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//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


NDMIClPiimY 

//nURAlUlS 

INTE6RATED DEVEOPNENT PLAN 2012 - 2017 


THURSDAY. 31 NARCH 2M6 


flnal Dralt Revlew IDP lor 2016/2017 Financial Year 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March2016 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Page 

Preface 

Message by the Mayor 

Acknowledgements by the Municipal Manager 


Glossary 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1-4 

CHARTER 1 ; VISION AND MISSION 5 

Vision 5 

Mission 5 

CHARTER 2: DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE 6 

2.1: Introduction 6 

2.2: Population and Population Growth 6-7 

2.3: Sex Rate and Gender 7 

2.4: Unemployment Rate and Education 7-8 

2.5: Households 8 

2.6: Household Dynamics 9 

2.7: Household Services 9-10 

2.8: Population Groups 10 

2.9: Languages Speak 10 

2.10: Conclusion 10 

CHARTER 3: POWERS AND FUCTIONS 11 

3.1: Introduction 11 

3.2: Schedule 4 part B 11 

3.2.1 : Building regulations 1 1 

3.2.2: Child care facilities 11 

3.2.3: Electricity reticulation 1 1 

3.2.4: Firefighting services 1 1 

3.2.5: Local tourism 11 


3.2.6: Municipal planning 12 

3.2.7: Municipal Health Services 12 

3.2.8: Municipal public transport 12 

3.2.9: Pontoons, ferries, jetties, piers and harbours 12 

3.2.10: Storm water management system in built-up areas 12 

3.2.11: Trading regulations 12 

3.2.12: Potable wate supply Systems 12 

3.2.13: Domestic waste-water and sewage disposal systems 12 

3.3: Schedule 5 part B 13 

3.3.1: Beaches and amusement facilities 13 

3.3.2: Billboards and the display of advertisements in public 1 3 

places 

3.3.3: Cemeteries, funeral parlour and crematoria 1 3 

3.3.4: Cleansing 13 

3.3.5: Contrei of public nuisance 1 3 

3.3.6: Control of undertakings that sell liquor to the public 1 3 

3.3.7: Facilities for the accommodation care and burial of animals 13 

3.3.8: Fencing and fencing 13 

3.3.9: Licensing of dogs 1 3 

3.3.10: Licensing and control of undertakings that sell foof to the 13 
public 

3.3.11: Local amenities 14 

3.3.12: Local sport facilities 14 

3.3.13: Fresh Produce Markets 14 

3.3.14: Markets means 14 

3.3.15: Municipal abattoirs 14 

3.3.16: Municipal parks and recreation 14 

3.3.17: Municipal roads 14 

3.3.18: Noise pollution 14 

3.3.19: Pounds 14 

3.3.20: Public places 14 

3.3.21 : Refuse removal, refuse dumps and solid waste disposal 14 

3.3.22: Street trading 15 

3.3.23: Street lighting 15 

3.3.24: Traffic and parking 15 



//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March2016 


CHARTER 4: PROCESS FOLLOWED 16 

4.1 : Legislative and Policy Framework 16 

4.1.1: The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (Act 

No 108 of 1996) 16 

4.1.2: White Paper on Local Government (1998) 16 

4.1.3: Municipal System Act (Act No 32 of 2000) 16 

4.1.4: Municipal Structure Act (Act No 1 17 of 1998) 17 

4.1.5 Municipal FInance Management Act (Act No 56 of 2003 17 

(MFMA) 

4.1.6 Spatlal Planning and Land Use Management Act 17 

(Act No 16 of 201 3) (SPLUMA) 

4.1.7 National Development Plan 1 7 

4.2: Process Followed 17 

4.2.1: OverView 17-19 

4.2.2: Roles and responsibilities 19 

4.2.2. 1: Internal Role Players 19-20 

4.2.2.2: External Role Players 20 

CHARTER 5: SPATIAI, ECONOMIC AND DEVELOPMENT RATIONALE21 

5.1: Introduction 21 

5.2 Spatlal Development Framework 21 

5.2.1 : Terms of reference of SDF 21-22 

5.2.2 Fundamental Principles of the //Khara Hais SDF 22-23 

5.2.3 Bioregional planning approach followed in preparation of SDF 23-25 

5.2.4 Creating a Framework for Bioregional Planning 25 

5.2.5 Bioregional Planning in the //Khara Hais SDF 25 

5.2.5. 1 Land-use classification approach 25-27 

5.2.6 Municipal Management In terms of Bioregional Principles 27 

5.2.7 Planning and Implementation context 27 

(see also sectlon e of sdf volume 1) 

5.3: International programs and conventions taken Into account 28 
In the development of the //Khara Hals Spatial Development Framework 

5.3.1 UNESCO’S man and the Biosphere program 28 

5.3.2 Agenda 21 28-30 

5.3.3: Local Agenda 21 30 

5.3.4: Conventlon on Blological Diversity 30-32 


5.3.5 :Llnited Natlons Millennium Development Goals 32 

5.3.6: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 33 

5.3.7: United Nations convention to combat desertification 33 

5.4 National Context 

5.4.1 Other Enabling National Legislatlon, Policy & Strategies 33 

5.4.1.1Enabling national legislation, policy and strategies 33 

5.4.1 .2 Environment Conservation Act 73 of 1989 34 

5.4.1 .3 National Environmental Management Act 107 of 1998 34 

5.4. 1.4 National Environment Management Biodiversity 

Act 10 of 2004 34 

5.4. 1.5 National Environment Management Protected Areas 

Act 57 of 2003 34 

5.4.1 .6 National Heritage Resources Act 25 of 1999 34 

5.4.1 .7 National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998 34 

5.4. 1.8 Disaster Management Act 57 of 2002 35 

5.4.1 .9 Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development 35 

Act 28 of 2002 

5.4.1.10 Physical Planning Act 125 of 1991 35 

5.4.1 .1 1 White Paper on Agriculture (Dept of Agriculture,1995) 36 

5.4.1 .12 Strategie Plan for South African Agriculture (2001 ) 36 

5.4.1.13 White Paper on Spatial Planning and Land Use 

Management (2001) 36-37 

5.5: Provincial Contex 37 

5.5.1 : Northern Cape Planning and Development Act 37 

5.5.2 Other enabling provincial legislation and policy 38 

5.5.2. 1 Northern Cape Nature and Environment Conservation 38 

Ordinance 19 of 1974 

5.5.2.2 The Northern Cape Tourism Act 5 of 1998 38 

5.6: District Context 38 

5.6.1 : ZFM District Municipality Integrated Development Plan 38 

5.6. 1.2 ZFM District Municipality Environmental Management 39 

Framework 

5.7 Local Context 39 

5.7.1 //Khara Hais Municipality Integrated Development Plan 39-40 

5.7.2 Vision, Goals, Objectives for promotion of sustainable 

development as included in the //Khara Hais SDF 40-41 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March2016 


5.7.3 Promotion of Sustainable Development - The overarching 41-42 
goal of the SDF 

5.7.4 The //Khara Hais SDF builds on the following understanding 

of the three global imperatives: 42 

5.7.4. 1 Humanwell-being 42 

5.7.4.2 Environmental Integrity 43 

5.7.4.3 Economie Efficiency 43 

5.7.5 Sustainable Development Objectives 43 

5.7.5. 1 Social Sustainability 43 

5.7.5.2 Economie Sustainability 43-44 

5.7.5.3 Biophysical Sustainability 44 

5.7.5.4 Technical Sustainability 44 

5.7.6 Role of the Municipality in promoting Sustainable 

Development 44 

5.7.7 Sustainable Development Themes to be Addressed 44 

5.8 Spatial Planning and Land use Management Act 45-47 

CHARTER 6: STATUS QUO ANALYSIS 48 

6.1: Municipal OverView 48-49 

6.2: Basic Service Delivery Annual 49 

6.2.1 :Development of a holistic Comprehensive Infrastucture Plan 49 

6.2.2: Water 49 

6.2.2. 1 : Review of the WSDP (See Annexure D) 49 

6.2.2.2: National targets 49 

6.2.2.3: Approved service level 49 

6.2.2.4: Backlogs 49 

6.2.2.5: Basic services provision 49 

6.2.2.6: Free basic water 50 

6.2.2.7: Highes levels of services requirements 50 

6.2.2.8: Associated servides e.g. Schools and clinics 
6.2.2.9: Water for growth and development 50 

6.2.2.10: Maintenance Plan for Operation and Maintenance of 

water services and Infrastructure 50 

6.2.2. 1 1 : Water Service Program 50 

6.2.2.12: Resources development (With relation to demand 
management, water balance issues and ecological 


reserve.) 50-51 

6.2.2.13: Contracting and licencing 51 

6.2.2.14: Water quality 51 

6.2.2.15: Extension of basic water services 51 

6.2.2.16: Interventions to improve water services 51 

6.2.3: Sanitation 52 

6.2.3.1: Availability ofa municipal sanitation implementation 

Plan 52 

6.2.3.2: The need / extent for basic services 52 

6.2.3.3: Backlogs 52 

6.2.3.4: Basic services provision 52 

6.2.3.5: Free basic sanitation 52 

6.2.3.6: Higher levels of services requirements 52 

6.2.3.7: Associated services e.g. Schools and clinics 52 

6.2.3.8: Maintenance Plan for Sanitation and infrastructure 52 

6.2.3.9: Financial viability of the sanitation services 52 

6.2.3.10: Contracting and licensing 53 

6.3.3. 1 1 : Extension of basic sewerage and sanitation 53 

6.2.4: Housing 53 

6.2.4. 1 : Housing demand 53 

6.2.4.2: Housing demand challenges 54 

6.2.4.3: Suitable land for housing dev 54 

6.2.4.4: Services levels through CIP 54 

6.2.4.5: Informal Settlements 54 

6.2.4.6: Implementation of current and planned housing projects 55 

6.2.4.7: Budgetary provision for planned housing projects 55 

6.2.4.8: The social viability of the settlements 55 

6.2.4.9: Number of Houses Completed/Built/Allocated 55 

6.2.5: Energy 55 

6.2.5.1 : Extent for basic energy services 55 

6.2.5.2: Provision for grid and non-grid energy sources 55 

6.2.5.3: Alternative sources and renewable energy 55-56 

6.2.5.4: Maintenance Plan for Operators and Maintenance (new 

projects) 56 

6.2.5.5: Reds Redistribution Policy 56 

6.2.5.6: Upgrading of facilities 56 

6.2.6: Roads, T ransport and Storm Water 56 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March2016 


6.2.6.1: Transport Plan 56 

6.2.6.2: Status with regards to roads and streets 56 

6.2.6.3: Maintenance Plan for Operations and Maintenance of 

roads and stormwater 57 

6.2.6.4: Extenslon of roads 57 

6.2.6.5: Maintenance Plan for Operations and Maintenance of 

roads 57 

6.2.7: Waste Management Services (see Waste 

Management Plan: Appendix C) 57 

6.2.7. 1 Intgrated Waste Management Plan 57 

6.2.7.2: Landfill sites 57 

6.2.7.3: Waste or refuse removal services 57-58 

6.2.7.4: Maintenance Plan for Operations and Maintenance 

of re-cycling 58 

6.2.8: Environment: Air Quality Management 58 

6.2.8. 1 : Air Quality Management Plan 58 

6.2.8.2: Status as licencing authorlty 58 

6.2.8.3: Maintenance Plan for Operations and Maintenance 58 

of new Capital projects 

6.3: Public Participation and Good Governance 58 

6.3.1: Community Consultations, Participation and 

Empowerment 58 

6.3.1 .1 : Budget for good governance 58 

6.3.1 .2: Community Participation Plan 59 

6.3.1. 3: Traditional Leaders 59 

6.3.1 .4: Ward Communitles 59 

6.3.1 .5: Recommendatlons towards the IDP 59 

6.3.1 .6: Social Coheslon Plan 59 

6.3. 1.7 Back To Basics Program 59-60 

6.3.2: Council and Sub-Committees 60 

6.3.3: Audit Committee 60-65 

6.3.4: OPMS Audit Committee 65-67 

6.3.5: IGR Matters 67 

6.4: Municipal Transformation & Institutional 

Development 67 

6.4.1 : OverView of Policies 67 

6.4.2: Information on the OPMS system and PMS 67 


6.4.3: Alignment with the IDP as well as key 

Performance Indicators and Targets 67 

6.4.4: Information on the Organagram Supporting 

Development Strategy 67 

6.4.5: Information on the Status on Workplace 

Skills plan (SEE ANNEXURE J) 68-69 

6.4.6: HIV/AIDS (SEE ANNEXURE J) 69 

6.4.6. 1 : HIV and AIDS Mainstreaming 69 

6.4.6.2: HIV/Alds and capacity challenges 69 

6.4.6.3: Implementation of the HIV/AIDS strategy 69-70 

6.4.7: Staff Recruitment and Retentlon Pollcy 70 

6.4.8:1 Anti-Corruptlon Stragegy (SEE ANNEXUR J) 70-71 

6.4.9: Organogram (SEE ANNEXURE J) 72 

6.4.10: Auditor General Report 72 

6.4.10.1: Audit Report 72 

6.4.10.2 Auditor General’s unqualified report with other matters 72-73 

2014/2015 

6.5: Financial Vlablllty and Management 73 

6.5.1: Comllance 73 

6.5.2: Expenditure 73 

6.5.2.1: Capital budget actuallyspent in 2013/2014 73 

6.5.2.2: Ability to implement the 2013 - 2017 IDP 73-74 

6.5.3: Alignment 74 

6.5.4: The Auditor General 74 

6.5.5: General 74 

6.5.5.1: Long Term Financial Strategy (Allgned with development, 

strategies) 74 

6.5.5.2: Observations in relation to own revenue generation and 

debt collection analysis 75 

6.5.5.3 Revenue and Expenditure Projection over the next three 
years (incl dora, services, other resources, loans) 
revenue 75-76 

6.5.5.4: Challenges 76 

6.6: Local Economie Development 76 

6.6.1: Economie Analysis 76 

6.6.1 .1 : LED Strategy (See Annexure D) 76 

6.6.1 .2: The local economie profile 76-77 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March2016 


6.6. 1.3: Stakeholder and community involvement on LED 
Activities 78 

6.6.1 .4: Adequate consideration of spatial issues 78 

6.6.1 .5: Statistical evidence supporting main development thrust 79-80 
6.7: Social Services and Community Facilities 80 

6.7.1: Education 80 

6.7.1 .1 : Early Childhood Development and Promary Schools 80 

6.7.1 .2: School Feeding Programme 80 

6.7.1.3: Backlogs 80 

6.7.1.4: Challenges 80-81 

6.7.1.5: Future Demands 81-82 

6.7.2: Health 82 

6.7.3: Safety And Security 82 

6.7.3. 1 : Programmes and Projects 82 

6.7.3.2: Backlogs 82 

6.7.3.3: Future demands 82 

6.7.4: Sport, Recreation and Community Amenities 82-83 

6.8: Disaster Management 84 

6.9: Priority Issues 84-85 

CHARTER 7: OBJECTIVES 86 

7.1 KPAs, Municipal Priorities and Development Objectives 

(over the 5 year term of the I DP) 86 

7.1.1 Development Priority 1: Spatial Development, Town 

Planning and Land Use Management (KPA 1 : Spatial Development 
Framework) 86 

7.1 .2 Development Priority 2: Water Resources and Services 86 

(KPA 2: Service Delivery and Infrastructure Development) 

7.1 .3 Development Priority 3: Sewerage (KPA 2: Service Delivery 86 
and Infrastructure Development) 

7.1.4 Development Priority 4: Human Settlements and Housing 

(KPA 2: Service Delivery and Infrastructure Development) 86 

7.1 .5 Development Priority 5: Energy and Electricity 86 

(KPA 2: Service Delivery and Infrastructure Development) 

7.1.6 Development Priority 6: Roads, Transport and Srormwater 
Drainage (KPA 2: Service Delivery and Infrastructure Development) 87 

7.1 .7 Development Priority 7: Sanitation, Waste Management 87 


and Waste Removal (KPA 2: Service Delivery and 
Infrastructure Development) 

7.1 .8 Development Priority 8: Economie Growth and Job Creation 87 
KPA 3: Local Economie Development) 

7.1.9 Development Priority 9: Community Development 

and Facilities (KPA 2: Service Delivery and Infrastructure 
Development and KPA 7: Social Services) 87 

7.1 .10 Development Priority 10: Administrative and Institutional 87 

Capacity (KPA 5: Institutional Development and Organisational 
Transformation and KPA 6: Good Governance) 

CHARTER 8: SECTOR RUNS 88 

8.1 : Sector Plan and Intergrated Development 88 

8.2: Spatial Vision 88 

8.2.1 : Spatial Development Framework 88-89 

8.3: Environmental Social and Economie Vision 89 

8.3.1 : Environmental Management Plan 89-90 

8.3.2: Housing Chapter 90 

8.3.3: Local Economie Development Strategy 91-92 

8.4: Input Sector Plans 92 

8.4.1: Water Services Development Plan 92 

8.4.2: Intergrated Waste Managemetn Plan 93 

8.5: Strategy support plans 93 

8.5.1: Disaster management plans 93 

8.6: Implementation Support Plans 93 

8.6.1: Institutional Plan 93-94 

8.6.2: Financial Plan 94 

CHAPTER 9: DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIE, PROGRAMME, 

PROJECTS 

9.1 :Three Year Strategy 95-103 

9.2: Annual Plan 104-111 

CHAPTER 10: OPERATIONAL PMS 112-123 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March2016 


CHARTER 11: PROGRAMMES AND PROJECTS OF OTHER 
SPHERES 

11.1: Programmes and Projects 124-127 


CHARTER 12: ALIGNMENT OF NATIONAL AND PROVINCIAL PROGRAMMES 
AND PROJECTS 128-131 

CHARTER 13: DISASTER MANAGEMENT 132-135 

13.1: Introduction 
13.1.1: What is a disaster 
13.1.2: What is a disaster management plan 
13.1.3: Status of the plan 
13.2: Legislative Framework 
13.3: OverView of Risk Profile 
13.4: Institutional Capacity for Disaster Risk 
Management 

13.4.1: Disaster Risk Management Structure 
13. 4.2: Roles and Responsibilities 
13.5: Disaster Risk Assessment 
13.6: Disaster Risk Reduction 
13.7: Response and Recovery 


Annextures 


PREFACE 


MS B HOWEY 
ACTING HEAD OF IDP 

In terms of Chapter 5 of the Municipal Systems Act (32 of 2000), Council must 
adopt a single, inclusive and strategie Integrated Development Plan (IDP), that 
guides and informs the municipality’s planning, budgeting, management and 
decision-making processes. 

The IDP reflects on a five year period from 2012 to 2017. The constant 
changes in social relations, economie directives, politica! agendas, spatial form, 
and natural environment, necessitates the annual revision of the municipality’s 
priorities, their ability and performance in terms of service delivery, because 
these changes might influence the execution of the strategie plan of Council. 

Because the IDP enforces the political agenda of Council, it remains in force for 
the political office bearers for their term of office, until a new IDP is adopted by 
the next elected council. 

IDP Objectives and lts alignment 

In consideration of various gaps in the previous IDP processes, the following 
IDP objectives were determined: 

Strengthen participatory governance 

- Initiate Ward Based Plans and Programmes to sustain livelihoods 

- Creating a single window of coordination between government 
departments 

Strengthen the administrative and financial capability of municipalities 
between policy intent and response regarding: 

- Implementation of a differentiated approach to municipal financing, 
planning and support; 

- Improving access to basic services; 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGI 

31 N 

- Implementation of CPW (Community Work Program) and EPWP (Expanded 
Public Works Programme) 

- Contribute to the achievement of sustainable human settlements and quality 
neighbourhoods, and 

Address coordination problems and strengthen cross-departmental initiatives 

Align the Organogram, Budget and SDBIP with the IDP; and 

Monitor and evaluate service delivery. 

To give effect to a credible IDP, Cabinet in January 2010 adopted the 12 Outcomes 
outlining service delivery, priorities and targets to be met by the Ministers of Cabinet. 

This IDP is the first attempt to integrate and align the municipality’s activities with these ' 
Outcomes. Greater emphasis was however placed on Outcome 9, focussing on 
responsive, accountable, effective and efficiënt local government system. The IDP w; 
also aligned with the seven National Key Focal Areas and Cogta’s Revised IDP Form 
guide 2012 and the Reviewed IDP Analysis Framework 2013. 

^TED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

larch 2016 

During the planning phase, we sought to integrate sustainable human settlement 
based on the Spatial Development Framework (SDF), and promote developmental 
self-assessments as opposed to compliance based assessment only. We addressed 
Ward-based planning, as a basis for community participation. 

Councillors, Ward Committees, political structures, government departments and the 
community at large, were effectively involved in the Municipal planning process, 
promoting the development of local communities and addressing the basic needs of 
our community, whilst achieving the objects of local government (Sec 153 of the 
Constitution). 

2 

a The IDP, though annually reviewed is a living document, and a process is followed 

IS where comments and inputs can be submitted in writing, on a continual basis. 

3t 

This IDP document is made available to the public through all municipal offices, 
libraries and the official website of Municioalitv //Khara Hais: www.kharahais.aov.za 




KHARA HAIS MUNICIPAI ITY INTI-ICIRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


MESSAGE BY THE MAYOR 

COUNCILLÖR LIMAKATSO KÜLTJT 

MAYOR 





Municipality //Khara Hais’ Integrated Development Plan (IDP) is an agreement 
between local government and the community. This agreement binds and guides 
Council and the municipal administration to be responsive and accountable in 
setting its budget priorities, and in the allocation of scarce resources to meet the 
needs of all the residents of Municipality //Khara Hais, as best it can. 

The prioritisation of key project implementation is //Khara Hais' way to impact on 
service delivery, which will remain a top priority for the coming months and years. 

All of us. Council. administration. community and all other relevant stakeholders. 
should be driven by urgency to accelerate the execution of our projects, programs 
and service delivery plans for the betterment of the lives of our communities. 

Council, through the IDP, have the opportunity to put the community at the centre of 
development, not merely as beneficiaries, but as drivers of transformation. In the 
effective and efficiënt accomplishment of our key deliverables over the next five 
years, we can realise our goal in providing a better life for all. 


Thanks to the Community at large, the IDP Steering committee in the 
administration, and IDP Representative Forum, consisting of members from 
all spheres within the community, i.e. ward committees, councillors, different 
sectors, who exercised their right to be part of an inclusive government. 

Even though Council is the ultimate political decision-making body, we 
acknowledge that the IDP/Budget/PMS Forum serves the needs of the 
community. The IDP/Budget/PMS Forum will therefore meet quarterly to 
monitor and evaluate the IDP process and Project implementation, give 
inputs. and make recommendations regarding Priority Issues. Objectives, 
Strategies, Projects and Programs. 

We can assure the IDP/Budget/PMS Representative Forum and all 
residents in //Khara Hais that, as a direct result of hard work by people in 
our administration, service delivery will improve, and we will see the 
credibility of the //Khara Hais’ administration increasing, and the stability 
and efficiency of Council's workforce improved. 

We are committed to deliver on our Constitutional mandate to serve all 
residents in the Municipality //Khara Hais jurisdiction, and will remain 
a municipality where the people govern... 



COUNCILLOR LIMAKATSO KOLOl 
MAYOR 

//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY 


.'/KHAKA HAIS MIINICII’AI rrv IN I t(iKA fF.I] DF.VI'I.( >PMENI PLAN: 201 2 -:ni7 

31 March 2016 


ACKNOWLEDGEWENTS BY THE MUNICIPAL MANAGER 


Despite these difficulties the municipality is still setting a high Standard of service 
delivery functions as reflected in the IDP. 


MR DE NGXANGA 
MUNICIPAL MANAGER 



The effective implementation of the IDP theretore requires that a fine balance be 
struck in allocating available resources in ensuring that more residents have access 
to basic services iike electndty, water, sanitation and refuse removal; the provision 
of primary heaith care. and the management of disasters, roads, storm water, sport 
and recreational facilities, meeting the essentiaf goals of crealing jobs, expanding 
and enhancing infrastructure, and operating a well-run, accountable administration 
staffed by reliable, committed and hard-working employees. 

While Issues such as education, policing and housing do not fall within the mandate 
of Municipality //Khara Hais, we are committed to working with, and supporting, 
provincial and national government in meeting their responsibilities in these areas, 
in order to ensure that residents enjoy a safe town that shows potential for social 
and economie growth to all residents. investors and visitors alike. 


The well-govemed Municipality //Khara Hais is committed to realise its Vision by 
ensuring that its administrative functions run effectively, policies are executed, and 
affordable quality services are provided to all residents and visitors. 


Integral to the achievement of this Vision is the need for effective planning. I am 
confident that the current IDP that covers the period between 2012 and 2017 sets 
a path and direction for future gro'Mh and development and gives the necessary — 
guldance to the budget. 

Even Ihough the payment of municipal rates and service charges are a household 
priority in our community, the municipality is still challenged by financial 
constraints and limited capacity and staff limitations. Another challenge that is 
persisting is the discrepancies in Ihe redistribution of weaith, the increasing gap 
between rich and poor, and the continued poverty in certain areas, evident in our 
communities. 



MR DE NGXANGA 
MUNICIPAL MANAGER 
//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 

31 March 2016 


GLOSSARY / LIST OF ACRONYMS 


Abbreviation 

Meaning 

AAPSS 

Northern Cape Agriculture and Agro processing Sector Strategy 

ABET 

Adult Basic Education and Training 

AG 

Auditor General 

AIDS 

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 

BBBEE 

Broad Based Black Economie Empowerment 

CAPEX 

Capital expenditure 

CBD 

Central Business District 

CDW 

Community Development Worker 

CED 

Community Economie Deveiopment 

CoGTA 

Cooperative governance and traditionai affairs 

DAGE 

Department of Agricuiture, Conservation and Environment 

DBSA 

Development Bank of South Africa 

DEAT 

Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism 

DALA 

Department of Agricuiture and Land Administration 

DLA 

Department of Land Affairs 

DLGH 

Department of Local Government and Housing 

DMP 

Disaster Management Plan 

DOE 

Department of Education 

DORA 

Division of Revenue Act 

DOH 

Department of Health 

DPW 

Department of Public Works 

DWAF 

Department of Water Affairs and Forestry 

ECD 

Eariy Chiidhood Deveiopment 

EIA 

Environmental Impact Assessment 

EMP 

Environmental Management Plan 

EPWP 

Expanded Public Works Programme 

FAMSA 

Family and Marriage Association of South Africa 

FET 

Further Educational Training 

HIV 

Human Immune Virus 

IDP 

Integrated Development Planning 

IDZ 

Industrial Development Zone 

IGR 

Intergovernmental Relations 


IWMP 

Integrated Waste Management Plan 

ITP 

Integrated Transport Plan 

KPA 

Key Performance Area 

KPI 

Key Performance Indicator 

LED 

Local Economie Development 

LRAD 

Land Restitution and Development 

MFMA 

Municipal Finance Management Act 

MIG 

Municipal Infrastructure Grant 

MSA 

Municipal Systems Act 

MTEF 

Medium Term Expenditure Framework 

MRM 

Moral Regeneration Movement 

MDR-TB 

Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis 

NCMS 

Northern Cape Manufacturing Strategy 

NGO 

Non-Governmental Organization 

NKFA 

National Key Focal Area 

OPEX 

Operational expenses 

PGDS 

Provincial Growth and development Strategy 

PMS 

Performance Management System 

REDS 

Regional Electricity Distribution System 

SABS 

South African Bureau of Standards 

SAFA 

South African Federation of Football Association 

SAPS 

South African Police Service 

SASSA 

South African Social Services Agency 

SANCA 

South African National Cancer Association 

SDBIP 

Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan 

SDF 

Spatial Development Framework 

SDI 

Sustainable Development Initiative 

SETA 

Sector Education Training Authority 

SOE 

State Owned Enterprise 

SMME 

Small Medium Micro Enterprises 

SWOT 

Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats 

WSA 

Water Services Authorities 

WSDP 

Water Services Development Plan 

XDR-TB 

Extreme Drug Resistent Tuberculosis 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 


1 1NTRODUCTION 


The //Khara Hais’ five year Integrated Development Plan (IDP) is a legislative 
compliant requirement in accordance with the Municipal Systems Act (32 of 2000), 
Sec 23, which is binding to the municipality. 

The IDP intends to promote integration, cooperation, collaboration and co- 
ordination between the community and local, provincial and national government. 
The IDP is therefore a planning instrument that ensures that plans and delivery 
processes of other sectors complement those of the municipality, ensuring the 
effective use of scarce resources. 

In August 2014, //Khara Hais Municipality embarked on a review process of its IDP 
as per legislation that requires that municipalities revise their IDPs on an annual 
basis. This IDP revision was informed by, amongst others, a number of key 
activities: 

Ward Based Planning: The Ward Based Planning was conducted by the IDP 
section in 2014 in order to analyse the quality of life of citizens in the municipality. 
The WBP provided an assessment of the quality of services provided to 
communities and the backlogs in services. 

Census 201 1 : The 201 1 Census results also presented the Municipality with recent 
and informative statistica that will inform the review of its plans especially with 
regards to access to services, population growth and densities and unemployment 
data. 

Various policies were also put high on the agenda for planning purposes such as 
the National Development Plan which assist in revising and updating programmes 
and projects. 

iï 


The revision of the IDP was also informed by the overall performance of the //Khara 
Hais Municipality including a review of progress against programmes and projects 
and external assessments such as, auditor general report. Finally, the //Khara Hais 
Municipality embarked on a Public Participation Process to consult with and get 
input from communities on the needs identified by the Ward Based Planning and to 
ensure social cohesion within communities. 


2. STRUCTURE OF THE 2016/ 2017 INTEGRATED 
DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

The Executive Summary gives an introduction and overview of the document's 
structure and content which includes: 

• Introduction 

• Brief rationale for review 

• Brief process 

• Outline of the 2015/1 6 IDP document 

CHARTER 1: VISION AND MISSION 

Chapter 1 provides the Vision and mission of the //Khara hais Municipality. 

VISION; 

To provide an affordable quality service to //Khara Hais and its visitors and to 
execute the policies and programmes of the Council. 

MISSION: 

As an authority that delivers Municipal Services to //Khara Hais, we attempt by 
means of a motivated staff, to develop //Khara Hais increasingly as a pleasant, safe 
and affordable living and workplace for its residents and a hospitable relaxed visiting 
place for its visitors. 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


CHARTER 2: DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE 

This chapter contains demographic information such as population statistics socio- 
economic information and their implication on planning, etc. This information was 
sourced from Statistics South Africa Regional office in Upington. The statistics 
indicates that //Khara Hais Municipality’s population grew from 77,919 in 2001 to 
93,494 in 2011. This reflects an overall population growth of 1.82% between 2001 
and 2011. The unemployment rate decreases significantly from 34% in 2001 to 
22.1% in 201 land there was a huge decline in the youth unemployment rate too 
from 42.3% in 2001 to 29% in 2011 but the youth unemployment rate is still very 
high in comparison with the overall unemployment rate of the municipality. Although 
about 44.7% of the//Khara Hais population are between14 and 35 years old, youths 
remains relatively marginalised. AH municipal services except sewerage increased 
since 2001 with electricity for lighting increased with a massive 17.5% from 73.6% in 
2001 to 91.1% in 2011 

CHAPTER 3: POWERS AND FUNCTION OF THE MUNICIPALITY 

This section indicates the powers and functions to the municipality. The 
Constitution States in section 156(1) that a municipality has executive authority in 
respect of, and has the right to administer the local government matters listed in 
Part B of Schedule 4 and Part B of Schedule 5. These functions delegated to the 
municipality and its definitions are discussed in this chapter. 

CHAPTER 4: PROCESS FOLLOWED 

In this chapter the legislative requirements informing the development of the IDP 
and details the process which was taken to produce the IDP. The approval of the 
Process Plan signals the start of the review process and the plan paved the way to 
review the IDP document for 2015/ 2016 financial year. The Process Plan gives 
certain responsibilities to internal as well as external stakeholders and role players 
with regards to the reviewing of the IDP document. 


2 


CHAPTER 5: SPATIAL, DEVELOPMENT AND ECONOMIC RATIONAL 

This chapter explains the reason behind the development of the Spatial 
Development Framework and illustrates how the SDF will facilitates with the 
development of //Khara Hais in a sustainable manner through the social, economie 
and environmental visions as pertaining to the Human Settlements Plan, LED 
Strategy and ZF Megawu District Municipality Environmental Framework. 

CHAPTER 6: STATUS QUO ANALYSIS 

Chapter 6 briefly answers the question on what category the //Khara Hais 
Municipality is, the total area the municipality has to service, the governance and 
administration structures of the municipality. It furthers provides information on 
where are the //Khara hais Municipality are with regards to the provision of services 
that relates to the identified critical services. The status quo assessment indicates 
the state of affairs in the municipality in relation to the following Key Performance 
Areas: 

KPA2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 

The .Information indicates the existing level of development in the community. It 
also, clearly indicate the wards and their level of service in respect of water; roads; 
electricity and energy; roads and storm-water; sanitation. 

KPA 3: PUBLIC PARTICIPATION AND GOOD GOVERNANCE 

Indicate the availability and status of the following structures: 

GOVERNANCE STRUCTURES: 

• internal audit function 

• audit committee 

• oversight committee 

• ward committees 

• council committees 

• supply Chain committees (SCM). 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONAL SYSTEMS: 

Indicate the availability and status of the following management and operational 
Systems: 

• complaints management system 

• fraud prevention plan 

• communication strategy 

• stakeholder mobilisation strategy or public participation strategy. 

KPA 4: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND TRANSFORMATION 

Indicate availability and status with regard to the following: 

• information technology (IT) 

• availability of skilled staff 

• organisational structure 

• vacancy rate 

• skills development plan 

• human resource management strategy or plan 

• individual performance and organisational management Systems 

• monitoring, evaluation and reporting processes and systems. 

KPA 5: FINANCIAL VIABILITY 

Indicate availability and status with regard to the following: 

• tariff policies 

• rates policies 

• SCM policy - staffing 

• staffing of the finance and SCM units 

• payment of creditors 

• Auditor- General findings (issues raised in the report if any) 

• Financial management systems. 


KPA 6: LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Indicate the availability and status with regard to the following: 

• Local Economie Development strategy. 

• Unemployment rate (disaggregate in terms of gender, age, etc). 

• Level of current economie activity - dominant sectors and potential sectors. 

Job creation initiatives by the municipality (e.g. local procurement, EPWP 
implementation, CWP, etc 

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT was identified as a seventh KPA and the status, 
backlogs and interventions in Education, Health, Safety and Security and Sports 
and Recreation are discussed. 


DISASTER MANAGEMENT 

The Disaster Risk Management Plan forms part of the //Khara Hais Integrated 
Development Plan as a sector plan in contrast to the various cross-cutting issues 
related to “integrated plans”. This section briefly gives an overview of the //Khara 
Hais Disaster Risk Management Plan. 

PRIORITY ISSUES 

As part of the situational analysis priorities issues were identified by the 
communities during the public participation process which are highiited and 
concludes the status quo analysis chapter. 


3 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


CHARTER 7: DEVELOPMENTAL OBJECTIVES 

The objectives indicate what a municipality can reasonably achieve in a five-year 
period or less and with the available resources. The development of objectives 
takes into account various national and provincial targets. There is a clear linkage 
between challenges identified in the status quo report and the objectives. The 
linkage is showed by providing the National Key Performance Area, the 
Development Priority of the Municipality and the Development objectives of the 
Municipality. 

CHARTER 8: SECTOR PLANS 

This chapter discusses the existence and status of sector plans. The section 
demonstrates how sector plans relate to one another. This relationship 
demonstrates how an integrated approach would contribute towards achieving the 
outcomes of developmental local government. 

CHAPTER 9: DEVELOPMENT STRETEGIES, PROGRAMMES AND PROJECTS 

This chapter provides concrete interventions that the municipality will implement to 
attain the objectives highiighted in the Development Objectives Chapter 7. The 
chapter details all strategies, programmes and projects of the municipality. The 
Three year strategy indicates the projects for the next three years while the Annual 
Plan reflects all projects that will be implemented over the next financial year. The 
Three Year Strategy and Annual Plan must be aligned with the MTERF of the 
municipality. 

CHAPTER 10; ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 

This chapter is the predecessor to the compilation of the SDBIP and gives KPI's for 
projects and programmes to be implemented during the next financial year. For this 
reason the SDBIP and PMS should reflect the Key Priority Areas, Development 
Priorities, Development objectives, Strategies and Key Performance Indicators 
(National Key Performance Areas), that is measurable by performance indicators 

and targets as set out with every project in Chapter 9. 

- 


CHAPTER 11: PROGRAMMES AND PROJECTS OF OTHER SPHERES 

This chapter of the IDP indicates the programmes and projects of other 
stakeholders and the implications that such projects/ programmes will have for the 
municipality to proactively put measures in place to accommodate the programmes 
and projects. 

CHAPTER 12: ALIGNMENT WITH NATIONAL AND PROVINCIAL PROGRAMS/ 
PROJECTS 

This chapter illustrates in tabular format the alignment of nasional and provincial 
programmes and projects with the municipal development priorities and strategies. 

CHAPTER 13: DISASTER AND RISK MANAGEMENT 

The final chapter of the document provides an overview of the strategie risks and 
mitigation measures as well as the //Khara Hais's Disaster Risk Management Plan. 

ANNEXTURES 

Annextures to the IDP is listed under a separate file. These include: 

A - Ward Profiles per Ward 

B - Spatial Development Framework 

C - Housing Chapter 

D - LED Strategy 

E - Wast Management Plan 

F - Water Services Development Plan 

G - Disaster Management Plan 

H - Other Sector Plans 

I - Financial Plan 

J - Institutional Programme 

K - Prioritised Projects and Programme Needs 

L - List of Policies 

M - Municipal By- Laws 


/KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


CHARTER 2: VISION AND MISSION 


In the previous five year IDP phase, the focus of Council was very much on their 
status quo situation, whilst the strategy phase focuses on the future (setting of 
objectives), and also on how to get there (strategies). Therefor, the development 
of a Vision for the municipality, as well as objectives and strategies, were linked to 
those issues. 


Vision: 

To provide an affordabie quaiity service to //Khara Hais and its visitors and 

to execute the poiicies and programmes of the Councii. 

In the SDF //Khara Hais envisage a self-sustaining ecology with long-term benefit 

for all inhabitants of //Khara Hais. The SDF foresee: 

1 . Agriculture as an optimally efficiënt and economically viable market-directed 
sector representing a socio-economic ‘pivot’ of //Khara Hais 

2. Manufacturing and industry as a viable sector which builds on the comparative 
economie advantages of //Khara Hais, and operates in accordance with the 
highest standerds for environmental management. 

3. Tourism as a sustainable industry, supporting or enhancing marginal industries 
and contributing significantly to the improvement of the quaiity of life of all the 
communities of //Khara Hais. 

4. Urban development in a safe, healthy and aesthetically pleasing urban 
environment, with the architectural and spatial character depicting the historie 
and cultural background of the habitant communities. 

5. Rural development in an environmentally sustainable menner with the 
infrastructure and services that is essential for the development of the rural 
communities of //Khara Hais whilst enhancing its unique rural character. 


5 


6. Social Development establishing an optimally developed and empowered 
society in harmony with its environment. 

7. Conservation of naturel habitats worthy to be Consolidated into continuous 
tracts of conservation land, protecting naturel biodiversity and providing 
community-supporting ecosystem services. 

8. Natural resources as fundamental requirements for sustainable development 
in //Khara HaisMunicipality. 

With Council adopting a new five year IDP, the Vision statement is under review 
in order to determine what //Khara Hais would like to achieve in the long run. 

Mission: 

As an authority that delivers Municipal Services to //Khara Hais, we attempt by 
means of a motivated staff, to deveiop //Khara Hais increasingiy as a pieasant, 
safe and affordabie iiving and workpiace for its residents and a hospitabie 
reiaxed visiting piace for its visitors. 

The current mission statement is also under review. 


KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 


31 March 2016 


CHARTER 2: DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE 


2.1 INTRODUCTION 

The demographic information provided below indicates the state of population and 
the development since the last Census in 2001 . 


Description 

2001 

2011 

Total population 

77,919 

93,494 

Young (0-14) 

31,7% 

29,8% 

Working Age (15-64) 

63,0% 

64,6% 

Elderly (65+) 

5,3% 

5,5% 

Dependency ratio 

58,7% 

54,7% 

Sex ratio 

95,5 

97 

Growth rate 

-0,73% (2001 -2011) 

1,82% (2001-2011) 

Unempioyment rate 

34% 

22,1% 

Youth unempioyment rate 

42,3% 

29% 

No schooling aged 20+ 

13,6% 

7,1% 

Higher education aged 20+ 

5,9% 

7,8% 

Matric aged 20+ 

20,9% 

26% 

Number of households 

17,934 

23,245 

Average household size 

4,1 

3,9 

Female headed househoids 

34,1% 

40,5% 

Formai dweliings 

81,2% 

75,2% 

Fiush toiiet connected to sewerage 

68,6% 

68,3% 

Weekiy refuse removal 

79,3% 

87,2% 

Piped water inside dwelling 

38,7% 

56% 

Electricity for lighting 

73,6% 

91,1% 


Table 1 - Key Statistics ( Source Stats SA) 


2.2 POPULATION AND POPUUTION GROWTH 

Table 1 above indicates that the //Khara Hais Municipality’s population grew from 
77,919 in 2001 to 93,494 in 201 1 . This reflects an overall population growth of 1 .82% 
between 2001 and 201 1 . //Khara Hais Local Municipality is the most populous 
municipality in ZF Mcgawu District. 


Population 


«sooo 

90000 

lysoao 


roooo 


M IVofMXallon 




Graph 1 : Population (Source - Stats SA) 


Population Growth 


1-50 

I KM 

e 

% 

ï 0-SO 

0.00 

lUi 



- 0.73 


J011 

1-82 


Graph 2: Population Growth (Source - Stats SA) 


H 


KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


The fertility rate in //Khara Hais has declined significantly over time. As a result 
children aged 0-15, decline with 1 .9% since 2001 . (From 31.7% in 2001, to 29.8% in 
2011 .) 

The working age population stadily grew over the 10 year period to 64.6% in of the 
total population in 201 1 . Other age categories, particularly the proportion of older 
persons (older than 65) has slightly grown with 0.2% from 5, 3% in 2001 to 5.5% in 
2011 . 

The dependency rate declined from 58.7% in 2001 to 54.7 in 2011. This implies that 
there is still a large number of residents that dependant on government pensions, 
implying that a large part of the residents of //Khara Hais earn less than R 1 280-00 
per month and that in itself has a negative influence on the payment of services. The 
percentage of households earning less then 2x old age grants per month, amounts 
to 28,8%. In total 14 486 households are subsidized by the services subsidy 
scheme. Only 26, 9% of the inhabitants are economically active. 

Age Structure 

ma 

« 0.0 • 

S(XO • 


oo 



• IS 

IS -64 

64 « 

■ ATT! 

«.7 

6)0 

S.3 

■ JOH 

291 


•i.5 


Graph 3: Age Structure (Source - Stats SA) 


2.3 SEX RATIO AND GENDER 

The sex ratio is one of the key measures of sex composition. It gives the number of 
males for every 100 females. If it is above 100, it shows the predominance of males 
over females: conversely when it is lower than 100, the reverse is true. Generally, 
sex ratios at birth are high and decrease gradually as age increases. 

Overall, data suggest that the population is predominantly of female population. On 
average, the population consists of 49.9% of male population and 51.1 % of female 
population. 

On average, //Khara Hais had a sex ratio of 97 (97 males per 100 females) which is 
an increase of 1 .5 since the 2001 Census. 

There is an almost fifty percent split between males and females 
As indicated on table 2 below. 


Sex 

Percentage 

Female 

50,7% 

Male 

49,3% 


Table 2 - Gender (Source: Stats SA) 


2.4 UNEMPLOYMENT RATE AND EDUCATION 

The unemployment rate decreases significantly from 34% in 2001 to 22.1% in 2011. 
There was a huge decline in the youth unemployment rate too from 42.3% in 2001 to 
29% in 201 Ibut the youth unemployment rate is still very high in comparison with the 
overall unemployment rate of the municipality. Although about 44.7% of the//Khara 
Hais population are between14 and 35 years old, youths remains relatively 
marginalised. 


n 


KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


An increase of 5.1% (20.9% in 2001 to 26% in 2011) of people living in //Khara Hais 
over the age of twenty years have completed the 12th grade while there was a 
significant decline of 6.5% (13.6 in 2001 to 7.1% in 2011) in people that had no 
schooling at all. Higher education increases from 20.9% in 2001 to 26% in 201 1 . 

Unemployment Rate 

400 
J50 
300 

na 
700 
150 
100 
iXi 
QJQ 

M/OOl 
■ Tüll 

Graph 4: Unemployment Rate (Source - Stats SA) 



Education (aged 20 •f) 






Mptrk 

ldui<«lu:n 

CnrolfnefTtlifrd & 13) 

■ TOOI 

IJl2 

57 

m 

88.6 

■ 2011 

70 

4 4 

255 

940 


Graph 5: Education (Sourse - Stats SA) 


2.5 HOUSEHOLDS 

There were 23245 households in the //Khara Hais Municipal area in 2011which is a 
significant increase since 2001 when there were only 17934 households. This 
creates a larger demand for household-based services such as housing, water, 
electricity and sewerage. 


8 


KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


Households 

?0QCD 

£ 

J 

j tSOOö 

3 

O 
X 

B 

^ IIXIÏI 
5000 

0 

Graph 6: Households (Source - Stats SA) 

2.6 HOUSEHOLD DYNAMICS 

Female headed households increases from 34.1% in 2001 to 40.5% in 2011. Which 
is worrying because families headed by single parents (usually women), and 
households headed by women are more likely to be poor than male-headedhouse 
holds. Programs that empower women should be implemented across all spheres of 
government to assist the vulneralble. 

Formal dwellings decrease from 81.2% in 2001 to 75.2% in 2011. This could be 
contributed to establish of more informal settlements and the slow delivery of 
subsidised houses. 




Graph 7: Household Dynamics (Source - Stats SA) 


2.7 HOUSEHOLD SERVICES 


All municipal services except sewerage increased since 2001 with electricity for 
lighting increased with a massive 17.5% from 73.6% in 2001 to 91.1% in 2011. 

The percentage of household whose refuse is removed by local authority weekly, 
increased consistently from 79.3% in Census 2001 to 87.2%in Census 2011. 

The proportion of households that have flush toilets connected to the sewage system 
decrease slightly from 68.6% in 2001 to 68.3% in 201 1 

Access to piped water in the dwelling or yard has increased significantly since 2001 
when only 38.7% of households reported access compared to 56% in 201 1 


9 


KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


Household Services 

iDao 



112001 793 ^7 7lf> 

■ ;nil ÓAI «7.7 ShO 91.1 


Graph 8: Household Services (Source - Stats SA) 

2.8 POPULATION GROUPS 

The coloured population is in the majority, followed by Africans and then y the white 
population. The most commonly spoken language is Afrikaans, spoken by 85% of 
the residents as indicated by tables 2 and 3 below. 


GROUP 

PERCENTAGE 

Black African 

23,1% 

Coloured 

65,2% 

Indian/Asian 

0,7% 

White 

9,9% 

Other 

1,2% 


Table 3 - Population group (Source; Stats SA) 


2.9 LANGUAGES SPEAK 

The table below shows that Afrikaans is the most dominant language in //Khara Hais 
with 85.2% of the population indicating that this was the language most often spoken 
in the home. This is followed by IsiXhosa at 5% and Setswana at 3.5%. 


10 


l^GUAGE PERCENTAGE 

Afrikaans 
English 
IsiNdebele 
IsiXhosa 
IsiZulu 
Sepedi 
Sesotho 
Setswana 
Sign Language 
SiSwati 
Tshivenda 
Xitsonga 
Other 

Not Applicable 

Table 4 - Language (Source: Stats SA) 

2.10CONCLUSION 

The demographic statistics indicates that //Khara Hais Municipality in cojunction with 
other spheres of government worked hard to improve the conditions of local the 
communities in //Khara Hais the past ten years. 

Information regarding the Population Composition and Distribution, as well as the 
Age and Gender composition is included in the Ward Profiles - Annexture A 


85,2% 

1,9% 

0 , 2 % 

5% 

0,3% 

0 , 2 % 

0,9% 

3,5% 

0,3% 

0 % 

0 , 1 % 

0 % 

0 . 8 % 

1,5% 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


CHARTER 3: POWERS AND FUNCTIONS 

POWERS AND FUNCTION OF THE MUNICIPALITY 

3.1 INTRODUCTION 

The Constitution States in section 156(1) that a municipality has executive authority 
in respect of, and has the right to administer the local government matters listed in 
Part B of Schedule 4 and Part B of Schedule 5. //Khara Hais Municipality has the 
following functions. 

3.2 SCHEDULE 4 PART B 


3.2.1 BUILDING REGULATIONS 

The regulation, through by-laws, and legislated building regulations, of any 
temporary or permanent structure attached to, or to be attached to, the soil 
within the area of jurisdictiën of a municipality, which must at least provide 
for: 

• Approval of building plans, 

• Building inspections, 

• Issue of completion certificates, and 

• Contrei of operations and enforcement of contraventions of building 
regulations if not already provided for in national and provincial legislation. 

3.2.2. CHILD CARE FACILITIES 

Ensuring a safe and healthy environment within facilities not included in 
national and provincial legislation pertaining to child care facilities. 

3.2.3 ELECTRICITY RETICULATION 

Bulk supply of electricity, which includes for the purposes of such supply, 
the transmissiën, distribution and, where applicable, the generation of 


11 


electricity, and also the regulation, contrei and maintenance of the 
electricity reticulation netwerk, tariff policies, monitoring of the operation of 
the facilities for adherence to standards and registration requirements, and 
any other matter pertaining to the provision of electricity in the municipal 
areas. 

Electricity reticulation in the municipal Area of Jurisdiuction is done by the 
Municipality in the Upington and surrounding areas and by Eskom in some 
rural areas, like Raaswater, Ntsikelelo, Leerkrans, Karos and 
Lambrechtsdrift. There is no service level agreement, as the Municipality 
and Eskom are delivering the service in their respective licensed Areas of 
Supply. The licensed Area of Supply is regulated by the National Energy 
Regulator of South Africa (NERSA). 

3.2.4 FIREFIGHTING SERVICES 

Including fighting and extinguishing of all fires; the rescue and protection of 
any person, animal or property in emergency situations not covered by other 
legislation or powers and functions. 

This function is the responsibility of the District Municipality, but due to 
capacity and infrastructure not been available this powers and functions were 
cazetted and approved by the MEC to the //Khara Hais municipality. The 
previously grant in aid due to fire services now forms part of the equitable 
share to the municipality. 

3.2.5 LOCAL TOURISM 

The promotion, marketing and, if applicable, the development, of any tourist 
attraction within the area of the municipality with a view to attract tourists; to 
ensure access, and municipal services to such attractions, and to regulate, 
structure and control the tourism industry in the municipal area subject to any 
provincial and national legislation, and without affecting the competencies of 
national/provincial government pertaining to “nature conservation”, 
“museums”, “libraries” and “provincial cultural matters”. 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


3.2.6 MUNICIPAL PLANNING 

• Integrated development planning for the local municipality in accordance with 
the framework for integrated development plans prepared by the district 
municipality 

• Development and implementation of a town planning scheme or land use 
management scheme for the municipality including administration of 
development applications in terms of special consents and rezonings. 

3.2.7 MUNICIPAL HEALTH SERVICES 

The protection, promotion and maintenance of human heaith, potable water 
quality monitoring, food control, waste management, control of premises, 
communicable disease control, vector control, environmental pollution 
control, disposal of the dead, Chemical safety and noise control but excluding 
port heaith, malaria control and control of hazardous substances. 

This function is delegated to the District Municipality but because of capacity 
the //Khara Hais deliver the services. No aggreement is in place but a 
committee was established to address the matter. The ZF Mgcawu District 
Municipality will take over the function within one year. 

3.2.8 MUNICIPAL PUBLIC TRANSPORT 

The regulation and control, and where applicable, the provision of: 

• Services for the carriage of passengere, whether scheduled or 
unscheduled, operated on demand along a specific route or routes or, 
where applicable, within a particular area. 

• Scheduled services for the carriage of passengere, owned and operated by 
the municipality, on specific routes 

3.2.9 PONTOONS, FERRIES, JETTIES, PIERS AND HARBOURS 

Pontoons, ferries, jetties, piers and harbours, excluding the regulation of 
international and national shipping and matter related thereto, and mattere 
falling within the competence of national and provincial governments 


12 


3.2.10 STORM WATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS IN BUILT-UP AREAS 

The management of systems to deal with storm water in built-up areas 

3.2.11 TRADING REGULATIONS 

The regulation of any area facility and/or activity related to the trading of 
goods and services within the municipal area not already being regulated by 
national and provincial legislation. 

3.2.12 POTABLE WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS 

The establishment or procurement, where appropriate, operation, 
management and regulation of a potable water supply system, including the 
services and infrastructure required for the regulation of water conservation, 
purification, reticulation and distribution; bulk supply to local supply points, 
metering, tariffs setting and debt collection; and provision of appropriate 
education so as to ensure reliable supply of a sufficiënt quantity and quality 
of water and effective water use amongst end-users, including informal 
households, to support life and personal hygiene. 

3.2.13 DOMESTIC WASTE-WATER AND SEWAGE DISPOSAL SYSTEMS 

The establishment or procurement, where appropriate,, provision, operation, 
management, maintenance and regulation of a system, including 
infrastructure, for the collection, removal, disposal and/or purification of 
human excreta and domestic waste-water to ensure minimum Standard of 
services necessary for safe and hygienic households. 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


3.3 SCHEDULE 5 PART B 


3.3.1 BEACHES AND AMUSEMENT FACILITIES 

Amusement facilities 
A public place for entertainment. 

3.3.2 BILLBOARDS AND THE DISPLAY OF ADVERTISEMENTS IN PUBLIC 
PLACES 

The display of written or visual descriptive material, any sign or symbol or 
light that is not intended solely for illumination or as a warning against 
danger which: promotes the sale and / or encourages the use of goods and 
services found in: 

• streets 

• roads 

• throughfares 

• sanitary passages 

• squares or open spaces and or 

• private property 

Excluding any aspect that may be covered by provincial or national 
legislation 

3.3.3 CEMETERIES, FUNERAL PARLOURS AND CREMATORIA 

The establishment conducts and control of cemeteries and crematoria 
serving the area of the local municipality only. 

Funeral parlours and crematoria are not operated by the municipality but 
they Work through the municipality - administratively. 

3.3.4 CLEANSING 

The cleaning of public streets, roads and other public spaces either 
manually or mechanically 


13 


3.3.5 CONTROL OF PUBLIC NUlSANCE 

The regulation, control and monitoring of any activity, condition or thing that 
may adversely affect a person or a community 

3.3.6 CONTROL OF UNDERTAKINGS THAT SELL LIQUOR TO THE PUBLIC 

The control of undertakings that sell liquor to the public that is permitted to 
do so in terms of provincial legislation, regulation and licenses, and includes 
an inspection service to monitor liquor outlets for compliance to license 
requirements in as far as such control and regulation are not covered by 
provincial legislation 

3.3.7 FACILITIES FOR THE ACCOMMODATION CARE AND BURIAL OF 
ANIMALS 

The provision of and/or the regulation, control and monitoring of facilities 
which provide accommodation and care for well or sick animals and the 
burial or cremation of animals, including monitoring of adherence to any 
standards and registration requirements outlined in legislation. 

3.3.8 FENCING AND FENCES 

Ensuring the provision and maintenance and/or regulation of any boundary 
or deterrents to animals and pedestrians along streets or roads 

3.3.9 LICENSING OF DOGS 

The control over the number and heaith status of dogs through a licensing 
mechanism 

3.3.10 LICENSING AND CONTROL OF UNDERTAKINGS THAT SELL FOOD TO 
THE PUBLIC 

Ensuring the quality and the maintenance of food safety and hygiene related 
environmental heaith standards through regulation, a issuance of a 
certificate of acceptability and monitoring of any place that renders in the 
course of any commercial transactiën the supply/handling of food intended 


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for human consumption. Implement policy and regulations 'as provided for 
and prescribed in terms of the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 
1972 (Act 54 of 1972) and the Health Act, 1977 (Act 63 of 1977), including 
the relevant regulations published under the mentioned Acts. 

3.3.1 1 LOCAL AMENITIES MEANS 

The provision, manage, preserve and maintenance of any municipal place, 
land, and building reserved for the protection of places or objects of scenic, 
natural, historical and cultural value or interest and the provision and control 
of any such or other facility for public use but excludes such places, land or 
buildings falling within competencies of national and provincial governments. 

3.3.12 LOCAL SPORT FACILITIES 

The provision, management and/or control of any sport facility within the 
municipal area. 

3.3.13 FRESH PRODUCE MARKETS 

The establishment, operation, management, conduct, regulation and control 
of markets restricted to the selling of fresh products, vegetables, fruit, 
flowers, fish and meat. 

3.3.14 MARKETS MEANS 

The establishment, operation, management, conduct, regulation and/or 
control of markets other than fresh produce markets including market 
permits, location, times, conduct etc. 

3.3.15 MUNICIPAL ABATTOIRS 

The establishment conducts and control of abattoirs serving the local 
municipality area only 

;h 2016 

3.3.16 MUNICIPAL PARKS AND RECREATION 

The provision, management, control and maintenance of any land, gardens 
or facility set aside for recreation, sightseeing and/or tourism and include 
playgrounds but exclude sport facilities. 

3.3.17 MUNICIPAL ROADS 

The construction, maintenance, and control of a road which the public has 
the right to and includes, in addition to the roadway the land of which the 
road consists or over which the road extends and anything on that land 
forming part of, connected with, or belonging to the road. 

3.3.18 NOlSE POLLUTION 

The control and monitoring of any noise that adversely affects human heaith 
or well-being or the ecosystems useful to mankind, now or in the future 

3.3.19 POUNDS 

The provision, management, maintenance and control of any area or facility 
set aside by the municipality for the securing of any animal or object 
confiscated by the municipality in terms of its by-laws. 

3.3.20 PUBLIC PLACES 

The management, maintenance and control of any land or facility owned by 
the municipality for public use 

3.3.21 REFUSE REMOVAL, REFUSE DUMPS AND SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL 

The removal of any household or other waste and the disposal of such 
waste in an area, space or facility established for such purpose, and 
include the provision, maintenance and control of any infrastructure or 
facility to ensure a clean and healthy environment for the inhabitants of a 
municipality 

liJ 

^ 


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3.3.22 STREET TRADING 

The contrei, regulation and monitoring of the selling of goods and services 
along a public pavement, road reserve and other public places but 
excluding the following: 

• Fresh produces markets as defined above. 

3.3.23 STREET LIGHTING 

The provision and maintenance of lighting for the illuminating of streets 

3.3.24 TRAFFIC AND PARKING 

The management and regulation of traffic and parking within the area of the 
municipality including but not limited to, the contrei over operating speed of 
vehicles on municipal roads but excluding any provincial competences as 
specified in legislation. 

The Registering Authority of //Khara Hais Municipality is the agent for the Provincial 
Department of Transport, Safety and Liaison as per the signed Services Level 
Agreement between the two parties, for the collection of all motor vehicle license 
fees in terms of the National Road Traffic Act, Act 93/1996, and to transfer all 
monies received to the Department including monies payable to the Road Traffic 
Management Corporation; the testing of motor vehicles for the purpose of checking 
roadworthiness of vehicles and issuing of learners and drivers licenses in terms of 
applicable legislation. 

A List of all By- Laws with regards to the enforcing and of formentioned functions is 
listed as Annexture - H to the IDP. 


15 


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CHARTER 4: PROCESS FOLLOWED 

4 .1 LEGISLATIVE AND POLICY FRAMEWORK 

Key legislative and policy framework informing to this IDP Process are as follows: 

4.1 .1 THE CONSTITUTION OF THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA: 

Section 152 of the Constitution provides the objectives of local government to: 

• provide democratie and accountable government for local communities; 

• ensure the provision of services to communities in a sustainable manner; 

• promote social and economie development; 

• promote a safe and healthy environment: and 

• encourage the involvement of communities and community organizations in 
the matters of local government. 

Werking to achieve these objectives, municipalities are also expected to transform its 
approach and focus to be developmental in nature, (section 153). To do this, the 
Constitution requires a municipality to: 

• structure and manage its administration, and budgeting and planning 
processes to 

• give priority to the basic needs of the community, and to promote the social 
and 

• economie development of the community; 

• participate in national and provincial development programmes; and 

• together with other organs of state contribute to the aggressive realization of 
fundamental rights contained in sections 24 to 27 and 29. 

4.1.2 WHITE PAPER ON LOCAL GOVERNMENT (1998) 

The White Paper establishes the basis for a new developmental local government 
and characterizes it as a system, which is committed to werking with citizens, groups 
and communities to create sustainable human settlements which provide for a 


decent quality of life and meet the social, economie and material needs of 
communities in a holistic way. 

To achieve developmental outcomes it will require significant changes in the way 
local government works. The White paper further puts forward three segments which 
can assist municipalities to become more developmental: 

i) Integrated development planning and budgeting. 

ii) Performance management. 

iii) Working together with local citizens and partners. 

4.1.3 MUNICIPAL SYSTEMS ACT (ACT NO 32 OF 2000) 

This is the primary legislation that gives direction and guidance on the development 
processes of the IDP. 

Chapter 5, Section 25 (1) of the Municipal Systems Act (2000) States that: 

“Each municipal council must, within a prescribed period after the start of its elected 
term, adopt a single, all inclusive and strategie plan for the development of the 
municipality which 

a) links integrates and coordinates plans and takes into account proposals for the 
development of the municipality 

b) aligns the resources and capacity of the municipality with the implementation of 
the plan; 

c) complles with the provisions of this Chapter; and 

d) is compatible with national and provincial development plans and planning 
requirements binding on the municipality In terms of legislation.” 

On the basis of the agreed framework plan, Section 28 mandates that each 
municipal council must adopt a process plan to guide the planning, drafting and 
adoption and reviewing of its integrated development plan. Once the IDP document 
has been prepared, it must be reviewed annually as stated in section 34. 

A municipal council must review its integrated development plan annually in 
accordance with an assessment of its performance measurements in terms of 
section 41; and to the extent that changing circumstances so demand; and may 
amend its integrated development plan in accordance with prescribed process. 




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4.1.4 MUNICIPAL STRUCTURE ACT (ACT NO 117 OF 1998) 

The Act directs how municipalities are to be structured and sets out the purpose and 
objectives of these structures i.e. powers and functions and procedural matters when 
these structures conduct business. 

4.1.5 MUNICIPAL FINANCE MANAGEMENT ACT (ACT NO 56 OF 2003) (MFMA 

Aspects addressed by the MFMA are the transformation of procurement regime and 
alignment of budgeting and the IDP, as well as related performance management 
mechanisme. With regard to the latter, chapterfive of the MFMA identify specific IDP 
timeframes that are linked to budgeting timeframes. The legislation also introducés 
corporate governance measures to local government. 

4.1.6 SPATIAL PLANNING AND LAND USE MANAGEMENT ACT (ACT NO 16 OF 

2013) (SPLUMA) 

The Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Bill was assented by the President 
on 2 August 2013, and gazetted on 5 August 2013 as the Spatial Planning and Land 
Use Management Act 16 of 2013. The objective of the Act is to create a coherent 
regulatory framework for spatial planning and land use management for the entire 
country that will redress the imbalances of the past and promote social and 
economie inclusion. 

4.1.7 NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

The National Development Plan (NDP) offers a long-term perspective. It defines a 
desired destination and identifies the role different sectors of society need to play in 
reaching that goal. 

As a long-term strategie plan, it serves four broad objectives: 

1 . Providing overarching goals for what we want to achieve by 2030. 

2. Building consensus on the key obstacles to us achieving these goals and 
what needs to be done to overcome those obstacles. 

3. Providing a shared long-term strategie framework within which more detailed 
planning can take place in order to advance the long-term goals set out in 
the NDP. 


4. Creating a basis for making choices about how best to use limited 
resources. 

The Plan aims to ensure that all South Africans attain a decent Standard of living 
through the elimination of poverty and reduction of inequality. The core elements of a 
decent Standard of living identified in the Plan are: 

• Housing, water, electricity and sanitation 

• Safe and reliable public transport 

• Quality education and skills development 

• Safety and security 

• Quality heaith care 

• Social protection 

• Employment 

• Recreation and leisure 

• Clean environment 

• Adequate nutrition 

4.2 PROCESS FOLLOWED 


4.2.1 OVERVIEW 

The Integrated Development Plan (IDP) is the results of a process through which the 
municipality prepare strategie development plans for a five-year period. The IDP 
supersedes all other plans that guide development at local government level, as it is 
one of the key instruments for local government to arrivé at decisions on issues such 
as municipal budgets, land management, promotion of local economie development 
and institutional transformation in a consultative, systematic and strategie manner. 

In order to ensure certain minimum quality standards of the IDP process and proper 
coordination between and within spheres of government, municipalities need to 
prepare an IDP Process Plan. It is in essence the process for the formulation of the 


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IDP, Budget, and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) set out in writing for adoption 
by Council. 

In terms of the Municipal Systems Act section 29 (1): 

The process followed by a Municipality to draft its integrated development plan, 
including its consideration and adoption of the draft plan, must- 

a) be in accordance with a predetermined program specifying timeframes for the 
different steps; 

b) through appropriate mechanisms, processes and procedures established 
in terms of Chapter 4 of the MSA, allow for- 

(i) the local community to be consulted on its development needs and 
priorities; 

(ii) the local community to participate in the drafting of the integrated 
development plan; and 

(iii) organs of state, and other role players to be identified and consulted 
on the drafting of the integrated development plan 

c) provide for the Identification of all plans and planning requirements binding on the 
municipality in terms of national and provincial legislation; and 

d) be consistent with any other matters that may be prescribed by regulation. 

In complying with legislation, a process of continuous engagement and 
developmental self assessments are promoted where the following aspects are 
considered: 

^ Comments received during IDP engagement meetings with National and 
Provincial Sector Departments 

^ Alignment of the IDP with the Provincial Growth and Development Strategy 
(PGDS) as well as with the National Spatial Development Perspective (NSDP) 


^ Areas identified through self-assessment i.e. strengthening of public participation 
structures; 

^ The implementation of Performance Management System; 

^ The reviewing and updating of all Plans and Programs; 

^ The updating of the Spatial Development Plan, Financial Plan, Integrated 
Institutional Plan, and Capital Investment Plan; and 

^ The compilation and implementation of the Service Delivery Budget 
Implementation Plan (SDBIP) according to the MFMA 

^ Updating of priority needs, objectives, strategies and projects 

^ Identification of new priorities and projects 

Information given in this document will therefore include the following: 

> a program specifying the time frames for the different IDP, Budgeting and 
setting of KPI phases during the planning process, and 

> appropriate mechanisms, processes and procedures for consultation and 
participation of local communities, organs of state and other role players in the 
IDP, Budget and KPI process. 

An IDP/Budget/PMS Process plan for 2014/2015, that outlined a predetermined 
program specifying timeframes for the different steps in the IDP consultative and 
participatory processes, was drafted and approved by Council on 25 August 2014: 
Resolution 13/08/2014. 

Appropriate mechanisms, processes and procedures were established in the 
Process Plan in terms of Chapter 4 of the MSA, where 

Ward Committees, the local community and different sector departments were 
consulted on its development needs and priorities; and 
The IDP/Budget/PMS Representative Forum and the local community 
participated in the drafting of the IDP. 


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An extensive consultative and analytical ward based planning process with ward 
committees, the community and ether relevant stakeholders yielded: 

Authentic ward profiles and plans (based on the SDF) for each ward; 

A SWOT analysis on each ward; 

Prioritized issues for inclusion in IDP projects and budget projection, and 
Targets and KPIs to monitor the progress and performance of the municipality 
on the delivery of services over the next five years. 

Ward based plans were used as a basis for community participation in each ward, in 
November 2011 2012 and 2013. 

Consultation was also done with sector departments to enable provincial and 
national government to integrate and implement their plans in the local space of the 
municipal area. 

The needs, plans and planning requirements of the community were aligned with the 
programmes of local-, provincial- and national governments, and in terms of national 
and provincial legislation in order to be consistent with any other matters prescribed 
by regulation. 

Care was taken to align the IDP with the National 12 Outcomes, Cogta's Revised 
IDP Format guide 2012, the Revised IDP Analysis Framework 2013, the Provincial 
Growth and Development Strategy (PGDS) as well as National Planning 
documents. 

Capital Projects were aligned with the Municipality’s strategie objectives and legal 
requirements in terms of contents, location and timing, in order to arrivé at 
Consolidated and integrated institutional programs and sector plans. 

From the inputs and comments received from the community and the 
IDP/Budget/PMS Representative Forum (which include representatives from 
National and Provincial Sector Departments), Project - and Program lists were 
compiled to inform the Implementation Plan, the Financial Strategy, and the 


19 


Annual Operation Plan, the organogram, as well as the Organizational 
Performance Management System (PMS). 

The revised draft 2012-2017 IDP for 2015/16 was, in concert with the MFMA’s 
deadline, approved by Council on 31®* March 2015. 

4.2.2 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

In order to ensure a well organised planning process it is essential that all role 
players are fully aware of their own and of other role player's responsibilities. 

Despite the above-mentioned organizational structuring and lack of capacity, 

the municipality will still attempt to distribute roles and responsibilities in such a way 
to ensure an effective planning process in the IDP. The municipality confirms the 
identification of the following role players in the IDP Review Process: 

4.2.2.1 INTERNAL ROLE PLAYERS 

(a) The Mayor serves as the Politica! Head of the Municipality and in his 
capacity should chairthe IDP Representative Forum Meetings. 

(b) Municipal Manager as Head of administration is responsible for the overall 
management, co-ordination, implementing and monitoring of the IDP, and 
will therefore chairthe IDP Steering Committee. 

(c) Municipal Council as the ultimate politica! decision making body, the 
Council has to: 

• Consider and adopt a Process Plan 

• Consider, adopt and approve the IDP 

(d) Ward Councillors as link between the Municipality and the residents, 
Councillors have to: 


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• Inform / link the process to the ward committees/constituencies; 

• Be responsible for organising, consultation and public 
participation; 

• Ensure that the relevant needs and budget are linked to and based on 
the IDP. 

(e) HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS are responsible for: 

• Providing relevant technical, sector and financial Information for 
priority issues; 

• Contributing technical expertise in the consideration and finalisation of 
strategies and Identification of new projects; 

• Providing departmental operational and Capital budgetary Information; 

• The preparation and integration of project proposals and sector 
programmes; 

(f) IDP STEERING COMMITTEE is responsible for: 

• Providing terms of reference for the various planning activities; 

• Commissioning of research studies 

• Consideration and commenting on: 

- inputs from sub-committee/s, study team and consultante; 

- inputs from provincial sector departments and support 
providers; 

• Processing and summarising documents/ outputs; 

• Making content recommendations; 

• Preparing, facilitating and documenting meetings. 

• Amend and prepare the final document 


4.2.2.2 EXTERNAL ROLE PLAYERS 

(a) IDP REPRESENTATIVE FORUM is responsible for: 

• Representing the interests of their constituents in the IDP process; 

• Providing an organisational mechanism for discussion, negotiations 
and decision-making between the stakeholders including municipal 
government; 

• Ensuring communication between all the stakeholder representatives 
including the municipal government; 

• Monitoring the performance of the planning and implementation 
phase; 

• Participating in the process of setting up and monitoring “key 
performance indicators” in line with the “Performance Management 
System”. 

(b) DISTRICT & LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES ensure alignment within the District 
takes place, especially relating to priority issues, disbursement of MIG 
funding and Local Economie Plans. 

(c) PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS serves on the IDP 

Representative Forum and provide the Municipality with the relevant 
Information regarding funding allocations and project implementation in the 
Municipalities by the respective Departments 

(d) PLANNING PROFESSIONALS will only be used when internal capacity is 
unavailable. They may be used for: 

• Guidance 

• Facilitation 

• Documentation 

• Special Studies 


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CHARTER 5 SPATIAL ECONOMY AND DEVELOPMENT RATIONALE 


5.1 INTRODUCTION 

Previous legislation and policies has fundamentally damaged the spatial, social and 
economie environments in which people live, work, raise their families, and seek to 
fulfill their aspirations. The //Khara Hais Municipality therefore has a critical role to 
play in rebuilding local communities and environments, as the basis for a democratie, 
integrated, prosperous and truly non-racial society. To fulfill the developmental duties 
of local government the municipal Council of //Khara Hais approved the Spatial 
Development Framework to address the challenges face by the citizens of //Khara 
Hais. 

5.2 SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 


5.2.1 TERMS OF REFERENCE OF SDF 

The overarching objectives of the SDF, as stipulated by the Municipality, is to 
facilitate sustainable development (i.e. a balanced relationship between economie 
efficiency, human well-being and environmental integrity) throughout the area of 
jurisdiction and to ensure integration of development processes. 

A key requirement was that the SDF must be aligned with all relevant national, 
provincial, regional and SDFs of neighbouring municipalities. The main purpose in 
this regard was to promote social, economie, and environmental sustainability in an 
integrated and holistic manner and in accordance with the applicable legislation, 
policy and protocols. Subsequently the SDF has to create conditions that facilitate 
economie benefit through the promotion of the comparative and competitive 
economie advantages of the Municipality. The SDF stipulates puts forward strategies 
to achieve this objective. 


21 


The terms of reference include the following key components together with all 
other matters related thereto; 

a) Consultation with all stakeholders, the objective being to obtain the 
endorsement of the SDF by such stakeholders. 

b) Revision of the 2010 //Khara Hais SDF, the purpose of which includes 
the following: 

(i) Refining the land use approach adopted by the Municipality in terms of 
the original 

SDF which gives effect to a ‘developmental state' as promulgated by inter 
alia the South African Constitution and the draft Northern Cape PSDF. 

(ii) Aligning the SDF with the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management 
Bill. 

(iii) Enhancing the integrity of the environment 

(iv) Ensuring a balance between employment growth and transportation 
accessibility, by locating residents close to employment opportunities and 
concentrating employment opportunities in areas well served by 
transportation. 

(v) Ensuring that the Municipality functions in compliance with the Northern 
Cape 

Provincial Growth and Development Strategy and the National Spatial 
Development Perspective. 

(vi) Ensuring the sustainable use of natural resources, including high 
potential agriculture land and renewable energy. 

(vii) Establishing directions of growth within the Municipality. 



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(viii) Identifying areas for future housing settlements throughout the 
Municipality. 

(ix) Identifying locations within the Municipality for economie activities as well 
as the types of development to be located within these areas. 

(x) Optimizing infrastructure investment spending within the Municipality. 

(xi) Promoting economie growth through public/private/community 
partnerships. 

(xii) Promoting the adoption of bioregional planning principles throughout the 
Municipality. 

(xiii) Promoting the formulation and implementation of municipal strategies to 
promote sustainable development. 

(xiv) Promoting the use of low-potential agricultural land in a manner that 
supports socio-economic growth and environmental rehabilitation. 

(xv) Promoting tourism as a viable economie sector. 

(xvi) Providing strategie, indicative and flexible forward planning guidelines 
to direct planning and decisions on land development within the Municipality. 

The SDF aims to contribute towards the achievement of sustainable development. It 
therefore addresses the challenge to balance the ‘triple bottom line’ imperatives of 
economie efficiency, human well-being and environmental integrity. 

5.2.2 FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF THE //KHARA HAIS SDF 

The SDF is based on fundamental principles derived from applicable government 
policy and legislation such as the National Environmental Management Act 107 of 
1998 (NEMA). These principles will also guide the implementation of the SDF and 
future decision-making related todevelopment and land-use. 


22 


a) Capacity building and education: AH people of the Municipality must have 
the opportunity to develop the understanding, skills and capacity for effective 
participation in achievingsustainable development. 

b) Consider all alternatives: Considering all possibilities and results in decision- 
making. 

i. Development and environmental planning, problem solving and decision- 
making are often complex. Possible consequences of conflicting interest, as 
well as the consequences of not acting need careful consideration. 

c) Co-ordination: Various concerns and issues cut across the key sectors and 
functions in the Municipality. Therefore, sustainability, integrated planning 
and management depend on co-ordination and integration of all sectors of 
society. 

d) Due process: Due process must be applied in all integrated management 
activities. This includes adherence to the provisions in the statutes dealing 
with just administration and public participation in regional and local 
governance. 

e) Duty of care: Every person or organisation has a duty to act with due care to 
avoid damage to others, or to the environment. This is referred to as the 
Environmental Responsibility Principle. 

f) Equity: There should be equitable access to natural resources, benefits and 
services to meet basic needs and ensure human well-being. Each 
generation has a duty to avoid impairing the ability of future generations to 
ensure their well-being. 

g) Environmental justice: To comply with the requirements of environmental 
justice, the SDF must integrate environmental considerations with social, 
political, and economie justice in addressing the needs and rights of all 
communities, sectors and individuals. 

h) Good governance: Good governance depends on mutual trust and 
reciprocal relations between the various groups and sectors of the 


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Municipality. This must be based on the fulfilment of constitutional, 
legislative and executive obligations, and the maintenance of transparency 
and accountability. 

i) Inclusivity: Integrated management processes must consider the interests, 
needs and values of all l&APs in decision-making to ensure sustainable 
development. 

j) Using traditional knowledge: This includes recognising all forms of 
knowledge, including traditional and ordinary knowledge. 

k) Precaution: The SDF promotes a risk averse and cautious approach that 
recognises the limits of current knowledge regarding the consequences of 
decisions or actions. 

l) Waste management: Waste management must minimise and avoid the 
creation of waste at the source. The SDF must encourage waste recycling, 
separation at source and safe disposal of unavoidable waste. 

5.2.3 BIOREGIONAL PLANNING APPROACH FOLLOWED IN PREPARATION OF 
SDF IN ORDER TO ENSURE THE INCLUSION OF SUSTAINABLE 
ENVIRONMENTAL PRINCIPLES IN THE PLANNING PROCESSES 

International experience has shown that biodiversity conservation is a prerequisite 
for sustainable development, and that for biodiversity conservation to succeed, the 
maintenance of environmental integrity (as defined by ecological, economie and 
social criteria) must be one of theprimary determinants of bioregional delimitation 
and land-use planning. This view has, during the past decade, evolved into a 
planning and management approach generally known as bioregional planning, which 
is increasingly being employed as a management system by, amongst others, United 
Nations Environmental Program (UNEP) and the World Resource Institute (WRI) to 
promote sustainable development practices world-wide. 

Bioregional planning is defined as ‘planning and land management that promote 
sustainable development by recognising the need for a balanced relationship 


23 


between environmental integrity, human well-being and economie efficiency, and to 
give effect and recognitiën thereto, within a specific geographical area, the 
boundaries of which were determined in accordance with environmental and social 
criteria' (Manual for Bioregional Planning in the Western Cape, PGWC (2003). 

In practical terms, bioregional planning refers to the ‘matching’ of human settlement 
and landuse patterns with the parameters of ecological systems, and the planning, 
design and development of the human-made environment within these parameters in 
a manner that ensures environmental sustainability. 

The above definitions imply that the relationship between the three imperatives for 
sustainable development, namely environmental integrity, human-well-being and 
economie efficiency should be recognised in a balanced and integrated manner in 
the context of a specific place, and never as stand-alone issues in general terms. 

In this regard, bioregional planning implies an integrative concept, one that 
amalgamates the learning and perspectives of several similar concepts, such as 
ecosystem management and biosphere reserve planning. It is ‘an organised process 
that enables people to work together, think carefully about the potential and 
problems of their region, set goals and objectives, define activities, implement 
projects, take actions agreed upon by the communities, evaluate progress and refine 
their approach' (Miller, 1996). 

Bioregional planning requires a value shift away from the sectoral nature of 
institutions (i.e. where environmental issues are dealt with by environmentalists, 
economie issues by economists, and social issues by social scientists), to an all- 
embracing approach where the sustainable development challenge is addressed in 
an integrated and holistic manner. 

Bioregional planning is designed to maximise the likelihood that protected area 
Systems will collectively sample biodiversity. It is a flexible decision support 
framework for assessing the best resolution to resolve inter-sectoral conflicts over 
the use of land and sea, and it provides guidance regarding integrative local 
government planning and community group projects. 


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Bioregional planning provides an essential tooi in bridging the divide between 
conservation and development tension. The application of this approach strengthens 
the planner's ability to incorporate sustainable development practices in the planning 
process. 

BIOREGIONAL PLANNING IS FURTHERMORE CHARACTERISED BY THE 
FOLLOWING (MILLER, 1996): 

a) Adaptive management: Bioregional programs are operated on an 
experimental basis, from which lessons may be drawn from experience to 
respond appropriately. 

b) Biotic viability: Bioregional management programs embrace regions large 
enough to include the habitats and ecosystem functions and processes 
needed to make biotic communities and populations ecologically viable in 
the long-term. These regions must be able to accommodate migratory 
patterns, anticipate nature’s time cycles and absorb the impacts of global 
change. 

c) Co-operative skills development: Communities and public and private 
organisations, together, must locate and mobilise the skills, knowledge, and 
Information needed to manage the area. 

d) Economie sustainability: The maintenance of livelihoods and the 
economie wellbeing of people living and working within the bioregion, 
including those in industry, and especially in the matrix, must be 
encouraged. 

e) Full involvement of stakeholders: AH parties who can affect or benefit from 
the resources in the region should be fully involved in planning and 
managing the bioregional program. Of primary importance in this regard, is 
building the local capacity to participate in, negotiate, and perform the 
various tasks involved. 


f) Institutional integration: Alliances between institutions are to be forged to 
close gaps, minimise overlap and make management and investment in the 
region more efficiënt. 

g) International co-operation: Because some ecosystems cross international 
boundaries and, in some cases, extend globally along animal migration 
routes or along venues where endangered species are traded, international 
co-operation agreements for debate, and mechanisme for joint research, 
Information management and investments must be part of the biodiversity 
management program. The MAB Program is particularly suited to this 
purpose. 

h) Leadership and management: The leadership to establish bioregional 
programs may come from public agencies, or from the community of 
residents and resource users. The tasks of convening stakeholders, 
preparing and negotiating Vision statements, and planning and implementing 
agreed-upon activities can be shared co-operatively between public and 
private entities, or be fully community based. 

i) Reliable and comprehensive Information: AH stakeholders must have at 
their disposal the critical Information needed to facilitate biodiversity 
management. GIS technology is to be used to help stakeholders envision 
their region and its distinctive features clearly. GIS will help them to model 
options and scenarios for the future. This bioregional Information system 
(BIS) program assemblee a comprehensive and ecosystem-level GIS 
consisting of biophysical, social, economie, and cultural databases. 

j) Research and monitoring: Research and inquiries should focus on people- 
environment interactions, the development of innovative methods for 
managing natural resources, and the long-term monitoring of environmental 
factors and the impact of management practices. 

k) Restoration: Where the viability of some habitats or ecological functions 
has been impaired upon through excessive or inappropriate use, these 
areas are to be rehabilitated. 


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l) Social acceptance: Any proposals for changes in the way of life and 
livelihoods of the residents and local peoples, including indigenous 
communities, need to be acceptable to them. AH stakeholders warrant the 
opportunity to participate in program management and implementation. 

m) Structure of interrelated cores, corridors and matrices: These programs 
include core nature areas that feature representative samples of the region’s 
characteristic biodiversity. Ideally such sites, which may already be 
designated as protected areas, should be linked by corridors of natural or 
restored natural plant cover to permit migration and adaptation to global 
change. Both the core sites and corridors should be nested within a matrix of 
mixedland uses and ownership patterns. 

n) Use of knowledge: Scientific, local and traditional knowledge should be 
employed in planning and management activities. Biology, anthropology, 
economics, engineering and other related fields are to be tapped. Such 
knowledge helps stakeholders and program managers to anticipate nature’s 
long and short cycles and to track global change. 

5.2.4 CREATING A FRAMEWORK FOR BIOREGIONAL PLANNING 

The Global Biodiversity Strategy puts forward fundamental objectives and supporting 
actions to establish a framework for bioregional planning and management. These 
objectives strive to achieve the following; 

a) Create institutional conditions to promote bioregional planning Bioregional 
planning and management have clear ecological, economie and social 
advantages. To achieve the above objective, the IUCN38 proposed the 
following actions: 

(i) Develop new methods and mechanisms at bioregional level for 
participation in the planning process and for the resolution of conflicts. 

ch 2016 

(ii) Give all communities the means to ‘have a say’ in the management and 
distribution of the region’s resources. 

(iii) Establish inter-sectoral and inter-agency task forces to facilitate 
bioregional planning. 

b) Incorporate biodiversity into the management of all biological resources 
The mix of species in an ecosystem enables that system both to provide a 
flow of ecosystem services under given environmental conditions, and to 
maintain that flow if environmental conditions change. The loss of 
biodiversity therefore limits the resilience of the affected ecosystem, which in 
turn, may have direct negative economie implications. 

c) Support bioregional conservation initiatives in the private sector The 
bioregional planning approach requires that conservation on private land 
becomes an integral part of the strategy. This, in turn, requires that forward 
planning must be done on a holistic bioregional basis. Environmental heaith 
is the key to sustainable development. The primary threat to environmental 
heaith is fragmentation of community-supporting ecosystems. Fragmentation 
generally leads to a cycle of environmental degradation, which subsequently 
influences the well-being of the dependent communities. 

5.2.5 BIOREGIONAL AND EVIRONMENTAL PLANNING IN THE //KHARA HAIS 
SDF 

5.2.5.1 LAND-USE CLASSIFICATION APPROACH 

A fundamental phase of bioregional planning is to undertake appropriate land-use 
classification for the planning area in accordance with a classification system that is 
based upon a structure of interrelated cores, corridors and matrices. It was, 
subsequently directed by //Khara Hais Municipality that UNESCO’s biosphere 
reserve designatlon model be adopted as a basis for such land-use classification. 

In terms of this model, the classification system is to include core nature areas that 
feature representative samples of the region’s characteristic biodiversity. Ideally such 
sites, which may already be designated as protected areas, should be linked by 

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^ ^ 


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corridors of natural or restored natural plant cover to permit migration and adaptation 
to global change. Both the core sites and corridors should be nested within a matrix 
of mixed land uses and ownership patterns. The figure below illustrates the practical 
implementation of the land-use classification system adopted for //Khara Hais. 




Figure 1 : Land-use classification based on a structure of interrelated cores, 
corridors and matrices. 


SPATIAL PLANNING CATEGORIES: A MECHANISM FOR LAND-USE 
CLASSIFICATION 

In order to apply the biosphere reserve designation principles in //Khara Hais, a set 
of Spatial Planning Categories (SPCs) was developed. These SPCs are generally 
consistent with UNESCO’s MaB Program and include all land zonings that are 
provided for under the existing Zoning Scheme Regulations. 

A total of six SPCs has been provided for (refer to the table on the following page). In 
addition, a number of Sub-Categories have been created for the purpose of refining 
the designation process. 

CATEGORY DESCRIPTION CLASSIFICATION CRITERIA & PURPOSE 
CATEGORY A DESIGNATED CORE 

CONSERVATION AREA 

a) Areas of high conservation importance to be protected from development. 

b) Generally only non-consumptive Iand-uses39 allowed conditionally. 

CATEGORY B BUFFER AREA 

a) Areas that serve as a buffer between Category A and Category C areas. 

b) Providing an appropriate interim classification for conservation-worthy 
areas that do not have statutory protection, including ecological corridors 
and areas worthy of rehabilitation. 

c) Appropriate sustainable development and non-consumptive landuses may 
be allowed conditionally. 


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CATEGORY C 

Agricultural areas Rural areas where extensive and intensive agriculture is practiced. 

CATEGORY D 

Urban-related areas Areas accommodating a broad spectrum of urban-related 
developmentand associated services and infrastructure. 

CATEGORY E 

Industrial areas: Areas accommodating industrial activities and associated 
infrastructure and where very high intensity of human activity and consumptive land 
use occur. 

CATEGORY F 

Surface infrastructure and buildings: AH surface infrastructure and buildings not 
catered for in the above categories, including roads, railway lines, power lines, 
communication structures, etc. 

Note: Chapter 4 of Volume 2 of the SDF provides a comprehensive description 
of the SPCs and Sub-Categories, and illustrates how these were applied in the 
land use classification of //Khara Hals. 

5.2.6 MUNICIPAL MANAGEMENT IN TERMS OF BIOREGIONAL PRINCIPLES 

From the perspective of promoting sustainable development and biodiversity 
conservation through integrating development and conservation, it is especially 
important to consider municipal planning and management in the context of the 
integrative relationship between ecological processes and the needs and 
perceptions of local communities. This integrative relationship is referred to as 
bioregional management in the Global Biodiversity Strategy (WRI, 1992). 

To successfully implement bioregional management, the following challenges need 
to be addressed (Miller, 1996): 

• Create the capacity to manage complex and integrated programs. 

• Involve stakeholders in a meaningful manner. 


27 


• Develop and link established institutions, or if needed, create new ones. 

A list of bioregional management guidelines to be adopted by the 
Municipality is provided in Volume 3 of the SDF. 

5.2.7 PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION CONTEXT (See also Section E of SDF 
Volume 1) 

SECTION SYNOPSIS 

This section describes the legislative context within which the HKhara Hais SDF was 
repared, including reference to the international and national obligations and 
protocols of which South Africa is a signatory. 

PLANNING CONTEXT 

//Khara Hais Municipality recognises that one of the critical determinants of the 
success of development planning is the extent to which all spheres of government 
co-operate and coordinate their activities. 

In this regard, the Municipality gives effect to the requirement that development 
planning should be undertaken within the context of five distinct levels, namely the 
international level, national level, provincial level, district level and the local level. 

INTERNATIONAL LEVEL 

• UNESCO’S Man and the Biosphere Program 

• Agenda 21 

• Convention on Biological Diversity 

• United Nations Millennium Development Goals 
• NEPAD 

NATIONAL LEVEL 

• South African Constitution 

• Local Agenda 21 

• Legislation 

• Policy 


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PROVINCIAL LEVEL 

• Legislation 

• Policy 

• Northern Cape Growth and Development Strategy 

DISTRICT LEVEL 

• Siyanda District Municipality IDP 

• Siyanda District Municipality EMF 

LOCAL LEVEL 

• //Khara Hais Municipality IDP 

• //Khara Hais Municipality SDF 

5.3 INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS AND CONVENTIONS 
TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE 
//KHARA HAIS SDF 


5.3.1 UNESCO’S MAN AND THE BIOSPHERE PROGRAM 

In terms of the project brief, this spatial development framework is to provide 
strategies that will promote sustainable development in the Municipality (refer to 
Section F below). It is generally accepted that UNESCO’s MAB Program provides an 
ideal framework for achieving this objective. 

The MAB Program is a global program of international scientific co-operation, 
dealing with people environment interactions over the entire realm of bioclimatic and 
geographic situations of the biosphere. Research under the MAB Program was 
designed to solve practical problems of resource management, and aims to fill gaps 
in the understanding of the structure and function of ecosystems, and of the impact 
of different types of human interaction. Key ingredients in the MAB Program are the 
involvement of decision-makers and local people in research projects, training and 
demonstration at the field level, and the bringing together of disciplines from the 


28 


social, biological and physical Sciences in addressing complex environmental 
problems (Miller,1996). 

The MaB program is supported by a host of institutions that could lend financial 
and/or logistical support. 

5.3.2 AGENDA 21 

Agenda 21 is an international program, adopted by more than 178 governments, to 
put sustainable development into practice around the world. It emerged from the 
United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) held in Rio 
de Janeiro in 1992. 

The South African government and, subsequently, local governments such as 
//Khara Hais are obliged to implement the Agenda 21 agreements, which reflect 
global consensus and political commitment on developmental and environmental 
cooperation. 

Underlying the UNCED agreements is the realisation that the international world 
cannot continue with present policies, which increase poverty, hunger, sickness and 
illiteracy and cause continuing deterioration of ecosystems on which life on earth 
depends. 

The government recognises Agenda 21 as the fundamental program of action for 
achieving sustainable development. Agenda 21 provides a broad overview of issues 
pertaining to sustainable development, including statements on the basis for action, 
objectives, recommended activities and the means of implementation. 

In the process of transforming the South African society, the South African 
Government stated as one of its priorities that the government ‘must ensure that all 
South African citizens, present and future, have the right to a decent quality of life 
through the sustainable use of resources'. It is also stated that ‘environmental 
considerations must be built into every decision' and that current legislation should 
be revised ‘with a view to establishing an effective system of environmental 
management’ in South Africa. The underlying principle of sustainability is not only 


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recognised as a priority by the South African Government, but also internationally by 
way of Agenda 21. 

OF PARTICULAR RELEVANCE TO THE FORMULATION OF THIS SPATIAL 
DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK, ARE THE FOLLOWING PRINCIPLES OF 
AGENDA 21 

(A) INTEGRATED APPROACH TO THE PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF 
LAND RESOURCES 

The broad objective of this program is to facilitate the allocation of land-uses to the 
uses that provide the greatest sustainable benefits and to promote sustainable and 
integrated management of land resources. In so doing, environmental, social and 
economie issues should be taken into consideration. Protected areas, private 
property rights, the rights of indigenous people and their communities as well as 
other local communities should be taken into account. 

(B) PROMOTING SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENT DEVELOPMENT 
It is expected that about half the world's population is living in cities. The 
urbanisation of society is part of the development process and on a global scale 
cities generate 60 percent of gross national product. 

In industrialised countries, the consumption patterns of cities are severely stressing 
the global ecosystem, while settlements in the developing world need more raw 
material, energy, and economie development simply to overcome basic economie 
and social problems. 

THIS IMPLIES, INTER ALIA, THE FOLLOWING 

a) Providing adequate shelter for all, especially for rapidly growing populations. 

b) Improving human settlement management to ensure sustainability of all 
urban settlements. 

c) Promoting sustainable land-use through environmentally sound planning 
and management. 

d) Promoting the integrated provision of services, such as water, sewage, 
stormwater and solid waste management. 


(C) INTEGRATING ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT IN DECISION- 
MAKING 

Countries can no longer afford to make decisions concerning developmental 
issues, without taking the environment into account. Changes are needed in 
the institutional structures of government to enable more systemic 
consideration of the environment when decisions are made on, amongst 
others, land-use, conservation, economie, social, agriculture, transportation 
and other policies. 

Governments should also strengthen national institutional capacity and 
capability to integrate social, economie and environmental issues at all 
levels of developmental decision-making and implementation. Attention 
should also be given to moving away from narrow sectoral approaches and 
progressing towards full cross-sectoral co-ordination and co-operation. 

THIS IMPLIES THE FOLLOWING 

(i) Integrating environment and development at the policy, planning and 
management levels, with the objective of improving, or restructuring, the 
decision-making process. 

(ii) Providing an effective regulatory framework, with the main objective to 
promote the integration of environment and development policies through 
appropriate legal and regulatory policies, Instruments and enforcement 
mechanisms at the national, provincial and local levels. 

(iii) Making effective use of economie Instruments and other incentives, by: 

- Incorporating environmental costs into the decisions of producers and 
consumers, and not to pass these costs onto society in general or to future 
generations. 

- Moving towards integrating social and environmental costs into economie 
activities so that prices will appropriately reflect the relative scarcity and total 
value of resources (water and electricity as examples) and contribute to the 
prevention of environmental degradation. 


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- Including the use of market principles in providing economie instruments 
(e.g. the establishment of an environmental trust fund) and policies to 
pursue development. 

(D) ESTABLISHING SYSTEMS FOR INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL 
MANAGEMENT AND AUDITING 

This principle includes the use of lEM procedures, which include the implementation 
of environmental management systems, monitoring and auditing in all development 
and conservation initiatives. South Africa is one of the global partners of Agenda 21, 
which calls on governments to adopt national strategies for sustainable 
development. The onus of implementing the key objective of Agenda 21 that of 
sustainable development has been placed clearly on local governments and its 
constituent communities. The real roots of Agenda 21 ’s success therefore lie at the 
micro, local level, all of which are addressed through the Local Agenda 21, which is 
described below. 

5.3.3 LOCAL AGENDA 21 

As described above, the South African government is a signature to the Agenda 21 
agreement. The Local Agenda 21 was developed as a result of South Africa's 
obligation towards the international Agenda 21 agreement, and is defined as a local- 
government-lead, community-wide, and participatory effort to establish a 
comprehensive action strategy for environmental protection, economie prosperity 
and community well-being in the local jurisdiction or area. This requires the 
integration of planning and actions across economie, social and environmental 
spheres. Key elements are community participation, assessment of current 
conditions, target setting for achieving specific goals, monitoring and reporting 
(Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, 1998). 

The Municipality supports the Local Agenda 21 and aims to give practical effect to, 
inter alia, the following themes of the Local Agenda 21 through its IDP and this SDF: 

a) Promoting sustainable use of resources 

b) Preventing pollution 

c) Conserving biodiversity 


30 


d) Meeting the basic needs of local communities 

e) Providing access to the skills, knowledge and information needed to 
enable people to play a meaningful role in society. 

f) Providing opportunities for culture, leisure and recreation to all. 

g) Developing human settlements that have appropriate scale and form. 

h) Establishing appropriate links with other parts of the world. 

THE ABOVE THEMES CAN BE PROMOTED BY GIVING PRACTICAL EFFECT 
TO THE FOLLOWING SIX KEY ELEMENTS OF THE LOCAL AGENDA 21 (DEAT, 
1998)51 

(i) Promoting the local authority's own environmental performance. 

(ii) Integrating sustainable development aims into the local authority's 
policies and activities. 

(iii) Promoting public awareness and education. 

(iv) Consulting and involving interested and affected parties. 

(v) Establishing appropriate partnerships. 

(vi) Measuring, monitoring and reporting on progress towards sustainability. 

5.3.4 CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY 

Another international obligation of relevance to the formulation of this spatial 
development framework entails the implementation of the Convention on Biological 
Diversity which was also adopted by more than 178 governments at the UNCED in 
Rio de Janeiro in 1992. 

THE THREE MAIN OBJECTIVES OF THE CONVENTION ARE: 

a) The conservation of biodiversity. 

b) The sustainable use of biological resources. 

c) The fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the use of genetic 
resources. 

The conservation of biological diversity on earth is vital, as the essential goods and 
services depend on the variety and variability of genes, species, populations and 
ecosystems. Biological resources feed and clothe us, and provide housing. 


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medicines and spiritual nourishment. The loss of the world's biological diversity 
continues, mainly from habitat destruction, overutilization of resources, pollution and 
the inappropriate introduction of foreign plants and animals. This decline in 
biodiversity is largely caused by humans and represents a serious threat to our 
development and very survival on earth. 

In meeting its international obligations of the Rio Convention, the South African 
government is required to develop national strategies, plans or programs, or adapt 
existing ones, to integrate the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity into 
sectoral and cross-sectoral plans, programs and policies. To this end, Government 
has published the National Environmental Management Act 107 of 1998 and the 
National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act 10 of 2004. 

The Vision, mission and principies guiding a biodiversity strategy for South 

Africa and therefore,//Khara Hais, are described beiow: 

(A) ViSiON FOR SOUTH AFRiCA 

A prosperous, environmentally conscious nation, whose people are in 
harmonieus coexistence with the natural environment, and which, derives 
lasting benefits from the conservation and sustainable use of its biological 
diversity. 

(B) MiSSiON OF GOVERNMENT 

Government will strive to conserve South Africa’s biological diversity and to, 
thereby, maintain ecological processes and systems whilst providing lasting 
development benefits to the nation through the ecologically sustainable, 
socially equitable, and economically efficiënt use of biological resources. 

(C) GUIDiNG PRiNCiPLES 

In the context of the above Vision and mission, the following inter-related 
principies, amongst others, will guide the application, assessment and 
further development of the biodiversity policy and strategy: 

ch 2016 

a) All life forms and ecological systems have intrinsic value. 

b) All people and organisations should act with due care to conserve and 
avoid negative impacts on biodiversity, and to use biological resources 
sustainably, equitably and efficiently. 

c) The benefits derived from the use of South Africa’s biological resources 
are dependent upon such resources being used at a rate within their 
capacity for renewal, i.e. sustainable use; maintaining the ecological integrity 
of the natural systems which produce such resources; minimising, or 
avoiding, the risk or irreversible change induced by humans; adequate 
investments being made to ensure the conservation and sustainable use of 
biodiversity; and avoiding or minimising the adverse impacts of the use of 
non-renewable resources on biodiversity. 

d) Benefits arising from the use and development of South Africa's biological 
resources will be shared in an equitable manner. 

e) Decision-makers and users of biological resources will be guided by 
economie approaches, which assess the full social and environmental costs 
and benefits of projects, plans and policies that impact upon biodiversity, i.e. 
undertake environmental audits. 

f) Where there is a threat of significant reduction, or loss, of biological 
diversity but inadequate or inconclusive scientific evidence to prove this, 
action should be considered to avoid or minimise threats, i.e. adopt the 
precautionary principle. 

g) Interested and affected individuals and groups will have an opportunity to 
participate in decisions about the ways in which biological resources are 
conserved and used. 

h) The conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity will be integrated 
strategically at all levels into national, provincial, local and sectoral planning 
programs, and policy efforts (e.g. forestry, agriculture, fisheries, land reform. 

3lJ 

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industry, education, heaith, mining, etc.) to implement the goals and 
objectives of the policy effectively. 

5.3.5 UNITED NATIONS MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS 

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) represent a global partnership that has 
grown from the commitments and targets established at the world summits of the 
1990s. Responding to the world's main development challenges and the calls of civil 
society, the MDGs promote poverty reduction, education, maternal heaith, gender 
equality, and aim at combating child mortality, AIDS and other diseases. Set for the 
year 2015, the MDGs are an agreed set of goals that can be achieved if all actors 
Work together and do their part. Poor countries have pledged to govern better, and 
invest in their people through heaith care and education. Rich countries have 
pledged to support them through aid, debt relief and fairer trade. 

THE UNITED MILLEINIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS ARE AS FOLLOWS:A) 
ERADICATE EXTREME POVERTY AND HUNGER 

• Reduce by half the proportion of people living on less than a dollar a day. 

• Reduce by half the proportion of people who suffer from hunger. 

B) ACHIEVE UNIVERSAL PRIMARY EDUCATION 

• Ensure that all boys and girls complete a full course of primary education. 

C) PROMOTE GENDER EQUALITY AND EMPOWER WOMEN 

• Eliminate gender disparity in primary and secondary education preferably 
by 2005, and at all levels by 2015. 

D) REDUCE CHILD MORTALITY 

• Reduce by two thirds the mortality rate among children under five. 

E) IMPROVE MATERNAL HEALTH 

• Reduce by three quarters the maternal mortality ratio. 

F) COMBAT HIV/AIDS, MALARIA AND OTHER DISEASES 

• Halt and begin to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS. 


• Halt and begin the reverse the incidence of malaria and other major 
diseases. 

G) ENSURE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY 

• Integrate the principles of sustainable development into country policies 
and programs, reverse loss of environmental resources. 

• Reduce by half the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe 
drinking water. 

• Achieve significant improvement in lives of at least 100 million slum 
dwellers, by 2020. 

H) DEVELOP A GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP FOR DEVELOPMENT 

• Develop further an open trading and financial system that is rule-based, 
predictable and non-discriminatory, including a commitment to good 
governance, development and poverty reduction - nationally and 
internationally. 

• Address the least developed countries’ special needs. This includes tariff- 
and quote-free access for their experts; enhanced debt relief for heavily 
indebted poor countries; cancellation of official bilateral debt; and more 
genereus official development assistance for countries committed to poverty 
reduction. 

Address the special needs of landlocked and small island developing States. 

• Deal comprehensively with developing countries' debt problems through 
national and international measures to make debt sustainable in the long 
term. 

• In co-operation with pharmaceutical companies, provide access to 
affordable essential drugs in developing countries. 

• In co-operation with the private sector, make available the benefits of new 
technologies - especially information and Communications technologies. 


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5.3.6 UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE 

A Framework Convention on Climate Change emerged from the UNCED held in 
Rio de Janeiro in 1 992. This was signed by 1 54 governments, including South 
Africa. The Convention addresses the threat of global climate change by urging 
governments to reduce the sources of greenhouse gases. 

The ultimate objective of the Convention is to stabilise greenhouse gas 
concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous 
interference with the climate system of the world. One of its first achievements was 
to establish a national greenhouse gas inventory as a count of greenhouse gas 
emissions and removals. Accounts must be regularly submitted by signatories of the 
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. 

5.3.7 UNITED NATIONS CONVENTION TO COMBAT DESERTIFICATION 

The Convention, the only convention stemming from a direct recommendation of the 
Agenda 21, was adopted in Paris on 17 June 1994 and entered into force in 
December 1996. It is the first and internationally legally binding framework set up to 
address the problem of desertification. The Convention is based on the principles of 
participation, partnership and decentralisation - the backbone of good governance 
and sustainable development. It now has 192 country parties to the Convention, 
making it truly global in reach. It addresses land degradation in arid, semi-arid and 
dry sub-humid areas of the world. 

5.4 NATIONAL CONTEXT 


This spatial development framework has been prepared to give practical effect 
to the intentions of the relevant Acts in terms of, inter alia, the following; 

a) Supporting an environmental ethic and the principle of environmental 
sustainability. The spatial development framework will provide a model for 


33 


environmental sustainability and will, as such, illustrate the practical 
implementation of the underlying ethics of the relevant legislation and policy. 

b) It will create positive guidelines in terms of which the relevant authorities 
will, in future, be able to consider development applications in accordance 
with the relevant legislation. 

The primary national statutes that provide the legislative context for the 
preparation of this spatial development framework are the following: 

• SOUTH AFRICAN CONSTITUTION 

• DEVELOPMENT FACILITATION ACT 

• LOCAL GOVERNMENT: MUNICIPAL STRUCTURES ACT 

• LOCAL GOVERNMENT: MUNICIPAL SYSTEMS ACT 

• NATIONAL SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE 

5.4.1 OTHER ENABLING NATIONAL LEGISLATION, POLICY & STRATEGIES 

Below is a summary of the additional national legislation, policy and 
strategies that provided the legislative framework for the formulation of the 
//Khara Hais SDF: 

5.4.1. 1 ENABLING NATIONAL LEGISLATION, POLICY AND 
STRATEGIES 

CONSERVATION OF AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES ACT 43 OF 1983 

This Act provides for control over the use of natural agricultural resources in 
order to promote the conservation of soil, water resources and vegetation 
and the combating of weeds and invader plants. Regulations were 
promulgated in Government Gazette 9238 of 25 May 1984, which provide, 
inter alia, for the use, control and protection of Virgin soil, indigenous 
vegetation, vleis, marshes, water sponges and watercourses. 


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5.4.1. 2 ENVIRONMENT CONSERVATION ACT 73 OF 1989 

Contrei of Uttering, pollution, activities which may have a detrimental effect on the 
environment, combating of noise, control and licensing of waste disposal (landfill) 
sites, preparation and contents of environmental impact reports. The Act also 
provides for the declaration and management of any property in private ownership as 
a Protected Natural Environment (PNE), the control of environmental pollution and 
for imposing penalties where any provision of the Act is contravened. 

5.4.1. 3 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT 107 OF 1998 

THE MAIN AIMS OF THIS ACT ARE, AMONGST OTHERS, THE FOLLOWING: 

a) The improvement of environmental management by all levels of 
government. 

b) The strengthening of the enforcement of environmental law by introducing 
innovative mechanisme to recover clean-up costs. 

c) Enhancing public participation by permitting private prosecution. 

d) It recognises that all South Africans have the right to an environment that is 
not harmful to his/her heaith or well-being and that the State must protect 
and fulfil the socio-economic and environmental rights of all and strive to 
meet the basic needs of the previously disadvantaged communities. 

5.4.1. 4 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT BIODIVERSITY ACT 10 OF 

2004 

The National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act 10 of 2004 provides for 
the management and conservation of South Africa’s biodiversity within the 
framework of NEMA. It provides for: 

a) The protection of species and ecosystem that warrant national protection. 

b) The sustainable use of indigenous biological resources 

c) The fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from bio-prospecting 
involving indigenous biologicalresources 

d) The establishment of a South African National Biodiversity Institute 

ch 2016 

5.4.1 .5 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT PROTECTED AREAS 

ACT 57 OF 2003 

The objectives of this Act are to, inter alia, provide for the declaration and 
management of protected areas, to give effect to international agreements on 
protected areas and to provide for co-operative governance in the declaration 
and management of protected areas and to provide for the continued existence 
of South African National Parks. This Act provides for the participation by 
communities in conservation and its associated benefits, and for co-operative 
governance in the management of protected areas. 

5.4.1 .6 NATIONAL HERITAGE RESOURCES ACT 25 OF 1999 

The purpose of this Act, which is administered by the South African Heritage 
Resources Agency, is to preserve and protect the historical and cultural 
heritage of this country, which includes natural and human-made assets. 

This Act provides for the proclamation of National Monuments and the 
designation of Conservation Areas, on the grounds of their historie, aesthetic or 
scientific interest. The Act stipulates that the Council must be consulted with 
respect to the planning of a Conservation Area. 

5.4.1 .7 NATIONAL WATER ACT, ACT 36 OF 1998 

In the National Water Act 36 of 1998, the principles of sustainability and equity 
are the central tenets that guide the protection, use, development, conservation, 
management and control water resources. The purpose of the 

ACT TAKES THE FOLLOWING FACTORS INTO ACCOUNT, NAMELY: 

a) Meeting the basic human needs of present and future generations 

b) Promoting equitable access to water 

c) Redressing the results of past racial and gender discrimination 

d) Promoting the efficiënt, sustainable and beneficial use of water in the public 
interest 

e) Facilitating social and economie development 

f) Providing for growing demand for water use 

g) Protecting aquatic and associated ecosystems and their biological diversity 

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h) Reducing and preventing pollution and degradation of water resources. 

i) Meeting international obligations 

j) Promoting dam safety 

k) Managing floods and droughts 

5.4.1. 8 DISASTER MANAGEMENT ACT 57 OF 2002 

THE DISASTER MANAGEMENT ACT 57 OF 2002 PROVIDES FOR: 

a) An integrated and co-ordinated disaster management policy that focuses on 
preventing or reducing the risk of disasters, mitigating the severity of 
disasters, emergency preparedness, rapid and effective response to 
disasters and post disaster recovery. 

b) The establishment of national, provincial and municipal disaster 
management centres. 

c) Disaster management volunteers. 

d) Other disaster related matters. 

5.4.1. 9 MINERAL AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ACT 28 
OF 2002 

The Mineral Act 50 of 1991 was repealed and replaced by the Mineral and 
Petroleum Resources Development Act 28 of 2002 and makes provision for 
equitable access to and sustainable development of the nations’ mineral and 
petroleum resources. The Act has the following principles: 

a) Recognising that minerals and petroleum are non-renewable natural 
resources. 

b) Acknowledging that South Africa’s mineral and petroleum resources 
belong to the nation and that the State is the custodian thereof. 


sustainable development of mineral and petroleum resources and to 
promote economie and social development. 

d) Recognising the need to promote local and rural development and 
the social upliftment of communities affected by mining. 

e) Reaffirming the State's commitment to reform to bring about 
equitable access to South Africa's mineral and petroleum resources. 

f) Being committed to eradicating all forms of discriminatory practices 
in the mining and petroleum industries. 

g) Considering the State’s obligation under the Constitution to take 
legislative and other measures to redress the results of past racial 
discrimination. 

h) Reaffirming the State's commitment to guaranteeing security of 
tenure in respect of prospecting and mining operations. 

i) Emphasising the need to create an internationally competitive and 
efficiënt administrative and regulatory regime. 

5.4.1.10 PHYSICAL PLANNING ACT 125 OF 1991 

This Act sets out South Africa's planning framework, i.e. regulates the levels 
at which plans operate, the responsibility for their drafting and 
implementation and their contents. In terms of this Act, policy and structure 
plans (SDFs) should promote the orderly development of the area to which 
they relate for the benefit of all its inhabitants. 


c) Affirming the State’s obligation to protect the environment for the 
benefit of present and future generations, to ensure ecologically 


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5.4.1.11 WHITE PAPER ON AGRICULTURE (DEPT OF 
AGRICULTURE,1995) 

The White Paper (Department of Agriculture, 1995) mandates an agricultural 
sector characterised by a range of farm sizes that are market directed, with 
access to agricultural land being broadened through land reform and 
supported by the provision of appropriate services. Agricultural production is 
to be based on the sustainable use of natural agricultural and water 
resources. Of particular relevance to the formulation of the SDF, is the 
following: 

a) Productive agricultural land should be retained for agricultural use. 

b) AH farmers are to be made aware of and be accountable for the 
sustainable utilisation of natural agricultural resources. 

c) The land-user’s responsibility towards the land will include the 
rehabilitation of mismanaged natural agricultural resources. 

5.4.1.12 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR SOUTH AFRICAN AGRICULTURE 
( 2001 ) 

The National Department of Agriculture aims to lead and support sustainable 
agriculture and promote rural development through: ensuring access to 
sufficiënt, safe and nutritious food, eliminating skewed participation, 
optimising growth, remunerative job opportunities and incomes in the 
agricultural sector, enhancing the sustainable management of natural 
agricultural resources and ecological systems, ensuring effective and 
efficiënt governance, and ensuring knowledge and Information management. 
The Strategie Plan has the following objectives: 

a) Create a common Vision for key stakeholders. 

b) Design and implement a strategie framework to guide policy and 
implementation in the future. 

c) Address issues undermining investor confidence and the building of better 
understanding and good social relations. 


36 


d) Ensure increased access and participation in the sector through well- 
designed empowerment processes and programs. 

e) Combine, share and optimise the resources and benefits among the 
partners. 

f) Poster global competitiveness, growth and profitability in the sector in 
order to attract new investment. 

g) Ensure sustainable development. 

h) Build lasting partnerships among the public, private and community 
stakeholders and NGOs. 

5.4.1.13 WHITE PAPER ON SPATIAL PLANNING AND LAND USE 
MANAGEMENT (2001) 

This White Paper builds, amongst other, on the concept of the municipal IDP 
as provided in the Municipal Systems Act 23 of 2000. 

THE ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF THE NEW SYSTEM PROPOSED IN 
THE WHITE PAPER ARE THE FOLLOWING: 

a) Principles: The system will be based upon principles and norms 
which will be aimed at achieving sustainability, equality, efficiency, 
fairness and good governance in spatial planning and land use 
management. 

b) Land use regulators: The White Paper proposes a category of 
authorities able to take the different types of decision falling into the 
realm of spatial planning and land use management, namely, land 
use regulators (municipalities). 

c) IDP-based local spatial planning: The Municipal Systems Act 23 of 
2000 requires that part of each Municipality's IDP must be a spatial 
development framework. The White Paper spells out the minimum 
elements that must be in a spatial development framework. It also 


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proposes that the SDF operate as an indicative plan, whereas the 
detailed administration of land development and land use changes 
is dealt with by a land use management scheme, which will actually 
record the land use and development permissions accruing to a 
piece of land. 

d) A uniform set of procedures for land development approvals. Where 
a proposed development is not permissible in terms of the prevailing 
land use management scheme, then permission is required from the 
appropriate land use regulator. The White Paper proposes one set 
of such procedures for the whole country, thereby eliminating the 
current situatiën where different procedures apply in different 
provinces. This will facilitate national capacity building within land 
use regulators as well as performance management of the system. 

e) National Spatial Planning Frameworks: In order to achieve more 
integrated and co-ordinated spending of public funds it is proposed 
that the Minister, in consultation, with Cabinet, is able to prescribe 
national spatial planning frameworks around particular programs 
and regions. 

White Paper on development & promotion of tourism in South Africa 
(DEAT, 1996) 

The White Paper on Tourism (DEAT, 1996) contains goals, principles and 
decision-making guidelines for tourism development in South Africa. Of 
particular relevance to //Khara Hais are the principles of: 

a) Harnessing the tourism industry to promote the quality of life of all South 
Africans, mitigating environmental problems and protecting the cultural 
heritage of the country. 


b) Mandatory use of lEM procedures, conducting on-going social and 
environmental audits and executing environmental management practices 
for all new tourism projects. 

c) Emphasising the diversity of the tourism product of South Africa. 

d) Private sector provision of tourism facilities and services at national parks 
and protected areas. 

e) Provision of infrastructure to improve the accessibility and unieash the 
tourism potential of rural areas, in a manner that minimises environmental 
impacts. 

5.5 PROVINCIAL CONTEXT 


THE FOLLOWING ACTS, WHICH WERE TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT DURING THE 
PREPARATION OF THE SDF, ARE APPLICABLE REGARDING DEVELOPMENT 
IN THE NORTHERN CAPE PROVINCE, AND ESPECIALLY IN //KHARA HAIS: 

5.5.1 NORTHERN CAPE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT ACT 

The Northern Cape Planning and Development Act 7 of 1998 provide a single set of 
procedures and regulations to complement the accelerated development procedures 
as provided for in the Development Facilitation Act 67 of 1995. The primary objective 
of the Act is to ensure effective and co- operative planning and land development 
throughout the Northern Cape. Furthermore, the Act provides a set of principles 
which will guide the preparation and implementation of integrated land 
developmental plans, the management of rural and urban land and its development 
through land-use management mechanisme, subdivisions and matters incidental 
thereto. 


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5.5.2 OTHER ENABLING PROVINCIAL LEGISLATION AND POLICY 

The following is a list of other provincial legislation and policy that 
collectively form the legislative framework for the preparation of the //Khara 
Hais SDF: 

5.5.2.1 NORTHERN CAPE NATURE AND ENVIRONMENT CONSERVATION 
0RDINANCE19 0F1974 

It was developed to consolidate and amend the laws relating to nature and 
environmental conservation, and to provide for matters incidental thereto. This 
Ordinance established the Department of Nature as well as an Environmental 
Conservation and Advisory Committee. It is also divided to cover nature reserves, 
miscellaneous conservation measures, protection of wild animals other than fish, and 
protection of fish, protection of flora and professional hunters and contractors. Under 
Section 82 of the Ordinance, the Administrator has the power to effect provincial 
regulations. 

5.5.2.2 THE NORTHERN CAPE TOURISM ACT 5 OF 1998 

The objectives of the Northern Cape Tourism Act 5 of 1998 are to provide for the 
establishment of structures to develop, promote and market tourism and develop and 
operate tourist services in provincial reserves in the Northern Cape within the 
framework of government policy. 

5.6 DISTRICT CONTEXT 


5.6.1 SIYANDA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

The target of the Siyanda District Municipality Integrated Development 
Planning (2004) process emphasised the following priorities; 

a) To develop a planning system that will promote community participation and 
encourage participation and partnerships between the government and 
communities. 

b) To set up a framework in the Siyanda District Municipality whereby the local 
community, other role-players and interested parties will be given the 


38 


opportunity to identify their own needs and issues as well as plan on how it 
can be implemented. 

c) Set up space for a root-level approach that will gather and distribute 
Information from provincial and international development strategies. 

d) To set up a balanced framework for local economie growth and to address 
the local needs for development. 

e) To establish a development planning system. 

f) To develop a planning system which will link public expenses to 
development strategies? 

g) The area management of the District Municipality and the local community 
will create goals and priorities. 

h) To set up a system framework through which the Siyanda District 
Municipality will be kept responsible for the progress regarding goals and 
objectives. 

i) To promote co-operation and co-ordination on national and provincial level 
between the Siyanda District Municipality and the government departments. 
The following priority aspects have been listed for //Khara Hais Municipality 
in the Siyanda District Municipality IDP namely: 

• Town planning 

• Roads 

• Storm water 

• Water networks 

• Sewerage networks 

• Electricity services 

• Parks and recreation 

• Protection services 

• Housing 

• Economie development 


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• Social services 

• Tourism/appearance of the town 

• Health & Corporate services 

5.6.1. 2 SIYANDA DISTRIT MUNICIPALITY ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT 
FRAMEWORK 

The Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT), the Northern 
Cape Department of Tourism, Environment and Conservation and Siyanda 
District Municipality decided to jointly draft an Environmental Management 
Framework (EMF) for the Siyanda District Municipality to ensure that future 
development in the area occurs in a manner that is appropriate to the unique 
features and character of the area. 

The purpose of the EMF (August 2007) is to integrate municipal and provincial 
decision-making and align different government mandates in a way that will 
put the area on a sustainable development path. The specific objectives of the 
EMF include; 

a) The provision of strategie guidance in the EMF area. 

b) Assisting in the Identification of ‘identified geographical areas' in terms of 
NEMA. 

c) Assisting in the Identification of ‘specified activities within ‘identified 
geographical areas' in terms of NEMA. 

d) The provision of a decision support system. 



5.7 LOCAL CONTEXT 


5.7.1 //KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

The //Khara Hais Integrated Development Plan 2007 - 2012 (May 2007) is a ‘living’ 
document. The IDP for 2003/2004 was reviewed and only Information relevant to the 
planning process of 2005/2006 was documented in the 2005/2006 IDP. The current 
//Khara Hais IDP 2007 contains only the relevant Information for the 2007 planning 
process. During the preparation of this SDF the IDPs for 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007 
were consulted. 


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According to the //Khara Hais IDP (2007) the municipal Vision and mission 

will be established by //Khara Hais Municipality and the local 

statements are the foiiowing: 

community. 

iDP ViSION 

f) To create a planning system that links spatial and developmental 

To provide an affordable quality service to //Khara Hais and its visitors and 

to executethe policies. 

planning. 

iDP MiSSiON 

g) To create a system framework through which //Khara Hais 
Municipality can be held responsible for progress in terms of aims 

As an authority that delivers municipal services to //Khara Hais, we attempt 

and objectives. 

by means of a motivated staff, to develop //Khara Hais increasingly as a 

h) To start a practical process of integrated development planning. 

pleasant, safe and affordable living and workplace for its residents and a 

hospitable and relaxed visiting place for its visitors. 

i) To promote co-operation and co-ordination between //Khara Hais 

The purpose of the iDP for //Khara Hais is as foiiows (//Khara Hais iDP, 

and government departments on provincial and national levels. 

2005); 

j) To ensure the speedy execution of programs and projects that are 
related to the Reconstruction and Development Project (RDP). 

a) To create a framework within which the local community and other 

role players, i.e. the //Khara Hais, other Local Development forums 

k) To establish co-operation and co-ordination with neighbouring 

and other interested parties and communities, identify their own 

development needs and plan how these will be given effect. 

municipalities as well as the district Municipality. 

b) To establish a balanced framework for local economie growth and 

5.7.2 VISION, GOALS, OBJECTIVES FOR PROMOTION OF SUSTAINABLE 

the addressing of local development needs. 

DEVELOPMENT AS INCLUDED IN THE //KHARA HAIS SDF: 

c) To create space for the exchanging of Information between the 

VISION, GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 

community and the local, provincial and national authorities and 

The studies that have been undertaken during the preparation of this document 

development strategies. 

confirmed the foiiowing: 

d) To develop a planning system that will promote community 

a) //Khara Hais comprises unique natural, cultural, social and 
economie attributes that justify its status as a national asset. 

involvement and will encourage participation and partnership 

between the government and the community through 

b) The natural environment and its resources of the Municipality are 

implementation and land development objectives. 

sensitive and susceptibleto over-exploitation or inappropriate use. 

e) To develop a planning system that links public expenses to 

c) There is a substantial need for social upliftment and community 

sustainable development strategies. Attainable aims and priorities 

development. 


d) Priority subsequently should be given to issues such as; 

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a. sustainable use of public resources, such as vacant land; 

b. rural development; 

c. land reform; 

d. social integration; 

e. environmental conservation; 

f. economie development; 

g. expansion of the manufacturing sector; and 

h. development of the proposed SEZ. 

e) There is a general lack of co-ordination of development and land 
use on a bioregional level, which emphasises the need for an 
integrated planning framework, within which government, 
community, corporate, and other private interests, would share 
responsibility for co-ordinating land-use planning for both public and 
private land; and for defining and implementing development 
options that would ensure that human needs are met in a 
sustainable way. 

f) In order to address the above aspects, a broad Vision, goals and 
objectives have been formulated in collaboration with the 
communities and other key stakeholders consulted during the 
preparation of the SDF. 

g) As described in Chapter 14, the SDF was prepared in context and in 
compliance with international agreements, protocols and 
obligations. Subsequently, in order to balance the socio-economic 
aspirations of //Khara Hais Municipality with the use of the natural 
environment and its community-supporting resources, the overriding 
mission of the IUCN55 was adopted as a fundamental guideline in 
the preparation of this document, namely: The maintenance of 
essential ecological processes, the preservation of genetic diversity 
and the insurance of the sustainable utilisation of species and 
ecosystems that can only be achieved by the conservation of 
essential habitats and not individual species; and, the management 
of human use of the biosphere so that it may yield the greatest 

TT 


sustainable benefit to present generations, while maintaining its 
potential to meet the needs and aspirations of future generations’ 
(lUCN, 1980)56. 

h) Additional fundamental guidance for the preparation of the SDF was 
provided by the discussion document of the Department of 
Environmental Affairs and Tourism entitled Towards a New 
Environmental Policy for South Africa' (1996). In particular, 
reference is made to the statement that ‘in the process of 
transforming the South African society, the South African 
Government of national unity States as one of its priorities, that the 
government must ensure that all South African citizens, present and 
future, have the right to a decent quality of life through the 
sustainable use of resources. It also States that environmental 
considerations must be built into every decision and that current 
legislation should be revised with a view to establishing an effective 
System of environmental management in South Africa. The 
underlying principle of sustainable development is not only 
recognised as a priority by the South African Government, but also 
internationally in Agenda 21’. 

VISION FOR //KHARA HAIS 

Based upon the above visionary statements, the following Vision was formulated for 

//Khara Hais namely: 

VISION 

a self-sustaining ecology with long-term benefit for all inhabitants of //Khara 

Hais.... 

5.7.3 PROMOTION OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - THE OVERARCHING 

GOAL OF THE SDF 

As stated in the project brief, the primary aim of the SDF is to ‘promote sustainable 

development in //Khara Hais’. 


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Sustainable development is defined as ‘development that meets the needs of the 
present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet 
theirown needs’ (WCED, 1987:8)57. 

The IISD58 (1995) highiights two key components with regard to sustainable 
development, namely the concept of need (in particular, the essential needs of the 
poor to which overriding priority should be given, and the reality of limitations, 
imposed by the state of technology and social organisation), and the environment's 
ability to meet present and future needs. 

In the World Conservation Strategy, sustainable development is considered to be a 
set of tools and strategies, which respond to five broad requirements, namely: 

a) Integration of conservation with development. 

b) Satisfaction of basic human needs. 

c) Achievement of equity and justice. 

d) Provision of social self-determination and cultural diversity. 



5.7.4 THE //KHARA HAIS SDF BUILDS ON THE FOLLOWING UNDERSTANDING 
OF THE THREE GLOBAL IMPERATIVES: 


e) Maintenance of ecological integrity. 

It is clear that sustainable development will not be achieved by only conserving 
natural areas. The Global Biodiversity Strategy (lUCN/UNEP/WWF) States that 
conservation strategies must be aimed at accommodating cultural, economie, and 
political circumstances at local and regional levels. 

Such strategies must, inter alia, be aimed at improving the well-being of local and 
regional communities through the implementation of conservation strategies. 

The USD (1995) points out that sustainable development occurs at the intersection of 
three global imperatives and that if these imperatives are not balanced, sustainable 
development cannot be achieved (refer to Figure Below). 


5.7.4.1 HUMAN WELL-BEING 

Human well-being refers to both material and spiritual well-being. Material well-being 
refers to the absence of poverty. Spiritual well-being, in terms of the bioregional 
planning approach, implies that the bioregion represents a physical and moral space 
where lts inhabitants seek to maintain and improve the continuity of lts complex 
ecology. This, especially, entails creating the conditions for developing the individual 
to become richly connected to place and to obtain new powers, emotionally, 
intellectually and physically, so as to enable the individual, as a member of society, 
to play his or her rightful role in promoting and achieving sustainable development. It 
is recognised that, in post-apartheid South Africa, special consideration has to be 
given to address historical inequalities that have undermined human well-being in 
the past. 


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57.4.2 ENVIRONMENTAL INTEGRITY 

Environmental integrity refers to the relative ‘wholeness’ of the environment. 
‘Environment’ is defined as the aggregate of all external conditions and influences 
affecting the life of an organism. In particular, ‘environment' refers to the 
surroundings within which humans exist and that are made up of: 

a) the land, water and atmosphere of the earth; 

b) micro-organisms, plant and animal life; 

c) any part or combinatiën of (a) and (b) and the interrelationships 
among and between them; and 

d) the physical, Chemical, aesthetic and cultural properties and 
conditions of the foregoing that influence human heaith and well- 
being. 

Environmental integrity is determined by the value of the environment or place 
(natural or human-made), with specific reference to its intrinsic, systemic, and/or 
instrumental value. The SDF builds on the recognitiën that the human-made 
environment is located within and ‘contained’ by the natural environment. The 
manner in which human settlements are developed, therefore, has an immense 
impact on the quality and integrity of the environment as a totality. It is therefore 
imperative that the human-made environment be planned, designed and developed 
in a manner that will ensure the maintenance of the values referred to above (i.e. 
intrinsic, systemic, and/or instrumental value). From a natural environmental 
perspective, it is clear that ecological integrity is a key factor in the sustainable 
development equation. Ecological integrity inter alia requires that source and sink 
thresholds are not exceeded, that biodiversity is protected and essential ecological 
processes and services (e.g. water yield and quality, soil conservation, 
decomposition, etc.) are maintained. 

5.7.4.3 ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY 

Economie efficiency is understood as the optimisation of benefit at the lowest cost for 
valued things. Efficiency is the balancing criterion between human well-being and 
environmental integrity as it relates to a level of achievement in a particular 


performance in the one, to a loss in performance with the other. In terms of the 
definition and understanding of sustainable development and bioregional planning, 
efficiency is considered to take place within an economie system. 

In view of the fact that efficiency balances the gains among different values, conflict 
often arises where the level of attainment of efficiency is in question. Efficiency, 
which balances the gains among different values, can therefore not be considered 
separately from justice, which balances the gains among persons. Whilst equity is 
most often considered as an ideal principle of just distribution of goods/benefits 
among persons, there are many stumbling blocks in society that make pure equity 
impossible to achieve. 

5.7.5 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES 

The application and implementation of the concept of sustainable development in the 
planning area need to be organised in accordance with set principles that will 
operationalize the Vision and goals of //Khara Hais. These principles include the 
following: 

5.7.5.1 SOCIAL SUSTAINABILITY 

This objective refers to the concept of need referred to above and addresses the 
following: 

a) Improve 

b) equality of human life, including poverty elimination. 

c) Recognise the extent of cultural diversity and respond accordingly. 

d) Protect and promote human heaith through a healthy environment. 

e) Implement skills training and capacity enhancement for historically 
disadvantaged people. 

5.7.5.2 ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY 

Effort must be made to achieve the following: 

a) Ensure that new development promote qualitative urban integration, 
affordable housing and densification, in a financially viable manner, without 
undermining existing property values. 


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b) Ensure that as a whole, the for- and non-profit projects combine into a 
financially viable local economy that benefits all stakeholders, including 
shareholders, employees, the community, and partners. 

c) Promote employment creation and, where practically possible, labour 
intensive construction. 

d) Enhance competitiveness within the context of the promotion of policies 
and practices that advance environmental sustainability. 

e) Invest some of the proceeds from the use of non-renewable resources in 
social and human-made Capital, to maintain the capacity to meet the needs 
of future generations. 

f) Protect and enhance the property and investments of all inhabitants. 

5.7.5.3 BIOPHYSICAL SUSTAINABILITY 

In //Khara Hais there will be the presumption in favour of conservation and a 
premium will be placed on the conservation of natural resources, wildlife and 
landscape. Materials for new development should, for example, be obtained 
from sustainable sources and in the design of buildings, the use of energy 
consumption will be minimised. 

In addition, the following principles will be incorporated into the planning and 
management of the development; 

a) Minimise use of the four generic resources, namely energy, water, land 
and materials. 

b) Maximise resource re-use and/or recycling. 

c) Use renewable resources in preference to non-renewable resources. 

d) Minimise air, land and water pollution. 

e) Create a healthy, non-toxic environment. 

f) Maintain and restore the Earth's vitality and ecological diversity. 

g) Minimise damage to sensitive landscapes, including scenic, cultural, 
historical, and architectural aspects. 


44 


57.5.4 TECHNICAL SUSTAINABILITY 

A primary alm of this SDF is to create a qualitative cultural 
environment, which is ‘in harmony’ with the natural environment that 
‘contains’ it. The following objectives are set in this regard: 

a) Construct durable, reliable and functional structures. 

b) Pursue quality in creating the built environment. 

c) Use serviceability to promote sustainable construction. 

5.7.6 ROLE OF THE MUNICIPALITY IN PROMOTING SUSTAINABLE 
DEVELOPMENT 

It is recognised that the Municipality plays a vital role in fostering sustainable 
development. The policies, programs and practices adopted and promoted 
by the Municipality are inter alia aimed at enhancing the efficiënt use of 
energy, water, sensitive habitats and other environmental resources. In 
addition, the sustainable development strategies of the Municipality aim to 
help local businesses reduce costs, generate new business 
opportunities, create jobs and increase economie competitiveness. It is 
furthermore recognised that the Municipality can exert tremendous influence 
on whether its communities adopt more sustainable paths. This involves 
shifting public resources, services, investments, purchasing power and 
policies to encourage more economically and environmentally sustainable 
outcomes. In this regard, the Municipality should fulfil a dynamic and leading 
role. 

5.7.7 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT THEMES TO BE ADDRESSED 

The SDF aims to help build and maintain viable communities within the 
broad framework of sustainability, which implies ‘meeting the needs of the 
present, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their 
needs'. 

With regard to strategie proposals relating to sustainable development 
implementation, the SDF document proposes certain themes and actions 
required at the level of the household, neighbourhood/community and the 
town/district. 


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The detail regarding these themes has been included under Volume 1 of the 
SDF and gives clear guidance to the municipality in this regard. 

5.8 SPATIAL PLANNING AND LAND USE MANAGEMENT ACT 

Implementation of the provisions of the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management 
Act 16 of 2013 (SPLUMA) that affects the Municipal Planning function within //Khara 
Hais Municipality. 

The Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Bill was assented by the President 
on 2 August 2013, and gazetted on 5 August 2013 as the Spatial Planning and Land 
Use Management Act 1 6 of 201 3. The objective of the Act is to create a coherent 
regulatory framework for spatial planning and land use management for the entire 
country that will redress the imbalances of the past and promote social and 
economie inclusion. 

The enactment of SPLUMA has brought 7 (seven) fundamental changes in spatial 
planning and land use management for //Khara Hais, which needs to be addressed. 
These changes area: 

i. Reiteration of the sole mandate of //Khara Hais municipality where municipal 

planning (land development, land use management) is concerned, 
placing the municipality as an authority of firs instant invalidating parallel 
mechanism, parallel systems, measures or institution that existed 
dealing with land development applications; 

ii. Development of SDF by all three spheres of government, norms and 

standards guided by development principles. 
lil. Development of Regional Spatial Development Framework; 
iv. Development of a single and inclusive land use scheme for the entire 

municipality with special emphasis to municipal differentiated approach; 
V. Establishment and composition of a Municipal Planning Tribunal and 
deciding on an appeal structure to determine and decide on land 
development applications; 

vi. The significance of intergovernmental support and alignment of 
authorisations; and 


vii. Significance of development charges. 

The above 7 (seven) fundamentals of SPLUMA call for a radical change in the 
manner in which //Khara Hais municipality have been performing our spatial 
planning, land development and land use management duties. SPLUMA provisions 
include amongst other the following: 

a. Establish a Municipal Planning Tribunal. 

b. Determine the type of Municipal Planning Appeal structure to be 
implemented. In the case of //Khara Hais Municipality, Council decided to 
make use of the existing Appeal Structure provided by the Provincial 
Government, namely the Northern Cape Development Appeal Tribunal 
which operates under the supervision and administration of the Department 
of Cooperative Government, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs 
(COHGSTA). 

c. Categorise development applications, those to be dealt with by the Municipal 
Planning Tribunal and those to be referred to the authorised official. This 
aspect have been dealt with in detail within the newiy approved Scheme 
Regulations for //Khara Hais Municipality and all powers and functions has 
been decided and include within the scheme regulations approved by 
Council. 

d. Review of delegations and tariffs associated with land use management and 
land development processes; (This aspect is being dealt with on an annual 
basis). 

e. A review of the existing capacity, both human and financial, has been 
undertaken as part of the process. 

f. All the Tribunal Members who will serve on the Municipal Planning Tribunal 
have been appointed and gazetted. 

g. A proper and appropriate Land Use Management System has been put in 
place and is currently 100% functional, as required by SPLUMA. 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


h. The LUMS component also includes: 

- A single Land Use Scheme covering the entire municipal area of 
jurisdiction; 

- A reviewed Spatial Development Framework which is consistent with 
SPLUMA provisions and; 

- Municipal by-laws (scheme regulations) relevant to spatial planning, 
land use and land development management. 

The Requirements SPLUMA places on //Khara Hais Municipality 
can be summarized as follows: 


Role Player 

Roles and responsibilities 

Reference 
to SPLUMA 

Status 

Municipal 

Council 

Adopt and Approve SDF 

Section 20 
(1) 

Completed 


Adopt and Approve/Review and 
monitor LUS 

Sect24(1) 

27(1) 

Completed 


Pass By-laws for enforcing a LUS 

Section 32 
(1) 

In process 


Decided on establishment of 
Municipal Planning Tribunal 

Section 35 
(1)34 

Completed 


Appoint members of Mun. 

Planning Tribunal 

Sect 35 & 36 

Completed 


Categorise development 
applications and delegations 

Section 35 
(3) 

Completed 


Give public notice in Prov 

Gazette and papers 

SPLUMA 

Completed 


May in place of Exec Authority 
authorize a body outside the 

Mun. to assume similar 
responsibilities 

Section 51 
(6) 

Completed 


Muni. 

Manager 

Receive and submit an appeal to 
Appeal Authority 

Section 51 
(2) 

Completed 

Municipal 

To make municipal land 

Sections 22, 

In place 

Planning 

development decisions 

40-50 


Tribunal 

Upon application in the 

Section 41 

In place - 


prescribed manner may: 

(a) Change the use, form & 
function of land; or 

(b) Remove, amend or 
suspend a restrictive 
condition. 

(1) 

awaits 

implementation 
of SPLUMA 


Co-opt, appoint or employ the 
services of technical or other 
advisers 

Section 39 
(1) 

In place 


May designate at least 3 
members of the Tribunal to hear, 
consider and decide a matter 
which comes before it 

Section 40 
(1) 

In place 


Must keep records of all its 
proceedings 

Section 40 
(5) 

In place 


Must provide reasons for 
decisions taken 

Section 40 
(6) 

In place 


Designate a municipal official or 
appoint any other person as an 
inspector to conduct an 
inspection 

Section 48 
(2) 

In place 

Appeals 

Must consider the appeal and 

Section 51 

In place 

Authority 

confirm, vary or revoke the 
decision 

(3) 






//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 

Authorised Access and decide on land Section 35 In place - 

officials development applications (2) and (4) operational 

Where an authorised official 
based on nature of development 
may refer it to the Mun. Planning 
Tribunal for decision 
Participate in hearing 
proceedings when required 
Record all processes thereof 
Conclude all activities associated 
with the land development 
application including 
proclamation/promulgation 
processes 


Municipal 

To investigate any non- 

Section 32 

In place 

Inspectors 

compliance with lts land use 
scheme 

( 3 ) 



To conduct an inspection 

Section 48 

In place 


required by the Municipal 
Planning Tribunal 

(2) 



INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS 

//Khara Hals Municipality did an assessment of the implications that the 
implementation of the new SPLUMA legislation will have on the institution and a 
report in this regard was tabled to Council for consideration and inclusion in the 
coming budget process. 


47 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


CHARTER 6: STATUS QUO ASSESMENT 


6.1 MUNICIPAL OVERVIEW 


The Municipal Area is divided into 14 wards. The Municipal Council of //Khara Hais 
consists of 27 members. Fourteen (14) represents wards and the rest are 
proportional representatives of political parties. The ruling party in Council is the 
ANC. 

//Khara Hais is a Local (Category B) Municipality (NC083) and is located in the ZF 
Mcgawu District Municipality (DC8). The ZF Mcgawu Municipality is the second 
largest district (approximately 103 871 knn 2 ) in the Northern Cape. The Municipality 
is approximately 344 446 ha in extent and straddles the Orange River. 

Upington is the main town of the //Khara Hais Municipality and has, since its 
inception, been the hub of activities in the region. 

GOVERNANCE AND INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS 

The governance and institutional arrangements of //Khara Hais Municipality are 
critical to achieving its Vision to provide an affordable quality service to //Khara 
Hais and its visitors and to execute the policies and programmes of the Council. 

This model is made up of the Council including the Speaker of Council, Section 79 
Portfolio Committees and Standing Committees; and the Executive made up of the 
Executive Committee, as well as the administration, led by the Municipal Manager. 

The core mandate of the Council is focused on the five themes listed below: 

■ Accountability, Oversight and Scrutiny 

■ Strengthen Capacity of the Council 

■ Public Participation to safeguard the local democratie processes 

■ Monitoring and Evaluation 

■ Sound Financial Management 


Legislative functions also include the approval of By-laws, policies, budget, the 
Integrated Development Plan, tariffs, rates, taxes and service charges. Council 
further considers reports received from the Executive Committee, focuses on public 
participation related to Council matters through discussions, stimulates debate in 
multi-party portfolio committees, ensures community and stakeholder participation 
as well as playing an oversight role of the on the Executive. 

The System of delegations guides committees in terms of the role of oversight they 
play within the Legislature. Councillors also physically visit sites where projects, 
especially service delivery projects are implemented, so as to fulfil the oversight role 
that they play. 

Section 79 Portfolio Committees perform an oversight role by monitoring the 
delivery and outputs of the Executive. These committees do not have any delegated 
decision-making powers. Functions include: 

■ Reviewing, monitoring and evaluating departmental policies; 

■ Reviewing and monitoring of plans and budgets; 

■ Considering quarterly and annual departmental reports; 

■ Examining the link between the strategy, plans and budgets of the Municipality; 
and 

• Holding the political Executive accountable for performance against policies and 
the Municipality’s priorities. 

Standing Committees have been established to deal with Council related matters. 
These committees have decision-making powers and are chaired by Councillors, 
with the exception of the Audit Committee which is chaired by an independent 
person. This is in line with the prescriptions of the Municipal Finance Management 
Act (MFMA). 

The Executive 

The Executive is made up of the Executive Committee of Council. The Executive 
Committee is representative of all political parties within the Council. 

The Executive Committee heads the Executive arm of the Municipality. The Mayor, 
Councillor Limakatso Koloi presides at meetings of the Executive Committee, 


48 



//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


performs ceremonial functions, and exercises the powers delegated to the Mayor by 
the municipal council or the executive committee. The Executive Committee is also 
accountable for the strategie direction of the Municipality. 

Members of the Executive Committee, is responsible for a specific portfolio and is 
directly accountable to the Executive Committee. 

INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW 

The Institutional Review process of a municipality is guided by the Municipal 
Systems Act, the Municipal Structures Act and well as the Municipal Finance 
Management Act. The frameworks provided by these Acts clearly define the roles 
and responsibilities of the Municipal Manager and how to appoint and manage 
Section 57 employees. In summary, the Institutional Review was based on a work- 
study performed in internally. This process produces a revised organizational 
structure which establishes two more directorates within the institution. 

The Directorates are: 

Office of the Municipal manager 
Corporate Services 
Financial Services 
Civil Engineering Services 
Electro mechanical Services 
Community Services 
Development and Planning 

The Administration 
The Municipal Manager 

Mr D. Ngxanga is the Municipal Manager appointed by the Council in terms of 
Section 82 of the Municipal Structures Act, and is therefore designated as the 
Accounting Officer and the Administrative Head of the Municipality. 

Responsibilities of the Municipal Manager include managing financial affairs and 
service delivery in the municipality. The Municipal Manager is assisted by the 
manager in the Office of the Municipal Manager and the various Directors and 
Senior Manager as well as Managers of the Departments. 


6.2 BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY ANNUAL 


6.2.1 DEVELOPMENT OF A HOLISTIC COMPREHENSIVE (ALL SECTORS) 
INFRASTRUCTURE DELIVERY PLAN 

The Municipality do not have a formal Infrastructure Delivery Plan. Business 
plans do however exist for infrastructure delivery. 

6.2.2 WATER 

6.2.2.1 REVIEW OF THE WSDP (SEE ANNEXURE D) 

//Khara Hais's WSDP was reviewed approved and adopted by the Council during 
2014 financial year which will be valid until 2016. The DWS has developed a new 
web-based WSDP in 2015. The DWS is busy with the role out of the new system 
throughout the province. The system is aimed to assist municipalities to update data 
by populating the system directly, also to report compliance and planning 
performance to the department on an annual basis. 

//Khara Hais has already began to populate data on to the system and will continue 
to do so before end of the year. 

6.2.2.2 NATIONAL TARGETS 

The national targets are in line with the Millenium Development Goals for water 
provision. 

6.2.2.3 APPROVED SERVICE LEVEL 

Formal Settlements - Stand Pipe 200m 
Informal Settlement: Provision in water tanks 

6.2.2.4 BACKLOGS 

Households below RDP Standard total 1933, and those with no service, 1439. 

6.2.2.5 BASIC SERVICES PROVISION 

House connection total 12143; Stand connection total 4 940, and Standpipes total 
1933 stands. 


4 ^ 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


6.2.2.6 FREE BASIC WATER 

The municipality is currently providing free basic water to 12 360 households. 

6.2.2.7 HIGHER LEVELS OF SERVICE REQUIREMENTS 

The total number of households that receives higher levels of services is 12143. 

6.2.2.8 ASSOCIATED SERVICES E.G. SCHOOLS AND CLINICS 

Total units with service include: 

27 Schools 
9 Clinics 
3 Police Stations 
Correctional Services 
Kalahari West Water Board 
8 South African Infantry Batallion 

6.2.2.9 WATER FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 

The main purification works in Upington, Abraham Holbors September Water 
Treatment Works, has a capacity of 84 M/lday and the highest recorded summer 
output is approximately 64 Ml/day. During winter it drops to an average daily output 
of 38MI/day. The integration of other sector program’s water requirements and 
specially the impact on water planning with regards to: Housing, Agriculture, Mining 
(salt etc.), Tourism and Public Works programs leaves room for growth in all 
sectors.The extend to which each sector will grow, will entirely depend on the onus 
of that particular sector. 

6.2.2.10 MAINTENANCE PLAN FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE OF 
WATER SERVICES AND INFRASTRUCTURE 

Maintenance Plans are in place for the repair and maintenance of mechanical and 
electrical equipment at the eight (8) water production plants of the municipality and 
the pump stations that form part of the distribution netwerk. 

Repair and maintenance of the water distribution netwerk take place mainly on a 
reactive basis, based on customer requests and emergency repair work as and 
when required. 


50 


The Operational Budget for operation and maintenance for water services increased 
to R42.8 million in projected costs for 2014/2015 

6.2.2.11 WATER SERVICES PROGRAM 

FINANCIAL VIABILITY OF THE WATER SERVICES PROGRAM 

Water Services are not ring-fenced since some functions within the municipality are 
not income generating functions and need to be cross-subsidized from income 
derived through functions such as water and electricity sales. 

The medium term Indicative Capital Budget for 2012-2015 make provision for 
income through the various combined funding sources of about R78 million, R52 
million and R58 million, respectively. 

The total capita! budget for the 2014/2015 financial year is about R 39 million. 

6.2.2.12 RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT (WITH RELATION TO DEMAND 
MANAGEMENT, WATER BALANCE ISSUES AND ECOLOGICAL RESERVE) 

The main water treatment works in Upington has been extended during the 
2009/2010 financial year to provide a total treatment capacity of 84 Ml/day in order 
to cater for future growth and development. Further upgrading works have been 
completed during the 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 financial year at a cost of 
approximately R23 million in order to provide treatment facilities for the treatment of 
algae and high raw water turbidity conditions. These upgrades were necessary, due 
to high algae growth and high raw water turbidity conditions which are experienced 
during the summer months especially, and periods of flooding of the Orange River. 

The municipality is currently lacking a comprehensive water demand management 
implementation strategy, however, the current focus is on metering. A reliable water 
balance , is also available at present. 

Currently, a huge gap exists within the relevant directorate responsible for water 
services management in terms of available resources (human resources and 
equipment). However, a human resources development strategy has been tabled by 
the relevant directorate in order to address these issues in the medium to long term. 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


6.2.2.13 CONTRACTING AND LICENSING 

AH contracting and licenses for raw water abstraction and supply is in place between 
the Department of Water Affairs and the municipality as well as the various water 
irrigation boards which supply the municipality with raw water in the peri-urban and 
rural villages 

6.2.2.14. WATER QUALITY 

Water quality monitoring is conducted at three (3) levels. Bacteriological monitoring 
takes place at various locations within the distribution system and compliance 
monitoring in terms of physical, Chemical and bacteriological parameters, takes 
place on a monthiy basis at all the water treatment facilities. Operational monitoring 
is also conducted at the 8 treatment facilities on a 2-hourly basis looking at the 
various physical and Chemical parameters. 

The //Khara Hais Municipality achieved Blue Drop scores of 7%, 38%, 44% and 
72% in the 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012 Blue Drop Report, respectively. It is evident 
in the scores that have been achieved over the years that the journey towards Blue 
Drop status has been long, difficult and onerous. The municipality has finally 
achieved Blue Drop status in the 2014 Blue Drop Report with an average Blue Drop 
score of 96%. Two out of the 8 Water Treatment facilities in the municipality 
achieved Blue Drop status in the 2014 Blue Drop report with the lowest score being 
78%. 

6.2.2.15 EXTENSION OF BASIC WATER SERVICES 

The Municipality is working toward providing water to every household with basic 
water services and budgeted an amount of R3.2 Million within the 2014/15 Annual 
Capital Budget. The following areas were given a higher priority namely 
Lambrechtsdrift, Karos, Leerkrans, Dakota Road, Rosedale (Smarties Valley, Hash 
Valley and Westerkim) and Paballelo's Informal Housing Area. 


6.2.2.16 INTERVENTIONS TO IMPROVE WATER SERVICES 

The table below indicates the water service level per ward as well as the 
backlogs. And the intervention required addressing the backlogs. 


Status on water provision, backlogs and interventions 

Ward 

Nu of 

households 

Service Level 

Intervention required 

Above RDP 

RDP Standard 

Below RDP 

No service 

1 

1399 

949 

137 

197 

116 

Provision of water on 313 
erven (136 new erven not 
included ) 

2 

1304 

896 

405 

0 

3 

Provision of water on 12 

erven 

3 

928 

928 

0 

0 

0 

Provision of water on 1 

erven 

4 

906 

906 

0 

0 

0 

Provision of water on 1 

erven 

5 

1611 

849 

479 

39 

244 

Provision of interim water 
onoccupied informal 
areas: 

Louisevale Road 235 
households 

6 

1768 

1048 

207 

0 

513 

Provision of water on 720 
erven ( new extention) 

7 

725 

725 

0 

0 

0 

Provision of water on 7 

erven 

8 

2385 

1752 

0 

0 

330 

Provision of water on 636 
erven (new extention) 

9 

1738 

1738 

0 

0 

0 

Provision of water on 172 
erven (new extention) 

10 

2810 

898 

802 

1110 

0 

Provision of water on 

1110 erven (new 
extention) 

11 

984 

465 

375 

144 

0 

Provision of water on 139 
erven (52 new erven not 
included) 

12 

1192 

80 

1006 

0 

97 

Provision of water on 151 
erven (29 new erven not 
included) 

13 

1859 

755 

890 

214 

0 

Provision of water on 541 
erven (new extention) 

14 

1149 

154 

639 

229 

127 

Provision of water on 275 
erven (153 new erven) 


51 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


6.2.3 SANITATION 

6.2.3.1 Availability of a municipal sanitation implementation plan 

A Sanitation Implementation Plan is currently in development. However various 
activities supported by the Department of Water & Sanitation are currently 
underway in order to address sanitation backlogs, most notably the Bucket 
Eradication Programma. Under this initiative, the //Khara Hais Municipality will 
benefit from the provision of approximately 4273 new toilet structures to be 
constructed in various wards. the different activities will be combined into a 
Comprehention Sanitation Development Plan during the 2014/2015 financial 
year. 

6.2.3.2 THE NEED / EXTENT FOR BASIC SERVICES 

Buckets - 2725, Pit latrines 194, No service 2466 

6.2.3.3 BACKLOGS 

Households with less than basic services increased from 5190 to 5385 

6.2.3.4 BASIC SERVICES PROVISION 

Total units with service include: 

1 5070 households with basic or higher services 
1 741 households with VIP/ UDS toilets 

6.2.3.5 FREE BASIC SANITATION 

Free basic sanitation is delivered to 12360 households. 

6.2.3.6 HIGHER LEVELS OF SERVICE REQUIREMENTS 

Households above RDP Standard totals 13 329 

6.2.3.7 ASSOCIATED SERVICES E.G. SCHOOLS AND CLINICS 
Total units with service include; 

TI school 
■T 9 clinics 


52 


3 police stations 
Correctional Services 
8 South African Infantry Batallion 
Kalahari Wes -Water 

6.2.3.8 MAINTENANCE PUN FOR SANITATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE 

The 2014/2015 Capital needs, take into consideration strategies and programs with 
regards to backlogs, basic services provision, free basic services, higher levels of 
service requirements, associated services and water for growth and development. 
However, projects are not allocated against a specific strategy and are often cross 
cutting. To this end a specific project may target the eradication of backlogs, but at 
the same time also include the delivery of a higher level of service. 

The total capita! budget for the 2014/2015 financial year is about R39 million. 

Operational costs for 2014/2015 for operation and maintenance for sanitation 
services is about R21 .6 million. 

Maintenance Plans are in place for the repair and maintenance of mechanical and 
electrical equipment at the 2 sewerage treatment plants of the municipality and the 
sewer pump stations that form part of the sewer collection netwerk. Repair and 
maintenance of the sewer netwerk take place on a reactive basis, based on 
customer requests and emergency repair work as and when required, as well as 
pro-active bases through the implementation of a preventative maintenance plan. 

6.2.3.9 FINANCIAL VIABILITY OF THE SANITATION SERVICES 

Sanitation Services are not ring-fenced since some functions within the municipality 
are not income generating functions and need to be cross-subsidized from income 
derived through functions such as water and electricity sales. 

The medium term Indicative Capital Budget for 2012-2015 make provision for 
income through the various combined funding sources of about R78 million, 
R52 million and R58 million, respectively. 

The total Capital budget for the 2014/2015 financial year is about R39 million. 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


6.2.3.10 CONTRACTING AND LICENSING 

The municipality is I the process of updating its licenses for effluent discharge with 
the Department of Water & Sanitation. However, all wastewater treatment facilities 
are registerd with the Department of Water & Sanitation. Effluent is being treated at 
two treatment facilities namely Louisvale Road Oxidation Fonds System and the 
Kameelmond Sewerage Treatment Works which makes use of bio filter and 
activated sludge processes. 

The Green Drop System evaluates these two treatments facilities and the Green 
Drop System scores in 201 1 was 35 % for Kameelmond STW and Louisvale Road 
Oxidation Fonds System was 37%. The 2013 Green Drop Score is 68 % for 
Kameelmond STW and Louisvale Road Oxidation Fonds System was 54 %. 

6.2.3.11 EXTENSION OF BASIC SEWERAGE AND SANITATION SERVICES 

Frovide all with basic sanitation services to eliminate UDS/ VIF toilets for rural areas 
(1738 households), and eradicate the bucket system by providing sewerage 
Systems for 5385 households in urban areas. 

Table 6 below indicates the existing level of service per ward and the intervetions 
needed to address the backlogs. 


Table 6 Sewerage and Sanitation services and backlogs per ward (Stats SA) 


Status and backlogs on Sewerage and Sanitation services and interventions 

Ward 

Nu of 

households 

Service Level 

Intervention required 

Above 

RDP 

RDP 

Standard 

Below 

RDP 

No service 

1 

1399 

1086 

0 

56 

257 

Phase out bucket system in five (5) years 
through instalation of sewer infrastructure fo 
existing unserviced sub- economie erven 

2 

1304 

1304 

0 

0 

0 


3 

928 

928 

0 

0 

0 


4 

906 

906 

0 

0 

0 


5 

1611 

990 

0 

386 

235 

Phase out bucket system in five (5) years 
through instalation of sewer infrastructure 
for existing unserviced sub- economie 


531 


Status and backlogs on Sewerage and Sanitation services and interventions 

Ward 

Nu of 

households 

Service Level 

Intervention required 

Above 

RDP 

RDP 

Standard 

Below 

RDP 

No service 







erven 

6 

1768 

1048 

0 

207 

513 

Phase out bucket system in five (5) years 
through instalation of sewer infrastructure 
for existing unserviced sub- economie 
erven 

7 

725 

725 

0 

0 

0 


8 

2385 

1752 

0 

0 

330 

Phase out bucket system in five (5) years 
through instalation of sewer infrastructure 
for existing unserviced sub- economie 
erven 

9 

1738 

1738 

0 

0 

0 

Instalation of sewer infrastructure for future 
developments 

10 

2810 

898 

0 

1658 

254 

Phase out bucket system in five (5) years 
through instalation of sewer infrastructure 
for existing unserviced sub- economie 
erven 

11 

984 

642 

220 

69 

53 

Construction of toilet structures in 
organised informal settlements 

12 

1192 

25 

928 

77 

162 

Construction of toilet structures in 
organised informal settlements 

13 

1859 

1240 

0 

350 

269 

Phase out bucket system in five (5) years 
through instalation of sewer infrastructure 
for existing unserviced sub- economie 
erven 

14 

1149 

47 

593 

116 

393 

Construction of toilet structures in 
organised informal settlements 


6.2.4 HOUSING 

Human Settlements (Housing) (See Housing Chapter: Annexure E) 

II Khara Hais Municipality obtained a level 2 accreditation. It means the staff of the 
housing section can capture the subsidy applications on COGHSTA’S Housing 
Subsidy System. 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


6.2.4.1 HOUSING DEMAND 

The Housing Demand Data Base/ Housing Needs Register are functional but the 
municipality still encounters login problems on a daily basis. Four temporary data 
capturers were employed to daily upload information on the system, but of late, 
3 members were re deployed, to other departments, which left the Housing 
Department vulnerable. 

Provincial government was requested to budget for training of these temporary 
employees. The Department of COGHSTA has made annual allocations to the 
municipality to cover the employee’s costs of the temporary staff. A lot of technical 
problems are encountered with the Housing Needs Register system. Total demand 
is estimated to be ± 7450. 

6.2.4.2 HOUSING DEMAND CHALLENGES 

Over the last two years a growth in demand of up to ±4000 persons were 
experienced. There is an increase in demand from single parents (both male and 
female), and in particular by the youth aged up to 35 years. 

New Business Plans were drafted and is in a process of completion. These Plans 
address all the needs of housing in the municipal jurisdictiën. The Municipality is 
currently venturing into the market of GAP and Social Housing as well, of which 
Rental Housing is one of the only other alternatives, funded by by COGHSTA. 


Housing status, backlogs and interventions 

Ward 

Nu of 

households 

Typeof main dwelling 

Intervention required 

Formal 

structure 

Informal 

structure 

Informal back 
yard 

1 

2055 

1208 

847 

0 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 
housing. 

2 

1578 

1480 

27 

71 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 
housing. 

3 

1157 

1115 

5 

37 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 
housing. 

4 

1023 

988 

4 

31 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 
housing. 

5 

1562 

1108 

438 

16 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 
housing. 

6 

1737 

1227 

424 

86 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 


Housing status, backiogs and interventions 

Ward 

Nu of 

households 

Type of main dwelling 

Intervention required 

Formal 

structure 

Informal 

structure 

Informal back 
yard 






housing. 

7 

950 

791 

42 

117 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 
housing. 

8 

2560 

2240 

305 

15 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 
housing. 

9 

2204 

2130 

69 

5 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 
housing. 

10 

2339 

1035 

1241 

63 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 
housing. 

11 

2215 

1591 

591 

33 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 
housing. 

12 

1769 

655 

1075 

39 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 
housing. 

13 

1810 

991 

628 

191 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 
housing. 

14 

1420 

920 

486 

14 

Construction of BNG; Subsidy and alternative 
housing. 


Table 7- Status of housing within IIKhara Hais Municipality (Stats SA) 


6.2.4.3 SUITABLE LAND FOR HOUSING DEVELOPMENT 

There is a shortage of land in the rural areas, but enough vacant land on the 
commonage. EIA and Geotech studies are being done on a regular basis. Private 
land will have to be purchased in certain rural areas. 

6.2.4.4 SERVICE LEVELS THROUGH CIP 

The nature of service levels on these land parcels through Comprehensive 
Infrastructure Plan. 

6.2.4.5 INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS 

The municipality do not have a Migration Plan. Most unorganised informal 
settlements established by community, are addressed on an adhoc basis by 
Council. 






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31 March 2016 


6.2.4.6 IMPLEMENTATION OF CURRENT AND PLANNED HOUSING 
PROJECTS 

Province, in principal, availed resources for a rental project with 500 units. Land 
was identified on erven 14974 for flats and a feasibility study and business plan 
was done. 

250 houses were allocated to //Khara hais Municipality to be build in different 
wards in the municipal area.Serviced erven was identified and the project will be 
implemented during the 2014/ 2015 financial year. 

The Housing department is continually processing applications for subsidised 
housing. These are forwarded to Province for approval and allocation of funds. 
An allocation is made for the service of rental houses, and the construction will 
begin in the 2015/2016 financial year. All our projects are handeld by the 
Department of Cooperate Governance. The housing department are also running 
the program of consumer education to make communities aware of services 
rendering by the municipality especially from the housing unit. 

6.2.47 BUDGETARY PROVISION FOR PLANNED HOUSING PROJECTS 

The cost for the top structure per house is R1 10 000.00. 

6.2.4.8 THE SOCIAL VIABILITY OF THE SETTLEMENTS 

All business plans in II Khara Hais area provide infrastructure EIA as well Social 
compact studies has been done, and is captured in the business plans. 


6.2.4.9 NUMBER OF HOUSES COMPLETED/BUILT/ALLOCATED 

During the last three years the following houses was build: 


Year 

Number of houses build 
perannum 

% spend per annum 

2009-2010 

247 

59.87% 

2010-2011 

732 

91.33% 

2011-2012 

16 

(100%)% 

2012-2013 

65 

100% 

2013- 2014 

250 

0% 


2014- 2015 250 0% 

2015- 2016 

2016- 2017 

Table 8 Completed houses 

6.2.5 ENERGY 

6.2.5.1 EXTENT FOR BASIC ENERGY SERVICES 

Council stafled an electrification program in 1993, with the result that in 1996 all 
houses in the municipal area of supply were connected or had access to a basic or 
higher level of connection. 

Since then an annual electrification program was introduced to make provision for 
new areas. Currently the new settlements are entered on the Integrated National 
Electrification Program, managed by Department of Energy and connected as funds 
are made available. 

Currently there are 455 houses in the program for 2015/16 and 320 houses for 
2016/17. 

The houses in the Eskom area of supply are also done through the Integrated 
National Electrification Program by Eskom. The electrification of 57 houses in 
Karos, 97 houses in Raaswater and 167 houses in Melkstroom is in progress 

6.2.5.2 PROVISION FOR GRID AND NON-GRID ENERGY SOURCES 

The main grid of the municipality is presently being developed according to a master 
plan approved in 1998, with amendments done during the IDP program for the 
period 2007-2012. Further projects have been included in the 2015 to 2017 period, 
but an update for the master plan is now becoming necessary. The department has 
never been involved in non-grid supply and no plan or budget exists. 

6.2.5.3 ALTERNATIVE SOURCES AND RENEWABLE ENERGY 

The municipality is currently involved in the national program for the development of 
solar power installations in the Upington area. The roll-out of solar geysers has 



//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


been taken over by the Department of Energy and the municipality is not currently 
included in the program. 


ELECTRICITY: Status and interventions 


Ward 

Nu of 

households 

Service Level 
Lighting 

Cooking 

Heating 

Intervention required 

1 

2055 

1225 

1211 

998 

Rosedale 455 connections, and High 
Mast lighting: Smarties Valley, West 
of Westerkim 

2 

1578 

1546 

1539 

1233 

High Mast lighting: Morning Glory - 
Oranjeweg to Vooruitsig Str 

3 

1157 

1147 

1104 

905 

High Mast lighting: Rainbow - 
Angelierweg 

4 

1023 

1001 

993 

995 


5 

1562 

1434 

1379 

607 

Rondomskrik - 90 connections 

6 

1737 

1510 

1446 

1342 

New Heaven (>500 erven) and High 
Mast lighting: Westen Street 

7 

950 

921 

907 

753 


8 

2560 

2270 

2122 

2026 

Electrification projects for new 
developments:Dakota Road 

9 

2204 

2092 

1968 

1773 

High Mast lighting: Melkstroom 

10 

2339 

1953 

1914 

1455 

Rosedale:North 200 connections 

11 

2215 

1523 

1342 

1008 

Kalksloot - 152 connections and 

High Mast lighting: Lemoendraai 

12 

1769 

1532 

1412 

1241 

High Mast lighting: Raaswater - 
New development 

13 

1810 

1764 

1723 

1613 

Paballelo - 375 connections 

14 

1420 

1268 

1153 

798 

High Mast lighting: Karos- New 


development, Leerkrans- New 

development 

Table 9 Status of provision of electricity for various uses 


6.2.5.4 MAINTENANCE PUN FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE 
(NEW PROJECTS) 

The annual budget makes provision for grid supply, but no provision is made for 
non-grid supply. 

6.2.5.5 REDS REDISTRIBUTION POLICY 

The development of REDs has been abandoned and therefore no policy or plan is 
necessary. 


6.2.5.6 UPGRADING OF FACILITIES 

Provision for the upgrading of facilities forms part of the annual budget. Due to 
financial constraints, no upgrades are planned for the period 2014/15 to 2016/17 

6.2.6 ROADS, TRANSPORT AND STORM WATER 

6.2.6.1 TRANSPORT PLAN 

A comprehensive Transportation plan is not currently in place. Coupled with a 
Transportation plan is a Pavement Management System for the management and 
development of road pavement conditions. Such a management system is not 
currently in place, but has been identified as a crucial planning and management 
instrument to put in place. 

6.2.6.2 STATUS WITH REGARD TO ROADS AND STREETS 

Table below indicates the total kilometres of roadnetwork in //Khara Hais Municipal 
area there state and possible interventions to address the needs. 


Status of ROADS/ STREETS and interventions 


Area 

Service Level 



Intervention required 


Total 

Tar 

Paved 

Gravel 



Street 

Streets 

Streets 

Streets 



length 

(km) 

(km) 

(km) 


Town Area 

279, 006 

193,824 

9.6 

100.1 

Tarring and paving of streets 

Lambrechtsdrift 

3, 440 

0 

0,420 

3,020 

Tarring and paving of streets 

Karos 

5, 390 

0 

0.8 

5,390 

Tarring and paving of streets 

Leerkrans 

4, 500 

0 

0.6 

4,500 

Tarring and paving of streets 

Ntsikelelo 

3, 105 

0 

0.4 

3,105 

Tarring and paving of streets 

Louisvale Road 

9, 250 

0 

1,550 

7,700 

Tarring and paving of streets 

Leseding 

7, 250 

0 

1,650 

5,600 

Tarring and paving of streets 

Louisvale 

5, 080 

0 

2,250 

2,880 

Tarring and paving of streets 

Raaswater 

7, 030 

0 

1,630 

5,400 

Tarring and paving of streets 

Kalksloot 

8, 800 

0 

1,970 

7,430 

Tarring and paving of streets 

Lemoendraai 

1,000 

0 

0 

1,000 

Tarring and paving of streets 

Kameelmond 

1,350 

0 

0 

1,350 

Tarring and paving of streets 


Table 10- Status quo: roadnetwork per area (Source: Survey- Civil Services 2012) 


56 




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6.2.6.3 MAINTENANCE PLAN FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE OF 
ROADS AND STORMWATER 

The municipality spent approximately R9.7 million during the 2013/2014 financial 
year on the upgrade and maintenance of existing tar roads. A total of R20.25 million 
was spent during the 2013/2014 financial year on the upgrade of gravel roads to 
paved roads. 

The //Khara Hais Municipal area experiences short high intensity summer rainfall 
storms, which regularly result in flooding in the urban areas. This is the case 
especially in the previously disadvantaged areas where historie urban town planning 
approaches did not take into consideration proper stormwater management and 
drainage systems. 

Improvement of Stormwater Management systems in the //Khara Hais Municipality 
been identified as a priority by disaster management agencies. 

A Stormwater Management Masterplan has been development and is currently 
implemented. This plan proposes action plans to address the problems currently 
experienced in terms of stromwater management. 

6.2.6.4 EXTENSION OF ROADS 

The municipality invested extensively in its road infrastructure in the past 5 years, of 
which the most noteworthy was the construction of a new link road and rail overpass 
bridge between the areas of Rosedale and Paballelo, which is currently divided and 
separated by an industrial area and the main international railway line Namibia. This 
project is completed and brings communities who have in the past been divided 
through the apartheid policies of segregated development together. All access 
roads in the rural areas have been upgraded to paved roads and numerous internal 
streets in previously disadvantaged areas have been paved as well. 

Another significant new road development project, which is in planning phase at the 
moment, is the extension of Dakota Road in order to provide a through route or 
bypass for heavy vehicles commuting on the Namibian-South African import/export 
route. 

57 


6.2.6.5 MAINTENANCE PLAN FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE OF 
ROADS 

Operational expenses for 2013/2014 for operation and maintenance for roads and 
stormwater management is R53.9 mil. 

Maintenance Plans are in place for the grading of gravel roads and an annual 
pavement reseal programma is in place. Repair of potholes and other smaller 
maintenance work are conducted on a reactive basis, based on customer requests 
and emergency repair work as and when required. 

6.2.7 WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES (See Waste Management Plan: 
Appendix C) 

6.2.7.1 INTGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN 

• //Khara Hais Municipality has an activa IWMP which is due for revision. The 

plan also needs to be aligned with the IWMP of the ZF Mgcawu District 
Municipality 

• //Khara Hais renders a 100% refuse removal service. 

• Waste removal service is rendered internally. 

6.2.7.2 LANDFILL SITES 

//Khara Hais Municipality has two Landfill sites- Leerkrans and De Duine Landfill 
site. 

6.2.7.3 WASTE OR REFUSE REMOVAL SERVICES 

A prompt and effective refuse removal service is in place. Weekly services are 
delivered to households and businesses, with the CBD being serviced weekly and 
as services are required. 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

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The table below indicates the service level of wast removal in //Khara Hais. 



Ward 

Nu of 
household 

s 

Service Level 

Intervention required 

Removal 

once/week 

Removal 
less often 

Communal 

dump 

Own refuse 
dump 

No rubbish 
disposal 

1 

2055 

2055 

0 

0 

0 

0 


2 

1578 

1578 

0 

0 

0 

0 


3 

1157 

1157 

0 

0 

0 

0 


4 

1023 

1023 

0 

0 

0 

0 


5 

1562 

1562 

0 

0 

0 

0 


6 

1737 

1737 

0 

0 

0 

0 


7 

950 

950 

0 

0 

0 

0 


8 

2560 

2560 

0 

0 

0 

0 


9 

2204 

2204 

0 

0 

0 

0 


10 

2339 

2339 

0 

0 

0 

0 


11 

2215 

Removal of 
all 2215 
every 14 
days 

2215 




Extend service to reach 
households with weekly 
service. 

12 

1769 

Removal of 
all 1769 
every 14 
days 

1769 




Extend service to reach 
households with weekly 
service. 

13 

1810 

1810 

0 

0 

0 

0 


14 

1420 

Removal of 
all 1420 
every 14 
days 

1420 




Extend service to reach 
households with weekly 
service. 


Table 11- Status on refuse removal per ward 

6.27.4 MAINTENANCE PUN FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE OF 
RE-CYCLING 

Tenders were advertised and site meetings were held with potential recycling 
componies who tendered. The tender process has been finalised and a 
Recycling company were appionted. 


6.2.8 ENVIRONMENT: AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT 

6.2.8.1 AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT PLAN 

As a local government //Khara Hais has no authority to issue licenses. Air Quality is 
therefor a function of the ZFM District Municipality, 

6.2.8.2 STATUS AS LICENCING AUTHORITY 

ZFM District Municipality is the Licencing Authority regarding Air Quality 
Licensing. ZFM District Municipality does not have an air Quality Management 
Plan, but is currently busy drafting one in collaboration with Dept. of 
Environment. 

6.2.8.3 MAINTENANCE PLAN FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE OF 
NEW CAPITAL PROJECTS 

There are no projects currently regarding Air Quality issues. 

6.3 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION AND GOOD GOVERNANCE 


6.3.1 COMMUNITY CONSULTATIONS, PARTICIPATION AND EMPOWERMENT 

Chapter 7 of the Constitution of South Africa highiight the objectives and show the 
importance of Local Government. 

Article 152 (e) emphasize the importance of the community involvement in this 
sphere of government. In the strife for good governance the Municipality must 
budget for community consultations, participation and empowerment. 

6.3.1. 1 BUDGET FOR GOOD GOVERNANCE 

In the budget of 2014/15 the Municipality budget for potential advancement of 
adequate skills development of councillors an amount of R425, 000. 00. The 
Municipality strive to develop the councillors so that they can have a better 
understanding of their roles in the municipality with all the challenges that confronts 


58 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


the municipalty. The councillors are enrolled at the University of Fort Hare where 
they study for the certificate in public administration. 

6.3.1 .2 COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION PLAN 

The Municipality have a community participation plan in place. Every year the 
council embark on a programme called, Council meets the people. This 
programme covers the whole Municipal area. It gives the communities an 
opportunity to interact with the Councillors in the different Wards. The Chief 
Financial Officer and the Finance Team went out with the members of the Exco in 
the preparation of the budget. The IDP process involves also the communities in 
different Wards. Ward base meetings happens on a monthiy bases in the Wards 
and it give the Councillors an opportunity to interact with the people in his/her 
Ward. 

6.3.1 .3 TRADITIONAL LEADERS 

In //Khara Hais Municipality there is no traditional authority that observes a system 
of customary law that may function subject to any applicable legislation and 
customs. 

6.3.1. 4 WARD COMMITTEES 

A broader view of community participation the Legislation on Local Government 
set clear mechanism for the establishment of the Ward Committees as a structure 
to liaise with the Municipalities. Municipalities are obliged to develop lasting and 
successful models by ensuring that participation takes place through these 
established structures and as are institutionalised. They are a creation of 
legislation, the Municipal Structures Act, giving effect to the Constitution of the 
South Africa. 

lts role is to facilitate participatory democracy, disseminate Information; help 
rebuild partnership for better service delivery, and assist with problems 
experienced by the people at Ward level. To let participatory democracy work, 
//Khara Hais Municipality allocate R880, 000.00 for the budget year 2014/15. This 
allocation serves as a stipend for Ward Committee members in fulfilling their 


respective responsibilities in the ward. To let participatory democracy work, 
//Khara Hais Municipality allocate R800, 000.00 for the budget year 2015/16. This 
allocation serves as a stipend for Ward Committee members in fulfilling their 
respective responsibilities in the ward. 

6.3.1. 5 RECOMMENDATIONS TOWARDS THE IDP 

To make the IDP work towards good governance it is important to look into the 
budget and extent the list of priorities. These priorities will be the guidelines which 
will inform the challenges towards the IDP. The challenges in the Municipality are 
that some of the Wards are in rural areas. The challenge now is to increase the 
budget amount from R172, 000.00 to R250, 000.00 to address the challenges 
facing community participation. 

6.3.1. 6 SOCIAL COHESION PLAN 

To address the Social Cohesion Plan within the IDP there must be a policy. The 
Social Cohesion Plan address the culture, identify and social cohesion is a 
thematic area that is framed in terms of its intersectionality with respect to 
gender, race, class and sexuality. 

There is a growing understanding that there is an urgent need to revitalize a 
humanity-driven research theme, to build our understanding or closed identities in 
relation to understanding our past, our heritage and our future in a transforming 
and develop state. 

The movement is towards a knowledge-based economy, investment in 
development and greater emphasis on building human Capital. This will be 
realized by promoting the value in the human meaning of public policy in 
evidence-based research. 

6.3.1. 7 BACK TOBASICS PROGRAM 

The Municipal Council of //Khara Hais Municipality adopted and launched the Back 
to Basics Program of Government in October 2014. This program aims to: 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


1. Create conditions for decent living by consistently delivering municipal 
services to the right quality and Standard. This includes planning and 
delivery of infrastructure and amenities, maintenance and upkeep thereof. 

2. Ensure good governance and effective administration - cut wastage, spend 
public funds prudently, hire competent staff, ensure transparency and 
accountability. 

3. Further ensure that corruption is prevented and rooted out at all levels; 

4. Ensure sound financial management and accounting by prudently 
managing resources so as to sustainably deliver services and bring 
development to communities; 

5. Build and maintain sound institutional and administrative capabilities 
managed by dedicated and skilled personnel at all levels; 

6. Put people and their concerns first and ensure constant contact with 
communities through effective public participation platforms; 

7. Ensure quarterly performance monitoring and reporting on the work of 
municipalities as directed by the Back to Basics approach; and 

8. Improve the politica! management of municipalities and be responsive to the 
needs and aspirations of local communities. 

COGTA initiated the Back to Basics Program and are responsible to drive the 
implementation of Back to Basics. 

The Municipality has since embarked on the B 2 B program whereby monthiy 
reports are submitted to COGTA indicating progress made and interventions take 
on issues of concern. 


60 


6.3.2 COUNCIL AND SUB-COMMITTEES 

The Council convene on a quarterly basis as per administrative calender. Special 
Council Meeting may be convene as necessary. The Council established an 
Executive Committee comprising of 5 members. All exess meetings are held in 
terms of the administration callender. Special meetings may be convened as 
nessessary. It is composed of the following councillors: ANC- 3 seats, DA-1 and 
COPE 1 Seat each. During the year of overview Local Elections took place and as 
from the IS*’’ of May 2011 new Councillors were elected. 

The Mayor is the chairperson of the Executive Committee. He/she performs the 
duties, including any ceremonial functions, and exercise the powers delegated to 
the mayor by the municipal council or executive committee. 

The Council has five portfolio committees. 

• Committee for Service Delivery & Infrastructural Development 

• Committee for Local Economie Development 

• Committee for Corporate Governance 

• Committee for Transformation & Institutional Development 

• Committee for Financial Viability 

Some of the members of the Executive Committee are tasked with the responsibility 
and chairing the supporting committees. These committees meet at least once a 
month. They make recommendations to the Exco on all items tabled to them. 

6.3.3 AUDIT COMMITTEE 

The Audit Committee is fully functional and consists out of 3 members.The 
committee operates in terms of an approved charter which is in line with legislation. 
All reports of the Audit Committee are tabled to Council. Section 166 of the MFMA, 
Act No 56 of 2003 requires from the Audit Committee amongst other matters: 

“To advise the Municipal Council, Political office bearers, the Accounting officer and 
management staff on matters relating to:- 

• Performance management and evaluation 

• interna! financial control and internat audits 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


• Risk Management 

• Accounting policies 

• The adequacy, reliability and accuracy of financial reporting and information 

• Effective governance 

• Compliance with MFMA, DORA and any other applicable iegislation. ” 

The Internal Audit Department is fully functional and operates in terms of a three 
year risk based audit plan as well as an annual operational plan which is approved 
by the Municipal Manager and Audit Committee. Audit reports are issued on a 
timeous basis and are tabled to the Audit Committee on a quarterly basis. 

The Audit Committee made the foiiowing most important recommendations to 
Councii during the 2014/2015 financiai year: 

To achieve a better audit outcome: 

• Must the audit recovery plan be monitored by management. 

• Regular feedback must be provided to the Audit Committee to monitor 
implementation of remedial actions. 

• The progress made on the implementation must be a standing item on the 
agenda of the Audit Committee. 

Office of Mavor and Speaker: 

To ensure the effective functioning of Ward Committees, the Office of the Mayor 
and Speaker must: 

• Prepare monthiy reports to Councii regarding the operations of the Ward 
Committees. 

• Do a need assessment of the members against the legislative requirements 
and compile a holistic training program. 

o Conduct all training against the need assessment. 

Employee costs: 

Compliance against Iegislation and Councii policy with regards to appointments: 

6ll ^ ^ ^ ^ 


• The Human Resources department must conduct a thorough investigation 
to determine if the job descriptions of all employees are filed on their 
personnel files. 

• A process must be implemented to ensure that all appointments 
have signed job descriptions within the first month (for example, but no 
longer) of appointment where after these documents must be filed on the 
personnel file. 

• Management must exercise due care with appointments to ensure 
compliance with Iegislation and Councii Policy. 

• Management should ensure adherence to laws and Regulations by 
implementing the remuneration packages of Senior Management in line 
with the Regulations regarding upper limits. 

• Reconciliation between the staff establishment against the approved 
organisational structure must be conducted. 

o If officials are in positions that are not on the structure, Councii 
must be requested to amend the structure to make provision for 
these posts. 

o Redundant posts must be removed from the staff establishment. 

Allowances: 

• Payment of allowances should be in line with collective agreements or 
Councii policy. 

o All allowance against the Collective Agreement and Councii policy 
must be stopped until such time that approval are granted. 

• Management should ensure that reconciliations are performed between 
payroll systemand the applicable government notice (determination of 
upper limits of salades, allowances and benefits of different members of 
municipal councils) and reviewed before implementation. 

• Management should ensure that reconciliations are performed between 
disclosure notes and payroll information to ensure the accuracy and 
completeness of disclosures in the financial statements. 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

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• The official responsible for administration of housing subsidy must ensure 
that employees provide all documentation needed to qualify. 

o The affected employees must be requested to submit the relevant 
documentation or the subsidy must be stopped. 

o All relevant documentation must be filed on the 
employee’s personal file for control as well as audit purposes. 

o In the event of overpayments, the subsidy must be recovered from 
the respective officials. 

Overtime and Standby: 

• All overtime sheets with completed attendance registers must be submitted 
to Human Resources to verify the completeness and correctness thereof. 

• Human resources must ensure that planned overtime are in line with 
Council policy in the verification process. 

• Human resources must ensure that all overtime claimed are substantiated 
by supporting evidences. 

• Managers must be made awareof policy requirements and control 
measurements. 

• Management must ensure that all Information required for audit purposes 
aretimeously submitted. 

• Investigation must be lodged for overtime paid without supporting 
documentation and if found that this overtime was incorrect, it must be 
recovered from the respective officials. 

• Management must determine against the collective agreement and the 
services being rendered by the municipality, what departments and 
respective officials need to be on standby and work overtime. 

o In the event of fixed overtime programmes, cancel the standby as it 
is not expected that these officials to be called out and they are 
compensated for overtime worked. 

o The Human Resources department must do a verification of 
standby claimed against Council policy as well as the Collective 
agreement. 


• Due to internal control weaknesses with overtime, management must: 

o develop a check list for the respective official responsible for the 
verification of standby and overtime. 
o ensure that the respective official does not submit claims to payroll 
office which are not substantiated with supporting documentation. 
o review the verification of the respective official on a sample basis 
and sign off the check list. 

o ensure that no claims against the Collective Agreement and 
Council policy are being paid out. 

• Submission of EMP 201 returns: 

o Management should as part of monthiy disciplines, ensure that the 
EMP returns is completed accurate as per salary run. 
o A senior manager must review and sign the documentation before 
submission and payment made to SARS within the prescribed 
dates. 

o Management should ensure that valid reasons are provided in 
cases whereby the legislative requirement will not be adhered to. 
o Management should ensure that proper reconciliation is performed, 
in order to identify any over or under payments to SARS. 

Resorts: 

• In order to ensure sound financial management principles and the 
correctness of financial Information, management must ensure that: 

o A daily reconciliation is performed between the physical income, 
income analysis and the cash take over register, 
o A daily reconciliation is performed between the Island Resort 
System and the BIQ General Ledger so that the necessary journals 
can be put through to the income votes. 
o Unutilized deposits are transferred daily from account SDP1005 to 
the relevant income vote. 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


o Officials adhere to Council policy at all times and negligence must 
be accounted for as it leads to financial losses which must be 
recovered. 

o The manager of the resort reviews the daily reconciliations for 
correctness and completeness. 

o That face value documents be treated with care and diligence to 
mitigate the risk of misuse or fraudulent activities. 
o Council policy is adhered to in cases of cancellations. 
o That there is proper recordkeeping of cancellations. 

• To ensure accountability with Council property: 

o The inventory list per chalet must be updated and reconciled with 
the actual inventory and assets to recover losses or damages. 
o Must inspections be done after departure of clients. 

Debt collection and indigent control: 

• Disconnection of electricity services not in accordance with policy; 

o Controls must be implemented to ensure that electricity services of 
defaulted consumers have been disconnected as instructed as it is 
the only way for the municipality to enforce payment. 
o Investigation should be lodged between Financial Services and the 
Electricity Department for the implementation of a finefor the 
uniawful reconnection of conventional electricity meters as this 
hampers the successful implementation of debt collection 
measures. 

• No debt collection measurements on overdue split accounts: 

o management must do an investigation regarding the negative 
impact of split accounts on the financial situatiën of the municipality 
and by that: 


o Request Council to review the decision by giving the 
administration instruction to consolidate all accounts in order to 
hold the owner accountable. If Council does not agree, 
measures must be implemented for these split accounts to be 
reviewed on a monthiy basis in order for the implementation of 
debt collection measures. 

o the cutting and blockages of accounts be reviewed by a senior 
official to ensure the correctness, completeness and 
compliance with Council policy. 

Indigent subsidy to households with tuck-shops: 

o Control measurements must be strengthened that will minimize the 
risk of consumers receiving indigent subsidies who are not entitled 
to and for this implement a regular inspection programma, 
o As there are businesses on these premises, the Information must 
be used to enforce the other tariffs as applicable on businesses and 
the indigent subsidies be cancelled. 


Controls must be implemented to ensure that indigent registration are in line 
with Council to: 

o Minimize the risk of consumers receiving subsidies that 
they are not entitled to. 

o Ensure that all applications be reviewed before registration 
to ensure correctness and completeness. 
o Enforce Council policy at all times. 
o Ensure that all documents be filed for control as well as 
audit purposes. 

Controls must be implemented to mitigate the risk of free services to 
consumers who are not entitled to it and by that: 




//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 

o Ensure that a senior official do a reconciliation on a 

O Finance lease contracts be evaluated to evaluate compliance against 

monthiy basis on free pre-paid electricity issued to 

GRAP 13. 

indigents. 

Supplv Chain Management: 

o The reconciliation must be reviewed by the Senior 

Manager Income and Revenue Collection. 

• That management must investigate any irregular or fruitless expenditure that 

• Inadequate Controls over cancellation of free basic services to de-registered 

occurred with procurement of goods and services. 

indigents: 

• That no payments be made to contractors who did not complete previous 
contracts. 

o Controls must be implemented to ensure that indigent subsidies be 

• That the supply Chain management database be updated continuously and 

cancelled immediately when the consumer is disqualified and for 

reviewed for correctness and completeness. 

this a checklist must be developed that has to signed by all 

• That due care is taken not to do business with suppliers whose tax clearance 

respective officials. T 

certificates are not updated. 

o the checklist must be reviewed by a senior official on a regular 

• That suppliers be requested to completed projects that already being paid for. 

basis. 


o reconciliation must be done on a monthiy basis between the 

Pound: 

registered indigents against the free water and electricity issued 


which must be reviewed by a senior official. 

• The loss of Income due to the release of impounded animals without any 
payment must be recovered as it also results in non-compliance to a 

Asset management; 

municipal bylaw. 

• The Pound Master must act strictly according to the Pound Bylaw and 

• Management should ensure that: 

should therefore only release animals if the necessary payment was made 
according to the approved tariffs. 

o Controls are in place to ensure that the asset register is complete and 

• The Pound Master must act strictly according to the Pound Bylaw and 

correct to enhance accountability and adherence to legislation. 

should therefore ensure that: 

o Quarterly asset counts are performed by the asset management unit to 

o Auctions of impounded animals are advertised twice in 

ensure that the asset register is correct and complete at all times. 

local newspapers and proof of it should be kept for auditing as well 

o Officials are held accountable for assets. 

as control purposes. 

o As an incomplete asset register can easily result in an audit 

o The register is completed with the details of the auction. 

qualification, asset register be adjusted to make provision for additional 

o The auction list is kept for control as well as auditing purposes. 

information where applicable. 

o Internal Audit is informed about auctions for the process to 

o Asset register be updated continuously with new purchases to ensure 

be audited. 

GRAP 17. 


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Rentinq of Halls: 

• To mitigate the risk of assets being misused, management must ensure: 

o Proper recordkeeping of Controls as identified in the risk strategy as 
Internal Audit must test the Controls for effectiveness and efficiency, 
o That the Manager Secretariat or delegated official implement a 
register for all letting of halls, tables and chairs. 
o That the register is completed correctly and that proper 
reconciliations are done. 

o That the register be reviewed by a senior official for correctness 
and completeness. 

Leave administration: 

• Management must ensure: 

o The reconciliation of leave on a quarterly basis, 
o That leave is reconciled before payment of leave credits to avoid 
overpayments which is difficult to recover. 
o Adherence to legislative requirements and Council policy. 
o The regulation of trade union leave in line with the collective 
agreement. 

o That all shop stewards who have exceeded their entitled trade 
union leave credits must be held accountable and therefore must 
these days be converted to annual leave. 
o That the processing of leave forms is reviewed by a senior official 
for correctness and completeness. 

o To implement Controls for the regulation of leave of temporary 
workers. 

o To do a spot check on the completeness of the attendance 
registers as these documents must reconcile with the leave 
records. 


65 


Traffic Services: 

• Proper control measurements with the handling of cash and by that ensure: 

o That copies of the direct banking’s for the day as well as receipts of 
BIQ are attached to the daily cash-up summaries. 
o That the unequal payments be authorized. 
o That daily cash up summaries be completed accurately. 
o That all parties sign for the handling and hand over of money. 
o The correct tariffs according to the tariff list approved by the 
Senior Magistrate must be implemented. 

o A senior official must review all notices issued by means of a 
signature to ensure the correctness and completeness thereof. 
o The Manager Traffic Services must investigate the abovementioned 
deviations and implement correctional actions where needed to 
recover financial losses. 

• Proper handling of representations to mitigate the risk of fraudulent 
activities and by that ensure: 

o Those representations are filed in an orderly manner so that it will 
be easily available for control and audit purposes. 
o A proper investigation intothe abovementioned deviations and 
implement correctional actions where needed to recover financial 
losses (if no representations could be found). 

• Measures must be implemented for the reviewing the notice books when 
handed in by the Traffic Wardens to ensure that all the notices are captured 
timeously on the TCS System. 

• Parking meter income owned to the municipality must be recovered. 

6.3.4 OPMS AUDIT COMMITTEE 
PREDETERMINED OBJECTIVES 

Predetermined objectives in terms of the IDP and SDBIP are audited on a quarterly 
basis by Internal Audit. Part of the audit procedures are to: 


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• test the linkages between the IDP, SDBIP and the budget; 

• determine if objectives in terms of service delivery are met; 

• evaluates if the key performance indicators are in line wiith legislative 

requirements. 

TO ENSURE A CREDIBLE IDP, BUDGET AND SDBIP 

• Management must ensure the reliability of predetermined objectives as it is 
a legislative requirement aimed at striving towards accountable, effective 
and efficiënt local government. 

• The Performance Management section must ensure the reliability and 
correctness of supporting documentation which are presented during 
evaluation and where possible, cross reference this information. 

• The PMS unit must verify supporting documentation against targets and 
ensure that all the required supporting documentation (evidence) is 
available for audit as well as control purposes. 

• The PMS unit must ensure that the information published in the annual 
report are substantiated by evidence and correlate with performance 
evaluations which took place throughout the year. 

• The measurement of predetermined objectives is to ensure that objectives 
are met and therefore must the evaluation panel: 

o Ensure that projects be measured against actual execution as well 
as budget spending which should be informed by the progress. 

• To avoid the perception that the IDP is a wish list and non-achievement of 
objectives that could hamper service delivery which has a negative impact 
on the corporate image of Council, proper care must be taken when 
compiling the document by ensuring that only projects that are funded be 
included on the annual project list. 

• KPI’s should not negatively impact service delivery but will provide an unfair 
advantage as it creates an impression that a department perform excellent. 


66 


• Proper financial planning must be executed to ensure that cash backed 
funding will be available before compiling the annual project list and 
budget. 

• Management must ensure that the Annual Report is a reflection of 
the SDBIP which is compiled out of the IDP and Budget. 

• The defaults in the e-perform system must be corrected by the service 
provider. 

• Controls must be implemented to ensure that valid, authorised, complete 
and accurate performance data are captured. 

• A detailed reconciliation must be done between the approved SDBIP and 
evaluation documentation for quarters 1 and 2 to detect deviations which 
need to be corrected prior to evaluations. 

• Performance information must be accurate and reliable to pass the integrity 
test that will be performed by external sources. 

• All evidence files must be kept at the PMS unit to avoid tampering of 
evidence and to ensure implementation of the audit recovery plan. 

• KPI's must comply with legislative requirements as it must be: 

o Specific - the nature and the required level of performance can be 
clearly identified. 

o Measurable - the required performance can be measured. 

o Achievable - the target is realistic given existing capacity. 

o Relevant - the required performance is linked to the achievement of 
a goal. 

o time - bound - the time period or deadline for delivery is specified. 

• Projects must be measured against actual execution as well as budget 
spending which should be informed by the progress (proof of progress must 
be submitted for example the report from the Consulting engineer, pictures). 

• The IDP progress report must reconcile with the SDBIP as the SDBIP 
measure implementation of the IDP. 

• Departments must not be evaluated on projects which do not resort under 
them. 


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• The Performance plans as well as the Personal Development Plans of 
Section 56 employees must be completed and filed on the personnel files. 

6.3.5 IGR MATTERS 

The Communications department coordinate the //Khara Hais Local Government 
Communications Forum (LGCF) meetings on a monthiy basis. The LGCF was 
launched on 17 September 2009 and the Speaker of municipality is the 
chairperson of the forum. AH government departments, parastatals (Eskom, 
Telkom and SA Post Office) and Non-governmental organisations attend this 
monthiy meeting. The meetings serve as a platform for NGO's and government 
to develop common programmes that are almed of improving service delivery at 
all levels of government. 

The Senior Communications Officer and or the person delegated attend all 
District Communications Forum (DCF) meetings. The meetings are held on a 
quarterly basis. 

The Communications department do all the communication work for the public 
participation processes for the IDP, Budget, council meets the People, national 
and provincial events where the Municipality provides assistance and all 
municipal events. Communication tools that are used are the municipality’s 
internal and external publications (Die Werker - internal (monthiy), The Resident 
- external (monthiy), the community radio station (two weekly radio programme 
paid by municipality and adverts), printed media (adverts, flyers, posters, media 
releases) and meetings (LGCF and DCF), the website and the Public Viewing 
areas that are situated on the outside of the municipal building. 

6.4 MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION & INSTITUTIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT 


6.4.1 OVERVIEW OF POLICIES 

A complete list of all the policies adopted by the Council, are included as Annexure 
G. Policies are adopted or revised, when needed. 


6.4.2 INFORMATION ON THE OPMS SYSTEM AND PMS 

Performance Management are driven from the Municipality, and the officials have 
ownership. 

The following activities took place during the year under review: 

Review of the SDBIP through functional framework workshops 
Formulation of Performance Plans for S.56 employees 
Performance Evaluations of S.56 employees 
SDBIP Evaluations of all Directorates and Departments/Divisions 
Development op Performance Plans and Evaluation forms for S.66 employees 
Performance Evaluations of S.66 employees 

Effective Controls and accountability systems are an integral part of the E-perform 
performance management system. Performance pertaining to KPI’s are measured 
in terms of unacceptable performance, not fully effective performance, fully effective 
performance, performance above expectation and outstanding performance. KPI’s 
and performance targets, when measured are also categorized in terms of warning 
signals, reason for performance and remedial action. 

6.4.3 ALIGNMENT WITH THE IDP AS WELL AS KEY PERFORMANCE 
INDICATORS AND TARGETS 

Community consultation was done in the setting of KPI’s for capita! projects. 

In line with the MSA Performance management among administration Performance 
Management (e-perform) is applicable pertaining to all Section 56 and Section 66 
officials.Performance agreements are in line with the six national KPI's, and as a 
result thereof in lined with performance indicators and community needs and 
signed. 

6.4.4 INFORMATION ON THE ORGANOGRAM SUPPORTING DEVELOPMENT 
STRATEGY 

The approved organizational organogram is alignment to the core business of the 
municipality. The affordability and sustainability of the structure is questionable 


M 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

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when compared to national norms and standards. Salades are currently 42% of the 
operating budget with national norms being 35%. 

6.4.5 INFORMATION ON THE STATUS ON WORKPLACE SKILLS PLAN (SEE 
ANNEXURE J) 

CURRENT SITUATION 

The municipality challenges are mainly in the technical field and we embarked on 
process of addressing these challenges through various skills development 
programmes. The engineering field is mainly affected by skills shortages. Attracting 
and retaining these types of skills and expertise also proved to be challenge at 
some point for the municipality. The municipality has spent an enormous amount of 
fund on the development of its employee. This includes bursaries, learnerships, 
internships, accredited training, apprenticeships, on-the-job training, formal and 
informal training to address the capacity challenges in the municipality. 

COUNCIL BURSARY SCHEME 

Employees are encouraged to further their studies and obtain recognized 
qualifications to improve their own knowledge to be able to improve both their own 
performance and that of the municipality. Employees enter into a contractual 
agreement with the municipality and terms and conditions are attached to this 
agreement. The bursary covers for books and registration fees. Due to financial 
constraints no bursaries were awarded for the financial year 2015/16. 

INTERNSHIP PROGRAMME 

The municipality has absorbed graduates for the financial Internship Programma 
that has started. A total of three (3) Interns are part of the programma. The idea is to 
prepare them for a period of two years to gain practical experience. The 
organization is very conducive for active learning. However, they are not guaranteed 
permanent employment after the completion of the programma. They are exposed 
to the following on various accounting and financial aspects and are also rotated on 
a quarterly basis. 


LEARNERSHIPS 

A learnership is a training programma that combines theory at a college or training 
Centra with relevant practica on-the-job. The idea is that people really learn the "ins 
and outs" of an occupation by practicing all its aspects under the guidance of an 
experienced and qualified person. In order to become qualified themselves, learners 
will have to be assessed against occupational standards that have been agreed in 
advance by industry stakeholders. 

Learnerships are based on legally binding agreements between an employer, a 
learner and a training provider. This agreement is intended to spell out the tasks 
and duties of the employer, the learner and the training provider. It is designed to 
ensure the quality of the training and to protect the interests of each party. 

Employers can offer learnerships to their own employees or can recruit unemployed 
people for training. Current employees who are provided with learnerships are 
referred to as 18(1) learner. Unemployed people who are offered learnerships are 
known as 18(2) learners. Currently there are four (4) learners sponsored by MISA in 
the following fields: 2 Electrical, 1 Fitter and 1 Diesel Mechanic. 

SKILLS PROGRAMMES 

A Skills programme consists of a unit Standard or group of unit standards that is 
large enough for the outcome to allow for the learner to become employable. Skills 
programmes do not result in a qualification themselves upon completion, but will 
lead to a Learnership qualification. Skills programmes allow for skills to be acquired 
that provide immediate access to income generation. Due to financial constraints 
the focus of training was on compliance training eg. Transportation and Handling of 
Chemical substances, Health and Safety Representatives and supervisors 
Operation of machinery like Truck Mounted Cranes, Mobile Elevation Platforms and 
Forklifts. 

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANS 

Personal Development Plans have been designed and are ready for 
implementation. A Personal Development Plan seeks to address the training needs 


68 


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of employees in a systematic manner. It should be directly link to the job/key 
performance indicator of an employee. 

A planned approach to skills development will contribute towards increasing the 
motivation of employees, due to the visible interest shown by the organization in 
their development and career paths. 

It facilitates a co-coordinated approach towards addressing skills needs both in 
localized sectors of the economy as well as nationally, which should contribute 
towards national economie growth. 

The municipality is seeking new and innovative ways to address future challenges 
and cognizance should also be taken about the new developments in the Higher 
Education and the emphasis that was placed on Rural Further Education Training 
Institutions to improve their skills. This necessitates that strenger relations be 
established with tertiary institutions. 

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EEP (See Annexure J) 

The Municipality's five year employment equity plan expired on 1 October 2010. AH 
targets were not met. A new plan is currently developed to coincide with the five 
year term of the newiy elected council. 

More than 70% of all staff members were trained in Diversity Management to 
onderstand the municipality's employment equity programme and to value and 
respect the cultural diversity of the workforce. The focus for the next five years will 
be to correct the gender imbalance on all levels of the workforce. 

The tables below reflects an insignificant improvement regarding employment equity 
target groups and the targets of women in top level positions. 



MALE 


African 

Coloured 

White 

Total 


‘10 

‘11 

‘12 

‘10 

‘11 

‘12 

‘10 

‘11 

‘12 

‘10 

‘11 

‘12 

Senior Managers 

2 

3 

4 

7 

11 

11 

6 

6 

5 

15 

20 

20 

Clerks 

14 

18 

19 

18 

21 

27 

4 

4 

4 

36 

43 

50 

Professionals 

2 

2 

3 

6 

6 

8 

4 

5 

5 

12 

13 

16 

Tegnical & related 

17 

25 

26 

27 

30 

33 

7 

9 

8 

51 

64 

67 

Horticulturists 

3 

2 

2 







3 

2 

2 

Artisans 

2 

3 

2 

9 

10 

10 

6 

6 

5 

17 

19 

17 

Machine operators 

16 

19 

22 

42 

43 

45 

1 



59 

62 

67 

Apprentice 










0 

0 

0 

Labourers 

25 

29 

32 

25 

41 

53 

2 

1 

1 

52 

71 

86 

Elementary Occupations 

133 

150 

147 

132 

140 

145 

1 

2 

2 

266 

292 

294 

Councillors 

2 

4 

4 

10 

9 

10 

3 

2 

3 

15 

15 

17 











526 

601 

636 


FEMALE 


African 

Coloured 

White 

Total 


‘10 

‘11 

‘12 

‘10 

‘11 

‘12 

‘10 

‘11 

‘12 

‘10 

‘11 

‘12 

Senior Managers 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

2 




3 

3 

3 

Clerks 

23 

30 

36 

32 

41 

51 

10 

13 

10 

65 

84 

97 

Professionals 

1 

2 

2 

6 

11 

10 

4 

4 

5 

11 

17 

17 

Tegnical & related 

3 

2 

2 

11 

9 

6 




14 

11 

8 

Horticulturists 



1 







0 

0 

1 

Artisans 










0 

0 

0 

Machine operators 

2 

2 

3 

4 

3 

6 




6 

5 

9 

Apprentice 










0 

0 

0 

Labourers 

4 

6 

8 

4 

6 

5 




8 

12 

13 

Elementary Occupations 

23 

29 

31 

35 

46 

50 




58 

75 

81 

Councillors 

2 

1 

1 

6 

7 

9 




8 

8 

10 











173 

215 

239 


Table 12- Employment Equity Figures 


6.4.6 HIV/AIDS (SEE ANNEXURE J) 

6.4.6.1 HIV and AIDS mainstreaming 

The Municipality adopted an HIV/AIDS workplace policy, which it shares with 
management first and then with the employees. 


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Key Principles of Code for HIV/AIDS workplace policy is the promotion of non- 
discrimination; no screening of employees for HIV for the purpose of employment; 
none dismissal of the positive employee; confidentiality; healthy work environment; 
continuation of employment relationship; and the prevention and care and support 
programs 

6.4.6.2 HIV/AIDS AND CAPACITY CHALLENGES 

HIV/AIDS affects the most productive age group of 15-49 years. It is affecting the 
most productive segment of the labor force, and resulting in higher costs. The 

major impacts are: 

• Loss of skilled and experience workers. 

• Reduced supply of labour. 

• Rising labour costs. 

• Falling productivity, 

• Affects services delivery. 

Since this group of workers is a bridge between the high-risk group and the general 
population, intervention at the workplace is very supportive in arresting the spread 
of infection. 

The intervention program concentrates on sensitization programs for the 
management, employees and their families. As part of its intervention it provides 
care and support for infected and affected workers and their families with the help of 
partnership with relevant partners. 

6.4.6.3 IMPLEMENTATION OF THE HIV/AIDS STRATEGY 
ADVOCACY PLAN 

With respect to HIV/AIDS, advocacy involves raising awareness of the issue; 
suggesting appropriate action and what is needed for this to occur; and, building 
consensus and support for its implementation. At primary level, it involves 
netwerking on an individual basis & through unions and the Office of the Mayor and 
other social groups. At secondary level, it involves netwerking with Government 
Departments, etc. 


70 


HIV PROGRAM AT WORKPLACE INCLUDES 

• Advocacy meeting with the HR management/CSR head. 

• Programs integrated and alligned with the District Program 

• Nomination of an employee as the HIV/AIDS Focal Persen. 

• An internal HIV/AIDS committee (officials) 

• Sensitization programma for the internal committee who assist with the 
HIV/AIDS workplace policy, and the drawing up of an annual plan for 
implementing the workplace program 

• Identification of passionate employees to become Master Trainers on STI and 
HIV/AIDS. 

• Regular small programs around HIV like quizzes, games, etc. 

• Encouraging the municipality to expand their workplace programmes to their 
contractual workers. 

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 

In 2015/2016 another two awareness campaigns were conducted in order to make 
all employees of the Municipality aware of the HIV/AIDS Policy in the workplace. 

On 20 November 2015 a Health Wellnessday was held for all the municipal workers 
which Include Voluntary Counseling and Testing on HIV and Aids. 

A session was held to advocate the building of the capacity of the subcommittee, 
and training was given to Peer Educators in all Departments of the Municipality in 
HIV/AIDS education and counseling. 

6.4.7 STAFF RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION POLICY 

To build capacity and recruit critical and scarce skills the municipality participate in 
Learnership Programmes for Water and Sewerage Purification. Sixteen unemployed 
youth are enrolled in this Learnership programme and are currently trained to 
become Process Controllers for Water and Sewerage Purification. 

Workers at all levels are afforded the opportunity to act in higher positions in the 
absence of their seniors to prepare themselves as successors. Bursaries to the 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


amount of R400 000 were also awarded to workers during 2012/13 to obtain the 
required competencies to fill senior positions. 

The staff turn-over rate 


Turn-over Rate 


Details 

Total Appointments 

Terminations 

Turn-over Rate* 


as of beginning of 

during the Financial 



Financial Year 

Year 



No. 

No. 


2011/2012 

802 

59 

7.36% 

2012/2013 

858 

49 

5.71% 

2013/2014 

848 

62 

7.31% 

2014/2015 




2015/2016 




2016/2017 





6.4.8 ANTI-CORRUPTION STRATEGY (SEE ANNEXURE J) 

6.4.8.1 APPROVAL 

Council approved the Anti- Fraud and Corruption Strategy per Resolution 

12.1/05/2014 dated 27 May 2014. 

6.4.8.2 OBJECTIVE 

Encourage a culture within //Khara Hais Municipality where all employees, the 
public and other stakeholders continuously behave ethically in their dealings with, or 
on behalf of //Khara Hais Municipality improving accountability, efficiency and 
effective administration within //Khara Hais Municipality. Improving the application of 
Systems, policies, procedures and regulations, changing processes of the 
Municipality that facilitate corruption/fraud and allow it to go unnoticed or 
unreported. 

6.4.8.3 COMPONENTS OF THE PLAN 

The main principles of the Fraud Prevention are the following - 

■ Creating a culture which is intolerable to corruption / fraud 

■ Deterrence of corruption and fraud 


■ Preventing corruption/fraud which cannot be deterred 

■ Detection of corruption/fraud 

■ Fraud prevention plan/strategy 

■ Investigating detected corruption/fraud 

■ Taking appropriate action against fraudsters. e.g. prosecution, disciplinary 
action 

■ Applying sanctions, which include redress in respect of financial losses 

6.4.8.4 FRAUD AND CORRUPTION PREVENTION PLAN 

For effective implementation of the Fraud and Corruption Strategy, a plan will be 
developed with detailed procedures on how to implement the strategy. The 
actions/outputs set on the plan are focused at mitigating the risk of fraud and 
corruption in the Municipality. The plan will encompass at most the following: 

■ Fraud Risk Assessment 

■ Monitoring Process 

■ Awareness 


The number of cases reported per annum, over the last three years are refrected in 
the table below. 


1 Year 

Cases reported 


Cases investigated/action taken | 


Fraud 

Theft 

Fraud 

Theft 

2009 

1 

2 

1 

2 

2010 

5 

5 

4 

4 

2011 

5 

4 

4 

2 

2012 

1 

2 

1 

2 

2013 

1 

2 

1 

2 

2014 

2 

1 

2 

1 

2015 

5 

1 

5 

1 

2016 


Table 13 - Reported cases 




//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


6.4.9 ORGANOGRAM (SEE ANNEXURE J) 

A new organogram was approved on 04 December 2015 by the municipality to 
address its human capita! needs for the next 5 years. Provision is made in the 
budget of each year for filling of vacancies as planned. All critical funded vacancies 
are filled in the financial year that the post becomes vacant. 

6.4.10 AUDITOR GENERAL REPORT 

6.4.10.1 Audi! Report 

Over the last three years, the municipality made huge improvements in their effort to 
obtain a clean audit report by 2015. In the 2011/2012 financial year the municipality 
regressed, and obtained a disclaimer from the Auditor General. In the 2012/2013 
financial year the municipality improved to a qualified audit report and in the 
2013/2014 financial year, the municipality received an unqualified report with other 
matters. The other matters decreased even further in the 2014/2015 financial year. 

6.4.10.2 Auditor General’s Unqualified Report with other matters 2014/2015 

The Auditor General expressed that the financial statements present fairly, in all 
material respects, the financial position of //Khara Hais municipality as at 30 June 
2015, and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended, in 
accordance with SA Standards of GRAP and the requirements of the MFMA and 
DoRA. 

Matters that were emphasized are: 

Restatement of corresponding figures 

As disclosed in note 36 to the financial statements, the corresponding figures for 
30 June 2015 have been restated as a result of an error discovered during 201 5 in 
the financial statements of the municipality at, and for the year ended, 30 June 
2014. 

Material losses 

As disclosed in note 44 to the financial statements, the municipality incurred water 
distribution losses of 40,4%.This included both technical and non-technical losses. 

72 1 


Additional matters: 

Predetermined objectives 

No material findings were identified on the usefulness and reliability of the 
reported performance Information for the selected development priorities, attention 
were however drawn to the following matters: 

Material misstatements were identified in the annual performance report submitted 
for auditing on reported performance Information of service delivery and 
infrastructure development: Water services. As management subsequently 
corrected the misstatements, material findings on the usefulness and reliability of 
the reported performance Information, were not identified by the Auditor General. 

Compliance with legislation 

The Auditor General performed procedures to obtain evidence that the 
municipality had complied with applicable legislation regarding financial matters, 
financial management and other related matters. The Auditor General’s material 
findings on compliance with specific matters in key legislation, as set out in the 
general notice issued in terms of the PAA, are as follows: 

Expenditure management 

Money owed by the municipality was not always paid within 30 days, as required 
by section 65(2)(e) of the MFMA. 

Reasonable steps were not taken to prevent unauthorised expenditure, irregular 
expenditure and fruitless and wasteful expenditure, as required by section 
62(1)(d)oftheMFMA. 

Internal Contrei 

The Auditor General considered internal control relevant to the audit of the financial 
statements, the performance report and compliance with legislation. The matters 


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31 March 2016 


reported below are limited to the significant internal contrei deficiencies that resulted 
in the basis for the opinion, the findings on the performance report and the findings 
on compliance with legislation included in this report. 

Leadership 

The following challenges were experienced that contributed to the weaknesses in 
the financial environment and the ultimate audit outcome: 

❖ The leadership did not take appropriate action with regard to a lack of 
Controls in the finance and supply Chain management directorates, resulting 
in non-compliance with applicable legislation and inadequate budget contrei 
measures. This, in turn, resulted in irregular as well as unauthorised 
expenditure. 

❖ Leadership did not regularly monitor management’s compliance with laws, 
regulations and internally designed policies and procedures. As a result, 
significant non-compliance issues were noted. 

Financial and performance management 

The annual report had material misstatements that were identified. It was 
subsequently corrected and material findings were avoided. 

Governance 

A risk management strategy was developed and a comprehensive risk assessment 
was conducted by the risk management department. Certain errors still occurred 
due to risks that were not effectively managed. 


6.5 FINANCIAL VIABILITY AND MANAGEMENT 


6.5.1 COMPLIANCE 

A financial plan (Appendix I) has been compiled compliant with section 26(h) of the 
MSA. The financial plan includes actual Capital and operating revenue and 
expenditure for the 2014/2015 financial year (audited by the Auditor-General) and 


Capital and operating revenue and expenditure estimates for the current financial 
year (2015/2016) and for the next three financial years (2016/2017 to 2018/2019). It 
also includes budget assumptions on which these budgets have been compiled. 
The financial plan also includes a financial strategy and Information on financial 
management policies. All budget related policies reviewed and approved by Council 
as part of the budgeting processes can be found on the municipality's website 

6.5.2 EXPENDITURE 

6.5.2.1 Capital budget actually spent in 2013/2014 

The actual capita! expenditure for 2013/2014 amounted to R94, 997, 081 which 
represented 64.51% of the 2013/2014 adjustments capita! budget. This capita! 
expenditure was funded with own funds (R 1,466,721 or 1.54% of capita! revenue), 
grants (R 52,802,068 or 55.58% of Capital revenue) and external loans 
(R 40,728,292 or 42.87% of Capital revenue). Capital expenditure increased from 
48.9% of the 2012/2013 adjustments Capital budget to 64.51% of the 2013/2014 
adjustments capita! budget. Council approved a revised organogram during January 
2014 that split the Directorate Infrastructure Development into three directorates 
respectively, namely Electro Mechanical Engineering Services, Civil Engineering 
Services and Development and Planning. This was done to build further capacity 
within these three directorates. The cash flow problems currently experienced by 
the municipality are however limiting expenditure on capita! projects. 

The 2014/2015 approved adjusted Capital budget expenditure amounts to 
R 69,731,963 and the percentage of expected actual capita! expenditure will be 
substantially higher compared with the 64.51% of 2013/2014. 

6.5.2.2 Ability to implement the 2013-2017 IDP 

The 2015/2016 Capital budget expenditure amounts to R 34,951,396 and the 
percentage of expected actual capita! expenditure will be in the region of 95% or 
higher. The budgeted capita! expenditure is to be funded with own funds 
(R 9,1 16,352 or 26.08% of Capital revenue), grants (R 25,835,044 or 73.92% of 
Capital revenue) and external loans (R 0 or 0% of capita! revenue). 


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Information on the projected Capital expenditure and its funding sources for the 
2016/2017 and 2017/2018 indicative financial years can be found in paragraph 1.9 
of the attached financial plan. 

//Khara Hais municipality is currently experiencing financial constraints and as a 
result we only focussed on projects that the municipality have the resources to 
execute.The capita! expenditure programme needs however exceed the available 
financial resources of the municipality by far. 

It is clear from this that the Capital expenditure programme needs are far greater 
than available sources of finance and that all identified needs cannot be met in the 
next three financial years. The municipality already reached its borrowing limits and 
National Treasury advised us not to incur any further loans as we currently do not 
have the ability to service additional loans. Capital projects must therefore be 
prioritised carefully to ensure that available sources of finance are used where it will 
have the most desired outcome in improving the quality of life of its citizens. 

In paragraph 1.9 and of the attached financial plan the dependency on grant 
revenue from national and provincial government, are discussed extensively. 

6.5.3 ALIGNMENT 

The Capital and operating expenditure needs identified in the IDP can only be 
addressed with available financial resources (tariff charges, other own revenue, 
grants and external loans). Care should be taken that prioritised needs identified in 
the IDP only referto and are linked to realistically anticipated sources of revenue as 
reflected in the medium term revenue and expenditure framework (MTREF) or so- 
called budget documentation. 

Grants reflected in the MTREF are DORA allocations from the national fiscus and 
gazetted allocations in the Provincial Gazette from provincial government's budget. 

6.5.4 THE AUDITOR GENERAL 

//Khara Hais Municipality received a qualified audit opinion for the 2008/2009 
financial year from the Auditor-General. For the 2009/2010 and 2010/201 1 financial 
years the Auditor-General gave a financially unqualified audit opinion with findings. 


//Khara Hais Municipality received a disclaimer audit opinion for the 2011/2012 
financial year and a qualified audit opinion for the 2012/2013 financial year. We 
received an unqualified audit opinion with findings from the Auditor-General for the 
2013/2014 financial year. The other marters decreased even further in the 
2014/2015 financial year, when //Khara Hais municipality again received an 
unqualified audit opinion. 

With regard to the findings raised by the Auditor-General an audit outcome recovery 
plan (AORP) with the required interventions was developed. The AORP 
(Annexure I) with its interventions forms part of Chapter 6 of the 2014/2015 Annual 
Report. The 2014/2015 Annual Financial Statements, the 2014/2015 Auditor- 
General's Audit Report and the AORP with the required interventions can be found 
on the municipality's website (www.kharahais.co.za). 

With the exception of the ZF Mgcawu District Municipality who received a clean 
audit opinion for the 2014/2015, 2013/2014 as well as for the 2012/2013 financial 
year; all other audit opinions for the district municipality and the other local 
municipalities in the district the last three financial years, were either disclaimer or 
qualified audit opinions. 

6.5.5 GENERAL 

6.5.5.1 Long Ter m Financial Strateqy (Aliqned with development strategies) 

The Lonq-Term Financial Strategy is discussed extensively in paragraph 1 .3 of the 
attached financial plan. It contains a financial framework and strategies talking to 
revenue adequacy and certainty; cash / liquidity position; sustainability; effective 
and efficiënt use of resources; accountability, transparency and good governance; 
equity and redistribution; development and investment; macro-economic 
investment; borrowing; revenue raising strategies; asset management strategies 
and programmes; financial management strategies and programmes; and, capita! 
financing strategies and programmes. 


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6.5.5.2 OBSERVATIONS IN RELATION TO OWN REVENUE GENERATION AND 
DEBT COLLECTION ANALYSIS 

Paragraph 1.2.2(a) to (c) of the attached financial plan (Annexure I) supplies 
Information on our debtor's turnover ratio and revenue collection percentages for the 
last few financial years and projections for the next three years. Our revenue 
collection percentages the last three years varied from 102.6% to 103.5%. The main 
defaulters were government departments and we would have reached more 
revenue collection percentages if government departments honoured their 
commitments. Our cash and liquidity position is very important for us in ensuring 
that sustainable services can be delivered to our citizens. 

6.5.5.3 REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE PROJECTION OVER THE NEXT THREE 
YEARS (INCL DORA, SERVICES, OTHER RESOURCES, LOANS) 

REVENUE 

Total operating revenue (capital transfers and contributions excluded) forecasted for 
the 2015/16 financial year reflects an increase of 8% to an amount of 
R 552,420,702 compared with the projected operating revenue of R 51 1 ,548,941 for 
the 2014/15 financial year. The operating revenue forecasts an increase of 5.3% 
and 6.8% to R 621 ,074,766 in year three. 

//Khara Hais' main operating revenue source is their electricity sales of 
R 247,425,251 that represents 44.8% (Figure 1 .1 of attached Financial Plan) of total 
operating revenue for the 2015/16 financial year. This source of revenue is 
projecting an income of R 278,007,010 by year three. This trading service produces 
the much needed profits to subsidise community services to be funded through 
property rates. Electricity tariffs over the same period increased at a slower rate 
than the bulk purchases from Eskom increased. Taking the high salary bill increases 
also into consideration, the gap between turnover and expenses is closing slowly 
but surely and is a threat to local government as a whole. 

Property rates of R 75,488,01 7are the second highest operating revenue source 
and represents 13.7% of total operating revenue. This revenue source increases to 
R 86,426,231 by year three. Care should be taken to not over burden rate payers 
with this unpopular source of revenue. It is difficult to get rid of a label that a 


municipality is an over-taxed enterprise and there are lots of examples in history 
where investors moved to other areas where property tax levied are seen to be 
reasonable. 

The third highest operating revenue source is government grants with an amount of 
R 73,277,956 that represents 1 3.3% of total operating revenue. The bulk of this 
grant amount consists of the equitable share for the provision of free basic services 
to indigent households and the payment of the out of pocket allowances to the ward 
committee members, to name a few. 

Water represents 8.8% or R 48,709,239 of total operating revenue followed by 
sanitation revenue (5.6%) and refuse revenue (5.3%). 

EXPENDITURE 

Total operating expenditure forecasted for the 2015/16 financial year reflects an 
increase of 7.4% to an amount of R 643,402,229 compared with the projected 
operating expenditure of R 599,170,828 for the 2014/15 financial year. The 
operating expenditure forecasts an increase of 5.8% and 6.9% to R 727,683,207 in 
year three. 

//Khara Hais' main operating expenditure type is their employee related costs of 
R 221 ,350,838 that represents 34.4% (Figure 1 .3 of attached Financial Plan) of total 
operating expenditure for the 2015/16 financial year. However when deducting non 
cash items from the total operating expenditure, the employee related costs as a % 
of the total operating expenditure increases to 41.5%. The national norm for 
employee related costs is 35%. It therefore means that the municipality’s employee 
related costs is 6.5% or R 34,637,398 more than the allowed norm.This expenditure 
type is projecting an expenditure of R 253,056,688 by year three. 

The second highest operating expenditure type is bulk water and electricity 
purchases with an amount of R 175,163,816 that represents 27.2% of total 
operating expenditure. This expenditure type increases to R 219,922,333 by year 
three. As mentioned before bulk electricity purchases grow at a higher percentage 
than the percentage in electricity tariff increases. Care should be taken to not over 
burden rate payers with this expenditure type. 


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//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

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The third highest operating expenditure type is depreciation and asset impairment 
with an amount of R 108,519,181 that represents 16.9% of total operating 
expenditure. This expenditure type decreases to R 104,221 ,821 by year three. 

Other expenditure (including repair and maintenance oosts) representing 
R 80,432,844 are the fourth highest operating expenditure type and represents 
12.5% of total operating expenditure. 

6.5.5.4 CHALLENGES 

(Focusing on cash flow plan (Budget), employee oost, repairs and maintenance, 
debt management etc.) 

A strategie response to identified challenges (Incl. short to long term mechanisme) 
to control staffing costs, reduction of the cost of long term debt considering the 
available interest rate, etc 

6.6 LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

6.6.1 ECONOMIC ANALYSIS 

6.6.1 .1. LED STRATEGY (SEE ANNEXURE D) 

LED Strategy was adopted by Council in November 2010.The LED strategy forms 
the link between sustainable livelihoods and economie activities. 

Development objectives in the LED strategy seek to address poverty and 
unemployment, and economie development through e.g. an enabling environment 
for the advancement of LED activities; addressing youth related social-economic 
issues: accelerate the roll out and effective implementation of High Impact Projects 
and Investment; and Identification and upgrading of new tourism projects and 
facilities. 

This LED strategy is aligned with the National, Provincial and District policies and 
legislation. The SDF and the LED Strategy aims at broadening the economie base: 
An important development principle underlying economie development is to 
contribute towards the achievement of sustainable development. The LED strategy 
therefore addresses the challenge to balance the ‘triple bottom line' imperatives of 
economie efficiency, human well-being and environmental integrity. 


Currently the ZF Megawu District Municipality is in the process of reviewing their 
LED & Tourism Strategies. This will assist //Khara Hais Municipality with an 
integrated approach when our Strategy is reviewed. 

6.6.1. 2 THE LOCAL ECONOMIC PROFILE 
DEVELOPMENT CONSTRAINTS AND STRENGTHS 

Key constraints/problems/issues in terms of the development of //Khara Hais 
Municipality include a shortage of job opportunities and job creation in the area. 
The natural resource base and economy does not have the capacity to support the 
total population, forcing the labour force to seek employment opportunities outside 
of the Municipality (e.g. Kimberley), etc. Furthermore low levels of income obtained 
in the area imply low levels of buying power and, therefore, few opportunities for 
related activities such as trade. This in turn also supports the leakage of buying 
power. 

With regards to the socio-economic characteristics of the local population, the 
employment rate for the Municipality is relatively high, with as much as 75% of 
people of working age who are actively seeking employment being able to secure a 
job. However, the majority of the employed population is found in elementary 
occupations, which require little or no skills. This is also reflected in the low 
education levels of the local population, with as much as 12% of the population 
aged 20 years and older having no form of education whatsoever. This, to some 
extent, constrains the development potential of the Municipality in the development 
of more advanced industries. The level of employment and type of occupations 
taken up by the population of the Municipality also directly affects their income 
levels. 

The Municipality’s economy is rather centred on the trade and retail sector, due to 
its strong tourism sector, leaving the local economy fairly vulnerable for any 
significant changes in this industry. It is, therefore, important that the Municipality 
seeks to further diversify its economy into other sectors. Furthermore, the 
manufacturing sector of the municipality is one of the lowest performing sectors of 
the local economy. This sector has the potential to generate significant growth for 
the region, and //Khara Hais Municipality is experiencing a lack of manufacturing 


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31 Man 

activities. As a result much in the municipality has to be sourced from outside of the 
municipal boundaries, resulting in money flowing out of the local economy. 

Due to the unique spatial manifestation of the municipality, both the first and 
second economy is mostly located around the CBD and farms. Upington has a well- 
defined business centre with numerous residential areas. Secondary activities in 
the study area are mainly light industrial, warehousing, and light engineering works. 

Main traffic routes connect Upington, the hub of activities in the region, to cities like 
Kimberley, Johannesburg, Cape Town and Namibia. Upington also serves 
as the ‘Portal' to Namibia and vice versa, the ‘Frontier’ to the Kalahari and the 
Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, the ‘Oasis’ in the desert’, the Agricultural hub of the 
Northern Cape, and the ‘Portal to the Kalahari's hunting ground. Furthermore, two 
major national parks are situated within a few hours’ drive from Upington. 

Agricultural activities take up portions of land abutting the Orange River in the 
Municipality. The Agricultural sector is important to the local economy and therefore 
represents an emerging strength for the Municipality, which creates further 
opportunities for expansion, as well as the development of linkages with other 
sectors of the economy, creating further opportunities for job creation. The White 
Paper on Agriculture (1995) highiights the fact that existing and emerging farmers 
and agri-businesses in the area should be supported, and the Northern Cape’s 
AAPSS and PGDS state that new technologies should be investigated where 
applicable to maximise production outputs. 

The manufacturing sector of the economy is not currently performing well. However, 
given the good agricultural base, opportunities for the expansion of the 
manufacturing industry exists through agro-processing and other activities. The 
local manufacturing sector also has a lot of potential for expansion and 
diversification, and the NCPGDS and the //Khara Hais IDP suggests that funds be 
invested in this sector. 

The NCMS has identified Upington as one of the pockets of manufacturing 
capability in the Northern Cape, and suggests that the //Khara Hais Local 
Municipality and other stakeholders focus on the upliftment of the local 

:h 2016 

manufacturing sector. Labour-based production methods should be favoured, as 
this will ensure employment in the local economy and will result in the upliftment of 
the local community. 

Upington Airport has been identified as an alternative or supplement for the O.R 
Tambo International Airport for cargo traffic, as there is less congestion and quicker 
airport turnaround times, shorter-to-market timeframes which would enhance 
product freshness by one day, and improved supply-chain performance, therefore 
offering greater benefits for cargo airlines and both importers and exporters of 
goods. The uncommonly long runway and the strategically advantageous location 
of the Upington Airport make it ideal to serve the African continent. An adequate 
volume of cargo is generated in the Western and Eastern regions of South Africa 
and Namibia to warrant the establishment of a cargo hub at Upington. 

Due to this, the establishment of an Industrial Development Zone (IDZ) at the 
airport has been proposed to further enhance the strategie importance of the airport 
for the local, regional and provincial economy. The establishment of an SEZ 
(Industrial Development Zone) has since been canned. New IDZ's are only 
established at ports and bigger manufacturing hubs. Province together with 
municipalities is in the process of establishing SEZ’s (Special Economie Zone) to 
ensure it coincide with the development of the airport as well as the Solar Park. 

Khara Hais benefits from a potentially economically active population that 
comprises approximately 67% of the total population, which provides the 
Municipality with a large human resource base. This allows opportunities for 
development projects to involve and benefit local people. The age distribution of 
the Municipality’s population also indicates a fairly young potential economically 
active population, necessitating development to focus on the youth 

In terms of economie indicators, the Municipality also enjoys comparative 
advantages in all of the economie sectors, except mining, compared to the District. 
The Municipality should therefore capitalise on these advantages to further 
strengthen its position in the District. Furthermore, the tastest growing sectors in the 
Municipality were those of the agriculture, electricity and water, and mining sectors. 

77 1 

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The current growth occurring in these sectors should be exploited to ensure the 
creation of new job opportunities for local people. 

The Table below shows the economically active population and the employment 
status of people in South Africa, the Northern Cape Province, the ZF Mgcawu 
District and the //Khara Hais Municipality. 

After the amalgamation of //Khara Hais Municipality and Mier Municipality the 
Department of Economie Development and Tourism will help with the review of the 
LED Strategy for the one municipality. 

The Tourism Plan must also be reviewed once the amalgamation process is 
completed. 


Economically active population and employment status, 2007 




Northern 

Siyanda 

//Khara Hais 



Province 

District 

Municipality 

Employment status as percentage of potentially economically active population 


Potential Economically Active 

30 840 661 

688 993 

157 892 

67 127 

Population (Ages 15-64) 





Employed 

40 % 

39 % 

46 % 

45 % 

Unemployed 

20 % 

18 % 

16 % 

16 % 

Not working / other 

40 % 

43 % 

38 % 

39 % 

TOTAL 

( 100 %) % 

( 100 %) % 

( 100 %) % 

( 100 %) % 

Employment status as percentage of economically active population 


Economically Active 

18 412 541 

389 843 

97 839 

40 894 

population 





Employed 

67 % 

69 % 

74 % 

75 % 

Unemployed 

33 % 

31 % 

26 % 

25 % 

TOTAL 

( 100 %) % 

( 100 %) % 

( 100 %) % 

( 100 %) % 


Table 14 Source: Stats SA, Community Survey 2007 


78 


6.6.1. 3 STAKEHOLDER AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT ON LED 
ACTIVITIES 

The ZF Mgcawu Commercial Forum has been established. NOCCI is also a 
business Chambers and are invited to attend the Forum meetings. The LED Forum 
consists of the following participants: Government (Local & Provincial), Organised 
Business, SEDA, SAWEN, and Tourism & Agriculture. 

The IDC Forum has also been established and the Senior Socio Economie 
Development Officer. 

6.6.1. 4 ADEQUATE CONSIDERATION OF SPATIAL ISSUES 

The SDF indicates which type of development should be allowed in the Municipality, 
where it should take place, and how such development should be undertaken. 

PROJECT A: SOLAR SPECIAL ECONOMIC ZONE 

Council took a decision (14/08/2014 Resolution) that stipulates the following 
regard the development of the Solar Special Economie Zone: 

Council in principle resolved to avail all the availbale municipal land as requested 
by die Office of the Premier for the purposes of establishing the SEZ in Upington. 
The developer of the SEZ will be responsible: 

• To pay for the surveying of all land as well as any EIA processes. 

• For the development of infrastructure of the land 

The DTi will be responsible for the payment of Master Plan studies for the 
upgrading of connector services in respect of electricity, water and sewerage 
services. Council also decided per resolution that the representatives from the 
Office of the Premier of the Northern Cape and DTi be granted the rights of 
access to the said available land. 

The SEZ development initiative is driven by the Department of Trade & Industry 
(DTi). 

Project B: Solar Park development 




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31 March 2016 


A Council Resolution was taken on 13/07/2014 reflecting the following: 

Klipkraal Farm, Portion 451, was identified as the Upington Site and is both 
feasible and ready for implementation. EAI and Geotechnical studies showed that 
1000 MW can be produced from this site with optimal PV/CSP ratios for peak 
demand. Transmission capacity of 500 MW will be available in 2017 with 
additional capacity available in 2022. This would allow for a phased approach in 
implementing the Solar Park to optimise on cash flow management. 

These outcomes must be presented to Cabinet pursuant to the Minister’s 
approval. Should Cabinet approve the recommendations, a detailed 
implementation and resource plan will be presented to the Provincial Executive 
Council and the Municipal Council. 

The Solar Park development initiative is driven by the Department of Engergy 
(DoE). 

6.6.1 .5 STATISTICAL EVIDENCE SUPPORTING MAIN DEVELOPMENT 
THRUST 

According to the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC), the Agriculture sector 
includes such activitles as the growing of crops, market gardening, horticulture, 
farming of animals, forestry and logging and related services. Other sub-sectors of 
the Agricultural sector also include commercial hunting, game propagation and 
fishing. 

AGRICULTURAL SECTOR 

In //Khara Hais' jurisdictiën there are 7 smaller rural settlements and various farms. 
Settlements include: Lambrechtsdrift, Karos, Leerkrans, Leseding, Raaswater, 
Sesbrugge and Klippunt, and Kalksloot. The inhabitants of these settlements are 
mainly rellant upon agricultural activities for their dally living. The Council has, in 
keeping with the land reform program of the State, availed 5500ha commonage 
known as Hondejag, Klipkraal and portions of the farm Olyvenhoudtsdrift and South, 
to provide needy, prospective farmers with grazing land for a total of ±4500 sheep. 
Formal lease agreements were signed. 

79 1 


TOURISM SECTOR 

Upington is well situated as a base for exploration of the region, and has an 
outstanding infrastructure in the form of accommodation. 

Various areas are classified as nature conservation areas. Spitskop Nature 
Reserve lies 13 km north of Upington. This nature reserve, of approximately 6 000 
hectares, supports gemsbok, zebra, springbok, ostrich, eland, blue wildebeest, as 
well as smaller game, and can be viewed from a circular route running through the 
park. For the hiker, there are a variety of routes and distances that wind through the 
area. Other nature areas within the jurisdictiën of //Khara Hais are Gariep Lodge 
and Uizip. 

The Kalahari Oranje Museum Complex has the status of a regional- and provincial 
museum. It conserves cultural items and is exhibited as a community-focus point. 
The following national monuments have been declared: 

• Roman Catholic Church in Le Roux Street (still in use) 

• NG Mother Community in Schroder Street (still in use) 

• Hortentia water mill 

• Missionary complex in Schroder Street (building is being used as a museum). 

BUSINESS SECTOR 

The central business district of Upington has developed gradually along the banks 
of the Orange River (then Gariep River) since the building of the mission station in 
1873. Because of certain physical limitations like the Orange River in the east and 
the railway line in the north, the business district has expanded westwards. 

Smaller suburban shopping centres are found in all residential areas. The suburban 
centres provide mostly in the day-to-day necessities of the surrounding residential 
areas. 

Informal traders concentrate mainly on the central business district and on high 
activity nodes like taxi ranks, Street crossings and main traffic routes. 

Both industrial areas on the northern and the south-western sides of the town 
(Updustria & Laboria) have railway facilities. Although growth in these two areas 
has taken place gradually over a long period, the premises in Updustria are used to 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


a 90% capacity; while in the case of Laboria 74% of premises are used. Although 
there are a large variety of industries, there is a shortage of manufacturing 
industries. 

6.7 SOCIAL SERVICES AND COMMUNITY FACILITIES 


6.7.1 EDUCATION 

The //Khara Hais Municipal area currently has 7 high schools and 23 primary 
schools. The following institutions of higher education have campuses or satellite 
campuses in the town: 

■ Upington College for Vocational Education 

■ Vaal Triangle University of Technology 

■ Universal College Outcomes 

■ Technikon SA 

The following programmes and projects are currently implemented in the region: 

6.7.1. 1 EARLY CHILDWOOD DEVELOPMENT AND PRIMARY SCHOOLS 

Eight (8) ECD classrooms have been built in Paballelo alone. Two as per the 
following schools; Lukhanyiso P/S, Vela Langa P/S, and 4 ECDs at the new 
primary school in Ward 13 in Paballelo which will be occupied by 01 April 2014 with 
accommodation for (66) ECD learners walking to Westerkim P/S. 

Two (2) doublé ECD class rooms have been built at both Simbruner P/S and 
Keidebees P/S in 2013 which are in use 

Two (2) doublé ECDs are currently being built at Vooruitsig P/S; Normal classrooms 
may also be utilized, 

Three (3) ECD classrooms have been built at Olyvenhoutsdrift P/S in 2012. In 
addition an additional two (2) ECD classrooms will be ready for use in April 2014 at 
the new primary school. 


ECD classroom have been built at Fanie Malan in 2013. Mobile classroom are 
been provided to Oranje -Noord with another 2 mobile classroom to be placed at 
Oranje-Noord P/S. 

Two (2) new ECD class rooms had been completed in ward 10 with the necessary 
play equipment and indoor toilets for learners, 

SC Kearns H/S currently has sufficiënt accommodation for high school learners and 
transport is available from the suburb. Vaalkoppies P/S has ECD facilities, which 
currently addresses the need. A new Primary school in Louisvale Road with 2 ECD 
classrooms have been completed and can assist if the need exists. 

6.7.1. 2 SCHOOLS FEEDING PROGRAMME 

The National Schools Feeding programme is implemented in all qualifying schools. 

6.7.1. 3 BACKLOGS 

Some schools (Franciscus/Oranje-Oewer) still has asbestos class rooms. All 
asbestos/inappropriate structures will be replaced as per the programme of the 
Provincial and National Department of Education - 5-year plan 

6.7.1.4CHALLENGES 

Landscaping / sports grounds - depends on raw water rsupplied to schools .Rates 
for water supplied to schools are too high to afford grass and trees on school 
premises. 

Cleaning of areas around new schools (Ward 5 & 13) - Remove rubble.Street to 
new school in ward 13 - widen as per town plan; adjacent plots not marked 
according to town plan resulting into a very narrow access road to the new Paballelo 
school. 

ABET classes offered - Numbers of ABET students currently enrolled at centres in 
Upington. Interested students may enrol at Westerkim P/S; Oranje-Oewer P/S or 
Paballelo H/S. A new centre for Louisvale will be established by 01 January 2015. 


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Access to school for children with learning disabilities - Westerkimn P/S provides 
remedial classes. Viability study to build a school for skills in Upington 

6.7.1 .5 FUTURE DEMANDS 

Identifying and service land for the building of new schools in Rosedale, Upington 
Town, Paballelo, Raaswater, Ntsikilello, Karos - urgent as per Dept. 5-year plan. 

The viability to build a primary school with ECD facilities will be established and put 
on the 5-year Departmental structure plan for Ntsikilelo 

Building of hall at Franciscus/Oranje-Oewer - will be put on5-year infrastructure 
plan. Note that these schools have asbestos structures and will be rebuilt within the 
next 5 years upon which school halls may be included. 


4 

5 


6 


Below table 15: Indicates the interventions to address future demands 


SOCIAL SERVICES: EDUCATION 


Ward 

Nu of 


Service Level 



Intervention required 

8 


people 

ECD 

Primary 

High 

Tertiary 






schools 

school 

institution 



1 

6397 

Westerkim 

Westerkim 

AJ 

0 

A new school is on the 4 






Ferreira 


year Departmental 
infrastructure plan 

Construction of Large 

Ablution at Westerkim has 

9 







been identified as need. 

Repairs and Renovations 
has been identified as 
need at AJ Fereira. 

10 

2 

7695 

Simbruner 

Simbruner 

Carlton 

0 

Asbestos/inappropriate 




Kiedebees 

Kiedebees 



structures will be replaced 




Vooruitsig 




as per the programme of 
the Provincial and 

National Department of 
Education - 5-year plan 
Upgrading of computer 
centers at Carlton as 
need. 

11 

3 

5328 

Vooruitsig 

Vooruitsig 

Saul 

0 

1 Doublé ECD Classroom 






Damon 


at Vooruitsig under 
construction 



81 


4714 

0 

Prim- 0 

0 

0 

Upgrading of computer 
centers at Saul Damon as 
need. 

Schools resides in ward 

11 

7121 

Olyvenhoutsdrift 
New Prim 

School 

Olyvenhoutsdrift 
New Prim 

School 

SC 

Kearns 

0 

In addition an additional 2 
ECD classrooms will be 
ready for use in April 

2014 at the new primary 
school. 

A new ABET centre for 
Louisvale will be 
established by 01 January 
2015. 

6910 

Lukhanyiso P/S, 
Vela Langa P/S, 

Lukhanyiso P/S, 
Vela Langa P/S, 

Pabalello 

High 

0 


3626 

0 

Prim- 0 

0 

0 

Schools resides in ward 6 
and 13 

6791 

Fanie Malan 

Voorpos Prim 

Upington 

Vaal UT 

ECD classroom at Fanie 


Oranje Noord 

Oranje Noord 

High 

UCO 

FAMSA 

Malan built in 2013 

Another 2 mobile ECD 
classrooms to be placed 
at Oranje-Noord P/S. 

6543 

Uap Prim 

Uap Prim 

Duineveld 

NC FET 
Upt 


10256 

Rosendal P/S 

Rosendal P/S 

0 

0 

2 new ECD classroom 
had been completed with 
the necessary play 
equipmentand indoor 
toilets for learners 

7538 

Kalksloot P/S 
Franciskus P/S 
Oranje Oewer 

Kalksloot P/S 
Franciskus P/S 
Oranje Oewer 

0 

0 

Hall for Franciscus and 
oranje Oewer will be put 
on5-year infrastructure 
plan. 

Note that these schools 
have asbestos structures 
and will be rebuilt within 
the next 5 years upon 
which school halls may be 
included. 



//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


12 

6636 

Frank Biggs 

Swart More 

Frank Biggs 

Swart More 

0 

0 

The building of new high 
school in Raaswater - 
urgent as per Dept. 5- 
year plan. 

13 

8350 

New primary 
school will open 
in the ward in 
April 2014, 

New primary 
school will open 
in the ward in 

April 2014, 

0 

0 

The building of new high 
school in Paballelo- 
urgent as per Dept. 5- 
year plan. 

14 

5589 

Vaalkoppies 

P/S 

Leerkrans P/S 
Karos P/S 

Vaalkoppies 

P/S 

Leerkrans P/S 
Karos P/S 

0 

0 

The building of new 
schools in Ntsikilello, 
Karos - urgent as per 
Dept. 5-year plan. 


AboveTable 15 Status of education facilities and interventions 


6.7.2 HEALTH 
MEDICAL FACILITIES 

//Khara Hais Municipal area currently has one hospital and 10 clinics. The 
Provincial Department of Health renders PHC Services to 1 1 areas. 

The table below indicates the population that the heaith facilities have to 
accommodate and interventions to address the backlogs. 


COMMUNITY FACILITIES 

Ward 

Nu of 
people 

Service Level 

Intervention required 

Hospitals 

Clinics 

ether 

1 

6397 

Harry Surty Hos 

Sara Strauss 



2 

7695 

Harry Surty Hos 

Sara Strauss 



3 

5328 

Harry Surty Hos 

Progress Clinic 



4 

4714 

Harry Surty Hos 

Progress Clinic 



5 

7121 

Harry Surty Hos 

Louisvale 

Clinic 



6 

6910 

Harry Surty Hos 

Lingulethu 

Clinic 



7 

3626 

Harry Surty Hos 

Lingulethu 

Clinic 



8 

6791 

Harry Surty Hos 

Upington Clinic 



9 

6543 

Harry Surty Hos 

Upington Clinic 

Mobile Clinic Service 

Uap, Uitkoms 



COMMUNITY FACILITIES 

Ward 

Nu of 
people 

Service Level 

Intervention required 

Hospitals 

Clinics 

Other 

10 

10256 

Harry Surty Hos 

Sara Strauss 



11 

7538 

Harry Surty Hos 

Progress Clinic 
Kalksloot Clinic 



12 

6636 

Harry Surty Hos 

Raaswater 

Clinic 

Mobile Clinic Service 
to Louisvaledorp. 

Leseding and Farm areas 


13 

8350 

Harry Surty Hos 

Lingulethu 

Clinic 



14 

5589 

Harry Surty Hos 

Leerkrans 

Clinic 

Karos Clinic 

Lambrechtsdrift 

Clinic 

Mobile Clinic Service to 
Ntsikilelo 



AboveiTable 16: Health facilities in respect of total population 

6.7.3 SAFETY AND SECURITY 
POLICE STATIONS 

Four police stations, a bomb squad, dog unit and a satellite police station provide 
services to the community. 

6.7.3.1 PROGRAMMES AND PROJECTS 

The SAPS running various prograame on monthiy basis in communities. 

The programmes are inlign with government monthiy themes. 

6.7.3.2 BACKLOGS 

The need to effectively curp crime and to enhance service delivery the need for 
satellite police stations at Kalksloot and Karos was identified.The building of a police 
station in Pabalello is currently under investigation. 

6.7.3.3 FUTURE DEMANDS 

To curb crime in the CBD and Taxi rank of Upington a CCTV system needs to be 
implemented. Different stakeholders were approached and the businesses give 
positive feed back on funding this project. 






//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


The building of a formal police station in Pabalello and the establishment of satellite 
stations in Kalksloot and Karos will address the existing backlogs and provide for 
future demand of safety and security in the communities. 

6.7.4 SPORT, RECREATION AND COMMUNITY AMENITIES 

Sport & Recreation: Formal sports facilities include 5 swimming pools, 8 formal 
sports fields and 6 mini sport fields. In many of the suburbs and rural settlements 
there are public open areas used as sports fields, especially for soccer. The sports 
fields are usually not grass-covered, and are viewed as informal fields. Most of the 
schools also have their own sports facilities for the use of their learners. 

Parks: There are 40 parks where children can relax. 

Cemeteries; Sixteen (16) cemeteries are spread over the /Khara Hais Municipal 
area and are usually situated near residential areas. 

Community halls: 12 community halls were erected across the municipal area. 

Below is a table that gives the status of above sevices and facilities per ward aswel 
as the need and the intervention required to address the need. 

Below are a table that gives the status of above sevices and facilities. 


COMMUNITY FACILITIES 

War 

Nu of 



Service Level 



Intervention required 

d 

househ 

Cemeterie 

Halls/ 

Parks 

Smimmin 

Sports 



olds 

s 

Centres 


g 

Pool 

Field / 
grounds 


1 

2055 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

New parks: erven 7082 
and erven 7065; 
Extend/upgrade 
cemeteries: Kameelboom 

2 

1578 

1 

0 

1 

0 

0 

New parks: 

Jurgenskamp, Morning 
Glory 

3 

1157 

1 

1 

2 

0 

0 

New parks: erven 

6134; Extend/upgrade 
cemeteries: Tink Tinkie 

4 

1023 

0 

0 

1 

0 

0 

New parks: erven 6589 


5 

1562 

1 

1 

5 

2 

1 

New parks: erven 89 
and 428 Extend/ cemetery 
at Louisvale Road, 
Upgrade sports ground 

6 

1737 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

Development of MuIti 
porpuse centre and 
sports ground 

7 

950 

0 

2 

4 

1 

1 


8 

2560 

1 

0 

9 

1 

1 

New parks: Stasiekamp 
erven 13861, 
Extend/upgrade 
cemeteries: Dekotaweg, 
Keidebees 

9 

2204 

1 

0 

5 

0 

0 


10 

2339 

0 

1 

1 

0 

0 

New parks: erven 

19807, Development of 
sport facilities. 

11 

2215 

1 

1 

2 

0 

1 

New parks: 

Kameelmond, 

Lemoendraai 

12 

1769 

3 

1 

3 

0 

2 

New park: 

Rondomskrik; 

13 

1810 

2 

0 

1 

0 

0 

New parks: erven 

19111; Extend/upgrade 
cemeteries: Jupiter 

14 

1420 

3 

3 

4 

0 

1 

New sportground: 
Ntsikilelo 


Table 17-Total facilities per ward and inteventions. 


CHALLLENGES 

The following challenges needs to be addressed to fulfil the function: 

• Shortage of staff for parks 

• Shortage of Mowing Equipment 

• Vandalism of parks, cemeteries and sport facilities 

• No new parks due to financial constraints 





//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: 2012 - 2017 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

31 March 2016 


PROJECTS 

The following projects will be completed in the 2015/ 2016 financial year: 

• Completing MIG funded parks in Lambrechtsdrift, Karos, Nstikilelo, 
Louisvaleweg, Rondomskrik, Leseding, Raaswater and Kalksloot 

• Completing MIG funded Sports Grounds in Lambrechtsdrift, Nstikilelo, 
Louisvaledorp 

• Completing Community Sports facility in Rainbow and Louisvaledorp 

6.8 DISASTER MANAGEMENT 


The majority of //Khara Hais Municipality’s population is living in vulnerable 
conditions as a result of high level of poverty, low standards of living, high level of 
unemployment, lack of access to resources and environmental degradation. 

The focus of the Disaster Risk Management Plan must be as required by the 
Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002), the National Risk Disaster 
Management Framework 2005 and the Disaster Management Regulations Chapter 
5, Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002), to prioritize risk reduction 
strategies on communities who are most at risk to disasters which are highiy to 
occur and which justify the efforts of risk reduction and emergency preparedness, 
rather than to take any possible disaster into consideration. 

The Disaster Risk Management Plan forms part of the //Khara Hais Integrated 
Development Plan as a sector plan in contrast to the various cross-cutting issues 
related to “integrated plans”. 

Disaster Risk Management Planning must be parallel with the Integrated 
Development Plan process in ensuring that high risk development projects are 
avoided. This can be achieved by ensuring that the Head of Disaster Management 
Centre serves (satellite) on the Integrated Development Plan Steering Committee 
as well as the integrated Development Plan Representative Forum of the //Khara 
Hais Municipality. 


6.9 PRIORITY ISSUES 


The outputs of the community and stakeholder analysis resulted in key prioritiy 
issues identified and prioritised. These include: 

(1) SPATIAL ISSUES 

A good and effective SDF to encourage a compact urban structure 
An effective land-use management system; 

Pro-active planning and surveying of available land for human settlement 
purposes to curb illegal scattering. 

The implementation of a proper environmental management plan; and need 
for spatial integration. 

(2) WATER RESOURCES AND SERVICES 

Water distribution networks 

Need to upgrade bulk water instalations 

Maintenance and upgrading of water infrastructure 

Account for water losses and improve revenue streams for municipality 

(3) SEWERAGE 

Eradication of the bucket system 

Maintenance and upgrading of sewerage/sanitation netwerk systems; 
Extension of existing bulk sewer infrastructure 

(4) HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND HOUSING ISSUES 

Housing provision through government subsidies 

Housing administration (Subsidy applications, waiting list, awarding of 

vacant stands) 

Addressing of land ownership and land tenure issues; 

(5) ENERGY AND ELECTRICITY 

Electricity provision to all in need. 

Upgrading of electricity infrastructure 


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31 March 2016 


(6) ROADS, STREETS AND STRORM WATER DRAINAGE 

Improvement and maintenance of: Roads (tar and gravel); 

Storm-water drainage systems; 

Public transport systems; 

(8) ECONOMIC PRIORITIES 

Job creation for unskilled, semi-skilled and skilled residents; 

The promotion of human resource development and the creation of a skills 
register; 

The implementation of a proper policy for informal economie sectors; 

The formulation and implementation of a: 

- Local Economie Development Plan; and 

- Marketing Plan. 

Support to national job creation programmes and community based 
enterprises. 

(9) COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND FACILITIES 

Sport facilities; 

Community facilities, e.g. Libraries, community halls, etc; 

Cemeteries; 

Open spaces; 

Health care centres; 

Recreatlonal facilities; 

Safety and security facilities, e.g. police stations, municipal police satellite 
stations, etc 

The reduction of the spread of HIV/Aids; 

Community development; 

Air and water pollution; 

The reduction of the crime rate; 

Proper traffic safety; 

Proper policing (municipal policing, as well as support to the SAPS); 

Proper emergency services; 


The promotion of equity, specifically regarding disadvantaged people (e.g. 
women, youth, disabled and aged people); and 
proper disaster management regarding: 

-Train collisions; 

- Air disasters; 

- flood disasters; etc. 

(10) INSTITUTIONAL ISSUES 

Improvement of the level of payment for services; 

Improvement of skills levels (capacitation) of councillors and officials; 

The establishment of satellite municipal offices (e.g. customer care 
centres); 

Proper communication between Council and communities; 

Expansion of revenue base of municipality; 

Charging of applicable rates and taxes according to the level of services 
provided; 

Change in culture and operations at municipal level; 

Fight against corrupt practices and nepotism; 

Participatory IDP process; 

Proper management systems; 

Proper Information technology systems; 

Adhere to the Batho Pele Principles “serving our people”; 

Productivity of staff complement 

Proper equipment; in good werking conditions. 

Effective decision-making process; 

Proper billing system; and adequately trained and skilled staff. 


85 


CHARTER 7: OBJECTIVES 


7.1 KPAS, MUNICIPAL PRIORITIES AND DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES (OVER THE 
5 YEAR TERM OF THE IDP) 

The focus of the IDP is still on the present (status quo) situation, but with strategie 
development objectives set the focus is set to shifts to the future. Development 
objectives were aligned with national imperatives and frameworks, and in line with 
the powers and functions of the municipality. 


GUIDELINES GOVERNING THESE DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES AND 
STRATEGIES INCLUDE THE NATIONAL KEY PRIORITY (FOCAL) AREAS: 

Focal Area 1 : Spatial Development Framework 
Focal Area 2: Service Delivery and Infrastructure Delivery 
Focal Area 3: Local Economie Development 
Focal Area 4: Financial Viability 

Focal Area 5: Institutional Development and Organisational Transformation 
Focal Area 6: Good Governance 
Focal Area 7: Social Development 

Seven (7) Key Priority Areas (KPAs) with ten (10) Development Priorities were identified 
based on the challenges faced by the municipality, and prioritized by both ward 
committees and the community during public participation processes. These KPAs were 
linked to the seven National Key Performance Areas (KPAs) and the SDF development 
objectives of the municipality. 


7.1.1 DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 1: SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT, TOWN PLANNING 
AND LAND USE MANAGEMENT (KPA 1: SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK) 
Development objective(s): 

'K Provide the framework and Vision required for improving the quality of life of the 
people living in //Khara Hais. 

Manage the development of sustainable land use, economie, spatial and 
environmental planning according to predetermined acceptable levels. 


86 


7.1.2 DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 2: WATER RESOURCES AND SERVICES (KPA 
2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT) 

Development objective(s): 

Develop, manage and maintain essential bulk water infrastructure and facilities 
to accommodate the aspirations, needs and pressures of present and future 
industries, businesses and dependent communities. 

Develop, manage and maintain necessary infrastructure and facilities required to 
improve the provision of water services. 

7.1.3 DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 3: SEWERAGE (KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY 
AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT) 

Develop, manage and maintain essential bulk sewerage infrastructure and 
facilities to accommodate the aspirations, needs and pressures of present and 
future industries, businesses and dependent communities. 

Develop, manage and maintain necessary infrastructure and facilities required to 
improve the provision of sewerage services. 

7.1.4 DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 4: HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND HOUSING 
(KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT) 

Eradicate housing backlogs in municipal area. 

'K Provide for sustainable human settlements (housing). 

7.1.5 DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 5: ENERGY AND ELECTRICITY (KPA 2: 
SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT) 

Provide, manage and maintain essential infrastructure required to improve the 
provision of electrical services. 


7.1.6 DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 6: ROADS, TRANSPORT AND STORMWATER 
DRAINAGE (KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE 
DEVELOPMENT) 

Develop, manage and maintain necessary Road, Transport and Storm 
water infrastructure and facilities required to improve transportation in, and 
aesthetic qualities of urban areas. 



//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY- INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 -2017 

Thursday, 31 March 2016 


7.1.7 DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 7: SANITATION, WASTE MANAGEMENT AND 
WASTE REMOVAL (KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE 
DEVELOPMENT) 

Regulate and manage waste disposal to prevent pollution of the natural 
environment and natural resources. 

7.1.8 DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 8: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB 
CREATION (KPA 3: LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT) 

Development objective(s): 

Promote the development of tourist infrastructure that will enhance tourism 
Create an environment that promotes the development of a diversified and 
sustainable economy. 


7.1.9 DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 9: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND 
FACILITIES (KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE 
DEVELOPMENT AND KPA 7: SOCIAL SERVICES) 

Development objective(s); 

Pro-active prevention, mitigation, Identification and management of 
environmental heaith, fire and disaster risks. 

Provide safety to communities through law enforcement services and through 
legislative requirements. 

Provide equal access to sport, park, recreational facilities and other public 
amenities to all residents. 


7.1.10 DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 10: ADMINISTRATIVE AND 
INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY (KPA 5: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND 
ORGANISATIONAL TRANSFORMATION AND KPA 6: GOOD GOVERNANCE) 
Development objective(s): 

Enable and improve financial viability and management through well- 
structured budget processes, financial systems, and MFMA compliance 
hrough legislative requirements 

Align institutional arrangements to provide an effective and efficiënt support 
service to deliver on organisational objectives 

Provide quality basic services to all communities within the municipality (i.e. 
electricity; water; sanitation; refuse) 

Manage and maintain municipal property, plant, equipment and vehicle fleet 
Facilitate the establishment of good governance practices 
Promote and improve public relations through stakeholder participation and good 
customer service. 


87 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 -2017 

31 March 2016 


CHARTER 8: SECTOR PLANS 


8.1 SECTOR PLAN AND INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT 


At the core of the new system of local government is the ability of municipalities to 
coordinate and integrate programmes of other spheres and sectors operating in 
their space. This role is very critical given that all government programmes and 
services are delivered in municipal spaces. In this regard, the integrated 
development planning process becomes a vehicle to facilitate integrated 
development to ensure the attainment of local government outcomes contained in 
the White Paper on Local Government. 

The approaches and plans to achieve these outcomes are contained in various 
national and provincial legislation and policy frameworks. 

National departments through legislation and policies express government priorities, 
strategies, plans and programmes. The legislation and policies also require 
municipalities to develop sector specific plans to guide the rendering of certain 
services. 

The new IDP framework group the sector plans into two (2) main categories of 
sector plans, namely sector plans providing overall development Vision of the 
municipality and sector plans that are service-oriented 

(a) Sector plans providing for the overaii deveiopmentai Vision of the 
municipaiity: 

These sector plans provides the socio-economic Vision as well as the transformation 
Vision of the //Khara Hais Municipality, and are provided as mandatory by the 
Municipal Systems Act. In terms of the MSA the following sector plans must be part 
of the IDP: 


• Spatial Development Framework (SDF); 

• Local Economie Development Plan (LED Plan); 

• Disaster Management Plan; 

• Institutional Plan; and 

• Financial Plan. 

(b) Sector plans provided for and regulated by sector specific legislation 
and policies: 

Various national legislation and policies provide for the development of service 
delivery related sector plans to regulate and guide the delivery of certain services in 
municipalities. These plans include amongst others - 

• Water Services Development Plan (WSDP), 

• Integrated Waste Management Plan (IWMP), 

• Integrated Transport Plan (ITP); 

• Environmental Management Plan (EMP); 

• Integrated Human Settlement Plan (IMS) / Housing Sector Plan (HSP); 

• Integrated Energy Plan (IEP), 

• Sports and Recreation Plan, etc. 

The two categories provide the strategies, programmes and projects that form the 
basis for the IDP and Budget. The section below outlines the relationship and the 
hierarchy of the various plans. 

8.2 SPATIAL VISION 


8.2.1 SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 

//Khara Hais Municipality approved the SDF on 26 May 2009 (Council Resolution 
10/05/2009 (RV)) as an integral part of the //Khara Hais IDP. The SDF is a dynamic 
document that is subject to regular supplementation by the Municipality and other 
stakeholders. A Revised SDF was completed in February 2012 and after a 
thorough consultation process, approved in September 2012 (Council Resolution 


887 



//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 -2017 

31 March 2016 


10/09/2012 UK). 

The SDF is a master development plan that provides the overall long term 
development Vision of //Khara Hals Municipality. Given that the SDF is a long term 
plan, it forms the basis for the development of the 5 year IDP. It further provides 
strategie direction for the development of all sector specific plans that will contribute 
to the achievement of the spatial Vision, particularly with regard to spatial 
restructuring and integration of settlements to promote social cohesion and 
economie development. The SDF is firstly directed towards achieving three (3) 
broad outcomes namely, creation of livable, integrated cities, towns and rural areas 
(social cohesion), economie development and environmental sustainability. 

Secondly, on the basis of these outcomes, the long term Vision for socio-economic 
development and environmental sustainability for the municipality is expressed in 
the SDF, in addition to the guidelines for a land use management. 

The key issues that emerged from the planning process, //Khara Hais IDP, and the 
maps and data provided by the FZ Megawu Environmental Management 
Framework were categorized into five programs. 

A program is defined as a strategie cluster of related activities that together achieve 
a specific goal. Collectively these programs are the ‘mechanisme’ through which the 
goals and objectives of //Khara Hais Municipality and the local community will be 
achieved. The various programs are: 

_ Program 1 : Environment 
_ Program 2: Development 
_ Program 3: Economie Sectors 
_ Program 4: Social Development 
_ Program 5: Municipal Management 

The various programs will be undertaken within the parameters posed by the three 

89 1 


imperatives for sustainable development (i.e. environmental integrity, human well- 
being, and economie efficiency). 

8.3 ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC VISION 


The social, economie and environmental visions of the municipality are represented 
by the Environmental Management Plan (EMP), Integrated Human Settlement Plan 
(IHSP)/ Housing Chapter, and Local Economie Development Strategy (LED 
Strategy). 

8.3.1 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN 


The purpose of the EMF is to integrate municipal and provincial decision-making 
and align different government mandates in a way that will put the area on a 
sustainable development path. 

It describes the following four physical geographical regions namely: 

_ The Kalahari; 

_ Bushmanland; 

_ The Griqua fold belt; and 
_ The Ghaap Plateau. 

The EMF also identifies environmental control zones. The purpose of environmental 
control zones is to indicate areas that require a specific type or regime of control 
due to unique environmental elements that occur in these areas. It may or may not 
be linked to the application of EIA legislation and should be dealt with at a more 
strategie level, where it should serve a guide for decision-making and planning. 

It also identified a few geographical areas based on environmental attributes of the 
areas, which means that different types of areas based on different environmental 
attributes are identified. 

A few strategies derived from this EMF. 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN; 2012-2017 

31 March 2016 


The purpose of strategies is to create a mechanism for implementing action to 
address some of the most pertinent issues that came out of the EMF. The strategies 
are focused on the alleviation of potential key development/environment friction 
areas by providing direction in respect to how these friction areas should be dealt 
with. 

The following strategies have been compiled: 

_ Strategy for the protection and conservation of high quality natural vegetation 
across the Siyanda District 

_ Strategy for development on sensitive areas in the Orange River floodplain 
_ Protection of sensitive environmental features on large proporties across Siyanda 
_ Strategy for the protection of sensitive environmental features surrounded or 

abutted by small properties. 

Linkto SDF 

Program 1 (Environment) of the SDF focuses on the environment and introducés 
two sub programs: 

Sub-Program 1 : Protected Nature Areas & Conservation-Worthy Areas 
Sub-Program 2: Natural Resources: 

These programs address the key issues containing in the IDP and adhere to the 
guidline and strategies in the ZF Mcgawu EMF. 

It is important that the ZF Mcgawu Environmental Management Framework initiated 
by the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT), the DTE&C and 
ZFM be implemented on a partnership basis under the auspices of the ZF Mcgawu 
and the relevant local municipalities, and as part of the IDP process. 


8.3.2 HOUSING CHARTER 


The housing sector plan as a component of the IDP is aimed at clarifying and 
providing strategy with respect to the manner in which housing development and 
comprehensive human settlement can be achieved at the local level. The main 
purposes of the Housing Chapter are as follows: 

To ensure effective allocation of limited resources to a variety of potential 
development initiatives. 

To provide guidance in prioritizing housing projects in order to obtain consensus for 
the order of implementation thereof. 

To ensure more integrated development through aligning cross-sectoral role players 
to coordinate their development interventions in one plan. 

To ensure budget allocations to local and district municipalities as well as provinces 
are most effectively applied for maximum impact. 

To provide spatial linkages between the spatial development framework and the 
physical implementation of the respective projects. 

To ensure there is a definite housing focus in the IDP 

Providing the IDP process with adequate information aboutthe housing programme, 
its benefits, parameters as well as strategie and operational requirements. 

Ensuring that the contents and process requirements of planning for housing are 
adequately catered for in the IDP process. 


9Ö| 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 -2017 

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LINKTO SDF 

Program 2 (Development) of the SDF specifies two sub- programs (Urban 
Development and Rural Development) which outlines the development of strategie 
vacant land (Sites A to Q) and proposed the bulk services (water, sewerage, 
electricity) demand to develop the abovementioned sites. Lastly the SDF propose 
strategies on how to develop the urban areas and deliver essential services to 
communities living in these areas. 

Sub- Program 2: Rural Development 

8.3.3 LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 


The LED Strategy and Investment Plan were approved by Council in 2010. The 
purpose of the LED and investment plan is to investigate the options and opportunities 
available to broaden the local economie base of the area in order to address the 
creation of employment opportunities and the resultant positive spin-off effects 
throughout the local economy. 

Numerous elements in a local economy can contribute to increased unemployment 
levels providing an unhealthy environment for investment, which in turns leads to a 
stagnating local economy. This in turn can place further strains on an already over 
extended local resource base, reinforcing the need for an innovative and effective 
broadening of the local economie base. This entails introducing new activities, offering 
incentives, applying new technologies, development ofSMMEs, broadening 
ownership, etc. 

This LED plan is prepared in conjunction with an investment plan. The aim of this 
study is thus twofold. The LED plan is based on the underlying needs, opportunities 
and comparative and competitive advantages of the Municipality and provides the 
Municipality with guidelines to create and facilitate economie development in order to 
realise the underlying development potential and in order to encourage both private 
and public sector investment and local job creation. Whereas the purpose of the 
investment plan is to outline the available incentive schemes and programmes on a 


91 


national level and highiight the prospects for investment incentives in the //Khara Hais 
local municipality. Potential financial and non-financial incentives, which could be 
introduced in the area to attract new businesses, are also provided. 

This plan is to be used by the Local Municipality to assist in ensuring the dedicated 
and effective utilisation of local available resources and to promote local economie 
development in a proactive and dynamic manner. 

The LED Strategy, therefore, provides the Municipality with the following: 

■ A strategically focused local economie development profile 

■ Methods to enhance co-ordination, integration and participation in local economie 
development 

■ Learning tool/s for the sharing of lessons learnt from the project 

■ A local economie development plan 

■ Sustainable and commercially viable business opportunities appropriately packaged 
for investment 

■ An investment incentive plan 

■ A implementation and monitoring and evaluation plan 

The plan is built on the underlying principle that a gap exists between the existing 
levels of development in Municipality and the potential level of development. In order 
to bridge this gap, this LED Strategy addresses the following aspects: 

■ A profile of the sectoral composition of the local economy 

■ Identification of the development potential of Municipality 

■ Identification of opportunities for SMME development in Municipality 

■ Identification of incentives available for business retention and attraction 

■ An institutional analysis. 

Four Strategie Thrusts are introducé to address LED in //Khara Hais 

Thrust 1 : Agricultural beneficiation and value-chain development 

Thrust 2: SMME and community business support 

Thrust 3: Tourism related development 

Thrust 4: Maximise and enhance benefits from strategie location 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 -2017 

31 March 2016 


The above Thrusts encompass the main local economie objectives for //Khara Hais 
Municipality as indicated above. 

The LED Strategy must be reviewed by 30 November 2015. The section LED, 
Tourism & Resorts contacted the provincial department of Economie Development 
& Tourism to ask for assistance in the review of the LED Strategy. The provincial 
department indicated that they can only assist the Municipality once the Mier 
Municipality is incorporated into //Khara Hais Municipality after the 2016 local 
government elections. 

Linkto SDF 

Program 3 and 4 of the SDF deals with Economie Sectors and Social Development 
respectively. Program 3 identifies three sub- programs: Tourism, Agriculture and 
Manufactoring. It is, therefore, of paramount importance that the fundamental role of 
the economy is properly understood and strategies be implemented for ensuring 
economie efficiency in all the integrated sectors described in the SDF. Economie 
efficiency refers to the optimisation of benefit at the lowest cost for valued things. 

Program 4 deals with Social Development. Unemployment and poverty are seen as 
the critical issues that need to be addressed in 

//Khara Hais. To address the above critical issues, social development strategies 
were proposed aimed at improving the HDI of historically disadvantaged groupings 
in //Khara Hais through the following: 

a) Building the economy: Increase personal income levels, reduce unemployment, 
reduce inequality, and reduce abject poverty. 

b) Developing human resources: Improve literacy and educational levels. 

c) Providing basic needs: Improve life expectancy, and enhance quality of life by 
providing clean drinking water, housing, primary heaith care, sports and recreation, 
social services, access to basic transport, and security. 


8.4 INPUT SECTOR PLANS 

The third level of sector plans is constituted by input sector plans that are directed 
towards the delivery of specific services. These plans are developed for the 
provision of specific services such as water, waste management, provision of sports 
and recreational facilities, and many more. This includes plans such as Water 
Services Development Plan, Integrated Waste Management Plan, Integrated 
Transport Plans, Integrated Energy Plans, Sports and Recreations Plan 
The existence, status and relationship with the level 2 sector plans are describe in 
the following paragraphs. 

8.4.1 WATER SERVICES DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

The Water Services Development Plan was approved by Council by 27*^ May 
2014.The current version of the WSDP covers the period of 201 1 till 2016. 

8.4.2 INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN 

The municipality has an Integrated Waste Management Plan. The IWMP is due to 

be reviewed and aligned with the adoption of Siyanda District Municipality's IWMP 

The purpose of this IWMP is to reduce the generation of waste and the 
environmental impact of all forms of waste and thereby ensure that the socio- 
economic development of //Khara Hais, the heaith of the people and the quality of 
its environmental resources are no longer adversely affected by uncontrolled and 
uncoordinated waste management. This should be done through an approach of 
waste prevention/ minimisation, recycle/reuse, treatment and finally disposal. 




//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 -2017 

31 March 2016 

The IWMP outlines the functions and responsibilities of //Khara Hais, strategies, 
plans and targets for integrated waste management planning, a waste Information 
System, waste minimisation and recycling, general waste collection, waste treatment 
and disposal, and capacity building, education, awareness and communication. 

The following plans are currently not available: 

Integrated transport Plan 

Integrated Energy Plan 

Sport and Recreation Plan 

8.4.3 INTEGRATED TRANSPORT PLAN 

strategies on communities who are most at risk to disasters which are highiy to 
occur and which justify the efforts of risk reduction and emergency preparedness, 
rather than to take any possible disaster into consideration. 

The Disaster Risk Management Plan will form part of the //Khara Hais Integrated 
Development Plan as a sector plan in contrast to the various cross-cutting issues 
related to “integrated plans”. Disaster Risk Management Planning must be parallel 
with the Integrated Development Plan process in ensuring that high risk 
development projects are avoided. This can be achieved by ensuring that the Head 
of Disaster Management Centre serves (satellite) on the Integrated Development 

Plan Steering Committee as well as the Integrated Development Plan 

Representative Forum of the //Khara Hais Municipality. 

8.6 IMPLEMENTATION SUPPORT PLANS 

In order to ensure that the organizational capability to support the achievement of 

the Vision exists and the financial resources to fund programmes and strategies 

The municipality is currently in process of developing an Integrated Transport Plan 

with the assistance and co-operation of the Northern Cape Provincial Department of 

Transport, Safety and Liasion. 

8.5 STRATEGY SUPPORT PLANS 

This level of sector plans support the implementation of level 2 and 3 sector plans 

exists two plans area critical, namely the Institutional Plan; and the Financial 

Management Plan 

8.5.1 DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN 

8.6.1 INSTITUTIONAL PLAN 

The majority of //Khara Hais Municipality’s population is living in vulnerable 
conditions as a result of high level of poverty, low standerds of living, high level of 
unemployment, lack of access to resources and environmental degradation. 

The focus of the Disaster Risk Management Plan must be as required by the 

Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002), the National Risk Disaster 
Management Framework 2005 and the Disaster Management Regulations Chapter 

5, Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002), to prioritize risk reduction 

No institutional Plan is currently in place but a HR Development Strategy is 
implemented. The Human Resources Development Strategy wlll provide a roadmap 
for the municipality that will develop, retain and grow the skills base required for an 
effective, sustainable and successful organization. 

The key deliverables of the Human Resources Development Strategy project are: 

• Proposed strategies that will align human resources development practices 
of the municipality with the Provincial Growth and Development Strategy of 

93 I 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012 -2017 

31 March 2016 

the Northern Cape, and the Human Resources Development Strategy for 

• South Africa, the National Skills Development Strategy and the strategies 
and programmes of the Local Government SETA; 

• Proposed strategies that will facilitate co-operation between internal and 
external stakeholders; and 

• Proposed strategies that will ensure that sufficiënt internal human resources 
capacity is build and that appropriate funding arrangements are established 
for the effective delivery of the Human Resources Development Strategy. 

This plan will also focus on the expansion of //Khara Hais’ revenue sources in 
relation to its costs to ensure that the municipality stays a financial viable and 
sustainable going concern. //Khara Hais must utilise available financial resources in 
an effective, efficiënt and economical way to ensure that outputs have the desired 
outcomes. The financial strategies detailed in this plan must contribute to the 
achievement of these objectives. 

The Human Resources Development Strategy of //Khara Hais municipality therefore 
have an internal as well as an external focus to integrate with other key municipal 
strategies and programmes. 


8.6.2 FINANCIAL PLAN 


The purpose of this chapter is to outline a comprehensive multi-year financial plan 
that will ensure long-term financial sustainability for //Khara Hais. The financial plan 
is essential to ensure that the municipality continues to implement its mandate 
effectively without impairing its capita! base and to move towards self-sufficiency in 
meeting the growing demands of service delivery. 


The multi-year financial plan is prepared for a planning period of five years, paying 
particular attention to infrastructure investment which is an important developmental 
component of the IDP. Through this plan //Khara Hais will focus on greater financial 
heaith and sustainability making collaboration of capita! investment projects with 
other levels of government and private sector investors much easier. It is of utmost 
importance that //Khara Hais stimulates the macro-economic environment to attract 
the private sector to invest in //Khara Hais. Through this approach //Khara Hais will 
enhance its ability to have access to much needed financial resources to invest in 
new as well as to maintain its current infrastructure assets. 


94 1 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY- INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 

March31,2016 


CHARTER 9: STRATEGIES, PROJECTS AND PROGRAMMES 

The prioritised project and programme needs (Annexure L) indicate the projects to be implemented over a five year period with the strategies, key performance 
indicators and targets. This phase is about the identification and design of projects linked to the municipal objective strategies, for implementation. Projects that 
were identified but not complete in the previous IDP cycle were also included if they were still relevant to address an identified priority areas. 

The outputs of this phase include: 

• Project targets and location 

• Cost estimates 

• Project related activities and time schedules, and 

• Performance indicators 

9.1 THREE YEAR STRATEGY 


PROJECT PROJECT NAME 

WARD RESPON 

PRIORITY MULTI YEAR INDICATIVE BUDGET 

FUNDING SOURCES 

NO/ITEM 

SIBLE 

2016/2017 2017/2018 2018/2019 


NR 

DEPART 




MENT 




DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 2: WATER RESOURCES AND SERVICES (KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT) 

Development objective: Develop, manage and maintain necessary infrastructure and facilities required to improve the provision of water services 
Strategy 2.1; Improve and upgrade existing water systems and/or technology 

2.1.1 Installation of 307 1,5,6, Development & 97.5 R774 588.00 RO RO Grants-MIG 

pre-paid water 13 Planning 

meters (Paballelo, 

Rosedale & 

Louisvale) 

2.1.2 Installation of 16 All Development R377 193.00 RO RO Grants - EPWP -National 

5051 communal stand pips & Planning 

Paballelo 


95 



//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY- INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 

March31,2016 


DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 2: WATER RESOURCES AND SERVICES (KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT) 
Development objective: Develop, manage and maintain necessary infrastructure and facilities required to improve the provision of water services 
Strategy 2.2: Extent and upgrade water infrastructure to improve the provision of water services 


2.2.1 

Provision of water - 

All 

Civil 

R3867 862.00 

RO 

RO 

Grants - EPWP 

5049 

Civil Services - 6667 
Erven (various areas) 


Engineering 

Services 





2.2.3 

5052 

Bulk Water 
Infrastructure- 
Acquisition & 
installation of 10 bulk 
meters & loggers 

All 

Civil 

Engineering 

Services 

R1 491 229.00 

RO 

RO 

Department Water Affairs 


Installation Water- 


Civil 

R31 8 959.00 

RO 

RO 

Own Funds 


Services Dakota road 
(Phase 2) 


Engineering 

Services 





5218 

Civil Services 

13 

Civil 

R500 000.00 

RO 

RO 

Own Funds 


Industrial ervens in 
Laboria 


Engineering 

Services 





2.2.3 

Bulk water provision 
(Melkstroom) 

9 

Civil 

Engineering 

Services 

RO 

R1000 519.00 

RO 

Grants - MIG 

Development objective: Develop, manage and maintain essential bulk water infrastructure and facilities to accommodate the aspirations, needs and 
pressures of present and future industries, businesses and dependent communities 

Strategy 2.4: Maintain and upgrade bulk water installations 

5048 

Upgrading of 


Civil 

R287 111.00 

RO 

RO 

Own Funds 


Raaswater and 

Protea Raw Water 
Pump stations 


Engineering 

Services 






96 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY- INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 


March31,2016 


DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 3: SEWERAGE (KPA2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT) 

Objective: Develop, manage and maintain essential bulk sewerage infrastructure and facilities to accommodate the aspirations, needs and pressures of 

present and future industries, businesses and dependent communities 

Strategy 3.1: Maintain existing sewerage infrastructure and bulk sewerage installations 


3.1.3 

Replacement of 

Civil 

R850 000.00 

RO 


RO Own funding - CRR 


worn- out pumps , 
valves, switch gear 

Engineering 

Services 






and meters 

Sewerage 






Bulk Sewerage 

9 Civil 

RO 

RO 

R2 631 579.00 

MIG 


Infrastructure: 

(Melkstroom) 

Engineering 

Services 

Sewerage 





4.2.1 

Eradication of 

All Civil 

R82 909000 

RO 

RO 

COGHSTA Department 


Bucket System 

Engineering 

Services 

Sewerage 




of Sanitation 

Energy Efficiency Civil R2 631 579.00 R4 385 965.00 RO EEDSM Grant 

Demand Engineering (Own Funds R5203 158. 00 

Management Supply Services 2015/2016R632 000.00 

(EEDSM Grant) Sewerage 2015/2016 (Own Funds) 

Development objective: Develop, manage and maintain essential bulk sewerage infrastructure and facilities to accommodate the aspirations, needs and 
pressures of present and future industries, businesses and dependent communities 

Strategy 3.2: Upgrade existing sewerage infrastructure and bulk sewerage installation 

3.2.4 

Extensions to 

All Civil 

RO 

RO 

R15 109 129.00 

Grants - MIG 


Kameelmond 
Sewerage Works 

Engineering 

Services 

Sewerage 





5089 

Upgrading of 

Civil 

R309 458.00 

RO 

RO 

Own Funds 

5090 

Mechanism Bio Filter 
number 1& 2 

Engineering 

Services 






Kameelmond WWTW 

Sewerage 






97 


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March31,2016 


DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 5: ENERGY AND ELECTRICITY (KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT) 
Development objective: Provide, manage and maintain essential infrastructure required to improve electricity provision. 

Strategy 5.1; Maintain and upgrade existing electrical networks 


5.1.2 

Upgrading of 

Networks 2015/16 

Al 

Elec Services 


R200, 000.00 


RO 


RO 

Own funding - CRR 

5.1.3 

Upgrade of Main 
Supply NetWork - 
Connection to Delta 

AH 

Elec Services 


R1 ,407,607.00 


RO 


RO 

Own funding - CRR 

Strategy 5.2; Implement electrification program 

5.2.4 

Electrification of new 

1 



R10 007 851 

RO 


RO 


Own funding CRR 

4941 

Developments:455 









R3 867 500.00 

4942 

R/D Westerkim 









INEP R6 140 351.00 
2015/2016 

5.2.6 

Installation of prepaid 

AH 

Elect services 

88.5 

R25 000.00 

RO 


RO 


Own funding (CRR) 

4946 

electricity meters 










5.2.7 

Electric prepayment 

AH 

/Elect services 

88.5 

R25 000.00 

RO 


RO 


Own funding (CRR) 

4945 

meters for indigent 
people 










5.2.4 

Electrification 

8 



RO 

RO 


R629 000.00 


Own funding CRR 


projects of new 
developments: 74 
connections Dakota 
road 


5.2.4 

Electrification 8 

R1 616 693.00 RO 

RO 

Own funding CRR- 


projects of new 



R739 500.00 


developments: 87 



Grants- 


connections Dakota 



INEP R877 193.00 


road 





98 



//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY- INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 

March31,2016 


DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 5: ENERGY AND ELECTRICITY (KPA2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT) 

Development objective: Provide, manage and maintain essential infrastructure required to improve electricity provision. 

Strategy 5. 3: Implement Street- and area lighting program for existing and new developments 

5.3.1 Installation of High AH Electserv 92.5 R7 643 666.00 RO RO Grants-MIG 

Mast lighting 

DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 6: ROADS, TRANSPORT AND STORMWATER DRAINAGE (KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT) 
Development objective: Develop, manage and maintain necessary Road, Transport and Storm water infrastructure and facilities required to improve 
transportation in, and aesthetic qualities of urban areas 

Strategy 6.2: Maintain and upgrade existing transport infrastructure 


6.2.9 

Supply & 
installation of 

AH 

Civil 

85 

R281 811.00 

RO 

RO 

MIG 


mountable kerbs 
for Kalksloot 

Access Road 








6.2.9 

Supply & 
installation of 

AH 

Civil 

85 

R504 032.00 

RO 

RO 

MIG 


mountable kerbs 
for Raaswater 
Access Road 








6.2.9 

Construction of 

AH 

Civil 

85 

R938 811.00 

RO 

RO 

MIG 


Leseding Access 
Road (roll over 








5038 

Paving of streets 

1 

Civil 


R1 4 738.00 

RO 

RO 

EPWP- Provincial 


and upgrading of 
stormwater 


Engineering 

Services 







Smartiesvalley 
(fase 2) 


Roads 







Paving of streets - 
Pabalello 


Development & 
planning 


R170 687.00 

R7912 113.00 

RO 

Grants-MIG 


99 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY- INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 

March31,2016 


Melkstroom: N14 Development& RO R10 970 746.00 RO Grants-MIG 

Access collector planning 

and distributor 
road 

DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 9: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND FACILITIES (KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND 

KPA 7: SOCIAL SERVICES) 

Development objective; Provide equal access to sport, park, recreational facilities and other public amenities to all residents 

Strategy 9.6 Improve existing Sport, Park and Recreation facilities 

PARKS 

9.6.4.7 Establishment of All Development & 74.8 R87 719.00 R8 328 903.00 R513 289.00 Grants-MIG 

parks/playgrounds Planning 

in various areas 
Leerkrans, 

Lambrechtsdrift, 

Karos, Ntsikelelo, 

Louisevale road 
(2), Rondomskrik, 

Kalksloot, 

Kameelmond, 

Raaswater & 

Leseding 

SPORTGROUNDS 

Strategy 9.6: Improve existing Sport, Park and Recreation facilities 


9.6.5.1 

Development of 14,12 

new sport grounds 
(Lambrechtsdrift & 
Louisevaledorp) 

Development & 

Planning 

R3 305 911.00 

RO 

RO 

Grants-MIG 

R3 595 451 2015/2016 

9.6.5.12 

Development of 
sportground 

Paballelo 

Development & 

Planning 

R589 771.00 

RO 

RO 

Lotto Allocation 


100 


. /KR4RA HAIS MUNICIP.^I'n'- INTEGRATED DE\TLOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 

March31,2016 


DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 10: ADMINISTRATIVE AND INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY (KPA 5: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND ORGANISATIONAL 
TRANSFORMATION AND KPA 6: GOOD GOVERNANCE) 

Development objective: Aligning institutional arrangements in order to provide an effective and efficiënt support service in order to deliver on 
organizational objectives 

Strategy: 10.2 Development of effective internal systems to provide better services to all residents 


10.2.2 Institutional Capital 

4929 Projects 

(Unallocated 

Direc 

to 

rates 

Executive & 

Council 

Office of MM 

R1 500 000.00 

R1590 000.00 

R1685 400.00 

Own funding (CRR) 

Assets) 

Objective: Aligning institutional arrangements in order to provide an effective and efficiënt support service in order to deliver on organizational objectives 
Strategy 10.3 Manage and maintain municipal property, plant, equipment and vehicle fleet 

10.3.3. Replacement of 

old vehicles and 
equipment 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

R931 980.00 

RO 

RO 

Own funding (CRR) 

(Purchase of 
sanitation truck) 

1 Ton Armoured 
Response Vehicle 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

R500 000.00 

RO 

RO 

Own funding (CRR 

1.6 SOOKgLAW 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

R340 000.00 

R370 000.00 

R400 000.00 

Own funding (CRR 

1 .6 Match back 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

R300 000.00 

R165 000.00 

R1 80 000.00 

Own funding (CRR) 

1 .6 Sedan 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

RO 

R180 000.00 

Own funding (CRR 

2 Ton Crew Cab 
trok met Drarak 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

R450 000.00 

R480 000.00 

RO 

Own funding (CRR 


101 




//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY- 

INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 






March31,2016 






2. lOOOKg LAW 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

R390 000.00 

R630 000.00 

R450 000.00 

Own funding (CRR 



9000 liter Vacuum 

Electro 

R1200 000.00 

R1 300 000.00 

R1 400 000.00 

Own funding (CRR 



Tanker 

Mechanical 

Services 







Bell Compactor 

Electro 

R3 500 000.00 

RO 

RO 

Own funding (CRR 



(Funksie 27 

Mechanical 

Services 







Blower Mower 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

R45 000.00 

R50 000.00 

R45 000.00 

Own funding (CRR) 



Cherry Pieker 

Electro 

R700 000.00 

R800 000.00 

RO 

Own funding (CRR) 



4Ton 

Mechanical 

Services 







Draagbare pomp 

Electro 

R1 3 000.00 

RO 

RO 

Own funding (CRR 



75mm ii en uitlaat 

Mechanical 







(Funksie 67) 

Services 







Grassnyers Zero 

Electro 

R105 000.00 

Ril 0 000.00 

Ril 5 000.00 

Own funding (CRR 



Turn 

Mechanical 

Services 







Jackhammer 

Electro 

R52 000.00 

R45 000.00 

RO 

Own funding (CRR 



Breaker 

Mechanical 

Services 







Kanslaner 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

R34 000.00 

R36 000.00 

R28 500.00 

Own funding (CRR 



Kompakteerder 

Electro 

R1 100 000.00 

R1 200 000.00 

R1 300 000.00 

Own funding (CRR 



Trok 

Mechanical 

Services 







Laaigraaf 3-4 cub 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

R950 000.00 

R1 050 000.00 

R1 150 000.00 

Own funding (CRR 


102 









//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY- 

INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 


March31,2016 


Mobliele 

Drukpomp 50 mm 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

2015/2016 

R9 296.00 

RO 

RO 

Own funding (CRR 


Roller (Bomag) 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

R90 000 .00 

RO 

RO 

Own funding (CRR 


Snoeisaag 

(Pruner) 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

R7 500.00 

R8 500.00 

RO 

Own funding (CRR 


Tipper 6000 cub 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

R900 000.00 

R950 000.00 

R1 000 000.00 

Own funding (CRR 

4928 

Install of Fuel 

Tanks and 
Equipment for 
stores 

AH 

Financial 

Services 

R2 mil 

RO 

RO 

Own funding (CRR) 

10.3.8 

Additional office at 
Water Distribution 

N/A 

Civil Services 

R90 745.00 

RO 

RO 

Own funding (CRR) 

10.3.14 

4931 

Upgrading of 

ITRON server and 
Equipment 


Corporate 

Services 

Information 

Technology 

R195 978.00 

RO 

RO 

Own funding (CRR) 


Implementation of 
Readyness study - 
Kameelmond 
WWTW(RBIG) 


Civil 

Engineering 

Services 

Sewerage 

R570 175.00 

RO 

RO 

RBIG (Regional Buck 
Infrastructurre Grant) 

103 


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March31,2016 

9.2 ANNUAL PLAN 


PROJECT PROJECT NAME WARD RESPONSIBLE PRIORITY PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES 

NO DEPARTMENT COSTS CRR GRANTS LOANS 

(MIG/INEP 

/EPWP 

NAT/PROV 

DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 2: WATER RESOURCES AND SERVICES 

Development objective: Develop, manage and maintain necessary Infrastructure and facllltles required to Improve the provislon of 
water services 

Strategy 2.1: Improve and upgrade existing water systems and/or technology 


2.1.1 

Installation of 307 pre-paid water 
meters (Paballelo, Rosedale & 

Louisvale) 

1,5,6, 

13 

Development & 97.5 

Planning 

RO 

RO 

R774 588.00 

MIG 

2.1.2 

Installation of 16 communal stand pips 

AH 

Development & 

RO 

RO 

R377 193. 00 

5051 

Paballelo 


Planning 



EPWP- 

National 

Strategy 2.2: Extent and upgrade water infrastructure to improve the provision of water services 

2.2.1 

Provision of water - 

AH 

Civil Engineering 

RO 

RO 

R3867 862.00 

5049 

Civil Services - 6667 Erven (various 
areas) 


Services 



EPWP 

2.2.3 

5052 

Bulk Water Infrastructure- Acquisition & 
installation of 10 bulk meters & loggers 

AH 

Civil Engineering 

Services 

RO 

RO 

R1 491 229.00 

Department 

Water Affairs 


Installation Water-Services Dakota road 


Civil Engineering 

RO 

R31 8 959.00 

RO 


(Phase 2) 


Services 




5218 

Civil Services - Industrial ervens in 

13 

Civil Engineering 

RO 

R500 000.00 

RO 


Laboria 


Services 




2.2.3 

Bulk water provision (Melkstroom) 

9 

Civil Engineering 

Services 

RO 

RO 

R1000 519. 

Grants-MIG 


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//KHARA HMS MUNICIPALITY- INTEGRATED DEWLOPMENT PLAN: 2012 -2017 

March31,2016 


PROJECT PROJECT NAME WARD RESPONSIBLE PRIORITY PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES 

NO DEPARTMENT COSTS CRR GRANTS LOANS 

(MIG/INEP 

/EPWP 

NAT/PROV 

Development objective: Develop, manage and maintain essential bulk water infrastructure and facilities to accommodate the aspirations, needs and 
pressures of present and future industries, businesses and dependent communities 
Strategy 2.4: Maintain and upgrade bulk water installations 

5048 Upgrading of Raaswater and Protea Civil Engineering R287 111.00 RO 

Raw Water Pumpstations Services 

DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 3: SEWERAGE (KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT) 

Objective: Develop, manage and maintain essential bulk sewerage infrastructure and facilities to accommodate the aspirations, needs and pressures of 

present and future industries, businesses and dependent communities 

Strategy 3.1: Maintain existing sewerage infrastructure and bulk sewerage installations 


3.1.3 

Replacement of wom- out pumps , 


Civil Engineering 

RO 

R850 000.00 

RO 


valves, switch gear and meters 


Services 







Sewerage 





Energy Efficiency Demand 


Civil Engineering 

RO 

R632 000.00 

RO 


Management Supply 


Services 







Sewerage 




4.2.1 

Eradication of Bucket system 

AH 

Civil Engineering 

RO 

RO 

R82 909000 




Services 



COGHSTADeptof 




Sewerage 



Sdfiitston 


Development objective: Develop, manage and maintain essential bulk sewerage infrastructure and facilities to accommodate the aspirations, needs and 
pressures of present and future industries, businesses and dependent communities 
Strategy 3.2: Upgrade existing sewerage infrastructure and bulk sewerage installation 

5089 Upgrading of Mechanism Bio Filter Civil Engineering RO R309 458.00 RO 

5090 number 1 & 2-Kameelmond WWTW Services 

Sewerage 


DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 5. ENERGY AND ELECTRICITY 


105 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY- INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 

March31,2016 


WARD RESPONSIBLE PRIORITY PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES 

DEPARTMENT COSTS CRR GRANTS LOANS 

(MIG/INEP 
/EPWP 
NAT/PROV 

Development objective: Provide, manage and maintain essential infrastructure required to improve electricity provision. 
Strategy 5.1: Maintain and upgrade existing electrical networks 


5.1.2 

Upgrading of Networks 2015/16 

Al 

Elec Services 


RO 

R200 000.00 

RO 

5.1.3 

Upgrade of Main Supply Network - 
Connection to Delta 

AH 

Elec Services 


RO 

R1 407 607.00 

RO 

Strategy 5.2; Implement electrification program 

5.2.4 

Electrification of new 

1 



RO 

R3 867 500.00 

R6 140 351.00 

4941 

Developments:455 R/D Westerkim 







4942 








5.2.4 

Electrification projects of new 

8 



RO 

R739 500.00 

R877 193.00 


developments; 87 connections Dakota 






Grants- 


road 






INEP 

5.2.6 

Installation of prepaid electricity meters 

AH 

Elect services 

88.5 

RO 

R25 000.00 

RO 

4946 








5.2.7 

Electric prepayment meters for indigent 

AH 

/Elect services 

88.5 

RO 

R25 000.00 

RO 

4945 

people 







Strategy 5. 3: Implement Street- and area lighting program for existing and new developments 

5.3.1 

Installation of High Mast lighting 

AH 

Elect serv 

92.5 

RO 

RO 

R7 643 666.00 

Grants-MIG 


DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 6: ROADS, TRANSPORT AND STORMWATER DRAINAGE (KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT) 
Development objective: Develop, manage and maintain necessary Road, Transport and Storm water infrastructure and facilities required to improve 
transportation in, and aesthetic qualities of urban areas 
Strategy 6.2; Maintain and upgrade existing transport infrastructure 

6.2.9 Supply & installation of mountable AH Civil Engineering 85 RO RO R281 811.00 

kerbs for Kalksloot Access Road Services MIG 

Roads 


106 


PROJECT PROJECT NAME 
NO 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY- INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 

March31,2016 


PROJECT 

PROJECT NAME 

WARD 

RESPONSIBLE 

PRIORITY 

PROJECT 


FUNDING SOURCES 

NO 



DEPARTMENT 


COSTS 

CRR 

GRANTS LOANS 

(MIG/INEP 

/EPWP 

NAT/PROV 

6.2.9 

Supply & installation of mountable 

All 

Civil Engineering 

85 

RO 

RO 

R504 032. 00 


kerbs for Raaswater Access Road 


Services 

Roads 




MIG 

6.2.9 

Construction of Leseding Access Road 
(roll over 

All 

Civil Engineering 
Services 

85 

RO 

RO 

R938 811.00 

MIG 




Roads 





6.2.9 

Paving streets - Paballelo 


Civil Engineering 


R170 687.00 

RO 

R170 687.00 




Services 

Roads 




MIG 

5038 

Paving of streets and upgrading of 
stormwater Smartiesvalley (Fase 2) 

1 

Civil Engineering 
Services 

Roads 


RO 

RO 

R14 738.00 

EPWP- 

Provincial 


DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 9: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND FACILITIES (KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND 
KPA 7: SOCIAL SERVICES) 

Development objective: Provide equal access to sport, park, recreational facilities and other public amenities to all residents 

Strategy 9.6 Improve existing Sport, Park and Recreation facilities 

PARKS 

9.6.4.7 Establishment of parks/playgrounds in All Development & 74.8 R87 719.00 

various areas Planning MIG 

Leerkrans, 

Lambrechtsdrift, Karos, Ntsikelelo, 

Louisevale road (2), Rondomskrik, 

Kalksloot, Kameelmond, Raaswater & 

Leseding 


107 


, ZKR^RA HMS MUNICIPALiri'- INTEGIL^TED DEVTLOPMENT PLAN: 2012 - 2017 


March31,2016 


PROJECT 

NO 

PROJECT NAME 

WARD 

RESPONSIBLE PRIORITY 
DEPARTMENT 

PROJECT 

COSTS 

CRR 

FUNDING SOURCES 

GRANTS LOANS 

(MIG/INEP 

/EPWP 

NAT/PROV 


SPORTS GROUNDS 







9.6.5.1 

Development of new sport grounds 

14,12 

Development & 



R3 305 911.00 



{Lambrechtsdrift & Louisevaledorp) 


Planning 



MIG 


9.6.5.12 

Development of sportground 


Development & 



R589 771.00 



Paballelo 


Planning 



Lotto Allocation 



DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 10: ADMINISTRATIVE AND INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY (KPA 5: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND ORGANISATIONAL 
TRANSFORMATION AND KPA 6: GOOD GOVERNANCE) 

Development objective: Aligning institutional arrangements in order to provide an effective and efficiënt support service in order to deliver on organizational 
objectives 

Strategy: 10.2 Development of effective interna! systems to provide better services to all residents 


10.2.2 

Institutional Capital Projects 

Direc 

Executive & 

R1500 000.00 RO 

4929 

(Unallocated Assets) 

to 

Council 




rates 

Office of MM 



Objective: Aligning institutional arrangements in order to provide an effective and efficiënt support service in order to deliver on organizational objectives 
Strategy 10.3 Manage and maintain municipal property, plant, equipment and vehicle fleet 


10.3.3. 

Replacement of old vehicles and 

Electro 

RO 

R931 980.00 

RO 


equipment 

Mechanical 





(Purchase of sanitation truck) 

Services 




10.3.3. 

Replacement of old vehicles and 

Electro 

RO 

R931 980.00 

RO 


equipment 

Mechanical 





(Purchase of sanitation truck) 

Services 





1 Ton Armoured Response Vehicle 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R500 000.00 

RO 


1.6 500KgLAW 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R340 000.00 

RO 


108 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY- INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 


March31,2016 


PROJECT 

NO 

PROJECT NAME 

WARD RESPONSIBLE 
DEPARTMENT 

PRIORITY PROJECT 

COSTS 

FUNDING SOURCES 

CRR GRANTS LOANS 

(MIG/INEP 
/EPWP 

NAT/PROV 


1 .6 Hatch back 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R300 000.00 

RO 


2 Ton Crew Cab trok met Drarak 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R450 000.00 

RO 


2. lOOOKg LAW 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R390 000.00 

RO 


9000 liter Vacuum Tanker 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R1200 000.00 

RO 


Bell Compacter (Funksie 27 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R3 500 000.00 

RO 


Blower Mower 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R45 000.00 

RO 


Cherry Pieker 4Ton 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R700 000.00 

RO 


Draagbare pomp 75mm ii en uitlaat 
(Funksie 67) 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R1 3 000.00 

RO 


Grassnyers Zero Turn 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R105 000.00 

RO 


109 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY- INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 

March31,2016 

PROJECT 

PROJECT NAME 

WARD 

RESPONSIBLE PRIORITY 

PROJECT 

FUNDING SOURCES 

NO 



DEPARTMENT 

COSTS 

CRR GRANTS 

(MIG/INEP 
/EPWP 
NAT/PROV 

LOANS 


Jackhammer Breaker 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R52 000.00 

RO 



Kanslaner 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R34 000.00 

RO 



KompakteerderTrok 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R1 100 000.00 

RO 



Laaigraaf 3-4 cub 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R950 000.00 

RO 



Roller (Bomag) 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R90 000 .00 

RO 



Snoeisaag (Pruner) 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R7 500.00 

RO 



Tipper 6000 cub 


Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

RO 

R900 000.00 

RO 


4928 

Install of Fuel Tanks and Equipment for 
stores 

AH 

Financial 

Services 

RO 

R2 mil 

RO 


10.3.8 

Additional office at Water Distribution 

N/A 

Civil Services 

RO 

R90 745.00 

RO 


110 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY- INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 


March31,2016 

PROJECT 

PROJECT NAME 

WARD RESPONSIBLE PRIORITY 

PROJECT 

FUNDING SOURCES 

NO 


DEPARTMENT 

COSTS 

CRR GRANTS 

(MIG/INEP 
/EPWP 
NAT/PROV 

LOANS 

10.3.14 

4931 

Upgrading of ITRON server and 
Equipment 

Corporale 

Services 

Information 

Technology 

RO 

R195 978.00 



Implementation of Readyness study - 
Kameelmond WWTW(RBIG) 

Civil Engineering 

Services 

Sewerage 

RO 

R570 175.00 RO 

RBIG (Regional 

Buck 

Infrastructurre 

Grant) 



111 


//KARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN - 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


CHARTER 10: ORGANISATIONAL PMS 

This Chapter deals with the implementation and monitoring of the IDP strategies, 
projects and programs aimed at achieving the Vision and objectives of //Khara Hais 
Municipality as set out in this document. The IDP and budget are implemented 
through a Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP). The Top 
Layer SDBIP is used as a scorecard to measure, monitor, evaluate and report on 
institutional performance (quarterly, mid term and annually). The Departmental 
SDBIP measures the performance of the departments, and performance 
agreements and plans are used to measure the performance of employees. 

The Performance Management System (E- Perform) implemented at //Khara Hais 
Municipality is intended to provide a comprehensive, step-by-step planning system 
that helps the Municipality to manage the process of performance planning and 
measurement effectively. The PM System serves as primary mechanism to monitor 
review and improve the implementation of the municipal IDP and eventually the 
budget. 

Section 38 (a) of the Systems Act requires municipalities to set appropriate key 
performance indicators as a yardstick for measuring performance, including 
outcomes and impact, with regard to the community development priorities and 
objectives set out in its IDP. Section 9 (1) of the Regulations to this Act maintains in 
this regard, that a municipality must set key performance indicators, including input, 
output and outcome indicators in respect of each of the development priorities and 
objectives. 

Every year, as required by Section 12 (1) of the Regulations to the Systems Act, 
the municipality also sets performance targets for each of the key performance 
indicators. The IDP process and the performance management process are 
therefore seamlessly integrated. 


A comprehensive set of KPI's are developed and included in the SDBIP of the 
Municipality. Below are the indicators and targets set for the top layer (Directorates) 
to be implemented during the 2015/ 2016 financial year. 


112 



//KHARA HAIS MIJNICIPALITY; INTEGRATED DE\TLOPMENT PLAN - 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


DEPARTMENT 

SECTION 

KPA 

DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

TARGET 

Office of the 

Municipal 

Manager 

Office of the 
Municipal 
Manager; Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

PMS framework ; Signed 
Performance Agreements for 
all Section 57 employees by 

30 June 2015 (Financial year 
2015/2016) 

Signed Performance 
Agreements by 30 June 

2015 (Financial year 
2015/2016) 

Office of the 

Municipal 

Manager 

Office of the 
Municipal 
Manager: Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Quarterly evaluations of all 
Section 66 employees 

Quarterly evaluations of all 
Section 66 employees. 

Office of the 

Municipal 

Manager 

Office of the 
Municipal 
Manager; Office 

Financial Viability 

Enable and improve financial viability and 
management through well-structured 
budget processes, financial systems, and 
MFMA compliance through legislative 
requirements 

Enable and improve financial 
viability and management 
through well-structured 
budget processes, financial 
Systems, and MFMA 
compliance through 
legislative requirements 

5 Percent deviation of 
actual expenditure VS 
departmental budget by 

30 June 2015 

Office of the 

Municipal 

Manager 

Office of the 
Municipal 
Manager; Office 

Good 

Governance 

Promote and improve public relations 
through stakeholder participation and 
good customer service. 

Manage Intergovernmental 
relations : 70 Percent 
Interventions achieved in 
terms of challenges per 
quarter 

70 Percent interventions 
achieved in terms of 
challenges per report 

Office of the 

Municipal 

Manager 

Office of the 
Municipal 
Manager; Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Senior Management meeting 
: Three planned staff 
interactions by the end of 
each quarter 

12 Meetings/ annum 

Office of the 

Municipal 

Manager 

Office of the 
Municipal 
Manager; Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Joint Management meeting ; 
Three planned staff 
interactions by the end of 
each quarter 

12 Meetings/ annum 


113 


//KHARA HAJS MIJNICIP.^TY: INTEGRATED DE\^ELOPMENT PLAN - 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


DEPARTMENT 

SECTION 

KPA 

DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

TARGET 

Office of the 

Municipal 

Manager 

Office of the 
Municipal 
Manager; Office 

;lnstitutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

1 Structured focus session 
by 30 June 2016 

1 event /exercise 

Directorate 

Community 

Services 

Directorate 
Community 
Services: Office 

Financial Viability 

Enable and improve financial viability and 
management through well-structured 
budget processes, financial systems, and 
MFMA compliance through legislative 
requirements 

5 Percent deviation of actual 
expenditure vs departmental 
budget by 30 June 2016 

5 Percent deviation of 
actual expenditure vs 
departmental budget by 

30 June 2016 

Directorate 

Community 

Services 

Directorate 
Community 
Services; Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Required information 
submitted for compilation of 
Annual Report by 

31/12/2015 

Required information 
submitted for compilation 
of Annual Report by 
31/12/2015 

Directorate 

Community 

Services 

Directorate 
Community 
Services: Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

80 Percent of assigned 
council resolutions executed 
by end of each quarter 

80 Percent of assigned 
council resolutions 
executed by end of each 
quarter 

Directorate 

Community 

Services 

Directorate 
Community 
Services: Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Three planned staff 
interactions by the end of 
each quarter 

Monthiy meetings 
(12/annum) 

Directorate 

Community 

Services 

Directorate 
Community 
Services; Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Quarterly evaluations of all 
Section 66 employees 

Quarterly evaluations 
of all Section 66 
employees 

Directorate 

Corporate 

Services 

Directorate 
Corporate 
Services; Office 

Financial Viability 

Enable and improve financial viability and 
management through well-structured 
budget processes, financial systems, and 
MFMA compliance through legislative 
requirements 

5 Percent deviation of actual 
expenditure vs departmental 
budget by 30 June 2016 

5 Percent deviation of 
actual expenditure vs 
departmental budget by 

30 June 2016 


114 I 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIP.^LITY; INTEGRATED DE\^ELOPMENT PLAN - 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


DEPARTMENT 

SECTION 

KPA 

DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

TARGET 

Directorate 

Corporate 

Services 

Directorate 
Corporate 
Services; Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Required Information 
submitted for compilation of 
Annual Report by 

31/12/2015 

Required Information 
submitted for compilation 
of Annual Report by 
31/12/2015 

Directorate 

Corporate 

Services 

Directorate 
Corporate 
Services: Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Annual Report compiled and 
approved by 31 March 2016 

Annual Report compiled 
and approved by 

31 March 2016 

Directorate 

Corporate 

Services 

Directorate 
Corporate 
Services; Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

80 Percent of assigned 
council resolutions executed 
by end of each quarter 

80 Percent of assigned 
council resolutions 
executed by end of each 
quarter 

Directorate 

Corporate 

Services 

Directorate 

Corporate 

Services 

Directorate 

Corporate 

Services 

Directorate 
Corporate 
Services; Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Policy Guidance - Updated 
register and publishing of all 
policies on data storage 
device per quarter 

Updated register and 
publishing of all policies 
on data storage device per 
quarter 

Directorate 
Corporate 
Services; Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Three planned staff 
interactions by the end of 
each quarter 

Monthiy meetings 
(12/annum) 

Directorate 
Corporate 
Services; Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Quarterly evaluatlons of all 
Section 66 employees 

Quarterly evaluatlons of all 
Section 66 employees 

Directorate 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

Directorate 
Electro 
Mechanical 
Services; Office 

Financial Viability 

Enable and improve financial viability and 
management through well-structured 
budget processes, financial systems, and 
MFMA compliance through legislative 
requirements 

5 Percent deviation of actual 
expenditure vs departmental 
budget by 30 June 2016 

5 Percent deviation of 
actual expenditure vs 
departmental budget by 

30 June 2016 


//KHARA HAIS MIJNICIPALITY; INTEGRATED DE\^ELOPMENT PLAN - 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


DEPARTMENT 

SECTION 

KPA 

DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

TARGET 

Directorate 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

Directorate 
Electro 
Mechanical 
Services; Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Required information 
submitted for compilation of 
Annual Report by 

31/12/2015 

Required information 
submitted for compilation 
of Annual Report by 
31/12/2015 

Directorate 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

Directorate 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

Directorate 
Electro 
Mechanical 
Services: Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

80 Percent of assigned 
council resolutions executed 
by end of each quarter 

80 Percent of assigned 
council resolutions 
executed by end of each 
quarter 

Directorate 
Electro 
Mechanical 
Services: Office 

Service Delivery 
and Infrastructure 
Development 

Provide, manage and maintain essential 
infrastructure required to improve the 
provision of electrical services. 

Electrification of New 
Developments: 200 
Connections in Rosedale 

North - R4,495,447.00 - 
Percent progress and budget 
spend as per quarterly target , 

100 Percent completed - 
R4,495,447.00 spend by 

30 June 2016 

1 

Directorate 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

Directorate 
Electro 
Mechanical 
Services; Office 

Service Delivery 
and Infrastructure 
Development 

Provide, manage and maintain essential 
infrastructure required to improve the 
provision of electrical services. 

Electrification of New 
Developments: 89 

Connections in Louisvale - 
R1, 383, 296.00 - Percent 
progress and budget spend 
as per quarterly target 

100 Percent completed - 
R1 ,383,296.00 spend 

Directorate 

Electro 

Mechanical 

Services 

Directorate 
Electro 
Mechanical 
Services: Office 

Service Delivery 
and Infrastructure 
Development 

Provide, manage and maintain essential 
infrastructure required to improve the 
provision of electrical services. 

Energy Management -<10 
Percent electricity losses per 
quarter 

Percent electricity losses - 
<10 Percent by 30 June 

2016 

Directorate 

Electro- 

Mechanical 

Services 

Directorate 
Electro 
Mechanical 
Services; Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Three planned staff 
interactions by the end of 
each quarter 

Monthiy meetings 
(12/annum ) 


116 


//KHARA HAIS MUMCIP.^UJTY: INTEGÏLATED DE\^LOPMENT PLAN - 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


DEPARTMENT 

SECTION 

KPA 

DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

TARGET 

Directorate Civil 

Engineering 

Services 

Directorate Civil 
Engineering 
Services; Office 

Financial Viability 

Enable and improve financial viability and 
management through well-structured 
budget processes, financial systems, and 
MFMA compliance through legislative 
requirements 

5 Percent deviation of actual 
expenditure vs departmental 
budget by 30 June 2016 

5 Percent deviation of 
actual expenditure vs 
departmental budget by 

30 June 2016 

Directorate Civil 

Engineering 

Services 

Directorate Civil 
Engineering 
Services; Office 

Service Delivery 
and Infrastructure 
Development 

Develop, manage and maintain essential 
bulk water and sewerage infrastructure 
and facilities to accommodate the 
aspirations, needs and pressures of 
present and future industries, businesses 
and dependent communities. 

Installation of Telemetry 
System - R626.316.00 

100 Percent completed - 
R626.316.00 spend by 30 
June 2016 

Directorate Civil 

Engineering 

Services 

Directorate Civil 

Engineering 

Services 

Directorate Civil 

Engineering 

Services 

Directorate Civil 

Engineering 

Services 

Directorate Civil 
Engineering 
Services; Office 

Service Delivery 
and Infrastructure 
Development 

Develop, manage and maintain necessary 
infrastructure and facilities required to 
improve the provision of water and sewer 
services. 

Provide water on occupied 
residential sites - 
R1. 000.000 .00 

100 Percent completed - 
R626. 316.00 spend by 30 
June 2016 

Directorate Civil 
Engineering 
Services; Office 

Service Delivery 
and Infrastructure 
Development 

Develop, manage and maintain necessary 
infrastructure and facilities required to 
improve the provision of water and sewer 
services. 

Replace worn-out water 
pipelines - R400.000.00 

100 Percent completed - 
R626.316.00 spend by 

30 June 2016 

Directorate Civil 
Engineering 
Services; Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Three planned staff 
interactions by the end of 
each quarter 

Monthiy meetings 
(12 annum) 

Directorate Civil 
Engineering 
Services; Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Quarterly evaluations of all 
Section 66 employees 

Quarterly evaluations of all 
Section 66 employees 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY; INTEGÏIATED DE\^LOPMENT PLAN - 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


DEPARTMENT 

SECTION 

KPA 

DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

TARGET 

Directorate Civil 

Engineering 

Services 

Directorate Civil 
Engineering 
Services; Office 

Service Delivery 
and Infrastructure 
Development 

Develop, manage and maintain essential 
bulk water and sewerage infrastructure 
and facilities to accommodate the 
aspirations, needs and pressures of 
present and future industries, businesses 
and dependent communities. 

Installation of Telemetry 
System - R626.316.00 

100 Percent completed 
R626.316.00 spend by 

30 June 2016 

Directorate Civil 

Engineering 

Services 

Directorate Civil 
EngineeringSer 
vices; Office 

Service Delivery 
and Infrastructure 
Development 

Develop, manage and maintain necessary 
infrastructure and facilities required to 
improve the provision of water and sewer 
services. 

Provide water on occupied 
residential sites - 
R1. 000.000 .00 

100 Percent completed - 
R626.316.00 spend by 

30 June 2016 

Directorate Civil 

Engineering 

Services 

Directorate Civil 
Engineering 
Services: Office 

Service Delivery 
and Infrastructure 
Development 

Develop, manage and maintain necessary 
infrastructure and facilities required to 
improve the provision of water and sewer 
services. 

Replace wom-out water 
pipelines - R400.000.00 

100 Percent completed - 
R626.316.00 spend by 

30 June 2016 

Directorate Civil 

Engineering 

Services 

Directorate Civil 
Engineering 
Services; Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Three planned staff 
interactions by the end of 
each quarter 

Monthiy meetings 
(12/annum) 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Development 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Developmet: 
Office 

Financial Viability 

Enable and improve financial viability and 
management through well-structured 
budget processes, financial systems, and 
MFMA compliance through legislative 
requirements 

5 Percent deviation of actual 
expenditure vs departmental 
budget by 30 June 2016 

5 Percent deviation of 
actual expenditure vs 
departmental budget by 

30 June 2016 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Development 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Developmet: 
Office 

Financial Viability 

Enable and improve financial viability and 
management through well-structured 
budget processes, financial systems, and 
MFMA compliance through legislative 
requirements 

90 Percent of DORA 
allocations spent by 30 June 
2016 

90 Percent of DORA 
allocations spent by 30 

June 2016 


118 


//KHARA HAIS MIJNICIPALITY; INTEGRATED DE\'ELOPMENT PLAN - 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


DEPARTMENT 

SECTION 

KPA 

DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

TARGET 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Development 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Development: 
Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Required Information 
submitted for compilation of 
Annual Report by 

31/12/2015 

Required Information 
submitted for compilation 
of Annual Report by 
31/12/2015 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Development 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Development: 
Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

80 Percent of assigned 
council resolutions executed 
by end of each quarter 

80 Percent of assigned 
council resolutions 
executed by end of each 
quarter 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Development 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Development: 
Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Three planned staff 
interactions by the end of 
each quarter 

Monthiy meetings 
(12/annum) 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Development 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Development: 
Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Quarterly evaluations of all 
Section 66 employees 

Quarterly evaluations of all 
Section 66 employees 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Development 

Directorate 
Planning & 
Development: 
Office 

Local Economie 
Development 

Promote the development of tourist 
infrastructure that will enhance tourism 

LED programmes and 
initiatives tangibly 
demonstrates IDP and SDF 
objectives: 80 Percent 
development approvals. As 
reflected in Council 
resolutions. in line with IDP 
and SDF objectives per 
quarter 

LED programmes and 
initiatives tangibly 
demonstrate IDP and SDF 
objectives: 80 Percent 
development approvals.as 
reflected in Council 
resolutions. in line with 

IDP and SDF objectives 
per quarter 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services: Office 

Financial Viability 

Enable and improve financial viability and 
management through well-structured 
budget processes, financial systems, and 
MFMA compliance through legislative 
requirements 

Actual operational 
expenditure as a Percent of 
approved expenditure - 95 
Percent 

Actual operational 
expenditure as a 

Percent of approved 
expenditure 95 Percent 


119 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY; INTEGRATED DE\^ELOPMENT PLAN - 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


DEPARTMENT 

SECTION 

KPA 

DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

TARGET 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services; Office 

Financial Viability 

Enable and improve financial viability and 
management through well-structured 
budget processes, financial systems, and 
MFMA compliance through legislative 
requirements 

Actual Capital expenditure as 
a Percent of approved 

Capital expenditure - 95 
Percent 

Actual Capital expenditure 
as a Percent of approved 
Capital expenditure - 
95% 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services: Office 

Financial Viability 

Enable and improve financial viability and 
management through well-structured 
budget processes, financial systems, and 
MFMA compliance through legislative 
requirements 

Actual operational revenue 
as a Percent of approved 
revenue - 99 Percent 

Actual operational 
revenue as a Percent of 
approved revenue - 99 % 

Directorate 

Financial 

Goed 

Facilitate the establishment of good 

Quality of Annual Financial 

Quality of Annual 

Financial 

Services 

Services; Office 

Governance 

governance practices 

Statements and Audit File 
particulars - Reduction of 
financial related exceptions 
to41 by 30/1 1/2015 

Financial Statements and 
Audit File particulars - 
Reduction of financial 
related exceptions to 41 
by 30/1 1/2015 

Directorate 

Financial 

Good 

Facilitate the establishment of good 

Auditor General Report - 

Auditor General Report - 

Financial 

Services . 

Services; Office 

Governance 

governance practices 

Timeous submission of 
financial related comments 
on the findings of the 
2014/2015 AG Report by 
15/01/2016 

Timeous submission of 
financial related 
comments on the findings 
ofthe 2014/2015 AG 

Report by 15/01/2016 

Directorate 

Financial 

Good 

Facilitate the establishment of good 

Auditor-General Report - 

Auditor-General Report - 

Financial 

Services 

Sen/ices; Office 

Governance 

governance practices 

Reduce other matters 
(financial related) in 

2013/2014 Unqualified 

Report to five other matters 
by 30/11/2015 

Reduce other matters 
(financial related) in 
2013/2014 Unqualified 
Report to five other 
matters by 30/11/2015 


120 1 


//KHARA HAIS MIJNICIPALITY; INTEGRATED DE\'ELOPMENT PLAN - 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


DEPARTMENT 

SECTION 

KPA 

DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

TARGET 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services; Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Auditing process - < 5 

Percent of financial related 
audit exceptions not 
answered as a Percent of 
total audit exceptions by 
30/11/2015 

Auditing process - < 5 
Percent of financial related 
audit exceptions not 
answered as a Percent of 
total audit exceptions by 
30/11/2015 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services: Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Auditor General Report - 
Compile an Audit Outcome 
Recovery Plan for 

2014/201 5 AG Report 
(financial related matters) 
and implement it by 
15/01/2016 

Auditor General Report 
Compile an Audit 

Outcome Recovery Plan 
for 2014/2015 AG Report 
(financial related matters) 
and implement it by 
15/01/2016 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services: Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Compilation of Annual 
Financial Statements - 
Approved Audit Plan for 
2015/2016 audit -MFMA 
compliance by 30/06/2016 

Compilation of Annual 
Financial Statements - 
Audit Plan for 2015/2016 
audit - MFMA compliance 
by 30/06/2016 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services: Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

80 Percent of assigned 
council resolutions executed 
by end of each quarter 

80 Percent of assigned 
council resolutions 
executed by end of each 
quarter 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services; Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Develop new policies. By- 
Laws and procedures - 100 
Percent updated register by 
31/05/2016 

Develop new policies. By- 
Laws and procedures - 
100 Percent updated 
register by 31/05/2016 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services: Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Reviewed and approved 

Asset Management Policy by 
31/05/2016 

Reviewed and approved 
Asset Management Policy 
by 31/05/2016 


//KHARA HAIS MUMCIP.^UJTY; INTEGRATED DE\^ELOPi\ENT PLAN - 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


DEPARTMENT 

SECTION 

KPA 

DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

TARGET 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Sen/ices; Office 

Goed 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Reviewed and approved 
Investment Policy by 
31/05/2016 

Reviewed and approved 
Investment Policy by 
31/05/2016 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services; Office 

Goed 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Review policies. By-Laws 
and procedures - 100 

Percent updated register by 
30/06/2016 

Review policies. By-Laws 
and procedures - 100 
Percent updated register 
by 30/06/2016 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services; Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Reviewed and approved 

Tariff Policy and By-Law by 
31/05/2016 

Reviewed and approved 
Tariff Policy and By-Law 
by 31/05/2016 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services; Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Reviewed and approved 

Gust. Care. Credit Control. 
Debt Col. and Ind. 

Household Policy and By- 
Law by 31/05/2016 

Reviewed and approved 
Cust. Care. Credit Control. 
Debt Col. and Ind. 

Household Policy and By- 
Law by 31/05/2016 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services; Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Reviewed and approved 
Write-Off of Irrecoverable 

Debt Policy by 31/05/2016 

Reviewed and approved 
Write-Off of Irrecoverable 
Debt Policy by 31/05/2016 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services; Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Reviewed and approved 
Supply Chain Management 
Policy by 31/05/2016 

Reviewed and approved 
Supply Chain 

Management Policy by 
31/05/2016 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services; Office 

Good 

Governance 

Facilitate the establishment of good 
governance practices 

Reviewed and approved 
Municipal Property Rates 
Policy and By-Law by 
31/05/2016 

Reviewed and approved 
Municipal Property Rates 
Policy and By-Law by 
31/05/2016 


122 I 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIP.ALITY: INTEGRATED DE\^LOPMENT PLAN - 2012 - 2017 

31 March 2016 


DEPARTMENT 

SECTION 

KPA 

DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

TARGET 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services; Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Three planned staff 
interactions by the end of 
each quarter 

Monthiy meetings 
(12/annum) 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services: Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Training interventions - 3 
specialized GRAP training 
sessions per quarter 

Training interventions - 3 
specialized GRAP training 
sessions per quarter 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services; Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Quarterly evaluations of all 
Section 66 employees 

Quarterly evaluations of all 
Section 66 employees 

Directorate 

Financial 

Services 

Financial 
Services; Office 

Institutional 
Development and 
Organisational 
Transformation 

Align institutional arrangements to provide 
an effective and efficiënt support service 
to deliver on organizational objectives 

Required information 
submitted for compilation of 
Performance Report by 31 
August 2015 

Required information 
submitted for compilation 
of Performance Report by 

31 August 2015 


123 


CHARTER 11: PROGRAMMES AND PROJECTS OF OTHER 
SPHERES 

To implement development processes, intervention should target specific 
aspects of human need. These needs are often related to institutionalized 
agencies responsible for the interventions and are defined as sectors. To 
date, planning and delivery has relied extensively on these sectors. The 
outcome of this approach has been one where delivery has occurred 

without adequate co-ordination and integration leading to disintegrated, 
dysfunctional and fragmented outcomes, with unsustainable investment. 

This chapter of the IDP identifies all the programmes and projects of other 
sector departments or other development agencies and the implications 
that such projects will have for the municipality. This approach will assist 
the municipality, sector departments and development agencies in 
planning and implementation of projects and programmes on a local level. 

The table below indicates all programmes and projects of sector 
departments and the implications it will have on the Municipality. 

PROJECT NO 
& 

WARD 

PROJECT NAME 

RESPONSIBLE DEPARTMENT 

IMPLICATIONS TO THE 
MUNICIPALITY/ 

SERVICES RENDER TO 
DEPARTMENT/ 

INTERVENTION 

4.2.1 

© Eradication of Bucket system 

(COGHSTA: R82 mil to eradicate the 

Municipality to 

AH Wards 

Morning Glory (Ward 2), 

buckets in //Khara Hais. 

monitor the 
implementation of the 
project with the 
consultante on 
project. 

8.1.14 

9,10,11,1348 

© Soup kitchens (for less privileged & HIV & AIDS infected) DSD (Dept. Social Development) 

- 3 days in a week-Melkstroom -Ward 9 

© Funding for Soup Kitchen at Babbelbekkies (erven 15043) Ward 10 Soup kitchens are run by the local 

© Supply kitchen facilities with access to warm water at Kalksloot wards in conjunction with Dept Social 

community hall (Ward 1 1 ) Services and not by LED 

© Soup Kitchen for ward (Ward 1 3 
© Soup Kitchen for all wards (Povertv Alleviation Programme) 

© Rosedale Soup Kitchen (Ward 10) All funded Soup Kitchens within the 

© Louisevale Soup Kitchen (Ward ) municipal area provide daily meals to 

© Uab Soup Kitchen (Melkstroom) vulnerable community members as part 

© Thembelilhe Soup Kitchen (Ward ) of the departments poverty alleviation 

© Aunt Wilna Soup Kitchen (Ward ) programme 

Provide available land 
Provision of municipal 
services (Water, 
ElectricityS Sanitation- 
Infrastructure 

Provide available land 
Provision of municipal 
services (Water, 
ElectricityS Sanitation- 
Infrastructure 

124 





//Khara Hais Municipality -INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 

March 31, 2016 


© Youth Service Centres (Youth Development) 

© Henry Goeieman Youth Centre (Ward 5) 


© Communitv Development Centre (Drop-ln Centre) 

© ECD Service Centres in all wards 
© St. Mary’s Child (Karos) Ward 14 
© Rakker Akker (Leerkrans) Ward 
© Kekkelbekkies (Rosedale) Ward 
© Dr Webster (Morning Glory) Ward 
© Morning Side (Morning Glory) Ward 
© Bavumeleni (Pabalello) Ward 13 * 

© Ezibeleni (Pabalello) Ward 7 * 

© Makukhanye (Pabalello) Ward 13 * 

© Blommie Day Care (Jurgenskamp) Ward 2 * 

© Communitv Based Service Centre’s In all Wards 

© Goeiemoed Service Centre (Karos) Ward 
© Lena Mouers Service Centre (Louisevaleweg) Ward 
© Vlytige Bejaardes Service Centre (Rosedale) Ward 
© Morning Side Service Centre (Morning Glory) Ward 
© St. Mary’s Service Centre (Kalksloot) Ward 
© Sarah Kotze Service Centre (Leerkrans) Ward 


All funded Youth Centres build capacity Transfering of 

to young people within thelr ownership of land/ 

communities by providing linking them buildings to occupying 

with developmental opportunities ECD’s * 


All eed centres provide stimulatlon 
programmes to children age 0-4 years 
which are essential to their 
developmental needs. 


Community based service centres 
promote active ageing by involving 
elderly people within their communities 


8.1.16 © Special Economie Zone (SEZ) 

Ward 8 & Ward 
13 


Dept Economie Affiars/ PPP 
The SEZ linked to the Upington Airport. 
Promote competitiveness of the 
manufacturing sector and encourage 
beneficiation of locally available 
resources. Will enhance upgrading and 
extension of terminal building with 
envisaged development of Cargo hub 
and Aircraft maintenance and storage 
facilltles as well as solar development 
Initiative. 


^ Provide available land 
^ Provision of municipal 
services (Water, 
ElectrlcItyS Sanltatlon- 
Infrastructure) 

& 


PROJECT NO PROJECT NAME RESPONSIBLE DEPARTMENT IMPLICATIONS TO THE 

Ï25 



& MUNICIPALITY/ 

WARD SERVICES RENDER TO 

DEPARTMENT 


11 . 1.1 

Ward12, 2,3, 
8,9,10,11,12 


© Establish mobile/ satellite clinics: Extention of Raaswater Clinic , Department Health 

Louisvaledorp (Erven 324) and Leseding (Erven 1518) 

© Estalish mobile/satellite clinic: Morning Glory and Jurgens Camp(Ward 2) 

© Renovation of Progress Clinic(Ward 4) 

© Mobile clinic -Dakota Rd and Diedericks Road(Portion erven 1)(Ward 8) 

© Establish mobile clinics at Identified sites (Melkstroom and Zonderhuls- 
Ward 9) 

© Construction of clinic for the ward. (Erven 18445) 

© Mobile clinic for interim. (Erven 1 8551 -Ward 1 0) 

© Mobile clinic for Kameelmond and Lemoendraai 
© Mobile Clinic service to Louisvaledorp (Erven 324) and Leseding (Erven 
1518)Ward 12 

© Development of clinic (erven 60-Ward 14) 

© Development of clinics for Ntsikilello (Erven 432) and Lambrechtsdrift 
(Erven 60) 

© Upgrading of clinics at Karos and Leerkans 
© Mobile clinic (Ward 4-Progress) 

© Upgrade clinic (Ward 5-Louisevale Road) 

© 


^ Provide available land 
^ Provislon of municipal 
services (Water, 
Electricity& 

Sanitation- 

Infrastructure) 


11.3.1 

Ward 1,2, 3 &4 
,9,8, 11,13 


© Satellite police office at Smartiesvalley 
© Police station Pabalello 

© Re-open satellite police station erven 6073-Tol Speelman Community Hall 
© Establish mobile police station at Melkstroom and Zonderhuis(ward 9) 
Mobile police station in Beecraft Street(Ward 8) 

© Satellite/mobile police stations in all areas(Ward 11) 

© Building of Police stations: Raaswater (erven 2760), Louisvaledorp (erven 
324) and Leseding (erven 1518-Ward 12) 

© Mobile police station in all areas (Ervens 

© Building of Police stations: Raaswater (erven 2760), Louisvaledorp (erven 
324) and Leseding (erven 1518) 

© Mobile police station (Sandile Prusent Camp Ward 13) 


Department of Public Works/ SAPS 
Pabalello station - 
Ward committees of wards 6, 7, and 13 
collectively identified erven: 21279 for 
the construction of the police station. 


^ Provide available land 
Provision of municipal 
services (Water, 
ElectrlcItyS Sanltatlon- 
Infrastructure/ 


1 1 .3.4 © Satellite complaints desk and CCTV System for CBD 


SAPS, Security 


^ None 


126 


//Khara Hais Municipality -INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 

March 31, 2016 

WardS 


Satellite complaints desk or IP intercom 
to report on crime and vandalism in 

CBD. 

Project to be run and funded by SAPS 



11.4.2 

© Technical institute of higher learning, 

DOE ( Department of Education) / 

è 

Provide available land 

WardS 


Upington FET 

è 

Provision of municipal 



Training of students in solar field. 


services (Water, 
ElectricityS Sanitation- 
Infrastructure/ 

11.6.1 

© Building of New Schools 

DOE ( Department of Education) 

è 

Provide available land 

Ward 14,1,4,12 

Karos: Part of erven 29 (Ward 14) 

Construction on a full service school at 

è 

Provision of municipal 


Satellite office at ND Swartz Office for information & computer classes 

Karos 


services 


(Ward 1) 



(Water, Electricity& 


© Establish ECD Centres (Ward 7) 



Sanitation- 


© Creches in Buccaneer Street - Erven 17690 and Cheetah Street - Erven 
17807 

© Establish ECD Centre at Zonderhuis and Melkstroom 



Infrastructure/ 


© Construction of Primary school in ward. (Erven 18535) 

© Construction of Secondary School - Raaswater (Erven 2744) 

© Develop secondary school in Karos (Erven 29) 




11.6.2 

© Additional classrooms and / ablutiën blocks or halls at existing schools 

DOE ( Department of Education) 

Ciass rooms: 

è 

None 

Wardll 


Kalksloot Intermediate - 3 class room 



WardS 


block 



Ward 6 


Vaalkoppies (ngk) - 2 class room block 



WardS 


Lukhanyiso Primary - 2 class room 



WardS 


block 



WardS 


Keidebees Intermediate - Dubble ECD 



Ward 11 


Abiution biocks: 

Saul Damon 





Upington High 

Franciscus Intermediate 



127 


CHARTER 12: ALIGNMENT WITH NATIONAL AND ' 

PROVINCIAL PROGRAMS I 


Planning at national and provincial level is primarily sectoral and 
based on existing government department programmes. These have 
specific sectoral requirements that need to be met by municipalities. 
However, the implementation of these programmes will invariably 


occur in the area of jurisdiction of municipal government. To ensure 
that municipal priorities are addressed, and in the spirit of cooperative 
governance, the planning process of all spheres of government must 
be aligned with and inform each other. This requires that municipal 
planning processes takes into account the legislative, policy, and 
strategy approaches of the line departments of national and provincial 
government. 


IDP DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 

IDP STRATEGIES 

ALIGNMENT WITH NAT & PROV 
PROGRAMMES/PROJECTS 

1 SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT, TOWN 
PLANNING AND LAND USE 

MANAGEMENT 

Establish and manage a land development & land use 
control System to ensure that the development objectives 
of Council are carried out & the prescriptions of the 
relevant legislation is adhered to 

^ The Urban Renewal Strategy (URS) 

^ Housing development programmes 
for municipality so can have better 
informed master plans 
^ MIG funding 

2 WATER RESOURCES AND SERVICES 

Extent and upgrade water infrastructure to improve the 
provision of water services 

^ Municipal Infrastructure Grant 
^ War on Leaks Programma 
^ Blue drop Support Programma 
^ Infrastructure refurbishment Programma 
^ Water Conservation and Demand 
Management 

^ Enhanced Local Government Support 
Approach 

^ Water Allocation Reform Accelerated 
Community 

^ Infrastructure Programma 

Plan, manage and maintain water distribution systems 

Maintain and upgrade bulk water installations. 


128 


//Khara Hais Municipality -INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 

March 31, 2016 


IDP DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 

IDP STRATEGIES 

ALIGNMENT WITH NATIONAL & PROVINCIAL 
PROGRAMMES/PROJECTS 

3 SEWERAGE 

Maintain existing sewerage infrastructure and bulk 
sewerage installations 

^ Municipal Infrastructure Grant 
^ Green drop Support Programme 
^ Infrastructure Refurbishment programme 

Upgrade existing sewerage infrastructure and bulk 
sewerage installation 

4 HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND HOUSING 

Secure housing subsidies and implementation of housing 
projects 

^ Sustainable human settlements; 

Breaking new ground 
^ Integrated Residential Development 
Programme (IRDP) 

^ Project-Linked, Individual, Consolidation 
Subsidies, Discount Benefit Scheme, 

Rural Housing. social housing, 
institutional subsidies, debtors 
programme 

^ The Human Settlement Redevelopment 
Programme 

5 ENERGY AND ELECTRICITY 

Implement electrification program 

^ Renewable Energy Independent Power 
Producer Procurement Bidding 
Programme, 

^ Integrated National Electrification 
Programme (INEP), Werking for Energy 
programmej_Compact fluorescent lamp 
exchange (Escom) 

Implement Street- and area lighting program for existing 
and new developments 

6 ROADS, TRANSPORT AND STORM 
WATER DRAINAGE 

Maintain and upgrade existing transport infrastructure 

^ Expended Public Works Programme 
^ Root out the dust programme 
^ Pulanala Programme 
^ EPWP Incentive Grant programme 

Develop and provide new road infrastructure 

Provide new- and upgrade and better existing storm water 
infrastructure 


129 


IDP DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY 

IDP STRATEGIES 

ALIGNMENT WITH NATIONAL & PROVINCIAL 
PROGRAMMES/PROJECTS 

7 HEALTH, SANITATION, WASTE 
MANAGEMENT AND WASTE REMOVAL 

Improve and upgrade sanitation facilities 

^ Comprehensive Rural Development 
Programme (CRDP) 

^ Sustainable Land-Based Livelihoods, 

^ People and Parks, Werking for Tourism, 

^ Werking on Waste (UHURU 

Leanerships) 

Werking for water 

Optimize and improve waste removal services 

8 ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB 
CREATION 

Job creation & relieve of poverty and unemployment 

^ Expanded Public Works Programme 
(EPWP) 

^ Small Enterprise Finance Agency 
(SEFA) 

^ Comprehensive Rural Development 
Programme 

^ National Youth Development Agency 
(NYDA) 

^ Youth Economie Participation 

Identify new and upgrade existing tourist facilities 

Capacity building within the community regarding tourism 
and business 

Institute awareness programs by all government approved 
institutions like NHBRC & CIDB 

Promote skills development and training through the 
building sector (SETA) and financial institutions 

9 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND 
FACILITIES 

Improve existing Sport, Park and Recreation facilities 

^ Sports for change programme 
^ Municipal Infrastructure Grant: 

Community Facilities 
^ National Lotto Board: Sports and 
Recreation grants 
^ Mass Participation 
^ The Office Provincial Programme of 

Action Steering Committee on the Rights 
of the Child National Youth Service 
Programme 

^ Youth and Local Government 

Programme 

Establish, maintain and improve facilities at cemeteries 

Promote equity regarding community facilities 


130 


//Khara Hais Municipality -INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN: 2012-2017 

March 31, 2016 




^ Office for Ihe Slalus of People Wilh 
Disabililies 

10ADMINISTRATIVE AND 

INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY 

Development of effective internal systems to provide beller 
services lo all residenls 

^ DORA: 

^ Operalion Clean Audil 
^ Balho Pele Principles 
^ Municipal Systems Granl Financial 

Supporl Granl 


131 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

March 31, 2016 


CHARTER 13: DISASTER MANAGEMENT 


13.1:INTRODUCTION 


13.1.1: WHAT ISA DISASTER 

According to the Disaster Management Act: a disaster is a 
Progressive or sudden, widespread or localized, natural or human - 
caused occurrence which causes or threatens to cause death, injury, 
or disease, damage to property, infrastructure, or the environment or 
the disruption of the life of a community and is of a magnitude that 
exceeds the ability of those affected by the disaster to cope with its 
affects using only their own resources. 

13.1.2: WHAT IS A DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN 

A continuous and integrated muiti sect oral, multi-disciplinary process 
of planning and 

Implementation of measures aimed at 

(a) Risk identification and assessment. 

a) (b)Preventing and or reducing the risk of disasters. 

b) (C) Mitigating the severity or consequences of disasters. 

c) (D) Emergency preparedness. 

d) (E)A rapid and effective response to disasters and 

e) (F)Post disaster recovery and rehabilitation. 

13.1.3: STATUS OF THE PLAN (in the process of being 
reviewed) 

The plan has been approved in 2003 and it is a level one plan, a 
however it was not reviewed for the financial year 2013/2014. The act 


determines that disaster management plans should be reviewed on 
annual basis. 

13.2: LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK 

Section 1 of the Disaster Management Act, No. 57 of 2002 defines 
“disaster management” as “a continuous and integrated multi- 
sectorial, multi-disciplinary process of planning and implementation of 
measures aimed at - 

(a) prevention or reducing the risks of disaster; 

(b) mitigation the severity or consequences of disasters; 

(c) emergency preparedness; 

(d) a rapid response and effective response to disasters; and 

(e) post-disaster recovery, and rehabilitation”. 

The purpose of //Khara Hais’s Disaster Risk Management Plan is to 
document the institutional arrangements, for departmental disaster 
management planning which includes the assignment of primary and 
secondary responsibilities for priority disasters posing a threat to the 
Municipality. 

In terms of section 41(1) (b) of the Constitution, all spheres of 
Government are required to “secure the well-being of the people of 
the Republic". 

Section 152(1)(d) specifically requires local government to “promote a 
safe and healthy environment’. 

Section 26(g) of the Municipal Systems Act, No. 32 of 2000 stipulates 
that a disaster management plan must be reflected in the 
Municipality’s Integrated Development Plan (IDP). 


132 



//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

March 31, 2016 


Sections 52 and 53 of the Disaster Management Act, No. 57 of 2002 
also requires of each municipality and municipal entity to prepare a 
Disaster Management Plan. 

The //Khara Hais Disaster Risk Management Plan aims to facilitate an 
integrated and coordinated approach to disaster management in 
//Khara Hais which will ensure that the Municipality achieves its Vision 
for disaster management embedded in the DMP which is to ensure a 
peaceful environment and enhance sustainable development in the 
//Khara-Hais Local Municipal area of jurisdictiën. 

13.3: OVERVIEW OF RISK PROFILE 


A risk profile was created for Khara Hais local Municipality by 
estimating the disaster risk associated with the identified hazards in 
the Municipality. Values were calculated for each hazard by assessing 
the threat, possible impact and vulnerability of communities to specific 
hazard. 

Vulnerability of communities to disasters was done by describing, 
where possible, the vulnerability of people, infrastructure (including 
homes and dwellings), services, economie activities and natural 
resources exposed to the hazard. 

The estimation of losses resulting from the action of the hazard on 
those that are vulnerable, to evaluate likely consequences or impacts 

The Identification of capacities, methods and resources are readily 
available to manage the risk. 

The estimation of the level of risk associated with a specific threat to 
determine whether the resulting risk is a priority or not. Estimation the 
level of risk is done by matching the likelihood of a hazard or disaster 

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with its expected impact or consequences. This process allowed for 
different threats to be compared for the purpose of priority setting. 
Based on the above, the following have been identified as the top ten 
prevalent disaster hazards for //Khara Hais Municipality: 

• Poverty 

• Floods 

• Droughts 

• Fire 

• Hazardous materials 

• Water pollution 

• Aircraft accidents 

• Erosion 

• Lightning 

• Air pollution 

The most prevalent hazards, affecting most of the Municipal areas 
and with the highest potential probability for escalating to a state of 
disaster, are: 

• Poverty 

• Foods 

• Droughts 

13.4: INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY FOR 
DISASTER RISK MANAGEMENT 


13.4.1: Disaster Risk Management Structure 

Disaster Risk Management structure of //Khara Hais Municipality is 
based on the current Administrative structure of the Municipality, 
which is headed by the Municipal Manager and the Directors of each 
directorate assisted by the Manager Fire Services and Disaster 
Management. 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

March 31, 2016 


13. 4.2; ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

The Disaster Management Plan highiights the roles and 
responsibilities of all stakeholders to ensure that there is no confusion 
during a disaster and that line of Communications are adhered to. The 
detailed roles and responsibilities are described in the DMP attached 
as annexure G in the IDP. 

13.5: DISASTER RISK ASSESSMENT 


The Disaster Management Plan contains risk assessment based on 
field studies, observations and primary- and secondary data sources. 
The Disaster Management Plan has as far as possible been 
imbedded in the current reality of the municipality. //Khara Hais is 
committed to implement measures to conduct comprehensive and 
Progressive assessments which will contribute to the development of 
disaster risk profiles which are current and relevant, and which will 
inform planning and the implementation of risk reduction strategies. 
The Disaster Management Unit within the Safety and Protection 
Services Department does regular disaster risk assessments in 
assessing its top ten risks as well as its capacity on a regular basis as 
to ensure that it's ready and prepared for any kind of disaster. 

13.6: DISASTER RISK REDUCTION 


In order to reduce risk, the Municipality has embarked on a number of 
initiatives, namely: 

• By-laws: The Disaster Management Centre will monitor and 
educate communities on existing by-laws and engage 
stakeholders in enforcement and compliance 

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• Centre 

• Community awareness programs: Risk awareness is critical to all 
communities to ensure risk avoidance. 

• Facilitate the development, implementation and maintenance of 
disaster management plans, programs and practices for strategie 
disaster risk reduction which will ensure that individuals, 
households, communities, infrastructure and the environment 
within the boundaries of the Municipality are resilient to disaster 
risk 

• Develop, establish and maintain a comprehensive information 
management system, an effective communication system and an 
accessible public awareness and information service 

• Provision for accessible training, education and research 
opportunities for disaster risk management stakeholders in the 
municipality 

• Facilitate the establishment of a disaster fund for disaster risk 
management in the Municipality 

• Ensure the development and maintenance of a current and 
relevant disaster risk profile 

• Ensure the development, implementation and maintenance of 
comprehensive disaster risk reduction planning and 
implementation by the directorates, departments and sections 
within the institution 

• Acting in an advisory and consultative capacity on issues 
concerning disasters and disaster risk management in the area by 
the establishment of the Local Disaster Management Advisory 
Forum 

• Establishing and maintaining co-operative partnerships with multi- 
sectoral role players including the private sector in accordance 
with Chapter 3 of the Constitution and the Integrated 
Development Plan objectives 


//KHARA HAIS MUNICIPALITY: INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

March 31, 2016 


• The establishment, management and maintenance of a unit of 
volunteers 

• Ensuring adequate capacity to deal with rapid, coordinated and 
effective disaster response and recovery 

• Providing and coordinating physical support to communities and 
the mission critical systems on which they depend, in the event of 
those disasters which are classified as local disasters. 

• Maintaining comprehensive records, documentation and reports 
of disaster response and recovery operations. 


13.7: RESPONSE AND RECOVERY 


The Municipality is committed to facilitating the development and 
implementation of contingency plans to ensure rapid, appropriate and 
effective disaster response and recovery to disasters which occur or 
are threatening to occur within the boundaries of the Municipality. 
Detailed information regarding response and recovery are described 
in the DMP. 

Disaster Risk Management Unit will continuously engage and plan 
with various security services within National Department structures 
i.e. South African Police Services and South African National Defense 
Force. 


ANNEXURES 

A: Ward Profiles per ward 

B: Spatial Development Framework 

C: Housing Chapter 

D: LED Strategy 

E: Waste Management Plan 

F: Water Services Development Plan 

G: Disaster Management Plan 

H: Other Sector Plans 

I: Five year Financial Plan 

J: Institutional Program - Human Resources 

- Workplace Skills Plan 

- Employment Equity Plan 

- Organogram 

- Monitoring and Performance Management System 

- Integrated Occupational Health and Safety 

- HIV/Aids Strategy 

- Anti-corruption Strategy 

- Communication Strategy 

- Risk Management System 
K: Prioritised project List 

L: List of Policies 
M: Municipal By- Laws 


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