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VOL. 25, NO. 48 • JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 2016 









































































































2 July 27, 2016 THE STRANGER 



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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 5 


fhcSiranga' 

Volume 25, Issue Number 48 
July 27-August 2, 2016 



COVER ART 


Illustration by TYLER SPANGLER 
tylerspangler.com 


WE SAWYOU 

Stranger staffers saw you wearing something 
weird at Block Party, catching Pokemon at the 
airport, and running away from raccoons ... 
page 7 

NEWS 

Why is this Scottish family traveling 12 hours 
for a three-day conference in Seattle? ... page 9 

The Stranger Election Control Board Voter 
Cheat Sheet... page 10 

WEED 

Why you should get high, play video games all 
day, and forget Trump ... page 13 

FEATURE 

Is Natasha Marin’s social experiment, Repara- 
tions.me, just a white savior arena? ... page 15 

A week in Cleveland offers a glimpse of a Trump 
presidency... page 19 

SAVAGE LOVE 

“I am intersex, do I disclose?” ... page 21 

THINGS TO DO: 

ARTS & CULTURE 

The Stranger suggests a Puget Soundtrack 
presentation of The Devils , a reading of indig¬ 
enous writers featuring Elissa Washuta, Bendy 
Brewski Yoga, and more ... page 23 

THINGS TO DO: MUSIC 

The Stranger suggests the Psychedelic Furs, the 
Church at Benaroya Hall, Motor at Kremwerk, 
Modest Mouse at KeyArena, and more ... page 27 

MUSIC 

Rolling Stone writer Rob Sheffield channels a 
Bowie-obsessed life into a book-length Bowie 
eulogy; an RNC, DNC, KRS, ASAI? etc. hang¬ 
over ... page 35 

VISUAL ART 

Learning to love Senga Nengudi’s pantyhose 
sculptures ... page 39 

BOOKS 

Jill Leovy’s Ghettoside delivers hope that public 
policy can play a role in the dynamics between 
the police and Black Americans ... page 41 

FILM 

Cafe Society is not the worst film Woody Allen 
has ever made ... page 42 

FREEWILL ASTROLOGY 

Free your body. Don’t ruminate and agonize 
about it. FREE YOUR BODY! ... page 43 

CHOW 

Four places in Seattle to enjoy ful, the most 
comforting breakfast dish ... page 44 

PERSON OF INTEREST 

Stranger Genius Award nominee Wave Books 
... page 46 


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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 7 



WE SAW YOU 

STRANGER STAFFERS WERE THERE AS IT HAPPENED 



THE STRANGER 

NICE HEAD As seen at Capitol Hill Block Party. 


RADIOHEAD AT BLOCK PARTY 

We saw you at Capitol Hill Block Party on 
Friday night wearing what looked like a con¬ 
vincing facsimile of a boom box on your head. 
That’s one way to fast-forward yourself into 
a lot of photos. 




To submit an unsigned confession or accusation, send an 
e-mail to ianonymous@thestranger.com. Please remember 
to change the names of the innocent and guilty. 



GOOD DOG, MEAN LADY 

My wife, the dogs, and I were having 
a nice walk along the trail that circles 
the park. Both dogs were leashed and 
fully in our control. We stopped to let 
our French bulldog poop and, being a 
responsible dog owner, my wife was 
bagging it while I kept an eye on our 
English bulldog. From out of nowhere, 

I hear a woman behind us ordering my 
wife to move our Frenchie out of her 
way. I turned around, and this woman 
yelled at me, "Sir, pull your dog back. I 
have mace and I will use it." She then 
thrust her can of mace in my dog's face. I 
just stood there stunned as she slow- 
jogged by me with her mace pointed at 
my dog and me. What kind of horrible 
sociopath threatens to mace a harmless, 
sweet, goofy, confused rescue dog? The 
only thing you did right was not pull 
that trigger. Your can of mace wasn't big 
enough to keep my enraged wife from 
whuppin' your ass! 

—Anonymous 


LET’S ALL TAKE A SECOND 
TO HATE THE HATERS 

We saw you, a young white dude walking into 
Neumos as if you were working there during 
Capitol Hill Block Party, wearing a black T- 
shirt emblazoned with the blunt statement “I 
HATE LOCAL MUSIC.” Ballsy move, under 
the circumstances. 

CATCHING POKEMON AT SEA-TAC 

You were at a Southwest Airlines gate in Seat- 
tle-Tacoma International Airport on Thursday. 
You sure looked weird as hell—denim shorts, 
Birkenstocks, sleep-deprived face—and the 
woman next to you, surrounded by her luggage, 
was looking at you with a tilted head. Not that 
you noticed. You were literally grumbling to 
yourself about there being too many Drowzees. 

CATCHING POKEMON 
ON A CROWDED BUS 

As the RapidRide E line was making its way 
north through Belltown last Wednesday just 
after 7 p.m., there were so many passengers 
the bus driver started prohibiting any more 
people at bus stops from getting on. Everyone 
was all up in each other’s laps, and the aisle 
was packed with standing passengers. We 
were one of those standing passengers, and 
while we did not want to spy at what you were 
doing on your phone, it was impossible to miss 
that you were catching Pokemon and having 
the best time. Then we looked away, and when 
we looked back down at you—we couldn’t see 
your face, only the assisted gold of your hair— 
we saw you typing a text message to someone. 
The words you were typing were “Pokemon 
spirit journey.” Horrified, we looked away. 

MAN CARRYING GROCERIES 
HAS MACAULAY CULKIN MOMENT 

We saw you—a man carrying groceries away 
from Trader Joe’s on a recent Thursday after¬ 
noon—have a total Macaulay Culkin in Home 
Alone moment when the handles of your bags 
broke two blocks from the store. You had 
double-bagged each paper bag, but no matter: 
Those Trader Joe’s handles are worthless. It 
looked like it might be about to rain. You fret¬ 
ted for a second, with busted bags, strewn gro¬ 
ceries, and no way to carry them home. But 
then you thought of something. You got out 


SHOULD I VOTE FOR HILLARY 
CLINTON? A FLOW CHART 


I am 100 percent behind Hillary 
Clinton. 



I disagree with her about some 
things, but I definitely prefer 
her to the Republican nominee. 


I mean, I guess I might vote for 
her, but only if she earns it in 
the next three months. 


T 

Fine. Here's a pacifier and some 
diapers. When they're used up... 


I'm fully committed to Bernie 
Sanders's revolutionary 
principles, and I'm devastated 
that he lost. 


She is a war hawk owned by 
the banks. 


No, she isn't. 


I think her laugh sounds forced 
and phony. 

T 

Consider how your laugh 
would sound when half the 
country has been brainwashed 
into thinking you're a 
murderous shrew, then... 


I'm sick of BOTH parties, so I'm 
voting Libertarian/Green/other 
party. 

i 

If you think Democrats and 
Republicans are bad, you're 
going to love fascist storm 
troopers. Get real, then... 


I think Donald Trump is hilarious. 


No, he isn't. 


I'm fed up with all the 
divisiveness, and I can't support 
either side, so I'm not voting 
at all. 


T 

You're fucking up. Here's a 
better idea: 



VOTE FOR HILLARY CLINTON. 



your phone, and within moments, a Lyft with 
a pink mustache on its dashboard pulled up. 


ODD COLOR EXTRUDES 
FROM DOG’S REAR END 

You, a dog on a side street at dusk on Sunday 
evening in Ballard, pooped purple. 

TWO RACCOONS WALKING 
DOWN THE STREET 

You two crazy cats—striped, Hamburglar- 
esque, not cats at all—were sauntering down 
the sidewalk on East Olive Way past that for¬ 
mer Online Coffee Company that for years 
has perpetually looked like it’s about to re¬ 
open but only just finally did reopen, as Good 
Citizen. Raccoons are the craziest-looking 
wild animals, and mixed in among other pe¬ 
destrians after dark these two almost looked 


human. A very tall man in a baseball cap and 
a Dina Martina T-shirt was walking up East 
Olive Way as the two raccoons were walking 
down, and when the man encountered na¬ 
ture’s Hamburglars, he got visibly anxious, 
stepped in between two parked cars, ducked 
as if ducking would help, and then darted 
across the busy street to get away from the 
raccoons. A young couple walking down the 
other side of the street laughed at him, and 
yet another onlooker somewhere else called 
out, possibly to make fun of him, “Squirrel!” 
The overly frightened man later admitted 
that he had recently smoked cannabis. 

THREE-LEGGED CHIPMUNK 
ON GRANITE MOUNTAIN 

We saw you, a three-legged chipmunk, 
breathing quickly at the summit of Granite 
Mountain shortly after we achieved the sum¬ 
mit ourselves. Reared up on your hind legs, 
we could see your right nub, totally furred 
over, bloodless, as if some god had simply 
twisted it off and tossed it off the mountain- 
top. You wanted some of our plum. Or some 
of our sandwich crumbs. Or maybe you just 
wanted another animal to gaze at you, and 
to hold the gaze without turning away. We 
couldn’t tell. We tried to get a picture of you 
to publish in this column, but by the time 
we’d gotten our phone out and held it up, 
you were already too far away, running off on 
your three legs. ■ 














































8 July 27, 2016 THE STRANGER 


SPIRITS TASTING and 
DISTILLERY TOUR 
on BAINBRIDGE ISLAND 



Walking the Talk 

That’s what leadership is all about 



i y 

John Paul J 

Ml 

till M 

-- 

Mm LiV m f Ji j- if - thWMQP 1 J 


Appointed by President Jimmy Carter in 1979 to create 
and head the National Consumer Cooperative Bank, 

John Paul Comerford was the first American banker to prohibit 
discrimination in lending policy based upon sexual orientation. 

John supports divesting fossil fuel stocks from the State Investment portfolio 
John supports a State Bank to hold our tax revenue here in Washington State 

Endorsed by the King County Democrats • Pierce County Democrats • Young Democrats of Washington 
• Democratic Progressive Caucus • Democratic Asian Pacific Caucus • the 1st, 2nd. 5th, 11th, 23rd, 26th, 28th, 30th, 31st, 
32nd, 33rd, 35th, 36th, 39th, 40th, 41st, 42nd, 43rd, 44th, 45th, 48th Legislative District Democrats 

Paid for by John Comerford for Treasurer. PO Box 9100. Seattle. WA 90109 


Experience • Education • Professional Credentials • Progressive Values 

John Paul Comerford for State Treasurer 


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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 9 



NEWS 


A Scottish Family Searches for Community 
at Seattle’s Gender Odyssey Conference 

BY ANA SOFIA KNAUF 


W hat are your PGP? 

Connor Tinlin’s tour guides, a 
lesbian couple, asked the Scottish dad that 
question during a visit to Seattle in 2012. 
“PGP” stands for preferred gender pronouns. 
Tinlin, then a recently out trans man with the 
peach fuzz and a changing voice to prove it, 
was deeply moved. 

“I could have cried,” Tinlin wrote in an 
e-mail from West Linton, a town near Edin¬ 
burgh, where he lives. “It was, I don’t know, 
relief? I thought that I want to feel this good, 
that my child should feel this good.” 

In August, Tinlin, 36, is returning to Seattle 
with Iona, his birth daughter, in order to attend 
Gender Odyssey, a three-day conference for 
transgender and gender-nonconforming peo¬ 
ple that kicks off on August 4. Tinlin and Iona, 
8, will attend workshops, see performances 
and films, and participate in family events. 
Gender Odyssey Family, a special program for 
parents and children, includes activities for 
teenagers and kids under the age of 12. 

Tinlin found out about Gender Odyssey 
while attending a baking conference in Skagit 
Valley in 2012. When he stopped through 
Seattle, he googled “trans Seattle” and hap¬ 
pened upon the convention’s website, where 
he read about their advocacy work in the com¬ 
munity. He was impressed. 

Years later, he finally committed to making 
the trip. 

Although Tinlin, who is currently unem¬ 
ployed, was able to stay with a friend during 
the convention and secure a scholarship from 
Gender Odyssey to cover the cost of admis¬ 
sion, he still couldn’t afford the flights on his 
own. So he created a GoFundMe campaign to 
raise money for plane tickets and hit his fund¬ 
raising goal in less than a month. 

According to Aidan Key, the event’s found¬ 
er, it’s not uncommon for families to fly in 
from overseas for Gender Odyssey, which is 
now in its 15th year. 

Before making his transition from female 
to male in 1998, Key was active in Seattle’s 
lesbian community, which was very tight- 
knit. When he began transitioning, he knew 
that some of his lesbian friends would be 
distressed, thinking he was leaving the com¬ 
munity. According to Key, for some people, 
trans people “rock the boat” too much. 

To prove that being trans wouldn’t divide 


“Most of the support 
out there is for trans 
people and partners or 
parents who have gender- 
nonconforming kids. We 
have literally never met 
anyone else in our situation.” 


“It’s no fun to throw a party and not have 
people show,” he said. 

According to Tinlin, it has been difficult 
for him to be accepted into LGBTQ spaces 
because he often passes as a single father—a 
single cisgender father. 

“Most of the support out there is for trans 
people and partners or parents who have 
gender-nonconforming kids. We have liter¬ 
ally never met anyone else in our situation,” 
said Tinlin. “Iona loves [to see] pictures of 
‘families like us,’ as she has wondered if she is 
the only kid out there with a mummy who’s a 
boy,” and he hopes Gender Odyssey will make 
Iona “feel less alone and more free.” 

For parents like him who have not been 
able to introduce their young children to oth¬ 
er families with trans parents, the convention 
is an opportunity to find peers and support. 

“If there’s distress, anger, or fear, of course 
kids are going to be confused,” Key said. “If 
there’s acceptance and conversation, it’s go¬ 
ing to be a lot easier. That doesn’t mean they 
won’t have a question or two. But if they get 
those questions answered, they move forward 
very easily.” 

When Tinlin asked Iona what it would 
mean to her to go to the convention, she said 
she was excited to make friends and meet 
other people like her dad, who she still some¬ 
times refers to as “mum.” 

Although they have met their fundraising 
goal, Tinlin’s GoFundMe page is still up and 
still accepting donations. He hopes to raise a 
little money to take his daughter sightseeing 
and to the top of the Space Needle. But Iona 
is most excited about something that doesn’t 
cost a dime: going swimming, but not for the 
usual reasons. 

“She knows I’m nervous about that post 
top surgery!” he said. ■ 


CONNOR tinlin With his birth daughter, Iona, attending Pride in Edinburgh, Scotland. 


him from the lesbian community, Key set up 
a series of educational workshops over three 
months at Seattle Central Community College 
in 2000. Key and attendees discussed gender 
from a number of angles, including its inter¬ 
sections with age, race, and levels of ability. 

“It was timely and a conversation that the 
gay and lesbian community [wasn’t having] in 
a formalized way,” said Key in an interview. 
“That was a pivotal and empowering time.” 

The workshop series was designed to 
“spark conversation and interest” in the first 
Gender Odyssey conference, which was al¬ 
ready scheduled for the following year at the 
Doubletree Hotel in SeaTac, he said. 

Inclusion is critical for Key, who said it’s 


easy for trans and gender-nonconforming 
people to feel isolated among the lesbian, gay, 
and bisexual community. To make the event 
inclusive, Gender Odyssey has been offering 
scholarships waiving admission costs since 
the inaugural convention. 

Trans and gender-nonconforming people 
often suffer extreme poverty, unemployment, 
underemployment, and workplace discrimi¬ 
nation, which would make paying difficult. 
According to the National Center for Trans¬ 
gender Equality’s discrimination survey, 26 
percent of people reported losing a job due to 
being transgender or gender nonconforming. 
And it’s important that Gender Odyssey be 
accepting—the more the merrier. 



COURTESY OF CONNOR TINLIN 


NEWS SHORTS 


BY STRANGER STAFF 

MINIMUM WAGE INCREASE HASN'T 
CAUSED SKY TO FALL Another University 
of Washington study finds no evidence 
that businesses small and large can't sur¬ 
vive higher minimum wages. "Our bottom 
line is we don't see the sky falling in terms 
of business closures," said public policy 
professor Mark Long during a presentation 
to the Seattle City Council on July 25. The 


study examines Seattle's economy in the 
first nine months after it began phasing 
in higher wages in 2015, from $9.47 up 
to $11 per hour, on a track toward $15. 
"We do not find compelling evidence that 
the minimum wage has caused signifi¬ 
cant increases in business failure rates," 
it says. "Moreover, if there has been any 
increase in business closings caused by the 


Minimum Wage Ordinance, it has been 
more than offset by an increase in business 
openings." The study finds that Seattle's 
economy is booming, and that the wage 
hike has put more money in the pockets of 
workers as intended. A companion study 
released in April found that increased 
wages in Seattle didn't lead to higher 
prices. ANSEL HERZ 

KSHAMA SAWANT WANTS TO PLACE 
CAPS ON "MOVE-IN" FEES Renters of 
Seattle, i.e., 52 percent of all city residents, 
pay attention! City council member Kshama 


Sawant, hot on the heels of passing an 
anti-slumlord law, is pushing for a new law 
to make it harder for landlords to screw 
you over. Sawant proposed new legisla¬ 
tion on July 21 that would drastically limit 
move-in fees charged by landlords and 
create payment plans for security deposits, 
fees, and last month's rent. The idea is to 
relieve the front-loaded burden of high 
costs on renters—a barrier facing 87 percent 
of Seattle low-to-moderate-income renters 
seeking housing, according to a new survey 
of 300 local residents by the housing justice 
group Washington CAN. (The Rental ► 
















10 July 27, 2016 THE STRANGER 



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Your Voice 
in Congress 


RamosforCongress.com 

Paid for by Friends of Santiago 
PO Box 292 Issaquah, WA 98027 

DEMOCRAT 


Housing Association of Washington, which 
represents landlords, did not respond to a 
request for comment.) ANSEL HERZ 



SDOT 


BERTHA BOONDOGGLE DRAGS ON, 

LATE AND OVER BUDGET The waterfront 
tunnel project needs a $60 million cash 
infusion from the state legislature in order 
to open three years behind schedule, in 
2019, transportation officials say. Bertha, 
the machine digging the tunnel to replace 
earthquake-prone sections of Highway 99, 
is only one-third of the way toward its fi¬ 
nal destination in South Lake Union. It has 
yet to reach its deepest point. The machine 
got stuck in 2013, but was finally repaired 
and made some progress earlier this year. 
ANSEL HERZ 

SEATTLE COPS REJECT CITY'S LABOR 
CONTRACT OFFER The Seattle Police 
Officers' Guild members—the city's 
rank-and-file police officers—has over¬ 
whelmingly voted down the city's latest 
contract proposal, as many expected, 

823 to 156. Ron Smith, the union presi¬ 
dent who recently resigned after making 
controversial comments about a "minority 


movement" on social media, had negoti¬ 
ated the deal in a protracted, confidential 
bargaining process. A copy of the proposal, 
obtained by The Stranger, outlined a new 
contract that represented a compromise 
between the union and the city on strong, 
independent civilian oversight. Mayor 
Ed Murray said he was disappointed by 
the vote and blamed the result on the 
"shocking" leak of the contract to the 
press. Police reformers say the contract 
negotiation process should be open the 
public. The contract rejection represents a 
blow to the mayor, city council, and police 
leadership. Both sides will now return to 
the bargaining table. ANSEL HERZ 

HOTEL WORKERS SAY THEY'RE HA¬ 
RASSED AND OVERWORKED A local 
union, UNITE HERE Local 8, has placed an 
initiative on the fall Seattle ballot that 
would provide hotel workers with panic 
buttons to use when they're working alone 
in rooms. At a recent union-organized 
a forum, a group of workers said they 
face terrifying sexual harassment from 
hotel guests with little recourse. Ermalyn 
Magtuba, a Filipina immigrant who works 
at the Seattle Hilton, said male guests 
have answered their doors naked, dropped 
their towels in front of her, and mastur¬ 
bated. "[Managers] just laugh with you 
because what can they do? They can't tell 
the guests to get out because they didn't 
really touch you," she said. Initiative 124 
would allow hotels to ban abusive guests 
for up to three years and require hotel 
operators to ensure that workers can ac¬ 
cess affordable health and family care. The 
Washington Restaurant Association has 
signaled opposition to the measure, saying 
in a statement that the initiative would 
create "onerous workplace provisions on 
hotel employers." ANA SOFIA KNAUF 



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The Stranger Election Control Board 

CHEAT SHEET 

For the August 2,2016, Primary Election 

The Stranger does not make endorsements in uncontested races (which, in this top-two 
primary, means races with two or fewer people in them) or in races we forgot. 


FEDERAL 


US Senator: Patty Murray 

US Representative Congressional 
District 1 : Suzan Dei Bene 

US Representative Congressional 
District 7: Pramila Jayapal 

US Representative Congressional 
District 8: Santiago Ramos 

US Representative Congressional 
District 9: Adam Smith 


STATE 


Governor: Jay Inslee 

Lieutenant Governor: Cyrus Habib 

Secretary of State: Tina 
Podlodowski 


Legislative District No. 28, 
State Senator: Marisa Peloquin 

Legislative District No. 32, 
Representative Position No. 1: 

Cindy Ryu 

Legislative District No. 32, 
Representative Position No. 2: 

Ruth Kagi 

Legislative District No. 34, 
Representative Position No. 1: 

Eileen Cody 

Legislative District No. 41, 
State Senator: Lisa Wellman 

Legislative District No. 43, 
Representative Position No. 1: 

Nicole Macri 


State Treasurer: Marko Liias 
State Auditor: Jeff Sprung 

Commissioner of Public Lands: 

Hilary Franz 

Superintendent of Public 
Instruction: Erin Jones 

Insurance Commissioner: Mike 
Kreidler 

Legislative District No. 17, 
State Senator: Tim Probst 


STATE SUPREME COURT 


Justice Position No. 5: Barbara 
Madsen 


SUPERIOR COURT 


Judge Position No. 44: Cathy 
Moore 


CITY OF SEATTLE 


Initiative No. 123 (Viaduct Park): No 


Legislative District No. 25, 
State Senator: Karl Mecklenburg 


Proposition No. 1 (Affordable 
Housing Levy): Yes 





























THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 1 1 



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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 13 



WEED 


Get High, Play Video 
Games All Day, 
Forget Trump 

BY TOBIAS COUGHLIN-BOGUE 


L ike peanut butter and jelly, whiskey and 
beer, or Ghostface and Raekwon, weed 
and video games are a timeless pairing. While 
people have been getting stoned far longer 
than they’ve been playing video games— 
researchers recently discovered charred 
remnants of cannabis dating back to the 
Neolithic era—it’s safe to say that potheads 
were probably early adopters of Pong. Few 
things seem to jibe 
quite so well as in¬ 
teractive screen time 
and cannabis, but 
as a non-gamer (too 
busy wheelie board¬ 
ing), IVe long been 
curious why stoners 
are so obsessed with 
gaming. 

So I asked a ston- 
er who also builds 
and plays video 
games for a living. 

Felix, who wanted to 
go by only his first name, said video games 
are a form of escapism, weed enhances the 
escapist effects of video games exponential¬ 
ly, and we all need to get away these days. 
“Video games are inherently surreal,” he 
said, “and I think smoking weed gets you 
into that mind-state where you’re blurring 
a little bit between reality and the story, the 
surreal world you’re in.” 

Felix added that he prefers to play video 
games at night, when he doesn’t have any ob¬ 
ligations. “I can really, truly get into it. Have 
an hour to two hours to sink into the depths 
of my escapism and just enjoy it. There are 
video games that don’t let 
you get away from things, 
but those are not the ones 
I prefer to play when I’m 
stoned.” 

Graham McClure, the 
bar manager at Sizzle Pie, 
echoed those sentiments. 

“[Weed] enables that will¬ 
ful suspension of disbelief a little more,” he 
said. “You can get more into it. You can for¬ 
get you’re sitting on the couch. Sometimes 
you just wanna shut it off. You know, shut 
off the real world and live in a fantasy la-la 
land.” 

Another stoner gamer I spoke to, who’s 
also a recovering alcoholic, said getting 
baked as fuck and playing World of War- 
craft—one of the most immersive games of 
all time—is a potent and necessary antidote 
to alcohol cravings. 

“I was always kind of trying to run away 
from something [with alcohol], and when I 
quit drinking, I was left with this pervasive 
boredom,” he said. “You can stop think¬ 
ing about the things that make you anxious 
[when you’re drunk]. You have to decompress 
somehow, and when you take away the only 
method that you had, you still want some¬ 
thing that allows you to run away. Video 


games allow you to build an immersive ex¬ 
perience that lets you get outside of yourself. 
I like to smoke weed and play video games 
because it allows me to really get away. Weed 
definitely enhances that ability.” 

Even for those who are not recovering alco¬ 
holics, the world can be a pretty shitty place. 
Cops are shooting people, people are shooting 
cops, people are shooting each other, people 
are running over other 
people in gorgeous 
beach towns over 
religion, people are 
maliciously harassing 
each other on Twitter, 
people are planning to 
vote for Trump, and so 
on ad infinitum. Things 
are legitimately bad, 
and most of us lack 
any sort of agency to 
make it better. But, as 
McClure pointed out, 
you’ve got a lot more 
agency in the digital world. 

“There’s still no Trump [in Fallout 3], in 
that postapocalyptic world,” he said. “Or if 
he was there, you could probably kill him and 
get away with it. No consequences!” 

If the thought of a little cannabis- 
enhanced Trump erasure sounds enticing, 
you are not alone. I asked one of the world’s 
leading experts on strains, Leafly editor 
and strain reviewer Bailey Rahn, who’s also 
a major gamer, to weigh in on the best bud 
for the experience. (Full disclosure: I am a 
reporter for Leafly.) Her first recommenda¬ 
tion? Not bud. 

“There is nothing 
quite like popping a 10- to 
15-milligram edible on a 
weekend where your to-do 
list consists of only Witcher 
contracts and side quests,” 
she said, in a reference to 
what I can only imagine is 
some kind of weird gamer 
shit. “These are great for highly immersive, 
sandbox, open-world RPGs [role-playing 
games] with impressive atmospheres. You 
can be as functional as a ham sandwich and 
still enjoy a nice nature walk through the 
stunning landscapes of Skyrim, Uncharted, 
Fallout, The Witcher 3, et cetera.” 

If you really want to smoke, Rahn mostly 
recommends sativa strains, because those 
tend to be headier and more focusing—ideal 
for getting really, really into a game. Durban 
Poison (sativa) was her go-to for fast-paced 
shooters and action games, Tangie (sativa) 
was her choice for gaming with friends, and 
Blueberry (indica) was her choice for melting 
into the couch and zoning out by yourself. 

Whichever you pick for your gaming 
adventures, one thing is blissfully certain: 
You’ll forget Trump for at least a few hours. 
That’s something we could all stand to do 
more often. ■ 



THE STRANGER 


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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 15 



The Case for Lowercase 
‘R’ Reparations 

Is Seattle Artist Natasha Marin’s Social Experiment, 
Reparations.me, Just a White Savior Arena? 


T he weekend of July 15, artist 
Natasha Marin tagged Rokea 
Jones in a Facebook group 
called “Reparations.” Jones saw 
the group’s title, saw the cover 
photo of a man holding an armful of kittens, 
and thought, “What the hell is this?” 

She was skeptical, but she told herself to 
look into it more deeply The group’s descrip¬ 
tion seemed pretty straightforward. Marin, 
37, billed it as “a social media experiment.” 
People who identify as white can offer goods 
and services to people of color. People of color 
can elect to accept those goods and services. 
Also, people of color can request goods and 
services they need. 

So Jones did some serious soul-searching. 
She scrolled through the list of offers and re¬ 
quests. Other people were asking for small 
things—food, a drink, a trip to the spa. But 
what would feel like a reparation for her? 
Here she is, a black woman who is taking 
time off from her 10-year career as a chef so 
that she can be there for her seven-month-old 
daughter during her infancy, a woman who 
regularly needs to take her daughter (and 
herself) to wellness checks at the hospital, a 
woman who is also training to be a doula. 


BY RICH SMITH 


A car. She needs a car. She is going to ask 
for a car. 

“There was definitely some fear,” Jones 
said. “Low-income communities and com¬ 
munities of color are the first ones to be fed 
the American dream rhetoric, that pull-your- 
self-up-by-your-bootstraps-manifest-density 
bullshit that America likes to portray but that 
is not necessarily true for all. With all that being 
driven into your thinking, subconsciously you 
feel some shame or fear when you ask for help.” 

But for Jones, a feeling of empowerment 
overcame the feeling of fear. “I wanted to 
demand what I felt was my right, and to own 
that demand,” she said. “We tell ourselves we 
live in one of the most progressive cities in 
the world. There’s no way a woman and her 
7-month-old child should be this stressed get¬ 
ting around in this city.” 

And so she requested a car fund. 

She got a response the same day. 

“I can contribute to your car fund,” a woman 
named Jenny wrote on Facebook, offering to 
lend Jones an “old but fully functional” car in 
the meantime. The car-sharing situation ended 
up not working out—Jones would have had to 
take a bus to the place where Jenny stored the 
car—but Jenny still contributed to the fund. 


Another woman named Jill, who lives in 
Texas, also messaged Jones, saying that she’d 
contribute to the car fund. Before Jones and 
Jill started to work out the details, they got 
to know each other. Jill asked how old Jones’s 
daughter was. Jones sent a photo. Her name 
is Ase. It’s Yoruban for “life force.” It’s also a 
word used to close a prayer. 

So now, she has a car fund. 

“For many years, it’s been a running 
joke—T still want my 40 acres and a mule,”’ 
Jones said. “I think this group is helping to 
paint a picture of what that might actually 
look like, in a way that doesn’t feel like pulling 
teeth. I’m not saying it’s healing all wounds, 
but it is helping to bridge a gap.” 

T hough the US government has given 
monetary reparations for incarcer¬ 
ating Japanese Americans during 
WWII, and though many Native Americans 
have received some reparations in the form of 
money, land, and tribal recognition, the word 
“reparations” is most closely related to the 
fight for reparations for slavery, which affects 
descendants of the African slave trade in par¬ 
ticular and not people of color in general. 

The fight for “capital ‘R’ Reparations,” 


most recently reinvigorated by Ta-Nehisi 
Coates’s incredible essay “The Case for 
Reparations,” is small but ongoing. Con¬ 
gressman John Conyers Jr. (D-Michigan) 
annually brings to the House floor HR 40, 
a bill that would establish a commission to 
study reparations proposals. The bill always 
gets committeed out of existence. 

There have been numerous reparations 
proposals, including cash settlements. (In 
2000, Harpers estimated the labor between 
1619 and 1865 plus 6 percent interest would 
amount to $100 trillion.) 

Glenn Loury, professor of economics at 
Brown, has critiqued the idea of reparations, 
arguing in the New York Times that a cash 
settlement would inadequately address the 
issue of racism in the US and also inflame 
racial tensions: “Reparations would allow the 
majority of Americans to look at the situation 
as one where ‘we’ do something for ‘them.’” 

Does Marin’s use of the word “repa¬ 
rations” undercut the fight for slavery 
reparations? 

She didn’t think so. “The word ‘repa¬ 
rations’ refers to the action of repairing 
something. So many things are broken,” she 
said over Facebook Messenger. “But just like 
affirmative action doesn’t ‘undercut’ the fight 
for equality, my little ole Facebook page and 
website can’t possibly undercut the totally le¬ 
gitimate fight for capital ‘R’ Reparations (for 
American Slavery slash Capitalism).” 

Marin isn’t the only artist to approach the 
idea of “lowercase ‘R’” reparations from an 
artistic perspective. The day Reparations.me 
launched, Lindsay Buchanan, an acupunctur¬ 
ist, organized an event in Portland, Oregon, 
called “Care Packages for POC Portlanders.” 
The event included free auricular acupunc¬ 
ture treatment, tea, and “heart medicine, 
self-care things... and sweet love notes.” 

And Damali Ayo, another Portland-based 
artist, occasionally performs Living Flag. 
She hits the streets to collect money in a 
bucket and hand it back to a random black 
person at the end of the day. 

E mily Batlan used the same phrase as 
Jones—“bridge a gap”—describing 
why she participated in Marin’s proj¬ 
ect. The recent shootings in Baton Rouge and 
Falcon Heights spurred Batlan, an academic 
advisor at University of Washington Bothell, 
to act: “We can read about it, but what can 
we do about it?” she asked. Fulfilling the of¬ 
fers on the website just seemed like “a really 
refreshing, possible thing.” 

Sitting on her couch at around 8:30 p.m., 
Batlan saw that a woman named Gloria had 
put out a request for a ride. Gloria (who asked 
that The Stranger not print her last name) 
works many sporadic contract jobs. One of 
them required her to travel to a handful of 
7-Elevens around the city that evening. 

“I have total insomnia right now,” Batlan 
thought, “so sure, I’ll do it, what the heck?” 

Batlan messaged Gloria. Gloria told Batlan 
that she found it hard to ask for help, but she 
would lose money if she didn’t figure out some¬ 
thing quick. Batlan said she was happy to drive 
Gloria around town. The whole process was 
only going to take about an hour and a half. It 
would have taken twice as long on a bus. 

As they drove around Seattle, the two 
new acquaintances talked about the way the 
buildings around town have changed and 
about how high the rent was getting. They 
talked about photography, a mutual interest 
they discovered along the ride. Batlan asked 
if Gloria requested anything else on the site. 
She said she had—grocery money. Someone 
had already private messaged her and wired 
her some funds. 

“It was caring, it was fun,” Batlan said. 
But are people like Batlan just appeasing 
their white guilt? 

“If people are doing this to assuage ► 





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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 1 7 


◄ their white guilt, at least they’re taking a 
step toward becoming aware that confronting 
bias and white privilege is really uncomfort¬ 
able,” Batlan said. “It wasn’t assuaging my 
white guilt. It was more about what I could 
do immediately. I wanted to make a positive 
contribution immediately.” 

Immediacy is one of the main reasons 
Marin built the webpage. “I’m particularly 
exhausted by this notion that folks, especially 
white folks, are somehow helpless to make 
a difference,” Marin said. “That couldn’t be 
farther from the truth.” 

Marin, whose show Remember Me is cur¬ 
rently on view at Vermillion on Capitol Hill, 
has a history of creating digital art projects 
designed to connect people. Her Red Lineage 
project is a long-form, collective poem that 
“explores relationships to family through 
metaphor.” She also maintains a blog called 
#WomanCentered, 

“a series of inter¬ 
views [that] seeks to 
tell the inspiring, in¬ 
terconnected stories 
of women’s reproduc¬ 
tive health, rights, 
and empowerment.” 

But Reparations, 
me has caught on 
more quickly than 
she anticipated, gar¬ 
nering coverage on 
KING 5 and the Se¬ 
attle Globalist since 
the launch. 

The pain that Rep- 
arations.me seeks to 
repair has long roots, 
perpetuated today by mass incarceration, 
police brutality, and discriminatory hous¬ 
ing policy. It is a long list. But there’s a gap 
between long-term legislative efforts to end 
those policies and the more immediate need 
to offer some relief to people of color who, in 
this age of Black Lives Matter, feel as if their 
lives are in danger. 

“These are reparations for this morning, 
last week, the day before yesterday,” Marin 
said. “People of color in America are manag¬ 
ing really high levels of stress right now.” 
Marin wants people “to feel empowered to 
DO SOMETHING.” 

Employees from local businesses such 
as Sugar Pill and the Pacific Northwest Bal¬ 
let have offered goods and services as well. 
But for those who are not as quick to jump 
into the experiment, whose initial impulse 
isn’t to “do something” right away but rather 
to think about what all this “means,” and to 
think about all the possible unintended con¬ 
sequences and moral murkinesses involved in 
action, a case of analysis paralysis can set in 
pretty quickly. 

Though the concept of crowdfunding and 
shared services isn’t new, the site’s name and 
intention triggers a series of complicated 
questions with no ready answers. Does Repa¬ 
rations.me ultimately transform white guilt 
into a kind of Groupon for people of color? Is 
that... a bad idea? Could a white guy make 
up for wearing a sombrero to a cousin’s Cinco 
de Mayo party by giving a Latino man a ride 
to work twice a week? Does this site really 
just set up a virtual white savior arena? Does 
the very name of the website somehow un¬ 
dermine the fight for reparations for slavery? 
Does this website perpetuate harmful stereo¬ 
types related to people of color? Is it racist to 
even have all of these thoughts? 

A white person (who happens to be writing 
this article right now) might ask: “If I keep 
asking these questions until I enter that men¬ 
tal state where I’m thinking about nothing 
and just staring into the middle distance and 
hoping the correct answers will magically ap¬ 
pear in my head, then have I performed what 
people call ‘one of those conversations we 


need to be having?’ Is it better to have anoth¬ 
er ‘one of those conversations we need to be 
having’ or to actually just listen to a person of 
color tell you what she needs to improve her 
life and try to provide that specific good or 
service if you can?” 

Marin says she’s choosing not to “center 
white people’s feelings or concerns” about 
this website, but that many of her white 
friends do seek to “extricate themselves from 
the guilt they are mired in.” 

White guilt, after all, may be only one of 
the many motivating factors for action. Bore¬ 
dom, a sense of philanthropy, and curiosity 
are others. 

A quick browse through the site sug¬ 
gests that Reparations.me isn’t a virtual 
white savior arena, either. A few mixed-race 
people and people of color with means have 
made offers, and a black man named Eddie 
in Connecticut, who 
requested a kidney 
donor in addition 
to $2,500 for school 
supplies, might have 
his request fulfilled 
by his sister, Angel, 
who is also black 
and who lives here. 

On Thursday, An¬ 
gel saw Eddie’s post, 
wherein he stated 
he’d been “patiently 
waiting, on dialysis” 
for a kidney donor. 
Angel knew vaguely 
that her brother was 
ill, but she didn’t 
know the severity of 
his condition, as the relationship between the 
two is distant and troubled. He is a minister 
and she is a proud atheist. That is the least of 
their disagreements. 

Nevertheless, Angel said, “None of my 
bad feelings toward him extend to not want¬ 
ing the absolute best for him and for him to 
live as long as possible.” 

So she offered her kidney. 

Eddie thanked her on the Reparations 
Facebook page, and the two began making ar¬ 
rangements. Even if the chances are low, Angel 
said she will still get their doctors in communi¬ 
cation and take the necessary tests in order to 
initiate a process of determining a match. 

The site “created a bridge to a relation¬ 
ship that I thought was too far away, both in 
terms of distance and bad feelings,” she said. 
Separated from her family and from con¬ 
nections that other people take for granted, 
Angel said she and her son “wouldn’t even be 
here” if it weren’t for strangers responding 
to her needs. “I need to know [places such as 
Reparations.me] are there,” she said. 

Not everyone is as enthralled; Marin has 
volunteer moderators to monitor racist com¬ 
ments. On Slog, some commenters balked at 
the relatively small offers and also at what 
seemed liked luxury requests. Is a trip to the 
spa extraneous? 

“Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, 
it is self-preservation, and that is an act of 
political warfare,” writes Audre Lorde in her 
book of essays, A Burst of Light. 

Marin seems to agree with Lorde’s notion: 
“I think we could make significant positive 
change in our societies and in the world just 
by making more time and space for women to 
care for themselves and each other,” she said. 

While it’s possible for Marin’s particular 
Reparations website to expand and become 
the hub for a national “small ‘R’” reparations 
movement, it’s just as likely that the website 
will inspire other artists and activists to try 
out the experiment for themselves in their own 
cities, with their own local social networks. 

It is, after all, a social experiment. Seemed 
to go okay for the people who’ve already tak¬ 
en part. ■ 


Though the concept of 
crowdfunding and shared 
services isn't new, the 
site’s name and intention 
triggers a series of 
complicated questions with 
no ready answers. Does 
Reparations.me ultimately 
transform white guilt into 
a kind of Groupon for 
people of color? 



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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 19 


What Is Trump’s America? 

The Democratic National Convention Can’t Erase the Nightmare of a Week in Cleveland 

BY SYDNEY BROWNSTONE AND HEIDI GROOVER 



O n the first night of the Democratic Na¬ 
tional Convention, First Lady Michelle 
Obama took the stage and talked about 
the future of America’s children. She talked 
about hope—about a belief that America was al¬ 
ready great and why, above all, the nation needs 
Hillary Clinton now more than ever. 

“You see,” she said, extolling Clinton’s work 
on children, health care, and her years of advo¬ 
cating for women, “Hillary understands that 
the president is about one thing and one thing 
only: It’s about leaving something better for our 
kids.” 

The attitudes on Cleveland’s streets and in 
the hall of the Republican National Convention 
last week couldn’t have been more different 
from the speeches at the Democratic National 
Convention. In Philadelphia, Democratic speak¬ 
ers talked about a $15 minimum wage, breaking 
glass ceilings, and tuition-free college. 

At the Republican National Convention, all 
around us, hundreds of cops roamed the streets. 
Tall, black fences corralled protesters. A few 
blocks away, inside Cleveland’s Quicken Loans 
Arena, Republican delegates spent the week 
listening to former New York City mayor Rudy 
Giuliani and former Defense Intelligence Agen¬ 
cy director Michael Flynn promising Trump 
will “Make America Safe Again.” 

On night three of the convention, a boy 
around 14 years old strolled down a Cleveland 
sidewalk with his family, looking bored. He wore 
a white T-shirt. “Hillary sucks but not like Mon¬ 
ica,” the shirt read. “Trump that bitch.” 

“BLOOD COMING OUT 
OF HER WHEREVER” 

Republican policies that erode women’s rights 
are nothing new. But in Trump’s Cleveland, a 
more gleeful, shameless misogyny is on full dis¬ 
play. Delegates are buying pins that read “KFC 
Hillary Special: 2 Fat Thighs, 2 Small Breasts... 
Left Wing.” It’s a fitting tribute for a man who 
has called women “dogs” and “fat pigs.” 

Some of the protesters at the DNC share a 
similar, seething hatred of Hillary Clinton. At 
the DNC, some protesters claim they’d rather 
sit out the election altogether, and chant, “Lock 
her up.” 

The Republicans must be pleased. The na¬ 
tional Republican Party platform, adopted 
during the convention, calls for defunding 
Planned Parenthood, overturning the Supreme 
Court ruling allowing same-sex marriage, and 
passing legislation that would apply the Four¬ 
teenth Amendment to “unborn children.” 

For women’s rights, Ohio—under the watch¬ 
ful eye of a so-called sensible Republican, 
Governor John Kasich—offers a preview of 
those antiabortion policies. Here, the state has 
enacted 18 restrictions on abortion, according to 
Planned Parenthood. Along with restrictions on 
abortion clinics and cuts in funding, Ohio has re¬ 
stricted funding for rape counselors who advise 
survivors. The state received an “F” grade from 
NARAL Pro-Choice America. 

Trump, while wishy-washy on social issues, 
has picked a VP who is anything but. And in 
Trump’s America, that VP—not Trump him¬ 
self—is actually in charge. 

According to a New York Times report, dur¬ 
ing his VP search, his son, Donald Trump Jr., 
told an adviser to Kasich, that Trump planned 
to put his VP in charge of both domestic and 
foreign policy. In other words, according to the 
Times , whoever Trump chose would be “the 
most powerful vice president in history.” 

The person he ultimately chose, Indiana 
governor Mike Pence, is an ultraconservative, 
known for signing laws allowing discrimination 


against LGBTQ people and restricting access to 
abortion. One particularly draconian law Pence 
signed enacted Texas-style clinic regulations 
and required people having abortions to pay for 
the cremation or burial of the fetus. 

“I’m a Christian, a conservative and a 
Republican,” Pence told the RNC crowd in 
Cleveland, “in that order.” 

A pseudo Pence presidency could lead to 
the nationwide adoption of the restrictive, anti¬ 
woman environments seen in Indiana and Ohio. 
The government would prioritize “religious lib¬ 
erty” over LGBTQ civil rights. With Planned 
Parenthood defunded, low-income people would 
have less access to STI testing, breast cancer 
screenings, and abortions. 

“WELCOME, FRIENDS OF COAL” 

On the night Donald Trump is set to speak at 
the RNC, the Kentucky Coal Association and 
Murray Energy Corporation, the biggest pri¬ 
vate coal mining company in the US, hold a 
private reception ahead of Trump’s speech in 
an air-conditioned Cleveland bistro. “Welcome, 
Friends of Coal,” the sign reads. 

Trump’s RNC speech does not disappoint 
his backers. “We are going to lift the restric¬ 
tions on the production of American energy,” he 
says. “My opponent, on the other hand, wants 
to put the great miners and steelworkers of our 
country out of work—that will never happen 
when I am president.” 

Trump has not yet outlined how he will sud¬ 
denly turn a failing coal market into a thriving 
one. Making coal into a lucrative industry would 
require not just reversing the Clean Air Act, but 
actively subsidizing coal production. As a global 
commodity, coal is no longer as attractive as it 
once was. Even China—yes, China —is backing 
away from burning coal. 

Not that it matters. Fox News segments that 


lend credibility to climate-science deniers have 
been airing for more than a decade. In Trump’s 
America, the state is financed by big polluters. 
In Trump’s America, you can forget about hear¬ 
ing the words “climate change” mentioned in 
any scientific capacity at all. 

“LAW AND ORDER” 

It’s upwards of 85 degrees in the shade, and 
about 40 protesters in Cleveland’s Public 
Square have braved the heat on Thursday. But 
on each side of the square, rows upon rows 
of cops in riot gear are standing watch, still 
as statues. Thousands of them are here this 
week, from New Jersey, Indiana, California, 
and Texas. There are more police officers than 
protesters. There are more police officers than 
almost anyone else. 

The scene could have been ripped from a 
movie about a dystopian future—or from real 
footage of a totalitarian past. After all, there 
is one big historical precedent for a fringe 
candidate who’s used funding from a battered 
industry to seize political power. In 1932, the 
Nazi party became the plurality in German par¬ 
liament after winning election financing from 
wealthy steel manufacturers, including one who 
owned several newspapers. 

As Trump takes the stage in Cleveland, 
Linda Sarsour is 300 miles east, driving home 
from a trip to the White House. Sarsour, the 
executive director of the Arab American As¬ 
sociation of New York, has just introduced 
President Obama to two Syrian refugees who 
have been relocated to Brooklyn after spending 
months in Malaysia. The refugees are in the car 
when Trump takes the RNC stage and his voice 
comes in over the radio. 

“We must immediately suspend immigration 
from any nation that has been compromised 
by terrorism until such time as proven vetting 


mechanisms have been put in place,” Trump 
shouts. “We don’t want them in our country.” 

Instead of “pivoting” and backing away from 
his proposal to ban Muslims—all Muslims— 
from entering the United States, he doubles 
down. 

“I was so hurt for [the refugees], that they 
have to hear that, that this is the man we’re al¬ 
lowing to compete for the highest office of this 
land,” Sarsour told The Stranger. “I wasn’t 
shocked by him, but I became more afraid.” 

But something else about Trump’s speech 
bothers Sarsour, too. Over and over again, she 
hears Trump promise to “restore law and order 
to our country.” 

“Do you understand what Trump and his 
supporters mean by Jaw and order’?” Sarsour 
asked her followers on Twitter. “More criminal¬ 
izing and terrorizing communities of color.” 

It’s not difficult for Sarsour to imagine law 
and order under a Trump presidency. She’s 
already seen it. After 9/11, the New York 
City Police Department systematically spied 
on Muslim communities. A decade later, the 
Associated Press reported on how the depart¬ 
ment’s “Demographics Unit” mapped Muslim 
neighborhoods. 

The NYPD’s treatment of Muslims eventu¬ 
ally resulted in a lawsuit, then a settlement to 
curtail the NYPD’s surveillance of Muslim com¬ 
munities. But Trump has called for reviving this 
kind of spying on American citizens. 

Former NYC mayor Rudy Giuliani offers 
another clue as to what restoring “law and or¬ 
der” might look like under a Trump presidency. 
Giuliani—who looks like he’s angling for a spot 
in the Trump administration—came to power in 
1994 via a “tough on crime” platform. He helped 
architect a system of racially biased policing 
that has been replicated all over the country. 

Under Giuliani’s governance, the NYPD 
cracked down on minor infractions—graffiti, 
riding bikes on the sidewalk, public urination— 
and greatly expanded the practice of stopping 
and frisking young Black and Latino men. In 
2013, a federal judge found that the NYPD’s 
stop-and-frisk practices were unconstitutional, 
violating the Fourth and Fourteenth Amend¬ 
ment rights of New York City citizens. The 
following year, activists drew a link between 
Giuliani’s legacy and the death of Eric Garner, 
a father of five who was selling loose cigarettes 
when police put him in a fatal chokehold. 

Today, Trump is also using “law and order” 
speech to respond to the Black Lives Matter 
movement. At the RNC, Trump’s supporters 
wear “Blue Lives Matter” pins. In Louisiana, 
“Blue Lives Matter” has actually been written 
into law; police officers and first responders now 
qualify as a “protected class” in the state’s hate- 
crime statute. Under a Trump presidency, it’s 
not difficult to imagine this policy could spread. 
Statutes designed to protect the most vulner¬ 
able members of society could be applied to a 
powerful, well-armed apparatus of the state. 

This type of ideology is not conservative; it’s 
fascist. But the thousands of hollering Trump 
fans in Cleveland don’t appear to care about the 
distinction. It’s now obvious that the Republican 
Party has lost control of Donald Trump. The 
party, or what remains of it, only exists to enable 
a bigoted narcissist with dreams of authoritar¬ 
ian rule. 

“Law and order,” Trump repeats on TV 
History, we have learned, can repeat too. As 
Michelle Obama said at the DNC, “We cannot 
sit back and hope that everything works out for 
the best.” 

We cannot afford four to eight years of 
Trump’s America. It is up to us to stop it. ■ 


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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 21 



SAVAGE LOVE 

Interabang by dan savage 


I’m 28 years old and live in the Midwest. I’m 
inter sex, but I identify as female. I am not out 
about being born intersex. Due to surgeries 
and hormones, I look like a fairly attractive 
female. I have been hanging out with a chill 
hetero guy, and things are getting very flirty. 
Is it unethical of me to not disclose my inter- 
sex-ness to him? 

In New Terrific Erotic Romance 

“We all have to make decisions about what we 
disclose to partners or potential partners and 
when we disclose it,” said Alice 
Dreger, historian of medicine 
and science, sex researcher, 
and author. 

Dreger, for readers who 
may not be familiar with her, 
is the founding board chair of 
the Intersex Society of North 
America and the author of Gal¬ 
ileo’s Middle Finger: Heretics, 

Activists, and One Scholar’s 
Search for Justice. Intersex, 
for readers who may not be 
familiar with the word, is an 
umbrella term covering dozens 
of different inborn conditions. 

“They all involve someone having some¬ 
thing other than the standard male or standard 
female body as those are defined by doctors,” 
explained Dreger. “There are lots of different 
ways to be intersex, including some so subtle 
that you might never even know you had that 
particular variation of development.” 

So that chill hetero boy you’re thinking 
about disclosing your intersex-ness to, INTER? 
He could be intersex himself and not know it. 
But you do know it, and does “knowing it” obli¬ 
gate you to disclose? 

“Lying is a bad idea, of course, but she’s not 
lying by presenting herself as a woman and 
identifying as a woman,” said Dreger. “She is 
a woman, just one whose body came with some 
parts that aren’t common to most women, or 
maybe lacking some parts that are common to 
most women (depending on her particular inter¬ 
sex condition).” 

Dreger suggests making a mental list of the 
things a long-term partner might want, need, 
or a have a right to know about your history 
and your body. Then using your best judgment, 
INTER, decide what to share with him and 
when to share it. 

“For example,” said Dreger, “if this chill 
hetero guy talks about wanting kids someday, 
and the letter writer is infertile, she might want 
to mention sooner rather than later that she 
was born with a condition that left her infertile. 
Do her genitals look or work differently than 
he might be expecting? If so, she might think 
about when it would be best to give him some 
guidance about how her body is a little different 
and what works best for her.” 

Each of us has to balance our partner’s legit¬ 
imate right to certain information, INTER, 
with our right to medical privacy as well as our 
physical and emotional safety. 

“There’s no reason for her to feel like she has 
to announce, ‘I’m an intersex woman.’ She could 
opt to say, at some point, T was born with con¬ 
genital adrenal hyperplasia,’ or T was born with 
androgen insensitivity syndrome,’ or whatever 
her specific condition might be, and then answer 
his questions,” said Dreger. “If the label ‘intersex’ 
were part of her core identity—a critical part of 
who she feels she is—then she might want to tell 
him early on, just as someone might talk about 
her ethnicity if that’s really important to her. But 
otherwise, she can disclose just like non-intersex 
people do with regard to fertility, sexual health, 
sexual sensation, sexual preferences, and sexual 
function—at a pace and in a way that promotes a 
good relationship and makes you feel honest and 
understood. And no one can tell her she has to use 
term ‘intersex.’ That’s entirely up to her.” 

Follow Alice Dreger on Twitter 
@AliceDreger. 


My husband looks at porn... porn of women 
with a body type almost the polar opposite of 
mine... Example: big boobs and tattoos... Does 
that mean he’s no longer attracted to my body? 
I’m so confused... He says I’m hot and sexy, 
but what he looks at does NOT make me feel 
that way. 

Personally Offended Regarding Nudes 

Is it possible your partner is attracted to... 
more than one body type? Example: Your body 
type and its polar opposite? 

And if your partner were 
looking at porn that fea¬ 
tured women with your exact 
body type... would you feel 
affirmed? Or would you be 
writing to ask me why your 
husband looks at porn of 
women with your exact body 
type when he can look at you? 
And is your husband sharing 
his porn with you... or are you 
combing through his browser 
history? Either way, PORN, 
if looking at what he’s looking 
at makes you sad... maybe you 
should stop looking at what 
he’s looking at? And if he’s not neglecting you 
sexually... if he isn’t just saying he finds you hot 
and sexy but showing you he does... why waste 
time policing his fantasies? 

People enjoy what they have and fantasize 
about what they don’t. So long as we don’t take 
what we have for granted... it’s not a problem... 
unless we decide to make it one. 

What are your favorite uses for the butt plug 
besides putting it in your own butt or someone 
else’s butt? 

Fun Faggy Question 

They make lovely paperweights, FFQ, and per¬ 
fectly proportioned pacifiers for adult babies. But 
at our place, we use decommissioned butt plugs to 
play cornhole—which is a beanbag toss game that 
became popular in the Midwest some years after 
I moved to the West Coast. (It’s true. Google it.) 
When I was a kid, we were instructed to run from 
drunk uncles at family picnics who suggested a 
little cornholing before dinner. But that was then. 

We all have to die , Dan. How would you most 
like to go? 

Genuinely Not A Threat 

In a tragic rimming accident. 

My partner and I got married last weekend. 
For his vows, he wrote a hilarious, wonderful 
song. (He’s a professional singer in Los Ange¬ 
les, so the song was pretty spectacular.) I’m a 
Femme Dom who loves ropes, while he’s pretty 
vanilla. Despite that, we’ve had a dynamite 
sex life for the last eight years, in part because 
he’s so GGG. Early on, I got him to start read¬ 
ing your column, and that concept made a 
huge impression on him. Here’s the verse from 
his song/vows that you inspired: u Now next I 
should obey you / But that one’s a little tricky / 
I’m what you call “vanilla”/ And on top of that 
I’m picky / Instead of blind obedience /1 hope 
it’s understood /1 promise to continue / Being 
giving, game, and good!” Thanks for all you do! 

Beloved Revels In Dan’s Love Education 

Congrats on your wedding, BRIDLE, and 
thanks for a lovely note—one that will give 
hope to kink-discordant couples everywhere. 
Perfect fits, sexually speaking, are rare. But 
whip a little GGG into the mix, and that imper¬ 
fect fit can become a perfect match! ■ 

On the Lovecast , Dan chats with the directors 
of the movie Tickled: savagelovecast.com. 


mail@savagelove.net 
@fakedansavage on Twitter 



SAVAGE LOVE 



5 Years of Dan Savage, now on your iPhone 


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All the Events The Stranger Suggests This Week 


Find the complete calendar of things to do in Seattle 
atstrangerthingstodo.com strangerTTD Stranger Things To Do 



FILM 


Puget Soundtrack: 
Fungal Abyss 
present The Devils 


DON'T MISS 


| Ken Russell's notorious adapta¬ 
tion of Aldous Huxley's The Devils of Loudun 
features the most accurate tagline of all time: 
"The Devils is not a film for everyone." That 
was especially true for the Catholic Church, 
which took offense at Russell's depiction of 
a 17th-century priest with a healthy sexual 
appetite (Oliver Reed in his most robust 
performance) and the sadistic, emotionally 
stunted nun (a shriveled Vanessa Redgrave) 
determined to destroy him. As if that isn't 
incentive enough to see this orgiastic cri de 
coeur against crown-sponsored religious 
hypocrisy, Caravaggio director Derek Jarman 
designed the sets and Seattle's Fungal Abyss 
(the psilocybin-powered alter ego of doom- 
metal band Lesbian) will be providing the live 
score for this incendiary installment of the 
Northwest Film Forum's Puget Soundtrack. 
(Northwest Film Forum, Sat July 23, 8 pm, 
$12/$15) KATHY FENNESSY 


Black Girl 


DON'T MISS 


_| Ousmane Sembene's feature 

debut—and what can be considered to be 
the first great African film by a black African 
director, and so is to world cinema what 
Chinua Achebe's novel Things Fall Apart is 
to world literature—is concerned with the 
existential horror of being a stranger in a 
strange, strange land. It is elegantly framed, 
acted, and articulated, it is bold, it is at 
once very French (particularly its ending) 
and very African, and, finally, it is a movie 
that you must see if you honestly consider 
yourself to be a lover of the art of moving 
pictures. (Grand Illusion, July 29-August 4, 
$9) CHARLES MUDEDE 


We also recommend... 

Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie: Various 
locations 

The BFG: Various locations 

Black Dynamite: Central Cinema, Wed Aug 

3, 7 pm, $8 

Do the Right Thing: Scarecrow Video, Sat 
July 30, 7 pm, free 
Finding Dory: Various locations 
Ghostbusters: Various locations 


Guardians of the Galaxy: Scarecrow 

Video, Fri July 29, 8 pm, free 

Hunt for the Wilderpeople: SIFF Cinema 

Uptown & Sundance Cinemas 

Jason Bourne: Various locations, opens Fri 

July 29 

New Belgium Brewing's Clips Beer & 
Film Tour: Gas Works Park, Fri July 29, 8 pm- 
midnight, free entry 

Noir City: SIFF Cinema Egyptian, $ 15/$150, 
through July 28 

The Secret Life of Pets: Various locations 
Star Trek Beyond: Various locations 

Complete listings at strangerthingstodo.com 


ART 


Dean Wong: New 
Street Photography 


DON'T MISS 


| If you don't know Dean Wong's 
name already, he is the photographer who 
has most doggedly and beautifully docu¬ 
mented Seattle's Chinatown, and he has a new 
book out. Seeing the Light: Four Decades in 
Chinatown. It includes photographs also taken 
in Chinatowns in San Francisco and Vancou¬ 
ver, BC, but Wong's heart is where his home 


is, here in Seattle, where he grew up in his 
family's home tucked into the streets of what 
we now call the International District, where 
he learned to develop his first roll of film at 
Cleveland High School in a black-and-white 
photo class taught by the biology teacher, and 
where, at the University of Washington, he 
developed a conscious practice of resistance 
toward the racist mainstream. Here at Jack 
Straw, you'll see a selection of the photo¬ 
graphs and a copy of the book, which includes 
images and also Wong's stories. His voice is 
vivid and no-nonsense, sometimes smack- 
ingly so. He is a powerful image-maker and 
storyteller. You can still find Wong out there 
in the ID taking pictures pretty much every 
Saturday and Sunday. His work is not finished. 
This is a show you want to see, and a book 
you need to have. (Jack Straw Cultural Center 
Front Gallery, Mon-Fri, free, through Sept 2) 
JEN GRAVES 

We also recommend... 

The Duchamp Effect: Seattle Art Museum, 
Wed-Mon, $20, through Aug 14 

Graphic Masters: Diirer, Rembrandt, 
Hogarth, Goya, Picasso, R. Crumb: Seattle 
Art Museum, Wed-Mon, $20, through Aug 28 
Inspiring Beauty: 50 Years of Ebony 
Fashion Fair: Bellevue Arts Museum, Tues- 
Sun, $12, through Aug 14 


Adam Fung: Constellation Atlas: Cloud 
Gallery, daily, free, through July 31 
Amanda Manitach: Nothing Left to Say: 

Roq La Rue, Wed-Sat, free, through July 30 
American Power: CoCA PS35, Thurs-Sat, 
free, through July 30 
C. Davida Ingram: Bridge Productions, 
Wed-Sat, free, through July 30 
Ceramics Invitational: National Clay: 
Traver Gallery, Tues-Sun, free, through July 30 
Christine Marie Larsen: Writers: Essentia 
Natural Memory Foam, free, through July 31 
Eli Coplan: Inferiority Machines: Glass 
Box Gallery, Tues-Sun, free, through July 30 
GIANT APPETITES: BONFIRE, Wed-Sat, free, 
through July 29 

Hit and Run: The Final Exhibition: Punch 
Gallery, Thurs-Sat, free, through July 30 
Hollow Earth: Documents: Glass Box Gal¬ 
lery, Wed-Sat, free, through July 30 
Joe Max Emminger and Zac Culler: Linda 
Hodges Gallery, Tues-Sat, free, through July 30 
Natalie Ball and Noelle Garcia: Make: 
SOIL, Thurs-Sun, free, through July 30 
Nicholas Nyland: SOIL, Thurs-Sun, free, 
through July 30 

Nick Strobelt: The Salt Lick: Veronica, Sat, 
free, through July 30 

Ruthie V: Neither Will This Stay: CORE, 

Wed-Sat, free, through July 30 

Sonya Stockton: The Head and Figure: 

Gallery 110, Thurs-Sat, free, through July 30 
A Touch of Light: A/NT Gallery, Wed-Sun, 
free, through July 31 

Complete listings at strangerthingstodo.com 

Continued ► 
















24 July 27, 2016 THE STRANGER 


Depression has 
many faces. 
What is your child’s 
telling you? 

If your child has been struggling with 

feelings of depression, you may be 
interested in learning more about the 
Engage clinical research studies for 
children and adolescents who have major 
depressive disorder (MDD). 

Your child may be eligible to 
join an Engage study 
if he or she: 

£ I q ~1 1 "7 \/p3rc old Engage in a clinical research program for 

y C pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). 

• Has been diagnosed 
with MDD or has been 
having feelings of depression 

If your child participates in an Engage 
clinical research study, the study will last 
for about 10 weeks and will include about 
9 study visits. All investigational drug 
will be provided at no cost, and you may 
be reimbursed for your time and travel 
expenses. 

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gethelpnow@etresource.com 

425 - 443-9551 




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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 25 


THINGS TO DO ARM CULTURE 


READINGS & TALKS 


A Reading of 
Indigenous Writers: 
Elissa Washuta, 
Tommy Pico, 
Demian Dine Yazh 


FareStart Guest Chef Night with Ian 
Weaver: FareStart, Thurs July 28, 5:30-8 pm, 
$29.95 

Pozole Making Class: El Centro de la Raza, 
Sat July 30, 10 am, $50 

Complete listings at strangerthingstodo.com 


PERFORMANCE 


Daisy 


DON'T MISS 


_| Elissa Washuta has been 

writing inside the northwest tower of the 
Fremont Bridge all summer. That's because 
she won the writer/poet in residency ap¬ 
pointment from the Office of Arts & Culture, 
which means she gets an office and a sweet 
$10,000 purse. What has she been writing 
about up there? According to an interview 
she did with UW Today: the Lake Washington 
Ship Canal, "displaced Indigenous peoples," 
and "unseen elements of the land." The last 
two books she wrote (My Body Is a Book of 
Rules and Starvation Mode) were innovative 
pieces of creative nonfiction wherein she 
uses quotidian genres—a doctor's note, say— 
to frame literary meditations on her personal 
experience. Her sentences are musical and 
she's a good reader of her work. Brooklyn- 
based poet Tommy Pico will join her. Two 
weeks ago at CAM, he read from his new 
book, IRL. The section he read was humor¬ 
ous, thoughtful work that reinvigorates 
the flaneur style with explicit discussions of 
gender and race. I don't know much about 
Portland-based artist and poet Demian 
DineYazhi', but he describes his own work as 
"a continual inquiry into Radical Indigenous 
Queer Feminist ideology." (Hugo House First 
Hill , Sat July 30, 4-5:30 pm, free) RICH SMITH 


DON'T MISS 


| This world-premiere play is 
based on the true story of marketing firm 
Doyle Dane Bernbach's creation of the first 
negative political TV ad. The weirdly avant- 
garde commercial, which was made for 
Lyndon B. Johnson's campaign against Barry 
Goldwater in 1964, shows a little blonde 
girl picking petals off a daisy only seconds 
before she gets blown to smithereens by a 
nuclear bomb. The ad is so legendary that 
politicians still reference it today. Though 
playwright Sean Devine didn't mean for it 
to be when he started working on it years 
ago, Daisy serves as a piece of compelling, 
dramatic commentary on the 2016 Trump 
Versus Clinton Hate-Vote Election™, which 
means his play is relevant in a very obvious 
way that people like. Our brain actively co¬ 
constructs our reality, and the people who 
are trying to trick us into voting for them 
or buying their tchotchkes know that. The 
most successful campaigns don't control 
our minds—they reflect our feelings back at 
us. We don't go with the product/president 
we understand, we go with the product/ 
president that makes us feel most under¬ 
stood. (ACT Theatre, Tues-Sun, $20-$68, 
through Aug 7) RICH SMITH 


We also recommend... 


We also recommend... 

Jack Straw Group Reading: Elliott Bay 
Book Company, Fri July 29, 7 pm, free 
Shin Yu Pai: Shoreline City Hall Gallery, 
Shoreline, Sat July 30, 5-7 pm, free 

Complete listings at strangerthingstodo.com 


FOOD & DRINK 


Bendy Brewski 
Yoga 


DON'T MISS 


| In a gallery lined with gold 
frames, the Frye Art Museum hosts a series 
of "Noise Yoga" classes, which caters to 
lovers of yoga, art, and experimental music. 
But what about all the craft beer-loving yo¬ 
gis and yoginis of Seattle? Where can they 
go? Today, Sodo's Pyramid Brewing hosts its 
first "Bendy Brewski" class: 45 minutes of 
yoga (open to all levels, with mats avail¬ 
able to borrow) followed by a pint of beer. 

It seems inevitable that someone would 
finally find a way to combine two of the 
city's favorite activities. Namaste and cheers. 
(Pyramid Brewery, Sun July 31, 9:30 am, $25, 
through Aug 14) ANGELA GARBES 


We also recommend... 

Eden Hill Winemaker Dinner featuring 
Martedi Winery: Eden Hill, Wed July 27, 
7:30 pm, $135 

Fabulous Fish Fridays: Machine House 
Brewery, Fri July 29, 5-9 pm 


DRAGON LADY: Theatre Off Jackson, 
Thurs-Sat, $15/18, through July 30 
Hamlet: Luther Burbank Park, July 28-30, 7 
pm, free; Fisher Pavilion, Sun July 31, 2 pm, 
free 

The Last Days of Judas Iscariot: Center 
Theatre, Thurs-Sun, $25, through July 31 
Seattle Festival of Dance Improvisation: 

Various locations, July 31- Aug 7 
Suffering, Inc.: 12th Avenue Arts, Thurs- 
Sat, 8 pm, $20, through July 30 

Complete listings at strangerthingstodo.com 


QUEER 


Jocks, Frocks, 
and Bacon: A 
Drag Brunch 
Spectacular 


DON'T MISS 


| The Gay Softball World Series 
is coming up, and Seattle's own Los Gallitos 
are fundraising to head to Austin in August. 
They'll be donning drag for this Sunday's 
brunch, with Two Doors Down serving food 
and drink, and the players serving fishy real¬ 
ness. Twenty bucks gets you food, booze, 
and the undying thanks of some men in 
uniform. Though they bill themselves as 
"slow-pitch," there's no limit to how fast 
they can catch. (Two Doors Down, Sun July 
31, 10 am-noon, $20) MATT BAUME 


Complete listings at strangerthingstodo.com 




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26 July 27, 2016 THE STRANGER 



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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 27 





WEDNESDAY 7/27 


The Psychedelic Furs, the Church 

(Benaroya Hall, all ages) "Heartbreak Beat" 
is the Psychedelic Furs' greatest song. From 
the opening eerie whine to the down-the- 
block horns to the martial snare to the 
declaration that "feels like love" is "all that 
we need," even as Richard Butler, through 
his abraded throat, knows he's settling for 
what he can settle for. But that's all he can 
get "down on my street." I still don't think 
the Furs made a great album [Actually, the 
first two qualify. —Dave Segal], although as 
late as 2014, I rode around on Metro with 
an old-style Walkman trying to parse Mirror 
Moves. They're a great singles band, though, 
and they can put those singles together to 
make a great show. That's what matters. 
Rough beauty. Sadness. ANDREW HAMLIN 


THURSDAY 7/28 


Seagaze Festival 

(Lo-Fi, July 28-31) Organized by Blackpool 
Astronomy's Jeff McCollough, Seagaze 
Festival is an ambitious four-night, 21-act 
event geared to exhibit some of Seattle's 
and America's top shoegaze, psych-rock, and 
post-punk musicians. The first night features 
Portland goth brooders Shadowhouse, 
who will surely divide some joy, along with 
melodious shoegaze stalwarts Black Nite 
Crash and Blackpool Astronomy. Night two 
stars Stranger Genius contender Erik Blood, 
supporting his dreamy heart-melter of an 
album, Lost in Slow Motion, and Lush-lovin' 
San Francisco shoegaze purists LSD and the 
Search for God. Third night's fabulous, high¬ 
lighted by muscular Chicago psychonauts 
Plastic Crimewave Syndicate, astral bliss- 
rock merchants Ecstatic Cosmic Union, and 
Hawkwind/Spacemen 3 disciples This Blind¬ 
ing Light. The final night concludes with 
many flavors of psychedelia dished out by 
Spindrift, the Asteroid #4, Kingdom of the 
Holy Sun, and the Young Elders. Talk about a 
heroic doses of higher-consciousness rock... 
Damn, Seagaze. DAVE SEGAL 

MOTOR: White Visitation, Bloom 
Offering, Decoy, T. Wan 

(Kremwerk) Axiom: A MOTOR event is es¬ 
sential to anyone interested in electronic 
music's vanguard of DJs and hardware- 
oriented producers. As his Boiler Room DJ 
set from last year proves, Mexico's White 
Visitation (aka Nicolas Guerrero) possesses 
a keen ear for techno's more menacing and 
abrasive tendencies, all the while maintain¬ 
ing dance-floor momentum. As a producer. 
White Visitation has released malevolent, 
convulsively rhythmic techno tracks for 
excellent labels like L.I.E.S., Blank Slate, and 
Styles Upon Styles. His claustrophobic slow 
burner "Delete Forever" is especially memo¬ 
rable. In addition to her great performance 
at Debacle Fest this year, Seattle producer 
Bloom Offering (aka Nicole Carr) has been 
advancing her music in recent months with 
bracingly nihilistic industrial-techno output, 
augmented by her take-no-shit vocals. 

DAVE SEGAL 




Noteworthy Shows This Week 

strangerthingstodo.com @SEAshows 



Studio 4/4: Felix Da Housecat, Wesley 
Holmes, Dash & Wyatt, Bbecks 

(Q Nightclub) Felix Da Housecat was a 
precocious Chicago house-music maverick 
who made his debut at age 14 in 1987 on 
DJ Pierre's "Phantasy Girl." Felix toiled in 
obscurity until electroclash started pop¬ 
ping around 2002. Then his album Kittenz 
and Thee Glitz blew up dance floors and 
chic boutiques worldwide—remember his 
libidinous club smash with Miss Kitten, 
"Silver Screen Shower Scene"? All of 
this led to Felix producing high-profile 
projects for Madonna, Britney Spears, 
and Iggy Pop. Felix reportedly had some 
substance-abuse issues that took four 
years out of his music career, but he 
returned in 2015 with Narrative of Thee 
Blast Illusion, which finds him expanding 
into dub with a Lee "Scratch" Perry collab 
and exploring feel-good, melodic dance- 
music styles, augmented by his falsetto 
vocals. Felix seems to have vanquished 
whatever demons were bedeviling him. 
DAVE SEGAL 


Weezer, Panic! At the Disco 

(Marymoor Park, all ages) Real talk: I haven't 
enjoyed a Weezer song since last decade, 
but that doesn't mean the shine is com¬ 
pletely off the turd. Rivers Cuomo, though a 
generally unlikable human, is an undeniably 
great songwriter. Trouble is, he may have 
been missing the mark for, oh, maybe the 
last seven albums. Their latest, the White 
Album (natch), hits the same old sweet spots 
of West Coast sun-soaked angst, cleverly 
bottled in an East Coast forced anxiety push. 
Weezer rehash the good old days of the late 
1990s and early '00s with Panic! At the Dis¬ 
co, whom I truly hoped were dead, but are 
in fact back to rock us once more with that 
flat-ironed, velvet-blazered Johnny Bravo 
aesthetic and stadium emo pop even your 
grandparents can enjoy (mostly because it's 
completely toothless). KIM SELLING 

The Yardbirds 

(Triple Door, early show all ages) You're 


going to see the Yardbirds in 2016 for those 
indelible songs, not for the performers, 
who are surely skillful, but the only original 
member left is drummer Jim McCarty. 
(Guitarist Chris Dreja left in 2013 due to 
medical issues.) Few British rock groups 
mastered and electrified the blues like the 
Yardbirds did some 50 years ago. Bolstered 
by a triumvirate of guitar heroes (you know 
who), the band gradually infused Gregorian 
chant into psych-rock song structures and 
introduced the amphetamined rave-up into 
rock's vocabulary, as exemplified by the 
extended proto-punk coda in the cover of 
Bo Diddley's "I'm a Man." The current lineup 
includes guitarist/vocalist John Idan, guitar¬ 
ist Johnny A (Bobby Whitlock, Peter Wolf), 
bassist Kenny Aaronson (Bob Dylan), and 
vocalist Myke Scavone (Ram Jam). Let's hope 
they still do "Ever Since the World Began." 
DAVE SEGAL 

Inquisition, UADA, 

Antitheus, Necrosomnium, 

Sacrament Ov Impurity 

(Studio Seven, all ages) Even though they're 
a local band. Inquisition don't play Seattle 
often. Well, local-ish; the band formed while 
singer/guitarist Dagon lived in Colombia, 
but the subsequent international move 
hasn't done much to change the band's 
take on black metal. While the genre has a 
reputation for amateur musicianship, Dagon 
brings an intense level of guitar technicality 
to his music. Layering pedal tone chugs on 
low strings with filigree shreds on the upper 
strings, Dagon filling out his dynamic range 
without a second guitar or bassist. Coupled 
with a croaking vocal delivery and lyrical 
fixation on astronomy. Inquisition have 
carved out a unique niche for themselves in 
a field of sound-alikes. JOSEPH SCHAFER 

B J the Chicago Kid, Elhae, 

Jairemie Alexander 

(Crocodile, all ages) Like many singers of 
a certain ilk, BJ the Chicago Kid moved to 
Los Angeles as a young man and put in 
songwriting and studio work as a back¬ 
ground vocalist until it was time to shine 
on his own. His gospel upbringing and 
early career in the service of soul legends 
like Stevie Wonder and Musiq Soulchild 
continues to inform his work, even as it 
moves in the direction of rap and R&B. 
Forever toiling with the influence of human 
vices against his faith, BJ has made this 
struggle a game to laugh, sing, and swear 
about, rather than a cold path toward self¬ 
doubt or self-hatred. His relatable battles, 
told in his sure voice over increasingly slick 
production, should continue to result in 
crossover success, so this could be a rare 
chance to catch him in a venue this size. 
TODD HAMM 


SATURDAY 7/30 


Grouper, Pink Void, Paul 
Clipson (visuals) 

(Washington Hall, all ages) Tons of musi¬ 
cians and bands inspire the descriptor 
"dreamy," but few deserve that adjective 
more than Grouper (Portland guitarist/ 
vocalist Liz Harris). Her songs are aural 
















28 July 27, 2016 THE STRANGER 






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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 29 


TIGS TO DO MUSIC 

mirages of subliminal ectoplasmic chants 
and gently oscillating guitar washes or 
plangent acoustic strums that come across 
like hypnagogic hymns to pastoral beauty. 
This beatific folque music rewards close 
listening, preferably with eyes closed and 
while lying alone in the dark, the better 
for it to weave its tranquil spells. It's the 
polar opposite of earthy blues or harangu¬ 
ing punk rock or any sort of music that's 
geared to amp you up, and you need it in 
your life, at least occasionally. Grouper's 
latest album, 2014's Ruins, goes heavier 
on piano-led reveries, but maintains her 
pervasive mood of downcast wispiness and 
a profound quietude that resonate to the 
core. DAVE SEGAL 

Rakta, Dreamdecay, Nudity, O.T.H.E.R. 

(Black Lodge, all ages) Up-and-coming 
Brazilian post-punks Rakta have a sound 
reminiscent of 1980s post-punk mainstays 
Mercenarias playing more minimalist and 
quietly seething songs in the style of Berlin 
weirdos Malaria! Rakta's latest record, 
the sprawling and fiercely musical III, was 
recently released on local punk label Iron 
Lung. Dreamdecay are another Iron Lung- 
affiliated Seattle band I've praised several 
times for their wildly inventive, intricately 
performed noise rock. Their shoegaze- 
infused heaviness consistently impresses 
with its unhinged yet calculated intensity. 
Nudity, an Olympia-based punk super¬ 
group of sorts, including producer Dave 
Harvey (SexA/id, BTPNLSL) and Rachel Cams 


(Kicking Giant, the Need) are not an easy 
act to classify. Merging early heavy metal's 
theatrical ferocity with manic Devo-esque 
quirkiness. Nudity create riffs that shred 
but contain an undeniable playfulness, 
and it all translates to a helluva live show. 
BRITTNIE FULLER 

Modest Mouse, Brand New 

(KeyArena, all ages) This has got to be one 
of the strangest stadium tours in recent 
memory. Issaquah's Modest Mouse have 
honestly always made plaintive garage rock, 
even if the gargantuan hooks of 2004 album 
Good News for People Who Love Bad News 
propelled them into the national spotlight 
and they briefly boasted Johnny Marr of the 
Smiths in their ranks. Likewise, New Jersey's 
Brand New couch their emotive post¬ 
hardcore in personal strife and bedroom 
poetics—and noise rock guitar breaks. That 
these bands managed to perform at Madi¬ 
son Square Garden playing what amount 
to passion projects is a minor miracle. Good 
taste ain't dead. JOSEPH SCHAFER 


SUNDAY 7/31 


Kim Simmonds and Savoy Brown 

(Triple Door, all ages) For the last 50 years, 
founding guitarist Kim Simmons has kept 
the bluesy flame of Savoy Brown lit. The 
group originally formed in England in 1965 
and were contemporaries of English bluesy 
groups like Free and the Groundhogs, but 
they didn't gain much traction until the 
late 1960s after they'd released a clutch of 
progressive blues albums and relentlessly 
toured the American underground. Now 


whittled down to a three-piece, the band is 
still recording and constantly touring; their 
most recent album, The Devil to Pay, even 
made number four in the blues charts last 
year. I'm betting for tonight's show we'll 
be getting a mix of well-known classics like 
"I'm Tired" and "Hellhound Train," plus a 
couple fresh Savoy jams. MIKE NIPPER 

Wine Country Blues Festival: 
Shemekia Copeland, the James 
Hunter Six, Mavis Staples, 
the Robert Cray Band 

(Chateau Ste. Michelle, all ages) I recall 
Mavis Staples's live album from 2008, 
when it wasn't clear if Obama would get 
in. I heard her in hope, and I heard her 
hope. I don't share her Christianity and 
her faith-based hope, but I felt inspired 
that somebody, a person who'd knocked 
around and seen the best and worst of 
things—far beyond what I could ever 
experience—still had hope. Now she's 
back with a new studio album. Livin' on a 
High Note, and still full of hope, which we 
need, if not more than ever, at the very 
least, as much as we did before this decid¬ 
edly blighted year commenced. Tacoma's 
own Robert Cray, of course, fashions dra¬ 
ma on a smaller, even more intense scale, 
examining high infidelity with the jocular 
cynicism of a cop, a private detective, or a 
pulp-novel maven. ANDREW HAMLIN 


MONDAY 8/1 


Flogging Molly, Frank Turner & 
the Sleeping Souls, Chuck Ragan 

(Showbox Sodo, all ages) For the past 


two-plus decades. Flogging Molly have 
been waving the flag of Celtic punk 
proudly, touring the world and provid¬ 
ing thousands of devoted fans with a 
night of drunken, sweaty, sing-alongs. 

The seven-piece LA-based band is truly 
a spectacle, as they play a wide range of 
instruments, including the bodhran, man¬ 
dolin, accordion, banjo, and tin whistle. 
Opener Frank Turner is a British punk 
rocker turned singer-songwriter with 
more in common with Billy Bragg than 
Dropkick Murphys. The common thread 
between both artists is their ability to 
draw upon their punk roots while push¬ 
ing boundaries and defining their own 
sound. KEVIN DIERS 


TUESDAY 8/2 


Ziggy Marley, Steel Pulse 

(Woodland Park Zoo, all ages) It's diffi¬ 
cult, as Americans, to get a good bead on 
the cultural importance of Bob Marley in 
his native Jamaica and to reggae and dub 
as musical institutions. On the one hand, 
he was the genre's great popularizer. On 
the other hand, "posthumous dorm post¬ 
er icon" is a dubious legacy. Look, then, 
to his children, musicians and performers 
in their father's vein, for a less histori¬ 
cally tainted view of his music's power. 
And while personally I prefer the hiphop 
consciousness of his youngest offspring, 
Damian, it is eldest son, Ziggy, who most 
definitely carries his father's torch. With 
18 records (one unreleased) to his name, 
Ziggy is as prolific as Bob, and one day 
may be as beloved. JOSEPH SCHAFER 




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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 31 


THIN T DO MUSIC 


All the Shows Happening This Week 

strangerthingstodo.com $0 @SEAshows 
★ = Recommended ©= All Ages 


WED 7/27 


★ © BENAROYA HALL The 

Psychedelic Furs and The 
Church, 7:30 pm, $40-$160 
BLUE MOON TAVERN Open 
Mic With Linda Lee, 8 pm 
CAPITOL CIDER An 
Evening with Clarkia Cobb 
and Evan McPherson, 
8-10:30 pm, free 
DARRELL’S TAVERN Open 
Mic, 9 pm, free 
EGAN’S JAM HOUSE Vocal 
Showcase and Jam, 7 pm, 
$10 

©ELCORAZON Letlive., 
Seahaven, Silver Snakes, 
Night Verses, 6 pm, $15-$ 18 
© FIX COFFEEHOUSE 
Open Mic, 7 pm, free 
HIGH DIVE Critte & The 
Borzoi, Little Child Man, 

The Rifle, Pacific Echoes, 7 
pm, $6/$8 

HIGHLINE Juliet Tango, 

Lust Punch, Hollow Giant, 
TCMLS, 9 pm, $8/$10 
HIGHWAY 99 Black Clouds 
Blues, 8 pm, $7 
J&M CAFE The Lonnie 
Williams Band, 8 pm, free 
© JAZZ ALLEY Albert Lee 
with Kate Taylor, Through 
July 27, 7:30 pm, $31.50 
OHANA Live Island Music: 
Guests, 9:30 pm, free 
OWL N’THISTLE Justin and 
Guests, 9 pm, free 
PARAGON Two Buck Chuck, 
8 pm, free 

PARLIAMENT TAVERN Billy 
Joe Huels with Rod Cook 
and Robin Cady, 8 pm, free 
SKYLARK CAFE & CLUB 
Open Mic, 8:30 pm, free 
SOUND CHECK BAR & 
GRILL Open Mic, 8 pm, free 
SUNSET TAVERN Moraine, 
Lark vs. Owl, Rory O.K., 9 
pm, $8 

TRACTOR TAVERN Arthur 
James, Ethan J Perry & 

The Remedy Band, Gabriel 
Wolfchild, 8 pm, $8 
TRIPLE DOOR AJ Croce 
with Nick Baker, 7:30 pm, 
$20-$28 

VERMILLION Urban Ghost, 
Vader Tots, Jane Deaux, 

8-11 pm, free 
WHITE RIVER 
AMPHITHEATRE Rob 
Zombie and Korn, 6:30 pm, 
$25-$79.50 

★ © WOODLAND PARK 

ZOO "Weird Al" Yankovic, 
$35-$269 

un 

BALTIC ROOM Bollocks 
BASTILLE CAFE BAR Le 

Verlan with DJ Paces Lift, 
8-11 pm, free 
CONTOUR NuDe 
Wednesdays, 9 pm, free 
HAVANA COOLIN: DJ Night 
with Stasia Mehschel and 
Larry Mizell, Jr., 10 pm, $3 
LOVECITYLOVE 
LOVECITYLOVE X 
WEDNESDAYS, 8-11 pm, 

$5/$ 10 

MERCURY Lure Party and 
Pokemon Contest, 9 pm-2 
am, $2-$5 

Q NIGHTCLUB FWD: Lunice 
with Guests, 9 pm-2 am, $12 
STUDIO SEVEN Electric 
Wednesday: Guests 


CLASSICAL 


© VOLUNTEER PARK 

Chamber Music in the Park, 
7 pm, free 


THURS 7/28 


AMBER Cuts and Keys, 7 
pm-midnight, free 
BARBOZA Sleeping Lessons, 
Spirit Award, P.S., 8 pm, $8 
BIG BLDG Sloucher, 
Trunkweed, Skates, Kblanq, 

8 pm, $7 

BLACK LODGE 20xx, 
Sculptures, Dead Spells, 
8-11:30 pm, $8 
BLUE MOON TAVERN Small 
Plans, Lagos, Fall on Fall, 

9 pm, $5 

CAPITOL CIDER Edan, 8:30- 
11 pm, free 

CENTRAL SALOON Crook & 
the Bluff, 8 pm, $5/$8 
CHIHULY GARDEN AND 
GLASS Summer Nights, 
5:30-7:30 pm, $27 
COLUMBIA CITY THEATER 
Casa Forte: Velocity, 7 pm, 
free; Lakoda, Heptagon, 
Ghost City Whistlers, 7 
pm, $10 

CONOR BYRNE Birch 
Pereira & The Gin Joints, 
Hobo Nephews of Uncle 
Frank, Cynthia Frank, 8 
pm, $8 

© CROCODILE 

Aristophanes with No Eyes, 

9 pm, $10 

© DOWNPOUR BREWING 

Open Mic Night, 5 pm, free 
© EL CORAZON 
Moonwalks, Vibragun, 
Swallowing Glass, King 
Lincoln, 8 pm, $10/$ 12 
THE FUNHOUSE Stiff Spirit 
with Guests, 9 pm, $7 
HARD ROCK CAFE Sound 
Check Happy Hour: Cassie 
Corelle, 5-7 pm, free 
HIGH DIVE Red Martian, 
Slums of Utopia, Toast, 8 
pm, $6/$8 

HIGHLINE Beyond the 
Woods, Pink Octopus, 

Wood Knot, 9 pm, $8/$ 10 
HIGHWAY 99 Patti Allen 
and Monster Road, 8 pm, $7 
J&M CAFE True Romans, 8 
pm, free 

★ LO-FI Seagaze Festival, 
July 28-31, 8 pm, $10-$35 
LUCKY LIQUOR Mr Night 
Sky, Matthew Frantz, Sam 
Russell, 8 pm, $8 

★ © NORTHWEST FILM 
FORUM Puget Soundtrack: 
Fungal Abyss Present The 
Devils, 8-10 pm, $ 12/$ 15 

© REDMOND TOWN 
CENTER Summer Concert 
Series: Cashing in Karma, 
The BPG, Heels to the 
Hardwood, 5:30-7:30 pm, 
free 

RENDEZVOUS J.Lately with 
Guests, 8 pm, $10 
© THE ROYAL ROOM 
Seattle Latin, Brazilian, and 
Caribbean Festival, July 
28-30, 7 pm, free 
SCRATCH DELI Music Open 
Mic, 7:30 pm, free 
SEAMONSTER Marmalade, 

10 pm, $5-$7 

© STONE WAY CAFE Open 
Mic: Guests, 7:30 pm, free 
SUBSTATION Zealandia, 

Kool Stuff Katie, Vigilante 
Santos, 8 pm-2 am, $6 
SUNSET TAVERN Trip Like 
Animals, 9 pm, $8 
TRACTOR TAVERN John 
Paul White with the Secret 
Sisters, 9 pm, $15 
TRIPLE DOOR Nick 
Drummond with Whitney 
Monge, 7:30 pm, $20 
©VERAPROJECT Henry 
Mansfield & the Bearded 
Scooter Gang, with Guests, 

7 pm, $8 


WILDROSE Wedding Band, 
8 pm-midnight, $10 

★ BARCA Jazz at Barca, 9 
pm, free 

© CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 
SPACE Earshot Series: Jazz, 
The 2nd Century, 8 pm, 
$5-$15 

© JAZZ ALLEY The 

Manhattan Transfer, July 
28-31, 7:30 pm, $47.50 
OSTERIA LA SPIGA Jazz at 
La Spiga, 7-9:30 pm, free 
PINK DOOR Bric-a-Brac, 8 
pm, free 

© SHUGA JAZZ BISTRO 

Chris James Quartet, 7 
pm, free 

VITO’S RESTAURANT & 
LOUNGE Casey MacGill, 

5:30 pm, free 

un 

AMBER Cuts and Keys, 7 
pm-midnight, free 
BALLROOM Throwback 
Thursdays, 9 pm 

BALTIC ROOM Sugar 
Beat, $3 

CONTOUR Jaded 

★ HAVANA Sophisticated 
Mama, free 

JAZZBONES College Night: 
DJ Christyle, 9 pm 

★ KREMWERK Motor: 
White Visitation, Bloom 
Offering, Decoy, T. Wan, 9 
pm, $12 

MERCURY Isolation: DJ 
Coldheart, $3 
MONKEY LOFT Deck'd 
Out: A Rooftop Party with 
Guests, 7-11 pm, $3; Yo Yo 
Yoga: Thursdays on the 
Deck with Audrey Dohm 
and Recess, 5:30-7 pm, 

$15/$20 

OHANA '80s Ladies Night 
Q NIGHTCLUB Studio 4/4: 
Felix Da Housecat with 
Guests, 9 pm, $15 
R PLACE Thirsty Thursdays: 
DJ Flow 

THERAPY LOUNGE Therapy 
Sessions, 10 pm 
TIMBRE ROOM Maal & 
Morris, 9 pm, $8 
TRINITY Beer Pong 
Thursdays, free 


FRI 7/29 


BLUE MOON TAVERN 

Babraham Lincoln with 
Guests, 9 pm, $5 
CHATEAU STE. MICHELLE 
John Fogerty, 7 pm, $62- 
$89.50 

CHINA HARBOR Orquesta 
la Solucion, 9:30 pm, $15 
CONOR BYRNE Fort Union 
with Guests, 9 pm, $8 

★ © CROCODILE BJ the 
Chicago Kid, Elhae, Jairemie 
Alexander, 8 pm, $16 

THE FUNHOUSE © Vista 
Kicks, The Gloomies, 
Decorations, 6 pm, $10/$ 12; 
Out of Order with Junto, 9 
pm, $6/$8 

© GORGE AMPHITHEATRE 

5th Annual Watershed 
Festival, $199 
HIGH DIVE One Drop, 

A King Also x The Royal 
Court, Deadly D, 8 pm, 

$ 10/$ 12 

HIGHWAY 99 Mojo Cannon, 
8 pm, $17 

★ LO-FI Seagaze Festival, 
Through July 31, 8 pm, 
$10-$35 

★ © MARYMOOR PARK 

Weezer and Panic! At the 
Disco, 6 pm, $49.50-$75 
NEUMOS Branden Daniel & 
The Chics, The Hoot Hoots, 


The West, DJ Goo Goo, 8 
pm, $10 

© THE ROYAL ROOM 

Seattle Latin, Brazilian, and 
Caribbean Festival, Through 
July 30, 7 pm, free 
SEAMONSTER Funky 2 
Death, 10 pm, $5-$7 
THE SHOWBOX An Evening 
with Richard Cheese 
& Lounge Against The 
Machine, 9 pm, $32-$95 
SKYLARK CAFE & CLUB 
Fred Roth Revue, The 
Heyfields, Service Animal, 

9 pm, $7 

SLIM’S LAST CHANCE Los 

Caballos Locos, Paul Lynde 
Fan Club, 9 pm, $5 

★ STUDIO SEVEN 
Inquisition, UADA, 
Antitheus, Necrosomnium, 
Sacrament Ov Impurity, 7-11 
pm, $ 13/$ 15 

SUBSTATION *sorusty* with 
Marques Wyatt and Guests, 

10 pm-2:30 am, $10 
SUNSET TAVERN Aqueduct, 
Hillary Susz, ANDY, 9 pm, 
$10 

TIM NOAH’S THUMBNAIL 
THEATER Friday Night 
Open Mic, 6:30 pm, $3-$5 
TRACTOR TAVERN Tyler 
Edwards, Stefan Paul 
George & The Vices, 
Kathleen Murray, 9 pm, $10 

★ TRIPLE DOOR The 
Yardbirds, 7:30 pm, $40-$60 

© JAZZ ALLEY The 

Manhattan Transfer, 
Through July 31, $47.50 
LATONAPUB Phil Sparks 
Trio, 5 pm, free 

un 

ASTON MANOR Cabaret 
Fridays: Guests 
BALLROOM Rendezvous 
Friday: Guests, 9 pm 
BALMARTop 40: Guests, 
9:30 pm, free 

★ BALTIC ROOM Juicy: 

'90s & 2000s Old School 
Throwbacks, $10 
BARBOZA Jet: Dance Party 
DJ Set with Special Guests, 
10:30 pm, free 

CHOP SUEY Comeback, 8 
pm, $8 before 11pm 

★ CUFF DJs, 10 pm, free 
HAVANA Viva Havana, 9 
pm, $11 

JAZZBONES Filthy Fridays: 
Guests, 11 pm, $10 
KREMWERK Reflect: 

Luke Mandala, 

Recess, Dash&Wyatt, 
Frome&Walter, 9 pm-3 am, 
$5 before 10:30pm/$10 
after 10:30pm 
MONKEY LOFT Paradise 
Sunset Sessions, 7-11 pm, $5 
NEIGHBOURS Absolut 
Fridays: DJ Richard Dalton 
and DJ Trent Von, 9 pm 
OZZIE’S DJs, 9 pm, free 
Q NIGHTCLUB ICON: Night 
Bass: Summer Phases Tour, 
10 pm-3 am, $15/$20 
R PLACE Swollen Fridays, 

9 pm 

STOUT DJ ePop, 9 pm, free 
THERAPY LOUNGE Under 
Pressure, 9:30 pm, $3 after 
10:30 p.m. 

TIMBRE ROOM Foolish 
Fridays, 9 pm-2 am, $5 
before 10pm/$10 after 
10pm 

TRINITY Power Fridays, 
$ 0-$10 


CLASSICAL 


★ © BENAROYA HALL 
RECITAL HALL Seattle 
Chamber Music Society 
Summer Concert, 8 pm, 
$16-$50 



THU.7.28: 



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REFLECT 


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32 July 27,2016 THE STRANGER 


aE;-:PARAMOUNT MOCfflE & 5 SM 3 ffiS 


AUGUSTIN ES 

H-Kia ■uvi'' COD i 

TNhS SAT! JULY ZG I CROCODILE 


•am \-pi nn-Pl OBATH 

ni:kt wi e^- AUGUST 5 | ng^mQS 


wavves 

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Sat au&uSt £ | Crocodile 


MSTRKRFT 

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AUGUST £4 3NEumOS 


SWEET DRUMS.THE MUSICDFPATSY DIIHL 

V CaHTHmA-.. HTJLPI AJfKA HDHO 

HTTIMHft TAB I TRIPLE DOOR 


JOSEPH 

BUPriAH FtLLChW'i 

SEPTEMBER 31 NEU^OS 


EDEN 

FBI SEPTEMBER 9* I CROCODILE 


NOTHING BUT THIEVES 

kk# pwn CFVH. 1 Tt*C WtlECKI 

SCAT EM 0 CR 19 l NCUMOS 


NF 

September £0 | neumOS 


WHAT SO NOT 

5EPTEM OCR 22 | 5HQWBOK EODO 


MARIAN HILL 

*m.LU Iifi.il VtlHITitL A IH.'.CP 

I Tkr WJX 


DJ SHADOW 

OCTOBER 3 I THE SHOWBOX 


RYLEY WALKER 

L+HI I mi |IIIVI CIRCUIT Mwm TEUX 

SAT OCTOBER Fd J BAF1ESQZA 


HIGHLY SUSPECT 

SaT OCTOBER £ I N-E ljmOS 


OCTOBER IB 1 NEUMOB 


KERO KERO BONITG 

OCTOBER 13 E CHOP SU€Y 

jyiTlDDCD-DHfiLI Fill AT IUU< 

PURITY RING 

hMCIIi «UM HAMA 

OCTOBER IT I SMDweO^ SOod 


BIJCK REBEL MOTORCYCLE CLUB 
DEAIR FROM ABOVE 1979 

kMCIU |UI«r LJLAK HLLV 

OCTODCR 50 I SHOWOCX SOO& 


M83 

VIMAVin 

OCTOBER £3 I W*Mu THEATER 


HAYDEN JAMES 


OCTOBER EG I CROCODILE 


BOY & BEAR 

OCTOOCA 30 I CftOCODn.fi 


WET 


OCTOBER 31 | NEUiMOS 


ANDRA DAY 

NDVEMDin 9 I THE S^IDWUO^ 


SHOVELS & ROPE 

sat NtyvrM-nm iz; miowddx sddo 


LEMAITRE 

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JUST ANNOUNCED! SATURDAY 8/6 


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7.28 Thursday (Reggae / Dub / Roots) 

JOHN BROWN'S BODY 

The Hooky's, Buzz Brump 

7.29 Friday (Funk) 

FIVE ALARM FUNK 

with Hillstomp 

7.30 Saturday (Dance Party) 

PRINCE VS MICHAEL 

w/ DJ Dave Paul 

8.2 Tuesday (Hip-Hop) 

RAS KASS & PLANET ASIA 

New Track City, Deadly Poets 
A-3ree, DJ Indica Jones 

8.3 Wednesday (Reggae) 

ZIGGI RECADO 
MILLION STYLEZ 

Zion High Kings Band 

8.4 Thursday (World) 

YAIMA + ATASH 

Madly in Dub 

8.5 Friday (DJ Dance Party) 

TRL "I WANT IT THAT WAY" 

#ALL4DORAS, DJ's Indica Jones & Pryme 

8.6 Saturday (Bollywood / Dance) 

JAI HO! 6THANUAL 
BOLLYWOOD DANCE PARTY 

Hosted by Prashant - Singer, Dancer, DJ 

8.7 Sunday (Bluegrass) 

TOWN MOUNTAIN 

Oly Mountain Boys, Jack Dwyer Band 

8.9 Tuesday (Pop / Alternative) 

THE LOST PROJECT 

The Feral Folk , Ian Hale and the Legacy 


EVERY MONDAY: MOJAM 

8.10 DEVON ALLMAN BAND 

8.11 CHRIS CAIN 

8.12 OTT & THE ALL-SEEING I 

8.13 ELDRIDGE GRAVY 

8.14 MANATEE COMMUNE 

8.15 FRED WESLEY + SKERIK 

8.16 B-SIDE PLAYERS 

8.17 MICKEY AVALON 

8.18 THE SOUL REBELS 

8.19 JIMMY WEEKS PROJECT 

8.20 KAMINANDA 

8.21 THE STONE FOXES 

8.23 RED BARAAT 

8.24 BUSDRIVER 

8.25 SWINDLER 

8.26 JERRY GARCIA 
CELEBRATION 

8.27 PROBLEM 

8.28 REBELLION 
THE RECALLER 

8.30 MORGAN HERITAGE 
9.2 EROTIC CITY 

PRINCE TRIBUTE 
9.4 BLACK UHURU 

9.8 NAPPY ROOTS 

9.9 JOHN KADLECIK 

9.10 DUMPSTAPHUNK 

9.11 LUCIANO 

9.17 LEE "SCRATCH" PERRY 

9.18 DJ ABILITIES 

9.22 MAD PROFESSOR 

9.23 THE PAPERBOYS 

9.24 CLINTON FEARON 

9.30 MATT WERTZ 

10.1 PIGS ON THE WING 
10.21 DEADPHISH ORCHESTRA 
10.27 THE CUMBIEROS 


































































































THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 33 


THINGS TO DO All the Shows Happening This Week 


★ © COLUMBIA PARK 

Music Under the Stars in 
Columbia City, 7:15 pm, free 

★ © FREEWAY PARK 
Music Under the Stars on 
First Hill, 7:15 pm, free 
SEATTLE REPERTORY 
THEATRE The Yeomen of 
the Guard, $40 

© ST. AUGUSTINE’S IN-THE- 
WOODS Whidbey Island 
Music Festival, $ 10-$20 


SAT 7/30 


BARBOZA Ayo Dot & The 
Uppercuts with Guests, 7 
pm, $10 

© BELLINI Leif Totusek 
— Solo Jazz Guitar, 6-9 
pm, free 

★ BLACK LODGE Rakta, 
Dreamdecay, Nudity, 
O.T.H.E.R., 8:30 pm, $8 
BLUE MOON TAVERN 
Tinfoil and Tape, The Bright 
Smoke, The Moon Is Flat, 
Gully, 9 pm, $5 
CENTRAL SALOON 
Wrinkles, Moguls, Familiars, 
The Women and Children, 8 
pm, $5/$8 

CLUB HOLLYWOOD 
CASINO Johnny and the 
Bad Boys and DJ Becka 
Page, 9 pm, $5 
COLUMBIA CITY THEATER 
Daniel Halligan, 8 pm, 
$15-$40; Matt Bingham, 6 
pm, free 

CONOR BYRNE The Great 
Urn with Mindie Lind, 9 
pm, $8 

CROCODILE© Rain 
City Rock Camp for Girls 
Summer Camp Showcase, 
Sat, July 30, noon, $10; © 
Augustines with Cobi, 8 
pm, $20 

THE FUNHOUSE MOS 

Generator, Ancient 
Warlocks, Terminal Fuzz 
Terror, 9:30 pm, $8 
© GALLERY 1412 Condo 
Horro, Sleeping with the 
Earth, SQUIM, Prisonfood, 

7 pm, free 

© GORGE AMPHITHEATRE 

5th Annual Watershed 
Festival, $199 

HARD ROCK CAFE The Lane 
James Band PTSD Benefit 
Concert, 6-11 pm, $20/$25 
HIGH DIVE Mads Jacobsen, 
Evie B, Butterflies of Death, 
Smashie Smashie, 8 pm, 

$ 8 /$ 12 

HIGHLINE God Module, 
VOICECOIL, Blakk Glass, 9 
pm, $15/$20 

HIGHWAY 99 The Sounds of 
Motown, 8 pm, $17 
HOPVINE PUB Solo Artist 
Showcase: Lumphead, 9 pm 

★ © KEYARENA Modest 
Mouse and Brand New, 7:30 
pm, $31.99-$51.99 

★ LO-FI Seagaze Festival, 
Through July 31, 8 pm, 

$ 10-$35 

LUCKY LIQUOR Lucky 
Liquor's One Year 
Anniversary Party, 8 pm-1 
am, $8 

© MARYMOOR PARK An 

Evening with The Piano 
Guys, 7:30 pm, $45-$169.50 

★ © MLKYWAY HOUSE 
9th Annual Hoodstock, 
3-9:30 pm, $10 suggested 
NEUMOS Po' Brothers, 
Lanford Black, Breakaway 
Derringer, 8 pm, $10 

© REDMOND TOWN 
CENTER Ian Hale and The 
Legacy: Redmond Summer 
Concert Series, 5:30-7:30 
pm, free 

© THE ROYAL ROOM 

Seattle Latin, Brazilian, and 
Caribbean Festival, Through 
July 30, 7 pm, free 
SKYLARK CAFE & CLUB 
Elephant Gun Riot, A 
Clockwork Tragedy, 
December in Red, 9 pm, $7 
SLIM’S LAST CHANCE The 
Gods Themselves, Stereo 
Creeps, Skies Below, Granite 
Waves, 8 pm-2 am, $12 
SUBSTATION Good Men 
and Thorough, Combinator, 
Either/Or, Peter and the 
Tribe, 8 pm, $8 


SUNSET TAVERN Into The 
Cold, Jamie Nova SKY, Late 
September Dogs, 9 pm, $10 
TRACTOR TAVERN Aubrie 
Sellers with Western 
Centuries, 9 pm, $10 
TRIPLE DOOR ★ The 
Yardbirds, 10 pm, $40- 
$60; Tiffany Wilson, 8 pm, 
$20/$25 

© VERA PROJECT A 

6950 Dance Party with 
DoNormaal, Raven 
Matthews, Michete, DJ 
Reverend Dollars, 8 pm, $5 

★ © WASHINGTON HALL 
Grouper, Pink Void, Paul 
Clipson, 8 pm, $20 

1 

CHATEAU STE. MICHELLE 

Chateau Ste. Michelle's 
Festival of Jazz, 2 pm, 
$45-$65 

© JAZZ ALLEY The 

Manhattan Transfer, 
Through July 31, $47.50 

EQ 

AMBER Amber Saturdays 
with DJ Kipprawk, free 
ASTON MANOR NRG 
Saturdays: Guests 
BALLARD LOFT Hiphop 
Saturdays, 10 pm, free 
BALLROOM Sinful 
Saturdays: Guests, 9 pm 
BALMARTop 40 Night: 
Guests, 9:30 pm, free 
BALTIC ROOM Crave 
Saturdays, 10 pm 
BARBOZA Inferno, 10:30 
pm, $5 before midnight/$10 
after 

BUCKLEY’S IN BELLTOWN 

'90s Dance Party, 9 pm 
CHOP SUEY Dance Yourself 
Clean: Guests, 9 pm, $5; 
free before 10:30 p.m. 

★ CUFF DJs, 10 pm, free 
GAINSBOURG Voulez-VoUS 
Boogaloo, 10 pm, free 
HAVANA Havana Social, 9 
pm, $15 

KREMWERK Kiss Off, 

10 pm-2 am, $5 before 
11pm/$7 after 11pm 
MERCURY Machineries of 
Joy: DJ Hana Solo, $5 
MONKEY LOFT Diggin 
Deep, 10 pm 
NEIGHBOURS Powermix 
OZZIE’S DJs, 9 pm, free 
Q NIGHTCLUB Bizaar 
Launch Party, 10 pm-3 
am, $12 

R PLACE Therapy Saturday: 
DJ Flo'w 

SARAJEVO LOUNGE 

European/Balkan/Greek 

Night 

STOUT DJ ePop, 9 pm, free 
THERAPY LOUNGE This 
Modern Love: Guests 
TIMBRE ROOM La Realeza 
Latinx Night, 10 pm-2 
am, $6 

TRINITY Reload Saturdays, 
$15 

rarcpn 

VARIOUS LOCATIONS What 
the Float: Silent Disco, 
$10-$25 


CLASSICAL 


© BENAROYA HALL 
RECITAL HALL Seattle 
Chamber Music Society 
Summer Concert, 8 pm, 
$16-$50 

© CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 
SPACE Kam Morrill: New 
Works, 8 pm, $5-$15 
★ © FREEWAY PARK 
Music Under the Stars on 
First Hill, 7:15 pm, free 
SEATTLE REPERTORY 
THEATRE The Yeomen of 
the Guard, $40 
© ST. AUGUSTINE’S IN-THE- 
WOODS Whidbey Island 
Music Festival, $10-$20 
© TOWN HALL Eunice 
Nahon: Mozart For A Cure, 
7:30 pm, $10 


SUN 7/31 


© CAFE RACER Racer 
Sessions, 7:30-11 pm, free 
© CAL ANDERSON PARK 
Zulu Park Jam, 4-8 pm, free 


★ CHATEAU STE. 

MICHELLE Wine Country 
Blues Festival, 3 pm, $45- 
$65 

CHOP SUEY An Evening 
with Mai DeFleur and 
Princess Charming, 8 pm, $8 
© CROCODILE Ozomatli, 

7 pm, $25 

THE FUNHOUSE Gallows 
Bound, Whiskeydick, 

Stoned Evergreen Travelers, 

8 pm, $8/$ 10 

© GORGE AMPHITHEATRE 

5th Annual Watershed 
Festival, $199 

HIGH DIVE Beatrix Sky, We 
Arsons, Goldie Wilson, 8 
pm, $6/$8 

HIGHLINE Pastel Motel, 

The Bright Smoke, Waking 
Things, 9:30 pm, $7 
LITTLE RED HEN Open 
Mic Acoustic Jam with 
Bodacious Billy, 4 pm 

★ LO-FI Seagaze Festival, 
Through July 31, 8 pm, 
$10-$35 

THE ROYAL ROOM 

Alexandra Picard and 
Michael Nicolella with 
Cullen Gray, 7:30 pm, $15 
© SKYLARK CAFE & CLUB 
Open Mic, 4-7 pm, free 
© STUDIO SEVEN 206 God 
& Apollo with Guests, 7 pm, 
$11/$ 14 

TIM’S TAVERN Kirsten 
Silva's Seattle Songwriter 
Showcase 

TRACTOR TAVERN Sleep 
Talk, Asterhouse, Flitestar & 
The Daily Strains, 8 pm, $8 

★ TRIPLE DOOR Kim 
Simmonds and Savoy 
Brown: 50th Anniversary 
Tour, 7:30 pm, $25-$35 
©VERAPROJECT Broken 
Beak, Bobby's Oar, Sun 
Dummy, 7:30 pm, $8 

IF 

THE ANGRY BEAVER The 

Beaver Sessions, free 
DARRELL’S TAVERN Sunday 
Night Jazz Jam, 8 pm, free 
© FREEWAY PARK Free 
Blues and Cool Jazz in 
Freeway Park 2016, 2-4 
pm, free 

© HARISSA Sunday Bossa 
Nova, 6 pm, free 
© JAZZ ALLEY The 
Manhattan Transfer, 
Through July 31, 7:30 pm, 
$47.50 

OSTERIA LA SPIGA Jazz at 
La Spiga, 8-10:30 pm, free 
SHUGA JAZZ BISTRO Shuga 
Sundays: Eric Verlinde and 
Guests, 7:30 pm, free 

★ ©TULA’S Jim Cutler 
Jazz Orchestra, 7:30 pm, $8 
VITO’S RESTAURANT & 
LOUNGE ★ Ruby Bishop, 

6 pm, free; ★ The Ron 
Weinstein Trio, 9:30 pm, 
free 

un 

BALTIC ROOM Resurrection 
Sundays, 10 pm 

★ CENTRAL SALOON 
Metal Brunch, 12 pm-4 
pm, $10 

CONTOUR Broken Grooves: 
Guests, free 

NACHO BORRACHO Heat 
Wave, 4-7 pm, free 
NEIGHBOURS Noche Latina: 
DJ Luis and DJ Polo 
R PLACE Homo Hop: Guests 

★ RE-BAR Flammable, 9 
pm, $10 

★ REVOLVER BAR No Exit: 
DJ Vi, Sun, noon, free 
TIMBRE ROOM Sunday 
Patio Party Series, 4-10 
pm, free 


CLASSICAL 


© ST. AUGUSTINE’S IN-THE- 
WOODS Whidbey Island 
Music Festival, $10-$20 
★ © ST. MARK’S 
CATHEDRAL Compline 
Choir, 9:30 pm, free 


MON 8/1 


CAPITOL CIDER 

EntreMundos, 9:30 pm, free 

CONOR BYRNE Bluegrass 


Jam, 8:30 pm, free 
©THE FUNHOUSE King 
Shelter with Wandr, 7 pm, 
$ 8 /$ 10 

LUCKY LIQUOR Sid Law 

★ © SHOWBOX SODO 

Flogging Molly, Frank 
Turner & The Sleeping 
Souls, Chuck Ragan, 8:30 
pm, $35/$40 

SUNSET TAVERN American 
Killers, The Pro-Nouns, 7:30 
pm, $8 

TRIPLE DOOR 
MUSICQUARIUM LOUNGE 

Crossrhythm Sessions, 9 
pm, free 

P T*+4 

©TRIPLEDOOR Brian 
Nova Jazz Jam, 8 pm, free 

ED 

BALTIC ROOM Jam Jam: 
Mista' Chatman and DJ 
Element, 9 pm 

★ BAR SUE Motown on 
Mondays, 10 pm, free 

★ THE HIDEOUT Industry 
Standard: Guests, free 

★ MOEBAR Moe Bar 
Monday, 10 pm, free 
PONY Fruit: DJ Toast, 9 
pm, free 


TUE 8/2 


BLUE MOON TAVERN 

Totusek Tuesday Nights, 

8-11 pm, free 

CAFE RACER Jacobs Posse 

★ COLUMBIA CITY 
THEATER The Best Open 
Mic Ever, 7:30 pm, free 

© CROCODILE Hurray 
For The Riff Raff, Promised 
Land Sound, 8 pm, $20 
EL CORAZON Verb Slingers: 
Guests, 3 pm, free 
© THE FUNHOUSE 
Darealwordsound with 
Guests, 8 pm, $8/$10 
HIGHLINE Kite, Die Robot, 
ManifestIV, 9 pm, $7/$10 
J&M CAFE All-Star Acoustic 
Tuesdays: Guests, 9 pm, free 
© JAZZ ALLEY Eric Bibb 
and Corey Harris, Aug 2-3, 
7:30 pm, $29.50 
NEPTUNE THEATRE 
Graham Nash: This Path 
Tonight Tour, 8 pm, $44.50 

★ © NEUMOS H/ELOS and 
Guests, 8 pm, $18 

THE OULD TRIANGLE Open 
Mic: Guests, 8 pm, free 
PARAGON You Play 
Tuesday: Guests, 8 pm, free 
PARLIAMENT TAVERN Billy 
Joe and the RCs, 8 pm, free 
SEAMONSTER McTuff Trio, 

11 pm, free 

SUNSET TAVERN Whitney 
with Michael Rault, 8 pm, 
$12 

TIM’S TAVERN Open Mic: 
Linda Lee, 8 pm 
TRACTOR TAVERN Jason 
Boland & The Stranglers 
with Guests, 9 pm, $15 

★ © WOODLAND PARK 
ZOO Ziggy Marley with 
Steel Pulse, 6 pm, $42.50- 
$117.50 

IFiVH 

OWL N’THISTLE Jazz with 
Eric Verlinde, 8 pm, free 

★ THE ROYAL ROOM 

Delvon Lamarr, 10 pm, 
donation 

© THE TRIPLE DOOR 
THEATER Landau Eugene 
Murphy, Jr., 7:30 pm, $30- 
$40 

un 

BALTIC ROOM Drum & Bass 
Tuesdays: Guests, 10 pm 
CONTOUR Burn: Voodoo, 9 
pm, free 

THE EAGLE Punk Ass! with 
DJ Toast, 9 pm-midnight, 
free 

★ HAVANA Real Love '90s: 
BlesOne and Jay Battle, $3; 
free before 11 p.m. 
MERCURY Die: Black Maru 
and Major Tom, $5 

ROB ROY Analog Tuesdays: 
Guests, free 



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JUST OFF 1ST AVE SOUTH - 110 S. HORTON 
More Info 206-286-1312 or www.studioseven.us 



WEEKLY EVENTS 

MON SALSA 
THE TANGO 
WEST COAST 
WED SWING 
BACHATA 
THU SALSA 
KIZQMBA1T 
FBI SALSA 

mmm 

TANGO," 

SAT SALSA 
SWING 
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DETAILS-1 UP-TO-DATE INFO 



AUG S-12 AND/OR 15-19 

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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 35 



MUSIC 



GEORGE CLERK/ISTOCK 


On Bowie 

A Conversation with Rolling Stone Writer 
Rob Sheffield on His David Bowie Obsession 



hough many of us were moved to 
type a few words when we learned 
that David Bowie had died, Rob 
Sheffield went the distance. 

The Rolling Stone journalist started writ¬ 
ing on January 10, the night the dreadful 
news arrived, and didn’t stop until he had 
written a book. On Bowie , published late last 
month, isn’t an exhaustive biog¬ 
raphy, nor a discography, nor an 
exegesis. It’s a book about how 
and why the correct response to 
Bowie was, and will remain, ob¬ 
sessive love. It’s about what it is like to spend 
your whole life thinking intensely about 
Bowie’s decisions, vicissitudes, triumphs, 
and failures as if they were integral facets of 
your own psyche. And now, half a year later, 
it’s also about missing him, still missing him, 
even after all that love and intense thought. 

Sheffield’s first book, Love Is a Mixtape, 
was a monument to love and loss; it leans at 
the intersection of pop culture and the in¬ 
ner life like a white-painted bicycle frame 
installed lovingly at a tragic stop sign. No 
surprise, then, that he found a way to fill the 
resounding Bowie bereavement hollow with 
meaningful wit and analysis. 

We spoke on the phone. It began as an 
actual interview, then devolved into just talk¬ 
ing about Bowie records, a devolution I will 
always welcome. 

Only about six months have elapsed since 
David Bowie’s death. Had any of the mate¬ 
rial in this book been published before, or 
did you just go? 

I just went. It started the night he died. 
I was up late that night. I was writing about 
the Golden Globe Awards, which seems really 
weird. It seemed weird then. I was planning 
on being up late. I was planning on writing 
a bunch of Empire jokes. I had a bunch of 


BY SEAN NELSON 

friends over, and they were watching the 
show and eating pizza. Then, I got a text at 
quarter of two with the sad news. I stayed 
up all night. I was writing a tribute for Roll¬ 
ing Stone, and kept writing after that. By 
the time I talked to my editor that morning, 
who’d just woken up to the news, she said, 
“What if you just wrote a book in a month?” 

I said I could because I’ve been 
On Bowie at my desk just typing continu- 

by Rob Sheffield ously about Bowie this entire 

(Dey Street Books) time. A lot of it is music I’ve 

written about before. Probably 
ideas that I’ve irritated my friends intensely 
by blathering about in bars over the years. 

Who among us hasn’t irritated their friends 
with drunken grand organizing theories 
about David Bowie? 

Some artists you obsess about your whole 
life. Then, you learn all these things about them 
that you didn’t know. That, for me, was a big 
aspect of Bowie dying. Finding out that he lived 
with this diagnosis for 18 months and didn’t tell 
anybody. He responded to this crisis by making 
music, music that was so powerful and beauti¬ 
ful and unlike anything he’d done before. Can 
you imagine finding out you had a year to live 
and thinking, “I think I’ll spend it at work”? 

And working incredibly hard, apparently. Ob¬ 
viously, studio days are long anyway. But from 
what I’ve read, these were 12-14 hour days, 
routinely. With complex, taxing music being 
written, played, figured out, all while beset by 
cancer treatments. I guess he tuned out the 
death anxiety by channeling it into work. 

Absolutely. I feel like I kept learning so 
much about him since then. A lot of it was 
just talking to friends in the days after he 
died. It was funny how I didn’t know... I 
can imagine it was probably the same in Se¬ 
attle, where everywhere you went, there was 


Bowie playing. Just talking about him. 

Everywhere. For weeks. Almost until Prince 
died months later, it seems like. 

I was blown away by how much I kept learn¬ 
ing about the different aspects of David Bowie 
that meant so much to people. Things that, to 
them, were like what Bowie was. Whether it 
was the theater work, the painting, the mov¬ 
ies, the mime. Aspects of David Bowie’s career 
that I thought of as just footnotes that were 
huge for people. I kept cracking up because 
after loving David Bowie all these years, I’m 
learning all this stuff about him now. I don’t 
know why it seems to be a surprise, but it’s 
beautiful for me. 


What struck me most, 
aside from my personal 
sense of loss, was the 
collective response. May¬ 
be this is overstated, but 
this year is riddled with 
the death of significant 

people. Does it force you _ 

to think about what it 

means to lose people you don’t know? 

Yes, and to ask what it means to mourn 
with a fan community. The idea that Bowie 
was an artist who, whether consciously or not, 
created a community of people around the 
world—different generations, different cul¬ 
tures, different personality types, who heard 
aspects of themselves in David Bowie and felt 
very communal about that. That was some¬ 
thing that he was aware of, and something 
that he seemed to be aware of in an album like 
Blackstar, where he’s basically writing songs 
knowing that they will be used by a commu¬ 
nity to help them grieve. 

Something I thought about really in¬ 
tensely in the months after Bowie died, and it 


Can you imagine 
finding out you had 
a year to live and 
thinking, “I think I’ll 
spend it at work”? 


became even more pronounced when Prince 
died, was the idea that we live in a time when 
there isn’t exactly a mass audience anymore. 
This fan community you’re talking about, part 
of what makes that exist is that these guys, 
Bowie and Prince, were huge artists. Even if 
they weren’t everyone’s favorite, everyone 
knew who they were. That kind of fame just 
isn’t available to musicians the way it used to 
be. You still have a handful of pop stars, but 
even that seems like a different proposition. 

And the way Bowie treated that kind of 
fame, as an instrument to play and play with— 
he was really decades ahead of his time with 
that. I think we’re in a time where pop stars 
think of that as the main perk of the job. For 
Bowie, it was an aspect that he used for himself. 
It’s funny, I think about artists like Beyonce or 
Taylor Swift, who are consciously seeing them¬ 
selves as doing something new every record. 
They’re not going to do what they did last 
year. They’re going to do something different, 
and it’s going to be a big party statement that 
will reflect another step of their growth, and 
end up there. They see themselves as chang¬ 
ing. They see that as part of their job. To me, 
it seems like David Bowie was way ahead of 
the rest of the pop-star community, in terms of 
seeing that as a creative opportunity. 

But the differences between Bowie’s albums 
Hunky Dory, Aladdin Sane, Young Ameri¬ 
cans, Station to Station were not just sonic 
or image-based, but structural. Not just, well, 
you might not like this as much as you liked 
the last one. More like: Here’s an almost to¬ 
tally different language you didn’t even know 
rock ’n’ roll could speak. Which was incredibly 
risky to do at that time. Do you think that risk 
was what he was prized for? 

I think so. It’s really weird to think of how 
consistently he refused to repeat proven suc¬ 
cesses that he had. All the sure shots he could 
have done to get a virtually guaranteed hit, yet 
he consistently opted not to do that. Over the 
course of five years, six years, 20 years. It’s as¬ 
tonishing to me. / would have been delighted if 
he had made Station to Station 20 times over 
the next 20 years... 

Right, yes! But also, it’s not like he was try¬ 
ing not to have hits by throwing all these 
stylistic curveballs. He 
was performing the 
role of a rock star, and 
a rock star is one who 
makes hits. So he made 
them. It was a complete 
reversal of the way it’s 
understood to work. The 
mass-ness of the audi- 
ence was the touch that 
really made it art. 

One of the perceived aspects of Bowie that 
has been interesting to write about, and to 
strip away, is that his radical records weren’t 
commercial hits. The mystique that’s collect¬ 
ed around an album like Low is: commercial 
suicide. It was a huge hit, on both sides of the 
ocean. It was a massive commercial success. 
Station to Station was a massive, massive 
success in the US and the UK. These were 
what we think of as crazy risks, but you can’t 
accuse him of not taking care of that aspect of 
it. But I think you’re right. It was: “Whatever 
I do, it’ll be a hit.” ■ 

A (much) longer version of this 
interview can be found at 

0 THESTRANGER.COM/MUSIC 











36 July 27,2016 THE STRANGER 



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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 37 




BJ THE CHICAGO kid Plays the Crocodile on Friday. 


My RNC, DNC, KRS, 
ASAP, Etc. Hangover 

BY LARRY MIZELL JR. 


m I awake? 

I saw horrors at the RNC podium 
worthy of Lovecraft’s racist ass, spitting 
blood like Gene Simmons’s also racist, NWA- 
hating ass. Days later, I’m recovering from 
playing a drinking game during Bernie’s 
DNC speech. Alcohol and politics may be 
#StrongerTogether but not stronger than 
the hangover that history says we’re headed 
for. (Please drink water.) 

How would a Trump presidency intersect 
with all the other nationalist craziness going on 
in the world? When have we ever gone to the 
precipice like this and not tipped the hell in? 

Were there really guns out for two consecu¬ 
tive weekends on the Hill, 
on top of the usual Big 
City Fantasy Camp for 
Eastsiders that Pike/Pine 
got turnt to? I love the 
Capitol Hill Arts District, 

I just hate all the CHADs. 

Speaking of, how was 
Block Party? I didn’t go— 
religious reasons—but I 
was looking at a beautiful 
apartment up there about 
the size of a bathtub, the rent the ticket on 
some Balenciagas. (So I’ve heard—me, I wear 
nylon Classics but I do listen to Mackned.) I 
mean, who wouldn’t want to pay NYC prices 
for a city you can’t even get a bodega sandwich 
in, that you’re lucky to find community in, one 
you can’t barely stand to kick it in anymore? 

The next day I used an app to get some¬ 
body to help me move my shit into storage; 
he was telling me about this petite blond girl 
from Wisconsin he’d just helped move into a 
place on 25th and Union. “You sure you know 
where you’re at?” he asked her. Real protec¬ 
tor, this guy. How many stars do you give 
an earnest and helpful white guy who’s out 
of touch and casually racist? (I feel like this 
should go in the Seattle POC FAQ.) 

KRS-One, doubling down on earlier com¬ 
ments, says our culture’s leaders should 
be infallible, and if you have a problem 
with Afrika Bambaataa, you should “quit 
hiphop”—I’m looking at the front door. 

ASAP Rocky once again reaffirmed his 
trash-ness, saying that Black Lives Matter is 
a bandwagon and that he identifies with Bill 


Cosby, who is innocent (even though Cosby 
himself admitted he wasn’t). Who identifies 
with rapists? One guess. 

It was beautiful that Stevie Wonder made 
an about-face with the All Lives Matter 
bullshit, but it’s scary to think that things are 
so dire-feeling that Michael Jordan’s notori¬ 
ously nonvocal ass has decided to speak up in 
defense of Black Lives (and police’s too). Plus 
Gucci Mane is sober living. What the hell? 

While I don’t know what fate has in 
store, I do know what Fete had planned; 
this would-be new entry to the local music 
festival racket was gonna be a one-day hi¬ 
phop shindig at White River Amphitheatre, 
headlined by Nas, with 
Rae Sremmurd, Metro 
Boomin, and August Al- 
sina, plus a gang (gang 
gang) of local talent—till 
the shit got canceled, no 
doubt due to ticket sales. 
(Maybe everybody re¬ 
membered what a biblical 
exodus it is just trying to 
exit White River—I feel 
like leaving the Gorge is 
quicker.) Probably would have gone off like 
gangbusters with G-Eazy or Lil Dicky head¬ 
lining; hey, y’all can pay me lots of money and 
I’ll tell you exactly who and what to spend the 
rest of it on. (No refunds.) 

Till then, my fly and fashion-forward 
Northwest urbanites, this is kinda still Kenny 
Chesney country. #NoShoesNation. 

So go see B J the Chicago Kid on Friday at 
the Crocodile instead—a real soul dude with a 
big heart, great content, and an unwieldy name; 
dude should be big as Anderson Paak in my 
eyes, and doesn’t sound like Macy Gray trying 
to impress Dr. Dre (uh, no shade, honestly). I 
haven’t heard a single or feature of his that dis¬ 
appointed yet—and like Paak did, B J seems to 
be stealthily ramping up to a big debut. If I had 
to recommend a few, I’d point to his two stellar 
joints to date with Kendrick Lamar (“His Pain” 
and “The New Cupid,” no shuffle), and one of 
my favorite songs of last summer, “That Girl” 
(featuring a breezy feature from the often fun- 
spoiling OG Maco, no less). 

Tell ’em I sent you, just please don’t tell 
’em you saw me. ■ 



It’s scary to think 
things are so dire¬ 
feeling that Michael 
Jordan’s notoriously 
nonvocal ass has 
decided to speak up. 



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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 39 



ART 



SENG A NENGUDl Her sculptures here are “activated ” by Joseph “jo” Blake and Haruko Crow Nishimura. 

Learning to Love 
Senga Nengudi’s 
Pantyhose Sculptures 

BY JEN GRAVES 


I always wondered about Senga Nengudi. 

She’s a legend for her 1970s sculptures 
made of pantyhose, but art history had her 
filed as a one-hit wonder. 

True: What a hit. There’s a fever and music 
to her sculptures made of pantyhose stretched 
and pulled between the wall and the floor. As 
majestic and abstract as they are, they also 
make an ache rise in my lower back, my legs, 
my crotch. When I confront them, I hear my 
mother’s worried and worrisome words to me 
as a feisty teenager: Cross your legs. I see the 
flashing slogan: “Control Top.” My body has 
not been the same size throughout my life, 
and that has mattered very much. I do not 
conquer these things, never will. These things 
hit deep. 

I’ve loved Nengudi’s sculptures. Over the 
years, I’ve seen them the way they usually 
appear—placed in line in the chronological 
march through 20th-century art history at 
major museums from New York to Paris— 
next to Robert Morris’s sagging rubber 
sculptures and Eva Hesse’s deteriorating 
latex, all representing a thing called post¬ 
minimalism. 

Now I realize how feeble my love was. 
Senga Nengudi: Improvisational Ges¬ 
tures, the survey exhibition at the Henry Art 


Gallery with 14 of her sculptures plus photo¬ 
graphs, videos, and a performance, reveals 
to me that I didn’t really know the first thing 
about her work. 

“I never had a dancer’s body,” Nengudi 
intoned, adding a British accent to the word 
“dancer”—dONcer—as she spoke to an audi¬ 
ence at the Henry last weekend. 

She is a dancer, but what she means is 
that dance where the size and shape of the 
body matters is not her kind of dance. Her 
sculptures don’t even stay the same size 
throughout a single exhibition: They stretch 
slightly, sag. If you were to take a measure¬ 
ment of them on opening and closing nights, 
you would see that they literally show their 
age. She replaces the hose as necessary and 
provides instructions to museums for how the 
forms are created. So they’re never exactly 
the same twice. 

And she is not exactly a sculptor. Even the 
sculptures are meant to be what she calls “ac¬ 
tivated” by performers. In photographs and 
videos, Nengudi demonstrates that her work 
is not kin to postminimalism so much as Bra¬ 
zilian body art of the 1970s, African ceremo¬ 
nial ritual, African American modern dance. 
She loved Allan Kaprow’s formless, impro¬ 
visational 1960s Happenings, when artworks 


were left open for audiences to explore, to 
play with physically. 

She never acknowledged limits on what 
she could make. When she noticed that a 
Catholic girls’ school was being demolished 
in Los Angeles in 1980, she ran onto the site 
with the bulldozers rolling behind her and 
enacted a version of Rapunzel in ruins. All 
that’s visible in Barbara McCullough’s result¬ 
ing photograph are a pair of pantyhose (worn 
on Nengudi’s head, but the crouching artist 
is unseen) stretched from the brick school’s 
one remaining window down into the rubble 
of the ground. 

In 2007, Nengudi took her video camera 
into a textile mill in New York. She created a 
film she titled The Threader, following a man 
named Amer Baig as he worked to make silk 
drapery cord. His rapid motions are bewil¬ 
dering and spellbinding. They 
are dance, performance, sculp¬ 
ture, and labor all in one. 

A room-sized installation 
from that time, Warp Trance, is 
also at the Henry. 

You walk into a darkened 
room to find a spectacle. Moving lights crawl 
across the walls and floor in patterns, like 
moving traffic or computer code scrolling 
down a screen. 

The light patterns are created by video 
projected onto the patterned holes in strung- 
up rolls (like Venetian blinds) of Jacquard 
punch cards. When these paper cards with 
holes punched out were invented, they revolu¬ 
tionized the production of textiles. The holes 
told the machines what to do. Now Jacquard 
punch cards are seen as the earliest prede¬ 
cessor to computer programming. Here, re¬ 
moved from function, they are naked, ancient, 
and reborn. You bathe in Warp Trance. 

I can’t stop thinking about one perfor¬ 


mance Nengudi staged under an LA freeway 
in 1978. Its participants were the members 
of a loose collective of Black men and women 
artists called Studio Z. It included people who 
would become influential in their own right, 
such as David Hammons and Maren Hass- 
inger. 

But the costumes they wore to perform 
improvised movement and music—captured 
in color photographs—were made of throw¬ 
away materials. As disposable people in the 
eyes of a white supremacist society, they 
chose a throwaway location, too, on that 
patchy ground under the concrete overpass. 

The videographer’s camera conked out 
that day. It’s difficult to make out the move¬ 
ment in still photographs. But in the catalog 
for the exhibition, I learned that Nengudi was 
responding to a specific situation: a rift be¬ 
tween Black men and women because main¬ 
stream feminism didn’t advocate for the is¬ 
sues of Black women, and Black Power asked 
women to take a backseat. 

Nengudi’s goal was togetherness. 

Seeing more of Nengudi’s pantyhose 
sculptures, it’s obvious that they’re not just 
about female bodies. Black female bodies are 
the common denominator, the base of opera¬ 
tions. But the sculptures conjoin a people di¬ 
vided by gender constructs and biologies. In 
a single sculpture, I might see in the knotted, 
dangling, bulbous nylons both penises at rest 
and post-nursing breasts. Nengudi may have 
begun the sculptures when her children were 
born, but she has continued, and they have 
become multifarious. Formally and emotion¬ 
ally, there is no “typical” pantyhose piece, 
unlike the idea I’d had in my mind from see¬ 
ing them one at a time. They can be playful, 
agonized, confused, hopeful, tired, or furious, 
the nylon mesh stretched, twisted, tied, cut, 
balled up, pressed flat, stuffed, flying upward, 
weighted down. 

I’d also never paid much mind to the fact 
that the pantyhose series is titled R.S.V.P., or 
“please respond.” 

“Can everyone stand up, please.” 

That’s how Nengudi began her artist 
talk—with a request. We’d all just watched 
Joseph “jo” Blake and Haruko Crow 
Nishimura “activate” an R.S.V.P. piece in the 
gallery involving five pairs of pantyhose. The 
dancers lived whole lives in those 15 minutes 
with the sculpture, like the characters in an 
August Wilson play, finding joy, desperation, 
collapse, wishing, protecting. 

Now we in the auditorium were being 
asked to please respond to the 
performance in a single impro¬ 
vised movement each. 

The first man to go, an older 
white man in the front row, put 
his hands in the air and fell to 
the floor. Nervous laughter. 

It was the end of a week of bodies drop¬ 
ping, actually falling dead, over the state of 
race in America, which Nengudi would al¬ 
lude to later in her talk, at which point she 
would ask us to draw one thing humans 
all have in common, in a beautifully 1970s 
moment. 

But we were still in the procession of shim¬ 
mies, elaborate arm waves, self-hugs, and 
even one hostile shrug. At some point, I no¬ 
ticed that Nengudi, onstage, was repeating 
every person’s movement, conducting word¬ 
less individual conversations lasting a few 
heightened seconds each. She took each body 
into her body, and gave us back anew. I know 
now. That is what her art does. ■ 


Senga Nengudi: 
Improvisational 
Gestures 

Henry Art Gallery 
Through Oct 9 





40 July 27, 2016 THE STRANGER 









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THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 41 




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ALL BLACK LIVES matter The police could be helping, and they’re not. 

Why Aren’t We 
Talking About 
Ghettoside? 


BY JEN GRAVES 


J ill Leovy’s 2015 book Ghettoside: A 
True Story of Murder in America 
has the potential to break an im¬ 
passe in the national dialogue about Black 
lives mattering. But it’s not getting the wide¬ 
spread attention of a book like Michelle Alex¬ 
ander’s The New Jim Crow, and 
I wonder whether that’s because 
it is simply not a politically con¬ 
venient book to talk about, for 
almost anyone. 

The book is about what Leovy describes as 
a plague of Black homicide. She studies the 
phenomenon in Los Angeles, but it appears 
in most major American cities, where Black- 
on-Black murders go unsolved at an alarming 
rate. 

Black-on-Black homicide is “like incest,” 
LA street activist Najee Ali tells Leovy, be¬ 
cause of “the shame and secrecy the issue 
evokes.” Leovy explains that “researchers 
describe skirting the subject for fear of being 
labeled racist” and “concerned Blacks cite 


their fear of inflaming white racism: Why em¬ 
phasize what seems sure to be used against 
them?” 

I don’t think Leovy set out to provide a 
conversation-changing answer to the argu¬ 
ment I often see online: “But black people 
commit more crimes!” preceded 
by “I’m not racist.” 

Okay, okay, you’re not racist. 
So if you do not discriminate be¬ 
tween people on the basis of race, 
yet you see a prevalence of violent crime hit¬ 
ting one racial group, then wouldn’t the only 
logical question to ask be: What is missing 
from this picture? 

Ghettoside is about what is missing from 
policing. 

Leovy spent years researching and writ¬ 
ing this book, and her work is Herculean. 
She was a journalist covering homicide at 
the Los Angeles Times —and as a result, she 
had a lot of good sources and long-term re¬ 
lationships with homicide detectives. She is 


not anti-cop. 

Like the best of those detectives, she re¬ 
fused to see the homicides as acceptable, face¬ 
less statistics. 

Even before embarking on a book, she 
kept a blog in which she reported every sin¬ 
gle homicide in the city—something newspa¬ 
pers don’t otherwise do. She’d heard moth¬ 
ers say that their sons died, but there was 
nothing about it in the paper. That didn’t sit 
right with Leovy. She wanted every mother 
to know that her son’s death registered in 
the press. 

Ghettoside depicts hardworking homicide 
detectives who care deeply about solving 
the murders of Black men in Compton and 
Watts—a place other parts of the police force 
view as hopeless gang territory. 

Leovy’s detectives not only care, they’re 
also brilliant. She follows one case all the way 
to sentencing and beyond, including grip¬ 
ping tales from interrogation rooms. If you 
like Law & Order, you will like Ghettoside ; if 
you dislike Law & Order because it’s too neat 
and simple, you will like Ghettoside. It isn’t 
wonkish—it’s a page-turner. But it also deliv¬ 
ers hope that public policy can play a role in 
changing the dynamics between the police and 
Black Americans. 

Leovy’s “ghettoside” detectives—their 
term—had to buy their own office supplies. De¬ 
tectives who worked on high-profile homicides 
got cars and won the prestige and respect of 
the brass. Those detectives 
didn’t go near South Cen¬ 
tral Los Angeles. 

Again, Leovy simply 
doesn’t see South Central 
as a lost zone populated 
by hardened gang killers. 

She sees a community 
suffering from deep grief, 
families pulled under by 
waves of killings that go 
unsolved, unpunished, and ultimately unde¬ 
terred, decade after decade. 

“In Jim Crow Mississippi,” she writes, 
“killers of Black people were convicted at a 
rate that was only a little lower than the rate 
that prevailed half a century later in LA—30 
percent then versus about 36 percent in Los 
Angeles County in the early 1990s.” 

The killers go free, and each killing brings 
another in revenge. 

Mothers lose one son, and then the oth¬ 
er. Reading these women’s voices hurts. It 
should. 

After a murder, the most common response 
to “Who did it?” is “Everybody knows.” Ev¬ 
erybody may know, but the police have vir¬ 
tually no protection to offer for anyone who 
wants to testify. 

In South Central, Leovy describes, the 
state does not fulfill its most important role— 
protecting the lives of citizens—and yet pa¬ 
trol police aggressively play-act at being in 
charge. They detain Black citizens for broken 
taillights and haul them in for nonviolent in¬ 
fractions. 

On July 12, former King County execu¬ 
tive Ron Sims wrote a piece for the Seattle 
Times in which he detailed the eight times 
he’s been pulled over by Seattle police. Eight 
times. He was never ticketed because he 
never did anything wrong. You hear it again 
and again. Black Americans are harassed. 
South Carolina’s Tim Scott, the only Black 
Republican in the Senate, told of his own ex¬ 
perience, describing “a deep divide between 
the Black community and law enforcement— 


a trust gap.” 

In one scene in Ghettoside, a patrol offi¬ 
cer arriving at a murder where 911 has been 
called and the victim is still breathing starts 
putting up yellow crime-scene tape. The of¬ 
ficer doesn’t lean down to comfort the victim 
or to ask, “Who did it?” It’s as if the answer 
barely matters to the officer. Just another 
gangland murder. 

At the same time, Leovy tells of a time 
when a detective did kneel down to a dying 
victim to ask what happened, and the victim’s 
dying words to the officer were simply “Fuck 
you.” 

What would bring a victim to use his last 
breath to condemn a police officer rather than 
his killer? The answer is a complaint made 
to police that’s heard throughout the book, a 
complaint that as Leovy documents, is actual¬ 
ly a historical fact: “You always come too late.” 

It is the greatest crime against Americans, 
she writes. 

“Like the schoolyard bully, our criminal 
justice system harasses people on small pre¬ 
texts but is exposed as a coward before mur¬ 
der. It hauls masses of black men through 
its machinery but fails to protect them from 
bodily injury and death. It is at once oppres¬ 
sive and inadequate.” 

As I was writing this, I tried to track down 
whether King County has its own “ghetto¬ 
side” neighborhoods, places where the data 
shows the system to be both “oppressive 
and inadequate.” I spoke 
briefly with a former Se¬ 
attle homicide detective 
who told me there used to 
be “a lot more” in Seattle 
proper, “but they’re gen- 
trified.” 

Local Black neigh¬ 
borhoods haven’t been 
relieved of crime. Se¬ 
attle has been stripped 
of Black neighborhoods, which have moved 
south. 

Leovy spent years accumulating data, so 
it’s not a surprise that I couldn’t get any¬ 
thing definitive in a day. Homicide does hit 
the Black community disproportionately in 
King County and across the state, both on 
the victim and suspect sides, a public health 
official told me. 

A 2014 report showed that homicide rates 
between 2002 and 2012 in South and Central 
Seattle were 20 times higher than the com¬ 
bined average rate in the lowest-homicide 
areas of Bellevue, Kirkland, Issaquah, Sam¬ 
mamish, Mercer Island, and Medina. 

Tony Gomez was the official I spoke to 
at Seattle & King County Public Health. 
He’s the manager of the Violence and In¬ 
jury Prevention Unit, and he followed up 
by e-mailing me multiple links to homicide 
data resources locally and nationally. (The 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
is developing a National Violent Death Re¬ 
porting System, which Washington is in the 
process of joining.) 

Gomez said he hoped I could give the ex¬ 
tensive research greater exposure. There 
wasn’t much written about the 2014 report 
when it came out, he said with dismay. I didn’t 
tell him crime isn’t even my beat. Pm usually a 
cultural critic. The ideas in Ghettoside need to 
go far beyond book reviewers and journalists. 
Take it away. ■ 


Read more book reviews at 

0 THESTRANGER.COM/BOOKS 


Ghettoside 

by Jill Leovy 
(Spiegel & Grau) 


Ghettoside is simply 
not a politically 
convenient book 
to talk about, for 
almost anyone. 














42 July 27,2016 THE STRANGER 



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“ARE YOU EXCITED TO STAR IN A WOODY ALLEN MOVIE?” “Iguess.” 


Cafe Society Is Not the 
Worst Film Woody 
Allen Has Ever Made 

BY NED LANNAMANN 


W oody Allen makes movies with the 
speed and precision of a short-order 
breakfast cook. Year after year, he churns out 
pancake after pancake for an undemanding 
diner crowd, with Cafe Society the 47th pan¬ 
cake he’s written and directed in roughly as 
many years. As pancakes go, it’s round and 
warm and tasty. It’s a pancake! What else 
were you expecting? Pour some syrup on it 
and eat up. 

As a movie, though, Cafe Society is a little 
harder to rate. It shouldn’t come as a shock 
to anyone that it’s noticeably 
half-assed—it’s a Woody Al¬ 
len movie. Half-assedness 
has practically become his 
trademark, particularly in his later years, 
as his workmanlike craftsmanship has de¬ 
volved into outright laziness. Its efficiency 
and carelessness, though, can’t obliterate the 
easygoing, intrinsic charm that runs through 
the movie or the romantic wistfulness that 
pops out of the screen, even as the char¬ 
acters—especially the women—remain 

woefully two-dimensional. It’s a difficult mov¬ 
ie to dislike, a quality it has in common with 
much of Allen’s work. (This quality is the rea¬ 
son the public at large has torn itself up over 
the disturbing allegations that have dogged 
Allen for years.) 

It’s not a particularly funny movie. Even 
the lamest of Allen’s films land a few choice 
one-liners; oddly, that’s not the case here. A 
bored-sounding Allen narrates as a young 
Bobby Dorfman (Jesse Eisenberg) seeks to 
make a name for himself in 1930s Los An¬ 
geles. Just like the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, 
Bobby ends up doing odd jobs for his Uncle 
Phil (Steve Carell); unlike the Fresh Prince, 
Uncle Phil lends Bobby his secretary Vonnie 
(Kristen Stewart) to show him around the 
city. 

Stewart is, by quite a significant stretch, 
the best thing here, even as her character 
is obviously sculpted by man hands. Von¬ 
nie wears childlike clothes that show off her 


midriff, and dismisses the phony Hollywood 
bullshit that permeates the film industry. 
She’s a perfectly constructed object of lust, 
and Bobby lusts indeed. Naturally, Von¬ 
nie has a boyfriend, so Cafe Society buffets 
her between the wills of these two compet¬ 
ing men, each of whom is determined to lock 
that shit down with a wedding ring. Stewart 
makes the most out of a thankless task, suc¬ 
ceeding to the point that we like Vonnie as 
much as her suitors do. 

Eisenberg is the now familiar, always 
bland Allen stand-in, and the 
weaselly quality that worked 
so well for him in The So¬ 
cial Network makes Bobby 
come across as a bit more of a predator than 
I think Allen intended. Carell, meanwhile, 
barely seems to be awake. Several disjointed 
subplots pop up concerning Bobby’s family 
back in New York, like his gangster brother 
Ben (the great Corey Stoll, wasted) and his 
sister’s troublesome next-door neighbor. In 
the movie’s most baffling scene, Anna Camp 
appears as a hooker on her first night on the 
job. Parker Posey and Blake Lively also have 
roles, but you’ll have forgotten them as soon 
as the credits roll. 

All these loose ends make it seem like Al¬ 
len chopped Cafe Society down from a much 
longer script, as he reportedly did with An¬ 
nie Hall. Of course, the opposite is likely 
true—that Allen is stretching out a few bare¬ 
ly fleshed-out ideas—but the possibility of it 
being a better, more thoughtful movie keeps 
Cafe Society mostly upright, against all odds. 
It’s a good-looking film, too, more than you 
can say for much of Allen’s 21st-century 
output, and its melancholy ending is weirdly 
effective. 

So back to the pancake metaphor: Cafe So¬ 
ciety does seem to be a bit undercooked, even 
runny in the middle, but maybe that’s better 
than being burnt. It’s definitely not the best 
pancake Allen’s ever whipped up, but it isn’t 
the worst, either. ■ 


Cafe Society 

dir. Woody Allen 


















































THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 43 


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY 

BY ROB BREZSNY 


For the Week of July 27 

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Free your body. Don't ruminate and ago¬ 
nize about it. FREE YOUR BODY! Be brave and forceful. Do it simply and 
easily. Free your gorgeously imperfect, wildly intelligent body. Allow 
it to be itself in all of its glory. Tell it you're ready to learn more of its 
secrets and adore its mysteries. Be in awe of its unfathomable power to 
endlessly carry out the millions of chemical reactions that keep you alive 
and thriving. How can you not be overwhelmed with gratitude for your 
hungry, curious, unpredictable body? Be grateful for its magic. Love the 
blessings it bestows on you. Celebrate its fierce animal elegance. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The people of many cultures have imag¬ 
ined the sun god as possessing masculine qualities. But in some tradi¬ 
tions, the Mighty Father is incomplete without the revitalizing energies 
of the Divine Mother. The Maori, for example, believe that every night 
the solar deity has to marinate in her nourishing uterine bath. Otherwise 
he wouldn't be strong enough to rise in the morning. And how does 
this apply to you? Well, you currently have resemblances to the weary 
old sun as it dips below the horizon. I suspect it's time to recharge your 
powers through an extended immersion in the deep, dark waters of 
the primal feminine. 

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): An Interesting Opportunity is definitely in 
your vicinity. It may slink tantalizingly close to you in the coming days, 
even whisper your name from afar. But I doubt that it will knock on your 
door. It probably won't call you seven times on the phone or flash you a 
big smile or send you an engraved invitation. So you should make your¬ 
self alert for the Interesting Opportunity's unobtrusive behavior. It could 
be a bit shy or secretive or modest. Once you notice it, you may have 
to come on strong—you know, talk to it sweetly or ply it with treats. 

CANCER (June 21-July 22): [Editor's note: The counsel offered in the 
following oracle was channeled from the Goddess by Rob Brezsny. If you 
have any problems with it, direct your protests to the Queen Wow, not 
Brezsny.] It's time to get more earthy and practical about practicing your 
high ideals and spiritual values. Translate your loftiest intentions into 
your most intimate behavior. Ask yourself, "How does Goddess want me 
to respond when my coworker pisses me off?" or "How would Goddess 
like me to brush my teeth and watch TV and make love?" For extra credit, 
get a T-shirt that says "Goddess was my copilot, but we crash-landed in 
the wilderness and I was forced to eat her." 

LEO (July 23-Aug 22): Be alert for white feathers gliding on the wind. 
Before eating potato chips, examine each one to see if it bears a likeness 
of Rihanna or the Virgin Mary. Keep an eye out, too, for portents like 
robots wearing dreadlock wigs or antique gold buttons lying in the 
gutter or senior citizens cursing at invisible Martians. The appearance 
of anomalies like these will be omens that suggest you will soon be the 
recipient of crazy good fortune. But if you would rather not wait around 
for chance events to trigger your good luck, simply make it your fierce 
intention to generate it. Use your optimism-fueled willpower and your 
flair for creative improvisation. You will have abundant access to these 
talents in the coming weeks. 

VIRGO (Aug 23-Sept 22): You have just begun your big test. How 
are you doing so far? According to my analysis, the preliminary signs 
suggest that you have a good chance of proving the old maxim "If 
it doesn't make you so crazy that you put your clothes on inside out 
and try to kiss the sky until you cry, it will help you win one of your 


biggest arguments with Life." In fact, I suspect we will ultimately see 
you undergo at least one miraculous and certifiably melodramatic 
transformation. A wart on your attitude could dissolve, for example. A 
luminous visitation may heal one of your blind spots. You might find a 
satisfactory substitute for kissing the sky. 

LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct 22): For many years, my occupation was "starving 
artist." I focused on improving my skills as a writer and musician, even 
though those activities rarely earned me any money. To ensure my sur¬ 
vival, I worked as little as necessary at low-end jobs—scrubbing dishes 
at restaurants, digging ditches for construction companies, delivering 
newspapers in the middle of the night, and volunteering for medical 
experiments. During the long hours spent doing tasks that had little 
meaning to me, I worked diligently to remain upbeat. One trick that 
worked well was imagining future scenes when I would be engaged in 
exciting creative work that paid me a decent wage. It took a while, but 
eventually those visions materialized in my actual life. I urge you to try 
this strategy in the coming months, Libra. Harness your mind's eye in the 
service of generating the destiny you want to inhabit. 

SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov 21): You have every right to celebrate your own 
personal Independence Day sometime soon. In fact, given the current 
astrological omens, you'd be justified in embarking on a full-scale eman¬ 
cipation spree in the coming weeks. It will be prime time to seize more 
freedom and declare more autonomy and build more self-sufficiency. 
Here's an important nuance to the work you have ahead of you: Make 
sure you escape the tyranny of not just the people and institutions that 
limit your sovereignty but also the voices in your own head that tend to 
hinder your flow. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22-Dec 21): Of all the forbidden fruits that you 
fantasize about, which one is your favorite? Among the intriguing places 
you consider to be outside of your comfort zone, which might inspire you 
to redefine the meaning of "comfort"? The coming weeks will be a favor¬ 
able time to reconfigure your relationship with these potential catalysts. 
And while you're out on the frontier dreaming of fun experiments, you 
might also want to flirt with other wild cards and strange attractors. Life 
is in the mood to tickle you with useful surprises. 

CAPRICORN (Dec 22-Jan 19): You have a special talent for accessing 
wise innocence. In some ways you're virginal, fresh, and raw, and in other 
ways you're mature, seasoned, and well-developed. I hope you will regard 
this not as a confusing paradox but rather as an exotic strength. With 
your inner child and your inner mentor working in tandem, you could 
accomplish heroic feats of healing. Their brilliant collaboration could also 
lead to the mending of an old rift. 

AQUARIUS (Jan 20-Feb 18): "Where is everybody when I need them?" 
Even if you haven't actually spoken those words recently, I'm guessing the 
voices in your head have whispered them. But from what I can tell, that 
complaint will soon be irrelevant. It will no longer match reality. Your allies 
will start offering more help and resources. They may not be perfectly con¬ 
scientious in figuring out how to be of service, but they'll be pretty good. 
Here's what you can do to encourage optimal results: (1) Purge your low, 
outmoded expectations. (2) Open your mind and heart to the possibility 
that people can change. (3) Humbly ask—out loud, not just in the privacy 
of your imagination—for precisely what you want. 

PISCES (Feb 19-March 20): Millions of Pisceans less fortunate than you 
won't read this horoscope. Uninformed about the rocky patch of Yellow 
Brick Road that lies just ahead, they may blow a gasket or get a flat tire. You, 
on the other hand, will benefit from my oracular foreshadowing, as well as 
my inside connections with the Lords of Funky Karma. You will therefore 
be likely to drive with relaxed caution, keeping your vehicle unmarred in 
the process. That's why I'm predicting that although you may not arrive 
speedily at the next leg of your trip, you will do so safely and in style. ■ 



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44 July 27, 2016 THE STRANGER 



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JENNIFER RICHARD 

SEATTLE’S MOST beautiful BOWL OF FUL Can be found at Jebena Cafe. 


Four Places to Enjoy Ful, the 
Most Comforting Breakfast Dish 

Try Starting the Day with a Savory Bowl of Fava Beans 

BY ANGELA GARBES 


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I devote a lot of time to thinking and 
writing about lunch and dinner, but not 
breakfast. Left to my own devices, I’d 
probably eat cold leftovers or plain yogurt 
straight from the container every morning. 
Meals out still feel like a luxury, while break¬ 
fast is an at-home necessity, one that I prefer 
to take with my coffee, in my comfy pants, be¬ 
fore I am fully conscious. 

But there’s one breakfast dish that al¬ 
ways seems to call to me, quietly and softly 
insisting that I get dressed and leave the 
house for it: ful, a humble, satisfying bowl of 
cooked fava beans. When I do, I am never 
disappointed. While the origins of ful—which 
you’ll often see spelled as “foul,” “fool,” or 
“foule”—go back as far as ancient Egypt, 
ful is now eaten throughout the Middle East 
and East Africa, in countries such as Syria, 
Lebanon, Jordan, Yemen, Ethiopia, Eritrea, 
and Sudan. 

Ful’s spices and accompaniments change 
with every country and cook who prepares 
it, but they include cumin, berbere, olive oil, 
tahini, parsley, lemon juice, fresh chilies, to¬ 
matoes, onion, hard-boiled eggs, and cheese. 
Eating ful requires no utensils, just a will¬ 
ingness to sop it up with pita, French bread, 


or spongy injera. But the heart and soul of 
ful is always dried fava beans. They begin 
as sad, brown, crumpled looking things, but 
after hours of the simple, miraculous act of 
cooking, they are transformed into some¬ 
thing entirely new—supple, tender, and 
wholly comforting. 

In Seattle, where we are blessed with a 
large number of East African immigrants, ful 
abounds in our many Ethiopian cafes and res¬ 
taurants. Much like Vietnamese pho, it pours 
out of the small kitchens in large quantities, 
a lifeblood that fuels a hungry community 
of workers with the energy they need to get 
through their days. 

For years, I’ve turned to the Central Dis¬ 
trict’s Cafe Selam for my ful needs. Here 
the ful is satiny smooth and spicy—the fava 
beans are lightly pureed with olive oil and 
red chili. It’s served in a broad white bowl 
topped with freshly chopped scallions, to¬ 
matoes, and serrano chilies, as well as slices 
of hard-boiled egg and soft crumbles of feta 
cheese. A red plastic basket filled with two 
crusty French loaves accompanies each 
bowl. Immediately after it lands on the table, 
I’m tearing into the bread and dragging it 
through the stew. Hours later, my lips are 


Cafe Selam 

2715 E Cherry St, 328-0404 

Sunset Cafe 

8115 Rainier Ave S, 722-0342 

Kaffa Coffee and Wine Bar 

8136 Rainier Ave S, 453-3558 

Jebena Cafe 

1510 NE 117th St, 365-0757 

still buzzing from its spice and heat. 

At Sunset Cafe on Rainier Avenue 
South, ful is served strictly during the morn¬ 
ing hours. It is beautiful and shimmering, 
with swaths of grassy olive oil pooling on its 
surface. Two small mounds of piquant diced 
green chilies and white onion, as well as a 
bundle of roughly chopped fresh tomato, float 
on top, begging to be stirred into the beans. 
The favas, while soft, remain pleasantly firm 
enough to bite through. 

Each bowl is served with small slices 
French bread, as well as a small ramekin 
filled with a soft, spreadable farmer cheese 
whose creaminess echoes that of the beans. 
While you can easily drag the bread through 
the ful (remember: no need for utensils), 











































THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 45 


consider spreading a little cheese on each 
slice and then topping it with favas and a few 
bits of onion, maybe a tiny piece of chili or 
two, as though you’re composing your own 
personal hors d’oeuvres. It makes each bite 
feel special. 

Service at Sunset Cafe can move at its 
own leisurely pace, so if you’re in need of 
a quicker ful fix, head across the street to 
Kaffa Cafe and Wine Bar, which is set up 
for more expedient coffee shop-type ex¬ 
perience. While the ful here is a bit bland 
compared to Sunset, it’s still quite tasty, 
and between the heady mix of berbere, cof¬ 
fee, and incense in the air, you may catch 
a little buzz. There’s an attention to detail 
here—red onions, jalapenos, and tomatoes 
are diced with precision and, along with 
some dry cheese (it resembles the dusty 
Parmesan cheese that comes in packets 
with pizzas), lovingly placed in their own 
quadrant on top of the bowl. 

Way up north in the Pinehurst neigh¬ 
borhood, Jebena Cafe serves what is 
certainly Seattle’s most beautiful bowl of 
ful. A crimson sea of favas—long simmered 
with berbere and tomato—fills a vintage 
green bowl, shaped like a leaf, that sits atop 


The favas in Jebena’s 
ful are simmered with 
berbere and tomato and 
showered with green 
chilies, scallions, and feta. 


a matching plate. It’s showered with diced 
green chilies, scallions, feta cheese, and a 
generous amount of olive oil that adds a 
silky richness. The ful is already wonder¬ 
fully spiced, but a final sprinkling of what 
tastes like cardamom and black pepper 
lights up your senses as you bend over and 
breathe in its scent. 

Jebena’s ful is astonishingly creamy— 
each scoop looks like it holds whole softened 
favas, but once inside your mouth, the skins 
melt away and suddenly your tongue is 
awash in a texture so lush and velvety, it’s 
hard to imagine the beans were ever dried. 
The whole French rolls served with the 
bread have thoughtfully been heated up just 
before serving. 

Just as pho has come to occupy an in¬ 
tegral part of Seattle’s consciousness and 
daily life, ful is making its way into the 
more mainstream fabric of the city. In 
Fremont, the lovely upscale cafe and wine 
shop Vif occasionally serves their own 
version of it. Vif’s spring ful, made from 
chickpeas and red lentils instead of favas, 
had decidedly seasonal Northwest ele¬ 
ments: soft-boiled farm egg, English peas, 
radishes, and soft herbs such as mint and 
chive blossoms. 

As ful finds new audiences, it remains a 
dish tied to another part of the world. As 
I sat in Jebena last week, breathing in the 
scent of incense that lingers in the dining 
room and eavesdropping on conversations 
spoken in Amharic, I felt transported. 

But as I looked down at my bowl, I no¬ 
ticed that the way the white crumbles of 
feta sit on its piled-high toppings look like 
a dusting of snow on a mountain. I’ll admit 
I have a tendency to fall in love and rhapso¬ 
dize about whatever plate of food happens 
to be in front of me, but for a moment it 
reminded me of gazing down at Mount 
Rainier from an airplane—another thing 
that makes me feel lucky to call this corner 
of the world home. ■ 


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Thursday, July 28 

BEYOND THE WOODS 
Pink Octopus 
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9PM, $8-$10 


Friday, July 29 

AUDIOS AMIGOS 
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9:30PM, $7 


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9PM, $15-$20 


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Read more restaurant reviews at 

0 THESTRANGER.COM/CHOW 


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Dinner service everyday 5-llpm 































46 July 27, 2016 THE STRANGER 




Wave Books! 

The one on the left is Joshua Beckman, the editor in chief 
of Wave Books who bounces back and forth between Se¬ 
attle and New York City meeting with current and future 
Wave Books authors. (As you can see, he enjoys reading 
more than getting his photo taken.) In the middle is Brit¬ 
tany Dennison, Wave's publicity director. On the right is 
managing editor Heidi Broadhead, who holds down the 
fort at the independent press's book-lined Eastlake office. 

At only 10 years of age, it's no exaggeration to say 
that Wave Books is one of the best-respected literary 


presses in the country. In their early days, the editors 
published Maggie Nelson's Bluets and Joe Wenderoth's 
Letters to Wendy's, both of which expanded the possi¬ 
bilities of literary collage. Since then, their influence on 
American and international literature has only expand¬ 
ed. See Don Mee Choi's Hardly War, Tyehimba Jess's 
Olio, and anything Mary Ruefle has written for them. 

The press also ventures out into the public spaces of 
Seattle, organizing events such as a translation festival, a 
trivia night, a film festival, and most recently a limited- 
edition newspaper full of facsimiles, prose poetry, and 
handwritten poems, all written by the poets Wave works 
with. It's called The Wave Papers, and it's amazing. 


Oh yeah, and have you seen and felt their books? 

Go to a bookstore and pick one up. Designer Jeff 
Clark's much-imitated text-only covers are simple and 
gorgeous, and they always interact with rather than 
obscure the work inside. The paperbacks are inexpen¬ 
sive, flecked with fibers, and somehow look better the 
more they're used. 

Wave Books will be celebrated at the Stranger Genius 
Awards party on September 24 at the Moore Theatre. 
They are one of three organizations nominated this 
year, alongside 12 individual artists. To see all 15 
nominees, go to thestranger.com/genius2016. 






















THE STRANGER July 27, 2016 4 7 



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