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Extract from the Twenty-Eighth Annual Report of the State Board of 

Agriculture. 


THE FIRST CONVENTION 


INAUGURATED AT THE 




Extract from, the Twenty-Eighth Annual Report of the State Board of 

Agriculture. 


THE FIRST CONVENTION V<V 


OF THE 


Pioneer Association ofIndiana, 


INAUGURATED AT THE 


ST-A-IMEi IF 1 .A. I JRj OF 18 78 


INDIANANAPOLIS : 

INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL COMPANY, PRINTERS. 

1879. 






STATE PIONEER CONVENTION. 


The first convention of the Pioneer Association of Indiana, 
so successfully inaugurated at the State Fair of 1878, had 
its origin in the evident necessity and importance of adopt- 
ing some system by which to collect and preserve the early 
history of the state, and reminisences of the hardships endured 
in pioneer life ; of the courage and fortitude required to brave 
the dangers of the frontier, with the hostile Indian on his 
hunting grounds, and the malaria incident to the rank 
vegetation of the rich valleys which innoculated the system 
of the unacclimated emigrant with the seeds of disease and 
death. 

The interest manifested in the summer meetings of the 
old settlers has been on the increase and they are greatly 
enjoyed. The inspiration and enthusiasm incident to such 
association, causes the blood to start anew and many of the 
participants seem to live o’er again, in spirit and feeling, the 
days of yore. Many interesting incidents are related of 
early days but are not preserved, and the few who are left 
to tell them are fast passing away. 

At a meeting of the Executive Committee of the Board 
of Agriculture in June, 1878, the idea of holding a Pioneer 
Convention during the State Fair was suggested by a num- 
ber of the oldest citizens, and a resolution was passed instruct- 
ing the officers to inquire into the feasibility of such arrange- 
ment, which was favorably considered and reported on. 
Accordingly, at the next meeting of the Board in July, a 
committee of arrangements and reception was appointed, 
and the following circular was issued: 


376 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


CIRCULAR OF THE COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS AND 
RECEPTION FOR A MEETING OF THE PIONEERS OF IN- 
DIANA, DURING THE STATE FAIR, 1878. 

To the Old Settlers: 

A number of pioneers of the state haying suggested that a meeting be 
held during the coming Indiana State Fair for the purpose of organizing 
a State Association, the Board of Agriculture granted every facility at 
their command to further the proposed object. To that end, a commit- 
tee of arrangements have been appointed to make all necessary prepara- 
tion, and to secure a successful result. 

Wednesday, October 2d, has been selected as the most suitable time, 
and the Music Hall on the State Fair Grounds as the most convenient 
place to assemble, which will be appropriately decorated for the occasion. 
It is specially requested that the pioneers and others bring such relics as 
are suggestive of the early settlements, and of the days when pluck and 
undaunted courage were the crowning virtues. 

It is hoped that this meeting will be the inception of regular annual 
meetings of the surviving pioneers of Indiana, where they who “ tramped 
down the nettles” and laid the foundation for this great and growing 
state, will meet, and renew in spirit and feeling the scenes of early days, 
and inspire others who are following in their footsteps with gratitude to 
those who “blazed the way” and “cleared the opening” for the blessings 
we now enjoy. 

It is specially requested that statements be made of any interesting 
incidents in connection with the early settlements, as all the proceedings 
of the meeting will be carefully prepared by a short-hand reporter and 
preserved with other records in the archives of the state for future 
reference. 

All pioneers seventy years of age, who have been residents of the state 
forty years, will be admitted free to the State Fair. 

The following named Committee of Arrangements and Reception will 
take charge of all matters connected therewith until the organization is 
completed by electing officers and adopting rules and regulations, and 
extend to all pioneers, and others interested, a cordial invitation to be 
present : 

Gov. J. D. Williams. 

Judge C. H. Test, of Marion county. 

John B. Dillon, of Marion county. 

Hon. Fielding Beeler, of Marion county. 

Judge T. J. Logan, of Marion county. 

Chas. A. Howland, of Marion county. 

I. D. G. Nelson, of Allen county. 

Prof. John Collett, of Vermillion county. 


STATE PIONEERS. 


377 


The following named persons were added to the Committee of Arrange- 
ments and Reception : 

Dr. A. C. Stephenson, of Putnam county. 

Dr. Geo. Berry, of Franklin county. 

Hon. H. T. Sample, of Tippecanoe county. 

Hon. Henry S. Lane, of Montgomery county. 

Hon. Frank Emmerson, of Jackson county. 

Dr. J. Helm, of Rush county. 

Hon. Chas. W. Cathcart, of Laporte county. 

Hon. M. C. Garber, of Jefferson county. 

Hon. John Pitcher, of Posey county. 

Dr. Geo. McConnell, of Steuben county. 

By order of the committee in session. 

August 14, 1878. Alex. Heron, Secretary. 

Arrangements are now pending to pass the pioneers free over the rail- 
roads one round trip, to attend the meeting, on presentation of proper 
certificate from the clerk of the county where such reside. 

Correspondence was then opened with the railroad com- 
panies in the state, numbering thirty, resulting, as stated in 
the following circular, which was sent to all the newspapers 
of the state : 

CIRCULAR. 

The Committee of Arrangements and Reception are pleased to announce 
that arrangements have been made with the officials of most of the rail- 
road companies centering at Indianapolis to pass free over their roads, for 
the round trip, all pioneers seventy years of age who have resided in the 
state forty years, to attend the Pioneer Convention during the State Fair, 
on condition that the names of such as are entitled to the favor are fur- 
nished, so that official passes may be issued. Therefore, it is especially 
requested that such pioneers, as desire to attend the meeting, will send in 
a statement of their age and residence in the state, without delay, to the 
secretary of this committee. Where such persons are not known to any 
of the members of the committee, other satisfactory evidence is required 
with the application. 

All pioneers, men and women, and their friends, are cordially invited 
to attend, and bring some relic of early days. 

The newspapers of Indiana are specially requested to favor the con- 
vention by giving publicity to this circular. 

By order of the committee. Alex. Heron, Secretary. 

[Form of Statement.] 

Place Date 1878. 

I am now years of age; have lived in Indiana years, and 

desire to attend the Convention of the Pioneers at the State Fair of 1878. 

Name 


378 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


I hereby certify that the above statement is true to the best of my 
knowledge and belief. 

Name 

All applications for railroad passes were submitted to the 
Committee of Arrangements for investigation, and if found 
in compliance with the rules and the parties known to be 
reliable, the names were registered and application made to 
the roads for the passes, which, when received, were for- 
warded to the applicants. It was a source of much regret 
that a number of applications were received too late to pro- 
cure and forward passes, some coming to hand on the morn- 
ing of the convention. The labor incident to this arrange- 
ment increased to such proportions that considerable addi- 
tional clerical force was required for several days previous 
to the meeting to make proper disposition of about one 
thousand letters relating to the convention, many of which 
contained long lists of names. 


OPENING CEREMONIES. 

State Fair Grounds, October 2, 1878. 

The pioneers of the State of Indiana assembled in con- 
vention at the music hall of the Exposition building, and 
the gathering was at once novel and of deep interest. Such 
a gathering of venerable men and women, all with smiling 
and happy faces, radiant with the joy of meeting each other 
to exchange greetings and compare notes, is a sight that has 
perhaps never before been witnessed in this city. The 
attendance was much larger than had been anticipated by 
any of the gentlemen who were the promoters of the meeting. 
There were probably at least seven hundred persons on the 
ground, representing every section of the state, who were 
above seventy years of age and had lived in Indiana more 
than forty years. In addition to these hardy veterans whose 
personal recollections dated back to a period long before the 
selection of the site for the state capital, there were not less 


STATE PIONEERS. 


379 


than a thousand others who might be considered entitled to 
rank as old settlers, men and women who were born and 
reared within the borders of hoosierdom, and have spent all 
their life in agricultural pursuits in this state. Had there 
been more time to collect the names of pioneers from all the 
counties, and to make the necessary arrangements for their 
journey by rail to the capital, there is little doubt that the 
number present might easily have been doubled. About 
the success of the gathering, however, there was not the 
least room for doubt or misgiving. All the old people felt 
amply rewarded for the trouble and difficulties of a long 
journey by the pleasure and satisfaction which such a reunion 
afforded them. It made them feel young again to renew 
old acquaintanceships, and every one else seemed to be glad 
to witness the hilarity and zest with which the pioneers 
entered into the enjoyments of the day 

At half-past ten the morning meeting in the music hall 
commenced, every seat and all the standing room in the 
building being filled. 

The meeting was called to order by Judge C. H. Test, of 
this city, who delivered the following 

OPENING ADDRESS: 

Ladies and Gentlemen: I have been appointed to preside tempo- 
rarily over this meeting of the old settlers of the State of Indiana until 
a permanent organization is made. Why I should have been selected to 
this position is, tome, somewhat a mystery. I am only seventy-six years 
old, and yet belong to “ Young America” — and ambitious. ‘‘Young 
America,” to whom must be confided the task of carrying out the great 
principles and measures so nobly begun and partly developed in your 
day. I do not sympathise with that class of men who see everything 
wrong because it is not done as it was done when they were young; we 
should not distrust ‘.‘Young America.” The men of to-day are much 
like those who were in active life when you and I were younger. 

Under the providence of God many within the sound of my voice will 
live to find the population of Indiana double what it is now. All they 
have to do is to see that the religious, moral and educational institutions 
of the state keep pace with its material developments and all will be 
safe. Indiana has an unwritten history, and you will agree with me, I 
think, that something should be done to place that history upon record, 
so far as possible, so that those who come after us may read of the hard- 
ships and adventures^ of the early settler, his privations and dangers in 


380 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


peace and war, his mighty struggles in laying the foundations of an 
empire which will endure for ages to come. We have a state historical 
soctety; it has had a feeble existence for near a half a century. It was 
founded, I think, in 1831, and while it has dragged its slow length along, 
it has accumulated only a few books and pamphlets. We hope to see it 
gain greater vitality. 

It has been thought, however, that a state organization of old settlers 
would do much to perpetuate the history of Indiana, where we might 
hear something from each county of the doings and sayings of the vener- 
able fathers of the state. It is not desirable to know merely of the politi- 
cal events of the early days, but we wish to learn, as much as possible, of 
the lives of those who set the wheels of government in motion and con- 
trolled its action, so much to the glory and honor of the state. Their 
names and private virtues should be handed down for the admiration and 
imitation of their successors. 

The call for this meeting has been addressed to the mothers as well as 
the fathers of the state. This was proper. There was no reason why the 
organization should be confined alone to the male portion of the com- 
munity. It is true the duties of the wives were mostly confined to the 
log cabins in which they lived, but their- influence for good was as con- 
trolling then as that of their daughters of the present day. They endured 
the same hardships, dangers and sufferings as their husbands, and in 
some instances even to a greater degree. Why ignore the one-half of the 
sources of our information? Bring on, mothers, the mementoes and pam- 
phlets of your early days, and let us hear from your own lips something 
of the struggles and toils of your early life. You have assembled from 
different portions of the state. Let all join in making this occasion inter- 
esting and profitable. Even the newer counties have their old settlers. 
Men there in middle life are the noble heroes, esteemed and honored 
because of their efforts in rescuing their country from a dreary wilderness 
and developing its resources. A great work has been done, and we are 
here to recount the scenes and live over some of the hours of the past. 
The men of to-day can scarcely realize the sufferings, the toils and dan- 
gers of the first settlers of Indiana. May I recur without the charge of 
egotism from my own observation to some of the incidents attending pio- 
neer life, and the circumstances which surrounded the early settler? Many 
of our young men are well acquainted with the history of the old world 
— even that of Greece and Rome — while they have but a scanty knowledge 
of the history of their own state. I fear, indeed, that they have failed to 
read the well written and authentic history of Indiana by John B. Dillon. 
That history comes down to 1816, the time when we became a state in the 
Union. This leaves a space of more than sixty years in which we have 
no reliable history. That interim of passing events should be supplied, 
and the men who can furnish the facts are fast sinking into the grave. 
Like the gigantic forests which then covered our lands, the actors and 
leaders of that day are fast vanishing from our sight; their triumphs are 
rapidly fading from our memory. Shall the noble men who then battled 


STATE PIONEERS. 


381 


for the right and successfully fought the spirit of evil go down to the 
night of forgetfulness? You are here to rescue their names and memories 
from so dire a calamity. 

My father, with his family, settled in the territory of Indiana sixty- 
eight years ago. Ten years before that time the territory of the north- 
west, ceded by Virginia to the United States, was divided, and a territo- 
rial government in Indiana was organized. William Henry Harrison 
was appointed governor of the new territory, and a distinguished pioneer, 
John Gibson, was selected as secretary. It is said that the latter is the 
person to whom that plaintive and eloquent speech of Logan, the Mingo 
chief, was addressed. 

About the time of the organization of the territory Isaac Dunn, Jesse 
L. Holman, the Guards and Hays families settled in Dearborn county. 
They were all enterprising and substantial citizens. A few settlers were 
strung along the valley of the White Water. Mr. Majors and Solo- 

mon Manwaring settled just above where the town of Harrison was after- 
wards located. In 1807 and 1808, near the mouth of Cedar creek, John 

Quick, Lewis Dewese, Mr. Wiley (the father of the late Dr. Allen 

Wiley, the celebrated Methodist minister), and the Tyner family formed 
a settlement. About the same time, further up the east branch of the 
White Water, near Hanna’s creek, might be found the progenitors of our 


present member of congress from this district, and the Templeton family — 
all from South Carolina; and still higher up, near where Richmond now 
stands, were to be seen Jeremiah Cox, John Smith, the Hoovers, the Bal- 
ias, and a few North Carolina Quakers. These were indeed the true 
pioneers of eastern Indiana, and their settlements formed a nucleus for a 
rapid increase in our population, attracting other emigrants from other 
states. 




( t When we arrived in the territory there were no roads or bridges; the 
people were without schools and school houses; without churches, except 
as occasionally the neighbors met in some private house for the purpose 
of_ worship. In fact, the country was a vast wilderness. It is true, after a 
ride of many miles, you might light upon a log cabin, surrounded by a 
few acres of imperfectly cleared ground, where a little corn and a few 
pumpkins were raised. Immigration had, however, fairly set in, and the 
neighborhoods already described were receiving accessions, mostly from 
the Carolinas. They were fleeing from states where, at that time, the 
poor white man was regarded a little superior to the slave or the cattle 
with which they cultivated their fields. It was amusing to see them 
wending their way to their future homes. I have seen a family of eight 
or ten following on foot a cow, on the back of which was thrown a 
sack containing all their worldly goods, and when asked, “Where are you 
from?” “‘From Beard’s Hatter Shop, North Carolina,” was the answer. 

On the next day you would meet just such another family following in 
the wake of a cart drawn by a poor old horse, whose ribs you count at 
the distance of many yards ; the cart had no tire except hickory withes, 
and not one ounce of iron entered into its structure. “ Where did you 


382 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


come from, friend?” “From the shallow ford of the Big Yadkin, North 
Carolina.” Why, I became almost as familiar with the localities of the 
Carolinas, as if I had lived there all my life. I remember on one occasion 
to have heard my old friend James Gregory, father of Robert Gregory, 
late one of our supreme judges, canvassing for the office of lieutenant 
governor, making a stump speech in the town of Rushville. He said that 
he “was born and raised in North Carolina and had never seen a wagon 
until he was twenty years old, and then followed a mile to see why the 
big wheels did not catch up with the little ones.” Of course this was 
intended as a joke, but nevertheless was tolerably illustrative of the early 
immigrants. They were not learned, but no truer people ever lived ; they 
were the firm friends of freedom and fought down the vile attempt to 
force slavery into the territory. 

These people worked hard and lived hard. It is a matter of amaze- 
ment how they got along so well as they did. Their cabins were of the 
rudest kind. A few round logs notched down, one upon another, until 
they reached a sufficient height to form a story of eight or nine feet, a 
clap-board roof and puncheon floor, a “cat and clay” chimney ornament- 
ing one of the gable ends of the structure; not a nail or pane of glass 
anywhere found — such were, in short, their dwellings. The clearing of 
three or four acres of ground, and the removing therefrom the green and 
heavy timber was a hard winter’s work. Even in the spring, when the 
seed was planted it was liable to be taken up by the birds and squirrels, 
and some one of the family was required to keep a constant vigil around 
the little field to prevent these depredations. In the fall, when their 
scanty crop was maturing, it was in equal danger from the raccoon and 
other wild animals roaming in the adjacent woods. 

The foregoing, however, were not the only difficulties surrounding the 
early settlers. The western boundary line of Franklin, Wayne and Ran- 
dolph counties separated them from the almost boundless territory of the 
Indians. We were in the midst of a war with the neighboring tribes, and 
hostilities about to commence with Great Britain. 

The savages continued to be exceedingly troublesome until 1814. They 
had taken the side of our enemies during the war with England. The 
settler lived in daily dread, not knowing at what moment his cabin might 
be invested by savages, and himself and family fall victims to their cruel 
and relentless warfare. Murders were frequent all along the border, nor 
was it unusual that the settler was compelled to fly to some neighboring 
block-house for protection. Two persons, whose names I have now for- 
gotten, were butchered not far above Brookville, while working on their 
field, and their horses stolen. A man by the name of Morgan and his 
two brothers were slain by the Indians on the west fork of White Water. 
The inhabitants became sensitive to alarm. The frequency of such occur- 
rences, and the hundreds of rumors of bloody massacres, many of which 
never happened, caused them to live in constant terror. I recollect on 
one occasion a gentleman on horseback came dashing up to our cabin, 
warning us to fly for our lives to the house of James Knight, in Brook- 


STATE PIONEERS. 


383 


ville, as the Indians were killing the settlers some eight or nine miles 
above, and would soon be upon us. It was a cold, frosty night in the fall 
of 1812. 

Without giving me time to more than half dress, we were hurried to 
Mr. Knight’s, where we found about fifty persons, men, women and chil- 
dren. A dozen Indians could have captured the whole party without 
trouble. There were in the crowd a few guns, but a great scarcity oi 
ammunition. Mr. John R. Beatty, the father of the late David Beatty> 
of this city, kept the only store in Brookville. He had about a half a 
keg of powder, which was freely offered on this occasion. Beatty was a 
brave and generous man, and had command of the citadel. Children 
half frozen were crying in the arms of their mothers, and the mothers 
themselves weeping in utter despair. It was indeed a gloomy nighty 
Beatty exerted himself to encourage hope and dry their tears. The next 
morning about nine o’clock the scouts who had been sent out to recon- 
noitre the movements of the enemy returned, and reported that some 
hunters on the waters of Pipe creek had fallen in with a flock of turkeys 
and in the night were shooting them on their roosts. This circumstance 
gave rise to the alarm. We then separated to our respective homes, truly 
glad that we retained possession of our scalps. 

With the exception of the battle of Tippecanoe, fought under the com. 
mand of General Harrison, November 7, 1811, our campaigns were gen- 
erally unsuccessful. The surrender of General Hull at Fort Dearborn in 
the month of August, 1812, without firing a gun; the failure of the 
mounted expedition that marched from Fort Harrison under the com- 
mand of General Hopkins ; the retreat of Colonel Campbell after the bat- 
tle of the Mississinawa on the 18th of December, 1812, and the disastrous 
defeat of General Winchester on the 22d of January, 1813, at the river 
Raison, gave boldness to the enemy and enabled Tecumseh and his 
brother, the prophet, to unite almost the entire body of the Indians of the 
northwest against our people. The inhabitants occupying the frontier 
settlement had good reason for alarm. The battle of the Thames and the 
signal defeat of Proctor with his British forces and Indian allies in the 
latter part of 1813, together with a few successful raids about that 
time in which the Indian villages and their corn were burned and 
destroyed, gave us great relief and improved the condition of the early 
settlers. The poverty and sufferings of the Indians produced divisions in 
the neighboring tribes and induced them finally to sue for peace. By the 
middle of the year 1814, we began to feel secure in our homes. 

I think it appropriate, and I know that I shall be forgiven, if, just here, 
I quote somewhat from a graphic description of the times given by Mrs. 
Rebecca Julian. Her communication was published in 1854 in a Centre- 
ville paper, where I then resided. Mrs. Julian, with her husband, Isaac 
Julian, moved to the White Water country in 1808. She was the mother 
of Jacob and George Julian, two well known citizens of this vicinity. 
Mrs. Julian, among other things, says : 


384 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


“A young naan by the name of Shortridge was killed by the Indians 
about three miles from our fort. He had on at the time a portion of the 
dress of another man who had made threats against them, and it is sup- 
posed that they mistook him for the latter. In the spring Charles Mor- 
gan and his two half brothers were killed at their sugar camp, scalped and 
one of them thrown into the fire. This happened about six miles from 
our residence. This was quite alarming. We knew not what to do. We 
gathered ourselves in small groups in order to hold council. Finally we 
concluded to leave our new homes, which we did time after time for the 
space of two years. We were grateful indeed to see peace returning so that 
we could again enjoy our homes. 

“There were many serious trials in the beginning of this country 
with those who settled amid the heavy timber, having nothing to 
depend upon for a living but their own industry. Such was our situ- 
ation. However, we were blessed with health and strength, and were 
enabled to accomplish all that was necessary to be done. Our husbands 
cleared the ground and assisted each other in rolling the logs. We often 
went with them on these occasions to assist in cooking for the hands. 
We had first rate times — just such as hard laboring men and women can 
appreciate. We were not what would now be called fashionable cooks. 
We had no pound cakes, preserves or jellies, but the substantiate prepared 
were in plain, honest, old fashioned style. This is one reason why we 
were so blest in health. We had none of your dainties — nicknacks and 
many fixings that are worse than nothing. There are many diseases now 
that were not heard of thirty or forty years ago, such as dyspepsia, neu- 
ralgia, and others too tedious to mention. It was not fashionable at that 
time to be weakly. We could take our spinning wheel and walk two 
miles to a spinning frolic, do our day’s work and, after a first rate supper, 
join in some innocent amusement for the evening. We did not take very 
particular pains to keep our hands white. We knew they were made to 
use to our advantage, therefore we never thought of having hands just 
to look at. Each settler had to go and assist his neighbors ten or fifteen 
days, or thereabouts, in order to get help again in log-rolling time. This 
was the only way to get assistance in return.” 

You see the good old lady talks right out and tells, without doubt, a 
true story of her younger life. She might have said much more of the 
habits and customs of her sex in that early day. 

The women at that time and for many years after not only spun and 
wove the fabrics for their own garments, but that of the whole family. 
They were their own mantua makers, and did the tailoring for the father 
and sons. I have to-day a pleasing remembrance of their white and well 
fitting dresses, with a small stripe of blue or red woven in the fabric out 
of which they were made. As to the tailoring, I often thought the waist 
of the coat too short by six or eight inches, and the breeches rather scant 
in material. Twelve “cuts” was a good day’s work, and if there was a 
surplus of the woven material, after suppling the wants of the family, it 
found a ready sale at the nearest store. It was a high commendation in 


STATE PIONEERS. 


385 


those days that a young lady was an adept in spinning and weaving. 
When I was a young man, some fifty-five years ago, I occasionally visited 
the daughter of an old friend. The mother took me round the cabin and 
showed me the bundles of yarn her daughter had spun, and the beautiful 
coverlids she had woven. Of course I was charmed, but I soon found my 
visits were far more agreeable to the mother than the daughter. She 
afterwards married a very clever gentleman. 

While alluding to the general privations of the early settler there was 
one embarrassment which weighed heavily upon his energies, and is 
measurably unknown to the present generation. Poor as he usually was 
he had brought from his old home means sufficient to enter a tract of 
government land. As the law then stood he could not enter less than a 
quarter section. The price of the public land was $2 per acre, and the 
purchaser was required to pay $80, or one-fourth down, one fourth in two 
years, and the balance in two equal annual installments, with interest; 
altogether $320. A failure to pay any one of the instalments caused a 
forfeiture, not only of the land, but the money paid. It is safe to say, 
that not two out of fifty were able to meet the payments as they fell due. 
Their failure placed them at the mercy of the government, and made 
them mere tenants at sufferance. The government, however, did not de- 
clare the forfeiture, and in March, 1820, Congress passed an act suspend- 
ing the forfeitures until March 31, 1821. This secured to the settler his 
home for another year, but that was all. The installments were all .due 
and he had no more money at the expiration of the year than when the 
act was passed. It only postponed the evil day. In the month of March 
following it looked as if something would be done for the relief of the 
settler. A bill was introduced in Congress which provided that the holder 
of any legal certificate of pnrchase might file a relinquishment in writing, 
on or before September 30, 1821, in the land office, and if such person had 
paid only one-fourth of the original price ot the land, the balance should 
be paid in eight equal annual installments; if he had paid one-half of 
the original price, the balance could be paid in six equal annual install- 
ments; if three-fourths part of the original price, the balance could be 
paid in four equal annual installments, and if the whole sum should be 
paid by the 30th of September, 1822, a deduction of 37J per cent, should 
be made; but such discount should not apply to the payments which had 
already been made. This bill passed March 21, 1821. 

My friends, if this enactment had been faithfully carried out it would 
have afforded substantial relief to the settler; but the time for the appli- 
cation was short. Many lived remote from the land office, and never 
heard of the relief proposed until it was too late to avail themselves of 
its provisions. Above all, the time had nearly expired before the land 
officers of the district received their instructions from the proper depart- 
ment. The consequence was, very few received any benefit from the law. 

Another bill was introduced in Congress, and, after great opposition, 
was finally passed on the third day of March, 1823, extending the pro- 

2 — Pioneers. 


386 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


visions of tlie law of 1821 to the 30th of September, 1823. General James 
Noble and Walter Taylor were our United States senators at the time, 
and Jonathan Jennings the sole representative of Indiana. Taylor never 
lived an hour in the state after his election, but returned to Virginia, his 
native state, and remained there until his term of office expired. Noble 
and Jennings worked like beavers to procure the passage of the relief 
measure to which I have just referred. They saved hundreds of families 
from utter ruin. Noble’s reception at home after the passage of the last 
bill was a perfect ovation. Men came long distances to thank him for liis 
services in their behalf. Noble died in Washington, having served in the 
Senate of the United States sixteen years, and Jennings, for many years 
one of the most popular men in the state, was buried near Charlestown 
without even a headstone to designate his resting place. 

With all these trials and discouragements I have seen Indiana rise 
from a population scarcely equal to that of a present county town to 
2,000,000 people, embracing within its limits 4,000 miles of railroad and 
about as many miles of telegraphic facilities, prosperous cities and towns, 
magnificent churches, w r ell improved farms, with stately mansions and 
school houses in every neighborhood, and a common school fund larger 
than that of any other state in the Union — all this in one lifetime. Our 
advance surpasses the imagination. It looks more like magic than realit} r . 
Who are the men that contributed to this wonderful success? I would 
gladly refer you in detail from my own personal recollection to many of 
those who participated in the events resulting in the extraordinary changes 
and in the adoption of the measures necessary to perfect them, but time 
will only permit, in this address, to glance at some of the more important. 
You, of this association, should fill up the vacancies. If you do not feel 
free to enter more fully into some of these matters, you can at least give 
us many of the religious, moral and social events of your early days. 
They gave shape to our present institutions and will be highly interesting 
to your successors; nor will these details be any the less interesting 
because they originated from a heterogeneous population — drifted from 
many lands, mostly, it is true, from the southern states, but a few from 
Pennsylvania, and some from the mountains of New England, and each 
imbued with the peculiar views derived from the customs of their native 
homes. 

In this crowd of old settlers who is there that can not give us a descrip- 
tion of an early corn husking, when the corn heap, being equally divided, 
the captain and the men on each side selected, and the party who first 
finished their portion of the heap carried their captain in triumph on 
their shoulders into the ranks of the opposition, in ridicule of the latter’s 
tardiness? What venerable mother is here who can not detail the par- 
ticulars of a sewing match or quilting in which they participated in early 
life, when, after their day’s work was finished, their husbands and neigh- 
boring young men joined them at the house, spent the evening, and some- 
times to the small hours of the morning, in playing ‘‘Sister Phcebe,” or 


• STATE PIONEERS. 


387 


If a violin could be had, in dancing an old-fashioned “reel?” There are 
but few of this association who could not tell us something about the old 
regimental musters in Indiana, at which most of the voters of the county 
attended, and after passing through the various military evolutions with 
■clubs and cornstalks in place of guns, the regiment was addressed by their 
distinguished commanders, and often the afternoon was occupied with 
political speeches. About the last muster at which I was present I recol- 
lect the colonel of the regiment was noted for a squeaking voice. When 
the corps was ready to receive him, he rode up in front of his regiment, 
the only man in the field dressed in uniform, and in his squeaking voice, 
called out, “Attention! battallion.” A boy some two hundred or three 
hundred yards distant cried out in imitation of the commander’s voice, 
<L Children, come out of the branch, or you will get snake bit.” Of course 
it raised a huge laugh, and I never heard of that regiment being called 
out again. 

Many of you could describe the early struggles of the church to main- 
tain itself in the rude state of society which surrounded it. There were 
Lewis Dewease and Judge Holman, of the Baptist church ; Mr. Barr and 
Mr. Bush, of the Presbyterian church; Jeremiah Hubbard and Charles 
Osborn, of the Quaker society ; and John Strange, James Havens, Edwin 
Hay, John P. Durbin, James Armstrong and many others of the Meth- 
odist church who deserve to be mentioned. These were all brave and 
.eloquent preachers. Wherever vice showed its hideous head they were 
sure to strike at it. It is true that murders, robberies and burglaries were 
unusual, but fighting, cock-mains and gambling were common vices; the 
use of intoxicating liquors was general in almost every private house, 
and small distilleries were located all over the inhabited portion of the 
country. Under the influence of such men to whom I have alluded these 
vices were kept in check. We had then our great periods of revival, in 
which the Christian men and women of the day seemed to be inspired by 
a supernatural power. Under the influence of such men the church even 
became aggressive, and often triumphed over a powerful opposition in 
passing laws and enforcing them to maintain the good order of society. 
These scenes and the heroic exertions of the men of that day are almost 
forgotten. The leaders of these movements — those who snatched society 
from the hands of the rowdies, the gambler and the bully — are fast going 
out of remembrance. Can you not revive their memories? Burns 
immortallized his name by his sweet strains commemorative of the social 
habits of Scotia, as Homer did that of Greece, and while there may be no 
Burns or Homer in this association, yet surely you can, in plain and sim- 
ple language, give us the names of some of those whose influence tended 
to modify the character of society. Right here, though somewhat out of 
place, I can not refrain from adverting for a moment to the last time I 
heard John Strange preach. It was 40 years ago, at a camp meeting in 
Rush county. The first sermon I ever listened to in Indiana was preached 
‘by John Strange. He was preaching when my father first settled in the 


388 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


territory. During the war and our Indian troubles he rode from one- 
block house to another to preach to the people and console them in their 
dire distress. I verily believe that he did not know what cowardice was. 
He was sensitive to an extreme, and could shed tears at the least mur- 
mur of distress, and yet of a “ courage to stand unmoved at the bursting 
of an earthquake.” His enunciation was clear and distinct. His voice 
was peculiar but rather musical, and without apparent effort he could 
throw it to be heard at a greater distance than any other man I ever 
knew. It was understood that John Strange, the presiding elder, would 
be present on the occasion alluded to. Here were the rude tents and 
seats, the temporary pulpit and alter, erected amid the grand old trees 
which had “ ruled the forest for ages past.” Here was assembled a vast 
throng of people who had come in wagons and on horseback, many 30 
or 40 miles from their homes, to worship their Maker and join in the sol- 
emn exercises of the meeting. It was the Sabbath day ; the 10 o’clock 
hour had arrived, and the presiding elder appeared upon the stand. The 
sermon can not be described. I can not depict how that multitude of 
men and women were melted into tears. Yet it was true. There was the 
stern Presbyterian, the staid Baptist, and the bronzed and stalwart coun- 
tryman swayed by the lofty eloquence and thrilling appeals of the preacher 
as the storm rocks the vessel at sea. Shouts of approval went up from 
every quarter of the encampment. I shall never forget the feeling pro- 
duced when he alluded to his poverty, his long service to his church and 
holding up his arm pointed to his dilapidated coat as the only one he 
had in the world. The excitement throughout was intense; the blood 
gushed from the nostrils of one man who had been noted as never having 
a religious sentiment in his life. John Strange died poor, but his mem- 
ory still lives as one of the purest and ablest men of his day. 

There are many other subjects the history of which would form a valu- 
able addition to public knowledge. The judicial history of Indiana; the 
organization of the courts; the changes in the law and the practice under 
it ; sketches of the most eminent of our judges and members of the bar, 
are all worthy of preservation. The literary, the mechanical, the agri- 
cultural and manufacturing history would each be very interesting. The 
projectors of our railroads, and railroad men should be noted. Our col- 
leges and universities, and schools of higher grades, as well as their foun- 
ders, should have their proper mention. But this address must have an 
end. It is already longer than intended. It was difficult, however, to 
make it shorter, and many temptations to lengthen it. I can truly say 
that I am glad to meet you here, and hope that there will be many annual 
reunions of the old settlers of Indiana, and the proper means adopted to 
perpetuate the history of the entire state. 

Whether we shall have these early reminiscences or not depend upon 
your determination. You can not set up as an excuse thajt you are old 
and your memories have failed; for we know, as a general result, that 
while the memory grows dull as to what passed yesterday, it becomes-. 


STATE PIONEERS. 


389 


^brighter as to the events of our earlier years. Physical infirmity, it is 
'true, may render all exertion painful, and in some instances impossible. 
Many of us are old, however, because we whimsically allow ourselves 'to 
so think and act. Yon Moltke, at the age of seventy-five years, success- 
fully commanded the armies of Germany. Old statesmen like Palmer- 
ston skillfully governed Great Britain as her prime minister, and old ora- 
tors like Thiers of France, are often strangely eloquent. They roused 
themselves to the work before them and astonished the world with their 
■triumphs. It is the will we want — the intellect is here. 

We have had many political campaigns, the history of which might be 
.given without in the least interfering with the party feelings of the pres- 
ent day. The incidents, if fairly and truthfully reported, would afford 
much amusement, as well as instruction. No political contest, however, 
in Indiana ever equaled that of 1840. It was the most remarkable that 
ever occurred in the life of the nation. The excitement was unparal- 
leled. The outpouring of the people, the enthusiasm, the log-cabins, the 
canoes, the banners and flags, the coon skins, the hard cider, and the 

• thousand devices to attract attention or express a sentiment — but, above 
all, the 40,000 people assembled in convention at the Tippecanoe battle 
ground, and sending forth a mighty voice to all the states of the union, 
was literally overwhelming. What opposition could withstand for a 
moment the terrible avalanche? The revolution in public sentiment was 
•complete. The party in power was hurled from their places as dry leaves 
before the wind. Still we have no record of that wonderful campaign 

• except a few perishing newspapers. Is there no one here to revive the 
memory of the scenes of the year 1840? Have we also forgotten the men 
who lead in the events to which I have alluded? I remember the names 
of Oliver H. Smith, James Rariden, Samuel C. Parker, Caleb B. Smith, 
George G. Dunn, Jonathan McCarty, George H. Proffitt, and a host of 
others who might be mentioned. The gentlemen named are all dead ; yet 
for force, power and eloquence they are not exceeded by any of those of 
the present day. In too many instances we have failed to foster the name 
of our great men. While other states cherish the reputation of their 
brighter spirits, and glory in doing honor, even to distinguished oppo- 
nents, we too frequently suffer our petty jealousies and party strifes to 
detract from their true merits. Let us nurse the memory of our great 
men and extol their good deeds, and the world will be more ready to do 
them justice. 

A very interesting portion of our history is connected with the adoption 
of the great system of internal improvement of 1836. For several years 
previous the subject had occupied the attention of our principal public 
men. Se’th Levenworth, one of my early school teachers, an enthusiast 
in favor of internal improvements, was elected to the legislature, and 
brought the matter in 1826 before the body, of which he was a member. 
His measures, however, were deemed extravagant, and met with little 
•support. In 1828 Governor Ray, in a flaming message, again brought 


390 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


the subject before the people of the state: but bis plans were also thought, 
to be extravagant and himself a fanatic. I recollect about this time my 
respected father, in a public speech, told the people that in England they 
were running on railroads at the rate of twenty miles an hour. Many 
of his audience doubted his word as a thing improbable, insisting “that 
a traveler going at such speed could not catch his breath.” Public sen- 
timent, however became more and more enlisted with each returning year. 

As a result of the continued agitatioa and discussion on the subject, a 
bill was introduced and passed in 1836 adopting a magnificent scheme for 
improving the state. Eight different works, consisting of pike roads, 
canals and railroads were authorized, and required to be completed with- 
out delay ; a board of public works constituted, and a loan of ten millions 
permitted on a credit of twenty-five years, at five per cent, interest. The 
passage of the law was hailed with demonstrations of delight. Bonfires 
and illuminations were kindled in every locality to be benefited by any of 
the works. The measure, however, was not adopted without opposition 
in the legislature. Eighteen members of the house voted against the law, 
and about one-third of the senate, headed by John Dumont, the senator 
from Switzerland, one-of the ablest and most witty debators of his day. 
John Dumont entered the arena the next year as a candidate for gov- 
ernor against David Wallace, who favored the system. The only question 
discussed was the classification of the public works. Dumont was 
defeated, to the great gratification of the friends of the measure. After a 
struggle of several years, in which no one of the contemplated improve- 
ments was completed, and a debt of ten millions was incurred, the whole 
scheme fell, unhonored, together with its warmest advocates. It was a 
stupendous failure, the history of which would require many pages to 
unfold. 

While the truth of history demands that we should record some mis- 
takes in the measures adopted, however well intended, there are others of 
which we may justly boast. Our school system is of the number. Many 
hard battles were fought before it became fixed on a basis which we now 
trust and believe is permanent. The mass of our people had come from 
states where free schools had no existence. They were averse to taxing 
themselves to educate the children of others. As late as 1850 the census 
showed that we had nearly seventy-five thousand people over the age of 
twenty-one years who could neither read nor write. Only think of it L 
Forty thousand voters who could not read the ballots which they cast,, 
and near thirty-five thousand mothers unable to teach their children the 
first rudiment of an education. Ever since the adoption of the first con- 
stitution of the state, the subject of common schools was a theme of con- 
stant agitation on the stump, by the press and in the legislature. It 
would be curious reading if we had time to give the .arguments for and 
against the measure. When, about the year 1845, the house of repre- 
sentative proposed a bill establishing a system of free schools with a lim- 
ited tax, the senate referred it to 'the* people by a provision that the law. 


STATE PIONEERS. 


391 


should only operate in such counties as should, by a popular vote, adopt 
it. This itself was considered a great triumph, although nearly one-half 
of the counties rejected the measure, and it is a strange fact that in every 
county where a college was located the majority was found against the 
law. Now free schools are accessible to all the children of the state — to 
the poor and rich alike. What a glorious consummation of manly strug- 
gle! Liberty and law, progress and civilization, will travel together, 
binding in one common cause by the efficient means of our common 
schools the vast population of the ages to come. 

Before closing this part of my address in reference to our common 
schools, we should not fail to notice how it was that $4,000,000 was added 
to our school fund. In 1834 George LI. Dunn, Samuel Merrill, Calvin 
Fletcher, James M. Bay, and other gentlemen, interested themselves in 
procuring an act of the legislature establishing a state bank and 
branches, one-half the stock to be subscribed and held by individuals, the 
other half by the state. The sum of twelve and a half cents was to be 
deducted from the dividends of the individual stockholders and retained 
in bank, and to constitute a permanent fund for common school purposes. 
The state borrowed about $3,000,000 to pay her portion of the stock. 
The act establishing the bank provided for the creation of a sinking fund, 
to liquidate and pay the loan of the state. A plain, simple-hearted old 
farmer, John Beard, managed to get in an amendment providing ‘‘That 
after the payment of the loan, the residue of said fund shall be a perma- 
nent fund to be appropriated to the cause of common school education.” 
The men who had been instrumental in procuring the charter had the 
chief management of the bank. Its business was well conducted. It 
maintained its credit unimpaired throughout all the reverses of the 
times. Upon winding up its affairs it was found that it had paid the 
state loan and left a surplus of $4,000,000 to be used as a permanent fund 
for common school purposes. This fund was saved to the children of the 
state by reason of the amendment offered by old John Beard, of Mont- 
gomery county. His name should be precious to every boy and girl who 
enjoys the benefits of our common schools. 

The address of the judge was frequently interrupted by 
applause, and was highly appreciated by the many aged 
veterans present, as was indicated by the vote passed at its 
close, ordering 5,000 copies printed in pamphlet form for 
distribution. 

Prayer was then offered by the Rev. Joseph Tarkington, 
of Greensburg, who settled in the state sixty years ago. 
Governor Williams was then introduced, and said: 


392 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


REMARKS OF GOVERNOR WILLIAMS. 

It affords me great pleasure to meet you here to-day. I have seen 
seventy-nine years and forty-nine days. I have been accustomed to 
meeting with the county pioneers of early days, and nothing gives me 
more satisfaction than to be here to-day. I know something of their 
hardships; as the common saying is, “I have been there.” I once spoke 
at one of their meetings of the mills we had in this country away back, 
and of deer skins punched with holes for sieves ; but one of the old men 
couldn’t remember it, and shook his head. Soon ten or twelve came to 
my rescue and said : “I remember ’em well ; that is no lie.” I have served 
in the Legislature with three generations of a family from Dearborn 
county, by the name of Tebbs. 

I used to like to go to cotton pickings, and I guess there are two hun- 
dred persons here who know all about them, and I noticed that the side the 
girls were on always won. They would hide the cotton then. [A voice: 
“Governor, you are mistaken; they haven’t forgotten to hide the cotton 
to-day.”] 

The governor then told an interesting story of how W. 
M. Safford, of Harrison county, obtained his education, 
and concluded by saying a Judge Test had tilled the bill, and 
in the name of the state I bid the old settlers a hearty 
welcome.” 

On motion, John B. Dillon was elected secretary. 

A committee of five to draft a constitution for a perma- 
nent organization was appointed, as follows : John B. Dil- 
lon, chairman ; Mr. Sample, Muncie ; Henry S. Lane, Craw- 
fordsville; Dr. Stevenson, Greencastle ; Mrs. Chris. Parker, 
Fort Wayne. 

On motion, General Simonson was added to the com- 
mittee. 

The meeting then adjourned until 2 o’clock. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The meeting was called to order at 2 o’clock p. m. by 
Chairman Test. The Hon. John B. Dillon, Indiana’s his- 
torian and chairman of the committee on permanent organ- 
ization, was then introduced, and delivered a most excellent 
address, as follows: 


STATE PIONEERS. 


393 


MR. DILLON’S ADDRESS. 

The first state convention, composed of old settlers of Indiana, will be 
mentioned in history as a memorable meeting of honorable representatives 
and personal examples of that remarkable class of people who laid the 
foundations of civilized communities in a vast wilderness, and who labored 
long, faithfully and successfully to raise our state and our nation into 
conditions of strength, peace and civil and religious freedom. They have 
made Indiana a great state among the states of the union, and they have 
helped, with strong arms, to make the union a great nation among the 
nations of the earth. 

The works in which the old settlers of Indiana, as a class, have made 
themselves famous are not finished, and these works of human progress 
and improvement must be carried on through future times by the wis- 
dom, strength and patriotism of the people of the state. Indiana, like 
the nation of which it forms a part, is yet in its early youth, and in 1978, 
one hundred years in the future, the citizens of the state at that time will 
study with a high degree of interest, the various institutions and the 
manners and customs of their predecessors of the present times, who will 
then be regarded as pioneer settlers of Indiana. 

It is not my intention, on the present occasion, to make a long discourse 
•on the marvelous growth of the United States and the extraordinary 
labors and triumphs of those who are known as pioneer settlers of the 
west. Our English dictionaries say that the word “ pioneer” means one 
who goes before to remove obstructions or prepare the way for another. 
The members of the old settlers’ association of Indiana know more than 
something about the dangers, toils and trials of what is called western 
pioneer life. They have studied the hard lessons for many years; they know 
them by heart, and every old settler in this assemblage of honored men 
and women, can, from observation and personal experience, relate many 
interesting particulars in reference to the early times in our state. Never- 
theless, in the course of a few brief remarks, I will mention some remarka- 
ble facts which have, perhaps, faded from the memories of many of the old 
settlers. Indeed, I sometimes think that they do not clearly see and appre- 
ciate the extraordinary results of their own labors in Indiana, nor the won- 
derful greatness of the work that has been done, in a short period of time, by 
the pioneer settlers of that part of our country which lies westwardly of 
the Allegheny mountains, and extends to the Pacific ocean. 

What was the condition of this vast region in 1770, at the time when 
some men and some women who are now alive were little, children ? A 
few pioneer settlers were living on the borders of the Monongaliela river, 
in the vicinity of Old Redstone fort, which stood at the present site of 
Brownsville; and where the city of Pittsburg now stands there was a 
small village and some old fortifications; there was a Moravian mission- 
ary station among the Indians who lived on the upper borders of the 
river Muskingum; there were small civilized settlements and Indian 


394 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


trading posts at Vincennes, Kaskaskia, Cahokia, St. Louis, Detroit, Mack- 
inaw, San Francisco and Santa Fe; and there were a few Catholic mis- 
sionary stations at other places among the Indian tribes. At that time 
the total civilized population of the thirteen English colonies in America 
was not as great as is the population of the State of Ohio at the present 
time. 

Then, in 1770, in the immense region lying between the Allegheny 
mountains and the Pacific ocean, there was no organized state, there was 
no county, there was no republican form of government, there was no 
civil court for the administration of justice, there was no printing office,, 
there was no public school. Now, in this vast wilderness region, in the 
course of the lifetime of some persons who are very old, the western 
pioneer settlers have organized nineteen states and eight territories, viz l 
W est Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, Texas, 
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Colorado, Ne- 
braska, Oregon, Nevada, Iowa, Utah, Montana, Dakota, Idaho, Wash- 
ington, Wyoming, Arizona, California and New Mexico. In these strong 
and enlightened states and growing territories, where the principles of 
civil and religious liberty have been established, there are at the present 
time many large cities, countless numbers of towns, villages and farms,, 
thousands of those mighty engines which move the world — I mean 
churches and printing presses — great numbers of universities, colleges 
and academies, many costly benevolent institutions, at least 150,000 
teachers of public schools, of whom about 14,000 are employed in the 
public schools of Indiana. 

These interesting and remarkable facts prove that the persevering labors 
of patriotic pioneer settlers of the region lying westwardly of the Alle- 
gheny mountains have produced many marvelous results in a very brief 
period of time. We may look in vain through the records of the past for 
another instance in which mankind have made works as great as these in 
a period so brief. 

The earth covers the mortal remains of thousands of those who were 
pioneer settlers of the west, and who, in their stations in life, were great 
and good men and women, according to their opportunities. 

Before the time of the declaration of American independence an organ- 
ized body of western pioneer settlers agreed to maintain the principles of 
religious freedom in the west. 

On the 27th of May, 1775, at Boonesborough, in Kentucky, a political 
organization, which assumed the name of the Legislature of the Colony 
of Transylvania, unanimously adopted a compact, from which the follow- 
ing is an extract: 

“ 4. That there be perfect religious freedom and general toleration 
provided that the propagators of any doctrine or tenets evidently tending 
to the subversion of our laws, shall, for such conduct, be amenable'To, 
and punished by the civiFcourts.” 


STATE PIONEERS. 


395 


A declaration so universally in favor of “perfect religious freedom ” 
has no precedent in the proceedings of any legislative body that ever met 
on the continent of America. 

About two hundred and thirteen settlements, which were called “sta- 
tions,” “ forts,” or “ block-houses,” were established in Kentucky between 
the years 1774 and 1795.' (Collins’ Kentucky.) 

In the summer of 1778, Zebulon Herton and John Parish, who were 
good Quakers from Pennsylvania, visited, for benevolent purposes, some 
of the Indian villages on the northwest side of the river Ohio. On their 
journey homeward they passed by the way of Fort Pitt, Braddock’s bat- 
tlefield, Redstone Old Fort, Laurel Hill, and a pioneer house which was 
called More’s tavern. Of this tavern Mr. Herton, in his journal, says. 
“The landlord was from home, and the landlady a proud and ill-natured 
woman; so that we had an unpleasant time.” (His. Mag. Feb. 1870.) 

Daniel Boone, in an account of his adventures, written by himself, says: 
“Many dark and sleepless nights have I spent, separated from the cheer- 
ful society of men, scorched by the summer’s sun and pinched by the 
winter’s [cold, an instrument ordained to settle the wilderness.” * * * 

On the subject of buffaloes in Kentucky, Boone says: “The buffaloes 
were more numerous than cattle in the settlements, browsing on the leaves 
of the cane or cropping the herbage on these extansive plains. We saw 
hundreds in a drove, and the numbers about the salt springs were 
amazing.” 

At the time to which Boone refers, and for some years afterwards, 
White river, which flows by the city of Indianapolis, was regarded by the 
Indians as a good stream on which to catch beavers. 

The names of early pioneer settlers of the west indicate that they, 
or their ancestors, were emigrants, chiefly from England, Ireland, Ger- 
many, Scotland, France and Holland. From 1820 to the present time 
about 9,700,000 emigrants from European nations have arrived in the 
United States. It is said, and the statement may be true, that at the city 
of Chicago, a few weeks ago, on a Sabbath day, religious services were 
conducted in the different languages of the English, German, French, 
Italian, Dutch, Swedes, Welsh, Norwegians and Spaniards. The names of 
towns in Europe have been given to towns founded by western pioneer set- 
tlers ; and we have Londons, Liverpools, Dublins, Limericks, Edinburghs, 
Glasgows, Berlins, Viennas, Amsterdams, Parises, Romes, Madrids, Gene- 
vas, Warsaws, Moscows, etc., etc. And the names of early western set- 
tlers, and the names of different kinds of animals, birds, fishes, trees and 
rocks, have been fixed upon townships, towns, creeks, springs, lakes, hills, 
valleys, plains and groves. There are many Eagle creeks, Turkey creeks, 
Duck creeks, Pigeon creeks, Deer creeks, Wild Cat creeks, Raccoon creeks, 
Otter creeks and Beaver creeks. 

In 1783 George Rogers Clark, the conqueror of the British forces at 
Kaskaskia and at Vincennes, made a long and lonesome journey, in a 
condition of poverty, from the west through the wilderness to Richmond,, 


396 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


Virginia. On his arrival at that place he addressed to Governor Benja- 
min Harrison a letter, of which the following is a copy. The letter, 
probably, has never been printed : 

“ Richmond, 21st May, 1783. 

“Sir — Nothing but necessity could induce me to make the following 
request to your excellency, which is to grant me a small sum of money on 
account; as I can assure you, sir, that I am exceedingly distressed for the 
want of necessary clothing, etc., and don’t know of any channel through 
which I could procure any except of the executive. The state, I believe, 
will fall considerably in my debt. Any supplies which your excellency 
favors me with might be deducted out of my accounts. 

“I have the honor to be your excellency’s obedient servant, 

G. R. ClARK. 

“ His excellency, Governor Harrison.” 

In the summer of 1783 General Clark was dismissed from the service 
of Virginia. On this occasion he received from Governor Harrison a 
letter which contains the following passage: 

“Before I take leave of you I feel myself called upon in the most 
* forcible manner to return you my thanks, and those of my council, for 
the very great and singular services you have rendered your country in 
wresting so great and valuable a territory out of the hands of the British 
enemy, repelling the attacks of their savage allies and carrying on a suc- 
cessful war in the heart of their country.” 

& i:'- iic it- # -jfr 

The legislation of the pioneer settlers of the territory of the United 
States northwest of the river Ohio was generally wise; but in some in- 
stances it was distinguished by the enactment of laws which would not 
be popular among children and servants of the present times. Laws 
were enacted to prohibit gambling, drunkenness and Sabbath breaking; 
and in 1788 a law for the punishment of disobedient children and ser- 
vants was passed, in the words following : “ If any children or servants 
shall, contrary to the obedience due to their parents or masters, resist or 
refuse to obey their lawful commands, upon complaint thereof to a justice 
of the peace, it shall be lawful for such justice to send him or them so 
offending to jail or house of correction, there to remain until he or they 
shall humble themselves to their said parents’ or masters’ satisfaction. 
And if any child or servant shall, contrary to his bounden duty, presume 
to assault or strike his parent or master, upon complaint and conviction 
thereof before two or more justices of the peace, the offender shall be 
whipped not exceeding ten stripes.” 

On the 20tli of July, 1788, more than ninety years ago, at the mouth of 
the Muskingum river, in the presence of a congregation composed of 
pioneer settlers, the Rev. Dr. Brick preached the first sermon that was 
delivered by a Protestant minister of the gospel before a civilized audi- 
ence in the territory northwest of the Ohio river. On the 2d day of 
September, in the same year, at Marietta, the first session of the first court 
held in the territory under the authority of the United States was opened 
by prayer. 


STATE PIONEERS. 


397 


By an act of Congress of 1804, an immense area of country was placed 
under the government of the Indiana Territory. Among the old settlers 
who have honored this meeting by their presence, there are probably some 
persons who were inhabitants of the territory when its jurisdiction, under 
the administration of Governor Harrison, extended over all the country 
from the State of Ohio westwardly as far as the sources of the rivers 
which flow into the Mississippi, northwardly to the boundary line between 
the United States and Canada, and southwardly on the western sides of 
the rivers Ohio and Mississippi, as far as the thirty-third degree of north 
latitude. 

Extending through various climates, the area of territory under the gov- 
ernment of the United States is very great. In our southern region mag- 
nolia forests, orange groves and different kinds of tropical fruits are 
growing. In our most northern territory, on the borders of the Arctic 
ocean, there are vast and dreary regions of snow covered mountains, 
frozen plains and icebergs. 

It is said that the Roman empire, in the days of Constantine the Great 
extended over at least 1,600,000 square miles. There are at the present 
time under the jurisdiction of the government of the United States about 
3,830,000 square miles of territory — an area greater than that of Europe. 
The distance from Sitka, the capital of Alaska,, to the capital of the 
Union, by the shortest route usually traveled, is about 4,500 miles, and 
when the hour of noon strikes at Washington City, it is only 9 o’clock in 
the morning at San Francisco. 

The State of Indiana occupies a very favorable geographical position in 
the great middle region which lies between the Allegheny mountains and 
the Rocky mountains — an immense region, superior to any other district 
of country of similar extent in the quantity and variety of its fertile lands; 
in the number of its growing cities; in the number of its churches, schools, 
colleges, universities and other educational institutions; in the salubrity 
of its climate; in the number and aggregate length of its navigable 
rivers; in its lake harbors; in the number and total length of its rail- 
roads and telegraph lines; in the number of its forests of useful timber, 
and in its great abundance of coal, iron, copper, lead and other valuable 
minerals. The river Ohio, in its course of 1,000 miles, from Pittsburgh 
to the river Mississippi, receives about 270 tributaries, including rivers 
and ereeks. The water of the Mississippi river which flows past the city 
of Memphis in one year has been estimated at a quantity sufficient to 
cover an area of 100,000 square miles to the depth of seven and a half 
feet. 

At a time not very far distant the great middle region, in which Indiana 
holds a favorable position, will be distinguished as the chief stronghold 
of the greatest nation in the world. * * * * 

From year to year the old log cabins, which were the dearly bought 
homes of early settlers of Indiana, are falling into ruins. The building 
of such dwellings in our state will soon be spoken of as one of the lost 


398 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


arts. But for many centuries interesting memorials of the good works of 
the early settlers of the state, and descriptions of their log cabins, their 
old fashioned household furniture, their wearing apparel and their prim- 
itive farming implements, will be preserved in history, in poetry, in 
painting and in sculpture. The numerous comfortable dwelling houses, 
which are called “hewed log houses” and “frame houses,” will, from 
time to time, be demolished to make room for more costly, grander and 
more durable mansions of brick or of stone. The fence rails now in use 
will disappear, and the work of log rolling and making rails will cease. 
We shall not again see the happy faces of hardy school children playing 
in the country around old log cabin school houses, with open doors, large 
fireplaces, wooden chimneys, puncheon floors, long windows, clapboard 
roofs, rough benches and strong writing desks. 

The spirit of modern progress will not stop in its long course. New 
discoveries in the fields of science, new inventions in all departments of 
human industry, and the arts of agriculture, architecture and landscape 
gardening will gradually change the face of the country; and new villa- 
ges, towns and cities will be built at many different places to supply the 
demands of trade, commerce and the arts among a large, enlightened and 
constantly increasing population. All these works of the progress of civ- 
ilization will be carried forward by the people of the present times, and 
their successors. Nevertheless, the old settlers, to whom my brief remarks 
are addressed, know that the future peace and temporal prosperity of the 
people of Indiana do not necessarily depend upon the rapid progress of 
those great improvements which can be made by the industry and wisdom 
of man. The grand old ruins of the empires of Assyria and Egypt have 
solemnly proclaimed to mankind for centuries that nations can not save 
themselves from decline and desolation merely by the strength of num- 
bers, wealth and intellectual power. Even these strong forces, supported 
by wise and humane laws, will never be powerful enough to subdue the 
evil and malignant influences which constantly disturb the peace of the 
states. Long ago, by the voice of an inspired servant, the All Powerful 
Creator and Ruler of nations said to those who were a mighty people: 
“If ye walk in my statutes and keep my commandments, and do them, 
* * I will give you peace in the land, and ye shall lie down, and none 

shall make you afraid.” This law of nations is still in force; and noth- 
ing but the power of divine law and Christian love, operating on the 
hearts of the people, can establish a perfect condition of peace on earth 
and good will toward men. 

The committee on permanent organization reported the 
following, which was unanimously adopted : 


STATE PIONEERS. 


399 


CONSTITUTION. 

Article 1. This association shall be called the Indiana Pioneer Society. 

Art. 2. Its object shall be to co-operate with the old settlers’ county 
and district societies of the state in collecting, preserving and from time 
to time publishing biographical sketches of the early settlers, aud other 
interesting materials in reference to the origin and progress of civilized 
settlements in the several counties of Indiana, which counties are requested 
to form old settlers’ societies and to send delegates to the annual meetings 
of this society. t 

Art. 3. The officers of the society shall be elected annually at the 
regular meetings, and shall serve until their successors shall have been 
elected. Said officers shall consist of a president, thirteen vice-presidents, 
•one from each congressional district, a secretary, a treasurer, and an exec- 
utive committee of five members. 

Art. 4. The regular meetings of the society shall be held annually, 
at such time and place as may be determined by the executive com- 
mitttee. 

Art. 5. Citizens of Indiana over sixty years of age, who have resided 
in the state for a period of thirty years, and citizens over fifty years of 
age born in the state, may become members of this society by signing the 
•constitution and paying one dollar admission fee to defray the necessary 
expenses of the society, provided that no payment of such fee shall be 
required of 'women, nor of men wdio shall have been exempted from such 
payment by a vote of the society. 

Art. 6. Honorary memberships of the society may be created by a 
vote of a majority of the members at any regular meeting. 

Art. 7. The duty of the president shall be to preside at all meetings 
of the society, to preserve order, and to give the casting vote in case of a 
tie. He shall, ex officio, be chairman of the executive committee when 
present at its meetings. 

Art. 8. The vice presidents shall assist the president at the meetings 
of the society, and one of their number shall preside in the absence of 
the president. 

Art. 9. The duty of the secretary shall be to conduct the correspon- 
dence of the society, keep regular minutes of its proceedings and preserve 
all manuscripts, books and other property belonging to the society. He 
shall give notices of its meetings, and perform such duties as may be 
deemed necessary by the order of the executive committee. 

Art. 10. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive all moneys 
due to the society, and pay, under proper- vouchers, all the expenses 
of the society incurred with the approval of the executive commit- 
tee. All orders for the payment of money shall Joe signed by the sec- 
retary and countersigned by the president, or by a member of the exec- 
utive committee; and the treasurer shall annually, at the regular meet- 
ing, make a report of the condition of the treasury. 


400 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


Art. 11. The duty of the executive committee shall be to superintend' 
the general interests of the society, and they shall have power to fill 
vacancies in the offices of the society, and to meet at' such times as they 
shall deem advisable. 

Art. 12. Amendments to this constitution maybe made at any meet- 
ing of the society by a vote of a majority of the members present. 

By request, J. W. Riley repeated the poem delivered by 
him at the old settlers’ meeting held at Oakland a short time 
ago. 

OLD SETTLERS. 

BY J. W. RILEY. 

The terse old maxim of the poet’s pen, 

“ What constitutes a state? — High minded men,” 

Holds such a wealth of truth, when one reflects, 

It seems more like a sermon than a text; 

Yet looking dimly backward o’er the years 

Where first the face of Progress, thro’ our tears, 

Smiles on us, where within the forest gloom 

The bud of Indiana hursts in bloom ; 

We can but see, from Lake of Michigan, 

To where Ohio rolls, the work of man — 

From where our eastern boundary line is pressed, 

To where the Wabash revels on the west ; — 

A broad expanse of fair and fertile land, 

Like some rich landscape from a master’s hand, 

That in its rustic frame we well might call 

The fairest picture on Columbia’s wall ; 

A picture now — a masterpiece divine, 

That, ere the artist’s hand in its design 

Had traced this loveliness, was but a blot 

' * 

Of ugly pigment on a barren spot — 

A blur of color on a hueless ground 
Where scarce a hint of beauty could he found, 

But patiently the hand of Labor wrought, 

And from each touch new inspiration caught; 

Toiled on thro’ disadvantages untold, 

And at each onward step found firmer hold, 

And obstacles that threatened long delay 
He climbed above and went upon his way, 

Until, at last, exulting, he could see 
The sweet reward of patient industry ; 

And beauties he had hardly dared to dream, 

In hill and vale, and cliff and winding stream,, 

Spread out before his vision, till the soul 
Within him seemed to leap beyond control, 

And hover over lands the genii made 
Of sifted sunshine and dew-washed shade; 

And who, indeed, that loves his native state, 

Has not the heart to throb and palpitate 
With ecstacy, as o’er her wintry past, 


STATE PIONEERS 


401 


He sees the sun of summer dawn at last, 

And catches, through the misty shower of light, 
Him glimpses of the orchard's bloom of white, 

And fields beyond, where waving empty sleeves, 
The “scarecrow ” beckons to the feathered thieves 
That perch, and perk their nimble heads awry, 

And flit away with harsh, discordant cry ; 

Or, shading with his hand his dazzled eyes, 

Looks out across the deadened paradise, 

Where wild flowers blossom, and the ivy clings, 
And from the ruined oak the grapevine swings, 
While high above upon the leafless tree 
The red-head drummer beats his reveille, 

And, like an army thronging at the sound, 

The soldier-cornstalks on their battle ground 
March on to harvest victories, and flaunt 
Their banners o’er the battlements of want ! 

And musing thus to-day, the pioneer 
Whose brawny arm hath grubbed a pathway here, 
Stands, haply with his vision backward turned 
To where the log-heap of the past was horned, 

And sees again, as in some shadowy dream, 

The wild deer bending o’er the hidden stream, 

Or sniffing, with his antlers lifted high, 

The gawky crane, as he comes trailing by, 

And drops in shallow tides below to wade 
On tilting legs, thro’ dusky depths of shade, 

While, just across, the glossy otter slips 
Like some wet shadow ’neath the ripple’s lips 
As, drifting from the thicket-hid bayou, 

The wild duck paddles past his rendezvous ; 

And overhead the beech and sycamore, 

That lean their giant forms from either shore, 

Clasp hands and bow their heads, as tho’ to bless 
In whispered prayer the sleeping wilderness. 

A scene of such magnificent expanse 
Of nameless grandeur that the utterance 
Of even feathered orators is faint, — 

For here the dove’s mast melancholy plaint 
Invokes no echo, and the killdee’s call 
Swoons in the murmer of the waterfall 
That, faint and far away and undefined, 

Falls like a ghost of sound upon the mind. 

The voice of Nature’s very self drops low, 

As tho’ she whispered of the long ago, 

When down the wandering stream the rude canoe 
Of some lone trapper glided into view, 

And loitered down the watery path that led 
Thro’ forest depths that only knew the tread 
Of savage beasts, and wild barbarians 
That skulked about with blood upon their hands 
And murder in their hearts. The light of day 
Might barely pierce the gloominess that lay 
Like some dark pall across the water’s face, 

And folded all the land in its embrace ; 

The panther’s whimper, and the bear’s low growl — 
The snake’s sharp rattle, and the wolf 's wild howl ; 

3 — Pioneers. 


EOAKD OF AGRICULTURE 


The owl’s grim chuckle, as it rose and fell 
In alternation with the Indian’s yell, 

Made fitting prelude for the gory plays 
That were enacted in the early days. 

But Fancy, soaring o’er the storm of grief 
Like that lone bird that brought the olive leaf, 
Brings only peace — an amulet whose spell 
Works stranger marvels than the tongue can tell— 
For o’er the vision, like a mirage, falls 
The old log cabin with its dingy walls, 

And crippled chimney with the crutch-like prop 
Beneath a sagging shoulder at the top. 

The coonskin battened fast on either side — 

The wisps of leaf tobacco — “cut and dried : ” 

The yellow strands of quartered apples hung 
In rich festoons that tangle in among 
The morning-glory vines that clamber o’er 
The little clapboard roof above the door : 

The old well-sweep that drops a courtsey 
To every thirsty soul so graciously, 

The stranger as he drains the dripping gourd 
Intuitively murmers, “ Thank the Lord ! ” 

Again thro’ mists of memory arise 

The simple scenes of home before the eyes ; 

The happy mother, humming, with her wheel. 

The dear old melodies that used to steal 
So drowsily upon the summer air, 

The house dog hid his bone, forgot his care, 

And nestled at her feet, to dream , perchance, 

Some cooling dream of winter-time romance. 

The square of sunshine through the open door 
That notched its edge across the puncheon floor, 

And made a golden coverlet whereon 
The god of slumber had a picture drawn 
Of babyhood, in all the loveliness 
Of dimpled cheek and limb and linsey dress. 

The bough-filled fireplace and the mantel wide, 

Its fire-scorched ankles stretched on either side. 
Where, perched upon its shoulders ’neath the joist. 
The old clock hiccoughed, harsh and husky-voiced, 
And snarled the premonition, dire and dread, 

When it should hammer Time upon the head : 
Tomatoes, red and yellow, in a row, 

Preserved not then for diet, but for show, 

Like rare and precious jewels in the rough, 

Whose worth was not appraised at half enough. 

The jars of jelly, with their dusty tops ; 

The bunch of pennyroyal, the cordial drops ; 

The flask of camphor and the vial of squills ; 

The box of buttons, garden seeds and pills ; 

And, ending all the mantel’s bric-a-brac, 

The old, time-honored “ family almanack 
And Memory, with a mother’s touch of love, 

Climbs with us to the dusky loft above, 

Where drowsily we trail our fingers in 
The mealy treasures of the harvest bin ; 

And feeling with our hands the open track, 

We pat the bag of barley on the back, 


STATE PIONEERS 


403 


As groping onward through the mellow gloom, 

We catch the hidden apple’s faint perfume, 

And, mingling with it, fragrant hints of pear 
And musky melon ripening somewhere. 

Again we stretch our limbs upon the bed 
Where first our simple, childish prayers were said, 
And, while without the merry cricket trills 
A challenge to the solemn whippoorwills, 

And filing on the chorus with his glee, 

The katydid whets all the harmony 
To feather-edge of incoherent song, 

We drop asleep, and peacefully along 
The current of our dreams we glide away 
To that dim harbor of another day, 

Where brown Toil waits us, and where Labor stands 
To welcome us with rough and horny hands. 

Aod who will mock the rude, unpolished ways 
That swayed us in the good old-fashioned days 
When Labor wore the badge of manhood, set 
Upon his tawny brow in pearl of sweat ? 

Who dares to-day to turn a scornful eye 
On Labor in his swarthy majesty ? 

Or wreath about his lips the sneer of pride 
Where brawny Toil stands towering at his side? 

By industry alone we guage the worth 
Of all the richer nations of the earth ; 

And side by side with honesty and toil 
Prosperity walks round the furrowed soil 
That belts the world, and o’er the ocean ledge 
Tilts up the horn of plenty on its edge. 

’Tis not the subject fawning to the king, 

’Tis not the citizen, low cowering 

Before the throne of state. — ’Twas God’s intent 

Each man should be a king — a president ; 

And while thro’ human veins the blood of pride 
Shall ebb and flow in labor’s rolling tide, 

The brow of Toil shall wear the diadem, 

And justice gleaming there, the central gem, 

Shall radiate the time when we shall see 
Each man rewarded as his works shall be. 

Thank God for this bright promise ! Lift the voice 
Till all the waiting multitudes rejoice ; 

Reach out across the sea and clap your hands 
TjII voices waken out of foreign lands 
To join the song, while listening Heaven waits 
To roll an answering anthem thro’ the gates. 


On motion of the Rev. W. W. Hibben the thanks of the 
meeting were tendered Mr. J. W. Riley for his very able 
production. 

The convention then went into the election of officers,, 


with the following result : 



404 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 


LIST OF OFFICERS. 

President — Judge C. H. Test, of Marian. 

Vice Presidents — John Lagrow, of Gibson; John AT. Posey, of Pike; 
Martin Adams, of Clark; Ezra Lathrop, Dr. Bond, John I. Morrison, of 
Henry; Andy Smith, of Marion; the Hon. John Collett, of Vermillion 
the Hon. H. T. Sample, of Tippecanoe; George Crawford, of Laporte; 
Jonathan Colborn, of Hamilton; the Hon. I. D. G. Nelson, of Allen; 
and Matthew Rippey, of Elkhart counties. 

Secretary — John B. Dillon, of Marion. 

Treasurer' — Robert B. Duncan, of Marion. # 

Executive Committee — Dr. G. W. McConnell, of Steuben ; Fielding 
Beeler, of Marion; L. B. Stockton and General Simonson, of Clark, and 
Christian Parker, of Allen. 

After transacting some other business of minor import- 
ance the convention adjourned sine die. 


THE LAST ADVENTURE AND DEATH OF GEORGE POGUE, THE FIRST 
WHITE SETTLER IN MARION COUNTY. 

RECITED BY MRS. SARAH T. BOLTON, OF INDIANAPOLIS. 

We stood on the iron network where a score of railroads meet ; 

Where the earth and air are pulsing to the fall of human feet ; 

Where the sky is red at midnight with forge and furnace tires, 

And the sunshine is reflected from a hundred domes and spires. 

“ It is not long, ” said a settler, who chanced to be my guide, 

“Since all this land, now flowing with a living human tide, 

Was a dense, unbroken wilderness, where echo never woke, 

To repeat the voice of a white man, or sound of woodman’s stroke. 

Nay, it is not long, ” he added, “ I well remember the time, 

Though I was only a stripling, and now I am past my prime, 

When the Indian built his wigwam where this fair, young city stands 
Enriching the world with the labor of a hundred thousand hands. 

That run,” and the old man pointed to the water far below, 

That crept on under the bridges with a turbid, sluggish flow, 

“ Was then a graceful streamlet, with waves as bright and free 
As ever, through shade and sunshine, went singing down to the sea. 

Wild roses bent and kissed it, fair lilys fringed its brink, 

And, down through its scented sedges, the red deer came to drink. 

He***#***##.;. 

It ehanced, one year, in the autumn, that a hardy pioneer, 

From his home in old Kentucky, came and made his campfire here ; 

With his wealth on two stout horses, he had threaded the pathless woods, 

One bearing his wife and children, the other his household goods. 

With his rifle on his shoulder and his good dog by his side ; 

He had been, by night, their warder, by day, their faithful guide, 

Aod there, in the curve of the streamlet, on a little sloping rise, 

That caught, through the white armed sycamores, a glimpse of sunny skies, 
While the wild birds sung above him and the free waves sung below, 

He built the first log cabin, six and fiftyjyears ago. 


STATE PIONEERS 


405 


It was built of buckeye saplings, with mortar and chumks between, 

But it led the van of our city, the beautiful ‘ Railroad Queen. ’ 

With a newborn sense of freedom that knew no bound, no thrall, 

As proud of his buckeye cabin as a lord of his manor hall, — 

Going to rest with the twilight, rising with early morn, 

Planting a patch of potatoes, clearing a field for corn ; 

Hunting the game in its covert, catching the fish in the stream, 

The life of the brave backwoodsman flowed on like a pleasant dream. 

But stormclouds follow the sunshine, and sorrow must have its place, 

And there came, at length, a shadow to the settler’s honest face; 

There was, plainly, some discordance in the music of his life, 

But he only said, in answer to the questioning of his wife, 

‘ There is nothing much the matter, I am hearty, well and strong, 

But I’m troubled with a fancy that something will go wrong. 

It wakens me up at midnight, and follows my steps all day, — 

I know it’s only a fancy, yet can not drive it away. 

I dreamed, one night, I was living in old Kentucky still; 

Living with father and mother, in the homestead by the mill. 

I had plowed the south field fallow, and when my task was done, 

Strolled out to hunt in the marchlands, with old Bowser and my gun. 

The trees were only in blossom, but the day was close and warm, 

And the woodlands seemed to listen for the voice of a coming storm. 

Finding no game worth taking, I wandered down to the pool, 

Where we used to fish for redeyes instead of going to school. 

And there, in a clump of willows that grew by the babbling stream, 

Sat down and dreamed of the future as only a boy can dream, 

While Bowser, stretched on a sandbank, in the shadows cool and deep, 

Was fighting his raccoon battles over again, in his sleep. 

The sky and the air grew darker, and a hollow sounding breeze 
Dimpled the face of the water, and whispered away through the trees. 

‘Ah Bowser, the storm is coming, we must hasten away,’ I said. 

Just then I heard, in the pathway, the fall of a light low tread, 

And Bowser suddenly started from the sandbank where he lay 
And barked as if he were holding some terrible thing at bay. 

I whistled a call to follow and homeward turned, but there, 

In strange, unearthly garments as white as his snowy hair, 

I saw the form and the features of good old Abner Drew, 

That used to preach in the school-house, as plainly as I see you. 

With his dead eyes never moving from their stony ghastly stare, 

His white lips slowly parted, and he said, ‘ Young man, beware ! 

There is danger and death before you, but God is good— prepare ! ’ 

I did not seem to be frightened standing there before the dead, 

And I tried to catch the meaning of the solemn words he said ; 

But when the white form faded and slowly vanished away, 

My senses seemed to forsake me, and when I woke it was day. 

* ’Twas only a dream,’ I argued, but a second time it came, 

And night before last a third time, and always the very same. 

And when I went out this morning to feed the stock, at dawn, 

The bars were down in the pasture and both the horses gone. 

I tracked them down through the cornfield and saw, where they crossed the stream, 
The print of Indian moccasins and, maybe, this is my dream, 

For those prowling, rekskinued rascals have stolen the beasts, I fear, 

And they are our sole dependence for raising a crop this year. 

So I’ll take old Boze and Betsy and strike the trail again, 

It will not be hard to follow on account of last night’s rain. 

Be careful to keep the children from playing about the stream ; 

The w^ter is high and rising— there was warning in my dream.” 

So saying, the brave backwoodsman went out of his cabin door 


406 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 


To hunt for his missing horses— he entered it never more. 

The trail from the creek turned southward and he followed aH day long ; 

His form was lithe and sinewy, his heart in its purpose strong. 

Away through the river bottoms, with briars and brambles rank,— 

Through tangled reeds and rushes, by sloughs and marshes d«nk, 

Through thickets of scented spicewood, where peavines rich and tall 
Had woven, with graceful tendrils, a nearly impervious wall, — 

Climbing the breezy blufflands, or threading the dells belew, 

Where the long spring rains had drifted a deep and dangerous flow, 

Skirting ravines and hollows, where sunshine never gleams. 

And crossing the driftwood bridges that spanned the swollen streams, 

He went his way through the forest, nor stopped for food nor rest 
Till the crimson glow of sunset faded out of the west. 

And then, by a spring that started from under a low, green hill, 

And sent a sparkling streamlet away at its own sweet will. 

He sat and ate his supper of venison-jerk and bread,— 

“ There’s enough for both, old fellow,” to his faithful dog, he said, 

“ We have traveled far since morning, full twenty miles, or more, 

And something seems to tell me the horses are just before ; 

So we’ll start again good Bozie with the rising of the moon, 

And hope to bring home the creatures before to-morrow’s noon. 

Hist, hist— was the sound of speaking borne on the passing breeze, 

Or was it only the twitter of a bird among the trees ? 

Nay, there is the light of a campfire, gleaming out in the dark, 

The sound of guttural voices and the ring of a wolf dog’s bark. 

Down, down for your life, good Bozie, and for both our lives be still, 

For there is a band of Redskins, on the other side of the hill.” 

So saying, the wary hunter dropt down on his hands and knees, 

And crept around the hillside, keeping behind the trees, 

Till he crane in view of the campfire, in a little dell below, 

And, half a score of Indians, basking in its ruddy glow. 

Then, hid, in a pawpaw thicket, with his rifle in his hand, 

He patiently watched and waited the movements of the band. 

They ate their smoking succotash, the calumet went round ; 

And, wrapped in their shaggy blankets, they stretched themselves on the ground. 
But, the patient hunter waited in the silence dumb and deep, 

Till the moon was lost in cloudlaud and the Indians sound asleep. 

And, “ Now,” he said, “ for^the horses, they are spanceled out to graze, 

The fire is low and smoldering, they sky is covered with haze. ” 

And feeling his way with caution lest a twig should break beneath, 

He glided down to the valley holding his very breath. 

4t Ah, here,” he said, “is Ruby and there is my gentle Fay,” 

But ere the words were whispered he was leading them away. 

They knew his voice and followed with a step as quick and light 
As if they knew the danger that encompassed him that night. 

Followed him up from the dingle and around the low green hill 
To the spring where faithful Bozie was keeping his night-watch still 
.Signing the dog to be silent, and follow his course with Fay, 

The hunter mounted young Ruby and sped on his homeward way. 

Ride fast, now, brave backwoodsman, ride fast for the love of life, 

For the cabin home in the forest, the little ones, the wife ! 

Give the choice of way to Ruby, and pause not to look back, 

For the Indians are awakened and their dogs are on your track. 

Speed faster, faster, Ruby, there is danger and death behind, 

For the bay of the red-mouthed bloodhound is borne on the startled wind, 

And the tread of fleet wild horses i3 throbbing along the ground ! 

.Speed faster, faster, Ruby, there is hope in every bound. 

On, on, over height and hollow, dark ravine and deep morass, 


STATE PIONEERS 


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407 


Where human fe.'t in the daylight would scarcely dare to pass ; 

Through tangled brake and bramble, where hardly a bird could fly, 

And grim, gigantic shad ;ws shut out a glimpse of the sky, 

The good steed carried her master from the hot pursuit away, 

Till the stars enveiled their faces in the light of dawning day. 

But she bates her speed and pauses on the dim uncertain shore 
Of a stream that rushes onward with an angry, sullen roar. 

Does the dumb thing know the danger? She shivers and seems to shrink, 
Looks one appeal at her master and bounds from the treacherous brink. 
The dark waves close around her, and the utmost strength and strain 
Of her iron thews and sinews against its force are vain — 

One wild and terrible struggle, one shrill, unearthly cry, 

Rang out through the grim old forest, rang up to the listening sky, 

And the swollon stream flowed onward with the same deep, sullen roar, 
But the noble horse and her rider reached never the hither shore. 

Good Bozie followed the water, and, a mile or two below, 

Where the drift to a little bayou was borne on an undertow, 

On a bank of blooming sedges, starred with blossoms pure and white, 

He found his master lying, with his face upturned to the light. 

One hand was laid on his bosom, the other under his head, 

His eyes were closed as in sleeping, but the brave, true soul had fled. 

Boze looked in the still face sadly, and licked the cold, white hand 
That would never more caress him, and seemed to understand; 

And while the waves sung dirges and the willows bent above, 

He crouched in voiceless sorrow, and watched for the sake of love; 
Watched in the light and darkness as the long hours passed away, 
Watched till the third day faded into the twilight gray ; 

And, then, his strength exhausted, he crawled to his master’s side, 

Laid his head on his bosom, looked ix his face and died. 

And there was wail in the cabin, was wail and sorrow sore 
For the pleasant face that left it and the step that came no more. 

Peace, peace to the dauntless spirit, to the hardy heart and hand 
That lighted the first home hearthstone in all this goodly land ; 

Earnest and self-reliant, he was one of the noble few 

That the needs of the world find ready to suffer, to dare, and do. 

That summertide brought others, brave of heart and strong of hand, 

To build their humble cabins in this lovely Indian land. 

Stalwart men and gentle women, whose only worldly wealth 
Was faith and self-reliance, perseverance, hope and health. 

And, the forest fell before them, in its beauty and its pride, 

And passed away like seaweed before a mighty tide. 

And prayers went up at morning, went up at evening’s close, 

That God would make the desert bloom and blossom as the rose. 

And soon the songs of the hammer, the spindle and loom were heard, 
Instead of the savage wolf-howl, or concert of bee and bird. 

And the hills with wheat grew golden and the valleys rich with corn ; 
Thus, from the heart of the forest an infant city was born. 

But those who bore th# burden and heat of that early day, 

Who suffered loss aud privation uncomplaining — where are they ? 

They wrought with strong endurance, thro’ discouragement and ill ; 

Has the great All Reaper spared them? — do they dwell among us still? 
Ah, no, they rest from their labors aud little to-iay appears 
To remind us of the hardships endured by the pioneers. 

Their noble lives have drifted beyond the shores of Time, 

But the blessed works that follow are enduring and sublime. 

Yet the Past is soon forgotten, as an idle story told, — 

The New is a strong young giant that slays and devours the Old. 

Who walks the streets of our cities where the tides of commerce flow, 


408 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 


And thinks of the sloughs and brushwood there fifty years ag# ? 

Who, seeing the classic facades of our mansions grand and fair, 
Remembers the buckeye cabins and the half-faced camps once there ? 

Ib the palace cars that bear us over the iron track, 

Leaving the wind to follow, who pauses and looks back 

To the time when the sole conveyance for human freight and goods* 

Was a staunch old four-horse wagon creeping along thro’ the woods ? 
Who sits in our splendid churches with their fretted and frescoed walls. 
Where the light, through painted windows, like a broken rainbow falls, 
And thinks of the band of settlers who paid to God their vows 
On the wild grass sod of the forest under the maple boughs ? 

Ah, the Past is soon forgotten when its pulsing heart grows cold, — 

The New is a strong young giant that slays and devours the Old. 


THE OLD FOLKS’ STATE REUNION— 1878. 

BY KEY. W. W. HIBBEN. 

From distant valleys, hills and plains, they come — 
These grand Old Folks of early cabin days ! 

Though tottering in the feebleness of age, 

They bear the spirit yet’of olden times. “ 

All, bald and gray, and dim of sight, they meet, 

Of pristine days, the relics— having run 
Beyond their fellows, in the race of life. 

Upon the course of time, like milestones, grim , 

Life’s changes stand, and measure off their steps. 
And count — how faithfully ! — the .iiany lights 
And shadows, past, of their precarious race ! 

Yet many failed, |where few have gained the prize 
Of honored age. 

Their “ threescore years and ten ” — 

Aye, even fourscore years ! — have come and gone, 
And with them many gay and happy scenes, 

And many anxious, sad and solemn days. 

But yesterday, mere thoughtless boys and girls 
Were they, whose sportive pranks, and merry laugh. 
Betokened gleeful hearts and healthy minds ; 

Then, happy youths, with footsteps light and swift — 
With graceful forms and actions free ; then men, 
With stalwart limbs, who swung the battle-ax 
That felled the forest giants, and with maul 
And wedge, and beetle, clove their massive trunks ; 
Or piled them, heaping high, on funeral pyres, 

On which the widowed vines were soon consumed. 
With bar-share plows, by many oxen drawn, 

They wrested hard, in many a tug of strength 
That taxed each muscle, then, and sinew <Vft, 

To clear a field of virgin soil. 

Their sports 

Athletic were, heroic too! the turkey, 

Deer, and bear, with cautious, patient tread , 

Were trailed, or chased with joyful, fleeting speed, 
Through densest woods and flowery vales, until, 

At last, the bearded bird, and antlered buck, 

And plan tigrated bruin, gave their lives 
To man ! Not man who erst the forest roamed — 

The savage monarch of the woods— to slay 
The beast that preyed upon the thronging deer ; 


STATE PIONEERS 


409 


But mas, whose mission is to multiply, 

And gain dominion over all the world ; 

Subduing and replenishing the earth — 

Obeying God’s command ! 

Not always though, 

Did gun, and ax, and plow provide the means 
Of life. The cabin homes oft saw a guest 
Unbidden enter. Pale and gaunt was he ! — 

And, while he sat beside the rude hearth- stone 
And warmed his haggard form, and bony hands, 

With pleading eye, and plaintive tone, he sued — 

So humbly ! — for a crust of bread ! But rare 
His visits were — this ga-unt unbidden guest ! 

For bounteous Nature’s generous hands are open 
And seldom closed. Hence, rarely glewed the fire 
Of winter’s eve, with aught but light and joy, 

When ’round the table sat the family group, 

With appetites the wealthy never know. 

And while the wick — immersed in oil the hunt 
Supplied — shone brightly on his humble board, 

The pioneer, with grateful thanks, besought 
The blessing God alone can give. His wife, 

The mother, looked with pride, subdued, on eon 
And daughter, who, with busy knife and fork, 

Did “ ample justice ” to her best display 
Of corn-cake, laved with honey ; turkey roast 
And venison, served to suit the eater’s choice ; 

Potatoes, baked and mashed ; and onions stewed ; 

And tea ; not “ store ” tea ! but — sh, well, ’twas “ tea ! ” 
Dessert ? Why yes ! ’Twas “ mush and milk,” or “ last 
But not the least ” — the golden pumpkin pie ! 

Thus health and happiness, within the cabin homes 
Of Pioneer, were “ to the manor born ! ” 

Such every one may covet, as a boon, 

Beyond the gifts of wealth, or fame ! 

And now 

To-day, their presence here revives to each 
A glorious throng of memories, that, like 
The distant stars in the winter’s limpid vault, 

Are clustered, full of wisdom, love and hope, 

And crowned with honor ! Far behind they look 
On graves unmarked, that hid the forms of those 
Beloved in early years, who once beside 
Them stood — their pride and joy. O’er many states 
Their children, friends and kindred, scattered, lie, 

In God’s half acres ! Mouldered dust, those forms — 

To native elements dissolved ! But they ? 

They live ! In forms more pure, ’mid scenes more fair, 
They wait to greet the mourners here below, 

Who, like the sturdy oaks, that many storms 

Have braved, their foliage stripped, their branches dead, 

Now patiently abide the final summons ! 

And one by one, they will depart — like stars 
Before the rising sun — to meet again 
Beneath the light of heaven ! 

Yet memory 

Shall o’er their dust erect love’s monument, 

While tongues immortal praise their deeds, and speak 
Their virtues evermore ! 


PIONEERS. 


LIST OF APPLICANTS FOE 

CONVENTION, 


MEMBERSHIP OF 
1878 . 




Name. 


Alley, Rebecca 

Aldrich, Lucy 

Allen, Obed 

Justin, E. P 

Ashton, Joseph 

Andrews, Alanson 

Anderson, A. L 

Allen, Catherine 

Armstrong, Isaac D.... 

Armour, James 

Anderson, George 

Able, Elias 

Alexander, John 

Alexander, Samuel R 

Amos, A. D 

Alsraan, John 

Adison, Thomas 

Adams, Alex 

Aughe, Samuel 

Aldrich, Paris 

Alexander, John 

Allen, Obed 

Adamson, E 

Adams, Lawrence .... 

Adams, Mary 

Allhands, George 

Bright, Ezekiel , 

Barnes, Stephen 

Bacon, Hiram 

Burns, M. M 

Barbour, Samuel 

Barbour, Harriet 

Bozill, Strodder 

Burgess, James P 


Address. 


Indianapolis ... 

Butler 

Noblesville 

Noblesville 

Utica 

North Yernon 
Greensburg.... 
Green sburg.... 

Frankfort 

Eugene 

Kuightstown .. 
Bloomington... 

Vincennes 

Vincennes 

Rushville 

Arlington 

Morristown 

Indianapolis.. 

Frankfort 

Adams 

Stilesville 

Rochester 

Carbon 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Charlestown... 

Brookville 

Stilesville 

Indianapolis... 
Indianapolis... 
Indianapolis... 
Indianapolis... 
Taylorsville... 
Richmond 



a 


cn % 

a3 

& 

Co -±_i 

be 

zn 

<5 


72 

66 

83 

42 

71 

52 

72 

52 

72 

60 

76 

60 

74 

56 

70 

40 

70 

50 

70 

45 

79 

40 

70 

40 

82 

45 

76 

50 

72 

45 

73 

59 

70 

59 

71 

48 

75 

46 

73 

56 

77 

49 

78 

41 

75 

48 

72 

47 

70 

47 

76 

50 

86 

58 

74 

50 

78 

58 

71 

64 

73 

47 

70 

47 

71 

55 

77 

60 


LIST OF PIONEERS 


411 


Name. 

Addkkss. 

bC 

<5 

Years In 
State. 

Beach, Ann 

Tjewisville 

72 

42 

Brawlev, Daniel 

Lafavette 

70 

40 

Bond, E. P 

Lawreneeburg 

70 

43 

Brown, R. T 

Indianapolis 

71 

58 

Bonta, Eli 

Annapolis 

73 

47 

Barwick, B. P. 0 

Brookville 

72 

52 

Bovle, Jacob 

Indianapolis 

72 

62 

Bell, Henrv 

Edinburg 

70 

40 

Bishop, Joseph 

Mooresville 

76 

41 

Bragg, Wilson > 

Iudianapolis 

75 

60 

Berrv, Nineveh 

Madison 

74 

74 

Brown, Peter D 

Iudianapolis 

70 

50 

Boswell, Strawder 

Tavlorsville 

71 

54 

Bal berger, Margaret 

Franklin 

70 

40 

Blake, John 

Markleville 

71 

61 

Brown, Elizabeth 

Taylorsville 

75 

50 

Blacklidge, John 

Rushville 

78 

67 

Blaeklidge, Harvey 

Clarksburg 

76 

67 

Bain, Thomas 

Indianapolis 

74 

45 

Bain, Nancy 

Iudianapolis 

71 

45 

Buckner, N,. N 

Franklin 

83 

45 

Branham, Granville 

North Madison 

70 

68 

Burnett, Travis 

Franklin 

75 

48 

Borer, James 

Charlestown 

71 

68 

Brown, Samuel 

Taylorsville 

76 

50 

Beeler. Elizabeth 

New Albany 

75 

60 

Branham, L 

Anderson 

75 

65 

Bodley, Charles C 

Salem Centre 

72 

42 

Bodlev, Mrs. Charles C 

Salem Centre 



Brink, William W 

South Bend 

71 

50 

Barker, Harrv 

Logansport 

71 

41 

Boring, Absalom 

Lincoln, Cass county 

72 

42 

Barron, N. B 

Logansport 

56 

56 

Bulla, T. P 

South Bend 

74 

72 

Brunson 

South Bend 

70 

40 

Blinn, Lucinda 

Frankfort 

73 

47 

Barnard, William 

West ville 

74 

60 

Baker, Abner 

Jefferson 

70 

52 

Bell, Charles T 

Greensburg 

70 

46 

Bowl by, George 

Harrison 

72 

54 

Bowlby, Mrs. George 

Harrison 


44 

Bostick, Joseph 

Brookston 

76 

46 

Bunnell, Nathaniel 

Reynolds Station 

73 

45 

Bunnell, Brezilla 

Reynolds Station .• ,. 

71 

44 

Browntrager, Andrew 

Delphi 

78 

48 

Browntrager, Mrs. Andrew 

Delphi 

72 

48 

Baum, David 

Delphi 

74 

53 

Bales, Eleazor 

Plainfield 

84 

56 

Brown, Preston 

Clayton 

70 

40 

Brown, Hezekiah S 

Dublin 

83 

44 

Brown, Nancy 

Dublin 

79 

44 

Ttflllard, Mnman 

Lewisville 

71 

47 

Bond, Jedediah 

Lewisville 

74 

47 

Bell, Harvev 

Knightstowu 

72 

40 

Bell, Susan E 

Knightstown 

73 

40 

Ballard, Gordon 

Knightstown 

73 

40 

Barrett, Clarissa 

Knightstown 

79 

40 

Beek, George H 

Hagerstown 

73 

40 

Brooks, John 

Green’s Fork 

72 

47 

Barrett, Clarissa 

Knightstown 

77 

51 

Barwick, R. P. C 

Brookville 

71 

52 

Bartlow, Cornelius 

Richmond 

72 

63 

Reitzell, Henrv 

Centreville 

70 

41 

Burtch, William 

Vincennes 



Beard, Joseph 

Bruceville 



Branham, Daniel 

Martinsville 

73 

63 

"Rungar, James 

Bloomington 







Barkwell, H. C 

Booneville 

70 

40 

Beadle, James W 

Rockville 

90 

50 

Rrvan, Margaret, 

Milroy 

71 

40 

B /yd, John 

Rushville 

88 

45 


412 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 


Name. 

Address. 

6 

bo 

<: 

Years in 

State. 

Bennett, Jesse 

Rushville 

83 

45 

Bigger, Finley 

Rushville 

71 

43 

Bennett, Jeremiah 

Shelbvville 

79 

46 

Bliss, Oxford 

Oxford 

71 

52 

Burton, Zaehariah 1 

Mitchell 

77 

52 

Black, Alexander 

Greencastle 

75 

42 

Bell, John 

Rushville 

75 

64 

Barrow, Abraham 

Stilesville 

70 

40 

Bartholomew, B 

Danville 



Blaekettpr, William 

Reno 



Blanket ter Elizabeth 

Reno 



Cloyd, William 

Thorntown 

73 

60 

Cox, Charles 

Indianapolis 

70 

45 

Clark, James 

Mt. Auburn 

74 

54 

Coffin Elihu 

Westland 

71 

50 

Copeland, W. H 

Edinburg 

71 

54 

Cress, V. P 

Indianapolis 

72 

42 

Colburn, Jonathan 

Noblesville 

79 

58 

Clark, H. W 

Noblesville 

76 

60 

Clark, A. C 

Noblesville 

72 

52 

Cotton, Hiram A 

Rav’s Crossing 

74 

56 

Campbell, John 

Oxford 

70 

57 

Chittv, W. H 

Hope 

73 

47 

Coombs, John 

Charlestown 

70 

70 

Craig, Henry 

Scottsburg 

72 

55 

Casebur, Andrew S 

Butler 

72 

41 

Cruson, M 

Angola 

70 

42 

Catey, Stacy B .* 

Warsaw 

72 

57 

Cooper, James 

Tipton 

80 

50 

Cox, William 

Argos 

70 

62 

Cat heart, C. W 

Westville 



Chari esworth, John .* 

Westville 

76 

44 

Callahan, John 

Lawreneebnrg 

80 


Callahan, Mary A 

Lawrenceburg 

76 


Culver, Jacob 

Frankfort 

80 

46 

Cattlerlin, Noah T 

Frankfort 

72 

56 

Cox, David F 

Plainfield 

71 

61 

Carter, David 

Plainfield 

85 

55 

Casner, Anthony 

Amo 

79 

4« 

Calvert, John..... 

New Lebanon 

71 

60 

Cline, William 

Clavton 

70 

40 

Cline, Ella 

Clayton 

70 

40 

Carv, Abram 

Knightstown 

70 

40 

Campbell, James M 

Knightstown 

73 

40 

Coffee, Simpson 

Brookville 

71 

67 

Chambers, Susan 

Brook ville *... 

71 

43 

Carr, John 

Rushville 

70 

48 

Custer, Arnold 

Cason 

70 

64 

Coolev, Reuben 

Brookville 

70 

6S 

Cruse, Philip 

Washington 

Callaway, John H 

Salem 

71 

68 

Crossfield, William 

Spencer 

77 

48 

Campbell, James 

Bloomington 

Cline, John W 

Groves 

73 

41 

Corn, John 

I ndianapolis 

71 

42 

Catren, David 

Pendleton 

71 

41 

Canary, Henry 

Edinburg 

73 


Chambers, John 

Adams 

78 

55 

Cable, George 

Stilesville 

70 

40 

Clifton, Andrew 

Danville 

Crow, George 

Fillmore 

73 

4* 

Cole, Andrew M. B 

Bentonville 

74 

53 

Conwell, A. B 

Counersville 

80 

50 

Cooper, James 

Tipton 

80 

46 

Chitwood, George R 

Connersville 

73 

46 

Chapman, George A 

Richmond 

71 

5ft 

Coffin, Elihu, Sr 

Greenfield..*. 

71 

50 

Caty, Sarah 

Richmond. . 

77 

71 

Deford, Ella..'. '... 

Castleton... 

70 

47 

Dickman, Francis 

Indianapolis. 

78 

45 

Dickman, Ellen 

Indianapolis 

72 

45 


LIST OF PIONEERS 


413 


Name. 


Deford, Geo. W 

Dill, James 

Dudley, Ransom 

Durbin, Wm. S 

DeMan, William 

Dickinson, Ezra 

DeWitt, Mr 

DeWitt, Mrs 

Davis, W. R 

Davis, Mrs. W. R.... 

Dickson, Elias. 

Duzan, John 

Donnell, Robert 

Dille, Cephas 

Davis, John 

Dennis, Burr P 

Duncan, Mary H 

Dimick, C 

Deyarmen, Thos 

Dunham, Alanson F 

Downey, John 

Denney, Joseph 

Duncan, Polly H 

Denson, Isaac 

Dunn, Andrew 

Dunning, Paris C 

Denny, Fielding 

Darnell, Lewis 

Dickerson, John C... 

Davis, Harvey 

Dooley, Moses 

Day, Archibald 

Dufour, Perret 

Edmundson, Trones. 

Elliott, Rachel 

Eaton, Sarah 

Evans, James 

Essex, Thomas 

Edgar, Edward 

Edsall, Simon 

Egleston, M 

Eudaley, James 

Eliason, Joshua 

Emison, W. W. C... 

Erwin, William 

Edwards, Catherine. 

Everett, James 

Earney, Patrick 

Fassett, Sarah C 

Freeman, L. L 

Freeman, Elizabeth. 

Fisler, Fanny 

Fletter, Samuel C 

Fisher, Asher 

Foley, James B 

Frazier, John 

Fletcher, R 

Freeman, Wm. H.... 
Foreman, Gabriel..., 

Finch, William 

Fisher, William 

Farmer, Eli P 

Furguson, J. C 

Forest, James 

Finger, Jacob 

Flynn, James 

Ferry, Jane 

Fowler, R. H 

Gaylord, William S.. 

Gray, Henry L. 

Green, John 


Address. 


Castle ton 

Liberty 

New Providence 

New Albany 

Charlestown 

Auburn 

Angola 

Angola 

Logansport 

Logansport 

Plymouth 

Zionsville 

Greensburg 

Greensburg 

Brookston 

Plainfield 

Bedford 

Ogden 

Richmond 

Richmond 

Lovely Dale 

Salem 

Bedford 

Bedford 

Bruceville 

Bloomington 

Cason 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Fountain City..., 

Danville 

Bedford 

Yevay 

Clayton 

Indianapolis 

Gallaudette 

Jamestown 

Columbus 

Winchester 

Ft. Wayne 

Dillsborough .... 

Richmond 

Centreville 

Bruceville 

Bedford 

Greenfield 

Brookville 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis.*.... 

Chase 

Chase 

Columbus 

Ft. Wayne 

Mt. iEtna 

Greensburg 

Kirks ><j Roads . 

Lewisville 

Lynn 

Vincennes. 

Cynthiana 

Bedford 

Blooming 

Irvington 

Laporte 

Mitchell 

Reno 

Indianapolis 

Lawrenceburg.. . 

Lafayette 

Osgood 

South Bend 


Age. 

rears 
[ State. 

70 

70 

74 

45 

71 

63 

72 

56 

78 

64 

88 

42 

102 

43 

71 

44 

71 

44 

71 

63 

76 

42 

80 

55 

74 

41 

75 

42 

80 

57 

71 

51 

80 

60 

78 

47 

73 

61 

70 

68 

71 

51 

74 

60 

75 

67 

73 

48 

73 

55 

72 

41 

71 

54 

85 

51 

71 

69 

76 

48 

89 

75 

74 

50 

72 

40 

71 

49 

74 

43 

. 70 

54 

76 

54 

73 

72 

73 

64 

. 74 

71 

. 72 

70 

. 70 

50 

. 72 

42 

. 76 

47 

. 73 

43 

. 71 

43 


43 

. 76 

45 

. 70 

48 

. 71 

68 

. 71 

45 

. 75 

45 

. 72 

54 


48 

. 70 

49 

. 77 

61 

. 70 

40 

. 70 

60 

. 79 

47 

. 72 

60 

. 74 

50 


68 

. 75 

40 

. 72 

45 


46 


414 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 


Name. 


Gilmour, Jennett 

Gould, Sarah H 

Gattenby, Silah 

Grover, Ira 

Grover, Elizabeth 

Glessner, Mrs. E 

Gossett, Samuel 

Garper, John 

Githens, Elijah 

Garrigus, Solomon 

Guilliams, Edgcomb.... 
Gardner, Mrs. Andrew 

Gorden, Samuel 

Glass, Shelton 

Greenville, Thos 

Gates, Avery B 

Grigsby, James 

Green, Morton 

Gatson, Thomas 

Grose, John 

Green, John 

Griffin, William 

Goddard, John 

Hicks, John 

Hancell, John 

Hornaday, 

Hazlett, Samuel 

Hamblin, Vincent 

Hill, Samuel 

Hyton, William C 

Hank, William 

Hank, Caroline M 

Hammond, G. W 

Hamrick, A. D 

Hart, Philiax 

Harris, Benjamin 

Haney, Harlan 

Hill, Martin 

Heaton, James 

Halstead, Alexander.... 

Hunt, Lydia 

Hoffman, George 

Henry, Samuel 

Houghman, Gabriel 

Huggins, Thomas 

Homan, Aaron 

Hicks, Joseph S 

Hill, Martin 

Hoshour, Samuel K 

Hoshour, Lucinda 

Hanch, Jacob 

Heim, John 

Hoss, Jacob 

Harvey, Nathan 

Hurst, John L 

Hutchings, John 

Harris, Jonah 

Harlon George*. 

Holder, Joseph 

Hubbert, Cornelia 

Hollenbeck, Emma 

Harter, James B 

Hicks, Samuel 

Hubert, Jacob 

Harty, Thomas 

Headley, Samuel 

Hall, Isaac 

Harding, George 

Hanna, Mrs. Judge 

Hodge, John 

Heady, Charity 


Address. 


Greensburg 

Aurora 

G alaudette 

Greensburg 

Greensburg 

Shelby ville 

Plaintield 

Amo 

Richmond 

Mansfield 

Fincastle 

Vincennes 

Bloomington 

Rush ville 

Arlington 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Brownsburg 

Danville 

Reno 

Tipton 

Madison 

Greensburg 

Freedom 

Guilford 

Plainfield 

Stilesville 

Pecksburg 

Pittsboro 

Dayton 

Connersville 

Connersville 

Belleville 

Hamrick’s Station 

Scipio 

Richmond 

Rockville 

Adams 

Craw fords ville 

Edinburg 

Plainfield 

Indianapolis 

Greenwood 

Rockville 

Indianapolis 

Cartersburg 

Cumberland 

Adams 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Maywood 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Amo 

New Providence... 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

New Providence... 

Hope 

Columbus 

Lexington 

Pendleton 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Butler 

Hall’s Corners 

Or land 

Fort Wayne 

Marion 

Kokomo 


6 

•rH . 

f-m *-> 

ci os 

to 


< 


73 

45 

72 

43 

63 

58 

83 

64 

74 

56 

74 

45 

72 

47 

70 

40 

72 

44 

75 

54 

72 

62 

70 

40 

70 

51 

74 

65 

70 

61 

76 

49 

70 

40 

71 

68 

72 

40 

75 

54 

88 

60 

74 

41 

70 

40 

70 

40 

70 

40 

70 

40 

75 

43 

70 

43 

71 

60 

70 

46 

78 

40 

80 

71 

70 

40 

75 

48 

70 

60 

89 

50 

73 

41 

70 

49 

70 

40 

83 

49 

72 

57 

84 

56 

80 

46 

75 

45 

75 

43 

75 

43 

72 

40 

72 

42 

76 

42 

76 

70 

72 

70 

76 

60 

87 

72 

70 

54 

74 

46 

7B 

43 

78 

55 

72 

42 

70 

40 

82 

44 

70 

40 

71 

42 

73 

42 

70 

43 

80 

63 

70 

60 

74 

56 


LIST OF PIONEERS 


415 


Name. 


Hardman, Jacob 

Hawk, George 

Harvey, Michael 

Harvey, Prudence 

Herron, John 

Holcraft, Abraham 

Hathaway, S 

Houghman, G 

Homan, Aaron 

Hudson, Stanton 

Hammond, George W 

Hayworth, Dillon 

Hunt, Asa 

Hunt, Lydia 

Hunt, Alfred 

Howe, J. C 

Hudelson, William 

Hudelson, Margaret 

Hiatt, Jordan 

Hyatt, Elmer 

Huffsutter, David S 

Hudelson, James 

Hiatt, Elisha 

Hiland, Joshua 

Hare, J. O 

Howp, Willis, Sr 

Harrison, James H 

Harrison, Elizabeth 

Hilligoss, Silas 

Helm, J 

Heron, Mrs. B 

Hinchman, James 

Handy, W 

Horton, John 

Hopkins, James V 

Hollingsworth, Jonathan. 
Hollingsworth, Catherine 

Harcourt, John 

Harcourt, Niatsia 

Hodge, John 

Ireland, Samuel I. H 

Johnson, Nancy 

Johnson, James 

Jordan, David 

Jones, Samuel 

Jennings, Jesse W 

Jamison, Josiah 

Johnson, Alexander 

Jackson, Iradell 

Jennings, John S 

Jenning, Myra J 

Johnson, H. B 

Jeter, Horatio 

Jones, Eben 

Jenkins, Philip 

Johns, Taylor 

Keely, William 

King, John 

King, Sarah 

Kepple, Michael 

Klingensmith, Joseph 

Kent, Eliphalet 

Kimberlin, Isaac... 

Kirkwood, Catherine 

Kirkwood, Jane 

Kiser, Peter 

Keller, Anthony 

Kepler, John 

Kelly, John 

Kirkpatrick, Mary 

Kemp, David 


Address. 


South Bend 

Logansport 

Marion 

Laporte 

Brookston 

Kirk’s ^ Roads 

Rising Sun J, 

Rockville 

Cartersburg 

Cartersburg 

Belleville 

Plainfield 

Plainfield 

Plainfield 

Clayton 

Lewisville 

Knightstown 

Knightstown 

Dublin 

Brookville 

Orleans 

Patoka 

Washington 

Lovely Dale 

Bloomington 

Princeton 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Rushville 

Rushville 

Connersville 

Rushville 

Morristown 

Logansport 

Laporte 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Marion...... 

Mishawaka 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Fairland 

Waterloo 

South Bend 

Clayton 

Cartersburg 

Clayton 

Greencastle 

Greencastle 

Spencer 

Bedford..-. 

A villa 

Centerville 

Connersville 

Indianapolis 

Zionsville 

Zionsville 

Zionsville 

New Augusta 

Shelbyville 

Lexington 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Ft. Wayne 

Wabash 

Cambridge City 

Annapolis 

Milroy 

• Morristown 



a 

0 

6 

- 6 
s- eS 

tc 

=8 -2 

< 

®<c 

(h 

74 

47 

84 

41 

71 

46 

71 

44 

82 

47 

71 

45 

85 

66 

80 

40 

83 

55 

78 

48 

71 

40 

72 

64 

71 

41 

73 

41 

70 

40 

72 

44 

76 

40 

78 

40 

71 

57 

70 

65 

70 

62 

76 

60 


74 

71 
70 
78 
74 
78 
78 

72 
70 
74 
72 
70 

84 
74 

70 

71 

74 
76 

72 

72 
71 

71 

75 
70 

76 
76 
75 

73 

73 

74 
70 
90 

72 

72 

73 

78 

79 

85 

70 

72 

73 
83 

71 
70 
70 

72 


59 
48 

48 

55 

60 
41 

56 

49 
40 

40 

59 
45 

43 

44 

60 

50 
65 

55 

45 

41 

46 

40 

41 
40 

52 
44 
65 
512 

42 
64 
40 

48 
50 
50 
44 

49 

49 
60 

53 
53 

56 
58 
58 

50 

40 

41 


41 $ 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 


Name. 

Address. 

to 

<5 

Years in 

State. 

IT i m herl i n . Dan i pi 

Lexington 

89 

73 

Kennedy, Jacob 

Cartersburg 

70 

40 

Koibh Tsaao 

Coatsville .7. 

70 

40 

TCprsey T)r. .lamps 

Amo 

70 

40 

Kennedy, Joshua 

Pittsboro 

70 

40 

Kessler, Lewis 

Danville, 



Kieth, Isaac 

Coatsville 

71 

47 

Koons, Adam 

Charlestown 

75 

53 

Little, Henry 

Madison 

78 

40 

Lawrence, J. K 

Flatrock 

70 

42 

Lukens, William 

Pendleton 

70 

41 

Lemar, James 

Edinburg 

77 

52 

Lemar, Rachel 

Edinburg 

74 

52 

Lloyd, Samuel 

Greencastle 

71 

41 

Lutz, John 

Charlestown 

76 

72 

Liston, James T 

Lincoln, Cass Co 

74 

53 

Losier, Jacob 

Warsaw 

78 

42 

Lathrop, Augustus 

Greensburg.., 

77 

61 

Loughlin, James 0 

Greensburg..! 

77 

50 

LaRue, Jonathan 

Drewersburg 

70 

61 

Lane, Wm. E 

Whitestown 

71 

67 

Lathrop, Ezra 

Greensburg 

75 

61 

Leonard, Abagail 

Gallaudette 

73 

58 

Lake, Daniel 

Harrison 

71 

57 

Layman, Dr. W 

Putnamviile 

70 

40 

Lockhart, Thomas 

Clayton 

70 

40 

Lancaster, W. S 

Richmond 

75 

68 

Lawrence, Edmund 

Dublin 

74 

42 

Lagow, John 

Princeton 

75 

70 

Laughlin, Harmony 

Rushville 

73 

63 

Lambert, Clayton 

Lyon’s Station 

75 

52 

Loyd, Zephania 

Kent 

73 

61 

Lvnch, Thomas H 

Indianapolis 

70 

50 

Lewis, John J 

Pendleton 

75 

46 

Lovette, Edmond 

Greensburg 

75 

48 

Lipe, Jonas 

Pittsboro 

70 

40 

Lyon, Lewis 

Indianapolis 

72 

51 

Lough, David 

Kewanna 

75 

41 

Langston , Henry 

Ravsville • 

75 

69 

Marvin, Henry H 

Danville 

70 

40 

McAllister, Alexander 

Dupont 

73 

40 

Milam, George, 

Spencer 

71 

60 

Miller, Robert 

Pawpaw 

72 

41 

Mon teeth, Wm 

Crawfordsville 

70 

40 

Myers, John 

Logansport 

79 


Marling, Hiram W 

Crothersville 

71 

<50 

Mathews, Sarah 

Gallaudette 

75 

44 

McGuire, John a 

Indianapolis 

72 

48 

Moore, James S 

Smithland 

74 

54 

McCormick, Patsy 

Indianapolis 

75 

58 

Moore, John 

Indianapolis 

72 

47 

Moore, John 

Waldron 

72 

63 

Maguire, Elizabeth .*... 

Southport 

70 

49 

Mith, George 

Carrollton 

81 

41 

McAlister, Alexander 

Dupont 

75 

50 

McCormick, 

Sellersburg 

73 

nn 

McCollum, Thomas 

Seymour 

70 

59 

McCollum, Fannie 

Seymour 

70 

4fi 

McConnell, George 

Scipio 

74 

74 

Mitchell, Thomas. 

Charlestown 

81 

75 

Mitchell, Peter 

Chartestown 

70 

70 

£9 

McCune, John L. P 

Charlestown 

85 

Myers.. James 

Zenas 

74 

5A 

Myers, Emaline 

Zenas 

70 

50 

Mead, Mary 

Andersen 

74 

74 

Mather, John 

Marion 

71 

47 

McDonald, Phoebe 

Plymouth 

72 

61 

Murphy, Thomas 

Tipton 

70 


Myers, John 

Rochester 

76 


McMillan, Robert.... 

Logansport 

72 

48 


LIST OF FIONEERS 


417 


Name. 


McMillan, Hosannah 

Maxwell, Irvin B 

McLaughlin, George 

McCurdy, Samuel 

McCorkle, T. Jay 

McCorkle, Mary 

Moss, Daniel 

McQuithv, Levi A 

Malcom, George 

Musgrave, Nathan . 

Musgrave, Martin.,. 

Mason, Anthony S 

Mason, Mary M 

Moore, John 

Mathes, J. M 

McKnight 

Morrison, John I 

Macy, John M 

Miner, N. W 

Miner, Susan 

Moffitt, William 

McCarty, Mrs. Abner 

McClure 

McLain 

Mclntiar, William C 

Mayes, James S 

Mitchell, William C 

McGowen, William 

Martin, James P 

McMurtrv, John S 

Mills, Caleb 

McLaughlin 

Morriss, William 

McClure, Andrew 

McClure, Mrs. Andrew 

McCormick, W. H 

Mills, Anderson B 

Meredith, Samuel C 

Maddox, William 

Masten, Beuben S 

McLeod, William 

McPheeters, Samuel 

McConn, R. C. S 

Nevitt, David 

Noble, George T 

Noble, John P 

Naylor, Mary C 

Noel, Scott 

Noel, Mrs. P 

Nutting, Harvey 

Nutt, Jane 

Neeley, Elizabeth 

Nichols, Thomas 

Nave, C. C 

Norwood, George 

Newhard, Sophia 

Neff', Colonel H. H 

Odell, James S 

Owins, Lucy 

Onstolt, Andrew 

Patterson, Samuel J 

Pierce, Henry 

Porter, Adam 

Power, Lucinda 

Parris, Jacob 

Phillips, Eli 

Phelps, Alfred 

Perrin, William 

Patrick, Sarah T 

Prather, James 

Patton, Mary 

4 — Pioneers 


Address. 


C> 

b© 

<3 


co O 

S3 


Logansport 

Frankfort 

Greensburg 

Gallaudette 

Thorn town 

Thorntown 

Greensburg 

Greensburg 

Delphi 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

New Lebanon 

New Lebanon 

Paoli 

Bedford 

Perrysville 

Knightstown 

Lewisville 

Dublin 

Dublin 

Brookville 

Brookville 

Brookville 

Avon 

Fort Branch 

Vincennes 

Bedford 

Oaktown 

Bruceville 

Judson 

Crawfordsville 

Crawfordsville 

Rushville 

Logansport 

Logansport .... 

Muncie 

Spencer 

Indianapolis 

Cartersburg 

Coatsville 

Pitts boro 

Danville 

Danville 

Indianapolis 

Greenwood 

Westville 

Crawfordsville 

Rockville 

Rockville 

Conner sville 

College Corner, Ohio 

Daleville 

Danville.... 

Danville 

Indianapolis 

Crawfordsville 

Winchester 

Plainfield 

Milton 

Rochester 

Indianapolis 

Shelbyville 

Camden 

Gallaudette 

Indianapolis 

Amo 

Edinburg 

Gosport 

Logansport 

Mooresville 

North Madison 


67 

73 

75 

86 

81 

70 

75 

90 

72 

72 

70 

70 

84 

70 

75 
72 
72 
78 
70 
70 

76 
83 
72 


71 

73 

71 
79 
70 

72 

74 
70 
70 

70 

73 

71 
70 
70 
70 


85 

77 
70 
70 
70 
70 
70 
75 
70 
70 
70 
90 

78 

70 

73 

71 

74 

72 
74 

74 

75 

73 

76 
76 
72 
72 
78 


44 

69 

59 

43 

49 

49 

41 

50 

60 
60 
60 

50 
62 
60 
40 

51 
71 
57 
60 

68 

59 

59 

73 

48 

47 

45 

42 
50 
40 
40 
40 
53 

44 
40 
40 
40 


68 

45 

45 

63 

64 
64 

46 

54 

55 
40 
40 
60 
51 


46 

40 

43 

5? 

42 

4 3 
4° 

! 8 

6 i 


418 


BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 


Name. 

Address. 

6 

bO 

<1 

Years in 1 
State. ' 

Plessinger, George 

St. Louis Crossing 

71 

46 

Parker, Christian.. . . . 

Fort Wayne 

71 

44 

Parker, Ranh pi ... 

Fort Wayne 

71 

44 

Powers, Winn 

Metz * 

78 

42 

Patrick, David S 

Logansport 

72 

50 

Periee, Peter 

Dillsborough 

78 

50 

Phillips, Samuel 

Amo 

70 

41 

Pope, .Tames N 

Clayton 

70 

40 

Pope, Mrs. .Tames N 

Clayton 

70 

40 

Pike, Jesse 

Dublin 

71 

40 

Pierson, Morris 

Greenfield 

79 

64 

Posey, J. W 

Petersburg 

78 

72 

Piety, W. D 

Bruceville 

70 

60 

Polk, James 

Oaktown 

74 

72 

Parker, Bazil 

Bruceville 

84 

63 

Partlow, Jesse 

Bellmore 

73 

47 

Phelps, Rev. William 

Edinburg 

70 

40 

Perkins, J. A 

Perkinsville 

70 

53 

Pearson, John 

Wabash 

79 

70 

Plasters, William 

Pittsboro 

70 

40 

Parker, Jesse P 

Bethel 

72 

64 

Pavne, William .« 

Spencer 

75 

56 

Peelle, John, Sr 

Richmond 

87 

60 

Parker, John C 

Westport 

70 

68 

Pence, John 

Frankfort 

77 

49 

Parsons, Elizabeth 

Rochester 

70 

40 

Parsons, Elijah 

Rochester 

71 

46 

Quigley, Henry 

Lafayette 

74 

41 

Quick, Elizabeth 

Brookville 

72 

68 

Robins, John 

Greensburg 

83 

57 

Robinson, James 

Shelby ville 

86 

56 

Ritchey, James 

Rensselaer 

74 

50 

Robertson, Aquilla 

Deputy 

74 

74 

Robinson, Jane 

Indianapolis 

72 

49 

Rockey, H. S 

Indianapolis 

73 

40 

Ritchey, John 

Reese’s Hill 

73 

48 

Royster, Peter 

Indianapolis 

72 

66 

Reecl, Eli 

Hope 

70 

47 

Reed, Thomas 

Hope 

77 

45 

Robinson, Horney 

Fort Wayne 

72 

62 

Rhodes, Jeremiah 

Spencerville 

71 

43 

Rippey, Matthew 

New Paris .’... 

76 

70 

Rush, Jacob 

Richardson 

72 

48 

Ross, W. T 

Lagro 

71 

58 

Runyan, Peter L 

W arsaw 

73 

47 

Reese, W. H 

Rossville 

76 

46 

Roland, Ellanor 

Lawrenceburg. . 

75 


Robinson, Aimer 

Delphi ”..., 

80 

54 

Rankin, Robert 

Cartersburg 

72 

45 

Reynolds, Daniel 

Dublin r. 

73 

58 

Reeves, Jabez 

Knightstown 

72 

40 

Reeves, Nancy 

Knightstown 

73 

40 

Ritchey, David 

Vincennes, 


Reel, Aaron 1 

Vincennes 



Reyman, Lewis J 

Salem 

72 

66 

Ramsey, James D 

Bedford 

70 

47 

Ristine, Joseph 

Covington 

70 

40 

Ristine, Mrs. Joseph 

Covington 

70 

40 

Rernley, Michael A 

Edinburg 

80 

50 

Ricketts, James 

Greencastle 

76 

40 

Rhoads, C. S 

Bridgeport 

79 

46 

Riley, William W 

Adams 

74 

42 

Reitzel, David 

Pecksburg 

70 

40 

Rose, Lewis A 

Danville 

70 

40 

Ruark, Thomas 

Fillmore 

75 

45 

Rernley, John 

Yountsville .. 

78 


Rice, John 

Crawfordsville. 

74 

71 

Rernley, M. H 

Edinbwrg 

81 

50 

Reese Bolton, Sarah T 

Indianapolis 

Stockston, L. B 

Lafayette 

• •• 

57 


LIST OF PIONEERS 


419 


Name. 


Sells, Franklin 

Shuler, Sarah 

Stephenson, Samuel 

Smith, Jonas 

Smith, Nancy 

Sanders, J. T 

Strickler, Reuben 

Sloan, William 

Stonehouse, Nancy 

Simonson, John S 

Stucker, Wm. S 

Sour wine, Jacob 

Sample, Thos. J 

Slick, Mr 

Slick, Mrs 

Suttenfield, 

Smith, Jacob 

Smith, Jacob 

Swikart, H 

Selby, Otho 

Smith, John 

Stover, Mathias 

Squiers, David 

Shank, John 

Shank, John 

Spades, Elizabeth 

Smelcer, Samuel 

Sterling, Thomas 

Seaw right, Wilson 

Southard, Aaron H 

Sea wright, Mrs. Wilson 

Selch, Peter 

Selch, Mary 

Sparks, Isaac 

Small, David 

Shirley, William 

Stallard, Joseph W 

Simpson, A. J 

Stevenson, A. C 

Short, Young 

Smith, Rebecca 

Stanton, Daniel 

Shipman, John 

Stratton, L. H 

Stratton, Ruth 

Scott, Robert 

Scott, Hannah 

Simpson, Maj. Thomas. 

Simpson, Mary 

Salter, J. W 

Standeford, John 

Shepard, Horace B 

Stormont, William 

Smock, Cornelius 

Steele, James 

Stewart, D. M 

Swift, John 

Stafford, Joseph 

Sheeks, Denton 

Stowe, Horace 

Southard, Isaac 

Smith, Ebenezer 

Scherer, John 

Shively, Wm. P 

Snider, Wm. H 

Turner, August 

Tarlton, Catherine 

Tucker, Lee 

Taff, Catherine 

Thomas, William 

Turner, Jacob 


Address. 


Smith’s Valley., 

Indianapolis 

Anderson 

London 

London 

Indianapolis 

Boggstown 

Poplar Grove.... 

Lexington 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Greenwood 

Muncie 

Salem Centre..., 
Salem Centre.... 

Ft. Wayne 

Warsaw 

Marion 

Columbia City. , 

Jonesboro 

South Bend 

South Bend 

Wabash 

South Bend 

South Bend, 

Logansport 

Brookston 

Delphi 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Cartersburg 

Cartersburg 

Plainfield 

Plainfield 

Pecksburg 

Shelby ville 

Paoli 

Greencastle 

Clayton 

Rockville 

Dublin 

Knightstown... 
Knightstown... 
Knighsstown... 
Knightstown... 
Knightstown... 
Lyon’s Station. 
Lyon’s Station. 

Richmond 

Greencastle 

Vincennes 

Princeton 

Crawfordsville. 

Eaton 

Rushville. . 

Connersville.... 

Morristown 

Mitchell 

North Madison 

Guilford 

Rushville 

Pecksburg 

B.ownsburg 

Utica 

Indianapolis.... 

Indianapolis.... 

Jamestown 

Cumberland — 

Lawrence 

Indianapolis.... 


to 


"1 
si 5 

£cc 


71 

74 

70 
82 

75 

71 
82 

71 
80 
82 
70 

76 

70 
90 

83 

72 
74 

71 

73 

72 

77 
70 

72 

73 

70 

74 
80 

71 

75 
70 
83 

78 
7L 

79 

72 

73 
81 

76 

70 

71 

73 
70 

77 

74 

72 
72 

70 
72 

71 
83 
79 

71 
77 

75 
■70 

72 

76 

75 

73 
72 

74 
70 

70 

72 

71 
74 

76 
79 

73 
87 


57 

64 
42 
47 
47 

56 
46 
45 

45 
61 
62 

46 

58 
42 

63 

49 

41 

42 

47 
46 
46 

65 
40 
58 

50 

48 
53 

48 

49 

50 
44 

44 

51 

57 
46 
60 
46 

52 
40 
50 
67 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
60 
60 
50 
52 

58 
46 
49 

64 

45 
60 

43 
62 
58 
62 

44 
40 
40 
48 

45 

44 

45 
79 

.50 

56 


420 BOAtti) or AORtCtrtTtJiil!. 


Name. 

Address. 

OP 

fcJD 

<1 

Years in 

State. 

Thomson, AaroD 

Lima 

84 

43 

Taylor, Lathrop M ,.. 

South Bend 

73 

58 

Tyner, Richard 

Logan sport 

72 

71 

Tarkington, Joseph 

Greensburg 

78 

63 

Taraington, Maria 

Greensburg 

73 

60 

Thomson, Catherine C 

Greensburg 

75 

56 

Tomlinson, James C 

Plainfield 

79 

60 

Tomlinson, William 

Amo 

70 

60 

Tharp, Allen 

Cartersburg 

78 

52 

Thomas, Norbour 

Eugene 

73 

45 

Thomas, Mrs. Norbour 

Eugene 

73 

45 

Turner, Jeptha 

Richmond 

72 

72 

Thompson, John G 

Rockville 

90 

50 

Thomas, Eli., 

Rushville 

75 

45 

Thomas, William 

Rushville 

74 

50 

Trueblood, James 

Indianapolis..., ; 

71 

66 

Thomas, Eli 

M ilroy 

75 

45 

Thomas, David 

Danville 


Tout, Henry 

East Germantown 

75 

46 

Tharp, Chauncy W 

Adams 

71 

56 

Test, Charles H 

Indianapolis 

70 

68 

Vandever, James 

Franklin 

77 

43 

Vandorn, William G 

Logansport 

71 

40 

Vigus, Cyrus 

Logansport 

85 

63 

Vankirke, John 

Lovelydale 


Yanarsdale, Cornelius E 

Crawfordsville 

78 

49 

Yauliorn, Cornelius 

Guilford 

72 

61 

Vannice, Lawrence 

Danville 

70 

40 

Vanuice, Peter C 

Danville 

70 

40 

Wilson, Mark L 

Lewisville 

76 

44 

Wilson, Mary 

Lewisville 

72 

44 

Walters, Nancy 

Clarksburg 

78 

50 

Walker, Thomas 

Whitestown 

77 

62 

Wilson, Anna 

Indianapolis 

74 

53 

Wallace, John 

Taylorsville 

72 


Williams, John, Sr 

Edinburg 

71 

58 

Walker, T 

Fortville 

74 

45 

Wrenick, W. P 

Morestown 

70 

52 

Wrenick, Nancy 

Morestown 

72 

64 

Watson, M. A 

Mitchell 

82 

72 

Wiles, Maria 

Columbus 

81 

56 

Wilson, Isaac H 

Shelbvville 

71 

62 

Whitton, Elijah 

Indianapolis 

72 

39 

Wriglithouse, George W 

Charlestown 

72 

72 

Wishard, Rebecca C 

Greenwood 

72 

45 

Wood, Harvey W.. 

Lima 

70 

43 

Wilson, John 

Salem Centre... . 

78 

42 

Woolman, Samuel N 

Marion 

77 

42 

Westerfield, W. D 

Rigdon 

71 

61 

Westerfield, Mrs. W. D 

Rigdon 

Webster, Lister 

South Bend 

7Q 

44 

Wissperman, Henry 

Logansport 

Q 9 

46 

Wood, Aaron 

Da v ton 

nc* 

47 

Watson, Ebenezer S 

Plainfield 

/O 

78 

71 

62 

42 

Worth, Thomas J 

Plainfield 

Wilson, Abraham 

Bridgeport 

/ 1 

Q 1 


Wilson, Allen 

Kightsville 

oi 

76 

79 

46 

Williams, Robert 

Paoli 

62 

Ward, William 

Lewisville 

/Z 

7 a 

62 

Whitsell, J. M 

Knightstown 

/o 

70 

40 

Welborn, Joshua 

Knightstown 

16 

7Q 

40 

Welborn, Phoebe 

Knightstown 

/O 

7C 

40 

Woods, Robert 

Knightstown ... 

/t) 

71 

40 

Woods, Hannah 

Knightstown .. 

/I 

40 

Witt, Rev. C. W 

Dublin 

/I 

71 

69 

Witt, Elizabeth 

Dublin 

/ J 

79 

79 

Wasskrn, J. M 

Richmond 

/ Z 
7K 

TO 

Wines. Mrs. Ann 

Bloomfield ..... 

/o 

84 

00 

Wise, Henry K 

Vincennes 

Wise, John 

Vincennes , 




ttsf OB' MONEESS 


421 


Name. 


Wise, William J 

Wolverton, Adaline 

Whitaker, Levi 

Wilkinson, William 

Wrennick, William P 

Wrennick, Mrs. William P 

Williams, Clayborn 

Wright, E. B 

White, Silas 

Wickard, John 

Wilson, Mary W 

Wilson, Mark L 

Wood, Lorenzo D 

West, Isaac , 

Walters, Nancy... ^ 

Wherrett, Nicholas 

Wedel, Elias 

Younger, Steven 

Younger, Louis 


Address. 

Age. 

Years in 

State. 

Vincennes 



Vincennes 



Alaska 

76 

44 

Cynthiana 

78 

70 

Morristown 

70 

53 

Morristown 

72 

53 

Edinburg 

70 

40 

Indianapolis 

74 

48 

. Traders’ Point 

73 

51 

Indianapolis 

80 

56 

Lewisville 

71 

44 

Lewisville 

76 

44 

Stilesville 

70 

40 

Keno 



Adams *, 

80 

50 

. Connersville 

79 

60 

Edinburg 

72 

56 

Bedford 

79 

69 

Bedford 

76 

46 






The above list contains the names of all the old settlers who applied for 
passes over hhe railroads to attend the Pioneer Convention. In many 
cases, as will be seen, the age and residence in the state is not given, the 
persons making the applications and vouching for them having stated 
simply that they were over seventy years of age, and over forty years 
residents of the state, instead of giving their exact age and residence as 
was desirable. 

ALEX. HEIION, 

Secretary Indiana State Board of Agriculture. 


IN MEMORIAM. 


John B. Dillon died at Indianapolis January 21, 1879, aged seventy- 
one years. He was one of those who suggested the movement that resulted 
in the congregation of many hundreds of the old settlers of Indiana in 
convention at the last State Fair, and they honored him by electing him 
secretary of the State Pioneer Association then organized. 

The work of preparing the proceedings of that convention, which would 
have been so well and cheerfully done by him, is left to be done by 
another. It is a mournful coincidence th at, in this record of the first doings 
of this association, in which he felt so much interest, and took so much 
pride, it becomes our sorrowful duty to record his death and pay this 
tribute of respect and esteem to his memory. 

He was born near Parkersburg, West Virginia. He learned the art of 
printing, at which he worked in Cincinnati, Ohio, and Logansport, Indi- 
ana. In 1842, he came to Indianapolis. From 1845 to 1850 was State 
Librarian; in 1851 was appointed Assistant Secretary of State by Judge 
Charles H. Test, then Secretary, in which position he remained four years. 
The State Board of Agriculture was organized in 1851, and Mr. Dillon 
was its first Secretary, holding the position five years. For nine years 
he was librarian of the United States Senate. In 1850 he published 
the first edition of his history of Indiana, followed by a second edition 
in 1859. He was also the author of several beautiful poems. At the 
time of his death he was closely employed in the publication of a work on 
which he bad been engaged for several years, entitled “ Memorable legis- 
lation of English colonial authorities in America on the subjects of reli- 
gion, morals, education, lands, Indians, slavery, etc., with chronological 
records of the origin and growth of pioneer settlements in regions west of 
the Alleghany mountains.” 

He was secretary of the State Historical Society, in which he took great 
interest, and was collecting and arranging for publication the papers and 
manuscripts connected therewith. 

Though not a prominent man in one sense, nor even identified with any 
great enterprise, Mr. Dillon was in his way am industrious worker, and a 
useful citizen. He was a man of breadth of intellect, of large informa- 
tion, painstaking, and thorough in whatever he undertook, a careful com- 
piler of facts, and a laborious searcher after truth. He was eminently a 


I 


IN MEMORIAM 


423 


conscientious man — conscientious in his every day life and in his work. 
Though not brilliant, he had qualities that were better than brilliancy ; 
and though not successful in amassing a fortune, no man ever built up a 
more solid character, or more fully commanded the esteem of good men. 

He was a great admirer and lover of woman, as he was of everything 
beautiful and good, yet he never married ; for what reason is not certainly 
known, but it is conjectured that it was owing to some disappointment in 
early life, probably shadowed in the following touching lines written by 
him : 

THE BURIAL OF THE BEAUTIFUL. 

BY JOHN B. DILLON. 

Where shall the dead and the beautiful sleep ? 

Iu the vale where the willow and Cyprus weep ; 

Where the wind of the West breathes its softest sigh ; 

Where the silvery stream is flowing nigh, 

And the pure, dear drops of its rising sprays 
Glitter like gems in the bright moon’s rays — 

Where the sun’s warm smile may never dispel 
Night’s tears o’er the form we loved so well — 

In the vale where the sparkling waters flow ; 

Where the fairest, earliest violets grow ; 

Where the sky and the earth are softly fair, 

Bury her there, bury her there ! 

Where shall the dead and the beautiful sleep ? 

Where wild flowers bloom in the valley deep ; 

Where the sweet robes of spring may softly rest 
In purity over the sleeper’s breast; 

Where is heard the voice of the sinless dove, 

Breathing notes of deep and undying love ; 

Where no column proud in the sun may glow, 

To mock the heart that is resting below ; 

Where pure hearts are sleeping, forever blest ; 

Where wandering Peris love to rest; 

Where the sky and the earth are softly fail - , 

Bury her there, bury her there ! 












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LIBRARY BINDERY 
COMPANY 
OF INDIANA, INC. 


546 SOUTH 
MERIDIAN STREET 
INDIANAPOLIS 


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