are; Control Voltage (CV) (8), STEP TIIVIE (8), GATE TIME (8), Multiplex (MPX) 
(1), TEMPO (1>, and TIME BASE (1). 



EXAMPLE: Select CVS Memory and assign it to channel 2. 



C 



BUTTON 
SEQUENCE: 



MEMORY 
SELECTiON 

CHANNEL 
ASSIGNMENT 



CV 



DISPLAY 

A., 



( ' ^ 

MEASURE: STEP: MEM DATA: CV# CH# 



\s 



15 



15 



(8 



Data contained 
at Ml 5-1 of the 
CV3 memory 



/ 




CV memory number 

Channel assignment 



EXAMPLE: Select Channel 4 GATE TIIVIE memory. 



c 





BUTTON 






DISPLAY 






SEQUENCE: 


r 
MEASURE; 

8 
8 


STEP: MEM DAT^ 

3 EH 

Data contained 
atM8-3ofthe 
CH4 gate memory. 


^: CV# CH# 


MEMORY 
SELECTION 


\ 


GATE 

TIME 




— 


CHANNEL 
ASSIGNMENT 


4 


- H 










; 

Channel assignment 



c 



CV memory selection is the only memory selection which requires pushing two of the digit 
buttons; all others require only one digit. 



49 



v^. 



OPERATIONS: Writing 



Operation 3 consists of writing (loading) data into the memories. 



EXAMPLE: Write "24" into the memory. 



DATA TO 
BE WRITTEN 

"WRITE" 
ORDER 

DATA FOR ^ 
NEXTSTEP 



ENTER 



3 



3 



S 



DISPLAY 
A 



H 
H 
H 
5 



MEASURE: STEP: KEY DATA; 



^ 



EH 

MEM DATA; 
KEY DATA; 



3 



CV# CH# 

- B 

- E 

- P 



E 



\^. 



This LED lights when 
display shows key dat 



This LED lights 
when display shows 
memory data 




Note the KEY/MEM data 
display change of mode. 



TIMES 1 eCOPYfREPeW y ^ -*T«1T MBIS.- 



9 



o 

ENQ 



H 



P Lj 



OATE 



.c 



BANK 

ocv 

OSTEP TIME 
O GATE TIME 
aUPX 



IMPORTANT; The first number key pressed in the write operation 
advances the ADDRESS one step. 



u 



After 



IS pressed, the KEY/MEM DATA display can be checked to make sure that the 



correct data has been written into the memory at the desired ADDRESS. After that the pressing 
of the next key {data for the next step) will advance the ADDRESS thus eliminating the need for 
using the 



key. This greatly simplifies the loading of long columns of data. 



will produce a short gate pulse at 



In Operation 3, when loading a CV memory, pushing 

the related GATE OUTPUT jack on the Interface panel which can be used for triggering the 

synthesizer so that the pitch values being loaded can be monitored by ear as they are loaded. 



^ 



50 






The TIME BASE/TEMPO set Operation 

The TIME BASE and TEMPO are stored in their own separate memories. Both must be translated 
into terms of a quarter note. For example: 

If tempo is MM i = 12, then MM J - 108* 

EXAMPLE: Set a TEMPO of MM J - 32 with a TIME BASE of J = 48. 
If MM J -32, then MM J « 64 



c 



c 



MEMORY 
SELECTION 



DATA TO 
BE WRITTEN 



MEMORY 
SELECTION 



DATA TO 
BE WRITTEN 



TIME 
BASE 




4 


8 


ENTER 






TEMPO 




6 




4 








ENTER 



DISPLAY 

A 






MEASURE: STEP: DATA: 


cv# cm 


■^' 


\ If ihe meirtoiies 






contained TIME BASE/ 


H 




TEMPO data as a re- 


HB 




sult of some previous 




operation, they would 






be shown: 


HB 




^ TIME BASE here; 
^ — TEMPO here; 


E 


1 


otherwise these display 


EH 


positions will show 
^'0". 


U U EH 


1 i 
1 t 


This portion of the ^ 


( J 

This portion of the 


display will blank 


display reverts back 


out if there is no 


to its previous display 


program data in the 


mode. 


nnemories. 







c 



*MM - Maelzel's Metronome, MM i= 72 means 72 dotted quarternotes per minute; therefore, 21 6 eighth 
notes per minute (3x 72 = 216) or 108 quarter notes per minute (216 -r 2 = 108). 

51 



V....- 



EXAMPLE: Set TIME BASE only; TIME BASE J = 16 



TiME 
BASE 




1 








6 




ENTER 



EXAMPLE: Set TEMPO only; MM J - 96 



TIME 
BASE 



TEMPO 



Note that when setting TEMPO only, the [^ 
button must be used first. 
This is to differentiate fixed TEMPO from 
variable TEMPO which is explained in 
Section 14. 



l: 



ENTER 



L. 



L 



52 



c 



c 



c 



c 



The data limits are: 

TtWlEBASE: 4-255 

TEMPO: 2 - 254 (even numbers only) 

For a given program, the TIME BASE multiplied by the TEMPO must equal 128 or more. 
Trying to loadaTlME BASE/TEMPO product of less than 128 will activate the ERROR function 
when 



is pushed, 



The upper extreme for the TIME BASE/TEMPO product will depend on a number of factors and 
may vary from program to program. The final test would be simply to try to run the program 



by pushing the ^^ button. If the program runs with no trouble, fine. 



If the program will not run, pushing ""'^ will throw the MlcroComposer Into a deadlock such that 
the front panel controls seem to have no effect This is a rare occurrence and should therefore 
cause little trouble. The deadlock can be broken by turning off the POWER switch, {Section 14 
shows how to break this deadlock without destroying the program). 

The programming and production of variable tempo is discussed in Section 14. Section 14 
also goes into more detail about problems which might be encountered with very high TIME 
BASE/TEMPO products. 

TIME BASE and/or TEMPO may be loaded at any time: before, after, or in the middle of loading 
the main program data. 



53 



v„ 



Sample Programs 

Program 21 is a simple chromatic scale for practice programming. Before trying this program, 
clear all the memories by turning off the POWER switch for a few seconds. Also, make sure that 
the MEMORY PROTECT switch is in the raised {LED off) position. 

PROGRAM 21: 

TEMPO MM J ^120 

1, Z 3. 4. 5. 6. 7, 



W 



Itl ' J | J U J 1 ; 



t 



^ 



iHf ir I I 



^. 



Use these figures when loading 
TIME BASE/TEMPO data. 



lAfA i ^ 62 




TIME BASE J =(/ 



54 



CHANNEi. 


A 


HEASuae 


STEP 


vco 


S 


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/ 


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/ 


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2 


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/ 


^2 




^ 












2 


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/ 


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' 


\ 


f 








i. 


3t 


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/ 


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zu 






































' 











































\ 

\ 
\ 
\ 
\ ^ 

\ ^ 

\ 



\ 

\ 

\ 

\ 

\ 

\ 



CV: 2 
(Pitch) 



MEAS 
SET 



ENTER 



CV 



ENTER 



}- 



MEAS 
END 



ENTER -- 



MEAS 
END 



STEPi 3 

(Time 

value] 



MEAS 
SET 




ENTER 






STEP 
TIME 




1 





ENTER " ENTER 



ENTER - 



ENTER 



ENTER 



GATE: 

(Actual length 
of sound) 



MEAS 
SET 




ENTER 






GATE 
TIME 




1 





ENTER - 



ENTER 



ENTER 



See following pages for 
explanation 



full 



L. 



^ 



r 



Usually, TIME BASE/TEMPO data is loaded first. Use the procedure shown on page 51 . 

The best practice is to load the program one column at a time starting at the left and moving 
column by column towards the right In any event, at least one CV memory must be assigned and 
loaded before the MicroComposer will accept data for either of the TIME memories in a given 
channel. 

EXAMPLE: Load CV1 for Program 21. 



c 



G 



OPERATION 

(D 



OPERATION 

(D 



MEAS 
SET 



> 



OPERATION 



ENTER 



CV 



ENTER 



MEAS 
END 



The use of this 



is optional 



Selection of CV memory. 

Assignment of CV1 to channel 1 gate output. 



The first key pressed In the write operation advances the 
address one step. 



' ^The above Is the reason for starting with measure "0' 

Pushing 



"writes" (loads) data into the memory. 
In this case, "24" has be^n written Into CV1 at 
n address M1-1. 



Pushing "« performs the same function as 



,but 



also informs the memory that this !s the fast step in the 
measure. 



1 — The first key pressed in the write operation always advances 
the address. 



ENTER 



c 



X (continued on next page) 



55 



^.. 



r (continued from previous pagej 



> 



OPERATION 

(continued) 



2 








7 








ME AS 
END 








2 








B 




ENTER 






2 








g 





Note that when loading the CV memory, if the synthesizer 
Is set up and connected to the Micro Composer, pushing 

win produce a short gate pulse which will 



or 



trigger the synthesizer, thus the pitches can be monitored 
as they are loaded. 



c 



\ 



> 



Continue in the same manner until the end. 
Don't forget to use 



> 



MEAS 
END 



MEAS 
END 



c 



The last step In the program must always be followed by 
even If It Is not a complete measure, otherwise the 



MicroComposer may continue to run after the end of the 
program, giving out random data as it runs. 



C 



56 



v.. 



Next, load STEP TIME, then GATE TIME. 



C 



C 



Loading STEP TIME: 



OPERATION 

® 



OPERATION 



MEAS 
SET 



ENTER 



STEP 
TIME 



Establishes address 



>^Memory selection 



1 



ENTER 



ENTER 



ENTER 



Since this is the first 
/button pu shed af ter the 
^ previous [ *^" | ,the 
' address advances one 

step. 
»^Writing data 



OPERATION 



repeatedly 



Loading GATE TIIVIE: 



OPERATION 
® 

OPERATION 

(2) 



[Push 

1 until the address display 

I A — I shows M6-2, which is the i — K 

I \j — ' last address where we ' — v 

want to write the re- ! 
peated data. 



OPERATION 



\> 



ENTER 



Pushing |_^ advances 
the address to M7-1 
which IS where we want 
to write "32". 





MEAS 
SET 




ENTER 




STEP 
TIME 








1 




*^ 






1 








4 




ENTER 


> 

^ 


ENTER 


p 


ENTER 



K 



ENTER 



c 



IMote that pushing 
DATA display; therefore. 



writes into the memory whatever data is displayed by the KEY/MEM 
can be used for data which repeats. 



Also note that [^ is not necessary (but may be used, if desired) when loading the TIME 
memories. 



57 



V, 



Producing the Sequence 

Make sure that the SYNC switch is in the raised position. On the MC-8 Interface^ make sure 
that the PORTAMENTO CONTROLLER is at "0" and the switch at MANUAL. (Or turn the 
PORTAMENTO knob up a little if you want to add portamento effect to the notes)* 



Push ™« and tune the VCO to A = 440Hz. 



To produce the program, pushp^ 

The tempo of the program may be varied with the TEMPO control by approximately ±60% of 
the programmed tempo* 

With the CYCLE switch depressed (LED on), the program will repeat Itself over and over. With l^... 

the switch raised (LED off), the program will run one time from the beginning each time the 



*^*^^ button is pushed. 



If you have trouble, double check that the synthesizer is set up and connected correctly. If the 
trouble is with the MicroComposer, it means a mistake has been made in programming. For the 
time being, clear the memories (by turning off the POWER switch) and try the program again 
from the beginning. (Editing and/or the correction of mistakes is discussed in detail in Section 8)* 

For exercise, also try Programs 22 and 23 which follow. After that, if you want to try some music 
with a rock flavor, try Program 15 in Section 4 using the same techniques and patching shown for 
Program 23. 



C 



c 



58 



V-,^ 



PROGRAM 22: 



GOD REST YE MERRY, GENTLEMEN 



Moderate 
1, 




c 



c 



MM 


J- (yz 








TIME BASE 


: j = 


14 




CHANNEL 


A 


(JEASUffi 


STEP 


cv/ 


T 


<% 










/ 


/ 


Ji? 


l<b 


fO 










X 


/ 


i9 




















2 


si- 




















J 


3t 




















^ 


J3 


















3 


f 


3/ 




















1 


30 




















3 


J9 




















^ 


^6 


















« 


/ 


2.9 




















i 


30 






















s/ 




















^ 


S3 


/(> 


fO 










^ 


/ 


3J^ 


n 


^5^ 









































































































o 



59 



U>: ...... 2.P 



PROGRAM 22: 



GOD REST YE MERRY, GENTLEMEN 



V_ 



O Load TIME BASE/TEMPO data (p. 51) S' yf^ - [?. 



O 



O LoadCVI 



OPERATION 





OPERATION 

(D 



OPERATION 



MEAS 
SET 



ENTER 



CV 






MEAS 
END 



ENTER 



ENTER 



ENTER 



MEAS 
EMD 



k 


t 


^ 


3 




5 




MEAS 
END 



Push I '^^*' I 
until address 
display show 
M4'4 



Load 


Load 


step 


@ gate 


time: 


time: 





MEAS 
SET 




ENTER 




STEP 
TIME 




1 




> 


1 




6 


ENTER 


ENTER 


> 






ENTER 




o 



Note the use of | ^-t" | 
for data which is to 
be repeated. 



o 



l> 



\ 





MEAS 
SET 








ENTER 




GATE 
TIME 












1 






1 










\ 











ENTER 


-> 
s 


ENTER 


1^ 


ENTER 



\ 



4 






4 




8. 






9 




ENTER 




ENTER 



y^ 



C 



^ 



60 



c 



PROGRAM 23: 



WALTZ 



Moderate 
1. 



2. 




Brahms 



mn 



3Z 



c 



c 



MM 


J. {26 




TIME 8ASI 


li- 


32 


CHANNEL 




M£ASUn£ 


STEP 


VCOI 
CVI 


oil 


5 


Gf 






/ 


/ 


3^ 


27 


^9 


i£6 








2 


32 


:tu 


/6 


/I 








3 


^Z 


^^ 


/^ 


td 








^ 


U 


J? 


/6 


fZ 






2 


/ 


S6 


2? 


«f? 


^6 








2 


d2 


2{^ 


/6 


a 








S 


^2 


a^ 


/6 


fA 








^ 


3£. 


^? 


/i 


/z 






J 


/ 


3? 


^f 


^i^ 


20 








>. 


^f 


3/ 


<^ 


3 








3 


37 


1? 


^ 


3 








^ 


36 


X7 


32. 


30 








^ 


3^ 


2i- 


32 


30 






^ 


/ 


36 


^7 


«9 


<£ir 

































































1 




"^ 


jL 










vco 

2 








* 






MIX 



VCF 






CVI 



CV2 



[f you monitor the pitches as you load 
them, note that: 

while loading CVI, since CV2 contains 
no data, VCO-2 will produce pitches 
equivalent to data "0"/ 

while loading CV2, VGO-1 will produce 
the pitch equivalent to the last data 
loaded in CVI ; in this case "27". 



Push ^ and tune both VCO's.to unison (A - 440Hz.) after loading the program. 



c 



*This is true only if tiie POWER switcii was used to erase the memories prior to loading. 



61 



c 



PROGRAM 23; 



BRAHMS WALTZ 



O t.oad TIME BASE/TEMPO data (p. 51) 



Load CV1 
(Upper voice); 



OPERATION 







OPERATION 

(D 



> 



MEAS 

SET 








ENTER 






CV 








1 








1 








3 








6 








ENTER 



ENTER 



ENTER 



OPERATION 

(D 



MEAS 
END 



ENTER 



' I 



I 



MEAS 

END 



Load CV2 
© (Lower 
Voice): 



> 



MEAS 
SET 



ENTER 



CV 



ENTER 



ENTER 



ENTER 



2 








7 








MEAS 
END 




ENTER 



MEAS 
END 



Load 
Q step 
time: 



Load 



MEAS 
SET 



ENTER 



STEP 
TIME 



ENTER 



ENTER 



ENTER 



ENTER 



ENTER 



+ 



ENTER 



© 



time: 



ENTER 





MEAS 
SET 












ENTER 




GATE 
TIME 












1 






4 












6 






> 


ENTER 




1 








2 










^ 


ENTER 






s 


1 




4 








ENTER 


■> 








1 




2 




ENTER 



c 



c 



c 



62 






c 



c 



c 



Summary 

The MicroCom poser outputs eight independent gate pulses. The data contained En the STEP 
TIME and GATE TIME memories for a given channel combine to produce the gate pulse output 
for that channel, STEP/GATE data for a given channel cannot be loaded into that channel until 
at least one other memory (CV, MPX, or TEMPO*) has been assigned to that channel and loaded 



with data. The '*^ button must be used when loading the assignable memories (CV, MPX, and 



TEMPO), but is not necessary when loading STEP/GATE memories. 

Usually, the program is loaded one column at a time starting at the left side of the program 
sheet Usually, the entire column is loaded even though it may run for many pages of program 
sheets. The main exception to this would be where you might want to program a few complete 
measures at a time for experimentation. For example, for a given set of data in the GATE 
TIME memory, the phrasing and articulation may change drastically with different settings of the 
synthesizer envelope generator controls. 



*Assignlng TEMPO to a gate channel output alloWs the programming of variable tempo; this 1$ discussed in Section 14. 

63 



V. 



^ 



c 



'^. 



64 



c 



6. Loading from an External Source 



Inputs 

The two EXT INPUT jacks on the Interface front panel can be used for loading control voltages 
only, or for loading control voltages v\/ith gate pulses from any external source such as a keyboard 
controller, analog sequencer, sample and hold, etc, 

The GATE jack will accept negative gate pulses when the GATE switch on the back of the 
Interface (see page 5) is in the INV (invert) position. 



c 



c 



c 

65 



V. 



LOADING FROM AN EXTERNAL SOURCE 

NOTE: When loading from an external source, the related memories must be cleared first, 
otherwise data will not be loaded correctly. 

O- Decide and set TIME BASE and TEMPO (p. 51 ) 



@. Select start measure and memories to be loaded. 



OPERATION 



(p. 48) 



/ 



OPERATION 

(Da 

This order (p, 49) 

cannot be 
reversed \^ 

OPERATION 

(Db 



MEAS 
SET 



ENTER 





exT 

INPUT 


> 




CV 


1 




1 




STEP 
TIME 




1 



Sequence is to start at the beginning 
{see page 68 for starting at other points) 



Memory selection- As shown, all the data necessary to 
reproduce the piayed sequence is being loaded. In this 
case in channel 1, The ST^P TflVIE channel and CV 
channel assignment must be the same, otherwise' the 
ERROR function will be activated. In tha t cas e the 
operation must be started again from the ^ button. 



L- 



©. Load data 



OPERATION 



(p. 50) 



START 



STOP 



ENTER 



■Omit this when loading CV only, 



c 



>- Play notes on keyboard controller 



O' Push t^MT to produce the sequence. (See p, 58) 



L 



66 



c 



c 



c 



c 



Loading CV and Gate Data 

When loading from an external source, the MicroComposer uses half of its available memory 



space as a sort of scratcli pad to remember the data being loaded. When [ '^^^ \ is pushed, the 
data is transfered to its permanent place in the memories. This means that when loading from an 
external source, the effective memory capacity is half of the available memory space. This is 
one reason the first step should be to clear the memories of all unwanted data (see "The Memory 
Clear Function", page 88), 

The other reason is that when loading from an external source, any data contained in the place 
where the external data Is to go will be mixed in with the old data. 

Once the data from the "scratch pad" has been written into its permanent place, the "scratch 
pad" area becomes free and may be used for writing more data, either from the external source, 
or with the keys on the front panel. 

Decide TIME BASE and TEMPO in more or less the same way as you would if you were going to 
load the data with the keys on the front panel of the MicroComposer. This is important because 
If the TIME BASE times TEMPO equals a smaller number than the fastest gate pulse you intend 
to Input, the resolution will not be fine enough and the MicroComposer will miss notes and many 
note time values will be noticeably different from the way they were played when loaded. 



After preparing for loading from an external source, if you push y but there is no external 
source connected to the EXT INPUT jacks, the MicroComposer will be thrown into a deadlock 
where none of the front panel controls have any effect. This can be broken into by turning off 
the POWER switch, or by Inputting a single gate pulse into the EXT INPUT GATE jack, then 
pushing 



While loading fr om an external source, the display will show the data being written Into the CV 



memory. Once ^^ is pushed at the end of the sequence, the display will revert to the STEP 



TIME display if that was the last memory selection before loading. 

The MEASURE display will remain at "1" and the STEP display will change each time a note 
is played, if a note time value (or rest) is too long for one step {more than 256 increments long), 
the STEP display will advance and use the next memory space to continue the note. Remember 
that the STEP display can run beyond 99, but that only the last digits will be displayed. Also, 
when editing, Operation .2 (measure set) cannot be used for selecting steps beyond Step 256 
{although the program will run bdyond this point). 

While loading data from the e xternal source, if the memory becomes full, the ERROR function 
will be activated- If you push | ^^ \ , the data will be written into the memory. The note before 
the note which caused the ERROR function will be the last note written Into the memory. 



67 



V.., 



Loading CV Only 

The connection between the gate source and GATE INPUT jack must be made even when loading 
CV only, 

I nternally, the method for writing CV only, or CV + GATE is exactly the same. The only difference 
IS that when loading CV only, the gate data is not written into the memory. Thus, when loading 
CV only^ if a note is held too long, it will take up more than one step in the memory. To get 
around this, you can temporarily program an extremely slow tempo, such as MM J = 4 (TIME 
BASE times TEMPO must equal 128 or more). With a temporary slow tempo, notes can be held 
much longer and still have each CV value take up only one step. 

Once CV data has been loaded, the STEP TIME and GATE TIME memories can be loaded using 
the keys on the front panel of the MicroComposer as described in the previous section- 
Editing 

Editing may be accomplished either by replaying the sequence from any given point to the end, 
or by using the keys on the front panel as explained in the following sections of this manual. 



L 



LOADING EXTERNAL DATA FROM ANY POINT OTHER THAN THE BEGINNING 



O 'The memories to be loaded must be cleared from the start point to the end ("The MEMORY 



CLEAR Function, page 88). The CV data just before the start point must contain a [^ flag 
(page 81). 



Q . Select start measure and memories to be loaded. 



c 



OPERATION 

® 

(p. 47) 




Start measure number 



The ERROR function will be activated here, 
but It may be ignored 

This Is so that the ADDRESS will be set at the 
desired start point -1 STEP, 

The remainder of tfie operation is as shown on 
page 66. 



L 



68 



c 



c 



c 



c 



Tuning the External Source 

If the external source is not tuned correctly, it is possible for mistracking {wrong pitches) to 
occur. If the external source is a properly calibrated keyboard controller, then usually setting the 
TUNING control at center is enough. 

If you have access to a digital voltmeter, you can set the keyboard controller TUNING control 
at the center of the range which produces a voltage reading at the CV output with no digits to 
the right of the decimal point when any C key is pressed. For example, middle C normally pro- 
duces 2.00 volts. 

Another method is to set the MicroComposer to accept data from the external source, then 
repeatedly play any given note. Adjust the keyboard controller TUNING control while watching 
the data at the KEY/MEM DATA display. There will be a range on the TUNING control where 
the data will remain unchanged. Above this range, the data will move up one value; below this 
range, down one value. The TUNING control should be set in the center of this range. Once set, 
the memories can be cleared and the desired sequence loaded. 

Portamento 

The GV memories will accept voltage levels only in chromatic semi-tone increments, thus 
portamento is not normally used when loading from an external source. 

This voltage level effect ctin also sometimes be used with advantage with the output of a sample 
and hold circuit Random notes would become random notes whose pitches fall within the scale 
system being used. The pitches of notes generated by other wavefomrs (such as a sawtooth wave) 
would also fall within the scale system being used. 

Multichannel Data Loading 

The external input function operates in such a way that it is possible to load data by playing 
along with melodies already loaded into the memories in the same way that recording is done 
with a multichannel tape recorder. This type of loading, however^ will prove Impractical because 
of timing errors which occur due to the fact that the CPU (the "brain" of the MicroComposer) 
is too "busy" trying to produce correct gate times at the outputs while at the same time trying 
to accurately read the gate times at the external input Also, it is humanly impossible to play 
notes with perfect accuracy. For example, if you happen to play a note whose timing turns out 
to be 19.53 timing increments, the MicroComposer will either load a 19 or a 20 into the timing 
memory since fractions cannot be loaded. 



69 



v.. 



u 



c 



L 



70 



7 The RUN Function 



Repeat RUN Function 

The MicroComposer program may be run from any given measure to the end of the program, or 
to some other measure in the program. This run may be made one time only, or repeated as many 
times as desired. This kind of run can be used where it is desired to checl< only a portion of a 
program, or for setting up synthesizer sounds to match a given passage. 



Note that the "^ (REPEAT) button is used for selecting a group of one or more measures from 



c 



the program and that this group will repeat only with the CYCLE button depressed. 

Also note that whenever the MicroComposer is running that releasing the CYCLE button will 
cause the MicroComposer to continue running to the end of the program (or to the end of the 



group selected with the ^ button), then stop 



c 







71 



v.. 



Repeat/Run Functions 



EXAMPLE: Run from M 1 to end of program 



ME AS 
SET 




1 









START 





maybe pushed here.) 



CYCLE switch off: Program will run once from MlO-1 to end of program. 
CYCLE switch on: The portion of the program from MIO-I to the end will 

repeat endlessly (until 

off}. 



is pushed or CYCLE is turned 



L 



EXAMPLE: Run from M31 to MSB (inclusive) 



REP 




3 


J 


1 


ENTER 


3 


•v 


5 


START 





)-START MEASURE 



> END MEASURE 



^ ^REPEAT 



Use the same measure number if only 
one measure Is to be run or repeated, 
(Same method as In COPY functton 
example shown on p. 95) 



c 



CYCLE switch off: Program will run once from M3M to the last step In MSB. 
CYCLE switch on: The portion of the program from M31-1 to the last step in 

M35 will repeat endlessly (until 

is turned off). 



IS pushed or CYCLE 



L 



72 



c 



c 



c 



Running the Program 

The program will run to theend of the channel with the largest number of measures. For example, 
if Channel 1 has been fully programmed from Ml to M50, but Channel 2 has been programmed 



from Ml to only M4 (perhaps you are experimenting with Channel 2 phrasing), when [^ is pushed, 
the program will run all the vyay to the end of IVIBO. The Channel 1 CV and gate will remain 
normal throughout; after M4, the Channel 2 data will cease flowing. 



If the Channel 2 M4 were an incomplete measure (no t^ ), the Channel 2 voice would produce 



random and intermittent sounds beyond M4 up to some indeterminate point If the Channel 1 



M50 were an incomplete measure (again, no "^' ), the program would continue running to some 



indeterminate point beyond W150, with the Channel 1 voice producing random and intermittent 
sounds. 

The MicroComposer RUN function cannot be started from any measure which does not contain 
data for all memories that have been selected and/or assigned, In other words, using the above 
example again, the program can be started from Ml, M2, M3, or M4, but not from any measure 
after M4 because the data for Channel 2 only goes to M4, Trying to start the RUN after M4 
will activate the ERROR function. 



Normally, pushing the Q button will start the program RUN from Ml. If a memory has been 
selected and/or assigned, but no data loaded {as can happen sometimes If you hit the wrong 
number key in Operation 2), the MicroComposer will not run at all. This is because there is a 
memory In the program which contains no data at M 1-1. Pushing Q will activate the ERROR 
function. The way to correct this Is to either load data into a memory or remove the memory 
assignment with the memory CLEAR function (as shown on page 90; see also page 78). 

Tuning 



Pushing y causes all the CV outputs to produce a voltage equal to the voltage that would be 
produced if a "33" were loaded into each CV memory. If you use the CV data/pitch relation 
system used in this manual, this voltage should produce the pitch of 440Hz A (the A above 



middle C). Using ^e then, all VCO's may be tuned to unison. 



Each CV output contains what is known as a latch circuit This means that each CV output will 
remember the last CV value received from the Internal circuits, much as a synthesizer keyboard 
controller will "remember" the last key struck. The MicroComposer CV outputs will retain the 
exact pitch indefinitely and will not "leak" upwards or downwards*. The main advantage of this 
is that specific chords or intervals within the program may be tuned perfectly beat-free, if desired. 

To tune a chord, run the measure which contains the chord. When the chord sounds, immediately 



push *w . Turn up the VGA gain controls and tune the VCO's as desired. 



'When using any of the tape memory functions (Section 12}, the CV levels will "leak" upwards, but wit! return to normal 
when the function ends, 

73 



V. 



The Display 

When the MicroComposer is running, the right hand portion of the display acts as a TIMER 
(Section 13), and the rest of the display will show nnennory data as the program runs. For 
example, to monitor CV data, use Operation 2 to select the desired CV memory, then while the 
program is being run you can watch the pitch data follow the pitches that they represent. 
When the program stops, the TIMER display remains. This can be canceled with the 



or 



key so that the right hand portion of the display goes back to showing which memory is 



being monitored by the display. 



This portion of the display 
acts as a TIMER when the 
program is run. 



























/ 




^ 






















OKEr/OMEAl DATA 


-1_MPXJ 




'ENOMEAS. 


niTC 




«EA9Ufte 


"lAOOflESSf QST6P 










CH# 


SAHK 






3 


5 


UcSlSflE 




3 




, 


— 2 


4 




^ 3 H 




5 

—7 


OCV 

OST£i»T1ME 
OGATCTIMg 
OMPX 
♦ TEMPO 



L. 



When setting up to run the program from any 
point other than M1 (p, 72) this portion of the 
display shows the START MEASURE number. 



When setting up to use the 
function, this portion 



of the display shows the 
END MEASURE number. 



(See also page 77 for explanation of NON-DISPLAY mode of display) 



C 



U 



74 



Remote ""^^ I "* 



The REMOTE START and REMOTE STOP Jacks on the rear panel of the MicroComposer may 
be used to control these functions from a remote position. All that is needed is a momentary 
push button type switch and a voltage source of from about -i-5 to about +10 volts. A 9 volt 
transistor radio battery can be used, if desired^ and should last a long time since these jacks 
require very little current and only w/hen the push button is closed. 



c 



Momentary 
push button 
type switch 



NOTE 
POLARITY 



+ — 



9V 



M) 



Standard 
phone jack 



30 



A multiplex pulse (explained in Section 11) could be put into the program and recorded on a 
spare track of the tape recorder, then used later to trigger the MicroComposer RUN function for 
joining two long programs together in series. 






o 



75 



V 



L. 



c 



c 



76 



^^.■ 



8. Program Revisions 



Key Punching Mistakes 



If the wrong number key is accidentally pressed, press [^, then the correct number. 



The only exception to the above is when selecting a memory (Operation 2). This is because 
pressing a number key in Operation 2 (channel nu mber, o r CV number and channel assignment) 
completes the operation without the need for the 1 ^^^ I key. To correct this kind of mistake. 



simply begin Operation 2 over again. (See also the last paragraph In "Running the Program, p, 73) 



The 



* Button 



c 



«t* , and ^ buttons can be used for manually running 



When editing the program, the 

through portions of the programvertic^lly to check data contained in a given memory. The 
memory select buttons and the l^ button can be used for running through the program hori- 
zontally for checking the data in each memory at a specific ADDRESS, 



The order in which the memories are displayed is determined by the order in which they were 
loaded; they are not necessarily displayed in numerical order. If the memories were loaded in 
exactly theordershown by your program sheets, then pushing the ^ button will have the effect 
of reading the data in steps across the program sheet from left to right at one given ADDRESS. 
Each time ^ is pressed, the CV#/GATE CH# display will change to show the next memory 
to be read, and the KEY/MEM DATA display will change showing the data contained in that 
memory. The ADDRESS display will not change since you are, of course, reading across the 
program sheet horizontally. 



c 



Once you have read through all the memories, pressing _^ once more will put the display in 
the NON-DISPLAY mode which is indicated by the CV#/GATE CH# portion of the display 
showing all dashes. This is a neutral state of display. The KEY/MEM DATA display will usually 
remain blank or show a "0", but when the program is run, the ADDRESS display will show the 
measure number from which the program run was started. (Also, the TIMER will operate normally). 



ntAE5— fc COPWflEi>€An - 



OKfiV/OMeMOATA 



— n*^n~~ 



cv# 



W% BANK 

ocv 






!<. 



The dashes indicate the 
NON-DISPLAY Mode. 



c 



AftertheNON-DtSPLAY mode, pressing 



Also, pushing some other button will interrupt the ^ mode so that pressing 



will start the process over again from the beginning. 

again will 



start the whole process over again, rather than continuing with the next memory in line. 



« (Memory) BANK DISPLAY 



77 



v.. 



If you are using the 



at an ADDRESS where a given channel contains no data, the ERROR 

button again will start 



function will be activated when you reach this memory. Pressing the 
the process from the beginning again. 



In the loading process, if the wrong number key is pressed while selecting a memory, and the 
memory CLEAR function is not used, this memory selection wil! remain and the program will 
not run because this memory contains no data. An accidental memory selection can be 
discovered simply by setting iVl 1-1, then using the ^i? button. The CV#/GATE CH# display 
will show in turn each memory which was selected. Any memory which was accidentally selected 
and does not belong in the program will contain no data at MM, and, therefore, will activate 
the ERROR function when you come to it with the 
(page 88) can be used to get rid of it. 



key. The MEMORY CLEAR function 



Data Revision 

When data is written into a memory, it automatically erases data previously written there. This 
means that revisions are made simply by rewriting the data where it is desired. 

When working with revisions, it is important to keep in mind the automatic address advancing 
feature (as shown on p. 50), 



L 



To check data contained at a given address in the memory, perform Operations 1 and 2. If the 
data shown by the KEY/MEM DATA display is to be revised, push 
in the normal Operation 3 manner. 



and write the new data 



C 



^ 



78 



EXAMPLE: Check CV2 data (channel 1 ) at iV13-2. 



OPERATION 

d) 



C 



OPERATION 

(D 





MEAS 
SET 




3 


EMTGR 


2 




BNTER 




CV 


/ 


2 




1 



These operations may be interchanged with Operation (|> 
being perfornned first. If desired.' 



c 



The above will show the CV2 data at 1VI3-2; if revision is desired, continue as 
shown on the next page. 



c 



79 



V„- 



EXAMPLE : Revise data to read "39' 



OPERATION 



;> 



BACK 
STEP 



■The first number key will advance the ADDRESS; | 
therefore, start with f^ ^ 



ENTER 



or 



ME AS 
END 



as needed 



This may be followed by other numbers In the normal Operation 
manner If following data is also to be revised 



L-- 



c 



80 



L. 






c 



Revision of t^ 



The purpose of the [j^ button is to divide the program into musical measures for convenience. 
In a long composition, this makes the finding and checking of individual notes much easier. 
Also, the COPY and REPEAT RUN functions depend on these fl^ flags for proper operation. 



The insertion of [^ in the wrong place (or its omission) will affect the program only If the 
COPY function is involved, or if the program is run from the measure with the [^ mistake or 
from any measure which follows. 



c 



^ is also required after the last step in the program. If [^ were-not used after the last step, 
the MicroComposer would continue running to some undetermined point after the end of the 
program. 



placement may be pinpointed by simply stepping through the suspected portions 

button} while comparing the ADDRESS display with 



Mistakes in 

of the program manually {with the 

the program sheet 



Mistakes in the placement of 
the point to be corrected. 



may be corrected by simply rewriting the data just In front of 



c 



81 



V 



PROGRAM 24: 




U E^EjLr 



3. 



^t^ ^^-^jI, 



MM 


J- /^^ 




TIME BA8{ 


: J. 


/6 




CHANNEL 


/ Truiip^t 


MEASURE 


STEP 


/ 


S 


^ 










/ 


/ 


^ 


P 


2. 












Jl 


4^ 


4i 


^ 












J 


^ 


if- 


4i 












¥■ 


w 


P 


6 










' 


^ 


¥i 


^ 


z 












^ 


^ 


^ 


¥■ 












7 


¥•/ 


¥■ 


^ 












? 


32- 


S^ 


6 












f 


«/ 


B 


2. 












xtf? 


A/ 


^ 


</L 












// 


3B 


u. 


^ 










o? 


/ 


36 


<P 


6 












2 


J» 


^ 


3. 












J* 


s» 


^ 


^ 












<t 


s6 


^ 


¥■ 












/^ 


^^ 


<? 


4 












^ 


36 


4t 


2 












7 


36 


<t 


V 












e 


3^ 


# 


S' 












9 


^^ 


^ 


6 












/o 


:2^ 


? 


2 










y 


/ 


:if 


^ 


tJL 












i 


i/ 


<« 


^ 












v^ 


33 


^<!> 


6o 

































































^ 



c 



82 



L. 






EXAMPLE: Bar line omitted between M2-10 and M3-1 {PROGRAM 24) 



C^ 



OPERATION 

® 



OPERATION 



OPERATION 



MEAS 
SET 



ENTER 



ENTER 



CV 



MEAS 
END 



DESIRED ADDRESS -1 



Operation (J) Is not needed 
if the display already shows 
the desired memory. 

Advances ADDRESS one step 



1 



J 



REVISION 



In this case^ the data at M2-10 has been rewritten followed by the correct 



EXAMPLE: Bar line accidentally inserted between W)2-4 and M2'5 (PROGRAM 24). 



c 



c 



OPERATION 



OPERATION 



OPERATION 



^ 


MEAS 
SET 




2 




ENTER 


3 






ENTER 


CV 




1 




1 






3 




6 






ENTER 



DESIRED ADDRESS -1 



Operation® IS not needed if the display 
already shows the desired memqry, 



^ The data at M2-4 is rewritten 



'^ 'This erases the bar line located after M2-4, 



83 



V. 



The INSERT and DELETE functions 

Any number of notes may be inserted anywhere in the program without having to reload the 
program. 



EXAMPLE; Make the following insertion. 
Program as written 



Desired insertion 

I 



CHANNEL 


/ 


MEASURE 


STEP 


cu/ 


















/<» 


f 


2/ 




















2 


22 






f^ 






CVl 








,3 


a^ 






J 




¥ 


i^ 








¥ 


.. 






< 




^ 


J^ 








^ 


■If 








// 


/ 


xi 






// 


y 


.w 










2 


X7 








2 


3/ 




















vi 


1-?? 






















































■ 









OPERATION 



OPERATION 



MEAS 
SET 



ENTER 





New 


program 










CHANNEL 


/ 


MEASURE 


STEP 


CV/ 












/o 


/ 


V 














^ 


XI 














^ 


23 














^ 


:iii 














<r 


2± 






INS 


:RTE 


D 


// 


/ 


26 






POF 


Tto^ 




-i- 


2? 














J 


12 














^ 


19 












/2 


/ 


30 














X 


3/ 














vj 


32 


































' 



























Last address before insertion 



ENTER 



CV 



Operation Q) is not neede,d if-display 
already shows desired memory. 



v.. 



L 



(continued on next page) 



^- 



84 



c 



{continued from previous page) 



G 



INSERT 
OPERATION 



> 
> 


2 


4 


INS 


2 




6 


INS 


MEAS 
END 


2 


> 


6 


INS 


2 




7 




INS 




Use « instead of ^^^ 



Method of writing is* in the INSERT mode 



c 



INS » INSERT 



c 



85 



The i« button may be used like the <--<^" and f^ buttons when repeating data 



EXAMPLE: Make the following insertion 



OPERATION 





OPERATION 



INSERT 
OPERATION 





ME AS 
SET 






2 


4 


ENTER 




4 






ENTER 




" 


STEP 
TIME 






1 




St 


INS 








INS 




s» 


INS 




s 


INS 






INS 


-• '^ 




INS 




^ 

s 


INS 




^ 


INS 





CHANNEL 


/. 


M£A&UR£ 


8TEP 


cv 


s 




















2i£ 


/ 




2ii 










QV 


.^. 










2 














:2^ 


/ 




3{^ 










3 
















2 
















^ 




2t^ 










3 














2^ 


/ 




_^2 




^ 






^ 
















2 














i^ 


/ 
















S 
















2 
















^ 




/2 










3 






























^ 




2^ 


- 

































































operation @ is not needed if display 
already shows desired memory* 



Like 



and (^ 



win operate on whatever 



data is shown by the KEY/MEM DATA display. When 
M24-4 IS set, the display shows "24"; pressing Q wil 
then Insert another 24 Into the program. 



If this were a CV memory/you would use 



here. 



' (Note that the COPY function discussed in Section 9 also operates in the INSERT mode). 
86 



G 



Any number of notes may be deleted from the program with the space left by this operation 
being automatically closed up. 



EXAMPLE: Delete the data which was inserted in the example on p. 84. 



OPERATION 
0) 



g; 



OPERATION 

(D 



DELETE 
OPERATION 



" 


MEAS 
SET 




1 









ENTER 


4 


ENTER 




CV 






1 




1 




k 


DEL 




> 
> 


DEL 




DEL 




DEL 





>- This is the ADDRESS of the first data to be deleted. 



Operation @ Is not needed 
if display already shows 
desired memory. 



Note that 



erases the data shown by the display, then 
will again erase 



closes the gap. The next pressing of 

the data and again dose the gap. The ADDRESS display 

does not change but continuously shows M104. 



c 



DEL = DELETE 



c 



87 



The MEMORY CLEAR function 

As mentioned before, to clear all of the MicroComposer memories of all data, turn off the POWER 
switch for a few seconds. 

The MEMORY CLEAR function allows any given MicroComposer memory to be cleared of data 
from any point to any other point in the program. 



EXAMPLE; Clear CVS-I from M5 to M8. 



OPERATION 



cv 



m 



Operation (2) is not needed if the CV#/GATE CH# display 
already shows CV3-1. 

Operation ® Is not needed at all since the next buttons 
determine what measures are to be cleared. 



ME AS 
SET 



ENTER 



m 



DEL 



First measure to be deleted 

\ 

When deleting only one measure, use the same number. 
Last measure to be deleted 



This is the button which actually executes the CLEAR 
function. If you change your mind before pushing 



going Into some other operation will cancel the CLEAR 
function. The ERROR function will be activated, but this 
may be ignored. 



After pressing «^ , the display will show the data in the 



last step in M4; in other words, the data just in front of the 
measures which were removed. 



As the [^ button implies, tiie data after M8 is brought forward to close up the hole left in the 
program by the CLEAR function. 



*(Samfl method es In COPY function example shown on p- 95) 



88 



c 



EXAMPLE: Clear CV2-2 from M10 to end of program. 



G 







cv 


> 




OPERATION 

(D 


> 


2 




>• Not needed If display already shows CV2-2 






2 


*^ 








Mm 

CLEAR 








1 


•v 


^ First measure to be deleted. 









^ 






DEL 


.^ c*jArtii+A« ♦u« /^f c A £> c>.»«*:^«. 






-^— L^AcuuLoa u(c VfL^f^r-in tuiiuciuil 



c 



After pressing Q , the ADDRESS display will show the last step In M9; in other words, the display 
will show the last data now contained in CV2-2, 



G 



89 



EXAMPLE: Clear all data from CV1-1 



OPERATION 



t 



cv 





MEM 
CLEAR 


1 




DEL 



First measure to be deleted 



In the above, the assignment of CVl to Channel 1 remains intact, but CV1 now contains no data. 
The ADDRESS display will show MO {measure zero) and the KEY/MEM DATA display will show 
"0". Remember that the MicroComposer will not run in this condition; data must be reloaded 
into CVl, or the channel assignment must be cleared. 



EXAMPLE: Clear all data from CV1-1 along with the channel assignment 



OPERATION 



[ 



cv 



I MEM I 
pt,EAR| 

.(H) 

DEL 



Optional 



The above will activate the ERROR function indicating that the memory has been cleared of all 
data and the channel assignment cancelled. 



90 



c 






c 



c 



The other MicroComposer memories are cleared in the same way as shown above. 

CAUTION: 

When loading data into the MicroComposer, one of the assignable memories (CV, IVIPX, or 
TEMPO) must be assigned to a channel and loaded before the MicroComposer will accept data 
for the related STEP or GATE TIME memory. When clearing memories, the opposite is true, 

If all the assignable memories for a given channel are cleared first, you no longer have access to 
the STEP/GATE memories. Trying to select these STEP/GATE memories will only activate the 
ERROR function. If the assignable memories are cleared but their assignment left intact, you can 
select the related STEP/GATE memories, but you still will not have access to the data. Also, the 
MicroComposer will not run. 

If you find that you have inadvertently cleared all the assignable memories, the only way to get 
access to the related STEP/GATE memories Is to temporarily reassign a memory to that channel 
and load data into it up to the point where access is desired. For example, if you want to clear 
STEP TIME completely {in other words from Ml to the end of the program), you need access to 
M1-1» Once the assignable memory has data at Ml-1, you have access to the STEP/GATE MM 
and can clear them. 



91 



92 



c 



G 



C 



9. Repetition 



Repeated Notes 

Repeated data within a given measure can be liandled as shown in Section 5 using the 



or 



buttons. 

COPY Function 

Repetitions of musical patterns may be easily accomplished with the COPY function. 

There are two types of COPY function. The first involves the transfer of data from one place to 
another in the same memory. This operation is shown on the next page and in Program 25 (p. 96), 



93 



COPY function {same memory) 



MEASURE: 



2. 



3. 



4. 


5. 


6. 


7 


S. 


9, 


10. 


11 


12, 


13. 


14. 


15 



Repeat two times 



16. 



17. 



OPERATION 



[IMtTIATES 
COPY FUNCTtON 

NUEV1BER0F 
TIMES FOR 
REPETITION 

FROM 
MEASURE 



TO 
MEASURE . . 



OPERATION 

(D 

continued 



LOADING 
CV 

I 
t 
I 



> 



> 



> 



MEAS 
END 



COPY 



> Data for !ast step (n IV17. 



DISPLAY 

A, 



MEASURE: STEP: 



EIMTER 



ENTER 



ENTER 



8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
B 
15 

^ Data for Ml 6-1 



8 

TIMES; 

^ 

STEP: 

a 



DATA: 



DO 
CU 



CV#: 



^ 

CH#: 



START MEASURE: END MEASURE: 



H 

H 
DATA: 

28 



cv# 












On the program 




c 




sheet the COPY 




2X 








ff4i 




Wtltlei't 


^ 








M7 













Displays the last data 
contained in the menri- 
ory as a result of 
the COPY operation. 



94 



c 



To repeat only one given measure a number of times: 



EXAMPLE: Repeat M3 ten times 



G 





COPY 




") 






> 
> 


1 













SNTER 


3 




ENTER 


3 




ENTER 



Repeat 10 times 






From ^/t3 



ToM3 



c 



c 



95 



pRo^mHij - 



Ccf^r fUA/CT/O/^ 



MM 


•)= /so 






TIME BASE 1 


1 . 


3^ 




































CHANNEL 


A 


MEASURE 


ST6P 


VCO 

/ 


VCO 

2 


5 


^ 


































/ 


/ 


^5/ 


2? 


/6 


^ 






. 






























2 


















































3 


















































iA 


















































^ 


















































4, 


















































7 


















































% 


3/ 


29 


/i 


^ 



































:i 


/ 


c 


2? 


' — , 


' 




































2. 


3K 






c 


z. 




































3 


Ml 






3 


< 




































<A 


Ml 








7 




































C 








r 


1 




































i 














































7 




































...J.. 










^^. 




M 






































v^ 


/ 




c 


'^i 






































a 




(X 






- 


NOTE: 
































J 




Ml 








in actual practice the use of the COPY functFon here is questionable" 
since it wouid be just as easy to load the "28" in the normai manner- 
for this measure. 










9- 




Ml 
















t 












































i 












































7 












































p 












































^ 


/ 




2i 






































X 








1 














J 


[. 




















^ 




_ 




■^^y ■ 






' ^^ 




— ■ 




f 




^^^ 


^ 1 


I 




^^^ ^^^m 




iPfs'-C* — 







■ 





^r-. 







V 






\A 


=E 


r- 


^^^. 






¥- 








* 3. 4. 




t 










(> 










'7 










— f- — 

4? 




i4 


■-jf- 




— 


-f— 


H — 


H — 




— H 








H — 














(to 4— < 


4- 




4 — 


iH- 


r — 1 


f « 


_J_ 


-4 




4 ( 


4 — 1 


1 — i 


1 4 


# 


• 






— Jo..... 




^^ 






-m — 


-m — 


m — 


V — 1 


i- — 4 


P 1 




^ 


i — 1^ — i 


p — 1 


4—^ g 


1 «^ 






































, , 









96 



G 



The second type of COPY function is the transfer of data from one memory to another. This 
operation is shown in Program 26. 



PROGRAfVI 26: 



G 



ALLEGRO 



BACH 



FLUTE 



ViOLIN 




V3^ 



G 



G 



97 



Pao^MM t^ 



BkA¥OiA/BUR^H Cof/c^MTa 



MM 


J= . 


/2C 


f 


TIMB BASE J . 


^<c 






























CHANNEL 


A V/OLlfJ 


^ . TLur. 


m 




MEASUflt 


STEP 


/ 


^ 


^ 


{/cA 








vi> 


S 


^ 


^ 






















/ 


/ 


33 


y?- 














S^ 




c 



























X 


JJ' 


^ 


</C 


92 






































^ 


^p 


/? 


/<^ 


s^ 




















■ 


















^ 


SS 


£ 


^ 


7i_ 




































>. 


/ 


Jit 


B 


7 


S^O 








^2 
































^ 


J>^ 




7 


;>? 




























. 










J 


3/ 




£ 


7^ 






































^ 


JO 




? 


7S» 






































^ 


3/ 




7 


7^ 






































4, 


^3 


8 


(, 


,7^- 




































.-? 


/ 


2(> 


2ii 


^ 


71 








3^ 




c 


fv 
























2 


JiJ- 


29: 


2 


70 








38 




<J/ 


ti 
























3 
















*<<• 




— ' 


d 






















- 


4£ 














iM. 




fe 


MX 


— — — - 












/ 








^^^^ 


/ 


afi 


i«r 


^ 


?/ 








...za 

ii2 






JR_ 










» 














1 


i? 


i«<r 


d- 


71 








iiO 






\. 


"^•m 


isop( 
eopp 


sratioi 
osite 


1 1ssh 
page. 


own { 


on 













3 
















39 








th 














^ 
















37 






























•t 
















3» 






















1 








6 
















4/U? 




























^ 


/ 


30 


* — ^ 


7=D 


7^ 








33 






&0 




















v^ 




2 


J5 


c 


ax 


7^ 








30 






72, 
























-i 


39 


m 


mz 


71 






































^ 


38- 






7C 






































^ 


37 






7i- 






































^ 


39 






72. 




































i 


/ 


J>t 






7? 








3/ 






7fC 














— 










2 


V.O 






?^ 








33 






78' 
























sJ 


i9 






72 






































^ 


^7 






<?<? 






































<t 


^l 






7^ 






































6 


46? 






7£, 




























































































































J 


^^ 



98 



COPY function (from memory to memory) 



EXAMPLE: Load STEP TIME 2 for Program 26. 



G 



C 



OPERATION 

(3) 

OPERATION 

(D 



OPERATION 



This is the 
only dif- 
ference 
between the 
two copy 
operations 



A 



COPY 
OPERATION 



S 



> 



> 



MEAS 
SET 



STEP 
TIME 



SMT£R 



ENTER 



COPY 



STEP 
TIME 



> 



> 



ENTER 



ENTER 



ENTER 



Copy order 



K Data to come from this memory* 
-Copy onetime 



Copy data starting with Ml of STEP TIME 1 



Copy data to (and including) MB of STEP TIME 1 



c 



When copying from a CV memory, include the 
CV channel assignment. In the example at the 
right, the copied data is to come from CVSwhich 
is assigned to Channel 3, 



> 



> 



COPY 



CV 



99 



Data in a CV memory cannot be transfered to a STEP or GATE TIME memory because the CV 



memory contains the t*^ flags. 



Data may be transfered between STEP and GATE TIME memories if the following is kept in 
mind: 

The capacity of the STEP and GATE TIME memories is 256 increments per step. They are 
numbered: 

STEP TIME: 1 to 256 

GATE TIME: to 255 

The internal circuits of the MicroComposer actually uses only one numbering system for both 
of these memories: to 255. Thus, when a "1" Is programmed into STEP TtME, the internal 
circuits are actually remembering the number "0". For this reason, if data is transfered from 
STEP TIME to GATE TIME, the data will become one less in value. 

EXAMPLE: STEP TIME -24; 

copied to GATE TIME it becomes: 23 

Also, for the same reason, data transfered from GATE TIME to STEP TIME will have a "1" 
added to it 

EXAMPLE: GATE TIME -15; 

copied to STEP TIME it becomes: 16 

In a legato passage where you might want the GATE TIME to be the same as STEP TIME, instead 
of trying to use the COPY function, write some arbitrary large number into GATE TIME as 
shown in Program 8 (page 24). 

Once an assignable memory has been assigned and loaded with data, this channel assignment 
cannot be changed without first erasing all the data. To get around this^ use the COPY function. 
For example, CV2 has been assigned to Channel 3 but now it is desired to have CV2 assigned to 
Channel 1. This can be done as follows: Copy the CV2 data into an unused CV memory; clear 
CV2 of its data and channel assignment; reassign C\/2 to Channel 1; copy the data back into 
CV2; clear the CV used for temporary storage. 

Tempo and multiplex channel assignments can be changed in exactly the same way. Copy the 
tempo or multiplex data into an unused CV memory, change the channel assignment, then return 
the data. This is possible because the CV, tempo and multiplex memories use exactly the same 
data storage system even though it appears different to us on the front panel displays and pro- 
gram sheets. 

If you have no spare channel for temporary storage, the data could be temporarily copied onto 
the tail end of an already occupied channel. 



100 



copy 99 times, then copy again 61 times. 

sometimes, e^n wi«, me.s>.«swhi* ^^"°^^'^\'^:::Z7rJZ'<ZZtL7Z, a 
rnl\rr.™rr::irrar:i.maVPro.eeas,ettocopytHemeasu., 

ZnZ' back and change t(,e data which is different 

The @ fiass in *e CV memories ^'-"I'^fJ^^^Tt^^Tiru'Xl-Sl^^ 

:rsS::r^;:Csra:So?Trd:i^n.o,oyw™ 

are of uneven length. 



c 



c 



101 



In Program 27, the COPY order will cause the four 2's in Ml to, be written four times, filling the 
program to the point shown. The MicroComposer depends on the S flags for orientation in 
the program, and because of the "C4X" order, will jump to the lastltep fn IV!5 Ifour measures 
away from Ml K Since M5-6 contains no data, the ERROR function will be activated. To defeat 
*r\o"oo!?! ° operation has been carried out, merely @(to M5-2 in this example) until 
the fcRROR function stops, then continue loading data from there. 

PROGRAM 27: 





MM j ^ 






TIME BASE j . 
































CHANNEL 
i 


A 




MEASUR 


6 STEP 


we 


s 


-^ 




































/ 


/ 






:2 






































2. 






2 






































3 






z 




































^ 






._2 


































Ji 


/ 






a 




































. ^ . 


^ 






^x 



































3 


/ 






M 






































2. 






^ 







































3 






V 


































k 


/ 
















! 






















^- 






2 










































<? 
























Us 


ing the ^^u^r runction as shown 












¥ 


















">"- wi 
ste 


II load a "2" into 

P5, 


al) of these 










- --,.. 


r 










































^ 






























'"'" 














- ? 










- 


































8- 












































f 








































, 


,^ 


/ 








































_ 




-i 








































- 




^ 






X 


































- 




-JL. 






X 


































- 


.* 


^ 






X 


































^ 




(> 






z.. 
































■■ 


- 













































- 


— •- — ~_ _ 






































10: 


> 






i 










1 






1 


















1 ■ 



c 



In Program 28, the [^ flags will cause the MicroComposer to jump ahead to M5^4 because of 
the "C 4X" order, but in this case there will be an overflow of data so the ERROR function will 
not be activated. In this case, push until the ERROR function is activated indicating that 
you have reached the first step with no data, then 



once and continue loading from there. 



(Or you could use the measure set operation to bring you up to the correct place). 



PROGRAIW 28: 



c 



c 



c 



MM 


J. 






TIME BASE 


J - 




























CHANNEL 


/ 


MEASUBE 


STEP 


/ 


s 


^ 
































/ 


/ 






i 


































2 






2 


































3 






2 


































^ 






2 
































:2. 


/ 






c 


































2 






^X 
































3 


} 






M{ 


































Z 






\Mt 
































4c 


/ 








































2 







































^ 


/ 


















-■■"--- 1 \ \ \ \ i 

- As before the COPY function will load a i 






1 
















> 


"2" into these steps. 








3 






































¥- 






































i 


/ 






^^^ 


































2 






































7 


/ 






































2 






































R 










































i 








































^ 






2 


































4£ 






Z 


























































































































































































































































1 








1 








1 



103 



An important point to keep in mind is that: 



The COPY function operates in the INSERT mode (see Section 8, pp, 84-86), 



in this way, inserting new repeat measures into a composition to fill a given time space {such as 
in commercial work) becomes quite simple.' 

Ifi the normal loading operation, writing data into a memory slot will erase any data which 
existed there previously; this is not true of the COPY function. If a mistake is made with the 
COPY function and you try to do the COPY operation over again at the same place, the new 
COPY data will be inserted in front of the previous COPY data. The way to avoid this is to use 
the MEMORY CLEAR function (see Section 8, pp. 88-91) before doing the corrected COPY 
operation. 



V^.^' 



104 



G 



C 



C 



C 



Canceling the COPY Function 

The following shows how you can change your mind or correct mistakes made when writing the 
COPY order. 



If you change your mind immediately after pressing «" , simply push c'JL. . This will activate the 



ERROR function which may be ignored, (To stop the flashing display, push '^ ). 



If you make a mistake with eith er the n umber of repetitions or one of the measure numbers, but 
have not yet pushed the related I «-'<- I , use S , 



If you have pushed «'"» after the END MEASURE (the last ^" when writing the COPY 



order), the COPY order has been completed. If data has been transfered, then it must be removed 
with the MEMORY CLEAR function (Section 8), then the COPY order rewritten. 



If you have pushed '^'^ at some other point, the COPY order has been partially written 

out; it must be canceled and rewritten from the beginni 
The ERROR function will be activated, but this can be 



but the order has not been carried out; it must be canceled and rewritten from the beginning. 
This can be done by pressing 



ignored; press ^ and start again. 



The same procedures work for the COPY function used for copying data from another memory. 

CAUTION: If you cancel the COPY order after selecting the memory from which the data is to 
be copied, this memory selection remains and the MicroComposer continues to monitor this 
memory after the cancelation of COPY rather than the memory into which the data was to be 
loaded You must re-select the original memory before doing anything else. 



105 



106 



c 



G 



C 



c 



10. Synchronous Recording 



The SYNC function allows for perfect synchronization of separate programs in multichannel 
recording. 

Normally, the sync signal is recorded on a separate track first, then the sync track Is used to 
drive the MicroComposer during the recording of the programs on the other tracks. 

Note that with the SYNC switch depressed (LED on), the MicroComposer will not run 
when there is no signal present at the SYNC IN jack. 



Recording the Sync Signal 

The sync carrier signal always appears at the SYNC OUT jack on the rear panel of the Micro- 



Composer when the SYNC switch is in the raised position (LED off). When the 
pressed, the sync carrier is modulated by the sync data. 



button is 



Patch the SYNC OUT jack to the LINE INPUT of the desired tape channel and set the RECORD 
level. A safe value to start with is -SVU, With a good recorder and good tape, you will probably 
be able to lower this to — 10VU (or more) to help reduce crosstalk; a little experimentation will 
show if this is possible. (The output at the SYNC OUT jack Is approximately OdBm). 

When the RECORD level is set, put the recorder in the RECORD mode and let it run for about 
five to ten seconds so as to record some of the unmodulated carrier, then push the MicroComposer 
button to record the sync. When the program ends, wait until a few seconds after the TIMER 



display stops running before stopping the recorder. 

The TEMPO knob on the front panel of the MicroComposer can be used to manually change the 
tempo of the music while the program runs, These tempo changes will also change the modulation 
rate of the sync carrier and, therefore, all following prpgrams will exactly follow these tempo 
changes. 



107 



Recording the Programs 

Patch the LINE OUT of the channel used for the sync signal to the MicroComposef SYNC IN 
jack on the rear panel. The output level for that channel may usually be left in the calibrated 
position {in other words, the VU meter will read the same level in PLAY as was used for recording 
the sync), (The SYNC IN jack will accept almost any level starting at about -lOdBm), 

Use the sel sync mode for the sync track the same as you normally use for overdubblng. In 
this way, music and sync remain synchronized and can be bounced to other tracks or tapes, if 
desired. Also, during the final mixdown, one final program can be added to the mix. 

Set the tape at a point a few seconds before the start of the recorded sync carrier. Start the tape 
transport (punch in the RECORD mode whenever desired) and watch the sync channel VU meter. 
When the meter jumps up showing the presence of the sync carrier, push the MicroComposer's 



SYNC switch in, then push ^^ . The program will begin running when the modulation of the 
carrier begins. 

Record all subsequent programs in the same manner. 

If the music is to use programmed variable tempo, the program used during the recording of the 
sync track must contain the tempo data. Once the sync has been recorded, the tempo data Is not 
needed. In fact, both TIME BASE and TEMPO (fixed or variable) may be omitted from the 
MicroComposer programs when the MicroComposer is being driven from an external sync source. 

The above is the normal procedure for multichannel recording. 



When the "*« button is pushed, the program begins to run and after a very slight delay, 
the modulation of the sync carrier follows. When the recorded sync is used to drive the 
MicroComposer, there will again be a very slight delay before the first pulse modulations produce 
the first note in the program. If the first program were recorded at the same time as the sync 
signal, this combined delay in some cases could cause a perceptible hesitation between the entry 
of the first program and the following programs, When the sync is recorded first, all programs 
receive the same delay and are therefore in perfect sync. 

^Talse" Starts 

Occasionally, due to circuit noise, pushing the SYNC switch in will cause the synthesizer to 
produce sound. As long as this sound has not been recorded on tape, there is no problem (a 
good reason for punching in the record mode after pushing SYNC}, The next step, pushing ^ 
wilt always cause the program to run from the beginning. 

If the GATE OUTPUTS are latched "on" (the synthesizer continues to produce sound), push 
, raise the SYNC switch and start the tape from the beginning again. 



108 



G 



C 



C 



C 



11. Multiplex 



The multiplex (MPX) memory is an assignable memory. This means that it requires assignment to 
a STEP TIME channel. If it is the only memory assigned to a given channel, then, like the CV 
memories, it must be loaded first before the related STEP TIME memory will accept data. Also, 



ike the CV memories, ^"^ must be used to designate the bar lines in the program. 



The STEP TIME determines the timing between the multiplex pulses. This means that the 
minimum required to produce multiplex pulses would be MPX data and STEP TIME data, if. 
In addition to the multiplex pulses, a gate pulse is also desired, GATE TIME data for that channel 
can be added. Of course, CV memories can be assigned to the same channel for the control of 
pitches or any other voltage controlled fuction along with the multiplex pulses. 

The STEP TIME determines the timing of the multiplex pulses. Any number of the available six 
bits may be programmed to appear at the respective output jacks for each step in the program. 
When a bit is programmed to occur at a given step, the output will be a +15 volt pulse whose time 
duration will be exactly the same as STEP TIME for that step. 

A few practical examples will help to clarify what multiplex is and how it can be used. 



109 



Rhythmic Patterns 

One of the uses of the multiplex outputs is the generation of multiple pulse trains for the triggering 
of percussion voices. 

Since the multiplex pulse is exactly the same length as STEP TIME, we have to give each note two 
steps in the program: one for "gate on'' time and one for "gate off" time. The total of these 
two steps would equal the desired time value for the note. With percussion voices usually a short 
pulse is enough to trigger the envelope, thus we have decided to use a STEP TIME of "1" for the 
"gate on" time in Program 29. 



110 



/""""^ 



PROGRAM 29; 



X.^..^-- 



TIME BASE J = 16 



MM 



Output of 
MPX 1 jack 
on Interface: 




1. 2 



3, 4 



iSTEPTJMEl ; 1, 7 1, 7 

ft tt 

ON OFF ON OFF 

TIME TIME TIME TIME 



i-./ox 



TIME BASE J «/^ 




c 



c 



111 



PROGRAM 30; 



TIME BASE J =16 



J = 



Drum: 



6 J J'J^ 



8 



f--f 



«(* 4 



J J^ 



JSTEPTIMEJ : 16 8 24 



12 4 8 16 8 



Desired 

trigger 

pulses: 



-16- 



i8»- 



'24- 



■12- 



'16^ 



MM 


•<= /ao 




TiME BASE 


! J== 


/^ 




CHANNEL 


/. 


MatSURE 


STEP 


///^ 


5 












/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 














c? 





/«■ 














3 


/ 


/ 














« 





y 














^ 


/ 


/ 














(> 


e> 


-3«^ 












2 


/ 


/ 


/ 














2 


O 


// 














3 


/ 


/ 














^ 





c? 














^ 


/ 


/ 














^ 





^ 














7 


/ 


/ 














S' 


o 


/^ 














f 


/ 


/ 














/o 





7 










































' 











































Patch the MPX 1 output on the 
Interface to the GATE Input of the 
envelope generator. 



112 



G 



EXAMPLE: Load MPX data for Program 30. 



G 



G 



OPERATION 


> 

> 

> 

> 
> 

> 

■v. 


MgAS 
SET 






(3) 


ENTER 




OPERATIOW 


MPX 






(D 


1 




Channel assignment 








1 






ENTER 

















ENTER 




The MPX display is explained at the end of this section 
(p. 122). 




1 






p™n j 1 j™ — j \ ^ 




ENTER 




Instead of * , the ^r« , ^ ,orl* 

{since there is no MPX 8 or 9) may be used here. 













OPERATION 


ENTER 




@ 


1 




ENTER 















MEAS 
END 




Note that 




must be used when loading the MPX 






memory. 








1 




^ J 












ENTER 






D 








ENTER 





? 



etc. 



G 



113 



up to this point the use of the multiplex over the standard gate output would seem to be a 
disadvantage since the multiplex requires twice as many steps for the same number of notes. By 
using multiplex, however, six completely independent rhythm voices can be programmed at the 
same time using only two memories (one channel}: MPX and STEP TIME. 

The first step would be to determine the overall rhythm of the passage so that you know how 
many steps are needed in each measure. 



PROGRAM 31 



MPX1 
Wood Blooks 



MPX 2 
Cow Bell 



MPX 3 
Bass Drum 



>- >- 



>- >- 



TIME BASE J = 24 



j- 



rr— ^ 



tn 



^ 



LTT 



rr-^ 



+ 



r r I f 'p 



^ 



r r If 



MEASURE 



step! ON 

OFF 



OVERALL RHYTHIVl: 

Time value 

[step TIME I ON 

OFF 



h^ 



24 

1 

23 



24 

1 

23 



2, 



1 3 5 
2 4 6 



3. 



J iJlJ iJ 



12 12 24 

1 1 1 

11 11 23 



4. 



24 

1 

23 



24 

1 

23 



13 5 7 
2 4 6 8 

~0 — — jf — ^ — 



12 12 12 12 

11 11 

11 11 11 11 



114 



G 



Each rhythm voice is assigned to one of the multiplex outputs; each step in the program is then 
programmed to contain the multiplex pulses for the rhythm voices which are to sound at that 
point in the program. 



PROGRAM 31: 



G 



C 



MM 


J= /oo 




T1ME3ASE 


J. 


;?<2 


t 




CHANNEL 


/, Pmcusstoi^ 


MEASURE 


STEP 


^ 


JPX 




6« 


CV+ 


s 








"N 


/ 


/ 




2. 


<^ 


<? 


90 


f 








i 














aj 








3 




X 


,5 








/ 








¥■ 








£) 




iv? 






X 


/ 


/ 


J2 


3 


7^ 




/ 








2. 


~ ^ 






% 




// 








3 


/ 






71 




/ 








^ 








72 




// 








<^ 


/ 






20 




/ 








6 












90, 


^3 






3 


/ 




Ji 


3 






7S 


/ 








:? 














JsJ 








3 




2 


a 








/ 








^ 








?0 


?S 


25 




. 


^ 


/ 


/ 


2 


c? 


7t 


P 


/ 








1 








7i- 




// 








3 


/ 






72 




/ 








<4. 








71 




// 








^ 


/ 






90 




/ 








^ 










?o 


// 








7 




2 






70 


/ 








S' 








U 


70 


// 


































' 













G 



Dynamics for 
wood blocks 



MPX 1 - Wood blocks 
MPX2 = Cowbell 
MPX 3 - Bass drum 



Dynamics for cow bell 
and bass drum 



115 



EXAMPLE: Load MPX data for Program 31. 



Perform Operations (T) and (Z) exactly as shown in Program 30. (p. 113) 



> 



OPERATION 



> 



> 



2 




3 








ENTER 









ENTER 






2 






3 






ENTER 



MEAS 
END 



> 



> 



> 



> 



ENTER 



ENTER 



ENTER 



ENTER 



^The MPX numbers within each step may be punched in any 
border gnd not necessarily In the order shown. 



For example, this order could have been used: 



etc. 



116 



C7 



G 



PROGRAM 32: 



MPX1: GUIRO 



MPX4: 
IVIPX5: 



Mambo 



1^ j^v n h n 



0—4^ — e—m — <>■■ # 



MPX 2: MARACAS [-4- 

MPX3: COWBELL \^ 1 ^1 ^1 ^1 



HIGH BONGO lA 
1 ni«/ ur\Kirir\ t A 



LOW BONGO * 4 



1 
P ^ 



1 



MPX 6: BASS DRUM } 



4 



^r r r 



y € 



fMEASUR£! :1. 

fSTEp]: 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 

OVERALL 
RHYTHMIC 
PATTERN 



#— # 



c 



G 



MM 


J= - 


I'-OO 




TIME BASE 


J. 


32 








CHANNEt. 


/ t^n 


MEASURE 


STEP 


/ 


2, 


J 


^ 


t 


^ 


S 






/ 


/ 


/ 


z 


^ 




J- 


I 


/ 








2 














/i- 








^ 




2 




^ 






/ 








^ 














^^ 








^ 


/ 


2 


.^ 




4- 




/ 








^ 














/^^ 








? 


/ 


2 




i/. 




6 


/ 








? 














Ar 








f 


/ 


2 


>? 





^ 




/ 








/<? 














/«r 








// 




2 




^ 






/ 








/-i 














/r 








/3 


/ 


2 


v5 




^ 


^ 


/ 








fV. 














/t 








/i- 


/ 


2. 




^ 






i 








/<; 














/r 





























117 



Many times, for percussion voices, the lengtli of the pulse used to trigger the envelope generator 
is not important. This fact can be used to simplify some of the percussion portion of a program. 



PROGRAM 33: 



MPX 2: Snare Drum 



4 



i 



i 



-f 



-w — w- 



i 



MPX 1 : Bass Drum 



u 



i 



1 



^ 



J 



ImeasureJ : r 



STEP 



OFF 



3. 



2 3 4 1 



MPX 2 Output: 
(Snare) 

MPX 1 Output: 
(Bass) 




MM 


J f6 




TIME BASE i =■ 


/i 




CHANNEL 


A PeRcoSSIoff 


UEA8UF<E 


STEP 


Hi 


JC 


5^ 










f^ ^ 






/ 


/ 


/ 




/6 












^ 




> 


/(> 










Si 


/ 


/ 




/6 












J2 




i 


/ 












3 






7 












a 




X 


S" 










^ 


/ 


/• 




/6 












































h 



118 



c 



Switching Functions 

The multiplex may also be effectively used for switcliing functions in conjunction with an 
analog switch (such as the ROLAND 723A) or an analog sequencer. 

Program 34 shows a simple on/off switching function to get a piano-like bass pattern, CVI 
is programmed for the lowest notes in the sequence; MPX 1 and 2 sen/e to add the other 
voices at the proper places. 



PROGRAM 34: 



G 



CV2. 0\ 

CVI CVI 



CV2 
^ 



c 



MM 


i- BO 








TIME BASE 


: J 


- 


^2 






CHANNEL 


/ /^/A4/d:> 


MEASURE 


STEP 


vco 


$ 


^ 


VCO 
CV2 


MCt 


MI>X 






/ 


/ 


/2 


32 


JJ 


yf 


J3 


O 








2 


/4 


















/ 








^ 


7 



























(/. 


/^ 


















/ 






X 


/ 


/^ 




' 














o 








2. 


/? 


















a 








3 


7 


















Q 








M 


/7 


32 


1 


/f 


23 


n 










































































—\ 




~] 

















G 



119 



The drawing below shows a patch for envelope switching. Each step in the program must contain 
an MPX 1, 2, 3, or 4 {or a combination of 1, 2, 3, and 4 for special effects). As an example, one 
envelope might have a longer attack time to give a swelling effect on certain notes, Other 
envelopes could produce other expression effects. 



Output for Switching 



ADSB 



ihai,twEieK«ticuf9i 



ANALOG 
SWITCH 



VCA 




VGA 



VCUU£{«UKUf9 



•?? 



!=d — ' 



1 ! 

• o 



Aoip-d B>*: 



^ Fi ^ F^ n 

MPX 1 MPX 2 MPX 3 MPX 4 CV (Dynamics) 



(Pitch) 



From MicroComposer 



120 






Portamento 

The multiplex memory contains a special seventh bit which is used for portamento on/off control. 

The PORTAMENTO controls on the front panel of the Interface affect the output of CV1 only. 
The knob controls the amount of portamento {lag time), When the switch is in MANUAL, the 
portamento is always in effect (and the LED next to the switch is lit). When portamento is not 
desired, the PORTAMENTO knob should be left at "0". 

With the PORTAMENTO switch in the "MPX-7" position, portamento will be in effect only in 
those steps in the program where a multiplex bit "7" has been programmed. The LED next to 
the PORTAMENTO switch will light for those steps where portamento occurs as the program runs, 



PROGRAM 35: 



I 



momrB 



ALOHA OE 



:;jp 



^^m 



" PF^ 



P 



PITCH CV: 



r" 



_r 



Set the PORTAMENTO switch at "MPX-7"; try the PORTAMENTO 
knob at about "4". 



C 



G 



MM 


J = 


SO 




TIME BASI 


; J. 


B% 






CHANNEL 


/. 


MEASURE 


STEP 


CV/ 


s 


^ 


HPK 










/ 


/ 


2i 


/<& 

















z 


2^ 


M 


/^ 












2 


/ 


as- 


32 


^1? 














2 


3t 


32 


2» 














S 


34 


^9 


¥o 


7 












^ 


2B 


/£ 


m 












J 


/ 


Ji6 


32 


:iS 














2 


3/ 


32 


i? 














3 


3S- 


^R 


«w 


7 




















\ 




















\ 


V 




















— *-== 






' 



When loading the MPX memory, 
use [j_[ for blank places. Also, 
don't forget to use [^ . 



121 



The MPX Display Mode 

Normally, the circuits which drive the displays convert the digital information in the Micro- 
Composer memories into decimal numbers which are easier for us to use and understand. When 
the display is in the MPX mode (which happens when the multiplex memory is selected using 
Operation 2), this conversion to decimal numbers does not take place; the MPX mode displays 
directly the on/off state of each MPX pulse output for each step in the program. 



The Multiplex Display 



L. 



TIMES 1 OCOPY/ftEfEATI - 



-STAItT MEAS.- 



H 





M£ASUflE 

END 



OKEV/OMSM DATA 





,cy.«.... 






/ 




f 
1 


• 


4 5 8 7 



BANK 

OCV 

0STEPT1WE 

OGATE TIME 

OMPX 

«TEUPO 



k^ 



ADDRESS display 
remains normal. 



^ „ — . 

This portion of the display is used for the multiplex. 
The digits displayed show the channel assignment; in this 
case, multiplex Is assigned to Channel 1. The position of 
the digits shows the outputs. In this example, pulses will 
appear at the 1 , 2, 4, and 6 MPX OUTPUT jacks at Ml -4 
In the program. 



Since the TIMER uses the right hand portion of the display whenever the MicroComposer is 
running (or when '^L^ is pushed), the MPX mode of display would be incomplete and 
meaningless when the TIMER operates. For this reason, when the TIMER operates during the 
MPX mode of display, the multiplex pulse data is converted into decimal numbers and displayed 
at the KEY/MEM DATA position. The resulting numbers are of not much use in the studio, 
but displaying them is better than leaving the KEY/MEM DATA position blank and these numbers 
do serve to show that monitored memory (MPX) does contain data. 

One more idiosyncrasy of the MPX mode of display should be mentioned. If the TIME BASE/ 
TEMPO set operation is performed while the display is in the MPX mode, the display wii! not 
show decimal numbers, but will display the tempo and time base figures as if they were a series 
of pulses (which they actually are inside the memory circuits). 



122 



G 



G 



G 



G 



12. External Tape Memory 



The digital infornnation contained m the MicroComposer memories can be recorded onto tape 
for permanent storage of program data. No matter what the condition of the program, even 
if it is not finished, or it will not run, or it continually produces the ERROR function, as long 
as the MicroComposer memories contain data, this data can be transferred to tape. 

Almost any tape recording format can be used, even cassettes. 

Recording the Tape Memory 

Patch the TAPE MEMORY DUMP jack on the rear panel of the MicroComposer to the LINE 
INPUT of the tape recorder. Like the SYNC OUT jack, a carrier signal always appears at this 
jack (at about OdBm). Set the RECORD level for OVU. 



To record the memory data, set the recorder in the RECORD mode and push 



When y has been pushed, all the displays will go dark and a "0" will appear at the KEY/ 
MEM DATA display. If you monitor the output of the tape recorder you will hear the memory 
carrier; after a five second delay, the carrier will become garbled with the memory data. At this 
point, the KEY/MEM DATA display will start counting slowly upwards at an even rate of speed 
(very roughly about one second between counts). Each of these counts represents a thirty-two 
byte* block of data. 

When the DUMP function terminates, the display will revert back to its original display mode; the 
ADDRESS display will show MO-O, and the data display will retain the last data block count. If 
you are monitoring the recorder output, the garbling of the memory carrier also ends. 

It may prove to be a good habit to write the final data block number at the end of the written 
program sheet, and also on the tape identification labels so that you can judge the time required 
for the DUMP/LOAD operations. 

About eight minutes of tape will be required if the MicroComposer memories are loaded to 
capacity (16 kilobytes; see Section 16). Less tape is required for shorter programs. 

The DUMP function merely reads the data contained in the memories and does not remove or 
alter it in any way. 



^bvte: a measure of memory space; one byte k required for each number written into the memory. (See Section 1 6). 

123 



Verification of the Tape Memory 

The VERIFY function allows the data recorded on tape to be compared with the data remaining 
in the memories to make sure that it has been recorded correctly* 

Patch the LINE OUTPUT of the recorder to the TAPE MEMORY LOAD jack on the rear panel 
of the MicroComposer. 

To verify, set the tape at a point several seconds before the beginning of the recorded memory 
carrier signal. Put the recorder in PLAY and watch the VU meter. When the meter jumps up 



indicating the presence of the recorded memory carrier, push the y button. As in the- 
DUMP mode, all displays will go dark, leaving a "0" at the KEY/MEM DATA display. When the 
tape reaches the point where the data starts, the display will start counting blocks of data as 
before. When the data ends, the counting will stop and the display will show the number of the 
last block of data counted. At this point the ERROR function will be activated if there was a 
mistake in the data as recorded. This type of error is most often caused by tape drop-out; it is 
often possible to correct it by simply re-recording the data. 

Retrieving the Tape Memory 

If the MicroComposer has just been turned on from cold in a very cold room, it may be necessary 
to let it warm up for at least one minute before trying to load the memories from a data tape. 



To retrieve the tape memory, use the procedure outlined above for VERI FY, but use the ^*>'^ 



button instead of ^^ 



Pushing the ^«^* button clears all the memories so that memory 



clearing before initiating the LOAD function is not necessary. 

The LOAD function is automatically terminated when the data for a given program ends so that 
once initiated, it no longer needs attention- Once terminated, the MicroComposer will not be 
affected by following data for other programs recorded on the same tape (unless 
pushed again). (The same is true of the VERIFY function). 



IS 



If you change your mind during the DUMP, VERIFY, or LOAD operations, the Q button can 
be used to terminate these functions. In the DUMP mode, if the ^"^ button is pressed while the 



display still shows "0", the function will not be canceled until the data count actually begins. 



v^ 



124 



c 



G 



C 



G 



Data Errors 

In the VERI FY mode, an ERROR indicates that the data on tape does not match the data in the 
memories- This Is corrected by re-recording the data. 

In the LOAD mode, an ERROR indicates that the MicroComposer has missed some data 
somewhere. If the ERROR was caused by noise, the tape can be run again. 

If an ERROR occurs due to drop-out, the ERROR function is held off until all the tape data has 
been read and loaded into the memory- In this way, valuable data tapes may be used even though 
they contain drop-out errors. Once loaded. It remains only to find where in the program the 
error is and to correct it by editing the program in the normal manner. 

If the ERROR function is activated, the MEASURE display shows a flashing number which 
represents the data block number where the error occurred (or the number of the data block 
containing the last error if there is more than one). If you remember that the data blocks are 
recorded on tape in exactly the same order in which they were loaded into the MicroComposer 
memories, you can see that the block numbers can sometimes give you a rough Idea where in 
the program the mistake occurs. 

For example: if you loaded CV 1-1, STEP 1, then GATE 1; if the last data block is numbered 96 
and the block containing the error is number 31 , since CVM represents the first third of the 
total memory space used, the error is located near the end of CV1-1 . 

Under normal studio conditions, the activation of the ERROR function when using any of the 
tape memory functions should be quite rare. 

Data Tapes 

As mentioned before, most troubles encountered with memory recorded on tapes will be caused 
by tape drop-out. For this reason, to protect valuable data tapes use the same standards of 
machine care, tape quality, and tape storage conditions as used for valuable audio tapes. 

There are two exceptions to the above. The difference in levels between the recorded data and 
the signal level of print-through is great enough that print-through is no problem; therefore, tapes 
need not be stored tail out and can be recorded in both directions to economize on tape. Like 
audio tapes, however, they should be stored tightly wound. 

The second exception is that you can usually get away with using lower recording speeds to help, 
economize tape. 



125 



Cassette Recorders 

Cassette recorders may prove to be the best medium for data recording from the cost and 
convenience stand point. Even a cheap pocket type cassette machine should cause Httle trouble. 
If the recorder has only a MIC input, you will need to make a special patch cord; 



Phone plug 



V\AA 




Mini-phone plug 



From MicroComposer 

TAPE MEMORY DUMP 
jack. 



To recorder 
MiCIN 



(1/4 watt resistors okay) 



The earphone jack can be used as is for data output from the recorder. You may want to measure 
the output level and mark the volume control at the point that produces OdB but this is usually 
not critical. Also, you may want to install a switch to cut off the speaker if it produces sound 
during the processing of data tapes. 

With a stereo cassette recorder, record data on both channels at the same time to minimize drop- 
out problems, !f you have trouble retrieving the memory, mix the stereo output together. 



126 



G 



13. The Timer 



When the MicroComposer fs running, the right hand portion of the display acts as a stop watch 
timer. 



G 



STAttt Mf AS- 



TSWES f'oCqpy/HEPEAT j- 

rJuwaSisSl ®ST£P QKEY/OMEM DATA 



3 



B 



E\H 






cv# 



3 H 5 



* '- — f —'9 



OATE 

CH# BANK 



OST£PTlME 
O GATE TIME 



} 



I Seconds Tenths of 
Minutes second 

V ^ ^ 

TIMER 



The tinner is activated whenever the y button is pushed and deactivated whenever the program 
ends or the "o. button is pushed. This means that not only can the program be timed from the 
beginning to the end^ but it can also be timed from any point to any other point using the RUN 
functions shown on page 72, 



The TIMER portion of the display contains four digits; the maximum amount of time which can 
be displayed is 9'59.9", after which the timer returns to O'OO.O", 



The V^-^ Button 



Pushing the '^^ button will cause the timer to display the time required for tiie program to run 



from the beginning to the point shown by the ADDRESS display. (This does not work when the 
display is in the NON-DISPLAY mode; p, 77). 



G 



When a specific time duration is required for a program {such as in commercial work), set the last 
address in the program (both measure and step number), push _^ and note the timing. Adjust 
the TEMPO control up or down slightly towards the desired timing and push [^ again. Repeat 
until pushing 



produces the desired timing. 



To cancel the TOTAL TIME display^ use *tw or 



For iong programs, the difference between the timing indicated when using *^ and when the 
program is actually run may vary ±0.1 second. Also, the time indicated could vary from channel 
to channel if the total number of timing increments loaded into each STEP TIME memory is not 
exactly the same. 



G 



In animation work, or any other work where musical punctuation must exactly match action on 
a screen, timing of different portions of the rnusic may become more Important than total time. 
This is discussed in Section 15. 



127 



{Note that the '^ function does not work to show correct timing when programmed variable 



tempo is used; see Section 14, p* 135.) 

If th e STEP TIIVIE values in a given channel totals more than 65,535 timing increments, pressing 
will activate the ERROR function since this figure is above the capacity of memory used to 



calculate the timing. Normally, this should cause little inconvenience since this could occur only 
with programs which would run from 20 to 30 minutes, depending on the tempo. 



128 



G 



C 



C 



14- Variable Tempo 



TIME BASE/TEMPO 

The TIME BASE figure determines how many timing increments in the timing circuits will equal 
a quarter note. 

TEMPO determines how many of these quarter note groups of time increments will occur per 
minute; In other words, the number of quarter notes per minute (with the TEMPO control on 
the front panel at center), 

TIME BASE times TEMPO, then, gives the number of time increments produced per minute. 

As an example, if you load a program using a TIME BASE of 16 and run it at a TEMPO of 
MM J = 100, quarter notes will be produced at a rate of 100 per minute, and the time increment 
rate will be 1,600 {16 x 100) per minute, Next, if you change the TIME BASE to 32 and the 
TEMPO to MM J = 50 without changing anything else in the program, it will sound the same as 
before. Doubling the TIME BASE without changing the note time values in the program has the 
effect of cutting all these time values in half. Since the tempo is also cut in half, the program will 
sound the same. The time Increment rate will also be the same (32 x 50 = 1,600). 

From the above it can be seen that changing either the TIME BASE or TEMPO will change the 
increment rate and thus the rate at which notes in the program are produced. 

As mentioned on page 53, the minimum increment rate which the MicroComposer will accept 
is 128 increments per minute. (In other words, TIME BASE times TEMPO must equal 128 or 
more). The upper limit will depend a great deal on the program itself. 

In the following three test cases, only one channel was used and all STEP TIME values were 
the same for every step in the program. 



STEP 
TIME 


™| TEMPO 


INCREME 
RATE 


1 


12 X 218 = 


2616 


2 


24 X 214 = 


5136 


16 


32 X 194 = 


6208 



The increment rates shown were the maximum rates which allowed exactly correct ttming of the 
steps. You would probably be able to go to twice these increment rates before your ear could 
detect timing errors, however. 

In most programs, of course, the STEP TIME values will vary from step to step. In programs with 
very high TIME BASE/TEMPO rates, steps with larger STEP TIME values will be normal while STEP 
TIMES with smaller values (such as 'M" or **2") would be slightly late. Most often, this would go 



129 



undetected, except for extremely high rates in large multichannel programs. In many cases if the 
large program is run by itself, no timing errors will be noticed; however, if a second long program 
is run in sync with the first, it is possible that the new material will gradually go out of sync with 
the first due to inaccuracies in timing. This can be avoided by using a TIME BASE times TEMPO 
of 3,000 or less, or by avoiding the use of "1" or "2" in the STEP TIME memories of such pro- 
grams. 



With extremely high rates, pushing y will occasionally cause the MlcroComposer to jam itseff 
into a deadlock where nothing seems to work. Short of destroying the program by turning off the 
POWER switch, this deadlock can be broken into as follows: 

Push the SYNC switch in, the TIMER portion of the display should begin running; 



push ^^ , push the SYNC switch again to raise H {LED off). Change the TIME BASE and/or 



TEMPO and try again. 

Manually Controlled Tempo 

There are three ways in which tempo may be varied as the program runs. 

The first would be, of course, to vary the tempo manually with the TEMPO control on the front 
panel as the program runs. These tempo variations will be reflected in the sync signal output so 
that in multichannel recording all following programs will exactly follow any tempo changes 
when the MicroComposer is being driven by the recorded sync signal- 
Varying STEP and GATE Times 

The other two methods of varying tempo involve programming. Programmed tempo has the 

advantage of remaining the same every time the program is run. In this way, you can listen to 

the effects of the tempo changes, then edit them so that eventually you get exactly the nuances '^ 

you want, and these nuances will remain the same each time the program is run. 

The first and most obvious way of changing tempo within the program is to alter STEP TIME. 
Program 36 shows ^n example of a ritardando done in this way. 



130 



c 



Pfio^f^3(> 



3acH /A/VBhJT/^f^ 



G 



C 



MM 


J = 


n 




TIME BA$e J = 


3Z 
































CHANNEL 


A /-hut/ 


■2. M>«A/ 


s)?. /iPkHS 


MEASURE 


STEP 


/ 


i^ 


^ 






i 


s 


<T 






3 


*A 


$- 


s 


^ 












•i/ 


/ 


36 




^ 






/i 


/6 


/^ 






Jl 


05 


35 




6 















a 


3<^ 










a 
















\- 














a* 


33 










/ii 


■■ 






























4^ 












/b 


d 


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^ 


/^O 










f> 


9 


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6 


3ci 

^_. J- 










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t 






























7 


i7 




/ ... ■ 






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// 


y 














/ 
















i 


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yx 


/o 




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-AH 


ered 1 


imes 














f 


Jfc? 


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// 


36 


// 


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iNote that the tei 
full mensum vaU 


-mata has been omitted since these are the normal 




















t 




\ 




, ! 


i 1 
















13 +14 « 27- 
15 + 16 = 31 



131 



Below are shown two other examples of how Channel 1 in M21 of Program 36 could be pro- 
grammed to produce different ritardando rates. 



(PROGRAM 36) 
Slower rate: 



(PROGRAM 36) 
Faster rate: 









JL. 


JL 








2Ll 


f 


H 


? 


(> 










i 


J^f 


















3 


*^j 


















<C 


^/ 


















^ 


^9 


















i 


J3 


















y 


5/ 
















? 


3^4 


? 


(> 










1 


33 


r 


-> 










/o 


Ji- 


f 


7 










/f 


3^ 


/o 


g* 










a 


i? 


/o 


P 










/3 


a^ 


// 


f 










^¥ 


3i. 


// 


f 










/i- 


^? 


fX 


/6 










/& 


^i 


iX 


/O 

















































1 , 


s 


<% 








al 


f 


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B 


6 










2 


3¥ 


















3 


33 


















♦ 


31 


















t 


:i? 


















6 


3d 


















7 


3l 






1 










» 


J« 


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^ 










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3i 


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7 










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J^ 


/a 


5* 










// 


36 


/2 


/d 










/2 


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/i 










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26 


/^ 


/^ 










/^ 


3^ 


/f 


/7 










fS 


2f 


2Z 


2.0 










/C 


S^ 


26 


2iC 

























The more compiicated the music becomes, however, the more cumbersome this system becomes. 
But even so, there are still advantages. Different rates of tempo or change are possible with 
different voices in the same measures. Another use would be to purposely miss- time certain 
voices. For example, in Program17 {p. 39), if the STEP TIME in Ml of Channel 3 (cello 
part) is made "31" instead of "32", the cello part will consistently be slightly ahead of the beat 
as long as the program is run from Ml. (If run from any other measure, the cello part will be 
"normal"). 



V^' 



132 



G 



G 



Programmed Variable Tempo 

TEMPO may be assigned to any channel and loaded in exactly the same way as a CV memory so 
that the tempo may be different for every note in the program, if desired 

The data limits are the same as for fixed TEMPO: 

MM J " 2 — 254 (even numbers only) 

{Data must be written in terms of a quarter note) 

Program 37 shows another ritardando, but using programmed variable tempo. 



PROGRAM 37: 



c 



MM 




TIME BASE «l 



CHANNEL 


A 




MEASURE 


STEP 


vco 

/ 


s 


^ 


vcA 

2. 


ff) 














'^' ' 












/ 


/ 


iu. 


/6 


/l> 


7o 


/je> 
















^ 


^? 










6? 


/iO 
















^ 


i/ 










4iC 


fiV- 
















^ 


3(> 










io 


//o 














2. 


/ 


no 










•f/ 


fOO 
















2 


a^ 










J-i 


»0 
















S 


<^B 










J-o 


(¥> 
















^ 


^^2 


/(> 


to 


<cs 


^ 














J 


/ 


^^ 


i^ 


^^ 


no 


4io 


















, 



























TEMPO 

(Page 138 shows how to load 
this data) 



c 



133 



If the full eight channel output is not being used, it may prove better to assign TEMPO to an 
unused channel rather than combining it with a CV channel. Using a separate channel makes it 
easier to program sections where tempo changes do not occur and is more economical of memory 
space; combining TEMPO with a CV channel means that all steps in that channel must also be 
loaded with a TEMPO value as well as pitch value. 



PROGRAM 38; 



MM 



TIME BASE j = S2 



CHANNEL 


A 


;?. TEWA5 


MEASUnfi 


STEP 




£ 


Gt 


cm. 






(X) 


s 


fv 




^ 


V 






/ 


/ 


^ 


/(> 


/O 


"70 






/■2« 


^2 








z 


:ii' 










i2 






//(« 


f£ 








3 


3/ 










6¥. 






NO 


ti 








U 


34 










60 














1 


/ 


i^o 










^ 






/06 


f(> 








2 


<f3 










t3 






U 












3 


u» 










^ 






i'A 












^ 


/Q 


/6 


f9 


4£t 






^ 


/i 






s 


/ 


<tt 


i^ 


vfP 


<f.O 






^0 


i^ 


































Thisp 


ros 


rar 


ns 


ou 


rids 8) 


<actlv 


thes 


ame z 


sP 


roc 


iram 2 


!7. 



TEMPO 

STEP TIME 

STEP T!tVIE detemines the 
length of time the TEMPO 
in each step will be held. 



134 



J-""^^ 



G 



C 



G 



Fixed/Variable TEMPO Selection Logic 

The functions of the MicroComposer are controlled by button pushing and the logic of the 
internal master programming. TEMPO is the only case where a problem arises. If you push 
, then a digit the MicroComposer would not know what to do with this digit Is it the first 



digit in fixed TEMPO? If so, then the digit must be loaded in one portio n of the memory and 



a place left for the possible loading of one or two more digits, and once | ^'^^ is pushed, this 
data will control the tempo of the program. Or is this digit a TEMPO channel assignment? If so, 
then the digit must activate the memory assignment, then wait for TEMPO data which will 
control the tempo of the program. 



This conflict was solved by deciding that if "**» was pushed after performing the TIME BASE set 



operation (even with a long delayK this would mean that the digits are to be fixed tempo. If 
is pushed at any other time, it means that the next digit will be the TEMPO channel assignment 

Once variable tempo has been programmed, it is still possible to run the program again with a 
fixed tempo by performing the fixed TEMPO set operation again. The variable tempo data 
portion of the program remains intact although it is not used. 



When it is desirable to return to the variable tempo program, simply push [^ plus the correct 
channel assignment 

When dumping a program with variable tempo, remember that the data recorded on tape will be 
exactly the same as that contained in the memories. In other words, if the program was run with 
fixed tempo before dumping, when it is retrieved from tape it will run at a fixed tempo as before. 



To reinstate the variable tempo^ push '^^^ and the channel assignment 



With fixed tempo, when '^Jt is pushed, the MicroComposer adds up all of the STEP times from 
the beginning of the program up to and including the STEP time at the ADDRESS shown by 
the display. This total Is than used, along with the fixed tempo rate, to calculate the time required 
for the program to run to the ADDRESS shown by the display. 

With variable tempo {using the TEMPO memory), the MicroComposer will calculate the time 
required to run to the displayed ADDRESS using the tempo value loaded at that ADDRESS. 



Thus, with Program 37 or 38, if the ADDRESS display shows M3-1 and [^ is pushed, 

the MicroComposer will calculate the time required to run the program to the end of M3-1 at a 

fixed tempo rate of MM J - 40. 



135 



Fixed Tempo 



TIME BASE/TEMPO Set Operation 

EXAMPLE: Set TEMPO at MM J = 96 with a TIME BASE of 16, 



TIME 
BASE 
set 



FIXED 

TEMPO 

set 



TIME 
BASE 



ENTER 



TEMPO 



ENTER 



Memory selection 



Memory selection 



TIME BASE Set Operation 



EXAMPLE; Set TIME BASE only (TIME BASE J - 16} 



TIME 
BASE 
set 



TIME 
BASE 




1 




6 




ENTER 



136 



G 



G 



Fixed Tempo (cont'd) 

EXAMPLE: Set TEMPO only. (TEMPO MM J = 96} 



TIME 
BASE 


TEMPO 


9 


6 


ENTER 



G 



VARIABLE TBVPO 

Variable Tempo set Operation 

EXAMPLE: Assign TEMPO to Channel 4 to be used for variable TEMPO, 



TEMPO 



This must not be preceded by the TiUB 
BASE Set Operation. 



G 



137 



Variable Tempo set Operation (complete, with data) 
EXAMPLE: Load TEIVIPO for Program 37 (p. 133) 



OPERATION 
® 



OPERATION 



OPERATION 



> 



? 



MEAS 
SET 






ENTER 


TEMPO 




1 




1 




2 









ENTER 


ENTER 


1 




1 




4 








ENTER 


1 




1 









MEAS 
END 







Note that if variable TEMPO is used, then you change your 
mind and remove the TEMPO data with the memory 
CLEAR function, the program will not run without first 
re-loading fixed TEMPO. 



Note that like CV and MPX, TEMPO also needs 



I i 

i etc. 



Altering Overall Tempo 

Because TIME BASE also affects the tempo of the program, if it is desired to alter the overall 
tempo of a variable tempo program, (outside the limits of the front panel TEMPO control), it is 
necessary only to change the TIME BASE. Of course, all editing and additions to the program 
must be done as if the old TIME BASE were still in effect 



138 



G 



C 



> y 



15. Miscellaneous MicroComposer Applications 



This section is designed to briefly present a few ideas on expanding the use of the Micro- 
Composer. 

Two or More MicroComposers in Parallel 

The SYNC OUT jacl< of one MicroComposer may be used to drive other MicroComposers in 
parallel with the first through their SYNC IN jacks. The "slave" MicroComposers should be set 



with their SYNC switches down (LED lit) and the ™^ buttons pushed. When the control Micro- 
Composer is started, the others will follow. 

If you push y on the control MicroComposer in the middle of the program run, then push Q 
ri again, the control MicroComposer will start at the beginning and the others will start where they 

left off. To start the slave MicroComposers from the beginning, push their ^^ , then [»^ buttons 
This is where the remote ™" / ^^ function would come in handy; all MicroComposers would be 



controlled by the same remote ^tabt IuZ buttons. 



If the program has been run to the end, the slave MicroComposers must be reset by pushing their 
buttons to run the program again. 



It would be possible to work out an elaborate live show using a number of MicroComposers- One 
or more could control several synthesizers. Other MicroComposers could be used to control the 
mix, including a separate mix for cueing any 'live" musicians. And other MicroComposers 
could control the lighting. The possibilities are unlimited. 

Two or More MicroComposers in Series 

There are two methods in which MicroComposers could be used in series for joining programs 
end to end. 

The first would be to program a multiplex pulse at the end of the first program and use it to 
trigger the START function of the following MicroComposer by connecting the related MPX 
OUT jack directly to the START IN jack of the next MicroComposer in line, Between the entry 
of the start pulse and the actual beginning of the program there is a very slight delay. It can be 
eliminated by making the STEP TIME just before the multiplex pulse slightly shorter than 
normal. 

The second method would be to run them in parallel with sync, but insert rests at the beginning 
of the "following" MicroComposer program, and at the end of the "lead" MicroComposer 
program. 



139 



Automated Mixing 

The sync track on the multichannel master tape can be used to drive the MicroComposer during 
the final mix so that this mix could be partially or completely controlled by the MicroComposer 
program. Many mixing consoles have ACCESSORY jacks where' VCA's could be inserted to 
control the levels in each of the input channels. 

Overdubbing ''Live" Music 

When combining electronic music and "live" musicians, the normal procedure is usually to record 
the electronic portion first This would be an almost absolute necessity with MicroComposer 
controlled electronic music because it would be extremely difficult to synchronize the Micro- 
Composer to already recorded sound. 

One of the main advantages of using the MicroComposer is that if the sync track is left intact 
after the electonic music is recorded, it can be used to drive the MicroComposer to produce a 
metronome beat for the musicians who have to perform for the overdub. In this way, the 
musicians can be carried over sections where the rhythm is ambiguous, or where long rests occur 
in the music. 

Other Scale Systems 

The MicroComposer is designed to handle the standard musical scale system in which the octave 
is divided into twelve semi-tones. Other scale systems can be generated by simply attenuating the 
control voltage input to the VCO. Since the CV memories have a capacity of 128 (0-127) voltage 
levels, it would be possible to have a scale system where the octave has 127 divisions. 

Consider the quarter-tone scale as an example. The quarter-tone scale has 24 divisions per octave. 
This means that if a "0" programmed into a CV memory produces a given pitch, "24" should 
produce the pitch one octave above. This is the key to tuning and adjusting the VCO to produce 
the pitches of different scale systems, 

Program 39 is designed to demonstrate a quarter-tone scale. For comparison. Ml produces a 
standard diatonic scale running upwards for one octave, M3 produces a one octave chromatic 
scale, and M5 produces a one octave quarter-tone scale. 

Load the program and temporarily insert a "0" and a "24" in front of M1-1 in the CV memory. 
With no CV input to the VCO, temporarily tune it to unison with any convenient reference 
pitch. On the MicroComposer, select the CV1 memory so that you can monitor the CV data at 



the display. Set the MicroComposer at Measure Zero and push ^^e' twice so that display shows 
"24". The voltage at the CV1 OUTPUT jack now corresponds to the data "24". Move the VCO 
CV input attenuator up until the VCO is tuned to one octave above the reference pitch. Use 



to return the CV output to "0". If the VCO is now in unison with the reference pitch, no further 
adjustment is necessary; otherwise, repeat the above steps until both "0" and "24" produce beat 
free sounds with the reference. 

After the above is finished, delete the "0" and "24" and tune the VCO with its tuning control 
to the desired frequency. (Do not alter the VCO modulation input attenuator). 



140 



G 



PimmH n 



/>/ia&KAHif 



P<K^e { 



P^$^Z 






c 



c 



MM 


J= /<*a 








TIME BASE J - 


n 


CHANNEL 


/ 


MEASURE 


STEP 


/ 


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^ 








/ 


/ 


^% 


/6 


/^ 










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72. 


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J. /OO 




TIME BASE 


J-J2 


CHANNEL 


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MEASURE 


STEP 


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141 



Timing in Music 

[n commercial work musical punctuation must sometimes exactly follow actions on a screen. 
Let us say that the foljowings timings are needed: 



PROGRAM 40a: 



1. 



3. 



5, 






G;4 



^ 



2.0 



^^ 



4.0 



4,4 



6.0 



7.8 



Time in seconds 



For all of the following, the position of the TEMPO control must remain unchanged Also, it 
is assumed that the score already approximates the desired timings. 

The first step is to write out a test program. Write the program using only one channel and as if 
the music contained only those notes where timing is important Load the test program. 



PROGRAM 40b: 



v^ 



TEST PROGRAM 



i 



j> 



TJ T J i J) 



^ — . 



J-^ 

















< 0.4 ^ 

^ 


2.0 


^ 










^ 




4,0 


^ 






'^ 




4,4 


6.0 — 


— ^ 


< 












— 7 



Time in seconds 



142 



c 



PROGRAM 40b: 



G 



MM 


J- /o(> 






TIME BASE 


I J = 


J2 








CHANNEL 


/. 


MEASUI1£ 


STEP 


/ 


^ 


^ 






isk 








/ 


/ 




^i 


o 




A^ 


2? 










2 




^X 


2 




— 


52 








X 


/ 




/(> 







2.0 


io 










2 




*e 


2 




^0 


("A 










3 




^2 


2 




m 


iJ 








3 


/ 




U 


z 




ifi 


f* 








u. 


/ 




% 


z 




7.? 


/e^ 








i- 


/ 




U 


2 






?(> 














1 


\ 






































See 


ext 































Normal STEP TIMES 
for TIME BASE J -32 



Now select the STEP TIME memory, set Ml-l, and push ™u*' . If the time is not correct, push 



sma 



and re-write the STEP TIME data. A larger number will increase the playing time and a 
ler number will decrease It Pus.h [^ again. Again, re-write STEP TIME, if necessary. You 



c 



will probably find that several values of STEP TIME will produce the correct time reading. 
Since MM in the test program represents four notes in the actual music program, we used a 
number divisabie by four; 28. 



Push 



and check the timing for Ml-2. Continue as above until all the timings in the program 



are as desired. 

After doing two or three of these steps, you will be able to judge more easily how much change 
is needed to get the correct time reading, and the process will go much more quickly. 

The music program can now be written out using the STEP TIME values from the test program 
to determine the STEP and GATE TIME values. 



c 



143 



PROGRAM 40a; 



MM 


J= /o6 








tlM£ BASE J - 


32 




CHANNEL 


/ 


MEASURE 


STEP 


/ 


s 


^ 


- 








/ 


/ 




rj) 


"^ 








— - 




X 




7 


t 












J 




'7 


t 












^ 




\v 


t 












t 




n 


/o 










a 


/ 




f^ 


*T 








— 




2 




UJ 


2 












3 




NO 


P 












<A 




iA 


2 












^ 






j!2 


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J 


/ 




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i 






















3 






















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£■ 




/^ 


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i 




» 


t 












7 




7 


s- 










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/ 




M 


6 












X 




9- 


2 










t 


/ 




n 


i 






















































\ 




1 











The total here Is 28, the same 
Ml'1 In the test program. 



This total equals test program 



144 



G 



16. The Memories 



Memory Capacity 

Memory capacity is measured in bytes. One byte is required for each data number written into— 
the memory. The memory space required for the storage of a given program may be estimated 
by remembering that one byte will be needed for each square on the program sheet which 
contains a number {excluding, of course, MEASURE, STEP, and column headings; also excluding 
fixed TEMPO and TIME BASE). 



G 



The MicroComposer is delivered with a standard total memory capacity of 16,384 bytes. This Is 
known as a 16K (16 kilobyte*} memory. 448 of these bytes are used as a "scratch pad" for the 
internal programming of the MicroComposer. This leaves 15,936 bytes for music programming. 

A single voice line program would require three bytes per note, one byte each for: pitch, STEP 
TIME, and GATE TIME. This means that a single line sequence of over 5,300 notes is possible. 



Available Memory 



When [^ is pressed, the right hand portion of the display will show how many bytes remain free 
for programming music. If you subtract the available memory figure from the actual capacity, 
you know how much memory space your program requires. The memory required by your 
program can be divided by 32 to determine approximately how far the data count will go and to 
estimate how much tape will be needed for dumping the data onto tape (see Section 12), 



c 



TIMES TccoPYTRepfXrh 



JAJMfflESS 



STEP 



ufAsvm 

EHD 



OKCT/OHEil 


DATA 






/ 

/ 


t ! 


—3 



cvit^ 



B: I 






.3 



6STEPTIM5 
OGA-r£TIM£ 
OMPX 



^ 



AVAILABLE MEMORY 
display 

In this example 12,179 bytes 
of memory space remain. 



c 



Kilo =1,000 



145 



Memory Protect 

Depressing the MEMORY PROTECT button (LED on) deactivates all of the MicroComposer 
front panel controls (except, of course, the POWER switch). With the MEMORY PROTECT 
button down, then, it beconnes impossible to alter the contents of the memories by inadvertant 
key punching. 

Memory Search Delay 

Each time data is written into a memory, the microprocessor inside the MicroComposer requires 
a small amount of time to search the memory being loaded for an empty space for the new data. 
The farther you get from Measure 0, the longer this search for memory space takes. With very 
long programs this memory search time becomes noticeable. 

You can observe this effect by trying Program 40. This program loads only the CV1 memory 
almost to the full capacity of the memories. After you have loaded the CV as shown, go back to 
the beginning and try loading a few steps of Channel 1 STEP TIME and you will note that there is 
no noticeable delay at the beginning of the program when loading a new memory. 

The above is an exaggerated case since Program 41 Is actually useless. Since most of the memory 
space is being used for CV data, there is no room for STEP and GATE data. 

In the event you do need a long program and this delay becomes objectionable, you could load 
CVl (for example) up to the point where the search time becomes annoying, then stop. At this 
point continue loading program data, but load it into Channel 2 from Ml. When the length of 
Channel 2 nears that of Channel 1, stop and use the COPY function to transfer the Channel 2 
data so that it follows the Channel 1 data, then clear Channel 2. Repeat this procedure, if needed. 



146 



G 



P/mmi4-/ 



T-e-si 



G 



G 



MK/ 


.j = 






TIM£ eASE J = 
































CHANNEL 


/. 


MEASURE 


STEP 


/ 


s 


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(Note ine Time requirea lor 
order after pressing the fin; 


the Microuomposer to carry out this uuhy 






HI 








)1 f^^V 


. 






























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t- 


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Loadiny uiis udia wui siiuw uiy diiiounioi ueiay encounierea 
near the end of a program which takes up most of the memory spa( 


;e. 










i 


3S 








(See text). 




























7 


^sr 






































P 2(> 


*/ 



































147 



Measure and Step Capaplty 

The MEASURE display contains three digits and therefore gives a practical limit of 999 measures. 
In actual practice, as shown by Program 41, it is possible to load almost any number of measures. 
If each measure contains only one note, It is possible to have more than 5,300 measures, but it is 



impossible to use the 11? button to select any measure above M999, 



The STEP display contains two digits which gives a practical limit of 100 steps, In actual practice 
it is possible to load as many as 256 steps and to use Operation 1 to gain access to this data* For 
Step 100, the STEP display will show "0"; for Step 101, it will show "1", etc. For Steps 200 and 
201, the display will be the same, "0'' and "1" respectively. When loading from an external 
source (Section 6), any number of steps may be loaded, but Operation 1 will give you access only 
up to Step 256, For access to steps beyond, insert 



V^- 



148 



^- 



G 



C 



C 



17 The ERROR Function 



When all the display LED's begin flashing on and off, this indicates that the ERROR function has 
been activated. The ERROR function is activated whenever you do something which is beyond 
the capabilities or comprehension of the JVlicroComposer. In some cases, this ERROR Indication 
is mundane and can be completely ignored, but in other cases it is helpful for showing that you 
may have made a mistake which will affect the program. 

If the flashing display distracts you while you are trying to decide what to do or checking your 

Remember that this does 



or 



program sheets, the flashing may be stopped by pushing 

not rectify the reason for the ERROR display and that the display in this condition does not 

show correct information. 

Following is a list of the causes which activate the ERROR function. 

WRONG DATA ERROR 

The ERROR function will be activated anytime you try to load data which is beyond the legal 
limits of the memories. 

Example: Loading 128 into a CV memory will cause an ERROR. (CV memories accept data 
only from to 127} 

Example: Loading a TIME BASE of 16 with a TEMPO of 4 will cause an ERROR. (TIME BASE 
times TEMPO equals less than 128) 



In the second example given above, the ERROR function will not be activated until y is 
pressed. 

Trying to write illegal data into an occupied memory space (as when correcting a mistake) will 
not affect the data contained there. Trying to write illegal data into a new space in the memory 
will cause some random data to be written into the memory if the loading process is continued. 
In this case, when the ERROR function is activated, the correct data may be written without 
using the [^button. 



Any combination of number keys or any number of number keys may be pressed without 



causfngan ERROR; the ERROR function will be activated only when j *>^^- \ is pushed if the 
KEY/MEM DATA display shows data outside the memory limits. 

The exception to the above is TEMPO. TEMPO (both variable and fixed} is designed to accept 
even numbers only from 2 to 254. If you try to load an odd number, it will automatically be 
reduced to the next lower number without causing an E R RO R. When loading variable TEMPO, 
the TEMPO memory will accept "0" (or any other figure which brings the TIME BASE times 
TEMPO below the 128 iimit), but when the program is run. It will stop at the point where the 
low tempo is and the ERROR function wilt be activated Also, In some cases where TIME BASE 
times TEMPO is too large, the ERROR will not occur until you try to run the program. 



With extremely high TIME BASE/TEMPO rates, pushing y may cause the MicroComposer to 

jam into a deadlock where nothing seems to work. (See top of page 130)* 

149 



WRONG OPERATION ERROR 

The MicroComposer requires certain sequences of button pushing to perform different operations 
such as measure selection, copying data, memory clearing, etc. In most cases, if this order is 
deviated from, the ERROR function is activated. 



Example: Pushing [^, then any key other than a number key (including pushing ^ again) 
will cause an ERROR, 

This kind of ERROR may be corrected by pushing the desired button a second time. 



Example: Push ^ ; if you change your mind and push ^^" to run the program, the E RROR 



function will be activated. Push 



again and the program will run. 



The exception is the Measure Set Operation {Operation 1) which may be interupted at any point. 
The ERROR function will be activated only if the display is in the NON-DISPLAY mode. 



NON-EXISTENT ADDRESS ERROR 

This is a very common ERROR because there are many places in a multichannel program where 
an ADDRESS exists in one channel but not in another. 

Example: If Channel 5 contains a simple bass line which consists of only one note per measure, 
trying to select any step other than Step 1 In Channel 5 will produce this type of 
ERROR. 

Example: If the display shows the data at IV16-4 in Channel 3 and you select one of the memories 
for the Channel 5 described above, the ERROR function will be activated since 
Channel 5 contains no IVI64. 

This type of ERROR will often occur while editing multichannel programs and may usually be 
ignored, 



150 



G 



G 



NO DATA ERROR 

To have access to a given STEP TIME or GATE TIME memory, at least one of the assignable 
memories (CV, MPX, or TEMPO) must have been assigned and loaded with data. Trying to select 
a STEP or GATE memory to which another memory has not yet been assigned and loaded will 
produce an ERROR. 
CAUTION: This memory selection will remain and the MicroComposer will not run (See p. 73), 

An ERROR will also be produced if you try to load a STEP or GATE memory beyond the last 
ADDRESS contained in the related assignable memory. 

Trying to run the program from any point where there is a memory with no data will also 
produce an ERROR, 

CV MEMORY IN USE ERROR 

If you select and assign a CV memory, then later try to select the same CV but assign it to a 
different channel, the ERROR function will be activated. 

The same is true of the (variable) TEMPO and MPX memories; the ERROR function is activated 
if you try to later assign them to different channels without first clearing both data and channel 
assignment 



COPY ERROR 

The ERROR function will be activated If you go to something else in the middle of writing the 
COPY order {WRONG OPERATION ERROR). 

Q^ ' The ERROR function will also be activated if you use strange measure numbers. 

Example: C1XM10-M3 

Example: Memory loaded only to M25, but: C IX iVI20 - M30 

In the above examples, no data will be copied. 



G 



Example: CV (or TEMPO, or MPX) is loaded to the end of M5, you forget [^, then write: 
C3XM5-M5. 

CAUTION; In the last example above, data will be copied, but not necessarily as desired. To 



correct this, Insert the ^^ in the correct place, clear the memory of data from M6 



(in this example) to the end of the program, then COPY again. 

The above applies to assignable memories. STEP and GATE data will be copied correctly from 
previous measures into following measures even if the count does not come out right The 
ERROR function will be activated if the amount of data is not enough to fill the open spaces 
(seepage 101). 

151 



NON-DISPLAY MODE ERROR 

An ERROR will sometlnnes occur when the display is in the NON-DISPLAY mode. Usually this 
may be ignored. 

Example: Selecting an ADDRESS in the NON-DISPLAY mode (NO DATA ERROR). 

When clearing all of a given memory {including channel assignment), the display reverts to the 
NON-DISPLAY mode and the ERROR function is activated. This is normal; it is actually an 
indication that the memory has been correctly cleared rather than an indication that a mistake 
(ERROR) has been made. 

MEIVIORY OVERLOAD ERROR 

Any operation which attempts to use more memory space than is available will activate the 
ERROR function, 

TAPE MEIVIORY ERROR 

The ERROR function may occasionally be activated in relation to tape DUMP/LOAD operations; 
see Section 12. 



152 



G 



18. Calibration 

This section is designed for qualified electronic technicians or repairmen. DO NOT ATTEMPT 
ADJUSTMENT WITHOUT THE PROPER TEST EQUIPMENT. 

Since they are very stable, these adjustments should not be made unless it is determined 
necessary. Even then, only the adjustments at fault should be made. 

The adjustments are divided into three groups. If adjustment is necessary, the groups may be 
done in any order desired. Within the groups, the order should be as shown. 

The following test equipment is needed: 
Digital Voltmeter 
(\^ Oscilloscope {dual trace) 

Frequency Counter 
Synthesizer Keyboard Controller 



c 



c 



153 



MicroComposer 



(v). Unplug line cord, 

@. Remove four screws and cover, 




This exposes TIMER/DISPLAY 
board 



(3)* Remove four screws from 
rear pane!. 



(4). Remove nine screws from 
bottom pan: three from each 
side, three from front. Do 
not remove screws from rear 



154 






Lift upper half of MicroComposer up as if it were 
hinged at the back. 



c 




DATA 
VR's 



Regulator board contains three 
fuses 



WARNING! 

Unplug the power cord. 
Line voltage appears at 
the POWER switch and 
the line fuse. 



Line fuse 



TRANSFORIVIER 



\^^ 



caution: 

Do not try removing any of 
the socket mounted IC's; 
static electricity generated by 
your body can easily and 
completely destroy them 
simply by touching them. 



c 



155 



TIMER/DISPLAY BOARD Adjustments (see text) 



(2) Load test program. Push 

Adjust SYNC MOD VR for Point 
"B" waveform; 



•^ 0.48ms- 



(3) Connect patch cord between SYNC (N 
and SYNC OUT. Push 



Adjust 



SYNC DEMOD VR for 60% duty cycle 
square wave at Point "C", (SYNC 
switch up). 



74LS368 



POINT 
"B" 



SYNC jf^ 

DEMOD'^ 

VR 




SYNC MOD VR 



POINT 
"A" 



^^-^ TEMPO 



0. Adjust TEMPO FREQ VR so Point 
"A" -139.8kHz. 
(TEMPO control at "0") 



156 



G 



The TIMER/DISPLAY Board Adjustments 

TEMPO FREQVR 

With the front panel TEMPO control at "0", adjust the TEMPO FREQ VR so that Point "A' 
reads 139,8kH2 on the counter. 

SYNC MOD VR 

Both the SYNC VR adjustments require that a program be loaded into the MicroComposer. 
Any program will do so long as the MicroComposer will run. If a data tape is not handy, the 
following might be used: 



c: 



c 



c 



MM 


J= :i^o 








TIME BASt 


; J. 


^2 




CHANNEL 


/. 


MEA$Un£ 


STEP 


/ 


s 


^ 










/ 


/ 


33 


H 


9 












J2 
























^ 
























(A 
























^ 
























6 
























7 
























? 


3i 


a 


y 










1 


/ 






-^" 














c 


9fX 
















HI 


Mf 































A 2.1 - 1.3kHz FSK is used for the sync signal. Load a test program into the MicroComposer. 
Push H. The waveform at Point "B'' will be a composite of the two FSK frequencies* The 



frequency of one of these waveforms will change when the SYNC MOD VR is changed. Adjust 
this portion of the waveform so that one full cycle equals 0,48 milliseconds. 



Portion to be adjusted is shown darker 
althoufih It win not be this way on the 
oscilloscope. 



0.48ms- 
SYNC DEMOD VR 

Patch the SYNC GUT jack to the SYNC IN Jack on the rear panel of the MicroComposer. With 

. Adjust the SYNC DEMOD VR so that the waveform at Point 



the test program loaded, push 
"C" has 3 duty cycle of 50%. 



■s-50%^ 




k50%^ 



157 



CPU Board Adjustments (see text) 



(T) Load test program. Push - Adjust DATA MOD VR 
for Point "A" waveform 




DATA MOD VR 



(2) Connect patch cord between TAPE MEMORY DUMP and LOAD jacks. 
Push , Adjust DATA MOD VR so Points "8" and "C" show the same 
waveform* 



158 



G 



The CPU Board Adjustments 



DATA MOD VR 



For data storage on tape the MicroComposer uses a 1-3 — 2.1 kHz FSK. The frequency of the 
square wave appearing at Point "A" will depend on the latch condition of the controlling IC, 



c 



if the frequency at Point "A" is changeable with the DATA MOD VR, use a counter to adjust 
for 2.1kHz, if not, load a test program, push CT, and after the data begins to flow, adjust the 



DATA MOD VR for 0.48 miilisecond cycle in exactly the same way as the SYNC MOD VR is 
adjusted. 



r" 



0,48ms- 



Portion to be adjusted is shown darker 
although it will not be this way on the 
oscinoscope. 



DATADEMODVR 



Load a test program. (It does not have to be a program which will run). Patch the TAPE 
MEiVlORY DUMP jack to the TAPE MEMORY LOAD jack on the rear panel. Push 



and 



adjust the DATA DEMOD VR after the modulation of the carrier begins; there are two methods: 



c 



One is with a dual trace oscilloscope. Adjust so that the waveforms at Points "B" and "C" are 
the same while data is being dumped. 

The other is to set the DATA DEMOD VR in the center of the range which produces the cleanest 
leading and trailing edges to the waveform at Point "B". 



c 



159 



INTERFACE 



(1) Remove all screws around edges of bottom pan- 




Memory Board 



Interface Board 



Connector 
1 1 


Width VR 
T ^^ Offset VR 
© © © 

input 
offset VR 



160 



c 



The Interface Board Adjustments 

CV OUTPUT ADJUSTMENTS 

The OFFSET VR and WIDTH VR adjustments affect all of the CV outputs and are usually 
adjusted while monitoring the voltage at the CV1 OUTPUT jack. 

Connect a digital voltmeter to the CV1 jack on the front panel of the interface. 

Program a "0^' in the CV1 memory and adjust the OFFSET VR for 0.00 volts. (If ''0" is 
programmed into the other CV memories^ their outputs should read volts, +10mv}. 

Program "120" in the CV1 memory and adjust the WIDTH VR for +10.00 votts. (If "120" 
(2^ is programmed into the other CV memories, their output will read +10 volts, plus/minus the 

error noted in the "0" data reading). 

Check that the following numbers programmed into the CVl memory will produce the following 
readings: 



c 



c 






0.00 volts 


12 


+1.00 


24 


+2.00 


36 


+3.00 


48 


+4.00 


60 


+5.00 


72 


+6.00 


84 


+7.00 


96 


+8.00 


108 


+9.00 


120 


+10.00 



161 



INPUT OFFSET VR 

The accuracy of this adjustment depends entirely on the accuracy of the keyboard controller 
used. 

Adjust the keyboard controller TUNING so that pressing the lowest key produces 0.00 volts 
at the keyboard CV output. 

Connect the keyboard controller to the EXTERNAL INPUT jacks and set up the MicroComposer 
programming so that one of the CV memories will accept data from the external source. 

The INPUT OFFSET VR is set so that playing a chromatic scale starting with the bottom key on 
the keyboard will produce numbers at the KEY/IVIEM DATA display which start at "0" and 
move upwards one step at a time all the way to the top of the keyboard without skipping or 
repeating numbers. 

There will be a short range of settings of the INPUT OFFSET VR which will produce the correct 
data readings; the VR should be set in the center of this range. Below this range will produce data 
which starts at some number higher than "0"; above this range will produce several zeroes before 
the count moves upwards. 



162 



G 



^j"^ 



19. Specifications 
MC-8 MicroComposer 

Power requirements; 

100V, ±10% 50/60HZ eOWmax 
117V, ±10% 50/60HZ eOWmax 
230V, ±10%* 50/60HZ 60W max 

*The 230V version can be used witii either 220V or 240V, 

Weight: 10.7l<g 

Dimensions {shown in millimeters): 



C 



Table top i^^ 
surface 



\ 



Air space behind 
MicroComposer 



Heat sink extends 20mm 
beyond rear panel 




Side panels on MicroComposer and Interface are exactly 
the same. 






163 



MC-8 INTERFACE 

Power requirements: None {power supplied from MicroComposer) 

Weight: 45kg 

Dimensions {shown in millimeters): 




164 



.J 



CV OUTPUTS 

8 independent outputs; program assignable to any GATE output channel 
Voltane rAno**: n^+inRR\/- 1/19\/etpnc /19S 



Voltage range: 

Min. permissible load: 

Voltage steps: 

Pitch control sensitivity: 

CV1 portamento range: 

CV1 portamento control 



^ +10.58V; 1/12V steps (128 steps) 
lOk^ 

0-127 

1 V/8va; more than 1 octaves range 
™ approx, 3 seconds 

Manual, or programmable 



GATE OUTPUTS (switchable to minus gate) 
8 independent outputs 
Gate voltage; ON; 

OFF: 
Output impeadance: 
Current sink (minus gate only); 



+15V (no load) 

OV 

4.7k^ 

2mA 



MULTIPLEX OUTPUTS 

6 bits; plus one bit for CV1 portamento on/off control 

Program assignable to any GATE output channel 

Pulse voltage; ON: +15V (no load) 

OFF; OV 

Output impeadance: 4.7ki^ 



EXTERNAL INPUTS 




CV sensitivity: 


1V/8va; 1 /1 2 volt steps 


CV range: 


0-+10.58V (128 steps) 


CV input impeadance: 


lOOka 


Gate pulse: 


+5 — +15V (switchable to minus gate) 


Gate input impeadance: " 


100kl2 


TAPE MEMORY OUTPUT 




Signal: 


FSK; 1.3™ 2.1kHz 


Level: 


OdBm (approx.) 


Impeadance: 


10kn 


TAPE MEMORY INPUT 




Minimum level; 


-lOdBm 


Impeadance: 


lOkO 



SYNC OUTPUT 

(Same as TAPE MEMO RY OUTPUT) 

STNC INPUT 

(Same. as TAPE MEMORY INPUT) 



165 



REMOTE START 

Minimum voltage: 
Minimum pulse length; 
Impeadance: 



+2.0V 

100ms 
lOto 



REMOTE STOP 

(Same as REMOTE START) 



MEMORY CAPACITY 

Standard; 



16 kilobytes 

(Single voice program: over 5,300 notes) 



166 






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