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Full text of "Town Topics (Princeton), Nov. 16, 1983"

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8 Sports in Princeton 

• ContlMu«d from Preceding Pag* 



you have to have players who 
'".can take on a player and go 
•around. We didn't have 11 
ui players with outstanding 
s skills. 



O "When we lost Bolster and 
.Gruhn (John Bolster was 
< sidelined early on as the result 
gof a bicycle accident injury 
^ and Nick Gruhn with a finger 
a injury that wouldn't heal) that 
^ took away some of our skill up 
: front. We were finally starting 
2 to get it together and they 
• would have really helped us." 
O As for next year, Mackey 
tu repwted that she intends to 
^ return as coach and an 
E nounced that center halfback 
°; Tom Foltiny and fullback and 
g stopper back Mike Petrone 
K have been elected co-captains 
2 of the 1984 squad. 
Starters lost 
graduation include Lysaker 
and sweeper Peter Gager, 
both of whom were out- 
standing performers all 
season, Bolster and fullback 
Tony Curtis. 



2 Big Games Ahead for PDS 

With a 10-1 rout of Montclair Monday, highlighted by Don 
Cogsville's five goals, the Princeton Day soccer team has 
just two games remaining this season, but what big ones 
they are. 

This Wednesday evening at 7:30, at Mercer County Park, 
the Panthers, 20-0-1, will have a re-match against 
Lawrenceville in the finals of the County Tournament, the 
first time two prep schools have faced each other in the 
championship round. In a regular season contest last 
month, PDS defeated the Larries for the first ever on a pair 
of last period goals by Cogsville and Sal Fier. 

Monday's victory over Montclair came in the semi-finals 
of the Prep "B" tournament, and will give the Blue and 
White a chance to win that by beating Pennington a second 
time. The two schools will meet Monday at 2:45 at 
Lawrenceville. 




(^ICO. 





o 



Topics of the Town 



Canoe Strokes and Water 
Exercise. 

"Supporting Each Other in a 
Nuclear World," an activity of 
The Day Before Project, is a 
, special potluck supper- 
T .1!!!."^- workshop planned for Friday, 
November 18. This program is 
co-sponsored by the Princeton 
YWCA, the Coalition for 
Nuclear Disarmament, The 
Unitarian Church and the 
Holistic Health Association. 
On Wednesday, December 14, 
the YWCA and the Writers 
Center will present "An 
AEROBICS PLANNED Evening of Poetry Readings." 
By Recreation Dept. The During the holiday vacation. 
Recreation Department is grade school children will be 
offering a seven-weak session able to participate in a special 
of Aerobic Expression mini-activities program, 
beginning Monday and con- Registration for mini- 
eluding January 6. session programs will take 
Classes will be held Mon- place between November 14 
days, Wednesdays and and 19. For details about 
Fridays frwn 9-10 and 10:15- registration or classes, con- 
IMS at Christ Congregation tact the YWCA at 924-5571. 

Church on the corner of 

Walnut Lane and Houghton dq you WRITE? 

Road; The cost is |15 for ^fitb Word Processor? "The 
Princeton residents, $30 for ^j^ofd Processor and the 
non-residents. Writer" ia the topic of a 

For additional information, discussion panel sponsored by 
call the Recreation Depart- the Friends of Princeton High 
mental 921-9480. gcbool Ubrary, to be given 

next Wednesday, November 
16, at 7:30 at the high school. 
The evening is free, and the 
public is invited. 
Randall Rothenberg, 

his 



established writer perhaps 
best known for his sensuous 
book, "An Armful of Warm 
Giri." 

The Authors' Party is a new 
feature of the store's semi- 
annual Book Festival. 
Refreshments will be served. 



Children's Day Set. The 
store will hold its November 
Children's Day on Saturday, 
November 19. 

Appearing will be Buddy the 
Clown and Matt the Juggler. 
There will be two hour-long 
shows ; the first beginning at 1 
and the second at 2. In ad- 
dition to the performers, there 
will be free balloons, free 
cookies and cider and door 
prizes. 

There is no admission 
charge. 



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WRITER TO SPEAK 
To Children at Library. 
"Truth and Lies in the Stories 
We Write" wiU be the subject 

^.*!^***o"^t?^** ?^°*'* *** p<iiiUcar^ter"^7¥d 
wJ 7 il"^ ^ J^'l ^'^st book on an Osborn I; 
?^"?t^' T^okpTiTor Vlfi Flora Davis, health columnist 
3.30 p.m. 'Tickets for the j MademoiseUe and Jamie 
piogram, which is open to «„K-Jn7:L „Tt;o7„l^t 

Children in third through M*^^^"^^' . ^ o "'"J^"^ 
eighth grades, are available at superintendent of Princeton's 
Se children's desk schools, will speak. 

Mrs. Gorog is the author of .,±^ .^'^\, ^"^ ^^,. ^, « 
"A Taste foTQu.et and Other "hands-on" demonstration for 
Disquieting Tales." published as ftiany ui the audience as the 
last year by Philomel Books, f^f' / coinputer center will 
and of "Caught in the Turtle." ^"^^ ^n exhibit of word pro- 
just published by Philomel, lessors will be shown 
Mrs. Gorog has been reading, courtesy of the Clancy Paul 
writing, hearing and teUing ^"*P"^'' ^^*«^- 
stories, she says, for as long as 
she can remember She lives 
Princeton with her 



Our ^^Superflex^' Suit 



Most men are all too familiar with the dilemma 



m 

husband, three children, and 
assorted pets, all of whom 
figure in her writing and thus 
in her talk. 

For further information or 
to reserve tickets, call the 
Children's Desk, 924-9529. 



AUTHORS* PARTY 
At U-Store. The Princeton 
University Store will hold an 
Authors' Party on Thursday, 
November 17, from 7 to 8:30. 
Part of the store's semi- 
annual Book Festival, the 
Authors' Party will provide an 
opportunity for the public to 

talk informally with some 

MANY PROGRAMS SET area authors, and to have 
In YWCA Mini-Sessions, books aut(^raphed. 
The YWCA Mini Session, Guests of honor will be 
which begins November 28, Nathaniel Burt, author of 
will feature a potpourri of "Jackson Hole Journal," a 
special programs for every personal memoir of life in an 
age and interest. extraordinary place; 

Adults can get into the spirit Ehzabeth Wenning Davidson, 
of the holidays by' learning to whose book, "The Christmas 



make crocheted Angel of 
Peace ornaments and 
smocked ornaments for 
decorating or gift giving. 
Parents and children can 
participate together in 



Mouse, " the story of the first 
singing of "Silent Night," is 
being re-issued; Trentonian 
columnist Bill Dwyer, author 
of "The Day Is Ours! Nov. 
1776 - Jan. 1777, an inside view 



Holiday Potpourri, Someone's of the battles of Trenton and 
in the Kitchen with Santa, Princeton; 

Bread Dough Wreaths, and 

Corn Husk Ornaments. Also, Reader's Digest 

columnist Peter Funk, author 

For those interested in of "High Spirits," the story of 
hMHh and fitness, the YWCA a modem American family in 
will offer High I-evel Wellness, search of an old fashioned 
Body Conditioning to Rhyth- dream; Charles Coulston 
mics, Slim and Trim, as well Gillispie, author of a vtriume 
as a variety of exercise on ballooning, "The Mon 
programs. Sporting activities tgolfier Brothers and the 
include ice skating for both invention of Aviation;" and 
adults and children, and novelists Deena Linett, "On 
baskiBtbali for women and Common Ground," and W. M. 
teens. Highlights of the spackman, "Difference of 
aqnatlcs program include Design." "On Common 
8norkelii« and gaoMs ctaMM Qroarid" is Ms. UiMtt's first 
for. children, and, for adahs. novel; Mr. Spackman is an 



of fluctuating weight, 
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one day or loose the 
next. To counteract 
this unfortunate oc- 
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a fabric (100% wool 
fibers, we might add) with 
a slight stretch factor 
woven in such a fashion as 
to make it extremely com- 
fortable when worn for 
prolonged hours. 



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S^tool$ Shocked by Unexpected B§ 
V $70,000 3 



esident Arrested for Squirrel Hunting 
From Witherspoon St. House 6 

Fire Chief Critical of Pakrwr Square Design; 
Inaccessible to Equipment. 18 

League Publishes Newly Revised Edition 
Of "Know Your Town". IB 

State High School Football Title at Stai<e 
ForPHS Team. 13B 

Hoc/cey Season to Begin Sunday Night in 
Baker Rink Against Yale 148 



— VOL. XXXVII, NO. 37 



Wednesday, November 1 7, 1 982 



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To Retire from Caund 
At End of This Yev 

A 430-mile round trip from home 
to job Is jiist too mucti, so Nelson 
van den Blink announced this week 
that she is resigning from Borough 
Council December 31. She has one 
year remaining in her third three- 
year term. 

Already several Democrats have 
stepped forward to announce their 
interest. Because Mrs. van den 
Blink is a Democrat, it is the 
"Democrats who will present the 
names from which Council will 
choose. The Democratic County 
Committee, headed by Gertrude 
Dubrovsky, is expected to submit 
three names. The Princeton Com- 
munity Democratic Organization 
will probably have a few sugges- 
tions of its own. 

Irv Urken, John Huntoon and 
Diana Radcliffe have all been men- 
tioned, and both Mr. Urken and Mr. 
HuntooQ have said they would like 
to be considered. 

For the past four years, Mrs. van 
den Blink has been on the board of 
directors of The Milliard Corporation 
of Elmira, New York, and in April, 
she was made chairman of the 
board. 

"I didn't realize there would be 
such involvement, " she said this 
week. "If the company were in the 
same area as Princeton, there 
would be no problem. But the five- 
hour drive of 215 miles — that was 
the key." 
^\ The Milliard Corporation makes 
industrial clutches for heavy 
machinery and also oil reclaimers 
and filters that keep machinery run- 
ning smoothly. The firm has 150 
employees in office and factory, and 
is about 75 years old. 

Mrs. van den Blink's father, Ed- 
ward A. Mooers, joined the firm in 
1928 and is still, at 86, active in its 
affairs. 
"It is basically a family company, 
-^^d I'm taking on a responsiblity for 
..„jn|^ family," Mrs. van den Blink ex- 
* ^V-ioed. "I grew up with it: the fac- 
tory was always another person at 
the dinnertable." 

'Td become more and more in- 
terested, since joining the board 
four years ago," she continued, "but 
I did not foresee taking this central 
role. I'd hoped to finish my term on 

Continued on Next Page 



I Intruder Shot to Death by Borough Police! 
8 After Breaking into Cleveland Lane Home 8 






An intruder in a Cleveland Lane home was shotgunned to death Sun- 
day afternoon by police when it bolted from a rear kitchen door. 
The intruder was a young buck deer. 
J. Mrs. Marjorie Fouike of 64 Cleveland Lane, who was alone in the 
house, told police that she had panicked when she heard a tremendous 
j^ crash and the sound of glass breaking. Frightened, she ran from the 
house. 

The breaking glass triggered an alarm at police headquarters at 3:15 
p.m. and Det. William Clark responded. Me was met by Mrs. Fouike who 
told him what she had heard. In checking the house, the officer 
discovered a small buck had jumped through a window and landed in 
the kitchen. Seriously cut, the buck was still on his feet walking about. 

After Sgt. Peter Hanley and Rl. Donald Dawson arrived, the doors of 
the house were closed to confine the deer, called a "iDutton buck" 
because it didn't have antlers, to the kitchen. Armed with a shotgun, 
Det. Clark positioned himself in the rear yard. 

After police had determined there were no other persons in the im- 
mediate area, the buck was chased from the kitchen through the pantry 
out of the house where he was shot by Det. Clark. 

"I was scared he would go on a rampage in the house," Mrs. Fouike 
said. "It was a complete and utter nightmare. The deer had cut himself 
badly and there was blood everywhere. ' 

Chief Michael Carnevale reported that the Fish & Game agency was 
notified, the deer picked up by the public works department and the car- 
cass disposed of. 

The large number of deer has always been a problem in Princeton, 
V especially in rural areas of the Township. Hunting is banned except for 

A ^- Continued on Next Page 

feoosoeoooocooooeooeooooe c o o cocooooooooooooeoocoooooeooecoo? 

Differing Philosophies and Financial Woes 
May Force Split Between YM and YWCA 



What happens when two 
organizations share a facility but 
one can no longer pay half the 
operating costs? 

Does that one pull out, leaving the 
other to be the sole occupant and 
user, as well as the sole bearer of 
the full cost? Or can a shift in space 
and cost allocation be negotiated, 
resulting in curtailed use and less 
expense for the one and greater 
responsibility and opportunity for 
the other? 

These are the questions at the 
bottom line of months of discus- 
sions, meetings and negotiations 
centering on the YMCA, the YWCA 
and the building they share on Paul 
Robeson Place. The talks have in- 
volved not only board members of 
the two associations but also, in the 
past two weeks, officials of the 
United Way, which provides 
substantial funding for both 
organizations. 

Two factors at the heart of the 
issue are the building itself and the 
widely differing philosophies and 



way of operating of the two associa- 
tions. 

Designed as a joint YM-YWCA 
facility and erected in 1954 at a cost 
of $1 million, much of it raised from 
the community, the building was 
subsequently enlarged for another 
$1 million. The 1954 agreement bet- 
ween the two associations 
stipulates that the costs of running 
the building will be shared on a 
50-50 basis, although how the space 
is to be used is not specified. 

Responsibility for the building 
rests with the Joint Management 
Trustees, three from the YM and 
three from the YW. The trustees 
draw up a budget for what it will 
cost in heat, light, water and 
maintenance to keep the building 
open for a year. 

The budget must then be approv- 
ed — sometimes with modifications 
— by the two associations and goes 
into effect for a January 1 to 
December 31 fiscal year. 



Continued on Page 2S 



Federal housing authorities have, 
in effect, wiped out Princeton Com- 
munity Housing's present applica- 
tion to build 101 units of housing for 
middle-income elderly. 

But officials of the non-profit cor- 
poration said this week that they 
will apply again after January 1 — 
using the same Elm Road site •— 
and believe they have "a good 
chance" to win approval. 

Meanwhile, Borough Council will 
hear next Monday the second part 
of the appeal filed by opponents of 
the Elm Road project. The hearing 
will begin at 7:30 in Borough Hall. 

PCH officials — president Harriet 
Bryan, Theodore Vial, Leslie Vivian 
and Golda Gottlieb, with architect 
Jeremiah Ford and consultant 
Michael McCarthy — met in 
Washington October 21 with an aide 
to Phillip Abrams, acting assistant 
director of the Federal Housing and 
Urban Development (HUD) office. 

HUD had already granted PCH 
conditional approval, had reserved 
money for the project and given 
PCH time to complete work toward 
the final application. That comple- 
tion deadline was September 30. 
PCH, faced with delays caused by 
the two garage referendums and the 
need to start all over again with a 
new site, had asked for an exten- 
sion of that working time. 

Mr. Abrams' office, explaining its 
refusal, said it could extend only if 
delays had been caused by HUD 
itself, or if litigation had been involv- 
ed. 

When PCH officials protested 
that, in their view, the two garage 
referendums constituted 

"litigation," Mr. Abrams said they 
were regarded as "peripheral." 

PCH had the support of both New 
Jersey Senators — Republican 
Nicholas Brady and Democrat Bill 
Bradley; Congresswoman Millicent 
Fenwick, who has been Princeton's 
representative, and Congressman 
Matthew Rinaldo, who is now 
Princeton's representative. All sent 
letters to Mr. Abrams, but apparent- 
ly without effect. 

"We are distressed about the 
delay," Mrs. Bryan said, announcing 
the refusal, "but we've been invited 
to apply again, using the Elm Road 
site." 

Continued on Next Page 




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Deer 

Contlnu«d trora Pag* 1 

a short bow and arrow season 
and on special days. 

"The cold weather has 
something to do with it. We 
have an awful lot of them," 
acknowledged Township Lt. 
Jack Petrone. "The hunters 
can't do anything in the 
Township and the cars pick 
'em off. We average four or 
five a week," concluded Lt. 
Petrone, who reported a 
Township patrol had struck a 
deer last month. 



O 

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Township roads at night are 
especially hazardous, and a 
dieck of last week's accident 
reports reveal three drivo^ 
struck deer. 

Sherif A. Hamdan of 
Cherry Hill Road collided with 
a deer on the Great Road at 
8:37 p.m. last week and Henri 
A. Grillet of Hibben Apar- 
ments slr^ict i ^eer at 7:30 
Friday night en Route 206 
between Hilltop and Man- 
s^nove. 

E^arlier in the week, a little 
further south on 206, Lynn a. 
Norton of Gillette struck a 
deer at dusk between Arreton 
Road and Ewing Street. The 
left fron fender, liond and 
headUght of her 1962 car were 
daumged. 

at 4:30 Sunday afternoon in 
the Borough, a deer attempted 
to jump over the hood of the 
car of Lawrence Tarantino, 58 
Qevdand Lane, while he was 
driving on Elm Road. It 
landed on the driver's side of 
the hood and ran off into the 
woods. 



variance from the Borough 
Zonnig Board on September 16 
and such a variance has a life 
S|>an of two yearc. That 
variance is now being 
challenged by opponents of the 
project. They have said they 
will continue their appeal 
beyond Council, which has 
already rejected the first part 
of their appeal. 

Commenting on use of the 
Elm Road location, Mrs. 
Bryan pointed out that PCH 
already has zoning approval 
and has invested lawyers' and 
architects' fees in the site. 

"There isn't any other place 
in Borough or Township that is 
available," she emphasized, 
"and somehow people must 
realize this : we simply cannot 
pay market prices for land — 
like the Shopping Center, for 
example. 



INDEX 

Art in Princeton lOB 

Business 24 

CalendaroftheWeek . 15 

Classified Ads 29-44 

Current Cinema 3B 

Engagements 14 

Mailbox 16 

Music 5B 

Obituaries 27 

Religion 26 

Senior Activities 18 

Sports IIB 

Theatres 2B 

Topics of the Town 3 

Youth Calendar 16 



government with the 
Township, yet we can tailor 
certain issues to our own 
Borough constituencies." 



PCH Housing 

Contuad ton njQB 1 

The appUcation must be 
completed by March, and 
PCH will hear from HUD in 
September, Mrs. Bryan said. 

"This gives us a year to 
wo(k out our transportation 
plan," she added. PCH intends 
to devdop a plan, using buses 
or vans, for providing 
transportation for tenants 
from Ebn Road into town. 
Ttec is no present bus ser- 
vka. 

PCH received its use 



"We must stick with a 
municipal site, like Elm Road, 
which belongs to the Borough 
and which we feel is under- 
utilized. 

"It is imperative that we 
continue," she stated. "There 
are elderly people in town with 
$6,500 a year income, who are 
paying more than half that 
amount for rent, without 
enough left over for food or 
utilities." 

Nelson van den BEnk 

Continued Ironn Page 1 

Council, but I have more in- 
volvement in the firm than 
most chairmen of the board 
and I need to be in Elmira on 
week-days." 

She recalled the snowy day 
last December when she left 
her work at Elmira early to 
make the five-hour drive to 
Princeton in time for a Council 
meeting. 

"It was snowing hard, and I 
went off the road — that was 
scary! I don't intend to make 
tiiat drive this winter." 



tunity to know so many people 
who are concerned about the 
community," is the first thing 
she says, when asked to talk 
about her eight years on Coun- 
cil. 

How to deal with people — 
"especially top-level decision 
makers" is the most impor- 
tant thing she learned on 
Council, she says. 



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She will not be moving away 
from Princeton, Mrs. van den 
Blink emphasized. Her hus- 
band, the Rev. A.J. van den 
Blink, has a practice in family 
Uierapy here and they plan to 
stay. Mrs. van den Blink will 
remain on the job in Elmira 
during the week, returning — 
if it isn't snowing — to 
Princeton for week-ends. 

Because the mechanism for 
replacing someone on Council 
provides a month in which the 
decision can be made, she 
hopes a choice can be nuide 
soon; otherwise, it could t>e 
February 1 before the replace- 
ment is sworn in. Council 
member Robert McChesney is 
scheduled to leave in early 
January for a sabbatical in the 
Soviet Union, and Mrs. van 
den Blink would like to leave 
Council when it is up to 
strength as much as possible. 
She is, therefore, prepared to 
leave before December 31. 



Yes, she acknowledges, it 
takes an "incredibly long 
time" to hear everyone out 
and come to a solution, "but 
seven people on Council don't 
have a comer on wisdom — 
you must hear what others are 
saying, distill this, and hope 
you've acted in the best in- 
terests of the community." 

Head of public works has 
been her biggest job. Working 
with engineers, sewer experts 
and the like has helped her 
with The Hilliard Corporation, 
she says. Negotiating with the 
Borough's public works 
employees has been instruc- 
tive, also. 

Rent Control issue. Rent 
control has been a continuing 
interest, and she regards rent 
in the Borough as "an on- 
going problem." With Mr. Mc- 
Chesney, she developed the 
present Rent Registration or- 
dinance. 

She speaks of her work on 
the DNA committee of the 
1970s, and of her role as leader 
in the successful campaign 
against consolidating Borough 
and Township. "I believe we 
have the best of both worlds," 
she said this week about that 
heated campaign in 1979. "We 
have almost a bicameral 

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Currently, she is Council's 
representative on the Plan- 
ning Board, and she would 
have liked to stay in that 
chair. 

"It's a natural outgrowth of 
my concern for the Central 
Business District, where the 
Borough faces the possibility 
of such change." 



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Considered Running for 
Mayor. Mrs. van den Blink 
had considered running for 
mayor. Although she had 
publicly announced her in- 
terest in opposing Mayor 
Robert W. Cawley when he 
ran in 1979, she withdrew her 
name before the spring 
primaries. Instead, that fall, 
she devoted her energies to 
the anti -consolidation cam- 
paign. 

Her father had been mayor 
of Ehnira. 

"He is a Republican!" she 
laughs, "and I don't think he 
has ever gotten over my 
political life as a Democrat." 

"She carried more than her 
share of the administrative 
load," Mayor Cawley said this 
week. "We'll miss not only her 
broad experience in many 
areas of government, but the 
conscientious effort she 
brought to her job. Public 
works isn't very glamorous, 
but it's an important part of 
what she accomplished — she 
was really on top of what was 
going on." 

"She'll leave a very, very 
big gap, and we'll miss her as 
a person." 

—Katharine H. Bretnall 



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State Wants $70,000 from Princeton Schools; 
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Having snatched over half a 
million from Princeton 
schools last summer, the state 
is now compounding the injury 
by announcing that it will send 
Princeton an unexpected 
$70,000 bill for the care of four 
severely handicapped 
children. 

The amount represents 
room and board for the four. 
Education of handicapped 
children is provided for under 
New Jersey law. In the past, 
Princeton has paid part of the 
tuition and the state has re- 
imbursed the district for the 
rest. The state has always 
paid all residential costs, us- 
ing Federal money. 

But Federal money is dry- 
ing up, and so the state is no 
longer paying any room and 
board costs. School districts 
must pay them all — and state 
law still requires that these 
children be cared for. 

What is particularly 
dismaying to Princeton school 
board members is that the 
$70,000 must be included along 
with everything else under the 
state-imposed budget cap. 

This means that it is also in- 
cluded in the state's calcula- 
tion of per-pupil expenditure, 
which in turn is used to deter- 
mine what districts get 
minimum aid. And it was 
minimum aid - over half a 
million dollars worth - that 
the state abruptly took away 
from Princeton this summer. 

Budget Talks. Under this 
lowering financial cloud, the 
school board was scheduled to 
sit down this Tuesday and talk 
of budgets. 

But it's hard to talk about 
budgets when you don't have 
any figures, comments 
business administrator Judith 
Horner. "We're working com- 
pletely in the dark." 



No data has come from the 
state on either this year's cap 
amount for Princeton, or on 
the revenues Princeton can 
expect. Mrs. Horner bays the 
Legislature is holding back 
because there is a debate on 
whether to release the figures. 
There is even talk on postpon- 
ing the April election, when 
voters pass or reject a budget, 
until closer to the end of the 
school — and fiscal — year. 

"Normally, we have these 
figures by early November, so 
we can begin work on the 
budget," Mrs. Horner says. 

Soon, the board must decide 
how to move toward an April 
bond referendum. The amount 
usually mentioned is $3 
million-plus. It might be a 
three-part package: the 
grounds of both middle and 
high schools, with emphasis 
on athletic fields ; energy, with 
focus on the kinds of repairs 
and replacements that would 
have a two-to-three-year 
payback; deferred 

maintenance. 

Board plans include naming 
a citizens advisory committee 
to shape this package. The 
board must still decide what 
structure this committee 
ought to have, and who should 
be on it. 



Committee and Joint Ap- 
propriations Committee, the 
majority leaders of Senate 
and Assembly, the minority 
leaders of Senate and 
Assembly, the Governor, 
Legislators who represent 
Princeton and, in the word of 
board president Ann 
McGoldrick. "others." 

"We think the state should 
resume paying room and 
board for handicapped 
students." Mrs. McGoldrick 
explained. "If they won't, 
we're asking them please to 
exempt this amount from the 
cap, and from calculations of 
per-pupil expenditure." 

"The state's population of 
handicapped is virtually 
stable. But families with han- 
dicapped children move in and 
out of communities within the 
state. 

"What happened in 
Princeton, is that there was a 
change in one family's in- 
surance. In another family, 
the student turned 18. We must 
pay until the student is 21 
We'd budgeted $48,000. figur- 
ing that was plenty. Now, we 
learn it will be $70,000 — that's 
almost $20,000 per child " 



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HOUSE OF THE WEEK 




Mi 



TOPICS 

Of Thv T(nni 



TEACHERS WIN 

This Round, Anyway. I^rry 

Ivan and Thomas Murray. 

physical education teachers in 

the Princeton schools, have 



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VOL. JJXXVII MO 37 



WednMday Havtmtm 17 tdfl2 



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Dimensions of Capital 
Budget. Also on Tuesday's 
agenda was discussion about 
the dimensions of the capital 
budget, which includes 
housekeeping details like roof 
repairs, driveways, paint 
jobs. In addition. Superinten- 
dent Paul Houston has a list of 
things he'd like to do — like 
staff training — that depend 
on finding revenues. 

Meanwhile, the board has 
sent a letter, shotgun style^ to 
all members of the 
Legislature's Joint Educatton 

won the most recent round in 

their battle with Princeton's 
administration and school 
board against transfer to 
other schools in the system. 
The board has announced it 
will appeal to a higher referee. 
After a series of formal 
hearings, Administrative Law 
Judge August E. Thomas rul- 
ed in favor of Mr. Ivan and 
Mr. Murray on October 29. 
The school board received 
notice of the action on 
November 11. It has ten days 
to file an appeal, and announc- 



Pupils who fall in the broad, 
average, middle are the ones 
Mrs McGoldrick worries 
about. When a school district 
is forced by the state, she 
says, to put out such a 
disproportionate amount for 
so few students - for gifted- 
and-talented. and for those 
who need compensatory 
education - "there is very lit- 
tle left for the average - and 
those are the ones who are go- 
ing to be the taxpayers." 

She also warns: "it is from 
this group that the backlash 
may come." 

—Katha rine H. Bretnall 

ed this week that it is doing so. 
The appeal is to Commis- 
sioner of Education Saul 
Cooperman who wil) have 45 
days to reach a decision. 

Mr. Ivan and Mr Murray 
protest their transfer in the 
spring of 1981 to Littlebrook 
School (Mr. Ivan) and the 
middle school (Mr. Murray). 
Mr. Ivan was head of the high 
school's physical education 
department at the time, and 

Continued on Next Page 



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Topics of the Town 

Continued from Preceding Peoe 

cross-country coach. Mr. Mur- 
ray was wrestling coach and 
assistant track coach. 

Three othe"- physical educa- 
tion teachers were transferred 
at the same time. They did not 
contest the action. 

Result of a Grievance? Mr. 

Ivan and Mr. Murray have 
charged that their transfer 
was the result of a grievance. 
Mr. Murray had given a fail- 
ing grade to a student whose 
father was president of the 
school l)oard at the time. 

John Sakala, principal of 
Princeton High School, chang- 
ed the grade to "passing" 
after receiving a physician's 
statement that the student had 
infectious mono-hepatitis. Mr. 
Murray then filed a grievance, 
but withdrew it after Mr. 
Sakala said that, in the future, 
he would confer at greater 
length with the teacher involv- 
ed if he changed a grade. 

The school board and 
superintendent Paul Houston 
say the transfers were not 
punishment or demotion as a 
result of the grievance. 

"It is equally valuable and 
important to teach elemen- 
tary, middle or high school," 
commented board president 
Ann McGoldrick. "We do not 
consider transfers as punish- 
ment and never have." 

^e acknowledgd that the 
transfer cost Mr. Ivan the ex- 
tra stipend he received as 
chairman of the high school's 
physical eduation depart- 
ment. 

Judge Thomas' opinion said 
the board acted in good faith 
on the bad faith recommenda- 
tions of Dr. Houston and Mr. 
Sakala. Mrs. McGoldrick 
states that the board does not 
agree the two administrators 
acted in bad faith, and says 
the board supported their 
recommendation for transfer. 

In a series of temporary ac- 
tions in the fall of 1981, the 
school board was upheld; 
however, formal hearings "on 
the merits" resulted in Judge 
Thomas' ruling. 



HOME IS ENTERED 
On Dodds Lane. A home on 
Dodds Lane was entered last 
week and police are waiting 
for a report from the owners to 
determine if anything was 
taken. 

The entry was discovered at 
8:40 Thrusday morning by a 
neighbor who was checking 
the house while the victims 
were away, police said. Most 
of the areas in the house, 
entered by breaking a glass in 
a rear storm door, gave 
evidence of being searched 
but not ransacked. 

Police report a telephone 
was pulled from the wall and a 
pillowcase was taken from the 
bedroom. 




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An unlocked room in 
Campbell Hall on the 
university campus was en- 
tered during a 25-minute 
period last week by an in- 
truder who departed with a 
$100 portable television set 
and a portable stereo cassette 
player valued at $100. 

A video cassette recorder 
valued at $700 was taken lasl 
week from a storage cabinet 
in Stevenson Hall, 91 Prospect 
Avenue. Police report there 
were no signs of the cabinet 
being forced open. 



TWO DRIVERS INJURED 
In Single Car Mishaps. Two 
drivers wre injured last week 
in single car mishaps in the 
Township. 

Trouble began for Janet T. 
Coursen. 52, 495 Princeton- 
Kingston Road when her purse 
fell on her car floor as she was 
driving on Route 27 neai 
Riverside Drive Friday af- 

ContinuM on M«xt Pag* 




\Topics ofthv Tim: 

ternoon. When she reached for 
it, she took her eyes off the 
road and lost control. 

Her 1981 sedan was totalled 
after it sideswiped one utility 
pole and then struck a second, 

^breaking it in three pieces. 

'Her car travelled a total of 180 



feet from initial impact before 
coming to rest between two 
trees. \ '^t •«, 

Mrs Coursen was treated at 
Princeton Medical Center for 
lacerations of the face. There 
were no charges by Pt. Robert 
Buchanan. 



Martha A. Williams, 26, of 
South River was ticketed for 



failure to k^p right by Ptl. 
Renn Kaminski, after her car 
crossed into the opposite lasne 
of Princeton-Kingston Road 
near the intersection of Dodds 
Lane and struck a service 
pole. 

She was treated at the 
hospital for head cuts after the 
mishap, which occurred at 
3:52 Monday morning. Her car 



had to be towed from the 
scene. 



Two cars collided late 
Friday morning when both 
entered the intersection of 
Route 27 and Snowden Lane. 

Seventeen-year old Maria 0. 
Pinochet, 447 Terhune Road, 
was issued a sumons for 
failing to yield at a traffic 



signal by Ptl. Robert Nielsen, 
after she attempted to make a 
left turn onto Snowden in front 
of a car coming the opposite 
direction operated by 
Alexandria L. Bosna, 42, of 
Trenton. The latter had just 
started to enter the in- 
tersection after the traffic 
light had changed. 
Miss Pinochet refused 



medical aid for minor leg 
injuries; a passenger in the 
Bosna car, Janice McGoni^e 
of Philadelphia was treated at 
the Medical Center for con- 
tusions and bruises. 



Failure to stop for the stop 
sign at the foot of Lovers Lane 
and Mercer Road resulted in 



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Burnett was administered a 
Breathalyzer test by Sgt. 
William Fitch and found to be 
intoxicated. 



I 
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He was later released in his 
own recognizance, pending an 
appearance December 15 in 
Borough court. Later, after 
the investigation was con- 
tinued by Ptl. Joseph Wilhelm, 
Burnett was issued three 
summonses by the state's Fish 
& Game agency cliarging him 
with violating state hunting 
laws: shooting across a 
roadway; possession of a 
loaded weapon within 450 feet 
and 



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Topics of the Totvn 

C«nlinue<J from Preceding Page 

the total loss of one car early 
last week. 

The 1978 sedan of Shall 
Khurana, 44, of Somerville 
was hit broadside when it 
failed to observe the stop sign 
and was struck by a car 



important evening. Tommye 
Schiro is in charge of in- 
vitations, Joyce Stoveken and ] 
Linda Sheldon are working on 
the silent auction, while Al and | 
Rhonda Lange oversee the 
live auction. The cocktail hour I 
is in the hands of Kathy and 
Tom Ferraro and dinner 
arrangements are being made 



Continued oo Page 8 



I MONDAY-THURSDAY (with this ad) jl 



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traveling east on Mercer Road by Pam Abernathy and 
driven by Frances M. Hed- Pauline Egan. 
bers 118 Library Place. Both Other committee members 
Mrs' Hedberg and her include Rom Williams, 
passenger, Hollis Hedberg staging; Judy d^ro, 
were treated at the hospital decorations; Claudia Wente. 
for minor injuries. Their car program; Carol Jefferson, 
hadtobetowed. flowers; Ann O NeiU, 

Ms. Khurana, uninjured, publicity; Enc Solonion, 
was ticketed for a stop sign treasurer. Maude Backes, 
violation by Ptl. Howard Alumnae Association 



Sweeney. 



president, is the alumnae co- 
ordinnator. 

For more information, call 
the school at 921-2330. 



STUART PLANS ACUTION 

As Fundraiser. Stuart 

Country Day School will hold T»o/-r'r 

Christmas Auction '82 on SQUIRRELS T.ARGET 
Saturday, December 4. The O' Intoxicated Hunter A 
benefit will begin at 6 with a Witherspoon Street resident 
silent auction and music by l«st week turned Princeton 
the Continental Gypsies Cemetery into a hunUng 
auring cocktails, a candlelight ground, 
dinnerandaliveauciton. Arrested last Wednesday 

Sr. Joan Magnetti, head- afternoon by police was 
mistress, is the honorary Richard Burnett, 52. 114 
chairman of Stuart's major Witherspoon Str^t who 
fundraising event. Camille allegedly admitted firing a 
Mnz is co-ordinator and Sr. shotgun from his front porch 
Betty Shearman, director of at squirrels in the cemetery 
services at Stuart, is the across the street. 

liasion to the Auction com- 

mittee. Police confiscated his 12- 

gauge shotgun and charged | 

Stuart parents, both past him with discharge of a 
and present, as well as firearm in the Borough, a| 
ahBMae are organizing the violation of a Borough or- 
mMiy (fifferent aspects of this dinance. At headquarters,] 



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dominals fully in the contracted position 
The short range of movement also makes 
the form of the exercise difficult to master. 
The prot)lems of full-range involvement 
and faulty style of performance have been 
solved with ttie f^autilus Abdominal 
Machine. 



it 

■Muscles of the Waist 

The appearance and strength of the 
waist are primarily determined by three 
muscles; rectus abdominis, external obli- 
que, and internal oblioue The rectus ab- 
dominus is attached to the fifth, sixth, and 
seventh ribs, extends across the front of 
the abdominal wall, and joins the pubis 
bone. The external and internal obliques 
cover both sides of the abdomen They 
are attached to the lower ribs and extend 
to the crest of the hip bone The primary 
functions of the abdominal group are to 
flex the spinal column forward and side to 
side. 



The Truth About 
Sit-Ups and Leg Raises 

The belief that sit-ups and leg raises are 
abdominal exercises is a misconception 
These movements primarily work the hip 
flexors The hip flexors connect the upper 
femur bones of the thighs to the lower 
lumbar region of the spine When these 
muscles contract, they pull the upper 
body to a sitting position; or they pull the 
thighs toward the chest, as in a leg raise 
The abdominals are only mildly involved 
in a traditional sit-up or leg raise 

The problem with the sit-up and leg 
raise has now Ijeen solved with thfi 
Nautilus Abdominal Machine. This ww 
machine effectively isolates and works 
the abdominal group to a degree not 
possible with conventional equipment or 
other machines. 



^50 OFF 



With Membership PLUS 
FREE Nautilus Sport Bag or 
FREE Princeton Poster 



Princeton Nautilus 
Fitness Center 

Princeton Shopping Center Open 7 Days ' Open 6 A.M. 



flHoppu/^ 





White or Red Wine for Turkey? 



There has been much debate on whether to choose white or red wine for Thanksgiving 
Day Dinner. The staff at Ellsworth's Wines & Liquors feels that either is appropriate. 
So.. .select your favorite and bon appetit! 



Selective White Wines 



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Robert Pepi Sauvignon Blanc , 

750 ml. 
Le Grand Cheneau Macon Vire 
LaTour Chardonnay 
Girard Chardonnay 



-Selective Red Wines 

Chuck Shaw Napa Camay $ 4.99 

Chateau Greysac 1 979 $ 6.99 

Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais Villages $ 4.99 
Chateau Gloria 1979 $11.99 

Champagnes 

Cordon Bleu Champagne de Venage $1 3.99 
Paul Cheneau Blanc de Blancs $ 5.99 




$7.99 

$5.99 
$7.99 
$9.99 



The wine and liquor sales are continuing... 
Over 300 premium wines on sale. 

Prices very competitive with New York. 
Come in and see our many unadvertised sales! 



$11.99 
$12.99 
$11.99 
$20.99 
$5.99 
$11.99 
$12.99 
$10.49 
$10.99 



Seagram 7 5th 
Andre Champagne 5th 
Frexiner Gordon Negro 
GalloChablis4 
Taylor California 3 

Rose, Rhine, Burgandy, Chablis 
Paul Masson 1 .5 

Burgandy, Chablis, Rose 
Folonari Soave 1 .5 . 



_ Not responsible for typographical errors ■ Shelf price prevails in case of error. 




J. ,• 
"^ - * 



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The store was closed last 
We<faie8day until 3:15 after an 
operator received a call 
shortly after 2:30 that a bomb 
in the store was going to go off 
in half an hour. Police and 
imiversity proctors searched 
the building without success. 

An unidentified caller called 
the store the next day at 2:04 
and again the store was 
emptied of employees and 
customers while police 
searched the interior. 
Borough police Captain John 
J. Bellow said that the caller 



had threatened to set off a 
bomb at a specific time. The 
store was reopened at 2:50. 

Employees of the store, 
members of the United Auto 
Workers District 65 union 
which is engaged in stormy 
contract talks with the store's 
management, disclaimed any 
responsibility for the threats. 
In an election July 21, the 
employees voted 39 to 35 to be 
represented by a union for the 
first time in the store's 
history. 



Asked if he thought there 
was any connection between 
the bomb threats and contract 
talks in progress. Chief 
Michael Camevale replied, i 
think it is certainly something 
that can't be dismissed." 

Chief Carnevale had 
declined to even report the 
incidents at his weekly press 
confa^nce because, he said, 
"it only serves to cause people 
to continue to call and make 
these kinds of threats when its 
reported in the papers. 

Continued on Pag« 10 



Need a Personal Bookkeeper? 

Bills need sorting? Accounts need straightening out^ Check 
book doesn't balance'^ Confused oy insurance forms? 
Let us put your bookkeeping problems right for you 

INSURANCE ASSISTANCE 

P.O. Box 208 

Hopewell, New Jersey 08525 



r 



4 



;\i.tiri\-'h' 



Ann Johnson 
466-1065 



Julie AtMrger 
737-2384 



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HARRY STRAUSS & SONS, INC 

OFFICE PRODUCTS CENTERS 



Dr. Lewis nomas 
Tapint of iltp Tttwn 

CanttniMtt from Pracedtng Pag* 

pedestrian and vehicular 
traffic on Witherspoon Street, 
I thiiik it is a pretty serious 
thing," commented Chief 
MidHd Camevale, "to have 
■ omeo u e discharge a shotgun 
t a busy street." 



PtI. Wilhelm had been 
approached at 12:32 p.m. 
while on car patrol by a 
woman who told him as she 
was walking on Witherspoon 
Street, a man had fired a 
shotgun from across the street 
into the cemetery. As Ptl. 
Wilhelm and Sgt. Fitch 
arrived, another witness 
pointed to a house and said 
that a man had come out on 
the porch with a shotgun 
which be fired into the 
cemetery. 

The officers apprehended 
Burnett as he was exiting 
from the rear door of his 
apartment dressed in hunting 
garb. Police said that he 
admitted firing the shotgun. 

Apparerttly Burnett's aim 
was off the mark. Chief 
Camevale reported that police 
were unable to find any 
squirrd carcasses. 



CHANNEL 13 TO GAIN 
FVmi TaOi Sanday. Positive 
attitudes towards new and 
fomSbty frightening scientific 
devkpments will be presented 
by Dr. Lewis Thomas in a 
lecture titled "Things 
Unsettled by Science" Sunday 
at 4 p.m. in the theatre of the 
Princeton Day School, The 
Gre^Road. 

The Princeton Friends of 
THIRTEEN are sponsoring 
the event, which will benefit 
WNET-THIRTEEN program- 
ing. Sponsor and Patron ticket 
holders are invited to a light 
buffet served vnth wine and 
cocktails immediately 
following the talk. _ 



Dr. Thomas, a 1933 graduate 
of Princeton University, is the 
recipient of the 1981 Woodrow 
Wilson Award, the highest 
honor Princeton can bestow on 
one of its graduates. He is the 
chaioeUor of Memorial Sloan- 
Kettering Cancer Center in 
New York City, a meml)er of 
the National Academy o( Art 
and Science and the American 
Philosophical Association. He 
is known for his award win- 
ning books, "The Lives (A a 
CeU" and The Medusa and 
theSnaU." 

Reservations and in- 
formatioo may be obtained by 
calUng 924-0071 or 921-3760. 
Tickets are priced at $50 for 
spooaors and 125 for patrons 
which indudes the reception. 
Admission to the lecture only 
is $15 and a special student 
group price of $5 a ticket is 
availaMe. 

All but a small portion of 
each ticket price is a tax 
deductible contribution to 
WNET-THIRTEEN. 



U-STORE IS SCENE 
or Tw BMih IhreaU. Thm 

wara ^o bomb threats on 

sooHninidtofli iB^lKWPi^ ''^ 
th« PflicetM University 
Store-mie fifth such seare 



Cheddars, Cheddars, Cheddars 



— come to our Cheddar Festival 

— savour a gorgeous two year old ONTARIO Cheddar, a hard-to- 
find cheese. Sample an extra aged NEW YORK Cheddar or a tru- 
ly Sharp CABOT from VERMONT. 

— all these Cheddars, as well as our smaller Gift Cheddars, are 
priced very specially for our Festival. 





104 NASSAU STREET PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 

(Formerly Center Business Machines) 

SUPER VALUES FOR OUR OLD FRIENDS... 

OVER 1000 REASONS FOR YOU TO BECOME ONE OF OUR NEW FRIENDS 



m 



FRESH CAVIAR 

The very best BELUGA 

MALOSSOL in all sizes, 

just arrived by air 



vyo 



n15> 



O. 



Princeton Shopping Center 






Ov«r ta yaara of tarvlca to Contra! Now Jorooy moono wo coll 
our ouotomoro our FRIENDS. AND... WE NEVER DISAPPOINT A FRIEND III 

Our oompotont courtoouo oorvloo will holp you ohoooo ovorything 
from tho right pon to tho boot oomputor for your noodo. 

Wo oorvloo ovorything wo ooll. And wo roopond FAST oo you 
don't hovo to wooto timo wolfing. ^ 

Stop Into ono of our Offico Product Contoro Cwo ro oioo in 
Now Brunowlok). and ooo why Horry Strouoo & Sono. Inc. lo ono of tho 
lorgoot comploto offico oupplloro in tho Unitod Stotoo. 

Robert L. Strouoo 
Prooldont 



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COMPUTERS 




p 



OFFICE SUPPLIES 



PENDAFLEX 




CALCULATORS 



HPIOC 

$72.00 



¥Ap% HEWLETT 
mL/im PACKARD 




Don't Forget! 

We are taking orders for— 

Thanksgiving 

All Fresh and Farm Grown 



Turkeys 
Capons 
Small Capons 
Muscovy Ducks 

Quail 

Large Pheasant 

Baby Pheasant 

Partridge 



1 0-28 lbs. 

7-10 lbs. 

51/4-61/2 lbs. 

4-8 lbs. 

Squab 

Guinea Hens 
Rabbits 



Also Available 

Pennsylvania Dutch 
Smoked Hams 10-14 lbs. 

Suckling Pigs 

Baby Lambs 

Fresh Pasta 
Wild Rice 




COMMODORE VIC-20 

Moro thon fun ond •••"••'../JViK '*'"' 
utor. eon bo oxpondod up to iok. 
■ oootto ond diok drivo ovollobio. 
$179.86 



8 



Lottor oiio Pondofiox 

fromoo ond foldort 

$2.89 Fromoo $7.88 Foldoro 



: S, 

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Chock oii our 
HP pricooll] 



n-fi'ii'ti >i II n n n n a a n 

aaoEiaoanciisHMa 

■"■■aaonasiiiiM i^ :: 



WRITE BROS. PENS 

$1.88 DZ Aooortod coloro 




COMMODORE 64 

Poworfui momory (64K), computing, 
orcodo quollty gomoo ond o quoiity 
muolc oynthooUor. 



ELECTRONIC 

TYPEWRITERS^ 





iHARP 
X-2186 

Printing colculotor 
itii dioploy momory. full foaturoo 
$89.00 




CANON P1251D 

Printing colculotor 
with dioploy momory. hoovy duty 

•ist.oo 



So that we may serve you better, 
please order by Saturday, Nov. 20. 



Dockside of Princeton 

Princeton Shopping Center — 609-924-0072 



'^.^C'i 



*and most of all — we carry the f nest, and — " - • • .\'., 

rsrgeM Selection of seafood anywhere 



'^ 




PORTABLE 

TYPEWRITERS 

SMITHCORONA 

Entorprloo II 

Cortridgo Typowritor 

$199.96 with roboto 




OFFICE FURNITUBE 




HON ' 
Studont/Soloomofi'o dook 

$69.00 



OLIVETTI Proxit 30 

Electronic Portoblo Typrwrltor 
$429.00 



Two drowor otooi fllo 



ycHofw, 

Blue, 
BritfilRcd, 

Qrccn, ^ 
Brownand $39.96 

White 




$$••.00 WrfH •© DAY WARRANTY 
yj oUiidTd tiroowrltoro tlgyo 



VISA and Master Charge 
accepted 



COUPON 

thio ooypofi 



Outoldo Now Brunowick arot [ Portablo Typowritor ••••$ 

phono: $00-221-0020 I Offl«« Typowritor S1$.$i 

.TP..T'jRfNjE';ON'"^' '" "''' TJ^iERiEY-AVENUE. NEW BRUNSWICK 




EXPIRES NOVEMBER 30. 1982. 



«.«•«■, 



.?'4 



^ » « II. * 







ClANCY . PAUL 
The Princeton 
Computer Store 

Princelon Shopping Center 
North Harrison Street 

6O9-ti!83-OO60 



FOOTWORKS 

24 Witherspoon Street 

Princeton. N.J. 924-6259 



ACtCDode 

DOUTiQUE 

1 5 Witherspoon Street 
Princeton, N.J. 




«».• of the inlaid wooden puzj^* ^^e 2»«!9"| JJJ SJ^iurdiy November 20, 
of the YWCA'8 annual Craftwomen s Marketplace on oaiu.^-j, 

from 10 to 4. 




SM Canada I 




...EAST or WEST 

Cross Country •Downhill or 

Bug-A-Boo! 

Call today for more Information 



Ask Mr. Foster atXHit Ski Packages 
to resorts around the world 



Ask Mr. Poster 

Anything You Want To Know About Travel 
41 Witherspoon Street 921-33S0 



Topics of the Town 

Continuad from Page 8 

PRINCETON MAN FINED 

For Assault. Jorge Reyes 
Amaya, 25 Redding Circle, 
was fined $150 last week in 
Township court for assault. 
Mr. Amaya was also ordered 
to pay $25 court costs, $50 for 
contempt of court for not 
appearing the first time, and 
$25 to the Violent Crime 
Compensation Board. 

Judge Sydney Souter also 
placed Mr. Amaya on one 
year's supervised probation, 
conditional on his paying a 
$195 hospital bill of the victim. 
Hector Gomez. 

Henry J. and Famey Velez, 
118 Witherspoon Street, were 
each fined $125 for shoplifting 
at the Acme Market in 
Princeton Shopping Center. 
Center. 



FORMULflT€D FOR 





We carry 
Q full line 

of 

Nexxus 

products... 




to he«p your holf through the dtying months of winter. 

Come in end osk for Humectress A^sture Potion, with its 

uoiufpossed obillty to retain voluoble moisture to the inner 

jtMCUiie of the hoir ■ leoving hoir plioble, smooth ond eosy 

to control 

So If dry hoir ond static etectrlcity ore 

fulning your styte, coll o$ todoy ond osk 

°H€lUS W 

WnUXC l«l«>*«WTMl»«W)UJITMKIHia Bj^^^^ 

pi^^prS CUSTOM ha¥design 

Washington Str—i • Rocky Hill. NJ 

Of 924-0600 



In traffic court, Vincente 
Marroquin, 34 Tupelo Row, 
was fined $215 for exhibiting 
someone else's driver's 
license while operating a 
motor vehicle He also paid a 
$65 fine as an unlicensed 
driver. 

Matthew M. Nigro, 12 
Heritage Way, Lawrenceville, 
was fined $95 for speeding. 

Borough Court. In Borough 
traffic court Monday, Edwin 
B. Williams, 62 Clay Stret, was 
fined $260 each on separate 
charges of drunken driving 
and refusing to take a 
Breathalyzer test. He also had 
his license revoked six months 
on each charge. 

In addition, Mr. Williams 
paid $25 for no license or 
registration in possession. 



Two were fined by Judge 
Russell W. Annich Jr. for 
improper entering or leaving 
a highway. Jungyoll T. Yun of 
the Graduate College paid $115 
and had his license revoked 30 
days; Elinor S. Prockop, 38 
Turner Court, paid $30 after 
pleading guilty with an ex- 
planation. 

Fined $60 each were Don M. 
Betterton, 120 Prospect 
Avenue, red light; Anthony C. 
Voeolo, 14 Larkspun Lane, 
Lawrenceville, careless 
driving, and Roland H. Snead, 
321 Witherspoon Street, stop 
sign. Moises Esc^lanto, 43-15 
Hunters Glen, Plainsboro, was 
fined $70 for speeding. 

Princeton Univeristy paid 
three fines: $20 for 
unregistered vehicle, $20 for 
improper display of plates and 
$15, overdue inspection. 
Others: Bill Sibrit, Ridge 
Road, Kingston, $15, overdue 
inspection, and Linda R. 
Levine. Canal Road, $25, 
unlicensed driver 






Music to make your party go. 

Sandy Maxwell / Music 

(609)9241983 



Since 1904 



%^FM*.nr^ 



LuTTM ANNS /Luggage 

New Jersey 's finest quality luggage and leather goods store 

Luttmann^s...a tradition in quality 
for holiday gift giving. 

You are cordially invited to view our extensive 
selection in brief and attache cases. 

Initials gold stamped and gift wrapping included. 

20 Witherspoon Street 92iW)/35 Princeton. N.J. 

Hours; l^onday through Saturday 10-6; FndaylO^ 



HOME DECOR 

CwtMS-Drweriet-Bedapreads-Lampthades 
PRINCETON SHOPPING CENTER 921-7296 







40 

fthmiiiiuin BKnds 



Del Mar mini-blinds are the stylishly slim slats that open, close 
and tilt at the twist of a plexiglas control wand Available in a 
full spectrum of decorator colors, they're perfect for any win- 
dow in the house. 



50% OFF WOVEN WOOD BLINDS 

in any pattern in their Super Naturals or Tapestry Collection 



20% OFF VERTICAL BLINDS 
AND SOR LIGHT SHADES 



ComlnuH) on Next Page 




fgidel mar 



WeVe got you covered, America. 



Topics of the Town 

Continued from Page 10 

^ THEFT REPORT "' 

Suede Hems Stolen. A pigskin 
suede skirt valued at $170 and 
a matching $200 suede jacket 
were shoplifted last week 
from a women's apparel store 
on Nassau Street. Two male 
customers observed earlier in 
the store are suspects. 



?';.' 



A graduate college student 
lost half his wheels last week, 
after someone stole both rear 
tires and rims from his car 
that had been parked in the 
university lot on Olden Street. 
Total loss: $160. 

The car trunk of a resident 
of the Stanworth area of 
Bayard I^ne yielded a green 
metal tpol box valued at $280 
when it was pried open last 
week, and a Trenton resident 
became a victim when his $30 
blue jacket and wallet were 
stolen between 11:30 Friday 
night and l Saturday morning 
from the basement of the 





*7Yl20 



NAL WEAR 
TAILORING 





Prom, Wedding, Cruise, Dinner Wear 
ALTERATIONS»DRY CLEANING>CUSTOM MADE CLOTHING 

All Styles 

MONOGRAMMING 




The Village Shopper*Route 206*Rocky Hill, NJ 

(609) 924-6277 



VISA 



1141 Hamilton Ave., Trenton 
(609) 392-2188 



Yardley Shopping Center 
(215)493-1452 




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PLANNING PATRONS' EVENING: Mrs. Edward R. 
Farley, Jr., left, and Mrs. Maurice F. Healy, Jr. are co- 
chairmen of the patrons party to be held at Stuart 
School, Monday, December 6, from 6 to 9 on the eve of 
the Christmas House Tour sponsored by the Associa- 
tion of the NJNPI. The evening will include a cocktail 
party, music and a preview of Christmas shops. 
Tickets are $12.50 per person and may be obtained by 
calling Mrs. Farley at 924-5881. ,BarbaraRusso photo ) 



Cottage Club on Prospect Wednesday of the theft in July a clerk pursued them 

Avenue. Police report the of a $345 check stolen from the through the Alchemist & 

wallet contained credit cards mailbox of a Lawrence Road Barrister alleyway to Palmer 

and an Amtrak train pass for resident. Police said that the Square where he observed one 

November. The jacket had check, made out by a rental 

been left unattended, they agency, showed up last week 

sa id . in New York City . 



Stop, Thief!. Two men en 
Four flashing warning lights tered a Witherspoon Street 



of the suspects near the Post 
Office building. The suspect 
dropped the seven suits valued 
at $350 and managed to 
escape. 



TJie Rare and the Beautiful 



were taken during the 
weekend from a construction 
site on Mt. Lucas Road, ac- 
cording to Township police, 
who were also notified last 



sports store Monday af- 
ternoon, grabbed seven 
warm-up suits from a rack 
near the door and ran south on 
Witherspoon 



WILL CHOSEN DEPtNn^BL^ MENS WEAR 








Established 7867 




ALDEN 




MAN IS JAILED 
On Drug Charges. Anthony 
K. Bailey, 27, Route 27 
Kingston, has been sent to the 
Mercer County Detention 
Center in lieu of a total of 
$10,000 bail stemming from 
drug charges and harrass- 
ment. 
Bailey was arrested by Ptl. 
Bernard Lenhardt, Ptl. John 
Reading and Sgt. Peter 
Henley who were in- 
vestigating an 8:26 call 
Saturday night that a man was 
trespassing on the rear porch 
of a Leigh Avenue apartment 
and harrassing the occupant. 

At headquarters, during 
processing, Bailey was found 
to be in possession of 
marijuana and intent to 
distribute was set at $2500 on 
each charge; for the charges 
of criminal trespassing and 
harrassment, bail was set at 
$5,000. 



'^^S^ 41^ 






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CAR F!RE EXTINGUISHED 

By Police. A fire confined to 
the engine compartment of the 
1972 station wagon of a Pen- 
nington resident, was ex- 

Continued on Next Page 



Explore the mystique 

and savor the beauty 

of loose and mounted gemstones 

at LaVake Jewelers' 

Exhibition and Sale 

Friday and Saturday 
November Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Please address all inquiries to: 

Michael Joachim 

{(i») 924-0624 




54 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 

Thursday and Friday Evenings Until 8:30 PM. 

MASTER (ARD * VISA ACCEPTED 



P» *'^*j? 



-^. 



The Alden lightweight! It's 47'7r 
lighter in weight. The alpine calfskin 
upper is fully leather lined, features a 
storm welt and is truly an "all-season 
all-weather show . ' ' This classic 
seamless hlucher provides years of 
smart appearance, comfort &. service. 
Alden style 945 illustrated. Black or 
Brown. $99. 

Tassel moccasin, created by Alden 
$117. Other Alden shoes to $ 1 25 . 



GET AN EARLY START... 

'j^^M^ALL YOU NEED 



:4i 



'^;3 



2nd Pair - Less 25% 
3rd Pair - Less 33% 

From stock or ordered 
Transaction may be shared. 



f^'''-WimtiimMim^^ 



Clothing • Furnishings 
Shoes • Sportswear 







Rt. 1 & 



Texas Ave. • Lake Lawrence Pl^za 
Lawrenceville 
Open Daily 10-9 • Saturday 10-5:30 
VISA • Master Cd • FWD Chg * Am Express 



Roasting Pans • Foil Pans 

Roasting Racks • Skewers 

Basters • Meat Thernnonneters 

Elec. Carving Knives • Pyrex 

Pie Plates • Corning Ware 

If It's for Thanksgiving, We've Got It! 

URKEN'S 

27 Witherspoon St. • Free Delivery • 924-3076 




o 

£ 
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o 





20 NO. Main St. Pennington, N.J 

Gitis tor All Occasions ano Ages 
■737^45 Mon-Sal10-5 30 



BELLOWS 

Women's 4 Children s Apparel 

210 Nassau Street 



Computer Encounter 

Princeton North 
Shopping Center 

924-8757 

Wcto compuleii loi homb and ollice 



NOAH'S SONS AND DAUGHTERS-IN-LAW: From left, Mary Ellen KeJ ley. Fran 
Beyea. Nancy Wlllard and Peter Fritz rehearse for Benjamin Br tten s Noye s 
FkKkte," which will be performed Friday and Saturday at 8 at Nassau 
Presbyterian Church. - — 



Topics of the Town 

Continued from Page 1 1 

tinguished last week by police. 
Patrolmen Joseph Wilhelm 
and Victor Fasanella used a 
powder extinguisher to put out 
the tdaze before a fire truck 
and six firemen arrived at the 
scene. The car had been 
parked in a lot on Stockton 



50% of 
your heat 



goes out tkell window. 



Street, site of the old Borough 
Hall. 



TO ANALYZE OUTCOME 
Of Lautenberg-Fenwick 
Race. A panel discussion 
entitled "The Lautenberg- 
Fenwick Race: Press, Public 
and Politics" will take place 
at Princeton University's 
Woodrow Wilson School, 
Monday, in the main 
auditorium. The event is 
presented by the Program for 
New Jersey Affairs, a com- 
ponent of the Woodrow Wilson 
School, in cooperation with the 
"Politics and the Press' 
undergraduate course. 

The discussion, open to the 
public, will examine the 
course of events leading to 
Democrat Frank Lauten- 
berg's November 2 victory 
over Republican Millicent 
Fenwick in a close race for the 
U.S. Senate seat from New 
Jersey. 



Fenwick campaign. The 
discussion will be sup- 
plemented by samples of 
television commercials 
developed by the "Image 
makers" for the two can- 
didates. 



l-TineptHfai. 



t— Hr Cotpetallan >• Making 

dMiara iwManwMe. Mane ot cryMai cwn 
rigid acrytic. Datwidar t insulates and 
M«p« neat >"■'* iigntaogro seit ««atnc' 
si'ipping mtlalli insist any honw. o«t>c» 
or in<luclfia< mintfoo 




2935 Route 1 

Lawrenceville, NJ 
(609)896-9519 



visa - mastercard 
phniy of partying 



"The election results sur- 
prised many and that 
warrants our reviewing the 
campaign to see if we can find 
an explanation for the 
results," states Richard 
Roper, director of the 
Program for New Jersey 
Affairs. The panelists will pay 
particular attention to 
"assessing the tide of public 
opinion during the course of 
the campaign and the role of 
the media in the election 
outcome. 

The four panelists will be 
Twn O'Neill, director of The 
Center on the Analysis of 
Public Issues; Cliff Zukin, 
director of the Eagleton Poll; 
Bob Squier, media consultant 
to the Lautenberg campaign; 
and a representative of Smith 
and Harroff Media Con- 
sultants, who worked with the 



ITEMS USTED 
For Decemberfest .\uction. 

The seventh annual 
Etecemberfest and Auction of 
the Stony Brook-Millstone 
Watersheds Association will 
take place Sunday, December 
5. from 5 to 9:30 ac The 
Institute for Advanced Study. 
A silent auction featuring 
some 200 items will be held 
from 5 to 7:30. and the live 
auction will begin shortly 
thereafter. John Eddmann of 
the Edelmann Galleries in 
New York will wield the 
gavel. Dinner catered by 
Root and Vielbig wiU fortify 
bidders between 6 and 7 : 30. 

Continued on Page 17 




^ 



ALL PRICES INCLUDE NJ SALES TAX • WHILE »JPI>LIE8 lAST 

Ah Specials are cash and carry. Prices effecVve Fri., Nov 19 
thni Wed., Nov. 24. 

WE HAVE A STORE FULL OF SPECIALS 



PRINCETON WINE & LIQUOR 



formerly The Cellar • Next to Davidson's 
174 Nassau Street 



piiS^;^^* 



924-0279 



Easy Pieces 




PRODUCE 

WASHINGTON STATE 

Red Delicious Apples 49* lb. 

Scrumpy Apple Cider »2.49 gal. 

Bananas 4lb8./*1.00 

Emperor Red Grapes 69* lb. 



'.<r^^ 



Fresh Green 
Broccoli 

Snow White 
Mushrooms 

Sweet Yams 



2hd8j*1.00 

89* lb. 
Slbs./*1.00 



HAPPY 

THANKSGIVING! 

FRESH SEAFOOD 



BAYBERRY FLORIST 

Thanksgiving 

Centerpieces '1 0. and up 

Mixed Fall Flowers 



Select Oyster 



Flounder Fillet 



Medium Shrimp 



*3.49 dz. 



*3.99 lb. 



*6.99 lb. 



Catering for 
All Occasions 



COUNTRY MEATS 
b THINGS 

Taking orders for Fresh Turkey 
All Sizes 

Also Fresh Hams-Whole or Half 

Boars Head Smoked Hams 

Whole or Half 

Loose sausage meat 

for stuffing •1.991b. 

Hormel Pepperoni »3.59 lb. 



Try some of our Gourmet Items. 
Imported Cheeses. Pumpkin 
Breads. Quiche and Fresh 
Pasta, etc. 




"For Friendly Service, Quality and Value." 

172 NASSAU ST. PRINCETON 

STOn HOURS: Mon . luei . wed ft Sot • o m «l t p m • Ihurt S o m «i • p m • Frt • am Ml 9 p m 





Ui.DA. Chok:* fton«l«ts l«*f 



J2^ 



Fr«th Tyson Grade A Twin Pock 

Corrash t*f 
Hens ^ 




W 



Fresh Grade A 4-5 lb. avg. 

Concord 
Duck 



lb. 



99* 



I.D.A. GfOd« "A" Jwm fremtum Oven Ready S»H 
•o««ngFro«en»0-Uori»-22tb.ovg _ _ . 

BuAeiball ^^ QQ^ 



TUikey 



lb. 



Li SjKH'nsAC 



FRUIT BASKETS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



V 



26 WItherspoon St 



924-6060 

Friday 10-8:30 



ROUTE 27 
KINGSTON, N.J. 
Phone:924-1830 



HOURS: 

Mon.-Thurs. 10 am-6 pm 
Friday 10am-7 pm 
Saturday 10 am-6 pm 



Foramount 'ufe All Nolu(a> No frejervattvei Added 
l014o'l»-22it> ovg 

Fiesh ^ 



Turkey 



v>: 



-^Ib 



99* 



FROZEN FOOD SAVINGS 

8 Inch Mrs. Smith's 

Pumpkin Pie 

129 




$2 



lb. 
pkg 



-GROCERY SAVINGS- 



Wilson 93* Leon Fu«v Cooked Water Added Boneless 

Smoked S099 

Ham lb 

Frozen Jamestown Pork 

Sausage Meat Roll 

Frozen Krauss Farm Country Pork Link 

Breakfast Sausage ib 

FresM Roosting Cfiicken With Pop Up Timef 5-7 

lb ovg ^ AC 

Perdue Oven Stuff er ib/V 

Hillshire Farm Meat e^^io 

Polskc Kielbasa ib ^2'^ 

Hillshire Farm Beef c^koo 

Polska Kielbasa ib ^2^^ 



79^ 

$349 



26 oz 
pkg 



^ 



Ore Ida 

Chopped 
Onions 



2120.00^ 
pkas M M 



Foodfown 

Green 
Peas 



24 oz 



99 



Save More 

Sacramento 
Tomato Juice 



V. 



46 oz 
can 



79* 



Regular or Unbleached 

Gold Medal 
Flour 



5 lb. 
bag 



79* 



r 



Southland 

Butternut Squash 

Birds Eye 

Tiny Tender Peas 

Seabrook 

Creamed Spinach 

Foodlown Northwestern In Syrup 

Red Raspberries 

IrKtividually Qurck Frozen Big Valley 

Blueberries 

Tropicana 

Orange Juice 



lloz. 
pkg. 

lOoz. 
pkg. 

16oz.$|29 
pkg. I 

10 0Z.S109 
pkg. *l 

pkg. ^1 
12o2.$li7 



59* 
69* 



can 



Assorted 

Viva 
Paper Towels 



^ 



jumbo 
roll 



69* 



In OH or Water Chunk Light 

Of The 
Sea Tuna 





Save More 

Crisco 



Save More 

Libby's 



r 



DAIRY SAVINGS 

Foodtown From Florida 

Orange Juice 



Vagal 
cont. 



99* 



Regular Quarters 

Land O" Lakes 
Maigarine 



Vegetable $019 Pumpkin ,,„ QA 
Shortening ^^n^Z Mix 00°' OY 



Chicken Mix 

Stove 

Top 

Stuffing 

Kleenex 



12 oz 

pkg. 



*1 



Jellied or Whole 

Ocean Spray 
59 Cranberry 
Sauce 



16 oz. 
can 



r 

49 



lb 
pkg 



59* 



99 



8 oz. AO« 

cont. 

lb. $249 



TempTeeWtnipped 

Cream Cheese 

Whole NWI< or Port Skim Foodtown 

Mozzarella pxg 

Assorted Varieties ^6oz.$| 

Chambourcy Yogurt Ocups ■ 

Yellow or White 12oz.$|69 

Dorman's Singles pkg ^ i 

Soft^^ ._ 2 8ozcupsQO« 

Chiffon Margonne msieeve Yt 

Ptiilodelphia 8 oz. Q AC 

Cream Cheese pkgOY 

Foodtown quart $|09 

Plain Yogurt cont i 

HEALTH & GOURMET 

imported trom France Sparkling Mineral 2 3 OZ. ^ A< 

Perrier Water bti /Y 

Imported from Canada ^ 21 2 oz.$199 

Stone Wheat Thins pkg *l 

Glorietta In Heavy Syrup 1 6 oz. AO^ 

Seedless Grapes can •»▼ 

Imported trom Swit/eriond Assorted 

Knorr's Soup Mix 



SOinQCC 
pkg 09 

4 0Z.TP09 

Foodtown Mushrooms can 



Dinner Napkins 

Sliced or Button 



Foodtown 

Boiled Onions 

Pokand 

Spring Water 

ComstocK 

Apple Pie Filling 

Lonmann Sliced 

Pickled Beets 

Sparkling 

Montclair Water 



16 oz 
jar 

gal. 
cont 

21 oz. 

can 



73' 
79* 
79* 



3sn 



25.3 oz 
btl. 



59* 



Paradise 

Glazed Fruit Mix 

Visible Pack Diamond 

Shelled Walnuts 

Semi Sweet or Real Ctxjcolate Chips 

Hershey Morsels 

Cara Mia 

Artichoke Hearts 

Hydrox w Vienna Fingers 

Sunshine Cookies 

Assorted Varieties Snack 

Nabisco Crackers 

Bell's 

Seasoning 



32 oz. SI 99 



$1' 

cont. ^ I 

16oz.$029 
pkg. *0 

12oz.$|69 
pkg. 1 

'io°?89* 

12 0Z.AAC 
pkg. OY 

pkg.YY 

pkg./Y 



U S D A Choice Beef Loin 
Untfimmed Custom Cut to Order 

Half She Is 
Of Beef 






/fresh Seafood Savings-^ 

Super Value c#ftao 

Fresh Flounder Fillet ib ^Z*"" 

Fresh 8oz.Ctf«29 

Maryland Oysters cup^a 

Fresn/Fro2en & Thowred 26 '0 30 Sue S099 

Large Shrimp ib/'O 

Fresn;F>o2en h. rtyjwed 60 to 70 Sue e £ 00 

Medium Shrimp \b^O^^ 

Ff®sh , ^ . S149 

Cooiced&SeosonedCrobs ib^i 
PRODUCE SAVINGS 



Fresh 

Sno White ,2oz 
Mushrooms pkg 



Size40 

Pink 
Grapefruit 



us. *1 Fancy 

Anjou or 
Bosc Pears 



Save More 

Fresh 

Red Radishes 



5J1 



5602 yl 
pkgs I 



U.S. II 

Loose 

Idaho Potatoes 



lb 



49* 



us. II 

Golden 
Sweet Yams 



4.^ 



Save More 



Yellow 
Wax Tumlps 



lb 



19* 



us. II 

MHd 

YeNow Onions 



3 lb 
bag 



49* 



New Crop 00< 

Chicory or Escaroie ib o Y 

="^'°° 10,o,»l 

eochw9 
pkg /Y 

«,59* 



Lemons 

Size 12 

Avocado 

Fresh n Plump 

Cranberries 

White 

Boiling Onions 

Importea 

Italian Chestnuts 

Greek Imported 

String Figs 



APPETIZER SAVINGS 



/s 

(i 



Sliced to Order Imported Polish 

Krakus 
Ham 



</>lb 



ii»h A 

gr) 



Sliced to Ott*r V»Ho« o> WMte CheeM 

DomKm's 

*/2lb 



Annerican 



: — N 



BAKERY SAVINGS 



DELI SAVINGS 



rooaivwii 



20 02. 
pkg. 



D 



fF00< 

I PUI 



Foodtown 

Pumpkin 
Pie 



20 oz. 
pkg. 



'¥) 



Imported Polisti 

Kralcus 
Ham 



3ib. 
can 



«7 



99 



^ 



SNced to 0«d«r Cttel Counn«t Cot 

TUricey 

Breast */> 



Regular 

Oscar Mayer ^^ 
Sliced Bacon pkg 



^2 



49 



can 
2'/joz.XA« 



Foodtown Onion Rye. Rye or 

Pumpernickel 

MightyGood Pumpernickel or 

Party Rye Bread 



160Z.XAC 

loaf OY 

8oz.|"AC 
pkg.OY 



Oscar Mayer Sliced 

Cooked Ham 

Foodtown 

Sauerkraut 



6oz.$|79 



pkg 

Ib. 
pkg 



KnorrS dOUM rrn^ m^w '^ ' 

iiiiiii coupon iiiiiii iiiiiiiicouponiiiiiii iiiiiii 

■■■■■■■ ^w " AMort«<*>^'*''*'<«»?SLWikT* S S Salted o 

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fe COKE r o9 S % MIX •;., ' •! V 

•^ ^^7rA^^„.^«A».»n™TlO»JAlS7 50 0R ^ #% wiTH THIS COUPON AND AN ADCMTK)NAl $7 50 



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coupon IIIIIII 



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WITH THIS COUPON AND AN ADCXTIONAl $7 50 OR 
MORI PORCHASl Coupon good Ol onv 
OoyldJon-i Supermortel ft>fu Nov JO, 19»2 Umft 
of»e coupon per fomllv 

NO* * 



or Sweet Quarters 

-^ - LAND O' 
Ago LAKES 

00 



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69 



wm« THIS CO«K>N ANO AN ADDITION Al $7 50 OR 
MORE PURCHASI Coupon good at onv 

. - Oovtdion'iSupermoiltetthruNov 20,1W2 AtmH 

\0 one coupon portomlly.' 

No. 3 



A 
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Sliced to Order Carar>do 

Genoa Salami 

Steed to Order Impof ted Switzertond 

Swiss Cheese 

Sliced to Order Foodtown 

Wide Bologna 

Sliced to Order Stella Slicing 

Provoione 

Sliced to Order Foodtown 

Braunschweiger 

Cut to Order 

He De France Brie 

By The Piece Armoiir Casserta 

Pepperoni 

Cut to Order Wispride 

Cheddar Spread 

Sliced to Order Swift 

Hard Salami 

Sliced to Order Carando 

Alpino Hot Ham 




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"; e" WiK^ '-^«'^ '^ fypoorap*^,#rton *V. r^.^ tt>r rK^ to Nrt^t quant.t«^ 



Color Film Processing — ^ 

$349 



12 
Exposure ron 



fvA 



24 
Exposure roll' 



20 S099fEach \^ 
Exposure ro« A | Reprint IT 





Sharon Tufano and Craig Brown 




ment Corp. in Hopewell 
TQw»»hip. Her husband is 
«ilkpl«iiyed by Merrill Lynch in 
•Princeton. 

After a wedding trip to St. 
Thomas, the couple will live in 
Ewing Township. 

Cooper-Twomey. Donna M. 
Twomey, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Cornelius Twomey of 
Federal City Road, Penn- 
ington, to James C. Cooper, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. 
Cooper of Hopewell; 
November 6 in St. Alphoiisus 
Church, Hopewell, the Rev. 
Frederick Clancy officiating. 

The bride and groom are 
graduates of Hopewell Valley 
Central High School and 
Mercer County Vocational 
Technical School. Mr. Cooper 
is employed by Hahn Elec- 
trical Service in Skillman, and 
Mrs. Cooper by the Village 
Beauty Salon in Pennington. 

Following a honeymoon in 
St. Maarten, the couple will 
live in Ewing. 



McIlwain-MacPherson. 
Rhonda L. MacPherson, 
dfTitghter of Mf'. and Mrs. 
Ronakl M. MacPherson of 
Grovers Mill, to James B. 
Mcllwain, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
William C. Mcllwain Jr. of 
Columbus, N.C. ; November 13 
in the Windsor Chapel, Dutch 
Neck, the Rev. David Morgan, 
pastor, officiating with the 
Rev. Nancy Morris, sister of 
the bridegroom. 

Mrs. Mcllwain was 
graduated from Princeton 
High School and the Universi- 
ty of Richmond, Va., where 
she is a sales support 
representative with the Bur- 
roughs Corporation. Her hus- 
band was graduated from 
Greenwich High School and 
Guilford College. He is assis- 
tant director of admissions at 
the University of Richmond. 

After a wedding trip to the 
Leeward Islands in the Carib- 
bean, the couple will live in 
Richmond. 



•I 1 



l& 



.s 



La Cuisine 

Gourmet Takeout & Catering 
Api^ealing appetizers, exciting entrees, seductive 
desserts, bright breads, salads, picnics and sumptuous 
specialties all personally and professionally prepared 
on our premises. 

On the Patio 183C Nassau Street 
Tue.-Sat. 9-7; Sun. 9-5 924-7687 



ENGAGEMENTS 



; Brown-Buck. Nancy C. P. 
::Brown, daughter ot Mr. and 
^ifrs. Charles J. Bfown of 
^dunond, Va., to Nomian-H. 
'Buck, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Alexander K. Buck of Pro- 
vince Line Road and Hobe 
Sound, Fla. 

Miss Brown is a graduate of 
St. Catherine's School in Rich- 
mond and expects to graduate 
in December from the Univer- 
sity of Virginia. Mr. Buck is a 
graduate of Princeton Day 
School and Hobart College. He 
is with Elagle Income Manage- 
ment, dealer/broker in 
government securities in 
Boston. 

The wedding is planned for 
April 9. 



Tafaao-Brown. Sharon 
Tufano, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph Tufano of 
Opossum Road, Skillman, to 
Craig W. Brown of Belle 
Mead, son of Mrs. Marion 
Brown of Belle Mead and 




Peter Brown of Skillman. 

The couple are graduates Of 
Montgomery High School. 
Miss Tufano is employed by 
Firestone Library at 
Princeton University, and her 
fiance is attending Trenton 
State College. 

They are planning a May, 
1984, wedding. 



ENGAGEMENTS 

Starkey-Wood. Emily B. 
Wood, daughter of Dr. and 
Mrs. James E. Wood 3rd of 
Bryn Mawr, Pa, to Samuel B. 
Starkey, son of Mrs. Austin C. 
Starkey of The Great Road, 
Bay Head and Gulf stream, 
Fla. ; November 13 in the Bryn 
Mawr Presbyterian Church, 
the Rev. Dr. David B. Water- 
mulder officiating. 

The bride is a telecom- 
munications analyst. She 
graduated from the Agnes Ir- 
win School in Philadelf^ia and 
the University of Penn- 
sylvania. Her husband, a cor- 
porate bond analyst at 
Salomon Bros, in New York 
City, was graduated from The 
Lawrenceville School and 
Lake Forest College. 



Shopper's Alert 



Drake-Bnrdette. Lori 
Burdette, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ben Burdette of Lewis 
Brook Road, Pennington, to 
Chris Drake, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. George Drake of 
Hopewell; November 6 at St. 
James Catholic Church, Penn- 
ington, the Rev. James Mc- 
Connell officiating. 

Mrs. Drake, a graduate of 
James Madison University in 
Virginia, is employed by 
Mobil Research & Develop- 

Nancy Brown 




OCow thai 9'oe qoiien your atienUon, J'cf/iAe lo I'n- 
irocfuce uou lo our new section which we call ihe 

^ ^ Snoop Coop 

Jfousecf in ihis exciting pari of our lower /eoe/ you 
will find furniture ancf accessories that are either 
cfiscontinuecfy one of a Aincf, or have Seen here Just too 
lony. 

Uocfay, everyone is loomny for (fua/ity merchandise 
at afforcfab/e prices, you if find it here. 

Stop in and Browse. SJt's very possio/e that you wi/I 
find just what you* oe Seen /ooAiny for. 

* ^ Snoop Goop * ' items are aoai/ao/e on a cashy 
XJisa or JKaster Card oasis. 

jtfope Uo See ^ou XJery Soon 



THE RUG & FURNITURE MART 



and 



IVY MANOR SHOWROOMS 

Princeton Shopping Center 921 -91 00 or 921 -8292 

Beautiful Tilings for Gracious Living" 



^vnt 11 1 III! ■Il l i i ■ B ■ * ivf r rr B i T H » > ' n r> >-* 



CALENDAR 

Of The Week 



Wednesday, November 17 

10:30 a.m.: Readings Over 
Coffee, Dr. Donald Ecroyd; 
Public Librarj'. 

4:30 p.m.: Reading, Joyce 
Carol Gates ; 101 McCormick 
Hall, Princeton campus. 

7:30 p.m.: Shaw's "Major 
Barbara," speech depart- 
ment, Princeton Seminary, 
directed by Karl Light; 
Campus Center, Princeton 
Seminary. Also on Thursday 

8 p.m.: League of Women 

Voters, Unit on State and 

Local Government, Mary 

^ Jacobs Library, Washington 

Road, Rocky Hill. 

P p.m.: Overeaters Anony- 
mous; Princeton House, 
Herrontown Road. 

8 p.m.: Lecture, John Young, 
audio-visual specialist in 
multimedia show sponsored 
by Friends of Princeton High 
School Library; Princeton 
High School auditorium. 

8 p.m.: Play, "The Sty of the 
Blind Pig," by Phillip H. 
Dean, Crossroads Theatre; 
320 Memorial Parkway, New 
Brunswick. Also on Friday 
and Saturday at 8, and on 
Sunday at 3 (final per- 
formance). 

8 p.m.: Public Lecture, 
"Limited Nuclear War," Dr. 
Frank von Hippel, senior 
research physicist, Prince- 
ton University; Hickman 
Hall, Douglass College 
campus, New Brunswick. 

8 p.m.: Nuclear Weapons 
Freeze Meeting; Trinity 
Church. 

8 p.m.: Dance-at-McCarter, 
The Feld Ballet; McCarter 
Theatre. 

Thursday, November 18 

7:30-9:30 p.m.: Open House. 
Princeton University Obser 



vatory; Peyton Hall, Ivy 
Lane. Lecture at 8 on "A 
Billion Suns, or the Galaxy 
We Live In, " Robert H. Lup- 
ton, graduate student. 

8 p.m.: Princeton Community 
Orchestra; The Band Room, 
Princeton High School. 

8 p.m.: Maya Angelou, author 
of "I Know How the Caged 
Bird Sings," speaking at 
Trenton State College 
Student Center. 

8 p.m.: Forum on U.S. 
Foreign Policy Toward Latin 
America Studies Program, 
and Lawrence Birns, 
director of the Council on 
Hemispheric Affairs; Whig 
Hall. 

8 p.m.: Nuclear Arms Convo- 
cation Lecture, "No First 
Use and A Nuclear-Free 
Europe," John Mear- 
sheimer. University of 
Chicago, and Peter Zimmer- 
man, Louisiana State 
University ; 50 McCosh Hall. 

8 p.m.: Borough Zoning 
Board; Borough Hall. 

8:30 p.m.: Sondheim musical, 
"Merrily We Roll Along," 
Triangle Club; 185 Nassau 
Street. Also on Friday and 
Saturday (final per- 
formance). 

8:30 p.m.: Shakespeare's "As 
You Like It," Theatre 
Intime; Murray Theater. 
Also on Friday and Saturday 
(final performance). 

Friday, Noveml>er 19 

12:30 p.m.: Museum Talk, 
"Animals, Plants, Topo- 
graphies in Drawings from 
the Holy Roman Empire," 
Lee Hendrix, graduate 
student; Princeton 

University Art Museum. 

1-3 p.m.: YWCA Artisans 
Guild, Hope Atlee demon- 
strating smocking 
techniques, including 
"sacking"; YM-YWCA.Paul 
Robeson Place. 

7:30 p.m.: Princeton Univer- 
sity Jazz Ensemble with the 
Dartmouth College Jazz 
Ensemble; Alexander Hall. 

8 p.m.: Nuclear Weapons Con- 



vocation, Randall Forsberg 
of Institute for Defense and 
Disarmament Studies, 
debating the Nuclear Freeze 
Resolution with an opponent 
of the Freeze; 50 McCosh. 

8 p.m.: Play, "An Almost 
Perfect Person," Pennington 
Players; Play bam, Franklin 
Avenue at Route 31, Pen- 
nington. Also on Saturday, 
and at 7:30 Sunday (final 
performance). 

8 p.m.: Folk Music Society 
Concert, U. Utah Phillips; 
YM-YWCA, Paul Robeson 
Place. 

8 p.m.: Concert, Benjamin 
Britten's "Noye's Fludde," 
Nassau Presbyterian Church 
choirs directed by Kenneth 
Kelley; Nassau Church, 61 
Nassau Street. Also on 
Saturday at 8 and on Sunday 
at4. 

8 p.m.: Thornton Wilder's 
"Skin of Our Teeth," Prince- 
ton Day School Drama Club; 
Princeton Day School, The 
Great Road. Also on 
Saturday. 

Saturday, November 20 

10 a.m. -4 p.m.: The Craft 
Woman's Marketplace; YM- 
YWCA, Paul Robeson Place. 

10:30 a.m.: Soccer, Dart- 
mouth vs. Princeton; Bed- 
ford Field. 

1:30 p.m.: Football, Dart- 
mouth vs. Princeton; 
Palmer Stadium. 

8 p.m.: Concert, Gary U.S. 
Bonds; Dillion Gymnasium. 

8 p.m.: Scottish Country 
Dancers; Murray-Dodge 
Hall. 

8 D.m.: Rutgers Wind 
Ensemble: Nicholas Music 
Center, Douglass College, 
New Brunswick. 

8:30 p.m.: concert, Geoffrey 
Michaels, violin, Marina 
Frenkel. piano; Woolworth 
Center, Princeton campus. 

Sunday, November 21 

3 p.m. : Concert, The Little 
Orchestra of Princeton, 
Portia Sonnenfeld, con- 
ducting. Su zanne Mead, cello 



soloist; Princeton High 
School Auditorium. 
3 p.m.: Slide lecture present- 
ation on The Development of 
Western Music; South 
Brunswick Public Library. 
Registration requested, (201) 
821-8224. 

3 p.m.: Museum Break Talk, 
"Animals, Plants and Topo- 
graphies in Drawings from 
the Holy Roman Empire," 
Lee Hendrix. sraduate 
student; Princeton Univer- 
sity Art Museum. 

4 p.m.: Lecture, Dr. Lewis 
Thomas; Princeton Day 
School. Benefit for The 
Princeton Friends of Thir- 
teen. 

7 p.m.: Organ Concert, Iso- 
bel Woods; Princeton 
University Chapel. 

7:30 p.m.: Hockey, Yale vs. 
Princeton; Baker Rink. 

Monday, November 22 

8 p.m.: Joint Commission on 
Aging; Borough Hall. 

8 p.m.: Borough Council, 
hearing on PCH appeal; 
Borough Hall. 

Tuesday, November 23 

Noon: Pre-concert lecture by 
John Ellis, chairman, 
Lawrenceville School music 
department, on program to 
be performed by N.J. 
Symphony Orchestra 
Saturday; Art People's 
Center, 102 Witherspoon 
Street. Tea and coffee 
available at 11:30. 

7:30 p.m.: International Folk 
Dancing, Princeton Folk 
Dance Group; Riverside 
School. Beginners welcome, 
instruction provided at 
beginning of evening. 

8 p.m.: Joint Recreation 
Board; Valley Road building 
meeting room. 

Wednesday, November 24 

7:30 p.m.: Jim Scott, 
guitarist, singer and com- 
poser; Eatery Amulette 
Restaurant Coffeehouse. 



LOVE 2 TRAVEL 

Windsor Plaza 

Princcton-Hightstown Rd 

Princeton Junction 




iSl^^i!^ 






IS 



o 

< 

m 

S 



S 

M 











'^-^^%:^K^^ 



V 






For Professional Installation Call 



924-0166 




Continued on Next Page 






REDDING'S 

PLUMBING and HEATING 

234 NASSAU STREET PRINCETON. NE\A/ JERSEY 08540 

N.J. LICENSE trsaoo 



HOBBIES - MODELS 



II I 



Nassau H 
& Crafts 








142 Nassau St. Princeton, N.J. 

6099242739 

MASTER CHARGE VIS* 

AMERICAN EXPRESS 




Marklin Trains— L.G.B.— Lionel 
Baclcmann H-0 and N— Rio Cars 

Fischertechnik— Capsela 

Burago Cars— Games— Lauri (Early 

Learning Materials)— Corgi 

Solido Cars— Chemistry Sets 

Lego Sets— Car Racing Sets 

Microscopes and Telescopes 

X-Acto and Dremel Tool Sets 




Christmas 
Lay away s 



WARGAMING BQARDGAMING 
& MILITARY MINIATURES 



Christmas 
Lay away s 



% 



CM 

CO 



UJ 

> 
O 

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< 
o 

(0 
Ul 

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o 

Ul 



YOUNG PEOPHE^SCmENDAR 

Wednesday. Nov. 17: 3:30 p m.: Storytime for school aged 
children with film, Rocky Hill Library. 

Thursday, Nov. 18: 7:30 p.m.: Film, "Shadow Catcher," 
about North American Indian thought and custom by Ed- 
ward Curtis, filmmaker ^nd anthropologist; Rocky Hill 
Library. 



Friday, Nov. 19: 

children with film; 



1:30 p.m.: Storytime for preschool 
Rocky Hill Library. 



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7 p.m.: Children's Theater, "The Pied Piper"; Kelsey 
Theatre, Mercer County Community College, West Wind- 
sor. Also on Saturday and Sunday at 12:30 and 3. 

Saturday. Nov. 20: 11 a.m.: Museum Talk for Children, 
"Darkroom," John Burkhalter, museum docent; Princeton 
University Art Museum. 

Wednesday, Nov. 24: 3:45 p.m.: Storytime for school aged 
children with film; Rocky Hill Library. 



Calendar 

Continued trom Preceding Page 



Also at 9: 30 and 11:30. 
J 8 p.m.: Thornton Wilder's 
g "The Skin of Our Teeth," 
Princeton Day School Drama 
Club; Princeton Day School, 
The Great Road. 
8 p.m.: Overeaters Anony- 
mous; Princeton House, 
Herrontown Road. 

Thursday. November 25 

Thanksgiving Day 
11 a.m.: Community Thanks- 
giving Service; Princeton 
University Chapel. 



M 



WbherB. 



owe 



he. 



Jhsurers •Recdtors 
Established 1885 

1000 H«irontown Rd. 

Princ«ton 

•09-024-0095 



Friday, November 26 

7th Annual Dart's Mill Arts & 
Crafts Fair; Route 523, 
Dart's Mill. $1 contribution to 
Dart's Mill Day Care Center. 
Also on Saturday and Sun- 
day. 

12:30 p.m.: i^rt Museum 
general tour; Princeton 
University Art Museum. Also 
on Sunday at 3. 

7:30 p.m : Hockey, Brown vs. 
Princeton. Baker Rink. 

7:30 p.m.: World Folkdance 
Cooperative; 185 Nassau 
Street. 

Saturday, November 27 

7:30p.m.: Dickens' "A Christ- 
mas Carol," McCarter 
Theatre Company; 

McCarter Theatre. 

8 p.m.: Basketball, Bucknell 
vs. Princeton. 

8 p.m.: Scottish Country 
Dancers; Murray-Dodge 
Hall. 

8:30 p.m.: New Jersey 
Symphony Orchestra, 
Thomas Michalak, con- 
ductor, Annie Fischer, 
piano; War Memorial 
Auditiorium, Trenton. 



Haagen Dazs 

Ice Cream Shoppe 
of Princeton 



'.-r.'.-^-r-" 'c \-SDOor ■ -^t 



Order Your 

Thanksgiving Turkey 

NOW 



This Thanksgiving, 
try turkey for dessert! 
An ice cream turkey! 

Open until 3:00 p.m. on Thanksgiving 
33 Witherspoon & Spring Sts. 

11:30-11 Sun-Thurs 

11:30-12 Fri& Sat 921-1160 



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Cousins extends warm holiday greetings to all 

our friends. For your dining pleasure, we suggest 

the following... 

Latour Beaujulals Villagas 79 $ 5.85 

Louis Martini Cabarnat Sauvlgnon '78 $ 6.90 

Jordan Cabamet Sauvlgnon '78 $1 7.50 

Heltz Cab9rnat Sauvlgnon '77 $14.35 

Vantana Chardonnay '81 $18.15 

Parducci Chardonnay '80 $ 8.25 

Lateur C(Mrdonnay '79 $ 8.85 

Sutter Home WMte ZInfandel '81 $ 5.75 

Sutter Home Antador ZInfandel $ 8.55 



Emmets Irish Cream Liqueur 

750 ml $8.99 

Th9 fresh taatB of Balhys at 

h^ th* prtea. 


Kahlua Coffee Liqueur 

750 ml $12.99 
To complete any holiday meal. 



Cash & Carry • Free Delivery and Friendly Service 
No discount on Sate Items • Limited supply on Sale lleme 




A Sign, Too Late 

To The Editor of Town Topics : 

When the Township Com- 
mittee writes its letter to the 
county urging that barriers be 
erected to limit the height of 
vehicles using the Harrison 
Street bridge, it should take 
account of why the previous 
barriers did not work. 

In conjunction with these 
barriers, the County put up 
big, bold signs advising 
drivers to detour if they did 
not meet the clearance limits. 
TTie hanging barriers are long 
since gone, but the signs are 
still there for anyone to see. 

What they show is that 
drivers would be past the 
suggested turn-offs before 
they could read the signs and 
react to them. No wonder 
trucks didn't heed them. 
Instead of backing up 
(probably against on-coming 
traffic), they just went on 
through. The result was 
almost daily replacement of 
the barriers until the County 
finallly gave up (but they 
never moved the signs.) 

Let's hope that the road 
engineers show better 
judgement in designing the 
signs and barriers this time - 
before it is too late for 
Harrison Street traffic. 

JEROME KURSHAN 
73 Random Rd 



^«ji Announcing "m. 

the Forest Jewelers 

Guest Artisan Series. 

November 20 and 27 



The Forest Jewelers Guest Artisan Series will 
feature the work of two of the more giftecd young 
artisans in jewelry today. - 

On November 20. Lorraine Licciardello's unique 
designs in gold, silver, precious and semi-precious stones 
will be on display and available for purchase. 

On November 27. Forest Jewelers hosts Danish 
craftsman Gunnar Agerholm. Casting from hand carved 
wax in Sterling silver and gold, Gunnar creates rerhark- 
ably beautiful jewelry. 

And we'll have a drawing for a beautifully accurate 
Pulsar watch. To enter, just print your name and phone 
number on the back of this ad, bring it to Forest 
ewelers on either date and , - : ,,_, 
drop it in the box. 

Good luck and enjoy 
our shows. There's more 
to come.". . in the Forest. : n iss.iu sr . , • f , • n ^MQ,.v:4l3b 



Niss.iu Sr 



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from M.31 up 



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1 42 Nassau Street, Princeton 924-2739 

OPEN SUNDAYS & EVENINGS 



Topics of the Town 

Continued from Page 12 

Items to be auctioned offer 
an array of choices. Among 
them are a ghder flight over 
Princeton in spring; Barbara 
and Paul Sigmund serving 
drinks and hors d'oeuvres at 
your cocktail party for 50; 
architect Harrison S. Fraker 
giving your house a walk- 
through energy audit; and a 
weekend in a Greenwich 
Village apartment. 

Also available will be a 
selection of tickets to cultural 
and sporting events, an array 
of holidav treats and fine 
wines and an edible ginger- 
bread house. A Peruvian 
portrait jug bearing the 
likeness of Fidel Castro might 
^rjice your library shelf, as 
might a fossil donated by 
Princeton University geology 
professor Erling Dorf . 

Co-chairmen of the party 
are Mrs. Robert E. Clancy, 
Mrs. Charles L. Jaffin and 



Mrs. Fran E. Johnson. Fur- 
ther information is available 
by calling the Watershed 
offices at 737-3735. 



ISRAELI TO SPEAK 
On Lebanon. An Israeli army 
officer, Itsvi Zores, will speak 
on "Lebanon: Occupation and 
Opposition" on Monday at 8 in 
McCosh 46 on the Princeton 
University campus. 

Mr. Zores is a represen- 
tative of the group Yesh Gvul 
( Enough is Enough !), an anti- 
war organization established 
by Israeli army officers who 
served in Lebanon and refused 
to go back for subsequent 
service because of their op- 
position to the war. The group 
demands unconditional, total, 
immediate withdrawal of 
Israel from Lebanon. 



Emergency Committee on 
Lebanon. His appearance here 
is being sponsored by Prince- 
ton University's Emergency 
Committee on Lebanon. 

For more information, call 
Tamara, 921-1136, or Steven, 
924-9446. 



Mr. Zores recently served in 
an Israeli prison because of 
his stand against the war and 
is on a speaking tour spon- 
sored by the National 



RUG BRAIDING CLASSES 
At YWCA. Shirley Chaikin 
will teach rug braiding in six 
Friday morning sessions star- 
ting in January at the YWCA. 
The class is described as an 
"unadvertised special" by the 
Adult Department of the 
YWCA. Participants will learn 
the craft of rug braiding from 
choosing materials and 
designing to completing a 
small rug. Ms Chaikin has 
worked with the Mercer 
Museum and other regional 
groups 

For further information call 
Liz Adams, Adult Program 
Director, at 924-557L 



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ORDER now: 



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RjmpkinCnifion 

Chocx)la+e Walnut 
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Tues.-Sat. 9-7; Sun. 9-5 924-7687 

on the patio 183C Nassau St. 




63 Palmer Square West 

Princeton. NJ 08540 

(609) 924-5635 



CPR COURSES PLANNED 
By Red Cross. The 
Princeton Chapter, American 
Red Cross, will conduct 
courses in cardiopulmonary 
resuscitation (CPR) on Tues- 
day, November 30, Friday, 
December 3, and Friday, 
December 17. 

The classes will meet from 
8:30 to 4 at chapter head- 
quarters, 182 Harrison Street 
North. For further informa- 
tion or reservations, call the 
Princeton Chapter of the Red 
Cross at 924-2404. 



SMOKEOUT SCHEDULED 

By Cancer Society. The 
Great American Smokeout, an 
annual one-day event spon- 
sored by the American Cancer 
Society to get as many 
Americans as possible to quit 
smoking for a day, is taking 
place this Thursday. 

Radio Station WHWH has 
teamed up with the Mercer 
County Unit of the ACS to pro- 
mote the event. To aid 
smokers who wish to become 
ex-smokers, the radio station 
is presenting 10-minute spots 
following the 7 pm. evening 
news in which a reformed 
30-year smoker discusses five 
major crises most smokers 
face while quitting and how to 
cope with them. Among these 
crises are weight gain, ner- 
vousness and tension, situa- 
tional urges to smoke, 
presence of other smokers, 
and an emotional crisis which 
prompts taking up smoking 
again. 

Tips on how to cope with 
these factors will be reviewed 
periodically on Thursday, the 
day of the Great American 
Smokeout. The American 
Cancer Society urges every 
smoker to give up cigarettes 
for at least 24 hours and hopes 
non-smoking will t)e enjoyed 
so much it will become perma- 
nent. 

For further information call 
the ACS at 394-5000. 



Continued on Next Page 



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SENIOR ACTIVITIES CALENDAR 

Information Provided by Senior Resource Center, 
Spruce Circle, 924-7108 

Wednesday, Nov. 17: 1 a.m.-noon: Food Coop open 
in Art People's Center basement; 102 Witherspoon 
Street. Also on Thursday. 

10:30 a.m.: MCCC course in Biblical heritage; Mt. 
Pisgah Church. 

10:30 a.m.: Readings Over Coffee; Public Library. 

1 1 a.m.: Vim exercise class; YM-YWCA. 
Thursday, Nov. 18: Noon: AARP Covered Dish 
Lunch, the Rev. Robert Beringer speaker; YM-YWCA 
building. 

I p.m.: Pottery; Redding Circle. 

5-9 p.m.: Thanksgiving Dinner; Princeton High 
School. $6. Transportation provided if necessary. To 
register call 921-9480. 

Friday, Nov. 19: 11 a.m.: Vim exercise class; YM- 
YWCA building. 

12:30 p.m.: Friday Club; YWCA. Frances Slade, 
director of Princeton Pro-Musica. will perform. 
Saturday, Nov. 20: Noon: Luncheon provided by All 
Saints' Church; Redding Circle. 
Sunday, Nov. 21: 3 p.m.: Little Orchestra of Princeton; 
Princeton High School Auditorium. $3 for senior 
citizens. 

Monday, Nov. 22:' 9:20 a.m.: MCCC course in pop 
culture; Jewish Center. 

10:30 a.m.: Dance/Movement; Senior Resource 
Center. 

10:30 a.m.: MCCC course in Biblical heritage; Mt. 
Pisgah Church. 

I I a.m.: Vim exercise class; YM-YWCA building. 
8 p.m.: Commission on Aging; Borough Hall. 

Tuesday, Nov. 23: 10 a.m.-noon: Food Coop open in 
Art People's Center basement; 102 Witherspcon 
Street. Also on Wednesday and Thursday. 

I p.m.: MCCC course in drama; Senior Resource 
Center. 

7:30 p.m.: Bingo; Senior Resource Center. 

Wednesday, Nov. 24: 10:30 a.m.; MCCC course in 
Biblical heritage; Mt. Pisgah Church. 

II a.m.: Vim exercise class; YM-YWCA building. 

Thursday, Nov. 25: Thanksgiving Day. 




Topics of the Town 

Continued from Page 17 

ONE MORE COLLINS? 

Board Sets Nov. .lO. Keeping 
green areas green, malcing 
way for fire engines and re- 
playing traffic survey 
statistics occupied the Plan- 
ning Board and Hi, audience 
Monday at the third, and 
possibly penultimate, evening 
of hearings on Collins 
Development's plans to ex- 
pand Palmer Square. 

Hearings will continue Tues- 
day, November 30, from 7:30 
p.m. in the Valley Road 
meeting room. 

"I can't get any equipment 
at all in there," explained Fire 
Chief Raymond Wadsworth, 
referring to the interior part of 
the deck that has been planned 
for the area roughly behind 
Toto's Market Collins plans 
townhouses there. 

Instead of steps leading to 
the deck, Chief Wadsworth 



asked, how about a ramp wide 
enough to take a mini- 
pumper? Architect Do Chung 
wasn't sure there was enough 
space for a ramp. 



I 
I 
I 



Don't be the turkey... 

WE'VE got the WINES 

to go with your turkey!! 



Sebastian! Chablis 4 litre $7.99 

Claude Mercier Blanc 1 5 litre $4.99 

French Rabbit (Blanc or Red) 750 mi $2.99 

Coderniu Extra Dry or Brut 750 mi $4.99 

—All Prices Include N.J. Sales Tax- 
No cr«dit cards or cr^arge» • Quantities Limiisd • Pric«s good Vvougn NovemtMr 24 

KINGSTON WINE & LIQUORS 

52 Main Sireat • Kingston, N.J. 
(609) 924H)941 



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Built-in Fire Truck. Regar- 
ding the fire-engine problem, 
Chief Wadsworth was told that 
the deck could have "hose 
cabinets" for storage of fire 
hoses, and a fire "station" 
with pump inside, providing a 
kind of permanent, built-in 
fire truck. 

The chief expresssed deep 
concern about water pressure. 
He explained that it would 
take an alarmingly long time 
to get hose out of the cabinets 
and connected to a hydrant. 
He pointed out that plans do 
not show how many hydrants 
would be installed along Paul 
Robeson Place. Mr. Chung 
said he and the chief together 
could decide how many are 
needed. 

"I'd like a modicum of pro- 
gress tonight." stated 
Borough Mayor Robert W. 
Cawley, who sits on the Plan- 
ning Board. He suggested the 
board ask Collins for a given 
amount of pressure plus ac- 
cess for mini-pumpers. 

But that was not the board's 
mood. Chief Wadsworth and 
Mr. Chung will confer and 
return to the board at its next 
meeting. 

Grass Roots Petition. A peti- 
tion bearing 260 signatures 
was presented by Alan Frank, 
who described it as "an ab- 
solute grass-roots situation" 

It asks the board to keep 
Collins from constructing a 
building across the grass from 
the present post office — the 
"lantern" building, so called 
because it was once shown as 
glass, although now it seems 
to be brick — and to make sure 
the post office stays where it 
is, and isn't moved north to 

Continued on Pag* K 



COMPLETE SELECTION OF 

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Mon-Thur 10-7; Fri 9-8; Sat 10-7 




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introducing the Security MoneyMom Account 



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"Take the Shoe Patti to walk your way" with famous 
and a ffordable brands for the entire family. 

THE 
SHOE PATH 

Princeton Shopping Center 

924-0110 

Ample free parking 

f-^ ji open h^on. Sat. 10-5 30; 
rSLtli Frm until 8 30 pm. 




The Mon^i^Mov^r Account 
earns nnoney like a nnoney market 
fund, without the bothersome 
restrictions of a money market 
fund. And you can open 
your MoneyMover for as 
little as $2,000. 

Here's how your 
Security MoneyMover 
works. 

Everyday the 
MoneyMover scans your 
current checking balance 
and automatically 'moves' 
any money above $2,000 
into a Repurchase 
Agreement that pays 
money market rates. 

But unlike most 



money market funds which 
require at least a $500 minimum 
for deposits and withdrawals, you 

Rate Hotline: 800-257-5370 



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Security Savings and Loan Please send me more information 

MAIL TO: 

Security Savings and Loan /MoneyMover Department 
P.O. Box 709/Vineland, N| 08360 




Address 



state 



Zip 



Home Phone 



can write checks for any amount 
on the balance in your MoneyMover 
Account And there are no service 
charges as long as you main- 
tain a combined balance 
of$I.OOO. 

You can open your 
MoneyMover Account by 
filling out the coupon or 
stopping by any Security 
office. Or call collect: 
609-629-8886 and ask 
for the MoneyMover 
Department 

The new MoneyMover 
Account from Security 

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Funds up to $2,000 are insured by the FS L 1 C Funds over 32,000 in your Repurchase 
Agreement are not insured but are backed by U.S. Government Securities, Investments in 
Repurchase Agreements are limited to $99 900 



BURLINGTON COUNTY DIVISION 



FIRST FEDEHMSAVlNGS&lJCW^ 
OF BURLINGIDN COUNTY 



VINELAND Dn/iSION 



MAIN OFFICE: 818 Landis Airenue. VlneUnd, Ni 



Cinnaminson 
Rt 1 30 and 
Meeting House Road 

Palmyra 

Broad Street and 

Garfield Avenue 

Oelran 

206 Rt 1 30 



Medford 
Taunton and 
TUckerton Road 

■febemacle 

Rt 206 at 

Medford l-akes Road 



Vineland 

1 1 64 Landis Avenue 
1771 Lincoln Avenue 
3569 E Landis Avenue 

Hammonton 

Hammonton Shopping Plaza 
Broadway & White Horse Pike 

Absecon 

610 Mill Road 



Williamstown 

Willtamstown Shopping Center 
Rt 322 & Main street 

Marmora 

Wayside Village Shopping Center 

TUckahoe Road 

Ocean City 

921 West Avenue 

Newfield 

6 North West Boulevard 



PRINCETON/ HIGHTSTOWN DIVISION 

P01?MEI?LY HIGHTSTOWN AND 

PRINCETON SAVINGS&LOAN 

ASSOCIAFIONS 




Princeton 

132 Nassau Street 

Somerville 

200 E Mam Street 

Plainsboro 

503 Plainsboro Road 

Hightstown 

104 North Main Street 



Lawrenceville 
243 1 Main Street 

Bedminster 
Lamington Road 

Kingston 

77 Main Street 

East Windsor 

A&P Shopping Center 
Route 1 30 



fecunly 

sflvinGS&iOfin fissoomon i^ 

"What will they think of next?" 



Member FS Lie 



M 



. Topics of the Town . 



I 



Continued Irom Page 18 

CoUins' new office building on 
Hulfish. 



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Mr. Frank, who owns 

Langrock's, declined to say 

who initiated the petition, but 

> said that 20 of the signers were 

merchants. 

He was supported by 
Everett Garretson, owner of 
H.P. Clayton, who told the 
board that a "lantern" op- 
posite the post office would 
completely block the view 
north, for anyone in Tiger 
Park on Nassau. 



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Post Office a Magnet. In ad- 
dition, he said, the present 
post office has "mercantile 
importance," attracting peo- 
ple down from Nassau Street 
and leading them north to 
^ shops in the Square. 
O For the Arts Council, Anne 
•- Reeves asked for "more open 
space for people" instead of 
the lantern. Other than that, 
she said, Collins' plan "is very 
much appreciated" by the 
Arts Council. 



She asked for "public con- 
trol" for major public spaces. 
Present Palmer Square 
owners, she observed, might 
agree to use of open spaces by 
various arts groups, but 
subsequent owners might not. 
Mayor Cawley reminded Col- 
lins that earUer plans had 
showed semi-covered spaces 
for use by art groups, whereas 
this revised plan does not. 

Traffic explanations by 
Georges Jacquemard, for Col- 
lins, were recapitulations fra* 
new board members from 
material presented last year. 




TRAP ROCK HAS PLANS 
To B«ild Road Along Canal. 
The Kingston Trap Rock In- 
dustries wants to close Laurel 
Avenue in Kingston and to 
build a road along the railroad 
right of way by the D & R 
Canal. The road would provide 
access for tnx:ks traveUng 
from the Trap Rock quarry to 
Route L 
Trap Rock Industries will 



CONTEST WINNER: Russel Jones of Twin Rivers 
Drive, East Windsor, is one of ten winners across the 
nation in a Win A Chair contest sponsored by 
Norwegian manufacturers, Ekornes and Westnofa. His 
entry blank from Viking Furniture, 259 Nassau Street, 
was selected at a random drawing held at the Royai 
Norwegian Consulate General in Chicago. By winning, 
he was allowed to pick from Viking any chair and mat- 
ching ottoman which was featured in a "Relax the 
Norwegian Way" brochure. Mr. Jones, holding his 
three-year old son, Courtney, at Viking said that he 
was "very much surprised" when informed he was a 
winner. "My son," he said, "has now decided it's his 
chair." 



present its Kingston Quarry 
Master Plan at a public 
meeting this Thursday at 7:30 
at the Kingston Firehouse. 
The purpose of the meeting is 
to provide an opportunity for 
neighbors to see the plan and 
make comments. 

Trap Rock also presented its 
plans to the Delaware & 



Raritan Canal Commission 
earlier in the week on Tues- 
day . Princeton Regional Plan- 
ning Board members to(^ 
note of the proposal at its 
regular meeting last Monday. 




HOSTESS 
ROBE 

by 
Lucie Ann 

in polyester 

velour. 

Green & Maroon 

petite/small 

med/large 



EDITH'S 

theflneM in quality & service 

30 Nassau St. 

•21*4059 
IIHtet 0:30-6:30 



Princeton Township Mayor 
Winthrop Pike suggested that 
Planning Board members 
may want to attend the 
Kingston meeting and add 
their comments. He said that 
Trap Rock has been quarrying 
under Laurel Avenue for some 
time and now felt the road 
ought to be closed. He added 
that he understood the com- 
pany was interested in making 
a monetary contribution to the 
Commission for park im- 
provements along the Canal in 
exchange for permission to 
build the road along the 
railroad right of way. 

Planning Board member 
Margen Penick pointed out 
that dripping oil from trucks 
traveling along the canal and 
asbestos from their brake lin- 
ings could be a source of pollu- 
tion to the Canal water, which 
is the primary source of drink- 
ing water for Princeton. 



VIKING HAS A WINNER! 

RUSSELL JONES of East Windsor, one of 
ten winners nationwide in a "WIN A 
CHAiR" contest sponsored by the 
Norwegian furniture manufacturers, 
Ekornes and Westnofa, selected a 
Stressless Royale below from Viking Fur- 
niture. (See picture this page.) 



Stressless 
Royale 

Reg. 1295 




Stressless 
Original 

In top grain 
leather 

Reg. 799 



chair & ottoman 



Just two off the many chairs featured 
in our Norwegian Festival brochure 




FURNITURE 



259 Nassau St. Princeton. N. J. 924-9624 

Our Only Location 



Topics of the Town S^^etSeJs' 1„"t5iSi"^.f 

Know Why The Caged Bird 
Sings," will speak Thursday, 
November 18, at 8 in the 
Trenton State College Student 
Center. 

Ms. Angelou's many talents 
include those of singer, 
educator, dancer, historian, 
songwriter and playwright. 
Presently she is writer- 
producer for 20th Century Fox 
TV. 



Continued trom Page 20 

IRS OWE YOU MONEY? 

Checks Undelivered. A 
dozen or so residents — or at 
least former residents — of 
Princeton are on the Internal 
Revenue Service list of 
undelivered refund checks for 
this year. No addresses are 
given; only names and the zip 
code. 

Listed under Princeton are: 
Ji Ping Chao, Jane M. Colon, 
Jane Core, Ira C. Demery, 
Consuelo Derodas, Zoltan 
Domotor, Margaret B. 
McGowan, John A. Rodio, Sue 
A. Stooksberry, Hsueh-Ying 
Teng, Mary L. Thompson and 
Deborah Dortha Walker. 

Two residents of Plainsboro 
— Mary E. Montegna and 
Elizabeth J. Weller — are also 
listed from this area. 



Tickets for the lecture are 
priced at $2 for general ad- 
mission, and 50 cents for 
students. For more in- 
formation, call 771-2264 or 771- 
2467. 



AUTHOR TO SPEAK 
At Trenton State. Maya 



The Classic 
Harry Ballot 




Our handsome, single 
needle, striped dress 
shirt of pure cotton 
Iroadcloth is available in 
blue/white, wine/white 
and tan/white. 

^35.00 




20 Nassau 924-0451 

Mon.-Sat. 9-5:30 



SPECIAL APPEAL SET 
For Israel Social Services. 
The Princeton United Jewish 
Appeal will hold a fund raising 
meeting Sunday from 4-6 at 
the home of FeUce and Alvin 
Gordon, 48 Woods Way. 
Bernard Bonine, a national 
vice president of U.J. A. who 
has recently returned from 
Israel, will discuss the 
economic impact of the war in 
Lebanon on the Israeli people. 

The World Jewish com- 
munity has committed itself to 
raise $300 million for the 
Israel Special Fund to help 
defray the costs of social 
services in Israel. Services 
such as welfare, education, 
and health programs can no 
longer be sustained by the 
Israeli people alone. Prince- 
ton's goal in this "Extra 
Effort" appeal is to raise 
$70,000. 

For more information, 
contact Roz Staras, chairman 
of the Princeton U.J. A. 



NEW PARENTS WELCOME 
At Familyborn Classes. 
Familyborn, A Center for 
Birth and Women's Health, is 
now offering an ongoing series 
of new parenting classes. 

Topics will include such 
concerns as the changing role 
of a couple, what it means 
when the l)aby cries, sibling 
rivalry, and the many 
emotional changes during the 
postpartum period. The 
classes will be lead by Joan 
Cittadino, RN, a director of 
the Infant Resource Center in 
Princeton. 

For further information, 
call Familyborn at 821-6200, 
Monday through Friday, 9-5. 




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LATEST IN COIFFURE FASHIONS 



PERSONALIZED WIG 
CONSULTATION ROOMS 

Precision haircuts 

Permanent waves 

Haircoloring 

Manicures 

Pedicures 

Facials 




<J.a (yolie Coiffure 

Owner: Jolie V^rdanegi 



THE NICKEL PACKAGES WARMTH 

For many years, the specialists at The Nickel have been committed to 
bringing the Princeton area QUALITY, VALUE, FUNCTION and 
SERVICE. We will continue this commitment and we back it up with the 
most comprehensive inventory of outdoor equipment and clothing in the 
area. 

To help you warm up to winter we've put together some warmth packages. 
If you don't need both package items, don't forget your Holiday shopping 
list! You'll find the same top quality and value you've come to expect at The 
Nickel at some warm, winter prices. Get your Nickel's worth NOW through 
NOVEMBER 20th. 




+ 




REG. $117.00 

:Z NOW $97.00 
+ A NICKEL 



WOOLRICH 
WOOL-LINED 
MTN. PARKA 



RAGG WOOL 

CREW NECK 

SWEATER 







+ 



REG. $95.50 

NOW $81.00 
+ A NICKEL 



SIERRA DESIGNS 
60/40 DOWN VEST 



OSA FLANNEL 
SHIRT 



•'% 




.m-'' •, 



+ 




REG. $49.95 

NOW $39.00 
+ A NICKEL 



DUOFOLD 

UNION SUIT 

UNDERWEAR 



ACORN SLIPPER 
SOCKS 



i-V.- 




+ 




REG. $43.50 

~ NOW $32.00 
+ A NICKEL 



WOOLRICH 
CHAMOIS SHIRT 



SKYR 
TURTLENECK 



PRE-SEASON CROSS COUNTRY SKI PACKAGE 

There's no experience like it - cross country skiing! To prepare you for this 
winter's ski experience, we're offering special preseason prices on the basic 
package of SKIS, BINDINGS, BOOTS and POLES. Buy them as a 
package and save 20% or save 10% on individual items. Be ready when the 
snow flies! 



M 

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OFFERS GOOD THROUGH NOVEMBER 20TH 



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THE NICKEL 



830 State Road (Rte. 206) 
Princeton, NJ 08540 

609-924-3001 



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PEOPLE 

In The News 



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Elizabeth Crane, (laughter 
of Mrs. Harold E. Crane Jr. of 
201 Linden Lane, is spending 
the fall semester apprenticed 
to a producing artist in New 
York City as a participant in 
the New York Arts Program 
at the College of Wooster, 
Ohio, where she is a senior. 
The program is designed to 
provide students seriously in- 
terested in communication, 
performing and visual arts, an 
opportunity to experience a 
broad range of arts events. 




Bree Ermentrout, daughter 
<rf Mr. and Mrs. John W. 
Ermentrout of Pennington, 
and Judith Freda, daughter of 
Dr. and Mrs. John C. Freda of 
Monmoutti Junction, have 
entered the freshman class at 
Bryn Mawr College this fall. 
Miss Freda is a graduate of 
Stuart Country Day School, 
and Miss Ermentrout of 
Phillips Academy in Andover, 
Mass. 



Jsaathan F. Tenney. son of 
Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Tenny 
of 168 Hickory Court, directed 
the Vassar College 
Independent Theatre 
production of Arthur Miller's 
"The Creation of the World 
and Other Business," in early 
November. 

Jonathan, now a junior at 
Vassar, is a graduate of 
jPrinceton High School. He 
was also assistant stage 
designer for this production. 



Robert F. Schwartz, of 

Rosedale Road, has been 
named chairman of the board 
of Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Company by the 
company's board of directors. 
Mr. Schwartz, who currently 
serves as vice-chairman, will 
assume his new position on 
February l, 1983, when 
Richard R. Shinn, 

Metropolitan's current 
chairman, retires. 

Mr. Schwartz, who has 
spent his entire career at 
Metropolitan, has served as 
vice-chairman of the board 
and chairman of the board's 
investment committee since 
1980. 



r 



EXTERIOR 

WINDOW 
SHUTTERS 

PONDEROSA PINE or POLYMER 



1 






Choice of Colors 

Prices of Polymer Shutters Start at *28.60 




Mon^H 
7:4S-4:4S 

Sat 
8:00-12.00 



VISA 




• ^ ^ 


rmMM.cMf»]l 


^M^^Kl 



924-004 

194 
Alexander 
Princeton 



DEUVERY AVAILABLE • A FULL SERVICE YARD 



Princeton, Sigurd H. Berven, 
Kenneth R. Hallows. John T. 
O'Neil and Eric A. Postel: 
from Rocky Hill, David 
Bocobo: from Pennington, 
Francis S. Lee: and from 
Hopewell, Adam B. Nathan. 



Three area residents attend- 
ed a meeting of the alumnae 
board of directors at Wilson 
College, Chambersburg, Pa., 
either as Wilson College Club 
representatives or as class 
agents 

They are Isabelle Stouffer, 
49 Palmer Square West; Jana 
Olson Kiefer. 408 Storwood 
Way. Lawrenceville; and 
Jane Ensminger. 5 Pin Oak 
Drive. Lawrenceville. Mrs. 
Ensminger is former presi- 
dent of the alumnae board of 
directors and is currently a 
member of the board of 
trustees. 

In addition, Peggy 
Kilmer. 181 Mt. Lucas Road, 
represented the Wilson Col- 
lege Club during Alumnae 
Council weekend. 



Dr. Henry H. Freedman, 138 

Valley Road, has been elected 
a trustee of the Wilmington 
Del., Medical Center. The 
center provices facilities of 
more than 1000 beds in its four 
division, the Delaware, 
Memorial. Wilmington 
General and Eugene du Pont 
Memorial Hospital. Presently 
under construction is the 780 
bed Southwest Division. 

Dr. Freedman is vice 
president. Research and 
Development, of Stuart 



Pharmaceuticals, a Division 
of Id Americas Inc. and vice 
president of ICI Americas 
Inc., Wilmington, Del. 



Grace Frank, daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. Calvin Calmon of 
Ewing Street has been ap- 
pointed to the dining hall 
committee at Swarthmore 
College where she is currently 
a junior. 



Arlene K. Sindlng of Prin- 
ceton has joined the faculty of 
The Berkeley School of 
Woodbridge as an instructor 
in communications, business 
organization and 

management. 

Ms. Sinding previously held 
teaching positions at The 
Berkeley School of Garret 
Mountain, Bergen Community 
College and Princeton High 
School. ^ 

A graduate of Nutley High 

Continued on Next Page 



People in the News 

Continued trom Preceding Page 

School, she earned a B.A. 
degree from Trenton State 
College and an M.A. degree 
from Rider College. 

She is a member of the New 
Jersey Business Education 
Association and the National 
Council of Teachers of 
English. 



"Mobilizing Capital" by 
Peter J. Bearse has been 
published by Elsevier Science 
Publishing Company of New 
York. The 475 page book 
focuses on a number of in- 
novative approaches that 
have been used to finance 
economic development at the 
regional, state, and local 
levels. Its sections on public- 
private partnership, which 
help to establish the basis for a 
reasoned "supply side" 



economic program based on 
local initiative, are directly 
relevant to any assessment of 
the Reagan Administration's 
"New Federalism." 

Mr. Bearse is a consulting 
economist and president of 
Peter Bearse Associates. 



William H. Behriiiger, M.D., 
has been elected to a three- 
year term on the board of 
medical advisors of the St. 
Lawrence Rehabilitation 



Center. He is also the chair- 
man of the professional 
education committee of the 
Amencan Cancer Society for 
the Mercer County Unit and is 
beginning a term as second 
vice president of that unit and 
as a trustee of the New Jersey 
Division of the American 
Cancer Society. 

Dr. Behringer, whose office 
of otolaryngology (head and 
neck surgery) and facial 
plastic surgery is located at 33 



State Road, has practiced in 
Princeton since 1980. Prior to 
coming to here, he was active 
in the American Cancer 
Society in Wilmington, Del., 
and was chief of 
otolaryngology for six years at 
the Veterans Administration 
Hospital in Wilmington. 



Navy Fire Control 
Technician 2nd Class James 
C. Staples, son of Bruce G. and 
Olive Staples of 4206 Foxrun 



Drive, Plainsboro, recently 
participated in the major 
NATO exercise, "northern 
Wedding-82." He is a 
crewmember aboard the 
guided missile destroyer USS 
Conyngham, homeported in 
Norfolk, Va. 

Conducted in the area 
around Denmark, the exercise 
was designed to test the 
capacity of alliance forces to 
resist aggression in the North 
Atlantic Ocean, Baltic and 
Norwegian Sea areas. 



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Christopher Randall of 
Princeton has been named a 
National Merit Semifinalist at 
The Lawrenceville School. He 
is one of 35 seniors at the 
school who have been named 
semifinalists or commended 
scholars. 

Area seniors who received 
commendation are, from 




• IL1« 



Michelle Pirone, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Pirone 
of The Great Road and a 
junior at Seton Hill College, 
Greensburg, Pa., is spending 
the academic year in France 
under a Rutgers University 
program. She is carrying a 
double major in French 
literature and history and in 
political science. 

Adrienne Scotchbrook 
Anderson of 52 Elm Road, is 
one of five New Jersey women 
who were honored for their 
achievements at the 50th 
annual College Day for high 
school students at Douglass 
College. 

Mrs. Andersmi is a graduate 
of Do<iglass and the first 
woman to earn a master's 
degree in metallurgical 
engineering from Lehigh 
University. She is executive 
director of the New Jersey 
College and University Coali- 
tion on Women's Education. 
She is also vice chair of the 
board of trustees of Rutgers 
University and-«ditor of "Op- 
tions for Women in New 
Jersey, " a directory of career 
services and continuing 
education opportunities. 



MERRILL LYNCH 

PRESENTS 
FINANCIAL DISCUSSIONS 



^<' 



Luncheon meetings will be held on Wednesday, November 24 
at noon in the Merrill Lynch Conference Center at 194 Nassau 
Street. 'vr' 

The topic on November 24 will be "Investments for a Chang- 
ing Economy." Sandwiches and coffee will be served and 
there will be a question and answer period. 



Please contact Audrey Gould at 609-924-7600. Pre-registration 
is required and there will be limited seating. 



Our Foreign Policy. 

When the dollar goes up abroad, 
our prices come down at home. 



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Right now, the dollar is very 
strong in Europe. 

What does this mean? Simply, 
that despite inflation, American 
money buys more in Europe. We 
search out the best buys all over the 
continent, and we're getting a lot 
more for our money than we have 
in years. 

So is everyone else. Including 
our competitors. 

But, unlike everyone else, we 
are passing the savings on to you. 



After all. when our costs go up, 
we raise our prices. We think it's 
only fair to lower our prices when 
our costs go down. 

Which is why, right now, you'll 
find most of our best imported fur- 
niture at truly incredible savings. 

The Workbench Foreign Policy 
— it means treating our customers 
as we would want them to treat us. 
And if everyone had the same pol- 
icy, the world might just be a little 
nicer place. 



Beginning December 1, we will 
no longer include a comparative 
"original price" in promotons of 
our Foreign Policy import prices. 
Since we have not sold this mer- 
chandise at these old higher prices 
for over a year, we feel these com- 
parisons are now irrelevant and 
perhaps misleading. 

We will, however, continue to 
pass along the extra savings on im- 
ports that a strong dollar creates. 






Heather Tamm. age 11, of 328 
Dodds Lane, was the featured 
harp soloist at Carnegie Hall 
on October 31. The occasion 
was the Golden Anniversary 
Feis Winners Concert of the 
United Irish Counties 
Association (rf New York, Inc. 
Heather was the only young 
person from New Jersey and 
the only harpist selected to 
play. 

Her selections included 
"Come My Love," an Irish 
folk Melody, "Allegretto," by 
Franz Josef Hayden, and "No. 
1 Reverie" by Alph. 
Hasselmans. Heather started 
harp instruction in the first 
grade while a student at 
Littlebrook School. She is 
presently a 6th grader at 
Princeton Day School. She 
studies with Mrs. Marjorie 
Mollenauer of Colts Neck and 
has attended harp workshops 
in New York under the 
direction of the harpist 
Mildred Dilling. 




Leaping frogs, motorcycles, 

f iretrucks, flapping ducks 

dancing zebras 

and mucli, much more. 






Christmas 

is fun 

at 

AMBLESIDE 




^ 



Christnas id««« from aroviid the world 

AMBLESIDE 

Gardens & Nursery- 

Rt. 206 ' B»ll« M>ad, N.J. • 201-3S9-8388 • Closed Mondays 



''k 




chair and ottoman 
*229. Ony S29y 



B. 



oak. teak or walnut tall storage as shown 
*396. Orig. $515 



:*i»* m*^ 



oak. teak or walnut storage system as shown 
5459.80 Orig $590 



D. 



side chair 
*39. Orig $60 



arm chair 
*49. Orig $75 



high back swivel chair 
H49. Ong $199 



F. 



iSBMHHHBl^HW 



classic bookcases 

low '75. Orig. $125 wide*99. Orig $170 

(all doors extra) narrow *89. Ong. $145 



A. Our leather chair and matching full 
size ottoman with bentwood beech 
frame and adjustable reclining back. 
Available in dark brown or russet 
patchwork leather 

B. From Scandinavia and made 
exclusively for us. our Tivoli storage 
units in oak. teak or walnut veneers. 
Shown here our handsome tall units, 
with three deep drawers and a glass 
door. Wide unit $149. orig $195: 
Narrow unit $119. orig. $150: 3 wide 
deep drawers $89. for set. orig. $120 
for set: glass door $39. orig $50. 



C. More Tivoli storage from 
Scandinavia in oak. teak or walnut 
veneers. We've shown only a few — 
there are many other coordinated 
pieces. As shown: 2 wide base cabinets 
$67. ea. orig $85 ea.: 2 wide top 
cabinets $59. ea orig. $80 ea. : 4 wide 
drawers $27.95 ea orig. $35 ea.: glass 
doors $59. orig. $75; double doors 
$37. orig. $45. 

D. Our best-selling classic chairs have a 
1 -piece solid steel tube frame, triple - 
plated hand-polished chrome finish and 
satin -smooth cane seats and backs. 
Natural, walnut or black lacquer. 



E. Our high back lounge chair swivels 
on a brown steel base. Choose from dark 
brown or russet patchwork leather both 
with blonde bentwood beech frames. 

F. Our classic Danish bookcases, made 
of selected oak. teak or walnut veneers. 
Choose from 2 different heights and 
widths, doors and extra shelves. 
Shown: 41h x 35V2w x 12'/2"d $75 orig. 
$125; 76h X 2iy4w x MVi^ $89. orig. 
$145: 76h x 35(/2w x 12V/'d $99. orig, 
$170: double doors for wide cases $33 
orig $55: single door for narrow case 
$19 orig. $35. 



•OPEN 8UWDAYS— SENO »2 FOR OUR 40 9MK. CATALOOUE 

NEW STORES: •SHORT HIUS 688 Mnrn» Turnpike. Short Hills N J O707H (201 1 4«j7 42,30 'WIUXJW GROVE Willow Grove Paik Mall, 2,500 Moretond Road Willow Grow Pa 1^090(215)659 4875 | 



•MANHATTAN . — 

470 Park Ave S 1320 3fd Awe 

Cot 32nd Si Bel 

NYC 



•BROOKLYN 

(jOChnlonSl 



• LONG ISLAND . 



2091 Bwnr 60 CHnlon Si 1457 Northern Blvd 

75 1 76 Si Bet 72 i 73 St Nr Montague St On the Miracle Mile 

NYC NYC Btooklyn.NY Manhanet. NY 

21?! 481 S454 (2121 753 1 17,3 1212: 724 3670 121211)25 1616 ,516)627 8774 



2075 SmMh 
Hwen Plaza 
LltKGrove.NY 
lWt«79-86a6 



• WESTCHESTER 

845 Central Aw 
Scartdale NY 
(9141 472 5585 



ALBANY „ 

Wolf Rnad Par). 
N olCol Cen 
Albany NY 
'518)458 7490 



BERGEN CNTV 

193 Rlver«de Sq 
iRte 41 

HackcnMck. N J 
(201) 4«9 0550 



PRINCETON 

55 Slate Rd 

iRle 206) VWe>lport. Conn 

Pnncelon NJ l203Ti26 7M4 

i609) 924 9686 



• WESIPORT _ • HARTFORD 

180 Po* W E«t Civic Center Shop* 
Trumbull St 
Hartlord Conn 
20.3' 549 0892 



PHUADetPHIA 

1610 Chestnut St 
Phila.Pa 
(215) 563 9393 



CAMBRirXiE 

1050 Mau Ave 

Bet Haiv & Ccr.t Sqs 



(617)876.9754 
c Workbench Ine 



1482 



-*.'. -►■ 






HaJEFFBOON 

PLUMBING— HEATING 
CONTRACTOR 



S««nc« Wnan ir t NMdw) 

CHEnnv V ALLEY RO 

11 934-3624 





•r« ^i^c'v 




32 CHAMBERS ST 

PRINCETON, N.J. 

509)924-1416 



FUllER BRUSHES 

BEN. D. MARUCA 



1 75 Redwood Ave 
Tel 888-1254 

Trenton, N J 08610 



Kobert \VhiMc\ 

me, line j'\ at jnlique 

trmliJ'K 'f.<. 'ifior. jrtl.rsplicelion 



KUKKKSTIMAri:;^,. 



SiiU-burs .NVci! Ni« lf"l»' 1 y 
Ml 115 2VI7K4,')1! - 



The Cummins Shop 
Crystal, China 

NNMMM 

924-1831 



IQI 



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^ S^ Ws'^.S'SrP.n'it ?rg?n;i£f«SS R. Kev.t, manawar of RCA 

When the David Sarnoff to .^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^ 

Ubrary w^ built m 1967 Mr. ^«»^ "^j^^^^ seafood. 
Cuomo did much of the in- ^"Jf. ^eef pasta and _ 
tmj)r decorating, frornd«,gn Pouu^y^ ^.^^^P^ ^^„ ^^ ^ 

and construction of built-m *;| . ^ specialty n 

cabinets to framuig pictures dessms^ ana p jm 

„^...r.sr^U --"la^^^-^aS riSei-^^Horc^"; 

Avenue, a leader ui the model j j^ ,^ ^ ^lis uncles' shops from , "o°" "^rink^and a 
sh^at RCA Laboratories, °Jt^"^hool. When he came to SPfciaUy priced dnnks and a 
and his c(^inventor. Robert W. Se United States in 1964, he f«»^»°" ^L'X ^ta^int 
Chambers, have beaijssued a ^^rkedfor an antique shop l^^^/^^for a5Sr-work 
VJS. patent for a method and reprodcing fine antique pieces ^^^'^f.^^^l'^L /°lthprin« 
appvatus for "dff lashing" rndVdd^ne to his wood meetmgs and gatherings. 



PRE-HOLIDAY SALE IN PROGRESS 

Large savings throughout 
the store 



BUSINESS 

In Prinveton 




molded recorded discs. finishing tecfeiques. 

Recorded discs, whether j^^ ^^ attended classes in 
coBvertional flnes for ^ j^ ^^ received a 

phonographs or for video disc 



FOR THE BLIND 



P^^-.J^ .^«Aop Tcnnwn as ^0", Inc. ^ ^3^ ^^^^^^ national head- 



or^w. Excess piasilcra«M:ri« jj^ . 
kround the edge.Tcnown as ^o"'*"*- 
"flash," has to be removed 



the $3.4 million national head- 
Quarters of Recording for the 



oberemovea ■■ quarters 01 ivetuiuiuB »«» -". 

a^ki'usually cut away by a NEW RESTAURANT OPENS Blind, Inc., at 20 Roszel Road, 
knife whUe the disc is rotated, ui Lawrenceville. CampbeU west Windsor. The new head- 
In the case of videodiscs, the HospitaUty, Inc., a division of quarters will be named for 
problem is more complex Campbell Soup Company, has rfB's founder and honorary, 
becawe the plastic material is opened a new eating and chairman, Mrs. Ranald 
more brittle and harder to drinking establishment at 4160 Thompson Macdonald. 
trim with a knife without Quakerbridge Road, across The new building, 34,00e 
brMkaee from the Mall Knows as square feet, will stand on a 

- * '•H.T.Mct>o6^l^ Tun aad ^ood»d, eight-acre site. 

Mr Cuoirto ana' Mr. Foodrinkery," U is the fourth Bowers Construction is the 
Chambers developed a rotary branch of a prototype builder. 

cutter which provides the originated in Greenbelt, Md., 

video disc with a smooth edge in 1961. , ' . „ ... _ ^ 'L-jip ipvpI the 

and a controlled dian»eter, ThenewH.T. McDoogal'sm Built on a s««^e >*J^^^^ 
Soe«ary since the disc must Lawrenceville has been building wUl hav« automatwl 
3«aiy removed from and designed to appeal to business carousel shelving and ceinng 
JiSin^ caddy. dine^ and adTs looking for a integrated conveyor to con^ 

Tr. Cuomo, who joined RCA sophisticated social en^ nect rj-^.f^^^^LoXg or 
Laboratories in 1949. »» vironment. The architect and new buiUling Re^^^^ 
^sponsible for making all interior designer have created the fimd wiU hotse a 6^000 
typ£ of cabinets used in pUot a New York-style resteurant master tape library « ^^^™j 
equipment, mockups and setting characteristic of many ed books with an estimaiea 
displays as ^ell as for all popular establishments found value of over $100 miUion^ 
tyiies of wooG turning and on Manhattan's East side. It There will /'so . j*^. ^^ 
formica and plastic seats more than 250 people duplicating center and a place 
fabrication. The deflasher is throughout the lounge and where orders will be proc^" 

hls first invention - ^ — — -^ - *«" ^s adnnnistrat.ve 

awarded a U.S. patent 



to be dining room areas. 



ed, as well as administrative 

offices. 

The all-day menu features The Princeton studios of 
In 1965 he built eight lee- over 130 selections in Recording for the JBhnd mil 



III I50J i.^ "«." -e» w»^. selections in KecoruuiK lui l..^ x...... " — 
tern8 equipped with special American and Coninental continue to be atJOO^St^ockion 
RCA microphones for cuisine. The menu 
PNsidert Lyndon B. Johnson 



cuibu.t: I..C ».^..« ranges street. It is one of the charter 
from appetizers and munchies units of RFB. 



\lVhenit comes 
totravel 

WE MEAN BUSIIMESSI 

Ti-«inrtm laraest lndH)endent^-owned travel agencvln 

S^^ Mr Foster can offer vou thebest travel values 
jj^^ss trie nattoo...anda over the wortd 

vL Mr Foster Travel sendee was founded in 1888. 
and w^^^sTe^lv over ttie years based on our 

orgest "ttue chip" companies and the Ist is growing 
""^^^cSJ^Sdav for the t»$t deals QOinQ in txislness 
travel and group travel. 

Ask Mr. Foster 

AnytMng You Want To Know About Travel. 

41 WItherspoon St 
(609)921-3350 

Ask tor Rose Marie D'Arcy 
Supervisor Corpofate Accounts| 

■Or- 

Bernice Stein 

Manager 



Founded in 1951 to aid blind- 
ed war veterans, the non- 
profit organization now has 28 
recording studios in 15 states 
and Washington, DC. Support 
comes from tax-deductible 
contributions from in- 
dividuals, corporations and 
foundations. 

RFB'S 5,000 volunteers 
read, monitor and record text- 
books which are then provid- 
ed, in cassette form, to 
registered borrowers. The 
loans are free of charge. 



Among those who borrow 
the tapes are children in 
elementary school, graduate 
and post-graduate students, 
and all the levels in t)etween. 
They live in all states and 35 
foreign countries. I^st year, 
RFB served 14,500 students. 

When a student asks for a 
tape which is not in RFB's 
library, it is assigned for 
recording to one of the 28 
studios. The first installment 
of a new text is mailed to the 
student witliin 10 working 
days. 

Contlwwdon Mirt ^ag* 



JwmiN. 



Dansl<in Bodysuit, full turtleneck, ^ ^25 

snaps. Reg. $15 

Dansl<in Leg Warmers in ■ ^7,75 
8 colors. Reg $9 50 ' 



BAILEY'S 

Princeton Shopping Center 

Mi»id«y.S«lurd«y 1I»:3I>; Fri. •». HI 6 



Ml^ 
~ 



LET YOURSELF GO ^ 
TO OUR CRUISE SHOW 



Enioy our seminar on cruising, featuring Norwegian Caribbean 
Lines Our Cruise Show will cover all the exotic ports of call, give 
you tips on shopping, let you have a look at the morning- 
till-night activities, the on-board entertainment, and 
the friendly people who'll serve you at sea 

You'll learn everything you wanted to know 
about Norwegian Caribbean Lines cruises: What 
they cost, where they go, what to pack, 
how to dress, what goes on at sea, which 
islands offer the best shopping and 
sightseeing, and what happens on NCLs unin- 
habited Out Island. 



[ FRB Na CRUISE SHOW! 

Wed. night. December 8 
6-9 P.M. - Refreshments served 
For information and resen/ations 
call 924-5210 



M^ToGo^ [j^^S 




NdMECIAM 
CARIBBEAN UNES 

Americds Favorite Cruise Line "" 



33 Witherspon St 

Princeton 
(609)924-5210 




Brighten someone's day 
with a... 
BLOOMING PLANT 

Anthurium. African Violets, Begonias. 
Cyclamen (regular and miniature, Gloxinia. 
Christmas Cactus, Jerusalem Cherries. 
Indoor Mumsjnj4;^or^^^ 

SILK a^RIEDARRANGEMENT 

^'i^r^.y c?IlV ON READY-MADE SILK ARRANGEMENTS 






SALE 

on 8" hanging baskets 

and 
assorted foliage plants 

in 6" pots. 



A few 

TULIP 
BULBS 

available at 
reduced .'^1 
price 






ORDER THANKSGIVING 
CENTERPIECES NOW! 




For your Holiday Arts and Crafts... 

Wreatns (grapevine, straw, wire, corn stalk and styrofoam). 

Ribbons (stripes, plaids, checks, velvets, etc.). Wire by the roll or tjunch. 

Phie Cones (assorted sizes). Loose Dried Materials (Gernnan Stat.ce. 

■ large or small bunches. Baby's Breath, Eucalyptus, Pods, 

Mexican Seed Pod Flowers), Burlap by the yard in gold, green and red, 

Candles. Stick Brooms. Giapevme Baskets 




rs ^^ tn <^^ 






.os^':, ca' 



^nJ 



iS 



o' 



PERNA'S 

PLANT AND FLOWER SHOP 

1 89 WMhIngton Rd. • Vi mile east of Rt. 1 • 452-1 383 

Mon.-Frl. 8:30-5: Sat. 8:30-4: Sun. 10-4 



^<^ 



'5ic 



^o. 



^ 





Elly de Boer 

Busness in Prinn^m 

Continued from Preceding Page 

Sr:MINAR PLANNED 
For Female Investor. Bar- 
bara Levin, a financial consul- 
tant for Shearson/American 
Express in Lawrenceville, will 
hold a seminar entitled 
"Stocks and Champagne " 
Saturday, November 20, at 
9:30 at M. Epstein in the 
Princeton Shopping Center. 
The seminar will focus on tax- 
saving strategies designed 
especially for the female in- 
vestor. 

Miss Levin is a registered 
representative of the National 
Association of Security 
Dealers and has experience in 
advising investors about 
stocks, tax-free bonds, defer- 
red annuities and tax shelters. 
A former newspaper editor, 
she has been associated with 
Shearson/American Express 
for three years. 

Reservations may be made 
by calling 896-2700 by 
November 17 or stopping by 
M. Epstein's customer service 
desk. A $5 fee will be charged 
and includes a champagne 
brunch. 




Tony Ciallella 

RECEIVES CONTRACT 

From Army. Textile 
Research Institute (TRI) has 
been awarded a one-year 
contract by the Aberdeen 
Proving Ground to study 
factors that control the 
penetration of liquids through 
fabrics intended to protect 
military personnel against 
noxious chemicals. 

According to Dr. Ludwig 
Rebenfeld, president of TRI, 
traditional evaluation 
techniques involving liquid 
droplets placed on the fabric 
will be compared with forced 
flow through methods 
developed at TRI by Dr. 
Bernard Miller, associate 
director of research, who will 
direct the work. It is planned 
to evaluate fabrics made from 
cotton, wool, nylon, polyester, 
and aramid fibers, including 
some blends, using a variety 
of pure and mixed liquids. 

Among the factors to be 
investigated are droplet size 
and kinetic energy at impact; 
fabric construction, tension, 
and moisture content; and the 
nature of the receiving phase . 



Patrick J. IMcDermott 



PERSONNEL NOTES 

Patrick J. McDermott of 

Hillsborough has joined the 
Princeton office of Weichert 
Realtors has a full time sales 
representative. Mr. McDer- 
mott was first licensed in real 
estate in 1966 and is a member 
of the Mercer Real Estate 
Board. 



Two new associates have 
joined the sales staff of the 
Princeton office of Weidel 
Real Estate. They are Elly de 
Boer of Princeton and Tony 
aallella of West Windsor. 

Mrs. de Boer previously liv- 
ed in The Netherlands. She is 
taking courses at Mercer 
County Community College 
and is a member of the 
Newcomers Club, the Univer- 
sity League, the YWCA Ar- 
tisans Guild and the Women's 
College Club. Mr. Ciallella is a 
longtime area resident who at- 
tended Valley Road School 
and Princeton High School 
and received a degree in 
psychology from Monmouth 
College. 




SEE HOW 
MIICHAVOIVO*S 
WORTHBY 
PRICING THE 
COMPEnnON. 



When you see what new cars offer for the money, Volvos come 
out looking better than ever. Because Volvos have a long-standing 
reputation for quality workmanship, 
comfort and durability. And our 



competition can't manufacture a 
reputation like that— much less 
a car— overnight. vol,vo 

DL SEDAN 



'CDMI 



VOIJVO 

OF PRINCETON 



)\\a Mco^-' c"^v'^'-\v 



Sales • Service • Parts • Leasing 



Qyerseas Delivery 
255 Nassau Street 

Open Every Day Except Sunday 



924-5454 



CURIOS 

FOR CHRISTMAS 



What better gift 
than one for the home. 

Show off all 

those prize collections 

you have been storing. 

Select a four-door 

curio or one in 

black chinosere finish. 

Park Lane has the styles, 

sizes and prices 

to make this a 

memorable holiday. 



^a^Aj^a 



FURNITURE 



LAWRENCE SHOPPING CENTER. ALT. ROUTE 1, TRENTON, N.J. 

(THREE MILES SOUTH OF QUAKER BRIDGE MALL) 
Open Daily 10:00 AM to9:00 P M . Saturdays to 500 P.M.. SuiW|py» Noon to 5 P M 

V 609 882 8770 




i 



«* 
^ 



> 
Q 



REUGiON 

In Princeton 



INTERFAITH SERVICE 
In West Windsor. An Inter 
Faith Thanksgiving Service 
will be sponsored by the 
Hightstown Area Minsterium 
on Wednesday evening, 
November 24 at 8 at 
Congregation Beth Chaim, 
Villiage Road East in West 
Windsor Township. 
Three choirs will par- 



COMMUNITY INVITED 
To Thanksgiving Service. 
The Annual Community 

Thanksgiving Day Service ticipate. They are "Voices of 
will be held ^t the Princeton Mt. Olivet" Choir of Mt. Olivet 
University Chapel at 11 a.m. Baptist Church in Hightstown 
a onThursday,*November25. under the direction of Ron 
^ The preacher will be the P«"T; the Congregation Beth 
Rev. Dr. Wallace M. Alston, Chaim Choir under the 
Jr., of the Nassau Presby- 



lU 



r 
Z 



o 



direction of Joseph Pucciatti 
taian'church'His^toVrwill and the Hand Bell Choir of the 
be "Towards a Faithful ^"^^ Baptist Church under ^i| 
'nianksgiving the direction of Virginia ' 

Hancock. 

The sermon will be 



SF Other participants will be 

^ Robert Cawley, Mayor of the delivered by Rev. Robert 

o Princeton Borough, who will Slusher of the First 



o. 
O 



Presbyterian 
Plainsboro. 



Church of 



z 




read the President's Thanks 

giving Proclamation; the Rev. 

Louise L. Kingston, Chaplain 

Z at the Princeton Medical A collection will be taken for 

•- Center; Ira Silverman, the Chaplancy of the Medical 
president of the Recon- Center of Princeton. There 
structionist Rabbinical ^*'^ also be a canned food BAZAAR IN MONTGOMERY: Judy Goodwin (left) and 
College in Philadelphia, and a ^'"*^® '°'' the Food Closet in Judy Chalk work on dried flower arrangements to be 
resident of Princeton; the Hightstown which is spon- sold at the Montgomery United Methodist Church's 
Rev. James H. Harris of the ^ored by the Hightstown Area annual Christmas Village Bazaar. The bazaar will be 
Princeton Methodist Church; Minstenum. A reception will held Friday from 4-9 and Saturday from 10-3. The 

Also, the Rev. Margot to'Jow, and everyone is church is located on Sunset Road off Route 206. 
Pickett, Christ Congregation; welcome. ^ ^^ ^ h^c^slot^ p„o,o, 



The 7th Annual Winter 
Festival-Bazaar of Holy 
Trinity Lutheran Church, 
Princeton Pike and Allan 
Lane, Lawrenceville, will be 
held on Saturday from 9:30 to 
3. 

There will be handcrafts 
boutique with hand-knitted 
crocheted, and quilted items, 
stuffed toys, pinecone center- 
pieces and dried flower 
arrangements. A variety of 
homemade soups, chili, hot- 
dogs, sauerkraut, hot and cold 
drinks, and desserts will be 
available. A bakery booth will 
offer homemade baked goods 
of all kinds. 

A Christmas Booth will offer 
tree decorations, personalized 
wooden Christmas ornaments, 
and a variety of other holiday 
decorations. There will be a 
silent auction of specially 
hand-crafted items. An attic 
treasures booth will be a flea 
market in itself, including 
glassware, china, jewlery, 
books, records, and other 
items. 



theRev. John Crocker, Jr., Babbi Erie Wisnia of 

Trinity Episcopal Church; the <^0"g''egation Beth Chaim 

Rev. Frederick H. Borsch, serves as president of the 

Dean of the Princeton Hightstown Area Minsterium. 

University Chapel; the Rev Seventeen churches and 



GOSPEL SINGER DUE BULLETIN NOTES 

N.«.^!f *??.!^cr"*"o" ?"^*''- Montgomery United 

!^?i tL^f ? ^T^^' •"■ Methodist Church will hold its 

B.J J A ^ -\ -'c Vu svnacocups in Hicht^tnwn ^i.^ .l^fi,^^*^ . ^ ^?^' fifth annual Christmas Village 

SJn"f.„ Ch™ch° aUd E'a"rSor ??a'"br: ll^.'^}^. '^^IH^IlA'!!' Bazaar on Friday from 4 to% 



cast Windsor, Cranbury, Simoson WednpcHav '^'T'" "•■*"""•'""•"• ^ 

Clergy Assoaation; the Rev. *'"'l*""»»''paungmemDer5. Mice ^,wm^r.w, .^^^^ u-x_ j 

Fred Tennie Jr., pastor of the 

Mt. Pisgah A.M.E. Church; 

and the Rev. Evasio F. De 

Marcellis of St. Paul's Roman 

Catholic Church. 



Miss Simpson made her 
New York recital debut in 



the specialty shops of Home 
.one „>^„ i J » , ..L Decor, Gourmet Foods, 

f^;.?C fr^^'^i^^^'""^ Children Only, Baked Good^ 
Library of Congr^ during m- and Plants. The Silent Auction 

fnTi.1 7^^ ^^1,^""^.^^' will offer items such as a 
toured extensively throughout handmade mahogany quilt 
North America, England, In- ^ack and a .handmade six foot 



SPECIAL SERVICE SET 
By Christian Scientists. 
First Church of Christ, Scien- 
tist, 11 Bayard Lane, invites 

The choir, drawn from the ^^ comniunity to a special dia and'theSovieTunron'sh'e 

congregations in the Prince- !?^*^ ™ Thanksgiving on won the Naumburg Founda- 

tonarea, will sing two an- Thursday. November 25, at tion 50th anniversary vocal nn an^nov nnn. nr«r.r,m^«r« 

thems "Now Thank We All 10:30. The service will trace comoetition and ha^ hp^n «" Anaaex ana tomprini com- 

rC.n'^'.T ic D u J the ScriDtural record of ChvI's i2 *^ L »"a ^"as been p^ter printers and various 

Our God' by J.S. Bach, and Yf i>cripiurai recora oi uod s engaged by a number of sym- oamp anH nrnaram nark^ for 

Max Reger's "Benedictus." blessings, even m times of phonies across the country «'«'"'» «"^ "'•"«"•«'"'«'"'« f*^*- 



wooden train set. Computer 
enthusiasts will t>e able to bid 
on Anadex and Comprint com- 



For more information on 



921-0981. 



WINDSOR CHURCHES JOIN 



They will be directed bv Dr. widespread economic 
Kenneth B. Kelley, director of challenges. 
miBic at the Nassau Presby- The Bible lesson-sermon, 
terian Church. drawn from both the Old and 

The offering from the New Testaments, will focus on 
service wUl be divided three God's provision for daily 

ways: for the support of the n«eds of food clothing and p^^ Thanksgiving Service. 
Department of Religious shelter, as well as the deeper ^Vest Windsor chimihes will 
Ministries at the Princeton yearnings for fulfillment. 
Medical Center, which health and the opportunity to 
supports the worii of hospital help others. Selections from 
Chaplains Louise Kingston the Christian Science text 
and Marilyn Boeke; for the hook, "Science and Health 
Hub program sponsored by with Key to the Scriptures," 
the churches and synagogues will also be read. 

and led by Arianne Kassof for 

the emotionally and mentally The latter part of the hour- 



game and program packs for 

the Atari 400 and 800 systems. 

There will also be an Art 



this Thanksgiving concert call Studio and a sit-down Cafe 

selling homemade soup, sand- 
wiches, l)everages and funnel 
cakes. 



The former rector of Trinity 

hold their annual community Church. 33 Mercer Street, the 
Thanksgiving services on ^^ Jo^^^" V. Butler, and his 



Wednesday, November 24, 
beginning at 8 in the Prince of 



assistant at Trinity, the Rev 
Martin Davidson, will make a 



Peace Lutheran Church on special visit to the church this 



Hightstown Road. 



Sunday as part of the 150th an- 



This annual event, open to niversary celebration. They 

everyone, is jointly sponsored will be present at the 11 : 15 ser- 

by the First Presbyterian vice, a parish luncheon at 

handicapped; and for CROP, long service will be set aside church of Dutch Neck, the 12:30 and a talk session at 3 

the hunger organization of the for expressions of gratitude. Princeton Baptist Church of p.m. Everyone is welcome. 

National Coundl of Churches Hymns, the Lord's Prayer and Penns Neck, the Windsor Dr. Butler was rector of 

which distributes food, the President's Thanksgiving Chapel and the Prince of Trinity from 1948 to 1959 when 

agricultural know-how and Proclamation will also be in- Peace Lutheran Church. The he was called to become the 



technology world-wide. The eluded. The meeting will be 

needs this year are especially conducted by Edwin Stamer, 

great. currently serving as First 

The annual event is spon- Reader. Kathryn M. Arm- 

•ored and arranged by the strong will read from the 

Princeton Gergy Association. Scriptures. 

All people in the Princeton The meeting is open to all 

area are urged to particpate in and free care for very young 

this community service. children will be available. 




Rev. Floyd W. Chum, pastor Dean of the Cathedral of St. 

(rf tlie Presbyterian Church, John the Divine in New York 

will preach a sermon entitled City. He later become rector 

"With Hearts, and Hands and of Trinity Church, Wall Street, 

Voices." Music will be New York. 

provided by the Lutheran 

choir under the direction of 

^*H£:»^*'i*"T'- „ u. Trinity Church Christmas 

A freewill offering will be Fair will take place on 

taken to benefit he Saturday, December 4, from 

Chaplaincy Program of the lo . 4 at 33 Mercer Street 



Princeton Medical Center. 



JOINT SERVICE SET 
By Catholic, Lutheran 



Holiday greens and 
decorations will be for sale as 
well as home-baked goods, 
hand-knit gifts and white 
dephant items. There will be 



CHANUKAH IS COMING: Brenda Kassiola, 17 months, 
and Ev« Cohen, 7 years, look over the display of gift 
and holiday Itams for the Woman's Division's 
Chamikah Bazaar to ba hakf 8ufKto)p, Hmintom 21. 
Ifom 11 to 2 it the Jawlth Csntar, 457 Waaaao Straat 



Churches. The congregations a silent auction of better 
of St David the King Mission *"«*< and a light lunch wiU 
Roman Catholic Church and d« served. For information on 
the Prince of Peace Lutheran ™»n« or donating items to 
Church will hold a Vesper add to the Fair, call Betty 
Service Sunday in the S?"(o^?' 924-5579, or Helen 
Lutheran Church on Hight Westcott, 452-1163. 
stown Road in Princeton 
Junction. The service will 
begin at 8 instead of the 
previously announced 7:30 
and is open to the public. 

The Rev. Evasio DeMar- 
cellis will be the homilist, and 
the Frederick Schott will lead 
the litany. Music will be 
provided by a brass section 
and guitars and a joint choir 
led by Mary Lou Jarzyna and 
Linda Shirbroun. 

Refreshments will be served 
following the service. For 
information call 799-1753 or 
799-17^., «^^ 



Dot Worth, a Bible teacher 
and retreat leader, will lead a 
"Learning to Live" seminar 
on Friday from 9:30 to 2:00 at 



The Princeton United 
Methodist Church, Nassau 
Street and Vandeventer 
Avenue. Her topic will be 
"Faith that Works.'based on 
the Book of James. 

Participants are asked to 
bring a salad for six. Babysit- 
ting may be arranged by call- 
ing the church office, 924-2613. 
A free will offering will be 
taken. 

Dialogue, a community ser- 
vice of the Unitarian Church, 
will meet Saturday at 7:30 at 
the church on Cherry Hill and 
State Roads. Jennifer Hanson- 
Marz of Rocky Hill and Bever- 
ly Almgren of Princeton will 
lead a discussion on how to 
have more pleasure and less 
hassle around the holidays. 
Participants will continue the 
discussion in small groups. 

Dialogue is open to any 
adult, married or single, and 
diversity in age and 
background in encouraged. 
Dialogue events include small 
group discussions with oppor- 
tunity for socializing and 
refreshments before and after 
the main topic. Ms. Hanson- 
Marz and Ms. Almgren are ex- 
perienced workshop leaders 
with master's degreer 
social work. 





JOY SIMPSON IN GOSPEL CONCERT! 

Highly acclaimed soprano 
Affiliate Artist of Princeton Theological Seminary 
Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, Nov. 24, 1982 
7:30 P.M. 

Nassau Christian Center 
26 Nassau Street 
Princeton, N.J. 08540 
609-921-0981 
Admission freel 
Jesse Owens, Pastor 



I 




t 



The 

KIMBLE 
FUNERAL HOME 

One Hamilton Avenue 
(609)924-0018 



Edwin L Kimble 
R. Birchall Kimble 
Claude M. Crater 



A Princeton Family 

Owned and Operated 

Funeral Home 

Since 1923 




LET'S 
TALK 
ABOUT 4 

ANNUAL 

MAINTENANCE 

PROGRAM 

with Sam DeTuro 

Woodwinds 
Associates 

We. at WOODWINDS, thought 
It might be appropriate to ex- 
plain to our readers the whys 
and wherefores of our many 
suggestions during the year 
We hope this might be of help 
to new homeowners and give 
an idea of how to keep your 
property beautiful and healthy 
As all of our time is at a 
premium, it is considered im- 
portant to find a simple way of 
controlling problems before 
they occur - sonne might call it 
preventative maintenance 
WOODWINDS suggests an 
ANNUAL (MAINTENANCE 
PROGRAN/1 to many of our 
clients. The program alleviates 
the headache of spending time 
watching for whatever insect, 
etc., might be lurking on the 
property. It is then WOOD- 
WINDS job to keep an eye out 
for infestation on the property 
As we take care of the gardens 
needs, we can alert the client 
of any specific problem and 
proceed with the best possible 
recommendations to the situa- 
tion. Call WOODWINDS 
(924-3500) for a consultation - 
wed be happy to serve you!" 



OBITUARIES 



Viola L. Haysbert, 75, of 
Hendrickson Drive, Princeton 
Junction, died November 11 at 
Princeton Medical Center. 

Born in Vinita, Okla., Mrs. 
Haysbert lived in Memphis, 
Tenn., before moving to 
Princeton Junction 14 years 
ago She worked 28 years with 
the Boy Scouts of America un- 
til her retirement in 1972, most 
recently as executive 
secretary in the North 
Brunswick headquarters of 
the Boy Scouts. Earlier she 
taught in the Memphis and 
Winston-Salem, N.C., school 
systems. 

She was a member of the 
Lutheran Church of the 
Messiah, Alpha Kappa Alpha 
Sorority and Top Ladies of 
Distinction. 

Surviving are her husband, 
Harry H. Haysbert; and two 
cousins, Darlene Albright and 
Viola Barnes, both of Denver. 

The service was held in the 
Lutheran Church of the 
Messiah, the Rev. Allen A. 
Gartner, pastor, officiating. 
Burial was in Trinity-All 
Saints' Cemetery. Memorial 
contributions may be made to 
the Lutheran Church m the 
Messiah, 407 Nassau Street. 

Clarice H. Knight. 87, of 311 
Plainsboro Road, Plainsboro, 
died November 11 at the Mer- 
wick Unit of Princeton 
Medical Center 

Mrs. Knight was born in Fit- 
chburg, Mass., and was 
graduated from Mount 
Holyoke College in South 
Hadley, Mass. She taught in 
Massachusetts for several 
years before marrying Robert 
E. Knight, who died in 1957. 

Active in community af- 
fairs, she served as a Gray 
Lady at Fort Dix during World 
War II and was one of the 
organizers of the Plainsboro 
Free Public Library. She was 
chairman of the library 
volunteers for many years. 
She was a member of the 
Brainerd chapter of the Order 
of the Eastern Star and the 
First Presbyterian Church. 

She is survived by a 
daugher, Priscilla Stitt of 
Plainsboro; four grand- 
children and two great- 
grandchildren. 

The service was held at a 
Cranbury funeral home, the 
Rev. Robert L. Slusher, pastor 
of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Plainsboro, of- 
ficiating. Burial was in 
Brainerd Cemetery. Contribu- 
tions may be made to the First 




Presbyterian Church of 
Plainsboro Memorial Fund, 
Plainsboro, 08536. 

Betty Dent Wainio, 64, of 
Walnut Lane, died November 
10 in Princeton Medical 
Center. 

Mrs. Wainio was born in 
Quincy, Mass.. and had lived 
in Princeton for the past 25 
years. She was a graduate of 
Connecticut College, New Lon- 
don, Conn., and earned her 
master's degree in library 
science from Rutgers Univer- 
sity. She retired in 1981 as 
director of the Somerville 
Public Library. 

She was a member of the 
Somerville Civic League. An 
avid hiker, she was also a 
member of the Somerset 
County Hiking Club. 

Surviving are her husband. 
Walter W. Wainio, a professor 
of bio-chemistry at Rutgers 
University, and a daughter. 
Marguerite D. Wainio of San 
Francisco. 

A private service was held. 
Arrangements were under the 
direction of the Kimble 
Funeral Home. Memorial con- 
tributions may be made to the 
New York-New Jersey Trail 
Conference. 20 West 40th 
Steet, New York, N.Y., 10018, 

Robert (Lee) J. Sutphen. 38, 
a native of Princeton, died Oc- 
tober 29 in Washington He 
had lived in Snohomish, 
Wash., for the past seven 
years. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Irene Sutphen of Snohomish ; a 
brother, James T. Sutphen of 
Florence; two sisters. Marie 
A. Perrine of Lambertville, 
and Carolyn C. Korman of 
Toms River 

The service and burial were 
in Snohomish, Wash. 

Susan Van Tongeren, 38, of 
Prospect Park, died Nov- 
ember 13 in Sloan-Kettering 
Memorial Hospital, New 
York . 

She was born in Minneapolis 
and had lived in Princeton for 
three years before moving to 
Prospect Park a year and a 
half ago. She received her 
bachelor of arts degree from 
the University of Colorado and 
her master of fine arts from 
California College of Arts and 
Crafts in Oakland. She taught 
sculpturer at William Patter- 
son State College in Wayne. 

Survivors include her hus- 
band, Michael W. Gember- 
ling; a son. Trygve Van 
Tongeren at home; her 
mother, Mrs. Erling J. Platou 
of Minneapolis; a brother. Jon 
Platou of Hollywood. Calif.; 
and a sister. Nancy Calhoun of 
College Station. Tex. 

A graveside service was 
held in Princeton Cemetery. 
Dr Wallace M. Alston Jr., 
senior minister of Nassau 
Presbyterian Church, of- 
ficiating. 



After graduation from 
seminary he became 
associate secretary of the 
board of foreign missions of 
the United Presbyterian 
Church and served as 
chaplain in the US Army. In 
1919 he was sent to Egypt as a 
missionary of the United 
Presbyterian Church and 
worked as the principal of a 
boys school in Cairo and a 
director of evangelistic and 
educational work along the 
Nile. 

In 1928 he was appointed 
Secretary of the Y.M.C.A. in 
Cairo and later senior 
American Secretary of that 
organization. He founded the 
Y.W.C.A. in Ethiopia. 



He is survived by two sons 
and two daughters, Robert M. 
Quay of Lancaster, N.H.; 
John G. Quay of East Had- 
dam. Conn. ; Barbara Q. 
Henry of Orlando, Fla., and 
Q. Hutchison of Cambridge, 
Mass.; 13 grandchildren and 
three great-grandchildren . 

A memorial service will be 
held Saturday, December 11, 
at 11:30 a.m. in Miller Chapel 
at Princeton Theological 
Seminary. President James I. 
McCord will officiate. 

In lieu of flowers, the family 
requests that memorial gifts 
be made to the Quay 
Scholarship Fund at Princeton 
Seminary. 



James K. Quay. 95, former 
vice-president of Princeton 
Theological Seminary, died 
October 29, at the Rydal Park 
Presbyterian Home in Rydal, 
Pa., where he had been a 
resident since 1974. 

Mr. Quay joined the 
Seminary staff in 1948 after 30 
years as a missionary in 
Egypt, and served for 10 years 
as vice-president in charge of 
fiindraising and public 
relations. In 1957 he retired to 
become field secretary for the 
American Bible Society and in 
1958 assumed the position of 
vice-president of the West- 
minster Choir College. 



He receiveced his bachelor 
of arts from Monmouth 
College, a bachelor of divinity 
from Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, and master of arts 
from teachers College. 
Columbia University. He also 
held honorary doctorates from 
Westminster College (Penn- 
sylvania) and Monmouth 



Our Famous 
Assorted 

CHEESE 
TRAYS 

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For The 
Holidays 

The 

GOUSE HOUSE 

Montgomery Center 
Rocky Hill, NJ. 

921 -1 666 



DELCAMPE 

LOCKSMITHS 



921-8033 




4-6 Hulfish St. 
Princeton, 921-3121 



't CARDS ^*^ 

^ CANDIES 

DEL VAL PHARMACY 

PENNINGTON 
SHOPPING CENTER 

Route 31 Pennington 

Leo S. Brummel R P 

Daily 9 to 9. Sat 9 to 5:30 

Sunday 9 to 1 

Phone 737-0900 



MICIIAKL Ij. KOKKNTIIALs M.H.W.. En.D. 

PERSONAL Problem. Career and Educational Counseling 
Individuals and Small Groups 



Pennington Professional Center 
65 S Main St . Bldg A Suite 23 
Pennington New Jersey 08*534 



{609) 737 2236 
By Appointment 



Doris M. Potts Offredo, 61, 
of Trenton, died November 9 
at Princeton Medical Center. 

Mrs. Offredo was born and 
raised in Trenton and worked 
at C.V. Hill Refrigeration 
Corp. for 37 years as a clerk in 
the shipping department. She 
was a former resident of 
Hamilton. 

Wife of the late Jerry Of- 
fredo, she is survived by a son, 
Jerry, a detective with the 
Princeton Township Police 
Department; a daughter, 
Nancy Morris of Salisbury, 
N.C. ; a brother, Walter Potts 
of Hamilton Township; a 
sister, Glenna Katona of Tren- 
ton; <ind seven grandchildren. 

The service was held in a 
Trenton funeral home, the 
Rev. Louise Kingston, 
Princeton Medical Center 
Chaplain, officiating. Crema- 
tion was in the Ewing 
Crematorium. Memorial con- 
tributions may be made to the 
American Cancer Society or 
the Princeton Medical Center 

Malcom M. Henderson, 6 

weeks, died November 5 at 
Childrens Hospital, Boston. 
He was the son of Carol and 
Bill Henderson of Wakefield, 
RI, and the grandson of Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul M. Douglas of 
Cleveland Lane. 

Memorial contributions 
may be made to Childrens 
Hospital Medical Center, c-o 
Dr. Peter Lang. Cardiology 
Department, Childrens 
Hospital Medical Center. 300 
Longwood Avenue, Boston, 
MA 02115 

IF YOU LIKE TOWN TOPICS, the best 
way to show your appreciation is to 
mention it to our advertisers 



LAST CALL! 

to have your house exterior painted before winter. 

If you noticed paint peeling or bare surfaces, a 
protective coating should be applied now before 
damp and freezing weather sets in. We also do 
pressure washing to remove mildew. 

Yes, we have professional painters available to 
take care of your needs before winter. 

Call us today for advice and estimate. 
924-1474 

IpIJULIUSH.GRCDSS 



Princeton, N.J. 

Serving this area for 25 years. 





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A COIVIPLETE 

Indoor World 

QUALITY OF PRODUCTS IS ESSENTIAL 
TO CONTINUING SUCCESS... 



M.OO OFF 



on each 
square yard of 

SOLARIAN SUPREME 

DESIGNER SOUVRIAN 

DESIGNER SOU\RIAN I 

F.F.C. SOLARIAN 

STUDIO SOLARIAN 

that you purchase 
with This Ad Only. 

Expires Nov. 30, 1 982 

Not valid on sale items. 



SAVE ON 

SELECTED 

LEES CARPETS 



REGENT 

Floor Covering and Carpeting 

Route 31, Pennington, N.J 
737-2466 

Open Mon., Tues., Wed. Jt Fri. 9 to 6 
Thur. Eve. til 9; Sat. 9 to 5 



>»» »Vt" »l^»'»^^ \rCtVWVSt W*'# 



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^ YMCA-YWCA higher than anticipated. 



a Continued trom Page 1 

^ Plagued with accumulating 
^ operating deficits over the 
ec past several years, the YMCA 
a has made it clear it can not 
^ pay one half of a Joint 
> Management budget in excess 
z of $300,000. In fact, a YMCA 
>: budget crisis in 1960, which set 
5 off special space allocation 
« negotiations with the YW, 
resulted in a tip of the scale 
from 50-50 to 45-55, with the 
YWCA using and paying for 
more space. 

According to Ralph (Rip) 
Mason, Jr., YMCA treasurer, 
5 the YM's 1982 expenses are 
g expected to amount to 
2 $551,868, with a projected 
g income of $517,439. This 
ffi means a projected shortfall of 
Se $34,429, but Mr. Mason thinks 
C the amount may be even 
*- higher because costs were 



O WANT EXTRA INCOMET A temporary 

^ or part time job may be the answer. 

Read ttte Help Wanted ads in this issue of 

TOWN TOPICS tor a varied selection o* 

o()portunities open to yoo. 



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YM board members say 
that their share of the Joint 
Management budget takes 
close to 40 percent of their 
income or twice the national 
YM average. Robert Aber- 
nathy, another board mem- 
ber, says that fact indicates 
"we've got to do something 
sooner or later, or that 
number will drag us to 
oblivion." 

Among the solutions the YM 
has been considering 
are: • withdrawing from the 
building altogether (a motion 
to that effect was pending 
before the YM board all 
summer and eventually 
defeated in October) ; 

scahng down its operation 
in that building while ex- 
tending programs and ser- 
vices elsewhere less ex- 
pensively ; 

• effecting a consolidation 
with the YWCA, particularly 
in regard to administration. 



costs, and having eliminated a 
$30,000 deficit incurred in 1961, 
the YWCA is in a stronger 
position today than ever. It is 
justifiably proud of the 
process by which programs 
are conceived, planned and 
carried out by volunteers with 
staff assistance to meet ex- 
pressed needs of women and 
girls. 



prevent leaks and reduce 
heating costs. The YM feels 
the lack of a training pool and 
enough handball courts to 
capitalize on the current 
demand for racquetball and 
handball. Refurbished locker 
rooms and access to the pool 
by the handicapped are high 
priorities for the YWCA. 



vTRememi 
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IQ 
Remember. . 

KALEirS 

FINE ARTS 

for framing and restoring 
of paintings and prints 

73 Palmer Square B 
Princeton, N.J. 
924-0740 
Bl 



re B 
IQBll 



TAKE A FRIEND 

TO LUNCH 

OR DINNER 

AT 

THE PEACOCK INN 

20BAYAROLANE 

924-1707 



Joint YM-YW. The last of 
chese alternatives has perhaps 
the highest priority witti board 
members, including Dr. 
Quentin (Bud) Lyle, 
presidoit. The men point out 
that although there is one 
building there are three 
boards, three budgets, three 
sets of books, two staffs and 
two telephones. They com- 
plain of harmful competition 
in programs and t>etween staff 
and lack ol direct control over 
the management of the 
building. "In today's 
economy," Mr. Mason says, 
"that just plain doesn't make 
sense." 

However, the YW has made 
it equally clear that it opposes 
merger and has strong doubts 
about consolidation. Having 
undertaken a careful review 
of all of its programs and 



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TIME TO COMPLETE > 

YOUR THANKSGIVING 

DINNER PLANS... -^ '^^ 

To proudly serve or happily take 
along for the holiday, 

Come check our baking ^i^^ -.^^^O 
list of ail those gcyyj: .•..-> ' ).-?•■ 

Pies, Cakes, Coffeecakes ^ '^'^ 

Rolls & Cookies 

Place your orders now, please 

VILLAGE BAKERY 

2 Gordon Av«. 896-0036 Uiwr«nc«vill« 

WmL M; Th. « Fri. 7-7; 
Set 7-«; Sun. 7-4 
^\ . Best to oraer ahead 




1^ 




FRESH TURKEYS 

will be available 



TUESDAY, NOV. 23 



First Come, First Served 

No Plione Orders 
Limited Supply and Sizes 

TOTO'S MARKET 

74 Witherspoon St 924-0768 




The many different strongly 
subscribed programs in three 
departments, mcluding many 
services offerings; a mem- 
bership of 7,000, including 500 
volunteers, and a budget of 
$750,000 all testify to the 
YWCA's viability. Even the 
men tip their hats at the YW's 
ability to program suc- 
cessfully. They YM has not 
had the strong volunteer 
corps, and its program of- 
ferings, far fewer in number 
now than previously, and 
largely designed by the 
national office, have been 
implemented by staff. 

The YWCA says that the 
very nature of the two 
associations make merger 
impossible. Since 1975 the YM 
nationally has thought of itself 
as a family organization and 
admits women as members 
and board members. Ellen 
Hodges of the Chamber of 
Commerce is the single 
female member of the YM 
board. 

Nationally, the YW takes 
tlie "W" in its title very 
seriously and does not permit 
men to be members or sit on 
the board. 



Better Location for YM? 

"Maybe the Paul Robeson 
facility is not the best place for 
us," says YM board member 
Bill King. "We could be in 
other locations. We could 
service the rapidly growing 
business community on Route 
1, for instance." 

Even as the YM thinks 
about programming in other 
places, it is also negotiating 
with the YW to reduce its 
proportionate share of oc- 
cupancy costs in the Paul 
Robeson building by taking 
only the space it can use to 
advantage. The difficulty is 
that as women enter the work- 
force and have the same off 
work hours as men, the 
competition for the more 
profitable gym and pool space 
becomes intense. 



Aware that the YM was 
having financial difficulties 
and considering withdrawal 
from the building or scaling 
down its operation, YWCA 
board members on retreat in 
October made four important 
decisions. According to Marge 
Smith, president, the YWCA 
made a commitment: 

• to remain in the building; 

• to keep the building (^en 
as a community resource for 
communtiyuse; 

• to {N-ogram for men and 
boys if the YM should leave ; 

• to retain its national 
YWCA affiliation. 



The YWCA has agreed to 
assume all the costs for the 
"Program" or class room 
wing which the YM says it 
isn't using and doesn't want to 
pay for. But at the same time 
the YW says it cannot be 
expected to give up all of the 
prime time in the gym pool 
wing which in turn help 
support the activities in the 
program wing. Another im- 
passe. 

However, through all the 
discussions and negotiations, 
the two organizations have 
come to know each other 
better, YWCA vice-president 
Pam Mount says, and they are 
talking to each other. Mrs. 
Mount has served on a joint 
building advisory board with 
Mr. King that has taken a 
number of constructive steps 
to improve the energy ef- 
ficiency of the building. 



Potential as Volunteers. Mrs. 
Smith is confident that the 
YWCA's programming could 
just as easily be done with 
men. She cites the "Days," 
all-day Saturday programs 
that have been put together by 
men and women planning 
together. Men are 

"tremendously" involved as 
volunteers in this town in 
activities they are interested 
in such as the youth soccer 
programs, she says. "I see 
their potential." 

However, the YM is also 
insistent that it have board 
representation in a con- 
sohdated organization. "We 
want our membership and our 
board to have right of 
representation,' says Mr. 
Mason, pointing out that some 
YWCA's have relinquished 
national affiliation in order to 
effect consolidation. And so 
the matter is at an impasse~at 
least for the moment. 



But as Marge Smith says, 
what is particularly difficult 
for the YWCA is the un- 
certainty of Itnowing just what 
the YM will decide to do. With- 
drawing from the building 
and selling its share to the 
YWCA means one set of 
numbers, programming the 
entire classroom wing and 
bearing that whole cost is 
another. 

Without revealing the 
YlVCA's irians for these con- 
tingencies, and pointing out 
that the brochure listing all 
winter programs has already 
been printed and delivered, 
Mrs. Smith noneless exudes a 
confidence her association caii 
rise to the challenge. 

- Barbara L. Johnson 



1^ 



924-4151 



PRMCCTON 

TOTAL HEALTH 

MASSAGE 

CENTER 

254 NasMU 

B"^ Appt. 



Thompson Land 



IM Nassau Street 

PriacetMi. N.J. 

(CM) 921-7CS5 



Got A Lealc? 




Call 



Roofing by Willamson 



tSSJl 



921-1184 

Roofing, Insulation, 
Builders 



5.T). Sachs 



OUTDOOR 
SHOPS^ 

' Quality Outdoor Clothing & Footwear 
Backpacking • Travel" 

45 State Road, Princeton, N.J. 

206 N boside Woikbench wiinin talking distance trom Nassau St 
Phona: 683-1788 Hours: Mon., Tuas., Wed. 10-6, Thurs., Fri. 10-9, Sal. 10-5:30 



■Cl)81Cll=-lilIljLl> 



RESIDENTIAL b COMIMERCIAL PROJECTS 

New work, alterations, 
additions & historic restorations 
Elizabeth Reilly Moynahan AIA ARCHITECT 
921-6776 

H.T.M. Corporation BUILDERS 

683-1534 





Mewjersqr^ 
i sdrmngi o 




More and more New Jerseyans are driving to SIS for 
all their car care needs. We're delighted but not 
surprised. We're an employee-owned company — so 
our managers and mechanics have a sp)ecial stake in 
doing the job right. And as we've believed all along: If 
you give better service, charge fair prices and do grea 
work, you're going to win over New Jersey. 

Drive to STS for tune-ups and tires, batteries 
and brakes, wheel alignment, front-end work, 
shocks — whatever it takes to keep your car ^ 
running smoothly. 



We 
gu.iiairtee. 

We're going to 
win you over, 
too. 



OFFICE SPACE 
RESEARCH PARK 

1 101 Smw Rm4, PriMMoa. N.J. 

$4.00 per square foot net, net 
, Areas up to 30,000 square feet 



427, 000 square feet in Park 
Occupied by approximately 50 Tenants 

Princeton Mailing Address 
and Phone Number 

CALL: Research Park 
609-924-6551 



RENTAL, FURNISHED HOUSE: 

Lovely surroundings, central Princeton 
location, 6 weeks Dec. 20 Jan. 31. 
Adults only Non srnokers. S1000 plus 
utilities 921 7612 



ROOM WANTED with kitchen 
privileges by postdoc, trom Dec. 1 Feb. 
5 Will be away over Christmas Dec 22 
Jan 10 Call 924 3886. 



CLEANING LADY vrauld like one day's 
work every Monaay 8 1. Steady work 
Call after six o'clock. 69S 2523. 11 17 2t 



1911 ENCYLOPEDIA BRITTANICA. 

Someone in Princeton borrowed 
Volume 26: T and U. Please bring It 
back! Gaby Borel. Tel. 934 1740. 11 )7 3t 



FALL LAWN SERVICE-Removal of 
leaves, lawn cutting and maintance. 
Private or commercial. Call 924-4394 
anytime. 11 17 3t 



CONVERTIBLE SOFA WANTED: 

Seeking to buy used sofa bed in good 
condition. Contemporary design, 
straight back, solid color preferred. 
Call 609 921 2575 during the day or 924 
6530 evenings and weekends. II I73t 



REMODELLING YOUR KITCHENT 



LEBANON: OCCUPATION AND OP 
POSITION A talk by Israeli army 
officer Tsvi Zores will take place on 
Monday, November 22 at 8 p.m. at 
McCosh 46, Princeton University 
Campus hAr Zores is a member ol 
Yesh Gvul (Enough is Enough!), an 
organization of Israeli army officers 
opposed to the war and calling lor 
immediate unconditional total Israeli 
withdrawal from Lebanon. The talk is 
sponsored by the Emergency Com 
mitfee on Lebanon For more in 
formation, please call 921 1136. 



WEEKEND SKI FLIGHTS. 

Destinations include Stowe, Whiteface 
Approximate two hour flight. Share 
flight expenses with commercial pilot 
instructor. $140. to about J215. per 
person (609) 921 3867. 1117 121 



ST. THOMAS U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS: 

one, two or three bedroom villa 
available for vacation rental. Full 
amenities, maid, beach, tennis, pools, 
restaurants. Contact Mrs. Brown, 
answering service, 924 1760. 11 17 15t 



C.J. Skiman Ca 

Furniture Repairing 
Upliclstery 

924-0221 
38 Spring Street 



State Roofing b Siding 

Siding • Roofing • Storm 

Windows • Gutters 

Down Spouts 

Satis taction • Reliability • Sa vmg s 

448-2354 (local call) 






RIDER FURNITURE 

Antique and Fine Furniture 

Restored and Reiinished • Reqluemg and Repairing 
Hand Stripping • Carung • Rushuiq • Furniture Sales 




4 DrowOT Oak DrMMr '125 

Ror* Oak 13-draw«r Hot*l Dwk '850 

Oak cor, cupboard w/li>a<U<i gloM '590 



Rear oi 75 Main St. 
(Rt. 27) 
Kingston, NJ. 

Pick Up and Delivery Sernce 



924-0147 



SELECT PECANSI Extra large in shell 
5 pounds $14.75 10 pounds $27.50 
Satisfaction Guaranteed Postpaid. 
Recipes included. We ship gifts. 
Andover Farms Box 130 VJ Magnolia 
Springs, Alabama 36555. 



Urban homesteader may be able to use CHAIRS REPAIRED - Reglued and 



your old kitchen cabinets, sink, stove 
and oven, refrigerator, etc. for his 
modest home improvement plan. Call 
609 921 2575 during ttie day or 924 6530 
evenings and weekends. 11-17-31 



finished. The Robert Whitley Studio of 
Antique Restoration and Replication 
Free estimates Solebury, near New 
Hope, Penna (215) 297 8452. 

10-2^81 



YOUTH EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

provides workers (age 1 4 and up) 

for the home, store or office 

Babysitting Yard Work 

Party Help Moving 

House cleaning Painting 

Deliveries and so forth 

Call Y Co anytime 
924-5841 

Office hours; 3-5 p.m. Monday through Friday 




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SOMERSET TIRE SERVICE 



Drive to your nearest STS. 



Itnr-Hckami • East lnM«kk • 

RaiM • I wi wu iHt • MaiiiM • lorlk 



FtaMiMlMI 

I PWtNltM 



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Meanwhile the YM has 
hired two new program 
directors, John Matune for 
physical programs and Alan 
Tablack as youth program 
director. Both are functioning 
jointly to improve 

programming in the Paul 
Robeson building. The YM is 
also taking a hard look at the 
cost and enrollment ef- 
fectiveness of its existing 
programs as well as at 
programming in other places. 

Little has been done by way 
of capital improvements to the 
Paul Robeson building over 
the years, consistent with a 
philosophy that says non- 
profit organizaiton should put 
their money into programs 
and not into bricks and 
mortar. Consequently the 
building needs a new and 
better insulated roof to 




gftsaas^sgssjggg^ 



Firestone ^eal "Estate 



169 Nassau Street 



REALTORS 



Carol Caskey 
Kay Connikie 



Mary MacManus 
Donna Reichard 



Joan Galiardo 
Jane Jacobs 



Ellen Souter 
Gary Grover 



(609) 924-2222 

Gail Firestone 

Jim Firestone. Broker 




LOSE TO THE MARVELOUS PLAYGROUNDS OF 
PRINCETON'S RIVERSIDE SCHOOL. A versatile 
four-bedroom home ideal for an in-law arrangement 
with a master bedroom suite and family room with 
fireplace at ground level. Upstairs are a living room 
and dining room with vaulted ceiling leading to a 
-jj treelop deck, a good eat-in kitchen and three family 
'^'vhedrooms. There's also a huge activity room for family 
projects, cub scouts, etc. Bicycling distance — even 
walking distance — to town and govi n. 1159.500 



LAND, LOTS OF LAND. AND 
HORSES TOO. 




5 ACRE COUNTRY ESTATE FN WEST WINDSOR 

Iwrdering on the Assunpink with a lovely custom 
two-story colonial and a 20 x 40 in-ground Buster 
Crabbe pool. Massive brick fireplace in the living 
room and dining room, spacious country kitchen, 
four generous bedrooms. Come watch a beautiful 
sunset in a very pretty area. $175,000 






NEW LAWRENCEVILLE LISTING: A LOVELY COL- 
ONIAL IN THE WOODS OF PINE KNOLL. Recently 
featured in a national homes magazine beautifully 
maintained, and in absolutely move in condition. Four 
bedrooms, two and a half baths, low cost gas heat and 
central air, and fireplace in the den for those cool 
nights. A wonderful neighborhood for raising a family. 
See it now. |111J)00 




A HOUSE IN THL UUUU^ l.\ iulns. 1. 1 « .^•- -^ i-i'^ KK- 
SIDE. Ideal for a mutli-level deck overlooking the 
brook. Four generous bedrooms, family room and 
study. Living room has high ceiling St fireplace. Great 
for a big family |17».500 



A SUPERB NEW OFFERING IN THE WOODS OF 
WEST WINDSOR. 5 bedrooms. 2' 2 bathrooms, large 
family room with fireplace. Ready to move into at 

1167,500 



THIS DELIGHTFUL RANCH IN PRINCETON'S 
RIVERSIDE in pristine condition features a living 
room with bay window, formal dining room, eat-in kit- 
chen and family room with fireplace. Three bedrooms 
in all including a master suite. Surrounded by a sylvan 
canopy of trees and just walking distance to school and 
bicycling distance to the University. $172,500 



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L N.T. Callaway^ 



REAL ESTATE 



4 NASSAU STREET PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08540 

921-1050 



Judy McCaughan 
Anne Gallagher 
Wllla Stackpole 
Eleanor Young 
Charlotte McLaughlin 
PatCahill 
Linda Hoff 
Barbara Rose Hare 



Mary Ann Sares 

Kay Wert ... ^^ ' 

Tip Blount 

Ann Brower 

Ned Scudder 

Zelda Laschever 

Catherine Geoghan 

Diane Bleacher, Pro. Mgmt. 

Pete Callaway, Broker 




CONSTITUTION HILL 



Condominium ownership, a secure maintenance-free lifestyle in a 
prestigious community. TWO NEW HOUSE DESIGNS have been added, 
featuring flexible floor plans with a variety of options. Gracious one, two 
and three bedroom homes with garages are priced from $238,000. 
1 3'/2% financing is available for a limited time to qualified buyers. 





WEST 

Close to schools and shopping, this Colonial features a step-down living 
room with fireplace, panelled library, dining room, kitchen and family 
room, along with a convenient location. Four bedrooms, 2 baths, plus 
powder room One car garage. Many flowering trees, shrubs and a brick 
» $110,000 




NELSON RIDGE ROAD 

Appealing Cape Cod situated on a large professionally landscaped lot. 
Center hall, spacious living room with fireplace, dining room and library^ 
Modern kitchen, screened porch and flagstone terrace. Master bedroom 
■and bath on the first floor. Two second floor bedrooms, bath and storage^ 
Tasteful decor and well-arranged floor plan. 2 car garage. $1 83,000 




WEST WINDSOR 



Park-like setting for a spacious Colonial featuring living room with 
fireplace panelled family room, kitchen with exceptionally large dining 
area powder room and laundry, dining room and deck. Master bedroom 
with 'bath, three family bedrooms, bath and good closet space. Two car 
garage. Currently being re-decorated. ^^ 33,500 



m 

BEAlfOn 



MUlTim LISTING SItVICE 

MLS 




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PRINCETON 

Great Room on the Great Road! Walls of windows, built-ins, wet bar, 
fireplace and adjoining deck off living/dining room provide a beautiful 
entertainment area in this exceptional contemporary. Modern kitchen, 
breakfast room, family room with bookcases and fireplace plus a lower 
level game room. First floor laundry, powder room, sewing room or 
bedroom. Curved stairway enhanced by copper lined planter leads to 5 
bedrooms and 2 baths. Almost 5 acres. Two car garage. $385,000 



4»»»t 



SAMPLE OUR SOUPSR SOUPS ior 

tupper, from the Foodwinkel Take 
home a quart tonight. U Cttambert 
Street 921 0809 

9«H 



HIRE CREATIVE WOODCRAFTS INC. 

to do the 1001 o<M lobs no one elM wants 
(carpentry, bookcases, window care, 
outside and inside work, etc.) 
References Call anytime609 5W 2IM. 
8 4 4t 



NASSAU AIRPORT TAXIS - Service to 
and from all airports. Teleptione 921 
/339. 

4 28M 



ARRAN6E-A-DATE 

It's tiard to find a nice person. ..Wtiy not 
let us make it easier for you? 



Call921-8SSS 

or write p.o. P.O. Box AN 

Princeton 



WE BUY USCO BOOKS allsubiects, but 
pay better for literature, tiistory, art, 
ctiildren's, tt>eoiogy, and ptiilosopfiy. 
Good condition a must. Call Micawber 
Books, 108 Nassau Street, Princeton, 

921 8454 



FILING CABINETS! Come and see our 
metal filing cabinets for office or fwme. 
Grey, tan, olive, 2 or 4 drawer. Also 
typing tables. Hinkson's, 82 Nassau 

610« 



10-6 tf 







V 



Walk to town from this solid slate roofed stucco Colonial located across 
from the High School. Presently used as a house and apartment, it could 
easily reconvert to a single family dwelling. House consists of living room 
with fireplace, sun p>orch, dining room, kitchen, bath, lower level 
playroom with Vz bath, second floor master bedroom. Separate back 
stairway leads to apartment-kitchen, living room, bedroom and bath and 
deck. Treed yard and 2 car garage. $21 5,000 




BATTLE ROAD 



A large corner lot provides an attractive setting for this brick Colonial 
which overlooks a pretty terraced yard. Large entry hall opens to a step- 
down living room with fireplace; spacious dining room and adjoining 
solarium. Kitchen, butler's pantry and first floor powder room. Four 
bedrooms, study or bedroom and two baths on the second floor. Two 
car garage $310,000 



Pnn-eton area representative tor 

SOTIIKBY PARKK BKRNKT 
INTERNATIONAL RKALTY ( ORPOR ATION 



Salads and Super Sandwiches 
at COX'S 

Fresti flowers, stone «nimal planters. 
Bagels, coffee and more, more, more... 

COX'S 

180 Nassau street 

98tf 



NOUSE FOR RENT opposite Princeton 
StioppingCenter. 3 bedrooms, 1 W baths, 
garage. S735 plus utilities. (609) 443 
1311 evenings weekends. 104 3t 



FILING CABINETSi Come and see our 
metal filing cabinets for off iceor home. 
Grey, tan, olive 2 or 4 drawer. Also 
typing tables. Klinkson's, 82 Nassau. 

610« 



STOVES, AOD-ONS, FURNACES: For 

wood and coal. SeautituI, practical and 
what heat! See our selection. Ttie 
Energy Warehouse, 2935 Route 1, 
Lawrenceville. 896 9519. 

106tf 



MASSAGE THERAPEUTIC FEMALE 

masseuse, Trained in Germany For 
woman only Call for appointment 
Renate (609) 394 2019. 11 3 3t 



CUSTOM DOWN CLEANING SER- 
VICE: Parkas, vests, coats, sleeping 
bags, comforters. Source Bicycle Shop, 
54 N. Onion St., Lambertville, N.J. 
(609) 397 1188. Daily 10 6, except 
Sunday and Tuesday. 11 3'4t 



MORRIS DANCING GROUP looking for 
place to practice in Princeton area. 
Anything from size of living room to 
gym will do, wooden floor preferred. 
Will pay $5. S10, 2 hours week Call 
Dana 452 5790 (days) . 



HOUSE TO SHARE: Quiet, non smoking 
professional sought to share four 
bedrooms, two bath, ttouse located on 
tree-lined street, just minute*' walk 
from Cox's Store, Thomas Sweet, and 
University campus. Rent ist275plus ■/> 
share of utilities. Garage space 
available for slight additional charge. 
Respond Town Topics Box No. U'l. 11 
10 2t 



PHILIP DRIVE HOME for sa^e, 
prestigious Riverside area, 4 BR exec. 
For lull details write Town Topics Box 
No. T99Principalsonly. 11 10 4t 



CHAPTERS WANTED: Montgomery 
High Sctiool PTSA Fair Saturday, 
December 11 Table rentals SlO ■ for 
application 201 874 4600. 11 10 4t 



MEN'S ALTERATION on clothing by 
expert tailor cither purchased here or 
elsewhere. Princeton Clothing Co.. 17 
Witherspoon St .Princeton 924 0704, 6 

10 tf 

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS of Prin 
ceton. For immediate help with a 
drinking problem, call 609 924 7592. For 
information, write PrlrKeton P.O. Box 
538, Meetings every night in Princeton 
or surrounding area. 9-l0tf 



CARNEGIE REALTY, Inc. 

Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated 
PRINCETON CIRCLE AT RT. 1 



921-6177 



452-2188 




PRINCETON - Spic and Span 3 Bedroom 2 Bath 
Ranch - Easy walk to town. Lovely lot with mature 
trees $124,500 

CARTER BROOK ROAD. Above Kingston. Lovely 
neighborhood on cul-de-sac. Spacious 4 bedroom 
2'/2 bath ranch. Fireplace, patio, underground 
utilities, Princeton address. $1 1 4,900 




I 



PRINCETON: Conveniently located 2 year old 
Colonial on Linden Lane. Walk to schools and 
shopping. $119,900 

PRINCETON - 5 bedroom Colonial within walking 
of Hospital and shopping, $69,900 

MONTGOMERY - Charming Colonial Farmhouse - 
1 50 years old - 2.56 acres. Owner offers financing 
to qualified buyer. $"• 62,500 

MONTGOMERY - Spacious 6 bedroom Dutch Col- 
onial. Possible Mother/Daughter arrangement 
Financing available to qualified buyer. $1 39,900 



197« BUICK REGAL, Sport Coupe, 
Turbo ctiarge, air conditioning, 43,000. 
$6500. Call 921 0279. 11 17 2t 



DIANE SURICK ANTIQUES -On Route 

27, 2V2 miles north of Kingston 6 shield 
back ctiairs, 6 Regency chairs, drop 
leaf table, dining room tables, 
mahogany breakfront, server, tilt top 
hall table, oriental rugs, silver tea set, 
brass lamps, carved Lincoln rocker, 
jewelry, much more, 201-821 6898 



FOR SALE: 2 RADIAL SNOW tires, 165 
X 15. used one winter only, like new, 2 
forS38, Call 924 2545 eve till 11 p,m. 



FOR RENT: Littlebrook area, 
Decemt>er 9 to January 15, Attractively 
furnished 2 bedroom house with large 
sunny livingroom. Nominal rent plus 
utilities, 921 9290or 452-4711, 



WANTED: Used post and rail fencing, 
round holes Also some snow fencing 
Call before 10 am, or after6 p.m., 921 
7967 



FOR RENT ■ Princeton 1 bedroom 
apartment Living room with 
fireplace, dining room, kitchen tialf of 
duplex. On Mount Lucas Road. $500 per 
month includes utilities. Call 924 2222 
Firestone Realtors. 



TRAVEL 
WANTED: 
March 12 
Venezuela 

2487999. 



COMPANION FEMALE 

your cost $459. Saturday 
to 19th. Margarita Island, 
Call from 9 4, Linda 212 



ON THE GULF - 1 Bedroom, V/, bath 
condo, AAarco Island. Available 
December $1200., January SI 300. 
References 587 8245 evenings. 11-17-2t 



FOR RENT ■ Three bedroom rancher, 5 
miles north of Princeton, available 
December 1 $600 per month. Call 215 
295 3562 after 5 pm 11 17 2t 



1910 HONDA PRELUDE: Great car 

good condition. Moon roof, copper 
colored. $5700 Call 609 397 2707, 
evenings, 11-17 2t 



ENRICH YOUR HOME this Christmas 
with oil portraits st>ow affection and 
love live sitting prefered for a striking 
likeness, from $300. Call Oliver 201 536 
5468 evenings. 11 17 3t 



PROFESSIONAL TYPINO - Theses 
Dissertations Term Papers, Call after 
6p.m.609 298 6661 A. Snedeker, 1117 

3t 



ARE YOU TIRED Of a big house?? We 
will find you a new house, town house or 
condominium- lust tt>e right size-and 
help you sell the present one. Country 
iHeritage Realtors 799-8181. Evenings, 
weekends 655 5500, 11 17 4t 



CARKHUFPS 
GARDEN CENTER 

Complat* Patio 

& Garden Cantar 

Nursery Supplies • Patio 

Furniture • R. R. Ties 
Route 1 South Brunswick 

(201)297-2626 

We deliver 
to the Princeton Area. 



ClARIDGE WINE 
b LIQUOR 

Wine and Champagne 

chill«d while you wait 

in 3-5 minutes 

Princeton 

Shopping Center 

924-0667 — 924-5700 
FREE DELIVERY 



beckandcall 

tlie ossistonce group of princeton 
caH (609) 924-7651 




PRIi\ICETI 
ARIVIY-NAVY 

Reasonable Prices 
AAV2 Witherspoon St. 




l&ATARD eOfIRT 

A Quality Condominium Complex in Princeton at • 
Mountain Ave. and Bayard Lane - ■ 




Excellent Financing Available 

Builder discount available on first units 

Open House Sunday 1 - 4 p.m. 

Elizabeth Moynahan, Architect H.T.M. Corporation, Builders 
Carol Caskey, Sales Consultant 



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FIRESTONE REAL ESTATE 



924-2222 



^»« ~. mtitt 



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,~r-ji,o. 



HILt, 



Custom Homes By 
William Bucci Builders, Inc. 

. . JUST 6 LOTS LEFT! 

Dogwood Hill is o unique residential enclave on the west 
side of Mount Lucas Road in Princeton Township. 

The .«^ite is noturolly rolling and covered with notlve 
dogwoods and large shade trees. 

Eleven custom horries will be built on lots of at least three 
quoiters of on acre, in a cluster plan with seven acres of 
common open space. 

William Ducci Builders, Inc., ore local builders with a tirie 
record of building quality custom homes in th^ Princeton oreo. 
They will build from their plans or yours. All lots ore fully 
developed with public woter, sewer and underground utilities 
of electric ond gos. 

For more inlormation. coll: 

K.M. Light Real Estate Stewardson - Dougherty 

Realtors Real Estate Associates. Inc. 

609-924-3822 609-921-7784 



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HOLIDAY kAZAAR Presbyterian 
Chrucn, BroMi and Low«il«n. Hopewell. 
FrideY November )9, 4 « p.m.; 
Saturday. November 20, 10 a.m. 2. 11- 
10 }t 



UNICEF HOLIDAY CARDS: And 

calendars for sale at the international 
Center, Princeton University, Room 11, 
Murray Dodge near Chapel. AAondays 
Through Saturdays, 10 4. Information 
4SIS006or921 7870. 

ni03t 



CLASSICAL PIANIST AVAILABLE to 

play at w««ldin«s, parties, banquets. 
alone or with saprano. References, 
masters degree, etc. Will play 
anything! Call Bridget Conrad at 971 
7851. 102751 



TENNIS PLAYER WANTED Com 

petent womens intermediate indoor 
game seeking additional player on 
Mondays, 5 6 30 pm Call Wl 3722, 921 

10-6tf 




MASONARY UNSTATIONARYT 
Heaved walls, cracKed steps loose 
oricks? Each winter neglected costs 
more to fix. 921 1135. 

11 10-4t 



FIREPLACE INSERTS; Help you heat 
your home! See our attractive and ef 
f icient models. The Energy Warehouse, 
2935 Route 1, Lawrenceville 896 9519 

I06tf 



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CONVENIENT: Windsor Mill luxury 
coodo, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, wall to wall 
carpeting, air, club, pool, tennis. S595 
monthly Minutes from NY trains. 
Doses, 409 443 *9U after 6 p.m. 

11 103t 



PARTS FOR TOYOTA CORONA. 
Alternator Voltage Regulator $25, 
starter $40; new Sears battery S3S, 2 
excellent steel tires $35 each with rim , 2 
good tires $20 each, tire size W S P165 
80R13. Call 924 4941. 

11-11-4t 



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RUBBER STAMPS 

School or college address. 

Home, business zip code 

Rubber stamps of all kinds and 

sizes made to your order at 

Hinkson's 
82 Nassau 




JEWELS BY JULIANA 

Expert watch Mewelry Repair 

Restrlnging on Premises 

Design ti Remounting 

16 Wltherspoon St. 

921 7233 



FLOOR SANDING, STAINING 
&REFINISHING 

Hardwood floors Installed 

BEST FLOOR CO. 
♦24-4*97 



11 10-H 



9 29 tf 



11 10-31 



HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. 2 

bedroom, 2 bath condo. Pool, free 
tennis, walk to beach. Many extras 
$319 $399 per week. 40»-»24-8315.^^^^ ^^ 



WINDOW QUILTS, COVERINGS « 
STORMS: Decrease hea? loss and save 
you energy $$$. We have a fine selec 
tion. The Energy Warehouse, 2935 
Route 1, Lawrenceville. 894 9519. 

106tf 



PASSPORTS, APPLICATIONS, VISAS, 

Pryde Brown Photographs, 12 
Chambers Street, 924 9792. Family 
portraits in natural settings. Weddings 
and other celebrations Please stop in 
and see the new studio. 

1013121 



ROOM FOR RENT: 750 sq. ft. plus 

' storage room for cultural or com 

• munity use only. Call 655^1350 or 395 

I 0711. 

11-3-3t 



WANTED -OUNS, SWORDS, military 
items, decoys. Licensed, collector 
dealer will pay more. Bert. Call 924 3aoo 
days. '"0-" 



ANTIQUE QUILTS A LACE. Daguer 
retypes. Stoneware, Silver, Rugs, 
Baskets, at Full House Antiques. 32 
Main Street, Kingston. 9S4-4040 iMO-tf 



Schwinn 

New and Used Bicycles 

Sales, Service 

Parts and Repairs 

KOPP'S CYCLE 

43 Wltherspoon Street 

9I4-iaS3 



1979 CHEVY MONZA. New stereo 
cassette New 4 fires, new batteries, 
new brakes 65,000 miles. Best offer 
Call 924 3360 after 5 p.m. 

11 3-3t 



2-14-tl 



PLUMBING, Reasonable, You Bet! Call 
Philip Plumbing Serving the Prin 
cetons, the Windsors and surrounding 

area 443 3345. 

11 3-4t 



AJDREYSHORT 

163 Nassau Street, Princeton, N.J. 921-9222 
2431 Main St., Lawrenceville, N.J. 896-9333 
ALL AROUND 
LAMBERTVILLE - an attractive 3 bedroom condorr.inium on a little 
creek ^64,900 

LAWRENCEVILLE - a town house with 3 bedrooms - Financing available . 
to qualified buyer. $95,000 

HILTONIA, WEST TRENTON - a handsome 3 story Dutch Colonial 
Financing available to qualified buyer. $84,900 

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP - A NEW LISTING a 4 bedroom nnultilevel in 
move-in condition. $157,000 

PRINCETON BOROUGH - Cape Cod with a private backyard and a large 
pat.0 $137,000 

HOPEWELL BOROUGH - 4 bedroom Victorian and carriage house with 
two apartments. $150,000 

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP - on Honey Lake in Elm Ridge Park - William 
Thompson Colonial. $259,500 

PRINCETON TOWNSHIP NEW LISTING - A 4 bedroom executive Col- 
onial. Excellent location. $188,000 

PRINCETON TOWNSHIP NEW LISTING - In Town 3 bec^oom Cape 
Cod. Walk to town. $113,900 

Call Toll Free 1-800-641-3486 Ext. 100 
Each Office Independently Owned and Operated. 






fit 



K) 



LIGHT 



SALES ASSOCIATES: 



Karl Light • 

Realtors 247 Nassau St. 



Broker 

(609) 924-3822 



Constance Brauer 
John Cartwright 
Friederike Coor 
Marcy Crimmlns 
Cornelia Oielhenn 

Lawrenceville 
Specialists 



Vonnie Hueston 
Shirley Kinsley 
Derry Light 
Stuart Minton 
Edward Moshey 

Marge Dwyer 
Gladys Wright 




REALTOR 

Princeton Real Estate Group 
Multiple Listing Service 



'-V, ">~l 




HIGH UP UPON A HILLSIDE 

in Princeton's exclusive Western section stands 
this Williannsburg colonial. Welcoming entrance 
hall with quarry tile floors, gracious living room 
with built-in bookshelves, cabinets, fireplace and 
oak parqust floors, guest sized dining room with 
chair rail, and warm country kitchen with quarry 
tile floors and dutch doors leading to terrace. 
Master bedroom with dressing room and bath. 3 
other bedrooms (2 also overlooking the balcony) 
on tf>e secoTKJ floor, arxJ a most useable basement 
featuring study with fireplace, laundry room arid 
workshop. Details include crown moldings, chair 
rail trim, brick terraces and walks, arid stone re- 
taining walls. All this on 2 plus wooded, nicely 
landscaped acres. A pretty house and a great new 
listing at $375,000 




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27 VANDER VEER 



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Beautifully maintained Lawrence ranch In Univer- 
sity Park Three bedrooms, 2 baths, new carpeting 
— excellent condition. Make offer! $99,500 



A TOUCH OF CLASS 

in a stunning residence on six plus wooded acres. 
Formal entry court with miniature fruit and 
espaliered trees, imposing 2 story stucco home in 
a neo-classic or post modernist design by ar- 
chitect Peter Waldman, it offers lovely, light soar- 
ing open spaces that make up the living, dining 
and kitchen areas of the first floor. Upstairs, a 
private master bedroom suite with library, loft and 
deck; in a separate wing. 2 more bedrooms, each 
with deck, and shared bath. 

Flanking one side of the entry courtyard is a 
charming guest house of large living room or of- 
fice, sleeping alcove, and '/z bath - all with its own 
private terrace. Potential apartment, anyone'' 

All the newest energy saving features are of- 
fered - wood burning stoves, extra duty fibre glass 
insulation, double glazed windows and 3 electric 
heat pumps to zone the living areas for 
economical heat and air conditioning. 

This is an exciting new listing for a very special 
buyer. Offered at $450,000 

HANDYMAN SPECIAL 

Older masonry Princeton home in need of up- 
dating - just waiting for some dedicated do-it- 
yourselfer! Living room, dining room, older kitchen 
and bath. 3 t)edrooms and study or nursery. 
Needs lots of work and tender loving care - but in a 
convenient in-town location near schools and 
shopping, it could t>e a buy at an asking price of 

$76,900 

HERE'S A BUY! 

Well kept 3 bedroom, 1 V2 bath colonial in nearby 
Franklin township. Front porch with louvred win- 
dows, living room, separate dining room, eat-in kit- 
chen. Mature landscaping, roof only 3 years 
young. Very convenient location on the New York 
txjsline. Only $85,000 

BUILDING TIME! 

A rare find! Small in-town lot on Moore Street, 
Princeton Township. Approximately .18 acre, 
public water and sewer, all utilities. Approved for 
building. Mature trees, some plantings. Owner 
financing available for qualified buyer. 

Reduced to $43,500 







K'v«s2S5«f 



BUILT BY HUNT & AUGUSTINE 

A Princeton word for quality Pretty brick and 
frame 2-story house may be your house to come 
home to. Large living and dining rooms, both with 
fireplaces, panelled study with wet bar. Five 
bedrooms (one on the first floor) and SVz baths. All 
on 2 plus acres with mature trees and plantings. 
New on the market at $325,000 




THE LIVING IS EASY - 

in this attractive one floor home, Solidly built and 
maintenance free, it offers pleasant living room 
with brick fireplace, separate dining room, good 
modern kitchen, 3 bedrooms and 2 baths Nestled 
under tall trees, and beautifully landscaped (some 
40 varieties of azaleas) the ground.'j are truly love- 
ly. Centrally air conditioned for your comfort, and 
convenieni to transportation, this is a new offering 
worth seeing. $139,500 



•|M 



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PSYCHOANALYTIC PSYCHO- 
THERAPY: Low cost for adults who 
are suitable for research program. 
Free consultation. Private office in 
Kendall Park Please call (201)297 1283 
if interested 



1f7SVW.RABBn DELUXE, Sl.OOO Call 
024 0S65. 



LARGE ROOM for professional female 
Kitchen privileges Walk anywhere 
J200plus utilities References required 
Evenings, 924 2787. 



BICYCLE TAG SALE: Many makes, 
including 3 and 10 speeds Mint con 
dition. Sale Saturday and Sunday Nov 
20 8. 21. 10 am. to 2 p m. 30 Duffield 
Place, Princeton 921 3492 



APARTMENT WANTED: Mature 
professional woman seeks small un 
furnished apartment immediately. 
Private kitchen and bath. Max $400 
month Walking distance Nassau Street 
stores or Princeton Shopping Center. 

jJ^n smoker Excellent Princeton 
references Pleasecall 924 1915 



YOUR TURN: Over scheduled? Doing 
more and enjoying it less? Your Turn is 
a workshop to confront your need to do 
one more thing for one more reason, 
and to explore your reluctance to take 
time lor yourself. Center for Human 
Resources, 896 0618 11 17 3t 



ARE YOU LOOKING for a real bargain 
jn telephoto copying machines? 
Available; two almost new Burroughs 
DEX for 200 systems machines Totally 
automated faclimile transceivers 
designed for minimum operator in 
volvement Can transmit and receive 
with no operator required. Features 
multiple speed, and can send to and 
receive from other brands of machines 
over standard telephorte wires. Original 
roll of paper in each machine only 
partially used. Five additional roles 
included in sale. Pair cost $9990 new. 
Best off«r over $5000 Call Ellie at 
609 452 8M6 11 17 3t 



ROSSMOOR RANCH for rent (Monrof 
Township) with oaraoe, near shopping 
and direct New York bus $77000. Other 
models from $55000 Country Heritage 
Realtor»799«181. 11 17 7t 



HEAR YEI HEAR YEt For the Im 

possible and possible, tf>e impractical 
and practical, the unique and wonderful 
and for that special someone who 
seems to have everything try the new 
McCarter Ttieatre Christmas Store for 
your holiday shopping. Located at 1 
Palmer Square in tt»e former Tucker, 
Anthony and R.L. Day office adjacent 
to the Princeton Bank, McCarter has on 
hand McCartar glassware, notecards, 
sweatshirts, t shirts, aprons, tote tags, 
sport bags, playing cards, key chains, 
mugs plus gift certificates and tickets 
to McCarter Theater events! Enter ttw 
Scrooge Doss Raffle Win a limiter 
edition, handmade, porcelain doll o 
Ebenezer Scrooge complete with hi 
very own counti,ig house desk and joii 
us in a complimentary glass of ho 
mulled cider. Holiday Shopping hat 
never been so easy! McCarter Theater 
Christmas Store, 1 Palmer Square in 
Princeton Open Monday through Sat 
urday, 11 am. *p.m., Thursday even 
ingsuntil9p.m. 11 17 3t 



6UTTERTALK: Check roof, chimney, 
clean gutters one story, $30. 2 story 
$45,921 1135. 

n-l04t 



FOR SALE Mercury Comet 1974 asking 
$*S0. Please call evenings or weekends. 
Telephone 683 0677 

11 11 2t 



SEEKING DAY WORK. Own tran 
sportation Please call 609 695 8522 
after 3 p.m. 

11 11 2t 



FOR SALE: 1978 green 4 door Chevette 
Very good condition. Air conditioning, 
automatic transmission, radial tires, 
bucket seats, excellent mileage Call 
days Mon Fri 924-6500 ext. 356, 
evenings 974 1616 

11 102t 



RELAXATION: Relax your tense 
jjUMCles and rejuvenate your entire 
body in your own spa or hot tub. We will 
guide you in your selection and in 
stallation of spas, hot tubs, saunas,^ 
decks and greenhouse enclosure. 
Affordable luxury for indoors or out. 
Call for professional consultation in 
your home Sales, Installation and 
service. Custom Aquatics and Car 
penfry. Inc. 609-446 2552. 10 27 51 



ARTISTIC HAIRDRESSERS 

All phases of beauty services from f>ead 
to toes Walk in service and by ap 
pointment 



i a WItDerspoon Street 

Ji ; 1-IT-tl 



DO IT YOURSELF 
LEGAL KITS 

Divorce. Wills, Bank^TipHy, Separation, 
Incorporation, Nanrte Change. 



201 782 5S40 
ANYTIME 




WOMENS 
WEAR 

in 100% 

Natural Fibers 

Wools-Silks-Cottons 

ANARKALI 
BOUTIQUE 

1 95 NasMu St. 

(across from Bellows) 
921-8974 M-Sat. 10-6 

visa - mastefca'd 



James Irish 
Tree Experts 

Tree & Stump Removal 

Tree • Shrub • Hedge 
Pruning and Topping 

residental • commercial 

924^3470 

* fully in»urr<d * 



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SKILLMAN FURNITURE 

Used furniture, chests, dressers 
unfinished bookcases, etc. 

SPECIAL OF THE WEEK: Mahogany 
breakfront; a long harvest table. 



\ 



212 Alexander St., Princeton 

Mon-Fri 9-5: Sat 9 1 924*1 881 




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P 

CROSSROADS 
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X CUSTOM HOME - WOODED ACRE - PRINCETON AD- 

O DRESS Spacious 11 room home has 2 fireplaces, 
library, LR, DR, family room, recreation room, 5 BR's 
and 4 baths. Built for an exacting engineer, it has many 
N extra features and could never be reproduced at the 
asl<ing price of... $224,000 

EWING CAPE ready for 2nd floor expansion if desired. 
Double lot, fenced yard. $52,900 

ASSUMABLE FHA MORTGAGE AVAILABLE in 

Hamilton. 3 BR colonial. $65,000 

WELL MAINTAINED, comfortable cape. 4 BR's, 
Lawrence. $71 ,500 

ATTRACTIVE RANCH surrounded by woods. Cheerful 
eat-in kitchen, full basement. Kingston. $74,000 




Linda Carnevale 

Aniuta Blanc 

Lois Fee 

Hazal Stix 

NIra Lavid 

Carolyn Hills 

Lenore Barish 

Marcle Braude 

Jeanette Leiggi 

Anne Hoffmann 

Mary Nordlund 

Nancy Armstrong 

Laura Procaccino 

Mary Ellen Marino 

Roslynn Greenberg 

Laralne LaPlaca Bender 



CHARMING PRINCETON FRAME 

decorated and painted. 2-3 BR's. 



HOME newly 
$79,000 



PRINCETON BOROUGH COLONIAL JUST REDUCED! 

3 BR's, glassed front porch, nice garden. $79,500 



LAWRENCE 3 BR 

decl<. 



ranch, brick fireplace, large wood 

$83,000 



LAWRENCE - 3/4 BR, family room w/brick fireplace, 
well-designed working kitchen. Quiet street. $83,500 

CHARMING - Princeton Boro colonial, chestnut wood- 
work, move-in condition. $89,500 

PRINCETON RANCH - LR w/fireplace, DR. eat-in kit- 
chen, garage, lovely large lot. $1 00,000 



4 BEDROOM PRINCETON CAPE - 2 baths, patio, 
aluminum siding. $105,000 

PENNINGTON CAPE on quiet, tree-lined street. 3/4 
BR's, walk to town. $118,000 

WEST WINDSOR - walk to train. 4 BR ranch. Step down 
family room w/fireplace. $1 1 9,000 

FIRST FLOOR PRINCETON BORO CONDO - in 

gracious older home. Renovated. $1 25,000 



OWNER'S WILL "TALK TURKEY" IN RETURN FOR 
DELAYED CLOSING. Beautiful arches and abundant 
natural light. Double glass doors from large living room 
with fireplace to covered porch and from large dining 
room to terrace. Perfect for entertaining. Spacious 
master BR w/dressing room, 2 other BR's. $1 59,000 

2 BR CONDO IN PRINCETON BORO VICTORIAN - 

wood burning stove, completely redone. $1 29,900 

CUSTOM BRICK RANCH ON 1.97 ACRES. 3 BR s 

family room w/fireplace, finished basement. Hopewell 
mailing address. $140,000 

ENJOY THE VIEW OF BROOK AND LOVELY 
GROUNDS from the picture windows of this Princeton 
ranch $144,000 

ENJOY PRINCETON ON FOOT - Condominium on Gor- 
don Way. Walking distance to schools and shopping. 

$162,500 

CONTEMPORARY ELEGANCE, COMFORT AND CON- 
VENIENT LOCATION. Superb one year old Princeton 
home. A great value at $1 66,000 

PRINCETON BORO TOWNHOUSES ON TREE 
STREET - 2 story LR w/FP, atrium, garage. $1 67,500 

ARCHITECT DESIGNED HOME on private lane 4 BR s, 
2^2 baths, skylights, open stairway. Princeton. 

$168,000 

CUSTOM BUILT PRINCETON HOME featuring 
maintenance free exterior, oversized rooms & beams. 

$179,500 



IN A STATELY PRINCETON HOME 

elegant condo next to lylarquand Park. 



a 3 plus BR 
$225,000 



NEW CONTEMPORARY IN PRINCETON. 4 BR s, huge 
library plus family room. Skylit living & dining rooms. 

$310,000 






PRINCETON - Off Stuart Road, 2 acre wooded lots. Sewer hook-ups included. 



$83,000 



PRINCETON - Large wooded building lot in a great family neighborhood Two minute walk to elementary school. $75,000 

PRINCETON - On a quiet cul-de-sac off Lambert Dr. in a fully developed area of individually designed homes - 3.47 wooded 
acres - at a new low price. • $75,000 

HOPEWELL-Twelve acres with view, privacy and seclusion on Van Dyke Road. Wear your hik- 
ing boots and walk back 1 200 feet on the cleared pathway to see the site and the ^'^^^^^^^dy 
for building. Approved perc Asking . *'" "'"* 



$85,000 




Princeton Crossroads Realty, Inc. 

\\V1 Nassau Streol (Corner Harrison) • Prinit'lon • Park in our lot. 
CALL ANYTIME 609-924-4677 OPEN 7 DAYS 



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PIANO TUNINO 

Exptrt ptano tuntng 

regulation and repair 

Reasonably priced 

KINNETHB. WEBSTER 
8M0S98 



10-13H 



TNHIS AND MAMUSCmrr TY PI NO 

Oltsertatlons 

Turabian, MLA APA or Campbell 

Foreign Language typing 

including Gieek 

Correcting Selectric II 

(20 type styles) 

10 years experience 

6ERAL0INE DiCICCO 



FARRINOTON'S MUSIC 

LESSONS 
SALES 

RENTALS 
REPAIRS 



12 Spring St. 



*24-l2|} 



I 

z 



specially designed, handmade 



FURNITURE AND CABINETWORK 



PORTRAIT SKETCHES FOR 

HOLIDAY giving pastels by ex 
perienced artist. Call evenings 924 6012. 
II 10 3t 



ROOFING 
SHEET MBTAL WORK 
J.C. EISENMANNACO. 

All Types of Roofing 
(including hot roofing) 
Free Estimates Given 

Ail WorK Guaranteed 
466 122B 



FACTORY OUTLET 

FOAM cut to any site 

MATTRESSES 8. BOXSPRINGS made 

to order 

PILLOW INSERTSmade 

SHREDDED FOAM in volume 

Therapcdir Name Brand BEDDING 

CAPITAL BEDDING 

Between Yardville » Bordentown 

US H*ynO Pti 798 0910 



WORK WANTED MOVING AND 
HAULING. Cleaning yards, attics and 
cellars. Call any time. 394 S644. 9 15 St 



in the Pr I rKeton 
area since '962 



• Rofer Maren 



WE BUY USED BOOKS all subjects but 

pay better for literature, history, art, 

children's, theology, and philosophy. 

4««.]03f Good condition a must. Call Micawber 

Books, 108 Nassau Street, Princeton, 

nil-lt 9218454. 



LOT FOR SALE, 3 acres, 8 miles from 
Palmer Square. Unusually attractive 
with lots of possibilities. For in- 
formation call 924 7034. 111031 



MAGIC BY LAICO: Live doves and 
rabbits Reasonable rates 201 382 1205. 

5 19 tf 



STUDENT MOVERS 
EXPERIENCED 

All Types Furniture 

Local or Long Distance 

"Reasonable Rates" 

No Job Too Small 

Call Kirk, 609 443 5844 

or Don, 609 393 3540 



FOR SALE: Quaint Three story building 
with office and two apartments above, in 
Princeton Borough. Owner will hold first 
mortgage for qualified buyer. Tel. 924 
0284. Evenings 921 8695. 



CARPENTRY SERVICE AVAILAELE: 

for home remodeling, additions, 
repairs, and other miscellaneous lobs 
25 years experience Free estimates 
Call 609 466 2980 

98tf 



JACK OF ALL TRADES ■ We will Clean 
your house, apartment or business, do 
vour /ard work or errands, serve and 
clean up at parties, and simplify your 
life in any other way we can. Don't do it 
yourself call us! Fully insured, locki 
(Princeton) references 215 598 3409. 

98tf 



FRAME IT NOW 

at the 



23M 



196S CORVAIR CORSA 4 door, 4 car 
burators, needs battery and more, $400 
or best offer Call 215 493 6719 after 6 
pm 



EYE FOR ART 

6 Spi ing St 







ADLERM AN CLICK 

15 Spring St., Princeton 924-0401 • 586-1020 

Realtors & Insurors since 1927 For All Area Listings 



RED CARPET 

'Coast to Coast" 





LISH Pi.l sn |M,\\ ri\(iSsurroundspacious9room 
PRINCETON spill near Lake Carnegie. If you're look- 
ing for a Dining Room, L/R with fireplace, 3 B/R's, 
and IV2 Baths in one area and a huge panelled Family 
Room, B/R, '2 Bath and sep entry in another area, 
think of the many possibilities this gracious Princeton 
home has for in-laws, teens, or separate quarters in top 
potcharea. Now $149,500 



WARM & COZY BI-LEVEL in Hightstown. 3 B/R's, I'l. 
bath home in a family neighborhood. Good sized L/R. 
D/R. eat-in kitchen, large family room & 2 car garage. 

$79,900 




ilN THE HEART OF PRINCETON! A charming^ B/R 
home near shopping, schools & public transportation. 
It features a L/R with a fireplace, dining area, kitchen. 
14 baths, a breezeway, full basement & 1 car garage. 
Also for rent at $750 mo. $115,000^ 




A LOVELY HOME near shopping, schools k walking 
distance to bus line. 3 B/R's, 2 large full baths, a bright 
Living Room w/fireplacc. Dining Room, sunny screen- 
ed porch, a good Kitchen and Den make up this charm- 
ing brick ranch. The garage has an automaUc opener. 
* $125,000 

A DARLING HOME PLUS IN-LAW APT. JUST 
LISTED IN PRINCETON! L/R with fireplace, dinette 
area, eat-in kitchen, 4 B/R's and 2 baths. Apartment 
has 1 B/R, kitchen & bath. $125,000 

BRAND NEW COLONIAL on almost an acre in 
Hightstown. 4 B/R's, sep. D/R. Eat-in Kitchen, Family 
Room w/fireplace. 2i^ Baths, Deck. Central air & 
Garage. Now under construction - still time to choose 
many finishing touches. $89,900 

HIGHTSTOWN BEAUTY! 3 bedrooms, l^-^ baths on a 
lovely tree lined street in Hightstown on a cul-de-sac 
surrounded by woods and a rippling stream Urge liv- 
ing room, dining room, modem kitchen, spacious den. 
1 car garage and large deck Just listed. $75,000 



Joan Alp.rt • HHarllyr, M.«n«. • Dan Faccinl • Marten. HorciU • Jan. Lamberty • Edyc. Ro..nlt,.l. • Joan LoPrlnd 
PhylH. L.».n • Edn. Aron. • Sar.h Larach • Roury 0N*H • S«ki Lewin • E.the, Pogrebln • Milton Sadovsky • Elaine Halberstadt 

Members: Multiple Listing Service, Princeton Real Estate Group 
COMMERCIAL AND LAND 

DESIRABLE INVESTMENT PROPERTY LOCATED 
IN PRINCETON BORO ON Nassau Street. 2 story, ap- 
proximately 2,500 sq. ft. property used as offices. Zon- 
ed "Neighborhood Business. " Asking $195,000 

BEAUTIFULLY RENOVATED SHOPPING CENTER 
in PRINCETON! 22,000 Sq. Ft. building in prime loca- 
tion. Excellent financing for qualified buyer. 90% leas- 
ed. Parking. NOW > $850,000 

IDEAL POSSIBLE PROFESSIONAL PROPERTY on 

well known well-traveled Cranbury Road in fast- 
growing West Windsor. Masonry house on corner lot is 
divided into living and working quarters with attached 
garage for easy expansion. Large living room & dinette 
area, 2 B/R's, bath, full basement, pine floors & panell- 
ing. $89,900 

YOU ASKED FOR IT! A small farm, income, lovely 
home, outbuildings on 15 level acres open & treed. It's 
hard to beat this combination in East Windsor at 

$144,500 

A MOST INTERESTING land listing on Washington 
Road with Princeton address. 4 acres. All utilities. 

$250,000 

COMMERCIAL BUILDING with approximately 3,000 
sq. ft. Parking for approximately 30-40 cars. New 
Egypt area . Rent at $675 per month or buy at $98,500 

60 ACRES with 5 B/R home, cottage & income produc- 
ing outbuildings now available for investment! If you 
have $50,000 and are qualified, we can get you a 10% 
mortgage on this lovely open & wooded property with 4 
separate lots having preliminary approvals. Sale due 
to retirement. $199,000 

.lESTAURAKT WITH LIQUOR LICENSE! Seats ap- 
proximately 300. Excellent building, good business. 
Washington Township. 

MUST tLOSt: ESTATE. 23 industrial acres with 
truckers' garage, all utilities. R.R. siding. 
CLARKSVILLE ROAD. 20 acies zoned ROM-4. 
suiUble for offices or industrial park. Also, 64.35 acres 
across road from above, zoned R-1. Available at 

$18,000 & $12,000 per acre 

EXCELLENT INVESTMENT. 11.2 acres in East Win- 
dosr. 530' frontage on Route 571. zoned industrial of- 
fice. **^'"^ 
«/2 DUPLEX, 2»/i story in desirable location. 5 apart- 
ments. Total income nearly $1,500 per month. In ex- 
cellent condition. Trenton. Asking $75,000 
4.5 ACRES IN KINGSTON — Zoned residential. Pro- 
fessional office use allowed in dwelling. $65,000 

RENTALS 

PRINCETON RETAIL SPACE!2,300 +/- Sq Ft. 
available now. Princeton has limited retail space 
available. Top market, excellent location and parking. 
Don't miss out!! 

PRIME OFFICE space in center of Hightstown. Close 
to N J. Turnpike & Rtes. 130 A 33 Warehouse space, 
shop area and dock available. Very reasonable rent! 

50.000 SQ. FT. of newly refurbished office space on Rte, 
130 in Washington Township. Will subdivide. 



».jf 




NEW price: : Estate says sell. Very special property 
in Hightstown on 3.4 acres. Our Victorian home has 6 
INCOME PRODUCING APARTMENTS PLUS AN OF- 
FICE SUITE. $165,000 

OLD FARM HOUSE + 29 ACRES - Millstone 
Township, Eight bedrooms, two kitchens, two baths. 
Workers bungalow, eggroom and garage. Owner mor- 
tgage for qualified buyer with 15-20 percent down. 




GRACIOUS OLDER COLONIAL on treed comer lot in 
Lawrenceville. Living Room w/fireplace. Dining 
Room, Library, Family Room w/fireplace, 7 B/R's 
and A^/2 baths. 6 Zoned Gas Heat! All draperies, 
washer, dryer & refrigerator/freezer included. $149,900 

COUNTRIFIED LIVlNCi in Roosevelt. 3 bedroom 
ranch, living room, eat-in kitchen, front and rear por- 
ches, and attached garage. $53,900 

BEAUTIFULLY DECORATED TOWNHOUSE with 
finished basement in East Windsor. 3 bedrooms, 2»*2 
baths. Move-in condition. Assumable mortgage 
available at 13Vij% to qualified buyer. In the $70.000's 



STORE A FIRST FLOOR office space avail, in 

Hightstown. Excellent terms 

OUR COMPETENT STAFF CAN SHOW YOU ANY PROPERTY IN THE 



AREA - CALL ANYTIME. 



STEWARDSON-DOUGHERTY 

T^ea/ Estate 'dissociates y Incorporated 

j66 ^?{assau Street y ^Princeton y !}{ew Jersey 08^40 

*T*hone: tog-gi 1-^^84 







NEW LISTING 



A gracious residence in the heart of town affording the utmost in conve- 
nience, charm and hospitality There is a very spacious entrance hall 
featuring a nnagnificent Tiffany glass v\/indow, a dining roonn where twen- 
ty can dine comfortably, as well as several bedrooms, library, and a liv- 
ing room just made for the Christmas Holidays. $269,500 

NEW LISTING 

ATTENTION DEVELOPERS! 86 acres of prime farmland with some 
woods located in Plainsboro. 10 acres zoned industrial, 76 acres zoned 
R200 Call for details 




DODDS LANE 

This Shady Brook split-level is sited on a lovely three quarter acre lot with 
exceptionally nice trees and mature shrubs. Designed for a small family, 
the floor plan includes an entry hall, separate living and dining room, 
family roonn with adjoining bath, a master suite with dressing roonn and 
bath, and a guest room and bath There is a fenced pool area with patio 
and swimming pool that needs to be revived. One-car garage, $1 57,000 




Well built Cape Cod, low maintenance 
ing. Three bedrooms, two baths. 



Walk to bus, schools and shopp- 

$108,000 



;#"*"""'?*» 




HOPEWELL 



A beautiful barn of a place! This handsome gambrel roof barn was con- 
verted into a spacious and unusual house at the direction of a leading 
Princeton architect Now further improved by the present owner the floor 
plan includes on one floor an entry hall with flagstone floor, a huge living 
room - dining room with fireplace and sunken conversation area, modern 
kitchen with breakfast area, a separate study, four bedrooms, two baths. 
Plus on the upper level a huge loft area for expansion or storage and a 
completely separate studio apartment with large studio room, kit- 
chenette, bath and sleeping loft. Special features include old panelling, 
wide pine floors, original beams, a very efficient Tarm furnace burning 
coal, wood or oil, enclosed courtyard, screen porch, two-car garage with 
studio/workshop. All on 1 ,5 acres between Pennington and Princeton 
Lovely country views, quiet surroundings. NEW PRICE $235,000 




PLACE 

Stately turn of the century Colonial with two living rooms, dining room, 
modern kitchen with breakfast room. Four bedrooms, three and one half 
baths. Third floor suites with bath. Five fireplaces, lovely private walled 
garden. $359,000 




ROLLING HILL ROAD 

An uncommon Colonial with classic charm. Spectacular living room with 
stone fireplace and high ceiling framed in massive hand-hewn oak 
beams; dining room with bay window and French doors to a stone ter- 
race; big, sunny modern kitchen; pine panelled study with fireplace; 
ground floor bedroom, bath and lavatory. Three twin bedrooms and two 
full baths on second. Attic, basement, two-car garage. Special features 
include plaster walls, random oak floors, slate roof, and rich architectural 
detail throughout. On over two beautiful acres adjoining Bedens Brook 



Claire Burns 
Anne Cresson 
Sharon Davidson 



Julie Douglas 

Betsy Stewardson Ford 

Georgia Graham 



Country Club. More land available 
Robert E. Dougherty, Broker 
REALTORS 

William E. Stewardson (1935-1972) 



$340,000 



Pam Harris 
Cathy Johnson 
Toby Laughlin 



Sylvia Nesbitt 
Emma Wirtz 
Valerie Young 



f p ^,p.p..iyi' fM^ ' [vi ' i ' ]:i:jLi i2ii ia!!a 3i ni^^ 



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PMNcnoN mm qchange 

KCORDS NEW & USED 
KOUGHI, SOLD & TVADB) 




20 |iUM»u S«r«»l 
Princalon. HJ 



till 



(Hf> 



MAZUR NURSERY 

M5 Bakers Basin Rd. 
Lawfranca Township 

(609) 587-91 50 



PKINCETON JUNCTION HOUSE FOR 
HINT: Available soon. } bedroom*, 2'/i 
baths, living room, dining room, newly 
remodeled Kitchen- large family room 
v>fltt< fireplace, walk to train station. 
$700 per month plus utilities. 799 0833 
n 1/ 4t 



MOVIN«r 

NEKDATRUCKT 

CALL HUB TRUCK RENTAL 

Alt Route NO. 1, Lawrenceville, N 
Across from Latayette Radio 
•W-44M 



DOERLER LANDSCAPES 

.r),.s/(//i//'></ Cdiitr.K Ufui 

9 Gutdon Avt>^ 
L.iwrencevillu 

924 1221 



PRINCETON STRING QUARTET 

serenades all joyous occasions Wed 
dings, parties. Bar Mitzvahs. Classical, 
waltzes and light music VWe add a note 
of grace to every occasion. Barbara 
Sue White, 924 1445. lM0'4t 



CAR POOL. Princeton to Newark 
UMDNJ. Monday to Friday. If in 
terested in forming tar pool call 921 
M17 11" '^ 



GCXDOSPORTS 

OUTLET 



Mercer Mail 

(across from 
Q.B. Mall) 
734-9330 



LIOHT HAULING - Moving JOO mile 
radius. Call 971 9320, 5 » weekdays, 
anytime weekends. ••'" 



[TtCKETRON L0CATI0N\ 
734-9271 



OCT AWAY PROM IT ALL 

Rent a secluded one bedroom New 
Hampahire cabin on four private wooded 
acres, located on a lovely, clear lake. 
Sallfl«h and canoe available for use: golf 
and tennis nearby. 



Call calloct weekdays 
(914) 4fS-MS9 



CLASSICAL GUITAR LESSONS given 
by internationally acclaimed concert 
guitarist. Alice Artzt. Serious students 
of all levels Call 924 2548. 1117 3t 



QUEEN-SIZE MATTRESS, Stearns & 
Foster, set and frame, good condition, 
t45 Call 924 7747 after 4 p.m. Don't call 
Friday. " " '^ 



AUDI $000, very clean, 1979, blue, $4,500 
Call 924 4159. 11 17 3t 



OUTLET 



SCHWINN 

HICVCLES- 




PORSCHE 944 

1983, Mocha Black, Alpine stereo, im 
maculate, garage kept. Take over 
lease, security deposit, cost of stereo. 
(409(921 7525, Mr. Greene. 11 17-lt 



FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT: 

Private entrance. No cooking. No 
problem for parking. Come see after 
4:30 344 Ewlng. 1117 41 




i^iKifiSTON ANTIQUES 



1 




Aunt Sollie's 
Darn 

Country FurnHure 
Glasswara*Collectible8 



. 20 Nassau Street 
Princeton - 924-1806 



J 



SALE PRICED! 

Walnut dining table. 
6 chairs, buflet. china closet 
NOW OPEN 
CLOTHES BARN 

Clothing 1870s- 1950's 

924-9502 

Tues-Sat 12-5 

arid by appt 

Furniture Repair 




You'll be the glltteriryg 

ornamenf or) any occasion 

wearing one of these. . . 

art deco diamond 
necklace * ^5° 

diamond pendant $ 600 

2 ct. tot. wt diamond/ 
platinum pin pendant $2400 
71/^ mm pearl amethyst 
featoon necklace $1 W^ 

DOROTHY H OPPENHEIM 
Res (609) 924-3923 



43 Moin St. • Kingston • 924-0032 



f 



PIANO TUNINO 
Ratlttered Cransman 

Piano Technlclara Guild Inc. 

9217242 

Regulating Repairing 

Robert H. Halllei 
Since 1951 *">"♦♦ 



XMAS TREES Balled and cut 3ft. to9 
ft , $3 to $4 ft. Kasmarek Nursery, 
Opossum Road, Skillman, N.J. Phone 
9218787. 111741 



WANTED: GARAOE to keep land 
scaping equipment in. Must be near 
Wiggins Street. '.Vlll pay. Thomas B 
Goodnow 921 3447. 11 17-4t 



siKscsfiiyici 



KOPn CYCLE SHOP 

43 Witherspoon St. 
Princeton, N.J. 

609-924-1052 



JACUZZI WHIRLPOOL BATH Original 
vi«rld famous Jacuzzi hydro massage 
for home, apartment, or health club, 
insist on Jacuzzi Whirlpool products. 
Anything else is something less. For 
information call Authorized Service 
Agent, Custom Aquatics and Carpentry 
4094442552. 10^27 51 



FIREWOOD: Seasoned apple and peach ' 
wood Split, slow burning and fragrant 
Terhune Orchards 924 2310. 11 U tf 



PRINCETON AREA LANDOWNERS - 

DO you want to keep hunters off of your 
property? For help with posting, ca I 
20^^29 2802 or 201 359 2705, late ar 

ternoons or evenings 



GOODTIME CHARLEY'S 

Lunch Aton thru Fri 

Dinner 7 days a week 

Music every night 

Banquet and Meeting Rooms 

40 Main St.. Kingston: 924 7400 

4 10 tf 



ifi. 



r«iiil.- 



^>l 



Sternsectk 

A handsome house, fastidiously maintained... comfortably spacious with 
four or even five bedrooms... and a pleasure at all seasons with four 
fireplaces for warmth now. a balcony and terraces for summer and a 
garden room for anytime! $275,000 



LAKE (^ARNEQIE ARbA 

A Icvely view of the Lake is just one of the special features offered! All 
the rooms of this colonial are spacious and inviting - great for entertain- 
ing or enjoying as a family. Five bedrooms, four baths, central air condi- 
tioning, burglar alarm, and much more. $365,000 

RENDALL-COOK 
& COMPANY 

REALTORS 

360 Alexander Street, Princeton 

924-0322 



a HILTON ® 

REALTY CO. OF PRINCETON, INC. 



](?E?Sfei«t^^' 



SPACIOUS FRENCH COLONIAL HOME. Heated swimming pool with a 
Cabana that has a kitchen for pool parties. The home has many extras, 
including a finished game room. $259,000 



'« % 



NEW 3 BEDROOM RANCH in*"Princeton close to Busing & Shopping, full 
basement, fireplace, gas heat, air conditioning, aluminum siding, other 
extras $128,000 

MINI-ESTATE ON WEST SIDE OF PRINCETON. Gracious living just a 
few minutes from Palmer Square 6 Bedrooms, an attached greenhouse, 
many extras. Please call for details. $375,000 

LARGE FOUR BEDROOM COLONIAL. WOODED LOT. Fireplace in 
family room, large modern kitchen, living room, good sized dining room, 
2'/2 baths, full basement and large two-car garage. $1 65,000 

DESIRABLE RANCH WITH MAINTENANCE FREE EXTERIOR in 

Hopewell Twp. 3 bedrooms, 1 '/z baths on lot with trees and garden in 
quiet neighborhood. $85,000 

MODERN 3 BEDROOM HOME on 3 very private acres. Features living 
room, a modern kitchen with breakfast area. 2 Baths, Full Basement and 
large deck overlooking the scenic valley below. $75,000 

RENTALS: NASSAU ARMS North Harrison Street. Princeton Boro - 
Apartments Available immediately. 



i 



I 



I 



RENTALS: HOUSES AND APARTMENTS 

Mercer and Somerset County MLS 
Princeton Real Estate droup 
Affiliated Independent Broker 
(Nationwide Referral Service) 

EVENINGS & WEEKENDS CALL: 

William Schuessler, 921 -8963 Anthony Tevere. 466-0925 

Harvey Rude, 201 -359-5327 Emma King, 799-1 694 

Mov>^ry. 395-1 671 Russ Edmonds. 201 -449-9357 



921-6060 

1 94 Nassau Street 

Hilton BIdg., 2nd floor 



SsSSSS»SSSafl*SSSS5*K«=!SSSSSSS6S$6Sd^ 



t > 



iirsvHO 



CONSUMER 
BUREAU 



loo 



in 



DEPENDABLE 



REGISTERED 

—Symbol 

of rasponslbia 

consumar tanrice 



Consumer 
Service? 

The local business people listed below are all Consumer Bureau 
Registered, which means they have not even one valid* un- 
satisfied customer complaint in Consumer Bureau's files. By adver- 
tising on these "Who's Who" pages, they help finance Consumer 
Bureau's continuing consumer information and assistance service 
and they cordially invite your patronage. 



i« Advertising - Outdoor. • Carpet Dealers: 

R.C. MAXWELL CO. 3968121 Since 1894 W.L. HARRIS Furnltur* Colonial 

Need We Say More! PO Box 1200. 
Trenton 08606 



Rt 



& 

130. 



• Air Freight & Express: 

AIR-X We ship anything any size & 
weight, anywhere' 3570 Ouakerbridge 
Hd . Tren 586 1833 



•Alarm Systems: 

AOT SECURITV SYSTEMS Fire. 

Burglar. Hold-up. Closed Circuit TV: 

cmmrcl & rsdtl 229 Lawrence Rd.. 
Trenton 695^1144 

•Antique OIrs; Auctioneers: 

CURVIN E MILLER Specializing in 

antiques Will arrange public auction. 

Will buy & sell estates Ham Sq 

586 0798 
LESTER ft ROBERT SLATOFF. Inc 

Auctioneers Dealers - Appraisers. 

Lecturers: Antiques. Households. 

Estates. Silver. Jewelry: China: 

Glass. Bought & Sold. 777 West 

State Trenton. 393-4848. 



Traditional furniture & carpets 

Cranbury 443-3200 
JACMAR FLOOR DESIGNS Rt 27. Kings 

ton Mail. Kingston 683-0745 
LOTH FLOORS ft CEILINGS Karastan. 

Bigelow Lee, others 208 Sanhican Or 

Trn 393 9201 
RUG A FURNITURE MART, Inc. Prn 

Shop. CI.. N Harri son St 921-9292. 

•Caterers: 

ANGELONI'S Cataring. Banquet & 
party facilities for over 800. 1445 
Whitehorse-Mercrvl Rd . Hamilton Sq 
586 4100. 



•Ceramic Tile: 

ARIES TILE INC. 

PO Box 11247 

Yardville. N J 695-8877 
TERRA COTTA Handmade ceramic tiles 

from Mexico & Europe Hamilton Av, 

Hopewell 4661229 



• Antiques: 

KINGSTON ANTIQUES Fine Jewelry & 
Antiques. 43 Mam. Kingston. 924-0332 
& 924-3923. 

• Appliance Repairs: 

AUST'S GAS APPLIANCE SVC ft IN- 
ST AL. Trn 585-2513. 



• Auto Body Repair Shops: 

BODY SHOP By Harold William*. 

Specializing in Fiberglass. Corvette 

All domestic & foreign cars Rie 206. 

Prn 9218585 
GRIFF'S AUTO BODY Auto Sales 

Repairs Towing 56 Troy Ave Tren 

ton 883*880 
MERCER AUTO BODY Body repairs on 

all makes & models 56 Model Ave 

Hopewell (10 mm from Prn local call) 

466-0217 



• Cleaning & Pressing: 

BLAKELY LAUNDRY All types of laundry 
service, dry cing rug cing 156 Bruns 
wick Ave Trenton 896 9235 (local call) 

CRAFT CLEANERS Rug Cleaning & 
Drapery Cleaning 225 Nassau. Prince- 
ton 924-3242 

L ft M LAUNDRY Dry cleaning by the 
pound Prn No Shop Ctr (Rte 206) 
924 2902 

LUXE FRENCH DRY CLNG Pick up S 
delivery 205 Withrspn Prn 921-0893. 



•Clothing - Furniture: 

10 (XX) sq (I ot clothing, furniture, bric. 
a brae etc SALVATION ARMY THRIFT 
STORE. 436 Mulberry SI Trn 599 
9801 



• Delicatessens: 



• Auto Dealers: 

AUDI ft PORSCHE Sales ft Service 

Holberl s Porsche Audi. Inc 1425 

Easton Rd . Warrington. Pa 7 miles 

from New Hope 215 343 2890 
AUDI-PORSCHE Aulh. Sales ft Service. 

OUAKERBRIDGE PORSCHE-AUDI 

Route 1 Prn 452 9400 
CATHCART PONTIAC 

1620 N Olden Av, Trenton 392 5111 
DATSUN Sales & Service SOLOMON 

DATSUN Rte 130 Highlstown 448 

1310 
HAMILTON ChrytlerPlymoulh 

Aulh Sales & Service Plymouth, 

Chrysler. Imperial 1240 Route 33. 

Hamilton Square 48620il 
JEEP.JEEP Sales, service, parts, 

accessories REDNOR ft RAINEAR, Inc. 

2635 So Broad. Trenton 888 1800 
SPORTS ft SPECIALIST CARS. INC. 

Mercer County s only auth SAAB 

dealer 1641 N Olden Av .Trn. 882-7600 



THE VILLAGE STORE Cold cuts salads 
dairy, barbecued chickens Plainsboro 
Rd . Plainsboro 799-8578 



• Auto Parts Dealers: 



LENTINI AUTO SALVAGE 

Rie 31, Ringoes (201) 782-4440 
THUL AUTO SUPPLY CO. American 
& Foreign Parts Rtes 206 & 518 
Rocky Hill 921W33 
TRENTON AUTO PARTS Hundreds of 
thousands of new. rebuilt and used 
auto parts lor anything on wheels 
667 Southard St Tren 394 5281 



•Auto Radiators: 

ROY'S ARCO The ONLY radiator repair 
shop in Prnci 272 Alexander. 924-8288 



• Florists: 

LAWRENCE ROAD FLORISTS 1365 
Lawrenceville Rd 882 6345 



• Auto Repairs & Sen/ice: 

AAMCO TRANSMISSIONS Free tow 
ing: one-day service 1459 Princeton 
Av, Tren. 599-3990 

ROY'S ARCO Electronic tuneups. auto 
repairs, road serv accessories 272 
Alexand«r, Princeton 924-8288. 



• Floor Covering Contractors: 

TILE DISCOUNT CTR. vinyls Gerjmics 
Carpeting. Capitol Plaza Shop Ctr . Tren 
(15 mm from Prn ) 392-2300. 



• Food Marl(ets: 



Rd 



• Banl(s: 



NEW JERSEY SAVINGS 

au Street. Princeton 



BANK 180 
924 8434 



• Bath & Bathroom 
Remodeling & Accessories: 

AARON BATH CENTER American 
Standard. Jacuzzi. ThermaSol Steam 
Baths. Solar Industries 10 Industrial 
Dr New Brunswick 201-247 4508. 



THE VILLAGE STORE Plainsboro 
Plainsboro 7998578 (local call) 

• Fuel Oil & Oil Burners: 

LAWRENCEVILLE FUEL Fuel oil 
pimbg. htng. an cond & energy audits 
16 Gordon Av. Lrncvl 896 0141 

NASSAU OIL Sales & Service 
800 State Rd . Prn 9243530 



>Bool( Stores: 



MICAWBER BOOKS Libraries bought & 
sold New. used & rare books Also open 
Sun 114. 108 Nassau. Prn, 921-8454 



^Boutiques: 



KISMET BOUTKIUE Imported Clothing 
& Accessories. 6V> Chambers Street. 
Princeton 921 8410. 

• Building Contractors: 

WILLIAMSON CONSTRUCTION 

Residential, commercial, renovations, 
additions Fiee estimates 921 1184 
NICK MAURO ft SON. BUILDERS. INC. 
Custom homes, additions: alterations, 
lilo 9242630. 

• Building Materials 
& Lumber: 

BELLE MEAD Lumber. lr\c.-for sen/ice & 
qualityi Serving Princeton area Reading 
3ivd Bel Md (local call] 201 3595121 

QROVBR LUMBER CO. Everything for- 
BuWders S Nqmaowners. l4l Alexan 
a«»:4»ra 924J3041 . 

»«ATM LUMBEM CO. Complete Honr>e 
Building Center Delivery Service 1580 
N Olden Av. Tm. 392-11W 



• Furniture Dealers: 

GASIOR'S FURNITURE ft ACCESSORIES 

2152 Rte 206. Belle Mead 201 874-8383 

(local call). 
GROSS. JULIUS, Inc. ASID. Interior 

Design Service Fine furniture, lamps. 

accessories 683 Rosedale 9241474. 
W.L. HARRIS Furniture Colonial & 

Traditional furniture & carpets Rt. 130 

Cranbury 4433200 
RUQ ft FURNITURE MART, Inc. Prn. 

Shop Ctr , N Harrison. Prn 921 9292 
SPIEGEL. HERMAN Fine Furnllure US 1 

& Allen La . Lawrence Twp (next to 

Lawrence Drive m) 882 3400 (loca' call) 
VIKING FURNITURE FROM SCANDIN- 
AVIA. Accessories: A. 1.0. Design s«r. 

vice 259 Nassau. 924-9624 



• Hardware Stores: 

LUCAR Paint, hdwre. tools, plumbing 
& elec suppi, houswrs. Open eves. Prn- 
Htstn Ro.. Prn Jnctn. (local call) 799 
0599 

PRINCETON HARDWARE Everything lor 
Home & Garden, paint: hswrs: window 
shades: tools, plumbing, elec, supl. 
Prn Shop Ctr 924-5155 

• Heating Contractors: 

WM. Q. LOWE HTG ft AIR CON. 

Hopewell 466 3705 
NASSAU OIL Sale* ft Service 

800 State Rd , Prn 924-3530. 



• Hi-Fi, Stereo Sales 
& Service 

ABSOLUTE SOUND 

3 Spring Street, Princeton 683-0210 
HAL'S CUSTOM SOUND - For quality' 
and service Rte l & Texas Av, 
Lawrnvl 883-6338 (local call) 

• Hospital Beds; Equipment: 

DELCREST MEDICAL PRODUCTS Hospit 
al equipment lor the home 2100 Notting- 
ham Way. Hamltn Twp 586 1679. 

• Insulation Contractors: 

WILLIAMSON Construction. Free 
Estimates. Reasonable prices 921-1184 

• Insurance Agents: 

G.R. MURRAY INSURANCE CO. 

Complete Insurance Service. 
1 Palmer Sq, W , Prn 9245000 




JOSEPHINE WEBB, Executive Director of Consumer Bureau, broadcasting a Consumer Bureau an- 
nouncement. Mrs. Webb personally Investigates consumer complaints received by Consumer Bureau 
artd In most cases she Is at>le to resolve them to </)• satisfaction of aM concerned. (For what happens to 
unresolved consumer complaints, see below.) 



• Office Machine, Calculator & 
Typewriter Dealers: 

THE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY STORE 

Electronic calculators for gifts 36 
University PI, Prn. 921-8500. 

• Organ Dealers: 

NOLDE'S PIANOS ft ORGANS. Inc. 
Hunterdon Shop Ctr, Rte 202, Fleming 
ton (30 min from Prn ) 201 782 5400 



'Painting: 



HUNT ft O'NEILL PAINTING Interior & 
exterior painting & glass work 443 
8479 

WILLIAMSON COMPANY Free estimates. 
Low Prices Princeton, 921-1184 



• Restaurants: 

THE ALCHEMIST ft BARRISTER Lunch 

eons. Dinner, Cocktails Open 7 days. 

28 Witherspoon. Prn 924 5555 
LIEGGI'S EWINQ MANOR 234 W Upper 

Ferry Rd Trn 882 1150 
PEACOCK INN LunchDinner-Cocktails 

New Adult Cocktail Bar 20 Bayard Lane 

(just off Nassau). Princeton, 924-1707 
Prlncelonlan Diner Restaurant New 

ownership & new management Open 24 

hrs Larger salad bar. daily specials 

Rte 1. Prn 452 2271 
TRIVENI EXOTIC INDIAN CUISINE 

Lunch 11 30 AM to 2 30 PM. 

Dinner 5 to 10 PM 201 249-6496 
VESUVK)'S PIZZERIA ft RESTAURANT 

Fast service 258 Nassau. Prn 921 

2477 



• Stoves, Wood & Coal: 

BOWDEN'S FIRESIDE SHOP. Fealunng 
Glacier Bay stoves & inserts. 
Thermograte inserts. Maieslic, 
Kerosun 1731 Nottingham Way. 
Trenton 586-3344 



• Suraical Supply & Equip. 
Dealers: 

FORER Pharmacy. Sales Rentals. 
Sickroonn equip 160 Witherspoon. Prn 
921 7287 



Uewelers; Jewelry SHops: TJZl^ ^^!l''tL. •!!!"Pl'°!!'".'."? 



• Swimming Pool Repairs: 

WILLIAMSON POOL SERVICE Special- 
izing in concrete swm pool rprs 
337 Witherspoon. Prn 921-1184. 



BAILEY BANKS ft BIDDLE Est 1832 
Quaker Bridge Mall, upper level. Law- 
rence Twp 799-8050 (local). 



• Kitchen Cabinets: 



KAPRI KITCHEN. Inc. ProlsnI. design & 

installation 3212 South Broad. Tren 

(15 mm from Prn.) 585-8150 
MILLNER LUMBER CO. Distr HAAS 

kitchen cabinets, paneling. 600 Artisan, 

Tren 393-4204 



Q.T. BENWARD Interior & Exterior 
painting & wallpapering 201 359-4455 

DANNY'S PAINTING. Exterior interior 
Fully insured Free estimates Water 
Pressure Washing 921-7835 

GROSS. JULIUS H. Interior & Exterior 
painting, paper hanging Decorating 
683 Rosedale Road. Princeton 924. 1474 

B. RICH Painting ft Reeling Free est 
fully insured Inter exter 15 yrs exp 
Sr citizen disc 8«2 7738 evenings 



MACK DINETTE WORKS INC. Kitchen 
chairs reupholstered 2340 Rt 33 
Robbinsville. 587-6606 



• Rigging & Trucidng: 

NICHOLAS FENELLI RIGGING ft 
TRUCKING. 42 years experience 64 
Hiiiman Ave . Trenton 882-0455. 



• Electrical Contractors: 

HAHN Lie No 4419 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING 
Need a good electrician for any size 

electrical job'' Free e«!t (local) ';66 

1.113 
N.W. MAUL ft SON INC. Rt 130 Dayton 

Power & light installation: maint 

repair Residential. Industrial (local 

call) 201 329-4656. 

• Exterminators: 

COOPER PEST CONTROL Graduate 
Entomologist All pests exterminated 
(local call) 799 1300 



• Feed Stores: 

ROSEDALE MILLS All kinds ot feed 
for animals & pets, farm supplies 
274 Alexander SI . Prn 9240134 

• Fireplaces & Accessories: 

BOWDEN'S FIRESIDE SHOP EVERY 
THING For Your Fireplace 1731 Notting 
ham Way. Trenton 586-3344 



• Landscaping Contractors: 

DOERLER LANDSCAPES Landscape 
Designing Shade Trees, tences, patios 
2281 Brunswick Pike. Lrncvl 896-3300 

PRINCETON GARDENING ft LAND- 
SCAPING Lawn Maintenance, Shrub- 
bery. Tree Removal. Top Soil 921-2744 

PRINCETON LAWN SERVICE Beautiful 
lawns built & maintained Free es 
limates & lawn analysis 921-8440 

TREESCAPE Tree care & landscaping 
Landscape design Installation & main- 
tenance Patios & wood decks 201-846- 
0251 & 609 46fr2415. 



Pharmacies: 



160 



FORER PHARMACY Prescriptions 
Witherspoon. Prn 921 7287 



• Photo Equipment & Sen^ice: 

THE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY STORE 

36 University PI , Prn 921-8500 



'Piano Dealers: 



• Laundries: 

L ft M LAUNDRY Self service or drop off 
Rte 206. Prn No. Shop. Ctr. 924-2902. 



CHOPIN PIANO ft ORGAN CO. 

Home of Steinway Pianos 
1001 N Olden Av Trn 695-7456 
NOLDE'S PIANOS ft ORGANS. Inc. 
Hunterdon Shop Ctr. R(e 202. Flem. 
ington (30 min. from Prn.) 201-782 
5400 



• Roofing Contractors: 

CHRISTENSEN ROOFING New shingle 
roofs: chimney & flashing repairs 184 
Carter Rd, Prn 921-1277 « 924 7737 

COOPER ft SHAFER. INC. Est 1930 
New roofs & repairs Fully insured 
63 Moran Ave . Prn 9242063. 

THERIAULT ft BROKAW Roofing & Car 
pentry All types ol new roofs & 
rprs. gutters 4 downspouts Free 
estimates (local) 466 1 259 & 466-2742 

WILLIAMSON Roofing. New roofs and all 
repairs Slate tar, metal, shingle, 921 
1184 



• Tire Dealers: 

JOSEPH J. HEMES ft SONS BF 

Good rich-DuniopPie re lli-Mic helm. 
All sizes, Amer 4 foreign cars Rims 
available Rte 206, Prn 924-4177 
PRINCETON CITGO. Firestone tires 
tor Amencan, compact 4 Foreign Cars. 
Princeton Shopping Ctr 921-6682. 

• Transmissions: 

LEE MYLES Free Check 11, Free 
Towing. Coast to Coast Warranty, 
Foreign 4 Domestic 859 US Hwy 130, 
East Windsor 448-0300. 



'Travel Agencies: 



'Sah/age Services: 



'Pizza Restaurants: 



RESCUE MISSION Our truck will pick 
up clothing, used appliances ft furniture 
98 Carroll St Trn 695 1436 



• Lawn. Garden & Farm 
Supp. & Equip; Repairs: 

SIMPLICITY Lawn. Garden 4 Snow Equip 
meni from 3'/; to 20 hp Complete 
service center JOSEPH J. NEMES - 
SONS. Rte 206. Prn 924-4177 



RODOLFO PIZZA Montgomery Shop Ctr 

Rocky Hill. 924 1813 
VICTOR'S PIZZERIA Fast service 86 

Nassau Prn 924-5515. 



AMERICAN EXPRESS TRAVEL 
Don t Leave Home Without Us 
10 Nassau Street 
Princeton 921-8600 

Ash Mr. Poster Travel Services (For. 
merly Welcome Aboard) Never a service 
fee Mon Fri 8-5:30, 41 Witherspoon, 
Prn 9213350 

DELUXE TRAVEL BUREAU. INC. Person- 
alized travel service 219 Nassau. 
Prn 9246270 

KULLER TRAVEL CO. 
Complete travel arrangements. 
109 Nassau Street, Princeton. 924-2550. 



'Lighting Fixtures: 



CAPITOL LIGHTING — WATCHUNG 
Oamplete lighting services sales 4 
design. US Hwy 22. No Plainfield (35 
min. from Prn ) 201 757 4777 

• Lightning Rods: 

WILLIAMSON CONSTRUCTION 

Free estimates 9?l 1184 



> Limousine Service: 



WILLIAMS CAR HIRE SERVICE Theatres. 
Airports, Weddings. Shopping Trips, etc 
Prn 921 0513 

• Liquor Stores: 

TOWNE Wine ft Liquor A complete 
liquor store serving Prn area Monig 
Shop Ctr, Rte 206. Rocky Hill 924 
3121 

VARSITY LIQUORS Wines, Liquors. Beer 
Free Prn. delivery 234 Nassau. Prn, 924- 
0836 



• Micro Computer — Retail: 

COMPUTER ENCOUNTER Micro Com 
puters for the Home 4 Small Business 
Apple, Atari, Texas Instrument, Hewlett 
PacKard Contact Carolyn Cochrane or 
Pat Varada. 924-8757 



'Moving & Storage: 



BOHREN'S Moving ft Storage. Local 
4 long distance moving 4 storage 
United Van Lines Auth Agt Princeton 
452 2200 

IICHMOND MOVING CO. 
Imlaystown Rd . Allentown. 259 2828 



'Plumbing & Heating 
Contractors: 

JOHN C. NIX Plumbing. Heating 4 Air 
Conditioning License No. 6032 921 
1433. 



• Printers: 

AAA REPROGRAPHICS Offset printing, 
camera stats Fast service 4 compeli 
live prices 262 Alexander St Prn 924 
8100 

LDH PRINTING UNLIMITED 
Complete Printing Service 924-4664 
Offset Printing ■■ Fast Service ■ Color 
Printing, Typesetting. Bond Copies. 
Rubber Stamps. Notary Service 1101 
State Rd (US 206) BIdg B, Prn 

MASTERGRAPHX Quality Printing, Type 
setting. Mechanicals 4 Artwork Rt 206 
4 518 Rky Hill 924 0460 

THE PRINTING CENTER Sears, Quaker 
bridge Mall Resumes instant copies 
invitations business cards, stationery 
4 forms Open every day including Sun- 
day, 

REPLICA Lowest prices: immediate ser- 
vice Offset printing 4 Xerox 10 So 
Tulane (around corner from Annex) Prn. 
924«869 



• Real Estate Agents: 

QUAKER STATE REALTY, Inc. Special 
izing in Bucks County properties. 40 S 
Main. Yardiey. 215-493-1891. 

• Records & Tapes: 

PRINCETON RECORD EXCHANGE 

Bought, sold, traded New, used, disc, 
20 Nassau St Prn 921-0881 



• Savings & Loan Assns: 

SECURITY SAVINGS ft LOAN ASSOC. 

132 Nassau. Prn 924O076 Lawrence 
ville 2431 Mam, 896 1550 (local). 



'Sewing Machine Dealers: ^Tree Sen/ice: 



AMERICAN SEWING 4 VACUUM CTR. 

Prn Shop Ctr , 921 2205 
SlngerOuaker Bridge Sewing Ctr. Sales, 

serv. We still make house calls 

799-8170. 



'Shoe Repair Shops: 



JOHN'S SHOE SHOP Expert repairs of 

shoes, incl orthopedic 4 athletic shoes 

18 Tulane. Prn 924 5596 
NASSAU SHOE REPAIR Orthopedic work 

Athletic shoes rep d Shoe dyeing 180 

Nassau (rear) Prn. 921-7552. 



• Shoe Stores: 

ALEKA SHOES CLOGS ■ 

173 Nassau, Prn 921-6625. 



• Siding Contractors: 

CONTEMPORARY ALUMINUM Check our 
prices before you decide!' Free est 
Trenton 586-1919. 

STATE ROOFING ft SIDING All type 
siding, storm windows 4 doors, gutters, 
downspouts. Free est. 448-2354 (local 
call). 



• Storm Windows & Doors: 

WILLIAMSON Construction. Free 
Estimates. Reasonable Prices. 921-1184. 



JAMES IRISH TREE EXPERTS Residen- 
tial tree, shrub 4 hedge maintenance. 
F^incelon 924 3470 

ROBERT WELLS TREE ft LANDSCAPE 

Professional arbonsls 924-0983 
SHEARER Tree Surgeons. Estab 1930 
Professional tree care Phil Alspach. 
prop 206 Wash Rd Prn 924 2800 



'Tree Surgeons: 



SCHERER TREE SERVICE. N J 
Certified Tree Expert Spraying, tree 
4 stump removal, pruning: shrub care; 
cabling, insect 4 disease control. 
Insured. Pengln. 737-9600. 



• Vacuum Cleaner Dealers: 

AMERICAN SEWING ft VACUUM CTR. 
Prn Shop Qr., 921 2205 



•Water Conditioning: 

CULLIGAN Water Conditioning of 
Nassau, Inc. FREE water analysis. 
P O Box 49. Prn 921 8800 

•Women's Wear Shops: - 

TALL FASHK3NS BY ELIZABETH Every- 
thing for the tall girl. Gilt cert. 
1905 Rt 33, Hmltn Sq 587-7777. 



• Furniture Unpainted: 

ERNEY'S UNFINISHED FURNITURE Over 

5,000 pieces of unpainted furniture' 
104 Mercer Mall. Rte 1 and Quaker 
Bridge Rd . Lawrncvl. 452-8404 

• Garbage & Trash Removal: 

HIGGINS Disposal Service, ResdntI: 
comrcl; indstrl Metal containers 1 to 
40 cu yds Constrctn 4 Oemoltn. Debris. 
121 Laurel Ave., Kingston 921-8470. 

•Gourmet Shops & Foods: 

FIDDLER'S CREEK FARM Country smok 
ad bacon, turkeys 4 capons Mail Order 
H D 1, Titusvllle 737-0685 (local) 



• Mufflers: 

MIGHTY MUFFLER CTR. 

(Formerly Scotii Muffler Ctr ) Div of J J 
Nemes ft Sons, Inc Mufflers tor Foreign 
4 American cars 100 percent guarantee 
Rte 206. Prn. 921-0031. 

• Office Furniture & Equip. 
Dirs: 

HINKSON'S Complele line of office furn 

iture 4 supplies 82 Nassau. Princetoh 

924-0112 
STATE SALES OFFKE EQUIPMENT New 

4 Used office furniture bought & sold 

094 S. Broad. Tren 392-8066. 



*OUR PROMISE TO PRINCETON CONSUMERS: 

^^^X* IF YOU HAVE A COMPLAINT against any local business firm, just 
call 924-8223 and a Consumer Bureau representative will respond antj in- 
vestigate: then, 

^'^Z^ IF CONSUMER BUREAU'S ALL-CONSUMER PANEL AGREES 
WITH YOU, the business firm involved has only two choices; either satisfy 
your complaint promptly or lose its Consumer Bureau Registration. 

^'C^^ DON'T STAY MAD at any business firm - unltl you first give Con- 
sumer Bureau a chance to help straighten meuer»ou<-Pa// 924-8223 any 
time of any day or night and a Consumer Bureau representative witl go into 
action There is no charge 



CONSUMER 
BUREAU 




YOW lOUl CONSUMB 

imWilKM lAH 

ESTABLISHED 1967 

P Box 443 

Pnnceton 924-8223 4 

•NOT a governmani agency 
■nOT a Better Business Buieau 



•^ 



I 



V-*i 




PRINCETON FURNISHINGS 
AND ANTIQUES 



(On Consignment) 
Fireplace Equipment 



924-1 989 



LANOSCAPINO 

by Martin Blackman 

Creative Designs 

Reasonable Rates 

Callevenings201 874 3172 

(Local call trom Princeton) 



3 12 tf 



coococooooooooocoa 



VILLAGE PAINT & WALLPAPER 

Rt. 206 Rocky Hill, Village Shopper, 921 7120 



PITTSBURGH & MURALO PAINTS 

FINE WALLCOVERINGS 

at discount prices! 



ART SUPPLIES • STENCIL PATTERNS 



SECONDARY 




1177 FORD ORANADA tour door, 60,000 
original owner miles, radio and heater. 
Can be seen at Stefanelii's Amoco. 
$2900. Call 924 2850 after* p.m. 11102t 



CONSULTATION WITH THE I CHINO 

lor difficult decisions, insight Into 
personal growth. For appointment call 
924 8*49. 11 1fr2t 



LOOKING FOR SQUASH PARTNER. I 

am a Princeton University Secretary, 
used to play squash in college, now 
have access to University's Dillon gym. 
Am presently Intermediate but have 
ootentlal. If yoo would like to learn or 
would like a partner, please call 924 
0757. 11 10-4t 



LOANS 



RiOM ANmCA'S OLDEST AiN) LARGEST 
HNANCIAL SBIVICE COMPANY 

Since 1935— 
Tlw aquHy In your hom« can b« uMd for — 

• tax shelters 

• educational trusts 

• investments 

• home purchases 

• hmne improvements 

• other worthwhile purposes 

YEGEN OFFERS — 

• prompt professional service 

• fkncible terms 

• VERY competitive rates 

• Credit Life Insurance 

For more informatkm call 

YEGEN HOME EQUITY 

MncMNi Sorvlce Cntr, 3490 US RL1. Princoton, N.J. 

(609) 452-7071 



HOUSE TO SHARK: Unusual op 
portwnity in a perfect location : Single 
bedroom plus garage and loft space 
available in four bedroom home In ttte 
heart of Princeton. Share house with 
ttree noo»n>oking professionals. The 
large detached garage and loft can be 
dedicated to your craft, hobby, or ar 
tistic pursuit. A small, private 
backyard will be virtually an outdoor 
room in the warm weather. Unfur 
nished. »4J5 a month plus share of 
utilities. Reply TT Box NOT 100. IMO^ 

2t 



DRIVEWAYS CONSTRUCTKO 

PAVING, ASPHALT OR STONE 

Call 914-1715 

•ACK HOC WORK 

Mptic systems, etc. 

EXPERT LANOSCAPINO 

Sod, Seeding and Shrubs 
Comntercial artd-or Residential 

Free estimates 
Call 924-1715 



1-lf-N 



J 



YEGEN ASSOCIATES 



LARK STRING QUARTET. Celebrate 
with music. Weddings, receptions, 
holiday parties, birthday parties, 
engagement parties, anniversary 
parties, or just plain listening. 924 M37, 
297 4267 



ROOFING: All types of roofs (new and 
repairs), leaders, gutttrs, ctilmney 
flashing Fast service. Work guaran 
teed Over 30 years in business. 10, 
percent discount to senior citizens. 
Belle Mead Roofing. 924 2041 or 201 359 
5992 2 11 tf 



SPECIALIZING IN HOME WINDOW 
AND STORM WINDOW CLEANING. 
Inside and out. $3 50 each. Free 
estimate, fully insured. All work 
guaranteed 393 2122 5 6 tf 



OVERHEAD OARAGE DOORS: 

electric operators. Factory to you. Over 
the counter or full service, parts and 
repairs. Call for free information, SOO 
872 4980, Ridge Door, West New Road, 
Monmouth Junction. I14tf 



BUILDING REPAIRS - Roofs (Metal 
Shingle, Slate, Tar), Chimney's 
Gutters, Spouts, Flashing, Walls, 
Walks, Patios, Garages, Porches, 
Steps, Driveways, Fences, Hauling, 
Demolition, Carpentry, Painting, 
Caulking, Glazing, Stucco-Masonry, 
Pointing Patching, inspections. 
Violations, Guaranteed and Insured. 
Call 921 1135. 3 3tt 



OPFICK SPACE, CENTRAL NASSAU 

STREET, recently decorated, low rent 
available now, teleptwne and recep 
tionist service. 9244300 33tt 



LAMP SHADES: Lamp mounting and 
lamp repairs Nassau Interiors, 167 
Nassau St. 61 H 



special appearance by 
JIM SCOTT 
Wed. Nov. 24 

EATERY AMULETTE 

Restaurant a Coffeehouse 

Ridge Rd., So. Brunswick 

(201 ) 329 2777 



CHELSEA CRIMPERS 

14 Spring Street, Princeton, N.J. 

(609)924-1824 

Tues. A Thurs. 9-8 

Wed. a Fri. 94 

Sat. 9-4:30 

distinctive halrstyling 
for men and women 



Lovely Household - Jewelry 
Fine China & Glass 

PUBLIC AUCTION 

DeCou Firehouse, Trenton (Whitehorse), N.J. 

(Off 2900 S. Broad St. to Hobson to Ruskin) 

TUES., NOV. 23 - 9 A.M. 

Lovely bedroom, dining room & living room sets; 
Jewelry; Good atitique bric-a-brac; 40 cartons antique & 
other cfiina, glass, silver, etc.! Important additions! 

Lester & Robert Slatoff 

AUCTIONEERS 
Trenton, N.J. 609-393-4848 



7 28tt 



Short Notice Sale 
Unseen Attic Contents 

PUBLIC AUCTION 

Est. Helen Barlow & Others 

51 2 Maple (Ewing) Trenton 
off Parkway 

Fri., Nov. 19-8:30 A.M. 

(Rain Date Next Day) 

Sold-9 A.M. • Living, dining & Bedroom turn.; old oak 
ladles & knee desks; 4 Windsor chairs; stands; tables; 5 
original Barlow prints; 3 Princeton & Harvard Bradshaw 
etchings; many good old frames; lots antique brlc-a- 
brac; glass & china; ruga; hospital bed. Etc. 

Sold-8:30 - lots wood working, hand & gardon tools; 
bench; drill pross; sender; motors, Etc.! 

Lester & Robert Slatoff 

AUCTIONEERS 
Trenton, N.J. (609) 393-4848 



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WEEKLY MORTGAGE INDICATOR 



\ vary, Wan on • dW|r Xit/m. For «n up lo Ifte ttivHA* 
looounl <0 «Mal to(to/> prawaMng rtami rale • cai fomnmnm 



NAfeichert 



ASKABOUTOUR 
EQUITY ADVANCE (gj 
PROGRAM -^^ 



u 



t3Cf^enle people of New Jersey think Real Estate...thev think Weicherf^ 



6 + ROLUNGACRES 

MOfEWEU.-...wilh wNle and ipiuc* pine trees sur- 
round 1Mb apadous 5 bedroom Ranch. Highltgrits in- 
dudt r/k b«»». iwniy ■'oom or oWc*. tMMment writri 
wood MOV* wd cowered deck. For your horees and 
•Qutament. twrt are 2 twtnd pMtura*. poie bwr^. 
haSdworVahopandaoaragM $179.500. Pn-^47. 



'*iJ 



Christmas Is For Qmng 



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i T-:i U-U- II II n IT ixn TrTrm 
ir Tj u u lJ u TT-n n it a 



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'^O 'tf V — D _ 

p Fourth Annual 

I U/JEICHERT CHRISTMAS TOY DRIVE 



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Realtors 



EXCELLENT STARTER 

lAWIIO«CWItUW»ertecl«ortheyouna«ami»y, Wa 

aUiacttoeslonatronthorrtelaahJfaaacuiiteil a Weawng] i 
room wMh Urapiaci*, tewtwpana w<ndowi. Ml beea- 
mam. brMze««ay. aconomical gas heal. 1 car garage 
andaprtvle.tanodyrd $73,&0O.PW-a096. 



WHAT; 

WHEN 
HOW: 

WHV: 



At v^our local VA/eich^rt Co 

Offict- 

Oifts \A rapped and labeled for aqe 
ar\ci sex of child 
On or before Decer>Aber 1st 
5ar\tav\illdeliverqiftsto local social 
ser\ ice orgar\izatior>s ir^tirwe for 
the holidai^s 

To help make a r^eedv^ child's dreanr> 
cory>e true aqair\ this ^ear 
Help us to h«lp ChHdrcn in need this HoKdot| Season 

[l.TTTnTIT 



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YOUR CHOICE 

EAST AMWELL- of great mortgage optionsi A 3-2-1 
BUYDOWN on $80,000 or assurrvlion on $58,000 is 
available to the qualified txjyer of this energy efficient 
and we(l constructed Contemporary surrourxted by 4.24 
acres of wooded beauty Must see to appreciate 
$149,900. PR-8244. 



^P 



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n_ n. CL n 

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PROVINCE LINE RD. 

MONTQOMERY TWP.-3 bedroom Rancti on quiet, ra- 
Mantial road can belong to your family You'll all love 
tia family room firapiace. large, eat-m kitchen and the 
fabutoua acre ol land. Si 05.000 PR-8235 



H 



RANCH WrrH STUDIO 

aWWCKTOW SbadPOorwHancMnPKncalonTwp taa- 
kma a sludto aparanartl tor axira tnoomat living room 
flnfitae. Mrwy. red oak doors and mora on a wooded 
Wm*eWeapai1tefwalua $132,500. Pl*-«71. 



MORTGAGING AVAILABLE 

MOMTOOMCRY TWP.-.to Iha qualified buyw of tf»8 ap- 
proved 9.8 acre subdivldaHa M «nh farmland a3sessrT>ent 
on Sunset fVJ Perlect lor a amal horse farm or a beautiful 
Mfth tumnQ sMe wUh siraem running through front 
$66,000. PR-ai32. 

OWNER ASSISTANCE 
MORTGAGE 

HOPeWElX- « availabis to the Qualified buyer of th.8 sec- 
hidad. semi-rural 1 87 aers tot oHenng both privacy and oon- 
weniwwa 10 towna and transportation With approved percu- 
Mtortwidaoiltog S3B.000 PR-8185 

WITH $10,000 DOWN 

MONTOMKRV TtWP.- quaMled buyer can oMain 
$15,000 MOfrrOAOE AT 13% tor 18 months on this 7/10 
acre buMng M. Looalad m a quiet ealaMiahed neighbor- 
hood, Vm pwosi laafems natural baeuly enhanced by Iraas 
S2S.OOO.Pn-6206. 



18 ACRES 

MONTGOMERY TWP.-Available in residential area of 
SiciHmarVMonlgomery Twp Approved perc and aoii log, city 
water - farmland asaesaed with subdivision potential. 
$100,000 with TERMS AVAILABLE to qualified buyer. 
Pfl-ei30 

OWNER MORTGAGE 

MONTQOMERY TWP.- available to the qualified buyer of 
ttvs beautiful 1 acre land on a quiet country road Residen- 
tiaiy zoned and near schools $33,500 PR-S131. 

READY TO BUILD 

MONT G OM E RY TWP.-Buiid your dream home on tfds 3 -i- 
acra wooded lot. Oently sloping land is excetleni property tor 
aComemporary home $45,900 PR-8266. 

PRESTIGIOUS PRINCETON 

PRINCETON TWP.- can be your home with this 1.6 
wooded acre of land Qet privacy and conventerxie to trana- 
portaMon En^ natural beauty and oountrycfienn Pare and 
soil log hjive been spproved $50,000 PR-820V 



NEARLY NEW 

EWING-Only one year old, this 3 
bedroom Ranch features upgraded 
carpeting, chair-rail in kitchen and 
dining room, special ceramic tile 
floors in bath and a heated garage. 
Convenient to 1-95 and close to 
schools. $76.900. PR-8218. 

Princeton Office 
609-6830300 



Offices Open 
9 a.m. -9 p.m.! 



Weichert 

Realtors 



>4SimBM 

AH offerings are subject to errors and omission^ , 



. 



f 



I 
I 



ASSOCIATES 
REALTY 

162 Masaau Strtot 

609-924-6501 

F. Procaccini, Broker 



IWE'LL FIX YOUR 
FAVORITE 
PIPE 

John David Ltd. 

TOBACCONIST 

Montgomery Shopping Coni 



It 206 



924-88C 



RUNNING SHOE FIX-IT 

MOOIFICATIONSSi REPAIRS 

ENGINEEREDTO 

INOIVIDUALNEEDS 

RECOMMENDED BY SPORTS 

MEDICINE PROFESSIONALS 

COACHESi RUNNERS 



Helen Hunt, (iOf ) n*-tiff 





YELLOW DOOR 
ANTIQUES 


Sr/ng your Xmas list 

unique gifts ■ accessories 

country - formal furniture 

prices you can afford. 

45 Main St. 

Kingston, NJ 

924-6266 

Tues-Sat 11-5 



HOUSEMATE WANTED to Share 4 
bedroom house with 3 others within 
walking distance to the University . J185 
oer month plus utilities. Available 
January I Call 452 3«79 (Kathy) orM4 
4067 



AMELIA SURF AND RACQUET CLUB 

oceanfroni luxury conao for rent on 
Amelia Island, Florida Beautiful 
beach, pool and free Harthru tennis. 27 
hole golf course and excellent fishing 
nearby Easy access by car or plane 
For more infornriation call 924 7072 
evenings 

9galt 



PRINCE CHEVROLET 

The AM New Chevrolet 

OK USED CARS 

ROUTE IM 

924-J350 

opp the airport 

3 )? tf 



A QUESTION 
OF SURVIVAL 



Women Under Siege 

Rasnadiy9fi is a lowri six nmei ticlh of 
the Isiaeli border in Souif^ern Lebanon 
Once a peaceful agnculiu'al vriiage. ''< 
1964 It became the setting to' a camp 
housing 14 000 Palestinian refugees For 
years they lived under constant harrass 
ment and threat of Israeli attack 

Women play a crucial role in the Palest'- 
man crynmunily, as motners teachers 
political organizers, farm laborers and 
fighters Tnrough actuality footage and in- 
terviews with the women ol Rashadiyah 
this film explores trie lives ol six represen- 
tative Palestinian women 

In June t982 the town ol Rashadiyan 
was bombed and attacked by Israeli 
forces The camp was reduced to ruins 
many of the residents lorced 10 llee again 



26 minutes color 1982 1 bmrii/vicjeo 

Made by an all-women 
crew (Britijh American 
and fmb). produced by 
Elizabeth Fernea ISomt 
Woimn ol Uarmkech ana 
Ssmis and Spirits) and 
directed by Marilyn Gaunt 



PALESTINIAN 
REFUGEES IN 
LEBANON 

A lilm by Roger PIc 

Roger Pic gives us a remarkable msighi 
into lives ol the Palestinians in Lebanon 
For the first time we see the full scope of 
their national movement the health ser- 
vices the schools and workshops me 
role of the PlO 

By focusing on the story ol one family. Pic 
succeeds in presenting a picture of eveiy 
day life in I'le camps We are introduced 
to Safta, a young woman who works in a 
PLO workshop in Beirut, and who in her 
spare time teaches reading lo combat the 
high Illiteracy rale in the camps Her older 
brother IS fighting the Israelis near the 
border ot the Gotan Heights, while her 
younger brother is being trained in a 
guerilla camp 



35 



minutes 



color 



1975 



17 8 p-m. 101 McCormicli Hall 

Pnnctton University Program m 
Near Eastern Studies 



Princeton University Program in Near Eastern Studies 







l JOHN HOUGHTON 



REALTOR 




JUST LISTED 

AFFORDABLE AND DESIRABLE 

MONTGOMERY PARK 

Located on a cul-de-sac within walking 
distance to Rocky Hill and conveniently 
located to shopping area. Beautifully 
treed residential location. This 4 BR, 2V2 
bath raised ranch is an excellent invest- 
ment. Central air conditioning, 2 car 
garage situated in Montgomery Twp. and 
priced to sell immediately at $112,900 



John H. Houghton, Licensed Real Estate Broker 

228 Alexander Street ( Sou'.h Entrance) 

Princeton. New Jersey 08540 



fJf.ALtOO_ - 



[609] 924-1001 
AMPLE FREE PAh^tSttt 



J i>r.i«r' 



LEBANON: OCCUPATION AND OP- 
POSITION A talk by Israeli army 
oHicer Tsvi Zores will take place on 
Monday, November 22 at • p.m. at 
McCosh 46, Princeton University 
Campus. Mr. Zores is a member of 
Yesh Gvul (Enough is Enough!), an 
organizatoin of Israeli army officers 
opposed to the war and calling for 
immediate unconditional total Israeli 
withdrawal from Lebanon. The talk is 
sponsored by the Emergency Com 
mitfee on Lebanon. For more in- 
formation, please call 9211 136. 



PRINCETON SMALL ANIMAL 
RESCUE LEAOUE 

S.A.V.E. 

WEEKDAYS TO CLAIM OR ADOPT A 
PET, CALL MRS. GRAVES, 8 4 p.m 
Saturday, 8 11 am, FOR AN AP 
POINTMENT. Nights and weekends, 
report lost or found or injured animals to 
the police 

Report lost and found pets 
wittiin a twenty-four twur period 

2 year old male purebred Newfoundland 
with papers, good with children 

Male 8 month old purebred Golden 

Retriever with papers 

Male Hound 10 monthsold all shots 

Male, 3 year old Ooberman, papers, 

house broken, good with ctiildren 

Female all white German Shepherd, 

excellent watch dog 

5 year old female spayed Irish setter 

with papers, housebroken, good with 

children 

3 female Cocker type pups, 8 weeks old 
Female 4 year old Doberman, has 
papers, good with children, housebroken 
Male and female 9 week old German 
Shepherd type pup 

3 four month old Shepherd type pups 
Female young Yellow Lab type dog 
Female purebred Collie, sable and 
white, and male tri color 6 month old 
Collie 

Male German Shorfhaired Pointer 
Springer Spaniel type, liver and white 
Male 3 year old purebred Doberman 
with papers, good with children 
Call us about young female spayed cats, 
altered male cats and some kittens 
y21-i122 



FREE FULL-SIZE mattress great for 
kiddies to play on Very good condition. 
No boxspring It's yours if you pick it 
up Call 924 6311 



SELECT PECANSI Extra Large. 2 
Pounds Halves (meats) U.SO 5 Pounds 
in shell $1475 Both $27.60. Satisfaction 
Guaranteed. Postpaid. Recipes in 
eluded We ship gifts. Andover Farms 
Box 130 VJ Magnolia Springs, Alabama 
36SSS 




BROOKMILL 



vi.. 



' • /■ 



An outstanding country estate, 13-(- acres, on quiet rural Mill 
Road. A property with everything : large restored stone and frame 
Colonial; two-apartment second house; three-car garage; horse 
barn; bath house; workroom and equipment shed; swimming 
pool; tennis court; gazebo. 

All of this is reached over a long driveway bordered by ivy- 
covered stone walls amidst towering trees and abundant 
specimen plantings and ground covers. The privacy is total, the 
effect breathtaking. 

An ever-running, crystal-clear stream, a large pond with dam 
and locks, picturesque bridges, and a lovely pasture complete the 
one-of-a-kind setting. 

$375,000 



m_ William 



B. May Company 
of New lersey Inc. 

Llc«BS«d Boal but* Broktr 

Sergeantivill*, N.I. 08857 
(609) 397-1907 




THE IDEAL FAMILY HOME IN 
HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP. Center hall Col- 
onial on well treed lot. Living room 
overlooking private pond, family room with 
fireplace, large country kitchen, dining 
room, powder room and study on first floor. 
Master bedroom with bath, guest bedroom 
and bath plus three additional bedrooms^ 
and bath on second floor. Lower level has a 
game room with second fireplace, plus a 
billiard room. Beautifully landscaped, 
deck, and privacy. Realistically Priced Jt 

LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP 
One of a kind house for a bachelor or couple. 
Living room with sleeping loft, bedroom, 
large bath, modem kitchen and laundry 
room. Good sized lot with ample room for 
expansion. , , , , $48,500 

^^^EAL ESTATE V 

10 NASSAU STREET 
PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08540 

Phone: (609) 921 1411 

S. Serge Rizzo ^ 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 



w 



RENTAL 
One Markham - two bedroom, two bath con- 
do, large living room/dining. $1000 

PRINCETON BORO 

Stucco and Slate-roof Colonial with 

beautiful garden. Living room with 
fireplace, heated sun room, den. gracious 
dining room, powder room, pantry and kit- 
chen on first floor. Master bedroom with 
bath plus three additional bedrooms and 
two baths on second floor - third floor has 

additional living quarters and two baths. 

$275,000 

PRINCETON TOWNSHIP 
Shady Brook Section - Ranch house, foyer, 
living room with bow window, dining area, 
country kitchen, panelled den overlooking 
jalousied porch, master bedroom and bath, 
two additional bedrooms and bath. FamUy 

room with fireplace on lower level. 

New Price $157,000 

John Street - Income property - 1st floor 
apartment has living room with fireplace, 
eat in kitchen, bedroom, bath, study and 
enclosed porch. 2nd floor apartment con- 
sists of living room, eat in kitchen, bedroom 
and bath. ^'^'^OO 

WEST WINDSOR TOWNSHIP 
Fieldstone and frame Cape Cod on one acre. 
Front to back living room with fireplace, 
center hall, dining room, eat in kitchen and 
powder room on first floor. Three bedrooms 
and bath on second floor. Amenities include 
grape vineyard, wine cellar and two car 
garage. lively plantings. }]^M 



Employment Opportunities tlirougliout the Princeton Area 



HELP WAKTED-SSCRKTARY: 

Permanent part-time secretary needed 
tor small congenial office in Princeton. 
Good organizational and secretarial 
skills necessary. Basic accounting 
linowtedge preferred. Call between 9 
■.m. 12 noon 924 5703. 



TELEPHONE SALES: Part time, 
permanent. Small Nassau St office. 
Great iob. 924 2040. 11 10-2t 



PART TIME POSITION. 4 days per 
week, scoring tests and proofreading in 
office. Must have good grammatical 
skills. Call Mrs. Ivan 924 3800. 



Z 

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S 
a. 

0) 

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a. 
O 

K 
Z 

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Are You Selling? Are You Insuring?' 

Furniture • China • Glass 

Art Objects • Silver • Jewelry 



Utter 
AND 

I Robert 



SIM 



AUCTIONEER 



IF YOU STAY HOME a lot and you are a 
dog lover, perhaps you'd like to take 
care ot a very affectionate male Cocker 
Spaniel for 2 months. I pay S80 a month 
and provide his food. Please call 212 
675 8003after5pm 1117 3t 



HELP WANTED with freelance paste 
up work at the Womans Newspaper of 
Princeton. Approximately 10 hours per 
month. Ask for Arri at 924 1330. 

10-27 5t 



HELP WANTED: For Plainsboro 
restaurant. Waitresses and salad prep. 
Call (609) 443 5291 evenings. 11 3 3t 



Attend 
Auctions 



Antique Dealer • Appraiser 

777 W. State St. 393 4848 Trenton, N.J. 



E. BAHADURIAN & SON 



estaoishta 1913 



ORIENTAL RUG 
APPRAISAL 




REFRESH 

YOUR RUGS 

FOR FALL 



Nationally Adv«ttis«d Broadloom Carpets 

Naw and Usad Oriental Rugs'Rug Cleanlng*Repairing 

15% Discount on all cash and carry rug cleaning 



(^ tianing aone on localior: d"U ^'W "i our own piam 

883 State Road'Princalon, N.J. •609-924^)720 

Plant Hours: Mon.-Frl. 8 am to 5 pm, Cloaad Saturday 



.SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR: Per 

manent, part time, days, evenings, 
small Nassau Street office 924 2040 

7 15 tf 

HAIRDRESSER to work as an assistant 
in busy beauty salon. Call 924 120C. 10 
27 3t 



THANKSGIVING HELP WANTED: 

Person to help serve and clean up. 
Approximately 18 p.m. $10 per hour. 
Call 921 7469eveings. 



JOB AVAILABLE: At the Women's 
Newspaper of Princeton as distribution 
manager. Payment on commission. 
Call Arri at 924 1330 1117 21 



RESTAURANT WORK 

For someone who likes to get the job 
done. Early level kitchen spot. AA F 11 
a.m. 6:30 p.m. Experience not 
necessary. 

Cafe auLait, 911-0173 



HOUSEKEEPER WANTED: For 2 

veeks, December 18 January 2. 3 light 
meals a day. Required to live in. 
Christmas Day and New Years Day off. 
Good salary. No deductions. 921 8042.11 
17 2t 



ASSISTANT TO BOOKKEEPER: Part 

time, permanent Small Princeton 
office Flexible hours 924 6300. 11 17 3t 



COMPANION TYPE HELP NEEDED 

easy work, some cooking, must drive. 
Hours and rates flexible. Riverside 
area. References. Call after 6 pm 924 
9725 



SANTA WANTED: At Princeton 
Shopping Center Must be reliable and 
like children. Hours; Fri and Sat, 12 to 5 
starting Nov. 26 Also wanted, 
photographer to take pictures of 
children with Santa, hours as above. 
(609) 921 6234. 



TOPNOTCH EXEC ASSISTANT For 

new high tech startup company. One 
Palmer Square office. Essential: 
Excellent voice, diction, telephone 
manner, poise, English Composition 
skills. Must be responsible, self 
motivating, enthusiastic, good at 
details, with dbility to liandle con 
fidential material. Working usually 
alone while principals travel. Will be 
given strong friendly support by per 
sonnel of related organization nearby 
No steno or dictation, but must like 
learning word processing. Occasional 
business travel in executive aircraft. 
Starting from $320 a week depending on 
experience and references. GEOSAT, 
CO Box U 2 Town Topics. 



SUPERINTENDENT 

For large Princeton office 
building. Must understand 
workings of furnaces, 
boilers, and small electrical 
repairs. Some carpentry 
and good painting Will 
have good salary, fringe 
benefits, large five-room 
apartment on premises in- 
cluded Call 683-0853 



RICHARD A. 



'SPECIALIST 

IN CORPORATE 

RELOCATION 



WEIDCL 



REALTORS 



CORP. 



FOR service! 

BACKED BY 

EXPERIENCE 

CALL WEIDEL 



WHEN THE QUESTION IS REAL ESTATE...THE ANSWER IS WEIDEL 



f*> 



:<^'! 



I 



k- •:<!»; 



'% -'^^Nr^ 



A LITTLE BIT COLINTRY ! Stone and cedar rancher in 
Montgomery Township on 6 Acres with fenced corral, 
pole barn and feed shed - all set up for keeping horses 
but just minutes from Princeton $135,000 



i. a*.**.. 



MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE! Custom cape with 
four bedrooms, two full baths and two-car garage. In- 
terior appointments include pegged hardwood floors, 
furniture quality cabinetry and ultra modern kitchen. 
A very appealing West Windsor home. $125,000 



t 



f / 



'4 



-t 



DOLL HOUSE - inside and out this charming colonial 
shows extra care and planning Decorative touches in- 
clude stenciled stairs and trim Brick patio aod garden 
encircled by shrubs for privacy. All in impeccable con 
dition. You'll want to move right in $97,900 



MINT CONDITION rancher in Brunswick Acres with 
many custom extras. Just the right size for the modern 
family with all the amenities for todays lifestyle 
Lovely to look at and delightful to own for $92,900 



j.j>h. 



164 Nassau Street, Princeton, N.J. 
609^V2700 

•OWN AND COUNTRY SPECIALISTS SINCE 19151 



MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATOR 

Princeton Township requires qualified 
person for this position witti experience 
in municipal government and degree tn 
public administration or related field, 
MPA preferred. Salary commensurate 
with experience and training. Please 
submit resume to Township 
Administrator, M9 Witherspoon Street, 
Princeton, New Jersey 08540, or call 
(609) 924 5176 for further information. 
AN EOUALOPPORTUNITY 
EMPLOYER 

11 17 2t 



INTERVIEWERS NEEDED: Part time 
for central telephone facility Day, 
evening and weekend hours available. 
Flexible scheduling, pleasant at 
mosphere, high school grads. Will 
train Call Total Research, 921 8053 11 
10 4t 



WHO WANTS PRINCETON 
CUSTOMERS? 

Some business firms do and some don't 
these days. How to find the ones that do? 
1400 of them, both out of town and local, 
offer their services through the 
classified pages of your Princeton 
Community Phone Book 9 23 tl 



CREATIVE DRAPERIES 

upholstering 
Slipcovers 

75 Main St. Kingston 
9213569 201828^7144 




PERSONNEL DIVISION 



(609) 924-1 022 

tQual Oppoilunity Empiuye 



FULL TIME 
NIGHT CREW 

CLERK 



All Union Benefits 

See Mr Funk 

at 

DAVIDSON'S 
MARKET 

172 NASSAU STREET 



DID YOU KNOW? 

That We Clean Some of 
The Most Unusual Things? 




sine* 
FRENCH DRY CLEANING 

TOLANE STREET PRINCETON. NJ 08S40 



i 

m 




I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

Li 



Looking for a Career? 

Do you sometimes teei that your ambitions are undirected'' 

Professional assistance can be helpful This oHice provides a 

counseling service that includes; 

•Testing of interests and aptitudes 

•Realistic information on 600 careers 

•Personal Counseling 

•Resume preparation 

For more information, call 921-8638 

Anna Willingham, M.A., M.S.W. 

20 Nassau Street, Princeton 



I 
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2S LANGUAGES 

Native teace's and trans- 
ators instriji 'lOr. 'or children 
and adults Aii leveis intens'.e 
courses for travelers and 
business people Tutoring 
Translations 

Call (609) •24-22S2 



SALES ASSOCIATE 

PART TIME 

That special person with a fashion touch and 
outgoing charm who can "pull it all togeth^f'' for 
the fashionable wonnan customer. Must be 
dedicated to service and available to work on 
alternate Saturdays. Above average starting 
salary and unusual benefits. Call t^rs. Downs for 
appointment 609-924-3221 



•FABRICS 

•DRAPERIES 

•SLIPCOVERS 

•FURNITURE 
REPAIRS 

DEWEY'S 

Upholstery Shop 

6-8 Station Drive 

Princeton Junction ^^_ 

799-1 778 ^•^ 



K» 



BELLOWS 

210 Nassau Street, Princeton 



SENIOR PROGRAMMER/ANALYST 

Immediate opening for senior staff in the software 
^ systems group. Requirements: e 

•B.S./M.S. ( E.E., Comp. Sci., Phy.. Chem. or Math. ) 

•3-1- years experience in real-time programming and 
operating systems on micros and minis, experience 
with RSX-llM. and PASCAL 

** Principals only need apply. Send resume and salary ^ 
history to Dr. E.J. Makuchowski. 

PRINCETON GAMMA-TECH, INC. II 

1200 State Rd. ^ 

Princeton, N.J. 08540 

f05 

^=1Q 



C(ynp*/i|r Part B»nmlitt 



ENJOY THE BEST 
OF BOTH WORLDS. 

We have a permanent part-time position open on our 
office staff that will provide you with a steady income 
as well as that important free time. 

This position will appeal to those who enjoy working 
with the public in a friendly, informal atmosphere. 

Duties include taking classified ads, proofreading, 
simple recordkeeping and other office functions. We 
will train you to operate an addressing machine Typ- 
ing ability of approximately 40 wpm and some office 
experience preferred. Hours are 9-5 Monday, Tuesday 
and Friday. 

Salary open, based on experience and ability. 
Benefits include two-week paid vacation after one 
year, annual bonus and participation in profit-sharing 
plan. 

Call 924-2200 to arrange an appointment for interviev^ 
and typing test. 

' TOWN TOPICS 




HAHN 
ILtCTRICAL CONTRACTING 
4M11I1 N.J.LIC«IMN.44lf 

(Talent & Equipment 

Plus 

Reasonable Price) 

Equals 

SATISFIED CUSTOMER 

Always a free written estimate 

for any size electrical |ob 

1 31 tf 



WE CLEAN LIKE NEW. For a ricfi 
man's simonize at a poor man's price 
Call Foster Powell B82 0888 anytime 11 
10 2t 



HANDYMAN Carpentry, electrical, 
painting, landscaping, repairs, 
cleaning. We do large and small jobs. 
PleasecalUoeat (201)297 5950. lM0 2t 



SO ACRES PRIME HUNTING LAND, 12 

miles west of Princeton, Ponds, woods, 
fields. 3 year tease. Call609 924 9792. 11 
10 3t 



TERHUNE ORCHARDS Fill your fruit 
bowl, stuff your turkey, festoon your 
table with apples, vegetdbles, and 
cider from Terhune Orchards. Apples: 
Stayman, Winesap, Red Delicious, 
Golden Delicious, Rome, Cortland, 
Jonathan, Jersey Reds, Mcintosh. 
Pears: Barlett, Seckel Vegetables: 
lettuce, carrots with tops, broccoli. 
Brussels sprouts on the stalk, squash, 
potatoes and much more. Open Monday 
through Friday 9 6, Saturday and 
Sunday 9 5, Thanksgiving 912. Free 
hayrides Sundays in November, 12-5. 
330 Cold Soil Road 924 2310. 11 l&3t 



AFS CITRUS SALE Grapefruit t9.S0ctn 
20 24; oranges $10 SO ctn 40 SO. Pick up 
Dec. 8 Princeton High School. Call 921 
3292 to order or send order and check 
to: 284 Oodds Lane, Princeton, N.J. 
08540 11 10 3t 



TAILORING AND ALTERATIONS on 

all garments, including leattier repair. 
782 Route 27, Princeton. Call (201) 297 
3542 11104t 



CARS sell for $118 95 (average). Also 
Jeeps, Pickups. Available at local Gov't 
Auctions. For Directory call 805687 
6000Ext 1436. Call refundable. I110 4t 



JOB INFORMATION: Overseas. Cruise 
Ships, Houston, Dallas, Alaska $20,000 
to $60,000 year posssible. Call 80S 687 
6000Ext. J 1436. Call refundable. 1110 
4t 



COME TO THE CHANUKAH BAZAAR: 

Biggest selection ever of gifts, 
menorahs, decorations, cards, wrap, 
games, novelties, candles. Princeton 
Jewish Center, Sunday, 11 a.m. to 3 
p.m. 457 Ndssau St. 



FURNISHED BEDROOM IN PRINCE- 
TON. Parking space Non smoking 
businessman No kitchen privileges. 
$17Samonth. Phone 924 0804 



SEWERS: Are you sewing for yourself 
for the holidays or making something 
special for someone? I have lovely 
Vogue patterns at great savings Many 
styles, many sizes. 921 1612. 



WANT TO THINK POSITIVELY about 

frightening new scientific develop- 
ments? Hear Dr. Lewis Thomas lecture 
at Princeton Day School, Sunday Nov. 
21, 4 p.m. Call (609) 924 0071 or 924 3570 
for infoimation. 



FRENCH Cours d'entretien (Niveau 
intermediaire Avance) 921 0492 



FOR SALE: Cast iron Franklin wood 
burning stove. Double door-with 
screen Call after6 (609)924 8665 11 
17 2t 



WOMAN OWNING FURNISHED ROOM 

for rent on Bank Street. No cooking, 
$45 00 a week Call 297 2123 for appt. 11 
3 2t 



WANTED IMMEDIATELY! Female 
professional to share spacious Rocky 
Hill home in beautiful country setting 
approx. 1 acre of land Master bedroom 
with bath, share den, study, liv dining 
room, 2 car garage, laundry. Must sign 
lease. $375 plus utilities, with possible 
3rd. Call 921 2011 evenings. Keep 
trying. 11 3 3t 



LOST, FEMALE BLACK and white 
Siberian Husky. 1 brown eye and 1 blue. 
Large reward to anyone knowing ttie 
whereabouts. Please write Town Topics 
Box NOT 97 113 3t 



lor)#i 



FULLY INSURED 



DANNY'S PAINTING 

^rae Estimates, 921-7835 Water Pressure\ 

Washing 



EXTERIOR INTERIOR 



FITTING 
REALTY 

New Hope, PA 
(215)862-9122 



TWENTY NASSAU OFFICE SPACE 



3,070 sq. ft. in perfect shape, newiy renovated by architects and Interior 
decorators. Elegant, spacious, with separate offices, reception area, large, 
sunny windows, wall-to-wail carpeting. Available Decennber. 

3,430 square feet in the heart of Princeton with 7 radiators, 4 sinks, 3 
bathrooms. Needs renovations to suit the tenant. Large private parking. 

Single office suites facing Nassau Street and campus. Sunny, bright, newly 
decorated 



Call 683-0853 or 924-7027 



aAaLJULJLJo Ia'<JLcJL^aX<JJLa1JULJUIaXJ0U^^ 



LEBANON: OCCUPATION AND OP- 
POSITION A talk by Israeli army 
officer Tsvi Zores will take place on 
Monday, November 22 at 8 p.m. at 
McCosh 46, Princeton University 
Campus. Mr. Zores is a member of 
Yesh Gvul (Enough is Enough!), an 
organiiatoin of Israeli army oHicers 
opposed to the war and calling for 
immediate unconditional total Israeli 
withdrawal from Lebanon. The talk is 
sponsored by the Emergency Com 
mittee on Lebanon For more In 
formation, please call 921 1 136. 




OUR NEWEST LISTING! A BEAUTIFUL BRICK COLONIAL 
WITH POOL AND JACUZZI IN WESTERN PRINCETON! 

This stately Georgian brick home offers convenience to town yet a private 
country-like setting in Western Princeton. The outdoor living situation is ideal : two 
beautifully landscaped areas with an inground Sylvan pool and Jacuzzi and plenty 
of room for a tennis court. 

The home itself is superb in every way. Featured within are a lovely foyer with 
quarry tiled floor, a truly spacious front to back living room with fireplace and 
screened porch overlooking the grounds, a formal dining room with exquisite 
wallpaper, a spacious eat-in kitchen with wide plank pegged floors and plenty of 
cabinet space, and last but not least a superb family room with fireplace ideally 
placed at the opposite end of the home from the living room. 

Upstairs, is a master bedroom suite with bath and walk-in closet, four more 
bright and cheerful family bedrooms, and a family bath with double vanity. 

Add to this a full basement with fireplace, excellent craftsmanship and attention 
to decoration throughout, and a neighborhood ideal for raising children. Come 
preview this unique home with a Firestone Associate. $350,000 

Firestone 

^eal Estate 



REALTORS 
1(59 Nassau St., Pi inceion 



924-2222 




HEATHCOTE FARM 

Be one of only four owners to share this exquisite country estate located 
near the village of Kingston only three miles fronn Princeton and within 
walking distance to New York City bus and ten nninutes to rail commuta- 
tion. 

Conversion of the Historic Mansion to four condominium apartments is 
near completion. High ceilings, decorative moldings, oak parquet floors, 
and fireplaces all have been retained. Individual gas heat, central air. 
New kitchens. Elevator. Private outdoor terraces. One, two or three 
bedroom units. All on five acres with rolling lawns, formal gardens, 
swimming pool, classic gazebo, lovely protected country views. Priced R 
from $220,000. Brochure on request. 



FOR THE 



TO PRINCETON REAL ESTATE CALL: 

921-7784 
Robert E. Dougherty 






>.;c- - 



Claire Burns 
Anne Cresson 
Sharon Davidson 
Julie Douglas 




Betsy Ford 
Georgia Graham 
Pam Harris 
Cathy Johnson 

William E Stewardson 1 1935 1972) 



Toby Laughlln 
Sylvia Nesbitt 
Emma Wirtz 
Valerie Young 



Realtors 
Representing Previews Executive Home Search 



■yYvpy^nf^rnrT^nrrnrTTyrTTTTTr^ 





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RATES 



^^^oiJSES SELLING! 




MORE LIKE A house: 
Yes. many of our clients have thought that this love- 
ly townhoiise ( duplex in design > and overlooking the 
pond in Plainsboro with its lovely Green Acres 
doesnt feel -townhousey ' at all' Upgraded with 
many extras bv its caring first owner, this offers 
two large bedrooms with good closet space and two 
full baths on the second floor. The first floor is 
divine with living room with comer fireplace, din- 
ing room with chair rail, kitchen with butcher block 
motit. dining area and access to the patio, powder 
room, fover and lots of storage, even a laundry 
closet: Good financing available to a qualified 
buyer .Asking $99,300. 



OUR LATEST PRINCETON LISTING... deep in the 
lovely woods off Cherry HiU .a six-year old colonial 
with glass addiUon that's simply scrumpUous: All the 
amenities abound midst the four bedrooms, with r*o 
full and two half baths A fabulous country kitchen, 
library living room and dining room afford comfor- 
table living space. Two fireplaces, walk-out basement, 
central air and much mw*. Asking $305,000 







A STUNNER - 3 or 4 bedroom custom California ranch 
in desirable West Windsor location, convenient 
distance to train station - beautiful courtyard, patio, 
and much more $144,500 




FIRST TIME OFFERED... This stately Iwick Georgian 
in Elm Ridge Park was custom built by discriminating 
buyers Four fireplaces, two staircases, skylights, 
maids quarters, library and family rpom, wet bar. 
Dado mokdu^, beautiful dec«-ating. and of course 
four bedrooms, toee baths and two powder rooms. A 
courroet's kitchen finishes the picture. It's smashing at 
* $3^.000 




OF SPECIAL INTEREST . 
PROFESSIONAL BUILDING. Princeton 
Borough ..professionally zoned residence near 
transportation and shopping Asking $155,000 

COMMERCIAL two houses in excellent Hamilton 
locaUon suitable for offices. To be sold separately or 
as a package. CaU Edith Mesnick for the details, 
please. 

RESIDENCE Western section of 

Princeton .5-bedroom tri-level colonial with heated 
swimming pool New kitchen and just painted inside 
and out: Owner leaving country and will negotiate 
all offers Asking $220,000 






OWNER FINANCING TO A QUALIFIED BUYER 
comes with this elegant coiooial overlooking Hooey 
Lake in Elm Ridge Park. HcpeweU Township^ 
foyer, front to back Uving room with 
ivc|i»«^ family room, toa with fireplace, great din- 
ii« room, eat-in kitchen and 5th bedroom or den on the 
nnsl fkwr. Tastefully decorated with two hiU and two 
halfbatlK. $227,300 

PRINCETON 

33 WWierspoon SL 

921-2776 






IN THE HISTORIC BATTLEFIELD AREA, 
PRINCETON. ..a Williamsburg Colonial on .56 acres of 
manicured garden areas, beautiful terracing and in- 
viting in-ground pool. Mar\elous entertainment pat- 
tern, elegant living room with fireplace and access to 
terrace, formal dining room, panelled 
library/fireplace. Guest bedroom/bath on first floor, 
expansion possibilities for studio/flat over 2-car 
garage with separate entrance and stairway. Master 
bedroom with fireplace, too. $299,000 




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WESTMINSTER of AMERICA... Beat inflation, invest 
in a Princeton Borough Victorian. Two apartments 
plus, or single residence with owner -occupied rental. 
100 year old home offers 12 rooms, beautifully main- 
tained, new insulation, storms and screens, 2 year-old 
furnace, new copper plumbing. 2 car detached garage. 
Quiet location makes this a special treasure $128,500 




A PRINCETON SURPRISE... this extraordinary con- 
temporary solarium/kitchen is the focal point of a 
splendid ten-room traditional colonial on 3.3 of the 
Township's finest acres. There's every amenity im- 
aginable, of course, including two superb terraces, 
fenced yard, splendid trees and shrubs. Asking just a 
bit over $300,000! 



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LOTS OF land: 

ALTUMN HILL ROAD, PRINCETON TOWNSHIP. 
Approved building lot . $65,000 

CROOKED TREE LANE, PRINCETON TOWN- 
SHIP 5.59 acres of woods: $165,000 

HARBOURTON. HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP Spec- 
tacular 4.95 acre lot: $55,000 

POOR FARM ROAD. HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP 
3-»- acres o< woods. Ready! $52,500 

CHERRY VALLEY ROAD. PRINCETON TWP. 
A wooded building lot. $56,500 

PROVINCE LINE ROAD. LAWRENCE. 38.17 
acres for development. $10,500 per acre 

CARSON ROAD. LAWRENCE. 66.7 acres near 
Squibb R-W zoning. $10,500 per acre 




^ 




ON THE WESTERN SIDE OF PRINCETON, in the 
Borough, a JANDL-inspired houHe... built before its 
fime... nestles snuggly on a wooded lot BUT open the 
door, cross the gracious foyer and VIOLA! Formality, 
graciousness, spjue and convenience! To Princeto- 
nians in the know they come to expect ..and love ...this 
feature of Jandl ! Plense come see this wonderful house 
for yourself... there is so much more. $310,000 



Equity Advances 

Mortgages, Too* 

*lf you qualify. 



WINDSORS 

Princeton-Hightstown Rd. 

799-4500 

CHENDERSON 



PRINCETON 

33 Witherspoon St. 

921-2776 



l\( 



REALTORS 

» Witherspoon Street. Princeton. New Jersey 08540 [609] 9212776 



RELO: 
World Leader 
In Relocation 




HENDERSON, OF COURSE! 




A SMASHING CONTEMPORARY ON FIVE OF 
HOPEWELL'S PRIME ACRES, near Elm Ridge Park, 
between Princeton and Pennington. A perfect start for 
the young family who wants some land for animals and 
kids! Three levels of dramatic, comfortable living 
space. Two fireplaces, cathedral ceilings and much 
more. Asking: $219,500! 



MAGNIFICENT PRINCETON TOWNSHIP Colonial in 
prestigious Winfield, offering foyer, living 
room/tireplace, sun room, panelled family 
room/fireplace, formal dining room, kit- 
chen/breakfast room, laundry and powder rooms. The 
master bedroom suite on the second floor has a dress- 
ing room and bath. Four additional bedrooms and two 
baths, of course! Brick walks, wooden decks comple- 
ment the over three-acre lot bordering on the brook. A 
lovely situation. $425,000 




WE ARE PLEASED TO OFFER our newest listing in 
the charming town of Lawrcnceville. Situated on a 
magnificently landscaped lot with brick walks, tulips, 
daffodils, extensive flower beds, large trees and a 
"summer house". This stucco house offers 4 BRs, 1 
Bath, LR with Fireplace, Sunny DR, Modern Kitchen, 
Central Air, Gas Heat. Meticulously maintained and 
offered at $98,000. Call us today for an appointment. 




PROVINCE LINE ROAD, }iup< a 

chip shot from the Bedens Brook Club, a delightful con- 
temporary of redwood and glass... Spacious deck, 
barn, tall trees. .. All on over three acres of privacy! In- 
teresting floor plan with cozy library, open kitchen, 
two handsome fireplaces, children's wing. Come see it 
for yourself! • $198,000 





JUST A CHIP SHOT FROM A GOLF COURSE ... this 
well-built Southern colonial nestles nicely on a two- 
acre lot on Bedens Brook Road, in an area where other 
houses are selling for over three hundred thousand! 
This builder's own house with many lovely appoint- 
ments is offered for $185,000 



JUST ABOUT THE PRETTIEST HOUSE ON THE 
PRETTIEST LOT IN THE POPULAR ELM RIDGE 
PARK AREA... a very special offering overlooking 
Honeybro(* Lane. Mature trees surround this eleven- 
room contemporary with every conceivable extra. 
This spacious house is a must to see. Asking; $267,500 




rUSfOM-BUILT COLONIAL NESTLED ON TWO 
BEAUTIFUL ACRES IN PRINCETON TOWNSHIP 
OFFERING PRIVACY AND SECLUSION... A love y 
four-bedroom home, well planned and impeccably 
maintained, offers country living minutes from Nassau 
Hall... city utilities; expansion possibilities unlimited, 
space for tennis court and/or pool... $365,000 



PRINCETON 

33 Witherspoon St 

921-2776 



CHARM AND PRIVACY are combined in our newest 
listing in Lawrcnceville. Situated on an acre is this 
stone and cedar shake cape cod with 4 BRs, 2 Baths 
LR with FP, DR, Eat-In Kitchen, 2-car garage - all at 
the end of a private lane, close to public transportation, 
shopping & schools. Offered at $115,000 - Call us today 
to see it! 



WINDSORS 

Princoton-Hlghtstown Rd. 

799-4500 




DRAMATIC LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP (Princeton Ad- 
dress) CONTEMPORARY. Only three years old, atten- 
tion to energy conservation and maintained to perfec- 
tion! The wooded acre plus is lovely. A house that 
MUST BE SEEN. $292,500 




A FABULOUS CONTEMPORARY NESTLED SNUG- 
GLY ON FIVE OF PRINCETON'S PRIME WOODED 
ACRES. .. in the Stuart Road area .. .not far from the day 
schools, the bicycle path or town! Designed in the 
Hillier manner with active family members in mind! 
Comfortable, warm, modem living... with a view of the 
trees and birds from every room. Come see this excep- 
tional house for yourself. 





A QUALIFIED BUYER CAN NEGOTIATE SOME EX- 
CELLENT FINANCING on this brick and aluminum 
cape colonial in an in-town Princeton location. Owner- 
occupied flat on the lower level, too, with separate en- 
trance, studio room, full bath and kitchen. Brand new 
deck and tandem garage. Easy to care for lot. Asking 

$139,500 





COMFORTABLE CONVENIENCE IN 

LAWRENCEVILLE. Ranch with flexible arrangement 
of rooms - three or four bedrooms, two baths, central 
air. Easily manageable and a nifty house. Two car 
garage and full basement. $112,000 



PRINCETON 

33 Witherspoon St 

921-2776 



Equity Advances 

Mortgages, Too* 

*lf you qualify. 



JOH.M 



CHENDEF^N 

REALTORS^^ 

33 Witherspoon Street. Princeton, New Jersey 08540 16091 921-2776 



RELO: 
World Leader 
In Relocation 



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REALTORS 

609-921-1550 



246 NASSAU STREET • PRINCETON NEW JERSEY 



^M-79 




BRAND NEW LISTING IN PRINCETON TOWNSHIP - a 4 or 5 bedroom two 
story Colonial with center hall, large living room, family room with fireplace, 
formal dining room and big modern kitchen. Splendid wooded lot. $230,000 




DECEPTIVELY SPACIOUS PRINCETON TOWNSHIP Cape Cod. There are 
4 bedrooms. 3 full baths, large living room with fireplace, den. dining room, 
eat-in kitchen, screen porch, pool and more. S1 59,900 



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^ERSIDE AREA IN PRINCETON TOWNSHIP an absolutely sparkling 3 
or 4 t)edfoom, living room with fireplace, dining room, kids' play sp>ace, 3 
full baths, brick terrace overlooking t)eautiful grounds. $1 46,000 



IN THE HEART OF PRINCETON a smaller Colonial - entrance hall, living 
room with fireplace, separate dining room, kitchen, 3 bedrooms, full base- 
ment. Terrific location. *■• 25,000 





MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP in a aesirable established residential area. 
This rambling 3 bedroom story and half has living room, dining room. 
Florida room and more that we can tell you about. $85,000 



YOUR OWN BIT OF COUNTRY - 5 acres in Hopewell Township with a big 
family house that has 5 bedrooms and lots of living areas. There are 4 
fireplaces. 2 outbuildings and other terrific features. Asking $1 75,000 





PRINCETON ESTATE -129 acres of exceptional western section property HISTORIC HOPEWELL COUNTRY ESTATE with 18th Century stone 

with maanificent brick Georgian residence and a number of other buildings. residence plus second 4 bedroom house Barns and stable on 53 acres 

r II f details overlooking the Hopewell Valley. Call for details. 

Sole Area Representative For Confederation of International Real Estate 
246 Nassau Street IF WE DON'T HAVE IT, WE CAN FIND IT. 1 34 South Main Street 

Prinoeton 921-1 550 OALL P#«nington 737-9550 

Peyton Associates 



Wealth of Information about Town Contained 
In Booklet Issued by League of Women Voters 



How well do you know your 
town? 

Is there a tree-lighting at 
Christmas-time? How much is 
a dog license? What's the 
JFirst Aid telephone number? 
Can private citizens use the 
municipal dump? 

For over 30 years, the 
phrase "Know Your Town' 
has meant League of Women 
Voters. It was in 1950 that the 
League published its first 
"Know Your Town". 

Now, in the late fall of 1982, 
the League has a new, sleek, 
pared-down, easy-to-use, high- 
tech "Know Your Town," the 
',^rst revision since 1971. 

reared down and slimmer 
because, frankly, it's cheaper 
that way. Earlier Know Your 
Towns, rather stately and 
plump in the form of a booklet 
a quarter-inch thick, would 



areas are insufficient for ttie 
Negro neigh twrhoods " 

Recreation Important To- 
day. But the 1982 "Know Your 
Town" needs two sections to 
cover Recreation and Cultural 
programs: paddle tennis 
(whoever heard of paddle in 
1950?) on four courts.... tennis 

on 15 courts an Olympic 

pool, diving pool, wading pool, 

competitive swim meets 4 

baseball diamonds.. ..two 

bocce courts.... Slimnastics 

Senior Citizen trips gym- 
nastics for kids, fourth grade 
and up 

Mrs. Potter thinks "Know 
Your Town" is unique in its 
listing of annual events. No 
dates, t>ecause they change 
from year to year, but you'll 
learn about the Art People 

EDITORS: Karen Woodbridge, left, and Lisa Potter, Party, Nutcracker Ballet, 
■ Bryn Mawr Book Sale, 




HREPIACE FURNSMNGS 



Glos* Door* 

Wood SlevM 

InMft* 



9 '■■■ ^ 1 



Toab 
F«nd«r« 
Andirons 

Hoooft 



Unusual Mailboxes, 
Weathervanes and Signs 

BOWDEN'S 

FIRESIDE SHOP 

1731 NOniNGHAM WAY (Rt 33). TRENTON, N, J. 

586-3344 Daily 1 0-5, Mon. & Thurs. Tin 9 P.M. 



havT^;;; wic^y ei^^nswe to: fight, did all the digging and f act^heckin^, organiz- ^^^^.Z'ZoZ'LdZ 
dav J F- ,pg gp^j editing for "Know Your Town, the new |rDJ7* ™ n.^ - » ^ 

Women Voters handbook " — — - 



day 

More Convenient Format. 

And harder to use, although 
they certainly served the pur- 
pose well in their day. The new 
one, 12 by a scant seven in- 
ches, with stepped-back sec- 
tion headings, has a conve- 
nient hole in the tipper left- 
hand comer. Hang it by the 
telephone, or on the kitchen 
bulletin-board. 

"I stole the format from the 
Lawrenceville know-your- 
town," is the cheerful confes- 
sion of Lisa Potter, co-editor 
with Karen Woodbridge and 
Mary Rorty. 



League of 
Princeton. 



about ^'Khting, Firemen's Parade 

and more 

You'll also find out when you 

can use the municipal dump 

a booklet, like earlier ^"<^ ^^^'^'^ ^- 
editions," Mrs. Potter says, 



budget assigned to delinquent 
taxes. 

And when a League publica- ... ^ . , . 

tion has a heading called ^j d° ^^^ ^av^ l^"i« '« 
"Courts." you can be sure it -^J^Xkl it'ac^^ Vou l.ve to see the mountain 



Needless to say, this wasn't 
read all that detail? And we P^^ted together overnight. 



won't tell you much about the Tn VirZ.r^rn hiin wh.>h of facts before you can see the 
relative merits of hard- l"?!!!".^'^^' P"^''^^:!^"^ J dimensions^ 



surface or cushion. That you ^*^ ^^^^ ^"^ ^ price-tag 

find under "RecreaUon ' *^ F^"^ ^O;. . 
Also, by doing 

bones 'Know Your Town, ,.-4 ,, u u 

smaller and cheaper, maybe ?f f "*^'^ ^f ? ^"^' ^^'^ 



Editors began "serious" 

a bare- *®''*^ ^^ January. They had 
to sort out which boards and 



She flips back the section 
pages, showing how. with the 
stepped-back format, all the 
chapter headings are visible 
at the same time: Princeton, 
Landmarks, Government, 
Borough Government, 
Townsl^p Government. 
Financed, Politics and Elec- 
tions, Public Safety and 
Public Works, Courts. 
Schools, Health Services, 
Recreation and Cultural Pro- 
grams. 

It's aU there. 



Many Changes Since 1950. 

The W "Know Your ^O- f"^P^ ^"-m -^'^'■l^::^,J!?Sj^t!:'J^'f. 
Town," published 32 years 

uui i;ui rem iiicip utiiic uui. lasi * 

Continued on Page 168 



ago. did not have some of the 
listings included in the new 
1982 edition. The Rape Task 
Force hotline, for example, 
and the Abused Women and 
Child Abuse numbers or the 
Venereal Disease telephone. 
Back in 1950. there were 



nate it with a revised map: — 7 ~:~" — T ' 

our current map came out last "P-to^^ as tomorrow. 

year." 



I 



Ardic 

MAP CENTER 

•International Maps 

•Domestic Maps '^ 

•Local Maps 

•Business & Marketing Maps 

•U.S. Geological Maps 

•Nautical Maps 

•Globes • Map Accessories 

•Custom Framing & Mounting 

TRAVEL and GIFT BOOKS 

MONTGOMERY CENTER 

Rocky Hill, N.J. Open Mon.-Sat. 9-6 924-2121 



OB 



Because "Know Your 
Town" has t>een boiled down 
and reduced, the League has 
eliminated everything not im- 

mediately within the borders 

three"memliere"'on Township of Borough and Township. The 
Committee. State law Chapm School, in Lawrence 
stipulated that a township had ^T^^fj^f « Probably the only 
to have five members if 



Quick Reference. 

"Newcomers to town need to 
be able to pinpoint things 
quickly," Mrs. Potter says. 
She points to the back cover: 
telephone numljers for fire, 
police, ambulance, poison con- 
trol center, health officer, 
municipal clerk, engineer. 
First Aid and Rescue 

Squad and League of 

^ Women Voters. 

"It's interesting how little 
some of us knew when we 
began to put the information 
together," she continues. 
"Free concerts at the 
Woolworth Center, all the 
materials available at the 
public library, the outdoor 
sculpture on campus, health 
screenings for (iabetes or 
cancer — one or another of us 
would exclaim that we'd never 
heardof this or that!" 



^^ 'citing and elections, and 
what to do if you want to run 
for office are not emphasized, 
even though this is a League of 
Women Voters publication. 
But you can find out 
everything atx>ut government 
and elections you ever wanted 
to know, even the percentage 
of municipal revenue raised 



population advanced to 4,500. 
Well, the final figures weren't 
yet in from the '50 census, but 
the unofficial Township 
population was 5.390, so it was 
beginning to look as though 
Princeton Township would 
move into the big time, with 
five members on Committee. 
The new booklet gives 13,683 
as the current Township 
population. 

The Township had an 
employee — Martin Clausen 
— who doubled as clerk and 
police chief. 

The Borough paid its police 
chief $4,500 a year and its 
clerk, $3,700. The engineer got 
a whopper: $7,000 annually. 

A section called "Surveys 
and Sore Spots" reminded 
readers that four different 
surveys had found desperate 
housing needs in the Wither- 
spoon area — "which is 
predominantly Negro." In 
that day, "black" was regard- 
ed by both black and white 
residents as an unthinkable 
term. 



admitted outsider. 

Also, everything listed is 
either free, or minimal cost. 



Eternal Verities. Getting 
back to 1950 

Although it's true that the 
town has changed, some 
things have an air of eternity. 

"The Borough Planning 
Board considers its purpose to 
be the preservation of the 

character of Princeton The 

Board's publication, 'Parking 
Problems,' is a study of one of 
our major municipal pro- 
blems, and was widely read by 
Princetonians. It played an 
important part in gradually 
getting citizen agreement on 
the installation of parking 
meters." 




We're striking 
up the band... 

Musical Themes 

on Christmas Cards, 

Advent Calendars 

and Invitations 



Thanksgiving cards, napkins 
and paper plates. 





The Country Mouse 



164 Nassau Street • Princeton • 921-2755 

Open Monday through Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 






Six years before, the 1950 
"Know Your Town" reported, 
25 percent of the Witherspoon 
area houses had no furnace. 22 
percent no hot water and 20 
percent, no bath. 

"Making land available (for 



housing) without regard to 
by taxes and t he amount in the religious or racial considera- 

' tions is a community respon- 



Where to Buy 
"Know Your Town," the 
new edition of the League 
of Women Voters' guide, is 
available for $2 at three 
outlets in Princeton. It 
may. later, be available 
elsewhere also. 

You can buy it at 
Hinkson's, the Princeton 
University Store and 
Center Stationers in the 
Princeton Shopping. 
Center. 



sibility," the League declared 
in this section. "The fact that 
any such sore spots exist at all 
in a community like 
Princeton, which prides itself 
on its civic-mindedness. is 
somthing which cannot be ig- 
nored." 

The 1982 edition, in contrast, 
does not discuss the League's 
position on community mat- 
ters. 

Accessible to Public. 
_ "Originally, we planned to do 



"A major endeavor of the 
Township Planning Board has 
been the development, in 
cooperation with other 
governmental units, of a plan 
for a by-pass route north of 
Princeton, to help relieve 
Princeton traffic congestion." 

Today, 32 years later, peo- 
ple who want that by-pass are 
looking for ways to finance it, 
and people who don't want it, 
are looking for ways to keep it 
out another 32 years. 

Chapter on "Our Needs." 
"Our Needs" was an impor- 
tant chapter in the first edition 
of "Know Your Town." 

Newcomers, the booklet had 
pointed out earlier, are sur- 
prised to find "there is no 
comprehensive municipal 
recreation program in the 
community." 

No places to swim... absence 
of places like parks or a com- 
munity recreation building 
where unorganized recreation 
can be enjoyed, no well- 
developed picnic areas no 

lounges where one can meet 
and talk with friends.... 

"It also appears that 
playground and play-field 



Ricchard's 

Shoes for the Discriminating 




1/i/. 




Distinguished shoes for those 
who appreciate quality. The superb 
2" stacked heel pump.. or the 
sleek, bowed patent flat ensure 
you of smart footing. 



ROBIAL105- 

bfown. navy or 
bordeaux calf skin 



Nannow or irwdhim widths avalabt* 




RANGO 

brown patCrDt 
bordeaux patent 
Mack patent 



150 Nassau St.. Princeton 924-6785 



Mon.-Fri. »4 
Th. 9^ Sat. 9-5 



.^Ai««A4 •. ... 




"MERRILY WE ROLL ALONG:" The Stephen Sondheim musical is providing 
Triangle Club with Its fall production, which will play again this week-end in the 
thMtre at 185 Nassau. Here are Tom Cott and Heidi Hoffman and pianist Rick 
Spina In a spirited rehearsal shot. 




BALLET 

MODERN DANCE 

MODERN JAZZ 

THE 

PRINCETON 

BALLET 50CIETY 

mcCARTER THEATRE Ca 



Micawber Books 

new, used and rare 

108 Nassau Street 

Princeton, New Jersey 

(609) 921^454 



Neum Of The 
THEATRES 



An Evening with 

STEVE 
FORBERT 

Sat.. Dec. 11 at 8pni 
at Alexander Hall , Princeton 




Tickets: $9.50. 8.50. 7 50. 6.50 at McCarter Theatre 
Box Office. Princeton & all Ticketron outlets. 



CMARGE-BY-PHONE ORDERS: (609) 452-5200 



ENTER SCROOGE 
With T. Tim. Every year, 
something different. Mc- 
Carter will open its Christmas 
present this year with an open- 
ing night spectacular on 
Saturday, November 27. It's 
the first 1982 performance of 
"A Christmas Carol," and the 
theatre has decided to have its 
first tree-lighting ceremony. 

A horse-drawn carriage, fill- 
ed with "Citizens of London" 
dressed fit to kill- in Dicken- 
sian costumes, will arrive 
first. Then the ceremony. And 
hot cider and cool carols sung 
by the Trinity Church Choir. 



•from 



ovies^ 
ccarter 



"A POWERHOUSE OF A FILM.. 

Akka KuRMavM is a leading candidate for the greatest 
IMng film director." — jkh Kioa. newsm/eek maoazne 



"AWESOME 

y t n t ani Canby. 
7VOn(TIMCS 



A TRIUMPH...' 

LOS ANGEl£S TIMES 




OEOUGE LUCAS «nd FRANCIS FORD COPPOLA 

pKMni 

A RLM BY AKIRA KUROSAWA 



THEi^SHADOW 
WARRIOR 



KRESQE AUDITORIUM (120 Frick) 
MON., NOV. 22 A TUES., NOV. 23 / 7 & 9:45 p.m. 



For the second perfor- 
mance, on Sunday, November 
28, McCarter has persuaded 
Herb Foster, who plays 
Scrooge, to venture out on 
stage aher the 2:30 perfor- 
mance to sign autographs and 
give out candy canes. 

Before the 7 : 30 performance 
that night, Kris Kringle will 
commandeer the horse-drawn 
buggy, and will make an ap- 
pearance at the theatre. 

On Thursday, December 2, 
the apprentice choir of the 
American Boychoir School 
will sing carols during inter- 
mission. Scrooge will be back 
on stage after that perfor- 
mance, also. 

All these goodies are for the 
first four performances only. 
But "A Christmas Carol" 
itself will play through 
December 12. 




NEW HOPE, PA. ANTIQUES SHOW & SALE 

The Prestige Show of Bucks County 

HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, RT. 179 (OLD RT. 202) 

BENEFIT - NEW HOPE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

Luncheons and dinners served bv A F S 

Friday, Nov. 26...2 p.m.-IO p.n). 

Saturday, Nov. 27... 11 a.m.-lO p.m. 

IManagement Sunday, Nov. 28... 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Donation: $3.00 

The PInit House Antiques 25* off with T.T. ad 



McCARTER THEATRE IS PLANNING 

A VERY SPECIAL THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY 

FOR YOU, YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS! 





^^stmas dvoi 
nf ^ \^^ McCarter gives to thee... 

Saturday, November 27 — Opening Night 

First Annual Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony — 6:30 p.m. 



Complimentar>' Hot Cider 





for the whole family. 



Caroling! 



:^ 



\ 



Opening Night performance of A CKmtmas CatoX — 7:30 p.m. 



Sunday. November 28 McCafter glVCS tO thcC... 

2:30 p.m. Matinee performance of A C/iristmm Carol 
and a post-performance, on-staqe autograph session for 
your children with K^ * .JL WKSIk Ebenezer Scrooge 

himself] 




HEU FOSTER 



Free Candy Canes! 



6:45 p.m. pre-performance visit from Kris Kringle 
arriving via horse-drawn carriage to bestow special 
treats upon your children. 

7:30 p.m. performance of A Chnstnuis Carol 





o 



^^^^^nas Carol 
"^e"^^^ McCarter gives to thee., 



Thursday, December 2 

7:30 p.m. performance of A C/iristmas^CoroI^ 
Christmas Carols presented at intermission by 

the Apprentice Choir 
of The American Boychoir School 
under the direction of Brad Richmond. 
Post-performance, on-stage autograph session with 
Ebenezer Scrooge. 

SEATS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE 

TO ALL OTFIER PERFORMANCES OF 

A CHRISTMAS CAROL 

THROUGH DECEMBER 12! 

A^ m^.w., ^^CKET PRICE RANGE: $9.00 to $14.00 

CURTAIN TIMES: MATINEES - 2:30 p m.. EVmNGS - 7:30 p.m. 

EASY CHARGE-BY-PHONE 

(609) 452-5200 

VlSA^Ml!S^Dn?J5?Vv9i! SATURDAY, NOON TO 6:00 P.M. 
McCAR^R ^iJS-p^^'^^a^^Pn^^™^^^ EXPRESS ARE WELCOME. 
McCART ER THEATRE 91 UNI VERSITY PLACE PRINCETON, N.J. 08540 



CIiristina.s at McCat tcr- An Encliariting TiarlitKvi 



CURRENT CINEMA 

liUes and Times Subject to Change 

GARDEN THEATRE. 924-0263: Theatre I, Atomic Cafe 
(PG), Wed. & Thurs. 7:30, 9:30: call theatre for weekend 
times; Theatre II, My Favorite Year (R), Wed. & Thurs 
. 7:30, 9:20; Fri. & Sat. 6:15, 8, 9:45; matinees Wed. & Sat. 1; 
Sun. 1, 2:40, 4:20, 6, 7:40, 9:20; Mon.-Thurs. 7:30, 9:20. 

MONTGOMERY THEATRE. 924-7144: Lola (R), daily 7:10, 
^ -«:20, with added early show Sunday at 5. 

MERCER MALL CINEMA. 452-2868: Cinema I, National 
Lampoon's Class Reunion (R), daily 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 
9:30; Cinema II, The Chosen (PG), daily 1:30, 3:30, 5:3o! 
7:30, 9:30; Cinema III, starting Friday, The Unicorn (G) 
daily 1, 3, 5, 7, 9. 

AMC QUAKERBRIDGE FOUR THEATRES. 799-9331: 
Theatre I, Tex (PG); Theatre II, Q (R); Theatre III. E-T 
(PG); Theatre IV, The Missionary (R); special matinee 
Thursday, November 25, Mountain Family Robinson (G); 
call theatre for times of all listings. 

ri-^RiNCE THEATRE. 452-2278: Theatre I, Time Bandits 
>PG). Wed. & Thurs. 7:15, 9:30; Fri. & Sat. 5:50, 8, 10:10; 
matinee Sat. 1; Sun. 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15; Mon.-Wed. 7:15, 
9:30; Thurs., Nov. 25, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15; Theatre II, First 
Blood (R), Wed. & Thurs. 7:30, 9:20; Fri. & Sat. 6:30, 8:20, 
10:10; matinee Sat. 1; Sun. 2, 3:50, 5:40, 7:30, 9:20; 
Mon.-Wed. 7:30, 9:20; Thurs., Nov. 25, 2, 3:50, 5:40, 7:30, 
9:20; Theatre III, Creep Show (R), Wed. & Thurs. 7:15, 
9:30; Fri. & Sat. 5:45, 8, 10:10; matinee Sat. 1; Sun. 2:30, 
4:45, 7, 9:15; Mon.-Wed. 7:15, 9:30; Thurs., Nov. 25, 2:30, 
4:45, 7, 9:15. 

LAWRENCE ERIC THEATRES, 882-9494: Eric I, \n Of- 
ficer and a Gentleman (R). Wed. & Thurs. 7:20,9:35; Fri. & 
Sat. 5:30, 7:45, 10; matinees Wed. & Sat. 1; Sun. 1, 3: 10, 5:30, 
7:30, 9:45; Mon.-Thurs. 7:20, 9:45; Eric II, Monsignore (R), 
Wed. & Thurs. 7:20, 9:35; Fri. & Sat. 5:30, 7:45, 10, matinees 
Wed. & Sat. l; Sun. 1, 3:10, 5:20. 7:30, 9:40; Mon.-Thurs. 
7:20. 9:35. 

OTHER: Movies-from-McCarter, Southern Comfort. Wed. 
7:30, 9: 15, Kresge Auditorium; Shoot the Moon (R), Tues. & 
Wed., Nov. 16 & 17, 7:15, 9:30, Kresge Auditorium. 



News of the Theatres 

Continued Irom Pracadlng Page 

COMEDY NIGHT 

At Princeton Inn. Both the 
new and the tried-and-true 
will be on stage this Friday 
and Saturday (8:30 p.m.) dur- 
ing "Comedy Night," at 
Princeton Inn College 
Theatre, Alexander Road. Ad- 
mission is free. 

The first half of the evening 
will be all-new material, and 
the second part is described as 
"a bit more traditional." 
Veronica Brady, of the Mc- 
Carter Theatre staff, and 
Sherry Long are performing 
and directing, respectively. 



GOLD-RECORD MAN 
Steve Forbert Here. His 

single, "Romeo's Tune," at- 
tained Gold Record status last 
year, so Steve Forbert has 
decided to celebrate by mak- 
ing his first Princeton ap- 
pearance. He'll be in Alex- 
ander Hall with his band on 
Saturday, December 11, under 
the auspices of McCarter 
Theatre, which is selling the 
tickets. 

A native of Meridian, 
Mississippi, he played there in 
rock and roll bands, working 
the bars and fraternity houses 
of his home town. He wrote all 
the songs, and played har- 
monica and acoustic guitar. In 
'76, he left Meridian for New 
York and his first album, 
"Alive on Arrival." 



Auditions 

"To Be Young, Gifted 
and Black," a portrait of 
Lorraine Hansberry, will 
be given January 14 to 
February 15 by Crossroads 
Theatre in New Brunswick, 
and auditions have been 
scheduled for this Saturday 
between noon and 5. The 
theatre is at 320 Memorial 
Parkway, next to the new 
Hyatt Hotel. 

If you want to try out, you 
should prepare a two or 
three-minute monologue. 
Director Lee Richardson 
needs two young black ac- 
tresses in their 20s or early 
30s; an older black actress, 
40-50; two white actresses, 
mid-20s to early 30s; one 
black actor in his late 20s 
and one white actor, early 
30s. 

Rehearsals will begin 
December 27. Additional 
information is available by 
calling 201-249-5625. 



1 



TO SING AT CAFE 
On Campus. Princeton 
L'niversity graduate student 
Joshua Miller will be singing 
and leading folksongs at the 
Cafe in the basement of 
Murray-Dodge Hall, on the 
Princeton University campus, 
this Friday at 10:30 and 11:30 
p.m. Admission is free. 

Accompanying himself on a 
six string guitar, Mr. Miller 
will perfrom songs written by 
Woody Guthrie, Lee Hays. 
Phil Ochs and others. Carla 
Hesse and Wendy Brown, 
Princeton graduate students, 
and alumnae of the University 
of California. Santa Cruz, will 
also perform a few numbers. 

Between songs Mr. Miller 
will tell stories about his times 
in Jonesboro, Santa Cruz, and 
other places. 

WANT EXTRA INCOMET A temporary 
or part time job may be ftie answer. 
Read ttie Help Wanted ads in rtiis issue 
of TOWN TOPICS for a varied selection 
of opportunities open to you. 



FINAL WEEKEND! 



fk 



PRINCETON TRIANGLE CLUB 

pr6S6nts 

MERRILY WE ROLL ALONG 



music and lyrics by 
STEPHEN SONDHEIM 



book by 
GEORGE FURTH 



directed by 

DALE COYE 

at 185 NASSAU STREET THEATER 

at 8:30 P.M. 

Thurs., Nov. 4 thru Sat., Nov. 6, 
Thurs., Nov, 11 thru Sun., Nov. 14, 
Thurs., Nov. 18 thru Sat., Nov 20. 

Tickets: »5,00 
Student Tickets: '4.00 

NOW ON SALE at McCarter 
Theatre Box Office, 452-5200. 

Tickets also available at door. 





%S Q*TONE 

^^ tore for bmks 
Come In end browee. 
MofrtgonMry C«nt«r 

Roule206& 518 Rocl<y Hill NJ921.e530 



Turner-Russo 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

63 Princeton Ave.. • Hopewell, NJ 08525 
609-466-2222 







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The 



Foot) wiNkeL 



a specialty take-out shop 

14 chambers street 
Princeton, new jersey 

609 921-0809 



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WIHKa'^ 6KEMfA6T AT t O'COJCtc; 



FOLK SINGER DUE 
In Concert at YM-YWCA. 

The Folk Music Society will 
feature U. Utah Phillips in 
concert on Friday at 8 at the 
YM YWCA on Paul Robeson 
Place. 

Bruce "U. Utah" Phillips, 
the Golden Voice of the Great 
Southwest, sings a variety of 
songs of America's working 
classes, songs of America's 
Southwest and his own 
compositions. In addition to 
critical acclaim as a per- 
former and songwriter, 
Phillips has also been called a 
master story-teller and each 
concert always includes a 
number of outstanding stories, 
outrageous puns, and political 
humor of the American West. 

Admission is $5 for adults, 
$3.50 for students, $3 for 
Society members. There are 
no advance sales. Member- 
ships are available at the 
door. For further information 
call: 924-9143. 




Farm Fresh Apples 

and Cider 
for Thanksgiving 



VEGETABLES 



Free hayrides 
Sunday in November 



TERHUNE ORCHARDS 



330 Cold Soil Road 
924-2310 

Thanksgiving 9-12 



Mon.-Frl. 9-6 
Sat. & Sun. 9-5 



For the holidays... 



Beautiful Flowers • Pumpkin Pics • Bagels 

Homemade Breads • Luscious Produce -- 

Croissants • Sticky Buns • Sherry-glazed Hams 

Pecans • Walnuts • Chestnuts 

Apple Cider and many other dclectablcs 



Flower Specials 

Spider Mums 6 for *4 

Sweetheart Roses 6 for *3 



Homemade soup every day 




cox 



180 Nassau Street 
Princeton, N.J. 
(609)683-1807 



Hours: Mon.-Thurs. & Sat. 6:45am - 7pm; Friday 6:45am - 8pm; Sunday 6:45am - 2pm 



v>>>>>>>>W*I*v^'''*'*'^*»V.*.n*.V. . » - 



"fr" 



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TOMMY ROOT 
PETER VIELBIG 

9212731 

PRINCETON CATERERS 






VESUVIO 

PIZZERIA ft RESTAURANT 

$10HF_ 

258 Nassau St. 

921-2477 



it 



Golden Mushroom 

ORIENTAL GROCERY 

and 
Chinese Food Take-out at Lunch Time 

354 Nassau St. Princeton 924-6653 



UJ 

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£ 
a. 

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GREAT WALL ^ i^ 

CHINESE RESTAURANT ^'^ "^ 

Peking, Hunan & Szechuan Cuisine 

TAKE OUT SERVICE 

Btnquet Menu ... Round table seating for 10-14 
people with special Chinese courses. 

WMkday Luncheon Special ... Only $2.99 in- 
cludes soup, rice, tea and main dish. 




prtwc»>on Shopping Ctntsr 
•21-7608 or 9244643 



Op«n7D«y« 
1iao«.m.-10pwm. 



Ichmimi ^Inhunses 




\ 



CVII^^KIES n spice 

Indian & International Cuisine 
Menu Changes Daily 

f^ 924-4575 

-~»~^ Reservations Accepted 

Ample Free Parking 

Closed Monday 
Major Credit Cards 

55 Mam Street 

Kingston 





Taco Grande 

restaurante 
otteriflf tk« 

TEXAS-MEX FLAVOR for the South-West 

in a casual, relaxed atmosphere. 

Reservations not necessary. 

Bring your own wine or beer. 

UNIVERSITY PLAZA 
OuakertKidge & Ftodc Rds, MttrcervMe 

(Near th« Howard Savings Banki 

OfCN Till 9 P.M. MON.-THUII. 10 P.M. FRI.-SAT. 
rot TAKI OUT 0«AL M7-4SII 



^ffic 



Thanksgiving 
Dinner 

at the Nassau Inn 
Is a friendly tradition 

JOIN US 

Complete Dinner. $12.50 
Chikjre n Under 10. Half Price 

Seatlngs at 1 2. 2, 5:30. 7:30 
Reservations Accepted - Call 921-7500 
Princeton, New Jersey 




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BACK HOME.... 

For Pennington Players. 
The PlayBarn EIra for Pen- 
nington Players was 1958-65. 
Now, the Players are l)ack in 
the PlayBarn for their current 
production, "An Almost 
Perfect Person." 

The comedy is in its final 
week-end and will play this 
Friday through Sunday at 8 
p.m. The PlayBarn is on 
Route 31 and West Franklin, a 
quarter mile north of the Pen- 
nington Market. Reservations 
may be made at 466-1010. 

Directors Priscilla Orr 
Treadwell and Dan Treadwell 
have in their cast Lila Howley, 
Richard Niedt and Players' 
president, Allen Rowe. Pro- 
ducer is Jack Rees. 

The renovated interior of 
the PlayBarn includes a new 



'KAGEMUSHA' 

Film Winner. The Grand 
Prize winner at the 1980 Can- 
nes Festival, "Kagemusha," 
will be shown four times next 
week in Kresge auditorium, 
Washington Road, in the 
Movies-from-McCarter series. 
Screenings will be at 7 and 
9:45 next Tuesday and 
Wednesday. 

The film is the 27th from 
Kurosawa, the Japanese 
director of "Rashomon" and 
"Seven Samurai." The film's 
title means "Shadow 
Warrior" and the story tells 
about a 16th-century warlord 
who is replaced after his death 
by his double, a nameless thief 
whose resemblance to the 
warlord has saved him from a 
sentence of death by crucifix- 
ion. 



McCarter to Open Uptown Store 

McCarter will open this Saturday a holiday ticket office 
and company store at One Palmer Square. Curtain-time: 11 
a.m. 

To be open Mondays through Saturdays, 11 to 6, through 
December 18, the store will sell McCarter t-shirts, note 
cards, sport bags, key-chains, playing cards and glassware 
— all maiiced with the McCarter logo. 

For Christmas, there will he greeting cards with costume 
sketches from "A Christmas Carol," and a one-dollar 
Christmas coloring lx)ok. A pen light, silver with black let- 
ters, could stuff a stocking. 

On display will be a 20-inch Ebenezer Scrooge doll, made 
in porcelain, complete with wooden accounting desk and 
stool. It is a limited edition of the original mold from the 
Faith Wick Company, and will be raffled off on December 
13. Tickets are on sale in the store for $1. 

Gift certificates to McCarter events will also be on sale, 
and you can buy your own tickets here, saving yourself the 
long walk down University Place. 



NORTH CHINA RESTAURANT 

36 With«rspoon St, Princeton 



Dtllclous 
Mandarin 
Dlahas 




Hot & Spicy 

Szechuan 

Cuialna 



Open Mon.-Thurs. 11:30-3; 5-10 
Friday and Sat 1 1 :30-3, 5-1 1 

Sunday 130- 10:00 



Reservations Suggasled 




9245640 
Carry Qui S, Catering 






IN PENNINGTON: She's "An Almost Perfect Per- 
son" In Pennington Players' production of that 
Klay, and she's portrayed by Lila Howley, shown 
ere. Allen Rowe, left, and Richard Niedt co-star. 

Afeur of the Jheatn^ 'X^^S^Slfr^ "" 

Continued from Preceding Page ^__^ 



OPEN 

SUNDAYS 

12 to 5 

NASSAU LIQUORS 

MNaMAuSt 924-0031 

' Pmrtfino Behind the Ston 
9 a.m. to 9:45 p.m. Alon.-Sat - Fr— Delh/9ry 



MEXICAN 

VILLAGE 
II 

42 Leigh Ave. 
Princeton 

(1 block from Withfrspoon) 




•■■^r""-f 



jff I' 



Reservations 

609-924-5143 



Regional Mexican Specialties featuring 
chiles, rellenos, salsa mole & vegetarian 
dishes. 

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 



Cenerino's 

Lounge and Restaurant 

57 Leigh Avenue, Princeton 



Open Thanksgiving Day 

AU dinners served with soup, salad bar 
and macaroni 

Roaat Toa Tarkcy $6.95 

Baked Haa $6.95 

Roaet Leg of Laaab $6.95 

Broiled Flounder $6.95 

New York Steak $9.95 



Reaervahona 924-4147 - Open 3 to 8:30 p.m. 



ALL 

HOMECOOKED 

FOOD 



Breakfast 7-10 Moa.-Sat. 
Laack ll:S0-2.-00 Moa.-Fri. 
924-4147 Reservations accepted 




GOBBLE, GOBBLE 
UP OUR... 



CI^EENUNE 



NATURAL FOODS 
you'// tasfe the difference! 

e 

fresh salads 

daily lunch & dinner specials 

homemade desserts 

NOH' OI>EN 9:JCAM 

roc ccrrccTtA, trc. 

179 NASSAU STCffCT • DDINCCTCM 



\ 



Fresh Pumpldn 
ice cream! 

Chocolate 
turlfeys & piigrims! 

Remember: 

Chocolate assortments 

make delicious gifts... 

Order them early! 



L 



lee Cream 

M-Th: 12-11 

Fri. Sat: 12-12 

Sun: 12-11 





179 Nassau St. 
924-7222 

Enjoy it on the patio!" 

Chocdatea 

l^-Fri: 10-9 
W, Sat: 10-6 






NOT FAST FOOD f 
FAST SERVICE! 

We like wtiat we've been 
doing all these years 
That!« why we're so 
good at it. 

Joyce — 16 years 
Ruby — IS years 
Hilda — 9 years 
Alice — 16 years 
Willy — 2 years 
Tony — 8 years 

■Hiais 79 suff years of 
service. So your order will 

_ ; . I 



reach you in minutes! 



PJ's Pancake House 

154 Nassau Street Piincetoti, N) 924-l.^S5 




K^ 



Luncheon Mon. thru Sat. 12-2:30 

Dinner Mon. thru Sun. 5-10 PM 
Fri & Sat. until 10:30 



The Terrace 

Restaurant 

Shoppers... 
Come for lunch, 

dinner, 
or in-between. 

The Terrace will prepare 
delightful meals to enjoy while 
holiday shopping or to take home 
and please your family 
priced from »2 and up. 

Where the best of two worlds meet 

At The Marketplace, Routes 27 & 518 
(201)821-8822 

Lunch: Monday-Saturday 11:30-4 
Dinner: Thursday & Friday 5:30-9:30 





DRY NUT SPECIALS 



Piatachioa $4.99/lb. 

Shelled 

Almonds 5 lbs./$9.99 



Raw Caahewra $4.99^. 
Roasted Salty 
Cashews $5.99/lb. 



INDIA DISCOUNT STORE II 

Indlon Groceries - Gorments • Sorees • Gifts 

INDIAN CO TTON GARM ENTS 1 0% ■ 40% OFF 

3001 Rt. 27 a FInnegane La.-Franklin Park 

(201)821-7775 -yust minutes from Princeton 



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•A LITTLE JEWEL ON THE DELAWARE" 

...N.Y. TIME$ 



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E/OTIC 
INDIAN 
CUISINE 



Choose from our wide selection 

of Ifidian cooking prepared to 

your taste. ..mild, medium or hot. 



Open Tues thru Sun 
Lunch 12 to 3 
Dinnpi 5 to 10 



(201)249 6496 

908 Livingston Ave. 

North Brunswick 






i-».*S\'>i, 



\S\>^wa t»« Ui5ua.( &leaance 

uinncr. .^jon • Thu.r%. foo • lO-OO 
rri.i Sat. f.jc ♦ 11:00 
Sun: 1:f0-9:00 




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JiJU.t.WtA..Jkur% lOfmx' imm 
.Jri.iSat. tifm. ' liontn. 



3SOO Jft. 27 '^luUirArt 201297- S9/0 




SUZANNE MEAD will be the soloist with The Little Or- 
chestra of Princeton in its first concert of this season 
on Sunday at 3 In the Princeton High School 

auditorium. iBensomeyspmo 



MUSIC 

In Princeton 



the direction of Jeff Byrum, 
Kenneth A. Kelley, and Sue 



Ellen Page. 



SEASON OPENER SET 
By Little Orchestra. The 

Little Orchestra of Prince- 
ton's first concert of the 1982- 
83 season will be on Sunday in 
the Princeton High School 
auditorium. The concert is 
sponsored by Commodities 
Corp. 

Suzanne Mead will be the 
soloist in the Schumann Cello 
Concerto. Ms. Mead studied 
with Bernard Greenhouse of 
Beaux Arts Trio and with 
Richard Kapuscinski. She has 
won scholarships to study with 
Janes Starker and Raya Gar- 
t)ousova at festivals such as 
Tanglewood and Interlochen 
and last year performed with 
Lynn Harrell in a public 
master class at the Halifax 
Festival. She teaches at the 
Westminster Choir College 
and privately. 



In Benjamin Britten's play 
to music, the text is taken 
from the Chester Miracle 
Plays as written at the end of 
the 16th Century in Chester, 
England. The action takes 
place in the church sanctuary, 
ivoah's menagerie, from 
elephants to mice, will be 
played by the children of the 
church, with elaborate 
costuming by Helen Wise and 
Anne Young and colorful 
paper-mache heads from 
Westminster church in 
Detroit. Mich. 

Mr. Kelley, minister of 
music at Nassau Church, has 
been assembling the forces 
needed to stage the work since 

Continued on Next Page 



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Q/U/d. 



Whatever your holiday •ntertainment 

naadi are you'll find, in our large 

■••ortmant. a dehcioue CarveC lea 

Cream Cake or troian dattart to 

help make every gathering 

a tpaciai event 



Our c«*e aaccf ftwg 



•n^ CeniW Qmtm 

Mhile you waft ! 



EMI 




SAMi 

$1.00 

WITH THIS 
COUPON 



This is our way of thanking you . 

The Carvel" Store, s listed in this ad will give you 
St 00 olt Ifeif 'eguiar retail D"ce ot any 

TOM THE TURKEY 
PILGRIM CAKES 

wvnen you present this coupon at time o( purchase 
Otter exptres November 2j 1982 






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' AMERICAS' 
IFRESHEST ICE CREAM 






Kingston Mall*Route 27, Raymond Rd. 

(near Shoprile) 

(609) 924-7287 



Rossini's overture to 
"L'ltaliana in Algeri" will 
open the concert, followed by 
Beethoven's Eighth Sym- 
phony. The program also 
includes "Tone Roads No. 3" 
by Charles Ives, which begins 
peacefully with a solo for 
chimes, but ends in 
deliberately quarter-tonal 
chaos. 

Tickets for The Little 
Orchestra concerts may be 
purchased at the Princeton 
Arts Center, 102 Witherspoon 
Street weekdays from 11 to 4, 
or at the door. Regular tickets 
are $5, Senior Citizens $3 and 
students $1. 

For further information 
about tickets, subscription 
rates, directions to the High 
School, contributions, future 
dates, auditions, or bookings 
throughout central New 
Jersey, call 924-4192, 924-7451 
or 924-7497. 



THAMSGIYINO 
DAT FEAST 

Seatings: The Copenhagen Room, 11:00 am; 1:30 pm; 
4:00 pm; and 7:00 pm 

The Princeton Room (for parties of 8 or more), 
12 noon; 2:30 pm; and 5:30 pm 




BRITTEN WORK READY 
At Nassau Church. Nassau 
Presbyterian Church choirs 
and soloists will present 
"Noye's Fludde" by Benjamin 
Britten on Thursday and 
Friday at 8 and Saturday at 4. 
Robert Jacks will sing the 
role of Noah, Lindsey Christ- 
iansen will be Noah's wife and 
Robert Paulus will be heard in 
the role of God. More than 200 
adults and children will 
participate in this production 
which includes both choirs and 
orchestra. All will be under 



'I 



THANKSGIVING DAY 

Hot Apple Cider or Fresh Cider 
Served on Arrival 

Choice of One 

Marinated Mushrooms 

Pate Maison with Cumberland Sauce 

Pilgrim Salad with Peppercorn Dressing 

Corn Chowder or Cream of Pumpkin Soup 

Entrees 

Roast Vermont Turkey with 

Chestnut Stuffing and Giblet Gravy $15.50 

Braised Chesapeake Goose with 

Red Cabbage, Apple and Prune Stuffing $17.00 

Pork Loin Madeira $17.50 

Broiled Filet of Flounder with Mustard Sauce $16.25 

Choice of Two 

Candied Yams— Rissole Potatoes — Boiled Potatoes 
Stringbeans Almondine — Zucchini Provencale — Broccoli Flowers 

Desserts Choice of One 

Pumpkin Pie 
' Bread Pudding with Bourbon Sauce 
Deep Dish Apple Pie 
Double Chocolate Cake 

Coffee — Tea — Sanka Home Baked Corn Bread on Tables 



© 



• (ft Children's portions available 

Scanticon-Princeton 

Executive Conference Center and Hotel 

105 College Road East, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 

__Caili609-452-7800 



I 



? Andre-Michel Schub's Concert at McCarter 
i Shows His Growing Reputation Well Deserved 



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Every year there seems to 
be an abundance of young 
pianists graduating from our 
nation's best music schools 
and trying to establish 
themselves as concert artists. 
Very few accomplish in a life- 
time what Andre-Michel 
Schub has done since his New 
York City debut in 1974. At 29, 
Schub has played with many 
major symphony orchestras 
tM>th here and abroad, and has 
performed solo recitals world- 
wide. 

His concert at McCarter 
Theatre on Tuesday, 
November 9, drew a full and 
warmly responsive audience 
for the second event in Music- 
at-McCarter's 1982-83 season. 
Schub's program was richly 
traditional : sonatas by Mozart 
and Beethoven and romantic 
fantasies by Schumann and 
Liszt. Despite some fleetingly 
troublesome moments, Schub 
demonstrated through his 
awesome power and 
musicality that his growing 
reputation as a pianist is weU 
dnerved. 



Effective Programming. 

The pairing of Schumann's 
"Arabeske," Op. 18 and 
"Carnival," Op. 9 was ef- 
fective programming on the 
part of Schub. The simplicity 
and dreaminess of the former 
piece contrasted well with 
"Carnival," which has many 
sudden changes of character 
in the course of its twenty-one 
sections. 

The very nature of "Car- 
nival" became somewhat 
problematic for Schub. In 
order to heighten the contrasts 
from movement to movement, 
tempos were sometimes too 
quick. Occasionally, not 
enough attention was given to 
the individuality of each 
section, making it difficult to 
follow for listeners unfamiliar 
with the work. 



demeanor with dazzling 
broken octaves and fine 
phrase shadings. 



available at the Etery and at 
the Holistic Health Asso- 
ciation, 360 Nassau Street. For 
mail and phone orders or 
more information call (201) 
329-2777. 



Schub opened with a 
brilliant rendition of Mozart's 
Sonata in F Major, K. 332. The 
pianist evoked warm, melting 
hues from the instrument, 
judiciously using the soft 
pedal for added tonal 
delicacy. The third movement 
leapt with energy and 
imagination without a bint of 
unevenness or urgency in the 
execution of cascading six- 
teenth notes. Even at this 
incredible tempo, Schub was 
capable of many subtly varied 
tiinlna. Quite frankly, this 
writer has heard no one play 
Mozart better. 



Beethoven's Sonata, Op. 22 
in B flat Major was written at 
a time when contemporary 
music was standard fare on 
recital programs, contrary to 
today's practices. As such, 
this work was written for the 
composer's own ooncertizing, 
which accounts in part for its 
technical and musical ad- 
venturism. 

Schub gave the piece a 
stunning perfiHmance. In the 
second movement, the drawn- 
out themes and daring har- 
monic shifts were allowed to 
speak for themselves. Though 
long and elaborately or- 
namented, Schub played it 
cohesively and intelligently. 
The first and fourth 
movements, the latter being a 
virtuosic tour de force, put 
great demands on the pianist. 
Throughout these movements, 
Schub maintained his electric 



Two LIsit Works. The 

pianist closed his program 
with two works by Liszt. "Au 
bord d'une source" was a 
beautifully executed color 
piece, a tone poem for piano 
describing the natural wonder 
of a Swiss mountain spring. 
This is music which, when 
played well (as this was), is 
best listened to with eyes 
closed, allowing its many 
images to have full play on the 
insides of the eyelids. 

The second work, "Apres 
une lecture du Dante," per- 
mitted Schub to display fully 
his extraordinary technical 
mastery of the piano. His 
power and flexibility allowed 
him to take this work at a very 
fast tempo, but not without 
some difficulty. In particular, 
the end was a bit too fast. The 
left hand tended to over- 
shadow the right, and some of 
the passages were played so 
quickly as to be virtually 
incomprehensible. But, of 
course, the spirit of the music 
is what counts most, and this 
performance was, if slightly 
flawed note-wise, very highly 
spirited. 

Perhaps Schub's youth- 
fulness compels him to play 
faster than is musically 
necessary in order to better 
establish himself as a pianist 
of formidable agility and 
strength. One hopes that the 
process of artistic maturity 
will slow him down and allow 
him to deive further into his 
superb musical sense. Then 
Schub's true worth as a great 
artist will emerge. 

Lynn Koch 



TO SING DUETS 
At Lawrenceville Church. 

John Ferrante and Gordon 
Meyers will present a 
program of duets on Saturday 
evening at 8 at the Lawrence- 
ville Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Ferrante is the 
"bargain-counter tenor" with 
the P.D.Q. Bach family, and 
Mr. Myers is creator of "The 
Art of Belly Canto." These two 
men sang together some two 
decades ago in the New York 
ProMusica. 



In addition to his annual 
tours with P.D.Q. Bach, Mr. 
Ferrante sings opera all over 
Europe, Canada and the U.S. 
In addition to becoming a 
professor at Trenton State 
College, Mr. Myers sings for 
anyone around the country 
who invites him. They'll 
perform serious music such as 
"Sound the Trumpet" by 
Purcell as well as crazy music 
like "A Duet for Two Cats" by 
Rossini. 



the music cellar 

records • tapes 

Princeton-Shopping Center 
9212550 



sonex 



fluno 

130 Washington St. Rocky Hill 



924-8787 



ENGLISH SILVER 

COFFEE POT 

Probably Wm. Hall 
LONDON 1825 

59 Palmer Square West 
924-2026 



News Of 1- 

Clubs and Organizations 



•MNRMIMMMHIIMI 

■MRiMi 




LampShadM 
i\^ Ump Repairs 
Cuttonwnad* Lamps 

NASSAU INTERIORS 



i-^sS? 



Mtuiic in Princeton 

OonttnuBd ffOfn PrtotdtnQ PtQB 

May. The score calls for six 
finging choirs, a bell choir, a 
children's string orchestra 
and a prolessional orchestra 
with five percussionists. 

Tickets are $3 for adults and 
$1 for children 12 and under 
and senior citizens if pur- 
daaed ahead of time at the 
dnrch. Country Mouse, Home 
Decor, or Hulitx. Tickets are 
$4 audi: at the doer. 



TO GIVE LECTURE 
Oa Symphony Program. 

Believing there's more to 
HMisic than meets the ear, 
John EHlis has joined with the 
Princeton Area Chapter of the 
New Jersey Symphony 
Orchestra League to present 
'warm-up' lectures prior to 
NJSO concerts at the Trenton 
War Memorial Auditorium. 

Music lovers are invited 
Tuesday at noon to The Art 
People Place. 102 Witherspoon 
Street when Mr. Ellis, using 
tapes, piano, and his own 
broad musical background, 
will discuss the works of 
Mozart and Rachmaninoff to 
be performed by the NJSO on 
Saturday evening, November 
27. The concert program in- 
cludes Mozart's Symphony 
No. 38 m D Major ("Prague) 
K. 504, his Concerto for Piano 
and Orchestra in D Minor, K. 
466, and Rachmaninoff's 
Symphony No. 2 in E Minor, 
Op. 27. 

Mr. laiis has been chairman 
of the Music Department at 
The Lawrenceville School 
since 1967 and has maintained 
aamsic studio at 14>^ 
Wlhtnpoon Street since 1960. 
With defprees in musicology 
the University of North 
I at Oiapel Hill, and in 
piano from the Juilliard 
School. Mr. Ellis also serves 
as a conmltant to The College 
Board, has taught at the 
Priaeetoa Adult School, and 
chaired the Princeton 
UMHrenlty Concerts Com- 




MUSICOLOGIST John Ellis, using tapes and piano 
will give a talk Tuesday at noon on the following Satur- 
day's concert program by the New Jersey Symphony 
The pre-concert talk will be held at the Art People's 
C enter. 

bring a bag lunch. Coffee and 
tea will be available at 11.30 
and the hour-long lecture will 
start at noon. Admission is 
free and donations are 
welcome by the sponsoring 
Symphony League chapter. 



For Saturday's concert, Mr. 
Michaels will perform works 
by Tartini, Prokofiev, Krei- 
sler, Vieuxtemps, Sarasate 
and Ysaye. 



Everyone is welcome to 



VIOLINIST TO PLAY 
On Campus. Violinist 
Geoffrey Michaels will give a 
concert on Saturday at 8:30in 
the McAlpin Rehearsal Room 
at Woolworth Center, on 
campus. Sponsored by the 
Friends of Music, the concert 
is free. 

A native of Western Aus- 
traUa. Mr. Michaels has been 
a laureate of the Tchaikovsky 
Competition, the Queen 
Elizabeth of Belgium Inter- 
national Competition, the 
Montreal International 
Competition, and the Con- 
cours Jacques Vhibaud in 
Paris. Two recent tours of 
Australia involved concerto 
and recital appearances in all 
the major cities, as well as 
engagements as artist-in- 
residence at universities in 
Perth, Melbourne and Sydney. 
Earlier this month he ap- 
peared at the Library of 



GjUITARIST TO PLAY 
At^estaurant. Jim Scott, a 
guitarist, singer and com- 
poser, will perform at the 
Eatery Amulette Restaurant- 
Coffeehoase on Wednesday, 
November 24. There will be 
three shows, 7:30, 9:30 and 
11:30. 

For the past few years Jim 
Scott has been building his 
reputation with the Paul 
Winter Concert, not only as 
guitarist but as composer as 
well. He is most noted for his 
two classic songs, "A Song for 
the Earth " and "Hands," and 
for his work on the Pal Winter 
"Callings" LP. 

The concert is being coor- 
dinated by Earthsong, a 
network of area en- 
vironmental, peace and 
holistic organizations. The 
Eatery Amulette Restaurant 
is at Old English Square, 
Ridge Road, Monmouth 
Junction <8oHth BmaawialiK 
TickeU are $5 and are 




HONOR CHIEF PORTER 
Dinner-dance Planned. 
^^Members of the Princeton 
Patrolmen's Benevolent 
Association will be hosts at a 
dinner dance Saturday, 
November 20 honoring Chief 
Frederick M. Porter Jr., 
retired Township police chief. 
The affair, to be held at 
Princeton Elks Lodge 2129, 
Route 518, Blawenburg, will 
begin with cocktails at 6, 
followed by dinner at 7 and 
dancing at 9. Newt Stewart 
will provide music. 
•^ Those who would like to at- 
tend are invited to call Sgt. 
' John W. Hammond, Princeton 
Township Police Department, 
921-2100. Tickets are $24 per 
person. The cost includes open 
bar, dinner and a share in the 
gift to Chief Porter. Those who 
cannot attend but would like to 
contribute to the gift, may do 

80. 



Anyone who .speaks French 
is invited. 



The Woman's Club will have 
a Dessert Fashion Show on 
Monday at 1 at All Saints' 
Church with fashions from the 
Dandeline Shop, Cranbury. 
For ticket information, 
contact Mrs. Norman NJack- 
son, 924-7912. 




>*\»«kV * pct-hight»town 



pct-hightstowr 
448-2212 



5^ TowR Sliop 



67 Palmar Squara 

924-3687 

Fine Gifts 



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The Ladies Auxiliary of the 
Princeton First Aid and 
Rescue Squad will hold its an- 
nual Christmas Bazaar on 
Saturday, December 4, from 
9:30 to 4 at the squad house on 
Harrison Street. 

Booths will feature hand- 
made items, antiques, 
Christmas items, baked goods 
and white elephant items. 
Luncheon will be served. 



LIONS RAISE FUNDS: The Princeton Lions Club has 
launched a drive to benefit organizations helping the 
blind and the diabetic. More than $100 has already 
been raised by the sale of home goods, personal ef- 
fects and food. Participating merchants included, 
from left, Lou Funk of Davidsons, John Hulit of Hulit's 
and Susan Root of Cox's. With them are Richard 
Brooks and Thomas Johnson of the Lions. 



The public is invited to a 
Thanksgiving celebration 
sponsored by the Holistic 
Health Association on 
Saturday, November 27 at 
7:30. Mahan Rishi Singh 
Khalsa and Karl Fury, along 
with other area musicians, 
will provide a blend of 
Eastern, Western, classical, 
jazz, folk and contemporary 
music. 

A $5 donation will be 
collected at the door. Guests 
are also invited to bring a 
favorite food to share. The 
party will include dancing. 

For further information, 
call the HHAPA at 924-8580. 



The Cercle Francais will 
mept on Sunday, November 28 
at 3:30 in the Woodrow Wilson 
School, Bowl 5. Sr. Rodolphe 
L. Coigny, president of the 
Association of Free French 
and a former attache to the 
United Nations, will speak on 
the problems concerning 
world health. 



The American Association 
for Retired Persons will spon- 
sor a trip to Radio City Music 
Hall in New York City on 
Wednesday, November 24. 

The bus will depart from the 
Princeton Shopping Center ai 
9 for the 11 a.m. performance. 
The cost per person for 
transportation and the show is 
$13. For further information 
call Jenny Jackson at 924-4787. 

The Princeton area chapter 
of the National Alliance of 
Homebased Businesswomen 

will meet Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. 
at the Mercer County Library 
in the Lawrence Shopping 
Center. Jennifer Hanson, 
social worker, will discuss 
assertive versus aggressive 
behavior. 

A $3 donation is requested 
from guests. For further infor- 
mation call Kera Herzog, 
921-1749. 



Woodrow Spear, president of 
Office Supply Order Systems, 
will speak on "Automating the 
Control of Office SuppUes." 

For further information and 
reservations call Clara Paris, 
882-6550, Hugette Roberts, 
924-6500, ext. 138, or Leslie 
SchulU, 799-0400, ext. 2242. 



3:30 to 8 at the Harlingen 
Reformed Church House on 
Route 106 in Belle Mead. 

The cost is $9.50 for adults, 
$4.50 for children under 12. 
Call (201) 359-8737 for reserv- 
ed seating time. 



• Aontirong 

• Bigclow 

• Mn*9 

• Congolcum 

• Bitc«yne 

• Kentil* 

• Amarion Oicm 

• Area Rugt 

• Cutiom Vinytt 

• ReudcniKi 

• Commcrcul 

• Frcr Itumilct 



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floor 

covering 

Stave Pviih. Sdes 



Lyay. 

(809) 890-2211 

Mon. & Tues. 10-6 
Wed., Thurs., Fri. 10-9 
Sat 10-5 Univartlty Plaza 

Quakerbrldg* & Flock Rdt. 
M«rc«rvlll«, NJ. 



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The Central Jersey Business 
and Professional Women's 
Council will meet Thursday at 
7 at the Coach and Four 
Restaurant, Hightstown. 
Judith Cohen of New York will 
be the guest speaker and pro- 
vide the music. 



Mercer County nurses are 
invited to attend the next 
nurse education committee 
meeting of the Mercer County 
Unit of the American Cancer 
Society on Thursday, 
November 18, at 8 in the con- 
ference room of St. Lawrence 
Rehabilitation Center, Route 
206, Lawrence Township. 



Tlia ITriila., nu.u ^t ♦*.« WANT EXTRA INCOME? A temporary 

The Friday Club of the „, p,„,i^e lob may be the answer 

Princeton YWCA will meet Read the Help wanted ad» in this issue of 

this Friday at 12:30 in the All town topics for a varied selection of 
Purpose Room of the YM- opp<>'-'»"i''«°P*"»°y»" 

YWCA Paul Robeson Place. 

Following a light sandwich 
lunch, the program will be 
Frances Slade in Concert," 
Ms. Slade is the director of 
Pro Musica, a choral group 
which performs at the Trenton 
War Memorial. 



11 Chambers Street 

Your hairstyle should be as individual 

as you are. 

We have a world of new ideas 

in precision haircutting. 

921-1834 



UNTIL YOU READ THIS... 



The Administrative 

Management Society will 
meet Tuesday at 5:30 at the 
Treadway Inn, Route 1. Din- 
ner will be served at 6. 



The Montgomery Township 
First Aid Squad will hold an 
oyster and ham dinner on 
Saturday, November 20, from 



don't clean 



NEW JERSEY 
SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 

Thomas Michalak, Music Director and Conductor 




Princeton Area Series 

TRENTON WAR MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM 

Saturday, November 27 at 8:30 P.M. 

Anne Fischer, Piano 

Mozart: Piano Concerto in D Minor K. 466 

The "Prague" Symphony K. 504 
Rachmaninoff: Symphony No. 2 in E Minor 

(This progiam is a preview of the NJSO's Lincoln Center debut on Nov 28) 

TICKETS: M 6.50, M 3.50, M 1 .50, *9.50 

at Karelia Innports, 20 Nassau St , Princeton 

at War Memorial box office on evening of perfornnance 

Reservations by calling Toll-Free 800-631-3407 

Student and Senior Rush Tickets. $6,50 thirty minutes before concert 



ALL MUSIC LOVERS ARE INVITED TO A PRE-CONCERT LECTURE BY 
JOHN ELLIS ON TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1 2 NOON AT THE ART PEOPLE 
PLACE 102 WITHERSPOON STREET AT PAUL ROBESON PLACE, 
PRINCETON. USING TAPES AND PIANO, MR. ELLIS WILL ENLIVEN YOUR 
ENJOYMENT OF MUSIC! 

BRING A BAG LUNCH: TEA AND COFFEE AVAILABLE AT 11:30. HOUR- 
LONG LECTURE BEGINS PROMPTLY AT NOON. ADMISSION FREE, DONA- 
TIONS SUGGESTED. 

PRINCETON AREA CHAPTER 
NEW JERSEY SYIVIPHONY ORCHESTRA LEAGUE 

aiA66lhAMNlVEBJ^ 



... all coin-op cleaning 
""^^ is not the same 



• the solvents we use are the same as those used by 95% of 
professional cleaners 

■ ...therefore articles and labels which advise avoiding petroieur^ 
lolvents and coin-op cleaning do not apply to us- 

• our equipment is the same as that used by professional 
cleaners; in most cases, cleaning is done in 1 V2 hours 

• leave your clothes with attendant; we will clean them for you 
at no extra charge 

• our bulk cleaning method is 70% cheaper than by the piece 

• wrinkle-free and odor-free; many pieces need no pressing 

• big washers for big loads, small washers for small loads 



CLEAN THE COIN OPERATED WAY AND SAVE 1 



COIN WASH 

Open 24 Hours a Day 

259 Nassau Street 921-9785 

Behind Viking Furniture 



.. fc\ *>>£♦%>:♦:%■: •• 



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IVHATS BREWING? 



we have the English 
electric Tea Kettle 
stainless steel, 
automatic, never 
boils dry 



55.00 





Commodore Vic-20 is priced 
lower than Crazy Eddie's. 
Computers by Commodore, 
Olivetti, Texas Instruments, 
IBM, and Hewlett-Packard 
are all on display at the shop. 



reCH« 

'TbehincetfmGourfnet 



Nassau at Harrison 



COMPUTERS AND SUPPLIES: Mr. Rps Cameron, 
manager of the newly-opened computer and business 
supply company, Harry Strauss and Sons, Inc. of 104 
Nassau Street Is happy to demonstrate the uses of 
computers by Olivetti, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Texas In- 
strument, and Commodore. The company is backed 
up by a 75,000 square foot warehouse m New 
Brunswick, where the family has been In busmess for 
63 years. 



A 



We have the finest 

COFFEE 

BEANS 

from all over 
the world 



Sunnatra 

Kenya 

Brazil 

plus ten more 



and our well known 
Swiss decaffeinated 



all perfectly roasted 
and ground for your 
coffee maker 

(mm mti thoutanda of 
fioundt a yar »o you 



IT'S NEW 



To t/s 




V<wo^ 



Natuu ai Harrison 



BUSINESS SUPPLY CO. 

New on Nassau Street. There 
is a new shop on Nassau St. 
which is becoming a hub of 
activity for Princetonians of 
all ages whether (hey be 
senior professors, business 
people or grammar school 
students. Harry Strauus and 
Sons, Inc. of New Brunswick, 
a large business supply 
company, opened their store 
on October 1st in what was 
formerly Center Business 
Machines. The response has 
been tremendous according to 
the company's youngest 
partner, Hank Strauss. The 
shop welcomes all to come in 
and use one of the many new 
computers sold and installed 
by the company. 

Mr. Strauss is convinced 
ttiat they have made a good 
decision in opening their slore 
here. He has been waiting for 
the chance to serve the 
Princeton community ever 
since he moved here with his 

young family thrte years ago. 



and told its former occupant, 
Mr. Gordon Popper, to call 
him whenever he was ready to 
sell. Mr. Popper called in 
July. Hank Strauss then urged 
his uncle and partner, Rot^rt 
Strauss, to move quickly 
because "this was an op- 
portunity we cannot miss!" It 
is conveniently located across 
from the University. 

Harry Strauss and Sons, 
Inc., established in 1919 
specializes in full across-the- 
board sales and service of 
business machines, furniture 
and office supplies. 



Favors Commodore Com- 
puter. Mr. Strauss is highly in 
favor of the Commodore for 
family and educational 
purposes. Reasonably-priced, 
the expandable color com- 
puter features a full 
typewriter-style keyboard, 
graphics, sound, and a wide 
range of add-on accessories, 
plus many video games for 
leisure hours. With the holiday 
season upon us, the shop 
anticipates a strong interest in 
computCT^ as gifts as well as 
for business needs. What is 
more convenient than shop- 
ping right here in Princeton? 
The Commodore 64 is a great 
competitor of the Apple II. 

"We do some serious 
teaching here and will install 
and service right in the home. 
We don't have any marketing 
gimmicks, just good service," 
claims Mr. Strauss, whose 
promise is backed up by their 
own electronics lab in New 
Brunswick. The shop also 
services typewriters in 48 
hours. 



"This is a great town to live 
in, the schools, the people, the 
whole atmosphere of Prin- 
ceton is so enriching. 
Everyone is so nice. That's 
why I moved here," he ex- 
plains with enthusiasm. He 
had an eye on his new shop's 



63 Years Experience. "We 
know all about support for the 
complete business systems 
which we sell because we have 
been in the servicing business 
for 63 years and the retail 
business for ten," says Mr. 
Strauss, who really enjoys the 
retail end. 

The company, which began 
as a comer cigar store with 
office supplies by Mr. Strauss' 
grandparents has grown into a 
very large concern indeed. 
There are three separate 
divisions, including a design 
department which will create 
an office from the ground up 
or renovate an existing space. 
They are the largest copier 
dealers in the state and one of 
the largest in the country. 




Appraisal Services 

For Qn outhorlCotive and 
up-to-dote Qsneument of your fine 

jewelry and tilver. . . 

IM LaVake*3 registered jewelers 

provide a complete written 

description . . . ivhether for q 

•ingJe piece or an entire 

collection. 

Members of the American Gem Society 

J9W9t0n »nd SM¥*rtmithM Sine* 1877 



flflic rf«aa|^ B' 



UrM 9:M Pm 




18 



THURSDAY 

NOVEMBER 

1982 



l^#5 



.^ 




/i%\ 



interior 
design 
studio 



2935 Rl. 1 , Lawr*nc«viH« 

»l Th» frurgy Wtrehoua* 

(609)896-2082 



Though Harry Strauss and 
Sons, Inc. has grown to these 
proportions supported by a 
total of 40 outside sales people, 
the family company insists on 
maintaining its policy of the 



KREN nPEWRITER 
SALES b SERVICE 

172 Alexander Road 
Princeton, N.J. 
(609)924-8163 



ALLEN'S 

Princeton's Largest 
ChMrens Department Store 

134 Nassau St. 
924-3413 

Monday-Saturday 9-5 30 



Dr. Laon C. Nurock 

Optomelrist 

84 Nassau St. 
Princeton 

For an appointment 
call 924-0918 




Itles 
unlimited 



■OOKSCLLIM 



montgomery center 
prInceton shopping center 



i 



Wallcoverings 

Aivniyt Ol«coufit«d 

|2929fltt.1 883-2086 



SPEECH THERAPY SERVICES 
CHILDREN - ADULTS 



STUTTERING • IMMATURE SPEECH • LANGUAGE 
APHASIA • TONGUE THRUST 

JUDITH M. RICHMAN, M.S., C.C.C. 

Certified Speech PethdoQlet * - 

924-4004 



■ THE POTTERY 

barn 



The Merfcetplece/Prtnceton 






Already, Harry Strauss has 
acquired some large accounts 
in the area including Squibb, 
ETS, RCA, and the Univer- 
sity. A well-versed staff is on 
hand to assist their customers 
and demonstrate the uses of 
the various computers and 
other business machines sold 
there. 

On weekends one will find 
sixteen year old Peter 
Wisnovsky, a computer wiz, at 
the shop programming and 
assisting manager, Ros 
Cameron. Store hours are 9 to 
5:30 daily except for Thur- 
sdays when it's open until 8. 
During the holiday season, 
Mr. Strauss hopes to be open 
seven days a week. 



HIGHEST PRICES 
PAID FOR 

QoW SNwr 
OtofiKMide AntlQuee 

J.C.T. GALLERY 

2S09 1. Breed St. 

Trillion, N. J> 

(609)8a«-2301 

MeihSat 9-8:30; W«d M 



J 



0-- ^' 



;>g 



ALADDIN 
KEROSENE 
HEATERS 

and others 






vx 



AoMossou 



27 Palm«r Sq. West 
921-7298 



It's New to Us 

Continued from Preceding Page 

ENORMOUS SELECTION 
At Park Lane Furniture. It 

would be difficult to imagine a 
furniture store with a greater 
selection than the Park Lane 
Furniture Co. The attractive 
store, located in the Lawrence 
Shopping Center, is an 
enormous building, more than 
10,000 square feet. However, 
shoppers can handle its size 
easily because it has recently 
been "gallerized." Galleries 
and grouping of furnishings 
enable one to visualize more 
readily how a piece of fur- 
niture or an entire room 
purchased would look in one's 
own home. 

The store, owned by a 
longtime Princeton resident, 
John Kozloski, and his family 
is multi-faceted yet has 
retained the same com- 
mitment to individualized 
service for which it has 
become so well known in the 
past 27 years. In fact, its at- 
tractive young manager and 
designer, Miss Robin Uhl, 
thought when she first began 
with the family store that they 
went overboard in the service 
department! 




GIFT POSSIBILITIES: Mr. John KozlowskI of Princeton, 
owner of Park Lane Furniture Co. in the Lawrence 
Shopping Center, discusses Ideas for holiday gifts 
with his chief interior designer and store manager, 
Miss Robin Uhl. Many lovely small items of crystal, 
glass, porcelain and brass in addition to a huge selec- 
tion of furnishings for the home, will make perfect 
gifts for Christmas. 



\ 



PURE WHITE KEROSENE 
BY THE GALLON 

Come In todey and eee our large display of nursery 
stock and laiKlscapIng materials. Talk to our experts 
and select what you need. We've everything from 
gardening tods k plant foods to trees and ehrubs. 

GREAT 

SELECTION ofDUTCH BULBS 



OBAL 



GARDEN 
MARKET 

"For the very best" 
Alexander Rd., Princeton 452-2401 
Landscape Consultants • M-Sat 8-5 



According to Miss Uhl, the 
shop has a phenomenal 
reputation. Witness the shop's 
offer of a three year guarantee 



DOORS of 

PRINCETON 

POSTER. 

24 of the most bcautitul 
doors in Princeton. 

Call the DOOR CENTER. Rocky Hill 924-3884 



location durinc these vears ^®^* service available. The 
location auring tnese years ^^^^^ ^^^jj ^^^ ^^ Nassau 

St., backed up by a 75,000 
square foot warehouse in New 
Brunswick, will deliver an 
item needed, large or small, 
by the next day ! 

"People are surprised by 
our prices. They are 
discounted and definitely 
competetive with those in New 
York," comments Mr. 
Strauss. For instance, the new 



The Perfect Holiday Gift 

Decorative 
Lamps 

by 
Nelson Lebo 

*39.95 



f 



Also 



Enter A 



Nevs/ Dimension 



In Hair Design 




•Custom-Made Hand-Painted Duck Decoys 

•Americana Artifacts 

•Framed Country Prints 

NASSAU Interiors 206 

Montgomery Shopping Center, Rocky Hill, NJ. 

921-6696 

Mon.-Thurs. 10-5:30; Fri. 10^; Sat. 10-5 



Brighten your whole outlook in a world that 
uses color to create illusion, contrast and subtle 
highlights. A world that uses color to make the 
most of your face shape, and where your hair 
becomes a canvas for the haircolorist's brush. 

With state-of-the-art dimensional techniques 
and rich colors from Redken,® our experienced 
haircolor artists can take you there. 

Call for an appointment today. And see your 
hair in a whole new light. 

REDI<£N 

Salon Prescription Center 

PROFESSIONAL HAIR ARTISTRY 
FOR WOMEN AND MEN 



Chelsea 




Tues. & Thurs. 9-8 

wed & Fri 9-6 

Sat. 9-4:30 



and full service on items sold. 
The Kozlowskis have seen 
three generations in a family 
buying fine furniture from 
them. Seven full-time 
qualified interior designers 
are on staff at Park Lane. 
They will come to the home or 
office without a retainer, an 
unusual service these days, to 
advise on complete renovation 
or a partial treatment. 

"We don't believe in 
charging people just for a 
Uttle advance advice," says 
Mr John Kozlowski whose 
son, Tom, is treasurer of the 
corporation and whose 
brother, William, is vice- 
president. Highly design- 
oriented, the shop recently 
won a coveted design prize as 
the leading store in the area 
using its gallery concept. In 
addition to this award, they 
have won the Delaware Valley 
Design award from the 
Delaware Valley Furniture 
Association. 

Hundreds of Sources. Park 
Lane Furniture Co. has 
hundreds of sources for the 
furnishings on display at the 
store. Among them are the 
top-of-the-line companies such 
as Drexel, Heritage and 
Pennsylvania House. Their 
services and stock include a 
terrific selection of carpeting 
and window and wall treat- 
ment for residential and 
commercial use. Staff 
designers will assist the 
shopper if called upon to 
coordinate a whole room or 
entire home or office. 
Acessories for same are in 
abundance. 

A separate leather shop with 
demonstrations of how leather 
furniture can be used to make 
an office or study cozy and 
pleasant is found on the upper 
level of the store. 



The Lane America 
collection will delight the eye. 
Stunning reproductions or 
replicas authenticated by the 
Museum of American Folk Art 
in bleached, pickled pine are 
fine examples of American 
craftsmanship. Some of the 
pieces are painted in 
traditional colors of the early 
America period. Chests, beds, 
tables and comer chair in this 
line are exquisite. 



The store is authorized by 
the renowned Drexel Heritage 
Furnishings Inc. which in- 
sures strict quality control, 
service and a wide range of 
design. These authorized 
outlets are few. 

The same gallery concept is 
used at Park Lane to display 
Pennsylvania House's 
beautiful collection of 
American traditiorul atxl 18th 
century reproductions in 
shining cherry , oak, and pine. 
Treasures in many different 
styles can be viewed in an 
unhurried pleasant at- 
mosphere. 

An interesting grouping is 
that of a French country 
dining room set with pumice 
rubbed wood and a table 
topped in thick glass. 



While strolling through the 
many displays shoppers will 
be able to envision their future 
rooms in the most traditional 
of designs or the latest con- 
temporary lines in furniture. 
The collection is varied 
enough to appeal to even the 
most discriminating buyer. 



Other items which may 
catch the eye include: han- 
dsome vitrines ; four-poster 
beds; campaign chests; and 
stunning diagonal channel- 
quilted sofas in off-white. The 
range of upholstered furniture 
is awesome! 

There are many stunning 
holiday gift ideas on display at 
Park Lane. These include: 
lovely brass sculptures and 
accessories (a huge reindeer 
for $1200.); frames; crystal 
vases and plates; lamps; a 
Ming tree of life; and hand- 
some ceramics. Why not buy 
the best gift of all. a gift 
certificate? Store hours are 
most convenient to the 
shopper, Monday through 
Friday from 10 to 9, Saturday 
from 10 to 5, and Sunday from 
noon to 5. 

— Susan Trowbridge 



14 SPftlNO StAECT 
HHNCETON. N.J. 



(so«) 924-1 824 



CARPET SALE 

RfSfDENTML a COMMERCIAL 
CARPCTINO 

• LEES • ARMSTRONG 

• MOHAWK • CALLAWAY 

• MAGEE • PLUS MANY OTHERS 
Installallon by Our Own Craftsmen 

TILE DISCOUNT CENTER 

CAPITOL PLAZA SHOPPING CffNTEII 
PRINCETON 4 OLDEN AVES., TRENTON 

Phone 392-2300 

HOURS: M«n., Thurs., Fri. 9 to t 
Tun. A Wtd. f t« 4 • S«t. f to S 



DKa^e M Gaydos A.SID. 
lr^«rior D«sigr«r Arlr Corsjl^arlr 



Complete Decorating Services 
Restdential'Commercial 



By appointment 
737-1010 



SMART MOVES 

FITNESS STUDIO 

located in the courtyard next to Workbench 

45 State Rd. (Rt. 206) •Princeton, N.J. 

924-9179 

S-T'R-ET-C-H 

• Rhythmic Exercise • Aerobics 

FOR ^fEN AND WOMEN 

• OPEN SCHEDULE • 

•Qasses from 9 am - 7 pm» Lunch hour classes 
• 5:30 pm stretch 

Membership entitlea you to unlimited attendance 

baby sitting available 

CaU or stop by for fuU schedule & rates 



Have you seen the new shop 
in the Princeton Shopping Center? 

JORDAN'S GIFT and 
CARD SHOP 

featuring: 



COLLECTIBLES 

Hurrvnels • Frances Hook 
Norman Rockwell • Precious Moments 

CANDY 

Russell Stover • Fanny Farmer 
Pennsylvania Dutch 

SMURFS 

Strawberry Short Cake 
Garfield and others! 



O 



o 
o 

(A 

■o 
a 

z 
o 
m 



m 

o 

m 

CO 

o 
> 
-< 



o 

< 
m 

OB 

m 

a 



M 



Princeton Shopping Center 
No. Harrison Street 924-61 61 

Open Mon.-Sat. 9:30-6; Fridays til 8 
IVI/C and Visa accepted 




If you're looking for fine quality boots 
or shoes with honest good looks, 
quality craftsmanship and rugged 
durability, you're looking for Herman. 
And we've got them. ' - ' , 

HERMAN 

Boolsandshoes. 




VALUABLE 




I 
I 

I 
I 



10% OFF 

any Herman boots in stock 
with this coupon. 

Expires Wed. Nov. 24, 1982 

■ COUPON ■ 

HUUT'S SHOES 

1 40 Nassau St. 924-1 952 

OPEN THURSDAYS TIL 8 P.M. 









It's often the little 

things that add 

individuality and 

distinction to a home 

^^furmtiire & accessories 

Rout* 206 •B«N«MMd 
k *f4-»3S3 



DREWES, AT FINE ART 

Recent Work. An exhibition 
of recent paintings, collages 
and prints by Werner Drewes 
will open this Saturday at the 
Princeton Gallery of Fine Art, 
8 Chambers Street, continuing 
through December 11. 

One of the first Bauhaus- 
trained artists to settle in the 
United States, Drewes arrived 
here in 1930. He had been in 
the Bauhaus with Paul Klee 
and Johannes Itten in 1921-22 
and later with Kandinsky and 
Feininger. 

He has had over 80 one-man 
shows throughout the world, 
and a retrospective of his 
work, honoring his 85th birth- 
day, will be held at the Na- 
tional Museum of American 
Art in Washington in 1984. He 
also has a show opening in 
New York next spring. 

Drewes is represented in the 
collections of the Museum of 
Modem Art, the Guggenheim, 
the Brooklyn Museum, Na- 
tional Collection of Fine Arts 
and the Bibliotheque Na- 
tionale, Paris. 

The Princeton Gallery of 
Fine Art is open Tuesdays 
through Fridays from 10 to 5 
and Saturdays from 11 to 5. 



ATETS 

Soft Sculpture, Glass. Etch- 
ings. Tlie work of three artists 
from the area is now on view 
in Lounge B, Conant Hall, 
Educational Testing Service. 
The exhibit will remain 
through December 10, and 
may be viewed between 9 and 
11 and 1 :30 and 4: 30 daily. The 
lounge is closed week-ends. 

Joseph F. Sulzberg of New 
Hope constructs glass panels 
in both contemporary and 
traditional styles, producing 
works for both residential and 
commercial use, that are 
visually delicate but struc- 
turally sound. He also teaches 
stained glass techniques. 

Annelies van Dommelen's 
etchings show both wild life, 
and androgynous, surrealistic 




IF 

iL 



Hopewell Frame Shop 



Hopewell House Square 
(609)466-0817 

"Cater to vour f moiglrKitlon ' 

TuM.-Sat 10-5 



^op |1 




LaVake 
requests the pleasure of 

assisting you 

in the selection of your 

Wedding Invitations 

and 

Social Stationery 

featu ing fine papers 

by 

Crane 



54 Nassau Street Princeton, New Jei^sey 08540 
(609) 924^24 




Jewelry • Gifts 

Art • Antiques 

Creative Clothing 

32MainSt.. Kingston 

924-4040 M Sat 10 6 



PICTURE FRAMING 
WITH CHARACTER 
If you would like to se« In- 
teresting design and unusual 
technique to presen/e and 
enhance your art, come to 
All's Art and Framing. 

If you ate lortunale enough lo be 
tamiliar with these skills you have pro- 
bably already been here and we would 
like to thank you 

ALFlSART & 



FRAMING 




H^afe 



Lawrence Shopping Center 
U.S.I a Tex»Ave.883 2401 



,~tm - ri ^* 



Disappointing Performance against Yale Leaves Tigers 
Struggling to Avoid Poorest Season Since 2-7 Mark in '76 



WERNER DREWES: An oil on canvas, done last 
year, Is part of the Werner Drewes exhibit that will 
open this Saturday at the Princeton Gallery of Fine 
Art, Chambers Street. Its title is "Momentum." 



figures. Concerned primariJ^y 
with line and design, she 
works largely in watercolor 
and etching. 

Arcadia Olenska-Petiyshyn 
came to this country from the 
Ukraine in 1949, and since then 
has exhibited her lithographs 
in the United States and 
Canada. Her work is in private 
collections both here and 
abroad. 

Robin Power creates soft 
sculpture and "wearable art" 
in her New Hope studio-home. 
Her conunissions have ranged 
in size from a large fiber "bed 
environment" to a fil)er 
eyepatch for the late Moshe 
Day an. 



Landau, will have their ex- 
hibits. 

Handmade jewelry, wood 
carvings, stained glass, 
ceramics, porcelains, wood 
collages and needlework will 
all be on view and for sale. 

Visitors may also watch a 
demonstration of spinning and 
weaving, and between visits to 
the various items on display, 
buy a bowl of chili, a pita sand- 
wich, bagels and cream 
cheese or baked goods and 
beverages. 

The donation of $1 (senior 
citizens, 50 cents) is payable 
at the door. Supervised ac- 
tivities will be provided for 
children. 



guild gallery^ 



•Custom Framing 
•HandcraMed Pottery 




in the montgomery center •rocky hill 

(609) 921-8292 ^ 






) 




COMMl/NlCATE 
Through Art. "Art is Com- 
munication," an exhibit co- 
ordinated by the Princeton Art 
Association, is now in the 
Western Electric Corporate 
Center gallery. Carter Road. 
It will remain through 
December 20 and is open 
week-days from 9 to 4 and 
week-ends from 2 to 5. 

Artists represented in the 
exhibit are Dorothy Bissell, 
Hope Carter, Patricia Cope, 
Ann Demarain, Jane Eccles, 
Howard Goldstein, George 
Greene. 

Ann Gross, Use Johnson, 
Ben Joseph, Eiko Kahn, Min- 
na Kirzenbaum, Michael 
Lasuchin, Betty Jane Lee, Mel 
Leipzig, Jean M. Mattson, 
Elizabeth Monath, Charles 
Ream, Gary Saretsky, Marie 
Sturken and Mary Yess. 



EXHIBITS 

The batik works of British 
artist Gillian Godfrey will be 
shown at the Hopewell Frame 
Shop Gallery from December 
7 through the holidays. The 
gallery is located in Hopewell 
House Square, Broad and 
Mercer Streets, Hopewell, and 
is open Tuesdays through 
Saturdays, 10 to 5: 30. 



cidypherndlid 

Fine Handcrafted Pottery 



We will carefully serxj 
your gift in time 
for the holidays 




H 



200 Washington St. (Rt. 51 8) 

Rocky Hill, N.J. 924-6394; 9-6 Tues-F; 10-5 Sat 



The Princeton football team 
was laid to rest in the Yale 
Bowl last Saturday, buried 
under a pile of its own offen- 
sive and defensive shortcom- 
ings, in a 37-19 loss to the Elis. 
Interred with it were all hopes 
for a winning season, not to 
mention fantasies of sharing 
the Ivy title. 

Now, the Tigers are in 
danger of posting their worst 
season mark in several years. 
A loss to Dartmouth this 
Saturday in Palmer Stadium 
would bring a 3-7 finish. That 
would be a low point for head 
.^oach Frank Navarro, who 
»^j(jok over in 1978, and the 
pot/i'est record since the 
Orange and Black ended 2-7 in 
1976. 

Considering Saturday's con- 
test, it's certainly no surprise. 
In two hours and 20 minutes of 



...BY DANZIGER 

Sculpture on View. The half- 
human, half-animal figures of 
Princeton sculptor Joan Dan- 
ziger will be on view at the 
New Jersey State Museum in 
Trenton starting this Friday 
and continuing through 
January 2. 

The sculptor will give a 
"Form and Fantasy" 
workshop under the auspices 
of the Princeton Art Associa- 
'tion on Thursday. Friday and 
Monday, December 2, 3 and 6. 
Students will learn themselves 
how to create animaloid 
figures, using armatures and 
rag mache. Details are 
available from the PAA at 
921-9173. 

Ms. Danzinger's work at the 
Museum is constructed with 
resin-reinforced fabric over a 
wood and wire armature. 
Figures are then modeled and 
shaped with celluclay and 
painted with acrylic 
polymers. Final details are 
applied with colored inks and 
pencils. 

The Museum is open from 9 
to 4:45 Mondays through 
Fridays and 1 to 5 week-ends. 
Admission is free. 

IN ROOSEVELT 
Art Fair. Jacob Landau will 
open his studio to the pubUc 
this Sunday during the 
Roosevelt Art Fair, and will 
share a percentage of his sales 
with the First Aid Squad, 
sponsor and beneficiary of the 
Fair. 

The annual event will be 
held from 11 to 6 in the 
Roosevelt Public School 
where artists, except for Mr. 



The Full House Gallery. 32 

Main Street, Kingston, will 
hold an exhibition of oil paint- 
ings by Anne Packard and 
ceramics by Gregorio 
Prestopino starting Sunday. 
The exhibit will continue 
through January 8. 

Hours are Monday through 
Saturday from 10 to 6. 
Christmas hours will start 
December 6 and include Sun- 
days until 4 and Wednesday, 
Thursday and Friday even- 
ings until 8. 





SKIERS 
ALERT! 

Time to shape up 

your skis for 
this winter season. 



Complete tune-up special includes: 

•Sharpen skis (side and bottom file) " ^ 

^Complete waxing 
. •P-tex last year's cki gouges 
•Binding adjustment and retease check 



ENTIRE SKI PACKAGE FOR ONLY $15 



Don't be left out in the cold with toad equipment. Have the former 
ski technician of The Sports People, Jeff Cramer examine your 
equipment. . . 

Princeton Nautilus 
Fitness Center 

Princeton Shopping Center 921-6985 
^ Open 7 days Open 6 A.M. 



SPORTS 
In Princeton 




playing time, Princeton gave 
a vivid demonstration of its 
problems this fall, and even 

added a few new ones With YALE'S PAUL ANDRIE ON THE MOVE: The Princeton 

eight games under their belts, defense chased Yale's Paul Andrle all afternoon but 

the Tigers looked like they rarely caught him quickly enough. The junior tailback 

were mvolved m a preseason ran for 118 yards from scrimmage, and added 50 more 

scrimniage here on a punt return, setting up the Eli's first 

In allowing the Elis their touchdown. Tigers' Rick Coley Is In pursuit 

. ^Boe Uatlhewa photo) 



highest point total of the 
season, the defense gave final 
proof that it has matured little 
if at all this year, or, in fact, in 
two seasons of play. Many 
players on the defensive unit 
were part of last year's that 
gave up a record 305 points in 
10 games. A new mark will be 
set this Saturday, if Dart- 
mouth can score 32 or more. 



worst at third or fourth down offense was in control of the 

and long yardage situations, game." 

This kept several Eli drives Sadly, Brent Woods was to 

alive, and ate up huge chunks have his poorest day passing 

of time on the clock, keeping this season, hitting on just 



An unheralded Yale offense 
gained 272 yards in rushing, 
118 by junior tailt>ack Paul An- 
drie. It completed just seven 
of 11 passes, but often these 
came at crucial moments. The 
Princeton defense was at its 



the Princeton offense on the 
sidelines. "We were constant- 
ly in a crisis situation," com- 
mented Navarro after the 
game. 



seven of 19 attempts for 84 
yards. He gained 94 on the 
ground, often after finding his 
receivers covered. 



"The game became such 
that we couldn't establish an 
offensive pattern. We never 
really got a reading on their 
defense, and their defensive 
series, mostly t>ecause their 




■ , %.! .V # ^Barnard ^*'"*"' HHHHBl^ Hi 

I STURHAHN, DICKENSON & BERNARD i 

' '" "^"1 



I 

I 

I 
I 



i 
i 

i 



Amazingly, there was 
once a man who played 
BOTH big league pro 
football AND major 
league basebal the 
SAME year with 2 
teams had the 
SAME NAME!... This 
oddity happened when 
Steve Filipowicz was an 
outfielder for the Giants 
in big league baseball in 
1945.. Then that autumn 
he became a running 
back for the Giants of 
the National Football 
League-setting a 
record unique in sports 
history. 

Here's a surprising 
fact. ..When Jimmy 
Connors won the U.S. 
Open tennis cham- 
pionship in September, 
it marked the 9th 
straight year a left- 
hander won it... The last 



time a righty won the 

U.S. Open was 1973 

when John Newcombe 

was the winner. 

-l--l--f 

I bei you didn't know 
that Homeowner's 
Insurance has low limits 
for silverware and 
jewelry unless 

specifically insured. 
-I--I- + 

Why are football 
fields in the United 
States 53-and-one-third- 
yards wide?... Why that 
particular width?. ..It 
was chosen in the early 
days of football because 
Harvard Stadium had 
just been built and that 
was the exact width the 
field could be, based on 
the width of Harvard 
Stadium. ..Since Har- 
vard dominated football 
then, they standardized 
that measurement. 
-!- + -»- 



f 1 



ft r.m illlBtSBtl 



m t m 1 



%< 




Sturhahn, Dickenson 
& Bernard 

INSURANCE SPECIALISTS 
14 NasMU St • 921-6880 



For all the talk about it, and 
all the records set, the offense, 
has managed no more than 
two touchdowns in the great 
majority of its games this 
season. And that was the case 
here, not counting a mean- 
ingless score near the end 
against the Yale reserves. 

The failure to score more 
against teams such as Colum- 
bia, Army and Harvard, has 
been just as important as the 
sloppy play on defense. 

Added to these woes were 
the breakdowns on special 
teams. A fumbled kickoff 
return that led to a Yale field 
goal, a fumbled punt that led 
to a touchdown, a long punt 
return by the Elis that set up 
another touchdown. 

Topping it off, the Tigers 
were hit with seven penalties, 
two of which nullified long 
gains. One stopped a drive 
near the end of the first 
quarter, with Princeton 
ahead, 7-3, and it was all 
downhill from there. 

The unfortunate fact about 
this season, is that it has been 
almost all downhill since the 
Brown game. That stirring 
second-half comeback against 
the Bruins, gave the Tigers a 
2-1 mark; they have won only 
once since then. 

QUICK LOOK AT DARTMOUTH 

OFFENSE: Strong ground 
game with Sean Maherand 
Richard Weissman, Caraviello 
an adequate passer. 
DEFENSE: Rebuilt around 
linebacker Dave Neslund, It 
has improved since the beginn- 
ing of the season. 
CHIEF ASSET: Still possible to 
gain a share of the Ivy title. 

CHIEF PROBLEM: Tigers may 
want to atone for a "lost" 
season. 

TYPE OF ATTACK: Multiple 



The Columbia game it turns 
out was not so much an aber- 
ration, but an indication of 
things to come. That horren- 
dous loss to a team that has 
not come close to beating 
anyone else, must stand as the 
turning point in the season's 
fortunes. 

The last-second victory over 
a Penn team, that was ob- 
viously having an off day, 
stopped the slide momen- 
tarily, but did not reverse it. 
Last Saturday, the Tigers hit 
bottom. 

If nine-game schedules were 
still in effect, this would have 
been a fitting end, but 
Princeton must go out once 
more and meet Dartmouth. 
Game time is one half hour 
earlier at 1. 

The game for Princeton 
means the diference between 
a 4-6 season and a 3-7 one, and 
the ability to end with some 
small amount of pride left in- 
tact. For Dartmouth, the 
possibility of sharing the Ivy 
title still exists. 

After a slow start, and the 
loss of two quarterbacks, the 
Big Green has rallied for a 4-2 
mark in Ivy play, 4-5 overall 
It can gain a share of the Ivy 
title if Penn loses to Cornell at 
Ithaca, a definite possibility. 

Dartmouth has a trio of fine 
runners in seniors Peter 
Lavery, Sean Maher, and 
sophomore Richard 

Weissman. Quarterback Mike 
Caraviello has been an able 
replacement for both Rick 
Stafford and Frank Polsinello, 
injured earlier in the season. 

While the Tigers would ob- 
viously like to upset Dart- 
mouth, it might be of more in- 
terest to give junior quarter- 
back Steve Cusma a starting 
shot at quarterback. Heavily 
recrited as a freshman. 

Continued on Next Page 



R.F. JOHNSON 

Elactrical Contraclor 
and Fixture StMMvroam 

,11 Iijianeb! 924-0606 

OpenMon -Fn 8 lo b 



BUNKER HILL 
\LANDSCAPING 

Landscape Design 
Planting • Patios 

201-359-3742 



PRINCETON 
CLOTHING CO. 



CtotHutglOfttui 






Shirts by 
Arrow - Van Heusen 
17 Witherspoon St 

924-0704 




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Rwtbal 

Cusma has had less than five 
minutes varsity experience in 
running the offense, all of it 
coming last Saturday. 

With an eye toward next 
year, it would be helpful if he 
got some meaningful playing 
time against Dartmouth. 
Woods certainly benefitted 
from his time against Cornell 
a year ago, when Bob Holly 
was injured. 



,1 .- 



A BLUE DAY 

For Tiger Supporters. If 
Princeton fans had any ideas, 
about starting a streak 
against the Yale, after last 
j-ear's dramatic 35-31 victory, 
they can be forgotten. 

Thfi Tigers came looking for 
their first victory in the Bowl 
since 1966, and left wondering 
if maybe this was the 
unbeaten team they were sup- 
posed to lose to last 
November. 



IVY LEAGUE STANDINQS 

LMg«M Overall 

W L W L 

Penn 5 17 2 

Harvard 4 2 6 3 

Dartmouth 4 2 4 5 

Yale 3 3 4 5 

Princeton 3 3 3 6 

Brown 2 4 4 5 

Cornell 2 4 3 6 

Columbia 15 18 

Last Saturday's Results 

Yale 37 Princeton 19 
Cornell 35 Columbia 26 
Dartmouth 22 Brown 16 

Penn 23 Harvard 21 

This Saturday's Games 

Dartmouth at Princeton 

Brown at Columbia 

Harvard at Yale 

Penn at Cornell 



ington, 3-1, Monday a't 
Lawrenceville in the cham- 
pionship game, proving that 
an earlier 8-0 triumph was no 
fluke. 



Winning the toss, Princeton 
chose to take the wind at the 
start and give Yale the ball. 
The Elis didn't give it up until 
almost six minutes later, after 
kicking a 25-yard field goal, 
and the tenor of the game was 
•et from the start. 

Yale would control the ball 
for more than two-thirds of the 
playing time, keeping Brent 
Woods and the offense sitting 
in frustration on the sidelines. 

The pattern of the game was 
also indicated eariy when 
quarterback Joe Dufek faced 
« fourth and 13 from the 
Princeton 30. He found Roger 
Javens open over the middle 
for a 17 yard gain and a first 
down. 



Princeton responded with a 
fine drive of its own, as Woods 
used backs Farris Curry and 
Roland Warren for good yar- 
dage on the ground. The 
Tigers' scored on a one-yard 
sneak by Woods, and led 7-3. 
Then things began to fall 
apart. 

Princetwi had to punt, after 
a first down was nullified by a 
holding penalty. Paul Andrie 
retunied the ball 51 yards to 
the Princeton 25, and eight 
plays later Yale regained the 
lead for good with its first 
touchdown of the day. 



It added two more field 
goals in the half, one from 52 
yards away with the wind, 
that broke the Yale record of 
49 yards. Behind by no more 
than six points, Princeton 
abandoned its running game, 
and started to pass, but ran 
just 14 plays in the second 
quarter, and never seriously 
threatened. 

The opening of the second 
half was a repeat of the first. 
With the wind against it, Yale 
received the kickoff and mar- 
ched 77 yards in 16 plays, con- 
suming more than seven 
minutes. Tom Neville dived 
over from the one to give the 
Elis a 23-7 lead. 



fourth quarter, as the Yale 
line began to open huge holes 
in the Princeton defense. 

With nine minutes remain- 
ing, Dufek scored on a five- 
yard keeper, raising the 
margin to 30-13. The Elis add- 
ed further insult five minutes 
later. 

Forced to punt, they were 
immediately in business 
again, when Guthrie fumbled 
on the Princeton 29. Reserve 
quarterback Mike Luzzi hit 
Rick Crews with a lob pass in 
the end zone between three 
Princeton defenders. 

Woods gave way to Cusma 
at this point and he guided the 
Tigers to their final score 
against the Yale reserves, 
with some fine running and 
three c<Hisecutive passes to 
Guthrie along the way. The 
drive covered 80 yards in just 
six plays. 

but came far too late to mean 
much. 

"I'd have to say we were a 
little flat today," Navarro 
said. "Our emotional cycle 
has been out of whack most of 
the season. We peaked for the 
games we shouldn't." 

— Jeb Stuart 

PDS BEATS PENNINGTON 
For Prep "B" Title. Last 
year the question of which was 
the best team in the state 
among "B' division prep 
schools was left up in the air, 
when Princeton Day and Pen- 
nington tied 1-1 in the cham- 
pionship game. Fighting 
among players, coaches and 
fans after the contest didn't 
settle anything either. 

There is no question this 
fall, and no need for fisticuffs. 
The Panthers defeated Penn- 



The Blue and White did a 
superb job containing the 
Raiders' offense, and its two 
top scorers, John Davies and 
Jay Bailey. "We wanted to 
keep the ball wide on offense 
and clog up the middle on 
defense," commented first 
year coach Carlos Cara. "We 
made the most of our oppor- 
tunities and stopped them." 

Sophomore Sal Fier, in par- 
ticular, made the most of the 
Panthers' chances, scoring all 
three goals. His first came on 
a cross from Andy Bing with 
just 4:36 gone in the contest. 

Pennington had several 
chances, but could not score, 
and with 2:40 left in the third 
period, Fier struck again, fin- 
ding the net on a cross from 
Don Cogsville. 

Pennington attempted to 
rally at the start of the final 
quarter, but to no avail. Fier 
completed his hat trick with 
4:26 remaining, when he head- 
ed a cross from Bing past the 
Raiders' goalie. Davies 
averted a shutout for the 
losers, scoring in the final 
minutes. 

The victory enabled PDS to 
finish with a 12-1-3 mark, one 
of the best in the area . It was a 
fine beginning for Cara, who 
took over the varsity coaching 
reins from Tom DeVito this 
fall. Not even Devito could 
have done any better. 



in the game to lift PDS over 
Kent Place, 2-1. The north 
Jersey school had won by the 
same score in regular season 
compeUUon. 

PDS took a 1-0 lead on a goal 
by Melinda Bowen in the first 
half, but Kent Place tied the 
score about two minutes later. 
Princeton Day finished its 
season with a 12-5-3 mark. 



PDS, PINGRY TIE 
Share Soccer Title. The 

Princeton Day girls soccer 
team and Pingry battled 
through four scoreless 
quarters, and two overtime 
periods, before their game for 
the NJISAA championship 
ended in a 0-0 deadlock last 
Friday. 

Thus the two schools will 
share the title, that PDS won a 
year ago, when it beat Pingry 
in the final. The final result 
can not be too disappointing 
for the Panthers, who were no 
better than 3-5-1 in mid- 
October, including a loss to 
Pingry. 



The Tigers came up with 
their second successful drive 
of the afternoon, as Woods 
fbund Kevin Guthrie and fight 
end Mike Lilley open in the 
Yale secondary. Warren went 
over from the two for the 
score, but a two-point conver- 
sion try to Guthrie fell in- 
complete, leaving Princeton 
behind 23-13. 

The Princeton defense had 
its one bright moment of the 
day, stopping the Bulldogs 
without a first down after the 
kickoff, and forcing a punt. 
Taking over on its 41, the 
Tigers had s chance to get 
back in the game. 



The>' made it to the Yale 36, 
before the drive stalled, hurt 
by an illegal procedure penal- 
Ijr. On third and 15, a Woods 
pMi intended for Lilley was 
ttaped and then intercepted 
After an exchange of punts, 
the EUs HMnred again in the 



Blackman to Retire 
Cornell football coach 
Bob Blackman, who has 
won more Ivy league 
games (97) than anyone 
else, has announced his 
retirement, effective at the 
end of this season. 

Blackman's overall 
record of 201-118-10, in- 
cludes 34 victories at 
Pasadena (Calif.) City Col- 
lege. His 167 victories at 
Denver, Dartmouth, Il- 
linois and Cornell rank him 
as the third-winningest 
coach in major college foot- 
ball, behind Bear Bryant of 
Alabama and Michigan's 
Bo Schembechler. 

His greatest success 
came at Hanover, where he 
compiled a record of 
104-37-3 in 16 seasons. Since 
taking over at Cornell, he 
has won 22, lost 33 and tied 
1, including a 3-6 mark this 
setison. He denied his 
team's record this fall had 
anything to do with the 
decision to end his 34-year 
coaching career. 

His announcement, 
however, may well have an 
emotional impact on his 
players, who will meet 
Pom this Saturday, and at- 
; tempt to halt the Quakers' 
bid for winning their first 
Ivy title outright since 1356. 



Madzy Besselaar made ii 
saves for the Blue and White, 
which outshot Pingry 14 to 11. 
PDS finished with an 8-6-2 
mark. 

It reached the finals with a 
1-0 defeat of Montclair- 
Kimberly in the semi-final 
round. Ronnie Curvy scored 
the game's only goal, her 
eighth of the season, in the se- 
cond period. 



PDS CAPTURES TITLE 
In Field Hockey. The 
Princeton Day field hockey 
team is obviously a team that 
gets up for the big ones. 

During the regular season, 
it lost to both Stuart Country 
Day and Kent Place, but when 
it came time to play both 
schools again in the NJISAA 
Division A tournament, the 
Panthers were ready. They 
defeated Stuart last Tuesday 
in the semi-finals and Kent 
Place Thursday in the cham- 
pionship game, thereby win- 
ning the title. 



This marked the second con- 
secutive year that PDS had 
won the championship, the 
first fime any team has won 
back-to-back titles. In the 
eight years the tournament 
has been held, PDS had won it 
four times, Kent Place, three. 

Stuart squeezed by the Blue 
and White, l-O, in the first con- 
test between the two, but it 
was not as close this time, as 
the Panthers rolled to a 3-0 
victory. Laura von Seldeneck, 
Janet Zawadsky and Louise 
Matthews all scored for PDS. 

On Thursday in the finals, 
Megan Nape scored on a pass 
from Zawadsky with 1:25 left 



EVALUATION EXTENDED 
For Dillon Basketball. 

Evaluatidh for those who want 
to play in the Dillon Basket- 
ball League has been extended 
to one more session on 
Saturday. 

Those 10 to 12 should come 
to the Gym at 9 a.m.; those 13 
and 14 at 10:30. The league 
offers instructional and 
recreational play on Saturday 
mornings throughout the 
winter. The fee is $10. 

The Princeton Recreation 
Department also announced 
that those who wish to play in 
the couples platform tennis 
tournament on Saturday, Dec. 
4. must contact the recreation 
office at 921^80. 



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PHS Loses Heartbreaker to Notre Dame, 1 5-7; 
But Can Win State Group II Title This Saturday 



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AME-WINN ING CONVERSION: Buried In this melee of Princeton High and Notre 
Dame football players is Steve Twamley, soon to knife free and fall over the goal 
line to give the Irish an 8-7 lead. Buried with Twamley were Princeton s hopes of 
gaming a sha re of the CVC crown. *^ 



This one hurt bad. So much 
so that it had Princeton high 
football coach Bill Cirullo in 
tears. 

The Little Tigers on their 
way to blanking favored Notre 
Dame and nailing down at 
least a share of the Colonial 
Valley Conference cham- 
pionship saw it all evaporate 
in the final two minutes and 
seven seconds. 



Trenton High School. Whether 
the game with the Tornadoes 
will be played was to be 
decided later in the week, 
according to PHS athletic 
director Carol Parsons. 



The visiting Irish stunned 
PHS with two touchdowns in 
nine seconds to turn a 7-0 loss 
into a 15-7 victory. What had 
been the Little Tiger's best 
played game of the season 
went all for naught. 

"We lost the CVC which was 
our main goal. We came so 
close to it," said Cirullo. In a 
post-game huddle, a choked- 
up Cirullo told his players, "I 
want you to know something. 
You're a proud football team. 
You're a good team. You gave 
it everything you could." 

PHS vs Shore Regional. 

While the CVC crown eluded 
the Blue and White, there is 
another, even more 
prestigious goal left: the 
Central Jersey Group II state 
championship. Had Shore 
Regional (6-2) not defeated St. 
Joseph's of Toms River 
Sunday, PHS would have won 
the title without playing a 
game. PHS, also 6-2, would 
have been the only team in the 
division with six wins needed 
to qualify. 

"I'd rather play," said 
Cirullo, who got his wish. PHS 
and Shore Regional will clash 
for the Central Jersey Group 
II state title Saturday at l at 
the PHS field. 

PHS had been scheduled to 
play its season's finale 
Saturday morning against 



Notre Dame Boxed. For 

most of the contest against 
Notre Dame, it was all Prince- 
ton. "We had Notre Dame 
defensed to a T," said Cirullo 
after the game."We had them 
completely boxed." 

"We did some different 
things with our personnel, and 
we took their ground game 
away from them. We wanted 
them to throw the ball and one 
play beat us. 

"Notre Dame has a good 
team, but we had them roped. 
I'm really proud of my foot- 
ball team. They have nothing 
to be ashamed of." 



PAT run, seemed to have 
Twamley contained. But the 
ND co-captain knifed through 
the line of tacklers, and fell 
over the goal line to give his 
team an 8-7 lead with 2:07 left. 
"It was late enough in the 
game that we had to go for 
two," said Moore later, who 
had commented, "We figured 
it would take two scores to 
win." That second score came 
nine seconds later when Phox, 
on first down following the 
kickoff, tried a screen pass 
over the middle. It was tipped 
by 6-3 tackle Jim Murray and 
picked off by defensive end 
Dave Liedtka who rumbled 13 
yards across the goal line. 



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PHS dominated the play for 
three periods, holding in check 
the Irish top rushers, Leon 
Hunt, Steve Twamley and Dan 
Haynes. Quarterback Steve 
Coffee failed to complete a 
single pass. 

The "one play" that beat 
PHS came late in the game 
after ND took over on its 40 
following a pressure punt by 
Terry Phox. On second down, 
Coffee passed ten-yards to Joe 
Lisnak for his first completion 
for a first down on the 30. After 
Hunt gained five. Coffee lofted 
a high, arching pass to the 
goal line which Lisnak pulled 
down, beating PHS defender 
Eddie Rice. 



"Tliat kid just happened to 
get a hand on it." said Cirullo 
later. "Our receiver was wide 
open. He was gone for a good 
40 yards." The interception 
was the fourth of five thefts for 
the Irish. 

"When we came in here we 
didn't want to play a con- 
servative game; we showed a 
lot of offense," said Cirullo. 



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ND Goes for Win. ND Coach 
Chappy Moore never 
hesitated. He had the officials 
move the ball from the muddy 
center of the field to the right 
hashmark. The PHS forward 
line, braced for the attempted 



PHS lost a big chance to add 
to its 7-0 lead in the third 
quarter when Phox completed 
a pass to Jerry Ingram for a 
first down on the Irish 15. 
Three plays later, PHS still 
needed four and Ken Varvel 
attempted a 26-yard field goal. 
The kick was wide - by inches 
-to the right. 

'If that field goal hadn't 
slipped by those pipes, that 
was a Princeton High School 
victory right there. They 
wouldn't have come back 
from ten down," Cirullo in- 
sisted. 



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Phox in Command. PHS and 

Phox played with complete 
confidence in the first half, as 
the Irish had the ball for just 
four plays in the first quarter. 
PHS used most of the first 
period and part of the second, 
driving 63-yards for its only 
score. Phox connected with 
running back Willie Whittaker 
with a seven yard pass ~ his 
fifth completion -for the TD. 

Whittaker was hit hard after 
he caught the pass and 
dropped the ball but the of- 
ficials ruled that he had 
possession. En route, Phox, 
passing sharply, hit Ken 
McKellar and Chris Hoover 
twice before teaming up with 
Whittaker. 



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Meantime, the PHS defense 
led by Alec Hoke, P.J. Young, 
Hoover and Varvel, was 
coming up with big plays to 
frustrate the Irish. Hoke 
stopped Coffee on a fourth- 
and-three in the second period 
from the 11. 

With 7:21 left to play, 
needing four yards on fourth 
down from the 12, Hunt was 
stopped inches short of a first 
down trying to sweep left end. 

PHS had one last chance 
after ND scored its second TD. 
but Phox s pass was picked off 

• ♦ 



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i Tigers Will Be Counting IHeavily on Freshmen 
§ As They Open Hocltey Season Here Sunday 



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Princeton football fans 
disappointed with the team's 
losing ways this fall need not 
waste much time bemoaning 
the sad facts surrounding the 
Tigers' performance. 

That Ivy League race is 
over for the Orange and 
Black, but another will begin a 
little more than 24 hours after 
Princeton and Dartmouth 
leave the Palmer Stadium 
turf. The hockey team will 
open its season at 7:30 this 
Sunday in Baker Rink against 
Yale. 



o 



Those who enjoy watching 
the fast-paced action in the 
ancient stone building had 
better step lively this year. 
Three of the 12 home games 
will fall in November. Brown 
is due here the Friday evening 
after Thanksgiving, and 
Boston College the following 
Sunday afternoon. The Tigers 
will play their first road 
contest this Tuesday at Boston 
University. 

Entering his sixth season, 
head coach Jim Higgins will 
be counting on more freshmen 
than usual to try and nail 
down the playoff spot in the 
post-season ECAC tour- 
nament that has eluded the 
Tigers for so many years. 
Considering the teams Prince- 
ton must face during the 
season, it's an extremely 
tough assignment. 




the team's biggest problem 
the past few seasons, and the 
loss of second-team all-Ivy 
Todd Hewett to graduation 
\^'ill make matters that much 
more difficult. 

Captain Keith Benker has 
been moved from the wing 
position to left defense to try 
and bolster this unit. He will 
be teamed with sophomore 
Rob Scheuer, who had a fine 
year as a freshman, finishing 
sixth on the team in scoring. 

Senior Mike Boyles will be 
matched with freshman Jeff 
York on defense, and two 
other freshmen, Cliff Abrecht 
and Mike Donate will make up 
the third pairing. 



The Ivy title has eluded the 
Orange and Black for three 
decades; it last won it in 1952- 
53. Winning seasons, too, have 
been few and far between, the 
last one coming 15 years ago, 
but don't think for a moment 



Ron Dennis 

Fourth Year In Goal 

that things are dull when the 
Tigers take the ice. 

The Tiger sextet is rarely 
out of contention in any game 
if plays, and can always be 
counted upon to pull off at 
least a couple of upsets 
against heavily favored op- 
ponents during the winter. 
Part of the reason for this in 
the last few years has been the 
fine goaltending of Ron 
Dennis. 

Starting his fourth season in 
the nets, Dennis is Princeton's 
all-time leader in saves with 
2,124. Last year he turned in a 
save percentage of .868 and a 
goals-against average of 4.53 
per game. 



The goals-against average 
is up from the previous year, 
because the Tigers allowed 13 
more goals last winter. Lack 
of depth on defense has been 



Up front, graduated seniors, 
Ray Casey, Drew Forbes, Ken 
Koenig and Sean Sherman will 
be missed, but so will Ross 
Lambert, the team's third 
leading scorer, who did not 
return to college this fall, after 
deciding to play the sport 
fulltime in his native Canada. 

Higgins has done some 
juggling, inserting a freshman 
here and there and come up 
with a first line centered by 
Paul Matthews, with Ed Lee 
at left wing and freshman 
Todd Ladda on the right. 
Sophomore Steve MacDonald 
will center the second line, 
skating between senior Jim 
Matthews on the left and 
senior Dave Clark on the 
right. 

Three freshmen make up 
the third line. Bill Brady at 
left wing, Ray Brodeur at 
center and Tim Oshier at right 
wing. Sophomore Tom Dac- 
cord will center the fourth line 
with Chuck Huggins at right 
wing and sophomore Tom 
Shustarich on the left. 



Little Tigers 

Continued trom preceding page 

by Jim Jacobs. Phox ended 
with nine completions-six in 
the first half-in 22 attempts 
and five interceptions for 119 
yards. Coffee was 2-for-7 and 
35 yards. ND outrushed PHS, 
180 to 75 yards Tom Haggarty 
getting the bulk for PHS with 
55 yards on 14 carries. 



HUN BOWS, 13^ 
In Football Finale. The Hun 

football team ended its 1982 
season last week with a 13-6 
loss to visiting Admiral 
Farragut. _ 



The record hoc* will show 
that Hun lost its last six in a 
row, after winning its first 
three. It wasn't nearly that 
bad. 

In five of those six defeats, 
Hun lost by seven points or 
less, pointed out Hun coach 
Bill Stout. "If a couple of those 
games had gone our way, we 
would have had a winning 
season," said Stout. "The only 
team that blew us out was 
Blair" (Hun lost that one 35- 
8). 

"We started out great with 
three wins, but the level of 
competition increased 
drastically, " observed Stout, 



in trying to explain the Hun 
collapse. 



Hun Scores First. Hun scored 
in the first period against the 
Future Admirals when it took 
advantage of a bad snap from 
center on a punt and 
recovered on the Farragut 20. 
Andrew Marlatt capped the 
short drive with a one-yard 
sneak. 

In the second period, Hun 
returned the favor fumbling 
away a punt on its own 15. 
Farragut's big fullback, John 
Mauther took the ball over 
from the six and when the 

Continued on Next Page 



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Sports in Princeton PHS Upsets Shore Regional in Field Hockey, 

To Win Central JersjBy Group II Championship 




Continued from Preceding Page 

visitors converted the extra 
point, they led, 7-6, at the nan 

Hun did not threaten in the 
second half. After a scoreless 
third period, Farragut (6-2) 
iced the game when it 
capitalized on another Hun 
'fumble, Mauther scoring on a 
13-yard run. 

Sick in bed with the flu, 
Stout did not attend the game, 
turning the coaching reins 
over to his three assistants 
Bill Quirk, Tom Liwosz and 
brother Dave Stout. After the 
game, the three cited the 
defensive play of safety 
Andrew Marlatt and 
lineliacker Matt Wheaton, and 
the rushing of fullback Brian 
Kelly. 

U Stout is going to turn 
Hun's football fortunes around 
next fall, he will have to rely 
on a lot of new faces. He loses 
heavily through graduation: 
his entire offensive and 
defensive backfields, five of 
seven of his offensive line and 
all but two from his defensive 
line. 



The Princeton High School 
field hockey team, which 
seems to get better with each 
succeeding game, won one of 
the biggest games of its 
season Friday when it 
defeated touted Shore 
Regional, 2-1, to capture the 
NJSIAA Central Jersey Group 
II championship. It was the 
farthest the 18-4-2 Little Tigers 
have come smce 1978. 

Should Princeton High get 
by its scheduled semi-final 
match Tuesday against un- 
defeated Pennsville, it will 
represent Central-South in 
Saturday's state cham- 
pionship game. They only 
team from Mercer County 
ever to win a state cham- 
pionship, PHS accomplished 
that feat in 1975. 



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"A total team effort," said 
PHS coach Jovce Jones, after 
her team had shocked favorite 
Shore Regional in Hightstown. 
Two years ago. Shore 
Regional had t)een unscored 
upon. In the past four years, 
the Blue Devils, Jones 
reported, had complied an 
impressive 74-4-2 record. 

"We were the underdog," 
said Jones, "We realized we 
had a challenge ahead of us. 
We talked about past game 
experiences, how we weren't 
able to win every game but we 
knew we had talent and the 
ability to go out and do our 
best. 

"It's been four years since 
we've won something like 
this; I think you appreciate it 
more when you have to wait. " 




left, Jones recalled, and 
stroked the ball into the right 
corner. "It was excellent 
deception on Rita's part," she 
said. "Rita has the ability to 
go up to the line relaxed and 
keep her composure. It can be 
a very tense situation." The 
converted penalty stroke was 
Sweeney's third of the season 
in regulation time. 

"There was a lot of pressure 
on me but with so little time 
left I knew we would win if I 
scored, added Sweeney. "I 
kept saying to myself, 'I can't 
miss; I can't miss.' " 



MAZUR'S 

Discount 

TIRES 



Seventeen minutes into the 
game, Carol O'Donoghue sent 
a hard drive across the circle 
from the right side and 
Princeton's left outside Esther 
deBoer on a deft reverse stick 
pushed it past Shore goalie 
Kerry Harmon. Shore's Sue 
Antoon tied the score with 
seven minutes left in the half 
when she beat PHS goalie 
Caylyn Tobin. 

Most of the play in the 
second half raged in midfield, 



HER SHOT DECISIVE: The 
ability of Rita Sweeney to 
convert a penalty stroke 
has propelled the 
Princeton High field 
hockey team into the 
NJSIAA state tournament 
semi-finals. 



Jones reported. Then, with 
2:15 left to play, PHS was 
awarded a penalty stroke 
when the referee ruled that a 
Shore player had kicked the 
ball on the goal line with her 
foot instead of her stick to 
prevent a sure goal. They PHS 
players designated team 
captian Rita Sweeney to take 
the shot. 



Although it was a team 
effort, Jones mentioned a few 
players who were standouts 
for the Little Tigers. "An 
unsung hereo, often 
overlooked by the spec- 
tators," she said of senior 
sweeper back Susan Hen- 
drickson, whom Jones cited 
for her"consistency and 
ability to execute." 

Junior center half Pam 
Jennings helped control the 
midfield play, Jones com- 
mented, and goalie Caylyn 
Tobin "had a good game. 
"She's part of the reason why 
we're in the semis. She's come 
a long way as a freshman. 



"Lisa Blair did everything 
well for us, " continued Jones. 
"She moved the ball like she 
owned the alleys " 

Before the game, in- 
discussing strategy, Jones 
said that she was aware that 
the Blue Devils were an ex- 
cellent defensive team and 
would deny PHS the middle of 
the field. "We decided, she 
said, to use the alleys." 

Summed up Jones, "We 
played super." 



Excellent Deception. 

Standing seven yards from the 
Shore goalie. Sweeney looked 



mm 



Sports in Princeton '■ ^'.*?"^ ^^^^^ offensive con- 
tributors were Scott Cooke 
and Ryan Van Syckle. 



Continued trom Preceding Page 




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TWO TEAMS TIE 
For Midget Football Title. 

For the second year in a row, 
the Princeton Midget Football 
League ended its season with 
two teams tied for first place. 
First National Bank tied 
Princeton Youth Sports when 
it defeated winless Lions Club, 
12-0, in its final game. Both 
teams ended 3-1, while Lion 
was 0-4. 



The Bank and Lions were 
scoreless after the first three 
periods. In the final quarter, 
Kelvin Russell scored on a 5- 
yard run and Balfour Merrill 
added the final six-pointer 
with less than a minute to 
play. 

While not able to score, the 
Lions offense did get close a 
couple of times behind 
quarterback Mark Payton. 
Barry Phox was the leading 
runner and receiver for the 



The FNB defense, which 
recorded another shutout, was 
led by Luciano Autennucci, 
Chris Borg, John Gibson, 
James Womack, Ray 
Navarro, Dwight Richmond, 
Glenn Scarborough, Robert 
Morris, Garret Morris, T.J. 
McManus, Pat Esposito and 
Tyler Boy ce. 

Standouts for the Lions on 
defense were Todd Marrow, 
Peer Soderberg, Scott Coke, 
Jeff Rattray, Sutty Hamilton, 
Shawn Hyter, Mark Pirone 
and Mark Payton. 



YALE BEATS PRINCETON 

in Soccer. The Princeton 
soccer team's slim hopes of 
capturing a piece of the Ivy ti- 
tle were ended last Saturday 
when it lost to second-place 
Yale, 2-1, in overtime. 

The third-place Tigers 
would also have needed a cou- 
ple of losses by league-leading 
Columbia, so the chances 



Earlier in the week, in its 
final regulation game of the 
season, PHS blanked Notre 
Dame, 1-0, on a deBoer goal to 
end up tying Hopewell Valley 
for the Colonial Valley Con- 
ference crown. Both teams 
finished 9-3 in league play. 

were slim indeed. The Elis 
took a 1-0 lead in the first half, 
but Yuri Fishman scored on a 
penalty kick at the 87:56 mark 
to force the extra session. 

Mark Rozells scored at 6:38 
of the second overtime for the 
win. The Tigers outshot Yale, 
30-21. The loss dropped 
Princeton's league record to 
3-3, and overall mark to 6-6-2. 

Earlier in the week, 
Princeton lost a very similar 
contest to Delaware. The Blue 
Hens took a 1-0 lead in the first 
half, but again a penalty kick 
by Fishman knotted the score 
near the end of regulation 
play. 

Princeton then lost a 2-1 
decision in the first overtime 
period, when Jon Petito 
blasted a shot by goalie Tom 
Roberts. 

One game remains to deter- 
mine whether the Orange and 
Black will finish with a winn- 
ing season. Princeton will play 
Dartmouth at 10:30 Saturday 
morning on Bedford Field. 





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Route 206 • Princeton, N.J. 
Phone 609-921-6400 



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ContiniMd trom Pag* t 

"The first week in 
September, we got back from 
vacation," Mrs. Potter smiles, 
"and found the Rescue Squad 
had changed its telef^one 
number, there was a new 
police chief and a change in 
the school listings!" 

But it's all together now, 
lean and sleek and light- 
weight. It tells you everything 
you ever wanted to know 
about Princeton. 

Including the fact that the 
Mercer Oak, whose winter 
silhouette is on the cover, is a 
service mark, owned jointly 
by Borough and Township and 
registered with the State of 
New Jersey. That's the mean- 
ing of the "SM", flying off one 
of the top branches. 

—Katharine H. Bretnall 



Street, Tprffeii; Francis arid 
Iris Maddalon, 209 Youngs 
Road, Hamilton Township, 
both on November 8; Robert 
and Janice Home, 19 Wiggins 
Lane, Belle Mead; Robert and 
Shirley Austin, 135 Harris 
Road; William and Diane 
Heck, 10 First Street, Rum- 
son, all on November 10; and 
Steven and Resa Besserman, 
934 Jamestown Road, East 
Windsor, November 11. 

Daughters were born to 
Geoffrey and Margaret 
Michael, 12 East Prospect 
Street, Hopewell; Tilden and 
Nancy Featherson, P.O. Box 
483, RD 1, both on November 
5; Bruce and Carol Hollows, 14 
Sivers Lane, Plainsboro, 
November 6; Karl and Teresa 
Monninger, 368 Hollow Road, 
Skillman; November 7; 



o 



OPEN HOUSE PLANNED 
By Skating Club. To help 

celebrate its 50th anniversary, 
the Princeton Skating Club 
invites the community to join 
with its members in an af- 
ternoon of free jce skating and 
instruction next Sunday, 
November 21, from 1:30-3:15 
at the Princeton Day School 
Rink. 

This is the Club's first 
family skatit^ session of the 
season and is intended for 
skaters of all ages. In addition 
to family skating, the Club 
also offers free style (jumps 
and spins) dance sessions, and 
classes and instruction in 
power skating, hockey skills 
and precision skating. 

The Open House will feature 
free instruction by Club 
professionals, refreshments, 
and information about joining 
the club. For further in- 
formation, call 921-7449. 



Also to Richard and Marilyn 
Barth, 58 Henderson Road, 
Kendall Park; Bruce and 
Cheryl Wortmann, 1501 
Parkside Avenue, Ewing, both 
on November 8; Paul and Mir- 
tha Cellar, 4 Hemlock Court; 
David and Honor Chandler, 12 
West New Road, Monmouth 
Junction; Steven and 
Kathleen Glasser, 10 Hastings 
Road, Yardville, all on 
November 9; and Jeremy and 
Margaret Anglin, 7 J Magie 
Apartments, Faculty Road, 
November 11. 



23 BIRTHS LISTED 
By Medical Center. In the 
week ending November 11, 
there were 13 boys and 10 girls 
bom at Princeton Medical 
Center. 

Sons were bom to James 
and Bfari Taylor, 446 Klockner 
Road, Trenton; Douglas and 
Linda Tindall, 65 Robbinsville- 
Edinburg Road, Robbinsville, 
both on November 5; Loring 
and Margaret Danforth, 7P 
Magie Apartments, Faculty 
Road; David and Mary Car- 
roll, 5 Sabrina Drive, Trenton; 
Steven and Linda Miccio. 238 
HiUcrest Avenue, Trenton, all 
on November 6; 



CAMPUS IS SUBJECT 
Of Book of Photographs. 
Princeton University, the 
beauty of its campus in all 
seasons, is the theme of a 
handsome book of color 
photographs published by 
Princeton University Press. 
An obvious choice as a 
Christmas gift for Princeton 
alums, as well as for those of 
the community who also take 
pride in the campus. "Prin- 
ceton Reflections: Con- 
templations in Color" is 
available at $24.50 until 
December 31 and $28.50 
thereafter. 

The book includes the work 
of more than a dozen area 
photographers with John W. 
Simpson represented more 
than any other. The book was 
designed by Bruce Campbell 
who also selected the photos. 
Grouped according to season 
and magnificently 

reproduced, the pictures 
capture the many moods and 
the magic of the campus. 



Also to John and Di^ne 
Boyle, 9 Poe Road ; November 
7; JeH^ and Patricia Hub- 
bert, 1191 Northgate Apart- 
ments, Cranbury, both on 
November 7; Fred and 
Christine Dumont, 81 West 



Nassau Hall is reflected and 
framed in an arched 
Alexander Hall Window, 
students are grouped on the 
steps of Whig Hall in late 
afternoon, and bicycles are 
clustered under the gothic 
arches of Holder Hall cloister. 




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There are snowy courtyard 
scenes, morning mist on the 
tennis courts, and glints of 
sunset following rowers on 
Carnegie I.ake. 

There are familiar scenes, 
such as the Woodrow Wilson 
Fountain and Prospect Gar 
dens with red tulips in full 
bloom, along with per- 
spectives, such as a long shot 
upwards at the arches sup- 
porting Palmer Stadium, that 
only an alert photographer 
would notice. There are in- 
terior scenes: sunlight falling 
on empty lecture hall seats in 
McCosh Hall and pouring 
through the stained glass 
windows of the Chapel; an 
aerial shot of Palmer Stadium 
on a perfect fall day with a 
football game underway ; and 
people-filled scenes from 
Reunions and athletic con- 
tests. 




PRINCETON SKATING CLUB MEMBERS: You're never too young to start learning 
as evidenced by these young members starting lessons with the Princeton 
Skating Club which will hold an Open House for the community next Sunday, Nov. 
21, at the Princeton Day School Rink. From left are Amy Liu, David Buchta, Heaths- 
Reichgott and Vanessa Chen. 






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Trenton Woman Leads Police on Merry 
Chase Through Princeton 7 

Oneta Campbell to -fle Honored for Her 
Years of Service to the Community 27 

!^^'//&m6ferf Street Residents Proposing to 
^^6^d dif( Townhouses in Area 1 B 

Little Orchestra of Princeton Presents 
'Oiffigult Works in Latest Concert 5B 

Pfinpeton Stores Full of Wonderful Gifts for 
Your Christmas Shopping 78 






Cornell Garfie Provides Unfortunate Finish to 
Disappointing Football Season 168 



VOL. XXXVIII, NO. 38 



Wednesday, November 23, 1983 



25* at All Newsstands 



Open Space Chief Concern 
As Collins' Hullish Plans 
Go Before Planning Board 

Open space was the chief 
topic of presentation, ques- 
tioning and discussion last 
Thursday as Collins' plans 
for the north of Hulfish 
Street went before the Plan- 
ning Board for the first time. 
The hearing will be con- 
tinued at 7:30 p.m. next 
Tuesday in the Valley Road 
Building. 

Collins proposes a park- 
ing garage, invisible below a 
deck; 140 condominium 
units ($98,000 to $175,000 
estimated); an office 
building; shops; plaza and 
various green areas in- 
cluding a new Green adjoin- 
ing the present mini-park 
next to Toto's Market. 

Board chair Hans K. 
Sander reminded colleagues 
and audience that Collins 
second, revised preliminary 
plan for the entire Palmer 
Square expansion area was 
approved last December 20 
after five public hearings. 

"This is the approved 
preliminary we're going by 
tonight," he explained. "The 
final plan is binding." 

Urban planner Stanton 
Eckstut, retained by Collins, 
explained that his client pro- 
vided 34 percent open 
space, exceeding the re- 
quired 25. But board and au- 
dience pressed a single 
question all evening: to 
whom does that open space 
belong and is it really 
public? 

"Does the law allow the 
use of residential open 
space as public open 
space?" demanded Yota 
Switzgable, 7 Greenholm. 

Allen Lavlne, board at- 
torney for all Collins hear- 
ings, told her that, as the or- 
dinance is drawn, such 
space can be counted, 
although "the public is not 
likely to go there." 

"You mean we can go into 
these people's backyards?" 
Mrs. Switzgable persisted. 

Continued on Next Page 




$3.7 Million Bond Issue for Repairs 
To Schools to Be Voted on Dec. 6 



TREATY COMES TO NEW JERSEY: At ceremonies in Alexander 
Hall last Thursday marking the celebration of the 200th anniver- 
sary of the signing of the Treaty of Paris that ended the 
American Revolution and established this country as an in- 
dependent nation. Governor Thomas H. Kean was presented a 
copy of a preliminary treaty that was one of 13 copies sent to 
the original 13 states by the Continental Congress. New Jersey 
is the only state to have a copy of the treaty. Making the presen- 
tation is Secretary of State Jane Burgio, a Princeton resident 
and master of ceremonies for the occasion. ishe^astuanphoto ) 



Garbage Recyling Will 
For Borough Residents 

Borough garbage won't be 
the same after passage of a 
mandatory recycling or- 
dinance, scheduled for in- 
troduction at Borough Coun- 
cil's work session this Tues- 
day. 

If the ordinance passes 
after public hearing in 
December, Borough 

householders will be re- 
quired either to separate 
bottles, aluminum cans and 
newspapers-magazines 
from the garbage or take 
these recyclables to a depot 
— probably the shed in the 
Shopping Center. 

Bottles, cans and 
newspapers-magazines will 
be collected at curb-side by 
a special collector — not the 
Borough's regular garbage 
collector. 

Whether bottles will have 
to be separated by color — 
brown, green and clear — is 



Become Mandatory 
If Ordinance Passes 

not yet known, Mayor Robert 
W. Cawley said this week. 

Nor does anyone know, at 
this early time, what the 
schedule might be. Will 
everything be picked up the 
same day? Will glass be 
picked up one day, cans 
another, newspapers 
another? (It is known that 
newspapers won't be picked 
up at all for at least a year, or 
until the used newsprint 
market improves.) 

Nor is It known. Mayor 
Cawley continued, whether 
the Borough will actually 
make any money. It has 
been said by sponsor Robert 
McChesney of Borough 
Council, that some New 
Jersey municipalities col- 
lect agreeable sums as their 
share of money received 
when the collector sells the 
recyclables. 

Continued on Next Page 



A $3.7 million school- 
repair bond issue will go 
before voters of Borough 
and Township Tuesday, 
December 6, and press tours 
have been held this week to 
show reporters what kinds 
of repair work would be done 
if the referendum passes. 
(Voting places will be car- 
ried in next week's issue of 
Town Topics). 

The committee of citizens 
backing the bond issue 
points out that school 
buildings are getting along 
in years: the high school is 
56 years old, its "new" addi- 
tion, 29; Riverside is 23; 
Community Park, 21 and 
even the youthful John 
Witherspoon is 17. 

Also, the committee says, 
highest priority in school 
budgets over the years has 
been the schools' educa- 
tional program, and the 
structural needs of the 
physical plant have been 
neglected. Yes, they con- 
cede, there was a high- 
school renovation bond 
issue in 1977, but much was 
omitted to save money. 

"We have a $30 million in- 
vestment in buildings and 
therefore a stewardship," 
says Superintendent Paul 
Houston. "Balance is impor- 
tant: when the building 
starts falling down around 
your ears, it's hard to con- 
centrate on physics. But 
high schools in West 
Windsor-Plainsboro and 
Hamilton all have swimming 
pools. We'd never have that 
in Princeton." 

Basically, board and 
citizens committee say, they 
have tried to anticipate pro- 
blems, so they don't have to 
react expensively when an 
old boiler blows. 

And if the bond referen- 
dum is defeated, they warn, 
the capital budget will have 
to be increased, and school 
taxes will rise "sharply and 
unpredictably." 

During the fall, members 
of the citizens committee 



have been talking and show- 
ing slides to many parent 
groups: the Friends of the 
Princeton High School 
library; to several members 
of the Friends of Princeton 
High Athletics; people who 
went to the Tennis Banquet; 
Peer Group parents at the 
high school; the executive 
committee of the Riverside 
PTO; Community Park PTO 
and parents yvho went to 
Playground Day at CP. 

Here's what they have 
been saying: 

Princeton High School. 

Two 1927 boilers will be 
replaced, although they're 
still working away. A 1955 
boiler will be tuned. Controls 
are antiquated, "but we keep 
them working," says 
facilities manager William 
Karch. 

Continued on Page 20 



Vote Recount Gives 
Cherry 8-Vote Win 

Republican William 
Cherry has won re- 
election to Township 
Committee, defeating 
Democrat Eleanor Lewis 
by eight votes, a recount 
in Trenton showed on 
Tuesday. 

Final total, including 
absentee ballots: Cherry, 
2,085; Lewis, 2,077. 

The recount also sliced 
five votes from the final 
total of Winthrop Pike, 
giving him an official 
2,230 instead of the unof- 
ficial 2,235. 

Democrats ordered a 
recount because the 
Cherry-Lewis contest was 
so close, and because 
there had been difficulties 
with a voting machine in 
District One. They 
demanded a recount 
throughout the Township 

— not just in District One 

— voting machines in all 
14 districts, a total of 22 
machines, were opened 
and recounted. 

Continued on Next Page 



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