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THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 5 


flieSfranger 

VOLUME 29, ISSUE NUMBER 4 

October 9-22,2019 



COVER ART 

Photo by anna!311/Getty Images 


7 

FORTNIGHT 

What you missed if you’ve been eating 
peaches for the last two weeks. 
Plus: Another White Guy drops out of 
2020 Democratic presidential race. 

9 

METH DEATHS ARE ON THE RISE 

A local MacArthur “genius” has an 
idea for tackling the problem. 

By Lester Black 

13 

VOTE! 

The Stranger’s endorsements for the 
November 5, 2019, general election, 
by Stranger Election Control Board 
PLUS: Voting cheat sheet! 


BLUNT TALK.22 

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY.23 

SAVAGE LOVE.25 

ART.27 

PERFORMANCE.29 

BOOKS & TALKS.31 

MUSIC.35 

FILM.49 

FOOD & DRINK.53 

LAUGH WHILE YOU CAN.56 


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THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 7 


Partial Index 

Sawant haters p. 18 
Scorpios texting Virgos p. 23 
sinister Siamese cat p. 50 
smoked salmon p. 7 
smoking meth p. 9 



springy noodles p. 53 
Stereolab’s spellbinding songs p. 35 
stooges eating ball sweat p. 13 
straight guys into anal p. 25 
Strippergate p. 19 
supporters of diversity p. 22 


EDITOR’S NOTE 



JOHNNY SAMPSON 


It has come to our attention that when there is 
an ad covering up a portion of the printed cover 
of The Stranger, readers don’t know where to 
find the cover without the ad. Guys, it’s ON THE 
VERY NEXT PAGE. That’s right-just turn the 
page! The full cover! No ad! Magic! Speaking of 
things that should be obvious but apparently 
cause enormous confusion: The Stranger is a 
free publication, and the costs to produce it are 
paid for by advertisers that place their ads ad¬ 
jacent to our editorial content (including on that 
outer cover). In an endorsements issue like this 
one, all kinds of candidates and political groups 
want to place ads next to our editorial content, 
including candidates and groups that disagree 
with our writers. We could not employ writers, 
research the issues, interview the candidates, 
etc. if we accepted ads only from candidates 
and political groups our writers agreed with. Ed¬ 
itorial and advertising are separate departments. 
So if you’re about to send us an e-mail (“Do you 
REALIZE you have an ad for XYZ when you didn’t 
endorse XYZ!?!?”), urn... save yourself some time. 
We know. 


Another White Guy Drops Out of 
2020 Democratic Presidential Race 

BY DONALD HENDERSON 


KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP)-After four 
months of campaigning, Democratic presi¬ 
dential candidate Another White 
Guy announced on Friday that 
he’s dropping out of the race, af¬ 
ter failing to gain traction in a 
crowded field of competitors— 
many of whom were also white 
and guys. 

"To those who put their faith 
and trust in Another White Guy,” 

Another White Guy told sup¬ 
porters, “I’m sorry to say that you will not see 
Another White Guy—at least not this white 
guy—in the White House.” 

For the entirety of his short-lived cam¬ 
paign, Another White Guy sought to cast him¬ 
self as the white, male centrist that he thought 
America desperately needed or, more impor¬ 
tantly, felt comfortable with. 

"I speak in broad, vague generalities,” 
Another White Guy told reporters in May, 
“and that’s the way America likes it!” 

And while Another White Guy enjoyed 
early popularity along with fellow white guy 
candidates Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, and 
Pete Buttigieg, support for Another White Guy 
waned after he refused to reveal his policies. 

“Look you people don’t get it,” he said in 
early August when asked about his platform. 
“I don’t need policies. I’m Another White Guy! 
Leave the so-called ‘policies’ to your Warrens, 


your Harrises, and your Bookers. I’m white... 
and, even better, a guy! Which means in 
America, I don’t have to prove or 
explain myself! I enter a race, you 
vote for me, and I walk into office. 
Bing-bang-boom, I’m Another 
White Guy!” 

In September, Another White 
Guy’s theory was tested when 
Democratic candidate Elizabeth 
Warren emerged as the front¬ 
runner in some national polls. 
“Has America has gone bananas?” An¬ 
other White Guy asked reporters following 
his concession speech last week. “They want 
a white guy in office! Or at least a guy, right? 
And yet Warren is passing Biden in the polls? 
HAS THE WORLD GONE TOPSY-TURVY?” 

“I may be just Another White Guy,” he con¬ 
tinued, “but on behalf of all other white guy can¬ 
didates, this is bull-fucking-shitl We white guys 
have been prioritized and given opportunities 
our entire lives—and now these privileges are 
being stripped away and given to people who 
aren’t white, aren’t guys, and have struggled 
their entire lives to get where they are? THIS 
IS NOT HOW AMERICA WORKS, PEOPLE! 
You all may have tossed me aside, but as god as 
my witness, you have not seen the lastofme\” 
As of press time, Another White Guy had 
taken a job selling tires for Les Schwab and is 
considering starting a podcast. 



YURI / GETTY IMAGES 


I, ANONYMOUS 



To the asshole at the unnamed Mexican joint: 

I was finishing my plate of tacos when you 
asked me if I could move to the counter so you 
and your friend could sit at the two-top I was, 
at that moment, occupying. Your order wasn’t 
even ready yet, and you could clearly see I 
was almost done with my meal. But nooo, you 
couldn’t wait three or four more minutes. The 
fuck!? Of course I replied, “No thanks.” Which 
was far more courtesy than you deserved. You 
rolled your eyes, said “Whatever,” and then 
moved on to another solo diner and asked the 
same question. They said no, too! At that point, 
you went back to the counter and asked for your 
food to go. By the time it was ready, there were 
three open tables, you rude piece of shit, but 
you and your equally over-perfumed friend left 
anyway. Good riddance! ANONYMOUS 

SOMETHING TO GET OFF YOUR CHEST? 

E-mail 200 words or less to 
ianonijmous@thestranger.com 



Three King County teens have overdosed 
and died since June as a result of taking 
fentanyl-laced pills. The teens were 
buying what they thought was Oxycodone, 
not the synthetic opioid that can be fatal 
in the smallest of doses. A reminder to not 
take any pills that you don’t receive directly 
from the pharmacy! 

Ablazered vape-shop owner in a starched 
dress shirt and tie was seen interrupting 
Governor Jay Inslee while the governor 
announced his plan to ban flavored vape 
products. The man was yelling, “THIS IS 
A DISSERVICE!” But, much to the disap¬ 
pointment of The Stranger, he did not blow 
a bubblegum-flavored vape cloud in the 
governor’s face. 


A senior Boeing engineer told federal 
investigators that executives opted to not add 
safety upgrades to the 737 MAX to save on 
costs, according to a scoop from the Seattle 
Times. The whistle-blower said the upgrades 
included some that could have potentially 
prevented the two crashes of this type of 
plane, which killed 346 people. 

Expedia is getting a fancy- 
schmancy new campus in Inter¬ 
bay. It will have wi-fi rocks. Yes, 
rocks with wi-fi routers in them. 

The Jackson Park golf 
course has a hot-pink poster- 
board on its bulletin board urg¬ 
ing people to “Save Golf.” The 
poster had multiple newspaper clippings 
about how golf courses could actually be 
used for public housing or public parks 
instead of 18 holes of bullshit. 

At a ribbon-cutting ceremony for a new der¬ 
by track at the Bitter Lake Community Cen¬ 
ter, The Stranger overheard a derby girl 
tell her friends that she couldn’t wait for her 
bat mitzvah because her parents will finally 


let her watch R-rated movies. She’s going to 
watch Deadpool. 

Performing under the name Positivland, two 
members of the legendary culture jammers 
Negativland treated a Timbre Room crowd to 
multisensory overload. The show was a warm¬ 
up for their forthcoming tours in 
2020 and 2021, supporting two 
new albums. Fusing extremely 
wonky electronic music with a 
ceaseless stream of spoken-word 
snippets cut-and-pasted from a 
glutted mediascape, Jon “Wob¬ 
bly” Leidecker and Mark Hosier 
evoked maddening informa¬ 
tion oversaturation and tech- 
dystopia vibes. The (probably) 
apocryphal assertions that caromed around 
the venue included: “The most profound tech¬ 
nologies are those that disappear” and “Alexa, 
half of the world’s data was created in the last 
two seconds.” 

A for-profit signature-gathering firm called 
Citizen Solutions was ordered to pay $1 mil¬ 
lion in fines for funneling donation money 
to long-sleeved T-shirt enthusiast and ass 



pustule Tim Eyman. Eyman is accused of 
helping cover up the scheme, which netted 
him more than $300,000 in kickbacks, money 
that Eyman then allegedly distributed to his 
wife and kids without their knowledge. 


If you missed Patti 
Smith at Benaroya 
Hall, you’re an idiot. 


High priestess of punk Patti Smith capti¬ 
vated Benaroya Hall with live music, readings 
from her new book Year of the Monkey, and 
musings about the Moore Theatre, Ginger 
Baker, geology, Robert Mapplethorpe, hitch¬ 
hiking, Michael Stipe, and being an antisocial 
homebody who just wants to read and watch 
TV. She also talked about betting on horses 
with playwright Sam Shepard, and how her 
friend Sandy Pearlman (producer of Blue 
Oyster Cult) once drove from Northern Cal¬ 
ifornia to Pike Place Market to buy Smith a 
certain kind of smoked salmon. It was an in¬ 
credible night at Seattle Arts & Lectures, and 
if you missed it, you’re an idiot. ■ 


































8 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 




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THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 9 



Meth Deaths Are on the Rise 

But a local MacArthur “genius” has an idea for tackling the problem. 

BY LESTER BLACK 


M eth killed more people than hero¬ 
in in King County last year. That 
might surprise you—we talk a 
lot more about the opioid crisis 
than meth abuse—but if you start 
looking around, it’s not hard to see that Seattle 
has a meth problem. 

You can see signs of it in the paranoid per¬ 
son twitching and pacing outside a bus stop. 
Meth shows up in criminal incidents—like 
the August attack outside Ballard’s post of¬ 
fice involving a pitchfork, or the unprovoked 
stabbing on the light rail in September. Sur¬ 
veys show meth use is concentrated in the 
homeless population. If it feels like there’s a 
growing number of unstable people in Seat¬ 
tle using this extremely powerful stimulant, 
that’s because there is. 

Meth use is increasing at a rapid pace by 
nearly every metric you can measure. And 
unlike alcoholism and opiate addiction, 
there’s no medically accepted drug to com¬ 
bat meth abuse or to help addicts who try 
to stop using to cope with their withdrawal 
symptoms. That leaves doctors and public 
health officials few ways to fight the growing 
epidemic. 

Seattle might be able to change that with 
a little help from Ritalin. 

A proposed pilot research project is ask¬ 
ing the city to pay for clinics to connect meth 
users with supportive services like housing 
and counseling while also giving them pre¬ 
scriptions for the pharmaceutical ADHD 


drug methylphenidate, commonly known as 
Ritalin. The program’s proponents hope the 
drug can function like methadone, which has 
been shown to ease opiate addicts away from 
using heroin. 

This proposed program would put Seat¬ 
tle in uncharted territory: No other program 
currently exists in the country that gives 
meth addicts Ritalin. But it would be an ex¬ 
periment worth taking, according to Lisa 
Daugaard, the executive director of Seattle’s 
Public Defender Association (PDA), who 
last month won a MacArthur Foundation 


“We are seeing more 
meth now than we 
have ever seen,” a 
local DEA agent says, 


fellowship (or “genius grant”) for her work 
on criminal justice reform. 

“The current set of options available to 
engage with and support meth users is inad¬ 
equate,” Daugaard said. “And I think there’s 
widespread agreement that this isn’t going 
to work. We cannot just shrug our shoulders 
at a condition that is more highly correlated 
with problematic behavior than many other 
behavioral health conditions. Complacency 
is not viable.” 


The PDA asked Mayor Jenny Durkan to 
fund the pilot research project in this year’s 
budget, but Durkan has so far declined. City 
council member Mike O’Brien is now pushing 
for the program as budget deliberations con¬ 
tinue. If he gets his way, Seattle could still be 
a testing ground for this innovative therapy. 

METH IS BACK AND BIGGER 
THAN BEFORE 

Meth use is nothing new in the Seattle area. 
It surged in the 1990s, and by 2003, Rolling 
Stone was calling Granite Falls, Washington, 
a sleepy former logging town at the foot of 
the Cascade Mountains, “methville.” That 
cover story warned that meth “is everywhere 
in the Pacific Northwest, and coming soon to 
a town near you.” 

The meth crisis back then was fueled by 
meth labs, where people would stockpile 
hundreds of pounds of cold medications like 
Sudafed (which contain a drug called pseu- 
doephedrine) and turn those over-the-count¬ 
er drugs into meth. This powerful stimulant 
is often called “crystal meth” because of its 
crystalline appearance, but it can also be 
made into pills. 

Meth can be smoked, eaten, snorted, or 
injected. It creates feelings of energy and 
euphoria by increasing the release of plea¬ 
sure- and alert-causing chemicals in the 
brain. Its high can last 8 to 12 hours and is 
usually followed by a period of exhaustion, 


depression, and paranoia. 

Faced with this crisis, Congress passed the 
Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act in 
2005, which stopped over-the-counter sales 
of medications that can be made into meth. 
Washington went further and mandated 
that pharmacies track who was buying these 
medications. The number of meth labs in the 
state dropped significantly. 

But even though the meth labs are largely 
gone, the drug is now back more than ever 
before. That’s driven in large part by Mexican 
criminal syndicates that smuggle meth sup¬ 
plies across the southern border and up In¬ 
terstate 5 to Seattle, according to Keith Weis, 
a federal special agent in charge of Seattle’s 
branch of the Drug Enforcement Adminis¬ 
tration (DEA). Weis said the DEA has more 
than doubled its seizures of meth shipments 
in the last year alone. 

“We are seeing more meth now than we 
have ever seen,” Weis said. “The shipments 
are increasingly larger and larger, everything 
from single pound shipments up to as much 
as 100 pounds per shipment.” 

Weis said that meth’s “readily avail¬ 
able supply” is dropping the price of the 
drug. Meanwhile, government data shows 
a strong increase in meth-related deaths. 
Meth-involved deaths in King County have 
increased from 4.2 deaths per 100,000 peo¬ 
ple in 2009 to 10.1 in 2018, according Public 
Health - Seattle & King County. And for the 
first time in two decades, meth was involved 









10 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 


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The Stranger’s weekly news podcast, 
FINDIT0N iTUNES 



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in more overdose deaths in 2018 than any 
other single drug. Heart attacks and strokes 
are common, and many users combine meth 
with other drugs, such as heroin, which can 
be a fatal mix. 

Meth use, at least among users who use 
the state’s syringe exchange program, ap¬ 
pears to be heavily concentrated in the 
homeless or nearly homeless populations. 
A 2017 survey of meth users at the syringe 
exchanges statewide found that 32 percent 
of people said they were homeless, while an¬ 
other 40 percent were living in temporary 
housing, according to the UW’s Alcohol and 
Drug Abuse Institute (ADAI). 

Meth addiction is also concentrated 
among gay men, with meth injection being 
“consistently higher” among men who have 
sex with men compared to men who did not 
have sex with men, according to needle ex¬ 
change surveys in King County. 

The resurgence of meth is troubling to 
public health officials. Aside from death, 
there’s a range of short- and long-term health 
impacts. Meth causes an elevated heart rate, 
teeth grinding, anxiety, damage to the ner¬ 
vous system, lesions and sores, insomnia, and 
hallucinations, and it is associated with tooth 
decay causedby “inadequate oralhygiene and 
preference for sugary foods and beverage,” 
according to a 2018 report from ADAI. 

Meth use also leads to a wide range of 
unhealthy associated behaviors, including 
riskier sexual activity and the danger of 
transmitting infectious diseases from shar¬ 
ing needles. And then there’s the collateral 
danger of meth users buying possibly taint¬ 
ed meth on the black market or committing 
property crimes to get money to buy it. Those 
dangers could be entirely erased if a doctor 
just gave users a substitute stimulant. 

SAFER STIMULANTS 

Prescription ADHD medications like Adder- 
all and Ritalin are widely popular in the Unit¬ 
ed States—an estimated 16 million Ameri¬ 
cans currently have prescriptions for these 
stimulants—but they aren’t very well regard¬ 
ed by the general public. A recent editorial 
published by the Guardianwas titled “ADHD 
drugs are as dangerous as street meth—and 
Americans are getting hooked.” 

But here’s the thing about Ritalin: There’s 
no way it’s as dangerous as meth. 

In addition to Ritalin being regulated 
for purity, which meth is not, there’s a good 
amount of evidence that it does not cause 
long-term harm to your body. That’s not 
true for meth. The high of meth is also sig¬ 
nificantly stronger, and the comedown is far 
sharper, which makes the drug harder on your 
nervous system and more difficult for users 
to manage, according to Dr. Paul Grekin, the 
medical director of Seattle’s Evergreen Treat¬ 
ment Services. 

That’s why Grekin is part of a coalition that 
wants the city to embark on the pilot research 
proj ect exploring whether prescribing Ritalin 
to meth users could reduce the harm associ¬ 
ated with their drug use. 

Grekin, along with D augaard, the PDA, and 
Council Member Mike O’Brien, are asking the 
city to create aRitalin clinic where meth users 
can get help, similar to how methadone clinics 
provide heroin users with a medically assist¬ 
ed way out of addiction. The city would set 
up an outpatient clinic somewhere in Seattle 
where meth users would go through a medi¬ 


cal screening. If they qualified, adoctor would 
prescribe them extended-release Ritalin. 

Daugaard said it was “fundamental” that 
this pilot research project include wrap¬ 
around services for meth users, including 
help with housing. “Meth use is often driven 
by vulnerability and sense ofthreat. So secu¬ 
rity issues are very important in trying to get 
a handle on this,” Daugaard said. 

Jesse Rawlins, a project manager with the 
PDA and a former staffer for O’Brien, said in 
an e-mail that running the pilot research pro¬ 
gram would cost the city between $250,000 
and $500,000. “The higher end ofthe proposal 
would be sufficient for a five-year study with 
more ability to provide evidence regarding 
the efficacy of the program,” Rawlins said. 

The program’s proponents repeatedly 
stressed that they still need to determine 
key details after funding is granted, including 
who exactly would qualify to participate and 
how supportive services like housing would 
be provided. 

Proponents had hoped Durkan would 
fund the program in her 2019 budget, but the 
mayor declined to do so. Durkan said in an 
e-mailed statement to The Stranger that she 
“shares the concerns of the community that 
there is much more that needs to be done to 
address people who are using methamphet- 
amine,” but she declined to offer an opinion 
about the proposed program. 

O’Brien is calling on the council to add 
funding for this project to the city’s 2020 
budget, which is currently being deliberated. 
But he said the complexities of the program 
might make it hard to fund during the hectic 
budget deliberations. 

“A pilot program for treatment for folks us¬ 
ing methamphetamines is probably a more 
complex question with the council,” O’Brien 
said. “It wouldn’t surprise me if the council 
needs more education to see if that’s some¬ 
thing they will prioritize.” 

Because no other program like it currently 
exists in the country, the council wouldbe go¬ 
ing into uncharted territory if it funded it. But 
there’s some medical evidence to support the 
idea. A 20-week randomized study prescrib¬ 
ing three drugs to meth addicts—Ritalin, an 
antipsychotic called aripiprazole, and a pla¬ 
cebo-showed that Ritalin had “promising 
results” for reducing the meth dependence 
among people injecting the drug. A separate 
pilot study found that a different ADHD 
drug, called dextroamphetamine, showed 
increased treatment engagement in patients 
with meth dependence. 

Dr. Judith Tsui, a physician at Harborview 
Medical Center and an associate professor 
at University of Washington, said the re¬ 
search shows evidence that meth users find 
prescription stimulants “useful in reducing 
or eliminating methamphetamine use. Fur¬ 
thermore, this is perhaps the most common 
strategy methamphetamine users them¬ 
selves identify to reduce or eliminate their 
reliance on illicit drugs.” 

Grekin, who oversees a methadone clinic 
at Evergreen Treatment Services, said the 
proposed program would be trying to reduce 
the amount and risk of meth use, not force 
participants into totally quitting. 

“I wouldn’t measure success by absti¬ 
nence, because it’s not a realistic measure,” 
Grekin said. “Just like if you are treating di¬ 
abetes, you don’t measure the success by the 
patient never having abnormal blood sugar, 
you are just trying to keep it normal and limit 









THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 11 


complications. Success [in this proposed 
research program] is reducing the quantity 
of use, reducing the ancillary uses like using 
needles, and reducing those kinds of high- 
risk behaviors.” 


FOLLOW THE GENIUS 

This isn’t the first time Lisa Daugaard has 
asked Seattle’s officials to head into new 
territory. In 2011, she was part of a col¬ 
laborative team of law enforcement and 
police-reform advocates who convinced 
the city to start a new program called Law 
Enforcement Assisted Diversion, or LEAD, 
that gave cops the discretion to refer people 
who commit low-level crimes to case man¬ 
agement instead of jail. 

Those services are often already offered 
to people who find their way into the crim¬ 
inal justice system, but LEAD did some¬ 
thing revolutionary: It diverted those folks 
away from the systembefore they were ever 
booked in j ail. The idea that police can catch 
someone committing a crime—like low-lev- 
el drug dealing or prostitution—and they 
can give supportive services to that person 
without booking them is a transformational 
change in criminal justice. 

And that program is clearly working. A 
UW study found that LEAD participants 
had 60 percent lower odds of arrest during 
the six months following their initial arrest 
and 39 percent lower odds of being charged 
with a felony over the following two years 
than people who weren’t the program. 

The program has since spread to ju¬ 
risdictions across the country. New York 
Times columnist Nicholas Kristof featured 
LEAD in an August article this year that pro¬ 
claimed: “Seattle Has Figured Out How to 
End the War on Drugs.” 

Last month, Daugaard’s work on LEAD 
won her the prestigious MacArthur fellow¬ 
ship, an award that comes with $625,000, no 
strings attached. Daugaard said she wants to 
use it to write more about LEAD and crimi- 
naljustice, and see if she can spread the pro¬ 
gram’s ideas into more jurisdictions. She’s 
also fighting for more LEAD funding in Seat¬ 
tle, where she says the program is underfund¬ 
ed and case workers are stretched too thin. 

Daugaard said one of the more transfor¬ 
mational aspects of LEAD is that rather than 
just calling for an end to over-criminaliza- 
tion, it’s actually building something in the 
criminal justice system’s place. 

“So much energy has been poured into the 
critique of mass incarceration. And that’s 
all right, but comparatively little energy has 
been put into building something that can 
take the place of that enormous dinosaur 
that is over-incarceration,” Daugaard said. 

Daugaard said LEAD was created only be¬ 
cause there was a diverse group of interests 
supporting it, from cops to police reformers 
to business groups. She said that kind of di¬ 
verse support is already forming around the 
idea of creating a medically assisted way to 
treat meth abuse. Social workers and drug 
users want a way to get people out ofthe mis¬ 
erable conditions of meth abuse, and neigh¬ 
borhood and business groups are pressuring 
the city to do something about the growing 
problem of meth-related property crime. 

“When you put those two sets of interests 
together and they are united, we can often 
make a lot of progress,” Daugaard said. 

And Ritalin might help us get there. ■ 




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THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 13 



JAMES YAMASAKI 


VOTE! 

The Stranger's endorsements for the November 5,2019, general election. 

BY STRANGER ELECTION CONTROL BOARD 


T he size queens on the Stranger Elec¬ 
tion Control Board were initially 
excited to hear from King County 
Elections that the length of the ballot 
for the November election is record 
breaking. “This 18-inch ballot is the largest 
ever,” they said. Someone in a uniform is 
probably stuffing it into your box right now. 

Then we learned the reason this ballot 
is so big—so big you’re going to have to fold 
it FOUR times just to get it into its enve¬ 
lope—is because it has been penis-pumped 
by Tim Eyman with bullshit, meaningless, 
time-wasting “advisory votes.” That’s right: 
Nearly half of this ballot’s historic length 
is due to the crooked initiative peddler’s 
unquenchable thirst for wasting taxpayer 
dollars on useless, nonbinding, statewide 
“votes” that make Eyman feel... potent? 
Manly? Relevant? 

He’s not the only embarrassing Republi¬ 
can out there trying to ruin our lives—but 
at least the one in the White House is cur¬ 
rently being impeached. Mix yourself an im¬ 
peachment cocktail (we recommend peach 
schnapps, vodka, and orange juice), pour it 
into a beer hat, and start sucking. See if you 
can blaze through all 12 of Eyman’s stupid 
fucking “votes” before you’ve got a good buzz 
going. Then you’ll be at the actually conse¬ 
quential ballot measures (yes to bringing 
reasonable affirmative action to Washing¬ 


ton State, hell no to another stupid-ass car- 
tab measure, also courtesy of Eyman, that 
would screw the poor and decimate public 
transit). After that, you’ll finally get to weigh 
in on who should be running city hall. Your 
vote will determine whether progressive 
candidates can save Seattle democracy from 
a plague of corporate cash or the keys will be 
handed to the corporate stooges who want 
nothing more than to lick the sweat off Jeff 
Bezos’s balls. 

Oh yeah, there are important votes to cast 
for King County Council, local ambulance 


Keep the corporate 
stooges licking Jeff 
Bezos’s balls from 
running the city. 


services, port commission, and the long- 
suffering Seattle School Board. Plus, you’re 
going to be picking King County’s elections 
director, and you really need to avoid voting 
for the “derpfuck” candidate. Don’t worry, 
we’ll tell you exactly who that is. 

The SECB is Lester Black, ChaseBums, Chris¬ 
topher Frizzelle, Nathalie Graham, Katie Her¬ 


zog, JasmyneKeimig, Charles Mudede, Laurie 
Saito, Eli Sanders, Rich Smith, and Volody- 
myr Zelensky. The Stranger does not endorse 
in uncontested races or in races we forgot. 


STATE 


REFERENDUM MEASURE NO. 88 

APPROVED 

At a time when a racist, misogynist, fake- 
tanned, fraudulent fuckbag is running the 
country—and keeping the legacies of institu¬ 
tional racism and sexism very much alive— 
this year’s Referendum 88 would finally 
legalize affirmative action in Washington 
State. This would effectively correct the 
problem created in 1998 when voters made 
affirmative action illegal here. 

The impacts of the wrongheaded 1998 ban 
are now clear: From 1998 to 2019, state con¬ 
tracts to minority and female-owned busi¬ 
nesses dropped from more than 13 percent 
to just 3.6 percent. Minority enrollment at 
the University of Washington also dropped, 
and admission rates for black, Native, and 
Hispanic people are still lower than their 
statewide demographics. 

Referendum 88 would correct this wrong 
by allowing government agencies in this 
state—just government agencies, you rabid 


free-enterprise fanatics!—to use race as one 
factor among many when making hiring, ad¬ 
missions, or contract decisions. Referendum 
88 does not allow race to be the sole factor in 
decision-making, nor does it mandate that 
less-qualified candidates must be chosen 
based on race. It also explicitly makes quo¬ 
tas illegal. 

Opponents of Referendum 88 include 
velvet-voiced conservative talk show host 
John Carlson, who told us that anti-white 
racism is “absolutely” a problem in Wash¬ 
ington State. The fuck? Carlson’s team 
claims Referendum 88 would create quo¬ 
tas (even though it literally makes quotas 
illegal) and that state contracts to minority 
and women-owned businesses have not de¬ 
creased (even though an exhaustive state 
study released this summer confirmed con¬ 
tracts to minorities have, in fact, decreased). 
When presented with this evidence, Carl¬ 
son’s pal in being opposed to this referen¬ 
dum, Yvonne Kinoshita Ward, told the SECB 
thatthe measure shouldbe rejectedbecause 
it’s just too divisive. 

“I love diversity,” Ward said, channeling 
her inner Trump. She didn’t say she was “the 
least racist person you’ll ever meet,” but she 
did say: “I have one of the best track records 
in the room on diversity and I’m proud to say 
it. I’ve won awards for it. But when you come 
in and say ‘quotas’”—which no one, in fact, 








14 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 



EL CAMINO 




has been saying—“that’s a problem. That’s 
divisive, it’s going to pit group against group.” 

LOL. The facts support Referendum 88. 
You should, too. Vote approved. 

INITIATIVE MEASURE NO. 976 

NO 

The next most important thing any Wash¬ 
ingtonian can do this year is vote against 
Initiative 976. This fecal-matter frittata 
would destroy funding for nearly every type 
of public transportation in this state. 

1-976 was birthed from the anal cavity 
of Tim Eyman, and though it almost looks 
appealing, because it would save you a few 
bucks—it would cap all vehicle licensing fees 
at $30 and repeal Sound Transit’s ability to 
collect taxes—it would create apocalyptic im¬ 
pacts fortransportation in the state, resulting 
in ever more apocalyptic traffic, and a bevy 
of other road-repair and transportation cri¬ 
ses. It would cost the state $2.3 billion, local 
governments $1.9 billion, and Sound Transit 
$20 billion. Sound Transit, in case you’re new 
here, is the agency building light rail roots to 
get cars off our insanely clogged streets. 

The impact of these cuts would be felt in 
every corner of the state, from pothole re¬ 
pairs in Spokane to light rail in Bellevue to 
bus service in Seattle (no joke, 1-976 would 
cut more than 170,000 hours of bus service 
in Seattle every year). 1-976 also cuts $1.3 
billion from our ferry system, repeals fund¬ 
ing for Amtrak trains, cuts funding for ma¬ 
jor highway projects on 1-405 and 1-90, and 
would entirely eliminate transit agencies in 
rural places like Garfield County. 

Basically, this measure is the script for an 
asteroid-hitting-the-planet movie, except 
we’d be voting for this asteroid to hit us. And 
it would be a handout to the 1 percent, mak¬ 
ing the car tabs on a $300,000 Ferrari cost 
the same as those on a $3,000 Honda. 

This initiative’s reckless and unfair im¬ 
pacts have led to a broad coalition opposing 
it, including all of the state’s major labor 
unions and environmental groups, the Dem¬ 
ocratic Party, and the Washington State Pa¬ 
trol Troopers Association. Even the fucking 
cops hate this initiative! 

The only person who seems to like the idea 
of gutting our state’s transportation system 
is shady, self-dealing charlatan Tim Eyman. 
You know, the shitstain who is being sued by 
the state attorney general over campaign 
finance improprieties, recently filed for 
bankruptcy, and yet magically gave himself a 
$500,000 loan to make this terrible initiative 
a reality. Eyman’s professional life appears 
to be burning around him: He’s currently 
charged with illegally laundering political 
donations and owes more than $200,000 in 
court fines for refusing to turn over docu¬ 
ments. Eyman even got banned from an Of¬ 
fice Depot in Lacey earlier this year after he 
was caught on camera stealing an office chair. 

Vote no on this terrible disgrace of an Ey¬ 
man “idea,” and then tell everyone you know 
to do the same. 

ADVISORY VOTES NOS. 20-31 

MAINTAINED 

Just so you know, it does not matter how 
you vote on these. The long parade of “ad¬ 
visory votes” on this year’s ballot is the re¬ 


sult of an old statewide initiative created by 
the aforementioned chair-humping goblin 
whose name rhymes with Rim Hymen. His 
supposed aim was to show voters all the tax 
increases passed by the state legislature each 
year, and to give us all a nonbinding “say” on 
them. (Even though we all get a fully binding 
say on tax increases every time we vote for, or 
against, our state representatives.) The result 
is an endless, meaningless waste of time each 
election season—and a costly headache for 
King County Elections, other ballot-printing 
agencies, and Washington taxpayers, who pay 
for this penis-pumping of our statewide bal¬ 
lots. (Tim, you know penis-pumping doesn’t 
even work, right?) Close your eyes and vote 
maintained on all of these items. 

SENATE JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 8200 

APPROVED 

The state legislature passed a law this year 
that allows elected representatives to step in 
and make sure government operations are 
running smoothly in times of local emergen¬ 
cies. Essentially, what this resolution is ask¬ 
ing you to vote on is whether current law can 
be amended to add some language on exactly 
what kind of local emergencies qualify for 
this kind of intervention. It’s literally asking 
whether we should include “catastrophic in¬ 
cident” under the umbrella of “emergency.” 
Dull. Easy. Vote approved. 


COUNTY 


KING COUNTY PROPOSITION NO. 1, 
MEDIC ONE LEVY 

YES 

Do you want the damn ambulance to come 
when your inebriated ass slips on a pot gum¬ 
my? Then vote yes on this no-brainer levy, 
which simply renews funding for King Coun¬ 
ty’s long-running, very successful, and very 
life-saving Medic One service. 

For this world-class emergency medi¬ 
cal assistance service, which any person in 
King County can call into action just by di¬ 
aling 911, and which is so well-trained and 
so well-equipped that Seattle has one of 
the best heart-attack survival rates around, 
King County voters will pay only 27 cents 
per $1,000 of value on their house. That’s if 
they own a house! King County voters have 
been supporting Medic One levies for about 
four decades. Now is not the time to call the 
waaambulance over the cost. Vote yes. 

KING COUNTY, 

DIRECTOR OF ELECTIONS 

JULIE WISE 

The most important thing in this race is that 
you don’t vote for the derpfuck candidate. 
King County director of elections Julie Wise 
is not the derpfuck. She is a raging wonk- 
aholic who, four years ago, was elected to her 
“dream job” managing all things vote-related 
around here. “I love it,” Wise told the SECB, 
before ticking through her list of election 
infrastructure promises made and kept. 

More ballot drop boxes? Check. (When 
Wise started. King County had about 10 drop 
boxes. Nowit has nearly 70.) Enhanced elec¬ 
tion audits? Check. Ballots translated into 













THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 15 


new languages to improve voter access? 
Check. Enhanced security measures for the 
county’s physical and online election infra¬ 
structure? Check and check. 

“I’ve really proven that you can have an 
election in which you remove barriers, in¬ 
crease access for all, and still have accu¬ 
rate and secure elections,” Wise says. Note 
the implicit repudiation of the nationwide 
Republican scaremongering about how 
increased voter access is going to destroy 
America or whatever. 

Wise’s opponent, Mark Greene, is the pe¬ 
rennial candidate whom the SECB delicately 
described as a “derpfuck” when he made a 
failed run for state legislature last year. We 
stand by our descriptor. 

On Wise’s agenda for her next term: a 
better voters’ pamphlet, a successful pres¬ 
idential primary election, a successful 
presidential election, and some determined 
lobbying of the state legislature to get rid of 
Tim Eyman’s bullshit advisory votes!!!!! She 
agrees they are expensive and pointless. “If 
there was ever an election that will hop efully 
make change on advisory votes, it’s this one,” 
she said. Vote Wise. 

KING COUNTY, 

COUNCIL DISTRICT NO. 2 

GIRMAYZAHILAY 



Back in August, af¬ 
ter all the primary 
votes were tallied, 
first-time candidate 
Girmay Zahilay led 
seven-term incum¬ 
bent King County 
Council member 
Larry Gossett by 
20 points. For an unknown challenger, that’s 
YUUUUGE. This indicates that the people 
of King County’s District 2 (which covers 
the eastern side of Seattle and runs from 
Skyway up to Laurelhurst) are ready for a 
change. So is the spoiled and soiled SECB. 

No disrespect to Gossett. He’s a living civil- 
rights legend who’s served the community 
all his life. He’s the reason we see the face of 
Martin Luther King Jr. on the official county 
seal, and recently he’s done decent work on 
affordable housing. He also helped create the 
ORCA LIFT program to help low-income 
people ride transit with cheaper fares. But 
he’s been disappointing us lately, too. 

For a municipal relations position at the 
county, Gossett voted for a white guy over 
a qualified woman of color who was rec¬ 
ommended by the employment committee. 
He also voted for the King County Council 
to take over local arts funding organization 
4Culture, opening up a previously indepen¬ 
dent public authority to political cronyism. 
And he doesn’t seem to be up on the latest 
policies for dealing with kids who commit 
violent crimes. This is what happens when 
a politician doesn’t have to defend against a 
serious challenger for nearly three decades. 

Zahilay, a lawyer who runs a nonprofit 
with a mission to mentor middle-schoolers, 
has ambitious plans for meeting the county’s 
stated goal of zero youth detention. And he’s 
got some good ideas for making that happen, 
including experimenting with close-to-home 
facilities for children who commit violent 
crimes. He also promises to fight, popu¬ 
list-style, for a county bank and a public in¬ 


vestment vehicle, both of which would bring 
in more money for housing. Plus, he scored 
an endorsement from Insecure star Issa Rae! 
(They went to Stanford together.) As an im¬ 
migrant son raised in public housing in the 
South End, he, like Gossett, knows firsthand 
how vital good public policy is for the coun¬ 
ty’s most disadvantaged populations. 

Gossett has earned our admiration and 
gratitude—and you know how hard it is for 
the SECB to feel either of those emotions. 
But District 2 needs some new energy in this 
seat. Vote Zahilay. 

KING COUNTY, 

COUNCIL DISTRICT NO. 4 

JEANNE KOHL-WELLES 


King County Council member Jeanne Kohl- 
Welles was a solid Democrat during her 20 
years in Olympia, and she’s voted the way 
we’ve wanted since being elected to the 
county council in 2015. Her opponent, Abi¬ 
gail Doerr, claims we need new energy in this 
county council seat, too, but the SECB is a 
little confused by Doerr’s claims. More on 
that in a moment. 

In her first term, Kohl-Welles spearhead¬ 
ed countywide legislation on just cause 
evictions, created a renters commission, 
launched an affordable childcare task force, 
and proposed alaw requiring the county ex¬ 
ecutive to create a green jobs strategy. She 
and her council colleague Rod Dembowski 
have also introduced legislation to speed 
up the process for converting King Coun¬ 
ty Metro’s buses to a zero-emission, car¬ 
bon-neutral fleet. 

Kohl-Welles has also found creative legis¬ 
lative ways to lower transit costs for the most 
vulnerable. As someone with a spot on the 
budget committee (rare for a council mem¬ 
ber in their first term), this year Kohl-Welles 


Kohl-Welles’s 
opponent took some 
baldly ageist swipes 
against her. 


added a proviso that creates an income-based 
fare, which would “amount to zero fare for 
a lot of people,” she told the SECB. (Kohl- 
Welles also cosponsored legislation that 
restructured Metro’s fare-enforcement 
practices in ways that basically led to fewer 
instances of harassment of homeless people.) 

Doerr, her opponent, is the former advocacy 
director at Transportation Choices Coalition 
and a former legislative assistant to Seattle 
City Council member Sally Bagshaw. We liked 
a lot of what she had to say. Her campaign is 
all about improving transit and fighting cli¬ 
mate change. She knows something about 
both, having rim the successful campaign for 
Sound Transit 3 and the sadly unsuccessful 
campaign for last year’s statewide carbon fee 
initiative. But if Doerr is thinking she’s going 
to get bigger stuff done, she didn’t show us how 
she was going to do that. She says she wants 
to make transit free and force big employers 
to provide ORCA cards to their employees. So 
do we! But Doerr didn’t have an answer when 
we asked her how, specifically, she could get it 
done as one of nine legislators on the council. 




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When we asked Doerr how she typically 
achieves her political aims, she said she’s 
always engaged in “coalition building.” She 
takes the “yes, and” approach. She didn’t 
say she was going to pack the council with 
protesters or engage in other sorts of messy, 
movement-style politicking, which is the 
only way major progressive change happens 
on that council. That was disappointing. 

So were some baldly ageist swipes Doerr 
made against Kohl-Welles during our en¬ 
dorsement meeting, apparently thinking the 
SECB would blindly march behind Doerr 
just because she’s younger. 

In her first term on the council, Kohl- 
Welles didn’t disappoint. She’s a seasoned 
legislator with a long track record of help¬ 
ing the most vulnerable, and she knows 
the 10,000 tricks you need to know and the 
10,000 people you need to know in order to 
move legislation through county govern¬ 
ment. Doerr has a bright future, but she chose 
the wrong race to run in. Vote Kohl-Welles. 

KING COUNTY, 

COUNCIL DISTRICT NO. 6 

CLAUDIA BALDUCCI 

Are you ready to get your mind blown? Clau¬ 
dia Balducci is a rare example of an Eastside 
politician who actually gets it. Based on her 
Bellevue pedigree (former Bellevue mayor, 
12 years on that city’s council), the SECB’s 
honey-badger-like political reflexes told 
us we should be diametrically opposed to 
everything she stands for. But instead of 
spending her political career arguing for 
Mercedes-Benz parking spaces and lower 
taxes, Balducci has been busy defending 
Sound Transit’s East Link extension, which 
will connect Bellevue to Seattle in 2023. 

When millionaires on the Eastside tried 
to kill East Link, Balducci fought to save it. 
When anti-transit people tried to force the 
East Link route to only follow 1-405 and SR- 
520, she successfully fought for East Link to 
actually go into neighborhoods where people 
live—and even spearheaded the creation of 
Bel-Red, one of the state’s best examples of 
transit-oriented development. 

Balducci’s opponent is anti-transit zealot 
Bill Hirt, a retiree whose current hobby is a 
website called “StopEastLinkNow.blogspot 
.com,” where he argues that light rail will be 
“a disaster for the entire Eastside.” Hirt is 
obviously not fit for office. Vote Balducci. 

KING COUNTY, 

COUNCIL DISTRICT NO. 8 

JOE MCDERMOTT 


reason, capitalized every word in the “Back¬ 
ground & Goals” statement of his website, so 
that the vague paragraph reads: “We Must 
Realign Spending Priorities And Stop Fund¬ 
ing Failing Programs In Order To Get The 
Money To People That Need Support. Heroin 
Injection Sites Should Be Banned...” 

Meanwhile, McDermott has been a strong 
and effective leader. He recently wrote a 
scathing letter to the head of Sound Transit 
after a teen got outrageously fair-enforced 
on the first day of school. We here at the 
SECB prefer scathing letters to insanely 
capitalized website screeds. Vote McDermott. 


PORT OF SEATTLE 


COMMISSIONER POSITION NO. 2 

SAMCHO 

Sam Cho has an im- 
pressive resume: 
He was a special 
assistant in the 
Obama administra¬ 
tion (sigh, remem¬ 
ber Obama?), he 
was a staffer for 
state senator Bob 
Hasegawa (sigh, remember when you could 
watch Hasegawa’s legendary “vape flute” 
performance on YouTube without worrying 
about vape lung?), and he’s currently presi¬ 
dent and owner of Seven Seas Exports, 
which, among other things, does some busi¬ 
ness with eggs. (Cho brought a whole box of 
his company’s eggs to his SECB endorsement 
interview, which we used for eating, throw¬ 
ing, and—when it came to one very confused 
and disappointed SECB member—nesting.) 

Cho has got big ideas for how to wield the 
Port of Seattle’s fat budget of $670 million 
(drawn mostly from property taxes). He 
wants to cut down on Sea-Tac Airport traffic 
and South Seattle air pollution by moving car¬ 
go flights away from Sea-Tac and into Grant 
County International Airport. He’s a charn- 
pionfor small business andthe environment, 
and he was the only person in our endorse¬ 
ment meetings to say he supports legalizing 
and regulating sex work to clamp down on 
human trafficking at the port. He can’t nec¬ 
essarily legalize sex work as a port commis¬ 
sioner (and he knows this), but we appreciate 
the sentiment. Also, his egg business will be 
handed over to someone else when he wins. 
No egg-sploitation here. Vote Cho. 

COMMISSIONER POSITION NO. 5 

FRED FELLEMAN 



In his first term, 
King County 
Council member 
Joe McDermott 
cosponsored and 
passed the secure 
gun storage ordi¬ 
nance, increased 
protections for im¬ 
migrants, scored more money for affordable 
housing, and fought (but ultimately failed, 
thanks in part to fellow council member Lar¬ 
ry Gossett) to keep 4Culture independent 
from crony politics. 

His opponent is a Safe Seattle dweeb 
named Michael Neher, who has, for some 



Fred Felleman, the 
environ mental - 
consultant-turned- 
star-port-commis- 
sioner, is the only 
option for this posi¬ 
tion. 

Felleman is the 
incumbent, and in 
his short tenure on the commission, he cre¬ 
ated the Energy & Sustainability Committee, 
which keeps track of and tries to lower the 
port’s emissions. Felleman is a lover of light 
rail and a defender of the southern resident 
killer whales, and he’s committed to making 
the port even more sustainable. That means 




























THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 17 


cutting down on idling plane emissions, fight¬ 
ing cruise ship scrubbing discharge (still not 
clear on what this is, but apparently it’s bad 
for the environment), and so much more good 
shit that we were barely able to scratch the 
surface of it all during our one-hour meeting. 

The absolute jokers running against 
Felleman wasted our time and are wasting 
precious ink by daring to put their names on 
the ballot next to Fred’s. This guy is not only 
knowledgeable about the port and desperate 
to share that knowledge through advocacy 
and transparent politics, but he’s actually 
really fucking excited by it. Seriously, we 
have never seen someone so excited about 
cruise ship scrubbing laws. Felleman was so 
passionate that it got us passionate. We love 
Fred. Don’t tell our boyfriend. Vote Felleman. 


CITY OF SEATTLE 


COUNCIL DISTRICT NO. 1 

LISAHERBOLD 



How’s the liquor lev¬ 
el in your beer hat? 
Time for a peach 
schnapps refill? You 
finally made it past 
all that fucking bor¬ 
ing garbage to the 
main event: the city 
council races! 
There’s no better place to start than with West 
Seattle’s incumbent council member, Lisa 
Herbold, who last year found herself at the 
center of what has become the defining mo¬ 
ment for the current council: the 2018 “head 
tax” debacle. 

In case you were unconscious: Last year, 
Herbold and all the other council members 
passed a modest per-employee tax on the 
city’s largest employers, like Amazon, to fund 
homeless services. This so-called “head tax” 
(sometimes called the “Amazon tax”) was a 
good thing! The tech giants that have made 
billions while exacerbating our housing cri¬ 
sis and deepening inequality would finally 
pitch in to help out. But the last thing Ama¬ 
zon founder and libertarian turd-licker Jeff 
Bezos wants to do is pitch in and help out. He 
fought back and, since billionaires always get 
whatever the fuck they want in America, the 
council quickly revoked the head tax. 

And even though Bezos got his way—his 
precious lack of taxes—he isn’t done kick¬ 
ing the rest of us in the face: Amazon, which 
rarely contributes anything to the civic life of 
the city, has dumped $450,000 into this elec¬ 
tion to try to get progressives like Herbold off 
the council. Herbold’s opponent, two-time 
electoral loser Phil Tavel, got $120,000 in 
campaign help from one Amazon-funded 
PAC alone. That’s more than Herbold’s en¬ 
tire campaign has raised. 

Tavel is pretty much a walking reason to 
vote for Herbold. He calls homeless people 
lazy and denies that we have a housing cri¬ 
sis. And just listen to what Tavel told the 
SECB: “Lisa cares more about the renters’ 
rights”—sold!—“and not necessarily some¬ 
one who owns a home, or is a landlord, or 
owns a business.” 

Herbold does care about homeowners and 
small-business owners, by the way, and there 
are plenty of them in West Seattle, where Her¬ 
bold is quite popular. Even the Seattle Times 
editorial board, which endorsed Tavel over 


Herbold and would lick the leftover shaving 
cream off Bezos’s scalp if he wanted them to, 
said the incumbent “has raised the bar for be¬ 
ing responsive to constituent inquiries.” 

She’s also fought for secure scheduling 
laws, more renter protections, and finding 
ways to make Seattle’s tax system more eq¬ 
uitable. Vote Herbold. 

COUNCIL DISTRICT NO. 2 

TAMMY MORALES 


Tammy Moraleshas 
lived in public 
housing, she knows 
what it’s like to be 
raised by a mom 
holding down three 
jobs, and she has 
made it her mission 
to “serve working 
families so they 
don’t have to struggle the way my family did.” 

Unlike her opponent (the Amazon-backed, 
Seattle Police Department-employed Mark 
Solomon), Morales also has concrete plans to 
help those working families out. She wants 
to introduce a new city tax to make Seattle’s 
wealthiest pay a reasonable amount to help 
make this place livable, and if that comes in 
the form of a new head tax, fine. But it could 
also be an inheritance tax, Morales says, or a 
tax on CEOs who are excessively compensat¬ 
ed, or a tax on second homes. “We can’t keep 
growing this city on the backs of working 
folks,” Morales says. 

Can she get it done? Well, she has a mas¬ 
ter’s degree in community planning and ex¬ 
perience working on tough issues in Texas, 
New York, and Seattle (which is a lot more 
policy experience than Solomon has). Mo¬ 
rales is endorsed by Congresswoman Prami- 
la Jayapal, and she scored an endorsement- 
in our eyes—from Mayor Jenny Durkan back 
in July when Durkan tried to slam Morales 
for being a “socialist,” as if that were a bad 
thing. (Morales says she’s not a socialist, for 
the record, though she did join Democratic 
Socialists of America at one point.) 

Durkan also said Morales would need to 
get above 50 percent in the primary to be 
viable. Blam! Morales got above 50 percent. 
Durkan’s preferred candidate, Solomon, 
scored a pathetic 23 percent. Vote Morales. 

COUNCIL DISTRICT NO. 3 

KSHAMA SAWANT 



Amazon’s lobbying 
arm has selected 
Wl Egan Orion as the 

K candidate most 

beneficial to 
bottom line—and, 
•ir lflj Jrjf honestly, the SECB 

J/jA is a little insulted. 

Really? Egan 
Orion? This is the guy Big Business is pick¬ 
ing to unseat two-term council member 
Kshama Sawant? 

Sawant wants landlords to cap our rent 
and pay our relocation expenses if they 
raise the rent so high that we have to move 
out. Orion doesn’t. Sawant wants to reduce 
hate crimes by tackling the root causes of 
economic inequality and systemic racism. 
Orion’s big idea is “bike chariots.” Sawant 





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wants to continue the fight for safe inj eetion 
sites—a data-driven, scientifically proven 
solution to reducing drug deaths. Orion 
thinks the science isn’t settled. Sawant 
thinks we can pay for the housing, environ¬ 
mental protections, and transit fixes we 
need by taxing big businesses that skip 
through the loopholes in our tax code to 
avoid paying their fair share. Orion thinks 
we can find the money in the couch cush¬ 
ions. Sawant is an economist and a com¬ 
puter programmer. Orion is an event planner 
and "flash mob king.” 


Even Egan Orion’s 
most adamant 
supporters are really 
just Sawant haters. 


The internet tells us we live in a city with 
some of the smartest people on the planet, 
and this is the guy Big Business picks? If 
that’s the wisdom their money buys them, 
they’re getting fleeced. 

Don’t get us wrong. Orion is certainly a 
friendly fellow with an earnest affection for 
the city, but that’s all anybody can really say 
for him. Even his most adamant supporters 
are really just Sawant haters. 

To be sure, Sawant’s brash, uncompro¬ 
mising, movement-style politicking tends 
to offend groups who have never needed a 
political movement to get what they deserve. 
But Sawant is not worried about the com¬ 
fortable and the delicate, and those "move¬ 
ments” she’s always uplifting have helped 
win a $15 minimum wage, progressive renter 
protections, $29 million for affordable hous¬ 
ing, and more. 

Sawant’s opponents call her "divisive” and 
“ineffective.” But if being “divisive” and “in¬ 
effective” means voting for all the up-zones, 
casting one of only two votes NOT to repeal 
the “head tax” on big businesses, and being 
the sole vote against a bad police contract, 
then we could use alittle bit more of that kind 
of “divisiveness” on the council. Vote Sawant. 

COUNCIL DISTRICT NO. 4 

SHAUN SCOTT 

District 4 covers 
everything from the 
little north-end nub 
of Eastlake all the 
way up to Sand 
Point, with the Uni¬ 
versity District, 
Ravenna, Walling¬ 
ford, and Wedg¬ 
wood all snuggled in between. It’s a district of 
dichotomies. There are the students of the 
University of Washington and the single¬ 
family homes in Bryant. There are about to 
be three light rail stations and insane transit 
access, while drivers in the district just 
waged a successful fight to kill two bike lanes 
on one dangerous thoroughfare. District 4 
will see a ton of change in the coming years, 
and this race will decide how, exactly, this 
area will change. 

Shaun Scott will see to it that we’ll all be 
living in an urbanist’s wet dream: an equal 
opportunity, climate-sanity-focused, transit- 


driven utopia. 

Does that sound too good to be true? It may 
be, given that his opponent, Alex Pedersen, the 
NIMBY and former Tim Burgess aide, already 
has close to half of the district’s support. Ped¬ 
ersen toldus he didn’t evenidentify any policy 
positions in the primary. He j ust told constitu¬ 
ents that he was the “accountable” candidate 
and tapped into their homelessness anxiety 
and ire against the current council. Pedersen 
has since released some policy positions. His 
transportation policy is unsurprisingly unex¬ 
traordinary (Pedersen voted against Sound 
Transit 3 and light rail). His environmental 
platform is nonexistent (he is one of two city 
council candidates who do not support a Se¬ 
attle Green New Deal). There’s more, but let’s 
stop dwelling on the negative. 

Scott has been policy-focused since the 
beginning. He was the first candidate to pro¬ 
pose a Green New Deal for Seattle. He sup¬ 
ports housing density. He campaigns the way 
we believe he will lead, transparently and 
painstakingly disclosing every expense down 
to a cup of coffee. He supports municipal 
broadband, public housing, safe consump¬ 
tion sites, and bike lanes. His staff is happy 
and they just unionized. Like we said, he’s 
the messiah of the hot urbanist wet dream 
Shangri-la! Vote Scott. 

COUNCIL DISTRICT NO. 5 

DEBORA JUAREZ 

Seattle needs a vi- 
brant North End 
that is more than a 
^ Bj bedroom communi¬ 

ty for downtown and 
a rest stop for Inter- 
I state 5—and reelect - 
I ing Council Member 
Debora Juarez is 
North Seattle’s best chance for getting more 
housing, more jobs, and more transit. 

As a council member, Juarez voted for 
the Mandatory Housing Affordability up- 
zones, brought a $75 million hockey train¬ 
ing facility to Northgate, and lobbied Sound 
Transit to build a new light rail station at 
130th Avenue Northeast. She told the SECB 
she supports even more up-zones, includ¬ 
ing allowing duplexes and triplexes in all 
single-family-zoned areas. 

Juarez’s strengths on housing make up 
for her other failings. She rarely talks to the 
media and, according to many community 
members, is slow to respond to constituents. 
She also has a problem taking responsibility 
for her fuckups and always seems to find a 
way to show how everyone other than her¬ 
self is mistaken. Or, as she put it to the SECB 
in the midst of one long-winded, sidestep¬ 
ping response, “Let me just finish this, and 
then I’ll tell you how you’re wrong.” 

When asked about her repeal of the head 
tax last summer, Juarez told the SECB, 
“You’re absolutely right, we fucked it up,” 
while also finding a way to blame former 
mayor Ed Murray and King County exec¬ 
utive Dow Constantine for not putting the 
head tax to the voters. Confusing! Juarez’s 
repeal vote on the head tax is especially trou¬ 
bling because she has the support of Amazon 
in this election. However, she told the SECB 
she still supports a new head tax, so long as 
it is put directly to the voters. 

While Juarez is not the SECB’s favorite 
































THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 19 


member of the city council, she’s a lot better 
than her competition, Ann Davison Sattler, a 
Safe Seattle-aligned NIMBY who describes 
legalizing backyard cottages as opening the 
"floodgates to mindless up-zoning devel¬ 
opment.” Sattler also wants to house 2,000 
homeless people inside an old Sam’s Club 
in North Seattle, which sounds like a fiasco 
and a human-rights violation. Vote Juarez. 

COUNCIL DISTRICT NO. 6 

DAN STRAUSS 

Voters swept Heidi 
Wills out of her city 
council seat in2003 
after the "Stripper- 
gate” scandal broke. 
That story involved 
Wills and two oth¬ 
er council mem¬ 
bers taking money 
from people who sounded like mob goons in 
exchange for voting to expand a parking lot at 
a North End strip club. Wills now says she’s 
learned her lesson about taking money and 
holding meetings with shady characters, but 
we’re not convinced. 

When asked for her opinion on Mom’s for 
Seattle—a shadowy PAC that has used mail¬ 
ers with photoshopped images to spread fear 
about homeless people, and that is fronted 
by four extremely wealthy women—Wills 
ducked and dodged before admitting she’d 
only read a little bit about the group in 
ParentMap. So far, the group has supported 
Wills by spending more than $46,000 on her 


Policy positions 
aside, Strauss is an 
elder millennial who 
loves plants. 


behalf—the largest outlay from an indepen¬ 
dent expenditure supporting her campaign 
to date—and she hasn’t even given them a 
good Google search yet? Sorry, we’re not 
buying it. 

If all Wills did was unquestioningly take 
lots of money from dubious characters, we 
might give her a pass. After all, she’s a pol¬ 
itician, and that’s what they do. But Wills 
goes the extra mile and actually upholds 
the values of her donors. Like those wealthy 
"moms,” Wills wants to see more pointless, 
expensive, and dehumanizing sweeps of 
homeless encampments. She also opposes 
the construction of safe consumption sites. 

The Stranger isn’t particularly thrilled 
to endorse a dude over a woman, but Dan 
Strauss, aka "Ballard’s paper boy,” is an 
extremely qualified candidate and affable 
character. He’s been a professional wonk 
for a decade, serving as chief policy adviser 
to Council Member Sally Bagshaw and as a 
legislative aide to state senator David Frockt. 
Unlike Wills, he thinks sweeps of homeless 
encampments are pointless and he doesn’t 
oppose safe injection sites. He’s also smart 
on housing, public utilities (which make up 
a huge portion of the city’s budget), and tran¬ 
sit, which is aparticularly important issue as 
light rail expands to Ballard. Plus, he’s an el¬ 
der millennial who loves plants. Vote Strauss. 


COUNCIL DISTRICT NO. 7 

ANDREW J. LEWIS 

Ah yes, District 7, 
the downtown dis¬ 
trict where Seattle¬ 
ites willbe forcedto 
choose between a 
cop (albeit a pro¬ 
gressive cop) and a 
prosecutor (albeit a 
union-strong pros¬ 
ecutor). 

The difference between former Seattle 
police chief Jim Pugel and assistant city 
attorney Andrew Lewis comes down to tax¬ 
es and up-zones. In a recent questionnaire, 
Pugel threw in with Queen Anne’s dreaded 
NIMBYs and outright opposed up-zoning. 
He’s also shy about taxing big businesses for 
homeless services. 

By way of contrast, Lewis is open to legal¬ 
izing apartments in places where rich white 
people live, despite their fear of brown people 
and rowdy youths moving in and destroying 
the "neighborhood character.” And although 
Lewis, too, is against the head tax, in our en¬ 
dorsement meeting he said "there could be 
a scenario” where he would support a head 
tax. That was arguably a better answer than 
the one Pugel gave, though it was complete 
lawyer-talk bullshit. 

Yes, Lewis looks like he lost his virginity 
on a yacht, but he’s actually a renter from a 
long line of union workers, and he has some 
smart ideas. For instance, he wants to offer 
a "public option for housing,” in which the 
city would buy up and set low rents for tons 
of housing units and then use our bonding 
capacity get more money for more units. 
Given that he was an early supporter of the 
Fort Lawton housing project, we believe he’s 
not just blowing smoke up our ass when he 
advocates for that kind of policy. 

Though the SECB strongly disagrees with 
Pugel on zoning and taxing issues, we’re not 
mad at him. He’s cool and dad-like. He even 
came into our den and rubbed CBD lotion 
on his knees. But District 7 needs someone 
who will represent the needs of renters and 
future homeowners—whoever those people 
are. Vote Lewis. 


SCHOOL 


SEATTLE SCHOOL DISTRICT 1, 
DIRECTOR DISTRICT NO. 1 

LIZA RANKIN 

Much like finishing 
the longest fucking 
ballot in King County 
history (almost 
there! Fuck you 
again, Tim Eyman!), 
sitting on the Seattle 
School Board is a 
thankless task. 

The meetings are 
boring as fuck, and you’re often stuck be¬ 
tween reality (meaning: budget constraints) 
and the well-meaning-but-super-fuck- 
ing-annoying parents who just want the best 
for their kids no matter how long past dinner 
it is. The SECB would rather run for chief 
dog-shit picker-upper than sit on the school 
board, but, for some reason, there still exist 






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THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 21 


concerned citizens who want to do it (who 
are you people?). 

Liza Rankin, an education advocate and 
school volunteer, is deeply involved with and 
knowledgeable about navigating the Seattle 
Public Schools system, especially when it 
comes to kids with special needs (and, no, 
we’re not talking about your precious little 
vegan princess). Rankin, who has kids in 
the system herself, has stood with striking 
teachers and is opposed to charter schools. 
She’s also in favor of less standardized test¬ 
ing—which many teachers and every child in 
this city will like, too. 

Rankin told the SECB that her priority is to 
make sure all students feel safe and valued at 
school (yes, even the annoying ones). To her, 
this means increasing ethnic studies, using 
restorative rather than punitive measures of 
discipline, and getting special education stu¬ 
dents back into classrooms instead of segre¬ 
gating them from their peers. She’s also com¬ 
mitted to implementing the school board’s 
new equity agenda and increasing funding, 
which, when there are only nine school 
nurses serving all 50,000 students in Seattle 
Public Schools, is a big fucking problem. 

Are all her plans doable? Yes, but proba¬ 
bly not before today’s kindergarteners are 
moving into nursing homes. The school sys¬ 
tem moves at the speed of a sloth on opiates, 
but we need ambitious people like Rankin 
to light a fire under the school board’s ass. 
Vote Rankin. 

SEATTLE SCHOOL DISTRICT 1, 
DIRECTOR DISTRICT NO. 3 

CHANDRA HAMPS0N 



The SECB hasn’t had 
this much of a crush 
on a candidate since 
m m ™ Sergio Garcia’s mus¬ 

tache made its ap- 
pearance. And, un- 
H L like Sergio Garcia’s 

mustache. Chandra 
I Hampson is more 
than qualified for the job. Hampson is also 
deeply familiar with the issues facing mar¬ 
ginalized students, particularly those who 
are Native American, a population on the 
losing end of the Seattle Public Schools’ ra¬ 
cial opportunity gap. She describes her her¬ 
itage as Ho-Chunk from the Winnebago 
Tribe of Nebraska and Anishinaabe from the 
White Earth Nation, and she’s currently 
president of the Seattle Council PTSA. 


Hampson wants to retain teachers and 
staffers of color and increase administra¬ 
tor accountability and transparency, which 
we like. But she does have a couple tiny X 
marks against her: Unlike the education 
and parenting experts here at the SECB, 
she’s not unequivocally opposed to charter 
schools, which we despise with all our pub¬ 
lic-school-loving hearts. Her reason for this 
isn’t terrible: At a meeting with the 36th Leg¬ 
islative District Dems, she said that while she 
doesn’t want to see public school systems 
privatized, she also doesn’t want to deprive 
parents of the opportunity to send their kids 
to “culturally responsive” charters like the 
Ashe Preparatory Academy. 

Also, city council candidate Alex Pedersen 
gave her money (boo!), but so did Louie Gong, 
the guy who sells those amazing Native blan¬ 
kets down at Pike Place Market (yay!), so 
we’re willing to forget the guilt by association. 
This time. Vote Hampson. 

SEATTLE SCHOOL DISTRICT 1, 
DIRECTOR DISTRICT NO. 6 

LESLIES. HARRIS 


First elected in 2015, 
Leslie Harris is now 
the Seattle School 
Board old guard and 
has just finished her 
second term as pres¬ 
ident. She’s probably 
(okay, definitely) not 
the farthest left of the 
candidates in this 
race, but for once we’re going to withhold our 
knee-jerk support of whoever makes Leon 
Trotsky look like a member of the GOP and 
endorse the slightly more moderate candi¬ 
date. Why? Because Seattle Public Schools 
needs someone with Harris’s level of experi¬ 
ence, full stop. 

Harris is a bulldog. She’s strong and prag¬ 
matic, and her eyes are wide open to all of the 
many (many) crises facing our city’s school 
district, from the lack of funding and teacher 
shortages to a school-bus crisis that is leav¬ 
ing kids stranded at bus stops and parents 
scrambling. Harris is ambitious, yes, but 
more important than that, she’s practical, 
with a wealth of knowledge on how to actu¬ 
ally get shit done instead of just talking about 
getting shit done. As Harris told us, “I know 
where the bodies are buried.” Unearth those 
bodies, Madame School Board President! It’s 
time to dig. Vote Harris. ■ 



The Stranger Election Control Board 

CHEAT (£5 SHEET 

For the November 5,2019, General Election 

The Stranger does not endorse in uncontested races or in races we forgot. 


STATE 


Referendum Measure 
No. 88 

Approved 

Initiative Measure 
No. 976 

No 

Advisory Vote 
Nos. 20-31 

Maintained 

Senate Joint Resolution 
No. 8200 

Approved 


COUNTY 


King County Proposition No. 1, 
Medic One levy 

Yes 

King County, 

Director of Elections 

Julie Wise 

King County, 

Council District No. 2 

Girmay Zahilay 

King County, 

Council District No. 4 

Jeanne Kohl-Welles 


PORT OF SEATTLE 


Commissioner Position No. 2 

Sam Cho 

Commissioner Position No. 5 

Fred Felleman 


CITY OF SEATTLE 


Council District No. 1 

Lisa Herbold 

Council District No. 2 

Tammy Morales 

Council District No. 3 

Kshama Sawant 

Council District No. 4 

Shaun Scott 

Council District No. 5 

Debora Juarez 

Council District No. 6 

Dan Strauss 

Council District No. 7 

Andrew J. Lewis 


SCHOOL 


Seattle School District 1, 
Director District No. 1 

Liza Rankin 


King County, 
Council District No. 6 

Claudia Balducci 

King County, 
Council District No. 8 

Joe McDermott 


Seattle School District 1, 
Director District No. 3 

Chandra Hampson 

Seattle School District 1, 
Director District No. 6 

Leslie S. Harris 





4 


Elect the Experienced Progressive 

Jeanne Kohl-Welles 

IE ndorsed King Cou nty u e ms, * 

^ JZnd, 36th. 46th Dems. 1 Planned 
Parenthood Vote? NV. * MLK Labor 5 
M ZQ+ Unions 1 WA Bikes ■ Alliance for 

-jT't Gun Responsibility * Washington 
Conservation Voters * Seattle Fire 
\cO** Fighters * CuFtere PAC and morel 


■-Jaunnsi 


^KOHL-WELLES 


Lear-n mere al wiY.JeanneKQhlWeNe 5 .T 0 rn 


*aa y t : rrpujs rj .«i'a foWW*:’*.. * P.Q ks. «CO > 5«*te, WA931B9 



YOU DESERVE 


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22 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 



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Blunt Talk 

BY LESTER BLACK 



RACHELLE ABELLAR 

The state could release new retail licenses to minority business owners. 


Who’s Down for 
Diversifying Pot 
Shops? 

I t’s been more than 20 years since Jim 
Pugel was a police officer arresting 
pot dealers on the corner of 23rd and 
Union, but he can still remember what 
the suspects looked like. They were almost 
all black men. 

Now, one of Seattle’s busiest pot shops 
sells millions of dollars’ worth of weed on 
that same corner. But the African American 
community reaps only a fraction of the legal 
weed industry’s profits. And that doesn’t sit 
well with Pugel. 

“I can understand,” Pugel recently said, 
“how the [African American] community 
is a little pissed off. We, the system—police, 
prosecutors, judges—all went after them for 
relatively low potency dope in the 1980s and 
’90s. And now it’s all mainstream. Where are 
the revenues going to repatriate all of those 
people who were incarcerated?” 

Pugel is far from the first person to point 
out how the war on drugs mainly hurt people 
of color, while legalization has sent profits 
mostly to white people. But Pugel may soon 
be in a position to do something about it. 

He is one of 14 people running for seats on 
the Seattle City Council, and there’s a good 
possibility the next council will get to decide 
if minorities should get achance to own more 
of the local pot industry. The Washington 
State Liquor and Cannabis Board (WSLCB) 
is asking state lawmakers to pass a law next 
year allowing it to issue new retail pot shop 
licenses to minority and women-owned busi¬ 
nesses. The proposed law would allow local 
governments to request additional retail li¬ 
censes for disadvantaged groups. 

There’s a strong rationale behind the 
proposal. Retail licenses are severely lim¬ 
ited, making them very valuable and highly 
coveted. And white people own a dispropor¬ 
tionate share of those licenses. White people 
make up 68 percent ofthe state’s population 
but own 78 percent of pot shops, according 
to a 2018 WSLCB survey. The survey found 
that Asian people own 7 percent of shops, 
black people own 4 percent, and Hispanic 


people own 4 percent; all of those minority 
groups own a smaller percentage of retail 
licenses than their percentages of the state¬ 
wide population. 

This plan probably isn’t popular with 
Seattle’s existing pot shop owners—who 
already complain about too much competi¬ 
tion—but I wanted to find out what the city 
council candidates thought. 

District 1 candidate Phil Tavel said he did 
not support the program because it’s “not 
the right time or the right method.” His op¬ 
ponent, Council Member Lisa Herbold, did 
not respond. 

District 2 candidate Mark Solomon said 
he did support the program, while his op¬ 
ponent, Tammy Morales, did not respond. 


The war on drugs 
hurt people of color, 
while legalization has 
benefited white folks. 


In District 3, Council Member Kshama 
Sawant said she supports the program but 
wants to ensure that the new retail owners 
also have adequate support to succeed. Egan 
Orion, her opponent, said he tentatively sup¬ 
ports the idea but wants to see the final law 
before committing. 

All four candidates in District 4 and 5 
did not respond. District 6 candidate Dan 
Strauss sent a confusing statement and then 
later clarified he was a “maybe.” Strauss’s op¬ 
ponent, Heidi Wills, declined to support the 
idea and said she was worried how the pro¬ 
gram would impact existing pot shop owners. 

District 7 candidate Andrew Lewis said 
he “fully supports” the idea and would spon¬ 
sor legislation trying to accomplish it. Lewis 
is running against Pugel, the former SPD cop 
who once arrested pot dealers in the Central 
District. He said he supports the program. 

What about Mayor Jenny Durkan? What 
about Lorena Gonzalez and Teresa Mosque- 
da, the two council members not up for re- 
election? Mosqueda’s office said she would 
respond after she returns from maternity 
leave. Durkan and Gonzalez did not reply. ■ 





















THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 23 



Free Will Astrology 

BY ROB BREZSNY 


October 9-15 October 16-22 


ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19): "Love is when you meet 
someone who tells you something new about yourself," wrote poet Andre 
Breton. I think that's an excellent principle to put at the top of your priority 
list in the coming weeks, Aries. To be in maximum alignment with cosmic 
rhythms, you should seek input from allies who will offer insights about 
you that are outside your current conceptions of yourself. You might even 
be daring enough to place yourself in the path of strangers, acquaintances, 
animals, and teachers who can provide novel reflections. There's just one 
caveat: Stay away from people who might be inclined to fling negative 
feedback. 

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20): Constantine P. Cavafy's poem 
"Waiting for the Barbarians" imagines the imminent arrival of an unpre¬ 
dictable agent of chaos. "The barbarians are coming today," declares the 
narrator. Everyone in town is uneasy. People's routines are in disarray. Faces 
look worried. What's going to happen? But the poem has a surprise ending. 
"It is night, and the barbarians haven't come," reports the narrator. "Some 
people have arrived from the frontier and say that there aren't any more 
barbarians." I propose that we use this scene as a metaphor for your life 
right now, Taurus. It's quite possible that a perceived threat isn't really a 
threat. So here's my question, taken from near the end of the poem: "What 
are we going to do now without the barbarians?" 

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20): Some folklorists prefer the term 
"wonder tales" rather than "fairy tales." Indeed, many such stories are 
filled with marvelous events that feature magical transformations, talking 
animals, and mythical creatures like elves and dragons and unicorns. I bring 
this up, Gemini, because I want to encourage you to read some wonder 
tales. Hopefully, as you do, you'll be inspired to reimagine your life as a 
wonder tale; you'll reframe the events of the "real world" around you as 
being elements in a richly entertaining wonder tale. Why do I recommend 
this? Because wonder tales are like waking dreams that reveal the wishes 
and curiosities and fascinations of your deep psyche. And I think you will 
benefit profoundly in the coming weeks from consciously tuning in to those 
wishes and curiosities and fascinations. 

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22): I suspect that in the coming 
days you'll be able to see into everyone's souls more vividly than usual. 
You'll have a special talent for piercing through the outer trappings of their 
personalities so as to gaze at the essence beneath. It's as if your eyes will 
be blessed by an enhancement that enables you to discern what's often 
hidden. This upgrade in your perception may at times be unsettling. For 
some of the people you behold, the difference between how they present 
themselves and who they actually are will be dramatic. But for the most 
part, penetrating to the depths should be fun, enriching, even healing. 

LEO (JULY 23—AUG 22): "This heart is rusty," writes poet Ga¬ 
briel Gadfly. "It creaks, it clanks, it crashes and rattles and bangs." Why is 
his heart in such a state? Because he has been separated from a person 
he loves. And so he's out of practice in doing the little things, the caring 
gestures and tender words, that a lover does to keep the heart well-oiled. 
It's my observation that most of us go through rusty-heart phases like this 
even when we are living in close proximity to an intimate ally. We neglect to 
practice the art of bestowing affectionate attention and low-key adoration. 
We forget how important it is for our own welfare that we continually 
refresh and reinvigorate our heart intelligence. These are good meditations 
for you right now, Leo. 

VIRGO (AUG 23-SEPT 22): "All the effort in the world won't 
matter if you're not inspired," writes novelist Chuck Palahniuk. I agree! And 
that's a key meditation for you right now. Your assignment is to enhance 
and upgrade the inspiration you feel about the activities that are most 
important to you—the work and play that give you the sense you're living 
a meaningful life. So how do you boost your excitement and motivation 
for those essential actions you do on a regular basis? Here's a good place 
to begin: Visualize in exuberant detail all the reasons you started doing 
them in the first place. 

LIBRA (SEPT 23-OCT 22): I hope you are embarking on a vig¬ 
orous new phase of self-redefinition. I trust you are excited about shedding 
old ways of thinking about yourself and eager to revise and reimagine the 
plot of your life story. As you do, keep in mind this helpful counsel from 
physicist Richard Feynman: "You have no responsibility to live up to what 
other people think you ought to accomplish. I have no responsibility to be 
like they expect me to be. It's their mistake, not my failing." 

SCORPIO (OCT 23-NOV 21): You've probably heard the saying 
"Genius is 99 percent perspiration and 1 percent inspiration." It's often 
attributed to inventor Thomas Edison. Sixteenth-century artist Michelan¬ 
gelo expressed a similar idea. "If you knew how much labor went into it, 
you would not call it genius," he said about one of his masterpieces. I'm 
guessing that you Scorpios have been in a phase when these descriptions 
are highly apropos. The work you've been doing may look productive and 
interesting and heroic to the casual observer, and maybe only you know how 
arduous and exacting it has been. So now what do you do? I say it's time 
to enjoy the fruits of your efforts. Celebrate! Give yourself a thrilling gift. 

SAGITTARIUS (NOV 22-DEC 21): "The universe is under 
no obligation to make sense to you," declared astrophysicist Neil deGrasse 
Tyson. If that's even a little bit true, I bet you won't believe it in the coming 
weeks. According to my analysis, the universe will make a great deal of 
sense to you—at times even exquisite, beautiful, breathtaking sense. Life will 
be in a revelatory and articulate mood. The evocative clues coming your way 
about the nature of reality could tempt you to believe that there is indeed 
a coherent plan and meaning to your personal destiny. 

CAPRICORN (DEC 22-JAN 19): In 2005, Facebook was a 
start-up company barely on the map of the internet. Its president asked 
graffiti artist David Choe to paint murals on the walls of its headquarters. 
Choe asked for $60,000, but the president convinced him to be paid with 
Facebook stock instead. Years later, when Facebook went public, Choe 
became a multimillionaire. I suspect that in the coming months, you will be 
faced with choices that are less spectacular than that, Capricorn, but similar 
and important. My conclusion: Be willing to consider smart gambles when 
projects are germinating. 

AQUARIUS (JAN 20-FEB 18): "Experiment is the sole source 
of truth," wrote philosopher and polymath Henri Poincare. "It alone can 
teach us something new; it alone can give us certainty." He wasn't merely 
referring to the kinds of experiments that scientists conduct in laboratories. 
He was talking about the probes and explorations we can and should carry 
out in the course of our daily lives. I mention this, Aquarius, because the 
coming days will be prime time for you to do just that: ask provocative 
questions, initiate novel adventures, and incite fun learning experiences. 

PISCES (FEB 19-MARCH 20): In my opinion, Piscean singer, 
poet, and actor Saul Williams produces high-quality art. So he has earned a 
right to critique mediocre art. In speaking about movies and TV shows that 
are hard to enjoy unless we dumb ourselves down, he says, "We have more 
guilty pleasure than actual fucking pleasure." Your assignment in the coming 
weeks, Pisces, is to cut back on your "guilty pleasures"—the entertainment, 
art, and socializing that brings meager returns—as you increase and upgrade 
your actual fucking pleasure. 

Homework: I discuss some of my ideas about astrology in the article pub¬ 
lished here: https://tinyurl.com/RobOnAstrology. 


ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19): "We can't change anything 
until we get some fresh ideas, until we begin to see things differently," 
wrote Aries psychologist James Hillman. I agree. And that's very good news 
for you Aries people. In my view, you are more attracted to and excited 
by fresh ideas than any other sign of the zodiac. That's why you have the 
potential to become master initiators of transformation. Some of my favorite 
plot twists in your life story occur when you seek out fresh ideas and initiate 
transformations not only in your own behalf but also for those you care 
about. I bet the coming weeks will bring some of those plot twists. 

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20): Metaphorically speaking, 
Taurus, you are now crossing a bridge. Behind you is the intriguing past; 
in front of you is the even more intriguing future. You can still decide to 
return to where you came from. Or you could pick up your pace and race 
ahead at twice the speed. You might even make the choice to linger on the 
bridge for a while; to survey the vast vistas that are visible and contemplate 
more leisurely the transition you're making. Only you know what's best for 
you, of course. But if you were to ask me, I'd be in favor of lingering on 
the bridge for a while. 

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20): As I write this, I'm sitting in a cafe 
next to two women. One sports a gold cashmere head scarf and pentagram 
necklace. The other wears a dark-blue pantsuit and a silver brooch that's the 
glyph for Gemini the Twins. Head Scarf shuffles a deck of tarot cards and 
asks Pantsuit what she'd like to find out during the divination she is about 
to receive. "I would very much like you to tell me what I really, really want," 
Pantsuit says with a chuckle. "I'm sure that once I find out that big secret, 
I'll be able accomplish wonders." I hope the rest of you Geminis will be on 
a similar mission in the coming weeks. Do whatever it takes to get very clear 
about what you want most. 

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22): Ancient Greek philosopher 
Socrates was meandering through an Athenian marketplace, gazing at the 
appealing and expensive items for sale. "How many things there are in this 
world that I do not want," he exclaimed with satisfaction. I recommend you 
cultivate that liberated attitude. Now is a perfect time to celebrate the fact 
that there are countless treasures and pleasures that you don't need in order 
to be charmed and cheerful about your life. For extra credit, add this nuance 
from Henry David Thoreau: People are rich in proportion to the number of 
things they can afford to let alone. 

LEO (JULY 23-AUG 22): I invite you to try this exercise. Imagine 
that one springtime you grow a garden filled with flowers that rabbits like 
to nibble: petunias, marigolds, gazanias, and pansies. This is a place whose 
only purpose is to give a gift to a wild, sweet part of nature. It's blithely 
impractical. You do it for your own senseless, secret joy. It appeals to the 
dreamy lover of life in you. Got all that, Leo? Now, in accordance with the 
current astrological omens, I suggest you actually try to fulfill a fantasy 
comparable to that one in the coming weeks. 

VIRGO (AUG 23-SEPT 22): My Virgo friend Lola got a text 
message from her Scorpio buddy Tanya. "Why don't you come over and 
chill with me and my demons? It'll be entertaining, I promise! My inner 
jerks are howlingly funny tonight." Here's what Lola texted back: "Thanks 
but no thanks, sweetie. I've been making big breakthroughs with my own 
demons—giving them the attention they crave without surrendering to 
their outrageous demands—and for now I need to work on stabilizing our 
new relationship. I can't risk bringing extra demons into the mix." I suspect 
this is an accurate description of what could be happening for you, Virgo. 

LIBRA (SEPT 23-OCT 22): In ancient holy texts from India, 
soma was said to be a drink that enhanced awareness and alertness. Ac¬ 
cording to modern scholars, it may have been a blend of poppy, ephedra, 
and cannabis. In Norse mythology, the beverage called the Mead of Suttungr 
conferred poetic inspiration and the ability to solve any riddle. It seemed to 
be a metaphor rather than an actual drink. In Slavic folklore, raskovnik is an 
herb with the magic power to unlock what's locked and uncover hidden 
treasures. I invite you Libras to fantasize about using these three marvels. 
To do so will potentize your imagination, thereby boosting the cosmic 
forces that will be working in your favor to enhance your awareness, confer 
inspiration, solve riddles, unlock what's locked, and find hidden treasures. 

SCORPIO (OCT 23-NOV 2l): Inventor Buckminster Fuller 
(1895-1983) was a visionary genius in numerous fields, including archi¬ 
tecture, design, engineering, and futurism. In the course of earning 40 
honorary doctorates, he traveled widely. It was his custom to wear three 
watches, each set to a different time: one to the zone where he currently 
was, another to where he had recently departed, and a third to where he 
would journey next. "I know that I am not a category," he wrote." I am not 
a thing—a noun. I seem to be a verb." I recommend his approach to you in 
the coming weeks, Scorpio. Be a verb! Allow your identity to be fluid, your 
plans adjustable, your ideas subject to constant revision. 

SAGITTARIUS (NOV 22-DEC 21): "Art is good for my soul 
precisely because it reminds me that we have souls in the first place," said 
actor Tilda Swinton. How about you, Sagittarius? What reminds you that 
you have a soul in the first place? Beloved animals? Favorite music? A stroll 
amid natural wonders? Unpredictable, fascinating sexual experiences? The 
vivid and mysterious dreams you have at night? Whatever stimuli bring you 
into visceral communion with your soul, I urge you to seek them out in 
abundance. It's Soul-Cherishing and Soul-Enhancing Time for you. 

CAPRICORN (DEC 22-JAN 19): The coming weeks will be 
a favorable time to arrange a series of high-level meetings between your 
body, mind, and soul. You might even consider staging an extravagant 
conference-like festival and festival-like conference. The astrological omens 
suggest that your body, mind, and soul are now primed to reveal choice 
secrets and tips to each other. They are all more willing and eager than usual 
to come up with productive new synergies that will enable each to function 
with more panache and effectiveness. 

AQUARIUS (JAN 20-FEB 18): "I believe in inhabiting contra¬ 
dictions," writes Aquarian author and activist Angela Davis. "I believe in 
making contradictions productive, not in having to choose one side or the 
other side. As opposed to choosing either or choosing both." I think Davis's 
approach will work well for you in the coming weeks. It's not just that the 
contradictions will be tolerable, they will be downright fertile, generous, and 
beneficent. So welcome them, honor them, allow them to bless you with 
their tricky opportunities and unexpected solutions. 

PISCES (FEB 19-MARCH 20): Piscean pianist Fr&teric Chopin 
(1810-1849) was a poetic genius whose music was full of sweetness and 
grace. "Without equal in his generation," said more than one critic. Today, 
170 years after his death, his work remains popular. Recently an Italian 
sound designer named Remo de Vico created an original new Chopin 
piece that featured all 21 of the master's piano nocturnes being played 
simultaneously. (You can hear it here: tinyurl.com/NewChopin.) As you 
might imagine, it's a gorgeous mess, too crammed with notes to truly be 
enjoyable, but interesting nevertheless. I'll counsel you to avoid a similar fate 
in the coming weeks, Pisces. It's fine to be extravagant and expansive and 
multifaceted—just don't overdo it. 

Homework: "I have thousands of opinions still—but that is down from 
millions—and, as always, I know nothing. “ So said author Harold Brodkey. 
And you? Testify at freewillastrology.com. 



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THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 25 


© Savage Love 

BY DAN SAVAGE 


Three City 
Swing 

We brought Savage Love Live to the Music 
Box Theatre in Chicago, the Barrymore The¬ 
atre in Madison, and the Pantages Theatre in 
Minneapolis over three nights. As is always 
the case at live shows, the crowd had more 
questions than I could possibly answer in a 
single night. So in this week’s column, I’m go¬ 
ing to tear through some of the questions I 
wasn’t able to get to. 

Ifyouuse food for vaginal play, is there any 
type you should definitely avoid? 

Lasagna makes for a lousy insertion toy. 
(Food doesn’t belong in vaginas; there 
could be bacteria on the food, even after 
washing, that results in a nasty infection. 
#FuckFirst #EatAfter) 

How do you feel about relationships that 
have a time frame or defined end point? 
For example, one person is going away for 
school or a new job? 

I’m fine about relationships with seem¬ 
ingly set end points, as relationships don’t 
have to be open to or become long-term in 
order to be a success. (Did you meet a nice 
person? Did you have some good sex? Did 
you part on good terms? Success!) And the 
world is filled with couples that met at a 
time in their lives when school or work com¬ 
mitments meant they couldn’t be together— 
and yet, years or even decades later, they’re 
still together. You never know. 

Is it okay that I always seem to hate my part¬ 
ners’ mothers? Is this normal? 

It isn’t, and it’s not. When you’re the com¬ 
mon denominator in a lot of high-stress, 
high-conflict relationships, you’re most likely 
the problem. 

Why do straight guys like anal so much? 

Superhero movies, bottled beer, watching 
sports—there are lots of things straight guys 
like that I just don’t get. But I get why they 
like anal: Done right, anal feels amazing. And 
not just for the person doing the penetrating. 
When it’s done right, it is also great for the 
person being penetrated. And sometimes 
the person being penetrated is a straight guy. 

After a year of dating, my boyfriend told me 
he is polyamorous. I don’t know how to pro¬ 
ceed. Any tips? 

If he meant, “Polyamory is my sexual orien¬ 
tation, and you have to allow me to date other 
people, and you can’t break up with me over 
this because that would amount to discrim¬ 
ination on the basis of sexual orientation,” 
that’s bullshit and this relationship is over. But 
if he meant, “Polyamory is abetter relation¬ 
ship model for me than monogamy,” that’s not 
bullshit and the conversation is just getting 


started. If you prefer monogamy but you’re 
willing to consider polyamory to be with him, 
i.e., if that’s a price of admission you’re willing 
to pay, it could work out. But if you aren’t open 
to polyamory, and monogamy isn’t a price he’s 
willing to pay tobe with you, it won’t workout. 

I work in secondary education and I’m in an 
open marriage. My job is awesome, but I’m 
so afraid of a student or a parent seeing me 
when I’m out with a different partner. What 
should I do? 



JOE NEWTON 

You could hope people would mind their 
own business and continue to make out in 
public with your other partners—or what¬ 
ever it is you’re doing in public that makes 
it clear you’re fucking/dating someone who 
isn’t your spouse—or you could be discreet. 
Since antidiscrimination statutes don’t offer 
protections to people in open relationships, 
and since people regularly freak out about 
teachers having sex at all, you really have 
no other choices besides discretion (when 
out with others) or shouldering the risk (of 
losing your job). 

My poly friend has started bringing her 
flavor-of-the-weekpartners to social events 
instead of her awesome wife. How do I tell 
her I’d rather hang out with her and her wife 
than her and her (usually boring, always 
temporary) new fling? 

Maybe your poly friend’s wife doesn’t want 
to hang out with you. Wait, I can say that in 
a nicer way: Maybe your poly friend’s wife 
is an introvert who would rather stay home 
and she’s only too delighted that the flavor- 
of-the-week is willing toescortherwifeto the 
box social. But if you miss your friend’s wife, 
maybe give her a call and invite her to lunch? 

My former lover cheated on his current 
live-in girlfriend with me. She has no idea. 
Should I tell her what a narcissistic cheater 
her boyfriend is? 

Vengeful former affair partners don’t have 
much more credibility than narcissistic 


cheaters—indeed, people view both with 
similar contempt. But you do you. 

My husband and I are swingers. For him, 
it’swho heis.Forme, it’s something I do (and 
like!). We argue over how often we go out or 
have sex with other couples. Any suggestions 
for finding a happy medium? 

More often than you’d like, and less often 
than he’d like—call it the bittersweet spot. 

How do I create a sexier bedroom for even 
better sex? 

Bedrooms are overrated, if you ask me 
(which you did), whereas basements, of¬ 
fice stairwells, clean single-seat restrooms 
in upscale restaurants, dark corners of 
public parks, the space underneath ban¬ 
quet tables in hotel ballrooms, etc. are all 
underutilized. 

Can you explain why male chastity is 
such a popular kink? I’m not offended by it, 
just curious about its sudden widespread 
popularity. 

“I think a big factor is that people are en- 
j oying the heightened mental connections 
that tend to develop with chastity play,” 
said Christopher of Steelwerks Extreme, 
makers ofthe Rolls-Royce of male chasti¬ 
ty devices. “Frequent business travel and 
long-distance relationships also make 
chastity an increasingly popular kink as 
the cage-wearer and key-holder can main¬ 
tain a playful dynamic without needing to 
be in the same room.” 

I’m 99.975percent sure I don’t want kids. 
My boyfriend of almost four years has a 
vasectomy scheduled for the end ofthe year. 
Should we go through with it?My boyfriend 
is really fucking sexy, hence the.025percent 
doubt. 

Vasectomies, like pregnancies, are reversible. 
Your boyfriend could also go to a sperm bank 
and put a load or three on ice. 

Female, 32, straight, and very pregnant. I’m 
about to pop! Do you have any postpartum 
sex advice? 

Explore outercourse for awhile and try to have 
(or try to fake) a positive attitude about it. 

Your thoughts on transmasculine folks who 
don’t necessarily identify as men using the 
word "faggot"? 

Fine, so long as they put the emphasis on the 
second syllable. ■ 


mail@savagelove.net 
@fakedansavage on Twitter 
ITMFA.org 

ON THE LOVECAST 

Love your curvy body, with Elle Chase: 
savagelovecast.com. 



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THINGS ™ DO +Art 


Art 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 27 


Tactile Sculptures of Light and Sound 

Yes, this show is amazing to go to while stoned. 

BY JASMYNE KEIMIG 


W alking into SPACEFILLED 
new show at Glass Box Gallery 
is like stepping into another 
universe. The artists behind 
the project—Alexander Nagy 
and Alexander Miller—went to great pains 
to block all outside light from coming inside 
the gallery, papering over the floor-to-ceil- 
ing windows, plunging the 
white cube into blackness. 

The duo’s moniker 
SPACEFILLER is a ref¬ 
erence to both their role 
as artists (one who fills 
space) and the mathematical model Con¬ 
way’s Game of Life (a “spacefiller” is a pat¬ 
tern that wants to spread out indefinitely). 

“We’re very into wonder and awe,” Nagy 
told me. He said their vision for this exhibi¬ 
tion, Fantasy Parameter Spaces, was “when 
you step through that door, you are stepping 
into this computational universe we’re ex¬ 
ploring and letting people explore.” 

Being shut off from the outside world only 
heightens your interactions with the exhi¬ 
bition, composed of tactile sculptures that 
immerse viewers in brilliant light and sound. 
Visitors have the opportunity to do things 
like grow and quash life with the press of a 
button, use a glowing LED cube controller 
to explore different graphic and sonic envi¬ 
ronments, and play with a 3-D simulation of 
slime mold. And before you ask—yes, this is 
deliriously fun to go to if you’re stoned. 

“Everything that you see and everything 
that you hear in the entire show—every 
graphic, every sound effect—is created using 
lines of programming code,” Miller told me. 
“All of our visuals are, at their core, based in 
math and scientific models.” 

But there’s nothing pretentious about any 
of the pieces. You’ll be easily forgiven for 
not knowing that the graphics in Terminal 
No. 1 —the result of a collaboration between 


SPACEFILLER: 

FANTASY 

PARAMETER 

SPACES 

Glass Box Gallery 
Through Nov 2 


SPACEFILLER, engineer Peter Whidden, 
Shaderpark, and Looking Glass Factory—are 
based off a mathematical technique called 
“signed distance fields.” 

Instead, Miller and Nagy emphasize explo¬ 
ration and curiosity. Playing into themes of 
chaos and order, destruction and construction, 
there’s no preconceived end or explicit objec¬ 
tive to their pieces. The process of interacting 
with the work is meditative, with the game-like 
nature of the pieces (buttons, knobs, control¬ 
lers galore) putting the viewer firmly in control 
of the environment around them. 

My favorite piece, Particle Collider, is 
nestled in a cozy corner of the gallery, and is 
one of their headier universes to step into. 
A delightful and otherworldly intersection 
between sight, sound, and touch, this sculp¬ 
ture is a simulation of (made-up) particles in 
SPACEFILLER’s fantasy version of physics. 

The cobweb-like interactive projection 
is composed of “particle streams” spinning 
around what looks like a wheel. There are 
sliders on the spokes of the wheel that con¬ 
trol the trajectories of the particle streams, 
and the sliders are adjustable, so you can 
force them to interact and collide with one 
another. These streams are connected to 
symphonic digital sounds created by Mick 
Marchan—think somewhere between a long 
electric guitar chord and a warbled radio 
transmission in space. 

When you use a slider to connect the white 
outside ring to the white inside ring, the lines 
go all berserk, making the music you’re im¬ 
mersed in completely spin out. During my 
visit, other viewers tried desperately to keep 
the sounds and sights in harmony, lambast¬ 
ing each other for any hint of discord. I, for 
one, loved forcing the particle streams to 
interact and clash, reveling in the chaos of 
it all. Unlike the world outside those black¬ 
ened windows, I was fully in control of my 
universe, a god. ■ 



JASMYNE KEIMIG 

Adjusting the sliders in ‘Particle Collider’ to make the streams collide. 


Top Picks 

CLOSING SAT NOV 2 

James Castle: ‘Drawings’ 

Born in 1899, American artist James Castle’s 
drawings remained relatively unknown until the 
1950s. Much of his work was made with soot and 
saliva on found items, like flour bags or receipts. 
The pictures themselves depict domestic interior 
and exterior scenes of rural Idaho, where Castle 
spent most of his life. Born deaf, he never learned 
to read, write, or use any form of signing outside of 
the personal signing he did with his family, though 


words and symbols do appear in his work. Despite 
his rudimentary materials, Castle’s drawings are 
varied and interesting, showing a strong grasp of 
shading that gives his drawings depth and life. (Greg 
Kucera Gallery, Tues-Sat, free.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 

CLOSING FRI NOV 22 

Alison Stigora: ‘certain/uncertain’ 

Seattle artist Alison Stigora creates gigantic sculp¬ 
tures that are constructed of coastal driftwood or 
galvanized steel, often filling up the gallery space 
and overpowering the viewer with their presence. 
Her work is aware of itself in a way that doesn't 
seek to shrink it or make it easy to comprehend, 
but rather forces viewers to interact with it. 


Inspired by the Pacific Northwest's natural land¬ 
scape, the size and materials of Stigora’s work call 
on our basic need for shelter while also leading us 
to think about our body in relation to space. ( SPAC, 
Mon-Thurs, free.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 

OCT 12-NOV 5 

Gina Siciliano: I Know What 
I Am: The Life and Times of 
Artemisia Gentileschi’ 

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, Artemisia 
Gentileschi was a fucking badass. One of the most 
accomplished painters of the 17th century, her 
paintings have an emotional and technical depth 


that’s unrivaled. Gentileschi is most famous for 
painting themes like Susanna and the Elders, 

Judith and 
Holofernes 
(which depict¬ 
ed Gentiles- 
chi’s rapist as 
Holofernes 
getting his 
head expertly 
sawed off-a 
legend), and 
Judith and 
Her Maidser¬ 
vant. Gina 
Siciliano’s first 













28 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 



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Myra Lara: Everyday Cry-sis 



COURTESY OF THE ARTIST 


graphic novel tells the story of this woman who 
braved the male-dominated art world to become 
one of the most formidable figures of Italian 
painting. (Fantagraphics Bookstore and Gallery, 
daily, free.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 

OCT 17-20 

Refract: The Seattle Glass 
Experience 

This region-Seattle, Bellevue, and Tacoma in 
particular-are giant international hubs of glass 
artists and glass art. Refract is a glass festival that 
showcases and celebrates the use and art of glass 
in the Pacific Northwest as well as those that work 
with it and admire it. In the festival’s first year, there 
will be live demonstrations, tours, films, exhibitions, 
talks, and open studios. Don't miss the Benjamin 
Moore, Inc. studio tour, the Western Neon School of 
Art exhibition, the opening party for Transparency: 


An LGBTQ+ Glass Art Exhibition at the Museum of 
Glass in Tacoma, and a live demo by Raven Skyriver. 
(Various locations, daily.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 

OCT 17-NOV 19 

Myra Lara: ‘Everyday Cry-sis’ 

Urban living is a /ot—especially in a city like Se¬ 
attle where the disparities between the rich and 
poor are at untenable levels. We pride ourselves 
on being liberal, green, and socially conscious, 
and yet we don’t tax big business, we don’t have 
enough public transit, and we let rents go through 
the roof. It’s exhausting! Artist Myra Lara will be 
exploring “the realities of life, political priorities, 
and social justice” in ourfair, emerald, techno¬ 
cratic city via her latest cartoon series, Everyday 
Cry-sis. ( Push/Pull, daily, free.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 

TheStrangsr.cam/EvirrOtit 


Short List 


MUSEUMS 

Beverly Semmes: 

Six Silvers 

Henry Art Gallery, Wed- 
Sun, $10, through Oct 13 

Donald Byrd: The 
America That Is to Be 

Frye Art Museum, Oct 12- 
Jan 26,Tues-Sun,free 

Flesh and Blood: Italian 
Masterpieces from the 
Capodimonte Museum 

Seattle Art Museum, 

Oct 17-Jan 26, Wed-Sun, 
$30 


Seattle Style: Fashion/ 
Function 

Museum of History ft 
Industry (MOHAI), daily, 
$22, through Oct 14 

GALLERIES 

Chantal Gibson, 
Brenetta Ward, Storme 
Webber, Moses Sun: 
Installations 

WaNaWari, Oct 18- 
Dec 28, Thurs-Sun, free 

Hayden Stern: Trans 
Tarot 

Push/Pull, daily, free, 
through Oct 15 


Photo Finish: A Group 
Exhibit of Photography 

G. Gibson Gallery, daily, 
free, through Oct 12 

Red List: Moths & 
Butterflies 

Ghost Gallery, Oct 10- 
Nov10,Tues-Sun, free 

ART EVENTS 

Capitol Hill Art Walk 

Capitol Hill, Thurs Oct 10, 

5- 8 pm, free 

Fused: A Festival of Glass 

Pratt Fine Arts Center, Fri 
Oct 18,6-10 pm, $40 

Georgetown Art Attack 

Georgetown, Sat Oct 12, 

6- 9 pm, free 


Halloween Tour 2019 

Frye Art Museum, Thurs 
Oct 17,5:30-6:30 pm, free 

The Haunting of Cloud 
Gallery: Suspiria 

Cloud Gallery,Thurs 
Oct 10,6-9 pm, free 

Lusio Lights 

Volunteer Park 
Conservatory, Sat Oct 19, 
7-10pm,$20/$22 

New Burke Grand 
Opening 

Burke Museum, Oct 12-14, 
daily, $22 

Saturday University: 

Silk Roads Past and 
Present 

Seattle Art Museum, Oct 
12-Nov 2, Sat, 10 am, $76 


Early Warnings 

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Performance 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 29 


THINGS TO DO -► Performance 


Indecent Is Incredible 

The play makes me wonder what kind of art is being produced 

in today’s concentration camps. 

BY RICH SMITH 


INDECENT 

Seattle Repertory 
Theatre 

Through Oct 26 


A ny play that involves an obscenity 
trial has a high probability of piqu¬ 
ing my interest, if only because the 
most fascinating obscenity is al¬ 
ways the trial itself. 

However, in Indecent, which runs at Seat¬ 
tle Rep through October 26, Pulitzer Prize¬ 
winning playwright Paula Vogel focuses less 
on trial scenes and more on the reason a state 
would use the courts to stomp out a play in the 
first place: power. 

Theater has the power 
to change minds and thus 
to change the world, while 
also offering everyone a 
much-needed distraction. Every play exists 
to remind us of that cliche. But, despite some 
heavy-handed moments, the Rep’s production 
of Vogel’s play avoids seeming self-serving 
and overdetermined, mostly by focusing on 
the double-edged nature of theater’s pow¬ 
er. (As any actor knows—and certainly any 
playwright—theater can save lives, but it can 
also ruin them.) Along the way, the script res¬ 
onates with contemporary issues of immigra¬ 
tion in unexpected and truly affecting ways. 

Indecent tells the history of The God of 
Vengeance, an early-20th-century play by 
Sholem Asch about an Orthodox Jew who 
runs a brothel. The controversial drama 
reveals the hypocrisies of Judaism—of all 
religions, really—and includes a romantic 
lesbian kiss with heavy petting in the rain. 
(You won’t be surprised to learn that this was 
Asch’s first play.) 

The play, originally performed only in 
Yiddish, was a hit all over Europe during the 
roaring 1920s. But when it made its English 
debut on Broadway, the cops arrested the 
producer and the entire cast for obscenity- 
even though the kiss had been cut from the 



BRONWEN HOUCK 


One of the many moments of tragic enthusiasm in this play. 


show. Implied homosexuality was apparently 
enough of a threat to the delicate sensibilities 
of Broadway’s audiences at the time. 

But the queer content wasn’t the only issue 
with The God of Vengeance. Plays containing 
lesbian relationships were seen as just one 
of the many forms of filth that Jews were 
sneaking into the country. With the influx of 
Eastern European immigration, anti-Sem¬ 
itism and extreme xenophobia were on the 
rise in the United States, and so the obscenity 
trial was just one more way the country could 
harass immigrants. 

An exuberant character named Lemml 
(played by Bradford Farwell) narrates this 


history as the years tick up from the 1920s 
to the genocidal 1930s, when he and a troupe 
of yellow-badged actors were secretly pro¬ 
ducing the play in the Polish ghettos. Even 
though The God of Vengeance risked making 
the Jews “look bad,” the play’s self-critique 
and self-questioning—which are, inciden¬ 
tally, foundational elements of the Jewish 
faith—were important enough to Lemml and 
the crew that they made sure the show went 
on even during the Holocaust. 

Moments like that one made me wonder 
what sort of art the Guatemalan migrant, 
or the Syrian refugee, or the Uighur forced- 
laborer is making—and hopefully enjoy¬ 


ing—during the rare idle moments they 
snatch from their oppressors in their con¬ 
centration camps. 

Incredible performances—particularly 
by Andi Alhadeff, Cheyenne Casebier, and 
Farwell—also make Indecent worth the 
ticket price. Each player switches between 
several different roles with different accents, 
and they even change accents depending 
on whether they’re meant to be speaking 
English or Yiddish, and they all do an im¬ 
pressive job. Though Vogel’s How I Learned 
to Drive is more common on the stages 
of regional theaters, I think I’d rather see 
Indecent appearing more often. ■ 


Top Picks 

OCT 10-13 

Autumn Knight: ‘M_ER’ 

Depending on which letters you place in the blank 

spaces, M_ER could spell mother, matter, or 

murder. All of those things are possible in this new 
work from Autumn Knight, an interdisciplinary artist 
who likes to play around with improv, visual art, and 
fucking with the audience. If the show is anything 
like Sanity TV, and it sounds a little like Sanity TV, 
Knightwill play a variously cheeky and antagonis¬ 
tic talk-show host who makes certain audience 
members feel uncomfortable a lot, which can be 
fun, especially if you’re not the one in the hot seat. 
(On the Boards, $10-$75.) RICH SMITH 


OCT ll-NOV 17 

‘The Great Moment’ 

Playwright Anna Ziegler earned a lot of attention 
in 2015 for Photograph 51, a well-received 
bio-drama about Rosalind Franklin, the woman 
who discovered DNA. Nicole Kidman played the 
starring role, everybody loved it, and Ziegler was 
praised for her “fair-minded and philosophical” 
approach to character building. Ziegler will likely 
bring that same talent for creating multidimen¬ 
sional characters to The Great Moment, which 
will have its world premiere at the Seattle Rep. 
According to press materials, the story follows 
a woman named Sarah, who is watching her 
grandfather slowly die while she raises her son. 
Alexandra Tavares plays the lead in this, and I’ve 


loved everything I’ve ever seen her in. (Seattle 
Repertory Theatre, $55-$72.) RICH SMITH 

OCT 17-19 

Ian Bell’s Brown Derby’s Francis 
Ford Coppola’s Bram Stroker’s 
Ruth’s Chris Dracula’ 

The Brown Derby Series always presents a goofy 
staged reading of a—let’s say-heavily altered 
film script. Local producer, director, and comedic 
actor Ian Bell has been running it for years, and the 
show has developed a strong cult following. This 
time he’s taking on Francis Ford Coppola’s film 
adaptation of Bram Stoker’s famous epistolary 
novel, both canonical pieces of goth culture that 
are ripe for parody. I don’t know who’s going to 
play Gary Oldman as Count Dracula, but if they 


don't wear that powdered, butt-shaped wig with 
the psychotic rat-tail, I'm going to be pissed. And 
will the actor in the role as Keanu-Reeves-playing- 
Keanu-Reeves-with-a-slightly-English-accent be 
able to nail it? There’s no way this isn't going to be 
a good time. (Re-bar, 7:30 pm, $22.) RICH SMITH 

OCT 17-20 

Sean Dorsey Dance: 

‘Boys in Trouble’ 

Queer dancer/choreographer Sean Dorsey has 
dedicated most of his work to excavating and 
preserving queer history through dance. But 
in this show, he’s taking a look at contempo¬ 
rary expressions of masculinity, including its 
intersections with race and class. For the last 
two years, Dorsey has been holding community 












30 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 


“Hilarious, Touching 
and Rewarding” 

Theatre vie w 




NOVEMBER IB 

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THINGS TO DO -► Performance 



forums on masculinity, and he’s using the stories 
he heard from students to shape the movements 
and dialogue used in the show. Like everything 
Dorsey’s done to date, expect this piece to be 
poignant without being too self-serious, funny 
without being too clever, and legible without 
being overdetermined. (Velocity Dance Center, 
7:30 pm, $20/$50.) RICH SMITH 

SUN OCT 20 

Craig Robinson 

Craig Robinson is a comic, actor, and musician 
who looks (and kind of sounds) like the late, great 
fusion keyboardist George Duke. On the screen, 
he’s been an animatedly deadpan laff riot in The 


Office, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Hot Tub Time Machine, 
Pineapple Express, and other projects. His stand- 
up routines are actually more like a sit-down 
act, with Robinson deftly playing keyboards and 
singing soulfully as he rewrites the lyrics of popu¬ 
lar tunes to hilarious effect. While comedy rarely 
works in music, music in comedy has a much 
more successful hit-to-miss ratio. To get an idea of 
Robinson’s ingenuity, check out the “sexy public 
domain songs” segment on The Late Late Show 
with James Corden, in which he reinvents utterly 
shopworn songs into something fresh and funny. 
(Neptune Theatre, 7 pm, $24-$34.) DAVE SEGAL 

TheStrange r. kj m/EverOut 


Short List 


Austen’s Pride: A New 
Musical of ‘Pride and 
Prejudice’ 

The 5th Avenue Theatre, 
$29-$159, through Oct 27 

Beware the Terror of 
Gaylord Manor 

ACT Theatre, $42-$82, 
through Nov 2 

Black Beauty 

Seattle Children's Theatre, 
$20+, through Oct 27 

Chamber Dance 
Company: Falling 

Meany Center for the 
Performing Arts, Oct 
10-13, $22 


Cinderella 

McCaw Hall, Oct19-Nov 
1, $35-$342 

Dracula 

ACT Theatre, Oct 18-Nov 
17, $27-$87 

Halloween Hell Harvest 
of Comedy 2019 

Copious, Sat Oct 19, 

10 pm, $10/$15 

House Party 2019 

Wing Luke Museum, Fri 
Oct 18,7-11 pm, $25-$60 

HYPE 

Timbre Room.Thurs 
Oct 10,8 pm, $5 


John Leguizamo: Latin 
History for Morons 

Moore Theatre, Wed Oct 

23,7:30 pm, $35-$225 

Minority Retort 

Jai Thai, Sat Oct 12, $12 

Overcoming 

18th & Union, Oct 10-14 ft 

17-19,7:30 pm, $15-$25 

Sandbox Radio: Witch 
Hunt 

Town Hall, Sun Oct 13, 
7:30 pm, $25 

Sankai Juku 

Meany Center for the 
Performing Arts, Oct 
17-19,8 pm, $61/$69 

Sunset Baby 

ArtsWest, $42, through 
Oct 20 


The Tempest 

Center Theatre, Oct 15- 
Nov 10, $50 

Ten Percent Luck 

Northwest Film Forum, 
Thurs Oct 10,7:30 pm, 
$12 

The Thanksgiving Play 

Seattle Public Theater, 
Oct17-Nov16 
This Is Halloween 

Triple Door, Oct 18-31, 
Tues-Sun, $29-$49 

Thriftease: Camp My 
Style 

Kremwerk, Fri Oct 18, 

8 pm, $10/$15 

Zombie Cheerleaders 
from Hell 

Can Can, $40+, through 
Nov 3 


Early Warnings 

COMEDY BANG! BANG! LIVE! Moore Theatre, Thurs Oct 24, 8 pm, $33-$43 


NICK KROLL: MIDDLE-AGED BOY TOUR Moore Theatre, Fri Oct 25,7:30 pm, $27-$37 


TODRICK: HAUS PARTY TOUR Moore Theatre, Sun Oct 27,7:30 pm. $35-$151 


MISS SAIGON Paramount Theatre, Oct 29-Nov 3, $30+ 


THE ATOMIC BOMBSHELLS... PUT A SPELL ON YOU! West Hall, Thurs Oct 37, 7-9 pm, $35-$200 


DISNEY ON ICE PRESENTS MICKEY’S SEARCH PARTY Various locations, Oct 30-Nov 10, $25+ 


RYAN HAMILTON Neptune Theatre, Sat Nov 2,9 pm, $29 


SAVION GLOVER Dimitriou’s Jazz Alley, Nov 4-6, $50 


TIM a ERIC: MANDATORY ATTENDANCE WORLD TOUR Moore Theatre, Fri Feb 28,8 pm, $40/$90 
































THINGS TO DO -► Books & Talks 


Books & Talks 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 31 


Ta-Nehisi Coates Is Not Perfect 

I did not like his debut novel, The Water Dancer. 

BY CHARLES MUDEDE 


T he great black American writer 
Ta-Nehisi Coates turns out not to 
be a great novelist. And this isn’t a 
bad thing. It happens. We can’t be 
good at everything. 

Coates, the celebrated essayist who is 
often compared to James Baldwin, clearly 
thought that, like Baldwin, he could write 
fiction as gripping as his 
TA-NEHISI COATES nonfiction. He tried, he 
Sun Oct 20, 

Benaroya Hall. Save it a decade of his life, 
7:30 pm, $45-$105 but he definitely failed. 

Yes, the novel, The Wa¬ 
ter Dancer, was picked by Oprah Winfrey 
for her much-prized book club, and it has 
received rave reviews in a number of places, 
but the truth is it’s pretty much a mess from 
beginning to end. 

I wanted the novel to be great, because 
Coates is not supposed to fail. He is on the 
right side of the fight, the right side of history. 
The argument he presented for reparations 


He tried to write 
fiction as gripping 
as his nonfiction. He 
definitely failed. 


for black Americans in 2014 in the Atlan¬ 
tic is impeccable. His memoir Between the 
World and Me is a 21st-century masterpiece 
of American literature. How can this writer 
do anything wrong? 

Well, this is how. The main flaw with the 
novel The Water Dancer is Coates wrote it to 



sound and feel like a novel. The story—which 
is set in Virginia, and is narrated by a young 
man, Hiram Walker, who has a photographic 
memory (one ofthe two superpowers he pos¬ 
sesses)—is told with the deliberate gravity of 
a writer who believes he’s writing a major 
work of fiction. 

It’s as if Coates did not want the reader to 
be uncertain about the status ofthe work. It’s 
not an essay, nor a historical document; it’s 


ANNA WEBBER / GETTY IMAGES 

a serious American novel. Page after page, 
the language insists on this. That villain has 
“deep set eyes.” This man is looking with 
“sidelong glances.” The room is “flooded 
with light.” There is in the distance “the last 
orange breath of a dying sun.” 

The only “respite” from this stiff, stilted, 
novelistic language is when Coates switch¬ 
es to his essayist mode and describes (in a 
monologue, of which there are too many 


in this book, or in exposition) an aspect of 
American slavery that clearly throws light 
on an aspect of the culture of our times. Or 
when Coates describes 
the narrator’s superpow¬ 
ers, which include “con¬ 
duction,” the ability to 
collapse time and make 
quantum leaps. (Hiram 
shares this superpower 
with Harriet Tubman.) 

When I completed 
this book, which is too 
long and often too slow, 
I found a real apprecia¬ 
tion for Colson White¬ 
head’s 2016 novel The 
Underground Railroad. 
Now that book, which 
covers almost the exact 
same ground as The Wa¬ 
ter Dancer, is a novel that does not sound 
like it’s trying to be important. It gets out of 
its own way. It has real narrative force. The 
pages move on their own. While reading The 
Water Dancer, I could feel my hand turning 
every one of its 400 or so pages. 

Also, Whitehead is much more masterful 
when dealing with his novel’s fantastic ele¬ 
ment—the underground railroad that is real¬ 
ly an underground railroad. Colson’s fantasy 
has the right combination of being very true 
and very ridiculous at once. In The Water 
Dancer, the fantastic element (conduction, 
which is connected, in a very complicated 
way, to Hiram’s photographic memory) al¬ 
ways feels like it should be in another book 
(a comic book), one without the ambition of 
being a Great American Novel. ■ 



STEVE PARKE 


Top Picks 

FRI OCT II 

Nick Cave 

You, and I, and most regular people know Nick 
Cave from his band the Bad Seeds. (For a frame of 
reference, their slinky, spooky “Red Right Hand” is 
the opening theme ofthe BBC period crime drama 
Peaky Blinders .) Some of us also know him for his 
early tenure as frontman of influential 1970s-era 
band the Birthday Party (see: “Release the Bats,” 
“Mr. Clarinet”). Cave's style has always been deep, 
dark, and gothic, like his baritone vocals and looks 
(ink-black hair, pale skin, well-cut black suits, 
fathomless eyes). He reflects on this, his music, 
his life, and anything else that fans who attend 
his current “Conversations with Nick Cave” tour 
stop in Seattle want to ask him about. It’s billed 
as an intimate mix of talk and music that will be 


“humble, personal, pure, with an open dialogue 
between Nick and the audience.” (During his debut 
in Australia, after an 11-year-old girl asked, “What’s 
the hardest thing about what you do?” he replied, 
“With live performance, the terror of standing in 
front of people... is incredibly addictive. But I grew 
to have a certain control over the outcome... these 
conversation events have brought back the terror. 
Because I don’t really know what I’m doing. And 
here I am answering the questions of a child.”) 
(Moore Theatre, 8 pm, $50-$80.) LEILANI POLK 

SAT OCT 12 

Augusten Burroughs: 

‘Toil & Trouble’ 

It’s a good time to be a witch. Modern witches 
(less the crook-nosed cartoon and more the 
millennial with a crystal collection) often profess 
to have exceedingly heightened powers of 
intuition, and this includes Augusten Burroughs, 


the memoirist made famous for his portrayal of 
his very unconventional family in Running with 
Scissors. He might not be a millennial, but he is 


a self-professed witch, and his new book details 
how, from an early age, he had certain... abilities 
others seemed not to possess. He confessed 













32 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 


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I'N DEPENDENT EYEWEAR 
FOR [INDEPENDENT MINDS,, 


THE ON* A ii p ONLY, a t fef C E 19 3 5., 




Taste o>f Iceland returns to Seattle October 11-20 fora weekend jam-packed with all things Icelandic^ Iceland Naturally's famouscultural festival 
femmes mostly free events throughout the city that highlight the best of Iceland's unique culture, food, music, flint, and mere. 


CONFERENCE 

NORDIC KNITTING CONFERENCE AT NATIONAL NORDIC 

MtfMUVt OCT 11-13 


CULTURE 

ICELAND OAY AT NATIONAL NORDIC MUSEUM , OC119 

IMWM-JPM 


MUSIC 

REYKJAVIK CALLING AT KEKT|OCT. 19i DOORS 
CtKN AT IifJQPM 


CUISINE 

ICELANDIC MENU AT CUOCOI OCT. 17-30 

PANEL 

WHY 1SGENDER EQUALITY SO IWCflTAM TO [LliCflAL) 
GftOtflHT AT NATIONAL NORDIC MLtSUM I OCT. 1714-fclSPto 

LITERATURE 


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COCKTAILS 

TASTE OF ICELAND COCKTAIL CLASS AT THE NORTHERN 

LIGHTS ROOM - HOTEL A NORA I OCT. W S3MPM 


FILM 

SHORTFISH: ICELAND'S PREMIER SHORT FILM FESTIVAL 
AT NATIONAL NORDIC MUSEUM | OCT J012-4PM 

DRINK 

BAft TAKEOVER WITH TOTA AT LIBERTY 10CT. 20 

FPM-CL05E 


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Books & Talks 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 33 


THINGS TO DO -► Books & Talks 


this to his mother, who wasn't surprised. And 
why would she be? She, too, was a witch, if 
not exactly the world's best mother, as anyone 
familiar with his previous work will recall. Toil 
ft Trouble is about coming to terms with what 
he could-and, perhaps more importantly, could 
not-control in his life and others’. (Elliott Bay 
Book Company, 7 pm, free.) KATIE HERZOG 

THURS OCT 17 

Richard Kenney 

Richard Kenney is the best local poet you’ve 
probably never heard of. But this guy is the real 
deal. He won a MacArthur “genius” grant for in¬ 
venting new ways to create and pattern rhymes. 
That’s right. Before Kenney started writing (and 
writing about writing, a speciality of his), we had 
fewer ways to find rhymes, which is one of the 
major food groups in poetry. If that’s all he did, 
he’d deserve your full attention for at least one 
evening. But he's also given the world several 
books of poetry that are worth keeping close by. 
Using syntax to probe science, and diving deep 
into the evolutionary origins of language, Kenney 
refreshes the language that daily dies in our 
mouths, and he brushes the dust off old feelings 
like joy and love so that we can feel them again 
as if for the first time. ( Broadway Performance 
Hall, 7:30 pm, $20-$80.) RICH SMITH 

WED OCT 23 

Hanif 

Abdurraqib 

Hanif Abdurraqib 
writes good poet¬ 
ry about music, 
and he writes 
good music crit¬ 
icism using the 
tools of poetry. 

Combining per¬ 
sonal narrative with an electric, analytical mind, 
Abdurraqib has made me consider the work of 
artists like Celine Dion, Macklemore, and Carly 
Rae Jepsen more deeply than I ever imagined I 
would. And, as much as it pains me to say this, 
it's true: He has written powerfully about the 
band Fall Out Boy. His essay about going to see 
a Bruce Springsteen show after visiting Michael 
Brown’s plaque is a must-read, too. So when 
news came out that Abdurraqib was working 
on a biography/book-length personal essay 
about his love for A Tribe Called Quest, called Go 
Ahead in the Rain, I jumped for joy. (Town Hall, 
7:30 pm, $10.) RICH SMITH 



KATE SWEENEY 


Literary Luncheon: 

David Guterson 

It’s been five years since we’ve seen a new book 
from David Guterson, famed local author of New 
York Times best-selling novel Snow Falling on 
Cedars. But now he’s breaking that silence with 
a new book-length narrative poem called Turn 
Around Time, which he says offers “a poetic 
take on the qualities of foot travel and of, among 
other things, birds, bats, fungi, flora, and fellow 
travelers.” With poem titles like “Barthes and 
Barth,” Guterson’s poetry more readily appeals 
to academic types who are absolutely sure how 
to pronounce both of those writers’ names. But 
this hiker-poet is at his best when he’s writing 
about Washington’s environs, so I have high 
hopes that these poems will be more grounded 
(ha-ha, kill me). Plus, press materials indicate 
that the long poem is sort of about a midlife 
crisis, which is always a fun time to check in on 
an author. And come on, people: He's the guy 
who wrote Snow Falling on Cedars. Hear him 
read over a catered lunch. (Third Place Books 
Ravenna, 1 pm.) RICH SMITH 

" ^ rheStranger.ram/EverOut 


Short 

List 

Behind the Veil: A Night 
of Femme Horror 

The Pine Box, Tues 
Oct 22,6-10 pm, $25 

Booktoberfest: 'Ales 
From The Crypt’ 

Palace Theatre 8: Art Bar, 
Tues Oct 22,8 pm, free 

Chris Abani: 

Mining for Awe 

Hugo House, Fri Oct 18, 

7 pm, $15/$30 

Clyde W. Ford: 

Think Black 

Elliott Bay Book 
Company, Tues Oct 15, 

7 pm, free 

Eliza Reid: Reykjavik to 
Seattle 

Central Library, Fri Oct 18, 
7 pm, free 

Hillary Clinton and 
Chelsea Clinton: 

Gutsy Women 

Campion Ballroom, Fri 
Oct 18,7 pm, $40 

Jeanette Winterson: 
Frankisstein 

Central Library, Wed 
Oct 16,7 pm, free 


Jonathan Gruber: 
Jump-Starting 
America’s Economy 

Town Hall, Mon Oct 14, 
7:30 pm, $5 

Lawrence Weschler: 

And How Are You Dr 
Sacks? 

Elliott Bay Book 
Company, Fri Oct 11, 

7 pm, free 

Neal Kosaly-Meyer: 
Finnegans Wake 

Gallery 1412, Sat Oct 12, 

8 pm, $5-$15 

Paul Theroux: 

A Mexican Journey 

Town Hall, Wed Oct 16, 
7:30 pm, $5 

Rachel Maddow: 
Blowout 

Benaroya Hall, Fri Oct 11, 

8 pm, $62 

Timothy Egan: 

A Pilgrimage to Eternity 

Town Hall, Tues Oct 15, 
7:30 pm,$35/$40 

Washington State Book 
Awards 2019 

Central Library, Sat Oct 12, 
7-9 pm, free 


Early Warnings 


LIT CRAWL SEATTLE Capitol Hill, Thurs Oct 24,6 pm-12 am, free 


THE MOTH SEATTLE GRANDSLAM Town Hall, Fri Oct 25, 8 pm, $25 


AKASHINGA: THE BRAVE ONES (NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE) Benaroya Hall, Oct 27-29, $28-$50 


ANDRE ACIMAN: FIND ME Central Library, Mon Nov 4,7pm, free 


AMPERSAND LIVE Moore Theatre, Thurs Nov 7. 7:30 pm, $15-$45 


SALON OF SHAME Theatre Off Jackson, Tues Nov 12, 8 pm, $16 


JENNY SLATE: LITTLE WEIRDS TOUR Neptune Theatre, Sun Nov 17,8 pm, $34 



OCTOBER 19-20 

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Brins this AO to get Free 
Turkish Coffee 

' 



2019 Seattle 
Antiquarian 
Book Fair 


“The Pacific Northwest’s 
Biggest Book Event” 

Sat / Oct. 12 / io am - 6pm 
Sun / Oct. 13 /11 am - 4pm 

Seattle Center 

Exhibition Hall / 301 Mercert St. 

























34 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 


'TcZ'Mx 


COMMON KINGS 

WITH LANDON MCNAMARA. 

ELI MAC, BIG BODY CISCO, 
WESTAFA 

ELECTRIC ^ 
GUEST 

WITH WAFIA 

CAT POWER 

WITH ZSELA 

OCTOBER 20 - 8:00PM 

OCTOBER 28 - 8:30PM 

OCTOBER 30 - 8:30PM 

BERNER 

WITH RMEAN, 

ANONYMOUS, HOLLYWOOD 

THE AQUABATSI 

WITH PPL MVR 

TORE NWIGWE 

NOVEMBER 3 - 8:00PM 

NOVEMBER 7 - 7:30PM 

NOVEMBER 10-8:00PM 

ffliTYl 

SUMMERWALKER 

WITH MELII 

CHELSEA WOLFE 

WITH IONNA GIKA 

GUNDERSEN 

WITH SCOTT RUTH 

NOVEMBER 16-9:00PM 

NOVEMBER 17-8:30PM 

NOVEMBER 20 - 8:30PM 

CAUTIOUS CLAY 

WITH REMI WOLF 

NOVEMBER 27-8:30PM 

THIEVERY 

CORPORATION 

WITH BRAZILIAN GIRLS 

DECEMBER 1 - 8:30PM 

THE DANDY 
WARHOLS 

WITH MOTHER MARIPOSA 

DECEMBER 6-8:30PM 


DANNY 

BRDWN 

WITH ASHNIKKO, ZEELOOPERZ 


OCTOBER 31 - 8:00PM 


THE WORD ALIVE, ASHLAND 


NOVEMBER 13 -7:45PM 


WITH CHEE, DIGITAL ETHOS, ZIA 


NOVEMBER 21 - 8:30PM 


COMETHAZINE 

WITH MAX THE DEMON 


DECEMBER 8 - 8:00PM 


SHOWBOX SODO 


1700 FIRST AVENUE SOUTH 


SUM 41 

WITH THE AMITY AFFLICTION, 

THE PLOT IN YOU 

YELAWOLF 

GWAR 

WITH SACRED REICH, 

TOXIC HOLOCAUST, 
AGAINST THE GRAIN 

SHORE 

MAF 

LINE 

A 

OCTOBER 13-7:00PM 

OCTOBER 16-8:00PM 

OCTOBER 21 -7:30PM 

OCTOBER 27 - 8:00PM | 

BISHOP BRIGGS 

WITH MIYA FOLICK, 

JAX ANDERSON 

GRAMATIK 

WITH THE LIBRARIAN, 
BALKAN BUMP 

HEROBUST 

WITH YOOKIE, INFINITE 

SK Ml 
THE SLUM 

WITH POUYA, P< 
DJ SCHEME, DAN 

ISK 

IPGDD 

3P SMOKE, 

NY TOWERS 

NOVEMBER 6 - 8:00PM 

NOVEMBER 8 - 9:00PM 

NOVEMBER 9 - 8:00PM 

NOVEMBER 11 -9:00PM 

CHON* BETWEEN 
THE BURIED AND ME 

WITH INTERVALS 

TROYBOI 

WITH YULTRON 

CASH CASH 
* R3HAB 

X AMBASSADORS 

WITH BEAR HANDS, VERITE 

NOVEMBER 13-7:00PM 

NOVEMBER 14-8:00PM 

NOVEMBER 16-9:00PM 

NOVEMBER 17-7:30PM 


BABYMETAL 

WITH THE HU 

GRIZ 

WITH THE FUNK HUNTERS 

BRDCKHAMPTDN 

WITH 100 GECS 

KEVIN GATES 

WITH YK OSIRIS, NLE CHOPPA, 
ROD WAVE, SDOT FRESH 

OCTOBER 16 - PARAMOUNT THEATRE 

OCTOBER 17 - PARAMOUNT THEATRE 

OCTOBER 27 - WAMU THEATER 

NOVEMBER 30 - WAMU THEATER 


Get tickets at 

OR CALL 888-929-7849 


axs 


.com 


SHOWBOXPRESENTS.COM 







































































THINGS TO DO -► Music 


Music 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 35 


Why Should I Give a 
Fuck About Stereolab? 

The world’s greatest Marxist motorik ye-ye rock band is BACK. 

BY DAVE SEGAL 


STEREOLAB 

Tues0ct15, 
Showbox, 8:30 pm, 
$30 adv/$35 DOS, 
all ages 


Y ears Active: 19 (they returned this 
year after a decade-long hiatus). 
Provenance: London, England. 
Essential Albums: Peng!, Tran¬ 
sient Random-Noise Bursts with An¬ 
nouncements, Emperor Tomato Ketchup, Dots 
and Loops, Simple Headphone Mind, Cobra and 
Phases Group Play Voltage in the Milky Night. 

Essential Songs: It’s impossible to nar¬ 
row it down to a manageable number, but 
here goes—“Golden Ball” (an “All Tomor¬ 
row’s Parties” homage, but more sinister and 
disjointed); “Metronomic Underground” 
(a skewed take on Can’s 
“Yoo Doo Right,” but funk¬ 
ier); “Soop Groove #1” 
(hypno-minimalist, IDM 
groove science); “Vonal 
Declosion” (swirling, Serge Gainsbourg- 
like funk); “Parsec” (a drum & bass samba); 
“Perversion” (subtle homage to the Velvet 
Underground’s “What Goes On,” minus the 
VU song’s sublime peaks); “We’re Not Adult 
Orientated” (more “What Goes On” worship); 
“Les Yper-Sound” (what Radiohead’s Kid A 
wishes it could be); “Olv 26” (serene drones, 
wonky oscillations, tranquil cruising tempo); 
“The Noise of Carpet” (their punkiest mo¬ 
ment); “Trippin’ with the Birds” (peak lyser¬ 
gic disorientation with Nurse with Wound); 
“Emperor Tomato Ketchup” (nods to PiL’s 
“Socialist”); “Jenny Ondioline” (Neul’s mo¬ 
torik klassik “Hallogallo” repurposed as girl- 
group gloriousness); “Escape Pod (From the 
World of Medical Observations)” (their most 
unhinged psych-rocker); “The Free Design” 
(complex rhythms, oddly enchantingmelody); 
“Fuses” (bizarro-world, vibraphone-powered 
jazz); “Outer Accelerator” (hattipto Michael 
Rother’s Flammende Herzen ); “Fiery Yellow” 
(an exotica tribute a la the Beach Boys’ “Pet 



Sounds”); “Blue Milk” (transcendent, Terry 
Riley-esque minimalism). 

Influenced By: Neu!, the Velvet Under¬ 
ground, the Modern Lovers, Can, BBC Ra- 
diophonic Workshop, the Beach Boys, the 
Free Design, Brian Eno, Silver Apples, Steve 
Reich, Frangoise Hardy, Esquivel, ye-ye. 

Influence On: Broadcast, Cornelius, the 
Postal Service, Electrelane, Fiixa. 

Precautions: Stereolab are returning to 


the live circuit after a 10-year layoff. Ergo, 
they maybe slightly rusty. Also, their last two 
albums— Chemical Chords and Not Music- 
are lackluster. But considering how many ex¬ 
cellent songs Stereolab released throughout 
the 1990s, this may be a moot point. Finally, 
a tip for record collectors: Avoid the reissues 
put out by a dubious label called 1972. Splurge 
instead on Warp Records’ more recent rere¬ 
leases, which sound better, come loaded with 


bonus tracks, and filter money to Stereolab. 

Why You Should Give a Fuck: Stereo¬ 
lab have built a towering canon by cleverly 
synthesizing their members’ impeccable, 
eclectic musical tastes. Their sophisticat¬ 
ed bricolage of elements—krautrock’s mo¬ 
torik grooves, Can and the Velvet Under¬ 
ground’s droning keyboards and chugging 
guitars, dulcet vocals somewhere between 
Frangoise Hardy and Astrud Gilberto, ana- 
log-synth fuckery a la Silver Apples and the 
BBC Radiophonic Workshop, suave appro¬ 
priation of loungey smoothness—coalesces 
into bewitching songs that age well. 

If listening to a woman elegantly illustrate 
the flaws of capitalism in French and English 
in a languidly buoyant tone pushes your but¬ 
tons, Laetitia Sadier has you covered. (Her 
wonderful vocal foil, the Australian Mary 
Hansen, tragically perished in a bicycle 
crash in 2002, and Stereolab haven’t been 
the same since.) 

Honestly, Sadier and Hansen could be 
singing about their favorite plants, pastries, 
or pole vaulters, and it wouldn’t really mat¬ 
ter. Their voices succeed as instruments of 
pure joy, their mellifluousness epitomizing 
chill diva status. But if lyrics are your bag, 
Sadier and Hansen deploy sugary voices to 
convey vinegary ideas, such as this one from 
“Nihilist Assault Group”: “Morals are for 
the blind / Not a critical mind,” while “Ping 
Pong” decries economic booms and busts 
and manufactured wars’ effects within an 
utterly charming pop context. 

Here’s the crazy thing: Stereolab could 
do a five-hour concert and still not exhaust 
their storehouse of spellbinding songs. By 
siphoning so many influences from music’s 
elite tier, they’ve become hugely influential 
and distinctive in their own right. ■ 


Top Picks 


THURS OCT IQ 

Depth x Haiised: Daniel Avery 

UJ2EHIE3 London’s Daniel Avery is one of the 
world's highest-profile techno producer/DJs, re¬ 
cording stellar albums for large indie Mute Records’ 
Phantasy subsidiary. His popularity isjustified by 
his mastery of spectral ambient atmospheres, en¬ 
grossing abstract rhythmic workouts, and nuanoed, 
peak-time dance-floor movers for acid gobblers. 
(Check out “Hyper Detail” from this year's Song for 
Alpha B-Sides ft Remixes for a revelatory example 
of the latter style.) No matter in which mode he 
works, Avery prioritizes enhancing your trip to the 
utmost, both on record and in club settings. Let your 


boss know Friday morning that you feel too good to 
go into work. ( Kremwerk, 9 pm, $12.) DAVE SEGAL 

Four Tet 

ESSESJI3 A D J with fantastic, eclectic taste, 
Four Tet (aka Englishman Kieran Hebden) uses his 
unerring instincts to create brilliantly hybridized 
music. Early recordings such as Thirtysixtwentyfive 
and “Glasshead” revealed Hebden’s interest in soul- 
jazz questing and krautrock propulsion. But he's 
largely left those styles behind for a sleek, cerebral 
brand of dance music that weaves in intriguing 
ambient, minimalist, and folk passages along with 
uplifting vocal samples. The tracks on There Is Love 
in You, Morning/Evening, New Energy, and Anna 
Painting aren’t functional DJ tools so much as 
they’re intricately stitched compositions in which a 
panoply of organic-seeming synthetic elements co¬ 
here into kaleidoscopic tapestries of ecstatic sound. 


Hebden isn’t afraid to go on extended journeys that 
will transport you to sublime headspaces. (Show- 
box Sodo, 8 pm, all ages, $23/$28.) DAVE SEGAL 

FBI OCT II 

50th! Great Records of 1969: 

The Tony Williams Lifetime’s 
‘Emergency!’ 

[^11 Along with Mahavishnu Orchestra's Birds 
of Fire and Love Cry Want’s self-titled LP, the Tony 
Williams Lifetime's Emergency! ranks among 
the best records to convince jazz-rock haters 
that the genre is not only worth your time, it’s a 
goddamn mind-bomb. Finally taking up the role 
of band leader after years of incredibly dexterous 
drumming for one of Miles Davis’s hottest groups, 
Tony Williams enlisted fellow Miles sidemen John 


McLaughlin on guitar and Larry Young on organ 
for Emergency!. Together, the trio fused fiery 
instrumental interplay with precision riffing and 
rhythming. It’s as if peak-years Michael Jordan, 
Kobe Bryant, and LeBron James formed a basket¬ 
ball team and decided to unleash all of their most 
athletic moves for one game. For this tribute, local 
greats D’Vonne Lewis (drums), Joe Doria (organ), 
and Cole Schuster (guitar) will put this explosive, 
inspirational LP through its paces. ( The Royal 
Room, 6:30 and 9:30 pm, $15-$20.) DAVE SEGAL 


Prom Queen, Von Wildenhaus 


SOUL/R&B 


| Seattle “doom-wop” band Prom 
Queen's sophomore album Midnight Veil is a trip. 
The record is mystical and dreamy, a swirling romp 
of retro-pop fun. Instead of following the model 
of making music videos for just the singles, Prom 
Queen made an entire video album for the record. 









36 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 



OCTOBER 28 




LIVE® 


ROYA 

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llisley Drill Ncrdsliom RkiIo-I Hall 

Bosmbifio (Nigert and Vieiw Farka Toure IMali) perform joint and separate sels, both electric 
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Sahara Desert- 1 he original btrlhpFace ol the blues, 


OCTOBER 29 

joriatban Elichniah featuring Tommy Larkins on 


rums 


llrsluy flail Nordslmiii Recital Hall 


Singer-sonLfi'uiitei Jonathan Ricftman has been writing music, recording and louring for most 
ol his life. In the early 1970s he formed the Modern Lovers, a major progeniior of punk musk. 
Drummer Tommy Larkins was in the groups Naked Prey. Giant Sand and oilier popular hands 
m Tucson, ArliWna. Tommy's drumming and Jonathan's guitar and singing blend seamlessly, 
create an unforgettable Hve e*perteeee, 


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Music 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 37 


THINGS TO DO -► Music 


It’s a campy, glittery, and sexy 58 minutes. In honor 
of the record’s fifth anniversary, Prom Queen will be 
screening the video album in its entirety. In addition 
to performing live, the event will also serve as 
Midnight Veil’s vinyl launch party. New York “guitar 
noir” band Von Wildenhaus will open. ( Triple Door, 

8 pm, $25-$35.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 

SAT OCT 12 



DAVID MARQUES 


Makaya McCraven 

This booking of the great Chicago drummer/ 
composer/improviser Makaya McCraven proves 
that Earshot Jazz Festival’s organizers know what’s 
happening with younger musicians in the game, as 
well as with its elders. Along with Ben LaMar Gay, 
Jeff Parker, Damon Locks, and jaimie branch, Mc¬ 
Craven is part of the International Anthem label's 
bold roster of exceptional fusionists. On his latest 
album, 2018’s critically acclaimed Universal Be¬ 
ings, McCraven achieves a deft balance between 
earthy and astral jazz-funk. Using vibes, harps, and 
strings to augment a restlessly inventive rhythm 
section, McCraven generates a rich, spiritual sound 
that bears a passport to many far-flung spots on 
the musical map. (The Royal Room, 7 and 9:30 pm, 
$10-$29.) DAVE SEGAL 


Pampa, Caitlin Sherman, 
Hotel Vignette 


ROCK/POP 


| Seattle-based Pampa craft a mix 
of down-tempo guitar pop, dusty 1970s-vin- 
tage-tinged indie folk rock, and neo psychedelia 
dosed heavily with Latino influences, all of it fin¬ 
ished with a layer of gray PNW moodiness. Buenos 
Aires native singer-songwriter-guitarist Moon Bail- 
lie helms the quartet, and his bilingual lyrics on new 
sophomore full-length La Contumacia are often 
abstract and delivered in poetic streams-of-con- 
sciousness, reflecting on the sun, the moon, sky, 
sand, love, the idea of home, the passage of time, 
open land and wilderness versus the city, existence 
... This is a release party celebrating La Contumacia 
(“The contumacy," meaning “a stubborn refusal to 
obey or comply with authority”), and the album 
ranges from the bouncy yet haunted set opener 
“When the Dawn Is Gone,” to the darkly urgent 
Crazy Horse-vibing rock of “Maniobrando (Con La 
Llama),” to the expansive, windswept luster of “So 
Far (Yes, So Far)," which features guest vocals by 
the Black Tones' Eva Walker. (Sunset Tavern, 9 pm, 
$10.) LEILANI POLK 


crew SunTzu Sound. He is also the cohost of 
KBCS’s Friday night program City Soul, where he 
deals in dance music with soul but not neces¬ 
sarily soul music-boogie, disco, jazz, RftB, Afro, 
techno, hip-hop, house, and more. Improv is a 
given with Afrocop, a spectral jazz trio whose 
sounds veer into outer space, with moods and 
styles varying greatly, from cuts that feel like they 
should be scoring the chase scenes in the original 
(1980s-era) Terminator (like “Sci-Tropics”), to “Up¬ 
ward Bound,” which starts out with vague NOLA 
jazz vibes before venturing into cosmic groove- 
land. (Timbre Room, 9 pm, $10-$16.) LEILANI POLK 

TUES OCT 15 


Faye Webster 


ROCK/POP 


Faye Webster is an Atlanta-based sing¬ 
er-songwriter who loves the pedal steel guitar. Often 
clad in a grandma-vibing visor, her brand of weirdo, 
folk-rooted music is charming and breezy. But if you 
pay attention, a thread of sorrow runs through it. An 
associate of Awful Records, Webster somewhat 
surprisingly has close ties to the ATL rap commu¬ 
nity. Her most recent album, Atlanta Millionaires 
Club, features winsome tracks like “Right Side of My 
Neck” and hard-hitting cuts like “Flowers,” which 
taps Atlanta rapper Father. While I do find the mash- 
up more than a little eye-roll inducing, it works. 

(. Barboza, 8 pm, $13/$ 75.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 


OCT 15-16 


Aldous Harding 



CLARE SHILLAND 


Aldous Harding, Hand Habits 


ROCK/POP 


The world needs more weirdos to stay 
weird, and Aldous Harding is holding it down. The 
New Zealand folk singer-songwriter’s music is a bit 
unsettling-not in a spooky way, but like her songs 
and voice might rip open the fabric of time. “The 
Barrel” off third album Designer is an absolute 
banger, with the accompanying music video 
featuring Harding dressed like a Hieronymus Bosch 
figure, moving like a puppet on-screen. She sings 
about showing the ferret to the egg. It’s genius 
and strange and makes me feel like perhaps I’ve 
witnessed a spell being cast. More of this, please! 
(Tractor Tavern, 8 pm, $23.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 


WED OCT 16 


SUN OCT 13 


DJ J-Justice, Afrocop 

EHS23This Earshot Jazz Festival billing 
stretches well past the usual constraints of the 
genre into exploratory terrain, if you couldn't tell 
by the venue or the artists involved. DJ J-Justice 
is a founding member of well-regarded West 
London-influenced DJ/production/promotions 


Knife Knights, Darius Jones, 
Stas Thee Boss 


HIP-HOP/RAP 


| Knife Knights is essentially a project 
by two wonderful musical minds, that of Ishmael 
Butler and Erik Blood. The two first met in 2003— 
but in 2009, Blood produced and mixed the two 
debut EPs by Shabazz Palaces (a duo made up 
of Butler and Tendai Maraire). In 2017, Blood and 



OCT. 19 -NOV. 1 


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38 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 



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FEATURED EVENTS 


10.18 Friday (Electronic) 

LUSINE & TRENT 
MOORMAN (LIVE) 

with Navvi, Ovoid, IG88 


10.11 Friday (80s New Wave) 

NITE WAVE 

THE BEST 80S PROM EVER! (SO FAR) 
with Clive Farrington (When in 
Rome) *80s Prom Attire Highly 
Recommended* 


10.19 Saturday (Punk Jazz) 

CRACK SABBATH 

with 45th St Brass 


10.12 Saturday (Funk) 

ELDRIDGE GRAVY & 
THE COURT SUPREME 

with Maxwell Friedman Group, 
JoyTribe 


10.26 Saturday (90s Party) 

90'S HALLOWEEN 
PROM 

with AII4doras, DJ NisMode 


10.13 Sunday (Progressive Metal) 

GEOFF TATE'S 

OPERATION: 

MINDCRIME 

with Mark Daly, Syztem7 


®,4© 


10.27 Sunday (Hip-hop) 

WAX 

with Ubi (Ces Cru), 
Lance Skiiiwalker 


10.30 Wednesday (Hip-hop) 

LEE "SCRATCH" PERRY 

with SUBATOMIC SOUND SYSTEM 


UPCOMING EVENTS 


10.17 Thursday (Electronic) 

THE HUMAN 
EXPERIENCE & GONE 
GONE BEYOND (LIVE) 

with Lazy Syrup Orchestra 


11.1 Friday (Live Tribute) 

UNDER PRESSURE feat 

BOWIEVISION 

with Queen Mother 


10.9 KNEEBODY 10.1 FUTURISTIC 10.11 TUBBY LOVE at High Dive 10.16 MARLON CRAFT 0.19 [MAYDAY! at High Dive 10.23 CESCHI X ONRY OZZBORN 
X ROB SONIC 10.24 BIDDADAT 10.25 THROUGH THE ROOTS 10.25 JAI HO! THRILLER at High Dive 10.29 WEEN TRIBUTE 0.31 DOOM FUNK HALLOWEEN 
ft HIGH PULP 11.2 KALYA SCINTILLA 11.3 RON ARTIS II 11.4 THE MIDNIGHT HOUR 11.1 MARCIA GRIFFITHS 11.7 CYTRUS & THE FUNKY KNUCKLES 11.8 
NOVALIMA 11.8 DIEGO'S UMBRELLA at High Dive 11.9 KUINKA 1 1.10 JACOB JOLLIFF BAND 11.12 THE BLOOD MOON ORCHESTRA 11.13 DELVON LAMARR 
ORGAN TRIO 11.14 SODOWN 11.15 JAI HO! 90'S THROWBACK 1.16 BROTHER ALI 11.11 CONSIDER THE SOURCE at High Dive 11.11 ALBOROSIE & THE 
SHENGENCLAN 11.1' RUCC1 11.21 JENNY & THE MEXICATS at High Dive 1 1.22-23 TAUK & JAZZ IS PHSH 11.24 EVE 6 11.27 & 11.2< THANKFUL DEAD ft ANDY 
COE BAND 11.30 GOOPSTEPPA & SAQI 12. BLOCKHEAD & ELIOT LIPP 12.6 DJ QUIK 12. CLINTON FEARON 12.12 & 12.13 MOON HOOCH (2 NIGHTS!) 
12.1 HOT BUTTERED RUM 12.18 REEL ROCK 14 SCREENING 12.20 PETTY OR NOT 12.21-22 CHROMEO (DJ SET) 12.2E "TALKING DEAD" 1.7 MURKULES 



WED 10/16 

ROBOT & RAVIDAT • NEON BLOOM 

— .—---THU 10/17 ---- 

LUNA MOSS • BLACK NITE CRASH 
BLUE GLASS 

.FRI 10/18. 

BEAUTIFUL FREAKS • OPTIONS OPEN (RELEASE 
PARTY] • SOFT CHEESE • SPRIG 

.SAT 10/19. 

VANNA OH! • THE RARE FORMS • NEW YORK CITY COPS 
(STROKES TRIBUTE] • TIGER RIDER 

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MONSTER ROAD 

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Music 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 39 


THINGS TO DO -► Music 



GREG WILLIAMS 


Butler finally came together in Knife Knights, which 
is less a cultural/music project like Shabazz Palaces 
and more of an exploration of sound itself, like 
Explosions in the Sky. With Knife Knights, one gets 
lost in the infinities of processed and reprocessed 
music. At this Earshot Jazz Festival concert, they 
will perform with support from NYC alto sax player 
and composer Darius Jones and Seattle’s own fu¬ 
ture soul artist Stas Thee Boss. ( Langston Hughes 
Performing Arts Institute, 7:30 pm, $10-$27.) 
CHARLES MUDEDE 


Max Richter, American 
Contemporary Music Ensemble, 
Grace Davidson 


CLASSICAL/OPERA 


My intro to German-born UK- 
based avant composer Max Richter came via The 
Leftovers, that fantastic yet short-lived postapoc- 
alyptic HBO series from Damon Lindelof. Richter 
scored the show's main theme, and numerous 
moments throughout the series, to dramatic, ex¬ 
quisite, evocative effect. His Leftovers work made 
you feel things, deeply. He’s also been tapped for 
loads of other film and TV soundtracks-Armra/, 
Black Mirror, Mary Queen of Scots, Ad Asfra-in 
addition to releasing eight albums that vary 
between ambient, classical, and post-minimalist 
sounds. In 2015, he released Sleep, an 8.5-hour- 
long “listening experience” based on the neuro¬ 
science of sleep and meant to score a full night’s 
rest. He performed it in its entirety outdoors in 
LA's Grand Park. Audience members were spread 
out on 560 beds, and it was timed so that the final 
movement occurred at dawn. He was joined by 
members of the American Contemporary Music 
Ensemble and singer Grace Davidson, both of 
whom will accompany Richter on his Seattle date; 
they'll be staging a shortened version of Sleep. 

He’ll also premiere material from his upcoming 
album, Deutsche Grammofon. (Moore Theatre, 
7:30 pm, all ages, $32-$76.) LEILANI POLK 


THURS OCT 17 

The Human Experience, Gone Gone 
Beyond, Lazy Syrup Orchestra 

EESESZISThe Human Experience is the music 
project of live electronic composer, multi¬ 
instrumentalist, and producer David Block, who’s 
celebrating 10 years with a new album, Stillness 
in Motion, and a tour that finds him joined by 
his live band, Gone Gone Beyond (made up of 
multi-instrumentalist/singer-songwriters Danny 
Musengo, Kat Factor, and Mel Seme). Their music 


doesn’t feel like electro at all; it feels organic, a 
blend of future folk and world fusion studded 
with elements of acoustic rock, soul, and ambient 
down-tempo grooviness. Block juggles perform¬ 
ing, composing, and conducting live on stage, 
and this show will feature two sets: a live-band 
performance accompanied by Gone Gone Beyond 
followed by a headline DJ set from the Human 
Experience. RIYL: Thievery Corporation, Juana 
Molina. (Nectar, 8 pm, $15-$50.) LEILANI POLK 

OCT 17-20 


Mozart’s ‘Requiem’ 


CLASSICAL/OPERA 


Mozart’s stunning and famously 
unfinished Requiem presents a musical bridge 
between life and death. Get ready for the Seattle 
Choral Company's alternately apocalyptic and an¬ 
gelic “Confutatis,” which is one of the most intense 
passages of music ever written. The symphony is 
putting two other requiems on the program-Toru 
Takemitsu’s Requiem for String Orchestra and Karl 
Amadeus Hartmann’s Concerto funebre-giving the 
audience an opportunity to explore classical-era and 
contemporary interpretations of death. A natural 
choice for the middle of October, when Seattle shuf¬ 
fles off the last few rays of autumnal light and grows 
gloomier. ( Benaroya Hall, $24-$134 .) RICH SMITH 


FRI OCT 18 


Jakob Ogawa, nina 

1 first heard Norwegian musician Jakob 
Ogawa on the truly excellent soundtrack to the third 
season of HBO’s stoner dramedy High Mainte¬ 
nance. Ogawa's mix of lo-fi indie pop and chilled-out 
RfrB beats is perfect for chatting with a gruff but 
charming weed man while unloading about your 
neurotic Brooklyn existence over an indica blunt. Or 
grooving—especially to “You and I.” The Los Angeles/ 
New York-based duo nina will open the show with 
their melancholic lo-fi dream pop. (Vera Project, 

8 pm, all ages, $15/$18.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 

The Moberlys, Tough Times, 

Ball Bag 

■Niimfiaiiii I’m always excited knowing that Se¬ 
attle’s best power-pop group ever, the Moberlys, 
are still gigging around! Not that frontman Jim 
Basnight ever seems to rest. But then, who better 
to keep the flames of strident songwriting, big 
boss-ringing guitar chords, and sweet harmonies 
alight? He’s been at it for more than 40 years, so 
I’d trust him. Warming up for the Moberlys on 
this night are Tough Times, who play cool, catchy 



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40 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 



MUSIC 
LIVES HERE 


Fri Oct 11 


A TRIP THROUGH MUSICAL TIME FEATURING: STORM RIDER 

(TRIBUTE TO THE DOORS) WITH THE WARNING 


PRIZE FIGHTERS WITH MISTER MASTER £ WAKING THINGS 


PINK i ODER IfOtt AND MIMOSAS" breast cancer fundraiser 

WITH COREPOWER fGGA 


■ \rm j ! • 

kV ’ I > 

j 


CUSTOM WITH PALOOKA A THE THRILL 






AARON (RAWFukD WITH THE CHATTAHQOCHEES 


LU P KOHSTARS HALLO WEEN BREAKFAST BASH - BREAKFAST BUFFET, 
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SSPa 

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THORSDAY10/10 

INJURY RESERVE 

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FRIDAY 10/11 

PHANTOMS 

SONDAY10/13 

JSONDARA 

ELISE DAVIS 

iHF 


mm 


TOESDAY10/15 

THE REGRETTES 

GREER 

WEDNESDAY 10/16 

BLACK LIPS 

BLOEROSEROONDERS 

FRIDAY 10/18 

BLACK PUMAS 

NEAL FRANCIS 

. 

MIHAHNA 

CP 

f 1 

1 a , 

SATORDAY10/19 

ARIHANNA 

A DANCE PARTY FOR ARI&RIRI 

TOESDAY10/22 

LUCY DACUS 

IIZA1NNE+SUHIUHE 

THORSDAY 10/24 

JORDAN RAKEI 

SAM WILLIS 

FRIDAY 10/25 & SATURDAY 10/26 

TWERK OR TREAT 

HALLOWEEN WEEKEND AT NEUMOS 

MONDAY 10/28 

WALE 

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ELEPHANT GYM & LITE 

THURSDAY 10/31 

FRIDAY 11/1 

TUESDAY 11/5 

TACOCAT 

MARIKA HACKMAN 

SKIZZY MARS 

SUNDAE CRUSH 

GIRL FRIDAY 

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THURSDAY 11/7 

FRIDAY 11/8 

SATURDAY 11/9 

TWIN PEAKS 

SEEFEEL 

MOONCHILD 

POST ANIMAL + 0HMME 

DR TROY 

KIEFER 

SUNDAY 11/10 

JAYMES YOUNG 

PHIL GOOD 

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If 


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MONDAY 10/14 

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WITH SPECIAL GUESTS 


FRIDAY 10/18 

ABHI THE NOMAD 

ATWOOD 


THORSDAY10/24 

KRISTIN CHAMBERS 

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS 


THURSDAY 10/31 

SUNDOG 

JAMES ANAYA AND THE CURRENT + 
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CLAIRE GEORGE + 
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SIR BABYGIRL 
BBYWEEMS 




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Music 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 41 


THINGS TO DO -► Music 


1970s-inspired punk (which wouldn’t be out of 
place on The Thing That Ate Floyd comp), and Ball 
Bag, locals who shred “classic, mid-tempo, North- 
west-style dirgey punk.” (Lucky Liquor, Tukwila, 
9:30 pm, $8.) MIKE NIPPER 

SAT OCT 19 


)) 


Devendra 

Banhart 




LAUREN DUKOFF 


Devendra Banhart, Daniel Higgs 


ROCK/POP 


Listening to the new Devendra Banhart 
album immediately made me want to text all my 
friends from high school, to ask if anyone still listens 
to the of psychedelic folk artist. His 10th and most 
recent album, Mo, is fucking pleasant as hell. Made 
after Banhart realized he might not ever reproduce, 
the record is meant to impart lessons on the child he 
may never get around to having. He's trying to make 
sense of everything he’s learned in life, I suppose, 
singing in English, Japanese, Spanish, and Portu¬ 
guese. It's really Banhart at his best, loungey and 
weird. Reflective, too. Unmissable cuts: “Taking a 
Page,” “Love Song,” and “Carolina.” (Moore Theatre, 

8 pm, all ages, $24-$34.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 


AMANDA DEMME 


Andrew Bird, Meshell Ndegeocello Who, Liam Gallagher 


BLUES/COUNTRY/FOLK 


Twelve albums deep, and 
Andrew Bird is still taking my breath away. His 
classy whistle-blown, violin-swept baroque pop 
has always had a certain groovy swagger, and he 
leans into it while taking a sharper turn into his 
folk and rock tendencies on the finely wrought 
My Finest Work Yet. It’s his most overtly political 
outing to date, with themes of the country’s divisive 
atmosphere, climate change, and apathy littered 
throughout. (The triumphant chorus that rages 
against the darkness bubbling beneath the surface 
in “Olympians” is an album highlight.) Bird’s vocals 
feel like a supple caress to the consciousness, its 
lower-toned, pitch-perfect, mellifluous, mild, and 
woolly quality conversely stunning and comfort¬ 
ing. Support on this tour from funk/soul/jazz/rock 
singer, songwriter, and bass slinger Meshell Nde¬ 
geocello, who's touring behind her own 12th outing, 
Ventriloquism, which includes covers of 11 RftB 
and pop tracks from the 1980s and '90s, including 
a breezy, ethereal take on TLC's “Waterfalls.” ( Para¬ 
mount Theatre, 8 pm, $37-$47.) LEILANI POLK 


ROCK/POP 


One of the Big 4 original British 
Invasion groups whose back catalog has withstood 
the test of time, the Who return for perhaps the last 
time to give die-hard fans a stadium-sized wallop. 
They’ll be rooting on singer Roger Daltrey and 
guitarist/vocalist/lyrioist Pete Townshend, whose 
best songs-“lnstant Party,” “My Generation,” “Can’t 
Explain,” “The Ox” (written with John Entwistle, 
Keith Moon, and Nicky Hopkins), “Run Run Run,” 
“Baba O’Riley,” “Eminence Front,” etc.-swagger 
with more bravado than most from their peak era 
(mid ’60s-early 70s) and country (England). For 
sheer sonic power and lyrical prowess, the Who are 
hard to beat. Opener Liam Gallagher boasted one of 
the brattiest, Lennon/Rotten-est voices in rock with 
world-class plagiarists Oasis and in Beady Eye. In 
his solo career, however, Gallagher has released 
two albums of accessible journeyman rock. The 
most entertaining thing about Liam these days is 
his chronic feud with older brother Noel. ( T-Mobile 
Park, 7:30 pm, $70-$1205.) DAVE SEGAL 


SUN OCT 20 


HIP-HOP/RAP 


Big Boi’s post-Outkast career has 
seen the ATL rapper with the effortless flow- 
which can be syrupy or serpentine, his rhymes 
fun, upbeat, and always clever-release three 
high-quality solo LPs and a collab, beginning 
with his fantastic debut, 2010's Sir Lucious Left 
Foot: The Son of Chico Dusty (see: “Back Up 
Plan,” “Turns Me On,” “Shutterbugg,” “Hustle 
Blood,” etc.). Then came 2012’s Vicious Lies and 
Dangerous Rumors (a sexy, groovy outing that 
cemented his creative relationship with Phanto- 
gram and prompted their co-project, Big Grams, 
in 2015), and most recently and probably most 
pop-catchily, Boomiverse (2017); one of its finest 
tracks, the oddly-paced, keys-fueled good time 
that is “All Night,” was Big Boi’s highest charter as 
a solo artist to date. He lands in town shortly after 
dropping “Intentions,” a smooth electro-funk joint 
with CeeLo Green and Sleepy Brown that’s the 
first single off Big Boi’s upcoming collaborative 
album with the latter, Big Sleepover, due out 
sometime next year. (Neptune Theatre, 9pm, all 
ages, $35/$39 .) LEILANI POLK 


Thom Yorke 


ROCK/POP 


I Thom Yorke’s solo output is, in some 
ways, clearly related to what he does with his 
mega band Radiohead, and in other ways departs 
from it with a swan dive into the deep end of 
electronic experimentation. He explores sounds, 
textures, and beats in cold, minimal soundscapes 
pierced by the odd rays of warmth (like the groovy 
bass line of “Impossible Knots,” or when “Twist" 
segues from its chilly starkness to glowing, expan¬ 
sive waves of sound), and multitracks his delicate 
falsetto into weird layered vox approximations, or 
leaves it bare as it drifts and slinks and soars over 
the music. This show has been sold out since day 
one, because the chance to see Yorke in such an in¬ 
timate venue is an opportunity that few Radiohead 
fans will pass up. (Paramount Theatre, 8 pm, all 
ages, $61 (sold out).) LEILANI POLK 


Vatican Shadow 

Over the last 21 years, Dominick 
Fernow has established a cult following among 
noiseniks for his Prurient project. “Were the 



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THINGS TO DO Music 



Marquis de Sade alive, he’d find Prurient a trifle 
overblown,” I wrote about Prurient in these pages 
11 years ago. Since 2011, Fernow has also conduct¬ 
ed a rewarding side hustle as Vatican Shadow. For 
top labels such as Hospital Productions and Ostgut 
Ton, he’s created tenebrous abstract electronic 
music and pugilistic techno that lets no color into 
its matrices except black. If German philosopher 
Friedrich Nietzsche (The Antichrist, Beyond Good 
and Evil, etc.) were around now, he’d be into Vati¬ 
can Shadow's will-to-power techno and its SftM 
beats. ( Chop Suey, 7 pm, $12/$15.) DAVE SEGAL 

MON OCT 21 


GWAR, Sacred Reich, Toxic 
Holocaust, Against the Grain 


METAL/PUNK 


Since the mid-1980s, Richmond, 
Virginia’s performance-art and satirical heavy 
metal freaks-or rather, our ALIEN OVERLORDS- 
GWAR have been shootingjizz and blood, urn, 

FAKE jizz and blood all over their audiences as they 
rage through the shreddiest of riffs while taking 
the piss out of our “society.” I think the first time I 
saw them was in 1990, and their stage show has 
evolved so very, very disturbingly far, while still 
being just as messy and fun. I’d bring a change of 
clothes if I were you. Also on the bill is NWOBHM 
thrashers Toxic Holocaust and killer headbangin' 
jams from Against the Grain. ( Showbox Sodo, 7:30 
pm, all ages, $21/$25.) MIKE NIPPER 


Steve Lacy 


SOUL/R&B 


[ Whenever he’s not holding down 
the Internet as the chillest guitarist in the band, 
producer-musician Steve Lacy is fiddling with 
his own music, famously making beats with his 
iPhone. Collaborating with artists like Vampire 
Weekend, Tyler, the Creator, Kali Uchis, and Kend¬ 
rick Lamar, he’s become a near-ubiquitous fixture 
of the contemporary R&B and pop scene. While 
in his other work, Lacy owes much to neo-soul, 
his debut solo album, Apollo XXI, is decidedly 
less funky, shimmering instead like a collection of 
guitar-focused, lo-fi indie tracks. (The Showbox, 
8:30 pm, oil ages, $30/$35 .) JASMYNE KEIMIG 


TUES OCT 22 


Lucy Dacus 


ROCK/POP 


I slept on Historian, the 2018 sopho¬ 
more album from alt-rock singer-songwriter Lucy 
Dacus, because there’s just too goddamn much 
music out there. I dug the single that got some 


local airplay, “Addictions"-a clever ode about old 
relationship habits dying hard (“I’m just calling 
’cause I'm used to it, you'll pick up ’cause you’re 
not a quitter”). But I only took a chance on the rest 
of the album recently, and immediately realized 
my error. There’s something in her vocal quality 
that reminds me of’70s AM radio, all velvety and 
polished and warm, while its emotive tone is con¬ 
versely apathetic, resigned, or world-weary. She’s 
been dropping singles throughout 2019, which 
began with a lovely cover of “La Vie en Rose” right 
around Valentine's Day, and most recently another 
cover, a fine reimagining of Bruce Springsteen’s 
“Dancing in the Dark.” (Neumos, 8 pm, all ages, 
$20.) LEILANI POLK 


WED OCT 23 


Dinosaur Jr., Steve Gunn 

1^22223 Dinosaur Jr. are a blessed hard-rock 
institution at this point. True, their best work 
occurred in the last halt of the 1980s, peaking with 
the one-two punch of You’re Living All Over Me 
and Bug. But J Mascis, Lou Barlow, and Murph 
are still issuing robust guitar-hero showcases 
and blustery melodic gems. They’ve honed 
their formula to a science and, against odds, it's 
still moving as hell. Chill psych-folk-rock artist 
Steve Gunn slowly but surely has ascended the 
indie-music food chain with several albums that 
pit lustrous, liquid guitar playing against flat yet 
appealing vocals. He’s a rare example of a quality 
musician gaining popularity on his own terms, 
without slipping creatively. (The Showbox, 8:30 
pm, all ages, $30/$33.) DAVE SEGAL 


Y La Bamba, Brown Calculus 

■MHifianiJ Portland-based Y La Bamba just keep 
getting better. This is no doubt a result of the artist 
behind the project, Luz Elena Mendoza, settling 
into her perch as a supreme storyteller and musi¬ 
cian. Her vocals are craggy and beautiful, at once 
full of introspection and splendor, compelling you 
to move, emote, love. They've dropped not one but 
two albums this year-the full-length Mujeres back 
in February, and the Entre Los Dos EP in Septem¬ 
ber. Where Mujeres feels expansive, the mostly 
Spanish Entre Los Dos is a bit looser. “Ocativo” 
plays like a piano ballad unspooling while “Las 
Platicas” retains a surf-rock, groovy sensibility. 

(Chop Suey, 8 pm, $13/$17.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 


TheStranpr.ca m/Ev&rdut 



























Music 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 43 



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Music 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 45 


THINGS TO DO -► Music 


Molly Sarle, Night Hikes 

Vera Project, Fri Oct 11, 

7 pm, all ages, $15-$18 

Nikki Lane 

Alma Mater Tacoma, 

Thurs Oct 10,9 pm, $15 

Oh Land 

Columbia City Theater, 
Sun Oct 20,8 pm, $20 

Postmodern Jukebox 

Paramount Theatre, Sun 
Oct 13,8 pm, all ages, 
$26-$201 

The Regrettes 

Neumos, Tues0ct15, 

7 pm, all ages, $16/$18 

Sara Bareilles, Emily 
King 

WaMu Theater, Tues Oct 22, 

8 pm, all ages, $40-$350 

Son Volt 

Neptune Theatre, Fri Oct 18, 

9 pm, all ages, $21/$24 

Street Sounds Live 

KEXP, Fri Oct 11,8 pm, all 
ages, $15/$20 

Sum 41, The Amity Afflic¬ 
tion, The Plot In You 

Showbox Sodo, Sun Oct 13, 
7 pm, all ages, $35/$40 

Todd Snider, Ramblin’ 
Jack Elliott 

Neptune Theatre, Wed 
Oct 16,8 pm, all ages, 
$29/$34 

Witch 

Crocodile, Mon Oct 21, 
7pm,$28/$30 

Yelawolf 

Showbox Sodo, Wed 
Oct 16,8 pm, $29 



Short 

List 

Aaron Parks Little Big 

Columbia City Theater, 
Wed Oct 16,7:30 pm, all 
ages, $10-$33 

All Your Sisters, Grave 
Babies, Youryoungbody 

Highline, Wed Oct 16, 

8 pm, $12/$15 

Altin Gun 

Neumos, Mon Oct 14, 

7 pm, all ages, $20/$22 

Andrew Combs, Guests 

Fremont Abbey Arts 
Center, Thurs Oct 17, 

7:30 pm, all ages, $0-$12 

Babymetal, The Hu 

Paramount Theatre, Wed 
Oct 16,8 pm, all ages, 
$56-$317 

Big K.R.l.T. 

Neptune Theatre, Sat 
Oct 12,9 pm, all ages, 
$24-$150 

Black Lips, Blue Rose 
Rounders 

Neumos, Wed Oct 16, 

8 pm, all ages, $25 

Black Pumas 

Neumos, Fri Oct 18,7 pm, 
$15/$17 

Cathedrals XXVII: 

Lemolo, Galen Disston, 
Brenda Xu 

Saint Mark’s Cathedral, 
Sat Oct 12,7:30-10:30 pm, 
all ages, $50 


Cecile McLorin Salvant 
with Aaron Diehl Trio 

Town Hall, Fri Oct 18, 

8 pm, $18-$60 

Circles Around The 
Sun, William Tyler 

Crocodile, Wed Oct 16, 

7 pm, $20/$23 

DakhaBrakha 

Triple Door, Oct 14-15, 

7:30 pm, $45-$55 

DJ OCnotes, Smacktalk 

Timbre Room, Sun Oct 20, 
7:30 pm, $10-$16 

Dropkick Murphys, 
Clutch, Russ Rankin 

WaMu Theater, Tues 
Oct 15,6:45 pm, all ages, 
$45/$50 

An Evening with Pete Yorn 

Neptune Theatre, Tues 
Oct 15,8 pm, all ages, 
$34/$142 

An Evening with The 
Julian Lage Trio 

Columbia City Theater, 

Sat Oct 12,8 pm, $22- 
$75 (sold out) 

Highly Suspect, 
Slothrust 

Neptune Theatre, Thurs 
Oct 17,8 pm, all ages, $28 
(sold out) 

Hozier, Freya Ridings 

WaMu Theater, Sat 
Oct 19,8 pm, all ages, $45 

Ingrid Michaelson, 
Maddie Poppe 

The Showbox, Sat Oct 12, 

9 pm, all ages, $40/$45 

Jade Bird, Flyte 

The Showbox, Fri Oct 18, 

9 pm, all ages, $20/$22 


Jonsi &Alex Somers 

Paramount Theatre, Fri 
Oct 11,8 pm, all ages, 
$56-$96 

Jonas Brothers, Bebe 
Rexha, Jordan McGraw 

Tacoma Dome, Sat Oct 12, 
7:30 pm, all ages 

Joshua Radin, The 
Weepies, Lily Kershaw 

McMenamins Elks Temple, 
Wed Oct 16,8 pm, all 
ages, $35 

JPEGMafia, Butch 
Dawson 

Neumos, Sun Oct 20, 

7 pm, all ages, $22 

Judah &The Lion 

Paramount Theatre, Wed 
Oct 23,7:30 pm, all ages, 
$31-$101 

KEXP Presents: Hiss 
Golden Messenger, 

Erin Rae 

Tractor Tavern, Oct 10-11, 

9 pm, $21 

Kim Petras 

The Showbox, Tues Oct 22, 

8 pm, all ages, $27/$30 

Leo Kottke 

Jazz Alley, Oct 22-23, 

7:30 pm, all ages, $41 

LIVE, Bush, Our Lady 
Peace 

ShoWare Center, Wed Oct 
16,7 pm, all ages, $39-$99 

Lusine with Trent Moor¬ 
man, Ovoid, IG88 

Nectar, Fri Oct 18, 

8:30 pm,$17-$50 

Maribou State 

The Showbox, Fri Oct 11, 

9 pm, all ages, $20/$22 


Early Warnings 

BROCKH AMPTON, SLOWTHAI WaMu Theater, Sun Oct 27, 8 pm, $37 


CAT POWER, ZSELA The Showbox, Wed Oct 30, 8:30 pm, $40/$43 


NATASHA BEDINGFIELD Neptune Theatre, Wed Oct 30, 8 pm, $35-$435 


DANNY BROWN, ASHNIKKO, ZEELOOPERZ The Showbox, Thurs Oct 31,8 pm, $28/$30 


IMMORTAL TECHNIQUE, CHINO XL, POISON THE PEN Crocodile, Sun Nov 3, 8 pm, $26/$30 


BISHOP BRIGGS, MIYA FOLICK, JAX ANDERSON Showbox Sodo, Wed Nov 6,8 pm, $28/$30 


TOM MORELLO Neptune Theatre, Wed Nov 6, 8 pm, $29 


YOUNG THUG, MACHINE GUN KELLY, POLO G, STRICK WaMu Theater, Sun Nov 10, 7:30 pm, $42-$199 


ALLEN STONE'S KARAOKE EXTRAVAGANZA Triple Door, Fri Nov 15,8 pm, $75 


BIG FREEDIA, LOW CUT CONNIE Neptune Theatre, Fri Nov 15, 9 pm, $24/$27 


THE BLACK KEYS, MODEST MOUSE, SHANNON ft THE CLAMS Tacoma Dome, Sat Nov 23,7pm 


SLEATER-KINNEY Paramount Theatre, Nov 23-24, 8 pm, $34-$39 


A$AP FERG, MURDA BEATZ, MADEINTYO Showbox Sodo, Sun Nov 24,8 pm, $40/$45 


SCHOOLBOY Q, NAV WaMu Theater, Sun Dec 1, 8 pm 


THE DANDY WARHOLS, MOTHER MARIPOSA The Showbox, Fri Dec 6,8:30 pm, $25/$28 


ANGEL OLSEN Moore Theatre, Wed Dec 11,8 pm, $30/$34 


BRANDI CARLILE WITH THE SEATTLE SYMPHONY, THE SECRET SISTERS Benaroya Hall, Dec 13-15 


TOURIST + MATTHEW DEAR Neumos, Thurs Dec 19, 8 pm, $20-$100 


COLD WAR KIDS Neptune Theatre, Jan 17-18,9 pm, $28/$31 



(aoo) m-2W ■ STGPfieSENTS.QRS 

Phiriry Seating ar:l DiSCpdiHJ (pr SriJu|iJ c*11. (200) 915-00 54 


Tickyis AttJilablfl Al lukaim ■ itBr.eom 




"A TRULY ONE-OF-A-KIND EXPERIENCE " 

fill Nmnae 

THE 


NOVEMBER 16 8 17 AT THE PARAMOUNT 
































































46 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 


glGHLINf] 

WEEKLY ON 

MONDAYS: 

FUCK YEAH BINGO 
7-9PM 


Thursday, October 10 

MECHANISMUS PRESENTS: 

PSYCLON NINE 

Striplicker, Justin Symbol 

9PM $20425 

Friday, October 11 

MECHANISMUS & MUSICWERKS PRESENT: 

ANYTHING BOX 

Love Vigilantes 
Rusholme Ruffians 

8PM $20425 

Saturday, October 12 

OFF WITH THEIR 
HEADS 

Slingshot Dakota 
Jet // Lag 

9 PM $16418 

Tuesday, October 15 

AESTHETIC 

PERFECTION 

Empathy Text, Lazerpunk 

8PM $20425 

Wednesday, October 16 

ALL YOUR SISTERS 

Grave Babies, Youryoungbody 

8PM $12415 

Thursday, October 17 

IRON KINGDOM 

Solicitor 
Point Zero 

8 PM $10415 

Friday, October 18 

XOTH 

The Devils of Loudun, Kommand, 
Nosretep 

9PM $8410 

Thursday, October 24 

ANICON 

Haunter,Huldrekall, Kihalas 

9PM $12415 

Friday, October 25 

GLACIER 

Solicitor, Silver Talon 

8PM $17420 

Saturday, October 26 

BARSHASKETH 

Deitus, Peste Umbrarum 

9 PM $13416 

Sunday, October 27 

WITCHCRAFT 

Spite,Crurifragium 
Antichrist Siege Machine 
Putrid Temple 

8PM $15420 


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210 Broadway Ave E • 211- 
Dinner service everyday 5-llpm 



CHBP PRESENTS 

PAUL CAUTHEN 


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SATURDAY. OCTOBER 12 


STG PRESENTS 

JULIAN LAGE TRIO 


TUESDAY. OCTOBER 15 


STG PRESENTS 

KAZU 


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1 6 


EARSHOT JA U PRESENTS 
AARON PARKS' 
LITTLE BIG 


THURSDAY. OCTOBER 17 


SHOWBOX PRESENTS 

FINK 

SOLO NORTH AMERICAN TOUR 


FRIDAY, OCTOBER IB 


MURDER APPIES PRESENTS 

THE NOIRE 
CHALLENGE 


SATURDAY, OCTOBER W 


DARK VIOLEI PRODUCTIONS PftESENrS 

NIGHTSHADE: 

VANGUARD 


SUNDAY, OCTOBER ?□ 


MONOUI PRESENTS 

OH LAND 


MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 


KRIS ALLEN 

10 YEARS, 1 NIGHT 
THE CROCODILE PRESENTS 

JONATHAN BREE 


UPCOMING SHOWS 


THURSDAY OCTOBER 2A 
AFTQfrt SHOWS PJfFSf NTS 
TRi DAY, OCrOBI S 25 
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THINGS TO DO Music 


Thurs 10/10 

LIVE MUSIC 

©THE AUDITORIUM @ 
UHEIGHTS Lula Wiles, Cahalen 
Morrison, 8 pm, $10/$15 
BELLT0WN YACHT CLUB Dirty 
Rugs, Glass Frames, Hi Wasted, 
8:30 pm, $10 

CENTRAL SALOON Tents, Date- 
nite, Like Lions, 8-11:45 pm, $10 
© CHOP SUEY RAP. Ferreira 
fka Milo, BB Sun, AJ Suede, 8 pm, 
$15/$17 

★ CL0CK-0UT LOUNGE Chris 
Brokaw’s End Of The Night Band, 
Kinski, Skull Kat, 9 pm, $12/$15 
©COLUMBIA CITY THEATER 

Ruel, Destiny, 8 pm, $20/$25 
(sold out) 

CONOR BYRNE David Tyler Fox 
and Joe Kaplow, 8 pm-12 am, $8 
©CROCODILE White Reaper, 
Dirty Nil, Criminal Hygiene, 7 pm, 
$15/$18 

© EL C0RAZ0N Hail the Sun, 
Strawberry Girls, Royal Coda, 

VIS, 6:30 pm, $16 
THE FUNH0USE The Atom Age, 
8:30 pm, $10/$12 
HIGHLINE Psyclon Nine, Striplicker, 
Justin Symbol, 9 pm, $20-$25 
LO-FI Mystic Revelations: 

Songs from the Rainier Valley, 

8 pm, $10 

© MOORE THEATRE Steve 
Hackett, 8 pm, $37-$57 
NECTAR Futuristic, Scribe Cash, 
Ekoh, Abstract, Gifted Youngstaz, 
Mr. Hi-Def, 7 pm, $18/$23 
© NEUM0S Injury Reserve, 
Slauson Malone, XXX, 8 pm, $17/$19 
RENDEZVOUS Wild Faith X 
Bobby Petite, 10 pm, $8 
RESONANCE AT SOMA 
TOWERS The Jewel Tones, 7 pm, 
$25-$30 

THE STATION TEN IA Benefit for 
At-Risk Youth, 7:30 pm, $15-$50 
TIM’S TAVERN Robber Barons, 
Rock, Paper, Period, Brandon 
Getz, 8 pm, $5 

©TRIPLE DOOR Joseph Arthur, 
7:30 pm, $23-$33 

TRIPLE DOOR MQ STAGE 

Mochima, 5 pm, free 

© VERA PROJECT Okilly 
Dokilly, MC Lars, 7 pm, $18/$20 

CLASSICAL/ 

OPERA 

BENAR0YA HALL Mozart 
Jupiter Symphony, $24-$134 

DJ/DANCE 

Q NIGHTCLUB Field Trip 92: 
JackLNDN, 9 pm-2 am, $10 

JAZZ 

©CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 
SPACE Don’t Move, 8 pm, 
$5-$15 

©JAZZ ALLEY The Manhattan 
Transfer, $51 

★ THE ROYAL ROOM Earshot 
Jazz Presents: Wally Shoup, 

7:30 pm, $10-$19 
SEAM0NSTER LOUNGE Jean 
Chaumont Band, 8-9:30 pm, free 
TOWN HALL Jazz Up Jackson 
Street: A Benefit for Washington 
Middle School & Garfield High 
School, 7 pm, $5-$100 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS Ear¬ 
shot Jazz Festival 2019, $0-$500 


Fri 10/11 

LIVE MUSIC 

© THE AUDITORIUM @ 
UHEIGHTS Joan Shelley, 
Guests, 8 pm, $15/$18 
©BALLARD HOMESTEAD 

Daimh, 7:30 pm, $12-$25 
BARB0ZA Christone “Kingfish” 
Ingram, The Cerny Brothers, 7 
pm, $18/$20 

© BLACK LODGE Northwest 
Speedfest 5,6 pm-12 am 
BLUE MOON TAVERN Family 
Worship Center, Guests, 8 pm, $10 


CAFE RACER Bread Pilot, 

Flying Fish Cove, Baby Jessica, 
Heavenly Bother, 8 pm, $5 
CL0CK-0UT LOUNGE Suitcase, 
Estocar, E.V.E.R., 9:30 pm, $10 
COLUMBIA CITY THEATER 
Songhoy Blues, 10 am 
CONOR BYRNE Whiskerman, 
Super Cosmic Mother Shuffle, 
Kelsey Sprague Band, 8:30 pm, $10 
© CROCODILE Break Science, 
K+Lab, 8 pm, $22.00 
EL C0RAZ0N Senses Fail, Hot 
Mulligan, Yours Truly, 8 pm, $20 
©FREMONT ABBEY Fanna- 
Fi-Allah Sufi Qawwali, 7:30 pm, 
$0-$30 

HARD ROCK CAFE ATrip 
Through Musical Time: Storm 
Rider, The Warning, 9 pm, $10 
HIGH DIVE Tubby Love & Amber 
Lily, Publish The Quest, Rebel 
Lion, 9 pm, $13 

HIGHLINE Anything Box, Love 
Vigilantes, Rusholme Ruffians, 

9 pm-2 am, $20-$25 
©HOLLOWEARTH RADIO 
Nostalgist, Curse, Harsh R, Ox 
Hunger, 8 pm-12 am, $7-$15 
LO-FI Service Animal, The 
Delusions, Luna Moss, 9 pm 
NECTAR The Best 80s Prom 
Ever! (So Far) with Nite Wave and 
Clive Farrington, 8 pm, $20-$50 
© NEUM0S Phantoms, 8 pm, 
$15-$20 

ORA NIGHTCLUB Eli a Fur, 

10 pm, $15-$500 
SEAM0NSTER LOUNGE Annie 
Jantzer a Kelly Ash, 8-9:30 pm, $10 
©SHOWBOX SODO Yung 
Gravy, 9 pm, $29/$31 
SKYLARK CAFE a CLUB Not 
Dead Yet, The Approximations, 
7-11 pm 

TIM’S TAVERN Tom’s Tavern: A 
Benefit For Children’s Hospital, 
6:30 pm, $10 

CLASSICAL/ 

OPERA 

BENAROYA HALL Selections 
From Density 2036: Claire Chase 
In Recital, 7:30 pm, $25 
©CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 
SPACE Amy Denio: Truth Is Up 
For Grabs, 8 pm, $6-$12 
©SAINT MARK’S CATHEDRAL 
Cathedrals XXVI: Choir! Choir! 
Choir!, 7:30 pm,$0-$20 

DJ/DANCE 

BELLT0WN YACHT CLUB This 
Charming Man, 9 pm, $0/$5 
KREMWERK Noise Complaint ft. 
Bruno Furlan a Proper Villains, 

10 pm, $10/$15 
SUBSTATION Fear Factory, 

8 pm, $18-$20 
SUNSET TAVERN Queens of 
Pop Dance Party with DJ Baby 
Van Beezly, 9 pm-1 am, $10 

JAZZ 

©JACK STRAW CULTURAL 
CENTER Jack Straw Piano Series: 
Jovino Santos Neto and Collin 
Meredith, 7-9 pm, $10-$20 
©JAZZ ALLEY The Manhattan 
Transfer, $51 

TOWN HALL Orrin Evans Trio with 
Jeff Tain Watts, 8 pm, $10-$33 

TRIPLE DOOR MQ STAGE The 

Hot McGandhis, 9 pm, free 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS Ear¬ 
shot Jazz Festival 2019, $0-$500 

Sat 10/12 

LIVE MUSIC 

BARBOZA K0K0K0!,7pm, $20 
BELLTOWN YACHT CLUB 
Weird Numbers, Bad Saint, Moon 
Palace, 9 pm, $10 
© BLACK LODGE Northwest 
Speedfest 5,6 pm-12 am 
BLUE MOON TAVERN Dirty 
Rugs, Guests, 8 pm, $8 
CHOP SUEY Lyfe Indoors, Jupiter 
Sprites, Paisley Devil, 6 pm, $8/$10 
CLOCK-OUT LOUNGE Cycles Of 
The Damned, Dust Moth, Great 
Falls, 9:30 pm, $10 
CLUBSURMIGS FEST III with 
Stephen Perkins, Peter DiStefan, 
Guests, 6 pm-2 am, $20 


★ CROCODILE Mike Doughty 
Plays Soul Coughing,Aos “Ruby 
Vroom", 8 pm, $25/$28 

★ EL C0RAZ0N The Goddamn 
Gallows, Scott H. Biram, The 
Bridge City Sinners, Urban 
Pioneers, 8 pm, $17-$22 
©FREMONT ABBEY Marty 
O’Reilly, Guests, 7 pm, $16/$18 
THEFUNHOUSEVinnieCaruana, 
Mike Ireland, 8 pm, $13/$15 
HARD ROCK CAFE The Endowed 
Tour (D’Banj), 7 pm, $0-$200 

★ HIGHLINE Off With Their Heads, 
Slingshot Dakota, 9 pm, $16/$18 
THE KRAKEN BAR & LOUNGE 
Bad Animals, Hot Won’t Quit, The 
Replicators, SMS, 8 pm, $7 
LUCKY LIQUOR Scary Monsters 
Super Creeps, 8 pm, $7 

★ NECTAR Eldridge Gravy & the 
Court Supreme, Maxwell Friedman 
Group, Joytribe, 8 pm, $15-$50 
© NEUMOS Desert Dwellers, 

8 pm, $20-$25 

★ ©SAINT MARK’S 
CATHEDRAL Cathedrals XXVII: 
Lemolo, Galen Disston, Brenda 
Xu, 7:30-10:30 pm, $50 
SUBSTATION Oktober 
DeathFest, 8 pm, $10 

TIM’S TAVERN Water Felon, 
Swinson &The Expedition, Will 
Rainier a The Pines, Mud Junket, 
7 pm, $8 

TRACTOR TAVERN Lucero, 
Vandoliers, 8 pm 

★ © TRIPLE DOOR JJ Grey: 
Front Porch Sessions, 7:30 pm, 
$45-$50 

©VERA PROJECT The Faim, 
Stand Atlantic, 6 pm, $16/$18 

CLASSICAL/ 

OPERA 

BENAROYA HALL Mozart 
Jupiter Symphony, $24-$134 
©CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 
SPACE Amy Denio: Truth Is Up 
For Grabs, 8 pm, $6-$12 
MCCAW HALL Opera Time, 
10:30 am, free 

DJ/DANCE 

ORA NIGHTCLUB Donald Glaude, 
David Turner, Ajax, 10 pm, $10 

JAZZ 

©JAZZ ALLEY The Manhattan 
Transfer, $51 

★ TOWN HALL Afro-Electric: Val 
Jeanty / Ravish Momin // Fay Victor 
/ Myra Melford, 7:30 pm, $10-$33 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS Ear¬ 
shot Jazz Festival 2019, $0-$500 


Sun 10/13 

LIVE MUSIC 

©BALLARD HOMESTEAD 

Brendan James, Guests, 7:30 
pm, $0-$25 

CENTRAL SALOON Fat Starfish, 
Glass Souls, Jaeden Luke, 
7-10:30 pm, $8 
©CHOPSUEY Banners, 
Ellevator, 8 pm, $15/$18 

★ CLOCK-OUT LOUNGE Blood 
Moon Orchestra, Bad Saint, 
Housekeys, 8:30 pm, $10 
CROCODILE The Rocket 
Summer, 7 pm, $20 
EL C0RAZ0N Saliva, Jaded 
Mary, One Gun Shy, Jericho Hill, 
Solartone, 8 pm, $18/$20 
HIGH DIVE Marbin, Ben 
DeLaurentis, 8 pm, $10/$15 
THE KRAKEN BAR ft LOUNGE 
Boss Tanaka, The China Wife 
Motors, The Contaminants, 

8 pm, $7 

NECTAR Geoff Tate's Operation: 
Mindcrime, Mark Daly, Syztem7, 

9 pm, $25-$50 

©NEPTUNE THEATRE Starset, 
7 pm, $24/$27 

© NEUMOS J. S. Ondara, 7 pm, 
$18/$20 

© 0CEAN5 Caspar Babypants, 

1 pm, $5 

©PHINNEY CENTER Duo Violao 
+1, Choroloco, 7 pm, $10-$20 
SHOWBOX SODO Bear Grillz, 
Somnium Sound, OG Nixin, 7 pm, 
$22-$32 


©THE SHOWBOX grandson, 

8 pm, $25/$28 

SUNSET TAVERN Jesse Malin, 
Guests, 7:30 pm, $15 
TIM’S TAVERN A Girl Named 
Genny, Colt Wolff, Neil Gregory 
Johnson, 7 pm, $5 
TRACTOR TAVERN Lucero, 
Vandoliers, 8 pm 
©VERA PROJECT House¬ 
warming Party, 7 pm, $8/$10 

CLASSICAL/ 

OPERA 

©AUBURN PERFORMING 
ARTS CENTER Auburn Symph¬ 
ony Orchestra: “Pictures at an 
lExhibition” - A Multimedia Exper¬ 
ience, 2:30-4:30 pm, $10-$37 

JAZZ 

©JAZZ ALLEY The Manhattan 
Transfer, $51 

★ TRIPLE DOOR Youn Sun Nah, 
7:30 pm, $10-$39 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS Ear¬ 
shot Jazz Festival 2019, $0-$500 


Mon 10/14 

LIVE MUSIC 

BARBOZA Good Morning, 8 pm, 
$12/$14 

★ MOORE THEATRE ECHOES- 
A Tribute Concert Benefiting The 
AMP (AIDS Memorial Pathway), 
7:30 pm, $25-$100 

© NEPTUNE THEATRE Alejandro 
Aranda is Scarypoolparty, 8 pm, 
$20/$23 (sold out) 

SUNSET TAVERN Air Drum 
Competition: A Fundraiser for 
Huntington's Disease, 7:30 pm, $10 
©VERA PROJECT Avery 
Leigh's Night Palace, iji, Wolfgang 
Strutz, 7 pm, $8 

CLASSICAL/ 

OPERA 

THE ROYAL ROOM Indigo Mist, 
7:30-9:30 pm, $15 

JAZZ 

★ CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 
SPACE Darius Jones, 7:30 pm, 
$10-$23 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS Ear¬ 
shot Jazz Festival 2019, $0-$500 


Tues10/15 

LIVE MUSIC 

CENTRAL SALOON The Winter 
Shakers, Jim Marcotte, Hayden 
Thomas, 8-11:45 pm, $8 
©CROCODILE Delta Rae, 
Frances Cone, 7 pm, $25 
EDMONDS CENTER FOR 
THE ARTS Jake Shimabukuro, 
7:30-9:30 pm,$34-$69 
HIGH DIVE Jed Crisologo & The 
Sun Killers, Glass Beaches, Them 
Savages, 8 pm, $8/$12 
HIGHLINE Mechanismus 
Presents Aesthetic Perfection, 

9 pm, $20/$25 

LO-FI Bit Brigade Performs Contra 
+ Metroid, 8 pm-12 am, $13 
©SHOWBOX SODO Sabaton, 
Hammerfall, 8 pm, $27 
SUNSET TAVERN The Parlor 
Mob, Dan Luke and The Raid, 
8:30 pm, $13 
©VERA PROJECT Bad 
Cop / Bad Cop, The Bar Stool 
Preachers, 7 pm, $15/$17 

JAZZ 

★ TOWN HALL Seattle Modern 
Orchestra with Darius Jones & 
Wayne Horvitz, 7:30 pm, $10-$23 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS Ear¬ 
shot Jazz Festival 2019, $0-$500 

Wed 10/16 

LIVE MUSIC 

©BALLARD HOMESTEAD 

Wolfchild, Caitlin Jemma, Pat 
Simmons Jr., 7:30 pm, $0-$15 
BARBOZA Jayomi, Peyote Ugly, 
Lucee, 8 pm, $8/$10 

























































Music 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 47 


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Friday, November 29 
Moore Theatre 


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GROUP Tickets available at Ticketmaster.com 


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48 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 



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OCTOBER 16 at THE MOORE THEATRE 


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THINGS TO DO ->■ Music 


CH0PSUEY MC Chris, 8 pm, 
$15/$18 

THEFUNHOUSEThe Heroine, 
8:30 pm, $8/$10 
HIGH DIVE Micstro, Webb 
Wavvy, D. Mikey, BariBux, scale- 
sofjustis, 8 pm, $8-$13 
O NECTAR Marlon Craft, 8 pm, 
$15-$35 

SEAM0NSTER LOUNGE Shawn 
Schlogel Band, 8-9:30 pm, free 
©THE SHOWBOX Cavetown, 
7:30 pm, $20/$25 
SUBSTATION The Mystical Hot 
Chocolate Endeavors, Vera Kay, 
Nurse Ratchett, Zoe Moreton 
Band, 8 pm 

★ SUNSET TAVERN The KVB, 
Numb.er,9 pm, $12 

★ ©TRIPLE DOOR Rick 
Wakeman, 8 pm, $60-$150 
TRIPLE DOOR MQ STAGE 
Sweetspot Combo, 5 pm, free 
VICTORY LOUNGE Thigh Master, 
Zebra Hunt, Dag, 8:30 pm, $8 
©WAMU THEATER Bring 

Me the Horizon, Sleeping With 
Sirens, Poppy, 7 pm, $40/$45 

JAZZ 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS Ear¬ 
shot Jazz Festival 2019, $0-$500 

Thurs 10/17 

LIVE MUSIC 

BARBOZA ayokay, 7 pm, $13-$38 

CENTRAL SALOON Luna Moss, 
Black Nite Crash, Blue Glass, 
8-11:45 pm, $8 

©COLUMBIA CITY THEATER 

Fink, 8 pm, $20/$25 
CONOR BYRNE TWIN PEAKS 
NIGHT: Hotel Stella, Goodwin, 
Hourglasses, 8 pm, $8 
© CROCODILE Lido Presents: 
Almost Peder Tour, 8 pm, $25/$28 
EL CORAZON Allegaeon, Inferi, 
Paladin, Blood and Thunder, 

7 pm, $15/$18 

THE FUNHOUSE One High Five, 
Professor Sweater, Fond Farewell, 
Jackie, 8:30 pm, $8/$10 
HIGHLINE Iron Kingdom, Solicitor, 
Greyhawk, 8 pm, $10/$15 
©PARAMOUNT THEATRE 
GRiZ, 7 pm, $26-$189 
PARLIAMENT TAVERN Sulphur, 
PAK, K0 SOLO, 9-11:30 pm 
RENDEZVOUS Tom Goss, Nakia, 
Liz DeRoche, 6:30 pm, 9 pm, 
$16-$42 

©THE SHOWBOX Caravan 
Palace, 8:30 pm, $35 
SUNSET TAVERN Dearheart, 
Bears and Other Carnivores, 
Willder, 8 pm, $10 
TIM’S TAVERN Peaceful Sorrow, 
Margo Adrift, The Murkies, 7 pm, $5 
TIMBRE ROOM Breaking Sound 
with Payge Turner, 7 pm, $10 
TRACTOR TAVERN Joe Pug, 
Guests, 8:30 pm, $17 
VICTORY LOUNGE Echolarks, 
Golden Ruins, Last Waves, 

8:30 pm, $8 

CLASSICAL/ 

OPERA 

©NORDIC MUSEUM Norwegian 
Pianist Oda Voltersvik, 7-9 pm, 
$10-$25 

DJ/DANCE 

KREMWERK HaV°sed: Sam 
Divine, 9pm-2am, $12 
Q NIGHTCLUB Field Trip 93: 
Bijou, 9 pm-2 am, $10 

STUDIO CURRENT DJRiz & DJ 
Onsies Dance Party: Dance- 
DanceDance Yo A’* Off!, 9:30 pm 

JAZZ 

★ ©JAZZ ALLEY Madeleine 
Peyroux, 7:30 pm, $65 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS Ear¬ 
shot Jazz Festival 2019, $0-$500 


Fri 10/18 

LIVE MUSIC 

BARBOZA Abhi the Nomad, 

7 pm, $15/$18 

★ BELLTOWN YACHT CLUB 

The Purrs, Oceanwires, Loose 
Wing, 9 pm, $10 
BLUE MOON TAVERN Pinto 
Wagonfire, Guests, 8 pm, $7 
CAFE RACER Racing to the 
Top - An Evening of Music with 
Seattle’s Rising Talent, 8 pm, $6 
CLOCK-OUT LOUNGE L Train’s 
B-Day Bash ft. Goody Bagg, 9 pm, 
$ 10/$12 

©CROCODILE Cory Wong of 
Vulfpeck, 8 pm, $22-$100 
DARRELL’S TAVERN 13 Finches, 
Guardian Alien, Memphis Radio 
Kings, 8 pm, $8 

EL CORAZON Josh A a Jake 
Hill, Darko, Jordanxbell, 8:30 pm, 
$19-$60 

THE FUNHOUSE Legendary 
Shack Shakers, Sinister Six, 
Stoned Evergreen Travelers, Ichi 
Bichi, 8 pm, $13/$15 
HIGH DIVE Ten Miles Wide, 
Karmic Unrest, The Unwilling 
Participants, 9 pm, $8/$12 
MOORE THEATRE Marisela a 
Amanda Miguel, 8 pm, $60-$200 
SUNSET TAVERN Chameleons 
Vox, Theatre of Hate, Jay Aston, 

9 pm, $25 

© THEATRE AT MEYDENBAUER 

Live at Meydenbauer Center Theatre: 
The Paperboys, 8-10:30 pm, 
$20-$70 

TRACTOR TAVERN The 

Brothers Comatose, Goodnight, 
Texas, 9 pm, $15 
VICTORY LOUNGE They Rise, 

We Die, Incanus, Mind Beams, 
Summoned By Giants, 8:30 pm, $8 

CLASSICAL/ 

OPERA 

★ BENAROYA HALL [untitled] 1, 

10 pm, $15 

© BROADWAY PERFORMANCE 
HALL Seattle Ladies Choir Fall 
Concert Season 17,7:30-9:30 pm, 
$10-$18 

©SAINT MARK’S CATH¬ 
EDRAL Concert on the Flentrop 
Organ: Christopher Houlihan, 

7:30 pm, $15/$20 

DJ/DANCE 

Q NIGHTCLUB YehMe2,10 pm- 
2 am, $15 

THE UNDERGROUND STA Pre¬ 
sents: Myon, 10 pm-3 am, $25/$30 

JAZZ 

★ ©CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 
SPACE Clarice Assad, 8 pm, 
$5-$20 

★ ©JAZZ ALLEY Madeleine 
Peyroux, 7:30 pm, $65 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS Ear¬ 
shot Jazz Festival 2019, $0-$500 


Sat 10/19 

LIVE MUSIC 

0 BLACK LODGE False Figure, 
Vueltas, Convictions, Medusa 
Stare, 7 pm 

★ BLUE MOON TAVERN Motrik, 
Guests, 8 pm, $8 

CAFE RACER The Cosmic Wrays, 
The Earthlings, Banzai Surf, 9:30 pm 
CENTRAL SALOON Vanna Oh, The 
Rare Forms, New York City Cops 
(Strokes Tribute), 8-11:45 pm, $8 

★ CROCODILE Jukebox The 
Ghost Presents HalloQueen with 
Zach Jones & The Tricky Bits, 

8 pm, $25 (sold out) 

©THE CROCODILE BACK 
BAR Tom West @ The Back Bar, 
6 pm, $10 

EL CORAZON Ape Shifter, 
lODrilz, 8 pm,$18/$20 
©THE FUNHOUSE No Home, 
Fairwell, 2KLIX, The Last of 
Us, Nova Fracture, Hacksaw 
Mutilation, 7 pm, $10-$15 


HUGO HOUSE Original Music 
Inspired by Stephen King's On 
Writing, 7:30-10 pm, $10 
MCMENAMINS ELKS TEMPLE 
Nite Wave Performs Prince + 

The Revolution’s “Purple Rain", 

8 pm, $20 

NECTAR Crack Sabbath, Guests, 
8 pm, $10 

SHOWBOX SODO Kaskade, 

8 pm, $55-$65 (sold out) 

©THE SHOWBOX Rich Brian, 

9 pm, $30/$35 
SUNSET TAVERN The 
Lonesome Billies, Via 
C0MBUSTA, Norman Baker & 
the Backroads, 9 pm, $10 
TIMBRE ROOM NiGHTofAL, 
6:30-9:45 pm 

★ ©TOWN HALL Global 
Rhythms: Trichy Sankaran with 
Ganesh Rajagopalan, 7:30 pm, 
$15/$20 

TRACTOR TAVERN The 

Brothers Comatose, Goodnight, 
Texas, 9 pm, $15 
©VERA PROJECT Jason 
McCue, Black Ends, Coach 
Phillips, Craig Jaffe, 7 pm, 
$ 10/$12 

VERMILLION Medicine Bows, 
riife, Guests, 6-8:30 pm, free 

CLASSICAL/ 

OPERA 

BENAROYA HALL Eastern 
Memories on the Western Wind: 
Songs of Home, 7 pm, $25-$30 
FIRST FREE METHODIST 
CHURCH Luco Concert One: 
Vienna Waits For You, 7:30 pm 
PANTAGES THEATER 
Symphony Tacoma: Romeo & 
Juliet, 7:30-9:30 pm, $24-$83 
QUEEN ANNE CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH Gallery Concerts: 
Crossing the Rhine, $35 

DJ/DANCE 

KREMWERK Tenth Aesthetic: 
JX216, Rubidium, Sone (From 0-1 
Showcase), 10 pm-2 am 
NEUMOS Arihanna - A Dance 
Party for Ari & Riri with Seattle’s 
Best Drag Queens!, 10 pm, $5 
Q NIGHTCLUB Haute Sauce: 
Swervewon, Famous, JCue, Zilla, 

10 pm-2 am, $10 

JAZZ 

★ ©JAZZ ALLEY Madeleine 
Peyroux, 7:30 pm, $65 

THE ROYAL ROOM Rise Up-A 
Tribute to the Music of Hamilton, 
5-6:30 pm, 8-11 pm,$18/$20 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS 
Earshot Jazz Festival 2019, 
$0-$500 

Sun 10/20 

LIVE MUSIC 

BELLTOWN YACHT CLUB 

VASAS, iji, Surething, 8:30 
pm, $10 

©THE CROCODILE BACK 

BAR Sizzy Rocket, 8 pm, $12/$15 
©EL CORAZON Rings Of Saturn, 
Enterprise Earth, Angelmaker, 
Brand of Sacrifice, 7:30 pm, $18 

©THE SHOWBOX Common 
Kings, 8 pm, $35/$40 
SUNSET TAVERN Dumbo Gets 
Mad, Guests, 8:30 pm, $15 

CLASSICAL/ 

OPERA 

©FOSTER PERFORMING 
ARTS CENTER Rainier 
Symphony -The Sum of All 
Parts, $0-$22 

JAZZ 

★ ©JAZZ ALLEY Madeleine 
Peyroux, 7:30 pm, $65 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS Ear¬ 
shot Jazz Festival 2019, $0-$500 

Mon 10/21 

LIVE MUSIC 

COLUMBIA CITY THEATER Kris 
Allen, 7:30 pm, $25-$100 


©EL CORAZON Wage War, 
Like Moths to Flames, Polaris, 
Dayseeker, 7 pm, $18/$20 
SUNSET TAVERN Saintseneca, 
Nick Delffs, 8 pm, $16 

JAZZ 

©CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 
SPACE Briggan Krauss, 7:30 pm, 
$10-$23 

TOWN HALL Anton Schwartz 
Sextet, 7:30 pm, $10-$23 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS 

Earshot Jazz Festival 2019, 
$0-$500 


Tues10/22 

LIVE MUSIC 

BARBOZA Heart Bones, Atari 
Ferrari, 8 pm, $15/$17 
CENTRAL SALOON Zigtebra, 
Something Witchy, Pink 
Shadows, VAENS, 8 pm, $8 
CHOPSUEY Linda From Work, 
The Early Warnings, North By 
North, Cozy Slippers, 8 pm, 
$ 8/$10 

COLUMBIA CITY THEATER 

Jonathan Bree, 7 pm, $13/$15 
CROCODILE Hot 8 Brass Band, 7 
pm,$22/$25 

EL CORAZON Messer Chups, 
The Delstroyers, 8 pm, $13-$15 

★ HIGH DIVE Eric Blu 8: The 
Soul Revue, Sensi Trails, Todd & 
The Toots, 8 pm, $6/$10 
MOORE THEATRE Lukas 
Graham, 8 pm, $27-$37 
SUNSET TAVERN Sunset 
Rollercoaster, Guests, 8 pm, $15 
TRACTOR TAVERN Teenage 
Bottlerocket, The Subjunctives, 
Coyote Bred, 8 pm, $14 
©VERA PROJECT Dorian 
Electra, Mood Killer, 7 pm, $12-$15 

CLASSICAL/ 

OPERA 

©GARFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 

Side-by-Side Concert with 
Garfield High School Orchestra, 

7 pm, free 

JAZZ 

★ THE ROYAL ROOM Carrie 
Wicks Quintet CD Release, 8 
pm, $15/$18 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS Ear¬ 
shot Jazz Festival 2019, $0-$500 

Wed 10/23 

LIVE MUSIC 

CENTRAL SALOON Modern 
Daze, Watership, Long Shorts, Ice 
Party, 7-10:30 pm, $8 
CROCODILE Big Wreck, Texas 
King, 8 pm, $20/$23 
©NEUMOS Collie Buddz,8pm, 
$26-$31 

SUNSET TAVERN Mild Orange, 
Guests, 9 pm, $12 
©VERA PROJECT The Obsess¬ 
ives, Jordan Krimston, 7-11:30 pm 

CLASSICAL/ 

OPERA 

©BENAROYA HALL Northwest 
Symphony Orchestra: National 
Parks, 7:30 pm 

DJ/DANCE 

TRINITY The House of Ghosts: 
Dubloadz, Dack Janiels, SUAHN, 

9 pm, $10-$50 

JAZZ 

©CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 
SPACE Larry Grenadier, Kelsey 
Mines & Carlos Snaider, 7:30 pm, 
$10-$27 

SEAMONSTER LOUNGE Lord 
Shambleton, 8-9:30 pm, free 

★ ©VARIOUS LOCATIONS Ear¬ 
shot Jazz Festival 2019, $0-$500 





















THINGS TO DO -► Film 


Film 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 49 


The Biggest, Queerest Fest in Town 

Seattle Queer Film Festival is October 10-20. 

BY CHASE BURNS AND JASMYNE KEIMIG 



T hree Dollar Bill Cinema hosts its 
24th annual Seattle Queer Film 
Festival at venues across town 
October 10-20. Formerly known 
as TWIST (and before that, the 
Seattle Lesbian & Gay Film Festival), the 
Seattle Queer Film Festival features more 
than 150 LGBTQ2+ films from 28 coun¬ 
tries. According to the fest, 96 transgender 
filmmakers and creatives were involved 
with the making of these films, and 58 per¬ 
cent of the films are directed by women. 
Here are nine of our favorites. Find the full 
schedule atthestranger.com/SQFF. 



SID a JUDY 

USA, 2019,97 min., Dir. Stephen Kijak 
Judy Garland is the talk of the town this 
fall. At least two big films have come out on 
her: First, the new blockbuster biopic Judy, 
which zooms in on the final year of Garland’s 
life. Second, Showtime’s documentary Sid 
& Judy, which centers on Garland’s rela¬ 
tionship with her third husband (of five), 
Sid Luft. The documentary is a cavalcade 
of archival footage and features zero talking 
heads—which I love. ( Thurs OctlO, 6:30pm, 
SIFF Cinema Egyptian.) CHASE BURNS 



ADAM 

USA, 2019,95 min., Dir. Rhys Ernst 
A film about mistaken identity, deception, 
and queer politics, Adam was swallowed by 
controversy before it was out of production. 
Many have prematurely labeled the film 
“dangerous” and “transphobic” because it 
centers on a horrible cisgender teenage boy 
who pretends to be a trans man to attract a 
young cisgender woman. It was created by 
trans filmmaker Rhys Ernst (previously 
a producer on Transparent) and includes 
a large trans cast and crew, but people 


continue to push to cancel the film before it 
even premieres. I find Adam full of contra¬ 
dictions: sweet and maddening, gentle but 
reckless, simple yet confusing. (Fri Oct 11, 
7 pm, Northwest Film Forum.) CHASE BURNS 

BILLIE AND EMMA 

Philippines, 2018,107 min., Dir. Samantha Lee 
In this sweet, mid-1990s coming-of-age tale, 
teenager Billie (Zar Donato) is shunned by 
her family in Manila for being a lesbian and 
sent to live with her aunt, a religion teacher 
at a Catholic girls school in rural San Isidro. 
In doing this, they think she’ll turn out less 
gay—as if that ever works. There she meets 
the popular and smart Emma (Gabby Padil¬ 
la), who hopes that her studies will help her 
leave the small town. The two grow closer as 
they are assigned to work on a school project 
together, but a complication in Emma’s life 
threatens to rip them apart. ( Fri Oct 11, 6:45 
pm, Northwest Film Forum; Thurs Oct 17, 
9pm, Gay City.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 

SEAHORSE: THE DAD WHO GAVE BIRTH 

United Kingdom, 2019,92 min., Dir. Jeanie Finlay 
This British documentary follows Alfred 
“Freddy” McConnell, a single gay trans 
man on a quest to get pregnant and give 
birth to his own child. The crew had almost 
completely unrestricted access to McCon¬ 
nell’s life, beginning with him stopping his 
testosterone treatments, navigating the 
transphobic health-care system, and up to 
the moment the baby arrives. While not un¬ 
common, McConnell’s path to fatherhood 
is still a particularly difficult and misun¬ 
derstood one, with a British court recent¬ 
ly ruling that he did not have the right to 
be legally recognized as the father on his 
child’s birth certificate. Incredibly tender 
and moving, Seahorse is a compelling por¬ 
trait of parenthood, gender, and family. I 
wept! ( Sat Oct 12,12:15 pm, Northwest Film 
Forum.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 

SCREAM, QUEEN! 

MY NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET 

USA, 2019,99 min., Dir. Roman Chimienti, Tyler Jensen 
The gayest slasher film ever made is get¬ 
ting a documentary. Obviously that film 
is A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy’s 
Revenge (1985), a critical flop that’s become 
a cult hit. In the sequel, the original film’s 
lead female character was replaced with a 
male character, a choice that embeds a queer 
undercurrent throughout Elm Street 2. The 
film’s screenwriter and director refused to 
acknowledge its gayness for years, but they 
have now reversed their position. ( Sun Oct 
13, 9 pm, Northwest Film Forum; Sat Oct 19, 
2:30 pm, Northwest Film Forum.) CHASE BURNS 


ZEN IN THE ICE RIFT 

Italy, 2018,90 min., Dir. Margherita Ferri 
Teenage genderqueer hockey star Zen (Ele¬ 
onora Conti) is constantly on the defensive 
in their rural Italian Alpine town. Bullied by 
the boys at their school and mocked by the 
girls, they are a mouthy outcast. But when 
schoolmate Vanessa (Susanna Acchiardi) 
has an unsatisfying sexual experience with 
her boyfriend, she runs away from town, 
seeking refuge in Zen’s family’s cabin. Obsti¬ 
nate at first, Zen cautiously begins to warm 
up to Vanessa. The film is gorgeously shot, 
high up in the Alps. Even though the ending is 
a bit unsatisfying, it’s worth it just for Conti’s 
explosive and vulnerable performance. ( Tues 
Oct 15, 5 pm. Northwest Film Forum; Sat 
Oct 19, 7pm, Gay City.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 



QUEER JAPAN 

USA/Japan, 2019,100 min., Dir. Graham Kolbeins 
This documentary features a giant inflatable 
latex pig—and by “giant,” I mean like the size 
of a warehouse—that gives birth to little baby 
pigs. And by “little,” I mean like the size of 
a full-grown human. That all happens at 
Department H, a hentai and bondage party 
in Japan that includes some of the wildest 
costumes I’ve ever seen. Queer Japan tightly 
explores various Japanese queer identities, 
snagging interviews with celebrities like 
erotic manga artist Gengoroh Tagame. Easy, 
fun, and highly recommended. ( Wed Oct 16, 
9:15 pm, Northwest Film Forum.) CHASE BURNS 


GOOD KISSER 

USA, 2019,79 min., Dir. Wendy Jo Carlton 
Threesomes can be tricky. This dynamic 
is the subject of local director and screen¬ 
writer Wendy Jo Carlton’s Good Kisser. It 
opens with couple Kate (Rachel Paulson) 
and Jenna (Kari Alison Hodge) taking 
a rideshare to go have some hot three- 
some-times with the sexy and worldly Mia 
(Julia Eringer). What they don’t know is 
that the introduction of a third party into 
their dynamic will expose faults in their 
relationship. ( Sat Oct 19, 7pm, Northwest 
Film Forum.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 



PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE 

France, 2019,119 min., Dir. Celine Sciamma 
From Celine Sciamma (Girlhood),Portrait 
of a Lady on Fire is set in the 18th centu¬ 
ry, where young artist Marianne (Noemie 
Merlant) is commissioned to paint a por¬ 
trait of Heloise (Adele Haenel) for poten¬ 
tial suitors to fall in love with. One thing: 
Heloise does not want her portrait done, as 
she does not want to get married. So Mar¬ 
ianne poses as her maid to get close to the 
woman, completing the painting in secret. 
But of course this closeness and secre¬ 
tiveness makes them all hot for each oth¬ 
er. Portrait has been getting rave reviews 
out of Cannes, becoming the first woman- 
directed film to take home the Queer Palm. 
(Sun Oct 20, 7pm, SIFF Cinema Egyptian.) 
JASMYNE KEIMIG 



50 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 



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THINGS TO DO Film 


Top Picks 

OCT 10-14 

Orcas Island Film Festival 

The Orcas Island Film Festival has done it again- 
put together a fantastic lineup of films, that is. 

Now in its sixth year, the test’s organizers have 
curated 39 feature films (five more than last year) 
that consist of internationally lauded titles and 
encompass more than 60 screenings overall. 
Attendees will have the chance to see some films 
twice or catch a film they might’ve missed the first 
time, as OIFF is expanding onto three screens this 
year. In particular, keep an eye out for Mati Diop’s 
Senegal-set sci-fi romance Atlantics (winner of the 
jury prize at Cannes); Pedro Almodovar’s somewhat 
autobiographical drama starring Antonio Banderas, 
Pain and Glory (Spain’s Oscar submission for best 
international film); and newcomer Levan Akin’s And 
Then We Danced, a Georgian film about a dancer's 
sexual awakening in a homophobic country (Akin 
won OlFF’s Vanguard Award and will be present at 
the festival to accept the prize). (Various locations 
around Orcas Island, $14-$500.) JASMYNE KEIMIG 

OCT 12, 15-16 



‘Morgiana’ 

If you’re craving a film that epitomizes 1970s-era 
stylistic excess-swooping cameras, Freudian set 
decoration, swooning women in heavily embel¬ 
lished dresses-you’ve arrived at the right place. 
Morgiana, directed in Czechoslovakia by the under- 
appreciated auteur Juraj Herz, casts Iva Janzurova 
as a virginal beauty as well as the jealous, Mrs. 
Danvers-esque sister who’s slowly poisoning her 
to death. In both roles, she wears enough makeup 
to provision a small army of drag queens. Morgiana 
is either a ridiculous, hallucinatory melodrama or 
a Jungian parable of self-destruction. Either way, 
it's a lot of fun. The Beacon is showing Morgiana - 
whose titular character is an adorable Siamese cat 
with a sinister role to play-as part of their “Folklore 
Phantasmagoria” series, which will continue with 
the quintessential Russian horror Viy- Spirit of Evil 
(Oct 19 ft 22-23) and the insane Shaw Brothers 
action movie The Boxer's Omen (Oct 26 ft 29-30). 
(The Beacon, $13.) JOULE ZELMAN 

OCT 13 & 15-16 

‘Alien’40th Anniversary 

When I was 10 years old, I read in a newspaper 
that a new film called Alien was so terrifying that 
people were not only fainting out of fear during 
screenings but also being taken out of the theater 
on stretchers. I badly wanted to see this movie: 
one that was so terrifying it could send a person 
to the emergency room. But Alien was rated R. 


“You too young to watch this movie,” said the man 
in the box office of the theater that was near my 
school, Janney Elementary in Washington, DC. I 
begged and begged; he said no and no and kept 
telling me that this film was only for grown people 
because it had an evil alien that was fucking 
scary. “But I just want to see people fainting and 
screaming,” I pleaded. “The alien won’t scare me 
none,” I promised. He said no for the final time, 
and I, wearing tube socks and carrying a Charlie 
Brown backpack, walked slowly and sadly back 


to my elementary school. This happened 40 years 
ago. (Various locations, $13.) CHARLES MUDEDE 

OPENING THURS OCT 17 



‘Zombieland 2: Double Tap’ 

Ruben Fleischer's Zombieland is one of my 
all-time favorite zom-coms, ranking right up there 
with Shaun of the Dead, Life After Beth, and 
The Cabin in the Woods (which is really more 
zom-fusion, if we’re being technical). The plot 
is typical, but the execution of it and the cast 
involved are damn near perfect: Jesse Eisenberg 
as the loner-geek college kid quietly and doggedly 
following his own set of “rules” to make it through 
the zombie apocalypse (also the film’s running gag 
and provider of comic relief); Woody Harrelson 
as the redneck gun nut he meets on the road and 
who becomes his sidekick/partner in crime (or 
is it the other way around?); and the two sisters 
(Emma Stone and Abigail Breslin) they meet, who 
alternately help and take advantage of them. Oh, 
also Bill Murray in the most epic walk-on role ever. 
I am super excited that Fleischer has helmed a 
sequel 10 years later, in which we pick up with 
the foursome as they deal with fellow survivors, 
evolved zombies, and their own makeshift family’s 
growing pains. No idea if it's as good as its prede¬ 
cessor, but the trailer made me belly laugh, which 
is a good sign. (Wide release.) LEILANI POLK 

MON OCT 21 

‘ZZ Top: That Little 01’Band 
from Texas’ 

Sam Dunn’s straightforward doc tells the feel¬ 
good story of a band that has lasted 50 years 
without a lineup change. For such a wildly pop¬ 
ular group, ZZ Top have experienced little drama 
during their five decades of down-and-dirty, 
upscale blues-rocking. Drummer Frank Beard’s 
drug problems and the draining Worldwide Texas 
Tour seem to be the only blips in a career that 
smoothly ascended from playing to one punter 
in 1969 to selling more than 15 million copies of 
1983's Eliminator and performing at the 1997 
Super Bowl. Commentary from the band, their 
producers/engineers, publicist, and fans such 
as Billy Bob Thornton and Josh Homme paint a 
rosy portrait of amiable, talented, hardworking 
hombres who got rich doing exactly what they 
wanted to do. Thankfully, there is some early 
Moving Sidewalks footage, albeit brief. (SIFF 
Cinema Uptown, 6:30 pm, $14.) DAVE SEGAL 
















Film 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 51 


THINGS TO DO -► Film 


UNSTREAMABLE 

Where we recommend great films you can find only on DVD. 

‘The Doom Generation’ 

Sarcastically taglined as “A Heterosexual Film 
by Gregg Araki,” The Doom Generation (1995) 
is a steamy misunderstood bisexual piece of 
trash. In The Scarecrow Video Movie Guide, Matt 
Lynch argues that “this film should be wiped from 
existence-the negative burned, all tapes and DVDs 
destroyed, and any memory, good or ill, of this piece 
of shit exiled into the void for all eternity.” A sizzling 
take I disagree with, but love. Thankfully, Scarecrow 
didn’t actually take his recommendation. The film’s 
plot is like Sartre's No Exit, but features hot bi boys 
with pouty lips who bone a volatile early-career 
Rose McGowan-and each other. All together! It 
opened a few months after Clueless, and it’s helpful 
to think of this ennui-filled mess as a foil to that pop 



sensation. While most filmmakers aim to create 
movies that are the pinnacle of their genre, Araki is 
comfortable exploring a genre’s very bottom, its na¬ 
dir. And we all know bottoms need exploration, too. 
(Available for rent at Scarecrow Video; more recs at 
thestranger.com/unstreamable.) CHASE BURNS 

iheStrange r. m m/EverOut 


Short 

List 

All That Heaven Allows 

The Beacon, Oct 13,15 ft 17, 
$13 

An Autumn Afternoon 

The Beacon, Oct 20,22 ft 
24,$13 

Bill and Ted’s Excellent 
Adventure 

Central Cinema, Oct 11-16, 
$ 2-$10 

Campout Cinema: 

‘The Fly’ 

Museum of Pop Culture, 
Sun Oct 20,7 pm, $14 


Candyman 

The Beacon, Oct 11-12, 

$13 

Cat People 

The Beacon, Oct 18-24, 
$13 

Chez Jolie Coiffure 

Northwest Film Forum, 

Oct 20,23 ft 30, $13 

The Dead Center 

Grand Illusion, Oct 11-17, 
$10 

Fright Night 

Central Cinema, Oct 19-23, 
$ 2-$10 

Ghostwatch 

The Beacon, Sun Oct 20, 
$13 


House 

Central Cinema, Oct 19-22, 
$5-$10 

In the Mouth of 
Madness 

The Beacon, Oct 18-19, 

21 ft 23-23, $13 

Kill List 

Grand Illusion, Oct 18-19 

a 21-22, $10 

Loro 

SIFF Cinema Uptown, 
opening Fri Oct 11, $11/$14 

Night of the Creeps 

Central Cinema, Oct 11-16, 
$ 2-$10 


Silent Movie Mondays: 
‘Within Our Gates' 

Paramount Theatre, Mon 
Oct 21,7 pm, $11 

The Spirit of the 
Beehive 

The Beacon, Oct 11-12,14, 
a 16-17, $13 

The Two Faces of a 
Bamileke Woman 

Northwest Film Forum, 
Oct 20,23 a 30, $13 

Viy - Spirit of Evil 

The Beacon, Oct 19 a 
22-23, $13 

The Wicker Man: 

The Final Cut 

Grand Illusion, Oct 19,24 

a 26,$10 




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Food & Drink 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 53 


THINGS TO DO -► Food & Drink 

My Ramen Bowl and 
Sake Cup Runneth Over 

Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto’s new Momosan features 

big bowls and generous pours. 

BY RICH SMITH 


I ’ve been a Masaharu Morimoto fan 
since his days on the original Iron 
Chef, back when it was a cult Japanese 
cooking show that pitted masters of 
world cuisine against chefs from lesser 
restaurants in a cook-off featuring a secret 
ingredient. 

I remember Morimoto standing out in 
particular for his artistry—he once made 
a sushi roll that looked like stained glass. 

So when I heard he was 

MOMOSAN extending his restaurant 

504 Fifth Ave S, ~ , , , 

206 501 4499 empire to Seattle s shores 

with a ramen place called 
Momosan in Chinatown-International Dis¬ 
trict, I was pretty pumped. I was not pumped 
to wait in what I assumed would be a long 
line to get in, but pumped nonetheless. 

But on a Tuesday night around 6:30 p.m., I 
was able to easily score a table for two with¬ 
out a reservation, which they don’t accept 
anyway. 

Mid-century toy robots stored in see- 
through, wall-mounted lockers positioned 
throughout the split-level, spacious restau¬ 
rant provide the only pops of color in a room 
otherwise dominated by brushed cement 
and gleaming metallic chandeliers. The 
place felt a little antiseptic and too bright, 
but that should change once things settle in. 

Both the menu and the seating options 
are designed to allow the maximum possible 
number of culinary experiences. Long dining 
tables, bar seating, and tables for two offer 
opportunities for happy hour drinking and 
snacking, dinner dates, and family style meals. 
I triedto have as many ofthose experiences as 
I could without turning into a dumpling. 

Though I was desperate to try one of the 
Morimoto signature beers brewed by Rogue 
Ales, the restaurant had already sold out for 
the month. That didn’t stop me from munch¬ 
ing on some drinking snacks, including atruly 



ANTHONYKEO 


Momosan’s tonkotsu ramen, with perfect springy-but-yielding noodles. 


superb chicken karaage. I also tried the chicken 
gizzard and the chicken heart yakitori. Make 
sure to get these with just the salt, though. 
They offer to gloop on a thick teriyaki sauce, 
but I found it to be too sweet. Skip the popular 
plate of duck tacos, too. The perfect half-heart 
slice of duck tucked into that friedtaco shell is 
adorable, but the apricot-chili glaze makes the 
whole thing taste like duck candy. 

In keeping with the theme of abundance 
suggested by the menu, Momosan offers 
some pretty significant portions. When 
I asked for a glass of Dassai 50 Junmai 


Daiginjo sake, the server placed a three- 
ounce shot glass into a mini bento box and 
poured in sake until it overflowed past the 
rim, nearly half-filling the box. “Morimo¬ 
to always says food and drink, as with life, 
should be filled to the top,” he said and 
smiled before walking away. 

The Dassai tasted like fresh apples, 
which paired perfectly with the tender 
pork folded atop my bowl of tonkotsu ra¬ 
men. Though I normally prefer to eat ra¬ 
men alone at a cramped bar while watching 
K-pop videos on mute, I gotta say the bowl 


served at Momosan is pretty special. The 
noodles are perfect—springy but yielding, 
with a slight bitterness that cuts against the 
heavy, mouth-coating broth. 

It was good enough to temper my sadness 
over not dropping $20 per ounce on a dish 
of A5 Wagyu beef seared table-side, though 
that did look pretty cool. The yellowfin bap, 
also seared table-side, was perfectly service¬ 
able—the citrus paste, sweet soy sauce, and 
fancy fish classed up the classic rice dish. 

But the ramen is the star of the show, and 
the ramen is very good. ■ 


Top Picks 

CLOSING SAT NOV 2 

Nightmare on Wall Street 

Continuing a spooky-season tradition started 
last year, Belltown’s award-winning tiki bar Navy 
Strength will temporarily transform into a “fully 
immersive haunting experience,” with libations 
inspired by horror films like Friday the 13th, The 
Babadook, Midsommar, The Ring, Pet Sematary, 
and more. They'll switch out their usual kitschy 
drinkware for vessels like pumpkins and Jason 
Voorhees-masked tiki mugs, and employ ingredi¬ 
ents like “candy corn orgeat.” Frightening horror-film 


soundtracks will contribute to the spine-chilling 
milieu. ( Navy Strength, Mon-Sat .) JULIANNE BELL 

SAT OCT 12 

Depressed Cake Shop 

In 2013, United Kingdom-based creative director 
and PR specialist Emma Thomas dreamed up a 
bake sale to promote mental-health awareness 
and raise money for local mental-health charities. 
The concept was simple: The cakes sold were a 
gloomy gray, but they contained a cheerful pop 
of color within to symbolize hope in the face of 
depression. It caught on, and cities everywhere, 
from Glasgow to Houston to Kuala Lumpur, 
began organizing their own versions. As they do 
each October, NAMI Seattle will host the Seattle 


fundraiser at Optimism Brewing, with som¬ 
ber-looking confections contributed by Le Fournil 
Fran’s Chocolates, Top Pot Doughnuts, Chocolati, 
Borracchini’s, and others. (Optimism Brewing, 

11 am-2 pm.) JULIANNE BELL 

Seattle Fresh Hop 
Beer Festival 

The Stranger’s Lester 
Black has written that 
during hops harvest 
season, Seattle 
is “the world’s 
greatest place to 
drink hoppy beer.” 

That’s because 
Seattle's proximity 


to Yakima Valley, which supplies 75 percent of 
our nation’s hop crop, means our region has an 
unparalleled selection of fresh hop beers (beers 
made with hops that have been picked no more 
than 24 hours before brewing). This tasting 
event exclusively dedicated to fresh hop of¬ 
ferings from more 
than 20 different 
local breweries- 
including Fremont 
(which produces 
more fresh hop 
beer than any 
brewery in the 
nation), Hellbent, 
Pfriem, Jellyfish, 
Fort George, and 









54 OCTOBER 9, 2019 THE STRANGER 



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more-is a great chance to try as many as you 
can during their all-too-fleeting season. ( The 
Stables, 12-4 pm, 5:30-9:30 pm, $20-$35.) 

JULIANNE BELL 


New Bars & 
Restaurants 


SUN OCT 13 

Matty Matheson 

The jovial, tattooed, foul-mouthed Canadian 
chef and self-proclaimed “Flavour Lord” Matty 

Matheson has 
earned legions 
offansforhis 
boisterous 
persona and 
his Viceland 
shows Dead 
Set on Life and 
It's Suppertime. 
(If you’re a 
devotee of 
Bon Appetit's 
YouTube channel, you may have caughtthe recent 
video of him going “noodling” for catfish in an 
Oklahoma river with Brad Leone of It’s Alive, with 
hilarious results.) In 2018, he released a New York 
Times best-selling cookbook, Matty Matheson: 

A Cookbook, interspersing recipes for gumbo and 
pigtail tacos with a memoir of his life. Experience 
his larger-than-life presence at Washington Hall, 
where he'll appear for an evening of “stand-up 
comedy/speaking/storytelling/slideshow.” (Wash¬ 
ington Hall, 4 pm, $28-$99.) JULIANNE BELL 

SUN OCT 20 

A Fall Foraged Dinner at Lark 
with Langdon Cook 

Aspiring mycologists and other lovers of mush¬ 
rooms would do well to check out this edifying 
dinner with Langdon Cook, a food writer and 
noted foraging expert. He'll demystify the region’s 
“most prolific” wild fungi of the season, all while 
you tuck into a four-course feast prepared by 
James Beard Award-winning chef John Sund- 
strom of Lark and accompanied by wine pairings. 
You'll leave feeling full, blissful, and inspired to 
scrounge seasonal delicacies from the land your¬ 
self. (Lark, 6 pm, $140.) JULIANNE BELL 




BALLARD 

Vera’s Pizza and Bar 

Late-night pizza and drinks 
5417 22nd Ave NW 

BELLTOWN 

Towne Pub 

Dog-friendly bar 
2320 First Ave 

DOWNTOWN 

Locust Cider & Brewing 

Cider taproom 
7222 Post Alley 
Xi’an Noodles 
Hand-pulled 
Chinese noodles 
400 Pine St 

FREMONT 

Kin Len Thai Night Bites 

Bar with Thai eats 
3517 Fremont Ave N 


PINEHURST 

Casa del Mariachi 

Mexican restaurant 
12327 Roosevelt Way NE 

QUEEN ANNE 

Eden Hill Provisions 

Modern American bistro 
1935 Queen Anne AveN 

SODO 

San Juan Seltzery Tap¬ 
room, Kitchen, and Bar 

Spiked seltzer taproom 
with cocktails and seafood 
3901 First Ave S 

WEST SEATTLE 

Lady Jaye 

Bar and smokehouse 
4523 California Ave SW 
Phoenicia 
Lebanese bistro 
4717 42nd Ave SW 



Omnivorous 



ALEXA SEIDLE MACKINNON 


Short 

List 

6th Annual Farm To 
Table Dinner 

UW Center For Urban 
Horticulture, Wed Oct 23, 
10 am-4 pm, $15-$35 

Brewology 

Pacific Science Center, 

Fri Oct 18,7-10 pm, $50 

Ghosts of October: 

A Vegan Dinner with 
Josh Ploeg 

Pettirosso, Mon Oct 21, 
6-9 pm 

Harvest in the City 

Frolik Kitchen + Cocktails, 
Thurs Oct 10,6-9 pm 


Japanese Whisky & 
Wagyu Dinner 

Daniel’s Broiler, Thurs Oct 
17,6-9 pm, $250 

Leavenworth 

Oktoberfest 

Leavenworth Festhalle, 
Fri-Sat, $10-$20, through 
Oct 19 

Omnivorous 

Washington Hall, Thurs 
Oct 10,5:30-8:30 pm, $85 

Sweet Tooth Pop-Up 

Fremont Sunday Market, 
Sun Oct 13,10 am-4 pm 

Taste Of Iceland in 
Seattle 2019: Icelandic 
Menu 

Cuoco, Thurs Oct 17, $80 

West Seattle 
Oktoberfest 

Ounces, Oct 11-13 


Food & Drink 


THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 5 5 




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THE STRANGER 



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ACROSS 

1. Like Atari 2600 and 
Nintendo Entertainment 
System game consoles 

5. Does voice-over work 

9. Windows forerunner 

14. Mighty tony 

15. Biblical twin 

16. “The Evil Dead” director 

17. Serious complaint from 
author Puzoy 

19. Chicken man 

20. “Some of us are becoming 
the men we wanted to 
marry” speaker 

22. Card dealer’s box 

23. “Stuff it” 

26. Took cover 

27. Unthinking worker 

29. China with scones 

31. Classic skateboarding 
magazine 

34. Computer bug, often 

35. Up one 

36. Actress Amurri Martino 

37. Turned on the waterworks 

38. Lactose intolerant’s no-no 

39. Representative Schiff 

40. When the trip’s going to end, 
briefly 

41. Ahmad Jamal’s instrument 

42. Tool houses 

43. “I’m not looking for a 
response,” on Twitter 

45. Party 


46. One who walked through hell? 

47. Coffee serving 

48. Pull off? 

49. Tease 

51. Collection of previously 
published works 

54. In a tumultuous state 

56. Outdoor areas where one 
can belch? 

60. Way to go 

61. Marc of fashion 

62. “I’m baby,” e.g. 

63. MLB commissioner before 
Manfred 

64. Cut the crop 

65. Annual Austin music/film fest 

DOWN 

1. When primetime starts 

2. Feathery neckpiece 

3. The Knesset’s nat. 

4. “So. Much_ 

5. Liar’s trade 

6. Humanitarian org. created 
by JFK 

7. Stable home? 

8. Deadpool.forone 

9. 1981 Conway Twitty album 
(which doesn't have a song 
titled "I Pity the Fool”) 

10. Approvals 

11. Dole out an expression of 
stupidity? 

12. Herman Melville’s most-famous 
novel (crossword-wise) 

13. Function of geometry 


18. Alternate choice 

21. Eel’s cousin 

23. Drunk as a skunk 

24. Legalese phrase 

25. Two things an angel must 
have while covering Aretha 
Franklin? 

28. Awful 

30. Drunk 

31. “To_own self be true” 

32. Artful dodger? 

33. Two-time Pro Bowl corner- 
back Jalen 

35. One who might need help 
getting started 

38. “Same” 

39. Fancy tuna 

41. Rate poorly 

42. Clean, as a spill 

44. Most populous island of 
French Polynesia 

45. Classic Seattle record label 
that found Nirvana 

47. Happening roughly 

49. Marmalade containers 

50. Woodwind instrument 

52. Zap in the microwave 

53. BJ’s rival 

55. Chicken serving 

57. Spot’s bud 

58. maps.google.ca meas. 

59. Darn 

Find the solution at 
thestranger.com/puzzlesolution. 



JOHNNY SAMPSON 






























































































































































THE STRANGER OCTOBER 9, 2019 57 




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