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DRAFT IDP 2017-2022 





■OAl 


TDRUM" 




CONTENTS 

MAYOR'S FOREWORD 

MUNICIPAL MANAGER'S OVERVIEW 

SECTION A: INTRODUCTION 13-40 

1. Vision and Mission 23 

2. Brief overview of the municipality 14 

3. Who is Mantsopa 14 

4. Municipal powers and functions 18 

5 Municipal broad geographical context 20 

6. State of development in Mantsopa local Municipality 22 

7. Opportinities offerd by the minicipality 22 

8. WhatisIDP 24 

9. Policy legislature and context 25 

10. Role and purpose of IDP 25 

11. Policy context and planning framework 26 

12. Approach of IDP review process 31 

13. Rationale of IDP 31 

14. IDP process 32 

15. IDP review plan 33 

16. Community and stakeholder priority issues 35 

17. Distribution of roles and responsibilities 36 

18. Core components of the IDP preparation 40 

SECTION B: LEGAL REQUIREMENT 41-45 

19. Background of the IDP 40 

20. Legal Overview for Integrated Development Planning 40 

21. National Development Plan 42 

SECTION CiDEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE 46-55 

22. Demographic analysis of Mantsopa locol Municipality 46 

23. Population 47 

24. Age profile 48 

25. Gender profile 48 

26. Ethic profile 49 

27. Human and social development 49 

28. Blue drop ang green drop score 53 


1 



SECTION D: STATUS QUO ANALYSIS 56-177 

23. Key statistics 56 

24. KPA Basic Services 57 

22. Water and Sanitation 57 

25. Elecrticity 78 

26. Roads 80 

27. KPA Public participation and good governance 82 

28. KPA Institutional participation and good governance 91 

29. KPA Local economic development 175 

SECTION E: DEVELOPMENT STATEGIES 178-198 

30. Development Strategies 178 

31. Strategies focus Areas 181 

32. Mantsopa Development Strategies 184 

33. Mantsopa Issues for Consideration linked to the KPA 184 

34. Mantsopa Local Municipalites IDP Projects 190 

35. Mantsopa Locol Municipalities MIG Projects 196 

SECTION F: DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 199-221 

36. KPA Spatial Development Framework 199 

37. Environmental Framework 209 

38. Natural Environment Analysis 210 

39. Integrated Human Settlement 219 

SECTION G:FINANCIAL PLAN 222-242 

61. Purpose 222 

62. Background 222 

63. Financial Strategic Plan 222 

64. Financial Management System 226 

65. Revenue Framework 226 

66. Grant Funding 228 

67. Tariff Settings 229 

68. Expenditure Framework 238 

69. Capital Requirements 240 

70. Source Funding 241 

71. Conclusion 242 

SECTION H: DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORKS 244-247 

72. Foreword by the Major 245 

73. Introduction 247 


2 



74. Part 1 SDBIP Overview 247 

75. Part 2 Financial Information 254 

76. Part 3 Municipal Performance plan 268 


ANNEXURES 


ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 

ANNEXURE 


A: MUNICIPAL STRUCTURE 
B: COMMUNICATION STRATEGY 
C: CAPITAL BUDGET 
D: DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN 
E: HUMAN SETTLEMENTS PLAN 
F: INDIGENT POLICY 

G: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN 
H: INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN 
I: INTEGRATED TRASNPORT PLAN 
J: WATER SERVICES DEVELOPMENT PLAN (WSDP) 
K: LED STRATEGY 

L: ANTI-FRAUD AND CORRUPTION POLICY 
M: SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 
N: HR STRATEGY POLICY 
O: AUDITOR GENERAL FINDINGS 
P: MANTSOPA STAFF ESTABLISHMENT 
Q: WORKPLACE SKILLS DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


FIGURES 


Figure 1: IDP Process Overview 32 

Figure 2 Components of the IDP 39 

Figure 3:Outcome based approach 42 

Figure 4: Languages spoken in the Municipality per ward Errorl Bookmark not defined. 

Figures: Number of households per year. Errorl Bookmark not defined. 

Figure 6 : Population size by age group Errorl Bookmark not defined. 

Figure 7: Total estimated population based on Census Statistics 2077. Error! Bookmark not defined. 

Figure 8: Approved Organisational Structure Errorl Bookmark not defined. 

Figure 9:Strategy Model. 177 

Figure 10: Access to Formal Housing 220 


MAPS 


Map 1 : Map of the Location of the Municipality in the Provincial Context.Errorl Bookmark not defined. 


3 


Map 

Map 

Map 

Map 

Map 

Map 

Map 

Map 

Map 

Map 

Map 

Map 

Map 

Map 


2: Surrounding Municipalities 

3 Road Networks 

4: Health Facilities 

S-.Schoois in Mantsopa 

6; Blue Drop Score 

7; Mantsopa Green drop Status 

8: top Projects in Mantsopa Local Municipality 

9; Ladybrand SDF Proposal 

10: Excelsior SDF Proposal 

11: Hobhouse SDF Proposals 

J2;Conservation Areas 

13: Geology 

14: Hydrology (Rivers and Dams, Wetlands, Estuaries). 
15: Vegetation 


19 

23 

49 

49 

54 

Error! Bookmark not defined. 

194 

203 

204 

204 

210 

211 

212 

214 


ABBREVIATIONS 


Abbreviation Description 


ASGI SA 

CBD 

Accelerated Shared Growth Initiative ofSA 
Central Business District 

CDW 

Community Development Workers 

DMP 

Disaster Management Plan 

EMP 

Environmental Management Plan 

EPWP 

EXCO 

GDP 

Expanded Public Works Programme 
Executive Committee 

Gross Domestic Product 

GIS 

Geographic Information System 

GRAP 

Generally Recognized Accounting Practice 

HIV 

Human Immunodeficiency Virus 

HR 

Human Resources 

HSP 

Housing Sector Plan 

ICT 

Information Communication Technology 

IDP 

IPAP 

Integrated Development Plan 

Industrial Policy Action Plan 


4 




iRpm 

Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network 

ISRDP 

Integrated Sustainable Rural Development Programme 

IT 

Information Technology 

KPA 

Key Performance Area 

KPI 

Key Performance Indicator 

LAP 

Local Area Plan 

LDTF 

Long Term Development Framework 

LED 

Local Economic Development 

LG5ETA 

Local Government Sector Education Training Authority 

LGTA5 

Local Government Turn Around Strategy 

LUM5 

Land Use Management System 

M&E 

Monitoring and Evaluation 

MDG 

Millennium Development Goals 

MEC 

Member of Executive Council 

MFMA 

Municipal Finance Management Act 

MIG 

Municipal Infrastructure Grant 

MILE 

Municipal Institute of Learning 

MPRA 

Municipal Property Rates Act 

MSB 

Municipal Service Backlog 

MSFM 

Municipal Services Financial Model 

MTIEF 

Medium-Term Income and Expenditure Framework 

MTSF 

NDP 

NEMA 

Medium-Term Strategy Framework 

National Development Plan 

National Environmental Management Act No 107 of 1998 

NEPAD 

The African Union and New Partnership for Africa's Development 

NSDP 

National Spatial Development Perspective 

PAA 

Public Audit Act 

PAIA 

Promotion of Access to Information Act 

PGDS 

Provincial Growth Development Strategy 

PHC 

PICC 

PMS 

Primary Health Care 

Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Council 

Performance Management System 

PMS 

Performance Management System 

PPP 

Public-private partnership 

PSDF 

Provincial Spatial Development Framework 

PSEDS 

Provincial Spatial Economic Development Strategy 


5 


SCM 


Supply Chain Management 
SDF Spatial Development Framework 

SDBIP Service Delivery Budget Implementation Plan 

SPISYS Spatial Planning and Information Management System 

SFA Strategic Focus Area 

SLA Service Levei Agreement 

SMME Smali Medium and Micro Enterprises 

SOB State of Biodiversity 

The MSA Municipai Systems Act No 32 of 2000 

UDL Urban Deveiopment Line 

VIP Ventilated improved pit latrines 

WPLG White Paper Locai Government 

WSA Water Service Authority 

WSDP Water Service Development Plan 


6 




MAYOR'S FOREWORD 


FOREWORD BY THE MAYOR, CLLR MAMSIE TSOENE 

This is the first annuai budget of the new administration whose term wili be ending in 2021 and it wiii serve as a baby 
step towards the achievement of ail commitments indicated in the 2016-2021 ANC locai Government Eiections 
Manifesto. 

The 2017/18 iDP & Budget wiii enabie us to systematicaily impiement the 2016 ANC locai Government Elections and 
the Government's Back to Basics programme, the focus of this term of Councii shaii focus on this important 5 piiiars 
of our ANC locai Government Elections Manifesto.. 

1. Putting peopie first and engaging with communities; 

2. Delivering basic services in a more efficient and effective manner; 

3. Strengthening and improving on good governance and accountabiiity; 

4. Ensuring sound financiai management, thereby improving on deiivery on the mandate of municipaiities; 

5. Buiiding municipai administrative capabilities by attracting a higbiy skiiied and professionai iocal government 
administration. 

Our first 2017/18 iDP/Budget as the new administration coincide with the year of Comrade O.R Tambo, Comrade 
Oiiver Reginaid Tambo wouid have ceiebrated 100 years of age had he iived untii 2017. The ANC Nationai Executive 
Committee, Mass Democratic Movements and our Aiiiance components dedicated this year his centenary. 

President Tambo served as president of our Movement from 1967 to 1991 and is regarded as the giue that heid the 
many facets of the ANC together during the difficuit years in exile. 

Comrade OR united the Movement by iistening and engaging with the concerns of comrades, by staying true to the 
core vaiues of the ANC and through dispiaying great integrity and discipiine in serving his peopie. 

Ali cadres of the Movement must emulate the historic exampies of President OR Tambo to infiuence our ongoing 
seifless service to the people. 

We have a united and stable Council, EXCO & Section 79 Committees with the requisite capacity for oversight on the 
work of the administration, provide guidance and leadership at all times, more work must be done to ensure 
consistency and adherence to the committee meetings schedule. 

There are Ward Committees in all 9 Wards, trained on relevant fields and able to discharge their mandates as 
required, guided by tbe ANC 2016 local Government Manifesto and IDP & Budget Process Plan, we had various 
Mayoral Imbizos on the 2017/18 IDP & Budget, Public meetings and other stakeholder engagement sessions as part 
of public consultation sessions in pursuit of a better lifer for all. 

The ANC led Free State Provincial Government under the leadership of Cde Ace Magashule has adopted a Provincial 
Government Programme on Radical Economic Transformation, this administration shall use all resources at our 
disposal to ensure the realization of this programme. 

As part of job creation, during 2016/17 financial year we appointed 70 workers through Incentive EPWP, 100 workers 
through Environmental Programme and 1023 workers through CWP in partnership with FSCOGTA. 

This number is expected to increase during the implementation of all our infrastructure projects for 2017/18 
financial year and outer years. 

In the pursuit of Radical Economic Transformation, we shall ensure that at least 60% of our capital projects are 
implemented by local entrepreneurs, we are duty bound to build and empower local SMME's and entrepreneurs. 

We have commenced with processes to ensure that Kgatelopele Brick making plant in ladybrand is capacitated to 
manufacture paving blocks as part of our of internal roads maintenance programme. 

Honorable Speaker, during 2017/18 financial year we shall be in discussions with Directors of Senmark in ladybrand 
to explore future investment and job creation for our people. 

We are not going to be apologetic about giving our people land for residential, commercial and entertainment 
purposes as part of addressing tbe legacy of 1913 land dispossession by Apartheid and colonial governments. 


7 


During 2017/18 financial year, we shall be allocating about 417 ervens to beneficiaries in Mahlatswetsa and 200 in 
Dipelaneng. 

We have instructed the administration to formalize residential erven (sites) in Ladybrand for allocation to 
beneficiaries, some erven (sites) will be sold to the highest bidders but the majority will be allocated to our landless 
people. 

We are in discussions with Housing Development Agency regarding the land for residential purpose in Tweespruit. 
Our yellow fleet and other vehicles and equipment are not in good condition to render basic services in a sustainable 
manner, it is within this context that we have requested the Free State Provincial Department of Police, Roads & 
Transport to consider procuring the yellow fleet on our behalf. 

This will enable us to maintain our roads and stormwater, refuse and waste management and other basic services, 
our negotiations are at an advanced stage in this regard. 

Our total debt as per age analysis of debtors is R321m, about R290, 8m of the debt is from the households, R14, 3m, 
is from organs of state and R15, 8m is from business, it is because of this reason and the need to finance service 
delivery that I will embark on an intensive Mayoral Operation Patala Campaign and all Councillors will be part of the 
campaign. 

We have strengthened our Credit Control & Debt Collection strategy in order to recover outstanding debt and 
prevent future debt. 

The total operating revenue is estimated at R 277, 1 million while total operating expenditure is estimated at R 270, 1 
million inclusive of capital grants. 

The 2017/18 IDP/Budget is reflecting a surplus of R7 millions of which Rl, 9million has been earmarked for upgrading 
of electricity infrastructure, the remainder be directed to reduce the ESKOM debt, 

A payment plan of Rll, 4 million towards the historical debt has been accepted by ESKOM for 2017/18 financial year, 
we must adhere to this payment plan at all costs. 

All Operating grants including grants in kind and subsidies constitute 42% of the 2017/18 Budget's total revenue. 

We allocated an amount of R 90.8 million which represents an increase of 8, 4% for employee remuneration costs, 
attributed to an anticipated annual bargaining council increase. 

Councilor's remuneration is allocated an amount of R 6.4 million, the provision for bad debts is allocated an amount 
of R 44,5 million which represents 33,8% of billed revenue, the bulk Eskom debt is currently R 98 million. 

Repairs and maintenance is allocated an amount of R 5 million and roads and storm water constitutes are larger 
portion. 

Electricity revenue constitutes 38% of all services charges revenue and as a result we have estimated it at R 40, 4 
million. Water being the second largest revenue source totaling R38, 8 million; the third largest source of revenue is 
sanitation totaling R24, 7 million; Refuse is the fourth largest source of revenue totaling R17 million, property rates is 
the lowest with an estimated revenue of about 14,7million. 

Operating Grants and transfers budgeted for in 2017/18 totals to R72, 4 million. The total grants allocated according 
to DoRA amount to R117, 5 million, these grants include grants in kind of RIO, 8 million, inclusive of grants in kind, 
capital grants decreased from R56, 6 million in 2016/17 to R45 million in 2017/18, this will most certainly affect 
service delivery programmes during 2017/18 financial year. 

The tariff for rates is anticipated to increase by an average of 7% of all properties that are above R 80,000 in terms of 
valuation roll. 

The tariff for electricity is anticipated to increase an average of 6, 88% which is in line with the National Energy 
Regulator of South Africa (NERSA) guideline of 6, and 88 %. 

The tariffs for Water, Sewerage, and Refuse are expected to increase by an average of 8% respectively. All the above 
increases are directly attributed to their relevant cost. 

In order to assist poor household to pay for their services, we shall embark on indigent registration programme 
targeting at least 6000 households with a household income not exceeding an amount R 3300 per month. 

The municipality shall continuously and strictly implement its debt collection policy to ensure that we maximize our 
collection to a target of 60% as envisaged by the provision of bad debts. 

We are also exploring the possibility of installing prepaid water meters in all our households to ensure that we 
maximize our collection rate, installation of prepaid water meters will also assist in the preservation of the water 
resource as scarce commodity. 

8 



This 2017/18 IDP/Budget will attempt to systematically address our roads and stormwater, electricity, waste 
management, parks and cemeteries, economic development and all related challenges, our community will be at the 
center of its implementation. 

I thank you. 

MAMSIE TSOENE 
MAYOR 


9 



MUNICIPAL MANAGER'S OVERVIEW 


OVERVIEW BY THE MUNICIPAL MANAGER, MR SELBY SELEPE 

As the Mayor has already indicated, the focus of this term of Council shall focus on this 
Important 5 pillars of the Government's Programme of Back to Basics... 

1. Putting people first and engaging with communities; 

2. Delivering basic services in a more efficient and effective manner; 

3. Strengthening and improving on good governance and accountability; 

4. Ensuring sound financial management, thereby improving on delivery on the mandate of municipalities. 

5. Building municipal administrative capabilities by attracting a highly skilled and professional local government 
administration. 

The municipality has a stable administration with the necessary competence to implement its IDP, Budget and other 
related tasks, as part of our comprehensive Skills Development and legislative requirement, Senior Management, 
middle management and other key staff members have been subjected to the competency assessment programme. 
The municipality, through the support of the Free State COGTA adopted the Back to Basics 2nd Phase Action Plan, 
with a specific focus on Local Government Back to Basics 10-Point Plan Priority Actions in May 2017 for 
implementation. 

The Back To Basics Action Plan is consistent with our 2017/18 IDP, the progress report with challenges, interventions 
and support required shall be submitted to FS COGTA quarterly, in addition, a monthly statistical Back to Basics 
report is submitted to the DCOGTA (national) as prescribed. 

Taking into account our obsolete water and sanitation infrastructure, we have appointed a professional engineering 
service provider to conduct a feasibility study, prepare a business plan and mobilize funding from the Department of 
Water & Sanitation and other sources of funding to address the following: 

1. The inadequate supply of bulk services, particularly in areas experiencing low water pressure; 

2. Address the already strained water resources, bulk water supply & associated reticulation; 

3. Operation & maintenance on water and sanitation treatment plants; and 

4. Water conservation and water demand management. 

The municipality is in a relatively stable financial position, able to finance our infrastructure, honor all commitments 
despite serious challenges. 

Chief amongst our challenges on financial viability and management includes the nonpayment of services by 
communities who can afford, including the non-payment of services by the Department of Public Works. 

Payment Plan of ESKOM debt will also have an impact on service delivery, that's why we request all our consumers 
to service their accounts, those that are indigent must register in our records as indigents. 

Our 2017/18 IDP/Budget is constituted by anticipated revenue to be collected and the expenditure to be incurred in 
order to advance service delivery to our people. There has been constraint from revenue collected by the 
municipality for the prior financial years due to the negative economic factors. 

The municipality shall always strive for efficiency in all of its functions, we headed to the call by the Minister of 
finance by implementing austerity measures envisaged by Circular 82, through implementation of austerity measures 
the municipality is anticipating save at least R 8 million from overtime and travel and subsistence expenditure. 

In ensuring that our budget is realistic, practical and comply with legislative and regulatory prescripts, MFMA circular 
No. 51, 54, 66, 67, 78, 79, 85 and 86 were used as a guide during the 2017/18 IDP & Budget processes. 

The total capital budget is mainly funded from government grants and subsides, own income to contribute about Rl, 
9m, the total capital budget is estimated R 46, 9 million which is Rll, 6 million lower than the previous financial year. 


10 


I'm confident that our Senior Management and workforce in general will direct their energy in implementing the 
2017/18 IDP/Budget, I will also rely on the valuable guidance and leadership of the Mayor, Speaker, EXCO and 
Council. 

In the implementation of this mammoth task during 2017/18 financial year, I will also be indebted to the support and 
guidance from the Free State Provincial Treasury and Free State COGTA. 

Your contribution is always valued, 

SELBY SELEPE 
MUNICIPAL MANAGER 


11 



SECTION A: INTRODUCTION 


^ision and Mission: 


In order to achieve the vision, we have to start change processes immediately. This requires the development of a 
Mission Statement and the elucidation of the Strategic IDP Objectives. 


To Communally Create Better Livelihoods and Build a 
Community of Mantsopa Defined by a Common Dream by 2030 


In order to achieve the vision, we have to start change processes immediately. This requires the development of a 
Mission Statement and the elucidation of the Strategic IDP Objectives. 


Transform Social and Economic Development Patterns through 
Integrated, Accessible, Equitable and Sustainable Service 


It further requires of municipalities to structure and manage its administration and budgeting and planning processes 
to give priority to the basic needs of the community and to promote the social and economic development of the 
community whilst participating in national and provincial development programmes. 

The above mandate should therefore be captured in the IDP of the local municipality and therefore the stronger 
focus on local development programmes that address the needs of the community. 


12 


Commented [SI]: Rep Forum to review the Vision and Mission 
in line NDP Horizon 



Brief overview of the Municipality 

Map 1 : Map of the Location of the Municipality in the Provincial Context. 


1 Mantsopa Local Municipality Locality wItHIn the Free State Province |- | Map. OO | 

South Africa 








Lli 

II 

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— 



Who is Mantsopa? 



Mantsopa Local Municipality was named after Anna Mantsopa, this is a clear testament to the fact that 
the municipality value the role played by women. 



Mantsopa Local Municipality was established on 5 December 2000 and comprises the previous areas of 
jurisdiction of Tweespruit Transitional Local Council, Ladybrand, Hobhouse, Excelsior, Thaba Patchoa and Maluti 
Transitional Rural Council. 

It forms part of the Eastern Free State and falls within the Thabo Mofutsanyana District Municipal area. The 
municipality borders the Kingdom of Lesotho in the east, Mangaung Local Municipality to the west, and 
Masilonyana and Setsoto to the north. The languages spoken in Mantsopa are Sesotho, English and Afrikaans as 
dominant languages in the Province. 

The economy of Mantsopa is largely on the commercial farming sector, which employs many of the community. The 
private businesses and public sector also employs a number of the community. Tourism also plays an attraction 
point within the Maluti Mountains and the official pronouncement of Lekhalong La Mantsopa as a national heritage 
side. Mantsopa therefore is the gateway to the Mountain Kingdom of Lesotho which attracts lot of tourists 
nationally and internationally 


13 


Commented [S2]: Mantsopa 


Table 1: Population distribution by languages most spoken 


Languages 

Gender 

Total 

Male 

Female 

Afrikaans 

1 898 

1911 

3 810 

English 

832 

1 133 

1965 

IsiNdebele 

- 



IsiXhosa 

110 

41 

152 

IsiZuiu 

39 

13 

52 

Sepedi 

74 

46 

120 

Sesotho 

22 401 

23 867 

46 269 

Setswana 

40 

32 

72 

Sign language 

- 



SiSwati 

- 



Tshivenda 

- 



Xitsonga 

- 

14 

14 

Khoi; nama and san languages 

- 



Other 

142 

34 

175 


Data sources: Stats SA, Census 201 1 and Community Survey 2016 


Table 4 above indicates the distribution of the population by language and gender. The most spoken language within 
the municipality is Sesotho followed by Afrikaans and English respectively. None of the population members uses 
sign language to communicate. The area is accessible via the N8 and R26 roads which transverse the area. A railway 
line that runs along these routes services the area. 

The municipal area accommodates approximately 51 056 people and covers an area of 4 290 km^. It incorporates 
five small towns, which accommodates collectively 70.9% of the total population of Mantsopa. These small towns 
serve the surrounding rural community. The five main towns situated in Mantsopa are Ladybrand Head Office, Hob 
House, Tweespruit, Thaba-Phatchoa and Excelsior. 

Ladybrand is the most progressive of all towns and is the most eastern node in the municipal area. Ladybrand 
municipal area includes Manyatseng, Mauersnek and the surrounding municipal commonages that covered an 
area of 4 682 ha in size. The town accommodates 34% of the total population of Mantsopa. 

Hobhouse is a smaller rural town that is located southwest of Ladybrand and east of the Leeuw River along the 
Lesotho border. Hobhouse is the most southern node in the municipal area. It is about 2 089 ha in extent which 
includes Dipelaneng and municipal commonages. The town accommodates 4.6% of the total population of 
Mantsopa. 

Tweespruit is the most centrally located node along the N8 route between Bloemfontein and Ladybrand. It is about 
1 534 ha in extent and included Borwa, Dawiesville and municipal commonages. The town accommodates 10.2% of 
the total population of Mantsopa. 

Excelsior is located 40 km north of Tweespruit along the R709 and forms the northern boundary of Mantsopa. It is 
about 1 298 ha in extent of which 243 ha was designed as an urban area, the rest were rented out to commercial 
farmers while some land was utilized for grazing purposes. It includes Mahlatswetsa and municipal 
commonages. Excelsior accommodates 10.6% of the total population of Mantsopa. 

Thaba Patchoa is located between Tweespruit and Hobhouse and is a small agricultural residence for 1100 
families. It is about 3 864 ha in extent and consisted of the farms Thaba Patchoa 105, Segogoana's Valley 665 and 
Sweet Home 667. 


14 



The municipal area has been divided into 9 wards. These wards comprise the following areas: 

Ward 1: Tweespruit, Borwa, Dawiesville, Thaba Patchoa and surrounding rural areas; 

Ward 2: Hobhouse, Dipelaneng, and surrounding rural areas; 

Ward 3: Vukazenzele; Masakeng; Mekokong; Part of Los My Cherrie and a small portion in town 

Ward 4: Part of Los My Cherrie, Flamingo; Part of Lusaka 

Wards: Mandela Park, Riverside, Masakeng, Thusanong, and Modderpoort 

Ward 6: Lusaka, Thabong, New Platberg, and Homes 2000; 

Ward 7: Ladybrand Town, Maursnek; Platberg 

Wards: Excelsior, part of Mahlatswetsa and surrounding rural areas; 

Ward 9: Mahlatswetsa. 


Table 2: Number of Households per ward. 


Number of Households per ward -Census 2011 


Wardl 

Ward 2 

Wards 

Ward 4 

Wards 

Ward 6 

Ward? 

Wards 

Wards 

Total for 

2011 

Total for 2016 

1886 

1865 

1859 

2 088 

1 558 

1 363 

1578 

14 94 

1479 

15 170 

16 951 


Source: Statistics South Africa - Census 2011 and community survey 2016 

Note: information for 2016 is from the community survey 2016 which is only up to municipal level not ward level. 


Table 3: Distribution of total population, number of households and household size 



Population 

Households 

Average Household Size 

Census 2011 

51056 

15170 

3.4 

CS2016 

53526 

16951 

3.2 


Data sources: Stats SA, Census 201 1 and Community Survey 2016 


Table 5 above indicates the total population, number of households as well as the average household size in 
Mantsopa local municipality between the years 2011 and 2016. Even though the total population as well as the 
number of households has increased, the average household size has slightly decreased from 3.4 to 3.2 where in 
essence it remained constant at 3 members per households when rounding off both household size figures. 

The municipality undertook a rural survey in 2001 to get more information regarding the current level of service 
provision in the rural areas and the number of people residing on the farms. This survey indicated that an average of 
2.8 households stay on those farms occupied by farmers and their workers. Where the farmer was not residing on 
the farm itself, 25% of all respondents indicated that an average of 2 families stayed on the farm. 

Only 35 farms, representing 11.4% of the respondents, had nobody that resided on the farm. A survey at the Deeds 
Office indicated that there are a total of 1874 farms registered in Mantsopa. If these figures are used to predict the 
number of households staying in the rural areas, the following: 


15 


Table 4.' Estimated number of Rural Households 


Survey Result 

Applied to total number of farms 

No of Households 

73% or 223 farmers resided on the farm 

73% X 1874 farms = 1368 

1368x2.8 = 3830 

35 farms had nobody residing on it (11%) 

11% X 1874 farms = 206 

206x0 =0 

48 farmers did not stay on the farm they worked 
(16%) 

16% X 1874 farms = 300 

300x2.0 =600 

Total 

1874 

4 430 


Source: Rural Survey (Mantsopa Local Municipality, 2011} 

The rural survey conducted by the municipality also indicated that the average household size of the farm workers is 
2.6 family members per household while the farmers has on average 2.1 family members. It is therefore estimated 
that 12 329 people are residing in the rural areas, using these average household sizes and multiplying it with the 
above estimated number of households. 

This figure is less than the rural population estimates of 21 405 people, if a compounded growth rate of 1.7% per 
annum is applied to the census figure of 1996. However, it is known fact that many farmers have retrenched workers 
since 1996 and therefore the rural population should have decreased, thus concluding the findings made by the rural 
survey. The following conclusion can therefore be drawn from the above, namely that: 

The estimated population of the rural survey is correct and therefore the rural population has decreased while there 
was an influx of people, through both migration and immigration into the urban areas. It is therefore estimated that 
the total number of households have increased from 11 715 to 15 057. Mantsopa Local Municipality has had some 
mixed outcomes in terms of Services Provision from 1996 to 2011 as showed in the table below. Access to piped 
water has had a serious decrease and needs to be addressed within this IDP. 


MANTSOPA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY BASIC 
SERVICES COMPARISON (1996 - 2011) 


100.0 

90.0 

80.0 

70.0 

60.0 

50.0 

40.0 

30.0 

20.0 
10.0 

0.0 


I Basic Services • 199C 
I Basic Services - 2001 


I Basic Services - 2011 


r 


Electricity(%) 

69.7 

74.9 


Sanitation(%) 

36.8 

34.5 


Piped Water to 
Dwelling(%) 

37.8 

73.8 
24.4 


16 


Municipality Powers and Functions 

Section 156 of the Constitution assigns executive authority to municipalities in respect of, and the right to administer 
the local government matter listed in Part B of Schedule 4 and Part B of Schedule 5 and any other matter assigned to 
it by national or provincial government. This implies that certain functions have been assigned exclusive to local 
government. As local government comprises both district and local municipalities, it was necessary to differentiate 
between the functional competencies of district and local municipalities. 

This division of functional competencies between district and local municipalities is governed by the Municipal 
Structures Act, as amended (2000), However, many district municipalities do not have the administrative capacity to 
execute their legislative powers and functions and therefore the MECfor Local Government and Housing authorized 
local municipalities to perform certain of the district municipal functions in terms of section 18 (1) of the Local 
Government Structures Amendment Act (2000). 

The MEC's authorization in terms on Provincial Notice No 225 of 27 November 2002 was repealed on 10 April 2002 
with the promulgation of Provincial Notice No 53 of 2002. According to the Provincial Notice No 53 of 2002, the 
following functions and powers have been authorized to Mantsopa Local Municipality. 


Table 4: Municipal Powers and Functions. 


Air & Noise Poilution 


Beaches and Amusement 

Facilities 


Billboards & Display of 
Advertisements in Public 

Places 

y 

Biliboards & Display of 
Advertisements in 

Public Piaces 


Building, Trading 

Regulations, Liquor 

SiPublic, Nuisance Control 


Cemeteries, Funeral 

Parlours & Crematoria 

y 

Chiid Care Facilities 


Cleansing & Trade Areas 


Electricity Reticulation 


Fencing and Fences 


Fire Fighting Services 
Licensing, Facilities for 
Accommodation, Care & 
Burial of Animals 


Local Tourism 

y 

Local Amenities 


Local Sport Facilities 


Markets Stalls / Trade 

Areas 


Municipal Abattoirs 


Municipal Planning 


Municipal Public Transport 


Municipal Parks and 
Recreation 


Municipal Roads 

y 

Pontoons, Ferries, Jetties, 
Piers &Harbours 


Storm Water Management 

✓ 

Pounds 


Public, Nuisance Control 

Fire Fighting Services 


Public Piaces 


Refuse Removal, Refuse 
Dumps & Solid Waste 

y 

Street Trading 


Traffic and Parking 


Storm Water Management 





Source: Mantsopa IDP (2016} 


Section 229 of the Constitution allows municipalities to impose property rates and service charges. This obligation 
requires strict financial management and accountability to the public. The allocation of certain functional 
competencies to district municipalities has an impact on the administration of local municipalities, it was therefore 


17 


necessary to consider the new functional competencies of local government in the design of a new organizational 
structure illustrated on the previously. 

Service Providers 

The municipality provides services in the municipal area that relates only to their core competencies. Other service 
agencies are therefore responsible for service delivery outside the functional competency of the local municipality 
but within the spirit of Co-operative Governance and the Intergovernmental Relations Act. The following is a list of 
service providers active in the municipal area. The list is not comprehensive, but gives an overview of those services 
providers, which the community perceive to be active in the municipal area. 


Table 5: Service Providers 


Service Delivered 

Ladybrand 

Hothouse 

Tweespruit 

Excelsior 

Thabo 

Patchoa 

Rural 

Areas 

Water 

Mantsopa Local Municipality 

Farm Owner 

Sanitation 

Mantsopa Local Municipality 

Farm Owner 

Electricity 

Ladybrand town: 
Centlec SOC 

Manyatseng: 

ESKOM 

Mauresnek & 
Platberg 

Centlec SOC 

Hobhouse town 

ESKOM 

Dipelaneng: 

ESKOM 

Tweespruit 

town: 

Centlec SOC 

Borwa: 

ESKOM 

Dawiesville: 

Centlec SOC 

Excelsior town 

Centlec SOC 

Mahlatswetsa: 

ESKOM 

Thaba 

Patchoa 

ESKOM 

Farms & 

Rural 

ESKOM 

Road Network 

Mantsopa Local Municipality & Provincial Dept of Roads & Police | 

Health Care 

Department of Health & Thabo Mofutsanyana Municipality (Environmental Health) 

Safety and Security 

South African Police Services 

Labour advice 

Department of labour 

Environmental Conservation 

Department of Tourism, Economic and Environmental Affairs, Municipality 

Tourism Promotion 

Maloti tourist route, Thabo Mofutsanyana District Municipality, Free State Tourism Authority 

Housing subsidies 

Department of Human Settlements 

Farm owners for farm 

residents 

Agriculture advice 

Department of Agriculture 

Welfare Service 

Department of Social Development 


Source: Morjtsopa IDP (2016/17} 


18 


Municipality Broad Geographic Context 

Mantsopa forms part of the central district municipal area, Thabo Mofutsanyana, within the Free State Province. The 
Free State is the third largest province in South Africa and covers 10.6% of the country's surface area while it 
accommodates only 5.3% of the total population of South Africa. {Census Statistics 2011). 


Table 6: Municipai Context 


Geographic Area 

Population size and Households 


Bordering Towns 

Mantsopa Local Municipality 
area of jurisdiction covers 

4 290km^ 

Population size 


It borders the Kingdom of Lesotho in the east, 

Mangaung Local Municipality to the west and South, 
and Masilonyana and Setsoto to the north. It 
incorporates five small towns, which accommodate 
collectively 66, 5% of the total population of 

Mantsopa. These small towns serve the surrounding 
rural community. 

1996 

2001 

2011 

2016 

50 085 

55 339 

51056 

53525 

Number of Households 


According to Statistics South Africa: Community Surveys 2016, there 
were a total number of 16 951 households within the area of 
jurisdiction of Mantsopa Local Municipality. 


Source: Census 2011 and community survey 2016 



19 


These Figures shows Population structures - Census 2011 and Community Survey 2016 



Data sources: Stats SA, Census 2011 and Community Survey 2016 


20 



Figure 3 and 4 above indicate population structures of Mantsopa local municipality in 2011 and 2016 respectively. This 
indicates that the municipality consists of young population than the old. Based on the age group 0 - 4 years, the 
figures suggest that there was consistency in terms of fertility within the municipality in the past five years. The figures 
suggest that females live longer than the male population within the municipality. 

State of Development in Mantsopa Local Municipality 

The December 5, 2000 Local Government Democratic Elections ushered in the era of developmental local government 
and politics. The incoming iocal councils were faced with challenges of deconstructing the decades long era of 
separate, unfair and racially based local government through cooperative government, all three levels of government 
implemented programmes and projects aimed at eradicating poverty and ensuring the socio-economic development 
of all South Africans. 

Mantsopa Local Municipality inherited serious developmental challenges and eventually experienced new growth 
challenges caused by expansion of the municipality more especially Ladybrand. With the adoption of the sister IDP and 
subsequent reviews of the IDP over years, Mantsopa Local Municipality crafted a developmental trajectory aimed at 
integrating the development of the municipality and ensuring the provision of equitable, fair and sustainable services 
to all. 

This chapter tries to sketch a broad overview of the current development situation within the municipal area and 
focuses on the demographic profile of the area, its human and social development status, the economic development 
situation, levels of infrastructure provisioning as well as land reform projects initiated in the area. 

The chapter further explores the spatial relationship of the municipal area and the environmental assets it possesses 
as well as those environmental issues that needs attention. It also critically assesses the strengths, weaknesses, 
opportunities and threats of the municipal area in order to strategically place the area in terms of future development 
opportunities. 

Opportunities offered by the Municipality 

Ladybrand is situated on the R26 between Ficksburg and Flobhouse. It is also situated on the N8 linking Bloemfontein 
with Maseru in Lesotho. The former municipal area measures approximately 4 682 hectares and comprises Ladybrand, 
Manyatseng and Mauresnek. The remaining extent of the municipal area consists of land mainly used for agricultural 
purposes. Ladybrand is a service center to the predominantly agricultural orientated surrounding rural area, but also 
to Lesotho. It is the most progressive and largest of all the towns in the Mantsopa Local Municipal area. The town has 
a promising economy and many national companies occupy retail and industrial space. 

Excelsior is located along the R703 between Tweespruit and Verkeerdevlei. It is also directly linked to Thaba 'Nchu and 
Winburg via untarred roads. The former town lands measures approximately 1 298 hectares and comprises the 
developed areas of Excelsior and Mahlatswetsa. The remaining extent of the municipal town lands consists of land 
mainly used for agricultural purposes and a large percentage of the land is leased to commercial farmers while other 
land is used for communal grazing purposes. 

Excelsior serves as a service center in support of the predominant agricultural surrounding area. In recent years, 
however, it lost its agricultural service center function due largely to the liberalization of the agricultural marketing 
system and improved technology. Agricultural produce is now delivered wherever it is needed and the services of the 
town are bypassed. The commercial sector also lost some of its former importance as those who can afford it, prefer 


21 



to shop in other Central, such as Thaba 'Nchu and Bloemfontein. This has a negative impact on the local economy and 
work opportunities in this town. 

Tweespruit is situated along the N8 between Bloemfontein and Ladybrand. There is also a direct link between 
Tweespruit and Excelsior along the R709. The former town lands measures approximately 1 534 hectares and 
comprises Tweespruit, Borwa and Dawiesville. The remaining extent of the municipal area consists of land mainly 
used for agricultural purposes. 

These communal areas are leased to commercial farmers and also serve as grazing area for livestock kept by local 
farmers in Borwa and Dawiesville. Tweespruit serves as a service center in support of the predominant agricultural 
surrounding area. This area is one of the highest sunflower production regions in the Free State and in response a 
large silo complex has been developed in the town. In combination with the station, with its capacity for mass 
transport of agricultural produce, it forms a positive asset for the town. 

Hobhouse is located along the R26 between Wepener and Ladybrand. It is also directly accessible from Tweespruit. 
The former town lands measures approximately 2 089 hectares and comprises Hobhouse and Dipelaneng. The 
remaining extent of the municipal area consists of land mainly used for agricultural purposes. Hobhouse serves as a 
service center in support of the predominant agricultural surrounding area. 

Thaba Patchoa is located approximately 30 km from Tweespruit in a south -easterly direction. It is inaccessible from 
the major access routes in the region. It was a farming settlement particularly earmarked for the coloured community 
during the previous era with its separate development policy. The former municipal area measures approximately 3 
864 hectares in extent. 

It is somewhat 'hidden' when referring to spatial planning initiatives of the past, but 'secluded', when referring to its 
largely untapped tourism potential. On micro scale, the urban area is located between the Leeuw River dam in the 
east and Thaba Patchoa Mountain in the west. Agricultural activity prevails and the town lacks any other form of 
economic infrastructure, while social amenities are poorly developed. It provides no services to the surrounding area 
and the community utilizes Hobhouse as the service center. 


22 



Map 3 Road Networks. 



Legend: 

I I Owtncl Mi«nic«>ainy 
L€>cal MuructpMty 
SettlemoatB 
Roads 

AnorMl Road 
Main Road 
S acondary Road 


Road Infrastructure within Mantsopa Local Municipality 


I Map: OO] 


Ma noa u iV9^W^r o 


e artdp 




Source: Deportment of Public Roads and Transport -2011 


What is the Integrated Development Plan? 


Integrated development planning Is a process through 
prepares a strategic development plan which extends over 
Integrated development plan as an instrument lies at the 
developmental local government in South Africa and 
force for making municipalities more strategic, inclusive, 
performance driven in character. The IDP is the principal 
instrument which guides and informs all planning, 
development, management and implementation in the 

making. Each directorate is required to conclude a detailed annual service delivery and budget 
that gives operational expression to the IDP. 



which the municipality 
a five-year period, 
center of the system of 
represents the driving 
responsive, and 
strategic planning 
budgeting, investment, 
medium-term decision- 
implementation plan 


The Senior Management Team and Middle Management are accountable for the implementation of the IDP, and this is 
reflected in our integrated Performance Management System that links the IDP to the strategic framework, to the 
macro-scorecard, and from there to performance contracts for Section 57 Managers. The Municipality is required to 
consult with communities and other stakeholders on its performance, and Mantsopa Local Municipality had made 
increased efforts this year to involve residents, officials and politicians in providing feedback on the municipal 
performance. 


23 


Policy and Legislative Context 

The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa outlines the kind of local government needed in the country. 
According to the Constitution (sections 152 and 153), local government is in charge of the development process in 
municipality, and notably is in charge of planning for the municipal area. The constitutional mandate is to relate 
management, budgeting and planning functions to its objectives and gives a clear indication of the intended purposes 
of municipal integrated development planning: 

• To ensure sustainable provision of services; 

• To promote social and economic development; 

• To promote a safe and healthy environment; 

• To give priority to the basic needed of communities; and 

• To encourage involvement of communities. 

The Constitution also demands local government to improve intergovernmental coordination and cooperation to 
ensure integrated development across the community. 

The White Paper on Local Government gives municipalities responsibility to "work with citizens and groups within the 
community to find sustainable ways to address their social, economic and material needs and improve the quality of 
their lives". 

The Municipal Systems Act (Act 32 of 200) defines integrated development planning as one of the core functions of a 
municipality in the context of its developmental orientation. The plan should be strategic and inclusive in nature. The 
plan should link, integrate and coordinate other plans, while taking development proposals into account. It should be 
aligned with the municipality's resources and capacity, while forming policy framework on which annual budgets are 
based. The Integrated Development Plan must be compatible with national and provincial development pans and 
planning requirements. 


Role and Purpose of the IDP 

The IDP is the single and inclusive strategic planning document for the municipal area. It therefore does not only 
inform the municipal management; it is also supposed to guide the activities of any agency from the other spheres of 
government, corporate service providers, NGOs and the private sector within the municipal area. The Mantsopa Local 
Municipality will therefore be accountable for the objectives related to their municipal mandate while other service 
providers and development agencies will be responsible for rendering appropriate services in terms of the non-core 
functions of the municipality. 

The IDP is a statutory document once published for public comment and adopted by the Council. Section 35(1) of the 
Municipal Systems Act, No 32 of 2000, stipulates that the IDP binds the municipality in the exercise of its executive 
authority, except to the extent of any inconsistency between an IDP and national or provincial legislation, in which 
case such legislations prevails. 

It furthermore binds all other persons to the extent that those parts of the IDP that impose duties or affect the rights 
of those persons have been passed as a by-law. According to Section 36 of the same act the municipality must give 
effect to the IDP and conduct its affairs in a manner that is consistent with the IDP. Section 35(2) stipulates that the 
Spatial Development Framework (SDF) contained in an IDP prevails over a plan as defined in section 1 of the Physical 
Planning Act, 1991. The SDF therefore guides future land use management in the area. 

24 



Policy Context and Planning Framework 

Constitution of the Repubiic (1996) 

The Constitution (1996) assigns the deveiopmental mandate to local government. This implies that municipalities 
must strive to achieve the objects of local government within its financial and institutional capacity, namely: 

• To promote democratic and accountable government for local communities. 

• To ensure that provision of services to communities in a sustainable manner. 

• To promote social and economic development. 

• To promote a safe and healthy environment 

To encourage the involvement of communities and community organizations in the matter of local government. 

The Constitution stipulates that all three spheres of governance are autonomous but interdependent. This therefore 
calls for closer collaboration between all these spheres of governance. Needless to mention, a number of national 
policies have a particular bearing on the provincial and local spheres of government. A few critical ones are highlighted 
below. 

National Development Plan 2030 

The South African Government, through the Presidency, has published a National Development Plan. The Plan aims to 
eliminate poverty and reduce inequality by 2030. The Plan has the target of developing people's capabilities to be to 
improve their lives through education and skills development, health care, better access to public transport, jobs, 
social protection, rising income, housing and basic services, and safety. More importantly for efficiency in local 
government the NDP proposes 8 targeted actions listed below: 

1. Stabilise the political- administrative interface 

2. Make pubiic service and local government careers of choice 

3. Develop technical and specialist professional skills 

4. Strengthen delegation, accountability and oversight 

5. Improve interdepartmental coordination 

6. Take proactive approach in improving national, provincial and local government relations 

7. Strengthen local government 

8. Clarify the governance of SOE's 

Cabinet and National Assembly adopted the National Development Plan 2030 as an overarching iong term strategic 
plan for the country to create employment, eliminate poverty and reduce inequality by 2030 through uniting South 
Africans, unleashing the energies of its citizens, growing an inclusive economy, building capabilities, enhancing the 
capability of the state and leaders working together to solve complex problems, the NDP further defines a desired 
destination and identifies the role different sectors of society need to play in reaching that destination. 

Free State Growth and Development Strategy (FSGDS) 

The provincial government of Free State has developed a Free State Provincial Growth and Development Strategy 
(PGDS) Free Sate Vision 2030. The PGDS is the fundamental policy framework for the Free State Provincial 
Government. It is the embodiment of the broad strategic policy goals and objectives of the province in line with 
national policy objectives. 


25 



The Strategy addresses the key and most fundamental issues of development, spanning the social, economic and 
political environment. It constantly takes into account annual provincial priorities and sets broad targets in terms of 
provincial economic growth and development, service delivery and public service transformation. The Strategy has 
identified six priority areas of intervention in the province, namely; 

1. Inclusive Economic growth and sustainable job creation; 

2. Education innovation and skills development 

3. Improved quality of life 

4. Sustainable Rural Development 

5. Efficient Administration and Good Governance 

6. Building social cohesion 

Medium Term Strategic Framework 2014 - 2019 

This Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) is Government's strategic plan for the 2014-2019 electoral term. It 
reflects the commitments made in the election manifesto of the governing party, including the commitment to 
implement the NDP. The MTSF sets out the actions Government will take and targets to be achieved. It also provides a 
framework the other plans of national, provincial and local government. 

The MTSF highlights Government's support for a competitive economy, creation of decent work opportunities and 
encouragement of investment. The introduction of a long-term plan brings greater coherence and continuity to the 
planning system and means that the MTSF now becomes a five year building block towards the achievement of the 
vision and goals of the country's long-term plan. 


The 2014-2019 electoral mandates focus on the following priorities: 

1. Radical economic transformation, rapid economic growth and job creation 

2. Rural development, land and agrarian reform and food security 

3. Ensuring access to adequate human settlements and quality basic services 

4. Improving the quality of and expanding access to education and training 

5. Ensuring quality health care and social security for all citizens 

6. Fighting corruption and crime 

7. Contributing to a better Africa and a better world 

8. Social cohesion and nation building. 

The Medium Term Strategic Framework 2014 - 2019 has two over-arching strategic themes; 

Radical Economic Transformation 

Government's programme of radical economic transformation is about placing the economy on a qualitatively 
different path that ensures more rapid, sustainable growth, higher investment, increased employment, reduced 
inequality and deracialisation of the economy. The NDP sets an annual growth target of above 5% by 2030 and 
emphasises measures to ensure that the benefits of growth are equitably shared. 

The NDP further indicates that South Africa needs to increase its level of investment to at least 30% of GDP by 2030. 
This requires an economic environment that encourages business investment and rewards competitiveness, especially 
in sectors that can catalyse longer term growth and job creation 


26 



Improving Service Deiivery. 

In dealing with backlogs and the quality of services which is uneven, there is a dire need to commit to resolve these 
challenges in order to improve the quality and consistency of services, which requires improvements in the 
performance of the public service, municipalities and service providers. 

Measures to improve the capacity and developmental commitment of the state should therefore receive high priority 
over this MTSF period. Building capacity of the state is a long-term task which requires immediate implementation. 

Key priorities aimed at improving the quality of service delivery include institutionalising long-term planning; forging a 
disciplined, people-centred and professional public service; empowering citizens to play a greater role in development; 
and building an ethical public service. It will also be important to improve the management of contracts in order to 
ensure effective relations with non-governmental and private sector service providers. 

Over the MTSF period, national and provincial departments of local government will focus on improving the quality of 
targeted oversight and support available to municipalities. Local government is the most participatory sphere of 
government and measures should be put in place to ensure that communities are empowered to hold public 
representatives and officials accountable, including through strengthening existing forums of people's participation. 

Particular attention will be given to the management of service delivery, human resource management and financial 
management at provincial level. Where national and provincial or local government have concurrent responsibilities, 
policy coordination, monitoring and support for service delivery will be strengthened and relations between spheres 
will be improved. 

Corruption impedes service delivery, compromises development and undermines public confidence in the state. To 
strengthen the fight against corruption. Government will focus on limiting the scope for conflicts of interest by 
prohibiting public servants and public representatives from doing business with the state as well as ensuring 
transparency in public expenditure and contractual relations with the business sector. 

Corruption is partly a symptom of a wider problem relating to weak management and operations systems, which 
create the space for corruption to occur, so improvement of operational management, and especially procurement 
systems, will be prioritised to play an important role in reducing the scope for corruption which is adversely affecting 
the poor. 

Outcome 9: Responsive, accountable, effective and efficient developmental local government system 

Drawing from the NDP chapter on a Capable and Developmental State, by 2030 SA will have a developmental state 
that is accountable, focused on citizen's priorities, and capable of delivering high-quality services consistently and 
sustainably through cooperative governance and participatory democracy. As depicted in the White Paper on Local 
Government, developmental local government is "local government committed to working with citizens and groups 
within the community to find sustainable ways to meet their social, economic and material needs and improve the 
quality of their lives". 

In this scenario, local government is at the forefront of participatory democracy, involving citizens in meaningful 
deliberations regarding governance and development; is responsive to citizens' priorities, and enjoys high levels of 
trust and credibility amongst the public; whose employees are skilled, competent and committed to delivering quality 
services; is able to cost-effectively increase the quantity and quality of services and operates within a supportive and 
empowering intergovernmental system. 


27 



Municipalities operate in a complex environment and municipal performance is impacted at four levels: the individual, 
institutional, environmental and macro-socio-economic. The priority issues within each of the four levels that are 
negatively impacting on municipal performance are reflected in the table 7 below: 


Institutional Capacity 

Enabling Environment 

Macro Context 


Weak political leadership 


Lack of central co-ordination 


Huge pressures of poverty, unemployment and 




support, information and M&E 


inequality 


Technical skills gaps and lack of relevant competencies 








Financial viability of 


Huge service delivery backlogs 


High staff turnover and vacancy levels 


municipalities 


Weak public participation 


Weak understanding of policies 

Political deployments not always competent 


Bulk infrastructure gaps 


Huge social issues, such as crime, drug abuse, 


appointments 


Lack of clarity re 
decentralisation of powers 


gender-based violence 


Lack of career progression 


and functions and role of the 


Weak revenue base of municipalities with low 




districts 


levels of affordability 


Poor attitudes & values of staff 


Role of DCOG unclear 


Political dynamics, including coalitions resulting in 


Lack of professionalism & regulation thereof by 
professional bodies & government 


Lack of planning alignment 


inertia 




amongst the 3 spheres - IDP 


Pressures of in-migration and urbanisation 


Corruption at all levels with no consequences 


not taken seriously by other 
spheres 


Weak education system 


Unclear administrative/political interface 


Local government financing 




Weak strategy - focus on compliance 


system, including Equitable 
Share, needs to be reviewed 




Weak financial management and low budget spend 


Unstable political environment 




Weak council decisions, often contrary to technical 


Inconsistent, incoherent and 




advice 


complex local government 
legislative environment 




Organisational instability, including review of S 57 
contracts linked to political term of office 


Lack of customised support to 
municipalities, and support 




Lack of oversight and accountability 


focused on compliance 




Lack of legal compliance or regulatory support 






Weak municipal systems 






Responding to the issues above will require a proactive approach to managing the intergovernmental system, in order 
to address specific weaknesses in collaboration and capacity support. National and provincial departments and entities 
impacting on local government will have to cooperate better and act with greater synergy in providing oversight and 
support to the local sphere. Moreover, provincial departments of local government will need to improve the way they 
monitor and support local government. 

This outcome will be coordinated by the extended local government Minmec at political level and the local 
government Mintec at administrative level. Provincial departments of local government have a pivotal role to play in 
ensuring the success of the local government outcome. In particular it will be necessary for each province to 
contextualize the key actions and targets and establish the planning, management and administrative apparatus to 
ensure implementation, monitoring of delivery, and accurate reporting. 

In reviewing its IDP, Mantsopa local municipality will pay necessary attention to these issues raised above, as a matter 
of principle and within the spirit and the epistle of the National Development Plan. 


28 




Sustainable Developmental Goals 

Background on SDGs 

Adopted by world leaders In September 2015 and Implemented at the start of 2016, more than 150 countries have 
pledged to mobilize efforts to end all forms of poverty, fight inequalities, and tackle climate change, while ensuring 
that no one is left behind. 

The SDGs build on the work of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that were emphasized from 2000 to 2015. 
The new SDGs are unique in that they're broader in their scope of eradicating all forms of poverty by calling for action 
by all countries, rich and poor, to promote prosperity while protecting the planet. The following is the agreed upon 
goals: 

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGS: 

17 Steps to a better world 

1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere 

2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture 

3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages 

4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all 

5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls 

6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all 

7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all 

8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment 
and decent work for all 

9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster 
innovation 

10. Reduce inequality within and among countries 

11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resiiient and sustainabie 

12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns 

13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts 

14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development 

15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, 
combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss 

16. Promote peaceful and Inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for 
all and build effective, accountable and Inclusive Institutions at all levels 

17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable 
development 


29 


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Approach to the I DP Review Process 

The process adopted for the compilation of an IDP needs to encourage consultation and participation of a wide 
spectrum of interested and affected parties. The approach should therefore allow residents, communities, 
stakeholders, service providers and specialists to make a contribution to the content of the plan. Secondly, the plan 
should be strategic, therefore focusing on addressing priority issues, ensuring that limited resources are used 
effectively and efficiently and that strategic choices are made. The approach to be followed should thus allow for this. 
Thirdly, the plan should be implementation orientated. This implies that the plan should be concrete and specific in 
terms of the outcomes and outputs to be achieved while it needs to take into consideration the inputs required to 
make it happen. There should therefore be a close link between planning and budgeting. 

It was therefore necessary to adopt an approach that allowed for all of the above processes to culminate into the 
integrated planning process required for the compilation of the IDP. It was decided that the sustainable livelihoods 
approach is best suited for this purpose. This approach focuses on the "assets" people have, the "outcomes" they 
desire and the strategies they choose to achieve these outcomes. The process also reviews the influences that 
external institutions or vulnerabilities may have on these people's lives. 

Rationale of Integrated Development Planning 

It is a strategic tool that will enable municipalities to eliminate the fragmented planning and implementation processes 
of the past and bring together the different initiatives and resources together in order to do more with the least 
resources and increase synergy. Spisys is creating a foundation to kick off the integrated planning process as this 
template provides a fixed and credible structure with automated data population of the report on an ad - hoc basis. 
This framework would ensure that the COGTA Simplified guidelines can be effectively implemented for the category B4 
Municipalities. 


30 




















other Municipalities could also utilize this template with success as this framework has been compiled to fit a 
comprehensive IDP Process. The focus and priority must be the poor of the poorest; where the IDP's holistic nature 
forces us to be people-centered and environmentally sustainable. 


IDP Process 

The developmental role of municipalities cannot be 




1 1 

^ - 


overemphasized. It 

r 


is a mandate and challenge that municipalities must 
for. 

Annual 

Report | 

Budget 

continuously strive 

The developmental role calls for municipalities to 
development and economic growth with the traditional 
know of provision of services such as water, refuse 
to those rural areas which do not have a luxury of such 
infrastructural backlogs. 



maximize social 

PMS 1 jj 

iOBIP 1 

role that municipality 
removal and others 
due to the 


— — — ^ 

Amid these challenges the critical role is to be able to 
the center of development without undermining their 



put communities at 
abilities, knowledge 


and wisdom. Public participation stili remains the weakest link in our initiatives and once strengthened it is the link 
that will make our programmes sustainable. 

The Integrated Development Planning (IDP) Process is a process through which the municipalities prepare strategic 
development plans for a five-year period. An IDP is one of the key tools for Local Government to cope with its new 
developmental role and seeks to arrive at decisions on issues such as municipal budgets, land management, promotion 
of local economic development and institutional transformation in a consultative, systematic and strategic manner. 

According to the Local Government Municipal Systems Act No. 32 of 2000, all municipalities have to undertake a 
process to produce IDP's. As the IDP is a legislative requirement it has a legal status and it supersedes all other plans 
that guide development at local government level. 

Section 23 of the Local Government Municipal Systems Act, No. 32 of 2000 determines that a municipality must 
undertake a development oriented planning in-order to ensure that it strives to achieve the objectives of local 
government and gives effect to its developmental duties as set out in the Constitution. 

Section 25 of the Local Government Municipal Systems Act, No. 32 of 2000 stipulates that immediately after the start 
of its term, each municipal council must within a prescribed period; adopt a single, inclusive and strategic plan for the 
development of the municipality. 

Section 25 of the Government Municipal Systems Act, No. 32 of 2000 further stipulates that the municipal must on 
annual basis, review the adopted integrated development plan until the new council come into power, which will then 
adopt its own integrated development plan. 

Section 25 (3) (a) of the Government Municipal Systems Act, No. 32 of 2000 further determines that a newly elected 
municipal council may adopt the integrated development plan of its predecessor, but must also ensure that it complies 
with Section 29, which states that(l) The process followed by a municipality to draft its integrated development plan, 
including its consideration and adoption of the draft plan, must _(b) through appropriate mechanisms, processes and 
procedures established in terms of Chapter 4, allow for the local community to be consulted on its development needs 

31 





and priorities; provide for the identification of aii pians and pianning requirements binding on the municipaiity in terms 
of provincial and national legislation; and(d) be consistent with any other matters that may be prescribed by regulation 

Section 34 of the Local Municipal Systems Act No. 32 of 2000 and the Municipal Planning and Performance 
Management Regulations (2001), which stipulates that: 

A Municipal Council must review its integrated development plan annually in accordance with an assessment of its 
performance measurements in terms of section 4 I; to the extent that changing circumstances so demand; and 
May amend its IDP in accordance with a prescribed process. 

Figure 1: IDP Process Overview 


LfeP> 



IDP Review Process Plan 


In order to ensure certain minimum quality standards of the IDP Review process, and proper co-ordination between 
and within spheres of government, municipalities need to prepare IDP review process plans. The preparation of a 
Process Plan, which is in essence the IDP Review Process set in writing, requires adoption by Council. This plan has to 
include the following: 

A programme specifying the time frames for the different planning steps; 

Appropriate mechanisms, processes and procedures for consultation and participation of local communities, organs of 
state, traditional authorities, and other role players in the IDP review process; and 
Cost estimates for the review process. 

32 










NB: IDP Steering Committee is chaired by the Mayor or her delegate or the committee chairperson and is composed of 
the Speaker and Chairperson of the IDP & Performance Committee, all Councilors, Municipal Manager and 
Management. The IDP Representative Forum members include all ward committee members. Community 
Development Workers, Sector Departments, - Thabo Mofutsanyana District Municipality, NGO'S, CBO, and Parastatals. 

The above events were designed in line with the IDP methodology in terms of: 

• The analysis information (including ward feedback reports) formed the basis of identifying the important 
development issues of Mantsopa Local Municipality 

• Issues were transferred to priority tables to determine the most urgent / urgent and necessary to do 

• Objectives are based on the clustering of priorities 

• Each objective is supported by a number of measurements that clarifies / describes the nature of the objective 

• In the interest of measurability, the measurements stipulates quantifiable baselines and targets for the next 
two years 

• Strategies are formulated to operationalise the objectives and in turn projects are designed as the 
implementation component of the plan 

The design of the process was influenced by the: 

• Credible IDP Evaluation Framework 

• 5 Year Local Government Strategic Framework 

• MFMA - Treasury Regulations 13: SDBIP 

• Alignment to the NDP and PGDS priorities 

The influence of the above is visible in terms of the content of the IDP (analysis / objectives and project phase) as all 
elements are organized according to the 5 National Key Performance Areas: 

1. Infrastructure and Basic Services 

2. Socio-economic Development 

3. Institutional Transformation 

4. Good Governance and Public Participation 

5. Financial viability and management 

In addition, the project register incorporate ward specific outputs to support the formulation of the SDBIP, objectives 
are supported by baseline and targets for the purpose of PMS alignment and the checklist for the credible IDP was 
used during the integration phase to highlight gaps and omissions. 

This document represents the strategic plan of the Municipality for the following 1 year. The content of the planning 
document does not represent an additional workload that should be funded over and above the current work of the 
municipality as the objectives and projects are aligned to the powers and functions of the municipality. It also does 
not only refer to capital projects but many of the projects reflect the on-going work of the municipality as it is 
intended. 

Analysis Phase 

The analysis phase concentrated on identifying and analyzing needs with the municipality. The goal of the phase was 
to form the foundation for further phases of the IDP. 

Strategy Phase 


33 



The strategy section consisted of strategic reasoning and debate around the problems identified during the previous 
phase. The goals were to design objects and strategies that best addressed the problems and needs with the available 
resources of the municipality and support institutions. The vision and Mission of the municipality was reaffirmed 
through the IDP process and the Municipal Core Values were also reaffirmed during this phase. 

Project Phase 

The project phase consisted of the designing of projects in line with the strategies. This phase resulted in arrange of 
projects prioritized for three financial years. Some are funded others not. 

Integration Phase 

The integration phase has the goal of ensuring that the IDP priorities and projects are aligned with other existing 
sector plans of the municipality. The integrated plans and programmes were confirmed with all relevant sector 
department and stakeholders. 

Approval Phase 

The approval phase consisted of the preparation of the draft IDP document, obtaining final comments, inputs and 
tabling before the Mantsopa Local Municipality council for final approval and implementation. 

Community and Stakeholder Priority Issues 

The following list of priority issues were identified by communities and stakeholders and represent a general trend of 
service delivery needs in most of the wards that were consulted. 


Table 8: Priority Issues. 


u 

Community and Stakeholders Priority Issues 

Wards that Identified Issues 

1 

Water 

Wards 8 and 9 (Excelsior) 

Ward 1 (Tweespruit) 

Ward 2 (Hobhouse) 

Wards 5 & 6 (Ladybrand- Thabong) 

All wards (Quality of the water) 

2 

Sanitation 

Ward 1 (Tweespruit) 

Ward 2 (Hobhouse) 

3 

Roads and Storm Water 

All wards 

4 

Electricity 

All wards (Area Lighting) (Ward 5 & 6 Ext 9 & 10 New settlement) 

5 

Community Facilities Housing and Land 

All wards 

6 

Housing and Land Community Facilities 

All wards 

7 

Local Economic Development Waste Management 

All wards 

8 

Waste Management 

All wards (management of landfill sites) 

9 

Local Economic Development 

All wards 

10 

Health 

Shelters at the ambulance drop off zones at the clinics in all wards. Shortage of 
ambulances in Tweespruit, Excelsior, Hobhouse and Thaba Patchoa 

11 

Safety and security 

Need for a Police Station at Manyatseng, 24 hours Police Station at Thaba 

Patchoa, Borwa, Mahlatswetsa and Dipelaneng 

12 

Social Welfare 

Social Workers in all towns, SASSA & Home Affairs Offices in all towns 

13 

Environmental Management and Conservation 

Maintenance and construction of Recreational parks in Borwa, Mahlatswetsa, 
Dipelaneng and Thaba Patchoa. 


34 


Distribution of Roles and 
Responsibilities 

A Municipality should establish an IDP Representative Forum 
representative of all stakeholders and interested and 
New role players are continuously added to the list of 
IDP Process. The main roles and responsibilities allocated to 
players are set out below. 


Table 9: Roles and responsibilities-intemal. 


Role Player 

Roles And Responsibilities 

Council 

Final decision making 

Approval of the revie\A/ed IDP documentation 

Approve Budget for IDP Implementation 

Ward Committee 

Linking the IDP process with their constituencies 

Organising public participation 

Ensure input from grass roots level 

Support and Monitor IDP Implementation 

Portfolio Committee (Economic Dev. and Pianning) 

Political over-sight of the IDP Process and 
recommendations to the Exco/Mayor 

Draft IDP documentation for Exco/Mayor 

Mayor/ Executive Committee 

Decide on the IDP Process Plan. 

Be responsible for the overall management, coordination and monitoring of the 
process and 

drafting of the IDP documentation, or delegate this function 

Municipai Manager 

Accountable for all IDP related administrative processes 

Implement the IDP as approved by Council. 

Monitor and account for implementation. 

Overall Management and co-ordination 

Carrying the administrative responsibility for development of the plan 

IDP Manager (Delegated by Municipal Manager) 

Day-to-day management of the process 

Responsible for (Draft)development of the plan 

Administrative support to portfolio committee 

IDP Co-ordinator 

Responsible to IDP Manager for day-to-day administration 

Data Capturing 

IDP Steering Committee 

Assist and support the Municipal Manager/IDP Manager and Representative 
Forum. 

Make relevant line function inputs into the various stages of the IDP 

Information "GAP" identification 

Oversee the alignment of the planning process internally with those of the local 
municipality areas. 

Consisting of the Managers and councillors, responsible for monitoring and 
development of the plan 

IDP Representative Forum 

Consisting of all stakeholders 

Responsible for monitoring development of the plan 

Debate contentious issues (Prioritization) 


35 


< I 








that is 

affected parties, 
stakeholders in the 
each of the role 


Table 10: Roles and responsibilities-External. 


Role Player 

Roles And Responsibilities 

Mantsopa Local Municipality 

Process Plan 

Adopt IDP 

Implement IDP 

Monitoring and Evaluation Process 

Monitoring of Process through IDP Manager 

District Mayoral Forum 

Political Support 

Coordinate District Based Priorities 

Department Of Cooperative Governance And 
Traditional Affairs 

Monitor alignment with sector departments and district 

Support and Guide IDP Process 

Comment on IDP Approval 

Support IDP Implementation 

Office Of The Premier (PCF) 

Ensure that departmental plans are in line with IDP of local municipality 

Ensure IDP is aligned with PGDS 

Monitor performance 

Investigate issues of non-performance and political support at provincial level 

Sector Departments 

Contribute knowledge and relevant information - Alignment/integration 

Adjust budgets according to local IDP priorities 

Contribute sector expertise and technical knowledge 

Provincial management systems and co-ordination 



Sustainable Service 
Delivery 


Inline with Chapter 3, section 40 of the Constitution of the Republic 1996, spheres of government are distinct but 
inter-dependent and interrelated. Each of the spheres has a legislative authority to develop its own plans for 
development but will observe the inter-connection which prevails among spheres of government through promotion 
of inter-governmental relations and co-operative governance. 

Chapter 5, section 24 (1) of Local Government Municipal Systems Act of 2000, provides that a planning undertaken by 
a municipality must be aligned with, and complement, the development plans and strategies of other affected 
municipalities and other organs of the state so as to give effect to the principles of co-operative government contained 
in section 41 of the Constitution. 


36 


National Linkages 


Section 154 of the Constitution provides fora peremptory support and strengthening of the capacity of municipalities 
by both national and provincial governments to manage their own affairs, to exercise their powers and to perform 
their functions. The national sphere should therefore provide a framework and support for the preparation of the 
Sector Plans, and funding where required. 

This will contribute to the creation of a normative framework and consistency between municipalities. The national 
sphere should also co-ordinate and prioritizes programmes and budgets between sectors and the national sphere in 
line with the framework and Simplified Guidelines. 

Extensive consultation through established protocols between spheres of government must be explored to ensure 
inclusive planning and equitable distribution of resources to support and implement developmental plans. 

National departments of government and other organs of the state shall participate through all available processes 
during the IDP process of the municipality. 

Provincial Level 

As with the National Government, Provincial Government should prepare Sectoral Guidelines and funding for the 
preparation of these plans. The preparation of the Sector plans and programmes and district programmes also need to 
be coordinated and aligned. 

Section 26 of Local Government Municipal Systems Act 2000, dictates that a municipal council's developmental 
strategies must be aligned with any national and provincial sectoral plans and other planning requirements. 

Provincial departments of government and other organs of the state in the province shall participate through all 
available processes during the IDP process of the municipality. 

District Municipaiity 

A district municipality and local municipalities within its area of jurisdiction must adopt a framework for integrated 
development planning, this framework must at least identify the plans and planning requirements binding in terms of 
national and provincial legislation on the district municipality and the local municipalities as well as identifying matters 
to be included in the integrated development plans of the district municipality and local municipalities that requires an 
alignment. 

A District Municipality will through an agreed framework plan co-ordinate all planning activities during the review 
process. Through the IDP Manager, the District Municipality will also organize district level alignment meetings 
between all the municipalities and as well as between municipalities and service providers. 

Local Municipalities 

Local municipalities will participate in all district-level alignment events and specific alignment meetings, but will also 
attempt to draw individual service providers into the local planning processes. The local municipalities will also 
contribute strategies in addressing district-level issues during the alignment meetings as per agreed framework. 

A local municipality must also draft its integrated development plan taking into cognizance the integrated 
development processes of, and proposals submitted to it by the district municipality. Municipality shall submit to both 
provincial government and district municipality an approved IDP process plan for support and participation. 


37 



Integrated Spatial Management System (SPISYS) 

SPISYS will support both the district and the local municipality to ensure that proper alignment takes place through 
facilitation and guidance where required. The system has been developed to provide an Integrated sharing platform 
for information and spatial data required to do spatial planning in the Province and could be utilized to assist as a 
mechanism as follow: 

• Spatial alignment of different Sector Plans to represent the location, uses and rights of all projects 

• To identify suitable locations and preferred positions of new projects by following a scientific approach 
towards sustainable development 

• Making informed decisions to guide political decision makers 

• Ease of reference to all documents required in a single environment to guide decision making 

• Having the latest data and information at your fingertips to assist decision makers with paving the way 
forward. 


38 



Core Components of the IDP Preparation 


The 'core elements' of the IDP correspond to the core functions of municipalities as outlined in the Municipai 
Structures Act and other legislation, the Department of Provincial and Local Government's IDP Guide Pack III and VI, as 
well as critical elements that have arisen from the preparation of the IDP's over the past years. 

Figure 2 Components of the IDP 



SCOPING 


ORAn DOCUMENTS 
PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 


DEVELOPMENT PROflLE 
SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS 


♦ 



The core components of the IDP process are grouped as follows: 

• Status of the implementation process of the previous IDP (Full term performance report). 

• Nine IDP Components as per the Municipal Structures Act (MSA): 

• the municipal council's vision for the long term development of the municipality with special emphasis on the 
municipality's most critical development and internal transformation needs; 

• an assessment of the existing level of development in the municipality, which must include an Identification of 
communities which do not hove access to basic municipal services; 

• the council's development priorities for its elected term, including its local economic development aims and its 
internal transformation needs; 

• the council's development strategies which must be aligned with any national or provincial sectoral plans and 
planning requirements binding on the municipality in terms of legislation; 

• spatial development framework which must include the provision of basic guidelines for a land use 
management system for the municipality; 

• the council's operational strategies; 

• applicable disaster management plans; 

• a financial plan, which must include a budget projection for at least the next three years; and 

• The key performance indicators and performance targets determined In terms of Section 41 of the Municipal 


Systems Act. 


39 




SECTION B: LEGAL REQUIREMENTS 


Background of the IDP 

Integrated Development Planning Is a central process that has 
process to ensure the residents of the municipal area are ultimately 
services that are provided by the municipality. The Integrated 
further seen as a consolidated process that provides a framework for 
development In a municipality. In this regard, all other municipal plans 
IDP and they must ultimately become annexures to the IDP. 

The development of Municipal Integrated Development Plans is not 
meeting the requirements of the law, but Integrated Development plays a very crucial part in the development of the 
municipal area. It should be emphasized that municipalities must develop realistic and/or credible Integrated 
Development Plans, in order to meet the country's development objectives. According to COGTA, the following 
constitute the Credible IDP: 

• Consciousness by a municipality of its constitutional and policy mandate for developmental local government. 

• Awareness by a municipality of its role and place in the regional provincial and national context and economy 

• Awareness by a municipality of Its own Intrinsic characteristics and criteria for success. 

• Comprehensive description of the area - the environment and its spatial characteristics. 

• A clear strategy, based on local developmental needs. 

• Insights into the trade-offs and commitments that are being made with regard to economic choices, 
establishment of Sustainable Human Settlements, integrated service delivery etc. 

• The key deliverables for the next 5 years. 

• Clear measurable budget and implementation plans aligned to the Service Delivery and Budget 
Implementation Plan. 

• A monitoring system (Organizational Performance Management Systems and Spisys). 

• Determines capacity of municipality. 

• Communication, participatory and decision-making mechanisms. 

• The degree of intergovernmental action and alignment to government wide priorities. 

Legal Overview for Integrated Development Planning 

The transformation of Local Government in South Africa has brought about drastic changes in the nature, powers and 
functions of municipalities. This transformation has placed an emphasis on developmental role of the municipalities, 
and hence, developmental local government. The notion of developmental local government commits the 
municipalities to work with the communities in ensuring that they together find sustainable ways of improving the 
quality of lives of the communities. 

Section 23 of the Local Government Municipal Systems Act No. 32 of 2000, which determines that all municipalities 
must undertake a development oriented planning, in order to ensure that they strive to achieve the objects of local 
government, further enhances the concept of developmental local government. It is through this development 
oriented planning that the developmental local government can be realized. 

The development oriented planning that is referred to above, is the integrated development planning, which is a 
process through which the municipalities prepare strategic development plans which extends for a five-year period. 

40 



become a driving 
the recipients of basic 
Development Plan is 
the planning of future 
must be aligned to the 


just for the purposes of 


The ultimate product of this planning process is the integrated Deveiopment Pian. An integrated Deveiopment Pian 
(iDP) is the principai strategic pianning instrument that guides and informs aii pianning, budgeting, management and 
decision-making processes in a Municipaiity. 

According to the Locai Government Municipai Systems Act No. 32 of 2000, aii municipaiities have to undertake a 
process to produce iDP's. As the iDP is a iegisiative requirement it has a legai status and it supersedes aii other pians 
that guide deveiopment at iocai government ievei. Section 23 of the Locai Government Municipal Systems Act, No. 32 
of 2000 determines that a municipaiity must undertake a development oriented pianning in-order to ensure that it 
strives to achieve the objectives of iocai government and gives effect to its deveiopmentai duties as set out in the 
Constitution. 

Section 25 of the Locai Government Municipai Systems Act, No. 32 of 2000 stipuiates that immediately after the start 
of its term, each municipai councii must within a prescribed period; adopt a singie, inclusive and strategic pian for the 
deveiopment of the municipaiity. Section 25 of the Government Municipai Systems Act, No. 32 of 2000 further 
stipuiates that the municipaiity must on annual basis, review the adopted integrated deveiopment pian untii the new 
councii come into power, which wiii then adopt its own integrated development plan. 

Section 25 (3) (a) of the Government Municipal Systems Act, No. 32 of 2000 further determines that a newly elected 
municipal council may adopt the integrated development plan of its predecessor, but must also ensure that it complies 
with Section 29, which states that - 

(The process followed by a municipality to draft its integrated development plan, must allow for the local community to 
be consulted on its development needs and priorities; ■ provide for the identification of all plans and planning 
requirements binding on the municipality in terms of provincial and national legislation; and, be consistent with any 
other matters that may be prescribed by regulation 9.) 

The integrated development planning process necessitates the coming together of all relevant stakeholders, with an 
aim of: 

• Identifying its key development priorities; 

• Formulating a clear vision, mission and values; 

• Formulating appropriate strategies; 

• Developing the appropriate organizational structure and systems to realize the vision and mission; and 

• Aligning resources with the development priorities 

The Municipal Systems Act further compels the municipalities to draw up an Integrated Development Plan as a 
singular, inclusive and strategic development plan that is aligned with the strategic development plans of the 
surrounding municipalities and other spheres of government. In this regard, a Municipality shall endeavor to align its 
strategic development plan to that of the neighboring Municipalities surrounding a Municipality. A Municipal IDP shall 
by all means be made of the following components as required by Municipal Systems Act of 2000: 

• A vision of the long term development of the municipality; 

• An assessment of the existing level of development in the municipal area which must include an identification 
of the need for basic municipal services; 

• The municipal development priorities and objectives for its elected term; 

• The municipal development strategies which must be aligned with national and/or provincial sectoral plans 
and planning requirements; 

• A spatial development framework which must include the provision of basic guidelines for a land use 
management system; 


41 



• The municipal operational strategies; 

• A municipal disaster management plan; 

• A municipal financial plan, which must include a budget projection for at least the next three years; and 

• The key performance Indicators and performance targets 

The Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations of 2001, further set out the following 
requirements for the Integrated Development Plan: 

• An institutional framework for the implementation of the Integrated Development Plan and to address 
municipality's internal transformation 

• Investment opportunities that should be clarified; 

• Development initiatives including infrastructure, physical, social and institutional development; and 

• All known projects, plans and programmes to be implemented witbin tbe municipality by any organ of state. 
Alignment Reports generated through Spisys are shown in the Spatial Development framework (SDF) section 
of this IDP. 

The Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA) of 2003 further provides for a total alignment between tbe municipal 
annual budget and tbe Integrated Development Plan. To ensure this, a Municipality should develop a single process to 
develop and review its annual budget and tbe integrated development plan. 

The Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA) of 2003 further provides for the development of the Service Delivery 
and Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP), which is a detailed plan that gives direction as to how the service delivery 
and annual budget should be implemented. SDBIP includes monthly revenue and expenditure projections, quarterly 
service delivery targets as well as performance indicators. 

Figure 3: Outcome Based Approach 


The Outcomes-based approach can Past Pa lllustratad as follows : 


WWAT WE AIM TO CHANGE? 

Th* long t«fTn cl«v*lopm*nt«il r*»utt* at • 
that tHt* logical con*oquar>ca of 
•cHtovlr>g •pacific oleoma* 


WHAT WE WISH TO ACHIEVE? 

Tha ma<iium-tarm ra*uit* for •pacific 
Panaficlaria* triat ara a logical consapuanca 
of achiaving apacific output* 

WHAT we PRODUCE OR DELIVER*;^ 

Tha final product*, or goods and 
•arvica* producod for daiivary 

WHAT WE DO? 

Tha proca*»a* or action* that u*a 
a ranga of Inputs to produca tha 
da*lrad output* and ultimataly 
outcomas 


WHAT we USE TO DO IT? 

Tha rasourca* that contributa 
to tha production and dallvary 
of outputs 


IMPACTS 

OUTCOMES 

OUTPUTS 

ACTIVITIES 

INPUTS 


National Development Plan 2030 

The South African Government, through the Ministry of Planning in the Presidency, developed a National Development 
Plan 2030. Cabinet and National Assembly adopted the National Development Plan 2030 as an overarching long term 
strategic plan for the country to eliminate poverty and reduce inequality by 2030 through uniting South Africans, 


42 



unleashing the energies of its citizens, growing an inclusive economy, building capabilities, enhancing the capability of 
the state and leaders working together to solve complex problems, the NDP further defines a desired destination and 
identifies the role different sectors of society need to play in reaching that destination. 

The National Development Plan 2030 implore to all spheres of government, organs of state, state owned companies, 
various socio-economic sectors and the broader society to strive for integration and alignment towards realization of a 
common national dream which in essence necessitate an alignment of all developmental plans at all levels of 
government with the National Development Plan. 

The Plan has the target of developing people's capabilities to be able to improve their lives through education and 
skills development, health care, better access to public transport, jobs, social protection, rising income, housing and 
basic services, and safety. It proposes to the following strategies to address the above goals: 

• Creating jobs and improving livelihoods 

• Expanding infrastructure 

• Transition to a low-carbon economy 

• Transforming urban and rural spaces 

• Improving education and training 

• Providing quality health care 

• Fighting corruption and enhancing accountability 

• Transforming society and uniting the nation 

The National Development Plan 2030 further implore to all spheres of government, organs of state, state owned 
companies, various socio-economic sectors and the broader society to strive for integration and alignment towards 
realization of a common national dream. The IDP review process took into cognisance the adoption of the National 
Development Plan 2030 by both Cabinet and National Assembly, which necessitates an alignment of all developmental 
plans at all levels of government with the NDP. 

Planning processes carried out by government departments, local government and other government entities will have 
a vital role to play in bringing the vision and proposals contained in the NDP to life. NDP proposals were incorporated 
into the existing activities of departments and broken down into the medium and short-term plans of government at 
national and provincial level hence it is important that also at municipal level alignment be found, because NDP 
provides the golden thread that brings coherence and consistency to these different developmental plans. The 
following are the drivers of the National Development Plan 2030 which the municipal IDP will be anchored upon: 


Economy and Employment 

Inclusive Rural Economy 

Economic Infrastructure 

Transition to Low-Carbon Economy 

Eluman Settlements 

Education Training and Innovation 

Health Care for All 

Social Protection 

Building Safer Communities 

Building a Capable State 

Fighting Corruption and Enhancing Accountability 

Transforming Society and Building the Country 

South Africa in the Region and the World 


The Plan makes the following policy pronouncements and proposes performance targets that intersect with 
developmental mandates assigned to local government. Importantly, municipalities are also expected to respond to 
these developmental imperatives when reviewing their Integrated Development Plan annually. 

• Youthful population presents opportunities to boost economic growth, employment and reduce poverty; 

43 



• strengthen youth service programmes - community based programmes to offer young people life skilis 
training, entrepreneurship training; 

• Increase employment from 13 million in 2010 to 24 million in 2030; 

• Ensure that skilled, technical, professional and managerial posts better reflect the country's racial, gender and 
disability makeup; 

• Establish effective, safe and affordable public transport; 

• Produce sufficient energy to support industry at competitive prices; 

• Ensure that all South African have access to clean running water in their homes; 

• Make high-speed broadband internet universally accessible at competitive prices; 

• Ensure household food and nutrition security; 

• Realise a developmental, capable and ethical state that treats citizens with dignity; 

• Ensure that all people live safely, with an independent and fair criminal justice system; 

• Broaden social cohesion and unity while addressing the inequities of the past; 

• Public infrastructure investment focussing on transport, energy and water; 

• Ensure environmental sustainability 

• Professionalise the public service, strengthen accountability, improve co-ordination and prosecute corruption; 

• Reduce the cost of living for low-income and working class households - {cost of food, commuter transport 
and housing should be reduced); 

• Invest in new infrastructure in areas affecting the poor (food value chain, public transport); 

• Prioritise infrastructure investment in - upgrading informal settlements, public transport, establishing 
municipal fibre optic network 

• Ensure spatial transformation by 2030 - increased urban densities, reliable public transport, 

• Protect the natural environment in all respects, leaving subsequent generations with a least an endowment of 
at least an equal value; 

• Reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve energy efficiency; 

• Review the allocation of powers and functions (Schedules 4& 5 of the Constitution) - housing, water, 
sanitation, electricity and public transport 

• Fight corruption at three fronts - deterrence, prevention and education. 

Mantsopa Local Municipality shall take these national issues into account when planning and reviewing development 
plans and strategies for the next five years. 



44 


SECTION C: DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE 


Demographic Analysis of Mantsopa Local Municipality 


Table 1: Demographic Analysis of Mantsopa Local Municipality 


DEMOGRAPHIC INDICATORS 

1996 

2001 

2011 

2016 

POPULATION SIZE 

Total Population 

50 085 

55 339 

51056 

53 056 

POPULATION DISTRIBUTION 

Formal Dwellings {%) 

59% 

68.40% 

81.7% 

83.7% 

Rural Areas 

21405 

12 329 

15 057 

- 

POPULATION COMPOSITION 

% Young (0-14) 

34.50% 

35.90% 

34.80% 

- 

% Working Age (15-64) 

23.20% 

26% 

25.90% 

- 

% Elderly (65+) 

5.20% 

5.60% 

5.40% 

- 

POPULATION GROUPS 

Black African 

43 084 

48 878 

45 725 

47 311 

Coloured 

2 233 

2 472 

2 006 

1 760 

White 

4 345 

3 761 

3 366 

4 010 

Indian/Asian 

183 

227 

296 

444 

HOUSEHOLDS AND SERVICES 

Average number of rooms 



4 

- 

Average household size 

11577 

13 773 

15 170 

16 951 

Access to piped water (%) 

37.80% 

73.80% 

24.40% 

95.5% 

Access to electricity ((%) 

69.70% 

74.90% 

90.90% 

91.0% 

Access to Sanitation (%) 

36.80% 

34.50% 

67.50% 

87.7% 

Tenure Status (%) 



29.70% 

- 

EDUCATIONAL STATUS 

Attending Educational Institution 



14 456 

- 

No schooling 



2 541 

- 

Primary enrollment rate 



15 724 

- 

Secondary enrollment rate 



21 625 

- 

% completed metric 



2.60% 

- 

% completed higher education 



4.80% 

- 

EMPLOYMENT STATUS 

Unemplyment rate (%) 

30% 

35.51% 

29.20% 

- 

Employment rate (%) 

70% 

64.49% 

23.10% 

- 

INCOME STATUS 

Average household income 



R19601-38200 

- 

Indegent households (below R3000) 



1426 

- 


45 


Population 


Table 2: Distribution of total population by functional age groups 



Age groups 

Total 

Dependency ratio 

0-14 (Children) 

15 - 34 (Youth) 

35-64 (Adult) 

65 + (Elderly) 

Census 2011 

16 216 

18 146 

13 918 

2 776 

51056 

59.2 

CS 2016 

16 048 

21301 

12 198 

3 979 

53 525 

59.8 

Population intercensal growth (2011 
- 2016) 

-168 

3155 

-1720 

1203 

2 469 



Data source: Stats SA, Census 2011 and Community Survey 2016 


Table 1 above indicates that the population of Mantsopa local municipality has increased between 2011 and 2016 with 
intercensal growth of 2469. In all age groups, the population has increased between the years except for children (0 - 
14 years) which declined by intercensal growth of 168. The dependency ratio of Mantsopa local municipality has 
slightly increased from 59.2% in Census 2011 to 59.8% in 2016. Refer to figure 1 below as well. 

Figure 1: Dependency ratio 

59.9 
59.8 
59.7 
59.6 
59.5 
S? 59.4 
59.3 
59.2 
59.1 
59.0 



Census 2011 

CS2016 

^^•Dependency ratio 

59.2 

59.8 


Data source: Stats SA, Census 2011 and Community Survey 2016 



46 


Age Profile 

According to census 1996, 34.5% of the total population was 19 years and younger and 70.0% of the total population 
was economic active (between 15 - 65 years). These figures could have changed due to migration and the impact of 
HIV/AID5 but it still gives a good overview of the age composition of the population. The table below gives a 
breakdown of the age profile per geographical area. 


Tables: Age profile per ward. 

#=there was no ward 9 before 2001. Ward 9 was only established after Census 2001 


AGE DISTRIBUTION 


1996 

2001 

2011 


0-14 

15-34 

35-64 

65+ 

0-14 

15-34 

35-64 

65+ 

0-14 

15-34 

35-64 

65+ 

Ward 1 

1612 

1785 

1095 

340 

1350 

1542 

1140 

324 

1987 

2142 

1877 

342 

Ward 2 

2235 

1825 

1331 

377 

2622 

2136 

1830 

486 

1823 

2012 

1653 

335 

Wards 

2107 

2415 

1215 

222 

2469 

2820 

1707 

309 

1650 

2198 

1542 

367 

Ward 4 

2004 

1899 

1795 

323 

1746 

2001 

1878 

336 

2505 

2781 

1831 

325 

Wards 

1982 

2563 

1751 

420 

2886 

3369 

2319 

576 

1713 

2048 

1384 

223 

Wards 

1415 

1671 

944 

186 

1581 

1776 

1131 

180 

1603 

1859 

1082 

185 

Ward? 

2555 

1926 

1577 

278 

2481 

2556 

2055 

342 

1460 

1631 

1796 

370 

Wards 

3301 

3627 

1983 

479 

2859 

3375 

2328 

537 

1925 

1734 

1474 

349 

Wards 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

1550 

1742 

1278 

269 

Total 

17 211 

17 711 

11691 

2 625 

17 994 

19 575 

14 388 

3 090 

16 216 

18 147 

13 917 

2 765 


Source: Census Statistics (2011) 


Gender Profile 


Table 4: Distribution of total population by gender 



Gender 

Total 

Sex ratio (Males per 100 Females) 

Male 

Female 

Census 2011 

24 402 

26 654 

51 056 

92 

CS 2016 

25 943 

27 583 

53 525 

94 


Data source: 5tats SA, Census 2011 and Community Survey 2016 


Table 4 above indicates the distribution of total population in Mantsopa local municipality by gender as well the sex 
ratio for Census 2011 and CS 2016. The males population has increased from 24 402 in 2011 to 25 943 in 2016 and as 
for females, it has increased 26 654 in 2011 to 27 583 in 2016. In both 2011 and 2016, the number of males was found 
to be less than those of females as the sex ratios were 92 and 94 in both 2011 and 2016 respectively. See figure 2 
below on sex ratio. 


47 


Figure 2: Sex ratio 


95 

94 

94 

93 

93 

92 

92 

91 

91 



Census 2011 

CS 2016 

♦ Sex ratio (Males per 100 Females) 

92 

94 


Data source: Stats SA, Census 2011 and Community Survey 2016 


Ethnic Profile 


Table 4; Distribution of total population by population group and gender 


Population group 

Census 2011 

CS 2016 

Male 

Female 

Total 

Male 

Female 

Total 

Black African 

21413 

23 713 

45 125 

22 937 

24 374 

47 311 

Coloured 

991 

1016 

2 007 

865 

895 

1 760 

Indian or Asian 

169 

128 

297 

326 

119 

444 

White 

1 668 

1 699 

3 367 

1 816 

2 194 

4 010 

Other 

162 

98 

260 




Total 

24 402 

26 654 

51056 

25 943 

27 583 

53 525 


Data sources: Stats SA, Census 2011 and Community Survey 2016 


Table 3 above shows the distribution of municipal total population by population group and gender. The dominant 
population group was Black Africans with 88% for both Census 2011 and Community Survey 2016 followed by White 
with 7% and 8% respectively. Indian/Asian population contributed the least to the total municipal population for both 
Census 2011 and Community Survey 2016 0.6% and 0.8% respectively. 

Human and Social Development 

Human development index 

It is extremely difficult to determine the level of human development of the municipal area due to a lack of accurate 
and recent information. The only information that is readily available is census data that does not reflect the human 
and social development status of a community. 


48 


Health Status 

General statistics on the health status of the community is limited. However, a good indication is obtained from the 
statistics provided by the Department of Health about the current health status of people living in Mantsopa. 

1318 new diarrhea cases were reported during 2014 in Mantsopa. The incidence rate is 104.6 per 1000 of the 
population (Free State Provincial Government (FSPG): Department of Health, 2014). 

The Provincial Department of Health (2014) also revealed that 8 297 new STI cases were reported in 2014 which 
represents 70.6 incidences. A 145 TB case findings were reported in 2000 with an incidence rate of 8.3%, a Teenage 
pregnancies have decreased from 321 to 118 since 2000 (FSPG: Department of Health, 2011). 



Map 2: Schools in Mantsopa, 



49 


Table:5 Distribution of employed popuiation in Mantsopa locai municipality by age groups and type of sector per ward 


Age group and ward 

Type of sector 


In the formal sector 

In the informal sector 

Private household 

35-64 (Adults) 

Ward 1 

580 

105 

69 

Ward 2 

345 

154 

146 

Ward 3 

453 

86 

233 

Ward 4 

520 

185 

79 

Ward 5 

414 

78 

168 

Ward 6 

209 

80 

69 

Ward 7 

735 

206 

185 

Ward 8 

442 

88 

71 

Ward 9 

291 

105 

106 

Mantsopa 

3 989 

1086 

1 127 

15-34 (Youth) 

Ward 1 

520 

74 

31 

Ward 2 

300 

97 

102 

Ward 3 

495 

126 

218 

Ward 4 

480 

188 

43 

Ward 5 

356 

103 

64 

Ward 6 

255 

107 

36 

Ward 7 

444 

169 

119 

Ward 8 

299 

61 

26 

Ward 9 

296 

108 

73 

Mantsopa 

3 445 

1033 

712 

15 -64 Years 

Ward 1 

1 100 

178 

100 

Ward 2 

645 

251 

248 

Ward 3 

948 

212 

451 

Ward 4 

1 000 

373 

122 

Ward 5 

770 

181 

232 

Ward 6 

464 

187 

105 

Ward 7 

1 179 

374 

304 

Ward 8 

741 

149 

97 

Ward 9 

587 

213 

180 

Mantsopa 

7 434 

2 119 

1839 


Data source: Stats SA, Census 2011 


Table 5 above indicates the distribution of employed population aged between 15 and 64 years in Mantsopa local 
municipality by type of sector per ward. The overall municipal employed people were found to be in formal sector with 
7 434 employed people. The informal sector was found to be more than that of private households with 2 119 
employed people. 


50 


Table 6: Distribution of employment status and unemployment rate by age groups per ward in Mantsopa local 
municipality 


Age group and ward 

Employment status 

Unemployment rate 

Employed Unemployed Not economically active 

35-64 (Adults) 

Ward 1 

761 

214 

902 

21.9 

Ward 2 

666 

104 

882 

13.5 

Ward 3 

804 

193 

544 

19.4 

Ward 4 

870 

305 

657 

26.0 

Ward 5 

664 

161 

559 

19.5 

Ward 6 

389 

179 

515 

31.5 

Ward 7 

1169 

84 

545 

6.7 

Ward 8 

617 

217 

638 

26.0 

Ward 9 

505 

99 

673 

16.4 

Mantsopa 

6 447 

1556 

5 915 

19.4 

15-34 (Youth) 

Ward 1 

637 

434 

1071 

40.5 

Ward 2 

507 

166 

1338 

24.7 

Ward 3 

866 

370 

962 

29.9 

Ward 4 

777 

677 

1326 

46.6 

Ward 5 

527 

385 

1136 

42.2 

Ward 6 

441 

434 

983 

49.6 

Ward 7 

761 

181 

692 

19.2 

Ward 8 

392 

439 

904 

52.8 

Ward 9 

484 

246 

1012 

33.7 

Mantsopa 

5 391 

3 332 

9 423 

38.2 

15 -64 Years 

Ward 1 

1 399 

648 

1 973 

31.7 

Ward 2 

1 173 

270 

2 220 

18.7 

Ward 3 

1 671 

562 

1 506 

25.2 

Ward 4 

1 648 

982 

1 983 

37.3 

Ward 5 

1 191 

546 

1 695 

31.4 

Ward 6 

830 

613 

1498 

42.5 

Ward 7 

1 929 

265 

1 237 

12.1 

Ward 8 

1 009 

657 

1 542 

39.4 

Ward 9 

989 

344 

1 685 

25.8 

Mantsopa 

11 838 

4 888 

15 338 

29.2 


Data source: Stats SA, Census 2011 


Table 6 above indicates the distribution of unemployment status as well as unemployment rate of population aged 
between 15 and 64 years in Mantsopa local municipality per ward in 2011. The overall municipal unemployment rate it 
was found to be 29.2%. The ward with the highest unemployment rate was Ward 6 with 42.5%. 


51 


Blue Drop and Green Drop Score 


Water Services Authority Mantsopa Local Municipality 

Water Services Provider(s) Mantsopa LM , Bl oem Water 

2014 Municioal Blue Drno Score 

52.78% 




2012 Municioal Blue Droo Score 

47.09% 



2011 Municioal Blue Droo Score 

38.48% 



Performance Area 

Excelsior 

Hobhouse 

Ladybrand 

Water Services Provider(s) 

Mantsopa LM 
, Bloem 

Mantsopa LM 

Mantsopa LM 

Water Safetv Planning (3 5 %) 

22.49 

13.56 

19.34 

Treatment Process Management (8 

7.16 

7.16 

5.56 

DWQ Compliance (3 0 %) 

10.13 

6.75 

15.00 

Management Accountability (10%) 

5.30 

2.70 

2.70 

Asset Management (14%) 

10.05 

8.19 

8.89 

Use Efficiency, Loss Management (3 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

B onus Scores 

3.37 

2.63 

2.55 

Penalties 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

2014 BLUE DROP Score 

58.48% 

40.99% 

54.03% 

2012 Blue Drop Score 

79.36% 

39.78% 

40.98% 

2011 Blue Drop Score 

48.25% 

30.10% 

48.08% 

System Design Capacity (Ml/d) 

1.4 

1.6 

10.8 

Operational Capacity (% ito Design) 

79% 

38 % 

89% 

Average daily Consumption (I/p/d) 

74.0 

228.3 

279.1 

Microbiological Compliance (%) 

89.6% 

80.0% 

100.0% 

Chemical Compliance (%) 

98.7% 

96.4% 

91.8% 

Blue Drop Risk Rating (2012) 

81.2% 

88.4% 

81.2% 

Blue Drop Risk Rating (2013) 

60.6% 

66.1% 

55.4% 

Blue Droo Risk Rating (2014) 

48.1% 

40.6% 

40.3% 


Water Services Authority Mantsopa Local Municipality 

Water Services Provider(s) Mantsopa LM 

1 (continued) 


Performance Area 

Thaba Patchoa 

Tweespruit 

Water Services Provider(s) 

Mantsopa LM 

Mantsopa LM 

Water Safety Planning (3 5%) 

15.14 

15.14 

Treatment Process 
Manasement ( 8 %) 

7.16 

5.16 

DWQ Compliance (3 0%) 

11.25 

6.75 

Management Accountability 

(io%) 

2.70 

2.70 

Asset Management (14%) 

8.19 

7.56 

Use Efficiency, Loss 

Management (3%) 

0.00 

0.00 

B onus Scores 

2.63 

2.63 

Penalties 

0.00 

1.49 

2014 BLUE DROP Score 

47.06% 

38.44% 

2012 Blue Drop Score 

52.15% 

41.28% 

2011 Blue Drop Score 

41.61% 

27.53% 

System Design Capacity (Ml/d) 

0.6 

1.4 


52 






Operational Capacity (96 ito 

33 % 

50 % 

Average daily Consumption 

125.0 

119.0 

Microbiological Compliance 

94.6% 

87.0% 

Chemical Compliance (96) 

96.6% 

96.8% 

Blue Drop Risk Rating (2012) 

82.5% 

88.6% 

Blue Drop Risk Rating (2013) 

91.1% 

91.3% 

Blue Drop Risk Rating (2014) 

37.8% 

48.1% 



chlorine dose pump balanced on sodium hypochlorite Main holding tanks for flocculent at the Habhouse 

drums WTW 


53 


According to Map below the Blue Drop Status van improved for all the towns in Mantsopa Local Municipality. A summary of the outcome is seen below the map. 

Map 3: Blue Drop Score 



Source: Free State DWA (2011 Water Sector Development Plan) 



SECTION D: STATUS QUO ANALYSIS 

Key Statistics - Census 2011 


Total population 

51,056 

Young (0-14) 

31,8% 

Working Age (15-64) 

62,8% 

Elderly (654-) 

5,4% 

Dependency ratio 

59,2 

Sex rati 

91,6 

Growth rate 

-0,81% (2001-2011) 

Population density 

12 persons/km2 

Unemployment rate 

29,2% 

Youth unemployment rate 

38,2% 

No schooling aged 20+ 

5,7% 

Higher education aged 20+ 

8,6% 

Matric aged 20+ 

22,9% 

Number of households 

15,170 

Number of Agricultural households 

3,934 

Average household size 

3,3 

Female headed households 

43,2% 

Formal dwellings 

81,8% 

Housing owned/paying off 

56,2% 

Flush toilet connected to sewerage 

67,5% 

Weekly refuse removal 

78,2% 

Piped water inside dwelling 

33,2% 

Electricity for lighting 

91% 



Water and Sanitation 

Figure 1: Percentage distribution of househoids by water access status 

120.0 

100.0 


80.0 

60.0 

40.0 

20.0 


0.0 

Piped water inside the dwelling Piped water on community stand 

No access to piped water 



■ Water access 

95.5 3.3 

1.2 



Data source: Stats SA, Census 2011 

Figure 1 above indicates the percentage distribution of households in Mantsopa local municipality by water access status wherein 95.5% of 
households had access to piped water inside dwellings/yards whereas 1.2% of households had no access to piped water at all. 


56 



Figure 2: Percentage distribution of househoids by source of water 


other 
Water tanker 
Water vendor 
River/stream 
Dam / pool / stagnant water 
Rain-water tank 
Spring 
Borehole 

Regional/local water scheme (operated by a Water Service Authority or provider) 


I 1.1 
I 1.0 
I 0.5 
0.2 
I 0.4 
0.3 
I 0.6 


0.0 


11.8 


20.0 


40.0 60.0 

% 


t 84.2 

80.0 100.0 


I Source of water 


Data source: Stats SA, Census 2011 


Figure 7 above indicates the source of water wherein households in Mantsopa local municipality get water from and 84.2% of households source 
their water from regional/local water scheme and 0.2% of households sources water from rivers/streams. 


57 



Figure 3: Percentage distribution of househoids by main source of water 


Other 

Spring 

Well 

Flowing water/stream/river 
Borehole outside the yard 
Water-carrier/tanker 
Public/communal tap 
Neighbours tap 
Rain-water tank in yard 
Borehole in the yard 
Piped water on community stand 
Piped water inside the dwelling/yard 



% 


H Source of drinking water 


Data source: Stats SA, Community Survey 2016 


Note: Source of water as well as water access was not derived the same for both Census 2011 and CS 2016 


Figure 8 above indicates percentage distribution of households by main source of water wherein 93.2% of households in Mantsopa local municipality 
has access to piped water and 4.0% of household access water from boreholes outside the yard. None of households accesses water from wells, 
public/communal tap or rain-water tanks in yards. 


58 


Figure 4: Percentage distribution of househoids by overaii rating of good quaiity of water service 


Other 

Spring 

Well 

Flowing water/stream/river 
Borehole outside the yard 
Water-carrier/tanker 
Public/communal tap 
Neighbours tap 
Rain-water tank in yard 
Borehole in the yard 
Piped water on community stand 
Piped water inside the dwelling/yard 



% 

■ Water Supply Services 


Data source: Stats SA, Community Survey 2016 


Figure 13 above indicates percentage distribution of overall rating good quality of water service In Mantsopa local municipality by households. 36.9% 
of households with access to piped water Inside a dwelling or yard have rated the municipality with good quality of water service whereas 82.5% of 
households who access water from boreholes outside the yard rated the municipality with good quality of water service. 


59 


• Figure 5: Percentage distribution of households with access to toilet facilities 



% 

BCS2016 H Census 2011 


Data sources: Stats SA, Census 201 1 and Community Survey 2016 

Figure 5 above indicates percentage distribution of households in Mantsopa local municipality by type of toilet facility being utilized. 
From the figure above, households with flush/chemical toilet facilities has increased from 70.4% in 2011 to 87.7% in 2016. 
Flouseholds without any toilet facilities have decreased from 2.5% in 2011 to 0.8% in 2016. 


60 


Figure 6: Percentage distribution of households by overall rating of good quality of toilet/sanitation service 

Other 71.3 


None 

Ecological toilet (e.g. urine diversion; enviroloo; etc.) 

Bucket toilet 

Pit latrine 

0.0 

= 

14.3 


! 

8 




Flush/Chemical toilet 




1 1 i 1 1 1 



0.0 10.0 20.0 30.0 40.0 50.0 60.0 70.0 80.0 

% 

■ Toilet/Sanitation service 


Data source: Stats SA, Community Survey 2016 

Figure 6 indicates percentage distribution of households in Mantsopa local municipality by overall rating of good quality of toile/sanitation 
service wherein 25.8% of households who uses pit latrine rated municipality for good quality of toilet/sanitation services and 36.8% of 
households without any toilet/sanitation services rated the municipality for good quality of toilet/sanitation services. 


61 


WATER SERVICES 

1. Clean water 

Mantsopa Local Municipality is participating in a Green Drop System in order to enhance compliance with a good environmental practices. What 
is being revealed by the audit results of 20.39% from the 0.00% of the 2009 outcome is that, municipality is improving with speed towards 
achieving Green Drop Certificate in future, however there seems to be challenges that need to be tackled through the Green Drop Committee 
that has been established. 

Municipality has generally improved on drinking water quality. The trading of water quality is monitored through the whole process of production. 
(From treated reservoirs and point of views). Audited samples are monthly taken to the accredited laboratory. Department of Environmental Affairs 
also monitors municipality independently. 

1.1. Municipality is also participating in Blue Drop System (BDS), which is a flagship programme that is I used to check the performance of 
institution in managing the quality of water from the source, production reservoirs and end-user. BDS is an incentive base regulation and 
acknowledge Excellency in drinking water quality management. 

1.2. Furthermore, Municipality has trained Plant Operators to various NQF levels in order to be more professional in their daily operations at 
waste and water treatment works. 

1.3. More trainings on water quality management are to be offered for both municipal employees and targeted unemployed youths. 

2. Water quality monitoring 

2.1. Operational monitoring at the Plant (Raw water. Settling Tanks, Filtration and Final Water) 

2.2. Compliance monitoring (Final Plant, Reservoirs, Network and Point of use / Tap water) 

2.3. Monthly Audit (Testing by independent Laboratories and Sector Departments). 

There has been an average percentage improvement of 14.30% on the quality of water supplied to the consumers from 2011 to 2014 as 
indicated by the latest Blue Drop results. 

Poor workmanship, aged infrastructure, iack of raw buik water suppiy and deiays on Suppiy Chain Processes impacts negativeiy on the guaiity of 
water. 


62 




3. Households water access status 


> 16 951 Households on urban areas spreading throughout the nine (9) Wards within the municipality have Tap water, however there is often 
an interruption to supply to high lying areas due to low water pressure. 

The table 1 below illustrates access to basic level of service to Households 


Tap water within the yard 16 951 

>200m 

<200m 

Constant suppiy 

Tankering due to iow water pressure 

Tankering (Formai erven) 

Tankering (informal erven) 



383 

64 (depending on occupation) 


4. Water access status to Public Amenities 

> There are 137 Public Amenities within the municipality identified as Schools, Early Childhood Development Centres, Places of Safety, Police 
and Correctional Services, Health Care Centres and Recreational Facilities. 

> Municipality is the Water Services Authority within its jurisdiction but not a Services Provider to some of these Facilities. They provide the 
service on their own. 


63 




The table 2 below illustrates access to basic level of service to Public Amenities per town. 


Towrn 

Type of Amenity 


Within the premises 

>200m 

<200m 

Ladybrand 

Schools 

16 

16 




Farm schools 

5 

5 X Service Providers 

Boreholes 



ECDs 

12 

12 




Farm ECDs 


X Service Providers 

X Boreholes 

X Boreholes 


Libraries 

2 

2 




Places of Safety 

3 

3 




Police Stations 

4 

4 




Correctional Services 

1 

1 




Flospital 

1 

1 




Clinics 

4 

4 




Sports Grounds 

9 

2 

1 

8 


Parks 

6 

3 

1 

2 







Tweespruit 

Schools 

4 

4 




Farm schools 

3 

2 X Service Providers 

1 X Boreholes 



ECDs 

6 

6 




Farm ECDs 


X Service Provider 

X Boreholes 

X Boreholes 


Libraries 

1 

1 




64 










5. Water Sources and Levels 


Water quantity and source: table 3 


NAME OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM 

SOURCES OF WATER 

RAW LEVEL 

Ladybrand 

Caledon River 

40% 


Catbcart Dam 

Medium flow 



100% 

Tweespruit 

Lovedale Dam 

60% 



4% 


Boreholes 


Thaba Patcboa 

Leeuwrivier river / Amenia Dam 

40% 

Excelsior 

Dinana spruit 

5% 


Balancing Dam 

10% 


Boreholes 



Bloemwater 

Av. ISOOOLt/month 

Hobbouse 

Leeurivier/ Amenia 

40% 


Municipality has five water supplies system and different raw water sources for different water works. Currently the raw water status is as follows 


The following Strategies are being implemented in order to conserve the limited resource as indicated by the quantities above: 

> Water restrictions in line with ... Municipal By-law. 

> Presidential War on Leaks Project. 

> Daily repairs and maintenance. 

More trainings on Water Conservation and Water Demand Management Program are to be offered for both municipal employees and targeted 
unemployed youths. 

68 




Continue awareness campaigns on Water Conservation and Water Demand Management. 


6. Available resources and the current status or condition 

> PERSONNEL 

> VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT: table 4 


Town 

Vehicle / Equipment 

Condition 


Ladybrand 

2 X Bakkies 

1 X Satisfactory 

1 X Bad 



2 X Trash Pumps 

Bad 


Tweespruit 

1 X Bakkie 

Very Bad 



1 X Truck 

Satisfactory 



1 X Trash Pump 

Bad 


Excelsior 

1 X Truck 

Satisfactory 


Hobhouse 

1 X Bakkie 

Very Bad 


Thaba Phatchoa 

1 X Bakkie 

Very Bad 



Vehicles forTweespruit, Excelsior, Hobhouse and Thaba Phatchoa are used for all services and functions. 


SANITATION 

1. Final Effluent Quality 

69 




1.1. Municipality has generally improved on treated Effluent quality. Audited samples are taken monthly and submitted to the accredited 
Laboratory. Department of Environmental Affairs also monitors municipality independently. 

1.2. Municipality is also participating in Green Drop Systems (GDS), which is a flagship programme that is used to check the performance of the 
Institution in managing the quality of treated sewer from the Waste Water treatment Works, Oxidation Ponds and Package Plants. GDS is an 
Incentive base regulation and acknowledge Excellency in treated effluent quality management. 

1.3. Furthermore, the Department has trained Plant Operators to various NQF levels in order to be more professional in their daily operations at 
Waste and water treatment works. 

2. Sewerage anility progress to date 

2.1. Municipality has generally improved on treated Effluent quality. Audited samples are taken monthly and submitted to the accredited 
Laboratory. Department of Environmental Affairs also monitors municipality independently. 

2.2 Municipality is also participating in Green Drop Systems (GDS), which is a flagship programme that is used to check the performance of the 
Institution in managing the quality of treated sewer from the Waste Water treatment Works, Oxidation Ponds and Package Plants. GDS is an 
Incentive base regulation and acknowledge Excellency in treated effluent quality management. 

2.3. Furthermore, the Department has trained Plant Operators to various NQF levels in order to be more professional in their daily operations at 
Waste and water treatment works 

More trainings on waste water quality management are to be offered for both municipal employees and targeted unemployed youths. 

3. Final Effluent Quality 

3.1. Operational monitoring at the Plant (Inlet Screen, Degrading, Aaerobic, Aeration, Anaerobic and Final Effluent). 

3.2. Monthly Audit (Testing by independent Laboratories and Sector Departments). 

There has been an average percentage improvement of ...% on the quality of effluent discharged from ... to ... as indicated by the latest Green 
Drop result. 

> Poor workmanship, aged infrastructure and deiays on Suppiy Chain Processes impacts negativeiy on the guaiity of water. 

4. Households Sanitation access status 


70 




> 16 951 Households on urban areas spreading throughout the nine (9) Wards within the municipality have Toilet facilities on site. 

The table below illustrates access to basic level of service to Households 


Households 

Type of Strueture 

Condition 

Distance 

16 951/ 

Brick and Fibre 

Good 

Within the yard 

383 Formalized erven 

Temporary 

Bad 

Within the yard 

64 (subject to occupation) Informal Settlement 

Very Bad 

<200m 


5. Types of Sanitation systems and Waste Water Facilities 

There are five (5) waste water facilities within the municipality operating differently depending on the type of sanitation system per area and town. 


Town 

Area 

Sanitation Type 

Facility 

Condition 

Ladybrand 

Town, Manyatseng, 

Mauersnek & Platberg 

Full Waterborne 

Waste Water Treatment 
Plant 

Good 

Tweespmit 

Town and Dawiesville 

Full Waterborne 

Oxidation Ponds 

Poor 

Dairy Village 

Septic tanks 

Boroa 

Closed Circuit System 

Package Plant 

Good 

Excelsior 

Town 

Septic tanks 

Oxidation Ponds 

Good 

Mahlatswetsa 

Full Waterborne 

Hobhouse 

Town 

Septic tanks 

Oxidation Ponds 

Poor 


Dipelaneng 

Closed Circuit System 

Package Plant 

Good 

Thaba Phatchoa 

Thaba Phatchoa 

Full Waterborne 

Oxidation Ponds 

Poor 


6. Sanitation service access status to Public Amenities 

> There are 137 Public Amenities within the municipality identified as Schools, Early Childhood Development Centres, Places of Safety, 
Police and Correctional Services, Health Care Centres and Recreational Facilities. 


71 




> Municipality is sole Service Provider within her jurisdiction but does not provide the service to some of these Facilities. They provide 
the service on their own. 

The table below illustrates access to basic level of service to Public Amenities per town. 


Town 

Type of Amenity 


Within the premises 

Basic Sanitation Type 

Low Sanitation Type 

Ladybrand 

Schools 

16 

16 

14 X Full Waterborne 

2 X Closed Circuit 

0 


Farm schools 

5 

5 X Service Providers 

Septic Tanks 

0 


ECDs 

12 

12 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Farm ECDs 


X Service Providers 

Septic and Pitlatrines 

0 


Libraries 

2 

2 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Places of Safety 

3 

3 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Police Stations 

4 

4 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Correctional Services 

1 

1 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Hospital 

1 

1 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Clinics 

4 

4 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Sports Grounds 

9 

2 

2 X Full Waterborne 

No Services 


Parks 

6 

3 

1 X Full Waterborne 

No Services 







Tweespruit 

Schools 

4 

4 

3 X Full Waterborne 

1 X Closed Circuit 

0 


72 





Farm schools 

3 

2 X Service Providers 

Septic and Pitiatrines 

0 


ECDs 

6 

6 

4 X Full Waterborne 

2 X Buckets 


Farm ECDs 


X Service Provider 

Septic and Pitiatrines 

0 


Libraries 

1 

1 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Places of Safety 

1 

1 

Closed Circuit 

0 


Police Stations 

1 

1 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Correctional Services 

0 

0 




Hospital 

0 

0 




Clinics 

2 

2 

1 X Full Waterborne 

1 X Closed Circuit 

0 


Sports Grounds 

7 

1 

Full Waterborne 

6 X No services 


Parks 

5 

1 

Full Waterborne 

4 X No services 







Excelsior 

Schools 

3 

3 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Farm schools 


X Service Providers 

Septic and Pitiatrines 

0 


ECDs 

3 

3 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Farm ECDs 


X Service Provider 

X Boreholes 

X Boreholes 


Libraries 

2 

2 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Places of Safety 

0 





Police Stations 

1 

1 

Full Waterborne 

0 


73 





Correctional Services 

0 





Hospital 

0 





Clinics 

1 

1 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Sports Grounds 

4 

1 

Full Waterborne 

3 X No services 


Parks 

2 



2 X No services 







Hobhouse 

Schools 

2 

2 

1 X Full Waterborne 

1 X Closed Circuit 



Farm schools 


X Service Providers 

Septic and Pitlatrines 

0 


ECDs 

3 

3 

3 X Closed Circuit 



Farm ECDs 


X Service Provider 

Septic and Pitlatrines 

0 


Libraries 

1 

1 

Closed Circuit 



Places of Safety 

0 





Police Stations 

1 

1 

Full Waterborne 

0 


Correctional Services 

0 





Hospital 

0 





Clinics 

1 

1 

Septic Tank 

0 


Sports Grounds 

5 

1 


4 X No services 


Parks 

3 

1 

Septic Tank 

2 X No services 








74 



Thaba Phatcoa 

Schools 

1 

1 

Fuii Waterborne 



Farm schools 

1 

1 

Septic Tank 



ECDs 

1 

1 

Fuii Waterborne 



Farm ECDs 


X Service Provider 

Septic and Pitlatrines 

0 


Libraries 

0 





Piaces of Safety 

0 





Poiice Stations 

0 





Correctionai Services 

0 





Hospitai 

0 





Ciinics 

1 

1 

Fuii Waterborne 



Sports Grounds 

5 



No services 


Parks 

3 

3 


No services 








7. Available resources and the current status or condition 
> PERSONNEL 


> VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT 



Town 

Vehicle / Equipment 

Condition 

Ladybrand 

2 X Bakkies 

1 X Satisfactory 
1 X Bad 


1 X Sewerjet 

Good 

Tweespruit 

1 X Bakkie 

Very Bad 


1 X Tractor 

Satisfactory 

Excelsior 

1 X Eloney Sucker Truck 

1 X Tractor 

Satisfactory 

Hobhouse 

1 X Tractor and Trailer 

Very Bad 

Thaba Phatchoa 

1 X Tractor 

Very Bad 







ELECTRICITY 

Figure 9: Percentage distribution of households with access to electricity 




100.0 

90.0 

80.0 

70.0 

60.0 

50.0 

40.0 

30.0 

20.0 

10.0 



Eiectricity 

Gas 

Paraffin 

Candles 

5olar 

Other 

None 

■ Electricity access 

91.0 

0.1 

0.5 

8.1 

0.2 

0.0 

0.2 


Data source: Stats SA, Census 201 1 


Figure 7 above indicates percentage distribution of households had access to electricity in Mantsopa local municipality in 2011 wherein 91.0% of 
households had access to electricity whereas only 0.2% of households had no access to electricity. 


77 



Figure 8: Percentage distribution of households with access to electricity 


No access to electricity 
Other 
Battery 
Solar home system 
Generator 

Connected to other source which household is not paying for 
Connected to other source which household pays for (e.g. con 

In-house prepaid meter 
In-house conventional meter 



% 


H Access to electricity 

Data source: Community Survey 2016 

Note: Access to electricity was not derived the same for both Census 2011 and CS 2016 

Figure 10 above indicates the percentage distribution of households with access to electricity wherein 78.1% of households had access to electricity with in- 
house meter in Mantsopa local municipality whereas none of the households use batteries or generators 


Other 






Battery 

0.0 





Solar home system 






Generator 

0.0 





Connected to other source which household is not paying for 






Connected to other source which household pays for (e.g. con 











In-house prepaid meter 










80.4 

In-house conventional meter 




3.5 



0.0 20.0 40.0 60.0 80.0 100.0 120.0 

% 

■ Electricity supply services 

Figure 9: Percentage distribution of households by overall rating of good quality of electricity supply service 

Data source: Stats SA, Community Survey 2016 


Fieure 14 indicates nercentaee distribution of households in Mantsona local municinalitv bv overall ratine of eood nualitv of electricitv sunniv service wherein 


ROADS AND STORMWATER 


All Mantsopa areas have access to roads. The state and condition of roads throughout the municipality is one of the urgent service delivery needs that 
requires attention. Roads are accepted as a critical vehicle of promoting economic growth in both the CBDs and townships. The general observation on the 
pavement structure is that they were designed for a very low traffic volume. The growth in road freight and heavy vehicles are damaging the road 
infrastructure. These heavy vehicles are from the N8 and the R26 seeking overnight rest in the town (especially in Ladybrand). With the little income the 
municipality has, it is a challenge to keep up with the rapid deterioration of the roads. In order to address this challenge, the municipality appreciates the 
"Pavement Management System" developed by the district municipality through RRAMS programme. 

The Gravel Road Management System is pending, up on completion, the municipality will have a complete road management system there by developing a 
comprehensive maintenance plan. Even though the MEM develops maintenance plan yearly, it is more of a reactive plan than the preferred proactive 
maintenance plan. The table 5 below shows the alignment of the NDP, FSGDS, MTSF and the municipality's objectives for roads and storm water. 


Priority 

NDP 

FSGDS 

MTSF 

MLM Objective 

Roads and storm water 






The roads in Mantsopa are as follows; 


Town 

Below Basic 

Level Graded 
(km) 

Basic Level 

Gravel Streets 
(km) 

Paved Streets 
(km) 

Tarred Streets 
(km) 

Total 

(km) 

Ladybrand 

42.7 

53.0 

0.9 

26.2 

122.8 

Excelsior 

4 

23.1 

0.0 

5.5 

32.6 

Tweespruit 

10.9 

12.8 

1.4 

8.4 

33.5 

Hobhouse 

8.8 

26.8 

0.0 

4.1 

39.7 

Total 

66.3 

116.5 

1.5 

45.4 

229.8 


28.9% 

50 . 7 %- 

0 . 7 % 

19 . 8 % 

100 % 


Table 7: From the draft Roads and Storm Water Infrastructure Plan 2009 


An updated structure, type and classification is pending the conclusion and subsequent approval/adoption of the Pavement Roads Management System and 
Gravel Roads Management System. 

Rail 

There is a railway lines through MEM, The first one is running from Mangaung through Tweespruit and Ladybrand to Lesotho. The second railway line runs 
from Ladybrand, through Modderpoort heading to Clocolan. Flowever these railways are for goods trains linking said towns. 


Airfield 


There is only one landing strip in Ladybrand which is privately owned. It is currently tarred and is seldom used by light aircrafts. 


Public transport 


Taxis are predominate public transport for the people of Mantsopa LM. There are buses linking Ladybrand with Bloemfontein and the Eastern Free State. 
There is also a bus route from Cape Town through Ladybrand to Durban. 





The Roads and Transport plans status 
Table 8 


Structures 

Availability 

Status 

Integrated Transport Plan 

Not Available 


Road Classification 

Yes 

Class; 3,4 and 5 

Arterial Roads 

Pending 

Pending RRAMS 

Access to social facilities 

Yes 

On the maintenance plan 

Roads and Storm-water operation and maintenance plan (RSOMP) 

Yes 

RSOMP 2017/2017 

Areas without access 

Yes 

RRAMS 

Provision for non-motorist transport 

Yes 

Maintenance on the sidewalk 

Plans to improve quality of roads 

Yes 

SDBIP and RRAMS 


The Storm-water and drainage plans status: table 9 


Structure 

Availability 

Status 

Storm-water Maintenance plans 

Yes 

RSOMP 2017/2018 

Approved service levels 

Not applicable 


Projects to improve access 

Yes 

Project lists of Roads and Storm-water 


KPA: PUBLIC PARTICIPATION AND GOOD GOVERNANCE 


STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: 

Promote a culture of participatory, accountable and responsive governance 

INTENDED OUTCOME: 

People oriented decision making and administration 


V 


A 




BATHO PELE APPROACH 

What is Bathos Pele? 

To promote this notion of "putting people first "and to provide a framework for the transformation of public service delivery, government 
introduced the concept of Bathos Pele, "people first" in 1997. This notion was expanded in the White Paper on transforming the public service, also 
known as the Bathos Pele White Paper, which provides a policy framework to ensure that Bathos Pele is woven into the very fabric of government. 

I 


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I 


I 


I 


BATHO PELE PRINCIPLES 


Ccrnscfftatforw 




Service Stcmdrrrcfs 




Access. 


Cahirtesy 


information 


Openness ern cf trcwrrspcrrenejir 


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fteefress 




Voioe for n/Iortey 





OUTCOMES OF THE IDP REPRESENTATIVE FORUM 

BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY 

• Increase of reservoir for water storage and quality 

• Road to the cemetery to be graveled at Hobhouse 

• Re gravelling and paving of streets in all towns 

• Speed humps at the main roads at Excelsior and Hobhouse 

• Installation of high or medium mast lights in all areas especially in new areas 

• Review of SLA between Centlec and the municipality 

• Getting a licensing and stock piling of gravel to maintain streets in the municipality 

• Increasing size and replace water pipes from asbestos to PVC. 

• Street lights at sevende laan 

• Paving of Park Street as a priority at Thaba Patchoa 

• Construction or upgrading of the main access road to Thaba Patchoa 

• Sewer jet to be procured 

• Project on war leaks to expedited 

• Cleaning of catchment dams 

• Carthcart dam system to be investigated as possibility at Thaba Patchoa 

• Underground study to be conducted at Tweespruit 

• Roads in all former town areas to be considered. 

• Investigation of low water pressure In Thabong 

• Eskom to be contacted for installation and lighting at the newly build RDP houses as there is possible illegal connections. 


COMMUNITY SERVICCOMMUNITY SERVICES 

• Provision of land for housing in all areas especially Tweespruit 

• Fencing of cemeteries in all areas 

• Upgrading or building of sports grounds in other areas excluding Ladybrand 

• Numbering of grave sites 

• Maintenance of the Dipelaneng, Thaba Patchoa, and excelsior 

• Request for title deeds replacement of dilapidated two roomed houses in other areas except Tweespruit 

• Security at all municipal properties 

• Cleaning and maintaining of illegal dumping sites 

• Identification of alternative land for cemeteries were applicable 

• Enforcement of by-laws concerning roaming cattle 

• Land to be identified for a taxi rank in town at Ladybrand 

• Different human settlement strategies to be investigated e.g. housing complexes or flats 

• Toilets and stand pipes at the cemeteries to be serviced 

• Investigation on opening our own testing ground 

• Meeting to be held with taxi association for consideration of commuting to be extend to routes include Lusaka & Thabong 

• Refuse bins to be provided to households 

• There should be a demarcated place in Platberg were refuse skips will be provided. 

• A final decision to be made about the sites next to traffic department. 

• .Street names in all areas 


CORPORATE SERVICE 

• Replacement of deceased and retired municipal workers 

• By laws for trucks that stop in town should be enforced 

• Employment of EPWP workers or similar programs should be on a rotation system and not the same people to be used repeatedly. 

• Utilization of learners who took part in municipal learner ships as a priority when it comes to employment. 

• Youth Centre 


PROJECTS FOR SECTOR DEPARTMENT 

• Establishment of a TVET college 

• Upgrading of Libraries in other towns 

• Sassa offices to be returned to the location in Ladybrand 

• Building of a Police Station in the Location 

• Increasing a number of ambulances especially in Excelsior 

• Opening of Asisi Clinic 

• Patients Shelter in all Wards. 

• Opening of testing ground in the Municipality 

• Establishment of an MPCC at Manyatseng offices 



Internal Audit Committee and Functions: 


The following Section provides some background on the Mantsopa Local Municipal Government Structures and includes the following Sections: 

• The Legal Background 

• Status of the Internal Audit Function 

• and the Scope of Work with regard to the Audit Functions of the Mantsopa Local Municipality 


Table 9: Audit Committee Functions 


Internal Audit Function: 

Audit Committee 

Legal Background: 

In terms of section 165 (2) of MFMA, the internal audit unit 
of a municipality must: 

a) Prepare a risk based audit plan and an internal audit program 
for each financial year; 

b) Advise the accounting officer and report to the audit 
committee on the implementation of the internal audit plan and 
matters relating to: 

Internal audit 

Internal controls 

Accounting procedures and practices 

Risk and risk management 

Performance management 

Loss control and 

Compliance with this Act, the annual Division of Revenue Act 
and any other applicable legislation; and 

c) Perform such other duties as may be assigned to it by the 
accounting officer. 

Legal Background: 

In terms of section 166(2) of MFMA, an audit committee is an independent advisory body which must advise the municipal 
council, the political office bearers, the accounting officer and management staff of the municipality on matters relating to: 

Internal financial control and internal audits; 

Risk management; 

Accounting policies; 

The adequacy, reliability and accuracy of financial reporting and information; 

Performance management; 

Effective management; 

Compliance with this Act, the annual Division of Revenue Act any other applicable legislation; 

Performance evaluation; 

Any other issues referred to it by the municipality; 

Review the annual financial statements to provide the council of the municipality with an authoritative and credible view of the 
financial position of the municipality, its efficiency and effectiveness and its overall level of compliance with this Act, the 

annual Division of Revenue Act and any other applicable legislation; 

Respond to the council on any issues raised by the Auditor General in the audit reports. 


Internal Audit Function: 

Audit Committee 

Status: 

The Internal Audit Division has completed audits as set out in 
the division's coverage plan and reviewed operational plan. 

This report serves as a sum up of all the identified weaknesses 
during the financial year under review. The purpose of the 
Internal Audit Division, as set out in the Internal Audit Charter, 
is to provide an independent, objective assurance and 

consulting service and to also evaluate the effectiveness of risk 
management, internal control and governance processes in 
terms of an integrated audit approach and to provide advice 
and information to management and the Audit Committee in a 
cost effective manner. 

This report represents the results of the in depth review of 
controls made on the identified high risk activities 

The audits conducted covered the following: 

Reviewing systems established by management to ensure 
compliance with those policies, plans, procedures, laws and 
regulations which could have a significant impact on operations 
and determining whether Mantsopa is in compliance. 

Reviewing means of safeguarding assets and appropriate, 
verifying existence of assets. 

Providing assurance that management process are adequate to 
identify and monitor significant risks. 

• Reviewing internal financial control/reliability of 
information. 

Status: 

The audit committee was established on 07 June 2007 consisted of three members as required by the law.. Municipality appointed 
the current audit committee through normal recruitment processes on the 30*^^ of January 2017 which consists of the following 
members: 

Chairperson: MrMCGwala 

Member; Miss V C Sikaundi 

Member; MissSLebeko 

Audit committee objectives 

The main objective of the audit committee is to advise the council, accounting officer and management staff on the 

effectiveness of internal controls, risk management, adequacy and reliability of financial statements and 

annual performance reports. Audit committee is committed to assist the council in performing its oversight responsibility. 


Internal Audit Function: 

Audit Committee 

Scope of Work: 

The following activities will audited and completed during the 
Financial year under review: 

1. Fleet Management 

2. Overtime 

3. Reconciliations (Bank, Creditor & Debtor Reconciliations) 

4. Payments of salaries 

5. Contracts/Tenders 

6. Application of services 

7. Attendance Registers 

8. Budget Control 

9. Expenditure 

10. Personal Appointment 

11. Leaves 

12. Tariffs 

13. DoRA& MFMA 

14. Occupational Health & Safety 

15. Information Technology 

16. Assets Management 

17. IDP 

18. Receipts 

19. Long Overdue Accounts 

20. Performance Management System 

21. Skills Development 

22. Temporary Employees 

23. Review of Annual Financial Statements 

24. Valuation Roll & Inventories 

25. Follow-up Audits, Year-end audit & AD HOC audits 

26. Risk Management 

27. Subsistence & Travelling 

Scope of work 

• To ensure that effective, efficient and transparent systems of financial and risk management and internal control are 
maintained by the Council, which contribute to the efficient and effective utilization of resources, safeguarding of assets and 
the accomplishments of established goals for operations or programs. 

• To promote the efficiency and effectiveness of accounting and management information systems. 

• To ensure that, in accordance with the Council's public accountability, that justifiable decisions pertaining to Municipal service 
rendering are taken 

• as indicated in policy statements, practices and the uncovering of malpractice. 

• To create a distinct and clear communications channel between the Council, management, external auditors and internal 

auditors. 

• To inform the Council regarding important problems which must be addressed concerning the preparation and 

discussion of the financial statements? 

• To monitor the effectiveness of the internal audit function. 

• To monitor management, internal audit and external audit with reference to the drafting of the financial 

statements. 

• To enhance the objectivity and credibility of reporting to stakeholders 


MANTSOPA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY 

MEETING DATES FOR STANDING COMMITTEES, EXCO AND COUNCIL FOR 2016 

STANDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS 



JAN 

FEB 

MRCH 

APR 

MAY 

JUN 

JUL 

AUG 

SEP 

OCT 

NOV 

DEC 

Finance 

Committee 

Monday of month indicated (morning) 

Only 

short 

EXCO 

and 

Council 

meeting 

6 

6 

3 

8 

5 

3 

7 

4 

2 

6 


Governance 

Comittee 

Monday of month as indicated (afternoon) 

6 

6 

3 

8 

5 

3 

7 

4 

2 

6 


Infrastructure 

and urban 
planning 

Tuesday of month as indicated (afternoon) 

7 

7 

4 

2 

6 

12 

1 

5 

3 

7 


Audit 

As determined bv Chairoerson from time to time 

As determined by Chairperson from time to time 

Community 

Service 

Committee 

Tuesday of month indicated (afternoon) 

7 

7 

4 

2 

6 

12 

1 

5 

3 

7 



Last TUESDAY of every second month in which there is no Council meeting 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE (EXCQ) MEETINGS 

JAN FEB MRCH APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC 

icil meeting 28 25 27 29 31 


JAN FEB MRCH APR MAY I JUN I JUL I AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC 


Closing date for items to be submitted to EXCO 


SPECIAL COUNCIL MEETINGS 


The meetings will be scheduled as determined by the Speaker 


COUNCIL MEETINGS 


Last TUESDAY of every second month in which there is no EXCO meeting 


Closinq date for items to be submitted to Councii 


JAN I FEB MRCH APR I MAY I JUN I JUL I AUG I SEP OCT I NOV 


FEB MRCH APR I MAY I JUN I JUL I AUG I SEP OCT I NOV 


MANTSOPA LOCAL MUNiCiPALiTY COUNCiLLORS 

(FS 196) 


SURNAMES. 

INITIALS 

CONTACT NO. 

ADDRESS 

ID NO 

PARTY 

SEAT TYPE 

GEND 

TSOENE M E 

078 366 0630 

29A PRINSLOO STREET, LADYBRAND 

670408 0287 08 0 

ANC 

PR 

F 

M J MODUKA 

073 083 9278 

71 MAHLATSWETSA, EXCELSIOR 

740327 5374 08 9 

ANC 

PR 

M 

MOSES SJ 

083 346 6642 

33A NUWE STREET, LADYBRAND 

600428 5630 08 9 

EFF 

PR 

M 

NAKALEBE P N 

071 8S8 1819 

67 SHELILE STR, DIPELANENG, HOBHOUSE 

790805 5742 08 1 

ANC 

WARD 2 

M 

MPAKATHE RT 

071 792 6483 

1528 KOMA VILLAGE, MAHLATSWETSA, EXCELSIOR 

870719 5199 08 0 

DA 

PR 

M 

THAISI N J 

083 860 0788 / 083 991 3290 

2581 LUSAKA, MANYATSENG, LADYBRAND 

780314 5545 08 3 

ANC 

WARD 4 

M 

MOLEFE DT 

073 339 8S18 

M440 THUSANONG, LADYBRAND 

801217 5563 08 6 

ANC 

WARD 5 

M 

TIGELI Kl 

078 309 9725 

L3419 LUSAKA, LADYBRAND 

740724 5418 08 2 

ANC 

WARD 6 

M 

GABA S Q G 

078 658 8145 

602 BOROA, TWEESPRUIT 

850518 6069 08 4 

ANC 

WARD 1 

M 

L P MOLETSANE 

084 3510 822 / 076 3162 188 

1174 MAHLATSWETSA, EXCELSIOR 

641203 5397 08 3 

ANC 

WARD 8 

M 

SEOE G M 

074 938 6465 

843 MAHLATSWETSA, EXCELSIOR 

831220 6224 08 2 

ANC 

WARD 9 

M 

HALSE T 

076 262 9790 

14A KOLBE STREET, LADYBRAND 

710401 0322 08 2 

DA 

WARD 7 

F 

HATTINGH D J 

072 658 1262 

19 STEYN STREET, EXCELSIOR 

660326 5066 08 9 

DA 

PR 

M 

JACOBS Y J 

082 543 5896 

60 LONG STREET, THABA PATCHOA 

700825 0115 08 2 

ANC 

PR 

F 






1. Finance Committee 

Councillor P N Nakalebe - Chairperson 
Councillor B E Meya 
Councillor D Hattingh 

2. Governance Committee 

Councillor G M Seoe - Chairperson 
Councillor S Q G Gaha 
Councillor B A Mahoza 

3. Infrastructure and Urban Planning Committee 

Councillor N J Thaisi - Chairperson 
Councillor L P Moletsane 
Councillor B M Sani 

4. Community Services Committee 

Councillor K I Tigell - Chairperson 
Councillor D T Molefe 
Councillor R T Mpakathe 

That the following Committees be established: 

1. Petitions Committee 

Councillor M J Moduka (Speaker) - Chairperson 
Councillor L P Moletsane 
Councillor B M Sani 

The Councillor of the Ward where the petition originates. 

2. Local Labour Forum 

Councillor M P Nakalebe - Chairperson 
Councillor N J Thaisi 
Councillor B A Mahoza 
Councillor K I TIgeli 

3. Rules Committee 

Councillor M J Moduka (Speaker) - Chairperson 

Councillor Y J Jacobs 

Councillor B M Sani 

Councillor R T Mpakathe 

Councillor B A Mahoza 

Councillor L P Moletsane 



Public Participation and Governance 

Mantsopa Local Municipality have specific Strategies and Programmes that are implemented to Facilitate Public Participation, they are as follow: 


dj 

> 

o 

BO 


• Ward committees can play an important role in municipal planning and 

• performance management. 

• Communities/ municipality customers need to have a platform where they can ask questions about 
services and projects and there should be responses to their queries. 

• IDP includes provisions to make sure that communities are can give their ideas and suggestion. 

• The Performance Systems is another way of making sure representatives and officials at the local level 
perform duties as they are mandated to. 

• To empower community to plan for itself (through Community-based Participation) to help municipality 
to be responsive to the community (through Community-based planning). 


CO 


TO 

tt) 

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Public participation is an important contributor for making sure that the government is accountable to its 
citizens, (accountability)regular report back meetings are important to make sure that the community is 
up to date on event s. (accountability)Conduct meetings at an accessible venue and in a language that 
people feel most comfortable participating in. 

Ward committees can play an important role in municipal planning and performance management. 
Encourage public participation in a form of public debates on the appropriate ways and means of solving 
problems. 

Hold meetings with affected communities and stakeholders 


KPA: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND TRANSFORMATION 



STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: 

Improve organizational cohesion and efficacy 

INTENDED OUTCOME: 

Organizational stability and elite performance 




HUMAN RESOURCES PLAN 


a. BACKGROUND AND LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK 

In the context of Developmental Local Government, Municipalities are tasked with crucial responsibility of fulfilling the Constitutional mandate 
delegated to them. The staff component of the municipality is the vehicle of service delivery and responsible for compliance with statutory 
requirements, it is incumbent on municipalities to ensure that human resources capacity is developed to a level where it can perform its 
responsibilities in an economical, efficient, effective and accountable way. 

In addition to legislation guiding Human Resources Management, amongst others the Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995; Basic Conditions of 
Employment Act 75 of 1997; Employment Equity Act 55 of 1998; Skills Development Act 97 of 1998; Skills Development Levies Act 9 of 1999; within 
the Local Government Environment specific obligations are placed on municipalities by means of the Municipal Systems Act 32 of 2000; concerning 
the alignment of its administration and specifically human resources management with its constitutional responsibilities. 

The Human Resources related obligations placed on municipalities in terms of Section 51 of the Municipal Systems Act is to organise its administral 
to: 

• Be responsive to the needs of the community; 

• Facilitate a Culture of public service and accountability amongst staff; 

• Be performance oriented and focus on the objectives of local government 

• Align roles and responsibilities with priorities and objectives reflected in the Integrated Development Plan; 

• Organise structures and administration in a flexible way to respond to changing priorities and circumstances; 

• Perform functions through operationally effective and appropriate administrative units; 

• Assign clear responsibilities; 

• Maximise efficiency of communication and decision making; 

• Delegate responsibility to the most effective level with the administration; 

• Involve in management decisions as far as is practicable; 

• Provide equitable, fair, open and non-discriminatory working environment. 

This legislative mandate concerning Human Resources is endorsed by Section 67 of the Municipal Systems Act, stating under the heading Human Resource: 
Development, that a municipality in accordance with the Employment Equity Act, must develop and adopt appropriate systems and procedures to ensure f 
efficient, effective and transparent personnel administration. 

b. HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT 

Training and development of the Mantsopa Municipality is focused on the enhancement of knowledge, skills, and behavioural competencies of employees 
and councillors to the appropriate levels required to deliver on and exceed organisational requirements, as embedded in the Organisational strategy / 
Integrated Development Plan and legislative prescripts. 

The main purpose of training and development to date was to ensure that the organisation's staff have competencies necessary to meet performance and 
quality standards in their current jobs. Training and development interventions also focus on the development of individual employees' career and potent! 
in order to meet their growth needs as well as the future human resource needs of the organisation. Due to financial constraints, the addressing of 
organisational needs had to take priority. For the 2014/2015 financial year an Organisational Needs Analysis was conducted. The cost associated with the 
implementation of training and development as contained in the Workplace Skills Plan on organisational training needs and the budgeted amount for train 
and development is R402 000.00 

During the Employment Equity Survey, engagement with staff concerns linked to (a) lack of an internal training facilities; (b) unwarranted preferential 
treatment w.r.t training opportunities; (c) limited training opportunities; (d) non-essential training and transparency concerning processes surfaced. An 
additional constraint is that the training and development of the entire municipality is coordinated by one person, the Skills Development Facilitator withoi 


91 


any administrative support or technical support positions. A specific limitation from Good Governance point of view is that while it is undisputed that train 
and development is an investment on staff and not a cost, the return on investment is not always evident and measurable. 

OBJECTIVES 

The Local Labour Forum resolved that Skills Development processes, policies and procedure must be developed as a matter of urgency to clarify training 
implementation. 

A comprehensive human resource development policy must be prepared and consulted with the stakeholders at the Training Committee and Local Labour Forum. 
The objectives of the policy will be consulted with all Councillors; management; trade unions and staff and be submitted for Council approval. 

• In order to ensure the Return On investment, the municipality shall monitor the effectiveness of its skills development interventions through 
appropriate measurement and evaluation methods; 

• Due to financial constraints the Training Committee support that all grants be successfully claimed against the skills development levy, will exclusiv 
be utilized for purposes of training and development of staff or purpose closely linked to the training and development of staff. 

• Mantsopa Municipality acknowledges the value of its own development and that of its employees in cooperating fully with LGSETA and shall ensun 
that it participate in all relevant grants and training opportunities. 

EMPLOYMENT EQUITY AND DIVERSITY MANAGEMENT 

As the designated employer in terms of the Employment Equity Act 55 of 1998, the Mantsopa Municipality is under legal obligation, in terms of Section 20( 
is obliged by the Act to draft an Employment Equity Plan, for a period between 1 and 5 years in duration, effective from 1 July 2015. 

The Mantsopa Municipality's Employment Equity Plan for the period in question is informed by (i) the relevant stipulations in the Employment Equity Act; i 
the strategic priorities of the municipality as captured in the Integrated Development Plan (IDP); (iii) the Code of Good Practice on Employment Equity Plan 
HIV/AIDS and employment, as well as employment of people with disabilities; and (iv) the previous Employment Equity Plan of the municipality as submittc 
to the Department of Labour; (v) the Employment Equity Progress Report for the reporting period ending 30 June and (vi) relevant benchmarks similar in 
nature and / or size to the municipality. 

Mantsopa Municipality must prepare the municipality's Employment Equity Plan with the objectives to: 

• Formulate and implement action steps, methodologies and strategies in pursuance of the objectives and principles of the Employment Equity Act; 

• Promote equal opportunity and fair treatment in employment; 

• Eradicate unfair discrimination and harassment, albeit on listed grounds such as race; gender; marital status; family responsibility; ethnic or social 
origin; colour; sexual orientation; age; disability; religion; HIV status; conscience; belief; political opinion; culture; language and birth; or any grounc 
that is systematic or indirectly discriminatory, must be eliminated; 

• Pursue the equitable representation of designated groups in all occupational categories and levels in the workforce; 

• Implement affirmative Action measures; and 

• Actively support an organisational culture and climate based on diversity, equality, mutual respect and dignity for all. 

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY 

The Occupational Health and Safety function is primarily focused on: 

(i) Creating and maintaining a safe working environment and 

(ii) (ii) Preventing workplace accidents. A major obstacle in achieving these objectives was the dormant departmental safety committee and the lack 
awareness and capacity amongst members of staff to fulfil the responsibilities of Safety Representatives 

The major objectives: 


92 


• The reactivation of dormant safety committee and functionality; 

• The training of relevant employees in First Aid; 

• Developing Traffic official in Hazmat; 

• The vaccination of relevant employees, at risk due to the nature of their jobs, against Hepatitis B; 

• Training on workshop safety; 

• Hazardous incidents Risk Assessment training; 

• Facilitating and conducting regular safety inspections. The number of Injuries on Duty (lOD'S) 

EMPLOYEE WELLNESS 

Employee Wellness, is based on the premise that "People who are well work well". In this context Employee Wellness entails all strategies, action plans anc 
methods used to promote physical; emotional; and mental health of employees. Substance abuse especially Alcohol Abuse must be addressed with the 
municipality by means of raising awareness; identifying peer counsellors and external referrals. Managers and supervisors should be trained on the 
management of substance abuse in the workplace. A Drug and Alcohol Support Group should be initiated to provider further assistance to staff members 
experiencing drug and alcohol abuse. 

In certain instances employees are experiencing distress as a result of emotional, psychological or social problems. Where these occurrence of distress a 
direct impact on work performance or result from work related incidents, and in the event of severe cases are referred for profession expertise or 
psychological intervention. According to payroll analysis conducted the financial status of the municipal employees indicated that most of our income earn 
employees are under administration and have garnisheeing orders instituted as part of their salary deductions. A Lifeskills Capacity Building program must 
initiated, to teach our employees the do's and don'ts of Credit and Lending as well as Financial Planning / Budgeting. 

RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION 

The recruitment and selection process is primarily aimed at sourcing staff with the necessary competencies, thus enabling the organisation to deliver on its 
strategic and operational priorities. 

The assumption of the community is that staff appointments are being tainted by nepotism, political influence, based in favour of specific racial groups and 
secrecy. Whether this is real or mere perception, the Employment Equity committee / forum should consider these factors as they will adversely impact or 
the credibility of the appointment processes. In addition, staff appointments were generally concluded following a general traditional interview whilst 
research and human resources best practices confirm that traditional interviews to be amongst the poorer predictors of job success. 

• The draft Recruitment and Selection Policy awaiting the consultative processes with management, trade unions, and Local Labour Forum, Council^ 
and then submitted for Council approval. 


93 


Organisational Structure 

The organizational structure of the municipality including all vacancies in one way or the other does not meet the institutional needs, and is heavy fc 
the municipality in terms of the number of employees and the salary bill, which exceeds the stipulated threshold. The number of vacancies does nc 
inspire confidence in the current employees, it creates the perception of being understaffed and overloaded with work. Thus an organizational work stud 
needs to be conducted to clear this. 

Furthermore, the organizational structure as it stands currently is not congruent to the IDP and therefore does not assist the municipality in terms c 
responding to service delivery needs in an effective and efficient manner. As such it must be reviewed to ensure that it is consistent with the provisior 
of Section 51 of the Municipal Systems Act and the principles contained in the Human Resource Strategy; to give effect to the Municipality's Integrate 
Development Plan and strategic objectives; and in accordance with appropriate and universal principles of organizational design. The current municip; 
structure is as follows: 

Figure 4: Approved Organisational Structure 

MICRO STRUCTURE 


IT FORMS PART OF ANNEXURES 


94 



Vacancy Rate 


The municipality strives to fill vacant positions within three months once they are vacant. The process might be a little longer due to unforesee 
circumstances. In terms of recruitment the municipality advertises vacant positions both internally and externally with the criteria being consistent in bot 
cases. Generally the media that targets previously disadvantaged groups assume priority in terms of advertisements. The retention of skilled and experience 
workers is an arduous task, which needs planning, time, financial resources and physical resources. 

There is high vacancy rate experienced in the technical department due to attrition, death, etc. It is of course still a challenge for the municipality to attra( 
scarce resource and skilled personnel due to the size and geographical area of the municipality. The current vacancy rate of the municipality is 2.8%. 

According to the Municipal Staff Establishment Rate there are 328 Existing Posts and 390 Proposed Post with a Difference of 59 Post, thus a vacancy rat 
of 0,18%. 


MUNICIPAL PERSONNEL 


EMPLOYEE TOTALS, VACANCIES AND TURNOVER 



EMPLOYEES 

DESCRIPTION 

2014/15 

2015/16 


Employees 

No. 

No of Employees 

Approved Posts No 

Employees No. 

Vacancies No. 

Vacancic 

MM's office 

20 

16 

22 

16 

6 

0.27 

Finance Department 

40 

36 

52 

35 

17 

0.33 

Corporate Services 

24 

23 

27 

23 

4 

0.15 

Community Service 

100 

95 

144 

89 

55 

0.38 

Technicai Services 

119 

143 

155 

87 

68 

0.44 

TOTALS 

303 

313 

400 

281 

119 

0.30 

Empioyee and approved positions are as at 31 June 2016 as per the approved organogram 


VACANCY RATE 


VACANCY RATE 

DESIGNATIONS 

Total Approved Posts 

No. 

Vacancies (Total time that vacancies exist using fulltime 
equivalents) No. 

Vacancies (as a proportion of total f 
category) 

% 

Municipal manager 

1 

0 

100% 

CFO 

1 

0 

100% 

Other S56 Managers (excluding Finance Posts) 

3 

0 

100% 

Senior Management: Level 1-3 (excluding Finance) 

11 

6 

54% 

Senior management : Level 1-3 (Finance Posts) 

5 

2 

40% 

Flighly skilled supervision: Level 4-5 (excluding 'finance 
posts) 

30 

4 

6.6% 

Flighly skilled supervision (Finance post) Level 4-5 

6 

3 

50% 

Flighly skilled production (level 6-8) 

31 

1 

3.00% 

Skilled production (level 9-11) 

35 

10 

28% 

Production (level 12-14) 

57 

17 

30% 

Production (Level 15-16) 

220 

76 

34% 


95 


TURNOVER RATE 


Details 

Total appointments 

Total terminations 

Turnover rate 

2013/2014 

39 

23 


2014/2015 

4 

12 


2015/2016 

5 

6 


2016/2017 

0 

0 



Divide the number of employees who left the organisation within a year by the total number of employees who are within the system at the beginning of the yea 

PRIOR YEAR AUDIT ACTION PLAN (2015/16) 


Although we have received three consecutive Disclaimers from the Auditor-General since the commencement of the current term of office, there was a 
significant improvement in 2014/15 when we received a qualified audit opinion from the Auditor-General. The improvement was mainly influenced by the 
weekly Clean Audit Steering Committee meetings chaired by the Municipal Manager, attended by the Provincial Treasury & FSCOGTA officials amongst 
others, the Weekly Management meetings and the regular interaction between the Municipal Manager, Mayor and Speaker. We are hopeful that at the er 
of the current financial year (2015/16) there will be a movement from Qualified to Unqualified audit opinion. 


MANAGEMENT ACTION PLAN ON THE OUTCOME OF THE AUDIT REPORT ON THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND PERFORMANCE INFORMATION OF 
MANTSOPA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2015 



96 


Operating expenditure 


Payabies 


Predetermined objectives 








and thereafter to other 

services to ensure that the 
loan payments will be up to 
date. 





Revenue 

Cash 

60 

HR Connpliance - Perfornnance 
evaluation not done (Ex. 202) (EX. 202) 

Finding: there was no evidence that the 

municipality performed the individual 

performance evaluation of the 

Municipal manager or other senior 

managers for the 2014/2015 financial 

year. The performance evaluation 

submitted was for the 2013/2014 

review cycle and also was not signed as 

proof of completion during the 

applicable year under review. 

Performance management system has 

not been implemented in the 

2014/2015 financial year. 

Non-compliance of the Municipal 

Systems Act. 

The municipal council should ensure 
that the performance management 
system is implemented across all 
staff and the individual performance 
evaluation is performed for financial 
year under review as require by the 
Municipal Systems Act so as hold 
employees accountable for their 
assigned duties. 

The PMS Policy is in review 
and is to be sent to council 
for approval 



Manager: Human 
Resources 

Direci 

Corpc 

Servic 

62 

Planning: Risk assessment: No fraud 
risk assessment performed (EX. 14). 

Finding: no evidence could be obtained 

to confirm that; a fraud risk assessment 

was conducted during the year. 

Inadequate oversight over governance 

and risk management processes 

The municipal manager should 

implement risk management 

procedures designed to address the 

risk of fraud. 




Risk Manager 

Munii 

Mana 


98 



If fraud risk is not assessed 

reguiariy, management is not abie to 

design appropriate and effective 

internai controis to prevent the 

occurrence of or mitigate the impact of 

such fraud occurring. 







64 

Pianning: Risk assessment: Risk 

identification processes not adequate 

(EX.23) 

Finding: The foiiowing risks were not 

considered during the risk assessment 

processes: 

• risks resuiting from heavy 
reiiance on consuitants or 
other reiated parties to 
perform criticai entity 
operations identified; and 

• risks posed by disruption of 
information systems 
processing and the extent to 
which backup systems are 
avaiiabie and can be 
impiemented. 

Processes and procedures appiied for 

risk identification were not adequate 

The municipaiity is not abie to design 

and impiement effective 

internai controis to address or mitigate 

the impact of such risk if they are not 

identified and evaiuated 





Risk Manager 

Munii 

Mana 

66 

Pianning - Composition of the audit 

committee (CoAF 3/2015) (EX.13) 

The head of risk 

management shouid deveiop, design 
and impiement effective risk 
identification processes to address 
current and future risks 
identification gaps 

The head of risk 
management shouid deveio 
p, design and impiement 
effective risk identification 
processes to address 

The 

municipaiity is 
in the process 
of appointing 
other audit 

01/03/2016 

On-going 

Mana 

Interr 


99 




Finding: The following risks were not 

considered during the risk assessment 

processes: 

• risks resulting from heavy 
reliance on consultants or 
other related parties to 
perform critical entity 
operations identified; and 

• risks posed by disruption of 
information systems 
processing and the extent to 
which backup systems are 
available and can be 
implemented. 

Processes and procedures applied for 

risk identification were not adequate 

The municipality is not able to design 

and implement effective 

internal controls to address or mitigate 

the impact of such risk if they are not 

identified and evaluated. 


current and future risks 
identification gaps. 

committee 

member. 




68 

Distribution losses-Misstatement 

(EX.211) 

Finding: 

A comparison of the amounts as 

disclosed in the financial statements 

for the comparative years was 

performed and it was noted that the 

2014 amount brought forward to the 

following year in the current year's 

financial statements does not agree to 

that as reflected in the prior year 

financial statements. 

The chief financial officer should 

implement appropriate record 

keeping controls to ensure that 

distribution losses are calculated 

based on correct records. 




PWC 

CFO 


100 




This arose due to the fact that the 

posting of distribution iosses from prior 

year and the caicuiation thereof was 

not properiy reviewed. 

This wiii resuit in the misstatement of 

distribution iosses 







70 

Distribution iosses- Incorrect units 

disciosed (EX.212) 

Finding: 

The caicuiation of distribution iosses 

submitted for audit was not 

appropriateiy reviewed and differences 

foiiowed up. 

Distribution iosses for water and 

eiectricity are misstated by an 

unknown amount. 

The chief financiai officer shouid 

ensure that accurate and compiete 

records of water and eiectricity 

sourced and used. 




PWC 

CFO 

72 

Procurement: SCM 25/14/15 - Irreguiar 

awarding of contract (EX. 17) 

Finding: The foiiowing was identified 

in reiation to contract SCM 25/14/15 to 

Doubie Ring for R9 775 485,36: Note 

1. Functionaiity was stated to be 

evaiuation criteria on the advert and 

there is no indication of its use on the 

bidding fiie. 

The chief financiai officer shouid 

design and impiement controis to 

ensure that SCM poiicy is fuiiy 

impiemented and that such poiicy is 

compiiant with SCM reguiations. 

The chief financiai officer 
shouid design and 
impiement controis to 
ensure that SCM poiicy is 
fuiiy impiemented and that 
such poiicy is compiiant 
with SCM reguiations 



SCM 

CFO 


101 



2. On the advertisennent it is stated 


that an 80/20 scoring wiii be used to 
evaiuate the contract but the amount 
of the contract exceeded R1 000 000. 

On the scoring a 90/10 was used as the 
amount is more than R1 miiiion. 

3. When the bidding box was opened 
three suppiiers were responsive ( 
Doubie Ring Trading, TR Construction 
and Modiri Tsohie Trading JV) and 
there are no reasons why the other 
two were disquaiified and not scored. 

4. The advert specified a CIDB grading 
of 6CEPE and the award was given to a 
suppiier who is a 2GB. 

5. It was found that Modiri Tsohie 
Trading JV and TR Construction scores 
wouid have been higher but the tender 
was awarded to Doubie ring trading 
356 (Pty) (Ltd) with no deviation from 
the municipai manager. 

6. The BBBEE points are not awarded 
to the appointed suppiier even though 
a BBBEE certificate is attached and it is 
a ievei 3 entitied to 8 points. 

7. There are no joint venture 
registration documents attached to the 


fiie. 





Municipal SCM policy was not correctly 

applied during the awarding of the 

contract. 

Irregular expenditure of R9 775 485,36 

has been incurred. 







76 

Procurement: SCM 08/14/15 - No 

indication of advert under CIDB as it is 

second phase (EX.103) 

Finding: No evidence was obtained that 

the advert was placed on the CIDB 

website as this project is a Phase 2. 

The municipal manager should 

implement supply chain 

management controls designed to 

ensure compliance with procurement 

regulations. 

The municipal 
manager should implement 
supply chain management 
controls designed to ensure 
compliance with 
procurement regulations 

28 February 

2016 


Mr. KD Pharoe 
(SCM Manager) 

Mr M 

77 

Procurement: SCM30/13/14 - Irregular 

awarding (EX. 104) 

Finding: 

1. Functionality was not used as 

evaluation criteria even though the 

advert stipulated that it will be used as 

evaluation criteria. 

2. The bid opening date 

(16/05/2014) is before the closing date 

(13/06/2014) stipulated in the advert. 

3. There is no risk assessment done as 

the supplier is in a lower grade (Grade 

The municipal manager should 

implement supply chain 

management controls designed to 

ensure compliance with procurement 

regulations. 

a) Management is not in 
agreement with the finding, 
Bid Evaluation Committee 

considered not to evaluates 
this bid on the pre- 
qualification and 
functionality as indicated to 
ensure consistency on the 
evaluation of the bids. Bid 
Evaluation considered all 
relevant legislations, 
regulations and acts such 
as Municipal SCM Policy, 
Guide for Accounting 

Officers. Guide for 

Accounting Officers states 
clearly that pre- 
qualification or 
functionality is usually 
necessary for large or 
complex works, or in any 
other circumstances in 
which high costs of 
preparing bids could 
discourage competition, 
such as custom designed 
equipment, industrial plant 

The municipal 
manager should 
implement 
supply chain 
management 
controls 
designed to 

ensure 

compliance 

with 

procurement 

regulations 

28 February 

2016 

Mr. KD Pharoe 
(Supply Chain 
Manager) 

Mr K[ 
(CFO) 


103 








4) than the one stipulated in the advert 

(Grade 5). 

4. No reasons were supplied for the 

disqualification of other suppliers 

except that price is too high and too 

low, whereas this was not part of the 

evaluation criteria stipulated on the 

advert. 

Inadequate oversight over supply chain 

management processes 

Irregular expenditure of R5 901 

954,50 was incurred. 


and build, or management 
contracting. Find attached a 
Guide for Accounting 

Officers of Municipalities 
and Municipalities and 
Minutes of the Evaluation 
Committee Meeting. 

b) Management is not in 
agreement with the finding, 
the closing of the advert is 

16 May 2014 and opening 
bid register date is 16 May 
2014 and including date on 
the bid document is 16 May 
2014. Find attached advert 
and bid opening register. 

c) Management is not in 
agreement with the finding, 
the CIDB grading of Ntsu 
Trading is 4CE PE 
(Potentially Emerging 
Enterprise) and by virtue of 
that the bidder is on level 5. 

The advert indicated that 
Municipality requires 4 CE 

PE or 5 CE and higher. Find 
attached Circular of CIDB 
(Refer to page (g) on the 
circular. Potentially 

Emerging Enterprise). 

d) Management is not in 
agreement with the finding, 
the advert stated clearly, 

"In order to protect its 
interest Mantsopa Local 
Municipality reserves 

the right not accept the 
lowest or any bid". The 
project value of the bid was 
R6200 000.00, the bid price 
of Umvezi Contractors was 

R4, 874 340.64 and bid 
price of Magwa 

Construction was R4, 845 
995.22 and their prices 
were above 20%. According 
to Section 18.1 of the 

General Contract, it only 
allows 15% of price 
variation of the contract 

cost and therefore their 
price was not realistic. Find 
attached General Condition 

of Contract. 






104 



80 

Procurement: No confirmation that 

quotations were requested for 

procurement (EX. 140) 

Finding: there was no indication of 

verbai quotations received as oniy the 

winning suppiier quotation is attached. 

Aiso there is no approvai of the 

quotation by a deiegated officiai. 


The SCM manager shouid 
ensure that the prescribed 
quotations are invited for 
aii procurement and or 
deviations approved by the 
accounting officer and 
reasons thereof indicated 

28 February 

2016 


Mr. KD Pharoe 
(Suppiy Chain 
Manager) 

Mr K[ 
(CFO) 

82 

Procurement: Evaiuation not done 

according to PPPFA (EX. 141) 

Finding:!. No evidence that three 

quotations were requested 

2. There was no decision to accept a 

winning quotation 

3. There was no deciaration of interest 

by the winning suppiier 

Noncompiiance with SCM reguiation 

and SCM poiicy. 

The chief financiai officer shouid 
ensure SCM reguiations are 
impiemented for aii procurement 
made and deviations approved and 
reasons for such deviations indicated. 

A fiie/register has aiready 
been started for aii 
deciarations by suppiiers. 

28 February 

2016 

On-going 


Suppiy Chain 
Manager 

CFO 

85 

Procurement: Possibie spiitting of 

quotations (EX. 142) 

Finding: The foiiowing is noted in 

respect of procurement processes, 

1. A possibiiity exists that the foiiowing 

transactions couid have been procured 

The chief financiai officer shouid 

ensure compiiance with SCM 

reguiations during procurement. 

Deviations must be approved by the 

municipai manager and reasons 

thereof indicated. 

The chief financiai officer 

wiii ensure SCM reguiations 

are impiemented for aii 

procurement made and 

deviations approved and 

reasons for such deviations 

indicated. 

28 February 

2016 


Mr. KD Pharoe 
(Suppiy Chain 
Manager) 

Mr K[ 
(CFO) 


105 



from one supplier, procurement of 

Sudflock for water treatment. The 

transactions could have been 

deliberately split to avoid competitive 

bidding. 







90 

Procurement: Suppliers in service of 

the state: No declaration (EX. 143) 

(EX. 143) Finding: the following 

suppliers did not declare their interest 

and they are employed by the state: 

The chief financial officer should 

implement controls to ensure to 

compel prospective suppliers to 

disclose whether they are in 

employment of the state or related 

to people employed by the state 




SCM 

CFO 

92 

Procurement: Employees did not 

declare their interest (Ex. 147) (EX.147) 

Finding: Contrary to the above 

requirement, the 

following employees did not 

declare business interest. 

The following employees in business 

with other suppliers did not declare 

interest: 

Management has not implemented 

procedures to compel staff to disclose 

business interest 

Noncompliance with the MSA and SCM 

regulations issued in terms the MFMA. 

The chief financial officer (default 

head of SCM) must implement 

processes designed to ensure 

compliance with SCM rules and 

regulations 

The chief financial officer 
(default head of SCM) must 
implement processes 
designed to ensure 
compliance with SCM rules 
and regulations 

28 February 

2016 


Mr. KD Pharoe 
(Supply Chain 
Manager) 

Mr K[ 
(CFO) 


106 





Procurement: Contract management - The municipal manager should 


consultants (182) (EX.182) Finding: 


ensure that service level agreements 


with consultants clearly defines 

Lack of monitoring of the contract by deliverables as follows 


the management of the municipality. 


(a) Clearly defined deliverables in 


The purpose of engagement might not form of tasks and responsibilities that 


be achieved in all respects. 


must be performed within defined 


timelines 


(b) Clear monitoring mechanisms and 
sanction for non-adherence to 


timelines 


(a) Clearly defined 
deliverables in form of 
tasks and responsibilities 
that must be performed 
within defined timelines 

(b) Clear monitoring 
mechanisms and sanction 
for non-adherence to 
timelines 

(c) Clear defined 
responsibility to transfer of 
skills to municipal staff and 
how such transfers will be 
monitored and evaluated 


28 February 
2016 


Mr. KD Pharoe 
(Supply Chain 
Manager) 


(c) Clear defined responsibility 
to to transfer of skills to municipal 


staff and how such transfers will be 


monitored and evaluated 


PPE: Overstatement of land (CoAF 


Management agrees with 


2/2015) (EX.26) Finding: 


the finding that the fixed 


The fixed asset register includes land The chief financial officer should 


that has been disposed for housing. 
Although the title has not 


review the register for land for the 
following; 


asset register includes land 
that has been disposed for 
housing. 


formerly transferred to the residents, 


Management is busy taking 


the service potential in respect of the (s) Land disposed for housing across out the land that has been 


land is no longer vested in the 
municipality but to the resident. The 


the municipality should be removed disposed for housing from 


from the register 


the asset register and once 


Asset Manager CFO 


municipality does not have rights 
to service potential or future economic 


(b) Land should be disposed at fair 
value 


the process has been 
finalized the Financial 


benefits from the land and thus no 


Statements will be adjusted 


longer deemed to be an asset. 


accordingly and supporting 


documentation (Journals) 


107 


The municipality has not formally 


will be provided to external 


transferred the title deeds for land 


auditors. 


used for housing to the residents 


Limitation on valuation (overstatement 
of land) amounting to R66 202 690 


Management is busy taking 
out the land that has been 
disposed for housing from 
the asset register and once 
the process has been 
finalized the Financial 
Statements will be adjusted 
accordingly and supporting 
documentation (Journals) 
will be provided to external 
auditors. 


PPE: Building could not be traced to the 
asset register-completeness (EX. 97) 
Finding: 


For the completeness testing, these 


assets could not be traced to the 


building asset register. For example 
Tweespruit Museum, etc. 


PPE - Current Additions - Existence 


could not confirmed (Ex. 220) (EX. 220) 


Finding: 


The chief financial officer 


should investigate the matter and 
update the asset register for 
buildings. 


subsequently evaluated; 


1. Electricity ( EL-LB-EL06-F36-A530- 


C1345 and EL-LB-EL06-F36-A530- 


C1345) management agrees with the 


Contrary to the above , following assets finding , 2.1 Sanitation ( SAN- 


do not be identified for existence; 


HH033-C174, SAN-HH136- 
C212 and SAN-HH140-C216) , the 


The above error represents a 14% error asset register satisfactorily tested , 
of the sample selected for current year the matter is resolved . 
addition. When this error is 


The assets listed above 
were included in the FAR 
submitted to the Auditor 
on the 31 October 2015. 

Discussed with, and 
identified on the FAR, to 
the satisfaction of the 
Auditor subsequent to the 
communication. Not all the 
assets were included in 
assets register . 

Therefor the misstatement 
is not resolved. 

The pipes in question for 
Project 

MIG/FS0468/S/07/07 are 
not duplicated. 

The Greywater System has 
2 pipes that run in parallel. 
One to remove the waste 
water and one to return the 
"greywater" for use back in 
the system. 


The pipe lengths have been 


Asset Manager CFO 


Asset Manager CFO 


checked in GIS (GIS 


108 




Measure) and the 
differences noted. Attached 


is a map with the pipes in 
question. (HH Sanitation 
WG27.pdf) 

The coordinate for SAN- 
HH056-C255 has been 
incorrectiy dispiayed on the 
FAR as weii as the iength. 

Management wiii ensure 
that the correct Latitude 
and Longitude is recorded 


in the FAR. 





Incorrect application of GRAP 26 

as impairment was calculated on non- 
qualifying assets without determining 

recoverable amount and or adjustment 

to remaining useful life 

The carrying amount (NBV) for 

infrastructure assets is understated by 

R78 510 109 







120 

PPE: Additions: Impact of correct 

impairment assessment on NBV 

(EX.225) 

Finding: 

(a) The carrying amounts of the 
following assets acquired in 
the current year have been 
negatively impacted by 
incorrect assessment of 
impairment loss even though 
their useful life has not been 
adjusted not their 
recoverable amount 

determined and disclosed. 

Incorrect application of GRAP 26 

as impairment was calculated on non- 
qualifying assets without determining 

recoverable amount and or adjustment 

to remaining useful life 

The carrying amount (NBV) for 

additions to assets is 

understated by R21 564 687 

(b) 

The chief financial officer should 

implement controls over the 

assessment of impairment for assets 

and related accounting for 

impairment loss so as to comply with 

the requirements of SA standard of 

GRAP 26 




Asset Manager 

CFO 


110 




(b) Possible fruitless and wasteful 
expenditure regarding interest paid 



111 




due to accounts not being settled 

within the relevant time frame. 







133 

Expenditure Bulk purchases: accounts 

not settled within 30days (CoAF 

17/2015) (EX.60) 

Finding: 

The following accounts were not 

settled within 30 days as they were 

outstanding at year end (30 June 

2015). 

The municipality does not 

appropriately budget for its operational 

expenditure and thus runs into cash 

flow problems 

Noncompliance with MFMA 

The municipality is unable to meet its 

financial obligations on time this 

incurring interest on overdue accounts. 

This constitutes fruitless and 

wasteful expenditure that could have 

been avoided. 

The chief financial officer should 

draw up and implement a realistic 

budget that is backed up by a reliable 

cash flow projection 

Management agrees with 

the audit finding, the 

transactions were not paid 

within 30 days due to the 

fact that the municipality 

had cash flow constraints. 

Flowever, management has 

also noted that there is a 

problem with the dates as 
indicated on the finding: 

The transactions were not 

paid within 30 days due to 

the fact that the 

municipality had cash flow 

constraints. 

The controls for revenue 

enhancement and debt 

collection should be 

strengthened in order for 
the municipality to collect 

what it has invoiced and 

encourage customers to 
pay their debts. 



Accountant: 

Expenditure 

CFO 


112 



136 

Expenditure General Expense- Payment 

not made within 30 days as per 

legislative requirements (CoAF 

27/2015) (EX.72) 

Finding: 

the following invoices were not paid 

within 30 days from invoice date: 

Management has cash flow problems 

arising from non-collection of revenue 

billed and unrealistic budgeting process 

Noncompliance with applicable 

legislative requirements 

Possible penalties and interest charges 

on overdue accounts which may be 

classified as fruitless and wasteful 

expenditure. 

The chief financial officer should 

prepare a realistic budget based on 

realistic cash flows 

The municipal manager should 

implement appropriate debt 

collection processes. 

Management agrees with 

the audit finding, the 

transactions were not paid 

within 30 days due to the 

fact that the municipality 

had cash flow constraints. 



Accountant: 

Expenditure 

CFO 

138 

Payables: Retentions - Insufficient 

supporting documentation submitted 

(Ex.38) (EX.38) 

Finding: The retention register does 

not contain adequate details to enable 

the audit of movement in retentions 

Management should provide a 

detailed schedule of the movements 

in retentions to support the amounts 

included in the retention register. 

Register to be reconciled 
with the GL on a monthly 
basis. 

Register in 
place 

On-going 


SCM 

CFO 


113 




- Limitation of scope with regard to 

the audit of retentions inciuded in 

payabies. 

Movements in the combined 

retentions baiance couid not be 

audited. 







140 

PDO: WASTE REMOVAL: Reported 

Objectives, KPIs & Targets not 

consistent with pianned objectives, 

indicators and targets: (EX.12) (EX. 12) 

Finding: 

(a) The foiiowing inconsistencies 
are identified between the 
pianned indictors as per the 
IDP, theSDBIPand 
the annuai performance 
report. 

b) The foiiowing 

reported objectives were not 
consistent with 
pianned objectives as per 
SDBIP: 

The annuai performance report was 

not evaiuated for consistency with 

SDBIP and the IDP. 

The planned indicators as included in 

the SDBIP were not evaluated 

for measurability (not well 

defined) prior the approval of the 

SDBIP 

Key performance indicators are not 

well defined to enable 

The municipal manager should 

ensure that the annual performance 

report is evaluated for consistency 

with planned performance as per 

SDBIP 

The municipal manager should 

provide training to senior manager 

involved in the formulation of key 

performance indicators 

The municipal Mayor should evaluate 

all the key performance indicators 

and related targets as included in the 

SDBIP and ensure they are 

measurable before approval thereof 

Management noted that 

the Waste Removal section 

of the Environmental 

Management was included 

in the Technical Services 

Departmental SDBIP 

2014/15 but was never 

submitted to the 

consolidated organisational 

SDBIP 2014/15. 

Management further noted 

that progress on the Waste 

Management's planned 

indicators and targets were 

reported in 2014/15 

Quarterly Performance 

Assessment Reports, Mid- 

Year Budget & Performance 

Assessment Report and the 

Draft Annual Reports for 

the year ending 30 June 

2015. 

Whilst the Management 
agrees with the finding, it 
disagrees with the alleged 
cause, impact and internal 
control deficiency in the 
light of the above- 
mentioned factors. 

Feb 2016 

Waste Removal 
Objectives, 
targets & KPI's 
included in the 
adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP 

Manager: Refuse 
Removal 

Direc 

Techr 


114 



performance/service delivery to be 

measurable 

The municipality is unable to measure 

its performance against planned and 

budgeted for service delivery 

objectives reported performance is not 

consistent with planned performance - 

Management response noted and since 

management did not plan for waste 

management in the SDBIP, the finding 

will remain and will be communicated 

on in the management and audit 

reports. 







144 

PDO: ELECTRICITY: Reported 

performance objectives, indicators and 

targets do not agree with planned 

objectives, indicators. (EX. 106) 

Finding: 

(a) The following discrepancies 
are identified between the 
objectives, indicators and/or 
targets in the IDP and/or 

SDBIP with those in the 
annual report: See 
Management Report 

(b) The following 

reported objectives were not 
consistent with 
planned objectives as per 
SDBIP: 

(c) The annual performance 
report was not evaluated for 
consistency with SDBIP and 
the IDP. 

The planned indicators as included in 

the SDBIP were not evaluated 

for measurability (not well 

The municipal manager should 

ensure that the annual performance 

report is evaluated for consistency 

with planned performance as per 

SDBIP 

The municipal manager should 

provide training to senior manager 

involved in the formulation of key 

performance indicators 

The municipal Mayor should evaluate 
all the key performance indicators 
and related targets as included in the 
SDBIP and ensure they are 
measurable before approval thereof 


Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurability of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 

Manager: 

Electricity 

Services 

Direc 

Techr 


115 



defined) prior the approvai of the 

SDBIP 

Key performance indicators are not 

weii defined to enabie 

performance/service deiivery to be 

measurabie 

The municipaiity is unabie to measure 

its performance against pianned and 

budgeted for service deiivery 

objectives reported performance is not 

consistent with pianned performance 







150 

PDO: WATER: Reported performance 

indicators and targets not consistent 

with pianned indicators and targets: 

(EX.123) 

Finding: 

Contrary to the above provisions, the 

foiiowing inconsistencies are identified 

between reported performance and 

pianned performance as per the SDBIP 

and/or IDP for water: 

See management Report 

The annuai performance report was 

not evaiuated for consistency with 

SDBIP and the IDP. 

Reported performance is not 
consistent with pianned performance 


Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurabiiity of 
KPIs approved 
by Councii 

Manager: Water 
Services 

Direc 

Techr 

153 

PDO: ROADS & STORM WATER: 

Reported performance objectives, 

The municipai manager shouid 

provide training to senior manager 


Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 

Manager: Roads 
and Storm water 

Direc 

Techr 


116 





indicators and targets do not agree 

with pianned objectives, indicator 

(EX.134) 

Finding: 

(a) The foiiowing discrepancies 
are identified between the 
objective, indicators and/or 
targets in the IDP and/or 
SDBIP with those in the 
annuai report: 

(b) The foiiowing discrepancies are 

identified between the objective in the 

IDP and/or SDBIP with those in the 

annuai report: 

The annuai performance report was 

not evaiuated for consistency with 

SDBIP and the IDP. 

The planned indicators as included in 

the SDBIP were not evaluated 

for measurability (not well 

defined) prior the approval of the 

SDBIP 

Key performance indicators are not 

well defined to enable 

performance/service delivery to be 

measurable 

The municipality is unable to measure 

its performance against planned and 

budgeted for service delivery 

objectives reported performance is not 

consistent with planned performance 

involved in the formulation of key 

performance indicators 

The municipal Mayor should evaluate 
all the key performance indicators 
and related targets as included in the 
SDBIP and ensure they are 
measurable before approval thereof 



accuracy & 
measurability of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 




117 










159 

PDO: SANITATION: Key performance 

indicator not weii defined: (EX. 138) 

Finding: 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurabiiity of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 

Manager: 

Sanitation 

Services 

Direc 

Techr 

162 

PDO: Sanitation: Reported Objectives, 

KPIs and targets not consistent with 

pianned Objectives, KPIs and 

targets(Ex.l56) (EX.156) 

Finding: 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurability of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 

Manager: 

Sanitation 

Services 

Direc 

Techr 

169 

PDO: WASTE MANAGEMENT: 

Indicators and target not measurabie 

(Ex.169) (EX.169) 

Finding: 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurability of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 

Manager: Waste 

Management 

Services 

Direc 

Comn 

Servic 

171 

PDO: ROADS & STORMWATER: 

Indicators not measurabie (Ex. 170) 

(EX.170) 

Finding: 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurability of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 

Manager: Roads 
and storm water 

Services 

Direc 

Techr 

173 

PDO: ELECTRICITY: Indicators not weii 

defined and consequentiy not 

measurabie (Ex. 171) (EX. 171) 

Finding: 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurability of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 

Manager: 

Electricity 

Services 

Direc 

Techr 

175 

PDO: WATER: Reported performance 

not reiiabie (176) (EX.176) 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurability of 

Manager: Water 
Services 

Direc 

Techr 


118 



Finding: 




KPIs approved 
by Council 



177 

PDO: ELECTRICITY: Reported 

performance not reliable (192) (EX. 192) 

Finding: 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurability of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 

Manager: 

Electricity 

Services 

Direc 

Techr 

181 

PDO: SANITATION: Reported 

performance not reliable (194) (EX. 194) 

Finding: 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurability of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 

Manager: 

Sanitation 

Services 

Direc 

Techr 

184 

PDO: Completeness of reported PI: 

Indigents support: (Ex. 201) (EX. 201) 

Finding: 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurability of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 

Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 

186 

PDO: Water: Reported performance 

targets not consistent with planned 

targets (Ex.215) (EX.215) 

Finding: 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurability of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 

Manager: Water 
Services 

Direc 

Techr 

189 

Receivables - Deficiencies on debt 

impairment calculation (CoAF 29/2015) 

(EX.19) 

Finding: 





PWC 

CFO 

204 

Receivables- Prepaid electricity sales 

(Ex.93). (EX.93) 

Recommendation 

The chief financial officer should 

ensure that the investment policy is 

amended, updated and approved to 

comply with the municipal 

(a) Management disagree 
with the audit finding, 
journal no: 10012477 was 
submitted along with those 
listed below: 

(b) Narrations - The 

SEBATA System 
process/configuration 

N/A 


Manager: BTO 

CFO 


119 


Finding: Section 62 of the MFMA 
General financial management 
functions; 


investment regulations issued in 
terms of the MFMA. 


(1) The accounting officer of a 
municipality is responsible for 
managing the financial administration 
of the municipality, and must for this 
purpose take all reasonable steps to 
ensure; 

1. (a) that the resources of the 
municipality are used 
effectively, efficiently and 
economically; 

2. (b) that full and proper 
records of the financial affairs 
of the municipality are kept 
in accordance with any 
prescribed norms and 
standards; 

3. (c) that the municipality has 
and maintains effective, 
efficient and transparent 
systems— 

(i) of financial and risk 
management and internal 
control; and 

(ii) of internal audit 
operating in accordance with 
any prescribed norms and 
standards; 

The following inconsistencies are 
noted between the GL of Mantsopa 
and accounting records submitted by 
Centlec 


Transactions reconciled at Centlec are 
not reconciled and recorded 


accurately. 



120 




Centlec receivable is misstated in the 

books of Mantsopa. 

Internal control deficiency 

Financial and performance 
management. Management did not 
implement the controls over the daily 
and monthly processing and reconciling 
of transactions. 







207 

Receivables - Debtors with credit 

balances caused by write off (CoAF 

29/2015) (EX.lll) 

Finding : Accounts have credit balances 

as a result of debt written off. 

Journal will be processed to correct 
AFS. 

No action as Journals have 
already been passed before 
finalisation of Audit 

Resolved during 
audit 


Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 

209 

Receivables: Deficiencies on the age 

analysis (EX. 112) 

Finding : Differences between debtors 

balance as per age analysis and 

balances as per Sebata system. 

Age analysis report is dependent on 
the date and time that the report is 
requested, as well as choices made 
by the report requestor. Possible 
transactions processed on the system 
after the age analysis was drawn. 

Ensure age analysis is done 
at year end when last 
accounts (fiches) have been 
processed and immediately 
there-after an Age analysis 
report (PF ??) to be 
processed. Investigate 
which reports needs to be 
prepared??? 

31 January2016 
and every 
month end 

there after 
testing. 


Accountant: 

Income Manager: 
Revenue 

CFO 

214 

Receivables: Calculation of impairment 

for debtors (Ex. 126) (EX.126) 

Finding: 1. Credit Policy does not 

indicate the number of days to be 

considered as long outstanding. 

2. Council does not distinguish 

between category of debtors when 

impairment is calculated, as well as the 

collection history or other specific 

Finding: 1 Although the Credit Policy 
does not indicate the impairment. 
Council has taken a Resolution on the 
basis for impairment. 

Finding 2. As per the management 
comment in Ex. 126, the AG has 
made the wrong assumption of 
category of users: The system 
differentiate between different user 
tariffs, namely Business, Residential, 
Schools, etc. and then between 
category of users as Companies, 
government, individuals, CC's, trusts, 
etc. Trusts for example can be a 
residential or a business tariff. 

Individuals can be a business or a 
residential tariff, depending on the 
usage. 

Finding 3. Impairment has not been 
done according to zoning 




PWC 

CFO 


121 




information reievantto different 

service debtors. 

3. Impairment recaicuiation has been 

based on zoning ciassification and does 

not agree with the zoning as per Sebata 

(Vaiuation Roii). 

ciassification as the municipaiity does 
not charge as per zoning, but usage. 






221 

Receivabies: Rates: Changes in 

property ownership not reflected on 

SEBATA system (Ex. 136) (EX.136) 

Finding : Vaiuation roii on system is not 

updated with changes in ownership. 

Debtor's accounts on the system do 

not reflect the correct account hoiders 

which may hamper recoverabiiity of 

amount owed. 


The Sebata System is 
updated as information 
becomes avaiiabie of 
ownership changes from 
the Deeds. 



Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 

224 

Receivabies: Existence of the debtors 

not confirmed (Ex. 152) (EX.152) 

Finding: 

The existence of the foiiowing debtors 

couid NOT be confirmed due to 

the foiiowing; 

(a) There were no payments made by 

the account hoider during the 

2014/2015 and 2015/2016 financiai 

years. 


The existence of the 

foiiowing debtors couid 

NOT be confirmed due to 

the foiiowing; 

(a) There were no 

payments made by the 

account hoider during the 

2014/2015 and 2015/2016 

financiai years. 

(b) There were no written 

contractuai payment 

arrangements between the 



Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


122 






(b) There were no written contractual 
payment arrangements between the 
municipality and account holder. 

(c) There was no signed documentation 
indicating the details of the account 
holder 

4) It is also noted that debtor balances 
used for debt impairment calculation 
included accounts with negative 
balances caused by incorrect debt 
write off by the municipality. The 
correct balance due at year end and 
related ageing is negatively impacted 
by the write off. Refer to the finding 
raisedEX.lll 

(5) The debtor impairment calculation 
is also not reliable based on differences 
between the age analysis and account 
balances as per SABATA financial 
systemEX.112 

Based on the above, we are unable to 
re-perform debt impairment 
recalculation amounting to R175 056 
330 and related current year 
adjustment of R72 279 634 (2014:R48 
773 392) 

• The standard temperate 
applied for impairment 
calculation was not adapted 
to the situational needs of 
the municipality 


municipality and account 
holder. 

(c) There was no signed 
documentation indicating 
the details of the account 
holder 


123 




• Incorrect accounting for 
receivables by the 
municipality 

This will result in limitation on the 

impairment recalculation amount of 

R175 056 330.00 







231 

Revenue: Rates: Incorrect calculation 

of property rates (Ex. 33). 

Finding: 

The following calculation differences 

were noted for property rates 

revenue: See list: 

Property rates revenue is reviewed for 

accuracy monthly 

Property rates revenue is overstated by 

R3 397 880 

The chief financial officer should 

review billing of property monthly 

Management is not in 
agreement with the finding 
except the second line. The 
valuation for this erf was 
already corrected on the 
system today by Mr. le 

Roux and the adjustments 
will be given through to the 
income division to be done 
in the new financial year, as 
Consbill for 2015 is closed 

off at 30 June 2015. 

In the calculations done by 
the AG the exempted 
amount of R75 000 were 

not deducted from 

residential and farm 

valuations. The differences 

of cents are as a result that 
the Sebata system is set up 
to round all amounts to the 

nearest 5 cent. Attached 
please find a spreadsheet 
with the correct 

calculations as well as 

remarks for each 

difference. 



Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 

242 

Revenue: Service charges: Water 

meters not read for the whole year 

(EX.35) 

Finding: 

The chief financial officer should 

ensure that water meters are 

regularly read. 

More data capturers have 
been employed in order to 
improve supervision of 
meters read. 


Meters of 
Platberg have 
been read and 
being in the 
process of 
captured. 

Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


124 




Revenue recognised for the following 

accounts is based on interim 

(estimates) as no meter readings were 

done during the whole year. It could 

thus not be determined if the water 

charges were in proportion to the use 

by consumers. 

The extrapolated error is R968 904.38 

Management did not perform meter 

readings during the year 

The reasonability of the estimates 

billed to consumers could not be 

assessed in the absence of a 

reasonable basis to be used as a 

benchmark. The extrapolated error is 

R968 904.38 







245 

Revenue: Service charges: Incorrect 

billing for water (EX. 52) 

Finding: 

Revenue recognised during for the year 

2014/2015 includes the 

following meter readings that appear 

to be incorrect: 

The chief financial officer should 

ensure that water meter readings are 

reviewed for factual correctness by 

generating and reviewing exception 

reports so that errors can be timely 

corrected. 

For (1) and (2) Management 

comments, the corrections made will 

be audited. (3) Management 




Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


125 




The extrapolated amount = R15 037 

131.80 

• Meter reading are not 
reviewed for factual accuracy 
before being captured on the 
system for billing. 

• Monthly exception reports 
for abnormal billing were not 
generated and reviewed for 
accuracy 

Revenue recognised for these accounts 

is overstated by an extrapolated 

amount = R15 037 131.80 

comments noted, the information 

will be verified. 

Refer to journal #96 for reversal of 

overbilling. The reversal however, 

could not be audited as the basis of 

the new billing was not submitted for 

audit. 

In addition the whole population has 

not been adjusted for overbilling as 

only a selected of revenue 

transactions was selected. The 

matter will be reported 






248 

Revenue: Free service charges for 

indigents and own consumption 

(EX.53) 

Finding: 

(1) The following is noted in respect of 

free basic services for indigents; 

(a) Approved indigents are billed 

monthly for free basic services 

provided. Amounts billed is thus 

recognised as revenue for the month. 

(b) According to the indigent register 

provided by management, there are 

about 2587 indigent accounts before 

The chief financial officer should 

review the accounting treatment for 

revenue from indigents and own 

consumption 

Management response 

1. Revenue: Free 
service charges 
for indigents and 

own 

consumption, a- 

c) 

2. Management 
agrees with the 
audit finding and 
will ensure that 

the relevant 
General Ledger 
and Annual 

Financial 

Statements are 
adjusted 
accordingly by 
decreasing the 
revenue with the 
subsidy amount. 



Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


126 



subsidy allocation and write off 
amounting to R34 6599 63 




127 




128 



The tariffs used for billing does not 


that the zoning of such property has including water, ensuring 


agree to the council approved tariffs 


changed to reflect current billing 


that consumers pay for 


for related zoning 


tariffs. The basis for billing is thus 


services in proportion to 


subjectively applied which impacts 


their use of that service and 


Property zoning as per valuation roll 


revenue. Matter to be reported as 


that the tariff reflects the 


does not agree to property zoning 


limitation of scope. 


costs reasonably associated 


captured on the SABATA system due to 


with the rendering of 


incorrect capturing of the valuation roll 


service, including capital. 


on the financial system and lack of 
regular system updates to reflect 


operating maintenance, 
administration and 


approved changes in property zoning 


replacement costs. 


and valuation 


This will result in incorrect levying of 


sewerage revenue 


Revenue: -Incorrect tariffs used in 


Management is not in 


billing for refuse (EX.64) 


agreement with the finding. 


Finding: 


The following differences were 


The chief financial officer should 


identified when recalculating revenue reconcile the approved manual 


In terms of section 74(1) 
and (2) of the Local 
Government: Municipal 
Systems Act, 2000 (Act no. 


from refuse: 


Extrapolated error = R2 605 059.75 


90VERSTATEMENT 


The tariffs used for billing does not 
agree to the council approved tariffs 
for related zoning 


valuation roll to that captured on the 32 of 2000), a municipality 


financial system and ensure that 


differences are corrected. The 


is obliged to adopt and 
implement a tariff policy on 


financial system should be regularly the levying of fees for 
updated to reflect approved changes municipal services, 
in the property valuation and zoning including water, ensuring 


as limitation of scope 


that consumers pay for 
services in proportion to 


Manager: 

Revenue 


129 




130 



262 

Revenue: Electricity deficiencies in 

monthly readings (EX. 65) 

Finding: 

The following monthly readings were 

not correctly captured on the system 

based on the inconsistencies noted in 

the sequence of meter readings: 

The following units were incorrectly 

calculated: 

The extrapolated error = R2 356 

671.87 

• Meter reading are not 
reviewed for factual accuracy 
before being captured on the 
system for billing. 

• Monthly exception reports 
for abnormal billing were not 
generated and reviewed for 
accuracy 

Revenue recognised for these 

accounts is misstated 

The chief financial officer should 

ensure that meter readings are 

reviewed for factual correctness by 

generating and reviewing exception 

reports so that errors can be timely 

corrected 

Management is in 
agreement with the finding 
of the Auditor General 



Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 

275 

Revenue: Rates: Private Property 

registered as Municipal 

Property.(Ex.l08) (EX.108) 

Finding: 

The following properties registered 

under Mantsopa Local Municipality are 

not municipal properties. 

The chief financial officer should 

perform regular updates of the 

valuation roll to reflect current 

property transfers 

Management disagree with 

audit finding; please refer 

to the attached spread 

sheet and supporting 

documentation. 



Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


131 











278 

Revenue - Interest levied at incorrect 

rate and balance (Ex. 125) 

Finding: 

(ii. Refer the approved interest rate 

policy 

(iii) The estimated impact of the 

interest differential is calculated as 

follows; 

(a) Interest is levied on accounts 

outstanding at year end. The following 

deficiencies have been reported in 

respect of management of debtors 

(i) Incorrect billing: Refer to 

findingEX.35 (CoAF No. 10/2015) 

(ii) lncorrect debt writes off: EX. 52: 

(CoAF No.10/2015) 

(b) (i) Interest on the outstanding 

is calculated using the un 

incorrect interest rate policy; 

The chief financial officer should 

ensure that interest is levied in terms 

of approved policy and appropriately 

calculated. 

Management comments did not 

address the fact that interest is levied 

at incorrect debtor accounts as per 

findings issued in respect of 

consumer services 

Management disagree 

with the audit finding. The 

correct interest rate has 

been used on all 

outstanding 

debtors. Please refer to the 

attached calculations. 



Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


132 





281 

Receivables: Deficiencies on indigents 

(CoAF 29/2015) (EX.127) 

Finding: 

(1) The following 
customers were 
incorrectly given 
the indigents 
subsidy and 
management 
realised that at the 

end of the financial 
year. Management 
only reversed the 
write off given but 
did not reverse the 
subsidy that was 
given: 

(2) The following 
customers were 
given the indigent 
subsidy and were 
classified 

as indigents on the 
SEBATA system 
but could not be 

traced to the 
indigent register 
and their indigent's 
application forms 
could not be 

obtained: 
Extrapolation = R8 
313 575.23 

(3) The following 
employee of the 
municipality who 
was earning more 
than R1 800 was 

included in the 
indigent register: 

Management should thoroughly check 

the changes made on the system to 

ensure that the changes are supported 

by appropriate documents. 

The following customers are 

classified as indigents on the 

system and can be traced to the 





Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


133 




indigent register (see coiumn with 

no. on the indigent register), 

attached are the indigent 

appiication forms. 







290 

Revenue: Water - Differences in tariffs 

used (Ex.159) (EX.159) 

Finding: 

The foiiowing differences were 

identified in between the amount 

biiied for water and recaicuiated 

amount using the approved tariffs: 

Tariffs appiied for biiiing do not agree 

to zoning tariffs approved per vaiuation 

roii 

Revenue from water is overstated by 

R1 565 833 

The chief financiai officer shouid 

ensure that biiiing for service charges 

is done using councii approved 

tariffs. Changes in property zoning as 

approved by councii and 

management must be updated on 

the vaiuation roii 

Management is not in 

agreement with the audit 

finding. We have 

investigated the differences 

and it was noted that the 

auditor made a mistake 

with the recaicuiations of 

water tariffs. Please refer 

to the attached spread 

sheet. 

Management has oniy 
recaicuiated September 

2014 to indicate that the 

tariffs have been caicuiated 
correctiy by the 
municipaiity. 



Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 

304 

PDO: ROADS AND STORM WATER: 

Reported performance not reiiabie 

(168) (EX.168) 

Finding: 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurabiiity of 
KPIs approved 
by Councii 

Manager: Roads 
and storm water 

Services 

Direc 

Techr 

304 

Revenue: Service charges: Meters 

couid not be traced to the financiai 

system (Ex. 162) Finding: (a) The 

foiiowing meters couid not be traced to 

The chief financiai officer shouid 

ensure that aii consumers are biiied 

for service charges. 

Management is in 

agreement with the finding 

regarding the foiiowing 

meters that couid not be 



Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


134 



the financial system (SABATA) to 

confirm billing for service charges 

The following sites identified had no 

meters therefore they were not billed 

for the services provided. 


traced to the financial 

system. 





309 

Revenue: Property rates: No manual 

reconciliation between manual 

valuation roll and SABATA (Ex. 173) 

Finding: 

Contrary to the above requirement, it 

was identified that a manual 

reconciliation between the rate-able 

valuation as per the valuation rolls and 

the rates and taxes raised through the 

municipal system was not performed 

during the year. 

The cause of the above is that the 

municipality does not have the 

effective internal controls to ensure 

that the reconciliations are performed. 

The impact of the above is that the 

rates and taxes of the municipality are 

overstated by R4 566 536 

The chief financial officer should 

ensure that a manual reconciliation 

between the rate-able valuation as 
per the valuation rolls and the rates 
and taxes raised through the 
municipal system should be 
performed by the municipality 




Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


135 












310 

Revenue: Electricity - Differences in 

tariffs used (Ex. 180) 

Finding: 

The following differences were 

identified between the amount 

charged and the recalculation using the 

approved tariffs: 

Management did not review the 

calculations done by the system to 

confirm accuracy 

This will result in the overstatement of 

revenue by a projected error of R3 678 

985.45 

The chief financial officer should 

implement quality controls over 

billing systems to ensure valid and 

accurate accounts 

In terms of section 74(1) 
and (2) of the Local 
Government: Municipal 
Systems Act, 2000 (Act no. 

32 of 2000), a municipality 
is obliged to adopt and 
implement a tariff policy on 
the levying of fees for 
municipal services, 
including water, ensuring 
that consumers pay for 
services in proportion to 
their use of that service and 

that the tariff reflects the 
costs reasonably associated 
with the rendering of 
service, including capital, 
operating maintenance, 
administration and 
replacement costs. 

Management is in 

disagreement with the 

finding. See the following 

calculations for July and 

August 2014 done and 

explanations provided by 

Management as similar 

oversights apply in respect 

of other months raised in 

the Communication. Please 

refer to the attached 

spreadsheet 



Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 

327 

Revenue - Unbilled revenue: Interims 

used to calculate the provision for 

unbilled revenue (Ex. 193) 

The chief financial officer should 

ensure that provisions for unbilled 

revenue is based on valid and 

accurate information. 

Management disagree with 

the audit finding based on 

the following: 



Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


136 






Finding:) 


BASIS OF IMPAIRMENT 


For the calculation of the Unbilled 
revenue interims were used for the 
following books which resulted in 
having zero on total days billed and 
June consumption days. This is distorts 
the whole calculation as the books that 
have interims effectively are not 
provided for. 


CALCULATION 


The impairment calculation 
is done on forward-looking 
basis and therefore use the 
number of days that the 
financial asset is still 
expected to be outstanding 
based on the information 
available at year-end. A 
combination of key 
indicators is use to 
determine a list of debtors 
that are most likely to be 
impaired. 


- Debtor 

type: Residential, Business, 
Indigent, Government, etc. 

The following matrix is use 
to determine a list of 
debtors most likely to be 
impaired A report from the 
system should supply 
suitable information 
regarding the following 

- Ageing of each 

debtor 


- Active / inactive 


account 







- Tenants' / 

owners' account 

Check scoring 

explained in management's 

response. 

After the scoring of the 

debtors a report is compile 

classifying the debtors into 

the following criteria. 





332 

Cash and cash equivalents: Bank 
reconciliation not performed timeously 
(Ex.178) (EX.178) 

Finding: the following month's bank 
reconciliations were inspected and it 
was noted the bank reconciliations 
were not performed timeously after 
each month end to ensure accuracy 
and completeness of the accounting 
records. 

Management controls in place are not 

timely implemented. 

Management disagrees with the 
audit finding. The whole bank 
reconciliations are performed on a 
monthly basis. The reason for the 
late review is when the municipality 
still needs clarity on certain amounts 
which forms part of the month that is 
reconciled. Flowever the FNB account 
is currently done on monthly basis. 

Bank Recon to be 
performed monthly and 
signed off by supervisor 

Monthly Basis 

7 Months 

reconciliations 

done and 
signed off 

Manager: Budget 
and Reporting - 
Feedback by 
Internal Audit 

CFO 

334 

Planning: Commitment register not 
reviewed (EX.l) 

Finding: No evidence could be obtained 

to confirm that the Chief financial 

officer reviewed the commitment 

register for completeness and accuracy 

The signed commitments register was 

not submitted for audit 

The review and approval of the 
commitment register by the chief 
financial officer was not confirmed. 

The chief financial officer should 

review and approve commitments 

register before the amounts 

therein are used to compile financial 

statement. Confirmation of such 

reviews should be submitted to the 

AGSA for audit. 

The chief financial officer 
should review and approve 
commitments register 
before the amounts 
therein are used to compile 
financial statement. 

Confirmation of such 

reviews should be 

submitted to the AGSA for 

audit 

28 February 

2016 


Mr KD Pharoe 
(Supply Chain 
Manager) 

Mr. K 
(CFO) 

336 

Employee costs: Leave: Supporting 
evidence for leave taken not submitted 
(Ex.154) (EX.154) 

The head of corporate services 
should implement appropriate filing 
and approval processes to ensure 

Leave files to be checked 
against attendance register 
and reports there of 
submitted for evaluation to 



Manager: Human 
Resources 

Direci 

Corpc 

Servic 


138 





Finding: 1. (l)the following employee 

took special leave to attended his 

father's funeral but no death certificate 

was attached to the leave form for 

special leave . 

(2)No evidence (leave application 
forms) could be obtained regarding 
unpaid leave for the following 
employees. 

Management did not ensure that 

documentation supporting the 

application for special leave are 

appropriately filed and safeguarded 

that documentation is available to 
support taken approved. 

the Director Corporate 
Services. 





338 

Employee cost: Leave: Non-compliance 
to Collective Service Agreement 
(Ex.158) (EX.158) 

Finding: (l)The following employees 

were granted annual leave days of less 

than 24 days. 

(2)The following employee did not take 

a minimum of 16 days within the leave 

cycle. 

Management did not ensure that 

collective service agreement is 

implemented across allow staff 

Non-compliance with provisions of 

collective agreements. 

The head of corporate services 

should implement controls designed 

to ensure that all staff are given the 

requisite leave days as per collective 

agreement. 

Leave files are to be 
checked against attendance 
registers and reports 
thereof submitted to the 
Director Corporate services 
for evaluation and approval 



Manager: Fluman 
Resources 

Direci 

Corpc 

Servic 


139 


341 

Employee Costs - SDL payments not 
submitted on time (Ex. 164) (EX.164) 
Finding: Contrary to the 
requirements above, the following 
skills development levy (SDL) 
payments was not paid before the 7th 
of the following month: 

Late payments made to SARS will result 

in penalties and interest that must be 

paid and will have to be classified as 

fruitless and wasteful. 

The municipality is facing cash flow 

problems due to poor collection of 

debtors and poor cash flow 

management. 

It is recommended to management 

that: 

• EMP201 forms should be 
reviewed by a person 
independent from the one 
capturing the data. 

• These forms should be 
submitted and paid to 

SARS before the seventh of 
the month following the 
declaration. 

The controls are in place 

but due to cash flow 

constraints at times 

payments are not made 

within 30 days. 

Ongoing 

Payroll clerk 

Accountant 

Expenditure 

CFO 

CFO 

343 

Employee costs: Overtime pay-outs not 
in accordance with Municipal Overtime 
Policy (Ex.166) - CoAF No. 60/2015 
(EX.166) 

Finding: Contrary to the above, the 

following employees were paid for in 

monetary value for the overtime 

executed on weekend days and/or 

public holidays: 

(Also indicated the percentage of 
overtime payment to the employees' 
salary. Thus, where the monthly 
compensation for overtime constitutes 
more than 30 per cent of the 
employee's monthly salary.) 

The municipal has not implemented its 

overtime policy. 

Non-compliance with municipal 

overtime policy 

The municipality is facing cash flow 
problems thus paying additional 

The head of corporate services 

should ensure implement the 

municipal overtime policy or apply 

for council for amendments. 

Implementation of the 
Collective agreement with 
regard to overtime worked 
to be implemented - 
Challenges are faced with 
Technical Department 
where employees work 
more hours than stipulated 
in the Collective agreement 



Manager: Human 
Resources/Accou 
ntant Expenditure 

CFO/I 

Corpc 

Servic 


140 




overtime could worsen the cash f\ow 

crisis. 







349 

Employee Costs: Internal Control 
Deficiency Identified (PC15 report) 
(Ex.172) (EX.172) 

Finding: No evidence could be obtained 
that the master file amendment report 
(PC15 - Audit Report on Payroll 

Changes) is reviewed and followed up 
by a senior independent official. 

This is due to a weak internal control 

environment in the Payroll section of 

the municipality and also a lack of 

understanding of the PC 15 report (not 

user friendly for Mantsopa employees). 

Management should ensure that 

sound controls exist to mitigate the 

risk of material misstatement of 

employee related cost by 

implementing the following controls: 

1. The master file amendment report 

(PC15 - Audit Report on Payroll 

Changes) is reviewed and followed 

up by a senior independent official; 

2. Sufficient training is provided to 
the appropriate personnel to ensure 
their understanding of the PC 15 
report. 

Users of the Payroll system 
to be trained on using the 
system. Understanding and 
using the internal controls 
provided by the system. 

We are in contact with 

Sebata FMS regarding the 
training on interpreting the 
PC15 report. 



Accountant: 

Expenditure 

CFO 

351 

Employee costs-Prior year exception on 
presentation and disclosure (Ex. 175) 
(EX.175) 

Finding: No detailed remuneration 

disclosures were made relating to 

councillor remuneration for the 

following persons: 

- Mayor 

- Speaker 

- Exco members 

- Chief whip 

Management did not ensure that prior 

year matters were corrected and 

resolved 

The comparative amounts in respect of 
employee costs are misstated. 

The chief financial officer should 

ensure that comparative amounts 

are corrected. 

In preparation of AFS, to be 
insured that comparative 
figures are correct. 



PWC 

CFO 

353 

Planning: Control environment - 
employee background checks not 
performed (EX.IO) 

The director of corporate service 
should ensure that the municipal 
recruitment and selection policy 
implemented. 

All new recruits will be 

checked in accordance with 
the recruitment policy. 



Manager: Fluman 
Resources 

Direci 

Corpc 

Servic 


141 








Finding: Contrary to the Municipality 
Recruitment and selection policy, no 
evidence was obtained to confirm 
that background checks for the 
following official were 
performed before appointment. 







355 

Planning_ Effectiveness of the audit 

committee not evaluated by council 

(EX.15) 

Finding: During the review of council 

minutes, the following was noted; 

(a) No evidence is obtained to confirm 

that the municipal council reviewed 

the effectiveness of the audit 

committee during the year 

(b) No evidence is obtained to 

confirm that the audit committee 

tabled reports on governance and risk 

management in the municipal council 

and or such reports were discussed by 

councillors 

Lack of appropriate skills, training and 

capacity by municipal council to 

evaluate the effectiveness of audit 

committee. 

The municipal council is unable to 

determine if the audit committee is 

effectively discharging its 

responsibilities. 

The municipal council should obtain 
the requisite skills and training to 
ensure adequate oversight over the 
activities of the audit committee. 

Letter to be written to 
Provincial Treasury to assist 
the municipal councillors 
on how to evaluate the 

effectiveness of the audit 

committee. 

30/06/2016 

On-going 

Manager: Internal 
Audit 

Munii 

Couni 

Mana 


142 



Planning: Control environment - No 
individual performance appraisal for 
employees. (EX. 20) same as for Ex. 202 


Finding: There was no evidence that 
the municipality performed the 
individual performance appraisals 
of other levels of the employees beside 
the section 56 managers. 


The same issue was reported in the 
2013/14 management report. 


Performance management system 
has been implemented to section 56 
managers but not extended to cover al 
municipal employees. 


Performance management system has 
not been fully implemented as the 
performance of senior management 
depends on the performance of staff 
within their span of control 


The accounting officer, should ensure 
that the performance management 
system is implement and the 
individual performance appraisal is 
performed for other levels 
of municipal staff. 

The municipality should 
implement systems to ensure that 
employees are held accountable for 
their duties and consequence 
management is enforced. 


(EX. 20) same as for Ex. 202 


Refer to discussions in 
meeting held!!! 


Manager: Human 
Resources 


Non-performance by staff and reasons 
thereof is not timely identified and 


corrective actions taken 


Span of accountability is limited to 
senior management but not extended 
to all municipal staff 


143 



Consequence management for poor 

performance cannot be implemented 

without performance assessment 







360 

Planning: Control environment - Job 

description for new employee not 

timely signed (EX.21) 

Finding: The job description of the 

following employee was signed long 

after the appointment date. The head 

of human resource management has 

not designed, communicated and 

implemented internal control 

procedures for the appointment of 

new staff 

Employee responsibilities are not 

clearly defined to the employee on the 

date of appointment to enable 

continuous performance monitoring 

and evaluation. 

The head of human resource 

management should design, 

communicate, implement and 

continuously monitor standard 

processes and procedures for 

the appointment of new staff. 

New entrants job 
description are to be signed 
upon appointment by all 
new recruits. 



Manager: Human 
Resources 

Direci 

Corpc 

Servic 

362 

Planning: Control environment - No HR 

plan in place (EX. 22) 

Finding: No evidence could be obtained 

to confirm that the municipality has 

developed an HR plan which 

The head of human resource 

management should design and 

develop a human resource plan to 

address current and future human 

resource requirements. 

The HR plan is being 
developed and should serve 
in the LLF in March 2016, 
and there after submitted 
to committee and finally to 
council with all policies for 
approval 



Manager: Human 
Resources 

Direci 

Corpc 

Servic 


144 



addresses current and future human 

resource requirements 

The head of human resource 

management has not designed and 

deveioped the pian 

The municipaiity is unabie to 

determine current and future human 

resource requirements based on 

service deiivery vision 







364 

Pianning: Monitoring - Shortcomings 

with regard to action pians (EX. 24) 

Finding: Contrary to the above, the 

foiiowing shortcomings were identified 

on the action pians to address internai 

audit findings and externai auditors' 

findings; 

1. It was determined 

that management does not in aii 

instances act on aii recommendations 

of internai audit. 

2. The action pian to address the 

externai audit findings does not 

indicated the root cause and status/ 

progress of the findings . 

Management did not evaiuate and 

consider aii findings from internai 

Management and oversight 

committees shouid monitor 

impiementation of internai audit 

recommendations and hoid 

managers that did not act on these 

recommendations accountabie. 

The action pian shouid indicate the 
root cause in order to address the 
finding appropriateiy. It should also 
indicate the status/ progress of 
implementation for monitor 
purposes. 

Action plan to form part of 
departmental meeting to 
check on progress made 
and respond to audit team 
weekly 



Managers on all 
levels in all 
departments 

Internal Auditor 

to oversee 

execution 

Munii 

Mana 

and a 

Direci 


145 



audit, the recommendations are also 

not in all instances followed up. 

The impact of the above is that 

deficiencies in internal controls that 

are not addressed may result in 

misstatements that could lead to 

unfavourable audit outcomes. 







366 

Unauthorised, Irregular, Fruitless & 

Wasteful expenditure not 

communicated to the MEC and the 

Auditor-General (Ex. 189) (EX. 189) 

Finding: No evidence that the 

accounting officer informed the MEC 

for local government and Auditor- 

General about any instances of 

irregular, unauthorised and fruitless 

and wasteful expenditure could not be 

obtained. 

The municipal manager did not ensure 

that the required communication is 

done. 

Non-compliance with the MFMA. 

The municipal officer should 

implement controls designed to 

ensure compliance with prescribed 

legislation. 

Communication Letter has 

been written to MEC of 

Local Government and 

Auditor-General. 

30/06/2016 

On-going 

Manager: Internal 
Audit 

Munii 

Mana 


146 




368 

Procurement: Quotations register for 

potentiai suppiiers is not in piace 

(EX.49) 

Finding: , the quotation register for the 

potentiai suppiiers with their quoted 

prices is not in piace. 

SCM Management did not compiy with 

the SCM Reguiation 

A record of quotations obtained during 

procurement process is not maintained 

as proof of compiiance with SCM 

reguiations 

The head of SCM shouid ensure that 

a quotation register for 

recording potentiai suppiiers and 

their quoted prices shouid be 

maintained. 

The head of SCM shouid 
ensure that a quotation 
register for 
recording potentiai 
suppiiers and their quoted 
prices shouid be 
maintained 

31 March 2016 



CFO 

369 

Procurement: SCM Poiicy not catering 

for the deciaration of interest (EX. 51) 

Finding: 

The SCM poiicy does not cater for the 

foiiowing: 

1. that deciarations of interests, in 

terms of SCM reguiation 46(2)(d)&(e) 

2. that aii deciarations by the 

accounting officer must be made to the 

mayor of the municipaiity or the board 

of directors of the municipai entity who 

must ensure that such deciarations are 

recorded in the register; and 

The head of suppiy chain 

management shouid review and 

update the SCM poiicy to ensure 

compiiance with SCM and reiated 

reguiations. 

The head of suppiy chain 
management shouid 
review and update the SCM 
poiicy to ensure compiiance 
with SCM and reiated 
reguiations 

31 May 2016 


Mr. KD Pharoe 
(SCM Manager) 

Mr M 


147 




3. that appropriate action is taken 

against any official or other role player 

who commits a breach of the code of 

ethical standards 

Municipal supply chain management 

policy does not comply with supply 

chain management regulation issued 

by National Treasury. 

The supply chain management policy 

does not facilitate compliance by the 

municipality with SCM regulation. 







371 

Accumulated Surplus: Differences 

between AFS and TB/GL (EX.228) 

Finding: 

The following differences were 

identified between the amount on the 

annual financial statements and the 

amount on the Trial Balance 

The following differences were 

identified between the note and 

journals. 

The annual financial statements were 

not appropriately reviewed by the 

management 

The chief financial officer should 

ensure that the prior year 

adjustments are properly reviewed 

and prior year figures are correctly 

adjusted. 

Management could not 
agree with the finding The 
total amount according to 
the final AFS correspond 
100% with the amount in 
the final general ledger. 
Differences that may have 
occurred, was rectified 
during the audit period. 
Management will ensure 
that the amounts are 
correct in the general 
ledger, and the AFS will be 
reviewed in future to 
ensure that the general 
ledger and the AFS figures 
correspond. 

31 July 2016 


CFO/Manager 

BTO / PWC 

CFO 


148 




This will result in the misstatement of 

Accumulated surplus. 







373 

PPE - FAR for immovable: 

Shortcomings on asset registers 

(EX.107) 

Finding: 

Contrary to the above act and policy , 

the following shortcomings were 

identified in the assets register 

a) the following information were not 

included in the assets registers; b) In 

the following assets registers , not all 

the assets were linked to a location ( 

street address or latitude and longitude 

were not indicated ), 

Inadequate quality control reviews 

over the compilation of fixed asset 

register 

The asset register does not include 

information prescribed and required 

for financial reporting on property, 

plant and equipment. 

The Chief financial officer should 

ensure that the asset registers 

contains the prescribed information 

that is required to support financial 

reporting on property plant and 

equipment 

The Land Register will be 
revised to include the 

information as indicated 

above. 

The Movable FAR will be 

revised to include the 

information requested 

above. 

The FAR is being reviewed 

and updated on an on- 
going basis for 

identification and other 

information, which may 

have been omitted or 

unavailable, and the final 

2015 register will include 

most of the details noted 

by the auditor above. 

It should be noted that 

location information for 

certain assets / 

components are available 

on drawings at this stage 

e.g. Water. These drawings 

can be used to identify the 



Asset Manager 

CFO 


149 









location of assets existing 

on the FAR at present. 

Municipality will ensure 

that this location 

information will be 

included in the FAR in 

future. 





377 

TGM 18:lnfrastructure assets: General 

report findings (Ex. 224) (EX.224) 

Finding: 

Contrary to the above provisions, the 

following findings are identified during 

the testing of water, sanitation and 

roads infrastructure: 

WATER 

1. The municipality does not have an 

approved policy in place that addresses 

routine maintenance of water 

infrastructure. 

2. Conditional assessments were not 

done on water infrastructure to inform 

the routine water infrastructure 

maintenance plan and budget. 

Management should ensure that the 

administration of water, sanitation 

and roads infrastructure projects is 

effective and reviewed. 

Policy to be put in place 
and adopted by Council. 

7 March 2016 


Asset Manager/ 

Technical 

Department 

MM 


150 





3. The municipality has not achieved 

blue drop status for water quality. 

4. The municipality did not spend 

budgeted maintenance budget in full 

SANITATION 

1. The municipality has not achieved 

green drop status for waste water 

management. 

2. Sanitation projects in progress in 

2014-15 do not address the cause of 

the sanitation backlog. 

3. 1 of 1 sanitation infrastructure 

projects has exceeded their planned 

completion date. 

ROADS AND STORMWATER 

1. The municipality does not have an 

approved policy in place for the 

planning, management and reporting 

of roads infrastructure. 

2. The selected roads infrastructure 

renewal projects have exceeded the 

planned completion date on average 

by 155 days to date. 

Management did not ensure the 

effective administration of their water, 








151 




sanitation and roads infrastructure 

projects. 

Possibie overspending on projects and 

iack of service deiivery to the 

community. 







381 

Investment poiicy does not compiy 

with the asset management (EX. 133) 

(EX.133) 

Finding: 

The investment poiicy has not been 

aiigned to the requirements of the 

MFMA 

This wiii resuit in the non-compiiance 

with the MFMA 13(2) Municipai 

investment reguiations 3(l)(a) and 3(2) 

(GNR.308 of 01 Aprii 2005) 

The chief financial officer should 
ensure that the investment policy is 
amended, updated and approved to 
comply with the municipal 
investment regulations issued in 
terms of the MFMA 

Management agrees with 

the following: 

A new and updated policy 

will be approved by Council 

in March 2016. 

Investing in Capital assets 
separately from Grants - 
from surplus revenue. 

31 March 2016 


Asset Manager/ 
Budget Manager 
and other 

managers 

CFO 

384 

PPE: Movabie assets: Dupiication of 

asset numbers (EX. 27) 

Finding: When reviewing performing a 

high ievei review of the movabie asset 

register, identified that there are 

dupiicate asset numbers. Inadequate 

controls over the allocation of unique 

asset number to individual assets. 

The chief financial officer should 
design, communicate and 
implement controls to ensure that 
unique asset identification numbers 
are allocated only once. 

The fixed asset register should be 
reviewed by the chief financial officer 
to ensure that unique asset 
identification numbers are not 
duplicated. 

We acknowledge the finding - the 
barcode scanner cannot read worn or 
damaged barcodes, therefor the last 
barcode scanned would be 
duplicated. 

Re-barcoding of all worn or 
damaged barcodes. 

Process already performed 
and new barcodes were 
given to the duplicated 
assets. List of new barcodes 

available at Asset Division. 

On-going process. 

Resolved during 
audit process. 
On-going 
process. 


Asset Manager 

CFO 

386 

PPE: Movable assets: FAR not complete 

(EX.67) 

The chief financial officer should 

investigate the assets not included in 




Asset Manager 

CFO 


152 



Finding: 

During the testing for completeness of 

assets, the following assets physically 

identified could not be traced to the 

fixed asset register. 

All assets have not been recorded in 

the fixed asset register. 

Quarterly asset count is not effective as 

they did not account for all municipal 

assets 

The fixed assets register for movable 

assets is not complete and is 

understated by projected error 

amounting R362 342.18 

the asset register and ensure that all 

assets have been recorded 






388 

PPE: Movable assets: Incorrect asset 

description (EX. 73) 

Finding: 

The following assets were incorrectly 

described in the asset register. 

The fixed assets has not been reviewed 

and compared to quarterly asset count 

reports 

The incorrect description will lead to 

incorrect classification of the assets 

The chief financial officer should 

investigate the matter and make 

corrections where necessary. 

The descriptions will be 

changed. 



Asset Manager 

CFO 


153 



and incorrect depreciation rate 

caicuiations. 







390 

PPE: Movabie assets: Prior year assets 

not verified not resoived (EX.84) 

Finding: 

The foiiowing assets not physicaiiy 

verified in the prior year stiii couid not 

be traced to the current year 

other fixed asset register for movabie 

assets. Quarteriy assets counts are not 

used to update the asset register. 

Quarteriy surpiuses and shortages 

report as per asset count are 

not investigated and used to update 

the asset register 

The asset register for movabie assets is 

not compiete. 

The chief financiai officer shouid 

ensure that quarteriy reports on 

shortages and surpiuses are 

investigated and fixed asset register 

updated accordingiy 




Asset Manager 

CFO 

392 

PPE: Movabie assets: Remaining usefui 

iife for movabie assets not inciuded in 

FAR (EX.95) 

Finding: 

The fixed assets register does not 

inciude a coiumn for the remaining 

usefui iife. The fixed asset does not 

inciude aii the requisite information 

deemed important 

The chief financiai officer shouid 

ensure that the FAR inciudes aii the 

information prescribed and or 

required for financiai reporting. 

The fixed asset does not inciude aii 

the requisite information deemed 

important 

The asset register does not inciude 

aii the prescribed information 

Management is in 
agreement with the finding. 

Management has taken 

note of the finding and had 

adjusted the FAR to inciude 

the remaining usefui iife of 

assets. 



Asset Manager 

CFO 


154 





The asset register does not include all 

the prescribed information. 







394 

PPE: Movable assets: Assets in poor 

working order and or scrapped assets 

not removed from FAR (EX. 110) 

Finding: 

1. Differences in asset 
description per listing of 
assets not in working order 
and same asset in the FAR. 

2. The following assets are 
listed as not in working 
condition but have not been 

removed from the FAR 

3. The assets below were 
indicated as scrapped in the 
FAR but were not written 

off: 

4. The head of asset 
management did not 
implement municipal asset 
management policy. 

5. The fixed asset register for 
movable assets may include 
assets without any service 
potential or from which the 
municipality does not expect 
future economic benefits. 

The chief financial officer should 

design and implement controls to 

ensure that the FAR is regularly 

reviewed for accuracy and 

completeness and old and obsolete 

assets are disposed and removed. 




Asset Manager 

CFO 

401 

Expenditure: Repairs and maintenance 

- No purchase order submitted (CoAF 

12/2015) (EX.32) 

Finding: 

It could not be confirmed if the 

following transaction was approved 

as no purchase order was submitted 

The chief financial officer should 

design and implement effective 

controls to ensure that recorded 

transactions are supported by 

sufficient documentation to provide 

an audit trail of the requisition and 

approval of the expense 

W/SSA 

Management submitted 

the appointment letter for 

WSSA. Matter resolved. 

Network & Computing 

(Pty)Ltd- Resolved 



Asset Manager 

CFO 


155 




and the invoice was not signed to 

confirm receipt of goods/services and 

approval of expenditure. Cognisance is 

however noted that the municipality 

has a service level agreement 

with WSSA to perform ad hoc support 

and maintenance services but such 

services should be requested. There is 

no evidence that the services provided 

were requested by the municipality. 

Management did not exercise proper 

and effective controls to ensure and 

confirm that the 

sufficient documentation is maintained 

to support expenditure transactions. 

The municipality may be invoiced for 

expenses that were not authorised. 

The municipality may be invoiced for 

services not requested (as per the 

purchase order). 


Management submitted 

the service level 

agreement. Inspected the 

SLA and confirmed that the 

invoices relating to this SLA 

will not be accompanied by 

purchase orders as it 

stipulates that services will 

be provided weekly 

between Sam and 5pm, 

and that remote 

maintenance and support 

will be provided via email 

or telephone. Matter 

resolved. 





403 

Expenditure: Repairs and maintenance 

- Quotations from at least 3 different 

suppliers were not obtained (EX.39) 

Finding: 

The following transactions were not 

processed in compliance 

with procurement regulations as 

the required number of quotations or 

The head of supply chain should 

implement municipal procurement 

policy and ensure that the policy 

complies with the prescripts of 

procurement laws and regulations 




SCM 

CFO 


156 




approval for deviation were not 

obtained. 

The head of supply chain management 

unit did not implement the municipal 

procurement policy 

Non-compliance with laws and 

regulations applicable to municipal 

procurement processes 







406 

Expenditure: Repairs and maintenance 

- Quantity on the invoice does not 

agree to the purchase order and goods 

received voucher (EX.40) 

Finding: 

(1) In carrying out the audit, it was 

noted that the purchase order, 

quotation and invoice had different 

quantities recorded. The purchase 

order was for 2 quantities, one for 

R3 993.99 (as seen below) and another 

for Rll 756.01 (recorded in a different 

sub-vote in the general ledger) 

whereas the quotation and the invoice 

was for 3 quantities of R 5 250 (excl. 

VAT) each. 

The following accounts refer; 

(2) Procedure to verify supplier details, 

quantities, etc could not be performed 

for the transactions below as there was 

(1) There should be controls in place 
to ensure that invoices being 
processed agree to purchase orders 
and quotations. 

(2) Management should ensure that 
sufficient and usable supporting 
documentation is kept. 

Management is not in 

agreement with the finding, 

as the quantities as per 

requisition, quotation and 

invoice are still the same 

(three machine to be 

repaired). Please refer to 

the attached supporting 

documentation 

Management response is 

acknowledged. 

Management should 
however note that a 
requisition does not 
constitute a purchase 
order. The purchase order 
should thus agree to the 
invoice and quotation, 
which is not the case. 
Management should 
ensure that the details, 
(description, quantity and 
amount) on the purchase 
order, requisition, invoice 
and quotation correspond. 

Management should 
however note that a 
requisition does not 



SCM 

CFO 


157 





no purchase order and/or quotation 

supporting the invoice. 

(1) Where the quantity suppiied per 

the invoice differs to the purchase 

order, management did not ensure 

that the quantities suppiied aiong with 

the cost agree to the purchase order. 

(2) Management did not exercise 
proper and effective controis to ensure 
and confirm that supporting 
documentation is kept. 

The municipaiity may receive 

quantities that they did not order. 


constitute a purchase 
order. The purchase order 
shouid thus agree to the 
invoice and quotation, 
which is not the case. 
Management shouid 
ensure that the detaiis, 
(description, quantity and 
amount) on the purchase 
order, requisition, invoice 
and quotation correspond. 





408 

Expenditure: Repairs and maintenance 

- Purchase order and quotation amount 

differ from the invoiced amount 

(EX.42) 

Finding: 

In carrying out the audit, it was noted 

that the invoiced amount was more 

than the amount quoted by the 

suppiier (per the quotation) and the 

purchase order. No supporting 

documentation was provided to notify 

of the price increase. 

Management did not ensure that 

where there are price changes that 

sufficient supporting documentation 

Where there is a iong deiay from 

when quotation is received and 

purchase order prepared, the 

municipaiity shouid request from the 

suppiier a new quotation or a ietter 

of notification of price increases that 

shouid be authorised by 

management. 

Management disagree with 
the finding, the invoice 
amount as indicated on the 
exception is unknown by 
management but the 
invoice amount as 
submitted by management 
to Auditor Generai was 
amounting to R49 218.80. 

However the variance was 

noted between the 
quotation and the invoice 
amount due to the fact that 
the traveiiing and iabour 
costs were not inciuded on 
the quotation. Refer to the 
attached supporting 
documentation - 
quotation, tax invoice and 
payment advice) 



SCM 

CFO 


158 




and authorisation of the increase is 

avaiiabie. 

The municipaiity may be invoiced for 

amounts that exceed budget per vote 

which may resuit to unauthorised 

expenditures. 







410 

Expenditure: Repairs and maintenance 

- Invoice for which payabie is raised 

was not authorised (EX. 43) 

Finding: 

In carrying out the audit to test the cut 

off of repairs and maintenance, it was 

noted that a journai was passed to 

account for expenditure without the 

reievant supporting documentation, 

i.e. (purchase order, goods received 

voucher) and consequentiy raised a 

creditor provision on 30 June 2015. 

Note 

A journai was passed at year end to 

raise the expense and creditor 

(SEBATA) for services rendered. 

Aithough the municipaiity has a service 

ievei agreement with SEBATA, the 

The chief financiai officer shouid 

ensure that supporting 

documentation is avaiiabie to 

support expenditure recognition 

Management agrees with 

the finding, however this 

was an isoiated case for the 

sampie tested where the 

invoice is not signed, 

invoices are normaiiy 

signed as proof that the 

service has been rendered 

and/or goods have been 

received in good order. 



SCM 

CFO 


159 




invoice was not signed by a deiegated 

officiai to confirm that the municipaiity 

was invoiced for services actuaiiy 

rendered. 

Management did not exercise proper 

and effective controis to ensure that 

sufficient supporting documentation is 

avaiiabie and is authorised to ensure 

that payabies are not raised for 

services that were not rendered. 

The municipaiity couid incur financiai 

iosses. 







412 

Transfers and subsidies: VAT inciuded 

in indigent support -Eskom suppiies 

(EX.74) 

Finding: Incorrect recording of 

transactions in the generai iedger. 

Grants and subsidies paid as disciosed 

in note 36 to the annuai financiai 

statements is overstated with an 

amount of R93 177,73 and VAT controi 

account understated with the amount. 

Indigent support eiectricity (Eskom 

suppiies) as disciosed in note 36 to the 

annuai financiai statements is 

overstated with an amount of R93 

177,73 as the expense was recorded in 

The chief financiai officer shouid 
impiement adequate controis over 
the processing of daiiy transactions 
and periodic reconciiiations. 

Auditor's conciusion 

Refer to jounaiC.1.20 adjusting 

Eskom indigent support for VAT 
inciuded therein. The journai was 
audited for vaiidity and ciassification 
and no exception noted 

The VAT portion was 

rectified with Journai No. 

0012689. Attached find 

Journai and supporting 

documentation. 

Eskom indigent support for 

VAT inciuded therein. The 

journai was audited for 
vaiidity and ciassification 
and no exception noted. 

N/A 

N/A 

Accountant: 

Expenditure 

CFO 


160 





the general ledger Inclusive of VAT as 

Indicated below: 







415 

Expenditure: Repairs and maintenance 

- Journals - Invoices not authorised 

(49/2015) (EX.80) 

Finding: In carrying out the audit, 

invoices that were provided as 

supporting documentation were not 

signed to acknowledge receipt of goods 

or services, ( nor was there a goods 

receipts voucher submitted) for which 

a payable was raised at year end. 

Management does not appear to 

exercise proper and effective controls 

to ensure that sufficient supporting 

documentation is available and is 

authorised to ensure that payables are 

not raised for services that were not 

rendered. 

1. The municipality may be 
invoiced for unauthorised 
expenditure. 

The municipality may be invoiced for 

incorrect goods/services. 

Management did not in all instances 

implement controls over daily and 

monthly processing and reconciling of 

transactions. 

Management should ensure that 

invoices are signed/stamped to 

confirm that the municipality 

acknowledges the expense 

Management will 

strengthen this control to 

ensure that all the invoices 

are signed to acknowledge 

receipt of goods or services 

Ongoing 

Creditors Clerks 

Accountant 

Expenditure 

CFO 

CFO 


161 







162 




The cause is Eskom invoices that are 

not reviewed for vaiidity and accuracy 

by the Municipaiity. 

Free basic eiectricity biiied for the 

year to the amount of R996,804 as per 

the annuai financiai statements couid 

not be confirmed due to the iimitation 

of supporting documentation not 

submitted. 

not be confirmed and the matter wiii 

be reported in the management 

report. 






422 

Expenditure Generai Expenditure: 

Journais - Insufficient supporting 

documentation (CoAF 26/2015) 

(EX.128) 

Finding: 

Contrary to the above, insufficient 

supporting documentation was 

submitted with the foiiowing journais: 

Transactions and supporting 

information are not fiied appropriateiy 

Non-compiiance with section 74 of the 

MFMA 

Limitation of scope with regard to 

the audit of generai expenditure 

Management shouid ensure that 

sufficient supporting documentation 

is provided as evidence of the vaiidity 

and accuracy of the journai. 

10011703: Attached piease 

find supporting 

documentation as evidence 

and vaiidity of the journai 

submitted for audit. 



Accountant: 

Expenditure 

CFO 


163 




Inefficiencies in the audit process due 

to deiays in getting the required 

information. 

Possibie projected misstatement of 

generai expenditure by R7 802 220,58 







425 

Expenditure Generai Expenditure- 

Invoices not signed or stamped to 

confirm receipt of services/goods 

(CoAF 31/2015) (EX.129) 

Finding: Contrary to the above, the 

foiiowing invoices were not signed, nor 

was there a goods received voucher to 

confirm receipt of goods/service. 

Management did not exercised proper 

and effective controis to ensure that 

invoices are authorised or stamped to 

confirm receipt or acknowiedgement 

of the expense. 

Some documentation has been 
provided to AG and the matter 
resoived. 

Management wiii ensure 
that aii invoices been 
checked and signed with 
appiicabie date stamps 
attached to 

documentation. 

The municipaiity is unabie 

to verify Eskom eiectricity 

readings due to the fact 

that the municipaiity does 

not have access to the 

Eskom meter. 

On-going 

process 


Suppiy Chain 

Cierks and 
Expenditure 
division to check 
before payments 
made 

CFO 

427 

Payabies - Suspense account not 

cieared at year-end (EX. 87) 

Finding: 

Contrary to the above provision, the 

foiiowing suspense accounts were not 

cieared at year end: 

The chief financiai officer did not 

ensure that aii transactions have been 

The chief financiai officer shouid 
ensure that suspense accounts is 
timeiy cieared 

Management disagrees 

with the audit finding. This 

suspense account has been 

considerabiy reduced from 

the previous year. Piease 

take note it is not possibie 

for the municipaiity to ciear 

the vote on year end 

because customers deposit 

money into the bank 



Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


164 




followed up and allocated to their 

correct accounts 

Over and understatement of the 

accounts to which the transactions 

should have been posted. 


account without 

references. 

Management is in 

agreement with the finding. 

Though the unknown 

deposits suspense account 

is not totally cleared, 

however, management is, 

on a regular basis clearing 

the deposits where 

possible, where the amount 

is not cleared, is as a result 

of an unknown referencing 

that could not be mapped 

to the consumers 'account 

number. 

Attached is the unknown 
deposits vote which shows 
all the deposits that were 
cleared during the financial 
year. The CB numbers 
represent all the cleared 

ones. 





429 

VAT payable: Information not 

presented for audit purposes and no 

narrations were provided for journals 

(EX.144) 

Finding: 

1) The following journal was 
not being provided for audit 
purposes. 

2) No narrations were provided 
for the following journals. 

3) Poor record keeping by the 
municipality. 

4) Limitation of the scope of the 
audit. 

Management should provide the 
requested information for audit 
purposes. 

1. (a) Management 

disagree with the audit 
finding, journal no: 
10012477 was 
submitted along with 
those listed below: 

2. (b) Narrations 

The SEBATA 

System 

process/configura 
tion constitute 

the basis for all 

Journals 



Manager: Budget 
and Reporting 

CFO 


165 




5) Inability to determine that 
journals are appropriately 
recorded. 


Input VAT (VAT 

on Creditors 

Invoices) is 

debited on initial 

transaction 

and once 

payment is done 

Input VAT on 

Creditors Invoices 

is credited and 

Input VAT on 

Invoices paid is 

debited. 

Output VAT (VAT on 

Debtors Invoices) is 
credited on the initial 

transaction and once 
payment is received Output 
VAT on Debtors Invoices is 
debited and Output VAT 
payable is credited. 





434 

Payable: Leave accrual differences 

(Exl49) (EX.149) 

Finding: 

Contrary to the above during 

recalculation of leave accrual the 

following differences in leave accrual 

were identified: 

Extrapolated error =R 561 123.67 

Management did not ensure that leave 

is accurately recorded 

The head of corporate services 

should implement controls to ensure 

that leave is accurately recorded 

The leave allocation has to 
be recorded accurately and 
employee files to be 
checked weekly - report to 
the effect must be 
submitted monthly for 
evaluation 



Manager: Human 
Resources 

Direci 

Corpc 

Servic 


166 






This resulted in understatement of 

leave accrual by projected error of 

R561 123.67. 







438 

PDOs: Prescribed KPIs not included in 

the SDBIP: Consistency of development 

objectives: (EX.7) 

Finding: 

Management did not review the SDBIP 

for compliance with prescribed key 

performance indicators 

The municipal SDBIP is not compliant 

with the requirements of Municipal 

Systems Act 2000. 

The municipal manager should 

implement a training plan for senior 

managers in the formulation of key 

performance indicators 

The management disagree 
with the finding on the 
ground that the Generally 
Prescribed KPI's are 
incorporated and 
contextualised within the 

Five Key Performance Areas 
of the 2014/15 SDBIP , page 
19- 71 of the 2014/15 

SDBIP as well as Chapter 3 
and 4 of the Draft Annual 
Report for the period 
ending 30 June 2015 are 
points of reference. 

Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, taking 
into account G- 
P KPIs approved 
by Council 

Performance 

Manager 

Muni 

Mana 

441 

PDOs: Mid-year performance 

assessment: Not submitted to 

treasuries by 25 January (Ex. 9) (EX. 9) 

Finding: 

Management noted that the Mid- 

Year Budget & Performance 

Assessment Report was submitted to 

the Mayor on the 23th January 2015 

as prescribed , to the FSCOGTA on 

the 09 February 2015 and Provincial 

Treasury on the 12 March 2015 

including the 2014/15 Adjustment , 

therefore agrees with the finding and 

will implement the recommendations 

to prevent recurrence. Flowever, it 

must be noted that Section 72 of the 

MFAM states that the Accounting 

Officer must assess the performance 

of the municipality by the 25‘^ of 

The municipal manager 

should design and 

implement controls to 

ensure timely performance 

reporting. 

27 January 2016 

S72 &52 MFMA 
report 

submitted to 
the Mayor, PT & 
NT on 

25/01/2016, 
was tabled in 

Council on 
26/01/2016 

Manager: BTO/ 

Performance 

Manager 

CFO/I 

Mana 


167 




January each year, and oniy after 

that it must be adopt by Councii and 

then it can be sent off to the 

different stakehoiders. 

The 2015/16 mid-year report was 

sent to the Municipai Manager and 

for the councii agenda on the 22"=' of 

January 2016. The Councii wiii sit 

oniy on 26 January 2015 and wiii be 

sent to aii reievant stakehoiders after 

adoption by Councii. 






443 

PDO: IDP: Noncompliance (EX. 11) 

Finding: 

(1) IDP Not submitted to COGTA within 

10 days of adoption 

(2) The budget inciuded in the SDBIP is 

for the 2013/2014 financiai year and 

not the 2014/2015 financiai period 

(3) It cannot be determined whether 

the notice and summary mentioned 

under paragraph (25) (4) Municipai 

Systems Act were made pubiic within 

14 days of the adoption of its 

integrated deveiopment pian since the 

newspaper articie which is presented 

for audit is not dated. 

The municipai manager shouid 

design and impiement controis to 

ensure timeiy performance pianning 

and reporting 



2015/16 Budget 
inciuded in the 
2015/16 SDBIP 
as per the A-G's 
recommendatio 

ns 

Manager: BTO/ 

Performance 

Manager 

CFO/I 

Mana 


168 



Oversight processes over performance 

planning and reporting are not 

adequate 

Non-compliance of the Municipal 

Systems Act and the Municipal Finance 

Act. 







446 

PDO: SDBIP not submitted within the 

prescribed timelines (EX.114) 

Finding: 

Contrary to the above provisions, the 

SDBIP was submitted to Treasury 15 

days after approval. 

Inadequate oversight over compliance 

with prescribed timelines 

Non-compliance with legislation 

The municipal manager should 

ensure that prescribed timelines are 

adhered to 

Management response 

noted and since 

management agrees with 

the finding, it will be 

maintained and will be 

communicated on in the 

management report. 

Feb 2016 

2015/16 SDBIP 
was submitted 

to FSCOGTA 

within the 
prescribed 
timeframe, 
management 
will endeavour 

to ensure that 

the same is also 

submitted to 

FSPT 

Manager: BTO 

CFO 

447 

PDO: Limitation of scope (EX. 145) 

Finding: 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurability of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 

Manager: 

Sanitation 

Services 

Direc 

Techr 

449 

PDO: Targets not achieved (Ex. 146) 

(EX.146) 

Finding: 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurability of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 

Manager: 

Sanitation 

Services 

Direc 

Techr 


169 


454 

PDO: ELECTRICITY: Targets not 

achieved (Ex. 183) (EX. 183) 

Finding: 







456 

PDO: WASTE MANAGEMENT: Reported 

performance not reiiabie (191) (EX. 191) 

Finding: 



Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurabiiity of 
KPIs approved 
by Councii 

Manager: Waste 

Management 

Services 

Direc 

Techr 

458 

Revenue: Vaiuation roii and financiai 

system not updated with property 

transfers (EX. 30) 

Finding: 

The foiiowing discrepancies between 

the vaiuation roii and titie deeds 

registry were noted in respect of 

property ownership. The foiiowing 

property owners as reflected in the 

vaiuation couid not be traced to the 

titie deeds registry. 

The municipai vaiuation roii has not 

been updated to reflect property 

transfers as per titie deeds registry 

Municipai accounts are sent to the 

incorrect debtor 

(address) which compiicates the 

recovery of such accounts 

The chief financiai officer shouid 
ensure that the financiai system and 
the vaiuation roii are updated to 
reflect changes in changes in 
property ownership. 

Certain changes might have been 

made in the vaiuation roii based on 

the ownership of the property 

owners however the soft copy 

vaiuation roii we received does not 

agree to the changes made and 

therefore we disagree with the 

response. Management shouid 

ensure that the necessary changes in 

the vaiuation roii are done on a 

yeariy basis with regards to the 

system so as the auditors can 

understand those changes and agree 

to them when necessary. It is aiso 

not even ciear if certain changes 

based on the vaiues of property were 

agreed upon with the vaiuer's of 

property as there is no indications 

whatsoever on the agreements. 

1. 

(a) Management 
is not in 

agreement with 
the finding. 

The owners in 

terms of the 

vaiuation roii was 

compared by the 

Auditor Generai 

against the 

municipai originai 

vaiuation roii 

which was 

impiemented Juiy 

2013 (prior to aii 

the registration 

dates referred to 

in coiumn 5), 

because it's the 

originai vaiuation, 

the changes 

made afterwards 

to the originai 

vaiuation roii wiii 

reflect on the 

current 



Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


170 




171 






3. Valuation roll 

4. Type of 

roll - Gener 

al valuation roll 
(A) 

1. - Rebate 

valuation roll (B) 

2. The PF03 report 
can then be run 
with the setup 
parameters 
chosen to reflect 

Part A & B of the 

valuation roll. 





465 

PDO: Reliability of audit evidence: 

Reliability of PI: Indigents support: 

Ex.177) (EX.177) 

Finding: 

1. The following households in 
Thaba Patswa and Ladybrand 
have discrepancies with their 
indigent status: 

2. The COGTA system for 
customer complains doesn't 
include the time for 
completion of the call 

3. Management did not review 
the indigent listing. 

4. The COGTA system is not 
designed to provide sufficient 
information. 

5. Reported performance is 
misstated. 

The head of performance monitoring 

and evaluation should ensure that 

reported performance is verified to 

supported information. 

The incompleteness of indigents in 

Platberg will remain and will be 

communicated on in the 

management report. 

(b) Management response noted but 

since the indicators related to 

consumer complaints are specific to 

the time lapse of attendance of calls 

and this cannot be confirmed by 

inspection of the system and in the 

complaint register presented for 

audit. The finding will remain and will 

be communicated on in the 

management report. 

(b) Management does not 

agree with the finding in 

that the FS COGTA 

customer complaints, 

adequate as is in our view, 

it is complemented by our 

manual customer 

complaints register. 

Feb 2016 

Adjusted 

2015/16 SDBIP 
& IDP, 

addressing the 
accuracy & 
measurability of 
KPIs approved 
by Council 

Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


172 










470 

Planning: Revenue and receivables 

cycle: Testing of controls in billing 

(EX. 3) - Finding: 1. Consumer was not 

levied for reconnection fee- 

Finding: 2.The estimated levy for a 

consumer has not been based on the 

past, minimum charge. 

1. Consumers are not levied 
against the service account, 
but have to pay the 
reconnection fee before 

service is reconnected. The 
person has paid a portion 
before disconnection took 
place. 

2. The meter was broken and 

therefore has been 

indicated as such - 
therefore correctly not 
interims charged, but the 
basic levy. 

1. Policy and 
procedures to be 
followed. 

2. Normal policy and 
procedures to be 
followed. 

With immediate 

effect. 

Done 

Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 

474 

Planning: Revenue: Internal controls: 

sale of graves (EX. 8) 

Finding: 

, No confirmation could be obtained to 

confirm that the grave register for 

Ladybrand is reviewed 

The chief financial officer has not 

implemented review controls over the 

processing of revenue transactions 

from the sale of graves. 

Possible incorrect processing of 

revenue transactions. 

The chief financial officer should 

implement review and 

approval controls over processing of 

revenue transactions 




Manager: 

Revenue 

CFO 


173 



KPA: LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: 

Create an environment that promotes local economic development 

INTENDED OUTCOME: 

Improved local trade and investment turnover and creation of decent employment 




Local Economic Development 


The purpose of local economic development is to build up the economic capacity of a local municipality to improve its economic future and the quality of 
for all. It is a process by which public, business and non-governmental sector partners work collectively to create better conditions for economic growth ; 
employment generation. In Mantsopa opportunities exist for communities to collaborate with each other to help all their economies grow, this can be achie 
by supporting strategic infrastructure, environmental improvements and economically friendly regulations that demonstrate a broad intention for Ic 
economic development. 


Local conditions determine the relative advantage of a municipal area and its ability to attract and retain investment. Low and medium capacity municipali 
with small towns and their surrounding rural areas can develop local economic opportunities at a national or international level by building on their Ic 
economic strengths, hence it is important that a Local Economic Development Strategy, which is inclusive of critical focal points such as Trade and Investm 
promotion. Manufacturing, Industrialization and SMME development is developed for Mantsopa Local Municipality. Institutional capacity assessment ; 
building is also an important component of the LED Strategy, so a dedicated effort should be given to build this capacity. 


THE PEOPLE SHALL SHARE IN THE WEALTH OF OUR ECONOMY 


LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TOURISM 


In realising the above-mentioned thrust of our Freedom Charter, operationalised in the Integrated Development Plan as a Key Performance Area, the 
municipality established a fully fleshed division within the Office of the Municipal Manager, dealing with Local Economic Development, Tourism and Rural 
Development. 


It is through the work of the division that we were able to develop and implement the Local Economic Development Strategy, which was reviewed annuall 
part of the IDP processes, the strategy included rural development, tourism, and SMMEs as part of its key thrusts through which key interventions can be 
effected in creating employment and fighting poverty. In addition to employment opportunities created through the Expanded Public Works Programme, 
CWP and other environmental related projects, we supported our small business stakeholders through the following sustainable projects in which we 
facilitated the sourcing of funding and other support. 


174 



NAME OF PROJECT 

LOCATION OF PROJECT 

YEAR FUNDED AND PRESENT STATUS 

Farm Fort Project 

Assisi( Marseilles) 

The project was funded in 2010 by MTN Foundation and FDC. The project is a milk productior 
and have more than 20 milk cattle. The project has a supplier who comes to collect milk from 
but the only problem is the small milk tank that they are using as in summer they cannot stor 
milk in the tank and the milk gets sour. The project is still in operation till now and has empio 
males and all the sisters at Assisi are responsible for the project the males are only helping w 
milking and storage of the milk: 2 males and 3 females and all are not Youth 

Kgatelopele Brick and Paving 

Ladybrand (Manyatseng) 

This project has been established since 2001 but struggled to get funding up until 2010 when 
Municipality interfered and brings in one paving project to manufacture its paving from the s 
project and the project started running again and till to date the project is still in operation ai 
employed 2 females and 5 males: 2 young females and 2 young males. 

Mantsopa Mother's 

Agricultural Primary Co-op 

Ladybrand (Manyatseng) 

This project started its operations in 2008 under the good care of the Municipality in 2010 th' 
Municipality made it easy for the project to get funding for a vehicle (bakkie). This one of the 
agricultural projects doing very well in Mantsopa Municipality. The project has employed 2 nr 
females and it has a market for its vegetables around Mantsopa Local Municipality: 1 female 
Youth 

Mokhothu's piggery farming 

Hobhouse 

In 2010 we suffered to get the project registered but ultimately it was registered and the pro 
started so small with 5 pigs but now the project has grown so big that the owner is fencing ar 
site and also employed 3 males and 1 female: 1 young male. 

Bataung Upholstery 

Ladybrand 

This project was funded 1 2009 as an upholstery project also repairing shoes and up to this st; 
project is doing well and have a full support from the Council. The project employs 3 males oi 
Young people all males 

Ipopeng Clothing 

Manufacturers 

Ladybrand 

This project was funded in 2009 to buy big sewing machines and up to now the project is doii 
and also have a full support of the Council and the project is employing 3 females now 2 fern; 
Youth. 

Diana Hair Salon 

Ladybrand 

This is a project that the Council gave its support in 2012 and allocated a building for the proj 
start its operations and to date the project is still operational and employs 2 females: All ere ' 

Alida's KItcheen 

Ladybrand 

This project was funded in 2009 and the Council gave a full support to the project and allocat 
building for this project, the project is one of its kind of catering and up to so far the project i 
well and employs 2 females: 1 Youth 

Seshweshwe 

Dress making 

Ladybrand 

This is part of Diana Hair Salon which was established in 2014 and the project is still strugglini 
support of its material but still doing fine as it is still operational and employs 1 female who is 
sewing: No Youth 

Charcoal Project 

Excelsior 

The Charcoal project was funded by MTN foundation in 2010 and the project was doing so wi 
also managed to purchase a lOton truck selling its charcoal around Mantsopa Local Municipa 
January 2014 the people of Excelsior went and still the electric cable that was used to get wa 
other things so the project collapsed and up to so far we are still looking for the money to ha' 
project started and doing its manufacturing again. By then the project employed 4 females ai 
males: 1 Youth female 

Women's Cooperative 

Tweespruit 

This project was funded by the department of Agriculture in 2010 and the Municipality availe 
free to this project, Since the beginning of this project the market was very poor and the proj 
beneficiaries were selling chicken meat at a low rate around Tweespruit, the project is still ur 
operation but still doing very little as their income. The project employs 3 females and 1 male 
female 

Lesedi Woodwork Project 

Excelsior 

The project was also funded by MTN foundation in 2010 but the Chairperson of the project d 
work well with the funding until FDC and MTN Foundation collects the material that was bou 
chairperson. The Chairperson of this project did not want to have any advises from anybody ; 
people who were working with her just left her with the project until by 2013 the project coll 
still there is machinery that was bought by the Municipality In 2008/2009 lying in the building 
project and nothing is happening till to date: 

Mamotse Kitchen 

Tweespruit 

This is a catering project in Tweespruit and has employed 4 females and 3 males: The for fern 
Youth and the 3 males are also Youth 

Planet 2000 

Ladybrand 

This is a general dealer project mainly doing the catering and has employed 1 female and 1 nr 
both are not Youth 


175 


Pabala Training 

Ladybrand 

This is a catering project in Ladybrand and has employed 2 females and 1 is Youth. 

Ka Pitseng 

Ladybrand 

This is also a catering project in Ladybrand and is employing 2 females and 1 male: 1 male is 'i 

Lere la THuso 

Hobhouse 

This is a catering project in Hobhouse and employs 3 females and all are not Youth 


176 



SECTION E: DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES 

Development Strategies 


Figurel: Strategy Model. 



Environmental Systems 
- Eco systems - 


Natural Resources 
- Built Environment • 


Socio- Political Systems 
- Social Development - 


The Economy 
- Economic Development - 


The way in which five 
sustainable development 
themes are pursued is 
briefly outlined below. 


a) Economic development 

The structure of the local economy is described in the Situational Analysis. In order to move the 
economy and the associated institutions in the much needed development direction the following 
strategies are to proposed to ensure sustainable development in the Municipality: 

• Identify strategic economic initiatives per Sector 

• Grow / stabilize the economic sectors 

• Identification and implementation of keystone projects, 

• Development of human resources, 

• Provision of a system of business support, 

• Development of poverty eradication strategies, 

• Improvement of the regulatory environment and service delivery. 



• create an effective developmental partnership between government and civil society to limit 
and reverse the spread of HIV&AIDS and TB 

c) Sustainable environmental utilization 

The sustainable use of the environment is divided up in two components namely: 

• Spatial development as manifested in settlement patterns of the region's inhabitants and; 

• Sustainable use of the natural environment 

d) Spatial development 

• The towns and villages in Municipalities are characterized by development that is spatially 
fragmented mostly associated with previous apartheid policies. 

• Over the last number of year's rapid growth in the lower socio-economic settlements occurred 
within built-up areas and on the fringes of settlements which caused unmanaged urbanization. 

• The low density patterns of lower socio-economic settlements result in high cost of service 
provision which resulted in urban sprawl. 

• Decisions on spatial developments are often taken by a range of different authorities and full 
cognizance of its combined effect gives rise to unfavorable environmental and serviceability 
impacts, planning is not done in a coordination manner. 

• Depletion of valuable natural resources and agricultural land. The consequence of 
abovementioned spatial development has an impact on the sustainable use of the natural 
environment 

e) Infrastructure and service delivery 

To ensure that a Municipality can cope with its future demand for infrastructure and service provision 
an integrated infrastructure development plan is needed to especially focus of the following key areas: 

i. Strategic focus 

• In order to ensure that infrastructure plans are not wish lists, public meetings should be 
arranged in the Municipality in order to agree on attainable objectives. 

• Infrastructure planning should be guided by three principles namely to; 

o eliminate the backlogs of the past 
o Maintaining existing infrastructure 

o Plan and desisn new infrastructure timorouslv in order to satisfv future demand in a cost 



• Solid waste 

• Housing 

Housing should be seen as one of the areas of service provision that needs special attention because 
of the urgent need. The strategies need to be aligned with national and provincial policy documents. 
Housing plans should be reflected in the spatial development framework for a Municipality which 
supports the integrated development of previously disadvantaged communities. The framework 
should be aligned with the economic development Plan of the Municipality. The strategies for housing 
projects of the municipality focus on the destitute and the homeless residents. Alternative housing 
types for all groups should also receive attention. The GAP housing market that caters for the middle 
income groups needs to be explored. The Municipality should further investigate mixed housing and 
land use patterns in order to facilitate integration in line with the Spatial Development framework and 
national and provincial policies. 

The provision of energy to local government users is a very important service where local authorities 
mainly act as a conduit for the national provider. It is one of the long term objectives of a Municipality 
to become less dependent on external sources of energy. Alternative sustainable renewable energy 
sources should be investigated as a way to decrease this dependence and also at the same time create 
employment opportunities that can result from renewable energy projects. As part of the economic 
development plans, outlined above, the viability of solar, wind and solid waste energy plants should be 
assessed. 

f) Good governance 

Good governance is the cornerstone of the wellbeing of a community. Representatives should be 
elected by the community and must adhere, amongst others, to the following principles: 

• Be accountable to their constituencies 

• Ensure that the wishes of the community are communicated 

• Ensure that the agreed upon priorities are executed 

• Must communicate with the constituencies 

• Create the channels of communication 

• As governing body the Council must oversee that services are provided in a cost effective way 
by insisting on an appropriate performance evaluation system 

• Monitor the execution of operational and capital plans 

• Monitor capacity to execute projects and insist on a capacity building strategy 

• Ensure that policies are in place to ensure ethical behavior of municipal officials and councilors 

• Ensure policies to prevent corruption 



strategic Focus Areas 

In order to ensure integrated and sustainable development 
within the municipal area, a Municipality should formulate 
several strategic focus areas. In undertaking the strategy 
formulation process the Municipality should move towards an 
outcomes based approach. 

These strategies cover the entire spectrum of development 
needs and opportunities in the Municipality. The integration of 
the strategies and the budgets are also being pursued during 
this planning cycle, which seeks to guide the development of the area over the next five years. Each 
strategy should have a number of programmes and related projects attached to it, which on completion 
translates into the achievement of the strategic goal. 

The situational analysis above has made all attempts to paint picture of the current realities of the 
Municipality, and therefore these outcome-based strategies are meant to address the problems identified 
under the situational analysis phase. 

The following constitute the broad strategic areas for the Municipality. These broad strategic focus areas 
will further be broken down into programmes and projects. They are: 

a) Improve service delivery 

Improving the level of service delivery is one of the critical challenges that require serious 
attention. A proper strategy and programme must be developed in order for the Municipality to 
address this challenge. This challenge will be addressed together with the challenge on ensuring 
strict credit control. 


b) Improve relationships 

It is a legal imperative for the municipality to act in a developmental way, and to provide an 
enabling environment for all its stakeholders to engage in a meaningful partnership with the 




Good Governance and administration 


The Municipality wants to be an institution that continuously improves its government, by ensuring 
good governance and an institution that has best administration practices. 

Economic Development 

The maximize the existing Economic Sectors within the Municipality and to further investigate 
other business and invest opportunities that will further enhance the major economic Sectors of 
the Municipality, this will unlock much needed employment opportunities. 

People Development 

The Municipality strives to be a place in which there is an advancement of community 
development, personal growth and social mobility so that at the end of the day challenges 
pertaining to poverty and vulnerability, inequality and social exclusion are addressed. 

Integrated Sustainable Human Settlements 

The Municipality needs to work on integrated sustainable human settlements, by ensuring that the 
Spatial Development frameworks do accommodate existing housing needs for all income levels 
and creating development incentives that will attract development within the Municipality 

Provide infrastructure and basic services 

The municipal area is characterized by areas where major service backlogs exist. This is in 
comparison with areas where the full range of services exists. This makes it important for the 
Municipality to forge good working relationships with sector departments and all stakeholders so 
that they will be able to contribute in as far as the provision of basic services to poor communities. 
Municipalities further need to ensure that developers are also responsible for service contributions 
to support the basic service delivery backlog programmes. This will ensure that while the up 
market development is going on, the poor communities are also getting something on the other 
hand. 


Environment 



j) Spatial form and urban management 


A spatial form that embraces the principles of integration, efficiency and sustainability, and realizes 
tangible increases in accessibility, amenity, opportunities and quality of life for all communities and 
citizens of the Municipality. 


k) Safe and secure environment 

If the area is to meet its vision, the issues of crime, traffic-related offences, fire and emergency 
services, disaster management and prevention and households subject to flood risks need to be 
addressed. A place where life, property and lifestyles are safe and secure, so that residents and 
business can live and operate free of crime, threats to public safety, personal emergencies and 
disasters. 

l) Financial sustainability: 

The Municipality should strive to ensure that it is able to finance affordable and equitable delivery 
and development, and that maintains financial stability and sustainability through prudent 
expenditure, sound financial systems and a range of revenue and funding sources. 

m) Ensure strict credit control 

Each Municipality has to deal with huge unemployment and poverty. With this scenario it becomes 
critical for council to realise what the affordability levels for payment of services are and then to 
adopt appropriate credit control policies. 

n) Manage the health environment and the HIV/Aids pandemic 

Many Municipalities are faced with the major challenge of responding to the issue of HIV/AIDS and 
AIDS-related issues, such as Aids-orphans. To this regard. Council has to identify and introduce 
projects that are aimed at providing care for AIDS orphans. 



Mantsopa Development 
Strategies 

• To provide democratic and accountable government for 
local communities 

• To ensure the provision of services to communities in a 
sustainable manner 

• To promote a safe and healthy environment 

• To promote social and economic development 

• To encourage the involvement of communities and 
community organizations in the matters of local 
government. 

In line with its developmental mandate, Mantsopa Local Municipality understands its service delivery 
objectives as set out in the developmental strategies. 

Therefore, the developmental strategies as espoused in this IDP, are directly linked to a specific 
developmental needs and objectives which must be measured in the organizational Performance 
Management System (PMS), and give effect to Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP) 
targets/ goals. 

Mantsopa Issues for Consideration linked to the 
KPA's 


Tablel: Mantsopa Local Municipality Issues for Consideration 


ISSUES FOR CONSIDERATION BY 

THE MA YOR AND COUNCILLORS. 

ISSUES FOR CONSIDERSTION 

SECTOR DEPARTMENT. 

BY 

ISSUES FOR CONSIDERATION 

BY MANTSOPA LOCAL 

MUNICIPALITY AND THABO 

MOFUTSANYANA DISTRICT 

MUNICIPALITY. 

KPA : BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY. 

Health. 



• Inadequate staff in all local 

clinics and Ladybrand 

provincial hospital. 

• Transportation of patient to 
and from the Provincial 
Hospital in Bloemfontein -the 
patient not be responsible for 
the bill. 

• Full time ambulance service in 
all towns of Mantsopa Local 
Municipality. 

• Unethical behaviour, which 
against Batho-Pele principles 
in local clinics worse case 
reported in Hobhouse clinic. 

• 

• Completion of phase 2 of new 
Ladybrand hospital. 


SAFETY AND SECURITY 

• Poor response by the police. 

• Mobile police station in 
Tweespruit and Excelsior. 

• Resuscitating Local Policing 
Forum. 

• Construction of police station in 
Manyatseng. 

• Engage with senior 
management team of the 
department on planning 
stage. 

BASIC SERVICES 

• RIO advance payment before 
accessing free basic 
electricity. 

• Re-opening of Juventon farm 
road. 

• Purchasing of land for 
oxidation ponds in 

Tweespruit. 

Roads 

Roads 

• Licensing borrow pits in 
Mantsopa for Maintenance of 
access roads. 

• Construction of Thaba Patchoa 

Public Road. 

• Construction of Thaba Nchu to 
Excelsior public road. 

• Paving of access roads in 
Mantsopa. 

• Construction of 

stormwater channels in 
Mantsopa. 

• Grading and Gravelling of 
internal streets. 

• Upgrading of access road 

from Boroa to 

Tweespruit. 

• Construction of Access 
Bridge in all areas of 
Mantsopa. 




Water 

Water 


• Fund implementation of water 

• Drilling of bore holes. 


quality monitoring. 

• Increase raw water 


• Fund bulk water supply for 

supply. 


Excelsior and Tweespruit. 

• Fund implementation of Bulk 
water supply for Hobhouse 
including commissioning of 
existing bore holes. 

• Pump station in Platberg. 


Sanitation 

Sanitation 


• Purchasing of Land for 

• Increase the capacity of 


development of Oxidation ponds 

all reported sewer lines. 


in Tweespruit. 

• Bucket Eradication in 


• Additional funding for 

Hobhouse. 


completion of phase 3 bucket 

• Bucket Eradication in 


eradication projects in Hobhouse 
and Tweespruit. 

Tweespruit. 


Eiectricity 

Eiectricity 


• Electrification of new 

• Installation of high mast 


developments. 

in all towns of Mantsopa. 

• Upgrading of streetlights 

in Mauersnek - 

Voortrekker Street. 

• High mast lights in 
Ladybrand. 

• Substation for Electricity. 

• Transformer for 

electricity in all towns of 
Mantsopa. 


Pubiic Faciiities 

Pubiic Faciiities 


• Construction of Ladybrand 

• Cleaning of all public 


boarder post Taxi Rank. 

spaces. 

• Development of Parks for 
recreation. 



• Relocation of Piggery farm in 
Tweespruit. 

• Expired food at the local 
shops. 

• Support the Municipal EHP office 
on health issues. 

• Review the service level 

agreement for 

implementation of 

Environmental Health 

Services. 

• Cleanest Town 

Completion. 

HUMAN SETTLEMENTS 

• Incomplete RDP houses in 
Mantsopa. 

• Waiting list for pensioners in 
Manyatseng old age centre. 

• Conversion of old age centre 
to municipal flats. 

• Funding for surveying and 
pegging of new township 
establishment. 

• Increase housing allocation to 
Mantsopa. 

• Review the Housing 
Sector Plan. 

• Update the living waiting 
list for subsidies and 

ervens. 

SPORTS ARTS AND CULTURE 

• Support for local soccer 
teams. 

• Establishment of new 
sports committee in 
Ladybrand. 

• Promotion of arts and 

craft. 

• Promotion of new 

sporting codes. 

• Fund upgrading of sports 

facilities in areas of 

Mantsopa. 

• Construction of Library in 

Dipelaneng. 

• Construction of Library in 

Boroa. 

• Upgrading of sports 
facilities in Ladybrand 
and Manyatseng. 

• Upgrading of access 
road to Ladybrand 
sports ground. 

• Establishment of arts 

and craft centre. 

• Fencing of existing 
sports facilities in 
Boroa. 

• Construction of Multi 
Purpose Community 
Centre in Boroa. 

• Construction of 

Sports and 

rehabilitation centre 

in Boroa. 

• Establishment of arts 

and craft centre. 






DISASTER MANAGEMENT 

• Use of volunteers on disaster 

occurrences. 

• Coordinate establishment of 
Disaster Management Centre in 
Mantsopa. 

• Fund purchasing of disaster 
equipment. 

• Review of Disaster 

Management Plan. 

• Establish Disaster 

Management Centre in 
Mantsopa. 

• Fund purchase of Disaster 
Equipment. 

KPA: LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Strategic Objective: Create an environment that promotes the development of the local economy and 
facilitates job creation. 

Intended Outcome: Improved municipal economic viability. 

• Recover equipment 

donated by SANGALA. 

• Fund LED initiatives projects 
for Mantsopa. 

• Budget for LED 

projects and 

programmes. 

KPA: FINANCIAL VIABILITY 

Strategic Objective: To improve overall financial management in the municipality by developing and 
implementing appropriate financial management policies, procedures and systems. 

Intended Outcome: Improved financial management and accountability. 

• Lead the budget and IDP 
review process in terms of 
section 53 of the Local 
Government: Municipal 
Financial Management 
Act no 56 of 2003. 

• Engage the communities 
on the importance of 
navinp their services. 

• Support the municipality 
with the new budget format. 

• Support the municipality 
with GRAP compliance. 

• Support the municipality 
with compilation of annual 
financial statements. 

• Support the municipality 

\A/ith cortinn 71 anri 77 

• Preparation of annual 
financial statements. 

• Preparation of annual 
budget. 

• Preparation of 

section 71 and 72 
reports. 

• Responding to audit 

ni lorioc 



Intended Outcome: Improved Organisational stability and sustainability. 

• Support management on 
IDP implementation 

initiatives. 

• Support the municipality of 
policy development. 

• Support the municipality on 
by-law formulation and 
proclamation process. 

• Support the municipality on 
organisational design. 

• Support the municipality on 
conduction of work-study. 

• Support the municipality to 
improve the IDP rating from 
medium to high. 

• Support the municipality to 
improve its section 46 report 
in terms of the MSA. 

• Support the municipality to 
improve its section 121 of the 
MFMA. 

• Implementation of PMS. 

• Review of municipal 
policies. 

• Development of by- 
laws. 

• Conduct 
organisational design. 

• Conduct work-study. 

• Improve the quality of 
the IDP. 

• Prepare section 46 
report. 

• Prepare section 121 
report. 

• Implement PMS. 

KPA: PUBLIC PARTICIPATION AND 
Strategic Objective: Promote a cult 
Intended Outcome: Entrenched cu 

GOOD GOVERNANCE 

ure of participatory and good governance, 
ture of accountability and clean governance. 

• Ensure public 

participation structures 
are functional e.g. ward 
committees. 

• Ensure that CDW's are 

effective. 

• Ensure that ward public 
meetings are convened. 

• Ensure that Local Imbizos 

are convened. 

• Ensure participation of all 
councilors in IDP and 
Budget process. 

• Train Mantsopa ward 

committee. 

• Enter into a service level 
agreement with Mantsopa 
on the use of CDW's. 

• Support the municipality 
during local Imbizos. 

• Train Mantsopa ward 
committees. 

• Cooperate with 

CDW's. 

• Help with 

coordination of public 
meeting and Imbizos. 



MANTSOPA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY'S IDP PROJECTS 

Table!: IDP Projects for the Municipality 


Table. 2: Summary of Mantsopa Local Municipal Strategies 


BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 

STRATEGIES 

IDP NO. 

PROGRAMMES/PROJECTS 

DESCRIPTION 

2017/2022 

PROGRESS TO DATE 

WATER AND SANITATION 

• Increase bulk water supply 

• Establish new operational laboratories. 

• Implement WCWDM 

• Commissioning of boreholes. 

• Increase bulk water supply. 

• Increase security, need to be house with 
bricks 

• Replace old infrastructure. 

WTOl 

Replacement of asbestos from 
Genoa to Ladybrand 

R20 000 000 

Not yet funded 

WT 02 

Installation of telemetries, 

Pressure Valves, and Bulk & Zonal 
Meters. 

R3 500 000 

Not yet funded 

WT 04 

Installation of Fire hydrants 

R200 000 

Not yet funded 

WT 05 

Water testing equipment 

R150 000 

To be incorporated in exiting water projects 

WT 06 

Water tanker 

R300 000 

Not yet funded 

WT 07 

Replacement of asbestos pipes in 
Ladybrand 

R20 000 000 

Not yet funded 

WT 08 

Construction of boreholes 

R3 000 000 

Not yet funded 

WT 09 

Refurbishment of Manyatseng 
Pressure House 

R500 000 

Not yet funded 

WT 10 

Refurbishment of old high 
pressure pump station 
(Manyatseng) 

R200 000 

Not yet funded 

WTll 

Hobhouse: Upgrading of raw 
water weir 

R1 000 000 

Not yet funded 

WT12 

Hobhouse: Groundwater source 

verification and borehole 
development 

R200 000 

Not yet funded 


WT 17 


WT 18 


WT 19 


WT20 


WT21 


WT22 


WT 23 


WT 24 


WT25 


WT26 


WT 27 


WT28 


WT29 


WT30 


WT31 


WT32 


Thaba-Patchoa: Upgrading of raw 
pipeline and pump station 
Thaba-Patchoa: Upgrading of the 

Water T reatment Works 

Thaba-Patchoa: Refurbishment of 
the reservoirs 

Thaba-Patchoa: Installation of 
scours, bulk meters and valves 
Thaba-Patchoa: Installation of 
scours, bulk meter and valves 
Thaba-Patchoa: Development of 
boreholes 

Thaba-Patchoa: Construction of 
offices, testing room and ablution 
facilities Water Treatment Works 
Tweespruit: Construction of 
boreholes 

Tweespruit: Upgrading of raw 
pipeline from Lovedale dam to 

Kopano WTW 

Tweespruit: Upgrading of pump 
station 

Tweespruit: Construction of 
offices and ablution facilities 
Tweespruit: Upgrading of Package 
plant(Water Treatment) 

Excelsior: Construction of 

boreholes 

Excelsior: Upgrading of two new 
raw water pipeline one to the 
plant and the other to the 
balancing dam. Including the 
pump station 

Excelsior: Upgrading of the 
package plant(Water Treatment) 
Excelsior: Refurbishment of town 
high pressure pump station 
Excelsior: Construction of offices. 


\A/T a a 


R500 000 

Not yet funded 

R2 000 000 

Not yet funded 

R200 000 

Not yet funded 

R200 000 

Not yet funded 

R300 000 

Not yet funded 

R3 000 000 

Not yet funded 

R150 000 

Not yet funded 

R9 000 000 

Implementation stage - RBIG 

Rll 000 000 

Procurement stage - RBIG 

R1 000 000 

Not yet funded 

RlOO 000 

Not yet funded 

R200 000 

Not yet funded 

R9 000 000 

Implementation stage - RBIG 


R12 000 000 Procurement Stage - RBIG 

R30 000 000 Designs are available. Not yet funded 

R150 000 Procurement stage - RBIG 


Dinn nnn 


M /-k-h 



SAN 01 

Tweespruit/Boroa: Sewer 
reticulation and treatment works 
for 1353 sites (bucket eradication) 

R2 000 000 

All the phases are complete. The 
commissioning is required. Funded by MIG 


SAN 02 

Hobhouse: Sewer reticulation and 

treatment works for 1282 sites 
(bucket eradication) 

R2 000 000 

All the phases are complete. The 
commissioning is required. Funded by MIG 


SAN 03 

Upgrading of Manyatseng WWTW 

RIO 000 000 

Procurement stage - DWS 


SAN 04 

Upgrading of Platberg sewer 
pump station 

R1 500 000 

Not yet funded 


SAN 05 

Refurbishment of Carthcartdrift 
dam pump station 

R300 000 

Not yet funded 



Upgrading of Thaba-Patchoa 




SAN 06 

Oxidation ponds and including 
fencing 

R27 164 774.50 

Contractor: HS B 01/2015/2016 


SAN 07 

Thaba-Patchoa: Purchasing of 
testing equipment 

R200 000 

Not yet funded 


SAN 08 

Purchasing of a Sewer Jet 

R9 000 

Still to be purchased this financial year 

ROADS AND STORM WATER 






• Identify and apply for licensing with relevant 
department. 

• Renting from government garage and 
budget for own resources. 

• Upgrade and rehabilitate. 

• Build/construct roads. 

• Submit application to MIG for upgrading of 
roads in the municipality. 

• Maintain roads to standards to avoid 
unnecessary claims. Upgrade and increase 
capacity. 

• Encourage integrated planning and 
enforcement of bylaws. 

• Apply for funding to rehabilitated damaged 
infrastructure due to floods. Implement 
storm water master plan and compliance to 
disaster management plan. 

• Erecting and review naming of streets in line 


RSWOl 

Developments of compliant 
borrow pits in Mantsopa X 4 

RO 

Not yet funded 

RSW02 

Gravelling of identified roads in all 
towns of municipality 

RO 

Implemented with operational budget. On- 
going process. 

RSW 03 

Purchase Excavator 

R3 000 000 

The municipality has resorted to hiring as the 
need arises. 

RSW 04 

Purchase a vibrating smooth 
wheeled roller 

R800 000 

The municipality has resorted to hiring as the 
need arises. 

RSW 05 

Boroa: Construction of 1.2km 

Paved road 

Rll 000 000 

The project is on implementation 

RSW 06 

Platberg: Paving of street and 
storm water channels 

R12 000 000 

The procurement processes have begun 

RSW 07 

Repair of storm water channels in 
Mantsopa 

R5 000 000 

Some storm water channels to be 
implemented through roads projects 

RSW 08 

Dipelaneng: Paving of internal 
streets and storm water channels 

R20 000 000 

2017/2018 

RSW 09 

Mahlatswestsa: Paving of internal 
streets and storm water channels 

R8 000 000 

2018/2019 

RSW 10 

Manyatseng: Paving of internal 

R8 000 000 

2018/2019 



• Upgrading of Thaba Patchoa toTweespruit 
road. 

• Create a functional unit responsible for road 
and storm water. 

RSW 15 

Rehabilitating roads in Hobhouse 
Town 

R3 000 000 

Not yet funded 

RSW 16 

Construction by paving of access 
road to Manyatseng cement 
reservoir and the Graveyard 

R8 000 000 

Not yet funded 

ELECTRICITY 

• +Secure the municipal premises and conduct 
awareness campaigns. 

• Equitable distribution of high mast/medium 
and street lights. 

• Purchasing of electricity truck mounted with 
SABS approved cherry picker and possible 
relocation of electricity material (storage). 

• Review of SLA with Centlec and Eskom. 

• Replacement or upgrading of all identified 
aging infrastructure (status quo report 
available). 

• Secure premises against vandalism and 
encourage integrated repair and 
maintenance of infrastructure. 

• Training of existing personnel. 

• Appointment of additional and qualified 
personnel. 

• Encourage integrated repair and 
maintenance of infrastructure. 

• Secure municipal properties. E.g. fencing and 
physical patrols (IGR). 

• Provision of household electricity 
connections. 

• Routine inspections, awareness campaigns 
and law enforcement. 

• Encourage integrated planning and 
execution. 

• Engage with service providers i.e. Eskom and 
Centlec. 

ELEC 01 

Upgrading of electricity 
infrastructure at Arthur Pitso 

Stadium 

- 

Funded by MIG, the project is to be part of 
the planned upgrade for the next financial 
years 

ELEC 02 

Procurement of electricity truck 
mounted with cherry picker 

R1 200 000 

To be procured this financial year. 

ELEC 02 

Installation of street lights from 
both entrances to Ladybrand 

R1 500 000 

2016/2017 

ELEC 03 

Installation of High Mast Lights in 
Mantsopa Towns 

Rll 845 443.57 

2018/2019 





WASTE MANAGEMENT 

• Identification of suitable land 

WM 01 

4 X Tractors and trailers 

R1 200 000 

To be procured later this financial year. 


• Engage and register waste pickers 

• Relocation of Indalo-Yethu project 
management to relevant unit to prepare 
for proper exit 

• Ensure strict implementation of NEMA 

• Installation of weigh bridges at the 
entrance of all landfill sites 

• Conduct audits on capacity of landfill sites 

• Conduct awareness campaigns and ensure 
strict implementation of NEMA 

• Conduct awareness campaigns and 
involve relevant provincial sector 
departments 

• Establish clear terms of reference and 

communication channels 

WM 06 

Construction of recyclable waste 
transfer stations in Tweespruit, 
Hobhouse and Excelsior 

R3 200 000 

Not yet funded 

SPORTS, RECREATION, ARTS AND CULTURE 


SRAC 01 

Manyatseng: Upgrading Arthur 

Pitso Stadium Phase 3 

R3 900 000 

Funding through MIG 

SRAC 02 

Dipelaneng: Rehabilitation Sports 
ground 

R3 000 000 

Not yet funded 

SRAC 03 

Boroa: Rehabilitation Sports 
ground 

R2 300 000 

2018/2019 Through MIG 

SRAC 04 

Mahlatswetsa: Rehabilitation 

Sports ground 

R3000 000 

Not yet funded 

SRAC 05 

Tweespruit: Construction of new 
park with playing equipment 

R6 000 000 

Not yet funded 

SRAC 06 

Thaba-Patchoa: Construction of 
new park with playing equipment 

R6 000 000 

Not yet funded 

SRAC 07 

Excelsior: Construction of new 
park with playing equipment 

R6 000 000 

Not yet funded 

SRAC 08 

Hobhouse: Construction of new 
park with playing equipment 

R6 000 000 

Not yet funded 

GOOD GOVERNANCE 


MPOl 

Upgrading of Manyatseng Offices 

R 2 000 000 

Funding is not yet secured 


MP03 

Security for Municipal Properties 

R 2 000 000 

Finalising the organogram prior to 
implementation of this process. 


MP04 

Printing of the IDP Document 




MP 

Rpuipw nf s;pr1-nr Plan<; 







SP 03 

sanitary pads at farms (Caring for 




SP 04 

Women's' day celebration 




SP 05 

Lunch with the boy child 




SP 06 

Mayoral Games 




Mapl: I DP Projects in Mantsopa Local Municipality 

Refer to the legend at the bottom left of the map. The legend indicates a project marked by a symbol. 





Mantsopa Local Municipality MIG Projects 


Table 3: IDP/MIG Projects for the Municipality 
MIG Funded Projects 


MIG 

Reference Nr 

Project Name 

EPWP 

Y/N 

Project Value 

MIG Value 

Status (Not 
Registered, 
Registered, 
Design & 
Tender, 
Construction, 
Retention, 
Completed) 

Planned 

date: 
Project to 
Start 

Planned 

date: 
Project to 
be 

Completed 

Planned 

Expenditure 

for 

2017/2018 

Planned 

Expenditure 

for 

2018/2019 

Planned 

Expenditure 

for 

2019/2020 

Category 

Ward 


PMU 

- 

953 050.00 

953 050.00 




1 017 900,00 

1 065 500,00 


PMU 

All 

MIG/FS1041/ 

R,ST/15/17 

Borwa: Construction of paved road 
and storm water channel 1.2km 

Y 

13 275 327.00 

13 275 327,00 

Retention 

12-Aug-15 

30-NOV-16 

4 153 682.30 

35 000 


R,ST 

1 

MIG/FS1070/ 

F/15/16 

Boroa: Erection of 755 metres of 
concrete palisade fence at the 
graveyard 

Y 

714 491,00 

714 491,00 

Registered 

Ol-Nov-17 

30-May-18 

0.00 

- 


F 

1 

MIG/FS1071/ 

F/15/16 

Excelsior: Erection of 730 metres of 
concrete palisade fence at the 
graveyard 

Y 

693 705,00 

693 705,00 

Registered 

Ol-Nov-17 

30-NOV-18 

592 827.70 

100 877.30 


F 

8,9 

MIG/FS1097/ 

R,ST/16/17 

Platberg: Construction of 0.6km 
paved road and storm water 

Y 

7 518 804,00 

7 518 804,00 

Registered 

20-Feb-17 

31-Sep-17 

1 473 180.83 

- 


R,ST 

7 

MIG/FS1143 

/CF/17/18 

Manyatseng: Upgrading of 
recreational and sports facilities at 
Arthur Pitso stadium (Phase 3) 

N 

3 900 031.00 

3 900 031.00 

Registered 

14-May-12 

29-Sep-18 

3 900 031.00 

- 


SP 

3 

MIG/FSR,ST/ 

17/19 

Dipelaneng: Construction of 2km 
paved ring road and storm water in 
Maclasseng and Graveyard 

Y 

20 152 782.00 

20 152 782.00 

Registered 

20-Feb-17 

30-NOV-18 

13 339 060.47 

5 287 809.34 


R,ST 

2 


Installation of 25 Fligh Mast Lights 
in Excelsior, Flobhouse, Ladybrand 
& Tweespruit 

N 

11 845 443.57 

11845 443.57 

Not 

Registered 

Ol-Aug-17 

28-Feb-19 

- 

11 845 443.57 


R,ST 

ALL 


Tweespruit: Rehabilitation of 

Sports Field 

N 

2 295 878.79 

2 295 878.79 

Not 

Registered 

Ol-Nov-17 

28-Feb-19 

- 

2 295 878.79 


F 

2 


Total 


139 996 579,68 

136 778 440,04 




20 358 000,00 

21 310 000,00 





RBIG Funded Projects 


RIBG 

Reference Nr 

Project Name 

EPWP 

Y/N 

Project Value 

RBIG Value 

Status (Not 
Registered, 
Registered, 
Design & 
Tender, 
Construction, 
Retention, 
Completed) 

Planned 

date: 
Project to 
Start 

Planned 

date: 
Project to 
be 

Completed 

Planned 

Expenditure 

for 

2017/2018 

Planned 

Expenditure 

for 

2018/2019 

Planned 

Expenditure 

for 

2019/2020 

Category 

Ward 

RBIG/FS196/ 

W/01/16/18 

Tweespruit: Installation and 
Construction of boreholes 
and associated pipelines 


11000 000 

11 000 000 

Construction 

25-Oct-16 

30-Jun-17 

4 241 294 



w 

1&9 

RBIG/FS196/ 

W/02/16/18 

Excelsior: Upgrading of new 
raw water pipelines to the 
plant and to the balancing 
dam. Including the pump 
station 


14 936 239 

14 936 239 

Construction 

25-Oct-16 

30-Jun-17 

10 758 706 



w 

8&9 


Total 


25 936 239 

25 936 239 




15 000 000 

20 000 000 

30 000 000 




Project from sector departments 


Town 

Department 

Project name 

Amount 

Excelsior 

Agriculture 

Infrastructure development, water supply, electricity, 
finances and access road & hydroponic tunnels 
agriculture 

R9,8 m 

Tweespruit 

Agriculture 

Unicom High School farming project 

R4 m 

Excelsior 

Bloemwater 

Booster pump station on the Excelsior pipeline 

R6m 

Ladybrand 

Eskom 

Ladybrand municipality, Manyatseng Feeder Bay 

R2,4m 

Tweespruit & Driedorp 

Eskom 

Tweespruit Driedorp 

R26,5m 

Ladybrand 

Human Settlement 

Transport Center 

R20m 

Ladybrand 

Public Roads & Transport 

Transport Center 

R20m 

Ladybrand 

Public Roads & Transport 

Testing Center 

R2m 

Excelsior 

Public Works 

Testing Station Revitalization 

R5m 

Tweespruit 

Public Works 

Testing Station Revitalization 

R7m 

Borwa 

CoGTA 

Construction of paved roads and storm water channel 
1.2km 

R3,5m 

Dipelaneng 

CoGTA 

Construction of 2 km paved ring road and storm water 
in Dipelaneng 

R13m 

Fvrpkinr 

TnGiTA 

Frprfinn nf 730 mpfprc nf rnnrrpfp nalicarip fpnrp af fhp 

RFQR nnn 


EPWP Funded Projects 


RIBG 

Reference Nr 

Project Name 

EPWP 

Y/N 

Project Value 

EPWP Value 

Status (Not 
Registered, 
Registered, 
Design & 
Tender, 
Construction, 
Retention, 
Completed) 

Manned date: 
Project to 
Start 

Planned date: 
Project to be 
Completed 

Planned 

Expenditure 

for 

2017/2018 

Planned 

Expenditure 

for 

2018/2019 

Planned 

Expenditure 

for 

2019/2020 

Category 

Ward 

EPWP/FS196 

/INF/01/17/1 

8 

Roads & Storm-water 

Maintenance 


R213 000 

R 213 000 

Planning 

Ol-Jul-17 

30-Jun-17 

R 213 000 

- 

- 

INF 

All 

EPWP/FS196 

/SOC/02/17/ 

18 

Security Guarding to All 
Mantsopa Facilities 


R 410 000 

R 410 000 

Planning 

Ol-Jul-17 

30-Jun-17 

R 410 000 

- 

- 

SOC 

All 

EPWP/FS196 

/SOC/03/17/ 

18 

Data Capturing 


R 57 000 

R 57 000 

Planning 

Ol-Jul-17 

30-Jun-17 

R 57 000 

- 

- 

soc 

All 

EPWP/FS196 

/SOC/05/17/ 

18 

Verification of Indigent 
Register 


R 110 000 

R 110 000 

Planning 

Ol-Jul-17 

30-Jun-17 

R 110 000 

- 

- 

SOC 

All 

EPWP/FS196 

/ENV/06/17/ 

18 

Cleaning Services 


R 210 000 

R 210 000 

Planning 

Ol-Jul-17 

30-Jun-17 

R 210 000 

- 

- 

ENV 

All 


Total 


R 1 000 000 

R 1 000 000 




R 1 000 000 






SECTION H: DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORKS 


KPA: SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 


Spatial Development Framework 

a) Spatial Development Framework Vision 

The spatial development framework will contribute to the balanced physical development of the municipality by establishing a spatial development structure, guiding the 
management of future development, accommodating development pressures and additional investment, maintaining and further developing the economic potential of the 
municipality while protecting and integrating the natural environment of the area. 

b) Legislative Framework 

Section 26 of the Municipal Systems Act (no 32 of 2000) state one the key components of the IDP is a "Spatial Development Framework which must include the provision of 
basic guidelines for a land use management system for the municipality". 

c) Objectives of the spatial development framework 

The following are the objectives for the Municipal Spatial Development Framework (SDF) and Land Use Management System (LUMS): 

• To provide strategic guidance for the future, physical/spatial development of the Municipal area 

• Ensuring that the envisaged physical/spatial development reflects the social, economic, environmental development issues identified in the IDP, i.e. while the SDF and LUMS 
provides primarily guidance for the existing and future physical / spatial development of the municipality, such development can only be considered appropriate if it adequately 
addresses the social, economic, environmental, institutional issues identified in the IDP. 

• To create a management tool for the future development, i.e. providing a municipal-wide comprehensive town planning scheme which reflects the various existing 
development conditions and which provides development management for the first steps of realizing the SDF. 

• To establish a development structure, i.e. identifying basic structuring elements which provide development guidance, certainty, growth opportunities and flexibility. 




• To create a sense of place, i.e. building on the specific opportunities of each location and encouraging the creation of unique environments, 

• To cluster development and establish a centre strategy, i.e. discouraging development sprawl, encouraging the clustering of compatible development and establishing a 
hierarchy of service nodes, 

• To identify access routes as investment lines, i.e. utilizing levels of accessibility as guidance for the location of development components. 

To recognize natural resources as primary assets, i.e. positively integrating natural elements in the creation of a human and sustainable environment 

d) Alignment to Provincial and District Plan 

Alignment to Provincial, District Development Plans and National Policy Priorities 

The table below compares the development goals for Province, District and Mantsopa Local Municipality. Evidence of alignment with the goals and indicators for Thabo 
Mofutsanyana District, the Provincial Government and National Government is therefore summarized as follow: 

Table 1: Development Goals 


Mantsopa Local Municipality 

Thabo Mufutsnyana District Municipality 

PGDS 

Back to basics 10 point plan 

To provide sustainable 

infrastructure and services 

Infrastructure and service 

Education, innovation and skills 

development 

1. Ensuring Positive Community 
Experiences. 

2. Municipalities Consistently 
Receiving Disclaimer Audit 
Opinions. 

3. Revenue Enhancement 
Programme. 

4. Appointment of Senior 

Managers In Municipalities. 

5. Services and Infrastructure. 

6. Implementation of Forensic 
Reports. 

7. Metropolitan B2B Programme. 

8. Strengthening Roles of District 
Municipalities. 

9. Spatial Regional Integration 
Zones / Spatial Contracts. 

To stimulate sustainable economic 
development and tourism 

Economic development and job creation 

Inclusive economic growth and sustainable 
job creation 

To sustain financial management 
excellence 

Financial viability 

Sustainable rural development 

To improve human resource 
management excellence 

(Institutional transformation) 

Social development 

Improve quality of life 

To improve good governance 
trough effective leadership 

Good governance and community 
participation 

Good governance 


The outcomes of most programmes that the Department would implement and contributes towards the economic growth and job creation, social upliftment of the poor with 
Mantsopa area of jurisdiction, safety and security as well as a well-managed administration in the spirit of corporative governance and ensuring sustainability of services. A 
programmatic partnership across spheres of government is critical in dealing with developmental challenges that affect the state. 

e) Alignment with the National Spatial Development Perspective (NSDP) 

The vision of the NSDP states that "South Africa will become a nation in which investment in infrastructure and development programmes support government's growth and 
development objectives 

i. By focus economic growth and empowerment creation in areas where this is most effective and sustainable; 

ii. Supporting restructuring where feasible to ensure greater competitive 

iii. Fostering development on the basis of local potential 


Ensuring that development institutions are able to provide basic services across the country 



BACK TO BASICS APPROACH 

The Context for the Back to Basics Concept and Approach 

• Building capacity of local municipalities in its area to perform their functions and exercise their powers, where such capacity is lacking; 

• Promoting equitable distribution of resources between local municipalities in its area to ensure appropriate levels of municipal service within the area 

• Developmental local government remains the visionary foundation for the continuing reconstruction and development of our country. The Local Government White Paper 
developed a vision of local government as a key component of the developmental state. 

• In pursuit of that vision, basic services, social services, and civil and political rights, including participatory governance, have been progressively extended to more citizens 
than ever before. 

• It is recognized however, that despite our delivery achievements, much still needs to be done to improve the performance of local government. 

The Five Pillars of the Back to Basics Campaign are: 

1. Putting people and their concerns first; 

2. Supporting the delivery of municipal services to the right quality and standard; 

3. Promoting good governance, transparency and accountability; 

4. Ensuring sound financial management and accounting; and 

5. Building institutional resilience and administrative capability. 



Elements of B2B phase ii 

• Work smarter and innovatively to increase impact 

• Focus on 20% of actions that will deliver 80% of impact 

• Make better use of available legal and other levers 

• Engage in more interventionist monitoring and accountability, e.g. Municipal visits, spot checks of SCM processes, implementation of forensic reports recommendations, 
site visits of MIG funded projects 

• Increase 154 support Packages and 139 interventions 

• Establish programmes to address generic systemic problems - e.g. weaknesses in human resource management, supply chain management, infrastructure procurement and 
financial management 

• Mobilise multi-departmental teams to tackle dysfunctional municipalities (mobilise national and provincial resources) 

• Strengthen community participation and local government accountability to citizens through innovative platforms (e.g. social media, community radio) 

• Strengthen communication about local government, use examples of best practice to promote change, and create a more positive narrative which recognises the problems 
but commits everyone to working together to address them 


f) Alignment with Provincial Growth and Development Strategy 

The Provincial Growth Development Strategy is a framework that indicates areas where economic opportunities exist; it also outlines the development priorities of the province. 
Some of the main objectives of the PGDS are to: 

• Serve as the overarching framework for development in the province 

• Guide the provincial government as well as other spheres, sectors and role players from civil society which can contribute to development in the province. 

• Set a long term vision and direction for development in the province. 

• Guide the district and metro areas' development agenda. 



Map 1: Ladybrand SDF Proposal 



Map2: Excelsior SDF Proposal 





bJ qj I jiw I p * 





Map 3: Hobhouse SDF Proposals 




Map 4: Tweespruit SDF Proposal. 



:3EHF 













Environmental Management Framework 

An effective Environmental Management function will positively promote a sustainable balance between environmental, social and economic development in Schedule 4 and 5 of the 
Constitution, additionally Section 24 of the South African Constitution states that "everyone has the right: 

• "to an environment that is not harmful to their health or well-being; and 

• "to have the environment protected, for the benefit of present and future generations, through reasonable legislative and other measures that 

• "prevent pollution and ecological degradation; 

• "promote conservation; and 

• "secure ecologically sustainable development and use of natural resources while promoting justifiable economic and social development." 

It is quite key for the Municipality to show ability for the management of Nature Reserves and Open Spaces for Biodiversity importance; Progressive development and implementation 
of a corporate Environmental Management System to reduce the carbon footprint of the Municipality through environmental friendly initiatives such as energy efficiency projects the 
Municipality has implemented in the past three financial years; Evaluate all developments (development proposals, town planning applications, building plans and infrastructure 
projects) for environmental sustainability and properly engage with stakeholders concerning the state of the environment and to advise the Municipal Council and Municipal officials 
on Environmental matters. 

NEMA provides that there shall be "environmental justice" in order to pursue correct measures that will ensure that environmental impacts shall not be distributed in such a manner 
as to unfairly discriminate against any person, particularly vulnerable and disadvantaged persons. 

a) Environmental Management Tools: 

Municipalities use the adopted environmental management tools as a way of supporting the precautionary principle approach which serves as a guide to prevent the occurrence 
of environmental degradation within municipal area of jurisdiction. The Precautionary Principle approach has many advantages since it encompasses the belief that the developers 
together with society should seek to avoid environmental damage by careful planning and stopping potentially harmful activities and promote sustainability of Municipal 
resources. Environmental awareness programmes need to be extended to all areas within the municipality. Notwithstanding the fact that the general public is becoming 
increasingly aware of the environmental issues such as global warming, sustainable development activities, renewable energy, greenhouse effects, water and air pollution, only a 
few are knowledgeable on what to do in preventing environmental degradation. During these programmes, the following tools will be used: 



• Water Act; 

• Provincial Biodiversity Act; 

• Strategic Environmental Assessment; Environmental 

• Management Plan Municipal Open Space Systems 

b) Involvement of Environmental NGO/NPOs 

Municipalities should have a good working relationship with the local environmental NGOs and their input in the strategic planning of the municipal development programmes 
should always be taken into consideration. Caring for the environment is a joint venture within the municipality which includes local communities and all relevant stakeholders. 
Issues of global climate change are taken very seriously and NGOs are playing a crucial role in ensuring that the municipality adhered to environmental sustainability principles as 
are outlined by the NEMA regulations. 



Natural environment Analysis 




Map 7: Geology. 








Map 9: Vegetation. 



Lejweleputswa 

Masilonyana 


Vegetation within Mantsopa Local Municipality 


tis, rural development 
~ & land reform 


Vegetation 


Legend: 

Settlements 
Roads 


LESOTHO 


^ Ostrtct MunicipaHty 
^ Local Municipality 


] Moist Oold Highrveld Grassland 
] Moist Oool Highveld Grassland 


Map: OO 




c) Waste Management Hierarchy 

The Municipality has completed the development of its Integrated Waste Management Plan and waste related legislative development and reform process. This is in line with 
Section 11 of Waste Act 59 Of 2008, the Integrated Pollution and Waste Management Policy and the National Waste Management Strategy. This Waste Management Plan sets 
out a number of objectives which needs to be achieved by a municipality. These include: waste management collection services; recycling; provision of quality, affordable and 
sustainable waste management collection services; environmentally sound management of special waste streams such as hazardous waste, construction waste etc.; waste 
treatment and disposal capacity; education and awareness; and effective waste information management systems. 

The Integrated Waste Management Plan takes into account the relevant national and provincial government policies, legislation and strategies. The foundation of the Waste 
Management Plan is based on the principles of Integrated Waste Management and Waste Hierarchy Approach. 

A municipality should subscribe to the Waste Management Hierarchy of the National Waste Management Strategy as a method of minimizing the environmental impacts due to 
waste that end up in the landfill sites. The Integrated Waste Management Plan aligns the waste management services that are provided in the Municipality with the National 
Waste Management Services and will contribute to the implementation of the national and provincial strategies to minimize waste at local level. 

An Integrated Waste Management Plan conceptualizes the first attempt at setting out the strategy for future waste management and planning for the municipality. It encourages 
a major shift away from traditional waste management principles into more integrated waste management principles. Sustainable waste management is the key driver of this 
plan with the emphasis on waste avoidance, waste reduction, re-use, recycling, treatment and safe disposal. Therefore, the municipality recognizes that it has a responsibility to 
abide by the statutes, policies and guidelines that are introduced by the National and Provincial Departments. In strengthening environmental sustainability through Sustainable 
Waste Management, a municipality should develop a greening policy for the municipality which is based on the sustainable development principles. 

d) Strategies and Priorities for Integrated Waste Management 

The Municipality's Integrated Waste Management Plan sets the objectives and targets that will have to be achieved within a specific time frame. The main objective of the Waste 
Management Plan is to ensure that waste is managed in an environmentally sound and integrated manner so as to prevent harm to the health of the people and the environment. 
The Municipality has identified three core strategies that will assist in achieving integrated waste management: 

• Waste Avoidance and Minimization Strategy 

• Reduction and Resources Recovery Strategy 

• Management of Residual waste Strategy 



j. Waste Avoidance and Minimization Strategy 

The waste avoidance and minimization strategy is aiming at the avoidance of waste through the adoption of eco-efficiency and waste avoidance measures. It is the most 
cost effective method of waste management intervention and it is best implemented at point source. The most important thing about waste avoidance is that it conserves 
natural resources, reduces the amount of waste requiring disposal to landfills, thereby increasing the airspace. 

ii. Waste Reduction and Resource Recovery Strategy 

The resource recovery strategy is aiming at reducing the volume of waste to be disposed while maximizing the economic value of resources during its life cycle through 
re-use, recycling and reprocessing, and energy recovery in preference to disposal. The need to pursue resource recovery is driven by a combination of additional economic 
and environmental factors such as: 

• the need to conserve finite resources 

• the need to reduce energy consumption 

• the need to reduce reliance to on the landfill 

• The reality of increasing waste disposal costs. 

iii. Management of Residual Waste Strategy 

Irrespective of how efficient the municipal can be, there will always be a portion of waste stream that cannot be practically or economically avoided or recovered. This 
will result in residual waste that ends up in the landfill site. Residual waste has to be managed in an environmental sound manner. Information management systems (like 
Spisys) , sustainable collection services, capacity, education and awareness programmes, robust treatment and disposal systems have to be in place to handle residual 
waste in a responsible manner with the objective of protecting human health and the environment. 

e) Climate Change 


I. Environmentally sensitive areas 

The focus should be on sensitive, vulnerable, highly dynamic or stressed ecosystems, such as coastal shores, estuaries, wetlands, and similar systems require specific 


strengthen sustainability in the Integrated Development Planning of municipalities. Municipalities must develop a Strategic Environmental Assessment which seeks to 
ensure that the unprecedented pressure placed by the development in the municipality does not compromise the state of natural goods. 

II. Environmentally Sustainable Development 

In accordance to NEMA sustainable development can be defined as the integration of social, economic and environmental factors into planning, implementation and decision- 
making of the Municipality so as to ensure that development serves present and future generations. The Municipality should align its development strategy to National 
Environmental Management Act (NEMA) that requires consideration of all relevant factors including: 

• "that the disturbance of ecosystems and loss of biological diversity are avoided, or, where they cannot be altogether avoided, are minimised and remedied; 

• "that pollution and degradation of the environment are avoided, or, where they cannot be altogether avoided, are minimised and remedied; 

• "that the disturbance of landscapes and sites that constitute the nation's cultural heritage is avoided, or where it cannot be altogether avoided, is minimised and remedied; 

• "that waste is avoided, or where it cannot be altogether avoided, minimised and re-used or recycled where possible and otherwise disposed of in a responsible manner; 

• "that the use and exploitation of non-renewable natural resources is responsible and equitable, and takes into account the consequences of the depletion of the resource; 

• "that the development, use and exploitation of renewable resources and the ecosystems of which they are part do not exceed the level beyond which their integrity is 

jeopardised; 

• "that a risk-averse and cautious approach is applied, which takes into account the limits of current knowledge about the consequences of decisions and actions; and 

• "that negative impacts on the environment and on people's environmental rights be anticipated and prevented, and where they cannot be altogether prevented, are 
minimised and remedied." 



Integrated Human Settlements 

a) Introduction 

The Municipality regards the right to housing as a very important aspect as it is enshrined in Section 26 of the Constitution, 1996, of the Republic of South Africa, which states that 
"everyone has the right to have access to adequate housing and that the state must take reasonable legislative and other measures, within viable resources, to achieve the progressive 
realization of the right" 

The Municipality has not only noted the abovementioned clause of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, but it has line with Section 9(l)(f) of the Housing Act, 1997, which 
states that "every municipality must, as part of the municipality's process of integrated development planning, take reasonable and necessary steps within the framework of national 
and provincial housing legislation and policy to initiate, plan, coordinate, facilitate, promote and enable appropriate housing development in its area of jurisdiction." 

In line with the Housing Act, the Municipality has developed the Integrated Human Settlement Plan, which seeks to address housing backlogs. 

Although the Municipality has continued to provide housing opportunities to the people, it must be mentioned that the number of people who qualify for housing subsidy, is growing 
on daily basis, especially because the masses of the people continue to migrate to the area in search of employment opportunities. 

There has been a slow progress in terms of the provision of housing to the people and this can be attributed to the lack of land for housing as well as lack of financial Resources to buy 
land for building houses. 

The Integrated Human Settlements Plan, recognizes the fact that the Municipality cannot on its own, provide housing and related infrastructure if does not work closely with relevant 
departments. In the spirit of intergovernmental relations and line with Intergovernmental Relations Act, the Municipality is working closely with the Department of Human Settlements 
as well as the Department of Agriculture and Rural Department; to solicit land for housing development. 

Middle income housing is one area that has been neglected for so long. Many developers have promised to address it only to find that their houses were out of reach for the middle 
income group. The Municipality will continue to play an enabling environment with aim of addressing the middle income housing backlog. 



HUMAN SETTLEMENTS & PROTECTION SERVICES 
IDP PROJECTS: MTEF: 2016/2019 


HUMAN SETTLEMENTS 


PROJECT NO 

PROJECT NAME 

LOCATION (WARD) 

YEAR 

FUNDER 

AMOUNT 

HSOOl 

Transfer Planning & surveying of Wellesviei FArm(12,0005ha) at Tweespruit 

Ward 1 

2016/2017 

DOHS 


HS002 

Acquisition of portion of farm Tweespruit 90 

Ward 1 

2018/2019 

DOHS 


HS003 

Subdivision & rezoning of erf 2697 into 74 residential erven 

Ward 4 

2016/2017 

MLM 

100 000 

HS004 

Planning & surveying of land ± 80ha across R26 route 

Ward 5 

2018/2019 

DOHS 

902 000 

HS005 

Township establishment at Platberg extension ± 120 erven 

Ward 7 

2016/2017 

DOHS 

300 000 

HS006 

Planning & surveying of land ± 70ha around airstrip 

Ward 7 

2018/2019 

DOHS 

860 000 

HS008 

Rectification of incorrect erven numbering/amendment of title deeds 

Wards 8 and 2 

2016/2017 

MLM 

200 000 


TRAFFIC 


PROJECT NO 

PROJECT NAME 

LOCATION (WARD) 

YEAR 

FUNDER 

AMOUNT 

TR 002 

Procurement of fire arms x 4 

Mantsopa 

2016/2017 

MLM 

100 000 

TR 003 

AARTO software Installation 

Mantsopa 

2016/2017 

MLM 

100 000 


DISASTER MANAGEMENT 


PROJECT NO 

PROJECT NAME 

LOCATION (WARD) 

YEAR 

FUNDER 

AMOUNT 

DM 001 

Establishment of control room 

Ward 7 

2016/2017 

MLM 

250 000 

DM 002 

Purchases of movable shacks/tents 

Mantsopa 

2017/2018 

MLM 

150 000 

DM 003 

Purchase of Fire Truck 

Wards 7 & 8 

2017/2018 

TMDM 

R3,5m 


CURRENT PROJECTS HUMAN SETTLEMENTS 


PROJECT NAME 

LOCATION (WARD) 

YEAR 

PROGRESS 

Installation of Bulk Infrastructure 200 erven 

Ward 2 

2015/2016 

Nearing completion 

Installation of bulk infrastructure 383 erven 

Wards4 & 6 

2014/2015 

Projects has stalled 

Installation of bulk infrastructure 417 erven 

Ward 9 

2016/2017 

Project not yet started (contractor not on site) 

Planning & surveying of 560 erven next to Mauersnek & Traffic department 

Ward 7 

2015/2016 

Layout Plan submitted to Surveyor-General for approval-Approved 

Formalisation of Township establishment 306 erven 

Ward 4 & 6 

2015/2016 

Finalized- Erven allocated 





Figure 5: Access to Formal Housing. 


I\/I AISITSCDFV\ LOCAL l\/l LI ISI I Cl FV\LITY FORIVIAL 
D\A/ELLII\IG3 CO l\/I PARI SO IM <1996 - 2011) 


100.0 

00.0 

so.o 

:7o.o 

00.0 

50.0 

40.0 

30.0 

20.0 

10.0 

0.0 



lantsof33 LfVI 


H Formal Dwol 1 i ngsC?^) lOOO 

50.0 

H Formal Dwol 1 i rigsC?^) 2001 

OS. 4 

H Formal C>va/oI 1 i ngsC?^) 2011 

SO.O 




221 


SECTION J: FINANCIAL PLAN 


1. PURPOSE: 

1.1 The purpose of this document is to outline the comprehensive Multi-year Financial Plan 
that will ensure long-term financial sustainability for the Municipality. 

1.2 A Multi-year Financial Plan is essential to ensure that the Municipality continues to 
implement its mandate effectively without impairing its capital base. It will also enable 
the Municipality to move towards self-sufficiency in meeting the growing demands of 
Service Delivery. 

2. BACKGROUND: 

2.1 A Financial Plan is prepared for a period of at least three years, however it is preferred that 
it should be for over a period of five or more years. 

2.2 A Multi-Year financial Plan is prepared to ensure financial sustainability, paying attention 
to the Municipality's infrastructure requirements. 

2.3 It is also an important component of the Municipality's Integrated Development Plan. 

2.4 A prudent Multi-Year Financial Plan identifies and prioritizes expected needs based on the 
Municipality's Five-Year Integrated Development Plan and details estimated amounts of 
funding various sources. 

2.5 The Multi-Year Financial Plan will also ensure that the Municipality has greater financial 
health and sustainability, making it easier to collaborate on projects with other levels of 
Government and variouspublic and private stakeholders. This will further enhance the 
ability of the Municipality to have access to more financing, funding and grants. 

3. FINANCIAL STRATEGY FRAMEWORK: 

3.1 Mantsopa Municipality is a developing and growing Municipality striving for service 
delivery excellence. Therefore many challenges are faced with regards to Financial 
Planning and are ever changing due to the dynamic setting of Local Government. 

3.2 The priority for the Municipality, from the financial perspective is to ensure viability 
and sustainability of the Municipality. The Multi-Year Financial Plan and related strategies 
will therefore need to address a number of key areas in order to achieve this priority. 
These strategies are detailed below: 

3.2.1 Revenue Enhancement Strategy: 

a) To seek alternative sources of funding; 

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222 


b) Expand Income base through implementation of a new Valuation Roll; 

c) The ability of the Community to pay for services; 

d) Identification and pursuance of Government Grants; 

e) Tightening Credit Control measures and Debt Collection Targets; 

f) Improve customer relations and promote a culture of payment; 

g) Realistic Revenue estimates; 

h) The impact of inflation, the Municipal cost index and other cost increases; and 

i) The creation of an environment which enhances growth, development and 
Service Delivery. 

3.2.2 Asset Management Strategy: 

a) The implementation of a GRAP compliant Asset Management System; 

b) Adequate Budget provision for Asset Maintenance over their economic lifespan; 

c) Maintenance of assets; 

d) Maintain a system of Internal control of assets to safeguard assets; and 

e) Ensure all assets owned and/or controlled except specific exclusions are covered 
by insurance. 

3.2.3 Financial Management Strategies: 

a) To maintain an effective system of Expenditure control including procedures 
for the approval, authorization, withdrawal and payment of funds. 

b) Implement controls, procedures, policies and by-laws to regulate fair, just and 
transparent transaction; 

c) Training and development of Financial staff to comply with prescribed minimum 
competency level 

d) Implement GRAP standards as gazette by National Treasury; and Prepare Annual 
Financial Statements timorously and review performance and achievements for 
past financial years. 

3.2.4 Operational Financing Strategies: 

a) Effective Cash Flow Management to ensure continuous, sufficient and 
sustainable cash position; 

b) Enhance budgetary controls and financial reporting; 

c) Direct available Financial resources towards meeting the projects as identified in 
the IDP, and 

d) To improve Supply Chain Management processes in line with regulations. 

3.2.5 Capital Funding Strategies: 

a) Ensure service delivery needs are in line with Multi-year Financial Plan; 

b) Careful consideration / prioritization on utilizing resources in line with the IDP; 

222 




223 


c) Analyze feasibility and impact on operating budget before capital projects are 
approved; 

d) Determine affordable limits for borrowing; 

e) Source external funding in accordance with affordability. 

f) Improve capital budget spending; and 

g) Maximizing of infrastructural development through the utilization of all available 
resource. 


3.2.6 Cost-Effective Strategy: 

a) Invest surplus cash not immediately required at the best available rates; 

b) Restrict capital and operating expenditure increases in relation to the inflation 
rate taking into consideration the macro economic growth limit guideline and 
Municipal cost increases. 

c) To remain as far as possible within the following selected key budget assumptions- 

d) Debt impairment calculated according to GRAP standards 

e) Overall cost escalation to be linked to the average 
inflation rates 

f) Tariff increase to be in line with inflation plus Municipal growth except when 
regulated; 

g) Maintenance of assets of at least 9% of total operating 
expenditure 

3.2.7 Measurable Performance Objectives for Revenue: 

a) To achieve the Debtors to revenue ratio below 50% 

b) To achieve a Debtors payment rate of 80% and above 

c) To ensure that the Debtors return remain under 90 days; and 

3.3 Financial Management Policies: 

The purpose of Financial Policies is to provide a sound environment to manage the 
financial affairs of the Municipality. The following are key budget related policies: 

3.3.1 Tariff Policy: the Policy prescribes the procedures for calculating tariffs. This policy is 
required in terms of Section 74 of the Local Government Municipal System Act, Act 32 
of 

2000; 

3.3.2 Rates Policy: a Policy required by the Municipal Property Rates Act, Act 6 of 2004. This 
Policy provides the framework for the determination of 

rates; 

3.3.3 Indigent Management support Policy: to provide access to and regulate free basic 

223 




224 


services to all indigents; 

Indigents are those households who are unable to access or pay for basic services due to 
a number of socio-economic factors. 

Indigents must gain access to the Municipal Services infrastructure including water supply, 
sanitation, refuse removal, electricity and alternative energy where no electricity 
is available. 

The Municipality needs to ensure that the services provided to indigent households are 
always maintained and available. The indigent subsidy must be targeted to the poor. 


3.3.6 Accounting Policy: The policy describes the basis of presentation of the Annual 
Financial Statements in accordance with the Generally Recognized Accounting Practices 
and Accounting Standards. 

3.3.7 Supply Chain Management Policy: this Policy is developed in terms of Section 1 of the 
Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003. The principles of this Policy is to give 
effect to a fair, equitable, transparent, competitive and cost effective system for 
the procuring of goods and services, disposing of goods and selecting of contractors in 
the provision of Municipal Services. 

3.3.8 Subsistence and Travel Policy: this Policy regulates the reimbursement of travelling and 
subsistence costs to officials and Councilors attending official business. 

3.3.9 Credit Control and Debt Collection Policy: this Policy provides for Credit and Debt 
Collection Procedures and mechanisms to ensure that all consumers pay for the services 
that are supplied. 

3.3.10 Cash Management and Investment Policy: this Policy was compiled in accordance with 
the Municipal Invest Regulation R308 and ensures that cash resources are managed in 
the most efficient and effective manner possible. 


3.3.11 Information Technoiogy Policy 
Aim of this poiicy is: 

The primary objective of iCT unit: 

To provide ICT infrastructure and ICT business system solutions that will assist Mantsopa 
Local Municipality to deliver sustainable services that are operationally efficient and cost 
effective, to all stakeholders and community 

To achieve the above primary objective the following secondary objective shall be followed 

To establish a culture of mutual understanding between the ICT unit and the lines of 
business within Mantsopa Local Municipality on how ICT can add value to ensure cost 
effective and sustainable service delivery of Mantsopa Local Municipality 
To establish principle of co-management and effective communications between ICT, 


224 




225 


lines of business and external service providers in building ICT solutions that will enable 
cost effective and sustainable service delivery 

To identify specific challenges in our current ICT environment and what measures 
should be deployed to improve ICT services and systems of Mantsopa Local 
Municipality 

4. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 

4.1.1. The municipality will be migrating to an mSCOA compliant financial system procured 

from 

SEBATA as from the 1“ of July 2017. The system will be integrated system comprising 
of the following modules: 

• Billing 

• Payroll 

• General ledger system 

• Human resource function 

• Budget 

• Supply Chain Management 

• Asset Management 

• Performance Management 

• Electronic Data Management 

4.1.2 Only officials with designated passwords will have access to the SEBATA financial system. 
For the purpose of monitoring access control and effective internal controls there will be a 
system administrator appointed and will be responsible for the system management. 

4.1.3 Capacity building programs in line with the municipality work-skill plan and mSCOA 
compliance are in place to further enhance the ability of concerned personnel to be able to 
work effectively and efficiently from on the system. 

5. REVENUE FRAMEWORK: 

5.1 In order to serve the Community and to render the services needed, revenue generation 
is fundamental to financial sustainability of every Municipality. 

5.2 The reality is that we are faced with developmental backlogs and poverty, challenging our 
Revenue generation capacity. The requests always exceed the available funds. This 
becomes more obvious when compiling the Municipality's Annual Budget. 

5.3 Municipalities must table a balanced and more credible Budget, based on realistic 
estimation of revenue that are consistent with their budgetary resources and 
collection experience 

5.4 The Revenue strategy is a function of key components such as: 

5.4.1 Growth in town and economic development 

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226 

5.4.2 Revenue enhancement 

5.4.3 Achievement of above 80% annualized collection rate for consumer revenue; 

5.4.4 National Treasury guidelines; 

5.4.5 Electricity tariff increase within National Electrification Regulator of South Africa (NERSA) 
approval; 

5.4.6 Determining tariff escalation rate by establishing / calculating revenue requirement; and 

5.4.7 Ensuring ability to extent new services and recovering of costs thereof. 

5.5 The South African economy is slowly recovering from the economic downturn and will 
still take some time for Municipal revenues to increase through Local economic growth. 

5.6 Consequently cash flows are expected to remain under pressure for the 2017/2018 
financial year and a conservative approach is followed to project expected revenues and 
cash receipts. 


5.7 The following table is a summary of the projected operating revenue for the 
Municipality over the Medium Term: 


Description 

R thousand 

2017/18 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

Budget Year 

2017/18 

Budget Year 

+1 2018/19 

Budget Year 

+2 2019/20 

Revenue Bv Source 




Properly rates 

14,714 

15,553 

16,424 

Service charges - electricity revenue 

40,413 

42,717 

45,109 

Service charges - water revenue 

34,872 

36,860 

38,924 

Service charges - sanitation revenue 

24,751 

26,162 

27,627 

Service charges - refuse revenue 

17,057 

18,030 

19,039 





Service charges - other 

— 

— 

— 


r 

r 

w 

Rental of facilities and equipment 

1,070 

1,131 

1,194 


r 

r 

w 

Interest earned - external investments 

400 

423 

446 


r 

r 

w 

Interest earned - outstanding debtors 

25,000 

26,425 

27,905 


r 

r 

w 

Dividends received 

20 

21 

22 


r 

r 


Fines, penalties and forfeits 

1,006 

1,063 

1,123 



r 

w 

Licences and permits 

— 

— 

— 



r 

w 

Agency services 

— 

— 

— 


r 

r 

w 

Transfers and subsidies 

72,472 

78,160 

83,610 

Other revenue 

875 

925 

976 





Gains on disposal of PPE 

- 

- 

- 

Total Revenue (excluding capital 

232,650 

247,469 

262,400 

transfers and contributions) 





5.8 In line with the formats prescribed by the Municipal Budget and Reporting Regulations, 

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227 


capital transfers and contributions are excluded from the operating statement, as inclusion 
of these revenue sources would distort the calculation of the operating surplus/deficit. 

5.9 Electricity is the largest revenue source totaling to R40 413 237 with water being the second 
largest revenue source totaling R 34 872 337. The third largest source is Sewerage which 
also totals to R 24 751 200. 

6. GRANT FUNDING: 

6.1 The Division of Revenue Act contains allocations from National and Provincial, which 
allocations are recognized as Government Grants and factored as follows under the 
Medium Term: 


Description 

2017/18 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 

Budget Year 

2017/18 

Budget Year 

+1 2018/19 

Budget Year 

+2 2019/20 

RECEIPTS: 

Ooeratina Transfers and Grants 

National Government: 

Local Government Equitable Share 

72,472 

78,160 

83,610 

68,314 

74,700 

79,840 

EPWP Incentive 

Finance Management 

MIG 

1,000 

2,145 

1,013 

r 

2,400 

1,060 

r 

2,660 

1,110 

Total Operating Transfers and Grants 

72,472 

78,160 

83,610 

Capital Transfers and Grants 

National Government: 

45,064 

64,338 

57,086 

Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) 

Regional Bulk Infrastructure 

INEP 

19,239 

16,000 

9,825 

20,138 

40,000 

4,200 

21,086 

31,000 

5,000 

Total Capital Transfers and Grants 

45,064 

64,338 

57,086 

TOTAL RECEIPTS OF TRANSFERS & GRANTS 

117,536 

142,498 

140,696 


6.2 Government grants forecasted for the 2017/2018 Financial Year reflect an decrease of 
20.5%% from the 2016/2017 Financial Year. 

6.3 The Equitable Share allocation to the local sphere of Government is an important 
supplement to existing Municipal Revenue and takes account of the fiscal capacity, 
fiscal efficiency, developmental needs, extent of poverty and backlogs in Municipalities. 

6.3.1 It is an unconditional grant and allocations are contained in the Division of 
Revenue 


227 


228 


Act (DoRA) 

6.3.2 The structure and components of the formula are summarized as follows: 

LGES = BS + (l + NTS)xRA±C 

• Where: 

• LGES is the local government equitable share 

• BS is the basic services component 

• I is the institutional component 

• NTS is the non-trading services component 

• RA is the revenue adjustment factor 

• C is the correction and stabilization factor 

• LGES = 

• Basic Services (Allocation for every poor household in the country to enable 
municipalities to fund the cost of free basic services) + Institutional and Non-Trading 
Services Made up of three parts: 

• Institutional funding + Funding for Non-Trading Services + Revenue Adjustment 
factor (Ensures more funds go to the municipalities with less own revenue capacity) 

6.6 It should be noted that the basic component support is only for poor households 
earning less than R 3000.00 per month and it also distinguishes between poor households 
provided with services and those provided with lesser or no services. 

6.7 A Municipality should prioritize its budget towards poor households and national 
priorities such as free basic services and the expanded public works programs. 

7. TARIFF SETTING: 

7.1 Mantsopa Municipality derives its revenue from the provision of services such as 
electricity, water, sanitation and refuse removal. A considerable portion of the 
Revenue is also derived from property rates and grants by National Governments as 
well as other minor charges such as traffic fines. 

7.2 As in the past, increase cost primarily driven by the Consumer Price Index (CPIX), dictates 
an increase in the tariffs charged to the consumers and the ratepayers. It therefore follows 
that all the tariffs will have to be increased by a percentage in line with the forecasted CPIX 
estimated at 6.4% for the 2017/2018 Financial Year and 5.7 % for the 2018/2019 year and 
5.6% for the 2019/2020 year (Municipal Budget Circular No 86 for the 2017/18 MTREF). 

7.3 It is realized that the ability of the community to pay for services rendered is also under 
tremendous pressure and that the economic outlook for the near future require 
everybody to make sacrifices. 

7.4 The additional revenue that will be generated through increased tariffs has to ensure 
continued service delivery. 

7.5 The latest figures released by STATS SA indicated contractions in several spheres of the 

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229 


economy and this confirms that the disposable income of households remain under a lot 
of strain. 

7.6 By drastically increasing tariffs on essential commodities, more strain will be added for 
the already cash stripped resident households. 

7.7 The outcome of the proposed increase in tariffs for the 2017/2018 on the different 
categories is as follows: 


2015/2016 2016/2017 2017/2018 


TARIFF TARIFF TARIFF 


CEMETERIES 


Grave: single 

Administration Fee 
Digging Fee 
Closing Fee 


R 850.00 R 920.00 R 1,010.00 


R 250.00 R 270.00 R 300.00 11.11% 

RAOO.OJ R 440.00' R480.00' 9.09% 

R 200.00' R 210.00' R 230.00' 9.52% 


Double 

Administration Fee 
Digging Fee 
Closing Fee 


R 1,100.00 R 1,190.00 R 1,310.00 


R 500.00 R 540.00 R 600.00 11.11% 

R 400.00' R 440.0(7 R480.00' 9.09% 

R 200.0(7 R 210.00' R 230.00' 9.52% 


Nine feet grave 

Administration Fee 
Digging Fee 
Closing Fee 


R 1,150.00 R 1,245.00 R 1,365.00 


R 250.00 R 270.00 R 300.00 11.11% 

R 600.0(7 R66O.O0' R 720.00' 9.09% 

R 300.0(7 R 315.00' R 345.00' 9.52% 


229 


230 



2015/2016 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 



TARIFF 

TARIFF 

TARIFF 


PROPERTIES 





RENT (Free use only on decision by the Municipal Manager) 





LADYBRAND/rWEESPRUIT/DAWIESVILLE/BORWA 





Town hall 





Main hall 

R 1,000.00 

R 1,300.00 

R 1,500.00 

15.38% 

Deposit for Mantsopa Residents 

R 1,400.00 

R 2,000.00 

R 2,200.00 

10.00% 

Deposit for non- Mantsopa Residents 

R 2,800.00 

R 3,000.00 

R 3,000.00 

0.00% 

Community hall Ladybrand 





Side hall (included in main hall and won't be let seperately) 





Main hall 

R 1,000.00 

R 1,300.00 

R 1,500.00 

15.38% 

Deposit for Mantsopa Residents 

R 1,400.00 

R 2,000.00 

R 2,200.00 

10.00% 

Deposit for non- Mantsopa Residents 

R 2,800.00 

R 3,000.00 

R 3,000.00 

0.00% 

MANYATSENG/EXCELSIOR/MAHLATSWETSA/HOBHOUSE/DIPELANENG/THABA 

, PATCHOA 




Community hall 

R 1,000.00 

R 1,200.00 

R 1,300.00 

8.33% 

Deposit for Mantsopa Residents 

R 1,400.00 

R 2,000.00 

R 2,200.00 

10.00% 

Deposit for non- Mantsopa Residents 

R 2,800.00 

R 3,000.00 

R 3,000.00 

0.00% 

HOBHOUSE/DIPELANENG 





Old Hall 

R 150.00 

R 150.00 

R 150.00 

0.00% 

Deposit for Mantsopa Residents 

R 150.00 

R 150.00 

R 150.00 

0.00% 

Deposit for non- Mantsopa Residents 

R 300.00 

R 300.00 

R 300.00 

0.00% 

GENERAL 





Personnel Housing Conditions 





Current Occupiers As per contract 





New Occupiers 





Church Street No subsidy 

R 3,500.00 

R 3,750.00 

R 4,000.00 

6.67% 

Loop Street No subsidy 

R 3,500.00 

R 3,750.00 

R 4,000.00 

6.67% 

Beeton street No subsidy 

R 3,000.00 

R 3,200.00 

R 3,400.00 

6.25% 

Casa Mia Subsidised 

R 3,000.00 

R 3,200.00 

R 3,400.00 

6.25% 

Kolbe Str 1 Bedroom Subsidised 

R 1,000.00 

R 1,100.00 

R 1,175.00 

6.82% 

Beeton flats bachelor Subsidised 

R 850.00 

R 900.00 

R 950.00 

5.56% 

Beeton flats 1 bedroom 

R 1,000.00 

R 1,100.00 

R 1,175.00 

6.82% 

Tweespruit flats Subsidised 

R 650.00 

R 700.00 

R 750.00 

7.14% 

Deposit's for damages equal to the monthly rental amount 





Private residents 





Indigents Kolbe and Beeton flats 6% of total income 





Deposit's for damages equal to the monthly rental amount 





Kiosks nextto Library 

R 20.00 

R 50.00 

R 100.00 

100.00% 

Application fee for corner signs (identilite and non-identilite) 

R 200.00 

R 200.00 

R 200.00 


Corner signs identilite rent per year 

R 250.00 

R 1,200.00 

R 3,000.00 

150.00% 

Corner signs non-identilite per year 

R 1,200.00 

R 1,200.00 

R 1,300.00 

8.33% 

Advertisments, posters, lamp posts etc. 30 days Dep; R1000 

R 350.00 

R 400.00 

R 450.00 

12.50% 

Motor shades Personnel 

R 35.00 

R 37.50 

R 40.00 

6.67% 

Caravan Park Hobhouse and other (per night) 

R 80.00 

R 80.00 

R 80.00 

0.00% 

Raasgat in Ladybrand 

R 300.00 

R 350.00 

R 400.00 

14.29% 


230 





231 





2014/2015 2015/2016 

2016/2017 


TARIFF TARIFF 

TARIFF 








CONSUMER DEPOSITS (Water and Electricity) 



Households Conventional meters (Excluding Flat 

1300.00 R 1,500 

R 1 ,600 


Households Prepaid meters 

650.00 R 750 

R800 


Flats Conventional and prepaid meters 

650.00 R 750 

R800 


Business 

1650.00 R 2,000 

R 2,200 


Bulk users 

R 100,000 

R 100,000 


Government 

0.00 R 0 

RO 





SEWERAGE DISPOSAL 



Not metered per month 

R 6,500.00’ R 7,000.00’ 

R 7,500.00 






SEWERAGE NETWORK 




Households 

R 142.00 R 155.00 

R 165.00 


Departmental 

R 217.00 R 247.00 

R 265.00 


Old age home 

R 233.00 R 247.00 

R 265.00 


Schools, hostels, Clinics 

R 233.00 R 247.00 

R 265.00 


Business, Industrial, Guest Houses 

R 233.00 R 247.00 

R 265.00 


Connections(where applicable) 

R 1,800.00 R 2,000.00 

R 3,500.00 





REFUSE REMOVAL (per month) 





Households 

R 74.00 R 85.00 

R 100.00 


Business, Industrial, Guest Houses 

R 296.00 R 320.00 

R 350.00 


Schools and hostels. Clinics 

R 296.00 R 320.00 

R 350.00 


Departmental 

R 296.00 R 320.00 

R 350.00 


Refuse (self loading) 

R 160.00 R 200.00 

R 220.00 


Refuse (municipality loading) 

R 640.00 R 800.00 

R 850.00 


Mass containers First 

R 593.00 R 628.55 

R 800.00 


Second 

R 752.00 R 797.00 

R 800.00 

Third 

R 930.00 R 986.00 

R 800.00 

Outside town 

R 19.00 R 30.00 

R 30.00 




231 


232 




2014/2015 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 



TARIFF 

TARIFF 

TARIFF 

ELECTRICITY 

Sales per kWh 

Households Tariff Structure (min 50kWh) (Conventional and pre-paid) 

0-50kWh 

Block 1 R 0.740 

R 0.790 

R 0.860 

51-350kWh 

Block 2 R 0.880 

R 0.950 

R 1 .030 

351-600kWh 

Block 3 R 1.197 

R 1.350 

R 1 .460 


600 and above 

Block 4 R 1.428 

R 1.610 

R 1.750 






Business conventional and pre paid (min 200k\ R 1.503 

R 1.600 

R 1.720 


Schools, Hostels, Sports clubs. Guest houses R 1.503 

R 1.600 

R 1.720 


Temporary users 

R 1.503 

R 1.600 

R 1.720 


Unbuild en«n : Basic 

R 82.100 

R 90.000 

R 95.000 

Plus Usage unbuild erven R 1.503 

R 1.600 

R 1.720 



Departmental 

R 1.503 

R 1.600 

R 1.720 



Bulk users (MIN 50kva Kva R 102.500 

R 115.000 

R 115.000 


Plus Units use 

Kwh R 0.585 

R 0.660 

R 0.710 


Conversion conventional connections to pre-pald or Pre-paid to Conventional metering 

Single phase 

Cost of meter, plus R 785.00 

R 900.00 

R 900.00 

Three phase 

Cost of meter, plus R 7,000.00 

R 8,000.00 

R 8,000.00 


New Connections 



Single phase 

R 3,700.00' 

R 3,950.00’ 

R 4,200.00 


Three phase 

R 8,150.00 

R 8,700.00 

R 9,100.00 





Other levies 




Reconnection fee after non-payment R 365.00 

R 390.00 

R 400.00 


Reminder Letters for cut off, etc R 95.00 

R 150.00 

R 150.00 


Test of meters 

R 650.00 

R 750.00 

R 800.00 


Private work per Hour 

R 650.00 

R 750.00 

R 800.00 


(Plus material cost) 






Tampered meters 



Replacement Single phase meter R 3,700.00 

R 3,950.00 

R 4,200.00 

Replacement Three phase meter R 8,150.00 

R 8,700.00 

R 9,100.00 

Plus 



Instalment fee 

R 1,100.00 

R 1,200.00 

R 1,300.00 


Plus 



Tampering fee (fine) single phase and three ph; R 1,100.00 

R 1,200.00 

R 1,200.00 



232 


233 




2015/2016 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 




TARIFF 

TARIFF 

TARIFF 


CONSUMER DEPOSITS (Water and Electricity) 

Households Conventional meters (Excluding Flats) 

R 1,500 

R 1,600 

R 1,800 

12.50% 

Households Prepaid meters 


R 750 

R 800 

R 900 

12.50% 

Flats Conventional and prepaid meters 


R 750 

R 800 

R 900 

12.50% 

Business 


R 2,000 

R 2,200 

R 2,500 

13.64% 

Bulk users Or as can be identified usage for three months 

R 100,000 

R 100,000 

R 100,000 


Government 


R 

R 

R 


SEWERAGE DISPOSAL 






Not metered per month 


R 7,000.00' 

R 7,500.06' 

R 8,000.00' 

6.67% 

SEWERAGE NETWORK 






Households 


R 155.00 

R 165.00 

R 170.00 

3.03% 

Departmental 


R 247.00 

R 265.00 

RO.OO 

0.00% 

Old age home 


R 247.00 

R 265.00 

R 300.00 

13.21% 

Schools, hostels, Clinics 


R 247.00 

R 265.00 

R 300.00 

13.21% 

Business, Industrial, Guest Houses 


R 247.00 

R 265.00 

R 300.00 

13.21% 

Connections(where applicable) 


R 2,000.00 

R 3,500.00 

R 3,500.00 

0.00% 

REFUSE REMOVAL (per month) 






Households 


R 85.00 

R 100.00 

R 110.00 

10.00% 

Business, Industrial, Guest Houses 


R 320.00 

R 350.00 

R 380.00 

8.57% 

Schools and hostels. Clinics 


R 320.00 

R 350.00 

R 380.00 

8.57% 

Departmental 


R 320.00 

R 350.00 

RO.OO 

0.00% 

Refuse (self loading) 


R 200.00 

R 220.00 

R 250.00 

13.64% 

Refuse (municipality loading) 


R 800.00 

R 850.00 

R 950.00 

11.76% 

Mass containers First 


R 628.55 

R 800.00 

R 900.00 

12.50% 

Second 


R 797.00 

R 800.00 

R 900.00 

12.50% 

Third 


R 986.00 

R 800.00 

R 900.00 

12.50% 

Outside tcper km 

R 30.00 

R 30.00 

R 32.00 

6.67% 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 






Subdivision or Consolidation or Rezoning or consent use 

R 800.00 

R 1,000.00 

R 1,100.00 

10.00% 

Health Compliance Certificates (Dairies, Business Licence) 

R 1,600.00 

R 1,700.00 

R 1,800.00 

5.88% 

Clearance certificate 


R 200.00 

R 220.00 

R 250.00 

13.64% 

Valuation certificate 


R 200.00 

R 220.00 

R 250.00 

13.64% 

Letters/Reminders 


R 150.00 

R 150.00 

R 170.00 

13.33% 

Valuation and other lists 


R 1,000.00 

R 1,200.00 

R 1,350.00 

12.50% 

Objection and appeal costs on valuations 

R 225.00 

R 230.00 

R 250.00 

8.70% 

Interest on arrear accounts (No interest on gosernment accounts) 

11.50% 

11.50% 

11.50% 


Criteria for identifying indigents (Total household income not more than) 

R 2,300.00 

R 3,000.00 

R 3,200.00 

6.67% 

ROADS 






Graders per hour 

WITH FUEL 

R 1,010.00 

R 1,100.00 

R 1,100.00 

0.00% 

Graders per hour 

WITHOUT FUEL 

R 800.00 

R 850.00 

R 850.00 

0.00% 

Front end loader per hour 

WITH FUEL 

R 1,010.00 

R 1,100.00 

R 1,100.00 

0.00% 

Trucks per km 


R 30.00 

R 35.00 

R 35.00 

0.00% 

Compactor Roller per hour 

WITH FUEL 

R 600.00 

R 650.00 

R 650.00 

0.00% 








2015/2016 2016/2017 2017/2018 


234 


TARIFF TARIFF TARIFF 


ELECTRICITY 
Sales per kWh 

Households Tariff Structure (min 50kWh) (Conventional) 


0-50kWh 

51-350kWh 

351-600kWh 

600 and above 

Block 1 

Block 2 

Block 3 

Block 4 

R 0.790 

R 0.950 

R 1.350 

R 1.610 

R 0.860 

R 1.030 

R 1.460 

R 1.750 

R 0.900 

R 1.100 

R 1.500 

R 1.800 

Basic Charge 

NEW!!! 



R 55.00 

Households Tariff Structure (min SOkWh) (Pre-paid) 




0-50kWh 

B!ock 1 

R 0.790 

R 0.860 

R 0.900 

51-350kWh 

B!ock 2 

R 0.950 

R 1.030 

R 1.200 

351-600kWh 

Block 3 

R 1.350 

R 1.460 

R 1.600 

600 and above 

Block 4 

R 1.610 

R 1.750 

R 1.800 

Business con\«ntional and pre paid (min 200kWh) 

R 1.600 

R 1.720 

R 1.800 

Schools, Hostels, Sports clubs, Guest houses 

R 1.600 

R 1.720 

R 1.800 

Temporary users 


R 1.600 

R 1.720 

R 1.800 

Unbuild er\«n ; Basic 


R 90.000 

R 95.000 

R 95.000 

Plus Usage unbuild erven 

R 1.600 

R 1.720 

R 1.800 

Departmental 


R 1.600 

R 1.720 

R 0.000 

Bulk users (MIN SOkva) 

Kva 

R 115.000 

R 115.000 

R 115.000 

Plus Units use 

Kwh 

R 0.660 

R 0.710 

R 0.750 

Conversion conventional 

connections to pre>paid or Pre-paid to Conventional metering 



Single phase 

Cost of mtCost of meter VAT inc=R2000,00 

R 900.00 

R 900.00 

R 960.00 

Three phase 

Cost of mtCost of meter VAT inc=R8000,00 

R 8,000.00 

R 8,000.00 

R 960.00 

New Connections 





Single phase - minimum 

Cost of m( Cost of meter VAT inc =R2000,00 

R 3,950.06' 

R 4,200.00' 

R 4,400.06' 

Three phase - minimum 

Cost of mtCost of meter VAT inc=R8000,00 

R 8,700.00 

R 9,100.00 

R 9,500.00 


Cost can be recalculated as the actual cost of the 

installation can vary. 


Other levies 





Reconnection fee after non-payment 

R 390.00 

R 400.00 

R 420.00 

Test of meters 


R 750.00 

R 800.00 

R 850.00 

Private work per Hour 


R 750.00 

R 800.00 

R 850.00 

(Plus material cost) 





Tampered meters 





Replacement Single phase meter 

R 3,950.00 

R 4,200.00 

R 4,400.00 

Replacement Three phase meter 

R 8,700.00 

R 9,100.00 

R 9,500.00 

Plus 





Instalment fee 


R 1,200.00 

R 1,300.00 

R 1,400.00 

Plus 





Tampering fee (fine) single phase and three phase 

R 1,200.00 

R 1,200.00 

R 1,300.00 


234 


4.65% 

6.80% 

2.74% 

2.86% 


4.65% 

16.50% 

9.59% 

2.86% 

4.65% 

4.65% 

4.65% 

0.00% 

4.65% 


0.00% 

5.63% 


6.67% 

- 88 . 00 % 


4.76% 

4.40% 


5.00% 

6.25% 

6.25% 


4.76% 

4.40% 

7.69% 

8.33% 



235 



2015/2016 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 



TARIFF 

TARIFF 

TARIFF 


WATER 





Households Basic Charge 

R 105.00 

R 115.00 

R 120.00 

4.35% 

Household usage (MIN 6kl) 

R5.50 

R5.90 

R6.30 

6.78% 

7-20 

R6.30 

R6.70 

R7.00 

4.48% 

21 -40 

R7.70 

R8.10 

R8.50 

4.94% 

41 > 

R9.20 

R9.40 

R9.80 

4.26% 

Business Basic charge 

R 55.00 

R 55.00 

R 60.00 

9.09% 

Business usage (MIN lOkI) 

R6.85 

R7.40 

R7.90 

6.76% 

Unbuild er\en Plus usage 

R 105.00 

R 115.00 

R 120.00 

4.35% 

Plus Usage Unbuilt erven 

R6.85 

R7.30 

R7.50 

2.74% 

Bulk use (MIN lOOkI) 

R6.15 

R6.70 

R7.20 

7.46% 

Departmental 

R6.15 

R6.70 



Sport clubs 

R6.15 

R6.70 

R7.20 

7.46% 

New Connections 





Connections normal meter 

R 2,000.00 

R 2,200.00 

R 2,300.00 

4.55% 

Connections bulk meter 

R 25,000.00 

R 30,000.00 

R 32,000.00 

6.67% 

Other tariffs 





Tankers per tanker + R 9.80 kl 

R 600.00 

R 650.00 

R 670.00 

3.08% 

per km 

R 35.00 

R 35.00 

R 35.00 

0.00% 

Swimming pool per call 

R 1,000.06' 

R 1,100.06' 

R 1,200.06" 

9.09% 

Use@ R9.80kl 





Call out - town premises/ HOUR 

R 900.00 

R 950.00 

R 980.00 

3.16% 

Test of meters 

R 750.00 

R 800.00 

R 850.00 

6.25% 

Private work per Hour 

R 750.00 

R 800.00 

R 850.00 

6.25% 

(Plus material cost) 





Tampered meters 





Replacement of meter 

R 2,000.00 

R 2,200.00 

R 2,300.00 

4.55% 

Plus 





Instalment fee 

R 1,200.00 

R 1,300.00 

R 1,400.00 

7.69% 

Plus 





Tampering fee (fine) 

R 1,200.00 

R 1,300.00 

R 1,400.00 

7.69% 


235 


2015/2016 2016/2017 2017/2018 

TARIFF TARIFF TARIFF 

RATES AND TAXES 


Households 


Improved value 


0.005225 

0.005600 

0.006000 

7.14% 

Building clauses 


0.005225 

0.005600 

0.006000 

7.14% 


% of business tariff 

50.00% 

50.00% 

50.00% 


Business 






Improved value 

All business properties 

0.010450 

0.011200 

0.012000 

7.14% 

Industrial 


0.010450 

0.011200 

0.012000 

7.14% 

Government 


0.010450 

0.011200 

0.012000 

7.14% 

Farm land 

Farms discounted tariff 

0.000933 

0.001000 

0.001100 

10.00% 


% of household tariff 

18% 

18% 

18% 



First R80 000 on all residential and farm properties exempted 


7.8 From the household perspective, how much more will be paid in rand is of more interest 
than the % increase in the various tariffs and rates. 

7.9 The implementation of the Credit Control and Debt Collection Policy, particularly with 
regards to the strengthening and capacitating the revenue division will aid in ensuring 
that the Municipality increases its current collection rate. It is however envisaged that 
with the pressure on tariff increases to fund the Medium Term Budget, the payment 
rate will become under pressure and special attention will have to be paid on managing 
all revenue and cash streams especially debtors. 

7.10 The Equitable Share allocation is mainly used to provide free basic services to 
approximately 4000 Indigents although the target for 2017/2018 is 7500 which is 
approximately 50% of Mantsopa Households. The proposed Indigent support provided 
for as per approved tariffs.is as follows: 


236 





237 


Description 




Budget Year 

2017/18 

Budget Year 

+1 2018/19 

Budget Year 

+2 2019/20 

Rand/cent 




Monthiv Account for Household - 'Indiaent' Household receivina free 




basic services 

Rates and services charges: 




Property rates 

- 

- 


Electricity: Basic levy 

55.00 

58 

61 

Electricity: Consumption 

45.00 

48 

50 

Water: Basic levy 

120.00 

127 

134 

Water: Consumption 

37.80 

40 

42 

Sanitation 

110.00 

116 

123 

Refuse removal 

170.00 

180 

190 

Other 

- 

- 


sub-total 

537.80 

568.45 

600.29 

VAT on Services 

75.29 

80 

84 

Total small household bill; 

613.09 

648.04 

684.33 

% increaseZ-decrease 

- 

5.7% 

5.6% 






8. EXPENDITURE FRAMEWORK: 

8.1 Some of the salient features and best practice methodologies relating to expenditure 
include the following: 

8.1.1 Infrastructure repairs and maintenance is a priority 

8.1.2 Balanced budget constraint (Expenditure cannot exceed Revenue) 

8.1.3 Operational gains and efficiencies resulting in additional funding capacity on the Capital 
Program as well as redirection of funding to other critical areas, and 

8.1.4 Strict principle of no project plan (business plan) no budget allocation (funding allocation) 


237 


238 

8.2 The following table is a summary of the total projected expenditure for the 
Municipality over the Medium Term period and aligned to the IDP. 


Description 

2017/18 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 

Budget Year 

2017/18 

Budget Year 

+1 2018/19 

Budget Year 

+2 2019/20 

Exoenditure By Type 




Employee related costs 

81,684 

86,340 

91,175 

Remuneration of councillors 

6,055 

6,400 

6,759 

Debt impairment 

44,528 

47,066 

49,701 

Depreciation & asset impairment 

5,032 

5,319 

5,617 

Finance charges 

- 

- 

- 

Bulk purchases 

40,533 

42,843 

45,242 

Other materials 

5,038 

5,325 

5,623 

Contracted services 

12,461 

13,171 

13,908 

Transfers and subsidies 

- 

- 

- 

Other ex penditure 

27,806 

29,391 

31,037 

Loss on disposal of PPE 

- 

- 

- 

Total Expenditure 

223,136 

235,854 

249,062 

Surplus/(Deficit) 

9,514 

11,614 

13,338 

Transfers and subsidies - capital (monetary 




allocations) (National / Provincial and District) 

34,239 

40,138 

51,086 

Transfers and subsidies - capital (in-kind - all) 

10,825 

24,200 

6,000 

Surplus/(Deficit) after capital transfers & 

54,579 

75,952 

70,424 

contributions 




Tax ation 

- 

- 

- 

Surplus/(Deficit) after taxation 

54,579 

75,952 

70,424 

Attributable to minorities 

- 

- 

- 

Surplus/(Deficit) attributable to municipality 

54,579 

75,952 

70,424 

Share of surplus/ (deficit) of associate 

- 

- 

- 

Surplus/(Deficit) for the year 

54,579 

75,952 

70,424 


8.3 In terms of the projected operating budget of R 223,135,631.00 for the 2017/2018 
Financial Year, indicative Salary increases have been included and represents 39.32%% 
of the total Operating Expenditure forecast. 

8.4 The cost associated with the remuneration of Councilors is determined and informed 
directly by way of the Remuneration of Public Office Bearers Act 1998 (Act No 20 of 1998) 

8.5 The provision of debt impairment was determined based on an annual collection rate of 
60% and the Debt Write-off Policy of the municipality. While this expenditure is 
considered to be a non-cash flow item, it informed the total cost associated with 
rendering the services of the municipality, as well as the municipality's realistically 
anticipated revenues. This provision of 40% equals an amount of R 44 528 000 in rand 
value. 

8.6 Provision for depreciation and asset impairment has been informed by the Municipality's 
Asset Management Policy. Depreciation is widely considered a proxy for the 
measurement of the rate asset consumption. Budget appropriations in this regard total 

238 


239 

R5 032 166 for the 2017/18. 

8.7 Aligned to the priority being given to preserving and maintaining the municipality's 
current infrastructure, the 2017/18 budget and MTREF provide for extensive growth in 
the area of asset maintenance, as informed by the asset renewal strategy and repairs 
and maintenance plan of the municipality. In terms of the Municipal Budget and 
Reporting Regulations, operational repairs and maintenance is not considered a direct 
expenditure driver but an outcome of certain other expenditures, such as remuneration, 
purchases of materials and contracted services. 

Other materials comprise of amongst others the purchase of materials for maintenance, 
cleaning materials and chemicals. In line with the municipality's repairs and maintenance 
plan this group of expenditure has been prioritized to ensure sustainability of the 
municipality's infrastructure. The appropriation against this group of expenditure has 
been budgeted an amount of R5 037 600. 

8.8 Bulk purchases are directly informed by the purchase of electricity from Eskom and water 
from Bloem Water. The annual price increases have been factored into the budget 
appropriations and directly inform the revenue provisions. The expenditures include 
distribution losses. Eskom has a debt of over BOmillion that the municipality need to pay, 
however due to a lower collection rate it makes it impossible to meet the financial 
obligations that the municipality has. 

9. CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS: 


9. The following table indicates the projected Medium Term Capital requirements per 
department. 


Vote Description 

R thousand 

2017/18 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

Budget Year 

2017/18 

Budget Year 

+1 2018/19 

Budget Year 

+2 2019/20 

Caoital Exoenditure * Functional 




Community and public safety 

593 

- 

- 

Community and social services 

593 


F _ 

Economic and environmental services 

18,647 

20,138 

'' 21,086 

Planning and development 


r _ 

r _ 

Road transport 

18,647 

20,138 

21,086 

Environmental protection 


r _ 

r _ 

Trading services 

27,725 

44,200 

36,000 

Energy sources 

'' 11,725 

4,200 

5,000 

Water management 

'' 16,000 

40,000 

31,000 

Total Capital Expenditure - Functional 

46,964 

64,338 

57,086 


These figures are based on the projects identified through the IDP project phase and reflect 
estimated amounts 
based on the availability of funding 


9.1 The table above illustrate the capital expenditure of the municipality. The expenditure is 
outlined per vote structure of the municipality. Mantsopa is a grant depended 

239 


240 

municipality when it comes to financing its own capital expenditure, we are highly 
dependent on grants and this is due to the poor collection rate that the municipality is 
facing. 

9.2 It is imperative that Capital Budgets are prioritized to reflect consistent efforts to 
address backlogs in basic services and the refurbishment and expanding of existing 
infrastructure. 

9.3 Cognizance should also be given that National Government has prioritized the supply 
and quality of drinking water and failures in the management of waste water through 
the blue drop and green drop performance ratings. 

9.4 Measures have to therefore be taken over the Medium Term Revenue and Expenditure 
Framework to implement these strategies to ensure that existing waters supply and 
waste water comply with these requirements. 

9.5 It is important to realize that these figures are only indicative of the different services 
and may vary as priorities change. 

9.6 From the above it is clear that for the next three years many challenges lie ahead to 
appropriate Capital Expenditure towards available sources of funding and to obtain 
alternative funding sources to address the needs as identified in the IDP. 

The project source of funding over the Medium Term have been carefully considered 
and can be summarized as follows: 

10. SOURCE OF FUNDING: 

10.1 The capital grants received decline by R 22 428 600 from R 56 668 000 to R 34 239 400. 
Elowever there are two additional grants in-kind to the R 34 239 400, R 1 000 000 for bulk water 
supply as well as R 9 825 000 that will be given to Eskom for electrification as per the DoRA. Inclusive 
of the grants in-kind the total for the Capital grants totals to R 45 064 400 as indicated in the capital 
budget. 


Vote Description 

R thousand 

2017/18 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

Budget Year 

2017/18 

Budget Year 

+1 2018/19 

Budget Year 

+2 2019/20 

Funded by: 




National Government 

'' 45,064 

'' 64,338 

'■ 57,086 

Provincial Government 


r 

r 

District Municipality 


r 

r 

Other transfers and grants 


r _ 

r _ 

Transfers recognised - capital 

45,064 

'' 64,338 

' 57,086 

Public contributions & donations 


r _ 

r _ 

Borrowing 


r _ 

W _ 

Internally generated funds 

^ 1,900 


W 

Total Capital Funding 

46,964 

64,338 

57,086 


240 


241 


11. CONCLUSION 

11.1 The continued improvement and development of an effective financial planning process 
aids the actualization of fulfilling its facilitating role to capacitate the community to build a 
prosperous future for all 

11.2 The Financial planning imperatives contribute to ensuring that the Municipality remains 
financially viable and that municipal services are provided economically to all communities 

11.3 The Multi-year Financial Plan contains realistic and credible revenue and expenditure 
forecasts which should provide a sound basis for improved financial management and 
institutional development as well as service delivery improvements and implementation. 

11.4 The strategy towards cash backing will certainly ensure the sustainability of the 
Municipality over the medium-to long-term. 


241 




242 


SECTION 


PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 


242 



243 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


ITEM 

DESCRIPTION 

PAGES 

1 

Foreword by the Mayor 

3-4 

2 

Introduction 

5 

3 

Part 1: SDBIP Overview 

5 

i 

Legislative Framework 

5 

ii 

Components of the SDBIP 

6 

iii 

Monthly Projections of Revenue to be collected for each Source 

6 

iv 

Monthly Projections of Expenditure and Revenue for each Vote 

6 

V 

Quarterly Projections of Service Delivery Targets and Performance Indicators for each vote 

6 

vi 

General Key Performance Indicators 

7-8 

vii 

Municipal Score Card Perspective 

9 

viii 

Detailed Capital Budget over Three Years 

10 

X 

Strategic Direction and Planning Cycle 

10 

Xi 

Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan Concept 

10 

xii 

SDBIP Monitoring, Reporting and Revision 

11 

4 

Part 2: Financial Information 

12-19 

5 

Part 3: Municipal Performance Plans 

20-70 

5.1 

Office of the MM 

20-30 

5.2 

Office of the CFO 

31-45 

5.3 

Corporate Services 

46-54 

5.4 

Community Services 

55-59 

5.5 

Technical Services 

60-70 

END 


243 




244 


Mayors Foreword 


A properly formulated SDBIP ensures that appropriate Information Is circulated Internally and externally for purposes of monitoring 
the execution of the budget, performance and achievement of the strategic objectives set by council. SDBIP enables the Municipal 
Manager to monitor the performance of senior managers, the Mayor to monitor the performance of the Municipal Manager, and for 
the community to monitor the performance of the municipality. 

This enables. In turn, the Mayor and the Municipal Manager to be pro-active and take remedial steps In the event of poor performance. 
The SDBIP alms to ensure that managers are problem-solvers, who routinely look out for unanticipated problems and resolve them 
as soon as possible. 

The SDBIP should, therefore, determine (and be consistent with) the performance agreements between the Mayor and the Municipal 
Manager and that of the Municipal Manager and managers directly accountable to the Municipal Manager, hence determined at the 
start of every financial year and approved by the Mayor. 

It Is the output and goals made public In the SDBIP that will be used to measure performance on a quarterly basis during the financial 
year. It must be noted that such In-year monitoring Is meant to be a light form of monitoring. The council should reserve Its oversight 
role over performance at the end of the financial year, when the mayor tables the annual report of the municipality. The In-year 
monitoring Is designed to pick up major problems only, and aimed at ensuring that the Mayor and Municipal Manager are taking 
corrective steps when any unanticipated problems arise. 

The SDBIP serves a critical role to focus both the administration and council on outputs by providing clarity of service delivery 
expectations, expenditure and revenue requirements, service delivery targets and performance Indicators. The Municipal Manager 
Is encouraged to develop the SDBIP concept further so that It Is meaningful and useful to managers. 

Whilst the budget sets yearly service delivery and budget targets (revenue and expenditure per vote). It Is Imperative that In-year 
mechanisms are able to measure performance and progress on a continuous basis. Hence, the end-of-year targets must be based 
on quarterly and monthly targets, and the Municipal Manager must ensure that the budget Is built around quarterly and monthly 
Information. 


244 



245 


Being a start-of-year planning and target tool, the SDBIP gives meaning to both in-year reporting in terms of section 71 (monthly 
reporting), section 72 (mid-year report) and Section 121 (end-of-year annual reports). 

The SDBIP is essentially the management and implementation tool which sets in-year information, such as quarterly service delivery 
and monthly budget targets, and links each service delivery to the budget of the municipality, thus providing credible management 
information and a detailed plan for how the municipality will provide such services and the inputs and financial resources to be used. 

The 2016/17 SDBIP indicates the responsibilities and outputs for each of the Senior Managers (Directors) in the top management 
team, the inputs to be used, and the time deadlines for each output. 

The 2016/17 SDBIP will, therefore, determine the performance agreements of the Municipal Manager and Managers directly 
accountable to the Municipal Manager, including the outputs and deadlines for which they will be held accountable. This SDBIP 
should also provide all expenditure information (for capital projects and services) per municipal ward, so that each output can be 
broken down per ward, where this is possible, to support Ward Councillors in Service Delivery information. 

It is in the light of the above-mentioned factors that I, Cllr Mamsie Tsoene, as the Mayor, hereby approve the 2016/17 Service 
Delivery & Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP) in terms of Section 53 (1) (c) (ii) of the Local Government: Municipal Finance 
Management Act, 56 of 2003. 


Cllr Mamsie Tsoene Date 

Mayor 

Mantsopa Local Municipality 
Free State Province 


245 



246 


2. Introduction 

The purpose of this document is to present the Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP) of Mantsopa Local 
Municipality for the 2016/17 financial year. The development, implementation and monitoring of a SDBIP is a requirement of the 
Municipal Finance Management Act No. 56 of 2003 (MFMA). 

The SDBIP is a detailed one year plan of the municipality that gives effect to the Integrated Development Plan (IDP) and the budget 
of the municipality. The SDBIP is a management plan for implementing the IDP through the approved budget. It is an expression of 
the objectives of municipality, in quantifiable outcomes that will be implemented for the financial year. It includes the service delivery 
targets for each quarter and facilitates oversight over financial and nonfinancial performance of the municipality. 

The SDBIP 2016/17 will not only ensure appropriate monitoring in the execution of the municipal budget and processes involved in 
the allocations of budgets to achieve key strategic priorities as set by the municipal IDP, but will also serve as the kernel of annual 
performance contracts for senior management and provide a foundation for the overall annual and quarterly organization performance 
for the 2016/17 financial year. 

The SDBIP also assists the council and the community in their respective oversight responsibilities since it serves as an 
implementation and monitoring tool. 

• Part 1 : SDBIP Overview 

Legislative Framework 

Section 1 of the MFMA defines the SDBIP as a detailed plan approved by the mayor of a municipality in terms of section 53(1 ) (c) (ii) 
for implementing the municipality’s delivery of services and its annual budget and which must indicate: 

a) Projections for each month of:- 

i. Revenue to be collected, by source; and 

ii. Operational and capital expenditure by, vote 

b) Service delivery targets and performance indicators for each quarter; and 

c) Any other matters that may be prescribed, and includes any revisions of such plan by the mayor in terms of section 54(1 ) (c). 


246 



247 


The MFMA requires that municipalities develop SDBIP as a strategic financial management tool to ensure that budgetary decisions 
that are adopted by municipalities for the financial year are aligned with their IDP strategy. In terms of Section 53 (1) (c) (ii) of the 
MFMA, the SDBIP must be approved by the Mayor of a municipality within 28 days of the approval of the budget. 

Components of the SDBIP 

• Monthly Projections of Revenue to be Collected for each Source 

• Monthly Projections of Expenditure and Revenue for each Vote 

• Quarterly projections of Service Delivery Targets and Performance Indicators for each Vote 

• Detailed Capital Budget Broken Down by Ward over 3 Years 


Monthly Projections of Revenue to be collected for each Source 

The failure to collect its revenue as budgeted will severely impact on the municipal ability to provide services to the community. The Municipality, 
therefore, has to institute measures to achieve its monthly revenue targets for each source. These measures will enable the municipality to assess 
its cash flow on a monthly basis with a view to undertaking contingency plans should there be a cash flow shortage or alternatively invest surplus 
cash. Furthermore, the effectiveness of credit control policies and procedures can be monitored with appropriate action taken if considered 
necessary. 

Monthly Projections of Expenditure and Revenue for each Vote 

The monthly projection of revenue and expenditure per vote relate to the cash paid and reconciles with the cash flow statement adopted with the 
budget. The focus under this component is a monthly projection per vote in addition to projections by source. When reviewing budget projections 
against actual, it is useful to consider revenue and expenditure per vote in order to gain a more complete picture of budget projections against 
actuals. 

Quarterly Projections of Service Delivery Targets and Performance Indicators for each Vote 

This component of the SDBIP requires non-financial measurable performance objectives in the form of service delivery targets and other 
indicators of performance. The focus is on outputs rather than inputs. Service delivery targets relate to the level and standard of service being 
provided to the community and include the addressing of backlogs in basic services. The approach encouraged by National Treasury’s MFMA 
Circular No. 13 is the utilization of scorecards to monitor service delivery, which Mantsopa Local Municipality has adopted. 


247 



248 


GENERAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS AS PRESCRIBED IN TERMS OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT: MUNICIPAL 
PLANNING AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS, 2001 


In formulating the key performance indicators in the IDP, Budget & SDBIP for the period ending 30 June 2017, the municipality was 
guided by the General Key Performance Indicators as prescribed in terms of the above-mentioned regulations. These General Key 
Performance Indicators were incorporated in the performance information to provide proper context and implementation as follows: 

KPA: Good Governance & Public Participation 

KPA: Local Economic Development 

KPA: Financial Viability and Management 

KPA: Transformation and Institutional Development 

KPA: Basic Services- Community Development and Social Cohesion 

All General Key Performance Indicators, as prescribed in terms of Section 43 of the Act, are listed below for ease of reference: 

(a) The percentage of households with access to basic level of water, sanitation, electricity and solid waste removal; 

(b) the percentage of households earning less than R3300 per month with access to free basic services; 

(c) the percentage of a municipality’s capital budget actually spent on capital projects identified for a particular financial year in 
terms of the municipality’s integrated development plan; 

(d) the number of jobs created through municipality’s local economic development initiatives including capital reports; 

(e) the number of people from employment equity target groups employed in the three highest levels of management in 
compliance with a municipality’s approved employment equity plan; 

(f) the percentage of a municipality’s budget actually spend on implementing its workplace skills plan; and 

(g) 

(h) financial viability as expected by the following ratios: 

(i) A = B-C 
D 

Where - 


248 



249 


“A” represents debt coverage 

“B” represents total revenue received 

“C” represents operating grants 

“D” represents debts service payments (i.e. interest + redemption) 

(ii) A = B 

C 

Where - 

“A” represents outstanding services debtors to revenue 

“B” represents total outstanding service debtors 

“C” represents annual revenue actually received for services; 

(iii) A= B+C 

D 

“A” represents cost average 

“B” represents all available cash at a particular time 

“C” represents investments 

“D” represents monthly fixed operating expenditure 


249 



250 


Municipal Score Card Perspective 


MUNICIPAL SCORE 
CARD PERSPECTIVE 



KPAs 

IDP PRIORITY ISSUES 

Basic Service Delivery and Infrastructure 
Investment 

■ Water 

■ Sanitation 

■ Electricity 

■ Roads and Storm water 

■ Waste Management 

Local Economic Development 

■ Local Economic Development & Rural Development 

■ Tourism 

■ SMME Development 

Community Development and Social 
Cohesion 

■ Community Facilities 

■ Housing and Land 

■ Safety and security 

■ Environmental Management and Conservation 

■ Education 

■ Health 

■ Social Welfare 

Municipal transformation and 
institutional development 

■ Human Resources 

■ Administration 

■ Legal Service and Contract Management 

■ Skills Development: 

o Training & Education 
o Learnership 

■ ITC (Information Technology 

Financial viability and financial 

Management 

■ Revenue 

■ Expenditure 

■ Asset and Liability Management 

■ SCM 

■ Financial Management Reforms 

■ MFMA Compliance 

Good governance and community 
Participation 

■ Governance 

■ Performance Management and Monitoring 

■ Ward Committees 

■ Communications and Intergovernmental Relations 


250 


251 


Detailed Capital Budget over Three Years 

Information detailing infrastructural projects containing project description and anticipated capital costs over the three year period. A 
summary of capital projects per the IDP plan is available on Council's website: www.mantsopa.fs.qov.za . 

The procurement process is an important component to ensure effective and timely infrastructure / capital service delivery 

Strategic Direction and Planning Cycle 

A seamless process between the Long Term Development Framework (LTDF), IDP, SDBIP, Performance Management System 
(PMS) and Annual Report would create an enabling environment for the municipality to achieve its deliverables 

The Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan Concept 


Approved 


IDP 


Budget 



Annual 
Performance 
Plans for Municipal 
Manager and Senior 
Managers 

Monthly reports 
Quarterly Reports 




252 


SDBIP Monitoring, Reporting and Revision 


In-year Reports 


Revision 


Annual Reports 

Monthly Reports must 
be submitted by 
Municipal Manager to 
the Mayor (Section 71 
of the MFMA) 

Quarterly reports 
submitted by the 
Mayor to council 
(Section 52 of the 
MFMA) 

Mid-year budget and 
performance 
assessment reports 
submitted by the MM 
to the Mayor (72 of the 
MFMA) 


Any revision to the 
SDBIP services delivery 
targets and 

performance indicators 
may only be made with 
approval of the council 
following the 
adjustment budget 
(section 54 of the 
MFMA) 


The annual report of 
the Municipality 
must include an 
assessment of the 
performance against 
measurable 
objectives and the 
approved SDBIO 
(Section 121 of the 
MFMA) 


252 




253 


4. Financial Information 


FS196 Mantsopa - Table A2 Budgeted Financial Performance (revenue and expenditure by functional classification) 


Functional Classification Description 

R thousand 

Ref 

1 

2013/14 

2014/15 

2015/16 

Current Year 2016/17 

2017/18 Medium Term Revenue & 
Expenditure Framework 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Original 

Budget 

Adjusted 

Budget 

Full Year 
Forecast 

Budget Year 
2017/18 

Budget Year 
+1 2018/19 

Budget Year 
+2 2019/20 

Revenue - Functional 











Governance and administration 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

77 913 

83 511 

89 261 

Executive and council 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

20 452 

21618 

22 828 

Finance and administration 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

55 904 

60 247 

64 694 

Internal audit 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1557 

1646 

1738 

Community and public safety 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

11418 

12 069 

12 745 

Community and social services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

2 068 

2186 

2 309 

Sport and recreation 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Public safety 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

6 785 

7172 

7 573 

Housing 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

2 565 

2 711 

2 863 

Health 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Economic and environmental services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

22 022 

24 508 

26 841 

Planning and development 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

2 375 

2 500 

2 631 

Road transport 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

19 647 

22 008 

24 211 

Environmental protection 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Trading services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

166 361 

191 718 

190 639 

Energy sources 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

52 592 

49 965 

53 613 

Water management 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

58 507 

83 341 

75 342 

Waste water management 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

32 911 

34 787 

36 735 

Waste management 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

22 351 

23 625 

24 948 

Other 

4 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total Revenue - Functional 

2 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

277 714 

311 807 

319 486 

Expenditure - Functional 











Governance and administration 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

76 421 

80 777 

85 300 

Executive and council 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

20 452 

21618 

22 828 

Finance and administration 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

54 411 

57 513 

60 733 

Internal audit 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1557 

1646 

1738 

Community and public safety 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

17 142 

18 120 

19 134 

Community and social services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

2 682 

2 834 

2 993 


253 



25 ' 


Sport and recreation 
Public safety 
Housing 
Health 

Economic and environmental services 
Planning and development 
Road transport 
Environmental protection 

Trading services 
Energy sources 
Water management 
Waste water management 
Waste management 

Other 4 

Total Expenditure • Functional 3 

Surplus/(Deficit) for the year 


25 ' 


5111 

5 402 

5 705 

6 785 

7172 

7 573 

2 565 

2 711 

2 863 

9 925 

10 491 

11 078 

2 846 

3 008 

3176 

7 079 

7 483 

7 902 

119 452 

126 260 

133 331 

47 073 

49 756 

52 542 

32115 

33 946 

35 847 

20 943 

22 136 

23 376 

19 321 

20 422 

21566 

222 940 

235 647 

248 844 

54775 

76 159 

70 642 


255 


FS196 Mantsopa - Table A3 Budgeted Financial Performance (revenue and expenditure by municipal vote) 


Vote Description 

Ref 

2013/14 

2014/15 

2015/16 

Current Year 2016/17 

2017/18 Medium Term Revenue & 
Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 


Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Original 

Budget 

Adjusted 

Budget 

Full Year 
Forecast 

Budget Year 
2017/18 

Budget Year 
+1 2018/19 

Budget Year 
+2 2019/20 

Revenue bv Vote 

1 










Vote 1 - MUNICIPAL MANAGER 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

10 058 

10 632 

11227 

Vote 2 - COUNCIL 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

13 314 

14 073 

14 861 

Vote 3 -FINANCIAL SERVICES 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

55 904 

60 247 

64 694 

Vote 4 - CORPORATE SERVICES 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

0 

0 

0 

Vote 5 - COMMUNITY SERVICES 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

9 350 

9 883 

10 436 

Vote 6 - TECHNICAL SERVICES 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

189 089 

216 972 

218 268 

Vote 7 -[NAME OF VOTE?] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 8 - [NAME OF VOTE 8] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 9 - [NAME OF VOTE 9] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 10 - [NAME OF VOTE 10] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 11 - [NAME OF VOTE 11] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 12 - [NAME OF VOTE 12] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 13 - [NAME OF VOTE 13] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 14 - [NAME OF VOTE 14] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 15 - [NAME OF VOTE 15] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total Revenue by Vote 

2 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

277 714 

311 807 

319 486 

Exoenditure bv Vote to be aporooriated 

1 










Vote 1 - MUNICIPAL MANAGER 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

10 058 

10 632 

11227 

Vote 2 - COUNCIL 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

13 314 

14 073 

14 861 

Vote 3 -FINANCIAL SERVICES 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

45 753 

48 361 

51069 

Vote 4 - CORPORATE SERVICES 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

8 658 

9152 

9 664 

Vote 5 - COMMUNITY SERVICES 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

14 461 

15 285 

16 141 

Vote 6 - TECHNICAL SERVICES 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

130 696 

138 145 

145 881 

Vote 7 -[NAME OF VOTE 7] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 8 - [NAME OF VOTE 8] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 9 - [NAME OF VOTE 9] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 10 - [NAME OF VOTE 10] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 11 - [NAME OF VOTE 11] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 12 - [NAME OF VOTE 12] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 13 - [NAME OF VOTE 13] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 14 - [NAME OF VOTE 14] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


255 



256 


Vote 15 - [NAME OF VOTE 15] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total Expenditure by Vote 

2 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

222 940 

235 647 

248 844 

Surplus/(Deficit) for the year 

2 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

54 775 

76 159 

70 642 


FS196 Mantsopa - Table A3 Budgeted Financial Performance (revenue and expenditure by municipal vote)A 


Vote Description 

Ref 

2013/14 

2014/15 

2015/16 

Current Year 2016/17 

2017/18 Medium Term Revenue & 
Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 


Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Original 

Budget 

Adjusted 

Budget 

Full Year 
Forecast 

Budget Year 
2017/18 

Budget Year 
+1 2018/19 

Budget Year 
+2 2019/20 

Revenue bv Vote 

Vote 1 - MUNICIPAL MANAGER 

1 







10 058 

10 632 

11 227 

1.1 - Office of the Municipal Manager 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

4 741 

5 012 

5 292 

1.2 - Internal Audit 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1557 

1646 

1738 

1.3 - Integrated Development Plan 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1294 

1367 

1444 

1.4 - Performance Management 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1103 

1166 

1231 

1.5 - Local economic development 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1363 

1440 

1521 

Vote 2 - COUNCIL 


_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

13 314 

14 073 

14861 

2.1 -Mayor's Office 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

4133 

4 368 

4 613 

2.2 - Speaker's Office 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

3 210 

3 393 

3 583 

2.3 - Council 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

5 971 

6 312 

6 665 

Vote 3 - FINANCIAL SERVICES 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

55 904 

60 247 

64694 


256 


257 


3.1 - Financial Services 

3.2 - Rates and Tax 


Vote 4 • CORPORATE SERVICES 

4.1 - Administration Services 


Vote 5 • COMMUNITY SERVICES 

5.1 - Community Services Director's office 

5.2 - Parks and recreation 

5.3 - Libraries 

5.4 - Fire Department 

5.5 - Traffic Department 

5.6 - Housing 

5.7 - Environmental Services 


Vote 6 • TECHNICAL SERVICES 

6.1 - Cemetaries 

6.2 - Properties 

6.3 - Project Management Unit 

6.4 - Roads and Streets 

6.5 - Electricity 

6.6 - Water 


257 


- 

i 41 189 

14 714 

44 695 

15 553 

48 270 

16 424 

- 

- 

- 

- 

_ 

0 

0 

0 

- 

0 

0 

0 

_ 

9 350 

9 883 

10 436 

- 

3 839 

4 058 

4 286 

- 

2 946 

3113 

3 288 

- 

2 565 

2 711 

2 863 

_ 

189 089 

216 972 

218 268 

- 

709 

749 

791 

- 

1360 

1437 

1518 

- 

1013 

1060 

1110 

- 

19 647 

22 008 

24 211 

- 

52 592 

49 965 

53 613 

- 

58 507 

83 341 

75 342 


258 


6.7 - Sewerage 

6.8 - Refuse Removal 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total Revenue by Vote 

2 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Exoenditure bv Vote 

1 






Vote 1 - MUNICIPAL MANAGER 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1.1 - Office of the Municipal Manager 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1.2 - Internal Audit 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1.3 - Integrated Development Plan 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1.4 - Performance Management 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1.5 - Local economic development 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 2 - COUNCIL 


_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

2.1 -Mayor's Office 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

2.2 - Speaker's Office 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

2.3 - Council 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 3 - FINANCIAL SERVICES 


_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

3.1 - Financial Services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

3.2 - Rates and Tax 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


258 


32 911 
22 351 


277 714 


10 058 

4 741 
1557 
1294 
1103 
1363 


13 314 

4133 
3 210 
5 971 


34 787 

36 735 

23 625 

24 948 

311 807 

319 486 

10 632 

11 227 

5 012 

5 292 

1646 

1738 

1367 

1444 

1166 

1231 

1440 

1521 

14 073 

14861 

4 368 

4 613 

3 393 

3 583 

6 312 

6 665 

48 361 

51 069 

48 361 

51 069 

- 

- 


45 753 

45 753 




- 

- 

Vote 4 - CORPORATE SERVICES 


_ 

_ 

4.1 - Administration Services 


- 

- 

Vote 5 - COMMUNITY SERVICES 


_ 

_ 

5.1 - Community Services Director's office 


- 

- 

5.2 - Parks and recreation 


- 

- 

5.3 - Libraries 


- 

- 

5.4 - Fire Department 


- 

- 

5.5 - Traffic Department 


- 

- 

5.6 - Housing 


- 

- 

5.7 - Environmental Services 


- 

- 

Vote 6 - TECHNICAL SERVICES 


_ 

_ 

6.1 - Cemetaries 


- 

- 

6.2 - Properties 


- 

- 

6.3 - Project Management Unit 


- 

- 

6.4 - Roads and Streets 


- 

- 

6.5 - Electricity 


- 

- 

6.6 - Water 


- 

- 

6.7 - Sewerage 


- 

- 

6.8 - Refuse Removal 


- 

- 

Total Expenditure by Vote 

2 

- 

- 

Surplus/(Deficit) for the year 

2 

- 

- 


259 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

8 658 

9152 

9 664 

- 

- 

- 

8 658 

9152 

9 664 

_ 

_ 

_ 

14461 

15 285 

16 141 




5111 

5 402 

5 705 

_ 

_ 

_ 

3 839 

4 058 

4 286 

- 

- 

- 

2 946 

3113 

3 288 

- 

- 

- 

2 565 

2 711 

2 863 

_ 

_ 

_ 

130 696 

138 145 

145 881 

- 

- 

- 

2 682 

2 834 

2 993 

- 

- 

- 

1483 

1568 

1655 

- 

- 

- 

7 079 

7 483 

7 902 

- 

- 

- 

47 073 

49 756 

52 542 

- 

- 

- 

32 115 

33 946 

35 847 

- 

- 

- 

20 943 

22 136 

23 376 

- 

- 

- 

19 321 

20 422 

21566 

- 

- 

- 

222 940 

235 647 

248 844 

- 

- 

- 

54775 

76 159 

70 642 


259 


260 


FS196 Mantsopa - Table A5 Budgeted Capital Expenditure by vote, functional classification and funding 


Vote Description 


R thousand 


Capital expenditure • Vote 


Ref 


2013/14 


2014/15 


2015/16 


Current Year 2016/17 


2017/18 Medium Term Revenue & 
Expenditure Framework 


Audited Audited 

Outcome Outcome 


Audited 

Outcome 


Original 

Budget 


Adjusted 

Budget 


Full Year 
Forecast 


Pre-audit 

outcome 


Budget Year 
2017/18 


Budget Year 
+1 2018/19 


Budget Year 
+2 2019/20 


Multi-year expenditure to be appropriated 2 


Vote 1 - MUNICIPAL MANAGER 
Vote 2 - COUNCIL 
Vote 3 -FINANCIAL SERVICES 
Vote 4 - CORPORATE SERVICES 
Vote 5 - COMMUNITY SERVICES 
Vote 6 - TECHNICAL SERVICES 
Vote 7 -[NAME OF VOTE?] 

Vote 8 - [NAME OF VOTE 8] 

Vote 9 - [NAME OF VOTE 9] 

Vote 10 - [NAME OF VOTE 10] 

Vote 11 - [NAME OF VOTE 11] 

Vote 12 - [NAME OF VOTE 12] 

Vote 13 - [NAME OF VOTE 13] 

Vote 14 - [NAME OF VOTE 14] 

Vote 15 - [NAME OF VOTE 15] 

Capital multi-year expenditure sub-total 7 


Single-year expenditure to be aporooriated 2 

Vote 1 - MUNICIPAL MANAGER 
Vote 2 - COUNCIL 
Vote 3 -FINANCIAL SERVICES 
Vote 4 - CORPORATE SERVICES 


260 



261 


Vote 5 - COMMUNITY SERVICES 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 6 - TECHNICAL SERVICES 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

46 964 

64 338 

57 086 

Vote 7 -[NAME OF VOTE 7] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 8 - [NAME OF VOTE 8] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 9 - [NAME OF VOTE 9] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 10 - [NAME OF VOTE 10] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 11 - [NAME OF VOTE 11] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 12 - [NAME OF VOTE 12] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 13 - [NAME OF VOTE 13] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 14 - [NAME OF VOTE 14] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 15 - [NAME OF VOTE 15] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Capital single-year expenditure sub-total 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

46 964 

64 338 

57 086 

Total Capital Expenditure ■ Vote 


_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

46 964 

64 338 

57 086 

Capital Expenditure ■ Functional 












Governance and administration 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Executive and council 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Finance and administration 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Internal audit 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Community and public safety 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

593 

- 

- 

Community and social services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

593 

- 

- 

Sport and recreation 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Public safety 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Housing 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Health 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Economic and environmental services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

18 897 

20 138 

21 086 

Planning and development 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Road transport 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

18 897 

20 138 

21086 

Environmental protection 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Trading services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

27 475 

44200 

36 000 

Energy sources 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

10 475 

4 200 

5 000 

Water management 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

16 500 

40 000 

31000 

Waste water management 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

500 

- 

- 

Waste management 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total Capital Expenditure ■ Functional 

3 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

46 964 

64338 

57 086 

Funded bv; 













261 


262 


National Government 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

45 064 

64 338 

57 086 

Provincial Government 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

District Municipality 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other transfers and grants 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Transfers recognised • capital 

4 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

45 064 

64338 

57 086 

Public contributions & donations 

5 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Borrowing 

6 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Internally generated funds 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1900 

- 

- 

Total Capital Funding 

7 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

46 964 

64338 

57 086 


FS196 Mantsopa - Table A6 Budgeted Financial Position 


Description 

Ref 

2013/14 

2014/15 

2015/16 


Current Year 2016/17 


2017/18 Medium Term Revenue & 
Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 


Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Original 

Budget 

Adjusted 

Budget 

Full Year 
Forecast 

Pre-audit 

outcome 

Budget Year 
2017/18 

Budget Year 
+1 2018/19 

Budget Year 
+2 2019/20 

ASSETS 

Current assets 












Cash 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

100 

106 

112 

Call investment deposits 

1 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

100 

106 

112 

Consumer debtors 

1 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

114 220 

120 731 

127 492 

Other debtors 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

5 000 

5 285 

5 581 

Current portion of long-term receivables 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

6 

6 

7 

Inventory 

2 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total current assets 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

119 426 

126 234 

133 303 

Non current assets 












Long-term receivables 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

200 

211 

223 

Investments 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1462 

1546 

1632 

Investment property 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

62 573 

66 140 

69 844 

Investment in Associate 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Property, plant and equipment 

3 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 068 768 

1 129 539 

1 182 922 

Agricultural 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Biological 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Intangible 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other non-current assets 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total non current assets 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 133 004 

1 197 437 

1 254 621 

TOTAL ASSETS 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1252430 

1 323 670 

1 387 924 


262 


263 


LIABILITIES 

Current liabilities 












Bank overdraft 

1 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

- 

- 

Borrowing 

4 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

940 

994 

1050 

Consumer deposits 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1689 

1785 

1885 

Trade and other payables 

4 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

71663 

75 748 

79 990 

Provisions 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total current liabilities 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

74 292 

78 527 

82 925 

Non current liabilities 












Borrowing 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

5 805 

6136 

6 479 

Provisions 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1431 

1512 

1597 

Total non current liabilities 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

7 236 

7 648 

8 077 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

81 528 

86 175 

91001 

NET ASSETS 

5 








1 170 902 

1 237 495 

1 296 923 

COMMUNITY WEALTH/EQUITY 












Accumulated Surplus/(Deficit) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 170 902 

1 237 495 

1 296 923 

Reserves 

4 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

TOTAL COMMUNITY WEALTH/EQUITY 

5 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 170 902 

1 237 495 

1 296 923 


263 


264 


FS196 Mantsopa - Table AlO Basic service delivery measurement 


Description 

Ref 

2013/14 

2014/15 

2015/16 

Current Year 2016/17 

2017/18 Medium Term Revenue & 
Expenditure Framework 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Original 

Budget 

Adjusted 

Budget 

Full Year 
Forecast 

Budget Year 
2017/18 

Budget Year 
+1 2018/19 

Budget Year 
+2 2019/20 

Household service taraets 

1 










Water: 











Piped water inside dwelling 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Piped water inside yard (but not in dwelling) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

15 100 

15 100 

15 100 

Using public tap (at least min. service level) 

2 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other water supply (at least min.service level) 

4 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Minimum Service Level and Above sub-total 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

15 100 

15 100 

15 100 

Using public tap (< min.service level) 

3 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other water supply (< min.service level) 

4 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

No water supply 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Below Minimum Service Level sub-total 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total number of households 

5 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

15 100 

15 100 

15 100 

Sanitation/seweraae: 











Flush toilet (connected to sewerage) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

15 100 

15 100 

15 100 

Flush toilet (with septic tank) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Chemical toilet 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Pit toilet (ventilated) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other toilet provisions (> min.service level) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Minimum Service Level and Above sub-total 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

15 100 

15 100 

15 100 

Bucket toilet 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other toilet provisions (< min.service level) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

No toilet provisions 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Below Minimum Service Level sub-total 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total number of households 

5 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

15 100 

15 100 

15 100 

Enerav: 











Electricity (at least min.service level) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

13 300 

13 300 

13 300 

Electricity - prepaid (min.service level) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1800 

1800 

1800 


264 



265 


Minimum Service Level and Above sub-total 

Electricity (< min.service level) 

Electricity - prepaid (< min. service level) 

Other energy sources 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

IB 100 

15 100 

15 100 

Below Minimum Service Level sub-total 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total number of households 

B 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

15 100 

15 100 

15 100 

Refuse: 











Removed at least once a week 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

IB 100 

15 100 

15 100 

Minimum Service Level and Above sub-total 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

IB 100 

15 100 

15 100 

Removed less frequently than once a week 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Using communal refuse dump 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Using own refuse dump 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other rubbish disposal 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

No rubbish disposal 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Below Minimum Service Level sub-total 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total number of households 

B 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

15 100 

15 100 

15 100 

Households receivina Free Basic Service 

Water (6 kilolitres per household per month) 

7 










Sanitation (free minimum level service) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Electricity/other energy (BOkwh per household per month) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Refuse (removed at least once a week) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Cost of Free Basic Services provided • Formal Settlements (R'OOO) 

Water (6 kilolitres per indigent household per month) 

8 







5 760 

6 088 

6 429 

Sanitation (free sanitation service to indigent households) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

8160 

8 625 

9108 

Electricity/other energy (BOkwh per indigent household per month) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

54 

57 

60 

Refuse (removed once a week for indigent households) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

5 280 

5 581 

5 893 

Cost of Free Basic Services orovided • Informal Formal Settlements fR'OOO) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total cost of FBS provided 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

19 254 

20 351 

21 491 

Hiahest level of free service provided per household 











Property rates (R value threshold) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 250 000 

1 250 000 

1 250 000 

Water (kilolitres per household per month) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

40 

40 

40 

Sanitation (kilolitres per household per month) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Sanitation (Rand per household per month) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

194 

0 

0 

Electricity (kwh per household per month) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

900 

1 

1 

Refuse (average litres per week) 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

125 

0 

0 


265 


266 


Revenue cost of subsidised services provided (R'OOO) 

9 


Property rates (tariff adjustment) ( impermissable values per section 17 of MPRA) 


- 

Property rates exemptions, reductions and rebates and impermissable values in excess 
of section 17 of MPRA) 


_ 

Water (in excess of 6 kilolitres per indigent household per month) 


- 

Sanitation (in excess of free sanitation service to indigent households) 


- 

Electricity/other energy (in excess of 50 kwh per indigent household per month) 


- 

Refuse (in excess of one removal a week for indigent households) 


- 

Municipal Housing - rental rebates 

Housing - top structure subsidies 

6 


Other 

Total revenue cost of subsidised services provided 




266 













80 

80 

80 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 





- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

80 

80 

80 


267 


MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE PLANS 


1 DIVISION: IDP | INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016/17 I 

KPA 


Good Governance and Public Participation 

DEPARTMENT 


Municipal Manager 

DIVISION 


Integrated Planning 

VOTES 



ANNUAL 

PERFORMANCE 

TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- 

PROJECT 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMANCE 

MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON 

REVIEW 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


Good governance 

Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes 

are 

development 

and 

maintained 

IDP 

2016/17 

1 

Annual review of 
approved 5 year 

IDP conducted in 
terms of MSA and 
MFMA 

Approved 
process plan 

IDP 

Assessment 

Consultation 

meeting 

Representative 

Forum 

Advertising 
the IDP 


Submission to Council 

Submission to Cogta 





1 




Council 

strategic 

plan 

Previous 

Strategic 

plan 

(2016/17) 

Coordination of 
Council strategic 
plan in April 2018 

Prepare 

Agenda 

Coordinate 

bookings 

Coordinate 

invites 

Conduct 
Strategic Plan 
session 

Agenda 

Invitation letters 

Attendance register 


1 







Sector Plans 

6 

Facilitation of 
sectorial 

Coordinate 
sectorial plans 

Proof of coordination 



1 





267 




268 






development plans 
and its 

incorporation in the 
IDP process 

Liaise with 

service 

providers 


Attendance registers 









Steering 

committee 

2 

Prepare Agenda 
invitations 

Prepare 

Agenda 

Invitations 

Minutes 

Attendance 


1 


1 




DIVISION: ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 


1 1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 


GOOD GOVERNANCE & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 

DEPARTMEN 

T 


OFFICE OF THE MUNICIPAL MANAGER 

DIVISION 


ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 

VOTES 



ANNUAL 

PERFORMANCE 

TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/PAG 

E 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDE 

D 

OUTCOM 

E 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANC 

E INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

WEIGH 

T 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMANC 

E MEASURE 

PROGRES 

SON 

REVIEW 

Q 

1 

Q 

2 

Q 

3 

Q 

4 


Ensure that 
sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

Ensured 
that sound 

governance 

processes 

are 

developed 

and 

maintained 

1 

(2016/17 

SDBIP) 

1 

(2017/18 

Annual 

SDBIP 
approved 
within 28 
days after 
the approval 
of the IDP 
and budget) 

2017/18 Annual 
SDBIP approved 
by the Mayor 
within 28 days of 
the approval of the 
2017/18 IDP & 
Budget 

Revise the SDBIP 
template for 
completion by 
Directors/Manager 
s 

Develop a 
program for 
Departmental 

SDBIP 

Engagement 

Session 

Consolidate the 
institutional 

2016/17 SDBIP 
and submission to 
MM, Mayor, FS 
COGTA, FS PT 


2017/18 SDBIP approved by 
the Mayor within the 
prescribed period 

Letter sent to the Mayor 

Minutes of Council 


1 





Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes 

are 

developed 

(5) 2017/18 

Signed 

Performance 

Agreements 

Facilitate 
the Signed 
Performanc 

e 

Agreements 
of Section 

Signed 2017/18 
Performance 
Agreements of 
Section 51 A and 
Section 56, and 
submission to 

Prepare the draft 
Performance 
Agreements for 
Directors & MM 

Approved Performance 
Agreements 

Proof of submission 

Minutes of Council 


1 






268 





269 



and 

maintained 


57A and 
Section 56, 
and 

submission 
to COGTA 
and 

Treasury 

COGTA and 
Treasury 

Submit the final 
Performance 
Agreements to FS 
COGTA & FS PT 

Prepare the draft 
Performance 
Agreements for 
Level 01-03 
Managers 
Incorporate inputs 
and submit the 
final Performance 
Agreements for 
Level 01 to 03 
Managers to the 

MM 









Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes 

are 

developed 

and 

maintained 

2 

(2015/16 

Annual 

Report) 

2 (MSA and 
MFMA 
compliant 
Annual 

Report 
tabled in 
Council by 

31 January 
2018) 

MSA and MFMA 
compliant Annual 
Report tabled in 
Council by 3 1 
January 2018. 

Prepare the draft 
2016/17 Annual 
Report and submit 
to Council for 
tabling & AG 
audit by 3 1 August 
2017 

Incorporate inputs 
and submit the 
final draft to 

Council by 3 1 
January 20 1 8 for 
Oversight 
Committee 
consideration 

Incorporate inputs 
of the Oversight 
Committee and 
submit the final 

AR not later than 

31 March 2018 to 
Council and to 
FSCOGTA after 
approval 

Proof of submission (COGTA) 

Council minutes 

Oversight Committee minutes 


1 


1 



Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes are 

Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes 

are 

20 

(Quarterly 

reports) 

20 

(Submit 

institutional 

Quarterly 

Performanc 

5 Prepare and 

submit 

institutional 

Quarterly 

Performance 

Consolidate 

Departmental 

Quarterly 

Performance 

Proof of submission 
(evidence from depts) 

Council minutes 


5 

5 

5 

5 



269 




270 


developed and 
maintained 

developed 

and 

maintained 


e 

Assessment 
Reports to 
Council) 

Assessment 

Reports to Council 

Assessment 

Reports 

Submit to MM, 
Council & Audit 
Committee 

Facilitate the 
Individual 
Performance 
Evaluation of 
Directors, MM, 
Level 01-03 


Acknowledgement from MM 
& Internal Auditor 

Performance Evaluation 
reports 







Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes 

are 

developed 

and 

maintained 

Back to 

Basics 

reports 

12 (Submit 
Monthly 

Back to 

Basics 
report to 
National 
COGTA) & 

4 (Quarterly 
Back To 
Basics 
reports to 

FS COGTA 
& Council 

Monthly & 

Quarterly Back To 
Basics reports 
submitted to 
National COGTA, 
FS COGTA & 
Council 

Prepare monthly 
National Back to 
Basics statistics 

Consolidate the 
departmental 
quarterly 
performance on 
the Back to Basics 
Action Plan for 
submission to FS 
COGTA 

Proof of submission 


3 

1 

3 

1 

3 

1 

3 

1 


Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes 

are 

developed 

and 

maintained 

Management 

& 

Departmenta 

1 Meetings 

12 Convene 
monthly 
Senior 
Managemen 
t meetings 

4 Convene 

quarterly 

departmenta 

1 meetings 

12 Convene 
monthly Senior 
Management 
meetings 

4 Convene 
quarterly 
departmental 
meetings 

Draft a schedule 
for monthly 
Management & 
departmental 
meetings 

Minutes & Attendance 

Registers 


3 

1 

3 

1 

3 

1 

3 

1 



270 




271 


DIVISION: INTERNAL AUDIT 


1 1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 I 

KPA 


GOOD GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 

DEPARTMENT 


OFFICE OF THE MUNICIPAL MANAGER 

DIVISION 


INTERNAL AUDITING 

VOTES 



ANNUAL 

PERFORMANCE 

TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- 

PROJECT 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMANCE 

MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON 

REVIEW 

Qi 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


ensure that 

sound 

governance 

processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

ensured that 
sound 

governance 

processes 

are 

developed 

and 

maintained 

1 (2016/17 
approved 
annual 
internal 
audit plan) 

1 (2017/18 
approved 
annual 
internal 
audit plan) 

Review annual 
internal audit plan 
for 2017/18 
financial year. 

annual 
internal 
audit plan 
approved by 
Audit 
Committee 


Agenda 

Minutes of the Audit Committee 
Meeting 

2017/18 approved annual 
internal audit plan. 


1 





Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

Ensured 
that sound 
governance 
processes 

are 

developed 

and 

maintained 

4(2016/17 

internal 

audit 

reports) 

4(2017/18 

internal 

audit 

reports) 

Implementation 
of 2017/18 annual 
internal audit plan. 

Quarterly 
audits to 
implement 
internal 
audit plan 

Agendas 

Minutes of the Audit Committee 
Meetings 

Attendance Registers 


1 

1 

1 

1 


Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

Ensured 
that sound 
governance 
processes 

are 

developed 

and 

maintained 

1 (2016/17 

approved 

three-year 

rolling 

coverage 

plan) 

1 (2017/18 

approved 

three-year 

rolling 

coverage 

plan) 

Review the three- 
year rolling 
coverage plan for 
2017/18 financial 
year 

Three-year 

rolling 

coverage 

plan 

approved by 

Audit 

Committee 

Agenda 

Minutes of the Audit Committee 
Meeting 

2017/18 approved three-year 
rolling coverage plan. 


1 






271 




272 


Ensured that 

sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

Ensured 

that sound 
governance 
processes 

are 

developed 

and 

maintained 

4(2016/17 
number of 
audit 

committee 
meetings 
held per 
annum) 

4(2017/18 
number of 
audit 

committee 
meetings 
held per 
annum) 

Number of audit 

committee 
meetings held per 

annum. 

Discussion 
of internal 
audit reports 
with Audit 
Committee 
Members 


Invitations 

Agendas 

Attendance 

Registers 

Minutes of the Audit Committee 
Meetings 


1 

1 

1 

1 


Ensured that 
sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

Ensured 
that sound 
governance 
processes 

are 

developed 

and 

maintained 

1 (2016/17 

approved 

internal 

audit 

charter) 

1 (2017/18 

approved 

internal 

audit 

charter) 

Review Internal 

Audit Charter for 
2017/18 financial 
year 

Internal 
audit charter 
approved by 
Audit 
Committee 

Invitation 

Agenda 

Minutes of the Audit Committee 
Meeting 

2017/18 approved internal audit 
charter. 


1 





Ensured that 

sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

Ensured 

that sound 
governance 
processes 

are 

developed 

and 

maintained 

1 (2016/17 
approved 
internal 
audit 

strategy and 

procedural 

manual) 

1 (2017/18 

approved 

internal 

audit 

strategy 

and 

procedural 

manual) 

Review Internal 
Audit Strategy and 
Procedural manual 
for 2017/18 

financial year 

Internal 

Audit 

Strategy 

and 

Procedural 
manual 
approved by 
Audit 

Committee 

Invitation 

Agenda 

Minutes of the Audit Committee 
Meeting 

2017/18 approved internal audit 
strategy and procedural manual. 


1 





Ensured that 

sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

Ensured 
that sound 

governance 

processes 

are 

developed 

and 

maintained 

1 (2016/17 

approved 

Audit 

Committee 

Charter) 

1 (2017/18 

approved 

Audit 

Committee 

Charter) 

Review Audit 

Committee Charter 
for 2017/18 

financial year 

Audit 
Committee 
Charter 
approved by 
Council. 

Invitation 

Minutes of the Council 

2017/18 approved audit 
committee charter. 


1 





Ensured that 

sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

Ensured 

that sound 
governance 
processes 

are 

developed 

and 

maintained 

4(2016/17 
number of 
audit 

committee 

report 

tabled) 

4(2017/18 
number of 
audit 

committee 

report 

tabled) 

Number of Audit 
Committee Reports 
Completed 

Audit 
Committee 
Reports 
tabled to 

council. 

Invitation 

Minutes of the Council 

Audit Committee Reports 


1 

1 

1 

1 



272 




273 


DIVISION: RISK MANAGEMENT 


1 1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 


GOOD GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 

DEPARTME 

NT 


Municipal Manager 

DIVISION 


Risk Management 

VOTES 



ANNUAL PERFORMANCE 
TARGET 

2017/18 

POE 

REF 

NO/PA 

GE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANC 

E INDICATOR 

WEIGHT 

SUB- PROJECT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMANC 

E MEASURE 

PROGRES 

SON 

REVIEW 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


ensure that 

sound 

governance 

processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

To ensured 
that sound 

governance 

processes are 

developed 

and 

maintained 
and the 

municipality 
has an 

integrated risk 
Management 
system 

2 (Risk 
Management 
Committee 
Meetings held) 

4(2017/18 
number of 
audit 

committee 
meetings held 
per annum) 

One Risk 

Management 

Committee 

Meeting held per 
quarter 


Discuss a Risk 
Management Report 
with the Risk 
Management 
Committee 

Minutes of the Risk 

Management Committee 

Meeting, 

Attendance Register of the Risk 
Management Committee 

Meeting, 

Agenda 


1 

1 

1 

1 


Ensured that 
sound 

governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

To ensured 
that sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 
and the 
municipality 
has an 

integrated risk 

Management 

system 

1 (Approved Risk 
Management 

Policy) 

1 

Revietw of the 

Risk Management 
Policy for the 
2017/18 financial 
year. 

Table the Risk 
Management Policy 
to the Risk 
Management 
Committee. 

Take the Risk 
Management Policy 
to Council for 
noting 

Reviewed Risk Management 
Strategy, 

Minutes of the Risk 

Management Committee, 

Council minutes 


1 






273 




274 


Ensured that 

sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 

To ensured 
that sound 
governance 
processes are 
developed and 
maintained 
and the 
municipality 
has an 

integrated risk 

Management 

system 

1 (Approved Risk 

Management 

Strategy) 

1 

Revie\A/ of the 

Risk Management 
Strategy for the 
2017/18 financial 
year. 


Table the Risk 
Management 

Strategy to the Risk 

Management 

Committee. 

Take the Risk 
Management 

Strategy to Council 
for noting 

Reviewed Risk Management 
Strategy, 

Minutes of the Risk 

Management Committee, 

Council minutes 


1 







1 (Approved Risk 
Management 
Implementation 
Plan) 

1 

Approval of the 
Risk Management 
Implementation 
Plan by the Risk 
Management 
Committee for the 
2017/18 financial 
year 

Table the Risk 
Management 
Implementation plan 
to the Risk 

Management 
Committee for 

review and approval 

Approved Risk Management 
Implementation plan, 

Minutes of the Risk 

Management Committee 


1 







1 (Approved 

Fraud Prevention 
Plan and 

Strategy) 

1 

Revie\w of the 
Fraud Prevention 
by the Risk 

Management 
Committee and 

Council 

Table the Fraud Plan 
and Strategy to the 
Risk Management 
Committee. Take 
the Fraud 

Prevention Plan to 
Council for noting 

Reviewed Fraud Prevention 

Plan and strategy, 

Minutes of the Risk 

Management Committee, 

Council minutes 


1 







1 (Conduct 
Institution Wide 
Risk Assessment) 

1 

Conducting of the 
Institution Wide 
Risk Assessment 

Conduct Institution 
Wide Risk 

Assessment 

Invitation 

Attendance register for the Risk 
Assessment, 

Risk Assessment Report 





1 




1 (Approved Risk 
Register) 

1 

Approval of the 
Risk Register for 
2017/18 financial 
year 

Conduct an 

Institution Wide 
Risk Assessment, 
Compile a Risk 
Register, Table the 
Risk Register to the 
Risk Management 
Committee 

Approved Risk Register, 

Minutes of the Risk 

Management Committee 





1 




0 

4 (Update 

Risk Register 
once a quarter 

Updating Risk 

Register on a 
quarterly basis 

Update the Risk 
Register with 

information from 
various departments 

Updated Risk Register, 

Proof of update by the Risk 
Champion and Risk 

Management Officer 


1 

1 

1 

1 



274 




275 


4 (number of 

4 (number of 

Number of Risk 


Risk Management 

Invitation 


1 

1 

1 

1 


Risk 

Risk 

Management 


Committee Reports 

Minutes of the Council 







Management 

Management 

Committee 


tabled to council. 








Committee report 

Committee 

Reports 



Risk Management Committee 







tabled) 

report tabled) 

Completed 



Reports 








DIVISION: ICT 


1 1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 


TRANSFORMATION AND INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

DEPARTMEN 

T 


Municipal Manager 

DIVISION 


Information and Communication Technology 

VOTES 



ANNUAL 

PERFORMANCE 

TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/PAG 

E 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDE 

D 

OUTCOM 

E 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANC 

E INDICATOR 

SUB- 

PROJECT 

WEIGH 

T 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMANC 

E MEASURE 

PROGRES 

SON 

REVIEW 

Q 

1 

Q 

2 

Q 

3 

Q 

4 


IT Good 
Governance and 
Public 

Participation 

Integrated 

Information 

Technology 

Systems 

(1) Draft IT 
Steering 
Committee 
Terms of 
Reference 

(4) ICT 
Steering 
Committee 
Meetings 

Develop risk 
register that is 
quarterly reviewed 
and updated 

IT risk 
control 
framework 
and risk 
register and 
proof 


-ICT Steering committee 

Agenda and Minutes 


1 

1 

1 

1 




Terms of 
Reference of 
ICT Steering 
Committee is 
submitted for 
management 
review 

(l)Annual 
Report on 
the review 
of ICT 
Steering 
committee 
Terms of 
Reference 

ICT Steering 
Committee 

Meeting for review 
and approval of 
Terms of 

Reference for ICT 
Steering committee 

IT Steering 

Committee 

Terms of 

Reference 

with all 

minutes of 

meetings 

held for the 

2015-16 

financial 

period 

Approved terms of reference of 
ICT Steering Committee 



1 






(3)ICT 

Service 
Providers 
must gain 
access by 
authenticating 

(12)Quarterl 
y report for 
Security log 
Access 
showing the 
details of the 

To monitor the 
municipal Service 
Provider in 
accordance to their 
SLA 

Quarterly 
Reports as a 
Proof that 

IT service 
providers 

Security Log access that show 
the logon detail of the service 
Provider 

SQL server 
is already 
Installed in 
the server to 
monitor the 
logon 

3 

3 

3 

3 



275 





276 




to municipal 
server 

service 

provider 


are 

monitored 











(l)DraftlCT 

Security 

Policy 

Approved 

ICT Security 
Policy 

Management 

ICT Security 

Policy is submitted 
for management 
review. 

The minutes 
and agenda 
showing 
that ICT 
Security 
Policy was 
review by 

IT Steering 
Committee 

Approved ICT Security Policy 
and Procedures 





1 




Trial SCCM 

(12)Monthly 

Computer 

generated 

report 

showing that 
all patches 
Deployed by 
System 
Configuratio 
n Centre 
Manager 

Implemented 

System Centre 
Configuration 
Manager to deploy 
patches on the 
workstations on 
monthly basis. 

Patch 

managemen 
t procedures 
and process 
Logs 

System Configuration Manager 
is deployed on the server as six 
month trial version 


3 

3 

3 

3 




Draft IT 

Disaster 
Recovery Plan 

Approved IT 

Disaster 

recovery 

plan and 

Backup 

register 

Quarterly Test 

Report showing the 
timeframes to 
resume IT Service 
in case of disaster 

IT Disaster 
recovery 
plan and 
Backup 
procedures 

IT disaster recovery plan and 
Backup procedures is submitted 
to the management for review 


1 

1 

1 

1 




Connection to 
municipal 

Towns 

Network 
Infrastructure 
and Network 
Diagram 

(6)Complete 
Network 
connectivity 
to the 
municipal 
remote 
offices and 
Towns 

(l)Quarterly 
computer 
generated Log file 
showing that 
remote municipal 
offices and towns 
can be access 

Acquiring 
new Base 
Station Unit 
and 

upgrading 

current 

Access 
points and 
negotiating 
with 

SENTECH 
for access to 
their 

transmission 
tower to 

Connect 

Approved quarterly reports 
showing the data traffic and 
access log to the remote 
municipal offices and towns 





1 




Draft Server 
Room 

Register 

(l)Upgraded 

Server 

Room to 

Physical Access 
and Environmental 
Controls 

Approved 
policy or 

procedures 

Develop server room access 
policy and procedure and 
electronic server room registers 





1 



276 




277 





meet the 
required 
server 

standards 


System 
generated 
server room 
access logs 
and server 

room 

visitors 

register 










LED AND TOURISM SDBIP: 2017/2018 


KPA 

LED AND TOURISM 

DEPARTMENT 

MUNICIPAL MANAGER 

DIVISION 

LED AND TOURISM 


ANNUAL PERFORMANCE POE 
TARGET 2017/2018 REF 

NO/P 
AGE 


IDP OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED OUTCOME 

BASELIN 

E 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

SUB-PROJECT 

FACILITATE DECENT 

EMPLOYMENT 

THROUGH INCLUSIVE 

ECONOMIC GROWTH 

BY STIMULATING THE 

GROWTH OFSMME's 

TO CONTRIBUTE 

TOWARDS THE 

REDUCTION OF 

UNEMPLOYMENT 

AND POVERTY 

Review LED Strategy 

2015/201 

6 LED 
Strategy 

1 

Approved 2017/18 LED 
strategy by Council not 
later than September 

2017 

IDP Review 

Roadshows 

Consultation 


Number Of employment 
opportunities created through the 
EPWP 

157 

300 

300 jobs created 
through EPWP 

People employed 
through EPWP 


Number of employment 
opportunities created through CWP 

127 

300 

300 jobs created 
through CWP 

People employed 
through CWP 


Contribution towards the 
sustainability of SEDA offices 

0 

1 

The operation of SEDA 
offices 

Operation of SEDA 
offices 


UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMAN 
CE MEASURE 


PROGRE 

SSON 

REVIEW 


Q1 I Q2 I Q3 


Q4 


Minutes of the IE 
committee meeting 
Attendance Register 


Contracts signed by 
employees 


Contracts signed by 
employees 


Service Level agreement 
with the Municipality 
Attendance Register 


277 





278 



Number of LED projects supported 
by the Municipality in conjunction 
with SEDA offices 

8 

8 projects 
per quarter 

Identify LED projects to 
be sup[ported by the 
Municipality and SEDA 

Support offered by SEDA 
and the Municipality to 
ourSMME's 


Attendance Register 
Minutes of meetings 
held 


8 

8 

8 

8 



Number of Cooperatives 
revamped/established 

3 

3 

3 new cooperatives 
established 

Newly Registered 
Cooperatives 

Copy of registration 
certificate 



1 

1 

1 



DEPARTMENT; OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 
KPA: FINANCIAL VIABILITY & MANAGEMENT 




Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan 2017/18 

KPA: 


Financial Viability and Management 

Department 


Financial Services (Expenditure Division) 

Votes: 



Operational 

Budget 



Performance Targets 

Capital 

Budget 



Annual Target 2017/18 

IDP Objective 

Indented 

outcome 

Baseline 

Annual Target 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Sub Project 

WEIGHT 

Unit of measure/Performance 

measure 

Progress on 
review 

Target 

Ql 

Target 

Q2 

Target 

Q3 

Target 

Q4 

POE Ref 
No/Pag 
e 

To ensure full 

compliance 

with 

MFMAand 

GRAP with 
regard to 
financial 
management 
and reporting 

Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountability. 

30% 

Payments 
within 30 
days 

60% creditors 
Payment 
within 30 days 
of receipt of 
invoice 

Monthly list 
of payments 
and 

reconciliation 

s 

Payment of 
creditors within 30 
days of receipt of 
invoice 

20% 

Monthly - Creditors account 
reconciliation, monthly list of 
payments and creditors age 
analysis 

(Keep a register as proof) 


40% 

45% 

50% 

60% 


Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountability. 

12 reports 
compiled 
for all 

suspense 

accounts 

reconciled 

and 

cleared 

12 reports 
compiled for 
all suspense 
accounts 

reconciled and 
cleared 

Monthly list 
and report 
on suspense 

accounts 

Monthly clearing of 
all suspense 
accounts 

Monthly - Reports compiled 
each month 

(Keep a register as proof) 


3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 



278 




279 




Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan 2017/18 

KPA: 


Financial Viability and Management 

Department 


Financial Services (Expenditure Division) 

Votes: 



Operational 

Budget 



Performance Targets 

Capital 

Budget 



Annual Target 2017/18 

IDP Objective 

Indented 

outcome 

Baseline 

Annual Target 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Sub Project 

WEIGHT 

Unit of measure/Performance 

measure 

Progress on 
review 

Target 

Ql 

Target 

Q2 

Target 

Q3 

Target 

Q4 

POE Ref 
No/Pag 
e 


Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountability. 

12 reports 
on all Filing 
of 

Payment 

vouchers 

12 monthly 

reconciliation 

reports 

Monthly 

creditors 

reconciliation 

Agree balance of 
Creditors control 
account to the 
Creditors ledger 
accounts 


Monthly - Creditors 
reconciliation each month 

(Keep a register as proof) 


3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 


Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountability. 

12 reports 
on all Filing 
of 

Payment 

vouchers 

12 reports on 
all Filing of 
Payment 
vouchers 

Monthly 
reports on 
filing of 
Payment 
vouchers 

Monthly summary 
of all Filing of 
Payment vouchers 

Monthly - list of payments 
made and reports compiled 
each month 

(Keep a register as proof) 


3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 


To ensure full 

compliance 

with 

MFMAand 

GRAP with 
regard to 
financial 
management 
and reporting 

Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountability. 

Submit 

before the 

IQth 

working 

day 

12 reports 
compiled and 
tabled at the 

Section 32 

committee 

and Council 

Monthly 
register on 
fruitless and 
wasteful 
expenditure 

Register for fruitless 
and wasteful 
expenditure 
incurred 

Monthly - Monthly register, 
minutes of Section 32 
committee and resolutions of 
Council 

(Keep a register as proof) 


3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 


Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountability. 

Salaries on 
25*^ each 
month and 
Wages 2"^ 
each 

month 

12 monthly 
Salaries and 
Wages 
Certification 
reports 

Salaries and 
Wages 
Certification 
report 

Payments of 

Salaries and Wages 

Monthly - Salaries and Wages 
Certification report and proof 
of payments 

(Keep a register as proof) 


3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 


Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountability. 

Submit 
before the 

IQth 

working 

day 

12 monthly 

reconciliation 

reports 

Monthly 

payroll 

reconciliation 

Payroll 

Reconciliation - 
Including Journals 

Monthly - Payroll 
reconciliation each month 
(Keep a register as proof) 


3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 



279 



280 




Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan 2017/18 

KPA: 


Financial Viability and Management 

Department 


Financial Services (Expenditure Division) 

Votes: 



Operational 

Budget 



Performance Targets 

Capital 

Budget 



Annual Target 2017/18 

IDP Objective 

Indented 

outcome 

Baseline 

Annual Target 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Sub Project 

WEIGHT 

Unit of measure/Performance 

measure 

Progress on 
review 

Target 

Ql 

Target 

Q2 

Target 

Q3 

Target 

Q4 

POE Ref 
No/Pag 
e 


Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountability. 

Submit 
before the 

IQth 

working 

day 

12 monthly 
reports 

Monthly 

reports 

Monthly 
submission of 
section 66 report 


Monthly - Payroll reports each 
month 

(Keep a register as proof) 


3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 


Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountability. 

IRP5 

reconciliati 

on 

Compilation of 
IRP5 

reconciliation 

Compilation 
of IRP5 
reconciliation 

Compilation and 
submission of IRP5 
reconciliation 

Bi-Annually -Submission of 

IRP5 reconciliations to SARS by 
31 October and 31 May 

(Submission report as proof) 


N/A 

31 

Octob 

er 

2015- 

Bi 

annua 

1 IRPSs 

28 

Febru 

ary 

2016- 

Final 

IRPSs 

N/A 


To ensure full 

compliance 

with 

MFMAand 

GRAP with 
regard to 
financial 
management 
and reporting 

Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountability 

BMP 201 

Forms 

BMP 201 

Forms 

BMP 201 

Forms 

Submission of 
Declaration of 
employees tax 
EMP201 forms to 

SARS 


Monthly - BMP 201 Forms 
completed and submitted not 
later than the 7*'^ each month 

(Keep a register as proof) 


3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 


Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountability 

Review 

and 

Submissio 
n of policy 

1 

Reviewed 

Review policy 

Policy review 

Review and 
adoption of the 
Travelling and 
Subsistence policy 

Annually 

(Policy reviewed and tabled 
before council for adoption by 

31 May) (Council resolution as 
proof) 


N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

31/05 

/2016 



280 



281 




Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan 2017/18 

KPA: 


Financial Viability and Management 

Department 


Financial Services (Expenditure Division) 

Votes: 



Operational 

Budget 



Performance Targets 

Capital 

Budget 



Annual Target 2017/18 

IDP Objective 

Indented 

outcome 

Baseline 

Annual Target 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Sub Project 

WEIGHT 

Unit of measure/Performance 

measure 

Progress on 
review 

Target 

Ql 

Target 

02 

Target 

Q3 

Target 

04 

POE Ref 
No/Pag 
e 


Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountability 

Answering 
of all audit 
queries 

5 days 

Response 
timeously to 
both internal 

and external 
audit queries 
for 

Expenditure 
and Payroll 

Units 

Response 
timeously to 
both internal 

and external 
audit queries 
for 

Expenditure 
and Payroll 
Units 

Timeous response 
to Audit 
queries 

Coordinate 
approval of 
responses 


Ongoing - Answering of 
queries within 3 working days 
after receiving query with 
relation to Expenditure and 
Payroll Units (lA report/ AG) 
(Register with query nr, query 
date and date of answer as 
proof) 


5 

workin 

gdays 

5 

work! 

ng 

days 

5 

work! 

ng 

days 

5 

work! 

ng 

days 


Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountability 

Compilatio 
n and 

Implement 
ation of 
audit 

action 

plan 

12 reports 
monthly on 
implementatio 
n and progress 
of audit action 
plan 

Year-end 

procedures 

Audit action plan 
implementation 

Audit File 

Monthly - Report monthly on 
implementation and progress 
of audit action plan (Report as 
proof) 


N/A 

N/A 

Ongoi 

ng 

N/A 



Division: Supply Chain Management 


281 




282 




Integrated Development Plan 2017/18 

KPA: 


Financial Viability and Management 

Department 


Financial Services 

Votes: 



Operational 

Budget 



Performance Targets 

Capital 

Budget 



Annual Target 2017/18 

IDP 

Objective 

Indented 

outcome 

Baseline 

Annual Target 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Sub Project 

WEIGHT 

Unit of 

measure/Performance 

measure 

Progress on 
review 

Target 

Q1 

Target 

Q2 

Target Q 

3 

Target 

Q4 

POE Ref 
No/Page 

To 

implement 
an effective 
and efficient 
system of 
supply chain 
managemen 

t and 

expenditure 

Improved 

financial 

managemen 

t and 

accountabilit 

y- 

Answering of 
all audit 

queries 

Response 
timeously to both 
internal and 

external audit 

queries on supply 
chain 

management 

processes. 

Response 
timeously to 
both internal 
and external 

auditquerieson 
supply chain 
management 
processes. 

Timeous response 
to Audit 
queries 

Coordinate 
approval of 

responses 

20% 

Ongoing - Answering of 
queries within 5 

working days after 
receiving query with 
relation to supply chain 


5 days 

5 days 

5 days 

5 days 



Improved 

financial 

managemen 

t and 

accountabilit 

y 

Update 
Supplier 
Database on 
regular basis 

Advertise 
annually for 

invitation of 

suppliers 

database on the 
newspaper and 
the website of the 
Municipality 

Advertise 

Update data 

base and. 

Report on new 
entries 

Ensure updating of 
supplier database 
on regular basis. 

Ensure compliance of 
SCM 14 (b) policy 


1 

On- 

going 

On- 

going 

On- 

going 



Improved 

financial 

managemen 

t and 

accountabilit 

y 

SCM 

procuremen 
t plan 

compiled 
and 

approved. 

Compile an 

annual 

procurement plan 

Approved SCM 

procurement 

plan 

Approved SCM 

procurement plan 

The signature of the 
MM and date of the 
approval procurement 
plan 





30 

June 

2016 



Improved 

financial 

managemen 

t and 

accountabilit 

y- 

Compilation 
of accurate 

and 

complete 

irregular 

expenditure 

and 

deviation 

12 

reports/registers 
of irregular 

expenditure and 
deviation 

Irregular 
expenditure 
and SCM 

section 36 

deviation 

Irregular 

Expenditure and 

Deviation Register 

Quarterly council 

resolutions for irregular 
expenditure and 

deviation 


3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

reports 

12 

report 

s 



282 




283 




Integrated Development Plan 2017/18 

KPA: 


Financial Viability and Management 

Department 


Financial Services 

Votes: 



Operational 

Budget 



Performance Targets 

Capital 

Budget 



Annual Target 2017/18 

IDP 

Objective 

Indented 

outcome 

Baseline 

Annual Target 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Sub Project 

WEIGHT 

Unit of 

measure/Performance 

measure 

Progress on 
review 

Target 

Q1 

Target 

Q2 

Target Q 

3 

Target 

Q4 

POE Ref 
No/Page 



register in 

conjunction 

with 

Expenditure 

Division 













Improved 

financial 

managemen 

t and 

accountabilit 

y- 

Appointmen 
t of bids and 
tenders 
within 90 
days 

Tenders and Bids 
evaluation must 
be completed 

within 90 days 

Tenders and 

Bids evaluation 
must be 

completed 
within 90 days 

Appointment of 

bids and tenders 
within 90 days 

Evaluation Reports must 
be submitted and list of 
bids register 


90 

days 

90 

days 

90 days 

90 

days 



Improved 

financial 

managemen 

t and 

accountabilit 

y 

Updated 
tender 
register on 
the website 
of the 

Municipality 

Updated tender 
register on the 
website of the 
Municipality 

Updated tender 
register on the 
website of the 
Municipality 

Updated tender 

register on the 
website of the 
Municipality 

Updated tender register 
on the website of the 
Municipality 


Mont 

hly 

Mont 

hly 

Monthly 

Mont 

hly 



Improved 

financial 

managemen 

t and 

accountabilit 

y 

Compilation 
of complete 
and updated 
commitment 
register 

Maintained and 
update 
commitment 
register 

Maintained and 
update 
commitment 
register 

Maintained and 

update 
commitment 
register 


Maintained and update 
commitment register 


On 

going 

On 

going 

On 

going 

On 

going 



Improved 

financial 

managemen 

t and 

accountabilit 

y- 

Reconciliatio 

ns: 

12 Reconciliation 
of Travel Card and 
Orders 

Commitments 

order and 

travelling 

reconciliations 

Commitments order 
and travelling 

reconciliations 

Reconciliations 


3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

reports 

3 

report 

s 



283 




284 




Integrated Development Plan 2017/18 

KPA: 


Financial Viability and Management 

Department 


Financial Services 

Votes: 



Operational 

Budget 



Performance Targets 

Capital 

Budget 



Annual Target 2017/18 

IDP 

Objective 

Indented 

outcome 

Baseline 

Annual Target 

Key 

Performance 

Indicator 

Sub Project 

WEIGHT 

Unit of 

measure/Performance 

measure 

Progress on 
review 

Target 

Q1 

Target 

Q2 

Target Q 

3 

Target 

Q4 

POE Ref 
No/Page 


Improved 

financial 

managemen 

t and 

accountabilit 

y- 

SCM policy 
review 

Annual review 

SCM policy 

review 

SCM policy review 


SCM policy review 


Not 

Applic 

able 

Not 

Applic 

able 

Not 

Applicab 

le 

31/05 

/2015 



Improved 

financial 

managemen 

t and 

accountabilit 

y 

Capturing of 
contracts 

awarded 
above RlOO, 
000.00 to 

National 

Treasury. 

12 Reports 

Capturing of 
contracts 

awarded above 
R100,000.00 to 
National 

Treasury on 

monthly basis 
before 10*^ 

Capturing of 

contracts awarded 
above RlOO, 000.00 
to National 

Treasury. 

Capturing of contracts 
awarded above RlOO, 
000.00 to National 
Treasury 


3 

report 

s 

3 

report 

s 

3 

reports 

3 

report 

s 



284 




285 


Division: Income 


Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan 2017/18 

KPA: Financial Viability and Management 

Departmen Financial Services (Income) 

_t 

Votes: 

Operational Budget Capital Budget Performance Targets 

Annual Target 2017/18 


IDP 

Objective 

Indented 

outcome 

Baseline 

Annual 

Target 

Key 

Performanc 

e Indicator 

Sub Project 

WEIGHT Unit of measure/Performance 

measure 

Progress on 
review 

Target 

Q1 

Target 

Q2 

Target 

Q3 

Target Q 

4 

POE Ref 
No/Page 

To ensure 

Improved 

End of 

All 43 books 

Meter 

Submission by 

20% Signed meter reading books 







full 

financial 

month 

to be read 

reading 

the 25 of each 

with the date when received 


129 

129 

129 

129 


compliance 

manageme 


and 

books 

month 



signed 

signed 

signed 

signed 


with 

nt and 


submitted 





meter 

meter 

meter 

meter 


MFMAand 

accountabili 


by the 25^^ 





reading 

reading 

reading 

reading 


GRAP with 

ty. 


of each 





books 

books 

books 

books 


regard to 



month 










financial 








3 

3 

3 

3 Monthly 


manageme 








MonthI 

MonthI 

MonthI 

exception 


nt and 








V 

y 

y 

reports 


reporting 








except! 

except! 

except! 











on 

on 

on 











reports 

reports 

reports 




Improved 

Calculatio 

Accounts to 

Monthly 

Calculation date 

Accounts dated month end and 


Calculat 

Calculat 

Calculat 

Calculatio 



financial 

n and 

be 

accounts 

and sending of 

proof of accounts distributed. 


ion at 

ion at 

ion at 

n at 



manageme 

sending 

calculated at 


accounts 



month 

month 

month 

month 



nt and 

of 

month end 





end and 

end and 

end and 

end 



accountabili 

accounts 

and sent on 





sending 

sending 

sending 

And 



ty. 


a monthly 





of 

of 

of 

sending of 





basis 





account 

s 

account 

s 

account 

s 

accounts 



Improved 

Monthly 

Monthly 

Cut-off list 

Monthly 

Increased collection rate 


3 cut- 

3 cut- 

3 cut- 

3 cut-off 



financial 

cut-off 

compilation 


compilation of 



off lists 

off lists 

off lists 

lists 



manageme 

list to be 

of the cut- 


the cut-off list 



accord! 

accord! 

accord! 

according 



nt and 

prepared 

off list 





ngto 

ng to 

ng to 

to the 



accountabili 







the 

the 

the 

policy 



ty. 







policy 

policy 

policy 




285 



Financial Viability and Management 
Financial Services (Income) 


KPA: 

Departmen 

_t 

Votes: 

Operational Budget Capital Budget 


IDP 

Objective 

Indented 

outcome 

Baseline 

Annual 

Target 

Key 

Performanc 

e Indicator 

Sub Project 


Improved 

Maximisi 

70% of 

Maximising 

Report on 


financial 

ng 

current 

monthly 

collected 


manageme 

nt and 
accountabili 

ty. 

monthly 

revenue 

account to 

be collected 

revenue 

accounts 
compared to 
outstanding's 

To ensure 

Improved 

Response 

Timeous 

Response 

Timeous 

full 

financial 

timeously 

response to 

timeously 

response to 

compliance 

manageme 

to both 

audit 

to both 

Audit queries 

with 

nt and 

internal 

queries (3 

internal and 


MFMAand 

accountabili 

and 

working 

external 

Coordinate 

GRAP with 

ty. 

external 

days lA 

audit 

approval of 

regard to 
financial 

manageme 

nt and 
reporting 


audit 

queries 

on 

Income 

Division 

report/ AG) 

queries on 
Income 

Division 

responses ( 3 
working days, 
lA report /AG) 


Improved 

Consume 

Comments 

Consumer 

Register for 


financial 

manageme 

nt and 
accountabili 

ty. 

r queries 

/Query 

register 

queries 

and/or 

comments 

consumer 

queries/Comme 

nts 


Improved 

Monthly 

Reconciliatio 

Monthly 

-Debtors 


financial 

Reconcilia 

ns to be 

Reconciliati 

Reconciliation 


manageme 

nt and 
accountabili 

ty. 

tions 

performed 

monthly 

ons 

-Consumer 
deposits 
Reconciliation 
-Clearing of 
suspense votes 


286 


Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan 2017/18 


Performance Targets 
Annual Target 2017/18 


Unit of measure/Performance 

measure 

Progress on 
review 

Target 

Q1 

Target 

Q2 

Target 

Q3 

Target Q 

4 

POE Ref 
No/Page 

Collection rate 


70% 

Collect! 

on 

70% 

Collect! 

on 

70% 

Collect! 

on 

70% 

Collection 


Management Report and 

Internal Audit Report 


Respon 

se 

within 

3 

workin 

gdays 

Respon 

se 

within 3 
working 
days 

Respon 

se 

within 3 
working 
days 

Response 
within 3 
working 
days 


Updated register 


Update 

d 

register 
100% 
resolve 
d in ten 
working 
days 

Update 

d 

register 

Update 

d 

register 

Updated 

register 


Signed, Reviewed and filed 
Reconciliations 


3 

reports 

3 

reports 

3 

reports 

3 reports 



286 



Financial Viability and Management 
Financial Services (Income) 


KPA: 

Departmen 

_t 

Votes: 

Operational Budget Capital Budget 


IDP 

Objective 

Indented 

outcome 

Baseline 

Annual 

Target 

Key 

Performanc 

e Indicator 

Sub Project 


Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 
accountabili 

ty. 

12 

reports 

12 reports 

Monthly 

Councillors' 

reports 

-Debtors 
payment per 
ward and 
category 
-Report on 
Councillors' 

accounts 


Improved 

Indigent 

2300 

Updated 

Updated 


financial 

manageme 

nt and 
accountabili 

ty. 

Register 

+36registere 
d indigents 

Indigent 

register 

indigent 

register 

To ensure 

Improved 

Review of 

The review 

Review of 

The review and 

full 

compliance 

with 

MFMAand 

GRAP with 
regard to 
financial 

manageme 

nt and 
reporting 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 
accountabili 

ty 

Policies 

and 

adoption of 
the indigent, 
and credit 
control and 
debt 

collection 

policy 

policies 

adoption of the 
indigent, and 
credit control 
and debt 
collection policy 


287 


Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan 2017/18 


Performance Targets 
Annual Target 2017/18 

WEIGHT Unit of measure/Performance Progress on Target Target Target Target Q POE Ref 
measure review Q 1 Q 2 Q 3 4 No/Page 

Submission of reports to form 3 3 3 3 reports 

part of Councillors' Agenda reports reports reports 


Filed updated indigent register 700 300 300Regi 1000 

Registr Registra stration Registrati 

ations tions s ons 


Adopted indigent, and credit 31.05. 

control and debt collection 2016 

policies 


287 




288 


Division: Budget Office 




Integrated Development Plan 2017/18 

KPA: 


Financial Viability and Management 

Division 


Budget Office 

Votes: 



Operationa 

1 Budget 



Performance Targets 

Capital 

Budget 



Annual Target 2017/18 

IDP 

Objective 

Indented 

outcome 

Baseline 

Annual 

Target 

Key 

Performanc 

e Indicator 

Sub Project 

WEIGHT 

Unit of measure/Performance 

measure 

Progress on 
review 

Target Q 

1 

Target Q 

2 

Target Q 3 

Target Q 

4 

POE Ref 
No/Pag 
e 

To ensure 

full 

compliance 

with 

MFMAand 

GRAP with 
regard to 
financial 

manageme 

nt and 
reporting 

Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 

accountabili 

ty. 

Submit 
before the 

IQTh 

working 
day after 
month end 

Section 

71 

reports 
on time 

Section 71 
reports 

Monthly and 
Quarterly 
submissions of 

section 71 
reports to 
National and 
Provincial 
Treasury as 
well as to the 
office of the 
Mayor 

20% 

1. Monthly 

(submissions before the IC’^ 
working day of the next month). 

2. Quarterly (submissions 
before the last day of the 
month following the end of the 
quarter) 

(Keep a register as proof) 


3 sets of 
Reports 
(Iper 
month) 

1 set of 
reports 
not later 
than 

31/10/20 

15 

3 sets of 
Reports 
(Iper 
month) 

1 set of 
reports 
not later 
than 

31/01/20 

16 

3 sets of 
Reports (1 
per month) 

1 set of 
reports not 
later than 
30/04/2016 

3 sets of 
Reports 
(Iper 
month) 

1 set of 
reports 
not later 
than 

31/07/20 

16 



Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 

accountabili 

ty. 

Submit 

before the 

IQth 

working 

day 

Departme 
ntal / 

Vote 

Income 

and 

Expenditu 

re 

Reports 
on time 

to all 
directors 

Departmen 
tal / Vote 
Income and 
Expenditure 
Reports 

Monthly 
submission of 
expenditure 
reports per 

vote to 
departments 

Monthly 

(Not later than the 10^^ day 
after month-end) (Keep a 
register as proof) 


3 Reports 
(1 report 
per 

month) 

3 Reports 
(1 report 
per 

month) 

3 Reports 
(1 report 
per month) 

3 Reports 
(1 report 
per 

month) 



Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 
accountabili 

ty. 

Timelines 
to be 
approved 
by council 

Budget 

Timelines 

s 

Budget 

Timeliness 

Budget 

Timeliness 
must be 
compiled and 
tabled before 
Council 

Annually 

(Compiled and tabled before 
Council by 31 August ) 

(Attached council resolution as 
proof) 


Timelines 
to be 
approved 
by 

31/08/20 

16 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 



288 




289 




Integrated Development Plan 2017/18 

KPA: 


Financial Viability and Management 

Division 


Budget Office 

Votes: 



Operationa 

1 Budget 



Performance Targets 

Capital 

Budget 



Annual Target 2017/18 

IDP 

Objective 

Indented 

outcome 

Baseline 

Annual 

Target 

Key 

Performanc 

e Indicator 

Sub Project 

WEIGHT 

Unit of measure/Performance 

measure 

Progress on 
review 

Target Q 

1 

Target Q 

2 

Target Q 3 

Target Q 

4 

POE Ref 
No/Pag 
e 


Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 
accountabili 

ty. 

Submit to 
council not 
later as 25 
January 

Section 

72 report 

Section 72 
report 

Submission of 
section 72 Mid- 
year and 
performance 
assessment 

report 


Annually 

(Mid-year report to be tabled 
before council by 25 January} 

(Council resolution as proof) 


N/A 

N/A 

Mid-year 

report 

tabled 

before 
council by 
25/01/2016 

N/A 



Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 
accountabili 

ty. 

Adjustment 
budget 
approved 
by not later 
than 28 
February by 
council 

Adjustme 
nt budget 
in line 

MFMA 

and 

Budget 

regulatio 

n 

Adjustment 
budget in 
line MFMA 
and Budget 
regulation 

Compilation, 
submission, 
and adoption 
of adjustment 
budget 

Annually 

(Compiled and tabled before 
council by 28 February) (Council 
resolution as proof) 


N/A 

N/A 

Adjustment 
budget 
tabled and 
adopted by 
28/02/2016 

N/A 



Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 

accountabili 

ty. 

Draft 

budget 

table 

before 

council 31 

March 

Draft 

budget 

Draft 

budget 

Compilation, 
submission, 
and adoption 
of draft budget 

Annually 

1. Discussions with 
departments by not later than 

15 March (Minutes of 
discussions) 

2. Compiled and tabled by 31 
March (Council resolution as 
proof) 


N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

Discussions 

to be 

finished by 
15/03/2016 

Draft 

budget 

tabled 

before 

council by 

31/03/2016 

N/A 

N/A 



Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 

accountabili 

ty. 

Application 
to Nersa by 
end of April 

NERSA 

applicatio 

n 

NERSA 

application 

Submission 
Electricity of 
tariff 

application to 
NERSA 

Annually 

(Lodge application to NERSA by 

30 April) (Letter as proof) 


N/A 

N/A 

Application 
sent to 

NERSA by 
30/04/2016 

N/A 



289 




290 




Integrated Development Plan 2017/18 

KPA: 


Financial Viability and Management 

Division 


Budget Office 

Votes: 



Operationa 





Performance Targets 


1 Budget 









Capital 





1 Annual Target 2017/18 


Budget 








IDP 

Indented 

Baseline 

i Annual Key Sub Project 

WEIGHT 

Unit of measure/Performance Progress on Target Q Target Q 

Target Q 3 Target Q 

POE Ref 

Objective 

outcome 


Target Performanc 


measure review 1 2 

4 

No/Pag 




e Indicator 




e 


Improved 

Table final Adoption I Adoption of I Adoption of the 


Annually N/A N/A 

N/A Final 



financial 

draft 

of the the draft draft budget by 


1. Discussions with 

discussio 



manageme 

budget to draft budget 31 May 


departments by not later than 

ns by 



nt and 

council by budget 


30 April and neighbouring 

30/04/20 



accountabili 

31 May 



municipalities (Minutes of 

16 



ty. 




discussions) 








2. Compiled and tabled by 31 

Final 







May (Council resolution as N/A N/A 

N/A budget 







proof) 

tabled 



and 

approved 

by 

31/05/20 

16 



Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 

accountabili 

ty. 

Finalising 

AFS 

Compilati 
on of AFS 

Compilation 
of AFS 

Compilation 
and submission 

of GRAP 
Compliant AFS 


Annually 

(Compilation of AFS completed 
and submitted to AG by 31 
August) (Submission letter as 
proof) 


AFS 

submitte 

d to AG 
by 

31/08/20 

16 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 



Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 

accountabili 

ty. 

Submit VAT 

201 forms 
by the 25*^ 
of each 
month for 
the 

previous 

month 

VAT 201 

Forms 

VAT 201 

Forms 

Submission of 

VAT 201 Forms 

to SARS 


Monthly 

(1. VAT 201 Forms completed 
and submitted each month by 
not later than the 25*^ 

2. VAT Reconciliation to be 
done by the 25^^ of each month) 
(Keep a register as proof) 


3 Reports 
(1 Report 
per 

month) 

3 Reports 
(1 Report 
per 

month 

3 Reports 
(1 Report 
per month 

3 Reports 
(1 Report 
per 

month 



Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 
accountabili 

ty. 

Reconcile 

registers 

monthly 

Loans, 
Investme 
nt, and 
Funds 
Registers 

Loans, 
Investment, 
and Funds 
Registers 

Updating of 
Loans, 
Investment, 
and Funds 
Registers 


Quarterly 

(Registers to be updated by the 
last day of the month following 
the end of the quarter} 

(Registers as proof) 


Updated 

by 

31/10/20 

15 

Updated 

by 

31/01/20 

16 

Updated by 
31/04/2016 

Updated 

by 

31/07/20 

16 



290 




291 




Integrated Development Plan 2017/18 

KPA: 


Financial Viability and Management 

Division 


Budget Office 

Votes: 



Operationa 

1 Budget 



Performance Targets 

Capital 

Budget 



Annual Target 2017/18 

IDP 

Objective 

Indented 

outcome 

Baseline 

Annual 

Target 

Key 

Performanc 

e Indicator 

Sub Project 

WEIGHT 

Unit of measure/Performance 

measure 

Progress on 
review 

Target Q 

1 

Target Q 

2 

Target Q 3 

Target Q 

4 

POE Ref 
No/Pag 
e 

To 

implement 
an effective 
and 

efficient 
system of 
the budget 
division 

Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 
accountabili 

ty 

Submit all 

budget 

related 

policies 

together 

with 

budget. 

Review all 

policies 

Policies 

Policies 

Review and 
adoption of the 
following 
policies; 

Budget 

Policy 

Investment 

Policy 

Tariff policy 

Rates policy 


Annually 

(Policies to be reviewed and 
tabled before council by 31 

March 2016 and final adoption 
by 31 May) (Council resolution 
as proof) 


N/A 

N/A 

Tabling of 
reviewed 
policies by 
31/03/2016 

Adoption 

of 

reviewed 

policies 

by 

31/05/20 

16 


Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 

accountabili 

ty 

Answering 
of all audit 
queries 

Response 
timeously 
to both 
internal 

and 

external 

audit 

queries 

on 

Budget 

and 

Treasury 

Office 

Response 
timeously 
to both 
internal and 
external 
audit 

queries on 
Budget and 
Treasury 
Office 

Timeous 
response to 

Audit 
queries 
Coordinate 
approval of 
responses 

Continuously 

(Answering of queries within 5 
working days after receiving 
query with relation to budget 
office up to a maximum of 3 
queries per day (lA report/ AG)} 
(Register with query nr, query 
date an date of answer as 
proof) 


On-going 

On-going 

On-going 

On-going 


Improved 

financial 

manageme 

nt and 

accountabili 

ty 

Implement 
audit action 
plan 

Year-end 

procedur 

es 

Year-end 

procedures 

Audit action 
plan 

implementatio 

n 

Audit File 


Implementation by the end of 
January 2016 

Progress on audit action plan is 
a continuous process 


Progress 

on-going 

Progress 

on-going 

Implement 

ation 

31/01/2016 

Progress 

on-going 

Progress 

on-going 



291 




292 


Department: Financial Services 
Division : Asset and Fleet Management 


1 1 PLANNED PERFORMANCE 2017/18 I 

1 ANNUAL TARGET 2017/18 I 

IDP/SDB 

IP 

OBJECT 

IVE 

INTENDE 

D 

OUTCOM 

E 

BASEL 

INE 

ANNU 

AL 

TARG 

ET 

KPI 

SUB- 

PROJECT 

WEIG 

HT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFOR 
MANCE MEASURE 

PROGR 
ESS AS 
AT 31 

DEC 

2015 

Qi 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

POE 

REF 

PAG 

E 

To 

impleme 
nt an 
effective 
and 

efficient 
system of 
Asset and 
Fleet 
division 

Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountabili 

ty 


100% 

Response 
timeously to 
both internal 
and external 
audit queries 
on Assets 

Timeous 

response to 

Audit 

queries 

Coordinate 

approval of 

responses 


3 working days( lA 
report/ AG) 

100% 

All Audit 
Queries 
issued by 
AGSA 

were 
responde 
d to 

timeously 

3 

working 

days 

3 working 
days 

3 working 
days 

3 working 
days 



Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountabili 

ty 



Inventory 

register 

Inventory 

register 

update 

monthly 

Updated room reports 
placed in all offices and 
buildings 

100% 

3monthly 

reports 

3 monthly 
reports 

3 monthly 
reports 

3 monthly 
reports 



Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountabili 

ty 



Inventory 

Count 

Conduct an 

inventory 

count 

Periodical Inventory 
count and/ or key 
control matrix 

0% 

1 report 
of 

inventory 
count/ or 
key 
control 
matrix 

1 report of 

inventory 

count/ or 

key 

control 

matrix 

1 report of 

inventory 

count/ or 

key 

control 

matrix 

1 report of 

inventory 

count/ or 

key 

control 

matrix 



Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountabili 

ty 



Asset 

Register 

Updating an 
asset 

register on a 

Quarterly 

basis 

(Additions 

Register) 

Updated additions 
register on quarterly 
base and asset register 
annually 

75% 

1 

1 

1 

1 



Improved 

financial 

management 

and 



Reconciliatio 

ns 

Reconciliati 
on of the 
Asset 
register 

Quarterly reconciliation 
register 

75% 

1 

1 

1 

1 



292 




293 



accountabili 

ty 




against the 

GL on a 
quarterly 
basis 










Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountabili 

ty 



Monthly 

fleet 

expenditure 

report 

Compilation 

Monthly 

fleet 

expenditure 

report 

Monthly fleet 
expenditure report 

75% 

3 fleet 

exp 

reports 

3 fleet exp 
reports 

3 fleet exp 
reports 

3 fleet exp 
reports 



Improved 

financial 

management 

and 

accountabili 

ty 



Obsolete, 

Slow 

Moving and 

Disposal 

Register 

Compile 

Obsolete, 

Slow 

Moving and 
Disposal 
Register 
Annually 

Compile obsolete, slow 
moving and disposal 
register annually 

50% 

Only 
applicabl 
e at the 

4 th 

Quarter 

Only 

applicable 
at the 4th 
Quarter 

Only 

applicable 
at the 4th 
Quarter 

Obsolete, 

Slow 

Moving 

and 

Disposal 

Register 

compiled 



DEPARTMENT: CORPORATE SERVICES 


1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 

KPA 


Institutional Development and Transformation 

DEPARTME 

NT 


Corporate Services 

DIVISION 


Human Resources 

VOTES 



ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/PAGE 

IDP 

INTENDED 

BASELINE 


ANNUAL 

KEY 

SUB- 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

PROGRESS 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


OBJECTIVE 

OUTCOME 



TARGET 

PERFORMAN 

PROJECT 


MEASURE/PERFORMAN 

ON REVIEW 











CE 



CE MEASURE 












INDICATOR 










To provide 

Improved 

Number of 

Fill all 

Targeted and 

Appointme 

20 % 

Submit a monthly report 


90 

90 days 

90 days of 

90 days 


sufficient 

organization 

funded 


positions 

qualified 

nt of Staff 


of all vacant positions 


days of 

of the 

the vacancy 

of the 


and skilled 

al stability 

vacancies 


that 

individuals 

prioritised 


Advertise all vacant 


the 

vacancy 

being 

vacancy 


human 

and 

as per 


become 

recruited in 

for 


positions and fill them 


vacanc 

being 

vacant 

being 


capital in 

sustainabilit 

organogra 


vacant 

line with the 

appointme 


within 90 days of being 


y being 

vacant 


vacant 


order to 

y- 

m 


during the 

critical posts 

nt in terms 


vacant 


vacant 





enable all 




year within 

identified 

of the 


Create a report on a 







department 




90 days of 

within 90 

presented 


monthly basis of all 







s to 




the position 

days of the 

vacancy 


appointments 







function 




being 

vacancy 

rate and 









optimally in 




created 

being vacant 

the 









order to 






appointme 










293 




294 


enhance 



and/or 

and/or 

nt of other 

service 



vacated 

created 

staff as and 

delivery and 





when 

institutional 

capacity. 





required 

To provide 

Improved 

2016/17 

Organisatio 

Organisation 

Identificatio 

sufficient 

organization 

organogra 

nal 

al structure 

n of gaps in 

and skilled 

al stability 

m structure 

Structure 

reviewed and 

all 

human 

and 

approved 

reviewed 

approved 

department 

capital in 

sustainabilit 


and 

annually 

s 

order to 

y 


approved 


Review 

enable all 



on a yearly 


Structure 

department 



basis 


addressing 

s to 





the 

function 





identified 

optimally in 





gaps 

order to 





Compilatio 

enhance 





n of 

service 





Monthly 1. 

delivery and 





Vacancy list 

institutional 





2. Vacancy 

capacity 





requisition 

3.Job 

specificatio 

ns 

3.Job 

description 

s 



HR manual 

Human 

Review all 

Identify 



to include 

resource 

policies 

policies 



new LRA 

policies 

identified for 

that needs 



changes 

reviewed 

a specific 

to be 




annually 

year and 

reviewed 





submit to 

and submit 





council for 

to different 





approval 

committees 

for 

considerati 
on and 
finally to 
council for 
approval 



Number of 

Job 

All Job 

Ensure that 



signed job 

description 

Descriptions 

new 



description 

compiled 


incumbent' 









Organogram submitted 
to council for approval 
annually 





Submissi 

on of 

organogr 

am to 

council 


Identified policies 
reviewed and approved 
by council 





Human 

resource 

manage 

ment 

review 


Job descriptions kept on 
file 


Finalise 
signing 
of job 

Finalise 
signing of 
job 

Finalise 
signing of 
job 

All job 
descripti 

(job 

evaluatio 

n 


294 




295 




to be 

confirmed 
after road 
show 

and 

distributed 
for all 
employees 


s Job 

description 
s are in 

their files 

and that 
they are 
signed as 
required 




descrip 

tions 

descripti 

ons 

description 

s 

on must 
be signed 

processes 

may 

intervene 

and 

course 

limitation 

S) 


DIVISION: SKILLS DEVELOPMENT 


1 1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

1 KPA 


1 Institutional Development and Transformation 









1 DEPARTMENT Corporate Services 

1 DIVISION 1 


1 Skills development 










VOTES 

2017/18 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

POE REF 
NO/PAG 

E 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANC 

E INDICATOR 

SUB- 

PROJECT 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMANC 

E MEASURE 

PROGRES 

SON 

REVIEW 

01 

Q2 

03 

Q4 


To Provide 
sufficient 
and skilled 
human 
capital in 
order to 
enable all 
department 
s to 

function 
optimally in 
order to 

Improved 

organisationa 

1 stability and 
sustainability 


All 

identified 

programs 
as per WSP 
should be 
undertaken 

Employees 
trained as per 
the approved 
annual 
Workplace 

Skills Plan 

Implement! 
ng LGSETA 
recommend 
ed 

programme 

s 

15% 

Monthly reports on 
progress of the 
implementation of 
programs 


Action plan 
as per 
approval of 
council 
2017/18 

3 Sets of 
monthly 
reports 

3 sets of 
monthly 
reports 

Submit 

WSD 

to 

LGSET 

A 



295 





296 


enhance 

service 
delivery and 
institutional 
capacity 















Skills audit 

conducted 

for 

Employees 

and 

Councillors 


Conduct 

Skills audit 
for all 
Councillors 
and 

Employees 

Annually 

Skills audit 

conducted for 
all Councillors 
and 

Employees 

Conduct 

skills audit 

A yearly report produced 
identifying skills gap and 
recommendations 


Capture all 
employee 
informatio 

n on 

COGTA 

skills audit 

online 

system 

Capture 

120 

employees 

Capture 

120 

employee 

s 

Capture 

130 

employee 

s 



Induction 



Collect 

informatio 

n on a 

monthly 

basis 





One 

induction 
per quarter 






Compliant EE 
Report and 

Plan 

submitted to 
the Dept, of 
Labour on 

time. 

EE plan 
backlog 
due to 

none 

compliance 

Submit the 

EE report 
to the 

Dept, of 
Labour 
manually 
on 1 Oct or 

electronical 
ly on 15 
January 
every year 

Compliant EE 
Report and 

Plan 

submitted to 
the Dept, of 
Labour on 

time. 

Develop an 

EE plan 

Acknowledgement of 
receipt of the completed 

EE Report received from 
the Department of 

Labour 


Invite 

labour 
departmen 
t to 

conduct 

training 

Develop 

and 

approve 

plan 

Submit EE 
plan to 
council 




296 




297 


DIVISION: EMPLOYEE WELLNESS 


INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 

KPA 1 1 

DEPARTMENT 

DIVISION 1 1 Employee wellness 

VOTES 

2017/18 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

POE REF 
NO/PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFO 

RMANCE 

MEASURE 

PROGRES 

SON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

04 


To ensure 
healthy 
working 
environme 

nt 

Enhance 
health and 
safety at 
work 


A once off 
biological 
assessment 

undertaken 
annually of 

areas 

associated 

with 

hazardous 

risks. 

Risk assessment to 
be done for all areas 
within the 
Municipality and a 
report be submitted 
to the Municipal 
Manager for 
implementation of 
recommendations 

Submit a 
request to 
undertake the 
study 

10% 

Finalised 

Assessment 

Report produced 
for 

implementation 

of 

recommendation 

s 


Submissi 
on for 
approval 

Advertise 
for service 
provider 
and make 
appointme 
nts 

Impleme 
nt plan 

Report to 
council and 
implement 
recommendat 

ions 




Protectiv 
e clothing 
is made 

available 

to 

employee 

Provision of 
protective 
clothing to 
employees. 
(PPE). 

Procure and provide 
employees with 

PPE's Bi-Annually 

Procure 
protective 
clothing and 
prioritize 
outside towns 

Number of 
employees 
provided with 

PPE. 


Procure 

ments 

Handing 
out of 
clothing 

Procure 

ments 

Handing out 
of clothing 




Require 

proper 

implemen 

tation 

Number of 
Municipal 
departmen 
ts/ sections 
inspected 
quarterly in 
line with 

OHASA 

Ensured that Health 
and Safety reps are 
identified and 
trained by End of 
September 2014 in 
order for them to 
inspect all 
departments 

Conduct 
inspection and 
submit incident 
reports monthly 

4 Inspections 
Reports 
submitted 
annually 


Training 
of new 

committe 

e 

members 

Implement 
ation of 
health and 
safety 

measures 

Impleme 

ntation 

of health 

and 

safety 

measures 

Implementati 
on of health 
and safety 

measures 





Quarterly 
reports on 

CO IDA 

Ensure compliance 
with COIDA by 
reporting all 
incidences in the 
Municipality 

Report on the 
payment of 

COIDA 

Injury on Duty 
reports created 
and submitted 
for approval 


1 

Facilitate 
payment 
of COIDA 

1 

1 

1 



To ensure 
a working 
environme 

nt that 

Implemen 
tation of 
employee 
wellness 

4 Quarterly 

Reports 

submitted 

on 

Conduct an 
employee wellness 
day to raise 

awareness 

Refer 

employees to 
the Doctor for 

Enforce 
attendance of 
employees 
wellness day 


1 

1 

Employee 

wellness 

day 

1 

1 



297 




298 



enables 
good staff 
morale. 

program 

me 

Employees 

wellness 


assessment 

yearly 


None attendance 

should have 

consequences 



(awareness 

day) 





DIVISION: LABOUR RELATIONS 


1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 

KPA 

DEPARTMENT 

DIVISION Disputes and Grievances 

VOTES 

2017/18 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

POE REF 
NO/PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMAN 

CE MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


To facilitate 
stable 
relations at 
work place 

Improved 

organisationa 

1 stability and 
sustainability 

Currently 
addressing 
two(2) 
disciplinar 
y actions 

Address 

all 

disputes 

and 

grievance 
s within 

90 days of 
receipt of 
such 

Disputes and 
grievances handled in 
terms of the SALGBC 
collective agreement 
within 90 days. 

Appoint prosecutors 
and presiding officers 
to resolve the matter 
within 90 days of 
receipt 

20% 

Report of all disputes 
and resolutions reached 
produced and submitted 
for approval 


Depende 
nt on 
disputes 

Depen 

dent 

on 

dispute 

s 

Depen 

dent 

on 

dispute 

s 

Depen 

dent 

on 

dispute 

s 


To provide 
efficient and 
effective legal 
Services. 

Improved 

work 

relations and 

maintain a 

stable work 
place 



By-Laws developed 
and approved as per 
priority functional 
area as identified 
annually 

Bylaws to be taken for 
public participation 

Identified By-laws being 
taken through Public 
Participation and 
approved by council 


Public 

participa 

tion 

Public 

partici 

pation 

Send 

for 

promul 

gation 




DIVISION: MANAGEMENT & COUNCIL 


INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 


DEPARTMENT 


DIVISION 

VOTES 


Council 


ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 
2017/18 


POE REF 
NO/PAGE 


IDP OBJECTIVE 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL TARGET 

KEY 

SUB- PROJECT 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

PROGRES 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 




PERFORMANCE 



MEASURE/PERFORMAN 

SON 








INDICATOR 



CE MEASURE 

REVIEW 






298 





299 


To provide efficient and 
effective council 
administrative support 
services 

4 Ordinary 
Council 
meetings 
held as at 

30 June 

2018 

4 Ordinary Council 
meetings being held 

Hold 4 Ordinary 
Council meetings 
annually 

Prepare agenda 
and minutes 

15% 

Minutes of meetings and 
attendance register 


Prepare 

agenda 

and 

minutes 

Prepare 

agenda 

and 

minutes 

Prepare 

agenda 

and 

minutes 

Prepare 

agenda 

and 

minutes 



Council, EXCO and 
Committee agendas 
delivered as per 
standard rules 
(Council - 48 hours, 
budget - 96 hours 
and EXCO& 

Committees - 48 
hours). 

100% of meeting 
agendas delivered 
on time as 
prescribed 

Prepare agenda 
and minutes 

Schedule of EXCO, 

Council & Standing 
Committee meetings 

Agenda, minutes & 
attendance registers 

Proof of delivery note 


1 

1 

1 

1 



quarterly reports to 
Council on the 
tracking of council 
resolutions 
(submitted at the 
end of each quarter 
- Sept, Dec, Mar & 

Apr 

Follow up 

Monthly on 
Resolutions taken 
by Council 

Follow up on 
resolutions 
Consolidation 
of feedback 

4 Quarterly council 
resolutions tracking 
management via 
email/memo 


1 

1 

1 

1 


To ensure that sound 

governance processes are 
developed and maintained 


Develop annual 
organizational year 
planner. 


Prepare year 
plan and take to 
council for 
approval 

Submit a schedule to 
council stipulating the 
dates for all committees, 
EXCO and Council for 
approval 








299 




300 


DIVISION: ADMINISTRATION 


1 1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 



DEPARTMEN 

T 



DIVISION 


Administration 

VOTES 



ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 
2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANC 

E INDICATOR 

SUB- 

PROJECT 

WEIGH 

T 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMANC 

E MEASURE 

PROGRES 

SON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q 

3 

Q 

4 



Protection 

of 

municipal 

informatio 

n 

All 

employees 
who have 
signed 

confidentialit 
y agreement. 

All current 
employees to 
sign 

confidentiality 
agreement by 

31 Dec 2016 

and new ones 
prior 

commencemen 

t of duty 

Number of 
employees 
who have 
signed 

confidentiality 

agreement. 

All new 

employees 

sign 

confidentialit 
y clause prior 
to starting 
work 

Current 
employees to 
sign by 31 
December 

2016 

5% 

Report of all employees 
who have signed the 
confidentiality and 

Conduct of Employees as 
per Schedule 2 of the 
Municipal Systems 


Continuou 

s for new 
employees 

All 

current 

employee 

s 



Check signed 
confidentialit 
y clauses per 
employee 
employed 


DIVISION: MANAGEMENT 


1 1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 I 

KPA 


Financial Accountability and Management 

DEPARTMENT 


Corporate Services 

DIVISION 


Management: Corporate services 

VOTES 



ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/PAGE 

IDP OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMANC 

E MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


To implement 
an effective 
and efficient 
system of 
supply chain 
management 
and 

expenditure 

Effective 

Expenditure 

Management 



Effective 
management of 
payroll 

information sent 
to Finance for 
payment. 

Create reports on 
all changes made 
to personnel. 

Generate reports 
on all payroll and 
do quality checks 

5% 

Monthly reports of 
submissions to Finance 
department for payroll 
payments 








300 




301 



Clean Audit 

Outcome 

2016/17 

Annual 

Report 

4 Quarterly 
reports 
deficiencies 
raised by 

AG 

addressed 

Handle and 
rectify all issues 
raised by the 
Auditor General's 
report of 

2016/17 Financial 
Year 

Handle and rectify 
all issues raised by 
the auditor 
general's report. 
Qne per quarterly. 


Quarterly reports 
produced and submitted 
for approval 


1 

1 

1 

1 



Clean Audit 

Outcome 

2016/17 

Annual 

Report 

Respond to 
Audit 
Exceptions 
within the 

maximum 

of 7 

working 

days 

Quality and 
timeously 
response to audit 
queries both 
from internal and 
external auditor 
within 

5 working days 
for 5 queries 

7 working days 
for more queries 

Quality Respond 
to queries 
timeously 

Report on submitted 
responses to auditors 



7 

maxim 

um 

workin 

gdays 

7 

maxim 

um 

workin 

gdays 

7 

maximu 

m 

working 

days 



DIVISION: REGISTRY 


1 1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 

KPA 


Governance 

DEPARTMENT 


Corporate Services 

DIVISION 


Administration: Registry 

1 VOTES 2017/18 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

IDP OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- 

PROJECT 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMANCE 

MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON 

REVIEW 

01 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

POE REF 
NO/PAGE 

To implement 
an efficient 
registry system 
to ensure 

smooth 
running of 
administration 

Smooth 
running of 
administration 

Quarterly 

reports 

submitted 

Ongoing 

Effective 

decimation of 
all mail within 
two day of 
receipt 

Statistics of 
day to day 
delivery of 
mail 

10% 

Generate Reports on all 
mail received and sent 
quarterly 


Reports 

Reports 

Reports 

Reports 



Smooth 
running of 
administration 



All 

correspondence 
received filed in 
an accessible 

manner 

Daily filing 
New files 

are open 

once 1. The 
old file is 
full or 2. A 

Generate Reports on all 
mail received and sent 
quarterly 


Reports 

Reports 

Reports 

Reports 



301 





302 







new matter 

has risen 










Smooth 
running of 
administration 



Number of new 
files opened 


Generate Reports on all 
mail received and sent 
quarterly 


Reports 

Reports 

Reports 

Reports 



Smooth 
running of 
administration 

0 

4 

Registry office 
to comply with 
archive 

regulations and 
standards 

Adopt and 

implement 

archive 

regulations 

and 

standards 

Report on compliance to 
regulations by creating a 
report on a quarterly basis 


Reports 

Reports 

Reports 

Reports 



Smooth 
running of 
administration 

0 

1 

A Records 
Management 
Policy to be 
drawn up and 
approved by 
Council 

Submit to 
council for 
approval 

Policy developed and 
submitted to council for 
approval 



Submit 

council 





Smooth 
running of 
administration 

0 

1 

Procedure 

Manual 
submitted to 
council for 
approval 

A 

Procedure 
Manual to 
be drawn 

up 

Approved Procedure 

Manual 



Submit 

to 

council 





302 




303 


DIRECTORATE: COMMUNITY SERVICES 


1 DIVISION: IDP INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 

KPA 



DEPARTMENT 


COMMUNITY SERVICES 

DIVISION 


HOUSING 

VOTES 



ANNUAL PERFORMANCE 

TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/PAGE 

IDP OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMA 
NCE MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON 

REVIEW 

Ql 

C12 

03 

Q4 


Housing 

To facilitate 

access to 

sustainable 

human 

settlements 
and improved 
quality of 
household 
opportunities 
and services. 

Establishment 
of housing 
needs , 
Addressing of 
housing 
challenges 

1 

1 

Housing Chapter 
updated and submitted 
to Council for approval 

Review the plan 

20% 

Housing chapter 
reviewed and adopted 





1 


Eradication of 
informal 

houses 

As per 

provincial 

allocation 

As per 

provincial 

allocation 

Identify beneficiaries 
and submit their 
subsidy applications to 
the Provincial Human 
Settlement 
department 

1. Identify 
beneficiaries 

2. Complete 
application forms 

3. Submit forms & 

List to Province 

1. Copies of application 
forms kept 

2. Status report of 
approvals obtained. 





100% 


Security of 
tenure to all 

communities 

12 ha 

12 ha of 
land 

identified 

12 ha of land identifies 
for human settlement 
in Tweespruit. 

Appointment of 
Town planner 
through SCM 
office 

Correspondence for 
appointment of Town 
Planner kept. 



12 

ha 




Reduction of 

housing 

backlog 

1100 

1100 

1100 of erven 
allocated to 
beneficiaries perto\A/n: 
Hobhouse (200} , 
Manyatseng (500) and 
Mahlats\wetsa(417) 

1. Identify 
beneficiaries 

2. Allocation 
erven numbers 

3. Submit lists to 
Council for 
approval. 

Approved lists kept 




200 

900 



303 




304 


DIVISION: TRAFFIC 


1 1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 



DEPARTMENT 


COMMUNITY SERVICES 

DIVISION 


TRAFFIC 

VOTES 



ANNUAL PERFORMANCE 

TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMANCE 

MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


Traffic 

To support 
safety and 
security 
awareness in 

communities 
and the "fight 
against crime 
"campaign in 
partnership 
with SAPS and 
other Key 
stakeholders. 

Road safety 
instilled 
amongst 
learners & 
other road 

users 

4 

4 

04 public 
transport forum 
meetings were 
held 

l.Send out 

invitation to 
meetings 

2. Keep 

attendance 

register 


Copies of minutes kept 


1 

1 

1 

1 


Compliance 
with the NRTA 

# of check 
points and 

Road blocks to 

ensure 

roadworthiness 
of vehicles 

3 

2 

02 road traffic 
safety 

programmes 
implemented in 
schools ( "Child 
in traffic") 

1. Guide and 
monitor scholar 
patrol 

2. Enforce law 
when necessary 

Attendance and pictures 
kept 


2 

2 

2 

2 


Compliance 
with the 

NRTA 

Reduction in 
road traffic 
offences 

3km road 
marked 

3km roads 
marked 

3 of kms of road 
marked 

Maintenance report 



1 

1 

1 


Compliance 
with the 

NRTA 

120 

120 check 
points and road 
blocks 
conducted 

Check points & 

Road blocks 
reports 










304 




305 


DIVISION: DISASTER MANAGEMENT 


1 1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 



DEPARTMENT 


COMMUNITY SERVICES 

DIVISION 


DISASTER MANAGEMENT 

VOTES 



ANNUAL PERFORMANCE 

TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/PAGE 

IDP OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMANCE 

MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


DISASTER 

MANAGEMENT 

To make use of 
the disaster 

management 

centre 

according to 

disaster 

management 

Act 

To make use 
of the 

disaster 
management 

centre 

according to 

disaster 

management 

Act 

4 

4 

04 meetings held 
with National, 
Provincial 
departments and 
District as well as 
NGO's to ensure 
their 

involvement in 

Disaster 
Management in 
Mantsopa. 

Draw an 

annual 

programme in 
consultation 
with the 
district 

15% 

Minutes and reports 
regarding meetings with 
stakeholders 


1 

1 

1 

1 


To ensure 

increased 
awareness by 
supporting 
and co- 
resourcing 

awareness 

programmes 

to increase 
preparednes 
s of all 

communities 

4 

4 

04 awareness 

sessions held 
with all disaster 
management 
disciplines. 

Make an 

appointment 

with 

stakeholders 

room 

Awareness sessions 

reports 


1 

1 

1 

1 


1 

1 

Annual review of 
the Disaster 
Management 

Plan 

Annual review 
process in line 
with the IDP 
Process plan 

Reviewed Disaster 
Management Plan 



1 




60 

60 

60 fire safety 
inspections done 

Make 

appointment 
with the 

stakeholders 

Report on fire inspections 


20 

20 


20 



305 




306 


DIVISION: PROPERTIES 


1 1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 



DEPARTMENT 


COMMUNITY SERVICES 

DIVISION 


PROPERTIES 

VOTES 



ANNUAL PERFORMANCE 

TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMANCE 

MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

03 

Q4 


PROPERTIES 

To ensure that 
all properties 
of Council 

such as 
municipal 
offices, flats 
and stores are 
properly 
maintained. 

To ensure 

that all 
properties 
of Council 
such as 
municipal 
offices, flats 
and stores 
are properly 
maintained. 

Number of 

municipal 

offices 

cleaned. 

10 municipal 
offices 

Daily cleaning of 
10 municipal 
office space 

Cleaning 

materials 


Weekly report on cleaning 
and inspections 


10 

10 

10 

10 


Number of 
community 
halls cleaned 

9 community 
halls 

Daily cleaning of 
09 community 
halls 

Cleaning 

materials 



9 

9 

9 

9 



306 




307 


DIVISION: PARKS, CEMETERIES AND RECREATION 


1 1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 



DEPARTMENT 


COMMUNITY SERVICES 

DIVISION 


PARKS, CEMETERIES AND RECREATION 

VOTES 



ANNUAL PERFORMANCE 

TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

WEIGHT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFORMANCE 

MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


PARKS AND 

CEMETRIES 

Communities 
in Mantsopa 
Local 

Municipality 
have access 
to proper 
cemeteries 
with enough 
capacity to 
cater for the 

next 20 

years. 

Number of 

cemeteries 

with sufficient 
burial space 
to cater for 

the next 20 

years. 

2 

02 Burial spaces 
procured / 
obtained for 
Manyatseng and 
Borwa 

cemeteries 

Measuring of 
the remaining 
land within 

cemeteries 


Manyatseng and Borwa 
cemeteries formalised. 


0 

0 

1 

0 




Number of 

cemeteries 

well cleaned 

10 

cemeteries 

Weekly 

maintenance of 

10 cemeteries 

Monthly 

maintenance 

reports 

Maintenance of 

cemeteries 


10 

10 

10 

10 



To ensure 

that all 
parks, 

recreational 
facilities of 

Council such 

as 

community 
halls, sports 
ground and 
parks are 
properly 
maintained. 

Number of 
municipal 
sports 
grounds and 
parks cleaned 

12 

Weekly cleaning 
of 06 sports 
grounds and 06 
recreational 
parks 

Cleaning 

material 

Cleaning and maintenance 
reports 


12 

12 

12 

12 



307 




308 


DEPARTMENT: TECHNICAL SERVICES 


1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 

WATER 

DEPARTMEN 

T 

TECHNICAL SERVICES 

DIVISION 

WATER SERVICES 

VOTES 


ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF NO 
/PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANC 

E INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFOR 
MANCE MEASURE 

PROGRES 

SON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Appendix: A 

To ensure that 
all households 
on formal erven 
have access to 
potable \A/ater 
connections. 

Water is 
constantly 
supplied to 
all 

Households 

15 170 

15 170 

Continuously 
Provide 15 170 
households 
with access to 
basic water 
supply within 
RDP standards 

Operation & 
maintenance of 
infrastructure, 
training of 
plumbers, 
Refurbishment of 
Manyatseng 
Pressure House 

15 170 households 
provided with access 
to basic water supply 
within RDP standards 


15 170 

15 170 

15 170 

15 170 

A 1 

(a, b & c) 
Monthly 

consumer 

accounts 

Operation 

and 

maintenanc 

e manual 

To ensure that 
clean drinking 
water is 

provided to 

households 
without 
standpipes. 

Water is 
provided to 

new erven 

at 

Manyatsen 
g ext. 9. 

383 

erven 

Occupied 
erven of 

383. 

Provide 383 

households 
with potable 
water supply 
using 

Communal 

Water tankers 
to occupied 

erven of 383 
without 

standpipes at 
Manyatseng 
ext. 9. 

Communal water 
tankers placed at 
strategic areas as 
alternative 
means of 

providing water 
to Households. 

Occupied erven of 
383 without 

standpipes. 


Occupied 
erven of 

383 

without 

standpipes 

Occupied 
erven of 383 
without 
standpipes 

Occupied 
erven of 

383 

without 

standpipes 

Occupied 
erven of 

383 

without 

standpipes 

A2 

Supply of 

water to 

383 of 

occupied 

erven at 

Manyatsen 

g ext. 9 

through 

alternative 

means. 

eight farming 

Water is 

provided 

whenever 

there is an 
interruptio 
n to supply 
other areas 


Thabong, 
Portion of 
(Manyatse 
ng, portion 
of 

Mahlatswe 
tsa) & eight 
farming 

areas. 

Continuously 
Provide 
additional 
water through 
jojo tanks and 
other methods 
in Thabong, 

about 700 

households in 
Mahlatswetsa 
& about 118 

households in 

Supply of water 
using JoJo Tanks 
and/other 
methods 

Thabong: 

118 households in 08 
farming areas, 700 
households in 

Mahlatswetsa 


Thabong, 
Portion of 
(Manyatsen 

g. 

Mauersnek, 
Platberg, 
Mahlatswet 
sa} & eight 
farming 

areas. 

Thabong, 
Portion of 
(Manyatseng, 
Mahlatswetsa 
) & eight 
farming areas. 

Thabong, 
Portion of 
(Manyatsen 
g, 

Mahlatswet 
sa) & eight 
farming 
areas. 

Thabong, 
portion of 
(Manyatsen 

g^ 

Mahlatswet 
sa) & eight 
farming 
areas. 

A2 

2.a-b: 

Water 

supply 

program 

with units 

provided, 

copy of 

vehicle 

Logbook 

and 

acknowledg 

ement 


308 




309 


1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 

WATER 

DEPARTMEN 

T 

TECHNICAL SERVICES 

DIVISION 

WATER SERVICES 

VOTES 


ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF NO 
/PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANC 

E INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFOR 
MANCE MEASURE 

PROGRES 

SON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Appendix: A 





eight farming 

areas 










Documente 

d 

information 

on 

alternative 

water 

sources 

available 

2 

1 

Conduct a 

Hydrological 
study to explore 
possible 
additional 

water source. 

Hydrological 
study to be 
conducted 

1 report of a 
Hydrological study 


Project plan 

Design and 
Tender 

Appointme 
nt of 

Service 

Provider 
and Project 
implement 
ation 

Monitoring 

and 

Completion 

report 

A4 

Copy of a 
completed 
Hydrologic 
al study. 


Water loss 
reduced 

47,09 

40% 

Reduce water 
loss in 

distribution by 
40% 

Installation of 

Bulk meter, 

Valves, night 

Flow meters 

Leak repairs 

All towns: Water 

Conservation 

Water Demand 

Management 

(WCWDM) 

40% Reduction 

compliance 

All towns 





40% 

compliance 

Implement 
ation and 
Completion 
Report 

A5 

(a, b & c) 

Water 

balance 

report and 

figure 

confirmed 

by Finance 

Department 

and 

Daily work 
done on 
maintenanc 
e and copy 
of 

submitted 

Business 

Plan. 


309 




310 


1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 

SANITATION 

DEPARTMEN 

T 

TECHNICAL SERVICES 

DIVISION 

WATER SERVICES 

VOTES 


ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF NO 
/PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDE 

D 

OUTCOM 

E 

BASEL 

INE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMAN 

CE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- 

PROJECT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFO 

RMANCE 

MEASURE 

PROGRES 

SON 

REVIEW 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Appendix 
: B 

To ensure that 
all households 
on formal erven 
have access to 
basic level of 

sanitation 

services. 

Sanitation 

service is 
constantly 
provided to 
all 

Households 

15 553 

15 553 

Continuously 
provide 15 553 
households 
with access to 
basic sanitation 

services. 

Operation 
maintenance of 
infrastructure 

Training of 

plumbers 

Completion 
report of Boroa 
snaglist and 

signed off by 
Municipal 

Manager 

15 553 households 
with access to basic 

sanitation services. 


15 553 

15 553 

15 553 

15 553 

B 1 

1(1)&{2) 

Water 

Services 

Report 

and 

Monthly 

consumer 

accounts 

Effluent is 

treated and 
discharged in 
compliance 
with Relevant 

Acts ie Waste 

Water 

discharged, 

Environmental 

Waste Act 

Percentage 
compliance 
with green 
-drop water 
quality 
accreditatio 
n system. 

31, 58% 

90% 

compliance 

Achieve 90% 

compliance 

with green drop 

waste water 

quality 

accreditation 

system 

Achievement of 
Green drop 
certificate 

90% compliance 


Process 

control, 

Maintenanc 

e: 10% 

Monitoring: 

15% 

Quality 

submission: 

5% 

Effluent 

quality 

compliance: 

30% 

Quality risk 
managemen 

t: 

15% 

Local 

Regulations: 

5% 

Treatment 

capacity 

5% 

Asset 

managemen 

t: 15% 

B2 

B(l)&(b) 

Copies of 
tests 

conducted 

during 

operation 

at Waste 

Water 

Treatment 

Works 

and 

monthly 

Effluent 

sampling 

results 

from 

Laborator 

y- 


310 




311 


DEPARTMENT OF TECHNICAL SERVICES CONTINUES... 


1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 I 

KPA 

ELECTRICITY 

DEPARTMEN 

T 

TECHNICAL SERVICES 

DIVISION 

ELECTRICITY 

VOTES 


ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/PAG 

E 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASE 

LINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMA 

NCE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

UNIT OF 
MEASURE/PERF 
ORMANCE 
MEASURE 

PROGRE 
SS ON 
REVIEW 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Appendix 

:C 

To ensure that all households 
connected to electricity on 
formal erven have access to 
electricity services. 

1993 

1993 

Continuously 
provide 1993 
Households on 
formalised 

erven with 

access to 

electricity 

services. 

Operation and 

maintenance of 
infrastructure 

15 170 Total 

households with 
access to electricity 
service 


15 170 

15 170 

15 170 

15 170 

Cl 
a & b 

Municipal 

consumer 

accounts 

and 

consumer 

satisfactio 
n through 
public 
participati 
on and/or 
reports by 
ESKOM 

1993 

Munici 

pality 

(centle 

C) 


1993 municipality 
(Centlec) supplied 
households 


1993 

1993 

1993 

1993 

13 177 

ESKOM 

Supply of 

electricity by 

ESKOM 

13 177 eskom 

supplied 

households 


13 177 

13 177 

13 177 

13 177 

To provide the 
reliable, and 

sufficient 
electricity 
supply 

Reviewed 
and approved 
SLAs in 

compliance 
with 

Electricity 

Regulations 

1 SLA 

1 SLA 

Annually 

Review SLA 
with 

CENTLEC to 
regulate 
electricity 
provision to 

1993 

households. 

Reviewed SLA 
approved by 
council 

1 SLA 




SI_A with 

CENTLEC 

considered 

and 

approved by 
council. 


C5 

Copy of 

SLA with 

CENTLEC 

approved 

by 

council. 

To minimise 
interruptions to 
electricity 
supply to users 

Strengthenin 
g of 

electricity 

infrastructure 

41 

substati 
ons and 
29 pole 
& 

ground 

transfer 

mers 

Annual 
Maintenanc 
e of 5 
substations 

Maintain at 
least 5 
substations 
annually 

Routine and 
unplanned 
maintenance of 
infrastructure 

Unit of 
infrastructure 
maintained 
according to 
maintenance plan 
and as need arises. 


100% of 
planned and 
reported 
incident 

100% of 
planned and 
reported 
incident 

100% of 
planned and 
reported 
incident 

100% of 
planned and 
reported 
incident 

C6 

Maintenan 
ce work 
done. 


311 




312 



Strengthenin 
g of 

electricity 

infrastructure 

100% 

of 

Electric 

ity 

Infrastr 

ucture 

Upgrading 
of main- 
substation 

Install MV 
cable from 
main substation 
to Dan Pienaar 
Substation 

Routine and 
unplanned 
upgrading of 
infrastructure. 

Unit of 
infrastructure 
upgraded as 
planned and 
according to the 
need. 


100% of 
planned and 
reported 
incidents 

100% of 
planned and 
reported 
incident 

100% of 
planned and 
reported 
incident 

100% of 
planned and 
reported 
incident 

C7 

Upgrading 

report 

Percentage 
reduction in 
electricity 
distribution 
Losses. 

Electricity 

1993 

electric 

ity 

meters 

Inspect 

1993 

electricity 

meters 

Annual 
inspection of 

1993 electricity 
meters 

Energy saving 
measures 

awareness, 
monitoring of 
meter tempering 
and cut-offs. 

15% Compliance 



100 

996 

996 

C9 

8(a)&(b) 

Copies of 
broken 

meters 
and Cut- 
off list 

To ensure 

provision of 

sufficient area 
lighting to the 
community of 
Mantsopa. 

2013 Street 
lights + 150 
solar street 
lights, 17 
Medium 

Mast and 5 
High Mast= 
2185 

2185 

Maintain 

2185 street 
lights in 
accordance 
with 

maintenanc 
e program 

Annually 
Maintain 2185 
street lights 

Maintain existing 
Streetlights. 

2185 in accordance 
with maintenance 
program 


546 

547 

546 

546 

C 10 
(a)&{b) 

Copy of 

Streetlight 

s 

maintenan 

ce 

program 
and report 


312 




313 


1 1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 


REFUSE COLLECTION, ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT 

DEPARTMEN 

T 


TECHNICAL SERVICES 

DIVISION 


REFUSE COLLECTION, ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT 

VOTES 



ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

2017/18 

POE 

REF 

NO/PA 

GE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMAN 

CE 

INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

WIEGHT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFOR 
MANCE MEASURE 

PROGRE 

SSON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


To provide 

Refuse 

collection 

services to 

all 

Households 

Refuse 

removal/ 

collection 

services to 

all 

households. 

15 170 

15 170 

Weekly 
Collection of 
refuse in all 

15 170 

households. 

Skips removal, 
collection 
route plan 

15% 

Refuse collected 

weekly in all 15 170 


100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

1. 

Domestic 

Waste 

Collection 
and Open 
Space 

Clearing 

Collection of 

waste at 

identified 
areas, illegal 
dumping 
sites and 

Open Spaces 
cleared. 

35 

35 

Weekly 
Clearing of 35 
illegal 
dumping 
sites 

Waste 

separation at 
source, 

Environ 
training, 
recording 
dumping sites 
hot spots. 

35 illegal dumping 
sites cleared weekly 


100% 

Refuse 

collection 

and 

cleaning of 
all 

identified 

illegal 

dumping 

sites 

100% 

Refuse 

collection 

and 

cleaning of 
all 

identified 

illegal 

dumping 

sites 

100% 

Refuse 

collection 

and 

cleaning 

of all 

identified 

illegal 

dumping 

sites 

100% 

Refuse 

collection 

and 

cleaning of 
all identified 
illegal 
dumping 
sites 

2. 

Integrated 

Environment 

al 

Managemen 
t and 

Planning 

Developmen 

t of 

Integrated 

Waste 

Managemen 

t Plan 

(IWMPs) 

Plan exists 

Annual Review 
of the current 
Integrated 

Waste 

Management 

Plan 

Annually 
review the 
Integrated 
Waste 

Management 

Plan 

Updates IDP 

Council approved 
Integrated Waste 
Management Plan 

Review 

of the 
docume 
nt has 
begun. 

0 

0 

0 

1 

6. 

Integrated 

Environmen 

tal 

Managemen 
t Plan - To 
inform 
effective 
planning. 

Plan exists 

Annual review 

of the current 

Integrated 

Environmental 

Management 

Plan 

Annually 
review the 
Integrated 
Environment 

al Plan 

Updates IDP 

Council approved 
Integrated Waste 
Management Plan 


0 

0 

0 

1 

7. 


313 




314 


Enforcement 
of legislation 

Compliance 

guidelines 

regarding 

waste 

managemen 
t as per 
NEMA. 

2 waste 

related 

bylaws 

compiled 

(Waste 

manageme 

nt and 

collection 

bylaws}. 

2 waste related 

bylaws 

promulgated 

Promulgate 

Waste 

management 
& waste 

collection 

bylaws 

Waste 

disposal 

bylaws 


Council approved 
By-laws on Waste 
Management & 

Waste Collection 


0 

0 

2 

0 

8. 

Waste 

Minimisation 

Quantificati 
on of 

diverted 
waste from 
landfill site. 

Amount of 

waste 

recycled. 

15 000 kg of 
recyclable 
waste diverted 
from the 

landfill site 

Divert 15 000 
kg of 

recyclable 
waste from 
the landfill 
site to the 
Buy-back 
centre 

Recycling 

initiatives, 

formalise 

recyclers. 

Amounts of recycled 
materials recorded. 


Initial 

quarterly 

figure 

10 percent 
increase 

from 

quarter one 

5 percent 
increase 

from 

quarter 

two 

5 percent 
increase 

from 

quarter 

three 

10. 


DEPARTMENT OF TECHNICAL SERVICES CONTINUES... 


1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 I 

KPA 

ROADS AND STORMWATER - 236,7km 

DEPARTMEN 

T 

TECHNICAL 

DIVISION 

INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS, ENGINEERING SERVICES , ROADS AND STORMWATER MAINTENANCE 

VOTES 


ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/ 
PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELIN 

E 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANC 

E INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFOR 
MANCE MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

D 

To improve the 
standard of 
roads and storm 
water drainages 
in the 

municipality 

Gravelled 

dirt 

roads/streets 

66,3km 

1km 

1km of dirt 
roads/streets at 
Platberg 
gravelled 

Construction of 
1km of Dirt 
roads/ streets to 
gravel surface 

1km 


Procure/Sec 
ure Gravel 

Pits 

Mining and 
delivery of 
gravel 

1km- 

Progress 

and 

completion 

report 

1,5km- 

Progress 

and 

completion 

report 


To maintain the 
existing roads 
infrastructure. 

Kilometres 
of tarred 

roads/streets 
maintained 

45,4km 

4km 

Patching of 
potholes on 

4km damaged 
tarred 

roads/streets in 
all towns 

Patching of 
potholes on 5km 
damaged tarred 
roads/streets in 
all towns 

4km of tarred 

streets/roads 

maintained 


Progress 
reports on 

1km 

Progress 
reports on 

1km 

Progress 
reports on 

11^ 

Progress 
reports on 

11^ 

D2 

Maint 

enanc 

e 

report 


314 





315 


1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 

ROADS AND STORMWATER - 236,7km 

DEPARTMEN 

T 

TECHNICAL 

DIVISION 

INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS, ENGINEERING SERVICES , ROADS AND STORMWATER MAINTENANCE 

VOTES 


ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/ 
PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELIN 

E 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANC 

E INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFOR 
MANCE MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

D 


Kilometres 
of gravel 
roads 

maintained 

53km 

2km 

Re-gravel 2km 
of streets/roads 
in 

Ladybrand/Man 

yatseng 

Re-gravelling of 
streets/roads 

2km of roads/streets 
re-gravelled 


Procure/Sec 
ure Gravel 

Pits 

Mining and 
delivery of 
gravel 

1km 

Progress 

Report 

1km 

Progress 

Report 

D3 

Maint 

enanc 

e 

report 




2km 

Reshaping 
(Grading) of 

2km of streets 
in Ladybrand 
and 

Manyatseng 

Shaping 
(Grading) of 
streets/roads 

2km of streets 
reshaped (graded) 




2km 


Maint 

enanc 

e 

report 



23,1km 

1km 

Re-gravel of 

1km of 

streets/roads in 
Excelsior/Mahl 

atswetsa 

Re-gravelling 

streets/roads 

1km of streets/roads 
re-gravelled 


Procure/Sec 
ure Gravel 

Pits 

0km 

1km 

Progress 

ReportOkm 


D4 

Maint 

enanc 

e 

report 




1km 

Reshaping 
(Grading) of 

1km of streets 
in Excelsior and 
Mahlatswetsa 

Shaping 
(Grading) of 
streets/roads 

1km of streets/roads 
reshaped (graded) 





1km 

Progress 

Report 




12,8km 

1km 

Re-gravel of 

1km of 

streets/roads in 
Tweespruit, 

Boroa and 
Dawiesville 

Re-gravel 
streets/roads in 

1km of streets/roads 
re-gravelled 


Procure/Sec 
ure Gravel 

Pits 

1km - 

Progress 

Report 



D5 

Maint 

enanc 

e 

report 




1km 

Shaping 
(Grading) of 

1km of 

streets/roads in 
Tweespruit, 

Boroa & 
Dawiesville 

Shaping 
(Grading) of 
streets/roads 

1km of streets/roads 
reshaped (graded) 



1km - 

Progress 

Report 





315 




316 


1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 

ROADS AND STORMWATER - 236,7km 

DEPARTMEN 

T 

TECHNICAL 

DIVISION 

INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS, ENGINEERING SERVICES , ROADS AND STORMWATER MAINTENANCE 

VOTES 


ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO/ 
PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELIN 

E 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANC 

E INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFOR 
MANCE MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

D 



26km 

1km 

Re-gravel 1km 
of streets/roads 
in Hobhouse 
and Dipelaneng 

Re-gravelling 
and shaping of 
streets/roads 

1km of streets/roads 
re-gravelled 



1km - 

Progress 

Report 


0km 

D6 

Maint 

enanc 

e 

report 


1km 

Reshaping 
(Grading) 1km 
of streets/roads 
in Hobhouse 
and Dipelaneng 

Reshaping 
(Grading) streets 
and roads in 
Hobhouse and 
Dipelaneng 

1km of streets/roads 
reshaped (graded) 




1km - 

Progress 

Report 


D7 

Maint 

enanc 

e 

report 



6,9km 

0,1km 

Reshaping 

(Grading) 

0,1km of 
streets/ Roads 
in Thaba- 
Phatcoa 

Reshaping of 
streets and roads 

0,1km of 
streets/roads 
reshaped (graded) 



0,1km - 
Progress 
Report 

0,5km 

Progress 

Report 

0km 

D 8 

To maintain 

Stormwater 

channels. 

Proper 

management 

of 

Stormwater 

channels 

11,2km 

5 km 

Maintain 5km 
of Stormwater 
channels 

Maintenance of 

Stormwater 

channels 

5km of storm water 
channels maintained 



2,5km 

2,5km 


D9 

Maint 

enanc 

e 

report 

To construct 

new stormwater 

channels. 

New 

stormwater 

channels 

constructed 

0km 

1,6km 

Construct 

1,6km new 
stormwater 

Construction of 
new stormwater 

channels 

1 ,6km new storm 
water channels 
constructed 


Appointmen 
t of a 

contractor 
and Site 
establishmen 

t 

Recruitment 
of labour 

Progress 

report 

Progress 

report 

1km 

completed, 
remaining 
0,6km to be 
completed in 
2017/18 

D 10 

Progre 

ss 

report 

s 

Measures in 

place for 

maintenance 
standards of 

roads and 

Stormwater 

Maintenance 

plan 

reviewed 

1 

1 

Annually 
review the 
current Roads 
& storm water 
maintenance 
plan 

Review Roads 
and Stormwater 
maintenance plan 
as part of IDP 
processes. 

Roads and 

Stormwater 
maintenance plan 
reviewed and 
approved by Council 


Initial stage- 
Sector Plans 

review 

Sector Plans 

review 

process 

Draft Sector 
Plan 

completed 

1 Approved 
by council 

D 12 
(a & 

b) 


PMU CONTINUES... 


316 




317 


1 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2017/18 | 

KPA 

PROJECT MANAGEMENT 

DEPARTMEN 

T 

TECHNICAL SERVICES 

DIVISION 

INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS, ENGINEERING SERVICES , ROADS AND STORMWATER MAINTENANCE 

VOTES 


ANNUAL PERFORMANCE TARGET 

2017/18 

POE REF 
NO 

/PAGE 

IDP 

OBJECTIVE 

INTENDED 

OUTCOME 

BASELINE 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

KEY 

PERFORMANC 

E INDICATOR 

SUB- PROJECT 

UNIT OF 

MEASURE/PERFOR 
MANCE MEASURE 

PROGRESS 

ON 

REVIEW 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

E 

To ensure that 
all Municipal 
Capital Projects 
are properly 
Administered 
and Managed 

Effective and 

efficient 

implementati 

on of 

Municipal 

Capital 

Projects 

All 

Project 

s 

identifi 

ed 

through 

IDP 

100% of 
registered 
and 

approved 

Capital 

Projects 

Monitor the 
performance of 
external service 
providers 
involved in all 
Municipal 

Capital Projects 
monthly 

Implementation 
of Projects in line 
with each 
specific Plan. 

PMU monthly 
reports 


Progress report 
50% complete 

Progress 

report 

75% 

complete 

100% 

complete 


E 1 

SCM 

report 


Increase 

Bulk water 
supply to 
new 

Mantsopa 

Local 

Hospital 

2,522m 

connect 

or 

pipelin 

e 

100% 

project 

completion 

2,522m 
Connector 
pipeline from 
reservoir to 
hospital 
completed. 

2,522m 

Connector 
pipeline from 

reservoir to 

hospital 
completed 

Completed Projects 
worth RS'OOO 000 


Progress report 
100% 




E2 

Progre 

ss 

report 



2 

Install a 
pipeline & 
build a 
pumpstatio 
n 

Increase Bulk 
Water Supply in 
Mantsopa by 
installing a 

pipeline from 
Linana river to 

the 

pumpstation 

Mantsopa- 
Tweespruit, 
Excelsior, Bulk 
Water Supply 

Projects worth R15' 
000 000 
implemented 


Identification of 
Projects scope 

Identified 
Projects to 
be 

submitted to 
council for 
approval 

Contractor 

appointed 

Progress 

report 

30% 

complete 

E4 

Progre 

ss 

report 



Water 

and 

Sewer 

Reticul 

ation 
Project 
for new 
benefic 

iaries. 

417 erven 

417 erven 
provided with 
water and 

sewer 

connections 

Water and Sewer 
Reticulation 

Project 

Completed Project at 
Mahlatswetsa 


Completion 

report 

100% 




E6 

Progre 

ss 

report 


317 




318 




Upgrad 
ing of 
electric 
ity 

supply 

Mains sub- 
station to 

Dan 

Pienaar 

Install electrical 
cable from the 
main station to 
Dan Pienaar 
sub station 

Install electrical 
cable from the 
main station to 

Dan Pienaar sub 
station 

2,4km of electrical 
cable installed 


Progress report 
15% 

Progress 

report 

50% 

Progress 

report 

100% 


E9 

Letter 

of 

confir 

matio 

n 

To improve the 
standard of 

roads and storm 
water drainages 
in the 

municipality 

Kilometres 
of street 

paved. 

0km 

0,6km 

0,6km Paving 
of road 

0,6 km of paved 
road in Platberg 

0,6 km road paved 


Appointment of 
consultant 

Design and 
appointment 
of contractor 

Progress 

report 

15% 

complete 

Progress 

report 

50% 

E 10 
Copy 
of 

recom 

menda 

tion 

To ensure that 
all Municipal 
Capital Projects 
are properly 
Administered 
and Managed 

# of fenced 
cemeteries 

2 

2 

Fencing of 
0,73km of 
cemetery 
fencing in 
Excelsior 

Fencing of 

0,73km of 
cemetery fencing 
in Excelsior 

Excelsior cemetery 
fenced 


Appointment of 
Supplier 

Progress 

report 

15% 

complete 

Progress 

report 

60% 

complete 

Progress 

report 

100% 

complete 


Fencing of 0,75 
of Borwa 
cemery 

Fencing of 0,75 
of Borwa cemery 

Borwa cemetery 
fenced 


Appointment of 
Supplier 

Progress 

report 

15% 

complete 

Progress 

report 

60% 

complete 

Progress 

report 

1002% 

complete 



Kilometres 
of streets 
paved 

2.2km 

1,2km 

1 ,2km of paved 
street 

1,2km 

1 ,2km of paved street 


Progress report 
50% complete 

Progress 

report 

75% 

complete 

Progress 

report 

90% 

complete 

Progress 

report 

100% 

E 11 

Progre 

ss 

report 


318