Skip to main content

Full text of "The Stranger 2015-05-13 (volume 24, issue 37)"

See other formats


I’VE BEEN THINKING ABOUT DAD BODS ALL DAY, I’M NOT GONNA LIE, 





EATTLE 















2 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 






















































THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 3 



LEGAL MARIJUANA I NO MEDICAL CARD NEEDED 121+ 


I FLOWER I OIL I INFUSIONS I CBD’S I PRE-ROLLS 

15029 AURORA AVE N1206.402.40391 DOCKSIDECANNABIS.COM 


$igh, Qtanclakdi,. 


dockside 

cannabis 


This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and 
judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with 
consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children. 



Our Signature Solitaire 

(also available in Platinum) 


Open stvw dap a week. 


f 


TUIKION^RAINf 

1407 FIFTH AVENUE I FlRH ft UWION l SEATTLE. WA 381 &1 | 20644? .3488 
Lyrgeonraine.com 



oetp ROOTS 

TATTOO & BODY PIERCING 



SEATTLE LYNNWOOD BELLEVUE 

206 . 633.2639 425 . 774.7668 425 . 453.5244 

O DEEPR00TSTATT00.COM 


























4 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 



To find out when this film (and all the others) are screening, check out our 


The Madeleine Albright Collection 


SIFF Guide in this issue (and online at thestranger.com/siff). 


THRU JUNE7 

■ W ampmrt U*i H 


* m i*M i cl 

BELLEVUE ARTS MUSEUM 


to(\ ^ 


L-. Vm -jf J¥ti 

rtilU h & ^ r-Tg h«- g rsnip-n rf 


Fred Meyer Jewelers 1 



VncfoMeb N>T SHOP 

■=CHEAF POT 

$8 GRAM!!! 

**** EVERYDAY!**** 

4-JOINT PACKS..$28 

by LiF* Gardeot - Many Slroam Avrilabl* ■ Em*h H-igh Ci-DS 

C AK-47 31 %THC.1 g$ 15 

■ by Kush Forms 

ACTIVE THC CAPSULES 30mc $22 

Saliva and" flndka by Fairwinds 

BROWNIES.. 10mg$12 

Single Sfirvmg Browns by SPOT ill Sahvtt or Indica 

rfjjgfc HIGH CBD CARTRIDGE.. .0.5g$66 

H-^rliquin and Sdur Tsynorni by Evcrgr<m-n 

1 1 PURE C02 CARTRIDGE 0.5g$57 

Space Quern by Aviuj* 

Z3FI0 * UNION * CHEAPEST+CLOSEST TO DQIMEtUIN * MLEIKESWTSffflPCQM 

Fr« Packing | Open 7 Doyi | Do£-F<rlHid^ J He Madkal Card Nesdfld | 21 + 

ICH> Irtn j « anrW iSfjibn Li t i hFG i 

N J+nini ^iiJi hMfltnsW *ut p) h,gdkr, ! ’u-iM l ^u™ 

H*r.i !*t WW, ■ V rm^whnrh^hi iH-r WH k 



LAST DAYS.7 

NEWS.9 

STRANGER SUGGESTS.15 

ARTS.17 

CHOW.18 

MUSIC.21 

FILM.33 

I V TELEVISION.33 

COMIC.35 

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY.35 

CLASSIFIEDS.36 

SAVAGE LOVE.38 

THE HIGH LIST.39 


COVER ART 

By TYLER SPANGLER 

See more of Tyler’s work at 
tylerspangler.com. 


Editorial 

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Dan Savage 
EDITOR IN CHIEF Christopher Frizzelle 
MANAGING EDITOR Kathleen Richards 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Eli Sanders 
ARTS EDITOR Sean Nelson 
INCOMING MUSIC EDITOR (HI!) Lindsay Hood 
OUTGOING MUSIC EDITOR (BYE!!!) Emily Nokes 
VISUAL ART EDITOR Jen Graves 
FILM EDITOR Charles Mudede 
THEATER EDITOR Brendan Kiley 
FOOD WRITER Angela Garbes 
STAFF WRITERS Sydney Brownstone, Heidi Groover, Ansel 
Herz, Dave Segal 
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Kelly 0 
SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER Zachary Peacock 
CALENDAR EDITOR Krishanu Ray 
MUSIC CALENDAR EDITOR Kyle Fleck 
COPY CHIEF Gillian Anderson 
COPY EDITOR Katie Allison 
COLUMNISTS Wm.™ Steven Humphrey, Larry Mizell Jr., 
Trent Moorman, Adrian Ryan 

Art & Production 

ART DIRECTOR Aaron Huffman 

PRODUCTION MANAGER Erica Tarrant 
EDITORIAL DESIGNERS Mike Force, Mary Traverse 
SENIOR AD DESIGNER Mary Traverse 
AD DESIGNERS Chelcie Blackmun, Joel Schomberg, Shena 
Smith-Connolly 

Advertising 

SALES DIRECTOR Carol Cummins 
SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Ben Demar, Katie Phoenix 
SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE/THEATER Juliette Brush-Hoover 


SENIOR ENTERTAINMENT ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Cheree Best 

DISPLAY ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Devin Bannon, Liz Hill 

SENIOR CLASSIFIEDS ACCOUNT 

EXECUTIVE Bobby Anderson 

SALES OPERATIONS MANAGERTaffy Marler 

Marketing/Promotions/Personals 

READER INTERACTIVE DIRECTOR Nancy Hartunian 
LOVELAB/LUSTLAB Bobby Anderson 

Business 

GENERAL MANAGER Laurie Saito 
CFO Rob Crocker 
CREDIT MANAGER Tracey Cataldo 
ACCOUNTING MANAGER Renee Krulich 
RECEPTIONIST Mike Nipper 
OFFICE MANAGER Evanne Hall 

Technology and Development 

CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICERAnthony Hecht 
IT COORDINATOR Erin Resso 
LEAD DEVELOPER Jay Jansheski 

DEVELOPERS Brenn Berliner, Michael Crowl, Nick Nelson 

Bold Type Tickets 

PRODUCT MANAGER Ryan Sparks 
CUSTOMER SERVICE MANAGERKatrina Hirsch 
CUSTOMER SERVICE Grant Hendrix 
EQUIPMENT WRANGLERKevin Shurtluff 

Circulation 

CIRCULATION MANAGER Kevin Shurtluff 
CIRCULATION ASSISTANT Paul Kavanagh 

PUBLISHER Tim Keck 


Find podcasts, videos, blogs, MP3s, free 
classifieds, personals, contests, sexy ads, 
and more on The Stranger’s website. 


theStrangcr.com 


the STRANGER 1535 11th Avenue, Third Floor, Seattle, WA 98122 
VOICE (206) 323-7101 FAX (206) 323-7203 SALES FAX (206) 325-1*865 
HOURS Mon-Fri, 9 am-5:30 pm e-mail editor@thestranger.com 



LM VERIFIED 

■ ■ w.rii ■: Fa - 1 _ a: fa. 








































THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 5 




©U 

NW NEW WORKS 
FESTIVAL 


TWO WEEKENDS. 
TWO STAGES. 


JUN 5 - 7 & 12 - 14 % 


WEEKEND ONE 

Violets on Smoke 1 theater/music 
Faith Helma | theater 
Markeith Wiley | dance 
Nancy Ellis | dance 


Travis Clarke & Benjamin Kami no | performance art 
LED | DANCE 

Members of Seattle Irish Dance Company j dance 
Jessica Johans & General Magic [ dance/theater 


WEEKEND TWO 

Antoinette Bianco & Spike Friedman | theater 
Lucy Lee Yim | dance 
Dani Tirrell | dance 
Andrew Halienbeck | dance 

Adriana Hernandez | dance 
Tim Smith-Stewart | theater 
MascallDance | dance 
PE/MO I DANCE/THEATER 


$14 | f Showcase | $20 | 2 Showcases. 

$24 | 3 Showcases 1 530 | 4 Showcases 
Call Ihe box office for discounts I 206.217,9688 


INFO AND TICKETS @ ONTHEBOARDS.ORG 



0N™I 










6 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 


6 


* 



ip» ^ '■ 





r]S 



Wl 



JOHN FLUEVOG 




<4 





MAY 15™ 


INTERNATIONAL 

r FLUEYOG 









a 



ON INTERNATIONAL FLUEVOG DAY, FLUEVOGERS WILL REJOICE IN DEALS, FESTIVITIES 
AND GIVEAWAYS AT THEIR NEIGHBORHOOD FLUEVOG STORES. 



1 

A 


IN HONOR OF FLUEVOG’S 45™ YEAR IN BUSINESS, ONE VERY LIMITED EDITION 
SHOE, ‘THE 45' WILL BE RELEASED AND SOLD EXCLUSIVELY ON MAY 15™. 


r 




JOH N FLUEVOG Vs SEATTLE 205 PINE ST 206-4411065 FLUEVOG.COM 






THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 7 




The Week in Review by david schmader 


MONDAY, MAY 4 This week of diabolical 
taintings, criminally “cool” principals, and the 
return of America’s best rock band kicked off 
in the pages of the New York Times , as today 
the Times' editorial board came out swing¬ 
ing in support of transgender rights. “A 
generation ago, transgender Americans were 
widely regarded as deviants, unfit for dignified 
workplaces, a disgrace for families,” wrote the 
board in a full-page editorial. “Coming out 
meant going through life as a pariah.” Noting 
the heartbreakingly high rates of homeless¬ 
ness, joblessness, and suicide among transgen- 

EljciXcUf Ijork STuites 

TIMES FOR TRANS 

der people, even as network television earns 
blockbuster ratings with interviews of trans¬ 
gender celebrities, the Times declared: “Being 
transgender today remains unreasonably and 
unnecessarily hard. But it is far from hope¬ 
less... The tide is shifting, but far too slowly, 
while lives, careers, and dreams hang in the 
balance. This generation should be the one 
that stopped thinking that being transgender 
is something to fear or shun.” To quote God, 
“Fuck yeah.” 

TUESDAY, MAY 5 In worse news, the 
week continued with an unfortunate story 
out of Virginia, where a former lab worker 
has pleaded guilty to smearing a cowork¬ 
er’s computer mouse and desk chair with 

—tamimm - l 

To submit an unsigned confession or accusation, 

send an e-mail to ianonymous@thestranger.com. Please 
remember to change the names of the innocent and guilty. 



SUFFERING IS RELATIVE 

Dear Food-Court Vomitorium Mom: 
While I can appreciate the yuckiness of 
your experience at whatever consumer 
garbage disposal you were at with your 
son, I felt the urge to mention that your 
whines were published adjacent to a 
description of a woman who was raped 
by multiple predators while witnesses 
not only didn't help but actually re¬ 
corded the violent act on their phones. 

I walk around every day knowing that 
I screamed for help while a man sat 
on me, pounding my head into the 
concrete on Boren Avenue. I made eye 
contact with a man who did nothing. 
Sorry you might have to explain to your 
son that people are mean (#bullies) 
and buy him a soda, but no amount of 
high-fructose corn syrup will ever make 
me feel better. When the cops finally 
showed up, they had a ride-along in 
the front seat, so I got to sit in the back 
of the cop car like I was the criminal. 
Cherry on top: The cop had to borrow 
my pen to write the "report," then left 
me on the side of the road. 

—Anonymous 


contaminated feces. Details come from the 
Associated Press, which identifies the admit¬ 
ted feces-smearer as 31-year-old Andrea Ed¬ 
wards. “According to 
a criminal complaint, 
Edwards obtained a 
stool sample from 
a patient she had 
tested in the lab,” 
reported the AP “It 
had tested positive 
for a type of bacteria 
known to cause in¬ 
fection, diarrhea, 
stomach pain and 
death. The com¬ 
plaint says she took the sample from the lab 
to the office area and put it on the coworker’s 
mouse and chair.” Today, Edwards was given 
a two-year suspended sentence for her shitty 
crime, and will spend the next year on super¬ 
vised probation. 

• • Speaking of the inappropriate use of re¬ 
fuse, tomorrow in Maryland, 56-year-old Sarah 
P Schrock will be arrested on suspicion of serv¬ 
ing her family members milk laced with dead 
skin shavings from her feet. “Schrock was 
placed under arrest and transported to the 
St. Mary’s County Detention Center, where 
she was charged with poisoning/contaminating 
of food, three counts of assault, and failure to 
comply with a peace order,” reported Southern 
Maryland News Net. “The poisoning/contami¬ 
nating of food charge is a felony punishable by 
up to 25 years in jail.” 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6 In sexier news, 
the week continued in Palm Beach County, 
Florida, where this evening North Palm 
Beach Police were summoned to a parking 
lot by a call reporting “people in the back¬ 
seat engaged in some sort of sexual activ¬ 
ity or being attacked,” as police told WFLA 
News. The beguiling call was the tip of the 
humans-are-weird iceberg: Upon arriving at 
the vehicle reported as a sex and/or attack 
site, a sergeant knocked on the door and was 
greeted by Krista Morton, the 45-year-old 
principal of nearby Mavericks High School, 
whose shirt was unbuttoned to expose her 
shoulders and part of her chest, and who was 
reportedly enveloped in the smell of fresh- 
burned marijuana. Also found in the vehicle: 
a bag of weed and rolling papers and an 
18-year-old male. According to police, Morton 
initially tried to pass the 18-year-old off as a 
stranger she’d picked up on the street to help 
her quash her loneliness, but eventually the 
18-year-old acknowledged that he was a senior 
at Mavericks High School and Morton was his 
principal. Both Morton and the student were 
arrested for marijuana possession. 

THURSDAY, MAY 7 The week continued 
with some progress in the quest to sort out 
what the fuck’s wrong with Baltimore, as 
new US attorney general Loretta E. Lynch 
announced the launch of a federal investigation 
of the Baltimore Police Department—specifi¬ 
cally, whether the BPD has habitually engaged 
in excessive force. 

• • Speaking of the Baltimore Police De¬ 
partment’s alleged history of excessive force, 
tomorrow attorneys for the six Baltimore po¬ 
lice officers charged in the death of Freddie 
Gray will file a motion in Baltimore City Dis¬ 
trict Court, seeking to get the case dismissed 
or at least to have 

Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby 



NOW WITH 
SOMETHING 
EXTRA 


taken off the case. “The motion... says Mosby 
‘egregiously violated’ the officers’ rights to due 
process when she ‘publicly and with inciting 
rhetoric’ announced the case against the of¬ 
ficers by reading every word of the charging 
documents,” reported CNN. “The motion also 
says Mosby’s statements to the young people 
of Baltimore revealed her political and per¬ 
sonal motivation in the case and betrayed the 
US Constitution and ethical requirements of 
prosecutors. The motion calls for the case to be 
dismissed and, if not, for a special prosecutor 
to be appointed.” 

FRIDAY, MAY 8 In incalculably better 
news, tonight brought the second of three 
sold-out shows at Seattle’s Showbox by Sleat- 
er-Kinney, the Portland-based punk group 
composed of vocalist/guitarist Corin Tucker, 
guitarist/vocalist Carrie Brownstein, and 
drummer/vocalist Janet Weiss, who have non¬ 
chalantly held the title of America’s best rock 
band since at least 1997, when the ferocious 
Weiss replaced the band’s perfectly fine pre¬ 
vious drummers and Sleater-Kinney released 
their noisy joyride masterpiece Dig Me Out. 
Tonight at the Showbox, the reunited-after- 



A KILLER BAND WITH 
WELL-READ FANS 


a-10-year-hiatus band was joined by a fourth 
musician—Katie Harkin, who added an occa¬ 
sional guitar-based sound effect or keyboard 
line—and a packed house full of the happiest 
people on earth. Tearing through a set of de 
facto greatest hits drawn from all but one of 
the band’s releases, Sleater-Kinney displayed 
again and again the singular intensity—three 
voices, two guitars, one drummer—that ce¬ 
mented their stature as this country’s premier 
purveyors of the tangle of aggression, melody, 
and precision known as punk rock. Bonus: the 
stage set, starring a cloth backdrop cut with a 
hundred strategic slices, which just hung there 
until it was blasted with a fan and exploded 
into a hundred waving flags, not one the same 
as the next. Another bonus: a quote overheard 
by the Showbox employee checking bags at the 
door, who exclaimed, “There are more books 
at this show than any I’ve ever worked.” 
Thank you, Sleater-Kinney. 

SATURDAY, MAY 9 Speaking of praise¬ 
worthy doings in Seattle, today brought not 
one but two notable protests: the Black Lives 
Matter rally that saw dozens of protesters 
surrounding Safeco Field during tonight’s 
Mariners game, and the Cannabis Freedom 
March that rallied in Volunteer Park in sup¬ 
port of Initiative 648, which aims to protect 
existing medical marijuana rights in Wash¬ 
ington State. 

SUNDAY, MAY 10 This tumultuous week 
comes to an end with at least two causes for 
celebration: Mother’s Day (yay moms and all 
maternal figures!) and Prince’s Rally 4 Peace 
in Baltimore (yay Prince and all politically 
engaged artists!). ■ 

Send hot tips to lastdays@thestranger.com 
and follow me on Twitter @davidschmader. 


Skin-shavings-free milk at 

0 THESTRANGER.COM/SLOG 



TQWN‘HALL 


SEATTLE 




■JhI L I, I■_I rj■ ■ ll, HH .h.h 


(5/15) UW School of 
E nviro n menta 1a n d Forest 
Sciences presents 

The UW Climate Change Video 
Awards with Annie Leonard 


the GOLDEN 
DRAGON WATER 
PUPPETTHEATRE 


df SAIGON 




(5/16) P550 presents 

Spring Concert 

15/171 Seattle Festrral Orchestra: 

Bienvenue en France! 

15/181 ParentMap presents 

'Having It Alt’ Film Premiere 

(5/181 ParentMap presents 
John Got (man 
Making Love Last and 
Marriage Work 

(5/18] World Science Festival 
Watch Party 
at Ada s Technical Books 


[5/17) Saigon’s Golden Dragon 
Water Puppet Theatre 

Bonus Matinee Performances! 

(5/20) KUOW presents 
David Barsamian 
Terrorism, Propaganda, 
and US Middle Eastern Policy 

[5/20) Ignite! Seattle 27 

(5/213 Martin Ford 

How to Stop Robots From 
Stealing Jobs 

E 5/221 Camp Jitterbug presents 
Jump Session Show 

L 5/2 6 3 Seattle Atheists: 
Rebecca Vitsmun 
Building A Humanist Disaster 
Recovery Team 

(5/27) Eugenia Cheng 
'Howto Bake Pi' 

[5/23| Richard Thaler wi t h 
Nathan Myhrvold 
Human Error, Redefining 
Behavioral Economics 


3 Sc 


WWW, TOWN HALLSEATTLE. 0 RG 

I... I ■l.llll.U ,U 















































8 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 



fiEE wheel 


BIKE WORKS! 


Ca^l^lirn i y hVc Shop 

We are a 1'j:l ^■r r v=M ComiJI^nity 
Gih d Shop and arc open daily. Our 
pn&OeftdS berltfftl our [SfdgdimKi 


Vo-vln i Fro 
We "-aye prapwraning for youm 

iird iicLi^ 


Adults tan lafca bike repair classes 
ard volunteer for Bike Works, 


YoulSi c£ii barn-a-Biku. id 
eumji'iej ttto louf qp camp, join 
a nc ng club or participate in Job 
Skills Iralniiq. 


/i'e ■ av- : . i BikaMotiile (riiir nn-:, 
t^e repair lipok) lha" can >151“ 
your rwiflhboiJwod, yout campa^, 
Crir special evartf & 


E c y c r S^cy- -j 
We accept draUflU of used fchkus 

cu d t;-kFj aCEflS&Qss&fi:. 


For ^ irfefp V «inri 

3 :at s r nr- ■ .iftd 

^-Jll W* 

IQK ??& ft&VF 


Ride Along > v @rreewheel p _cargo ■ www.ffeewheeEcafgD.com 


©Gregg’s C ycle,. 

ON^*^/^^Tarnil^wned since 1932 

www.greggscycles.com 


PEDAL POWER! 

Seattle Bike to Work Day 
Friday May 15 


Biking Across I-90 
Bike Trail? Stop By 

WEEKEND 


Emerald City Bike Lawyer 

Sean Kuhlmeyer - Attorney 


Talk to the lawyer who forced 

7 Seattle to fix the Burke Gilman trail. 

Free Consultation 

(206) 695-2568 
Sean@emeraldcitylawyer.com 
www.emeraldcitybikelawyer.com 

Helping Injured Cyclists Pursue Justice 


FREEWHEEL 

CARBON FREE CARGO 


RATED SEATTLE'S BEST BIKE SHOP 

Serving Seattle's Cycling Community for 83 Years and Counting! 


Deliver your products without the pollution. 




mm 


riders 


f SPECIALIZED 


ikes in Stock 
Seattle's Largest Clothing Selection 
Full-service professional repair shop 
Customized GURU DFU Bike Fitting 


' J 'MEIC cannondale 


Greenlake Bellevue Alderwood 
206 - 523-1822 425 - 462-1900 425 - 248-4842 









































JJUVI-4 FEATURE SUGGESTS ARTS CHOW MUSIC FILM 


THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 9 



NEWS 


Why Is Jean Godden Running for 
Another Term on the City Council? 
She Doesn’t Seem to Know. 

BY HEIDI GROOVER 

I n a lifeless beige room, Mayor Ed Murray is on a tear brag¬ 
ging about his first year in office. “One of the things that I 
wanted to do when I became mayor of Seattle,” he says, “was to 


show that progressives, people who are lib¬ 
erals, people who are Democrats, can work 
together and show the rest of the country and 
the rest of the state how progressives can get 
things done.” 

It’s at this point—as a projector paints a 
far wall with photos of 83-year-old city coun¬ 
cil member Jean Godden—that Murray tells 
the small crowd why his own success was 
possible. 

“Because of Jean’s style— 
her toughness, her willingness 
to take risks, her willingness to 
compromise, her willingness to 
collaborate,” Murray says, “I 
think last year we showed that 
this is a progressive city that can 
show how progressives work to¬ 
gether and get things done.” 

He credits Godden for last 
year’s voter-approved parks dis¬ 
trict measure, universal pre-K, 
expanded bus service, and the 
big one: Seattle’s new minimum- 
wage increase. 

“We decided we were going to 
be the first city in America to ad¬ 
dress income inequality and raise 
the minimum wage,” Murray 
tells the people in the room, all of 
them gathered for the kickoff to 
Godden’s campaign for a fourth 
term. “And we did that because 
of Jean’s leadership.” 

Wait. What ? 

Godden wasn’t one of the 
three council members on the 
mayor’s minimum-wage commit¬ 
tee, which hashed out the deal. 

And while David Rolf, SEIU 775 
president and cochair of that 
committee, says Godden’s “vote 
for $15 was never in doubt,” he 
also says she “had the most con¬ 
servative voting profile of any 
council member,” supporting a tip credit, op¬ 
posing efforts to get rid of the lower training 
wage, and opposing the idea of moving the 
new wage implementation up from April to 
January. She is rarely—if ever—mentioned 
in the many reflections on how Seattle made 
history with $15. 

But this is how Jean Godden wins. Stay 
cordial, toe the middle line, only disagree 
when you’re not alone, and let everyone as¬ 
sume you’re further to the left than you 
actually are. Oh, and nod and smile when the 
mayor—currently your best political bud— 
claims you led the minimum-wage fight. 

It’s true that on her signature issue— 
gender pay equity—Godden has received 


praise for helping usher in a four-week paid 
parental-leave policy for city employees. 
“She fights for all of us and she wins,” Kris¬ 
tin Rowe-Finkbeiner, the fervent founder and 
director of the advocacy group MomsRising, 
tells the kickoff crowd. 

Yet Godden has no clear next step or new 
proposal in the ongoing fight for equity—or 
at least not one she’s articulating in her cam¬ 
paign for another term on the council. At a 


recent candidate forum, she appeared dis¬ 
tracted, stumbling over some of her answers. 
And on a March morning in the Starbucks 
high up in the Columbia Center, she sounded 
defensive when I asked why she’s running. 

“I’m running for reelection for the same 
reason that I ran in the first place,” Godden 
said. “To get some things done for the public. 
There are many things that are still remain¬ 
ing, and I’m not a quitter.” 

Nice phrases, but not very specific. 

Why, exactly, Godden is running, and why, 
exactly, she deserves another four years are 
questions worth asking. That’s less because of 
her age—she’ll be 84 on Election Day and 88 
at the end of another term—than because of 


her record, a mixed bag of calling for change 
and serving the status quo. Plus, on an increas¬ 
ingly divided council, and in a new district 
elections system inviting wholesale change, 
Godden’s race could be a bellwether for how 
incumbents are faring this election year. 

G odden is a well-known and likable pres¬ 
ence on the city council—familiar to 
many Seattle voters from her two decades as 
a newspaper columnist documenting gossip 
and city oddities. But during her time on the 
council, she’s also been criticized as a more 
conservative member who’s too beholden to 


moneyed interests. 

No current council members, nor recent¬ 
ly departed Sally Clark, would speak with 
The Stranger on the record about Godden. 
But sources inside and close to city hall who 
agreed to talk anonymously paint a portrait of 
a council member who’s well-intentioned but 
aloof, unpredictable, easily persuaded, and 
rarely willing to take a controversial stand if 
she’s in the minority. They have trouble think¬ 
ing of policies—other than that the recently 
passed parental-leave law—that Godden has 
truly championed or led on in her 11 years on 
the dais. 

Godden won’t concede her relevance quite 
so dramatically, but she characterizes her 


political style this way: “Sometimes you can 
lead more progressively by not being quite as 
loud.” 

Raised in a family that she says lived in 
more than 100 towns because of her dad’s job 
making maps for the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, Godden landed 
in Seattle in 1949. She got her journalism 
degree from the University of Washington in 
1974 and began her career editing and writ¬ 
ing columns at both daily newspapers—the 
Seattle Times and the now-online-only Seattle 
Post-Intelligencer. At the time she started in 
journalism, Seattle was climbing out of a Boe¬ 
ing bust and watching the birth of Microsoft, 
and was still three years out from having a 
professional baseball team. 

Godden was first elected to the council in 
2003, defeating Judy Nicastro, whom she told 
The Stranger at the time had “wasted good 
time” during her four years in office. 

A lifelong member of the Pacific Northwest 
Newspaper Guild, she’s dogged and heartfelt 
in her feminism, often recounting how she 
was paid less than her male colleagues at the 
PI or how a college adviser once told her “to 
forget my career in journalism because wom¬ 
en would never be allowed in the newsroom.” 

Back in 2005, as she voted against stiffer 
rules for strip clubs, including 
one requiring dancers to stay at 
least four feet from customers, 
Godden told her fellow council 
members that the proposal had 
“an element of paternalism.” 

“For far too long,” she said 
then, “men have tried to tell 
women what work they can do.” 

D uring her time on council, 
Godden has done some 
important work, overseeing 
City Light as it reduced mas¬ 
sive debt and chairing the budget 
committee during some of the 
worst years of the recession— 
from 2008 through 2011. She 
cosponsored sick and safe leave 
legislation and introduced a bill 
to keep the city from shutting 
off the water for nonpayment in 
homes with children. 

But these days, her conser¬ 
vative streak is becoming more 
obvious as some of the council’s 
most outspoken members, like 
Mike O’Brien and Kshama Sawa- 
nt, pull the council further left. So 
has her political partnership with 
Mayor Murray. In her campaign 
for reelection, Godden mentions 
the mayor’s plans for transpor¬ 
tation and affordable housing as 
often as she mentions her own. 
Meanwhile, she’s equivocating on some of the 
most controversial issues set to come before 
the council. 

“Jean has done a really good job for the 
city on a lot of issues, but the things I care 
about, the things the people of the Northeast 
care about, are not things she has spent a 
lot of time focusing on,” says Godden’s best- 
funded opponent in District 4, Rob Johnson, 
the 36-year-old executive director of the 
Transportation Choices Coalition. (What 
kinds of things? Expanding transit, designing 
bus and light-rail connections, and addressing 
the city’s carbon footprint.) 

Godden’s other main challenger, 33-year- 
old paralegal and parks activist Michael 



CITY OF SEATTLE 


BEST BUDS Three-term city council member Jean Godden with Mayor Ed Murray. Godden’s recent willingness to 
toe the mayor’s line is raising the question: What,, exactly ; are Godden’s own priorities in a fourth term? 




















10 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 



IN THE 12TH AVENUE ARTS BUILDING 

We've now brought our fresh hand-made Japanese noodle expertise, quick 
and casual service style, and best value to the Capitol Hill district. Get your 
fresh noodles and arts in one place! Cap Hill location serves beer and sake. 

1640 12th Ave., Seattle, WA 98122 
FOR MORE UPDATES: WWW.FRESHUDON.COM 


SAT MAY 33RD 0-00 S ; 0(> 

TATTOO FOR NEPAL 



NEPAL EARTHQUAKE RELIEF 
GET THAT TATTOO YOU ALWAYS 
WANTED AND % 100 WILL GO TO 
HELP THE PEOPLE OF NEPAL. 

SOCIAL SKINS TATTOO 

60S K ROADWAY E, SEATTLE WA, 98102 
(206)325-6161 


Launch Your Career 
With the Peace Corps 


Lunchtime Information Session 

Thursday, May 21 
12 to 1 p.m. 

Peace Corps Seattle Office 
Westlake Tower Building 
1601 Fifth Avenue, Suite 60S 


Returned Peace turps Vblu nteer Stephanie JJys wil I discu ss how you 
can make a dLFfcrrnrc overseas and return homo with the experience 
and £Lflhai perspective to stand out in a competitive joh market. 

Life is tailing, How far wifi you go? 



85S.85S.1961 | www,peacecorps,gov 


Maddux, is less diplomatic. 

“We’re going on 11 and a quarter years 
she’s been on council, and what have we 
seen out of that?... She doesn’t do anything,” 
Maddux says. “The big difference I really see 
right now is some of us come to the table with 
ideas, and other people come to the table say¬ 
ing whatever the mayor says.” 

C athy Allen, Godden’s longtime friend 
and campaign consultant, bristles at 
the characterization that the council member 
is relying too heavily on Murray. 

“Why is it that if a woman tends to agree 
with someone in a position like Ed’s, that 
all of a sudden she’s leaning on him, follow¬ 
ing him, and not showing leadership?” Allen 
says. “There’s a little bit of sexism there. Just 
because she thinks [his positions are] good 
doesn’t mean she’s not showing leadership.” 

But there’s no denying where Godden falls 
on the council’s current political spectrum. 

In 2010, she supported a six-lane replace¬ 
ment of the 520 bridge, despite concerns that 
the design wouldn’t adequately accommodate 
light rail. In 2011, she supported a lower car- 
tab fee than some of her colleagues, with 
more of that money going to roads and less to 
transit. She supported the downtown tunnel 
project and voted for a controversial anti-pan¬ 
handling bill in 2010 that would have added a 
new civil penalty for “intimidating conduct” 
while soliciting (at a time when panhandling 
was already a criminal offense). Then mayor 
Mike McGinn later vetoed that bill. 

“In my experience as mayor,” says McGinn, 
who had a famously tenuous relationship with 
the city council during his time in office, “she 
was always a very reliable supporter of what 
the downtown interests wanted.” 

In 2013, Godden opposed a proposal from 
Council Member Nick Licata to allow more 
regulated homeless encampments, only to 
come around on the issue this year, once 
Murray was proposing it and the council 
makeup had shifted to a majority in favor of 
encampments. 

In the process 
of supporting that 
piece of legislation, 
she was an obstacle 
to a stronger bill. 

The proposal, draft¬ 
ed by the mayor’s 
office, didn’t allow 
encampments in 
residential zones, so 
Sawant introduced 
an amendment to 
study the possibility 
of someday allowing them in those areas. (It’s 
worth reiterating: This was just a study. The 
council would have had to vote again down 
the road to actually allow encampments in 
residential areas.) 

Murray opposed that change, so he con¬ 
tacted council members and—despite having 
not engaged on this issue at previous meet¬ 
ings—Godden showed up and cast a vote to 
kill the amendment (it was later revived). 
Ahead of the vote, when O’Brien asked God¬ 
den if she had any comments, she replied, 
“Nothing in particular, just wanted to be part 
of the decision making.” 

Godden told The Stranger afterward 
that she opposes encampments in residen¬ 
tial areas because they’re already allowed 
on church land, which is often in residential 
neighborhoods. She said she wasn’t in her of¬ 
fice when the mayor called about the vote, but 
“it was relayed to me it was an important is¬ 
sue and one should go and check it out.” 
Right. 

E ven if Godden is ready to fall in line 
behind Murray on things like encamp¬ 
ments, that shouldn’t stop her from making 
progress on her signature issue—gender pay 


equity—which the mayor has said he sees as 
a priority. (Whether he’s demonstrated that 
is for another time.) 

Yet there her effect has been limited, too. 
After a 2013 report from the National Part¬ 
nership for Women & Families found that 
Seattle had the worst pay gap among the 
50 largest metro areas in the country, and 
a follow-up city study showed that women 
employed by the city were paid 9.5 percent 
less than men, Godden loudened her call for 
equity. During last year’s budgeting process, 
she introduced an amendment to add partial 
funding for paid parental leave, anticipating 
that policy would come along this year. And, 
indeed, she introduced that policy with the 
mayor in February and ushered it through 
her committee last month. 

But even Godden admits four weeks of 
paid parental leave—far less than other 
countries and some other cities offer—is not 
enough. She and other supporters framed 
this as the best the city could do right now. 
What comes next? Godden praises efforts 
in Olympia and Washington, DC, to protect 
from retaliation employees who ask about or 
share salary information, but she’s vague on 
what she will or can do from the city council. 

Meanwhile, Morgan Beach, a member of 
the Seattle Women’s Commission and first¬ 
time candidate for a different city council 
district than Godden, is lapping the veteran 
council member with specifics. Beach is cam¬ 
paigning on expanding the new parental leave 
policy to 12 weeks and pitching three other 
ideas: a city fund to help small businesses of¬ 
fer parental leave, allowing child-care centers 
in residential areas, and creating a program 
similar to one in Boston, where some private 
companies anonymously provide data about 
how much their employees are paid broken 
down by gender and other factors. 

“You’ll never hear me say she’s not doing 
anything,” Beach says of Godden, “because 
she’s bringing it up and focusing on these 
things and that keeps it top of mind for 
people. That said, 
I want to be more 
bold and go further.” 

A t that forum 
in which God¬ 
den stumbled, held 
on an April eve¬ 
ning at Roosevelt 
High School, she 
refused to defini¬ 
tively answer yes or 
no questions about 
three issues before 
the city right now: rent control, a newly pro¬ 
posed public campaign-financing measure, 
and whether dilapidated slumlord properties 
near Roosevelt High School should be turned 
into a park. 

Godden attended a city press conference 
in March—with the mayor, naturally—at 
which the city unveiled its plan for a park 
on the slumlord property. Then she backed 
off when controversy arose about whether it 
should have been used for affordable housing 
instead (and when the mayor said he would 
reconsider the park proposal). Now, she says 
“affordable housing is certainly a good sug¬ 
gestion, and I also like the idea of having 
open space.” 

She also now says that she’s met with 
organizers of that newly proposed public 
campaign-financing measure since the Roos¬ 
evelt forum and does, indeed, support it. But 
her overall record on public campaign financ¬ 
ing is mixed, supporting one effort in 2013 
and blocking another last year. 

Rent control is currently banned under 
state law, but Sawant and Licata are propos¬ 
ing a resolution asking the state to lift the 
ban. Here’s how Godden characterizes her 
position on that: “What I am in favor of is 


This is how Jean Godden 
wins: Stay cordial, toe the 
middle line, only disagree 
when you’re not alone, 
and let everyone assume 
you’re further to the left 
than you actually are. 
















i?UVi-4 FEATURE SUGGESTS ARTS CHOW MUSIC FILM 


THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 11 


RALLY 


Pe-£(eest KSHAMA 

SAWANT 


FEATURING 


cnm HEDGES 


SATURDAY 

JUNE 6 6:30 PM 


TOWN HALL 

SEATTLE 

8 th AVE & SENECA 



www.KSHAMASAWANT.ORG 

hi Vote Sawant © 206-486-0099 U@VoteSawant 


Pulitzer Prize-Winning 
Reporter and Columnist 




Q 


JILL STEIN 

2012 Green Party 
Presidential Candidate 


PRAMILA JAYAPAL 

Washington State Senator 



DAVID ROLF 



President of SEIU 775 


DUSTIN WASHINGTON 

Anti-Racist Community Organizer 

CHRISTOS GIOVANOPOULOS 

Syriza, an Anti-Austerity Party 
Recently Elected in Greece 


Paid for by Vote Sawant P.O. Box 85862 Seattle WA, 98145 




Seattle's neigh bar hood destination for 
quality recreational cannabis 

Wfwchw your* a f«te lon^canr^sseur orsafnplln^ first iw. owucen 
to Ittvfi you Cttfrte \^a L UM Odf MfcUdly kiWw -djiu;iUI* vlbill tup^CCi he^iv&J 
firetn product thafi Just lot you Qpr.n emy 



Bondi Farm5 Feature | Friday. May 15 14pm 

Meet the expert growers from Ekmrfi FarmsJ 
Exclusive Special: A premium strabns jusl $5 for 1 gram" 

6 kft J drjnfl |l>4cly t Apmt O^npp j Sujw' Ljmtf" Mi,v 

rthik KMP|rfi£« l«t LiI 1 pfcftlii tO*Ti£f. 



r=i;ni|Hi| 

Trrjf 




KltiU 


N NkmKlN^ 


Stone Way N, Seattle 0M) 946- 815 7 | seattleha ^htag.com 


Tim. pnvAu: I ki-i i^siui ^!i:ii, *0 »-.i. fc* fulHl hcnu - a M2-ia_uili* c Ah I- p.ia turn -- 11 1 : ! i . i■ i 

CWilnuiun. +--■? IJdtffernrr .1 Dt; r&ente A VfWt lc cr rauii.lvcifry i.Tidp liug ol IliK- Ct-UR 

1 'i: i ■ mj-fla IVjI !irr.« . : - 11!" i..i:.. . - 1 1 , rf -.,e i ■ ■- “ I. - . |. : -V,« ! F-trt in ti i , . . JtiUli _ 1 m \‘. 

-‘nr. Rmd out o# rr«h of thta VW* ll* Si 15S 























12 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 



ntKifKfAl-^11-liWI I'ki'IFc C & '\ III I llh.=■'IKSETITIH'l l±f. I'RISRNT 



How to Meet People 

A PrtKiKtf Guide xo Creating Rewarding PenwKti Reiatittnsfrip; A 

Wflh W*tv TTnOibn. U»W 


K 


May 30 9[3UaM-4pm $120 

UlKeridlte tlliTNle, i IHU Mtnn AvtPil. SeoJLlle 
bm^Ti fujie rl kteLsjCftm/Gvcult/ ] 

»piur rUTFLlY. 7Hf ft kTtlffftrJinrviJiM 

info. W w w„ ni Ur vt h i hti u s.r 11 rn 


-VAPOR-r 

Experienced staff to help beginners 
Large selection of flavors and hardware 
Gift Certificates Available 
Locally owned 

FUTURE-VAPOR.COM 

Hours: Mon-Fri 10-g | Sat-Sun 11-8 | 18+ 

206.323.9654 

1828 B 12th Ave Seattle, WA 98122 
2 and a half blocks North of Pine St 



51 MIDDLE WAY 

" ACUPUNCTURE INSTITUTE 


New Class Starts Every September 


*• Monthly Weekend-intensive Format 
*• Small Classes 
*• Nature-based Curriculum 
^•Classical-inspired 5 Element Acupuncture 
^Traditional Chinese Medicine Acupuncture 

360.336.6129 

www.middlewayacupuncture.com B^uke 



BLOEDEL 

RESERVE* 


“Americas Greatest Lawn” 
-WeSeedAmerica.com 



SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL BEERFEST 
NEEDS VOLUNTEERS JULY 10-12. 

seattlebeerfest.com 

for more info. 


DEVELOP YOUR ENGLISH SKILLS 


doing those things we can do now... I will 
have to look and see what [the resolution] 
says. Last time I looked at it, it seemed to 
be awfully broad. I want to make sure it’s a 
little less broad, so what we can say is we 
want local control.” 

“She tries to be all things to all people,” 
says political consultant John Wyble, who’s 
working on Maddux’s campaign. “You al¬ 
ways get these comments from people that 
she’s been there too long or she’s too old. I 
think that stuff’s ridiculous. It’s really: Is 
she the kind of council member you want? 
Is she consistently progressive? And I don’t 
think she is.” 

So where does all of this leave Godden? 

In the city’s new districting system, 
she’s pitching herself to a subset of voters 
who know her name well and have elected 
her to office in the past. District 4 covers an 
area from Lake Union up to Sand Point, in¬ 
cluding the University District and most of 
Wallingford, a swath of the city that Ben An- 
derstone calls “a swing district, and a very 
polarized one.” 

Anderstone, a political consultant at Pro¬ 
gressive Strategies Northwest who isn’t 
working on any current Seattle council 
races, frames the “two-step” Godden will 
have to do in her district in order to strike 
a balance between very progressive rent¬ 
ers or homeowners in areas like Wallingford 
and the wealthy, conservative homeowners 
elsewhere in the district—for whom voting 


Godden has no clear 
next step or new 
proposal in the ongoing 
fight for gender pay 
equity—or at least not 
one she’s articulating 
in her campaign for 
another term. 


FOR A CAREER IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 


Full scholarships are available 

for U.S. citizens with a college degree 
who are native speakers of 

Amharic • Arabic • Balochi • Bambara • Dari 
Hausa • Hindi • Kazakh • Kurdish • Kyrgyz 
Mandarin Chinese • Pashto • Persian Farsi 
Punjabi • Somali • Tajik • Tamashek 
Turkish • Urdu • Uzbek • Yoruba 

Online information sessions 

Thursday, May 21 • 2:00-3:00 p.m. PDT 
Understanding the Service Requirement 

Wednesday, June 3 • 1:00-2:00 p.m. PDT 
General Information 

Tuesday, June 23 • 9:00-10:00 a.m. PDT 
The Online Application 

More information at www.ehlsprogram.org 

Application deadline: July 13 


£ C|_|| O GEORGETOWN —^ National Security 

4Y* L n LO UNIVERSITY nsep Education Program 



against tent encampments in residential 
areas, for example, is the perfect move. It’s 
the latter who will likely decide the August 
primary, but the more diverse set that will 
vote in November. 

“That’s why Godden is wise to raise is¬ 
sues like gender pay equity,” Anderstone 
says in an e-mail. “It appeals to progressives 
without alienating those more moderate vot¬ 
ers.” It may also be why she is being so fuzzy 
on certain issues—like rent control—that 
stand to split hardcore progressives from 
more moderate progressives. 

Whether that’s working—well, it’s still 
too soon to tell. Last month, in a straw poll 
conducted by the 43rd District Democrats, it 
didn’t look good. Godden came in dead last. 

Maddux, who has strong ties to the party, 
took first, followed by Johnson, and then a 
third challenger, neighborhood activist Tony 
Pro vine. 

Of course, Godden is still ahead in the 
money race with $71,000—that’s $25,400 
more than Johnson and five times as much 
as Maddux. And straw polls are imprecise. 
(As the P/’s Joel Connelly confusingly wrote 
afterward, “Straw polls can be straws in the 
wind, and they can blow away.” What the 
fuck, Joel?) Still, at this early stage in the 
campaign, it appears Godden’s relevance 
could be waning and that her vagueness on 
so many issues—whether strategic or dispo¬ 
sitional—isn’t serving her well. 

Instead, it’s raising new questions: What 
has Godden actually accomplished in her 
three terms on the council? And if voters 
hand her another term, what is she pledging 
to do with it? Godden herself doesn’t seem 
to know. ■ 





























JEHVJ-4 FEATURE SUGGESTS ARTS CHOW MUSIC FILM 


THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 13 





WOULD 


AWARDS 


wOM Lb t 
HIM 




*■ nr-,1 



Knc£e&k& 


POT SHOP 


CHEAP POT 


••■HOME OF THE*** 

$8 GRAM!!! 






lbic£e£k& 


SPRING SALE 


Spo^igl K &\ny\ ■ Gandingj! Glg-1? 
Royals Glrj!,:. * Hippo Glmi 
HilflWafl Glkaii • W&Qtht+t Glaii 
Sai^uQicSi Glau * Kind TpTO^ t 5 ro>U T-roy 
PaM&ig- Pinio^irfii. App-snil 

Grn«n Arbor Cfcgfhirag 
iMir.i Nidi Enok! * Newport Torchtis 
Eli opn Vfipfl 4 -ih-l 


Wfafc £tyipffa\, Iga? 

EVERYTHING YOU NEED IN ONE STOP! 


?3H0 * UftIBFf * CHEAPEST+CLOSEST TO OQItfKJQRIN * 1JNCLELKESP0TS^]P.CDh| 

Frfro Poi-kirrg | Gp*fi. 7 Doyi I Daa-Ffiofidly { Nd Mb^oI Cord Ns^dad | 21 + 

Ti W* Tw p ■U'k kiHLw c- i-o.- ■ ■nri.' wi^ir ■ Iw sprm ■.•vm ra.^i'i ■ Aa 

haTfau dta r*f, hnoj »vxri isumd .4 au^ia d^vaiu vwl|^iH%uiffikr kapjo'ddy kefJ ttaw 'hip mumm 
Jrih !■ BL '^a'M ■ vpdAiHH p iutVii iriijl^hfu Va kfa! ¥m wa^^n IWp| mb ypb.K 








fcjfltll 

DFLLStlBHAMANTAM 

'mwmmz 

ABU MUHAMMAD 

SipTH-lA 

mi 

fcpijti 

DAKHAERAKUA 

(hi (3 

SAHKAliUXU 

(kitf 

CAMIH'jU iSPOSITO 

lki73 

W’JJDSE LJVE ANY WftY ? 

Dtili 

[IftOEft JOE’S 
SILENT «MD«THE 
CABINET OF D1 CAL E ARL 

Dr! 2 ? 

SHAPifJEf S0UN0 


IIVEfiSAEV 

HwM. 

IF/THEfl 


tl*r l¥ 

lilARK 0XONILQR S 
AN APPALACHIAN 
tiiiis 

BwH-Jm HI 

THE BOOK CP MORMON 

STOMP 

MU 

BULLETS OVER BHflAM 

SOTEfllMlMSTHA 
PERFORMS iYUTOWJ 

Mi . 

THE JUT!IS FAMILY SIMjFRE 

Jtb¥ 

PUS&V RlOt: A 
MRS™ 

AND EDIDMENTAHY- 
StREEfiflG 

Mir 

DREGcav paamt 

MTfl 

KRQfiRSDUARlEI 


HuX 

STARBUCKS 
HOT JAVA mi JAZZ 

Mffll Ip l 

BLUE MAN GROUP 

AHAMEFUEEOLUO- 

HOWrWfWE 

Iffb 

TAfiVATAJ&AQ Prnsiinis 
riA'iUHK DF niirJtiSTH 

Hffi 

STAR THFK: 

THE UOiMATEVffVAGE 

i^u-ir 

AWAlLEYAMe™ 

OAnCETHfATtit 


fyil-tiatl 

DISC'S newsies 


IWt (3 

GtOUAL PARTY 
ilsv20tt 

MAJK h .- r GPFIl£ DANCE 
GROUP 

HimtJ 

SNARKY PUPPY 


MM3 

NETvrftk-: presents 
DrSFifVS BEAUTY AfJDTHE 
BEAST 

Dr U 

MVTH9USTERS 

JAMIE K ASAM UNLEASHED 


iaa 

TRADER* 

mbit movie mnm: 

EEtJ HURfA TAtlOFTBE 
Chii'ST wlili StEhvan 
Copeland' 

JfarA 

JDSE GONZALEZ AND 
VMUSIG 

ferC-13 

.lERElYRH^ 

JiLii IS&t¥ 

KIDD FIV0TMICMIC 
CQ.YiPANi THEATRE - 
EETROtJENHEIT 


SEATTLE RDCK ORCHESTRA 
PERFORMS fJEH DIAMOND 

*Uff3 

SOUND OPTIONS LIVE 

yefSHuulT 

MOTO'A'.'J THE MUSICAL 

ton 13‘7? 

TFtABf JE JOE'S 
SILENT MOVIE MOTi DAYS 
FLAPPER ERA SERIES 

JsFfHT 

IBTH ANNUAL DANE! THIS 


<• • 1“ 



S!!H[ mt\ smimm sms oh build yooh am at 

JUS UP STGPfiESEHTS.ORG/SEASflW OR CALL (206) B 12-tl M 





llj^nai "‘i rE*x mi - 

ijjtnj $EjfM friWffld^REH™c *■ 


1 liirl I I PliFIda 










































14 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 



Music ■ Gaines * Prizes 
Food Specials ■ Beer * Wine * Cocktails 


SEATTLE CENTER ARMORY 


MtHUR3DW»Wt(ttMLmn 


seattlecenter. com 


PARTY 


rP*'Mobile*' 


seaitlecenter 

foundation 


% 

iL lIh *J-HmJ|h 


@ 

seattletenter 


rfc-raz/djrp.i iL-ni ™ cbi^pK | Mom =dncmMlmi u nMCh^Tn b mIi J m m bi i mu 

CUH S, 5***±V WHMl« 1 vklhin 



Our own frame line... 

Gus is wearing the “Lenin. 















































THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 15 


STRANGERSUGGESTS 


SO MUCH MORE AT 

THESTRANGER.COM/EVENTS 



Peter Brotzmann Trio -DS9 


lt f s not every day Seattle gets a band as 
potent with free-jazz firepower as this one, 
so thanks. Earshot. Peter Brotzmann is the 
74-year-old German saxophonist famous for 
his cyclonic robustness and radical tonal 
range, and a 48-year career of life-enhanc¬ 
ing albums and live performances in many 
contexts. His American bandmates tonight— 
drummer Hamid Drake and bassist William 
Parker—have their own storied discographies 
and would be worth the price of admission on their own. Both are supremely 
versatile players ideally equipped to provide inventive ballast for 
Brotzmann's bold flights of feral fancy. ( Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave, 
earshot.org, 8 pm, $18, all ages) DAVE SEGAL 



Columbia City 
Farmers Market HB9 

We're lucky to have a few farmers markets that stay open year-round 
in Seattle, but there's a different energy to the smaller neighbor¬ 
hood ones starting up again. My favorite is Columbia City, open today 
for just the second time this year: multigenerational families —East 
African, Caucasian, Latino, African American, and Asian—packed into 
two blocks just off of Rainier Avenue, buying produce, cheese, and 
other treats. Currently a massive PCC supermarket is under construc¬ 
tion on the same street. While the two might make good neighbors, 
this is the last year to enjoy the market's distinct charm before big 
change comes to its home on Edmunds Street. (Columbia City Farm¬ 
ers Market; 37th Ave S & S Edmunds St, seattlefarmersmarkets.org; 

3-7pm, every Wednesday) ANGELA GARBES 


tssw 


‘Imminent Mode’ -nan 


More often than not, much of Capitol Hill's monthly art walk is composed of two-dimensional works—paintings, photography, and screen prints. Tonight at 
True Love Gallery (known for showcasing queer artists), there's an art opening that features an entirely uncommon medium—CLOTHING. Imminent Mode 
is the name of a new series of shows to be curated in 2015 by local singer/performer/actor Ade Connere. The first installment marries five local fashion 
designers with five local fine artists. The end result of the five collaborations will be pieces of ''wearable art." Why not paint on textiles? And, for once, 
picture frames be damned! ( True Love Gallery, 1525 Summit Ave, trueloveart.com, 6-10 pm, free, through June 7) KELLY O 


Linda Davidson, 
SayaMoriyasu -B 

I When Seattle painter Linda Davidson gives you a look at something 
she's seen—a road at night, curving and disappearing; a rainbow 
arcing down from moody sky—she asks you to look twice, three 
times, four. Her paintings are all versions, and fragments, of each 
other, at various sizes and made using various techniques, and she 
scatters them across the gallery walls like photographs laid out on 
a table, overlapping, repeating, extending each other. Her facility 
with paint is actually emotionally moving. Showing with her is 
a playful installation of sculptures and drawings that's almost a brain 
map, by Seattle ceramicist Saya Moriyasu. (G. Gibson Gallery, 300 S Washington St, 
ggibsongallery.com, 11 am-5 pm, free, through June 6) JEN GRAVES 




Free Video Games! 


Yes, you read that right. Vidiot is a little 


GAMES/BOOZE 


bar near West Seattle's Admiral Junction 
that is packed full of old arcade games. Area 51, Knights of 
the Round, Hydro Thunder, and hundreds of other classics 
are all free to play at all times. They also have several 
excellent coin-operated pinball machines, a Nintendo Wii, 
and board games. Oh, and a great selection of beer and 
cider on tap, all for entirely reasonable prices. It's easy to 
lose track of time in the delightfully dark space (can't have 
any glare on those screens), so just lean into it and plan to 
stay a while. You'll stumble back out into the sunlight a 
happier person (though perhaps with sore thumbs). (Vidiot, 
4210 SWAdmiral Way, 11 am-2 am, 21+) KATIE ALLISON 


UII5P 

‘Outside Mullingar’ 

Theatrical audacity often comes from 


THEATER 


experimentalism, but the latest romantic 
agony/farce by the great John Patrick Shanley dares to 
embrace conventions so hard they burst into vivid, 
contemporary human glory. The provincial Irish charac¬ 
ters are archetypally familiar, yet between the muted 
love and generations-old property-line feuds, they 
yearn to break free of the roles they've been assigned, 
but they can't. But they do! Everything about the Rep's 
season closer is an exemplary affirmation of life and 
live drama, but Emily Chisholm's performance as Rose¬ 
mary is positively revelatory. (Seattle Repertory Theatre, 
155 Mercer St, seattlerep.org, 2 pm, $22-$72, through 
May 17) SEAN NELSON 


E03F 

m "' ‘Frame by Frame’ m 

Afghanistan was a country without pho¬ 
tography during the Taliban, and this doc 
follows the core crew of four photojour¬ 
nalists—one of them a woman—trying 
to rebuild the practice. Their story is 
incredible. We see them fighting for ac¬ 
cess, getting bombed but taking pictures 
rather than panicking, visiting children 
who are past subjects they watched nearly 
die, looking into the eyes of women who 
are never seen. "And also I will be seeing the self-immolation section in the 
hospital" is a sample line. Maybe that sounds depressing. But seeing mat¬ 
ters. See this film, and tell everyone you know to see it, too. (Lincoln Square 
Cinemas, 700 Bellevue Way NE, Bellevue, siff.net, 3:30 pm, $13) JEN GRAVES 





Heaven Adores You’ H9 


"Who's that guy in the white suit and dirty hair?" Elliott Smith softly states about his appearance at the 1998 Oscars, where his song "Miss Misery" 
was nominated. "What in the world is he doing here?" The sweetness and the sadness always seemed to battle for equal ground when Smith sang 
or spoke. Fleaven Adores You is an equally melancholy and celebratory documentary about the late artist, framed loosely by atmospheric shots of 
Portland, New York, and Los Angeles—three cities he lived in. If you're like me, you can't listen to his unbelievably emotive albums XO, Either/Or, or 
Figure 8 without getting teary-eyed, so bring tissues to the theater. Lots of them. (Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave, nwfilmforum.org, 8 pm, 
$11, May 15-26) KELLY O 

























16 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 



NBW - MAY 24 2015 


A 

I v 

E 


(206) 625-1900 WWW.SlHAVENUE.ORG 

GINkJPS OF 90 <Kt MCflJ ULL I flfl& 4 J 5-1 iSB ON SIN 4 %'FV.lC IN EXNlWTCW^ SEAT 1 LE 


A cnt»*iL 




- - -- - y 







CdI on d HdlTm Rod 
Must dose Mdy 17 

SiUikr vips ■■E] undivt 
■ifkKLV I rail: V. 1)1 ud. ta 
ttj WmdftprHii 4 htnig 

plD. 


Joqutt BietH Alive 
end Well 

Mwi dew Yfljr 17 

Ihrp^r" £>J 

F'llnus' UUfS [I lMJ«Li If!' 
ATI 14 ti-d rfwlricol 
Mi ■ ikh liLum ekmcdI 

|a>fl *H4 


Ikdgnhrduk Wchfii 
Plnywnghrb Ffilivul 
JtaylH 

Tli HiIimii* TtiJinl 

\mim Jiedta. 
W Ifellrvpi. hhr *aln 
JI^LliiwVtp. 
lAiiDt T*M«d DipiLrE^ki. 

HieGiwI Sub! n[ Russia 
MgyH) 

hii Ik StfigsTI 4 tr 

irifc itiklEi'i mr ikr.\ 
^hisr^ .to frugal 
•upTlndif riBi -ntiklp ■>! 

jianJrrKJilL 


Kt4**l £rit W MM : W 0ii$rt ^rtatT, pi*fc£.« S«-nN 


Jvn 5-21 


By Vussef El Guindi 

ffifettid by Chris Cdlamni 





T iff tap 




at the bathhouse 





















NEWS FEATURE SUGGESTS 


CHOW MUSIC FILM 


THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 17 




COURTESY ROB RHEE 


XENIA At this one-bedroom condo in Eastlake, you don’t just live with art, you live in art. 

Artbnb —Xenia 
Turns Condo Rental 
into an Installation 

BY JEN GRAVES 

C hecking into the condo I’d rented on Airbnb for the night of 
Friday, April 17, I noticed immediately that its big, beauti¬ 
ful living room had no couches or chairs. Instead, a white pedestal 


about six inches high covered most of the 
wood flooring. 

Atop the pedestal were objects that 
looked like furniture from an alternate uni¬ 
verse. A tiny table, placed centrally, was just 
planks of wood and dowels inter¬ 
secting through the holes of yel¬ 
low wiffle balls. It was 9 a.m. on a 
workday, and this table appeared 
to have the most likely working 
surface in the room, but to use it, 

I’d have to step up onto the pedestal. 

It was only six inches tall, but those were 
the six inches between being a person and a 
thing on a pedestal with other special pedes¬ 
tal things. 

I took off my shoes. I put one foot on the 
white surface, tentatively. Then the other. My 
head jerked around to see whether I was be¬ 
ing watched. There was nobody there. Maybe 
this is how a sculpture feels, I thought. 

Here’s the Airbnb description of this place: 
“Our one bedroom in Eastlake is in a prime lo¬ 
cation, has a beautiful roof deck, and offers a 
one of a kind experience. Stay here and spend 
time with works of art at your leisure and in 
relation to your day to day experiences.” 

That sounds so normal. 

When my husband and newborn joined me 
later that day, we lay the baby down on a soft 
cushion on the pedestal. Suddenly he became 
an advertisement for a baby. 

T he Airbnb listing is called Xenia. Funny 
name, since it has nothing to do with 
the condo building or the street or the neigh¬ 
borhood where it’s located, Eastlake, just 
up from Lake Union in Seattle. Xenia is the 
name given to the listing by the artist Rob 
Rhee, and the listing is not just a condo, it’s 
an Airbnb art installation—the first one I’ve 
ever heard of. You don’t just live with art, you 
live in art. “This project, Xenia , is an experi¬ 


mental format for hosting people and art to¬ 
gether,” explained Rhee. 

Rhee’s friend, another artist, owns the 
condo and let him turn it into an installation 
with about 25 works by 15 artists. It’s only a 
one-bedroom condo, so it’s mostly 
art. No room for couches or chairs. 
Anyway, Rhee didn’t want seats 
that implicitly direct the sitter’s 
gaze. (There are two folding chairs 
in the closet.) The place has been 
on Airbnb since March and is booked more 
nights than not. For $100 a night, you check 
in at 9 a.m. and check out at 1 p.m. the next 
day. It’s quite the 28 hours. 

In the middle of my night at Xenia, I woke 
up thirsty. Stumbling out of the bedroom, I 
found the entire living room glowing as if it 
were on fire. No, it wasn’t a mirage of half¬ 
sleep that disappeared 
when I rubbed my eyes. 

It was the entire common 
area of the condo glazed 
hot red. 

It took me a second. 

Then I realized that the 
red light was emanating 
from a live feed on the 
TV monitor on the living 
room floor. This had been 
a work of art I’d been 
looking at all day, except it looked nothing like 
it looked all day. 

The art didn’t change, the sky did. During 
the day, the live feed—of a skylight—showed 
the shape of the skylight and the shifting 
natural light. What I didn’t notice during the 
day is the red artificial light sitting next to the 
camera, looking faint because of the stronger 
daylight. But as night fell, the red rose. Until it 
became this fever. 

On the paper stuck to the fridge by a 
magnet, all it said about that work of art was 
“Tivon Rice’s Live Video Feed/Living Room/ 


The television has been turned on for you. 
It shows a live feed. If you require, you may 
turn it off. Please do not adjust it otherwise.” 

If I had not been thirsty, I never would 
have seen the light show. I doddered back to 
bed feeling charmed, knowing in the morn¬ 
ing, the fever would be gone without a trace. 

T he art in Xenia falls in two categories: 

art you touch and art you don’t. Inter¬ 
esting paintings, drawings, and sculptures 
by good artists hang on the walls or sit on 
mounted shelves. But they aren’t the most in¬ 
teresting parts of Xenia, because as art expe¬ 
riences they’re conventional, drawing you out 
of the domestic realm and into the art-looking 
realm, making you feel more or less like being 
in a gallery. 

In the kitchen cabinets, there are four 
ceramic plates and mugs by Colleen Brown. 
They stain with every use. You have the option 
of using them or not, depending on whether 
you find the evidence of other guests’ food 
gross. I do find the stains a little gross, but 
also a little comforting, like certain degrees of 
sharing with other people always feel to me: 
fulfilling and not unfrightening. 

The dishes are emblematic of the distinc¬ 
tion between Airbnb and hotels, a distinction 
that drew Rhee to Airbnb as a medium. Signs 
of prior use at hotels are unacceptable. (I was 
a hotel maid for a summer, and every day is 
a startling reset.) At Airbnb rentals—homes 
away from home—imperfections are part of 
the deal. They are lived-in places, and those 
marks and quirks reveal their owners. 

What’s revealed at Xenia is art, gradually, 
at your pace. A small wood sculpture by Col¬ 
leen Brown is the key chain for the condo keys. 
It is soft and fat—the opposite of a hotel key 
card—and inordinately ergonomically pleas¬ 
ing. It’s such an irregular shape that you can’t 
describe it in words or hold it in the mind. You 
must hold it in the hand. This is the kind of ob¬ 
ject you could grow devoted to. A short story 
about such an object, Virginia Woolf’s “Solid 
Objects,” was on the reading list at a Seattle 
artists’ book group that informed Rhee’s idea 
for Xenia. But the title refers directly to xe- 
nia, the ancient Greek code of hospitality. The 
part Rhee liked is the way a host would feed 
guests communally first, but then stock their 
quarters with food they could prepare them¬ 
selves. It wasn’t just food but also privacy, 
not just “sustenance but also... autonomy,” 
described Norman Bryson, an art historian 
Rhee quotes in his notes on the fridge. 

Rhee is perfectly pleased to show in a 
museum or gallery. But those are houses of 
art, and houses of art impose time limits and 
limit privacy. Meanwhile, actual domestic set¬ 
tings, where art also lives, can make the art 
so familiar as to be almost 
invisible. Rhee wanted to 
invent an art-refreshing 
environment. It’s some¬ 
thing artists have been 
trying to do since the rise 
of modernism, resulting 
in creative new forms like 
land art (set to occur out 
there) and conceptual art 
{in here). 

Reflecting on Xenia, 
what strikes me as its most unusual aspect 
is that it created the conditions for me to be 
unsettled by art, to get the frisson of strong 
work—like the pedestal, like the fever—and 
then to forget about the art entirely and go 
about my life, and then to be brought back 
to the art again, on my own time frame, 
over and over. Temporarily, art could have 
a room of its own, and at the same time, so 
could I. ■ 


Coment on this story at 

0 THESTRANGER.COM/VISUALART 



Xenia 

For rent on Airbnb.com 
through May 31 


We lay the baby down 
on a soft cushion 
on the pedestal. 

Suddenly he became 
an advertisement 
for a baby. 



w 

SEATTLE 

SHAKESPEARE 

COMPANY 


Final Weekend 
Must Close May 17 


APR 29-MAY 17 

senttles hti kespeare.org 



■Ki ri nil h nt 

12 AVE ARTS 

1H0 IBS Aycnu* at P|IK Slftet 


May IS. 2fl1S 

A Ili&tpin 

thel -3 >1S pmject^.orp/tmornlwjx 

1 ? (wnmsefs get a ilw™ am 2 * nouns 
tewtte Dnu affliirtq Lori ijes 2A tours 
to ititHsra. Our tiiS-era musical evert 1 



curate anrj (tired some 
II V i FjJtfilu fruiii rtfSTOli post All 

unliraly drflerert! Imu up ewy ngtiL 

FrfrSitt Spm * 

May 22-3ft, 2H-15 



Find more about this & othar 
shci'ivs tfrroLKjhDLit ttie rcgidn at; 

































18 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 



Hfflmtt T PAYS. A iCEK 

WOtltLT SPWUW iWH VT3Y DH 

wrrr lbih 5 - Mmic, 

fAlR "RADE BE WSJ FF3v CAFf FEMES IH-^ 
3A\ WS^|?AT1« pi!tR!?ri 

THE *Of±EL 



local pastry 

,io-Tr-:^i>X€jr.; i^vuic, tc-T*jn 
LITTCr kAT-E IMDn WT rEJTl 
gr rxm-iL rmnt> r^rmv Cuntth'in rnrK>- mtttiut;- 

WJl.OiAS KUlOT IX.'TT'i min 

m? sffror^B &ii ujj](T rrYVrv jcjLirir nrr, j^n 


CALL US 

^hQLIT qu& 

VfttOLlSALf 

ooircfeE 

rtiniaol 


LwWfrv AlB.. I 


- FUfltKvrrn 



& Patties... 

Delicious Gluten Free & Vegan Choices Available 


www. sweetviolette. com 


Watch all the MLB Games Here 

Pacific Inn Pub 



New Late Night Happy Hours 

$1 off Well Drinks & PER Pints + Free Pool 
Sun-Thurs 10:30 till Close 

Serving Seattle’s Best Fish & Chips 
at the Corner of 35th. and Stone Way N. 



Visit MS I ut IVtt'fcf nil JiNilKll 1 

4th & Vim? in KHIlowi) 

Hrum.fi hi.irn- +jin: SiiL. ft- Sun 




STOMPTowtfcoFfee 

N I T R O 

cold 

BR e W 



Before, During & After 
the Mariners games! 


ONE BLOCK NORTH OF SAFECO 
553 1 ST AVE S • 206-628-0474 
www.trianglepub.com 




CHOW 



St 

r j 

JLTJI 


raGwi 

H 1 

L_>f 

ft r4 J 


Ijvf.jl 

j'/y 




KELLY 0 


COLUMBIA CITY Customers enjoy Full Tilt ice cream in a place once surrounded by 
barbed wire. 


Mexican Ice Cream, 
Vietnamese Pancakes, 
and Cornish Meat Pies— 
All Under One Roof 

A Plaza in Columbia City Highlights the 
Changing Neighborhood’s Diversity 

BY ANGELA GARBES 


K en Anderson and Lenore Sharp knew they were taking 
a risk when they opened their ice-cream shop, Full Tilt 
Columbia City, in a small, dingy plaza just off of Rainier Avenue 


six years ago. 

“When we first moved in, the parking lot 
was shady There was a storm fence across 
the front with plastic wo¬ 
ven in, so you couldn’t see 
anything going on in here,” 

Anderson recalled. “There 
was barbed wire on top. 

And inside it was basically 
an open-air drug and pros¬ 
titution market.” Sharp’s 
mother, who was visiting from out of town at 
the time, was horrified. 

But Anderson and Sharp were optimistic 
about the location. Like their friends Justin 
Cline and Ann Magyar, who founded the Pull 
Tilt in White Center, the couple believed their 
business could create a safer, more active 
community in their diverse neighborhood. 

Today, their vision looks like it has become 


a reality: The barbed-wire fence is long gone, 
and the little plaza has become home to more 
than half a dozen businesses, including Hum¬ 
mingbird Saloon (which is 
also owned by Anderson 
and Sharp, along with family 
members Steve and Bridget 
Sharp), microbrewery Fly¬ 
ing Lion, Kenyan restaurant 
Safari Njema, and Viet¬ 
namese eatery Watercress 
Bistro. There’s also a Vietnamese hair and 
nail salon, Mexican tienda, African conve¬ 
nience store, and Kenyan dance hall. 

In a gentrifying South Seattle neighbor¬ 
hood that was once mostly black, with a 
significant Latino and Asian population, the 
plaza serves the many tastes of its community. 
By all accounts, the retail strip is a mutually 
beneficial environment for business owners, 


5041 Rainier Ave S 

Flying Lion Brewing, 659-991 2 
Full Tilt Columbia City, 226-2740 
Hummingbird Saloon, 349-1731 
Safari Njema, 723-3058 
Watercress Bistro, 722-0238 






































THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 19 


NEWS FEATURE SUGGESTS ARTS ^«I!F>WA MUSIC FILM 



KELLY 0 



One Dollar OPP: Bottled & draft beer 
Two Dollars OPP: Wine by the glass 


BREAKFAST* LUNCH 
DINNER • COCKTAILS 

DAILY FOOD AND DRINK SPECIALS 
LIVE MUSIC AND EVENTS AVAILABLE 
FOR PRIVATE PARTIES 


Monday-Thursday 8 am- 2 pm & 4 pm- 12 am Friday 8 am- 2 pm 
& 4 pm- 2 am Saturday 8 am- 2 am Sunday 8 am- 12 am 


SAFARI njema It’s a family affair: co-owner George Murigo with his brother-in-law, 
John Mbogo. 


located in the MarQueen Hotel at 


600 Queen Anne Ave N. THETINLIZZIELOUNGE.COM 


who patronize each other’s establishments 
and encourage their customers to do the same. 

For example, it’s not uncommon for a cus¬ 
tomer to walk into Full Tilt, whose flavors 
include a cinnamon-spiked Mexican chocolate 
and ube, made from Filipino purple yam, with 
an empty pint glass. Once they get a scoop, 
they walk back over to Flying Lion Brewery 
to enjoy an ice-cream-and-beer float. Steve 
Sharp, who tends bar at Hummingbird four 
nights a week, said he’s also seen a frazzled 
father steal away from his family at Full Tilt, 
order a quick shot or a beer, then rush out 
saying that his wife will be in shortly for her 
own drink and to pay the bill. 

Hummingbird serves familiar bar food 
like nachos, but also Cornish pasties, tradi¬ 
tional meat pies that, while common in the 
Midwest, are rare in Seattle. The recipe 
comes from Anderson’s grandmother, who 
used to make them for her husband who 
worked in the copper mines of Michigan. “We 
don’t have a lot of cultural recipes, but that 
is the one thing we don’t change,” Anderson 
said. “We don’t mess with the recipe, we just 
make it like it is.” 

Hummingbird also keeps a keg of Flying 
Lion beer—“the most local beer possible,” 
said Anderson—on tap. The keg makes the 
long journey from two doors down on a hand 
truck. 

“Honestly,” said Griffin Williams, 
owner and head 
brewer of Flying 
Lion, “I wouldn’t 
have sold to them, 
but they started ask¬ 
ing for kegs three or 
four months before 
we even opened.” 

Williams oversees a 
small operation, and 
while he’s gotten requests from a few bars and 
is about to double his production, Flying Lion 
beers aren’t available anywhere else in town. 

Williams owns Flying Lion with two of 
his brothers (and his investors include every 
member of his immediate family). He comes 
from a family of home brewers—most of his 
beers, including the top-selling single hop pale 
ale and IPA, are family recipes. Williams’s own 
preference is for brewing and drinking darker 
beers, and Flying Lion’s excellent rye stout is 
made from his own recipe. 

Williams, who moved to Seattle from 
Minneapolis in 2013, spent months biking 
around the city, checking out neighborhoods, 
all with an eye for a small industrial space 
in an area with good walkability. He chose 
Columbia City because he liked the feel of 


it, and because it was an up-and-coming 
neighborhood. 

“The overall crowd here is the gentrifica- 
tion crowd,” said Williams. “I didn’t factor 
that in or realize that we might be contrib¬ 
uting to [displacing people] until two months 
after we opened. It has occurred to me, ‘How 
can I be a respectful business?’ I don’t have 
an answer to that, but I like the fact that we 
are here in this building.” 

There certainly isn’t another brewery in 
town where you’ll find a mostly white, middle- 
aged clientele chowing down on Kenyan mbuzi 
(spiced, stewed goat) and ugali (a steamed 
corn bread) doused in a wonderful, citrusy, 
bright-orange hot sauce. The food is made 
next door by chef Jane Kagira, who, along with 
her husband, George Murigo, has owned and 
operated Safari Njema for the last five years. 

“We will even take food over to custom¬ 
ers,” said Kagira, who was born and raised 
in Kenya before immigrating to the United 
States almost 20 years ago. Being sandwiched 
between a brewery and a bar that don’t serve 
food is especially good for Kagira and Murigo, 
who, following personal beliefs, do not serve 
alcohol at their restaurant. “It has helped our 
business,” Kagira said, grinning. “A lot.” 

Vietnamese restaurant Watercress Bistro, 
tucked into the back corner of the plaza, is 
also popular among Flying Lion’s customers, 
according to Williams. Diners will often order 
a beer while wait¬ 
ing to pick up their 
food and then return 
with fragrant takeout 
containers filled with 
grilled pork, pickled 
carrots and radishes, 
and rice vermicelli 
noodles. 

Watercress’s spe¬ 
cialty dishes include a terrific banh xeo—a 
savory, turmeric-scented pancake made from 
rice flour and filled with bean sprouts, sea¬ 
food, and pork—and bo ne, marinated cubes 
of beef with a sunny-side-up egg served on a 
sizzling platter. The menu, like those of the 
other restaurants in the plaza, is based on 
family recipes—in this case, those of Water¬ 
cress owner Loan Hua. 

Traditions abound in the little plaza and, 
as Columbia City grows and changes, they 
find new audiences. “I have nine tables in 
here,” said Kagira, looking around her res¬ 
taurant. “On any day, you’ll see Asians over 
here, Somalis over there, Americans over 
here, Indians over there.” Kagira flashed her 
beautiful, wide smile again. “Different kinds 
of people—they keep coming.” ■ 


“On any day, 
you’ll see Asians over 
here, Somalis over there, 
Americans over here, 
Indians over there.” 



WE DELIVER 
AWESOME 
SANDWICHES 
TO YOUR DOOR 

Your Sandwich Salvation 

Capitol Hill 

721 E Pike St • (206) 257-5927 
(See website for delivery area) 

Ballard 

5315 Ballard Ave NW • (206) 789-0936 
Call us or Order Online at 

www. Other Coast Cafe. com 



Maritime Pacific 
Art 1 11 inti C o, 


ROCKIN 

PIANO 

SHOW 


Sf YOU NAME tT t ^ 
WEIL CELEBRATE ffl 


AMMYFFtAKf 
mJKMY 

bmhmct 


ffitf 7NE JOHN 

mwf totot? 
owttjW’ rm 



1 

I ■ 

e rar 

p wwmf&m 


IT 

™ff of rwf ursvffi 
lOW 

mmmm 

mtm 

XBATIVijmivsmf 

yw'u mum 


g 


* 


z 


rniomnpmmm but place 


^£*7 *»t 

~ In picturesque' 
Wallingford 



BREAKFAST 

LUNCH 

DINNER 

BREAKFAST AVAILABLE 
All Dag & Night 

Open 7 dags a week 
8am-10pm 

2114 North 45th St 
Wallingford // 206.322.0124 

_ www.chowfoods.com 





















































































20 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 



DECADENT VEGAN FOOD 


EVERY SUNDAY THROUGH WEDNESDAY, 4PM - 8PM 


LIVE MUSIC MOST NIGHTS, FOR FULL CALENDAR VISIT OUR WEBSITE 

210 Broadway Ave E • 328.7837 • highlineseattle.com 



STARnrS^T/5PMWSATURDAY|MAY#f6TH 




(ANNIVERSARY 


@ 


02523 


How-Mo-Lo-Can-Lo-Mo-go?! 

Lo-Mo Mondays! 

Manny’s Pale & Lucille IPA for the price 
of Logan Morrison’s batting average. 

EVERY MONDAY * ALL DAY!! 


iua»lw4pnu7P»«iVv.eeKendsH Oam-Zpir 


IP 

m 

— - j 

m 

p 

i _ 

Li 


*^5 


M 

] 


' - ,T: - : = - : ■ 1 


i,.v^ 




-vy. 


Manners 



206*547*1417 * 460 North 36th Street • normseatery.com f 



V FRESH FRESH V 
LIVE MAINE LOBSTER 


4 


WE SHIP 

SEAFOOD OVERNIGHT 
ANYWHERE IN THE USA 
OR WE PACK FOR 
AIR TRAVEL 


§ 


University 
Seafood & Poultry 

1317 NE 47th • Seattle 
(206)632-3700 • (206)632-3900 


MESOB HAS MOUED! 

...and is notu hnouun as.... 



SHeLLJ FIBER 

Restaurant £ Lounge 

DiT Ml 11I '% I 

ON I2TH RND S MRIN ST 

1221 s. Main st - Seattle 

206 860 0H03 


4006 University Way 



BEER, WINES, SPIRITS 



TEX-MEX COMES TO CAPITOL HILL, 
KAISHO CLOSES 

Rooster's Bar & Grill (611 Broadway E, 
922-3061), now open on Capitol Hill, bills 
itself as Tex-Mex, though the menu is vast 
(and a little overwhelming), including 
appetizers as wide-ranging as ceviche and 
bruschetta, and entrees like fajitas, mac 
'n' cheese, and barbecue meats smoked 
in-house. Owners Stan Moshier and Lori 
Campbell, former owners of Madison Park's 
Bing's, told Capitol Hill Seattle blog that 
longtime kitchen staffers Oscar Arevalo and 
Jose Luis Ceja not only cook at Rooster's but 
are also partners in the business. 

Bluwater Bistro in Green Lake has 
closed, although it will reopen as Jak's 
Grill, which already has locations in West 
Seattle, Laurelhurst, and Issaquah. Kaisho, 
on Pike Street and 12th Avenue on Capitol 
Hill, is also closed, but the owners (who 
also run Blue C Sushi and Boom Noodle, 
the two other restaurants that have oc¬ 
cupied the same space) promise: "Back by 
popular demand. Boom Noodle is coming 
to Capitol Hill. Stay tuned." 

“One and a half pigs, one 
half cow, and four lamb/ 
goats are expected to be 
consumed per week." 


REVEL'S GRILL SHACK IS NOW OPEN 


206.634.2307 


One of my favorite harbingers of summer, 
the outdoor grill shack at Fremont's Revel 
(403 N 36th St, 547-2040) is officially up 
and running. This year, the restaurant is 
promising lots of "nose-to-tail" grilling of 
locally and sustainably raised meats, begin¬ 
ning with a month of pork. May offerings 
might include smoked pork collar with 
sesame-cilantro rub, pork trotter and shank 
rillettes, and Korean blood sausage. Own¬ 
ers Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi say "one 
and a half pigs, one half cow, and four 
lamb/goats are expected to be consumed 
per week" between now and August 31. 

SEATTLE BEER WEEK CONTINUES UNTIL 
MAY 17 




[RESEfijttEj 


COCKTAILS • TASTY HOT DOGS 
L0TSA PINBALL • FROSTY BEER 

2222 2ND AVENUE • SEATTLE 

206 - 441-5449 

BETWEEN BELL AND BLANCHARD 


Seattle Beer Week, the ever-growing 
celebration of an ever-growing industry, 
began on May 7 and continues until May 
17, with an impressive number of events 
taking place throughout the city every day. 
You'd be wise to snag seats at the Holy 
Mountain Brewing Beer Dinner at Brave 
Horse Tavern (310 Terry Ave N, 971-0717) 
on Thursday, May 14. A relative newcomer 
to Seattle's microbrewing scene (its Interbay 
taproom opened in January), Holy Moun¬ 
tain has already made a name for itself with 
its barrel-fermented and barrel-aged beers. 
The five-course, beer-pairing menu includes 
the debut of King's Head, a bourbon-barrel- 
aged double oatmeal brown ale, served 
alongside morel-stuffed pork. 

In other beer-related news, two brewer¬ 
ies in Ballard have made some significant 
upgrades: Just in time for sunnier weather, 
Stoup Brewing (1108 NW 52nd St, 457- 
5524) has greatly expanded its outdoor 
area into a full beer garden with large 
picnic tables and bright Adirondack chairs. 
And Reuben's Brews (5010 14th Ave NW, 
784-2859) has moved a short two blocks 
into a much larger, 4,000-square-foot space 
with increased brewing capacity, 24 taps, 
and plenty more seating. 























































NEWS FEATURE SUGGESTS ARTS CHOW 


FILM 


THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 21 



MUSIC 




MIKE LAYE 


THE JESUS AND MARY CHAIN Can we at least agree that William and Jim Reid both 
had great hair? 

Psychocandy at 30: 
Insolent Masterpiece 
or Boring Dirge? 

Segal and Nokes Go Head-to-Head 
Over the Jesus and Mary Chain 

BY DAVE SEGAL AND EMILY NOKES 


D AVE SEGAL: To best appreciate the 
nuclear-bomb-like impact of the Je¬ 
sus and Mary Chain’s Psychocandy, you 
needed to hear it upon release during 1985 
pop/rock’s gaudy malaise. (Better yet, you 
shouldVe heard JAMC’s urgent, caustic 1984 
debut single, “Upside Down.”) 

But failing that happy acci¬ 
dent of birth, you should put 
the album’s emergence in the 
context of the era’s landscape, 
dominated as it was by MTV 
faves like Bruce Springsteen, Duran Duran, 
Don Henley, Tears for Fears, and Thompson 
Twins. Then along came these sullen, brut¬ 
ish Scots, sneaking wild-honeyed, Beach 
Boys-like melodies into the sort of noise tsu¬ 
namis that made the Velvet Underground’s “I 
Heard Her Call My Name” seem placid. Psy¬ 
chocandy was the enema rock direly needed 
in the middle of the Reagan dynasty. Brothers 
William and Jim Reid proved that paint-peel¬ 
ing cacophony could coexist with super-sweet 
tunes in a rock context, and even get major- 
label backing while doing so (Blanco y Negro 
was a UK subsidiary of WE A Records Ltd.). 
There was nothing quite like it in that de¬ 
cade—or in any previous one, for that matter. 

EMILY NOKES: DON’T TELL ME WHEN 
TO BE BORN, DAVE SEGAL. Just kidding, 
I know you’re just trying to help me not be 
an idiot, but I have to respectfully disagree: 
While there may have been nothing like it in 
1985, there has been much like it since, and... 
and... Oh! I’m sorry, did I just fall asleep 
while trying to type about dudes playing loud/ 
distorted music? 

Before the torches and pitchforks (and 
Pitchforks) come after me, let me first 
say: I don’t hate Psychocandy —hell, I like 


amphetamines and bad attitudes just as 
much as the next guy. I don’t even neces¬ 
sarily dislike it, but this album especially 
represents a tricky sliver that gets caught in 
my foot from time to time with music that 
is my same age or older: CONTEXT. You’re 
right—I lose out on the first 
foundation of the album’s 
“ideal listening conditions” 
because I was a dumb 1-year- 
old when the Jesus and Mary 
Chain spewed their grating 
opus onto the hungry, ’Steen-hating youth 
of the USA. (Worse still, I was an even¬ 
less-brilliant l-month-o\d when the mushy/ 
prickly “Upside Down” came out.) Normally, 
I love a shapeless mess, in terms of music 
(and dresses), but to my ears, Psychocandy 
sounds commonplace and boring—which un¬ 
fortunately comes with the territory of being 
considered verrrrrry 
influential/verrrrry 
groundbreaking. Disaf¬ 
fected drug dudes plus 
distortion? No way! 

Sorry I saw the future, 
guys, but it’s already 
pretty full of guitars. 

True, the “had to 
be there” argument is 
deafening here, but is that all you’ve got? 

DAVE SEGAL: Oh, I’ve got more. But let’s deal 
with the gravest accusation. You mean “com¬ 
monplace and boring” like a hurricane that 
carries traces of Phil Spector’s girl groups, 
the Velvets, the Beach Boys, Suicide, and Lee 
Hazlewood, I presume? Okay, Emily: I guess 
if that’s your definition of “commonplace 
and boring,” you’ll probably “Never Under¬ 
stand.” [Rim shot ] Speaking of: That song 


represents the Reid bros’ pinnacle of captur¬ 
ing teen angst, fucked-up love situations, and 
(im)pure sonic catharsis. JAMC could’ve re¬ 
tired after dropping “Upside Down” and 
“Never Understand” and still deserved can¬ 
onization. But Psychocandy keeps delivering 
greatness throughout. Its magic lies in the 
contrast—and combination—of sweetness 
and harshness (again, “Never Understand” 
is the apotheosis). I mean, “Cut Dead” is the 
best bubblegum Leonard Cohen number ever, 
and cool moms worldwide can swoon to it. Yet 
on the other pale, bony hand, JAMC can prick 
up the ears of Motorhead fans with a burner 
like “In a Hole.” That kind of range is rare (see 
also: Velvet Underground & Nico). Even if you 
were to assemble an orchestra of harps, ther- 
emins, and glockenspiels to play all 15 songs 
off Psychocandy, they’d still sound insolent. 

EMILY NOKES: No accusations, Dave, only 
feelings. “Pinnacle of capturing teen angst”? 
Believe me, I wish I could feel that instead of 
playing the millennial foil here (so we could 
just get back to arguing about Phil Collins or 
whatever). My giant shrug for this album is 
odd even to me, because I love noise in pop 
and pop in noise! And Psychocandy's contrary 
elements are there ON PAPER. The sweet 
girl-group sensibility is there. The harsh hiss 
is there (and there, and there, and there). But 
where’s that magic? “Taste the Floor” and “In 
a Hole” get there—discordant enough to be 
defiant, melodic enough to be interesting—but 
the album doesn’t scream “canon” for me, it 
slurs “pretty good.” 

I’ll take your (and everyone’s) word that this 
once qualified as bona fide insolence, but again, 
I’m only hearing a “time and place” argu¬ 
ment—yet another album that requires a thesis 
statement and timeline attached as a prerequi¬ 
site for appreciating it. Suicide’s first album is 
a glorious stomachache—uncomfortable, sac¬ 
charine, monotonous, melodic, terrifying—and 
you could hear that in a vacuum, in any decade. 
Psychocandy' s shtick just kinda makes me 
tired, and toward the end of the album I want to 
physically peel back the static noise (which was 
never that brutal to begin with, just omnipres¬ 
ent—“hurricane” my foot) to get some idea of 
what’s going on under there. Which is precisely 
what they did on Darklands, and precisely why 
that album is better JAMC. Blasphemy, I know, 
but after being told for so long that I HAD to 
genuflect to Psychocandy, I suppose I’m rebel¬ 
ling against the rebellion. 

DAVE SEGAL: Emily, I respect your shrug 
for the Jesus and Mary Chain’s masterwork, 
This could be nostalgia talking, but time has 
only cemented Psychocandy in my heart and 
mind, as undeniable a landmark as Marquee 
Moon or Entertainment! For best results, 
don’t listen via earbuds/iPhone. 

EMILY NOKES: While I think we all know 
who had it harder here—the rock ’n’ roll en¬ 
cyclopedia defending 
a universally praised 
album versus the up¬ 
start earbuds lady (AS 
IF, Dave) wondering if 
anyone else can see the 
emperor’s junk—but 

thank you for indulging 
me. While every other 
musician and album 
you’ve mentioned in this piece deserves every 
bit of worship, I’ll just chalk Psychocandy up 
to requiring a gramophone and an ear trum¬ 
pet to enjoy. (Sickest burn!) 

DAVE SEGAL: Oh, Emily. 

EMILY NOKES: Oh, Dave. ■ 


Taste the floor at 

0 THESTRANGER.COM/MUSIC 


The Jesus and 
Mary Chain 

Thurs May 14, Showbox, 

9 pm, $35 adv/$40 DOS, 21 + 


I’m sorry, did I just 
fall asleep while trying 
to type about dudes 
playing loud/ 
distorted music? 


THE 



SATURDAY 

MAY 16th 

3:00 pm-8:00 pm 


VERMILUM ART CALiHT 
1541 ITTl AYE.SE ATTLE, Vft 


HHULL ADMISSION $3 
EARLY ENTRY I-3FM SIC 
•FULL BAR WITH LI.* 
*UYE KE JAYS ALL DAY* 


2fl Of THE FINEST RECORD 

realusihtheh.il 

TOGETHER IN ONE LOCATION. 
SELLING RECORDS 
IN ALL STYLES 


*SML43't>lltC«ir»IIFHr* 

»F8YCI*PIJIII<PftK* 
*l»GJU*Rftl*RRIAH* 
»MI2> GARAGE* NEW WAVE* 



Dtscogs ©aw 


VERMILLION (k&IS&ttlE 





















22 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 



TOVE STYRKE 


May 17 .The Ciflcodfl* + WNY 

all 11 tix at tidadly « r 


+ LIFE IN FILM 

& CHEERLEADER 


Mu v E u 


MAT I t i NEPTUNE 


SEINABO SET 


Fjt/iJjr, < 


SCARS ON 45 

JUNE7//SIQ^BOnDDDLOPGF 

INGRID 

MICHAELSON 

JUNL17 /: 1HE MM MO UNI 

PINS 

JIJJtE 19 //SHOWEOX SODO LDUNBF 

JAY NRANNAN 


THE HUNTS 

JJLY23//T9E CROCODILE 


MEMORIAl MY WEEKEND 

LESSEHWAB««PHIIMEATE R // tEHD, DR 
THE QECEM8EHISIS • SPOON 

FRIDAY kUY £Z 

RYAN ADAMS * JENNY LEWIS 

SATURDAY WAY 23 

ROBERT PLANT & THE SENSATIONAL 
SttCESHlFTERS^JD MCPHERSON 

MONDAY WAY 25 


W W W .WTO NQlfl.C O M 



CARRIE brownstein Still the drama you’ve been craving. 

Using Sleater-Kinney 
as a Life Raft 

BY LINDSAY HOOD 


L ast December, after unexpectedly los¬ 
ing my job as news editor of the music 
website Wondering Sound, I made the deci¬ 
sion to leave Brooklyn and move to Seattle. 
On February 26, two days before I left, I 
headed to Terminal 5 to see my last show in 
New York City, which also happened to be my 
first time seeing Sleater-Kinney I thought 
it poignant that my final band in NYC was 
from the part of the country where I was go¬ 
ing to start a new life. I was reading into the 
situation, looking for some sort of sign that a 
cross-country move was my destiny. 

But I attended the show under bittersweet 
circumstances. I’d been researching Sleater- 
Kinney prior to getting laid off, for a column 
in which I wrote about my experience getting 
to know certain artists’ catalogs. Although 
I’d been vaguely aware of Sleater-Kinney in 
college, I didn’t listen to the group in ear¬ 
nest until I moved to New York City in 2006. 
They had released The Woods a year prior 
and just finished the tour that concluded in 
a 10-year hiatus. I’ve always wished I could 
hand-deliver Sleater-Kinney to my 14-year- 
old self. They would’ve blown her tiny mind, 
maybe even provided a road map of sorts for 
the fumbling little dork who wasn’t sold on 
the idea of being a nice girl. 

The first time I heard “Bury Our Friends,” 
I was sitting in an office with my old co¬ 
workers. My colleague Claire had received 
the Start Together box set ahead of time, 
Shazam’d the 7-inch marked “1/20/15,” and 
discovered the album cover for No Cities 
to Love. Wondering Sound broke the news 
of the new Sleater-Kinney album later that 
afternoon. For a new music site gaining mo¬ 
mentum, this was a huge coup. I remembered 
that day while I stood in Terminal 5, waiting 


for the band members to make their entrance. 
All the plans I’d made when I scheduled the 
concert no longer existed. I’d be getting on a 
plane in less than a week. 

What I remember from that show is not 
Sleater-Kinney. Mostly, I recall my own frus¬ 
tration. Terminal 5 is a terrible venue, but it 
was even worse that night as a wide range 
of age groups tried to negotiate for space. 
Younger fans, who’d just been turned on to 
the band, wanted to mosh. Older fans, who 
clearly felt their longevity and nostalgia de¬ 
served respect, wanted to sip their beers and 
watch. It was a clusterfuck of mixed inten¬ 
tions. Everyone was being rude, and I did not 
belong anywhere. I was in between every¬ 
thing in a city I no longer really lived in. 

Carrie Brownstein’s 
ever-growing fame was 
also in full effect, and her 
television stardom drew 
out almost every single 
celebrity in the five bor¬ 
oughs. I watched Claire 
Danes try to make out 
with her bored-looking 
husband, Hugh Dancy, 
while Gaby Hoffman 
dangled from the railing and Jenna Lyons 
surveyed the scene in a sparkly blazer. An 
ever-present Fred Armisen seemed to be 
escorting every female cast member of Sat¬ 
urday Night Live. There were at least two 
actors from Orange Is the New Black, plus an 
actor from The Walking Dead for good mea¬ 
sure. I tried to focus on the music, unable to 
stop my eyes from drifting over to the shiny, 
famous people, and hating myself for recog¬ 
nizing them. 

It was a show I should have enjoyed, but I 


couldn’t. New York was a city I loved, but I’d 
grown so weary of trying to glimpse a concert 
through the glowing barrage of cell-phone 
screens, working 12-hour days only to have 
jobs disappear overnight, starting afresh 
with each new piece—feeding the new-media 
monster that growls you’re only as relevant 
as your next byline. I’d hacked it out for al¬ 
most nine years, and even convinced myself 
on occasion that there was no other way to 
live. But with each morning I was pushed off 
the L train and thrown into the foot traffic of 
Union Square, for every seven-foot-tall bro 
who stood directly in front of me at a show, 
I became more convinced it was time for me 
to leave. 

My escape fantasy went like this: I would 
go to Seattle and work a 9-to-5 job, leave mu¬ 
sic writing behind. I wouldn’t think of work 
once I left for the day. Weekends would be 
blissful stretches of free time in a city where 
I could take a 30-minute bus ride to the mid¬ 
dle of the actual woods, not manicured park 
lawns. I’d seek out a West Coast lifestyle 
without submitting to the endless traffic of 
Los Angeles, the real-estate market of San 
Francisco, or the laziness of Portland. (Seri¬ 
ously, what do people do in Portland?) 

Then I accepted the position of music edi¬ 
tor at The Stranger, so my plan to live the 
life of a normal didn’t quite work out as I’d 
envisioned. Last Thursday, less than three 
months after the bummer at Terminal 5, I 
found myself at a very different club in a very 
different city, for a very different Sleater- 
Kinney show. 

Straight away, the energy was different 
from what I’d experienced at Terminal 5. Co- 
rin Tucker kept fumbling the opening guitar 
notes of “Price Tag,” prompting feigned exas¬ 
peration from Brownstein and a spontaneous 
drum solo from Janet Weiss. The audience 
laughed, the band members chuckled, and I 
relaxed into an atmosphere more playful and 
less polished than it had been in New York. 
And I felt grateful to be in a respectful audi¬ 
ence, because I was able to focus. It was clear 
to me that the band felt more at home here at 
the Showbox than they had in the cavernous 
Terminal 5. So did I. I wasn’t part of the city 
yet, but I felt welcome. 

Everyone in Seattle keeps asking me, 
“How are you liking it here?” and my answer 
always seems to disappoint. “It’s different,” 
I keep replying. But it is. No one I know or 
meet here ever knew me in Brooklyn. I am 
without context. I rush to claim I’m not com¬ 
paring it to New York, even though that’s a 
lie. Of course I’m comparing. How could I 
not? I compare the two cities the same way 
I keep comparing the two Sleater-Kinney 
shows, the way writers always bounce Corin 
Tucker and Carrie Brownstein off each other. 
In truth, I might as well compare my iPod to 
my headphones. They serve different func¬ 
tions, but I need one to 
use the other. 

I needed both con¬ 
certs to help me develop 
my opinion of the band, 
to help fill in the de¬ 
tails and experiences I 
missed out on by discov¬ 
ering them later in life. I 
appreciated last week’s 
concert much more 
than what I saw in New York, but Terminal 
5 is what allowed me to feel grateful. Perhaps 
it’s more apt to say that I’m using Sleater- 
Kinney as a life raft right now, an example 
of how I need both my cities, old and new. 
They’re wildly diverse, but the experience of 
one has been unduly influenced by the other. 
Can one city really be better than the other? 
No, but also... yes. Only together. ■ 


Bury your friends at 

0 THESTRANGER.COM/MUSIC 


It was clear the 
band felt more at 
home here at the 
Showbox than they had 
at Terminal 5. So did I. 



















NEWS FEATURE SUGGESTS ARTS CHOW 


FILM 


THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 23 



iHtrefTHP thh« to JOHHNY CASH 


CASH'D 

OUT 


■ :-Tm :.'.T '>:» 

-■I I. --. .1 - > IMULjlld 

■ •MaifrhCM mit™ 

-lH» Wrer " 


NfW Vt A*'S EVt SHOW WITH 

STRAIGHT 




50 TH ANNIVERSARY WORLD TOUR 


QUEENSRYCHE 


) FRIDAY 
OCTOBER? 
SHOWARE 
CENTER 

621 W IAJWIS V, Ki Ml WA • SiiHPM 
J*WW All AGES WEuCOMt 
THTKETS AVAILASLI FROM ^HOVVARI 
CENTEft 60X OFFICE 
ONUNE AT7ICKLT4. 
4HOWAASaHrfR.COM 
CkASCE W PHON; IS*t] V71-W) 


FEATURING LIVE ON STAGE PERFORMING ALL TOGETHER 
KY tiOODIX ■ ttHAKON Wi ll E K ■ EJGKY EKAGG8 


O 0 BI 


WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 7 MOORE THEATRE 

1912 2 ND AVI lUTTL t. WA Sffi'M SHOW - ALl AGH 
TICKETS AVAIL Mil FROM TKKETS.COm CWH6S 6* fHOME 1 BO0-7&J377 


nciEriinw: 1-1 kepidni aul k honotki 

STEVEN 

WILSON 

WEDNESDAY 


THlATlU 

■ .-0 *!. Slipi" 


CHASEH 


j, i jj 1 y 

f n 3 h L 

y 10:0QAM 

T 'WFJT 

THE OLD FASHIONED TOUR 


SHANE KOYCZAN 

e I I IE SHORT STORY LONG 


CLIVE 


Nifior 


THURSDAY DECEMBER 11 
MARION OLIVER MCCAW HALL 

\21 MIRCIR M SEATTLE. WA - SiBOPM iHOW ■ Alt AGE* 

HEKETiAT ALL TKlttTMMlIR LOCATIONS • CHARGE ftV PHONE I fiOO-74i'MOa 


SUNDAY JULY $ 
THE TRIPLE 
DOOR 

2Tt UNION STMH 
jEArriF W7, 

SW.VA 
ALLAGES 

Tjf KTTS. fjULlh-I AT 

‘ I rKin.CtKjOtt.WE E 
LHAKut 5f N-IOMf 


He kwtfly 


CARROLL 


-ijL- 


fm 

ABBOTT 

BAND 

WEDNESDAY |ULY 1ITKI CROCODILE 

17M > *- 1 'i !iuw.:h|i 

■ nan +■ r* iim^cw. rua +- mm 


■f * 
V 


BAND 

MONDAY AtHHttT I TftACTOA TAVERN 

■ h'D LKiMJ-n (hM ^ 




JtNATHA 

IRMKE 































































24 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 




THE 

SJfl 


WALK OFF 
THE EARTH 

win sent itiiwufH 


WK) 


SHOWBOX SODO 

1700 FIRST AVENUE SOUTH 



Get tickets at SYS . 

0HCALL888-S29-7849 


com 



SHOWBOXPRESENTS.COM 



NOQUALMIE 

/ CASINO 


MOVEiRLL 


THE LEGACY TOUR 

i TRIBUTE Tli 


LOU GRAMM 

THi UDI< EQFF0REI6HIR 

THUR MAY 21 6PM 


SUN JUNE 7 7PM 


JUNE 11-13 BFM 


TICKETS: 5NOCASlNO.COM OR THE 
SNOQOALMIE CASINO BOX OFFICE 

SEATTLE'S CLOSEST CASINO ] 1-90 E, EXIT 27 


/SnQcasiino 






























NEWS FEATURE SUGGESTS ARTS CHOW 


FILM 


THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 25 



M BOM AM AS S/I 


I DON’T WANNA DANCE, 
I’M SCARED TO DEATH 

RIP to Oklahoma brother Eric Miller, 
fatally shot last month by a Tulsa County 
Sheriff reserve deputy named Robert Bates 
who allegedly meant to grab his Taser. In 
a Tulsa World report, sources claimed that 
the sheriff's department falsified Bates's 
training records. Bates, 73, is also, appar¬ 
ently, a wealthy insurance executive and 
political ally of Sheriff Stanley Glanz. He 
has pleaded not guilty to second-de¬ 
gree manslaughter. You can't make this 
shit up—you can't make up for it, either. 

I am not meaning to turn this column, 
which is ostensibly about hiphop music, 
into a tally of black lives lost at the hands 
of the police. It's just that a war upon 
black people is extremely relevant to any 
conversation about hiphop, close to mind, 
and completely inescapable—though if it is 
managing to somehow escape your notice, 
you should count your blessings. For extra 
credit, you can count the blessings of oth¬ 
ers, too, and think 
honestly about 
why they've 
stacked up the 
way the have. 

For an extra 
credit card, hit 
up your boy Ja 
Rule, once an 
okay rapper, 
then a terrible 
pop-rap-singer, then a joke and has-been 
thanks to 50 Cent. Now he's a paid shill 
for Magnises, a bootleg "black card" 
aimed at (fleecing) millennials. "It's a very 
unique situation," Ja hilariously told Fox 
News. "Whenever you can marry the afflu¬ 
ent with the less fortunate, you get... the 
birth child... which is called hiphop." It's 
Murdaaa! Ja also helped the troll-kings at 
Fox bring a Dave Chappelle joke to life 
by giving his completely worthless and ter¬ 
rible two cents on Baltimore and the 2016 
election. "Who gives a fuck what Ja Rule 
thinks at a time like this?" said Chappelle 
in his classic 2008 "Where's Ja?" stand-up 
bit. "I don't wanna dance. I'm scared to 
death." 

Just last week in old Baltimore, Ja's old 
label head Kevin Liles, a B-more native, 
marched for justice for Freddie Gray 
while being pestered by idiot-demons Ger- 
aldo Rivera (Fox News) and Brian Todd 
(CNN). They both, on camera, managed to 
mistake Liles for that other black ex-head 
of Def Jam, Russell Simmons. (Todd actu¬ 
ally thought Liles was lying to him about 
who he was.) These make for one of the 
few moments in history that I wish Dame 
Dash actually was present to yell at some¬ 
body. Like, how much fucking insult—and 
mind you, this is nothing compared to the 
unarmed black victims of police killings— 
do you really think people will take? 

Listen to Seattle OG and flawless world- 
class blend-king DJ Topspin's ace twist of 
Michael Jackson's ever-poignant "They 
Don't Care About Us" and Phat Kat's 
Dilla-produced "Don't Nobody Care About 
Us." The result is called "Ain't Nobody 
REALLY Care About Us," put out by the 
estimable Rappers I Know (shout-out the 
guy FWMJ). I remember there being a big 
flap over the lyrics of the Jackson song be¬ 
cause of the "Jew me, sue me" line. I now 
pull your attention to other words: "Beat 
me, hate me, you can never break me." ■ 




lllfi W GQH&tRT 


PARAMOUNT 

THEATRE 

MAY 14™ 
15™ 8,16 th 


tickets. cam 



I40- 4 ■« .iv J-M in 1 \\\ r Vi kviyi fL\l^lJF#MrITLr» -■»' 




WED/MAY 13 

AMOS MILLER PRESENTS 


supersquare 

V " w ’ - & 

FRI/MAY15 

the pine hill project: 
lucy kaplansky and 
richard shindell 

Vt 1 _t^4^ 

SAT/MAY 16 

the Seattle sound 

SUN/MAY 17 

craigmont’s 
midlife crisis! 



MON/MAY 18 

grant lee Phillips 
and steve poltz 



TUE/MAY19 

elvis perkins 
w/ alex salcido 



WED/MAY 20 • 7:3C 
20TH ANNIVERSARY 
KABLOOEYFEST! 


showgirls with 
david schmader 

next • 5/21 Seattle secret music showcase 
15 • 5/22 brazilian nights! antonio adolfo 
and hendrik meurkens • 5/23 super 
jam plays elvis costello and squeeze 

• 5/27 joe driscoll & sekou kouyate 

• 5/29 nearly dan • 5/30 bowievision 

• 5/31 Seattle steps up for too slim! 


the workshop zach 

bruce birch pereira and the 
gin joints / afrocop gravelroad 
the moonspinners 
crossrhythm sessions singer- 
songwriter showcase featuring tyler 
edwards, caitlin patterson and michael 
monroe champagne Sunday 


DOORS OPEN 1.5 HOURS PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW 
ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM) 

thetripledoor.net 

216 UNION STREET, SEATTLE 
206.838.4333 

































26 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 


UP& COMING 

Lose your legions of 13-year-olds every night this week! 

For the full music calendar, see page 29 or visit thestranger.com/music 

For ticket on-sale announcements, follow twitter.com/seashows @ = All Ages. 



THE JON SPENCER BLUES EXPLOSION These born-bad motherfuckers are feral 
dogs with tails wagging and noses all up in your business. Thurs May lip at Crocodile. 


Wednesday 5/13 


Today Is the Day, Lazer/Wulf, 
Lesbian, Spacebag, Great Falls 

(El Corazon) Nashville's Today Is the Day is the 
twisted output of one Steve Austin. As the leader 
and only consistent member of one of metal's most 
head-scratching bands, he veers all over the map 
stylistically, from fluid, proggy riffs one moment to 
sludgy and grindy ones the next, calling to mind 
such disparate bands as technical death metalers 
Anata and even early-era Mastodon (Mastodon's 
Brann Dailor and Bill Kelliher are among Today Is 
the Day's alumni). Austin's screeching howl could 
strip paint off walls, and his lyrics (sample: "You 
fucked up my mind!") are no more comforting. 
The band is touring in support of last year's Animal 
Mother. KATHLEEN RICHARDS 

Randy and Mr. Lahey of 
Trailer Park Boys 

© (Crocodile) The Canadian TV show Trailer Park 
Boys is a bizarre treasure full of lovable criminals, 
intoxicated shenanigans, and SO MUCH WEED. 
Mr. Lahey is the drunken, shit-metaphor-spewing 
supervisor of the titular trailer park; Randy is his 
perpetually shirtless, cheeseburger-obsessed as¬ 
sistant and lover. Onstage tonight, they promise 
"songs and skits, audience participation, profan¬ 
ity, Shakespeare, and general hilarity" (fun fact: 
John Dunsworth, who plays Lahey, is also a classi¬ 
cally trained and renowned stage actor). Will this 
(surprisingly all-ages) event capture the TPB magic 
and make you laugh so hard it hurts? I can't say, 
but my greatest wish is to see Mr. Lahey make his 
hands into bird claws and mutter "shit-hawks" in 
person. KATIE ALLISON 


Prom Queen, Powers, Trabants, 
Kingdom of the Holy Sun 

(Sunset) Last September, local trio Powers quietly 
released a booming, potent, and intelligent rock 
record. Doris Rising boasts heavy, crunching guitars 
and sinewy percussion, all expertly tempered by gor¬ 
geous, forceful vocals. The latter are mainly courtesy 
of guitar player Lara Hilgemann (formerly of the 
Peeping Tomboys), but backup vocals throughout 
the record enhance everything they touch. Bass un¬ 
dercurrents are handled by Jordan Gomes (Sailor 
Mouth), and the aforementioned drum work is 
that of the inimitable Lupe Flores (Tacos, the Griz¬ 
zled Mighty, probably 12 other bands I don't know 
about). This is one of those records you put on and 
then don't turn off until it's weeks later and you 
realize it's the only thing you've been listening to. 
It's an addicting affair, and according to Flores, the 
band is already at work on a new one. Get in now so 
you can say, "I told you so." GRANT BRISSEY 

Reel Big Fish, Less Than 
Jake, the Interrupters 

© (Showbox) What is it about third-wave ska 
that makes it so universally deemed uncool? Is it 
the horn section? Is it the muttonchops, Hawaiian 
shirts, and porkpie hats? The gimmicky jokes? Okay, 
I'm pretty sure it's all of the above that keeps the 
genre pretty widely reviled by cool kids—but to 
middle-school me, this era of ska was everything. 
Reel Big Fish and Less Than Jake sing about angst 
and unrequited love in gleeful, super-catchy melo¬ 
dies, enthusiastically proclaiming that everything 
sucks, belting out odes to selling out and being 
a misunderstood, dateless loser kid in the world. 
When I was an awkward just-barely teenager, these 
bands were a palatable entrance into punk, shows I 
could get dropped off at with posi vibes and geeky 


acceptance. Are legions of 13-year-olds still getting 
into this stuff? I'm finally no longer embarrassed 
to admit that it still strikes a totally dorky, precious 
chord in my heart. ROBIN EDWARDS 

Stephin Merritt, Calvin Johnson 

© (Benaroya Hall) I struggle to think of two per¬ 
formers who are less temperamentally, aesthetical¬ 
ly, and presentationally similar than these two. On¬ 
stage, Stephin Merritt (of Magnetic Fields, Future 
Bible Heroes, and the 6ths) is a perpetual Gloomy 
Gus whose melodically transcendent and lyrically 
ingenious songs are what TV cooking contest shows 
would call "the hero"—they're so brilliantly crafted 
and classically pleasing that he can hold completely 
still and it's still a show, and usually a good one 
(though I can't deny the last couple times I saw 
Magnetic Fields left me with the distinct impres¬ 
sion that they were doing the audience a big favor 
by deigning to appear). Calvin Johnson is the exact 
opposite in every particular. His songs—from Beat 
Happening to Halo Benders to Dub Narcotic Sound 
System and onward—tend toward primitivism, and 
his physical presence in the room is a concoction 
of punk confrontation and giddy, fearless abandon. 
It will be interesting to see what form he takes in 
such august surroundings, but if history is a guide, 
it will be riveting. Oh, I know what they have in 
common: deep voices! SEAN NELSON 


Thursday 5/14 


The Jesus and Mary Chain, 
the Black Ryder 

(Showbox) The elusive comeback album the reunit¬ 
ed Jesus and Mary Chain have alluded to in recent 
years has yet to surface, but the rivaling sibling kings 
of alternative noise pop are back out of the gates 
to celebrate the 30th anniversary of their lauded 
debut. Psychocandy. Can you blame them? Almost 
anyone with good music taste has fallen in and/or 
out of love while drowning their ears in JAMC's blis¬ 
tering dream noir, which has influenced countless 
bands. Whether you were hip to the druggy, thrill¬ 
ing amalgamation of Velvet Underground, Suicide, 
and Phil Spector girl groups while you were teasing 
your dyed-black hair in 1986 or discovered them via 
the Lost in Translation soundtrack you bought in col¬ 
lege, there's no denying that the songs of Psycho¬ 
candy make one of the most perfect rock albums of 
the 20th century. Bring a date and let the Candy do 
the talking. TRAVIS RITTER 

Midday Veil, Swahili, 

Newaxeyes, DJ Explorateur 

(Chop Suey) Swahili have changed significantly since 
their self-titled 2012 debut LP on Seattle's Translin- 
guistic Other label. Back then, the Portland quintet 




I A JOYFUL NOFSE FEATURING I 

| ONCE UPON A TUESDAY | 


THURSDAY. MAY 14 


HARPS 

FEY MOTH ■ A RADI A 


FRIDAY, MAYJ5. 


RL HEYElTS SWEET ACTION 

| BEN BRUCE BAND AMD MOPE | 


SATURDAY. MAY 16 


f SEED OF LIFE PRODUCTIONS 
| OFFICIAL RECESS PR E-PART y| 


3UJMDAY, MAY17 


BRITISH INVASION 

BURLESQUE TO THE BEST OF BRITISH 


WEDNESDAY MAY 20 


MIKE DUMOVICH 

|THOUSANDS TOMO NAKAYAMA| 




TAKE 
WARNING 


PtIOTS 


WWW.TAKEWARNINGPRESENTS.COM 

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/TAKEWARNINGPRESENTS 
TWITTER @TAKEWARNINGSEA 

TICKETS @ WWW.TAKEWARNINGPRESENTS.COM 




SATURDAY MAY 16TH @ ECLECTIC THEATER 
*2 SHOWS / LIMITED TICKETS!* 

EMILY HELLER 

ELICIA SANCHEZ 


7:30 PM (EARLY) & 10:00 PM (LATE) 
ALL AGES (BAR W/ID) 

$ 18 ADV / $20 DAY OF SHOW 

THURS MAY 28TH @ SHOWBOX SODO 

STREETLIGHT 

MANIFESTO 


DAN POTTHAST, SYCAMORE SMITH 

8:30 PM / ALL AGES (BAR W/ ID) 
$21.50 ADV/ $25 DAY OF SHOW 

U&C: 6/25 JEN KIRKMAN @ VERA PROJEQ 













































NEWS FEATURE SUGGESTS ARTS CHOW 


FILM 


THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 27 


purveyed a more agitated, chaotic brand of cosmic 
rock that slotted them in the Gang Gang Dance/ 
early Prince Rama camp. That cavernous and thunder- 
drummed approach has been airbrushed out on the 
new Amovrevx (pronounced "am-or-euh" and refer¬ 
ring to the sixth Arcanum—the Lovers—of the Tarot 
de Marseilles). Instead, the eight songs here approach 
a kind of spiritualized glam disco and satiny funk in 
which percussive grit coexists with textural glitz, as vo¬ 
calist Van Pham rides the ascendant grooves with cool 
ebullience. (There are also a couple of deep-breathing 
ambient interludes.) Amovrevx is a radical makeover 
that somewhat mirrors Midday Veil's transformation 
on their third album, This Wilderness. Turns out the 
mystics need to dance their asses off once in a while. 
Newaxeyes are evolving in even more unpredictable 
ways, and they just turned in an amazing, nerve- 
flaying reinterpretation of the Alien soundtrack at 
Northwest Film Forum. The seriously knowledgeable 
and versatile DJ Explorateur opens the night and spins 
in between live sets. DAVE SEGAL 

Little Big Show #12: Cloud 
Nothings, Tacocat, Chastity Belt 

© (Neptune) If you haven't previously heard of the 
other 11 Little Big Shows, you should know that this 
is a concert series for youth charities. Since the first 
event in 2012, Little Big Show has collectively raised 
more than $100,000 for local arts nonprofits like Rain 
City Rock Camp for Girls, Vera Project, Youth in Focus, 
and Hugo House. One hundred percent of ticket sales 
from this excellent three-band lineup goes to Teen- 
Tix—a program that gets teenagers into art muse¬ 
ums, galleries, and theaters for a reduced $5 fee. Your 
ticket price will keep generating good, and I know 
you must believe that children are the future. I mean, 
teach them well and let them lead the way! KELLY O 

The Jon Spencer Blues 
Explosion, We Are Hex 

© (Crocodile) If Jon Spencer has done one thing right 
in his life, it has been making brazen, bastardized 
blues with gutter-greased gonads. For all the cheeky 
machismo and unabashed inauthenticity, Jon Spencer, 
Judah Bauer, and Russell Simins have been kicking out 
their own strain of rhythm and booze with reckless 
abandon and unbridled badassery for a quarter centu¬ 



ry. Their latest. Freedom Tower: No Wave Dance Party 
2015, finds their well-oiled groove machine running 
smoothly with no backfires and plenty of hell-yeahs. 
These born-bad motherfuckers are feral dogs with 
tails wagging and noses all up in your business before 
they bite and make you rabid in a pool of sweat. Plus, 
the old dogs still have some new tricks compared to 
the neutered puppies of the Black Keys, who are still 
shitting and pissing on the floor. TRAVIS RITTER 


Friday 5/15 


The Rezillos, Kid Congo and 
the Pink Monkey Birds 

(Studio Seven) As inspired pairings go, first-gen punks 
the Rezillos on a bill with ace guitarist Kid Congo Pow¬ 
ers takes the cake. Before forming garage-punk quar¬ 
tet the Pink Monkey Birds, Powers (born Brian Tristan) 
made his mark with the Gun Club, the Cramps, and 
the Bad Seeds. Of late, he's been working on a record 
with Mick Collins (the Dirtbombs) and Bob Bert (the 
Chrome Cranks). The Rezillos, who formed in 1976, 
have spent four decades making music in a variety 
of manifestations, like the Revillos, before releasing 
their second record. Zero, this year. Along the way, 
they unleashed one of the most adrenaline-charged 
covers set to tape: aggro-pop classic "Somebody's 
Gonna Get Their Head Kicked In Tonight," a song 
originally (and improbably) performed by Fleetwood 
Mac. KATHY FENNESSY 

John Wiese, Pink Void 

© (Grand Illusion) Tiny U-District nonprofit theater 
the Grand Illusion seems to be the venue for film/ 
music performances these days, and it's also a sur¬ 
prisingly cozy space to see a band. Hardcore experi¬ 
mental fans are in luck tonight, with LA noise wizard 
John Wiese in the house. Wiese's avant-garde melting 
pot of a career spans everything from alienoid found 
sound in his solo work to his grindcore-concrete act 
Sissy Spacek's hypertechnical, apocalypse-inducing 
rock spasms, appropriately deemed "noise-gore" by 
Wiese himself. His expansive output even resulted 
in an art show for his "first 100" 7-inches! The very 
conceptually driven and prolific Wiese will be pre¬ 
senting several of his recent short films, followed by a 


live set. Local noise queen Pink Void (Crystal Perez of 
Blue Sabbath Black Cheer) will bring forth even more 
harsh-noise hellscapes. BRITTNIE FULLER 


Saturday 5/16 


ICP Orchestra 

© (Royal Room) Founded in the Netherlands in 1967 
by pianist Misha Mengelberg, drummer Han Ben- 
nink, and saxophonist Willem Breuker, ICP (Instant 
Composers Pool) Orchestra swirled out of the Fluxus 
movement and incorporated its freewheeling aes¬ 
thetic to forge unpredictable, fiery, and whimsical 
improvisations that inevitably got them slotted into 
the "jazz" genre. Now expanded into a multinational 
big band that includes British, German, and Ameri¬ 
can musicians, ICP Orchestra come off like a chamber 
orchestra itching to burst into liberating flights of 
fancy... or, say, a joyous cover of Thelonious Monk's 
"Criss-Cross." They're still led by Bennink and Mengel¬ 
berg, whose restless playfulness ensures that no two 
ICP Orchestra shows are ever the same. Expect much 
wig flipping. Early show is all ages. DAVE SEGAL 

The Hollers, My Cartoon 
Heart, Naked Giants 

© (Vera) I witnessed local trio Naked Giants play the 
finals at this year's EMP Sound Off! battle of the (un¬ 
derage) bands. With technical proficiency and stage 
moves well beyond their years, they created an en¬ 
ergy that was so exuberant and stage banter so vig¬ 
orously chipper, I thought maybe they weren't really 
underage, but rather hired actors to play the perfect, 
super-fun young band to inspire musically inclined 
youth to "FOLLOWTHEIR DREAMS IN ALL CAPS [high 
jump with guitar]\" Much of their rock/alt/blues mu¬ 
sic nods to the early-2000s garage-rock revival a la 
the Hives and White Stripes (thankfully without the 
severe color schemes), plus healthy pinches of more 
modern fuzz guitar like Ty Segall. EMILY NOKES 


Sunday 5/17 


On this date 35 years ago, PiL baffled the hell out 
of American Bandstand viewers. 


Monday 5/18 


Matt Akers, as-dfs, Sacred 
Signs, DJ Maire, Skulp 

(Kremwerk) Kremwerk's monthly Squall night con¬ 
tinues to redeem that traditional wasteland of 
entertainment (i.e., Monday nights) with another 
strong lineup. Portland via Detroit synth master 
Matt Akers imbues his works with the icy gran¬ 
deur of Tangerine Dream's 1980s output, but he's 
also capable of grinding out menacing industrial- 
dance numbers or punching out chiller-killer, John 
Carpenter-esque soundtrackage. He's one versa¬ 
tile composer and his music possesses a rich tonal 
palette; one can see Akers working in Hollywood 
in the immediate future. Slumdiscs recording art¬ 
ist as-dfs is a mysterious entity whose Soundcloud 
doesn't clarify matters. The music found there sug¬ 
gests an impish creative thrust that values spon¬ 
taneity, oddly contoured rhythms, and unusual 
tonalities over functional, "logical" production 
techniques. Seattle's Sacred Signs (aka Winter Par¬ 
kin) combines subtly deranged drones with darkly 
folkish songcraft for a hybrid sound that'll leave 
you profoundly confounded. DAVE SEGAL 


Tuesday 5/19 


Timber Timbre, Xiu Xiu 

(Neumos) Taylor Kirk possesses the kind of voice that 
forces you to stop whatever it is you're doing and 
listen. It doesn't matter what he's singing about—all 
you can do is lie down and absorb its smoky depth. 
Like Nick Cave, Mark Lanegan, and Tindersticks' Stu¬ 
art Staples, Kirk can be vulnerable and warbly one 
minute, then powerful and soulful the next. He's 
certainly the most potent instrument of Timber Tim¬ 
bre. The rest of the band creates a sparse and roomy 
backdrop—a spooky, noir, lounge vibe with quaver¬ 
ing organ, creeping bass line, plinking piano, and 
crackling electric guitar. The band is still riding the 
wave of last year's critically successful Hot Dreams, 
Timber Timbre's fifth record in 10 years. This is not 
the show to go to if all you want to do is yell at your 
friend at the bar. KATHLEEN RICHARDS 






JWrer & NieWdu* 



CEREMONY WTauniswor?! 

Cm MrM (rflBhqi It TMTirt (frfth 
HtJK'ii JoDtSt Lind. Ojs JQ Bftd Chsnc?. 
6 b 9 b «kF beyond /K'tDpmiS k 4 

FLAMMABLE ^ 

■Viifij Coaa'S LuigiSt‘Runnli'Kj 

House Music NigM wlfti Bran Lyons 
End W&icy Hounrs vYiCfcmS? 


MQNSTEfl PLANET 

Freaky toum) taobge fell] vibes wHh live 

I, , ml. _____ ,, ,r 1 ■ ■ Jl| 

Wmmc nr:nr? ann r^gnng r-i*S1 Or 

nmitclans si S|Hn Free 


9EOT11EP0E1RYSLAU cptfi 
lealurod poete Seattle & targes! lunnfrg 
vwekJy shwri frMpm W wkshop, 
epm Sign u0e“B3Q Opto Mie ■v'S5 


I AH BELLS BROWN KR0Y PRESENTS 

JURASSIC PARK 

Live parody paying homage Id the 1 - 933 - 
dinosaur fpKtKtflefI toors at 7 pm. 
,M 3 pn AlfV bCktiBr $20 ■'tfXrf £35 

SUM 1? 

MATCH CAME pmMI* CHER WARS VIII 
If We C*Hid Tun Sstk ftn« Wma 

Costumes Greatly E ncotiraged! fi! 7pm 


Wed 

5/13 

8pm 

BEVERLY CRUSHER, 
Walter & Perry, 

Femurs, Blooper - $6 

Thu 

5/14 

9pm 

LANF0RD BLACK, 

General Mojos 

Key Project, 

Stefan George - $7 

Fri 

5/15 

9pm 

SAY0NARA, 

NEEDS, Sashay, 

Sailor Mouth - $7 

Sat 

5/16 

9PM 

SNAP! 

90’s Dance Party 
w/ @TrashyTrashDJz 
$10/21 + 

Sun 

5/17 

8PM 

MADE OF BOXES, 

No Rey (duo), 

Elijah Sussman, 

& Guest - $7 

Tue 

5/19 

9PM 

STOP BITING 

W/ABM089 Crew 
(Germany), Northern- 
Draw (PDX), Diogenes 
+ Introcut, Absolute- 
Madman, Fishboogie & 1 
AC Lewis-$5/21 + 



www.reLtarseaTile.corn 

TtT# Hounflr 

w 


theloflnet 

2Qfi-2M-2a2a 
429 la sll a he Ave. East 
Auks 21+ 





NEETAR 


NECTAR LOUNGE 
412 N 36th St 
206 632 2020 
www nectarlounge com 


5.14 Thursday (Electro Pop/Indie Rock) 

CRAYMER 
JAMES ANAYA 

Fox Hunt 

$5adv/$10dos, 8pm, 21 + 


5.16 Saturday (Electronic) 

BLOCKHEAD 

Mono/Poly, Tor, IG88 

$15-17adv/$22dos, 8pm, 21 + 


5.17 Sunday (Rock/Soul) 

STONE-LOWE-COE 

Asher Fulero Band, Baby Cakes 

$7adv/$10dos, 8pm, 21 + 


5.18 Monday (Weekly Jam) 

MO' JAM MONDAYS 

Where Seattle Musicians Come To Jan 

NO COVER, 9pm, 21 + 


5.20 Wednesday (Rock & Roll) 

THE HIGH COUNCIL 

Achilles Wheel, Kuli Loach 

$7adv/$10dos, 7:30pm, 21 + 


6/15 McTUFF ♦ SKERIK’S 
SYNCOPATED TAINT HORNS 


5.15 Friday (Funk/Jazz) 

MCTUFF with 

SYNCOPATED TAINT HORNS 

(Skerik, Hans Teuber, Steve Moore) 

with Jefferson Rose Band 
and DJ Chilly (KEXP El Sonido) 

$8adv/$10dos, 8pm, 21 + 


5/23 SHAFTY PLAYS PKISH 

3 FULL SETS FROM 9PM - 2AM 


5.22 Prince & Michael Experience 5.24 The 
Lowest Pair 5.27 JeConte & The Mali All-Stars 
5.28 Mike Love 5.29 The Mother Hips 5.30 
Jai Ho 5.31 Potluck & Wrekonize 6.2 Nneka 
6.4 Twista 6.5 Nitewave 6.6 Clinton Fearon 
6.10 Sebastian Bach 6.18 HONK! Kickoff 6.19 
ALO w/ Flowmotion 6.21 The Expanders 6.25 
Fayuca 6.26 Living Daylights 6.29 Orgone 


5/29 THE MOTHER HIPS 

„ - - *; «• 

* t .V \ 

> . - 
v ^ r y ^ 

‘ 1 ** A 





































28 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 


gSPAMilElUHT MOaRE^^^JTr 



KLINGANDE 

- I NEXT WEEK! 
e^MAY2Q | CROCODILE 

^ VAADAT CHAHIGIM 

1 apccd gi»" WPrWI EACO 

NEXT WEEK! 

MAY 20 IBARBOZA 




m 


SMALLPOOLS 

OlTIFCHA nr-d hWIE^ HTfflrL? 

NEXT WEEK! 

SAT MAY 231 CROCODILE 


THE D0 

W* fe^Cid QlfHh 

SATURDAY 30 
NEUMOS 


JON BELLION 

W* il-JU tKlTOtk 

JUNC4 

CROCODILE 


STARSAILDR 

EMBRACE 

SATllfl&AY AJME 6 
hEumQS 


PURITY RING 

jf ArTEBSHOWaWSET) 
JUM IU Li NIGHTCLUB 

SHOWED* KUDU - SOU OUT!^ 

SONlUX 

Hl 4 r.> ^+*J CH.il x |J 4 |. 

SATURDAY JUNE 27 
CROCODILE 



ACTIVE CHILD 

ipKd [)«*+• LOW ft-DAB 
JUNE 2S 
TRPPLE ODOR 


JULY 9 
CROCODILE 




^ ws nniERr jlkm k ns iniHir 

JFRI JULY l7j CflflCQDtLE 


RYNWEAVER 


FRIDAY JULY 37 
NEUMOS 


THE BOTH 

Saturday july ih 
crocodilc 





PENGUIN PRISON 

(LIVE) 

JULY 21 I NEUMOS 


di 


GOOD OLD WAR 


ON SALE FRI IOAP4 


JULY 23 i TRACTOR 


^mugg 


WE 


71*idf »■ — 


NiUMCI 



925 E. PIKE STREET, SEATTLE, WA 
NEUMOS.COM THEBARBOZA.COM 


FRIDAY 5/15 

BOOTIE SEATTLE: 

5-YEAR ANNIVERSARY! 
SEATTLE'S ONLY ALL-MASH- 
UP DANCE PARTY 

FT. A PLUS D + DJ FREDDY + KING OF 
PANTS + DJ DESTRUKT 


SATURDAY 5/16 

TANGERINE + 
FLY MOON ROYALTY 

SNUFF REDUX 


SUNDAY 5/17 

HIATUS KAIYOTE 

CHIMURENGA RENAISSANCE + MAIAH 
MANSER + J-JUSTICE 


TUESDAY 5/19 

TIMBER TIMBRE 

XIU XIU 


WEDNESDAY 5/20 

SLICK RICK 

JARV DEE + GIFTED GAB 
+ KUNG FOO GRIP 

THURSDAY 5/21 

THE REVEREND 
HORTON HEAT 

NEKROMATIX + DEAD MAN 


WEDNESDAY 5/27 

WIRE 

MILD HIGH CLUB + POSSE 


FRIDAY 5/29 

THE PHYSICS 


TUESDAY 6/2 

MAE 

ALL GET OUT + MIKE MAINS & THE BRANCHES 


FRIDAY 6/5 

THE DUSTY 45s+ 
COUNTRY LIPS 


EVENING BELL + ANNIE FORD BAND 



THURSDAY 5/14 

BREAKS AND 
SWELLS 

ST. KILDA + BOOTS TO THE MOON 


FRIDAY 5/15 

COLONIES 

LEMOLO + SPIRIT AWARD 


SATURDAY 5/16 

TORRES 


SUNDAY 5/17 

URBAN MUSIC FARM 


WEEKLY FRIDAY & SATURDAY DANCE 
NIGHTS FROM 10:30PM TO CLOSE 

COMING UP 

5/13 Acid Tongue • 5/20 Vaadat Charigim • 
5/21 Heatwarmer + Spyn Reset • 5/22 Hutch 
& Kathy • 5/23 Bryan John Appleby • 5/24 J 

• • 5/26 King Chip • 5/27 
Speedy Ortiz • 5/28 Shy Girls • 5/29 Vendetta 
Red • 5/30 The D0 • 5/31 Rob Lyons • 6/3 
Blackbird Blackbird • 

• 6/3 Blackbird Blackbird • 6/4 All Them 
Witches • 6/6 Lonely Mountain Lovers 6/8 
Amen Dunes + Ryley Walker • 

• 6/10 Holiday Mountain • 

• 6/12 Sam Prekop • 



TICKETS AVAILABLE AT 
MOE BAR AND ETIX.COM 



SEATTLE’S MONTHLY MASHUP DANCE PARTY 


BOOTIE SEATTLE CELEBRATES FIVE YEARS OF MASHifiG IT llPf 


FROM SAM FRAIKISCft: 

A PLUS D 


RESIDENT BOOTHE SEATTLE DJt: 

KING OF PANTS - DESTRUKT 


FRIDAY MAY 15 

9Z5 E PIKE STREET « 1QTH, SEATTLE 

[Ml RE FI n SOOT1ESEAnUE.COM - 0 PM - 2 AM 

[|>EJ [S 'as? Ifyli 39 ai+wflo ■ si before iopm • sto 

FREE BOOTIE CDs TO FIRST 1 DO PEDPIfi 



frfOP >tiPV NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! 


imEtumsiiHi 


HIPPY MUM- 


MIDDAY VEIL 
SWAHILI 


II [ill EIEI III 


NEWAXEVES 

DJ EmORATEUR 


1HI 

HARRY NILSSON 

FULKTFiE* 

II TIE HI 


BARDOT 

TILSON XOXO 

LEVELS I MOVEMENT 


DANCE 

YOUHSELF 

CLEAN 

EMUD DO'S/if 


iLitiis-wiiseMiuni 


DANCE mmil CLEAN - EYEIT SATURDAY Q O 
MURE EVENT INFO IT CHOP5UEi.COM omm mrnam cwmisunu 


COMING SOON 


ymumimiEIEI1MIKII* 
IJtTOO MANY CREEPS 

uilUILti mm 
Ml (Ml YD SON! 
SJIEWTlIUVU-lAIPtihi 
ilFEJfilltl 

iSlELLtSlim FIILEAEHiR 
HI HO P ALONG 
SHMJSTENKENSFtUE 

SJ1 llli S| ill: IK HH3 

umm 

UKIN5KI IE[HlinU3 
ESBIE1I LAKE SWIMMERS 
iiUFDIYIAMMJT 
HHNSIlILlCIICIltIL 
Ell LAIEAKIFTT ILEIUBnEin 
EG APPLE JAM 
iMaLwmir-rarBiip 
Eli CAR SEAT HEADREST 
EIHJIlft 

IJI DllIRH! WITH IKIH 

(3HEAC WOUNDCITY 
71 CARY WILSON 

TIME LT- BA MANA - TOR CHE 
7JIFUNIIYCDNGPESJETIDN 
ME THE SPITS 




























































































NEWS FEATURE SUGGESTS ARTS CHOW 


FILM 


THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 29 



DRUNK OF THE WEEK.. .BELOW 
THE HOMOSEXUAL AGENDA. . . 31 
DATA BREAKER. . . 32 


WED 

5/6 

iimi 

BARANOF The Life Acoustic 

★ CROCODILE Deerhoof, 
guests 

★ HIGHLINE Inter Arma, 
Yautja, Mercy Ties, guests 
JAZZ ALLEY Eric Bibb, 
Michael Jerome Browne 
LO-FI Wild Wants, I’D DIE 
FOR LO-FI, The Beach Boy 
NARWHAL Gaythiest, Baby 
Gurl, Sayonara, 9 pm, $6 
NECTAR Pablo Moses & The 
Revolutionary Dream Band 
Q NIGHTCLUB Kaytranada 
THE ROYAL ROOM The 
Minor 9, guests 8 pm 
SEAMONSTER Crack 
Sabbath: 10 pm, free 
SHOWBOX SODO All Time 
Low, Issues, guests 

★ SUNSET TAVERN The 
Shilohs, iji, 8 pm, $8 

★ © TACOMA DOME New 
Kids on the Block, TLC, Nelly 
TRACTOR TAVERN Della 
Mae, Left Coast Country 
THE TRIPLE DOOR 
THEATER Liz Longley, 
Anthony D’Amato, 7:30 pm 
© VERA PROJECT A 
Weekend at the Feelies, Soft 
Fangs, Red Alder, 8:30 pm 
VICTORY LOUNGE Lazy 
Animals, guests 



CONOR BYRNE The 

Brotherhood of The Drum 
TULA’S Kareem Kandi Band 


cd 

CHOP SUEY BYOV: 8 pm 
CONTOUR NuDisCO 
FOUNDATION SUBstance 
HAVANA Wicked & Wild 
★ KREMWERK Chinga la 
Rental: 9 pm 
NEIGHBOURS Pulse 


CLASSICAL 


© MCCAW HALL Ariadne 
auf Naxos: Seattle Opera 

THURS 

5/7 

il Ml 

© CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 
SPACE Machinations 
Musical, Divers & Sundry 
© CROCODILE The Mama 
Rags, guests 
© EL CORAZON Sick of 
Sarah, guests 
HIGHWAY 99 Brian Lee & 
the Orbiters: 8 pm, $7 

★ © JAZZ ALLEY Ramsey 
Lewis Ouartet, 7:30 pm 
JEWELBOX THEATER 
Sessions of She 

★ LO-FI Crawler, Dogs of 
War, guests, 9 pm, $7 
NECTAR Peter Rowan, 
guests, $20/$25 

★ NEPTUNE THEATRE They 
Might Be Giants: 8 pm 

© NEUMOS Ivan & Alyosha 
Q NIGHTCLUB Sharam Jey 
THE ROYAL room Royal 
Ramble: Red Jacket Mine 
SHOWBOX SODO The Panda 
Funk Tour: Deorro, 7 pm 

★ THE SHOWBOX Sleater- 
Kinney, 8 pm, $30 
SUNSET TAVERN R. Ring 


TRACTOR TAVERN The 

Foghorns, guests, 9 pm, $8 

THE TRIPLE DOOR 
THEATER Papa Josh & 
Friends: Howard Jones 
★ VERMILLION An Evening 
of Edgy Culture: 8 pm 
VICTORY LOUNGE 
Unwelcome Guests, 9 pm 



CONOR BYRNE The Guitar 
Summit: 8 pm, $13/$15 

ED 

BALLROOM Throwback 
Thursdays: DJ Tamm of KISS 

BALTIC ROOM Sugar Beat 
BARBOZA No Duh! 
contour Jaded 

★ HAVANA Sophisticated 
Mama 

★ MERCURY Sex. Wave 
NEIGHBOURS Tinder 
OHANA Get Right: DJ Sosa 
Q NIGHTCLUB Scuba: 9 pm 
SAINT JOHN’S BAR AND 
EATERY Peel Slowly 
TRINITY Space Thursdays 
THE WOODS Jobot, PressHa 


CLASSICAL 


© BENAROYA HALL Mozart: 
The Great Concertos 
© BRECHEMIN 
AUDITORIUM Brechemin 
Piano Series: 7:30 pm, $5 

FRI 

5/8 

nwi 

© BALLARD HOMESTEAD 

Courtney Marie Andrews, 


DRUNK OF THE WEEK 



I HAVE SOME QUESTIONS ABOUT BEER 

S eattle Beer Week runs through Sunday, May 17. This is the 
annual celebration of ALL THINGS BEER! I have some ques¬ 
tions: Who drank the first-ever beer—was it invented in ancient 
Mesopotamia or in the Middle Ages by Christian monks? How 
long does it take, running on a treadmill, to burn off one pint of 
stout? Does beer make your ears grow? Should you trust a two- 
fisting, sword-carrying man with two tiny horns coming out of 
his forehead? What kind of beer should I order? Find out more at 
seattlebeerweek.com. KELLY O 


Whitney Lyman, Anna Tivel 
BARBOZA Megan Wilde, A 
String of Pearls, guests, $8 
BLUE MOON TAVERN 
Colorworks, guests, $5 
CAFE RACER The Grindylow, 
Weird Ons, 9 pm 
COLUMBIA CITY THEATER 
Real Don Music, Screens, 
Richie Dagger’s Crime, 9 pm 

★ © CROCODILE The 
Rentals, guests, 8 pm, $15 
© EL CORAZON Icarus The 
Owl, guests 

★ GROUND ZERO 
(BELLEVUE) White Wards, 
Nudes, Wetbrain, guests, $6 
HIGH DIVE The Requisite, 
American Island, guests 
HIGHLINE Assemblage 23, 
Alter Der Ruine: 9 pm, $1 5 
HIGHWAY 99 DoctorfunK 
HOLLOW EARTH RADIO 
Glossophonic Showcase 

★ © JAZZ ALLEY Ramsey 
Lewis Ouartet, 9:30 pm 
LO-FI Katie Kate, Erik Blood, 
Aeon Fux: 9 pm, $8/$1 0 
THE MIX Jamie Nova Band, 
Machine, guests, 9 pm, $8 
MOORE THEATRE 1 4th 
Annual More Music 
NECTAR Annual Northwest 
Deep Funk Festival: Guests, 
8 pm, $10/$15 

★ NEUMOS Dan Deacon, 
Prince Rama, Ben O’Brien 
RENDEZVOUS Johnny 
Hoffman & the Residents, 
guests 

SHOWBOX SODO Griz, 
Floozies, Muzzy Bearr 

★ THE SHOWBOX Sleater- 
Kinney, 9 pm, $30 
SKYLARK CAFE & CLUB Jon 
Davidson, guests, 9 pm, $7 
© STUDIO SEVEN N8V, 
Supercult, guests 
SUNSET TAVERN Jupe Jupe, 
guests 

TACOMA DOME Big Band 
World Tour: Diplo, guests 
TRACTOR TAVERN Bright 
Lights Social Hour, guests 
© THE TRIPLE DOOR 
THEATER Nellie McKay, Ben 
Ballinger, 8 pm, $26-$33 



88 KEYS Dueling Pianos 
NORDIC HERITAGE 
MUSEUM Friday Night 
Concert & Ballard Jazz Walk 
TULA’S Jovino Santos Neto 
Ouinteto: 7:30 pm, $16 
VITO’S RESTAURANT & 
LOUNGE Casey MacGill 

ED 

ASTON MANOR #AstonMob 
Fridays: Guests 
BALLROOM Rendezvous 
BALMAR 80’s/90’s Night 
BALTIC ROOM Fundamental 
Fridays: Guests 
CHOP SUEY Shimmy 
Shimmy Ya!: DJ Curtis 
FOUNDATION Resonate 
HAVANA Viva Havana 
NEIGHBOURS Absolut 
PONY Shenanigans 
Q NIGHTCLUB DJ Christyle 
R PLACE Swollen Fridays 
THERAPY LOUNGE Rapture 
TRINITY Playday 
VERMILLION The Jam 


CLASSICAL 


© CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 
SPACE Seattle Composers’ 
Salon: 8 pm, $5/$15 
© MEANY HALL The Magic 
Flute, 7:30 pm 
© SEATTLE ASIAN ART 
MUSEUM Music of the 
Japanese Imperial Court 

★ © ST. JAMES CATHEDRAL 
Prism-Part & MacMillan 

SAT 

5/9 

© BALLARD HOMESTEAD 

Julia Massey & The Five Finger 
Discount, Robb Benson 

★ BARBOZA Unknown 
Mortal Orchestra, Nurses 
BLUE MOON TAVERN The 
Hasslers, guests 


★ = Recommended Q = All Ages 

For the complete, searchable, constantly updated calendar, go to thestranger.com/music 
For ticket on-sale announcements, follow twitter.com/seashows 



UIGHLINj; 

Wednesday, May 13th 

BLOODY PHOENIX 

Wilt, Endorphins Lost, Savage 

9PM, $7 


Friday, May 15th 

DOA 

Hilltop Rats, Dead Bars, 
Bad Future 

9PM, $12-$15 


Saturday, May 16th 

GREEN JELLO 
Headless Pez, Paralyzer, 
WARNING DANGER, 
Wolfgang Fuck 

9PM, $10-$12 


Sunday, May 17th 

Highline’s 5 year anniversary show!: 

EYEHATEGOD 
Special Guests! 
Transient 

9PM, $20-$24 


Monday, May 18th 

FUCK YEAH BINGO! 

7PM, FREE 


Wednesday, May 20th 

TRUE WIDOW 

Dust Moth, Red Liquid 

9PM, $10-$12 


www.highlineseattle.com 

210 Broadway Ave E • 21+ 

Dinner service Sun - Tues 4pm-8pm 






































































30 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 



5/14 

THURSDAY 



The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion 

We Are Hex 

All Ages 


5/15 

FRIDAY 



Through the Roots 

Stranger, Valley Green 

All Ages 


5/16 

SATURDAY 



Brite Lines album release 

The Weather (formerly Campfire OK), 
Unlikely Friends 

21 + 


5/17 

SUNDAY 

5/18 

MONDAY 



Tove Styrke 

All Ages 



GBH 

FANG, The Lucky Boys 

21 + 




Sun 6/21 

THE EXPANDERS 

@ NECTAR 
LOUNGE 



Tue 6/16 

7 SECONDS 



Wed 7/8 


BIG 

BUSINESS 


UP & COMING EVERY MONDAY & TUESDAY LIQUID COURAGE KARAOKE 5/20 KLINGANDE 3RDEGREE 
5/22 PUBLISH THE QUEST 5/23 SMALLPOOLS '24 SLY & ROBBIE AND THE TAXI GANG 5/28 LUNIZ 5/29 MIAMI 
HORROR 5/30 REFUSED 5/31 SCHOOL OF ROCK 6/1 MEG MEYERS 6/2 DEAD MEADOW 6/3 WHITE LUNG 6/4 DRENGE 
@ THE SUNSET 6/5 GREAT LAKE SWIMMERS @ CHOP SUEY 6/6 RONE 6/6 WARLOCKS @ LOFI 6/9 DELTA SPIRIT 


2200 2ND AVE ★ CORNER OF 2ND & BLANCHARD 
TICKETS @ THECROCODILE.COM & THE CROCODILE BOX OFFICE 
★ MORE INFO AT WWW.THECROCODILE.COM ★ 



BLOCK & PARTY 

Capitol 



m 

% 



Hill 


RATATAT TV On The Radio The 
Toro y Moi Built to Spill Jamie xx 


Broods The Julie Ruin Flatbush Zombies 

Wye Oak Giraffage Shabazz Palaces 

DIIV Com Truise Deafheaven 

Unknown Mortal Orchestra Shannon & The Clams Wet 


capitolhillblockparty.com 


# 




Ml... 

Rutji -HE?] 




THIS 

FRI 


WEDC 
AUG 9 

7:00PM DOORS 
21 AND OVER 


10:00AM 


W/PROPER 


LOCAL Hi 


8:00PM DOORS 


7:00PM DOORS 
21 AND OVER 


W/PROPER 


FOR A FULL SCHEDULE VISIT WWW.MIKETHRASHERPRESENTS.COM 

FOLLOW US ONLINE AT: FACEBOOK.COM/MIKETHRASHERPRESENTS 
TWITTER.COM/MIKETHRASHERSEA • INSTAGRAM: @MIKETHRASHERPRESENTS 


CROWN 

THE 

EMPIRE 

& VOLUMES 


mim 


FOREVERMORE 
UNTIL THIS 
SUNRISE 
& HERMOSA 


THE 


GATE 


THIS 


SAT 


BATTLEME 

& SHIVER TWINS 


SAT 1A 

MAY IO 


FEATURING KYLE TOUCHER 


SAT n 

JUN IJ 


TOE TAG 

DEATHRAID 
MILLHOUS 
& POWER HITTER 


855-CAS-TIXX X2 VHf ■ pfr ■ 


THE WEATHER 

& VALISE 


COPELAND 


COMING MICROWAVE • CROWBAR • TAYLOR CANIFF • MEG MYERS 

CAAil. ACCEPTANCE • FU MANCHU • ANTHONY RANERI (OF BAYSIDE) 
5WV "I* SUICIDEGIRLS • OVERKILL / SYMPHONY X 


GO TO 

WWW.MIKETHRASHERPRESENTS.COM 

FOR COMPLETE DETAILS AND INFO ON HOW TO 
GET YOUR TICKETS EARLY 





Photo of Erika 
by Kelly 0. 

Watch these ads 
for more lovely 
HUMP!-ers! 



The Stranger and 
the Portland Mercury 
invite local filmmakers, 
porn stars, porn-star 
wannabes, hotties, 
kinksters, regular folks, 
and all other creative 
types to make short porn 
films - five minutes max - 
for HUMP! 2015. 


GtDSH tMKQSS 

BEST HUMOR: $1000 First Prize BEST SEX: $1000 First Prize 

BEST KINK: $1000 First Prize BEST IN SHOW: $5000 Grand Prize 

This year’s extra credit items: Mike Huckabee’s book 
“God, Guns, Grits, and Gravy” and Hula Hoops! 


HUMP! SUBMISSIONS DUE SEPTEMBER 30 TH! 

For complete information - go to humpseattle.com 






























































NEWS FEATURE SUGGESTS ARTS CHOW 


FILM 


THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 31 


CAIRO Chastity Belt, 
Pleather, Mommy Long Legs 

© CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 
SPACE FHTAGN, 8 pm 
COLUMBIA CITY THEATER 
Freddy and Francine, 7 pm 
CONOR BYRNE The Barn 
Owls, guests 

★ CROCODILE Helmet 

© EL CORAZON Ensiferum, 
Korpiklaani, TrollFest, 7 pm 
HARD ROCK CAFE Kalimba, 
guests 

HIGH DIVE Milhouse with 
The Deities, guests 
HIGHWAY 99 Too Slim & the 
Taildraggers: 8 pm, $18 

★ © JAZZ ALLEY Ramsey 
Lewis Quartet, 9:30 pm 
KATE’S PUB Decoys!, Deep 
Channel, 8:30 pm, free 
KIRKLAND PERFORMANCE 
CENTER Ina Mina Dika 
KRAB JAB STUDIO Lennon 

★ © LANGSTON HUGHES 
PERFORMING ARTS 
INSTITUTE B’Shnorkestra 
THE MIX Load Levelers, 
Spiderface, guests 

★ MOORE THEATRE Seattle 
Rock Orchestra Performs 
The Beatles: 8 pm, $25 
NECTAR Desert Dwellers, 
guests, 8 pm 

NEPTUNE THEATRE 
Kodaline, Gavin James 
NEUMOS Chris Robinson 
Brotherhood, 8 pm, $18 
© OMCULTURE Love + 
Music = Education: 7 pm 
THE ROYAL ROOM Twisted 
Groove 

★ THE SHOWBOX Sleater- 
Kinney, 9 pm, $30 
SKYLARK CAFE & CLUB The 
Music of Weezer, U2, and 
Guns N’ Roses: 9 pm, $7 
SLIM’S LAST CHANCE The 
Disco Cowboys, guests 

© STUDIO SEVEN Kung Fu 
Vampire, guests: 7 pm, $22 
SUNSET TAVERN Zooma 
Bella, 5:30 pm, $8; McTuff, 
guests, 10 pm $8 
© TOWN HALL Hootenanny! 
A Town Hall Tribute to Pete 
Seeger 

TRACTOR TAVERN Cash’d 
Out, 11 pm, $17 
TRIPLE DOOR 
MUSICQUARIUM LOUNGE 

Mackapalooza 3 



88 KEYS Dueling Piano Show 
© KERRY/PONCHO HALL 

Vijay Iyer Trio, 8 pm 
TULA’S Greta Matassa 
Quartet: 7:30 pm, $15 



95 SLIDE Good Saturdays 
ASTON MANOR NRG 
Saturdays 
BALLROOM Sinful 
Saturdays: Guests, 9 pm 
BALMARTop 40 Night 
BALTIC ROOM Crave 
BARBOZA Inferno 

★ COLUMBIA CITY 
THEATER Cirque du 
Bollywood: DJ Kazan, 9 pm 
HAVANA Viva Havana 
KREMWERK Bottom Forty 

★ LO-FI Emerald City Soul 
Club: 9 pm, $10 
NEIGHBOURS Powermix 
PONY Glitoris 

R PLACE Therapy Saturday 
RUNWAY CAFE DJ David N 
SUBSTATION Brian Lyons, 
Erin O’Connor, Ramiro, 9 pm 
TRINITY Reload Saturdays 


CLASSICAL 


© BENAROYA HALL Mozart: 
The Great Concertos 
© MEANY HALL The Magic 
Flute, 7:30 pm 

★ © ST. JAMES CATHEDRAL 

Prism-Part & MacMillan 

SUN 

5/10 

IILVl 

BARBOZA Tal National 

★ BLACK LODGE Neil 
Michael Hagerty, guests 
CHOP SUEY Childbirth, 
Mommy Long Legs, guest 
© CROCODILE Kyle, 
Brothers from Another: 8 pm 
© EL CORAZON Solstafir, 
Ancient Wisdom, Guests 

★ © HARD ROCK CAFE 
Caspar Babypants 

★ © JAZZ ALLEY Ramsey 
Lewis Quartet, 7:30 pm 
JAZZBONES Sinatra at the 
Sands: Paul Wall 

© KEYARENA Neil Diamond 


LITTLE RED HEN Honky 
Tonkers 

★ MOORE THEATRE Seattle 
Rock Orchestra Performs 
The Beatles 

© MURAL AMPHITHEATRE 

Stone Karaoke Light Real 
Music Festival: 6 pm 
NECTAR Taarka, Renegade 
Stringband, guests 

© THE SHOWBOX James 
Bay, Elle King, 8 pm, $16 
© SKYLARK CAFE & CLUB 
Fallow, Trauma Del Ray, 
Harpoon the Whale 
© THE TRIPLE DOOR 
THEATER In Dreams 

★ © VERA PROJECT Harry 
and the Potters, Lisa Prank 
VICTORY LOUNGE Cmrtyz, 
Versing: 9:30 pm 



THE ROYAL ROOM Roxy 
Coss Quintet, 7 pm, 

★ © TULA’S Lonnie Mardis 
& SCC Jazz Orchestra 

CZ1 

CONTOUR Broken Grooves 

CORBU LOUNGE Salsa 
MERCURY Interzone 
NEIGHBOURS Noche Latina 
R PLACE Homo Hop 


CLASSICAL 


© BENAROYA HALL 

Tchaikovsky’s String Quartet 
No. 1 

© BRECHEMIN 
AUDITORIUM Barry 
Lieberman & Friends 
© MEANY HALL The Magic 
Flute: Pacific MusicWorks 

MON 

5/11 

HUl 

88 KEYS Blues On Tap 
© CROCODILE Dev, Go 
Periscope 

© EL CORAZON Maid 
Myriad, The Fine Constant, 
guests 7:30 pm; Mothership, 
guests, 8:30 pm 

★ SUNSET TAVERN Willis 
Earl Beal, Skin Lies, 8 pm 
© THE TRIPLE DOOR 
THEATER Luke Wade, 


Tommy Simmons: 7:30 pm 



THE ROYAL ROOM Zachary 
Rushing, 8 pm, donation 
TULA’S David Marriott Big 
Band: 7:30 pm, $5 



BALTIC ROOM Jam Jam 

MOE BAR Moe Bar Monday 
★ RE-BAR Collide-O-Scope 


CLASSICAL 


★ BENAROYA HALL After 
Life 

TUE 

5/12 

CHOP SUEY Some Girls, DJ 
Sloppy Jo, DJ Dyl Widdit 
© CROCODILE Wolf Alice, 
Gateway Drugs, 8 pm, $12 
© EL CORAZON Cartel, 
Chroma, guests 
© FREMONT ABBEY Loch 
Lomond, Windoe, Guests 
HIGH DIVE Tim Held, 

RAICA, Gel-Sol, 8 pm, $6 
© JAZZ ALLEY Jane Bunnett 
& Maqueque 
narwhal Sciatica, 
Frustration, guests 
NEUMOS Other Lives, 
Riothorse Royale, 8 pm, $15 
SUNSET TAVERN 
Greyhounds, The Witness 
THE TRIPLE DOOR 
THEATER Susan Galbraith, 
Zarni, Nick Drummond 
VERMILLION Tinfoil and 
Tape, guests, free 



PINK DOOR Marina Albero 
TULA’S Emerald City Jazz 
Orchestra: 8 pm, $5 



CORBU LOUNGE Club NYX 
Wave & Goth: 10 pm, $5 
DARRELL’S TAVERN DJ 
Wade T, free 
HAVANA Real Love ‘90s 
NEIGHBOURS Pump It Up 


CLASSICAL 


© BRECHEMIN 
AUDITORIUM BM Recital 


THE HOMOSEXUAL AGENDA 


BY ADRIAN RYAN 


THURSDAY 5/14 

BEAT YOUR FACE, BEAT SOME SUGAR 

Ding, ding, ding! In the Big Gay Battle for 
Thursday night, there has emerged a clear 
and fagabulous winner, and it is Sugar 
Beat at the Baltic Room. You 
haven't been yet? Well, sister 
mister (sinister?), you're the 
only one: That place gets as 
packed as Elton John's fudge. 

A drunken, twirling haven 
for drag artistes old and new, 
pretty rubberneckers, and 
the consummately dancey, it 
has grown to be one of my 
favorite nights, exclamation point. The eve¬ 
ning is graced by the beauty and talents of 
hostess Isaac Scott (who fled Neighbours' 
Thursday night just to do it), and one can 
always expect to encounter a few Mar- 
koses, a handful of Howes, and the magic 
of James Majesty—there are more Drag 
Hauses represented than you can shake a 
mascara wand at. Add to this the astro¬ 
nomical cost of NO COVER (when you like 
Sugar Beat on Facebook) and the delicious 
discoings of DJ Brett Law, and I mean 
really—who cares if you have to get up at 
dawn's rosy ass crack the next morning? 
Drink, dance, drink, love, live, gurl... LIVE! 
(And drink.) Baltic Room, 9 pm, $3, 21 +. 

FRIDAY 5/15 

BROWN DERBY DOES DINOSAURS 

It is my firm and immutable policy to 
never miss a Brown Derby—the whimsi¬ 
cal romps through hilarious lands of 


pure madness joy (also fart jokes) that 
they are. It's really quite depressing that 
they are so few and far between, it's true, 
but our throbbing hunger for it ends at 
last! Ian Bell and his balls-out-crazy crew 
are bringing us their 
brachiosaurus-iest, Jeff 
Goldblum-iest offering 
to date: Jurassic Park\ 
Yes, there will be Freddy 
Molitich and Todd LaTodd 
(Seattle's version of James 
St. James) and Scott 
Shoemaker like always, 
but Kimberly Nyhous and 
dreamy Jason Sharp are joining this time, 
too, so it's sure to be super extra talent- 
packed. Three nights only! Re-bar, 8 pm, 
$20 adv/$25 DOS, 21+, May 14-16. 

SUNDAY 5/1Z 

AN AGING CATHEDRAL 

Time flies when you're a big freaky fairy. 
Can you believe our baby, Cathedral at 
Kremwerk, is a whole year old already? 
Tonight is the anniversary party! It seems 
like only yesterday that... well, every¬ 
thing seems like only yesterday. I drink 
a little. (I've only just barely learned to 
spell "Kremwerk" correctly!) Seattle's "it 
gurl" queen Cucci Binaca will be all up 
in the event, as will our friend Amoania, 
and they are bringing a curious San Fran¬ 
cisco performance artist called Dia Dear 
to dazzle your eyeballs too. Resident DJs 
Roy G Biv and Ozma Otacava presiding. 
Kremwerk, 9 pm, $5, 21 +. 




WED Silt 

WET Jammu 

DfUSfTl 

HLSEPHKffl 

FffltfIS 

StK bui w Jutaitti 


mrnm*»w 

SIM 5/17 

MTHENUL ifiJUMi 

KM S/l| 

somu 


WMLE DUCHESS 

FBI SfJ? 

KJMACTraMHi 


iHTt\ DJG HIFT-Rjlft ! IflflfTHtHI f SPiCtMTEH 

Mm BONSil JLl t QBti DWtMA f (L?S tfAfE 4 SHARLE3£ 

mtmi hw hfciwdi t eeh mt\m t djs + : ykum 

TT W ms] f MFF RIFF + REMhUJ Ht M 

im w* dla dor mi film j mm 
iiriBiwuEiumAin mMi as-gis t sajgred mwi 
m mu ranfUmaw* / ttfWGif t Q j wSTCR SSIEfl 
PWwmCTui BMfESljY HflmES f BP tin .TUBS + IK I? 





































32 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 



0STUOIO 


ALL SHOWS / ALL AGES BAR W/ID UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED 
JUST OFF 1ST AVE SOUTH - 110 S. HORTON 
More Info 206-286-1312 or www.studioseven.us 


EVEN 


jmrmi 

j .im fir i w|l u 11 mi 

5 PREVAIL 'A 


fHfli 


5-AT |UME 6TH 


UP & COMING 


glTONY MACAPLINEpJlO YEARS MlEIL OF 
MAYA ^1349 / NECROPHAGIA @ CLUB SUR 
WILLIAM CONTROL 5 QUIET RIOT / JACK 
RUSSELL'S GREAT WHITE / LA GUNS £ UPON THIS 
DWJJNIN^^^H^RjSTOCRAT^ft^UTOGRAPH 


ALL EVENT TICKETS AVAILABLE THRU 
WWW.ETIX.COM AND STUDIO 7 BOX OFFICE 



FRI 

5/15 


SAT 

5/16 


SUN 

5/17 

MON 

5/18 

TUE 

5/19 

WED 

5/20 


= PRESENTS: FUNK/SOUL/GROOVE 

MARMALADE 

FT. ARTIST OF THE MONTH: 

TEMPLE CANYON $6/8 PM 

HIGH DIVE PRESENTS: INDIE/GROOVE 

GEORGETOWN ALL-STARS 

AIRPORT WAY, MILE 9 $8/9:30 PM 

HIGH DIVE PRESENTS: THE 9TH ANNUAL 
TRACKSUIT INVITATIONAL 

MOE BETTA & FRIENDS 

HOLY PISTOLA, DJ RISE 

$10 SUGGESTED DONATION/8 PM 

PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT SAFE FUTURES 

HIGH DIVE PRESENTS: HIP-HOP/ALTERNATIVE 

SAMMY WARM HANDS 

OGAR BURL, PUNCHACOP (BLACK 
MAGIC NOIZE/FATED EMPIRE), PRYOR PRISM 
$7/8:30 PM 

ABSOLUTE KARAOKE 

WITH KJ-NOMI! $5 JAMESON DRINKS ALL 
NIGHT LONG! SINGING AT 9 PM! FREE/7 PM 

HIGH DIVE PRESENTS: ELECTRO/POP 

TIM HEID 

RAICA, GEL-SOL $6/8 PM 
HIGH DIVE PRESENTS: INDIE/POP 

THE WEEKNITES 

BIG BAD, THE GANGHIS CON ARTIST 
$6/8 PM 


LIVE MUSIC • FOOD • BOOZE 
No Cover until 1 Hour before show! 





TO 5/13 ftr/w M 'H&! 
m 5/13 l\/l ! • I—| 

JSAi 3 /I 6 TVTE ATI 

SUN 5/17 *n IMU11MTTUNMI 

J10N t/lfl JWKKM »01L QtJEEft BAR 

TUE 5/ISI * MrtT* HMA9HF | 



OPEN TUE Ur JD 4 £ SUM JU1 

UTE HITE DIN INC 

MILT HtfPT HOUR 

(UfT (OUClULS A tiURHT fOOP 



—OBi 

BY DAVE SEGAL 

THURSDAY 5/14 

FALSE PROPHET, NOW ON THURS¬ 
DAYS, WELCOMES ANIMAL BODIES 
AND BEST AVAILABLE TECHNOLOGY 

False Prophet moves from Sunday 
to Thursday, so you have less of a 
valid excuse to not attend resident DJs 
Sharlese and Kate's great, darkly 
tinted monthly. On their 2014 album 
The Killing Scene, Vancouver's Animal 
Bodies have a track called "Start the 
Suffocation" that sounds almost exactly 
like D.A.F.'s 1981 EBM stormer "Der 
Mussolini." If you're going to steal, take 
from the best, right? The rest of the 
record follows in the tradition of stolid 
'80s European electronic body music 
that strives to move your hips while 
simultaneously shattering them. 
Trust me, it's more fun than it sounds. 
Seattle-via-Portland aural agitator Best 
Available Technology (aka Kevin Palmer) 
also roughs up your body, but in a less 
propulsive, more abstract manner. His 
jagged, extravagantly distorted compo¬ 
sitions sometimes come off as long-lost 
illbient jams (check out the cone- 
toasting dubadelia and Chain Reaction- 
esq ue techno of his BASH004 EP). With 
Ozma Otacava, installations by Claire 
Haranda. Kremwerk, 9 pm, $8, 21+. 



JOIN US BEFORE OR AFTER YOUR SIFF MOVIE 



FUll Wl RKTMIUIH 

its e pine ^ show noon 

tAPTTOL HILL 

WtfW.THETINTABLE com 



THURS, 5/14 - SAT, 5/16 

WITTY CITY with 

MONICA NEV1 



Monica Nevi is a native of the Seattle 
area, having grown up about 20 
minutes south in Renton, Wa. She 
has performed in the Bridgetown 
Comedy Festival and the Seattle 
International Comedy Competition 
as well as finishing first place in 
the Olympic Peninsula Comedy 
Competition. Monica has appeared on 
FOX'S nationally syndicated television 
show 'Laughs', as well as Seattle 
based television programs 'New Day 
Northwest and '[the 206]' 


1COMEDY 
UNDERGROUND 


109 S.WASHINGTON ST. 

(ON OCCIDENTAL PARK) 

(206) 628-0303 


WWW.COMEDYUNDERGROUND.COM 


MAYA JANE COLES IS AN ACE 
HOUSE-MUSIC POPULIST 

English Japanese DJ/producer Maya Jane 
Coles has achieved a rare combination 
of critical adulation and commercial suc¬ 
cess. You may find yourself using words 
like "tasteful," "immaculate," "sultry," 
and "soulful" when listening to Coles's 
populist, house-oriented output. While 
I may not be astounded by her music 
(except when it gets deep and hypnotic, 
as on "I Would Fly"), I can recognize that 
it comes from a sharp, shrewd mind. 

She also operates under the Nocturnal 
Sunshine alias, producing dubstep-lite 
dance cuts that work on both radio¬ 
friendly and club-centric levels (the 
Nocturnal Sunshine LP drops May 26, by 
the way). Lots of people love Coles, so 
you should expect a packed dance floor 
"Getting Freaky" at Q tonight. Mind 
your hygiene. With Midland and Nor¬ 
dic Soul. Q Nightclub, 9 pm, $20, 21+. 

SATURDAY 5/16 

DEBAUCHED TEKNO NIGHT KRAKT 
RELAUNCHES WITH BAY AREA 
BRUISER MILKPLANT 

Notorious club night KRAKT barges 
back into rude life tonight after a long 
hiatus, at the newish venue Substation. 
This is great news for people who like 
their techno hard and smart. Resident 
DJ Kristina Childs has always stressed 
techno's most debauched and rau¬ 
cous tendencies while maintaining a 
high level of intelligence—no mean feat 
for your mean feet. Headlining KRAKT's 
welcome reboot is former Seattle/cur¬ 
rent Oakland producer Milkplant (aka 
Justin Pennell), co-boss of the extraor¬ 
dinary label From 0-1 with Seattle DJ/ 
producer Sone, also on the bill tonight. 
Whether behind the decks or in the 
studio, Milkplant plows a narrow but 
deep furrow of merciless techno that 
makes you feel adrenalized and invul¬ 
nerable. That delusion comes in handy 
on a Saturday night in Ballard. With 
John Massey, Xan Lucero, and Eu¬ 
gene Fauntleroy. Substation, 10 pm-4 
am, $10 before midnight/$15 after, 21 +. 
































































NEWS FEATURE SUGGESTS ARTS CHOW MUSIC JJUflW 


THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 3 3 


FILM SHORTS 

More reviews and movie times: thestranger.com/lilm 


LIMITED RUN 

★ THE EPIC OF EVEREST 

A documentary about the failed (but still groundbreaking) 
attempt to summit Mount Everest in 1924 by George 
Mallory and Andrew “Sandy" Irvine, freshly restored by 
the British Film Institute. Grand Illusion, Sat-Sun 5 pm, 
Mon-Tues 7 pm. 

★ HEAVEN ADORES YOU: AN ELLIOTT SMITH 
PROJECT 

The emergence of Elliott Smith from the cacophony of mid- 
‘90s Northwest punk was unlike any other music success 
story, except in the sense that, in the end, it was exactly like 
every music success story. The same can be said of this 


documentary, which benefits from the filmmakers’ obvious 
affection for his subject and access to a lot of Smith’s actual 
friends and collaborators (many of whom make an admirable 
habit of not participating too promiscuously in the Elliott 
Smith industry). The most important asset, of course, is the 
impossible bounty of Smith’s songs on the soundtrack. But 
all these good elements also conspire in a strange way to 
diminish the film-the same way an Elliott Smith song on 
pretty much any speaker seems to shame any song that 
precedes or follows it. The form of the music bio doc is so 
familiar by now that it can't help but bend any artist’s story 
to its strict generic edges, no matter how reverent and loving 
the treatment strives to be. Smith never fit comfortably in the 
frames that were available to him-aesthetically, culturally, or 



ir 

TELEVISION" 

BY WM.™ STEVEN 
HUMPHREY 


MAD MEN: HOW IT ALL ENDS 

Clear your schedules, buttholes! The Mad 
Men series finale is this Sunday, May 17 
(AMC, 10 pm)—and if creator Matthew 
Weiner's past is any indication, the poop is 
gonna smack the fan! As you remember, 
Weiner also created The Sopranos and the 
now-famous "blackout" scene at the end of 
the series, which left viewers screaming 
in confusion over the fate of Tony Soprano. 
WELL, MR. SMARTY-PANTS WEINER! Just 
to make sure you're not pulling any similar 
shenanigans, I'm writing a little thing called 
"Wm.™ Steven Humphrey's Five Most 
Brilliant Mad Men Theories™ That Will Be 
Absolutely 100 Percent Correct™!" Now try 
to bamboozle us, Mr. Shenanigan! 

• Joan Holloway Causes the Beatles 
to Break Up! Sure, everybody blames Yoko 
Ono for causing the 1970 split of the Fab 
Four. But actually, Joan quits McCann Erick¬ 
son to manage Apple Records, where the 
Beatles fall hopelessly in love with her. Joan 
picks Paul— of course —causing the other 
members to explode in fury... particularly 
John, who exacts his revenge on the earth 
by hooking up with Yoko and writing some 
of the worst music ever. Nice going, Joan! 

• Pete Campbell Gets Run Over by 
the Lawn Mower from Season 3! Re¬ 
member that rampaging lawn mower that 
ran amok in Sterling Cooper and cut off the 
foot of their limey boss? We never heard 
from the lawn mower again, right? Because 
it kept going! It's been circling Central Park 
this entire time, waiting patiently to maul 
its true, original target—Pete Campbell. 
(Cutting off the limey's foot was just bloody 
icing on the cake.) 


• Roger Sterling's Mustache Inspires 
the World's Greatest Mustaches! Roger 
doesn't quit advertising... he becomes a 
mustache model! And he's so successful, he 
inspires the great mustaches of the 1970s, 
including Burt Reynolds, Billy Dee Williams, 
Sam Elliott, and Tom Selleck. Unfortunately, 
Roger's mustache tragically dies in a 1978 
lawn-mower accident, causing Roger to lose 
his fortune and become a greeter at Walmart. 

• Peggy Olson Magically Becomes US 
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright! 
Look, I don't know how she does it... it's 
just "magic," okay? Urrrrrghhhh. FINE. How 
about this: Unhappy at McCann Erickson, 
Peggy's visited by a magic donkey whose 
only power is turning people into Secretary 
of State Madeleine Albright. And Peggy's 
like, "Sure... don't have anything else cook¬ 
ing. Why not?" So she becomes Madeleine 
Albright, who goes on to travel the world, 
championing human rights and global envi¬ 
ronmental standards and knocking Saddam 
Hussein's eyeball out during an argument 
over who really broke up the Beatles. 
(Spoiler alert: It was Joan.) 

• Don Draper Wants to Be US Secre¬ 
tary of State Madeleine Albright, Too... 
but He Can't! Insanely jealous that Peggy/ 
Madeleine Albright gets to knock Saddam 
Hussein's eyeball out, he begs the magic 
donkey to let him be Madeleine Albright, 
too. "Are you nuts?" cries the magic 
donkey. "There can't be TWO Madeleine 
Albrights, idiot. Besides, you've already 
changed your identity once, so EFF OFF." 
Despondent, Don legally changes his name 
back to Dick Whitman, and in the last shot 
of the show is seen climbing aboard the 
rampaging lawn mower (which is blasting 
Beatles music). Then he rides into Iraq in or¬ 
der to run over Saddam Hussein's eyeball... 
aaaaand BLACKOUT! ■ 


Read Humpy’s weekly TV listings at 

0 THESTRANGER.COM 





WIN A COMPLIMENTARY PASS 
FOR TWO, TO A SPECIAL 
ADVANCE SCREENING! 


TOMORROWLAND 


TUESDAY, MAY 19 
7:00 PM - SEATTLE 


Send us your name and email address to 
seattle@43kix.com for your chance to 
win a complimentary pass for two, 
to a special advance screening! 

Must enter by 12 p.m. on Monday, May 18 


THIS FILM IS RATED PG. 

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Limit one (1) admit-two pass per person. Must be 13 years of age to receive pass. 
Employees of all promotional partners and their agencies are not eligible. Void where prohibited. Entries must 
be received by 12PM on MONDAY, MAY 18,2015 to be eligible to receive pass. Winners will be contacted via 
e-mail to receive their pass. Sponsors not responsible for incomplete, lost, late or misdirected entries or for 
failure to receive entries due to transmission or technical failures of any kind. SEATING IS LIMITED, SO ARRIVE 
EARLY. PASS DOES NOT GUARANTEE A SEAT AT THE SCREENING. 


IN THEATERS NATIONWIDE MAY 22, 2015 

Disney.com/Tomorrowland | H/DisneyTomorrovvland 
^/DisneyPictures | #Tomorrowland 


r\pl THE SCASICROW PROJECT 5030 ROOSEVELT WAYNE, SEATTLE • 206-524-8554 
PtftSENTS.: www.scarecrow.com 



ON SALE THIS WEEK Also available for rent 


MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW (Criterion 
Collection) Please, Call your Parents. You’ll Be Glad 
You Did. Blu-ray $26.95 

BATTLESTAR GALACTICA COLLECTION 

Every Original Series Episode...Get your Muffit the 
Daggit fix. 

8-Disc Blu-ray Set $84.95 or 18 Discs (!) for $109.95 

BLACKHAT Thor is the World’s Greatest Hacker 
DVD/Blu-ray $27.95 



ALSO NEW THIS WEEK For a full list of New Releases for rent + sale, visit scarecrow.com 


RAZING THE BAR 

Awesome Doc about Beloved Venue The Funhouse 
DVD $15.00 

MOONLIGHTING 

Long Out-of-Print Polish Classic Starring Jeremy Irons 
DVD / Blu-ray $27.95 

X: THE MAN WITH THE X-RAY EYES 

X-Ray Vision isn’t All It’s Cracked Up to Be 
Blu-ray $21.95 



VAMPYROS LESBOS 




Jess Franco’s Erotic Vampire Masterpiece - Uncut 
Blu-ray $23.95 

SHE KILLED IN ECSTASY 

Revenge Is a Dish Best Served Sexy 
Blu-ray $23.95 

JAMAICA INN 

The Other Hitchcock/Du Maurier Classic 
Blu-ray $23.95 


Two New Cult Transmissions from ARROW! 


Yakuza Thriller RETALIATION and the 


Deliriously Twisted THE STRANGE CASE OF 
DR. JEKYLL AND MISS OSBOURNE 


Both $26.95 on Blu-ray! 


























































34 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 



NOW PLAYING 

AVENGERS: AGE OF ULTRON 



» NOW FEATURING 1 


USER PROJECTION. DOLBY ATMOS. RESERVED SEATING, 
GOURMET CONCESSIONS. BEER. WINE HKD EIDER 


TICKETS AVAILABLE AT CINERAMA.COM 



otherwise-so his presence in this one can’t help feeling 
like a reduction of an irreducible person, rather than an 
encapsulation of a great and tragic career. But for all that, 
seeing his close friends talk straight about the experience 
of losing him is both gratifying and disturbing. (SEAN 
NELSON) Northwest Film Forum, Fri 8, 10 pm, Sat 
8:15,10 pm, Sun 5,8 pm, Mon 1,3,8:15 pm, Tues 8 pm. 

★ MICHAEL JACKSON VS. PRINCE VS. 

JANET JACKSON SING-ALONG 

Sure, the SIFF opening-night gala is tonight, but everyone 
knows this is the hottest party in town. Central Cinema, 
Thurs May 14 at 8 pm. 

★ ONE DEADLY SUMMER 

SAM’s French film noir series continues with this 1983 
film starring Isabelle Adjani as a troubled teen seeking to 
avenge her mother’s rape. Presented on 35 mm. Seattle 
Art Museum, Thurs May 14 at 7:30 pm. 

OUT OF PRINT 

Filmmaker Julia Marchese explores the importance of 
revival cinema and 35 mm exhibitions at places like the 
New Beverly Cinema. Presented, fittingly, on 35 mm. 

Grand Illusion, Wed May 13 at 7 pm. 

★ POOTIE TANG 

Did you know Louis C.K. directed this movie? Central 
Cinema, Fri-Tues 9:30 pm. 

★ TRAILER APOCALYPSE 

It’s a 35 mm presentation of a bunch of old, weird trail¬ 
ers, cobbled together by Grindhouse Releasing. Grand 
Illusion, Thurs May 14 at 7 pm. 

WORKING GIRL 

Mike Nichols {The Graduate, Who’s Afraid of Virginia 
Woolf?) directed this romantic comedy from 1 988, 
which stars Melanie Griffith, Sigourney Weaver, Harrison 
Ford, and Joan Cusack. Central Cinema, Fri 7 pm, 
Sat 3, 7 pm, Sun-Mon 7 pm. 


NOW PLAYING 


SUNDANCE 

CINEMAS SEATTLE 

4500 9TH AVE NE • 206-633-0059 



TWO WAYS TO SAVE AT 


MONDAY IS $6 ORCA DAY 
TUESDAY IS GIRLS MOVIE NIGHT OUT! 

FULL BAR & BISTRO FARE • RESERVED SEATS 
$2 PARKING AFTER 5PM AT ADJACENT LOT* 
+21 AT ALL TIMES 


MAD MAX: FURY ROAD 
in 3D/2D 


FAR FROM THE 
MADDING CROWD 


AVENGERS: AGE OF 
ULTRON in 2D/3D 


EX MACHINA 


IRIS 


WHILE WE’RE YOUNG 


5 FLIGHTS UP 


* PAY AND VALIDATE AT OUR BOX OFFICE 
** TIX AVAIL AT BOX OFFICE ONLY 



IN HECKLEVISIONl \ 

KINDERGARTEN COPli 

THURSDAY @ 8:00PM 


MAP THEATRE: SIMPSONS TRIVIA NIGHT 


MOVIES* FOOD + BEER 


cencM csidtiscom nsbeunM) 


★ CLOUDS OF SILS MARIA 

Those who are familiar with the films of the great French 
director Olivier Assayas will receive useful information 
from the place I locate his latest feature, Clouds of Sils 
Maria, in the body of his previous work: It’s somewhere 
between Irma Vep and Late August, Early September. 
The first is about the state of cinema; the second is built 
and feels like a deep novel. In Clouds, the director takes a 
look at the state of 21 st-century Hollywood-it’s dominated 
by superheroes and green screens. The story, which 
concerns a very close relationship between a famous but 
aging French actress (Juliette Binoche) and her young and 
snappy American personal assistant (Kristen Stewart), 
unfolds with the grace and intellectual momentum of a 
novel-the film even has chapters and an epilogue. Clouds 
also has many, many beautiful scenes and sequences. 
While watching, you feel like you are breathing the special 
air of the rich and famous. You walk with them up and 
down the Alps, you dine with them at posh restaurants, 
you sit with with them in first class. Assayas knows the 
elite region of entertainers inside and out, and Stewart’s 
performance will make you see her beyond the horrors and 
stupidities of the Twilight series. (CHARLES MUDEDE) 
Seven Gables, Fri 4:30, 7:10, 9:45 pm, Sat-Sun 1:50, 
4:30, 7:10, 9:45 pm, Mon-Tues 4:30, 7:10, 9:45 pm. 

★ EX MACHINA 

This is the near future. A sleek black helicopter flies toward 
a place that looks like the Arctic. Miles upon miles of hills 
and fields are covered in ice and snow. There is only one 
passenger in the helicopter; he is a young employee, Caleb 
(Domhnall Gleeson, who in this film looks like a young Bill 
Gates, and with good reason), of a huge internet corporation 
that’s very much like Facebook. In a competition, Caleb has 
won the honor of meeting his boss, Nathan (rising star Oscar 
Isaac), a man who has amassed the kind of fortune that can 
buy the whole Arctic and who has plans for his employee. 
Caleb soon learns that his boss is developing a robot, Ava 
(Alicia Vikander), with the power of self-awareness. But the 
trillionaire wants to be certain about his creation. He wants 
proof that it is as self-aware as a human. It is Caleb’s job 
to determine the extent, depth, and realness of the robot’s 
self-awareness. He begins performing tests on the beautiful 
Ava, which unlike the beautiful Rachael in Blade Runner 
is aware that it is a robot, created by a human. Every word 
matters in this film: Not a look, movement, or sequence is 
wasted by first-time director Alex Garland. And it all leads 
to an impressive conclusion that’s not so much about 
the future but about what it really takes to stage a revolt 
against your masters. The break (or, to use the language 
of Foucault, the rupture) has to be brutal and total. For the 
effective beginning of a new world, nothing of the past must 
be preserved. (CHARLES MUDEDE) Various locations. 

★ WHILE WE’RE YOUNG 

Intentionally or otherwise, Noah Baumbach’s While 
We’re Young plays like a sequel to 2010’s Greenberg 
in which middle-aged Ben Stiller was both befuddled by 
and attracted to game-for-anything millennials like Greta 
Gerwig. In Baumbach’s nouvelle vague-inspired follow¬ 
up, 2012's Frances Ha, cowriter Gerwig took the lead 
as a 27-year-old dancer at a crossroads in her life. It was 
a deeply sympathetic piece of work-and his best film. 
If the new one doesn’t hit the same heights, it’s acutely 
perceptive and painfully funny. This time, Stiller’s Josh isn’t 
a single sadsack, but a married sadsack. His career as a 
documentarian is stuck in neutral, his friends (including a 
very good Adam Horovitz as a Wilco fan with back prob¬ 
lems) are having babies, his father-in-law (Charles Grodin, 
a minimalist par excellence) makes him feel like a failure, 
and he and his wife, Cornelia (Naomi Watts, an underrated 
comic actress), are bored. Then they meet Jamie (Adam 
Driver) and Darby (Amanda Seyfried), a couple in their 20s 
who listen to bad ‘80s records, watch beat-up VHS tapes, 
and make all their own stuff. Josh and Cornelia come alive 
again in their presence. Once Josh segues from besotted 
mentor to hectoring detective, the film threatens to go off 
the rails until Baumbach restores equilibrium by ending 
on the same funny-sad grace note with which he began. 
(KATHY FENNESSY) Sundance Cinemas, Fri-Sat 2:10, 
4:25, 6:40, 9 pm, Sun-Tues 3:10, 5:25, 7:40 pm. 









































THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 35 


COMIC I BY ELAINE LIN 


STRflbJBERRy DOG CAUGHT |N THE AH 






Till® HOURS LATER 


ElAlNE LIjA 


FREE WILL 
ASTROLOGY 

BY ROB BREZSNY 


For the Week of May 13 

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The danger 
of resisting a temptation too strenuously 
is that the temptation might depart. I 
suggest that you prevent that from hap¬ 
pening. Without throwing yourself on the 
mercy of the temptation, see if you can 
coax it to stick around for a while longer. 
Why? In my view, it's playing a useful role 
in your life. It's motivating you to change 
some things that really do need to be 
changed. On the other hand. I'm not yet 
sure that it should become anything more 
than a temptation. It might serve you best 
that way, not as an object of your satis¬ 
fied desire. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): My astro¬ 
logical colleagues discourage me from 
talking to you Bulls about financial mat¬ 
ters. "Most Tauruses know 10 times more 
about the mystery of money than you will 
ever know," said one. "Their excellent 
instincts trump any tips you could offer." 
Another astrologer concurred, noting, 
"The financial advice you give Tauruses 
will at best be redundant and at worst sim¬ 
plistic." A third colleague summed it up, 
"Offering Tauruses guidance about money 
is like counseling Scorpios about sex." So 
although I'm shy about providing recom¬ 
mendations, I will say this: The next five 
weeks will be a favorable time to set in 
motion the plans to GET RICHER QUICKER! 

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): "Endings to 
be useful must be inconclusive," wrote 
science-fiction novelist Samuel R. Delany. 
I endorse that theory for your use in the 
coming weeks. Interweave it with this ad¬ 
vice from playwright Sam Shepard: "The 
temptation toward resolution, toward 
wrapping up the package, seems to me 
a terrible trap. Why not be more honest 
with the moment? The most authentic 
endings are the ones which are already 
revolving toward another beginning." In 
other words, Gemini, don't be attached 
to neat finales and splashy climaxes. Con¬ 
sider the possibility that you can simply 
slip free of the complicated past and head 
toward the future without much fanfare. 

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In mythic 
terms, you should be headed for the win¬ 
ner's circle, which is inside the pleasure 
dome. The parade in your honor should 
follow the award ceremony, and let's hope 
you will be on the lead float wearing a 
gold crown and holding a real magic wand 
while being sung to by a choir of people 
you love and who love you. If for any 
reason you are not experiencing some ver¬ 
sion of these metaphors, I urge you to find 
out why. Or better yet, get busy on plan¬ 


ning a homecoming or graduation party 
or award ceremony for yourself. From an 
astrological perspective, you have a man¬ 
date to be recognized and appreciated for 
the gifts you offer the world. 

LEO (July 23-Aug 22): British Field 
Marshal Arthur Wellesley was a brilliant 
military commander. Renowned for his 
ability to beat larger armies, he also had 
great skill at minimizing loss of life among 
his own troops. His most famous triumph 
took place in 1815, when he led the forces 
that defeated Napoleon Bonaparte at Wa¬ 
terloo. In the aftermath, the French tyrant 
lost his power and went into exile. What 
was the secret of Wellesley's success? 
"Bonaparte's plans were made in wire," 
he said. "Mine were made in string." In 
other words, Wellesley's strategy was 
more flexible and adaptable. As circum¬ 
stances changed, it could be rearranged 
with greater ease. That's the approach I 
recommend for you in the coming days. 

VIRGO (Aug 23-Sept 22): You may not 

be strong enough to take a shot at a 
daunting challenge that's five levels be¬ 
yond your previous best. But I think you 
are at least ready to try a tricky challenge 
that's one level higher than where you 
have been operating. And that, in my 
opinion, is a more practical use of your 
courage. I think it would be a waste of 
your energy to get wrapped up in gran¬ 
diose fantasies about impossible perfec¬ 
tions. As long as you don't overreach, you 
can accomplish small miracles. 

LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct 22): I suspect you 
are about to experience some prime con¬ 
tenders for The Most Unusual Adventures 
of 2015. Are you thoroughly prepared? 
Of course not. There's no way you can be 
totally ready to adapt to unpredictable 
wrinkles and change your mind at a mo¬ 
ment's notice. But that's exactly what will 
make these experiments so fun. That's 
why they will be effective in building up 
your resilience and willpower. For best 
results, apply your nighttime thinking to 
daytime activities, and vice versa. Spend 
minimal time on responsibilities that don't 
teach you noble truths about your fellow 
madmen and madwomen. Now here's my 
big question: How can you tap into the 
extra power you will need during your 
rite of passage? 

SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov 21): Many 
modern astronomers are allergic to as¬ 
trology, but from my perspective, there 
is no inherent conflict between the two 
fields. Four of history's greatest astrono¬ 
mers were practicing astrologers, after 
all: Johannes Kepler, Galileo Galilei, Tycho 
Brahe, and Pierre Gassendi. One of my 
friends from college, a Scorpio woman 
named Martha Maiden, is a first-rate as¬ 
trologer who got a degree in astronomy 
and became a top scientist at NASA. In the 
spirit of finding reconciliation between 
apparent opposites. I'm happy to say that 


you are now a virtual virtuoso in your 
ability to reconcile both apparent oppo¬ 
sites and actual opposites. I invite you to 
use this aptitude with flair and daring. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22-Dec 21): Sagit- 
tarian Matt Stutzman competes in the 
sport of archery. He's the world record 
holder for longest accurate shot, having 
hit a target 230 yards away. What makes 
his accomplishment so extraordinary is the 
fact that he was born without any arms. 
He holds each arrow in his mouth and 
grasps the bow with his foot with the help 
of a chest harness. In the spirit of this arm¬ 
less archer, and in accordance with your 
current astrological omens, I invite you to 
initiate an attempt to triumph over one of 
your so-called disadvantages. 

CAPRICORN (Dec 22-Jan 19): Long be¬ 
fore Lou Reed recorded the song "Walk 
on the Wild Side," Nelson Algren wrote 
a novel titled A Walk on the Wild Side. 
It depicts the luxuriant depravity of New 
Orleans' French Quarter in the 1930s. One 
of Algren's most enduring bits of spiritual 
advice goes as follows: "Never, ever, no 
matter what else you do in your whole 
life, never sleep with anyone whose trou¬ 
bles are worse than your own." What do 
you think of that, Capricorn? Even if you 
don't regard it as a universal rule that 
you should unfailingly obey, I suggest 
you observe it in the coming weeks. For 
the sake of your mental hygiene, be extra 
discerning about what influences you ab¬ 
sorb—not just in bed, but everywhere. 

AQUARIUS (Jan 20-Feb 18): The cosmos 
has authorized you to be hungrier than 
usual. You may also feel free to respond 
to your enhanced hunger with an extra 
aggressive quest to be fed. Therefore: Be 
voracious! Risk being avid, ardent, and 
even agog. Fill yourself up with pud¬ 
ding, pleasure, praise, peace, perks, and 
privileges. Anything else you'd like to 
engorge? If some unenlightened person 
questions your right to claim the biggest 
piece and the sweetest taste and the best 
fuel, inform them that your astrologer 
says you have ultimate permission. 

PISCES (Feb 19-March 20): Is there an 
interesting ally whose path rarely crosses 
yours? Do you draw inspiration from a 
like-minded dynamo who is not fully 
available? Has fate kept you and a friend 
from getting as close as you would wish? 
According to my reading of the astrolog¬ 
ical omens, relationships like these could 
become more substantial in the coming 
weeks. The dream of a more robust con¬ 
nection could ripen into an opportunity 
to actually collaborate. So be alert for the 
openings, and be prepared to do what's 
necessary to go deeper. 

Homework: Imagine that everything im¬ 
portant you know is condensed into a 
single symbol or image. What is it? Tell at 
freewillastrology. com. 




Museum! 

SeattleArchitejctu're 


DARfllNGTQN. MIA I SlJWWfiflWELTMWNFEST.COW 


** STRANGERTICKETS 


LABOR DAY WEEKEND SEPT 5 ? B, 7, 2Q1 S SEATTLE 


jK " 


* 




,v 




Thursday, May 14 at Foster/White Gallery 

Art in Public Panel Discussion 

Cultural Landscapes: Shaping the Story of Seattle 


SPIRITS TASTING 

, 


Sunday, fTlay 17 at faiun Hall 


Capttol 


sfliGans GOLDEn dr/idqh 

WATER PUPPET THEATRE 


July 24th- 


HI 


26th 


Block 


- A . ■ 


y i 1 

JP Jr 

J * ; 




s’ 


Party 


■f 


RAT CITY ROELERGIRES PRESENTS: 

THE HITDITCH CUP 


The Rat's 
Nest 


Saturday, May 16 
Queen Anne Tour: The Evolution 
of an Urban Neighborhood 

West Queen Anne Elementary School 






































































36 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 



flieSft mger 


10OOs more free classified ads online at 

thestranger.com/classifieds 

To place an ad over the phone call: 206-323-7101 


EMPLOYMENT | REAL ESTATE [ 


HEALTH & SERVICES 


| MUSIC INSTRUCTION & SERVICES 


GENERAL HELP WANTED 


START YOUR HUMANITARIAN 

career! Change the lives of others while 
creating a sustainable future. 1, 6, 9, 
18 month programs available. Apply 
today! www.OneWorldCenter.org 269- 
591-0518 info@oneworldcenter.org 
AAN CAN) 


100 WORKERS 
NEEDED TODAY! 

APPLY TODAY! We have job openings 
available in Warehouse, Distribution, 
Food Production, Construction, 
Event Concessions, Hospitality, 
Material Handling, Truck Driving, 
Waste Management and many more 
fields. Call your local LaborWorks 
Branch today for more information. 
TUKWILA: 16256 Military Road South, 
Seatac, WA 98188, 206-766-9675. 
LYNNWOOD: 19715 Scriber Lake 
Road, Lynnwood, WA 98036, 
425-275-5867. 

RENTON: 3155 NE Sunset Blvd, 
Renton, WA 98056,425-643-2500 


PAID RESEARCH 


ALCOHOL STUDY THROUGH UW- 

Men 18-20 needed for a study on health 
behavior. Earn up to $150 if eligible. 
Email dartuw@uw.edu for more info. 


POLLEN ALLERGIES? 

AUTOIMMUNE Disease? Earn 
$185 Donate Plasma plasmalab.com 
425-258-3653 


YOUNG MEN & women are wanted 
for a study on health-related behaviors. 
Participants must be ages 18-20. Earn 
up to $200 if eligible! Visit http:// 
depts.washington.edu/uwepic/ or email 
Project EPIC at UWepic@uw.edu for 
more information. 



ECO ELEMENTS METAPHYSICAL 

Books & Gifts. Immed opening for 
PT sales person. Energetic, flexible, 
committed, EXP. & knowledgeable in 
metaphysical. Also looking for an expe¬ 
rienced Psychic Tarot Reader. Drop off 
resume in person & book list to: 1530 
IstAve (serious inquiries only) 


LOVE FASHION? 

BUFFALO EXCHANGE seeks Buyers 
and Cashiers. Our eclectic buy-sell- 
trade clothing shop offers challenging, 
fun retail environ. Must be quick learn¬ 
er, cheerful, dependable, energetic. PT/ 
FT w/benefits. No exp. nec. Apply at 
www.buffaloexchange.com or in person 
2232 NW Market/4530 NE University. 

Not your regular retail job! EOE 


SKILLED TRADE/CRAFT 


MDSEDM EXHIBIT 
FABRICATOR 

Pacific Studio is a nationally recog¬ 
nized Museum Exhibit Design and 
Fabrication Company, dedicated to 
producing unforgettable experiences. 
We are currently hiring for experienced 
Fabricators/Lead Fabricators. 
Apply to careers@pacificstudio.com 


ART STUDIO/CREATIVE 


THIS ELEGANT 1 500 square foot 
space includes wall length mirrors and 
small stage, excellent classes (i.e., 
yoga, dance, aerobic fitness, Zumba, 
etc.) and private parties (wedding, 
birthday, etc.).We are looking for long 
term tenants. 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


MAKE AN OFFER as soon as pos¬ 
sible this one will go fast! 6461 NE 
Center St Suquamish, WA 98392 MLS 
# 747741 call 206-799-0294 


ALL AR EAS ROOMMATES.COM. 
Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect 
roommate to complement your person¬ 
ality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! 
(AAN CAN) 


FURNISHED OR NON furnished, 
large room in house share, direct tv, 
internet secluded parking, close to bus 
and stores. 10 min to downtown sea, 7 
min to sea tac. 


SERVICE I CLASSES/WORKSHOPS 


CRYSTAL TAROT READINGS with 
AriElle, Spiritual Advisor & Angel 
Messenger - East West Bookshop 
Every Thursday 10am-3pm Receive 
answers, clarity, direction, reassurance 
and validation, this practical intimate 
insight can transform challenges in 
your life. Call 206.523.3726 or Walk-In. 
Cash Accepted 


DREAMSCAPE MASSAGE 

/ Capitol Hill Enjoy a massage at 
Dreamscape MassagelWe are 
located at 619 Broadway Ave. E on 
Capitol Hill. Please visit our Web 
site at DreamscapeMassage.com / 
206-568-3771 


LIKE A JAPANESE Hot Springs 
- At The Gated Sanctuary you can 
soak naked outside among soaring 
cedar trees in jetted hot pools. Dip 
in our Alaskan cold plunge. Get an 
amazing massage. Enjoy our euca¬ 
lyptus steam room. (425)334-6277 
www.TheGatedSanctuary.com 


STUDIES 


50-70 YEAR-OLDS WHO have expe¬ 
rienced the death (in the last five years) 
of a previously abusive parent are need¬ 
ed for a dissertation study. If you are 
willing to tell your story, please contact: 
survivorresearch@gmail.com Or visit 
https://www.surveymonkey.eom/s/ 
YVGQ6FM 


CASH FOR YOUR UNWANTED 
& JUNK,CARS,PAID UP TO $300 
CASH(206)941 -0612 Please visit my 
website www.Freejunkcarhauling.com 
or call me at (206)941 -0612,(253)859- 
5566 or emeil cashforjunk@yahoo.com 
junk,free,Seattle, wrecking,unwanted, 
towing, metal,donate,car removal, 


CLEANING SERVICES OFFERED 

By You’ve Got It Maid. Call Today For 
A Clean Home TOMORROW. Contact 
Taylor 206-375-8307. *We are a pro¬ 
fessional cleaning company. 


LITTLE GUY P.l. will help you 
locate a person, document, or solu¬ 
tion. Affordable and discreet private 
investigation for the common person. 
Free Consultation.(206)902-1250 
www.littleguypi.com 


lili 


ACTING CLASS. BEGINNING 

ACTING CLASS. Beginning Acting! 
Learn how to create characters, memo¬ 
rize dialogue, perform short scenes 
onstage. Plus: warm-ups, theater 
games, auditioning. 206-420-1309. 
Seattleworkshops@aol.com. http:// 
www.classesandworkshops.com 


BEGINNING DRAWING CLASS 

meets in April. http://www.classesand- 
workshops.com 


MAKING MOVIES! IN MAKING 
MOVIES! In this class, you’ll learn how 
to make an independent movie: from 
buying the right microphone, lights and 
camcorder to planning your shots and 
working with actors. For more informa¬ 
tion, visit http://www.classesandwork- 
shops.com, or call 206-420-1309. Or 
email Nilsosmar@gmail.com 


JUNK REMOVAL RECYCLING and 

donating unwanted items is our spe¬ 
cialty. Same or next day service is pos¬ 
sible! Call Greenwise Removal today for 
an estimate. 206-245-9666. 


TIPS FOR WRITING and marketing 
your screenplay. New class, It’s Time to 
Write Your Screenplay, starts in July. 
http://www.classesandworkshops.com 


MUSICIANS AVAILABLE 


DRUMMER AVAILABLE. 50 yrs 

exp./ good equipment. Experienced in 
all types of music. Appearances with 
bands in the PNW. Seeking to find older 
musicians in the Everett/North Seattle 
Area. Contact: Wild Bill 425-265-7103 


EXPERIENCED BASSIST 

Looking fora band beginning or 
established. Willing to play anything 
from punk rock to industrial metal. Hell 
I just wanna play. And maybe get rich 
and famous. Call Divain @ 520-461- 
0369 or 206-364-2429. 


OPENED FOR 
JEFF BRIDGES! 

Legendary Pianist Available. I’m 
Richard Peterson, 66 year old com¬ 
poser, arranger, and pianist. I play 
weekly at KOMO Plaza. I’m available to 
play parties, weddings, clubs, shows, 
etc. $200/gig. Covers and originals. 
Please call 206-325-5271, Thank You! 
CD available. Must have a piano. 

— 

NEW GUITARIST NEEDED for rock/ 
post-punk/glam-influenced band. Find 
music, videos, contact information, etc 
at www.varnishcentral.com. 


PHUK EWE SEATTLE’S premier 
attitudinal sheep-herding rockers seek 
freshly-sheared drums/bass/rhythm 
guitar. We rock. Ewe? fmontigue@ 
gmail.com 

THE REGATTA GRILLE at the 

Crowne Plaza Hotel Is looking for tal¬ 
ented electric-acoustic guitar Duo’s To 
perform for our Summer “Party on 
the Patio" series 11 straight Thursday 
evenings from 4 to 8PM Renumeration 
negotiable Contact: Bruce McCurdy @ 
206-676-3901 

WEEN GUITARIST NEEDED for 

Seattle’s Ween tribute band, Weener. 
Catalog is vast (60+ songs). Must have 
transportation, a job, willing to jam at 
least weekly and share rent in our jam 
space in lower QA ($60+ mo), ween- 
erband@hotmail.com. Hail Boognish! 


RECORDING/REHEARSAL 


ROCK ROOMS BALLARD- 
HOURLY ($20-$30)/Monthly 
Rehearsal Rooms ($225-$1,100) pri¬ 
vate/shared available (24-7, heated, 
security, parking). Recording at 
Birdhouse Studio. Dave 206-369-7588 
attackodave@yahoo.com 


FREE PSYGttIG 
^pA«DIJVG*S 

★ SOLVES PROBLEMS ★ 

★ REUNITES LOVERS ★ 

, call 214-646-4865 , 


ip*. 

LABORWORKS 

Industrial Staffing Specialists 

We Are Looking For 

Hardworking 
Temporary labor 

Our Staffing Specialists can help you find a job. 

Industries Include: _ 

Warehouse Event Concessions 

Distribution Hospitality 

Production Material Handling 

Construction Truck Driving 

1.888-637-WORK LaborWorks.<om 



SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF KING 

In re: 

Deborah West, Petitioner 

And Abdourahame Bangoura, Respondent. 

No. 15-3-02324-5KNT 
Summons by Publication (SMPB) 

TO THE RESPONDENT: Abdourahame Bangoura 

1. The petitioner has started an action in the above court requesting that 
your marriage or domestic partnership be dissolved. 

3. You must respond to this summons by serving a copy of your 
written response on the person signing this summons and by filing 
the original with the clerk of the court. If you do not serve your written 
response within 60 days after the date of the first publication of this 
summons (60 days after the 15 day of April, 2015), the court may en¬ 
ter an order of default against you, and the court may, without further 
notice to you, enter a decree and approve or provide for other relief 
requested in this summons. In the case of a dissolution, the court 
will not enter the final decree until at least 90 days after service and 
filing. If you serve a notice of appearance on the undersigned person, 
you are entitled to notice before an order of default or a decree may 
be entered. 

4. Your written response to the summons and petition must be on form 
WPF DR 01.0300, Response to Petition (Marriage). Information about 
how to get this form may be obtained by contacting the clerk of the 
court, by contacting the Administrative Office of the Courts at (360) 
705-5328, or from the Internet at the Washington State Courts homep¬ 
age: http://www.courts.wa.gov/forms 

5. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you 
should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be 
served on time. 

6. One method of serving a copy of your response on the petitioner is 
to send it by certified mail with return receipt requested. 

7. Other: Order for Service of Summons by Publication. 

This summons is issued pursuant to ROW 4.28.100 and Superior 
Court Civil Rule 4.1 of the state of Washington. 

Dated: 4/10/15 

Deborah West 

Signature of Petitioner or Lawyer/WSBA No. 

File original of your response with the clerk of the court at 
Clerk of the Court at: 

Maleng Regional Justice Center 
401 - 4th Avenue N. 

Kent, Washington 98032 

Serve a copy of your response on: Petitioner (you may list an ad¬ 
dress that is not your residential address where you agree to accept 
legal documents. Any time this address changes while this action 
is pending, you must notify the opposing parties in writing and file 
an updated Confidential Information Form (WPF DRPSCU 09.0200) 
with the court clerk.) 

Deborah West 

25040- 106th Ave SE #H-306 
Kent, WA 98030 



Ticket info for 
Seattle’s music 
scene-on sale 
dates, pre-sale 
announcements, 
and more. 

Brought to you by 

flieSfranger 

TWITTER.COM/SEASHOWS 





























































THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 37 



24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC 2588 


Find your flame on 


Seattle 206-753-CHAT 

( 2428 ) 

Tacoma 253-359-CHAT 
Everett 425-405-CHAT 
Vancouver, WA 360-314-CHAT 
Vancouver, BC coming soon... 

Portland 503-222-CHAT 

or WEB PHONE on LiveMatch.com 


206.686.5484 

Try for FREE Ahora en Espanol 

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 

www.livelinks.com Teligence/18+ 


MAN to MAN 
206-753-CHAT 


AHORA EN ESPANOL 


QUESTCHAT.COM 


206.812.2900 

TACOMA 253.579.3000 
EVERETT 425.791.2900 
OTHER CITIES 1.888.257.5757 

OO GET THE APP 

*18+ RESTRICTIONS APPLY 


n 

vovfSlE 


CUTE GUY 4TH& 

BLANCHARD 

You: Cute guy, black jacket, jeans, 
waiting for bus. Me: Blue track jacket, 
demin skirt, sunglasses. You smiled. 
I smiled. I crossed 4th. Smiled. You 
smiled. I crossed Blanchard. You 
were looking. I waved. You waved! 
And.J KEPT WALKING. Ugh. When: 
Monday, May 11, 2015. Where: 
4th & Blanchard, Belltown. You: 
Man. Me: Woman. #921100 


GREENLAKE FIX - SATURDAY 

You, on a laptop w wine, dark hair, 
blue top with pink sandals. Felt a 
moment with you as you smiled at 
me and regret not saying hi. Can you 
give me another chance? Me and my 
brown dog When: Saturday, May 
9, 2015. Where: Greenlake Fix 
Coffeehouse. You: Woman. Me: 
Man. #921097 


HANDSOME BIKER WITH 
AWESOME SUNGLASSES 

I first saw you a year ago but now I 
see you everywhere. It’s fantastic and 
I love it every time. You: walking your 
french bulldog; looking sharp. Me: 
short, dark-haired, be-glassed beauty. 
Let’s keep running in to each other. 
When: Saturday, May 3, 2014. 
Where: Poggie’s and envi¬ 
rons. You: Man. Me: Woman. 
#921096 


NORTHACRES OFF-LEASH 
PARK 

You have a yellow lab. You were wear¬ 
ing a white shirt and jeans. I was just 
leaving when you arrived, you asked if 
we wanted to play with you. I go there 
each weekend. Let’s meet before then 
for drinks? When: Sunday, May 
10, 2015. Where: Northacres 
off-leash dog park. You: Woman. 
Me: Man. #921095 


SEATAC TO HAWAII FLIGHT 

We waited for our flight to Hawaii. 
You’re beautiful. You checked 
something on your ticket, then sat 
elsewhere. I saw you getting on the 
flight, I was 30 rows back. You: 
Brunette, freckles, beautiful. Me: 
Tan, black hair, black hoodie When: 
Thursday, May 7, 2015. Where: 
SeaTac. You: Woman. Me: Man. 
#921094 


EX-MANCHESTER GIRL AT 
PACIFIC SUPPLY 

You- girl, short brown hair, 20’s-30’s. 
We used to talk, this time I was pre¬ 
occupied. I left the store and you’ve 
been on my mind ever since. Bruce. 

When: Saturday, April 18, 2015. 
Where: Pacific Supply. You: 
Woman. Me: Man. #921092 


FEMALE BIKE COURIER 

Female bike courier with dark hair, 
and arm band tattoo. I see you sev¬ 
eral times a week, you make my day 
every time. You are very pretty, and 
you are my biggest crush. When: 
Wednesday, May 6, 2015. 
Where: Downtown. You: Woman. 
Me: Man. #921091 


H.P. LOVECRAFT: STAND-UP 
COMEDIAN 

Tuesday night, we flirted in line for 
the bathroom. We agreed that even a 
blood sacrifice required major clean¬ 
up, the theater was still nicer than the 
streets below. Buy you a drink? Let’s 
enjoy ourselves before Cthulhu rises... 
When: Tuesday, May 5, 2015. 
Where: Annex Theater. You: 
Woman. Me: Man. #921090 


WHITE SOCKS & 

HUARACHES 

On the 49 morning commute to 
downtown, You: blonde male, white 
socks & huaraches. Me: brown hair, 
female, paisley jacket across from 
you. I liked your sock & shoe combo, 
and I guess you’re pretty cute too. 
Drinks? When: Wednesday, May 
6, 2015. Where: Broadway & E 
Republican. You: Woman. Me: 
Woman. #921089 


#106 METRO DRIVER SAT. 
MAY2ND 

You, driving from Georgetown to down¬ 
town, 10.45pm. I asked if you were 
almost done, you said you had till 
4am with displeasure.Late hour bus 
rides must suck, but you should know 
that you are the hottest metro driver 
I’ve seen! When: Saturday, May 
2, 2015. Where: Seattle. You: 
Man. Me: Woman. #921084 


SAW U AT FRED MEYERS 

You were watching me as i started 
running to my car, a grey mustang. I 
pushed the cart back, while you still 
watched me. You were driving a white 
car, then ypu left. Thought you were 
cute. Sumner. When: Sunday, May 
3, 2015. Where: fred meyers, 
sumner. You: Man. Me: Woman. 
#921083 


ROUTE 44, DEPARTED IN 
BALLARD 

Your colorful dress and denim jacket. 
Brunette hair, the most beautiful face 
in Seattle. Sat in front of me, cracked 
open a hardcover. My grey t-shirt, 
earbuds. A glance in my direction? 
Searching for excuses to engage when 
you exited. When: Sunday, May 
3, 2015. Where: Ballard, Bus 
Route 44. You: Woman. Me: 
Man. #921082 


TATTOO ENVY AT BECU 

‘Saw you at ATMs. I noticed plastic 
wrap around your arm and asked 
if I could I could see your new tat¬ 
too. I may have also been staring 
because you were adorable. Do you 
work in a shop too? When: Friday, 
May 1, 2015. Where: BECU 
on Broadway. You: Man. Me: 
Woman. #921081 


YOU PANTSED MY HEART 

Truly. Madly. Deeply. I dont under¬ 
stand why you havent responded. (It’s 
yours, and I’m in) When: Friday, 
May 1, 2015. Where: smarty 
pants. You: Man. Me: Woman. 
#921080 


WALKING FROM THE BUS 
STOP 

You: Cute friendly lady with red lip¬ 
stick. Me: Glasses, black sweatshirt, 
and dark hair. Chatted for several 
blocks after we got off the bus at the 
same stop, but I was too shy to ask 
for your number. Coffee sometime? 
When: Friday, May 1, 2015. 
Where: Fremont & 46th bus 
stop. You: Woman. Me: Woman. 
#921079 


WSECU BLACK & BLUE HAIR 

We made brief eye contact a few 
times, you made my heart race. I was 
waiting outside to say hi, but a cop 
pulled up and added weird vibes. You: 
stunning Me: beard. I’d love another 
opportunity. When: Friday, May 1, 
2015. Where: University District 
WSECU. You: Woman. Me: Man. 
#921078 


YOU PAID FOR MY DINNER 

We were at Samurai Noodle when you 
paid for my dinner. You were a girl with 
an AmazonLocal coupon. Wednesday, 
7pm. I was touched; decided to 
pay it forward. I donated to Rainier 
Valley Food Bank. Thank you. When: 
Thursday, April 30, 2015. 
Where: Samurai Noodle. You: 
Woman. Me: Woman. #921077 


BEARD, BIKE, BISCUIT, 
BALLARD? 

Saw you while driving by. You are a 
handsome beardy dude with plugs 
You were doing something to your 
bike outside Morsel and Bean . Lets 
grab a biscuit? pint? I don’t know shit 
about bikes. When: Wednesday, 
April 29, 2015. Where: Outside 
Morsel and Bean on 15th in 
Ballard. You: Woman. Me: 
Woman. #921076 


PASSPORT AGENCY 

You were going to your friend’s wed¬ 
ding in Mexico and had lost your 
passport. I was getting mine for a 
trip to Canada. You’re cute! :) Hope 
you got your passport in time. When: 
Tuesday, April 21,2015. Where: 
Downtown Seattle Passport 
Agency. You: Man. Me: Woman. 
#921075 


FLIGHT FROM LAX TO 
SEATTLE 

to the beautiful and bright woman 
next to me boarding the plane. I 
was playing accordion & just getting 
back from the jungle. I invite you for 
a stroll - if no, I invite you to take 
this compliment. When: Monday, 
April 27, 2015. Where: Evening 
flight from LAX to Seattle. You: 
Woman. Me: Woman. #921074 


HANDSOME DEVIL WITH A 
CANE 

You are tall, handsome with blonde- 
brown hair and a walking cane. I actu¬ 
ally saw you last week and couldn’t 
stop thinking about how cute you 
are! I was happy to see you again 
this morning. Just thought you should 
know. When: Tuesday, April 28, 
2015. Where: 49 Bus headed 
to the U-District. You: Man. Me: 
Woman. #921073 


BUZZED BEAUTY 

Buzzed, black haired beauty with 
glasses rode E Line from Denny to 
Greenlake, noticed you before we got 
on @5 PM, nice smile when you 
got off. Me: tall, older, bi-colored 
nails. You’re adorable, get to know each 
other? When: Saturday, April 25, 
2015. Where: Denny Triangle. 
You: Woman. Me: Man. #921072 


CORGI GUY 

Passing by on the #40 bus near 
5th and Bell. You were walking your 
cute as hell corgi. You: Backwards 
hat,beard, flip flops, green shirt. Cute 
dude. Beer and corgi date? When: 
Thursday, April 23, 2015. 
Where: 5th and Bell. You: Man. 
Me: Woman. #921071 


PULLED ME OVER, 1-5 
NORTHBOUND 

You’re the cop that pulled over a 
cute girl that didn’t have any regis¬ 
tration, proof of insurance, outdated 
tabs since 2008, oh boy and what 
else. The flood light isn’t the most 
flattering, but you are hot! Can we 
date? When: Wednesday, April 
22, 2015. Where: On the side of 
the road 1-5 Northbound. You: 
Man. Me: Woman. #921068 


EAST SIDE SAFEWAY STOCK 
BOY 

Our eyes met, a smile shared, the 
energy felt was undeniable. I hope 
you see this, because if you do, you’ll 
know who you are. Let’s add words to 
this connection. When: Monday, 
April 20, 2015. Where: Juanita 
Safeway in Kirkland. You: Man. 
Me: Man. #921067 


RED APPLE BATTERY JUMP 

You needed a jump and I wished I 
knew how to open my hood. Even 
more I wished I gave you my card in 
case you needed roadside assistance 
again! : ) When: Saturday, April 
18, 2015. Where: Red Apple 
on Jackson St.. You: Man. Me: 
Woman. #921066 


PFI AND SHARED FETA 

You were with your mom at Big John’s 
PFI Monday, April 20th buying fasci¬ 
nating beans. We bought the same 
gouda, and shared Bulgarian feta. 
We should make quesadillas. When: 
Monday, April 20, 2015. Where: 
Big John’s PFI. You: Man. Me: 
Woman. #921065 


TOPKNOTATADD-A-BALL 

You were at Add-a-ball Saturday 
night. You are so handsome. We kept 
on smiling but neither of us said 
anything. That was silly of me. Lets 
try again soon. When: Saturday, 
April 18, 2015. Where: Add- 
a-ball. You: Man. Me: Woman. 
#921064 


DINNER FOR 1 AT LINDA’S 

You forgot avocado on my burger on 
my birthday when I was by myself.. 
You offered my whole meal for free. 
This was last November and I haven’t 
forgotten.Dinner on me? .You- waiter, 
dark hair, a couple tattoo’s, Keanu 
Reeves lookin. When: Saturday, 
April 18, 2015. Where: Linda’s 
Tavern. You: Man. Me: Man. 
#921063 


HEY, ORANGE NAIL POLISH 

You rolled up real cool and calm to 
bum a cigg from me in alley. I should 
have smoked a bowl with you and 
your friends! lets meet again When: 
Friday, April 17, 2015. Where: 
In the alley by the 5 point. You: 
Man. Me: Woman. #921062 


EL BORRACHO, TATTOOED 
BEAUTY 

El Borracho tonight in Ballard. Sexy 
black dress, tattoos on your arms, 
black hair pinkish bangs. Looked like 
you were on an awkward first date? 
You are absolutely beautiful, I was 
praying for an opportunity to talk 
to you. When: Thursday, April 
16, 2015. Where: El Borracho 
Ballard. You: Woman. Me: Man. 
#921061 


BLONDE BOMBSHELL SING¬ 
ER NORTH CITY TAV 

Hi Kate-Hated to leave Saturday 
night but I had to take my friend to 
Everett. You were getting ready to 
sing ‘hit me with your best shot’ I’m 
John. I sing too, lets harmonize! 
When: Saturday, April 11,2015. 
Where: North City Tavern. You: 
Woman. Me: Man. #921058 


I CALLED YOU HANDSOME 

You were the handsome man in the 
beer garden at the Fiesta 5k. I meant 
it. You’re handsome. I’d date you. 

When: Saturday, May 2, 2015. 
Where: Volunteer Park. You: 
Man. Me: Woman. #921087 


phone services phone services phone services 


ALL 


MALE 


LIVE 


CHAT 


206.866.2009 

OTHER CITIES 1 . 877 . 510.3344 


REAL 

PEOPLE 

REAL 

DESIRE 

REAL 

FUN 


CHATLINE 


Match 

Free to TRY! 


^luestChat 

Fun, Private, Safe 

Connect with 

1000s of 
local 
singles 


Free 24/7 - LiveMatch 
CHATROOMS and 
member FORUMS. 
Ladies, chat with VIPs 
FREE all the time! 


Seattle 


rsAw u 

Read bucketloads more (or place your own) online at www.thestranger.com/personals 































































38 May 13, 2015 THE STRANGER 


BQD® 

©§> 800 GOT BUGS 

Paratex Fumigation 

Mention fllC^TOII^Cr for a 5% Discount 

PflRJITEH 

[ www.paratex.com 



X-RATED 

FUN! 


Free Admission 


will) this ail, drink purchase required. exp. 5-19.15 

liam-Ssm JFri-Sat IlKlMam i Sun £pm-3am 

15011 Tukwila Infl BIwd.Tukwil* WA 

*ONL¥ 3hlln from SEA/TAC 



sTheMedicine 


unday May 1™ 5pm 


Because less chemicals in our medicine 
was kind of the idea. 


Volunteer Day 

unday May 17fh 5pi 


W ' Pick Up Your Volunteer Kits ™ 
%ign Referendum 76, Donate To The Cause 
Bring Yjpur Friends £ Family, Open To Tl^f Public 
HotiDogs & Refreshments Will Be Served 

NW Cannabis Market 
2329 Rainier Ave S Seattle, WA 98144 

205-* Z0-406S litf o@n weanna bis™ rkei.-c om 




SAVAGE LOVE 

Fixated by dan savage 


My wife is one of those women who need 
manual stimulation of her clit during sex to 
climax. Before meeting her, I had several long¬ 
term girlfriends, and not one needed to do this 
in order to climax. Before we got married, I 
explained that I wanted to 
explore and push the bound¬ 
aries, and she promised me 
that would happen. But she 
has no fantasies, kinks, or 
fetishes, and she’s not into any 
of the things I’ve proposed. 

Bringing this all together is 
that when we are having sex, 
she’s so fixated on stimulat¬ 
ing her clit, it’s almost like we 
are in two different worlds. 

When she’s working toward 
an orgasm, her eyes are shut 
and she’s concentrating on 
the rubbing—whether she’s 
doing it or I am—and I can’t 
help but wonder if the work it takes to get her 
to orgasm is part of the reason she’s not inter¬ 
ested in exploring. I’ve talked to her several 
times about how I’m yearning to do more, but I 
haven’t brought up my thoughts on how the way 
she comes may be affecting things. 

Come As You Are 

My thoughts, in no particular order... 

1. Three out of four women need direct, 
focused, and sometimes intense stimulation of 
their clit in order to climax—sailing a dick up 
the vaginal canal isn’t going to do it for most 
women—so either you lucked out and all of 
your previous girlfriends were 25 percenters 
or many/most/all of your previous girlfriends 
were faking it. 

2. I’ve never met a man who wasn’t fixated 
on stimulating his dick during sex and/or hav¬ 
ing his dick stimulated for him during sex. 

3. If your wife is picking up on your negativ¬ 
ity about the way her pussy works, that could 
negatively impact her enthusiasm for sex in 
general and sex with you in particular. 

4. Your wife is fantasizing about something 
when she closes her eyes and starts rubbing 
her clit. You might be able to have more pro¬ 
ductive conversations about your sex life—and 
your desire for a more adventurous one—if you 
drew her out about what’s going on in her head 
when she’s getting off. Tell her how sexy she 
looks, tell her you would love to know what she’s 
thinking about, tell her how hot her fantasy is 
if she opens up about it (and don’t freak out if 
she’s not fantasizing about you), carefully build 
on her fantasy with some dirty talk. Once she 
opens up about whatever it is that’s unspooling 
in her head, you can suggest realizing her fan¬ 
tasies in real life—and a few of yours as well. 

5. And... um... lastly... Your wife may need 
to block you out—she may need to clamp her 
eyes shut—in order to climax because... um... 
she may not be sexually attracted to you. That’s 
harsh, I realize, and I hope that’s not the case. 
But if marital sex for her is a joyless exercise— 
she gets you off then clamps her eyes shut 
and gets herself off—then this is a problem 
that can’t be fixed, and spending the next five 
decades trying to fix it will be both futile and 
frustrating. 

Here’s hoping your wife’s issue is some¬ 
thing more common and something that can be 
fixed—she’s sexually repressed but can work 
through it, this clamp-eyes-and-rub-clit routine 
was her masturbatory go-to for years but you 
two can find new and exciting ways to get her 
off. Those new and exciting ways to get her off 
will most likely require her to fixate on stimu¬ 
lating her clit—and that’s okay. 

I’m a lesbian who has been pretty successful 
at online dating. Lately, however, I’ve had a 
few women contact me who turn out not to 
be cisgender. I’ve tried to remain open, but I 
have never been attracted to a trans woman. 
I don’t rule out the possibility that it could 


happen. But one great thing about online dat¬ 
ing is that you can express preferences before 
going on a date, and I’d rather not unknow¬ 
ingly walk into these potentially awkward and 
painful situations. Is there something I could 
put on my profile expressing 
my preference for cisgender 
women that is not offensive to 
trans people? It’s important 
to me that I remain an ally. 

Can I Say? 

You can put “not into trans 
women” in your online dating 
profile, CIS, but you’ll have to 
hand in your Trans Ally card. 
Gay men are likewise free 
to put “no fats, no femmes” 
or “white guys only—just 
expressing my preference” on 
their profiles, and too many do 
(and not all of them are white 
guys), but gay men who do that have to hand in 
their Not an Asshole cards. Occasionally having 
coffee with someone you’re not into—and hav¬ 
ing to tiptoe through the awkwardness—isn’t 
something you can avoid in online dating. You 
would have to do that even if only cis lesbians 
responded to your ads, as you’re presumably 
not attracted to all cis lesbians. Having a cof¬ 
fee now and then with a trans woman you most 
likely won’t find attractive—but you never 
know—is a small price to pay to make the 
online dating world a less shitty place for trans 
people. It’s what an ally would do. 

I’m a 29-year-old yay yuy in a committed rela¬ 
tionship. My boyfriend says he feels sexually 
inadequate, because I’m not the type of guy 
who needs to come in order to feel that I had 
great sex. Honestly, foreplay and receiving 
anal sex are much more pleasurable for me. If 
I want to come, I will, just not all the time. As 
long as there’s plenty of kissing, touching, and 
licking—and all the other wonderful “ings ”— 
I don’t feel like ejaculation is a big deal. He 
thinks it means I’m not attracted enough to 
him. He’s self-conscious since his dick is a bit 
on the small side, and my not coming seems 
to make it worse. I’ve told him that I find 
him utterly attractive—bless those legs, that 
chest, that ass—and I always try to make him 
have an orgasm. I’ve also tried to come more 
often for him, but sometimes I’m just not in 
the mood. I’ve also told him that he’s not doing 
anything wrong and this is just the way I’m 
wired. He says he still feels inadequate. I don’t 
know what else to do or say. 

Orgasms Reliably Great 
Although Sometimes Missed 

You’ve done the reassuring thing (about his 
size), you’ve done the explaining thing (this is 
just the way you’re wired), and you’ve done the 
meeting him halfway thing (coming more often 
to appease/mollify). Now it’s time for the exas¬ 
perated ultimatum thing. I’ve taken the liberty 
of scripting your ultimatum: “You have to stop 
obsessing about whether or not I come every 
time we fuck. I would never make you feel bad 
about your dick, but you’re making me feel bad 
about my dick. So here’s the deal: You’re going 
to drop this. You’re going to take ‘Yes, I’m 
attracted to you’ and ‘This is how my dick works’ 
for an answer. And you’re not going to bring this 
up anymore. Sometimes I’ll come, sometimes I 
won’t. Putting up with that—and getting over 
your insecurities or at least shutting up about 
them—is the price of admission to be with me. If 
you can’t pay that price, if me not coming every 
time we have sex is something you’ll never get 
over, then we should break up.” ■ 

Don’t miss Sherman Alexie on the 
Savage Lovecast: savagelovecast.com. 


mail@savagelove.net 
@fakedansavage on Twitter 

















THE STRANGER May 13, 2015 420 



THE HIGH LIST 


RECOMMENDED 
EVENTS FOR STONERS 

BY EMILY NOKES 




Philip Glass 

READING Wed May 13, Town Hall (1119 
Eighth Ave) 

The repetitive structures in Glass's sym¬ 
phonies and soundtracks changed the way 
we think of classical music, music for concen¬ 
trating, or music simply to soak your brain in 
after a bong ride to Contemplation Nation. 
The 78-year-old composer has written a 
memoir called Words Without Music and wil 
be discussing it with Rajan Krishnaswami of 
the Seattle Symphony. He may not be get¬ 
ting high beforehand, but you should. 

Nearby snack: Potbelly's (1208 Madison 
St #121) PB&J is everything you didn't know 
you needed. 

Mariners vs. Red Sox 

SPORTS Thurs May 14, Safeco Field (125C 
First Ave S) 

Listen to this story my friend told me. 
Between innings at a recent Mariners game 
against the Texas Rangers, the Jumbotron fo 
cused on a man dressed as the Lone Ranger 
playing an acoustic guitar. A booing crowd 
gathered, and out popped the Mariner 
Moose, who took the guitar and smashed 
it, then picked up an electric guitar to play 
Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit" while the 
words SEATTLE ROCKS flashed across the 
screen. Now imagine watching that while 
pot gummy bears take over your brain! 

Nearby snack: Safeco Field is basically 
a snack paradise lined with Shishkaberry's, 
garlic fries, pretzels, cheesecake, pizza, 
burgers, and refreshments galore. 

Ian Bell’s Brown Derby Series: 
‘Jurassic Park’ 

THEATER May 14-16, Re-bar (1114 
Howell St) 

Ian Bell's Brown Derby Series is "ri¬ 
diculously staged readings of your favorite 
screenplays." Next up: the 1993 classic 
Jurassic Park (!!!). Hold on to your butts! 

Nearby snack: Being a vegetarian means 
I have no idea what Market House Meats 
(1124 Howell St) has in store for you, but 
someone told me it was good and it's super 
close to Re-bar. I'm not even judging you. 

‘Seacats Forever: A DIY Stage Play 5 

MUSIC/THEATER Fri May 15, Hollow 
Earth Radio (2018A E Union St) 

I've always liked those Seacats—a pop 
band formed by two brothers originally 
from Kelso, Washington. Their songs are 
catchy and danceable, and they could leave 
it at that, but there's also a theatrical side 
to the Seacats empire that includes several 
hilarious videos, spoken-word/jamming ex¬ 
periments, and now a play, which combines 
a comedic narrative with live music. (Elch 
and Sun Dummy are also on the bill.) 

Nearby snack: Up the street, Katy's 
Corner Cafe (2000 E Union St) has cookies 
and other coffee-shop fare. 

‘I Want to Believe 5 

ART Through May 29, Eight and Sand 
Gallery (5840 Airport Way S, Suite 212) 

Works from local and national artists 
cover subjects in the vein of "cryptozoology, 
aliens, metaphysical beings, lizard politicians 
from another dimension wearing human 
suits, and secret societies." Yes, obviously. 

Nearby snack: Flying Squirrel Pizza 
(5701 Airport Way S) for casual pizza, salad, 
and appetizers. They have a pizza called the 
R.E.M., which sounds half good. ■ 


ACCESSORIES 


VIRGIN VAPOR GO Electric! Our 
award-winning, ultra premium organic 
e-liquids taste just like the real thing, 
because they are made from the real 
thing! Electrify your tastebuds! www. 
virginvapor.com 


COOPERATIVES 


CONSCIOUS CARE COOPERATIVE/ 
BALLARD. Dope Industry Awards 
Winner-Best Medicine Selection. Free 
Gram for first time patients. Open 7 
days a week. 1701 NW Market St. 
206-297-6043 


DELIVERY 


ATM DELIVERY SEATTLE Open 7 
days a week: Mon-Thurs lOam-IOpm; 
Fri & Sat lOam-midnight; Sun 10am- 
8pm. Free downloadable app @ www. 
atmdelivery.net. 844-420-1212 21+ 

AXIOM LOGISTICS-LARGEST 
LOCAL Delivery Area. Fast reliable 
service 7 days a week. Call or text for 
full menu. 425-273-5987. 

SEATTLE CANNABIS EXPRESS- 

-WE proudly focus on delivering 
to Downtown, West Seattle & South 
King County. 206-556-6925. Visit us 
online to view our amazing prices. 
www.SeattleCannabisExpress.com / 
Seattlecannabisexpress@gmail.com 


SEATTLE’S BEST CANNABIS 

Delivery. SeattlesBestCannabisDelivery. 
org Check out our menu online. We 
have the best prices in town. Delivering 
to most areas. 425-238-2812 or 206- 
939-3074. MMJDELIVERYSEATTLE@ 
GMAIL.COM 

TOP TIER DELIVERY $60 min. 
delivery. Serving Seattle, Bellevue, 
Lynnwood. Flowers, Concentrates, 
Edibles. Open 7 days 10am-12mid- 
night. 206-946-5524 


DOCTORS 


MEDICINE MAN WELLNESS Center 
4021 Aurora Ave N Seattle WA 98103 
632-4021 medicinemanwellness.com 
Best service in town! Medical autho¬ 
rization and card for $99. Walk-ins 
welcome. Verification provided 7 days 
a week. 

TIGER HEALTH CLINIC. 

Professional and discreet medical 
marijuana authorizations with qualified 
medical conditions. 11680 Renton Ave. 
S. 206-853-5165 


RECREATIONAL 


HERB HAS GOT your herb at 
Ballard’s first recreational marijuana 
store for 21 and over. Come visit our 
friendly staff at Herbs House. 716 NW 
65th St. 206-557-7388 



716 NW 65th St 
herbshouse.org 
206.557.7388 

Sun - Thur 11-9 
Fri - Sat 11-10 
21 & OVER 




Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. It can impair concentration, 
coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery underthe influence of this 
drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by 
adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children. 



(206) 853-5165 


$100 NEW MEDKAL MARIJUANA AUTHORIZATIONS* 

Regular price $150, mention this ad for above price* 


RENEWALI$75 FOR 12 MONTHS* 

*With Qualified medical records 


Assists with: 

Pain management. Energy Level, 
Chronic illnesses. Appetite, 

And More! 

Provides: 

General Wellness Exams, 

Sports Physicals, 

Nutrition Consultations 

Professional & Distreet! 


11680 Renton Ave S. Seattle WA 98178 



imnfSfUta a uui'iia < s e>i jice 




TOP TIER 
DELIVERY 


‘ A Tier Above’ 

$60 min. delivery 

21+ PHOTO I.D. REQUIRED 

Serving Seattle - Bellevue - Lynnwood 

• Phenomenal Flowers! 70-100/qtr 

• Concentrates 40-50/g 

• Brownies/Edibles 10-20 

• Open 7 days 10am-12midnight 

206 - 946-5524 Like us on Facebook 


MEDICINE MAN 

WELLNESS CENTER 

Fti wmpthnce with RCW 6fc.5t A 



Best Service fir Town 

SS9 • lnclu ik** A u.Lh jct/jtion md t jcd 
VcTiSiLilKin pcumlcj 7 Jjvij vrefrit! 

Online Verification Available 

24 hpuK a djy, 7 days a iveefc 

Doctors Available 

Tues 2-6 
lhurs 11-3 
Fri 11-6 
Sun 12-4 

TVjmffc/ns 

-1021 Aurora Ave N., Sr.illli', iVAWItll 

E 206-632-4021 W 

\\ wiv, medicine rn-an wpl I ncsp.irom 


rm 


INDUSTRY 

AWARDS 

WINNER 


BEST 

MEDICINE 

SELECTION 



206-297-6043 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 


- - - uvw rAJ u;- * + 

COOPERATIVE 


1701 NW MARKET STREET 
SEATTLE, WA, 98107 



OPEN MON-SAT, 11-4 WITH EVENING CLINICS 

SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT ONLINE 

TheHopeClinics.com 

Call Us 206.466.1766 Fax 206.913.2815 


BOTANICAL 

HEALTHCARE 


PRIMARY CARE & COMPREHENSIVE 
CANNABISTREATMENT PLANS! 


*L-ov 4 Irtc^wve/ Slicing Scales VWlf Cosfs Av^iUbk/ tdifk Woof of Uc^wve/ 


U-DISTRICT 5267 University Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105 WEST SEATTLE 2532 Alki Ave SW, STE B, Seattle, WA 98116 

CLEARVIEW 16510 Washington 9, STE E, Snohomish, WA 98296 LYNNWOOD 15804 Hwy 99, Bldg A, STE C, Lynnwood, WA 98087 

SEATTLE 3107 Eastlake Ave. E, Seattle, WA 98102 TACOMA 4051 Tacoma Mall Blvd, Tacoma, WA 98409 


CBD EFFECT: CONNECTING PATIENTS, PROVIDERS, AND CANNABIS HEAL ARE 















































TURN THE PAGE FOR POT! 

Recreational, Medical, Delivery, etc. 





fhettanger 

BULLETIN BOARD 


- CANNABIS CITY - 
Seattle’s FIRST 
Legal Marijuana Store 
Open Daily new expanded hours! 
2733 4th Ave S, SODO 
206-682-1332 

Do you have PTSD and alcohol problems? 
Seeking free treatment? 

Paid research opportunity. 

Call the APT Study at 206-543-0584. 
Learn to WELD! 

TEAM BUILDING EXCERCISES AVAILABLE 
allmetalarts.org 
allmetalarts@gmail.com 


PET PHOTOGRAPHY ON-LOCATION! 

206.323.6072 | elliottbayphoto.com 
Seattle Cannabis Co. 

Open 7 days a week. 21+ 
Tourists Welcome! 

3230 1st Ave S. Seattle, WA 98134 
206.294.5839 

SEX OFFENDER REGISTRATION 
GOT YOU DOWN? 

We may be able to help to remove that requirement. 
The Meryhew Law Group, PLLC (206)264-1590 
www.meryhewlaw.com 



WhmAtfi'r 
srn i [iinwr 

OJdSi -VRECI ECT1U 

mMOW -GLMSELK4X1 H [IMIUfla- APh 



We proudly focus on 
delivering to Downtown, 

West Seattle and South King County. 

206.556.6925 

online to view 
H&urcamazing prices 
www.SeattleCannabisExpress.com 
Seattlecannabisexpress@gmail.com 



YEAST INFECTION RESEARCH STUDY 

We are currently enrolling women in a research study of a new investigational drug for recurring yeast infections. 


You may qualify to receive this oral medication if you: 

Are a woman, 18-64 years of age 
Currently have an active vaginal yeast infection 
Have experienced at least 3 yeast infections in the past 12 months 
(including the current infection) 


Other study criteria will be assessed by a study doctor. If you qualify for participation, the study drug and all 
study check-ups will be provided at no cost to you. Reimbursement for time and travel may be provided. 



REVIVE STUDY 

To learn more about this study and to see if you qualify, 
please contact us at 206-522-3330 ext. 2 or visit Seattlewomens.com 


WE’RE BACK!! 


$50+ MINIMUM FOR 

DELIVERY 

$40 MINIMUM FOR 

PICK-UP 



FREE DOWNLOADABLE APP AT: 
WWW.ATMDELIVERY.NET 

“The most convenient, 
affordable, discreet, 
and safe access to 
your product.” 


DELIVERY 


SEjtrru 


21 + 


(844) 420-1212 SEESE" 0 

Mon-Thurs lOam-lOpm / Fri & Sat lOam-Midnight / Sun 10am-8pm 

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE!! 



DRUG & FINANCIAL CRIMINAL DEFENSE 
FIREARM RIGHTS RESTORATION 
CRIMINAL HISTORY CLEAN-UP 
SEIZED PROPERTY RETURN 


Serving All of WA - Your Location Doesn’t Matter 

You Can Call Collect 360-853-8368 Day or Night 

billie@LawyerfortheLittleGuy.com 

9805 Sauk Connection Rd, 98237 


Seattle’s Best Cannabis Delivery 

SeattlesBestCannabisDelivery.org 

CHECK OUT OUR MENU ONLINE 

WE HAVE THE BEST PRICES 
IN TOWN, DELIVERING TO 
MOST AREAS - 
CALL TO CHECK 
AVAILABILITY 


425-238-2812 


r|Br\ 

‘*O™ r O v 206-9 39 - 3074 


1 HYDRO 4 LESS 

Hydroponics 

^ Gavita Pro 
1000w M 

& Gardeing 

1 Stor^^j 



MMJDELIVERYSEAnLE@GMAIL.COM 


www.hydro4less.org 

SEATTLE 9100 E. Marginal Way South 
Seattle, WA 98108 206-767-8082 



Northwest Clinical 
Research Center 


425-453-0404 

www.NWStudies.Corn 





...It could be FIBROMYALGIA 

Join a No-Cost Medical Research Study 
And Help us Fight Fibromyalgia Pain 


1ECIH0L0GY NOT TOBACCO 


LOWEST PRICES GUARANTEED 

(we will beat the prices for any retail store in King County, AUTHENTICS ONLY) 

Buy One get Two Free 
BV E-liquids with this ad 

Capitol Hill location only: 

$10 towards any device purchase. 

{Authentic Vapes I Artisan E-Liquids I Accessories } 


Capitol Hill: 1550 E. Olive Way 
206-859-2757 

U-District: 4546 University Way NE 
N0 W 206-547-5247 
OPEN’- BeyondVape.com 



VAPE 



FREE LEAF 

RELIABLE & SAFE RECREATIONAL DELIVERY 

2 i+. Adults Delivering to Adults. Delivery to King & Snohomish Counties. 
$75 Minimum Order. Cash Only. 

INDICA: Lavender 

SATIVA: Sour Diesel HYBRID: Blue Dream 
TOP SHELF: Bubbleberry 


7-DAYS A WEEK (206) 601-0506* TEXT US FOR FULL MENU 

*new number 



NEED YOUR TEETH CLEANED? WANT TO GET PAID FOR IT? 

$400!!! and 


Has it been more than 5 years since your last cleaning? Are you over 18? You could earn up to (If you qualify we use you). 

Dental Hygiene students looking for potential board exam patients. Contact us at 253-271-9676 or email dhstudentsl3@gmail.com 


Walk m hours Tues. l:30pm-4pm, Tue/Thurs 8:30am-11:30am and Wed l:30pm-4:00pm • 16101 Greenwood Ave N. (Shoreline Dental Hygiene Bldg 2500)