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Ex LIBRIS 

UNIVERSITATIS 

ALBERT/ENSIS 



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TOURISM STUDIES 



Learning re source c u ; d e 



INTERIM 1993 



Liberia 



MAY 1994 



EDUCATION 
CURRICULUM STANDARDS BRANCH 



Comments and suggestions are welcome and should be directed to: 

Career and Technology Studies Unit 

Alberta Education 

Curriculum Standards Branch 

1 1 1 60 Jasper Avenue 

Edmonton, Alberta 

T5K 0L2 

Telephone: 427-2984 

Fax: 422-3745 

V Of Ai-BF-R ' 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

INTRODUCTION 1.1 

CTS and the Resource-Based Classroom 1.1 

Purpose and Organization of this Document 1.1 

How to Order 1.2 

Resource Policy 1.2 

TOURISM STUDIES AT A GLANCE 1.3 

Module Overviews 1.3 

Scope and Sequence 1.6 

AUTHORIZED RESOURCES 1.7 

Basic Learning Resources 1.7 

Support Learning Resources 1.7 

Teaching Resources 1.7 

OTHER RESOURCES 1.1 

Print 1.10 

Video 1.18 

ADDITIONAL SOURCES 1.24 

Teacher-Librarians 1.24 

Alberta Education Sources 1.24 

Other Government Sources 1.25 

Government of Canada 1.26 

Professional Associations/Industry Organizations 1.26 

DISTRIBUTOR DIRECTORY 1.28 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 
University of Alberta Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/tourismstudiesleOOalbe 



INTRODUCTION 



CTS AND THE RESOURCE-BASED CLASSROOM 

Career and Technology Studies (CTS) encourages teachers to establish a resource-based classroom, 
where a variety of appropriate, up-to-date print and non-print resources are available. Learning 
resources identified for CTS strands include print, software, interactive videos, manipulatives, student 
learning guides and tutorials. 

The resource-based classroom approach accommodates a variety of instructional strategies and 
teaching styles, and supports individual or small group planning. It provides students with opportunities 
to interact with a wide range of information sources in a variety of learning situations. Students in CTS 
are encouraged to take an active role in managing their own learning. Ready access to a strong 
resource base enables students to learn to screen and use information appropriately to solve problems, 
to meet their specific classroom and learning needs, and to develop competency in reading, writing, 
speaking, listening and viewing. 

PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATION OF THIS DOCUMENT 

The purpose of this document is to help teachers identify a variety of resources to meet their needs and 
those of the students taking the new Tourism Studies curriculum. It is hoped that this practical guide to 
resources will help teachers develop a useful, accessible resource centre that will encourage students 
to become independent, creative thinkers. 

This document is organized as follows: 

• Authorized Resources: 

- basic learning resources 
support learning resources 
teaching resources 

• Other Resources: 

- print and video 

• Sources. 

Some resources in the list have been authorized for use in some or all of the CTS strands; e.g., the 11- 
video Career and Technology Studies series produced by ACCESS Network. Full information is 
provided in the appropriate section of this resource guide. 



CSB: 94 05 24 Tourism Studies /I.l 

(Interim 1993) 



Each resource in the guide provides bibliographic information, an annotation where appropriate, and a 
correlation to Tourism Studies modules. The distributor code for each entry will facilitate ordering 
resources. It is recommended that teachers preview all resources before purchasing, or purchase one 
copy for their reference and additional copies as required. 





Distribu- 
tor Code 










Levels/Mod. No. 






1 


2 


3 




ATEC 








101 


201 


301 






Author 


Title 




Distributor S 
Code— See 










Bibliographic Information 




Distributor 








Directory 




Annotation 













1 = Introductory Level 

2 = Intermediate Level 

3 = Advanced Level 

1 Indicates 
module 
number 



HOW TO ORDER 

Most authorized resources are available from the Learning Resources Distributing Centre (LRDC) at: 

12360- 142 Street 

Edmonton, AB 

T5L 4X9 

Telephone: (403) 427-2767 

Fax: (403) 422-9750 

Purchase order numbers have been provided (where possible) for resources available through the 
LRDC. 

The section on Additional Sources lists a variety of other places to find information (e.g., the Alberta 
Tourism Education Council [ATEC] and the Urban and Regional Resource Centres). In addition, at the 
back of this document is a Distributor Directory, which contains the name and address of each 
publisher/distributor referred to in the resource list. Note that in some cases a resource may be 
published by one company but distributed through another. 

The information contained is as complete and accurate as possible. 

RESOURCE POLICY 

For further information on resource policy and definitions, refer to Student Learning Resources Policy 
and Teaching Resources Policy or contact: 

Learning Resources Unit 

Curriculum Branch 

Alberta Education 

5th Floor, Devonian Building, East Tower 

11160 Jasper Avenue 

Edmonton, AB 

T5K0L2 

Telephone: 422-4872 

Fax: 422-5129 



Tourism Studies /1. 2 
(Interim 1993) 



CSB: 94 05 24 



TOURISM STUDIES AT A GLANCE 

MODULE OVERVIEWS 

Tourism Studies is organized by modules, each of which is assigned a number based on the level. 
Introductory level modules are assigned series 100 numbers; intermediate level, series 200 numbers; 
and advanced modules, series 300 numbers. The module numbers are prefaced with TOU, for Tourism 
Studies, which differentiates Tourism Studies modules from other Career and Technology Studies 
modules. 

The resource listing provides correlations to Tourism Studies modules at the introductory, intermediate 
and advanced levels. 

Below is a brief description of module learner expectations for each module in Tourism Studies. 

Module TOU101: The Tourism Industry 

Students analyze the organizational structure of the tourism industry at local and provincial levels, and 
investigate employment opportunities in tourism. 

Module TOU102: People and Places 

Students design strategies for maintaining and enhancing the well-being of tourists, including individuals 
and groups such as families, and for preserving the cultural and environmental heritage of a tourism 
area. 

Module TOU103: Quality Guest Service 

Students demonstrate the knowledge, skills and attitudes of quality guest service including hospitality, 
effective communication and workplace safety. 

Module TOU104: Tourism Food Sector 

Students evaluate food service establishments, explain basic food-handling principles, demonstrate 
satisfactory skills of food service and adapt service standards to meet the needs of guests. 

Module TOU105: Tourism Accommodation Sector 

Students research accommodation options available, discuss basic principles of the accommodations 
industry and develop service strategies for handling individual guest requirements. 

Module TOU 106: Tourism Travel Sector 

Students research a variety of travel services, demonstrate basic travel information and promotion skills, 
and investigate career opportunities in providing travel information. 

Module TOU 107: Tourism Attractions Sector 

Students analyze and compare the natural, cultural and recreation attractions available in Alberta, 
develop strategies to maintain the well-being of guests and investigate employment opportunities in 
these areas. 

Module TOU201: Tourism Events 

Students plan, organize, facilitate and evaluate a tourism event in the school or community. 

Module TOU204: Food Functions 

Students demonstrates the knowledge and skills of serving food for a food function that he or she has 
planned to meet the needs of a client. 

Module TOU205: Meetings and Conferences 

Students develop a meeting plan, facilitate and evaluate the success of the meeting plan, and 
investigate opportunities in meeting and convention planning. 

CSB: 94 05 24 Tourism Studies /I.3 

(Interim 1993) 



Module TOU206: Tourism Destinations I 

Students demonstrate knowledge of world tourism geography by presenting travel information about 
North America and at least one other world region. 

Module TOU207: Tourism Destinations II 

Students demonstrate knowledge of world tourism geography by presenting travel information about at 
least four major tourism regions of the world. 

Module TOU208: Travel Planning 

Students create and evaluate an Alberta tour package and an international travel package including 
itinerary, tour and attractions information, and traveller information. 

Module TOU209: Tourism Interpretation I 

Students evaluate the different types of interpretation media and demonstrate the basic skills of an 
information attendant by conducting an interpretation program for a tourism activity. 

Module TOU210: Tourism Interpretation II 

Students create, implement and evaluate interpretation programs for both conducted and non- 
conducted activities, and demonstrate the skills of an effective leader in a conducted activity. 

Module TOU303: Food Service Operations 

Students relate trends and issues in food service to industry activity, design food service strategies and 
present a marketing or venture plan for a food service business. 

Module TOU304: Hotel/Motel Operations 

Students demonstrate correct check-in and check-out procedures, and research the organization of a 
large hotel, analyze marketing strategies and present a marketing plan for a hotel department. 

Module TOU305: Alternative Accommodations 

Students research and discuss issues related to alternative accommodations, develop a service strategy 
and standards, and present a venture or marketing plan for an alternative accommodation business. 

Module TOU306: Travel Agency Operations 

Students research the operation of a travel agency and the role and work activities of a travel agent, 
and present a marketing or venture plan for a travel agency. 

Module TOU307: Airline Reservations 

Students processes travel reservations using a computer reservation system, develops an itinerary and 
provides the traveller with information related to the itinerary/destination. 

Module TOU308: Tourism Air Transportation 

Students research and report on the organization and operation of a major airline, and present a 
marketing plan for an airline. 

Module TOU309: Tourism Surface Transportation 

Students research the business operations and career opportunities of rail, motor coach, auto and 
cruise industries, and present a variety of marketing strategies for a transportation industry. 

Module TOU310: Attractions Operations 

Students analyze the economic, social, cultural and environmental impact of attractions operations, and 
present a marketing or venture plan for an attractions development. 



Tourism Studies /I.4 CSB: 94 05 24 

(Interim 1993) 



Module TOU311: Adventure and Ecotourism 

Students analyze the economic, social and environmental factors that influence the development plan 
for an adventure or ecotourism venture, and compare management issues for different types of 
recreation areas. 



CSB: 94 05 24 Tourism Studies /I.5 

(Interim 1993) 



SCOPE AND SEQUENCE 



(Interim Status, September 1993) 
TOURISM STUDIES 



INTRODUCTORY INTERMEDIATE ADVANCED 


THEME 












Nature of the 
Industry 




The Touriam Industry 




Tourism Events 
















People and Places 


■' 










Quality Guest Service 
























Food 




Tourism Food Sector 




Food Functions 




Food Service Operations 
































Accommo- 
dation 




Tourism Accommodation 
Sector 




Meetings and Conferences 




Hotel/Motel Operations 




















Alternative 
Accommodations 
























Travel 




Tourism Travel Sector 




Tourism Destinations I 




Travel Agency Operations 






















Tourism Destinations II 




Airline Reservations 
















Travel Planning 




Tourism Air 
Transportation 
















Tourism Surface 
Transportation 
























Attractions 




Tourism Attractions Sector 




Tourism Interpretation I 




Attractions Operations 






















Tourism Interpretation II 




Adventure and Ecotourism 



















Prerequisite 



Recommended prerequisite or corequisite 



Tourism Studies /I.6 
(Interim 1993) 



CSB: 94 05 24 



AUTHORIZED RESOURCES 



BASIC LEARNING RESOURCES 

The following basic learning resources have been authorized by Alberta Education for use in the 
Tourism Studies curriculum. A curriculum correlation appears on pages 1.8 and 1.9. 



Distributor 
Code 



Resources 



ACC 



LRDC 



LRDC 



ACCESS Network. Project Planning, Anatomy of a Plan, Portfolios, Innovation, Making 
Ethical Decisions, The Ethics Jungle, Go Figure. (Career and Technology Studies 
series.) Edmonton, Alberta: ACCESS Network, 1993-94. Videotapes and utilization 
guides. 

A series of 15-minute videotapes that are relevant in all CTS strands. The series will include Creativity. 
Responsibility, Teamwork and Professionalism. 

Howell, David W. Passport: An Introduction to the Travel and Tourism Industry. 

Second edition. Cincinnati, OH: South-Western Publishing Co., 1993. Student text. 
LRDC PO#252841 . 

Provides an overview of the travel and tounsm industry and is designed to help students understand the 
roles played by vanous personnel involved in travel and tourism. 

Timmons, Veronica. Tourism and Travel: Focus Canada: A Guide to Canada's 
Tourism Industry and its Careers. Third edition. Vancouver, BC: Timmons and 
Associates, 1 989. Student resource and computer disk. LRDC PO#242967. 

Provides information about the different sectors of the industry and how they are organized. Contains 
information about most entry-level |Obs and available career paths. 



SUPPORT LEARNING RESOURCES 

The following support learning resource is authorized by Alberta Education to assist in addressing some 
of the learner expectations of a module or components of modules (TOU206 and TOU207). 



Distributor 
Code 



Resources 



LRDC 



Hannell, Christine, Robert Harshman and Graham Draper. Travel and Tourism: A World 
Geography. Toronto, ON: John Wiley & Sons, 1992. LRDC P0#255192. 

Links issues and trends in 1 1 sample regions around the world with the travel and tounsm industry in each. 
Provides a variety of learning expenences including planning and collaborative activities. 



CSB: 94 05 24 



Tourism Studies /1. 7 
(Interim 1993) 



TEACHING RESOURCES 

The following teaching resource is authorized by Alberta Education to assist teachers in the instructional 
process. 



Distributor 
Code 



Resources 



LRDC 



Howell, David W. Passport: An Introduction to the Travel and Tourism Industry. 
Second edition. Cincinnati, OH: South-Western Publishing Co., 1993. Instructor's 
resource manual. LRDC PO#261701. 

Accompanies the student text descnbed above. 



Tourism Studies /1. 8 
(Interim 1993) 



CSB: 94 05 24 



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Tourism Studies /1. 9 
(Interim 1993) 



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Tourism Studies /1. 10 
(Interim 1993) 



CSB: 94 05 24 



OTHER RESOURCES 



These titles are provided as a service only to assist local jurisdictions to identify resources that 
contain potentially useful ideas for teachers. Alberta Education has done a Tolerance and 
Understanding audit and a preliminary review of the resources. However, the responsibility to 
evaluate these resources prior to selection rests with the user, in accordance with any existing local 
policy. 



PRINT 



Distributor 
Code 


Other Resources 


Levels/Module No. 


1 


2 


3 


ATEC 


Alberta Tourism Education Council. Is There a Tourism Career in 
Your Future? Edmonton, AB: Alberta Tourism Education 
Council. 

A booklet that includes general tourism information in the form of a quiz 
followed by information on career options in tounsm. 


101 
104 
105 
106 
107 






NEL 


Ames, Margaret. The Travel Agency of D.C.: A Job Simulation. 
Second edition. Cincinnati, OH: South-Western Publishing 
Co., 1991. 

A self-contained package that simulates the position of a travel agent in an 
agency. Introduces realistic travel agency procedures and activities. Entire 
simulation requires about 25 to 35 hours to complete. Includes manuals, 
forms and documents required by the student, and an instructor's guide and 
cassette. 






306 


CCP 


Baird, Chris and Linda Carter. Front Office Assignments. 
London, England: Pitman, 1988. 

A collection of assignments, case studies and exercises that provide ideas for 
classroom and student-centred learning. Currency, location, etc., are British. 


105 




306 


LPP 


Blake, Don. Alberta Trivia. Revised edition. Edmonton, AB: 
Lone Pine Publishing, 1992. 

Includes photos and descriptions of history, services, transportation, sports, 
cities and towns, parks, museums, zoos, etc. A reference for games, quizzes 
and general interest 


101 

102 






GPC 


Carpenter, Jeff. Tourism Exercises and Activities. Toronto, ON: 
Hodder & Stoughton, 1990. 

Includes groups of learning activities, each covering a different theme in tourist 
training. Over 125 questions test students on information content and on 
basic themes and skills. Refers to UK Tourism. 


101 
106 


206 




LPP 


Donaldson-Yarmey, Joan. Back Roads of Northern Alberta. 
Edmonton, AB: Lone Pine Publishing, 1992. 

Describes northern Alberta's famous and infamous citizens, natural and man- 
made attractions, stories and humour. Sections cover roads that share the 
same history or scenery, are in the same ecological zone or make a nice one- 


101 
106 








day tnp. 







CSB: 94 05 24 



Tourism Studies /1. 11 
(Interim 1993) 



PRINT (continued) 



Distributor 
Code 



Other Resources 



Levels/Module No. 



1 



LPP 



HMF 



MMC 



NEL 



ALT 



Donaldson-Yarmey, Joan. Back Roads of Southern Alberta. 
Edmonton, AB: Lone Pine Publishing, 1992. 

Describes southern Alberta's famous and infamous citizens, natural and man- 
made attractions, stories and humour. Sections cover roads that share the 
same history or scenery, are in the same ecological zone or make a nice one- 
day tnp. 

Dostal, June. Beryn Ice Cream Company: A Management and 
Marketing Simulation. Second edition. Markham, ON: 
Houghton Mifflin Co., 1989. 

A management/marketing simulation where students take an entry-level 
management position to work in six departments of the company: Operations, 
Marketing, Production, Information Processing, Finance and Personnel. The 
student workbook contains all necessary information and forms to make this a 
possible independent study unit. Teacher's manual has completed forms and 
suggested answers. 

Foster, Dennis L. First Class: An Introduction to Travel and 
Tourism. Mission Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1990. 

Textbook covers the history, scope and functions of the industry, and develops 
an understanding of and skills in constructing itineraries: using the Official 
Airline Guide; calculating air tanffs and fares: domestic and international 
ticketing; handling hotel, motel, resort reservation; booking tour and car 
rentals; and using references and resources. Provides overview of job 
opportunities, responsibilities and professionalism, instructor's guide has 
supplementary aids, lesson plans and sample assignments and quizzes. 
(Note: In-depth discussion of procedures may be appropriate for higher 
levels.) 

Gold, Hal. The Cruise Books: From Brochure to Bon Voyage. 
Scarborough, ON: Nelson Canada, 1990. 

Examines the techniques and technicalities of the cruise industry: the 
psychology of the cruise (history and contemporary trends), detailed 
information on all major cruise lines (itineraries and evaluations), and in-depth 
material describing the development of the cruise market and the opportunities 
to bring this recreational activity to a mass market. Instructor's guide includes 
chapter overviews, answers to text questions and discussion possibilities. 

Government of Alberta. Guidelines for the Development and 
Operation of a Bed and Breakfast Home in Alberta. 
Edmonton, AB: Alberta Tourism. 

A manual intended to assist prospective hosts to plan, develop and operate a 
bed-and-breaktast business. Regulations that may affect the operations of 
such a facility are mentioned. 



101 

106 



304 



208 



304 
306 
307 
308 
309 



106 



208 



306 



105 



305 



Tourism Studies /1. 12 
(Interim 1993) 



CSB: 94 05 24 



PRINT (continued) 



Distributor 
Code 


Other Resources 


Levels/Module No. 


1 


2 


3 


DJUS 


Government of Alberta. Impaired Driving Program. Edmonton, 
AB: Solicitor General. 

Describes the designated driver concept and outlines the programs that are 
operational in Alberta, Canada and the United States. Also provides an 
overview of the Alberta-wide program being established. 


103 
104 




303 


ALT 


Government of Alberta. Minimum Standards for Approved 
Campgrounds and Trailer Parks. Edmonton, AB: Alberta 
Tourism, updated June 1988. 

Includes campground classifications, regulations and procedures for 
development. 


105 




305 


ALT 


Government of Alberta. Minimum Standards for Approved Guest 
Ranches and Country Vacations. Edmonton, AB: Travel 
Alberta, July 1985. 

Lists minimum standards for approval of these accommodation facilities, 
recommendations and guidelines for operation. 


105 




305 


EPPC 


Government of Alberta. Report of the Environmental Legislation 
Review Panel. Edmonton, AB: 1991. 

Makes recommendations regarding the proposed Alberta Environmental 
Protection and Enhancement legislation and includes a summary of written 
and oral submissions from the public from 12 locations in Alberta 


101 
102 






ssc 


Government of Canada. Tourism on the Threshold. Hull, PQ: 
Supply and Services Canada, 1990. 

Pamphlet descnbes the state of the tourism industry in Canada and the new 
Federal Tourism Policy, which is included in an appendix. Also describes the 
challenges faced by the industry including responding to major market trends, 
developing new products, expanding infrastructure, applying innovative 
technologies, and managing human resources. It shows where the industry 
could be if it responds to these challenges energetically and effectively. 
Concludes with how the federal government can help the industry respond to 
these challenges. 


101 






uws 


Interpreters' Handbook Series. Stevens Point, Wl: University of 
Wisconsin-Stevens Point Foundation Press Inc. 
Series contains The interpreters Guidebook: Techniques for Programs 
and Presentations (1992); Signs. Trails, and Wayside Exhibits: Connecting 
People and Places: Creating Environmental Publications: A Guide to 
Writing and Designing for Interpreters and Environmental Educators 
(1992): and Making the Right Connections: A Guide for Nature Writers. 




209 
210 





CSB: 94 05 24 



Tourism Studies /1. 13 
(Interim 1993) 



PRINT (continued) 



Distributor 
Code 


Other Resources 


Levels/Module No. 


1 


2 


3 


NEL 


Jedrziewski, David R. The Complete Guide for the Meeting 
Planner. Cincinnati, OH: South-Western Publishing Co., 
1991. 

The text/workbook format is suitable for high school students to help them 
understand how to use guidelines and checklists. The material is arranged in 
chronological order from the earliest stage' of planning a meeting/conference to 
evaluation of the event Each part is independent of the others and includes 
one exercise that can be completed in the classroom and one that requires 
research and observation in the field. These learning activities give the 
students an opportunity to apply the knowledge and practise the skills required 
for a successful event (Note: Resource lists are for United States.) 




201 
205 




PRH 


Landry, Janice L. and Anna H. Fesmire. Explorations: Travel 
Geography and Destinations Study. Engiewood Cliffs, NJ: 
Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1994. 

Combines geographical knowledge with a study of travel destinations. 
Includes chapter reviews, "up-close" and at-a-glance sections. 








NEL 


Mancini, Marc. Conducting Tours— A Practical Guide. 
Cincinnati, OH: South-Western Publishing Co., 1989. 

Binder and instructor's guide include the basics of tour creating and guiding, 
strategies for managing group behaviour, tips on using cultural sensitivity in 
tours, information on other branches of the travel industry, ideas for making 
commentary more effective, advice on dealing with the unexpected and 
suggestions to help get and keep a tour guide position. 




209 
210 




WIL 


Mcintosh, Robert W. and Charles R. Goeldner. Tourism 
Principles, Practices, Philosophies. New York, NY: John 
Wiley & Son, Inc., 1990. 

A post- secondary level text that includes major concepts in tourism, what 
makes tourism possible, how tourism can become an important economic 
factor, study approaches, travel motivators, development principles, marketing, 
research, consumerism and some hypotheses for the future. Instructor's 
manual and test bank available. 


101 
102 
106 


206 

208 


306 
308 
309 
310 
311 


NEL 


Metalka, Charles, J. The Dictionary of Hospitality, Travel and 
Tourism. Third edition. Scarborough, ON: Nelson Canada, 
1990. 

Over 3000 entnes define clearly and concisely terms from vanous fields within 
the tounsm industry. Includes appendix of associations, organizations and 
government bodies involved in the tounsm industry (American). 


101 







Tourism Studies /1. 14 
(Interim 1993) 



CSB: 94 05 24 



PRINT (continued) 



Distributor 
Code 


Other Resources 


Levels/Mcdulf 


2 No. 


1 


2 


3 


NEL 


Morrison, Aiastair M. Hospitality and Travel Marketing. Albany, 
NY: Delmar Publishers Inc., 1989. 

Textbook provides comprehensive and systematic coverage of marketing 
theory and techniques for the hospitality and travel sectors. (Note: Intended 
for second- to fourth-year post-secondary students and may not suit a high 
school audience. May be used as a reference for teachers.) Instructor s 
manual has transparencies, assignments and answers. 






304 
306 


NGS 


National Geographic Society. National Geographic Traveller. 
Washington, DC. 

Contains regular columns and feature articles on travel destinations around 
the world. Periodical published six times a year. A reference for destination 
studies, advertising and marketing. 




206 
207 




WIL 


Powers, Tom. Marketing Hospitality. New York, NY: John Wiley 
and Sons, Inc., 1990. Text. 

Textbook provides comprehensive information on marketing from a hospitality 
perspective. Study guide available. 








NEL 


Reilly, Robert T. Effective Communication in the Travel Industry. 
Scarborough, ON: Nelson Canada, 1990. 

This easy-to-follow textbook discusses the principles of communication and 
applies them to the travel industry. Designed to help students develop the 
communication skills necessary to function as travel professionals. (Note: 
This classroom reference may be used when working on letters, 
advertisements, presentations and proposals.) Instructor's guide has chapter 
overviews and answer key. 




205 
208 
209 
210 


304 


NEL 


Reilly, Rober; T. Handbook of Professional Tour Management. 
Second edition. Scarborough, ON: Nelson Canada, 1991. 

Textbook provides a comprehensive foundation for understanding all the 
elements that go into producing and directing a group tour: planning, 
developing, and costing are covered, as well as conducting a tour from the 
time it leaves its home base until it returns. Instructor's guide has chapter 
overviews and answer key. 




208 


306 


NEL 


Reilly, Robert T. Travel and Tourism Marketing Techniques. 
Second edition. Scarborough, ON: Nelson Canada, 1988. 

Textbook descnbes market research, types of media and their use, and 
specific information on advertising in the different sectors. Teacher's guide 
has chapter overviews and answer key. 






303 
304 
306 
308 
309 
310 



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NEL 


Rutherford, Denney G. Introduction to the Conventions, 
Expositions and Meetings Industry. New York, NY: Van 
Nostrand Remhold, 1990. 

Intended for the post-secondary level, this text discusses the convention and 
meetings industry in a number of categories including associations, convention 
facilities, meeting planners, hotels and facilities, exhibitors, transportation, and 
food and beverage. Appendices include convention industry contact 
addresses in the United States. No pictures and few charts or diagrams. 
Suitable as a teacher resource. 




205 




MMC 


Saulness, Cindy. Hospitality Marketing: Travel and Tourism. 
Mission Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1992. 

Textbook and teacher's manual provide an overview of travel and tounsm 
industry and careers, basic marketing and trends, airline and surface travel 
reservations, and sales applicable to travel agency operations. 




208 


306 
307 
309 


NEL 


Sebo, Robert Lee. The Traveller's World Destination Geography. 
Cincinnati, OH: South-Western Publishing Co., 1991. 

Textbook provides a broad knowledge of world geography, destinations and 
cultures. Includes overview and detailed maps. Teacher's manual includes 
an answer key to the chapter questions and chapter tests, and transparencies. 




206 
207 




MHR 


Smith, William 0. Restaurant Marketing. Second edition. Career 
Competencies in Marketing Series. Whitby, ON: McGraw-Hill 
Ryerson, 1990. 

Includes an overview of the food service industry, marketing, communications, 
food preparation and service, pricing and administration. Each unit includes 
an extensive project that relates to the unit material. Teacher's manual 
available. 


104 


204 


303 


NEL 


Stevens, Laurence. Your Career In Travel, Tourism & Hospitality. 


104 




303 




Albany, NY: Delmar Publishers Ltd., 1988. 


105 




304 




Textbook describes career opportunities in airlines, travel agencies, tour 


106 




306 




operations, accommodation, food service and the tourism industry 










infrastructure. 








PRH 


Stiel, Holly and Delia Collins. Ultimate Service: The Complete 
Handbook to the World of the Concierge. Englewood Cliffs, 
NJ: Prentice-Hall Inc., 1994. 

Covers all aspects of "conciergeland" in an informative, common-sense style. 
Includes good ideas, danger signs and anecdotes. 








NEL 


Stnanese, Anthony J. Dining Room and Banquet Management. 
Albany, NY: Delmar Publishers Ltd., 1990. 

Textbook addresses the importance of service in the restaurant and banquet 
fields. It introduces new theories in the evolution of service. It is divided into 
three parts: the hospitality industry, an a la carte restaurant and a banquet 
facility. 


104 


204 


303 



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ATEC 


Tourism: Joining Alberta's Best. Edmonton, AB: Alberta 
Tourism Education Council, 1990. 

Classroom presentation, delivered by industry representatives by appointment, 
is designed to increase student awareness of career opportunities in tounsm. 


101 






TIA 


Tourism Industry Association of Canada (TIAC). National Round 
Table on the Environment and the Economy. Code of Ethics 
and Guidelines for Sustainable Tourism. 


101 
102 






ARPW 


von Hauff, Donna, Editor. Alberta's Parks: Our Legacy. 
Edmonton, AB: Alberta Recreation, Parks and Wildlife 
Foundation, 1992. 

A classroom or library reference that describes the parks in each geographical 
region of Alberta. Contains colour pictures, a short descnption of each park, a 
time iine of the history of Alberta parks and a trivia section. 


102 
106 
107 






PRH 


Walsh-Heron, John and Terry Stevens. The Management of 
Visitor Attractions and Events. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: 
Prentice-Hall Inc., 1990. 

Hands-on approach to visitor attractions and events: the structure of the 
sector and how rt functions, and how to develop a career in it. 








NEL 


Weissinger, Suzanne. Hotel/Motel Operations An Overview. 
Cincinnati, OH: South-Western Publishing Co., 1989. 

Textbook, instructor's manual. 


105 




304 
305 


ECA 


Wight, Pamela. Tourism in Alberta. Edmonton, AB: Environment 
Council of Alberta, 1988. 

Discussion paper about the potential for a partnership between tourism and 
tne environment and the implications of policy development. 


101 
102 






NEL 


Woodring, Carol D. and Gail S. Huck. Reservations and 

Ticketing: Apollo. Albany, NY: Delmar Publishers Inc., 1991. 
Textbook and software provides students and professionals with a working 
knowledge of the Apollo System through three sections that represent three 
levels of learning expertise. It teaches the process of automated reservations 
and ticketing using Apollo, it takes the learner step-by-step through the 
procedures of reservations ticketing in a logicaJ and straightforward manner. 
The book can be used with or without a live Apollo System. The software 
runs on DOS 3.2. Instructor's manual available. 






307 


NEL 


Zedlitz, Robert. Getting a Job in the Travel Industry. Cincinnati, 
OH: South-Western Publishing Co., 1989. 

A step-by-step guide to obtaining a career position in the travel industry. It 
also tells students how to leave a job peacefully and with excellent references 
should a better opportunity present itself. Binder, instructor's manual 
available. 


106 







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OCCUPATIONAL STANDARDS 








ATEC 


Food and Beverage Server 


104 


202 
203 
204 


301 
302 
303 


ATEC 


* Bartender 


104 
105 


202 

203 


301 
302 
303 
304 


ATEC 


Maitre d' 


104 


202 
203 


301 

302 
303 


ATEC 


Host/Hostess 


104 


202 
203 


301 
302 
303 


ATEC 


Local Tour Guide 


106 


202 
203 
209 
210 


301 
302 


ATEC 


Housekeeping Room Attendant 


105 


202 
203 


301 

302 
304 
305 


ATEC 


Beverage Services Manager 


104 
105 


202 
203 


301 

302 
304 
305 


ATEC 


Outdoor Guide— Core Skills 


107 


202 
203 
209 
210 


301 
302 
311 



* Students must be at least 18 years of age to serve alcohol. 

A number of other occupational standards are available. Contact ATEC (See Distributor Directory) for 
more information. 



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ACCOMMODATION 








ATEC 


Front Desk Courtesy. Scarborough, ON: Omega Films Ltd. 

Shows how front desk employees influence guests' impressions of the 
establishment Examples of good and poor courtesy are shown, including 
handling problems, suggestive selling and dealing with problem guests. 
(11 mm.) 






304 


ATEC 


Front Office— Handling Guest Complaints. East Lansing, Ml: The 
Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Motel 
Association. 

Promotes positive techniques for handling most complaints. (25 min.) 






304 


AHM 


Front Office— Registering the Guest. East Lansing, Ml: The 
Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Motel 
Association. 

Goes through the steps of registering a guest smoothly and efficiently. (25 
mm.) 






304 


ATEC 


Guest Service— Building a Professional Team. East Lansing, Ml: 
The Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Motel 

Association. 

Outlines how customers and employees can benefit from professional service. 
(14 mm.) 


103 






ATEC 


Guest Service— Putting the Guest First. East Lansing, Ml: The 
Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Motel 
Association. 

Shows how important the employees' attitudes are to their work and how their 
behaviour and their guests' behaviour can be affected by events unrelated to 
work. (17 mm.) 


102 

103 






AHM 


Handling Reservations Properly. East Lansing, Ml: The 
Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Motel 
Association. 

Goes through the steps that could eliminate problems and improve service in 
reservations. (19 mm.) 






304 


ATEC 


Hotel Security. Scarborough, ON: Omega Films Ltd. 

Raises security awareness and illustrates fundamental precautions that reduce 
risk to guests. (32 mm.) 


102 






ATEC 


Housekeeping — Communications and Motivation. East Lansing, 
Ml: The Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Motel 
Association. 

Outlines the importance of the housekeeping department to the success of the 
facility. (20 mm.) 


105 




304 



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Providing Professional Bell Service. East Lansing, Ml: The 
Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Motel 
Association. 

Describes the roie of a guest services attendant (22 mm.) 






304 




CAREERS 








ATEC 


Alberta— Accent on Excellence. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Culinary 
Arts Foundation. 

Highlights the success of Alberta chefs at the World Culinary Olympics and 
looks at career opportunities in this area (12 mm.) 


104 




303 


ATEC 


ARFA: Making It Happen. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Restaurant 
and Foodservices Association. 

Identifies the scope and importance of the food services industry in Alberta 
Provides an overview of the Alberta Restaurant and Foodservices Association 
and highlights the programs, services and benefits provided by ARFA to the 
restaurant and food services industry in Alberta (10 mm.) 






303 


CRF 


Careers Cafe. Toronto, ON: Canadian Restaurant and 
Foodservices Association. 

Shows the potential for careers in the food service industry, and provides 
statistics of the food service industry's growth. (11 mm.) 


104 




303 


AHM 


Hotel/Motel Careers — Check In Today. East Lansing, Ml: The 
Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Motel 
Association. 

Looks at the variety of choices, opportunities and rewards that can come from 
careers in the tourism/hospitality industry. (15 mm.) 


105 






ATEC 


/ Love My Career, Wish You Were Here. Edmonton, AB: Travel 
Alberta. 


101 






ATEC 


Joining Alberta's Best. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Tourism 

Education Council (ATEC) with Tourism Industry Association 
of Alberta (TIAALTA). 

Focuses on positive, upbeat testimonials from a cross-section of tourism 
personnel. Highlights the magnitude of the industry, the range of opportunities 
and the availability of post-secondary education and training. (16 mm.) 


101 






ATEC 


Surprise It's Tourism. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Tourism. 

Outlines how Albertans benefit from tourism and shows how communities can 
become involved in the industry. (16 mm.) 


101 







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CUSTOMER RELATIONS 








ATEC 


Conflict and Confrontation. Winnipeg, MB: Marlin Motion 
Pictures. 
Demonstrates the skills necessary for handling irate customers. (14 mm.) 


103 






ATEC 


How to Handle the Irate, Angry, Rude, Unhappy and Sometimes 
Abrasive Caller on the Phone. Scarborough, ON: Omega 
Films Ltd. 


103 






ATEC 


Dealing with Angry Customers. Winnipeg, MB: Marlin Motion 
Pictures. 

Provides a simple method for dealing with angry customers: deal with the 
person, then with the problem. (16 mm.) 


103 






ATEC 


Dealing with People. Winnipeg, MB: Marlin Motion Pictures. 

Demonstrates basic skills involved in effective customer service. Shows that 
all of us are customers and that effective customer service is only effective if 
the customer feels it. (12 mm.) 


103 






ITF 


Dealing with People on the Telephone. Vancouver, BC. 
International Tele-Film. 

Suggests key words, phrases and methods for dealing with customers on the 
telephone. (20 mm.) 


103 






MMP 


Explosive Situations: Defusing the Angry Customer. Winnipeg, 
MB: Marlin Motion Pictures. 

Illustrates different methods for dealing with angry customers. (24 mm.) 


103 






ATEC 


Handling Complaints. Scarborough, ON: Omega Films Ltd. 

Vignettes illustrate concepts of attitude, listening, accepting and clarifying the 
complaint. (14 mm.) 


103 






ATEC 


Handling Customer Complaints. Vancouver, BC. International 
Tele-Film. 

Studies the front-line emDloyees and the imDortance of their first encounters 
with customers in enhancing the company's goodwill. (20 mm.) 


103 






ATEC 


It's Up to You. Winnipeg, MB: Marlin Motion Pictures. 

Illustrates that getting ahead and staying there is usually up to the employees. 
Offers strategies to help employees become successfully involved. (14 mm.) 


103 






BBC 


Managing Customer Service. Toronto, ON: BBC Education & 
Training. 


103 






ATEC 


New Handling Complaints. Scarborough, ON: Omega Films Ltd. 

Illustrates procedures for handling a complaint in a manner that creates 
customer goodwill. (14 mm.) 


103 







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Positive Attractions. Edmonton, AB: Edmonton Northlands. 

In mime form, illustrates approaches to guest service and handling complaints. 
Highlights the attractions sector. (17 mm.) 


103 






ATEC 


Telephone Courtesy Pays. Scarborough, ON: Omega Films Ltd. 
Develop skills and attitudes essential to telephone courtesy. (7 mm.) 


103 






ITF 


Telephone Courtesy Pays Off. Vancouver. BC: International 
Tele-Film. 

Demonstrates proper use of the telephone to improve the image and increase 
business in a company. (18 mm.) 


103 






ATEC 


Telephone Manners. Scarborough, ON: Omega Films Ltd. 

Identifies steps in answenng a phone call. Points out that the voice on the 
phone is the voice of the organization. (1 1 mm.) 


103 






ATEC 


Turnabout — Put Yourself in the Customer's Shoes. Vancouver, 
BC: International Teie-Film. 

Dramatizes common customer service incidents in which customers are not 
treated properly and then changes the incidents to positive expenences. 
(16 mm.) 


103 






ATEC 


Winning With Customers. Two parts. Vancouver, BC: 
International Tele-Film. 

Uses a variety of situations (e.g., museum, hotel, office and hospital) to 
emphasize the importance of paying attention to customers' feelings and 
wants, and of dealing with these feelings and offenng options for the solution 
of problems. Illustrates a team approach and creative customer service. 
(40 mm.) 


103 








FOOD SERVICE 








ATEC 


Art of the Restaurant Service Professional. American Express. 

Examines ways of using sales techniques to improve service and improve 
customer response. (10 mm.) 


104 




303 


ATEC 


Banquet Service. Scarborough, ON: Omega Films Ltd. 

Discusses duties and responsibilities of banquet service personnel. Shows 
time-saving techniques and how to serve a variety of food items. (15 mm.) 


104 


204 





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ATEC 

ATEC 
ATEC 


Better Banquet. East Lansing, Ml: The Educational Institute of 
the American Hotel & Motel Association. 

Focuses on efficiency and service as areas to build the skills of banquet 
servers. (20 mm.) 

Buffet Layout and Service. Scarborough, ON: Omega Films Ltd. 

Illustrates techniques for buffet layout, attractive table display and food 
service. Describes procedures of buffet equipment set-up. (12 mm.) 

Cafeteria Service. Scarborough, ON: Omega Films Ltd. 

Demonstrates basic job responsibilities of food servers in cafeterias. (9 mm.) 

Professional Dining Room Service. Two parts. East Lansing, Ml: 
The Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Motel 
Association. 

Provides mechanical and interpersonal skills necessary to provide professional 
food service. (40 mm.) 


104 

104 
104 


204 
204 


303 


ATEC 

ATEC 

CHR 
ACC 


MANAGEMENT AND SELF-DEVELOPMENT 

Keeping Your Mind on the Job. Scarborough, ON: Coronet Film 
& Video. 

Shows how managers and employees can improve productivity and reduce 
job-related injuries by learning to recognize the underlying causes for 
accidents and mistakes on the job. (16 mm.) 

Tourism is Your Business. Ottawa, ON: Travel Canada. 

Designed for people who own or operate (or plan to own and operate) a small 
or medium-sized hotel/motel in Canada It provides the financial management 
skills needed to help ensure success of the operation. (90 mm., 3-cassette 
set.) 

Welcome to the Future. Washington, DC: CHRIE. 

Describes the wide variety of job opportunities in the tourism industry, now 
and in the future. (14 mm.) 

What's Cooking. Two parts. Edmonton, AB: ACCESS Network. 
Outlines and explains career paths in food preparation. (15 mm.) 


103 
105 

101 
104 




304 


ATEC 


SANITATION AND HYGIENE 

Sanitation and Hygiene: Why the Importance. Scarborough, ON: 
Omega Films Ltd. 

Shows biological reasons for kitchen sanitation and hygiene and the conditions 
for controlling bacteria growth. (10 mm.) 




204 





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Sanitation: Conquering Kitchen Germs. East Lansing, Ml: The 
Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Motel 
Association. 

Demonstrates basic information on good sanitation practices in the kitchen. 
Consequences of improper sanitation procedures are shown, and proper 
procedures are demonstrated. (18 mm.) 

Alberta In All Her Majesty. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Tourism. 

Describes Alberta and its beauty. (13 mm.) 


101 
106 


204 





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ADDITIONAL SOURCES 



Available to Tourism Studies teachers, both 
locally and provincially, are many sources of 
information that can be used to enhance Career 
and Technology Studies courses. These sources 
are available through the community, 
government agencies, resource centres and 
organizations. Some of these sources, e.g., 
government departments, undergo frequent name 
and/or telephone number changes. Please 
consult your telephone directory or an appropriate 
government directory. 

The following is a partial list of sources in the 
community to consider: 

TEACHER-LIBRARIANS 

Planned and purposeful use of library resources 
helps students grow in their ability to gather, 
process and share information. Research 
activities require access to an adequate quantity 
and variety of appropriate, up-to-date print and 
non-print resources from the school library, other 
libraries, the community and additional sources. 
Some techniques to consider are: 

• planning together 

• establishing specific objectives 

• integrating research skills into planning. 

Cooperation between the teacher-librarian and 
the subject area teacher in the development of 
effectively planned resource-based research 
activities ensures that students are taught the 
research skills as well as the subject content. 
Also see Focus on Research: A Guide to 
Developing Student's Research Skills referenced 
in the Alberta Education Resources section. 

ALBERTA EDUCATION SOURCES 

Related Documents 

The following monographs are available for 
purchase from: 

Learning Resources Distributing Centre 

12360- 142 Street 

Edmonton, AB 

T5L 4X9 

Telephone: 427-2767 

Fax: 422-9750 



Please consult the "Support Documents" section 
or the Legal, Service and Information 
Publications" section in the Buyers Guide for 
ordering information and costs. 

Developmental Framework Documents 

• The Emerging Student: Relationships Among 
the Cognitive, Social and Physical Domains 
of Development, 1991 

This document looks at the whole child, or 
student, as a productive learner, integrating 
all the domains of development-cognitive, 
social and physical. It emphasizes the need 
for providing balanced curriculum and 
instruction. 

• Students' Interactions Developmental 
Framework: The Social Sphere, 1988 

This document focuses on the student as a 
social being. It looks at the student's 
affective or emotional growth and examines 
moral development. These three domains 
make up the social sphere. 

• Students' Physical Growth: Developmental 
Framework Physical Dimension, 1 988 

This document examines children's normal 
physical growth in three areas: perceptual, 
structural and motor development. In none of 
these areas is the child's growth in a single 
continuous curve throughout the first two 
decades of life. Physical growth is 
characterized by periods of rapid growth and 
periods of slower growth. Consequently, 
differences and changes in growth patterns 
may affect the timing of certain learning 
processes. 



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Tourism Studies /1. 25 
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• Student's Thinking: Developmental 
Framework Cognitive Domain, 1 987 

This document explores children's cognitive 
development from infancy to adolescence, 
the Piagetian stages of pre-operational, 
concrete operational and formal operational 
thinking are explained. Suggestions for 
improving the learning process are also 
presented. 

Others 

• Focus on Research: A Guide to Developing 
Students' Research Skills, 1990 

This document outlines a resource-based 
research model that helps students manage 
information efficiently and effectively, and in 
this process, to gain skills that are 
transferable to all school work situations. 
This model provides a developmental 
approach to teaching students how to do 
research. 



Teaching Thinking: 
1990 



Enhancing Learning, 



Principles and guidelines for cultivating 
thinking, ECS to Grade 12, have been 
developed in this resource. It offers a 
definition of thinking, describes nine basic 
principles on which the suggested practices 
are based, and discusses possible 
procedures for implementation in schools and 
classrooms. 



discussion, classroom projects and other 
activities. Video topics are Making Ethical 
Decisions, the Ethics Jungle. Project Planning, 
Anatomy of a Plan, Go Figure, Portfolios, 
Innovation, Responsibility, Teamwork and 
Professionalism. 

The programs listed and accompanying support 
material can be obtained from: 

ACCESS Network 
3720 - 76 Avenue 

Edmonton, AB 

T5B 2N6 

Telephone: 440-7777 (in Edmonton) 

1-800-352-8293 

(outside Edmonton) 

Alberta Advanced Education and Career 
Development 

For information on Alberta's Apprenticeship 
program, contact the Career Development Office 
nearest you or call the Career Information Hotline. 

Telephone: 422-4266 (in Edmonton) 
Hotline: 1-800-661-3753 (toll free) 

Alberta Economic Development and Tourism 

Visitor Sales and Service 

3rd Floor, 10155-102 Street 

Edmonton, AB 

T5J 4L6 

Telephone: 427-4321 

Fax: 427-2852 

Hotline: 1-800-661-8888 



OTHER GOVERNMENT SOURCES 

ACCESS Network 

ACCESS Network offers a variety of resource and 
services to teachers. For a nominal dubbing and 
taping fee, teachers may have ACCESS Network 
audio and video library tapes copied. 

ACCESS Network publishes a listing of audio and 
video cassettes as well as comprehensive 
programming schedule. 

Of particular interest are the Career and 
Technology Studies videos that are available with 
teacher utilization guides. The guides outline key 
points in each video and suggest questions for 



• Can provide tourist information for all tourist 
zones and centres of interest in Alberta; 
publications vary. 

Alberta Tourism Educational Council (ATEC) 

12th Floor, Sterling Place 

9940 - 1 06 Street 

Edmonton, AB 

T5K 2N2 

Telephone: 422-0781 

Fax: 422-3069 

• Responsible for development and 
implementation of certification/occupation 
standards for tourism occupations. Copies of 
occupational standards documents may be 
purchased from ATEC. 



Tourism Studies /I.26 
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• Can provide information regarding training 
and further education programs operating in 
Alberta. 

• Operates the Training Resource Centre, a 
library of audio-visual materials for tourism 
and hospitality. Schools and/or school 
systems can purchase a membership, which 
allows borrowing privileges. 

• Responsible for development and 
coordination of the ALBERTA BEST program. 
These seminars are designed to increase 
awareness of tourism and quality guest 
service. 

National Film Board of Canada (NFB) 

The NFB has numerous films and videotapes that 
may be suitable for Tourism. The Alberta Library 
is located at: 

NFB Video and Film Service 

Canada Place 

120, 9700 Jasper Avenue 

Edmonton, AB 

T5J 4C3 

Telephone: 495-3010 

Fax: 495-5084 



The western and northern Canada toll free 

number, excluding Edmonton: 

1-800-267-7710 



ACCESS Network and some school boards have 
acquired duplication rights to some NFB 
videotapes. Please consult the relevant 
catalogues in your school or school district. 

For a listing of NFB films and videotapes indexed 
by title, subject and director, consult the nearest 
NFB office. NFB has offices in Edmonton and 
Calgary. For further information, contact the 
Education Marketing Officer in either office. 

The Calgary Public Library has a selection of NFB 
films and videotapes that can be borrowed free of 
charge with a Calgary Public Library borrower's 
card. For further information, contact: 

Calgary Public Library 

Films and Recordings Department 

616 Macleod Trail, SE 

Calgary, AB 

T2G 2M2 

Telephone: 260-2781 



Provincial Film Library 

Queen's Printer Building 
11510 Kingsway Avenue 
Edmonton, AB 
T5A 2Y5 

• Holdings include a variety of tourism-related 
videos including the Destinations series on 
tourism zones in Alberta. 



PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS/INDUSTRY 
ORGANIZATIONS 

Alberta Hotel Association 

401, 5241 Calgary Trail South 
Centre 104 
Edmonton, AB 
Telephone: 436-6112 

• Publishes guides to tourism facilities in the 
province. 

Council on Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional 
Education 

1200- 17 Street, NW 

7th Floor 

Washington, DC 

20036-3097 

Telephone: (202) 331-5990 

Fax: (202)785-2511 

• Contact CHRIE for information on Canadian 
Chapters. 

Educational Institute of the American Hotel 
and Motel Association 

1407 South Harrison Road 

P.O. Box 1240 

East Lansing, Ml 

48826 

Telephone: (517)353-5500 

Fax: (517)353-5527 

• Various publications and videos are available. 



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Tourism Studies /1. 27 
(Interim 1993) 



Resource Centres 

Urban Resource Centres 

Director 

Learning Resource Service 

County of Strathcona 

2001 Sherwood Drive 

Sherwood Park, AB 

T8A 3W7 

Telephone: (403) 464-8235 

Coordinator of Instruction 

Red Deer Public School Board 

4747 - 53 Street 

Red Deer, AB 

T4N 2E6 

Telephone: (403) 343-1405 

Supervisor 

Instructional Materials 

Calgary Separate School Board 

1000 -5th Avenue SW 

Calgary, AB 

T2P 4T9 

Telephone: (403) 246-6663 

Supervisor 

Education Media 

Calgary Board of Education 

3610 Ninth Street SE 

Calgary, AB 

T2G 3C5 

Telephone: (403) 294-8540 

Learning Resource Consultant 

Edmonton Public School Board 

Centre for Education 

Edmonton, AB 

T5H 4G9 

Telephone: (403) 429-8320 

IMC Manager 

Medicine Hat School District 

601 First Avenue, SW 

Medicine Hat, AB 

T1A4Y7 

Telephone: (403) 526-1323 



Supervisor 

Curncular Resources 

St. Anthony's Teacher Centre 

10425 - 84 Avenue 

Edmonton, AB 

T6E 2H3 

Telephone: (403) 439-7356 

Area Superintendent 

Lakeland Public School District No. 5460 

Postal Bag 1001 

Bonnyville, AB 

T9N 2J7 

Telephone: (403) 826-3145 

Fax: (403) 826-4600 

Regional Resource Centres 

Zone 1 

Film Supervisor 

Zone One Regional Resource Centre 

10020 - 101 Street 

Box 6536 

Peace River, AB 

T8S 1S3 

Telephone: (403) 624-3187 

Zone 2/3 

Film Supervisor 

Central. Alberta Media Services (CAMS) 

2017 Brentwood Boulevard 

Sherwood Park, AB 

T8A 0X2 

Telephone: (403) 464-5540, 467-8896 

Zone 4 

Operations Manager 

Alberta Central Regional Education Services 

(ACRES) 

County of Lacombe 

Parkland Regional Library Building 

56 Avenue & 53 Street Corner 

Box 3220 

Lacombe, AB 

T0C 1S0 

Telephone: (403) 782-5730 



Tourism Studies /1. 28 
(Interim 1993) 



CSB: 94 05 24 



Zone 5 

Film Supervisor 

South Central Alberta Resource Centre (SCARC) 

County of Wheatland 

Westmount School 

Wheatland Trail 

Box 90 

Strathmore, AB 

TOJ 3H0 

Telephone: (403) 934-5028 

Zone 6 

Film Supervisor 

Southern Alberta Learning Resource Centre 

(SALRC) 

Provincial Government Administration Bldg. 

909-Third Avenue North, Room #120 

Box 845 

Lethbridge, AB 

T1J 3Z8 

Telephone: (403) 320-7807 



CSB: 94 05 24 Tourism Studies /I.29 

(Interim 1993) 



DISTRIBUTOR DIRECTORY 

The entries in the Distributor Directory are arranged alphabetically by code. 



Code 


Distributor/Address 


Telephone 


ACC 


ACCESS Network 
3270 - 76 Avenue 
Edmonton, AB 
T6B 2N9 


(403) 440-7777 
Fax: (403) 440-8899 
1-800-352-8293 (Outside 
Edmonton) 


ALT 


Alberta Economic Development and Tourism 
5th Floor, CityCentre 
10155-102 Street 
Edmonton, AB 
T5J 4L6 


(403) 427-4321 


ARPW 


Alberta Recreation, Parks and Wildlife Foundation 
7th Floor, Harley Court 
1 0045 - 1 1 1 Street 
Edmonton, AB 
T5K 1 K4 


(403) 482-6467 
Fax: (403) 488-9755 


ATEC 


Alberta Tourism Education Council 
12th Floor, Sterling Place 
9940 - 1 06 Street 
Edmonton, AB 
T5K 2N2 


(403) 422-0781 
Fax: (403) 422-3069 


BBC 


BBC Education and Training Sales 
Cinevillage 

#111, 65 Heward Avenue 
Toronto, ON 
M4M 2T5 


(416) 469-1505 
Fax: (416) 469-0642 


CCP 


Copp Clark Pitman 

See LRDC Buyers Guide for information 




CHR 


Council on Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional 
Education (CHRIE) 
7th Floor, 1200-17 Street NW 
Washington, DC 
20036-3097 


(202) 331-5990 
Fax: (202) 785-2511 


CRF 


Canadian Restaurant and Food-services Association 
#1201, 80 Bloor Street, West 
Toronto, ON 
M5S 2V1 


(416) 923-8416 
Fax: (416) 923-1450 


DJUS 


Department of Justice 
Communications Branch 
3rd Floor, Bowker Building 
9833 - 109 Street 
Edmonton, AB 
T5K 1E8 


(403) 427-8530 
Fax: (403) 422-7363 



Tourism Studies /I.30 
(Interim 1993) 



CSB: 94 05 24 



Code 


Distributor/ Address 


Telephone 


ECA 


Environment Council of Alberta 
8th Floor Weber Centre 
5555 Calgary Trail, South 
Edmonton, AB 
T6H 5P9 


(403) 427-5792 


EDN 


Edmonton Northlands 
P.O. Box 1480 
Edmonton, AB 
T5J 2N5 


(403) 471-7210 


EPPC 


Environmental Protection 
Publications Centre 
14th Floor, Oxbridge Place 
9820 - 106 Street 
Edmonton, AB 
T5K 2J6 


(403) 427-6132 


GPC 


General Publishing Co. Ltd. 
30 Lesmill Road 
Don Mills, ON 
M3B 2T6 


(416) 445-3333 
Fax: (416) 445-5967 


HMF 


Houghton-Mifflin Company 
150 Steelcase Road, West 
Markham, ON 
L3R 3J9 


(800) 268-4404 
Fax: (800) 267-6255 


ITF 


International Tele-Film 

#301, 5090 Explorer Drive 
Mississauga, ON 
L4W 4T9 


1-800-561-4300 
Fax: (416) 629-1211 


LPP 


Lone Pine Publishing 

#206, 10426- 81 Avenue 
Edmonton, AB 
T6E 1X5 


(403) 433-9333 
Fax: (403) 433-9646 


LRDC 


Learning Resources Distributing Centre 
12360 - 142 Street 
Edmonton, AB 
T5L 4X9 


(403) 427-2767 
Fax: 422-9750 


MHR 


McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited 

See LRDC Buyers Guide for information 




MMC 


Maxwell Macmillan Canada 

See LRDC Buyers Guide for information 




MMP 


Marlin Motion Pictures 
211 Watline Avenue 
Mississauga, ON 
L4Z 1P3 " 


1-800-465-2288 
Fax: (416) 890-6550 


NEL 


Nelson Canada 

See LRDC Buyers Guide for information 





CSB: 94 05 24 



Tourism Studies /1. 31 
(Interim 1993) 



Code 


Distributor/ Address 


Telephone 


NGS 


National Geographic Society 

See LRDC Buyers Guide for information 




PRH 


Prentice-Hall, Inc. 

See LRDC Buyers Guide for information 




ssc 


Supply and Services Canada 
Place du Portage 
Phase3-16A1 
II Laurier Street 
Hull, PQ 
K1A0S9 


(819) 997-6363 
Fax: (819) 994-4296 


TIA 


Tourism Industry Association of Canada 
#1016, 130 Albert Street 
Ottawa, ON 
K1P5G4 


(613) 238-3883 
Fax: (613) 238-3878 


UWS 


University of Wisconsin — Stevens Point Foundation 
Press Inc. 
449 COPS Building 
Stevens Point, Wl 
54481 


(715) 346-3060 


WIL 


John Wiley and Sons, Inc. 

See LRDC Buyers Guide for information 





Tourism Studies /I.32 
(Interim 1993) 



CSB: 94 05 24 



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